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PLACES 


LIBRARY 

* r Trail Ret, 








WITH THE 
FLOW 

/ 

Student Life 



6 



36 


ALL OUT 

Academics 

THE EXTRA 
MILE 

Clubs 80 



S 


'/ J 



* FOR THE GOLD 

/ 

Athletics no 



TO THE TOP 

/ 

Individuals 164 


W'j BEYOND 


Ads/Index 


238 


PCHS LIBRARY 

5414 Cougar Trail Rd 

QubJin, VA 24084 











! 

M 


d 


I 

I 




■■MU! 











Onward we march. Destry Harding, Bill Davis, 
Jermaine McClanahan, Mike Richards, and the rest 
of the Cougar football team are introduced before 
the homecoming game against William Fleming. 
When asked what he felt while walking down those 
steps, Destry said, “Words can’t really describe the 
feeling you get when you walk down those stairs. 
You go so excited and psyched. It is such a great 
feeling.’’ 


J J 
~V 

a. 

C/5 



PLACES 


1991 Cougar Pinnacle 
Pulaski County High School 
P.O. Box 518 
Dublin, Virginia 24084 
Student Enrollment 1834 


title — 1 


















Total concentration. Karla Poole types away in her 
first period data processing class. Data processing is 
one of the classes offered in the Business 
Department. 

t 


2 — OPENING 













PLACES 


Throughout our lives, each day 
at a time, we work toward the goal 
of going places in society. As 
I students, we undergo changes 
j constantly, changes that determine 
1 our future and the places we will 
: go. As students, we see that our 

• school, our county and our society 

• are constantly changing. 

Even before the new school year 
began, the addition of computers 


in the English and Math Pods 
moved the school into the realm 
of higher technology with a new 
method of instruction. With the 
addition of computers in other 
areas of the school came computer 
— generated report cards and 
schedules. At the same time, the 
old computer building was 
transformed into the Southwest 
Virginia Governor’s School for 



Math, Science and Technology. 
With this change came a new 
concept in education for students 
in not only Pulaski County but 
also the surrounding counties. 

However, because of the 
economic situation this year and 
especially because of the Mideast 
crisis and the rise in the price of 
oil, the opportunities for students 
to experience field trips were 
drastically cut. Indeed, Pulaski 
County saw economic troubles 
with lay-offs at several local 
industries and especially with the 
closing of the AT & T plant in 
Fairlawn. 



c 

o 

CTJ 


Does this look familiar? Pulaski County High 
> School was established in 1974 when the county 
‘ high schools merged. “I have seen PCHS move 
from the status of a building to house students and 
staff to an institution with a personality, character, 

I traditions, and high expectations for all who are 
part of the school,” said Mrs. Majella Myers. Mrs. 
Myers retired at the end of December after 27 
f years of serving the county as both a teacher and an 
I administrator. 




OPENING — 3 















PLACES 


Within the first few months of 
school, Pulaski County welcomed a 
new superintendent of schools, 

Dr. William Asbury. Under his 
leadership, the school found itself 
going places in the instructional 
program. 

Because of the preparation the 
graduates had received while in 
school, they were able to meet the 
demands placed on them in their 
areas of concentration, whether 


those areas were in higher 
education or in the world of work. 
They were also moving one step 
closer to achieving their goals and 
reaching the plateaus of which 
they had dreamed. 

Within the nucleus of our 
school, activities and events are 
constantly happening. Without 


really realizing the impact of such 
simple things as getting our books 
and going to classes, we are going 
places in our lives. And each event 
that happens in our lives leads us 
one step closer to reaching our 
life-long goals. 

Becca Woolley 
Shana Taylor 



Please print your last and first name in the next 
space. Senior Shane Fralin carefully fills out the 
information sheet given to her before starting the 
SATs. Students had to be at the school between 
8:00 and 8:15 a.m. Taking the SATs for many was 
a start on the path to college. Shane said, “The 
math part of the SATs was not bad, but the verbal 
part was really tough.” 


4 —THEME 










Jason Speller 

And that comes to a total of . .. Derek Sams gives 
Robin Gallimore her change after she ordered a 
I drink at McDonald’s. Many students work after 
school to earn money and to gain on-the-job 
j experience. Derek said, “I have learned a lot from 
j working at McDonald’s, but I feel that the most 
important thing I learned was responsibility. I also 
[learned how to work well with others.” 


THEME —5 








Students drift through time, 
experiencing new depths of life 








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7 


Having the cake and eating it, too. Stephanie is performed annually by the family grooms had been engaged; and following the preparing students for “going with the flow in 

Alley, Destry Harding, Shane Blevins and Kelly management classes for which the students do ceremony, they would start their families. Other the “outside” world. 

Hill share in cutting the wedding cake as part of all the planning as well as conduct the entire classes were invited to the ceremony as the 

the mock wedding ceremonies. A mock wedding ceremony. Before the wedding, the brides and wedding guests. This activity was another step in 




Adrift on the Nile 


Memories . . . All alone on 
the Nile? Stacey Dalton and 
Rusty David share this 
special moment together. 
The students worked very 
hard to make this a 
memorable event in their 
lives. Most agreed it was a 
night they will never forget. 


Anticipation filled the air as the evening of 
May 12 approached. It was to be a night full of 
magic and excitement; it was the Junior-Senior 
Prom. This was the night that would end the 
frantic search for that perfect gown and that 
perfect tux. To Shannon Simpkins, her date was 
the most perfect thing about prom. 

Most would agree the gym never looked quite 
so nice. Juniors started decorating the gym a 
week in advance to better prepare for the night. 
When entering the gym, students would have 
thought that they were having “A Night on the 
Nile.” 

Palm trees and pyramids surrounded 
everyone. Neon hieroglyphics were everywhere 
to brighten the atmosphere. Wendy Arnold 
commented, “The decorations were very unique 


and original.” 

The traditional senior bridge, surrounded by 
gold and white balloons, was once again in 
service. Tina Spangler said, “I will never forget 
walking across the bridge; it felt good!” 

A local band, the Boomers, provided 
entertainment for the evening, playing a variety 
of music. “The band was good, but I would have 
preferred more slow songs,” said Joey Davis. 

Soon, however, the evening came to a close. 

T he night that took months of planning was 
over, and the students came to the realization 
that this year’s prom had ended. As Dana Dean 
said, “It was the seniors’ year to shine!” 

Monica Jone: 

Misty Andrew: 



8 — PROM 






Here we go! Brad Smith and 
Lateffa Akers stroll across 
the senior bridge together. 
The bridge was an important 
part of prom. With all 
seniors and their dates 
crossing the bridge, a great 
deal of entertainment was 
provided. 

How interesting! Jeff 
Shelton and Emily 
Hammond examine the 
tickets for the discount at the 
Farmhouse. All seniors 
received these discounts. 



Are we having fun yet? 

These two seem to be . . . 
Karen Branscome and Jamie 
Duncan dance the night 
away together. Students 
enjoyed dancing at prom to 
the various songs. 


PROM — 9 











“Hard work equals 
excellence,” said Craig 
Loftus, one of the 
co-valedictorians. About 
Craig’s speech, Stephanie 
Norris, another graduate, 
said, “His speech really 
inspired me.” Craig's speech 
was one of several during 
the graduation ceremonies. 


The 

The final step of high school, commencement, 
is when students think of their greatest 
memories. To Karen Crigger, her greatest 
memories are “those of being with my friends.” 

Students also like to give special thanks to 
teachers, parents and friends. Linda Jones said, 
“I would give my special thanks to Mr. John 
Freeman for giving me the support in my 
freshman year when my father died.” Tony 
Dunford said, “1 would give my special thanks to 
Coach Pat Burns who has given me the support 
through my high school years.” 

Likewise, when they stop to think, students 
have found they achieved much in high school. 
Some of the achievements could be belonging to 
band, being class president, being on the 
basketball or football team. Teresa Lynn Brewer 
said, “My greatest achievement was being flag 
captain.” 


step 

As students reflected on their high school days 
they admitted there were some things that they 
would change about their high school careers. 
Some things they would like to have changed 
include their study habits, some of the rules, and 
some of the fun times. Joey Montgomery said, “I 
would have studied harder.” 

But as the seniors made that final step, they 
had many thoughts and words. Tony Dunford 
said, “My high school career in my own words 
was a great experience — something I will 
cherish forever.” Karen Crigger’s thoughts were, 
“I will miss my friends.” 

The final step was both a painful and joyful 
way to think of the last look at high school as 
many would be starting a new experience with 
military, college, jobs or living alone. 

Sandra WeikU 


final 



10 — GRADUATION 









The final walk. The seniors 
make their way to the gym 
for the graduation 
ceremonies to begin. This is 
the day when many students 
u remember their high school 
= days. Graduation is the time 
seniors look forward to the 
§ most and remember the 
A longest. 




“Fly as high and as far as 
your wings will take you.” 

Hung Lui, a salutatorian, 
addresses his classmates. 
Hung said, “1 think I will 
always worship education.” 
Hung and his family 
immigrated to the United 
Ji States from Viet Nam in 
1979. 

C/3 

C 

o 

CTJ 


“Pomp and Circumstance.” 

Eva Machelor leads Shannon 
Caudell and the other 
graduates to the front of the 
gym, the final walk the 
seniors would make across 
the gym. Eva was one of the 
graduation marshals. 



GRADUATION — 11 












Keep the tacks rolling. April 
Busic tacks up the banners in 
the locker banks to represent 
the different classes. 
Volunteers from each class 
stayed after school during 
Spirit Week to decorate the 
halls for the homecoming 
pep rally contests. 



Showing spirit 


Dressing up, decorating the showcases and 
locker banks, yelling at the top of one’s lungs — 
these were the ways students celebrated spirit 
week, the week of homecoming. 

During the five days of spirit week, students 
dressed up for patriotic day, pirate day, hat day, 
storybook character day and Cougar spirit day. 

“I had the most fun on patriotic day because it 
showed that the school supports our soldiers in 
Saudi Arabia,” said senior Neal Leahy. 

“That week was a boost to school spirit because 
it helped to psyche up the football team for the 
tough match against William Fleming,” said 
senior, Natoya Webb. Natoya said that she 
heartily participated in spirit week, doing 
everything she could to support her senior class. 


At the same time, Sherry Vest, freshman, said, 
‘The day I most enjoyed was the storybook day.” 


On this day, students came dressed as everything 
from Little Red Riding Hood to the Scarecrow 
from “The Wizard of Oz.” 

“The reason I participated in spirit week was 
because I wanted to show my spirit by wearing 
hats and dressing up in the variety of outfits 
assigned to each day,” said junior, Kim Bowman. 

As Kim suggested, school spirit was at the 
heart of this week of activities. And the school 
spirit came to a head at the pep rally concluding 
spirit week when the students gathered in the 
gymnasium to show their support and pep up 
the football team for the big game. 

Teresa Stone 




Fishing up a new idea. 

Laurel Shroyer and Ricky 
Daya put a few finishing 
touches on a showcase. 
Decorating the showcases in 
the Commons was one of the 
activities during Spirit Week 
in preparation for 
homecoming. 


12 — SPIRIT WEEK 
















Painting the school colors. 

Wendy Foushee paints a 
cougar paw on a sheet. 
u Painted sheets were used for 
= decorations this year as a 
means of being 
o environmentally 
A conservative. 



Don’t move an inch. Richard 
Myers paints Brian Hill’s 
face to show the Cougar 
Pride during Spirit Week. 


SPIRIT WEEK — 13 









Floating 

With the theme of “Enchantment under the 
Sea” for homecoming, the Commons was 
decorated with a mural of an under-the-sea scene 
created by the advanced placement art students. 
The individual classes decorated the showcases in 
the Commons also to bear out the theme. 

A new attraction to the homecoming 
celebration was a disc jockey — the one and only 
Scott Richards — from K-92 who entertained at 
the dance. Lanie Younce said, “I liked the idea 
that the disc jockey was from K-92; it made it 
even more special.” 

In talking about why students go to 
homecoming, Benny Hancock said it was because 
it was like “a night on the town.” 



Leading the way to victory! 

Mark Lawson leads the 
Cougars on the field while 
Sarah Tilson and Alison 
Spain show their Cougar 
pride. Mark said, “I was 
thinking of beating William 
Fleming.” 


Come on down! Rita Cox 
waits to be escorted onto the 
field by Eric White while the 
flag corps waves. Rita said, “I 
thought the walk down the 
field would never end.” 


on water 

Students also said they enjoyed the entire week 
of homecoming activities because of how students 
showed their school spirit. Jodi Cox said, “All the 
classes showed a lot of spirit in the homecoming 
activities.” 

Benny said, “The senior class really showed 
their spirit by winning the spirit stick.” 

In looking back on the activities, Lanie Younce 
said she wished more people had participated in 
the dress-up days. But for Pam Smythers, who 
said she enjoyed being on the homecoming 
court, the entire week was great. She said, “I 
would not change a thing about homecoming.” 

Sandra Weikle 



14 


HOMECOMING 






Announcing the winners. 

Seated, Chip Jones, king; 

Rita Cox, queen; Ronnie 
u Hamblin, duke; Latha 
= Gearheart, prince; Amy 
« Farmer, princess; and Karla 
o Poole, duchess. Karla said, “I 
was shocked.” 


We need to make the first 
touchdown, boys. Coach Joel 
Hicks gets the players fired 
up before the game starts. 
Rocky Huff, Eric Hunter 
and their teammates listen 
attentively. 



HOMECOMING — 15 


Jason Speller 








“Bon appetit.” Kelly Farmer 
and Cindy Martin talk 
during second lunch. Eating 
lunch together gave students 
the chance to wind down 
from the morning classes. 
“Kelly and I used our lunch 
to talk about how we did in 
history that day,” said Cindy. 

We’re looking for a few 
good men. Andy Kiser and 
Albert Hancock speak with 
Sergeant Robert Shafer, a 
Marine recruiter. Students 
could use their lunch time to 
speak with recruiters from 
the armed forces and 
colleges. This time gave 
students a chance to speak to 
those who had first-hand 
knowledge about 
qualifications and 
expectations. 




Definitely not take-out style, j 

Joey Bower, Dane Eller and 
George Gosnell eat pizza and 9 
talk. Students used the 
20-minute lunch blocks as a 
chance to eat, talk with 
friends and catch up on the 
news of the day. 


16 — LUNCH 








THR€€ SHIFTS 


Anticipation rises; your heart begins to race, 
ind your stomach lets go another loud roar. You 
itare at the clock without even blinking, waiting 
or that relief. 

Ding, ding, ding. The bell rinally rings for the 
beginning of the lunch blocks. The halls begin to 
ill with hungry students as you sprint all the way 
o the Commons to get ahead of everyone else in 
line. 

Students looked forward to their lunch period 
is a time to talk with friends or that special 
.omeone. For all of the students to have a place 
o sit, the lunch hour was divided into three 
lifferent blocks. 

When asked what lunch she liked the best, 
vVendy Pickett said, “I like third the best because 
/ou know the day is almost over by the time you 
ret out of lunch.” On the other hand, Benny 
Hancock said, “I like first simply because there is 
more of everything to choose from. By the time 
you get to third, everything is gone!” 

One half of the students polled said that they 


had one table where they sat everyday with their 
friends. The others said they either did not sit at 
the same table everyday or they did not eat; they 
walked around instead. 

When asked what they thought about people 
saving seats, Christy Funk said, “I think it’s okay 
because you may be able to see your friends only 
during lunch.” Wendy Pickett said, “It is okay 
except when the lunch room gets really 
crowded.” 

At last you make it through the lunch line and 
to your table that you had some friends reserve. 
You down your lunch with tremendous success 
and your stomach’s obnoxious growling suddenly 
ends. As you get up to empty the multi-colored 
tray, you notice that things have grown calmer 
until the next ding, ding, ding; and the vicious 
cycle starts all over again. 

Alison Spain 
Shana Taylor 
Tammy McMillan 
Toni Ratcliffe 



Land ahoy! The only water 
Deanna Wyatt sees on pirate 
day is that coming from the 
water fountain. DeAnna was 
one of those who went all 
out during Spirit Week. 
Throughout all three lunch 
blocks, students saw pirate 
hats, swords and eye patches. 


LUNCH — 17 











conpaiwe RJN 


Calm down! Senior Mike 
Talbert sets up this heifer 
before the FFA and 4-H 
livestock show at the New 
River Valley Fair. This heifer 
placed second. Mike won 
other prizes, including first 
in reserved champion with 
another heifer and third in 
the pole-bending section of 
the horseshow. “Winning 
reserved champion with one 
of our heifers was the most 
exciting part of the 
competition,” said Mike. 


Head spinning — walking in a jagged line. 
Every step the person takes is uncertain. A pale 
face and the expression on the person’s face let 
people know that person has just gotten off 
THE ZIPPER! 

The exciting rides were the main attraction for 
the people who attended the New River Valley 
Fair. “The most exciting moment for me was 
when I rode the Predator,” said Aaron Cress. 

The fair also allowed students the time to see 
friends they had not seen all summer. Indeed, 
Sabrina Woodyard said that she decided to go to 
the fair “to socialize with friends.” 

Entertainment provided the students with a 
chance to take a rest from those nauseating rides. 
Such groups as Shenandoah, Billy Joe Royal, 
Mickey Gilley and Marie Osmond entertained the 
enthusiastic crowds. 

Other events, such as the Magic Show, the 
Hollywood Stunt Show, and the Demolition 
Derby provided entertainment for students. 

Shelly Looney said, “The demolition derby was 


the most exciting for me.” 

The fair also hosted a beauty pageant for girl 
“I entered the pageant because it was the one 
pageant I had wanted to compete in since I was 
little,” said Tanya Lovern, who was second 
runner-up in the pageant. 

Other competitions were available for student 
to enter, such as the arts and crafts show and th 
Future Farmers of America (FFA) and 4-H 
livestock show. Stephanie Cook competed in the 
arts and crafts show with two drawings, one 
mixed media and two watercolors. She received 
one first-place and two second-place prizes. “I 
wanted to see how I would do; and I figured 
since there was no entry fee, how could I go 
wrong?” said Stephanie. 

Thus, the New River Valley Fair provided a 
time for students to socialize, to have fun, to be 
entertained and to show off their talents. It was 
the turning point between the end of summer 
and the beginning of the new school year. 

Angela Ck 



18 — FAIR/VACATIONS 


















Smile! Douglas Freeman, 
Darden Freeman, Brad 
Burrus, Chuck Fox, Joel 
Sayers, Janell Hurst, Beau 
Keister, Brian Atkinson, 

Matt Layman, Jason Hall 
and Becca Woolley stand in 
front of the London Bridge 
in England. The German 
trip offered these students 
an opportunity to expand 
their horizons. “I traveled to 
Germany to experience a 
different culture,” said Joel 
Sayers. 


i 



Sick yet? The Superloop at 
the Fair provided excitement 
for many students. “The 
Superloop was great! 
Hanging upside down was 
really breathtaking to me. 1 
would definitely recommend 
this most excellent ride to 
really daring people questing 
for adventure,” said senior, 
Elizabeth Knarr. 



Sit back for the ride. Cory 
Byrd, Becca Woolley, Janell 
Hurst, Carl Carter, Hal 
Lawson, Jeff Lawson, 

Darden Freeman, Douglas 
Freeman, Sean Smith, Chuck 
Fox, Brad Burrus and Matt 
Layman, German students, 
took the opportunity to tour 
Europe. Lucerne, 
Switzerland, was a favorite 
for junior Brad Burrus. “Of 
all the cities we visited, it was 
the most like America,” said 
Brad. 


FAIR/VACATIONS — 19 














La’S C00RhT€ 


Snow gracefully falls from the sky and softly 
lands on the cold, frozen ground. Little children 
laugh and throw snowballs in the process of 
building snowmen. Colorful lights glow in the 
darkness of the chilly winter breeze. Everything 
is calm and peaceful. 

For thousands of people, these sentences 
describe the most popular season and holiday. 
Every year people prepare for Christmas. Old 
and young alike agree this season is the happiest. 

Sophomore, Tracy Skeens, said she likes 
Christmas best because “I see people that I don’t 
get to see very often.” Christmas is a time for 
families to be reunited with other friends and 
relatives that live far away. Senior, Sally 
Nehrling, said, “I like Christmas because my 
brothers come in to visit.” 

Christmas is not just a time to see old friends. 
Others see it as a time of celebration and 
gift-giving. “We celebrate the holiday by having a 
big Christmas dinner,” said sophomore, Lee 


Graham. Another sophomore, Misty Powers, 
said, “We eat and exchange gifts.” 

But Christmas is not the only season that 
brings celebration. “January 13 is my favorite 
‘holiday’ because it’s my birthday,” said 
sophomore, Duane Knode. Birthdays, 
Thanksgiving, Halloween and Valentine’s Day 
are also popular holidays. 

Misty Powers said, “My favorite time of the 
year is autumn because of the leaves and all the 
beautiful colors.” On the other hand, Sally 
Nehrling enjoys spring because “everything is 
growing again.” Tracy Skeens loves summer for 
the simple fact of “no school!” 

Even though there were different ideas about 
favorite holidays and seasons, everyone did agree 
that there was at least one special day to 
celebrate or one special occasion for which to be 
happy. 

Tracy Speller 



Trick or treat. Students 
enrolled in the child care 
class took the younger 
children trick or treating for 
Halloween through several 
classrooms. Senior, Jenny 
Farmer, said, “We 
encouraged them to say 
‘thank you’ when receiving 
treats.” 



“Hello. Front desk.” Senior, 
Wendy Myers, shows her 
Halloween spirit by dressing 
up. She, as well as other 
students, came to school as 
Halloween characters. 
Wendy worked in the of fice 
in the afternoons, answering 
the phone and handling 
checkouts. 






20 — HOLIDAYS 


















Preparing the tree. The 

Christmas tree is an 
important part of Christmas. 
Freshman, Todd Gray, 
shows his spirit by decorating 
the tree in the Science Pod. 

“I think Christmas is great. I 
really like it.” he said. 

Whom do you love? Cherie 
Gunn, Scott Peterson and 
Melissa Dotson work on the 
layout for the Valentine issue 
of the ‘‘Cougar Prowler.” 
“This was the funniest layout 
because I got to read all 
those love notes,” said 
Melissa. More than 100 notes 
were submitted for this issue. 





It’s Christmas. Senior, Toni 
Ratcliffe, hangs a drawing of 
a Christmas carol in the 
Math Pod. The National Art 
Honor Society helped to 
decorate the pod. Toni said 
she enjoyed being in the club 
“because we all get together 
and do lots of things.” 


HOLIDAYS — 21 












“Something wicked this way 
comes” describes the story 
that Jeff Shelton’s character 
told Robbie Crockett’s 
character in THE ZOO 
STORY by Edward Albee. 
This excerpt made its way to 
state competition where it 
placed third, and Jeff 
Shelton walked away with 
the title of Best Actor in the 
state of Virginia. 

Baby, you can drive my car. 

Gayle (Courtney Crockett) 
and Suzi (Tina Thompson) 
along with their fellow high 
school friends (Joe Warden, 
Robbie Crockett, Jermaine 
Russell, Gus Lorton, Jeff 
Shelton, Ted Farmer, Krystal 
Horton, Alyssa Rollins, 
Brandon Quesenberry, and 
Jodi Cox) imagine the thrill 
of driving a car. 



Jason Speller 





Jason Speller 


True friends last forever, 

but it almost did not for Ted 
Farmer, who played a drug 
addict, and Terry Ann 
Hoffmann, who portrayed a 
victim of anorexia. Neither 
of them would admit their 
problems which almost 
destroyed their life-long 
friendship. 


22 — PCHS PLAYERS 



FRONT hND CQim 


Theatre of the absurd ... in the Little 
rheatre? No chance! Well, it has passed through 
)ur hallowed stage and has been executed in a 
nost dynamic way. 

The Players performed several excerpts from 
Idward Albee’s plays. One, THE ZOO STORY, 
vent to district competition where the Players 
jlaced second, then regional competition where 
hey placed first, and the long-awaited state 
ompetition where they placed third. Jeff Shelton 
ilso walked away with first place in regional and 
'irst in state as Best Actor. 

“This work is extremely difficult, generally 
onsidered college level or even professional level 
lifficulty. I see some very sophisticated 
performers here that are capable of more than 
ypical high school fare,” said Ms. Rhonda Welsh, 
lirector. 

The Players worked long hours to prepare for 
he production. “I worked hard and listened to 
lirections. I also read up on Albee because I did 
lot really understand his work or like it,” said 
rina Thompson. 

The works were performed in front of a select 
;roup of classes; however, this did not change 
he amount of effort given forth from the actors. 



Tamasha Crouse said, “Actually, the Drama 
Department tries to put the same amount of 
effort into each presentation, whether we have a 
large, general audience or a selected few. The 
effect will still be the same.” 

The Players tried to focus on a different 
playwright for each production, so it was not at 
all out of the ordinary for them next to put on 
the musical, SOMETHING IN THE AIR FEELS 
LIKE TOMORROW. 

This play depicted stereotypical high school 
teenagers. “Anytime you go into the hall, you can 
see one or more of the characters in the play; it 
is not high school without the regular 
stereotypes,” said Gerri Whittaker. 

Rehearsal time was on the average of four days 
a week. For some, it was their first experience 
with a musical, and many songs had to be 
learned. Ted Farmer, a 1990 graduate, said, “I 
do feel like the last play was by far the best. 
However, I always feel that something else could 
have been done.” 

If there is one phrase that could sum up the 
Players, it would be that they definitely swing 
from one extreme to another. Shelby Assad 

Shana Taylor 



Joey (Robbie Crockett) sings 
his heart out to Lisa 

(LaDona Sizemore). He tried 
his best to persuade her to 
stay with him throughout the 
performance of 
SOMETHING IN THE AIR 
FEELS LIKE TOMORROW. 


“There, there my little 
pretty.” Natalie Bowling 
tried to intimidate Emily 
Hammond, who was at this 
point in hysterics during 
another excerpt by Albee. 


PCHS PLAYERS — 23 




JUST h 

“The course of true love never did run 
smooth,” is a famous quote from William 
Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” 
And the PCHS Players brought that quote to life 
with their fall production of this Shakespearean 
play. Performances were Nov. 15-17. 

Actors, practice, rehearsals and props were 
only a few of the things that combined to make 
the play come to life. One other ingredient was 
the director, Ms. Rhonda Welsh. 

New to the production was the fact that several 
of the adult roles were played by guest 
performers. Mr. Fran Shelton, a math teacher, 
played the part of Egeus. Mr. Shelton said, “I 
found learning the lines very easy.” 

Mr. Rick Knack, another guest artist, said, 

“The most rewarding experience was the 
pleasure of finally having a role in a high school 


DIKhN 

production.” 

The lights and technical work helped set the 
mood for the play. Daniel Vest, the technical 
director, said, “I like working with the lights.” 

Jermaine Russell said, “I want to take theatre 
as a career because 1 really enjoy acting; it’s an 
experience that can’t be explained.” 

The play centered around lovers, fairies and 
fantasy. The lovers were always arguing, and the 
fairies tried to fix things; however, they only 
made things worse. The characters seemed to 
think the bad things that happened were just 
dreams, but they had actually taken place. 

filings did turn around, though, to make a 
happy ending and to bring to a close one of 
Shakespeare’s greatest comedies. 

Sonya Steffey 



We will elope tonight. 

Carrie Shay (Hermia) and 
Chris Farmer (Lysander) 
play the roles of lovers. 
Hermia, who loves Lysander, 
is being forced by her father 
to marry Demetrius. When 
Hermia has to decide 
whether to marry Demetrius, 
be killed, or go to a nunnery, 
she decides to elope with 
Lysander. Carrie said, “I 
think Ms. Welsh is the 
greatest director in the 
world, and I felt everyone in 
the cast was like family.” 


24 — PCHS PLAYERS 



I represent the moon. 

Jonathan Breedlove plays the 
part of Starveling, a 
mechanical. The mechanicals 
were instructed to perform a 
play for the Duke. Starveling 
represents the moonshine in 
the interlude. “I th’e man in 
the moon seem to be,” said 
Starveling. 












Weaving the dream. Lisa 
Rowh (Puck) and Robbie 
Crockett (Oberon) discuss 
their plans for using the 
juice from the flower hit by 
Cupid’s arrow. The juice 
makes people fall in love. 
“'This must be done with 
haste,” said Puck to Oberon. 

Kiss me through the chink 
in the wall. Tracy Skeens, 
Mark Allen and Benny 
Hancock perform as 
mechanicals. Tracy plays the 
part of the wall; Mark plays 
Thisby; and Benny plays 
Pyramus. “Pyramus and 
Thisby” is a play that ends 
tragically because of their 
love for each other. “I 
enjoyed being in the play; it 
was a lot of fun,” said Tracy. 



PCHS PLAYERS — 25 





TH€ CROWNING 


The pageant was only one hour away as the 
contestants filed into the building carrying their 
essentials (make-up, clothing, etc.). As contestants 
started dressing, each one experienced a 
“tragedy!” Finding runs in their hose, breaking 
eyeliner pencils, and discovering that their 
zippers would not stay up all contributed to the 
anxiety of the contestants. 

After dressing, the contestants wondered what 
the judges would be looking for. Would it be 
poise, a gleaming smile, or just a warm and 
friendly personality? Only the judges would 
really know. 

As the contestants strolled across the stage, 
their hopes and anticipation occupied their 
minds. Then everything came to a halt, and they 
stood, waiting for the results. 

The Miss PCHS contestants felt these anxieties. 
Natashia Reed said, “I was very nervous, 
especially when I had to tell the audience of my 
future plans.” Natashia was first runner-up, 
while Sarah Simpkins was second runner-up. 

Cindy Austin, a junior, was crowned Miss 
PCHS. Cindy said, “I experienced all kinds of 
emotions during the pageant; but through it all, 

I felt calm and confident.” Cindy said she had 
looked forward to participating in this pageant 
since she was a little girl. 


Other contestants admitted they had ulterior 
motives for entering the contest. Sarah said, “I 
wanted to gain experience in performing and 
speaking to a group of people.” 

Jennifer Clark agreed when she said, 
“Everyone needs to get a little exposure for a 
more rounded life.” 

Nevertheless, all contestants had different 
motives for entering the contest. Rita Cox said, 

“I wanted to test how well I could perform 
under pressure.” 

Heather Edens entered for the competition, as 
did Lori Chinault, who said, “It’s rewarding to 
represent yourself individually in a competition 
like this.” 

The contestants agreed that the best part of 
the pageant was the opportunity to meet new 
people. Sarah said, “People came together and 
helped each other.” 

“People who didn’t know each other found 
that they shared common interests,” said Rita. 

The excitement, new friends, and a chance to 
overcome fears all characterized this pageant 
where contestants vied for the title of Miss 
PCHS. 

Angela Clark 
Christi Wayne 



And the next contestant is. 

Caroline James sports her 
casual wear as she is escorted 
down the runway by Sergio 
Hendricks. Caroline, a 
senior, said, “I enjoyed being 
in the pageant.” 



26 — MISS PCHS 


Jason SDeller 













Put your best foot forward. 

Monica Robertson puts her 
best foot forward as she 
walks onto the stage during 
the beauty pageant. “1 had 
the question of ‘Who is going 
to be the next Miss PCHS?’ 
running through my mind,” 
she said. 



I can’t believe I won. Cindy 
Austin shares her excitement 
of being crowned Miss PCHS 
with Natashia Reed and Rita 
Cox. Cindy said, “I was 
completely shocked when 
they called my name out to 
be the new Miss PCHS.” 



Miss PCHS finalists. Sarah 
Simpkins, second runner-up; 
Cindy Austin, Miss PCHS; 
Natashia Reed, first 
runner-up. 


MISS PCHS —27 










$3.00 and a smile. Showing 
her school spirit, Rita Cox 
sports her Cougar sweater as 
she buys football tickets for 
the Friday night games. 
Students appreciated buying 
their tickets for $3.00 at 
school because at the game 
they are $4.00. Rita said, 
“Since 1 was drum major, I 
was buying tickets for my 
family to support die team.” 


One ticket, please. Danny 
Stanley purchases his ticket 
to see a football game at the 
gate. “1 usually end up 
waiting too late to buy my 
ticket during school,” he 
said. Danny said he went to 
several football games, 
usually with friends, because 
admission to a game is one 
of the things students can 
buy for $5.00. 




28 — WHAT $S CAN BUY 








$5.00= IS THhT ML? 


Mr. X was so excited. He finally got a date 
with Miss Y. He never thought such a knockout 
girl would go for a guy like him. As he added 
the finishing touches to himself, he checked his 
wallet and what to his eyes should appear: 
nothing but five one dollar bills. 

“Oh-no,” thought Mr. X, “only five dollars and 
no chance of getting an advance on my 
allowance.” 

He stood in his room wondering what on earth 
he and his date could do for only five dollars. He 
thought of the advice of Tony Franes and “take 
her out for ice cream,” or he could go with 
Adam Taylor’s suggestion and “call the date off 


and stay at home.” No, he would not do that; it 
took him too long to even get up the nerve to 
ask her out. He might do as Adam Carr 
suggested and “rent a movie and have a quiet 
evening home alone with someone special.” 

Or he could do as Chad Hall suggested and go 
to the morning movie with his date for only a 
dollar. Then he figured it out; he would follow 
Brian Redd’s advice and go buy two sodas and a 
bag of chips and sit in the moonlight together, 
and he would whisper in her ear. “It’s not 
material things that are important.” 

Christi Wayne 



Chevron 


Pumping gas. “Man! I went 
over by one cent,” said David 
Wright. Students used their 
$5.00 to put gas in their cars 
and then drive away. 


JU 

13 

a. 

c r, 


o 

CT3 



I 

I 


J 


WHAT $S CAN BUY — 29 






sm TH€ 

“Earth Day, Every Day” was a phrase often 
heard throughout the month of April. Although 
Earth Day 1990, the 20th anniversary of the first 
Earth Day in 1970, was officially held on Sunday, 
April 22, the phrase showed that Earth Day 
should be observed on a daily basis and not just 
on a specific day once every twenty years. 

Earth Day was an effort by environmentalists 
all over the world to get people to realize how 
much harm has been done and is still being done 
to the environment, and to tell people how they 
can put an end to these harmful practices. 

Many local environmentalists worked together 
to commemorate and teach about Earth Day. 
Around the school, members of the Science Club 
hung posters bearing messages about the 
destruction of the environment and what people 
could do to help stop this destruction. Jeanette 
Dishon joined the New River Earth Day Coalition 
to help spread the word about our environment. 

“I became involved with Earth Day as part of the 
coalition because 1 feel it is important for my 
generation to become aware of and involved with 
our environment and the problems we all face.” 
Jeanette also distributed a flyer around the 
school titled “Earth Day Primer,” which 
contained several suggestions for the average 
person to follow in order to create a cleaner, 
healthier environment. 

The Science Club also began an aluminum 
recycling campaign by setting trash cans 
designated for aluminum collection around the 
school. Junior Jodi Cox made computer posters 
to hang around the school bearing such phrases 
as “We have met the enemy, and he is us” and 
“One Life, One World, One Chance.” While 
talking about why she hung these pictures, Jodi 
said, “It was an inexpensive way of getting 
people to recognize that it was Earth Day because 
the average person wouldn’t have known about it 
otherwise, and the paper could be recycled so 
that wasn’t a problem.” Posters from Mrs. 

Harriet Anderson’s science classes were hung in 
the Science Pod. The National Art Honor Society 
also made posters and banners which were hung 

“What’s it doing?” Elizabeth 
Bertholomey and Linda 
Jones study the picture they 
received of their adopted 
whale, Pegasus. Linda said 
that the reason they adopted 
Pegasus was, “At the time 
our class was studying 
astronomy, so the name 
Pegasus seemed 
appropriate.” 


mm 

around the Math Pod. ' 

“Plant a Tree” was another common phrase 
during April, and many clubs and classes did just 
that. The Science Club planted a blue spruce, 
and Mr. John Duncan’s second period physics 
class planted an ornamental maple. The National 
Art Honor Society planted a white birch tree in 
front of the counseling center and a vibernum 
plant near the front offices. 

Other activities done by classes were a trash 
pick-up by Mrs. Anderson’s first and second 
period classes, and the adoption of a whale by 
Mr. Duncan’s fifth period class. Linda Jones, a 
class member, said, “We decided to adopt a 
whale for Earth Day because of the threat of 
extinction that exists. Extinction can only be 
prevented through programs like Greenpeace 
and the Whale Adoption Program.” 

The trash pick-up involved the gathering of 
trash found on the floors and tops of the locker 
bank areas. The various types of trash were 
sorted into color-coded boxes over a period of 
three days. The trash was weighed, and the 
amount multiplied by five for the remaining 
periods of the school day, then by 180, for the 
remaining days of the year. The result was a 
finding of approximately two and a half tons of 
trash in a year, just in the locker bank floors. 

The people who worked in these projects were 
trying to increase awareness in the general public 
about environmental concerns and problems. 
Through involvement in organizations like 
Greenpeace, Ducks Unlimited, World Wildlife 
Fund, the Environmental Protection Agency, the 
National Forest Council, and the National Arbor 
Day Foundation, students and teachers alike 
showed their concern for the environment and 
tried to share their concerns with others who 
may not have known of some of the dangers 
facing our environment. Jodi Cox said, 

“Everybody’s always talking about future 
generations; and if we don’t start doing 
something about the environment now, there 
won’t be any future generations.” 

Lauren Haley 



Lauren Haley 


30 — EARTH DAY 











“Earth Day doesn’t end in 

one day,” was the message 
that Stephanie Cook was 
trying to get across with her 
Earth Day poster. Stephanie 
did the poster in a National 
Art Honor Society meeting, 
along with the rest of the 
NAHS members. The 
posters, with a banner and 
several flyers, were displayed 
in the Math Pod during 
Earth Week in April and 
through the first two weeks 
of May. 



“Make sure the roots are 
covered.” Danny Martin and 
Jason Rupe shovel the dirt to 
fill in the hole where they 
planted a tree. Mr. Dewey 
Wilson helped to cover the 
roots as Mrs. Susie Cutlip 
looked on. Four trees were 
planted around the campus 
in observance of Earth Day. 


EARTH DAY —31 





New beginnings. Senior, Aaron Cress, receives help 
from Miss Vada Boyd, computer lab coordinator 
for the English Department. A “new beginning” for 
both the English and math classes was the addition 
of computer-assisted instruction. About the use of 
computers for instructional purposes, Miss Boyd 
said, “They have been a great learning instrument 
for both the students and the teachers.” 


“One of the main advantages of 
computer-assisted instruction is the 
individualized nature of the work.” 

Miss Vada Boyd 


Jason Spelle 


Computerized 


Computers have marked the beginning 
of a new age. It seems as if everything in 
modern times has something 
computerized — microwaves, calculators, 
cars. In businesses, file cabinets 
disappeared with the bell bottoms 
because data is now stored on computer 
disks. 

Pulaski County has been no exception 
to the age of computers as they are now 
a vital part of the education program. 
The most significant use of computers 
has come with the computer-assisted 
instructional program now in place in the 
county. 

Both the Math Pod and the English 
Pod house computer-assisted instruction 
(CAI) labs to be used as part of the total 
curriculum. Both labs use the WICAT 
(World Institute for Computer-Assisted 
Technology) system. 

Miss Vada Boyd, an English teacher 
who serves as computer lab coordinator, 
explained the basic function of the 
system. “Rather than replace programs in 
the standard English class, the WICAT 
curriculum is intended to complement 
the current program in English.” 

Teachers in both departments took 
their students to the lab where the 


r 

students worked on their own levels at l 
their own rates. Students received 
immediate feedback from the computers \ 
about their progress. The computer 
immediately corrected the students if 
they gave a wrong answer and explained 
how to correct the wrong answer. 

“One of the main advantages of 
computer-assisted instruction is the 
individualized nature of the work,” said 
Miss Boyd. 

The use of CAI programs required 
adjustments on the parts of both student 
and teachers; but for the most part, the 
reactions were optimistic. Matt Miller, a 
junior, spoke of the program in English. 
“I don’t think that computers will ever b< 
able to replace what we learn from a 
teacher, but they do help us to recall anc 
to use what we’ve learned in English.” 

Likewise, A.L. Stoots, a junior, said, 
“The advantages outnumber the faults. 
The thing I found to be the greatest was 
that you are taught on your own 
individual level of learning. There is no 
way a teacher can go to each person and 
teach him/her separately.” 

Aaron Smith 
Shana Taylor 


32 — MINI-MAG 













Uncertainty 


For the first time in many years, the 
Jnited States faced talks of a serious war. 
/Vhen Iraq’s leader, Saddam Hussein, 
ook over Kuwait in 12 hours in August, 
uddenly oil supplies were cut off to 
>ther countries. American troops were 
> [uickly sent to Saudi Arabia to curtail 
-lussein’s power. Almost immediately 
here were 10,000 troops sent, male and 
emale, from all branches of the armed 
orces. 

Four weeks into the crisis in the 
’ersian Gulf, Hussein took more 
lostages. Then in September, the women 
nd children held as hostages were 
llowed to leave; but the men had to stay. 
Vith unsuccessful peace talks and Iraq 
efusing to retreat from Kuwait, more 
J.S. troops were sent to Saudi Arabia as 
he possibility of war grew. 

In early December, the United Nations 
mposed a Jan. 15 deadline for Iraq to 
withdraw from Kuwait. More American 
roops were sent to the desert, preparing 
or offensive moves. 

As the deadline drew near, tension 
;rew. 

- Be February 1, 430,000 American 
roops were stationed in Saudi Arabia. 
Uong with the American troops were 
roops from Egypt, Great Britain, Syria, 
i iaudi Arabia, France, as well as other 
Hied nations. 

In Pulaski County, citizens felt the 


realization of possible war. Families had 
loved ones in the Persian Gulf; more 
than 60 men and women from Pulaski 
County were stationed in Saudi Arabia. 

People from all parts of the United 
States tied yellow ribbons to cars, trees 
and doors to show their support of the 
soldiers. Likewise, several county schools 
sent care packages to the troops, 
packages that contained items such as 
food, gum, magazines and books. 

Students began writing the soldiers and 
sending them pictures to let them know 
that the folks at home were thinking of 
them and supporting them. 

“The Southwest Times” continually 
published pictures and information about 
soldiers from this area who were 
stationed there. The SCA offered free 
homecoming videos to families to send to 
their members stationed in the Persian 
Gulf. 

Throughout the ordeal, class 
discussions and private conversations had 
a way of returning to the topic of the 
Persian Gulf Crisis and what the 
consequences would be. And then it 
happened. The United-States-led forces 
invaded Baghdad on the night of Jan. 

16, in a massive air attack aimed at 
strategic military targets in Iraq. The talk 
of war had become a reality. 

Becca Woolley 


Hang a ribbon until the troops come home. Mrs. 
Ann Aust, library aide, hangs a ribbon on the 
bulletin board dedicated to the local servicemen and 
women in the Persian Gulf. Mrs. Aust’s son, Bryan, 
a 1988 graduate, is stationed in Saudi Arabia. 



MINI-MAG — 


33 


















“I have seen Pulaski County High School 
move from the status of a building to house 
students and staff to an institution with a 
personality, character, traditions, and high 
expectations for all who are part of the 

school. ” 
Ms. Majella Myers 


A bit of nostalgia. Ms. Majella Myers, assistant 
principal for instruction, retired Dec. 31. Ms. Myers 
came to Pulaski County in 1963 as a science 
teacher, a position from which she moved to 
Science Department chairperson and then to 
assistant principal in 1974 when the county high 
schools were consolidated. 


Pleasant memories 


As the Christmas holidays approached, 
students grew ever more excited about 
putting school work behind them for a 
couple of weeks. But for one 
administrator, Ms. Majella Myers, the 
holidays brought other thoughts and 
plans — putting this work behind her 
permanently. Ms. Myers, assistant 
principal for instruction as well as ninth 
grade principal, retired Dec. 31. 

Ms. Myers began her adventure in 
education in Louisiana and then moved 
to Floyd, VA. In 1963, she came to 
Pulaski County and taught a variety of 
science courses at the old Pulaski High 
School. In 1964, she was named 
chairperson of the Science Department. 

When the county high schools 
consolidated in 1974, Ms. Myers was 
named one of the assistant principals. In 
this capacity, she was responsible for 
student activities and attendance. One of 
her “unpopular” jobs with students was 
her responsibility for writing passes for 
check-ins. 

With a new school, new students, and 
new programs, Ms. Myers found herself 
busy helping clubs to form and assisting 
them in their initial programs. She also 
established an activity day on which every 
student was involved either in a club or 
an activity once a month. Added to all of 
these activities, Ms. Myers was also 
instrumental in drafting a school song 
and choosing the school colors. 

Needless to say, Ms. Myers now has 
plenty of memories to keep her occupied. 


One that brought a glimmer to her eye I 
as she spoke was the memory of the firs f 
prom here, a prom for which she was 
responsible for decorations. 

Ms. Myers explained how the student: I 
had decorated the gym with crepe pape : 
streamers hanging from the ceiling 
rafters. The morning of the prom, the 
fire marshals came to inspect for fire 
hazards; they found that the paper had | 
stretched until there was a clearance of 
only four feet between the floor and the L 
streamers. Ms. Myers and the volunteers 
she was able to find had to re-decorate 
the gym for the prom that night. 

After her assignment with student 
activities, Ms. Myers assumed the 
responsibility for the instructional 
program. It was her contributions to the I 
instructional program that she feels wer< . 
her greatest accomplishment. “Due to thi 
superb staff, this school has a strong 
curriculum.” said Ms. Myers. 

“I have seen Pulaski County High 
School move from the status of a 
building to house students and staff to a 
institution with a personality, character, 
traditions, and high expectations for all 
who are part of the school,” said Ms. 
Myers. She said that she enjoyed working 
with the students and enjoyed the 
challenge of finding programs at which 
students could find success. “After all,” 
she said, “that’s whom the school is for.”. 

Melissa Dotso 
Scott Peterso 
Regan Shelto 



Carrie Linkous 


mSr 

JBSg&s. 



Wfghjsp j 



34 — MINI-MAG 


















What are your thoughts? Dr. William C. Asbury, 
Superintendent of Schools, talks with Shana Taylor 
and Becca Woolley, co-editors of “The Cougar 
Pinnacle” and Aaron Smith, co-news editor of the 
“Cougar Prowler." Dr. Asbury began his duties in 
early November by emphasizing his conviction that 
education is a cooperative effort among students, 
teachers, administrators, parents and the general 
public. This involvement means that communication 
lines must remain open and that all concerned must 
take active roles in the decision-making process. 


“Anyone who is involved in our schools needs 
not only to know what we are doing but also 
to be a part of what we are doing. ” 

Dr. William C. Asbury 


Jason Speller 

Open communication 


Open communication with the public, 
udents and administrators is a priority 
1 Dr school superintendent, Dr. William C. 
Lsbury, who began his official duties 
ere in early November. 

A graduate of Concord College, Dr. 
Lsbury received his bachelor of science 
egree in education and then joined the 
larine Corps, rising to the rank of 
aptain during his service in the Viet 
Jam crisis. 

After leaving the Marines in 1968, Dr. 
isbury returned to the education field 
'here he taught in the Richmond Public 
chools. He received his master’s degree 
rom Virginia Commonwealth University 
nd his doctorate from the University of 
hrginia. Before coming to Pulaski 
Jounty, Dr. Asbury served as school 
uperintendent in Caroline County, a 
position he held for six years. 

Speaking of his career moves from 
caching to supervision. Dr. Asbury said, 

I find the two very related.” He 
xplained that even though he may be 
ut of a classroom, he still does a great 
eal of teaching by helping other 
dministrators and faculties with their 
}bs. 

Dr. Asbury explained that he has many 


goals for Pulaski County. Among these 
are carefully monitoring the financial 
status of the school system, evaluating 
and constantly improving the programs, 
and maintaining open communication 
with the public as well as his employees. 

“Anyone who is involved in our schools 
needs not only to know what we are 
doing but also to be a part of what we 
are doing,” said Dr. Asbury. He stressed 
that in order for teachers to be most 
effective in their roles, they must play a 
part in making the decisions concerning 
their schools. 

When he talked about his expectations 
for students, Dr. Asbury said, “I expect a 
lot from the students. They’re the reason 
we exist. One of the things I expect 
students to do is work hard, to try hard, 
and to be part of the process beyond 
education, to tell us what they think and, 
like teachers, to be involved in some of 
the decision making.” 

Dr. Asbury admitted that he is 
optimistic about his work here and about 
the programs this county offers. “We 
have a very proud community that is 
proud of our schools. The schools have 
some terrific programs in place,” he said. 

Aaron Smith 


MINI-MAG — 35 


















New and expanded instructional 
programs find the school 



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37 





















MACC 


English 
Math 
Science 
Social Studies 
All Around 


Wins Losses 
3—5 
8—0 

3— 5 

4— 4 

6—2 


On wheels 

A large part of MACC was the bus 
trips to and from away meets. Some 
people socialized, others slept, and a few 
took the opportunity to study. The 
contents of a MACC member’s backpack 
consisted mainly of a Walkman, 
homework, munchies, and, of course, the 
fat notebooks. The bus was at times 
likened to a “sardine can on wheels,” said 
Lauren Haley of the Social Studies 
MACC Team. Although it was crowded, 
most everyone managed to have a good 
time. The highlight of the trips was when 
everyone invaded one of the fast food 
places on the way to each of the meets. 
The Math MACC Team were very 
disappointed, though, when the driver 

never stopped at “Family Dollar.” 

Tammy McMillan 



Boom! The cannon misfires? No, it’s Natalie 
Bowling falling out of the playtube at Burger King. 
The MACC Team stopped at Burger King after 
competing against Rural Retreat. Other MACC 
members played on the wobbly bridge and on the 
sliding board to relieve competitive tension. 


Group thinking. Jennie Russell, 
Steve Warren, Scott Altizer, and 
Jason Alley think over their 
response to a question. One tough 
thing about MACC competition was 
trying to recall things deep set in 
your mind in a matter of seconds. 
That in itself was pretty 
intimidating at times. 

Warming up their minds. Ms. 

Suzanne Steele calls out practice 
questions to Brooks Newsome, 
Elizabeth Knarr, and Regan 
Shelton. This enabled them to see 
what type of questions they would 
be asked in actual competition. 
Sometimes they were lucky because 
exact practice questions would pop 
up every once in a while. 




A little last minute studying. 

Jennie Russell takes a few minutes 
to look over her list of Supreme 
Court Justices. Jennie’s other quick 
study guides for the Social Studies 
MACC included the names of the 
Cabinet members and major 
Supreme Court cases. Jennie 
carried around a large folder filled 
with things that dealt with Social 
Studies. 


Putting on the finishing touches. 

Ladona Sizemore helps set up 
equipment for a home meet against 
Rocky Gap. This was their first 
home meet, so they were less 
nervous being in familiar 
surroundings. Mrs. Pat Reece said, 
“I could see that the girls were not 
as tense up on stage.” 





38 — MACC 
















Basics and concepts 


Poetry was recited again 
and again, and forgotten 
concepts of trigonometry 
had to be remembered. The 
basics of biology were 
recalled as well as aspects 
from early United States 
history. 

It’s clear to see that 
MACC competitions 
involved a wide range of 
studies. The English, Math, 
Science, Social Studies, and 
All-Around Teams had to 
be familiar with as much 
information as their subjects 
covered. 

Each of the teams began 
preparation three months 


before actual competition. 
Books were read, problems 
were solved, dates were 
recorded, and theories were 
recalled. Members discussed 
strategies, practiced speed 
with the buzzers, and 
carried around fat 
notebooks to be memorized. 
“The fat notebooks were 
folders organized by content 
material that each student 
developed to review before 
each event,” said Mr. Wayne 
Wooten, the Math MACC 
coach. 

All of the extra 
preparation was necessary in 
order for all the teams to 


compete to the best of their 
ability. “You can practice for 
hours on the buzzers in the 
classroom, but sometimes 
you’re still not fast enough 
for the real thing,” said Pam 
Dalton of the English 
MACC Team. Speed and 
memory were essential to 
having a good team. 

The Math MACC Team 
placed first in the season 
along with the All-Around 
Team. This year the 
tournament was held at 
Christiansburg High School. 

Tammy McMillan 






An admiration society? Elizabeth 
Knarr, Regan Shelton, and Brooks 
Newsome take time out to admire 
their trophy. The All-Around 
MACC Team took first place in the 
season. This was a special win since 
it was Elizabeth’s and Regan’s first 
year in competing on the team. 


MACC — 39 













Moving up 

Imagine this . . . Leaving school to talk 
with representatives of colleges, 
universities and the armed services. 

Being able to have questions answered 
instantly by these representatives. Taking 
home folders filled with information 
from a number of colleges. All of these 
impressions were ways of describing 
College Day. 

Every year the juniors and seniors who 
have registered for or have taken either 
the SAT’s or PSAT’s have the 
opportunity to attend the annual College 
Day program where they may view the 
college and military displays. “College 
Day was a great way to see what colleges 
have to offer,” said junior, Tammy 
Tucker. 

Representatives from the various 
colleges supplied the students with 
information about financial aid, course 
offerings and other related subjects. “I 
learned a lot about where I want to go to 
college and what it will take,” explained 
Tammy. 

Students from Pulaski County as well 
as the counties of Floyd, Giles, 
Montgomery and the city of Blacksburg 
attended this year’s program. 

Mr. Randy Flinchum, twelfth grade 
guidance counselor, was one of the adults 
who accompanied the students on this 
field trip. For him the program was a 
chance to talk with the various 
representatives and update the 
information that he shares with students. 

For Tammy as well as other students, 
this program was a worthwhile 
experience. “I found out selecting a 
college is a tough decision, and it will 
take a lot of thought,” she concluded. 

Tracy Speller 


“Let’s see now.” Mrs. Linda 
Johnson, guidance secretary, uses 
her time to help average grades. 
Although her job required her to 
do many different things, Mrs. 
Johnson took it all in stride. The 
Guidance Office was always a busy 
place offering help to students and 
teachers. 




Early release. Helping students 
with their schedules was only one 
of the many tasks of the guidance 
counselors. Mrs. Jean Blankenship 
looks over an application for a 
modified schedule. The early 
release schedules also had to be 
approved by the principal. 


Schedule changes. Mrs. Faye 
Hanks, tenth grade counselor, 
assists Lisa Parnell with her 
schedule. Counselors were ready to 
listen and help students with their 
classes. Students were the Guidance 
Office’s main concern. 




40 — GUIDANCE 














More than just schedules 


y 


“Hello. How may I help 
you?” These were familiar 
words to students and 
teachers as they entered the 
Guidance Office. Indeed, 
this place was an area where 
students visited for a variety 
of problems, concerns or 
questions. 

“We met with students 
who had personal problems 
and conflicts in class 
schedules,” said Mrs. Linda 
Johnson, secretary. The 
counselors recommended 
sources of help. 

However, schedules and 
counseling were not the 
only events taking place in 
the Guidance Office. Each 
grade had new activities and 
new adjustments. For 
freshmen, Mrs. Pat Reece, 
ninth grade counselor, 


helped them adjust to a 
much larger school and 
more flexible schedule. 

But freshmen were not 
the only ones with changes. 
Sophomores as well as 
juniors and seniors had to 
start thinking about future 
goals concerning education 
and jobs. Mrs. Faye Hanks, 
tenth grade counselor, 
worked with sophomores as 
they considered these 
matters. 

Mrs. Elaine Jackson, 
eleventh grade counselor, 
and Mr. Randy Flinchum, 
twelfth grade counselor, 
spent hours counseling the 
upperclassmen and helping 
them select classes that 
would best match their 
future plans. 

Mr. Flinchum was also 


responsible for scheduling 
the armed forces recruiters 
and college representatives 
to talk with students. 

College choices, work 
programs, jobs, financial aid 
and careers were important 
topics of discussion between 
counselors and students. 

Working with all grade 
levels were Mrs. Jean 
Blankenship, Guidance 
Department head; and Mrs. 
Cindy Watson, intervention 
specialist. Mr. Ted Viers 
responded to students’ 
questions in the vocational 
field. 

But counselors were not 
the only ones working in 
guidance. With so much 
time devoted to individual 
counseling, minor jobs were 
sometimes left unattended. 


Student aides then found 
themselves busy running 
errands and completing 
tasks to help the counselors. 

“I put things in mailboxes 
and ran errands for them,” 
explained Tammy 
Robinson. 

And for these aides, the 
work was fulfilling. “I enjoy 
working with people and 
helping them, so I decided 
to become an aide,” said 
Patricia Wyatt. 

“The Guidance Office is 
an important part of the 
school. There isn’t one job 
more important than 
another. The students are 
the most important aspect 
of our work,” concluded 
Mrs. Johnson. 

Tracy Speller 



GUIDANCE —41 


Crystal Carden 











Naturally 

Natural resources? A class? Where is 
this? Natural resources is a class where 
students work on projects that relate to 
the resources we use that nature 
provides. 

This year the class took on a unique 
project, aquaculture. Aquaculture is the 
process of growing fish with assistance 
from humans. Dr. Karl Poison, the 
instructor, said this was the first time 
such a program has been offered in a 
public school. 

To begin the project, the class 
purchased a floating cage, four feet by 
four feet. Made of plastic, this cage was 
designed to hold 500 six-inch fingerling 
catfish. The class then purchased 300 
catfish from a company in Arkansas. 

The class then found a location in 
Claytor Lake for the cage. Joey VanDyke 
volunteered to place the cage near his 
property and to feed the fish once a day. 

The goal of the project was to raise the 
six-inch fish to a one-pound size. The 
class met the goal as most of the fish 
actually weighed over a pound. 

There were some difficulties with the 
project, though. A fungus wiped out a 
majority of the fish at the beginning of 
the project; the long trip and the stress 
placed on the fish had left them weak. 
Despite this setback, over 100 fish were 
harvested, filleted and used in a fish-fry. 

Because of the success of this project, 
Dr. Poison plans to continue it another 
year. 

Mark Barnes 


Hard as steel. Thomas Gravely, 
Andy Thornton, and Eddie 
Hughes drill through a post hole 
digger in order to try to fix it. Mr. 
James Graham stands close to make 
sure the job is done right. 




Handle with care. Billy Davis uses 
careful hands with the plants to 
ensure their safety. Most of the 
plants grow and flourish here in 
the greenhouse. 

Trimming down. Shannon 
Branscome prunes the leaves on a 
plant in Horticulture. This is one 
technique the students learn in 
order to help improve the plant’s 
growth. 



42 — AGRICULTURE 












Having connections 


Agriculture and 
horticulture? Are the two 
the same? This is what 
students assume. The two 
are related but different in 
many ways. 

Agriculture is often 
thought of as farming. 
However, the classes 
prepared students in career 
fields such as land 
management, agricultural 
economics, and wildlife and 
fisheries. 

The Agriculture 
Department offered a 
four-year program for 
students to participate in 
activities related to 
agriculture mechanics, 
farming, forestry, wildlife 
and leadership. Students 
also learned agricultural 


mechanics skills in welding, 
electricity, small gas engines 
and power woodworking. 

The more advanced 
agriculture courses 
emphasized projects related 
to farm management, crop 
production and animal 
science. 

In horticulture, students 
learned how to grow plants, 
make corsages; and they 
also learned the art of 
salesmanship. In the spring, 
the students grew vegetable 
plants and flowers to sell to 
the public. Horticulture also 
provided the flower 
arrangements for 
homecoming, prom, and 
graduation. The work was 
challenging in both courses, 
yet it was very educational. 


Terri Shelor said, “I’ve 
always liked working with 
plants, and I would like a 
career that deals with 
plants.” 

The horticulture classes 
this year made yellow 
ribbons showing support for 
the troops in Saudi Arabia 
and also provided ribbons 
for the seniors to wear on 
their arms during the first 
fall pep rally. The classes 
also studied tissue culture. 
This study involved taking 
plant cells and growing a 
whole new plant from one 
cell. Mike Dunford said, “I 
think the tissue culture 
project was a great learning 
experience.” 

Mark Barnes 





Carrying the torch. Cliff Phillips 
practices his techniques in welding 
as part of his grade in agriculture. 
The students learn basic welding, 
agricultural economics, and other 
related topics in this class. 

April showers bring May flowers. 

Derek Sams applies his own 
showers as he takes time to water 
the flowers outside the greenhouse. 
Constant care had to be used in 
order to keep the plants healthy. 


HORTICULTURE — 43 













Here we go 

Broadway! Here in Virginia? The 
sophomore honors English classes 
traveled to Virginia Tech campus in the 
fall to see the musical CAMELOT, 
written by Alan Jay Lerner and Fredrick 
Lowe. “I feel that this was a great 
experience for the students,” said Miss 
Nancy Ballinger, teacher, who 
accompanied the students on the 
educational trip. 

The students enjoyed the music, the 
costumes, the characters and the humor 
in the play. Anjanette Radford said, “I 
liked the music most of all.” 

There was also a variety of characters 
for the students to enjoy. Krystal Talbert, 
like many of the girls, admitted, 

“Lancelot was my favorite character in 
the play.” 

Yes, the students found Broadway on 
the Virginia Tech campus. 

Jennifer Weikle 
Teresa Stone 


The next spelling word is . .. Miss 
Suzanne Steele calls out spelling 
words to her sophomore English 
class. Her seventh period class 
listens closely to hear the correct 
pronunciations. “Spelling will help 
me when I look for a job in the 
future,” said Dawn Taylor. 

Ponder, ponder. Miss Elizabeth 
Dinsmore, student aide from 
Radford University, helps Mrs. 
Virginia Mammi’s class as they 
work on computers first period to 
improve their English skills. Miss 
Dinsmore assists Clay Montgomery 
and James Thornton as they 
determine the correct option. Clay 
said, “The computers are an 
interesting way to learn English 
skills.” 




44 — ENGLISH 







Jason Speller 


Cutting edge 


Can you imagine 64 
computer terminals and 64 
students working quietly at 
these terminals with five 
teachers dashing around 
helping students? Such is 
the everyday scene in the 
computer lab in the English 
Pod. 

English classes work on a 
regular basis in this lab with 
a program for 
computer-assisted 
instruction. Students work 
at their own pace on their 
own level. 

Terri Shelor said, “It 
guides you along until you 
understand fully what 
you’re doing.” 

Computers are used to 


help students improve their 
skills in both reading and 
writing. 

Other changes have also 
occurred in the English pod 
this year; the classes are 
now year-long classes rather 
than semester-long classes. 
This change helps students 
to know their teachers 
better. The classes are also 
scheduled by grade level 
instead of by elective 
options. 

“I like it better because 
you don’t get used to a class 
and then have to change; 
and it gives you more time 
to understand what you’re 
doing,” said Jennifer 


Simpkins. 

Teachers are also 
optimistic about the English 
program. “I have always 
enjoyed the study and 
interaction of the 
humanities. English classes 
are unique in that they 
study and discuss many 
topics related to all students. 
From this setting comes an 
opportunity to develop skills 
of communication,” said 
Mrs. Audrey Burnett, 
department chairman. 

English classes help 
students develop 
communication skills that 
are important in all phases 
of life. Because of its 


importance, English is 
required for students for all 
four years of high school. 

In speaking of the 
importance of English as a 
required course, Denise 
Jackson said, “Since we live 
in the largest 
English-speaking country, 
we should know how to use 
it and read it. Most 
countries have many people 
who can also speak English, 
so we don’t want to appear 
dumb by not even knowing 
how to speak our own 
language.” 

Jennifer Weikle 
Teresa Stone 



“Who are the characters in this 
short story?” Ms. Rhonda Murdock 
asks her ninth grade English class. 
The students listen intently to Ms. 
Murdock and then answer her 
questions with full details about the 
story. 



That’s not right; maybe it is! Bill 

Ward has several choices from the 
list shown on the computer screen. 
Computers are a new addition to 
the English pod. “This will help me 
in the future to make more 
decisions in life,” said Bill. 


ENGLISH — 














On to work 

Being a part of a marketing class 
requires students to have a job. The 
students in a marketing class had 
part-time jobs and were allowed to leave 
school early to go to work. Most of the 
students left sixth period, but some were 
scheduled to leave as early as fourth and 
fifth periods in order to be at their jobs 
on time. 

There were various types of jobs at 
which the students worked. Many 
students found jobs at fast food 
restaurants — McDonald’s, Burger King, 
Hardees and others. Some students 
worked at the mall in stores like JC 
Penney, Hess’s, Leggett and some of the 
smaller stores. Other students found 
work at a hospital — Radford or Pulaski 
Community Hospital — or even at 
veterinary hospitals. 

“The biggest advantage of taking this 
class in my opinion is learning how to 
help customers in need and finding out 
things about your job that you never 
knew before,” said Caroline James. 
“Marketing helped me to have the best 
attitude toward my job,” said Kay 
Ramsey. 

Sarah James 



Please explain ... Seniors Denise 
Clemons and Misty McCoy work on 
an assignment in marketing class. 
Marketing requires many skills like 
writing journals and keeping a 
chart of hours the students have 
worked during each week. 
“Marketing teaches you about the 
real working world,” explained 
Denise. 

What is this? Junior Jennifer 
Simpkins studies her work in 
typing class. Typing is among the 
many business classes in the school. 
The class can teach students to 
touch type, how to proofread 
papers, and help improve typing 
speed. 


46 — BUSINESS/COMPUTERS 









The future is on the way 


The boy eyed the 
keyboard suspiciously, 
wondering what he would 
be expected to do. Most of 
the people who entered 
business/computer classes 
probably had these thoughts 
when they began their class. 
Classes in this department 
cover basics from learning 
how to type to learning how 
to set up and use a 
computer. 

“I’ve learned more 
coordination with my 
hands,” explained Yen Lui, 
a typing student. Typing 
can help students with skills, 
such as proofreading or 


secretarial skills. 

The business classes also 
help students reach goals 
for the future. “This class 
will help prepare me for all 
of the papers I’ll need to 
type in college,” said Misti 
Worrell. “I plan to major in 
computer technology,” said 
Lora Vest. 

A large part of the 
Business Department is 
computers as the use of 
computers is growing 
rapidly in the business 
world today. “I have been 
taking computer classes for 
four to five years now. They 
will help me get a headstart 


towards the future,” said 
Casey Ratcliffe. 

The computer classes 
benefit students in various 
ways. “The class helped me 
understand how to write a 
program properly,” said 
Don Hanshew. “We gained 
logical thinking patterns in 
figuring out what will and 
won’t work,” said Stephanie 
Alley. 

Marketing is another 
beneficial class for students 
working toward the future. 
“I think this class will give 
me some additional 
experience to learn about 


the working world and what 
it takes to have a job,” said 
Caroline James. 

Students feel they gain 
numerous advantages by 
taking a class in marketing. 
Kay Ramsey said, “It will 
help me to have the best 
attitude towards a job.” 

“It will help me know how 
life is in the real world and 
to be able to take a 
challenge,” said Shannon 
Bowman. 

In general, marketing 
helps prepare students for 
most any type of job. 

Sarah James 






The figures don’t add up ... 

Senior Angela Clark checks her 
computations with her calculator as 
she checks an assignment problem 
in an Accounting II class. 
“Accounting has really helped me 
to understand how the business 
community functions,” said Angela. 

Tapping away. Senior Randall 
Morris works on a calculator in a 
business class. This class can help 
students in speed and accuracy, as 
well as learning the fundamentals. 


BUSINESS/COMPUTERS — 47 


Jason Speller 










Roll on 

Food Occupations is rolling toward 
those food careers. Each year food 
occupations students go to one restaurant 
and one delicatessen. “I believe this is a 
good experience for students so they 
would get the feel for the different 
types,” said Mrs. Mickey Weikle, 
instructor. 

Health occupations students 
brightened the days for the elderly as the 
students go to nursing homes and help 
with the elderly people. They go to 
nursing homes twice a week to learn the 
practical skills of working with older 
people. 

Sandra Weikle 


Is this the right color for my cake? 

Claudia Harrison and Angela Cole 
work on their first cake of the year. 
They plan to do catering work for 
many people. “I like this project 
because it’s fun and a learning 
experience for the future to come,” 
said Claudia Harrison. 

Are you choking? This is the first 
question you ask when a person 
looks like he or she is choking. 
Belinda Whited and Julia Sutphin 
are practicing the Heimlech 
maneuver while Mrs. Nancy 
Sparks, instructor, assists them. “1 
like taking part in this, so one day 
I’ll know how to save someone’s 
life,” said Julia Sutphin. 




Going to grandmother’s house? No, the health 
occupations students are getting ready to go to the 
nursing homes. They go to nursing homes twice 
each week as part of their practical skills. “This is 
something I look forward to every week because I 
learn something new,” said Lisa Smith. 


48 — HEALTH OCCUPATIONS 














Jason Speller 



Tastefully fit 


“The abilities I will learn 
before becoming a health 
care worker,” explains Lisa 
Hamilton, are her reasons 
for enrolling in Health 
Occupations. Some of the 
skills students learn in 
taking Health Occupations 
include taking blood 
pressure, temperature, 
pulse, and respiration. 

Likewise, students who 
enroll in this class learn that 
there is a wide range of 
health careers which they 
may enter. Mary Jane 
Crowder, for instance, says, 
“I would like to become a 


pediatrician.” 

Students who successfully 
complete this course may 
also enter such health fields 
as nurse, nursing assistant, 
home health care worker or 
other related areas. 

Another vocational class is 
food occupations, a class 
that trains students for work 
in the food-related 
occupations. Some examples 
of the food occupation 
careers could be that of a 
chef, a dietician, or a food 
services manager. 

“The best thing about this 


class is working with 
different types of people,” 
said Kimberly Simmons. 

“This will teach students 
responsibility for the 
future,” said Mrs. Mickey 
Weikle, instructor. 

Both of these classes, 
health occupations and food 
occupations, develop skills 
that students may use in the 
future, skills that will make 
them productive citizens in 
the world of work. 

Sandra Weikle 




I 





[ason 


“This is the spinal cord, Patty,” 

says Kim Hayes. Kim Hayes and 
Patty Hayes are studying for a test 
in health occupations. The students 
are amazed with the many facts 
and details they need to learn. 


One, two, three, breathe. Lisa 
Smith and Karen Dehart are 
learning how to do CPR, and they 
plan on getting their certificate in 
CPR. “I think it is very important 
to learn because one day I may 
have to save someone’s life,” said 
Lisa Smith. 


FOOD SERVICE OCCUPATIONS — 49 















FAC of 
NRV 

Early in the year, the art classes visited 
the Fine Arts Center of the New River 
Valley in downtown Pulaski. The art 
teachers used their class period to take 
their students to see the different art 
works from the community. 

The students were given an 
introduction by one of the employees 
and then they looked at all of the 
pictures and different art works. This 
exposure helped the students to broaden 
their minds and to see types of works 
they had practiced or discussed in class. 

“I just love going to the Fine Arts 
Center so I can see all of the art works 
and so I can get ideas of what I can do 
for class,” said Terri Shelor. This was the 
reaction from many other students also. 
Students felt the trip was an educational 
and worthwhile experience. 

Leslie Tate 
Sarah Steffy 



Hmm! Is this right? The 

computers in the Math Pod were 
introduced to the students last year. 
Each student’s name was put into 
the program. “I really enjoy 
working on the computers during 
math class,” said Terri Shelor. The 
students are allowed to work on the 
computers during their math 
classes as well as before and after 
school. 


This has to be perfect. Aaron Cress 
is a very big bicycle rider. He is 
working on a paste up of a bike. 
Riding bikes is Aaron’s favorite 
pastime. One can usually find him 
on the streets in Pulaski riding his 
bike and doing many of his favorite 
tricks. 




50 — ART/MATH 


Michelle Simpkins 



















Crystal Carden 


Painting by numbers 


Have you ever wondered 
what makes the Math Pod 
so unique? Could it be the 
bright colors and 
geometrical designs that 
stand out as you enter the 
pod, or is it the hard work 
and creativity that make the 
pod so special? 

