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broward 

community college 
catalog 1976-1977 



BROWARD 

COMMUNITY 

COLLEGE 



General Catalog 1976-1977 
BROWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE 



BICENTENNIAL EDITION 



Central Campus 

3501 Southwest Davie Road 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314 

Fort Lauderdale Center 

College Administrative Offices 

225 East Las Olas Boulevard 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301 



North Campus 

1000 Coconut Creek Boulevard 
Coconut Creek, Florida 33063 

Hollywood Center 

3601 Johnson Street 
Hollywood, Florida 33021 




Accredited By 

Florida Department of Education 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

Member of 

Florida Association of Community Colleges 

College Entrance Examination Board 

American Council on Education 

Florida Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers 

Florida Association of Colleges and Universities 

Southern Association of Community and Junior Colleges 

American Association of Community and Junior Colleges 

American Association of School Administrators 

American Technical Education Association, Inc. 

American Association for Higher Education 

Florida Junior College Conference 

Institute of International Education 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 



CONDENSED 



INFORMATION 



for 



READY REFERENCE 



1976 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 1 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


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1 


? 


3 


1 


? 


3 4 5 


6 


7 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 






1 


2 3 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 10 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 17 


18 19 


20 21 22 


?3 


24 


?? 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 24 


25 26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 


29 










28 


29 


30 31 






25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 1 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


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1 






1 2 3 


4 


5 






1 


2 


3 


1 


?. 


3 4 5 


6 7 


2 3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 14 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


lb 


17 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 21 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


?? 


23 


24 25 26 


27 28 


23 24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 30 






25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 


29 


30 


31 




30 31 




































SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER | 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


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S 


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S 


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1 2 


3 


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1 


2 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 






1 2 


3 4 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 11 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


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14 


15 


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19 


20 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 18 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


17 


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19 20 21 


?? 


23 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 25 


26 27 


28 29 30 






24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 






26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 



1977 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 1 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 

1 


S 


M 


T W T 
1 2 3 


F 
4 


S 
5 


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M 


T W T F 
12 3 4 


S 

5 


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M 


T W T 


F S 

1 2 


2 3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 


lb 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 


in 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


?0 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


23 24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


27 


28 








27 


?8 


29 30 31 




24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 30 


30 31 


































MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 1 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 






1 2 


3 


4 






1 


2 




1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


8 9 


10' 11 12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


3 


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5 6 7 8 


9 


7 


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9 10 11 


12 13 


15 16 


17 18 19 


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12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 13 14 15 


16 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 20 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


?5 


17 


18 


19 20 21 22 


23 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


29 30 


31 






26 


27 


28 29 30 






24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 29 


30 


28 


29 


30 31 




SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER | 


S M 


T W T 
1 


F 
2 


S 

3 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 

1 


S 


M 


T W T F 
12 3 4 


S 

5 


S 


M 


T W T 
1 


F S 

2 3 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 10 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


lb 


13 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 17 


18 19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


16 


1/ 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 


?1 


22 23 24 25 


26 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 24 


25 26 


27 28 29 


30 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 30 




25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 31 



1978 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 1 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 






1 2 


3 


4 






1 2 


3 


4 








1 


8 9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 8 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 15 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


2b 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 22 


29 30 


31 






26 


27 


28 






26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 




23 
30 


24 


25 26 27 


28 29 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 1 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 






1 


2 


3 










1 






1 2 3 


4 5 


7 8 


9 10 11 


1? 


13 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 12 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 19 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 26 


28 29 


30 31 






25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 30 31 




SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER | 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 






1 


2 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 






1 2 


3 


4 








1 2 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


10 11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


17 18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


24 25 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 






26 


27 


28 29 30 






24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 


29 30 



Administrative Boards 



Administrative Boards 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Reubin O'D. Askew _. Governor 

Bruce Smathers Secretary of State 

Ralph D. Turlington Commissioner of Education 

Robert Shevin Attorney General 

Philip Ashler Treasurer 

Doyle Conner Commissioner of Agriculture 

Gerald Lewis Comptroller 



STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE COUNOL 

Fred B. Hartnett, Chairman Hartnett, Incorporated 

2816 Ponce de Leon Boulevard 
Coral Gables, Florida 

James E. Hendry, Vice Chairman St. Petersburg, Florida 

Louis Hill Peoples Bank 

Tallahassee, Florida 

J. Carlisle Rogers First National Bank 

Leesburg, Florida 

Mrs. Jean Ewing Gainesville, Florida 

Van H. Priest Madison, Florida 

Mrs. Jeanne Goddard Ormond Beach, Florida 

Lee G. Henderson Executive Secretary 

Director, 

Division of Community Colleges 

Department of Education 

~ Tallahassee, Florida 



DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Sheldon J. Schlesinger, Chairman Hollywood, Florida 

George E. Mayer, Vice Chairman Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

John H. Payne Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

Margaret Roach __ Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

Elinor Wilkov Hallandale, Florida 



Directory of Correspondence 

PAST MEMBERS 
DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(1968-1975) 

Clem E. Bininger John H. Payne 

Robert E. Ferris Judson A. Samuels 

Jules J. Polachek Walter C. Young 



COLLEGE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

(1959-1968) 

Clem E. Bininger John H. Payne 

W. W. Cadwell Jules J. Polachek 

Lloyd C. Cassels Judson A. Samuels 

Robert E. Ferris Florence Tustison 



DIRECTORY OF CORRESPONDENCE 

A, HUGH ADAMS, President 

Policies, representative for the College in pubHc addresses and informa- 
tion, public relations, faculty, physical property, general college busi- 
ness, fund raising, endowments, and gifts. 

CLINTON D. HAMILTON, Executive Vice-President 
General operational concerns. 

DAVID A. GROTH, Vice-President for Academic Afjairs 

Curriculum, courses of study, faculty activities, and genera! academic 
regulations. 

JOHN F. MORACK, Vice-President for Business Affairs 

Student accounts and fees, campus planning, sales and service for staff 
and students, contracts, grounds and plant maintenance. 

GEORGE W. YOUNG, Vice-President for Student Development 

Student activities, student orientation and information, student disci- 
pline and regulations, student organizations, counseling, student loans, 
scholarships, workshops, student employment, and student health. 

GLEN A. ROSE, Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Catalogs, entrance requirements, applications, prospective student ques- 
tions, transfers, schedule of classes, transcripts, academic records, veter- 
an and selective service questions, and evaluation of permanent records 
for graduation. 

8 



Directory of Academic Personnel 



ALBERT ROBERTSON, Director of Development and Federal Programs 
Fund raising, endowments, gifts, bequests, establishment of trusts, 
charitable giving, and estate planning. 

CURTIS S. MURTON, Provost, Central Campus 

Matters specifically concerning the Central Campus. 

CARL M. CRAWFORD, Provost, North Campus 

Matters specifically concerning the North Campus. 



EMERGENCY CALLS: 

DAY: Contact Vice-President for Student Development 

Area Code Number 305 
Telephone Number 525-4271 
Extension 222 

NIGHT: Contact Registrar 

Area Code Number 305 
Telephone Number 525-4271 
Extension 260-262 



DIRECTORY OF ACADEMIC PERSONNEL 

Listed below are College and Campus personnel. Normally, Department 
Heads should be contacted by students who have questions about courses or 
similar matters. The normal appeal route is as follows: from Department 
Head to Division Chairperson, to Campus Dean of Academic Affairs, to 
Campus Provost, to College Vice-President for Academic Affairs, to College 
Executive Vice-President, and to the College President. 

College Officers: 

President — A. Hugh Adams 

Executive Vice-President — Clinton D. Hamilton 

Vice-President for Academic Affairs — David A. Groth 

Central Campus Officers: 

Provost — Curtis S. Murton 

Dean of Academic Affairs — Willis N. Holcombe 

Dean of Student Development — Katharine Tymeson 

Division of Business- Administration and Economics: 
Division Chairperson — Philip Trees 
Department Heads: 

Business Administration — Nellie Dry 

Casualty Insurance — Marguerite Lloyd 

Marketing Management — Richard Goodwin 

Secretarial Science — Marlene Kennedy 



Directory of Academic Personnel 

Division of Communications: 

Division Chairperson — John Pawlowski 
Department Heads: 

English — Betty Adkins 

Communications for International Students — Gail EUyson 

Journalism — Max Hall 

Modern Foreign Languages — Marina Burdick 

Reading— Margaret Porter 

Speech — George Cavanagh 

Division of Humanities: 

Division Chairperson — Jimmy Woodle 
Department Heads: 

Art — Lawrence Tobe 

Drama — Mildred Mullikin 

Music — Thomas J. Cole 

Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation: 

Division Chairperson — R. L. Landers 

Department Heads: 

Aquatics, Theory, and Recreation — Leroy Wheat 
Team, Individual, and Dual Sports — Elaine Gavigan 

Division of Mathematics and Science: 

Division Chairperson — Richard Hill, Jr. 
Department Heads: 

Biological Science — W. Holt Harner 

Landscape and Pest Control — Dudley Palmer 

Mathematics — Gordon Chesser 

Physical Sciences — Wm. G. Bailey 

Division of Social Sciences: 

Division Chairperson — Stewart M. Brown 

Department Heads: 

Social Science I— Max W. Harper 
Social Science II — Boyd M. Hildebrand 

Division of Allied Health Technology: 

Division Chairperson — John Brett 

Department Heads: 

Dental Assisting — Constance Ziel 

Emergency Medical Technology — Kathy Blais 

Medical Assisting — La Verne Dreizen 

Medical Laboratory Technology- — Barbara Kremp 

Nursing — Linda Tenenbaum 

Nursing, South — Marjorie Brantferger 

Physical Therapist Assistant — Lester Lubin 

Radiation Therapy — Shirley Frazier 

Radiologic Technology — Shirley Frazier 

Respiratory Therapy — Keith Finlayson 

10 



Directory of Academic Personnel 



Division of Engineering Technology. 

Division Chairperson — Ormond F. Whipple 
Department Heads: 

Aerospace — Wm. Bowen 

Contracting & Civil Engineering — Lorenz Minicone 

Data Processing — M. J. Ellis 

Electronics — Burton Greenstein 

Architecture — Raul Perez 

Division of Public Services: 

Division Chairperson — L. Ray Dieterich 
Department Head: 

Fire Science — Charles Redmond 

Criminal Justice Institute: 

Director — Stanley Wisnioski 

Department Heads: 

Career Development — Sidney Rocker 
Corrections — Douglas MacGregor 
Police Science — James F. McGowan 
Police Training — Michael Slepecky 

Fort Lauderdale Center: 

Coordinator — Doris Horton 

Hollywood Center: 

Coordinator — Donald C. Rigg 

North Campus Officers: 

Provost — Carl M. Crawford 
Dean of Academic Affairs — Roy A. Church 
Dean of Student Development — David Cox 
Division of Business Administration: 
Division Chairperson — Colin Battle 

Division of Communications: 

Division Chairperson — Donna Wilkinson 
Department Heads: 

English — Shelby Lee 

Reading — Pearl Nitka 

Division of Humanities: 
Department Heads: 

Art — Karen Mitchell 
Music — Tom Cavendish 

Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation: 
Division Chairperson — Bill Porterfield 

Division of Mathematics and Science: 
Department Heads: 

Mathematics — Patricia Dyer 
Science — John Rosen 

11 



Where to Go For Help 

Division of Social Science: 
Department Heads: 

Behavioral Science — Lee C. Jones 

History, Political Science, and Geography — Ralph Clark 

Division of Allied Health Technology: 
Department Head: 

Nursing — Grace Gallagher 

Division of Engineering Technology: 

Division Chairperson — Samuel Oppenheimer 



WHERE TO GO FOR HELP 

Academic Standing, Probation, Suspension, Reinstatement Registrar 

Add, Drop, or Change Courses Counseling- Advisement Office 

and Registrar 

Admissions, Registration, and Academic Records . Registrar 

Advisor or Counselor, and Assignment of Counseling-Advisement Office 

Alumni Development Office 

For Reservations and Special Events in 

Hospitality Center _ Provost, Central Campus 

Books and Classroom Supplies Bookstore 

Pay College Bills, Adjustments in College Bill Bursar's Office 

Career Information — Career Center 09 

Check Out Books . -.. Library 

Class Enrollment Overload Form ... Division Chairperson and 

Campus Dean of Academic Affairs 

Course Overload Form Counselor, Registrar, and 

Campus Dean of Academic Affairs 

Evaluation of Permanent Records for Graduation Registrar 

Gifts and Donations ^ Development Office 

Help With Personal Problems ^.Counseling-Advisement Office 

Illness -. -. College Nurse 

Loans, Scholarships . - Financial Aids 

Lost and Found Counseling-Advisement Office 

Parking Permit Student Services Building 

Permission to Organize a Club Vice-President for Student Development 

Director of Student Activities 

12 



College Calendar 
Term 1, 1976 

Public Relations, including News Releases, Brochures, Guest Speakers, and 
Promotional Events and Publicity Assistant to the President 

Reading Help, Building 07, Central Campus 
Building 9, North Campus 

Report Matters Needing Attention on Campus 

and in Buildings Vice-President for Business Affairs 

Student Activities, General Student Activities Office 

Student Work on Campus Financial Aid 

Test Results and Interpretation Counselor 

Transfer (In or Out) Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Waiver of Requirements Form Division Chairperson 

and Campus Dean of Academic Affairs 

Withdrawal From College Registrar 

IN CASE OF ACCIDENT REPORT TO: 

Instructor, College Nurse, or Security Officer 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 
1976-1977 

TERM I* 

ON LINE REGISTRATION March 1-August 20 

1. Advisement and on-line registration for currently enrolled students 
by appointment only. 

March 22-August 20 

2. Advisement and on-line registration for new Jtudents by appoint- 
ment as indicated on notice of admission. 

August 18, 19, 20 
**3. On-line registration BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. Students who 
apply at this time should contact the campus Registrar's office. 
(9:00 a.m. -7:00 p.m., August 18) 
(9:00 a.m. -7:00 p.m., August 19) 
(9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m., August 20) 

LATE APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION August 6 

Last day for new students and for returning students who have not 
been enrolled since Term I, 1975, to file application for admission. 
The application must be in the Registrar's Office this date. 

*There is a 100% refund for withdrawals for students who preregister and 
withdraw through the last day preceeding the commencement of classes 
in a term. 
**This is regular registration. 

13 



College Calendar 
Term I, 1976 

FACULTY REPORT DATE August 23 

All faculty report for duty (faculty meetings and preparatory work). 

ORrENTATION— NEW STUDENTS 

Students will be notified from respective campus regarding orientation 
dates. 

CLASSES BEGIN 8:00 a.m. August 24 

LATE REGISTRATION FOR TERM I 

DROP AND ADD PERIOD August 24-31-September 1-3, & 7 

Schedule change and adjustments. (9:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m.) (5:00 p.m. -7:30 
p.m.). Advisor must sign the form to be processed. A three dollar 
($3.00) fee is charged for the addition of courses. No fee is charged 
when a course is dropped. There is an 80% refund for courses dropped 
or for a complete withdrawal from College. No refund for courses 
dropped will be made after September 7. Class options after August 
24 may be limited. Early registration is advised for more schedule 
options. 



LABOR DAY HOLIDAY (NO CLASSES DAY OR EVENING) September 6 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER LABOR DAY HOLIDAY September? 

REFUND PERIOD August 24-September 10 

(September 10) 

Last day complete withdrawal from college with an 80% refund. 

ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERM II October 18-December 22 

1. Advisement and on-line registration for currently enrolled students 
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. 

November 8-December 22 

2. Advisement and on-line registration for new students BY AP- 
POINTMENT ONLY as indicated on notice of admissions. 

LAST WEEK FOR GRADUATION EVALUATIONS for Term I October 4-8 

Last week to secure evaluations for completion of degree requirements 
for Term I. 

LAST DAY TO PAY GRADUATION FEES October 8 

Last day to pay graduation fees for Term I graduates. 

"W" PERIOD (NO GRADE PENALTY) August 24-November 5 

LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE WITHOUT RECEIVING GRADE 

PENALTY . November 5 

CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT PERIOD ENDS November 5 

14 



College Calendar 
Terni l-A, 1976 

VETERANS' DAY HOLIDAY 

(No evening classes November 10th or 11th) November 11 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER VETERANS' DAY HOLIDAY November 12 

8:00 a.m. 

LAST DAY FOR STUDENT TO WITHDRAW November 24 

Last day for student to withdraw from a class in Term I. 

REMOVAL OF "I" GRADE November 24 

Last day to remove an "I" grade for previous summer terms IIIA 
and IIIB. 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY 

(NO CLASSES DAY OR EVENING) November 25-26 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY November 29 

8:00 a.m. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS December 13-17 

TERM I ENDS December 17 

TERM I GRADES DUE December 20 

All grades for Term I are due in the Campus Registrar's Office 
(10:00 a.m.) 

LATE APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION FOR TERM II December 17 

Last day for new and returning students who have not been enrolled 
in Term 1, 1976-77, to file application for admission. The application 
must be in the Registrar's Office this date. Late applications after this 
date will be assigned appointments when possible after all regular 
applicants have been processed. 

LAST DAY TO SUBMIT APPLICATION December 23 

Last day to submit an application for admission for Term H, 1977. 



1976-1977 
TERM l-A* 

ON LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERM l-A March 1-August 23 

1. Advisement and on-line registration for currently enrolled students 
by appointment only. 

March 22-August 23 

2. Advisement and on-line registration for new students by appoint- 
ment as indicated on notice of admission. 

'' *3. On-line registration by appointment only August 18, 19, and 20. 

*There is a 100% refund for withdrawals for students who preregister and 
withdraw through the last day preceding the commencement of classes 
in a term. 
**This is regular registration. 



15 



College Calendar 
Term l-B, 1976 

CLASSES BEGIN 8:00 a.m. August 24 

LATE REGISTRATION FOR TERM l-A 

DROP AND ADD PERIOD August 24-25 

Schedule change and adjustments. (9:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) (5:00 p.m.- 
7:30 p.m.). Advisor must sign the form to be processed. A three dollar 
($3.00) fee is charged for the addition of courses. No fee is charged 
when a course is dropped. There is an 80% refund for courses dropped 
or for a complete withdrawal from College. No refund for courses 
dropped will be made after August 25. Class options after August 24 
may be very limited. Early registration is advised for more schedule 
options. 

LABOR DAY HOLIDAY (NO CLASSES DAY OR EVENING) September 6 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER LABOR DAY HOLIDAY September 7 

8:00 a.m. 

REFUND PERIOD August 24-September 3 

LAST DAY FOR COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL 

WITH AN 80% REFUND Septembers 

"W" PERIOD (NO GRADE PENALTY) August 24-September 24 

LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE WITHOUT RECEIVING 

A GRADE PENALTY September 24 

CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT PERIOD ENDS October 8 

LAST DAY FOR STUDENT TO WITHDRAW October 8 

Last day for student to withdraw from a class in Term I-A. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS October 19-20 

TERM l-A ENDS -^ October 20 

TERM l-A GRADES DUE October 21 

All grades for Term I-A are due in the Campus Registrar's Office 
(10:00 a.m.) 



1976-1977 

TERM l-B* 

ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERM IB March 1-September 1 

October 18-20 

1. Advisement and on-line registration for currently enrolled students 
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. 

16 



College Calendar 
Term l-B, 1976 

October 18, 19, 20 

2. Advisement and on-line registration for new students BY AP- 
POINTMENT ONLY as indicated on notice of admission. 

October 20 

= 3. On-line registration BY APPOINTMENT CARD ONLY. 

CLASSES BEGIN 8:00 a.m. October 21 

LATE REGISTRATION FOR TERM IB 

DROP AND ADD PERIOD October 21-29 

Schedule change and adjustments. (9:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m.) (5:00 p.m.- 
7:30 p.m.). Advisor must sign the form to be processed. A three dollar 
($3.00) fee is charged for the addition of courses. No fee is charged 
when a course is dropped. There is an 80% refund for courses dropped 
or for a complete withdrawal from College. No refund for courses 
dropped will be made after October 22. Class options after October 21 
may be very limited. Early registration is advised for more schedule 
options. 

REFUND PERIOD October 21-29 

Last day for complete withdrawal with an 80% refund. 

(October 29) 
"W" PERIOD (NO GRADE PENALTY) October 21-November 24 

LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE WITHOUT 

RECEIVING A GRADE PENALTY November 24 

CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT PERIOD ENDS November 24 

VETERANS' DAY HOLIDAY 

(NO CLASSES DAY OR EVENING NOVEMBER 10) November 11 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER VETERANS' DAY HOLIDAY November 12 

8:00 a.m. 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY 

(NO CLASSES DAY OR EVENING of 24th) November 25-26 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY November 29 

8:00 a.m. 

LAST DAY FOR STUDENT TO WITHDRAW December 10 

Last day for a student to withdraw from a class in Term I-B. 

* There is a 100% refund for withdrawal for students who preregister and 
withdraw through the last day preceding the commencement of classes 
in a term. 

**This is regular registration. 

17 



College Calendar 
Term II, 1976 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS — The week of December 13th December 13-17 

TERM l-B ENDS December 17 

TERM l-B GRADES DUE December 20 

All grades due in Campus Registrar's Office (10:00 a.m.). 

1976-1977 
TERM II* 

ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERM II October 18-December 22 

1. Advisement and on-line registration of currently enrolled students 
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. 

November 8-December 22 

2. Advisement and on-line registration for new students BY AP- 
POINTMENT ONLY as indicated on notice of admission. 

'^*3. On-line registration by time card appointment only. (Obtain time 
card from registrar's Office.) Students applying at this time must 
contact the Campus for appointments. 
(9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m., December 28) 
(9:00 a.m. -7:00 p.m., December 29) 
(9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m., December 30) 

CLASSES BEGIN 8:00a.m. Januarys 

LATE REGISTRATION FOR TERM II 

DROP AND ADD PERIOD January 5, 6, 7, 10, 11 

Schedule change and adjustments (9:00 a.m.-3.30 p.m.) (5:00 p.m.- 
7:30 p.m.). Advisor must sign form to be processed. A three dollar 
($3.00) fee is charged for the addition of courses. No fee is charged 
when a course is dropped. There is an 80% refund for courses dropped 
or for a complete withdrawal from College. No refund for courses 
dropped will be made after January 1 1 . Class options after January 5 
may be very limited. Early registration is advised for more schedule 
options. 

REFUND PERIOD January 5-14 

(January 14) 

Last day for complete withdrawal with an 80% refund. 

"W" PERIOD (NO GRADE PENALTY) January 5-March 11 

Last day to drop a course without receiving a grade penalty. 

CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT PERIOD ENDS March 11 

''^There is a 100% refund for withdrawal for students who preregister and 
withdraw through the last day preceding the commencement of classes in 
a term. 
**This is regular registration. 

18 



College Calendar 
Term II, 1976 



ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERMS IMA, lll-B, TERM I (1977-78) 



1. Advisement and on-line regis- 
tration for currently enrolled 
students BY APPOINTMENT 
ONLY. 

2. Advisement and on-line regis- 
tration for new students BY 
APPOINTMENT ONLY as in- 
dicated on notice of admission. 



IMA, Feb. 28-April 29 

Ml-B, Feb. 28-June 15 

Term I, Feb. 28-August 19 



MIA, March 18-April 29 

Ml-B, May 23-June 15 

Term I, March 18-August 19 



LAST WEEK FOR TERM II GRADUATION EVALUATIONS February 14-25 

Last week to secure evaluations for completion of degree requirements 
for Term II. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY HOLIDAY 
(No classes day or evening) 



CLASSES RESUME AFTER HOLIDAY 



8:00 a.m. 



LAST DAY TO PAY GRADUATION FEES 

Last day to pay graduation fees for Term II graduates. 



February 21 

February 22 
February 25 



LAST DAY FOR STUDENT TO WITHDRAW April 11 

Last day for student to withdraw from a class in Term II. 

REMOVAL OF "I" GRADE April 11 

Last day to remove an "I" grade for previous term (I). 

LATE APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION FOR TERM MIA April 11 

Last day for new students and returning students who have not been 
enrolled in Term II 1976-1977, to file application for admission for 
Term III-A. The application must be in the Registrar's Office this date. 

LAST DAY TO SUBMIT APPLICATION April 11 

Last day to submit an application for admission for Term III-A. 



EASTER HOLIDAY 

No evening classes will be held on April 7. 



April 8 



CLASSES RESUME AFTER EASTER HOLIDAY 
FINAL EXAMINATIONS 



8:00 a.m. 



Aprilll 
April 25-29 



TERM II GRADES DUE 



May 2 



All grades for Term II are due in the Registrar's Office (10:00 a.m.). 



19 



College Calendar 
Term ll-A, 1976 

COMPLETION OF GRADE REPORTS OR CORRECTIONS May 2 

Last day for faculty to complete grade reports or make corrections on 
incomplete grades received in Term I, 1976. 

GRADUATION May 2 

TERM II ENDS April 29 



1976-1977 
TERM ll-A* 

ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERM ll-A October 18-December 22 

1. Advisement and on-line registration for currently enrolled students 
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. 

November 8-December 22 

2. Advisement and on-line registration for new students BY AP- 
POINTMENT ONLY as indicated on notice of admission. 

November 28, 29, 30 

* 3. On-line registration BY APPOINTMENT CARD ONLY. 

CLASSES BEGIN 8:00a.m. Januarys 

LATE REGISTRATION FOR TERM ll-A 

DROP AND ADD PERIOD January 5, 6, 7 

Schedule changes and adjustments (9:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m.) (5:00 p.m.- 
7:30 p.m.). Advisor must sign the form to be processed. A three dollar 
($3.00) fee is charged for the addition of courses. No fee is charged 
when a course is dropped. There is an 809r refund for courses dropped 
or for a complete withdrawal from College. No refund for courses 
dropped will be made after January 7. Class options after January 5 
may be very limited. Early registration is advised for more schedule 
options. 

REFUND PERIOD January 5-14 

(January 14) 

Last day to complete withdrawals with an 80% refund. 

"W" PERIOD (NO GRADE PENALTY) January 5-February 4 

(February 4) 

Last day to drop a course without receiving a grade penalty. 

CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT PERIOD ENDS February 4 

*There is a 100% refund for withdrawals for students who preregister and 
withdraw through the last day preceding the commencement of classes 
in a term. 
'^ 'This is regular registration. 

20 



College Calendar 
Term I IB, 1976 

GEORGE WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY HOLIDAY February 21 

(No classes day or evening). 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER HOLIDAY 8:00 a.m. February 22 

LAST DAY FOR STUDENT TO WITHDRAW February 18 

Last day for student to withdraw from a class for Term II-A. 



FINAL EXAMINATION! 

Last class meeting week of February 28. February 28-March 3 

Last class meeting week of February. 

TERM II-A ENDS March 3 

TERM II-A GRADES DUE March 4 

All grades for Term 11-A due in the Campus Registrar's Office 
(10:00 a.m.). 



TERM ll-B* 

ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERM ll-B October 18-January 11 

1. Advisement and on-line registration for currently enrolled students 
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. 

February 28-March 3 

2. Advisement and on-line registration for new students BY AP- 
POINTMENT ONLY as indicated on notice of admission. 

March 3 

* 'S. On-line registration BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. 

CLASSES BEGIN 8:00 a.m. March 4 

LATE REGISTRATION FOR TERM ll-B 

DROP AND ADD PERIOD March 4 and 7 

Schedule changes and adjustments (9:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) (5:30 p.m.- 
7:30 p.m.). Advisor must sign the form to be processed. A three dollar 
($3.00) fee is charged for the addition of courses. No fee is charged 
when a course is dropped. There is an 80% refund for courses dropped 
or for a complete withdrawal from College. No refund for courses 
dropped will be made after March 7. Class options after March 4 may 
be very limited. Early registration is advised for more schedule options. 

REFUND PERIOD March 4-11 

(March 11) 

Last day for complete withdrawal with an 80% refund. 

■There is a 100% refund for withdrawals for students who preregister and 
withdraw through the last day preceding the commencement of classes 
in a term. 
' ■ This is regular registration. 

21 



College Calendar 
Term lll-A, 1976 

"W" PERIOD (NO GRADE PENALTY) March 4-April 1 

April 1 

Last day to drop a course without receiving a grade penalty. 



CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT PERIOD ENDS April 1 

EASTER HOLIDAY (NO CLASSES DAY OR EVENING) April 8 

No evening classes will be held on April 7. 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER EASTER HOLIDAY 8:00 a.m. April 11 

LAST DAY FOR STUDENT TO WITHDRAW April 15 

Last day for student to withdraw from class in Term Il-B. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS — 

Last class meeting of 25th April 25-29 

Last class meeting week of April 25. 

TERM Il-B ENDS April 29 

TERM Il-B GRADES DUE May 2 

All grades for Term Il-B are due m the Campus Registrar's Office 
(10:00 a.m.). 



TERM lll-A* 

ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERMS lll-A, lll-B, TERM-I (1977-78) 

**L Advisement and on-line regis- lll-A, February 28-April 29 

tration for currently enrolled ^ '"-B- February 28.June 15 

students BY APPOINTMENT ^^'"^ '' ^^^'""^'^ 28-August 19 
ONLY. 

**2. Advisement and on-line regis- lll-A, March 18-April 29 

tration for new students BY ^ '"-p. ^^y 23-June 15 

A nn/^TXTT-A^fcxT-r /-wMT -%.^ Term I, March 18-August 19 

APPOINTMENT ONLY as m- " 

dicated on notice of admission. 
CLASSES BEGIN 8:00 a.m. May 3 



There is a 100% refund for withdrawal for students who preregister and 
withdraw through the last day preceding the commencement of classes in 
a term. 
'■* April 29 is regular registration for Term III-A. 

22 



College Calendar 
Term lll-A, 1976 

LATE REGISTRATION FOR TERM II lA 

DROP AND ADD PERIOD May 3, 4 

Schedule changes and adjustments. (9:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m.) (5:00 p.m.- 
7:30 p.m.). Advisor must sign the form to be processed. A three dollar 
($3.00) fee is charged for the addition of courses. No fee is charged 
when a course is dropped. There is an 80% refund for courses dropped 
or for a complete withdrawal from College. No refund for courses 
dropped will be made after May 4. Class options after May 3 may be 
very limited. Early registration is advised for more schedule options. 

REFUND PERIOD May 3-13 

(May 13) 

Last day for complete withdrawal with an 80% refund. 

"W" PERIOD (NO GRADE PENALTY) May 3-20 

Last day to drop a course without receiving a grade penalty. 

(May 20) 
CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT PERIOD ENDS May 20 

MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY (NO CLASSES DAY OR EVENING) May 30 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY 8:00 a.m. May 31 

LATE APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION FOR TERM lll-B May 27 

Last day for new students and returning students who have not been 
enrolled since Term I, 1976-77, to file application for admission for 
Term III-B. The application must be in the Registrar's Office this date. 

LAST DAY FOR STUDENT TO WITHDRAW June 3 

Last day for a student to withdraw from a class in Term III-A. 

ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERM lll-B, AND TERM I (1977-78) 

•*1. Advisement and on-line regis- lll-B, February 28.June 15 

tration for currently enrolled Term I, February 28-August 19 

students by appointment only. 

'■''■2. Advisement and on-line regis- lll-B May 23-June 15 

tration for new students by Term I, March 18-August 19 

appointment as indicated on 
notice of admission. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS June 14, 15 

TERM lll-A ENDS June 15 

TERM lll-A GRADES DUE June 16 

All grades for Term III-A are due in the Campus Registrar's Office 
(10:00 a.m.). 

'■'*June 15 is regular registration for Term III-B. 

23 



College Calendar 
Term lll-B, 1976 

1976-1977 
TERM lll-B* 

ON-LINE REGISTRATION FOR TERM lll-B, AND TERM I (1977-78) 

•'■']. Advisement and on-line regis- lll-B, February 28-June 15 

tration for currently enrolled Term I, February 28-August 19 

students BY APPOINTMENT 
ONLY. 

'^'•2. Advisement and on-line regis- lll-B May23-Junel5 

tration for new students BY Term I, March 18-August 19 

APPOINTMENT ONLY as in- 
dicated on notice of admission. 

CLASSES BEGIN 8:00 a.m. June 16 

LATE REGISTRATION FOR TERM lll-B, 

DROP AND ADD PERIOD June 16-17 

Schedule changes and adjustments (9:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m.) (5:00 p.m.- 
7:30 p.m.). Advisor must sign the form to be processed. A three dollar 
($3.00) fee is charged for the addition of courses. No fee is charged 
when a course is dropped. There is an 80% refund for courses dropped 
or for a complete withdrawal from College. No refund for courses 
dropped will be made after June 17. Class options after June 16 may 
be very limited. Early registration is advised for more schedule options. 

REFUND PERIOD June 16-24 

(June 24) 

Last day for complete withdrawal with an 80% refund. 

INDEPENDENCE DAY HOLIDAY (NO CLASSES DAY OR EVENING) July 4 

CLASSES RESUME AFTER INDEPENDENCE DAY HOLIDAY 8:00 a.m. July 5 

"W" PERIOD (NO GRADE PENALTY) June 16-July 1 

(Julyl) 

Last day to drop a course without receiving penalty. 

CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT PERIOD ENDS July 1 

LAST DAY FOR STUDENT TO WITHDRAW July 22 

Last day for a student to withdraw from a class in Term Ill-B. 

REMOVAL OF "\" GRADE July 22 

Last day to remove an 'T" grade for preceding Term II. 

"There is a 100% refund for withdrawal for students who preregistered 
and withdraw through the last day preceding the commencement of 
classes in a term. 
'^ *June 15 is regular registration for Term III-B. 

24 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 
TERM lil-B ENDS 



College Calendar 
Term lll-B. 1976 

July 28-29 

July 29 



TERM Ili-B GRADES DUE August 1 

All grades for Term III-B are due in the Campus Registrar's Office 
(10:00 a.m.). 




25 



II 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



General Information 
History 

General Information 

fflSTORY 

Authorized by the Florida State Legislature in 1959, Broward Commu- 
nity College began to take form with the appointment of the local Advisory 
Committee under State Board of Education Regulations in October of that 
year. The first President was Dr. Joe B. Rushing, who assumed his duties on 
April 7, 1960. In the fall of 1960, the College opened its first session with 
701 students in facilities formerly occupied by a Naval Air Station at the 
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. From the beginning, 
permanent facilities were planned. Upon completion of the initial permanent 
buildings, activities were moved from the Naval Air Station to the present 
Central Campus site on Southwest Davie Road in August, 1963. 

From the first session, the College experienced sound growth in facili- 
ties, number of students, and quality of its programs. In the fall of 1965, 
Dr. Rushing resigned as President and was succeeded by Dr. Myron Blee. 
Upon Dr. Blee's resignation in 1968, Dr. A. Hugh Adams was chosen as the 
third President and assumed his duties on April 15, 1968. 

Effective July 1, 1968, by Legislative action of the 1968 Florida Legis- 
lature Special Session, the College was separated from the School Board of 
Broward County and its Advisory Board became a governing District Board 
of Trustees. Since the summer of 1968, the College's enrollment has in- 
creased over 100 per cent. Projections indicate significant growth will con- 
tinue over the next ten years. 

Early in Dr. Adams' tenure of office, a comprehensiv'=; ten-year develop- 
ment program was inaugurated and it was completed and accepted as a 
general blueprint for the College by the Board of Trustees on January 20, 
1970. This plan envisions three campuses (North, Central, and South), 
centers in high population density areas, and off-campus course offerings. 
Target dates for planning, construction, and openings have been tentatively 
established. Since multicampus operations began, the current Davie Road 
152 acre site is known as Broward Community College, Central Campus. 
Each campus will be designated appropriately in the same fashion. It is 
anticipated that the College will reach a total enrollment in excess of 20,000 
by the end of the decade if its development plans materialize as projected. 

Beginning with a limited university parallel program, the College has ex- 
panded its programs so that it is now a comprehensive community college 
offering work in varied technical areas as well as in university parallel curric- 
ula. Plans call for continual re-evaluation and adjustment so as to serve 
the educational needs of all facets of the Broward community, the State, 
and the Nation consonant with the College's purposes and its resources. 

College administrative offices were moved to downtown Fort Lauderdale 
in early 1973. Located in the same building at 225 East Las Olas Boulevard 
is the Fort Lauderdale Center. 

29 



General Information 



Sites and Buildings, Philosophy, Purposes 

SITES AND BUILDINGS 



The Central Campus on Southwest Davie Road contains about 152 
acres and is situated in the Nova educational complex. Other institutions in 
the complex are the Nova schools and Nova University. Currently, the 
Central Campus has seventeen buildings and complete athletic and parking 
facilities. The site has been sodded and landscaped so as to enhance its 
esthetic qualities. An observatory and additions to the science and engineer- 
ing technology buildings were constructed in 1973. A Fort Lauderdale 
Center is in full operation. 

Located west of the Florida Turnpike at Exit 20 and south of Ham- 
mondville Road, the North Campus of approximately 1 1 3 acres in Coconut 
Creek had constructed on it the first permanent facilities beginning in the 
summer of 1970. This site is being landscaped as facilities are constructed. 
Two buildings were constructed during 1971 and occupied in January, 1972. 
A library/ classroom building and a physical education building were con- 
structed in 1973. Two buildings were completed in 1975 and one is sched- 
uled for completion in 1976. 

The South Campus site has been designated at the North Perry Airport 
in Pembroke Pines on Hollywood Boulevard. A Hollywood Center now 
operates in a most adequate building made available through a leasing ar- 
rangement with the Hollywood Memorial Hospital Board. This building is 
located at 3601 Johnson Street, adjacent to the hospital. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Because Broward Community College is committed to the ideal of the 
worth and dignity of the individual, its underlying philosophy is to provide 
opportunities for youth and adults to develop themselves for a purposeful, 
gratifying, and useful life in a democratic society. The College accepts the 
national goal of providing at least two years of education beyond the high 
school level. Paramount in such education are programs of study designed to 
fit the needs of students with varying educational and vocational goals and 
those which provide co-curricular activities and community services consis- 
tent with the concept of the community junior college. Operating in the 
larger context of local, state, regional and national higher education patterns, 
the College seeks to respond to the needs of the individual at his level of 
ability and development. 

PURPOSES 

Broward Community College has as its main purposes the following: 

1. To provide programs which parallel the first two years of degree 
programs in four-year colleges and universities. 

2. To provide educational opportunities for students who do not plan 
to complete a four-year degree program, but who can profit from 
the pursuit of a one-year and/ or two-year program of technical, 
health, semi-professional and occupational education beyond the 
high school level. 

30 



General Information 



Accreditation, Equal Opportunity Employ- 
ment Policy, Community Services 



3. To provide programs for students which will enrich their cultural 
lives and improve their personal efficiency. 

4. To serve as an educational and cultural center for Broward Coun- 
ty and South Florida. 

5. To provide special services, courses, and programs for groups with 
particular needs such as the culturally deprived, the senior citizens, 
those who need to learn new skills, and those who have specialized 
needs that can be met by short term credit and non-credit courses, 
seminars, lectures, and classes, including regular offerings. 

ACCREDITATION 

Broward Community College is accredited by the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools. It is also accredited by the Florida Department of 
Education. Allied health programs are accredited by the American Medical 
Association in collaboration with the appropriate agencies. 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT POLICY 

Broward Community College as an institution of higher learning is 
dedicated to the inculcation of the highest ideals of citizenship in a free 
society. The College seeks to set a proper example by complying with all 
relevant laws enacted at every level of government. Consistent with the 
American ideals of equality of citizens and the dignity and worth of each 
person, the College hereby states that equal employment opportunity and 
advancement are guaranteed consonant with appropriate laws without regard 
to race, religion, color, national origin, sex, or any other such factor. All 
members of the faculty, staff, and student body are expected to assist in 
making this policy a practical reality. The President of the College is 
empowered to implement this policy through appropriate personnel and by 
use of effective guidelines. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

In 1973, the College established the Office of Community Services. The 
purpose of this office is to expand the range of offerings of the College, to 
extend the College's services into the community through outreach programs, 
and to program a variety of educational, upgrading, and new career oppor- 
tunities which reach beyond the traditional limits of college credit 
restrictions. 

The Office of Community Services is charged with the responsibility for 
making direct contacts with the community, including the public govern- 
mental personnel, school personnel, professional organizations, business and 
industrial interests, condominium dwellers, and other groups, and insuring 
that whenever 15 or more people are interested in a subject that a course is 
developed. Non-credit courses, special credit courses, workshops and other 
events are announced in a quarterly newsletter. The Broward Community 
College Contact. 

31 



General Information 



Student Developiment, Orientation, 
Counseling 



In addition, Community Services offers non-credit courses, seminars, 
and workshops designed to help women of all ages expand their potential. 
Other special projects are developed which help provide for the vocational, 
educational, and personal needs of women throughout the county and South 
Florida. 

The Office of Community Services assists the College more effectively 
to serve the total college district by seeing that instruction is offered in 
multiple locations throughout the district, at times most convenient for 
prospective students to participate, and covering subject matter which is of 
highest need and priority for the citizenry. 



STUDENT DEVELOPMENT 

ORIENTATION 

The Orientation Program is designed to assist the student in making 
an adjustment to college. The program provides the student with informa- 
tion about campus facilities and services and introduces the Administration 
and Staff. Broward Community College rules and regulations are discussed 
and the responsibilities of the student are explained. The Orientation Pro- 
gram is offered prior to the beginning of Term I and participation of all 
new students is encouraged. 

Orientation materials are available in the Academic Advisement Office 
for students who begin classes in Term II and III. 



COUNSELING 

Broward Community College considers each student as a unique 
talented human being with individual abilities, potentialities, interests, needs 
and life styles. College years are vital stepping stones to the future and the 
major decisions a student must make are foundations on which life will 
be built. 

The Counseling Center provides opportunities for the students to grow 
as a "whole" person, to explore his or her aptitudes and interests as they 
effect emotional and academic life and to accept responsibilities as a mature, 
healthy individual. A student may call on the Counseling Service for career- 
educational information and positive, realistic help in life and career goal 
planning. 

Counselors are always ready to help resolve "road blocks" that may 
interfere with the student's effectiveness as a student and as a person. 
Specialized testing is available to students in need of objective information 
concerning abilities, achievements, interests and personal attributes. 

The counseling staff is sensitive to the needs of a diverse student 
population and invites mature women, minorities, and others to discuss their 
particular needs. 

32 



General Information 

Articulation, Financial Aid, 

Types of Aid Available Loans 

A Career Center located on Central Campus offers Broward Community 
College students and Broward County residents a comprehensive service in 
career-vocational exploration. Professional counselors, a career information 
library, job placement services, specialized testing and a cooperative educa- 
tion program are included in the Career Center. 



ARTICULATION 

The High School/ College Articulation program is designed to promote 
better communication between the high schools and Broward Community 
College. The coordinator of this program works with administrators, 
guidance directors, counselors and occupational specialists in all of the 
Broward County high schools, both public and private. A variety of assem- 
bly programs are being offered for high school students to improve com- 
munications and to inform them of the offerings at Broward Community 
College designed to meet their needs. 



FINANCIAL AID 

Broward Community College welcomes applications from all students 
who, without financial assistance, would be unable to attend college, but 
limits of available fund resources may preclude some students from consider- 
ation when applications are not received in time for proper evaluation. 
Deadline dates for all financial aid applicants have, therefore, been estab- 
lished as follows: 

Fall Semester (Term I) June 1 

Spring Semester (Term II) October 1 

Summer Semester (Term III) March 15 

Financial Aid applications are available through the College's Financial Aid 
Office at the Central and North Campuses, and Ft. Lauderdale Center and 
the College administrative office, or from any Broward County high school 
guidance office. 



TYPES OF AID AVAILABLE 
LOANS 

All long-term loans are low interest loans with repayment deferred until 
the student graduates, withdraws or changes his status as a full-time student. 
Short Term loans must be repaid within the term borrowed. 

Nursing Loan Program — Available on a need basis to U.S. nationals or 
permanent residents who are full time in nursing. Applicants must be 
working for a Associate Degree and be in good academic standing. 
The program provides a long term, low interest loan with repayment 
beginning nine months following termmation of studies. Up to 85% 
of the loan amount may be cancelled. 

33 



General Information 
Grants 

Federally Insured Loan Program — The Federally Insured Loan is an ar- 
rangement by which a student can make a loan through a bank, credit 
union, or other lending agency (which participates in the program) and 
the federal government will provide the guarantee of the loan. Interest 
of 7% will be paid by the government (if student qualifies) while 
the student is enrolled. Loan payment will begin nine months after 
a student terminates school. Maximum loan is $2,000 per year at 
B.C.C. 

Short Term Loan — Full-time students, with a 2.0 overall average may 
obtain emergency or short term loans up to $100 per term. Applications 
may be made at the Financial Aid Office any day the college is in 
session. Repayment must be made before the end of the term in which 
the loan was made, contingent upon available funds. 

GRANTS 

Financial assistance in the form of grants is available to undergraduate 
students. Such grants require financial need and do not have to be repaid 
by the student. 

B.E.O.G. — Basic Educational Opportunity Grant — A Federally sponsored 
aid program designed to provide financial assistance to those who need 
it to attend approved colleges, vocational or technical schools. Applica- 
tions are available at high schools, colleges and universities. 

S.E.O.G. — Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant — Undergrad- 
uate students with financial need may receive up to one-half of their 
total financial assistance as a grant under this program; for those who 
are not eligible for B.E.O.G. 

Nursing Grants — This is a federally sponsored program to assist students 
with financial need to undertake courses of study leading to an Associ- 
ate Degree in Nursing. Preference is given to second year nursing 
students. 

Florida Student Assistance Grant — This is a program for undergraduate 
Florida residents with high financial need. Application for this grant 
should be made directly to the State Department of Education, Talla- 
hassee, Florida or from local high schools. Parent's Confidential State- 
ment or Student's Financial Statement must also be sent to Dept. of 
Education, Tallahassee, Fla. 

Donor Scholarships — Many civic and professional organizations in Broward 
County donate scholarship funds to Broward Community College. 
These scholarships require a 2.0 grade point average and a full time 
attendance. The awards usually range from $115 to $300; in most 
cases a 3.0 grade point average is required. 

B.C.C. Fee Waivers — A limited amount of funds arc available as B.C.C. 
Fee Waivers. These awards are made to students who have special 
talents in specific areas of study or activities (i.e. Athletics, Drama, 
Music, Art, etc.). These awards are made by the Department Chairman 

34 



General Information 



Student Employment Program, 
Placement Testing, Academic Advisement 



in area of interest. Waivers are tuition only for four semesters. Student 
applies to the appropriate Department. 

Principal's Honors — Each high school principal in Broward County may 
choose two students each year to receive a four semester scholarship 
of $12.00 per credit hour not to exceed 16 credit hours per semester. 
The student must maintain a 3.0 average each semester in order to 
continue on this scholarship. 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM 

C.W.S.P. — College Work-Study Program — The Student Financial Aid 
Office administers the College Work-Study Program which is sponsored 
by the Federal Government for students with financial need. Students 
must be enrolled on a full-time basis and be listed in good academic 
standing. Students may work on the B.C.C. campuses. Students are 
paid on hourly rate and usually work 15 hours per week. 

Institutional Student Employment — This program allows students from all 
income levels to work in various departments on the B.C.C. campuses. 
Students must be full-time, with a 2.0 grade point average and may 
work up to 15 hours per week. 



PLACEMENT TESTING 

We recommend every full-time student complete the Florida Twelfth 
Grade Placement Test battery before receiving program advisement. Appli- 
cants who have not taken the Placement Test should contact the Advisement 
Office and arrange to take the Test at the earliest scheduled date. If a student 
does not complete the Test or, in the case of an out-of-state student, does 
not submit appropriate ACT or SAT scores in lieu of the Florida Twelfth 
Grade Placement Test, he will be unable to enroll in some courses, (English 
for example) during his first term at the College. A number of testing 
dates are scheduled throughout the year. 

Students with previous foreign language study/ experience will be given 
placement tests by the Counseling-Advisement Office in order to determine 
the level of study they will begin at Broward Community College. 

Requests for variance from the testing requirement (possible for some 
transient students and sophomore level students transferring into the College) 
should be directed to the Director of Counseling. This should be done well 
in advance of advisement-registration. 



ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Academic Advisement is available to all students during registration for 
each term at Broward Community College. Academic Advisors help students 
plan their program of study, select individual courses and assess their 
progress as they continue their studies. 

35 



General Information 
Curriculum 

New and returning students must see an Academic Advisor before 
he/she registers. Test scores and academic records are reviewed and a future 
program of studies is planned. The student may self-advise for ensuing 
semesters but is encouraged to return for advisement if he or she encounters 
academic problems, plans a change in educational goals or just to consult 
periodically with an academic advisor on the accuracy of his/her self- 
advisement. The student must return for graduation evaluation prior to his 
last term at Broward Community College. 



CURRICULA OFFERED 
Associate in Arts Degree Programs: 



Agricultural Science 

Architecture 

Art 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Building Construction 

Business Administration 

Business Administration — 

Administrative System 
Business Education 
Chemistry 
Child Development in Home 

Economics 
Chiropractic 

Computer Systems Science 
Corrections 
Dental 
Drama 

Education (Elementary) 
Education (Secondary) 
Engineering 
English 

Fashion Design in Home Economics 
Fashion Merchandising in Home 

Economics 
Food and Nutrition Science 
Foreign Language 
Forestry in Forest Products 

Technology 
Forestry in Forestry & Wild Life 
Geology 

Health Education 
History 

Home Economics 
Home Economics Education 
Housing and Interior Design 
Journalism 



Latin American Studies 

Law 

Law Enforcement 

M arketi ng- M anagement 

Mathematics 

Medical 

Medical Technology 

Music 

Music Education 
Nursing 
Occupational Therapy 

Oceanography 

Optometry 

Pharmacy 

Physical Education (Men) 

Physical Education (Women) 

Physical Therapy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Radio-Television 

Recreation 

Religion 

Secretarial Science 
Social Welfare 

Sociology 

Speech 

Speech Pathology-Audiology 

Tourism Industries Administration 

Veterinary Medicine 

A. A. Degree in Liberal Arts 

(Undecided Major) 

Home Furnishing Marketing 



36 



General Information 
Curriculum 



Associate in Science Degree Programs: 



Accounting 

Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

Airline Careers 

Air Traffic Controller 

Architectural Technology 

Aviation Administration 

Banking Career 

Business Administration-General 

Career Pilot 

Commercial Art 

Contracting & Civil Engineering 
Technology 

Corrections 

Crime Scene Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Data Processing (Business Option) 

Data Processing (Engineering- 
Scientific Option) 

Dental Assisting 

Dietetic Technician 

Electrical Engineering 

Electronic Technology 

Electronics (Digital or 
Communication Option) 

Emergency Medical Technology 

Fashion Merchandising 

Fire Science Technology 

Hospital Accounting 

Hotel-Restaurant-Institution 
Administration 

Insurance Careers 



Landscape Technology 

Market-Management 

Mechanical Engineering 

Medical Assisting 

Medical Laboratory 

Medical Transcriptionist 

Nursing 

Pest Control Technology 

Physical Therapy Assisting 

Police Science 

Pollution Prevention and Control 

Public Administration 
Purchasing Management 
Radiation Technology 
Radiologic Technology 
Real Estate 

Respiratory Therapy 
Savings & Loans Careers 
Secretarial, Executive, General 
Secretarial — Legal 
Secretarial — Medical 

Secretarial Teacher Aide Education 
Security Administration 
Teacher Aide 

Tourism Industries-Administration 
Veterinary Medical Assisting 



CertilBed Programs — Specialized Areas: 



Accounting 

Building Construction 

Clerical Typist 

Corrections 

Credit Union Leadership Training 

Data Processing 

Dental Assisting 

Fire Science 

Food Service 

Group Living Home Management 

Income Tax Preparation 



Medical Assisting 

Merchandising 

Police Science 

Pre-school and Daycare Center 

Secretarial 

Secretarial, Advanced 

Secretarial, Certified Professional 

Security Administration 

Small Business-Administration 

Teacher of Private Nursery School & 

Kindergarten 
Traffic Management 
Wastewater Control Operator 

Specialist 



37 



General Information 



Placement Sen/., Insurance, 

Health Sen/., Hospitality Center, Transportation 



Many students will not be clear regarding their career goals. Such stu- 
dents are well advised to pursue the College's program in general education 
and to seek early assistance in working through a vocational decision. The 
staff of the Counseling Office is available for help in this area. 

Students are encouraged to correspond with the senior college or uni- 
versity which they contemplate attending after completion of their first two 
years of study. They should familiarize themselves with specific admission 
and degree requirements. Counselors are available to assist in identifying 
and clarifying such requirements. 

PLACEMENT AND CAREER PLANNING SERVICES 

A Placement and Career Planning Services Center is available to all 
students and alumni of Broward Community College as well as residents 
of Broward County. The Center is located on the Central Campus of the 
College on the first floor of the Student Services Building. The Career 
Center provides students with information about full and part-time job 
openings, assistance in choosing and planning a career, vocational informa- 
tion, information about other colleges and universities and financial aid 
information. Placement career services are available without charge for 
day and evening students. 

INSURANCE 

A low-cost accident insurance program is offered to students through a 
local agency. All students are strongly encouraged to avail themselves of this 
service. Forms for this insurance program are located in the Student De- 
velopment Office on each campus. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Medical and hospital facilities are not provided. In case of accident or 
illness students should report to the Health Center, which is located on the 
first floor of the Student Services Building, Central Campus and on North 
Campus in the HPR Building (Building 31), and on North Campus in 
Building 8. 

HOSPITALITY CENTER 

The College's Hospitality Center, Central Campus, consists of a large, 
modern cafeteria for individual and group meals. Cafeteria services, snack 
bar services and private dining rooms for club and social affairs are avail- 
able. Student lounge, recreational areas, the Student Activities Office and 
a Counseling Office are also located in the Hospitality Center. On the North 
Campus, the student lounge and food facility are located in the Services 
Building. 

TRANSPORTATION 

The campuses are readily accessible by automobile and city buses 
operate during the daytime and early evening hours. Students arc cncour- 

38 



General Information 



Off-Campus Classes, Athletics, 
Bookstore, Student Activities 



aged to form carpools with friends and neighbors in order to alleviate 
campus parking problems and to conserve energy. 

OFF-CAMPUS CLASSES 

In order to serve more effectively the total College District, the College 
is offering instruction for multiple locations throughout the District. 

ATHLETICS 

The College is a member of the Florida Junior College Conference, 
Florida Commission of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, Association 
for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and the National Junior College 
Athletic Association. Broward Community College began intercollegiate 
athletics in 1962-63 at Central Campus and 1972-73, at the North Campus. 

The activities are basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, wrestling, swimming 
and women's sports. 

BOOKSTORE 

The Central Campus Bookstore and the North Campus Bookstore are 
the source for required books and supplies needed for classroom use. Avail- 
able are both new and used textbooks, general college supplies, and a full 
line of art and engineering supplies. In addition, the bookstores offer a large 
selection of paperbacks, including best sellers; school jewelry, athletic and 
monogrammed clothing; custom-imprinted shirts and other school necessities. 
Extra services of the Bookstore include special orders, film processing, and 
the buying of used books from students. The College Bookstores are owned 
and operated by Broward Community College for the convenience of 
students, faculty, and staff. 

The Central Campus Bookstore, Building No. 10, is conveniently lo- 
cated next to the Hospitality Center, and is open for business Monday 
through Thursday, 7:45 AM to 7:00 PM; Friday, 7:45 AM to 3:30 PM. 

The North Campus Bookstore is located on the first floor of the Ad- 
ministration/Student Services Building, Building No. 8, and is open for 
business Monday through Friday, 8:00 AM to 3:30 PM. 

Temporary Bookstores will be open at the Hollywood Center and the 
Fort Lauderdale Center for the first meeting of every class. Special arrange- 
ments will be made at satellite centers for the sale of textbooks. Both Central 
and North Campus Bookstores will post their extended hours prior to the 
beginning of each term. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student activities embrace projects, functions, and clubs, which involve 
student participation apart from formal classroom instruction and adminis- 
trative services. They form an essential segment of educational development 
through the cultural, intellectual, recreational and social life of the college 
community. 

39 



General Information 



Alumni Assoc, Clubs and Programs, 
Student Government, Intramural Sports 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The College's interest in its students does not end upon their graduation, 
but rather, a new relationship is established. A very active Alumni Associ- 
ation has been formed to provide opportunities for the College to continue 
playing a meaningful role in the lives of its students both now and in the 
future. In addition to the annual meeting of the Alumni Association, a 
number of social and cultural events are held. Graduates are welcome to 
attend and participate in the monthly meetings of the Executive Committee 
which take place in the Board Room of the Ft. Lauderdale Center. 

CLUBS, ORGANIZATIONS, AND PROGRAMS 

The development of student organizations, clubs, and programs within 
the college is encouraged as a function of the activities program operating 
under the supervision and coordination of the Vice President for Student 
Development and the Director of Student Activities. The goals of student 
organizations encourage cultural and intellectual development which bring 
into practice the skills and values set forth in the instructional program. 
These groups function in prescribed formats which encourage student 
direction. Included are the following: 

1. Honorary Societies 

2. Departmentally affiliated activities 

3. Inter-collegiate athletics 

4. Intramurals 

5. Extramurals 

6. Student Government Association 

7. Inter-Club Council (All Clubs) 

8. Greek Council 

9. Special Interest Clubs 

The above groups center their purposes around an interest, profession, 
or service. They are designed to permit students to perform in areas of useful 
pursuits which capture their individual attention or interest. Through organi- 
zations the students will develop mature, responsible, social, and democratic 
ideals and attitudes. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student Government organizations are established oi\ North and Central 
campuses through the President of the College. Students are encouraged to 
participate in these governmental organizations to make them a truly repre- 
sentative voice of the students. It is hoped that through these organizations 
students will develop skills in self-government and leadership. 

INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROGRAM 

The purpose of the Intramural Sports Program at the College is to 
provide an opportunity for students to participate in the individual and 
team sports of their choice. It is the desire of the intramural committee to 
select activities which will provide enjoyment and physical recreation during 

40 



General Information 



Student Publications, Fine Arts Program 



the student's college career, contribute to the student's physical well being, 
improve recreational skills for leisure time use in adult life, and aid in the 
development of sound emotional and social qualities. 

Participation is entirely voluntary, and all students are invited to take 
part. Among the activities included in the program are basketball, tag 
football, table tennis, tennis, softball, volleyball, badminton, swimming, golf, 
bowling, paddleball, archery, skeet shooting, billiards, cross country, soccer, 
sailing, fencing and recreational games. An intramural sports program on 
a limited basis is offered at the North Campus. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Central Campus: The Phoenix newspaper; Silver Sands, the college 
magazine; P'an Kii, the literary magazine. 

North Campus: The Polaris newspaper; Poseidon, the literary maga- 
zine. Students with communication experience and/ or interest, are urged 
to join the staffs or to submit materials for these publications. All publi- 
cations are available free to all students. 

FINE ARTS PROGRAM 

College Singers, North Broward Community Chorus, Broward Community 
College Choral Society, Concert Choir, Chamber Singers, Opera Work- 
shop, Chamber Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Neophonic Jazz Ensemble, 
Adult Jazz Band, Symphonic Band, Coral Springs Band, Broward 
Symphony Orchestra, Broward Community College Youth Symphony, 
Training Symphony are presented for various college and community 
events. 

Drama — The Drama program of the college affords each student an oppor- 
tunity to participate in all aspects of its program from acting to tech- 
nical set design. All try-outs for productions are open to any student, 
part-time or full-time, from any campus. There are two major produc- 
tions scheduled during the year at the Central Campus Drama Depart- 
ment, one of which is a Children's Theatre Production. A Workshop is 
available during the summer term. This Workshop is open to com- 
munity teachers or directors of drama in high schools as well as 
college students. The North Campus Drama Department plans at least 
one production a year. 

The Pantomime Players, sponsored by the Drama Department, is an 
organization whose purpose is to bring the art of pantomime to people 
on campus and in the community through a varied program of per- 
formances. Tryouts are held periodically throughout the year and are 
open to all students. 

Art Lyceum — The Art Department exhibits works by faculty members, 
students, and visiting artists. In addition, it sponsors an Art Film Series. 

Cultural Programs — Aside from the above listed musical, drama and art 
shows many speakers are presented each year and the members of the 

41 



General Information 



Scholastic Honorary Groups 

Professional and Academic Groups, Clubs 



college family speak frequently to civic, church and cultural groups. 
Various student groups, through the Student Activities program, sponsor 
events of interest during the college year. The Buehler Planetarium 
presents two weekly shows to the public and many special shows to 
public schools and civic groups. 

SCHOLASTIC HONORARY GROUPS 

Delta Psi Omega — Honorary group for Drama 

Phi Rho Pi — National Honorary Society for Forensics 

Phi Theta Kappa — a National Scholastic Honorary Society with approxi- 
mately 500 chapters in two year institutions throughout the country. 
Phi Theta Kappa's purpose is to promote scholarship, develop character 
and cultivate fellowship among students in the junior colleges. Invita- 
tion for admission depends on a student's achieving a sufficiently 
high academic grade point average. 

PROFESSIONAL AND ACADEMIC GROUPS 
Student Nurses' Association of Florida 
Student Medical Assistants' Association 
International Foreign Language Organization 
Sigma Mu Gamma (Sales & Marketing, DECCA) 
Phi Beta Lambda (Business Administration) 
Florida Engineering Society 
Broward Community College Flight Team 
Debate 

INTEREST CLUBS 
Black Awareness Club 
P'an Ku Club (Literary) 
Physical Education Majors 
Sailing Club 
Karate & Judo 
Soccer 
Chess 

SERVICE CLUBS 
Circle K (co-ed) — College branch of the Kiwanis Club 

42 



General Information 



Clubs, Fraternities, 
Academic Affairs, Entrance Requirements 



RELIGIOUS CLUBS 
Newman Club 
Bahai Club 
Jewish Student Union 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

Greek Council — The Greek Council is a student organization designed to 
recommend controls for and to supervise all groups defined as social 
Fraternities and Sororities. Included in the council are the representa- 
tives of two subcommittees, the Inter-Fraternity Council and the 
Panhellenic Council. 

Students are urged to start new clubs according to their interests. Many 
unlisted clubs are now inactive and can be reactivated quickly. The 
Student Activities office personnel will be happy to help new clubs get 
started. 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

Admission to the College is based on a number of considerations, no 
one of which is the determining factor in deciding an applicant's eligibility 
for admission. Certain records and forms, are required before a person can 
be unconditionally admitted to the College. 

Here are the steps in applying for admission to Broward Community 
College. 

1. Contact any Campus Registrar's Office for the official application 
forms. The Campus Registrar, upon request, will send to a prospec- 
tive student all the necessary information and forms for admission. 

2. Complete all forms according to instructions given, and return them 
to the Campus Registrar. 

3. Upon a review of all required information submitted by the student, 
the College Registrar's office then will communicate the decision of 
the College concerning his admission. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

i. Properly completed Application for Admission form. 

2. Graduation from an approved high school or equivalency diploma. 

3. Applicants who are 18 years of age or older and who have not 
completed high school may take the General Educational Develop- 
ment tests and qualify for a high school Equivalency Diploma by 
earning an average score of 45, with no score less than 40. This is 
recognized by the Florida Department of Education, other State 
Departments, and the United States Armed Forces. 

43 



General Information 
Acattemic Regulations 

4. Properly completed emergency information form. 

5. Aflfidavit of Residency. 

6. Application Fee $10.00. (for new credit students) Non-refundable. 

7. Official transcript(s) showing high school and college credits. The 
transcript or transcripts should be in the Registrar's Office at least 
two weeks prior to the opening of the semester the student wishes 
to enter. 

8. Evidence of good character. 

9. Upon admission from an unaccredited high school, the applicant 
will be admitted on academic probation and he must make satis- 
factory grades in order to remain in College. 

The College reserves the right to request a physical, psychological, or a 
psychiatric examination from an applicant or student at any time that such 
course of action would seem to be in the best interests of the student and/ or 
the College. Expenses incident to such an examination are the responsibility 
of the applicant or student. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Transfer Students 

1 . Upon receipt of an official transcript from all colleges attended, the 
Registrar will evaluate them and when necessary, will consult the 
Academic Standards Committee concerning the credits. 

2. Courses submitted that are not parallel with courses listed in the 
Catalog of the College will be evaluated, and credit toward gradu- 
ation will be granted as approved by the Registrar or by the Aca- 
demic Standards Committee. 

3. Credit will be allowed in any transferred course with a grade of 
"D" or higher. 

4. Failure to report previous college level work attempted constitutes 
a falsification of application and subjects one to loss of all credit 
earned. Suspension may result. 

5. Transfer students will not be admitted to the College if they are 
not eligible for readmission where they have been attending college. 
Any student transferring from other institutions or providing ad- 
vance standing for educational experience in the armed forces must 
meet the requirements for graduation as specified in this Catalog 
in order to receive an associate degree or certificate. 

6. Complete information on the application for admission is required. 
Incomplete information will cause rejection of the application. False 
information will subject one to immediate dismissal without refund 
of fees paid. 

7. Credits earned in another college during suspension from Broward 
Community College will not be honored. 

44 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

Admission Under Special Conditions 

1 . Students who do not qualify to sit for the General Education Devel- 
opment Tests and who are at least 18 years of age will be admitted 
on probation pending completion of 12 semester hours with at least 
a C average. 

The College will accept qualified applicants on a space and staff avail- 
able basis. Broward County residents will be given priority. The College re- 
serves the right to deny admission to any applicant when appropriate ideals 
of scholarship and deportment are jeopardized. 

International Students 

Broward Community College is committed to cooperating toward ad- 
vancing the educational endeavors of international students, particularly our 
neighbors in the Caribbean, Central and South American countries. 

The credentials of an applicant for admission from a foreign country 
are evaluated in accordance with the general regulations governing admis- 
sion. The student must submit a complete academic record from the first 
year of secondary school to the time of application. All documents should be 
submitted in the language of the country, accompanied by English transla- 
tion, preferably certified by the United States Consulate. International 
Students on visa are required by the United States Immigration regulations 
to be enrolled full-time. They should make satisfactory progress toward 
their degree objective each term. Academic advisement is provided to assist 
the student in selecting the appropriate courses for his educational objectives. 
They also must submit evidence that they are proficient enough in oral and 
written English to do satisfactory work in English. The Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) administered by the Educational Testing 
Service, Princeton, New Jersey, is required prior to admission. 

The student is referred also to the Division of Communications, Com- 
munications for International Students, for information regarding English 
Language course requirements at Broward Community College. 

All international students must have sufficient funds to cover tuition, 
fees, books, living expenses, transportation and incidental expenses while 
attending college. Students must have these funds available when they 
register for classes each Term. Out of State fees may be waived if the student 
is sponsored by a formally recognized international organization. Health 
insurance and statement of financial support are required for admission. 

Broward Community College does not provide, supervise, nor recom- 
mend student housing. International students should arrive in the Fort 
Lauderdale area several weeks prior to enrollment to arrange housing ac- 
commodations and transportation. Public transit is very limited. 

All international students are requested to report to campus one week 
before the first day of classes for that semester. 

Transient Student 

A student attending a college or university, who wishes to earn credits 
to transfer to that institution, may be admitted to the College as a transient 

45 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

Student. He must present an official statement from the institution he has 
been attending in which it is certified that he is in good standing, and that 
the credits he earns at this College will be accepted as part of his program 
there. Such a student is not required to file a transcript of his previous 
college credits. 

Veteran Students 

Broward Community College is approved for veteran training for the 
following: Associate in Arts and Associate in Science Degrees. Those who 
expect to receive monthly V.A. subsistence should report their enrollment 
status to the Registrar's Office each semester by completing the necessary 
V.A. claim forms. 

Allied Health Technology Students 

Admission requirements: 

1 . Fulfill general requirements for admission to the College. 

2. Official High School transcripts: 

a. Partial transcript before graduation 

b. Complete transcript after graduation 

3. Official transcripts from each college or program previously attended. 

4. 2.0 cumulative grade point average on all college courses attempted. 

5. Satisfactory scores on Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test or 
satisfactory completion of appropriate courses. 

6. Other testing and/ or counseling as recommended. 

7. Acceptable letters of reference and recommendation. 

8. Satisfactory medical and dental forms. 

9. Satisfactory personal interview where required. 

Admission Procedure: 

1. Submit letter of application directly to appropriate Allied Health 
department. Student will receive required forms and materials for 
admission. 

2. Make an appointment with the office of academic advisement and 
counseling for verification of academic qualifications. 

3. Present verification of academic qualification to Division of Allied 
Health Technology for admission approval. Approval based upon 
fulfillment of all admissions requirements. 

4. If a student is accepted into an Allied Health program but is unable 
to register because the class quota has been reached, the student 
may register for the next in-coming class. 

Uniforms: 

Uniforms that meet the approval of the appropriate Allied Health 
faculty must be furnished by the student. Information regarding their pur- 
chase is furnished to each applicant following admission to a program. 

46 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

Liability Insurance: 

All Allied Health Technology students are required to carry Profes- 
sional Liability Insurance throughout their educational program. This is 
due at the beginning of each year and payable at the time of registration. 

Accident Insurance: 

It is recommended that all students in Allied Health Programs carry 
accident insurance. 



CLASS ATTENDANCE AND ATTENDANCE REPORTS POLICY 

It is the responsibility of each instructor to formulate an attendance 
policy and to insure that this policy is communicated in writing, in a timely 
and clear manner to all students attending classes. 

The instructor may withdraw violators of his/her class attendance 

policy by simply reporting a 'W on a corrected class roll and submitting 

the corrected class roll to the campus registrar's office, or by processing 
an administrative withdrawal form. 

The student is responsible for adhering to the instructor's policy, and 
for officially withdrawing from class. 

There is a $5.00 administrative fee charged to the student when the 
withdrawal is initiated by the instructor. 

Withdrawals 

The College permits students to withdraw from a course without 
receiving a grade (only "W") preceding the midterm examination week. 
(See College Calendar for the deadline.) A student may withdraw from a 
course with a "WF" or "WP" (whatever he has earned to that point) two 
weeks preceding the week of final examinations. (See College Calendar for 
the deadline.) Students who withdraw from College within two weeks of 
the end of a term (for Terms I and II to within one week of Term III-A 
or III-B) must apply to the Academic Standards Committee for permission 
to take final examinations and do all work required for full credit. This 
permission normally will be granted only in especially meritorious situations 
such as serious illness. 

Examinations and Tests 

Each instructor is free to direct his class and to give such tests as he 
feels are necessary. Usually there is a mid-term examination and more fre- 
quent period or subject examinations. All instructors are expected to give 
final examinations according to the schedule issued by the Registrar's Office. 

Students may remove "I" grades for the preceding term through the 
deadline date in the College Calendar. 

Transcripts 

Each student at Broward Community College is entitled to transcripts 
free. Transcripts are mailed as promptly as possible; however, students 

47 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

should make written requests to the Registrar's Office at least two weeks 
before the credentials are needed. No transcript or official statement will 
be issued for students who are financially indebted to the college, or have 
not fully satisfied admission requirements. A request for a transcript of 
credit should give the last date of attendance at the college. Married women 
should give their maiden names as well as their married names. 

Registration 

Students are required to register for courses at the beginning of each 
term. The Admission Procedures must be completed in the Office of the Reg- 
istrar before registering for courses. A student cannot earn credit by attend- 
ing a section of a class for which he has not officially registered, and paid 
fees. 

A student whose attendance at the College is interrupted by one or 
more regular terms (Term I and II) may apply for readmission and if read- 
mitted, will be subject to the rules and regulations that are in effect at the 
time he applies for readmission. 

Registration dates are listed in the College Calendar. Students who en- 
roll in a course after instruction has begun are at a distinct disadvantage. 
They are responsible for assignments and instruction which they have missed. 
Consult the College Calendar for the last date to register. 

Repetition of Courses 

Responsibility for loss of credit because of duplication of courses rests 
with the student. Repetition of a course removes the previous grade from a 
student's record for the purpose of calculating grade point average. 

The State's Articulation Agreement does not allow courses to be re- 
peated after the A.S. and A. A. Degree is awarded. 

Academic Load 

To be considered as a full-time student, one must carry a minimum 
load of 12 hours. The Veterans Administration considers 12 hours as a full 
load for determining subsistence.'^ Fifteen or sixteen hours is the normal 
student load and 18 is the maximum which may be carried. However, stu- 
dents who make a qualifying point average of 3.2 or above may carry an 
extra course, but in no event shall the maximum load exceed 21 semester 
hours. The maximum load for Term III-A or III-B is nine semester hours; 
the normal load is six semester hours. 

Adding, Dropping, or Changing Schedule 

Information regarding the procedure to initiate a schedule change can 
be obtained from the Registrar's Office. The student is expected to continue 
in class attendance and participation until he has complied with procedures 

*A\\ veterans should contact the Registrar's office relative to eligibility for 
subsistence prior to the commencement of classes in each Term. 

48 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

outlined by the Registrar's Office. Schedule changes are possible early in the 
first week in the term when absolutely necessary. However, a $3.00 fee will 
be charged for each drop/ add form processed. No charge will be made when 
the responsibility is clearly attributable to: 

1. Cancelled class. 

2. An advisement error. 

3. A course which a student failed and has to repeat. 

4. A course which requires a prerequisite. 

5. An instructor or administrator who requests, in writing, and states 
the reason for recommending the change. 

6. Complete withdrawal from college. 

Selective Service Status 

Every male citizen and/ or resident alien, who has attained the age 
of 18 but has not attained the age of 26, must register according to the 
Military Selective Service Act. Contact your local Selective Service Office 
for further information. 

Classification of Students 

A student who has earned 25 or more semester hours credit is classified 
as a sophomore. A student is a full-time student if he carries not fewer than 
12 semester hours (in academic courses) in a given term. 

Conduct 

College students are considered to have reached an age of responsible 
citizenship and are expected to conduct themselves appropriately both on 
and off campus. 

Every student, by the act of registering for scholastic work at Broward 
Community College, obligates himself to obey rules and regulations which 
the institution formulates, including those in this Catalog and those in the 
Student Handbook. 

Residence 

A "Florida Student" is interpreted to mean that the student, or if the 
student be less than eighteen years of age, his parent(s) or legal guardian(s) 
shall have resided in Florida for at least one year prior to the time of enroll- 
ment in the College. 

An Out-of -State Student is interpreted to mean one who has lived in 
Florida less than one year prior to the time of enrollment in the College. If 
he is under eighteen years of age, his parent(s) or legal guardian(s) shall 
have lived in Florida less than one year prior to the time of enrollment. 

Residence status is determined at the time of the student's enrollment in 
the College and may not be changed unless, in the case of a minor, his par- 
ent(s) or legal guardian(s) move to and become bonafide residents of Brow- 
ard County and the State of Florida. To change residency status from out 
of state to in state the student's application for reclassification must be ac- 
companied by a certified copy of a declaration of intention to establish 
domicle filed with the clerk of the circuit court. 

49 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

Changes in classification are made effective at the student's next regis- 
tration not retroactively. Legal papers proving guardianship must accompany 
the application. 

Audit 

A student who is approved for auditing a course must agree to attend 
the class regularly and meet all class assignments requested by the instructor. 
A course may be changed from credit to audit. A student may take a course 
previously audited for credit at a later date but he may not petition for 
credit on the basis of the previous audit. 



ACCELERATION MECHANISMS FOR 
PROGRAM COMPLETION 

Several options are available to students to accelerate the completion of 
their programs: Advanced Placement; College Level Examination Program; 
Dual Enrollment; Early Admission; Term Combination; and Waiver of 
Credit for Experience in Technical Areas. 

Advanced Placement 

This College cooperates fully with accredited high schools and colleges 
in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. Credit is given for such courses for grades of 3 or better. 

College Level Examination Program 

Students who score at the fiftieth percentile or above on certain genera) 
or subject examinations administered by the Education Testing Service in its 
College Level Examination Program may be granted up to 30 semester hours 
of credit. Details of the Policy are available from the Registrar's office. 

Dual Enrollment 

Superior high school seniors who lack only a very few courses to 
graduate may be admitted under the following conditions: approval of high 
school principal and guidance director; a grade point average of at least 2.8. 

Early Admission 

Superior high school students who have a grade point average of at 
least 2.8, completed all requirements through the eleventh grade, obtained 
the recommendation of both their high school principal and the guidance 
director, and the approval of the College's director of admissions, may be 
granted early admission to the College contingent upon the completion of 
at least twenty-four (24) semester hours of credit with a grade point average 
of at least 2.0. 

Term Combination 

Through the appropriate use of minimesters (Terms I-A, I-B, II-A, and 
II-B) and the Weekend College in combination with regular terms students 
can shorten the time for completion of degree requirements significantly. 

50 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

Waiver of Credit for Experience in Technical Areas 

Under certain conditions a waiver of credit for previous experience may 
be made in Technical areas. Contact the respective Division for details. 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 

Term System 

The term system is used. The academic year is divided into three terms. 
Terms I and II are approximately seventeen weeks in length and Term III 
approximately twelve weeks. Terms I and II are divided into A and B seg- 
ments of approximately eight weeks each. Thus there are at least six periods 
of enrollment throughout the year. Term III is divided into two parts, Term 
III-A and Term III-B. 

Unit of Credit 

The unit of credit is the semester hour, each representing one hour of 
recitation with two hours of preparation per week for a period of approxi- 
mately seventeen weeks. Generally, two hours of laboratory work count as 
one hour of class work. The schedule in Terms I-A, I-B, II-A, II-B, III-A, 
and III-B is adjusted to include the same time equivalent as is used in the 
longer terms. 

Grades and Records Policy 

A. Final grades for each term are recorded and preserved. Reports are 
submitted to students at the close of the term. 

B. Grade points are earned and recorded as follows: 

Grade Points per 
Semester Hour 

Grades 

A Excellent 4 

B Good 3 

C Average 2 

D Passing 1 

F Failure 

I Incomplete 

W Official Withdrawal 

WP Withdrawal Passing 

WF Withdrawal Failing 

WT Withdrawal-Transferred to another section 

XF Failure-Excessive absences 

X Audit 

NC Non-Credit Course 

*NG No Grade Assigned (for 090 series, 

SPANS and Specialized B.A. 

courses) 

NR Grade not received 

*Only grades of A, B, C, or NG are assigned in 090 series courses, 
SPANS courses, and specialized Business Administration Courses. 

51 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

Grade point averages are calculated only on academic work, exclusive 
of all 080 and 090 series courses, and S.P.A.N.S. courses. 

C. "I" Grades become "F" grades if not completed by the time stated in 
the College Calendar. "I" grades will be awarded only by the approval 
of the Instructor when a student has been unable to complete his work 
because circumstances beyond his control, such as emergencies be- 
cause of death or serious illness. 

D. No student may change a course from credit to audit after the time 
specified in the College Calendar. 

E. Grade point averages are computed on all work attempted at all colleges. 

Scholastic Standards 

A grade average of at least "C" (2.0) is required on all academic work 
attempted to complete certificate and degree programs. 

A student will be placed on academic probation at the end of any term 
that his cumulative grade average becomes less than a "C" grade average. 

A student, after being placed on academic probation, will be placed on 
academic restriction at the end of any term that he becomes 20 or more 
grade points below a "C" grade average. No student will be restricted 
academically at the end of any term in which a term grade point average of 
2.0 is attained. 

Students who return after one term of academic restriction must main- 
tain a 2.0 each term they are 20 or more points below a "2.0" or they 
will be placed on academic restriction for another term. 

Transfer students will be subject to the same academic regulations as 
regular students at the College. 



Cancellation of Previous Unsatisfactory Record 

Under some conditions, a previous unsatisfactory academic record 
which is two or more years old may be cancelled under an established policy 
for students in technical programs. One interested in having this policy ap- 
plied in his case should contact a Counselor and the Dean of Academic 
Affairs for further information and details. 



Academic Honors 

The College recognizes scholastic achievement by publishing the Presi- 
dent's List, the Dean's List, and the Honor Roll at the end of each regular 
term. 

The President's List includes the names of students carrying twelve (12) 
or more semester hours who have a grade point of 4.0. 

The Dean's List includes the names of students carrying twelve (12) or 
more semester hours who have a grade point average of 3.5 to 3.99. 

52 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

The Honor Roll includes the names of students carrying twelve (12) or 
more semester hours who have a grade point average of 3.25 to 3.49. 

Evening Classes 

Broward Community College provides an educational program for peo- 
ple who are unable to attend college during the day. The evening program is 
multipurpose in function. It is designed to offer courses to meet the needs of 
persons who wish to take two years of college work in some area and pause 
in their education at this point. It is also designed to meet the needs of 
persons who wish to increase their proficiencies and broaden their educa- 
tional and cultural backgrounds by taking a course or courses in certain 
areas. 

The policies for admission, registration, graduation, and requirements 
are the same for the evening student as for the day student. For admission 
information please contact the Registrar. 

Correspondence and Extension Courses 

A maximum of 12 semester hours in correspondence and extension 
course credits may be accepted from regionally accredited or recognized col- 
leges and universities. No more than six of the final 1 5 semester hours before 
Graduation may be earned through correspondence. No student will be 
granted a degree from Broward Community College who has earned less 
than 24 semester hours in residence. A regular student must secure permis- 
sion from the Dean of Academic Affairs before registering for a correspon- 
dence and extension course. The combined load of residence and correspon- 
dence study should not exceed eighteen semester hours per regular term. 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program, initiated in the fall of 1968 as a pilot program, 
and inaugurated on a permanent basis in the fall of 1969, is indicative of the 
College's academic endeavors. Designed for students of high academic ex- 
cellence or extraordinary creative potential, the program may consist of 
regular classes, independent study, seminars, or a combination of the several. 

Honors classes incorporate varied forms of instruction. However, since 
continued academic growth depends upon the scrutiny of existing facts and 
philosophies, research is of great importance. Another matter of emphasis 
within the program is discussion, which is, in essence, a cooperative search 
for truth. Still another paramount activity within the program is writing, a 
means in itself of recording, communicating, and creating. Through the 
Honors Program, the student demonstrates his own competence in interpret- 
ing and evaluating within certain fields of knowledge; he does not rely upon 
the instructor to interpret and evaluate for him. 

To be considered for the Honors Program, a student must meet at least 
one of the following criteria: 

A. Have a score of 425 on the Twelfth Grade Placement Test. 

B. Have a score of 90 on the respective subject area of the Twelfth 
Grade Placement Test. 

53 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

C. Be among the top 10% of his high school graduating class. 

D. Have a strong recommendation from a former teacher. 

E. Receive the recommendation of the Honors Program Director. 

F. Apply directly to the Honors Program Director or to the Honors 
Counselor for consideration. 

To remain within the program more than one semester, a student must 
maintain a B average in honors courses. 

Although all honors courses carry the same credit as regular courses, an 
H is affixed to the transcript to indicate honors credit. 

Foreign Studies 

The College, with approval of appropriate State agencies, offers some 
courses abroad in various disciplines with the College's instructors in charge. 

LEARNING RESOURCES 

The Learning Resources Center plays an active part in the teaching- 
learning process within the College by providing a wide range of instruc- 
tional support services to students and members of the college staff. A closed 
circuit television network interconnecting all classrooms on each of the 
college's two campuses is capable of conveying several simultaneous live 
or pre-recorded color TV programs for supplementing classroom instruction. 

The Center is equipped for producing a wide variety of custom made 
instructional materials, including color slides, black and white photographs, 
overhead transparencies, audio, and videotapes. 

Direct service to BCC's students is provided through a Learning Labo- 
ratory on each campus, which provides developmental and enrichment 
materials in various programmed instruction and audiovisual formats. 

GRADUATION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

'^A. Earn at least 60 semester hours of approved credit excluding four 
hours of HPR activity courses which are required for A. A. Degree 
and the number of hours as listed in the College Catalog for the 
A.S. Degree. 

B. Achieve an average grade of "C" (2.0) or above on all work 
attempted, exclusive of the SPANS and 090 courses. 

C. Earn at least 24 semester hours of credit in residence, including the 
last twelve. 

■Students who are 29 years of age or older, or who have had previous mili- 
tary experience, or who are exempted upon medical certification are not 
required to take HPR activity courses. Medical certification must specify 
the term or terms for the exemption. 

54 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

D. Pay graduation fee and participate in the formal graduation. (The 
graduation fee is not refundable.) 

E. Honors are computed on 40 or more academic hours earned at 
Broward Community College. 

F. Hours and grade points earned in 090 series courses will not count 
toward an A. A. Degree, and will not count toward the A.S. Degrees 
unless indicated in the various curricula in this catalog. 

G. A student may graduate either under the catalog under which he 
first enrolled if his attendance has been consecutive, or the one in 
effect at the time of his graduation. If his attendance has been 
broken, he must meet the requirements of the catalog under which 
he reenrolled provided his attendance has been consecutive, or the 
one in effect at the time of his graduation. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE 

(University Parallel) 

*A. Completion of 60 semester hours of academic credit with an overall 
grade point average of at least 2.0 including the required four 
semester hours of physical education activity courses. Excluded are 
080 and 090 series courses and courses especially designed for 
technical education curricula and SPANS courses which carry 
institutional credit. 

B. Completion of the following specific area requirements: 

1. English Composition 6 semester hours 

ENG 101 and 102 or 104 (Required of all students.) 

2. From any two of the following (Humanities) 6 semester hours 
ENG203,204, 205, 206, 207, SPA 205, 206 ART 207 

208,209,210,211,212, FRE 205, 206 DRA 207 
221 , 222, 230, 23 1 , 290, GER 205, 206 MUS 207 or 
PHI 260,263 MUS 203 or 
REL 121, 122, MUS 204 
141, 142, 

205, 240 (only one religion 
course may be 
used) 

3. History and the Social Sciences 6 semester hours 

Select two from any area, either a, b, c, d, or e: 

a. HIS 101, 102 d. PSC 121, 122, or 221 

b. HIS 201, 202 e. ANT 225, SOC 21 1, 212, 221 

c. HIS 111, 112 (any two) 

^Students who are 29 years of age or older, or who have had previous mili- 
tary experience, or who are exempted upon medical certification are not 
required to take HPR activity courses. Medical certification must specify 
the term or terms for exemption. 

55 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

4. Mathematics and Science 9 semester hours 
Mathematics — any three semester hours except 090 series 

courses, courses especially designed for technical edu- 
cation curricula, and Math 106. 

Science — any combination from the following areas: physical 
science, astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, or physics, 
except the 090 series courses and courses especially de- 
signed for technical education curricula. Normally and 
preferably a student should choose a sequence in the same 
discipline consistent with his educational objectives, unless 
a combination best fits his specific educational objectives. 
Many upper divisions require a laboratory science. 

5. From any two of the following 9 semester hours 

Select three (3) courses; two (2) must be from one area, 
a, b, c, d, e, or f 

a. Foreign Language — any combination sequence in a specific 

language at the 100 or 200 course level. Often upper divi- 
sions of senior institutions require at least the intermediate 
level of the language (200 level courses). Most colleges of 
arts and sciences in upper division institutions require 
completion of the intermediate level of a foreign language 
as a part of their lower division program. 

b. Behavioral Science — any combination of the following: 

PSY 101, 201, 202, 211, 212, 221, 238 
SOC 231 

c. ECO 251, 252 

d. SPE 100, 111 

e. GEO 101, 201, 202 

f. Any courses from 2, 3, or 4 above. 

g. MUS 105 and 106 

*6. Physical Education (Activities) 4 semester hours 

(No more than 4 activity courses may be counted toward 
a degree.) 