There is a variety of 
classes taught in the Math 


The answer is x = 79. Jessi Ratcliffe 
and Sam Raykes sit attentively as 
Mrs. Diane Trump goes over the 
answers to their homework from 
the night before. Mrs. Trump goes 
over the homework every day at 
the beginning of class to see if the 
students have any questions. 


Pod — all levels of math 
classes, art classes and even 
journalism and yearbook 
classes. 

Though the times are 
changing rapidly, art is a 
subject that never goes out 
of style. Lori Poskas said, 
“Art lets you express 
yourself;” and a number of 
students agree with her 
thoughts. 

Cindy Moore commented 
that “being able to create 
new and interesting things” 
is her favorite part of art. 
And even though a majority 
of students do not look for 
a future career in art, 
several students did indicate 


that they are interested in 
becoming commercial 
artists. 

The art classes produce 
projects such as clay pots 
and sculptures, portraits 
and sketches, as well as 
various detailed paintings. 

While art students focus 
on watercolor and oil paints, 
math students concentrate 
on word problems and 
equations. 

Math, a class where logic 
and numbers mean 
everything, is a class that at 
some time everyone is 
required to take. 

Students agree that math 
is important in today’s 


society. Wendy Cox said, 
“Now you must have a 
college degree in order to 
get a good job. In any field 
or occupation, math is a 
very important factor.” 

Heather Morehead 
believes “the feeling I get 
when I finally understand” 
is her favorite part of math. 
This feeling is shared by 
several students as they 
attempt problems that seem 
almost unworkable. 

From paint brushes and 
canvas to pencil and paper, 
the Math Pod is a place for 
creativity. 

Sarah Steffey 
Leslie Tate 




Oh! O.K. I understand. Terry 
Hoffman talks to Mr. Steve Hester 
about one of the many art projects 
for this year. “I really enjoy art,” 
said Terry. This year some of the 
art classes did portraits of their 
classmates. 


ART/MATH — 51 


Jason Speller 













Halloween 

While most students only thought 
about the trick part of Halloween, the 
child care students were in for a real 
treat. The students enrolled in the child 
care classes planned a special outing for 
the children in the child care program on 
Halloween day. 

The children brought in their various 
costumes from home, and the students 
helped them get “all dressed up.” The 
students then escorted the children, who 
had transformed into ghosts and other 
characters, through the pods. 

Participating teachers handed out candy, 
treats and other goodies to the small 
children. 

This event was an experience for both 
the children and the students. The 
children learned important Halloween 
safety rules, while the students received 
experience which may prove useful in 
the future when many of them become 
parents. 

Michelle Parnell 


Making plans. Jennifer Gallimore 
color codes her lesson plans that 
outline the activities she will teach. 
Students in child care were 
required to teach the pre-schoolers 
on specified days; but before they 
taught a lesson, they had to draft 
their lesson plans. 


Teacher helping teacher. Mrs. 
Bonnie Graham, child care 
instructor, helps Lenny Ramsey 
with her lesson plans for teaching. 
Crystal Brown looks over her plans 
to make sure they are complete. 





52 — HOME ECONOMICS/CHILD CARE 















Leaving, prepared 


Decision making is a big 
responsibility for most 
teenagers. Child care and 
home economics classes 
prepare students for this 
responsibility by teaching 
them about marriage, 
parenting and life in 
general. “I’m almost out of 
school, and I’m going to be 
on my own; and I’d like to 
know the basics to living 
solo,” said Brian Porter, a 
student enrolled in family 
management. 

Besides participating in 
class discussions and 
cooking, the family 
management students 
prepared for the future by 
participating in a mock 
wedding. Then they learned 
some of the parenting skills 
when they had to care for 
their “egg babies” 


throughout the school day 
without breaking them. 

Brian Roope said, “This 
class will give me parental 
techniques I can use in the 
future as well as make my 
current family atmosphere 
healthier.” 

Skills students learned in 
home economics classes 
varied. For instance, they 
learned skills, such as 
cooking, sewing, and 
furnishing and decorating a 
home. 

Fashion merchandising 
involved designing and 
sewing original fashions, 
and the fashion 
merchandising students 
planned a fashion show for 
the spring. 

Students in the child care 
classes were also involved in 
a lot of planning. Students 


had the opportunity to plan 
special activities, such as 
Halloween and Christmas 
parties for the children who 
were part of a day-care 
program operated by 
students in this class. 

About her experiences in 
child care class, Lorrie Peak 
said, “I like working with 
the children. They’re a lot 
of fun, and you get a lot of 
experience.” Cristy Mills 
admitted, “I’m learning 
along with the kids.” 

Child care classes were 
also stepping stones for 
students interested in 
becoming teachers, social 
workers or day care center 
workers. 

Michelle Parnell 




Snip, snip. Cristy Mills cuts out 
mittens for the children’s projects. 
Teaching art was one of the many 
requirements of students enrolled 
in the child care program. “It takes 
a lot of time and patience to work 
with the children,” said Cristy. 


Color wheels? Students in fashion 
merchandising discuss the different 
styles and colors of fabric. Darlene 
Jones, Julie Hallett, Angie Peak 
and Nicole Moore work with color 
wheels to learn fabric colors. 


HOME ECONOMICS/CHILD CARE — 53 


Michelle Simpkins 










Holding 

out 

The IMC is “the place” to go if you 
have a research paper due or if you have 
a report to do or if you need a place to 
study or find some quick answers. 

Students sometimes complain, saying 
they don’t have enough information or 
don’t have enough time to complete their 
assignments. Now, however, they can’t 
use the line “I didn’t get it finished” 
anymore. The IMC has extended its 
hours to accommodate students’ needs. 

The IMC opens at 7:30 a.m. and stays 
open until 4:30 p.m. so that students who 
ride early and/or late busses may have a 
place to work. And when students do not 
have specific assignments to do, they may 
come to the IMC to catch up on current 
events by reading the newspapers, or 
they may spend the time leisurely 
reading a variety of magazines. 

Whatever the question or the need, 
students may find their answers in the 
IMC. 

Carrie O’Dell 


Where does this book go? Tina 
Jones and Joanna Harman shelve 
library books as part of the IMC 
skills class that they take. 


Let’s hope this works. Amy Morris 
desensitizes a book at the IMC 
checkout so that the alarm system 
will not be activated. 




Just spending time. Michael 
Edwards spends some of his free 
time in the IMC, reading his 
favorite sports magazine. 

How should I end this? During 
her fifth period study hall, Becky 
Gravley goes to the IMC to work 
on her class assignments. 



54 — IMC 


























A new change 


“You can pick up your 
ID’s in the IMC during first, 
second and third lunch 
today” was the 
announcement heard many 
times over the public 
address system throughout 
the year for those students 
who had to have their ID’s 
remade. 

Some things like these 
announcements never 
change, but some things are 
changing this year. For 
example, a new circulation 
system is being installed in 
the IMC, using IBM 
computers instead of Apple 


computers, explained Mrs. 
Elinor Morgan, head 
librarian. 

“This will help the staff 
and students locate 
materials quicker and 
easier,” said Mrs. Morgan. 

But that isn’t all that is 
changing in the IMC. Now, 
students can check out their 
books for three weeks 
instead of two weeks. Also, 
extra hours have been 
added in the morning and 
afternoon so that students 
can spend more time in the 
IMC. Trade Roan said, “I 
like the idea of longer 


hours; that way there’s more 
time to visit the IMC.” 

Many students don’t know 
how much the librarians 
enjoy the students’ 
cooperation in the IMC. Ms. 
Susie Cutlip said, “Feeling 
helpful and useful to our 
students is very rewarding.” 

Many other students have 
reasons for going or liking 
the IMC. Tracy Speller said, 
“The variety of books to 
choose from makes it so 
easy when you have 
everything at your 
fingertips!” 

Carrie O’Dell 


IMC — 55 


















Clean up 

The grounds are beautifully kept, 
neatly trimmed, and cleanly taken care 
of. Who is responsible for this? The 
WECEP class is. WECEP (Work 
Experience Cooperative Education 
Program) is a class where students learn 
job skills through actual hands-on 
experiences. 

Students mow the lawn on a regular 
basis to keep it looking sharp. They also 
trim around the buildings and obstacles 
where the grass has grown tall. The 
many bushes are trimmed to look like 
ones around a palace. Litter is picked up 
around the premises and also at the 
football stadium after a game. The class 
faces one of the biggest challenges at the 
high school. 

Before the students can do this 
maintenance, though, they must learn 
how to operate equipment like 
lawnmowers, weed eaters, and pruners. 
After that, the students go to work. 

This class prepares them for the real 
world as it teaches them how to perform 
a job properly. Lee Holston said, “I like 
this class because it is preparnig me for a 
job after I finish high school, and I also 
enjoy the work.” 

Mark Barnes 


Sweating in the sun. David 
Branscome, Tom Clarkson, and 
Paul Edmonds construct an 
overhang on a previously built 
building. The work in building 
maintenance is challenging and 
offers the students on-the-job 
training. 



One right after another. Brad 
Hopkins watches the papers as they 
shoot through the printing 
machine. Students learn different 
techniques of printing and the 
steps involved. 





56 — VOCATIONAL 
















w>n*s 



A different 


A different education, a 
different environment, and 
a whole different world. 
This could be said about the 
vocational building. A 
student can decide a career 
that he or she is interested 
in while in this building. 
Classes offered are in 
cosmetology, electricity, 
building maintenance, and 
drafting. 

In cosmetology, students 
learned how to care for a 
person’s hair. The course 
was offered to juniors and 
seniors and lasted three 
periods a day. This course 
opened the chance of a 
| career in hairstyling to 
” interested students. Susan 
J, Mathena said, “This class 


helped me to decide to open 
up my own hairstyling 
shop.” 

In electricity classes, 
students learned basic 
wiring and then progressed 
to more complex wiring. 

The students performed 
wiring around the school, 
saving the school money 
while providing experience 
for the students as well. 
Sherman Wright said, “Mr. 
Ward was our biggest help 
because he wanted us not 
only to learn but also to 
excel in life on the way.” 

In building maintenance, 
students learned all the tools 
and trades needed to plan 
and build a house. The 
students could be found 


world 

making improvements 
around the school. Luke 
Williamson said, “It has 
taught me the different 
types of nails, screwdrivers, 
and hammers needed to do 
a job. It has also taught me 
the different types of 
materials that are used and 
how they are used.” 

Drafting students learned 
more technical matters like 
how properly to draw out 
blue prints for a house and 
draw the designs to an exact 
measurement. Kirk Jennings 
said, “I took drafting to 
further my knowledge in 
drawing skills and also to 
learn how to draw a straight 
line!” 

Mark Barnes 




Jason Speller 

Let the paint fly. Brian Taylor 
suspends from a ladder as he 
paints the trim on a building. The 
building was in need of a coat of 
paint so the students in building 
maintenance went out to tackle the 
job. 

Wash away those suds. Angela 
Warf rinses a student’s hair after 
giving her a perm. The students 
also learn how to cut, tint, and care 
for a person’s hair. 


VOCATIONAL — 57 


















p 


Night out 

Before regular school even started, 
most of the students of the Southwest 
Virginia Governor’s School for Science, 
Math, and Technology went on an 
overnight field trip to the UVa Mountain 
Lake Biological Station. The field trip 
was headed by Dr. Michael Bentley, Mrs. 
Carolyn Linkous, and Mr. Dwayne 
Gauck. The main purpose of the trip was 
for the students to get a chance to know 
each other and to establish ground rules 
for the Magnet School. 

Many games such as the compound 
word game and lining up from oldest to 
youngest by month, date, and year were 
ways students got to know each other. 
Students spent many hours in group 
discussions and wrote private journals so 
they could express their feelings, 
opinions, and experiences. 

When asked what he liked about the 
field trip, Darden Freeman said, “The 
highlight was the bonfire. There we got a 
chance to talk, share stories, and basically 
get to know each other.” 

Becca Woolley 



“Bowl! ... Bowl! ... Bowl!” exclaimed Cindy 
Martin during a getting-to-know-you activity. 
Students were given a part of a compound word 
and while blindfolded, had to yell out their word 
until they found their correct match. 




“In the time it takes for you to 
read this sentence, eight acres of 
trees will disappear.” Jason 
Jennings, J.J. Clark, John Hawley, 
and Aaron Smith listened to Dr. 
Bentley explain the information 
about the loss of the world’s 
woodlands since 1950. Students 
learned about deforestation and its 
effects on the gene pool diversity. 

What next? Cory Byrd, Darden 
Freeman, and Clinton Leonard do 
an experiment on the force of 
gravity during their physics class. 
Cory said, “This experiment 
demonstrated my ability of 
projecting balls as it paralleled my 
ability to make a mess with 
hydrogen hydroxide. I’m enjoying 
the experience with my classmates, 
instructors, and instructor’s aides.” 
Darden added, “This study 
enhanced my intellectuality on how 
metal spheres increase velocity as 
they descend from the inclination 
of the tubular structure.” 



pf V 

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III '“‘V* \ 




58 — MAGNET SCHOOL 









Jason Speller 


New beginnings 



Apprehensively, the girl 
takes her seat in the 
unfamiliar room. She looks 
all around her at the 
strange faces staring back at 
her. 

The teacher gets up and 
begins the lesson. “Does 
anybody know the 
probability of the 
parachutist landing in an 
area without trees?” 

The girl looks around the 
room again to see if anyone 
is raising a hand. 

“I wonder how these 
classes are going to be? Will 
1 be able to understand 
everything? What if I don’t 
get along with everyone? 
Should I really be here at 
this school?” 

Then she notices an 
unfamiliar face from across 
the room smile at her. With 
that connection of 




friendship between the two, 
the girl realizes she made 
the right decision and raises 
her hand to answer the 
question. 

The new “member” on 
campus was the Magnet 
School, otherwise known as 
the Southwest Virginia 
Governor’s School for 
Science, Math, and 
Technology. Forty-four 
juniors from the counties of 
Giles, Wythe, Pulaski, 
Carroll, Bland, Floyd and 
the city of Galax 
participated in this new 
program. 

Students attended the 
school during the morning 
hours and then returned to 
their own school for the 
afternoon. A total of 17 
PCHS students attended this 
school after being accepted 


through an application 
process. 

When asked why she 
decided to apply to the 
Magnet School, Fong Lui 
said, “I thought it would be 
a great opportunity to 
further my education in 
science and math. I plan to 
major in business or 
mathematics, so it would 
help me a lot.” 

Director of the Magnet 
School is Dr. Michael 
Bentley; assistant director is 
Mrs. Carolyn Linkous, who 
said, “It was an idealistic 
kind of job in that as a 
person committed to 
education, the opportunity 
to make some decisions and 
possible changes in 
education is something you 
can’t resist.” 

Each day students 


prepared for something 
different than the day 
before. Some days consisted 
of math and science block 
classes, while other days 
consisted of laboratory 
classes in chemistry, physics 
or environmental studies, 
independent study time, 
seminars and lecture 
programs. 

“The Magnet School’s 
classes differ from regular 
classes because they are 
more challenging, and we 
get more than just a 
textbook education,” said 
Emily Hammond. 

James Dye said, “The 
classes are a better 
challenge; they allow me 
better control over what I 
study, and they teach me 
things that I couldn’t learn 
in other classes.” 

Becca Woolley 





Okay, now the next problem. Mrs. 
Carolyn Linkous teaches her math 
class while Emily Hammond, Brent 
Rampey, Toby Hall, Patty Dupuis, 
Lateffa Carter, Lisa Langendorfer, 
Matt Miller, Fong Lui, Matt 
Layman, and Vic Terry listen. 

Math is just one of the classes 
taught at the Magnet School. 

Now does everybody understand? 

Dr. Michael Bentley teaches his 
science class. Along with being a 
teacher, Dr. Bentley is also the 
director of the Magnet School. 



“If I could only see around his 
head,” Shellie Simpkins thought. 
Shellie and Craig Dobyns try to 
copy down problems during their 
math class. 


MAGNET SCHOOL — 59 











Car #U 

Last night I slept peacefully in the 
parking lot. “Ouch!” someone stuck a key 
in my lock. He sat in my seat, put the key 
in my ignition and stomped my 
accelerator. He started the car and took 
me to the driving range. 

I felt nervous because I wasn’t the only 
car on the driving range, and he wasn’t 
the only student learning to drive. My 
student driver drove me around in circles 
until I was dizzy. He pulled me forward 
and backward until I thought my brakes 
were fractured. 

He had brought me through weeks of 
driver training without even a scratch, 
but I just knew that would change today. 

Fear overcame me, and all of my joints 
rattled as my wheels rolled to the 
interstate. 

However, he drove quite well. Back at 
school, I realized how much he meant to 
me and how much I meant to him as the 
coach said to him, “Here’s your 
certificate . . . You’re ready to get your 
license.” 

Sonya Steffey 



It’s just a car. The Pulaski County School Board 
owns a fleet of six used state employee cars that are 
used for driver education. These cars are operated 
four periods each day as well as throughout the 
summer. 


Keep on going. John Crowder, Dan 
Moore, Jimmy Mustian, Jason 
Freeman, James Mann, Danny 
Flinchum and Matt Ficke warm up 
for football. Matt said, “I like 
playing sports.” Exercise was part 
of the daily activities. 





y jl * 


if 

It 




Watch that cone. Coach Wright 
watches the students as they take 
their turns on the driving range. 

Bull’s eye! Greg Quesenberry takes 
part in the archery unit. Archery 
was a class in which all tenth 
graders participated. 



60 — DRIVER EDUCATION/PHYSICAL EDUCATION 















Shapin'* it 



Physical education class is 
the time of day to get in 
shape, have fun, and 
sometimes even to socialize. 
There is a variety of sports 
and activities that the 
students taking PE 
participate in with every 
student having a different 
idea about the most favorite 
and least favorite activity. 

The gymsuit is an issue 
that the ninth grade PE 
students have thoughts 
about. Some students would 
like to see longer shorts or 
to be able to wear outfits 
from home. Stacey McPeak 
t . said, “I would just like 
something that is more 
= comfortable.” Rhonda 
A Quesenberry, though, had 


another view. “I like the 
gymsuit the way it is,” she 
said. 

While the ninth graders 
were thinking of the way 
they would like their 
gymsuits to be, tenth 
graders were thinking of 
this year being their last one 
in PE. Amanda Folsom said, 
“I’m glad because I get tired 
of dressing out, but I like 
playing sports.” 

As the PE classes were 
doing exercises and playing 
sports, the driver’s 
education students were 
working to reach their goal 
of obtaining their driver’s 
licenses. 

Driver’s ed students spent 
time on the driving range as 


up 

well as in the classroom. In 
talking about what made 
him the most nervous in 
driver’s ed, Mike Frazier 
said, “When the teacher’s in 
the car.” On the other hand, 
Chris Farmer said, “There is 
nothing really unnerving 
about driving.” 

Driver’s ed is not a 
required course, but most 
students take it. 

Thus, both physical 
education and driver’s 
education are important; PE 
gets the body in shape, 
while driver’s ed gets a 
person in shape for the 
road. 

Sonya Steffey 









Moving right along. Sarah 
Simpkins and Sonya Steffey run as 
part of the agility drills in PE class. 
Agility drills help build speed and 
endurance. Sarah Simpkins said, 
“Although I don’t like to run. I’m 
looking forward to volleyball.” 


And they’re off! Kim Martin and 
Melissa Kilbert are ready to go. As 
the whistle blows, the next group 
awaits their turn. Running is one of 
the daily exercises in physical 
education. 










DRIVER EDUCATION/PHYSICAL EDUCATION — 61 






















Close by 

Each year the seniors in the auto body 
class travel down Cougar Trail to 
Volvo-White GM Truck Corporation to 
see first-hand the skills being used that 
students have developed in their class. 
Because many of the former students in 
the auto body class are now employed by 
Volvo, Mr. Roger Caudell, auto body 
instructor, believes this trip is especially 
beneficial for the students. 

“The students get to see the type of 
work that is done there and see how 
former students have been successful in 
the auto body field,” Mr. Caudell 
explained. 

Through this experience, students also 
get a feel for what they can expect once 
they graduate and enter the real world of 
work. “This trip is a very good 
motivational and educational 
experience,” Mr. Caudell concluded. 

Jessica Sifford 




Come off. J amie Tolbert works on 
the hood of a car, sanding it down 
so it can be repainted. This is only 
one of the things students are 
responsible for in auto body. 


Don’t mess up, please. This could 
be one of Chip Jones’ thoughts as 
he paints. “I like auto body best 
because it gives me the ability to 
start a vehicle and show pride in 
what 1 can do,” Chip said. 




62 — AUTO BODY/AUTO MECHANICS 


Jason Spell< 


















What could we do now? Allen 

Bullion works at the front left 
wheel of the car while Johnny 
Sexton works under the front. 
Students in auto body learn the 
fundamentals of repairing car 
bodies. This is a class where the 
work is definitely shown on the 
outside. 


How interesting. Cory Webb, Chris 
Donithan and Eric Bryant examine 
a piece of equipment in auto 
mechanics, one of the classes 
offered in the vocational program. 
Chris explained that when he 
finishes high school, he plans to 
become a mechanic. 



Machine’s a running 


Motors screaming, motors 
screaming, “Gotta do more, 
gotta be more ...” 

That’s just what the guys 
enrolled in auto body and 
auto mechanics are saying 
and what they are planning 
to do. Both auto body and 
auto mechanics classes give 
students the chance to 
develop their interests in 
cars at the same time that 
they are developing skills 
for a career. 

“I’ve learned how to work 
on cars; but more 
importantly, I learned how 
to work as a team and how 
to be mature in a working 
area,” said Brad Dalton. 

It is in these classes that 
students learn things that 
they cannot learn in any 


other class. 

“The best thing about this 
class is doing the body work 
because you can see the 
damage change in front of 
you,” Jackie Akers said. 

Likewise, Jason Wolf said, 
“I like the hands-on work. 
Not many schools have 
hands-on work like ours.” 

Indeed, in these classes 
students learn much by 
using their hands as well as 
their minds. 

“What I like best about 
auto mechanics is getting to 
work with my hands. After 
we learn something in the 
classroom, we get to use it 
in the shop,” said Andy 
Kiser. 

Students generally agree, 
though, that it takes 


determination to do well in 
these classes. And it is this 
determination that pays off 
in the future for them. 

“After finishing high 
school, I plan on being a 
great mechanic and getting 
a good job in a garage 
somewhere,” said Randy 
Reynolds. 

“I plan to go to college to 
increase my auto body 
education and then get a job 
in the auto body field,” said 
Butch Hudson. 

Indeed, most of the 
students will use these skills 
they learn and will continue 
to develop them as they 
leave school and enter the 
world of work. 

Jessica Sifford 


AUTO BODY/AUTO MECHANICS — 63 


Jessica Sifford 








May 9 

Flipping back through the pages of our 
local history, we cannot help but 
remember the Battle of Cloyd’s Farm, or 
as the Yankees called it, the Battle of 
Cloyd’s Mountain, that took place on 
May 9, 1864. 

On that battlefield, which is presentday 
Lillydale and Back Creek, 2,000 
Confederate and 6,555 Yankee soldiers 
gathered and fought for the side and the 
cause to which they owed their support 
and allegiance. 

Some people went beyond reading 
about this battle and actually recreated 
the battle on the very soil where it first 
occurred. This re-enactment occurred 
last spring on the Sunday closest to the 
original date and was sponsored by the 
Southwest Virginia and East Tennessee 
Historical Foundations. 

The Confederate soldiers were made 
up of the Fourth Virginia Infantry, 
which consisted of local members from 
the counties of Pulaski, Montgomery and 
Wythe; the Eighth Virginia Cavalry; and 
the Eighty-ninth Tennessee Infantry. 

The Yankee soldiers were portrayed by 
the Eighth U.S.-Tennessee Infantry. 

The actors arrived on Friday night and 
camped out on the original battlefield. 
Their first skirmish was Saturday, but it 
was not open to the public. On Sunday, 
the public battle took place on the south 
end of the battlefield. Originally, the 
battle began at the mountain and 
reached down to what is now the New 
River Valley Fairgrounds. 

In the end, the Yankees finally won 
the battle, but they suffered so many 
casualties that they retreated into 
present-day West Virginia. 

“We like to think that the Confederates 
won the campaign,” said Mr. Jim Tucker, 
who participated in the re-enactment and 
who is also in the process of writing a 
book about the battle. 

Wendy Foushee 



Slow down. Junior, Rachael Long, 
hurries to copy down notes in Ms. 
Maria Douthat’s United States 
History class. Students studied 
about the makeup of the country, 
both past and present. “I never 
knew how much went into the 
founding of our country,” said 
Rachael. 

I don’t understand. Mrs. Virginia 
Fizer helps her French II student, 
Carrie Weddle, understand her 
lessons in studying a foreign 
language. “French isn't really that 
hard,” said Carrie. “You just have 
to apply yourself,” she said. 






HSR 




64 — SOCIAL STUDIES/LANGUAGE 











Michelle Taylor 



Local and foreign affairs 


Imagine yourself on a 
deserted island that has no 
official language and 
absolutely no form of 
government. There is 
nothing but one chaotic 
mess. As primitive as it 
sounds, this is how our 
world as we now know it 
today once began. 

Over thousands of years, 
our culture has grown and 
developed into a web of 
society that extends beyond 
the boundaries of our 
nation and into the lands 
and lives of other countries 
and people located across 
our vast planet. 

Even though we 
sometimes take it for 
granted, our lives are 
affected by the culture of 
countries all over the world. 
The studies of these 
cultures and governments 
form the nucleus of the 
social studies classes. 


The major issue that was 
on everyone’s mind was the 
situation in the Middle East. 
“This class is important in a 
situation like this because it 
helps me Vo understand 
what is going on and what 
decisions our government 
could make to insure the 
safety of Americans,” said 
senior government student 
Chris Hull. 

“The crisis in the Middle 
East will soon be of major 
importance in history 
classes,” said sophomore 
Jonathan Cline. 

“Since the Middle East 
conflict began, government 
class means a lot because my 
dad is in the Air Force; and 
his unit is on alert,” said 
Aaron Cress. 

Learning about our own 
government also proved to 
be an exciting task for the 
students. “We have fun 


discussing things and 
listening to each other’s 
comments, no matter what 
your opinion,” said 
government student Melissa 
Montgomery. 

At the same time, what 
could interest students in 
taking a foreign language? 
For Spanish student April 
Asbury, it was watching 
“Sesame Street.” “With the 
help of Maria on ‘Sesame 
Street,’ ” giggled April, “I 
learned to say the numbers 
one through ten in Spanish 
almost before I could count 
in English.” 

“I’ve always been 
interested in going to 
France,” said third-year 
French student Denise 
Jackson. “The language and 
the country are so beautiful. 
Everything about it interests 
me,” she said. 

Likewise, fifth year 


German students, Latha 
Gearheart and Elizabeth 
Knarr, were enthusiastic 
about their studies. “This is 
our fifth year studying 
German, and we both 
believe it is a most excellent 
experience,” agreed Latha 
and Elizabeth. 

“One important thing we 
do is to discuss foreign 
affairs in German. It gives 
us a broader aspect on 
European affairs and helps 
us to learn and understand 
the German culture,” they 
said. 

On any day, then, one 
could watch as the Social 
Studies Pod came alive with 
the culture of our world’s 
neighbors through classes in 
social studies as well as 
classes in the foreign 
languages. 

Wendy Foushee 
Natashia Reed 




€3 

i. * 






Now what did he say? With a 
pondering look, senior. Jay Horton, 
listens to Mr. Clark Reece in his 
United States Government class. 
“You never really know how 
interesting and complex our 
government is until you study 
about it,” said Jay. The class 
studied capitalism, socialism, 
communism and economic systems. 


Michelle Taylor 

German duet. Seniors, Elizabeth 
Knarr and Latha Gearheart, enjoy 
working together to translate 
German. They learned about 
German culture, starting from early 
European civilization. “Elizabeth 
and I are the only two German V 
students, so this year is really 
special,” said Latha. They also read 
and translated German newspaper 
articles to catch up on the current 
events in Germany. 


CTJ 



z 



SOCIAL STUDIES/LANGUAGE — 65 






Newsflash? 

On the road again. The TV 
production class gathered experience 
when they saw a live news crew putting 
all of the basics together. The production 
class traveled to television studios in 
Roanoke where they were shown how to 
make their interviews, sports and weather 
more professional. 

The trip provided a look, feel and 
measure of the hectic life of a newscaster. 
“We got to see what it is like to operate 
the cameras,” said Allen Simpkins. 

The main objective for a trip was to 
give the class a feel for the involved job 
of broadcasting. The anchors showed the 
class how to use the new technology, how 
the earpieces work, and how everything 
goes together to make a more 
professional newscast. 

The class got to see everything that the 
television audience does not get to 
experience. 

Shirene Broadwater 



Monitors? What happened to the term TV? Phillip 
Bird and Trena McCroskey sit patiently in the 
control room concentrating on what is happening in 
the TV studio. Taping, switching monitors, light 
adjustment and audio production were a few 
activities that took place in the control room. “I like 
this class because it gives me a look about things to 
come,” said Trena McCroskey. 


O.K. Camera one, get ready. Erica 
Grubb, Phillip Bird and Patricia 
Hayes sit in the control room 
concentrating on what is happening 
in the studio. The control room 


was where all the editing 
techniques were used. “I like to 
work in the control room and 
behind the camera. It is a fun 
experience,” said Erica Grubb. 



Standin’ by for a closer view. 

Rasheeh Jackson stands waiting for 
the screen to get focused. Focusing 
and other TV procedures was used 
to make the production the best. 

“It is a really exciting experience to 
be able to work with the camera 
and the people around it,” said 
Rasheeh Jackson. 

Rollin’! Phillip Bird makes a quick 
glance on the TV camera to make 
sure everything is in its place. The 
TV cameras were used often, so 
they would have to be adjusted 
more than once. 




66 — VIDEO PRODUCTION 























Newscaster 


In 5 ... 4 ... 3 ... 2 .. . 

1. Most people wake up to 
the weather, sports, and 
other important events by a 
morning broadcast. But 
there is more to 
broadcasting than meets the 
eye. 

Becoming a newscaster 
has to start somewhere. 
Some of our fellow students 
have already started on the 
long road toward a 
television career. These 
students have begun with 
the TV production class. 

“I want to be a newscaster 
on television, so I felt it was 
necessary to learn 
everything on and between 
the scenes,” said Denise 
Jackson. Allen Simpkins 
agreed and said, “It might 
help me decide what I want 
to be in the future.” 

TV production is more 
than a class; it is also an 
opportunity for individuals 
to take their interests and 
make them come to life. “As 
individuals, we get to take 
the camcorders out and tape 


our own stuff. As groups we 
do shows, broadcasts, and 
videos,” said Sarah Tilson. 

The production class is 
not all sports and weather. 

It is also an exercise in 
controlling one’s frustration 
level. For Denise Jackson, it 
is frustrating to do “ad 
libbing on camera; putting 
all of the necessary 
equipment, music, and 
talent together at once to 
make a shot or scene.” The 
most frustrating thing for 
Sarah Tilson is 
“remembering how to use 
the cameras.” 

TV production has a 
practical side; students learn 
to use their own camcorders 
and put classroom exercises 
to the test. John Anderson 
is taking TV production 
because he wants “to learn 
how to produce better 
videos with my own 
camcorder.” Production 
class gives these students a 
head start on their futures. 

Shirene Broadwater 



So could you please tell us how it 
happened? As Rasheeh Jackson is 
taping, Tiek Shrewsberry interviews 
Timothy Spencer. Interviews are 
one of the basic necessities 
important in any kind of TV 
studio. “Since being in this class, I 
have more interest in 
communication, and it has opened 
the door to a career,” said Tiek 
Shrewsberry. 


VIDEO PRODUCTION — 6 







































Summer on 

Over the hill and through the woods to 
Lynchburg workshop we go. As many 
students enjoy their summer vacation 
completely away from the school 
environment, there are still some who go 
above the call of duty to secure new ideas 
for the upcoming year for the 
PINNACLE staff. 

Five students, Fong Lui, Tammy 
McMillan, Shana Taylor, Becca Woolley 
and Jason Speller, attended a yearbook 
publications workshop in Lynchburg this 
past summer. This workshop, sponsored 
by the Jostens-Hunter Publishing 
Company, included a four-day stay at 
Lynchburg College where the students 
attended sessions with students from 
other schools to create, discuss and learn 
ways that each staff could improve the 
quality of their work. 

The students found themselves 
working both day and night as they 
learned techniques for writing copy, for 
designing pages and for improving their 
photography. The students also 
developed their theme and plan for the 
upcoming year. 

The highlight for these students came 
at the concluding assembly of all 300 
delegates when Jason Speller was named 
outstanding photographer. 

Also attending the sessions with these 
students were yearbook advisers, Mrs. 
Chime Saltz, Mrs. Patricia Huber, and 
Mr. Steve Hester. 

Bobbie Jean Grubb 


An editor’s work is never done. 

Jason Alley works hard to get copy 
ready for submission. Jason 
believes, “Cooperation is the most 
important part of making our 
magazine come together.” 

Getting it straight. Shana Taylor 
checks to make sure everything is 
in line. Shana feels that “meeting 
deadlines is a must.” 




68 — PUBLICATIONS 














Against a deadline 


Endless paper slowly fills 
up as the everflowing ink 
keeps coming to the end; 
and the mind turns over 
and over, bringing new 
ideas with every turn. This 
image could best describe a 
publications student 
working against a deadline. 

Sarah Steffey, a member 
of THE COUGAR 
PINNACLE staff, said she 
feels the most important 
part of the yearbook is 
“meeting deadlines and 
pleasing the student body.” 

For Scott Peterson, a 
member of the COUGAR 
PROWLER, the most 
important part of 
newspaper is “seeing that 
the public gets a good paper 


with good articles.” 

To Travis Terry, a 
member of INKLINGS, the 
most important part of 
being on the literary-art 
magazine is “to publish 
quality student literature 
and art.” 

All three student 
publications are distinctively 
different, but they require 
many of the same skills and 
work. First of all, each staff 
much insure that they have 
enough funds to publish 
their work. For this reason, 
staff members sell 
advertisements to finance 
their publication. 

Also, students on all of 
the staffs must be willing to 
give of their time as well as 


their talents. For many, this 
means spending hours after 
school working on the 
publication. 

Likewise, each publication 
is a representative of the 
entire school and 
community. For that reason, 
students work with the 
public in drafting a positive 
image for the work. 

Finally, each publication is 
submitted to Virginia High 
School League, the 
governing body for Virginia 
high schools, for 
competition. And all 
students take pride when 
the publications bring home 
top ratings. 

Bobbie Jean Grubb 






Getting just the right one is hard, 

but someone has to do it. Aaron 
Smith flips through a contact book 
looking for a picture for the 
COUGAR PROWLER. For Aaron, 
being on the newspaper staff has 
given him “a sense of responsibility, 
the ability to deal with the public 
and the knowledge of the 
journalism field.” 

Typing away. Scott Peterson 
diligently types one of his many 
newspaper articles. In talking about 
the COUGAR PROWLER, Scott 
says its purpose is “to inform the 
student body about current events 
that are going on around them.” 



Thinking hard. Travis Terry listens 
carefully to make sure he doesn’t 
miss a word. Travis commented 
that he thought the most exciting 
moment of being on INKLINGS 
staff was “getting the finished 
product at the end of the year.” 


PUBLICATIONS — 69 













Flagging 

Whirling their flags in step to the 
music, the Flag Corps of the Golden 
Cougar Marching Band liven up 
half-time performances for football fans 
and add color and pizazz to the band’s 
shows. 

Being in this unique part of the 
marching band carries its own appeal. “It 
gives you a chance not only to be a part 
of a group, but also to support your 
school,” said Angie Farris. 

The flags give the marching band 
performance an extra twist during the 
games and pep rallies that the members 
participate in. 

Toni Ratcliffe 



Off the ground! Natashia Reed does her part in the 
marching band’s performance. Part of the Flag 
Corps, Natashia is in her first year of marching 
band. “I think it’s a lot of hard work and long 
hours. It’s also hard when you’re performing 
because you have to concentrate on what you’re 
doing,” she said. 


70 — MARCHING BAND 


Duet! Deanna Wyatt and Brian 
Berry play “Wishing You Were 
Somehow Here Again” as a duet 
during the marching band’s 
half-time performance. “Everybody 
looks at you, and it’s an exciting 
feeling,” Deanna said. 



:■ ' 



And coming on the field ... Cindy 
Palmer and Deanna Wyatt enter 
with the rest of the marching band. 
Cindy, a veteran on the trumpet, 
prepares to play her part in the 
first song of the band’s field show. 
“It’s a really good opportunity, and 
you have a lot of responsibilities,” 
Cindy commented. 

Preparation! David Farris prepares 
to enter the gym with the rest of 
the marching band for the first pep 
rally of the year. “I like the rhythm 
and pound of the drums. I’ve 
wanted to play since I was little,” 
David said. David plays the quints 
for the marching band. 
















Musical phantasy 


Phantasizing on the 
phenomenal success of the 
PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA, the Golden Cougar 
Marching Band brought this 
classic closer to the students 
with their own version 
during half-time 
entertainment at the football 
games. 

With the show lasting 
approximately ten minutes, 
the Phantom, Mark Martin, 
appeared on the field three 
times during the 
presentation. Mark 
commented, “Being a 
phantom fanatic, I have 
really gotten into the part.” 

Mark, along with the 
other band members, 
worked on the set that was 


placed on the field during 
the show. The students 
commented that they stayed 
after school three days each 
week to work to be ready 
for the show. 

The band members found 
that their years of 
experience in the band 
helped them to perform to 
their best. And even with 
experience, sometimes 
things did not always go as 
planned. 

Krystal Talbert related an 
experience she had once 
had at a festival in 
Chilhowie. “I packed 
everything EXCEPT my 
trumpet; luckily, a friend 
had an extra one 1 could 
borrow,” she said. 


Cindy Palmer admitted 
that she had also had such 
an experience. “I was 
marching backwards, and I 
started a domino effect,” 
she said. 

In talking about her 
reasons for joining the 
band, Kim White said, 
“When I went to the 
ballgames before I was in 
high school, I always said, 
‘One day I’ll be down there!’ ” 
Toni Ratcliffe 


Attention! Giving their Final salute 
after the performance are band 
members, Rita Cox and Gina 
Haynes. This year the members 
performed segments of THE 
PHANTOM OF THE OPERA. “1 
was very excited when I found out 
we were to do one of my favorite 
plays!” said Gina. 



JV 

~Z 

a. 


o 

rs 



Jason Speller 







MARCHING BAND — 71 











Drum on 


The percussion section was made up of 
snare, timpani, and bass drums as well as 
cymbals and bells. These instruments 
were an important and necessary part of 
band. Drums, along with the conductor, 
maintained the tempo and helped the 
rise and fall of the music. 

Being a member of the percussion 
section was a difficult job. Drummers 
were expected to march and play while 
carrying their heavy instruments. “When 
we made mistakes, it was more obvious 
than when the other sections made 
mistakes,” said Eva Machelor. 

The percussion section practiced more 
than any other section in order to ready 
themselves to compete for the drum line. 
They attended two extra sectionals each 
week with their drum instructor, Mr. 

Tim Black. They were also a relatively 
young section with a bass line made up 
entirely of rookies. 

Because of the time they spent 
together in practice, the drummers 
found themselves sharing a close-knit 
relationship. They even enjoyed small 
parties together and ordered shirts 
publicizing their drum line. Indeed, this 
rhythm they shared together carried over 
into their music. 

Tammy McMillan 



A beat of a different drummer. Jason Jennings 
practices the timpani drums during symphonic 
band. The timpani drums blended well with the 
How of the music, but they made their presence 
known when the volume of the music changed. 


72 — BAND 



All that brass! In jazz band Deanna 
Wyatt, Brian Berry, Wendy Cox, 
Anjanette Radford, Marty Katz, 
Chasity Friend, Drerna Crist, and 
Scarlett Williams play “Take the A 
Train.” Jazz band had a more 
personal sound because they were 
made up of a smaller ensemble and 
shared a special interest in jazz 
music. 

A bit of hand-eye coordination. 

Carrie O'Dell plays the slide 
trombone as she reads the music in 
jazz band. It took weeks to master a 
piece of music with all of its tempo 
and key changes. 



















The French connection. Drema 
Crist and Kerri Weddle practice 
their French horns. They spent 
hours of class time practicing in 
order to better their performance. 
It took concentration and steady 
hands to play well. 



The sound of silence 


Silence. Absolute silence. 
Suddenly the first sweet 
notes of the flute hit the air 
a clear and melodious 
sound. The saxophones 
joined in with their sultry 
charm; the trumpets blared 
in triumph; and the 
heartbeats of the drums set 
the tempo. The music built 
until finally it reached its 
pinnacle. The sound 
echoed, vibrated, and soon 
died. Silence. Absolute 
silence. 

This was familiar ground 
to students who were part 
of the band. Day after day 
they attended class and 
_ practiced to achieve that 
special harmony that is 
c essential for every good 
X band. “Each day we 


practiced flexibility 
techniques to improve our 
performance,” said Pam 
Dalton. 

Band is divided into three 
distinct groups: concert, 
symphonic, and jazz. 

Concert band consisted of 
two classes, one composed 
entirely of freshmen. It 
covered all the basic 
instruments except for the 
strings. 

Symphonic band involved 
instruments similar to 
concert band, but it had a 
higher quality of music that 
was more difficult. Members 
of the concert band had to 
audition to obtain a chair in 
symphonic band. A new 
bonus to the symphonic 
band was the addition of a 


string bass played by Daniel 
Leary. “The bass violin is a 
fun instrument to play. It 
has a unique sound, and I 
really enjoyed playing it this 
year,” he said. 

Jazz band was a smaller 
ensemble with no 
woodwinds. Basically it 
consisted of trumpets, 
saxophones, a percussion 
set, and a rhythm section. 
One needed the knack to 
play jazz, swing, and blues 
to become a member. 

All three bands joined 
together and performed at 
the Christmas and spring 
concerts. They competed at 
the State Concert Festival, 
and they also hosted the 
All-Regional Concert. 

Tammy McMillan 


BAND — 73 














Moving 

You wake up and try out your voice. 
Then suddenly you find out there is no 
voice. POOF! Just another dream. 

For students in choir, such a dream 
could be a nightmare, especially the night 
before a big performance or before 
heading to a competition. Much is at 
stake. 

Last year the Concert Choir traveled to 
the Myrtle Beach Choral Competition 
and brought back four trophies. 

Some of the special activities in which 
the choirs participated this year were 
Carowinds Choral Competition, district 
festival, and all-district choirs. The 
Concert Choir also sang the national 
anthem at pep rallies. 

The concerts were big parts of the 
choir experiences. The annual 
performances included the Christmas 
concert and spring concert in which all 
choirs participated. 

Cindy Cook 


Warming up. Before choirs start to 
sing, they go through levels of 
warm-ups. “Choir is a worthwhile 
opportunity to show the talents that 
I have,” said Alyssa Rollins. 

On the move. Concert Choir is the 
highest level of choir in which a 
student may participate. He or she 
was required to audition for a place 
in this choir. For Jessica Sifford, “It 
was the chance to go to new places 
and learn from different people. 





Satisfaction. “I enjoy the challenge 
of teaching Concert Choir the 
music of the masters as well as the 
more contemporary selections,” 
said Mr. Gregory M. Quesenberry, 
choir director. “But all of my choirs 
are good,” he added. Teaching 
more than 160 students each day is 
a job in itself. 


Chopsticks. No, it is not chopsticks, 
but it is still music. Sharon Watson 
said, “I enjoy the feeling I have 
when 1 play for Concert Choir 
because it’s an honor to do 
something you enjoy doing.” Also 
pictured is Kim Hayes. 



74 —CHOIR 










The difference. Concert Choir is 
composed of four different singing 
voices. An alto, Carol Burton, said, 
“I consider my voice to be a lower 
pitch, so 1 sound better singing alto 
rather than soprano.” 




Lingering notes 


You are standing on 
stage, waiting for the 
curtains to open. “Is my tie 
straight?” asks one. “I hope 
this is easy!” says another. 
And you wonder, “Am I 
really here?” 

The curtains open. You 
start singing, and then you 
relax because you know this 
is only practice. 

Even though students 
may relax in practice, some 
choir students are never 
able to relax during one of 
the concerts throughout the 
year. As Brian Atkinson 
said, “I get excited. I love 
performing, but I always get 
nervous.” Indeed, most 


choir students admit to 
being nervous before and 
during a performance. 

“Because I love to sing 
and express myself through 
song” is the reason Heather 
Edens joined choir. Tony 
Duncan, on the other hand, 
said, “I joined because my 
brother was in choir, and he 
encouraged me.” 

For Mr. Gregory M. 
Quesenberry, choir director, 
he finds, “Music is present 
in everyone’s life.” With 160 
choir students each day, his 
job is to bring out that 
music in a melodic, pleasing 
manner. 


Choir students experience 
all types of music — from 
classical to popular. Most 
students admitted, though, 
that their favorite is rock or 
pop because “it’s fast and 
fun to dance to.” 

At the same time that 
choir students are 
developing their musical 
talents they also share these 
talents with others as they 
give public performances at 
Christmas and again in the 
spring. It is then that the 
learning experiences turn to 
fun experiences as the choir 
students share with others. 

Cindy Cook 


CHOIR — 75 


Jason Speller 







It's a Zoo 

Sweat slowly slips down his forehead, 
his hair already sopping with 
perspiration. He takes the back of his 
hand and gently, almost unconsciously, 
wipes the nagging wetness away. He 
stares forward in complete silence, not 
budging until his stomach starts to 
rumble and roar with hunger. He has 
not been able to eat since his severe 
“butterfly of the stomach” set in. One 
deep sigh and it is over with until the 
next time, which may be soon. Just then, 
as he is beginning to relax his tensed up 
muscles, it hit him like thunder! He 
thinks to himself, “Oh please, not 
another panic attack; there are only five 
more minutes until I’m up for the 
audition.” 

One of the Players’ more memorable 
performances would be the one held in 
Manassas, VA. The Players journeyed to 
Manassas for the State Theatre Festival. 
THE ZOO STORY by Edward Albee was 
the selection they chose to perform. 
Robbie Crockett felt this was the most 
unusual choice because after four weeks 
of rehearsal, he and Jeff Shelton 
changed parts with only a week left 
before the performance. But obviously 
that was a good plan because the Players 
walked away with second in district, first 
in regional, and third in state, while 
Robbie Crockett and Jeff Shelton went 
on to receive separate acting awards with 
Jeff being honored with first place in 
state. 

Shana Taylor 



Dramatics explode from Robbie Crockett as he 

performs his role in THE ZOO STORY at 
Manassas. When asked what first interested him 
about theatre, he said, “I had participated in several 
plays, and I discovered that it is what 1 truly love 
and want to spend the rest of my life doing.” 


Practice makes perfect. Chris 
Farmer performs in front of his 
fellow drama students, Tanya 
Lovern and Mark Martin. Chris 
said about his previous drama 
classes, “They have helped me 
come to understand emotion, as 
well as further my skills in the 
technical, acting, and directing 
aspects of theatre.” 

A little help can go a long way. 

Ms. Rhonda Welsh gives Robbie 
Crockett pointers on how to give 
his character, a pig, reality. Robbie 
said, “This class has helped me gain 
the valuable experience I will need 
for college theatre classes.” 




76 — DRAMA 






















The perfect practice. Natalie 
Bowling, familiar with hours and 
hours of rehearsal time, recites a 
poem using some techniques that 
her drama classes have taught her. 
Practicing with her are Tanya 
Lovern and Tracy Skeens. “My past 
theatre classes have taught me a lot 
of basic techniques that I now 
apply to my present theatre roles,” 
Natalie said. 


In the spot light. Tanya Lovern 
rehearses lines from a poem that 
her drama class learned as Chris 
Farmer, Benny Hancock, and 
Natalie Bowling coach her in the 
dramatic presentation for which 
she was searching. 




#■ 




Break a 


Theatre exists in many 
forms as shown through the 
wide variety of drama 
classes offered. These 
classes range from the 
direction and technical 
aspects of theatre arts all the 
way to the actual 
dramatization. Not only do 
these classes teach students 
about drama, but also they 
provide the chance for 
hands-on experiences. 

What does it take to spark 
an interest in someone to 
take a drama class? Maybe 
seeing a good movie or 
maybe attending a 
well-performed play? 

Sandra Rapp said, “I’ve 
always wanted to get into 
acting, and I heard this was 
I an outstanding class for 
« someone who wants to 
| understand and learn about 
theatre.” 

And for Terry Ann 


Hoffmann, “I’ve always 
loved theatre, and I felt a 
class would give me better 
direction.” 

Theatre for some students 
does not exist only in 
school. Chris Farmer, a 
three-year veteran of 
theatre, played William 
Ingles in the outdoor drama 
THE LONG WAY HOME 
in Radford last summer. 

And Robbie Crockett, 
otherwise known as the 
Velveteen Rabbit, said, 
“Whenever I have time (if 
I’m not committed to hours 
and hours of rehearsal for a 
PCHS Player’s production), 

I enjoy taking part in skits 
for church events. I also 
love participating in 
workshops, both teaching 
and learning.” 

College preparatory 
classes obviously prepare 


leg 

students for college. But 
what could a theatre class 
prepare students for, 
besides giving a little 
background on what it takes 
to make a successful 
production? 

Josie McMillan said, “I 
plan to do a lot of acting 
later, and I’d love to become 
famous; but that is a chance 
in a lifetime. However, I am 
going to be in all the plays I 
can.” 

Robbie Crockett said that 
he plans to go to college as 
a theatre major and then 
become an equity actor. Yet, 
Whitney Wallace took a 
different point of view. 

“This class has already 
helped me with my 
self-esteem, which, in turn, 
will help me at a job later in 
the future,” she said. 

Shana Taylor 


DRAMA — 77 


Jason Spell* 











Stargazing 

Collaborating with Virginia Tech, the 
Science Department offered an 
astronomy class this year, a class offered 
by only eight school divisions in the state. 

Pulaski was chosen as one of the 
locations because of the efforts of Tech 
astrophysicist Dr. W.P. Trower, who 
wanted to bring a knowledge of 
astronomy to the general public. Dr. 
Trower admitted he was excited about 
offering the program in Pulaski because 
he found the county receptive to new 
ideas and willing to experiment in the 
pioneer program. 

Ms. Harriet Anderson taught the 
astronomy class, the scientific study of 
the universe beyond the earth. The class 
involved skills learned in chemistry, 
biology, physics and geology. The class 
was structured so that students made 
actual observations. 

Dr. Trower came to the school each 
Wednesday and lectured on a variety of 
topics related to astronomy. 

Regan Shelton 


Ohhhhhh. “Ooh, they are gross!” 
exclaimed Sherry Stoots to Lea 
Quesenberry and Brian Cook as 
the students collected grasshoppers 
for their biology experiment. 

Sherry had the job of painting the 
grasshoppers’ backs with blue paint. 


Ping-pong balls? How many 
ping-pong balls lit in a suitcase? 

Ms. Harriet Anderson, astronomy 
teacher, listens intently as Dr. 
Trower, an astrophysicist from 
Virginia Tech, provides the answer 
during an astronomy class. Each 
Wednesday Dr. Trower led the 
students in sessions on a variety of 
topics related to the study of 
astronomy. 




78 — SCIENCE 












The world beyond 


Teachers filled with 
enthusiasm and students 
conducting experiments. 

The stage is now set for a 
picture of the Science Pod. 
This image of investigative 
learning is what gives the 
Science Pod its identity. 

Beyond the physical 
* characteristics of the pod, 
i. though, are the values and 
w goals that distinguish this 
| department from the others, 
s With a schedule of more 


than 40 classes each day, the 
science curriculum includes 
courses in biology, earth 
science, chemistry, 
consumer chemistry, physics 
and astronomy, a class new 
to the department this year. 

Students indicated their 
favorite activities for science 
classes were those in which 
they had hands-on 
experience, like the 
experiments. “I think 
science is a very interesting 


class,” said Kathryn 
Edmonds. 

Of course, students also 
commented that they were 
not always excited about the 
experiences, especially when 
they had to dissect. 

With more emphasis on 
the importance of science 
and technology, students 
found the Science Pod to be 
the place to begin in their 
“search for tomorrow.” 



I 



Weighing and measuring. Brandy 
Haley and Rhonda Richardson, 
earth science students, weigh a rock 
to determine the mass of the object. 
Brandy said, “Science is interesting; 
and even though it’s very detailed 
with lots of experiments, it’s fun.” 




Hopping along. “Grasshoppers are 
one of the most interesting 
creatures,” commented Brian Cook 
during an experiment in biology. 
Students collected grasshoppers, 
painted their backs and then let 
them go. The purpose of the 
experiment was to let students 
learn about the migratory habits of 
grasshoppers. 


J 


'* 


4 


SCIENCE — 79 










Competitive and supportive 
programs create a sparkle of 
livelihood within students and 



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I 


Behind the scenes. Timmy 
Spencer interviews Theresa 
Brewer, former president of the 
Video Club and now a 
communications major at East 
Tennessee Stale. The staff was 
required to tape one newscast 
per week, consisting of local 
news, sports, and weather. 


In the editor’s seat. Jake Price 
and Cam Coble edit one of their 
current videos. Editing involved 
cueing up tapes, assembling 
different scenes, and combining 
video and audio. It took 
approximately five times longer 
to make a video than it did for 
the viewer to watch the video. 




Drawing a crowd 


Art is a challenging 
subject, and students in 
the National Art Honor 
Society must have at least 
a B average in art. 

The NAHS sponsored 
several activities this year. 
During the Count Pulaski 
Day festivities, several of 
the members painted 


faces for a fee to raise 
money for the club’s 
materials. 

The NAHS also 
painted pumpkins for 
Halloween and sponsored 
a pumpkin painting 
session so that those 
interested could paint 
faces on their pumpkins. 


At Christmas, the 
NAHS members 
decorated windows in the 
Math Pod with paintings 
depicting Christmas 
carols. “I enjoyed NAHS 
because you get to meet 
people who have 
something in common 
with you,” said Sheila 
Mottesheard. 

Leslie Tate 




82 — VIDEO/NAHS 



















Portable memories 


Like an artist, his lens 
was his canvas. Instead of 
using paint, though, he 
used film. He tried to 
capture the feeling of the 
entire event while 
showing only a small part 
to the viewer. 

The Video Club was 
for students who wanted 
to learn additional skills 
associated with the video 
productions class. 
Students learned how to 


improve the quality of 
their work, what action to 
film, and what produced 
an interesting study. 

The club provided the 
school with a video 
service by recording 
major events like 
homecoming, the mock 
wedding, pep rallies, and 
the PCHS Players’ 
performances. 

The club earned money 
by marketing the finished 


product to the student 
body. “The money we 
made selling videos was 
used to upgrade the 
equipment in the studio,” 
said Cam Coble. 

The club was also 
involved in community 
service projects, one of 
which was filming the 
Fairview Home’s 
Christmas events. 

Tamniv McMillan 




More tape, please. Mrs. Martha 
Preston, NAHS sponsor, helps 
Toni Ratcliffe and Laurel 
Shroyer as they decorate the 
Math Pod windows. Club 
members illustrated popular 
Christmas carols and then 
displayed them on the windows. 


Dashing through the snow . . . 

Mr. Chuck Shomo plays the 
12-string guitar as he leads club 
members in Christmas carols. 
Mr. Shomo provided 
entertainment for the NAHS 
December meeting. 


VIDEO/NAHS — 83 


Jason Speller 














Fellowship together 


The Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes (FCA) 
is a club whose name 
suggests the requirements 
for membership. 
Following a year’s 
absence, the club was 
reinstated this school 
year. 

The club had been 
stopped the previous year 
when the Pulaski County 


School Board was advised 
that allowing it to meet at 
school could be 
unconstitutional. 

By mid-winter of 1990, 
the School Board 
determined that the club 
could meet at school, but 
that it had to meet before 
school hours and that a 
teacher could not be 
appointed as sponsor. 

In July of 1990, the 
Supreme Court ruled on 


a case that upheld the 
Equal Access Act, saying 
that an organization 
could not be 
discriminated against 
because of beliefs and 
that it could not be kept 
from meeting if other 
groups were meeting. At 
that point, it was decided 
that FCA could return as 
a regular club. 

Laurel Shroyer, a club 
member who had 


followed the decisions 
very closely concerning 
this issue, offered to help 
start the club again. “I 
felt very strongly that the 
FCA’s existence could 
benefit so many people.” 

With that, she set as 
her goal “to build a very 
strong foundation so that 
a student-led FCA will be 
successful and last for 
many years.” 

Alison Spain 



Just do it! As Aaron Cress does 
a 180-degree fly-out, he turns 
seven feet in the air. As he 
comes down, he just keeps 
saying to himself, “Just do the 
trick and don't crash!” 



84 — FC A/FREESTYLE 


— 














Here you go! Part of being a 
member of a club is paying club 
dues. Tommy Powers pays his 
dues to the Freestyle Club to 
club president, Aaron Cress. 
“Some of this money was for 
buying a freestyle video on 
biking,” said Tommy. 


Flipping 


Palms sweating! Hearts 
pulsating! Cheering from 
friends saying, “You can 
do it!” 

You let your anxiety 
go, and you’re ready to 
face the eight-foot vertical 
jump ramp ahead. I’he 
tires on your bike whine 
as you whiz down the 
plyboard runway. 

1'hen comes the 
moment for which you’ve 
been waiting — “grabbing 
the air.” 

Within a split second, 
you shoot over the lip of 
the ramp. You turn your 
body as hard as you can 
to achieve your 

I 180-degree “fly-out.” 

a. 

GO 


Smack! You land level 
on the platform. You’ve 
achieved your goal, and 
you’re ready to go again. 

Sound familiar? Maybe 
not to everyone, but to 
the members of the 
PCHS Skating/Freestyle 
Club, this is almost an 
everyday occurrence. 

“It takes a lot of wit, 
concentration and daring 
to do these stunts,” said 
president, Aaron Cress. 

“You know that if you 
mess up, you’ll pay for it; 
so it’s not too often that 
you mess up.” said Jason 
Speller. 

For the third straight 
year, members of the 


Making preparations. Joel 
Sayers, April Busic, Elizabeth 
Knarr, Laurel Shroyer, and 
Angie Hall discuss plans for the 
FCA meeting. Laurel was in 
charge of all presentations since 
— FCA did not have a faculty 
jr sponsor. This club was 
§ reactivated due to the amount 
of student interest. 


out 

Freestyle Club worked 
with groups such as 
SADD and the local 4-H 
clubs to show young 
people that they can have 
fun without drugs. 

Freestyler Tommy 
Powers said, “I wouldn’t 
even consider doing 
freestyling if I were on 
drugs or alcohol. You 
mix the two, and you’ll 
end up lying in the 
hospital.” 

For the club members, 
then, their work with the 
other organizations was a 
fun way of letting young 
people know the dangers 
of drugs and alcohol. 

Carrie ODell 


FC A/FREESTYLE — 85 











Name that country. Justin 
Phelps, Melissa Smith and Piper 
McMillan quiz each other on a 
variety of topics as they prepare 
for competition. The students 
admitted they spent many hours 
preparing for the Odyssey of 
the Mind competitions. 



Reaching peaks 


It was a brisk, bright 
morning as anxious 
students began the hike 
up the steep mountain. 

At first, the energetic 
students hiked at a fast 
pace until the journey 
became excruciating. 
Slower steps and deeper 
breaths soon 
characterized the 
members of this 
expedition. 

President of the Science 
Club, Daniela Stoots, said, 
“The trek up Mount 
Rogers was difficult. My 
pack weighed about 50 
pounds, and it seemed 
that we had to hike five 
hours straight uphill.” 

Students prepared their 
own food, and some even 
slept under the stars. 
Scarlett Williams said, “I 
had to cook my own food 
even though I can’t cook! 
But at least I learned how 


to boil water.” 

“Unlike the others, 
Teresa Ramsey and I 
camped outside in the 
18-degree weather in 
sleeping bags,” said 
Daniela. 

The Science Club 
encouraged members and 
other students to become 
environmentally 
conscious. They 
sponsored various 
activities, such as trash 
pick-ups along highways, 
paper and aluminum 
recycling drives, and the 
celebration of Earth Day. 

Senior, Latha 
Gearheart, said, “Being in 
the Science Club and 
participating in the road 
clean-ups and the 
recycling projects help 
demonstrate the 
responsibility to our 
environment that 
everyone shares.” 

Elizabeth Knarr shared 


the same feelings when 
she said, “The Science 
Club has allowed me to 
express my deep concerns 
and anxieties about our 
environmental situations.” 

The club also created 
memories, especially with 
the trip to Mount Rogers. 
Vice-president, Teresa 
Ramsey, said, “The trip 
was most enjoyable and 
definitely an experience 
never to be forgotten. I 
know that I speak for all 
of those who attended 
when I say that the 
memory of that trip could 
never be erased.” 

The trip also left 
humorous images in the 
minds of those who 
hiked. “Teresa had on 
bright red overalls and 
moccasins; she looked like 
Santa Claus on Mount 
Rogers,” said Daniela. 

Angela Clark 
Wendy Foushee 



86 — OM/SCIENCE CLUB 





















Jason Speller 




Creative challenge 


“Challenging questions 
that require a lot of 
creative thought” is the 
way Justin Phelps 
described the 
competitions for members 
of the Odyssey of the 
Mind (OM) teams. 

Members began 
meeting in December to 
decide teams. With seven 
members on each team, 
the members worked 
together to solve 
problems and gather 
props for competition. 

They spent their time 
quizzing each other with 
spontaneous questions. 


They were expected to be 
able to answer these types 
of questions, and they 
were also given specific 
problems in advance 
which they worked to 
solve. 

Many of the members 
had participated in OM 
before. Justin talked of 
one previous competition 
in which his team had to 
build a self-propelled car 
and complete a circuit 
around a course in two 
minutes. “I was in my car, 
and my oars broke off,” 
he said. He admitted that 
although the experience 


was not funny at the 
time, it became a 
memorable occasion. 

Both the “hardened” 
members, who had both 
victories and disasters 
under their belts, and the 
new members, who had 
fresh ideas, waited 
expectantly for the 
competition, keeping in 
mind the advice of their 
sponsor, Mr. Dave 
Carroll, who said, “The 
point was to be 
challenged and to have 
fun.” 

Toni Ratdiffe 





Picture perfect. Before the hike 
up Mount Rogers, the 
adventurers, Diane Owens; 
Scarlett Williams; Misti 
Williams; Casey Ratcliffe; 

Teresa Ramsey; Daniela Stoots; 
Crystal Carden; and Teresa 
Perry, student aide, captured 
the moment. “The hike was 
definitely a challenge, but we 
enjoyed it. We climbed over 
rocks to see who could go up 
the highest,” said Casey. 



What a drop! Science Club 
members, Casey Ratcliffe; 
Scarlett Williams; Teresa Perry, 
student aide; Daniela Stoots; 
and Crystal Carden take in the 
view from the top of Mount 
Rogers after their long hike up 
the mountain. Daniela, a junior, 


said, “I felt like I was on top of 
the world because we saw states 
other than Virginia.” Scarlett 
said, “Standing up on the rocks 
was like being on Mars in a 
science fiction movie. It was 
barren, dead and rocky.” 


How cute! Teresa Ramsey and 
Crystal Carden stop to pet one 
of the many wild ponies on 
Mount Rogers. Crystal said, “We 
had to bribe the pony with food 
so we could get close to it.” 


OM/SCIENCE CLUB — 87 








“Have you heard the latest?” 

While potting dirt for plants in 
horticulture, Patricia Wyatt, 
Teresa Holcomb, Winona 
Shelor and Lisa Duncan enjoy 
some friendly conversation. 
Once the pots were filled, the 
students planted a variety of 
flowers. 

Thank you. Nathan Lovingood 
accepts a first-place trophy for 
shooting an eight-point buck 
from Mr. Mike Cox. The FFA 
sponsored several competitions 
for students, including the fruit 
sales competition. President, 
Mike Talbert, and secretary, 
Joanna Linkous helped 
announce the winners of the 
buck competition. 





/ 


88 — FFA 















Preparing for the future 




Encouraging, learning 
responsibility, being able 
to participate in activities, 
having fun — these were 
some of the ways 
members of the Future 
Farmers of America 
(FFA) described their 
club and classes. 
“Agriculture is a great 
class for an individual 
who likes the outdoors,” 
said Tim Hill. 

There were several 
activities in which club 
members participated. 
The most popular 
activities were field trips, 
picnics, fruit sales and 
club meetings. “1 liked 
selling oranges,” said 


Jason Freeman. 

Not only were students 
invited to join by all the 
activities, but also 
encouragement from 
friends and family made 
them decide to join. “My 
brother encouraged me 
to join, saying it was fun,” 
said Derrick Woodbridge. 
“Mr. Cox, a club advisor, 
encouraged me,” said 
Tobi Thomas. 

FFA helped students 
who were planning a 
career in agriculture. 
“FFA taught me how to 
weld so I can use this task 
in later life,” said Nathan 
Cooper. And even 
though it was only his 


first year in agriculture, 
David Crowder had 
decided that he was going 
to own a horse farm. 

There were also 
contests and conventions 
in which the members 
participated, including a 
forestry contest; the 
junior and senior teams 
both placed third in their 
categories. 

President, Mike 
Talbert, and 
vice-president, Roy 
Carter, both had the 
opportunity to attend 
conventions. Roy was able 
to be part of the largest 
single gathering of youths 
when he attended the 



national convention in 
Kansas City, Missouri. 

The most popular 
activity, conducted 
annually, was the fruit 
sales. “I enjoyed the fruit 
sales,” said Angie Atwell. 
Derek Tickle was the top 
salesman, selling over 100 
boxes. 

Whether it was through 
welding, selling fruit, 
being a member of the 
forestry team, or 
participating in any other 
project, FFA and 
agriculture helped 
students prepare for the 
future. 

Tracy Speller 


“This meeting is now in 
order.” President, Mike Talbert, 
performs the opening 
ceremonies at the FFA club 
meeting. Being president of this 
club involved both preparation 
and responsibility. 




FFA — 89 






r 


Celebrating heritage 


Some people may go 
through life without ever 
giving a thought to their 
heritage, never knowing 
or even caring about their 
cultural background. 
Others, though, such as 
the members of the 
Afro-American Club 
(Black History Club), take 
the opportunity to search 
out their past and 
celebrate their present. 

Club members 
participated in a variety 
of activities. Some 
traveled to the College of 
William and Mary for a 


national black leadership 
conference. Another 
event was the Henry 
Street Festival in Roanoke 
that featured street 
dancing, singing and 
speakers addressing the 
topic of black history. 

The highlight of the 
year came with the J. 
Plunky Branch concert in 
February. This was the 
second year the 
professional saxophonist 
from Richmond 
performed for the 
student body. 

Club members also 


placed posters around the 
school, highlighting the 
contributions of various 
black people; and they 
designed a showcase in 
memory of Dr. Martin 
Luther King, Jr. 

However, studying 
their heritage was not the 
only reason that students 
chose to join the club. 

D.J. Patterson said, 

“Being in the Black 
History Club means to 
me helping other people 
in need and finding 
hidden meaning within 
myself.” 


Tamara Reed said, “It 
means learning more and 
teaching it to other black 
brothers and sisters who 
are in need.” 

Mia Williams said, “We 
want to know more about 
our history, the things we 
know little about.” 

Tamasha Crouse, the 
club’s vice-president, said, 
“We want to be educated 
and to educate others as 
to the African culture. 

We are on our way to 
great achievements.” 

Shana Taylor 
Becca Woolley 


“Where should we hang this?” 

Allison Rollins and Tamasha 
Crouse hang a picture of Martin 
Luther King, Jr., in the 
showcase in memory of his 
birthday celebrated in January. 
Tamasha said, “By putting up 
the showcases and being a 
member of the Black History 
Club, we get to learn more 
about black history as opposed 
to the usual information on 
George Washington and 
Abraham Lincoln.” 




90 — BLACK HISTORY CLUB 



















“Any suggestions?” Ms. Mary 
Todd talks to the Black History 
Club about upcoming events 
while Lamont Smith, Stacy 
Arnold, Adele Taylor, Janel 
Sheffey, Natoya Webb, and 
Ashley Scott listen. The Black 
History Club planned many 
activities for the year. Adele 
said, “This year we participated 
in the Henry Street festival, 
worked in the concession stand 
| at games, went to Williamsburg 
for a black leadership 
§ conference, and designed a 
A showcase." 



Play that funky music. J. 

Plunky Branch plays the 
soprano saxophone during the 
concert he performed for the 
student body in February. The 
concert was sponsored by the 
Black History Club as part of 
Black History Week. 


BLACK HISTORY CLUB — 91 

























Planning ahead 


DECA (Distributive 
Education Clubs of 
America) is an 
organization for students - 
who hold jobs while also 
attending school. The 
members met once a 
month with their advisor, 
Mr. Gary McCoy, to 
discuss their jobs and 
activities. 

The students also 
discussed careers and 
training for those careers. 
Bobbie jean Grubb said, 


“I plan to attend New 
River Community College 
for two years and then 
transfer to Virginia Tech 
to major in marketing 
and communications.” 

The club sponsored a 
sock-hop and also 
prepared a homecoming 
float. They participated 
in a unique project this 
year. Bobbie Jean said, 
“This year we teamed 
with L.A. Joe store to buy 
clothes and toys for the 


Joy Ranch orphanage.” 

DECA members 
attended the spring rally 
at Wytheville Community 
College. There they 
participated in contests 
where students were 
judged on abilities and 
performance in certain 
job areas. Winners went 
to state competition 
where they had the 
chance to earn a move to 
national competition. 

Mark Barnes 




Winter royalty. Members of the 
court for the Snow King and 
Queen dance were Kim White 
and Chris Pendergrast, first 
runners-up; Destry Harding 
and Jennifer Minnick, king and 
queen; Church Fox and Amy 
Farmer. These students were 
nominated and then 
campaigned by collecting votes 
in the form of money. 

“I now crown you Snow 
Queen.’’Jennifer Minnick is 
crowned Snow Queen by Mr. 
Odell Sheffy, student activities 
director. The crowning 
occurred at the annual dance 
sponsored by the FBLA in 
December. 



92 — DECA/FBLA 


















“Under his power.” Joey Dice 
portrays Cougar Neptune as he 
stabs a William Fleming 
opponent. This float was 
DECA’s entry in the 
homecoming pep rally. The club 
earned an honorable mention 
for its work. 



R eady for the future 


The Future Business 
Leaders of America 
(FBLA) was a club that 
promoted service to the 
community. 

One of the fund-raisers 
for FBLA this year was 
for project ASK, the 
Association for the Study 
of Childhood Cancer. 

The profits from the 
Snow King and Queen 
dance were donated to 
project ASK. 

Students from each 
grade level were 
nominated for Snow 
Queen and King. These 
students then campaigned 
by collecting money, and 
the boy and girl who 
collected the most money 
were named queen and 


king. 

In speaking of why she 
joined the club, Jennifer 
Underwood said, “I 
joined FBLA because 1 
wanted to learn about my 
future business career. I 
also enjoyed raising 
money to help people 
throughout the 
community.” 

Misti Worrell said, “I 
think FBLA is a great 
club for anyone who is 
planning on going into 
the business profession.” 

A new project for the 
members of FBLA was 
the project of secret pals. 
Everyone who wanted to 
participate completed an 
information sheet about 
themselves; the sheets 


were then switched so 
that no one knew who 
had which paper. 
Throughout the year, 
members surprised each 
other with gifts for the 
birthday, for Christmas 
and for other special 
occasions. At the end of 
the year, secret pals were 
revealed. 

Leading this club in the 
activities were its officers 
— Rhonda Roop, 
president; Angie 
Hopkins, vice-president; 
Kim Ratcliffe, secretary; 
Angela Clark, reporter; 
Kyndra Lawson, 
historian. Sponsors were 
Mr. John Johnson and 
Mrs. Marianne Trotter. 