7. Electives 24 semester hours 

Any combination of courses from the general education 
offerings (Business Administration; Communications; Fine 
Arts; Health, Physical Education and Recreation; Mathe- 
matics and Science; and Social Science) except 080 and 
090 series courses and courses designed especially for 
technical education curricula. The student should give 
careful attention to his major and to the requirements of 
the institution to which he plans to transfer when choosing 
his electives. 

''Students who are 29 years of age or older, or who have had previous mili- 
tary experience, or who are exempted upon medical certification are not 
required to take HPR activity courses. Medical certification must specify 
the term or terms for the exemption. 

56 



General Information 



Academic Affairs, Student Fees 



C. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours of residence as a 
degree seeking student in Broward Community College, including 
the last 12 semester hours. 

D. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Ad- 
visement Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final 
term. The student is responsible for completing all graduation 
requirements. 

E. Removal of all admission conditions. 

F. Attendance at all official graduation exercises. 

Honors At Graduation 

Completion of a minimum of 40 semester hours in Broward Commu- 
nity College is required to be eligible for honors. The calculation of the grade 
point average for honors includes Broward Community College record and 
all previous college work attempted. 

Students who achieve at a high level are accorded honors at graduation 
as follows: 

With honor — a grade point average of 3.250-3.499. 
With high honor — a grade point average of 3.500-3.749. 
With highest honor — a grade point average of 3.750-4.000. 



STUDENT FEES 

Student Fees and Charges 

Fees (Matriculation, tuition, registration and other special course fees) 
are due and payable in full at the Bursar's office, on or before the due date 
assigned at the time of registration. Fee payments received after the assigned 
due date, cannot be processed. Student is required to re-register; as schedule 
is voided when not paid in full by the assigned due date." 

"Postage Paid-Pre-Addressed payment envelopes are available, when 
registering, for payment of fees by mail. Care should be taken by mailing 
payment in sufficient time to be received by the assigned due date. Fee 
schedule will be returned, when address is supplied. 



Non-Credit Courses Fees and Charges 

The College, through the Community Service Office and other aca- 
demic departments, offers non-credit courses, seminars, and workshops 
designed to meet the needs of citizens of all ages who reside in Broward 
County. Special brochures and bulletins are developed and distributed 
covering the specifics of each course. These documents become supplements 
to the official Catalog and contain the fees and special charges associated 
with that course. These fees are due and payable according to the terms 
indicated within these documents. 

57 



General Information 



Academic Affairs, Student Fees 



Terms I, I-A, & I-B, or 

II, II-A, & II-B, or 

III, III-A, & III-B 

Separate Minlmesters I-A, I-B, 
II-A, II-B, III-A, or III-B 

Semester 
Registration Matriculation Tuition Hour 

Florida $12 per semester $ $12 

Students $4.50t hour 

Non-Florida $12 per semester $15 per $27 

Students $4.50t hour semester 

hour 

Note: Matriculation fees include those funds required to support a comprehen- 
sive student activities program. 



STUDENT FEES 

AER Courses: 

Fees for AER courses are not received by the College Business Office 
but are payable directly to the flight contractor. They arc subject to change 
and vary between different flight training contractors. The Aerospace De- 
partment can advise at any given time what the fee is for any course with 
a particular contractor for the current term. For planning purposes fees 
are generally in the following ranges: 

COURSE # APPROXIMATE AMOUNT 

AER 171 $1000-$1100 

AER 292 900- 1100 

AER 293 1000- 1200 

AER 294 1 100- 1700 

AER 233 200- 300 

AER 234 500 minimum 

TER 235 700- 1100 

Full-time/ Part-time 
Student Special Fee 



ART 102- Life Drawing $15 

ART 107 -Design II 5 

ART 151 -Introduction to Graphic Media 5 

ART 152 - Introduction to Three-Dimensional Media 5 

■ART 206 - Crafts, Woods, Metals, and Plastics 5 

ART 211 - Printmaking 20 

ART 212 -Graphic Processes 20 

ART 215 - Photography for Fine Artist 10 

ART 216 -Film Making 10 

ART 221 -Sculpture 5 

ART 280 -Ceramics 20 

BA 190, 290 -Real Estate 5 

BA 217 - Procedures for Real Estate Title Closing 2 

58 



General Information 



Academic Affairs, Student Fees 



Full-time/ Part-time 
Student Special Fee 



BIO 105 -Modern Principles of Biology Lab 7 

BIO 107 -Audio-Tutorial Biology 7 

BIO 117- Paramedical Science II Lab 7 

BIO 151 -General Botany Lab 7 

BIO 161 -General Zoology Lab 7 

BIO 251 - Principles of Marine Biology Lab 7 

CEB 024 - Principles of Real Estate 5 

CHE 108 - Chemistry for General Education Lab 5 

CHE 134 -General Chemistry Lab 10 
CHE 135 -General Chemistry and Qualitative 

Analysis Lab 10 

CHE 223 -Organic Chemistry Lab 15 

CHE 224 - Organic Chemistry Lab 15 

DA 174 -Clinical Practices and Procedures 10 

DA 176 -Clinical Practices and Procedures II 10 

DA 1 80- Allied Dentai Theory 5 

DA 187 - Dental Materials 10 

EL 100- Direct Circuits 5 

EL 104 - Alternating Current Circuits 5 

EL 106 -Active Electronic Devices 5 

EL 209 - Transistors 5 

EL 21 1 - Communications 1 5 

EL 213 -Digital Systems 5 

EL 216 - Semi-Conductors 5 

EL 219 -Computers I 10 

EL 220 - Computers II 5 

EL 223 - Applied Circuit Analysis Lab 5 

RDG 093 - Reading Communications 5 

RDG 105 - Advanced Developmental Reading 5 

ENG 207 - The Film as Literature 8 

ERE 101 -French Language Lab 5 

ERE 102 -French Language Lab 5 

PRE 1 1 1 - French Language Lab 5 

FRE 211 -French Language Lab 5 

GER 101 -German Language Lab 5 

GER 102 - German Language Lab 5 

GER 1 1 1 - German Language Lab 5 

GER 211 -German Language Lab 5 

GY 106 -Physical Geology Lab 7 

GY 109 -Florida Geology Lab 5 

GY 1 1 1 - Historical Geology Lab 5 

HPR -Towel fee for the following HPR courses: 2 
101, 102, 105, 107, 108, 109, 110, 112, 113, 114, 
115, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125. 
128, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 139, 140, 
143, 144, 148, 201, 205, 208, 210, 214, 220, 225, 
236, 239, 240, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248 

HPR 101, 201 -Archery 3 

HPR 104, 204 -Bowling 18 

HPR 111 - Horsemanship 60 

HPR 138 -Skeet and Trap Shooting 40 

HPR 246 -Scuba Diving 35 

ITA 1 1 1 - Italian Language Lab 5 



59 



General Information 



Academic Affairs, Student Fees 



MA 210 -Basic Medical Lab Techniques 

MA 220 - Clinical Practices and Procedures 

MLT 290 - Basic Instrumentation 

MLT 292 - Advanced Medical Lab Techniques 

MPA 216 -Motion Picture Production I 

MPA 217 -Motion Picture Production II 

MPA 218 -Motion Picture Workshop 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Voice 

MUS 141, 151 

MUS 161, 171,181. 191 

MUS 241, 251 

MUS 261, 271, 281. 291 

Piano 

MUS 142, 152 

MUS 162, 172, 182. 192 

MUS 242, 252 

MUS 262, 272, 282, 292 

Organ 

MUS 143, 153 

MUS 163, 173, 183. 193 

MUS 243, 253 

MUS 263. 273. 283, 293 

Woodwinds 

MUS 144, 154 

MUS 164, 174, 184. 194 

MUS 244, 254 

MUS 264, 274, 284, 294 

Brass 

MUS 145, 155 

MUS 165, 175. 185. 195 

MUS 245, 255 

MUS 265, 275, 285, 295 

Percussion 

MUS 146, 156 
MUS 166, 176, 186. 196 
MUS 246. 256 ! 

MUS 266. 276, 286. 296 

Strings 

MUS 147. 148. 157, 158 

MUS 167. 168. 177. 178. 187. 188. 197. 198 

MUS 247, 248. 257, 258 

MUS 267, 268, 277, 278. 287. 288. 297. 298 

Accordion 

MUS 149, 159, 249, 259 

MUS 169, 179, 189, 199, 269, 279. 289. 299 

NUR 171 -Nursing 



Full-time/ Part-time 
Student Special Fee 

10 

5 

5 
10 
20 
20 
20 



36 

72 
36 

72 



36 

72 
36 

72 



36 

72 
36 

72 



36 

72 
36 

72 



36 

72 
36 

72 



36 

72 
36 
72 



36 

72 
36 

72 



36 

72 
5 



60 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 



Full-time/ Part-time 
Student Special Fee 



NUR 172 -Nursing 


5 


NUR 297 -Nursing 


3 


PHY 131, 203, 204, 212, 213 -Physics Lab 


2 


POL 211 - Criminal Investigation II 


5 


POL 212 - Crime Scene Processing I 


5 


POL 213 -Crime Scene Processing II 


5 


SCI 103 - Physical Science Lab 


3 


RUS 101, 102 -Russian Language Lab 


5 


SPA 101 -Spanish Language Lab 


5 


SPA 102 -Spanish Language Lab 


5 


SPA 1 1 1 - Spanish Language Lab 


5 


SPA 211 -Spanish Language Lab 


5 


XR 100 - Introduction to Radiologic Technology 


2 


XR 101 -Dental Radiology 


5 


XR 105 -Radiologic Science 


5 


XR 120 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure 


10 


XR 210 - Positioning and Special Procedures 


5 


Miscellaneous Fees (Not Refundable): 




Add 


3 


Drop (Initiated by student) 


None 


*Drop (Administrative withdrawal) 


5 


AppHcation 


10 


'''Checks returned and not honored 


5 


Duplicate Fee Card (Except when completely 




withdrawing from all College classes) 


I 


Graduation 


4 


*Fines, lost books, and reprocessing books 


As required 


Lost HPR locks 


0.85 


Lost HPR Towels 


Per curren* years contract 


Parking decal (over first two) 


0.50 


^Traffic violation 




1st violation 


1 


2nd violation 


3 


3rd violation 


5 



Special fees are charged in certain courses to cover the cost of use of special 
supplies, materials, equipment, or facilities; such fees are listed in the 
Registration Handbook each term. 

Waiver of Credit for Previous Training or Experience: 

Per hour waived 1 

CLEP (for each separate report from ETS 

when credit is granted) 5 

Advanced Placement (for each separate report 

from ETS when credit is granted) 5 

*Student must pay fine prior to any subsequent registration or prior to 
release of his/her records. 



61 



General Information 



Academic Affairs, Refund Policies, Library 

REFUND POLICIES 



1. Under the following conditions a student may receive 100% refund of 
matriculation, tuition, and laboratory fees, or as otherwise indicated: 

a. Through the last day preceding the commencement of classes in a 
term established in the College Calendar, a student who registers in 
advance through on-line registration procedures. 

b. At the time he is administratively withdrawn, a student who registered 
and it is later determined he was not eligible to register for academic 
reasons. 

c. A student who registers for a particular course which is cancelled 
(refund of fees paid for that course.) 

d. A student entering the Armed Forces on a regular and extended tour 
of active duty. (Student must present an official copy of his Armed 
Forces orders to the Registrar to receive refund.) 

e. A student who dies or who withdraws for health or medical reasons, 
as certified by a licensed medical doctor, on or before the date of the 
first scheduled class of a college term. (Parents, legal guardians, ex- 
ecutors of estates or trustee of trust fund may receive refund.) 

2. A 100% refund of the $4.50 registration fee will be made to those stu- 
dents registering for 12 or more semester hours and who have paid this 
fee but who officially drop below 12 semester hours by the end of the 
scheduled drop and add period for that semester. 

3. Under the following conditions a student may receive an 80% refund of 
matriculation, tuition, and laboratory fees: 

a. A student who is officially withdrawn from the College on or before 
the last date listed in the College calendar for withdrawing with such 
refund. 

b. A student who has attended classes in a given College term and who 
dies or withdraws for health or medical reasons, as certified by a 
licensed medical doctor, before the middle of that term. (Parents, 
legal guardian, executor of estate, or trustee of trust fund may request 
and receive refund.) 

To be withdrawn officially from the College, a student must have completed 
the proper forms as prescribed by the Registrar on or before the designated 
date. 



LIBRARY 

Trained professional librarians with many years of college and univer- 
sity library experience are available and eager to assist students at all times 
the libraries are open. A somewhat formal atmosphere of individual academic 
research is maintained in the reading rooms which house the principal book 
collections on shelves open to students. Hours, regulations, and policies 
which affect students are published in the Student Handbook each year. 

62 



General Information 
Academic Affairs 

The Library Staffs encourage students and faculty to make suggestions 
for the improvement of service to the college community and also appreciate 
recommendations for titles of books to be added to the collection. 

The Central Campus Library is conveniently located in the center of the 
campus. It has a book collection of 82,000 volumes and about 5,000 are 
being added each year. In addition there are subscriptions to about 450 
periodicals. 

The Library at the North Campus is, like that on the Central Campus, 
located in close proximity to the classrooms, offices, and student center. This 
library has 23,000 volumes and will be expanded rapidly to equal in size 
and resources that of the Central Campus. Students have access to the col- 
lections of both campuses. Construction of the first phase of the permanent 
library complex was recently completed. 

The Library at the South Campus is in the process of being developed 
and 7,500 current volumes have been cataloged for this library. It, too, will 
be expanded rapidly to equal in size and resources that of the Central 
Campus. 

Broward Community College Library is a member of the Southeastern 
Library Network (SOLINET) and most of the centralized technical process- 
ing of library materials done at the College makes use of the features of 
this automated system. 

Books and magazines at each campus are selected by the faculty and 
library staffs located there, and they reflect primarily the courses of instruc- 
tion given at each campus. 



63 



m 



GENERAL 
EDUCATION 



Curricula and Courses 




.. , , '■«V,-i^-T",v^-^ 



General Education 
Business Administration 

Suggested Programs in 
General Education Curriculum 

The student who follows any one of the SUGGESTED programs out- 
lined on the succeeding pages will earn a degree at BCC and will meet the 
appropriate general education requirements of most upper division colleges. 
He would be wise to familiarize himself with the special requirements of the 
particular college to which he may choose to transfer. 

Student and Advisors are reminded that Developmental Reading and/ 
or 090 level courses are suggested for all individuals who may profit from 
these courses. When signing up, students may consider lightening the re- 
mainder of the study load for that term. 

This section contains A. A., A.S., and Certificate programs in the follow- 
ing Academic Divisions. 

Division of Business Administration and Economics 

Division of Communications 

Division of Humanities 

Division of Health, Physical Education, 

and Recreation 

Division of Mathematics and Science 

Division of Social Sciences 



DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Business La^ 

Economics 

Fashion Merchandising 

Insurance 

Marketing - Management 

Real Estate 

Secretarial Science 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Education for business prepares the student vocationally and helps to 
develop the social and economic attitudes which are essential in establishing 
the future success of American youth in our democratic economic system. It 
offers a knowledge and understanding of business and business methods, a 
competency in skills, and the development of character and personality that 
will help the student cope with our changing economy. 

The business administration programs are divided into three groups: 

(1) Suggested programs leading to an Associate in Arts Degree which 
cover the first two years of a four-year university program leading 
to a Bachelor's Degree. 

67 



General Education 
Associate in Arts 

(2) Suggested special programs leading to an Associate in Science 
Degree which help develop and improve skills and offers specialized 
courses enabling the student to enter business. 

(3) Specialized programs for which certificates are granted. Special 
programs may be developed for students with specific requirements. 

Day and evening classes are offered for the convenience of the student 
for entering a specialized field of employment. The employed student can 
select courses to attain higher proficiency in an area of study. 



PROGRAMS LEADING TO AN ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(A.A. Degree) 

(Must meet General Education requirements set forth on page 55 of this 
catalog) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101-Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104-Composition 3 

*BA 113, 114, 115-Basic Typing. BA 231 -Business Law I 3 

Parts, 1, 2, 3 or **Science 3 or 4 

DP 101 Fundamentals of Data -**Math 3 

Processing 3 HPR-Physical Education 1 

BA 100-Intro. to Business 3 

Humanities 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13-14 



Term IH-A or III-B 

Science 3 or 4** 

Humanities 3 

Total Semester Hours 6-7 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BA 245-Bus. of Communications 3 BA 222-Prin. of Accounting II 3 

BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 3 ECO 252-Prin. of Economics II 3 

ECO 251-Prin. of Economics 13 SPE 100 3 

Social Science 3 Elective# 3 

STA 221 Statistics 3 Social Science 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 

''^Students with credit for high school typing should take DP 101. Students 
taking Basic Typing should concurrently enroll in BA 113, 114, 115. 
**Many upper division colleges require a laboratory science. 
***Most upper division colleges recommend MTH 132 College Algebra and 

the Division of Business Admin, recommends MTH 133. 
# Accounting and Finance majors should elect BA 232 Business Law II. 

68 



General Education 

Administrative Systems, 
Business Education 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION— ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEMS 

(A.A. Degree) 

(Must meet General Education requirements set forth on page 55 of this 
catalog) 

Only students planning on transferring to Florida Atlantic University with a 
major in Administrative Systems should follow this program. 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 

DP 101 Fund, of Data 

Processing 3 

BA 100 Intro, to Business 3 

Humanities 3 

HPR-Physical Education I 

Total Semester Hours 13 



Second Term 
ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

BA 231 Business Law I 3 

^Science 3 or 4 

MTH 132 College Algebra 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 or 14 



Term III-A or IIl-B 

*Science 3 or 4 

Humanities 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 or 7 



SECOND 

First Term 
BA 221 Prin. of Accounting 13 
ECO 251 Prin. of Economics I 3 

Social Science 3 

STA 221 Statistics 3 

DP 105 Computer 

Programming I 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



YEAR 

Second Term 
BA 222 Prin. of Accounting U 
ECO 252 Prin. of Economics II 
SPE 100 
Social Science 
DP 221 Systems Dev. and 

Design 

HPR-Physical Education 

Total Semester Hours 



3 

3 

3 

.3 

.3 
.1 
16 



*Many upper divisions require a Laboratory Science. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR BUSINESS EDUCATION 

(A.A. Degree) 

(Must meet General Education requirements set forth on page 55 of this 
catalog) 

FIRST 

First Term 

Humanities 3 

ENG 101-Composition 3 

Social Science 3 

*BA 118, 119, 120-Intermediate 

Typing, Parts 4-6 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 13 



YEAR 

Second Term 
ENG 102- or 104-Composition 3 

Social Science 3 

*BA 112-Shorthand II 3 

BA 202, 203, 204-Expert 

Typing, Parts 7-9 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Mathematics 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Term IH-A or HI-B 

****Science 3 or 4 

Humanities 3 

Total Semester Hours 6-7 



69 



General Education 
Marketing — Management 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

=^***Science 3-4 

BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 3 
ECO 251-Prin. of Economics 13 

**BA 211 -Shorthand III 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 



Second Term 
BA 245-Bus. Communications 3 
BA 247-Business Machines 3 

BA 222-Prin. of Accounting 3 

ECO 252-Prin. of Economics II 3 

***SPE 100 or PSY 201 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13-14 Total Semester Hours 16 

■A student not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying 
course(s). A student taking Intermediate Typing may concurrently enroll 
in BA 118, 119, 120. A student who had two years of high school 
typing and/ or shorthand may be exempted (without credit) from taking 
BA 118-120 and/ or BA 112. Shorthand is not required for "broad 
field" teacher certification. 

^Not to be taken before first term of second year. 
'Students transferring to FAU should take SPE 100. 
'Many upper division colleges require a laboratory science. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR MARKETING-MANAGEMENT 

(A.A. Degree) 
(Must meet General Education requirements set forth on page 55 of this 
catalog) 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

ENG 101-Composition 

^'MTH 1 3 2-Con temporary College 
Algebra 

173-SEMINAR I: Marketing 
in Perspective 

170-Marketing 

HPR-Physical Education 

Total Semester Hours 



BA 



BA 



Second Term 

ENG 102 or 104-Composition 3 

**Science 3-4 

**STA 221 -Elementary Statistics 3 

BA 283-SEMINAR II: Research 

in Marketing 
BA 130-SaIesmanship 
HPR-Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



.3 
.3 
I 
16-17 



Term III-A or III-B 

***Science 3-4 

DP 101-Fund. Data Processing 3 

Total Semester Hours 6-7 

SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 3 
ECO 251 -Economics I 3 

BA 284-SEMINAR III: 

Marketing Management .3 

Social Science 3 

Humanities 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Second Term 
BA 222-Prin. of Accounting II 3 

ECO 252-Economics II 3 

Humanities 3 

Social Science 3 

SPE 100 or PSY 201 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



^Students who plan to enter FAU's DE Program may take MTH 100. 
**Students who plan to enter FAU's DE Program may take an elective — 

BA 171, BA 271. 
**Many upper division colleges require a laboratory Science. 



70 



General Education 

Secretarial Science 

Associate in Science 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR SECRETARIAL SCIENCE:^: 

(A.A. Degree) 

(Must meet General Education requirements set forth on page 55 of tliis 



catalog) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term 

ENG 101-Composition 3 

Social Science 3 
^=BA 118, 119, 120-Intermediate 

Typing, Parts 4-6 3 

BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 



Second Term 
or 104-Composition 



Total Semester Hours 



13 



ENG 102 

Mathematics 

Social Science 

BA 112-Shorthand II 

BA 202, 203, 204-Expert 

Typing, Parts 7-9 
HPR-Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

1 

16 



Term III-A or lU-B 

**Science 3-4 

Humanities 3 

Total Semester Hours 6-7 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

**Science 3-4 ECO 252-Prin. of Economics II 3 

ECO 251-Prin. of Economics I 3 BA 244-Secretarial Procedures 3 

BA 245-Bus. Communications 3 BA 242-Transcribing Machines 3 

BA 211 -Shorthand III 3 Humanities 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 PSY 201 or SPE 100 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13-14 Total Semester Hours 16 

# Not to be confused with specialized secretarial programs. 

'■'A student not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying course(s). 
Students taking Intermediate Typing may concurrently enroll in BA 1 18, 
119, 120. A student who had two years of high school typing and/ or 
shorthand may be exempted (without credit) from taking BA 118-120 
and/ or BA 112. 

*'*Many upper division colleges require a laboratory science. 

PROGRAMS LEADING TO AN ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE 
ACCOUNTING PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101-English Composition 3 ENG 103-104-Composition 3 

*BA 113. 114, 115-Basic DP 101-Fundamentals of Data 

Typing, Parts 1, 2, 3 3 Processing 3 

BA 150-Business Math 3 ECO 251 -Economics 3 

BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 3 BA 222-Prin. of Accounting II 3 

BA 231-Business Law I 3 BA 232-Business Law II 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 



71 



General Education 
Airline Careers 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BA 223-Intmd. Accounting 3 BA 225-Cost Accounting .3 

BA 226-Prin. of Finance 3 BA 245-Bus. Communications 3 

BA 227-Income Tax 3 BA 247-Business Machines 3 

ECO 252-Principles of BA 132-General Insurance 3 

Economics II 3 DP 102-Data Preparation 

'^'■'Elective in business 3 Equipment 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 HPR-Physical Education I 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 

MVIay be exempt (without credit) if student had one year of high school 
typing with a minimum grade of "C." 
■*Business electives to be selected from: BA 100, BA 170; BA 260 and 
BA 262. 



AIRLINE CAREERS 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

This program is planned for those students who wish to pursue a career 
with an airline company as flight attendant, secretary, or other office posi- 
tions. Completion of this course does not insure that such a position can be 
obtained. 

The purpose of the program is threefold: to encourage high school 
students who want to be flight attendants to attend college until they are 
old enough to qualify for this job; to provide them with better qualifications 
for securing such a job by requiring more general education and/ or liberal 
arts courses than are required in the business programs currently offered; 
and to offer them an opportunity to obtain an employable skill in business 
in the event they do not meet qualifications required by the airlines. 

1. Completion of 64 semester hours of credit and a grade point average of 
2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: (27 semes- 
ter hours) 

ENG 101 or ENG 095-English Composition 3 

ENG 102, 103 or 104-Composition 3 

HIS 111-The Two Americas, 1492-1830 3 

HIS 1 12-The Two Americas, 1830-Present 3 

SOC 21 1 -General Sociology 3 

SPE lOO-Intro. toSpeech 3 

PSY 100 or PSY 101 -Psychology 3 

PSY 201-General Psychology 3 

MTH 100-Gen. Ed. College Math 3 

3. Completion of a minimum of 18 semester hours of business from the 
following courses: 

BA 1 00; BA 113-115, BA 118-1 20, BA 202-204; BA 1 1 1 or BA 1 54: 
BA 112 or BA 155; BA 211; BA 105; BA 108; BA 121, BA 122 
or BA 221, BA 222; BA 242, BA 243; BA 244; BA 245; BA 247. 

72 



General Education 
Banking Program 

4. Completion of a minimum of 15 semester hours from the following 
areas: Business, Data Processing, or Languages. 

5. Completion of four semester hours of Physical Education activities. 

6. Students should consult the Department Head of Secretarial Science 
before enrolling for this degree. 

BANKING CAREER PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

(In cooperation witli the Broward County Chapter of the American 
Institute of Banking) 

The American Institute of Banking, as part of the American Bankers 
Association, is a national educational organization providing career-related 
educational opportunities to chapter-member bank employees. It awards 
Basic, Standard, Advanced, and General Certificates to Students. A student 
following this program may earn his A.S. Degree in addition to receiving 
these A.I.B. Certificates. 

1 . A grade point average of 2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following Foundations of Banking Courses: 
BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 

or BA 121-Accounting Survey I 3 

BA 222-Prin. of Accounting II 

or BA 122-Accounting Survey II 3 

BA 228-Analyzing Financial Statements 3 

BA 100-Introduction to Business 3 

BA 226-Prin. of Finance 3 

*BA 150-Business Mathematics 

DP 101 -Fundamentals of Data Processing 3 

BA 231-Business Law I 3 

ECO 254-Money and Banking 3 

BA 180-Principles of Bank Operations 3 

ECO 251-Prin. of Economics I 3 

Semester Hours 30 

3. Completion of the following Banking Functions Courses: 
■'BA 272-Bank Investments 

BA 182-Bank Public Relations & Marketing 3 

'^BA 257-Credit Administration 

or BA 228-Analyzing Financial Statements 
'•'BA 270-Federal Reserve System 
BA 255-Home Mortgage Lending 

or BA 256-Installment Credit 3 

BA 254-International Banking 3 

'■'BA 273-Savings and Time Deposit Banking 
BA 258-Trust Department Organization 

or BA 259-Trust Department Services 3 

Semester Hours 12 

'''Not required for the A.S Degree. 

73 



General Education 
Banking Program 

4. Completion of the following Management and Supervision Courses: 
BA 181-Bank Management 3 
BA 262-Prin. of Supervision 3 

•BA 264-Personnei Administration 

Semester Hours 6 

5. Compieton of the following Language and Communications Courses: 
BA 245-Business Communications 3 
ENG 101 -Composition 3 

Semester Hours 6 

6. Completion of the following General-Elective Courses: 

PSY 100-Human Relations in Business and Industry 3 

BA 240-Current Business Practices 3 

Semester Hours 6 

7. Completion of 4 semester hours of 

physical education activities 4 

Total Semester Hours for A.S. Degree 64 

8. Alternative electives for students who have completed any of the above 
courses without receiving credit from an accredited institution: 

BA I 1 1, BA 1 13, BA 1 14, BA 115, BA 130, BA 150, BA 170, BA 171, 
BA 223, BA 224, BA 225, BA 227, BA 247, BA 260, BA 261, BA 270, 
BA 271, BA 272, BA 273, BA 290. 



AIB CERTIFICATES REQUIREMENTS 

The American Institute of Banking offers four certificates, each of 
which represents a different level of academic achievement. They are: Basic, 
Standard, Advanced, and General. 

Basic Certificate Semester Hours 

!. BA 180 **Principles of Bank Operations 3 

2. ECO 251 Principles of Economics I 3 

3. Select one course from Foundation of Banking Courses 3 

4. ENG 101 Composition 3 

5. *One General-Elective Course 3 

Total Semester Hours 15 

Standard Certificate 

The Standard Certificate requires an additionar 21 semester hours 

beyond the Basic Certificate, which is prerequisite. 

These credits must be distributed within the content areas as follows: 
i. Foundations of Banking: 

BA 1 21 -Survey of Accounting I 

or BA 221-Principles of Accounting I 3 

ECO 254-Money and Banking 3 

2. Banking Functions 3 

3. Management and Supervision 3 

4. Language and Communications 3 

5. ''General Electives 6 

Total Semester Hours 21 

"Not required for the A.S. Degree. 

74 



General Education 
Fashion Merchandising 

Advanced Certificate 

The Advanced Certificate requires 30 semester hours beyond the Stan- 
dard Certificate, which is a prerequisite. Since the only required course is 
BA 181-Bank Management, the student has considerable latitude in choosing 
courses. The distribution within the content areas must be: 

1. Foundations of Banking 3 

2. Banking Functions 12 

3. Management and Supervision 

(BA 181-Bank Management required) 6 

4. 'General Electives 9 

Total Semester Hours 30 

General Certificate 

The General Certificate is based primarily on the accumulation of 
credits since there are no required courses. 

In order to earn this certificate, a student must earn 36 semester hours 
of credit. 

For more details concerning the General Certificate the student should 
consult an AIB Governor or the AIB Educational Director. 

•Credits taken in excess of the minimum number required under the four 
principal content areas may apply to the General-Elective area for The 
Basic, Standard, Advanced or General Certificate. 
**Savings and Time Deposit Banking or Trust Functions and Services may 
be used as alternates for students in savings and trust banking. 



FASHION MERCHANDISING 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

This program is a combination of campus instruction and practical 
work experience in a related fashion merchandising position in the com- 
munity. Through individual instruction, the student develops a better com- 
prehension of self and his or her ability to identify with the fashion world. 
The goal of Broward Community College is to graduate a student educated 
in the fashion merchandising field and capable of assuming management 
responsibilities. Each student should be employed part-time while enrolled 
in the program. Students are responsible for finding their own employment. 
CWS credit may not be substituted for BA 173, BA 283, and BA 284. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 095 or 101 3 BA 170-Marketing 3 

BA 130-Salesmanship 3 BA 144-Textiles 3 

BA 135-Fashion Merchandising 3 BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I or 

BA 173-Seminar I: Marketing BA 121 -Accounting Survey I 3 

in Perspective 3 BA 283-Seminar II: Research 

HPR-Physical Education 1 in Marketing 3 

Business Elective 3 HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 13 

75 



General Education 

Home Furnishing Marketing 

Term III-A or III-B 

SPE 100-Introductory Speech 3 

Business Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BA 171-Advertising 3 BA 271 -Merchandising 3 

BA 172-VisuaI Merchandising 3 BA 262-Principles of 

ECO 251-Prin. of Economics I 3 Supervision 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 BA 231-Business Law I 3 

Elective 3 BA 284-Seminar III: Marketing 

Management 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 16 



HOME FURNISHING MARKETING 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 



First Term 
174-Home Furnishings 
Marketing I: 
Interior Decoration 

ENG 095 or 101 

101-Beginning Drawing 
173-Marketing Seminar 

HPR-Physical Education 

Elective 

Total Semester Hours 



BA 



ART 
BA 



FIRST YEAR 

Second Term 
287-Home Furnishings 
Marketing II: 
Furniture Selection 3 

130-Salesmanship 3 

283-Marketing Seminar .3 

144-Textiles 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 



3 
.3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
16 



BA 



BA 
BA 
BA 



Term III-A or III-B 

BA 170-Marketing 3 

ENG 103 or 104 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BA 288-Home Furnishings BA 172-Visual Merchandising .3 

Marketing III: BA 271 -Merchandising 3 

Window Treatment, ART 210-Interior Design 3 

Accessorizing and ART 107-Design II 3 

Commercial Decoration 3 HPR-Physical Education 1 

BA 284-Marketing Seminar 3 

BA 121 or 221 -Accounting 3 

ART 106-Design I 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours .13 

ELECTIVES: ART 208, BA 150, BA 140, BA 231, BA 100, BA 205, BA 171, 
CWS 101, CWS 102, ECO 251 



76 



General Education 

General Business Program, 
Insurance Careers Program 

GENERAL BUSINESS PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 095 or 101 3 ENG 103 or 104 3 

Social Science BA 170-Principles of Marketing 3 

(PSC 121, HIS 101, HIS PSY 100-Human Relations 3 

111, or HIS 230) 3 BA 140-Personal Finance 3 

"BA 113, 114, 115-Basic Business Elective 3 

Typing, Parts 1, 2, 3 3 HPR-Physical Education 1 
BA 100-Intro. to Business 3 

BA 150-Business Math 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 



Term III-A or III-B 

BA 231 -Business Law I 3 

Business Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BA 227-Income Tax 3 BA 261-Office Management or 

BA 247-Business Machines 3 BA 262-Prin. of Supervision 3 

BA 121-Accounting Survey I or DP 101 or 102 3 

BA 221-Frin. of Accounting 13 BA 245-Bus. Communications 3 

BA 232-Business Law II 3 BA 122- Accounting Survey II or 

HPR-Physical Education 1 BA 222-Prin. of Accounting II .3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 

^Students who have successfully completed one year of typing in high school 
should take BA 118, 119, 120 Intermediate Typing, Parts 4, 5, 6 during 
Term I. 



INSURANCE CAREERS PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

This program is designed for students interested in insurance sales, 
adjusting, underwriting, or management; and it allows, but does not require, 
specialization in either property or life insurance. 

1 . Completion of 64 semester hours of credit with a grade-point average 
of 2.0 or better. 

2. The residence requirement consists of twenty-four semester hours at 
Brovs^ard Community College which must include the last twelve 
semester hours. 



77 



General Education 
Insurance Program 

3. Core courses for the Insurance Programs; 

ENG 095 or 101 Composition 3 

ENG 103 Technical Report Writing or 

ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

SPE 100 Speech or BA 245 Business Communications 3 

BA 132 General Insurance 3 

PSY 100 Human Relations or PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

MTH 100, 131, or 132, or BA 150 Business Math 3 

Physical Education Activities 4 

'■'Business or Economics Electives 12 

Semester Hours 34 

'Business or Economic Electives to be selected from: BA 112, BA 130, 
BA 170, BA 190, BA 211, BA 221, BA 222, BA 231, BA 232, BA 247, 
BA 260, ECO 251, ECO 252, ECO 254, and ECO 256. Three semester 
hours credit may be selected from the following: BA 118, BA 119, 
BA 120 or BA 202, BA 203, or BA 204. 

4. In addition to the core courses, the student must complete 30 semester 
hours of insurance courses according to the program selected in ^5. 
Not more than 9 semester hours toward the 30-hour requirement may 
be satisfied by substituting the specified Business or Economics Courses 
for the designated Insurance Professional Examination Preparation 
Courses: 

BA 222, BA 226 and BA 260 may be substituted for INS 228 and INS 
229. BA 222 and BA 226 may be substituted for INS 235. ECO 251 
and ECO 252 may be substituted for INS 234. ECO 251, ECO 252, 
and either PSC 121, PSC 122, or HIS 230 may be substituted for INS 
224 and INS 225. 

5. Each student should select one of the following programs: 

A. General Insurance Program 

Core courses 34 

Insurance electives 30 

Total Semester Hours 64 

B. Insurance Solicitors Program 

Students interested in preparing for the Insurance Solicitors License 
Exam should take: 

Core courses 34 

*INS 199 Solicitor's Qualification Course I 3 

*INS 200 Solicitor's Qualification Course II 4 

Insurance Electives 23 

See your advisor or department head regarding property and casualty 
electives to be chosen to meet Chapter 626, Florida Statutes, Agents' 
Requirement. 

Total Semester Hours 64 

*Concurrent enrollment in INS 199 and INS 200 is required. 

78 



General Education 
Insurance Program 

C. Agents Qualification Program 

Students interested in meeting the educational course requirements 
under Chapter 626, Florida Statutes (Fire and Casualty Insurance 
Agents and Solicitors Qualification Law), should take the following 
courses: 

Core courses 34 

'*\NS 201 Agents and Solicitors Course I 3 

■'INS 202 Agents and Solicitors Course II 3 

'^INS 203 Agents and Solicitors Course III 3 

■^'INS 204 Agents and Solicitors Course IV 3 

'^INS 205 Agents and Solicitors Course V 5 

Electives — Any other Insurance courses 13 

Total Semester Hours 64 

'Students taking this option must enroll for the entire 17-hour 
sequence at the time of selecting this option. The courses will 
consist of 255 hours of instruction. No refund will be given after 
first class meeting. No credit will be granted until the concurrent 
enrollment is completed. 



Note zp 1: The Insurance Department recommends that students who 
have not had general insurance agencv or company experience 
take BA 132 prior to enrolling in the Agents Qualification 
Program. 



Note ^ 2; Students can fulfill the educational requirements for the 2-20 
License by taking the following courses: 
'■'INS 201 Agents and Solicitors Course i 3 

''INS 202 Agents and Solicitors Course II 3 

'•'INS 203 Agents and Solicitors Course III 3 

'■'INS 204 Agents and Solicitors Course IV 3 

'"INS 205 Agents and Solicitors Course V 5 

'•'Students taking this option must enroll for the entire 17-hour 
sequence at the time of selecting this option. The courses will 
consist of 255 hours of instruction. No refund will be given 
after first class meeting. No credit will be granted until the 
concurrent enrollment is completed. 



Note :^ 3: Well-qualified students, preferably with general insurance 
agency or company experience, can fulfill the educational re- 
quirements for the 2-20 License by the following alternate plan: 

Required Courses Semester Hours Credit 

INS 261 Principles of Risk and Insurance 3 

INS 262 Property and Marine Insurance 3 

INS 263 Casualty, Health and Life Insurance 3 

Required credits 9 

79 



General Education 
Insurance Program 

Electives: (Minimum of 6 semester hours) 
INS 268 Structure of Risk Management 

Process 3 

INS 269 Risk Control 3 

*INS 220 Insurance Principles and Practices I 3 

'■'INS 221 Insurance Principles and Practices II 4 

*='INS 222 Analysis of Insurance Functions I 3 

**INS 223 Analysis of Insurance Functions II 4 

Electives 6-8 

Total Hours Required 15-17 

D. Students interested in life insurance sales and marketing should 
take the following courses offered in cooperation with the Broward 
County Association of Life Underwriters. The National Under- 
writing Training Council is a national educational organization 
providing career-related educational opportunities to member life 
insurance company employees. Upon successful completion of these 
four courses the Council will award the Diploma in Life Insurance 
Marketing and upon successful completion of each of these LUTC 
courses a certificate is awarded. 

Core Courses 34 

INS 191 Personal Life Insurance Marketing 4 

INS 192 Business Life Insurance Marketing 4 

INS 193 Disability Income Marketing 2 

INS 194 Equities Marketing 2 

Insurance Electives 18 

Total Semester Hours 64 

E. Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriter Program 
Students interested in property and casualty insurance should take 
the following courses. Successful completion of these courses will 
entitle him to apply for the different CPCU examinations and, if 
successful, receive the CPCU designation: 

'''Core Courses 29* 

''INS 220 Insurance Principles and Practices I 3 

'■'INS 221 Insurance Principles and Practices II 4 

'•"^INS 222 Analysis of Insurance Functions I 3 

'■"^INS 223 Analysis of Insurance Functions II 4 

'•"^'"'INS 224 Economics, Government and Business I 3 

'■"^"^'INS 225 Economics, Government and Business II 4 

^•*INS 226 Insurance and Business Law I 3 

^"'INS 227 Insurance and Business Law II 4 

^■^INS 228 Management, Accounting and Finance I 3 

•"^INS 229 Management, Accounting and Finance II 4 

Total Semester Hours 64 

'^Business or Economics Electives will be reduced to 7 Semester Hours. 

'^Concurrent enrollment in INS 220 and INS 221 required. 
* '-'Concurrent enrollment in INS 222 and INS 223 required. 
'""Concurrent enrollment in INS 224 and INS 225 required. 

80 



General Education 
Management Program 

-* •^•Concurrent enrollment in INS 226 and INS 227 required. 
'"^***Concurrent enrollment in INS 228 and INS 229 required. 

Note :^ 1: No credit will be granted until the concurrent enrollment is 
completed. 
F. Chartered Life Underwriter Program 

Students interested in life insurance should take the following 
courses. Successful completion of these ocurses will entitle him to 
apply for the different C.L.U. examinations and, if successful, 
receive the C.L.U. designation. 

Core courses 34 

INS 231 Economic Security and Individual Life Ins 3 

INS 232 Life Insurance Law and Mathematics 3 

INS 233 Group Insurance and Social Insurance 3 

INS 234 Economics 3 

INS 235 Accounting and Finance 3 

INS 236 Investments and Family Financial Management 3 

INS 237 Income Taxation 3 

INS 238 Pension Planning 3 

INS 239 Business Insurance 3 

INS 240 Estate Planning and Taxation 3 

Total Semester Hours 64 



MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 103 Tech. Report Writing 3 SPE 100 Speech 3 

DP 101 Fundamentals of Data ECO 190 or ECO 251 3 



3 


SPE 




ECO 


3 


BA 


3 


BA 



Processing 3 BA 262 Prin. of Supervision .3 

BA 260 Intro, to Management 3 BA 231 Business Law I 3 

BA 121 or BA 221 or BA 222 *Electives 4 

Accounting 3 

*Electives .4 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 

Term III-A or III-B 

BA 263 Production Management 3 

PSY 100 Human Relations 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BA 245 Business Communications 3 INS 279 Managerial Decision 

INS 278 Management and Human Making 3 

Resources 3 INS 280 Management in a 

*Electives 7 Changing World 3 

*Electives 7 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 

*To be approved by the Business Administration Department Head. 

81 



General Education 

Marketing Management Program 

PURCHASINC MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

This curriculum supplies a desirable body of knowledge needed by pur- 
chasing men and women. Emphasis is placed on principles and policies for 
industrial, institutional, and governmental purchasing and auxiliary functions 
as recommended by the National Association of Purchasing Management 
(N.A.P.M.) 

FIRST YEAR 

FiiM Term Second Term 

BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 3 BA 222-Prin. of Accounting II 3 

ECO 251-Prin. of Economics I 3 ECO 252-Prin. of Economics II 3 

= BA 165-lntro. Traffic -SPE 100-Speech 3 

Management 3 *BA 245-Bus. Communications 3 

BA 170-Prin. of Marketing 3 HPR-Physical Education 1 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 

Term IIl-A or III-B 

BA 231 -Business Law 3 

DP 101-Fund. of Data 

Processing 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BA 260Tntro. to Management 3 *BA 263-Production 3 

BA 226-Prin. of Finance .3 Management 3 

BA 250 Purchasing I 3 STA 22 1 -Statistics 3 

*ECO 254-Money and Banking 3 BA 262-Prin. of Supervision 3 

PSY 100-Human Relations 3 BA 225-Cost Accounting 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 -BA 251 -Purchasing II 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 

■A three-hour course in Business Administration or Economics may be 
substituted for one of these courses. 



MARKETING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

This program is designed for the student seeking careers in marketing 
occupations (Examples: retailing, advertising, buying, selling, wholesaling, 
banking, credit, and services.) Emphasis is placed on required skills, re- 
sponsibilities, and attitudes necessary for job entry and promotion. Students 
are expected to be employed in a marketing related occupation and if not 
employed, they will be assisted in securing such a position. Students will 
have the opportunity to participate in DECA activities. A student interested 
in transferring to a university for a four-year degree should follow the 
appropriate A. A. Degree Program. CWS may not be substituted for BA 
173, BA 283, BA 284. 

82 



General Education 
Real Estate Program 



First Term 

ENG 095 or 101 

BA 130-Salesmanship 
BA 173-SEMINAR I: 

Marketing in Perspective 

BA 170-Marketing 

HPR-Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



FIRST YEAR 

Second Term 

3 ENG 103 or 104 3 

3 BA 171-Advertising 3 

BA 150-Business Math 3 

3 BA 283— SEMINAR II: 

3 Research in Marketing 3 

i Elective in Business Admin. 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

13 Total Semester Hours 16 



Term III-A or III-B 

BA 140-Personal Finance 3 

Total Semester Hours 3 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
BA 284-SEMINAR III: 

Marketing Management 3 

BA 121-Accounting Survey or 

BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 3 

BA 231 -Business Law 3 

Electives in Business Admin. 6 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Second Term 
BA 245-Bus. Communications 
BA 262-Prin. of Supervision 
BA 271-Retailing 
SPE 100-Speech 

ECO 25i-Prin. of Eco. I 

HPR-Physical Education 

Total Semester Hours 



3 
3 
3 

.3 

.3 

1 

16 



REAL ESTATE PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

This program is designed for students interested in a career in Real 
Estate. Successful completion of the the first course, BA 190, satisfies the 
educational requirement of the Florida Real Estate Commission as a pre- 
requisite to sitting for the Real Estate Salesman's examination. 

BA 191 and BA 233 should increase the student's knowledge of the 
Real Estate profession as practiced in Florida to the extent that a passing 
grade should be obtained on the Florida Real Estate Commission's exami- 
nation for salesmen. 

1 . A grade point average of 2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

ENG 095 or 101 3 

ENG 103 or 104 3 

PSY, SOC, or SPEECH 3 

ECO 3 

Semester Hours 12 



83 



General Education 



Savings and Loan Career Program 



3. Completion of the following courses in Business Administration: 

BA 100 Intro, to Business 3 

BA 150 Business Math 3 

BA 1 30 Salesmanship 3 

BA 231 Business Law I 3 

BA 232 Business Law II 3 

BA 190 Intro, to Real Estate Prin. & Practices 3 

B A 1 9 1 Legal Aspects of Real Estate I 3 

BA 192 Real Estate Appraisal I 3 

BA 193 Real Estate Finance 3 

BA 290 Prin. of Real Estate 3 

BA 293 Real Estate Appraisal II 4 

BA 294 Real Estate Exchange and Taxation 3 

Electives 12 

Semester Hours 49 

4. BA 289— THE MORTGAGE BROKER IN MORTGAGE LENDING 
and BA 296— PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT 

may be substituted for two of the above real estate courses or may be 
used as electives. 

5. Completion of four semester hours of 

Physical Education Activities 4 

Total Semester Hours 65 



SAVINGS AND LOAN CAREER PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

In cooperation with the Florida Suncoast Chapter #202 of the Ameri- 
can Savings and Loan Institute and the Broward County School Board's 
Adult Education Program, the Business Administration Division offers the 
following curricula for a student to earn an A.S. Degree in addition to 
receiving American Savings and Loan Institute credits for diplomas: 

1. A grade-point average of 2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 



ENG 103 Technical Report Writing 
ECO 251 Principles of Economics I 
ECO 252 Principles of Economics II 
SPE 100 Introductory Speech 
Elective 



84 



Semester 




Hours 


ASLI COURSE # 


3 


None 


3 


024 


3 


025 


3 


019 


3 


None 


15 





General Education 



Savings and Loan Career Program 



3 


016 


3 


018 


2 


030 


3 


047-048 


17 





3. Completion of the following Business Administration courses: 
BA 183 Intro, to Savings Association 

Business 2 060 

BA 187 Savings Accounts or 

Savings Account Admin. 2 008-009 

BA 188 Savings Association Operations 2 062 

BA 1 90 Real Estate Principles 

and Practices 1 or 015 

BA 290 Real Estate Principles 

and Practices II 
BA 245 Business Communications 
BA 152 Financial Institutions 
BA 262 Principles of Supervision 



4. Completion of a minimum of 10 courses including a minimum of 28 
semester hours of credit from the following related electives: 

BA 231 Business Law I 3 043 

BA 232 Business Law 11 3 044 

BA 244 Secretarial Procedures 3 050 

BA 132 General Insurance 3 026 

BA 140 Personal Finance 3 032 

BA 260 Introduction to Management 3 023 

BA 264 Personnel Administration 3 

BA 190 Real Estate Principles & 

Practices I or 015 

BA 290 Real Estate Principles & 

Practices II 3 016 

DP 101 Fundamentals of Data 

Processing 
BA 253 Mortgage Loan Servicing 
BA 234 Real Estate Law I 
BA 235 Real Estate Law II 
BA 142 Savings and Loan Accounting I 
BA 143 Savings and Loan Accounting II 
BA 186 Teller Operations 
BA 286 Savings Association Lending I 
BA 175 Public Relations 
BA 291 Residential Appraising I 
MINIMUM 

5. Completion of 4 semester hours of 

physical education activities. 
(If eligible for waiver, electives 
may be substituted.) 4 

Total 64 

*These credits may be earned through the Chapter's Broward County Adult 
Education Program and may be waived toward the College's A. S. Degree. 

85 



3 


053 


2 


029 


2 


006 


2 


007 


2 


004 


2 


005 


2 


003 


2 


Oil 


2 


049 


2 


061 


28 





General Education 



Executive or General Secretary 



PROGRAM FOR EXECUTIVE OR GENERAL SECRETARY 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
■=BA 118, 119, 120-Int. 

Typing, Parts 4, 5, 6 
BA 150-Business Math 
ENG 101 

BA 100-Intro. to Business 
^*BA 154-Machine Shorthand I or 
BA 105-Oflfice Procedures 
HPR-Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



3-6 

1 

16-19 



Second Term 
BA 202, 203, 204-Expert 

Typing, Parts 7, 8, 9 3 
BA 108-Pers. Prep for Business 3 

BA 140-Personal Finance 3 
^=BA 112-Shorthand II or 

BA 155-Machine Shorthand II 3-6 

ENG 103 or 104 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16-19 



Term lU-A 

BA 105-Office Procedures, or 
business elective if BA 105 
was previously taken 

BA 242-Transcribing Machines 
Total Semester Hours 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

BA 2! 1 -Shorthand III 3 
BA 245-Bus. Communications 3 

BA 247-Business Machines 3 

BA 121-Accounting Survey I 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



Second Term 

BA 244-Secretarial Procedures 3 
PSY 100-Human Relations in 

Business and Industry 3 

BA 231 -Business Law 3 

Elective .3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



^^ A student not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying course(s). 
A student who had two years of high school typing and/ or shorthand 
may he exempted (without credit) from taking BA 118-120 and/or 
BA 112. Students taking Intermediate Typing may concurrently enroll 
in BA I 18, 1 19, 120. 

**Student is not required to take both machine shorthand and Gregg 
Shorthand; Those electing machine shorthand should consult with the 
Department Head. 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES: PSY 101, SPE 100, BA 190, BA 132, BA 122 
or BA 221, BA 260, BA 261, BA 262, HIS 230, DP 101, DP 102. 



86 



General Education 

Legal Secretary Program 

PROGRAM FOR LEGAL SECRETARY 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101 3 

*BA 118, 119, 120-Int. Typing, 

Parts 4, 5, 6 3 

BA 150-Business Math or 
MTH 100-General College Math 3 
BA lOO-Intro. to Business 3 

**BA 154-Machine Shorthand I or 
BA 105-Office Procedures 3-6 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16-19 



ENG 
^BA 
BA 
BA 

BA 



SeconcI Term 

103 or 104 

1 12-Shorthand II, or 
155-Machine Shorthand II 3- 
202, 203, 204 Expert Typing 
Parts 7, 8, 9 
121-Accounting Survey I 



HPR-Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



13-16 



Term III-A or III-B 

BA 105-Office Procedures, or 
BA 245-Bus. Communications 
if BA 105 was previously 
taken 
BA 231 -Business Law I 
Total Semester Hours 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
BA 211-Shorthand III 
BA 215-Legal Techniques 
BA 232-Business Law II 
BA 140-Personal Finance 
HPR-Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



13 



SeconcI Term 
PSC 121 or HIS 101 or 111 
BA 216-Legal Techniques II 
'=**BA 242-Transcribing Mach. 
BA 245-Bus Communications 
or elective if BA 245 was 
previously taken 
BA 244-Sec. Procedures 
HPR-Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 16 



'''A student not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying course(s). 
A student who had two years of high school typing and/ or shorthand 
may be exempted (without credit) from taking BA 118-120 and/ or 
BA 112. Students taking Intermediate Typing may concurrently enroll in 
BA 118, 119, 120. 
'■■*BA 1 16 required only if student is taking machine shorthand in place of 
Gregg Shorthand; Those electing machine shorthand should consult with 
the Department Head. 
'^**BA 215-Legal Techniques I must be completed before BA 242. 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES: PSY 100, BA 247, BA 249, BA 261, DP 102, 
BA 132, BA 190, BA 108, HIS 230, BA 122. 



87 



General Education 
Medical Secretary Program 

PROGRAM FOR MEDICAL SECRETARY 
(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 







FIRST 


YEAR 




First Term 








ENG 


101 




3 


ENG 


'BA 


118, 119, 120-Intermediate 




BA 




Typing, Parts 4, 5, 6 




3 




BA 


140-Persona] Finance 




.3 


*BA 


MA 


110-Intro. to Medical 






**BA 




Assisting 




. ,2 


MA 


*BA 


154-Machine Shorthand I 
or 






BA 


BA 

Electi 


100-Intro. to Business 
ve 




3-6 
1 


BA 
HPR- 



HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16-19 



Second Term 
103 or 104 3 

202, 203, 204-Expert 

Typing, Parts 7, 8, 9 3 

1 12-Shorthand II or 
155-Machine Shorthand II 3-6 
120-Office Practices and 

Procedures 3 

100-Intro. to Business or 
150-Business Math .3 

Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16-19 



Term III-A or III-B 

BA 231 -Business Law I 
BA 150-Business Math or 
Elective 
Total Semester Hours 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

BA 245-Bus. Communications 3 

BA 211-Shorthand III 3 

MA 115-Medical Terminology 3 
PSY 100-Human Relations in 

Business and Industry 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



Second Term 

'■^*BA 242-Transcribing Mach. 3 

BA 121-Acctg. Survey I 3 

BA 244-Secretarial Procedures 3 

MA 1 16-Clinical Terminology 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



'Students not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying courses. 
Students who have completed two years of typing and/ or shorthand in 
high school may be exempted (without credit) from taking BA 118-120 
and/or BA 112. Students taking Intermediate Typing may concurrently 
enroll in BA 118, 119, 120. 

**Students are required to take machine shorthand or Gregg Shorthand 
but not both; Those electing machine shorthand should consult with the 
Department Head. 

***Not to be taken until completion of MA 115, 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES: BA 105, BA 108, BA 247, SPE 100, MA 220, 
PSY lOL 



88 



General Education 



Court Reporting Program 
Accounting Certificate Program 



COURT AND CONFERENCE REPORTING PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree in Business Administration) 

Term II 

155 Machine Shorthand 11 6 
100 Intro, to Business 3 

231 Business Law 1 3 

245 Business Communications 3 

1 





Term I 






BA 


154 Machine Shorthand I 


6 


BA 


ENG 


101 


3 


BA 


BA 


118, 119, 120 Int. Typing 




BA 




Parts 4, 5 & 6 


3 


BA 


BA 


105 Office Procedures 


3 


HP] 


HPR 




1 





Total Semester Hours 



16 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



Term HI-A 

BA 156 Machine Shorthand III 6 

Term I Term II 

BA 214 Machine Shorthand IV 6 BA 220 Machine Shorthand V 3 

MA 115 Medical Terminology 3 MA 116 Clinical Terminology .3 

BA 190 Real Estate 3 BA 239 Practicum in Court 

HPR 1 Reporting 6 

Elective from Items 1-5 of Gen. HPR 1 

Ed courses, pg. 55 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 13 

^Students not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying course(s). 
Those who have completed two years of typing in high school (or equiva- 
lent) may be exempted (without credit) from taking BA 118-120 and 
may substitute BA 202, 203, and 204 Expert Typing Parts 7, 8, 9. 



CURRICULA REQUIRED FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

All certificate programs require a grade point average of 2.0. 
ONE- YEAR ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 





First Term 






Second Term 




ENG 


095 or 101 


. 3 


ENG 


103 


. . 3 


BA 


150-Business Math 


3 


BA 


140, or ECO 251 


3 


BA 


121-Acctg. Survey 1 or 




BA 


221 or 




BA 


221-Principles of Acctg. 


3 


BA 


222-Principles of Acctg. 


3 


*BA 


113, 114, 115-Basic Typing, 




DP 


102-Data Preparation 






Parts 1, 2, 3 or 






Equipment 


3 


DP 


101-Fundamentals of Data 
Processing 


. 3 


BA 


247-Business Machines 


3 


BA 


227-Income Tax 


, .3 









Total Semster Hours 



15 



Total Semester Hours 



15 



^Students must take BA 221 if he has had high school bookkeeping with 
a grade of "C" or better. Students graduating in the top 20 per cent of 
their high school class should take BA 221. 

'•'Students taking Basic Typing should concurrently enroll in BA 113, 114, 
115. 



89 



General Education 



Income Tax Preparation Program, 
Secretarial Certificate Program 





First Term 




BA 


150-Business Math. 


3 


BA 


221-Principles of Acctg. I 


3 


BA 


227-Income Tax 


3 


BA 


23 1 -Business Law I 


. . .3 


* Busi 


ness Elective 


3 




Total Semester Hours 


15 



ONE-YEAR INCOME TAX PREPARATION 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM** 

Second Term 
BA 222-Principles of Acctg. II 3 
BA 229-Income Tax II 3 

BA 232-Business Law II 3 

'•'Business Electives 6 

Total Semester Hours 15 

^Suggested business electives: BA 190-Introduction To Real Estate Princi- 
ples and Practices, BA 245-Business Communications, BA 247-Business 
Machines, ECO 251 -Principles of Economics I, ECO 252-Principles Of 
Economics II. (Note prerequisites indicated in course descriptions.) 
**A11 courses in this program will apply to the A.S. degree in Accounting. 

ONE-YEAR ADVANCED SECRETARIAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

This program is designed especially for students who earned above- 
average grades in five or more business education courses in high school; 
specifically, two years of shorthand and two vears of typewriting or the VOE 
three-hour block program plus other business courses such as business 
English, business math, bookkeeping, office practice, etc. These five or more 
basic credits allow the student to be exempted from taking the introductory 
or prerequisite courses required of most secretarial students and to have 
a specialization option. 

Students should plan their programs with the advice of the Head of the 
Secretarial Science Department. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: Completion of 36 hours with a minimum 
grade point average of 2.0. 

REQUIRED COURSES: 

First Term ~ Second Term 

*BA 105-Office Procedures or -BA 121 or BA 221 if not 

*BA 121-Accounting Survey I or taken previously or 

*BA 221-Prin. of Accounting I 3 BA 122- Accounting Survey II 3 

**BA 202, 203, 204-Expert BA 245-Business Communications 3 

Typing, Parts 7, 8, 9 3 BA 244-Secretarial Procedures 3 

**BA 21 1-Shorthand III 3 Specialization courses 6 

ENG 101 -Composition 3 

Specialization course .3 

Total Semester Hours 15 Total Semester Hours 15 

Term IH-A 

Specialization course 3 

Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

"^Students who had the VOE three-hour block program in high school may 
be exempted (without credit) from taking BA 105. Students who had a 
year of high school bookkeeping may be exempted (without credit) from 
taking BA 121 and may either take BA 221 or enroll in BA 122 for 
Term II. 
*"A student not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying course(s). 

90 



General Education 
Secretarial Certificate 

SPECIALIZATION COURSES: 

Special courses for General Secretary option; 

BA 100-Introduction to Business 3 

BA 150-Business Math 3 

BA 242-Transcribing Machines 3 

BA 247-Business Machines 3 

BA 249- Advanced Education for Secretaries 3 

Special courses for Executive Secretary option: 

BA 100-Introduction to Business 3 

BA 242-Transcribing Machines 3 

BA 150-Business Math and/ or 

BA 247-Business Machines 3 or 6 

BA 249-Advanced Education for Secretaries 3 

BA 261 -Office Management and/ or 

BA 262-Principles of Supervision 3 or 6 

Special courses for Legal Secretary option: 

BA 215-Legal Secretarial Techniques I 3 

BA 216-Legal Secretarial Techniques II 3 

BA 190-Introduction to Real Estate Prin. and Prac 3 

BA 231 -Business Law I 3 

BA 232-Business Law II 3 

Special courses for Medical Secretary option: 

MA 1 10-Introduction to Medical Assisting 3 

MA 115-Medical Terminology 3 

MA 116-Clinical Terminology 3 

BA 242-Transcribing Machines 3 

MA 120-Office Practices and Procedures 3 

Special courses for Insurance option: 

BA 132-General Insurance 3 

BA 100-Introduction to Business 3 

BA 231-Business Law I 3 

BA 150-Business Math and/or 

B A 247-Business Machines 3 or 6 

Special courses for Real Estate option: 

BA 190-Introduction to Real Estate Prin. and Prac 3 

BA 231-Business Law 1 3 

BA 232-Business Law II 3 

BA 150-Business Math and/or 

BA 247-Business Machines 3 or 6 

Special courses for Accounting option: 

BA 121-Accounting Survey I and/ or 
BA 122-Accounting Survey II 
OR 

BA 221 -Principles of Accounting I and 

BA 222-Principles of Accounting II 3 or 6 

91 



General Education 
Secretariat Certificate 

BA 150-Business Math and/ or 

BA 247-Business Machines 3 or 6 

B A 227-Income Tax 3 

DP 101 -Fundamentals of Data Processing and/ or 

DP 102-Data Preparation Equipment 3 or 6 

Special courses for Police Science option: 

CJ 100-Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 

POL 101-Police Administration I 3 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES: All BA courses listed above, BA 108, BA 140, 
HIS 230, PSY 100. 



ONE-YEAR SECRETARIAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 





First Term 




Second Term 




ENG 


095 or 101 


. .3 


BA 242-Transcribing Mach. 


3 


BA 


118, 119, 120-Intermediate 




***BA 121-Accounting Survey I 


3 




Typing, Parts 4, 5, 6 


3 


BA 202, 203, 204-Expert 




BA 


105-Office Procedures 


3 


Typing, Parts 7, 8, 9 


3 


BA 


112-Shorthand II or 


3 


BA 2 11 -Shorthand III or 




*BA 


154-Machine Shorthand I 


3-6 


**BA 155-Machine Shorthand II 


3-6 


BA 


lOO-Intro. to Business 


3 


BA 244-Secretarial Procedures 


3 



Total Semester Hours 15-18 Total Semester Hours 15-18 



Term IH-A 

BA 150-Business Math or 
BA 247-Business Machines or 
**BA 211-Shorthand III if not 

previously taken 3 

BA 245-Bus. Communications 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

'^A student not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying course(s). 
Students taking Intermediate Typing may concurrently enroll in BA 118, 
119, 120. A student who had two years of high school typing and/ or 
shorthand may be exempted (without credit) without taking BA 118-120 
and/ or BA 112. 

''*Students electing Machine Shorthand must complete BA 211 Shorthand 
III to meet certificate requirements. 

***Students who had a year of high school bookkeeping may be exempted 
(without credit) from taking BA 121 and may enroll in BA 122 Term II. 

NOTE: Students should plan their programs with the advice of the Head 
of the Secretarial Science Department. 

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Clerical — Typist Certificate, 
Professional Secretary Certificate 



ONE- YEAR CLERICAL-TYPIST CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 095 or 101 3 BA 202, 203, 204-Ex pert 

BA 100-Intro. to Business 3 Typing, Parts 7, 8, 9 3 

*BA 118, 119, 120-Intermediate BA 247-Business Machines 3 

Typing, Parts 4, 5 6 3 BA 140-Personal Finance 3 

BA 150-Business Math 3 Business Elective 3 

**BA 105-Office Procedures 3 ***BA 121-Acctg. Survey I 3 

Total Semester Hours 15 Total Semester Hours 15 

Term IH-A 

Elective 3 

BA 242-Transcribing Machines 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

* A student not meeting prerequisites will need to take qualifying course(s). 
A student who had two years of high school typing may be exempted 
(without credit) from taking BA 118-120. Students taking Intermediate 
Typing may concurrently enroll in BA 118, 119, 120. 
** Prerequisite: BA 115 Basic Typing, Part 3, or equivalent. 
*'''*Students who had a year of high school bookkeeping may be exempted 
(without credit) from taking BA 121 and may enroll in BA 122 Term IL 

NOTE: The student should plan the program with the advice of the Head 
of the Secretarial Science Department. 



PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

In cooperation with the National Secretaries Association, the following 
certificate program is offered as an aid to those secretaries preparing to sit 
for the National Certified Professional Secretary examination. However, it is 
a program that should be of considerable aid to any secretary interested in 
increasing her proficiencies and in qualifying herself for a top secretarial 
position. 

A certificate from Broward Community College is granted upon the 
completion of 30 hours in a planned program based on individual needs 
including twenty-four hours from the following courses: 

BA 100 Introduction to Business 3 

BA 231 Business Law I 3 

BA 232 Business Law II 3 

BA 121 Accounting Survey I 3 

BA 122 Accounting Survey II 3 

BA 221 Principles of Accounting I 3 

BA 244 Secretarial Procedures 3 

BA 245 Business Communications 3 

BA 260 Introduction to Management 3 

BA 261 OflSce Management 3 

BA 262 Principles of Supervision 3 

ECO 251 Economics I 3 

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Small Business Administration Certificate, 

Credit Union Leadership Certificate 

ECO 252 Economics II 3 

PSY 100 Human Relations in Business 3 

BA 202, 203, 204 Expert Typing, Parts 7, 8, 9 3 

BA 211 Shorthand III 3 



ONE- YEAR SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

The college, in cooperation with the Small Business Administration and 
the Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE), offers this certificate 
program for small business owners and managers or for students desiring 
to enter this field. A certificate will be granted upon completion of the 
following courses: 

BA 121 Acctg. Survey I or 

BA 221 Principles of Acctg. I 3 

BA 297 Seminar IV: Small Business Administration 3 

BA 237 Small Business Management I 3 

BA 238 Small Business Management II 3 

BA 262 Principles of Supervision 3 

* Related Elective 3 

''Business Electives 12 

30 Credit Hours 

*The following electives should be selected with the advice of the Head of 
the Business Administration Department: BA 100, BA 121, BA 130, BA 
132, BA 150, BA 170, BA 171, BA 221, BA 222, BA 231, BA 250, BA 
260, BA 264, BA 271, HMA 100, FSA 100, HRI 230. 



ONE- YEAR CREDIT UNION LEADERSHIP TRAINING 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

The following certificate program is offered in cooperation with the 
Broward County Credit Unions: 

BA 141 Credit Union Accounting 3 

DP 101 Fundamentals of Data Processing 3 

BA 231 Business Law I 3 

BA 226 Principles of Finance 3 

B A 245 Business Communications 3 

BA 262 Principles of Supervision 3 

ECO 251 Principles of Economics I - 3 

ECO 252 Principles of Economics II 3 

ECO 254 Money and Banking 3 

PSY 100 Human Relations in Business and Industry 3 

Total Semester Hours 30 

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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BA 100 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 3 semester hours 

Basic study of the nature of business activity in relation to the economic 
society in which we live and how it is owned, organized, managed and 
controlled. Course content designed to give special emphasis on business 
vocabulary and career opportunities by surveying various areas of specializa- 
tion as to personal characteristics and training. 

BA 103 BASIC OFFICE PRACTICES 3 semester hours 

Instruction in basic office skills such as typing, household budgets and 
accounts, cash and banking procedures, filing, completion of forms, etc., 
for students in special programs or with permission of the instructor or 
the Secretarial Science Department Head. 

BA 105 OFFICE PROCEDURES 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: Credit in BA 115 Basic Typing Part 3 or equivalent. Theory 
and practice of filing rules and procedures, routines common to all offices 
(processing mail, telephone usage, handling appointments, etc.), duplicating 
processes, discussion of careers in business, and job application procedures 
are included in the course, which does not require a knowledge of shorthand. 

BA 108 PERSONAL PREPARATION FOR BUSINESS 3 semester hours 

This course, for both males and females, is designed to help prepare the 
individual for social and business success. Course content covers visual poise, 
wardrobe planning, personality development, personal grooming, telephone 
technique, and job application. 

BA 111 SHORTHAND I 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: Credit in BA 115 Basic Typing Part 3 or equivalent. Presenta- 
tion of theory of manually written shorthand with emphasis on the develop- 
ment of writing skill and accurate typewritten transcription of simple new 
material dictation. Three laboratory hours per week are expected in addition 
to the three class hours. Offered Terms I and II. 

BA 112 SHORTHAND II 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BA 111 and credit in BA 120 
Intermediate Typing Part 6 or equivalent. Review of theory and brief forms, 
intensive development of shorthand writing skills and transcription skills, 
new material dictation with previews, and introduction to usable transcripts 
of short business letters. Three laboratory hours per week are expected in 
addition to the three class hours. 

BA 113 BASIC TYPING PART I 1 semester hour 

This typing credit, covering only Lessons 1 to 25, is an introduction to 
the keyboard with development of fundamental techniques for touch type- 
writing. Simple exercises in horizontal and vertical centering are included. 
Two laboratory hours per week are expected in addition to the three class 
hours. (NOTE: Students needing more than one credit in typing should 
concurrently enroll for two or more parts. NG may be given for a part 
started but unsatisfactory or incomplete at the end of the term.) 

BA 114 BASIC TYPING PART 2 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: Ability to type 21 words a minute for 2 minutes with 5-error 
cut-off. This part of typing, covering Lessons 26 to 50. includes skill develop- 
ment, simple correspondence (blocked business, personal, and formal letters), 

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simple tabulations, simple manuscripts, enumerations and basic report forms. 
(NOTE: Students needing more than one credit in typing should concurrently 
enroll for two or more parts. NG may be given for a part started but un- 
satisfactory or incomplete at the end of the term.) 

BA 115 BASIC TYPING PART 3 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: Ability to type 27 words a minute for 5 minutes with 5-error 
cut-off. Lessons 51 to 75 include skill development, postal cards, business 
letters and envelopes, interoffice memos, invoices, telegrams, revision marks, 
bound and unbound reports and manuscripts with footnotes. (NOTE: 
Students needing more than one credit in typing should concurrently enroll 
for two or more parts. NG may be given for a part started but unsatisfactory 
or incomplete at the end of the term.) 

BA 118 INTERMEDIATE TYPING PART 4 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: Ability to type 35 words a minute for 5 minutes with 5-error 
cut-off. This typing credit, covering Lessons 76 to 100, includes skill develop- 
ment, word division, semiblocked letters, tables (open, ruled, boxed), news 
releases and manuscripts for publication. (NOTE: Students needing more 
than one credit in typing should concurrently enroll for two or more parts. 
NG may be given for a part started but unsatisfactory or incomplete at 
the end of the term.) 

BA 119 INTERMEDIATE TYPING PART 5 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: Ability to type 39 words a minute for 5 minutes with 4-error 
cut-off. This part of typing, covering Lessons 101 to 125, includes skill 
development, various letter styles, billing and payroll forms, displays, reports, 
job applications, resumes, and fluid duplication. (NOTE: Students needing 
more than one credit in typing should concurrently enroll for two or more 
parts. NG may be given for a part started but unsatisfactory or incomplete 
at the end of the term.) 

BA 120 INTERMEDIATE TYPING PART 6 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: Ability to type 42 words a minute for 5 minutes with 4-error 
cut-off. Lessons 126 to 150 include skill development, two-page letters, odd 
stationery, simple financial statements, and legal papers. (NOTE: Students 
needing more than one credit in typing should concurrently enroll for two 
or more parts. NG may be given for a part started but unsatisfactory or 
incomplete at the end of the term.) 

BA 121 ACCOUNTING SURVEY I 3 semester hours 

Suggested prerequisite: BA 150. Instruction in standard bookkeeping pro- 
cedures for small professional, service, and retail sole proprietorships. Atten- 
tion is given to journalizing, posting, and preparing the trial balance and 
financial statements. Procedures for handling petty cash, bank deposits and 
withdrawals, payroll, business tax reports, and special journals are included. 
This course is primarily for the non-accounting major or for those who 
need additional background prior to taking BA 221. 

BA 122 ACCOUNTING SURVEY II 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 121. A continuation of BA 121 involving fiscal-year pro- 
cedures beyond the simple trial balance for sole proprietorships and partner- 
ships, with an introduction to accounting procedures for small corporate 
organizations. 

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BA 127 MEDICARE COST REIMBURSEMENT 3 semester hours 

A study of the legal requirements for medicare reimbursement including 
the eligibility and necessary reports, the principles of cost reimbursement 
and regulations. Stresses practical application of completing required forms 
for reimbursement. 

BA 130 SALESMANSHIP 3 semester hours 

This course is a combination of principles and techniques of selling. It 
recognizes why, as well as what, how and when. The principles which 
receive emphasis are basic and lasting; they are the principles which students 
will apply in business. The course seeks to describe persuasion on a moral 
and ethical foundation as a powerful tool which is needed universally. 

BA 132 GENERAL INSURANCE 3 semester hours 

This course is an introduction to the topic of risk and insurance. The origins 
and evolution of insurance are discussed. The range of types of insurors are 
studied as well as the variety of coverages in showing the relationship of 
insurance to business activity and the national economy. To give the student 
(primarily as a consumer) a working knowledge of basic insurance contracts, 
the coverages and provisions of life, health, property, and liability policies 
for individuals are emphasized. Commercial property and casualty insurance 
is surveyed as are the functional areas of underwriting, rating, and adjust- 
ing. Special consideration is given to current topics such as Florida's "No 
Fault" Auto Law, flood insurance, qualifications for agents and solicitors, 
government regulation of insurance, and recent changes by judicial decision 
or legislation affecting insurance. 

BA 133 SOCIAL SECURITY LAW 3 semester hours 

The purpose of this course is to provide professional people with an under- 
standing of their rights under Social Security. The course will concentrate 
on eligibility requirements, the insured status coverages, eligibility for de- 
pendents, death benefits, corporation officers and directors, and closed family 
corporations, medicare, etc. 

BA 134 MERCHANDISING TOUR — 

NEW YORK CITY 1 semester hour 

Includes orientation one day of Broward Community College, five days 
of merchandising related activities, and one day of follow-up, evaluation, 
and discussion at Broward Community College. The tour enrollment is 
limited to fifteen. 

BA 135 FASHION MERCHANDISING 3 semester hours 

Course acquaints student with careers in the fashion industry along with 
fashion history, fashion trends, fashion creators in Europe and America, 
fashion terminology and fashion periodicals. Student develops a total concept 
of fashion and its application to business. Class meets three hours per week. 

BA 136 INTERIOR DECORATION I 

FOR MARKETING 3 semester hours 

A study of the principles of color and design and the historic background 
of today's decoration. Student will plan the functional arrangement of 
interior space and coordinate the selection of furniture, draperies, floor 
coverings, and interior accessories. 

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BA 137 INTRODUCTION TO FOOD MARKETING 3 semester hours 

This is a basic course in the study of food marketing organizations, practices, 
and problems with emphasis on the supermarket. Topics included are: 
economic importance of food marketing, history and development of food 
retailing, systems of food distribution, supermarket organization and manage- 
ment, food industry issues, and the future of the industry. 

BA 140 PERSONAL FINANCE 3 semester hours 

Survey of the areas of which personal, daily economic problems must be 
solved by all people. Course attempts to guide each person in receiving 
the best results for his money in the following areas: buying on credit, 
borrowing money, using your bank, investing savings, all forms of insurance, 
home ownership vs. renting, investing in stocks and bonds, obtaining invest- 
ment information, buying or starting a business, income taxes, social security 
and medicare, retirement planning and annuities, estate planning, wills, and 
trust. 

BA 141 CREDIT UNION ACCOUNTING 3 semester hours 

This course is a study of the basic principles and practices of accounting 
for Credit Unions using Credit Union forms, etc. The last part of the course 
will cover Credit Union auditing, principles and procedures. 

BA 142 SAVINGS & LOAN ACCOUNTING I 2 semester hours 

Study of statement of conditions, statement of operations, general ledger, 
general journal, preparation of trial balances, closing procedures, subsidiary 
ledgers, control accounts, and source documents. 

BA 143 SAVINGS & LOAN ACCOUNTING II 2 semester hours 

Study of savings accounts, loans, accounts, mortgage and construction loans, 
payment on monthly installment loans, home improvement loans, and college 
education loans. 

BA 144 TEXTILES 3 semester hours 

Provides a foundation of knowledge about basic fiber classifications, proper- 
ties, uses and care procedures, basic weave designations by definition and 
trade name, and basic dyeing and finishing processes; the effect of these 
on wear and care of the resulting fabric. This course will offer opportunities 
for involvement with current fashion fabrics, for mastery of basic fabric 
terminology so that federal regulations may be understood and adhered to, 
for creating ways of making the information meaningful to others and for 
using the information in making judgments at the designing and buying levels. 

BA 145 FASHION SALES PROMOTION 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to help students understand the principles and 
methods of selling fashion and promoting fashion. Students will analyze 
advertisements, displays, publicity and other sales presentations of retail 
and wholesale firms. Students will prepare a complete sales promotion. 

BA 146 HISTORY OF COSTUME 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to help students explore a history of civilization 
and art and its relation to fashion trends. The course will include illus- 
trated lectures, visits to museums and a study of society and a reflection 
of political, economical and social conditions. 

BA 147 FASHION IN CONTEMPORARY LIVING 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to show students how to keep abreast of fashion 
trends. The course aims to help students develop critical judgment and to 

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develop the ability to judge the significant in fashion, and to analyze, and 
interpret trends. An emphasis will be placed on current readings, attending 
fashion events and attending dramatic, operatic, and musical performances. 

BA 148 FASHION DESIGN 3 semester hours 

This course provides or incorporates the principles of design and color. 
Students analyze factors motivating fashion and gain practice in making 
quick simple sketches. The course uses sketches to implement fashion 
perception. Sketches relate interpretation rather than art proficiency. 

BA 150 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

Mathematics applied to negotiable instruments, payroll, discounts, profit and 
loss, merchandising, commissions, depreciation, taxes, securities, insurance, 
and other business problems. 

BA 152 FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 2 semester hours 

Banking structure, monetary roles of the Federal Reserve and Treasury, 
the money market, financial aspect of corporate organizations, the financing 
of business, securities market, small business finance, farm credit institutions, 
capital markets. 

BA 154 MACHINE SHORTHAND I (Stenograph) 6 semester hours 

Suggested prerequisite: BA 115 Basic Typing Part 3, or equivalent. Basic 
theory of machine shorthand with speed development and rapid reading of 
notes. Beginning transcription skills are taught with the dictation and tran- 
scription of short paragraphs and simple letter material. (NOTE: Any 
student who has not had beginning typing or equivalent must contact the 
instructor or the Department Head before registering for Machine Short- 
hand I.) 

BA 155 MACHINE SHORTHAND II (Stenograph) 6 semester hours 

Prerequisites: BA 154 and BA 115 Basic Typing Part 3, or equivalent. A 
continuation of BA 154 covering advanced theory, rapid and accurate 
reading of notes, dictation for speed building, and accurate typewritten 
transcripts. 

BA 156 MACHINE SHORTHAND III (Stenograph) 6 semester hours 

Prerequisites: BA 155, BA 120 Intermediate Typing Part 6 or equivalent, 
BA 231, and BA 245. An advanced speed building course with vocabulary 
development related to court and conference reporting terms and shortcuts. 
Particular emphasis is placed on accurate writing at higher speed levels and 
on dictated and written transcription of courtroom testimony and 
conferences. 

BA 165 INTRODUCTION TO TRANSPORTATION AND 

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

An introduction to traffic management covering federal regulations, freight 
classification, freight rates and tariffs, shipping documents, special freight 
services, and freight claims. 

BA 166 TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC 

MANAGEMENT I 3 semester hours 

The fundamentals of construction and filing of tarifl's with emphasis in 
freight rate structure. In addition, methods of routing and handling traffic 
including terminal facilities, demurrage, weight, warehousing, and packaging. 
Prerequisite: BA 165, or actual experience in the field and consent of 
instructor. 

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BA 170 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3 semester hours 

Study of company management areas dealing with the broad problem of 
sales. Emphasis given to the kind of decisions for which the marketing 
manager is responsible: Prices, advertising, and other promotion, sales 
management; the kind of products to be manufactured; and the marketing 
channels to be used. 

BA 171 ADVERTISING 3 semester hours 

Introduction of fundamental principles, practices, and common media in 
modern advertising. Includes activities that supplement both advertising and 
personal selling, such as sampling, displays, demonstrations, and other kinds 
of effort that render them more effective. The course presents the marketing 
viewpoint, the communications viewpoint, and the viewpoint of the citizen 
who is inevitably exposed to advertising every day. Offered Term II. 

BA 172 VISUAL MERCHANDISING 3 semester hours 

The relationship of display to sales promotion in retailing is studied. Basic 
principles of design as applied to merchandise display are considered. Individ- 
ual and group projects give opportunity for practice in application. Instruction 
and practice in show card copywriting and lettering are included. 

BA 173 SEMINAR I: MARKETING IN 

PERSPECTIVE 3 semester hours 

Students are expected to be working or will be assisted to secure employ- 
ment in a marketing related occupation. In addition, students will have the 
opportunity to develop leadership skills through participation in DECA 
activities. Course curricula will include marketing related learning activities. 

BA 174 HOME FURNISHINGS MARKETING I: 

INTERIOR DECORATION 3 semester hours 

Introductory course examining interiors, floor plans, renderings and draw- 
ings. Furniture styles will be studied in addition to coloring, fabrics and 
furniture arrangements. 

BA 175 PUBLIC RELATIONS 2 semester hours 

Guide to good public relations, how images are created, public relations 
practices, special events, researching your savings market and local housing 
market, public relations ideas, attitudes, advertising, and customer relations. 

BA 180 PRINCIPLES OF BANK OPERATIONS 3 semester hours 

The economic importance of banks; the receiving function; processing of 
cash items; bookkeeping operations; posting systems; legal relationships with 
depositors; internal controls; international financial services; trust services; 
growth of the American banking system; banking and public service. 

BA 181 BANK MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

The nature and objective of banking, formulation of objectives and policies; 
organizational planning; management controls; managements and specific 
functions; the art of management. 

BA 182 BANK PUBLIC RELATIONS AND 

MARKETING 3 semester hours 

Functional structure of bank public relations and marketing; marketing and 
opinion research; advertising; community relations; government relations; 
blueprint for a winning bank. 

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BA 183 INTRODUCTION TO SAVINGS ASSOCIATION 

BUSINESS 2 semester hours 

History of savings association. Federal Reserve System, Federal Home Loan 
Bank System, charters and regulations, securities markets investment 
processes, the housing environment. 

BA 185 SAVINGS AND LOAN OPERATIONS 3 semester hours 

The operation of various financial institutions are discussed in this course 
with special emphasis on the savings and loan association. The historical 
development of savings and loan associations, their special characteristics 
and organization are topics covered. The appraisal function of the savings 
and loan business and the savings program are included in the course. 

BA 186 TELLER OPERATIONS 2 semester hours 

Customer service coins and currency, precautions in cashing checks, insurance 
of accounts, dividends on savings, interest on loans, emergency situations, 
responsibilities of a teller supervisor. 

BA 187 SAVINGS ACCOUNT 2 semester hours 

Basic theory of savings, the contractual nature of savings accounts, classifica- 
tion by ownership and by operation, insurance accounts, opening the savings 
account, policy regarding legal advice, earnings, withdrawals and services 
to savers. 

BA 188 SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

ADMINISTRATION 2 semester hours 

The pooled capital concept, liquidity, management of liabilities, inactive 
or dormant accounts, garnishment and execution, amounts of decedents, 
savings activities at branch and agency offices. 

BA 190 INTRODUCTION TO REAL ESTATE 

PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3 semester hours 

An introduction to the basic principles, practices, and theories of real 
property, its economic value, legal implications, and relationship to the sales- 
man and broker. Successful completion qualifies a candidate to sit for the 
Florida Real Estate Salesman license. $5.00 fee. (FREC I). 

BA 191 LEGAL ASPECTS OF REAL ESTATE 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: Real Estate Principles BA 190 or substantial real estate or 
escrow experience. This course covers the elementary concepts of real estate 
law and practice in Florida. Subjects covered include: property classes, 
estates, leaseholds and ownership, easements, transfers, escrows, contracts, 
zoning, broker's regulations, license law, and title insurance. 

BA 192 REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL I 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 190 or consent of instructor. This course is the equivalent 

to SREA Course 101. The appraisal process will be examined and applied 

in an analytic approach to determine residential property value on a cost, 

market; and income basis. Consideration will be directed to such factors as 

neighborhood and site analysis, residential style and functional utility, build- 

j ing cost estimates and depreciation. This course is offered in cooperation 

I with the Society of Real Estate Appraisers and registration is through SREA 

't Term I. Offered for regular students Term II. 

BA 193 REAL ESTATE FINANCE 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: License or BA 190. This course covers methods of financing 
real estate: i.e., conventional loans, government insured loans such as FHA 
or GI. The second half of the course includes essentials of real estate values. 

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BA 194 REAL ESTATE ECONOMICS 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A practical study of the economic trends 
and factors influencing real estate. Topics include real estate market analysis, 
growth and structure of cities, subdividing and building, appraising and 
finance. National, state and local government regulations aflfecting the real 
estate market will be considered. 

BA 195 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 190. An examination of the professional handling of income 
producing properties, including leasing, tenant relations, collections, advertis- 
ing, maintenance, and accounting for commercial, industrial, and residential 
properties. 

BA 202 EXPERT TYPING PART 7 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: Ability to type 45 words a minute for 5 minutes with 4-error 
cut-off. This typing credit, covering Lessons 151 to 175. includes skill de- 
velopment, letter series with copies, printed forms, and formal report with 
footnotes. (NOTE: Students needing more than one credit in typing should 
concurrently enroll for two or more parts. NG may be given for a part 
started but unsatisfactory or incomplete at the end of the term.) 

BA 203 EXPERT TYPING PART 8 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: Ability to type 49 words a minute for 5 minutes with 3-error 
cut-ofi". This part of typing, Lessons 176 to 200, covers skill development, 
secretarial correspondence, statistical tabulation, stencil duplicating, space- 
saver reports, and art typing. (NOTE: Students needing more than one 
credit in typing should concurrently enroll for two or more parts. NG may 
be given for a part started but unsatisfactory or incomplete at the end of 
the term.) 

BA 204 EXPERT TYPING PART 9 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: Ability to type 52 words a minute for 5 minutes with 3-error 
cut-off. Lessons 201 to 225 include skill development, production tests, and 
various unarranged problems requiring decisions. 

BA 205 FASHION BUYING 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basics of merchandising, 
the role of a buyer, and buying principles. Emphasis is on the technical 
processes in merchandising, merchandising math, and planning for profit. 
Students analyze consumer buying habits and the motivation of consumers 
in terms of implications for retail buying. 

BA 206 PRINCIPLES OF FASHION 

COORDINATION 3 semester hours 

This course offers hypothetical experience in the coordination and presenta- 
tion of fashion. Students will analyze fashion information and present the 
results in terms of a fashion show or clinic. They will study the functions 
of fashion coordinators and directors in retail and wholesale fields. 