Sonya Steffey 


DECA/FBLA — 93 













Full of Interpretations 


Her knees rattled 
together as she neared 
the podium. She carefully 
placed her copy of “The 
Raven” on the podium, 
staring directly in front of 
her. Her lips quivered as 
she began to blurt out 
her first words. This was 
only the beginning of 
good things to come. 

In speaking about what 
she would tell people 
about the Forensics Club, 
Natalie Bowling said, “If 
this club interests 
someone, then it is a 
great opportunity to 
receive constructive 
criticism and better one’s 
speaking skills.” 


Natalie continued to 
say that one’s chances of 
succeeding in 
competitions are better if 
a person is a club 
member because the club 
holds rehearsals before 
the actual competitions. 

With the constant 
pressure of performing 
well, students also 
remembered some of the 
humorous experiences. 
Natashia Reed said, “I got 
lost, and I didn’t know 
which line I was on; but 
thank goodness, it was 
only a practice.” 

Natalie said, “During 
one competition, I lost 
my voice; and I went 


through my piece so fast 
that my voice cracked the 
whole time.” 

On the same side, Mrs. 
Trish Burton, sponsor, 
said the purpose of the 
club “is to inform 
students about forensics 
competitions and to allow 
them time to choose 
materials and rehearse 
before the actual 
competitions.” 

She also said, “Most of 
our school’s winners are 
members of the club, so it 
must provide a valuable 
service.” 

Shana Taylor 




Activities, activities. Diane 
Owens, Karen Dehart and 
Melissa Montgomery prepare a 
bulletin board highlighting 
activities and awards from the 
previous year’s state HOSA 
convention. Keeping active with 
projects and activities promotes 
interest in the club. 


First time for everything. The 

HOSA meeting begins with 
Melissa Montgomery calling it to 
order. Melissa, Karen Dehart, 
Tracy McPeak, Mary Ann 
Beckner, Diane Owens, Becky 
King, Lisa Smith and Christy 
Simpkins form the HOSA 
executive committee. “We talked 
about activities and the club's 
involvement and made plans for 
raising funds and the HOSA 
convention in Reston, VA,” said 
Lisa Smith. 



94 


FORENSICS/HOSA 

























A word of advice? Mike Price, 
Jeff Johnson and Sean Smith 
receive helpful hints from 
Forensics sponsor, Mrs. Trish 
Burton. Membership in the 
Forensics Club offers students a 
chance to rehearse and receive 
constructive criticism before 
actual forensics competition. 



Doctor 

“We are people out to 
help others in a 
health-related way by 
being there for any 
medical conflict that they 
might encounter. The 
ideas and encouragement 
behind the HOSA 
(Health Occupation 
Students of America) are 
to lend a helping hand.” 
said senior, Susie Young, 
in speaking of the HOSA 
Club. 

“Being involved isn’t 
just socializing and 
making new friends,” said 
Mary Ann Beckner. 
HOSA also means “doing 
activities in the 
community,” said Diane 
Owens. 

A major project for 
I HOSA was the blood 
« pressure clinics. Students 

O 

re 


“Childhood Is a Kingdom 
u Where Nobody Dies.” Wendy 
=g Cox reads this 

«■ thought-provoking poem for the 
| annual forensics competition 
A held in December. 

anyone? 

took blood pressures for 
a fee and then donated 
the money for a needy 
family. Club members 
also brought canned food 
items and toiletries for 
the family. With the 
money they also 
purchased Christmas 
presents for the children. 

During regular club 
meetings, members 
discussed career 
opportunities, career 
decisions and career 
qualifications. During one 
of the meetings, members 
of an ambulance team 
talked to members about 
the importance of 
volunteers and 
demonstrated life-saving 
equipment. 

Shirene Broadwater 


FORENSICS/HOSA — 95 

















Stick ’em up! 


The halls were desolate 
and peaceful with no 
disturbances from loud 
voices and trampling feet. 
Then the distinct sound 
of footsteps broke the 
silence. The lone student 
searched the lockers, 
looking for # 800. He 
found it; and without 
hesitation, he slapped a 
sticky paw onto it and 
vanished. 

To show their support 
and school spirit, Pep 
Club members used their 
time after school to make 
locker stickers and 


banners for the sports 
teams. They also baked 
cookies and brought 
goodies for those 
competing. 

“I baked things to give 
to the teams, and I tried 
to attend as many events 
as I could. During 
football season, I sold 
programs,” said Denise 
Jackson. 

Members felt the club 
was an important part of 
the school. Muffin 
Lemons said, “It’s 
important to get students 
involved with all the 


activities that go on 
during the school year.” 
The Pep Club let the 
teams know they were 
appreciated, as club 
members also boosted the 
confidence of those 
competing. 

The club also 
supported the academic 
competitions as well as 
athletic competitions. 
Members sent letters of 
appreciation along with 
bagged goodies to other 
clubs and organizations. 

The members 
supported community 



projects as well. ''The 
canned foods we collected 
went to the Salvation 
Army at Christmas. We 
also sang at the Fairview 
Home for Adults,” said 
Ashley Edmonds. 

Between drawing 
locker stickers and 
singing carols, the Pep 
Club expressed the desire 
to bring pride to the 
school’s athletic and 
academic programs. 
Megan McNeil said, “We 
let teams know the Pep 
Club is rooting for them 
and is behind them 
100 %!” 

Fong Lui 


J\\> 

\ // • 1 




Fruit baskets full of love. 

Tammy Susak, Kim Simmons 
and Angie Newcomb prepare 
fruit baskets to take to the 
residents at Fairview Home for 
Adults. HERO club members go 
to the nursing homes four times 
each year to cheer up the 
residents. “Sharing with the 
elderly cheers my day also,” said 
Kim. 


Paint, paint, paint! That’s what 
Sandi Lytton does at the HERO 
Club t-shirt workshop. “I enjoy 
painting t-shirts; my artistic self 
comes out,” said Sandi. This 
activity is one of the fun 
activities members do in this 
club. 



i 


96 


PEP CLUB/HERO 











It’s a perfect Fit! Senior, Sarah 
Tilson, tapes a spirit sticker on 
basketball player's locker. The 
lockers displayed the club’s 
support for the school. 
Members stayed after school to 
cut and paste locker stickers 
before the next day. 


Open up and say “Ah!” Armed 
with cookies and candy, Mrs. 
Stephanie Fitzgerald and Megan 
McNeil stuff the lunchbags with 
goodies for the basketball team 
before the game with Cave 
Spring. The Pep Club prepared 


treats for the academic and 
athletic teams to show support. 
Megan said, “We let the teams 
know they're appreciated and 
try to give them a boost of 
confidence.” 




Public services 


Traveling to the 
nursing home to visit the 
elderly during special 
seasons was one of the 
projects of HERO (Home 
Economics and Related 
Occupations). Members 
visited the elderly at 
Halloween, Christmas, 
Valentine’s Day and 
Easter, bringing them 
healthful gifts. 

“I enjoyed going to visit 
the nursing home 
residents because I 
received much enjoyment 
by sharing time with 
them,” said Angie 


Newcomb. 

The nursing home 
visits were only one of the 
service projects HERO 
did this year. The club 
also sponsored a picnic 
playday for children at 
the Ashtree Center for 
the Handicapped. 

Other types of projects 
the club members did 
were painting t-shirts, a 
pizza party, a costume 
party and the senior 
social. “I enjoyed the fun 
projects because they 
helped me with my 
self-esteem,” said Tracy 


Hoover. 

To finance their 
activities, the club held a 
major fundraiser in the 
fall. “We sold candy and 
cookbooks to pay for our 
activities,” said Daphne 
Tickle. 

Students enrolled in 
food occupations or child 
care were eligible for 
membership in HERO. 
Sponsors were Mrs. 
Mickey Weikle and Mrs. 
Bonnie Graham. 

Pam Smythers, 
president, said, “This club 
is a worthwhile club for 


all students if they take 
an active part in the 
service projects and the 
club activities.” 

As responsibility is an 
important characteristic 
in the world of work, the 
club offered experiences 
for students to develop a 
sense of responsibility. “I 
feel that I have learned to 
be more responsible 
through my two years of 
membership in this club,” 
said Beth Lively. 

Jennifer Weikle 


1 



PEP CLUB/HERO — 97 


Jason Speller 













Buying and selling 


Collecting, selling, 
trading, making 
posterboards and going 
to cards and comics shows 
were some of the 
activities that kept 
members of the Cards 
and Comics Club busy. 

Club members met 
once a month to discuss 
their common interest — 
cards and comics. “I was 
inspired to join this club 
because of my interest in 
comics. I wanted to know 


more about them and sell 
them, too,” said Donnie 
Dowdy. Donnie even 
hopes to open a cards 
and comics shop as a 
result of his involvement 
with this club. 

Members agreed that 
the most popular benefit 
of belonging to this club 
was the opportunity to 
sell or trade their cards 
and comics. 

“I have acquired a few 
comics that I couldn’t 


find elsewhere,” said Eric 
Hagee. 

Furthermore, students 
who keep their collections 
and add to them through 
the years will find they 
have a fairly valuable 
collection. 

“I wanted to join this 
club because I love cards, 
and the benefit of this 
club is that it helps me 
meet people,” said Chris 
Gravley. 

Teresa Stone 




PCHS Players proudly present 

. . . Rehearsing for their 
upcoming performance, "The 
Insanity of Mary Girard,” 
drama students, Lisa Rowh, 
Benny Hancock, Gina Haynes, 
Natalie Bowling and Tracy 
Skeens, surround actress, Terri 
Hoffmann. “This is a difficult 
show to do because it starts with 
such high energy and intensity,” 
said Terri. 


“Cut this line out.” Ms. Rhonda 
Welsh and Chris Farmer work 
with club members to edit 
scripts to suit the PCHS Players. 
The actors performed their 
shows in advance for club 
members to get a “feel" for the 
audience. 



98 — CARDS AND COMICS/DRAMA 

















Jason Speller 








“Give me a life!” 

“You are a surfer dude 
lost in the jungle.” 

The actor comes to life 
and takes on the role of 
the character given to 
him by a member of the 
audience. He gropes his 
way through the jungle 
lost in the new, 
unfamiliar environment. 
Even though the setting 
and the character seem 
unlikely to be matched in 
real life, they create a 
challenge for the actor to 
portray. 

“Give me a life” is only 
one of the acting 
exercises Drama Club 
members participated in 
during their monthly 


A bit of “funnies.” Jonathan 
Fisher reads one of his comic 
books. Students interested in 
collecting baseball cards and 
comics met once a month as the 
Cards and Comics Club to share 
and trade. Jonathon said, “1 like 
comics.” 



Acting out 


meetings. Students in the 
drama class, taught by 
Ms. Rhonda Welsh, 
j)repared activities and 
performances for the club 
members to view and 
critique. 

“In Drama Club, we 
presented previews of 
shows and sponsored 
workshops to get other 
members of the student 
body who were not 
involved in the drama 
class to participate,” said 
president, Robbie 
Crockett. 

Drama members 
performed for people in 
the community as well as 
for the student body. 

“Our goal was to create a 


learning experience for 
both students and the 
community, to entertain 
them and present them 
with our talents,” said 
vice-president, Terry 
Hoffmann. 

Junior, April 
Morehead, said, “Drama 
is the one hobby in my 
life I enjoy. There has 
never been anything I 
could join and do that 
involved fun until I 
found Drama Club.” 

“Acting is a lot of fun 
and an enjoyable way to 
spend part of your day. 
It’s always a challenge, 
which makes it even more 
fun,” said freshman, Jeff 


How about a laugh? Chris 
Gallimore and Steve Umberger 
. do some trading. The hobby of 
\ collecting cards and comics can 
? be an enjoyable pasttime as well 
l as a source of valuable 
- collections. 


Berkley. 

“The Drama Club 
provided an outlet for the 
advanced theatre class to 
get a feel for the 
audience before 
performing for the 
public,” said club 
treasurer, Mark Martin. 

And then club 
secretary, Tanya Lovern, 
summed up the feelings 
when she said, “George 
Clurman is quoted as 
saying,.‘Theater is the art 
of presence.’ I could be 
quoted as saying, 

‘Theater is the art of 
living.’ ” 

Wendy Foushee 


CARDS AND COMICS/DRAMA — 99 














Music! Music! Keith Webb, an 
APPALKIDS alumnus, Daniel 
Leary, Mike Dunford, Wendy 
Reynolds, Chris White, Todd 
Viers, and with their backs to 
the camera, Dr. David Parks 
and Angie Vaughn, sing some 
of their Appalachian favorites. 


Kidding around. Dr. David 
Parks, Appalachian Studies 
sponsor, shares a humorous 
story with Daniel Leary, Todd 
Viers, Jimmy Quesenberry, Lee 
Ratcliff, Chris White, and 
seated, Michelle Dalton, Phyllis 
Leary and Wendy Reynolds. 




I 


8 » 



Kids 

Throughout the year, a 
group of students 
traveled to various places, 
expressing their 
Appalachian heritage 
through storytelling or 
just by some “good ole 
singin’.” 

Their purpose was to 
tell people about their 
heritage and what it 
means to be from 
Appalachia; they wanted 
to promote their interest 
among others. This 


expressing culture 


group of students was 
called the APPALKIDS 
(American People 
Presenting Appalachian 
Life Through Kids In 
Dramatic Skits). 

When asked about his 
most enjoyable 
experience as an 
APPALKID, Todd Viers 
said, “Visiting the nursing 
homes and seeing the 
smiling faces. They really 
enjoyed our coming to 
visit them.” 


For the APPALKIDS, 
their experiences were 
also learning experiences 
as they researched their 
background. Michelle 
Dalton said, 

“APPALKIDS has 
provided learning 
experiences as I found 
out more about my 
culture and about myself. 
APPALKIDS has allowed 
me to learn about a lot of 
people.” 

Learning music and 


playing instruments is 
another part of being an 
APPALKID. Students 
performed with a variety 
of Appalachian 
instruments, ranging 
from guitar to violin. 
Phyllis Leary said, “I love 
playing all the 
instruments. I would 
especially like to learn 
how to play the guitar, 
mandolin and violin.” 

Carrie ODell 


All work, no play? Todd Viers 
demonstrates the techniques of 
playing the autoharp. “We all 
enjoy performing for people, 
but there can be dull moments,” 
Todd said. 





100 — APPALACHIAN STUDIF.S/APPALKIDS 















“Swing your partner, 
do-si-do.” This might be 
one of the calls heard 


during a meeting of the 
Appalachian Studies 
Club. 

At another time, Keith 
Webb, a former 
APPALKID, came to play 
various instruments and 
talk to club members. 

“Watching the 
APPALKIDS perform 
influenced me to join the 
club,” said Lee Ratcliff 
about the club that 
encourages students to 
become actively aware of 
and to participate in the 


we go 

heritage of the 
Appalachian region. 
Membership was open to 
all students. 

“It’s a fun club to be 
in,” said Todd Viers. The 
club’s activities varied 
from circle dancing to 
eating traditional foods. 

Through the club 
students grew in their 
understanding of the 
Appalachian region and 
grew to appreciate the 
Appalachian culture and 
its influence on their 
lives. 

Cindy Cook 



Just singin’ along! Michelle 
Dalton sings “Heaven’s 
Mountain Band.” Michelle said, 
“I enjoy being in the 
APPALKIDS because 1 can 
meet new people and be with 
people 1 like to be with for a 
while." Part of the requirements 
of being in the APPALKIDS 
requires students to sing, play 
and perform. 


APPALACHIAN STUDIES/APPAI.KIDS — 10! 











Promoting leadership 


Vocational and 
Industrial Clubs of 
America (VICA) worked 
to help students grow in 
leadership, competition 
and technical skills. 

VICA participated in a 
variety of activities. “Our 
club attended OLTI 
(Officer Leadership 
Training Institute) in 
Leesburg, Virginia, and 
the VICA State Fall Rally 
at Christiansburg High 
School. We also attended 
the Va. Tech and N.C. 


State football game,” said 
Eddie Murray. 

Students found this 
club experience to be 
beneficial. “I met many 
people,” said Kevin 
Linkous. “It also provided 
me with training and 
leadership skills,” he said. 

VICA members sold 
candy bars to raise money 
for their club’s activities 
and Christmas events. 

Membership in VICA 
also helped students to 
focus on the future. 


“VICA helped me with 
training skills which will 
provide me with a good 
job,” said Eddie. 

Indeed, a main 
function of the club, 
students agreed, was in 
providing them with 
leadership skills. 

“I believe VICA will 
provide me with good 
working skills to prepare 
me for a future,” said 
Steve Eaves. 

Sarah James 




The little mermaid. Kim 

Caldwell floats her way up the 
gymnasium on the VICA float 
during the homecoming pep 
rally. “1 felt a little embarrassed 
to have the entire student body 
looking at me,” said Kim. 


The blue wire goes here. 

Russell Reese works on wiring 
in electricity. Students have 
many workshops and much 
instruction in their classes 
before they compete in VICA 
competitions. 



102 — VICA 











Power surge! Ron Linkous and 
= Eric Hoback work on a practice 
wiring in electricity, 
g Competition is one of the 
-l activities for VICA members. 



VICA — 103 














Taking charge 


Did you ever wonder 
who decided the theme of 
homecoming or who 
organized the Miss PCHS 
Pageant? 

The Student Council 
Association (SCA) was the 
organization that decided 
many of the school’s 
activities. First period 
classes elected 
represenatives to attend 
SCA meetings where 
students discussed the 
plans for upcoming 
events and made 
decisions about what the 
student body would like. 


This year’s big projects 
were the homecoming 
activities, sponsoring a 
canned food drive, and 
organizing the Miss 
PCHS Pageant. Along 
with these projects, the 
SCA also adopted a 
family for the Christmas 
holiday season. 

“I really enjoyed being 
in SCA,” said president, 
Amy Farmer. “We have 
contributed a lot to the 
school, such as giving 
flowers to the 
administration for 
homecoming, designing 


the showcase, and 
planning the 
homecoming dance and 
activities,” she said. 

Other officers included 
J.J. Clark, vice-president; 
Amy Bishop, secretary; 
and R. Ratcliff, reporter. 

When asked why she 
enjoyed being a 
representative in the 
SCA, senior, Amy 
Albano, said, “I enjoyed 
being involved in school 
activities and upcoming 
events.” 

Becca Woolley 



Tap! Tap! Senior, Deanna 
Wyatt, taps junior, Daphne 
Tickle with an invitation for 
membership in the National 
Honor Society. “It was the 
second annual ceremony, and I 
was privileged enough to be a 
part of both. It is a tradition 
that I hope will carry on for 
years to come.” said Deanna. 



104 — SCA/NHS 



























What do you think about this? 

Amy Farmer, Daniela Stoots, 
Chuck Fox and Kelly Anderson 
discuss plans for the Miss PCHS 
Pageant. This event is 
sponsored annually by the SCA. 


Implied meaning 


“Members, begin 
tapping,” said president, 
Scarlett Williams, as 
students holding a grade 
point average of 3.5 or 
higher were “tapped” for 
membership into the 
National Honor Society. 
Other club officers were 
Stephanie Alley, 
vice-president; Rita Cox, 
recording secretary; 

Emily Hammond, 
corresponding secretary; 
Amy Farmer, treasurer; 
and Deanna Wyatt, 
historian. 

A total of 37 students 
— 13 seniors and 24 
juniors — were tapped. 
Such an increase in 
membership was caused 
by the weighted classes 
and students working for 
academic excellence. 
Rhonda Roop said. 


“There are many new 
members in NHS, which 
makes an excellent 
reflection on PCHS.” 

The National Honor 
Society was exactly what 
its name implies — an 
honor. “Being in NHS is 
a privilege because only a 
few people are in it,” said 
senior, David Knick. 
Rhonda said, “It’s an 
honor to be in this club 
because it reflects all the 
hard work I have done 
over the years.” 

The club emphasized 
the recognition of 
academic excellence. 
Character, service, 
leadership and 
scholarship were all 
stressed. “It’s important 
to recognize academic 
excellence because it is 
what students strive for; 


and without a good 
education, one cannot 
succeed,” said senior, Eva 
Machelor. 

Activities for club 
members other than the 
tapping ceremony 
included a banquet for 
the initiation of new 
members and a tea for 
honor roll students. Club 
members also sponsored 
special activities for the 
pre-vocational training 
program students. The 
students sold M & M 's to 
provide a scholarship for 
a student. 

The National Honor 
Society was one way of 
honoring the academic 
excellence of students 
and of telling all students 
to “strive for excellence.” 

Angela Clark 


These are our upcoming 
events. SCA president, Amy 
Farmer, explains upcoming 
events to council members. Each 
month student representatives 
met to plan and evaluate their 
activities. The SCA sponsored 
the homecoming activities, a 
canned food drive and the Miss 
—i PC FIS Pageant. 


SCA/NHS — 105 


















A way of life 


To students involved, 
the Future Homemakers 
of America (FHA) is not 
just a dub; it’s a way of 
life. 

During club meetings, 
guest speakers spoke to 
dub members about 
different kinds of 
businesses in the 
community. And baking 
and cooking helped to 
build the club members’ 
culinary experiences. New 
recipes and new ideas 
were a part of the club’s 


events. 

In other activities, 
members of the 
Cosmetology Department 
visited the dub and gave 
them some health tips 
while also doing 
demonstrations with club 
members. 

Club officers were 
Wendy Woodyard, 
president; Lori Wright, 
vice-president; Sarah 
Henley, 

secretary-treasurer; and 
Sharon Watson, reporter. 


These officers did the 
necessary planning to 
make sure the club ran 
smoothly. 

Club sponsors were Ms. 
Peggy Hemmings and 
Mrs. Mary Kelly. 

In FHA, the learning 
experiences also turned 
into fun experiences. 
Diane Board wine said, 
“Being in FHA is great, 
and it is a real learning 
experience. I really 
enjoyed it.” 

Sarah Steffey 




Skits! Skits! Skits! Mr. Dave 
Wright, SADD sponsor, helps 
students plan their activities. 
Working with him are Mark 
Barnes, Leigh Ann Surratt and 
Lora Nelson. Leigh Ann’s 
question was, “When are we 
going to perform our skits?" 


Celebrate life! This message was 
the main thrust of SADI) 
members as they paraded their 
float in front of the student 
body at the homecoming pep 
rally. SADD members 
emphasized that they did not 
want students killed on 
homecoming weekend. SADD 
members who participated were 
Mark Barnes, Lori Rupe, Kim 
Branscome, Blake Hughes, Josh 
Henry and Lori Akers. In 
speaking about working on this 
float, Lori Rupe said, “It was 
spooky.” 



106 — FHA/SADD 















CJ 


a. 

co 



Sparking interest. A guest 
speaker helped to make club 
meetings more interesting. Sallie 
Hall talked to the FHA about 
Christmas crafts. Speakers 
allowed the students to learn 
more about opportunities for 
them. 


Listening attentively. FHA 

members listen to a presentation 
by Sallie Hall. Programs at club 
meetings gave members a 
chance to learn more about a 
variety of topics. Diana 
Boardwine said, “I like FHA; it 
is a lot of fun.” 




C elebrate 


Silence filled the 
gymnasium as the coffin 
was paraded onto the 
gym floor. Could this 
coffin be a homecoming 
float? Yes, as SADD 
(Students Against Drunk 
Driving) illustrated to the 
student body how 
homecoming could turn 
into a tragic event. 

A new addition to 
SADD was the d ough 
CATS (Cougars Are 
Talking Straight). 
Through this program, 
SADD members went out 
into the community to 
talk to elementary 
children to tell them how 


to “just say no.” 

Alyssa Rollins, skit 
director, said, “I get to 
write the skits for the 
younger children to tell 
them how bad drugs and 
alcohol are.” 

Educating others 
against the evils of drugs 
and alcohol was a main 
goal of club members. 
Lisa Knick said, “I can 
have fun without 
drinking and driving.” 

This year also brought 
a new sponsor, Mr. David 
Wright, to the club to 
help students plan and 
implement their 
programs. 



SADD members 
participated in parades to 
make the community 
aware of their efforts. 
Christi Wayne, 
vice-president, said, “This 
helped us when we went 
to the different 
elementary schools.” 

Stacey McPeak said, “I 
joined this club because I 
wanted to try to help 
people understand the 
consequences of drinking 
and driving.” 

Alyssa said, “I joined to 
educate the kids on how 
to just say no.’ ” 

Sandra Weikle 


FH A/S ADD — 107 













Checkmate 


Chess is a game which 
requires much 
concentration and skill 
with patience as a must. 
The Chess Club, 
sponsored by Mr. Fran 
Shelton and Mr. Roger 
Asbury, consisted of 
about a dozen members 
who met in the Commons 
during First period on 
each Club Day. They met 
to play each other in the 
game and to practice 
strategies and techniques 
of the game. 

Chess can be an 
intriguing pastime, but 
members also participated 


in other activities as well. 
Cliff Phillips said, “I also 
play soccer; but chess is a 
mental challenge, whereas 
soccer is a physical 
challenge.” 

Larry Clevinger said, 
“Chess requires more 
thought and patience 
than most sports.” 

Students took the game 
very seriously, although 
they admitted they did 
enjoy it as well. When 
asked what he enjoyed 
most about playing chess, 
Chad Graham simply 
said, “Winning!” 

Michelle Parnell 




What should we do? Amy 

Webb, Natashia Reed and Belli 
Lively discuss plans to raise 
money for Special Olympics, a 
project the club has sponsored 
for seven years. Beth said, “As 
president of Junior Civitan, 1 
enjoyed working with the club. 


Santa’s little helpers. Beth 
Lively and Tara Averette pack 
toys to take to the Joy Ranch 
orphanage. Tara said, “I 
enjoyed collecting the toys for 
Junior Civitan to take to Joy 
Ranch." This project was only 
one of the service projects of 
the club. 



CHESS/JUNIOR CIVITAN 













It’s your move. Eric Haga 
thinks twice before moving his 
gamepiece while Chad Graham 
concentrates on the game. Chess 
members spent much of their 
time in practice, trying to 
improve their game. 



Check! Jamie Ousley captures 
his opponent’s knight in hopes 
of winning the match. Playing 
against each other provided 
practice and competition for 
members of the Chess Club. 



Helping hands 


“I enjoy helping 
people; it makes me feel 
good when they 
appreciate what we clo,” 
said Tara Averette. 

Junior Civitan is a club 
whose purpose is to serve 
others. 

Members were active in 
several service projects, 
such as supporting 
Special Olympics, doing 
the adopt-a-friend 
program with the 
Fairview Home for 
Adults, adopting a 
highway, and going to 
Joy Ranch Orphanage to 
visit the children and take 
them presents. 

“The adopt-a-friend 
program at the Fairview 
Home for Adults made 


me feel really lonely; they 
love to have visitors, and 
it makes me feel good to 
be able to help them,” 
said Jennifer Gilbert. 

As another service, the 
club was responsible for 
raising and lowering the 
flag each day at school. 

Speaking of her 
involvement in the club, 
Amy Webb said, “It 
makes me feel good to 
know that I am doing 
something to brighten 
someone’s day.” Junior 
Civitan helps students 
feel that they have made 
a difference in someone 
else’s life . . . and they 
have. 

Christi Wayne 


JU 

0 - 

s 

o 

n 


CHESS/JUNIOR CIVITAN — 109 

















Athletes worked positively 
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111 










On track 


It seemed endless! The 
path lay stretched in 
front of him. The 
competitors were waiting 
for the gun to go off. 
Excitement was in the air! 
One could feel the 
tension from all the 
players. This was it! All 
the back-breaking, 
muscle-building practices 
led to the real thing! 
BANG! And they’re off! 
Lift those legs! One 
hurdle . . . two . . . three 
. . . ! In a matter of 
seconds the 110m high 
hurdles event was over. 
His sweaty, painstaking 
efforts have paid off. It 
didn’t matter whether or 
not he won. What was 
important was that he 
tried. 

For the team, getting 
through a competition 
wasn’t enough. Giving all 
they had was the 
objective. 

“You must have speed 
and good concentration,” 
explained David Akers. 

Before a meet, every 
player had to put himself 
in a position where he 
knew he’d be ready for 
anything. 

“You have to have the 

Wind Beneath My Wings! With 
flying ease, David Akers leaps 
over the hurdle in the 110m 
hurdle dash. It took speed and 
quick judgment to know when 
to jump and land successfully. 

“I concentrated on getting off to 
a great start,” commented 
David. “You need to have great 
form too!” He manages to win 
the event with a time of 19.3 
seconds. 


Boys’ Track 

1-3 


Opponent 

PCHS 

William 


Fleming 

96-30 

Patrick Henry 

81-50 

Franklin 


County 

29-102 

Cave Spring 

78-34 


right attitude, or else 
you’ll find it easy to quit 
when it gets tough. You 
also need good 
conditioning because you 
can’t run well if you’re 
not in shape,” Cam 
Calfee advised. 

“I take deep breaths 
and do something to get 
my mind pumped up and 
prepared,” said Don 
Hanshew. 

New members found it 
easy to fit in with the 
others. They learned that 
you just need to talk to 
everyone and show that 
you want to win. You also 
have to come out ready to 
work. 

“It wasn’t hard to be 
myself. I found that no 
one is putting any 
pressure on me,” recalled 
Robbie Hager. 

With strength and 
determination, they were 
ready to challenge their 
rivals. Their first victory 
was the meet against 
Franklin County with a 
score of 102-29. Tim 
Shortt placed first in the 
3200m run with a time of 
10:47.5. David Goodman 
won the 400m dash in 
57.2 seconds. 


At the Roanoke Valley 
District track and field 
championships, the team 
qualified for the regional 
meet at the University of 
Virginia in nine events. 
D.j. Patterson placed 
third in the high jump 
and fourth in the 200 
meters. The 1400 meter 
relay team finished 
second to William 
Fleming with a time of 
44.2, which was a second 
better than the last 
previous best. Kirk 
Hendricks was third in 
the triple jump. The 1600 
meter relay team was 
victorious with a time 
3:55.2. The only distance 
qualifier was Tim Shortt, 
who placed fourth in the 
3200 meters at 10:34. 

“The team has really 
grown this year. There is 
a lot of positive thinking. 
Everyone concentrates on 
what he is doing and goes 
out hoping for the best,” 
commented Coach Doug 
Dunavant. Strong will 
and good sportsmanship 
kept the team alive and 
“on track.” 

Fong Lui 
Jennifer Weikle 











112 —BOYS’TRACK 


Jason Speller 












Who-o-o-sh! Coming in for a 
landing, Richard Younger tries 
to gain more distance in the 
triple jump. His first thoughts 
are, “I got sand in my shoes!” 
He hopes to have a high score 
. . . and he does because he wins 
the event with a distance of 
39'3". 


BANG! And he’s off! Sergio 
Hendricks springs forward to 
run the 400m dash in the meet 
against Franklin County as 
Coach Holcomb cheers him on. 

Coaches are impressed with the 
hard work and effort players 
show. “The team has really 
come together and has worked 
toward improvement,” said 
Coach Betty Holcomb, who is 
the girls’ track coach. 

I 

Flying high! Kevin Taylor 
bounds over the sand to reach a 
distance of 16.5 feet in the long 
jump. Kevin was a new member 
of the team. “It was more than I 
expected. I had to work hard 
and do my very best,” he 
explained. 



Jason Speller 

Varsity Boys’ Track: Front 
Row: Robbie Hager, Mark 
Hurst, Don Hanshew, Latha 
Gearheart, Cam Calfee, Robert 
Kennedy. Second Row: Sean 
Lester, Kevin Taylor, David 
Akers, Sergio Hendricks, 
Richard Younger, David 
Hamilton. Back Row: Matt 
Layman, Jason Hall, Tim 
Shortt, Robbie Epperly, Bryon 
Mayberry, DJ Patterson, Johnny 
Sexton, Mike Richards, Carmen 
Dunford, Jackie Bruce. 


BOYS’ TRACK — 113 










Finishin 


“It’s not as important if 
you win as it is for you to 
do your best and finish 
the race.” This is what 
Coach Betty Holcomb 
told the members of the 
girls’ track team before 
meets. 

As the girls’ track team 
competed, this positive 
attitude was 
commonplace. Erika 
Schofield endured “hard, 
vigorous physical 
training” as she prepared 
for a meet. 

Practicing late for as 
many as five days a week 
was common for many of 
the members. Helping 
the girls prepare, Coach 
Holcomb often stayed 
after herself. 


“I love the competition, 
the self-satisfaction and 
the achievement that I 
get from the track 
meets,” explained Erika 
Schofield on her reasons 
for joining the team. 
“Concentrating hard” was 
what it meant to Kellie 
McCoy. 

Erika Schofield realized 
the rewards of such long 
and difficult practice 
were “the medals in 
district and regional 
competition.” Kellie 
McCoy was another 
winner who took first 
place in a 400 meter relay 
against Franklin County. 
Eve Allen had also 
realized the rewards of 
practice when she took 


second in the 400 meter 
run, and third and sixth 
place in the 400 meter 
relay. 

Natoya Webb was the 
only member to place in 
the regionals. She 
received sixth place in the 
long jump and fourth 
place in the triple jump. 

Any of the members 
who placed sixth or above 
in any of the events 
qualified to go on to the 
Northwest Regionals in 
Charlottesville that were 
held in May. 

Toni Ratcliffe 
Tami Castle 


Running Power. Natoya Webb 
sprints around the track as she 
tries to come in first place. 




Girls’ Track Team 

1-3 


Opponent 

PCHS 

Patrick Henry 

83-44 

William 


Flemming 

89-37 

Cave Spring 

81-40 

Franklin 


County 

51-81 


Girls’ Track Team: Front Row: 

Amy Farmer, Kellie McCoy, 
Jennifer Whitaker, Louann 
Millar, Middle Row: Ericka 
Schofield, Mary Nash, Eve 
Allen, Tonya Turner. Back 
Row: Sonya Davidson, Melissa 
Montgomery, Tina Jones, 
Dianne Owens, Georgette 
White, Becky Horn, Natoya 
Webb. 

Up and over. Tonya Turner 
leaps the hurdles on her way to 
the finish line. 



114 — GIRLS' TRACK 














Jason Speller Jason Speller 












ommm 



Flying High. Speeding down 
the track, Kellie McCoy shows 
great height. With a little 
concentration and speed she 
comes out a leap ahead. 

Taking off. After receiving the 
baton, Sonya Davidson gets a 
running start. Even while 
practicing for the real thing, she 
gives it her best. 


Jason Speller 


GIRLS’ TRACK — 115 














































Good 


“The team had the 
motivation and drive, the 
spirit, the heart, and all 
the talent a coach could 
ask for. But we just could 
not seem to get the ball in 
the goal,” admitted Coach 
Jim Couch. The team 
struggled at the 
beginning of the season, 
with difficulty scoring. 
Having settled into the 
season, however, the 
players added victory to 
their record. 

The Cougars held two 
scrimmages before their 
official season began. The 
first was against 
defending state 
champions, Blacksburg. 
The second was against 
Radford, where they 


recorded a 2-1 victory. 
Then time arrived for the 
first official game against 
Virginia High. It was 
blowing snow, and the 
temperatures were frigid. 
At times the players could 
not see the fluorescent 
yellow ball being kicked 
around. They fought to a 
0-0 tie in overtime. Neal 
Leahy said, “The team 
progressed through the 
year and played together 
as a team, showing spirit 
and exhilaration.” 

The players 
experienced something 
new this year when they 
were able to play at the 
Kenneth J. Dobson 
Stadium. Formerly, the 
only sport played on the 


work 

field was football. The 
Cougars hosted William 
Fleming for their first 
game on this field. The 
weather was dreary and 
cool, but the team shut 
out the Colonels 1-0. Jay 
Dye said, “Playing on the 
field was a great feeling 
because it showed that 
the school actually knows 
that there is a soccer 
team.” The games had 
been played at New River 
Community College. 

In existence for a total 
of three years, the team 
was still young. However, 
the roster had 34 
members, all talented and 
enthusiastic. Many 
breathtaking moments 
took place on the field, 


especially when the 
opponent was William 
Fleming. “The second 
game against William 
Fleming was one of the 
best fought games I’ve 
ever played in. Even 
though I don’t like to see 
players scuffling on the 
field, we played a very 
good game,” said Dustin 
Lyons. The game went 
into overtime, where the 
Cougars won 3-2. 


Mark Barnes 
Chris Farmer 


Hustling for success. Danny 


Stanley goes for the ball as a 

« «yi 

Marion opponent slides in for 

”' " 4 -M 

control. Warren Spradlin looked 


on in anticipation in hopes of 
another goal. 

• ■ *| 


Varsity Soccer Team: Front 
Row: Ben McGlothlin, Anthony 
Smith, Mike Price, Derek 
D’Ardenne, Neal Leahy, Aaron 
Quinlan, Kirk Jennings, 
Jonathon Cline, Brad 
McConnell, Danny Stanley. 
Second Row: Jonna Linkous, 
Sean McKinney, Scott Dunaway, 
Don Southern, Ben Armbrister, 
Matt Weddle, Micah McMillan, 
Zeke Denny, Robert Freeman, 
Kevin Seagle, Scott Burroughs, 
Craig Dobyns, Chris Arnold, 
Cindy Whittaker. Back Row: 
Chris Dye, Chuck Fox, Josh 
Henry, Dustin Lyons, Mark 
Barnes, Warren Spradlin, Scotty 
McNeil, Jay Dye, Mr. James 
Couch,coach. 

Making the move. Aaron 
Quinlan fakes out two Marion 
players as he drives for the goal. 
Aaron scored his first goal in 
this game. He was one of two 
freshmen to score for the 
Cougars the entire season. 



116 —SOCCER 
















Jason Speller 

Up and away! Ben Armbrister 
clears the ball from the 
backfield in a game against 
Marion as Josh Henry looks on. 
The Cougars won this game 4-0 


Another dive, another save. 

Goalkeeper Mark Barnes dives 
through the air to record 
another save. He had 15 saves 
for the game and recorded his 
third shutout of the year. 


Varsity Soccer 

3-8-1 

Opponent PC 
Virginia High 
Franklin Co. 
William Fleming 
Patrick Henry 
Cave Spring 
Franklin Co. 
Glenvar 
Marion 

William Fleming 
Patrick Henry 
Cave Spring 
Christiansburg 


■P****KI§l 






SOCCER — 117 










Boys’ Tennis Team: Front 
Row: John Lockwood, John 
Harrell, Carl Carter, Jacob 
Henry, Ken Alley, Philip Boyd. 
Second Row: Chris Woodrum, 
Brian Gallimore, Jef f Gardner, 
Corey Byrd, John Lockerby, 
Erik Vaughan, Joel Sayers, 
Stephen Cox. Back Row: Coach 
Ron Kanipe, Rvan Boyd, 
Hunter Eley, Sean Smith, Mark 
Alley, Brian Hill, Chad Davis, 
Eric Rymer, Chris Castle. 



Boys’ Tennis 


7-5 


Opponent PCHS 

Graham 


(Scrimmage) 

6-3 

Radford 

1-8 

William Fleming 

1-8 


0-5 


2-7 

Cave Spring 

6-2 


7-2 


9-0 

Patrick Henry 

4-5 


5-4 


6-3 

Franklin County 

1-8 


0-9 

District 


Patrick Henry 

5-4 



“What a shot,” says Mark Alley 
as he practices for a tennis 
meet. “The shot was an easy one 
for me seeing that the ball came 
directly to me,” remarked Mark. 


Ugh.. . exclaims Ryan Boyd as 
he serves the ball to another 
teammate at practice. “Practice 
was a very important part of 
tennis this year. It helped us 
become more defensive, and it 
helped create team spirit,” said 
Ryan. 



118 — BOYS’ TENNIS 












Make it, is what was going 
through Erik Vaughan’s mind 
as the ball zoomed toward him 
“This was only practice but 1 
felt that I had to make it, for 
my own sake,” said Erik. 



PCHS 10S 


The basic point of the 
game tennis is that two 
people run back and 
forth on a court hitting a 
bright green ball over a 
net with a racket. But 
tennis is not all it appears 
to be. Tennis is a sport 
than can enhance not 
only your physical 
appearance but also your 
mental outlook. “Tennis 
is a sport that will last a 
lifetime,” said Erik 
Vaughan. 

“Playing tennis will 
better my game and my 
love for the sport,” stated 
Joel Sayers when asked 
what was one benefit of 
the sport. Some players 
participated to better 
their education. “It might 
help me get a scholarship 
to college some day,” said 
John Harrell. 

Like all sports, the 
team had some 
weaknesses. The overall 
team’s weakness was their 
backhand; and of course, 
they had their strong 
point, which was their 
doubles. 


In an exhibition match 
against Franklin County, 
Philip Boyd and Jacob 
Henry played doubles. “I 
was nervous because it 
was my first match, and it 
was exciting because we 
won 7-5,” said Philip. 

This was not only a 
memorable game for 
Philip but also for the 
team because Franklin 
County didn’t have 
enough players, and the 
Cougar tennis team 
showed their kindness 
and gave them Chris 
Rupe. “It was something 
to remember playing 
tennis for a team that is 
not your own. I had fun 
playing for Franklin 
County, but I like playing 
for the Cougar tennis 
team a lot better because 
the team is more 
supportive,” stated Chris 
Rupe. 

The coach of the boys’ 
tennis team feels that the 
team was not tough 
enough. “We are not 
tournament tough. We 
need to play more 


tournaments during the 
summer,” said Coach Ron 
Kanipe. “I enjoy working 
with young people 
outside of a classroom 
situation. I feel that 
playing sports develops a 
well-rounded individual, 
plus tennis is a sport you 
can play the rest of your 
life,” said Coach Kanipe 
when asked why he chose 
to be a tennis coach. 

Coach Ron Kanipe had 
tennis in his heart and 
mind at all times, and he 
also took it wherever he 
went because he had 
PCHS 10S on his license 
plate. 

To really think about 
playing tennis you should 
“be in good shape, have a 
good attitude, and keep 
up with your grades,” 
said John Harrell. 

Senior Erik Vaughan 
did exactly that when he 
said, “Tennis is a sport 
that is a lot of fun and 
also is a very hard sport 
to play.” 

Vicki Turner 
Shirene Broadwater 



BOYS’ TENNIS — 119 






Batter up 


It’s the bottom of the 
ninth, and the score is 
tied. Only one out left as 
the player steps up to the 
plate. The pitcher hurls a 
fast ball. Then CRACK, 
the ball goes speeding out 
of the park. It’s a 
homerun! The baseball 
team worked hard for 
many moments like this, 
but first it started with 
many hard days after 


school for try-outs. 
Darden Freeman 
explained what they 
actually did, “We worked 
on basic fundamental 
stuff.” John Akers added, 
“We hit, threw, caught, 
and ran a lot!” 

After try-outs, positions 
were assigned. Jamie 
Duncan loved his 
positions. “I play pitcher 
and right field. I love to 
pitch. I feel I’m good, but 


my playing changes when 
I don’t have a good 
game.” When asked what 
was the main thing that 
made the team good, he 
replied quickly, “We try!” 

Todd Jones said it was 
because “all of us were 
friends and it helped a 
lot.” 

Denise Jackson 
Kim Holston 




120 — VARSITY BASEBALL 












Varsity Baseball 

11-9 


Opponent PCHS 

Northside 

2-9 

Patrick Henry 

5-3 

George Wythe 

1-5 

Princeton 

1-2 

William Fleming 

1-7 

Patrick Henry 

6-5 

Tazewell 

13-5 

Richlands 

2-6 

Christiansburg 

3-7 

Franklin 


County 

14-3 

William Fleming 

2-6 

Tazewell 

10-0 

Cave Spring 

14-5 

Princeton 

0-7 

Patrick Henry 

6-7 

Franklin County 

5-4 

Franklin County 

3-8 

William Fleming 6-7 

Cave Spring 

10-8 

Cave Spring 

8-2 

Tournament 


William Fleming 

0-3 

Cave Spring 

8-2 


a 

h 

£ 


Varsity Baseball Team: Front 
Row: Tony Powell, Greg Tickle, 
Jason Green, Tommy Shepherd, 
Mark Mills, Todd Jones. Back 
Row: Eric Yates, Ronnie 
Hamblin, Eddie Murray, John 
Akers, Richard Myers, Brad 
Burrus, Robby Sarver, Jamie 
Duncan, Darden Freeman. 


'Safe! Todd Jones slides into 
home plate to score a run for 
the Cougars. This point helped 
the Cougars win against 
u Franklin County. 


Having a pep talk, Coach 
Freddie Akers talks with catcher 
Todd )ones and pitcher Richard 
Myers about the inning. Having 
team work always helps during 
the season. 


VARSITY BASEBALL — 121 


Wes Taylor 














Home plate 


A deep silence fell over 
the crowd as the player 
walked up to bat. With 
tension in the air, he 
grasped the bat with a 
clinched grip as he felt 
what seemed like millions 
of eyes upon him. The 
pitcher hurled the ball 
with all his might. In his 
swing, the batter hit the 
ball with an inner power 
that sent the ball soaring 
out of the ballpark! 

This is a dream for 
many young baseball 
players who are just 
starting out. 

Even though they were 
a young team and for 
some of them it was their 
first year, it did not take 
long for the JV baseball 
players to “get into the 
swing of things.” 

When asked how he 
felt when he made the 
team, Tony Snider 
replied, “I was really 
excited but was nervous 


in a way because I was 
only a freshman.” 

Around the first week 
in March the team started 
practice, which involved 
hitting, fielding, and base 
running. 

“I tried out for the 
team because I just love 
the game of baseball,” 
said outfielder Garry 
Wright. When questioned 
about his reason for 
trying out for baseball, 
pitcher Jamie Arnold 
replied, “I wanted to 
represent our school and 
just have fun.” 

When asked about the 
relationship between the 
players, outfielder Gary 
Snider replied, “I like to 
think that everyone is 
respectful of everybody 
else.” 

In addition to fulfilling 
his duties as a coach, 

Clark Reece was also a 
friend who reinforced 
respect for the individual. 
“I try to teach the players 


the game of baseball and 
emphasize performance 
in doing their best,” said 
Reece. “I prepared the 
team to compete, taught 
the players to play as a 
team, and taught them 
that they should show 
good sportsmanship, 
whether they win or 
lose.” 

As the players felt the 
tension of loaded bases 
and sensed the silence of 
the crowd, they were left 
with unforgettable 
baseball moments. For 
Rocky Huff it was at the 
game with Patrick Henry 
when he hit his 365-foot 
homerun. “When 
swinging the bat, I was 
trying for a base hit, not 
a homerun. I ran down 
first base thinking the ball 
was going to drop in 
front of the fence. As I 
looked towards second 
base, I saw the 
centerfielder run 
backwards and then stop 


as the ball went over the 
fence. That was the 
farthest ball I have ever 
hit. This was just about 
the greatest moment of 
my life.” 

Second baseman Ben 
Davis recalled, “My 
favorite part of playing 
was the excitement of the 
games because they were 
so close in score. Our 
game with Cave Spring 
ended up to be tied. The 
score was seven to one, 
and we came back in the 
last few innings. In our 
other game here with 
Cave Spring, we lost by 
only one run. The last 
few innings of these 
games were really 
exciting; there was more 
enthusiasm at these 
games than any of our 
other games.” 

Wendy Foushee 

Robert Dunford 


Batter up! J.J. Housel steps up 
to the plate and prepares to hit 
the ball. The Cougars went on 
to win the game against Patrick 
Henry with a score of 17-7. 



JV Baseball Team: Front Row: 

Ben Davis, Brad Wright, Gary 
Snider, Eric Yates, Tommy 
Cruise, Tony Snider. Back Row: 
Ryan Blackburn, J.J. Housel, 
Derick Kemp, Joey Bower, Joey 
Hoback, Rocky Huff, Garry 
Wright, Jamie Arnold, Chris 
Sutherland. 









122 — JV BASEBALL 














Swing! Joey Bower gets in a 
little batting practice as he 
warms up for a game. His 
teammates, Ryan Blackburn and 
Ben Davis, watched his progress 
in the background. 

Fast Pitch .. . Cougar pitcher 
Jamie Arnold starts to release 
the ball during one of the home 
games. Third baseman Ryan 
Blackburn waits to see the 
outcome of the pitch. 



It’s a grounder! First baseman 
Tommy Cruise tries to catch a 
ground ball before his opponent 
makes it to first base. 


JV Baseball 
6-3-1 

Opponent PCHS 
Carroll County 8-5 
Christiansburg 4-5 
Christiansburg 3-7 
Patrick Henry 7-17 
Patrick Henry 2-13 
Cave Spring 4-3 
Carroll County 6-2 
Cave Spring 12-12 
William Fleming 0-1 
William Fleming 0-1 




JV BASEBALL — 123 



















Twist and shout 


Picture it — a crisp, 
clear autumn night, 
excited fans huddled in 
blankets in the stands, 
musical sounds of the 
band playing the school 
song. Then without a 
moment’s delay, the 
cheerleaders start 
cheering to pep up the 
crowd who are awaiting 
the arrival of the football 
team. 


To Kam Kelly, 
cheerleader, “Being a 
leader with spirit” is what 
cheerleading was all 
about. 

The cheerleaders were 
the spirit boosters; they 
brought out enthusiasm 
at pep rallies and football 
games. 

They took the spirit 
with them last summer 
when they traveled to 


Roanoke College for a 
cheerleading camp. The 
cheerleaders returned 
with first place in every 
category and the chance 
to go to national 
competitions. 

Angel Riddle said, 
“Being a cheerleader not 
only taught me how to 
cheer, but also it made 
me learn a lot about 
myself; and I know I’ll 


have more confidence in 
myself and in whatever I 
decide to do in the 
future. Cheerleading has 
been a really great 
experience.” 

“Cheering at any game 
is great, win or lose; but 
my eleventh grade year, 
we had a 10-0 season, 
which will always be 
special to me,” said 
Angel. 

Christi Wayne 




Varsity Football Cheerleaders. 
Front Row: Angel Riddle, 
Robin Gallimore, Muffin 
Lemons. Second Row: Sarah 
Tilson. Third Row: Heather 
Wade, Melanie Richeson, Kam 
Kelly. Back row: Alison Spain, 
Shane Fralin, Sherry Mabry. 


Leading the crowd in spirit. 

Alison Spain has the right 
moves as she performs a cheer 
to help encourage the team to 
make a touchdown. Alison said, 
“1 enjoy cheering; I was a 
basketball cheerleader last year, 
and I enjoy cheering my team 
on.” 




124 — VARSITY FOOTBALL CHEERLEADERS 










Forming the paw power. The 

cheerleaders make the paw with 
pride as Sarah Tilson, Alison 
Spain, Shane Fralin and Melanie 
Richeson help lead the team to 
a victory. Shane said, “I was 
happy to be cheering my team 
on.” 


Reaching new heights. The 

cheerleaders work hard to get 
the crowd fired up. Kant Kelley, 
Muffin Lemons, Sherry Mabry, 
u and Sarah Tilson cheer with 
= spirit to reach new heights for 
m their team. Sarah Tilson said, “1 
o enjoyed cheering my team on to 
— a victory.” 




Jason Speller 



VARSITY FOOTBALL CHEERLEADERS — 125 








Down you go! Junior, John 

Akers, tackles an E.C. Glass 
opponent. “Being a football 
player takes a lot of discipline 
and hard work," said John. 
Sergio Hendricks (#2) is ready 
to assist in the tackle. 


126 — VARSITY FOOTBALL 



.i Can’t get him now! Jammon 
Payne attempts to get past the 
g William Fleming defense. 
^Jammon, a freshman, said, “I 
love playing the tailback 
position, but I’d rather give the 
blow than take it.” 

“It’s mine,” said senior, Sergio 
Hendricks as he reaches for the 
ball that was meant for 
Fauquier. Sergio said, “I 
couldn’t let them have a tie.” 
Fauquier could not penetrate 
the Cougars’ growling pride. 
“The pride is always there,” said 
Sergio. 















Can’t touch this. The E.C. Glass 
defense can't stop senior, Curtis 
Rollins, as lie runs for the score 
after receiving the ball from 
quarterback. Brad Burrus, #18. 
Curtis, a fullback, said, “I 
probably couldn’t have scored 
without Brent Golden and Brian 
Porter blocking for me. So you 
see, football really is a team 
effort!” 


Steady now. Mike Worrell 
concentrates as he holds the ball 
in position for senior kicker, 
Charles Cutlip. Charles scores 
the extra point for the Cougars. 
“It’s a great feeling to know that 
all the practice paid off,” said 
Charles. 



Varsity football 

5-5 


Opponent 

PCHS 

Anacostia 

6-38 

Heritage 

27-10 

Danville 

56-13 

E.C. Glass 

20-19 

Franklin 


County 

18-35 

Salem 

10-0 

William Fleming 7-0 

Northside 

6-23 

Cave Spring 

9-14 

Patrick Henry 

0-42 



Paws of pride 


The fans shivered from 
the icy wind that blew 
through the stadium. 
They watched another 
play in anticipation. 

The quarterback had 
the ball, and the Cougar 
offense started to run, 
working to break the 
opponent’s defense. The 
wide receiver was open, 
hoping the quarterback 
would spot him. The 
quarterback did, and the 
ball was hurled to the 
wide receiver. 

The pass was complete, 
and the ball carrier 
darted past a few of the 
opponent’s team 
members — a close call. 

Then there was an 
enormous guy on defense 
rushing toward the 


runner. A fellow Cougar 
bulldozed the defense 
down. 

The receiver scored 
with the help of the 
indestructible Cougar 
team, and the game 
ended with the Cougars 
winning. 

The Cougars did not 
end the season with a 
perfect record, but the 
team’s personal successes 
were noticeable. “Being 
able to come back after 
some tough losses and 
win a few more games to 
complete the season was 
one of the greatest 
achievements to me,” said 
Perry Beverly, a 
cornerback. 

Mark Lawson said, “My 
greatest achievement was 


making first team 
all-RVD offense.” 

To the players, football 
was a test on both the 
mental and physical 
levels. “It’s a challenge to 
push one’s body to its 
physical peak,” said 
tackle, Brent Golden. 

Curtis Rollins, fullback, 
said, “It is a big task to 
see if I’m better than the 
person in front of me.” 
Scotty McNeil agreed 
when he said, “Football is 
not only a physical 
challenge but a mental 
one as well.” 

When thinking about 
the football program, 
though, one also thinks ol 
the coaching staff behind 
the players. In speaking 
of the coaches, Jon 


Henley, tailback, said, 
“They’re the best!” 

Scotty said, “I think we 
have one of the best staffs 
in the state. Although this 
season may be considered 
a disappointment, over 
the years this program 
has been a constant 
winner.” 

But whatever the 
record, the players had 
one thing in common: 
football was a special part 
of their lives. Latha 
Gearheart, a four-year 
veteran of the sports 
program, said, “Football 
has meant more to me 
than anything else in my 
high school career.” 

Angela Clark 
Wendy Foushee 


rc 


VARSITY FOOTBALL — 127 











Safe ... Fullback, Eric Yates, 
cradles the ball as he is 
protected by receiver, Gary 
Snider, and tackle, Brandon 
Quesenberry. In this game 
against Cave Spring, Eric scored 
the first touchdown of the 
game. “We have improved as a 
team this season and have 
grown stronger,” he said. 


Almost there. Quarterback and 
co-captain, J.J. Housel, runs the 
ball down the field to score a 
touchdown as he is pursued by 
Bluefield’s defense. “Football is 
a challenge to me because 1 
have both to recall and execute 
the plays at one time,” said J.J. 





in 



Varsity and Junior Varsity 
Football Team. Front Row: Eric 
Hunter, Sergio Hendricks, 

Perry Beverly, Chad Lewis, 
Ronnie Hamblin, D.J. Patterson, 
Stevie Eaves, Charles Cutlip, 
Curtis Rollins, Brian Duncan. 
Second Row: Ben Davis, David 
Akers, Devang Desai, Mike 
Worrell, Richard Hamblin, 
Kenny Eaves, J.J. Housell, Brad 
Burrus, Jeff Linkous, Destry 
Harding. Third Row: Cam 


Calfee, Donell Patterson, Derick 
Kemp. Jason Tabor, David 
Goodman, Jess Dunford, D.A. 
Parris, Joey Quesenberry, 

Ric hard Younger, Brian Porter. 
Fourth Row: Jammon Payne, 
Keary Russell, Latha Gearheart, 
Jon Henley, Brent Alls, Todd 
Albano, Montie Brown, Eric 
Yates, Todd Shrewsberry, Joe 
Warden, Kevin Taylor. Fifth 
Row: Wade Lhnberger, 

Shannon Rice, Mark Lawson, 


Paul McFall, Chris Thompson, 
Bruce Stephens, Billy Davis, 
Jereme Greer, Brandon 
Quesenberry, Brian Roope, 
Gary Snider, Malcolm Lewis. 
Sixth Row: Brady Hurst, Paul 
Lhtderwood, Tony Grantham, 
Dane Eller, Vidal Webb, A1 
Brown, Matt Layman, Walter 
King, Steven Back, Ed 
McClanahan, Brent Golden. 
Seventh Row: Mike Richards, 
Mark Hurst, Roger Hollins, 


Scotty McNeil, Richard Myers, 
Rocky Huff, Stacey Bradley, 
Robbie Hager. John Akers. 

Back Row: Marvin Arnold, 

Lynn Fuller, Coach Clark Reece, 
Coach Tommy Hale, Coach Jim 
Chapman, Coach Billy Myers, 
Coach Ken Dobson, Coach Dave 
Bell, Coach Joel Hicks, Coach 
Randy Flinchum, Coach Freddie 
Akers, Mario Green, Buck 
Blevins. 



128—JV FOOTBALL 











I 


Going for goal 



Hearts pounding with 
anxiety and heads 
throbbing with 
excitement, team 
members raced down the 
steps to the field as they 
wondered what the result 
would be of yet another 
action-packed game. 
Would they win or lose? 
Would the junior varsity 
football team reach the 
goal for a perfect season? 

Going for any goal 
required effort, 
determination and 
especially team work. 
Defensive tackle, Paul 
Underwood, said, “My 
greatest achievement this 
year was learning how to 
play for a team that 
considered itself a 
| family.” 

% “Every time I made a 
| tackle or picked up a 


fumble, I could feel the 
love and support of the 
team. Football is a 
challenge. You push 
yourself for four quarters 
of grueling, 
heart-pounding, 
head-smashing action; 
and you do it all for the 
pride of your school,” 
said Paul. 

Brandon Quesenberry, 
tight tackle, said, “The 
team stuck close together 
and never gave up, even 
when we were behind.” 

Donell Patterson, 
safety, said, “The team 
relationship was just 
excellent. We had a 
positive attitude toward 
every game. Our goal was 
to be undefeated, but we 
lost to Patrick Henry, 
getting second in the 



RVD. We are still 
hanging on; there is 
always next year.” 

Of course, working 
toward success did not 
come without its rough 
spots and embarrassing 
moments. Overcoming 
those rough times helped 
to strengthen the team. 

Monde Brown, split 
end, said of the rough 
times, “Practice was hard 
since we started in the 
summer when it was very 
hot, and we had to 
practice daily.” 

Quarterback, Kenny 
Eaves, said, “My worst 
game had to be against 
Cave Spring. I couldn’t 
see a thing because I 
didn’t wear my contacts.” 

For Robbie Hager, the 
most embarrassing 



Running free. Tailback, Chad 
Lewis, carries the ball down the 
field as he is protected by tight 
tackle, Brandon Quesenberry. 
“Football is tough but fun. My 
goal this year was to play both 
offense and defense, and I 
achieved it,” said Chad. Chad 
went on to score two 
touchdowns, and the team went 
on to win the game against 
Bluefield. 


moment came in the 
game against Franklin 
County. “I went to the 
game with my left cleat 
and my locker partner’s 
left cleat. I didn’t realize 
this until we got there, 
and the team laughed for 
10 minutes. I panicked, 
thinking I was going to 
have to wear two left 
cleats; but luckily, 
another teammate had an 
extra pair,” Robbie said. 

By the end of the 
season, the team had 
made it through the 
rough times, the 
embarrassing moments; 
and they had finished 
with a second place in the 
Roanoke Valley District. 

Angela Clark 
Wendy Foushee 


Listen up, guys! Coach Randy 
Flinchum explains a play to #87 
Robbie Hager and the rest of 
the players. “Coach Flinchum 
really helped us work to make 
ourselves the best we could be,” 
said tackle, Brandon 
Quesenberry. 


JV Football 
4-1 

Opponent PCHS 
William Fleming 0-8 
Greenbrier 

East 12-26 

Patrick Henry 22-0 
Cave Spring 0-20 
Bluefield ' 6-22 


JV FOOTBALL — 129 








Taking over 


The crowd roared as 
the team scored yet 
another touchdown. 

While they glanced at the 
final score, they cheered 
with joy in seeing their 
team win. 

Most of the players on 
the freshman football 
team started playing the 
sport when they were 
young. “I love football, 
and I’ve been playing 
ever since I was seven 
years old,” said Wayne 
Page. 

“When I was in the 
fifth grade, 1 played for 
the little league. Some of 
my friends persuaded me 
to play so I did. The 
more I got to know about 
the game, the more I 
liked it,” said James 
Haga. 

And football was 
definitely a well-loved 
sport among the players. 
“I like sports that are 
physical. I also played 
because I thought it 
would be a lot of fun,” 
said Wayne Puckett. 


“I like football because 
it’s a perfect way in 
dealing with stress and 
anger. It calms me 
down,” said James. 

For the players, the 
games held a variety of 
exciting experiences. “In 
playing Franklin County, 
we scored every drive and 
won the game,” said 
Randy Dunnigan. 

The Franklin County 
game was also exciting 
for Wayne Page. He said, 
“I didn’t feel very well 
because I had a pulled 
muscle in my back and a 
broken finger, but it was 
the best game I played 
because I made more 
tackles in that game than 
in any other before.” 

Wayne Puckett 
remembered the game 
with Hidden Valley. “It 
was raining but not very 
cold. We were moving the 
ball really well and were 
stopping them on 
defense.” 

The players also saw a 
connection between 


games and the future. “I 
think football will help ► 

me get into better shape, jl 

and it made me more 
disciplined,” said Wayne 
Puckett. 

At the same time, 

James said, “Football will 
help me with quick 
decisions — how to make 
the right, quick decision 
and how to cope with the 
decision.” 

Looking further into 
the future, Wayne Page 
said, “I could maybe 
become a pro football 
player and make money.” y 

For the present time, 
though, Randy said, “It 
will make me in a better 
physical condition.” 

The freshman team 
earned the title of 
Roanoke Valley District 
champions. James said, 

“The championship was 
ours, and we did it for 
ourselves and the 
coaches.” 

Sarah James J 




Freshman Football Team. Front 
Row: Coach Jack Preston, Brad 
Page, Andy Hall, Carl Lewis, 
Todd Davis, Jeff Berkley, Jay 
Webb, Brian Redd, A.J. Stancil, 
Tim Kimbrough, Tim Hill, 
Coach Doug Dunavant. Second 


Row: Coach Perry Reece, J.W. 
Quesenberry, Steve Haynes, 
Billy Ingles, C.A. Burkes, Brian 
Stoots, Wayne Page, Robbie 
Shelton, Chad Draper, Michael 
King, David Draper, Coach 
Trevor Coleman. Third Row: 


Steve Cox, John Farmer, Jimmy 
Haga, Clay Dillon, Jonathan 
Martin, Larry Newcomb, Wayne 
Puckett, Jared Eller. Back Row: 
Billy Whitlock, Tommy Linkous, 
Doug Tucker, Randy Dunnigan, 
Todd Turner, Leon Crane, 
Jason Cochran, Matt Jackson. 



130 — FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 
















Freshman Football 

4-4 


Opponent 

PCHS 

William Fleming 

12-0 

Bluefield 

35-14 

Salem 

12-8 

Cave Spring 

6-22 

Northside 

6-18 

Hidden Valley 

2-26 

Patrick Henry 

38-18 

Franklin County 

0-36 


Go for it! Billy Ingles blocks for 
Carl Lewis. “It was easy 
adapting to the high school 
level. We have a lot of talent on 
our team. During warm-ups 
before our RVD championship 
game, I could tell we were 
ready,” said Billy. 



Practice makes perfect. Tim 
Hill, #42, and Carl Lewis, #14, 
collide while lunging for the 
ball. "I enjoyed playing 
freshman football because the 
coaches and players worked well 
together to bring home the 
RVD championship. I also took 
pride in being a captain, in 
leading my team to a great 
season,” said Tim. 


FRESHMAN FOOTBALL — 131 













Cheers and chants 


Positioning and 
balancing are important 
facets in building a 
pyramid. The wrong step 
and the whole pyramid 
falls. 

The same holds true 
with the junior varsity 
cheerleaders. Mandy 
Morris said, “The JV 
cheerleaders rely on 
coordination.” Jennifer 
Minnick said, “You must 
have the ability to work 
with others.” 

Cheering was not all 
exhibition in front of 
other people. It was also 
“repetition of cheers, 
chants and pyramids to 
get them perfect,” said 
Lori O’Dell. 

Stacey Allison said, 
“You have to be willing to 
work hard during 

Spirit boosters! Jennifer 
Minnick aims to draw the 
Cougar spirit from the crowd. 
“Cheering is having a chance to 
show my support,” said 
Jennifer, who cheers to 
encourage the football team. 


practice and donate extra 
time after school hours 
for special events. 

“Practice is a big key, 
and you can’t be shy,” 
said Tracy McCoy. “You 
cannot be afraid to show 
school spirit and an 
outgoing personality,” she 
said. 

Music and performance 
were the other high 
points to a cheerleader’s 
everyday life. “You have 
to learn to work and 
become involved with 
fellow classmates,” said 
Kellie McCoy. 

“Cheering for the team, 
showing my school spirit 
and seeing all the 
excitement are my 
favorite things about 
being a cheerleader,” said 
Jennifer Underwood. 


Supervision was 
another part of cheering. 
“Carri Cutlip oversees to 
make sure no one gets 
hurt, and she teaches us 
new cheers. She also 
keeps unity among us 
when times are hectic,” 
said Ranch Biggs. As 
Jennifer Minnick said, 
“Carri Cutlip keeps us in 
line.” 

The JV cheerleaders 
were more than just 
people clapping and 
chanting. They had 
feelings and problems 
just like everyone else. 
They were just the 
epitome of school spirit as 
they showed support and 
encouraged the teams. 

Shirene Broadwater 
Teresa Stone 



132 — JV CHEERLEADERS 





















Pride power! Cheerleaders take 
pride in showing spirit for the 
team. “We do cheers, chants, 
pyramids and routines to 
perfection,” said Mandy Morris. 
The girls work to perfect their 
routines. 


Junior Varsity Cheerleaders. 
Front Row: Lori O'Dell. Second 
Row: Kellie McCoy, Karen 
Spraker, Jennifer Minnick, 
Mandy Morris. Third Row: 
Randi Biggs, Jennifer 
LInderwood, Kelly Campbell. 
Back Row: Stacey Allison, Tracy 
McCoy. 




Cheering for the challenge! 

Positive attitude, a lot of spirit 
and good academic 
performance are three qualities 
needed to be a cheerleader. 
Randi Biggs shows her spirit 
while cheering. “Cheering for 
the team and showing my school 
spirit and all the excitement are 
my favorite things about 
cheering,” said Jennifer 
Minnick. 


Together again. Spirit, 
coordination and personality get 
Mandy Morris on a roll with this 
routine as she cheers. “My 
favorite thing about cheering is 
knowing that I’m giving the 
crowd and the team 
encouragement and spirit," said 
Mandy. 


JV CHEERLEADLRS — 133 








Cross Country 

5-1 

Opponent 

PCHS 

Patrick Henry 

43-19 

Cave Spring 

18-45 

Salem 

33-26 

Northside 

Franklin 

30-25 

County 

William 

48-15 

Fleming 

Radford 

33-25 

University 

4th 

Metro 

6th 

District 

3rd 

Regional 

9th 


In the middle of the pack. Tim 

Shortt quickens his pace as 
three Cave Spring players 
surround him. Tim finished as 
the top runner for the Cougars 
in almost every meet. 

Cross Country Team. Front 
Row: Carmen Dunford, Robert 
Kennedy, Diane Owens, 

Jennifer Pohlig, Robbie Epperly. 
Back Row: Sean Lester, Tim 
Shortt, Jason Hall, Ben Linkous, 
Don Hanshew, Daniel Leary, 
Bryan Mayberry. 






134 — CROSS COUNTRY 


Jason Speller 



















Goin 


Struggling to be the best. 

Jennifer Pohlig, one of the top 
runners for the girls, pushes 
herself to finish with the other 
top runners. Her best finish was 
at an invitational in Salem 
where she finished second. She 
said, “Cross country was fun, 
but I liked the meets more than 
the practices.” 

Keeping up the pace. Robert 
Kennedy and Robbie Epperly 
head down the hill at a home 
meet. Both kept a substantial 
lead against their opponents. 
Coach Dave Wright cheers them 
on as he checks their progress. 


Thup! Thup! That is 
all the runner hears. For 
what seems like hours he 
has been pushing himself , 
and finally he reaches the 
end of the line. 

The coach rushes over 
to congratulate him for 
taking first place, and the 
runner feels very proud 
of himself. 

Suddenly he snaps out 
of his daydream. He is 
running for cross country 
practice, not for a 


championship meet. 

One thing about the 
cross country team is that 
they run a lot. Tim 
Shortt, senior, said, “We 
run anywhere from 8-13 
miles a day.” 

“A lot of times I'm 
asked, ‘Why do you run?’ 
I have no idea why I run; 
I don’t even know how I 
got started running. The 
team loves to run, 
compete and just have 
fun. I think when the fun 


of running ends, my 
running ends,” said Tim. 

Carmen Dunford, 
senior, agreed. “I loved 
every minute of it,” he 
said. 

Jason Hall, who has 
been on the team for 
four years, explained that 
running cross country 
requires commitment. 

The team posted a 5-1 
record, including the 
district meet. 

Cindy Cook 


CROSS COUNTRY 


135 






Front and center. As the ball 

sails over the net, Carla Sayers 
gives a sigh of relief. “I love 
tennis,” said Carla. “A love of 
the sport helps to keep you on 
your toes,” she said. 

Backhand again. Amy Hudson 
delivers the ball over the net. 
“Practicing my backhand is 
important,” said Amy. Most of 
the players, when practicing, 
wore comfortable clothes for 
easy movement and agility. 



Girls’ Tennis 
3-7 

Opponent PCHS 
Heritage 2-7, 6-3 
Patrick Henry 9-0, 
8-1 

Cave Spring 8-1, 9-0 
William 

Fleming 1-8, 0-9 
Franklin 

County 8-1, 6-3 
Districts 

Cave Spring 9-0 



136 — GIRLS’ TENNIS 























Set for games 


As a yellow circular 
object comes flying over a 
net, the player has sheer 
seconds to react. This is 
the normal play for the 
girls on the tennis team. 
The players learn to 
apply the right pressure 
and right angle to the 
racquet as they return the 
ball over the net. 

“I love to play. You get 
to be outdoors, and you 
have more of a chance to 
talk and meet new friends 
since it’s a one-on-one 


sport,” said Denise 
Jackson. 

Friendship is essential 
both on an off the court. 
The friendship between 
players improves the 
quality of the team’s 
performance. 

The game of love, 
match and set is as 
different as the words 
used in the game. Tennis 
ranges from singles to 
doubles. 

The love of the game is 
also a basic part of tennis. 


“I just love the challenge 
of tennis,” said April 
Alexander. 

Learning to play tennis 
is half the battle; some 
started at early ages, 
while others became more 
interested as they grew 
older. April said, “Tim 
Hill taught me and got 
me interested in tennis.” 

In speaking of her 
favorite match, Denise 
said, “Amy Hudson and I 
were playing Franklin 
County in doubles. I went 


for a backhand and fell 
through a gate. I was so 
embarrassed, but it didn’t 
hurt. Later on, I went for 
another shot on the 
opposite side and 
sprained my ankle. I 
refused to give up, and 
somehow we won. It’s my 
favorite because it’s the 
toughest match I’ve ever 
played.” 