BA 207 FASHION ILLUSTRATION 3 semester hours 

This course encompasses procedures and principles of fashion illustration. 
Students will learn how to render fabrics and accessories in pen and ink 
and brush techniques suitable to line-cut production. Students study fashion 
illustrations in various media and analyze styles and techniques. 

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BA 208 APPAREL DESIGN 3 semester hours 

This course presents a study of principles and problems in developing a 
design through draping. The course includes an analysis of figure types, 
standardization of measurements, garment silhouette, fit, construction price, 
and terminology. A knowledge of clothing construction is helpful in this 



BA 211 SHORTHAND III (Manual or Machine Writers) 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BA 112 or BA 155 and in BA 204 
Expert Typing Part 9 or concurrent enrollment in BA 204. Continuation 
of skill development for sustained rapid writing and accurate transcription 
of new material dictation; office standards of speed and accuracy are empha- 
sized in dictation for usable transcripts of business letters, which are varied 
in subject matter, length, and difficulty. Two laboratory hours per week are 
expected in addition to the three class hours. (NOTE: This course is required 
of all secretarial majors whether manual shorthand or machine shorthand 
writers.) 

BA 213 MEDICAL DICTATION 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 211 or 156 or the concurrent enrollment in BA 211 or 156 
Gregg shorthand and machine shorthand theory of medical terms is included 
with the dictation and transcription of medical material. (NOTE: Either 
Gregg-writing or machine-writing shorthand students may enroll in this 
course.) 

BA 214 MACHINE SHORTHAND IV (Stenograph) 6 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 156. Corequisites: BA 190 and MA 115 (if not taken 
previously). A continuation of BA 156 for further speed building and 
vocabulary development with practice on legal and medical testimony, jury 
charges, hearings, and congressional record material. A study is also made of 
the court system, courtroom and hearing procedures, legal forms, and the 
production of cover and deposition transcripts. 

BA 215 LEGAL SECRETARIAL TECHNIQUES I 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: Credit in BA 120 Intermediate Typing Part 6 and either credit 
in BA 211 (or BA 156) or concurrent enrollment in BA 211 (or BA 156). 
An introduction to legal terminology, the typing of legal documents and 
pleadings, and office procedures for the legal secretary. Usually offered only 
Term I. 

BA 216 LEGAL SECRETARIAL TECHNIQUES II 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 215. A further study of legal terminology with emphasis 
on dictation and transcription of legal papers. Use of the IBM Executive 
typewriter is included. Usually offered only Term II. 

BA 217 PROCEDURES FOR REAL ESTATE 

TITLE CLOSINGS 3 semester hours 

Course designed for persons involved in the details required in the procedure 
of Real Estate Title Closings while working under the supervision of an 
attorney. Students will study the terms of the sales contract and what actions 
are necessitated by the contracts, legal descriptions of Real Property, the 
completion of any and all forms necessary including instruments required 
by law to be recorded, and the techniques of working with clients. Admission 
by permission of instructor or Department Head. Special fee $2. 

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BA 220 MACHINE SHORTHAND V 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 214. This course includes speed building dictation for the 
development of skill to the required 225-word-per-minute level and daily 
transcription of 3-voice testimony, jury charges, courtroom testimony, con- 
gressional record material, etc. Accurate transcripts are essential. 

BA 221 PRCVCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I 3 semester hours 

Introductory study of the fundamental principles of recording financial data 
and reporting of financial activities as applied to individual proprietorships. 

BA 222 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II 3 semester hours 

A continuation of BA 221, with emphasis on accounting for corporations, 
control, and decision making. Includes material on cost accounting, special 
reports, and statement analysis. Prerequisite: BA 221 with a grade of C or 
better. 

BA 223 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I 3 semester hours 

A systematic and in-depth consideration of the financial statements and under- 
lying records. Special attention is given to the elements composing working 
capital, cash receivables, inventories, current liabilities, and investments in 
stock, bonds, and funds. Prerequisite: BA 222 with grade of C or better. 
Offered Term I. 

BA 224 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II 3 semester hours 

A continuation of BA 223 with extensive coverage of non-current assets and 
liabilities, stockholders' equity, and analytical processes. Topical presentation 
includes plant and equipment, intangibles, long-term debt, paid-in capital, 
retained earnings, funds and cash flow, statement analysis, ajid related sub- 
sidiary issues. Prerequisite: BA 222 with grade C or better. Offered on 
deman(^ 

BA 225 COST ACCOUNTINCJ 3 semester hours 

A study of the relationship of the cost accounting to the control and decision- 
making functions of management. A review and an overview of accounting 
for costs precede the detailed consideration of product costing. Costs are 
classified and analysed in terms of materials, labor and overhead for both 
job order and process cost systems. Prerequisite: BA 222 with grade of C 
or better, or instructor's approval. Offered Term II. 

BA 226 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE 3 semester hows 

A study of business finance in the American economy, capitalization, equity 
capital, credit capital, intermediate capital, short term credit, financial poli- 
cies, working capital and turnover ratios, cash flow budgets. Prerequisites: 
BA 222 and ECO 252. 

BA 227 INCOME TAX 3 semester hours 

Principles of Federal Income Taxation applicable to individuals. The course 
is designed to acquire the basic knowledge necessary in the preparation of 
individual returns. Sample returns will be prepared. 

BA 228 ANALYZING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 3 semester hours 

Basic considerations in statement analysis; details of financial statements; 
basic ratios; analysis of internal comparison; analysis by external comparison; 
consolidated statements; budgets and projections. 

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Courses — Business Administration 



BA 229 INCOME TAX II 3 semester hours 

A continuation of BA 227 with emphasis on income tax laws applicable to 
partnerships and corporations. A brief survey of estate and gift taxes will be 
undertaken. Sample returns will be prepared. 

BA 230 ACCOUNTING FOR TRAVEL AGENTS 3 semester hours 

A study of the basic principles and practices of accounting for Travel 
Agencies with applications for managerial decisions. 

BA 231 BUSINESS LAW I 3 semester hours 

Study of basic principles of law and their application to business problems, 
encompassing discussion of courts and legal procedures, the law of contracts, 
agency and employment, negotiable instruments, personal property, and 
bailments. 

BA 232 BUSINESS LAW U 3 semester hours 

Continuation of BA 231, including a study of legal principles covering sales 
of goods, insurance, suretyship, partnership, corporations, real property, 
leases, bankruptcy, torts, and business crimes. Prerequisite: BA 231. 

BA 233 CASE PROBLEMS IN 

REAL ESTATE CLOSING 3 semester hours 

This course covers the following: proration problems; tax rate problems; 
area problems and property description problems; brokerage fee problems; 
capitalization problems, profit and loss problems and gross rent multiplier 
problems; interest problems; discount problems; depreciation problems and 
appreciation problems; state transfer tax problems; and general problems. 

BA 234 REAL ESTATE LAW I 2 semester hours 

Land and its elements, fixtures, easements, land description, land titles, 
deeds, recording and instruction aotice, escrows, community property. 

lA 235 REAL ESTATE LAW IF 2 semei^r hours 

Liens, mortgages, construction loans, closing mortgage loaiiis, foreclosures 
and redemptions, F.H.A. loan insurance, subdivisions, building restrictions, 
zoning, shopping centers, condominiums. 

BA 237 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT I 3 semester hours 

An introduction to Small Business Management covering the role of small 
business in our econorrty; development of a management philosophy for the 
entrepreneur including general functions of management; factors in business 
failure and success; problems in initiating a business including the legal, 
financial, facility and planning aspects. 

BA 238 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT II 3 semester hours 

A continuation of Small Business Management covering financial and ad- 
ministrative control, budgeting, reporting, business risks and types of insur- 
ance; development of marketing and credit policies; developing management 
and business operational policies including employee relations, vendor rela- 
tions and inventory management; and understanding of legal government 
relationships. 

BA 239 PRACTICUM IN COURT REPORTING 6 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 220 or concurrent enrollment in BA 220 and permission 
of the instructor or Department Head. The student is assigned to a local 
court reporting agency for a minimum of 12 hours per week. Conference 
meetings are arranged on an individual basis. 

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Courses — Business Administration 



BA 240 CURRENT BUSINESS PRACTICES 3 semester hours 

This course is designed for use as a vehicle to organize classes for business 
teachers or business students for the study of specific areas of business 
practices in the local community or in the state of Florida. (Short field trips 
or travel vi'ithin the state may be required.) 

BA 242 TRANSCRIBING MACHINES I 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: For all students — credit in BA 120 Intermediate Typing Part 
6 or equivalent; additional prerequisite for medical assisting, or medical 
secretarial majors — MA 115; additional prerequisite for legal secretarial 
majors — BA 215. Skill development for accurate transcription of recorded 
dictation to office standard proficiency levels is emphasized; special material 
related to each student's major subject area is provided. 

BA 243 TRANSCRIBING MACHINES II 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: BA 242 and either credit in BA 204 Expert Typing Part 9 or 
concurrent enrollment in BA 204. A continuation of BA 242 for the further 
development of transcription skills on special material related to the 
student's major. 

BA 244 SECRETARIAL PROCEDURES 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: BA 211 (or BA 156) or concurrent enrollment in BA 211 
(or BA 156) and credit in BA 204 Expert Typing Part 9 or concurrent 
enrollment in BA 204. This course is designed for students completing 
their secretarial programs and includes decision-making projects and/ 
or discussion related to the duties, responsibilities, and personal qualifications 
of a secretary, the efficient handling of office routine matters, an overview 
of the secretarial profession as a career, and procedures and techniques of 
acquiring satisfying, challenging positions. Usually offered only Term II. 

BA 245 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: ENG 101 and BA 115 Basic Typing, Part 3, or equivalent. 
The study of the psychology and techniques of effective business writing, 
stressing the use, planning, and writing of important types of business letters. 
Report writing and the use of dictating equipment is included. 

BA 247 BUSINESS MACHINES 3 semester hours 

Suggested prerequisite: BA 150. The touch system of operating 10-key 
machines and instruction for practical business applications is included on 
1 0-key and full-keyboard adding machines, rotary calculators, electric 
calculators, electronic printing and display calculators, and a simple book- 
keeping posting machine. 

BA 249 ADVANCED EDUCATION FOR 

SECRETARIES 3 semester hours 

Extension of the knowledges and skills previously obtained in all fields of 
secretarial training. Emphasis is on mastering the more difficult routine 
matters and handling the unusual and unique situations encountered on the 
job. Prerequisite: "B" average in secretarial courses taken at Broward Com- 
munity College and/ or approval of the Department. Offered Term 11. 

BA 250 PURCHASING I 3 semester hours 

Study of the purchasing function, organization, policies, legal aspects, ethics, 
source of supply, quality concepts, quantity determination, pricing, cost 
improvement, forecasting, automation, make or buy and capital equipment, 
study of traffic, surplus, storekeeping, budgets, international purchasing, 
public purchasing, personnel, performance evaluation and public relations. 

106 



General Education 



Courses — Business Administration 



BA 251 PURCHASING II 3 semester hours 

Continuation of BA 250. This would include purchasing problems in the 

Material Management, Negotiation, Inventory Management, and Contract 
Administration Field. 

BA 252 HOME MORTGAGE LENDING 3 semester hours 

This course approaches the subject from the viewpoint of the mortgage loan 
officer who seeks to develop a sound mortgage portfolio. A picture of the 
mortgage market is presented first, then the acquisition of a mortgage port- 
folio, mortgage plans and procedures, mortgage loan processing and servicing, 
and finally the obligations of the mortgage loan officer in over-all portfolio 
management. 

BA 253 MORTGAGE LOAN SERVICING 2 semester hours 

Loan servicing systems and regulations, assumptions and modifications, 
acquisition of real estate, management of owned real estate, buying and 
servicing participation loans, procedures for outright loan sales, home im- 
provement loans. 

BA 254 INTERNATIONAL BANKING 3 semester hours 

The world of international banking; activities of the international depart- 
ment; foreign exchange; letters of credit and banker's acceptances; the 
businessman and international banking. 

BA 255 HOME MORTGAGE LENDING 3 semester hours 

Mortgage credit in the United States; structure of the mortgage market; 
development of a mortgage portfolio; appraisal of property; mortgage loan 
servicing; management considerations in mortgage lending and portfolio 
management. 

BA 256 INSTALLMENT CREDIT 3 semester hours 

Evolution of installment credit; investigation and the credit decision; inven- 
tory financing; rate structure and cost analysis in installment credit; servicing 
installment credit; special loan programs; advertising and business develop- 
ment; installment credit and your bank. 

BA 257 CREDIT ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

Discussion of policy; the bank credit department; sources of credit informa- 
tion; credit correspondence; unsecured and secured loans to customers; loans 
to small business; term loans; interbank loans; real estate loans; influence of 
the Federal Reserve System; opportunities and responsibilities of the bank 
lending officers. 

BA 258 TRUST DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION 3 semester hours 

The nature of trust powers; organization of a trust department; executive 
and administrative activities of a trust department; equipment of a trust 
department; procedures for corporate trusts and agencies; procedures for 
investment of trust funds; management of real property and mortgages, tax 
work of a trust department; trust selling techniques; estate planning; trust 
costs and earnings; guiding principles of trust institutions; government super- 
vision of trust business. 

BA 259 TRUST DEPARTMENT SERVICES 3 semester hours 

Property and property rights; wills; settlement of estates; responsibilities of 
executors and administrators; personal trusts; insurance trusts; administration 
of personal trusts; responsibilities of trustees; guardianships and personal 
agencies; other trusts and agencies; historical background of trust services 
and trust institutions. 

107 



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Courses — Business Administration 



BA 260 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Reflects current theory and research in stressing the concepts and analysis 
of principal phases of management. Emphasizes fundamental principal phases 
of management. Emphasizes fundamental principles of scientific organization, 
motivation, economic analysis and control and their application to business 
decisions. Integrate new developments in the behavioral sciences and quanti- 
tative techniques for basic management courses. 

BA 261 OFFICE MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

An analysis of various office departments, their organization and manage- 
ment, with emphasis on the methods used in selection and training of office 
personnel; office planning and layout; scientific analysis of office procedures, 
office jobs, office forms, and their relation to cost control; types and uses of 
office appliances; and other techniques necessary for efficient operation of the 
modern office. Offered Term II. 

BA 262 PRINCIPLES OF SUPERVISION 3 semester hours 

Includes principles and necessary techniques of supervision, importance and 
place of supervision in the business organizaton, and the handling of human 
relations with employees, fellow supervisors and higher management in 
business, including manufacturing and construction industries. Offered Term 
II. 

BA 263 PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

A study of the various phases of production control and the elements which 
contribute lo a successful operation, production forecasting, product develop- 
ment, control of materials, routing, scheduling and follow-up are studied 
in sequence in terms of their significance and their relationship to production 
control. 

BA 264 PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

Practices of personnel administration are studied including the formulation 
and application of personnel policies as a means for creating an effective 
working force within an organization. Covered are job analysis and evalu- 
ation, recruiting, selecting and training employees. 

BA 265 TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC 

MANAGEMENT II 3 semester hours 

Advanced rate study covering imports and exports, combination through 
rates, intermediate rates, milling in transit, loss and damage, overcharges 
and undercharges, classification and rate committee procedure. Prerequisite: 
BA 166. 

BA 266 TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC 

MANAGEMENT III 3 semester hours 

Transportation law — a study of the Interstate Commerce Commission regu- 
lations on tariff, procedures, and practices before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, damages awarded under the regulations, and review of the 
Commission's decisions. Prerequisites: BA 265. 

BA 267 SEMINAR IN SUPERVISION 1 semester hour 

Includes conference and lecture sessions covering: Management Funda- 
mentals, Organization Dynamics. Methods of Work Proficiency and Rules, 
Discipline, Tardiness and Absenteeism as topics related to the contemporary 
supervisor. Students anticipating transfer must complete the series of one 
hour courses, Seminar in Supervision I, Seminar in Supervision II, and 
Seminar in Supervision III, the equivalent of BA 262 Principles of 
Supervision. 

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Courses — Business Administration 



BA 270 FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 3 semester hours 

A study of the background of the Federal Reserve System. Monetary and 
fiscal policies, combating postwar inflation, domestic credit trends in the 
1960's, Federal Reserve System and International Monetary Cooperation, 
working toward economic stability, etc. 

BA 271 RETAIL MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

An introduction to the management functions unique to retail store opera- 
tions. Subject areas include department store organization, low margin 
retailers, store location and layout, shopping centers, and merchandising. 

BA 272 BANK INVESTMENTS 3 semester hours 

A study of the banks needs for primary reserves and loanable funds. It 
analyzes primary and secondary reserve needs, the source of reserves, and 
their random and cyclical fluctuations, showing the influence on investment 
policy. A study of yield changes as they affect long term holdings. 

BA 273 SAVINGS AND TIME DEPOSIT BANKING 3 semester hours 

The role of savings in economy, motivation for saving, deposit-type savings, 
insurance-type savings, differences among savings institutions, interest 
rates and yields, characteristics of deposit-type savings institutions, etc. 

BA 274 SUPERMARKET MERCHANDISING 3 semester hours 

Merchandising techniques which apply to the supermarket are reviewed. 
Receiving emphasis: the store manager's merchandising responsibilities; an 
analysis of profit centers; customer motivation; consumer dynamics; product 
information; space management in store sales, promotion, and displays; 
inventory control; pricing; advertising; brand management; and increasing 
store sales and profits. Prerequisite: BA 137 - Introduction to Food Marketing. 

BA 283 SEMINAR II: RESEARCH IN 

MARKETING 3 semester hours 

Students will continue working in a marketing related occupation and partici- 
pate in DECA activities. Emphasis to be on developing management skills 
and research techniques employed in marketing. Prerequisite: BA 173. 

BA 284 SEMINAR HI: MARKETING 

MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Students will continue working in a marketing related occupation and 
participate in DECA activities. Students will be expected to participate in 
a group research project. 

BA 285 WAREHOUSING, DISTRIBUTION AND 

MATERIAL HANDLING 3 semester hours 

The principles of warehousing and distribution in relation to sales, services 
and transportation conditions. The use of storage and warehousing as a part 
of sales distribution. Warehousing contracts, warehouseman's liability, insur- 
ance and service, methods of material handling. Pallet loads, conveyor or 
systems and other time and labor saving devices. 

BA 286 SAVINGS ASSOCIATION LENDING 2 semester hours 

Savings and loan mortgage plan, functions of loan department, loan applica- 
tions, appraisals for financing, loan closing, F.H.A., V.A., housing for low 
income and elderly. 

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Courses — Business Administration 



BA 287 HOME FURNISHINGS MARKETING II: 

FURNITURE 3 semester hours 

Students will work with customers budgets, determining appropriate furnish- 
ings, floor coverings, bedding materials, wall coverings materials, and kitchen 
equipment. In addition, the students will study furniture construction in 
depth. They will also complete an integrating project developing an interior 
plan for a consumer's home. 

BA 288 INTERIOR DESIGN III: 
COMMERCIAL DECORATION, 
WINDOW TREATMENT, ACCESSORIZING 3 semester hours 

Students will study window treatments, lighting, accessories, and table 
appointments. Approximately one-half semester will be devoted to commer- 
cial decoration including such topics as office interiors, office furniture, 
commercial floor coverings, wall materials and accessorizing commercial 
interiors. An integrating project will deal with planning the commercial 
interior. 

BA 289 THE MORTGAGE BROKER 

IN MORTGAGE LENDING 2 semester hours 

The Mortgage Brokerage Act, Chapter 494, Florida Statutes; the mortgage 
broker in mortgage lending; history of mortgage lending; application proce- 
dure; the broker's role in closing the mortgage loan; mortgage business 
customs procedures; Federal Housing authority loans; Veteran Administration 
loans; the role of the appraiser in mortgage lending; and final examination, 
State of Florida Comptroller's office. 

BA 290 PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE 3 semester hours 

Nature of rights in real estate, urban development and utilization, valuation 
of real property, the real estate business, and government regulation. Prereq- 
uisite: BA 190 or instructor approval. (FREC II). $5.00 Fee. 

BA 291 RESIDENTIAL APPRAISAL 2 semester hours 

The role of appraising, neighborhood analysis, site and building data, 
improvement analysis, gross rent multiplier analysis, cost approach, methods 
of site valuation, reproduction cost, appraising for land development, how 
to organize an appraisal department. 

BA 292 ADVANCED ASPECTS OF 

REAL ESTATE LAW 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 190, BA 191 or Real Estate Broker or Salesman License, 
or Practicing Attorney, or Escrow Officer. This is a course for persons 
interested in the more advanced legal aspects of real estate problems. The 
course assumes a basic knowledge of the elements of real estate law. Subjects 
covered include: real estate contracts, probate proceedings, trusts, leases, 
tract maps, legal descriptions, litigation finance trust deed provisions, me- 
chanic's liens, loan laws, cooperative projects, condominiums, and business 
regulations. 

BA 293 REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL II 4 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 192. This course is the equivalent to SREA course 201. 
Combination of lecture and case approach to commercial appraisal with 
emphasis on income approach, in particular the estimation income and 
expense and the capitalization of net income into a value indication. This 
course is offered in cooperation with the Society of Real Estate Appraisers 
and registration is through SREA. 

110 



General Education 
Courses — Economics 

BA 294 REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE 

AND TAXATION 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: Six hours in real estate subjects or license. This course is a 
study of the taxation in real estate investment and sales. Recent legislation 
concerning Federal Income Tax which affects real estate is included. Detailed 
examples are given concerning exchange methods in transferring real estate 
ownership and its relationship to taxation. 

BA 295 REAL ESTATE ADVANCED 

PRACTICES 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: BA 190 sequence or consent of instructor. An advanced course 
developed especially for real estate licenses or persons employed in real 
estate services to increase their knowledge and improve their knowledge and 
improve their competence in four specialized areas of real estate operations: 
(1) the use and completion of selected real estate forms; (2) Title and 
escrow procedures; (3) residential construction and design; and (4) invest- 
ment and commercial properties. 

BA 296 PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE 

INVESTMENT 3 semester hours 

Real estate investment fundamentals depreciation, capital gain and loss, 
installment sales, nontaxable exchange, ownership forms, commercial lease- 
hold financing, creative financing, financial analysis projection, land, industrial 
property, shopping centers, office buildings, residential property, and mobile 
homes parks. 

BA 297 SEMINAR IV: SMALL BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION (MANAGEMENT) 3 semester hours 

This course is designed for the individual who is interested in establishing 
his own business. Emphasis on business law, accounting, recruiting and 
supervising employees and decisions related to setting up and operating a 
small business while being employed at his training station. Projects will 
include contact with owners of small businesses and a comprehensive project 
on how to set up his own business. 

BA 298 SECURITIES AND INVESTMENTS 3 semester hours 

Basic principles underlying investment decisions are explored. The operations 
and structure of the stock exchanges and the over-the-counter markets are . 
reviewed. Functions of security dealers and brokers are presented together 
with a detailed examination of the various types of stocks and bonds. Atten- 
tion is given to investment companies, financial statement analysis, fore- 
casting techniques, and portfolio management problems. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
ECONOMICS 

ECO 190 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 3 semester hours 

One-term survey of economic institutions and economic analysis. Course 
considers both individual decision-making units and the functioning of 
the economy as a whole, with some emphasis on current economic problems. 
It is primarily designed for terminal programs, or for students whose time 
is limited to a less intensive study than the two-term principles of economics 
course. (Credit will not be given for both this course and ECO 251.) 

Ill 



General Education 
Courses — Insurance 

ECO 251 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I 3 semester hours 

Introductory course in economic principles and analysis. Areas covered in- 
clude: basic economic problems and concepts, functioning of an enterprise 
economy, business organization and finance, public finance, national income 
accounting and analysis, and money and banking. 

ECO 252 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II 3 semester hours 

Extension of ECO 251 dealing with: price theory, income distribution, 
international trade and finance, economic growth, and comparative economic 
systems. Prerequisite: ECO 251 or instructor approval. 

ECO 254 MONEY & BANKING 3 semester hours 

General survey of the economics of money and banking. Areas covered 
include: the nature and functions of money; monetary standards; structure 
of the commercial banking system; creation of bank deposits; other financial 
institutions; structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System; monetary 
policy; monetary theory and the price level; interrelation of monetary and 
fiscal policy; recent monetary problems; international finance. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
INSURANCE 

INS 191 PERSONAL LIFE INSURANCE 

MARKETING 4 semester hours 

Course covers concept of life insurance as property — detailed study of the 
life insurance contract and its flexibility versus other means of savings and 
investment; the development of necessary characteristics of successful career 
agents; and the rules of selling with special emphasis on overcoming the 
prospect's psychological barriers and on total needs selling. (Preparation 
for LUTC Part I) Prerequisite: BA 132, or permission of the instructor. 

INS 192 BUSINESS LIFE INSURANCE 

MARKETING 4 semester hours 

Course emphasizes problems caused by death of a business owner (sole 
proprietor, partner, or stockholder of close corporation.) Federal taxation 
of business owners and organization and insurance premiums and proceeds 
is studied together with sales oriented study of the federal estate tax, gift 
taxes, income taxes, IRA, Keogh, tax-sheltered annuities, pension and 
profit-sharing plans, and group insurance. Includes split-dollar and deferred 
compensation for key persons; business continuation through buy-sell 
agreements funded by life insurance; and sales-oriented review of wills, 
intestacy laws, joint ownership, trusts, gifts, and estate problems. (Prepa- 
ration for LUTC Part II) Prerequisite: INS 191, or permission of the 
instructor. 

INS 193 DISABILITY INCOME MARKETING 2 semester hours 

Course emphasis is on the infinite needs and types of disability income 
coverages for individuals, business owners, and key personnel. Marketing 
emphasis placed on impact of programming income needs, interview 
psychology, and training client objections into stepping-stones for closing 
sales. Idea-stimulating case histories and action projects allow students to 
apply marketing techniques and ideas immediately. (Preparation for LUTC 
Part III) Prerequisite: BA 132, or permission of instructor. 

112 



General Education 
Courses — Insurance 

INS 194 EQUITIES MARKETING 2 semester hours 

The essentials of equity products and the costs of investing. Emphasis on 
mutual funds and variable annuity sales including how the products differ, 
tax consequences, flexibility and assurances, which product to recommend 
based on concept of a product or service for every need. Includes accumula- 
tion plans, withdrawals, one-time purchase, income funds, and deferred 
annuities. Discusses correlation of social security, taxes, and retirement 
aspects of financial planning, split-funded plans, deferred taxes, Keogh. 
and trusts. (Preparation for LUTC Part IV) Prerequisites: INS 191 and 
INS 192, or permission of the instructor. 

INS 199 SOLICITOR'S QUALIFICATION 

COURSE I 3 semester hours 

An introduction to the principles of risk and insurance. Primary emphasis 
is placed on understanding coverages, policy provisions, and concepts 
common to property and automobile insurance. Recommended prerequisite: 
BA 132. Co-Requisite: INS 200. 

INS 200 SOLICITOR'S QUALIFICATION 

COURSE II 4 semester hours 

Laws of negligence, principles of legal liability, and in depth study of 
casualty, surety, and commercial multi-peril policy provisions, coverages, 
and affiliated concepts. Co-Requisite: INS 199. 

INS 201 AGENTS & SOLICITORS COURSE I 3 semester hours 

An introduction to insurance theory and insurance regulation, the standard 
fire policy, fire and allied lines coverages and elements of rating, dwelling 
risks, non-dwelling risks, business interruption forms and other time element 
coverages, homeowners' forms. Recommended prerequisite: BA 132. Co- 
Requisite: INS 202. 

INS 202 AGENTS & SOLICITORS COURSE II 3 semester hours 

Torts and laws of negligence, principles of legal liability, basic concepts 
and elements of rating, family auto policy, basic auto policy, special auto 
package policy, comprehensive auto liability, garage insurance, Financial 
Responsibility Law, Florida Auto Reparations Act, JUA. Co- Requisite : INS 
201. 

INS 203 AGENTS & SOLICITORS COURSE III 3 semester hours 

Principles of legal liability, types of liability, fundamentals of coverage, 
coverage forms, elements of rating, history and development of worker's 
compensation, Florida's Worker's Compensation Law, employer's liability 
insurance, rating. Prerequisite or co-requisite: INS 201 and INS 202. 

INS 204 AGENTS & SOLICITORS COURSE IV 3 semester hours 

Crime, fidelity & surety, combination crime and fidelity, glass, health or 
disability, aviation, boiler and machinery, ocean marine. Prerequisite or 
co-requisite: INS 203. 

INS 205 AGENTS & SOLICITORS COURSE V 5 semester hours 

Inland marine, commercial multiple peril for motel-hotel, apartment house, 
office, mercantile, institutional, processing or service, industrial, optional 
coverages, Florida insurance rating law, survey, and agency management 
and operations. Co-Requisite: INS 204. 

113 



General Education 
Courses — Insurance 

INS 220 INSURANCE PRINCIPLES 

& PRACTICES I 3 semester hours 

Nature of risk, theory of probability, principles underlying insurance, the 
insurance contract, the negligence concept. A study of fire and allied lines, 
marine insurance, general liability, worker's compensation. (Preparation 
for CPCU Part I) Co-requisite: INS 221. 

INS 221 INSURANCE PRINCIPLES 

& PRACTICES II 4 semester hours 

A study of automobile liability and physical damage, crime, fidelity and 
surety bonds, boiler and machinery, health, life, miscellaneous casualty, 
multiple-line. (Preparation for CPCU Part I) Co-Requisite: INS 220. 

INS 222 ANALYSIS OF INSURANCE 

FUNCTIONS I 3 semester hours 

A study of the formation and organization of insurers, marketing of insur- 
ance, underwriting, reinsurance, rate-making, regulation of insurance. 
(Preparation for CPCU Part II) Co-Requisite: INS 223. 

INS 223 ANALYSIS OF INSURANCE 

FUNCTIONS II 4 semester hours 

A study of preparation and analysis of insurers' financial statements, record- 
keeping, required state statements and reports, retrospective and experience 
rating, loss and claims adjusting, human motivation, professional ethics, 
risk management including risk analysis and control, and insurance surveys. 
(Preparation for CPCU Part II) Co-Requisite: INS 222. 

INS 224 ECONOMICS: GOVERNMENT AND 

BUSINESS I 3 semester hours 

Economics overview, price determination, production theory, wages and 
worker management relationship, interest and capital, profits, national 
income concepts, sources of money, monetary and fiscal policy. (Preparation 
for CPCU Part III) Co-requisite: INS 225. 

INS 225 ECONOMICS: GOVERNMENT AND 

BUSINESS II 4 semester hours 

Business cycles, international trade — finance and economics, current eco- 
nomic problems, economic role of government, federal income taxation, 
basis and types of governmental control, anti-trust laws, regulation of 
insurances. (Preparation for CPCU Part III) Co-requisite: INS 224. 

INS 226 INSURANCE AND BUSINESS LAW I 3 semester hours 

Legal aspects of the insurance business. Insurance law re the insurance 
contract, the insurance agency, the standard fire policy, warranties, repre- 
sentation and concealment, waiver and estoppel. (Preparation for CPCU 
Part IV) Co-requisite: INS 227. 

INS 227 INSURANCE AND BUSINESS LAW II 4 semester hours 

Commercial law re contracts, agency, personal property and bailments, 
real property, negotiable instruments, partnerships and corporations, tort 
law. (Preparation for CPCU Part IV) Co-requisite: INS 226. 

INS 228 MANAGEMENT, ACCOUNTING AND 

FINANCE I 3 semester hours 

Modern management and decision making; planning, organizing, actuating 
and controlling. Assets, liabilities and owner's equity. The accounting cycle. 
(Preparation for CPCU Part V) Co-requisite: INS 229. 

114 



General Education 
Courses — Insurance 

INS 229 MANAGEMENT, ACCOUNTING AND 

FINANCE II 4 semester hours 

Using accounting information, financial planning and control, financial 
analysis, short and long term financing. (Preparation for CPCU Part V) 
Co-requisite: INS 228. 

INS 231 ECONOMIC SECURITY AND 

INDIVIDUAL LIFE INSURANCE 3 semester hours 

This course lays the economic and ethical foundation on which the life 
and health insurance business is based. It includes economic security needs, 
human behavior, professionalism and ethics in life and health insurance. 
Also familiarizes students with individual life, health and annuity contracts, 
and life insurance programming. Types of insurers, investments, financial 
statements, risk selection, taxation and regulation of companies are also 
covered. (Preparation for C.L.U. Course HS 301.) 

INS 232 LIFE INSURANCE LAW AND 

MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

Legal aspects of contract formation, policy provisions, assignments, owner- 
ship rights, creditor rights, beneficiary designations, and disposition of life 
insurance proceeds. Also covered is the mathematics of life insurance as 
related to premiums, reserves, nonforfeiture values, surplus and dividends. 
(Preparation for C.L.U. Course HS 302.) Recommended prerequisite: 
INS 231. 

INS 233 GROUP INSURANCE AND 

SOCIAL INSURANCE 3 semester hours 

Analysis of group life and health insurance, including products, marketing, 
underwriting, reinsurance, premiums, and reserves. Also, various govern- 
mental programs related to the economic problems of death, old age, un- 
employment, and disability. (Preparation for C.L.U. Course HS 303.) 
Recommended prerequisite or corequisite: INS 231 and INS 232. 

INS 234 ECONOMICS 3 semester hours 

Economic principles, the governmental and banking institutions which 
have an effect on the national economy, national income, theory and 
application of price determination, business cycles, money and banking, 
monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade and finance. The 
changes in economic conditions on financial decisions relating to life insur- 
ance, pensions, and other financial media. (Preparation for C.L.U. Course 
HS 304.) 

INS 235 ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE 3 semester hours 

Basic accounting principles including data accumulation systems, income 
measurement, valuation of assets and liabilities, and financial statement 
analysis. The accounting process from the recording of a business transac- 
tion in the books of account to the final preparation of financial state- 
ments. Various sources of short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term 
funds available to business enterprise. (Preparation for C.L.U. Course 
HS 305.) Recommended Prerequisite: INS 234. 

INS 236 INVESTMENTS AND FAMILY FINANCIAL 

MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Various aspects of investment principles and their application to family 
finance. Yields, limited income securities, investment markets, and valuation 
of common stock. Also family budgeting, property and liability insurance, 

115 



General Education 
Courses — Insurance 

mutual funds, variable annuities, and aspects of other investment media. 
Financial counseling in setting financial objectives and allocating available 
resources in a manner consistent with risk preferences. (Preparation for 
C.L.U. Course HS 306.) Recommended prerequisites or corequisites: INS 
234 and INS 235. 

INS 237 INCOME TAXATION 3 semester hours 

The federal income tax system with particular reference to the taxation of 
life insurance and annuities. The income taxation of individuals, sole propri- 
etorships, partnerships, corporations, trusts, and estates. Also, the income 
taxation of transactions involving annuities as well as life and health in- 
surance. (Preparation for C.L.U. Course HS 307.) 

INS 238 PENSION PLANNING 3 semester hours 

Basic features of pension plans. Cost factors, funding instruments, and 
tax considerations involved in private pensions, profit-sharing plans, and 
tax-deferred annuities. Also, thrift and savings plans and plans for the 
self-employed. Effect of Employees Retirement Income Security Act of 
1974 on covered areas. (Preparation for C.L.U. Course HS 308.) Recom 
mended prerequisite: INS 237. 

INS 239 BUSINESS INSURANCE 3 semester hours 

Business uses of life and health insurance, including proprietorship, partner- 
ship and corporation continuation problems and their solutions through the 
use of buy-sell agreements properly funded to preserve and distribute 
business values. Other business uses of life and health insurance, such as 
key man insurance, nonqualified deferred compensations plans and split- 
dollar plans. Also covered are corporate recapitalizations, professional 
corporations, and business uses of property and liability insurance. (Prep- 
aration for C.L.U. Course HS 309.) Recommended prerequisites or co- 
requisites: INS 237 and INS 238. 

INS 240 ESTATE PLANNING AND TAXATION 3 semester hours 

Estate and tax planning, emphasizing the nature, valuation, disposition 
administration, and taxation of property. The use of revocable and irrevo- 
cable trusts, testamentary trusts, life insurance, powers of appointment, 
wills, lifetime gifts, and the marital deduction. Also, the role of life 
insurance in minimizing the financial (problems of the estate owner. The 
capstone learning experience of the CLU Diploma Program. Knowledge 
acquired in other CLU courses is necessary for students to have a rewarding 
and successful learning experience in this course. (Preparation for C.L.U. 
Course HS 310.) Required prerequisites or corequisites: INS 231 through 
INS 239, or credit for C.L.U. national examination for those courses. 

INS 259 PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE AND 

PROPERTY LOSS ADJUSTING 3 semester hours 

This course explores many of the principles basic to the entire field of 
insurance in addition to developing an understanding of the fundamental 
areas in property loss adjusting. Besides the fundamental areas of indemnity, 
requisites of an insurable risk, probability, and many others, emphasis is 
placed on the adjustment process. Claim analysis, claim reporting, estima- 
tion of building losses, construction costs, as well as personal property loss 
adjustment are studied. (Preparation for I.I. A. ADJ 31) Prerequisite: 
BA 132; INS 260; or permission of instructor. 

116 



General Education 
Courses — Insurance 

INS 260 PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE AND 

LIABILITY CLAIM ADJUSTING 3 semester hours 

This course considers the important functional areas of rating and under- 
writing, as well as the subjects of regulation, reinsurance, and company 
organization. Basic liability claim adjustment is explored, including a study 
of the legal liability hazard, and the investigation, evaluation, negotiation, 
and settlement of general and automobile liability claims, and automobile 
physical damage losses. Special attention is given to the Florida "No Fault" 
law and to the subject of understanding human behavior of claiments. 
(Preparation for I.I.A. ADJ 32) Prerequisite: BA 132; INS 259; or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

INS 261 PRINCIPLES OF RISK AND INSURANCE 3 semester hours 

This course is primarily concerned with developing an understanding of 
the basic principles of risk and insurance as well as the nature and oper- 
ation of the insurance business. Understanding is developed in the funda- 
mental areas of: indemnity, insurable interest, negligence, co-insurance, 
subrogation, proximate cause, requisites of an insurable risk, probability, 
and many others. Important functional areas of rating, underwriting, and 
adjusting are considered as well as the subjects of regulation, reinsurance, 
powers and functions of insurance agents and brokers, company organi- 
zation, and many other aspects of the insurance business. (Preparation for 
I.I.A. INS 21) Pre-requisite BA 132; INS 262; INS 263; or permission of 
instructor. 

INS 262 PROPERTY AND MARINE INSURANCE 3 semester hours 

Primary emphasis in this course is placed on understanding coverages, policy 
provisions, and concepts common to property and marine insurance. Con- 
tracts and forms will be analyzed and studied, ranging from Standard Fire 
Policy to the Property and Inland Marine coverages provided by multiple- 
line contracts. (Preparation for I.I.A. INS 22) Prerequisite: BA 132; 
INS 261; INS 263; or INS 260; or permission of the instructor. 

INS 263 CASUALTY, HEALTH, AND 

LIFE INSURANCE 3 semester hours 

Principal emphasis in this course is placed on understanding coverages, 
policy provisions, and concepts peculiar to the common casualty, surety, 
and multiple-line contracts, as well as Life and Health contracts. (Prepara- 
tion for I.I.A. INS 23) Prerequisite: BA 132; INS 261; INS 262 or INS 
259 and INS 260; or permission of the instructor. 

INS 265 PROPERTY INSURANCE ADJUSTING 3 semester hours 

Covers in more depth than previous courses the subjects of apportionment, 
insurable interest, limitations on the amount of insurer's liability (including 
replacement cost and contribution), and estimating. Special consideration 
is given to adjustment of building losses (including valuation), merchan- 
dise and fixture losses, reporting form losses, and business interruption 
losses. (Preparation for I.I.A. ADJ 35) Prerequisite: INS 259 and INS 
262; or permission of instructor. 

INS 266 LIABILITY INSURANCE ADJUSTING 3 semester hours 

Covers the concepts of legal duty, breach of legal duty, and concepts of 
damages. Also considered are an introduction to medical knowledge needed 
by adjusters, a study of adjuster-lawyer, and adjuster-physician relationships, 
and sp>ecial problems of settlement of worker's compensation claims. 
Investigation and evaluation problems are examined at a more advanced 
level than previous courses in the program. (Preparation for I.I.A. ADJ 
36) Prerequisite: INS 260 and INS 263; or permission of instructor. 

117 



General Education 
Courses — Insurance 

INS 267 INTRODUCTION TO PROPERTY AND 

LIABILITY ADJUSTING 3 semester hours 

This course includes the Property Loss Adjustment Topics from INS 259 
and the Liability Claim Adjustment Topics from INS 260 for students 
previously completing INS 261 covering the Principles of Risk and Insur- 
ance and associated topics. (Preparation for I. LA. ADJ 37) Prerequisite: 
INS 261, or permission of instructor. 

INS 268 STRUCTURE OF THE RISK 

MANAGEMENT PROCESS 3 semester hours 

Against background of the principles of general management and the 
objectives of a business organization, this course presents the steps in the 
risk management decision-making process. Procedures for identifying and 
evaluating property, income, liability, and personnel loss exposures are 
detailed. The general characteristics of the various risk control and risk 
financing techniques are explored. The course concludes with guidelines 
for selecting the most appropriate risk management techniques for each 
exposure and demonstrates how proper risk management contributes to 
achieving the organization's overall objectives. (Preparation for 1. 1. A. RM 
54) Prerequisite: BA 132, or INS 261; or permission of instructor. 

INS 269 RISK CONTROL 3 semester hours 

This course focuses on the best use of risk control techniques. Drawing 
on the guidelines developed in INS 268, a detailed study is made of when 
and to what extent each risk control technique should be employed, how 
each should be monitored for control and coordination of the total risk 
management effort. (Preparation for I. LA. RM 55) Prerequisite: INS 268. 

INS 270 RISK FINANCING 3 semester hours 

This course concentrates on the selection, administration, and monitoring 
of the methods by which an organization can obtain funds to finance the 
restoration of those losses which it incurs. Risk financing techniques are 
investigated with attention directed primarily to risk retention (including 
retention through a captive insurer), use of credit to restore losses and 
commercial insurance. The financial and economic guidelines from INS 
268 are again applied (more rigorously) to such topics as setting the 
amounts of self-insured retention, negotiating with admitted and non- 
admitted insurers, and coordinating self-insurance with commercial insur- 
ance. (Preparation for I.I.A RM 56) Prerequisite: INS 268. 

INS 277 THE PROCESS OF MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Introduction to the study of management and managerial problem-solving. 
The major functions in the management process are explored. Cases based 
on actual organizational experience, including that within the insurance 
industry, provide opportunities to apply concepts in solving management 
problems. (Preparation for I.I.A. MGT 41). 

INS 278 MANAGEMENT AND HUMAN 

RESOURCES 3 semester hours 

Course develops an understanding of human behavior within organizations, 
drawing upon the behavioral sciences to provide analytical tools and ways 
of studying behavior within organizational settings. Case studies are used 
to emphasize the search for ways the manager can act effectively to achieve 
organizational goals by influencing organization members. (Preparation for 
I.I.A. MGT 42). 

118 



General Education 
Courses — Insurance 



INS 279 MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING 3 semester hours 

This course develops a systematic framework for the evaluation of de- 
cisions. Particular attention is given to the human decision process, and 
to the sources of inaccuracy and error in the making of decisions. The 
organizational decision making process, including the computer's role in 
such decision making, is treated. The managerial significance of the topics 
is stressed rather than the procedures themselves so that knowledge of 
statistics or advanced mathematics is not required. (Preparation for I. LA. 
MGT 43). 

INS 280 MANAGEMENT IN A CHANGING 

WORLD 3 semester hours 

This course examines the mutual influences of managerial activities and 
the broader society. Emphasis is placed on the forces to which the manager 
must respond, including changes within people as well as technological 
developments. Emerging trends in managerial practices and managerial 
thinking are studied for their usefulness in preparing to meet the leadership 
needs of change-dominated organizations in the future. (Preparation for 
I.I.A. MGT 44). 




Language Labora 



TORY 



QUIET PLEASE 



119 



Communications 
English! 

DIVISION OF COMMUNICATIONS 

Communications for International Students 

English 

Journalism 

Modern Foreign Languages 

Reading 

Speech 

The Division of Communications represents that portion of the college 
curriculum which is basic to the communications skills and which is neces- 
sary for the student's progress in all curricula. The program emphasizes 
development of broad aspects of linguistics, in English and in foreign 
languages. 

Below, under the headings of Communications for International Stu- 
dents, English, Journalism, Modern Foreign Languages, Reading and Speech, 
will be discussed in some detail the intent and scope of these disciplines 
which make up the Division of Communications. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

All regularly enrolled Freshman and Sophomore students in the Uni- 
versity Parallel Program are required to complete a minimum of six hours 
of English Composition. All such students must complete ENG 101 which 
is the first 3-hour unit of English composition. The second three-hour unit 
requirement may be fulfilled with either ENG 102 or ENG 104. Sub)ect to 
appropriate area approval, students enrolled is certain techoic^ programs 
may substitute ENG 095 and ENG 103 for ENG 101 and ENG 102 or 
ENG 104 to satisfy composition requirements leading to an A.S. degree. All 
international students (F-J Visa) are required to enroll in Communications 
for International Students. After successful completion oi the CIS sequence, 
the student will complete his English requirement with ENG 102, 103, or 
104, depending on the degree sought. 

Students who do not qualify for English 101 will be placed in English 
094 or English 095 on the basis of a special English test. These courses 
carry three semester hours credit. They are designed for local credit only; 
they will not be acceptable as a substitute for a college transfer course that 
will count toward the college Associate in Arts Degree; and they will prob- 
ably not be acceptable by other institutions for credit toward a four-year 
college degree. ENG 095 carries RDG 093 (Reading Communications) as 
a corequisite which should be taken the same term as ENG 095. In special 
cases permission may be granted to allow the student to take RDG 093 
the term following his successful completion of ENG 095. Students whose 
records show adequate preparation in reading and those who score well on 
the Reading Department diagnostic test will be exempted from RDG 093. 

In literature courses, the ability to evaluate critically is given paramount 
importance. Emphasis is placed upon preparing the student to express him- 
self in both oral and written language. 

120 



Communications 
English 

A cluster of specialized courses provides training and experience in the 
craft of creative writing. If the student wishes, he may combine these writing 
courses with the different but related writing opportunities in the Journalism 
Department. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR ENGLISH 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 Composition 3 

SPE 100 Intro, to Speech MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 

Comm 3 Science 3 

Social Science 3 Social Science 3 

Modern Foreign Language 3 Modern Foreign Language 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 16 

Summer Terms 

Science 3 

Total Semester Hours 3 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

Elective 3 ENG 140 or JOU 100 3 

ENG 211 or 212 World ENG 222 British Literature 3 

Literature 3 Modern Foreign Language 3 

ENG 221 British Literature 3 PHY 260 Intro, to Philosophy .3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 Elective 3 

Modern Foreign Language 3 HPR Physk^l Educstion 1 

HPR Pteysical Education 1 

TotaJ Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 

RECOIV^IENDED ELECTIVES 

EDU 250 Introduction 3 

SPE 1 1 1 Introduction to 

Public Speaking 3 

ART 207 Art Appreciation 3 

PHI Ethics 3 

MU 207 Music Appreciation 3 

ENG 230 or 231 American 

Literature 3 

ENG 140-Introductory 

Creative Writing 3 

ENG 141 Creative 

Writing — Fiction 3 

ENG 142 Creative 

Writing — Poetry 3 

ENG 143 Creative 

Writing — Script 3 

ENG 144 Creative 

Writing — Articles 3 

ENG 245 Creative 

Writing Workshop 3 

121 



Communications 
Courses — English 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
ENGLISH 

ENG 094 FUNDAMENTALS OF GRAMMAR, 

USAGE, AND MECHANICS (NT) 3 semester hours 

A study of the functions of parts of speech, clauses, sentence types, 
capitahzation, punctuation, and spelling. 

ENG 095 FUNDAMENTALS OF WRITING (NT) 3 semester hours 

A study of the logic of exposition through the writing of sentences, para- 
graphs, and short expository compositions. Corequisite: RDG 093. 

ENG 101 COMPOSITION 3 semester hours 

Training in methods of expository writing and processes of logical think- 
ing. Prerequisite: A minimum score of 60 in English on the Florida 12th 
Grade Placement Test and a minimum average score in high school 
English of 2.0, or successful completion of ENG 095 with successful 
completion of RDG 093 or registration for RDG 093 the same term as 
ENG 101, or counselor approval. 

ENG 102 COMPOSITION 3 semester hours 

Training in descriptive, narrative, and argumentative writing. Emphasis 
on the research paper. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Either ENG 102 or ENG 
104 will satisfy English composition university parallel requirements. 

ENG 103 TECHNICAL REPORT WRITING 3 semester hours 

Training to qualify students to meet industry writing standards. Includes 
common types of reports, graphics, and oral presentations. Stresses process 
description, writing instructions, and simple proposals. Prerequisite: ENG 
095 or ENG 101. 

ENG 104 COMPOSITION 3 semester hours 

Training in writing descriptive, narrative, argumentative, and evaluative 
papers. Emphasis on investigative techniques, abstracting and documenta- 
tion. A research paper on a subject related to student's principal field of 
interest is required. Develops verbal communications skills through individ- 
ual and group presentations. Prerequisite: ENG 101. Either ENG 104 or 
ENG 102 will satisfy English composition university parallel requirements. 

ENG 110 GRAMMAR 3 semester hours 

Includes parts of speech, tense, case, mood, sentence patterns, and punctu- 
ation. Designed for English majors, students who desire further work 
with grammar, and students enrolled in a beginning foreign language 
course. 

ENG 140 INTRODUCTORY CREATIVE WRITING 3 semester hours 

Student writing as the basis for critical discussion with emphasis on 
fundamental aspects of poetry, fiction and drama. Prerequisite: Eligibility 
for ENG 101. 

ENG 141 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE 

WRITING— FICTION 3 semester hours 

Student writing as the basis for critical discussion with emphasis on 
analysis of the elements of fiction. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or instructor's 
approval. 

122 



Communications 
Courses — English 

ENG 142 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE 

WRITING — POETRY 3 semester hours 

Student writing as the basis for critical discussion with emphasis on analysis 
of the elements of poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or instructor's approval. 

ENG 143 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE 

WRITING — SCRIPT 3 semester hours 

Student writing as the basis for critical discussion with emphasis on 
analysis of the elements of script. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or instructor's 
approval. 

ENG 144 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE 

WRITING — ARTICLES 3 semester hours 

Student writing as the basis for critical discussion with emphasis on 
analysis of the elements of article writing. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 
instructor's approval. 

ENG 203 GREAT IDEAS IN POETRY 3 semester hours 

An analytical and emotive exploration of ideas in the specific genre of 
poetry. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

ENG 204 GREAT IDEAS IN THE SHORT STORY 3 semester hours 

An exploration of relevant and stimulating ideas through class discussions 
centering on analyses of American, British and Continental short story 
masterpieces. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

ENG 205 LITERATURE OF THE SUPERNATURAL 

AND OF SCIENCE FICTION 3 semester hours 

A survey of literary masterpieces of the supernatural and of science fiction 
involving such writers as Edgar Allan Poe, H. G. Wells, Bram Stokes, Ray 
Bradbury, and Isaac Asimov. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

ENG 206 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN THE 

COMMUNICATIVE ARTS 3 semester hours 

An analytical and emotive exploration of contemporary issues in the genres 
of fiction, poetry, drama, essay, and the film. Prerequisite: Eligibility for 
ENG 101. 

ENG 207 THE FILM AS LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

Introduction to the film as literature: an examination of the elements of 
film contrasted to the elements of novels and plays, with emphasis on the 
basic components of fiction as translated into visual images. The course 
provides an opportunity for viewing significant films and sharing in their 
evaluation. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. Completion of ENG 
101 prior to enrollment is strongly recommended. Special fee required. 

ENG 208 MALE/ FEMALE IMAGES IN 

LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

An exploration of the ways literature represents and perpetuates sex roles 
in society with particular emphasis on the stereotyping of women. Read- 
ings include drama, short stories, novels, and poetry from classical to 
contemporary. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

ENG 209 CONTEMPORARY BLACK LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

Fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama by American and African writers 
since 1920, including Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Leroi 

' Jones, Peter Abrahams, and Lorraine Hansberry. Prerequisite: Eligibility 

} for ENG 101. 

i 

1 123 



Communications 
Courses — English 

ENG 210 MYSTERY FICTION 3 semester hours 

A discussion of plot, character, setting, theme, style, and subject matter 
of some of the most representative works of the greatest authors of 
mystery fiction, including Poe, Chesterton, Sayers, Christie, and Conan 
Doyle. 

ENG 211 WORLD LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

Selected masterpieces of world literature before 1611. Emphasis on the 
Greek myth, epic, and drama; the Bible; and Shakespeare. Prerequisite: 
ENG 101. 

ENG 212 WORLD LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

Selected masterpieces of world literature since 1610. Thematic approach 
to man's search for identity in such authors as Racine, Balzac, Dostoevsky, 
Goethe, Pirandello, Ibsen, Camus, Hesse, and Lorca. Prerequisite: ENG 
101. 

ENG 221 BRITISH LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

Traces the growth of the modern mind — the development of the world 
view and the changing relationships between man and woman, man and 
authority, man and art, man and God, in British literature through the 
eighteenth century with emphasis on Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

ENG 222 BRITISH LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

A study of man's relationship to the natural environment, the increasing 
sense of social responsibility, the liberated woman, the continuing intellec- 
tual revolution, and the origins of current social and economic problems, 
in British literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including 
such writers as the Romantic poets, Tennyson, Browning, Hardy, Yeats, 
Shaw, Eliot, and Thomas. Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

ENG 230 AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

Selected masterpieces of American literature before 1900, including works 
of Hawthorne, Whitman, Melville, and Crane. Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

ENG 231 AMERICAN LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

Selected masterpieces of American literature from 1900 on, including 
works of Faulkner, Frost, and Hemingway. Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

ENG 245 CREATFVE WRITING WORKSHOP 3 semester hours 

A continuing development of creative writing ability. Prerequisite: ENG 
140, ENG 141, ENG 142, ENG 143, or ENG 144. 

ENG 246 ADVANCED CREATIVE 

WRITING WORKSHOP 1 semester hour 

A continuing development of creative writing ability. This course may 
be repeated a maximum of three times for a maximum of three semester 
hours credit. Prerequisite: ENG 245. 

ENG 290 SEMINAR IN LITERATURE 1-6 semester hours 

A combination of classroom preparation plus travel. Variable content 
depending on areas to be visited. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

124 



Communications 

English Honors Program, 
International Students 

ENGLISH HONORS PROGRAM 

The following English honors courses are offered. Only students who 
have qualified under the college's honors program may enroll for these 
courses. * 

ENG 101 H HONORS COMPOSITION — 

Term I only 3 semester hours 

Stresses expository writing with emphasis on critical discussion of student 
writing. 

ENG 102 H HONORS COMPOSITION — 

Term II only 3 semester hours 

Stresses research and documentation techniques, argumentative, descriptive 
and narrative writing, and critical examination of various literary genres. 

HONORS LITERATURE COURSES 3 semester hours 

At least one literature course is offered for honor credit each Term I 
and II of every academic year. For explanation of content see individual 
literature course descriptions. Stress is placed on student interest and effort. 
Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program and ENG 101 with a term 
grade of B. 

*To remain in the Program, a student must maintain a B average in honors 
courses. Though all honors courses carry the same credit as regular courses, 
an H is affixed to the transcript to indicate honors credit. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS FOR 
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

The Communications for International Student Courses are designed 
to provide second language instruction to the non-native speaker of English. 
Registration in CIS courses is required of all incoming international students 
(F-J visa). The courses are also open to residents whose native language is 
not English. 

Placement in courses is determined by interview and testing. The ap- 
propriate combination of speech and English instruction is determined 
individually according to the student's existing English language skills. Once 
in the CIS sequence a student may be exempted from a course by instructor 
recommendation . 

CIS 940 (Phonetics), CIS 941 (Conversation), CIS 950 (Beginning 
English), and CIS 951 (Intermediate English) are designated for institutional 
credit only; credit granted is not applicable to the college Associate in Art 
Degree, and in most cases, would not be considered transferable college 
credit. CIS 100 (College Composition) in an advanced course that grants 
transferable credit. The student fulfills his English requirement by successful 
completion of CIS 100, plus ENG 102, 103 or 104, depending on the 
degree sought. 

125 



Communications 
Journalism 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

CIS 940 PHONETICS OF AMERICAN 

ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER 

LANGUAGES 3 semester hours (institutional) 

Designed to guide the student to mastery of basic English communicative 
skills. The approach is multi-sensorial involving listening, speaking, reading, 
and writing techniques of language acquisition, with prime emphasis on 
phonemic production and vocabulary acquisition. 

CIS 941 CONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH FOR 
SPEAKERS OF OTHER 
LANGUAGES 3 semester hours (institutional) 

Designed to guide the students toward acceptable pronunciation, phrasing, 
and intonation of oral American English through exercise material predicated 
upon the students' social and academic needs. 

CIS 950 ENGLISH AS A SECOND 

LANGUAGE 6 semester hours (institutional) 

An intensive course in beginning English for Speakers of Other Languages. 
Provides development in writing, classroom speaking, listening, and study 
skills. 

CIS 951 ENGLISH AS A SECOND 

LANGUAGE 6 semester hours (institutional) 

An intensive course in intermediate English for Speakers of Other Languages. 
Provides development in writing, classroom speaking, listening, and study 
skills. 

CIS 100 ENGLISH AS A SECOND 

LANGUAGE 3 semester hours 

A college composition course for the advanced student of English as a 
Second Language. Emphasizes logical thought and substantiation in various 
expository styles along with continued reinforcement in the mechanics of 
English. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of CIS 951, or instructor 
recommendation. 



DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATIONS 

The Journalism curriculum offers students basic courses in writing and 
editing, history and survey, and opportunity to put the knowledge to use by 
writing for campus publications. Students are encouraged to look off campus 
as well as on campus for newsworthy material. Student newspapers and 
magazines invite interest and participation and opportunity is provided for 
journalism students to participate in state and national competition. The BCC 
journalism program prepares students for further study in pursuit of a 
degree, and in some cases has opened the way for media employment upon 
completion of the associate in arts degree. 

126 



Communications 
Courses — Journalism 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR JOURNALISM (A.A. Degree) 
(News-Editorial, Magazine, Photo-Journalism) 



FIRST 

First Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 

*PSC 121 National Government 3 

JOU 140 Magazine Production 3 

JOU 100 Writing for Mass 

Communications 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



13 



YEAR 

Second Term 
ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 
*PSC 122 State & Local Gov't. 3 
MTH 131 Basic College Math or 
MTH 132 Contemporary 

Algebra 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

JOU 101 Intro, to News Writing 

and/or 
JOU 141 Magazin.; Practicum 1-2 
JOU 205 Basic Newspaper Edit, 
or 

JOU 215 Magazine Edit 3 

Total Semester Hours 14-15 



Summer Terms 

SPE 100 Introductory Speech 3 

GEO 201 World Regional Geo. 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours . 7 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
PSY 201 General Psychology 
ECO 251 Prin. of Economics 

Science 

ENG 231 Contemporary Am. 

Literature 

JOU 210 Photo JournaHsm 



Second Term. 
3 JOU 102 Intro, to News Writing 
3 and/or 

3-4 JOU 142 Magazine Practicum 1-2 
ECO 252 Prin. of Economics 3 

.3 ENG 212 World Literature 



Total Semester Hours 



ENG 222 English Literature 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Science 3-4 

JOU 118 Survey of 

Communications 3 

16-17 Total 14-15 



''Two courses of American history are required of all students in the Uni- 
versity of Florida College of Journalism and Mass Communications. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
JOURNALISM 

JOU 100 WRITING FOR MASS 

COMMUNICATIONS 3 semester hours 

Pre-professional course providing fundamental instruction and practice 
in writing as a basis for all upper division courses in journalism. Includes 
writing in the news style, leads, what is news, types of stories, organization 
of stories, policy and libel. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 101. 



127 



Communications 
Courses — Journalism 

JOU 101 INTRODUCTION TO NEWS WRITING 1 semester hour 

Practical application of news writing and editing principles through work 
with college media. Prerequisite: JOU 100. 

JOU 102 INTRODUCTION TO NEWS WRITING 1 semester hour 

Continuation of JOU 101. Prerequisite: JOU 101. 

JOU 118 SURVEY OF COMMUNICATIONS 3 semester hours 

Introductory course in mass communications dealing with history, com- 
parative foreign press, process and effect, opportunities in and responsibil- 
ities of various media. Open to freshmen. 

JOU 140 MAGAZINE PRODUCTION 3 semester hours 

Course provides instruction and practical experience in the philosophical 
and technical aspects of magazine production, including printing processes, 
copy setting, picture editing, graphic design, and camera ready layout 
techniques. 

JOU 141 MAGAZINE PRACTICUM 1 semester hour (2 hour lab) 

Practical application of magazine production, magazine writing, or maga- 
zine editing principles through work with college magazine media or 
internship with community media under academic supervision. Prerequisite: 
JOU 140, or JOU 210, or JOU 215, or ENG 144, or ART 106. 

JOU 142 MAGAZINE PRACTICUM 1 semester hour (2 hour lab) 

Continuation of JOU 141. Prerequisite: JOU 141. 

JOU 205 BASIC NEWSPAPER EDITING 3 semester hours 

Course provides instruction and practical experience in copy editing, tele- 
type editing, rewriting, copy preparation, headline writing, page layout for 
both news and advertising, picture cropping and scaling and cutlines. 
Prerequisite: JOU 100. 

JOU 210 PHOTOGRAPHIC JOURNALISM 4 semester hours 

Course teaches the photograph as a communications medium, its purposes 
and advantages. It deals with law, taste, sensitivity, responsibility, mechanics 
of layout, of placement and of cropping. Work includes practical experience 
in photo essays, spot news, novelty pictures, black and white and color 
and cutlines. Basics in filing, reference, and the morgue are included. Three 
hours lecture and two hours lab. 

JOU 215 MAGAZINE EDITING 3 semester hours 

Course provides instruction and practical experience in editing a magazine 
including human relations, expertise in article writing, copy and picture 
editing, audience analysis, and legal and economic aspects of editing. 
Prerequisite: JOU 100 or Eng. 144. 

JOU 220 NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING 3 semester hours 

A course in campaign planning, layout, illustration, copywriting, headlines 
and titles, economics of advertising, typography, value of advertising in the 
American economy, agency organization, history and ethics. 



128 



Communications 
Foreign Languages 

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

The students enrolled in foreign languages will receive intensive prepa- 
ration in the basic skills of the language so that they will be able to continue 
their work and interest in this area after graduating from B.C.C. A combi- 
nation of modern and traditional methods helps the student learn to speak 
the language and gives him an insight into the culture. 

Thus the student is offered language training that assists him in his 
preparation for upper division work or for use in a vocation or profession. 
At the same time, a modern language laboratory is an integral part of be- 
ginning language classes and is available for additional drill and comprehen- 
sion at all levels. 

The advanced courses permit the student to proceed in a given language 
beyond the basic skills and offer a substantial introduction to literary masters 
and to the culture of each country. 

The Modern Foreign Language Department now offers special con- 
versation courses at the elementary and intermediate levels. These are 
designated as 111 and 211 courses. 

The student should consult the section in the index entitled Degree 
Requirements for B.C.C. requirements in foreign languages. 

Students who plan to transfer to upper division work towards the B.A. 
or B.S. degree should complete the intermediate level of foreign language at 
B.C.C. All candidates for the A. A. degree are encouraged to do so, especially 
if they are not certain of their ultimate major program at the upper division. 
The student should remember that often upper divisions of senior institu- 
tions require at least the intermediate level of the language. 

During the registration period, all students who have had 2 years or 
more of a foreign language in high school and who are to continue in this 
language are given placement tests to determine the suitable level of study. 
Students transferring from other colleges should continue equivalent se- 
quential courses. 

Students should note that Studies in Literature and Culture (FRE, 
GER, or SPA 205 and 206) may be applied to fulfill 6 hours of the Hu- 
manities requirement. 



MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE ACTIVmES 

International Foreign Langu^e Organization — This organization is open to 
students of foreign languages and to other interested members of the college 
community. It provides an opportunity for intercultural exchange and for 
reinforcement of the spoken language. 

TRAVEL — Study Program (see course descriptions FRE 104, GER 104, 
SPA 104). 

129 





Second Term 




3 


ENG 102 Composition 


3 


3 


HIS 102 World Civilization 
Modern Foreign Language 


3 


3 


(in sequence) 


3 or 4 




Science with Laboratory 


4 


3 
1 


HPR Physical Education 


1 



Communications 
Foreign Languages 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
HIS 101 World Civilization 
Modern Foreign Language (level 

according to placement test) 
SPE 115 Phonetics of American 

English 
HPR Physical Education 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 14 or 15 

Summer Terms 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

Total Semester Hours 3 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 201 World Literature 3 ENG 202 World Literature 3 

Modern Foreign Language Modern Foreign Language 

(in sequence) 3 (in sequence) 3 

2nd Modern Foreign Language 3 2nd Modern Foreign Language 3 

Science with Laboratory 3 Humanities 3 

MTH 100 Gen. Ed. College Math. 3 GEO 201 World Regional Geo. 3 

HPR Physical Education I HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 16 

SUGGESTED ELECTIVES 

MUS 207 Music Appreciation 

EDL) 250 Intro, to Education 

SPE 100 Introduction to Speech 

BA 101 Elementary Typing 

ENG 221 English Literature 

ENG 222 English Literature 

HIS 112 The Americas from 1815 

ENG 1 10 Grammar 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Science 3 HPR 1 

HPR 1 Geography 201 3 

Spanish 101 3 Spanish 102 . .4 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 14 

Summer Terms 

French 101 3 

Total Semester Hours 3 

130 



Communications 
Courses — French 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

Mathematics 100 3 French 201 3 

French 102 4 History 212 3 

History 211 3 HPR 1 

Humanities 3 Humanities 3 

HPR 1 Science 3 

Spanish 201 3 Spanish 202 3 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 16 



Summer Terms 

French 202 3 

Total Semester Hours 3 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FRENCH 

FRE 101 BEGINNING FRENCH 3 semester hours 

Fundamentals of speaking, understanding, reading and writing. Classroom 
practice and exercises supplemented by language laboratory sessions de- 
signed to develop confidence and proficiency. Student expected to continue 
with French 102. 1 hour language laboratory weekly. Fee: $5.00. 

FRE 102 BEGINNING FRENCH 4 semester hours 

Continuation of French 101. Further development of the basic skills. 
Selected readings. Prerequisite: French 101 or its equivalent. One hour 
language laboratory weekly. Fee: $5.00. 

FRE 104 FRENCH STUDY-TRAVEL 3 semester hours 

A course designed for students who wish to combine the study of French 
with subsequent travel to a French-speaking region. Prerequisite: French 

101 or 111 or permission of instructor. 

FRE 111 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

(Institutional Credit) 

A custom-made course for those residents in the community who require 
a cursory knowledge of French to help them communicate with French- 
speaking people. 

FRE 201 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 3 semester hours 

Review of most salient grammar principles plus introduction of new 
grammatical and idiomatic material. Composition and readings in French 
prose. Conversation at an easy and enjoyable pace. Prerequisite: French 

102 or equivalent. 

FRE 202 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 3 semester hours 

Emphasis on composition and comprehension and conversation. Interesting 
tour through French history, geography and literature. Aim of course to 
give student a necessary background in the culture of France and to gain 
more fluency in oral and written expression. This course completes inter- 
mediate year. Prerequisite: French 201 or equivalent. 

131 



Communications 



Courses — French, German 



FRE 211 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

(Institutional Credit) 

Course may be taken in conjunction with French 201 or French 202 but 
cannot displace either one of those courses as a college parallel require- 
ment. 

The purpose of this course is to permit that student who wishes to in- 
crease his comprehension and speaking facility in French to be in a class 
where the emphasis is totally on the oral approach and where a greater 
variety of topics will be discussed at a faster pace than the required 201 
course would allow. Prerequisite: French 101-102 or its equivalent. 

FRE 203 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 

AND CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

For students wishing to attain greater proficiency in spoken and written 
French. Strongly recommended for majors. Conducted entirely in French. 
Conversation and composition based on selected readings and a variety 
of contemporary topics, together with an introduction to French literature. 
Prerequisite: French 202 or its equivalent. 

FRE 204 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 

AND CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

For students wishing to attain greater proficiency in spoken and written 
French. Strongly recommended for majors. Conducted entirely in French. 
Conversation and composition based on selected readings and a variety 
of contemporary topics, together with readings in contemporary prose and 
poetry. This course completes one year of advanced composition and con- 
versation. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. Instructor approval. 

FRE 205 STUDIES IN FRENCH LITERATURE 

AND CULTURE 3 semester hours 

Course enables student to read intelligently classical masterpieces in the 

literature of France from Middle Ages to Nineteenth Century as well 

as contemporary prose and poetry. Careful attention to development of 

correct expression and fluency. Humanities credit. Prerequisite: French 
202 or equivalent. Instructor approval. 

FRE 206 STUDIES IN FRENCH LITERATURE 

AND CULTURE 3 semester hours 

Course enables student to read intelligently classical masterpieces of the 
literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on the 
contemporary. This course completes the year of advanced literature. 
Humanities credit. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. Instructor 
approval. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
GERMAN 

GER 101 BEGINNING GERMAN 3 semester hours 

Fundamentals of speaking, understanding, reading and writing. Classroom 
practice and exercises supplemented by language and laboratory sessions 
designed to develop confidence and proficiency. Student expected to con- 
tinue with German 102. 1 hour language laboratory weekly. Fee: $5.00. 

132 



Communications 
Courses — German 

GER 102 BEGINNING GERMAN 4 semester hours 

Continuation of German 101. Further development of the basic skills. 
Selected readings. Prerequisite: German 101 or its equivalent. One hour 
language laboratory weekly. Fee: $5.00. 

GER 104 GERMAN STUDY-TRAVEL 3 semester hours 

A course designed for students who wish to combine the study of German 
with subsequent travel to a German-speaking region. Prerequisite: German 

101 or 111 or permission of instructor. 

GER 111 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

(Institutional Credit) 

A custom-made course for those residents in the community who require 
a cursory knowledge of German to help them communicate with German- 
speaking people. 

GER 201 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 3 semester hours 

Review of most salient grammar principles plus introduction of new 
grammatical and idiomatic material. Composition and readings in German 
prose. Conversation at an easy and enjoyable pace. Prerequisite: German 

102 or equivalent. 

GER 202 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 3 semester hours 

Emphasis on composition and comprehension and conversation. Interesting 
tour through German history, geography and literature. Aim of course to 
give student a necessary background in the culture of Germany and to 
gain more fluency in oral and written expression. This course completes 
intermediate year. Prerequisite: German 201 or equivalent. 

GER 211 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

(Institutional Credit) 

Course may be taken in conjunction with German 201 or German 202 
but cannot displace either one of those courses as a college parallel 
requirement. 

The purpose of this course is to permit that student who wishes to 
increase his comprehension and speaking facility in German to be in a 
class where the emphasis is totally on the oral approach and where a 
greater variety of topics will be discussed at a faster pace than the required 
201 course would allow. Prerequisite: German 101-102 or its equivalent. 

GER 205 STUDIES IN GERMAN LITERATURE 

AND CULTURE 3 semester hours 

A review of the language, philosophy, life and selected writings of the 
major German-speaking literary artists from the Middle High German 
period to the masters of the twentieth century. Careful attention to devel- 
opment of correct expression and fluency. Humanities credit. Prerequisite: 
German 202 or equivalent. Instructor approval. 

GER 206 STUDIES IN GERMAN LITERATURE 

AND CULTURE 3 semester hours 

A review of the literature and culture beginning with the German Enlight- 
enment to 1945. This is followed by a more detailed study of the German- 
speaking peoples' major writings and thoughts since World War II to the 
present. This course completes the year of advanced literature. Humanities 
credit. Prerequisite: German 202 or equivalent. 

133 



Communications 



Courses — Russian, Spanish 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
RUSSIAN 

RUS 101 BEGINNING RUSSIAN 3 semester hours 

Fundamentals of speaking, understanding, reading and writing. Classroom 
practice and exercises supplemented by language laboratory sessions de- 
signed to develop confidence and proficiency. Student expected to continue 
with Russian 102. 1 hour language laboratory weekly. Fee: $5.00. 

RUS 102 BEGINNING RUSSIAN 4 semester hours 

Continuation of Russian 101. Further development of the basic skills. 
Selected readings. Prerequisite: Russian 101 or its equivalent. One hour 
language laboratory weekly. Fee: $5.00. 

RUS 201 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN 3 semester hours 

Review of most salient grammar principles plus introduction of new 
grammatical and idiomatic material. Composition and readings in Russian 
prose. Conversation at an easy and enjoyable pace. Prerequisite: Russian 
102 or equivalent. 

RUS 202 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN 3 semester hours 

Emphasis on composition and comprehension and conversation. Interesting 
tour through Russian history, geography and literature. Aim of course 
to give student a necessary background in the culture of Russia and to 
gain more fluency in oral and written expression. This course completes 
intermediate year. Prerequisite: Russian 201 or equivalent. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
SPANISH 

SPA 101 BEGINNING SPANISH 3 semester hours 

Fundamentals of speaking, understanding, reading and writing. Classroom 
practice and exercises supplemented by language laboratory sessions designed 
to develop confidence and proficiency. Student expected to continue with 
Spanish 102. 1 hour language laboratory weekly. Fee: $5.00. 

SPA 102 BEGINNING SPANISH 4 semester hours 

Continuation of Spanish 101. Further development of the basic skills. 

Selected readings. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or its equivalent. One hour 
language laboratory weekly. Fee: $5.00. 

SPA 103 BEGINNING SPANISH ACCELERATED 3 semester hours 

This is a condensed 101-102 course, using basic texts as used in those courses 
and especially designed for students presenting credit covering regular two- 
semester course but who, because of a time lapse or insufficient preparation, 
may find the intermediate level too advanced. 

SPA 104 SPANISH STUDY-TRAVEL 3 semester hours 

A course designed for students who wish to combine the study of Spanish 
with subsequent travel to a Spanish-speaking region. Prerequisite: Spanish 
101 or 111 or permission of instructor. 

134 



Communications 
Courses — Spanish 

SPA 111 ELEMENTARY SPANISH 

CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

(Institutional Credit) 

A custom-made course for those residents in the community who require a 
cursory knowledge of Spanish to help them communicate with Spanish- 
speaking people. 

SPA 201 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 3 semester hours 

Review of most salient grammar principles plus introduction of new gram- 
matical and idiomatic material. Composition and readings in Spanish prose. 
Conversation at an easy and enjoyable pace. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or 
Spanish 103 or equivalent. 

SPA 202 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 3 semester hours 

Emphasis on composition and comprehension and conversation. Interesting 
tour through Spanish history, geography and literature. Aim of course to 
give student a necessary background in the culture of Spain and to gain 
more fluency in oral and written expression. This course completes inter- 
mediate year. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or equivalent. 

SPA 211 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

(Institutional Credit) 

Course may be taken in conjunction with Spanish 201 or Spanish 202 but 
cannot displace either one of those courses as a college parallel requirement. 
The purpose of this course is to permit that student who wishes to 
increase his comprehension and speaking facility in Spanish to be in a class 
where the emphasis is totally on the oral approach and where a greater 
variety of topics will be discussed at a faster pace than the required 201 
course would allow. Prerequisite: Spanish 101-102 or its equivalent. 

SPA 203 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

For students wishing to attain greater proficiency in spoken and written 
Spanish. Strongly recommended for majors. Conducted entirely in Spanish. 
Conversation and composition based on selected readings and a variety of 
contemporary topics, together with an introduction to Spanish literature. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or its equivalent. 

SPA 204 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 

CONVERSATION 3 semester hours 

For students wishing to attain greater proficiency in spoken and written 
Spanish. Strongly recommended for majors. Conducted entirely in Spanish. 
Conversation and composition based on selected readings and a variety 
of contemporary topics, together with readings in contemporary prose and 
poetry. This course completes one year of advanced composition and 
conversation. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or equivalent. Instructor approval. 

SPA 205 STUDIES IN SPANISH LITERATURE 

AND CULTURE 3 semester hours 

Course enables student to read intelligently classical masterpieces in the 
literature of Spain from Middle Ages to Nineteenth Century as well as 
contemporary prose and poetry. Careful attention to development of 
correct expression and fluency. Humanities credit. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 
or equivalent. Instructor approval. 

135 



Communications 
Reading Courses 

SPA 206 STUDIES IN SPANISH LITERATURE 

AND CULTURE 3 semester hours 

Course enables student to read intelligently classical masterpieces of the 
literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on the 
contemporary. This course completes the year of advanced literature. 
Humanities credit. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or equivalent. Instructor 
approval. 

DEPARTMENT OF READING COMMUNICATIONS 

It is the purpose of the Reading Department to provide opportunities 
for students to improve and further develop reading skills, attitudes and 
understandings of written materials which will enable them to succeed in all 
college curricula and vocational objectives. 

READING 093: A developmental reading course offered for students who 
desire to improve their reading habits and skills. Students may 
enroll at the time of registration and earn three credits by successfully 
completing the course. These credits are non-transferable and are not appli- 
cable to all degree programs at the community college. The course employs 
the most modern techniques and equipment and is of immeasurable value 
to the student who desires to get the most benefit from his college program. 
Emphasis is placed on improvement of vocabulary, reading speed, compre- 
hension, organization of ideas and critical analysis of many types of reading 
materials. In addition to regular classroom attendance a minimum of one 
hour's laboratory experience is required each week. 

READING 093 is a co-requisite requirement for students in English 
Communications 095. If Reading 093 sections close before English 095 
students have registered for the course those students unable to enroll for 
Reading 093 should enroll for the course the following semester in order to 
complete the requirements. 

READING 105: Advanced Developmental Reading is offered as an elective 
for students who have successfully completed Reading 093, or who can 
demonstrate attainment of the fortieth percentile of college norms on a 
standard reading test. Students may also gain admittance by obtaining 
Instructor's permission. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
READING 

RDG 093 (NT) READING COMMUNICATIONS 3 semester hours 

Stresses methods to improve reading skills through training in vocabulary 
and comprehension, and developing proper study skills. Corequisite: ENG 
094 and/or Eng 095. Fee: $5.00. 

RDG 105 ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL 

READING 3 semester hours 

Stresses speed and growth in analytical, inferential and critical reading 
abilities. Prerequisite: RDG 093 or 40th percentile on a national college 
reading test. However, students may be admitted with Instructor's approval. 
Three hours weekly (two lecture, one laboratory). Fee: $5.00. 

136 



Communications 
Speech 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 

Speech department services, activities, and courses present to a student 
opportunities for general speech improvement, hearing evaluation, treatment 
of speech disorders, participation in intercollegiate debate and Readers 
Theatre, selection of electives creditable toward general education require- 
ments and beginning courses of study for majors and minors in General 
Speech, Radio-Television, Speech Pathology, and Audiology. 

Students are urged to contact the Speech Department for consultation 
with a speech instructor specializing in the individual student's particular 
service desire, activity interest, and course of study. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR SPEECH (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

SPE lOO-Intro. to Speech SPE HI Public Speaking 3 

Comm 3 HIS 101 World Civilization 3 

Lab Science 4 *Foreign Language 3 or 4 

^Foreign Language 3 DRA 225 Acting 

HPR Physical Education 1 OR 

SPE 110 Voice and Diction 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours . 14 Total Semester Hours 16 



SUMMER TERMS 

HIS 102 World Civilization 3 

Mathematics 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

DRA 207 Theatre Western Humanities 3 

Culture 3 SPE 115 Phonetics 3 

SPE 105 Intro. Argumentation SPE 220 Intro, to Speech 

And Debate 3 Correction 3 

SPE 140-Intro. Oral Interp 3 PSY 100-200-201 Psychology 3 

^Foreign Language 3 *Foreign Language 3 or 4 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Laboratory Science 4 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours . 16 



137 



Communications 
Speech 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR RADIO - TELEVISION 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 

Lab Science 4 HIS 101 World Civilization 

SPE 100-Intro. Speech SPE 140 Intro. Oral 

Comm. 3 Interpretation 

^Foreign Language 3 SPE 110 Voice and Diction 

HPR Physical Education 1 *Foreign Language 3 or 

HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 14 Total Semester Hours 

* Major institutions, may or may not require Foreign Language. 

Summer Terms 

BIO 160 General Zoology 4 

Total Semester Hours 4 



First Term 
Literature 

SPE 230 Intro. Radio-Tv . 
JOU 100 Writing for Mass 

Communication 
HIS 102 World Civilization 
*Foreign Language 
HPR Physical Education 

Total Semester Hours . . 



SECOND YEAR 

Second Term 

3 Humanities 3 

3 SPE 235 Television Prod. I 3 

SPE 115 Phonetics Amer. Eng. 3 
3 MTH 100 General Education 

3 College Math 3 

.3 ^Foreign Language 3 

1 HPR Physical Education 1 

.16 Total Semester Hours 16 



Students intending to enroll in T.V. Production as terminal curriculum 
may wish to change the foreign language courses suggested above. See the 
department advisor before making your elective course selection. 

* Major institutions may or may not require Foreign Language. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR SPEECH PATHOLOGY-AUDIOLOGY 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101-Composition 3 

^Foreign Language 3 

Laboratory Science 4 

SPE 100 Intro. Speech Comm. 3 
HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 



Second Term 

ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 
* Foreign Language 3 or 4 

SOC 211-General Sociology 3 

SPE 110 Voice and Diction 3 

SPE 115 Phonetics Amer. Eng. 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 or 17 



Summer Terms 

DRA 207 Humanities 3 

MATH 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



138 



Communications 
Courses — Speech 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

*Foreign Language 3 Humanities .3 

Laboratory Science 4 PSY 211 Child Psychology 3 

SOC 221 Social Problems 3 *Foreign Language 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 ED 251 or 140 Education 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 SPE 221 Intro. Audiology 3 

SPE 220 Intro. Speech HPR Physical Education 1 

Disorders 3 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 16 

*Major institutions may or may not require Foreign Language. 

Students are urged to consult with a member of the Speech Department 
about their courses before enrolling. Pre-Speech Majors should be aware 
that degree granting institutions may accept only 9 to 12 hours of speech 
towards the speech major. Additional hours will be counted as electives. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
SPEECH 

SPE 100 INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH 

COMMUNICATION 3 semester hours 

The beginning course in Speech is designed to give each student the oppor- 
tunity to study and to practice the principles and methods involved in 
communication while he participates as a speaker and as a listener. Upon 
completion of the course, the student should expect to have attained 
proficiency in the abilities requisite to effective oral communication. 

SPE 105 INTRODUCTION TO ARGUMENTATION 

AND DEBATE 3 semester hours 

The student upon completion of this course should achieve proficiency in 
the principles or argumentation including analysis, evidence, inference, and 
refutation, as they pertain to the debate situation in a democratic society. 
The student will have had the opportunity to participate in intramural and 
inter-collegiate debate. 

SPE 106, 107, 108, 109 FORENSIC LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Upon completion of this course the student should have acquired the ability 
to use advanced debate techniques in a manner which allows him to com- 
pete successfully in inter-collegiate forensic competition. This course may 
be taken in sequence for one hour credit each semester for a total of 
4 hours credit. 

SPE 110 VOICE AND DICTION 3 semester hours 

Through observation, study and practice the student should acquire an 
understanding of the speech mechanism, a knowledge of its proper use, 
and improvement of individual voice and diction. 

SPE 111 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC 

SPEAKING 3 semester hours 

Upon completion of this course the student should have acquired an under- 
standing of, and ability to use, techniques of public speech communication 
including structure and delivery of the public message. 

139 



Communications 
Courses — Speech 

SPE 112 INTRODUCTION TO GROUP DISCUSSION AND 

CONFERENCE TECHNIQUES 3 semester hours 

Upon completion of this course the student should be better able to take 
an active role in society using group discussion and conference techniques 
to resolve various human problems. 

SPE 115 THE PHONETICS OF AMERICAN 

ENGLISH 3 semester hours 

Upon the completion of this course the student should have acquired a 
knowledge of the sounds of American English, the use of the International 
Phonetic Alphabet, and the recognition of acceptable American English 
pronunciation. 

SPE 140 INTRODUCTION TO ORAL 

INTERPRETATION 3 semester hours 

Upon completion of this course the student should have gained a knowledge 
of and presentational ability in the art of oral interpretation as applied to 
prose, poetry, drama and Readers Theatre. 

SPE 141 READERS THEATRE 3 semester hours 

Upon completion of the course the student will have an understanding 
of the selection, staging, and editing of dramatic literature. The student 
should develop interpretative insight and master the needed vocal skills 
for successful presentation. A performance course. 

SPE 142, 143, 144, 145 READERS THEATRE LAB 1 semester hour 

Upon completion of performance in a Readers Theatre production, a student 
may earn one hour credit per semester. Participants will be selected through 
arranged auditions and will be enrolled at that time. A student may earn 
up to four hours credit. 

SPE 220 INTRODUCTION TO 

SPEECH DISORDERS 3 semester hours 

Upon the completion of this course the student should have an understand- 
ing of the types, causes, and therapeutic methods relative to prime speech 
disorders with emphasis on pre-school and elementary school populations. 

SPE 221 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Upon completion of this course the student will have an understanding of 
the types, causes, and treatment relative to prime hearing disorders with 
emphasis on pre-school and elementary school populations. 

SPE 230 INTRODUCTION TO RADIO 

AND TELEVISION 3 semester hours 

An introduction to the broadcast media through which the student should 
gain an understanding of the historical, technical, legal, and critical aspects 
of radio and television media. 

SPE 235 TELEVISION PRODUCTION I 3 semester hours 

From this course the student will acquire understanding of the theory 
and practice of television program production and directing with emphasis 
on creative forms of production. Prerequisite: SPE 230 or permission of 
the instructor. 

140 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Art 

Drama 

Music 

Philosophy 

Religion 

The Division of Humanities offers students an opportunity to investigate 
and acquaint themselves v^'ith the visual arts, drama, music, philosophy, 
and religion. Students may select courses which increase their understanding 
and appreciation of the arts as part of their general cultural knowledge and 
heritage, or they may follow a program of studies in one area leading to 
a major at a senior institution. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 
ART COURSES 

The Art curriculum offers the student those basic courses which will 
meet the requirements leading to a major or minor in art. Students who plan 
intensive study in art should confer, well in advance of initial registration 
with an art advisor in order to plan a program of work which best fits the 
individual's needs, interests, and abilities. Lower division requirements at the 
senior institutions vary considerably. It is strongly recommended that stu- 
dents who intend to major or minor in art education consult the programs 
offered at the institution to which they intend to transfer. Courses are also 
offered in art which meet the needs of adults in art appreciation and in 
various open studio courses. 

Students are encouraged to take both basic design courses before at- 
tempting 200 level studio subjects. Art majors should take the basic 100 level 
courses in their freshman year. 

All the courses listed in the catalog are not necessarily taught during 
the academic year, limitations of studio space, instructor availability and an 
insufficient number of students for particular classes make this so. A student 
concerned with a particular advanced class should check the schedule for the 
current academic year, or ask the department head about course offerings, 
before including the advanced course in his schedule. 