Shirene Broadwater 






Girls’ Tennis Team. Front 
Row: April Alexander, Carla 
Sayers, Mary Knarr, Meg 
Folsom, Jill Underwood. Middle 
Row: Stacy Van Sise, Shane 
Fralin, Amber Jenkins, Amanda 
Folsom, Vicki Underwood, 
Laurel Shroyer. Back Row: 
Scarlett Williams, Elizabeth 
Knarr, Lynn Coltrane, Denise 
Jackson, Cindy Martin, Amy 
Hudson, Kathy Litton, Coach 
Ron Kanipe. 

Sun’s in my eyes. Laurel 
Shroyer, being blinded by the 
sun, is trying to get a little 
higher to reach the ball. “The 
wind is bad on the tennis courts, 
and the sun is in my eyes at 
every match,” said Laurel in 
speaking about how the weather 
affects tennis. 


The Southwest Times 


GIRLS' TENNIS — 137 














Hole in one 


Among the pines on 
the course, the golf team 
practiced at Thorn 
Spring Country Club, the 
home greens. Members 
practiced for many hours, 
learning the strategies to 
compete against the 
opponents. 

The team members 
competed in various 
matches both at Thorn 
Spring and throughout 
the Roanoke Valley 
District. In district 
competition, the relatively 
young team placed 
fourth. 


I'he players agreed that 
golf was a sport that is 
enjoyed by young and old 
alike. “I feel golf will stay 
with me all through my 
life and give me 
something to do when I 
retire,” said junior, Sean 
Smith. 

Tim Rigney said, “It 
offers an excellent 
opportunity for exercise 
throughout your life.” 

“I hope to play in 
college and even hope to 
make it to the pro’s,” said 
senior, Eric Haga, captain 
of the team. Indeed, the 
future is what the golf 


players look to when they 
compete. 

“I felt welcomed and 
enjoy playing with the 
older guys,” said Aaron 
Rygas, one of only two 
freshmen on the team. 

Sophomore, Jacob 
Henry, said, “I feel that 
the group has grown 
from the beginning of the 
season.” 

The team consisted of 
10 members: two seniors, 
one junior, five 
sophomores and two 
freshmen. 

Jennifer Weikle 
Michelle Parnell 



Golf Team. Front Row: Eric 
Woolley, Aaron Rygas, Jacob 
Henry, Anthony Wood, Tim 
Rigney, Coach Butch White. 
Back Row: Micah McMillan, 
Eric Haga, Sean Smith, Scottie 
Wyatt, Stephen Schwenk. 

Just a swingin.’ Golf requires 
patience, composure and 
concentration. Eric Haga 
concentrates on his shot. “I 
think this sport helps me learn 
to be patient with other 
players,” said Eric. 



138 — GOLF 





















Putting fore the fun of it! , Tim 

Rigney takes careful aim before 
hitting the ball. Having the 
proper swing form and 
concentration is essential to 
execute the ball properly. 



The sand man. The golf team 
practiced at Thorn Spring 
Country Club. Scottie Wyatt, a 
sophomore on the team, said, “I 
= was making a sand shot to get 
tg- the ball onto the green." 

§ Practicing the shots is an 
essential part of playing golf. 



Golf 


Matches incl 

uded 

Cave Spring, Frank¬ 
lin County, Patrick 
Henry, Pulaski 
County, William 

Fleming. 

Location 

Place 

Thorn Spring 

4th 

Roanoke County 3rd 

Hunting Hills 

4th 

Countryside 

4th 

Water’s Edge 
District 

3rd 

Tournament 

4th 


_4 J 

X 

O. 

0O 


GOLF 


139 









This one’s over. Kerry Lewis 
says spiking is one of her 
favorite plays in volleyball. 

While she spikes this one, Bucky 
Edwards prepares for the 
return ball. 




Varsity Volleyball Team. Front 
Row: Jill David. Second Row: 

Staci Dickerson, Bucky Edwards. 
Third Row: Teeka Morris, 
Marsha Southern. Fourth Row: 
Tina Jones, Becky Cregger. 

Back Row: Karri Mabry, 
Stephanie Cook, Kerry Lewis, 
Melissa Dotson. 


I got it! "Part of volleyball is 
learning to spike and block the 
ball,” said Marsha Southern. 
Kerry Lewis spikes while Tina 
Jones prepares to block. Marsha 
waits to return the ball when it 
comes back to their court. 



140 — VARSITY VOLLEYBALL 














































Let’s block this one! “Trying to 
block the ball was one of the 
techniques of defending the 
hard hit to our side and 
preventing our opponent from 
scoring,” said Melissa Dotson. 

£ Melissa and Staci Dickerson 

1 show this technique. 

o 

15 




The expressions and 
feelings about the 
volleyball season were 
written on the players’ 
faces. Ending the season 
with a 4-6 regular season 
record, the team placed 
third in the district. 

The players 

commented that they had 
improved greatly through 
"E the season. Tina {ones 
^ expressed these feelings 


when she said, “Overall, 
we have improved 
greatly; for example, we 
have learned to 
communicate and play 
better as a team. I feel as 
if we have nothing to be 
ashamed of because we 
have done well.” 

Also at the end of the 
season, Kerry Lewis was 
named to the all-district 
team. 


Demanding, 

challenging, competitive, 
hard work, dedication, 
fun, exciting, friends, 
fitness were just a few of 
the descriptions fit to 
characterize volleyball this 
year. 

Several of the players 
were asked why they 
chose to play volleyball. 
Amy Bishop said, “I 
really enjoy it, and it is 


Varsity Volleyball 
4-6 

Opponent PCHS 

Heritage 9-15, 12-15, 
6-15 

North Cross 15-2, 
15-11, 11-15,6-15, 15-6 
Heritage 13-15, 15-8, 
15-6, 15-6 

Roanoke 

Catholic 16-14, 

11-15, 15-11,3-15, 1-15 
Patrick Henry 15-2, 
15-13, 15-3 
Franklin County 15-10, 

13-15, 14-16, 15-12, 

14- 16 

Cave Spring 15-9, 15-9, 
1 13-15, 15-2 
William Fleming 1 1-15, 

15-12, 15-4, 15-11 
Patrick Henry 15-10, 
15-9, 11-15,4-15, 15-11 
Franklin County 15-11, 

12-15, 14-16, 9-15 
District tournament 
Cave Spring 15-9, 

15- 12, 

16- 14 

William Fleming 12-15, 

13-15, 0-15 


the only thing I put a 100 
percent effort into.” 

Jill David agreed and 
said, “It’s a powerful 
sport and very 
demanding. It’s also a 
challenge. Volleyball 
seemed like it would be 
fun and worth the effort. 

I love it and everyone 
involved.” 

Mark Barnes 
Carrie ODell 



VARSITY VOLLEYBALL — 141 












Spike it! Misty Williams spikes 
the ball on two of her 
opponents from Heritage. "1 
felt so excited because it was 
one of our first games,” she 
said. A spike is a fundamental 
offensive move in volleyball. 

Hit me with your best shot. 

Misty Williams prepares to block 
her opponent’s shot. “I was 
afraid that my opponent was 
going to score on me,” she said. 



Ifijii— r- f 






1 



142 — JV VOLLEYBALL 



























Set it up 


The pressure is in the 
air! Each of the junior 
varsity volleyball players 
felt a certain pressure 
when the ball was in the 
air. 

“I just keep thinking 
how I want the ball to 
come to me and how I 
don’t want to make a 
u mistake,” said Holly Hall. 
^ For the players, 

= pressure was a big part of 
~ the play. “Just get it to 


the setter,” said Martha 
Blair. 

Although many of the 
players had started in 
backyard volleyball, they 
moved on to play it as a 
school sport. “A bunch of 
us girls just thought it 
would be fun, so we tried 
it,” said Angie Hall. 

And pushing the girls 
to do their best was the 
coach, Mrs. Maggie 
Manning. “She has shown 


us a lot of love and 
skills,” said Amy Huff. 

Another highlight for 
the team, as may be the 
case with every team, was 
the trips on the buses to 
the away games. Those 
were the times when the 
girls were the most 
“hyped,” and the 
excitement and pressure 
reached their peaks. 

Leslie Tate 


JV Volleyball 

8-3 


Opponent 

PCHS 

Heritage 2-15, 5-15 

North Cross 

9-15, 


15-4, 


10-15 

Heritage 15-6, 5-15, 


14-16 

Patrick Henry 

15-13, 


1-15, 


10-15 

Franklin County 

15-6, 

12-15, 

15-12 

Hidden Valley 

3-15, 

15-13, 2-15 

William Fleming 

3-15, 


4-15 

Patrick Henry 

9-15, 


7-15 

Franklin County 



15-11, 


15-8 

Hidden Valley 

15-4, 


4-15, 


15-5 

William Fleming 

1-15, 


5-15 




Junior Varsity Volleyball 
Team. Front Row: Amy Bishop, 
Jana Whitlock, Vicki Lambert, 
Martha Blair, Holly Hall, B.J. 
Jackson, Jessica Sifford. Back 
Row: Misty Williams, Jody 
Haynes, Kanda Kettle, Alicia 
Akers, Angie Hall, Amy Huff. 

“I’ve got it. Alicia Akers spikes 
the ball after her teammate Jody 
Haynes has set it. Amy Huff 
stands ready to assist her 
teammates. 


JV VOLLEYBALL — 143 


































Off the edge 


Diving into the second 
year of a new frontier, 
the swim team entered its 
second year with 
splashing successes with 
improved strokes. 
Sophomore, Amy Bishop, 
said, “I joined the team 
because I love to swim, 
and I thought I would be 
good at it.” 

The swim team was 
larger this year, a fact 
that helped to improve 
the team’s record. There 
were enough swimmers to 
fill all individual events 
and relays. Sophomore, 


Megan Metz, said, “The 
numbers of people and 
the ability of last year’s 
swimmers have improved 
a lot.” 

Work, work, work! 
That’s what it took for 
these swimmers. Jennifer 
Pohlig, freshman, said, 
“The highlight of the 
season has been to lower 
my times. I’ve gone from 
1 minute, 20 seconds for 
a 100-meter freestyle to a 
1 minute, 12 seconds 
100-meter freestyle.” 

The swimmers 
practiced at the Hensel 


Eckman YMCA. Junior, 
Chuck Fox, said, “We 
swim the whole time 
during everyday 
practices.” 

Swimming isn’t just a 
sport for the present, 
though. Swimming offers 
much for swimmers for 
later. Amanda Folsom, 
sophomore, said, “I will 
have a good background 
on swimming, so I can 
use it as a lifetime sport.” 

As the team moved 
forward in this new 
school sport, the 
members viewed the 


success with an eye also 
on their weaknesses. 

Brian Manning, 
sophomore, said, “I feel 
the major weakness of the 
team is that there is a 
limited number of girls 
who can swim the 
difficult strokes, like the 
butterfly and individual 
medley.” 

The team was 
composed of four seniors, 
four juniors, thirteen 
sophomores and four 
freshmen. 

Jennifer Weikle 



Swimming 

Opponent 

PCHS 

Boys 


4-6-1 


Blacksburg 

40-49 

Patrick Henry 

40-40 

Cave Spring 

51-34 

Virginia High 

95-73 

Patrick Henry 

39-42 

Heritage 

61-25 

Tennessee High 

56-28 

North Cross 

69-82 

E.C. Glass 

56-30 

Blacksburg 

48-37 

Danville 

40-46 

Lynchburg Invitational 


6th place 

Girls 


3-8 


Blacksburg 

52-26 

Patrick Henry 

68-18 

Cave Spring 

60-26 

Virginia High 

108-70 

Patrick Henry 

57-29 

Heritage 

52-34 

Tennessee High 

58-28 

North Cross 

49-112 

E.C. Glass 

64-22 

Blacksburg 

26-58 

Danville 

5-74 

Lynchburg Invitational 


7th place 



Soaring with power. Neal Leahy 
gets off to a quick start for the 
individual medley relay at the 
North Cross meet. His 
teammate, Scott Dunaway, 
watches from below. The team 
earned a first place in this 
event. 





I 


Swim Team: Front Row: 

Georgette White, Eva Machelor, 
Jennifer Pohlig, Mary Knarr, 
Kellie McCoy, Kerri Weddle. 
Second Row: Carmen Hanks, 
Amanda Folsom, Sally 
Sandidge, Erin Zel, Elisabeth 
Morgan, Emily Folsom. Back 
Row: Scott Dunaway, Brad 
Terrell, Brian Manning, Ken 
Hurley, Jonathan Fore, Chuck 
Fox, Chris Terrell, Nathan 
Gessner, Neal Leahy. 


144 — SWIMMING 





















Ready, set, go. At the sound of 
the gun, the swimmers start the 
competition against Danville. 
Competing for the Cougars 
were Neal Leahy, a senior, and 
Brian Manning, a sophomore. 
This home meet was held at the 
Hensel Eckman YMCA in 
Pulaski. 

Flying through the water. Bobbi 
Metz cuts through the water 
with the butterfly as she 
competes in the individual 
medley against Danville. She 
claimed a first-place finish. “All 
I could think of was how my 
feet were positioned in the 
water,” said Bobbi. 



SWIMMING — 145 






Rebounds 


Thud! Thud! Thud! 

The distinct sound of the 
thunderous ball seemed 
to keep rhythm with the 
player’s pounding heart. 
The whole game relied 
on a crucial shot. 

Expectant eyes were on 
the ball as it whizzed 
through the air. The 
silence which filled the 
gym was broken as the 
ball swooshed through 
the net. 

The game was over; 
the Lady Cougars had 
won! 

Winning was one of the 
things the Lady Cougars 
did best this season. 
Although the object of 
the game was to win, the 
girls said they also 


enjoyed the competition 
and the feeling of being a 
part of the team. 

Jenny Skeen said, “I 
like playing as a team. It’s 
not an individual sport. 
It’s one where everybody 
is important; and if you 
plan to get far, you’ve got 
to work together,” 

Competition and 
teamwork were important 
parts of the game, but 
there were other aspects 
which made the sport 
equally as exciting. 
Meeting new people and 
traveling to new places 
were what the players 
enjoyed. 

Lateffa Carter said, 
“The fast pace is exciting. 
When the ball goes in the 


basket, it is such a thrill.” 
All of the players agreed 
that they enjoyed winning 
the most. 

It takes coordination, 
teamwork, practice and 
talent to play basketball; 
and to the girls, the work 
was well worth the effort 
when they won. Alicia 
Akers said, “I feel like we 
have worked hard, and 
we deserved to win,” 

The season was good 
for the Lady Cougars. In 
talking about the season, 
Coach Rod Reedy said, “I 
feel pretty positive. Both 
the JV and varsity teams 
have played outstanding 
seasons.” 

Michelle Parnell 
Leslie Tate 



You’ve got to work together. 

Coach Rod Reedy gives 
instructions to the team at a 
time out. 


Girls’ Varsity Basketball 

19-1 


Opponent 

PCHS 

G.W. Danville 

43-78 

Heritage 

26-73 

E.C. Glass 

47-54 

Patrick Henry 

39-62 

Heritage 

12-46 

E.C. Glass 

31-43 

Heritage 

35-71 

Franklin County 

39-61 

G.W. Danville 

31-50 

William Fleming 

60-64 

Cave Spring 

68-48 

Patrick Henry 

29-63 

E.C. Glass 

24-62 

Franklin County 

37-60 

William Fleming 

44-65 

Cave Spring 

26-52 

Patrick Henry 

27-53 

Franklin County 

44-65 

William Fleming 

44-45 

Cave Spring 

54-57 


They had a dream of 
going to the state 
championships, and the 
girls’ varsity basketball 
team turned that dream 
into reality. 

During their winning 
season, the girls claimed 
the title of Roanoke 
Valley District champs. 


State Finals 

When they arrived at 
Cave Spring High School 
for the Northwest 
Regionals, did they dare 
hope for victory? Yes, 
and the victory was theirs. 

That led them to the 
state playoffs where they 
defeated Petersburg and 
Phoebus to advance to 


the state finals. 

There they were 
matched against the 
nationally ranked James 
Madison from Vienna. In 
this final championship 
game, the girls were 
defeated. 

Shana Taylor 


146 — GIRLS’ VARSITY BASKETBALL 


Jason Speller 












It’s magic time! Junior, Terri 
Garland, goes for two points 
with a lay-up. Hard work and 
hours of practice helped make 
the team a winning team. “It 
gives me a sense of 
accomplishment to know all the 
work we do is paying off,” said 
Terri. 


Girls’ Varsity Basketball Team. 
Front row: Jenny Skeen, Terri 
Garland, Robin Dotson, Becky 
Smith, Sonya Davidson, Lateffa 
Carter. Back row: Coach Rod 
Reedy, Tonya Sayers, Patricia 
Turner, Alicia Akers, Lena 
Jones, Cindy Martin, Kristie 
Ratcliffe. 




On guard! Jenny Skeen guards 
Sonya Davidson during one of 
the afternoon practices. 
“Basketball’s not an individual 
sport; it’s one that takes team 
effort,” said Jenny. 


GIRLS’ VARSITY BASKETBALL — 147 












'll 


Girls’ Junior Varsity Basketball 
Team. Front row: Janel Sheffey, 
Becky Horne, Crystal Andrews, 
Laura Bishop, Stacy Arnold, 
Laura Nelson. Back row: Ashley 
Thompson, Stacy VanSise, Kim 
Branscome, Mary Grubb, 
Christian Scheppers, Randee 
Chrisley. 

Going, going . . . almost there. 

Becky Horne shoots for two. “I 
was glad the shot went in,” said 
Becky, who also talked of how 
tense a game can become. 


Alley oop! As Stacey Van Sise 
jumps to make a three-pointer, 
a William Fleming opponent 
moves to block it. Stacey said, 
“Nervous! That is what 1 was 
because I knew that could be a 
deciding point.” 












148 — JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL 


Jason Speller 























Jason Speller 



To win 


of my shots. I scored 16 
points in all.” 

Stacy Arnold said, “I 
decided to join the team 
because it’s my favorite 
sport, and I enjoy 
playing.” 

Playing high school 
basketball had been a 
goal for many for several 
years. Laura Nelson said, 
“When I was in fourth 
grade, I became 
interested in basketball. 
We were having a field 
day, and I was in the 
basketball shooting 
contest, and I won.” 

Likewise, several of the 


players expressed an 
interest in playing not 
only on the varsity high 
school level but also on 
the college level. And 
starting on the junior 
varsity level will increase 
their chances of meeting 
that goal. 

Without exception, 
though, the part the 
players enjoyed the most 
was winning. “We felt we 
had accomplished a great 
deal,” said Ashley 
Thompson, in speaking 
of their wins. 

Sonya Steffey 

Cindy Cook 


As the team watched 
eagerly, hoping that the 
shot would connect, the 
crowd rose to their feet in 
great exhilaration. 

The girls’ junior varsity 
basketball team saw the 
first year of action this 
season. The team had 
four sophomores and 
eight freshmen. The 
coach was Mrs. Harfiet 
Farris. 

In describing her best 
game, Crystal Andrews 
said, “The best game was 
when we played William 
Fleming (away). I was the 
leading scorer and hit all 


Trapped, Nowhere to go? Becky 
Horne said, “Going up and 
getting the ball over the other 
team’s guard and getting it in 
the basket is a great feeling.” 


JV Girls’ Basketball 

12-2 


Opponent 

PCHS 

Heritage 

27-47 

E.C. Glass 

18-67 

Patrick Henry 

14-62 

Heritage 

21-55 

E.C. Glass 

25-45 

Franklin County 

39-29 

William Fleming 

27-34 

Patrick Henry 

13-57 

E.C. Glass 

22-37 

Franklin County 

40-25 

William Fleming 

27-32 

Patrick Henry 

23-47 

Franklin County 

26-34 

William Fleming 

35-36 


JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL — 149 









Varsity Basketball 
Cheerleaders. Front Row: 

Jennifer Clark, Christina Hurd, 
Lesley Nash, Stephanie Lytton. 
Second Row: Rachael Long, 
Vicki Underwood. Back Row: 
Carrie Kincaid, Stephanie Alley. 


Tension in the air. Before the 
William Fleming game, Jennifer 
Clark, Carrie Kincaid, Christina 
Hurd, Vicki Underwood, 

Rachael Long, Stephanie Alley 
and Lesley Nash pep up the 
team. “At the beginning of 
games, we go out to support our 
team and cheer them on for the 
game. It gives us a chance to let 
them know we’re standing 
behind them,” said Lesley. 



She’s got the spirit. Stephanie 
Lytton performs a sideline 
cheer, showing her school spirit. 
“It makes me feel good when I 
get the crowd into the action of 
the game. We especially get a lot 
of crowd response when we 
spell out “Cougars” with our 
pompons,” said Stephanie. 



Let’s go! Christina Hurd raises 
the spirit of the crowd during 
the home game with William 
Fleming. “It was good to be able 
to cheer at home again because 
so many of our games were 
away,” said Christina. 



150 — BASKETBALL CHEERLEADERS 






On to victory 


She quickly glanced at 
the scoreboard, which 
displayed that there were 
only three short minutes 
left in the game and that 
the team was down by 
eight points. Knowing the 
players must not give up 
hope, she urged her 
squad on as her body 
grew tense with anxiety. 

As the group began 
stirring up the crowd 
with spunky cheers, the 
team made a basket to cut 
the lead by six. In the last 
minutes of the game, the 
home team scored three 
more baskets and won the 
game. 

She knew the hard 
work, dedication and long 
practices of the 
cheerleaders had now 
paid off! 

“Practices involve lots 
of hard work but are a 
great deal of fun, too. We 


practice chants, jumps, 
cheers and dance 
routines,” said senior 
co-captain, Stephanie 
Alley. “Basically, we try to 
work the ‘bugs’ out of our 
routines in an attempt to 
give the most dynamic 
crowd effect,” she said. 

These dynamic routines 
were a group effort and 
required input and 
participation from all of 
the girls. “We like to 
choose music that’s going 
to be appealing to the 
audience and that many 
are familiar with. Usually 
if someone wants to make 
up a routine, she does; 
and then the squad 
decides as a whole 
whether or not to use it,” 
said junior, Christina 
Hurd. 

“For one of our dances, 
we all selected different 
music. We finally decided 


to mix the music and 
came up with one song,” 
said junior, Stephanie 
Lytton. 

Boosting the spirits of 
the crowd was not the 
only goal for the 
cheerleaders. Their most 
important goal was to 
boost the spirits of the 
team. 

“We make signs to put 
up throughout the 
building, hang locker 
stickers, and bake cookies 
for the players to let 
them know we care and 
support them,” said 
junior, Vicki Underwood. 

Closeness within the 
group was an important 
quality for the squad. 

“We all get along with 
each other; and our 
sponsor, Coco Fralin, 
treats us all like 
daughters,” said 
Stephanie Lytton. 


“We have sleep-overs, 
go to the mall, go out to 
eat together, and share 
secret pal gifts at each 
away game,” said senior 
co-captain, Lesley Nash. 

“I feel that this really 
makes us closer, and it 
lets us become more open 
with each other,” she 
said. 

Stephanie Alley said, 
“As a captain, along with 
Lesley, I hope the other 
girls see me not as one 
who orders them around 
but as someone who takes 
responsibility and tries to 
get things organized. Our 
sponsor is wonderful and 
fun-loving, but she also 
knows when to suggest 
that we get serious and 
work hard.” 

Wendy Foushee 


Reaching new heights. At 

halftime during the game 
against William Fleming, 
Rachael Long, Carrie Kincaid, 
Stephanie Alley, Stephanie 
Lytton, Jennifer Clark, Lesley 
Nash and Vicki Underwood 
construct one of their pyramids 
in the cheer, “Go, Fight, win.” 
“Building was more of a 
challenge this year because we 
had only eight people to work 
with,” said Jennifer. 



BASKETBALL CHEERLEADERS — 151 
























Hang tough 


The crowd sit silently 
on the edge of their seats 
with the sweet taste of 
victory close at hand. The 
players begin to line up at 
the foul line. 

With two seconds left 
on the clock and a tied 
score, the foul shooter 
prepares to make the two 
most decisive baskets of 
the night. 

The player takes a 
deep breath, shoots and 
misses. The crowd gasp. 

The player bends over, 
takes another deep breath 
and shoots. 

The ball hits the rim, 
rolls around and falls in. 

The crowd jump to 
their feet with a roar. 

The winning team 
congratulates the player 


with slaps on the back 
and smiles. The team has 
won the game by a single 
point. 

The varsity basketball 
team spent many hours in 
practice, developing their 
skills both as individuals 
and as a team. “When we 
get on the floor, we have 
a job to do,” said Rasheeh 
Jackson. 

“We have a lot of pride 
on the team, and we love 
to play,” said Shawn 
Burchett. 

In developing their 
skills, though, the players 
have been working for 
several years. John Akers, 
who has been playing 
since middle school days, 
said, “I got interested in 
playing in the school 
yard.” 


Chris Foster said, “I 
always enjoyed playing in 
the school yard.” 

Just as playing is 
competitive and brings 
the opportunity to work 
as a team, playing the 
sport also offers the 
players other advantages. 
“We get a chance to 
excel,” said Shawn. 

Others hope to 
continue playing in the 
future. “I hope to go to 
college and play 
basketball and become a 
coach,” said Perry 
Beverly. “I’d like to play 
pro ball,” said Rasheeh 
Jackson. 

“It makes you feel good 
to be part of a team,” said 
Jammon Payne. 

Tracy Speller 
Carrie ODell 



Going for two. Shawn Burchett 
shoots over the E.C. Glass 
opponents. Shawn said, “With 
the team playing together and 
with pride, we can be as good as 
we want to be.” 


152 — VARSITY BOYS’ BASKETBALL 









On the run. Jumping over 
opponents, Kevin Alexander 
drives to the hoop. Kevin said, 
“After missing five games with a 
broken wrist, I was really glad 
to get back. Watching my 
teammates play was hard work.” 

Varsity Boys’ Basketball Team: 

Malcolm Lewis, Mark 
Quesenberry, Jammon Payne, 
Chris Burns, Rasheeh Jackson, 
Chris Foster, John Akers, 

Shawn Burchett, Perry Beverly, 
Kevin Alexander. 



Jump shot. Chris Burns goes 
for another three. Chris said, 
“While the year has not been as 
good as we would have liked, we 
felt that we came together as a 
team toward the end of the 
season.” 




Up and away. Going for the 
points, senior, Perry Beverly, 
leaps into the air as he releases 
the ball. “I remember driving to 
the basket, trying to score," he 
said. John Akers is in the 
background, preparing for the 
next play. 


Boys’ Varsity Basketball 

10-11 

Opponent 

PCHS 

Heritage 

58-62 

Blacksburg 

75-76 

Princeton 

80-70 

E.C. Glass 

74-71 

Heritage 

58-65 

Fort Eustis 

Hampton 

95-56 

Highland Springs 

80-62 

Cave Spring 20T 

62-66 

Patrick Henry 

77-63 

William Byrd 

57-56 

Cave Spring 

58-45 

Princeton 

51-53 

William Byrd 

47-63 

E.C. Glass 

65-49 

Franklin County 

53-64 

Blacksburg 

65-75 

William Fleming 

63-60 

Cave Spring OT 

88-83 

Patrick Henry 

81-58 

William Fleming 

77-80 

Franklin County 

74-77 


VARSITY BOYS’ BASKETBALL 


153 





















On the way 


The boy frantically 
dribbles the ball down the 
court as the cheering 
crowd watches in 
anticipation. 

“Basketball is a highly 
competitive sport that 
requires much agility, 
coordination and 
concentration. 

“Basketball helps me to 
learn responsibility, meet 
new people, and travel,” 
said Freddie Collins. 

“I really enjoy playing 
the game, and I’ve been 
interested in it ever since 
I was about five years 
old,” said Chad Owen. 


The team members 
generally agreed that 
their best games were 
with E.C. Glass and Cave 
Spring. “I believe the best 
game we played was with 
E.C. Glass. We were 
down 22 and came back 
to win by two points,” 
said Montie Brown. 

“To me, Cave Spring 
wasn’t a high scoring 
game, but I think we 
played well all around,” 
said Bryan Hale. 

The thoughts of 
winning brought a variety 
of feelings from the 
players. “I felt excited 


and happy,” said Ryan 
Blackburn. 

“I felt like we 
accomplished something 
from a team concept,” 
said Larry Marshall. 

The players also 
mentioned that playing 
basketball taught them 
qualities they could use in 
other areas of their lives. 
“It teaches you 
discipline,” said Monde. 

“It helps me learn 
responsibility and helps 
me get along with 
others,” said Freddie. 

Teresa Stone 
Sarah James 



Junior Varsity Basketball 
Team. Front Row: Larry 
Marshall, Ryan Blackburn, 
Kenny Eaves, Chris McCoy. 
Back Row: Tommy Cruise, 
Bryan Hale, Chad Owen, 
Monde Brown. 


Flying high. Montie Brown 
shoots for a basket as Bryan 
Hale positions for a possible 
rebound. “Basketball helps me 
to be a part of a team and learn 
how to get along with others,” 
said Bryan. “I’ve been interested 
in basketball since I was about 
seven years old,” said Monde. 








1 



JV Boys’ Basketball 

6-13 

Opponent 

PCHS 

Blacksburg 

56-44 

Princeton 

75-55 

E.C. Glass 

60-57 

Heritge 

69-61 

Radford 

53-67 

Patrick Henry 

65-37 

William Byrd 

58-60 

Cave Spring 

59-67 

Princeton 

49-35 

William Byrd 

63-52 

E.C. Glass 

73-75 

Franklin County 

60-46 

William Fleming 

59-47 

Blacksburg 

54-66 

Cave Spring 

77-60 

Patrick Henry 

59-32 

Radford 

59-55 

William Fleming 

65-72 

Franklin County 

72-68 


JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL — 155 







Shooting stars 


Dribbling and shooting, 
the freshman basketball 
players worked to rack up 
points on the scoreboard. 
The freshman team 
members knew that 
basketball was a sport that 
required practice, skill 
and work. 

Added to those 
requirements, though, 
was also the fan support. 
With fans cheering in the 
stands, the players said 
they felt they could win. 


Aaron Rygas said, “It’s 
good to know our fans 
are supporting us out 
there.” 

This year, though, was 
not the first year for 
basketball for these guys. 
Several mentioned that 
they had begun 
developing their skills 
when they played on 
teams at the middle 
school. Others talked of a 
growing interest even 
before that time. 


Nevertheless, the 
try-outs were the first 
contact these players had 
with high school 
basketball. 

The season also 
brought other memorable 
moments for the players. 
For some, it was the first 
game they played as high 
school students; for 
others it was the game 
where they scored the 
most points. 

However, as they 


worked, the players said 
they could not help but 
think of the future — to 
play on the junior varsity 
and then the varsity team 
and even to think about 
college basketball. 

Clay Dillon summed up 
the feelings when he said, 
“I hope to get better at 
basketball, and the harder 
you try, the better you 
get.” 

Sarah Steffey 
Sandra Weikle 




Leaps and bounds. Brian Redd, 
#22, goes for a basket, while 
Carl Lewis, #5, prepares to back 
hint up. Carl said, “I knew that 
Brian was going to make that 
shot good.” 

Off the tips of his toes. Brian 
Redd, #22, goes for a foul shot. 
The cheerleaders are cheering 
him on. Brian said, “I was 
nervous, hoping the shot would 
fall.” 



T ___ ___ J 


156 


FRESHMAN BOYS' BASKETBALL 






















Jason Speller 



I’ve got it. Brian Redd, #22, 
goes for the rebound while his 
opponent scrambles for the ball. 
Brian said, “It was exciting and 
1 wanted to get the rebound.” 




Freshman Boys’ Basketball 
Team: Front Row: A.J. Stancil, 
Carl Lewis, Andy Hall, Leon 
Crane, Aaron Rygas. Back Row: 
“R” Ratcliffe, Clay Dillon, 

Wayne Puckett, Benji Linkous, 
Brian Redd. 

Leaping for the stars. A.J. 
Stancil, #21, shoots while an 
opponent from Northside tries 
to block the shot. “I love to 
make jump shots,” said A.J> 


Freshman Boy 

s’ 

Basketball 


2-10 


Opponent 

PCHS 

Northside 

39-23 

Cave Spring 

48-25 

Patrick Henry 

47-34 

Hidden Valley 

47-28 

Northside 

57-36 

Franklin County 

60-35 

Cave Spring 

60-30 

William Fleming 

72-57 

Hidden Valley 

54-35 

Patrick Henry 

44-45 

William Fleming 

49-50 

Franklin County 

40-26 


FRESHMEN BOYS’ BASKETBALL — 157 






















We’ve got spirit. Laura Tolbert 
and Carrie Bryson cheer as the 
Cougars attempt to score. Laura 
said, “Cheerleading is fun. 

We’re like one big, happy family 
— the Cougar bunch!” 

Rock steady. Rhonda Johnson, 
Jill Underwood, April 
Alexander, T.J. Lytton, Laura 
Tolbert, Laura Bishop, Jessica 
Piediscalzo, Carrie Bryson and 
Timi Morgan form a pyramid 
while Susan Rudisill does a back 
tuck. Susan, who has been able 
to do a back tuck since sixth 
grade, said, “Doing a back tuck 
takes lots of coordination.” 




158 — FRESHMAN CHEERLEADERS 

















1 



With spirit 


Cheerleading is not 
merely leading cheers; it 
is also dedication and 
work. Supporting the 
football and basketball 
teams was only part of 
the job of the freshman 
cheerleaders. Making 
banners for the school 
walls and cheering at the 
games were part of the 
effort of these girls to 
promote school spirit. 

The hours of practice 
came to a highlight, 
though, when the 
cheerleaders stepped onto 
the gym floor during the 


C-O-U-G-A-R-S. Timi Morgan 
shows her spirit at a home 
game. Timi, the captain, said, 
“Cheerleading has helped me to 
try my hardest this year.” 


first pep rally. It was 
their first performance in 
front of the entire school. 

Laura Tolbert said, 
“Representing the 
freshmen at pep rallies is 
one of the best feelings I 
think you can get because 
when you look up at the 
freshman class and see all 
the cheering crowd and 
happy faces, you realize 
that you’re a big part of 
it; and it makes you very 
proud.” 

The freshman 
cheerleading squad 
consisted of 10 girls. 
Working together, they 
also became close friends. 
April Alexander said, 

“My favorite part of 
cheerleading is learning 
new cheers and becoming 


closer to the others.” 

Other girls said they 
joined the squad because 
they wanted to be 
cheerleaders when they 
were younger, Timi 
Morgan said, 
“Cheerleading fills in for 
all my spare time, and it 
feels great to get in front 
of my school to support 
it.” 

For Rhonda Johnston 
the most memorable part 
of the cheerleading 
season was the first pep 
rally. “I had never seen 
so many spirited people,” 
she said. 

Sarah Steffey 




Go, Cougars, Jill Underwood, 
Laura Bishop, Laura Tolbert, 
T.J. Lytton, Timi Morgan and 
Jessica Piediscalzo finish a cheer 
while showing their 
encouragement for the team. 
T.J. said, “It's a great feeling to 
be part of all that spirit." 





FRESHMAN CHEERLEADERS — 159 






















On top of it. Ronnie Hamblin 
fights to stay on top of his 
opponent as time is running 
out. In his four years of 
wrestling, Ronnie was a district 
champion three times. His 
senior year brought him the 
honor of being named one of 
the captains. 


Smile of victory. Dustin Lyons 
smiles after claiming the 
individual championship in the 
171-pound weight class at the 
district tournament in Franklin 
County. Dustin was one of seven 
Cougar wrestlers to advance to 
regional competition. 





















Mark Barnes Mark Barnes 





( 



Win by pin 


The whistle sounds as 
the referee’s hand crashes 
to the mat, representing 
another pin and six 
points for the team. 

This was a familiar 
sight and sound for the 
varsity wrestling team this 
year. The grapplers 
began their season with 
six straight victories, 
winning by substantial 
figures. 

Indeed, they did not 
lose their first match until 
the Northside quad 
tournament where their 
record fell to seven wins 
and two losses. Shawn 
Taylor said, “The team 
started out great. We lost 
a few wrestlers early, but 
we were still extremely 
competitive.” 


The team suffered a 
few early season injuries 
and problems that hurt 
their overall team score. 
Ricky Hamblin, 
103-pounder, sustained a 
knee injury that put him 
out for the rest of the 
season. 

Then, before the 
district matches began, 
three wrestlers did not 
certify at their specific 
weights, leaving three 
forfeits at the beginning 
of each match. 

However, that did not 
put a damper on the 
wrestlers’ individual 
records. Dustin Lyons 
said, “Despite having 
three forfeits, our 
individual wrestlers had 
excellent records and did 


well in the districts. We 
just wrestled to show our 
Cougar pride.” 

The team traveled to 
Grundy, VA, where they 
competed in the Agie 
Skeens Memorial 
Tournament. Seven 
wrestlers placed in this 
tournament, the most 
since Mr. Tommy Hale 
started coaching. 

Coach Hale said, “I 
think we were very 
competitive even though 
we were young in our 
lower weight classes.” 

The most exciting 
match of the season was 
against William Fleming, 
the first district match, 
where the Cougars found 
themselves down by 30 
points halfway through 


the match. But the team 
pulled out wins from the 
145-pound weight class to 
the unlimited, giving the 
team a victory despite 
three forfeits. 

The team proved 
competitive with two 
freshmen, one 
sophomore, one junior 
and six seniors starting. 

Ronnie Hamblin said, 

“I attribute our success to 
those who stayed out for 
wrestling and kept on. 

We had a lot of people 
quit because the practices 
were strenuous. But those 
who stuck it out noticed 
that it was worth it 
because we did slaughter 
many teams.” 

Mark Barnes 






Let’s shake on it. Mark Lawson 
shakes hands with an opponent 
before the match at districts. 
One of the team captains, Mark 
finished in second place in the 
heavyweight class, earning him 
the chance to advance to 
regionals. 


Determination. Curtis Rollins 
goes for a pin against his 
opponent in the district 
tournament. Curtis captured 
first place in the 160-pound 
weight class. 


Varsity Wrestling 

9-5 

Opponent 

PCHS 

James River 

26-41 

Salem 

19-58 

Covington 

15-54 

Laurel Park 

28-59 

Northside 

35-23 

Bassett 

39-31 

E.C. Glass 

29-35 

Charlottesville 

24-52 

William Fleming 

30-42 

Coeburn 

30-44 

Carroll County 

59-13 

Lebanon 

21-66 

Patrick Henry 

32-29 

Cave Spring 

50-24 


VARSITY WRESTLING — 161 



















Young and old 


A new team was 
created this year, 
consisting of the new 
arrivals, the freshmen, 
and the one-year 
experienced sophomores. 
These combined to form 
the Cougar junior varsity 
wrestling team. 

This year in the 
Roanoke Valley District, 
the teams combined ninth 
and tenth graders to 
produce a team that was 
well-balanced yet able to 

Over you go! Chris Heidt 
executes a fireman’s carry as he 
throws his wrestling partner, 
David Fore, over his shoulder 
and onto the mat. Chris warmed 
up before his match by working 
his wrestling moves. 


travel with the varsity. 

The coach, Mr. Tommy 
Hale, said, “We decided 
basically to do this to save 
expenses when traveling. 
Now both teams can go 
together. But doing this 
also produces a good 
team for the future.” 

Even though the 
Cougars lacked wrestlers 
to fill this team, the 
experience allowed those 
few who participated the 
needed knowledge before 
moving up to varsity. 


Chris Heidt said, “It 
has helped me to slim 
down and become better 
not only in wrestling but 
also for baseball. A man 
once told me that it took 
one year to learn the 
moves, one year to 
become well-conditioned, 
and another to be fully 
experienced. So by my 
first year in varsity, I 
should do well.” 

The junior varsity 
wrestlers held their 
matches right before the 


varsity matches, creating 
a full night of wrestling. 
The junior varsity 
wrestlers also held their 
practices with the varsity 
wrestlers. 

David Fore said, “This 
gave us a chance to learn 
from the veteran 
wrestlers. Personally, it 
made me quicker, more 
motivated, and 
knowledgeable. It also 
helped me mature.” 

Mark Barnes 


162— JV WRESTLING 




Jason Speller 



Working a pinning 
combination. David Fore puts 
Chris Heidt in a near cradle 
before a match as a way to 
warm up. David said, “Working 
with the other varsity wrestlers 
has really helped me improve 
for my years to come.” 



JV WRESTLING — 163 













Motivation drives students to 
achieve the desire of 



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165 










ZTit/t/tt/ty .'/?attr , (/<■// 

DECA 10,11,12; FBLA 10,11,12; SADD 10; VICA 10,1',12, 

Z/ra/tl <S<Aourc/ _ ((//t/M' II 
C/ar/es f/f o/ai „ (/et\s 

HOSA 11,12; Chorus 9,10. 

( 3ac/ue //ec ^ (/an~ 

Football 9,10; FCA 9,10; F1CA 11,12; Who's Who. 


t i/uwsto/i . (fane . xfers 
^ (tttty ( < y/ea/tette . (//xrtto 

Drama 9,10; FCA 12; Forensics 11; SCA 11,12; Science Club 
12; MACC 10; Chorus 9.10,11,12; Class Secretary 11; Who's 
Who; All-Regional Chorus 9.10,11,12; Homecoming Court 

&bnaa - (fane - (//>ai 

FHA 10,11,12. 

Q)amc/-/<’(' - (//at, ( ( /t\ 

Basketball 9; DECA 1 1,12; VICA 11,12; Skatmg/Freestyle 

9,10.11. 


„ (Jttrttr (Soette ., (//at 

Track 9,10,11,12; Cross Country 10; Black History Club 
9,10,12; FBLA 10,11,12; All-Regional Crosscountry 10; 

\\ h<>’s Wh<' 12. 

c /trso/t '((tZ/tottt ^ (//ay 

Drama 10,11; Forensics 9,10,11,12; Literary Magazine 11. 
Editoi 12. Pep Club 12; SCA 10,12; Science Club 10,11,12; 

MACC 11,12; Band 12; Chorus 9,10,1 I . < lass 
Vice-President 12; Who's Who; Boys’ State; Music Hall of 

Fame. 

t Hc/t/ia/itc - (///tc ^ (//aj 

Track 9; Cheerleading 9,10,11, .C'aptain 12; FCA 9,10,12; 
Forensics 9; NHS 11, Vice-President 12; Science Club 12; 
MACC Captain 11,12; Who's Who 10,11,12; Foreign 
Language Honor Society 1 1; Governor’s School. 

l/lre/t/ l/it/ftt/ . (//• 

Football 9.10; VC A 10,11. 


„ (ftt /tZ/c -/aty/t . (//tza * 

Drama 12; FBLA 10; Forensics 12; Pep Club 12; 

Appalachian Studies 11,12. 

((nys/a/ .(tytt/t . (ttt/a *£OZf 

FHA 11,12; Junior Civitan 10,11,12; Who’s Who. 

^/o/t/t (/tax/<>/>/a' , (/tt/avwt 

FBLA 9,10,11,12; Appalachian Studies 10; OM 9; MACC 9; 

Who’s Who 12. 

r Jtt/M'/tittC ( C /tt , (ttt/t'.SOtt 

Drama 11,12; FBLA 12; Pep Club 12; SCA 12; Band 9; 

Chorus 9; Who’s Who. 








& o. 




still in the making 


Choices, choices, and more 
choices — the senior class 
officers led the way through 
the chaos to bring together 
another year for the class of 
1991. 

This was the last year for 
them to serve. The class 
officers were elected in the 
spring of their junior year. 

The leaders were Scotty 
McNeil, president; Jason Alley, 


vice-president; Pam Dalton, 
secretary; and Rita Cox, 
treasurer. 

Each of these officers’jobs 
was distinctively different, but 
along with the effort came 
their satisfaction of knowing 
they had collectively worked to 
assist their classmates. 

As president, Scotty listened 
to the concerns of the class, 
headed the Senior Steering 


Committee and led the 
planning for homecoming 
events and senior socials. 

Jason’s main job as 
vice-president was to assist 
Scotty and fill in for him in his 
absence. 

As secretary, Pam had the 
major duty of recording the 
events for the class and 
directing communication to the 
class members. 


Rita’s job as treasurer was to 
keep accurate records of the 
finances. 

Together, these officers with 
the help of their classmates 
have worked to make this year 
an especially memorable one 
for all. 

Bobbie Jean Grubt 


166 — SENIORS 
























{/)aua ’(ihzz/te . (/iareu>& 

VICA 12. 

'z/tzzz/ (//uooocZ . (/'.morviter- 



Soccer 10,11,12; All-Regional Wrestling Champ 9; Track 9; 
Football 9; Band 9,10,11,12. 


jUaro/'/t ./ce _ Oyw/cI 

Track Manager 9,10; Football Manager 9,10,11; Black 
History Club 9,10,11,12; DECA 10,11; Chorus 9,10. 

K’cm/z^ ( /ar// „ (zvia/c/ 

Track 9,10,11,12; Cross Country 10; FCA 9,10,12; 1CF9.10; 
Pep Club 12; SADD 10,11; SCA 9; Band 10,11.12; Chorus 
9,10,11,12; Who’s Who 11,12; Who’s Who in Music 12; Flag 
Corps 11,12; All-Regional Choir 9,12; All-Regional Band 12. 

<>(///a/ Goria/i „ 1 ItAm&afi 

Cross Country 10,11,12; Science Club 12; Chorus 10,11,12; 
Who’s Who. 


t ma/TOYi ^zj/te/Yc . 

FBLA 11.12; Pep Club 9,10; Who’s Who 11,12. 

. (z/z/e/zz { J)(tu>// GAazzz/zYz/zjre 

DECA 10,11,12. 


{/Izzziz/zz// ( .A. tAa/os, ( /r. 


. (Jar/; _ {zti/zoztzy Q/oame& 

Soccer 10,11,12, MVP 11, Captain 12; Wrestling 9,11,12; 
Cards/Comics 9; FFA 9; Junior Civitan 9, Vice-President 10, 
Lt. Governor 11; NHS 11,12; SADD 11,12; Science Club 11; 
Yearbook 10,11, Editor 12; Boys’ State; Graduation Marshal, 
Foreign Language Honor Society 11. 

GZtn-stoft/cr t (//•// l . Ac// 

FBLA 12; VICA 12. 

G/uir/e& G/zzzzzY QoezuzeU 

FBLA 12; Science Club 12; Band 9,10.11,12. 



Bringing it all together — the senior 
class officers: Pam Dalton, Jason Alley, 
Scotty McNeil, Rita Cox. Scotty McNeil 
said the best part of being an officer 
was “being able to work with your 
classmates on a common goal and 
being successful and well liked.” 


167 































“Have you heard what our 
senior T-shirt is going to look 
like?” 

“No, what?” 

“Well, I’m really not at 
liberty to discuss it with you, 
but you can guess.” 

“The Senior Steering 
Committee decides on issues 
that best represent our class. 
Since we used sheets for 
homecoming decorations, we 


\Jh: 


eemn 


'f 


// 


te 


uwtu 


to a better year 


gave the money we saved to 
charity. We hope to benefit the 
community as well as our 
class,” said Rhonda Roop. 

Besides deciding the design 
for senior shirts and 
homecoming decorations, the 
committee also planned senior 
socials and voted on what 
seniors were to wear to the 
pep rallies, among other 
various duties. 


Alison Spain felt that her 
number one obligation to the 
SSC was to get information out 
to the students about 
upcoming senior issues and 
activities. 

When asked what they 
enjoyed most about belonging 
to this group, Rita Cox said, “I 
like taking part in deciding 
plans for the year”; Pam 
Dalton said, “I like the fact 


that I am able to voice my 
opinions and vote.” 

Rhonda Roop agreed that 
being on the Senior Steering 
Committee will help her in the 
future. She said, “Being on the 
SSC will give me the 
experience of working with a 
committee and making 
decisions with other people to 
benefit a majority.” 

Shana Taylo- 


( Ao6///i jflmssa Qoerry 

Black History Club 11; Forensics 10; HOSA 11, Treasurer 
12; Pep Club 10,11,12; Appalachian Studies 11,12; Chorus 

10 . 

Q)oay//as ‘/(a////r G&eiter/u, ( /r. 

Cards/Comics 9; V1CA 11. 

( r Ja/nm tAs/vy Goever/p, ( c /r. 
Track 9,10,11,12; Baseball 12; Footbail 9,10.11,12; 
Basketball 9,10,11, Captain 12; Black History Club 
9,10,11,12; Cards/Comics 10,11,12; Pep Club 12. 


iAa/y Goto/ ( .A>/qy.s 

DECA 11; Drama 9; FCA 10; FFA 10; HOSA 9,10,11, 
Captain 12; Who's Who; Beauty Pageant 12. 

QSet/ . Ifarte (A/eom& 
V1CA 12 . 

S/ume (A/eams 

Soccer 12; Track 9; Black History Club 9,10; Cards/Comics 
9; FBLA 10,11; FCA 9,10; ICF 9; SADD 9,10; Science Club 
11.12; V1CA 9; Band 9; Skating/Freestyle 9. 


tAammy jdarte (A/eam& 

DECA 9; FBLA 10,11; V1CA 11,12. 

dtasu/u Ay/w Qoo/t 
< C / ( y/ /r 9 '{9 //y/ ( -A>OUh/(7/ 

Track 9; VICA 11. 


. \ / ata/ie Gay/e OSow/ziy 
ason . i/it/ofu/ {iSoa>///a// 

AIASA 12; NAHS 11,12; FBLA 10; FCA 10; FFA 9,10; ICF 
10; VICA 10; Newspaper 11; Skating/Freestyle 11; Who’s 

Who. 

' J/uisinon Aauuj (Aowman, 

DECA 10, Secretary 11,12; FBLA 9; FFA 10,11,12; Who’s 

Who 11,12. 



168 — SENIORS 





















Senior Steering Committee: Front 
Row: Alison Rollins, Alison Spain, 
Scarlett Williams, Diron Lane, Karla 
Poole, Kim Caldwell. Second Row: 
Amy Farmer, Kara Hall, Angel Warf, 
Rhonda Roop, Pam Dalton. Back 
Row: Rita Cox, Erika Stoots, Jenny 
Farmer, Steve Warren, Bryant Boyd, 
Scotty McNeil, Jason Alley, Ken 
Tabor, Chris White. 



OSr^anA feee 06aac/ 

■Aetjaur ■ Ztrt/e QAurto/i 0/6ot/(/ 

FBLA 11. 

jlfe/sssa ( ./ia/Jt 06 ra//v/ier 
A)atm/ '// at/e OSrastsca/tte 


Ooa/vy ‘./uc/art/ Oftrasi&osi 

Who’s Who 11,12. 

fefetstc/ /Zee 06 ratto/i 
.. {/cut '/feast OS/wa/t 

Track 9,10.11,12 Black History Club 10,12; SADD 12; Band 
9; Chorus 10,11; Who’s Who i0,1 1. 

. (fe/o/tAi> Game// 06svtast 

Wrestling 9,10,11,12; Football 9,10,11,12. 


Ct/rtsta/Zfezaeme 06eatast 

Black History Club 12; HERO 11.12; Chorus 9,10,11 

///an/cefe 0Z)ame/Ze Odraat/t 

FBLA 10; HERO 11,12; Chorus 10. 

0//at//erfe fefesw OSroatst 

DECA 12; FBLA 11,12; NHS 11,12; SADD 12; Band 
9,10,11,12; Graduation Marshal; Who’s Who 10,11; 
All-Regional Band 9. 

jl/ic/ae/ OTot/f/ OSswa/t 

Track 10; Cross Country 10,11; Football 9. 


0/jaaie/\ fcott O/Sraasit 



Wrestling 9,10; Track 9,10; Cross Country 9,10; Football 
9,10; FHA 9,10; SADD 9,10,11. 

Curtis OZa/re/t QSucA/asic/ 

FFA 9,10,11; VICA 11,12. 

t y/taiosi 0/)oua/a& Oduec/ett 

Basketball 9,10,11, Captain 12; FBLA 12; FCA 12; Band 
9,10; Who’s Who 11,12; Pep Club 12. 


SENIORS — 169 




















CZara/ C remtce Qoterto/z. 

FBLA 10; HOSA 9,10,11.12; Chorus 9,10,12; All-Regional 

Chorus 9,10. 


c fozZa ‘Kaz/z/c Qourto/z 

FFA 9,10,11,12. 



DECA 11,12; HOSA 10; Junior Civitan 9; VICA 11, 
Secretary 12; Chorus 9; Beauty Pageant 12; Senior Steering 

Committee. 

f fo/uz fee GaZZaatay 

Baseball 9; Wrestling 9,10; Track 9,10,11; Cross Country 
10; Football 9; Basketball 9,10; FFA 9; SADD 10; 

Skating/Freestyle 9,10. 


. xcZa/n c f/osc/z/z G’arr 

FFA 9,10.11,12; VICA 11,12. 

. / (z/zz/zzzz „ Zsi/zette GastZe 

Drama 9; Pep Club 12; Appalachian Studies 9; VICA 11,12; 

Yearbook 10,11. 

. fJarZ Qjazz/ze GZectZ 
QZaotcZ GSrta/z G/zzr/zzZZcr 

Cards/Comics 9; Drama 11; VICA 11,12. 


GZiz'z.sfo/>/zer Gasort G/zerty 

Soccer 12; Tennis 12; Golf 9,10; Cross Country 9,10; DECA 
11,12; SADD 11; Science Club 9; VICA 10,11,12; 

Skating/Freestyle 11; Who’s Who. 

o ric ^ (ZZzz/z CZ/zrts/ey 
„ (zzz/zZzz . t/zcZzcZZe CZ/ar/t 

FBLA Reporter 12; FHA Treasurer 9; Junior Civitan 12; 
NHS 12; MACC 9,12; Band 9; Yearbook 12; Spanish Club 
9; Governor’s School; Graduation Marshal; All-American 
Scholar 11; Keyettes 10,11; Majorette 11. 

fas/zcs GZGc/zzZzzZZ CZZzz/z 

Drama 11; NHS 12; Pep Club 12; Science Club, President 
11,12; MACC 10,11, Captain 12; Chorus 9; Who’s Who 
11,12; All-Regional Chorus 9; Graduation Marshal; Boys’ 

ZTadtZ . (ZzZrzye G/zyfott 

FBLA 11,12; Drama 9; VICA 9; Chorus 9,10. 

Z/ma Qjenise G Zano/tx 

DECA 11,12; Drama 9; VICA 9; Chorus 9,10. 

Ga/vy Z/e/zc C>Zez)z/u/ez' II 

Wrestling 9; Football 9; Chess Tournament 9,10,11,12; 
Cards/Comics President 9,10,11,12; Who’s Who 10,11,12. 

Q&ra/icZu lZ)azo/z GoZzZ 

Appalachian Studies 11; FCA 10; HERO 11,12. 



<fhZ)z<[ time oft/ 

to learn something different 


“So what are you, doing this 
summer?” asked a student on 
the last day of school. “Well, 
after a few weeks of lying in 
the sun, I’m going to 
Governor’s School.” School in 
the summer? 

To many of us, school in the 
summer seems out of the 
ordinary, but for some 
students it was a fun and 
interesting experience that 


they would always remember. 

A total of eight students 
attended Governor’s School 
last year. Stephanie Alley and 
Scarlett Williams attended the 
Governor’s School for the 
Humanities, University of 
Richmond; Eva Machelor 
attended the NASA/VIMS 
Governor’s School for Marine 
Science at the College of 
William and Mary. 


Attending the Summer 
Magnet School for Math and 
Science in Clinch Valley were 
Angela Clark and Elizabeth 
Knarr. Hunter Eley, Christina 
Hurd, and Aaron Smith 
attended the Governor’s 
Academy for Foreign 
Language. 

“I really enjoyed going to 
the Magnet School since I got 
to meet many new people, and 
it helped me decide the career 


of my future,” said Angela 
Clark. 

When asked how the 
experience would benefit her, 
Stephanie Alley said, “The 
ideas which I was exposed to 
have given me a broader 
outlook on life. I have become 
more open-minded and 
accepting of the various ideas 
of others.” 

Becca Woolley 


170 — SENIORS 













































G)c////m Ga/ne/'o/i Go/hc 

Skating/Freestyle 9; Video Club 11,12. 

{/Iona// {/lay Clo/e 
ooni/j _ G/icia Gon/ier 

Chorus 9,10. 


//a//te,s G/iotaarc/ Goo/ 

Golf 10; Baseball Manager; VICA 11,12; Who's Who. 

ohy/anie Qorezitoa Goo/ 

Volleyball 10.11.12; Track 10; NAHS 10,11, Secretary 12; 
Drama 11,12; FCA 12; SADD 12; Beauty Pageant 11; Who's 
Who 10,11,12. 

< Qorad/ey Goo/ 

Wrestling 10; Football 9,10. 


G&e/uwfu/f o wcso/i Goalsoo 
Z/rra/t G)ua/u' Gowa/i 
G/Gan/or/a G/)aa>/t Go uxm 

DECA 9,10; Pep Club 9. 


. (/to/ Z/y/u/ Go. r 

Volleyball 11; FCA 9,10,11; Junior Civitan 9,10,11,12; Pep 
Club 9,10; SADD 9; SCA 9,10,11. 

Ga/om ( ./lo$coe G/o.z- 
Go/i/vu/ Gee Goa: 

FBLA 12; Chorus 9.10,11,12; Who's Who 10,11,12. 



Ready for the summer? Seniors, 
Angela Clark, Stephanie Alley, 
Elizabeth Knarr, Scarlett Williams and 
Eva Machelor, spent part of their 
summer attending Governor’s School. 
Elizabeth said, “Going to summer 
magnet school will give me 
recommendations for college, and I 
now have a lot more self-discipline.” 


__ 

C/3 


C 

0 


SENIORS — 171 





















$f 


f/iee, 


/< 


of politicking 


“It’s the Boys’ State of 
Virginia that you see . . For 
12 young men, these were the 
words they sang daily at Boys’ 
State held at Liberty University 
in Lynchburg from June 
17-23. 

Boys’ State is a program that 
allows selected rising seniors to 
experience the political aspects 
of government. It is a 


conference that brings 
together 800 juniors from 
around Virginia. 

When they arrived at Liberty 
University, the citizens didn’t 
know what was in store for 
them. The 800 young men 
were divided into 12 cities and 
two political parties. 

The rest of the week 
included speeches, seminars, 


and competitions. And then at 
the end of the week they voted 
for the politicians. 

Dustin Lyons said, “I felt lost 
when I first arrived. But after 
I experienced the first two 
days and learned what was 
going on, I enjoyed it.” 

During the week, the group 
listened to speeches from 
dignitaries, such as Lieutenant 
Governor Don Beyer and 


Governor Doug Wilder. 

Seminars were also part of 
the daily schedule. Kirk 
Jennings said, “These seminars 
seemed to drag on for days. 

All we could do was wait for 
free time to come. Athletics 
was the best time of the day, 
but it all was worth the time 
and effort.” 

Mark Barnes 


2S 


(((////Tc/T// „ (//// Cox 

Basketball 9,10,1I;FBLA 12; FCA 9.10; VICA 10. 

If aria if////// (fax 

Track 9,10; Cross Country 11;FBLA 11; SCA 9,12; Senior 

Steering Committee. 

„ (fa/'/a Q)ia/ie Cox 

FBLA 11,12; Pep Club 12; Appalachian Studies 11,12; 

Who’s Who. 


if//a Qoetsa _ (//// (fax 

Drama 12; FCA 12; Junior Civitan 11, Secretary 12; SCA 
11,12; MACC 12; Band 9,10,11,12; Class Treasurer 11,12; 
Senior Steering Committee; Beauty Pageant 11,12; Drum 
Major 11,12; Foreign Language Honor Society; 

Homecoming/Queen. 

t floor// ^ (wo// (fax 

Soccer 10; Tennis 11,12; Chess Club 9; Cards/Comics 9,10; 
FBLA 12; Junior Civitan 10; Chorus 9,10; Who’s Who. 

(Tamm// .'/? c//oo (fra/vforof 

Who's Who 10,11. 


ineTeec/z f/z/ie ((ro/j/oo 

Volleyball 11,12; FBLA 12; SADD 11,12; Who’s Who. 

. Caro// (fama/ (fre&s 

Cross Country 10; Pep Club 12; SADD 11,12; SCA 9,12; 

Skating/Freestyle 9, President 1 1,12. 

f)ao//T < J.7/a/mo.a Crosse// 

FFA 9,10; SADD 10; Who's Who. 



Drama 9,10,11. President 12; Band 9,10,11,12; International 
Thespian Society Troupe Vice President 11, President 12; 

Honor Thespian 11,12. 

f/o/o ■ 77/orzurs (Cromer 
Oo/u/Ti'S (foe (Crcnoe/er 



172 —SENIORS 




















OJ 

CD 


Delegates to Boys’ State. Front Row: 

Latha Gearheart, Hunter Eley, Mark 
Barnes, Larry Clevinger. Back Row: 
Jason Alley, Scotty McNeil, James 
Clay, Dustin Lyons. 



..(Jury c /a//e (j 'nxoc/cr 

HERO 11,12; HOSA 9,10, Reporter 11,12; SCA 10,11 

G/Aar/es (Sc/uHtn/ (jutAfe 

Baseball 9; Football 9,10,11,12; Basketball 9,10,11; VICA 
12; Who’s Who 10,11; U.S. Achievement Academy; 
Homecoming Court. 

i ./Srtu//ay > lea// Wa/ton 

Wrestling 9,10,11,12; DECA 10; VICA 11,12. 

. (fuAe/A' -/eia/ Wa/ton 


ifir/nc/r > Sue Wa/ton 

Drama 11; Junior Civitan 11,12; SCA 12; MACC 10,11,12; 
Band 9,10,11,12; Class Secretary 12; Senior Steering 
Committee; Who’s Who 10,11; All-Regional Band 10,11; 
Graduation Marshal. 

SI)ere A _ i/Aen W\ GrcAenne 

Soccer 10,11,12; FCA 12; Junior Civitan 12; VICA 10,11,12; 
Band 9. 

QStAAy G’uyene Wauls, //e. 

Wrestling 9,10,11,12; Track 12; Football 9,10,11,12; DECA 
10; FCA 9,10; FFA 9,10,11, Vice-President 12. 

G//rtste -/enure Wean 

HERO 11,12. 

~ (fatt/eue „ Gre/se Wensuy 

Soccer 11,12; Chess Club 9; Cards/Comics 9,10; Band 9,10; 
Skating/Freestyle 9; Who’s Who. 

S/Si/Ay//Aoe Wire, ( c /r. 

Cards/Comics 9,10; DECA 11,12; Drama 9; FBLA 10,11; 

OM 9; Who’s Who 12; Model General Assembly 11,12. 

t Jtaet G/e/aA WteAerson 

Volleyball 10, Captain 11,12; FBLA 9; FCA 9,10; Junior 
Civitan 11; SCA 11; Who’s Who 10; Homecoming Court. 

( ( Jeffrey/ '/fS/A/u/n WoAl/uyer 


r Aurtma /ee Wext/ay 

SADD 9; Chorus 9. 

GAar/es GAlant/to// Woo/eyy III 

FBLA 11; Who’s Who; Latin Club 9; French Club 10. 

G A/ton -/ee Doss 

Wrestling 9,10; Football 9,10; FFA 9,10; VICA 11, Reporter 

12 . 

I . no A at ^Annette Watson 

Basketball 9,10,11, Captain 12; FCA 9,10,11,12; Junior 
Civitan 10,12; Pep Club 9,12; SADD 9,10,12; Who’s Who 

II . 


SENIORS — 173 


































l/y////^> ‘KaZ/er Qdu/iaya/t 111 

Cards/Comics 9,10; DEC A 11; Who’s Who. 

-/lur tfh/nyon Q)u/tca// 

DECA 12; FFA 10,11,12. 

tTl/ia yy/ui Wemca/i 

V1CA 12. 


C ja/Yne/i Q8aAer iZ^u/i/on/ 

Wrestling 9; Track 9,10,11,12; Cross Country 9,10, Captain 
11,12; SCA 12; Chorus 9,10,11,12; Skating/Freestyle 
9,10,11,12; Homecoming Court. 

. Z^/y/ Q)a<v/t bSy/v/ <Sar/iart 

FCA 12; HOSA 9,10.11,12; SCA 12; Who's Who 12. 

ijScfisy i/lc/utc <Sar/art 

Band 9,10,11,12; All-Regional Band 9. 

<Steaen S&csto/i o! ao€& 

Track 9,10,11,12; Football 9,10; Basketball 9,10,11. Black 
History Club 10; DECA 11; FBLA 10; FCA 9,10,12; Fep 

Club 11. 


-/<w/ o/yew <>//(/' 

Track 9,10. 

f/l/z/Urr ylam/o/fi/ S/cy 

Tennis 9,10,11, Captain 12; Chess Tournament 9,10,11,12, 
Chess Club 9,10,11,12; FCA 12; Junior Civitan 12; NHS 12; 

SCA 9,11; OM 9,10; MACC 11,12; Boys’ State; German 
Governor’s School; Foreign Language Honor Society; Who’s 

Who. 

yjouy/a& inicAarc/. ~Fa/mwy 

NAHS 10,11,12. 
( ,/u////><r/y i/xuyc . Tcu/yuyy 


^ Irrny JmcAt/Ze >7cr/Y/ter 


Track 11,12; Cross Country 11; FCA 12; Junior Civitan 
11,12; Literary Magazine 10; SADD 11; SCA 9,10.11,12; 
VICA 11,12; MACC 11,12; Band 9,10,11,12; SCA President 
12; Graduation Marshal; Who’s Who; Who’s Who in Music; 

Beauty Pageant 11; Senior Steering Committee; 

Homecoming/Princess. 


<S(/aar ./ee zTar/ner-, r fr. 

FFA 9,10,11.12; VICA 10,11. 


f r /<7/y//cr y 1 ay/ ■ 7u!/y//c/' 


. (fe/t&sa ^/u'//y ■ Ttuv/zer 

Drama 9,12; FBLA 10; Forensics 9,10.11,12; Junior Civitan 
11,12; Pep Club 12; SADD 12; Band 9,10,11; Who’s Who; 

Beauty Pageant 11. 




en- tor e -ivse-A 



Buy now or buy later 


I want it now! Every senior 
experiences it at one time or 
another, the urge to buy. What 
each person buys varies from 
one person to another. 

Most seniors spent their 
money on things like gas and 
food, but there were a few 
who had money left after these 
necessities. Destry Harding 


spent his money “on my 
girlfriend.” 

“Paying off debts, Kool Aid 
for parties, dates and gas,” said 
Brian Roope when he was 
asked how he spent his money. 

Wendy Arnold spent hers on 
“stamps and envelopes for my 
friends in the Middle East.” 

Latha Gearhart said he spent 
“eleven dollars a week for 
school lunch.” 

After slaving all week to 


bring in that seemingly 
inadequate paycheck, students 
needed a place to relax, to 
spend all of that hard-earned 
money. 

So where did they go? The 
consensus was to go to the 
mall, but Cam Coble said 
McDonald’s. Steve Warren 
said, “I go to Mobile and 
Record Exchange.” Wendy 
Myers spent most of her 
money at school. 


Spending money at school 
could cost, too. Seniors had 
such “necessary” items to buy 
as senior T-shirts, caps and I 
gowns, mugs, and even prom 
dresses and tuxes. 

Whether seniors wanted to 
buy now or buy later, it all 
came down to having enough 
money. 

Toni Ratcliffe 


174 — SENIORS 












































- (/ajrc/a Aa/Z ■ 7sarcs' 

Drama 9,10; I'BLA 10; FCA 9,10; SCA 9,10,11,12; Science 
Club 9; Band 11,12; Flag Corps 11,12; Class Treasurer 10; 
Video Club Treasurer 11, President 12. 

. (/osar . (fane . Aeuse/Z 
. Z/rars/c -/a/o/u'a . Zsz/Za/ 


„ 7<vu///cr < AZia/tc AZ/aZ/s/ 

(/ cl 7 

Tennis 11,12; Gymnastics 9,10; Cheerleading 9,10,1 1,12, 
Captain 9,10,12; Pep Club 9,10; Homecoming Court; Who’s 
Who. 

[/)<>//</// ^/ee . 7 ra Z/Cr 

Junior Civitan 11,12; Chorus 9,10,11,12. 

'ftetoria Zz /U> AZsrrz/er 

DECA 12; Junior Civitan 11; Band 9; Newspaper 10,11; 
Who’s Who 12. 


j fJaU/ew <5 cZusarcZ AZros/ 

< Asr/foss/Ze/i/ieZZ, Ts/ZZcr 

Wrestling 9,10,11,12; Track 9,10,11,12; Football 9,10; Band 
9,10. 

. (AcZicZZe . (fane ■ ZiaiA 

DECA 11,12; FBLA 9. 


f yeruu/er r /au/ AaZZanorc 

HERO 11,12; W'ho's Who 12. 

iAoZaa „ fJ/cZaZZc Asa/Zunore 

Cheerleading 9,10,1 1,12; Baseball Manager 11; Gymnastics 
9,10; FBLA 10; FCA 9,12; Pep Club 9,10,11,12; Who’s Who 
11 . 

ZatAa . (//a/ As car/ear/ 

Track 9,10,11; Football 9,10,11,12; Basketball 9,10; Literary 
Magazine 12; NHS 11,12; Pep Club 11,12; SCA 12; Science 
Club 12; MACC 11,12; Snow Court 9; German Governor’s 
School; Boys’ State; Homecoming/Prince; Foreign Language 
Honor Society 11. 



Forms to complete; fees to pay! 

Senior, Kim Ratcliffe, hands Mr. Bill 
Edmonds, the representative for senior 
supplies, her form for her cap and 
gown. Seniors met in early November 
to receive the information they needed 
for placing their orders. Kim said, 
“Senior supplies are worth the money 
to me because they represent the 
upcoming graduation.” 


SENIORS — 175 
























“Reach out and touch someone.” 

When seniors found they had time on 
their hands, they spent their time with 
friends or working. Troy Honaker 
said, “In my spare time, 1 like to talk 
to friends on the phone.” 




FFA 9,10,11,12; VICA 11,12 
, iMirtM < VOOC/ 


iSrc/tan/fj'/ta/te- S/o/</<■// 

Track 9,10; Football 9,10.11, Captain 12; Ft'.A 9; Pep Club 

11; Who’s Who. 


G/uic/uhcA S/rot/t &ra/cim 

Chess Tournament 12; FBLA 10,11; FCA 12; Literary 
Magazine 9,10; VICA 10,11,12; MACC 10,11,12; Who's 

Who 10,11. 

C c /c/v//j './ie/ecar G/rave/ty 

HOSA 9,10,11.12; Who’s Who. 

' itaca/ ()/ar/e-‘i G//yy 

DECA 11,12; Drama 10; FBLA 10; FFA 9; VICA 12. 


! Ao/6/e ( Jean ■ Gra//> 

DECA 9.10, Reporter 11.12; VICA 10,11; Newspaper 11,12. 

G/erte (Soon G/u//// 

Volleyball 9; Track 9; Cross Country 10,11; Drama 1 L 
FBLA 11; FCA 9.10; FHA 12; Pep Club 9,10; SADI) 10,11; 

Band 9; Chorus 9.10; Newspaper 9,10,11,12. 

o red < G (/)/( // G/laya 

Golf 10,12; Chess Tournament 9,10.11,12; Cards/Comics 

9,10; DECA 11,12. 


G/Ga/G/y G/yyc GGGcyya 
GG&rta/t- '((GsGry G7la// 

Basketball 9,10,12; FCA 12; SADD 12; Chorus 12; Who's 

Who 10,11,12. 

/fa.ion, GGz//m/yc GGGa/G 

Track 9,10.11.12; Cross Country 9,10,11,12: ICF 10; Junior 
Civitan 11; SCA 12; Chorus 9,10,11.12; All-Regional Chorus 
9,10.11,12; Who’s Who 11; Who’s Who in Music 11,12; 

Boys' SLate; Senior Steering Committee. 