Materials for studio courses will cost at least $20.00. In Art courses 
the right is reserved to keep permanently, selections from a student's work. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR ART (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ART 106 Design I 3 ART 107 Design II 3 

ART 101 Beginning Drawing 3 ART 102 Life Drawing 3 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

MTH Elective 3 ART 207 Art Appreciation 

HPR Physical Education 1 Humanities 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 

141 



Humanities 
Art 



SUMMER TERMS 

Science Elective & Lab 

Humanities Elective 

Total Semester Hours 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

*Studio Art Elective 3 *Studio Art Elective 3 

HIS 101 World Civilization 3 HIS 102 World Civilization 3 

Science Elective & Lab 4 ART 209 Art History II 3 

ART 208 Art History I 3 **Elective 6 

^Elective 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 16 



PROGRAM FOR COMMERCIAL ART (A.S. Degree)* 
FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ART 101 Beginning Drawing 3 

ART 106 Design I 3 

ART 271 Lettering 2 

ENG 101 Composition 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 12 



Second Term 

ART 102 Life Drawing 3 

ART 107 Design II .3 

ART 273 Advertising Design 3 

ENG 104 Composition 3 
PSY 100 Human Relations in 

Business and Industry 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Cooperative Work Study for 3 months — ART 270 Art Practicum - 6 hours. 

*Students must have the necessary prerequisites for admission to ad- 
vanced studio courses. Some universities will not accept advanced studio 
courses taken at the college toward the major in Art, but will count the 
hours toward their degree. Students are urged to consult the catalog of 
the senior institution for preparation of their programs. 
^^*Students planning to teach art in public school should consider meeting 
state certification requirements. Students planning to pursue a Bachelor 
of Arts degree in Fine Arts should complete the intermediate level of a 
foreign language. The catalog of the senior institution should be con- 
sulted for the possibility of language requirements for the B.A. degree. 
'^**This is not a university parallel program. A maximum of two commercial 
art courses' can be transferred to a senior institution. 

YEAR 

Second Term 
ART 276 Design for the 

Corporate Image . .4 

ART 374 Design for 

Reproduction 

BA 171 Advertising 
ART 209 Art History II 
HPR Physical Education 



SECOND 


First Term 




ART 272 Illustration 


. .3 


ART 275 Design for Television 


3 


BA 170 Prin. of Marketing 


3 


ART 215 Photography for the 




Fine Arts 


3 


ART 207 Art Appreciation 




Humanities 


3 


HPR Physical Education 


1 


Total Semester Hours 


16 



Total Semester Hours 



.3 
3 

.3 
I 

14 



Any alterations in the preceding program must have the approval of the 
Head of the Art Department and the Chairman of the Humanities Division. 



142 



Humanities 
Courses — Art 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
ART 

ART 101 BEGINNING DRAWING 3 semester hours 

Landscape and still life composition in charcoal, ink, and other media. 
Sketch book. Six studio hours weekly. 

ART 102 LIFE DRAWING 3 semester hours 

Human and animal forms using various media. Sketchbooks. Laboratory fee 
$15.00. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisite: Art 101. 

ART 106 DESIGN I 3 semester hours 

Two dimensional study of form, fundamental principles and the elements 
of design for all creative work in visual arts. Six studio hours weekly. 

ART 107 DESIGN II 3 semester hours 

Three dimensional study of form, fundamentals, principles, and elements 
of design. Six studio hours weekly. $5.00 fee. 

ART 150 DRAWING FOR NON-ART MAJORS 3 semester hours 

A laboratory course designed for non-art majors introducing elementary 
printing techniques, media, and creative experience of the artists. Course 
closed to art majors or minors. Six studio hours weekly. 

ART 151 PRINTMAKING FOR NON-ART MAJORS 3 semester hours 

A laboratory course designed for non-art majors introducing elementary 
printing techniques, media, and creative experience of the artist. Course 
closed to art majors or minors. Six studio hours weekly. Laboratory fee 
$5.00. 

ART 152 THREE DIMENSIONAL MEDIA FOR 

NON-ART MAJORS 3 semester hours 

A laboratory course designed for non-art majors introducing elementary 
ceramic, sculptural, and three dimensional techniques, media, and creative 
experiences of the artist. Closed to art majors or minors. Six studio hours 
weekly. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

ART 153 PAINTING FOR NON-ART MAJORS 3 semester hours 

A laboratory course designed for non-art majors, introducing elementary 
painting media, technique, and creative experiences of the artist. Course 
closed to art majors or minors. Six studio hours weekly. 

ART 200 RECREATIONAL ARTS AND CRAFTS 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to give the student maximum practical experience 
in creative crafts projects and to provide the opportunity to master the 
techniques of teaching these projects to varying age groups in a number 
of recreation settings. The student should be exposed to many types of 
arts and crafts projects. Fee $5.00 

ART 205 JEWELRY DESIGN 3 semester hours 

An exploration of basic techniques and processes necessary to execute 
well designed jewelry. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisite: ART 107. 

ART 206 CRAFTS - WOODS, METALS, AND 

PLASTICS 3 semester hours 

Course offers experience with wide range of materials, adaptable to various 
levels of education. Design emphasis in plastic, woods, copper, silver, and 
enameling. Laboratory fee $5.00. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisite: 
ART 107. 

143 



Humanities 
Courses — Art 

ART 207 ART APPRECIATION HUMANITIES 3 semester hours 

A course considering form and content in western world art, emphasizing 
historical aspect so that students may become aware of how and why 
a work is created and its resulting contribution to their culture. 

ART 208 ART fflSTORY I 3 semester hours 

Survey and analysis of western twentieth century art sources. Architecture, 
painting, sculpture, and crafts from paleolithic times through the 
Renaissance. 

ART 209 ART HISTORY H 3 semester hours 

Study of styles from post-Renaissance Mannerist period to the present, 
stressing development of contemporary artistic concepts. 

ART 210 INTERIOR DESIGN 3 semester hours 

Design is applied to the interior space of dwelling and commercial archi- 
tectural structures. The form and function of space, materials, and furnish- 
ings will be stressed. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisite: ART 106. 

ART 211 PRINTMAKING I 3 semester hours 

A study of processes and techniques in Serigraphy and Intaglio printing. 
Laboratory fee $15.00. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisites: ART: 101, 
106. 

ART 212 PRINTMAKING II 3 semester hours 

A study of positive and negative printmaking with problems in relief and 
lithographic techniques. Laboratory fee $15.00. Six studio hours weekly. 
Prerequisites: ART 101, 106. 

ART 215 PHOTOGRAPHY FOR THE FINE ARTIST 3 semester hours 

The creative use of black and white photography in the darkroom, studio 
and outdoors. Laboratory fee $10.00. Class limited to ten students. Pre- 
requisites: ART 106 and instructor approval. Two lecture hours and four 
studio hours weekly. 

ART 221 SCULPTURE 3 semester hours 

Creative techniques in metal, wood, stone, and clay. Laboratory fee $5.00. 
Six hours weekly. Prerequisite: ART 107. 

ART 230 COLOR AND COMPOSITION 3 semester hours 

A basic course in the exploration of color theories, color systems, and 
color relativity in regard to optical sensation, lighting variation and 
psychological impact. Six studio hours weekly. 

ART 231 WATERCOLOR 3 semester hours 

A creative exploration of watercolor techniques and media both past and 
present with an emphasis on composition. Six studio hours weekly. Pre- 
requisite: ART 106. 

ART 232 PAINTING 3 semester hours 

Creative techniques and composition applied to oil painting and acrylic 
media. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisites: ART 101, 106. 

ART 269 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours 

A course designed to establish frame work for future self-learning. Each 
student will shape the course to fit his needs by planning with a faculty 
advisor. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisites: ART 101, 106, 107. Excep- 
tions to prerequisites will be considered by the Art Department Head. 

144 



Humanities 



Courses — ^Art 
Motion Picture Technoiogy 



ART 270 ART PRACTICUM 6 semester hours 

Independent study and research dealing with the students training assign- 
ment in Art leading to a written report and/or research paper. Hours to be 
arranged with instructor and the Cooperative Education Office. 

ART 271 LETTERING 2 semester hours 

A course of study involving lettering, calligraphy, and design problems 
related to lettering. Four studio hours weekly. Prerequisite: ART 106. 

ART 272 ILLUSTRATION 3 semester hours 

Design of illustration for use in a wide range of publications including 
fiction and non-fiction, fashion, merchandise, and interiors. Laboratory fee 
$5.00. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisites: ART 106, ART 273. 

ART 273 ADVERTISING DESIGN 3 semester hours 

Design as applied to modern advertising techniques and media. Layout and 
preparation of samples for mass production: magazine, direct mail, poster, 
packaging, and display. Laboratory fee $5.00. Six studio hours weekly. 
Prerequisite: ART 106. 

ART 274 DESIGN FOR REPRODUCTION 3 semester hours 

Introduction to the theory of offset and letter press reproduction and 
designing for 1, 2, 3, and 4 color printing. Laboratory fee $10.00. Six 
studio hours weekly. Prerequisites: ART 106, ART 273. 

ART 275 DESIGN FOR TELEVISION 3 semester hours 

Exploration of media and techniques suitable for use in television including: 
storyboard, camera and drop cards, animation, set design, slide visuals, 
editing and studio vocabulary. Laboratory fee: $5.00. Six studio hours 
per week. Prerequisites: ART 106, ART 273. 

ART 276 DESIGN FOR THE CORPORATE IMAGE 4 semester hours 

Design as applied to the development of the corporate image. Preparation 
of a total graphic package for a corporation: Publications, Signage, Packag- 
ing, Product, and T.V. commercial. Laboratory fee $5.00. Eight studio 
hours weekly. Prerequisite: ART 106, ART 273. 

ART 280 CERAMICS 3 semester hours 

Study of basic ceramic shaping techniques, glazing, decorating and firing. 
Laboratory fee $15.00. Six studio hours weekly. Prerequisite: ART 107. 

ART 290 SEMINAR IN ART 1-6 semester hours 

A combination of classroom preparation plus travel to include sketching, 
painting, native crafts, etc. Variable content depending on areas visited. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



CERTIFICATE PROGRAM-MOTION PICTURE TECHNOLOGY: 

This program is designed to prepare students for a first job in motion 
picture production and to orient students majoring in various areas of the 
college curriculum to motion picture technology. It is designed to prepare 
the student to be a functioning member of the film production team. The 
student studies production procedures and applies these procedures in work- 
ing situations. (Certificate of Completion awarded) 

Each student in the certificate program will be required to take 12 
credit hours of instruction in conjunction with the requirements of the 

145 



Humanities 
Drama 

degree program of his choice. Whenever possible, these courses will be taken 
as electives within A.A. or A.S. degree programs. 

THE CERTIFICATE 

Upon completion of the program, the student will receive a certificate. 
He will also receive a letter outlining his functions on the films on which 
he has worked. The school will keep a copy of these films and will make 
them available to prospective employers for preview. 

FRESHMAN YEAR— FIRST TERM 

MPA 216 MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION I 3 credits 

Introduction to motion picture production procedures and techniques. The 
course will stress the following units of instruction: the film script as a 
production blueprint, the camera, film as a recording medium, laboratory 
practices, lighting techniques, editorial techniques, and sound recording 
and reproduction. Practical application through student projects. (2 hour 
lecture; 2 hour lab) Laboratory Fee $20.00. 

FRESHMAN YEAR— SECOND TERM 

MPA 217 MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION II 3 credits 

Advanced motion picture production procedures stressing the following 
units of instruction: the production crew, production management, set 
operations, advanced lighting and sound techniques, continuity, and post 
production procedures. Practical application through student projects. Pre- 
requisite: MPA 216 (2 hour lecture; 2 hour lab) Laboratory Fee $20.00. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR— FIRST AND SECOND TERM 

MPA 218 MOTION PICTURE WORKSHOP 3 credits 

The application of motion picture production theory and skills in a 
production team context. Practical application through production assign- 
ments. Prerequisites: MPA 216 and 217 (1 hour lecture; 5 hours lab) 
Laboratory Fee $20.00. 

NOTE: This course will be taken twice for a total of 6 credits. 



DRAMA ACTIVITIES 

All drama majors and minors are required to be present at all try outs 
to read for a role in the plays or to identify themselves to the Technical 
Director for technical assignments. 

The department offers the student the regular dramatic productions as 
well as an opportunity to audition for the Pantomime Repertory Company 
and the Children's Theatre Production (Term II). 

Members of the community as well as high school juniors and seniors 
are encouraged to participate in all aspects of our program. 

County school teachers may earn recency of credit toward certification 
as well as toward drama certification by successfully pursuing the special 
courses. 

146 



Humanities 



Courses — Drama 



DRAMA COURSES 

The Drama curriculum offers work which will fulfill general educational 
requirements as well as provide an opportunity for study leading to a major 
or minor in drama or the theatre. A student seeking a major or minor in 
either of these areas should make an appointement with a Drama instructor 
in order to plan a logical program of study. 

The curricular and co-curricular programs in Drama provide the 
student actor or technician with the theoretical and practical experiences in 
the theatre arts which may lead to further work in all aspects of educational 
and professional theatre. Major productions performed in the Campus 
Lecture Theatre are open to all interested students and members of the 
community. 

A drama student should not take more than 14 hours per semester 
because of the hours involved in productions. 

During Term II, the Children's Theatre Production is in progress and 
a student may earn 6 semester hours in Children's Theatre Production Labo- 
ratory. During this term the student may elect only 9 academic semester 
hours. 

A performance course involves a final production performance which 
earns the student actor or technician a grade based upon improvement which 
is viewed in the final analysis during the performance. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR DRAMA (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second T<erm 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 Composition 3 

*Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

DRA 254 Acting I or DRA 255 Acting II or 

DRA 251 Stagecraft 3 DRA 260 Contemporary Drama 3 

SPE 115 Phonetics of Am. SPE 100 Spe. Communications 3 

English 3 DRA 101-106 Theatre 

**DRA 101-106 Theatre Productions 1-2 

Productions 1-2 DRA 211 Fencing for the 

DRA 212 Ballet for the Stage 1 

Stage 2 

Total Semester Hours 15-16 Total Semester Hours 14-16 



TERM m-A TERM ffl-B 

Natural or Physical Foreign Language 3 

Science 3 History 3 

DRA 207 Theatre in West. HPR Physical Education 1 

Culture Humanities 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 7 Total Semester Hours 7 

147 



Humanities 
Courses — Drama 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

DRA 253 Makeup 3 Natural Science 3 

Foreign Language 3 Laboratory 1 

History 3 DRA 258 Directing 3 

DRA 256 Acting III or Humanities 3 

DRA 265 History of Theatre 3 DRA 205 Children's Theatre . 3 

MTH 100 3 DRA 101-108 1-3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 17-18 

^Students planning to major in Drama with a Bachelor of Arts degree 
should complete the intermediate level of a foreign language. Each student 
is urged to consult with a member of the Drama Department about his 
courses. FRESHMEN ARE URGED TO BEGIN THEIR COURSE 
WORK IN DRAMA THE FIRST TERM OF THEIR FRESHMAN 
YEAR. 

** Drama 100 courses may not be taken for more than a total of 6 semester 
hours. A student may sign up for 101-104 if he knows he will work at 
least 100 hours during the term. DRA 105-106 requires a minimum of 
200 hours and DRA 107-108 requires a minimum of 300 hours. A log 
of working hours and job responsibility must be kept by each student and 
this given to supervisory drama instructor for evaluation and grade. 
By special permission of drama faculty. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
DRAMA 

DRA 101-104 Theatre Productions 1 semester hour 

DRA 105-106 Theatre Productions 2 semester hours 

DRA 107-108 Theatre Productions 3 semester hours 

Participation by the student as actor, dancer, technician, etc. in the major 
dramatic and musical productions of the college. A student may not earn 
more than 6 hours in Theatre Production laboratory. DRA 101-104 re- 
quires a minimum of 100 hours, DRA 105-106 requires a minimum of 
200 hours and DRA 107-108 requires a minimum of 300 hours laboratory 
work. During the six-week sessions. Term III-A or Term III-B, minimum 
hours required are one half of those shown above. By special permission 
of Drama faculty. 

Caution: These production courses should be taken in proper sequence. 
One may not repeat the same number & receive credit for the 
initial course. 

DRA 205 CHILDREN'S THEATRE PRODUCTION 3 semester hours 

Laboratory credit for students participating in the Children's Theatre 
program Term II. This includes the rehearsal and production period which 
continues the entire sixteen-week academic period. Prerequisite: By audi- 
tion for the Children's Theatre play. This is a performance course. 

148 



Humanities 

Courses — Dra ma 

DRA 206 CHILDREN'S THEATRE PRODUCTION 

FOR SPECIAL ASSISTANTS 3 semester hours 

Laboratory credit for special student assistants to the Children's Theatre 
program. This will give to the student director, stage manager, costume 
designer, etc. the extra credit for the hours of preparation, rehearsal and 
production. By permission of the instructor. 

DRA 207 THEATRE IN WESTERN CULTURE — 

HUMANITIES 3 semester hours 

A course designed to present a general approach to the development of 
the theatre arts in western culture through an historical and contemporary 
study of dramaturgy. 

DRA 210 LFVE THEATRE APPRECIATION 3 semester hours 

A course designed to afford an opportunity for members of the community 
to attend local theatre productions and to discuss the dramaturgy as to its 
aesthetic and cultural effects upon life today. Extra expense for the course 
includes play scripts and tickets to plays and/ or musicals. Contact 
Instructor. 

DRA 211 FENCING FOR THE STAGE 1 semester hour 

This course is designed for the actor to learn the usage of weapons as 
they pertain to the period and style of the play. Open to male or female. 
This course will not satisfy the HPR activity credit requirement. 

DRA 212 BALLET MOVEMENT FOR THE 

STAGE 2 semester hours 

A course designed to teach the beginning actor ballet terminology as it 
applies to the classic ballet. Each basic movement and step will be practiced 
as sufficiently as the student's ability will enable him to progress. This 
movement will be utilized as it applies to the needs of the actor. Open 
to, male or female. A student need not have studied ballet to enroll in 
this course. This course will not satisfy the HPR activity credit require- 
ment. 

DRA 213 BALLET MOVEMENT FOR THE STAGE 

CONTINUED 2 semester hours 

Continuation of DRA 212. Further development of basic skills in ballet 
movement for the novice actor or actress. Each movement and step will be 
practiced as sufficiently as the student's ability will allow him to progress. 
Prerequisite: DRA 212. (This course will not satisfy the HPR activity 
credit requirement.) 

DRA 214 BALLET MOVEMENT FOR THE STAGE 

ADVANCED 2 semester hours 

Advanced classical ballet movement for the actor or actress. Prerequisite: 
DRA 213. (This course will not satisfy the HPR activity credit require- 
ments.) 

DRA 251 STAGECRAFT 3 semester hours 

Course designed to investigate the principles of stagecraft, lighting, props 
and set construction. Open to first semester freshmen. 

DRA 252 SET DESIGN 3 semester hours 

The research and execution of the visual environment of the play. Layouts 
will be prepared for an assigned production project. Pencil and ink draw- 
ings, ground plans, elevations and models will be executed to scale in 
preparation for construction of the set. Prerequisite: DRA 207 or DRA 
265 and DRA 251. By permission of instructor only. 

149 



Humanities 
Music 

DRA 253 MAKEUP FOR STAGE AND 

TELEVISION 3 semester hours 

The theoretical and practical application of all types of straight and 

character makeup for the stage and television. Open to freshmen. 

DRA 254 ACTING I 3 semester hours 

The concentrated study of body movement to communicate thought and 
idea. Open to freshman. 

DRA 255 ACTING H 3 semester hours 

Course designed to assist the beginning actor in controlUng his voice 
as it relates to his role in the play. Exercises related to flexibility and 
control on stage will be taken from draipatic literature, classical to con- 
temporary. A study of dialects will assist the actor in versatility. The 
course is designed for drama majors and minors. Prerequisite: DRA 254. 

DRA 256 ACTING HI 3 semester hours 

Advanced techniques of acting. Prerequisite: DRA 253, DRA 254, DRA 
255. 

DRA 258 DIRECTING 3 semester hours 

Course designed to investigate the problems of choosing and analyzing 
the script, casting, rehearsal, costuming, makeup, organization management 
of the educational theatre. Prerequisites: DRA 253, DRA 254, DRA 255, 
DRA 256, DRA 260. 

DRA 260 CONTEMPORARY DRAMA 3 semester hours 

Course designed to acquaint the student with plays written from the 
beginning of Realism (Ibsen) to present day. Plays will be studied in light 
of the philosophy, socio-political, economic and moral milieu of the era 
that promulgates the particular genre. Plays will be analyzed from the 
dramatist's viewpoint. 

DRA 265 fflSTORY OF THE THEATRE 3 semester hours 

An evolutionary study of the theatre from 5th Century B.C. to the present 
day. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 
MUSIC COURSES 

The music curriculum offers two specialized Associate of Arts degrees 
which represent the first two years of work leading to a degree in music or 
music education at a senior institution. Courses are also offered to meet the 
needs of students in music humanities and in choral and instrumental music. 



MUSIC 

Before registering in the music curriculum, a student must demonstrate 
the ability to sing or play an accepted musical instrument. This is a highly 
specialized degree and students are expected to have already acquired certain 
musical skills in order to qualify for this program. Music majors are required 
to participate in at least one performing organization each term. 

150 



Humanities 
Music 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Music education majors are required to take three techniques classes to 
be chosen from MUS 119, 120, 121, or 122. It is advisable that an instru- 
mental music education major study three instruments outside his own 
principal area. Vocal majors may choose any three. Music education majors 
are required to participate in at least one performing organization each term. 

MUSICAL ACTIVITIES 

The following music activities are open to all students of the College, 
either for credit or non-credit basis with the instructor's approval. 
Choral/ Vocal Organizations 

College Singers — Mus 126 

North Broward Community Chorus — Mus 126 

Broward Community College Choral Society — Mus 126 

Concert Choir — Mus 127 

Chamber Singers — Mus 128 

Opera Workshop — Mus 130 
Instrumental Organizations 

Chamber Ensemble — Mus 128 

Jazz Ensemble — Mus 134 

Neophonic Jazz Ensemble — Mus 134 

Adult Jazz Band 

Symphonic Band — Mus 136 

Coral Springs Band — Mus 136 

Broward Symphony Orchestra — Mus 138 

B.C.C. Youth Symphony— Mus 138 

Training Symphony — Mus 138 

MUSIC PREPARATORY DIVISION 

The Music Preparatory Division has been organized to provide a 
qualified music instructor for anyone in Broward County. Individual in- 
struction in voice and all instruments are available. Interested persons should 
contact the Music Department. 

CURRICULUM FOR PRE-MUSIC 

(Applied Music Major in Performance) 

General Education Music 

ENG 101 & 102 or 104 6 Music 105, 106 205, 206 16 

History and the Social Sciences . 6 Applied Music Major — 

(select 6 hrs. from #3, p. 55) Sequence of Mus 180, 190, 280, 

(Select 3 hours from # 5 p. 56 3) & 290 numbers 8 

**Math & Science-elect 9 hrs. Applied Music Secondary — 

from #4, p. 56 9 Sequence of Mus 140, 150, 240, 

HPR 4 & 250 numbers 4 

Music Activity (Chorus, 

Band, etc.) 4 

Music 203, 204 6 

Total Semester Hours 28 Total Semester Hours 38 

151 



Humanities 
Music 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-MUSIC (A.A. Degree) 



FIRST 

First Term 
ENG 101 3 

History and the Social Sciences 

(Select from #3, p. 55) 3 

MUS 105 4 

MUS 180 Sequence 2 

MUS 140 Sequence (or class voice 

or class piano 1 

Music Activity (Chorus, 

Band, Etc.) 1 

HPR, Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 



YEAR 

Second Term 
ENG 102 or 104 3 

History and the Social Sciences 

(Select from #3, p. 55) 3 

MUS 106 4 

MUS 190 Sequence 2 

MUS 150 Sequence (or class voice 

or class piano) 1 

Music Activity (Chorus, 

Band, Etc.) 1 

HPR, Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours .15 



YEAR 

Second Term 

MUS 206 4 

MUS 290 Sequence 2 

MUS 250 Sequence (or class 
piano) 1 

MUS 204 3 

Music Activity (Chorus, 

Band, Etc.) 1 

*Phy 240, Acoustics (or another 

Science course. See #4, p. 56) 3 
Science (See #4, p. 56) 3 

HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours 18 

*Math 131 is prerequisite to Phy 240, Acoustics which is available to music 
majors. 





SECOND 


First Term 




Elective (See #5, p. 56) 


3 


*Math 131 (or another Math 




course. See #4, p. 56) 


, .3 


MUS 205 


4 


MUS 280 Sequence 


2 


MUS 240 Sequence (or class 




piano) 


.1 


Music Activity (Chorus, 




Band, Etc.) 


1 


MUS 203 


3 


HPR 


1 


Total Semester Hours 


18 



CURRICULUM FOR PRE-MUSIC EDUCATION 



General Education 
ENG 101 & 102 or 104 6 

His. and Social Sciences 
*Select 6 hrs. from #3, p. 55 6 

Select 3 hrs. from #5, p. 56 3 

**Math & Science — select 9 hrs. 

from #4, p. 56) 9 

HPR Physical Education .4 



Total Semester Hours 28 



Music 
MUS 105, 106, 205, 206 16 

Principal Instrument — Sequence 

of 160, 170, 260 & 270 numbers 8 
*Secondary Instrument — Sequence 

of 142, 152, 242, 252 (or 

piano class) 4 

Music Activity (Chorus, 

Band, Etc.) 4 

Technique Classes (3 selected 

from MUS 119, 120, 121, 122) 3 
MUS 203, 204 6 

Total Semester Hours 41 



* Students with principal applied area in piano must elect another secon- 
dary area. 

*PHY 240— ACOUSTICS is available to music majors. 



152 



Humanities 
Music 

*SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-MUSIC EDUCATION 

(A.A. Degree) 

The Music Education Degree will follow the same outline as the Pre- 
Music Degree listed above with the following exceptions: 

1. Add three hours of technique classes selected from MUS 119, 120, 
121, 122. It is suggested that two be taken during the freshman year 
and the remaining be taken the second term of the sophomore year. 

2. Instead of the MUS 180, 190, 280, and 290 sequences, the student 
should enroll in the 160, 170, 260 and 270 sequences. 

3. The MUS 140, 150, 240, and 250 sequences should be in the area of 
piano or piano class unless the student's principal instrument is piano 
in which case he may take any other applied music other than piano 
or piano class. 

4. The total hours for the Music Education Degree will be 69 hours. 



MUSIC ACTIVITIES 

MUS 126 CHORAL ENSEMBLES 1 semester hour 

Concert Choir 

College Singers 

North Broward Community Chorus 

Broward Community College Choral Society 
Open to all college students by audition. Three rehearsals weekly. May be 
taken four times for transfer credit. 

MUS 128 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES 1 semester hour 

Chamber Ensemble 

Chamber Singers 
Small group whose members are selected by the director through audition. 
Study and performance of repertoire appropriate to the specific chamber 
media. TTiree rehearsals weekly. May be taken four times for transfer credit. 

MUS 134 JAZZ ORGANIZATIONS 1 semester hour 

Jazz Ensemble 

Neophonic Jazz Ensemble 

Adult Jazz Band 
Corequisite: MUS 136 or MUS 138. Enrollment is determined by the 
director through audition. Study and performance of music asssociated with 
the popular music and show presentation fields. May be taken four times 
for transfer credit. 

MUS 136 BANDS 1 semester hour 

Symphonic Band 

Coral Springs Band 
Open to all college students, faculty and members of the community who 
play band instruments. Three rehearsals weekly. Chairs assigned by con- 
ductor through audition. May be taken four times for transfer credit. 

153 



Humanities 
Music 

MUS 138 ORCHESTRA 1 semester hour 

Broward Symphony Orchestra 

B.C.C. Youth Symphony 

B.C.C. Symphonette 
Open to students, faculty and members of the community who play an 
orchestral instrument. Chairs assigned by conductor through audition. 
May be taken four times for transfer credit. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
MUSIC 

MUS 100 FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC 3 semester hours 

A study of basic music fundamentals for the beginning music major whose 
background in music has been minimal. Emphasis on sightsinging and ear 
training. 

MUS 105 THEORY I 4 semester hours 

Integrated course in written theory and analysis, sightsinging, aural train- 
ing, and related keyboard skills. Emphasis on diatonic materials. Five 
class periods weekly. 

MUS 106 THEORY U 4 semester hours 

Continuation of MUS 105. Prerequisite MUS 105. 

MUS 117 PIANO CLASS 1 hour each semester 

Fundamentals of piano technique. Two hours weekly. Corequisite: MUS 
105, 106, 205, or 206. 

MUS 118 PIANO CLASS 1 hour each semester 

Continuation of Mus 117. Fundamentals of piano technique. Two hours 
weekly. Prerequisite: MUS 117. Corequisite: MUS 105, 106, 205, or 206. 

MUS 119 BRASS CLASS 1 semester hour 

Development of elementary skills on comet. Explores similarity to other 
Brasses and examines literature and teaching techniques for group instruc- 
tion of young students. Two hours weekly. Corequisite: MUS 105, 106. 
205, or 206. 

MUS 120 WOODWIND CLASS 1 semester hour 

Development of elementary performing skill on clarinet. Explores similarity 
to other woodwinds and examines literature and teaching techniques for 
group instruction of young students. Two hours weekly. Corequisite: 
MUS 105, 106, 205 and 206. 

MUS 121 STRING CLASS 1 semester hour 

Development of elementary performing skill on a string instrument. Basic 
study of all string instruments. Examines literature and teaching techniques 
for group instruction of young students. Corequisite: MUS 105, 106, 
205, or 206. 

MUS 122 PERCUSSION CLASS 1 semester hour 

Development of elementary performing skill on the snare drum, Basic 
study of all percussion instruments. Examines literature and teaching 
techniques for group instruction of young students. Corequisite: MUS 
105, 106, 205, or 206. 

154 



Humanities 
Courses — Music 

MUS 123 VOICE CLASS 1 semester hour 

Fundamentals of voice production and building of solo repertoire. Two 
hours weekly. Corequisite: MUS 105, 106, 205, or 206. 

MUS 200 MUSIC FOR THE ELEMENTARY 

CLASSROOM TEACHER 3 semester hours 

Systematic study of the elements of music. Primarily for elementary 
education majors. 

MUS 202 SERVICE PLAYING 2 semester hours 

Techniques and materials used in playing church services including con- 
ducting techniques from the organ console. Two hours weekly. Prereq- 
uisite: MUS 106 and MUS 173 or 193, or approval of instructor. 

MUS 203 MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

A chronological approach to music history with emphasis on major 
composers and their works from Renaissance through Contemporary 
periods. Three hours weekly. Recommended for second year students. 

MUS 204 MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE 3 semester hours 

Continuation of Mus 203 with emphasis on music literature and style. 
3 hours weekly. Recommended for second year students. 

MUS 205 THEORY IH 4 semester hours 

Continuation of Mus and 106. Concentration on chromatic materials, 

musical forms, and 20th century techniques. Prerequisite: MUS 105, 106. 
Five class periods weekly. 

MUS 206 THEORY IV 4 semester hours 

Continuation of Mus 205. Prerequisite Mus 205. 

MUS 207 MUSIC IN WESTERN CULTURE — 

HUMANITIES 3 semester hours 

Course for non-music majors, designed to enlarge the student's personal 
appreciation of music and to expand his knowledge o* music for cultural 
information. Emphasis on evaluation and listening to music from the 
Renaissance through the Contemporary periods. 

MUS 217 PIANO CLASS 1 semester hour 

Continuation of MUS 118. Two hours weekly. Prerequisite: MUS 118. 
Corequisite: MUS 105, 106, 205, or 206. 

MUS 218 PIANO CLASS 1 semester hour 

Continuation of MUS 217. Two hours weekly. Prerequisite: MUS 271. 
Corequisite: MUS 105, 106, 205, or 206. 



155 



Humanities 
Courses — Music 



APPLIED MUSIC — INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 

Corequisite: MUS 105, 106, 205 or 206 or specific approval of Music De- 
partment Head 



Secondary Applied Music Area 

First Year Second Year 

I II I II 

Mus 141, 151, 241, 251 Voice 

Mus 142, 152, 242, 252 Piano 

Mus 143, 153, 243, 253 Organ 

Mus 144, 154, 244, 254 Woodwinds 

Mus 145, 155, 245, 255 Brass 

Mus 146, 156, 246, 256 Percussion 

Mus 147, 157, 247, 257 Strings 

Mus 148, 158, 248, 258 Classical 

Guitar 

*Mus 149, 159, 249, 259 Free Bass 
Accordion 

One half hour lesson weekly and one 
hour practice daily. 

Credit, 1 semester hour 



Principal Applied Music Area 

First Year Second Year 

I II I II 
Mus 161, 171, 261, 271 Voice 
Mus 162, 172, 262, 272 Piano 
Mus 163, 173, 263, 273 Organ 
Mus 164, 174, 264, 274 Woodwinds 
Mus 165, 175, 265, 275 Brass 
Mus 166, 176, 266, 276 Percussion 
Mus 167, 177, 267, 277 Strings 
Mus 168, 178, 268, 278 Classical 
Guitar 
*Mus 169, 179, 269, 279 Free Bass 
Accordion 

One hour lesson weekly and two hours 
practice daily. 

Credit, 2 semester hours 



Major Applied Performing Area 

First Year Second Year 

I II I II 
Mus 181, 191, 281, 291 Voice 
Mus 182, 192, 282, 292 Piano 
Mus 183, 193, 283, 293 Organ 
Mus 184, 194, 284, 294 Woodwinds 
Mus 185, 195, 285, 295 Brass 
Mus 186, 196, 286, 296 Percussion 
Mus 187, 197, 287, 297 Strings 
Mus 188, 198, 288, 298 Classical 
Guitar 
*Mus 189, 199, 289, 299 Free Bass 
Accordion 

One hour lesson weekly and three hours 
practice daily. 

Credit, 2 semester hours 

*Accordion may not transfer as a secondary, principal or major applied 
performing instrument. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
PHILOSOPHY 

PHI 161 INTRODUCTORY LOGIC 3 semester hours 

Study of the Principles and evaluation of critical thinking including identifi- 
cation and analysis of fallacious as well as valid reasoning. Traditional, 
symbolic and mathematical logic will be considered and foundations will 
be laid for further study in each area. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or equivalent. 



156 



Humanities 
Courses — Music 

PHI 162 INFORMAL LOGIC AND SCIENTIFIC 

METHOD 3 semester hours 

An examination of the uses of language geared toward an understanding 
of correct versus incorrect reasoning; an investigation of the reasons for 
our sometimes being misled by arguments notoriously used by, for example, 
politicians and advertisers; an investigation of the methods employed by 
both the natural and the social sciences, an investigation of different types 
of scientific explanation. 

PHI 260 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3 semester hours 

Consideration of fundamental questions which man asks and some of the 
answers which he proposes. Prerequisite; Sophomore standing. 

PHI 263 ETHICS 3 semester hours 

Study of the basic concepts and principles of morals, moral values and 
judgments, as well as the leading ethical theories will be considered. Prereq- 
uisite: Sophomore standing. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR RELIGION (A.A. Degree) 
FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
BIO 100 Modem Biology 
BIO 105 Modem Biology Lab 
*HIS 101 or PSC 121 
Language 
HPR Physical Education 



3 


ENG 


3 


MTH 


1 


BIO 


3 


BIO 


3 


BIO 


1 


BIO 



Total Semester Hours 



14 



Second Term 
102 Composition 
131 Basic College Math 

150 General Botany and 

151 Botany Lab, OR 

160 General Zoology and 

161 Zoology Lab 

Language 

HPR Physical Education 



Total Semestei Hours 14 



Term IH-A or IH-B 

SPE 100 Intro, to Speech 3 

"HIS 102 or PSC 122 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 7 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
Humanities 3 

MTH 132 Contemporary College 

Algebra 4 

REL 240 World Religions 3 

Language 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 



Second Term 

Humanities 3 

REL 142 New Testament 

History 3 

Elective 3 

Language 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology .3 
Total Semester Hours 15 



* Students vi'ho enroll in HIS 101 must take HIS 102; those enrolling in PSC 
121 must take PSC 122 or PSC 221. 



157 



Religion, Physical Education, and Recreation 
Uniforms 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
RELIGION 

REL 121 THE OLD TESTAMENT 3 semester hours 

Reading the English Bible in various documents, and examining selected 
source material, with emphasis on its cultural importance today. 

REL 122 THE WISDOM BOOKS OF THE BIBLE 3 semester hours 

Limited to the study of the Books Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and some 
selected Wisdom Psalms. There is no prerequisite. 



DIVISION OF HEALTH, 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 

Physical Education is that part of the college curriculum vi^hich is con- 
cerned with the physical well-being of each student with consideration for 
the social, intellectual, and emotional aspects of his development as they 
relate to the physical in the learning of skills, development of endurance, 
strength and organic vigor. 

All regularly enrolled freshmen and sophomore students will be re- 
quired to take four (4) credit hours of physical education activities unless 
those students fall in to these categories: students who have reached their 
29th birthday, those who have served continuously in the military service for 
one year or more, or those medically excused. 

The following Health, Physical Education and Recreation courses DO 
NOT satisfy the required four credit hours activity: HPR 149, 150, 151, 152, 
153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 160, 162, 249. 



UNIFORMS 

Apparel that meets the approval of Physical Education Department 
must be furnished by the student. 

Combination locks are available for student use. Personal locks, if 
desired, may be used on an assigned locker. 



^SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR HEALTH EDUCATION (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 Composition 3 

Social Science 3 Social Science 3 

BIO 100 Modern Biology 3 CHE 107 Chemistry for General 

BIO 105 Modern Biology Lab 1 Education 3 

MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 SPE 100 Introductory Speech 3 

HPR Activity 1 PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

Elective 3 HPR Activity 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 16 

158 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 

Courses 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

Humanities 3 

BIO 150 Botany and BIO 151 

BIO Lab 4 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

HPR 151 Personal Hygiene 3 

HPR Activity 1 

Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 17 



Second Term 

Himianities 3 

BIO 160 General Zoology 3 

BIO 161 General Zoology Lab 1 
HPR 152 First Aid & Safety 3 

HPR Activity 1 

Elective 6 



Total Semester Hours 



17 



SUGGESTED ELECTIVES 

SOC 23 1 The Family 

EDU 299 Perspectives in Education 

PSY 212 Adolescent Psychology 

PSY 238 Social Psychology 

SPE 111 Public Speaking 

STA 221 Elementary Education 

^SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR EDUCATION (A.A. Degree) 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 



FIRST 

First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
BIO 100 Modem Biology 
BIO 105 Modern Biology Lab 
History OR Social Science 
HPR 150 Intro, to Phys. Educa'n 
**HPR 143 Physical Education 

Laboratory 



YEAR 



BIO 
BIO 



Total Semester Hours 14 



Second Term 
ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

160 General Zoology and 

161 Bio Lab OR 

CHE 107 Chemistry for General 

Education AND 
CHE 108 Chemistry for General 

Education Lab 4 

Social Science 3 

HPR 152 First Aid & Safety 3 

HPR 153 Intro, to Recreation 3 

HPR 144 Skills and Techniques of 

Folk, Social Dance - Phys. Ed. 

Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 



*It is suggested that students should acquaint themselves with the require- 
ments at the institution to which they plan to transfer and select courses 
accordingly. 

SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

Humanities 3 

*BIO 150 General Botany and 
BIO 151 BOT Lab OR 
PHY 130 Physics & PHY 131 4 

** HPR 151 Personal Hygiene 3 

**HPR243 Physical Education 

Laboratory 1 

Electives 6 

Total Semester Hours 17 



Second Term 
Humanities 3 

*MTH 100 General Education 

College Mathematics OR 
MTH 131 Basic College Math. 3 

HPR 154 Sport Officiating 3 

** HPR 247 Physical Education 

Laboratory 1 

SPE 100 Intro, to Speech 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 

**HPR 143, HPR 243, HPR 247, Men Majors only. 144 (Men and Women) 
Coed-Majors only. 



159 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 
Courses 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

PSY 211 Child Psychology 
PSY 212 Adolescent Psychology 
SOC 211 General Sociology 
EDU 299 Perspectives in Education 
EDU 251 Educational Psychology 
EDU 210 Audio Visual Aids 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR EDUCATION (A.A. Degree) 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

BIO 100 Modern Biology 3 CHE 107 Chemistry for General 

BIO 105 Modern Biology Lab 1 Education AND 

History or Social Science 3 CHE 108 Chemistry for General 

HPR 150 Intro, to Physical Education Lab OR 

Education 3 BIO 160 General Zoology and 

**HPR 139 Skills and Techniques BIO 161 Bio Lab OR 

of Golf and Tennis 1 Science with Lab 4 

HPR Gymnastics, Tumbling 1 History or Social Science 3 

HPR 152 First Aid & Safety 3 

HPR 153 Intro, to Recreation .3 

HPR 101 Archery 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 Total Semester Hours 17 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

Humanities 3 Humanities 3 

HPR 151 Personal Hygiene 3 *MTH 100 General Education 

**HPR 239 Skills & Techniques of College Mathematics OR 

Volleyball and Basketball .1 MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 

SPE 100 Introductory Speech 3 **HPR240 Skills & Techniques 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 of Hockey and Soccer 1 

HPR 155 Sports Officiating 3 HPR Electives 7 

HPR 144 Skills & Techniques of PSY 201 General Psychology 3 
Folk & Social Dancing 1 

Total Semester Hours .17 Total Semester Hours 17 

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

PSY 211 Child Psychology 

PSY 212 Adolescent Psychology 

EDU 299 Perspectives in Education 

EDU 251 Education Psychology 

PHY 130 Physics 

CHE 107 Chemistry for General Education 

CHE 108 Chemistry for General Education Lab 

EDU 210 Audio Visual Aids 

*It is suggested that students should acquaint themselves with the science 
and mathematics requirements at the institution to which they plan to 
transfer and select courses accordingly. 
**HPR 139, 239, 240 Women Majors only. 



160 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 

Courses 

HPR 139, HPR 247 — Oflfered Term I —even numbered years 

HPR 239, HPR 243 —Offered Term I — odd numbered years 

HPR 143, HPR 240 —Offered Term II— even numbered years 

HPR 144 — Offered Term II — odd numbered years 

RECOMMENDED 
A/ A DEGREE IN RECREATION 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

SOC 211 Gen. Sociology 3 SOC 212 Social Org 3 

AST Astronomy 3 ART 200 Arts/ Crafts 3 

HPR 153 Intro, to Rec. 3 Elective 3 

HPR 156 Group Leadership 3 GY 105 Phy Geology 3 

CWS 101 Rec. Co-op Practicum 2 CWS 102 Rec. Co-op Practicum .2 

HPR Activity 1 HPR Activity 1 

Total Semester Hours 18 Total Semester Hours 18 



SUMMER FIELD WORK 

CWS 201 
40 Hrs. Wk.— 3 hrs. Credit 

DRA 207 Theatre in West. HPR 158 Outdoor Recreation 3 

Culture 3 PSY 211,212,238 3 

PSY 201 Gen. Psychology 3 MUS 207 Music in West. 

MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 Culture 3 

HPR 154/155 Sports Officiating 3 HPR 152 First Aid 3 

HPR 157 Special Group Rec. 3 SPE 100 Intro, to Speech 3 

CWS 103 Rec. Co-op Practicum 2 CWS 104 Rec. Co-op Practicum 2 

HPR Activity 1 HPR Activity 1 

Total Semester Hours 18 Total Semester Hours 18 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



^HPR 101 ARCHERY 

Coeducational. $3.00. 



1 semester hour 



HPR 102 BEGINNING BALLET 1 semester hour 

Basic ballet steps including Barre work, center floor movement including 
adagio and allegro work. 

HPR 103 CASTING AND ANGLING 1 semester hour 

Course designed primarily for beginners. It includes techniques and 
fundamentals for baitcasting, spincasting, spinning, and fly casting, surf 
spinning and casting; also fishing field trips. Coeducational. 



HPR 104 BO^VLING 

Coeducational. Fee $18.00. 

HPR 105 DANCE (Modern) 

Women only. 



1 semester hour 



1 semester hour 



*HPR on campus activities require a $2.00 general lock and towel fee. 

161 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 
Courses 

HPR 106 DANCE (Social) 

Coeducational. 

HPR 107 DANCE (Folk and Square) 

Coeducational. 

HPR 108 FENCING 

Coeducational. 

HPR 109 BEGINNING GOLF 

Coeducational. 

HPR 110 BEGINNING GYMNASTICS 

Men only. 

HPR 111 HORSEMANSHIP 

Coeducational. Fee $60.00. 

*HPR 112 BEGINNING SWIMMING 

Coeducational. 

HPR 113 IIVTERMEDIATE SWIMMING 

Coeducational. 

HPR 114 BEGINNING TENNIS 



1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 



Coeducational. (Student must furnish racquet & balls) 

HPR 115 BEGINNING DIVING 1 semester hour 

This course is designed for beginning divers. The principles of board 
work, flight and entry into the water will be taught. 

HPR 116 BILLIARDS. 1 semester hour 

Fundamentals and advanced study of bilhards. Includes the science and 
techniques of standard billiard games. Coeducational. 



^HPR 117 RECREATIONAL GAMES 

Coeducational. 

HPR 118 YOGA EXERCISES 

HPR 119 BEGINNING JAZZ DANCE 

HPR 120 INTERMEDIATE MODERN DANCE 



1 semester hour 

1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 
1 semester hour 



Floor work — center of floor and Barre work. Prerequisite: HPR 105. 

1 semester hour 



HPR 121 VOLLEYBALL AND BASKETBALL 

Women only. 

HPR 122 CONDITIONING 

Women only. 

HPR 123 FIELD HOCKEY 

Women only. 



1 semester hour 



1 semester hour 



HPR 124 SOCCER, SPEEDBALL AND SOFTBALL 1 semester hour 

Women only. 

*HPR on campus activities require a $2.00 general lock and towel fee. 

162 



1 semester hour 



1 semester hours 



1 semester hour 



1 semester hour 



1 semester hour 



2 semester hours 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 

Courses 

HPR 125 BEGINNING GYMNASTICS 1 semester hour 

Women only. 

HPR 128 HANDBALL AND PADDLEBALL 1 semester hour 

Women only. (Students must supply own gloves) 

HPR 131 BASKETBALL AND VOLLEYBALL 1 semester hour 

Men only. 

HPR 132 SOFTBALL AND SPEEDBALL 

Men only. 

HPR 133 FLAG FOOTBALL AND SOCCER 

Men only. 

HPR 134 HANDBALL AND PADDLE BALL 

Men only. (Students supply own gloves.) 

HPR 135 CONDITIONING 

Men only. 

HPR 136 WEIGHT TRAINING 

Men only. 

HPR 137 UNARMED DEFENSE 

Introduction to diflferent areas of self-defense developing fundamental 
knowledege of defense tactics and restraints. Police Academy students 
only. 

HPR 138 SKEET AND TRAP SHOOTING 1 semester hour 

Fundamentals of Skeet and Trap Shooting and Hunter Safety Training 
Course. Coeducational. Fee $40.00. 

HPR 139 SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES OF GOLF 

AND TENNIS 1 semester hour 

Open to women physical education majors only. Course is designed to 
aid prospective physical education teacher in becoming more skilled in 
golf and tennis, and to gain a more thorough knowledge of strategies, 
rules and techniques required for teaching these sports. Meets three 
hours weekly. Offered every other year. 

HPR 140 UNARMED DEFENSE 1 semester hour 

Introduction to different areas of self-defense at developing fundamental 
knowledge of defense tactics and restraints. 

HPR 141 BEGINNING BASIC SAILING 1 semester hour 

The basic course includes certain fundamentals and techniques of sea- 
manship and sail handling as would be necessary for safe, enjoyable use 
of a sailboat. Included is nomenclature, preparation and getting under- 
way, maneuvering, mooring, emergencies, safety precautions, and points 
of helmanship. The final goal of the course is the achievement of 
sufficient knowledge and skills to handle boats under reasonable condi- 
tions without instructors. 

HPR 142 BEGINNING WATER SKIING 1 semester hour 

Course for beginners directed toward techniques and fundamentals of 
skiing, two skis and slaloming — one ski. Prerequisite: Know how to 
swim. Coeducational. Fee $35.00. 

*HPR on campus activities require a $2.00 general lock and towel fee. 



163 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 
Courses 

HPR 143 PHYSICAL EDUCATION LAB 1 semester hour 

Conditioning and Self-Testing — Open to men physical education majors 
only. Course designed to improve physical fitness of students majoring 
in physical education. Time will be spent in various conditioning pro- 
grams, self-testing activities and vigorous exercise. Lectures will involve 
the organization and operation of conditioning programs for the physical 
education student as well as the athlete. Meets three hours weekly. 
(Men only) 

HPR 144 SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES OF SOCIAL 

AND FOLK DANCING 1 semester hour 

Open to physical education majors only (men and v/omen). American 
and European folk forms; square, circle, reel, line, couple and solo 
dances; traditional and current social dances. Meets three hours weekly. 
Offered every other year. 

HPR 145 THERAPEUTIC PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION 1 semester hour 

Modified exercise, activities, and sports that provide therapeutic and 
relaxation techniques with emphasis on the diagnosis and remediation 
of motor disabilities. Activities include passive, active and resistive 
exercises; elementary tumbling and gymnastics; bowling or badminton; 
basketball and /or volleyball. If the disabling condition warrants develop- 
ment of locomotor skills, activities of daily living will be included 
to enhance locomotion. Must have instructor approval to enter class. 

HPR 148 BEGINNING WRESTLING 1 semester hour 

This course is designed for a beginning student interested in wrestling. 
No previous experience is necessary. Course content will include the 
history, conditioning, vocabulary and fundamental skills of wrestling. 

HPR 149 SMALL CRAFT- 
INSTRUCTOR'S AIDE Non-Credit 

TTiis program will give beginning instructors additional experience. It 
gives qualified trainees valuable aid when seeking a sailing instructor's 
position. This program has the backing of the Red Cross Program. 
Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. 

HPR 150 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION 3 semester hours 

Course gives the prospective teacher early in his training, some under- 
standing of what is involved in the profession and an adequate prepara- 
tion for teaching. Coeducational. 

tHPR 151 PERSONAL HYGIENE AND 

COMMUNITY HEALTH 3 semester hours 

The study of health problems relating to the individual community 
including mental health, physical fitness, nutrition, the use of tobacco, 
alcohol and drugs, marriage and family living, safety, and the study of 
diseases. Coeducational. 

tHPR 152 FIRST AID AND SAFETY 3 semester hours 

Accepted practices and training in first aid care of the injured and 
medical self-help for survival in emergencies. Course includes suggested 

*HPR on campus activities require a $2.00 general lock and towel fee. 
tNot classified as an activity course. 

164 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 

Courses 

procedures effective until adequate medical assistance can be obtained. 
Principles of safety problems and accident prevention are included. 

tHPR 153 INTRODUCTION TO RECREATION 3 semester hours 

Acquaints the individual with the recreation organization and opportuni- 
ties for leaders in the field. 

tHPR 154 SPORT OFFICIATING 3 semester hours 

Men only. Theory and practice of officiating in elected sports. Field 
work in intramural activities. 

tHPR 155 SPORT OFFICIATING 3 semester hours 

Women only. Theory and practice of officiating in elected sports. Practice 
in intramural activity. 

tHPR 156 GROUP LEADERSHIP 3 semester hours 

It is important that recreation students gain a knowledge of human 
dynamics, leadership abilities, and the identification of types of groups. 
Leadership application, so far as this course is concerned, deals with the 
student's obtaining a practical knowledge of group situations and the 
principles necessary for effective leadership. A number of leadership 
techniques are presented and the instructor is urged to provide adequate 
class time for students to apply these techniques. 

Opportunities should be afforded to observe recreation leaders in 
actual leadership experiences and to allow suflficient time for student 
evaluation of their performances. 

tHPR 157 RECREATION FOR SPECIAL GROUPS 3 semester hours 

To provide students opportunities to develop recreational activities for 
special groups. Laboratory experience will include interaction with special 
groups in institutional and community settings by incorporating the latest 
methods, techniques and materials. 

tHPR 158 OUTDOOR RECREATION 3 semester hours 

History, development and economic significance of outdoor recreation 
activities at the local, state and federal levels. Laboratory and field trips 
include camping and hiking activities; emphasis on appreciation of 
natural resources. 

tHPR 160 PROMOTING PERSONAL HEALTH 1 semester hour 

Ths course includes a nucleus of topics specific for the certificate or 
community service program student. The nature of the human body, 
nutrition, infectious diseases and family planning are discussed. 

tHPR 161 HEALTHFUL LIVING 1 semester hour 

Deals with emotional and mental health, marriage and the family, and 
chronic disease states. A discussion of health quackery is included. 

tHPR 162 FIRST AID 1 semester hour 

Accepted principles and training in caring for the sick and injured of 
school age children. Breathing, Bleeding, Shock, Broken bones. Burns, 
and Poisons are the major areas to be reviewed. 

HPR 201 INTERMEDIATE ARCHERY 1 semester hour 

For students having had the beginning course of instruction in archery 
or other students with previous shooting experience and specialized 

*HPR on campus activity courses require a $2.00 general lock and towel fee. 
tNot classified as an activity course. 

165 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 
Courses 

interests in archery. It would be desirable to have your own tackle. 
Prerequisite: HPR 101 or instructor approval. Coeducational. 

HPR 204 INTERMEDIATE BOWLING 1 semester hour 

Prerequisite: HPR 104 or instructor approval. Coeducational. Fee $18.00. 

*HPR 205 CONTEMPORARY DANCE 1 semester horn- 

Composition with respect to form, design, dynamics and rhythm. 
Prerequisite: HPR 105, 120. 

HPR 206 INTERMEDIATE BILLIARDS 1 semester hour 

Intermediate course as billiards for students who have completed HPR 
116 with emphasis on advanced skills and techniques. Course will include 
advanced techniques in snooker, one pocket. bank pool, rotation, cribbage, 
and three cushion billiards. Prerequisite: HPR 116. 

HPR 208 INTERMEDIATE FENCING 1 semester hour 

Advanced techniques of foil fencing and foil direction. Coeducational. 
Prerequisite: HPR 108. 

HPR 209 INTERMEDIATE GOLF 1 semester hour 

. Coeducational. Prerequisite: HPR 109 or instructor approval. 

*HPR 210 INTERMEDIATE GYMNASTICS 1 semester hour 

Men only. 

= HPR 214 INTERMEDIATE TENNIS 1 semester hour 

Coeducational: Prerequisite: HPR 114 or instructor approval. 
(Students furnish own racquet and balls) 

*HPR 220 DANCE COMPOSITION 1 semester hour 

Principles of composition, student choreography and performance of 
solo and group compositions required. Prerequisite: HPR 105, 120, 205. 
(Women only.) 

HPR 225 INTERMEDIATE GYMNASTICS 1 semester hour 

Women only. 

HPR 236 INTERMEDIATE WEIGHT TRAINING 1 semester hour 

Advanced course in weight training for those who have completed HPR 
136. Special attention given to Olympic lifts (2 hand press, 2 hand 
snatch and 2 hand clean and jerk). In HPR 136 basic fundamentals of 
weight training were achieved. Better lifters in HPR 136 would have 
the opportunity to continue training at an advanced level with possible 
development into competitive lifters. 

HPR 239 SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES OF 

VOLLEYBALL AND BASKETBALL 1 semester hour 

Open to women physical education majors only. Course designed to 
develop skills and knowledges necessary for the prospective physical 
education teacher in basketball and volleyball. Advanced skills, strategies 
and rules included. Meets three hours weekly. Offered every other year. 

*HPR 240 SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES OF 

HOCKEY AND SOCCER 1 semester hour 

Open to women physical education majors only. Course aids in prospec- 
tive physical education teacher in developing skills and techniques in 

*HPR on campus activity courses require a $2.00 general lock and towel fee. 

166 



Health, Physical Education & Recreation 

Courses 

hockey, soccer, and softball. Advanced rules and strategies included. 
Meets three hours weekly. Offered every other year. 

HPR 241 INTERMEDIATE SAILING 1 semester hour 

This course involves a review of the basic course and continues to include 
the use of balloon sail, and other sails less frequently used, some racing 
points, navigation, anchoring etc. This course will develop in the student 
a confidence in himself and increase skills with his equipment. Prereq- 
uisite: HPR 141 or approval of instructor. 

HPR 242 INTERMEDIATE WATER SKIING 1 semester hour 

Course designed for advanced slaloming, trick skiing, barefoot skiing. 
Prerequisite: Water Skiing 142, or experienced on slalom. Coeducational. 
Fee $35.00. 

*HPR 243 PHYSICAL EDUCATION LAB 1 semester hour 

Skills and techniques of golf and handball. Open to men physical education 
majors only. Course designed to develop skills and knowledge necessary 
for prospective physical education teacher in golf, and handball. Ad- 
vanced skills and strategies included. Meets three hours weekly (Men 
only.) 

HPR 244 SENIOR LIFE SAVING AND 

ADVANCED SURVIVAL 1 semester hour 

Instructor's approval required. Coeducational. 

*HPR 245 INSTRUCTOR COURSE (Swimming) 1 semester hour 

Instructor's approval required. Prerequisite: HPR 244. Coeducational. 

*HPR 246 SCUBA DIVING 1 semester hour 

Instructor's approval required. Coeducational. Student responsible for 
rental of scuba equipment. Fee $35.00. 

-HPR 247 PHYSICAL EDUCATION LAB 1 semester hour 

Skills techniques in gymnastics, trampoline and tunibling. Open to men 
physical education majors only. Course designed to aid prospective 
physical education teacher in becoming more skilled in gymnastics and 
tumbling and in techniques required for teaching these skills^ Meets 
three hours weekly. (Men only.) 

*HPR 248 INTERMEDIATE WRESTLING 1 semester hour 

This course is designed to be a progression of HPR 148 with emphasis 
on more advanced skills of wrestling. Prerequisite: HPR 148 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

HPR 249 SMALL CRAFT — INSTRUCTOR 1 semester hour 

This program enables a qualified person to teach sailing and issue Basic 
I and II awards. Each graduate would receive his American National 
Red Cross Instructor's Card. Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. 

HPR 257 SAILING RACING CLINIC 1 semester hour 

This course is designed to develop complete amateur sailboat racers. 
Emphasis would be on tactics and boat handling. Boat handling would 
include physical conditioning, use of racing equipment, repair and choice 
of equipment and proper trim of sails and flying of spinnaker. Tactics 
would include theory and practice as well as practical experience against 
other advanced students. Part of course content would include guest 
lecturers of amateur and professional status. 

*HPR on campus activity courses require a $2.00 general lock and towel fee. 

167 



DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 

Biological Science 

Mathematics 

Physical Sciences 

Landscape Technology 

Pest Control Technology 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

The biology offerings present the student a variety of options, while 
contributing courses to the numerous programs of the College. A student, 
depending upon his background, academic or professional goal, may enter 
these courses by exercising one of three options: 

OPTION I Biology 100, Biology 105, or Biology 107. This introduc- 

tory course is recommended to the General Education 
student and those students planning to take only (1) one 
term of biology. Biology 105, the accompanying laboratory 
course should be taken by students planning to transfer to 
schools that require a laboratory science. 

OPTION II Biology 105, Biology 150, Biology 151, Biology 160, 

Biology 161. Biology majors should start their sequence 
with this option. These five courses should be planned with 
an advisor of the biology programs. 

OPTION III Biology 095, (NT) Introduction to Natural Science. A 
course designed to correct deficiencies and/or refine the 
student's Natural Science background. The Counseling Ser- 
vice should be consulted prior to enrolling in this course. 

Introduction to Natural Science 095 is designed for local credit. It will not 
be acceptable as a substitute for a college transfer course that will count 
toward the junior college Associate of Arts Degree; and it will probably not 
be acceptable by other institutions as counting toward a four-year college 
degree. 



MATHEMATICS 

The mathematics curriculum has course offerings covering a variety of 
needs. Course prerequisites for physics and engineering are included. Enter- 
ing students will be assigned to the mathematics course best suited to their 
needs and abilities on the basis of high school records, placement test scores, 
and stated goals. MTH 09 1 and MTH 092 are basic studies courses designed 
to correct deficiencies in the student's high school background. MTH 100 is 
a general education course recommended for most students needing only a 
single semester of mathematics. For students majoring in mathematics or 
science, and for other students needing more than one semester of mathe- 
matics, the following sequence of courses is available: MTH 131, MTH 132, 
MTH 134, MTH 223, MTH 224, MTH 235. MTH 234 may be taken at 
any time but has a prerequisite of MTH 132. MTH 191 is a non-sequential 
service type course which may be taken concurrently with any other mathe- 

168 



Mathematics & Science 
Physical Sciences 

matics course. MTH 171 and 172 are designed to meet the needs of students 
in technical and specialized programs. 

Basic Mathematics Communications 091: Students who have a score which 
is between the first and the thirtieth percentiles on the Florida Twelfth Grade 
Test in mathematics will be placed in MTH 091. The exception to this may 
be students who have a score of 275 or over on the total Florida Twelfth 
Grade Test and a 2.0 cumulative high school grade point average in 
mathematics. 

Basic Mathematics Communications 092: Students who place in the thirty- 
first to the fiftieth percentiles on the Florida Twelfth Grade Test in mathe- 
matics will be placed in MTH 092. The exception may be students who 
score 300 or over on the Florida Twelfth Grade Test and have a high 
school cumulative point average in mathematics of 2.5 or over. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

The Physical Sciences Department offers courses in the areas of 
Physical Science, Astronomy, Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, and Physics. 
The course offerings cover a variety of needs including courses for science 
majors as well as students in related fields. In addition, courses are provided 
to meet the general education requirements for non-science majors and the 
specialized needs of technical students. 

NOTE: Students beginning sequence courses such as CHE 131- 
132-133, CHE 221-222, EGR 101-105, should plan to 
complete the sequence in this College. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR ASTRONOMY (A.A. Degree) 

The student should be advised that failure to maintain a B average 
(3.0) will jeopardize his chances of completing the seven year minimum 
course for an astronomer. 

In any instance in which a student is qualified to undertake a course 
with a higher sequence number than the one listed it is to be understood that 
the higher course will be acceptable. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 104 Composition 

GER 101 Elementary German 3 (Scientific) 3 

HIS 101 World Civilization .3 GER 102 Elementary German 4 

HPR Physical Education 1 HIS 102 World Civilization .3 

*MTH 134 Pre-Calculus Math II 3 MTH 223 Calculus I 6 

Elective 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 17 

Summer Tenns 
Term HI-A Term ID-B 

ENG 201 World Literature 3 GY 105 Physical Geology 3 

Humanities 3 GY 106 Physical Geology Lab 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 6 Total Semester Hours 5 

169 



Mathematics & Science 
Cou rses — Astronomy 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

AST 101 Astronomy I 3 AST 102 Astronomy II 3 

PHY 210 General Physics 3 GER 202 Intermediate German 3 

PHY 212 General Physics Lab 1 PHY 211 General Physics 3 

GER 201 Intermediate German 3 PHY 213 General Physics Lab 1 

MTH 224 Calculus II 6 Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

MTH 235 Differential Equations 3 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 17 

*Students entering without qualifications to begin MTH 134 must anticipate 
additional terms. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
ASTRONOMY 

AST 101 ASTRONOMY I 3 semester hours 

Descriptive, non-mathematical study of the solar system and astronomical 
methods of general interest. Three hours weekly and additional evening 
observing sessions. 

AST 102 ASTRONOMY H 3 semester hours 

Continuation of Astronomy I. Consideration given primarily to objects 
and events beyond the solar system in our galaxy and in other galaxies. 

AST 200 PLANETARIUM EDUCATION 3 semester hours 

Course for teachers and students of Education. Study of the use of the 
Planetarium in education. Various audio-visual devices will be employed. 
Large portions of the course consist of directed study with the student 
designing and writing his own educational materials pertaining to audio- 
visual concepts in planetarium education. Acquaints student with the 
celestial sphere and planet position. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. 

SUGGESTED BIOLOGY (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

*MTH 134 Pre-Calculus Math II 3 MTH 223 Calculus I 6 

CHE 131 General Chemistry 3 CHE 132 General Chemistry 3 

PRE 101 Elementary French CHE 134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

(or GER 101) 3 PRE 102 Elementary French 

BIO 105 Biology Lab 1 (or GER 102) 4 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education . 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 Total Semester Hours 18 

Summer Terms 
Term m-A Term HI-B 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 Humanities 3 

CHE 135 General Chemistry Lab . 1 Social Science 3 

Humanities 3 

Total Semester Hours 7 Total Semester Hours 6 

* Students entering without qualifications to begin MTH 134 must anticipate 
additional terms. 

170 



Mathematics & Science 
Cou rses — Biology 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

*CHE 221 Organic Chemistry 3 CHE 222 Organic Chemistry 3 

CHE 223 Organic Chem. Lab 1 CHE 224 Organic Chem. Lab 1 

BIO 150 General Botany 3 BIO 160 General Zoology .3 

BIO 151 General Botany Lab 1 BIO 161 General Zoology Lab 1 

MTH 224 Calculus II 6 Foreign Language (French 202 

Foreign Language (French 201 or German 202) 3 

or German 201) 3 Social Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 18 Total Semester Hours 15 

*PHY 201, 202, 203, and 204 are also required, either Physics or Organic 
Chemistry may be taken as a sophomore course. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
BIOLOGY 

BIO 095 (NT) INTRODUCTION TO 

NATURAL SCIENCE 3 semester hours 

An elementary science course designed to improve skills of the student 
who has had difficulty understanding science. This course will help the 
student learn the language, and the framework of ideas in science and will 
increase the student's word meaning, idea grasping and reading ability. 
An assigned counselor's approval is required. 

BIO 100 MODERN PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Course designed to give students an understanding of modern principles 
of biology, while focusing on the nature and activities of living organisms. 
Course primarily for non-science majors. (See BIO 105) 

BIO 105 MODERN PRINCIPLES OF 

BIOLOGY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Two hours of laboratory weekly which may be taken concurrently with 
BIO 100. For students planning to transfer where laboratory is required 
for science credit. This lab course must be taken as either a prerequisite 
or a corequisite to the BIO 150 Botany or the BIO 160 Zoology. One two- 
hour period weekly. Fee $7.00. 

BIO 107 AUDIOTUTORIAL BIOLOGY 4 semester hours 

A lively, multi-media involvement in bioscience, combining the lecture 
topics of BIO 100 with the laboratory experiences of BIO 105. Instruction 
is individualized by way of instructor contact, audiotape, film, and relevant 
laboratory exercises. Living organisms are used extensively. For majors and 
non-majors alike. Three hours integrated lecture-lab instruction, two-hour 
tape review, and one hour evaluation each week. Fee $7.00. 

BIO 111 INTEGRATED SCIENCE FOR 

ALLIED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 2 semester hours 

An integration of physical, chemical, and biological subjects presented 
in support of the allied health technician in training. General physics, 
general chemistry, and microbiology are introduced in sequence and 
coordinated with the allied health programs. Pre or corequisite: BIO 105 
or BIO 107. Does not meet requirements for General Education Science. 

171 



Mathematics & Science 
Courses — Biology 

BIO 112 INTEGRATED SCIENCE FOR 

ALLIED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 2 semester hours 

An introduction to human body parts, cells, tissues, and organ systems with 
continuing integration of subjects offered in BIO 111. Presented in support 
of allied health technician in training and introduced in a sequence coordi- 
nated with the alhed health programs. Prerequisite: BIO 111. Does not 
meet requirements for General Education Science. 

BIO 113 INTEGRATED SCIENCE FOR 

ALLIED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 2 semester hours 

A continuing introduction to human body parts, cells, tissues, and organ 
systems with an integration of subjects offered in BIO 111. Presented in 
support of the allied health technician in training and introduced in a 
sequence coordinated with the allied health programs. Prerequisite: BIO 
111. Corequisite: BIO 117. Does not meet requirements for General 
Education Science. 

BIO 114 INTEGRATED SCIENCE FOR 

ALLIED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 2 semester hours 

A continuing introduction to human body parts, cells, tissues, and organ 
systems with an integration of subjects offered in BIO 111. Presented in 
support of the allied health technician in training and introduced in a 
sequence coordinated with the allied health programs. Prerequisite: BIO 
111. Corequisite: BIO 117. Does not meet requirements for General Educa- 
tion Science. 

BIO 117 INTEGRATED SCIENCE FOR ALLIED 

HEALTH TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Laboratory experiments to accompany BIO 112, 113, and 114. Prerequisite: 
BIO 111, BIO 105 (BIO 107 as a substitute for BIO 105). One two hour 
period weekly. Fee $7.00. 

BIO 120 MAN AND ENVIRONMENT I 3 semester hours 

Offered over T.V. in cooperation with Miami-Dade Community College. 
The evolving nature of man and his value system, the trend toward urbani- 
zation of large populations and the consequent environmental pollution. 
Does not meet requirements for General Education Science. 

BIO 121 MAN AND ENVIRONMENT II 3 semester hours 

Offered over T.V. in cooperation with Miami-Dade Community College. 
A sequel to, but not prerequisited by BIO 120. Man's perception of his 
environment, ecological areas, and the solution to contemporary problems 
are considered. Does not meet requirements of General Education Science. 

BIO 150 GENERAL BOTANY 3 semester hours 

Course designed to treat entire plant kingdom with emphasis on structure 
and function of flowering plants. Fundamental cell and tissue structure of 
both vascular and non-vascular plants are studied. Associated physiological 
and chemical effects as related to function are emphasized. Three hours 
weekly. Pre or corequisite: BIO 105. Corequisite BIO 151. 

BIO 151 GENERAL BOTANY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Laboratory Experiments and field trips to accompany BIO 150. Pre or 
corequisite BIO 105 and corequisite BIO 150. One two-hour period weekly. 
Fee $7.00. 

L72 



Mathematics & Science 
Courses — Chemistry 

BIO 160 GENERAL ZOOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Basic course pertaining to the development, anatomy, physiology, ecology 
and natural relationships of the animal kingdom. Pre or corequisite: BIO 
105. Corequisite BIO 161. 

BIO 161 GENERAL ZOOLOGY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Laboratory Experiments and field trips to accompany BIO 160. Prerequisites 
or corequisite BIO 105. One two-hour period weekly. Corequisite BIO 160. 
Fee $7.00. 

BIO 250 PRINCIPLES OF MARINE BIOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Introduction to marine life involving identification of organisms and the 
nature of their environment. Collecting trips and laboratory study relate 
to economic applications. Prerequisites: BIO 150-151 and 160-161 or 
instructor approval. Corequisite BIO 251. 

BIO 251 MARINE BIOLOGY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Field trips and Laboratory Experiments to accompany BIO 250. Prerequisite 
BIO 150, 151 and 160-161 or instructor approval. One two-hour period 
weekly. Corequisite BIO 250. Fee $7.00. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR CHEMISTRY (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

CHE 131 General Chemistry .3 CHE 132 General Chemistry 3 

*MTH 134 Pre-Calculus Math II 3 CHE 134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

GER 101 Elementary German 3 MTH 223 Calculus I 6 

HPR Physical Education 1 GER 102 Elementary German 4 

Social Science 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 18 

SUMMER TERMS 

Term III-A Term IH-B 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 Humanities 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 Social Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 5 Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 



. 3 CHE 222 Organic Chemistry 3 

1 CHE 224 Organic Chem. Lab 1 

.6 PHY 211 General Physics .3 

.3 PHY 213 General Physics Lab .1 

. 1 GER 202 Intermediate German 3 

.3 Humanities 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 15 



CHE 221 Organic Chemistry 
CHE 223 Organic Chem. Lab 

MTH 224 Calculus II 

PHY 210 General Physics 
PHY 212 General Physics Lab 
GER 201 Intermediate German 



^Students who are not prepared to begin with MTH 134 can expect to spend 
an extra term for each mathematics course preceding MTH 134. 

173 



Mathematics & Science 
Courses — Chemistry 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
CHEMISTRY 

CHE 107 CHEMISTRY FOR GENERAL 

EDUCATION 3 semester hours 

Non-laboratory course concerning the structure of matter and the trans- 
formation it undergoes. Designed for students who are non-majors and 
who do not require a year of general college chemistry in their programs. 
Credit will not be given for both CHE 107 and CHE 131. 

CHE 108 CHEMISTRY FOR GENERAL 

EDUCATION LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

For students in general education planning to transfer to an institution 
requiring a laboratory science course or for general education students 
desiring laboratory experience in conjunction with CHE 107. One two-hour 
laboratory period weekly. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 107. Fee $5.00. 

CHE 115 PARAMEDICAL SCIENCE III 4 semester hours 

A presentation of the science of Chemistry directed toward an understand- 
ing of metabolism as applied to Respiratory Therapy, including blood gases 
and acid-base balance solutions and ions, and eletrolytes. A foundation of 
related pharmacology is also presented. Prerequisite: CHE 107. 

CHE 131 GENERAL CHEMISTRY 3 semester hours 

First course in the three term sequence CHE 131, 132, 133. Introduction 
to elementary principles of modern chemistry. Corequisite or prerequisite: 
MTH 131 or two years of high school algebra with grade "C" or better. 
Credit will not be given for both CHE 131 and CHE 107. 

CHE 132 GENERAL CHEMISTRY 3 semester hours 

Further development of the principles of modern chemistry introduced in 
CHE 131 including the descriptive chemistry of familiar elements and 
their compounds. Prerequisite: CHE 131. Corequisite: CHE 134. 

CHE 133 GENERAL CHEMISTRY AND 

QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 3 semester hours 

The third segment of the lecture sequence CHE 131, 132, 133. Continued 

development of modern chemical principles. CHE 133 and CHE 135 

completes requirements for General Chemistry and are prerequisites to 
further chemistry courses. Prerequisite: CHE 132 and CHE 134. Coreq- 
uisite: CHE 135. 

CHE 134 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHE 132. One three-hour period 
weekly. Prerequisite: CHE 131. Corequisite: CHE 132. Fee $7.00. 

CHE 135 GENERAL CHEMISTRY AND QUALITATFVE 

ANALYSIS LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Qualitative analysis of selected cations and anions to accompany CHE 133. 
One three hour period weekly. Prerequisite: CHE 132 and CHE 134. 
Corequisite: CHE 133. Fee $7.00. 

CHE 221, 222 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 semester hours each 

Study of the structures, preparations, and reactions of various classes of 
hydrocarbons and their derivatives, these reactions being interpreted and 
unified in the light of modern electronic theory. Course is integrated in 
organization taking up aliphatic aromatic compounds together. Prerequisite 

174 



Mathematics & Science 
Cou rses — Chemistry 

for CHE 221: CHE 133 and CHE 135. Corequi&ite for CHE 221: CHE 
223. Prerequisite for CHE 222: CHE 221 and CHE 223. Corequisite for 
CHE 222: CHE 224. 

CHE 223, 224 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

LABORATORY 1 semester hour each 

Organic laboratory experiments to accompany CHE 221, 222. One three 
hour period weekly. Prerequisite for CHE 223: CHE 133 and CHE 135. 
Prerequisite for CHE 224: CHE 221 and CHE 223. Corequisite for CHE 
223: CHE 221. Corequisite for CHE 224: CHE 222. Fee $12.00 each 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-ENGINEERING (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 



CHE 
ENG 



First Term 
131 General Chemistry 
101 Composition 
^MTH 134 Pre-Calculus Math II 
EGR 101 Engineering Drawing 
HPR Physical Education 
Social Science 



Total Semester Hours 



Second Term 

3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

3 MTH 223 Calculus I 6 

3 CHE 132 General Chemistry 3 

3 CHE 134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

1 HPR Physical Education 1 

3 EGR 105 Descriptive Geometry 3 

16 Total Semester Hours 17 



SUMMER TERMS 

Term IH-A Term III-B 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 Social Science 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 Area 5 (Other than F) 3 

Humanities 3 

Total Semester Hours 7 Total Semester Hours 6 

*The first term on campus Pre-Engineering students should enroll in the 
highest mathematics course for which qualified and in EGR 101. 

Students who are not prepared to begin with MTH 134 can expect to 
spend an extra term for each mathematics course preceding MTH 134. 



SECOND 

First Term 

Humanities 3 

MTH 224 Calculus II 6 

PHY 210 General Physics 3 

PHY 212 General Physics Lab 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

*MTH 234 Linear Algebra (a) 3 



Total Semester Hours 17 



YEAR 

Second Term 
*MTH 235-Differential 

Equations (b) .3 

PHY 211 General Physics 3 

PHY 213 General Physics Lab 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

EGR 233 Engineering 

Mechanics (b) 3 

DP 110 3 

Total Semester Hours 14 



(a) Offered during the fall term, Term I. It is not a required course, but 
would help strengthen the student's background. 

(b) Offered only during spring term (Term II). 

*Agricultural Engineering substitute Biology for MTH 234 and MTH 235. 



175 



Mathematics & Science 
Courses — Engineering 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
ENGINEERING 

EGR 101 ENGINEERING DRAWING 3 semester hoars 

Use of drafting instruments, lettering title compositions, orthographic 
projection, dimensioning, drawing to scale; plan reading, auxiliary and 
sectional views, isometric and oblique projection, linear-perspective, tech- 
nical sketching, accepted practices and conventions, fits and tolerances, 
common fasteners. Corequisite: MTH 131. Six hours weekly. Offered at 
night only in Term I. Not Offered Term III. 

EGR 105 DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 3 semester hours 

Orthographic representation, fundamental problems of the point, line, and 
plane with special emphasis on visualization in order to develop the ability 
to think in three dimensions. Practical applications to problems m engineer- 
ing. Prerequisite: EGR 101 or instructor approval. Six hours weekly. 
Offered at night only in Term II. Not offered Term III. 

EGR 233 ENGINEERING MECHANICS 3 semester hours 

Statics of particles, rigid bodies and structures. The algebra and calculus 
of vectors are applied to the analysis of bodies at rest. Also included are 
problems dealing with equilibrium and friction. Calculus is used to find 
centroids and moments of inertia and in the analysis of virtual displace- 
ments. Prerequisites: PHY 210 and MTH 223. Offered Term II only. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR GEOLOGY (A.A. Degree) 
FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 

MTH 131 Intermediate Math 3 

CHE 131 General Chemistry .3 

Modern Foreign Language 3 
(Level according to 
placement test) 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Social Science 3 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



Second Term 
ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

MTH 132 Pre-Calculus 

Mathematics I 3 

CHE 132 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

Modem Foreign Language 3 

(in sequence) 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Social Science 3 

Total Semester Hours 17 



SUMMER TERMS 



Term IH-A 

ENG 230 American Literature 3 

Modern Foreign Language 3 

(in sequence) 
HPR Physical Education . 1 

Total Semester Hours 7 

SECOND 
First Term 

Humanities 3 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

GY 105 Physical Geology 3 

GY 106 Physical Geology Lab 1 
PHY 201 Intermediate Physics 3 

PHY 203 Intermediate Physics 

Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 



Term III-B 

MTH 134 Pre-Calculus Math II 
Modern Foreign Language . 
(in sequence) 



Total Semester Hours 6 

YEAR 

Second Term 
BIO 100 Modern Biology 3 

GY 110 Historical Geology 3 

GY 111 Historical 

Geology Lab 1 

Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

PHY 202 Intermediate Physics 3 

PHY 204 Inter. Physics Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 



176 



Mathematics & Science 
Courses — Geology 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
GEOLOGY 

GY 105 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Study of geologic agents, minerals, rocks, structure, and land forms. Appli- 
cations are made of life and human relations. Students registering in GY 
105 are strongly urged to also register in GY 106. Some colleges and 
universities require geology laboratory in order to give credit for physical 
geology lecture. 

GY 106 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Study of common rocks and minerals including their classification and 
origin. The interpretation of landforms through the study of geologic maps. 
One two-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite or corequisite: GY 105. 
Fee $7.00. 

GY 108 FLORIDA GEOLOGY 3 semester hours 

A study of the unique nature of geology and hydrology of the State of 
Florida as it relates to water management, conservation, and pollution. 

GY 109 FLORIDA GEOLOGY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

One two-hour session per week designed to provide laboratory experience 
and/or field trips to complement the topics covered in GY 108. Fee $5.00. 

GY 110 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Study of the geologic record, including life forms, from pre-Cabrian to 
the present. Course embraces a study of geologic maps, orogenic history, 
stratigraphy and fossils. Some elementary field work is done. Prerequisites 
GY 105 and GY 106. 

GY 111 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

One two-hour session per week. Experimental topics include fossils, paleo- 
geography, rock correlation, and interpretation of geologic maps as related 
to the lectures. Corequisite: GY 110. Fee $5.00. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICS (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

Second Term 

ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

MTH 223 Calculus I 6 

Social Science 3 

GER 102 German (or FRE 102) 4 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 17 

SUMMER TERMS 

Humanities 3 

Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

* Students entering without qualifications to begin MTH 134 must anticipate 
more than the suggested two year sequence in mathematics. With program 
recommendation qualified students may take MTH 223 during the first 
term and continue the sequence. 

177 





First Term 




ENG 


101 Composition 


3 


MTH 


134 Pre-Calculus Math II 


3 


GER 


101 German (or FRE 101) 


3 


Social 


Science 


3 


HPR 


Physical Education 


.1 



Mathematics & Science 
Courses — Mathematics 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

MTH 224 Calculus II 6 MTH 235 Differential Equations 3 

PHY 210 General Physics 3 PHY 211 General Physics 3 

PHY 212 General Physics Lab 1 PHY 213 General Physics Lab 1 

GER 201 German (or ERE 201) 3 GER 202 German (or ERE 202) 3 

MTH 234 Linear Algebra 3 Humanities 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours .17 Total Semester Hours .14 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
MATHEMATICS 

MTH 091 (NT) COMMUNICATIONS IN 

MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

A course to improve the abilities of the student who has had difficulties 
in arithmetic. This course will help the student learn how to read the 
language of mathematics; how to go about solving problems, and how to 
improve his basic skills. 

MTH 106 (NT) ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA 3 semester hours 

A course to improve the abilities of the student who has had difficulties 
in mathematics and to help him learn the basic algebra needed for further 
mathematics courses. This course will also teach the student how to apply 
his knowledge of arithmetic and algebra to many problems. A course in 
elementary algebra, Elective credit will be granted for successful comple- 
tion of this course. 

MTH 109 GENERAL EDUCATION COLLEGE 

MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

A General Education course recommended for students not planning to 
major in mathematics or science. Emphasis is placed upon fundamental 
mathematical concepts. 

MTH 131 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 3 semester hours 

An intermediate course in algebra, emphasizing operations with algebraic 
symbols, solution of equations, functional relationship, graphs, verbal 
problems, and selected additional topics. Credit will not be given for 
both this course and MTH 171. Prerequisite: one year of high school 
algebra with a grade of "B" or better or successful completion of MTH 
106. 

MTH 132 PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS I 3 semester hours 

Topics in the theory and methods of college algebra, designed to supple- 
ment previous courses in mathematics and to provide the first semester of 
two-semester sequence in pre-calculus mathematics. Prerequisite: MTH 
13.1 or two years of high school algebra with grade of "B" or better, 
or recommendation of the Mathematics Department. 

MTH 134 PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS II 3 semester hours 

A continuation of MTH 132, including topics from trigonometry and 
advanced topics in algebra, to prepare the students for Calculus. Credit 
will not be given for both this course and MTH 172. Prerequisite: MTH 
132 or recommendation of the Mathematics Department. 

178 



Mathematics & Science 



Courses — Mathematics, Physical Science 



MTH 136 MATHEMATICS WITH MACHINES 1 semester hour 

Flow charts, the BASIC programming language, machine languages, 
familiarization with the type of problems machines can handle, develop- 
ment of problem-solving skills. The class meets three hours per week 
for 5 weeks. You may take MTH 136 at the start of a term, after 5 
weeks of the term, or the last 5 weeks of the term. 

MTH 171 TECHNICAL ALGEBRA 3 semester hours 

Technical algebra is designed for students majoring in electronics, drafting, 
and other engineering technologies. A review of the fundamentals of 
mathematics is provided. Algebraic concepts involving monomials and 
polynomials, equations, scientific notation, linear equations, quadratic 
equations, and common logarithms are included. Credit will not be given 
for both this course and MTH 131. 

MTH 172-TECHNICAL TRIGONOMETRY 3 semester hours 

This is the second course in a two-term sequence for engineering tech- 
nology majors. The concepts developed include complex notation, trigo- 
nometric tables, vector fundamentals, right triangle relationships, and 
other applicable trigonometric relationships. Credit will not be given for 
both this course and MTH 134. 

MTH 223 and 224 CALCULUS AND 

ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY 6 hours each semester 

Topics from analytic geometry, functions, limits, derivatives, definite and 
indefinite integrals, parametric equations, polar coordinates, transcendental 
functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, sequences and series, L' 
Hospital's rule and the generalized mean value theorem, improper integrals. 
MTH 223 and 224 form a continuous sequence; students enrolling in 
MTH 223 are advised to complete the entire two-term sequence before 
transferring to another college. Prerequisite for MTH 223: MTH 134 or 
recommendation of Mathematics Department. Prerequisite for MTH 224: 
MTH 223. 

MTH 234 LINEAR ALGEBRA 3 semester hours 

A first course in linear algebra, emphasizing the algebra of matrices 
and vector spaces. Recommended for students majoring in mathematics 
or related areas. Prerequisite: MTH 134 and recommendation of Mathe- 
matics Department. Offered Term 1 only. 

MTH 235 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 semester hours 

Classification and solution of equations involving variables and their 
derivatives, with numerous applications. Prerequisite: MTH 224. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

SCI 101 PHYSICAL SCIENCES SURVEY 3 semester hours 

A survey of Physical Sciences including Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, 
Meteorology and Physics, oriented to the non-science major. Available with 
a laboratory for students whose programs require a 4 credit science course. 

SCI 103 PHYSICAL SCIENCES LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

An optional course providing laboratory experience in the disciplines taught 
in SCI 101. One two hour period weekly. Fee $3.00. 

179 



Mathematics & Science 
Courses — Physics 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PHYSICS (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

Second Term 
102 or 104 Composition 
132 General Chemistry 
134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 
MTH 223 Calculus I 

102 Elementary German 
Physical Education 



First Term 






ENG 101 Composition 


, ,3 


ENG 


CHE 131 General Chemistry 


3 


CHE 


MTH 134 Pre-Calculus Math II 


.3 


CHE 


GER 101 Elementary German 


, 3 


MTH 


HPR Physical Education . . 


. 1 


GER 


Elective 


..3 


HPR 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



Total Semester Hours 



3 
.3 

1 

6 
.4 

1 
18 



SUMMER TERMS 
Term III-A 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 4 



Term IIIB 

Social Science 



Total Semester Hours 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

MTH 224 Calculus II 6 

PHY 210 General Physics 3 

PHY 212 General Physics Lab 1 

Humanities 3 

GER 201 Intermediate German 3 

HPR Physical Education . 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 



Second Term 

MTH 235 Differential Equations 3 

PHY 210 General Physics 3 

PHY 213 General Physics Lab 1 

Elective 3 

Humanities .3 

GER 202 Intermediate German 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 



^Students who are not prepared to begin with MTH 134 can expect to 
spend an extra term for each mathematics course preceding MTH 134. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
PHYSICS 

PHY 130 PHYSICS 3 semester hours 

General Physics course accompanied by an optional laboratory. Contents: 
■Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism. Intended for students in general 
education and technical fields. Students majoring in a technical field should 
take PHY 131 concurrently with PHY 130. 

PHY 131 PHYSICS LABORATORY 1 semester hour 

Laboratory which meets for two hours per week for the purpose of demon- 
strating and verifying the theories of mechanics, electricity and magnetism. 
The concept of heat is introduced and experiments are performed to 
illustrate this concept. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHY 130. Fee $2.00. 

PHY 201 and 202 INTERMEDIATE PHYSICS 3 semester hours each 

General physics course at the intermediate level. Contents mechanics, 
properties of matter, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, light, atomic 
and nuclear physics. The course is not intended for students majoring in 
engineering or the physical sciences, but satisfies the needs of pre-medical 
students and majors in technical fields. Prerequisite for PHY 201: MTH 
172 or MTH 134. Prerequisite for PHY 202: PHY 201. 



180 



Mathematics & Science 
Courses — Physics, Statistics 

PHY 203 and 204 INTERMEDIATE 

PHYSICS LABORATORY 1 semester hour each 

Laboratories designed to accompany PHY 201 and PHY 202 respectively. 
Each lab meets for two hours each week. Prerequisite or corequisite for 
PHY 203: PHY 201. Prerequisite or corequistite for PHY 204: PHY 202. 
Fee $2.00 each course. 

PHY 210 and 211 GENERAL PHYSICS 3 semester hours each 

Designed as a two-term course offering a comprehensive coverage of the 
entire science of physics. Contents for the first course includes mechanics, 
heat, wave motion, and sound. The second course includes electricity, 
magnetism, light, and modern physics. Complex numbers are introduced 
and used in the solution of problems. Calculus is used extensively and 
simple differential equations are solved. The courses are intended for 
majors in physics, or the physical sciences, or in engineering. Prerequisite 
or corequisite for PHY 210 is MTH 223. Prerequisite for PHY 211 is 
PHY 210. Pre or corequisite for PHY 211 is MTH 224. 

PHY 212 and 213 GENERAL PHYSICS 

LABORATORY 1 semester hour each 

Laboratories designed to accompany PHY 210 and PHY 211 respectively. 
The labs meet for two hours each week. Prerequisite or corequisite for 
PHY 212: PHY 210. Prerequisite or corequisite for PHY 213: PHY 211. 
Fee $2.00 each course. 

PHY 240 ACOUSTICS 3 semester hours 

A survey of basic topics in the physical properties of sound and music, 
including an in depth study of wave motion, pitch, timbre intensity, and 
the nature of stringed, wind, percussion, and vocal instruments. Three 
hours weekly. Prerequisite: MTH 131. Prerequisite or corequisite: MUS 
105 or consent of instructor. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 
STATISTICS 

STA 221 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 3 semester hours 

First course in statistical methods dealing with such topics as collecting, 
grouping, and presenting data; measures of central tendency and variation; 
theoretical distributions; probability; tests of hypotheses, regression, and 
correlation. A student owned pocket calculator is required. Prerequisite: 
Any college mathematics course of two years of high school algebra with 
grade of "C" or better. 



LANDSCAPE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

The opportunities in this rapidly expanding industry for technically 
trained personnel are almost limitless. Technological advances, increased 
emphasis on environmental control through the use of plants, additional 
consumer leisure time and greater aesthetic interest have greatly increased 
the need of personnel in the areas of landscape design, landscape contract- 
ing, nursery and turf production and management, horticultural pest control, 
horticultural sales, and garden supply. 

181 



Mathematics & Science 
Landscape Technology 

The Associate of Science graduate of this program will have an under- 
standing of the basic knowledge and technical skills necessary for rapid 
advancement in the industry of his choice. Credits may be applied toward 
a degree at various senior institutions. 

Many of the courses are offered in the evening for industry members 
who wish to continue their education and advance in their field. 

Persons interested in this self-satisfying and lucrative career should 
contact the staff of the Landscape Technology program for a personal inter- 
view or the Guidance Department. 



LANDSCAPE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

Requirements for the Associate of Science Degree in Landscape 
Technology: 

1. Completion of 71 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 or 
better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
English Composition 3 semester hours 

ENG 101 

Social Science 6 semester hours 

PSC 122, PSY 100 

3. Completion of 43 semester hours in major field: 

LST 104 LST 132 LST 233 LST 270 LST 287 

LST 105 LST 150 LST 240 LST 252 LST 271 

LST 131 LST 185 LST 260 LST 286 

4. Completion of 15 semester hours in related areas: 

BA. 100 3 semester hours 

BA 130 3 semester hours 

BA 150 3 semester hours 

BA 121 3 semester hours 

BA 260 or 262 3 semester hours 

5. Completion of four semester hours of Physical Education Activities. 

6. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at Broward Community College, including the last twelve semester 
hours. 

7. Make formal application for degree to the Registrar during the term in 
which 45 semester hours is earned. 

8. Remove all admission conditions. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

182 



Landscape Technology 

Courses — Landscape Technology 



PROGRAM FOR LANDSCAPE TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 



FIRST YEAR 

First Term 
*=ENG 101 English Composition 3 BA 

BA 150 Business Mathematics 3 BA 
LST 104 Horticultural Botany 4 LST 
LST 105 Subtropical 

Horticultural Science 3 LST 

LST 131 Landscape Plant LST 

Identification I 3 

HPR Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



HPR 



Second Term 
100 Intro, to Business 
121 Accounting Survey 
185 Horticultural 

Practices I 

150 Soils and Fertilizers 
132 Landscape Plant 
Identification II 
Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



3 
3 

3 

.3 

3 
.1 
16 



Term ffl-A 

LST 270 Field Service 3 

Total Semester Hours 3 



SECOND 

First Term 
PSC 121 or 122 Government 3 

PSY 100 Human Relations in 

Business and Industry 3 

LST 286 Horticultural 

Practices II 3 

LST 233 Advanced Landscape 

Plant Identification III 3 

LST 240 Horticultural Seminar 1 
LST 252 Plant Pest Control 4 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 18 



YEAR 

Second Term 

BA 130 Salesmanship 3 

LST 260 Plant Design 4 

LST 287 Landscape and Turf 

Business Administration 3 

LST 271 Field Service II 3 

BA 260 or 262 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 



''Completion of English 095 vs^ill satisfy the requirements for a degree in 
Landscape Technology at this institution. However, students contemplating 
transfer to a four-year institution should complete English 101 and 104 
since English 095 may not be acceptable for transfer credit. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
LANDSCAPE TECHNOLOGY 

LST 102 HOME LANDSCAPE DESIGN 2 semester hours 

The principles of basic design and of the use of plants for the esthetic, 
practical, and economic improvement of private properties. It also includes 
a study of basic architectural features in the landscape and practice in 
drawing and reading landscape plants. One lecture weekly for 10 weeks. 
Not required for A.S. Degree. 

LST 104 HORTICULTURAL BOTANY 4 semester hours 

Applied botany in terms of taxonomy, ecology, physiology, genetics, anat- 
omy, and morphology of the higher plants. Three lectures, one two hour 
lab weekly. Term I. 



183 



Landscape Technology 

Courses — Landscape Technology 

LST 105 SUBTROPICAL HORTICULTURAL 

SCIENCE 3 semester hours 

An introduction to the principles of horticultural science with emphasis on 
the fundamental plant processes as limiting factors to plant growth. Water, 
temperature, light and essential elements as related to plant growth, propa- 
gation and management. Three lecture hours weekly with occasional field 
trips. Term I. 

LST 131 LANDSCAPE PLANT 

IDENTIFICATION I 3 semester hours 

The identification and landscape use of ornamental vines, palms, shrubs, 
and trees commonly used in south Florida landscapes. Approximately 200 
species and. varieties will be covered. Three lecture hours in field weekly 
with occasional field trips. Term I. 

LST 132 LANDSCAPE PLANT 

IDENTIFICATION II 3 semester hours 

The identification and landscape use of ornamental vines, palms, shrubs 
and trees commonly used in south Florida landscapes. Three lecture hours 
in field weekly with occasional field trips. Term II. 

LST 150 SOILS AND FERTILIZERS 3 semester hours 

The study of the complex problems and use of existing soils in south 
Florida in the growing of ornamental plants. Fertilizer formulations for 
landscapes, turf and container and field nurseries will be discussed thorough- 
ly. The use of various soil amendments will also be discussed. Three lecture 
hours weekly with occasional field trips. Term 11. 

LST 185 HORTICULTURAL PRACTICES I 3 semester hours 

The practices and procedures used in growing and managing landscape 
plants in south Florida. The student will take part in transplanting, fertiliz- 
ing, soil sampling, mixing soils and pruning as well as other horticultural 
procedures. Two three-hour labs per week. Field trips will be required. 
Term II. 

LST 203 TURF-GRASS MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

A practical approach to the principles of turf-grass management and their 
applications in the field. The areas of study will be the nature of the 
turf-grass industry, characteristics and adaptations of southern grasses, 
establishment and maintenance of turf, the case and operation of turf 
equipment and turf pests. Three lecture hours weekly with occasional field 
trips. Term II. Not required for A.S. Degree. 

LST 206 WEED IDENTIFICATION AND 

CONTROL 3 semester hours 

Identification and methods of control of terrestial and aquatic weeds of 
southern Florida commonly found in landscapes, field and container 
nurseries, and turfgrasses and aquatic areas. Calibration use and preventative 
maintenance of pest control equipment will also be discussed. Two three- 
hour lectures per week and three field trips. Term III-A. Not required for 
A.S. Degree. 

LST 220 RETAIL NURSERY CERTIFICATION 3 credit hours 

This course is designed to prepare students for the Retail Nurseryman's 
Certification Test. Topics to be covered include salesmanship, plant growth 
and development, soils, plant pests, state regulations weed control, home 
landscaping, watering practices, and landscape plants. Some familiarity 
with ornamental plants and nursery practices is assumed. 

184 



Landscape Technology 

Courses — Landscape Technology 

LST 230 LANDSCAPE INSTALLATION 

CERTIFICATION 3 credit hours 

The techniques involved in proper selection, pre-planting, the post-planting 
of landscape plants and materials. The proper and safe use of landscaping 
tools and equipment will also be stressed. This course leads to eligibility 
to take the Certification Exam given by the Florida Horticultural Industries 
Certification Board. 

LST 233 LANDSCAPE PLANT 

IDENTIFICATION III 3 semester hours 

The identification and landscape use of ornamental plants of more recent 
introduction and development in south Florida and certain specialized 
horticultural crops. Three lecture hours in field weekly with occasional 
field trips. Term I. 

LST 240 HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR 1 semester hour 

Analysis of selected current problem areas in horticulture and related 
subjects. Term L 

LST 252 PLANT PEST CONTROL 4 semester hours 

The identification and chemical and biological controls of insects and 
diseases afi'ecting the ornamental plants and turf grasses of south Florida 
and will be stressed along with the proper use of all necessary mechanical 
equipment. Three lecture hours weekly with occasional field trips. Term I. 

LST 260 LANDSCAPE DESIGN 4 semester hours 

Introduction to the basic principles of landscape design. Stress will be 
on the drawing, reading and execution of landscape plans. Two three-hour 
laboratories weekly and occasional field trips. Prerequisite: LST 131 and 
132 or permission of Department Head. Term II. 

LST 270 FIELD SERVICE I 3 semester hours 

One summer's practical experience in an approved commercial business. 
Total employment to be no less than 30 hours weekly for 6 weeks. Tech- 
nical report required. Term III-A. 

LST 271 ADVANCED FIELD SERVICE 3 semester hours 

One term of part-time, on-the-job, practical experience in an approved 
commercial business. Total part-time employment to be no less than 12 
hours weekly and no more than 18. Technical report required. Term II. 

LST 286 HORTICULTURAL PRACTICES H 3 semester hours 

Basic principles and practices involved in: 1) The cultural adaptations, 
production and management of south Florida turf grasses; 2) All phases 
of weed control; 3) Irrigation design and installation, and; 4) introduction 
to operation, maintenance and minor repair of equipment used in the 
horticultural industry. Two three hour labs per week. Term I. 

LST 287 LANDSCAPE AND TURF 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

Studies in the basic nature of horticultural services: Retail, wholesale 
and service organizations. Site selection, business and labor management, 
production, cost analysis, insurance, law, taxation and other areas will be 
discussed with businessmen in the field. Three lecture hours weekly with 
occasional field trips. Term II. 

185 



Landscape Technology 
Pest Control Technology 

LANDSCAPE TECHNOLOGY 
SEMINARS AND SHORT COURSES 

Throughout the year, seminars and short courses oriented toward the 
industry and homeowners are offered in turfgrass management, weed control, 
diagnosing plant problems, home gardening, home landscape design, plant 
identification, and other subjects. 

Florida Horticultural Industries Certification Board (FHICB) Courses 
are offered by this department for training in the various examination 
categories of the FHICB throughout the year. 

PEST CONTROL TECHNOLOGY 

The tremendous population explosion and the boom in building de- 
velopment is creating a pressing demand on the services offered by structural 
and landscape pest control companies. The door of opportunity is wide open 
for the technican trained in the control of insects, diseases, nematodes, and 
weeds that cause a threat to our environmental health, and economical well 
being. 

This two year program combined studies in general education, pest 
control technology, and business administration at the college with occupa- 
tional experience under certified and licensed pest control operators. The 
Associate of Science graduate of this program will have the basic knowledge 
and practical skills necessary for rapid advancement in the industry. Em- 
phasis is placed on the control of general household pests, termites and 
other wood destroying organisms, public health pests and pests of landscape 
plants and turf. 

Many of the major courses are offered in the evening for industry 
members who wish to continue their education and advance in their field. 
Upon completion of graduation requirements the student will receive an 
associate of science degree in pest control technology and will be eligible 
to apply to take the Florida State Division of Health Examinations in all 
Pest Control categories. 

Persons interested in the curriculum and course description should write 
the staff of the Pest Control Technology Program. 

PEST CONTROL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

Requirements for the Associate of Science Degree in Pest Control 
Technology: 

1. Completion of 69 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 or 
better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3 semester iiours 

ENG 101 
SCIENCE 3 semester hours 

BIO 100 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 6 semester hours 

PSC 122, PSY 100 

186 



Pest Control Technology 
Courses — Pest Control 

3. Completion of 28 semester hours in major field: 

PCT 101 PCT 151 PCX 217 PCX 261 

PCX 211 
PCX 121 PCX 201 PCX 251 PCX 271 

4. Completion of 9 semester hours in related field (Landscape): 

LSX 105 LSX 203 LSX 252 

or 

LSX 206 

5. Completion of 15 semester hours in related areas: 

BA 100 . 3 semester hours 

BA 130 3 semester hours 

BA 150 3 semester hours 

BA 121 3 semester hours 

BA 260 or 262 3 semester hours 

6. Completion of 4 semester hours of Physical Education activities. 

7. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours of residence at 
Broward Community College, including the last 12 semester hours. 

8. Make formal application for the degree to the Registrar during the term 
in which 45 semester hours is earned. 

9. Remove all admission conditions. 

10. Attend all official graduation exercises. 



PROGRAM FOR PEST CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

Second Term 
100 Intro, to Business 3 

121 Accounting Survey 3 

**LSX 203 Xurf Grass Man 3 

121 Pesticides 3 

151 Insect Identification .3 

1 

Xotal Semester Hours 16 

^Completion of English 095 will satisfy the requirements for a degree in 
Landscape Technology at this institution. However, students contemplat- 
ing transfer to a four-year institution should complete English 101 and 
104 since English 095 may not be acceptable for transfer credit. 
**LSX 206 may be taken Xerm III- A instead of LSX 203. 

Term m-A 

PCT 201 Field Service I 3 

*LST 206 Weed Identification 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

*LST 203 may be taken Term II instead of LST 206. 

187 



First Term 






*ENG 101 English Composition 


3 


BA 


BA 150 Business Mathematics 


3 


BA 


LST 105 Horticulture 


.3 


**LS1 


PCT 101 Entomology 


. .3 


PCT 


BIO 100 Biology 


. .3 


PCT 


HPR 


..1 
16 


HPR 


Total Semester Hours 





Pest Control Technology 
Courses — Pest Control 



SECOND YEAR 



Second Term 




BA 130 Salesmanship 


.3 


BA 260 or 262 


.3 


PCT 251 Wood Destroying Pests 




and Control 


4 


PCT 261 Pest Control Business 




Administration 


.3 


PCT 271 Field Service II 


3 


HPR 


1 


Total Semester Hours 


.17 



First Term 
PSC 122 Government 3 

PSY 100 Human Relations in 

Business & Industry 3 

PCT 211 Household Pests and 

Control 4 

PCT 217 Seminar 2 

LST 252 Plant Pest Control 4 

HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
PEST CONTROL TECHNOLOGY 

PCT 101 ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 3 credits 

An introduction to the natural history, classification, habits, anatomy, 
and development of insects and their relatives. Emphasis will be placed on 
those of pest control significance. A survey of control practices will be 
included. Three lecture hours per week. Term I. 

PCT 121 PESTICIDES 3 credits 

The classification, mode of action, toxicity, mixing, registration, and safe 

application techniques of chemicals used in Pest Control Industry. Three 
lecture hours per week. Term II. 

PCT 151 INSECT IDENTIFICATION 3 credits 

The systematic indentification of insects and other animals of pestiferons 
and biological importance to the Horticultural and Structural Pest Control 
Industries. Three lecture hours weekly with occasional field trips. Term II. 

PCT 201 FIELD SERVICE I 3 credits 

Summer, full-time, on-the-job work experience with a pest control firm 
doing business in all categories. At least 30 hours per week for 6 weeks. 
Term III-A. 

PCT 211 HOUSEHOLD PESTS AND CONTROL 4 credits 

A practical approach to the identification, biology, life histories, inspection 
procedures, and controls involving general household pests. Three lecture 
hours weekly and three field trips required. Term I. 

PCT 217 SEMINAR 2 credits 

Analysis of selected current problem areas in Pest Control and related 
subjects. Term I. 

PCT 251 WOOD DESTROYING PESTS AND 

THEIR CONTROL 4 semester hours 

A practical approach to the identification, biology, life history, detection 
and control of the termites, beetles and fungi which destroy wood in 
structures. The operation and selection of tools and equipment will also 
be demonstrated and discussed. Three lecture hours weekly and three field 
trips required. Term II. 

188 



Pest Control Technology 
Courses — -Pest Control 

PCX 261 PEST CONTROL BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

Studies in the basic nature of pest control services'- Site selection, business 
and labor management, production, cost analysis, insurance, laws, taxation 
and other business methods as they relate to Pest Control Business will be 
discussed. Three lecture hours weekly. Term II. 

PCT 271 ADVANCED FIELD SERVICE 3 semester hom-s 

One term of part-time employment with a pest control firm doing business 
in all categories. At least 12 hours per week on-the-job for 15 weeks will 
be required. Work experience is approved by and under the jurisdiction 
and supervision of the PCT faculty member. Research projects and written 
reports commensurate with the individual's career goals are required. 
Term II. 

Pest Control — Seminars and Short Courses 

Throughout the year, seminars and short courses are offered w^hich are 
oriented toward this industry. Contact Pest Control Technology for infor- 
mation. 




189 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology History Psychology 

Education Military Science Sociology 

Geography Political Science 

The Division of Social Sciences offers academic courses in three pro- 
gram areas: University Parallel, Certificate, and Non-Credit. All regularly 
enrolled students under the University Parallel program (Area Four) are 
required to complete six semester hours of courses listed. Students are en- 
couraged to take two years of a modern foreign language. They should, 
by all means check the requirements of the institution to which they plan to 
transfer. In many cases, two years of a modern foreign language are 
mandatory. 

Non-credit courses are listed in periodic brochures. Those courses pro- 
vided primarily for Certificate and Associate Degree programs which are not 
generally accepted for transfer credit by senior institutions, are listed sepa- 
rately. University Parallel courses, which may also be credited toward 
Certficate and Associate Degree programs, carry course numbers 100 to 199 
— primarily for Freshmen, and from 200 to 299 — primarily for 
Sophomores. 

The Division of Social Sciences offers three special programs in the area 
of Education — a certificate program for Teachers of Private Nursery 
Schools and Kindergartens, and Associate in Science Degree programs in 
Secretarial Teacher Aide, and Teacher Aide. 

The objectives of the Division as reflected in the nine discipline areas 
are to acquaint the student with the various aspects of man in relation to his 
culture, environment, behavioral patterns, heritage, and political institutions. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 EN G 102 or 104 Composition 3 

**HIS 101 or PSC 121 3 **HIS 102 or PSC 122 3 

MTH 100 General Education BIO 100 Modern Biology .3 

College Mathematics or BIO 105 Modern Biology Lab . 1 

MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 Language 3 

Language 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

MUS 200 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 14 

Term lU-A or IH-B 

Schedule three (3) hours of a language and 3 or 4 hours from 2nd year sug- 
gested program OR from degree requirements in general education areas as 
outlined on pages 55 and 56 of this catalog. 

190 



Social Sciences 

Secondary Education 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
ART 207 Art Appreciation OR 
MUS 207 Music Appreciation 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

SPE 100 Intro, to Speech 3 

EDU 299 Perspectives in Edu. 3 

Humanities 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



Second Term 
SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

EDU 251 Education Psychology 3 

Science 3-4 

Humanities 3 

Language 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16-17 



^Students in Education programs are encouraged, but not required, to 
schedule two years of a modern foreign language, and are strongly en- 
couraged to learn to operate a typewriter. 

*Students who enroll in HIS 101 must take HIS 102; students who enroll 
in PSC 121 must take PSC 122 or PSC 221. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION 

(A.A. Degree) 





FIRST 


YEAR 


First Term 






ENG 101 Composition 

HIS 101 or PSC 121 

BIO 100 Modern Biology 

BIO 105 Modern Biology Lab 

Language 

HPR Physical Education 


.. .3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
.1 


ENG 
*HIS 
MTH 

MTH 
PSY 


Total Semester Hours . 


. . .14 


HPR 

T 



Second Term 
102 or 104 Composition 
102 or PSC 122 
100 General Education 
College Mathematics OR 
131 Basic College Math 
201 General Psychology 

age 

Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



3 

3 

3 

.1 

16 



Term EII-A or IH-B 

Elect any six (6) or seven (7) hours from 2nd year suggested program OR 
from degree requirements in general education areas as outlined on pages 55 
and 56 of this catalog. 



SECOND 

First Term 
SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

SPE 100 Intro, to Speech 3 

EDU 299 Perspectives in Edu. 3 

Science 3-4 

Language 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16-17 



YEAR 

Second Term 

PHI 260 or 263 Philosophy 3 

ART 207 or MUS 207 3 

Elective 3 
SOC 221 Social Problems OR 

SOC 231 The Family 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Language 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 



191 



Social Sciences 
Courses — Education 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
EDUCATION 

EDU 100 INFANT DEVELOPMENT 

AND BEHAVIOR 3 semester hours 

An overview of the physical, intellectual and social stages of development 
of the infant (0-3) and their implications for the child's interaction with 
his environment. 

EDU 101 CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

AND BEHAVIOR 3 semester hours 

A study of the progressive development of the child (3-6) years covering 
physical, intellectual, emotional, and social stages and their relationship 
to the child in his environment. Prerequisite EDU 100 or permission of 
the instructor. 

EDU 102 PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION 3 semester hours 

Behavior and growth pattern relation to the learnings of the pre-school 
child. Program development and techniques in instruction are considered. 
Prerequisite EDU 101 or permission of the instructor. 

EDU 103 PRE-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 3 semester hours 

Curricula for and activities of the pre-school child. Techniques and 
materials appropriate for art, drama, music, science, and play are con- 
sidered. Prerequisite: EDU 102 or corequisite EDU 102 or permission 
of the instructor. 

EDU 104 PRE-SCHOOL MATERIALS 3 semester hours 

Literary selections, story telling, puppets, dramatics and creative com- 
munications as related to pre-school child. 

EDU 210 AUDIO VISUAL AIDS 3 semester hours 

This course deals with the operation and use of various forms of projec- 
tors, tape recorders, amplifiers, and other audio-visual equipment. It in- 
cludes instruction in the preparation of display materials, source of free 
and inexpensive materials, filmstrips, films, and recordings. 

EDU 140 INTRODUCTION TO TESTS 

AND MEASUREMENTS 3 semester hours 

Designed for the in-service teacher, this course deals with planning and 
constructing teacher-made tests; trying out and evaluating teacher-made 
tests; evaluation of standardized tests results; measurement programs; and 
the history and philosophy of the development of the measurement move- 
ment in education. 

EDU 251 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Study of psychological principles relevant to effective teaching and learning. 

EDU 299 PERSPECTIVES IN EDUCATION 3 semester hours 

A study of the principles of American education with emphasis on Histori- 
cal, Philosophical, and Sociological bases of education and their impact 
on curriculum development. 

192 



Social Sciences 
Cou rses — Geogra phy 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
GEOGRAPHY 

GEO 101 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY 3 semester hours 

An analysis and human significance of inter-relationships of the phys- 
ical elements of man's natural environment, including climate, weather, 
land forms, soils, vegetation, minerals, and conservation of natural 
resources. 

GEO 201 REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE 

WESTERN WORLD 3 semester hours 

Study of geographical characteristics, area relationships, and major prob- 
lems of the Western World's component regions limited to Europe, North 
and South America, and the Caribbean. 

GEO 202 REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE 

NON- WESTERN WORLD 3 semester hours 

Study of geographical characteristics, area relationships, and major prob- 
lems of the Non-western World's component regions with emphasis on 
Africa, Asia, Australia, and the Soviet Union. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR HISTORY (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 Composition 3 

HIS 101 Western Civilization 3 HIS 102 Western Civilization .3 

MTH 131 Basic College SPE 100 Introductory Speech 3 

Mathematics 3 Language 3 

Language 3 Natural Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 16 

Term III-A or III-B 

Natural Science .4 

Total Semester Hours 4 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
HIS 201 History of the U.S. 3 

Humanities 3 

Language 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



Second Term 

HIS 202 History of the U.S 3 

Humanities 3 

Language 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Recommended Humanities 

ENG 221 or 222 English Literature 
PHI 260 or 263 Philosophy 

Recommended Foreign Language 

French or German 

Spanish is area of concentration in Latin 

America or American studies 



193 



Social Sciences 
Courses — History 



Recommended Natural Science 

BIO 100 and BIO 105 

Recommended Electives 

GEO 201 Regional Geography of 

the Western World 
GEO 202 Regional Geography of 

the non-Western World 
PSC 121 National Government 
PSY 201 General Psychology 
PHI 161 Logic 
SOC 211 General Sociology 
tENG 221, 222 
tPHI 260, 263 
SOC 201 Introduction to Anthropology 



tWhen not taken as part of humanities requirements. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
HISTORY 

HIS 101 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 3 semester hours 

A survey of Western Civilization from the Ancient near East to the Age 
of Louis XIV. Emphasis will be placed on the social, intellectual, political 
and cultural forces responsible for Western development. 

HIS 101 HON 

The chronological period covered is similar to HIS 101 (the Ancient 
Near East up to and including the Protestant Reformation). Student 
reports and papers will be emphasized along with regular tests. 

HIS 102 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 3 semester hours 

Continuation of HIS 101 to the present with emphasis on expansion of 
the West. 

HIS 102 HON 

The period covered by this course is from the Age of Louis XIV up to 
the present, with an emphasis on the period from the French Revolution 
to the 1960's. Student reports and papers will be required along with 
regular tests. 

HIS 107 NON- WESTERN CIVILIZATION 3 semester hours 

This course is a survey of the culture and civilization of the non-western 
world from its earliest beginnings to the present, dealing with the religious, 
political, social and economic aspects of their societies. 

HIS 111 THE HISTORY OF THE TWO AMERICAS 3 semester hours 

The North and South America story, from the day of the Indians through 
the conquest and colonization of the whites to the beginning of today's 
Revolutions. 

^To remain within the program more than one semester, a student must 
maintain a B average in an honors course. Though all honors courses carry 
the same credit as regular courses, and H is affiixed to the transcript to 
indicate honors credit. 

194 



Social Sciences 
Courses — History 

HIS 112 THE HISTORY OF THE TWO AMERICAS 3 semester hours 

The Problems of today in the Hemisphere, how they developed, why they 
changed and what will become of them with emphasis on inter-American 
relation in the areas of politics, economy and social structure. 

HIS 201 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 3 semester hours 

Designed for a general understanding of U. S. History. Brief review of 
Colonial period and Revolution. More intensive study of national leaders, 
political, social, and economic developments from 1789 to 1865. National- 
ism and expansion. Orgins and events of the Civil War. 

HIS 202 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 3 semester hours 

One Hundred years of U. S. History from the post-Civil War Recon- 
strucution period in the South to our involvement in South Viet Nam. 
A general survey of the basic forces shaping American life; development 
of modern industrialism; organization of laborers and farmers; immigration. 
The Progressive Era; World War I; Prohibition; Depression and New Deal. 
The U. S. as leader of the free world. 

HIS 205 HISTORY OF THE AFRO-AMERICAN 3 semester hours 

A survey of the Afro-American beginning with his arrival in Colonial 
America until the present time. Emphasis will be placed on his economic, 
political and cultural development, and his contributions to our present 
society. 

HIS 206 JEWISH HISTORY AND CULTURE 3 semester hours 

A systematic survey of the development of Jewish History and Culture 
from biblical times to the present. 

HIS 207 FLORIDA HISTORY 3 semester hours 

A survey of Florida from 1492 to the present. Emphasis will be placed 
on the state's development since the Civil War and its expectations for 
the future. 

HIS 211 LATIN AMERICA 3 semester hours 

Review of Indian culture before 1492, followed by the invasion of the 
Americas by the forces of Western Civilization. 

HIS 212 LATIN AMERICA 3 semester hours 

History of the Latin-American nations from the eve of revolution to the 
present day. Combines study of developments common to the whole 
area with case studies in national development. Includes discussion of 
international relations, particularly with the United States. 

HIS 222 THE TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD 3 semester hours 

A survey of the major political forces. Among the topics covered are: 
the end of European dominance; the rise of totalitarian regimes; the 
emergent nationas: the cold war; and a look toward the 21st Century. 

HIS 225 RUSSIA AND THE SOVIET UNION 3 semester hours 

A survey of Russia from the time of Peter the Great until the present 
with emphasis on the Russian Revolution and the Rise of the Soviet 
State. A considerable portion of the time will be concerned with Soviet 
international relations since World War II and its place in the power 
politics of today. 

HIS 230 HISTORY OF AMERICAN BUSINESS 3 semester hours 

A history of the development of American business from colonial time to 

195 



Social Sciences 



Courses — Political Science 



the present with emphasis on the development of transportation, commu- 
nication, agriculture and commerce. Considerable time will be spent on 
corporations, trusts, monopolies, etc. 

HIS 290 SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL 

TRAVEL 3-6 semester hours 

A combination of classroom preparation plus foreign travel. Variable 
content depending on countries to be visited. Historical background and 
travel preparation will be included. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE 

(A.A. Degree) 
FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

Language 3 

ENG 101 Composition 3 

Mathematics 3 

PSC 121 National Government 3 
HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



Second Term 
Language 
HIS 101 Western Civilization 

ENG 102 Composition 

Humanities 

PSC 122 State & Local Gov't. 
HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



3 
3 

.3 

.3 

3 

1 

16 



SUMMER TERMS 

HIS 102 Western Civilization 3 

Total Semester Hours 3 



SECOND 

First Term 
SOC 201 Introduction to 

Anthropology 3 

Science 3-4 

Language 3 

Humanities 3 

PHI 260 Intro, to Philosophy OR 
ENG 224 English Literature 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16-17 



YEAR 

Second Term 

HIS 201 History of the U.S. 3 
PHI 263 Ethics 

ENG 222 English Literature 3 

Science 3-4 

Language 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16-17 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PSC 121 NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3 semester hours 

Study of theory, principles and institutions involved in the American Na- 
tional Government. 

PSC 122 STATE & LOCAL GOV'T. 3 semester hours 

Study of the principles and institutions of American State and Local 
Government. 

PSC 221 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL 

RELATIONS 3 semester hours 

A consideration of the concepts of sovereignty, power, security; national 
interest in the determination of foreign policy; the United Nations and 



196 



Social Sciences 

Cou rses — Psyciiology 

its functions and limitations. Study of the employment of these concepts in 
analysis of foreign policy developments of leading nations. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-PSYCHOLOGY 

(A.A. Degree) 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
'=HIS 101 or PSC 121 
MTH 100 General Education 

College Mathematics OR 
MTH 131 Basic College Math 

Language 

HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



3 

3 

.1 

13 



Second Term 
ENG 102 or 104 Composition 
^HIS 102 or PSC 122 
BIO 100 Mod. Prin. of Bio. 
BIO 105 Mod. Principles of 

Biology Lab 

Language 

HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



3 
3 
3 

.1 
.3 
.1 
14 



Term III-A or III-B 

Elect any six (6) or seven (7) hours from second year suggested program or 
from degree requirements in general education areas. 

"^Students who enroll in HIS 101 must take HIS 102; those enrolling in PSC 
121 must take PSC 122 or PSC 221. 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

SOC 211 Gen. Sociology 3 PSY 202 Adv. Gen. Psychology 3 

ART 207 Art Appreciation OR STA 221 Elementary Statistics 3 

MUS 207 Mus. Appreciation 3 Science 3-4 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 Language 3 

SPE 100 Intro, to Speech 3 Humanities 3 

Language 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16-17 

NOTE: Students not planning to carry graduate work beyond the B.A. de- 
gree should consult with the Consulting Staff or Psychology Depart- 
ment before selecting psychology as an academic major. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
PSYCHOLOGY 

BEH 222 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours 

A directed study course in the behavioral sciences. The course will be 
available to both majors and non-majors who wish to investigate a parti- 
cular problem. The student will make application for the course to the 
Head of the Behavioral Sciences Department via an instructor with whom 
he wants to work. Prerequisite: To be ascertained by the instructor and 
Department Head. 



197 



Social Sciences 
Courses — Psychology 

PSY 100 HUMAN RELATIONS IN BUSINESS 

AND INDUSTRY 3 semester hours 

Introductory course to the study of human behavior, emphasizing its 
practical applications in business and industry. It introduces the student 
to personal and social adjustment mechanisms as a means of understand- 
ing the behavior of one's self and of others. Also introduces the student 
to current psychological applications in the fields of testing, advertising, 
selling, market research, morale, personnel work, employee selection and 
training, and supervisory practices. 

PSY 101 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT 3 semester hours 

Basic study of motivation, reactions to frustration and conflict, personality, 
and techniques of mental hygiene. Recommended for students who do not 
plan to take advanced psychology courses. 

PSY 201 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Scientific approach to basic principles of human behavior, emphasis is 
placed on such topics as learning motivation, perception, feeling and 
emotion, intelligence, and personality. 

PSY 202 ADVANCED GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours 

The rationale, methods, and application of the scientific analysis of 
behavior. Emphasis is placed on the lawfulness of behavior. How behavior- 
al laws are found and used in the modification of behavior. Prerequisite: 
PSY 201. 

PSY 211 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Study of the concepts and principles of the areas of physiological and 
psychological growth and development in infancy and childhood. Observa- 
tions will supplement assignments. Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

PSY 212 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Personal and social development and maturation during adolescence with 
attention to research dealing with characteristic problems and adjustments. 
Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

PSY 221 APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours 

The application of behavioral laws in situations calling for behavior 
change. The student is provided with a variety of opportunities to modify 
behavior by applying principles of behavior. The student then evaluates 
the effectiveness of his program. Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 202. 

PSY 238 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Application to psychological principles to social problems and social 
relations. The topics studied include: the individual and the group, role 
and status, fads and fashions, attitudes, public opinion, propaganda, 
conflict and prejudice. Prerequisite: PSY 201. 

*These courses may not transfer to senior institutions as psychology courses 
but they will transfer as electives. 

198 



Social Sciences 

Courses — Psychology 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR SOCIAL WELFARE (A. A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

**HIS 101 Western Civilization or **HIS 102 Western Civilization or 

HIS 111 The Two Americas HIS 112 The Two Americas 

from 1493-1830 3 from 1830-Present 3 

MTH 131 Basic CoUlege Math 3 Language 3 

Language 3 CHEM 107 General Chemistry 

HPR Physical Education 1 or SCI 101 Physical Sciences 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 

SUMMER TERMS 

BIO 160 General Zoology 3 

PSC 121 National Government .3 

BIO 161 Gen. Zoology Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 7 

*Certain upper division colleges may not require foreign language for a 
degree in social welfare. Students are urged to follow the recommenda- 
tions of the college to which they wish to transfer. 
**Students who enroll in HIS 101 must take HIS 102; those enrolling in 
HIS 111 must take HIS 112. 

SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

Humanities 3 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

^Elective 3 

Language 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



Second Term 
PHI 260 Introduction to 
Philosophy 

PHI 263 Ethics 3 

**SOC 221 Social Problems 3 

SOC 231 The Family 3 

STA 221 Elementary Statistics 3 

Language 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



* Recommended electives: SPE 100-Introductory Speech; ECO 251 -Princi- 
ples of Economics. 

*PSY 238-SociaI Psychology could be substituted for either SOC 231 or 
SOC 221. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR SOCIOLOGY (A. A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

HIS 101 or PSC 121 3 MUS Music Appreciation 3 

MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 BIO 100 Mod. Prin. of Biology 3 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 BIO 105 Mod. Prin. of 

HPR Physical Education 1 Biology Lab 1 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours .14 



199 



Social Sciences 
Courses — Anthropology 

Term III-A or IH-B 

Elect any six (6) or seven (7) hours from second year suggested program 
or from degree requirements in general education or electives. 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

SOC 212 Social Organizations 3 SOC 231 The Family or 

PSY 202 Adv. Gen. Psychology 3 ANT 225 Gen. Anthropology or 

ART 207 Art Appreciation SOC 221 Social Problems 3 

or PSY 238 Social Psychology 3 

MUS 207 Music Appreciation 3 STA 221 Elementary Statistics 3 

HPR Physical Education . 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

HIS 102 or PSC 122 Electives 3 SPE 100 Intro, to Speech 3 

Electives 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 

*If a student plans to continue for a four (4) year degree, he should check 
the language requirements of that college. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANT 225 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 3 semester hours 

An introductory study of the evolution and cultural development of man, 
his customs, his social organization, and his institutions. Emphasis is 
placed upon the cultural aspects of anthropology, and the student is 
introduced to the major fields of study undertaken by anthropologists. 

BEH 222 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours 

A directed study course in the behavioral sciences. The course will be 
available to both majors and non-majors who wish to investigate a parti- 
cular problem. The student will make application for the course to the 
Head of the Behavioral Sciences Department via an instructor with whom 
he wants to work. Prerequisite: To be ascertained by the instructor and 
Department Head. 

ANT 227 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL 

ANTHROPOLOGY 3 semester hours 

A study of the biological origins of man, focusing upon human evolution, 
race, primatology and population genetics. 

ANT 230 INTRODUCTION TO 

THE HISTORY OF MAN 3 semester hours 

A study of the history of man in which innovation and discovery emerge 
as a natural activity, thus illustrating the ongoing process of cultural 
evolution. 

ANT 232 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY 3 semester hours 

A study of man's past based upon archaeological evidence and the 
methods used to procure it. Pre-requisite: ANT 225. 

ANT 235 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD 

ETHNOLOGY 3 semester hours 

A survey of cultures on differing levels of development, focusing upon 
subsistence, social organization, religion, art, and culture change. Pre- 
requisite: ANT 225. 

200 



Social Sciences 
Courses — Sociology 

ANT 240 INTRODUCTION TO 

THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN 3 semester hours 

A survey of the North American Indian tribes. Pre-requisite: ANT 225. 

ANT 245 ANTHROPOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL 1-6 credits 

A course designed for study on various topics in cultural and physical 
anthropology. Study would be limited to field and/or laboratory projects. 
Prerequisite: ANT 225 and permission of the instructor. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
SOCIOLOGY 

BEH 222 INDEPENDENT STUDY 3 semester hours 

A directed study course in the behavioral sciences. The course will be 
available to both majors and non-majors who wish to investigate a parti- 
cular problem. The student will make application for the course to the 
Head of the Behavioral Sciences Department via an instructor with whom 
he wants to work. Prerequisite: To be ascertained by the instructor and 
Department Head. 

SOC 211 GENERAL SOCIOLOGY 3 semester hours 

General analysis of the structure and functions of society and culture 
through a scientific consideration of the most significant generalization 
and concepts of man's collective behavior. 

SOC 212 SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS 3 semester hours 

A study of the institutions of our society and how our society is organized. 
Special emphasis is on theories of social organization, social change, and 
the exploration of each institution in our society. Prerequisite: SOC 211. 

SOC 221 SOCIAL PRCWLEMS 3 semester hours 

Study of the social and cultural aspects, incidence, and characteristics of 
selected social problems. Prerequisite: SOC 211. 

SOC 222 CRIMINOLOGY 3 semester hours 

A study of crime and criminal behavior, and its cause and related effects 
on society, with emphasis given to criminal theory and the sociological 
implications of criminal behavior. Prerequisite: SOC 211. 

SOC 225 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 3 semester hours 

A study of juvenile and delinquent behavior and its development which 

focuses on the social structure of society to find patterns of delinquent 

activity and its causations. Prerequisite: SOC 211. 

SOC 230 CONTEMPORARY RACE AND 

ETHNIC STUDIES 3 semester hours 

A study of minority dominant relations with emphasis upon ethnic, racial, 
and religious minorities. Prerequisite: SOC 211. 

SOC 231 THE FAMILY 3 semester hours 

Study of the institution of the family utilizing cross-cultural preliterate 
types; the background, evolution and current structure of the American 
family. 

201 



Social Sciences 



Courses — Military Science 
Pre-School & Day Care Certificate 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
MILITARY SCIENCE 

MS 101 ORGANIZATION, DEFENSE DEPARTMENT 

AND THE ARMY 1 semester hour 

Study of the Organization of the Department of Defense with emphasis 
on mission, functions and organization of the Army in the field. 1 clock 
hour per week. 

MS 102 MILITARY ART 1 semester hour 

Study of Military Art, historical case studies of the Civil War, with 
emphasis on strategy tactics and leadership employed. 1 clock hour per 
week. 

MS 201 MILITARY HISTORY I 1 semester hour 

American Military History; emphasis on the development of the United 
States and the impact the United States Army had on United States growth, 
development of post 1900 strategy and relationship to National Security. 
2 clock hours per week. 

MS 202 MILITARY HISTORY II 1 semester hour 

American Military History, emphasis on the development of the United 
States and the impact the United States Army had on the United States 
growth, development of post 1900 strategy and relation to National Security. 
2 clock hours per week. 

PRE SCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTER 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

A certificate program designed to prepare personnel for employment in 
child care centers. Emphasis is placed on the overall understanding and 
management of the pre-school child. At the completion of at least 28 hours 
of prescribed courses with a grade of "C" or better in each course, a certifi- 
cate will be awarded. 

PRESCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTER 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Semester Hours 

EDU 101 Child Development and Behavior 3 

EDU 102 Preschool Education 3 

EDU 103 Preschool Activities 3 

EDU 104 Preschool Materials 3 

ART 107 Art Appreciation Humanities 3 

MUS 200 Fundamental Skills in Music 3 

HPR 151 Personal Hygiene and Community Health 3 

HPR 152 First Aid and Safety 3 

SPE 100 Introduction to Speech Communication 3 

27 
The following courses may be waived if competency 
test is passed. 

ENG 093 Reading Communications 3 

ENG 094 Fundamentals of Grammar, Usage, and 

Mechanics 3 

ENG 095 Fundamentals of Writing 3 

202 



Social Sciences 



Pre-Professional Programs 



SUGGESTED CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 

(A.A. Degree) 

The Child Development Associate (CDA) Program is a national 
effort to train, evaluate and award a professional credential to persons who 
are working with, or who want to work with, young children. 

The goal of the CDA is to meet the growing national needs for compe- 
tent staff in child care programs. 

The CDA training is a competency based program which prepares the 
CDA trainee to become a candidate and apply for assessment by the na- 
tional CDA Consortium. Upon successful completion of the suggested Child 
Development Program a person will be fully prepared for the assessment 
procedure leading to the award of a CDA credential. 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 
SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES 

(A.A. Degree) 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
BIO 100 Modern Biology 
BIO 105 Biology Lab 
MTH 131 Basic College Math 
CHE 131 General Chemistry 
HPR Physical Education 

Total Semester Hours 



3 


ENG 


3 


BIO 


1 


BIO 


3 


MTH 


3 


CHE 


1 


CHE 




HPR 



14 



Second Term 

102 or 104 Composition 3 

150 General Botany 3 

151 General Botany Lab 1 
132 College Algebra 3 
132 General Chemistry 3 
134 Gen. Chemistry Lab. 1 
Physical Education I 

Total Semester Hours 15 



SUMMER TERMS 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab I 

Social Science 3 

Total Semester Hours 7 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
BIO 160 General Zoology 3 

BIO 161 General Zoology Lab 1 
MTH 134 Pre-Calculus Math 3 

Humanities 3 

Social Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



14 



Second Term 
PHI 161 Logic 
Humanities 
ECO 190 Introduction to 

Economics 
HPR Physical Education 
Area 5 (Other than F) 
PHY 201 Intermediate Physics 
PHY 203 Inter. Physics Lab 
Total Semester Hours 



,3 
.3 

.3 
1 

.3 
.3 
.1 
17 



203 



Pre-Professional Programs 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-ARCHITECTURE 

(A.A. Degree) 



Second Term 
102 or 104 Composition 
216 Arch. Commun. 11 
134 Pre-Calculus Math 
100 Modern Biology 
Physical Education 





FIRST 


YEAR 




First Term 




ENG 


101 Composition 3 


ENG 


ARC 


110 Arch. Drafting 1 1 


ARC 


ARC 


1 1 1 Arch. Drafting I Lab 2 


MTH 


ARC 


215 Arch. Communications I 3 


BIO 


MTH 


132 Contemporary College 


HPR 




Algebra ' 3 


BIO 


HPR 


Physical Education 1 




Total Semester Hours .13 


T 



105 Principles of Biology Lab 1 



Total Semester Hours 



14 



SUMMER TERMS 
TERM III-A or IH-B 

Social Science 3 
ARC 212 Materials and Methods 

of Construction 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

MTH 223 Calculus 6 

PHY 201 Intermediate Physics 3 

PHY 203 Inter. Physics Lab I 

Humanities .3 

'=ARC 270 Arch. Design I 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Second Term 
PHY 202 intermediate Physics 3 

PHY 204 Inter. Physics Lab 1 

Humanities 3 

Social Science 3 

ARC 271 Arch. Design II 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 14 

* Prerequisite: The student must have ART 101 and EGR 101 before en- 
rolling in ARC 215. 

Suggested electives depending on 

Student's math level: 

GY 105 Physical Geology 

BIO 150 Botany & Bio 151 Botany 

Lab. 
ECO 190 Intro, to Economics 
PSY 201 General Psychology 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

CC 100 Materials & Processes 2 ARC 110 Arch. Drafting I I 

CC 101 Materials Testing Lab 1 ARC HI Arch. Drafting Lab 2 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 Composition 3 

MTH 132 College Algebra 3 MTH 134 Pre-Calculus 3 

MTH 136 Math & Machines 1 BIO 105 Biology Lab 1 

Political Science 3 Political Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 Total Semester Hours 14 



204 



Pre-Professional Prog ra ms 



TERM in-A 

CC 250 Surveying 1 

CC 251 Surveying Lab . .2 

Area 5 (Other than F) 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
BIO 100 Modern Biology 
MTH 223 Calculus 
PHY 201 Intermediate Physics 
PHY 203 Inter. Physics Lab 
HPR Physical Education 
Humanities 



Total Semester Hours 



Second Term 

3 DP 101 Data Processing 3 

.6 GY 105 Physical Geology 3 

3 PHY 202 Intermediate Physics 3 

1 PHY 204 Inter. Physics Lab 1 

1 Humanities 3 

. 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

17 Total Semester Hours 14 



Term III-A 

ENG 103 Tech. Report Writing .3 

BA 221 Accounting I 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-CHIROPRACTIC (A.A. Degree) 



Second Term 
102 or 104 Composition 
112 The Americas OR 
122 State & Local Gov't. 

160 General Zoology 

161 General Zoology Lab. 
100 Intro, to Speech 

132 General Chemistry 
134 Gen. Chem. Lab 





FIRST 


YEAR 




First Term 






ENG 


101 Composition 


3 


ENG 


HIS 


111 The Americas OR 




HIS 


PSC 


121 National Government 


3 


PSC 


BIO 


100 Mod. Prin. of Biology 


3 


BIO 


BIO 


105 Biology Laboratory 


1 


BIO 


CHE 


131 General Chemistry 


.3 


SPE 


MTH 


131 Basic College Math . 


3 


CHE 


HPR 


Physical Education 


1 


CHE 


Total Semester Hours 


,17 


1 



Total Semester Hours 



3 
3 
1 
3 

.3 
1 

17 



SUMMER TERMS 



Term III-A 

PHI 260 Intro, to Philosophy 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 4 



Term III-B 

CHE 133 General Chemistry and 

Qualitative Analysis 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chem. and 

Qual. Analysis Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 4 



SECOND 

First Term 
CHE 221 Organic Chemistry 3 

CHE 223 Organic Chem. Lab 1 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

Humanities (Lit.) 3 

ECO 190 Intro, to Economics 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 



YEAR 

Second Term 
CHE 222 Organic Chemistry 3 

CHE 224 Organic Chem. Lab 1 

Humanities (Music) .3 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

Humanities (Art) 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 

TOTAL 70 



205 



Pre-Professional Programs 



PROGRAM FOR PRE-CORRECTIONS (A.A. Degree) 

Interested students are directed to the section on the Criminal Justice 
Institute. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-DENTAL 

(A.A. Degree) 
See Suggested Program under Pre-Medical 

SUGGESTED PRE-CHILD DEVELOPMENT IN HOME ECONOMICS 

(A.A. Degree) 



First Term 
Foreign Language 
ENG 101 English Composition 
MTH 131 Basic College Math 
BIO 100 Mod. Prin. of 

Biology 
BIO 105 Mod. Prin. of 

Biology Lab 
HPR Physical Education 
HIS 101 Western Civilization 
Total Semester Hours 



FIRST YEAR 

Second Term 
3 Foreign Language 
3 ENG 102 English Composition 
3 CHE 107 Chemistry for General 

Education 
3 GEO 201 World Regional 

Geography 

102 Western Civilization 

Physical Education 



HIS 
HPR 



.3 
17 



Total Semester Hours 



3 

.3 

1 

16 



SUMMER TERMS 
Term III-A or IH-B 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND 

First Term 

Foreign Language 3 

ART 150 Introduction to 

Drawing Media 3 

MUS 111 Elementary Harmony 2 
SOC 221 Social Problems 3 

NTR 261 Nutrition in the 

Schools .3 
HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



15 



YEAR 

Second Term 
Foreign Language . 

PSY 211 Child Psychology 
ART 207 Art Appreciation 
MUS 112 Elementary Harmony 
MUS 207 Music in Western 

Culture or 
DRA 207 Theatre in Western 

Culture 

HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



.3 
1 

15 



For students who complete the Language Requirement (Intermediate 
Level) in two terms, or less, suggested courses are HIS 102, ENG 230, ENG 
231, ART 152. 



206 



Pre-Professional Programs 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-FOOD AND NUTRITION 
SCIENCE (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

Foreign Language 3 

ENG 101 English Composition 3 

MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 

BIO 100 Mod. Prin. of Biology 3 

BIO 105 Mod. Prin. of Bio. Lab 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 



Secoiul Term 

Foreign Language 3 

ENG 102 English Composition 3 

CHE 131 General Chemistry 3 

STA 221 Elementary Statistics 3 

HIS 101 World Civilization 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Term III-A or III-B 

HIS 102 World Civilization 
ENG 230 American Literature 

or 
ENG 231 American Literature 

Total Semester Hours 



SECOND 

First Term 

Foreign Language 3 

CHE 132 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 134 Gen. Chem. Lab 1 

ECO 251 Principles of 

Economics 3 

NTR 261 Nutrition in 

the Schools 3 

MTH 132 College Algebra 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



17 



YEAR 

Second Term 

Foreign Language 3 

CHE 133 General Chem. 3 

CHE 135 General Chem. Lab 1 

ART 207 Art Appreciation or 
MUS 207 Music in Western 

Culture or 
DRA 207 Theatre in Western 

Culture 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-FORESTRY (A.A. Degree) 

MAJOR IN 
FOREST PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
CHE 131 General Chemistry 
MTH 132 College Algebra 
EGR 101 Engineering Drawing 
HPR Physical Education 
SPE 100 Intro, to Speech 

Total Semester Hours 



3 


ENG 


3 


CHE 


3 


CHE 


3 


EGR 


1 


HPR 


3 


MTH 



16 



Second Term 

102 or 104 Composition 3 

132 General Chemistry 3 

134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

105 Descriptive Geometry 3 

Physical Education 1 

134 Pre-Calculus Math 3 

Social Science 3 

Total Semester Hours 17 



SUMMER TERMS 



Term IH-A 

ECO 251 Economics 
CHE 133 General Chemistry 
CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 
Total Semester Hours 



Term lU-B 

3 Humanities 

3 ECO 252 Economics 
1 
.7 Total Semester Hours 



207 



Pre-Professional Programs 







SECOND 




Firm Term 




BIO 


150 General Botany 


3 


BIO 


151 General Botany 


Lab 1 


MTH 


223 Calculus 


6 


PHY 


210 General Physics 


3 


PHY 


212 General Physics 


Lab 1 


HPR 


Physical Education 


.1 


Area 


5 (Other than F) 


3 



Total Semester Hours 



YEAR 

Secund Term 

Humanities 3 

MTH 224 Calculus 6 

PHY 211 General Physics 3 
PHY 213 General Physics Lab 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Social Science 3 

Total Semester Hours 17 



General Zoology (BIO 160-1) is required and may be taken at either 
the lower or the upper division institution. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-FORESTRY (A.A. Degree) 
MAJOR IN FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
CHE 131 General Chemistry 
MTH 132 College Algebra 
BIO 150 General Botany 
BIO 151 General Botany Lab 
HPR Physical Education 
BIO 105 Biology Lab 
Total Semester Hours 



3 


ENG 


3 


CHE 


3 


CHE 


3 


BIO 


1 


BIO 


1 


HPR 


1 


MTH 


15 


1 



Second Term 

102 or 104 Composition 3 

132 General Chemistry 3 

134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

160 General Zoology .3 

161 General Zoology Lab 1 
Physical Education 1 
134 Pre-Calculus Math 3 

Total Semester Hours 15 



SUMMER TERMS 



Term III-A 




Term III-B 




Humanities 


3 


STA Elementary Statistics 


3 


Social Science 


3 


Humanities 


.3 


Total Semester Hours 


6 


Total Semester Hours 


6 



^Will probably serve as well for General Forestry, Industrial Forestry, 
Timber Management, Forest Service, Forest Recreation or Wildlife. 



SECOND 


First Term 




MTH 223 Calculus 


6 


CHE 133 General Chemistry 


,3 


CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 


1 


PHY 201 Intermediate Physics 


3 


PHY 203 Inter. Physics Lab 


1 


HPR Physical Education 


1 


Total Semester Hours 


15 


Suggested Elective: Economics 


252 



YEAR 

Second Term 

ECO 251 Prin. of Economics 3 

PHY 202 Intermediate Physics 3 

PHY 204 Inter. Physics Lab 1 

SPE 100 Introductory Speech 3 

Social Science 3 

HPR Physical Education I 

Total Semester Hours 14 



208 



Pre-Professional Programs 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-HOUSING AND 
INTERIOR DESIGN (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 English Composition 3 ENG 102 English Composition 3 

HIS 101 World Civilization 3 HIS 102 World Civilization 3 

MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

PSY 100 Human Relations in AST 101 Astronomy I 3 

Business and Industry 3 Foreign Language 3 

Foreign Language 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 

Term III-A Term III-B 

ART 208 Art History I 3 Humanities 3 

ENG 230 American Literature 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 Total Semester Hours 3 



SECOND 

First Term 
ART 209 Art History II 3 

BIO 100 Modern Principles of 

Biology 3 

BIO 105 Mod. Prin. of Bio. Lab 1 
BA 251 Prin. of Economics 3 

Foreign Language 3 

PHY 130 Physics 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 



YEAR 

Second Term 
ART 101 Beginning Drawing 3 

ART 106 Basic Design 3 

SOC 231 The Family OR 
SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

BA 252 Prin. of Economics 3 

Foreign Language 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-LAW (A.A. Degree) 

The American Association of Law Schools suggests that students pre- 
paring for law school should acquire the following basic skills: 

1. Effective expression, both written and oral, in the English language. 

2. Critical practice in the use of creative and analytical reasoning in 
a variety of problem solving situations. 

Law schools generally do not require any particular undegraduate 
major as long as the work completed has academic merit. However, experi- 
ence has shown that certain preparation is more beneficial. The school to 
which a student applies may have particular preference or policy. Students 
should consult the pre-law advisor who will help construct a meaningful pro- 
gram which will meet the requirements of the senior college or university 
desired. 



PROGRAM FOR PRE-LAW ENFORCEMENT (A.A. Degree) 

Interested students are directed to the section on the Criminal Justice 
Institute. 



209 



Pre-Professional Programs 

tSUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENGlOl Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

BIO 105 Principles of BIO Lab 1 CHE 132 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 131 General Chemistry 3 CHE 134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

*MTH 223 Calculus 6 MTH 224 Calculus 6 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Area 5 (other than F) 3 

Total Semester Hours 14 Total Semester Hours 17 

* Additional summer terms may be necessary if student is not ready for 

MTH 223, or if the senior institution to which transfer is planned requires 

physics, such as PHY 201 or 202, or PHY 210 or 21 1. 
tStudent may wish to vary the program according to the requirements of 

the transferring Senior Institution, but be careful that general education 

requirements are met. 

SUMMER TERMS 
Term III-A or IH-B 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 4 



SECOND 

First Term 
BIO 150 General Botany 3 

BIO 151 General Botany Lab 1 

CHE 221 Organic Chemistry 3 

CHE 223 Organic Chem. Lab 1 

Humanities 3 

Social Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 



YEAR 

Second Term 
BIO 160 General Zoology 3 

BIO 161 General Zoology Lab I 

CHE 222 Organic Chemistry 3 

CHE 224 Organic Chemistry Lab 1 

Humanities 3 

Social Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

(A.A. Degree) 







FIRST 


YEAR 






First Term 






Second Term 


ENG 


101 Composition 


3 


ENG 


102 or 104 Composition 


HIS 


111 History of Americas 


or 


HIS 


112 History of Americas or 


PSC 


121 National Govt. 


3 


PSC 


122 State and Local Govt. 


CHE 


131 General Chemistry 


3 


BIO 


100 Principles of Biology 


MTH 


131 Basic College Math 


3 


BIO 


105 Prin. of Biology Lab 


HPR 


Physical Education 


1 


CHE 


132 General Chemistry 


Humanities 


.3 


CHE 


134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 








HPR 


Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



3 
3 
I 
3 
1 
I 
Total Semester Hours 15 



210 



Pre-Professional Programs 



SUMMER TERMS 
Term IH-A or HI-B 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

Humanities 3 

Total Semester Hours 7 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 



BIO 150 General Botany 3 

BIO 151 General Botany Lab I 

CHE 221 Organic Chemistry 3 

CHE 223 Organic Chem. Lab 1 

PHY 130 Physics 3 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 



Second Term 



BIO 160 General Zoology 3 

BIO 161 General Zoology Lab I 

CHE 222 Organic Chemistry 3 

CHE 224 Organic Chem. Lab 1 

Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Area 5 (other than F) 3 

Total Semester Hours 15 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-NURSING (A.A. Degree) 



ENG 

BIO 

BIO 

CHE 

MTH 

HPR 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 



101 Composition 
100 Principles of Biology 
105 Prin. of Biology Lab 
131 General Chemistry 
131 Basic College Math 
Physical Education 



Second Term 



Total Semester Hours 



ENG 102 or 104 Composition 
BIO 160 General Zoology 
BIO 161 General Zoology Lab 
CHE 132 General Chemistry 
CHE 134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 

Social Science Elective 

HPR Physical Education 
14 Total Semester Hours 



SUMMER TERMS 
Term IH-A or IH-B 

Humanities 3 

Social Science 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 General Chem. Lab 1 

Electives 3 

Humanities 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 



Second Term 
PSY 211 Child Psychology 3 

PHY 130 Physics 3 

Electives 9 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



211 



Pre-Professional Programs 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 3 

MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 

ART 106 Basic Design I 3 

HPR Physical Education . . 1 

Social Studies 3 

Total Semester Hours 13 



Second Term 

ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

Social Studies 3 

PHI 161 Logic 3 

ART 107 Basic Design II 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



SUMMER TERMS 

GY 105 Physical Geology 3 

GY 106 Physical Geology Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 4 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

Humanities 3 Humanities .3 

BIO 100 Modern Principles of BIO 160 General Zoology 3 

Biology 3 BIO 161 General Zoology Lab 1 

BIO 105 Biology Lab 1 PHY 130 Physics 3 

ART 206 Crafts 3 PSY 211 or 212 Child Psychology 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 or Adolescent Psychology 3 

Elective 3 Electives .3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours . 17 Total Semester Hours 17 



PRE-OCEANOGRAPHIC PROGRAM (A.A. Degree) 

Any student interested in perusing an Oceanographic program, should 
plan his work according to the curriculum requirements with the college or 
university wherein he wishes to matriculate. In addition, the student should 
check with his counselor and also investigate the requirements according to 
the Head of the Department in Science which will fit the student's needs. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-OPTOMETRY 

(A.A. Degree) 



Second Term 

102 or 104 Composition 3 

132 General Chemistry 3 

134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

134 Pre-Calculus Math 3 

Science 3 

Physical Education 1 

13 Total Semester Hours 14 





FIRST 


YEAR 


First Term 






ENG 101 Composition 


.3 


ENG 


CHE 131 General Chemistry 


3 


CHE 


MTH 132 College Algebra 


3 


CHE 


Social Science 


3 


MTH 


HPR Physical Education . . 


1 


Social 
HPR 



Total Semester Hours 



SUMMER TERMS 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

Total Semester Hours 4 



212 



Pre-ProfessJonal Programs 



SECOND YEAR 

The work for the second year should be planned on the basis of the senior 
institution to which transfer is planned; it will probably include PHY 201- 
202; BIO 160. Be careful that the general education requirements of this 
College are met. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM PRE-PHARMACY 

(A.A. Degree) 



FIRST YEAR 

First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
BIO 105 Modern Principles of 

BIO Laboratory 
CHE 131 General Chemistry 
'=MTH 132 College Algebra 

Social Science 

HPR Physical Education 

Total Semester Hours 



1 

3 
.3 
.3 

1 
14 



ENG 

CHE 

CHE 

MTH 

BIO 

BIO 

HPR 



Second Term 
102 or 104 Composition 
132 General Chemistry 
134 Gen. Chemistry Lab 
134 Pre-Calculus Math 

150 General Botany 

151 General Botany Lab 
Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



3 
3 
1 

.3 
3 
1 
1 

15 



* Additional summer terms may be necessary if student is not ready for 
placement in MTH 132 or if the senior institution to which transfer is 
planned requires language hours. 



SUMMER TERMS 



Term IH-A 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

Social Science 3 

Total Semester Hours 7 



Term ffl-B 

Humanities .3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Area 5 (Other than F) 3 

Total Semester Hours 7 



SECOND 

First Term 
CHE 221 Organic Chemistry 3 

CHE 223 Organic Chem. Lab 1 

MTH 223 Calculus 6 

PHY 201 Intermediate Physics 3 

PHY 203 Inter. Physics Lab 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 



YEAR 

Second Term 
CHE 222 Organic Chemistry .3 

CHE 224 Organic Chem. Lab. 1 

BIO 160 General Zoology 3 

BIO 161 General Zoology Lab .1 
PHY 202 Intermediate Physics 3 
PHY 204 Inter. Physics Lab 1 

Humanities 3 

Total Semester Hours 15 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 3 

MTH 131 Basic College Math 3 

CHE 131 General Chemistry 3 

Social Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Second Term 
ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

MTH 132 College Algebra 3 

CHE 132 General Chemistry .3 

CHE 134 Gen. Chemistry Lab .1 

Social Science 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 



213 



Pre-Professional Programs 



SUMMER TERMS 

CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 7 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

Humanities 3 Humanities . 3 

BIO 100 Modern Principles of BIO 160 General Zoology' 3 

Biology 3 BIO 161 General Zoology Lab 1 

BIO 105 Biology Lab 1 PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

PHY 130 Physics 3 PHI 161 Logic 3 

Elective 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 Total Semester Hours 14 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE 

(A.A. Degree) 



FIRST 

First Term 
ENG 101 Composition 
BIO 105 Modern Principles of 

BIO Laboratory 
MTH 132 College Algebra 
CHE 131 General Chemistry 
Social Science 
HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



YEAR 



3 


ENG 




MTH 


1 


CHE 


3 


CHE 


.3 


HPR 


3 


BIO 


1 


BIO 


14 


1 



Second Term 

102 and 104 Composition 3 

134 Pre-Calculus Math .3 

132 General Chemistry .3 

134 Gen. Chemistry Lab I 

Physical Education .1 

150 General Botany 3 

151 General Botany Lab 1 
Total Semester Hours 1 5 



^A student planning to enroll in Auburn University would be well advised to 
elect one year of a foreign language or to take the correspondence course 
in Medical Vocabulary from Auburn University. 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
CHE 221 Organic Chemistry 
CHE 223 Organic Chem. Lab 
PHY 201 Intermediate Physics 
PHY 203 Inter. Physics Lab 
MTH 223 Calculus 



3 


BIO 


I 


BIO 


3 


CHE 


1 


CHE 


6 


PHY 




PHY 



Total Semester Hours 



14 



Second Term 

160 General Zoology 

161 General Zoology Lab 
222 Organic Chemistry 
224 Organic Chem. Lab 
202 Intermediate Physics 
204 Inter. Physics Lab 

Humanities 

HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



3 
1 
3 
1 

.3 
I 

.3 
1 

16 



SUMMER TERMS 
Term lO-A Term III-B 

Humanities 3 CHE 133 General Chemistry 3 

Social Science 3 CHE 135 Gen. Chemistry Lab 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 Area 5 (other than F) 3 

Total Semester Hours 7 Total Semester Hours 7 



214 



IV 



SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 



Special Programs 
Cooperative Education 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

The Cooperative Education Program is designed to give students the 
opportunity to integrate their classroom study with practical experience in 
their major field. This is done by alternating terms of full-time study with 
terms of full-time work* (Alternating Plan), by working part-time while 
attending school full-time (Parallel Plan) or by working full-time for a single 
term (Internship Plan). 

Eligibility 

All full-time students who have completed one semester (12 credit 
hours) are eligible to enter the cooperative program provided they meet 
the following requirements:** 

a. Students should have a 2.0 GPA and be in good academic standing. 

b. Students must plan to graduate from Broward Community College. 

c. Students must intend to remain in the cooperative program until 
graduation from Broward Community College. 

When to Apply 

Students may apply as soon as they have been accepted for full-time 
enrollment by the College, even though they will not receive a work assign- 
ment until after they have completed one semester of work in the College.** 

Application Procedures 

Students who are interested in the Cooperative Education Program 
should follow the procedures outlined below: 

a. Obtain an "Application for Cooperative Educaticn Program" form 
from their counselor or from the Co-op Department Office, and 
make an appointment with the Co-op Office to review the completed 
application with a coordinator. 

b. The coordinator will conduct an in-depth interview with the student 
with regard to his career and possible cooperative assignments. 

c. If the student is accepted, the Cooperative Education Department 
will be responsible for locating an appropriate training position. 

Course Requirements for the 
Cooperative Education Program 

There are three different Cooperative Education plans offered at 
Broward Community College — the Parallel Plan, the Alternating Plan, and 
the Internship Plan. 

The Parallel Plan operates as follows: A part-time job, meeting the 
requirements of a student accepted into the program, is obtained by the 

*For special programs in which work may be seasonal, the plan may be 
modified in order to meet the needs of that area. 
**A student who does not meet this criterion may petition for entry into 
the program. Such petition must be approved by the Cooperative Educa- 
tion Department. 

217 



Special Programs 



Courses — Cooperative Education 



Co-op Office. The student works 15 to 20 hours per week year-round while 
attending school full-time. The student receives two semester hours of credit 
for each work assignment (CWS 101-CWS 106). Any co-op work assign- 
ment selected must be one which will provide that student with experience 
in his chosen field. 

The Alternating Plan operates as follows: A full-time job, meeting the 
requirements of a student accepted into the program, is obtained by the 
Co-op office. This assignment is usually shared by a pair of students on 
an alternating basis. While one student is working on the job, his partner 
(alternate) is attending classes. At the end of each semester, the students 
change places. The student receives three credit hours for each work assign- 
ment (CWS 201-CWS 204). Any co-op work assignment selected must be 
one which will provide that student with experience in his chosen field. 

The Internship Plan operates as follows: A full-time job, meeting the 
requirements of a student is obtained by the Co-op Office. The student 
works for one term (usually the summer term). The student receives three 
credit hours (CWS 110) for the assignment which is selected to provide 
experience in his chosen field. 

The Cooperative Education Department will grade the assignments 
based on reports submitted by the student and the evaluation made by the 
employer. 

Co-op academic credit may be included as part of the degree require- 
ments in many technical programs, and is transferable to all state-supported 
universities in Florida. Students may also use co-op credit as part of their 
Associate in Arts Degree programs. Students on Alternating and Internship 
work assignments are considered to be full time students by B.C.C. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

CWS 100 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION SEMINAR 1 semester hour 

A seminar designed to prepare the student for entry into the Cooperative 
Program and to acquaint him with his responsibilities to the college and 
his employer. 

Alternating Plan Courses 

CWS 201 WORK EXPERIENCE I 3 semester hours 

First in a series of courses designed to provide experience in a student's 
field of study through full-time work. Students are graded on the basis of 
learning objectives and employer evaluations. On the job experience is 
supplemented by three class sessions per term. Prerequisite: Co-op De- 
partment approval. 

CWS 202 WORK EXPERIENCE II 3 semester hours 

A continuation of CWS 201. Prerequisites: CWS 201 and Co-op Depart- 
ment approval. 

CWS 203 WORK EXPERIENCE III 3 semester hours 

A continuadon of CWS 202. Prerequisites: CWS 202 and Co-op Depart- 
ment approval. 

218 



Special Programs 



Courses — Cooperative, Education, 
Career Planning 



CWS 204 WORK EXPERIENCE IV 3 semester hours 

A continuation of CWS 203. Prerequisites: CWS 203 and Co-op Depart- 
ment approval . 

Parallel Plan Courses 

CWS 101 CO-OP PRACTICUM I 2 semester hours 

First in a series of courses designed to provide practical experience in 
a student's field through part-time work. Students submit and are evaluated 
on the basis of learning objectives. On-the-job experience is supplemented 
by three class sessions per term. Corequisite: Full-time student status. 

CWS 102 CO-OP PRACTICUM II 2 semester hours 

A continuation of CWS 101. Prerequisites: CWS 101 and Co-op Depart- 
ment approval. 

CWS 103 CO-OP PRACTICUM III 2 semester hours 

A continuation of CWS 102. Prerequisites: CWS 102 and Co-op Depart- 
ment approval. 

CWS 104 CO-OP PRACTICUM IV 2 semester hours 

A continuation of CWS 103. Prerequisites: CWS 103 and Co-op Depart- 
ment approval. 

CWS 105 CO-OP PRACTICUM V 2 semester hours 

A continuation of CWS 104. Prerequisites: CWS 104 and Co-op Depart- 
ment approval. 

CWS 106 CO-OP PRACTICUM VI 2 semester hours 

A continuation of CWS 105. Prerequisites: CWS 105 and Co-op Depart- 
ment approval. 

Internship Course 

CWS 110 CO-OP INTERNSHIP 3 semester hours 

A course designed to provide on-the-job experience related to the student's 
major. Student works a minimum of 360 hours and submits a written 
report. Open to students in all majors. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
Cooperative Education Department. 

Additional Information 

All special rules and regulations, having implications for students, 
employers, and the college are available through the Cooperative Education 
Department. 

CAREER PLANNING 

The choice of career field is one of the most important decisions college 
students make. 

In order to make a wise decision, a student needs to be aware of his 
own abilities and limitations as well as the vocational alternatives which are 
available to him. 

The Career Planning Workshop is an important first step for the student 
who is seeking this information. 

219 



Special Programs 
Courses — SPANS 

CPW 100 CAREER PLANxNING WORKSHOP 1 semester hour 

This course is designed to help students decide upon an appropriate voca- 
tional choice. The student will be assisted in learning who he is, where he 
is, what he wants in life and why, what career fields may be compatible 
with his value system, and what he must learn to enter and progress in 
these fields. 

Through the Counseling office and Career Center, career counseling is 
available throughout the student's stay at Broward Community College. 

SPANS PROGRAM 

SPANS (Student Program to Achieve New Spheres) is designed for 
underachievers and disadvantaged students. Significant features of the Pro- 
gram are its flexibility to meet individual student needs and the ability of 
students to participate in a full range of college activities. Details of the 
Program can be secured from the Director of the Program. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
SPANS 

SSS 999 SOCIAL SCIENCE (HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

AND HUMAN RELATIONS) 3 semester hours 

An integrated study of the development of the self with special emphasis 
upon the development of positive feelings of worth. Understandings in 
the psychological, sociological, and biological aspects of growth and devel- 
opment will be stressed. Attention will be given to how human beings solve 
their problems, how they relate to one another, and how the basic ideas 
of ethical conduct and aesthetic appreciation are developed. Emphasis 
upon the relationship of all these factors affecting solutions to problems 
as perceived by students will be stressed. 

SPS 999 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PLANNING 1 semester hour 

These are planning sessions designed to help the student acquire functional 
data about himself in order for him to make more realistic self-appraisals 
and to determine attainable goals and specific goal direction. Group 
counseling and some sensitivity training will be incorporated into these 
sessions. 

SMS 999 MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

An individualized program for the development of skills in the operations 
of arithmetic; many fundamental skills and concepts of business mathe- 
matics are included. Basic algebraic skills and concepts are stressed. The 
course is designed to meet the individual needs of the student. Problems 
related to family spending, business usage, to application in industry, and 
to use in travel and in sports. Lectures, individualized programs, workbooks 
are all used in presenting the varied topics designed to meet individual 
needs for genera! everyday use, and for his entry into the mathematics 
of the career of his choice. 

SEC 999 ENGLISH 3 semester hours 

This course includes a study of basic grammar and usage as it applies to 
readings and discussions of relevant literature. It will also encompass a 
survey of the fundamentals of composition. 

220 



Special Programs 

Courses — SPANS 

Honors 

SBS 999 NATURAL SCIENCE 3 semester hours 

An individualized program designed to help the student to understand 
the aspects of environment which man can or cannot control. The student 
will see man's interdependence with plants and animals; the student will 
learn body care, and he will come to understand factors of inheritance. 
In addition thereto, the student will come to recognize the application 
of science in the world of business and industry. 

SRD 999 DEVELOPMENTAL READING 3 semester hours 

A special course for students with reading handicaps that inhibit success 
in achievement of life goals. This course will offer special work in vocabu- 
lary development through practice in word attack skills, syllabification, 
roots, prefixes and suffixes. Comprehension will be developed through 
practice in locating main idea, recognition of supporting details, paragraph 
development and writing summaries of materials read. Special emphasis 
will be placed on development of eye acuity, reasonable rate of speed, 
and formation of proper study habits. 

SSP 999 SPEECH 3 semester hours 

This course has been designed toward special goals to help the student 
develop an awareness of the function of effective oral communication in 
contemporary society. Special emphasis is placed upon the relationships 
of career goals, speech habits, listening habits, vocabulary, grammar, voice 
and intelligibility as they may influence the student's career or job place- 
ment. Techniques and materials used emphasize the building of skills 
necessary for effective oral communication of the student's ideas and 
feelings to a listener in groups and individual interactions. 



HONORS INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR 

HON 101, 102, 103, 104 3 elective semester hours 

Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar is open to students who have attended 
Broward Community College for at least one term and have met the 
requirements for admission to the Honors Program. 

Discussions on a subject chosen by the members of the seminar are led 
by instructors from various disciplines, as well as by experts from outside 
the college. Students are required to do the assigned reading, participate 
in the discussions, do research on one aspect of the general subject and 
lead at least one discussion. Written work in the form of commentaries 
and annotated bibliographies is also required. 



221 



V 



TECHNICAL 
EDUCATION 



Curricula and Courses 



(Additional A.S. Degree Programs are 
listed in the Business Administration, 
Humanities, and Social Science Divisions) 







^:tnnv, 



il^^i 




i 



3^ 



^^ 



'""W^ 



i 




f -^ ^^^^^^r^J 





TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

Division of Allied Health Technology 

Division of Engineering Technology 

Division of Public Services Technology 

It is the purpose of Broward Community College to provide in its 
technical and semi-professional curricula, opportunities for students to 
develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and appreciations which will enable 
them to enter their chosen vocations qualified to perform competently. 



DIVISION OF ALLIED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 

Dental Assisting Technology 

Medical Assisting Technology 

Medical Laboratory Technology 

Nursing Technology 

Physical Therapist Assistant Technology 

Radiologic Technology 

Radiation Therapy Technology 

Respiratory Therapy Technology 

Emergency Medical Technology 

Continuing Education 

Group Living Homes Management 



ALLIED HEALTH COURSES 

Nutrition 
Pharmacology 

"Participation of Allied Health students in Cooperative Education is 
voluntary. Interested students should contact the Department of Cooperative 
Education for details." 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO 
ALLIED HEALTH PROGRAMS 

1. Fulfill general requirements for admission to the College. 

2. Official High School transcripts: 

a. Partial transcript before graduation 

b. Complete transcript after graduation 

3. Official transcripts from each College or program previously attended. 

4. 2.0 cumulative grade point average on all college level courses at- 
tempted exclusive of developmental courses. 

5. Satisfactory scores on Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test or satis- 
factory completion of appropriate courses. 

225 



Allied Health Technology 
Dental Assisting Technology 

6. Other testing and/ or counseling as recommended. 

7. Acceptable letters of reference and recommendation. 

8. Completed physical and dental examination forms. 

9. Satisfactory personal interview where required. 

10. Medical Laboratory students refer to Medical Laboratory Technology 
Program. 



PROCEDURE FOR APPLYING FOR ADMISSION TO 
ALLIED HEALTH PROGRAMS 

1. Submit letter of application directly to appropriate Allied Health de- 
partment. Student will receive required forms and materials for ad- 
mission. 

2. Make an appointment with the Office of Academic Advisement and 
Counseling for verification of academic qualifications. 

3. Present verification of academic qualification to Division of Allied 
Health Technology for admission approval. Approval based upon ful- 
fillment of all admission requirements. 

4. If a student is accepted into an Allied Health program but is unable 
to register because the class quota has been reached, the student may 
register for the next in-coming class in which space is available. 

Uniforms: 

Uniforms that meet the approval of the appropriate Allied Health 
faculty must be furnished by the student. Information regarding their 
purchase is furnished to each applicant following formal acceptance. 

Liability Insurance: 

All Allied Health Technology students are required to carry Professional 
Liability Insurance throughout their education program. This is due at 
the beginning of each year and payable at the time of registration. 

Accident Insurance: 

It is recommended that all students in Allied Health Programs carry 
accident insurance. 



DENTAL ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 

Requirements for the Certificate of Achievement in Dental Assisting: 

Completion of 36 semester hours of credit and a grade point average 
of 2.0 or better. No grade lower than "C" will be acceptable in all 
courses required for the Dental Assisting Certificate. 

Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

SPE 100 3 semester hours 

ENG 101 3 semester hours 

226 



Allied Health Technology 
Dental Assisting Technology 

3. Completion of the following courses in related areas: 

XR 101 2 semester hours 

NTR 210 1 semester hour 

PSY 250 1 semester hour 

4. Completion of the following courses in major field, (no grade lower 
than "C" will be acceptable in Dental Assisting courses). 

DA 161, 165, 174, 176, 180, 185, 187, 188, 

194 26 semester hours 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Dental Assisting^ 

1 . Completion of 68 semester hours of credit and a grade point average of 
2.0 or better. No grade lower than "C" will be acceptable in all courses 
required for the Dental Assisting Degree. 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

ENG 101 3 semester hours 

ENG 102, 103 or 104 3 semester hours 

BA 150 Business Math 3 semester hours 

SOC 211 3 semester hours 

SPE 100 3 semester hours 

PSY 201 3 semester hours 

BIO 105, 111, 112, 113, 114, 117 10 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following courses in related areas: 

XR 101 2 semester hours 

PSY 250 1 semester hour 

NTR 210 1 semester hour 

4. Completion of the following courses in major field: (no grade lower 
than "C" will be acceptable in Dental Assisting courses.) 

DA 161, 165, 174, 176, 180, 185, 187, 188, 

194, 295 29 semester hours 

5. Completion of four semester hours in Physical Education activities. 

6. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at the College. 

7. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advise- 
ment office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 
The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

8. Remove all admission conditions. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

10. The Dental Assisting staff reserves the right to discontinue a student's 
enrollment, at any time during the program, if in its judgment the 
student does not possess the personal qualifications necessary for suc- 
cess in a career in Dental Assisting. 

227 



Allied Health Technology 
Dental Assisting Program 

DENTAL ASSISTING PROGRAM 

A career in Dental Assisting has developed into a rewarding and 
challenging opportunity for men and women of today. A Dental Assistant is 
a member of a highly qualified health team, working to improve the health 
of the community. The varied duties and responsibilities of the dental as- 
sistant requires knowledge of the basic dental sciences, proficiency in office 
management procedures, and practical clinical experience involving special- 
ized skills. 

Broward Community College has developed a unique program to meet 
the need for trained Dental Assistants in the community. Completion of the 
first year leads to a certificate; continuation in the program with completion 
of a second year of prescribed study leads to an Associate in Science Degree. 
The optional program is designed to meet the individual needs of the student. 

Applicants to the Dental Assisting program must fulfill the general 
requirements for admission to the College and submit a letter of intent to 
the Dental Assisting Department. The selection of students is based upon the 
following additional factors: 

1 . Evidence of good physical and mental health. 

• 2. Satisfactory high school and college transcripts, including a 2.0 
grade point average in all college courses previously attempted. 

3. Acceptable scores on the Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test. 

4. Acceptable letters of reference from employers, where applicable 
and letters of personal recommendation. 

5. Verification of academic qualifications by a Counselor or Academic 
of the College. 

6. Acceptable score on manual dexterity test administered by the 
College. 

7. Completed physical and dental examination forms. 

8. Satisfactory personal interview with Dental Assisting Department 
faculty. 

9. Satisfactory completion of a typing competency examination. 

Preliminary provisional approval status has been granted by the Com- 
mission on Accreditation of the American Dental Association. Approval 
of the program by the Commission will grant the necessary eligibility for the 
graduates of the one year certificate program to take the National Certifica- 
tion Examination for Dental Assistants. 

The Dental Assisting Program is a two-phase curriculum. The first year 
of study constitutes the basic dental assisting curriculum for which a certifi- 
cate will be awarded upon satisfactory completion. Those desiring the As- 
sociate in Science Degree may elect to take the second year of general 
academic studies (terms IV and V). 

228 



Allied Health Technology 
Courses — Dental Assisting 



Term I 



Degree Program of Study 



DA 161 Preclinical Orientation 

to D.A. 
DA 165 Intro, to Dental 

Assisting 
DA 180 Allied Dental 

Theory 
DA 185 Dental Anatomy & 

Physiology 
DA 187 Dental Materials 
DA 194 Oral Hygiene 
XR 101 Dental Radiology 
Total Semester Hours 



3 

3 

2 

.2 

17 



Term II 



DA 174 Clinical Pract. & 

Proc. I 4 

DA 188 Dental Office 

Practice 3 

SPE 100 Speech 3 

PSY 250 1 

NTR 210 Nutritional 

Diet Modif .1 

ENG 101 Composition 3 



Total Semester Hours 



Term IH-A 

DA 176 Clinical Pract. & 
Proc. II 
Total Semester Hours 



Term IV 
SOC 211 General Sociology 
BIO 105 Lab 
BIO 1 1 1 Physical Science 

& Micro 
BIO 112 Anatomy & 

Physiology I 

*ENG 102, 103 or 104 

PSY 201 General Psychology 
HPR Physical Education 
HPR Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



2 
.3 
3 
1 
1 
16 



Term V 
DA 295 Dental Practicum 3 

BIO 113 Anatomy & 

Physiology II 2 

BIO 114 Anatomy & 

Physiology III 2 

BIO 117 Lab 1 

BA 150 Business Math 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

HPR Physical Education .1 



Total Semester Hours 



13 



^Students contemplating transfer to a university should complete ENG 101 
and either ENG 102 or 104 since other English courses may not be ac- 
ceptable for transfer credit. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
DENTAL ASSISTING 

DA 161 PRECLINICAL ORIENTATION 

TO DENTAL ASSISTING 3 semester hours 

Designed to orient the student to the dental office and the use and steriliza- 
tion of all instruments and equipment used in the practice of dentistry. 
Pre-clinical laboratory practicum is included. 

DA 165 INTRODUCTION TO 

DENTAL ASSISTING 1 semester hour 

An overview of dentistry and the dental assisting profession including its 
history, ethical and legal aspects, duties and responsibilities of the dental 
health team, professional organizations, and proper conduct and grooming 
of the dental assistant. 



229 



Allied Health Technology 
Courses — Dental Assisting 

DA 174 CLINICAL PRACTICES AND 

PROCEDURES I 4 semester ho«rs 

Practicum phase provides the opportunity for each student to receive closely 
supervised individual instruction in all phases of chairside assisting. Accom- 
panying lecture series acquaints the student with the necessary background 
material and assisting procedures involved in each dental specialty. Lab 
fee $10.00. 

DA 176 CLINICAL PRACTICES AND 

PROCEDURES II 4 semester hours 

Practicum phase is a continuation of DA 175 with the addition of a super- 
vised externship program utilizing dental oflfices and public health facilities 
in the community. Accompanying lecture demonstration series focuses on 
selected dental topics pertaining to effective dental assisting and the addi- 
tional duties permitted by Rules and Regulations of the Florida State Board 
of Dentistry. Lab fee: $10.00. 

DA 180 ALLIED DENTAL THEORY 3 semester hours 

Designed to acquaint the student with the basic concepts of microbiology 
and their relevance to sterilization. General aspects of oral pathology in- 
cluding common pathological conditions of the mouth, teeth and their 
supporting structures will be presented. Additional consideration will be 
given to the pharmacological properties, therapeutic applications and any 
toxicities or contraindications of drugs and medicaments commonly used 
in dentistry. Lab fee: $5.00. 

DA 185 DENTAL ANATOMY AND 

PHYSIOLOGY 3 semester hours 

The study of head and neck anatomy with emphasis placed on the structure, 
morphology and function of the primary and permanent human dentitions. 
Laboratory projects involving drawing and carving of individual teeth will 
be required for course completion. 