176 — SENIORS 
































'Q)o <(// 


a cut beruora 


/icrtae 


senioritis? 


The symptoms were 
ometimes unnoticeable; but 
eteriorating grades, forgotten 
lomework, and a need to 
! iarty were sure signs of the 
disease.” If any of these 
ymptoms sounded familiar, 
hen the student had a healthy 
1 ose of senioritis. 


Although many seniors knew 
nothing of this disease, most 
knew the exact time they 
acquired the disease. When 
asked when he first realized he 
had the classic symptoms, Joey 
Dice said, “I knew the day 1 
received my final report card 
in my junior year.” 


Todd Viars realized he had 
senioritis on the first day of 
school. 

Once they realized they had 
senioritis, many felt like 
staying home and sleeping 
through their senior year. 
Others wanted either to do 
absolutely nothing or party. 


These methods were only 
two of the ways students saw to 
control senioritis. When asked 
if there were a cure, most 
seniors said, “Yes, graduation.” 

Michelle Parnell 



dfOara fc/iee/i fla// 

CV 

Junior Civitan 12; Literary Magazine 9; VICA 11,12; Band 
9,10; Who’s Who 10,1 1; Senior Steering Committee. 

dtac/c Q)ume f/(a// 

Volleyball 9; Cards/Comics 11; DECA 10.11,12; FCA 
9,10,12; Pep Club 9,10,11,12; Beauty Pageant 11,12. 

. fracie fa/m (fla// 

VICA 1 1 . 12 . 

( c fa/e _ (//// ff(a//ctt 


l .Ro/u/// Sfamb/m II 

Baseball 9,10,11, Captain 12; Wrestling 9,10,11, Captain 12; 
Football 9.10,11,12; FBLA 11,12; FCA 10,12; 
Homecoming/Duke. 

Qbaniel Hita/cic ffami/ton, f/r. 

VICA 11,12. 

QSea/a/ ff/'tt/if/'/i (/(/uicocA 
{Rebecca ^yasi (/(orfu/ 

FHA 9,10; VICA 11,12. 


(Rema We&trq (/(arfa/q 

Baseball 9,10; Wrestling 9; Football 9,10.11,12; FBLA 11,12 
FCA 9,10,12; VICA 9,10; Chorus 9; Senior Steering 
Committee; Homecoming Court. 

^ Cs/i/ca fAaaatz ftar/eu' 

NAHS 11,12; OM 10; Who's Who 10. 



( (/o.u^/ t Icott (fix/CrtS 

FFA 9,10; SADD 9,10,11,12; VICA 11,12. 


Qde/fre/a f)aa>a (RasA 
ffuia j (forte ffa/j/tes 

Drama 9,10,11,12; Forensics 10; Band 9,10,11,12; Beauty 
Pageant 11; Drum Major 12. 

( c /asoa ’(cat/ (fAq/ynai 

Cards/Comics 9,10; FBLA 11,12; VICA 10,11,12; 
Skating/Freestyle 9. 

c J cry to ^ (farce// (fteocAricAs 

Golf 10; Track 9,10,11,12; Football 9,10,11,12; FBLA 
9,10,11; FCA 9,10; ICF 10; SADD 10; Who’s Who; 
Homecoming Court. 


SENIORS — 177 

























( c fonat/uz// ZZZ/// t nm/o'/ 

Track 9,10,11,12; Football 9,10,11, Captain 12; FCA 9,10; 

VIC A 9,10,11,12. 

t r /mAua _ Z/u/rao ZZtc/irz/ 

Soccer 9,10.11,12; Wrestling 9,10; FFA 9; Junior Civitan 

11,12; SADD 12. 

j (fe//&&a ~ (//// f/Oc/s 

Track 12; Black History Club 9,10, Secretary 1 1, 
Vice-President 12; Pep Club 12; SADI) 11; Chorus 
9,10,11,12; Who's Who. 

, ~7~aftu/uy <SZa///e ZZt/cA& 

HERO 11,12. 


c ZZzZZ/y ZZ(/ZZ 

HOSA 10,11,12; Junior Civitan 11; Pep Club 10,11; SADD 
9; Chorus 9; Who’s Who. 

(S/yc Ch (/mom/ Z/Zo/xicZt 

Baseball 9; FCA 10; FFA 9; V1CA 12. 

( ZZZ/zaZtet/t ZnaZacA 

Drama 12; FBLA 10.11,12; SCA 11.12. 

ZTere&a . {//// ZfioZco/nA 

Who’s Who. 


(J/are/tfc Zfee ZZZaZston 
tZ~roy ye? ./(o/nr/u'r 

Who’s Who. 

„ Z/uycZa Q)e/u&e f/Zo/>A//i& 

FBLA 9, Historian 10, Parliamentarian 11, Vice-President 
12; VICA 11,12; Who’s Who. 

Z&rac/Zay < !co// Z/(o/>Z///s 

Tennis 10,11; Golf 10,11,12; FCA 9,10; FHA 10; SADD 10; 

VICA 11,12. 


We/&sa yeiy/i !Z(o/io/t 

FBLA 9,10; FCA 9,10; FFA 9,10; SADD 9,10; Science Club 
9,10,11; VICA 9,10,11; Who's Who. 

Z<r// Z 7 ~. Znorto// 

f/ Cy 

Baseball 9,10; Track 9,10,11,12; Footbaii 9,10,11; Chorus 

9,10,11. 

Z77//a . (Z/xZhZZc ZZ(o/iof/ 

Drama 9; FHA 9; HERO 11,12; SCA 12; Chorus 9,10,11,12. 

(>Z/rz'.s/o/>Zwr c ’//ye/u’ ZnZuZ&o// 

Football 9; VICA 10; Skating/Freestyle 9,10,11. 



SBKBBBS/t 


1 

HE|| V \ 


ijanr 71 


m 







Friends forever. Seniors, Deanna 
Roope and Pam Smythers discuss 
recent happenings. “A friend is 
someone who is there for you, trusting 
and caring,” said Pam. 



178 


SENIORS 

































FFA 10,11; Appalachian Studies 9; VICA 11,12. 



(j/eistoft/ier GZtar/cx Zf(///Z 

Crosscountry 10; NAHS 11, President 12; DECA 10,11,12; 
FBLA 10,11; Literary Magazine 9; SCA 10; Science Club 
10 , 12 . 


Gone// G)ia//i’ GZZurst 
.. (/a// faso// Z/G/Z/a// 

c7 C/ 

DECA 12. 

c ( fere/ru/ GHa/uZoZ&Zi ■ ZuycZ 




{ J)(roa/ fee Zfsom 
GaroZi/ie .. Svelte ■ c /a///os 

DECA 12; Chorus 9,10,11,12; Beauty Pageant. 

ffean/iie fZZearZ farreZZx 

HERO 11,12. 



Soccer 10,11,12; Cross Country 9,10; Who’s Who; Boys’ 
State; Scholastic All-American. 

. {///.son GZZri&Zma ffones 

VICA 11,12; Who’s Who 11. 

GZuf Q0oay/a& ffeme# 

FFA 9,10; VICA 11,12; Homecoming/King. 


f</t<f-Zutt<’ />//</(//<'., 


remain friends 


As graduation nears, seniors’ 
oughts turn to “What am I 
»ing to do after I graduate?” 
ong with these thoughts 
mes the disappointment of 
ends moving on and 
lationships slowly dissolving. 
Although most people hate 
lose a good friend, most 
lint to see those long-time 


buddies turn into something 
successful. 

“Hopefully, my friends will 
further their education and 
make something out of 
themselves by going on to 
college,” said Melissa Hicks. 
Melissa also said that she wants 
to see herself and her friends 
reach their goals for life. 


Angela Clark said, “Most 
likely my friends and I will all 
go to college, get married and 
have kids; but whatever 
happens, we will always keep 
in touch.” 

Chrissy Stillwell said, “I 
don’t think my friendships will 
change; well, maybe one or 
two will; but for the most part, 


they will stay the same.” 

So after graduation and the 
senior vacations, the class of 
1991 will go their separate 
ways; but they will carry with 
them their memories of lasting 
friendships. 

Bobbie Jean Grubb 


SENIORS — 179 



























Voting before age 18? 


Voting in an election before 
the age of 18? Not in real life, 
but two students did have the 
opportunity to learn the 
fundamentals of voting in an 
election along with other 
activities. The place was Girls’ 
State, and the students were 
Tammy McMillan and Rhonda 
Roop. 

Guest speakers added a 
special flair to the study 
environment. Both Rhonda 


and Tammy said they enjoyed 
the lecture given by George 
Obermyer, an alcohol and 
drug education coordinator. 

Other speakers included 
Governor Doug Wilder and 
Attorney General Mary Sue 
Terry. 

Tammy said, “Both Wilder 
and Terry answered our 
questions directly and did not 
try to evade the issues.” 

The future benefits of Girls’ 


State could be endless. Tammy 
said that it would provide 
“practice for college.” Rhonda 
thought her experience at 
Girls’ State taught her to take 
elections more seriously. 

“I plan on finding out as 
much as I can about each of 
the candidates in an election. I 
also learned that every vote 
counts,” said Rhonda. 

Both had some advice for 
girls interested in Girls’ State. 


Tammy said, “Bring lots of 
dresses, a radio, and a portable 
mattress because the box 
springs in my bed were shot.” 

Rhonda said, “I advise 
future Girls’ Staters to be 
outgoing, make friends, and 
talk to everyone because 
everyone is in the same boat — 
alone.” 

Angela Clark 


GZtrot/uur Gy/t/t ( c fo//cs 

Volleyball 11,12; Track 9,10,11,12; Cross Country 10,12; 
NHS 11; Graduation Marshal 1 1. National Merit Award I 1; 

Foreign Language Honor Society 1 I. 

G)<U//<Z . (/'///O/uZoC Zones 
Chess Club 10; FCA 9; FFA 10; VICA 11,12; Chorus 

9,10,11. 

GZizaoetA . Out ( ( /o/tes 


{ZlttZty Yu/ut f c yones 

VICA 11,12; Chorus 9. 

' ho// Gt/otuv/ r /ottes 

CJ 

FFA 9. 

QSrene/a ZZaiZ GZZas/ 

FHA 9,10,11; HERO 11. 


ZZl/ZZay { . Z\ tt/Zt c ZZet-s/ee 

Track 10,12; Cross Country 10,11; Drama 11; FBLA 
9.10,11; Forensics 9; SADD 12; SCA 12; Chorus 9; Class 

Treasurer 9. 

. Z/ttZrcto gfason GZZtser 

Wrestling 9; VICA 9,10,11,12. 

GZtzaZc/Zt y<utc hZZtta/T 

Tennis 9,10,11, Captain 12; Chess Tournament 9; Drama 
11,12; FBLA 11; FCA 12; Junior Civitan 12; NHS 11,12; 
Pep Club 11,12; SCA 10; Science Club 1 1,12; MACC 11, 
Captain 12; Who’s Who 10,11,12; Foreign Language Honor 
Society 10,11,12; Clinch Valley Governor’s School. 


ZZaoicZ ~ tVan hZZ/ttiZ, g/e. 

FBLA 12; NHS 11,12; Who’s Who; National Academic 

Achievement Award. 

Zone ■0/ryo/vy G/wnZert 
Wiron r ht/ttr/ Ga/tc 

Baseball 9,10; Football 9,10; FBLA 11,12; FCA 9,10,12; 

Science Club 12; Senior Steering Committee. 



180 — SENIORS 



























Reflections. Rhonda Roop and 
Tammy McMillan reflect on their 
memories of Girls’ State. Rhonda’s 
fondest memory includes “all of the 
valuable friends made at Girls’ State. 





f * M i 1 

v .a jdA ' - m 

m * 4k 

,fj 1 JWi 


G/a&idy < 5 /ame ^a/tydier 


ddy/idra dy/i/iette datoso/t 

FBLA Historian 12; Junior Civitan 10; SADD 9; SCA 9; 
Science Club 10; Band 9,10,11,12; Snow Court 9; Who’s 
Who. 


. (fad t {//'// d acthSO " 

Wrestling 11,12; Track 9.10,11,12; Football 9,10,11,12; 
FBLA 12. 



Soccer 10,11,12; Swim Team 11,12; Video Club 11,12; 
VICA 12. 


Q)a/ue/ cv/w/y daisy 

Cross Country 12; APPALK1DS 10, Financial Manager 
11,12; Appalachian Studies 10,11,12; SCA 12; Band 12; 
Model General Assembly 11; Who’s Who 9,10,11; Cougar 
Pride Award 9. 

ddcr/y dCouKirdd^ZHS 

Volleyball 11, Captain 12, RVD All-District Volleyball Team 
12; FCA 12; Pep Club 12; Chorus 9,10; Beauty Pageant; 
Homecoming Court. 

_ (//red '// ’<ry/N_‘ dwda/nooa 
Track 9,10,11; Football 9,10,11; FCA 10,12; FFA 10; VICA 
10 , 11 , 12 . 

. (fa/y o /za/wtA d< m dyy 

Track 9; FBLA 9,10,11,12; FCA 12; Junior Civitan 9,10; 
SADD 10,12; SCA 10,11,12; Science Club 10,11,12; Who’s 
Who; Snow Court 11. 

6/utr/es ddeot// dsst/iom 

Football 9; FFA 9,10,11; Cards/Comics 9; VICA 11,12. 

dtoftfiie d €C d ,l/ dou> f 

VICA 12. 

'(hi or d<u 

Football 10; Class Vice-President 9. 

dj/za/n’// ddc/y 

FBLA 10; FCA 12; HERO 11.12; 1CF 11; Junior Civitan 11, 
President 12; Band 9,10,11,12; Beauty Pageant; SCA 11,12; 
Snow Court/Queen 10; Who’s Who. 


Q)ust//’/ Cmr/xd/ dyons 

Soccer 9,10,11, Captain 12; Wrestling 9,10,11, Captain 12; 
Boys’ State; Who’s Who 10,11,12. 

j(Je/i&sa Qdawft dy^° ft 

Drama 11,12; FBLA 9,10,11.12; FCA 12; Appalachian 
Studies 11; Science (dub 11,12; Who’s Who 11,12. 

- i'/ierry (z /f// - da/ry 

Cheerleading 10,11,12; FBLA 10,11; FCA 12; Pep Club 
9,10,11,12; Band 9. 

(Sort dfrt.s//// ^ (Jac/c/or 

Gymnastics 9; NHS 11,12; Science Club 9,11; OM 9; MACC 
10,11,12; Band 9,10,11,12; Class Vice-President 10,11; Swim 
Team 11,12; NASA/VIMS Governor’s School 11; Clinch 
Valley Governor’s Scholar Program 10; All-Regional Band 
9,10,11,12; Who’s Who; World Affairs Conference 10. 

SENIORS — 181 

























(fu//t/>er/j ,. (//// j flamie/ 

FFA 10; Pep Club 12; V1CA 11,12. 

//fan - Oat ■ (fars/a/Z 

HERO 9; HOSA 11,12; V1CA 11. 

QOa/aeZ <SarZ. (far/m, ( /r. 

. (far/ Q)ura/uZ . (far/a/ 

Cross Country 9; Drama 9,10,11,12; International Thespian 
Society Treasurer 11,12; Literary Magazine 11,12; Band 12. 


f/raca _ Isi/irl/e - (fa//ai 

Gymnastics 9; Track 9.10; FBLA 9; HOSA 9, Treasurer 

10,11,12; Who’s Who. 

(Sc/toarcZ fermat/ie . (fcff/emaZta/t 

Track 10,11; Football 9,10,11,12; Basketball Manager 
9,10,11; Black History Club 9,10; DECA 10,11,12; FBLA 
10,11,12; FCA 9,10,12; FFA 9; Pep Club 12. 

ftcitas/a (furai . (fcG/aua 

Basketball 9,10; Black History Club 9; FBLA 12; FCA 9,10; 

VICA 10; Chorus 10. 

- (fc-Gofi/te// 

DECA 1 10; FBLA 10,11,12; FCA 9; SADD 12. 


, (fa// o V/'att jffcffoart 

DECA 11. 

jifi&ta (Zar/jfott „ (/ ((ay 

Hfe/tc/// OZteaee , (fcGo/y 

Gymnastics 9; FBLA 9; MACC 11; Who's Who 10.11; 

National Merit Scholar; Science Club 11. 

ffmi/er/a L Oaat/t . ffcfOa/ue/ 

Gymnastics 9; Cheerleading 9,10,11; FBLA 9,10,12; Pep 
Club 9,10; SCA 11; Science Club 12; Who’s Who 12; Beauty 
Pageant 11,12; Homecoming Court. 


fo/m/u/ fuxi/i&o/i .. (ff/ee 

VICA 11,12. 

c /o/iat/ian o/yc jffofrac// 

Who’s Who. 

( ffame& (fazze//e . (f \ (fcf/e 
ffcw/u/t// (fa/w . (f \ (f Z/a/t 

NAHS 10.11.12; NHS 11,12; MACC 11; Yearbook 10,11,12; 
Girls’ State; Graduation Marshal; Who’s Who 10,11,12; 
All-American Scholar 11; Foreign Language Honor Society 

10 , 11 . 







craze 


What’s hot? 


From bell bottoms of the 50s 
to the tie-dyes of today — it 
certainly is a task to keep up 
with the ever-changing trends 
of clothing. 

First impressions are often 
taken from the clothing a 
person wears. Destry Harding 
said, “Pants, sweaters and 
penny loafers were the most 
impressive.” 

Amy Albano said, “Designer 
suits were impressive.” 


However, Brian Roope said 
that “understated clothing 
made into a fashion statement” 
impressed him the most. 

Could personality be 
revealed by the clothes one 
wears? Brenda Kast said, “The 
clothes I wear reveal my 
personality as not being wild.” 
“My clothes say that I’m a 
leader, not a follower,” said 
Troy Honaker. 

Some clothes, according to 


students, are more “in style” 
than others. Johnny Cox 
believes the M.C. Hammer 
pants reveal style. 

“Button-up sweaters and 
dressy boots are certainly 
stylish,” said P.J. Townley. 

However, Cam Coble 
believes there is not a 
particular clothing that is “in 
style.” “If it’s your style, it’s in 
style,” said Cam. 

What makes people choose 


the clothes they wear? 
Convenience, practicality and 
comfort are factors for Tim 
Shortt. “How I think clothes 
look on me is an important 
factor for choosing the clothes 
I wear,” said Troy Honaker. 

Whatever the styles are, 
though, one thing is certain; 
whatever is stylish today may 
not be tomorrow. 

Angela Clark 


182 —SENIORS 






































f/Ze/trt/ ifo/c/i j(fct/Zei/ III 

Soccer 10,11, Captain 12; Football 9,10.11,12; Basketball 
9,10; Chess Club 10; Drama 10,11; FCA 12; Science Club 
12; MACC 11,12; Class President 9,10,11,12; Homecoming 
Court; Who’s Who; Senior Steering Committee. 

. (fic/ae/ Ifot/er j (/cl/at/; 

DECA 10; FBLa'iI; FFA 9,11,12; V1CA 10. 

(Zasmsu/ra . Out . (fem/otm 

Black History Club 9,10,11; FCA 11,12; VICA 11,12; 
Chorus 9,10. 


f/ttuuttt/t . (forte . (ftc/ett 

DECA 10,11,12; FBLA 9; Who's Who 11 

Grtf&ia/ . (ftc/e//e , (ft/f 

HERO 11,12; SADD 9,10,11.12; VICA 11,12; Chorus 9,10, 
Reporter 11,12. 

• f/'ttae . (fte/e/e . (ft/c/e// 

FHA 9, President 11; HOSA 10; Pep Club 9; SADD 
10,11,12; Science Club 12; Beauty Pageant 12; Who’s Who 
11 . 


. ffef&so ^ Out . (lo/itaotueru 

Track 9,10,11,12; Black History Club 9,Vo,l 1,12; FBLA 9; 
FHA 12; HOSA 9,10,11,12; SCA 10,12; Band 9,10,11,12; 
Senior Steering Committee; Who’s Who 1 1,12; Who’s Who 
in Music 11. 

r J<a/tt/ra ifue ^ (fo/t/t/outeru 
< Juso/t . \teo/e . (foore 

SADD 9, Reporter 10, Vice-President 11, President 12; 
Science Club 10,11,12; Chorus 9; Who’s Who 11; MCA 
11 , 12 . 


(flarru . (lic/iae /. (fore/eat/ 

Tennis 12; Drama 12; Band 9; Skating/Freestyle 9; Who’s 
Who. 

Onaru/a// 1 icott- ~ (forri& 

FBLA 12; VICA 11; Skating/Freestyle 9. 

. fee/a . 0Zee/t ~ (forris 

Volleyball 11,12; Gymnastics 9,10; Cheerleading 9; FCA 
9,10,11,12; HOSA 10, Vice-President 11,12; Pep Club 11; 
Chorus 9; Who’s Who 10,11. 



SSSSS ... Hot! F rom the outrageous 
to the conservative, Rita Cox, Hunter 
Eley, Steve Warren, Scarlett Williams, 
Sarah Tilson and Jody Burton make 
their own fashion statements. Sarah’s 
LeBaron GT convertible complements 
these statements. Steve said, “Clothing 
can be expressive of one’s personality, 
but 1 wouldn’t depend on it.” 


SENIORS — 183 






























Of course, the bus would be 
late on a day that it is raining. 
His once dry shoes make 
squishing noises with every 
step, and his hair is plastered 
to his head. Finally, he hears 
the roar of an engine and 
catches sight of something 
yellow. 

The driver pulls up, stops in 
front of him, and opens the 
phone booth doors with a 
bang. He reluctantly climbs in 


si A 


((jury 


</f/< 


ernma 


A driving solution 


and searches for an empty and 
hopefully dry seat. 

He sits down with a sigh, 
leans his head back against the 
seat, and wonders how he’ll be 
able to endure another boring 
ride. He is jerked back and 
forth and tossed all about as 
the driver changes gears. 

Half of the ride to school 
consists of stops that literally 
hurl him into the seat in front 
of him. The other half is spent 


on a straight stretch of road 
where he travels at an 
excessive speed of 45mph. 

After smelling vinyl for 
thirty minutes, he eventually 
arrives at his destination. All in 
all, it’s another wonderful start 
to another wonderful day. 

Things change, though, once 
he becomes a senior. He 
strides outside and steps into 
the cockpit of his pressurized 
Ford Escort. He turns the key 


and feels the power of a 
four-cylinder engine ready to 
be mastered. He throws the 
car into first gear and gives it 
some gas. 

Once he turns onto Route 
1 1, he hits the cruise control ai 
a warp speed of 55 mph. He 
follows his flight plan and 
boldly goes where no senior 
has ever gone before. 

Tammy McMillai 




t y/iei/a _ isi/i . fSVottes/imrc/ 

Soccer 12; NAHS 11,12; SADD 9,10; V1CA 11; Chorus 

9,10,11,12. 

r HAea . f/ye 

Games Oc/wa/xZ . Hurray 

Baseball 9,10,11,12; Cards/Comics 9; FCA 10; V1CA 11, 
Vice-President 12; Chorus 9; Who’s Who. 



VICA 11; Skating/Freestyle 9. 



Baseball 9,10,11,12; Basketball 9.10; FBLA 9,10; FCA 
9,10,12; Pep Club 12; VICA 10. 

'Wesu/u Zy/w . (Z/ers 

FBLA 11,12; SADD 9; VICA 9; Chorus 9,10,11,12; Senior 

Steering Committee. 


OesZey Oare/i j\asZi 

Cheerleading 9,10,12; FBLA 11; Pep Club 9,10,11,12. 

<JaZZ// HeZtecca j\ eZmZmy 

Drama 11,12; FBLA 11; NHS 12; MACC 10,11,12; Band 
9,10,11; Who’s Who 11; Freedom’s Foundation 11; 
Scholastic All-American 9,10,11; National Merit Award; 
Graduation Marshal; Foreign Language Honor Society 

11 , 12 . 

G/cu/uhcA gee Ae&ter 

Track 9,10,11,12; Football 9; Basketball 9; FCA 9,10; SADD 

11. 


Zbyi SZZZye . 1 cs/ee 

FFA 9,10,11,12; VICA 12. 

.. (anec ZZZe/it QncZ/cZ 

Gymnastics 9; NAHS 12; Drama 9,10,11,12; FCA 
9,10,11,12; Forensics 9,10; Literary Magazine 11; SADD 
9,10; SCA 9; VICA 11; Band 9; Flag Corps 11. 

HlZZ/ee dar/xM Overman 

Chess Tournament 9,10,11,12; Chess Club 9,10,11,12; SCA 
12; Skating/Freestyle 9; Homecoming Court. 



184 — SENIORS 






























Making an escape. Aaron Cress makes 
a getaway from school. Driving to 
school allowed seniors to go to 
after-school jobs or to stay late for 
extra-curricular activities. Most 
importantly, though, driving to school 
kept them from having to ride “old 
yeller.” 



. (//c/u’//' , r //me i/ar/n:// 

NAHS 10.11,12; SADD 11; Yearbook 12; Who’s Who 11,12. 

Q)ouy/as -i/cv/vy ASutterson , ( 

Track 9,10,11,12; Football 9,10,11,12; Black History Club 
9,10,11,12; DECA 11,12; Drama 11; FBLA 10; FCA 9,10. 

j(Ia/y ZNnrence AScMoft 

Drama 12. 

A/o/rte . (//// ±£caA 

Gymnastics 9; HERO 11,12; Pep Club 11; SADD 12; Who’s 
Who. 


(9/u/tui . Vcn/aa /£eo//e& 

„ (fars/ia Q)aion /Serc/ue 

FBLA 12; Pep Club 10; SADD 10; Chorus 10,11; Who’s 
Who. 

/o/yr _ 0u/£ AA/u///m 

FFA 9; HERO 11,12; Junior Civitan 11,12; Literary 
Magazine 9; Pep Club 10; SADD 10. 

Z/Zar/i //on7/a iCoo/c 

Black History Club 9,10, Vice-President 11, President 12; 
Drama 11,12; FCA 10,1 1; Pep Club 9; SCA 9; Flag Corps 
11; Chorus 9,10,11,12; Class Vice-President 9; Senior 
Steering Committee; All-Regional Choir; Beauty Pageant 12; 
Homecoming/Duchess. 

. 7/r///tw . (fae l// nn 

Track 10; HERO 11,12; Chorus 9. 

My i/toy .l/nofrn/r/yy II 

DECA 12; FBLA 11,12; Who's Who. 

( c ///n/ny -Any Azue&en/o/ry 

APPALKIDS 10,11, Sound Manager 12; Cards/Comics 9; 
Drama 12; Forensics 9; Appalachian Studies 10,11,12; Who’s 
Who. 

!/?o/ai ( /o-sr/Z AC/osonZe/yy 
DECA 11,12; FFA 9,10. 


QDc/oroA Ci'/ery/ Ana/ney 

Drama 12; HERO 11. 

Connie AZysui Zn am&ey 
//•//ora . Inn Ananvsey 

HERO 11.12; ICF9.I0; Chorus 9,10,11; All-Regional 
Chorus. 

. (Iona Cury lAn/nyy 

Track 9; DECA 10,11,12; Band 10,11. 


SENIORS — 185 




























{nona/a yiam&eu 

Chess Club 9; DECA 11; Drama 12; V1CA 9,11,12; Band 
,10,11,12; Basketball Manager 9. 

. (far/ Q)aaaZ ifta/c/0 

DECA 11,12; VICA 12; Band 9. 


iZZc/l/UlZt j f/uZ/azZ ( JLitcZ//c 

Drama 10,11; Who’s Who 12. 



HOSA 11,12. 


iZZ/z/Zx'/Z/y !/?c/t’cat ZftatcZtft& 

FBLA 10, Secretary 11,12; NHS 11,12; Chorus 9; 
Foreign Language Honor Society 11; Graduation 

Marshal. 

[/\o/ai Q)a/t/uy ZZtatcZ/ffe, ( fr. 
tZoza . (fane ZZlatcZz/fe 

NAHS 11,12; Yearbook 11,12; Who's Who 11,12. 

ocuuZra ZZZaa weaves 

DECA 10,11,12. 


c/t/nolZu/ c flawic i/leezZ 

Football 9. 

Unaware/ Q)entoft, ( .Zi caZ// 

FFA 9,10,11; VICA 11,12. 

ZZtusseZZ da/nurZ!/?cosc 

Football 10; SADD 10; VICA 12; Who's Who 11. 

. (lic/ae/ (Z/ar/es i/iuZ/z/nZs 

Wrestling 9; Track 9,10,11,12; Football 9,10,11,12; 
Cards/Comics 9; FBLA 10,11,12; FCA 9,10,12; SADD 10,11; 

Skating/Freestyle 9. 


. (/u/c/a , (fuZuZZc £ Zl/cZcZZe 

Gymnastics 9,10; Cheerleading 9.10.11.12; FBLA 9,10; FCA 
9,10,12; Pep Club 9,10,11.12; SCA 9,10,11; Who’s Who. 

' fyZ/cn/ ZZZe/ut { .Z\ uZZZc 
Z7e/yy c Kat//tc £ZticZcZZe 

VICA 11,12. 

. (feZi.S'Sa ZZZZc/z iZloZ/Z>m,s 

Track 10,12; NAHS 11,12; Drama 9,10; FBLA 12; HOSA 
11; Pep Club 12; Band 9,10,11. 







(l auZaon ciAeacl 

Senior daydreams 


“I wonder how well I did on 
my English test last period. 

Did I pass my quiz in 
government? Wait. Did the 
teacher just ask me something? 
No, she asked the freshman 
sitting in front of me. Oh no! 
We get our report cards today. 
I’ll probably be grounded until 
I’m sixty years old. No more 
driving to school for me. No 
more fun on the weekends 


“Chris? Chris? Come back to 
us, Chris.” 

One of the hazards of being 
a senior was finding oneself 
daydreaming during class. It 
certainly wasn’t intentional, 
though. A senior would be 
sitting in class, minding his 
own business, when the 
daydream would suddenly hit 
him. 


It gave no warning and 
wasn’t detectable until it had 
already run its course. 

No one was safe. Not the 
teacher’s pet, the class clown, 
or the habitual sleeper. 

Where were some of the 
places that a senior was most 
susceptible? Seniors who took a 
computer class were in danger 
of daydreaming because of the 
hypnotic wavelengths emitted 


from their monitors. 

The required government 
classes posed a threat to the 
mental awareness of a senior. 
“My mind usually floated away 
during government,” said Beth 
Fellows. 

These were dangerous areas; 
but it was obvious that seniors 
were susceptible at any time 
and in any place. 

Tammy McMillai 






































(RoZ/Zho Rue (RoZ/ce/sou 

Gymnastics 9; Cards/Comics 11; FBLA 10; FCA 12; FFA 9; 
HOSA 9,10,11,12: Pep Club 9,10,11,12; Appalachian 
Studies 11; SADD 10. 

( fo/iette Re// (R<oZ)i//&on 

FBLA 11,12; FCA 12; Junior Civitan 12; Pep Club 12; 

SADI) 11; Band 9,10,11,12; Flag Corps 10,11,12; Who’s 
Who 11. 

RZa//u/iu (RoZ/i/ison 

Track 9; Drama 11,12; Science Club Secretary 9; Newspaper 
9; Who’s Who 1 1; French Club Treasurer 10. 


ZRmZcZ R/uart .RoZu/.s/w 

Chess Tournament 12; FBLA 9; FFA 9,10,11,12; V1CA 
11,12; Chorus 9,10,11. 

HZ’/ZZ/a/// f/u'/// (RoZ/mson 

VICA 12. 

. (//.sou (Ro/iett/z ZRouta/ne (RoZZu/s 

Soccer 12; Track 9,10,11; Black History Club 9,10,11,12; 
FCA 9,10; 1CF 11; Class Treasurer 12. 


((///•/as OOtlHU/Vie -Ro/Z/AS 
Baseball 10; Wrestling 11; Track 9; Football 9,10,11,12; 
Basketball 9,10; SCA 10; VICA 11. 

(RZo/uZ/z f Rea/zet/e (RooR 

FBLA Reporter 11, President 12; NHS 11,12; SADD 10; 
Band 9,10,11; Senior Steering Committee; Who’s Who 
11,12; Girls’ State; All-Regional Band 10; Foreign Language 
Honor Society 11.12; Graduation Marshal. 

iR/r/zu Q/uane (Roo/ze 

Tennis 12; Wrestling 9,10; Track 11; Football 9,10,12; 
Cards/Comics 9; Drama 11,12; FBLA 10,11,12; FCA 9,10; 
SCA 9,12; Skating/Freestyle 9,10,11,12; Senior Steering 
Committee. 


„ ff/r/Y/svY/ (Rea////// (Roofte 
_ Is// Zee (Rose 
Re/y/u////e (R/zsseZZ 

Wrestling 9,12; Track 11; Football 9,10; DECA 11,12; 
Drama 11,12; FFA 11; Chorus 9,10,11,12; All-Regional 
Choir 9,12; International Thespian Society 12. 



Constructive daydreaming. "Maybe l 1! 
have pretzels dropping like rain 
around the cow,” says Chris Hull. Art 
class was perhaps the only class where 
daydreaming was actually encouraged. 
The “holstein project” in art found 
students daydreaming for five weeks, 
constructing designs consisting of 
three holstein spots, four concentric 
circles, eleven pretzels and a 
checkerboard. 


SENIORS — 187 















enC'Oun'teyS 


A survey was taken of 45 
seniors. They were asked the 
following questions: 

1. You’re eating lunch, and 
your dream girl sits down 
beside you. To impress her 
you: 

a. show her how many 
pineapple chunks you can stuff 
in your mouth. 

b. start quoting from your 
limited knowledge of 
Shakespeare. 


Survey 

c. “tell her she is the apple 
of my eye, the peanut butter 
of my jelly, and the floppy of 
my disk,” as Brian Roope 
suggested. 

2. A football player, with a 
body like Arnold 
Schwarzenegger’s, bumps into 
you in the hall, knocking your 
books all over the place. You: 

a. tell him to pick them up. 

b. tell him his mother was a 
wall flower and she had a 


speaks 

blooming idiot. 

c. say “Excuse me.” 

d. “tell him to pick them up, 
then pat him on the head and 
say ‘good boy,’ ” said Stephanie 
Cook. 

3. You and your girlfriend 
go to see Paula Abdul in 
concert. Out loud you admire 
the outfit the star is wearing. 
You notice your girlfriend has 
suddenly became irate. You: 

a. ask her what the problem 


is. 

b. hurriedly try to catch your 
class ring as it whizzes past 
your head. 

c. apologize profusely. 

d. “offer to buy her an outfit 
like Paula Abdul’s,” suggested 
Larry Clevenger. 

Of the available answers, the 
following were the most 
popular: 1. a; 2. a; 3. b. 

Toni Ratcliffe 


. ff/cA/aeA < JAa/ic / facAAer 
QOcrcA < Jcott t Jams 

Wrestling 12; Track 10; Cross Country 10,11; FFA 

9,10,11,12. 

{ ./\o/ai .Ac //r la//>(/' 

Baseball 9,10,11, Captain 12; Wrestling 9,10; Football 11. 


„ A/tlAto/y/ AAuye/ie < Ja/////Acrs 
//oc/ . (Jay/utrcA f foyers 

Tennis 9,10,11,12; Volleyball Manager 11; Cross Country 
10; FBLA 11,12; FCA 12; Junior Civitan 12; Science Club 
12; Chorus 9; VA. Tech Leadership Conference. 

' )teJ>// 7 / ( . At<>/>(/'/ ' i (A//////A 


(/lay A or/////// ' IcAd'/cr, ( c /r. 

FBLA 12; FFA 9,12; Who's Who 11. 

^en/u/e/^ „ flarAe/ie < ic/ma/i 
'// Ai/ma „ {//// r y/c/or 

FFA 10,11,12; Chorus 9. 


Aumc/a// G/ar/e& - ///nr/ 
/Amot/u/ S/a/ie < V/io/tt 

Track 9,10,11,12; Cross Country 9,10, Captain 11,12; Junior 
Civitan 10,11; SADD 9; Who’s Who; Boys’ State. 

Z7/cA > SAa/mon < fA/rc/osAc/vy 

Basketball 9,10; FCA 9,10,12; VICA 12; Band 9,10,11,12; 

Video Club Vice-President 12; Who’s Who 11,12; Who’s 
Who in Music 9,10; All-Regional Band 9,10,12; Flag Corps 

10; Drum Major 11. 



188 — SENIORS 





























Just friends. Jason Alley and Tammy 
McMillan discuss an art submission she 
has made to “Inklings,” the literary 
magazine. Senior year is a time for 
students to think of lasting friendships 
and changing relationships. 



(ZZ/z/zZc/Z// iZt’ez/ee G/z/unoz/S 

HERO 11,12; Class Vice-President 11; Who’s Who. 

< )araZ/ ^ uZee// c J/szofrZ///& 

Drama 10,11: FCA 12; Forensics 9,10,11,12; SCA 9; Science 
Club 12; OM 9,10; MACC 10,12; Band 9,10,11,12; Beauty 
Pageant 11; Who’s Who 11,12; All-Regional Band 
9,10,11,12; Who’s Who in Music; Model General Assembly 
11 , 12 . 

{Zuimo/ui ^(/y////e < fe/Zer 

HERO 11. 

( c /o/Zy ■ (It me r \/ate 


ZTc/notZu/ QS/Vo// JZ/r/e 
6 Z/a/Zes G’/xZ/y - wiitZi 

Black History Club 12. 

GZ/cr/ „ ZcZeZe iSmitZ 

G/msiojh/ter- „/ ee < J/ni/Zi 

Track 9,10; Black History Club 9,10,11,12; DECA 
9,10,11,12; FCA 9,10,11; ICF 10; Skating/Freestyle 10. 


( c /oZ/// . (far//// 'Z/n/lZ/, ( c /r. 

Football 9,10; FFA 9; VICA 10. 

(ZleZ/ecea iZ?///Z < S/////Z/ 

Track 10,11,12; Cross Country 10; Basketball 9,10,11, 
Co-Captain 12; FCA 9,10,11,12; Pep Club 11,12; S< A 
11,12; VICA 10,11,12; Video Club Vice-President 11,12; 
Who’s Who 11,12. 

1CameZa Q)e//ise GnvytZ/e/'S 

Cheerleading 10; HERO 11,12; Homecoming Court. 

„ UarsZ/a (y///> < Jou/Z/em 

Volleyball 10,11,12; Drama 9,10; FBLA 9; Junior Civilan 
12; SADL) 11; Science Club 12; Who’s Who; Beauty Pageant 
12 . 


SO// „ \/'co/c ' if////// 

Cheerleading 9,10,11,12; Drama 9,10; FBLA 10,11,12; FCA 
12; SCA 9,10,11,12; Science Club 9; VICA 11,12; Yearbook 
11,12; Senior Steering Committee; Beauty Pageant 11,12; 
Who’s Who 10,11,12; Homecoming Court. 

Wa/tieZ < Jteoe/zso/i < y./e//ee 
ZTi/z/o/Zuy Goroo/s < oh// re/' 

Coll 11; Track 10; Cross Country 9; Basketball 10; 
Cards/Comics 9,10,11; FFA 9; ICF 10; SADD II; Science 
Club 10; VICA 11,12; Band 9,10,11,12. 

GZ/aeZw/cZ (f/ZZ/o/n < i/cZ/Z/e// 

Football 9; VICA 12. 


SENIORS — 189 













G/iri&tme> .. (fane < D/fase// 
fn/ar ( far// t floats 

Junior Civitan 10,12; Pep Club 9,12; SADD 9,12; Band 
9,10,11,12; Who’s Who 12; Senior Steering Committee. 

f (amantna -{//at t numjb 

FFA 9.10; V1CA 11,12. 

{ -/)(\ la//a (nenee t l/a//ner 

NAHS 12; Junior Civitan 12; Who's Who 12. 


STa/nnia f. !ae > Susan 

fu////rr/y _ (//// < fu/ft/un 
Junior Civitan 12; SADD 11; SCA 10; Band 9,10,11,12; 

Class Secretary 10; Who’s Who. 

TennstA ( , /i ay (Ta/or, ( fr. 

Cards/Comics 12; DECA 11,12; FFA 9; Who's Who. 

^y/unoof . (Tic/iae/' f7a//er (, fr. 


if nan (fee Tcuy/or 
GAa/foUe . tfic/ef/e GTay/ar 

Chorus 9,10. 

( ( /erry (//a// tfay/or 

Tennis 12; Wrestling 9,10; Track. 9,10; Cross Country 9. 

- In ana fat/// c/ay/on 

SADD 9.10; Yearbook 10,11, Editor 12. 


’ Inawn • fteoen Tiry/or 
( yo/n Tnu//y , / ’cr/W/ 

Swim Team 11,12; VICA 12; Who’s Who. 

fznum Gneoi/i (Terra 

Cards/Comics 9,10; Drama 10,11,12; Literary Magazine 
11,12; SCA 9; Skating/Freestyle 9; Who’s Who 12. 

( c /e/vy '(foyne T7oma&, c /r. 

Gymnastics 9,10; DECA 9,10,11,12; VICA 11,12. 



Perfection makes the best impression? 

Kelly Farmer and Mrs. Martha Preston 
discuss an art project during Advanced 
Art 1 class. Kelly said, “I think the best 
way students can impress a teacher is 
just by simply being themselves.” 



190 —SENIORS 
























< Pot/t /' l)a>c/t 077 tomas 

VICA 11,12. 

!/?(vice . (fuietlc 077io/r//o// 

Junior Civitan 12; SADD 10,11,12; Chorus 9,10,1 1,12; 
All-Regional Chorus 9,10,11,12; Who’s Who 10,11. 

Pio/et fou/,se c77c//e 

FHA 9; HERO 11,12. 

< Ji tra/t ! /?o/tut ■ P/Zo/t 

Cheerleading 9,10,11,12; FBLA 11; Pep Club 9,10,12; 
Who’s Who. 


Zneuut tTa/Zert 
t£au/ ODua/tc ZToto/t/ay, Jr. 

Tennis 12; Cards/Comics 9,10; Video Club 11,12; 
Skating/Freestyle 9. 

r ff/PZ Z0)otu//as OTrcu/ 

FFA 9,10; VICA 11,12. 



ffu/ie „ Out ■ Trt///f 

Drama 9,10; FBLA 12; Forensics 9,10,11; SADD 11,12; 
Science Club 11; Band 9,10,11, All-Regional Band 9,10; 
Beauty Pageant; Who’s Who. 

ffesuufer utosan/ie 07ro/rt/)c/er- 
C ltc/u Wawn tTumer- 

FBLA 10,11,12; Pep Club 12; Appalachian Studies 11; 
Science Club 11. 


- Ott/rtw ■ Tu/fu/t 
{tOa/Tty Oucax usu/erutovc/ 

-/arru Qua/uW ( Pe&t 

Football 9,10; Cards/Comics 11; Drama 11,12; FCA 10. 



from the experienced 


During the four years that 
hey attended high school, one 
|)f the things that seniors 
earned was how, when, and 
vhy to impress a teacher. It is 
he sort of thing that made life 
little easier and broke the ice 
or the student-teacher 
elationship. 

Since impressing a teacher 


was so helpful, someone must 
have mastered the art of it. 
Toni Ratcliffe said, “In the 
past I have gone to extreme 
measures to make my projects 
look better than everyone 
else’s, not to show everyone 
else up, but to show the 
teacher that I truly care about 
what is asked of me.” 


Angela Clark, when asked 
about her method of 
impressing a teacher, said, “I 
turn assignments in early! I 
ask a lot of questions in class to 
make the certain teachers feel 
like they have my interest.” 

But did Angela succeed? “Of 
course, I did! As they say, 
flattery gets you everywhere,” 


she said. 

As the seniors prepare to 
leave, they reminisce about 
their high school years and 
about those impressions they 
made on others, especially on 
their teachers. 

Shana Taylor 


i 


SENIORS — 191 
























Time out. David Cressell uses his spare 
time to do his homework. David, the 
first lieutenant of the Pulaski County 
Junior Life Saving Crew, takes 
advantage of every minute. At any 
time an emergency call could take him 
from his lessons. 



^a&on /Toa/d '/ /c/w 

APPALKIDS 10,11, Executive Assistant 12; Drama 12; 
Appalachian Studies 10,11,12; Band 9; Who’s Who 12. 

■Oeo/yc _ (//a/ M, ( f /r. 

.'/? o/ta// u/Ze/V ( ((a//a' 

Cards/Comics 11,12; FBLA 9,10; FFA 9.10,11,12; VICA 

11 , 12 . 

t fonya Glene 'tta/Zcr 



FBLA 9; Pep Club 12; VICA 11,12. 


> l at/a/uc/ Hfhmvt 

Drama 9,10, Vice-President 11, President 12; Literary 
Magazine 10,11,12; Science Club 11,12; MACC 11,12; 

Senior Steering Committee. 

. I atoya t c /a/tace Z(h//) 

Track 10,11,12; Basketball 11; Black History Club 10,11,12; 
FBLA 11,12; FCA 10,11,12; SCA 12; Newspaper 10; Who’s 
Who 10,11,12; All-Regional Track Meet 10,11,12; State 

Track Meet 11,12. 

„ datt/ieuf iSroc/ r UG/i//c 


Z&rya/i ZGZut/na/i '(( Za'/e 



Wrestling 9,10; APPALKIDS 11,12; Cards/Comics 9,10, 
Vice-President 11; Drama 9,10,11,12; Appalachian Studies 
12; OM 10; Senior Steering Committee; International 
Thespian Society 12. 

■Oa/ertZ' Scot/ Z(Za/e 

VICA 9. 

ZGatey GZau/e ‘((Za/c 


GarZ^ay c fG//a/n& 
OcarZett . \/co/e c fPi//iams 

Swim Team 11,12; Tennis 10,11, Captain 12; Drama 
9,10,11,12; Forensics 9,10,11,12; Literary Magazine 9,11,12; 
NHS 11,12; Science Club 10,11,12; MACC 10,11,12; Band 
9,10,11,12; Senior Steering Committee; Who’s Who; 

Governor’s School. 

( c /a,w/i '((iZey 

Baseball 9,10,11,12; Football 9,10. 

„ (fart/ia Z/ee - (sm ( Woodz 

Cheerleading 9; FBLA 9,10,11,12; Pep Club 10; SADD 9,12. 



192 —SENIORS 













, ,.... . 



The dreaded assignment 


. (Tic/ae/ dfbs/cy '(ibrrt// 

Football 9,10,11,12; Basketball 9,10,11; FBLA 11,12; FCA 
11.12; FFA 10,11; SADD 12. 

„ (ttyanc//c „ i/ttrtr '//Ay// 

Band 9,10. 

b/)at>u/ bd/md/cy dirty/// 

FBLA 12. 

OOcutic /1 merman dirty// 

Soccer 9,10; Crosscountry 10,ll;Junior Civitan 10,11,12; 
VICA 11, Treasurer 12; SCA 12; Who's Who; Graduation 
Marshal. 


idatyer /fee dOrtty// II 

Football 9; VICA 11,12. 

dd/tza/e// . i/tty dibt'o/e/t 
( J)tftitt/ _ i//en di’tya// 

(n/ta Wtya/X 

Gymnastics 9,10; NHS 11,12; Band 9,10,11,12; Swim Team 
11; Who’s Who; Who’s Who in Music; All-Regional Band 
9,10,11,12; Graduation Marshal. 


c fa-ton { . Artrt//ay difya// 
s/a/rtcta Q)atan difya// 

FFA 9,10,12; FHA 9; SADD 12. 

In/totu/a fyon Z/ottaty 

APPALK1DS 9,10; Appalachian Studies 9,10. 

d/'arrttnty t iazanne Z/ott/uy 

HOSA 9,10,11,12; Chorus 10,11,12.' 


“Homework again? That’s 
te fourth time this week. 

1 hen am I going to find time 
jtj do it?” 

Sometimes students are 
iced with this dilemma. Some 
Eidents work or play sports, 
laking every free second 
j ecious. Of course, there are 
«her students who sometimes 
o not even bother doing their 
bmework. 


So when do students do 
their homework? Sherman 
Wright, who works at nights, 
said, “I try to get my 
homework done during my 
breaks. Otherwise, I have to do 
it at two o’clock in the 
morning. There is never a 
spare moment.” 

Others try to finish it right 
before class. Eddie Murray 
said, “I do some of mine right 


before class because it keeps 
me from losing time after 
school.” 

But there are students who 
do their homework at home. 
Students feel that in order to 
do well in a particular class 
they must spend extra time 
working at it. Josh Henry said, 
“I usually sit in my bedroom 
and relax while 1 do my 
homework.” 


A simple solution to this 
homework problem is to do 
away with it completely. The 
hard part would be getting the 
teachers to go along with this 
solution. So students will just 
have to keep on doing the 
dreaded assignment. 

Mark Barnes 


Ua/riaa _ i/t/t ddbot/yart/ 

Drama 10; FBLA 9,10,11,12; Pep Club 9; SADD 12; Band 
9; Chorus 10. 

ine/ecat . inn d(bo//tyty 

Junior Civitan 10,11; NHS 12; SCA 12; Science Club 10,11; 
Yearbook 10,11, Editor 12; Who’s Who 10,11,12; 
Graduation Marshal; All-American Scholar 11. 

( c /tuta i/aty/ dibrrt'// 

Track 10; Drama 11; FBLA 10,11; FHA 9; SADD 10,12: 
Science Club 11,12; Who’s Who 12. 

-/da l/iatCf dibar// 


SENIORS — 193 












































Roger Adams 
Danny Akers 
David Akers 
John Akers 
Ronnie Akers 
Sammy Akers 
David Albert 


Stephanie Albert 
Matt Alberts 
Kevin Alexander 
Sherry Alexander 
Mark Allen 
Doug Alley 
Ernie Alley 


Shelena Alley 
Cherish Almarode 
C.R. Altizer 
Darrell Anderson 
James Anderson 
Kelly Anderson 
Tony Andrews 


Benji Armbrister 
Angie Arnold 
Stacy Arnold 
Cindy Austin 
Kevin Austin 
Tara Averette 
Cheyenne Ayers 


Steve Back 
Angie Banes 
Pete Banks 
Michael Barrett 
Renita Barrett 
Charles Bell 
Brian Berry 



Key to success 


Good planning is a key to 
the success of any project, and 
the activities of the junior class 
were no exception. “We plan 
for prom and decide the 
decorations for homecoming. 
As an officer, I feel my 
opinion helps make decisions 
for the junior class," said 
Chuck Fox, class reporter. 

Other officers were Laurel 


Shroyer, president; April 
Busic, vice-president; Cindy 
Whitaker, secretary. 

“Fund raising is important to 
our class, so we can show our 
school spirit. Our class officers 
help our class get money for 
prom and homecoming,” said 
Lisa Smith. One of the fund 
raisers for the class was a 
sock-hop to raise money for 


the prom. 

All of the officers had goals 
for the class, one of which was 
to continue to have the 
togetherness and spirit that 
they had always had. They also 
wanted to keep their sense of 
pride. 

“I feel working together is 
important to the class, so we 
can make it to the top,” said 


April Busic. 

“I wanted to be an officer 
because I have done it in the 
past, and it’s really rewarding 
and also fun. I like working 
with and for the people in the 
class of ’92. They’re all great 
people, and I love 
representing them,” said 
Laurel Shroyer. 

Jennifer Weik 


194 — JUNIORS 

















































Scott Bevil 
Phillip Bird 
Brian Black 
Amy Blankenship 
Micheal Blevins 
Billy Bobzin 
Eric Bond 


John Bouldin 
Stephanie Bouldin 
Joshua Bowden 
Joey Bower 
Kim Bowman 
Priscilla Bowman 
Mike Boyd 


Anita Boysaw 
Steve Branch 
Dewane Bratton 
Shirene Broadwater 
A1 Brown 
Eric Bryan 
Mark Bryant 


Jeremiah Bryson 
Terry Buckner 
Allen Bullion 
Chris Burns 
Scott Burroughs 
Brad Burrus 
Susan Burton 


April Busic 
Cory Byrd 
Glenn Byrd 
Robert Caldwell 
Cam Calfee 
Christina Calfee 
Chris Callahan 



The future! The juniors vote during 
advisor-advisee meeting for their class 
officers. “I feel that the experience of 
being an officer helps me become 
responsible and make decisions; it also 
makes you self-conscious because you 
know that the ideas you decide upon 
will represent the entire junior class. 
Overall, this experience makes me feel 
a lot of pride,” said Cindy Whitaker. 


JUNIORS — 195 










































r />t//(<’:> 


With or without? 


To die for dimples? In 
speaking of dimples. Misty 
Freeman said, “I guess only 
lucky people get them. I wish I 
had dimples.” 

People are born every day 
with and without this facial 
feature. Why do some people 
have the dimples? Eva Ward 
said, “A lot of people get them 
from their relatives.” Bobby 
Quesenberry said, “God 


wanted it that way.” 

Dimples may enhance one’s 
personality because they “bring 
out your smile, cuteness and 
sometimes embarrass you,” 
said Christy Croy. 

Misty f reeman agreed. 

“They make a person seem 
more alive when they smile, 
laugh or even talk; they make 
you look innocent, enhance 
your spirit,” she said. 


The advantages of dimples 
are endless, or are they? Misty 
Dawn Rose said, “People 
always talk about how cute 
they are, and older people 
used to pinch my cheeks when 
I was younger because of my 
dimples.” 

Likewise, people have 
varying ideas as to why 
dimples appear. Cindy Moore 
said, “There is a string 


attached to the inside of the 
mouth that makes them 
appear.” Misty Dawn Rose 
said, “Maybe they come from 
smiling too much or laughing 
too much or both.” 

It seems, then, that either 
you have dimples or you are 
dimpleless because of luck or 
simply because that was the 
way it was meant to be. 

Shirene Broadwate 


Tim Carden 
Amy Carter 
Lateffa Carter 
Roy Carter 
Lori Chinault 
April Chrisley 
Christie Chrisley 


Richard Chrisley 
Tracy Chrisley 
Edward Clark 
Jennifer Clark 
Mae Lynn Clark 
Angela Cole 
Mark Cole 


Mary Cole 
Tammy Cole 
Ronnie Coleman 
Lynn Coltrane 
Randy Counts 
Jodi Cox 
Jason Craig 


Scott Craig 
Roger Crowder 
Tiessa Crowder 
Christy Croy 
Jill David 
Sonya Davidson 
Michael Davis 


Sharon Davis 
Terry Davis 
William Davis 
Rick Daya 
Dennis Dean 
James Dean 
Karen DeHart 



196— JUNIORS 















































Double dimples are a rarity but often 
found in pairs. Chuck Fox and Terri 
Shelor share a good time, making their 
dimples show. Dimples are a basic part 
= of life and bring a clarity to life that 
“adds flavor to my personality which 
§ would be missing otherwise,” said 
.2, Chuck Fox. 



Tammy Dice 
Tracy Dickerson 
Amy Dishon 
Carol Dobbins 
David Dobbins 
Craig Dobyns 
Chris Donithan 


Danielle Donley 
Melissa Dotson 
Chris Douglas 
Donnie Dowdy 
Brian Duncan 
Chad Duncan 
Joshua Duncan 


Kristie Duncan 
Tonya Duncan 
Jess Dunford 
Mike Dunford 
Chris Dye 
Jay Dye 
Hope Eads 


Bill Eastridge 
Heather Edens 
Ashley Edmonds 
Bucky Edwards 
Jennifer Edwards 
Jerry Eller 
Robbie Epperly 


Amanda Evans 
Cindy Fain 
Chris Farmer 
Pam Farmer 
David Farris 
Jason Ferguson 
Rick Fernandez 


JUNIORS — 197 













































Lisa Fisher 
Stephanie Flanigan 
Jonathan Fore 
Cody Foster 
Wendy Foushee 
Chuck Fox 
Allen Fralin 


Kent Franklin 
Michael Frazier 
Brian Freeman 
Darden Freeman 
Misty Freeman 
Nathan French 
Kevin Funk 


Penny Gallimore 
Terri Garland 
Jennifer Gilbert 
David Goodman 
George Gosnell 
Aaron Graham 
Tony Grantham 


Tammy Gravely 
Jennifer Gravley 
Missi Gravley 
James Gray 
Linda Gray 
Chad Hall 
Jill Hall 


Lisa Hamilton 
Emily Hammond 
Nancy Hancock 
Don Hanshew 
James Harrell 
Samuel Harrell 
Claudia Harrison 



Nuthin’ but a good time. Sharing 
common interests in music, Aaron 
Cress, A.L. Stoots and Cindy Austin 
discuss one of their favorite rock 
bands, Poison. Cindy said, “I attended 
the last Poison concert in Roanoke 
with my friends and had a blast!” 
Concerts and musical groups were a 
hot topic of conversation for juniors. 



198 — JUNIORS 

































Kim Hayes 
Patricia Hayes 
Ginger Henley 
Sarah Henley 
Stacey Hill 
Dorothy Hilton 
Joey Hoback 


Todd Hoback 
Terry Hoffmann 
Leesa Honaker 
Jennifer Hoover 
Tracy Hoover 
Tracy Horton 
Cynthia Hoskins 


Stacey Howard 
Pamela Howell 
Toni Hubbard 
Jason Huddle 
Amy Hudson 
Rocky Huff 
Martie Hull 


Eric Hunter 
Christina Hurd 
Ken Hurley 
Brady Hurst 
Mark Hurst 
Shannon Hurst 
Michael Hutchison 


Amanda Jackson 
Denise Jackson 
Rasheeh Jackson 
Sarah James 
Jason Jennings 
Shelia Johnson 
Dan Jones 


.... n /(■((/ 4 /.; 


the beat goes on 


Tapping their toes to the 
>eat, the juniors knew exactly 
vhat kind of entertainment 
hey liked. Their styles of 
ausic varied among hard rock, 
ountry, pop rock and rap. 
he “oldies” were also 
deluded in the most popular 
ausic survey. 

A cross-section of 46 juniors 
ompleted an informal survey 


regarding their likes and 
dislikes about music and 
current artists. 

Jonathan Fore said that the 
60s music was his favorite 
because “it has real drums and 
guitars, not like some music 
today.” 

In contrast, Tim Carden 
insisted that hard rock and 
metal was the best. “It moves 


me; I like music that moves 
me,” he said. 

Regina Sexton said with 
conviction that soul was her 
choice “because it has a good 
dance beat.” Indeed, students 
agreed that a great rhythm was 
the key to popular music. 

In total, this sampling of 
students from the class of 1992 
indicated that pop rock, 


followed closely by hard rock 
and country, was their favorite 
in the musical scene. 

Top Five 
Motley Crue 
Clint Black 
Vanilla Ice 
Alabama 
Poison 

Natashia Reed 




JUNIORS — 199 




















































How does that fit? Susan Burton has 
her finger sized by Mr. Bart Edmunds 
from Jenkins and Sons, Inc. Ordering 
a class ring is one of the privileges 
juniors have. “I picked the purple 
stone since it was my birthstone,” said 
Susan. 



De Jones 
Dona Jones 
Lena Jones 
Mark Jones 
Wayne Jones 
Ram Kelly 
Carrie Kincaid 


Shannon Lafon 
John Lancaster 
Matt Layman 
Tonya Lemons 
Sean Lester 
Malcolm Lewis 
Susan Lindsay 


Tracy Lineberry 
Jeff Linkous 
Jonna Linkous 
Kathy Litton 
Crystal Long 
Rachael Long 
Tanya Lovern 


Nathan Lovingood 
Fong Lui 
Luong Lui 
Sandi Lytton 
Stephanie Lytton 
Karri Mabry 
Carol Mann 


Michael Mannon 
Jeff Marshall 
Cindy Martin 
J.R. Martin 
Stanley Martin 
Susan Mathena 
Bryon Mayberry 



200 — JUNIORS 



































and responsibilities 


As students climb higher up 
he ladder, they think more of 
he responsibilities they have as 
veil as of the privileges they 
barn. These privileges then 
I jecome more precious, 
especially to juniors. 

To Alyssa Rollins, life itself 
s a privilege. “The most 
arecious privilege that I have 
s life because everyone has 
been given a life that is more 


precious than ever,” she said. 

Ashley Edmonds said, “I 
would say that having a license 
is the precious privilege.” 

When students become 
juniors, they start adding to 
their list of privileges. They 
can have a car or borrow one 
from their parents. To some, 
the privileges are endless. 
Laurel Shroyer said, “We 
juniors have enough privileges 


that if everything were thrown 
at us, we’d get overwhelmed by 
the greatness.” 

Of course, when students 
add privileges, they also add 
responsibilities to their lives. 
These responsibilities teach 
students how to take their 
privileges seriously. “Privileges 
will help me work for my 
goals,” said Jonna Linkous. 

Self-esteem? What does this 


have to do with privileges. 
Lanie Younce said, “It makes 
you feel like you have control 
of your life.” Tanya Lovern 
said, “Privileges can help our 
self-esteem in that we feel 
more confident when people 
trust us with responsibility.” 

Sandra Weikle 



Lora McCoy 
Mary McCoy 
Scott McCoy 
Chris McGlothin 
Darrell McGrady 
Michele McGrady 
Sean McGrady 


Sean McKinney 
Megan McNeil 
Michael McPeak 
Kathryn Melvin 
Steven Melvin 
Bobbi Metz 
Dean Miller 


Matt Miller 
Tanya Mitchell 
Jamie Moles 
Cynthia Moore 
Scylenea Moore 
John Morefield 
April Morehead 


Heather Morehead 
Travis Morris 
Jennifer Mottesheard 
Ronnie Moye 
Mary Nash 
Shannon Nelson 
Danny O’Dell 


Laurie Oliver 
Michael Oliver 
Tracy Otey 
Caroline Palmer 
Teresa Parnell 
Dewayne Parris 
Steve Patterson 


JUNIORS — 201 




















































Scott Peterson 
James Phibbs 
Holly Phillips 
Windy Pickett 
Lori Poskas 
Jacob Price 
Valorie Prim 


Neil Puckett 
Chris Queen 
Mark Quesenberry 
Hope Ramsey 
Teresa Ramsey 
Jason Ratcliff 
Lee Ratcliff 


Casey Ratcliffe 
James Reavis 
Johnny Reece 
Natashia Reed 
Tamara Reed 
Tryphena Reed 
Randy Reynolds 


Wendy Reynolds 
Melanie Richeson 
Rick Riddle 
Dana Ridpath 
Kelley Riggins 
Monica Robertson 
Alyssa Rollins 


Kris Roop 
Jessica Roope 
Junior Rorrer 
Misty Rose 
Jessica Ross 
Jason Rupe 
Eric Rymer 




Ways of spending time 


From 8:40 a.m. to 3:18 p.m. 
was a full day of classes, 
lectures, notetaking, lunch, 
goofing off with friends and 
the other things that comprise 
a busy day at school. When the 
magic hour of 3:18 arrived, 
freedom was in the air. 

Some people could go home 


and relax, like Amanda 
Jackson. But some were not so 
lucky; some went home only 
briefly and then went on to 
work, like Scott Peterson, who 
works at the Steer House. 

But there are those who did 
go home and, yes, they 
studied. For example, Eric 


Bond would begin studying at 
5 p.m. and worked for maybe 
two or three hours. 

Then there were those who 
stayed at school after 3:18, 
where they began another full 
round of activities with sports, 
clubs, band, play rehearsals or 
other extracurricular events. 


Regardless of what students 
did after 3:18, though, they 
knew that at 8:40 the next 
morning, the freedom would 
end for another seven hours. 

Christi Wayne 


202 — JUNIORS 








































Working for a living. Danny O'Dell 
spends much of his after-school time 
at Kroger, bagging groceries. In 
talking about his job, Danny said, 
“Anything for a buck." 


Amy Sarver 
Kyle Scaggs 
Robert Scott 
Barry Semones 
Johnny Sexton 
Regina Sexton 
Tiffany Sexton 


Caroline Sharier 
Leona Shelor 
Terri Shelor 
Stacy Shelton 
Jonathan Sheppard 
Billy Shifflett 
Kevin Shively 


Doug Shockley 
Laurel Shroyer 
Eddie Simmers 
Charles Simmons 
Christy Simpkins 
Jennifer Simpkins 
Johnny Simpkins 


Libby Simpkins 
Phillip Simpkins 
Scott Simpkins 
Shellie Simpkins 
Jenny Skeen 
Joey Slaughter 
Kisha Smart 


Aaron Smith 
Cintoria Smith 
Lisa Smith 
Sean Smith 
Traci Smith 
Jason Speller 
Danny Stanley 


JUNIORS — 203 







































j()i mast /whufar excuses 

for the creative junior 


Throughout the halls and 
classrooms echoed the 
“creative coverups” known as 
excuses. “I forgot”; “I didn’t 
know anything about it.” 

Exactly how many excuses 
did a junior make on the 
average day? Terry Hoffman 
said, “I make very few and try 
not to repeat the excuses I do 
make.” 

On the other hand, Chad 
Hall made “three or four . . . 
hundred. I make excuses 


mostly to my parents and 
friends but not to my teachers; 
I learned my lesson a long 
time ago,” he said. 

Teenagers became experts at 
coming up with crazy excuses 
on the spur of the moment. 
When asked what was the best 
excuse she had ever created, 
Cindy Austin said, “I was 
kidnapped by a group of crazy 
mountain men, but 1 jumped 
out of the back of their old 
Ford and trekked back 


through the forest to town.” 

David Farris even had a 
strategy for making his 
excuses. “You team up with 
someone else and use the same 
excuse, so you can back each 
other up,” said David. 

Students really had practice 
making excuses to their, 
teachers who, they found out, 
weren’t so gullible. When 
coming in to class after the 
tardy bell had rung, Jason 
Ferguson said, “I’m not late; 


I’m just early for tomorrow’s 
class.” 

Dan Jones skipped over the 
ever-popular “dog excuse” and 
said, “My cow ate my 
homework.” 

No matter what the occasion, 
juniors always had an excuse 
for everything; some they 
pulled off . . . and some they 
didn’t. 

Wendy Foushee 


Dean Stephens 
Terry Stephens 
David Stigger 
A.L. Stoots 
Daniela Stoots 
Michael Stoots 
Susan Stoots 


Ann Summers 
Sharon Surface 
Chris Sutherland 
Julia Sutphin 
Daris Tabor 
Leslie Tate 
Alice Taylor 


Michelle Taylor 
Shawn Taylor 
Shawn Taylor 
Christy Thompson 
Philip Thorpe 
Daphne Tickle 
April Toney 


Dean Trueheart 
Brian Tuck 
Tammy Tucker 
Kevin Turman 
Misty Turman 
Latitia Turner 
Vicki Underwood 


Kevin Viars 
George Viers 
Franklin Vires 
Heather Wade 
Robert Walker 
Ricky Wall 
Eva Ward 



204 — JUNIORS 





























C’mon, Bessie. Dan Jones pulls his 
English essay away from his hungry 
calf. Dan skipped over the 
ever-popular “dog excuse” and said, 
“My cow ate my homework.” Not 
surprisingly, his teacher did not buy 
his excuse. 




Lee Williams 
Mia Williams 
Christina Wilson 
Wildie Wilson 
Joyce Winebarger 


Bill Ward 
Holly Warden 
Sharon Watson 
Christi Wayne 
Kelly Weaver 
Amy Webb 


Cory Webb 
Jennifer Weikle 
Sandra Weikle 
Cindy Whitaker 
Hope Whittaker 
Julie Williams 



Chris Woodrum 
Brian Woodyard 
Greg Woodyard 
Jennifer Woodyard 
Kim Worrell 


Tammy Worthington 
Garry Wright 
Lori Wright 
Elaina Younce 
Richard Younger 


JUNIORS — 205 



















James Adams 
Alicia Akers 
Diane Akers 
Heather Akers 
Rebecca Akers 
Robin Akers 
Tammy Akers 
Todd Albano 
Kimberly Albert 


Becky Alderman 
Tracy Alexander 
Stacey Allison 
Brandi Anderson 
Bryan Anderson 
Chandra Anderson 
Misty Andrews 
Jamie Arnold 
Mary Arnold 


Stacy Arnold 
April Asbury 
Shannon Atkinson 
Angela Atwell 
Jason Ayers 
Paula Back 
Mary Ann Beckner 
Phillip Bevil 
Randi Biggs 


Amy Bishop 
Ryan Blackburn 
James Blankenship 
Yolanda Blankenship 
Jerry Blessing 
Diana Boardwine 
Kevin Bond 
Misty Bowman 
Phillip Boyd 


Robert Boyd 
Tabitha Bratton 
Jonathan Breedlove 
Montie Brown 
Roger Brown 
Stephanie Brown 
Monica Brunk 
Angela Buckland 
Rebecca Burke 


David Burton 
Mark Burton 
Kent Byrd 
Kelly Campbell 
Crystal Carden 
Dean Carner 
Shendaie Carroll 
Carl Carter 
Brian Chandler 


Travis Clark 
Thomas Clarkson 
Cory Claytor 
Jonathan Cline 
Sue Cochran 
Travis Coffey 
Tracey Cole 
Bobby Coleman 
Fredrick Collins 


Bryan Cook 
Cynthia Cook 
Jamie Cooper 
Rebecca Covey 
Steve Cowan 
Allen Cox 
Jennifer Cox 
Marie Cox 
Michael Cox 



206 — SOPHOMORES 
































'{d/om c/ 7 4993 


heading the 
way 


The people who helped to 
make the sophomore class the 
way it was were the class 
officers, who include Tracy 
McCoy, president; Kelly 
Campbell, vice-president; 
Mandy Morris, 

secretary-treasurer; and Karen 
Spraker, reporter. 

For these officers, helping 
their fellow students was a 
priority. “Because I feel close 
to my fellow sophomores, and 
I want their voices to be 
heard” was the reason Kelly 
Campbell ran for office. 

Tracy McCoy said, “I 
decided to run for office 


because I was class president 
last year, and 1 had so much 
fun that I wanted to be a part 
of it again.” 

These officers headed the 
class, decorated for 
homecoming, and completed 
other activities for the class 
they represented. They 
worked to achieve the goals set 
for them and to voice the 
opinions of their peers. 

Through the work and 
dedication of the officers, the 
sophomores were heard 
throughout the school. 

Sonya Steffey 



Jason Speller 


Leading the class. This year's class 
officers: Karen Spraker, Mandy 
Morris, Kelly Campbell, and Tracy 
McCoy. Kelly Campbell said, “1 really 
enjoy being an officer, not for the 
authority; but 1 feel like I’m giving the 
sophomores some encouragement." 


SOPHOMORES — 207 



















Wendy Cox 
Dana Cregger 
Travis Cregger 
Eddie Cressell 
Drema Crist 
Courtney Crockett 
Tamasha Crouse 
Tommy Cruise 
David Dalton 


Brent Davidson 
David Davidson 
Randy Davidson 
Ben Davis 
Carrie Davis 
James Davis 
Lea Ann Davis 
Richard Delph 
Devang Desai 


Roy Dickerson 
Brian Dishon 
John Draper 
Ami Dudding 
Scott Dunaway 
Shane Dutton 
Roger Eads 
Clarence Eanes 
Kenny Eaves 


Kathryn Edmonds 
Tammy Edwards 
Carl Farmer 
Erika Farris 
Chuck Foley 
Amanda Folsom 
Chris Foster 
Marcella Foushee 
Chasity Friend 


Christy Funk 
Teena Funk 
Brian Gallimore 
Chris Gallimore 
Lisa Gallimore 
Mike Gallimore 
Anica Gambill 
Jeff Gardner 
Lee Graham 


Thomas Gravely 
Sandra Gravely 
Jereme Greere 
Erica Grubb 
Lori Grubb 
Mary Grubb 
Ronald Gusler 
Robbie Hager 
Adam Hall 


Angela Hall 
Scott Hall 
Sunni Hall 
Richard Hamblin 
Albert Hancock 
Bronson Hanks 
Carmen Hanks 
Sandra Hanks 
John Harrell 


Sharon Harriman 
Elizabeth Hatcher 
Jodi Haynes 
Jeffery Hedge 
Kristen Hedrick 
Chris Hendricks 
Jacob Henry 
Bryan Hill 
Brad Hines 



208 — SOPHOMORES 









































4 / UOU^ 


excuse. 