DA 187 DENTAL MATERIALS 3 semester hours 

Designed to familiarize the student with the various types of materials, 
their physical properties and characteristics, proper manipulation and 
designed application in the practice of dentistry. Projects demonstrating 
proficiency in the technical application and proper manipulation of specified 
dental materials will be required. Lab fee: $10.00. 

DA 188 PRACTICE ADMINISTRATION OF THE 

DENTAL OFFICE 3 semester hours 

The study of efficient dental office management. Basic concepts to be 
presented will include telephone etiquette and communication, guidelines for 
better interpersonal relations, methods for effective appointment control, 
dental bookkeeping systems and practices, business writing, techniques of 
collections and billing, filing of patients records and procedures for tax 
and health insurance forms. Typing proficiency must be demonstrated by the 
student for course completion. 

DA 194 ORAL HYGIENE 2 semester hours 

Emphasis is placed on the development of a plaque control program to 
meet individual patient needs. Materials on methods of toothbrushing. 
supplementary aids for oral physiotherapy and the use of ffuorides in pre- 
ventive dentistry will be presented. 

230 



Allied Health Technology 
Medical Assisting Program 

DA 295 DENTAL PRACTICUM 3 semester hours 

Designed to provide an opportunity for continued practice in dental assisting 
procedures whiles the student is completing -the general college courses 
necessary to meet the requirements of an Associate in Science degree. 

XR 101 DENTAL RADIOLOGY 2 semester hours 

Fundamentals of radiological science as applied to dentistry will be pre- 
sented. Special consideration will be given to physical behavior, radiation 
hazards, biological effects, protection and control methods, and proper 
techniques for exposing, processing and mounting of x-rays. Laboratory 
exercise demonstrating proficiency in these techniques will be required. 



MEDICAL ASSISTING PROGRAM 

The role of the Medical Assistant within the physician's office of today 
is becoming more varied, demanding and complex. Her duties and responsi- 
bilities many encompass that of either an administrator, clinician or techni- 
cian, and in many instances she may be expected to function in all three 
areas in addition to being a public relations expert at all times. 

Taking into account the broad and varied responsibilities that the 
Medical Assistant may be required to assume, the Associate Degree Program 
in Medical Assisting offered by Broward Community College requires 
courses in General Education, Business Education, and in areas of speciali- 
zation directly related to this allied health occupation. 

The placement of students in the Practicum offers maximum flexibility 
and has been specially designed to meet the individual ne^^ds of the student 
thus allowing for the development of specific skills within any chosen in- 
terest or specialty area. Students in the practicum courses will be required to 
spend a minimum of ten hours per week in clinical facilities. 

Applicants must fulfill the general requirements for admission to the 
College and submit a letter of intent to the Medical Assisting Department. 
The selection of students is based upon the following additional factors: 

1. Evidence of good physical and mental health. 

2. Satisfactory high school and college transcripts, including a 2.0 
grade point average in all college courses previously attempted. 

3. Acceptable scores on Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test or 
satisfactory completion of appropriate courses. 

4. Acceptable letters of reference from employers, where applicable, 
and letters of personal recommendation. 

The Medical Assisting Program is approved by the Council on Medical 
Education of the American Medical Association in collaboration with the 
American Association of Medical Assistants. Graduates are eligible to take 
the national Certification Examination for Medical Assistants. 

231 



Allied Health Technology 
Medical Assisting Program 

MEDICAL ASSISTING TECHNOLOGY 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Medical Assisting: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 65 semester hours of credit and a grade 
point average of 2.0 or higher. 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

ENG 101 3 semester hours 

HPR 152 or EMT 183 3 semester hours 

Social Science elective 3 semester hours 

PSY 201 3 semester hours 

BIO 105, 111, 112, 113, 114, 117 10 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following courses in related areas: 
BA 118, 119, 120, or BA 202, 203, 204 

BA 121 3 semester hours 

BA 242 3 semester hours 

BA 245 or ENG 103 or ENG 104 3 semester hours 

NTR 210 1 semester hour 

4. Completion of the following courses in major field: (No grade lower 
than "C" will be acceptable in Medical Assisting courses.) 

MA 110, 115, 116, 120, 210, 220 

240, 241, AH 166, 167 30 semester hours 

5. Completion of four semester hours of Physical Education Activities. 

6. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at the College. 

7. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advise- 
ment Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 
The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

8. Remove all admission requirements. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

10. The Medical Assisting faculty reserves the right to discontinue a stu- 
dent's enrollment at any time during the program if in its judgment 
the student does not possess the personal qualifications necessary for 
a career in Medical Assisting. 

1 1. Enrollment in MA 240, 241 is by recommendation of the faculty. 

A brochure describing the Medical Assisting Program is available on re- 
quest from the Division of Allied Health. 

MEDICAL ASSISTING PROGRAM (M.S. Degree) 

A Suggested Sequence 



Term 11 

MA 110-Introduction to MA 116-C]inical Terminology 

120-Administrative Office 
MA 115-Medical Terminology 3 Procedures 

232 





FIRST 


YEAR 


Term I 






llO-Introduction to 




MA 


Medical Assisting 


2 


MA 


115-Medical Terminology 


, .3 





Allied Health Technology 
Medical Assisting Certificate 

i^BA 118, 119, 120 MA 220-CIinical Office 

Intermediate Typing 3 Procedures 3 

ENG 101-Composition 3 BIO 113, 14 Human Anatomy 

BIO 105-Lab 1 and Physiology 4 

BIO 111, 112 Physical Science BIO 117-Lab 1 

& Microbiology 4 HPR Physical Education 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours 15 

Term IH-A or III-B 

HPR 152 First Aid & Safety or .3 
EMT 183 Emergency Medical 

Technology 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

SECOND YEAR 
Term I Term 11 

MA 210-Basic Medical MA 241 -Advanced Practicum in 

Laboratory Techniques 4 Medical Assisting 5 

MA 240-Practicum in Medical =^*BA 245-Bus. Communications or 

Assisting 5 ENG 103 or 104 3 

BA 242-Transcribing Machines 3 BA 121-Accounting Survey 3 

AH 166, 167 Pharmacology 2 PSY 201-Psychology 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 NTR 210-Nutritional Diet 

Modifications 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 Total Semester Hours 16 

'^If student does not meet prerequisites, she will have to take qualifying 
typing courses. Students taking Intermediate typing should concurrently 
enroll in BA 118, 119, 120. 
' 'Completion of English 101 and English 103 or BA 245 will satisfy the re- 
quirements for a degree in Medical Assisting Technology at this institu- 
tion. However, students contemplating transfer to a university should 
complete English 101 and 104 since the other English courses listed above 
may not be acceptable for transfer credit. 



MEDICAL ASSISTING 
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM 

This program is designed solely for individuals who already possess 
basic business office skills and/ or medical office experience, but who are 
desirous of improving or changing their employment opportunities. 

Individuals who believe they qualify for acceptance into the certificate 
program should contact the Department Head. Work experience must be 
validated in writing by a previous employer who must send his statement 
directly to the Department Head. 

Individuals seeking admission to the certificate program must fulfill 
the same admission requirements as those seeking the M.S. degree in Medical 
Assisting. 

233 



Allied Health Technology 
Courses — Medical Assisting 

A certificate of achievement will be awarded upon completion of the 
courses listed below. Students should contact the Department Head during 
their final term to assure the prompt preparation of their Certificate. An 
appointment must also be made with an academic advisor for a formal 
evaluation of completion of certificate program requirements. 

Credits 

MA 110 Introduction to M.A 2 

MA 115 Medical Terminology 3 

MA 116 Clinical Terminology 3 

MA 120 Admin. Office Procedures 3 

MA 210 Med. Office Lab. Procedures 4 

MA 220 Clinical Office Procedures 3 

AH 166, 167 Pharmacology 2 

EMT 183 Emergency Procedures 3 

MA 240 Practicum'in M.A. 5 

MA 241 Advanced Practicum in M.A 5 

Total Credit Hours 33 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
MEDICAL ASSISTING 

MA 110 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL 

ASSISTING 2 semester hours 

An overview of (he Medical Assisting profession including duties, re- 
sponsibilities, ethical and legal aspects of medicine and medical assisting, 
history of medicine, and discussion of proper telephone usage. Public 
relations and interpersonal relationships are also emphasized. Course offered 
Terms I & II . 

MA 115 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Provides a broad survey of the language of medicine and health tech- 
nologies. Emphasis is placed on the building of medical terms from word 
parts. Special pronunciation sessions are held in the language laboratory 
to assist students in developing competency. Course offered Terms I & II. 

MA 116 CLINICAL TERMINOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Continuation of MA 115 with in depth study of medical terminology 
specifically related to the human tissues, organic systems, and disease 
processes. Prerequisite: MA 115 or successful completion of MA 115 
final examination to demonstrate competency in basic medical terminology. 
Course offered Terms II & III-A. 

MA 120 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE 

PROCEDURES 3 semester hours 

Former Title: Medical Office Practices & Procedures 

Deals with the administrative aspects and operation of a physician's office. 
Instruction includes: duties as receptionist; techniques of record keeping, 
patient interviewing, billing and collecting fees, completing insurance forms, 
and practice in telephone techniques. Prerequisites/Co-requisites MA 110. 
Elementary Typing skill. Course offered Terms II & III-A. 

234 



Allied Health Technology 

Courses — Medical Assisting 

Veterinary Medical Assisting 

MA 210 MEDICAL OFFICE LABORATORY 

PROCEDURES 4 semester hours 

Former Title: Basic Medical Laboratory Techniques 

A clinical laboratory course designed especially for the Medical Assisting 
student and/or other personnel employed in physicians' offices. Laboratory 
studies include instruction and practice in the following: drawing blood 
samples, performing red and white blood cell counts, differentials, hemo- 
globin and hematocrit determinations, blood grouping, urinalysis, and other 
special procedures relevant to office laboratory. Two hours of lecture and 
four hours of demonstrations and practice each week. Prequisite'- Medical 
Assisting student and/or permission of the instructor. Professional uniform is 
required attire. Fee $10.00. Course offered Term I only. 

MA 220 CLINICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES 3 semester hours 

Former Title: Clinical Office Practices & Procedures 

Designed to orient the medical assistant to all phases of patient care in 
the physician's examining room. Discussion of basic principles involved 
and subsequent laboratory practice in procedures relating to: assisting at 
the physical examination and minor surgery, sterilization of instruments, 
taking electrocardiograms, preparation and administration of medications. 
Fundamentals of immunology, physiotherapy. X-ray are also considered. 
Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory practice each week. 
Fee $5.00. Broward Community College approved uniform required. Pre- 
requisites Co-requisites M.A. 110, M.A. 115. Course offered Term II only. 

MA 240 PRACTICUM IN MEDICAL ASSISTING 5 semester hours 

Student assigned to physician's office, clinic, or laboratory for a total of 
ten (10) hours per week. Conference meetings will be arranged on an 
individual or group basis at a time and place to be arranged by the student 
and the coordinator. Conferences may include pertinent demonstration and 
practice sessions. Attendance at group orientation prior to assignment is 
mandatory. Professional liability insurance required for placement. Fee 
$8.50. Course offered Terms I, II, III-A, and on minimester basis during 
Terms I & II. Prerequisites: MA 110, 115, 12$, 220 and by permission 
of Practicum Coordinator. 

MA 241 ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN MEDICAL 

ASSISTING 5 semester hours 

Student is assigned to physician's offices, clinic or laboratory and may also 
rotate into various community health facilities as necessary for a total of 
ten (10) hours per week. Conference meetings and rotations will be 
arranged on a small group or individual basis by the student and coordi- 
nator. Attendance at group orientation prior to assignment is mandatory. 
Professional liability insurance required for placement. Course offered 
Terms I, II, III-A, and on minimester basis during Terms I & II. Pre- 
requisites MA 240, 210 (May be a corequisite) and/or by permission of 
Practicum Coordinator. 



VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSISTING 

Employment opportunities exist for Medical Assisting graduates in 
veterinary hospitals and clinics as well as medical practices. Students with an 
interest in veterinary medical assisting should make an appointment with 
the Medical Assisting Department Head in order to apply for a practicum 
placement with a veterinarian. If a student completes VMA 240, MA 240 

235 



Allied Health Technology 
Medical Laboratory Technology 

and MA 241 with a veterinarian, the A.S. degree will be granted in Veteri- 
nary Medical Assisting. 

MEDICAL LABORATORY PROGRAM 

The Medical Laboratory Technician program of Broward Community 
College is open to graduates of Certified Laboratory Assistant programs 
approved by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory 
Sciences (NAACLS). Applicants must satisfy requirements for admission to 
the college, submit verification of graduation from an approved CLA Pro- 
gram and verification of CLA certification. Applicants whose CLA certifica- 
tion is pending will need the recommendation of their CLA instructor. CLA 
credentials must be approved by the Medical Laboratory Technology 
Department. 

Upon meeting admission requirements and completing MLT 290 and 
MLT 292 with a grade of C or better, CLA graduates will have the thirty 
(30) MLT 100 level credits awarded. Students must complete forty-two (42) 
semester hours credit to satisfy the Associate in Science degree require- 
ments for graduation. 

Once selected for admission into the Medical Laboratory Technician 
program, students may select one of the three (3) curriculum tracks toward 
the Associate Degree. Track I is designed essentially for students not inter- 
ested in transferring to a University for further study. Track I contains 
(25) university parallel credits. Track II is designed for students desiring more 
university parallel credits than Track I. Track II contains thirty-four (34) 
university parallel credits. Track III reflects our Pre-Medical Technology 
(A. A. Degree) program as it appears in the College catalog and does not 
require the first year in the Certified Laboratory Assistant program as a 
prerequisite. Track III is designed for the student who is not interested in 
acquiring career entry skills prior to earning a Baccalaureate Degree in 
Medical Technology. 

MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Medical Labora- 
tory Technology: 

1. Completion of 72 semester hours of credit with a grade point average 
of 2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following courses in major field (no grade lower than 
"C" will be acceptable for MLT courses) 

MLT 290, 292 8 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following courses in related areas: 

MLT 170, 171, 172, 173 30 semester hours 

These courses represent a 12 month approved Certified Laboratory 
Assistant program and will be waived upon verification of certification 
as Certified Laboratory Assistant. These courses are not offered by 
the College. 

236 



Allied Health Technology 
Medical Laboratory Program 

4. Completion of the following courses in general education: 

a. Tracks I and II 

ENG 101 3 semester hours 

MTH 131 3 semester hours 

CHE 131, 132, 134 7 semester hours 

PSY 201 3 semester hours 

b. Track I only 

BIO 105, 111, 112, 113, 114, 117 10 semester hours 

ENG 103 3 semester hours 

SOC 211 3 semester hours 

c. Track II only 

ENG 102 (104) 3 semester hours 

MTH 132 3 semester hours 

CHE 133, 135 4 semester hours 

BIO 107 (or 100 and 105), 160, 161 8 semester hours 

5. Completion of two semester hours in Physical Education activities. 

6. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at the College. 

7. Remove all admission conditions. 

8. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advisement 
Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. The 
student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

10. The Medical Laboratory Technology staff reserves the right to dis- 
continue a student's enrollment at any time during the program if in 
its judgment the student does not possess the qualifications necessary 
for a career in Medical Laboratory Technology. 

MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNICIAN PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree) 

Each student must complete the following courses: 

MLT 170, 171, 172, 173 30 semester hours 

MLT 290, 292 8 semester hours 

ENG 101 3 semester hours 

MTH 131 3 semester hours 

CHE 131,132,134 7 semester hours 

PSY 201 3 semester hours 

HPR 2 semester hours 

Students may elect from the following Tracks to complete their require- 
ments: 

TRACK I 

BIO 105, 111, 112, 113, 114, 117 10 semester hours 

SOC 211 3 semester hours 

ENG 103 3 semester hours 

Total 42 semester hours 

237 



Allied Health Technology 



Courses — Medical Laboratory Technology 



TRACK II 

MTH 132 3 semester hours 

CHE 133, 135 4 semester hours 

BIO 107 (100 + 105), 160, 161 8 semester hours 

ENG 102 (104) 3 semester hours 

Total 44 semester hours 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 

MLT 170 MEDICAL LABORATORY 

TECHNOLOGY 10 semester hours 

Orientation to a career in the clinical laboratory including ethical concepts. 
General skills including weighing methods, measuring techniques, and 
solution preparation. Blood specimen collection. Basic hematology includ- 
ing: manual counting of erythrocytes, leiikocytes, platelets and eosinophils: 
differential counts; sickle cell procedures; hemoglobinometry; hemotocrits; 
erythrocyte sedimentation rates; cell counts on spinal and other body 
fluids; introduction to automated counting methods. Routinely performed 
coagulation procedures. Basic immunology including: precipitation, agglu- 
tination and flocculation tests; immunoreaction procedures; colloidal gold. 
Course includes experiences in the classroom and in a clinical facility. 

MLT 171 MEDICAL LABORATORY 

TECHNOLOGY II 10 semester hours 

Routine urinalysis including use of microscope, urinometer and refracto- 
meter. Total protein, Sulkowitz, urobilinogen, bile and pregnancy tests 
on urine. Principle of the Addis count. Occult blood. Basic chemistry 
including procedures of the following types: titrimetric, colorimetric and 
spectrophotometric; enzyme; automation; flocculation; standard preparation; 
quality control. Course includes experiences in the classroom and in a 
clinical facility. 

MLT 172 MEDICAL LABORATORY 

TECHNOLOGY III 5 semester hours 

Blood banking procedures including: grouping and typing; compatibility 
testing; component preparation; anti-human globulin techniques; donor 
selection; donor phlebotomy; identification and record keeping. Course 
includes experiences in the classroom and in a clinical facility. 

MLT 173 MEDICAL LABORATORY 

TECHNOLOGY IV 5 semester hours 

Electrocardiogram. Principle of basal metabolism rate. Techniques for 
handling infectious materials and preparation of sterile materials. Micro- 
biological procedures including: preparation of stained smears; innocula- 
tion and culturing techniques; antibiotic susceptibility testing; colony count- 
ing; handling fecal specimens for parasite investigation. Course includes 
experiences in the classroom and in a clinical facility. 

MLT 290 ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION 4 semester hours 

Operation and maintenance of the autoanalyzer, spectrophotometer, fluoro- 
meter, gasometer, densitometer, potentiometer. Coulter counter and micro- 
titrator; minor mechanical trouble-shooting; electrophoresis theory, princi- 
ples of light and electricity. Preparation of data for acquisition equipment. 

238 



Allied Health Technology 
Nursing 

4 laboratory, 2 lecture hours per week. 'Prerequisite: Satisfactory comple- 
tion of approved Certified Laboratory Assistant program and verification 
of certification. Fee $5.00. 

MLT 292 ADVANCED MEDICAL LABORATORY 

TECHNIQUES 4 semester hours 

Study of microchemistry, steriods, enzymes, protein, lipids, hemoglobin 
and toxicology. Application of theories and techniques acquired in MLT 
290 Advanced Instrumentation. In-depth study of prepared specimens in 
hematology, parasitology and microbiology. Prerequisite: MLT 290. 4 
laboratory, 2 lecture hours per week. Fee: $10.00. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING TECHNOLOGY 

Requirements for the Degree of Associate in Science in Nursing: 

1 . Completion of 70 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 or 
better. No grade lower than "C" will be acceptable on all courses 
required in the Nursing Degree. 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

English Composition 6 semester hours 

ENG 101 and 104 (102, 103) 

Social Science elective 3 semester hours 

SOC 211 3 semester hours 

PSY 201 3 semester hours 

PS Y 211 3 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following courses in the major field: (No grade 
lower than "C" will be acceptable in Nursing courses.) 

Nursing 171, 172, 181, 291, 

292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297 37 semester hours 

4. Completion of the following courses in related areas: 

Biology 10 semester hours 

BIO 105, BIO 111, 112, BIO 113, 114, BIO 117 
NTR 210 1 semester hour 

5. Completion of four semester hours in Physical Education Activities. 

6. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advise- 
ment Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 
The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

7. Remove all admission conditions. 

8. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at the College, of which 15 hours must be in nursing. (Eight of these 
must be 200 level courses.) 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

239 



Allied Health Technology 
Nursing 

10. The Department of Nursing Technology reserves the right to discon- 
tinue a student's enrollment, at any time during the program, if in 
its judgment the student does not possess the qualifications necessary 
for a nursing career. 

A brochure describing the nursing program is available on request from 
the Department of Nursing Technology. 



NURSING PROGRAM 

The Associate Degree program in Nursing is designed to prepare men 
and women for careers in nursing. The program recognizes as its purpose 
the education of persons to provide competent nursing care at the technical 
level and to contribute to the promotion of health in the community. 

The program combines studies in general education and nursing educa- 
tion at the College with selected experiences in nursing in hospitals and 
other community facilities. Nursing courses require students to spend 12 to 
30 hours per week in clinical experiences. 

Applicants must fulfill the general requirements for admission to the 
College and submit a letter of intent to the Nursing Department. The selec- 
tion of students is based upon the following additional factors: 

1 . Evidence of good physical and mental health. 

2. Satisfactory high school and college transcripts including a 2.0 
cumulative grade point average in college or nursing programs 
previously attempted. 

3. Acceptable scores on the Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test 
or satisfactory completion of appropriate courses. 

4. Acceptable letters of reference from employers, where applicable 
and letters of personal recommendation. 

5. Satisfactory interview with Department faculty upon request. 

Graduates will receive an Associate in Science in Nursing Degree which 
meets the academic requirements for eligibility to write the Florida State 
Board of Nursing examination for licensure as registered nurses. 

The Nursing Program is approved by the Florida State Board of Nurs- 
ing, is accredited by the National League for Nursing, and holds member- 
ship in the Associate Degree Council of the National League for Nursing. 



NURSING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM (A.S. Degree) 

Each student must complete the following courses: 

BIO 105 1 semester hour 

BIO 111, 112 4 semester hours 

BIO 113, 114 4 semester hours 

BIO 117 1 semester hour 

240 



Allied Health Technology 
Courses — Nursing 

*ENG 101 3 semester hours 

*ENG 104 (102, 103) 3 semester hours 

NTR 210 1 semester hour 

NUR 171 4 semester hours 

NUR 172 4 semester hours 

NUR 181 1 semester hour 

**NUR 291 4 semester hours 

**NUR 292 4 semester hours 

**NUR 293 4 semester hours 

**NUR 294 4 semester hours 

NUR 295 4 semester hours 

NUR 296 4 semester hours 

NUR 297 4 semester hours 

Social Science elective 3 semester hours 

SOC 211 3 semester hours 

HPR 4 semester hours 

PSY 201 3 semester hours 

PSY 211 3 semester hours 

'Completion of EngHsh 101 and English 103 will satisfy the requirements 
for a degree in Nursing Technology at this institution. However, students 
contemplating transfer to a university should complete English 101 and 
102 (or 104) since the other English courses listed above may not be 
acceptable for transfer credit. 

^Interchangeable courses in medical-surgical nursing. Required instructor 
approval for enrollment. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
NURSING 

NUR 171, 172 NURSING FUNDAMENTALS 4 semester hours each 

Courses encompassing theory and planned laboratory experiences to de- 
velop the fundamental knowledges and skills of nursing care for persons 
of all ages. Prerequisite or corequisites: PSY 201, BIO 111, 112, and 
BIO 105. Lab Fee $10.00 per course. 

NUR 291, 292, 293, 294 NURSING 4 semester hours each 

Interchangeable courses in medical-surgical nursing. These include the 
reactions of the human body to disease and injury during the life cycle. 
Emphasis on the promotion of health and the prevention of illness and 
on giving patient-centered nursing care in selected health problems. Pre- 
requisites: NUR 171, NUR 172 and instructor approval. Prerequisites or 
corequisites: PSY 211, BIO 113, 114 and BIO 117. 

NUR 291 4 semester hours 

Nursing care of patients with respiratory conditions. The care of children 
with selected health problems and the effects of illness on normal growth 
and development are included. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY 211. 

NUR 292 4 semester hours 

Nursing care of patients with metabolic and digestive disturbances. 

241 



Allied Health Technology 

Courses — Nursing 

Physical Therapist Assistant 

NUR 293 4 semester hours 

Nursing care of patients with disturbances of the cardiovascular and 
urinary systems. 

NUR 294 4 semester hours 

Nursing care of patients with problems of mobility and sensory impair- 
ment. 

NUR 295 NURSING 4 semester hours 

Nursing care of the mentally ill person is given primary consideration. 
Includes concepts of mental hygiene, prevention, treatment and rehabil- 
itation of the emotionally ill person. Prerequisites: NUR 171, NUR 172 
and instructor approval. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY 201. 

NUR 296 NURSING 4 semester hours 

Family centered nursing care of the mother and the newborn infant. 
Emphasis is on the physiological and emotional changes of childbearing. 
Consideration is given to factors which may complicate normal, physiolo- 
gical processes of the mother and infant. Care of the patient with gyne- 
cological problems is included. Prerequisites: NUR 171, NUR 172 and 
instructor approval. Prerequisite or corequisite: SOC 211. 

NUR 297 NURSING 4 semester hours 

A theory and laboratory course with emphasis on the care of the patient 
who is critically ill. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. Fee $6.00. 

NUR 181 NURSING 1 semester hour 

The responsibilities and relationships of the registered nurse in the pro- 
fession and in the community are explored. Consideration is given to the 
role of the nurse in current patterns of health care delivery and in those 
projected for the future. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. 



PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT PROGRAM 

The training and education of the Physical Therapist Assistant is a 
joint venture with the profession, the community, and Broward Communi- 
ty College. Men and women participating in carrying out skilled technical 
work in varied settings performing duties which are delegated to them by 
the supervising physical therapist, to aid the patient in the recovery of 
normal body functions by use of physical modalities. 

Course work is provided for currently employed aides who wish to 
obtain an Associate Degree, as well as for those students entering the field, 
and for those wishing to transfer to a four year university. 

Application for accreditation with the American Physical Therapy 
Association and the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical 
Association has been made. Licensing examinations are given by the Florida 
State Board of Professional Examiners at the completion of the two year 
program, and the Physical Therapist Assistant shall be eligible for 
an appropriate membership category in the American Physical Therapy 
Association. 

Applicants must fulfill the general requirements for admission to the 
College and submit a letter of intent to the Physical Therapist Assistant 

242 



I Allied Health Technology 

Physical Therapist Assistant 

Department. The selection of students is based upon the following additional 
factors: 

1 . Evidence of good physical and mental health. 

2. Satisfactory high school and college transcripts including a 2.0 
cumulative grade point average in college or nursing programs 
previously attempted. 

3. Acceptable scores on the Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test 
or satisfactory completion of appropriate courses. 

4. Acceptable letters of reference from employers, where applicable 
and letters of personal recommendation. 

5. Satisfactory interview with Department faculty upon request. 

Graduates will receive an Associate in Science in Physical Therapy 
Assisting. 

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Physical Therapist 
Assistant: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 70 semester hours of credit and a grade 
point average of 2.0 or better. No grade lower than "C" will be 
acceptable in all courses required in the Physical Therapist Asst. 
Degree. 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

ENG 101, 102 (103, 104) 6 semester hours 

PSY 201, 202 6 semester hours 

BIO 105, 111, 112, 113, 114, 117 10 semester hours 

HPR 151 3 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following courses in related areas: 

MA 115, 120 6 semester hours 

AH 166, 167 2 semester hours 

I EMT 183 3 semester hours 

i: 4. Completion of the following courses in major field: (No grade lower 
I than "C" will be acceptable in Physical Therapist Assistant courses). 

PT 160, 162, 170, 171, 280, 284, 290, 
^ 296, 298 30 semester hours 

5. Completion of four semester hours of Physical Education activities. 

6. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advisement 
Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. The 
student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

7. Remove all admission conditions. 

8. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at the College. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

243 



Allied Health Technology 
Physical Therapist Assistant 

10. The Physical Therapist Assistant faculty reserves the right to dis- 
continue a students enrollment at any time during the program if in 
its judgment the student does not possess the personal qualifications 
necessary for a career as a Physical Therapist Assistant. 

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT 



Term II 

170 Clinical Practices 1 3 

113, 114 Human Anatomy & 
Physiology 4 

117 Paramedical Science 
Lab 1 

166, 167 Pharmacology 2 

183 Emergency 

Medical Tech. 3 

Physical Education .1 



Total Semester Hours 18 Total Semester Hours ,14 

SUMMER TERM 

PT 162 Disabilities & Therapeutic Procedures 3 

PT 171 Clinical Practice II 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

SECOND YEAR 

Term I Tenn II 

PT 280 Applied Kinesiology 3 PT 296 Rehabilitative 

PT 290 Clinical Pracdce III 3 Procedures 3 

PT 284 Disability and Thera- PT 298 Physical Therapy 

peutic Procedures 3 Procedures 6 

■=*ENG 102, 103, or 104 3 MA 120 Oflfice Practices 3 

HPR 151 Personal Hygiene & PSY 202 Advanced General 

Community Health 3 Psychology 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours .16 Total Semester Hours 16 





FIRST 


YEAR 




Term I 






PT 


160 Introduction to 




PT 




Physical Therapy 


3 


BIO 


BIO 


111 Phys. Science & 








Microbiology 


2 


BIO 


BIO 


112 Human Anatomy 








& Phys. 


2 


AH 


BIO 


105 Modern Principles of 
Bio. Lab 


1 


EMT 


MA 


115 Medical Terminology I 


3 


HPR 


ENG 


101 Composition 


3 




PSY 


201 General Psychology 


3 




HPR 


Physical Education 


.1 





*HPR activity: It is recommended that students consider swimming, condi- 
tioning, and unarmed defense. 

'*Students contemplating transfer to a university should complete English 
101 and 102 or 104 since other English courses listed above may not be 
acceptable for transfer credit. 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

PT 160 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL THERAPY 3 credit hours 

The role of the assistant in relation to the patient, the physical therapist, 
and other members of the health team is discussed. The philosophy of 
rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities are described and demonstrated. 
Fee: $3.00. 

244 



Allied Health Technology 



Courses — Physical Therapist Assistant 
Radiologic Technology 



PT 162 DISABILITIES AND THERAPEUTIC 

PROCEDURES 3 credit hours 

Etiology, symptoms, and treatment of conditions encountered in Physical 
Medicine are discussed. Orthopedic, medical and surgical problems are 
covered in detail. 

PT 170 CLINICAL PRACTICE I 3 credit hours 

Theories and skills of hydrotherapy, radiant therapy and electrotherapy are 
taught and applied in the clinical setting. Massage and therapeutic exercise 
is included. 

PT 171 CLINICAL PRACTICE H 3 credit hours 

Application of acquired knowledge and skills in a clinical setting under 
close supervision is provided. 

PT 280 APPLIED KINESIOLOGY 3 credit hours 

Develops the students skill in palpating anatomical structures. Gives a basic 
knowledge of the laws and techniques of body mechanics. 

PT 284 DISABILITIES AND THERAPEUTIC 

PROCEDURES II 3 credit hours 

The etiology, symptoms and treatment of neuromuscular diseases is empha- 
sized. Psychiatric illness and its physical problems are discussed. Skills in 
therapy are developed. 

PT 290 CLINICAL PRACTICES HI 3 credit hours 

Supervised affiliation in a clinical setting is provided with the application 
of accumulated techniques. 

PT 296 REHABILITATIVE PROCEDURES 3 credit hours 

Principles and practices of prosthesis and other appliances are detailed. 
Fitting and evaluation is taught. 

PT 298 PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES 6 credit hours 

A practicum in hospitals and clinics and under expert supervision applying 
all learned knowledge and skills. 

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 

Requirements for the Degree of Associate in Science in Radiologic 
Technology. 

1. Completion of 69 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 
or better. 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

English Composition, ENG 101 and 104 (103) 6 semester hours 

Mathematics 171 (131) 3 semester hours 

Speech, SPE HI 3 semester hours 

Psychology 201 3 semester hours 

Medical Terminology, MA 115 3 semester hours 

BIO 111, 112, 113, 114, 117 9 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following courses in major field: (No grade lower 
than "C" will be acceptable in Radiologic Technology courses). 

XR 100, 105, 120, 125, 135, 

140, 200, 205, 210, 212, 215, 216, 230 38 semester hours 

245 



Allied Health Technology 
Radiologic Technology 

4. Completion of four semester hours in Physical Education Activities. 

5. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advise- 
ment Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 
The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

6. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at the College. 

7. Remove all admission conditions. 

8. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

9. The Radiologic Technology staff reserves the right to discontinue a 
student's enrollment, at any time during the program, if in its judg- 

" ment the student does not possess the personal qualifications necessary 
for success in a Radiologic Technology career. 

A brochure describing the Radiologic Technology program is available 
on request from the Division of Allied Health. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

The Radiologic Technology Program prepares an individual to become 
an X-Ray Technologist. Clinical work is done in local hospitals toward the 
satisfactory completion of the 28 month course. The individual will be 
eligible to take the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists examina- 
tion during the final month of internship. Registered radiologic technologists 
will find immediate employment in the many hospitals and clinics through- 
out the country. 

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

Term I Term H 

XR 100 Introduction to Radio- XR 115 Clinic A 2 

logic Technology 3 XR 120 Prin. of Radiologic 

BIO 1 1 1 Physical Science/ Experience 3 

Microbiology 2 XR 125 Topographical 

BIO 112 Human Anatomy & Anatomy 1 

Physiology 2 MA 115 Medical Terminology .3 

XR 200 Nursing Procedures 2 *ENG 103 of 104 Composition 3 

*ENG 101 Composition 3 BIO 113, 114 Human Anatomy 

*MTH College Math 171 3 and Physiology 4 

HPR Physical Education 1 BIO 117 Lab 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 18 

*Completion of English 101, English 103 and MTH 171 will satisfy the 
requirements for a degree in Radiologic Technology at this institution. 
However, students contemplating transfer to a university should complete 
English 101 and 104 and MTH 131 since the other English and math Usted 
above may not be acceptable for transfer credit. 



246 



Allied Health Technology 

Courses — Radiologic Technology 

SUMMER TERMS 
Term IH-A Term HI-B 

XR 105 Radiologic Science 3 XR 140 Clinic C 2 

XR 135 Clinic B 2 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 5 Total Semester Hours 3 



SECOND YEAR 

Term I Term H 

XR 205 Clinic D 2 XR 210 Advanced Positioning & 

XR 212 Radiologic Physics 3 Special Procedures .4 

XR 215 Radiotherapy 1 XR 230 Internship 8 
XR 216 Radioisotopes 2 

SPE 111 Public Speaking 3 Total Semester Hours 12 

PSY 201 Psychology 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 Clinic Hours: 50 weeks, 

Total Semester Hours 15 40 hrs./wk. Total 2000 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 

XR 100 INTRODUCTION TO 

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 3 semester hours 

This course sets the pace for the future technologist. The history concerning 
the discovery, development, production and use of X and Gamma radiation 
will be presented. Radiologic Technology as a chosen profession, including 
the needs, criteria and demands placed on a future technologist will be 
studied. Familiarization with hospital organization with special emphasis 
on the Department of Radiology will be stressed and other related structure, 
rules, requirements, regulations and general knowledge necessary for student 
function in the department will be covered. Fee: $2.00. 

XR 105 RADIOLOGIC SCIENCE 3 semester hours 

A detailed study of radiation hazards, effects, personnel and patient protec- 
tion methods, measurement and monitoring radiation will be presented-. 
Included are the elements of dark room chemistry, solutions and film han- 
dling. Student participation in automatic and manual processing methods 
will be emphasized. Fee $5.00. 

XR 115 CLINIC A (Positioning) 2 semester hours 

Provides the student observation and limited participation within the X-ray 
room. Film critique and panel discussion will be correlated within each 
procedure to provide interesting learning experience. Positioning classes are 
held during each procedure. Office procedure will also be included. 

XR 120 PRINCIPLES OF 

RADIOGRAPHIC EXPOSURE 3 semester hours 

Presented are the principles of Radiographic Exposure which will include 
prime factors, radiographic quality, latent image formation, radiological 
mathematics, screens, technical and tube rating charts, calibration and 
accessories. The various phenomena will be observed through practical 
experimentation with an activated X-ray lab unit and a phantom patient 
of tissue equivalent absorption power. Fee: $10.00. 

247 



Allied Health Technology 
Courses — Radiologic Technology 

XR 125 TOPOGRAPHICAL ANATOMY 1 semester hour 

Stresses anatomical reference points, the relative position of organs to 
each other and to the skeletal system. Viewing radiographs of various 
areas of the body. Discussing tissue density and positioning. Review of 
circulation to various organs as used for special procedures. Pertinent 
details of all of the body systems and functions are studied. Wherever 
applicable, pertinent pathological conditions demonstrable radiographically 
are discussed along with the anatomy of the involved area. Prerequisite: 
BIO 111, 112. Co-requisites. BIO 113, 114, 117. 

XR 135 CLINIC B (Positioning) 2 semester hours 

The student is involved in preparing the less complex selected X-ray exami- 
nations under close supervision. Film critique and lecture will reinforce 
the learning experience. 

XR 140 CLINIC C (Positioning) 2 semester hours 

Provides increased student involvement in actual performance of X-ray 
studies. Technical factors and film critique will be correlated with position- 
ing classes during the clinic. 

XR 200 NURSING PROCEDURES 

PERTINENT TO X-RAY 2 semester hours 

The fundamental principles of sterile technique related to X-ray procedures, 
the care and safety of the patient, such as wheelchairs and stretchers, will 
be emphasized. The elements of first aid in emergency patient handling are 
also present. Familiarization with equipment and procedures for its use 
within the department will be stressed. 

XR 205 CLINIC D (Positioning) 2 semester hours 

Involves student rotation into advanced radiographic operations. Diver- 
sification in the types of examinations in the Emergency, Operating and 
Fluoroscopic rooms, positioning, film critique, and technical factors run 
concurrently. 

XR 210 ADVANCED POSITIONING AND 

SPECIAL PROCEDURES 4 semester hours 

The student becomes acquainted with vascular and arterial radiography. 
The methods, equipment and contrast media which are utilized in attaining 
these examinations are correlated with the examination routine. Prerequisites: 
XR 100, 105, 120, 200. Fee $5.00. 

XR 212 RADIOLOGIC PHYSICS 3 semester hours 

A detailed study involving the fundamentals of electrical and radiation 
physics is presented. The basic principles underlying the operation of X-ray 
equipment and auxiliary devices are explained. X-ray circuitry will be dem- 
onstrated and be available to the student for individual study. The important 
concepts of radiation protection for patients and personnel are stressed. 
Prerequisite: MTH 171 or 131. 

XR 215 INTRODUCTION TO 

RADIATION THERAPY 1 semester hour 

Designed to give the diagnostic technologist an introduction to the field of 
radiation therapy. The student will explore the types of diseases which are 
receptive to radiation therapy and their treatment, while protecting the 
patient's total health. Includes the various radiation materials available, 
the necessity of treatment planning, and the special techniques required to 
deal successfully vAth these patients. 

248 



Allied Health Technology 



Special Program — Radiologic Technology 



XR 216 INTRODUCTION TO 

NUCLEAR MEDICINE 2 semester hours 

Designed to give the diagnostic and therapy technologist an introduction to 
nuclear medicine. Provides an overview of the diagnostic and therapeutic 
procedures involved in nuclear medicine. The student is shown how nuclear 
materials are obtained, why given properties of each make them valuable 
in specific examinations, and the protective measures necessary for both 
patient and technologist. The student learns the basic operation of the 
counters, scanners and cameras used in this area and observes the activities 
in the wet and dry labs. 

XR 230 INTERNSHIP 8 semester hours 

Rotating room assignments and increased skills in all areas of examinations 
will be reviewed. All previous clinics, materials, examinations and pro- 
cedures will be included within seminars. Students participation and perform- 
ance of previous skills will be applied. 40 hours weekly. (50 weeks — 2000 
hours). 

SPECIAL DEGREE PROGRAM IN 
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 

This program is designed as a course of study exclusively for the 
registered, practicing radiologic technologist. The program provides continu- 
ing education leading to the Associate in Science Degree. It fulfills the 
recommendations of national and local radiologic organizations for in-service 
training and provides access to further educational opportunities. 

Admission to this special program requires verification of current 
ARRT registration. Upon admission to the program and completion of XR 
210 and XR 260, the student will be awarded forty-four (44) credits. The 
student must complete the required twenty-four (24) credits to satisfy the 
Associate in Science degree requirements for graduation. 



SPECIAL PROGRAM— RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Radiologic 
Technology: 

1. Completion of 68 semester hours of credit with a grade point average 
of 2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following courses in major field (no grade lower 
than "C" will be acceptable for XR courses). 

XR 250, 260 6 semester hours 

3. Germane credits awarded in 

Radiologic Technology 44 semester hours 

4. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

English Composition 101, 104 (103) 6 semester hours 

MTH 171 Technical Math (131) 3 semester hours 

SPE 111 Speech 3 semester hours 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 semester hours 

EMT 183 Emergency Med. Tech 3 semester hours 

249 



Allied Health Technology 
Radiation Therapy Technology 

5. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advise- 
ment Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 
The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

6. Remove all admissions conditions. 

7. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

8. Completion of a minimum twenty-four semester hours of residency at 
the College. 

9. The Radiologic Technology staff reserves the right to discontinue a 
student's enrollment at any time during the program if in its judgment 
the student does not possess the qualifications necessary for partici- 
pation in the program. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY SPECIAL PROGRAM 

XR 250 Special Procedures 3 semester hours 

XR 260 Advanced Seminar 3 semester hours 

ENG 101 Composition 3 semester hours 

ENG 104 Composition 3 semester hours 

MTH 171 Technical Math 3 semester hours 

SPE 111 Public Speaking 3 semester hours 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 semester hours 

EMT 183 Emergency Med. Tech 3 semester hours 

Credits awarded for ARRT 44 semester hours 

Total 68 semester hours 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Special Degree Program in Radiologic Technology 
XR 250 SPECIAL PROCEDURES 3 semester hours 

A presentation of the methods and materials used for the radiographic study 
of organs and systems not routinely visualized. 

XR 260 ADVANCED RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 

SEMINAR 3 semester hours 

Seminars and lectures will be presented by radiologists, other physicians, 
and instructors with expertise in given area of radiologic technology. Em- 
phasis will be placed on keeping the technologist current in the field with 
recent developments in techniques, procedures, and equipment. 



RADIATION THERAPY 
TECHNOLOGY 

Requirements for the Degree of Associate in Science in Radiation 
Therapy Technology. 

1. Completion of 66 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 
or better. 

250 



Allied Health Technology 

Radiation Therapy Technology 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

English Composition: ENG 101 and 104(102, 103) 6 semester hours 

Mathematics: MTH 171 and 136 4 semester hours 

Speech: SPE 111 3 semester hours 

Psychology: PSY 201 3 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following Allied Health Courses: 

Medical Terminology: MA 115 3 semester hours 

Nuclear Medicine: XR 216 2 semester hours 
Anatomy & Physiology: BIO 111, 112, 113, 

114, 117 9 semester hours 

4. Completion of the following courses in major field: (No grade lower 
than "C" will be acceptable in Radiation Therapy Technology courses.) 
RTT 160, 161, 163, 165, 166, 281, 

171, 172, 291, 292 32 semester hours 

5. Completion of four semester hours in Physical Education Activities. 

6. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advisement 
Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. The 
student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

7. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at the College. 

8. Remove all admission conditions. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

10. The Radiation Therapy Technology staff" reserves the right to discon- 
tinue a student's enrollment at any time during the program, if in its 
judgment the student does not possess the personal qualifications nec- 
essary for success in a Radiation Therapy Technology career. 

A brochure describing the Radiation Therapy Technology program is 
available on request from the Division of Allied Health. 

RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

The Radiation Therapy program prepares an individual to assist the 
medical doctor specializing in this field with the management, control, and 
care of patients receiving radiation therapy. Clinical work is done in local 
hospitals. On completion of the 24 months course, the student will be eligi- 
ble to take the American Registry of Radiation Therapy Technology exami- 
nation. 

Applicants must fulfill the general requirements for admission to the 
College and submit a letter of intent to the Radiologic Technology Depart- 
ment. The selection of students is based on the following additional factors: 

1. Evidence of good physical and mental health. 

2. Satisfactory high school and college transcripts including a 2.0 
grade point average in all college courses previously attempted. 

251 



Allied Health Technology 
Courses — Radiologic Technology 



Acceptable scores on Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test or 
satisfactory completion of appropriate courses. 

Satisfactory interview with department faculty upon request. 

Acceptable letters of reference from employers, where applicable, 
and letters of personal recommendations. 



The Radiation Therapy Technology program is approved by the Council 
on Medical Education of the American Medical Association in collabora- 
tion with the American College of Radiology, and the American Society of 
Radiologic Technologists. 



RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 

(A.S. Degree) 



FIRST YEAR 



Term I 

RTT 160 Intro to Radiation 

Therapy 
RTT 165 Intro to Radiation 

Physics 
BIO 111 Physical Science/ 

Microbiology 
BIO 112 Human Anatomy & 

Phys. I 

ENG 101 Composition . . 
MTH 171 Technical Math 

or 131 
MTH 136 

XR 216 Nuclear Medicine 
HPR Physical Education 



RTT 

RTT 

RTT 
RTT 
BIO 

BIO 

BIO 

MA 



HPR 



Term II 

161 Principles of Radiation 

Ther 2 

163 Radiographic 
Procedures 2 

166 Radiation Physics 2 

171 Clinic A 2 

113 Anatomy & 
Physiology II 2 

114 Anatomy & 

Physiology III 2 

117 Lab 1 

115 Medical 

Terminology 3 

Physical Education .1 



Total Semester Hours 



1! 



Total Semester Hours 



17 



Term HI 

RTT 172 Clinic B 

HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



SECOND YEAR 
Term I Term II 

RTT 281 Advanced Radiation RTT 284 Pathology & 

Physics 4 Radiobiology 3 

RTT 291 Clinic C 2 RTT 292 Clinic D 6 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 

SPE 1 1 1 Public Speaking 3 

^ENG 103 or 104 Composition 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 9 

■'Completion of English 101, English 103 and MTH 171 will satisfy the 
requirements for a degree in Radiation Therapy Technology at this in- 
stitution. However, students contemplating transfer to a university should 
complete English 101 and 104, and MTH 131 since the other English 
and Math listed above may not be acceptable for transfer credit. 



252 



Allied Health Technology 



Radiation Therapy Certificate Program 



RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 
ONE YEAR PROGRAM 

Requirements for a certificate in Radiation Therapy Technology. 

1. Completion of 27 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 
or better. 

2. Completion of MTH 136 and, in some instances, BIO 111, 112, 113, 
114, and 117. 

3. Completion of the following courses in major fields: (No grade lower 
than "C" will be acceptable in Radiation Therapy Technology courses.) 
RTT 160, 161, 181, 182, 190, 281, 284, and 292. Students other than 
R. T.'s (A. R. R. T.) will be required to complete RTT 163. Bacca- 
laureate degree accepted students who have not had appropriate credits 
in Anatomy and Physiology must complete BIO 111, 112, 113, 114 
and 117. 

4. Remove all admission conditions. 

5. The Radiation Therapy Technology staff reserves the right to discon- 
tinue a student's enrollment at any time during the program, if in its 
judgment the student does not possess the personal qualifications neces- 
sary for success in a Radiation Therapy Technology career. 

A brochure describing the Radiation Therapy Technology program is 
available on request from the Division of Allied Health. 



RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

The Radiation Therapy Technology certificate program prepares indi- 
viduals who have certain qualifying factors to assist the Radiation Therapist 
with the management, control and care of patients receiving Radiation 
Therapy. Clinical work is done in local clinics and hospitals. On completion 
of the 12 month course the student will be eligible to take the American 
Registry of Radiation Therapy Technology examination. 

Applicants must fulfill the general requirements for admission to the 
College and submit a letter of intent to the Radiologic Technology Depart- 
ment. The selection of students is based on the following additional factors: 

1. Evidence of good physical and mental health. 

2. Satisfactory high school and college transcripts including a 2.0 
grade point average in all college courses previously attempted. 
Must be a Registered Nurse or Radiologic Technologist 
(A. R. R. T.) or have a baccalaureate degree in a related field. 

3. Satisfactory interview with department faculty upon request. 

4. Acceptable letters of reference from employers, where applicable, 
and letters of personal recommendations. 

253 



Allied Health Technology 
Courses — Radiation Therapy 

The Radiation Therapy Technology program is approved by the Coun- 
cil on Medical Education of the American Medical Association in collabo- 
ration with the American College of Radiology, and the American Society 
of Radiologic Technologists. 

RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Term I Term II 

RTT Intro to Radiation RTT 161 Principles of Radiation 2 

Therapy 3 RTT 182 Clinic Y 4 

RTT 181 Clinic X 4 RTT 281 Advanced Radiation 

RTT 190 Anatomy and Physiology Physics 4 

Self-Study 1 RTT Pathology and Radiobiology 3 

MTH 136 Math with Machines 1 

Total Semester Hours 9 Total Semester Hours 13 

Term HI 

RTT 295 Clinic Z 5 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
RADIATION THERAPY PROGRAM 

RTT 160 INTRODUCTION TO 

RADIATION THERAPY 3 semester hours 

To introduce the student to the clinical institution and the department. 
Stresses the ethics of patient-radiologist-technologist relationship, nursing 
procedures and safety precautions necessary for therapy patients, and the 
keeping of records. 

RTT 161 PRINCIPLES OF RADIATION THERAPY 2 semester hours 

Examines the principles of Radiation Therapy, the rationale of treatment, 
radiosensitivity of various tissues and tumors and the radiations used for 
each showing the necessity of fractionation and protraction consistent with 
tissue tolerance. 

RTT 163 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCESS 2 semester hours 

The fundamentals of taking and processing a radiograph as related to 
radiation therapy. 

IRTT 165 INTRODUCTION TO RADIATION 

PHYSICS 1 semester hour 

The study of the structure of matter and its interaction with radiation. 

RTT 166 RADIATION PHYSICS 2 semester hours 

The production of natural and artificial radiation. Properties and measure- 
ment of various types of radiation are studied. The necessity and means 
of protection are examined. 

RTT 190 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

SELF-STUDY 1 semester hour 

Planned to review Anatomy and Physiology by means of film loops and 
cassettes. The program may be self-paced with knowledge and comprehen- 
sion tested at various stages of the program. 

254 



Allied Health Technology 

Courses — Radiation Therapy 
Respiratory Therapy Technology 

RTT 281 ADVANCED RADIATION PHYSICS 4 semester hours 

Advanced physics of ionizing radiation including measurement, dosage, 
absorption, isodose curves, filters, radium, treatment units and planning. 
Prerequisite RTT 165, 166. 

RTT 284 PATHOLOGY AND RADIOBIOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Introduces the various types of pathology that will be encountered in 
radiation therapy. Introduces radiobiology of the cell and the various 
cellular responses to radiation as well as the physiological responses of 
the patient. 

RTT 171, 172 and 291 are practicum courses requiring a minimum of twelve 
clock hours per week in clinical experiences. RTT 292 is an internship 
requiring forty hours per week in clinical practice. 

RTT 171 CLINIC A 2 semester hours 

Introduces the student to clinical training, working under direct supervision 
by registered therapy technologists. The student becomes involved in patient 
contact and patient care procedures. 

RTT 172 CLINIC B 5 semester hours 

Continued experience in the chnical area, becoming more involved in the 
procedures and problems of patient care. Clinical techniques are acquired 
under direct supervision. 

RTT 291 CLINIC C 2 semester hours 

Continued application of knowledge and skills with the acquisition of new 
techniques. Greater variety of opportunities and exposure to a variety of 
facilities and equipment are provided. 



RTT 181 and 182 are practicum courses requiring a minimum of 24 clock 
hours per week in clinical experience. 

RTT 181 CLINIC X 4 semester hours 

Introduces the student to clinical training, working under direct supervision 
by registered therapy technologists. The student becomes involved in patient 
contact and patient care procedures. 

RTT 182 CLINIC Y 4 semester hours 

Continued application of knowledge and skills with the acquisition of new 
techniques. Greater variety of opportunities and exposure to a variety of 
facilities and equipment are provided. 

RTT 295 CLINIC Z 5 semester hours 

Advanced clinical application providing a complete range of experiences 
in a concentration of clinical hours. The student becomes totally familiar 
with and competent in all aspects of radiation therapy technology including 
problem solving and decision making. 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNOLOGY 

Requirements for the Degree of Associate in Science in Respiratory 
Therapy: 

1. Completion of 72 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 or 
better. 

255 



Allied Health Technology 
Respiratory Therapy Program 

2. Completion of the following courses in General Education: 

English composition: ENG 101, 104 (103) 6 semester hours 

Mathematics: 171 3 semester hours 

PSY 201 3 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following courses in major field: (No grade lower 
than "C" will be acceptable in Respiratory Therapy courses.) 
Respiratory Therapy 100, 105, 110, 115, 

120, 200, 210, 215, 220, 225, 230 
Total • 34 semester hours 

4. Completion of the following courses in related areas: 

Biology: BIO 105, 111, 112, 113, 114, 117 10 semester hours 

Medical Terminology: MA 115 3 semester hours 

Chemistry: CHE 107, 115 7 semester hours 

Pharmacology: AH 166, 168 2 semester hours 

5. Completion of four semester hours in Physical Education Activities. 

6. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advise- 
ment Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 
The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

7. Remove all admission conditions. 

8. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

9. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at the College including the last twelve hours. 

10. The Respiratory Therapy technology staff reserves the right to dis- 
continue a student's enrollment at any time during the program if, in 
its judgment, the student does not possess the personal qualifications 
necessary for success as a Respiratory Therapist. 

A brochure describing the Respiratory Therapy Program is available on 
request from the Division of Allied Health. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY PROGRAM 

Respiratory Therapy is concerned with the diagnosis, management, 
control, and care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities of respira- 
tion. Practicum courses require students to spend 12 to 20 hours per week 
in clinical experiences. 

Graduates of this program will receive an Associate in Science Degree 
in Respiratory Therapy. The Degree represents partial fulfillment of the 
requirements established by the National Board for Respiratory Therapy for 
writing the national registry examinations. 

Applicants must fulfill the general requirements for admission to the 
College and submit a letter of intent to the Respiratory Therapy Department. 
The selection of students is based upon the following additional factors: 

1. Evidence of good physical and mental health. 

2. Satisfactory high school and college transcripts including a 2.0 
grade point average in all college courses previously attempted. 

256 



Allied Health Technology 

Respiratory Therapy Technology 

3. Acceptable scores on the Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test 
or satisfactory completion of appropriate courses. 

4. Satisfactory interview with department faculty upon request. 

5. Acceptable letters of reference from employers, where applicable, 
and letters of personal recommendation. 

The Respiratory Therapy Program is approved by the Council on Medi- 
cal Education of the American Medical Association in collaboration with 
the American Association for Respiratory Therapy, The American College 
of Chest Physicians, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, and the 
American Thoracic Society. 

PROGRAM FOR RESPIRATORY 
THERAPY TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

Term I Term II 

RSP 100 Introduction to RSP 110 Respiratory Therapy 3 

Respiratory Therapy 3 RSP 1 1 5 Respiratory Therapy 

RSP 105 Respiratory Therapy Practicum B 3 

Practicum A 3 BIO 113, 114 Anatomy & 

BIO 105 Biology Lab 1 Physiology 4 

BIO 111, 112 Anatomy & BIO 117 Lab 1 

Physiology 4 CHE 115 Paramedical 

CHE 107 Chem. for Gen 3 Science 4 

MTH 171 Math. 3 *MA 115 Medical Terminology 3 

Total Semester Hours 17 Total Semester Hours . 18 

SUMMER TERMS 
Term IH-A or III-B 

RSP 210 Practicum C 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 4 

* Students with prior experience may, by permission of instructor, substitute 
MA 116 for MA 115. 

SECOND YEAR 

Term I Term II 

RSP 200 Cardiopulmonary RSP 215 Respiratory Therapy 

Pathophysiology 2 Respiratory Care 4 

RSP 220 Practicum D 3 RSP 225 Pulmonary Function 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 RSP 230 Respiratory Therapy 

AH 166, 168 Pharmacology 2 Practicum E 3 

RSP 120 Physiology of *ENG 103/104 Tech. Rep 3 

Respiration 4 HPR Physical Education .2 

*ENG 101 Composition 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 18 Total Semester Hours 15 

*Completion of English 101 and English 103 will satisfy the requirements 
for a degree in Respiratory Therapy Technology at this institution. How- 
ever, students contemplating transfer to a university should complete 
English 101 and 104 since the other English courses listed above may not 
be acceptable for transfer credit. 



257 



Allied Health Technology 
Courses — Respiratory Therapy 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

RSP 100 INTRODUCTION TO RESPIRATORY 

THERAPY 3 semester hours 

The student is introduced to basic American Heart Association cardio- 
pulmonary resuscitation techniques. Also, two fundamental units of study — 
infection control and patient assessment are covered followed by medical 
gas administration and humidity/aerosol therapy. 

RSP 105 RESPIRATORY THERAPY- 

PRACTICUM A 3 semester hours 

The student is orientated to the hospital's environment and the health care 
team concept. The practicum provides an opportunity for "hand on experi- 
ence" of topics being covered concurrently in the RSP 100 didactic course. 

RSP 110 RESPIRATORY THERAPY 3 semester hours 

Intermittent positive pressure breathing, chest physiotherapy, airway care, 
and mechanical ventilation are covered. Aerosol medications commonly 
administered in conjunction with IPPB are covered in this course. 

RSP 115 RESPIRATORY THERAPY- 

PRACTICUM B 3 semester hours 

Additional hospital experience is provided in conjunction with practice in 
administering IPPB, chest physiotherapy, oxygen therapy, airway care, and 
aerosol therapy, to non-critical patients. The practicum provides an oppor- 
tunity to gain experience in administering respiratory therapy modalities 
being covered concurrently in the didactic course RSP 110. 

RSP 120 RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY 3 semester hours 

Alveolar ventilation, regulation of respiration, response to oxygen and oxygen 
lack, mechanical factors of breathing and other topics fundamental to the 
understanding of respiratory disorders and their treatment are covered in 
this course. Emphasis is placed on the respiratory care that may correct or 
improve specific respiratory problems. 

RSP 200 CARDIO-PULMONARY 

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 2 semester hours 

Basic pathological processes, such as inflammation, degeneration and neo- 
plasms, are described. Specific diseases of respiration in the various sub- 
specialties; (pediatrics, obstetrics, surgery, internal medicine) are studied, 
with emphasis on pathophysiology. 

RSP 210 RESPIRATORY THERAPY- 

PRACTICUM C 3 semester hours 

Experience with all types of respiratory care modalities is provided eight 
hours a day, four days a week for six weeks during the summer terms. 
The primary emphasis is on non-critical patients. However, an orientation 
to the environment of a critical care unit is provided in this course. 

RSP 215 RESPIRATORY THERAPY- 
RESPIRATORY CARE 4 semester hours 

The topics of supportive ventilatory care and post ventilatory management 
are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationship of pathology, 
physiology, acid-base chemistry and advanced respiratory therapy techniques. 

258 



Allied Health Technology 

Courses — Respiratory Therapy, 
Continuing Education 

RSP 220 RESPIRATORY THERAPY- 

PRACTICUM D 3 semester hours 

Clinical experience in the respiratory care treatment of critical patients 
emphasizing airway care, chest physiotherapy, tracheostomy care, and 
mechanical ventilation is covered in this practicum course. The practicum 
is designed to complement the cardiopulmonary pathophysiology course 
RSP 200 offered concurrently. 

RSP 225 PULMONARY FUNCTION 3 semester hours 

Refined techniques in spirometry gas analysis, and theory of arterial blood 
gas analysis are discussed. Acid base balance and chemistry of oxygen and 
carbon dioxide transport are covered. Mass screening and other techniques 
in diagnosis of respiratory disease are given. 

RSP 230 RESPIRATORY THERAPY- 

PRACTICUM E 3 semester hours 

The last practicum course in the program, this course is designed to allow 
students to gain experience in clinical problem solving. Emphasis is placed 
on the assessment of patients with respiratory and cardiovascular dis- 
turbances and the formulation of a respiratory care plan. 



CONTINUING EDUCATION 

To meet expressed community needs, the Division of Allied Health 
Technologies will oflfer opportunities for continuing education through semi- 
nars, workshops, and special educational programs. The Division of Allied 
Health Technologies faculties recognize their responsibilities to provide com- 
munity service to assist allied health practitioners to adapt to their changing 
roles in today's society. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CED 200 CONCEPTS OF RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

IN NURSING 3 semester hours 

Provides in-depth insight into the fundamentals of respiratory therapy. 
Relates respiratory therapy to total patient care emphasizing uses of 
therapeutic agents and equipment. 

CED 290 CORONARY CARE NURSING 9 semester hours 

A comprehensive cardiac course to review and add to the scientific knowl- 
edge needed by the coronary care nurse in the practice of her art. Specific 
skills and competencies shall be developed in the use of equipment and 
methods of care. Guidelines shall be presented for the development of 
individualized nursing care plans and for teaching and guiding other 
members of the health care team in the effective application of the 
concepts of coronary care. Designed to foster an attitude of striving for 
excellence in knowledge, method, and technique. Developed by the Florida 
Regional Medical Program as a standard coronary care course. Certificate 
awarded upon successful completion. Registration is selective and open 
only to those persons who are eligible to take or have taken the licensing 
examination for registered professional nurse. 

259 



Allied Health Technology 
Emergency Medical Technology 

CED 287 NURSING CARE OF THE CRITICAL 

PATIENT 4 semester hours 

This course concentrates on concepts of intensive care nursing. The initial 
assessment of the critically ill patient, instruction on fluids and electrolytes, 
acid-base balance, and blood gases will be included, with related anatomy, 
physiology, pathology, and specific nursing procedures. 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

These courses are designed primarily for persons engaged in emergency 
medical services although persons with a general interest in emergency 
care may be admitted into EMT 180. Persons who intend to write the 
State Registry Examination must take all EMT courses for credit. 

Persons completing the basic Emergency Medical Technician program 
(EMT 185) with a grade of "C" or better will be eligible to write the Flor- 
ida State Division of Health Emergency Medical Technician Registry 
Examination. 

The EMT staff reserves the right to discontinue a student's enrollment 
at any time during the program if, in its judgment, the student does not 
possess the personal qualifications necessary for success as an Emergency 
Medical Technician. 

Requirements for admission to EMT 182: 

1. Current or intended employment in emergency medical capacity. 

2. Allied Health personnel experienced in emergency care. 

3. Persons for whom State Certification is required. 

4. Satisfactory completion of EMT 181. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

EMT 180 EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE 3 semester hours 

Introductory survey of emergency medical services including medical/ 
legal aspects; techniques of CPR; emotional trauma, laboratory applica- 
tion of skills and procedures involved in life threatening emergencies as 
seen in daily living. Designed to acquaint persons in the community with 
emergency medical techniques; does not qualify the student for certifica- 
tion as an EMT. 

EMT 183 E.M.T. FOR ALLIED HEALTH 3 semester hours 

Introductory survey of emergency medical services including medical/ 
legal aspects; techniques of CPR; emotional trauma; laboratory applica- 
tion of skills and procedures involved in life threatening emergencies as 
seen in hospitals, medical and dental offices and daily living. Designed 
to acquaint the student with emergency medical techniques; does not 
qualify the student for certification as an EMT. Registration for this 
course is limited to students enrolled in Allied Health programs. 

260 



Allied Health Technology 



Courses — Emergency Medical Technology 



EMT 185 BASIC EMERGENCY 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 4 semester hours 

Introductory survey of emergency medical services including medical/ 
legal/ethical aspects; techniques of CPR; emotional trauma and theoretical 
discussion of medical and surgical emergencies. Includes study and 
practical application of skills and procedures involving life threatening 
emergencies in the following clinical settings: emergency room, respira- 
tory care, and on rescue vehicles. Designed to meet the State's require- 
ments for EMT I certification examination and the American Heart 
Association standards for basic CPR certification. Admission to this 
course requires departmental approval. Liability insurance is required 
(fee — $8.50). Health insurance recommended. Prerequisite: American 
Red Cross Standard First Aid Certificate. Corequisite: completion of 
National Safety Council Defensive Driving Examination. 

This course is designed and limited to those individuals actively working, 
or intending to work, in emergency service. 

EMT 120 EMERGENCY MEDICAL 

TECHNICIAN REVIEW 1 semester hour 

A twenty hour course designed to review the basic knowledge and skills 
of emergency care, and to introduce the student to current methods, use 
of new equipment and changes in medico-legal aspects of emergency 
medical care. 

EMT 281 ADVANCED EMERGENCY MEDICAL 

TECHNOLOGY IH 4 semester hours 

Advanced course for the State certified emergency medical technician for 
instruction in clinical techniques of life supportive care. Under professional 
medical and nursing supervision, planned experiences in intravenous ad- 
ministration and the techniques of electronic monitoring and defibrillation 
are provided. The pharmacology of drugs used in emergencies, life-threaten- 
ing arrhythmias and their treatment, the assessment of patients in shock 
and their supportive management are covered. Prerequisites: EMT 181, 
State EMT certification; interview, and/or testing as required. 

EMT 282 CLINICAL EMERGENCY MEDICAL 

TECHNOLOGY IV 4 semester hours 

Advanced course stressing practical application of clinical knowledge and 
skills under close medical supervision. Provides for directed experiences 
in local hospitals and field experiences in emergency vehicles. Satisfactory 
completion requires written verification by the physician supervisor. A 
Certificate of Achievement will be awarded upon successful completion. 
Provides eligibility for Broward County licensure and State certification. 
Prerequisite: EMT 281. 

GROUP LIVING HOME MANAGEMENT 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

This program is designed to train persons in the management of group 
living homes and in the basic care of retarded or disturbed persons in their 
charge. 

Admission to the program is by referral and special selection. The 
program is offered in three consecutive eight week segments. Students will 
receive didactic instruction in the elements of group home management and 

261 



Allied Health Technology 

CoMrses — Group Living Management 

Nutrition 

participate in clinical experiences for practical application of knowledge and 
techniques. 

Successful completion of the curriculum will award the student a 
certificate of achievement in group home management and will qualify the 
individual to function as a group living home operator. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
GROUP LIVING HOME MANAGEMENT 

GLH 160 ORIENTATION TO GROUP 

HOME MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Examines the concepts of the group living home in terms of purposes 
and goals, regulatory agencies, community resources, and trends in ex- 
ceptional child care. Provides a study of normal and exceptional growth 
and development, discipline and behavior management, group process and 
coping skills. Health care of the exceptional person, management of 
medical problems, medical/legal aspects" are studied as are communication 
skills and human relations. 

GLH 170 PRACTICUM IN GROUP HOME 

MANAGEMENT 3 semester hom-s 

Provides in-depth involvement through practical application of knowledge 
and skills in selected group homes and related clinical agencies. Reinforce- 
ment of learning is provided through weekly seminars on campus. Provides 
64 clock hours of practicum; 15 seminar hours. Prerequisite: GLH 160. 

GLH 162 GROUP HOME MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Examines administration responsibihties and management skills required 
in the development and operation of a group home. Students continue in 
practicum on a prescription basis. Continued personal reinforcement 
through group sessions is provided. Provides 32 clock hours of practicum; 
24 class hours. Prerequisite: GLH 170. 



ALLIED HEALTH COURSES 

Allied Health courses are designed to provide instruction in the many 
aspects of health care common to the disciplines within the allied health 
technologies. 



NUTRITION 

This course is designed specifically for students enrolled in Allied 
Health programs. Other students may enroll only by permission of the 
Division Chairman. 

NTR 210 NUTRITIONAL DIET MODIFICATIONS 1 semester hour 

A summary of normal nutritional components and their usage as building 
blocks in the modification of disease processes by special diet therapy. A 
survey of special diets and servings is included. Required for nursing, 
dental and medical assisting students. Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: BIO 111, 
112, or 113, 114. Course offered Terms, I, II, III-A. 

262 



Allied Health Technology 

Courses — Terminology, Pharmacology 

TERMINOLOGY 

AH 116 SPECIAL TERMINOLOGY 1 semester hour 

Emphasis is placed on the building of specific terms from word parts 
with pronunciation sessions in the language laboratory to develop com- 
petency. Prerequisite: MA 115 (Medical Terminology). 

PHARMACOLOGY 

These courses are designed specifically for students to be enrolled in the 
Allied Health programs. Basic principles of pharmacology are discussed as 
related to specific medical orientation. 

AH 166, 167, 168 — to run sequentially — 

Prerequisites: MA 115 and BIO 111, 112. Audiovisual aids are used for 
reference. A course designed to prepare Allied Health students in the 
fundamentals of pharmacology as related to their career fields. 

AH 166 PHARMACOLOGY I 1 semester hour 

The classification of drugs and their effects on the human body are 
discussed. Dosage and solution is included. 

AH 167 PHARMACOLOGY II 1 semester hour 

Pharmacological contraindications and reactions are described. The ad- 
ministration of medications is detailed. 

AH 168 PHARMACOLOGY HI 1 semester hour 

Specific therapy as applied in special allied health fields is surveyed. 
Required for Respiratory Therapy students. 



263 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 
AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY 

Air Traffic Controller 
Aviation Administration 
Career Pilot 

AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION 

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 

CONTRACTING AND CIVIL ENGINEERING 

DATA PROCESSING 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

ELECTRONICS 

Electronic Technology 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

Candidates for the Associate of Science Degree in Engineering Tecli- 
nology Programs are required to complete the following: 

1. Completion of 66 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 or 
above. 

2. General Education Courses: 
COMMUNICATIONS 

English 6 semester hours 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 3 semester hours 

* SCIENCE AND MATH 

Mathematics 7 semester hours 

Physics 4 semester hours 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 4 semester hours 

3. **ELECTIVES (Approved by Advisor) 6 semester hours 

4. Completion of courses in a 

selected major field 36 semester hours 

5. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at Broward Community College, including the last twelve semester 
hours. 

6. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advise- 
ment Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 
The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

7. Remove all admission conditions. 

8. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

* Students enrolled in Data Processing may substitute any 3 hour Science 
course for the Physics requirements. For students enrolled in the Business 
Option, BA-150, Math 131 and STA-221 will satisfy the math require- 
ments. 
**Electives should be in the major field of endeavor, job related to the 
chosen occupation, or a strong desire of the student to increase his knowl- 
edge of ability to perform. 

265 



Engineering Technology 
Aviation Administration Program 

Those students desiring to continue their education toward a Bachelor's 
Degree should enroll in Math 132 and 133 instead of the technical courses, 
MTH 171 and 172; and Physics 201 and 202 instead of PHY 130 and 131. 

Completion of ENG 095 and ENG 103 will satisfy the requirements 
for a degree in Engineering Technology at this institution. However, students 
contemplating transfer to a four-year institution should complete ENG 101 
and 104 since the other English courses listed above may not be acceptable 
for transfer credit. 090 Series of courses will not be accepted for elective 
courses in the Engineering Technology programs. 



AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY 
AVIATION ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 

The Aviation Administration program is designed for the student who 
would like to work in the aviation industry, but not primarily as a pilot. 
Selected theoretical aviation courses, to provide a broad base of aviation 
knowledge, are provided together with general business management and 
specialized aviation management courses. 



PROGRAM FOR AVIATION ADMINISTRATION (A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 



Term I 

AER 115-Aeronautical Science 
AER 11 6-Navigation Science I 

AER 171-Primary Flight 

ENG 101 -Composition 

MTH 132-Pre-Calculus Math I 
HPR-Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



Term II 

3 AER 120-Meteorology 3 

3 ENG 102-Composition 3 

.3 Elective 3 

.3 PSC 121-National Govt 3 

3 MTH 134-Pre-Calculus Math II 3 

1 HPR-Physical Education 1 

16 Total Semester Hours 16 



Term III-A 

AER 260-Airport Management 
PSC 122-State and Local 
Government 
Total Semester Hours 



SECOND 
Term I 

AER 270-Airline Marketing 3 

ECO 251-Prin. of Economics 3 

BA 22 1-Prin. of Accounting 3 

Elective 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

MTH 136-Math with Machines 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 

Suggested Elective: Humanities 



YEAR 

Term II 

AER 225-Air Carrier 

Management 3 

ECO 252-Prin. of Economics 3 

BA 222-Prin. of Accounting 3 

PHY 130-Physics 3 

PHY 131-Physics Lab .1 

HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 



NOTE: In the Aviation Administration program, Business Administration 
and Economics courses, as well as Aviation courses, are considered 
to be in the major field. 



266 



Engineering Technology 
Career Pilot Program 

CAREER PILOT PROGRAM 

The Career Pilot Program provides both the flight and ground school 
required for the private and commerical pilot certificates with instrument 
rating. The graduate of this course of study receives an Associate of Science 
Degree in Aerospace Technology. The average of the students' final grades 
in AER-115 and 116 must be 80 or more in order for him to be eligible 
to take the FAA written examination for private pilot. The average of his 
final grades in AER-125, 140, and 205 must be 80 or more in order for 
him to be eligible to take the FAA written examination for commercial 
pilot. The average of his final grades in AER-120, 200 and 210 must be 
80 or more in order for him to be eligible to take the FAA written exami- 
nation for an instrument rating. 



PROGRAM FOR CAREER PILOT (A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

Term I Term II 

AER 1 15-Aeronautical Science 3 AER 120-Meteoroiogy 3 

AER 116-Navigation Science I 3 AER 125-Aerodynamics 3 

AER 17 l-Primary Flight 3 AER 292-Intermediate Flight 3 

ENG 095 or ENG 101 Elective 3 

Communications 3 MTH 172-Technical 

MTH 171 -Technical Algebra 3 Trigonometry 3 

HPR-Physical Education 1 HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 



Term III-A 

AER 140-Engines and 

Aircraft Structures 3 

ENG 103-Technical Report 

Writing 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

SECOND YEAR 

Term I Term II 

AER 200-Navigation Science II 3 AER 210-Instrument Flight 

AER 205-Aeronautical Science Theory 3 

Safety 3 AER 294-All Weather Flight .3 

AER 293-Advanced Flight 3 PSC 121-National Govt 3 

PHY 130-Physics 3 Elective 3 

PHY 131-Physics Lab 1 MTH 136-Math with Machines 1 

HPR-Physical Education 1 HPR-Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours .14 Total Semester Hours 14 

Suggested Electives: 

AER 233, 234, 235; DP 101 and DP 110. *SPA 101 and SPA 102; BA 

100 and BA 260; BA 100 and SPE 100 or other courses with department 

approval. 

*Two terms of any one language may be substituted for SPA 101 and 102. 

267 



Engineering Technology 

Air Traffic Controller Program 

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER PROGRAM 

This is a four year co-operative education program to be taken at this 
college, at Florida International University, and with work periods at an 
FAA air Traffic Control facility. It is available to a limited number of 
selected students. After completion of approximately 30 semesters hours 
of work at BCC, the student will apply to the FAA for acceptance into 
the program. Selection will be on a competitive basis and students not 
selected should not continue the ATC program. Those selected will continue 
and begin taking courses at FIU as well as BCC. Two on-the-job training 
work periods are provided with the FAA, during which the student is paid 
at regular civil service rates by the U.S. Government. No actual flight 
training is required. Students are encouraged to take AER 171, Primary 
Flight, as an elective. Students should contact the co-operative education 
office during their first semester of enrollment. Upon satisfactory completion 
of the four year program the student receives an Associate in Science degree 
from this institution as well as a Baccalaureate degree from Florida Inter- 
national University. 



Term I 

AER 115 Aero Science 
AER 116 Nav Science I 
ENG 101 Communication 
PSC 121 National Govt. 
Humanities Elective 
HPR Physical Education 



Total Semester Hour.s 



FIRST YEAR 

Term II 

3 AER 150 Introduction to Air 
3 Traffic Mgmt. . 3 

3 ENG 104 Tech Report Writing .3 
3 MTH 171 Tech Algebra 3 

3 MTH 136 Math with Machines 1 

1 Humanities Elective 3 

Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

16 Total Semester Hours 17 



SCREENING AND SELECTION BY FAA 

After selection by the FAA the student will take courses at both FIU 
and BCC. The exact scheduling will vary according to the time of year. 
Additional courses required at BCC are as follows: 

AER 120 Meteorology 3 semester hours 

AER 125 Aerodynamics 3 semester hours 

AER 200 Navigation Science II 3 semester hours 

AER 205 Aero Science Safety 3 semester hours 

AER 210 Instrument Flight Theory 3 semester hours 

AER 227 Directed Studies in Air Traffic Control 3 semester hours 

MTH 172 Trigonometry 3 semester hours 

PHY 130 Physics 3 semester hours 

PHY 131 Physics Lab 1 semester hour 

SPE 100 Introduction to Speech 3 semester hours 

CWS 201 Work experience 3 semester hours 

HPR Physical Education 2 semester hours 

Students can determine courses required for graduation at FIU from 
that institution. The Aerospace Department at BCC maintains a current list 
of the FIU required courses. 



268 



Engineering Technology 
Courses Aerospace 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
AEROSPACE 

AER 115 AERONAUTICAL SCIENCE 3 semester hours 

The theory of flight. Elementary aerodynamics. The major components 
of airplanes and their function. The pertinent Federal Aviation Agency 
Regulations. An introduction to meteorology, both weather phenomena 
and reading and understanding teletype weather data and weather maps. 

AER 116 NAVIGATIONAL SCIENCE I 3 semester hours 

The use of computers in the solution of basic navigation problems, aero- 
nautical charts, pilot techniques. An introduction to the use of the Airman's 
information Manual and radio navigation aids. 

AER 120 METEOROLOGY 3 semester hours 

A study of the basic concepts of meteorology, temperature pressure, mois- 
ture, stability, clouds, air masses, fronts, thunderstorms, icing, and fog. 
Analysis and use of weather data; interpretation of the U.S. Weather 
Bureau maps, reports and forecasts. Prerequisite: AER 115, or private 
pilot's license. 

AER 125 AERODYNAMICS 3 semester hours 

An analysis of the physical laws and aerodynamic principles which govern 
the flight and performance of aircraft stability and control, weight and 
balance, and aircraft instruments afl'ecting flight. Operational considerations 
of controllable pitch propellers, retractable gear, weather, and precision 
maneuvers. Prerequisite: AER 115, or private pilot's license. 

AER 140 AIRCRAFT ENGINES, 

STRUCTURES, AND SYSTEMS 3 semester hours 

Aircraft engine types and theory of operation. Theory, materials and con- 
struction methods of aircraft structures. Operations of hydraulic, electrical, 
fuel, pressurization, and anti-icing, heating and instrument systems, includ- 
ing sources of power for their operation. Prerequisite: AER 115 or private 
pilot license. 

AER 150 INTRODUCTION TO 

AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

History of the development of Air Traffic in the U.S. Federal Agencies 
concerned with Air Traffic and their functions. Federal Air Navigation 
Systems, Aircraft performances as related to traffic control. Aircraft 
recognition and characteristics. Communications related to traffic control. 
Pertinent regulations and publications. 

AER 171 PRIMARY FLIGHT 3 semester hours 

This course provides the flight training and experience required by the FAA 
for a Private Pilot Certificate. As a minimum it will provide the training 
required by par. 3 and 4 of Appendix A to Part 141 of the FAR. It will 
consist of a minimum of 50 flying hours, no more than 5 of which may 
have been in an FAA approved pilot ground trainer. Corequisite: AER 
115 and 116. Fee: See section on student fees under General Information 
in this catalog. 

AER 200 NAVIGATION SCIENCE II 3 semester hours 

Methods and procedures for the solution of advanced pilotage and dead 
reckoning problems. Functioning, capabilities, and limitations of radio 
navigation systems. The use of radio as a primary air navigation means. 

269 



Engineering Technology 
Courses — Aerospace 

The use of Sectional Charts, Enroute Low Altitude Charts and The Air- 
man's information Manual. Prerequisite: AER 116 or a private pilot's 
license. MTH 171 and MTH 172, or MTH 132 and MTH 133. 

AER 205 AERONAUTICAL SCIENCE SAFETY 3 semester hours 

Orientation on Federal organizations involved with aviation safety. Man's 
physical limitations and the effects of flight on the human body. Con- 
siderations of severe weather phenomena and inflight emergencies. Federal 
Aviation Regulations pertaining to the commercial pilot. Prerequisite: AER 
115 or private pilot's license. 

AER 210 INSTRUMENT FLIGHT THEORY 3 semester hours 

Physiological factors involved with instrument flying. The functioning of 
basic flight instruments and their use in controlling aircraft under instru- 
ment conditions. Electronic Aids and their use. Communications facilities 
and equipment. The airways system, air traffic control facilities and pro- 
cedures as related to instrument flight. Flight planning, Enroute Charts, 
Area Charts, SID Charts, STAR Charts, Instrument Approach Procedure 
Charts. Prerequisite: AER 200 or commercial pilot's license. 

AER 225 AIR CARRIER MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

A study of Federal laws concerned with air transportation. Organizational 
and financial considerations of the corporate body. Equipment handling 
and its economic usage. Aircrew scheduling and personnel management. 
Maintenance and other ground support activities. The profit motive and 
its relationship with fixed and operating costs. 

AER 227 DIRECTED STUDIES IN 

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL 3 semester hours 

This course is available only to Air Traffic Control students participating 
in a Cooperative Education Program with the Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration. Students will be prepared for and take the Employer Indoctrination 
Course, Control Tower Operator, and the Limited Aviation-Weather Re- 
porting Examinations. Credit will be based upon examination grades as 
reported by the Federal Aviation Administration to the Cooperative Educa- 
tion Department. 

AER 233 FLIGHT SIMULATOR TRAINING 1 semester hour 

A total of 15 hours of training in a flight simulator. Material covered 
includes: basic instruments, VOR procedures, ADF procedures. The course 
should normally be taken with AER 231 or 232. Fee: See section on 
student fees under General Information in this catalog. Offered at Ft. 
Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, and Ft. Lauderdale Executive 
Airport. 

AER 234 FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR TRAINING 2 semester hours 

The flight and ground instruction to train a commercial pilot to be a 
flight instructor. Consists of the number of dual and solo flying hours, 
and oral instruction required in each case to qualify the individual for an 
FAA Flight Instructor certificate. In no case less than a total of 25 flying 
hours. Students must get FAA certificate in order to receive credit for 
the course. Prerequisite: Commerical pilot certificate. Fee: See section on 
student fees under General Information in this catalog. Offered at Ft. 
Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport and Ft. Lauderdale Executive 
Airport. 

270 



Engineering Technology 
Courses Aerospace 

AER 235 MULTI-ENGINE TRANSITION 1 semester hour 

Nine hours of dual flight instruction, one hour of solo flying, and five 
hours of oral instruction covering training in operation of multi-engine 
airplanes. Students must obtain FAA multi-engine rating in order to 
receive credit. Prerequisite: Private pilots license. Fee: See section on 
student fees under General Information in this catalog. Offered at Ft. 
Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport and Ft. Lauderdale Executive 
Airport. 

AER 260 AIRPORT MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Compliance with Federal requirements and cooperation with Federal sup- 
porting agencies. Acquisition and direction of ground support activities. 
Organization and development of facilities and space utilization. Service 
and sales. Fixed and operating costs and other financial considerations. 

AER 270 AIRLINE MARKETING 3 semester hours 

An analysis of markets suitable to air transportation. The psychology of 
salesmanship. Economic considerations of delivery schedules and their 
relationships to personnel costs and customer inventories. Passenger-mile 
costs and ton-mile costs and their bearing on profits. Operation of travel 
agencies and freight forwarding companies and their relationships with 
scheduled airlines. 

AER 292 INTERMEDIATE FLIGHT 3 semester hours 

This course continues the training and experience begun in Primary Flight, 
and together with AER 293 and AER 294 provides the aeronautical 
experience required to qualify for the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate 
with Instrument Rating. It will consist of a minimum of 45 flying hours, 
no more than 10 hours of which may have been in an FAA approved 
pilot ground trainer. Prerequisite AER 171 or POL Fee: See section on 
student fees under General Information in this catalog. 

AER 293 ADVANCED FLIGHT 3 semester hours 

This course continues the training and experience of Intermediate Flight. 
Together with AER 292 and AER 294 it provides the aeronautical experi- 
ence required for the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument 
Rating. During this course the student achieves qualification in high per- 
formance aircraft. It will consist of a minimum of 45 flying hours, no 
more than 10 hours of which may have been in an FAA approved pilot 
ground trainer, and will provide the instruction and practice required by 
par. (b)(3) and 3 (c)(3) of Appendix D to Part 141 of the FAR. Pre- 
requisite: AER 292 or POL Fee: See section on student fees under General 
Information in this catalog. 

AER 294 ALL WEATHER FLIGHT 3 semester hours 

This is the final of the series of courses designed to provide the aeronauti- 
cal experience for a FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument 
Rating. As a minimum it will provide the aeronautical experience, flying 
hours, and cover the subject matter specified in par. 3 of Appendix C to 
Part 141 of the FAR. In order to receive credit for this course the student 
must have accumulated a total of at least 190 hours of flight training, no 
more than 40 hours of which may have been in an FAA approved pilot 
ground trainer. Prerequisite: AER 293 or POL Fee: See section on student 
fees under General Information in this catalog. 

271 



Engineering Technology 



Courses — Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 



PROGRAM FOR AIR CONDITIONING AND 
REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 

This program is designed to give the post high school student the 
skills and knowledge for assisting the professional engineer in the design 
and application of equipment for residential and commercial systems. 

Students can prepare for engineering technology design, job site super- 
vision, equipment manufacturing, laboratory testing or system sales. 

AIR CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY 
(A.S. Degree in Engineering Technology) 



FIRST YEAR 





First Term 






AIC 


161 Introduction to Air 




AIC 




Conditioning 


3 


ELS 


ELS 


100 Electrical 








Fundamentals I 


3 


MTH 


MTH 


171 Technical Algebra 


3 


MTH 


ME 


100/101 Mechanical 




ENG 




Drawing 


3 


HPR 


ENG 


101 Composition 


3 




HPR 


Physical Education 


1 




Total Semester Hours 


16 


T 



Second Term 

111 Heat Transfer 3 

101 Electrical 

Fundamentals II 3 

172 Technical Trigonometry 3 
191 Slide Rule Operations 1 

104 Composition 3 

Physical Education .1 



Total Semester Hours 



14 



Term III-A 

AIC 173 Fluid Dynamics 4 

AIC 174 Air Distribution Draftmg 2 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 





First Term 






AIC 


275 Conditioning Systems 




AIC 




Design 


3 




AIC 


276 Control Systems 


3 


AIC 


ELS 


270 Industrial Controls I 


4 




PHY 


130 Physics 


3 


AIC 


PHY 


131 Physics Lab. 


1 


PSC 



HPR Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



15 



Second Term 
274 Centrifugal 
Refrigeration 
272 Estimating and System 

Troubleshooting 

277 Design Project 

121 National Government 

HPR Physical Education 

Elective 

Total Semester Hours 



16 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION 

AIC 161 INTRODUCTION TO AIR 

CONDITIONING 3-0-3 semester hours 

This course covers the basic science required in the study of air conditioning 
and refrigeration. The concepts of heat, temperature, heat transfer by 
radiation, conduction and convection, absolute properties of pressure and 
temperature are discussed. Psychometric properties of air, fluid flow, and 
basic refrigeration machinery pumps and blowers are studied. The course 
acquaints the student with areas that he will study in depth later. Prereq- 
uisite or corequisite: MTH 092 or MTH 171. 