? 


Try to think of the most 
common or even the ultimate 
excuse to get out of 
participating in a PE class. Of 
course, everyone knows what 
“PE” stands for — PHYSICAL 
education, the class where 
pain, soreness, activities and 
sports are all part of the game 
plan. 

Students used all kinds of 
excuses to avoid the sports 
they disliked. Some said, “I’m 
sick,” “I have a headache,” “I 
have to go to the nurse,” or 
the ultimate, “I need to see 
Mr. Wilson.” 

Of course, there were also 
those really creative excuses 
among the common ones. How 


about, “I have the worst 
sunburn, and I need to sit out 
and relax?” Then there was 
the whopper; “I can’t take PE 
today because my dog stole my 
gym suit; and while she was 
running away with it, she got 
hit by my bus; and now I’m in 
emotional shock.” 

H owever, there were also 
those honest individuals who 
missed PE activities only when 
they were really sick; and they 
really detested people who lied 
to get out of it. 

Excuse or no excuse, 
physical education was a class 
that all sophomores were 
required to take. 

Sarah Steffey 



Another day, another report. Writing 
reports was the make-up work for 
students who were not able to 
participate in physical education 
activities. Tammy Akers said, 
“Somedays that I have to write a 
report I would much rather be doing 
the activity.” 


SOPHOMORES — 209 


Michele Simpkins 
































Shawn Hite 
Chris Hodge 
Michele Hollins 
Roger Hollins 
Kimberlv Holston 
Casey Hopkins 
Becky Horne 
Robbie Horsley 
Kim Horton 


Teresa Horton 
Tina Horton 
Leah Houghton 
J.J. Housel 
Beth Hubbard 
Amy Huff 
Blake Hughes 
Eddie Hughes 
Laura Hughes 


Julian Hunter 
Eric Jarrells 
Joe Jarrells 
Amber Jenkins 
Shaun (enks 
Daniel Johnson 
Daniel Johnson 
Jeff Johnson 
David Johnston 


Amanda Jones 
Monica Jones 
Teresa Joseph 
Marty Katz 
Rebecca Keene 
Derick Kemp 
Leigh Ann Kemp 
Robert Kennedy 
Kanda Kettle 


Janet Kidd 
Melissa Kilbert 
Stephen Kilby 
Walter King 
Christina Klaiber 
Mary Knarr 
John Knode 
Chris Knotter 
Victoria Lambert 


Christy Landreth 
Mike Lawson 
Chad Lewis 
John Lewis 
Bobby Lindsey 
Keith Lindsey 
Carrie Linkous 
Jon Lockwood 
Shelly Looney 


Jason Lottier 
Brandy Lowe 
William Lowe 
Paulette Lucado 
Phuong Lui 
Yen Lui 
Brian Manning 
Stephen Mannon 
Jeff Manuel 


Christa Martin 
Lena Martin 
Brad McConnell 
Chris McCoy 
Kellie McCoy 
Tracy McCoy 
Trena McCroskey 
Jeff McFall 
Paul McFall 





210 — SOPHOMORES 





























Fatal disease? 


Danger! Beware! Take 
EXTREME caution when 
entering. May enter warp zone 
between carrying bookbags 
and ordering class rings. 

Cause: too much homework, 
French tests, a yearning to 
drive, the idea of two more 
years at school. 

Symptoms: boredom, heavy 
eyes, snoring while in class, 
restlessness. 

Cure: more pep rallies, 
brainstorming, sleeping and 
more social activities. 

These were ways to describe 
the sophomore year. Misty 
Andrews said, “I enjoy being a 
sophomore”; however, Jessica 
Sifford said, “1 still have two 
more years to survive up 
here.” Krystal Talbert agreed 
when she said, “When you're a 
sophomore, you’re just stuck 


there.” 

Sophomores were able to 
find the root of the 
sophomoritis. Douglas 
Porterfield said his problem 
was “too much homework.” 
Angel Hall agreed and said the 
cause of her sophomoritis was 
“when all seven of your 
teachers decide to have a test 
on the same day!” 

When asked how to relieve 
the symptoms of sophomoritis, 
Lee Graham said, “Don’t think 
about it.” Christina Porterfield 
said, “Just forget about school 
during the weekends and have 
some fun.” 

But one student found 
another remedy entirely. Sarah 
Steffey got rid of her 
sophomoritis by repeating, 

“I’m no longer a freshman!” 

Tracy Speller 



It’s setting in. Quizzes are one of the 
ways sophomoritis affects students. 
Tommy Cruise “hopes this graph is 
correct” for his biology quiz. Tests and 
quizzes help teachers to evaluate 
students’ progress in specific areas. 


SOPHOMORES — 211 































Ben McGlothlin 
Micah McMillan 
Tracey McPeak 
Marcia Meadows 
Brandy Meredith 
Wendy Meredith 
Megan Metz 
Louann Millar 
Kesha Miller 


Canibi Milstead 
Jennifer Minnick 
Angel Montgomery 
Elisabeth Morgan 
Mandy Morris 
Tonya Mullins 
Kathy Mustian 
Mike Myers 
Mark Newman 


Belinda Nuckols 
Carrie O'Dell 
Lori O'Dell 
Charlie Olinger 
Mike Olinger 
Chad Owen 
Diane Owens 
Cindy Palmer 
Stephen Parks 


D.L. Patterson 
Mitch Patterson 
Stacy Pauley 
Chris Pendergrast 
Christine Peoples 
David Perdue 
Brian Perry 
Tina Petty 
Greg Pfaff 


Chris Phibbs 
Cliff Phillips 
Crystal Phy 
Mark Pickett 
Kim Pope 
Christine Porterfield 
Douglas Porterfield 
Misty Powers 
Tommy Powers 


Wylie Powers 
Mike Price 
Joe Puckett 
Chuck Pugh 
Brandon Quesenberry 
Greg Quesenberry 
Jennifer Quesenberry 
Joseph Quesenberry 
Lea Quesenberry 


Melissa Quesenberry 
Wally Quesenberry 
Aaron Quinlan 
Anjanette Radford 
Ernest Ratcliffe 
Gregg Ratcliffe 
Jessi Ratcliffe 
Kristie Ratcliffe 
Tim Ratcliffe 

Heather Reagan 
Chris Reavis 
April Reynolds 
Shannon Rice 
Troy Riddle 
Beth Riggins 
Tim Rigney 
Trade Roan 
Leslie Robertson 



212 — SOPHOMORES 


















































raveu. 


*? 


Off to school 


The students exited the 
school corridors, knowing 
exactly what to expect — 
excitement or possibly even 
fear. They knew it would be 
best to expect the worst. 

So what was it that the 
students dreaded or accepted? 
They were looking for their 
means of transportation, for 
their way to, and, most 
importantly, from school. 

The most popular means of 
transportation for freshmen 
and sophomores was the 
“yellow banana,” more 
commonly known as the school 
bus. 


Joe Jarrells said, “I make my 
bus riding experiences more 
enjoyable by talking with 
friends and goofing off.” 

The “best” way of getting to 
and from school, though, was 
by riding with an 
upperclassman who was 
generous enough to give a ride 
to the younger students. 

And as these underclassmen 
move up to junior status, a top 
priority for them will be that 
driver’s license so that they 
may bring an end to the days 
of “the big yellow limousine.” 

Shana Taylor 
Carrie ODell 



We’re off. Riding a bus was one of the 
ways students traveled to and from 
school. Sophomore, Jarrod Shinn, said. 
“I look forward to riding the bus 
because that means it is time to go 
home.” 




SOPHOMORES — 213 


Michele Simpkins 

























Michelle Robertson 
Cathy Rorrer 
Hollie Rorrer 
Edward Rowe 
Lisa Rowh 
Lori Rupe 
Sherod Russell 
Sally Sandidge 
Robert Sayers 


Tonya Sayers 
Stacy Schwenk 
Amanda Seagle 
Kevin Seagle 
Cynthia Sexton 
Carrie Shay 
Janell Sheffey 
Carolyn Shelton 
Hayley Shelton 


Terri Shelton 
Bryan Shepherd 
Jarrod Shinn 
Thomas Shockley 
Todd Shrewsbury 
Jessica Sifford 
Michele Simpkins 
Allen Simpkins 
Jammie Sipe 


Tracy Skeens 
Amanda Smith 
Anthony Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
Gary Snider 
Tony Snider 
April Southern 
Tracy Speller 


James Spence 
Karen Spraker 
Shelena Sprouse 
Eric Stancil 
Trina Stancil 
Sarah Steffey 
Sonya Steffey 
Bruce Stephens 
Teresa Stone 


Kim Stoots 
Sherry Stoots 
Frank Stowers 
Jonathan Stump 
Sherry Stump 
Floyd Summers 
Leigh Anne Surratt 
Rodney Slithers 
Jason Tabor 


Kevin Tabor 
Krystal Talbert 
Aimee Taylor 
Dawn Taylor 
Jenny Taylor 
Kevin Taylor 
Lisa Taylor 
Steven Taylor 
Christopher Terrell 


1 obi Thomas 
Cecil Thompson 
Chris Thompson 
James Thornton 
Stephen Thorpe 
Derek Tickle 
Stephen Tolbert 
Zack Tomlinson 
Donald Trail 



214 — SOPHOMORES 





































aeitev 


cw itxmte 


Siblings 


Richard finally realized that 
he would be getting his 
driver’s license in just a few 
weeks. He needed to practice 
his driving. Rushing down the 
stairs to get the car keys, he 
realized jimmy, his older 
brother, had the keys and the 
car. 

Students who had older or 
younger siblings at times 
found themselves having 
problems sharing possessions 
with them. 

As Jeff Johnson said, 
“Sharing is hard and should be 
avoided at all times.” 

However, there were those 
who found their siblings 
helpful. “They take up for 
me,” said ferry Underwood. 


Money! Would students 
trade their brothers or sisters 
for money? “No way! I mean a 
lot to my brother, and he looks 
up to me,” said Angie Bird. 

Then there were students 
who felt that parents 
sometimes paid more attention 
to the younger or older sibling. 
But not always, as in Wendy 
Meredith’s case. “Mom pays 
attention to me more than to 
them sometimes; and other 
times, it’s the other way 
around,” she said. 

Janet Kidd, though, summed 
up general feelings about 
siblings when she said, “I 
would trade them for 
nothing!” 

Cindy Cook 



% 


% 

Sisterly love. Having a sibling with 
which to compete in a class can keep a 
student on the edge as in the case with 
Jennifer and Michele Simpkins. 
“Having an older sister can be an 
advantage when it comes to doing 
homework,” said Michele. 


SOPHOMORES — 215 




























Carhi Trull 
Patricia Turner 
Tonya Turner 
Wade Umberger 
Jennifer Underwood 
Paul Underwood 


Terry Underwood 
Angela Vaughn 
Barry Vaught 
Melena Waddel 
Leonard Walker 
Vanessa Walker 


Carmen Ward 
Brian Warden 
Joe Warden 
Tony Warden 
Jessica Weddle 
Kerri Weddle 


Jon Weiant 
Jennifer Whitaker 
Amy White 
Georgette White 
Kim White 
Kimberly White 


Belinda Whited 
Jana Whitlock 
David Whitt 
Misti Williams 
Luke Williamson 
Donna Wingo 


Elaine Woodard 
Julie Woodyard 
Eric Woolley 
Eric Worley 
Misti Worrell 
William Worthington 


Bradley Wright 
Travis Wright 
Scott Wyatt 
Eric Yates 
Tracie Young 
Erin Zel 





216 — SOPHOMORES 





























f/Ae m-AeluieeneM 


Sophomore life 


The sophomore 
in-betweeners are in the 
middle; they’ve made it 
through their freshman year 
but are still working toward 
that senior year. Having more 
privileges as a senior is 
something the sophomore 
in-betweeners look forward to. 

Kesha Miller looks forward 
to leaving class five minutes 
early for lunch and getting 
senior pictures made. 

“I look forward to just being 
a senior because that’s when all 
your hard work pays off,” said 
Tamasha Crouse. 

The senior year is the 
highest level, and the 
in-betweeners look forward to 
having all the privileges that 
go with that level. For now, 


they can look at those seniors 
and think, as Tamasha Crouse 
does, that the seniors should 
have those privileges since they 
have been here longer. 

Those future privileges can 
also be an incentive for the 
in-betweeners when they think 
about their long trek ahead. 

As they move upward, these 
in-betweeners also realize that 
the extra privileges are just 
that — privileges — and that 
abusing these privileges may 
cause them to be taken away. 

For now, though, the 
in-betweeners enjoy the 
privileges of being with 
friends, talking, spending time 
together and having fun on 
their way up the ladder. 

Teresa Stone 



Comics! Comics! Comics! Brandon 
Quesenberry shares his feelings with 
his comic idol, Bart Simpson, a 
popular figure with the students. “I 
enjoy reading comics to learn new and 
interesting jokes,” said Brandon. 



Richard Ken Alley 

September 30, 1975 —July 26, 1990 
f reshman Football, Boys’ Tennis, 
Forensics. 


SOPHOMORES — 217 














preparing 

today 


Sweat is pouring off their 
faces; their fingers are 
twitching with nervous 
anticipation; their knees and 
legs are bouncing up and 
down on the floor like rubber 
balls. Finally, it’s over. 

These were some of the 
reactions of freshmen as they 
sat, waiting to hear election 
results for class officers. 

Elected as president was Jill 
Underwood with Timi 
Morgan, vice-president; April 
Alexander, secretary-treasurer; 
and T.J. Lytton, class reporter. 

“I enjoy being at the top, 
and I wanted to be able to do 
as much as possible for the 
freshman class,” explained Jill. 

Likewise, Timi wanted the 
best for the class of 1994. “I 

Reach for the top. Freshman class 
officers: JiH Underwood, T.J. Lytton, 
Timi Morgan, and April Alexander. 
"Being a class officer is an honor 
because you get to work with so many 
people,” said T.J. Lytton. 


want our class to be one of the 
most spirited and 
hard-working classes that has 
ever gone through PCHS,” she 
said. 

“I feel like I was right for 
the job, and I like to let people 
know what is going on,” said 

I-.I 

The class officers knew their 
work would be demanding and 
time-consuming. “I will spend 
all the time I have to to make 
this year the best year the class 
of 1994 will ever have,” said 
April. 

And the officers all agreed 
that because of their positive 
experiences this year, they 
would probably run for office 
again next year. 

Teri Horsley 





218 


FRESHMEN 















































Chris Adkins 
Lori Akers 
April Alexander 
Robert Alger 
Scottie Alley 
Cindy Altizer 
Danielle Altizer 
Summer Anderson 
Crystal Andrews 


Shannon Andrews 
Crystal Arnold 
LeeAnn Arnold 
Tracy Arnold 
Kellie Atkins 
Sherrie Austin 
Josh Averette 
Dwayne Bailey 
Sonya Bales 


Dwight Banks 
Seth Baxter 
Roger Bell 
Jeff Berkley 
Ashonda Berry 
Laura Bishop 
Martha Blair 
Wendy Blankenship 
Buck Blevins 


Woody Booth 
Robert Bopp 
Alicia Bouldin 
Kevin Bower 
Danny Boyd 
David Boyd 
Tonya Branch 
Kim Branscome 
Marsha Branscome 


Susan Branson 
Alice Brown 
Joe Brown 
Tina Brown 
Wesley Brown 
Brenda Brunk 
Carrie Bryson 
Jennifer Buckner 
TJ. Burcham 

Ashley Burchett 
Georgia Burleigh 
Brandy Burton 
Dean Burton 
Christina Cardoza 
Tim Carpenter 
Samantha Carr 
Amber Carrico 
Kevin Carroll 


Jennifer Carter 
Cory Cassell 
Amy Chan 
Charlie Chan 
Shannon Charlton 
Hong Chen 
David C.hrisley 
Jessie Chrisley 
Randee Chrisley 


Tony Clark 
Nat Clemmons 
Travis Coake 
Jason Cochran 
Henry Coe 
Carl Coffey 
Mitchell Cole 
Melissa Conner 
Jimmy Cook 


FRESHMEN 


219 












































t/ie /rey/t 


/<A 


i/n, trie ireynman ra/te 


First reactions 


Bewilderment, confusion, 
chaos. 

“Where can I get elevator 
tickets?” “Which way to the 
swimming pool?” “What song 
do I have to sing if I get up up 
on the lockers?” 

Sound familiar? These 
questions were popular ones at 
the beginning of the school 
year, especially for freshmen, 
who spent time trying to sort 
fact from fiction. 

“When I first got here, my 
first impressions were, ‘It’s so 
big; I'm going to get lost.’ 
Probably I was most impressed 
by how many people there 
were,” said April Alexander. 

“It was surprising that it is 


easier to find your way than 
what everyone thought,” said 
Amy Myers. 

There were big surprises 
and impressions for the 
freshmen, but there were also 
some overwhelming 
impressions. 

“The halls are too crowded,” 
said Charles Burke. 

“The school is so big,” said 
Michelle Dalton. 

Whatever the impressions, 
though, these will be lasting 
impressions that will remain 
with the members of the class 
of 1994 forever. 

Jessica Sifford 
Teri Horsley 







Proud enough to bear the Cougar 
paw. Buck Blevins is easily recognized 
as a Cougar fan by the paw print he 
had cut into his hair. Buck said, “1 was 
really impressed by the pride and 
spirit students have here. I was also 
impressed with the football team.” 
Buck plans to keep his paw for a while 
to let people know he is proud to be a 
Cougar. 




' 


220 — FRESHMEN 







































m 


Shawn Cook 
Nathan Cooper 
April Corvin 
Missy Courtney 
Cheryl Cox 
Crystal Cox 
Mary Cox 
Randy Cox 
Steven Cox 


Leon Crane 
Jason Crawford 
David Crowder 
Eugene Crowder 
Trish Crowder 
Thomas Custer 
Jason Dalton 
Michelle Dalton 
Tommy Dalton 


Wendy Dalton 
Emily Damron 
Jackie Davis 
John Davis 
Todd Davis 
Betty Dean 
MaryLou Dean 
Daniel DeCosta 
Stephanie DeCoasta 


Bobby DeHart 
Debbie DeHart 
Hope Denny 
Josh Denny 
Sheryl Desrocher 
Joan Dickerson 
Clay Dillon 
Bobby Dishon 
Chris Dishon 


Kim Donald 
Steve Donathan 
Gloria Donithan 
David Draper 
Jeff Duke 
Randy Dunnigan 
Mark Dye 
Chad Eanes 
Shannon Eanes 


Whitney Earles 
Keith East 
Joe Edwards 
Misty Edwards 
Andy Eller 
Jerred Eller 
Gary Evans 
Crystal Fain 
Kristina Fain 


Shannon Farley 
William Farley 
John Farmer 
Shawn Faulkner 
Matt Ficke 
Julian Finley 
Jonathan Fisher 
Emily Folsom 
Meg Folsom 


Yvonne Ford 
Thomas Fore 
Crystal Fowler 
Traci Fowler 
Jess Fowlkes 
Anthony Franes 
Angel Freeman 
Jason Freeman 
Shannon Freeman 


FRESHMEN — 221 































/A //e o/</ 

yellow limousine 


The boy stood waiting in the 
cold early in the morning. 
Finally, the huge yellow vehicle 
slowed to a stop in front of 
him; he boarded and searched 
for an empty seat. 

This “vehicle” was a familiar 
sight to students — the school 
bus. “It’s big, yellow, long, 
ugly, and it takes you to 
school,” said Rochelle 
Murdock. 

This “vehicle” conjured up 
negative experiences and 
images. “The ride is so long 
that by the time I get home, 
‘Scooby Doo’ has gone off,” 
said Cheryl Cox. 

“I fell to sleep and missed 
the stop,” said Amanda Nicolo. 


“I get to school too late,” 
said Brian Redd. 

Although there were 
disadvantages to riding the 
bus, there also were 
advantages. “I get to see and 
talk with my friends,” said Ann 
Richardson. 

“I have time to think of the 
day’s ups and downs,” said 
Susan Sutherland. 

“You get to gossip,” said 
Monica Slaughter. 

And even though riding a 
bus could be an inconvenience, 
it was only a temporary means 
of transportation for students. 
It was not forever. 

Sarah James 


Back to school. Freshman, Angie Hall, 
departs from the bus for another day 
at school. Riding the bus was the 
means by which most underclassmen 
traveled to and from school. Angie 
said, "Riding the bus is a bum; but it 
gets you to school.” 




S'7 

'v yeuuoar 


222 — FRESHMEN 













































Tim French 
Amy Friant 
Lewis Frye 
David Funkhouser 
Steven Garner 
Jason Gearheart 
Nathan Gessner 
Angie Gilmer 
Andrew Goad 


Angela Goad 
Brea Graham 
Carson Graham 
Chris Gravley 
Jason Gravley 
Rebecca Gravley 
Todd Gray 
Jimmy Haga 
Brandy Haley 


Amanda Hall 
Andy Hall 
Angela Hall 
April Hall 
Cherish Hall 
Dean Hall 
Holly Hall 
Shane Hamblin 
Dustin Handy 


Joseph Harkrader 
Moretta Harless 
Kendra Harris 
Syndi Hash 
Ryan Haulsee 
Stephen Haynes 
Chris Heidt 
Jeff Hickman 
Tristan Hickman 


Tim Hill 
Sissy Hinkley 
Benny Holcomb 
Ormond Honaker 
Sylvia Hoosier 
Michael Horn 
Teri Horsley 
Steven Horton 
Travis Huff 


Robert Hurd 
Heath Hyder 
Billy Ingles 
Brandy Irby 
B J. Jackson 
Matt Jackson 
April Johnson 
Rhonda Johnston 
Latisha Jones 


Michael Jones 
Scott Jones 
Tracy Jones 
Shannon Keagle 
Lula Kennedy 
Teresa Kilbert 
Tint Kimbrough 
Jeremy King 
Mary King 


Michael King 
Scott King 
Suzanne Kirby 
Lisa Knick 
Zack Krug 
Jason Lambert 
D.J. Lane 
Jason Lane 
Ginger LaRue 


FRESHMEN — 223 































Wl 


te 



o 


tie-to 


ona sea/v-c. 


•/ 


still continues 


Around the campus it is 
fairly easy to point out 
freshmen by the load of books 
that they have crammed into a 
small bag that they are lugging 
around on their shoulders. If 
the freshmen are not 
accompanied by a bookbag, 
they may be easily recognized 
because they walk like the 
Hunchback of Notre Dame, 
caused by carrying every book 
that they own on their 
shoulders all day long all year. 

The freshmen polled had 
some unique responses as to 
what the ultimate bookbag 
would be like. B.J. Jackson 
described it as being an 
invisible one so that one could 
carry it on both arms without 
looking like a complete nerd. 

Oscar Russell said, “The 
ultimate bookbag would have 
to be super light-weight, have 
an indestructible stereo, a 

Freshmen could be identified by the 

large bookbags they carried, stuffed 
with their belongings. Kelly Simmers 
said, “My idea of the ultimate bookbag 
would be one that is flexible enough to 
carry as many books as you want it to.” 
Kelly looks forward to having a locker 
in the academic building next year. 


microwave, fold-out wheels, a 
TV/VCR, and a built-in 
cooler.” 

R. Ratcliffe agreed with the 
latter and added that it should 
also come with someone to 
carry it. 

Holly Hall said that her ideal 
bookbag would be one that 
could compact into a lipstick 
case, while Shannon Farley 
opted for one that would not 
fall apart when she put a 
single book in it. 

The tradition of freshmen 
knocking around other 
students with the infamous 
“portable lockers” on their 
backs will probably continue 
for the next couple of 
centuries at the very least, 
unless of course they manage 
to get academic building 
lockers. May wonders never 
cease? 

Shana Taylor 




TCimi 


224 — FRESHMEN 









































Kevin Lawson 
Phyllis Leary 
Amanda Leftwich 
Monica Leisure 
Shawn Lester 
Carl Lewis 
Todd Lindamood 
Jessica Lindsey 
Ben Linkous 


Kim Linkous 
Tommy Linkous 
Michael Lovell 
Christina Lovern 
Greg Lovern 
T.J. Lytton 
James Mann 
Cindy Marshall 
Larry Marshall 


Becky Martin 
Jonathan Martin 
Kim Martin 
Sonja Mathena 
Paul Mayes 
Bobby McClanahan 
Nathan McCormick 
Dawn McCoy 
Jayson McCoy 


Billy McCroskey 
Josie McMillan 
Piper McMillan 
Chris McPeak 
Mona McPeak 
Stacey McPeak 
Randy McRoberts 
David Melton 
Jimmy Meyer 


April Miller 
Betty Miller 
Allen Montgomery 
Lori Moody 
Daniel Moore 
Tinti Morgan 
Kerri Morris 
Kevin Mottesheard 
Rochelle Murdock 


James Mustian 
Amy Myers 
Laura Nelson 
Cassandra Nester 
Larry Newcomb 
Jamie Newman 
Amanda Nicolo 
Kim Norris 
Eric Nunn 


Lisa Ogle 
Jennifer Oliver 
Shawnna Osborne 
Charlie Ousley 
Jamie Ousley 
Christie Owens 
Gena Owens 
Laura Owens 
Misty Owens 


Brad Page 
Wayne Page 
Keilh Palmer 
Aaron Parks 
Eric Patterson 
Lawrence Patton 
Rhonda Patton 
Chanda Payne 
Jammon Payne 


FRESHMEN — 225 










































Need 


a<jfxun' 


an excuse 


“My locker jammed.” “I got 
lost.” “There was a fight.” 

These were just a few of the 
excuses freshmen used for 
their tardiness to class. 

Since freshmen were new at 
trying to find excuses, they 
usually listened to those of the 
upperclassmen; of course, once 
the teachers heard the excuses, 
they usually caught on to what 
the students were doing. 

At that point, the students 
either learned to tell the truth 
or resorted to the classic, “I’m 
sorry; it won’t happen again.” 

Then another appropriate 
remark was, “I was late 
because my locker was in the 
vocational building.” 


And since the freshmen 
were new to this scene, the 
students also thought they 
should be given a little edge. 
“Freshmen should get away 
with being tardy for at least 
the beginning of the year 
because things were new to 
us,” said Cindy Marshall. 

But an excuse that seemed a 
natural was, “I got stopped by 
a big guy, and he wouldn’t let 
me go to class.” 

Nevertheless, after the first 
few weeks of school, finding 
excuses grew harder; and 
freshmen decided they either 
needed to get to class on time 
or find new teachers. 

Jessica Sifford 



You’re late. “We had car trouble, so I 
couldn’t get there on time,” said Tom 
Warburton to Ms. Harriet Anderson. 
Students used that excuse often in 
explaining their tardiness to school. 



226 — FRESHMEN 





































Russell Payne 
Della Peoples 
Rita Peoples 
Kelly Perry 
Bobby Petty 
Justin Phelps 
Brian Phillips 
Michelle Phillips 
Janet Pickett 

Jessica Piediscalzo 
Venetia Pirico 
Jennifer Pohlig 
Donald Porath 
Daniel Porter 
Crystal Powers 
Chris Pratt 
Wayne Puckett 
J.W. Quesenberry 


Rhonda Quesenberry 
Mike Rakes 
Bryan Ramsey 
Sandra Rapp 
Curtis Ratcliffe 
Raymond Ratcliffe 
Sam Raykes 
Brian Redd 
Karen Reed 


Sharon Reed 
Amanda Reese 
Ann Richardson 
Rhonda Richardson 
Christina Ridout 
Stephen Roark 
Amanda Robertson 
Lorrie Robinson 
Myrissa Rollins 


Shannon Roop 
Gena Rorrer 
Tania Rorrer 
Susan Rudisill 
Jerry Runyon 
Derek Rupe 
Oscar Russell 
Aaron Rygas 
Adam Sage 

Tim Sarver 
Kenneth Saunders 
William Saunders 
Carla Sayers 
Christina Schepers 
Angie Scott 
Ashley Scott 
Eric Sexton 
Selena Shaver 


Chris Shaw 
Lori Shelburne 
Robbie Shelton 
Michael Sheppard 
Steven Shockley 
Andrew Shumate 
Donetta Sifford 
Kelly Simmers 
Sarah Simpkins 


Mike Sink 
Kristie Sipe 
Monica Slaughter 
Vickie Slusher 
Linda Smith 
Melissa Smith 
Michael Smith 
Lamont Smith 
Sabrina Smith 


FRESHMEN — 227 






























Freshman flight 


The boy scrambled hurriedly 
through the large, heavy doors 
toward the vocational building, 
heading for his locker. His 
mind was set on gathering his 
books from his locker and 
getting back to class in the 
main building without being 
late. 

This experience was 
common for freshmen because 
freshman lockers were located 
in the vocational building, set 
apart from all the lockers in 
the main building. 

The freshmen had differing 
views on the location of their 
lockers. “I have no classes over 
there,” said Lori Akers. 

“You can’t go after every 
class, so you have to lug your 
books around in your hands or 
in a bookbag,” said Monica 
Slaughter. 


Michael King said, “It’s sort 
of like an initiation for the 
freshmen.” 

“Nobody has the primary 
classes in the vocational 
building,” said Roger Bell. 

Although most of the 
opinions about lockers in the 
vocational building were 
negative, some of the 
freshmen did notice some 
advantages in having their 
lockers there. “It’s not 
crowded,” said Randy 
Dunnigan. 

The freshmen may have felt 
they were at a disadvantage 
with their lockers in the 
vocational building, but they 
will have lockers in the main 
building next year; and they 
can view that change as a 
privilege of moving up. 

Sarah James 



Not another trip. Freshmen, Mike 
Sink and Aaron Rygas, take their 
books from their lockers in the 
vocational building. “It’s too hard to 
go back and forth to the vocational 
building between each class,” said 
Aaron. 



228 — FRESHMEN 





























Adele Taylor 
Kevin Taylor 
Larry Taylor 
Melissa Taylor 
Susan Taylor 
Barbara Thomas 
Ashley Thompson 
Eric Thornsberry 


Tonya Smith 
Virginia Smith 
Antone Smits 
Donna Snavley 
Sean Snider 
Mary Ann Sonner 
Debbie Southern 
Karen Spence 
A.J. Stancil 

Chris St. Clair 
Brian Stoots 
John Stout 
Susan Sutherland 
Jeremy Swecker 
Dana Tabor 
Holly Tabor 
Roshelle l abor 
Adam Taylor 


Kristal Tolbert 
Laura Tolbert 
Amy Townley 
Jeremy Trail 
Jerry Trail 
Markie Trivett 
Douglas Tucker 
Bessie Turner 


Todd Turner 
Stephen LImberger 
Jill Underwood 
Stephen Underwood 
Stacy VanSise 
Lora Vest 
Sherry Vest 
Carrie Via 


Derick Waddell 
Carnell Walker 
J.C. Walker 
James Wall 
Rhonda Wall 
Whitney Wallace 
Mandy Waller 
Thomas Warburton 


Cheryl Warden 
Jay Webb 
Angi Welker 
David White 
Jennifer White 
William Whitlock 
Rhonda Whittaker 
Stephanie Williams 


Tiffany Williams 
Michelle Wimmer 
Anthony Wood 
Chris Woodie 
Darrell Woodyard 
Wendy Woodyard 
Derrick Woolridge 
Tracy Wright 


FRESHMEN — 229 




























Ms. Harriet Anderson 

Astronomy, Biology, Head Sponsor — 
Senior Class 

Mrs. Patti B. Askew 

Accounting I, Advanced Keyboarding, 
Typing, FBLA 

Mrs. Ann Aust 

Librarian 

Mr. Milton Aust 

Building Engineer 

Mr. Frank Baldwin 

Custodian 


Ms. Nancy Ballinger 

English 10, “Inklings” 

Mrs. Martha P. Bassett 

Cosmetology 1,11; VICA 

Mrs. Judith Belcher 

Vocational Assessment 

Mrs. Kathy Bishop 

Receptionist and Secretary 

Mrs. Jean L. Blankenship 

Chairman, Guidance Department 


Miss Vada Boyd 

CAl Lab Coordinator — English 

Miss Mary Britt 

PBD classes, Basic Algebra. Applications of 
Math, Peer Counseling 

Mrs. Karen Brown 

Math Lab Manager 

Mrs. Sarah Brubaker 

Consumer Math, Algebra I, Advanced 
Algebra/Trig., NHS 

Mr. Larry Bruce 

Custodian 


Mrs. Audrey A. Burnett 

AP English, English 12, English MACC, 
Junior Civitan 

Mr. Pat Burns 

Driver Education, Advanced PE, Adaptive 
PE, Head Basketball Coach 

Mrs. Patricia Burton 

English 9, Forensics 

Mr. Roger Caudell 

Auto Body 1,11; VICA 

Ms. Karen K. Cecil 

Earth Science 



Teaching away. Ms. Mary Todd gives 
one of her students instructions with 
the computer. Ms. Todd said, “The 
computers have enabled students to 
work at their own pace. It frees the 
teacher to concentrate on individuals 
who need extra help. The computers 
give instant feedback, and students 
usually leave the lab with positive 
feelings about the class. Therefore, 
student morale has improved because 
of the computer-assisted instruction. 
Computers will never replace the 
teacher, but they enhance the skills of 
a good teacher.” 




230 — FACULTY 































Mrs. Regina Cecil 

French I,III,IV, Peer Counseling 

Mrs. Louise Chinault 

Math Pod Secretary 

Mrs. Linda S. Cline 

Shorthand, Typing, Business Law, FBLA 

Ms. Karen Clymer 

Resource 


Mrs. Judith E. Cook 

English 12, English 9, Writing Lab 
Coordinator — English 

Mr. Mike Cox 

Agriculture I, Agriculture Production, FFA 

Ms. Susie Cutlip 

AV Librarian, Cheerleading Coordinator, 
Varsity Football Cheerleaders 

Miss Kim C. Davidson 

Computer Applications, BASIC, Beginning 
Typing 


Mr. Lloyd R. Davis 

Drafting II.Ill, Trade and Industrial 
Department Chairman, VICA Section 
Adviser 

Mrs. Maxine S. Dishon 

English 11 

Mrs. Diane V. Dixon 

PE 9,10, Peer Counseling, PCEA 

Mr. T. Ray Dunavant 

Tenth Grade Principal, Supervisor of 
Student Activities 


Mr. G. Frank Eller 

ICT, VICA 

Ms. Billie D. Farmer 

Keyboarding Applications, Word 
Processing, FBLA Assistant 

Mrs. Harriet Farris 

Earth Science, JV Girls’ Basketball Coach, 
Assistant Varsity Girls’ Basketball Coach 

Mrs. Charlotte S. Felts 

SRC, Detention 




4 /r/' alma matew 


Teaming with the faculty 


Imagine the feeling of 
becoming a colleague with 
one’s teachers. Such is the case 
with Ms. Mary Todd, who said, 
“It was at first very strange to 
be a teacher when most of my 
previous teachers were still 
here. Now it gives me a sense 
' of pride to know that I can 
contribute to my alma mater.” 

Ms. Todd is one of the 
graduates who came back here 


to teach after she finished her 
studies at Radford University. 
She did live for a while in 
California; but Ms. Todd 
returned to her home county 
because her family lives here, 
and her family is very 
important to her. 

While attending PCHS, Ms. 
Todd participated in Future 
Homemakers of America, 
Girls’ Athletic Association, 


Future Business Leaders of 
America; and she was secretary 
of the Black Student Union. 

A 1977 PCHS graduate, Ms. 
Todd said, “My fondest 
memories are of an English 
class I had my senior year with 
John Newberry and 
participating in theatre 
productions with Skip 
Maiden.” 

Ms. Todd is now a resource 


teacher and the Black History 
Club sponsor. In talking about 
her goals for her students, Ms. 
Todd said, “My goal for my 
students is that they learn 
self-respect and self-pride. I 
hope to teach by example the 
Golden Rule and to stress the 
greatest love of all — learning 
to love yourself.” 

Becca Woolley 


FACULTY —231 






























Mrs. Susan Ficke 

English 10, Forensic Club Assistant 

Mrs. Stephanie Fitzgerald 

Geometry A, Math 9, Peer Counseling, 
PBD Department Chairman, Pep Club 
Sponsor, Football Program Coordinator 

Ms. Carolyn Flinchum 

Bus Driver 

Mr. Randy Flinchum 

Twelfth Grade Guidance Counselor. 

Football Coach 


Mrs. Jackie Freeman 

Geography, American History, OM 

Mr. John M. Freeman 

German I,II,III,IV,V, Cards and Comics 
Club Sponsor 

Mr. Jim Gettys 

ICT I,II, VICA 

Mrs. Bonnie C. Graham 

Child Care 1,11, Child Development, 
HERO 


Mr. James D. Graham 

Agriculture, FFA 

Mrs. Doris Gravely 

Cafeteria 

Mr. James Gunter 

Psychology 

Ms. Bonnie Gusler 

Bus Driver 


Mr. James Hale 

Custodian 

Mrs. Layda C. Hamblin 

Spanish 1,111,1V 

Mrs. Rebecca D. Hancock 

English 9, English 10, APPALK1DS 

Mr. Carl E. Hanks 

Algebra B 1,11, Algebra I 



Hall Duty! Ms. |ennifer Thompson 
stops Jason Ferguson to check his hall 
pass. Hall duty is just one of the duties 
of Ms. Thompson, who teaches 
Spanish I. “I wanted to be an 
elementary teacher at first, but I went 
to Mexico and decided to teach 
Spanish,” said Ms. Thompson. 



232 — FACULTY 






















as a teacher 


Mrs. C. Faye Hanks 

Tenth Grade Counselor 

Mrs. Linda Hanshew 

IMC Secretary/Aide 

Mrs. Carol Harrell 

English Pod Secretary 

Mrs. Carolyn Harrell 

Bus Driver 

Ms. Peggy H. Hemmings 

Family Management, Fashion 
Merchandising, Child Care I, FHA, 
Freestyle Club 


Mr. C. Bruce Henderson 

Earth Science 

Mr. Steve Hester 

Advanced Art II, Studio Art 11,12, AP Art 
Studio, "Pinnacle” and “Prowler” 
Photography Adviser 

Mr. Michael Hickman 

U.S. Government, Social Studies 
Department Chairman, Track Coach 

Mrs. Jeanne Hillman 

English 10, PBD, Peer Counseling 

Mrs. Laura Hoffman 

Science Aide 


Mrs. Patricia B. Huber 

English 12, Journalism, “Prowler,” 
“Pinnacle" 

Mrs. Merita Hutchens 

Cafeteria 

Mrs. Brenda S. Hylton 

Office Procedures 1,11. Recordkeeping, 
Business Department Chairman, FBLA 
Assistant, Cooperative Office Education 
Coordinator 

Ms. Elaine H. Jackson 

Eleventh Grade Guidance Counselor 

Mr. John M. Johnson 

Date Processing I, COBOL, Software, Business 
Law, Business Economy, FBLA Sponsor 

Mr. Jerry Jones 

Building Maintenance I,II, VICA 

Mr. Ron Kanipe 

World Geography, Boys’ and Girls’ Tennis 
Coach 

Mr. Frank T. Kasik III 

English 11, Peer Counseling 

Mr. Jim Kelly 

AP Biology, Consumer Chemistry, Science 
Department Chairman, MACC 

Mrs. Mary Kelly 

Family Management, Life Management 
I,II. FHA 


“I shall return.” Ms. Jennifer 
Thompson could not resist the 
offer to return to her alma 
mater even though, she said, 
“To be perfectly honest, 1 had 
not intended to return to my 
hometown upon graduation 
from college.” 

Becoming a teacher in one’s 
own high school could be a 
bewildering experience. “It 


feels strange!” Ms. Thompson 
said. “Sometimes I feel like the 
teachers should still be asking 
me for a hall pass instead of 
me asking students for one,” 
she said. 

Ms. Thompson, who has 
come here for her first year as 
a teacher, said she has come to 
love teaching. She also 
remarked that she has found 


the faculty and administration 
to be very supportive. 

Things change, and the 
school is no exception. Ms. 
Thompson said, “T he most 
noticeable change is the 
decrease in the number of 
students. I graduated in 1986; 
and needless to say, the halls 
were a lot more crowded.” 

Teaching Spanish I, Ms. 


Thompson said that she would 
like her students to gain a 
greater appreciation for a 
culture other than our own. 

She feels it is important for all 
of us to learn about other 
people, cultures and customs. 

Toni Ratdiffe 


FACULTY — 233 
























Miss Patsy King 

US History, World Geography 

Mrs. Melba M. Knox 

Algebra II, Math 9, “Pinnacle” Business 
Manager 

Mrs. Ann Lambert 

Substitute Teacher 

Ms. Annyce Levy 

School Nurse, Teen Mothers, Positive Sell 

Image 

Mr. Carl R. Lindstrom 

Twelfth Grade Principal, Athletic Director 


Mrs. Edna A. Loftus 

Geometry A, Applications of Math. 

Algebra 

Mrs. Virginia Mammi 

English 9, English 11 

Mrs. Maggie Manning 

PE 10, Aerobics, Advanced PE, Volleyball 

Team 

Mr. Gary R. McCoy 

Marketing, Advanced Marketing, DECA 

Mrs. Thelma McDaniel 

Cafeteria 


Mrs. Pat McGlothlin 

Science Pod Secretary 

Mr. William E. McNeely 

Auto Mechanics I,II, VICA 

Mr. Bill Meyer 

American Government. Head Sponsor — 
Senior Class 

Ms. Gina M. Miano 

At-Risk Counselor. School/Family 
Counseling Center 

Ms. Elinor W. Morgan 

Head Librarian, IMC Skills, Freshman 
Cheerleaders, Cougar Pride Committee 


Ms. Rhonda L. Murdock 

English 11, English 9, PBD 

Mrs. Alma Myers 

Cafeteria 

Mrs. Majella H. Myers 

Ninth Grade Principal 

Mrs. Sharon Owens 

English 12, English 9, Pep Club 
Co-sponsor 

Dr. Karl O. Poison 

Natural Resources, Agriculture, FFA 




/a'jii//</ 6a /<■/' Aometaum 


'nu 


to give something back 


It is true that during most 
teenagers’ lifetimes they have 
said at least once that they 
cannot wait to get away from 
their homeplace as soon as 
possible. Once the opportunity 
prevails to leave, why stay? 

For Miss Kim Davidson the 
answer was simple, “I returned 
to Pulaski so that I could be 
close to my family and 
friends.” 

Miss Davidson, a 1978 


graduate, teaches in the 
Business Department. In 
speaking of her experiences 
here, Miss Davidson said, “I 
did not realize what nice 
facilities we had until 1 visited 
other high schools while in 
college. I consider it a privilege 
to teach here.” 

Graduates have fond 
memories of high school; and 
when asked what hers was, 

Miss Davidson said, “I enjoyed 


being involved in the concert 
choir activities and the 
friendships I had with my 
fellow classmates and 
teachers.” 

High school has changed 
since Miss Davidson was here, 
though; more students drive to 
school; there are seven periods 
in a day rather than six; and 
pupils now learn to type on 
computers instead of on the 
manual typewriters that she 


had, to name only a few of the 
changes. 

Miss Davidson has set many 
goals in the past for her 
students, but she feels her 
main goal is to teach her 
students well enough so that 
they will be prepared 
adequately for college or 
employment, whichever the 
case may be. 

Shana Taylor 


234 — FACULTY 
































anwiw 


Mrs. Martha Ireson Preston 

Art, Art Department Chairman, National 
Art Honor Society 

Mr. Bob Priest 

Symphonic Concert I,II, Jazz Band, 
Marching Band 

Mr. Gregory M. Quesenberry 

Choir, Fine Arts Department Chairman 

Mr. Raymond F. Ratcliffe 

Industrial Maintenance, Mechanics I,II,III, 
VICA 


Mr. Clark Reece 

American Government, Varsity Football 
Assistant 

Ms. Patricia Reece 

Ninth Grade Guidance Counselor 

Mr. Rodney Reedy 

World Geography, Girls’ Basketball 

Mr. J.B. Richards 

World History, Geography 


Mr. Robert H. Riley 

Vocational Assistant Principal 

Ms. Mary M. Roop 

Printing and Desk-top Publishing I,II,III, 
VICA 

Mrs. Ruby Roseberry 

Cafeteria 

Mrs. Glenda Roudebush 

English 9, Junior Civitan 


Mrs. Zoe M. Rowell 

Algebra II. Algebra B 1 11 

Mrs. Chime Saltz 

PE 9, “Pinnacle," “Prowler” 

Mrs. Phyllis A. Scott 

Resource 

Ms. Valerie Sellers 

Resource 



Busy as a business teacher. Miss Kim 
Davidson said, “I chose the Business 
Department because I liked the skills I 
learned when I was in high school. I 
also wanted to prepare students with 
the business skills they can use in 
almost any field of work.” 


FACULTY — 235 




















Mr. Odell B. Sheffey 

Eleveruh Grade Principal. Director ol 
Student Activities, Head Sponsor—Junior 

Class 

Mr. Fran Shelton 

Algebra 1, Algebra B I, Basic Algebra. 
FOR I RAN, Chess Tournament Team 

Mr. Jesse J. Shelton 

TV/Video Production and Business, Video 

Club 

Mr. Don Skeen 

PE 10. Driver Education, PCEA President 


Mr. Don Smith 

Work Experience Program, VIC A 

Mrs. Linda H. Snow 

English 12, Head Sponsor — Sophomore 

Class 

Ms. Nancy Sparks 

Introduction to Health Occupations, 
Health Assistant I and II, HOSA 

Mrs. Betty G. Spraker 

Algebra 1, Algebra B I, Consumer Math 



Mrs. Elissa Steeves 

Horticulture IIEIV.V, FFA 

Mrs. Lisa Swope 

AP History, US History 

Ms. Evelyn H. Tate 

Algebra B I, Geometry A,B, National 
Honor Society 

Mrs. Maxine Taylor 

Custodian 


Ms. Jennifer Thompson 

Spanish I 

Mrs. Ruby Tickle 

Bus Driver 

Ms. Mary M. Todd 

Resource, Black History Club Sponsor 

Mrs. Marie Trail 

Administrative Aide 




onu 


n f 




me 


to the Science Pod 




An alumna who has 
returned as a teacher is Ms. 
Karen Cecil, a 1976 graduate 
who teaches earth science. 

When asked why she 
returned to Pulaski to teach, 
she said, “I really like the 
area’s topography. Also friends 
and family are in the area.” 

Some of Ms. Cecil’s fondest 
memories of her high school 
years were club activities, pep 


rallies, being the drum 
majorette in the band, and 
band trips. 

One way that Ms. Cecil feels 
that high school today differs 
from high school when she was 
here is that the students are 
not as responsible for their 
actions. She also said that 
students sometimes are more 
apathetic and want everything 
given to them. Coming back to 


Pulaski County to teach was 
not easy at first. Ms. Cecil said, 
“I felt very apprehensive at 
first because I did not know 
what to expect. Everyone was 
so helpful, especially the 
teachers in the Science Pod. 
They were so supportive and 
helped me to make my first 
year successful.” 

The goals that Ms. Cecil 
wants for her students are for 


them to see science as a 
challenge, to be inspired and 
keep an open mind, and to 
question the world and its 
processes around them without 
accepting everything that is 
given to them. 

Of course, these goals could 
apply to everyone, not just her 
students. 

Alison Spain 


236 — FACULTY 





















Mr. Louis Tribble 

Construction Technology, Wood 
Technology, Drafting 1, I SA 

Mrs. Marianne Trotter 

Accounting 1,11, Typing, Peer Counseling, 
FBLA 

Mrs. Goldie Turpin 

Cafeteria 

Mr. Ted James Viers 

Vocational Guidance, Job Placement 
Counselor 

Mr. Philip D. Vickers 

AP Pascal 

Miss Brenda Waller 

English 1 1. English 10 

Mr. Charles W. Ward 

Electricity I,II.Ill, V1CA — Head Sponsor 

Ms. Cindy Watson 

Intervention Specialist 

Mrs. Marie Watson 

Cafeteria 

Mrs. Mickey G. Weikle 

Food Occupations 1,11. Child Development, 
HERO 


Ms. Rhonda Welsh 

Advanced Theatre Arts, Theatre Arts 
Exploration, Stage Craft and Set Design, 
Direct Theatre Productions, Drama Club 
Sponsor 

Mr. Bert Weschke 

Drafting I.II, Communications 
Technology, TSA, VICA 

Mr. Jesse L. White 

AP Calculus, Pre-Calculus. Advanced 
Algebra/Trig, Geometry B, Golf Coach 

Mrs. Ann Williams 

Cafeteria 

Mr. Reuben H. Williams 

Building Maintenance 1,11, VICA 


Mr. Dewey S. Wilson 

Principal 

Mr. Wayne Wooten 

Calculus, Geometry, Math MACC, Math 
Department Chairman 

Mrs. Pat Worrell 

Bus Driver 

Mr. David Wright 

Driver Education, PE 10, Cross Country 

Mr. Grady Young 

Building Trades, VICA 



Homework again? Ms. Karen Cecil, 
earth science teacher, checks her 
lesson plans in preparation for her 
next class. Ms. Cecil received her 
undergraduate degree from VA Tech 
and her master’s degree from Radford 
University. About her return to teach 
at her alma mater, Ms. Cecil said, "I 
never thought I'd be doing all this 
again.” 


FACULTY — 237 





















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1601 Bobwhite Blud. 
PULASKI 

PHONE: (703) 980-6881 


— ADVERTISEMENTS 






















VALUE "l 1 "" SERVICE 


A\L 

STORE 


Pulaski Drugs 
Mall Shopping Ctr. 
Rt, 99 980-6260 


Dublin Pharmacy 
Route 11 
Dublin, Va. 
674-4816 



Pulaski 980-3923 
Dublin 674-1309 
Locally owned and operated 
Burgers — Mexican — Breakfast 
Ice Cream 


“Your Store On The Corner” 

HATCHER 

ASKEW 

Downtown Pulaski 


Homebody at heart 


Since she was big enough to 
carry a stack of books around 
the house, Mrs. Brenda Jones 
had always wanted to be a 
teacher. “My brother and sister 
knew it was time to ‘play 
school’ when they saw me 
lugging my books around the 
house,” Mrs. Jones said. Now 
she is a sixth-grade teacher at 
Pulaski Middle School and a 
coach of the Olympics of the 
Mind team. 

The 1975 graduate was an 
active participant in the 
activities and opportunities the 
high school offered. “I was a 
basketball cheerleader, a flag 
corps member, a member of 
the National Honor Society 
and Tri-Hi-Y as well as a class 
officer and a member of the 
SCA,” Mrs. Jones said. She 
added, “In my senior year I 


received the DAR (Daughters 
of the American Revolution) 
award.” 

Mrs. Jones believes that high 
school helped her to mature 
and become a more 
responsible person. However, 
it was college that molded her 
into a more independent 
person; the lack of attention 
given by professors forced her 
to learn how to take care of 
herself. 

Mrs. Jones attended 
Tennessee Wesleyan, a small 
college in a small town, where 
she received a degree in 
elementary education. 

Mrs. Jones admitted she was 
excited about finding a job in 
Pulaski County because she 
would always be “a homebody 
at heart.” 

Shana Taylor 


DeVilbiss Funeral 
Home, Inc. 

1200 GROVE AVE. 
RADFORD, VIRGINIA 
PHONE: (703) 639-2422 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 241 











An apple for 

Students often wonder what 
it would really be like to be a 
teacher instead of always being 
the student. For Teresa 
Wheeling, that thought became 
a reality. 

Following her years here, 

Ms. Wheeling attended 
Radford University, where she 
earned a bachelor’s degree in 
1985. Two years later she 
received her master’s degree in 
English. She then taught 
freshman English at RU, but 
she has returned to Pulaski 
County where she is teaching 
English at Dublin Middle 
School. 

The experiences Ms. 

Wheeling had while in high 
school were very influential. In 
fact, the English courses and 
teachers here were what 
sparked her interest in 
pursuing a career in English. 

Ms. Wheeling also worked 
on the yearbook staff for two 
years. She explained that these 
experiences greatly increased 
her interest in writing. “That 
was the first time I was able to 
see writing’s real purpose — 


THOMAS M. SEACLE & SONS 

FUNERAL HOME 

415 NORTH JEFFERSON AVENUE 
980-1700 


me teacher 

communication,” said Ms. 
Wheeling. 

Besides her work as a 
teacher, Ms. Wheeling also 
works with the APPALKIDS. 
She said she started this work 
because she believes it is 
essential for all people to 
understand their culture and 
because she has always 
admired the work Mrs. 
Hancock, APPALKIDS 
sponsor, and the group have 
done. 

It is because of her interest 
in young people and education 
that Ms. Wheeling spends 
many of her after-school hours 
here helping in whatever way 
she can. “I would encourage 
students to invest themselves in 
their education. I just hope 
that today’s students realize 
that what they choose to get 
out of high school directly 
affects their futures. As a 
student, you have to put forth 
the effort. No one can do it 
for you,” she concluded. 



PULASKI MAIL. ROUTf 99 
rUtASKI, VIRGINIA 


FEATURING 

FAMILY DINING ENJOYMENT 

WHERE YOU HO NOT PAY FOR EXTRAS 


1631 BOB WHITE BOULEVARD 
PULASKI, VIRGINIA 24301 
PHONE: 980-6160 


BOWER FUNERAL CHAPELS 


E. MAIN STREET 
DUBLIN, VIRGINIA 24084 
PHONE: 674-4665 


Jessica Sifford 



1201 E. MAIN STREET 
PULASKI, VIRGINIA 24301 


242 


ADVERTISEMENTS 






































BANK 

We’re Right For The Times. 


Pulaski 

Peak’s Knob * 

Fairlaum * 

*24 Hour Cash Flow Banking 


Sovran Bank, HA. 
Member FDIC 


Need insurance for your 
home, car, life, boat or RV? 



Omer E. Fannin 
Karen L. Fannin 
104 East Main Street 
Pulaski, Virginia 24301 
980-0432 



Call me! 

I have the right coverage 
for all your needs. 



Allstate Insurance Company 
Life from: Allstate Life Insurance Company 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 243 












Where imagination combines 
with technotogy 


Inland Motor Division - Kollmorgen Corporation 

501 First Street 
Radford, VA 24141 
703-639-9045 


CHEVROLET 


< IIIUMIK 


Plymouth 


Dodge 


JodgeTnirki 


Pulaski County’s 
New and Used Vehicle 
Headquarters 


“We support the 
Pulaski County High School 
Cougar Programs” 


CHRYSLER • PLYMOUTH • DODGE • JEEP/EAGLE 
Bob White Blvd. 

at Memorial Drive D.L. No. 882 

Local — Pulaski County 980-7110 In Virginia 1-800-442-4282 


CHEVROLET•GEO • DAIHATSU 


Mum 


PULASKI, VA 


CHRYSLER • PLYMOUTH • DODGE • JEEP/EAGLE 

Bob White Blvd. 


at Memorial Drive 
Local — Pulaski County 980-7110 


D.L. No. 882 
In Virginia 1-800-442-4282 


244 — ADVERTISEMENTS 







































APPALACHIAN TIRE PRODUCTS INC. 
APPALACHIAN 
TIRE 

Rt. 99, Pulaski 
980-3760 

1st & Walker Streets, Radford 
639-2451 

Official Inspection Station No. 4485 
Services Available In Radford 


The Draper Mercantile, Inc. 

Exit 30 — 2 Minutes Off 1-81 


r: 


I! Hi 


T 


|li IIJIJ1J] 1III) !J 1 f llllll !l iil! [Ilf I III ft! 


Discount Furniture Showrooms 
Lee R. and Katie LaFleur (703) 980-0786 




SCREEN PRINTING AT IT*S BEST !! 

ELEVEN WEST 

•T-SHIRT$*CAPS* 

•GREEK WEAR*D0RM SHIRTS* 

•$WEATPANT$*80XER $H0RT$*EMBR0I0ERY 
•MATCHB00KS*KEY CHAINS*WIND0W 0ECALS 
•JACKETS*S WE ATSHIRTS*BUMPER S'. RIPS* 

•MAGNETIC SIGNS*CUPS*G LASS WARE 
•TACKLE TWILL-TRANSFERS* 

BLAH • BLAH • BLAH 

CONGRATULATIONS PULASKI CO. SENIORS I 

RETAIL 703*639*4064 • AT 2 I0X 246A*AADF0A0 VA* 24141 • PROD. 703*«3»*»31» 



OFFICIAL PRINTER OF COUGAR WEAR 







EPI 

Edmonds 
Printing, Inc. 

Pulaski, Va. 

(703) 980-2411 



Estab. in 1891 as B.D. Smith 
& Bros., Printers 




For 1981 graduate, 

Ms. Cindy Farmer, 
accomplishments and hard 
work did not end in high 
school. After graduation, Ms. 
Farmer attended Virginia 
Tech where she majored in 
communication studies with 
options in public relations and 
broadcasting journalism and 
minored in sociology and 
business marketing. While at 
college, she joined the Beta Phi 
sorority; held a class office; 
was head of the Hokie 
Hostesses, an organization 
which welcomes new students; 
and was the Homecoming 
queen of the freshman class. 
Also during her years in 
college she worked as a 
student secretary for the VA 
Tech Athletic Department and 
as a sales clerk at a clothing 
store. 

During her senior year at 
Tech, Ms. Farmer interned 
with WSLS TV-10 and then 
got a part-time job there as a 
reporter in the New River 
Valley. Immediately following 
college, Ms. Farmer began 
working at WSLS TV-10 as a 
noon weather forecaster and 
reporter. Gradually she moved 
up to early morning anchor 
and eventually to 6:00 and 
11:00 weather director. 

Ms. Farmer has also given 
much of her time to charitable 


organizations. She gave her 
time to the Toys for Tots 
foundation for the past four 
years, worked with the 
Roanoke Jaycees, the Special 
Olympics, the March of Dimes, 
the American Cancer Society 
and Red Cross, and the 
Children’s Miracle Network. 

Ms. Farmer worked for 
WSLS TV-10 for five years 
and is now working at WFMY 
as a co-host of the “Good 
Evening Show,” an evening 
magazine show out of 
Greensboro, NC. Ms. Farmer’s 
dream is to have a syndicated 
show like the “Good Evening 
Show.” 

Ms. Farmer recalled that 
being the president of her class 
and being a cheerleader in 
high school helped her a great 
deal. They taught her how to 
present herself better in front 
of a crowd and how to be 
more of a public person. Being 
on the yearbook staff in tenth 
grade also helped develop her 
writing skills, she said. 

“It is very important for me 
to let people know where I am 
from. I am very proud of my 
Pulaski County roots, and I let 
people know that every chance 
I get. Never forsake your 
family or your friends or your 
roots,” said Ms. Farmer. 

Becca Woolley 








































Accent ’ Opticians , Inc. 

—LICENSED OPTICIANS— 

Pulaski Shopping Mall 
Pulaski, Va. 

980-0087 

Tom Breeding *Ruth Ratcliff 


Fowlkes Grocery 
and Custom 
Meat Processing 

Richard and Stella Fowlkes, 
Owners 
980-3216 


Changes 


Birth, school, college, 
marriage, career . . . changes 
naturally occurring in life. 
Being born in Pulaski and 
reared here, one keeps close 
contact with the hometown; 
and that close contact amid 
many changes is important to 
Deborah Van Epp. “Attending 
this school, I was impressed 
with all of the opportunities 
available with the addition of 
the vocational building. It was 
a big change, but worth it,” 
said Mrs. Van Epp. 

Working has kept Mrs. Van 


Epp within her home county. 
She is employed at Magnox, 
formerly Hercules, as a 
customer service 
representative. But her work 
here does give her some 
international contacts. She 
works with people who travel 
to and from Europe as 
representatives of the Magnox 
Corporation. Her work, here 
in the county, has been a 
fulfilling experience for Mrs. 
Van Epp as she reflects on the 
changes in her life. 

Shirene Broadwater 


HEARING AIO 
SALES & SERVICE, INC 


P.0 BOX 53 
DUBLIN, VA 24084 


LUTHER C. REPASS 


DEALER & FITTER 

JANICE ANDERSON 


9:30 A M. • 4:00 P.M. 

674-4889 MONDAY - FRIDAY 

ACROSS FROM HARDEE'S SAT. BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 


Gilbert 

Auto Parts, Inc. 

Discounts for Students 
Faculty, and Staff 

One Armstrong Street 
Dublin, VA 24084 



246 


ADVERTISEMENTS 














JEFFERSON MIFFS 


"PROUD MEMBER OF THE PULASKI COMMUNITY FOR 50 YEARS" 



Valley and Commerce Streets — Pulaski, Virginia 

Phone: (703) 980-1530 











Your Chamber Takes Pride 
In And Supports Business, 
Education And The Young People 
of Pulaski County High School. 



TOOUBSELF! 


CHAMBER 



OF COMMERCE 


"Building A Better Pulaski County 

































CLASS RINGS ! GRADUATION ANNOUNCEMENTS 
CAPS } GOWNS 

DIPLOMA COVERS} MEDALS » AWARDS 


John W.(Bill) Edmunds 
PO. Box 4095 


Roanoke.Virginia 24015 
(703) 774-4525 


J. Barton Edmunds 
2923 Glenmont Dr. 
Roanoke.Virginia 24018 
(703)772-0908 



elf 


FURNITURE 


Heilig-Meyers 

Furniture 


P.O. Box 1370 
Rt. 99, E. Main 
Pulaski, Virginia 
980-3242 




& HOMETOWN 

RENTALS & SALES 


TVs • APPLIANCES * FURNITURE 

RT 1, BOX 510D. BLUEFIELD, WV 24701/PH. 327-5154 
106 THORN ST.. PRINCETON. WV 24740/PH. 425-5608 
P.O. BOX 5110. ROYAL CITY. VA 24614/PH, 935-6406 
1064. EAST MAIN STREET. PULASKI. VA 24301/PH 960 0999 


TELEPHONE 639-0111 


MAURICE R. HAMILL, JR., D.D.S., M.S. 

DIPLOMATE AMERICAN BOARD OF ORTHODONTICS 


Mi i ill in 

An>TK.an Association oi 


Amctican Association ol 

Orthodontists —=—— 



MARTIN BUILDING 
1127 NORWOOD STREET 
RADFORD, VIRGINIA 24141 


Drawing me world 


This could best describe Joy 
Wayne, a 1988 graduate, who 
is now in her third year in art 
school. She is attending 
Atlanta College of Art and 
Design in Atlanta, Georgia, 
where she is planning to major 
in communication design. 

In speaking of her 
experiences since high school. 
Miss Wayne said, “My most 
interesting thing I have done 
since going to college is living 
in Washington, DC, for two 
years while I was attending 
Corcoran School of Art.” 


Miss Wayne admitted she 
has not decided exactly what 
type of job she would like. “I’ll 
either want to work in a 
graphic design firm or go 
freelance,” she said. 

“My fondest memories of 
Pulaski County High School 
would be my four years with 
Mr. Charles Goolsby, art 
teacher, and the Art 
Department, something I will 
always remember,” said Miss 
Wayne. 

Sandra Weikle 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 249 

































LONG-AIRDOX CO. 


JACK W. WRIGHT 

PERSONNEL MANAGER 


P. 0 Box 1231 Office: 703/980-4530 

Pulaski, VA 24301 

'5*i 

FI F! fl A member of T he Marmon Group of companies 


With Highest Honor 


In four short years of 
attending Virginia Tech, Mr. 
Geoffrey Layman, a 1986 
PCHS graduate, achieved 
more than most people only 
hope for in a lifetime. Mr. 
Layman, who majored in 
political science, graduated 
from Tech in the spring of ’90 
with one of the highest awards 
possible, that of being a 
summa cum laude graduate. 

In his senior year at Tech, Mr. 
Layman also received the 
Joseph L. Bernd Award as an 
outstanding political science 
senior. 

As a freshman, Mr. Layman 
received a University 
Scholarship Award. He was 
recognized in Who’s Who in 
American University and 
Colleges and also in 
Outstanding College Students 
in America. He was on the 
Dean’s List every term and was 
on the President’s List twice. 

Even with his time-filling 
achievements and long hours 
of studying, Mr. Layman still 
found the time to participate 
in other collegiate activities. He 
was a member of the Marching 


Virginians, the Virginia Tech 
marching band, in which he 
played the trumpet; he was 
also active in the Metro Pep 
Band. Mr. Layman was a 
member of the Phi Eta Sigma 
Honor Society, the Pi Sigma 
Alpha Honor Society, the Phi 
Kappa Phi Honor Fraternity, 
and Phi Beta Kappa. 

While still attending PCHS, 
Mr. Layman was a graduation 
marshal and a recipient of the 
Daughters of the American 
Revolution History Award. In 
1986, he was nominated as an 
Academic All-American, 
received the National Band 
Award, and was a member of 
All-Regional Band. 

Activities he participated in 
during his high school “career” 
included Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes, French 
Club, Symphonic, Marching, 
Jazz, and Pep Band, and the 
track and tennis teams. 

Mr. Layman is now 
attending Indiana University 
in Bloomington, Indiana, 
where he received a three year 
fellowship for $46,500.00. 

Wendy Foushee 


MAGN X 

INCORPORATED 


Good Luck Seniors 


MAGNOX PULASKI INCORPORATED 

P.0. DRAWER 431 
PULASKI, VIRGINIA 24301 USA 
FAX (703) 980-3538 
TELEX 265138 MAGN-UR 
PHONE (703) 980-3500 



250 


ADVERTISEMENTS 


















Just like you 
We're there too. 

Js»0uti|foest tEhttes 

Pulaski County's hometown daily 
newspaper for over 80 years. 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 251 





















“J back 


the family insurance 
I sell with 


good neighbor service 



STATE FARM 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICES: BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 


Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. 



EVELYN F. SKEEN, Agent 


Dublin Office Building 
Office: 674-5285 
Home: 980-2009 



a trusted and respected name in funeral service 
Four Generations . . . 

Serving your Community For The Past 101 Years 


252 — ADVERTISEMENTS 


















PHONE 980-1383 HOME 674-6878 

Marshall 

Welding Supplies 

DISTRIBUTORS FOR LINDE COMPANY 
AND LINCOLN ELECTRIC CO. 

BELL AVENUE 

MILLARD J. SPENCE PULASKI, VA 




STATE INSPECTION 


WHEEL BALANCING 
AND 

ALIGNMENT SERVICE 

WOODYARD AUTO SERVICE 

RT. 100, DUBLIN, VA 
“EXPERT MECHANICS’’ 

All Types of Automotive Work 

DOUG GALLIMORE PHONE 674-6440 


Mission Impossible 


Not for Mark Harris and 
Faith Gibson Harris, members 
of the graduating class of 
1979, who are now active 
missionaries in South Africa. 

After graduation, Mr. Harris 
attended Radford University 
where he received a master’s 
degree in English. Mrs. Harris 
attended New River 
Community College, receiving 
an associate’s degree in 
computer programming and 
operation. They were married 
in December of 1985. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Harris 
had grown up in the church 
and were influenced by their 
former pastor, Kit Teasdale. 
His influence was a major 
factor in their deciding to 


become missionaries. In 
preparation, they traveled to 
London and attended a school 
of missions for four months. 
They then toured by rail, 
visiting France, Belgium, 
Germany and Switzerland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris have 
been stationed in Natal, South 
Africa, since 1986; they now 
have a three-year-old son. 
“They plan to continue their 
missionary work,” said Mrs. 
Harris’ mother. “They are 
quite happy with what they are 
doing now,” she concluded. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris will be 
eligible for furlough in early 
1991. 

Tammy McMillan 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 253 


























NEHI 

BOTTLING CO. 


PHONE 980-3231 


P. o. BOX 1068 

James R. Neighbors 609 commerce st. 

PRESIDENT 

PULASKI, VA. 24301 


Night Time Video 
Fairlawn 
633-1660 

Areas largest Nintendo Rental 
Over 500 games to choose from 
Over 8,000 movie rentals to choose from 
In the Oakvillage Shopping Center 


Working away 


Out of school, out of state! 
Mr. Isaac Ritter, formerly of 
Fairlawn, graduated from here 
in 1985. After moving to 
Greensboro, North Carolina, 
he began working at Volvo 
White GM Corporate 
Headquarters as an assistant 
technician. The company then 
paid for two years of his 
college education, where he 
completed one year of 
machine shop and one year of 
auto mechanics. 

After completing his 
education in 1987, Mr. Ritter 
was promoted to associate 
technician, where he worked in 
the metal fabricating 
department. Soon, though, he 
was promoted to technician. 
Now he makes and designs 
parts, test drives the “almost” 
completely finished products, 
and builds prototype vehicles. 

Experimental engineering, 


where Mr. Ritter works, can be 
hazardous at times. For 
instance, the gas tanks actually 
explode as part of the testing. 
However, he says, “I am very 
comfortable with my job. 

There are excellent working 
conditions, and I couldn’t ask 
for a better job.” 

Part of that job included 
flying to Michigan in 1988 for 
one week to test drive new 
models. This exercise was 
conducted at the Chrysler 
Proving Grounds. 

This career for Mr. Ritter 
stemmed from his desire to 
know more about cars, a desire 
that began when he was 12 
years old. He attributes his 
success to the encouragement 
of friends and teachers who 
pushed him to give 100 
percent effort and to work 
hard. 

Toni Ratcliffe 




Pulaski, VA 24301 

Off.: (703) 980-2525 STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Home: (703) 674-8281 home offices: Bloomington. Illinois 

"Like a Good Neighbor, State Farm is There"' 


254 


ADVERTISEMENTS 


















BANK OF SPEEDWELL 


A PREMIER BANK 

• SPEEDWELL • WYTHEVILLE • FT. CHISWELL 
• PULASKI • RURAL RETREAT • DUBLIN 

Member F.D.I.C. 



Saint Albans 
mjm Psychiatric Hospital 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 255 























We know you hurt 
We want to help! 




Slips, falls, lifting too much; job and auto injuries. 
They’re an every day fact of life. 

Back pain is America’s number one health problem 
and at Tuck Clinic of Chiropractic we’re 
doing something about it. We have instituted a three- 
step program to effectively treat the problem at its 
' source. 

:' ' Our program aims to eliminate back pain 

and to correct the cause of the ache and 
discomfort. And to make the correc¬ 
tion permanent! 

If you suffer back or neck 

r _problems or symptoms don’t 

* become a back pain surgery 

^ statistic. 

If you’ve been told that you will have 
j. to learn to live with back pain you owe it to 
yourself to find out if there is a Chiroprac¬ 
tic answer to your problem. 

We won’t accept your case unless we honestly 
believe we can help. And to make sure expenses don’t 
interfere with your treatment, we accept insurance 
assignment. 

Call for complete back pain examination today! 


3 


10 Years Experience In Relief Of: 

• Neck 8c Shoulder Pain 

• Disc Injury 

• Pain Conditions 

Tuck Clinic of Chiropractic, P.C. 


65 East Main Street, Pulaski, Va. 
Rt. 114, Fairlawn, Va. 24141 
Call 980-8353 


Dedicated To Quality Care 


256 — ADVERTISEMENTS 







Tipton Ridge 

Veterinary Medical Center 

1858 Bob White Blvd., Pulaski, Va. 

Dr. Randy Vaughn 
980-0186 




: 


OLD FASHIONED 

HAMBURGERS 




A tittle PR 


“I’m very grateful for the 
fine teachers I had while 
growing up in Pulaski 
County.” These were the 
words of Pulaski County High 
School graduate, Ms. Jeanne 
Whitman. Ms. Whitman, who 
graduated in 1975, is now the 
editor and public affairs 
officer at Wake Forest 
University. 