272 



Engineering Technology 



Courses — Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 



AIC 172 HEAT TRANSFER 2-2-3 semester hours 

Basic heat transfer is studied in steady state and nonsteady state conditions. 
The study of conduction through composite sections and circular cross 
sections is emphasized. Film coefficients, conductivity, convection (forced 
and natural) and their effect on heat transfer is discussed. Special emphasis 
is on building construction heat transfer coefficients and calculation of 
total effective temperature difference. Prerequisite: 

AIC 173 FLUID DYNAMICS 3-1-4 semester hours 

This course is the study of the flow of fluids and gases. Fan laws and 
pump laws are studied and velocity, turbulent, nonturbulent & uniform flow 
and the effects of temperature, density and viscosity on fluid flow 
are studied. Duct sizing, pipe sizing and special emphasis on refrigeration 
pipe sizing, velocity pressure, static pressure, and pressure drop are in- 
cluded. Prerequisite: AIC 172. 

AIC 174 AIR DISTRIBUTION DRAFTING 1-2-2 semester hours 

This course applies the techniques of duct sizing and air distribution studied 
in AIC 173. Practical layout of ducting and piping systems and use of 
industry standards will be presented. Selection and sizing of components 
will be included. 

AIC 272 ESTIMATING AND SYSTEMATIC 

TROUBLE ANALYSIS 2-2-3 semester hours 

Estimation of job costs from plans and specifications. Previous design 
projects for cost estimation will be used whenever possible. Determination 
of system malfunction from design considerations and also mechanical 
system malfunctions analysis using instrumentation and intuitive reasoning. 
Prerequisite: AIC 172. 

AIC 274 CENTRIFUGAL REFRIGERATION 3-0-3 semester hours 

Use of centrifugal refrigeration for large building and industrial refrigeration 
systems. Types of systems for economical usage, consideration of high 
velocity, dual duct systems, controls and mixing boxes are included. Use of 
plans to provide application of equipment. 

AIC 275 AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM 

DESIGN 1-3-3 semester hours 

This course applies the information studied in AIC 161, 172, and 173. 
Selection of system components used in the mechanical systems of buildings. 
Calculation of building heat loads, sizing of ducts and piping based upon 
actual construction projects. The needs of the occupants of the building 
and the economics of alternate systems are considered. 

AIC 276 CONTROL SYSTEMS 3-0-3 semester hours 

Theory and operation of control used in refrigeration and air conditioning 
systems. Determination of control media and measurement of temperature 
pressure, flow in closed and open loop system. Theory of basic servo- 
mechanisms and description of electrical, electronic and pneumatic systems 
are included. Prerequisites: AIC 275. 

AIC 277 DESIGN PROJECT 1-4-3 semester hours 

This course is a directed independent study project. The objective is to 
allow students as much freedom as possible in selection of an air condi- 
tioning problem or project. Visits to job sites, collecting of manufacturer's 
information and literature research will be included. Prerequisite: All 
required AIC Courses. 

273 



Engineering Technology 
Architectural Program 

ELS 100 ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS I 2-2-3 semester hours 

Basic Circuit Theory, Magnetism, Capacitance, Inductance, Introduction to 
Alternating Currents. Prerequisite or corequisite: MTH 092 or MT 171. 

ELS 101 ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS U 2-2-3 semester hours 

Electrical Machinery, Polyphase Circuits and Electricity for A/C and 
refrigeration. Prerequisite: ELS 100. 



ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAM 
PROGRAM FOR ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 

(A.S. Degree) 

Provides a student with the necessary basic concepts and practices 
employed in the architectural field today. Special problem solving situations 
qualify the student for special areas, such as architectural drafting, specifi- 
cation writing, pictorial presentations, model presentation and planning and 
estimating. 



ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAM 
PROGRAM FOR ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 

(A.S. Degree) 



FIRST YEAR 



Term I 

ARC 110 Architectural 

Drafting I 

ARC 111 Architectural 

Drafting Lab I 
ARC 215 Architectural 

Communications I . 
ENG 101 Composition 
MTH 171 Technical Algebra 
HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



.3 

3 

3 

.1 

13 



Term II 



ARC 216 Architectural 

Communications II 
ENG 103 Technical Report 

Writing 

^Elective 

MTH 172 Technical Trig. 
PHY 130 Physics 
PHY 131 Physics Lab 
HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



.3 
.3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
17 



Term IH-A 

ARC 212 Materials & Methods 

of Construction 3 

CC 250 Surveying 1 

CC 251 Surveying Lab 2 

Total Semester Hours 6 



274 



Engineering Technology 

Courses — Architectural Technology 

SECOND YEAR 

Term I Term II 

ARC 210 Architectural ARC 230 Architectural 

Drafting II 1 Drafting III 1 

ARC 211 Architectural ARC 231 Architectural Drafting 

Drafting Lab II 2 Lab III 2 

CC 200 Strength of Materials 2 CC 240 Construction Planning & 

CC 201 Strength of Materials Estimating 3 

Lab 1 CC 210 Mechanical & 

**Electives 6 Electrical Systems 3 

MTH 136 Math with Machines 1 ME 204 Principles of Industrial 

HPR Physical Education 1 Engineering 3 

PSC 121 National Government 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 Total Semester Hours 16 

* Suggested Electives: 

LST 260 Landscape Design 
ART 106 Basic Design 
BA 100 Introduction to Business 
** Suggested Electives: 

CC 292 Land Surveying 

CC 230 Structural Design 

ME 104 Safety & Health Standards 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 

ARC 110 ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING I 1-0-1 semester hour 

This course offers the student basic knowledge of architectural drawing with 
emphasis placed on residential construction and building techniques. 
Methods of showing plans, elevations, sections, riser diagrams, dimensioning 
and perspectives are covered. Zoning and local building codes are studied. 
Must be taken concurrently with ARC 111. 

ARC 111 ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 

I LAB 0-3-2 semester hours 

Will give the student an opportunity to put into practice those basic 
essentials of residential design and construction. Reproduction techniques 
utilized by local architects will be experienced by the student throughout 
this lab. Also student visitation to local architectural offices will be included 
to better familiarize the student with practices and techniques employed by 
the architectural profession. Must be taken concurrently with ARC 110. 

ARC 210 ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING II 1-0-1 semester hours 

Methods and techniques used in commercial buildings will be emphasized 
with special attention directed to prestressed-precast concrete beams and 
structural steel members. Commercial parking and zoning as required by 
local codes are studied. Prerequisite: ARC 110. Must be taken concurrently 
with ARC 211. 

ARC 211 ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 

II LAB 0-3-2 semester hours 

Will give the student an opportunity to put into practice those basic 
essentials of commercial design -^nd construction. Reproduction techniques, 

275 



Engineering Technology 

Courses — Architectural Technology 

Utilized by local architects, will be experienced by the student throughout 
this lab. Must be taken concurrently with ARC 210. 

ARC 212 MATERIALS AND METHODS 

OF CONSTRUCTION 1-3-3 semester hours 

Introduction to materials and methods of construction with emphasis on 
wood, masonry, concrete and steel. The evaluation of materials, functional 
applications, and code requirements are stressed. Lab exercises include 
building of representative building systems and components with models. 
Field trips to building construction sites and fabricating plants are also 
included. 

ARC 215 ARCHITECTURAL 

COMMUNICATIONS I 1-3-3 semester hours 

Introduction to the theory and practice of perspective drawing and pre- 
sentations. Develop techniques, language, graphics and models with exercises 
in graphic representation of space. The study of light, shades and shadows 
as they affect architectural forms is also emphasized. 

ARC 216 ARCHITECTURAL 

COMMUNICATIONS II 1-3-3 semester hours 

Emphasis is given to refinement of perspective drawing techniques. Spe- 
cialized methods of presentations such as multi-media, photographic tech- 
niques and rendering methods are covered. Introduction of planning and 
design by participating in projects involving form, mass, nature and space. 

ARC 230 ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING III 1-0-1 semester hour 

This course offers the student basic fundamentals and techniques of high 
rise construction. Special emphasis is placed on air conditioning, elevators, 
refuse disposal, parking and landscape. Prerequisite: ARC 210. Must be 
taken concurrently with ARC 231. 

ARC 231 ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 

III LAB 0-3-2 semester hours 

Will give the student an opportunity to put into practice those basic 
essentials of high rise design and construction. Reproduction techniques, 
utilized by local architects, will be experienced by the student throughout 
his lab. Must be taken concurrently with ARC 230. 

ARC 270 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I 0-6-3 semester hours 

Basic studies in the components of architecture, relating principles of design 
and solutions from research data obtained by the students. Prerequisite: 
ARC 216 

ARC 271 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II 0-6-3 semester hours 

Improving perception and awareness of problems related to design and 
environment of architectural order. Prerequisite: ARC 270. 



PROGRAM FOR CONTRACTING AND CIVIL 
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 

The Contracting and Civil Engineering Technology program prepares 
the student primarily for employment as an Engineering Technician or 
Surveyor. The courses emphasize fundamentals and techniques of construc- 
tion of buildings, highways, bridges and utilities. 

276 



Engineering Technology 



Courses — Contracting & Civil Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



Term I 

CC 100 Materials & Processes 2 

CC 101 Materials Testing Lab 1 

CC 220 Water Supply 3 

MTH 171 Technical Algebra 3 

**Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



Term II 

CC 111 Civil Drafting I .3 

PHY 130 Physics 3 

PHY 131 Physics Lab 1 

MTH 172 Technical Trig. 3 
MTH 136 Math with Machines 1 

^ "^Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 15 



Term HI-A 

CC 250 Surveying 
CC 251 Surveying Lab 
Social Science 

Total Semester Hours 





SECOND 


YEAR 






Term I 






Term II 




CC 
CC 
CC 
CC 
CC 


200 Strength of Materials 

201 Materials Lab 
211 Civil Drafting II 
260 Route Surveying 
Elective 


2 
.1 
.3 
.3 
. 3 


CC 210 Mech. & Elect. 

Systems 
CC 230 Structural Design 
CC 240 Planning & Estimating 

*CC Elective 

ENG 103 Tech. Report Writing 
HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 


3 
3 
3 
3 


ENG 101 Composition 

HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 


. 3 

1 

.16 


3 

1 

16 



**CC Electives — Suggested 

CC 231 Civil Drafting III 

CC 292 Land Surveying 

ME 104 Safety & Health Standards 

ME 204 Industrial Engineering 

ME 270 Basic Hydraulics 
* * Electives — Suggested 

BA 100 Introduction to Business 

BA 130 Salesmanship 

BA 140 Personal Finance 

DP 101 Data Processing 

Students enrolled in the cooperative work experience program should 
enroll in one of the following courses during their work period: CWS 201 
Work Experience I (Practicum) CWS 202 Work Experience II (Practicum). 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
CONTRACTING AND CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CC 100 MATERIALS AND PROCESSES 2-0-2 semester hours 

Introduces the materials and processes commonly used in building construc- 
tion. Provides background relating to physical properties, sources and costs. 
Includes a study of standard manufacturing processes and recent methods 
of application. Should be taken concurrently with CC 101. Offered on Central 
and North Campuses. 



277 



Engineering Technology 



Courses — Contracting & Civil Engineering 



CC 101 MATERIALS TESTING LAB 0-2-1 semester hour 

Introduction of A.S.T.M. procedures for testing concrete and reinforcing 
steel specimens. This course should be taken concurrently with CC 100. 
Offered on Centeral Campus only. 

CC 111 CIVIL DRAFTING I 1-3-3 semester hours 

Introduces drafting techniques required for producing contract drawings 
related to foundations, concrete and steel structures, roof framing, etc. 
Emphasis is placed on linework, lettering and familiarity with all sections 
of the South Florida Building Code. Student is required to provide his own 
drafting tools. College provides drafting tables and blueline print machine. 
Offered on Central and North Campuses. 

CC 200 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 2-0-2 semester hours 

A study of statics and strength of materials without the use of advanced 
mathematics. Include properties of sections, stress, strain, shear and moment 
diagrams. Introduction to solving problems using an electronic calculator. 
Prerequisite: PHY 130 or equivalent. Should be taken concurrently with 
CC 201. Offered on Central and North Campuses. 

CC 201 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS LAB 0-1-1 semester hour 

Laboratory sessions emphasize standard procedures for testing soils, asphalt 
and building materials. This course should be taken concurrently with CC 
200. Off£red on Central Campus only. 

CC 210 MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 

SYSTEMS 3-0-3 semester hours 

Acquaints student with mechanical and electrical equipment commonly 
used in high rise and commercial buildings. Presents fundamentals of air 
conditioning, heating, lighting, communicating and wiring for electrical 
equipment. Includes a study of specialty equipment such as elevators, dumb- 
waiters and moving stairways. Offered on Central and North Campuses. 

CC 211 CrVIL DRAFTING II 1-3-3 semester hours 

Intermediate course in drafting with emphasis on detailing reinforced concrete 
and steel structures. Student is required to prepare complete contract drawings 
for a specific project. Fundamentals of graphical methods for stress analysis 
are included. Prerequisite: CC 111 or equivalent. Offered on Central and 
North Campuses. 

CC 220 WATER SUPPLY AND WASTE 

WATER DISPOSAL 3-0-3 semester hours 

A single course covering the sources, treatment and distribution of potable 
water; and the collection, treatment and disposal of wastewater. Field trips 
include inspection of local facilities. Offered on Central and North Campuses. 

CC 230 STRUCTURAL DESIGN 3-0-3 semester hours 

Simplified design of reinforced concrete structures including beams, columns, 
footing, retaining walls and pile foundations. Classification of soils and 
interpretation of borings from the standard penetration test. Student is 
required to perform design computation using an electronic calculator and 
prepare sketches specifying materials and dimensions. Prerequisite: CC 200 
or equivalent. Offered on Central and North Campuses. 

CC 231 CIVIL DRAFTING III 1-3-3 semester hours 

Final course in drafting stresses site planning including grading, drainage, 
utility and highway layout. Preparation of contract drawings for industrial 
plants, water and wastewater facilities. Piping layouts are studied and drawn. 
Prerequisite: CC 1 1 1 or equivalent. Offered on Central and North Campuses. 

278 



Engineering Technology 

Courses — Building Construction 

CC 240 CONSTRUCTION PLANNING AND 

ESTIMATING 1-3-3 semester hours 

A study of construction contracts, contractor responsibilities, job planning, 
scheduling, selection of equipment, methods of construction and safety 
standards. The student is required to make quantity takeoffs from a set of 
plans to do pricing of labor and materials. Prerequisite: CC III or equiva- 
lent. Offered on Central and North Campuses. 

CC 250 SURVEYING 1-0-1 semester hour 

The theory of construction surveying including the use and care of surveying 
instruments. This course should be taken concurrently with CC 251. Offered 
on Central and North Campuses. 

CC 251 SURVEYING LAB 0-3-2 semester hours 

The student is required to assume various duties as a member of a survey 
party. Field practice includes setting corner stakes, batter boards, bench 
marks. This course should be taken concurrently with CC 250. Offered on 
Central and North Campuses. 

CC 260 ROUTE SURVEYING 1-3-3 semester hours 

Highway surveying including horizontal and vertical curves. Traverse com- 
putations using the electronic calculator. Familiarization with advanced 
techniques such as Laser, Sonar, Tellurometer and Geodimeter equipment. 
Prerequisite: CC 250 or equivalent. Offered on Central and North Campuses. 

CC 292 LAND SURVEYING 3-0-3 semester hours 

A study of the legal aspects of land surveying, including section surveys, 
metes and bounds descriptions, plat law, water boundaries and office pro- 
cedures. Prerequisite: CC 250 or equivalent. Offered on Central and North 
Campuses. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

(A Certificate Program) 

This program is designed to provide on-going educational opportunities 
for existing & prospective members of the construction trades. 

BCN 163 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

PLANS INTERPRETATION 2 semester hours 

Develop the student's ability to quickly interpret working drawings. 
J Emphasis is on architectural and structural details with limited coverage 

on mechanical and electrical aspects. (2 hr. lecture) 

BCN 164 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

ESTIMATING FUNDAMENTALS 2 semester hours 

An analysis and determination of building construction costs. Commences 
'f. with the classification of materials, labor, and sub-contracted work into the 

f smallest manageable units. Development of a simple estimate for a residen- 

[ tial structure. (2 hr. lecture) 

BCN 165 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

ADVANCED ESTIMATING 2 semester hours 

Estimating more advanced elements of building construction, analysis of 
costs of complicated systems of construction involving commercial build- 
ings. Includes indirect and overhead costs, the preparation of bid proposals 
and related documents. Prerequisite BCN 164 (2 hr. lecture) 

279 



Engineering Technology 
Courses — Building Construction 

BCN 166 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

SPECIAL TOPICS 2 semester hours 

An introductory survey course for the student presently working in the 
building construction industry desiring to commence formal study. Subjects 
discussed include analysis of the building construction industry, building 
and safety codes, plan interpretation, construction specifications, esti- 
mating, management, human relations, job opportunities, wage scales, 
profits, and short and long range opportunities. (2 hr. lecture) 

BCN 167 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

FINANCING 2 semester hours 

A study of building construction financing and related contract require- 
ments. Topics include construction loans, permanent building mortgages, 
construction bids and contracts, penalty and incentive provisions, progress 
payments and retention, escalation provisions, cost extras, performance and 
bid bonds, company profits, cash flow, and business loans. (2 hr. lecture) 

BCN 180 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

PLANNING AND COST CONTROL 2 semester hours 

A study of time-cost relationship for various building construction oper- 
ations. Includes preplanning and continuous scheduling of work flow and 
comparative analysis of actual and estimated costs for construction projects. 
(2 hr. lecture) 

BCN 181 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION LAW 2 semester hours 

A study of the legal aspects of construction contracts and the responsibilities 
arising particularly from the field operations. Also includes relationship of 
general contractor to owner, architect, and sub-contractor; materialmen, and 
mechanics lien law; bonds; labor law; and other statutes and ordinances 
regulating contractors. (2 hr. lecture) 

BCN 260 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION INSURANCE 2 semester hours 

Examines the different types of insurance required by law or contract 
for building construction projects and personnel engaged thereon, i.e., 
casualty, liability, and products insurance; workmen's compensation; and 
unemployment compensation. Also covers employee benefits and additional 
insurance available, i.e., group life and hospitalization, paid vacations, 
retirement benefits, profit sharing programs, etc. (2 hr. lecture) 

BCN 261 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 2 semester hours 

Designed primarily for the student with seme work experience in the 
construction industry. Current construction methods are analyzed and 
classified with special attention given on how they evolved. Developments 
in new materials and systems are also discussed with emphasis on appli- 
cations and future trends in South Florida. 

BCN 282 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

SUPERVISION 2 semester hours 

Examines techniques of supervision and management of skilled and un- 
skilled personnel on the job site, office personnel, and technical and 
professional individuals. Includes problems of delegation of authority, 
accountability morale, motivation, grievances, human relations, leadership, 
and incentives as encountered in building construction. 

280 



Engineering Technology 
Data Processing Technology 

DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY 

To help meet the needs of industry in the field of Data Processing in 
the Broward County area and South Florida, the Community College has 
adopted a program of studies for the employed person as well as the student 
who would like to go full-time. 

The curriculum comprises a succession of courses designed to provide 
an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques involved in 
electronic processing of data. Courses are arranged in a workable-sequence 
suitable to the instructional needs of students, with an appropriate balance 
between technical courses and laboratory exercises. Within the topics of each 
course, the concepts are solidified through practical application utilizing the 
latest equipment IBM/370 model 135 computers and equipment. 

The student may choose to work toward the two-year AA degree, the 
two-year AS degree, or the three semester certificate program. Both the 
curricula in the AS and certificate program train an individual as a pro- 
grammer trainee or computer-programmer. However, if the student is 
contemplating going on to a senior college, he should choose the degree 
program. 



DATA PROCESSING 
PRE-COMPUTER SYSTEMS/SCIENCE (A.A. Degree) 

The following suggested program will transfer to the Florida Atlantic 
University, Florida International University, and the University of West 
Florida. Any student planning to transfer to any other school should plan 
his work according to the curriculum requirements of that particular college 
or university. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRE-COMPUTER SYSTEMS/ SCIENCE 

(A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

Term I Term II 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

DP 101 Fund, of Data BA 222 Prin. of Accounting II 3 

Processing 3 ^Science 3 or 4 

BA 221 Prin. of Accounting I 3 MTH 131 or 132 3 

Humanities 3 DP 105 Comp. Programming 13 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 16-17 

Term III-A and Term m-B 

^Science 3 or 4 

DP 205 Comp. Programming II 3 
Total Semester Hours 6-7 

*Many upper divisions require a laboratory Science 

281 



Engineering Technology 
Data Processing Certificate 

SECOND YEAR 

Term I Term II 

ECO 251 Prin. of Economics I 3 ECO 252 Prin. of Economics II 3 

**DP 110 Fortran Programming 3 DP 225 Adv. Programming 3 

Social Science 3 Humanities 3 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3 Social Science 3 

STA 221 Statistics 3 HPR Physical Education 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 13 

**The University of West Florida prefers DP 1 10, other schools will accept 
DP 115-PL/l Programming. 

DATA PROCESSING 
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM 

The following is a certificate program to prepare an indivdual for the 
entry job. It is specifically designed for the employed student as well as the 
full time student. To be awarded the certificate a student must have com- 
pleted the courses with an average of "C" or above. 

TERM I 

Course Number Description C L Hrs. 

DP 101 Fundamentals of Data Processing 3 3 

DP 102 Data Preparation Equipment 2 2 3 

■='=*ENG 101 Composition 3 3 

BA 221 Principles of Accounting 3 3 

Total 12 

TERM II 

DP 104 Introduction to Programming Systems 2 2 3 

DP 105 Computer Programming I 2 2 3 

***ENG 102 or ENG 103 Composition 3 3 

BA 222 Principles of Accounting 3 3 

Total 12 

TERM in 

DP 205 Computer Programming II 2 2 3 

DP 221 System Development & Design 3 3 

BA 150 Business Math or MTH 131 3 3 

Social Science 3 3 

Total 12 

TERM IV 

DP 210 Contemporary Programming Practices 2 2 3 

DP 225 Advanced Programming Techniques 2 2 3 

DP 115 or DP 110 2 2 3 

Total 9 

Total Semester Hours 45 

***Completion of ENG 095 and ENG 103 will satisfy the requirements for 
a Certificate in Data Processing at this institution. 

282 



Engineering Technology 
Data Processing 

PROGRAM FOR DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 

Business Option 







FIRST 


YEAR 










Term I 






Term II 






DP 


101 Fundamentals of 




DP 


104 Introduction to 








Data Processing 


3 3 




Programming Systems 


, 2 


2 3 


DP 


102 Data Preparation 




DP 


105 Computer 








Equipment 


.2 2 3 




Programming I 


, ,2 


2 3 


ENG 


101 Composition 


3 3 


ENG 


102 or 103 Com. 


3 


3 


BA 


150 Business Math 


3 3 


BA 


222 Prin. of Acc't. 


3 


3 


BA 


221 Prin. of Acc't. 


3 3 


MTH 


131 Basic College 






HPR 


Physical Education 


2 1 




Math 


. .3 


3 








HPR 


Physical Education 


2 


1 


Total Semester Hours 


16 


Total Semester Hours 




.16 



Term III-A or lU-B 

DP 205 Computer 

Programming II 2 2 3 

ECO 251 Prin. of Economics 3 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 



Term I 

DP 210 Cont. Programming 

Practices 2 2 3 
DP 221 Systems Dev. & 

Design 303 

STA 221 Elem. Statistics 3 3 

Science 303 

HPR Physical Education 2 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



Term II 

DP 225 Advanced Program- 
ming Techniques 
DP 115 or DP 110 
DP 226 Field Project 
Social Science 
^Elective 
HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



'Suggested Elective (Approved by Advisor) 



2 2 3 

2 2 3 

1 2 2 

3 3 
3 3 

2 1 

15 



BA 260, BA 261, BA 100, Speech 100 or Humanities 
BA 221, and BA 222 are considered as part of the 36 semester hours 
required in the major field. BA 121 and BA 122, while not transferable, 
may be substituted for BA 221 and BA 222 for the A.S. Degree. 

Students enrolled in the cooperative work experience program should 
enroll in one of the following courses during their work period. 
CWS 201 Work Experience I (Practicum) 
CWS 202 Work Experience II (Practicum) 

PROGRAM FOR DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 
Engineering-Scientific Option 



DP 





FIRST YEAR 






Term I 




Term U 




101 Fundamentals of 


DP 


110 Fortran 


.2 2 3 


Data Processing 


3 3 DP 


105 Computer Pro- 




102 Data Preparation 




gramming I 


.2 2 3 


Equipment 


2 2 3 ENG 


103 Tech. Report 





DP 



ENG 101 Composition 



3 3 



Writing 



3 3 



283 



Engineering Technology 
Courses — Data Processing 

MTH 131 Basic College 

Math 

Science 

HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



.3 3 

3 3 

2 1 

.16 



MTH 132 Pre-Calculus Math 
HPR Physical Education 



Total Semester Hours 



Term lU-A or III-B 

DP 221 System Dev. & 

Design 3 3 

DP 205 Computer Pro- 
gramming II 2 2 3 
Total Semester Hours 6 



16 



Term I 

DP 115-PL/I Computer 

Programming 

Elective 

MTH 134 Pre-Calculus 

Math II 
MTH 136 Math with 

Machines 

Social Science 
HPR Physical Education 
Total Semester Hours 



SECOND YEAR 

Term II 

DP 225 Adv. Program- 

2 2 3 ming Techniques III 2 2 3 
.303 ECO 251 Principles of 

Economics 3 

3 3 Elective 3 

PHY 130 Physics 3 

.10 1 PHY 131 Physics Lab 

HPR Physical Education 2 



3 

1 

14 



Total Semester Hours 



3 
3 
3 
1 
1 

14 



Suggested Electives: (Approved by Advisor) 
SPE 100, DP 104, STA 221, BA 221, BA 222 



COURSES IN INSTRUCTION 
DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY 

DP 101 FUNDAMENTALS OF 

DATA PROCESSING 3-0-3 semester hours 

An introduction to electronic data processing. Topics include basic com- 
puter theory, file storage media, input-output devices, binary and hexa- 
decimal number systems and programming techniques. 

DP 102 DATA PREPARATION EQUIPMENT 2-2-3 semester hours 

This is a survey of unit record equipment, which will develop the need 
for machine "Processable" solutions to accounting and record keeping 
problems. The concept, power and flexibility of the unit record approach 
is imparted to the students during class sessions. 

DP 104 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING 

SYSTEMS 2-2-3 semester hours 

An orientation to the terminology, procedures and use of electronic equip- 
ment in data processing. Business applications, related to punchcard and 
magnetic tape systems, are programmed in RPG (Report Program Genera- 
tor) language. Prerequisites: DP 101 and DP 102 or Instructor approval. 

'^ DP- 102 is ofTered on Central Campus only; all other courses may be taken 
on North or Central Campus. 



284 



Engineering Technology 
Courses — Data Processing 

DP 105 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I 2-2-3 semester hours 

Cobol as a programming language is taught and utilizes the IBM/370. 
Through a series of lectures and laboratory practices, the student develops 
a working knowledge of the Cobol language. Emphasis is placed in creat- 
ing and maintaining tape and disc files. Prerequisite: DP 101 or Instructor 
approval. 

DP 110 FORTRAN PROGRAMMING 2-2-3 semester hours 

A basic computer programming course in Fortran, which is a problem solv- 
ing language. This course is particularly useful to students who are in 
Mathematics, Science, and related fields and who will need to utilize the 
computer as a tool in their professions. 

DP 115 PL/ 1 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 2-2-3 semester hours 

The IBM PL/1, an elective in Programming language, utilizes the various 
types of input-output devices. Emphasis is placed on the creation and 
maintenance of direct-access and sequential index files. 

DP 205 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING II 2-2-3 semester hours 

IBM 370 Assembly language and the disc operating systems are utilized. 
Disc and tape files are used extensively through lectures and laboratory 
procedure involiving programming and debugging techniques. Prerequisite". 
DP 105 or Instructor approval. 

DP 210 CONTEMPORARY PROGRAMMING 

PRACTICES 2-2-3 semester hours 

A programming course designed to teach advanced concepts of the As- 
sembler Language (BAL). The student will also become acquainted with 
the latest communications and tele-processing languages and techniques. 
Prerequisites: DP 105 and DP 205 or instructor approval. 

DP 212 ADVANCED TOPICS IN 

FORTRAN PROGRAMMING 2-2-3 semester hours 

The course is designed to introduce some Fortran Programming techniques 
beyond those in introductory courses. Topics related to arrays, subpro- 
grams, tape and disc processing are presented through lecture-discussions 
alternating with problem solving laboratory periods. Prerequisite: an 
introductory Fortran course or instructor's approval. 

DP 221 SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT AND 

DESIGN 3-0-3 semester hours 

The course includes a survey of present procedures and system of internal 
Controls. Students learn through lectures and practical case studies how 
to apply equipment and programming techniques to actual business data 
processing applications. Prerequisite: DP 105 or instructor approval. 

DP 225 ADVANCED PROGRAMMING 

TECHNIQUES III 2-2-3 semester hours 

The student utilizes previous studied programming languages. Problems are 
selected which provide for more sophistication in file creation, maintenance, 
use of subprograms, and special programming techniques. Prerequisite: 
DP 205. 

DP 226 FIELD PROJECT 1-2-2 semester hours 

The student will be assigned a project selected by the Instructor or one 
chosen from an existing local Data Processing firm. The project will 
include problem definition, flowcharting, coding, testing and a detail 

285 



Engineering Technology 
Electronic Technology 

document of the complete application. Prerequisites: DP 205 and DP 210 
or instructor approval. 



ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 

The electronics program prepares individuals to become technicians 
who assist the engineer in the building and testing of electrical or electro- 
mechanical devices and electronic systems. The student completing the 
course requirements for the A.S. Degree is qualified as a scientifically trained 
engineering technician. The prescribed courses should be taken in the order 
indicated. 

PROGRAM FOR ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 
Digital or Communication Option 







FIRST 


YEAR 






Term I 






Term II 






*EL 100 DC Circuit 




3 1 4 


EL 102 Electronic 






MTH 171 Tech. Algebra 




3 3 


Drafting 


1 


3 3 


MTH 136 Math with 






*EL 104 AC Circuits 


3 


1 4 


Machines 




10 1 


MTH 172 Tech. Trig- 






ENG 101 Composition 




3 3 


onometry 


3 


3 


PSC 121 National 






ENG 103 Technical Report 






Government 




3 3 


Writing 


3 


3 


HPR Physical Education 




1 1 


HPR Physical Education 





1 1 


Total Semester Hours 




15 
Term 


Total Semester Hours 
III-A 




.14 


EL 


106 


Active Electronic 








Devices 


12 2 






EL 


209 


Transistors 3 14 






Total 


Semester 


Hours 6 







* Advanced students, with the approval of his advisor, may take EL 101 
(combines EL 100 and EL 104). These students will need to select an 
additional electronic elective (4 hours) to meet the 36 hours in their major 
field. 

Students enrolled in the Cooperative Work Experience Program should en- 
roll in one of the following courses during their work period: CWS 201- 
Work Experience 1; CWS 202- Work Experience IL 

COMMUNICATION OPTION 

SECOND YEAR 
Term I Term II 

EL 216 Semiconductors 2 2 3 EL 212 Communications II 3 3 

EL 218 Electronic EL 223 Applied Circuit 

Instrumentation 3 3 Analysis 223 

EL 211 Communications 13 14 PHY 130 Physics 3 3 

EL 213 Digital Systems I 3 14 PHY 131 Physics Lab 2 1 

HPR Physical Education Oil HPR Physical Education 01 1 

*Electives 5 

Total Semester Hours 15 Total Semester Hours 16 



286 



Engineering Technology 

Courses — Electronic Technology 

DIGITAL OPTION 
SECOND YEAR 





Term I 






Terra II 




EL 


213 Digital Systems I 


.314 


EL 


214 Digital Systems II 


3 3 


EL 


216 Semiconductors 


2 2 3 


EL 


220 Computers II 


2 2 3 


EL 


218 Electronic 




PHY 


130 Physics 


3 3 




Instrumentation 


3 3 


PHY 


131 Physics Lab 


2 1 



EL 219 Computers I 3 14 HPR Physical Education 1 1 

HPR Physical Education 1 1 *Electives 5 

Total Semester Hours 15 Total Semester Hours 16 

'"Suggested Electives (Approved by Advisor): 
EL 226 Special Problems (3 credits) 
DP 104 Introduction to Programming Systems (3 credits) 
DP 105 Computer Programming I (3 credits) 
DP 110 Fortran Programming (3 credits) 
DP 205 Computer Programming II (3 credits) 
ECO 190 Introduction to economics (3 credits) 

Students enrolled in the cooperative work experience program should enroll 
in one of the following courses during their work period: 

CWS 201 Work Experience I (Practicum) 

CWS 202 Work Experience II (Practicum) 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 

EL 100 DIRECT CIRCUITS 3-1-4 semester hours 

Student is introduced to the principles of basic electricity, color codes. 
Ohm's law, network analysis, and DC instruments. Laboratory experience 
is provided in construction and testing of series and parallel circuits, voltage 
dividers, voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters, and RC time constant circuits. 
(This course is offered on Central Campus. ELS 160 is offered on North 
Campus and may be substituted for EL 100). 

EL 102 ELECTRONIC DRAFTING 1-3-3 semester hours 

The content includes lettering, orthographic projection, isometric drawing, 
electronic symbols, schematic and block diagrams, printed circuit diagrams 
and layout procedures. (This course is offered on Central Campus.) 

EL 104 ALTERNATING CURRENT CIRCUITS 3-1-4 semester hours 

Study of impedance, reactance, resonance, power, AC networks and trans- 
formers. Laboratory experience is made available in the construction and 
test of series and parallel reaction circuits, resonance, transformers, and use 
of the oscilloscope. (This course is offered on Central Campus. ELS 162 is 
offered on North Campus and may be substituted for EL 104.) 

EL 106 ACTIVE ELECTRONIC DEVICES 1-2-2 semester hours 

The construction and theory of vacuum tubes is presented including diodes, 
triodes, pentrodes, cathode ray tubes and semiconductor diodes. (This course 
is offered on Central Campus.) 

EL 209 SEMI CONDUCTORS I 3-1-4 semester hours 

CE, CC, CB configurations, large signals, biasing, AC operation and 
cascaded amplifiers. (This course is offered on Central Campus.) 

287 



Engineering Technology 

Courses — Electronic Technology 

EL 211 COMMUNICATIONS I 3-1-4 semester hours 

This course is the first of two courses to prepare the student to obtain a 
second class FCC Radiotelephone License. The course will cover RF resonant 
circuits, coupled circuits, voltage and power amplifiers, oscillators and AM 
transmitters. The associated laboratory will include the operation of resonant 
circuits and construction, testing and alignment of an AM radio. '(This 
course is ofl[ered on Central Campus.) 

EL 212 COMMUNICATIONS H 2-1-3 semester hours 

This course is a continuation of Communications I and will cover demodula- 
tion of AM, AM receivers, frequency modulation, transmitters and receivers, 
single side band, transmission lines and antennas. The student, at his option, 
will take the FCC 2nd class license examination. (This course is offered on 
Central Campus.) 

EL 213 DIGITAL SYSTEMS I 3-1-4 semester hours 

A study of the logic concepts and circuits used in digital systems including 
measuring instruments, communication equipment, and computers. Integrated 
circuits are used to demonstrate the digital techniques of gating, counting, 
storing, shifting and converting. (This course is offered on Central Campus.) 

EL 214 DIGITAL SYSTEMS II 2-1-3 semester hours 

A study of the operation of several small scale digital systems selected from 
the fields of consumer and communication electronics. Circuit analysis is 
extended from individual IC's to large logic blocks. The interpretation and 
use of logic block diagrams will be stressed. (This course is offered on 
Central Campus.) 

EL 216 SEMI CONDUCTORS II 2-2-3 semester hours 

Subject matter includes field effect transistor, unijunction transistors, tunnel 
diodes and silicon controlled rectifiers. (This course is offered on Central 
Campus.) 

EL 218 ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION 2-1-3 semester hours 

Familiarization with oscilloscope, VTVM, VOM, digital voltmeters, im- 
pedance bridge, transistor curve tracer, pulse generators, signal generators, 
power meters, frequency counters and distortion analyzers. (This course is 
offered on Central Campus.) 

EL 219 COMPUTERS I 3-1-4 semester hours 

Study of the organization and operation of a stored program digital computer 
with emphasis on CPU operation in response to assembly and machine 
language instructions. Methods of selecting and operating I/O devices under 
program control will also be studied. (This course is offered on Central 
Campus. ) 

EL 220 COMPUTERS II 2-2-3 semester hours 

Analysis of a general purpose digital computer with emphasis on system logic 
and timing. The functional operation of system components will be studied 
with the aid of diagnostic programs and digital test equipment. (This course 
is offered on Central Campus.) 

EL 223 APPLIED CIRCUIT ANALYSIS LAB 2-2-3 semester hours 

A study of special circuits used in television transmitters and receivers 
with their relationship to high frequency signal acquisition and transmission. 
(This course is offered on Central Campus.) 

288 



Engineering Technology 
Mechanical Engineering 

EL 224, 225, 226 SPECIAL PROBLEMS 1-2 or 3 semester hours 

An elective course, with permission of Electronic's Area Leader, designed 
to allow outstanding students the opportunity to work on advanced electronics 
problems. 1 hour credit for 224, 2 hours credit for 225, 3 hours credit for 
226. (This course offered on Central Campus.) 

EL 227 DIRECTED STUDIES IN 

ELECTRONICS (FAA) 3 semester hours 

This course is available only to electronic technology students participating 
in a cooperative education program with the Federal Aviation Administration. 
Fundamentals of electronics and mathematical applications will be taught 
through directed studies. Completion of this course may be counted as elec- 
tive credit only. (This course is offered on Central Campus.) 



PROGRAM FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

The program in Mechanical Engineering Technology is designed to 
prepare a student for the occupational profession of engineering aide or 
technical assistant. The student should attain a broad coverage in a diversi- 
fied field. Fundamental knowledge of drafting, machine tool and die design, 
production, testing materials, basic hydraulics, and a core of general edu- 
cation subjects for individual enrichment. 



FIRST YEAR 



Term I 

ME 100 Technical Drafting 1 

ME 101 Technical Drafting 

Lab 2 

MTH 171 Technical Algebra 3 

ENG 101 Composition 3 

^Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 



Total Semester Hours 13 



Term II 

140 Tool Design I 1 

141 Tool Design Lab 2 

151 Die Design 1 

152 Die Design Lab 2 

MTH 172 Tech. Trig 3 

PHY 130 Physics 3 

131 Physics Lab 1 

103 Tech. Report Writing .3 



ME 
ME 
ME 
ME 



PHY 
ENG 



HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 17 



Term IH-A 

ME 102 Design of Machine 

Elements 3 

CC 250 Surveying 1 

CC 251 Surveying Lab 2 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 





Tenn I 




ME 


202 Manufacturing 






Processes 


3 


ME 


240 Tool Design II 


1 


ME 


241 Tool Design II Lab 


, 1 


ME 


270 Basic Hydraulics 


. .2 


ME 


271 Basic Hydraulics Lab 


1 


CC 


200 Strength of Materials 


. 2 



Term II 

CC 210 Mechanical and 

Electrical Systems 3 

ME 204 Principles of Industrial 

Engineering 3 

ME 205 Statistical Quality 

Control 3 

PSC 121 National Govt 3 



289 



Engineering Technology 

Courses — Mechanical Engineering 

CC Strength of *Elective 3 

Materials Lab 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

MTH 136 Math with Machines 1 
HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 Total Semester Hours .16 

* Suggested Electives: 
BA 113-115 Basic Typing 

DP 101 Basic Computing Machines, ME 104 Safety and Health Standards 
Related to Man and His Environment 

Students enrolled in the cooperative work experience program should enroll 
in one of the following courses during their work period: 

CWS 201 Work Experience I (Practicum) 

CWS 202 Work Experience II (Practicum) 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

ME 100 TECHNICAL DRAFTING 1-0-1 semester hour 

Course is designed to provide basic knowledge of the standard of mechanical 
drafting. Subjects covered include applied geometry, basic dimensioning, 
pictorial representations, auxiliary views, sections, conventions, intersections, 
developments, finish marks, surface symbols, tolerances, fits, allowances, 
screws, keys, pins, rivets and springs. The student learns to recognize and 
use the A.S.A. standard welding symbols. Must be taken concurrently with 
ME 101. (Offered on Central and North Campuses.) 

ME 101 TECHNICAL DRAFTING LAB 0-3-2 semester hours 

The student will develop skill in the use of drafting equipment. The princi- 
ples of orthographic projection and techniques of laying out multi-view 
drawings are introduced. Lettering and line work are stressed. Must be taken 
concurrently with ME 100. (Offered on Central and North Campuses.) 

ME 102 DESIGN OF MACHINE ELEMENTS 3-0-3 semester hours 

Design principles are studied and calculations are made in determining 
size and shape of machine parts. The student will receive instruction in 
designing such elements as beams, bearings, clutches, brakes, bushings, 
screws, rivets, gears, springs, belts, and flywheels. Attention will be given 
to loads of various types, stresses, deformation, shrink fits, and other 
factors in the design of machine elements. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 104 SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS 

RELATED TO MAN AND HIS ENVIRONMENT 

AND FIRST AID 3-0-3 semester hours 

To give an awareness of the factors involved in the prevention of injury and 
damage and the practice of good industrial hygiene. To provide understand- 
ing and comprehension of Federal, State and Local Safety and Health 
Legislation with emphasis upon compliance and record keeping requirements. 
(Offered when requested.) 

ME 140 TOOL DESIGN I 1-0-1 semester hour 

The student learns nomenclature of single point tools. Types of material 
removal are studied as they affect the design of tools. Fixtures are studied, 
considering types, locating points and their relation with previous and sub- 

290 



Engineering Technology 

Courses — Mechanical Engineering 

sequent operations. Prerequisite: ME 100 or equivalent. Must be taken 
concurrently with ME 141. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 141 TOOL DESIGN I LAB 0-3-2 semester hours 

Jig assemblies are detailed to improve the student's ability to read assembly 
drawings and develop the techniques of detailing. Pump jigs are adapted 
and fixtures designed to illustrate the use of proper locating points. Must 
be taken concurrently with ME 140. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 151 DIE DESIGN 1-0-1 semester hour 

Student studies die drawings to learn the style and techniques used in de- 
signing sheet metal dies. Blank nesting, pierce, form and flange dies analyzed. 
Prerequisites: ME 100 or equivalent. Must be taken concurrently with 
ME 152. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 152 DIE DESIGN LAB 1-3-2 semester hours 

Part drawings of the student's own design are used for the student to draw 
blank, piercing, forming and flanging dies. Must be taken concurrently 
with ME 151. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 202 MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 3-0-3 semester hours 

Course covers cold processing of rnaterials by abrasion, cutting, and press 
working to obtain desired forms, dimensions, and surface finishes. Machines 
are described in detail and interpreted in terms of classifications, capacities, 
and versatilities. Special consideration is given to various types of cutting 
tools, dies, jigs, and fixtures, emphasizing their particular functions and the 
types of materials from which they are made, and other factors which 
determine performance and tool life. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 204 PRINCIPLES OF INDUSTRIAL 

ENGINEERING 3-0-3 semester hours 

Course teaches the essential elements of good plant layout, materials, 
handling, and the principles of industrial engineering. It explains the setting 
up an efficient plant layout and discusses fundamental factors influencing 
these operations. A comprehensive study is made of the specific methods 
and equipment used in the horizontal, vertical and overhead movement of 
materials. Problems in product protection, packaging, and storage are 
presented for analysis. Specific cases are studied to show the relationship 
between plant layout and efficient materials handling. (Offered on Central 
Campus. ) 

ME 205 STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL 3-0-3 semester hours 

This course is designed to acquaint all technicians with the type of control 
charts used in production and inspection, based on simple statistical calcula- 
? tions. Sampling plans and assignable causes of out-of-control conditions are 

examined. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 240 TOOL DESIGN II 1-0-1 semester hours 

Emphasis is put on jig design, methods of guiding tools in relation to 
^ the problems they have studied in fixture design. Techniques of measuring 

s and maintaining surface finishes and tolerances are emphasized. Feeding 

i\ devices, as they affect tooling, are discussed. Prerequisite: ME 140. Must 

be taken concurrently with ME 241. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 241 TOOL DESIGN II LAB 0-3-2 semester hours 

A multiple spindle drill press attachment is designed by each student to 
drill a part of their choice. Must be taken concurrently with ME 240. 
(Offered on Central Campus.) 

291 



Engineering Technology 

Courses — Mechanical Engineering 

ME 270 BASIC HYDRAULICS 2-0-2 semester hours 

A study of basic hydraulic components. The type of pumps, valves, cylinders, 
filters, gauges, sumps, accumulators, and relief valves are discussed with 
calculations for the application and design. Must be taken concurrently with 
ME 271. (Offered on Central Campus.) 

ME 271 BASIC HYDRAULICS LAB 0-2-1 semester hour 

Equipment components are studied, assembled, and results measured with 
gauges. Designs are created and submitted in the form of proposals. Must 
be taken concurrently with ME 270. (Offered on Central Campus.) 




292 



DIVISION OF PUBLIC SERVICES 

Public Administration 

Dietetic Technician 

Fire Science Technology 

Hotel-Restaurant-lnstitution Administration Technology 

Pollution Prevention and Control Technology 

Tourism Industries Administration Program 

The Division of Public Services seeks to serve the pubHc and private 
sectors of Broward County by developing programs, mainly for college credit, 
to meet the needs of our community. The degree programs listed under this 
division are the result of extensive community involvement and participation. 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 

The Public Administration Program is designed to prepare students for 
careers at the managerial and executive levels in local public service. The 
Program's emphasis is on a liberal education as the basis for the intelligent 
use of technical skills in administrative and governmental work. The Pro- 
gram aims at a broad understanding. of the goals and problems of Public 
Administration and how these relate to the technical specialties of public 
administration: budget analysis, planning, organization and management 
methods, and personnel administration. The Program is also valuable prep- 
aration for those who intend to work for public agencies or voluntary as- 
sociations interested in the problems of government including unions, cham- 
bers of commerce, business corporations, farm organizations and community 
service organizations. 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
PROGRAM FOR PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (A.S. Degree) 

1 . Completion of 64 semester hours of credit and a grade point average of 
2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 

A. COMMUNICATIONS 9 hours 

(1) ENG 101 (3) 

(2) ENG 102/103/104 (3) 

(3) SPE 100 (3) 

B. SOCIAL SCIENCES 9 hours 

(1) PSC 121/122/205 (3) 

(2) PSY 201 (3) 

(3) SOC 211 (3) 

C. MATHEMATICS 3 hours 
(1) MTH 100/131 (3) 

3. Completion of the following requirements in related fields: 

A. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3 hours 
(1) BA 260 (3) or 

(3) BA 261 (3) or BA 262 (3) 

B. STATISTICS 3 hours 

(1) STA 221 (3) 

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4. Completion of 18 hours in the field of concentration: 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 18 hours 

PA 100 (3), PA 105 (3), PA 106 (3), PA 110 (3), PA 205 (3), 
PA 207 (3), PA 210 (3), PA 211 (3). 

5. Completion of four semester hours of Physical Education Activities. 

HPR 4 hours 

(Not required of veterans or students 29 years or older.) 

6. Electives must be selected from the following: 

Business Administration, Fire Science, Police Science, 

and Public Administration 15 hours 

7. Completion of requirements C, D, E, and F on Page 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

PA 100 THEORIES OF PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

The bases of administration and administrative decision making. A general 
study of organizational structure and processes: the division of work, 
authority, status systems, communication and control. Relation of policy 
to administration. The origins and development of Public Administration. 

PA 105 EFFECEIVE SUPERVISORY PRACTICES 3 semester hours 

Designed for the in-service training of supervisors employed by cities, 
counties and other local government. First-line supervisors will be assisted 
in mastering difficult responsibilities in organizing and directing work, main- 
taining discipline, counseling employees, handling grievances and other vital 
areas of their jobs. 

PA 106 MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR 

SMALLER CITIES 3 semester hours 

Designed to give an overview of major objectives, methods and procedures 
in each of the "line activities" of small municipal governments, with emphasis 
on the staff aspects of the chief administrator such as: planning, financing, 
personnel, trend analysis and public relations. 

PA 110 MUNICIPAL PERSONNEL 

ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

Examination of recruitment, examination, and promotion procedures for 
public service personnel. The relationship of formal and informal communi- 
cation processes in lower administrative echelons as they bear on the formu- 
lation and implementation of personnel policies. 

PA 205 MUNICIPAL FINANCE 

ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

This is noi a course for city Finance Directors. It is a practical course in 
preparing and operating within a municipal budget and the various kinds 
of management approaches which can be undertaken to assure efficient and 
effective expenditures of budgeted funds. Designed for division/department 
heads and departmental fiscal control personnel, it will include new and 
innovative budget management techniques, including getting and using fed- 
eral/state grants, performance budgeting and program monitoring activities. 

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Courses — Public Administration 



PA 207 MANAGING THE MODERN CITY 3 semester hours 

A study designed for administrators of all sizes of cities: metropolis, suburb 
or village; stressing the sociology and make-up of cities, the forces of change, 
programming for change with close view of organization and management of 
administrative functions in a changing era. 

PA 210 MUNICIPAL PUBLIC WORKS 

ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

Course designed to relate public works to other municipal functions on a 
basis of measured achievement in areas of personnel, vehicle maintenance, 
sewage, cost accounting. The impact of public works on ecology, zoning, 
density and financing as considered from the view of the administrator. 

PA 211 SUPERVISORY METHODS IN 

MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

A program designed for supervisors and administrators stressing leadership 
and human relations. The thrust of the course is aimed at the creation and 
maintenance of a climate of participation based on communication and 
effective leadership. 

PA 212 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF 

URBAN PLANNING 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to cover the latest concepts and methods of urban 
planning. Included are: basic planning studies, special approaches to planning, 
implementation of policies and plans, regulations and renewal and the 
planning agency. 

PA 213 MUNICIPAL PUBLIC RELATIONS 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to cover the increasingly complex area of public 
opinions, public attitudes, and public information regarding governmental 
and municipal operations. It will teach public employees to act effectively 
in these areas and the course provides the tools and understanding to make 
good public relations integral to a city's administrative practice. 

PA 214 GROWTH MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC 

SECTOR 3 semester hours 

This course is designed to be a study in the bases for and techniques of 
growth management. Emphasis will be placed on the legal aspects, the 
traditional and emerging techniques of growth management, and the relation- 
ship of politics, planning, and the public interest. 

PA 270 PA 271-272-273 CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours each 

These courses are designed to bring into focus those problems that are 
facing public administrators in Broward County each semester, and provide 
an opportunity to discuss these problems from the professional and academic 
viewpoint, working towards a better understanding of the problem and 
possible solutions. Each semester different topics will be reviewed and a 
decision made as to which subject to pursue according to public interests. 
The content will vary with local current issues. Different course numbers are 
used to denote the material is not repetitious, and the student may repeat 
the course. 



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Fire Science Program 

FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

Broward Community College is prepared to meet the needs of the Fire 
Service and with the support and advice of local leaders has developed a 
Fire Science program. An associate degree program is offered for students 
desiring to enter or advance in the Fire Service. In addition, a one-year 
Certificate program provides an opportunity for Fire Service employees to 
improve their knowledge through a concentration on Fire Science subjects. 

Federal, State and Municipal governments have recognized the need 
for degree programs in the Fire Service for both entry level and in-service 
personnel. Recent scientific and technical developments have created a de- 
mand for highly skilled personnel and population increases and civil dis- 
turbances have placed increasing demands on the fire departments. Broward 
County in its rapid growth is well aware of the need to meet this challenge 
of expansion. 

FIRE SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Requirements for the Associate of Science Degree in Fire Science. 

1 . Completion of 67 semester hours credit and grade point average of 
2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
COMMUNICATIONS 

ENG 101 and 103 or 104 6 semester hours 

(ENG 095 and 103 will satisfy degree requirements) 
SPE 100 3 semester hours 

MATH 

MTH 3 semester hours 

(Math 092, 100, or BA 150) 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 

PSY 100, 201, and PSC 121, or 122 9 semester hours 

3. Completion of these courses from the related areas: 

PA 100, PA 213, and PA 270 9 semester hours 

Plus one 3 credit elective 3 semester hours 

4. Completion of Fire Science courses 30 semester hours 
Required: 

EMT 100, FS 101, 110, FS 112, 201, 210, 212, 214 
Select two of following: 

FS 100, 105, 204, 207, 216 6 semester hours 

5. Completion of four semester hours of 

Physical Education activities. 4 semester hours 

Not required of veterans or students 29 or older. 

6. Cooperative Work Study program includes 

Fire Science students 6 semester hours 

(May substitute 3 hours of co-op credit for PSY 
100 or 201 and may substitute 3 co-op hours for 
one 3 credit elective in area 3 above. 

7. Completion of requirements C, D, E and F, page 57. 

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Courses — Fire Sciences 

FIRE SCIENCE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

This program is designed to increase the practical knowledge of the 
"in-service" firemen in relation to the administration and operation of the 
fire department and as an aid in meeting promotional requirements. 
Required: 

PSC 121 or 122 3 credits 

FS 101 Fire Administration I 3 credits 

FS 110 Fireground Tactics and Strategy 3 credits 

FS 201 Fire Administration II 3 credits 

FS 212 Hazardous Materials I 3 credits 

FS 105 Fire Prevention Theory & Application 3 credits 

FS 210 Application of Fireground Tactics 3 credits 

Selection of any 3 Fire Science courses: 9 credits 

Total Semester Hours 30 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

FS 100 INTRODUCTION TO FIRE SCIENCE 3 semester hours 

This introductory course will examine the evolution of the modern Fire 
Department, chemistry and physics of fire, fire hazard properties of 
materials; combustion; theory of fire control; importance of fire protection; 
public fire defenses; and other materials pertinent to fire service. 

FS 101 FIRE ADMINISTRATION I 3 semester hours 

Course will examine objectives of Municipal Fire Departments, organi- 
zation, distribution of equipment and personnel, building and equipment, 
fire defenses and insurance rates, personnel problems in the fire service. 

FS 105 FIRE PREVENTION THEORY 

AND APPLICATION 3 semester hours 

A study of laws and ordinances pertaining to fire prevention; the proper 
physical arrangements for fire safety; preventive inspections in industry 
and the home; and the study of hazards in industry to include explosive 
dust and chemicals. 

FS 110 FIREGROUND TACTICS & STRATEGY 3 semester hours 

A study of tactics and strategy employed in extinguishing fires; preparation 
planning and an examination of company level field operations. Fire 
situations will be analyzed utilizing acceptable fire fighting tactics. 

FS 112 FIRE PROTECTION THROUGH 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 3 semester hours 

Study of building codes in relation to fire protection. Community concepts 
in building construction; eliminating fire problems on the drawing board; 
the relationship between building departments and fire protection agencies; 
and the fire extension problems in modern and old building construction. 

FS 201 FIRE ADMINISTRATION H 3 semester hours 

A continuation of FS 101 — water supply for the fire service, fire alarm 
communication systems, legal aspects of fire prevention, municipal and 
state fire prevention agencies, records, reports, evaluations and other 
phases related to fire administration. 

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Public Services 

Courses — Fire Science 

FS 204 ARSON AND FIRE INVESTIGATION 3 semester hours 

A study of the problems involving the Fire Service concerning: arson 
detection, motives, types of arsonists, suspicious fires, arson in aircraft, 
ships and small craft, handling of physical evidence, scientific investiga- 
tion, preparing the case for prosecution, court procedure and other material 
related to the subject of arson. 

FS 207 FIRE APPARATUS AND PROCEDURES 3 semester hours 

Course offers study in evolution of fire apparatus; apparatus construction; 
pumps and pump accessories; pumping procedures; pump tests; trouble 
shooting; aerial ladders; aerial platforms; maintenance; driving fire 
apparatus. 

FS 210 APPLICATION OF 

FIREGROUND TACTICS 3 semester hours 

This course applies the basic principles learned in FS 110 to specific fire 
problems, e.g. churches, flammable gases and liquids, lumberyards, de- 
partment stores, residential, supermarkets, warehouses. Included are 
additional pointers on solving these problems and those of a miscellaneous 
nature; also command responsibilities on the fireground. Prerequisite FS 110. 

FS 212 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS I 3 semester hours 

Study of types of chemicals and processes, storage and transportation of 
chemicals, hazards of radioactive materials, precautions to be taken in 
fire fighting involving hazardous materials, laws of federal, state and local 
levels pertaining to such materials. 

FS 214 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS II 3 semester hours 

A continuation and expansion of FS 212 to include radioactive materials, 

corrosives, pesticides, rock propellants, and other related materials. Pre- 
requisite FS 212. 

FS 216 FIRE DEPARTMENT SUPERVISION 3 semester hours 

Study of superior-subordinate relationship, motivation, leadership, morale, 
discipline, work planning and other material related to supervision in the 
Fire Department. 

EMT 100 EMERGENCY MEDICAL 

TECHNOLOGY I 3 semester hours 

Introductory survey of emergency medical services including medical-legal 
aspects, techniques of emergency resuscitation and cardiac massage, extrica- 
tion, transportation, physiological and emotional trauma, and practical 
application of skills and procedures involved in life threatening emergencies. 

EMT 110 EMERGENCY MEDICAL 

TECHNOLOGY II 3 semester hours 

Continuation of EMT 100 and involving advanced techniques in cardio- 
pulmonary resuscitation, hemorrhage, patient maintenance, emergency room 
care, medications. Includes in-depth study of anatomy and physiology; 
triage, assessment and stabilization of the patient in shock. Twenty hours 
of clinical practice in hospitals required. Prerequisite: EMT 100. 

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Hotel-Restaurant-lnstitution 
Administration Program 



HOTEL— RESTAURANT— INSTITUTION 
ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 

The explosive growth of the Food Service/ Lodging Industries (they 
now employ more people than any other industry in this country and are 
fourth largest in dollar income) has created a tremendous opportunity for 
careers of all types, especially in the broad mid-management areas. 

While the emphasis of the program is on management techniques, we 
recognize that the graduates working within these industries will have per- 
sonal obligations of public trust to society and have included a broad range 
of General Education requirements to help the student form his own ethical 
and philosophical base. Judicious use of the practicum periods further en- 
hance the value of the graduate to his employer, allowing him to enter the 
industry on a leadership basis. 

Those students planning to enter a Bachelor's Degree program should 
contact the transfer institution to secure approval in advance for transfer 
of credits. 

HOTEL— RESTAURANT— INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Hotel-Restaurant- 
lnstitution Administration. 

1. Completion of 68 hours of credit and a grade point average of 2.0 or 
better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education. 
*English Composition 6 semester hours 

English 101 and English 104 
Social Science 

PSY and Elective 6 semester hours 

Speech 3 semester hours 

3. Completion of 40 hours in major field: 
CORE CURRICULUM: 

HRI 105 Operations and Service Practicum 6 semester hours 

HRI 110 Supervisory Development 3 semester hours 

HRI 112 Volume Foods 3 semester hours 

HRI 125 Engineering and Maintenance 3 semester hours 

HRI 126 Engineering and Maint. Lab 1 semester hour 

HRI 200 Organization and Personnel 

Management 3 semester hours 

HRI 205 Financial Management OR 

FSA 204 Food Service Costing & Controls 3 semester hours 

HRI 215 Management and Control Practicum 6 semester hours 

HRI 230 Marketing 3 semester hours 

^Completion of English 095 and English 103 will satisfy the requirements 
for a degree in Hotel-Restaurant-Institution at Broward Community Col- 
lege. However, students contemplating transfer to a four-year institution 
should complete English 101 and 104 since the other English courses listed 
above may not be acceptable for transfer credit. 

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Food Certificate Program 



In addition to this required core, the student is to select, from the 
following courses, the 3 that will be the most coherent with his career goals: 
TIA 100 Introduction to Tourism 

Industries Administration 3 semester hours 

HMA 225 Law and Insurance 3 semester hours 

HMA 265 Seminar in Contemporary 

Problems in Administration 3 semester hours 

FSA 102 Food and Beverage Purchasing 3 semester hours 

PSA 170 Classical Cuisine 3 semester hours 

FSA 204 Food Service Costing and Controls 3 semester hours 

FSA 225 Experimental Foods 3 semester hours 

FSA 270 International Cuisine 3 semester hours 

4. Completion of nine hours in Business Administration** 

BA 130 Salesmanship 3 semester hours 

BA 150 Business Mathematics 3 semester hours 

BA 121 Accounting Survey 3 semester hours 

5. Completion of four hours of Physical Education Activities. 

6. Completion of requirements C, D, E, and F, on page — . 






It is recommended that those students electing to transfer to FIU's 4 year 
program schedule BA 221, BA 222 & MTH 100 for these 9 credits along 
with HRI 205. 



ONE-YEAR FOOD SERVICE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Designed for the recent high school graduate seeking a start in the 
Food Service/ Lodging Industries above the normal entry jobs. This program 
is equally important to the currently employed individual desiring to up- 
grade and up-date his knowledge. All courses may be used toward the A.S. 
degree. 

FSA 102 Food and Beverage Purchasing 3 semester hours 

FSA 204 Food Service Costing and Controls 3 semester hours 

FSA 225 Experimental Foods 3 semester hours 

HRI 110 Supervisory Development 3 semester hours 

HRI 112 Volume Foods 3 semester hours 

HRI 125 Engineering & Maintenance 3 semester hours 

HRI 126 Engineering Maintenance Lab 1 semester hour 

HRI 200 Organization & Personnel Management 3 semester hours 

HRI 215 Management & Control Practicum 6 semester hours 

HRI 230 Marketing 3 semester hours 

Total Semester Hours 31 semester hours 

NOTE: 

Students whose major areas of interest lie in School Food Service, Hospitals, 
Extended Care Facilities, etc., should make the following substitutions: 

FSA 150 Institutional Food Service Supervision 3 semester hours 

FSA 250 Advanced Institutional Food 

Service Supervision 3 semester hours 

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Courses — Hotel-Restaurant-lnstitution 



FOR 

HRI 215 Management and Control Practicum 6 semester hours 

ALSO 

NTR 261 Nutrition in the Schools 3 semester hours 

FOR 

HRI 112 Volume Foods 3 semester hours 

To be awarded the certificate, the student must complete his program with 
a grade average of "C" or better on all work attempted. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
HOTEL— RESTAURANT— INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 

HRI 105 OPERATIONS AND SERVICE 

PRACTICUM 6 semester hours 

Full-time "on the job" work experience in an approved segment of the 
Food Service/Lodging Industry coordinated with a weekly seminar. Faculty 
makes regular appraisals of the learning progress through on-site visitations 
and consultation with the student and his supervisors. Five written reports 
commensurate with assigned duties are required. 

HRI 110 SUPERVISORY DEVELOPMENT 3 semester hours 

Training in the techniques involved in the supervision of employees. De- 
veloping sound relations with other departments, group discussions, methods 
of improvement and development of cost consicousness. 

HRI 112 VOLUME FOODS 3 semester hours 

Application of principles of cookery to preparation of food in large 
quantities. Standardization of formulas with reterence to quantity, 
manipulation, time and cost. Menu-making and costing. Student will work 
in both the foods laboratory and production kitchen. (Two lectures and 
lab period weekly.) 

HRI 125 ENGINEERING AND MAINTENANCE 3 semester hours 

Basic principles of electricity, heating, and air conditioning, kitchen planning 
and layout, mechanics and plumbing, laundry operations. How to trouble 
shoot, how to write specifications, how to write and draw plans. Heavy 
emphasis on the safe, sanitary and efficient operation of a food service 
and lodging establishment. 

HRI 126 ENGINEERING AND 

MAINTENANCE LAB 1 semester hour 

Two hours of laboratory weekly to be taken concurrently with HRI 125. 

HRI 200 ORGANIZATION AND 

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

Organization, supervision and direction of Food Service/Lodging oper- 
ations. Analysis of the internal organization structure and of administrative 
roles and functions. Consideration of new techniques of employment, 
training, promotions, job specifications, discipline and morale. The course 
borrows extensively from the behavioral sciences in emphasizing the human 
dimensions of management. Prerequisite HRI 110 or instructor approval, 

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Courses — Hotel-Restaurant-Institution 



HRI 205 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 semester hours 

A study of accounting systems for the Food Service/Lodging Industries, 
with emphasis on operating statistics and financial reports. The utilization 
of financial statements by management. Prerequisite FSA 204, BA 121 or 
221 or instructor approval. 

HRI 215 MANAGEMENT AND 

CONTROL PRACTICUM 6 semester hours 

Continuation of HRI 105 with emphasis on Management techniques and 
control of men, money, and material. Six reports and a weekly seminar 
period are required within the 500 hours. 

HRI 230 MARKETING 3 semester hours 

How to sell and promote the many services the Food Service/Lodging 
Industries offer guests. How to secure business through a personal selling 
and all media of advertising and publicity. How to operate a sales and 
convention department. Prerequisite Sophomore standing. 

HMA 225 LAW AND INSURANCE 3 semester hours 

Nature and function of our legal system as it applies to the operation 
of an inn. Innkeeper-guest relationship, contracts, torts, civil rights and 
insurable risks are emphasized. 

HMA 265 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY 

PROBLEMS IN ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

Analysis of selected current major problem areas. Critical review of 
controls and techniques used to achieve management objectives. Projection 
of trends into the future and their impact upon the industry. 

FSA 102 FOOD AND BEVERAGE PURCHASING 3 semester hours 

Basic information on sources, grades and standards, criteria for selection 
and purchasing. Estimates of raw materials needed and receiving and 
storage techniques leading to the development of standards and writing of 
specifications. 

FSA 150 INSTITUTIONAL FOOD 

SERVICE SUPERVISION 3 semester hours 

Full time "on the job" work experience along with 48 hours classroom 
work covering all aspects of kitchen management. Enrollment must be 
with the approval of the American Dietetic Association. 

FSA 170 CLASSICAL CUISINE 3 semester hours 

(Lecture and Demonstration) 

Emphasis is placed on upgrading the professional culinary student as to 
new menu items and correct terminology. Application of standards to hot/ 
cold hors d'oeuvres, appetizers, large and small dinner parties and pastry 
products. The student has the opportunity to observe preparation skills in 
detail, participate in writing recipes, watching the correct serving tech- 
niques and tasting the prepared food. Prerequisite: HRI 112 or instructor 
approval. 

FSA 204 FOOD SERVICE COSTING 

AND CONTROLS 3 semester hours 

A cost managing approach to the study of food and labor controls. The 
relationship of food and labor costs to selling price; cost control procedures 
for recipes and menus; pre-cost, pre-control techniques; and the prepa- 
ration and utilization of management reports are examined. A review of 

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Dietetic Technician Program 



mathematics and its application to practical problems. The emphasis is on 
the utilization of controls as a tool of management. 

FSA 225 EXPERIMENTAL FOODS 3 semester hours 

Laboratory projects testing theories of food preparation, judging of products, 
and establishing standards, of foods. Evaluation of effect of ingredient, 
proportion, time, manipulation, temperature, etc., on quality characteristics. 

FSA 250 ADVANCED INSTITUTIONAL FOOD 

SERVICE SUPERVISION 3 semester hours 

Continuation of FSA 150. Successful completion of both courses leads to 
membership in the Hospital, Educational, and Institutional Food Service 
Society recognized by the American Hospital Association. 

FSA 270 INTERNATIONAL CUISINE 3 semester hours 

(Lecture and Demonstration) 

Emphasis is placed on international cookery as it applies to the proper 
modern menu use and selection. The course will include preparation of 
cold buffet, entree, dinner accompaniment and flambe desserts. The student 
has the opportunity to observe preparation skills, writing recipes, watching 
correct serving techniques and tasting the prepared food. Prerequisite: 
FSA 170 or instructor approval. 

NTR 261 NUTRITION IN THE SCHOOLS 3 semester hours 

A study of the basic fundamentals of nutrition as related to the optimum 
health of the child and its effect on the normal growth and development 
processes throughout life. 

NTR 263 NUTRITION AND CHEMISTRY 3 semester hours 

A study of food nutrients, their digestion, absorption and metabolism. 
Methods of determining requirements and interrelationships of nutrients 
and the effects of excesses and deficiencies. Special emphasis upon the 
practical applications of scientific principles to nutrition for mankind. 



DIETETIC TECHNICIAN PROGRAM 

The Dietetic Technician program in Broward County is a joint offering 
of the Board of Public Instruction and Broward Community College, leading 
to the Associate in Science degree awarded by the college. The first year is a 
structured series of lecture, laboratory, and clinical experiences as described 
in the American Dietetic Association publication "Essentials of an Accept- 
able Program of Dietetic Technician Education." These must take place 
under the direction of a Program Director and a clinical instructor, both of 
whom have been approved by the American Dietetic Association in institu- 
tions and facilities also carrying this approval. Atlantic Vocational Center 
is the only institution in the county which has applied for such approval. 

The Dietetic Technician functions at the management level performing 
supervisory responsibilities under the direction of the Registered Dietician. 
Typical duties of the Dietetic Technician are: to supervise employees, plan 
menus, purchase food, give diet instruction and information to patients, plan 
and supervise special functions, and train employees. The Dietetic Tech- 
nician is an integral member of the health care delivery team in an occu- 
pation offering both personal and financial rewards. 

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Diatetic Technician Program 
Pollution Control 



DIETETIC TECHNICIAN PROGRAM 
(A.S. Degree) 

Management Option 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Dietetic Technician 
Program: 

1 . Completion of 70 semester hours of credit with a grade point average 
of 2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
COMMUNICATIONS 

ENG 101 and 104 6 semester hours 

(or ENG 095 and 103 will satisfy degree requirements) 
MATH 

MTH 131 3 semester hours 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

PSY 201, SOC 211 6 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following Science courses: 
BIOLOGY 

BIO 100 and 105 4 semester hours 

CHE 131, 132, 134 7 semester hours 

4. Completion of the following courses in major field: 
FSA 204, HMA 265, HRI 110, HRI 200, HRI 205, 

NTR 263 18 semester hours 

5. Completion of the following courses in related areas: 
DT 100, DT 102, DT 104, DT 106, DT 110, DT 112, 

DT 114 and DT 116 24 semester hours 

6. Completion of two semester hours of Physical Education activities. 

7. Completion of requirements C, D, E, and F on page — . 

At the time the catalog went to Press a Nutrition Option was being 
planned. 



POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL 
TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

(A.S. Degree) 

The Pollution Prevention and Control Technology Programs are de- 
signed to prepare students for careers at the supervisory and managerial 
levels of employment. The Programs' emphasis is on technical and admin- 
istrative skills development as well as a liberal education. Program goals 
include understanding of local government operations and contemporary 
management concepts as they relate to the technical specialties in the broad 
spectrum of Pollution Prevention and Control occupations including: 

Water Control Operations 
Wastewater Control Operations 

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Pollution Prevention & Control Technology 



Air Pollution 
Noise Control 
Nuclear-Radiological Pollution Control 

The first two specialty programs, Water Control Operator and Waste- 
water Control Operator, have been developed through the direction of an 
active advisory committee from all levels of Utility Plant Operation and 
Management in Broward County. After completing one of the Certificate 
Programs, strong emphasis is put on up-grading of the control operator in 
management and technical skills. 

The degree program is designed to help up-grade operators to a Class B 
or Class A license in water and wastewater control. These courses follow 
closely the areas of competence identified in the state certification program. 
Licensing is administered by the Florida Department of Pollution Control 
and the Department of Health. 

For experienced operators who have their Class A or B licenses, waiv- 
ers of credits for experience and license grade is available toward the A.S. 
Degree. 

The emerging program of Air Pollution, Noise Control and Nuclear- 
Radiological Pollution Control are being identified and will be added as 
community needs are determined. 

PROGRAM FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND 
CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (A.S. Degree) 

1. Completion of 63 semester hours and a grade point average of 2.0 
or better. Four (4) semester hours of physical education activity courses 
are required unless exempt. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 

A. Communications 6 semester hours 

(1) ENG 095 Fundamentals of Writing or 
ENG 101 Composition 

(2) SPE 100 Speech Communication 

(3) ENG 102 Composition or ENG 104 Composition or 
ENG 103 Technical Report Writing 

B. Social Sciences 6 semester hours 

(1) PSC 121 or 122 Government 

(2) PSY 100 Human Relations in Business & Industry or 
PSY 201 General Psychology or 

(3) SOC 211 General Sociology 

C. Mathematics and Science 10 or 11 semester hours 

(1) MTH 131 Basic College Mathematics or 3 hours 

MTH 171 Technical Algebra AND 3 hours 

(2) CHE 131 General Chemistry and 3 hours 

CHE 132 General Chemistry and 3 hours 

CHE 1 34 General Chemistry Lab OR 1 hour 

(3) BIO 107 Audiotutorial Biology and 4 hours 

GY 105 Physical Geology 3 hours 

GY 106 Physical Geology Laboratory 1 hour 

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Water Control Operator Certificate 



3. Completion of the following requirements in related 

fields 15 semester hours 

A. Public Administration 

(1) PA 100 Theories of Public Administration 

(2) PA 211 Supervisory Methods in Municipal Administration 

(3) PA 210 Municipal Public Works Administration 

B. Business Administration 

(1) BA 121 Accounting Survey I 

(2) BA 231 Business Law I 

4. Completion of 13 hours in the field 

of concentration 13 semester hours 

A. Water Control Operator Specialist 

(1) SAN 100 Introduction to Water Plant Operations 

(2) SAN 102 Basic Hydraulics & Laboratory Tests for Water 
Plant Operations 

(3) SAN 104 Water Plant Operations Control 

(4) SAN 106 Operation & Management of a Water 
Treatment Plant 

B. Wastewater Control Operator Specialist 

(1) SAN 101 Introduction to Wastewater Plant Operations 

(2) SAN 103 Basic Hydraulics & Laboratory Tests for Waste- 
water Plant Operations 

(3) SAN 105 Wastewater Plant Operations Control 

(4) SAN 107 Operation & Management of a Wastewater Treat- 
ment Plant 

Other fields of concentration to be announced. 

5. Completion of four semester hours of Physical Education 

Activities HPR 4 hours 

(Not required of veterans or students 29 years or older) 

6. Electives 9 hours 
They must be selected from the following areas. 

A. Public Administration. 

B. Mathematics & Science. 

C. Cooperative Work Study. 

7. Completion of requirements C, D, E and F, on page 57. 



WATER CONTROL OPERATOR SPECIALIST 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Course No. Name Credit Hours 

SAN 100 Introduction to Water Plant Operations 4 

SAN 102 Basic Hydraulics and Laboratory Tests 

for Water Plant Operations 3 

SAN 104 Water Plant Operations Control 3 

CWS 201 Cooperative Work Study I 3 

CWS 202 Cooperative Work Study II 3 

Total 16 

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Courses — Pollution Control 



WASTEWATER CONTROL OPERATOR SPECIALIST 
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Course No. Name Credit Hours 

SAN 101 Introduction to Wastewater Plant Operations 4 

SAN 103 Basic Hydraulics and Laboratory Tests for 

Wastewater Plant Operations 3 

SAN 105 Wastewater Plant Operations Control 3 

CWS 201 Cooperative Work Study I 3 

CWS 202 Cooperative Work Study II 3 

Total 16 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL 

SAN 100 INTRODUCTION TO WATER PLANT 

OPERATIONS 4 semester hours 

Includes history of water supply and treatment, characteristics of potable 
water, water uses — domestic and industrial and water resources glossary. 
Students will make several on-site plant visitations and have an extensive 
review of Florida water standards and regulations. A thorough study of 
certification standards and professionalism are also included. 

SAN 101 INTRODUCTION TO WASTEWATER 

PLANT OPERATIONS 4 semester hours 

Includes history of wastewater treatment and disposal, characteristics of 
wastewater, water pollution, wastewater glossary, certification standards 
and professionalism, pollution control standards and personal hygiene. 
Extensive review of Florida Department of Pollution Control regulations 
and testing procedures is also included. Several on-site plant visitations 
are incorporated. 

SAN 102 BASIC HYDRAULICS AND LABORATORY TESTS FOR 

WATER PLANT OPERATIONS 3 semester hours 

The student will perform mathematics exercises including conversion factors 
as they relate to application of formulas used in daily water treatment 
plant operations. He then applies these formulas to laboratory use as 
he learns water sampling techniques and physical, chemical and biological 
analysis used in daily plant operator routine. Prerequisite: SAN 100. 

SAN 103 BASIC HYDRAULICS AND LABORATORY TEST FOR 

WASTEWATER PLANT OPERATIONS 3 semester hours 

The student performs mathematics exercises including conversion factors 
as they relate to application of formulas used in daily wastewater plant 
operations. He then applies the formulas to laboratory use as he learns 
wastewater sampling techniques and physical, chemical and biological 
analysis used in daily plant operation routine. Prerequisite: SAN 101. 

SAN 104 WATER PLANT OPERATIONS 

CONTROL 3 semester hours 

The student will study in detail water supply availabilities and water 
treatment methods and control. Prerequisite: SAN 100 and SAN 102. 

307 



Public Services 



Tourism Industries Administration Program 



SAN 105 WASTEWATER PLANT OPERATIONS 

CONTROL 3 semester hours 

The student will study in detail wastewater collection systems and waste- 
water treatment processes and control. Prerequisite: SAN 101 and SAN 
103. 

SAN 106 OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT OF A 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 3 semester hours 

Detail study is made into the design, operation and management practices 
of a water treatment plan. Water distribution systems including water 
storage and transmission is thoroughly studied. Prerequisite: SAN 100, 
SAN 102 and SAN 104. 

SAN 107 OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT OF A 

WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT 3 semester hours 

Detail study is made into the design, operation and management practices 
of a wastewater treatment plant. Included is a study of the methods of 
effluent and sludge disposal. Prerequisite: SAN 101, SAN 103, and SAN 
105. 



TOURISM INDUSTRIES ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 

Tourism is the largest industry in the world. Career opportunities are 
similarly global, but nowhere are they brighter than on Florida's Gold 
Coast. This fortunate region is one of the few which combines the attractive- 
ness of a destination with the accessibility of a transportation center. All 
trends point to this area's becoming one of the 3 or 4 most important 
centers for tourism in the world. 

This growth will require vast numbers of people educated to function 
in all segments and at all levels of the industry. To serve this diversity, both 
the mid-management A.S. degree and the transfer A. A. degree are offered. 

It is recommended that the student take the Travel Agency I (Begin- 
ning) and Travel Agency II (Advanced) courses in the Adult and Vocational 
Division of the Broward County Schools before or concurrently with TIA 
100. 

PROGRAM FOR TOURISM INDUSTRIES ADMINISTRATION 

(A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

**TIA 100 Intro, to Tourism TIA 105 Tourism Industries 

Industries Administration 3 Administration Operations 

HRI 110 Supervisory Practicum 3 

Development 3 BA 121 Accounting Survey .3 

BA 150 Business Mathematics 3 BA 113-115 Basic Typing 3 

ENG 101 English Composition 3 ENG 104 Coposition 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 

308 



Public Services 



Tourism industries Administration Program 



Term ffl-A 

HRI 200 Organization and 

Personnel Management 3 

GEO 201 Geography 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

TIA 200 Tour Packaging 3 TIA 215 Tourism Industries 

BA 122 Accounting Survey II 3 Administration Management 

BA 105 Office Procedures 3 Practicum 3 

Modern Foreign Language 3 BA 230 Accounting for 

HPR Physical Education 1 Travel Agents 3 

B A 26 1 Office Management 3 

Modern Foreign Language 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 

Term UI-B 

HRI 230 Marketing 3 

GEO 202 Geography 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 

'''"^It is recommended that the students take the Travel Agency I (beginning) 
and Travel Agency II (advanced) courses in the Adult and Vocational 
Division of the Broward County Schools before or concurrently with 
TIA 100. 



PROGRAM FOR TOURISM INDUSTRIES ADMINISTRATION 

(A.A. Degree) 



FIRST 

First Term 
**TIA 100 Intro, to Tourism 

Industries Administration 3 

HRI 110 Supervisory 

Development 3 

ENG 101 English Composition .3 

Social Science elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



YEAR 



Second Term 
105 Tourism Industries 
Administration Operations 

Practicum 3 

221 Principles of Accnt I .3 
ENG 104 Composition 3 

Social Science elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 



TIA 



BA 



Term ffl-A 

HRI 200 Organization and 

Personnel Management 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

HPR Physical Education 1 

Total Semester Hours 7 



309 



Public Services 



Courses — Tourism Industries 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BA 222 Prin. of Accounting II 3 TIA 215 Tourism Industries 
Humanities elective 3 Administration Management 

MTH elective 3 Practicum 3 

Modern Foreign Language 3 BA 230 Accounting for 

HPR Physical Education . 1 Travel Agents 3 

BA 261 Office Management or 
Elective 3 

Modern Foreign Language 3 

Science* 3 or 4 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 15 or 16 



Term UI-A 

Science** 3 or 4 

Economics elective 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 or 7 



^Many upper division colleges require a laboratory science. 

^It is recommended that the students take the Travel Agency I (beginning) 
and Travel Agency II (advanced) courses in the Adult and Vocational 
Division of the Broward County Schools before or concurrently with 
TIA 100. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
TOURISM INDUSTRIES ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 

TIA 100 INTRODUCTION TO TOURISM 

INDUSTRIES ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

An overview to show the history, organization, problems, opportunities 
and possible future trends in the many areas which comprise the travel 
and tourism industries. Emphasis is on the economic benefits and social 
implications of tourism. This course would be beneficial to the purchaser 
of tourism services as well as the marketeer. ^ 

TIA 105 TOURISM INDUSTRIES ADMINISTRATION 

OPERATIONS PRACTICUM 3 semester hours 

Work experience (average — 15 hours/wk) in an approved segment of the 
Tourism Industries coordinated with a weekly on-campus seminar. Faculty 
makes regular appraisals of the learning progress through on-site visitations 
and consultation with the student and his supervisors. Research projects and 
written reports commensurate with the individual's career goals are required. 

TIA 200 TOUR PACKAGE 3 semester hours 

How to create, develop and sell package tours. Methods of customizing 
tours through the proper matching of destinations with market segments. 
Prerequisite TIA 100 or instructor approval. 

TIA 215 TOURISM INDUSTRIES ADMINISTRATION 

MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM 3 semester hours 

Management Practicum Continuation of TIA 105 with the emphasis shifted 
from skill level duties to managerial functions. 



310 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE INSTITUTE 

Criminal Justice 

Corrections 

Police Science 

Crime Scene Technology 

Broward Police Academy 

Holt Training Program 

The Criminal Justice Institute has been made possible by the financial 
support of the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration by the Federal 
Department of Justice and the Governor's Council on Criminal Justice. The 
Institute is designed to serve the needs of all facets of the Criminal Justice 
Agencies of Broward County. Operated by Broward Community College, its 
purpose is to serve all government divisions of Broward County, large or 
small and to upgrade the administration of Criminal Justice. 

Students preparing to enter Florida State University to pursue a bac- 
calaureate degree should follow the University Parallel programs leading to 
an A. A. degree in Pre-Law Enforcement or Pre-Corrections. 

The A.S. degree in Police Science is a two year degree for students who 
wish to enter directly into a police career. 

The A.S. degrees in Criminal Justice and Corrections will permit stu- 
dents to qualify for acceptance at Florida Atlantic University, and Florida 
International University, Biscayne College & Nova University to seek a 
baccalaureate degree at the same time they prepare to enter their profession. 

Non-credit seminars and workshops are offered to police to meet the 
training needs of the Criminal Justice agencies of Broward County and 
southeast Florida. These are offered under the auspices of the J. Lester Holt 
Law Enforcement program, established in memory of the late J. Lester Holt, 
Chief of Police of the City of Fort Lauderdale. The program is a joint 
enterprise of the Broward County Chiefs of Police Association and Broward 
Community College. 

The Criminal Justice Institute holds a Florida Police Standards Board 
Training Certificate which authorizes the basic Police Academy, the Auxil- 
iary Academy and Police Career Development courses. 

Programs offered in Corrections are for both pre-service students and 
those presently employed. These programs include the study of the rehabili- 
tation process through treatment in confinement, probation and parole of 
both juvenile and adult offenders. 

A Program in Crime Scene Technology is available as a specialty in 
the Law Enforcement field. 

Criminal Justice students who have a clear cut plan to acquire specific 
skills along with their degree selection may, with prior approval of the 
Director, substitute specific courses (up to 15 credits) to achieve their aim. 

311 



Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice Requirements 

Waivers are offered to Criminal Justice students with exensive non- 
credit experience and/ or training. Students will be able to receive credit 
for specific courses by satisfactorily completing all requirements and exami- 
nations for the course. Applications should be made to the Director of the 
Criminal Justice Institute. 

Requirements for the Associate in Arts Degree in Pre-Law Enforce- 
ment: 

1. Completion of 65 semester hours of credit and a grade point average 
of 2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
COMMUNICATIONS 9 semester hours 

ENG 101 and 102 or 104 (6) 

SPE 100 (3) 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 24 semester hours 

PSY 201 (3) 

SOC 211, 222, 225, and ANT 225 (12) 

PSC 121, 122 or 205 (3) 

HISTORY 101 and 102 (6) 
MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

MTH 100 or higher level (3) 
SCIENCE 7 semester hours 

BIO 100 and 105 (4) 

AST 101, GY 105, PHY 130, SCI 101 or 

CHE 107 (3) 
HUMANITIES 6 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following requirements in Criminal Justice: 

CJ 100, POL 101, and 102 9 semester hours 

4. Completion of Physical 

Education Activities 4 semester hours 

(Note: Not required of veterans or students 29 years of age and older.) 

5. Completion of at least 3 credits of electives to be taken from the 
following courses: 

Social Sciences, Science, Economics 

of Statistics 3 semester hours 

6. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours of residence at 
Broward Community College including the last 12 semester hours. 

7. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advise- 
ment Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 
The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

8. Remove all admission conditions. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

Requirements for the Associate in Arts Degree in Pre-Corrections: 

1 . Completion of 65 semester hours of credit and a grade point average of 
2.0 or better. 

312 



Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice Requirements 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
COMMUNICATIONS 9 semester hours 

ENG 101 and 102 and 104 (6) 

SPE 100 (3) 
SCIENCE 7 semester hours 

BIO 100 and 105 (4) 

AST 101, GY 105, PHY 130, SCI 101 or CHE 107 (3) 
MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

MTH 100 or higher level (3) 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 24 semester hours 

PSC 121, 122 or 205 (3) 

HIS 101 and 102 (6) 

PSY 201 (3) 

SOC 211, 222, 225, and ANT 225 (12) 
HUMANITIES 6 semester hours 

3. Completion of the following allied subjects 9 semester hours 

CJ 100 (3) POL 110 (3) and COR 101 (3) 

4. Completion of Physical Education activities 4 semester hours 

5. Completion of at least 3 credits of electives to be taken from the 
following areas: 

Psychology, Sociology, Economics or Statistics 3 semester hours 

6. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours of residence at 
Broward Community College including the last twelve semester hours. 

7. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advisement 
Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. The 
student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

8. Remove all admission conditions. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 



Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Criminal Justice: 

1 . Completion of 64 semester hours of credit and a grade point average of 
2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
COMMUNICATIONS 6 semester hours 

ENG 101 and 102 or 104 (6) 
MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

MTH 100 or higher level (3) 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 18 semester hours 

PSC 121, 122 or 205 (3) 

PSY 201 (3) 

SOC 211, 222 and 225 (9) 

HIS (3) 

HUMANITIES 6 semester hours 

SCIENCE 6 semester hours 

313 



Criminal Justice 



Criminal Justice Requirements 



3. Completion of 21 credits in the major field of concentration: 

CJ 100, POL 101, POL 102, POL 110, 

POL 111, POL 201, POL 211 21 semester hours 

4. Completion of four semester hours of Physical Education 

Activities 4 semester hours 

(Not required by veterans or students 29 and older.) 

5. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours of residence at 
Broward Community College including the last 12 semester hours. 

6. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advisement 
Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. 

The student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

7. Remove all admission conditions. 

8. Attend all official graduation exercises. 



Requirements for Associate in Science Degree in Police Science: 

1. Completion of 64 semester hours of credits and a grade point average 
of 2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
COMMUNICATIONS 6 semester hours 

ENG 101 and 103 (6) 

(Completion of ENG 095 and 103 will satisfy degree requirements.) 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 15 semester hours 

PSC 121, 122 or 205 (3) 

PSY 201 (3) 

SOC 211, 222 and 225 (9) 
MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

MTH 091, 092, or 100 (3) 

3. Completion of the following requirements in related areas: 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

BA 260, 261 or 262 (3) 

4. Completion of 24 hours in the major field of concentration. 

CJ 100, POL 102, POL 110, 

POL 111, POL 201, POL 202, POL 211 24 semester hours 

5. Completion of four semester hours of Physical 

Education Activities 4 semester hours 

(Not required of veterans or students 29 and older.) 

6. Completion of at least nine credits of electives to be selected from the 
following: 

Data Processing, Humanities, Social Science, Science, Business Adminis- 
tration, HPR 152, POL 209, and SPE 100 9 semester hours 

7. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours of residence at 
Broward Community College includes the last 12 semester hours. 

314 



Crimlnat Justice 



Criminal Justice Requirements 



8. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advisement 
Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. The 
student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

9. Remove all admission conditions. 

10. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree in Corrections: 

1 . Completion of 64 semester hours of credit and a grade point average of 
2.0 or better. 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
COMMUNICATION 6 semester hours 

ENG 101 & 102 or 104 (6) 

SCIENCE 6 semester hours 

MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

MTH 100 or higher level (3) 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 15 semester hours 

SOC 211, 222 and 225 (9) 

PSY 201 (3) 

PSC 121 or 122 or 205 (3) 
HUMANITIES 6 semester hours 

3. Completion of Physical Education electives 4 semester hours 

4. Completion of the following in the major field of 

concentration 23 semester hours 

CJ 100 (3) Intro, to Criminal Justice 

POL 110 (3) Criminal Law 

COR 101 (3) American Corrections 

COR 111 (3) Confinement Facilities 

COR 201 (3) Probation & Parole Procedures 

COR 202 (3) Correctional Services in the Community 

COR 210 (3) Correctional Casework 

COR 211 (3) Correctional Seminar 

5. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at Broward Community College, including the last twelve semester 
hours. 

6. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advisement 
Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. The 
student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

7. Remove all admission conditions. 

8. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

Requirements for the A.S. Degree in Crime Scene Technology: 

1 . Completion of 66 semester hours of credit and a grade point average of 
2.0 or better. 

315 



Criminal Justice 
Police Science 

2. Completion of the following requirements in General Education: 
COMMUNICATION 6 semester hours 

ENG 101. and 103 (6) 
(Completion of ENG 095 and 103 will satisfy degree requirements) 
SCIENCE 11 semester hours 

CHE 107 (3) & 108 (1) 

BIO 100 (3) 

PHY 130 (3) and 131 (1) 
MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours 

MTH 100 or 131 (3) 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 12 semester hours 

PSC 121, 122, or 205 (3) 

PSY 201 (3) 

SOC 211 and 222 (6) 

3. Completion of Physical Education 

Electives 4 semester hours 

4. Completion of at least SIX hours of electives to be selected from the 
following: Humanities, Social Science, Business Administration, or 
Police Science 6 semester hours 

5. Completion of the following in the major field of 

concentration 24 semester hours 

CJ 100 (3) Intro, to Criminal Justice 

POL 101 (3) Police Administration I 

POL 110 (3) Criminal Law 

POL 111 (3) Criminal Evidence and Court Procedures 

POL 201 (3) Criminal Investigation I 

POL 211 (3) Criminal Investigation II 

POL 212 (3) Crime Scene Processing I 

POL 213 (3) Crime Scene Processing II 

6. Completion of a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of residence 
at Broward Community College, including the last twelve semester 
hours. 

7. Completion of evaluation of graduation requirements in the Advisement 
Office at the time of advisement/ registration for the final term. The 
student is responsible for completing all graduation requirements. 

8. Remove all admission conditions. 

9. Attend all official graduation exercises. 

POLICE SCIENCE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

This program is designed to assist working police officers to achieve 
practical knowledge of the administration and operation of a modern police 
department and its subdivisions and to meet promotional requirements as 
they might be established by the police agency. For police officers only. 

PSC 121 or 122 Political Science 3 credits 

CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 credits 



316 



Criminal Justice 



Criminal Justice Programs 



POL 101 Police Administration I 3 credits 

POL 102 Police Administration II 3 credits 

POL 110 Criminal Law 3 credits 

POL 111 Criminal Evidence 3 credits 

POL 201 Criminal Investigation I 3 credits 

POL 202 Traffic Problems & Administration 3 credits 

POL 211 Criminal Investigation II 3 credits 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 credits 

Total Hours 30 

CORRECTIONS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

PSC 121 or 122 or 205 Political Science 3 credits 

CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 credits 

POL 110 Criminal Law 3 credits 

COR 101 American Corrections 3 credits 

COR 111 Confinement Facilities 3 credits 

COR 201 Probation & Parole Procedures 3 credits 

COR 202 Correctional Services in the Community 3 credits 

COR 210 Correctional Casework 3 credits 

COR 211 Correctional Seminar 3 credits 

SOC 211 General Sociology 3 credits 

Total Hours 30 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR PRELAW ENFORCEMENT 

(A.A. Degree) 







FIRST 


YEAR 




First Term 






ENG 


101 Composition 


3 


ENG 


HIS 


101 World Civilization 


3 


HIS 


PSC 


121 or 122 or 205 


.3 


POL 


CJ 


100 Intro, to Criminal 




HPR 




Justice 


3 


ANT 


HPR 




1 


SOC 



Total Semester Hours 



13 



Second Term 

102 or 104 Composition 3 

102 World Civilization 3 

101 Police Adm. I 3 

Physical Education .1 

225 Intro, to Anthropology 3 

201 General Sociology .3 

Total Semester Hours 16 



SUMMER TERMS 

MTH 100 Gen. Ed. College 

Math 3 

PSY 201 Gen. Psychology 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

BIO 100 Prin. of Biology 3 Science 3 

BIO 105 Prin. of Biology Lab 1 SOC 225 Juv. Delinquency 3 

SOC 222 Criminology 3 Elective 3 

Humanities 3 Humanities 3 

POL 102 Police Adm. II 3 SPE 100 Intro. Speech 3 

HPR 1 HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours 14 Total Semester Hours 16 



317 



Criminal Justice 



Criminal Justice Programs 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR CORRECTIONS (A.A. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

HIS 101 World Civilization 3 HIS 102 World Civilization 3 

CJ 100 Intro, to Criminal ANT 225 Intro, to Anthropology 3 

Justice 3 SOC 21 1 Gen. Sociology 3 

PSC 121 or 122 or 205 3 HPR 1 

HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 



SUMMER TERMS 

MTH 100 Gen. Ed. College 

Math 3 

PSY 201 Gen. Psychology 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
BIO 100 Prin. of Biology 
BIO 105 Prin. of Biology Lab 
Elective 

Humanities 

POL 110 Criminal Law 

SOC 222 Criminology 

HPR 



Total Semester Hours 



.3 
1 
3 

.3 
3 
3 
1 

17 



Second Term 
COR 101 American Corr. 

Science 

Elective 

Humanities 

SOC 225 Juv. Delinquency 
HPR 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE (A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

PSC 121 or 122 or 205 3 POL 101 Police Adm. I 3 

CJ 100 Intro, to Criminal POL 111 Criminal Evidence and 

Justice 3 Court Procedures 3 

POL 1 10 Criminal Lav^ 3 HPR 1 

HPR 1 SOC 21 1 Gen. Sociology 3 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours 13 

SUMMER TERMS 

MTH 100 Gen. Ed. College 

Math. 3 

HUM .3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
PSY 201 Gen. Psychology 3 

Science 3 

POL 102 Police Adm. II 3 

POL 201 Crim. Investigation I 3 
HPR 1 

SOC 222 Criminology 3 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Second Term 
SOC 225 Juv. Delinquency 3 

Humanities 3 

Science 3 

POL 211 Crim. Investigation II 3 
HPR I 

History elective 3 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



318 



Criminal Justice 



Criminal Justice Programs 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR CORRECTIONS (A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 ENG 102 or 104 Composition 3 

CJ 100 Intro, to Crim. Justice 3 COR 111 Conf. Facilities 3 

COR 101 American Corr. 3 Science 3 

POL 110 Criminal Law 3 SOC 211 Gen. Sociology 3 

HPR 1 HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours 13 Total Semester Hours .13 

SUMMER TERM 

MTH 100 Gen. Ed. Col. Math 3 

PSY 201 Gen. Psychology 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 
COR 201 Prob. & Parole 3 

COR 202 Corr. Svcs. Comm. 3 

Humanities 3 

PSC 121 or 122 or 205 3 

SOC 222 Criminology 3 

HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



Second Term 

COR 210 Corr. Casework 3 

COR 211 Corr. Seminar 3 

Humanities 3 

Science 3 

SOC 225 Juv. Delinquency .3 

HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR POLICE SCIENCE (A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 

PSC 121 or 122 or 205 3 

CJ 100 Intro, to Crim. Justice 3 
POL 110 Criminal Law 3 

HPR 1 



Total Semester Hours 



13 



Second Term 
ENG 103 Technical Report 

Writing 3 

POL 101 Police Adm. I 3 

POL 1 1 1 Criminal Evidence 3 

HPR 1 

SOC 211 Gen. Sociology 3 

Total Semester Hours 13 



SUMMER TERMS 

MTH Elective 3 

PSY 201 Gen. Psychology 3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 

First Term Second Term 

Elective 3 SOC 225 Juv. Delinquency 3 

BA Elective 3 Elective 6 

POL 102 Police Adm. II 3 POL 202 Traffic Problem & 

POL 201 Crim. Investigation I .3 Administration 3 

HPR 1 POL 211 Crim. Investigation II 3 

SOC 222 Criminology 3 HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours 16 Total Semester Hours 16 



319 



Criminal Justice 



Courses — Criminal Justice 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR CRIME SCENE TECHNOLOGY 

(A.S. Degree) 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

ENG 101 Composition 3 

CJ 100 Intro, to Crim. Just. 3 

POL 201 Crim. Invest. I 3 

POL 110 Crim. Law 3 

HPR 1 

Total Semester Hours .13 



Second Term 
ENG 103 

POL 211 Crim. Invest. II 
CHE 107 & 108 
POL 111 Crim. Evidence 
HPR 

Total Semester Hours 



SUMMER TERM 

MTH 100 Gen. Ed. College 

Math or 131 3 

PSY 201 Gen. Psychology .3 

Total Semester Hours 6 



SECOND YEAR 



First Term 

POL 101 Pol. Admin. I 3 

PSC 121, 122 or 205 .3 

POL 212 Crime Scene Process 13 

BIO 100 3 

SOC 211 Gen. Sociology 3 

HPR 1 



Total Semester Hours 



16 



Second Term 
SOC 222 Criminology 3 

PHY 130 3 

PHY 131 1 

POL 213 Crime Scene Process. II 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

HPR 1 



Total Semester Hours 



17 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CJ 100 INTRODUCTION TO 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 semester hours 

Course will examine the philosophy and history of law enforcement. 
Included are: a survey of Criminal Justice problems and crime, organi- 
zation and jurisdiction of local, state and federal enforcement agencies, 
and a survey of professional qualifications and opportunities. 

COR 101 AMERICAN CORRECTIONS 3 semester hours 

An overview of American corrections system: its development, local 
problems, state prison and institutional procedures, treatment approaches, 
future trends, and related facilities and agencies. 

COR 111 CONFINEMENT FACILITIES 3 semester hours 

Reviews the origin and development of jails, prisons, and correctional 
facilities. A study of institutional procedures including physical plant, 
custody and control, administration and management procedures, inmate 
treatment, and preparation for return to the community. 

COR 201 PROBATION AND 

PAROLE PROCEDURES 3 semester hours 

Examines this important community based treatment aspect of the cor- 
rections system. Reviews philosophy and development, the presentence 
investigation, and supervision methods. Juvenile practices are also included. 



320 



Criminal Justice 



Courses — Criminal Justice Program 



COR 202 CORRECTIONAL SERVICES 

IN THE COMMUNITY 3 semester hours 

Emphasis on community treatment programs as alternatives to institu- 
tionalization, use of volunteers and sub-professional aides, release and 
furlough programs, and an examination of community resources that can 
be brought to bear on the correctional task. 

COR 210 CORRECTIONAL CASEWORK 3 semester hours 

A practical career development course covering the basic working pro- 
cedures in the corrections field. Includes interview techniques, report writ- 
ing, counseling and supervision in correctional and community settings, 
and a look at specialized problems such as vocational and educational 
deficiencies, and alcohol and drug addiction. 

COR 211 CORRECTIONS SEMINAR 3 semester hours 

This course will be a survey of the corrections system including guest 
speakers from related disciplines, field trips to confinement facilities, and 
projects involving local agencies concerned with the corrections process. 

POL 101 POLICE ADMINISTRATION I 3 semester hours 

Principles of organization, administration and functioning of police de- 
partments to include inspection and control, personnel, training and 
operations. 

POL 102 POLICE ADMINISTRATION H 3 semester hours 

A continuation of POL 101 with emphasis on operational services, records, 
communications, custody, etc. (Replaces POL 200.) 

POL 105 SURVEY OF LAW ENFORCEMENT 3 semester hours 

A survey course designed for recruit policemen at the Broward County 
Police Academy. The broad aspect of Law Enforcement are presented with 
various academic disciplines to acquaint police with their role in American 
society. Course will substitute for CJ 100. 

POL 110 CRIMINAL LAW 3 semester hours 

Courses will be concerned with the sources and elements of criminal law. 
Emphasis will be placed on criminal law as related to law enforcement 
officers with particular attention given to the rights and responsibilities of 
officers in enforcing various criminal laws. 

POL 111 CRIMINAL EVIDENCE AND 

COURT PROCEDURES 3 semester hours 

An examination of the rules governing the admissibility of evidence, 
specifically as they affect the law enforcement officer in the processes of 
arrest, force, search, seizure, preservation, custody, testimony and courtroom 
procedures. 

POL 201 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION I 3 semester hours 

The investigation activity of a police department is studied to evaluate its 
organization, functioning and relationship with other divisions and agencies. 
Emphasis is placed on the administration, report writing and procedural 
aspects of investigation. 

POL 202 TRAFFIC PROBLEMS 

AND ADMINISTRATION 3 semester hours 

An examination of the police responsibility in the area of motor vehicles 
and traffic problems to include the areas of Engineerng, Education and 

321 



Criminal Justice 



Courses — Criminal Justice Program 



Enforcement. The organization and operation of a traffic activity will be 
developed and techniques for enforcement investigation and prevention 
will be studied. 

POL 203 CRIME AND DELINQUENCY 

PREVENTION 3 semester hours 

This course is structured to examine the many crime prevention techniques. 
Security measures, patrol prevention procedures, and crime trends are 
discussed in detail. The problem of juvenile crime is also viewed in respect 
to its implication to the police community. 

POL 209 CURRENT TOPICS IN 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 3 semester hours 

This course is structural to provide proficiency in the identification of 
problem areas and the application of problem solving techniques. A term 
paper is utilized to demonstrate complete staff work. Various Criminal 
Justice Agencies will be visited and prominent officials will participate in 
seminar sessions. (Will substitute for any POL 200 level requirement.) 

POL 211 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION II 3 semester hours 

An introduction to the scientific aspects of investigation known as Criminal- 
istics, with emphasis on crime scene techniques, the collection and preserva- 
tion of evidence and the examination of evidence. Students will be 
familiarized with the capabilities and limitations of a police laboratory. 
Fee: $5.00. 

POL 212 CRIME SCENE PROCESSING I 3 semester hours 

This course will develop the specific skills utilized in the processing of 
evidence from collection through identification, evaluation and preparation 
for the court room. Prerequisites are POL 201 and 211. Fee: $5.00. 

POL 213 CRIME SCENE PROCESSING 11 3 semester hours 

The knowledge and skills developed in the prerequisites, POL 201, 211 
and 212 are coordinated in practical exercises which will develop expertise 
in the complete processing of crime scenes. Fee: $5.00. 




322 



VI 



ROSTER 



Administration 
and Faculty 



COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

A. HUGH ADAMS, B.S., M.S., Ed.D President 

CLINTON D. HAMILTON, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Executive Vice President 

GEORGE W. YOUNG, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice President 

for Student Development 

JOHN F. MORACK, B.S., B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D Vice President 

DAVID A. GROTH, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Vice President for Academic 

Affairs and Director of Community Services 

THOMAS E. BROWN, B.A., M.P.A Director of Personnel 

REX BRUMLEY, B.S., M.A Director of Athletics 

ISAAC CALL, B.A., M.A. Director of Learning Resources 

BRUCE D. IVEY, B.S. M.Ed Assistant to the President 

GRADY W. DRAKE, B.S., B.S. in L.S Director of Libraries 

ALBERT FIELDS, B.S.B.A. Director of Internal Auditing 

DONALD HULMES, L.L.B., J.D Attorney 

WILLIAM C. STUCKRATH, JR., B.S Director of Physical Plant 

ALBERT ROBERTSON, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S Director of Federal 

Programs and Development 

GLEN A. ROSE, B.S., M.P.H.E., Ed.D Registrar 

FRED L. SCOTT, B.S., M.Ed., M.A Director of Data Systems 

CLETUS SIEFKER, B.S Director of Accounting 

THEODORE TAYLOR, B.S., M.A., Ed.D Director of Special Services 

MANTHA VALHOS, B.S., M.A. A., Ph.D., Director of Institutional 

Research and Systems Planning 

CAROL J. FEVDLEY, B.S., M.A., Ed.S., Ed.D. Director of 

Interinstitutional Relations 

WALTER F. THOMASON, B.A., M.A Director of 

Cooperative Education 

JOHN M. WYNN, B.A., M.A Director, Career Services 

and Financial Aid 

W. HALL WHALEY, JR., B.S Comptroller 

BETTY J. GREGORY, B.S Director of Purchasing 

ANN ELLEN CHANDLER, B.S., M.A., D. Phil, et Litt Director of 

Cultural Affairs, Special Programs & Bailey Hall 
JOSEPH J. DEBLASE, B.A Director of Auxiliary Services 



CENTRAL CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION 

CURTIS S. MURTON, JR., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Provost 

WILLIS N. HOLCOMBE, II, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D Dean of 

Academic Affairs 

ADRIAN MESA, B.S., M.S Librarian, South Campus 

MALCOLM BLACK, B.M.F., M.M.E., Ed.D Registrar 

SANDRA C. GRADY, A.A., B.Ed., M.Ed Coordinator of 

Community Services 

KATHARINE P. TYMESON, B.A., M.S.W Dean, Student 

Development 



325 



NORTH CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION 

CARL M. CRAWFORD, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D Provost 

LEROY A. CHURCH, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Dean of Academic Affairs 

JOE W. CASEY, B.S., M.A., Coordinator of Community Services 

ROBERT MEINHOLD, B.B.A., MBA Registrar 



The Faculty 



Abbott, Frances Biology 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
Adams, A. Hugh President 

B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Florida State University 
Adkins, Betty Jean Department Head, English, 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Miami Central Campus 
Ames, Richard, D.D.S. Dental Director, Dental Assisting 
Anderson, La Monte E. Art 

B.S.Ed., M.F.A., Bowling Green University 
Andrews, Alton B. Assistant Director, 

B.S., University of Rhode Island Athletics, North Campus 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Asal, Kareem Chairperson, Division of Mathematics, 

B.S.E., M.S.E., Arkansas State University North Campus 

Ed.D., University of Mississippi 
Audet, Thelma Medical Assisting 

B.S., Mount St. Mary College 

M.T., Massachusetts Memorial Hospital — Medical Technology 
Aurand, Alvin D. Engineering 

B.S., Michigan State University 

M.S., Florida State University 
Bailey, John M. Public Services 

B.S., M.S., Florida International University 
Bailey, William G. Department Head, Physical Sciences, 

B.S., Trenton State Teachers College Central Campus 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 
Banerjee, Amal Biology 

B.S., University of Calcutta 

M.S., College of the Pacific 

Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Barton, Wayne E. History 

B.A., Western Michigan University 

M.A., University of Miami 
Battle, Colin Chairperson, Division of Business Administration, 

B.S., University of Florida North Campus 

M.B.A., University of Massachusetts 
Bethel, Jacquelyn E. Business Administration 

B.A., Marietta College 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 

326 



Bishop, Dan H. Physics 

B.S., M.A., Ball State Teachers College 
Black, Malcolm Campus Registrar, Central Campus 

B.M.E., Jackson College 

M.M.E., University of Wisconsin 

Ed., Nova University 
Boase, John Art 

B.A., M.A., Ohio State University 
Bocchino, Irmgard Speech 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 

M.A., University of South Florida 
Bockstege, Ben Jr. Mathematics 

B.S., Indiana University 

M.S., Northern Illinois University 
Bowen, William C. Department Head, Aerospace Technology, 

B.S., University of Florida Central Campus 
Branca, Frank Psychology 

B.A., M.S., Florida State University 
Brantferger, Marjorie Department Head, Nursing, South Campus 

B.S., Emory University 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Braunstein, Milton, M.D. Medical Director, Respiratory Therapy 

B.A., Rutgers University 

M.D., New Jersey College of Medicine 
Brett, John Chairperson, Division of Allied Health Technology 

B.S., State University 

Teachers College Cortland, New York 

M.A., The City College of New York 
Brock, James J. Data Processing 

B.S., Lincoln Memorial University 

M.Ed., University of North Carolina 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Brock, Joan E. Business Administration 

B.S., Tennessee Polytechnic Institute 

M.S., University of Tennessee 
Brooks, James A., Jr. Music 

B.S., M.M., Duquesne University 

Ph.D., Washington University 
Brown, Frances Library 

B.A., M.Ed., University of Florida 
Brown, Hildred R. Nursing 

B.S., Hampton Institute of Virginia 

M.A., Jersey City State College 
Brown, John H. Air Conditioning Technology 

B.S.M.E., Pennsylvania State University 

M.B.A., New York Institute of Technology 
Brown, Stewart M. Chairperson, Division of Social Sciences, 

B.A.E., M.Ed., University of Florida Central Campus 

327 



Brown, Thomas E. Director of Personnel 

B.A., University of South Florida 

M.P.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Brumley, Rex Director of Athletics 

B.S., Sam Houston State Teachers College 

M.A., George Peabody College 
Bunch, John M. Social Science 

B.A.E., M.Ed., University of Florida 
Burdick, Marina Garcia Department Head, Modern Foreign Language, 

B.A., Brooklyn College Central Campus 

M.A., Columbia University 
Burford, Judy Nursing 

B.S.N., Old Dominion University 

M.S.N., University of Kentucky 
Burgess, Barbara English 

B.S., Florida Memorial College 

M.A., University of Florida 
Burke, Thomas H. Physical Education 

B.A., Transylvania College 

M.A., University of Alabama 
Burns, Lona English 

B.A., Woman's College, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 

M.A., University of Alabama 
Caballero, Alfredo A. Spanish 

B.A., University of Kentucky 

M.A., University of Miami 
Calbert, Myrtle Nursing 

B.S.N. , Florida State University 
Call, Isaac Director of Learning Resources 

B.A., Mars Hill College 

M.A., Appalachian State University 
Cameron, Gibson A. Jr. Counselor 

A.B., Central Methodist College 

M.Ed., St. Louis University 
Campbell, Bernard M. English 

B.A., King College 

M.A., Southwest Texas State Teachers College 
Cappello, Joseph Drama 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 

M.A., Florida State University 
Carabelli, Marcella Biology 

B.S., University of Miami 

M.S., University of Miami 
Carl, Mary Jo English 

B.S., Indiana State University 

M.A., Purdue University 
Casey, Joe W. Coordinator of Community Services, 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State University North Campus 

M.A., George Peabody College 

328 



Catalo, Eileen Nursing 

B.S.N., Florida International University 
Cauflfiel, Paul W. Social Science 

B.A., M.S., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Cavanagh, George J. Department Head, Speech, Central Campus 

B.A., New York State College 

M.A., University of Connecticut 
Cavendish, Thomas Department Head, Music, North Campus 

B.A., West Virginia University 

M.M.Ed., Ph.D., Florida State University 
Chandler, Ann Ellen Director of Cultural Affairs, 

B.S., Long Island University Special Programs & Bailey Hall 

M.A., Brooklyn College 

D. Phil, et Litt., University of South Africa 
Chesser, Gordon Department Head, Mathematics, Central Campus 

B.S., Bowling Green State University 

M.S., Barry College 
Chinn, James Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., Western Kentucky University 

Ed.D., Florida State University 
Chinoy, Norman Mathematics 

B.A., Monclair State College 

M.A., Seton Hall University 

M.S., Florida State University 
Church, LeRoy A. Dean of Academic Affairs, North Campus 

B.S., State University of New York 

M.Ed., Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
Clark, Ralph T. Department Head, History, Political Science, and 

B.A., Princeton Geography, North Campus 

M.A., University of Virginia 
Clement, George D. Mathematics 

B.S.E., M.Ed., University of Florida 
Cleveland, Donald Student Development Specialist 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State University 

M.S., Florida Atlantic University 
Cole, Thomas J. Department Head, Music, Central Campus 

B.A., Furman University 

M.A., Eastman School of Music 
Comes, Elaine Acquisitions Coordinator 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Comes, Gladwin Astronomy 

B.S., Stroudsburg State College 

M.S., Florida State University 
Condon, James C. Geology 

B.A., University of Illinois 

M.S., University of Iowa 
Copeland, Orion Biology 

B.S., Bethune-Cookman College 

M.S., Michigan State University 

329 



Cosier, Robert Business Administration 

B.S., M.B.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Crawford, Carl M. Provost, North Campus 

B.A., Florida A&M University 

M.Ed., Boston University 

Ed.D., University of Miami 
Crawford, Richard B. Music 

B.M., M.M., Louisiana State University 
Crispo, Neil Social Psychology 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 

Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi 
Crowe!!, Hamiiton T. English 

Ph.B., Muhlenberg College 

M.A., Middlebury College 
Curry, Frederic German, Russian 

B.A., University of Florida 

M.A., Middlebury College 

M.A.T., Wesleyan University 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Cuvillier, Pauiette French 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 

M.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Daw!dns, Algerine Secretarial Science 

B.S., West Virginia State College 

M.S., Indiana University 
DeBiase, Josepfai J. Director, A uxiliary Services 

B.A., Brooklyn College 
Demps, Annie B. Nursing 

B.S.N. , Hampton Institute 

M.A., Jersey City State College 
Dery, Wiiliam M. Cooperative Education 

M.A., University of Miami 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
DeYampert, Lucius D. Geology 

B.S., Birmingham Southern College 

M.S.T., University of Florida 
Dic!{erson, Lee Fartliing English 

B.S., Appalachian State Teachers College 

M.A., Duke University 
Dietericti, Lawrence Ray Jr. Chairperson, Division of Public Services, 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University Central Campus 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Donotiue, Timotliy W. Business Administration 

B.A., St. John's University 

L.L.B., Columbia University 

M.B.A., Akron University 
Dowerman, Louise R. Librarian 

B.A., Eastern Kentucky University 

B.S., in L.S., George Peabody College 

330 



Drake, Grady W. Director of Libraries 

B.S., University of Florida 

B.S., in L.S., Columbia University 
Dreizen, La Verne H. Department Head, Medical 

B.S., Mount Mary College Assisting Technology, Central Campus 

M.T., Jackson Memorial Hospital-Medical Technology 

M.Ed., Rorida Atlantic University 
Dry, Nellie Department Head, Business Administration, 

B.S., Concord College Central Campus 

M.S., University of Kentucky 

Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Dunlevy, Elvira Speech 

B.A., University of Michigan 

M.S., Purdue University 
Dunne, Margaret Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., Catholic University of America 
Dunne, Mary C. Nursing 

B.S.N.E., Catholic University 

M.A., Teacher's College, Columbia 
Dyer, Patricia A. Department Head, Mathematics, 

A.B., Fresno State College North Campus 

M.S., Fresno State College 
Edwards, William Music 

B.M., Richmond Professional Institute 

M.M., Indiana University 

Ph.D., Indiana University 
Eliot, C. Stevens Art 

B.A., University of West Virginia 

B.F.A., Yale University 

M.F.A., Maryland Institute 
Ellis, Lawrence Librarian 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 

M.A., Florida State University 
Ellis, M. J. Department Head, Data Processing Technology, 

B.S., Tennessee Polytechnic Institute Central Campus 

M.Ed., University of Miami 
Ellyson, Gail J. Department Head, Communications for 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University International Students, 

M.A., University of Miami Central Campus 

English Bernardine Psychology 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida 
Erickson, Jane Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
Esco, M ar jorie B. Speech 

B.A., M.A., University of Alabama 
Esparza, Eunice Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 

331 



Everett, Roger Engineering 

B.E.E., Georgia Tech 

M.S., Purdue University 
Fazzini, Rudolph V. English 

B.A., Slaem College 

M.S., Barry College 
Fields, Albert Director of Internal Auditing 

B.S.B.A., Boston University 
Findley, Carol J. Director of Interinstitutional Relations 

B.S., M.A., Indiana State University College Articulation 

Ed.S., Butler University 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Finlayson, A. Keith Allied Health 

B.S., University of Houston 
Fishe, Patricia Nursing 

Nursing, University of Tennessee 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 

M.S., Barry College 
Foss, Arthur H. Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., Boston College 
Fraizer, Shirley K. Department Head, Radiologic Technology, 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University Central Campus 

Freeman, Roy E. Controller, Computer Systems A nalyst 

B.B.A., Florida Atlantic Univ. 
Fritze, Bernard Biology 

B.S.Ed., M.S., Kansas State Teachers College 
Furlow, Richard H. Social Science 

B.A., M.A., Indiana University 
Gagliardi, Gene Electronics 

B.S.E.E., University of Connecticut 
Gallagher, Grace N ursine 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 
Gambell, Hillary Counseling 

B.A., University of Miami 

M.Ed., University of Miami 
Gavigan, Elaine Department Head, Team, Individual, and Dual Sports, 

B.S., Florida State University Central Campus 

M.A., Ohio State University 
Gilford, Anna Nursing 

B.S.N. , Florida International University 
Gifford, WUbur S. Physical Education 

B.S.P.E., M.P.H., University of Florida 
Goff, Andrea M. Secretarial Science 

B.S., M.Ed., Temple University 
Goodwin, Richard H. Department Head, Marketing Management, 

B.A., University of North Carolina Central Campus 

M.B.A., University of Miami 
Gortych, Barbara Anthropology 

B.A., Florida State University 

M.A., University of North Carolina 

332 



Cover, M. Ray Counselor 

B.S., Union College 

M.A., Eastern Kentucky University 
Grady, Sandra C. Coordinator of Community Services 

A. A., Miami-Dade Jr. College-South 

B.Ed., University of Florida 

M.Ed., University of Miami 
Grande, Luke M. English 

B.A., St. Mary's College 

M.A., Loyola University 

Ph.D., St. Louis University 
Grasso, Mary Ellen English 

B.A., Westminster College 

M.A., University of Pittsburgh 
Green, Russell B. Art 

B.S., University of Louisville 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Green, Thomas L. Geography 

B.S., M.A.J.C, University of Florida 

M.A.J.C.T., University of Miami 
Greene, William E. Jlistory 

B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Greenstein, Burton S. Department Head, Electronics, 

B.S.E.E., University of Miami Central Campus 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Gregory, Betty J. Director of Purchasing 

B.S., Cedar Crest College 
Grosso, Vincent J. Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Florida Atlantic University 
Groth, David A. Vice President for Academic Affairs and 

B.S., M.S., Iowa State University Director of Community Services 

Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Guinn, V. O. Chemistry 

B.S., M.Ed., Mississippi State University 
Haire, Ronald Chemistry 

B.S., Valdosta State College 

M.S., Florida State University 
Hall, Max Department Head, Journalism, 

B.A., University of Miami Central Campus 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Hamilton, Clinton D. Executive Vice President 

A.B., Union University 

M.A., Vanderbilt University 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
Hamilton, Terry Biology 

B.Ed., University of Miami 

M.A., Appalachian State Teachers College 
Hampton, Vera Nursing 

B.S., Florida A&M University 

333 



Handleman, Chester History, Political Science 

A.B., M.A., Clark University 

Ed.M., Massachusetts State College 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Harner, Holt W. Department Head, Biological Science, 

B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan Central Campus 

M.S., The Ohio State University 
Harper, Max W. Department Head, Social Science I, 

B.A., M.A., University of Missouri Central Campus 
Hart, Maureen Sociology 

B.S., M.S., Iowa State University 
Hart, Michael J. Sociology 

B.A., M.S., Iowa State University 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Hayes, Theresa O. Secretarial Science 

B.S., College of William & Mary 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Hays, John P. History 

B.S., University of Georgia 

M.A., Emory University 

M.Ed., Temple University 
Hearn, Saul D. Data Processing 

B.S., Brooklyn College 

M.A., George Washington University 
HefFernan, Mary L. School Nurse 

A.S., Broward Community College 

B.S., Duquesne University 
Henderson, Luther J. Mathematics 

B.S., Bethune-Cookman College 

M.S., Atlanta University 
Hernandez, Jose Department Head, Contract & Civil Engineering, 

B.S., Nat'l University of Columbia, S.A. Central Campus 

M.S.C.E., Nat'l University of Columbia, S.A. 
Hess, Kyra Art 

B.F.A., Arizona State 

M.F.A., Florida State 
Hildebrand, Boyd Department Head, Social Science H, 

A.B., University of Miami Central Campus 

M.A., Western Kentucky University 
HiU, Neda G. English 

B.A., Blue Mountain College 

M.A., Mississippi State University 
Hill, Richard D., Jr., Chairperson, Division of 

B.S., Florida State University Mathematics and Science, 

M. Ed., University of Florida Central Campus 

Hill, Sharan J. Cooperative Education 

B.A., Mary Washington College 

M.S., Radford College 

334 



Holcombe, Willis N., II Dean of Academic Affairs, Central Campus 

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College 

M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Florida 
Holmes, Lucille Biology 

B.S., Eastern Michigan University 

M.S., University of North Carolina 
Hoover, John J. Business Administration 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

M.B.A., Pace College 
Horton, Doris M. Coordinator of the Fort Lauderdale Center 

B.S., M.S., Kansas State College of Pittsburg, Kansas 

Ed.S., University of Florida 
Horton, Hettie Mathematics 

B.S., Florida A & M University 

M.A., Morgan State College 
Howell, Charles B. Jr. Business A dministration 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Florida 
Hughes, Frances P. Nursing 

B.S.N., Seton Hall University 
Huttinger, Beverly English 

B.A.E., University of Florida 

M.S., Barry College 
Iddings, Eleanor M. Business Administration 

B.S., Ball State University 

M.A., Western Michigan University 
Inciardi, Frank E. Business A dministration 

B.A., Brooklyn College 

L.L.B., Brooklyn Law School 
Ivey, Bruce D. Assistant to President 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
Johnson, Gloria English 

B.A., M.A., University of Miami 
Jones, Lee C. Department Head, Behavioral Science, North Campus 

B.S., M.S., Mankalo State College 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Kapelinski, Kenneth Drama 

B.A., Lewis University 

M.F.A., Wayne State University 
Kempton, Willard R. French 

B.A., Dartmouth College 

M.A., Columbia University 
Kennedy, Joyce Physical Education 

B.S., Kentucky State College 

M.S., University of Wisconsin 
Kennedy, Marlene L. Department Head, Secretarial Science 

B.S., M.S., Florida State Universty Central Campus 

335 



Kidd, Rex C. Education 

B.S., East Tennessee State College 

M.Ed., Duke University 

Ed.D., University of Florida 
King, Alma Physical Education 

B.S., Miami University of Ohio 

M.Ed., Bovi'ling Green State University 
King, John J. Police Science 

B.A., J.D., Loyola University 

M.P.A., Illinois Institute of Technology 
King, Lawson Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

B.S., University of Southwestern Louisiana 

M.S., University of Tennessee 
King, William B., M.D. Medical Director, Radiologic Technology 

B.S., University of Notre Dame 

M.D., Indiana University 
Koch, Adolph M. Psychology 

B.A., George Washington University 

M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

L.L.B., St. Johns University 

J.S.D., St. Lawrence University 
Koenig, Julie English 

B.A., Northwestern University 

M.A., Michigan State University 
Kremp, Barbara Department Head, Medical Assisting, 

B.S., Wayne State University Central Campus 

M.T., Woman's Hospital — Medical Technology 
Kruse, Barbara Nursing 

B.S.N. , University of Florida 
Landers, R.L. Chairperson, Division of Health, 

B.B.A., M.E., Baylor University Physical Education, and Recreation, 

Central Campus 
Laschinski, George History and Political Science 

B.S., University of Miami 

M.A., American University 
Lash, Neil A. Electronics 

B.E.E., City College of New York 

M.A., New York University 

Ed.D., University of Missouri 
Ledford, James English 

B.A., Harding College 

M.A., Ball State University 
Lee, G. Shelby Department Head, English North Campus 

B.S.E., Arkansas State University 

M.S.C., Arkansas State University 
LeMaire, Alfred A. English 

B.A., M.A., University of Oklahoma 
Linger, Neil B. Librarian 

B.A., Stetson University 

M.L.S., Florida State University 

336 



Little, Lowell Music 

B.M., University of Illinois 

M.M., Ed., Colorado State College 
Lloyd, Marguerite Department Head, Casualty Insurance, 

A. A., Miami-Dade Central Campus 

B.B.A., M.B.A., University of Miami 
Long, Letty Librarian 

B.A., William Smith College 

M.L.S., State University of New York 
Lubin, Lester Department Head, Physical Therapy 

B.A., M.A., New York University 
Luck, Phyllis English 

B.S., Auburn University 

M.A., University of Alabama 
MacGregor, Douglas Department Head, Corrections 

B.S., Florida Southern College 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Macnamara, Nancy Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College 

B.A., M.Ed., University of Florida 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Makos, John J., HI Biology 

B.S., M.S., University of Massachusetts 
Maney, Margaret English 

B.A., American University 

M.A., State University of New York 
Marsee, Dwight Physical Education 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.S., Indiana University 
Martin, Joel M. Astronomy 

B.S., M.A.E., University of Florida 
Matthews, Patricia English 

B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S., Florida Atlantic University 
McCarthy, William P. Police Science 

B.B.A., New York University 
McGarry, Edward G., M.D. Medical Director, Medical Assisting 

A. A., B.S., M.D., George Washington University 
McGahee, Elaine Librarian 

B.S., Florida Memorial College 

M.L.S., Florida State University 
McGehee, William M. Physical Education 

B.S., Tennessee Technological University 

M.A., Middle Tennessee State University 
McGowan, James F. Department Head, Police Science 

B.S., Michigan State University 

M.A., St. Lawrence University 
McLean, David P. B. Landscape Technology 

B.S., University of Miami 

337 



Meadows, Paul, M.D. Medical Director 

B.A., University of Iowa 

M.D., Harvard Medical School 
Medusky, John W. Mathematics 

B.S., U.S. Military Academy 

M.S., University of California 

M.S.T., University of Florida 
Meeker, Robert, Jr. English 

B.S., M.S., University of Miami 
Meinhold, Robert Campus Registrar, North Campus 

B.B.A., Hofstra University 

M.B.A., St. Johns' University 
Mesa, Adrian Librarian, South Campus 

B.S., University of Havana 

M.S., Kansas State Teachers College 
Minicone, Lorenz Contracting and Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., Columbia University 
Mitchell, Karen Department Head, Art, North Campus 

B.Ed., University of Miami 

M.A., Michigan State University 
Mondin, Gordon Contracting and Civil Engineering 

B.S., Florida State University 
Montondo, Margaret Librarian, North Campus 

A.B., University of Kentucky 

M.S., Catholic University 
Moore, Leon W. Physical Education 

B.S., Grambling College 

M.S., University of Colorado 
Moore, Mercy English 

B.A., Florida A&M University 

M.A., Atlanta University 
Morack, John Vice President for Business Affairs 

B.S.B.A., Geneva College 

M.Ed., Duquesne University 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Morris, Clinton E. Physical Education 

B.S., Livingston State 

M.A., George Peabody College 
Moskowitz, Janet, CD. A. Dental Assisting 

A.S., Gulf Coast Community College 
Mullikin, Mildred Department Head, Drama 

B.A., Lander College 

M.A., University of Alabama 
Murton, Curtis S., Jr. Provost, Central Campus 

B.A., M.A., University of Michigan 

Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Nance, Marshall Real Estate 

J.D., Stetson University 



338 



Narel, Ronald A. Counselor 

B.A., Hofstra University 

M.A., Colgate University 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
Nash, Peggy Social Science II 

B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Nelms, Ellen G. Chemistry 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 
Nichols, Donald Speech 

B.A., Westmar College 

M.A., Temple University 
Nichols, Judith B. English 

B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina 
Nitka, Pearl M. Department Head, Reading, North Campus 

B.A., Glassboro State College 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Nittel, Jenevieve Business Administration 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Nixon, Robert A erospace 

B.S., University of Southern California 
O'Brien, Linda Nursing 

B.S., St. Anselm's College 

M.N., University of Florida 
Oppenheimer, Samuel L. Division Chairperson, 

Newark College of Engineering Engineering Technology, 

M.B.A., New York Institute of Technology North Campus 
Opperman, William Science 

B.S., M.S., University of Florida 
Owen, Elsie E. English 

B.A., M.A., University of Miami 
Pactor, David E. Art 

B.S., M.A., Ball State Teachers College 
Palmer, Dudley A. Department Head, Landscape and Pest Control 

B.S.A., University of Florida Technology. Central Campus 
Parke, Janet E. Physical Education 

B.S., Capital University 

M.S., Indiana University 
Parker, Thomas F. Counselor 

B.S.Ed., Northern Illinois University 

M.A., Roosevelt University 
Pawlowski, John Division Chairperson, Communications, 

B.A., Northern Illinois University Central Campus 

M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University 
Perez, Raul C. Department Head, Architectural Technology, 

B.A., University of Florida Central Campus 
Perfect, Mary L. Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
Perry, James, M.D. Medical Director, Physical Therapist Assistant Program 

B.A., M.D., Marquette 

339 



Pharr, Janrett C. Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Chattanooga 
M.A., Instituto Technologico de Monterrey 

Polcyn, Alyce R. Nursing 

B.S., M.S., Ohio State University 
Porter, Margaret F. Department Head, Reading, 

B.A., Converse College, South Carolina Central Campus 

M.Ed., University of Virginia 
Porterfield, William A. Division Chairperson, Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., Middle Tennessee State College and Recreation 

Ed.D., University of Alabama North Campus 
Quianthy, Richard Speech 

B.A.E., M.Ed., University of Florida 
Ratliff , Dale Psychology 

B.A., Centre College 

Th.M., D. Min., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 
Reagan, Robert P. Physics 

B.S., U.S. Military Academy 

M.S., Ohio State University 
Rebstock, James Sociology 

B.S., M.S., Mankato State College 
Redding, John L., Jr. History 

B.A., M.A., University of Kentucky 

M.A., University of Miami 
Redmond, Charles Department Head, Fire Science, 

B.S., Fordham University Central Campus 
Reno, Eric E. English 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 

M.A., San Francisco State College 
Rhodes, C. E. Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., University of Texas 

M.S., Florida Atlantic University 
Rhodes, Phyllis Jane 7: Counselor 

B.S., M.A., West Virginia University 
Rigg, Donald C. Coordinator, Hollywood Center 

B.A., Yale University 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Roberts, George Psychology 

B.A., Mercer University 

M.A., Peabody College 
Roberts, Mary Pardee Librarian 

B.A., Stetson University 

B.A. in L.S., Emory University 
Robertson, Albert Director of Federal Programs 

B.A., Duke University and Development 

M.Ed., Ed.S., Florida Atlantic University 
Rocker, Sidney Department Head, Career Development 

B.A., L.D., Cornell University 

340 



Romaglia, Ann Nursing 

B.A., Jersey City State College 

M.E., Florida Atlantic University 
Romance, Dennis J. Business Administration 

B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo 

M.B.A., Arizona State University 
Rose, Glen, A. Registrar 

B.S., M.P.H., University of Florida 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Rosen, John F. Department Head, Science, North Campus 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois 
Roulston, Reybum R. Business Administration 

B.A., M.A., University of Minnesota 
Ryan, Thomas J., Jr. History 

B.S., Florida Southern College 

M.A., University of Alabama 
Sams, Doris L. Counselor 

B.A., Seton Hall College 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
Scheer, Grace Coordinator of Honors Program 

B.A., B.A., University of Miami 
Schenks, Maxine G. Business Administration 

B.A., M.A., University of Kentucky 
Scherperel, Loretta Music 

B.M., Greensboro College 

M.M., Eastman School of Music 
Schindeler, Edward J. A. Political Science 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
Schmerler, Oscar A. Religion 

B.A., University of Leeds 

M.A., Syracuse University 
Schultz, Donald Police Science 

B.S., Long Beach State College 

M.P.A., University of Southern California 
Schulz, Rex, Sr. Police Science 

B.S., University of Nebraska 
Schwartz, Audrey S. Psychology 

B.A., Beaver College 

M.A., Hunter College 

Scott, Fred L. Director of Data Systems 

B.S., Miami University, Ohio 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

M.A., Rutgers 
Shaw, David Alan English 

B.A., M.Ed., University of Florida 
Sheeks, John T. Business Administration 

B.S., M.A., University of Minnesota 

B.A. & Education Specialist 

341 



Shekmar, Llewellyn Librarian 

B.A., Georgia State College for Women 

M.A., University of Georgia 
Sheldon, Russell Aerospace 

F.A.A., Advanced Ground Instructor's License 
Shenosky, Peter S. Business A dministration 

B.S., Murray State Teachers College 

M.A., Rollins College 
Siefker, Cletus Director of A ccounting 

B.S., Xavier University 
Sivik, Frank P. Biology 

B.S., Providence College 

M.S., University of Massachusetts 
Slepecky, Michael Department Head, Police Training 

B.S., Kent State University 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Smith, Patricia Reading 

B.A., M.A., Florida State University 
Smith, Susan Malter Counselor 

B.A., M.Ed., University of Florida 
Snively, David Music 

B.M., M.M., Eastman School of Music 
Spahn, George Physics 

B.S., University of Dayton 

B.S.C.E., Catholic University 

M.S., Case Institute of Technology 

Spanton, Katherine Speech 

B.A., M.A., Bowling Green State University 

Stebner, Norman S. English 

B.S., Southern Methodist University 

M.A., St. Cloud State College 
Stills, Diane G. Special Services 

B.A., Glassboro State College 

M.A., Kean College of New Jersey 
Struckrath, William C, Jr. Director of Physical Plant 

B.S., State Teachers College, Cahfornia, Pa. 
Stunt, Sharon P. English 

B.A., M.A., University of Miami 
Sullivan, Gary H. Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., City College of New York 
Tarullo, Daniel A. English 

A.B., M.A., D.C.T., D.A., University of Miami 
Taylor, Theodore Director, Special Services 

B.S., M.A., Florida A&M University 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Teague, Elizabeth Nursing 

B.S., Adelphi College 

M.S., Hunter College 

342 



Tenenbaum, Linda Department Head, Nursing, Central Campus 

B.S., Duke University 
M.A., Wake Forest College 

Theriault, Harold John History 

B.S., Massachusetts Maritime Academy 

M.S., Florida State University 
Thomason, Walter F. Director of Cooperative Education 

B.A., M.A., University of South Florida 
Tobe, Lawrence Department Head, Art, Central Campus 

B.S., M.A., University of Louisville 
Tracy, Betty J. Reading 

B.A., Barry College 

M.Ed., University of Miami 
Trees, Philip L. Chairperson, Division of Business 

B.S., M.A., Ball State Teachers College Administration and 

Economics, Central Campus 
Tymeson, Katharine P. Dean, Student Development, 

B.A., University of Maryland Central Campus 

M.S.W., Columbia University 
UUivarri, Phyllis Drama 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Van Alstyne, Judith English 

B.A., Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
Van Arsdall, Charles S. Mathematics 

B.S., Eastern Kentucky University 

M.A., Louisiana State University 
Vlahos, Mantha Director of Institutional Research 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University and Systems Planning 
Wagner, Aurelia Counselor 

B.A., D'Youville College 

M.S., Barry College 
Walker, William Psychology 

B.A., University of Florida 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Mississippi 
Wall, Carlton D. Business Administration 

B.S., Belmont College 

M..^., George Peabody College 

Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Wallace, Mary E. Art 

B.S., M.A., Ball State Teachers College 
Warwick, Lewis A. Mathematics 

B.A., Asbury College, Kentucky 

M.A., University of Michigan 
Watts, Leon Counselor 

B.S., Florida A&M University 

M.A., University of Michigan 
Weir, Judith E. Librarian 

B.A., State University College 

M.L.S., State University of New York at Albany 

343 



Weldon, John C. French 

B.A., M.A., University of Kentucky 
Wells, John D. Philosophy 

B.A., M.A., Florida State University 
Wetmore, Loretta Nursing 

B.S., Nazareth College 
Whaley, W. HaU, Jr. Comptroller 

B.S., Florida State University 
Wheat, Leroy Department Head, Aquatics, Theory 

B.S., Northeast Missouri State and Recreation, Central Campus 

M.A., University of Missouri 
Whipple, Ormond Chairperson, Division of 

B.S., General Motors Institute Engineering Technology, 

Ed.E., Nova University Central Campus 

Wilkinson, Donna K. Division Chairperson, Communications, 

B.A., Muhlenberg College North Campus 

M.A., George Peabody College 
Will, Albert A., Jr. Biology 

B.L.A., M.S., University of Florida 
Wilson, James Speech 

B.A., M.A., Kansas State Teachers College 
Wisnioski, Stanley W. Jr. Director, Criminal Justice Institute 

B.G.S., M.E., University of Massachusetts 
Wong, Muriel Nursing 

B.S., M.N., University of Florida 
Wood, Julianne Speech 

B.A., University of South Dakota 

M.A., University of Nebraska 
Woodle, Jimmy O. Chairperson, Division of Humanities, 

B.A., Furman University Central Campus 

M.M., Indiana University 
Wyatt, Danny Cooperative Education 

B.S.E., Florida Atlantic University 
Wynn, John M. Director, Career Services and Financial Aid 

B.A., Divine Word College 

M.A., Divine Word Seminary 

M.A., Catholic University 
Wynn, Pamela Social Science U 

B.A., M.A., University of Texas 
Yater, Roy L. English 

B.A., Mexico City College, Mexico 

M.A., Florida State University 
Young, George W. Vice President for Student Development 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University 
Ziel, Constance, R.D.A. Department Head, Dental 

B.S., West Virginia University Assisting, Central Campus 



344 



vn 



AWARDS 



■f' ••'•'--.^'.■.^l. 



^?«i§^V*;s>*,, !^■^i■^.■^ «f^w*.^-«C|^ ' 





DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD 

Periodically for outstanding meritorious service in behalf of the College 
a Distinguished Service Award is presented. Awardees for the year in which 
the award was given are set forth below: 

Mr. Gene A. Whiddon — 1973 




347 



vm 



FOUNDATION 



BROWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION, INC. 

A community college and the community it serves are synonymous. As 
partners in service, interested citizens of the community have established a 
foundation to assist the College in the continued expansion of higher 
educational opportunities and services to the community at large and to 
provide a means for active citizen participation in the future growth and 
development of their community college. Public funds derived from taxes 
provide the basic needs for higher education, but private support is often 
needed to provide those components necessary for true academic excellence. 



BROWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION, INC. 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Gene A. Whiddon, Chairman 

Robert L. Elmore, Vice Chairman 

Marietta Benevento, Secretary 

Alfred D. Harrington, Jr., Treasurer 

Dr. Hugh Adams 

Dr. Roy A. Church 

Dr. Clinton D. Hamilton 



A. Robertson, Executive Director 



Dr. Willis N. Holcombe 

Glenn Lewis 

Steven J. McDonald 

Fred Millsaps 

Margaret L. Roach 

Richard Roe 

W. Hall Whaley 



HONORARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Maynard Abrams 
Lawrence H. Adams 
John Allen 

Boyd H. Anderson, Jr. 
Ralph E. Anderson 
E. William Ball 
Walter Banks 
Derek A. Barrett 
Guy Bass, Jr. 
Jack F. Beal 
Dr. Curtis Benton, Jr. 
Dr. Donald Berman 
Ben A. Bollinger 
James W. Brown 

E. L. Browne 
William J. Burke 
Otto M. Burkhardt 
George L. Caldwell 
James D. Camp, Jr. 
George W. Church 

F. Peter Clements 
James H. Collins, Jr. 
Marjorie F. Cowan 
Dr. George Crane 



Charles Creighton 
Claude Davis 
James Donn 
Harold Dyer 
George W. English 
William Ernst 
Norman Evans 
James Farquhar 
Judge John G. Ferris 
Robert F. Ferris, Sr. 
Randolph Fisher 
June Foshe 
Dr. Charles Forman 
Hamilton Forman 
Judge Arthur J. Franza 
James Gardener 
R. M. Gardner 
Albert E. Garnitz 
Dr. Alfred Geronemus 
Dr. J. C. Gilbert, Jr. 
Daniel S. Goodrum 
Allen Gordon 
Theodore T. Gore 
John A. Grant, Jr. 



Charles H. Gravett 
Edee Greene 
Joel K. Gustafson 
Lee P. Hatsfield, Jr. 
Hubert R. Heilman 
Walter Hobbs 
William Horvitz 
Robert Hudson 

F. R. (Jack) Humphries 
Dick Hunter 

Fred Hunter 
O. E. Hutchison 
Norman Jackson 
S. K. Jordan 
David Keating 
Dr. Edward C. Kenney 
Louis W. King 
Richard Kowalske 
William F. Leonard 
Frederick Lippman 
Robert B. Lochrie, Jr. 
William Markham 
Ralph Marrinson 

G. W. (Bill) McCall 



351 



Russell McCaughan 
J. Walter McCrory 
Fred Millsaps 
Judge James F. Minnet 
Albert Montella 
Lester E. Moody 
Judge J. H. Moore II 
S. A. Mudano 
William A. Mullen 
H. Eugene Nace 
Alwen Neuharth 
Earl Nightingale 
Albert J. W. Novak 
Judge F. A. Orlando 



Dr. Paul W. Panakos 
Charles E. Paoli, Jr. 
Billy M. Peed 
Ferguson E. Peters 
Fred P. Pettijohn 
Dr. Robert Pfiefer 
Marilyn Pinkerman 
Dwight L. Rogers, Jr. 
A. W. Saarinen, Jr. 
Arthur W. Saarinen, Sr. 
Judge James J. Simons 
Stanford K. Smoker 
Morris H. Sterling 
Leon Sultan 



Robert B. Taylor 
Judge G. W. Tedder, Jr. 
Florence Tustison 
Kenneth F. Vordermeier 
Thomas J. Walker 
Judge Louis Weissing 
Bernie B. Welch 
Dr. Juan S. A. Wester 
E. Thomas Wilburn 
Virginia Young 
Dr. Walter Young 
Dr. Marcus Zbar 
William K. Zinke, Sr. 




352 



IX 



ADVISORY 
COMMITTEES 



Technical Education 



Advisory Committees 
Technical Education 



ACCOUNTING AREA 



Andrew E. Bryan, CPA 
Thomas Castello, CPA 



Richard K. Kornmeier, CPA 
L. R. Wheeler, Jr., CPA 



Ernie S. Bell 
Carlton W. Hamilton 
Joseph C. Mackey 



AEROSPACE 



Robert D. Walker 

Robert Rawls 

L. E. Wagener 



AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY 



Alvin Coy 
Charles Keast 



Hugh Kirkpatrick 

Phiroze Umrigar 

Everett P. Palmatier 



ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY 



Lawrence Browning 
Robert Dickinson 



Charles S. Houha, P.E. 
John Kantor, A.I.A. 



BANKING 



Dennis P. Clark 
Jean Hinson 
Richard Latham 



Edward Leach 

Joseph Barber 

Donna Waldron 



CONTRACTING AND CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 



Richard A. Baker, A. LA. 
Charles Bolton, P.E. 
Thomas Boyd 
Paul G. Davis, P.E. 



Gerald R. Fishe, P.E. 

Charles H. Houha, P.E. 

Herbert Pickle, P.E. 

Martin J. Yohalem, P.E. 



CORRECTIONS 



Judge M. Daniel Futch, Jr. 
H. Squier Hanni 
Raymond A. Long, III 



Serai Davis 
Jeflf Gill 
Dale Loback 



CREDIT UNION 



Chief Vincent A. Miro 

Judge Frank Orlando 

Verne C. Thornton 



Mary Ann Rohan 
Don Wills 



355 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE INSTITUTE 

Chief Leo Callahan Sheldon Schlesinger 

Judge John Ferris Chief Bernard Scott 

Director Stanley Kubala Philip Shailer 

Howard Levine Sheriff Edward Stack 

Warner Olds Judge Louis Weissing 

Andrew DeGraffenreidt Mayor E. Clay Shaw, Jr. 

DATA PROCESSING 

William Fuss Robert Tritt 

Karsten Rist James Williams 

Don Fodal 



DENTAL ASSISTING 

Mary Allen, C.D.A., R.D.H. Dolores Hagmaier, C.D.A. 

Fred J. Ackel, D.D.S. Normal K. Landman, D.D.S. 

Louise Bendix, C.D.A. Edward S. Nacht, D.D.S. 

Lavonne R. Carter, D.M.D. Ray C. Olson, D.D.S. 

Alfred Geronemus, D.D.S. William Shumpert, D.D.S. 

William Wegman, D.D.S. 

DIETETIC TECHNOLOGY 

Ann Chickowski Marianne Pack 

Joan Cumnock Adelaide Sanchez, R.D. 

Sister Gonzega Dorothy Wenger 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Virgil Barnhill Tracy Smith 

William Flewellen Arnold Velazquez 

William McKenzie 

ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 

Arthur Burns Edward Clageit 

Ricardo Carreras Wesley Jory 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Michael Bakst George Rhodes, M.D. 

Richard Beeman Viola Regan, R.N. 

Jere Creed, M.D. Edward Spievack, M.D. 

R. S. Dellerson, M.D. Jack Stevens 

John Gardella Leatrice Turlis, R.N. 

Pat Martinez, R.N. D.D. Wells, M.D. 

Jean Ready, R.N. Sheryle Wills, R.N. 

356 



FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 



Captain Robert Arndt 
Chief Edward Bailey 
Chief John Coyne 
Chief Julian Shear 
Chief John Lissiter 



Captain John SuIUvan 

Chief George TilHnghast 

Ted KakHs 

Chief Francis Bisson 



Pierre Duhon 
Charles Fredy 
Hubert Heilman 



Jack Allen 
Michael Koch 
Bernard Resnick 



FOOD SERVICE ADMINISTRATION 

James Wilson 

Chef Jean-Claude Mille 

C. E. Perry 

HOTEL/MOTEL ADMINISTRATION 

David S. Searles 

Jed White 

William F. Wernerback 



D. Thomas Fazio, CPCU 
Joseph Gazzi 
Rocci Lombard 
Irene McKee, CPCU 



INSURANCE (GENERAL) 

William H 



Walter G. 



Rhett, Jr., CPCU 

Joan Sapp 

Chester Tozzi 

Williams, Jr., C.I.C. 



INSURANCE (LIFE) 



Thomas F. Buckley, CLU 
Robert O. Cash, Jr., CLU 
H. Sherman Davis, CLU 
Andre Faucher, CLU 
Erven S. Friedlander, CLU 
Laurence A. Godden, CLU 
Arnold G. Haroldson, CLU 
Jerome Levine, CLU 



Richard L. Marks, CLU 

Mort W. Rowe, CLU 

William E. Sallade, II CLU 

William F. Scott, CLU 

Clifford W. Siegrist, CLU 

Robert W. Weiss, CLU 

Albert S. Winters, CLU 



Albert A. Fields, Jr. 
Frank Langford 
Larry Masterson 
Jack Raffety 
D. Eugene Shaeffer 



INTERNAL AUDITING 



Julius Ujhelyi 

L. R. Wheeler, Jr. 

Phil Trees 



LANDSCAPE TECHNOLOGY 



Franklin Chaplin 
Bert Chatfield 
Donald Gerhart 
Richard McCall 
Richard Naugle 



Betty Roberts 

Lanny Neel 

Bill Nichols 

2. Michael Oliver 

Lev^'is Watson 

Paul Wunderlich 



357 



LEGAL ASSISTANT 



Robert T. Carlile 
Harry G. Carratt 
W. Tinsley Ellis 
Norma Howard 
E. T. Hunter 



Laurance M. Hyde, Jr. 

Judie Kae Wilson 

William F. Leonard 

Donald J. Lunny 

Maurice O. Rhinehardt 

Carl Schuster 



Wayne Cordero 
Jim Davis 
Diane Obermayr 



MARKETING MANAGEMENT 



James L. Seely 

Steve Shelton 

Pete Welch 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Charles Bolton, P.E. 
David Linderman 
William A. Peterson, P.E. 



Gaylor Shirley 
L. E. Wagener 



Bruce Burgess, M.D. 
Doris Horton 
Ann Jordana, CM. A. 
Donald Plevy, M.D. 



MEDICAL ASSISTING 



Barry Portnoy, M.D. 

Cathy Schenck, C.M.A. 

William G. Stafford 

Doris Wendell, C.M.A. 

Gilberto Wanderley, M.D. 



MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 



Al Blum 
Gibson Cameron 
Michael Felder, M.D. 
Carol Harper, MT 
Russell Jones, M.D. 



Ethel Miller, R.N. 

Mary O'Conner, MT 

Suzanne Sauls, MT 

Cynthia Hallahan, MLT (A.S.C.P.) 

Patricia Gaiefsky, MT (A.S.C.P.) 



MINORITY AFFAIRS 



Hayv^ood Benson 
Edith Burchett 
Chester A. Byrd 
Samuel Collier 
Jeanette Copeland 
Andrew DeGraffenreidt 
Larcelous Edwards 
C. V. Ford 
James Gardner 
Levi Henry 
Ulysses Home 
Evelyn Lewis 



Rose Milton 

Ellis Parker 

Sylvia Poitier 

Margaret Roach 

Greg Samuels 

Claudette Sapp 

John Saunders 

Joe Lewis Smith 

Wanema Smith 

James Stevens 

Charles Watson 

George Weaver 

Zebedee Wright 



358 



NURSING TECHNOLOGY 



Cora Braynon 
Virginia Dressier, R.N. 
Carolyn Giuffreda, R.N. 
Clare Good, R.N. 
Joseph Kump, M.D. 
Susan Levine, R.N. 
S. T. Lewis 

Sister Margretta, R.S.M. 
Nancy Oehler, R.N. 



R.N. 



Janice Osteen, R.N. 

Alan Popis, M.D. 

Jean Ready, R.N. 

Norman Silverman, M.D. 

Eleanor Smith, R.N. 

Jack Stephens 

H. W. Thompson 

Marian Thompson, R.N. 

Julia Trenker, R.N. 



PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 
(Educational Advisory Committee) 



James B. Andrews 
Joseph A. Bunsfield 
Phyllis Crowe 
John S. Demetski 



Jack K. Moore 

Gerri Preston 

Howard H. Sypher 

Joan A. Tucci 



PEST CONTROL TECHNOLOGY 



Frederick M. Diehl 
F. R. Du Chanois 



Joseph P. Irvine 
Steven Tendrich 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Mortimer Abrashkin, M.D. 

William T. Bell 

B. J. Collister 

Frank R. Fabiani, M.D. 

Richard Fowler 

David Fisher 



Richard A. Kurras 

Herman Mautner, M.D. 

Gordon McAllister, M.D. 

James Perry, M.D. 

Emmett Shaughnessy 

Robert White 

William B. Kurtz, Jr. 



POLICE SCIENCE 



Chief Leo Callahan 
Chief Oretes J. Franza 
Assistant Chief LeRoy Hessler 



Director Stanley B. Kubala 

Chief Bernard Scott 

Sheriff Edward Stack 



POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGY 



John Bramble 
Jim Baxter 
Taylor Calhoun 
John Hayes, Jr. 



Frank D. Hoble 

George Lohmeyer, P.E. 

Tom Mueller 

Bob Steytler 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



Woodward Hampton 
Richard Anderson 
Lewis A. Hester 



Howard Sypher 

James Chandler 

Robert D. Johnston 



359 



PURCHASING MANAGEMENT 



Paul Gilbert 

Dorothy Jean Holcomb 

Gordon A. Howard 



Robert K. Lowry 

John E. Pughe 

George H. Wolf 



RADIATION THERAPY 



Tim Aldrich 
Harvard Brazelle, M.D. 
Wallace B. Buchanan, M.D. 
Komanduri Charyulu, M.D. 
Ivor Fix, M.D. 
Ernesto Fonts, M.D. 
Marcia Gill, R.T.T. 
Pavlov Hudak 



Rubin Kelin, M.D. 

Mary Jane Loser, R.T.T. 

Sr. M. Mercy McGrady 

Nancy Marx, R.T.T. 

Paul Meadows, M.D. 

Mike Meredith 

Kenneth Monson, M.D. 

Richard Stull 

Mario Vicsonavich, M.D. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 



Rudolph Ahorner 
Don Blanchet, R.T. 
Maria Coflfey, R.T. 
Charles Day, R.T. 
Leon C. DeGrove, R.T. 
Robert Floger, R.T. 
J. E. Hutlas, R.T. 



Carl M. Adams, Jr. 
Robert W. Comeron 
Leroy G. Edwards, Jr. 



REAL ESTATE 



Robert Liebskind, M.D. 
Sr. M. Mercy McGrady 
Thomas McGinty, M.D. 
Stanley Margulies, M.D. 

Raymond Parks, M.D. 
Lewis J. Raia, M.D. 

Virginia Rigsbee, R.T. 
Manuel Rodriguez, R.T. 



W. A. Maier, S.R.A. 
T. Edward Thomsen 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 



Milton Braunstein, M.D. 
Jim Freund, A.R.R.T. 
Gary D. Karch, M.D. 
Edwin S. Klotz, M.D. 
Fred McMurtrie, A.R.R.T. 



Thomas J. Ormsley, M.D. 

Antonio Pizarro, M.D. 

Richard Stull 

Will Traver, A.R.R.T. 

Leon Wendell, A.R.R.T. 



Eva Burkard 
Jim Dearing 
Joan Findlay 
Perry LaCaria 



Ruth Brewer 
Ursula Elve 
Louise Ensminger, CPS 
Carol P. Harper 



SAVINGS AND LOAN 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 



Gloria Leltera 

Dorothy Snow 

Bonnie Trappe 

Alan Yablonsky 

Edward C. Lawrence 

Ralph Parilla 

Kathryn Smithers 



360 



X 

SCHOLARSHIP 
DONORS 



SCHOLARSHIP DONORS 

Abiding Savior Lutheran Church 

Anthony Adragna Memorial Scholarship 

A.E.S.O.P. 

Airlines Stewardess Association 

American Business Women's Association — Biscayne Chapter 

American Legion Post 277 

American National Bank 

Associated General Contractors 

Beach Hospital Auxiliary 

Blanche Ely Class of 65 

B.C.C. North Athletic Boosters 

Bnai Brith Herzl Lodge No. 2764 

Broward County Association of Media Specialists 

Broward County Classroom Teachers Association 

Broward County Council of P.T.A. 

Broward General Medical Center Auxiliary of Ft. Lauderdale 

Broward County Teachers Credit Union 

Broward Educational Secretaries Association (BESA) 

Robert Bubier Memorial Scholarship 

Paul Buck Memorial Scholarship 

Business & Professional Women's Club, Inc. 

Charles A. Byrne 

Cleveland District Golf Association 

Coconut Creek High School 

Conn. Higher Education Loan 

Cooper City High School 

Coral Ridge Woman's Club 

Coral Springs Woman's Club 

Cornell University 

Dania Improvement Committee 

Helen Ann Dean Memorial Nursing Fund 

Deerfield Beach High School 

E.O.C.G. 

Dario Escobar 

Eta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., Iota Chapter 

F.A.A. 

Federal Little League Concession Stand 

F.B.H. Church of Florida 

Florida Atlantic Music Guild 

Fla. Gold Coast Chapter Of The Hotel Sales Management Association 

Florida Hotel Motel Association 

Florida Peace Officers Ladies Auxiliary 

Florida Power & Light 

Fort Lauderdale High School 

Fort Lauderdale News 

Fort Lauderdale Woman's Club 

Fort Lauderdale Women's Civic Club 

Dorothy Gaffney Memorial Scholarship Fund 

363 



Gemini Women's Club t; 

Gold Coast Chapter For Mentally Retarded, Inc. l 

Gordon Jewelry Corp. > 

Gore Publishing Co. ^ 

Hallandale Civic Center Fund i 

Hallandale Community Council Scholarship 

Hubert Heilman ,; 

Hollywood Florida Scholarship Foundation, Inc. i 

Hollywood Hills High School ; 

The Homestead Scholarship Fund 

Imperial Point Woman's Club 

Junior Achievement of Broward County 

Kingston High School < 

Florida Kiwanis Foundation \ 

Kiwanis Club of Southside — Foreign Student Loan 

Madonna Academy 

McArthur Dairy 

Mc Arthur High School 

McDonald's 

Mrs. Edith McMillion Memorial Scholarship , 

Memorial Hospital Auxiliary ■ 

James F. Minnet, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

Mt. Herman A.M.E. Church, Inc. i 

National Council of Jewish Women — Hollywood Center 

National Council of Jewish Women — North Broward Section , 

National Secretaries Association, Hollywood Chapter :•; 

Navy Relief Society i 

Neighborhood Youth Corp. ] 

New Jersey Higher Education :; 

New York Higher Education Assistance Corp. ? 

North Broward Hospital Auxiliary 

North Broward Society Of The Symphony ; 

Northeast High School 

Nova High School ^ ?, 

Peabody Football Boosters Club } 

Peg's Pantry 'l 

Phi Theta Kappa — Omega Phi Chapter ■ 

Piper High School i 

Plantation High School ^ 

Plantation Orchid Society - 1 

Pompano Beach High School J 

Pompano Beach Woman's Club I 

Mrs. Robert G. Ragsdale .| 

Rotary Club of Hollywood | 

Rotary Club of Ft. Lauderdale — Foreign Student Loan j 

Rotary Club of Southwest Broward 

Anthony J. Samal Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Ruth Schmidt Music Scholarship 

Sigma Delta Chi 

Sinawik Club of Ft. Lauderdale 

364 



South Broward High School 

South Florida Chapter of the Association of Legal Administrators 

South Plantation High School 

Stewardess Alumni Association 

Stranahan High School 

Sweeting Foundation Fund, Inc. 

United Airlines Foundation 

U. S. Coast Guard Wives Club of Washington, D. C. 

Welcome Wagon of Hollywood 

V/inn-Dixie Stores, Inc. 

Woman's Auxiliary to Broward County Medical Assoc 

Woman's Auxiliary to Broward County Medical Assoc. 

Woman's Auxiliary to Broward County Medical Assoc 

Branch 
Women's Auxiliary to Broward County Dental Association 
Youth Symphony Association 



— Central Branch 

— North Branch 

— South Broward 




365 



INDEX 

Academic Advisement 35 

Academic Honors 52 

Academic Load 48 

Academic Personnel 9-12 

Academic Regulations 44 

Academic Load 48 

Adding, Dropping or Changing Schedule 48 

Admission Under Special Conditions 45 

Advanced Placement 50 

Allied Health Technology Students 46 

Audit 50 

Class Attendance 47 

Classification of Students 49 

College Level Examination Program 50 

Conduct 49 

Dual Enrollment 50 

Early Admission 50 

Examinations and Tests 47 

International Students 45 

Registration 48 

Repetition of Courses 48 

Residence 49 

Selective Service Status 49 

Term Combination 50 

Transcripts 47 

Transfer Students 44 

Transient Students 45 

Veteran Students 46 

Waiver of Credit for Experience (in Technical Areas) 51 

Withdrawals 47 

Acceleration Mechanisms 50 

Accounting Programs 71 

Certificate Program 89 

Accreditation 31 

Adding, Dropping or Changing Schedule 48 

Administration of the Curricula 51 

Administration and Faculty 324 

Administrative Boards 7 

Admission 43 

Procedures 43 

Requirements 43 

Allied Health Technology Students 46 

Under Special Conditions 45 

Advanced Placement 50 

Advisement 35 

Advisory Committees 355 

Aerospace Technology 266 

Courses 269 

366 



AIB Certificates 74 

Airline Careers, Programs 72 

Air Conditioning & Refrigeration, Program 272 

Courses 272 

Air Traffic Controller, Program 268 

Allied Health Technology Division 225 

Allied Health Technology Students, Admission Procedure 226 

Alumni 40 

Anthropology, Courses 200 

Applied Music, Individual Instruction 156 

Architecture Program 274 

Architecture Technology, Program 274 

Courses 275 

Art Lyceum 41 

Art, Department of 141 

Courses 143 

Program 141 

Articulation 33 

Associate in Arts Degree, Curricula Offered 36 

(Also see Index under "Suggested Programs — General Education") 

Associate in Arts Degree Requirements 55 

Associate in Science Degree, Curricula Offered 37 

(Also see Index under "Suggested Programs — Technical 

Education") 
Associate in Science Degree Requirements — see particular Program 

Astronomy, Program 1 69 

Courses 170 

Athletics 39 

Audit 50 

Aviation Administration, Program 266 

Banking Career, Program 73 

Basic Opportunity Grant 34 

Biological Science 171 

Biology Program 170 

Courses 171 

Board of Trustees 7 

Bookstore 39 

Building Construction, Program 279 

Courses 279 

Business Administration and Economics Division 67 

Business Administration, Programs 95 

Courses 95 

Business Education, Program 69 

Cancellation of Previous Unsatisfactory Record 52 

Career, Pilot, Program 267 

Central Campus Administration 325 

Certificate Programs, Curricula Offered 37 

(Also see Index under "Suggested Programs — Certificate") 

Chemistry, Program 173 

Courses 1 74 

367 



Child Development in Home Economics, Program 206 

Chiropractic, Program 205 

Class Attendance 47 

Classification of Students 49 

Clerical-Typist Certificate Program 93 

Clubs, Organization, and Programs 40 

College Administration 325 

College Calendar, 1975-76 13-25 

College Level Examination Program 50 

Commercial Art, Program 142 

Communications Division 1 20 

Community Services 31 

Computer Systems/ Science, Program 281 

Conduct 49 

Continuing Education, Courses 259 

Contracting and Civil Engineering Technology, Programs 277 

Courses 277 

Cooperative Education, Program 217 

Courses 218 

Corrections, Program 318 

Correspondence and Extension Courses 53 

Counseling 32 

Court Reporting, Program 89 

Credit, Unit of 51 

Crime Scene Technology, Program 320 

Criminal Justice Institute 311 

Criminal Justice, Programs 318 

Courses 320 

Cultural Programs 41 

Curricula Offered, Associate in Arts Degree Programs 36 

Curricula Offered, Associate in Science Degree Programs 37 

Curricula Offered, Certificate Programs 37 

Data Processing, Programs 281 

Certificate Program 282 

Courses 284 

Degree Requirements 54 

(For Technical Education see particular program) 

Dental Assisting, Program 228 

Dental Assisting Certificate Program 229 

Courses 229 

Dietetic Technician, Program 304 

Directory of Academic Personnel 9-12 

Distinguished Service Award 347 

Directory of Correspondence 8, 9 

Drama, Program 147 

Activities 146 

Courses 1 48 

Dropping, Adding or Changing Schedule 48 

Dual Enrollment 50 

Early Admission 50 

368 



Economics, Courses Ill 

Education Opportunity Grants 34 

Education, Programs 1 90 

Courses 192 

Electronic Technology, Programs 286 

Courses 287 

Emergency Calls 9 

Emergency Medical Technology 260 

Courses 260 

Engineering, Program (A. A. Degree) 175 

Courses 176 

Engineering Technology Division 265 

Engineering Technology Curriculum Requirements 265 

English, Department of 120 

Program 121 

Courses 1 22 

Entrance Requirements 43 

(Allied Health Technology students, page 46) 

Equal Opportunity Employment Policy 31 

Evening Classes 53 

Examinations and Tests 47 

Faculty 326 

Fashion Merchandising 75 

Fees 57 

Financial Aid 33 

Fine Arts Program 41 

Fire Science, Program 296 

Certificate Program 297 

Courses 297 

Florida Horticulture Industries Certification Board 186 

Food and Nutrition, Program 207 

Food Service Certificate Program 300 

Foreign Language, Program 129 

Foreign Students (See International Students) 126 

Foreign Studies 54 

Forestry Programs 208 

Foundation 351 

Fraternities and Sororities 43 

French, Courses 131 

General Business, Program 77 

General Education, Division of: 

Business Administration and Economics 67 

Communications 1 20 

Humanities 141 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 158 

Mathematics and Science 168 

Social Science 1 90 

General Education Programs Ofi'ered 67 

General Education Requirements (Associate in Arts Degree) 55 

General Information 29 

369 



Geography Courses 193 

Geology, Program 176 

Courses 177 

German, Courses 132 

Grades and Records Policy 51 

Graduation and Degree Requirements 54 

Grants and Scholarships 34 

Group Living Home Management, Program 261 

Courses 262 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Division 158 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Programs 159 

Courses 161 

Health Services 38 

History of College 29 

History, Programs 193 

Courses 194 

Home Furnishing Marketing, Program 76 

Honors at Graduation 57 

Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar 221 

Honors Program 53 

Horticulture (See Landscape Technology) 182 

Hospitality Centers 38 

Hotel-Restaurant-Institution/ Administration, Program 299 

Courses 301 

Housing and Interior Design, Program 209 

Humanities Division 141 

Insurance 38,47 

Insurance Careers, Program 77 

Courses 112 

Interest Clubs 42 

International Students 125 

Courses 126 

Intramural Sports Program ,, 40 

Journalism, Program 1 27 

Courses 128 

Landscape Technology, Program 181 

Courses 183 

Languages, Dept. of Modern Foreign 129 

Latin American Studies, Program 130 

Law, Program 209 

Law Enforcement, Program 311 

Learning Resources 54 

Library 62 

Loans 33 

Lyceum Programs 41 

Marketing-Management, Program 70, 82 

Mathematics and Physics 1 80 

Mathematics and Science Division 168 

Mathematics, Program 177 

Courses 178 

370 



Mechanical Engineering Technology 289 

Courses 290 

Medical Program 210 

Medical Assisting Technology, Programs 231 

Courses 234 

Certificate Program 233 

Medical Laboratory, Program 236 

Courses 238 

Merchandising Certificate Program 75 

Military Science, Courses 202 

Modern Foreign Languages, Department of 129 

Motion Picture Technology, Program 145 

Courses 146 

Music, Department of 150 

Programs 152 

Courses 154 

Activities 153 

North Campus Administration 326 

Nursing Programs 240 

Nursing Technology Program 240 

Courses 241 

N utrition. Courses 262 

Oceanography, Program 212 

Occupational Therapy Program 212 

Oflf-Campus Classes 39 

Optometry, Program 212 

Orientation 32 

Past Members 8 

District Board of Trustees 8 

Advisory Committee 8 

Pest Control Technology 186 

Courses 188 

Pharmacy, Program 213 

Pharmacology, Courses 263 

Philosophy, Courses 156 

Philosophy of the College 30 

Physical Education, Programs 159 

Courses 161 

Physical Therapist Assistant, Program 246 

Courses 244 

Physical Science, Courses 179 

Physics, Program 180 

Courses 180 

Placement and Career Planning Services 38 

Placement Testing 35 

Police Science Programs 319 

Certificate Program 316 

Political Science, Program 196 

Courses 196 

Pollution Prevention & Control, Programs 304 

371 



Courses 307 

Professional and Academic Groups 42 

Programs Offered 36,37 

(Also see Index "Suggested Programs") 

Psychology, Program 197 

Courses 198 

Public Administration, Program 293 

Courses 294 

Public Services Division 293 

Purchasing Management, Program 82 

Purposes of the College 30 

Radiation Therapy Program 251 

Courses 254 

Radio-Television Program 138 

Radiologic Technology, Program 246 

Courses 247 

Special Degree Program 249 

Courses 247 

Reading, Area of 136 

Courses 136 

Real Estate Program 83 

Records and Grade Policy 51 

Refund Policies 62 

Registration 48 

Religion, Program 157 

Courses 158 

Religious Clubs 43 

Repetition of Courses 48 

Requirements for Associate in Arts Degree 55 

Respiratory Therapy Technology, Program 256 

Courses 258 

Residence 49 

Russian Courses 134 

Schedule Changes 48 

Savings and Loan Career Program 84 

Scholarships 34 

Scholarship Donors 363 

Scholastic Honorary Groups 42 

Scholastic Standards 52 

Science (See Mathematics and Science) 168 

Secretarial Science, Program 71 

Secretarial Programs 86 

Executive or General, Legal, Medical 86-88 

Certificate Programs 90 

Selective Service Status 49 

Service Clubs 42 

Sites and Buildings 30 

Social Science Division 190 

Social Welfare, Program 199 

Sociology, Courses 201 

372 



Spanish Courses 134 

SPANS Program 220 

Courses 220 

Speech, Department of 137 

Programs 137 

Courses 139 

Speech Pathology-Audiology, Program 138 

State Board of Education 7 

State Community College Council 7 

Statistics, Course 181 

Student Activities 39 

Student Development 32 

Student Fees 57 

Student Government 40 

Student Publications 41 

Student Workstudy 35 

Suggested Programs — Certificate Programs: 

Accounting 89 

Banking Certificate (Basic) 73 

Banking Certificate (Advanced) 73 

Banking Certificate (Standard) 73 

Banking Certificate (General) 73 

Building Construction 279 

Clerical Typist 93 

Corrections 319 

Credit Union 94 

Data Processing 281 

Dental Assisting 228 

Fire Science 296 

Food Service 300 

Group Living Home Management 262 

Income Tax Preparation 90 

Medical Assisting 232 

Merchandising 75 

Motion Picture Technology 145 

Police Science 314 

Pre-School and Day Care Center 202 

Secretarial 92 

Secretarial, Advanced 90 

Secretarial, Certified Professional 93 

Small Business Administration 94 

Wastewater Control Operator 307 

Pre-School and Day Care Center 202 

Police Science 314 

Suggested Programs — General Education (A. A. Degree) 

Administrative Systems 69 

Art 141 

Astronomy 1 69 

Biology 170 

Business Administration 67 

373 



Chemistry 173 

Dental Assistant 210 

Drama 147 

Education (Elementary) 190 

Education (Secondary) 191 

English 121 

Foreign Language 130 

Geology 176 

Health Education 158 

History 193 

Journalism 127 

Latin American Studies 130 

Mathematics 177 

Marketing-Management 82 

Physical Education (Men) 159 

Physical Education (Women) 160 

Physics 180 

Political Science 196 

Pre-Agriculture Science 203 

Pre-Architecture 204 

Pre-Building Construction 204 

Pre-Child Development in Home Economics 206 

Pre-Chiropractic 205 

Pre-Computer Systems Science 281 

Pre-Corrections 206 

Pre-Dental 206 

Pre-Engineering 175 

Pre-Food & Nutrition Science 207 

Pre-Forestry in Forestry Products Technology 207 

Pre-Forestry in Forestry & Wildlife 208 

Pre-Housing & Interior Design 209 

Pre-Law 209 

Pre-Law Enforcement 209 

Pre-Medical &. Pre-Dental 210 

Pre-Medical Technology 210 

Pre-Music 153 

Pre-Music Education 153 

Pre-Nursing 211 

Pre-Occupational Therapy 212 

Pre-Oceanographic 212 

Pre-Optometry 212 

Pre-Pharmacy 213 

Pre-Physical Therapy 213 

Pre-Psychology 197 

Pre-Social Welfare 199 

Pre-Sociology 199 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine 214 

Radio and Television 138 

Recreation 161 

Religion 1 57 

374 



Secretarial Science 71 

Speech 137 

Speech Pathology — Audiology 138 

Tourism Industries Administration 308 

Suggested Programs — Technical Education. (A. S. Degree): 

Accounting 71 

Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 272 

Air Traffic Controller 268 

Airline Careers 72 

Architectural 274 

Aviation Administration 266 

Banking Career 73 

Career Pilot 267 

Commercial Art 142 

Contracting & Civil Engineering 276 

Corrections 319 

Court Reporting 89 

Criminal Justice 311 

Crime Scene Technology 315 

Data Processing (Business Option) 282 

Data Processing (Engineering Scientific Option) 281 

Dietetic Technician 303 

Dental Assisting 228 

Electronic Technology 286 

Electronics (Digital or Communication Option) 287 

Fashion Merchandising 75 

Fire Science 296 

General Business Program 77 

Home Furnishing Marketing 76 

Hotel-Restaurant-Institution Administration 299 

Insurance Careers 77 

Landscape Technology 181 

Market Management 82 

Mechanical Engineering 289 

Medical Laboratory 236 

Nursing 239 

Pest Control Technology 186 

Physical Therapist's Assistant 244 

Police Science 314 

Pollution Prevention & Control 304 

Public Administration 293 

Purchasing Management 82 

Radiation Therapy Technology 251 

Radiology 245 

Real Estate 83 

Respiratory Therapy 256 

Savings & Loan Career 84 

Secretarial, Executive or General 86 

Secretarial, Legal 87 

Secretarial, Medical 88 

375 



Tourism Industries Administration 308 

Technical Education Programs Offered 225 

Technical Education, Division of: 

Allied Health Technology 225 

Criminal Justice Institute 311 

Engineering Technology 265 

Public Services Technology 293 

Term System 51 

Tourism Industries Administration, Program 308 

Courses 310 

Transcripts 47 

Transfer Students 44 

Transient Students 45 

Transportation 38 

Unit of Credit 51 

University Parallel Degree Requirements 55 

University Parallel Programs Offered 55 

Unsatisfactory Record, Cancellation Policy 52 

Veteran Students 46 

Veterinary Medical Assisting 235 

Veterinary Medicine, Program 214 

Waiver of Credit for Experience (in Technical Education) 61 

Wastewater Control Operator Specialist, Certificate 306 

Where To Go For Help 12 

Withdrawals 47 

Workstudy Programs 35 



376 



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