Many years of studying and 
hard work earned her the job 
she now holds. During the 
1979-80 academic year, Ms. 
Whitman taught English here; 
then in 1983, she finished a 
master’s degree in English at 
the University of Virginia. She 
earned her master’s degree in 
business administration at 
Wake Forest in 1987. Ms. 
Whitman then took a year to 
live in England and study at 
the University of Birmingham. 

While in Europe, Ms. 
Whitman had the opportunity 
to travel to France, Germany, 
Switzerland, Spain, Italy and 
Russia. Her work now takes 
her to cities such as New York, 
Washington, DC, and San 
Francisco. 

It was in 1983 that she 
joined the staff at Wake Forest 
as assistant to the chief 


academics officer. “I learned 
how colleges were run, how 
curriculums affected colleges, 
the faculty, funding for 
programs and institutional 
priorities,” she explained. 

In 1987, Ms. Whitman 
became the editor and public 
affairs officer where she has 
the responsibility of producing 
material for the university. Ms. 
Whitman explained that her 
work can become a “stressful, 
deadline-driven business.” In 
addition, Ms. Whitman also 
has the responsibility of 
keeping up with Wake Forest’s 
printing services and teaching 
honors classes in the 
undergraduate college. 

However, the hectic schedule 
does not dampen her spirits. “I 
feel fortunate to have a job 
with very bright, politically 
active, creative people.” she 
said. 

Ms. Whitman said she also 
likes the university 
environment as a wonderful 
place to work and to keep 
learning. “Publications is a 
hard work, but the final 
product would be well worth 
the effort,” Ms. Whitman 
concluded. 

Tracy Speller 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 257 




















Claytor Park Concessions, Inc. 


Claytor Lake State Park 
Dublin, Virginia 

Barry S. Moore, Jr. P.O. Box 621 

MGR. Pulaski, VA 

703 980-8500 24301 


Marina, Beach 

Restaurant 

Ramp 

Gas 


Snacks 

Ice 

Bait 



SOUTHWEST 

The Place to Bank for Value 


New River Valley 

639-1691 

Member FDlC 

- Virginia end V z<e • eg sfe-ea with t.-e w 5 3 c? O’* 


Succeed 


“What shall I be? I have 
excelled in both academic and 
extracurricular areas. I can go 
in practically any direction in 
search of a career.” These 
could be the words of Mr. Joe 
Guthrie, a 1985 high school 
graduate who has found 
success in many areas. 

After graduating, Mr. 
Guthrie entered Virginia Tech. 
While there, he carried a 3.98 
QCA and financed 80 percent 
of his education through 
scholarships. He studied in the 
Department of Agricultural 
Economics and worked as a 
teaching assistant and a 
research assistant as part of his 
program. 

While working for his 
master’s degree, Mr. Guthrie 
had the opportunity to live in 
New Zealand. During his stay 


there, he attended classes and 
studied the geographical area. 
After returning from New 
Zealand, he received his 
master’s degree in February 
1991. 

Mr. Guthrie also excelled in 
other areas as well. He served 
as president of the 
Agricultural Economics Club, 
was vice president of the Block 
and Bridle Club; he served as 
assistant editor of the yearbook 
and vice president of Omicron 
Delta Kappa National 
Leadership Honor Society. Mr. 
Guthrie also took part in 
intramural softball and 
basketball. In his senior year, 
he was named the Outstanding 
Graduating Senior, and this 
led to his selection as Man of 
the Year. 

Mark Barnes 



Corner Cupboard 
“Country Traditions” 

Village Oaks Shopping Center 
Radford, VA 24141 

(703) 639-9520 Pat Buckland 


Aid to education. 



258 


ADVERTISEMENTS 





























Pulaski County Life Saving Crew 


P.O. Box 368 • Dublin, VA 24084 



SiViln 


Pulaski County Life Saving Crew 
Serving the fine citizens of Pulaski 
County for 42 years 


TOGETHER WE CAN SAVE LIVES 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 259 



















Pulaski 


IJUNTY mPEUMAY 




'Virginia'* Final 4/10 Mile Paved Oval” 


Route 2, Box 278, Radford, VA 24141 Telephone (703) 639-2000 



Winston 

RacingSeries 




GRAND NATIONAL 


Racing every Saturday night through September 
— Special events for 1991 — 


May 25 

July 6 
July 27 
August 31 


Martinsville Challenge 
“Smart” modifiers 
Busch Grand National Series 
Martinsville Challenge 


260 — ADVERTISEMENTS 






























C and L Camper Sales 

Radford, Virginia 
639-1708 



Max’s Bakery, Jewelry, 
and Gifts 

334 N. Washington Avenue 
Pulaski, Virginia 24301 
703-980-4262 
40 years in business 


Flying high 


“John Michael Epperly.” 

This was the sound that rang 
through the gym on June 6, 
1985. After graduating 
eighteenth in his class, John 
Epperly entered West Point, 
beginning his service in the 
Army. “I always wanted to be a 
combat leader,” said Lt. 
Epperly, who graduated in the 
top third of his class on May 
24, 1989. He earned a 
bachelor of science degree with 
a major in international 
relations and a minor in math 
and engineering. 

In speaking of his years at 
West Point, Lt. Epperly said, 
“During my time as a cadet, I 
only spent summers training to 
be a soldier. The academic 
year was just that, albeit set in 
a military atmosphere. The 


immediate goal beyond 
graduation was to become a 
platoon leader.” Lt. Epperly 
commands a platoon of four 
M-l battle tanks. He has been 
a platoon leader since January 
of 1990. 

Lt. Epperly has served in 
Ireland, The Republic of 
Korea, and all over the United 
States since his graduation 
from West Point. 

Lt. Epperly’s advice to high 
school students is “You can do 
anything you want if first you 
believe; and second, you don’t 
quit.” He said, “Luckily all my 
teachers really cared enough to 
help me realize my dreams. If 
any students have a goal and 
want to learn, the teachers will 
give them what they need.” 

Leslie Tate 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 261 























MARTIN 

PHARMACY 

Main Street 
Pulaski, VA. 
PH. 980-4060 


“We Care For Your Special Friend” 

PULASKI ANIMAL CLINIC 

DOWNTOWN PULASKI 

980-2180 

David H. Lilly, V.M.D. 674-6349 


Cleaning up 


“What am I going to do 
after high school?” “I’m going 
to find a job.” For one man, 
that was true. Mr. Larry 
Bruce, a 1976 graduate, went 
straight into the work world. 

First, Mr. Bruce worked for 
Volvo White as a security 
guard. After working there for 
ten years, he joined the staff 
for janitorial services at the 
high school. Fie has worked 
here the past five years. 

Mr. Bruce said, “I enjoy the 
job. The students are not that 
bad. Back when I went to 
school, you were not allowed 
to be seen with candy or gum. 


Today it is different. However, 
the students are not that 
messy.” 

In high school, Mr. Bruce 
participated in the art club, 
SCA, chorus, and served on 
the Human Relations Council. 

During his time off, Mr. 
Bruce travels as much as 
possible. He said, “I just take 
off to the Carolinas, 

Tennessee, and other states to 
visit relatives and other 
friends. Every now and then, I 
run into an old classmate. 

Over all, I just enjoy life.” 

Mark Barnes 



HahqI 

1 


Available At I hese AHCS Locations: 

RADFORD: 1200 B Tyler Ave. 

639-0707 

BLACKSBURG: 102 Davis St. 

552-6605 

PULASKI: 93 W. Main St. 

980-0505 

GALAX: 110 Valley St. 

236-5575 

MARION: 201 E. Main St. 

783-4471 

Advanced Health-Care Services 



262 


ADVERTISEMENTS 

















Chevron 



HUFF PETROLEUM COMPANY 

PULASKI. VIRGINIA 


SALUTES THE STUDENTS OF 
PULASKI COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL 



UJeVe. 



Cougar Proud! 


PULASKI MOTOR CO., INC. 


P.0. BOX 939 • ROUTE 99 • EAST MAIN STREET • PULASKI, VIRGINIA 24301 

980-1050 

639-1235 

1-800-868-1050 




ADVERTISEMENTS — 263 
























RESIDENTIAL*►COMMERCIflLAFflRMi*lilMD 


Service & Security Auto-Home-Life-Hospital 

HODGE 

INSURANCE 


Corner of 5th St. & Washington Ave. 


980-0863 


264 — ADVERTISEMENTS 






































■ 

1 

I 


1 

i 

! 




I 





A Cl I It 1ST CENTRUM) CHURCH 


AI.IVF. WITH HOD'S LOVE 
SERVING TIIK NEEDS OF PERSONS 
IN ALL ACES AND STATIONS 
OF LIFE 

Slindiiy School 0:05 
Worship 1 I :00 


A onili F 


rllounhjji 


Larry Oii.slry. Ta.Uar 



Catch the Spirit 

DUBLIN UNITED METHODIST CIIURCII 

A (A It INC MINISTRY (THERE All. VEOPl.E ARE WELCOME 

424 Bail Main Slrccl, Dublin Telephone: R71.512A 


\ 



FARMER REAL ESTA TE 

221 Broad Street 


P.O. Box 004 
Dublin, VA 24084 


DA VID S. FARMER Office (703) 074-0002 

BROKER - AUCTIONEER Home (703) 074-5550 


OLD 

DOMINION 

INSURANCE 

SERVICES 

INC. 

24 Third St., Pulaski, Va. 24301 
(703) 980-2911 

Bondurant Office Building 
P.O. Box 1086; 1302 Norwood St. 
Radford, va. 24141 • (703) 639-3968 

Downtown North Building 
620 N. Main St., Blacksburg, Va. 24060 
(703) 552-5400 



A local success 


A man who has earned 
respect in his community is 
James McClanahan, a 1975 
PCHS graduate. 

After graduating from high 
school, Mr. McClanahan 
attended West Virginia 
University where he played 
football. While playing 
football, Mr. McClanahan 
injured his knee; so he 
transferred to Pacific Career 
College where he earned a 
degree in juvenile counseling. 
While there he worked his way 
through college as a police 
officer. 

Next, Mr. McClanahan 
worked at a community center 
in New York where he worked 
with the youth of the area. He 
established various programs 
for the young people to “keep 


them off the streets.” He 
worked to get the youth 
interested in sports and 
activities other than street life. 

Mr. McClanahan left New 
York, though, to come back to 
his hometown of Pulaski. 

Mr. McClanahan is presently 
working at the Hensel Eckman 
YMCA as the program 
director and martial arts 
instructor. 

In speaking of the goals for 
young people today, Mr. 
McClanahan said, “I would 
advise today’s young people to 
first of all stay in school and 
get an education. Also, they 
need to know that shortcuts 
will never work. T hey need to 
plan for their future ahead of 
time.” 

Sarah James 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 265 












































BSI_ 

BENEFIT SERVICES, INC. 

“Your local Employee Benefits Connection” 
Ernest K. Meredith, CPA 


P.O. Box 706 

1902 Downey Street 703/639-1199 

Radford, Virginia 24141 FAX 703/639-6103 


Making points 


Most of us may never have 
seen this 6'7" basketball player 
in action. Ron Shelburne 
graduated in 1987 and then 
moved on to Radford 
University where he also 
played basketball. 

When asked what he 
remembered most about his 
high school basketball career, 
Mr. Shelburne said it was 
definitely the home games with 
his friends sitting in the stands 
behind him, cheering him on. 
He also said that he owed 
much thanks to Coach Pat 
Burns for taking time to help 
him and make him a better 
player. Coach Burns helped 
Ron as well as others gain 
exposure with colleges all over 
the East Coast and Midwest. 

Mr. Shelburne admits that 
he is somewhat “homesick” 
and would love to come back 
to high school. The things he 
misses most are the guys that 


were on the team, his friends 
behind him, all the spirit at the 
games and the sockhops 
afterwards. 

Ron Shelburne is a senior 
this year at Radford 
University. He said he would 
possibly like to attend graduate 
school. He has been 
approached about possibly 
playing overseas or in the 
CBA, the minor league of 
basketball. 

In talking about high school 
athletics, Mr. Shelburne 
believes that sports are a very 
positive experience for 
students. Sports teach athletes 
the importance of team effort 
and also give them the 
opportunity to travel. 
Ultimately, as in the case of 
Mr. Shelburne, athletics 
awarded him with a full 
college scholarship. 

Alison Spain 


Pulaski Presbyterian 
Church in America 

975 Memorial Drive 
Pulaski, Virginia 24301 



PROCLAIMING CHRIST IN OUR COMMUNITY 
Church Services 

Sunday School .9:45 A.M. 

Morning Worship .11:00 A.M. 

Evening Service.7:00 P.M. 

(5:00 P.M. Nov.-March) 

Mid-Week.7:00 p.m. 


VILLAGE VIDEO 

212 Broad Street 
Dublin, Virginia 24084 
674-0676 

Open 12-8 Monday-Saturday 
FREE LIFETIME MEMBERSHIP 


266 — ADVERTISEMENTS 





















The Highlanders Salute 
A Great Student-Athlete! 


Radford University 


RON SHELBURNE 

Radford University '91 
Pulaski County High School '87 


W & 


lULASKI 

Furniture Corporation 

"The Occasional Furniture People” 


"Education is the cornerstone upon which 
to build the future." 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 267 



















DUBLIN SHOE SALES AND REPAIR 

CORNER GILES STREET AND ROUTE 11 

PO BOX 504 DUBLIN, VIRGINIA 24084 

674-1016 



We specialize in boots, shoe repair and orthopedic repair. 


268 — ADVERTISEMENTS 






















































































































General contractors 

Equipment Rentals 

DEBUSK & 

SHELOR, INC. 

P.O. 

BOX 1112 

DUBLIN. VIRGINIA 24084 

(703) 

674-8855 

R. A. DEBUSK 

<703) 921-3278 


GERALDINE B. SCOTT, E.A. 

• TAX ANALYST • CORPORATE 

• ESTATE, INDIVIDUAL & PARTNERSHIP 

• MANAGEMENT ADVISORY SERVICES 

• BUSINESS PLANNING 

Personal Attention to Each Account 
980-4432 

38 5th ST. N.E. PULASKI 


Giving that extra edge 


As people grow older, they 
like to reflect on their earlier 
years and think about all the 
good times they have had. 
Some people find it fascinating 
to listen to what these older 
and more experienced people 
have to say. 

In 1976, Ms. Nelia Larsen 
graduated from our “hallowed 
halls” to begin her journey 
through the intricate “maze of 
life.” Little did she know then 
that her success would give 
pride to the citizens of Pulaski 
County and give some 
youngsters the extra edge that 
may decide who excels and 
who does not. Surely in the 
course of her high school 
years, someone must have 
made a lasting impression on 
Ms. Larsen and when asked, 
she said, “The one person who 
made the biggest impression 
on me was definitely Mr. Mont 
Quesenberry.” She first met 
Mr. Quesenberry when she 
played for the choir, and then 
when she sang with the group. 
But even that is not surprising 
because music is one of Ms. 
Larsen’s favorite hobbies 
whenever she has time for 
them. 

You may be asking yourself, 


“What is she doing now; how 
did she get there?” To answer 
that, Ms. Larsen attended 
Bauder College in Atlanta, 
Georgia where she received 
her associate of arts degree in 
fashion merchandising in May 
1978. Since then she has been 
employed by Leggett 
Department Stores where her 
current position is group 
human resources manager for 
the Newmarket Mall in 
Hampton and Patrick Henry 
Mall in Newport News. 

When asked about her 
college experiences, she said, 

“I thought that college was the 
final level, that after I 
graduated I would 
automatically be placed in a 
top notch position and have 
the corner office. That was not 
the case. You have to realize 
that most people start at the 
bottom and work up even after 
four, six, or even eight years 
of college. You should gather 
all the experience you can and 
use it to your full advantage. 
Also, do not ever rush your 
youth and have as much fun as 
possible. You will remember it 
as the best times of your life.” 

Shana Taylor 


ADVERTISEMENTS 


269 
















Aspiring to attain a dream, 
Miss Tammy Wayne headed 
off to James Madison 
University in the fall of 1984. 
While at college she studied 
hard to complete a degree in 
English and political science in 
1988. That year she entered 
the law school of William and 
Mary for three years of study. 
“In my second year of law 
school I felt I had begun to 
excel in a career that was once 
thought of as an all-male 


occupation,” said Miss Wayne. 
In the summer of 1990, she 
worked as a law clerk for 
Woods, Rogers, and 
Hazelgrove of Roanoke. 

Miss Wayne explained that 
her memories of high school 
were Friday night football and 
sneaking out for lunch at 
Hardee’s. “My favorite class 
was calculus taught by Mr. 
Phillip Vickers,” remarked 
Miss Wayne. 

Jennifer Weikle 


THAT THE BEAUTY OF LIFE MAY SURVIVE 

Highland Memory Cardens, Inc. 
Owners and Operators 
of 

Highland Memory Cardens 
and 

Sunrise Burial Park 

Dedicated to protecting the 
cherished memory of your 
loved ones 

674-5231 


Safari Video 




SM 


RADFORD SHOPPING PLAZA 
ROUTE 11 

RADFORD, VA 24141 
703-639-9641 




270 — ADVERTISEMENTS 


















ONCE 


IN A LIFETIME 
GRADUATION, 
GIVE THE GIFT 
THAT WILL ALWAYS 
BE REMEMBERED 

What better tribute to 
accomplishment than a 
gift that makes an 
educated statement. 

Like fine jewelry. 


Fine Jewelry. 

When your feelings are for real. 


Ginger’s Jewelry 


Member 

Jewelers of America. Inc 

1 .1960 Jewelers of America Inc 


Twin County Plaza 
Galax, VA 24333 
703/236-5123 

Radford Shopping Plaza 
Radford, VA 24141 
703/639-1000 or 674-6000 

Towne Square (Near Phar-Mor) 
Roanoke, VA 24012 
703/563-5559 




ADVERTISEMENTS — 271 







































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272 — ADVERTISEMENTS 



















































FARM 

BUREAU 

VIRGINIA 


VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU 
INSURANCE SERVICES_ 

200 W. Grace St. • Box 27552 • Richmond, Virginia 23261 


Doris H. Covey 

Insurance Advisor 


Earl S. Covey 

Insurance Advisor 


Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Ins. Co. 
Early Settlers Insurance Co. 

Southern Farm Bureau Life Ins. Co. 


P.O. Box 1185 
Dublin, Virginia 24084 
Office: (703) 674-5119 
Residence: (703) 674-5201 


Patrons 

Images by B 
Kentucky Fried Chicken 
Richard H. Mansell, DDS 
A. Carole Pratt, DDS 
Radford Furniture 
Sew Biz 
Theda’s Studio 



Family Practice Clinic, Inc. 

600 Randolph Street 
Radford, VA 24141 
639-9051 

Russell L. Davis, Jr., M.D. 

Thad C. Lee, M.D. 

Scott A. Kincaid, M.D. 

Daniel R. Kelly, M.D. 
and 
Staff 


Working for ike people 


Perspiration permeated his 
shirt. Obviously he wasn’t 
“sure” he prepared himself for 
the event. The butterflies 
fluttered nervously in his 
stomach. Slowly he cleared his 
throat and his mind of uneasy 
thoughts. The door opened, 
and his audience awaited. 

As a member of the House 
of Delegates in the Virginia 
General Assembly, Mr. 

Tommy Baker, Jr., 
experienced times of tension 
when he met people. But that 
was a part of his job. “You get 
to meet new people and give 
assistance to them in some 
way,” explained Delegate 
Baker. 

Not only does Mr. Baker 
help the community as a 
delegate, but also he serves the 
people as an attorney. A 1982 
graduate of the Washington 
and Lee Law School, he 
became a general practitioner. 

“My greatest achievement in 
the school was the receipt of 
my law degree in 1982,” 
Delegate Baker recalled. 

Who made it all happen for 
this important man in our 
community? 

“Unlike many people, I 


cannot point to any one 
individual or individuals who 
influenced me the most in my 
career decisions. I have always 
been a student of history and 
government. I would attribute 
many of my career decisions to 
my interest in these subjects.” 

As a member of the General 
Assembly, Delegate Baker 
stresses the importance of a 
good education. He believes it 
is “indispensable to the growth 
and economy of both our state 
and country.” 

“One of the strongest 
concerns I have with education 
is self-involvement of the 
students. Students today need 
to focus more attention 
towards education. I have 
always been a proponent of 
the philosophy that study is its 
own reward,” commented 
Delegate Baker. 

Delegate Baker feels that 
high school education is the 
“foundation for a college 
career.” 

“I was fortunate enough to 
have broad liberal studies in 
high school which prepared 
me for my college education,” 
concluded Delegate Baker. 

Fong Lui 


ADVERTISEMENTS — 273 






















Symphonic Band: Front Row: Daniel 
Leary, Lynn Coltrane, Tara Averette, 
Shannon Atkinson, Cindy Austin, Kim 
Worrell, April Asbury, Beth Lively, 
Lynn Brown, Allen Cox, Jason 
Jennings, David Farris, Ms. Trade 
Hornby, Mr. Bob Priest Second Row: 
Jonette Robinson, Shellie Simpkins, 
Bobbi Metz, Tiek Shrewsberry. Erika 


Stoots, Kyndra Lawson, Terri Shelton, 
Betsy Earhart, Stacy Arnold, Cindy 
Fain, Elisabeth Morgan, Melissa 
Montgomery, Pam Dalton, 1 anya 
Lovern, Sarah Simpkins. Third Row: 
Gina Haynes, Megan McNeil, Rita 
Cox, DeAnna Wyatt, Brian Berry, 
Wendy Cox, Anjanette Radford, 
Chasity French, Phillip Boyd, Shawn 


Jenks, Adam Hall, Natalie Bowling, 

Bill Ward, Kristen Hedrick. Back 
Row: Micah McMillan, Amy Farmer, 
Chris Dye. Ken Hurley, Amy Webb, 
Martha Hull, Robbie Crockett, 

Amanda Folsom, Daniel Johnson, 
Chuck Bennett, Timmy Spencer, Craig 
Dobvns, Kerri Weddle, Drema Crist. 



Pep Club 9: Front Row: Tiffany 
Williams, Ashley Scott, Carrie Via, 
Sabrina Smith, Emily Folsom. Whitney 
Wallace, Buck Blevins, Trish Crowder, 
Kelly Perry, Tracy Jones, Stephanie 
DeCosta, Kelly Dalton. Second Row: 
Laura Tolbert, April Alexander, 
Crystal Fain, Susan Rudisill, Melissa 


Smith, Sandra Rapp, Wendy 
Blankenship, Wendy Dalton, Sherrie 
Austin, Rhonda Johnson, Josie 
McMillan, Meg Folsom. Third Row: 
Jennifer Pohlig, Jill Underwood, 
Jessica Piediscalzo, Laura Bishop, 
Piper McMillan, Danielle Alti/er, Kim 
Martin, Kim Linkous. Stacey McPeak, 


Kristina Fain, Timi Morgan, T.J. 
Lytton, April Hall, Back Row: Mandy 
Waller, Ten Horsley, Misty Edwards, 
Della Peoples. Susan Branson. 
Shawnna Osborne, Becky Martin, Kim 
Branscome, Aaron Rygas, Syndi Hash, 
Lisa Knick, Paige Cox. 



Drama Club: Freshmen: Front Row: 

Jonathan Fisher, Brandy Irby, Sherry 
Vest, Chris Pratt. Jessica Piediscalzo, 
Emily Folsom, Josie McMillan, 
Summer Anderson. Second Row: 
Amanda Reese, Sandra Rapp, Piper 


McMillan, Whitney Wallace, Amy 
Friant, April Miller, John Stout, Sam 
Raykes, Shawn Faulkner. Third Row: 
April Hall. Melissa Smith, Rhonda 
Quesenberry, April Corvin, Aaron 
Parks, Bobby Petty, Jeff Berkley, Josh 


Denny, Paul Mayes, Todd Lindamood. 
Back Row: Nathan McCormick, Mike 
Sink, Babette Miller, Daniel DeCosta, 
Ben Linkous, Wayne Puckett, Zack 
Krug, Carson Graham, Travis Coake. 


274 — INDEX 


A 


Abell, Tammy Renee 12 . . . 166, 279 
Adams, James Richard 10 . . . 206 
Adams, James Russell 12 . . . 277 
Adams, Roger Wayne 11 ... 194 
Adkins, Micheal Christopher 9 ... 219 
Adkins, II, Grant Edward 12 . . . 166 
Akers, Alicia Dawn 10 . . . 143. 206. 
282 

Akers, Charles Robert 12 . . . 166 
Akers. David Edward 11 ... 112. 113, 
128, 194 

Akers, Freddie Faculty ... 121. 128 
Akers, Heather Charmin 10 . . . 206, 
282 

Akers, Jackie Lee 12 . . . 63, 166, 277 
Akers, James Ronald 11 ... 194 
Akers, John Robert 11 ... 120, 121, 
126', 128, 194 
Akers, Lateffa ... 9 
Akers, Lori Christine 9 . . . 160, 219, 
228 

Akers, Rebecca Elizabeth 10 . . . 206, 
276, 277, 278, 281 

Akers, Robin Melissa 10 . . . 206, 275 
Akers, Ruth Diane 10 . . . 206 
Akers, Sammy 11 ... 194 
Akers, Shannon Marie 12 . . . 166 
Akers, Tammy Marie 10 . . . 206, 209 
Akers, Jr.. Danny Ray 11 ... 194, 284 
Albano, Amy Jeanette 12 . . . 104, 166, 
182, 277,'278, 281 

Albano, Todd Cecil 10 . . . 128, 206 
Albert, Kimberlv Dawn 10 . . . 206, 

282 

Albert, Stephanie Kave 11 . .. 194, 
276, 278 

Albert, Tonya Marie 12 . . . 166, 282 
Albert, Jr. David Lee 11 . . . 194 
Alberts. Matthew John 11 . . . 194 
Alderman, Rebecca Sue 10 . . . 206 
Alexander, April Leigh 9 . . . 137, 158, 
159, 218, 219, 220. 274. 277, 281 
Alexander, Kevin Dale 11 . .. 194, 

276, 285 

Alexander, Sherry Leigh 11 ... 194 
Alexander, Tracy Denise 10 . . . 206 
Alger, Robert Lewis 9 ... 219, 284 
Allen, Gregory Mark 1 1 ... 25, 194 
Allen, Maria Evette 12 . . . 114, 166, 
281 

Allen. Jr.. David Lee 12 . . . 166 
Alley, Douglas Eugene 11 ... 194 
Alley, Ernie Douglas 11 ... 194 
Aliev. Jason William 12 ... 38, 68, 

166, 167, 169, 173, 189, 277, 278 

Alley, Mark Kelly G_118 

Alley, Richard Ken 10 . . . 118, 217 
Alley, Scot tie Edgar 9 ... 219 
Alley, Shelena 11 ... 194 
Alley, Stephanie Anne 12 ... 7, 47. 

166, 170, 171, 276, 277, 278 
Allison, Stacev Lynn 10 . . . 132, 133, 
206 

Alls. Brent Patrick 12 . . . 128, 166 
Almarode, Cherish Ann 11 ... 194 
Altizer, Christopher Russel 11 . . . 194 
Altizer, Cindy Lee 9 ... 219 
Altizer, Danielle Dawn 9 ... 219, 274 
Altizer, Michelle Leigh 12 . . . 166 
Altizer, Scott G. . . . 38 
Anderson, Angela Brandi Renee 10 
. . . 206 

Anderson. Crystal Lynn 12 . . . 166, 
281,282 

Anderson. Darrell Eugene 11 ... 194 
Anderson, Harriet Faculty ... 78, 226, 
230 

Anderson, Jenifer Kelly 11 . . . 105, 

194 

Anderson, John Christopher 12 . . . 

67. 166 

Anderson, Summer Danyiel 9 ... 219. 
274, 282 

Anderson, Sunshine Jo 12 . . . 166 
Anderson, Bryan Christopher 10 . . . 
206 

Anderson, Chandra Lea 10 . . . 206 
Anderson, Jr., James Alphons 11... 
194,276 

Andrews, Crystal Dawn 9 ... 219 
Andrews, Doug Wayne 12 . . . 167 
Andrews, Mark Anthony 11 ... 194 
Andrews, Shannon Jennelle 9 . . . 219 
Andrews, Misty Michelle 10 . . . 206 
Armbrister, Benjamin Wiley 11... 

116, 117, 194, 280. 285 
Armbrister, Roy Lynwood 12 . . . 167 
Arnold, Angela Renae 11... 194, 281 
Arnold, Crystal 9 ... 219 
Arnold, James Christopher 12 . . . 116, 
167 

Arnold, Lee Alin Denise 9 ... 219, 284 
Arnold, Marvin Lee 12 . . . 128, 167, 
278, 280, 281 

Arnold, Stacy Lee 11... 194 
Arnold, Tracy Lee 9 ... 219 
Arnold, Wendy Jean 12 ... 8, 167, 

174, 281, 285 

Arnold, Jamie Ray 10 . . . 122, 123, 

206 

Arnold, Mary Ann 10 . . . 206 


Arnold, Stacy Marie 10 . . . 206, 274, 
281 

Asbury, Dr. William C ... 35 
Asbury, Roger Faculty . . . 277 
Asbury, April Joy 10 . . . 65. 206, 274, 
278 

Askew, Patti Faculty . . . 230 
Atkins, Grant . . . 284 
Atkins, Heather . . . 285 
Atkins, Kellie Lynn 9 ... 219 
Atkinson, Rodney Brian 12 . . . 19, 75, 
167, 281 

Atkinson, Shannon Ashley 10 . . . 206, 
274, 278, 285 

Atwell, Angela Misty 10 . . . 89. 206 
Aust, Ann Fac. . . . 230 
Aust, Milton Fac. . . . 230 
Austin, Cynthia Rose 11... 194, 198, 
204, 274, 282 

Austin, Kevin David 11 . . . 194, 280, 
284 

Austin, Sherrie Lvnn 9 ... 219, 274 
Austin. Samuel Grant 11 ... 281 
Averette, Joshua Samuel 9 . . . 219 
Averette, Lara Leigh 11... 108, 109, 
194, 274, 276, 282 
Ayers, Cheyenne Yates 11 ... 194 
Ayers, Sharron Lynette 12 . . . 167, 
277, 281 

Ayers, Jason Arnold 10 . . . 206 


B 


Back. Steven Michael 11 ... 128, 194 
Back, Paula Michelle 10 . . . 206, 282, 
285 

Bailey. Bryan Dwayne 9 ... 219 
Bainbridge. Angela Dawn 12 . . . 167 
Baines, Angie . . . 278 
Baker, Tommy . . . 273 
Baldwin, Frank Fac. . . . 230 
Bales. Sonay Renae 9 ... 219 
Bales, Jr.. Randy Blaine 12 . . . 167 
Ballinger, Nancy Faculty ... 44, 230 
Banes, Angela Dawn 11 ... 194 
Banks, Atesha Lee 9 . . . 285 
Banks, Larry Dwight 9 ... 219 
Banks, Pete'll . . . 194 
Barnes. Mark Anthony 12 . . . 106, 

116, 117, 167, 173,'276, 285, 288 
Barrett, Michael 11 . . 194 

Barrett, Renita Gayle 11 ... 194, 285 
Bassett, Martha Faculty . . . 230 
Baxter, Seth Thomas 9 ... 219 
Beckner, Mary Ann 10 ... 94, 95. 

206, 

275, 279 

Belcher, Judy Faculty . . . 230 
Bell, Charles Fredrick 11 ... 194 
Bell, Christopher Allen 12 . . . 167 
Bell, Roger Brandon 9 ... 219, 228 
Bell, Dave Fac. ... 128 
Bennett, Charles Stuart 12 . . . 167, 
274,278 

Bendy, Dr. Michael . . . 58, 59 
Berkley. Jeffrey Lee 9 . . . 99, 130, 
219, 274 

Berry, Ahsonda Winette 9 ... 219 
Berry, Brian Grayson 11... 70, 72, 
194, 274 

Berry, Melissa 12 . . . 168 
Bertholomey, Elizabeth Eileen G. . . . 
30 

Beverly, Jr., Douglas Wayne 12 . . . 

168 

Beverlv. Jr., James Perry 12 . . . 127, 
128, 168 

Bevil, Scott Wayne 11 ... 195 
Bevil, Phillip Lee 10 . . . 206. 275 
Biggs, Ruby Carol 12 . . . 168 
Biggs, Ranch Ranai 10 . . . 132, 133. 
206, 281. 285 

Bird, Angela Michelle 12 ... 215 
Bird, Phillip Allen 11 ... 66, 195, 284 
Bishop, Kathy Fac. . . . 230 
Bishop. Laura Gail 9 . . . 158, 159, 

219, 274 

Bishop, Amy Marie 10 . . . 141, 143, 
206 

Black. Julian Brian 11 . . . 195 
Blackburn. Rvan Heath 10 . . . 122, 
123, 206, 281 

Blair, Martha Anne 9 . . . 143, 219, 

281 

Blakenship, Wendy Lyn 9 ... 219. 274 
Blankenship, Amy Beth 11 ... 195 
Blankenship. Jean Faculty ... 40, 41, 
230 

Blankenship, James Patton 10 . . . 206, 
282, 285 

Blankenship, Yolanda Mischelle 10 . . . 
206,277, 285 

Blessing, Jr., Jerry Wayne 10 . . . 206 
Blevins, Beth Marie 12... 168 
Blevins, Larry Jonathan 9 . . . 128, 

129, 220, 274,275 
Blevins, Michael Shane 11 ... 195, 

282 

Blevins, Shane Hampton 12 ... 7, 168 
Blevins, Tammy Marie 12 . . . 168 





Board wine, Dianne Carol 10 . . . 106, 
107. 206. 284, 285 
Bobzin, William Patrick 11 ... 195 
Bolt, Randy Lynn 12 . . . 168 
Bond, Angie . . . 285 
Bond, Eric Lester 11... 195, 281 
Bond, Kevin Matthew 10 . . . 206 
Booth, Woodrow Eric 9 ... 219 
Bopp, Robert Anthony 9 ... 219 
Bouldin, Alicia Irene 9 ... 219 
Bouldin.John Heath 11 ... 195 
Bouldin, Stephanie Michelle 11... 

195.281 

Bowden, Joshua Paul 11 . . . 195. 278 
Bowden, Jeffery Lynn 12 . . . 168, 277 
Bower. Benjamin Joseph 11 ... 16, 
122, 123, 195 

Bower, Kevin Lee 9 ... 219 
Bowling, Natalie Gayle 12 . . . 23, 38, 
77. 94, 98, 168, 274, 275, 277, 283 
Bowman, Jason Anthony 12 . . . 168, 
280 

Bowman, Kimberly Anne 11 ... 12, 
195, 282 

Bowman, Priscilla Leah 11... 195, 

281 

Bowman, Shannan Renay 12 . . . 47, 
168, 282 

Bowman. Misty Dawn 10 . . . 206, 284 
Boyd, Bryant Lee 12 . . . 169 
Boyd, Daniel Eugene 9 ... 219 
Boyd, David Lee 9 ... 219 
Boyd, Michael Steven 11 ... 195 
Boyd. Ryan Thornton G. ... 118 
Boyd, Vada Faculty . .. 37, 230 
Boyd, Phillip Lee 10 . . . 118, 119, 206, 
274 

Boyd, Regina Faye Burton ... 169 
Boyd, Robert James 10 . . . 206 
Boys Tennis ... 118, 119 
Boysaw. Anita Diana 11 ... 195 
Bradley, Stacy Lee 12 . . . 128 
Brammer, Melissa Ruth 12 . . . 169 
Branch Stephen Michael 11... 195 
Branch Tonya Lynn 9 ... 219 
Branscome, David Wade 12 . . . 56, 

169 

Branscome, Karen Rebecca G. . . . 9 
Branscome, Kimberly Ann 9 . . . 106, 
219,274, 285 

Branscome, Marsha Dawn 9 ... 219 
Branscome, Marshall Wayne 11... 

277 

Branson, Barry Richard 12 . . . 169 
Branson. Susan Diane 9 ... 219, 274, 
282 

Bratton, Janet Lee 12 . . . 169 
Bratton, Tabitha Ann 10 . . . 206 
Bratton, Jr., Donald Dewayne 11... 
195 

Breedlove, Jonathan Thomas 10 . . . 

24, 206, 275,278 
Brewer, Teresa Lynn G . . . 10. 82 
Britt, Mary Faculty . . . 230 
Broadwater, Shirene Esther 11... 

195,288 

Brown. Alice Faye 9 ... 219 
Brown, Alicia Jean 12 . . . 169 
Brown, Alphonso 11... 195, 276, 277 
Brown, Alphonso Carnell 12 . . . 128, 
169 

Brown, Christal Laverne 12 . . . 52, 

169 

Brown. Joseph Edward 9 ... 219 
Brown, Karen Fac. . . . 230 
Brown, Kimberly Darnelle 12 . . . 169 
Brown, Bimberly Lynn 12 . . . 169, 

274, 276, 277,281 
Brown. Michael Todd 12 . . . 169 
Brown, Roger Dennis 10 . . . 206 
Brown, Tina Tonyell 9 ... 219 
Brown, Wesley Howard 9 ... 219 
Brown, Stephanie Larissa 10 . . . 206, 
284 

Brown, Jr., Monde Ervin 10 . . . 128, 
129. 206 

Brubaker. Sarah Faculty . . . 230, 276 
Bruce, Cindy . . . 277 
Bruce, Larry Fac. . . . 230, 262 
Bruce, Pete'. . . 281 
Bruce, II. Robert Jackson G. . . . 113 
Brunk, Brenda Lee 9 ... 219 
Brunk, Monica Lynn 10 . .. 206, 282 
Bryan, Eric Vernon 11 . . . 195 
Bryant, David Scott 12 . . . 169 
Brvant, Mark Anthony 11 ... 195 
Bryant, Rodney Wayne 12 . . . 169 
Bryson, Carrie Jo 9 . . . 158, 219, 281, 
284 

Bryson, Jeremiah Jackson 11 . . . 195. 
277. 284 


Buckland, Curtis Darren 12 . . . 169 
Buckland, Angela Maria 10 . . . 206 
Buckner, Terry Allen 11 ... 195 
Buckner, Jennifer Marlina 9 . . . 219 
Bullion, Jr., Paul Allen 11... 63, 195, 
277 

Burcham, Tijuana Lynn 9 ... 219 
Burchett, Ashley Gayle 9 ... 219 
Burchett, Shawn Douglas 12 . . . 169, 
278. 281, 282 

Burke, Rebecca Diana 10 . . . 206, 282 
Burkes. Charles Anthony 9 . . . 130, 
220 

Burleigh, Georgia 9 ... 219 
Burnett, Audrey Faculty . . . 45, 230, 
282 

Burnettte. Samuel Tony 12 . . . 284 
Burns, Christopher Patrick 11 ... 195, 
276 

Burns, Pat Faculty . . . 230 
Burroughs. Clifton Scott 11 ... 116, 
195,280 

Burrus, Gerald Bradley 11 ... 19, 

121, 

127, 128, 195, 277 
Burton, Brandy Michell 9 ... 219 
Burton, Carol Vernice 12 . . . 75, 170, 
281 

Burton. Dean 9 ... 219 
Burton. Jody Wayne 12 . . . 170, 183, 
284 

Burton, Patricia FAc. . . . 94. 95, 230, 
283 

Burton, Susan Marie 11 . . . 195, 200 
Burton, David Lee 10 . . . 206, 285 
Burton, Mark Anthony 10 . . . 206 
Busic, April Joy 11 . . '. 12, 85. 194, 
195,276 

Bvrd. Cory Scott 11 ... 19, 58, 118, 
195 

Byrd, Glenn Edward 11 ... 195 
Bvrd. Kent Lee 10 . . . 206, 282 


C 


Caldwell. Kimberly Hope 12 . . . 102, 
103, 169, 170,279 

Caldwell, Robert Randolph 11 ... 195 
Cal fee, Charles Alfred 11 ... 112, 

113, 

128, 195, 277, 282 
Calfee. Christina Lee 11 ... 195 
Callahan, Christopher Stephen 11... 
195 

Calloway, John Lee 12 . . . 170 
Campbell, Kelly Lynn 10 . . . 133, 206, 
207, 277, 282, 285 

Carden, Timothy Dale 11... 196, 199 
Carden, Crystal Gayle 10 ... 87, 206, 
288, 278 

Cardoza, Christina Maria 9 . . . 219, 
282 

Carner, Jr., Barry Dean 10 . . . 206 
Carpenter, Timothy Wayne 9 . . . 219 
Carr, Adam Joseph 12 . . . 29, 170 
Carr. Samantha Faye 9 . . . 219, 284 
Carrico, Amber Autumn Paige 9 . . . 
219, 282 

Carroll, David Faculty ... 87 
Carroll. Kevin Douglas 9 ... 219 
Carroll, Shendale Leigh 10 . . . 206, 
282 

Carter, Amy Michelle 11 ... 196 
Carter, Jennifer Ann 9 ... 219 
Carter, Lateffa Olanna 11 ... 59. 196, 
276. 280 

Carter, Carl Harlan 10 . . . 19, 118, 
206,278, 281,285 
Carter, Jr., Roy Lee 11... 196, 284 
Cassell, Cory Michael 9 ... 219 
Castle, Christopher Scott G . . . 118 
Castle, Tammy Annette 12 . . . 170 
Caudell, Roger Faculty . . . 62, 230, 

277 

Cecil, Karen K. Fac. . . . 230, 236, 237 
Cecil, Mark Duane 12 . . . 170 
Cecil, Regina Fac. ... 231 
Chan, Amy Chung-Hua 9 ... 219 
Chan. Charlie Chung 9 ... 219 
Chandler, David Brian 12 . . . 170 
Chandler, Brian Kent 10 . . . 206. 277, 
282, 285 

Chapman, Jim Faculty ... 128 
Charlton, Shannon Duane 9 . . . 219 


Chen, Hong 9 ... 219 
Cherry, Christopher Cason 12 . . . 170, 
279 

Chinault, Lori Leigh 11 ... 196, 279, 
282 

Chinault, Louise Fac. ... 231 
Chrisley, April Marie 11 ... 196 
Chrisley, Christie Michelle 11 . . . 196 
Chrisley, David Aaron 9 . . . 219, 284 
Chrislev, Eric Allan 12 . . . 170, 278, 
281, 282 

Chrisley, Randee Michelle 9 ... 219 
Chrisley, Richard Lee 11 ... 196 
Chrisley. Tracy Lee 11... 196, 284. 
282' 

Chrisley, II, Jessie James 9 ... 219 
Clark, Angela Michelle 12 . . . 170, 

171, 179, 191, 279, 281, 282, 288 
Clark, Edward Boyd II ... 196 
Clark, Jennifer Erin 11 ... 58, 196, 
276 

Clark, Mae Lynn 11... 196 
Clark, John Travis 10 . . . 206, 285 
Clark, II, Tony Ellis 9 ... 219 
Clarkson, Thomas Lee 10 . . . 56, 206 
Clay, James Kendall 12 . . . 170, 173, 
275, 278, 279, 282 
Clayton, Todd Aldrige 12 ... 170 
Claytor, Corwin Duane 10 . . . 206, 

281 

Clemmons, Nathanal Grav 9 ... 219, 
275 

Clemons. Gina Denise 12 . . . 46, 170 
Clevinger, II, Larry Gene 12 . . . 108, 

170, 173, 188, 275. 276 
Cline, Linda Faculty . . . 231 
Cline, Jonathan Andrew 10 . . . 65, 

116, 206 

Clymer, Karen Fac. ... 231 
Coake, Lattie . . . 277 
Coake, Travis 9 ... 219. 274 
Cobbs, Brandy Dawn 12 . . . 170, 285 
Coble, Dennis Cameron 12 . . . 82. 83, 

171, 182, 284 

Cochran, Michael Jason 9 . . . 130, 219 
Cochran, Peggy Sue 11... 206 
Coe, Henry Garrett Edward 9 ... 219 
Coffey, Travis Porter 10 . . . 206 
Coffey, Jr., Carl Monroe 9 ... 219 
Cole, Angela Dawn 11 ... 48, 196, 

282, 285 

Cole. Mark Alan 11 ... 196 
Cole, Mary Ellen 11 ... 196 
Cole, Mitchell Lee 9 ... 219 
Cole. Ronald Ray 12 . . . 171 
Cole, Tammy Lynn 11 ... 196 
Cole, Tracey Michelle 10 . . . 206, 275 
Coleman, Ronnie Lee 11 . . . 196 
Coleman, Trevor Faculty . . . 130 
Coleman, Jr., Bobby Ray 10 . . . 206 
Collins, Fredrick Lee 10 . . . 206 
Coltrane, Anna Lynn 11 ... 137, 196, 
274, 276, 282 

Conner, Emily Alicia 12 . . . 171, 282 
Conner, Melissa Ann 9 ... 219 
Cook, James Howard 12 ... 171 
Cook, Jimmy Wayne 9 . . . 219 
Cook, Judith E. Fac. ... 231 
Cook, Shawn Edward 9 ... 221 
Cook, Stephanie Brenton 12 . . . 18. 

31, 140. 171, 188. 277. 280, 284 
Cook, Stephen Bradley 12 . . . 171 
Cook. Bryan Thomas 10 . . . 78, 79, 
206, 281, 278 

Cook, Cynthia Lee 10 . . . 206, 282, 

283, 288 

Cooper, Nathan Allen 9 ... 89, 221 
Cooper, Jamie Lee 10 . . . 37, 206, 285 
Corvin, April Dawn 9 . . . 221, 274 
Couch, James Fa. ... 116 
Coulson, Benjamin Eric 12 . . . 171 
Counts, Randall Kyle 11... 196, 284 
Courtney, Melissa Ellen 9 . . . 221, 284 
Covey. Rebecca Ann 10 . . . 206, 285 
Cowan, Frank Duane 12 . . . 171, 279 
Cowan, Kimberly Dawn 12 . . . 171 
Cowan, Steven Wayne 10 . . . 206 
Cox, Amy Lynn 12 . . . 171 
Cox, Calvin Roscoe 12 . . . 171 
Cox, Carson Allen II... 206, 274 
Cox, Cheryl Alice 9 ... 221. 222 
Cox, Crystal Paige 9 ... 221, 274, 281 
Cox, Curtis Randv Craig 9 ... 221 
Cox, Jodi Denise 11 . . . 22, 30. 196, 
278, 281, 284 

Cox, Johnny Lee 12 . . . 171, 281 
Cox, Kimberly Ann 12 . . . 172 
Cox, Loria Lynn 12 . . . 172 
Cox, Maria Diane 12 . . . 172 
Cox, Mary Sue 9 ... 221 
Cox, Mike Faculty ... 231 


Cards and Comics: Front Row: Mr 

John Freeman, Jonathan Fisher, 
Stephen Underwood, Buck Blevins. 
Brian Stoots, Michael Lovell, Michael 
King, Kelly Dalton. Second Row: 
Chris Gravley, Robert Hurd, Todd 



Mixed Choir: Front Row: Amanda 
Evans, Robin Akers, Buck Blevins, 
Mary Ann Beckner, Becky Martin, 
Tracey Cole. Back Row: Jennifer 


Edwards, C.J. Hoskins, Donald 
Frazier, David Stigger, Sherod Russell, 
Leigh Ann Kemp. Hope Whittaker. 



Freestyle: Front Row: (esse Fowlkes, 
Phillip Bevil, Tommy Powers, Wendy 
Dalton. Second Row: David Davidson. 


Kim Horton, Kim Martin. Back Row: 
Aaron Cress. Jerry Taylor, Jason 
Speller, Christy Powers. 



Albee Cast and Crew: Front Row: 

Ted Farmer, econd Row: Natalie 
Bowling, Emily Hammond, Joe Smith, 
Tina Thompson, Jeff Shelton, Robbie 
Crockett. Third Row: Courtney 
Crockett, Daniel Vest. Fourth Row: 
Tanya Lovern, Alvssa Rollins, Mark 


Martin, Sally Nehrling, Tonya Turner, 
Tamasha Crouse, Kesha Miller. Back 
Row: Chrissy Workman, Jonathan 
Breedlove, Gerri Whittaker, Benny 
Hancock, Aaron Graham, James Clay, 
Chris Farmer, Tracy Skeens, Linda 
Handy. Lisa Rowh. 



Turner. Dusty Handy. Donnie Dowdy, 
Jeff Hickman, Stephen Roark, Luong 
Lui Third Row: Billy McCroskey, 

Mike Sink. Keith Lindsey, Eric Hagee, 
Eric Woolley, R. Ratcliffe, Bobby Petty, 


Nat Clemmons. Back Row: Jason 
Gearheart, Eric Nunn, Jeremy King, 
Jonathan Martin, Jerred Eller, Jeff 
Me fall, Chris Gallimore, Chris Ferrell. 
Larry Clevinger. 


INDEX —275 















NHS: Second Year Members 
(Seniors): Front Row: Ms. Evelyn 
Tate, Sponsor, Lynn Brown, DeAnna 
Wyatt, Eva Machelor.Second Row: 
Mrs. Sarah Brubaker, Sponsor, 


Rhonda Roop, Kim Ratcliffe, 
Stephanie Alley, Tammy McMillan. 
Back Row: Rita Cox, Mark Barnes, 
David Knick, Latha Gearheart, Tina 
Jones. 



APPALKIDS: Front Row: Phyllis Leary, Chris White, Jimmy 

Leary, Todd Viers. Second Row: Quesenberry. 

Michelle Dalton. Back Row: Daniel 



Chess: Front Row: Jamie Ouslev, 
Victoria Lambert, Cliff Phillips, 
Snapper Overman, Stephen 
Umberger. Second Row: Mr. Fran 


Shelton, Sponsor, Karen Spraker, 

Chad Graham, Eric Haga, Jason Horn. 
Back Row: Rebecca Akers. Larry 
Clevinger, Scotty McNeil. Hunter Eley. 



FCA: Juniors: Front Row: Jill David, 
Stef Albert. Kam Kelly. Tara Averette, 
Lynn Coltrane. Ashley Edmonds. 
Second Row: Stephanie L.ytton, April 
Busic, Cindy Whitaker, Bucky 
Edwards, Chad Hall, Lateffa Carter. 
Robbie Epperly. Third Row: Vicki 


Underwood, Terri Garland, Laurel 
Shroyer, Jennifer Clark. James 
Anderson, Denise Jackson. Kelly 
Weaver. Back Row: Natashia Reed, 
Kevin Alexander, Malcomb Lewis, 
Chuck Fox, Sean Smith, Chris Burns, 
A1 Brown. Don Hanshew. 


Cox, Rita Betsy Ann 12 . . . 14. 15, 28, 
71. 167, 168. 172, 183, 274, 276, 
277, 278, 282 

Cox, Steven Aaron 12 . . . 118, 172, 

281 

Cox, Steven Troy 9 . . . 130, 221 
Cox, Jennifer Denise 10 . . . 206, 277, 

283 

Cox, Michael Wayne 10 . . . 206 
Cox, Tina Marie 10 . . . 206 
Cox, Wendy Michelle 10 . . . 57, 72, 

95, 208, 274, 283 

Craig, Jason Brian 11 ... 196, 282 
Craig, Scott Whitman 11 ... 196 
Crane, Jr , Jerry Leon 9 . . . 130, 221, 

284 

Crawford. Jason Reed 9 ... 221 
Crawford, Tammy Renee 12 . . . 172 
Cregger, Rebecca Jane 12 . . . 140, 

172, 282, 285 

Cregger, Dana Ann 10 . . . 208 
Cregger, William Travis 10 . . . 208 
Cress, Aaron Lamai 12 . . . 18, 50, 65, 
84, 85, 172, 185, 198, 275, 277 
Cressell. David Shannon 12 . . . 172, 
192 

Cressell, Edward Allen 10 . . . 208 
Crigger. Karen Elaine G. . . . 10 
Crist. Drema Diane 10 ... 72, 73. 208, 
274, 283 

Crockett, Robert Lee 12 ... 22, 23, 25. 

76, 77. 99, 172, 274, 275, 277 
Crockett. Courtnev Kaye 10... 22, 
208, 275, 278 ' 

Cromer, John Thomas 12 . . . 172, 279 
Crouse, Tamasha De’Von 10 . . . 23, 
208, 217, 275, 277, 281 
Crowder, David Lee 9 ... 221 
Crowder, Douglas Lee 12 . . . 172 
Crowder, John Eugene 9 . . . 60, 221 
Crowder, Mary Jane 12 . . . 49, 173 
Crowder. Patricia Lynn 9 ... 221. 274, 

285 

Crowder, Roger Allen 11... 196, 282 
Crowder. Tiessa Diane 11 ... 196 
Croy, Christy Coretha 11... 196, 280 
Cruise, Thomas Wayne 10 . . . 122, 

123, 208, 211 

Custer. Thomas Shawn 9 ... 221 
Cutlip, Charles Edward 12 . . . 127, 
128, 173, 278, 279, 282 
Cutlip, Susie Faculty ... 31, 55. 231 


D 


D'Ardenne. Derek Allen 12 . . . 116, 
173, 278, 279. 282 

Dalton, Bradley Scott 12 . . . 63, 173, 
277 

Dalton, Jason 9 . . . 221 
Dalton, Kelly W.9 . . . 274, 275 
Dalton, Michelle Leigh 12 . . . 173 
Dalton, Michelle Leigh 9 . . . 100, 101, 
220, 221, 276, 283 

Dalton, Pamela Sue 12 ... 39, 73. 167, 
168. 169, 173, 274, 279, 282 
Dalton, Stacy Lynette G. . . . 8 
Dalton, Way-man Thomas 9 ... 221 
Dalton, Wendy Kaye 9 ... 221, 274, 
275 

Dalton, David Bradley 10 . . . 208 
Damron. Emily Louise 9 ... 221 
David, Billy ... 42 
David, Jill Lvnette 11... 140, 141, 

196, 276,’278 
David, Rusty G. . . . 8 
Davidson, Kim Faculty ... 231, 234, 
235 

Davidson, Sonya Patrice 11 ... 114. 

115, 196, 281 

Davidson, Brent Erik 10 . . . 208 
Davidson, David Damion 10 . . . 208, 
275 

Davidson, Randy Pierce 10 . . . 208 
Davis, Billy Eugene 12 . . . 128, 173. 
282, 284 

Davis, Chad Ryan G. . . . 118 
Davis, Jackie Andrew 9 ... 221 
Davis, John Micheal 9 ... 221 
Davis, III Joseph Douglas G. . . . 8 
Davis. Lloyd Faculty ... 231 
Davis, Michael Wayne 11 . . . 196 
Davis, Sharon Denise 11 ... 196 
Davis, Terry Wayne 11... 196 
Davis, Todd Allen 9 . . . 130. 221 
Davis, William Jackson 11 . . . 196 
Davis, Benjamin Alexander 10 . . . 

122, 

123, 128, 208 

Davis, Carrie Ann 10 . . . 208 
Davis, Lea Ann 10 . . . 208, 282, 285 


Davis, Jr., James Thomas 10 . . . 208 
Daya, Rakesh 11 ... 12, 196, 281, 282 
Dean, Betty Ann 9 ... 221, 284 
Dean, Dana Michelle G. . . . 8 
Dean, James Michael 11 . . . 196 
Dean, Kristi Lenore 12 . . . 173, 285 
Dean, Marylou Virgie 9 ... 221 
Dean, Denise 11 ... 196 
Decosta, Daniel Thurston 9 ... 221, 

274 

Decosta, Stephanie Lynn 9 . . . 221, 

274, 282 

Dehart, Debra Dawn 9 ... 221 
Dehart, Karen Renee 11... 49, 94, 

196, 279, 281 

Dehart, Jr., Robert Claude 9 ... 221 
Delph, Richard Eugene 10 . . . 208 
Denny. Hope Joanna 9 ... 221 
Denny, Joshua Aaron 9 ... 221. 274 
Denny, Matthew Areise 12 . . . 116, 

173 

Desai, Devang Arun 10 . . . 128, 208 
Desrocher, Sheryl 9 ... 221 
Dice, Tammy Marie 11 ... 197, 281, 
282 

Dice. Jr., Billy Joe 12 . . . 93. 173, 177, 
279 

Dickerson, Joan 9 ... 221 
Dickerson, Staci Leigh 12 . . . 140, 141, 
173 

Dickerson, Tracy Dawn 11 ... 197, 

279 

Dickerson, Roy Arvin 10 . . . 208 
Dillon, III, Eugene Claiborne 9 . . . 
130,221 

Dinsmore, Elizabeth ... 44 
Dishon, Amy Beth 11 ... 197 
Dishon, Christopher Ray 9 ... 221 
Dishon, Jeanette Gail G. ... 30 
Dishon, Maxine Faculty ... 231 
Dishon, Brian Scott 10 . . . 208 
Dixon, Diane Faculty ... 231 
Dobbins, Carol King 11 ... 197 
Dobbins, David Daniel 11 . . . 197, 

277, 

284 

Dobson, Kenneth ... 128 
Dobyns, Craig Allison 11... 59, 116, 

197, 274 

Dolinger, Jeffrey William 12 . . . 173 
Donald, Kim 9 ... 221 
Donathan, Steven Lee 9 ... 221. 284 
Donithan, Christopher Stephen 11... 
63, 197 

Donithan, Gloria Ann 9 ... 221 
Donley, Danielle Dawn 11 ... 197 
Donley, Katina Lee 12 . . . 173 
Dooley, Ill. Charles Hampton 12 . . . 

173 

Doss, Clifton Lee 12 . . . 103, 173, 280 
Dotson, Melissa Dawn 11... 21, 140, 
141. 197 

Dotson, Robin Annette 12 . . . 173 
Douglas, Christopher Cleveland 11... 
197 

Dowdy, Donald Ray 11... 98, 197, 

275 

Doyle, Jeffrey Lee 12 . . . 174 
Draper, Chad Ray 9 . . . 130 
Draper, David Lee 9 . . . 130. 221 
Draper, John Bradley 11... 208, 279 
Dudding, Ami Lorane 10 . . . 208, 285 
Duke, Jeffery Taylor 9 ... 221 
Dunavant, T. Ray Fac. . . . 231 
Dunavant, Doug Fac. ... 112. 130 
Dunaway, Larry Scott 10 . . . 37, 116. 
208 

Duncan, Brian Keith 11 . . . 128, 197 
Duncan, Chad Everett 11 ... 197 
Duncan, Jr.. James Curtis G. ... 9, 

120, 121 

Duncan, Joshua Elwood 11 . . . 197, 

284 

Duncan, Kristie Suzanne 11... 197, 

285 

Duncan, Lisa Runyon 12 . . . 88, 174. 
282 

Duncan, Tina Lynn 12 . . . 174 
Duncan, Tonya Marie 11... 197, 281 
Dunford. Carmen Baker 12 . . . 113, 
134, 135, 174, 277, 281 
Dunford, Michael Aaron 11... 43, 
197, 282, 283 

Dunford, Robert Wayne G. . . . 100 
Dunford, Jess Matthew 11 . . . 128, 

197 

Dunn, Anthony Todd G . . . 10 
Dutinagan, III, Philip Walter 12 . . . 

174 

Dunnigan. Randall Lee 9 . . . 130, 221, 
228 

Dupuis. Patty ... 59 
Dutton, Robert Shane 10 . . . 208 
Dve, Christopher Neil 11 ... 116, 197, 
274 

Dve, James William 11... 59, 116. 

197 

Dye, Mark Anthony 9 ... 221 



Eads Andrea Hope 11 ... 197, 279, 
281 


. 197 
102, 128, 


128, 


, 75, 


Eads, Roger Duane 11... 208 
Eanes, Chad Steven 9 ... 221 
Eanes, Shannon 9 ... 221 
Eanes, Clarence Dewayne 10 . . . 208 
Earhart, Betsy Renae 12 . . . 174. 274 
F.arhart, April Dawn Byrd 12 . . . 174 
Earles, Whitney Ellen 9 ... 221 
East, Keith Allan 9 ... 221 
Eastridge, William Dale 11.. 

Eaves, Steven Preston 12 . . . 

174, 277, 278, 280, 281 
Eaves, Kenneth Dewayne 10 
129, 208, 281, 285 
Edens, Heather Michelle 11 . 

197, 281, 282 

Edmonds, Ashley Daniell 1 1 
197, 201, 276 
Edmonds, Mr. Bill ... 175 
Edmonds, Paul Eugene 12 . . 
Edmonds, Kathryn Anne 10 
208 

Edmunds, Bart . . . 200 
Edwards, Bucky Shannon 11 
197, 276 

Edwards, Jennifer Dawn 11 . 

275,285 

Edwards, Misty Michelle 9 . . 

274 




, 96. 


56, 174 
. 79, 


140, 


197, 


221 , 


Edwards. Michael Anthony 10 ... 54 
Edwards, Tammy Jean 10 . . . 208, 285 
Edwards, Jr., Larry Joseph 9 . . . 221 
Eley, Hunter Randolph 12 . . . 118, 
173, 174, 183, 276, 278, 279, 282 
Eller, Frank Faculty ... 231 
Eller, Jerred Wane 9 . . . 130, 221, 275 
Eller, Jonathan Andrew 9 ... 221 
Eller, II, Jerry Dane 11 ... 16, 128, 
197 


Epperly, John Michael G. . . . 261 
Epperly, Robert Bryan 11 ... 113, 
134, 135, 197, 276, 281, 283 
Evans, Amanda . . . 282 
Evans, Amanda Gail 11... 197, 275 
Evans, Gary Wayne 9 ... 221 


F 


Fain Cindy Renee 11 ... 197, 274 
Fain, Crystal Charlene 9 ... 221, 274 
Fain, Kristina Ann 9 ... 221. 274, 282 
Fanning, Douglas Richard 12 . . . 174, 
277,278 

Fanning. Kimberly Paige 12 . . . 174 
Farley. Shannon Renee 9 ... 221 
Farley, William 9 ... 221 
Farmer, Amy Michelle 12 . . . 15, 92, 
104, 105, 114, 169, 174.274.277, 
278,279, 282 

Farmer, Billie Faculty ... 231 
Farmer, Christopher Daniel 11... 24, 
61, 76. 77, 98, 197, 275, 278 
Farmer, Candy G. . . . 245 
Farmer, Jennifer Leigh 12 . . . 20, 169, 
174 

Farmer, John Aaron 9 . . . 130, 221 
Farmer, Melissa Kelly 12 . . . 16, 174, 
190, 282 

Farmer, Pamela Ann 11 . . . 197, 281 
Farmer, Theodore Herman G. . . . 22, 
23. 275 

Farmer, Carl David 10 . . . 208 
Farmer, Jr., Edgar Lee 12 . . . 174, 

284 

Farris. Angela Gail 12 ... 70, 175, 

277, 284 

Farris, David Harrison 11 . . . 70. 197, 
204, 274 

Farris, Harriet Faculty ... 231 
Farris, Erika Lynn 10 . . . 208, 282 
Faulkner. David Shawn 9 ... 221. 274 
FCA . . . 278 
Fellows, Beth ... 186 
Fellows, Beth . . . 279 
Felts, Charlotte Faculty . . . 231 
Ferguson, Jason Adams 11... 197, 
204, 232 

Fernandez, Richard 11... 197, 277 
Fewell, Mona Marie 11... 175, 285 
Ficke, Robert Matthew 9 ... 221 
Ficke, Susan Faculty . . . 232, 283 
Finley, Adrienne Latonia 12 . . . 175 
Finley, Julian Karlshe 9 ... 221 
Fisher, Jonathan Preston 9 . . . 99, 

221, 

274, 275 


276 — INDEX 














Fisher. Lisa Gail 11... 198, 282 
Fitzgerald, Stephanie Fac. . . . 97, 232 
Fizer, Virginia Faculty ... 64 
Flanigan, Stephanie 11 ... 198 
Flinchum, Carolyn Fac. . . . 232 
Flinchum, Randy Faculty . . . 40, 41. 
128, 129, 232 

Flinchum, Danny Lynn 10 ... 60 
Foley, Charles Robert 10 . . . 208 
Folsom, Emily Denise 9 ... 221, 274 
Folsom, Margaret Anne 9 . . . 137, 

221, 274, 277, 284 

Folsom. Amanda fane 10 ... 61, 208, 
274. 282, 285 

Ford, Yvonne Lynn 9 ... 221 
Fore, David Thomas 9 ... 221. 284 
Fore, Johnathan Carroll 11... 198, 
199, 281 

Forensics . . . 283 
Foster, Cody Sayers 11 ... 198 
Foster, Christopher Allen 10 . . . 208 
Foushee, Wendy Leigh 11 ... 13, 198, 
278, 280, 288 

Foushee, Marchella Dee 10 . . . 208, 
278 

Fowler, Crystal Dawn 9 ... 221 
Fowler, Traci Leigh 9 ... 221 
Fowlkes, Jesse Eugene 9 ... 221, 275 
Fox, Charles Clifford 11 ... 19, 92, 
105, 116, 194, 197, 198, 276, 277, 
280 

Fralin. Allen, Wayne 11 ... 198 
Fralin, Jennifer Shane 12 ... 4. 124, 
125! 137, 175 

Franes, II, Anthony james 9 . . . 29, 
221 

Franklin, Kimberly Dawn 11 . . . 198 
Frazier, Donald Lee 12 . . . 175. 275 
Frazier, Michael Anthony 11 ... 61. 
198 

Frazier. Victoria Lynn 12 . . . 175, 282 
Freeman, Angel Dawn 9 ... 221 
Freeman, Doug ... 19 
Freeman. Jackie Faculty .. . 232 
Freeman, John Faculty . . . 232, 275 
Freeman, Larry Jason 9 ... 60, 89, 

221 

Freeman, Misty Dawn 11 ... 196, 198 
Freeman, Robert Darden 11 ... 19, 
58, 116. 120, 121, 198. 280 
Freeman, Shannon Dee 9 ... 221 
Freeman, Timothy Brian 11... 198, 
280 

French, Chasity . . . 274 
French, Nathan McNiel 11 ... 198 
French, Timothy Jackson 9 . . . 223 
Friant, Amy Lou 9 . . . 223, 274 
Fricker, Matt ... 60 
Friend, Chasity Leigh 10 ... 72. 208, 
285 

Frye, Lewis B. 9 . . . 223 
Fuller, Lynn G. . . . 128 
Fuller, Stafford Lennell 12 . . . 175 
Funk, Kevin Joseph 11 ... 198 
Funk. Michelle Marie 12 . . . 175, 279 
Funk, Christina Lee 10 . . . 17, 208, 
285 

Funk, Teena Alane 10 . . . 208 
Funkhouser, David Michael 9 . . . 223 


G 


Gallimore. Jennifer Jean 12 . . . 52, 
175,285 

Gallimore, Lisa Ann 10 . . . 208, 282, 

284 

Gallimore, Penny Ann 11 ... 198 
Gallimore, Robin Michelle 12 ... 5, 
124, 175, 278, 282 

Gallimore, Christopher Randolph 10 
... 99, 208. 275 

Gallimore, Michael Daniel 10 . . . 208, 

285 

Gallimore, Robert Brian 10 . . . 118, 
208 


SCA: Front Row: Johnny Reese, Angi 
Farris, Jennifer Minnick, Melanie 
Richeson, I'.J. Lytton, Kelly McCoy, 
April Alexander. Amy Farmer. Meg 
Folsom. Second Row: Latha 
Gearheart. Stephanie Alley, Cam 
Calfee, Megan McNeil, Cindy 
Whitaker. Laurel Shroyer, Amy 
Albano, Alison Spain, Jessica 
Piedicalzo, Mr. Roger Asbury. Third 


Gambill, Anica Charrise 10 . . . 208 
Gardner, William Jeffrey 10 . . . 118, 
208. 282 

Garland, Terri Katherine 11 . . . 198, 
276, 278 

Garner, Steven Earl 9 . . . 223 
Gearheart, Jason Christopher 9 . . . 

223 

Gearheart, Latha Allen 12 . . . 15. 65. 
86, 113, 127, 128, 173, 174, 175, 
276, 277, 278, 282 
Gessner, Nathan Webb 9 . . . 223 
Gettys, Jim Faculty . . . 232 
Gilbert, Jennifer Rae 11 ... 109, 198, 
282 

Giles, Jr., Harry Reaford 12 . . . 176. 

280, 284 

Gilmer, Angela Dawn 9 . . . 223 
Goad. Andrew David 9 . . . 223 
Goad, Angela Suzanne 9 . . . 223, 284 
Goad, John Martin 12 . . . 176 
Golden, Brenard Shane 12 . . . 127, 
128,176 

Goodman, David Lee 11... 128, 198 
Gosnell. George Edward 11 ... 16, 

198 

Graham, Aaron Russell 11 . . . 198, 
275, 278 

Graham, Bonnie Faculty ... 52, 232 
Graham, Chadrick Irving 12 . . . 108, 
109, 176, 276,278, 279 
Graham. David Carson 9 . . . 223, 274, 

278 

Graham. Deanna Brea 9 . . . 223, 282 
Graham, Audrey Lee 10 . . . 20, 208, 
211, 285 

Graham, James D. Fac. . . . 42. 232, 
284, 285 

Grantham. Anthonv Brian 11... 128, 
198 

Gravely, Jenny Rebecca 12 . . . 176 
Gravely, Edward Thomas 10 ... 42. 
208 

Gravely, Sandra Kay 10 . . . 208 
Gravely, Tammy 11 . . . 198, 279 
Gravlev, Christopher Lee 9 ... 98, 
223, 275 

Gravley, Doris Fac. . . . 232 
Gravley, Jason Fredrick 9 . . . 223 
Gravlev, Jennifer Lvnn 11... 198, 

279 

Gravley, Melissa Dawn 11 ... 198 
Gravley, Rebecca Ann 9 . . . 54, 223 
Gray, Linda Sue 11 ... 198 
Gray. Todd Wayne 9 . . . 223 
Gray, Stacey Charles 12 . . . 176 
Gray, Jr., James Malcolm 11... 198 
Green, Mario Eugene 9 . . . 128 
Greene, Jason Brent G. ... 121 
Greere, Jererne Dean 10 . . . 128. 208 
Grubb, Bobbie Jean 12 ... 92, 176, 
279 

Grubb, Erica Ladonne 10 . . . 66, 208 
Grubb, Lori Ann 10 . . . 208, 277 
Grubb, Mary Elizabeth 10 . . . 208. 

281, 285 

Gunn, Cherie Evon 12 ... 2, 176 
Gunter, Jim Faculty . . . 232 
Gusler, Bonnie Fac. . . . 232 
Gusler, Jr., Ronald Ray 10 . . . 208 
Guthrie, Joe G. . .. 258 


H 


Haga, Carlos James 9 . . . 130, 223 
Haga, Eric Stephen 12 . . . 109, 138, 
139, 176,276 

Haga, Kathy Gaye 12 . . . 176 
Hagee, Eric Lee 12 ... 98, 275 
Hager, Robert Eugene 10 . . . 112, 
113, 128, 129. 208 
Hale, James Fac. . . . 232 
Hale, Tommy Faculty ... 128 
Hale, Justin Brvan 10 . . . 277 
Haley, Brandy Michelle 9 . . . 79, 223 
Halev, Lauren Ashleigh G. . . . 38 



Concert Band: Front Row: Ms. Tracie 
Hornby, Missy Blankenship, James 
Harrell, Steven Parks, Chad Owens, 
Brian .Sheppard, Mr. Bob Priest. 
Second Row: Sally Sandidge, Vickie 
Lambert, Georgette White, Becky 
Horne, Amy Taylor. Amiee White, 


Christy Landreth, Sherry Stoots, Kesha 
Miller, Stephanie Shelton, Carol Mann. 
Teresa Joseph, Tracy Roan, Tracy 
Lineberry. Third Row: Krystal 
Talbert, Kim White, Cindy Palmer, 
Marty Katz, Wendy Reynolds, Lori 
Grubb, Hayley Shelton, Richard 


Fernandez, Scylenea Moore, Regina 
Sexton, Brian Chandler, Chad Hall 
Back Row: Mike Myers, Jeff Johnson, 
Carrie ODell, Thomas Shockley, Kathy 
Litton, Jennifer Cox, Wylie Powers, 
Shon Hite, Becky Akers, Kyle Scaggs. 



Drama Club: Seniors: Front Row: 

Aimee Ondich, Karla Poole, Amy 
Farmer, Sarah Simpkins, DeAnna 
Wyatt, Rita Cox, Robbie Crockett, 
Chris White, Natalie Bowling. Second 
Row: Lynn Brown, Cindy Bruce, 


Allison Rollins, Cheri Smith, Stevie 
Eaves, Steve Warren, Jamie Hoback, 
Mike Morehead, Sally Nehrling. Third 
Row: Lattie Coake, Lynett Ayers, 

Doug Fanning, Latha Gearheart, Brian 
Roope, Travis Terry. Mark Martin, 


(.ina Haynes, Benny Hancock. Back 
Row: Julie Fribble, Todd Viers, 
Daniel Vest, Stephanie Cook, Chris 
Hull, Scotty McNeil, Jason Alley. 
Jermaine Russell, Curtis Rollins, Jim 
Quesenberry. 



VICA: Auto Body and Auto 
Mechanics: Front Row: Kelley 
Riggins, James Harrell, Jackie Akers, 
Todd Hoback, Jason Rupe, Brad 
Dalton, Chip Jones, Mr. Roger 
Caudell. Second Row: David Dobbins, 


Allen Bullion, Jeff Trail, Jamie 
Adams, Dan Hamilton. Hope 
Whittaker, Jeff Riddle. Third Row: 
George Viers, James Ray Martin, 
Jeffrey Bowden, Johnnv McGee. Scott 
Harris, Zane Lambert. Jeremiah 


Bryson, Marshall Branscome. Back 
Row: Johnny Sexton, Butch Hudson, 
Roger Wright, Jamie Tolbert, Billy 
Montgomery, Jimmy Phibbs, Mark 
Jones. 


Row: Brady Hurst, Teresa Ramsey, 
Tamasha Crouse, Aaron Cress, 
Carmen Dunlord, Tracy McCoy, Kelly 
Campbell. Mandy Morris, Snapper 
Overman, Becky Martin Back Row: 
Daniel Leary, Scotty McNeil, Jason 
Alley, A1 Brown, Bryan Hale, Chuck 
Fox, Brad Burrus, Rita Cox, Becca 
Woolley. 



INDEX — 277 














Freshmen Band: Front Row: Ms. 

Trade Hornby. Melissa Smith, Kerri 
Morris, Meg Folsom, Missy Conner, 
Kris Fain, Shannon Andrews, Sherry 
Vest, Susan Sutherland, Amber 
Carrico, April Hall, Sarah Simpkins, 
Mr. Bob Priest. Director. Second Row: 
Eric Sexton. Kim Donald, April 
Corvin, Michelle Wimmer, Amy 


Friant, Myrissa Rollins, Cherish Hall. 
Susan Rudisill, Hope Denny, Ashley 
Bruchett, Melissa Smith, Shannon 
Farley. Third Row: John Stout, Sam 
Raykes, Steven Roark, Justin Phelps, 
Angi Welker, Jason Lambert, Angie 
Gilmer, Ben Linkous, Martha Blair, 
Steven Underwood, Larry Taylor, 
April Miller, Amanda Nicolo. Chris 


Woodie. Back Row: Carson Graham, 
Wes Brown, Tony Clark, Kevin 
Taylor, Amanda Hall, Jessica Lindsay, 
Oscar Russell, Todd Lindamood, Josh 
Averett, Mike Sink, Kelly Perry, 
Sherry Austin, Cheryl Cox, Kim 
Norris. 



Drama: 10 and 11: Front Row: 

Cintoria Smith. Carrie Kincaid, Jon 
Breedlove, Tanya Lovern, Angela 
Vaughan, Lisa Rowh, Carl Carter, 
Lena Martin, Carrie Linkous. Second 
row: Angie Baines, Tonya Turner, 
Kesha Miller, Jessica Sifford, Amy 


Huff, Carrie Shay, Cindy Sexton, 
Jenny Taylor, Alyssa Rollins, Bryan 
Cook. Third Row: Rebecca Akers, 
Heather Reagan, Sherod Russel, April 
Asbury, Tracy Skeens, Terry 
Hoffmann, Courtney Crockett, Marcy 
Foushee, Kvle Scaggs, Aaron Graham, 


Back Row: Wayne Jones, Jodi Cox, 

Ken Hurley, Joe Warden, Joshua 
Bowden, Natashia Reed, Stephanie 
Lytton, Wendy Foushee, Brandy Lowe, 
Chris Farmer, Tracy Lincberrv. 



FCA: Seniors: Front Row: Eva 

Machelor, Amy Farmer, Alison Spain, 
Ronnie Hamblin. Destry Harding, 
Ronnie Curtis Rollins. Marvin Arnold, 
Stevie Eaves, Chris Smith. Second 
Row: Stephanie Alley, Robin 


Gallimore, Chad Graham, Derek 
D’Ardenne, Steve Moye, Matt Weddle, 
Diron Lane, Neal Leahy, Becky Smith. 
Third Row: Amy Albano, Richard 
Myers, Brad Terrell, Rita Cox, Doug 
Fanning, Sarah Simpkins, Elizabeth 


Knarr, Hunter Eley, Janell Hurst, 
Marsha Southern. Back Row: Brian 
Hall, Michael Worrell, Scotty McNeil, 
Charles Cutlip, Caroline James, Sergio 
Hendricks, Kim McDaniel, Shawn 
Burchett, Eric Chrisley, Zane Lambert. 



Hall, Amanda Ellen 9 . . . 223 
Hall, Andy Lee 9 . . . 130. 223 
Hall, Angela Lvnne 9 . . . 85, 143, 222, 
223, 281, 285 

Hall, April Michelle 9 . . . 223, 274 
Hall, Brian Wesley 12 . . . 176, 278, 

281 

Hall, Chad Allen 11 . . . 198, 204, 276, 
277, 282 

Hall. Cherish Susanne 9 . . . 223 
Hall, Dean Anthony 9 . . . 223 
Hall, Holly Jean 9 . . . 143, 223, 281, 
282 

Hall, Jason Ethredge 12 . . . 19, 113, 
134, 135, 176.281 
Hall, Jill Suzanne 11 . . . 198, 279 
Hall. Kara Janeen 12 . . . 169. 177 
Hall, Sallie . . . 107 
Hall, Stacie Dianne 12 . . . 177, 279 
Hall, Toby ... 59 
Hall, Tracie Lynn 12 . . . 177 
Hall, Adam Preston 10 . . . 208, 274 
Hall, Angela Marie 10 . . . 143, 208, 
211 

Hall, Autumn Leigh 10 . . . 208 
Hall, Scott Austin 10 . . . 208 
Hallett, Julie Ann 12 . . . 53, 177 
Hamblin, Layda Faculty . . . 232 
Hamlin, Shane Ronald 9 . . . 223 
Hamblin, Richard Lee 10 . . . 128, 208, 
281 

Hamblin, II, Ronald Lee 12... 15, 
121. 128, 177, 278 
Hamilton, Lisa Ann 11... 49, 198 
Hamilton, Daniel Wayne 12 . . . 177, 
277 

Hammond, Emily Christine 11 ... 9, 
23, 59, 198, 275, 280 
Hancock, Albert Abraham 10 . . . 16, 
208 

Hancock, Becky Faculty . . . 232 
Hancock, Benny Franklin 12 . . . 14, 

17, 25, 77, 98, 177, 275, 283 
Hancock, Nancy Lynn 11 . . . 198 
Handy, Linda Christine G. ... 275 
Handy. William Dustin 9 . . . 223, 275 
Hanks. Carl Faculty . . . 232 
Hanks, Faye Faculty . . . 40, 41, 233 
Hanks, Sandra 10 . . . 208 
Hanks, Carmen Leigh 10 . . . 208 
Hanks, Casey Bronson 10 . . . 208 
Hanshaw, Linda Fac. . . . 233 
Hanshew, Jr., Donald Rav 11 . . . 47, 
112, 113, 134, 198, 276 
Hardin. Rebecca Lynn 12 . . . 177 
Harding, Kevin Destry 12 . . . 1, 7, 92, 
128, 174, 177, 182', 278, 281 
Harkrader, Joseph Calvin 9 . . . 223 
Harless, Ashley Hauntz 12 . . . 177, 

280 

Harless, Moretta David 9 . . . 223 
Harman, Joanna Elizabeth 12 . . . 54 
Harrell, Carol Fac. . . . 233 
Harrell, Carolyn Fac. . . . 233 
Harrell, James Daniel 11 . . . 103, 198, 
277 

Harrell, Samuel Franklin 11... 198, 
284 

Harrell, Sherry Leigh 12 . . . 177 
Harrell, John David 10 . . 118, 119, 
208 

Harriman, Sharon Renee 10 . . . 208 
Harris, Faith Gibson G. . . . 253 
Harris, Joseph Scott 12 . . . 177, 277 
Harris, Kendra Delise 9 . . . 223 
Harris, Mark G. . . . 253 
Harrison, Claudia Ellen 11... 48, 

198, 285 

Hash, Dedreia Dawn 12 . . . 177 
Hash, Synthia Lynn 9 . . . 223, 274, 
282 ' 

Hatcher, Elizabeth Ann 10 . . . 208, 
282, 285 

Haulsee, Ryan Lee 9 . . . 223 
Hawley, John ... 58 
Haves, Kimberly Renee 11... 49, 74, 
199 

Haves, Patricia Elaine 11 . . . 199, 279, 

284 

Haynes, Gina Marie 12 ... 71, 98, 

177, 274 

Haynes, Jason Scott 12 . . . 177 
Haynes, Stephen Neil 9 . . . 130, 223 
Haynes, Jodi Michelle 10 . . . 143, 208 
Hedge, Jr., James Jeffery 10 . . . 208, 

285 


Hedrick, Kristen Leigh 10 . . . 208, 

274 

Heidi, Christopher Thomas 9 . . . 223, 

284 

Hemmings, Peggy Faculty . . . 233. 284 
Henderso. Bruce Faculty . . . 233 
Hendricks, Christopher Lee 10 . . . 

208,281 

Hendricks, Sergio Marcell 12 . . . 113, 
126, 128, 177, 278 
Henley, Billy James 12 . . . 279 
Henley, Johnathan Lyn 12 . . . 127, 

128, 178, 280,282 
Henley, Sarah Rena 11 ... 199 
Henley, Ginger Marie 11... 199, 282 
Henry, Joshua Andrew 12 . . . 106, 

116, 117, 178, 193. 282, 285 
Henry, Jacob Anderson 10 . . . 118, 
138, 208, 282 

Hester, Steve Fac. ... 51, 233, 286, 

288 

Hickman, Jeffrey Wayne 9 . . . 223, 

275 

Hickman, Mickey Faculty . . . 233 
Hickman, Tristan Gisell 9 . . . 223, 281 
Hicks, Joel Faculty ... 15, 128 
Hicks, Melissa Ann 12 . . . 178, 179, 
281, 282 

Hicks. Tammy Elaine 12 . . . 178 
Hill. Brian 12 . . . 13, 118 
Hill. Bryan 1- . . . 208 
Hill, Kelly Lenore 12 ... 7, 178 
Hill, Stacey Lee 1 l ... 199 
Hill, Timothy Wayne 9 . . . 89, 130, 
131, 223 

Hillman, Jeannie Faculty . . . 233 
Hilton, Dorothy Lee 11 ... 199 
Hines, Brad 10... 208 
Hinkley, Ethel Sue 9 . . . 223 
Hite, Shawn David 10 . . . 210, 277 
Hoback, Bradley Todd 11 . . . 199. 

277 

Hoback, Eric Edmond 12 . . . 103, 178, 
280 

Hoback, Jamie Elizabeth 12 . . . 178, 
277 

Hoback. W r illiam Joseph 11 . . . 122. 
199 

Hodge, Christopher Matthew 10 . . . 
210 

Hoffman, Terry Ann 11 ... 22, 57, 

77, 98, 99, 199, 204, 278, 280, 281 
Holcomb, Benny 9 . . . 223 
Holcomb, Betty Faculty ... 113, 114 
Holcomb, Teresa Ann 12 . . . 88, 178, 
282 

Hollins, Michele Lea 10 ... 210 
Hollins. Jr., Roger Roy 10 . . . 128, 

210 

Holston, Clarence Lee 12 . . . 56. 178, 
282 

Holston, Kimberly Lynn 10 ... 210 
Honaker, Leesa Dawn 11... 199, 280 
Honaker, Ormond Brice 9 . . . 223 
Honaker, Troy Lee 12 . . . 176, 178, 
182 

Hoosier, Sylvia Ann 9 . . . 223 
Hoover, Jennifer Ann 11 ... 199, 280 
Hoover, Tracy Elaine 11... 97, 199, 

285 

Hopkins, Angela Denise 12 . . . 178, 
279, 281, 282 

Hopkins, Bradlev Scott 12 . . . 56, 178 
Hopskins, Casey Alan 10 ... 210, 285 
Horn, Michael Jason 9 . . . 223, 276 
Hornby, Tracie . . . 274, 277 
Horne, Rebecca Lea 10 . . . 114, 210. 
277 

Horsley, Teri Danielle 9 . . . 223, 274. 
288 

Horsley. Robbie Allen 10 ... 210 
Horton, Delissa Leigh 12 . . . 178 
Horton, Jay Thomas 12 . . . 65. 178, 
280 

Horton, Krystal G. . . . 22 
Horton, Steven Wayne 9 . . . 223 
Horton, Tina Michelle 12 . . . 178 
Horton, Tracy Ann 11... 199, 285 
Horton, Katina Katherine 10 . . . 210 
Horton, Kimberly Lvnn 10 ... 210, 
275 

Horton, Teresa Lynn 10 ... 210 
Hoskins, Cynthia Jean 11... 199, 275 
Houghton, Douglas . . . 284 
Houghton, Leah 10 ... 210 


Science Club: Front Row: Martie 
Hull, Crystal Carden, Daniella Stoots, 
Jill David, Stephanie Albert, Vicki 
Lambert. Hillery Kiester, Shannon 
Atkinson. Second Row: Sarah 
Simpkins, Amy Webb, Natashia Reed, 
Tanya Lovern, Janell Hurst, Latha 
Gearheart, Amy Albano, Misti 


Williams. Third Row: Diane Owens, 
Amanda Reese, Chuck Bennett, Nicole 
Moore, Tracie Mitchell, Beth Lindsay, 
Steve Warren, Aaron Graham. Back 
Row: Terri Garland, Carson Graham, 
Scotty McNeil, Chris Pendergrast, 
Travis Terry, Jason Alley, James Clay, 
Stephanie Alley. 


78 — INDEX 








Housel. John Jessce 10 . .. 122, 128, 
210, 281 

Howard. Stacey Lynn 11 ... 199 
Howell. Pam 11 ... 199, 279 
Hubbard, I mu Marie 11 . . . 199, 285 
Hubbard, Elizabeth Louise 10 ... 210 
Hubble, Christi Dionne CL . . . 

Huber, Patricia Faculty . . . 233. 288 
Huddle, Jason Andrew 11 ... 199 
Hudson, Christopher Eugene 12 .. . 
178 

Hudson, Elizabeth Amv 11... 136, 
137, 199 

Hudson, Jr.. Harry H. 12 . . . 63, 179, 

277 

Huff, Amy Christine 10 .. . 143, 210, 

278 

Huff. Rocky Allen 11 ... 15, 122, 128, 
199. 280 

Huff, Travis Waylon 9 . . . 223 
Hughes. Jimmy Lee 12 . . . 179 
Hughes, Lisa . . . 282 
Hughes, James Edward 10 . . . 42, 210. 
285 

Hughes. Laura Ann 10 . . . 210 
Hughes, William Blake 10 . . . 106, 

210, 285 

Hull, Christopher Charles 12 . .. 65, 
179, 187, 277, 280 
Hull. Martha June 11 . . . 199, 274, 

278 ' 

Hunter, Eric Lamont 11 ... 15, 128, 
199 

Hunter. Julian Dwane 10 . . . 210 
Hurd, Christina Dawn 11 . . . 199, 280 
Hurd, Robert Edward 9 . . . 223, 275 
Hurley, Eldon Kenneth 11 . . . 199, 
274, 278 

Hurst, Bradv Kevin 11 , . . 128, 199, 

277, 282' 

Hurst, Janell Diane 12 . . . 19, 179, 

278. 281. 282 

Hurst. Mark 11 ... 113, 128, 199 
Hurst, Shannon Marie 11 ... 199 
Hutchins, Merita Fac. . . . 233 
Hutchins, Michael Haven 11... 199 
Hyder, Thomas Heath 9 . . . 223 
Hylton, Alan Jason 12 . . 179 
Hylton. Brenda Faculty . . . 233 


/ 


Images, By B. . . . 273 
Ingles, William Jordan 9 . . . 130, 131, 
223 

Irby, Brandy Nichole 9 . . . 223, 274 
Isget, Jeremy Randolph 12 . . . 179 
Isom, David Lee 12 . . . 179 


7 

Jackson, Amanda Beth 11 . . . 199 
Jackson, Barbara Jean 9 . . . 143.223 
Jackson, Elaine Faculty ... 41, 233 
Jackson, Karen Denise 11... 45, 65, 
67, 96, 137, 199, 276, 282 
Jackson. Matthew Peyton 9 . . . 130, 
223 

Jackson, Rasheeh Duane 11 ... 199 
James, Caroline Noelle 12 . . . 278. 
279,281 

James, Sarah Annette 11... 199, 288 
Jarrells, Jeanie Pearl 12 . . . 179, 285 
Jarrells, Eric Dewayne 1- . . . 210, 285 
Jarrells, Joseph Leon 10 . . . 210. 213. 
281 

Jenkins, Amber Star 10 . . . 137, 210. 
282 

Jenks, Shaun Alan 10 ... 210, 274 
Jennings, Jason Stuart 11... 58, 72, 
199. 274 

Jennings, Kirk Alan 12 . . . 57. 116, 
172, 179 

Johnson, April Dawn 9 . . . 223 
Johnson. John Faculty . . . 233 
Johnson. Linda Fac. . . . 40. 41 
Johnson, Shelia Ann II... 199, 285 


HOSA: Front Row: Susie Young, 
Kathleen Mustian, Valeria Prim, 
Rebecca Keene, Crystal Long, Christy 
Simpkins. Second Row: Melissa 



Johnson, Daniel Ray 10 . . . 210 
Johnson, Daniel Vincent 10 . . . 210, 
274 

Johnson, Jeffery Neal 10 . . . 95, 210, 
215 

Johnson, Rhonda Renee 9 . . . 158, 
159, 223, 274, 282 
Johnson. David Clyde 10 ... 210 
Jones, Alyson Kristina 12 . . . 179 
Jones, Brenda ... 241 
Jones, Caroline Noelle 12 . . . 179 
Jones. Chadwick Deangelous 11... 
200 

Jones, Chip Douglas 12 . . . 15. 62, 
179,277 

Jones, Christina Lynn 12 ... 54, 114, 
141, 180, 276 

Jones, Christopher Todd 120, 

121 

Jones, Daniel Armondoe 12 . . . 180, 
280 

Jones, Dona Marie 11... 200 
Jones, Elizabeth Ann 12 . . . 180 
Jones, Jerry Faculty . . . 233 
I ones, Latisha Yocoeona 9 . . . 223, 

284 

Jones, Lena Marcharie 11... 200 
Jones, Linda Lee G. . . . 10, 30 
Jones, Mark Anthony 11... 200, 277 
Jones, Michael 9 . . . 223 
Jones, Rebecca Darlene 11 ... 53 
Jones, Ruby Lynn 12 . . . 180 
Jones, Scott Anthony 9 . . . 223 
Jones, Scott Edward 12 .. . 180 
Jones, Tracy Bernice 9 . . . 223, 274, 

285 

Jones, Amanda Gail 10 ... 210 
Jones, Monica Lucille 10 . . . 210 
Jones, Wayne Allen 11... 200, 278 
Jones, Jr.. Danny Wayne 11... 199, 
204, 205 

Joseph, Teresa Ann 10 ... 210. 277 


K 


Kanipe, Ron Faculty ... 118, 119, 137, 
233 

Kasik, Frank Faculty . . . 233 
Kast. Brenda Gail 12 ... 180, 182, 

281, 282 

Katz, Martin Ashley 10 . . . 72, 210, 
277. 284 

Keagle, Shannon Mariesa 9 .. . 223 
Keene, Rebecca Lynn 10 ... 210, 279 
Keister. Beau ... 19 
Keister, Hillerv Ruth 12 . . . 180, 278, 
281 

Kelly, Jim Faculty . . . 233 
Kelly, Kambeth Lee 11... 124, 125, 
200, 276, 282 

Kelly, Mary Faculty . . . 233, 284 
Kemp, Derick Duane 10 . . . 122, 128. 
210,281,285 

Kemp. Leigh Ann 10 . . . 210. 275 
Kennedy, Lula Michelle 9 . . . 223 
Kennedy, Robert Glenn 10 . . . 113, 
134, 135, 210, 282 
Kentucky Fried Chicken . . . 273 
Kettle. Kanda Cay 10 . . . 143, 210 
Kidd, Janet Ann 10 ... 210, 215 
Kilbert, Teresa Lynn 9 . . . 223 
Kilbert, Melissa Ann 10 ... 61, 210 
Kilby. Stephen Lane 10 ... 210, 285 
Kimbrough, Timothy Lamont 9 . . . 

130, 223 

Kincaid, Carrie Michelle 11... 200, 
278,282 

King, Becky ... 94 
King, Jeremy 9 . . . 223. 275 
King, Mary Ann 9 . . . 223 
King, Patrick Scott 9 . . . 223 
King, Patsy Faculty . . . 234 
King, W'alter Eugene 10 . . . 128, 210 
King, Jr., Michael Forrest 9 . . . 130, 
223,228, 275 

Kirby, Suzanne Frances 9 . . . 223, 284 
Kiser. Andrew Jason 12 . . . 16. 63, 

180 

Klaiber, Christina Carol 10 ... 210 

Knack, Rick ... 24 

Knarr, Elizabeth Jane 12 . . . 19, 38, 

39. 65, 85, 86^ 137, 171, 180, 278 


Montgomery, Diane Owens, Mari Ann 
Beckner, Tracy McPeak, Lisa Smith. 
Third Row: Okima Peoples, Tracy 
Annette Martin, Teeka Morris, Karen 


Knarr. Mary Christin 10 . . . 137, 210, 
285 

Knick, Lisa Dawn 9 . . . 107, 223. 274, 
285 

Knick, Jr.. David Alan 12 . . . 105, 180, 
276, 281 

Knode, John Duane 10 . . . 20, 210, 
282 ‘ 

Knode. Kristopher William 10 . . . 285 
Knotter, Christopher Donald 10 . . . 
210 

Knox, Melba Faculty . . . 234, 288 
Krug. James Zackery 9 . . . 223, 274 


L 


Lafon, Shannon Kelly 11... 200 
Lambert, Ann Fac. . . . 234 
Lambert. Jason Matthew' 9 . . . 223 
Lambert, Zane Gregory 12 . . . 62, 

103, 

180,277,278 

Lambert, Victoria Leigh 10 . . . 143, 
210, 276, 277, 278 

Lancaster, II, John William 11... 200 
Landreth, Christy Sue 10 . . . 210, 277, 
285 

Lane, David Jason 9 . . . 223 
Lane, Diron Stuart 12 . . . 169. 180, 
278 

Lane, Tonya Lynn 9 . . . 285 
Lane. Jr.. Jack Jason 9 . . . 223 
Langelier, Chasidy Elaine 12 . . . 181 
Langendorfer, Lisa . . . 59 
Larsen, Nelia G. ... 269 
Larue. Ginger Suzette 9 . . . 223 
Lawson, Hal ... 19 
Lawson. Jeff ... 19 
Lawson, Kevin Wade 9 ... 225 
Lawson, Kvndra Lynettc 12 . . . 181, 
274. 281 

Lawson, Mark Alan 12 . . . 14, 127, 

128, 181, 282 

Lawson, Michael Jackson 11 ... 210 
Layman, Geoffrey G. . . . 250 
Layman, Matthew Waldron 11 ... 19, 
59, 113, 128, 200, 280 
Leahy, Neal Patrick 12 . . . 12, 116, 

181, 278 

Leary, Daniel Emory 12 ... 73, 100. 

134, 181, 274, 276, 277, 283 
Leary, Phyllis Conway 9 . . . 100, 225, 
276 

Leftwich, Amanda Gail 9 . . . 225 
Leisure, Monica Bell 9 . . . 225 
Lemons, Tonya Lynnette 11 ... 96, 
124, 125, 200 
Leonard, Clinton ... 58 
Lester, Christopher Sean 11 ... 113, 
134, 200 

Lester, Jamie Shawn 9 ... 88, 225 
Levy, Annyce Faculty . . . 234 
Lewis, Cari Desmond 9 . . . 130, 131, 
225 

Lewis, Kerry Howard 12 . . . 140, 181 
Lewis, Malcolm Courtney 11 ... 128, 
200,276 

Lewis. Chad Edward 10 . . . 129, 210 
Lewis, John Joseph 10 . , . 210 
Lindamood, Alfred Wayne 12 . . . 181 
Lindamood, Brandon Todd 9 . . . 225, 

274 

Lindsay. Mary Elizabeth 12 . . . 181, 
278,281 

Lindsay, Susan Michael 11... 200, 

280, 281 

Lindsey, Jessica Lee 9 . . . 225, 282 
Lindsey, Bobby Lewis 10*. . . 210 
Lindsev, Freeman Keith 10 . . . 210, 

275 

Lindstrom, Carl Faculty . . . 234 
Lineberry, Tracy Suzanne 11... 200, 
277, 278 

Linkous. Benjamin Lee 9 . . . 134, 225, 
274, 282 

Linkous, Carolyn ... 59 
Linkous, Charles Kevin 12 . . . 102, 

103, 181, 280 

Linkous. Jeffrey Keith 11 ... 128, 

200, 

201 

Linkous, Jonna Lee 11... 88, 116. 

200, 284 


Dehart, Tracy Dickerson, Mrs. Nancy 
Sparks. Back Row: Heather Reagan. 
Patricia Hayes, Sandra Weikle, Leslie 
Tate, Tammy Gravely, Kevin Shively. 


NHS: Senior Inductees: Front Row: 

Pam Dalton, Sally Nehrling, Beth 
Fellows, Amy Farmer, Becca Woolley, 
Angela Clark. Back Row: Eric 



VICA Drafting: Front Row: Amy 

Farmer, Jennifer Woodyard, Sharon 
Watson. Angie Hopkins. Second Row: 
Chad Graham, Samantha Stump, 
Jenny Gravley, Alison Spain. Third 


DECA: Front Row: Mr. Gary McCoy, 
Cynthia Moore, Jill Hall, Tammy 
Abell. Jennifer Mottesheard. 
Cassandra Meadows, April Toney, 
Kim Caldwell. Second Row: Stacie 
Hall, Christy Thompson, Jessica Ross. 
James Peoples, Joey Dice, Michelle 
Funk. Kay Ramsey, D.J. Patterson. 
Third Row: Caroline James, Chris 


McGrady, John Cromer, James Clay. 
Steve Schwenk, Hunter Eley, (diaries 
Cutlip. 



Row: John Cromer, Brad Terrell, 

Mark Ratcliff, Steve Moye, Derek 
D’Ardenne. Back Row: Charles Cutlip, 
Jim Bob Spencer. Chris Cherry, 

Robert Walker. 


Smith, Lori Chinault. Heather 
Morehead, Caroline Sharier, Hope 
Eads, Pamela Howell, Bobbie Jean 
Grubb, Kenneth Tabor Back Row: 
Bobby Quesenberry, Billy Henley, 
Christopher Lovern. Stephen 
Schwenk, Brad Draper, Dean 
Trueheart, Chris Cherry, Frank 
Cowan. 




INDEX — 279 


Jason Speller 










NHSi Junior Inductees: Front Row: 

Emily Hammond, Fong Lui, Daphne 
Tickle, Darden Freeman, Scott 
Peterson. Second Row: Matt Miller, 
Jennifer Hoover, Lori Poskas, Leesa 
Honaker, Jenny Skeen, Laurel 


Shroyer, Lateffa Carter Back Row: 
Tamy Tucker, Matt Layman, Chuck 
Fox, Aaron Smith, Christina Hurd, 
Vicki Underwood, Wendy Foushee, 
Cindy Martin. 



VICA: ICT, Industrial Maintenance, 
Printing: Front Row: Ben Armbrister, 
Julie Williams, Christy Croy. Second 


Row: Dan Jones, Derek Tickle, 
William Robinson, Back Row: Jon 
Henley, Harry Giles, J .T. Horton. 



NAHS: Front Row: Mrs. Martha 
Preston, Cynthia Moore, Jessica Ross, 
Terry Hoffmann, Tammy McMillan. 
Second Row: Laurel Shroyer, Lori 
Poskas, Wendy Foushee, Sheila 


Mottesheard, Toni Ratcliffe, Melissa 
Robbins. Back Row: Jason Bowman, 
Susan Lindsay, Stephanie Cook, 
Ashley Harless, Chris Hull. 



VICA: Electricity: Front Row: Mr. 

Charlie Ward, Steven Eaves, Marvin 
Arnold, Sherman Wright. Second 
Row: Kevin Austin, Eddie Murray, 
Scott Burroughs, Chad Stephens, 


Russell Reese. Third Row: Rick 
Riddle, Brian Freeman, Kevin 
Linkous, Eric Hoback. Back Row: 
Rocky Huff, Ron Walker, Ron 
Linkous, Lee Doss. 


Linkous, Kimberly Dawn 9 . . . 225, 
274 

Linkous, Ronnie Lee 12 . . . 103, 181, 
280 

Linkous, Carrie Jeannette 10 . . . 210, 
278, 285. 288 

Linkous. Jr., Joseph Thomas 9 . . . 

130, 225 

Litton, Katherine Ann 11... 137, 

200, 

277, 282, 283 
Liu, Victor 12 ... 47, 181 
Lively, Elizabeth Jane 12 . . . 97. 108, 
181, 274, 282, 285 
Lockerby, John Thomas 11 ... 118 
Lockwood, II, Jon William 10 . . . 118, 
210 

Loftus, Andrew Craig G. . . . 10 
Loftus, Edna Faculty . . . 234 
Long, Crystal Gail 11... 200, 279 
Long, Rachael Waverly 11... 64, 200 
Looney, Shelly Renae 10 . . . 18, 210 
Lorton, Gregory Brian G. ... 22 
Lottier, Jason Antonio 10 ... 210 
Lovell, Michael Wayne 9 . . . 225, 275 
Lovern, Christina Anne 9 . . . 225 
Lovern, Christopher James G. . .. 279 
Lovern, James Gregory 9 . . . 225 
Lovern, Tanya Corrinna 11 ... 18, 76, 
77, 99, 200, 201, 274, 275. 278 
Lovingood, Nathan Daniel 11 . . . 88, 
200, 284 

Lowe, Brandv Michelle 10 ... 210, 

278 

Lowe, William Charles 10 ... 210, 

282, 285 

Lucado, Paulette Renae 10 ... 210 
Lui, Fong My 11 . . . 59, 200, 288, 280 
Lui, Hung Kien G. . . . 11 
Lui, Luong Kien 11... 200, 275. 281 
Lui, Phuong My 10 . . . 210 
Lui, Yen Mei 10 ... 210 
Lyons, Dustin Carroll 12 . . . 116, 172, 
173, 181 

Lytton, Melissa Dawn 12 . . . 181 
Lytton, Sandra Gail 11... 96, 200, 

' 285 

Lytton, Stephanie Leigh 11... 200, 
276, 278, 283 

Lytton, Trivonna June 9 . . . 158, 159, 
218, 225, 274, 277, 284 


M 


Mabry, Karri Anne 11 ... 140, 200 
Mabry, Sherry Lynn 12 . . . 124, 125, 
181 

Machelor, Eva Kristin 12 . . . 11, 72, 
105, 171, 181, 276, 278 
Mammi, Virginia Facuty . . . 234 
Mann, Carol Jean 11... 200, 277 
Mann, James David 9 . . . 60, 225 
Manning, Maggie Faculty . . . 143, 234 
Manning, Brian Thomas 10 ... 210 
Mannon, James Micheal 11... 200, 
284 

Mannon, Stephen Wayne 10 ... 210 
Mansell, DDS, Richard H. . . . 273 
Manuel, Kimberly Ann 12 . . . 182 
Manuel, Jeffrey Ray 10 . . . 210 
Marshall, Cindy Lou 9 . . . 225, 226 
Marshall, Jeffrey Stephen 11... 200 
Marshall. Larry Michael 9 . . . 225 
Marshall, Lynn Ann 12 . . . 182 
Martin, Cynthia Lynn 11 ... 16, 58, 
137, 200, 280 

Martin, Daniel Earl 12 . . . 182 
Martin, James Ray 11 . . . 200, 277 
Martin, Jonathan Aaron 9 . . . 130, 

225, 275 

Martin, Kimberly Dawn 9 ... 61, 225, 

274, 275 

Martin, Mark Durand 12 ... 71. 76, 
99, 182, 275, 277 

Martin, Rebekah Dawn 9 . . . 225, 274, 

275, 277 

Martin, Stanley Lloyd 11... 200 
Martin. Tracy Annette 12 . . . 182, 279 
Martin, Christa Irene 10 . . . 210 
Martin, Lena Gail 10 ... 210, 278, 282 
Martin, Jr., Daniel Earl 11 ... 31 
Mathena, Sonja Lynette 9 . . . 225, 285 
Mathena Susan Lynn 11 ... 57, 200 
Mayblerry, Bryan Douglas 11 ... 113, 
134, 200 

Mayes, Paul Brian 9 . . . 225, 274 
McClanahan, Bobby Devon 9 . . . 225 
McClanahan, Edward Jermaine 12 . . . 
128, 182 

McClanahan, James G. . . . 265 
McCloud, Natasha Lynn 12 . . . 182 
McConnell, Jeffrey Paul 12 . . . 182 


McConnell. George Bradley 10 . . . 

116, 210 

McCormick, Nathan Rex 9 . . . 225, 
274, 282 

McCourt, Mark Elliot 12 . . . 182 
McCoy, Dawn Michelle 9 . . . 225 
McCoy, Gary Faculty . . . 234, 279 
McCoy, Jayson Bryce 9 . . . 225 
McCoy, Lora 11 ... 201 
McCoy, Mary Etta 11 ... 201 
McCoy, Misty Marylou 12 . . . 182 
McCoy, Scott David 11 ... 201, 284 
McCoy, Wendy Renee 12 . . . 182 
McCoy, Chrisopher Brian 10 . . . 210, 
281 

McCoy, Kellie Jean 10 ... 114, 132, 
133, 210, 277, 281, 282 
McCoy, Tracy Erin 10 . . . 132, 133, 
207, 210, 277, 281, 285 
McCroskey, Trena Darlene 10 . . . 66, 
210 

McCroskey, Jr., William Joseph 9 . . . 
225, 275 

McDaniel. Kimberly Dawn 12 . . . 182, 

278 

McDaniel, Thelma Fac. . . . 234 
McFall, Jeffery Michael 10 . . . 210, 

275.281 

McFall, Paul Douglas 10 . . . 128, 210 
McGee, Johnny Swanson 12 . . . 182, 
277 

McGlothin, Chris Dane 11 ... 201 
McGlothin, Pat Fac. . . . 234 
McGlothlin, Benjamin Bates 10 . . . 

116, 212 

McGrady, Darrell Lee 11 ... 201 
McGrady, Jonathan Eric 12 . . . 182, 

279 

McGrady. Michelle Lynn 11 ... 201 
McGrady, Sean Derick 11 ... 201 
McKinney, Robert Sean 11 ... 116, 

201 

McMickle, James Rozzellie 12 . . . 182 
McMillan. Josie Marie 9 . . . 77, 225, 
274 

McMillan, Piper Lori 9 . . . 86, 225, 
274. 284 

McMillan, Tammv Lynn 12 . . . 180, 
181, 182, 189,'280, 288 
McMillan, Micah Rhett 10 ... 116, 

138, 212, 274 

McNeely, Bill Faculty . . . 234 
McNeil. Megan Mary 11... 96, 97, 
201, 274, 277, 282 

McNeil, III, Henry Robert 12 . . . 116, 
127, 128. 167, 169, 173, 183, 276, 
277, 278. 282 

McPeak, Christopher Allen 9 . . . 225 
McPeak, Michael Roger 12 . . . 183, 

284 

McPeak, Ramona Ieishia 9 . . . 225 
McPeak, Stacey Lynn 9 ... 61, 107, 
225,274, 285 

McPeak, William Michael 11 ... 201 
McPeak, Tracey Dawn 10 . . . 94, 212, 
279 

McRoberts, Randy Lee 9 . . . 225 
Meadows, Cassandra Ann 12 . . . 183, 
279 

Meadows. Marcia Louvenia 10 ... 212, 
282, 285 

Melton. David Jackson 9 . . . 225 
Melvin. Kathryn Jean 11... 201, 281 
Melvin, Steven William 11 ... 201 
Meredith, Brandy Renae 10 ... 212 
Meredith, Wendy Hope 10 ... 212, 
215 

Metz, Bobbi Sue 11 . . . 201, 274 
Metz, Megan Mae 10 ... 212 

Meyer, Bill Fac_234 

Meyer, James Wade 9 . . . 225 
Miano, Gina Fac. . . . 234 
Mickey, Shannon Marie 12 , . . 183 
Millar, Elizabeth Louann 10 . . . 114, 
212 

Miller, April Dawn 9 . . . 225, 274 
Miller, Babette . . . 274 
Miller, Betty Jo Marie 9 . . . 225 
Miller, Carl Dean 11 ... 201 
Miller, Matthew Corey 11... 59, 201, 

280.281 

Miler, Kesha Levette 10 ... 212, 275, 

277, 278 

Miller, Tammy 11... 284 

Mills, Crystal Michelle 12 . . . 53, 183, 

285 

Mills, Mark Anthony G. . . . 121 
Milstead, Cambi Ruth 10 ... 212 
Minnick, Jennifer Dawn 10 . . . 92, 

132, 133, 212, 277, 281, 285 
Mitchell, Tanya Rena 11 ... 201, 281 
Mitchell, Tracie Michelle 12 . . . 183, 

278, 285 

Moles, James Duane 11 . . . 201, 281 
Montgomery, Allen Clayton 9 . . . 44, 
225 

Montgomery, Angel Shawn 9 ... 212, 
282. 285 


Montgomery, Billy Jayson 12 . . . 277 
Montgomery, Joey Lee G. ... 10 
Montgomery, Melissa Ann 12 . . . 65, 
94, 114, 1 15, 183, 274, 279 
Montgomery, Sandra Rae 12 . . . 183 
Moody, Linda Loretta 9 . . . 225 
Moody, Lori . . . 285 
Moore, Cynthia Dawn 11... 57, 196, 
201, 279, 280 

Moore, Daniel Kent 9 . . . 60, 225 
Moore, Scylenea Dawn 11 ... 201, 

277, 282 

Moore, Susan Nichole 12 . . . 53, 183, 

278, 285 

Morefield, John Matthew 11 ... 201 
Morehead, April Michelle 11... 99, 
201 

Morehead, Harry Michael 12 . . . 183, 
277 

Morehead, Heather Layla 11 ... 51, 
201, 279 

Morgan, Elinor Faculty . . . 55, 234 
Morgan, Timi Lea 9 . . . 158, 159, 218, 
225,274, 281 

Morgan, Elisabeth Whitney 10 . . . 212, 
274,282, 285 

Morris, Kerri Michelle 9 . . . 225 
Morris. Randall Scott 12 . . . 47, 183 
Morris, Teeka Aileen 12 . . . 140, 183, 
279 

Morris, Travis Lovell 11 ... 201 
Morris, Amanda Michelle 10 . . . 132, 
133, 207, 212, 277, 281,285 
Mottesheard, Jennifer Dawn 11... 
201, 279 

Mottesheard, Kevin Michael 9 . . . 225 
Mottesheard, Sheila Ann 12 . . . 82, 
184, 280 

Move, Ronald Dean 11 ... 201, 281 
Moye, Stephen Rhea 12 . . . 184, 278, 
279 

Mullins. Tonya Michelle 10 ... 212 
Murdock, Rhonda Faculty . . . 45, 234 
Murdock, Rochelle 9 . . . 225 
Murphy, Ray 12 . . . 284 
Murray, James Edward 12 . . . 102, 

103, 121. 184, 193, 280 
Murray. Patrick Joseph 12 . . . 184 
Mustian, Kathleen May 10 . . . 212, 

279 

Mustian, II, James Marshall 9 . . . 60, 
225. 

Myers, Alma Fac. . . . 234 
Myers, Amy Michelle 9 . . . 220, 225 
Myers, Majella Fac. . . . 33, 34, 234 
Myers, Richard Lee 12 ... 121, 128, 
278, 282 

Myers. Wendv Lynn 12 . . . 20, 184, 
281 

Myers, Bill Fac. ... 128 
Myers. Christopher Michael 10 . . . 
212,277 


N 


Nash, Lesley Karen 12 . . . 184, 282 
Nash, Mary Catherine 11 ... 114, 201 
Nehrling, Sally Rebecca 12 . . . 20, 

184, 275, 277, 279 
Nelson, Laura Lynn 9 . . . 106, 225 
Nelson, Shannon Blaine 11 ... 201 
Nester, Cassandra Dawn 9 . . . 225 
Nester, Chadwick Lee 12 . . . 184 
Nester, Virgil Hope 12 . . . 184 
Newcomb, Larry Edward 9 . . . 130, 
225 

Newcomb, Angela Marie 12 . . . 96, 97, 
285 

Newman, Jamie Lynn 9 . . . 225 
Newman, Mark Anthony 10 ... 212 
Newsome, Carl David G. . . . 38, 39 
NHS ... 279 

Nicolo, Amanda Janine 9 . . . 222, 225 
Norris, Kimberly Marie 9 . . . 225 
Norris, Stephanie Dawn G. . . . 10 
Nuckols, Belinda Faith 10 ... 212 
Nunn, Eric Anthony 9 . . . 225, 275 


O 


O'Dell, Carrie Marie 10 . . . 72, 212, 
277, 285, 288 

O'Dell, Lori Dalaine 10 . , . 132, 133, 
212, 281 


280 — INDEX 



















O'Dell. Jr., Danny Reginald 11... 
201,'203, 284 

Ogle. Lisa Michelle 9 . . . 225 
Olinger, Charles Wayne 10 ... 212 
Olinger, Michael Bradley 10 ... 212 
Oliver. Jennifer 9 . . . 225 
Oliver, Laurie Ann 11 ... 201 
Oliver, Michael Junior 11... 201 
Ondich, Aimee Kent 12 . . . 184. 277 
Osborne. Shawnna Maria 9 . . . 225, 
274 

Otey, Tracy Lynn 11 ... 201 
Ousley. Jr., Charlie Estel 9 . . . 109, 
225 

Ousley. Jr., Larry Janies 9 . . . 225, 

276 

Overman, Walter Barrett 12 . . . 184, 
276, 277 

Owen, Chadwick Marshall 10 ... 212, 

277 

Owens, Christina Marie 9 . . . 225 
Owens, Gena Louise 9 . . . 225 
Owens, Laura Ann 9 . . . 225 
Owens, Misty Lou 9 . . . 225 
Owens, Sharon Faculty . . . 234 
Owens. Diane Marie 10 . . . 87, 94, 95, 
114. 134, 212, 278, 279 


P 


Page. Bradley Lee 9 . . . 130, 225 
Page. Jr., Gary Wayne 9 . . . 130, 225 
Palmer. Buford Keith 9 . . . 225 
Palmer, Caroline Elizabeth 11 ... 71, 
201 

Palmer. Cynthia Suzanne 10 ... 212. 
277, 285 

Parks, Aaron Wesley 9 . . . 225, 274 
Parks. David Faculty . . . 100, 283 
Parks, Stephen Lee 10 . . . 212, 277, 
285 

Parnell. Michelle Irene 12 . . . 185, 288 
Parnell, Teresa Dawn 11 ... 201 
Parnell, Lisa Michelle 10 ... 40 
Parris, Dewavne Antonio 11... 128. 
201 

Patrey, Angie . . . 285 
Patterson, Eric Brandon 9 . . . 225 
Patterson, Steven Woodrow 11 ... 201 
Patterson, Donell Lamont 10 . . . 128, 
129, 212, 281 

Patterson, Mitchell David 10 ... 212 
Patterson. Jr., Douglas Perry 12 . . . 

113, 128, 185,279 
Patton. Lawrence Edward 9 . . . 225 
Patton, Rhonda Yevette 9 . . . 225 
Patton, Mary Florence 12 . . . 185 
Pauley, Stacy Lee 11 ... 212 
Payne, Chanda Sue 9 . . . 225 
Payne, Jammon Damont 9 . . . 126. 

128,' 225 

Payne, Russell Steven 9 . . . 227 
Peak, Angie Gail 12 ... 53 
Peak, Lorrie Ann 12 . . . 53, 185 
Pendergrast, Christopher Michael 10 
... 92,212, 278, 282 
Peoples, Della Annetta 9 . . . 227, 274 
Peoples, James Terroge 11... 279 
Peoples, Okima Tenicia 12 . . . 185, 

279 

Peoples, Rita Lee 9 . . . 227 
Peoples, Christine Ann 10 ... 212 
Pep Club . . . 274. 282 
Perdue, Marsha Dawn 12 . . . 185 
Perdue, David Dwight 10 . . . 212, 285 
Perry, Kelly Lynn 9 . . . 227, 274 
Perry. Teresa ... 87 
Perry, Brian Stephen 10 ... 212 
Peterson, Scott Mitchell 11 ... 21, 69, 
202, 280, 281 

Petty, Bobby Clay 9 . . . 227, 274, 275 
Petty, Tina Maria 10 ... 212. 282 
Pfaff, Gregory Stanton 10 ... 212 
Phelps, Justin James 9 . . . 86, 87, 227, 
284 

Phibbs. James Anthony 11... 202, 

277 


Phibbs, Jackie Christopher 10 ... 212 
Phillips, Brian Hugh 9 . . . 227 
Phillips, Holly Ellen 11... 202 
Phillips. Lora Anne 12 . . . 185 
Phillips. Rockie Michelle 9 . . . 227 
Phillips, Clifton Samuel 10 . . . 43, 108, 
212. 276, 285 

Phy, Crystal Kimberly 10 ... 212, 282, 
285 ' 

Pickett, Janet Kay 9 . . . 227, 284 
Pickett, Windy Ramona 11 ... 17, 202 
Pickett, Mark Warren 10 ... 212 
Piediscalzo, Jessica Ann 9 . . . 158, 159, 
227, 274'. 277. 284 
Pirico, Venetia 9 . . . 227 
Pohlig, Jennifer Jean 9 . . . 134, 135, 

227.274 

Poison, Carl Faculty . . . 43, 234, 284 
Poole, Karla Yonna 12 ... 2. 15, 169, 
185, 277, 281 

Pope, Kimberly Dawn 10 ... 212, 282 
Porath. Jr., Donald Franklin 9 . . . 227 
Porter, Daniel Ray 9 . . . 227 
Porter, Brian 12 . . . 53, 128 
Porterfield, Christine Renee 10 . . . 

211, 212 

Porterfield. Jr., Douglas Wayne 10 . . . 
211, 212 

Poskas, Lori Denise 11 ... 51, 202, 

280 

Powell, Anthony Quentin G. . . . 121 
Powers, Crystal Diana 9 . . . 227, 275 
Powers, Misty Dawn 11 ... 20, 212 
Powers, Thomas Michael 10 . . . 85, 

212.275 

Powers, Wylie Carlson 10 . . . 212, 277 
Pratt, Mark Christopher 9 . . . 227, 

274, 283 

Pratt, DDS. A. Carole . . . 273 
Preston, Jack Fac. ... 130 
Preston, Martha Ireson Faculty . . . 83, 
190, 235, 280 

Price, Jacob Wesley 11... 82, 202 
Price. Michael Scott 10 . . . 95, 116. 
212, 281, 283 

Priest, Bob Faculty . .. 235, 274. 277 
Prim, Fannie Mae 12 . . . 185, 285 
Prim, Valorie Lynn 11... 202, 279 
Puckett, Adrian Niel 11... 202 
Puckett, Joseph Dallas 10 . . . 212 
Puckett, Jr., Larrv Wayne 9 . . . 130. 
227,274 

Pugh, Charles Duane 10 . . . 212 


a 


Queen. Christopher Michael 11... 

202 

Quesenberrv, Jr., Stephen Walter 10 
... 212 

Quesenberry, Jerry Wayne 9 . . . 130, 
227 

Quesenberrv, Jimmv Ray 12 . . . 100. 
185,276,277 

Quesenberry, Mark Steven 11... 202 
Quesenberrv, Mont Faculty . . . 74, 75, 
235 

Quesenberry, Rhonda Jean 9 ... 61, 
227, 274 

Quesenberrv, Robert Joseph 12 ... 
185, 196', 279 

Quesenberry, Brandon Douglas 10 . . . 

22. 128. 129. 212, 217. 281 
Quesenberrv. Gregory Leonard 10 . . . 
60,212,281 

Quesenberrv, Jennifer Alison 10 . . . 

212,282, 285 

Quesenberry, Joseph William 10 . . . 
128,212 

Quesenberrv. Lea Danelle 10 . . . 78, 
212, 282', 285 

Quesenberry. Melissa Sue 10 ... 212 
Quesenberry. 111. Billy Roy 12 . . 

185,281 

Quinlan, Aaron Ryan 10 . . . 116. 212 


Black History Club: Front Row: Karla 
Poole, Melissa Hicks. Cintoria Smith, 
Alyssa Rollins. Allison Rollins. Second 
Row: Stacy Arnold, Tiffany Williams, 
Ashley Scott, Kenny Eaves, Cheri 
Smith, Marvin Arnold, Curtis Rollins. 
Third Row: Janel Sheffey, Stevie 
Eaves, Mia Williams, Adele Taylor, 


Chris Hendricks, Donell Paterson, 
Lennie Walker. Mary Walker, Mary 
Grubb. Back Row: Ms. Mary Todd, 
Tonya Smith, Tristan Hickman, 
Tamara Reed, Tamasha Crouse, Sam 
Austin, Marie Allen, Sonya Davidson, 
Pete Bruce. 



Concert Choir: Front Row: Pricilla 
Bowman, Carol Burton, Carmen 
Dunlord, Eric Bond, Joe Jarrells, 
Jonathan Stump, Terry Hoffman, Lori 
O’Dell, Angie Vaughan. Second Row: 
Alyssa Rollins, Angie Hall. Jenny 
Skeen, Angie Arnold, Robbie Epperly, 


J.J. Housel, Ronnie Moye. Chris 
McCoy, Heather Edens, Lisa Smith. 
Third Row: Jodi Cox, Missy Hicks, 
Tamara Reed, Jason Hall, Mike Price, 
Matt Miller. Brian Atkinson, Jermaine 
Russell. Brandon Quesenberry, Jessica 
Sifford, Karen Dehart. Back Row: 


Sonya Davidson, Tonya Duncan. 
Renee Thornton, Wendy Arnold. 
Brian Hall. Greg Quesenberry, 
Jonathan Fore, Johnny Cox, Joe 
Warden. Jeff McFall. Carolina James, 
Kathryn Melvin, Amy Albano. 



FBLA: Juniors and Seniors: Front 
Row: Lee Ann Woods, Kim Ratcliffe, 
Rhonda Roop, Lanie Younce, Heather 
Wade, Hillery Kiester. Brenda Kast, 
Paige Cox, Tammy Diet Second Row: 
Rick Daya, Lynn Brown, Susan 
Lindsay, Janell Hurst. Angie Hopkins, 


Stephanie Boulin, Roy Sebester, Jamie 
Moles, Scott Peterson, Hope Eads. 
Third Row: Lynett Ayers, Angela 
Clark, Kyndra Lawson, Wendv Myers, 
Amy Sarver, Pam Farmer, Sharon 
Watson, Michelle Taylor, Kim Worrell. 
Billy Quesenberry, Tonya Mitchell. 


Back Row: Jana Worrell, Beth 
Lindsay, Destry Harding, Shawn 
Burchett, Eric Chrisley, Jonathan Fore, 
Danny Stanley, Cindy Whitaker, 

Luong Lui. Steven Cox, David Knick. 



FCA: Sophomores and Freshmen: 
Front Row: Jason Tabor, Tonya 
Turner, Carl Carter, Jennifer 
Whitaker, Kenny Eaves, Eric Yates, 
Rickie Hamblin. Second Row: Mandy 
Morris, Carla Sayers, April Alexander, 


Jennifer Minnick, Holly Hall. Chris 
Hendricks, Mike Price, Derick Kemp. 
Third Row: Angie Hall, Carrie 
Bryson, Sabrina Smith, Timi Morgan 
Randi Biggs, Kellie McCoy, Martha 
Blair, Stacy Schwenk, Cory Claytor. 


Back Row: Jill Underwood, Crystal 
Andrews, Laura Tolbert, Brvan Cook, 
Tracy McCoy, Kim White, Rebecca 
Akers, Lennie Walker, Rvan 
Blackburn. 



INDEX — 281 










Pep Club 11 and 12: Front Row: 

Cindy Austin, Melissa Hicks. Mia 
Williams, Emily Conner. Heather 
Wade, Kam Kelly, Angel Riddle, Lanie 
Younce, Janell Hurst, Heather Edens, 
Regina Sexton, Scylena Moore. Second 
Row: Tammy Dice, Megan McNeil. 
Robin Gallimore, Brenda Kast. 


Amanda Evans, Tamara Reed, Becky 
Creeger, Lori Chinault, Carrie 
Kincaid, Eric Chrisley, Leslie Nash, 
Sarah Tilson, Roy Sebester. Third 
Row: Charles Cutlip, Richard Myers, 
Michael Blevins, Lisa Fisher, Jennifer 
Selman, Victoria Frazier, Denise 
Jackson, Cam Calfee, Tammy Tucker, 


Bradv Hurst. Latha Gearheart, Rakesh 
Daya. Back Row: Scotty McNeil, Kim 
Worrell. Alyssa Rollins, Becky Smith, 
Kelly Farmer, Kim Bowman, Lynn 
Coltrane, Shawn Burchett, Christopher 
Saul, James Clay, Jon Henley, Mark 
Lawson. 



FBLA: Freshmen and Sophomores: 
Front Row: Nathan McCormick, 
Amber Carrico, Stephanie DeCosta, 
Melissa Taylor, Susan Branson, Angel 
Montgomery, Erika Farris, Lena 
Martin, Janet Turpin, Jeff Gardner, 
Elizabeth Morgan. Second Row: 
Summer Anderson. Holly Hall, 


Rhonda Johnston, Lea Quesenberry, 
Jennifer Quesenberry, Chris Candza, 
Ben Linkous, Brea Graham, Jessica 
Lindsey, Monica Brunk, Rhonda 
Whittaker. Third Row: Tracy Wright. 
Wendy Woodyard, Svndi Hash, 
Shendale Carroll, Kellie McCoy, Kelly 
Campbell, Paula Back, Kim White, 


Robert Kennedy, Marcia Meadows, 
Lisa Gallimore, Amanda Folsom. Back 
Row: Mandy Waller, Krystal Tolbert, 
Rhonda Richardson, Heather Akers, 
Jodi Haynes, Sherry Stump, Michelle 
Robertson. Crystal Phv, Misti Worrell, 
Cindy Cook, Alicia Akers, Amber 
Jenkins, Chris Pendergrast. 



FFA: Horticulture: Front Row: 

Angela Cole, April Reynolds, Shannan 
Bowman, Janna Whitlock, Willie Lowe, 
Lanie Younce, Mrs. Elissa Steeves, 
Sponsor. Second Row: Kim Albert, 
(linger Henley, Lisa Hughes, Elizabeth 


Hatcher, Carmer Ward, Cheryl 
Williams, Tina Petty, Roger Crowder 
Third Row: Patricia Wyatt. Teresa 
Holcomb, Rebecca Burke, Kim Pope, 
Amanda Smith, James Blankenship, 
Rov Sebester, Mike Dunford. Back 


Row: Lisa Duncan, Tonya Albert, 
Winona Shelor. Tracy Chrisley, Kent 
Byrd, Lee Holston, Bill Davis, Jason 
Craig, Derek Sams. 



R 


Radford, Anjanette 10 . . . 44, 72. 212, 
274, 283 

Radford, Furniture . . . 273 
Rakes. Michael Dwayne 9 . . . 227 
Ramey, Deobrah Cheryl 11 ... 185 
Rampey, Brent ... 59 
Ramsey, Bryan Paul 9 . . . 227 
Ramsey, Connie Lynn 12 . . . 185 
Ramsey. Lenora Ann 12 . . . 52, 185, 
285 

Ramsey, Melody Hope 11... 202 
Ramsey, Mona Kay 12 ... 46, 47, 185. 

279 

Ramsey, Ronald Lee 12 . . . 186 
Ramsey, Teresa Ellen 11 ... 86, 87, 
202, 277 

Rapp, Sandra Carol 9 ... 77, 227, 274 
Ratcliff, Jason 11 ... 202 
Ratcliff, Lee Andrew 11.. 100, 101, 
202, 283 

Ratcliff, Mark David 12 . . . 186, 279 
Ratcliffe, Casey Lynn 11... 47. 87, 
202 

Ratcliffe, Curtis Wavne 9 . . . 227 
Ratcliffe, Jesse ... 51 
Ratcliffe, Kenneth Michael 12 . . . 186 
Ratcliffe, Kimberlv Rebecca 12 . . . 

175, 186, 276, 281 

Ratcliffe, Kimberlyn Anne 12 . . . 186 
Ratcliffe. Raymond F. Faculty . . . 235 
Ratcliffe, Raymond Franklin 9 . . . 175, 
227 

Ratcliffe, Jr., Robert Danny 12 . . . 186 
Ratcliffe, Toni Marie 12 ... 20, 83, 
186, 191, 280, 288 

Ratcliffe, Ernest Coy 10 ... 212, 285 
Ratcliffe, Gregg Huiet 10 ... 212, 285 
Ratcliffe. Jessica Dawn 10 . . . 212 
Ratcliffe, Kristina Lynn 10 ... 212 
Ratcliffe, Timothy Wayne 10 ... 212 
Ravkes, Samuel Clifton 9 ... 51, 227, 
'274 

Reagan, Heather Caroline 10 ... 212, 
278,279 

Reaves, Sandra Kay 12 . . . 186 
Reavis, James Howard 11... 202, 284 
Reavis, Christopher Allen 10 ... 212 
Redd, Brian Keith 9 . . . 130, 222, 227 
Reece, Clark Facultv . . . 65, 122, 128, 
235 

Reece, Johnathan Rav 1 1... 202, 277, 
284 

Reece, Patricia Faculty ...38,41, 235 
Reece, Perrv Fac. ... 130 
Reed, Karen Leigh 9 . . . 227 
Reed, Natashia Betah 11 ... 70, 94, 
108, 202. 276, 278, 282, 283, 288 
Reed, Sharon Renee 9 . . . 227 
Reed, Tamara Laverne 1 1... 202, 

281, 282 

Reed, Timothy Wayne 11 ... 186 
Reed, Trvphena Kathryn 11... 202 
Reedy, Howard Denton 12 . . . 186 
Reedy. Rod Faculty . . . 235 
Reese, Amanda Carol 9 . . . 227, 274, 
278 

Reese, Russell Samuel 12 . . . 102. 186, 

280 

Reynolds, Edwenia Renee 11 ... 100, 
202, 277, 283 

Reynolds. Randy James 11... 63, 202 
Reynolds, April Meschelle 10 ... 212, 
282 

Rice, Shannon Edward 10 . . . 128, 212 
Richard. J.B., B. Faculty . . . 235 
Richards, Micheal Charles 12 . . . 113, 
128.186 

Richardson, Mildred Ann 9 . . 222, 
227 

Richardson, Rhonda Faye 9 . . . 79, 

227, 282 

Richeson, Melanie Nicole 11 . . . 124, 
125, 202, 277 

Riddle, Angela Michelle 12 . . . 124, 

186, 282 

Riddle, Jeffery Glenn 12 . . . 186, 277 
Riddle, Rick Eric 11... 202, 280 
Riddle, Terry Wayne 12 . . 186 
Riddle, Troy Oren 10 ... 212 
Ridout, Christina Joyce 9 . . . 227 
Ridpath. Dana Diane 11... 202 


Junior Civitan: Front Row: Sherman 
Wright, Tara Averette, Kristina Fain, 
Kim Worrell, Amy Webb, Lea Ann 
Davis, Renee Sumner, Amy Farmer. 
Second Row: Angela Clark, Pam 
Dalton, Jennv Taylor, Angie Hopkins, 
Victoria Frazier, Jacob Henry, Lisa 
Taylor, Beth Lively, Mrs. Audrey 
Burnett, Sponsor. Third Row: Derek 


Riggins. Kelly Lee 11... 202, 277, 

284 

Riggins, Bethel Ann 10 ... 212, 285 
Rignev, Timothy Wayne 10 . . . 138, 
212 

Riley, Bob Faculty . . . 235 
Ritter, Isaac G. . . . 254 
Roan. Trade Rhea 10 . . . 55, 212, 277 
Roark, Stephen Bradley 9 . . . 227, 275 
Robbins, Melissa Ellen 12 . . . 186, 280 
Robertson, Amanda Dawn 9 . . . 227 
Robertson, Monica Gwen 11 . . . 202 
Robertson, Robbin Sue 12 . . . 187 
Robertson, Leslie Aaron 10 ... 212 
Robertson, Michelle Elizabeth 10 . . . 
214,282 

Robinson, Jonette Lea 12 . . . 187, 274 
Robinson, Lorrie 9 . . . 227 
Robinson, Tammv Lynn 12 ... 41, 

187 

Robinson, Todd Stuart 12 . . . 187 
Robinson, William Keith 12 . . . 187, 
280 

Rollins, Alison Bonette 12 . . . 169, 

277,281 

Rollins, Alyssa Dione 11 ... 22, 74. 

107, 187, 201, 202, 275, 278, 281, 
282. 285 

Rollins, Curtis Dwayne 12 . . . 127, 

128, 187, 277, 278, 281 
Rollins, Myrissa Nicole 9 . . . 227 
Roop, Kristopher Thomas 11... 202 
Roop, Mary Faculty . . . 235 
Roop. Rhonda Jeanette 12 . . . 168, 

169, 180, 181, 187, 276,281 
Roop, Shannon Leigh 9 . . . 227 
Roope. Brian Duane 12 . . . 53, 128, 
174, 182, 187, 188,277 
Roope, Jessica Lynn 11... 202 
Roope, Margaret Deanna 12 . . . 178, 
187 

Rorrer, Gena Diane 9 . . . 227 
Rorrer, Tania Lynn 9 . . . 227, 284 
Rorrer, Catherine Louise 10 ... 214 
Rorrer. Hollie Gay 10 ... 214 
Rorrer, Jr., Philip Wayne 11... 202 
Rose, Asa Lee 12 . . . 187 
Rose, Misty Dawn 11 ... 196, 202 
Roseberry, Ruby Fac. . . . 235 
Ross, Jessica Michelle 11 ... 81. 202, 
279, 280 

Roudebush, Glenda S. Faculty . . . 235 
Rowe, Jr., Edward Mitchell 10 . . . 214 
Rowell, Joe Faculty . . . 235 
Rowh, Lisa Michelle 10 ... 25, 98, 

214, 275,278 

Rudisill, Susan Beth 9 . . . 158, 227, 

274 

Runyon, Jerry Franklin 9 . . . 227 
Rupe, Christopher Lee G. . . . 119 
Rupe, Derek Alan 9 . . . 227 
Rupe, James Dewey 11 ... 31 
Rupe, Jason Arlington 11... 202, 277 
Rupe, Lori Lynn 10 . . . 106, 214, 285 
Russell. Jennie Lee G. . . . 38 
Russell, Jermaine 12 . . . 22, 24. 187, 
277, 281 

Russell, Keary Sherod 10 . . . 128. 214, 
275, 278 

Russell, Jr., Oscar Leroy 9 . . . 224, 

227 

Rygas, Aaron Christopher 9 . . . 138, 
227,228,274 

Rymer, Eric Blaine 11 ... 118, 202 


S 


Sadler, Michael Shane 12 . . . 188 
Sage, Adam Courtney 9 . . . 227 
Salt/, Chime Faculty . . . 235, 288 
Sams, Derek Scott 12 ... 5, 43, 188, 
282 

Sandidge, Sallv Anne 10 ... 214, 277, 
285 

Sarvcr, Amy Nicole 11... 203, 281 
Sarver, Robert Neil 12 . . . 121, 188 
Sarver, Timothy Allen 9 . . . 227 
Saul, William Christopher 12 . . . 282 
Saunders, Anthony Eugene 12 . . . 188 
Saunders, Kenneth Eugene 9 . . . 227 
Saunders, William Burtis 9 . . . 227 


D Ardenna, Kelly Weaver, Marsha 
Southern, Chad Hall, Jennifer Selman, 
Brian Chandler, Natashia Reed, Lynn 
Coltrane, Crystal Anderson. Back 
Row: Rita Cox, Hunter Eley, Anthony 
Smith, Tonya Turner. Jennifer 
Gilbert, Susan Sutherland, Duane 
Knode, Kathy Litton, Josh Henry. 


282 — INDEX 






Sayers. Carla Suzanne 9 . . . 136, 137, 
227 

Sayers, Joel Mavnard 12 . . . 19, 85, 
118. 119, 188 

Sayers, Robert Odell 10 ... 214 
Sayers. Tonya Gale 10 ... 214 
Scaggs, Kyle Stephen 11... 203 
Schepers, Christina Marie 9 . . . 227 
Schofield, Ericka Tanisha G. . . . 114 
Schwenk, Stacy Ann 10 . . . 214 
Schwenk, Stephen Robert 12 . . . 138, 
188 

Scott. Angela Renee 9 . . . 227 
Scott, Ashley Annette 9 . . . 227 
Scott, Phyllis Faculty . . . 235 
Scott, Robert Lewis 11... 203 
Seagle, Amanda Ellen 10 ... 214 
Seagle, Kevin Duane 10 . . . 116. 214 
Sebester, Jr.. Roy Norman 12 . . . 188 
Sellers, Valerie Fac. . . . 235 
Selman, Jennifer Marlene 12 . . . 188 
Semones. Barry Michael 11... 203 
Sew Biz . . . 273 

Sexton, Johnny Wayne 11 ... 63, 113, 
203 

Sexton. Lawrence Eric 9 . . . 227 
Sexton, Regina Gail 11 ... 199, 203 
Sexton, Tiffany Joy 11... 203 
Sexton, Cynthia Renee 10 ... 214 
Sharier. Caroline Frances 11... 203 
Shaver, Selena Ann 9 . . . 227 
Shaw. Christopher Lee 9 . . . 227 
Shay, Carrie Ann 10 . .. 24. 214 
Sheffey, Odell Faculty . . . 236 
Sheffey, Janel Lovern 10 . . . 214 
Shelburne, Lori Ann 9 . . . 227 
Shelburn, Ron G. . . . 266 
Shelor, Leona Candace 11... 203 
Shelor, Terri Michele 11... 43, 45, 

50, 197, 203 

Shelor, Winona Ann 12 . . . 88, 188 
Shelton. Fran Faculty . . . 24, 236 
Shelton. Jeffrey Charles G. ... 9, 22 
Shelton, Regan Virginia 12 . . . 38, 39 
Shelton, Robert Hall 9 . . . 130, 227 
Shelton, Stacie 11... 203 
Shelton, Carolyn Verneise 10 ... 214 
Shelton, Hayley Paulette 10 ... 214 
Shelton, Jesse j. Fac. . . . 236 
Shelton. Terri Dawn 10 ... 214 
Shephard. Tommy Allen G. . . . 121 
Shepherd. Bryan Chosley 10 . . . 214, 
277 

Sheppard, Johnathan Wayne 11... 
203 

Sheppard. Michael Allen 9 . . . 227 
Shifflett, William Burnall 11 . . . 203 
Shinn, Jarrod Matthew 10 ... 213, 

214 

Shirah, Randall Charles 12 . . . 188 
Shivelv, Tracy Kevin 11... 203, 279 
Shockley. Douglas Wayne 11... 203 
Shockley. Steven Allen 9 . .. 227 
Shockley, II, Everett Thomas 10 . . . 
214. 277 

Shomo, Chuck ... 83 
Shorn, Timothy Lane 12 . . . 113, 134, 
135, 188 

Shrew sberry, Tiek Shannon 12 ... 67. 
188, 274. 284 

Shrewsbury, David Todd 10 . . . 128, 
214 

Shroyer, Laurel Elizabeth 11 ... 12, 
83, 84, 85. 137, 194, 201, 203, 276, 
277,280 

Shumate. Andrew Thomas 9 . . . 227 
Sifford, Donetta Lee 9 . . . 227 
Sifford. Margaret Jessica 10 . . . 74. 

143, 21 1, 214, 278,281,288 
Simmers,s Kelly Marshall 9 . . . 224, 
227 

Simmers. Jr., Garnett Edwin 11... 
203 


Simmons, Charles Wayne 11... 203 
Simmons, Kimberly Renea 12 . . . 49, 

96, 189 

Simpkins, Elizabeth Hattie 11... 203 
Simpkins, Jennifer Lynn 11... 45, 46, 
203, 215 

Simpkins, Phillip Wayne 11... 203 
Simpkins. Sandra Christina 11 ... 94, 
203, 279 

Simpkins, Sarah Ailene 12 . . . 189, 

274, 277, 278 

Simpkins. Sarah Linell 9 ... 61, 227 
Simpkins, Scott Allen 11... 66, 67, 

203 

Simpkins, Shellie Rae 11 . . . 59, 203, 
274 

Simpkins, Andrea Michelle 10 ... 214, 
215, 288 

Simpkins, II. Avery Allen 10 ... 214 
Simpkins, Jr., Johnny Douglas 11... 
203 

Sink, Michael Bruce 9 . . . 227, 228, 
274, 275 

Sipe, Kristie Lynn 9 . . . 227 
Sipe, Jammie Edward 10 . . . 214 
Sitler, Ramona Lynne 12 . . . 189 
Sizemore, Ladona Michella G. . . . 23, 
38 

Skeen. Don Faculty . . . 236 
Skeen, Jenny Rebecca II... 203, 280, 
281 

Skeens, Tracy Rebecca 10 . . . 20, 25, 
77, 98, 214, 275, 278 
Slate, Judy Marie 12 . . . 189, 285 
Slate, Timothy Brian 12 . . . 189 
Slaughter, Monica Lynn 9 . . . 222, 

227. 228, 284 

Slaughter. Jr., Carlis Joe 11... 203 
Slusher, Vickie Mae 9 . . . 227 
Smart, Kisha Denise 11... 203 
Smith, Aaron Jerome 11... 35, 58, 

69, 203, 280 

Smith, Brad Christopher G. . . . 9 
Smith, Charles Cody 12 . . . 189 
Smith, Cheri Adele 12 . . . 189. 277. 
281 

Smith, Christopher Lee 12 . . . 189, 
279, 282 

Smith, Cintoria Tynette 11... 203, 
278, 281 

Smith, Don Faculty . . . 236 
Smith, Joseph Antione G. . . . 275 
Smith, Linda Louise 9 , . . 227, 284 
Smith, Lisa Sue 11 . . . 48, 49, 94, 194, 
203, 281 

Smith, Melissa Dawn 9 . . . 86, 227, 
274, 284 

Smith, Michael Lee 9 . . . 227 
Smith, Rebecca Ruth 12 . . . 189, 278, 
282 

Smith, Rodney Lamont 9 . . . 227 
Smith, Sabrina Angeli 9 . . . 227, 274, 

281, 284 

Smith, Sean Patrick 11 ... 19. 95. 118, 
138, 203,276 

Smith, Tonya Danielle 9 . . . 229, 281, 

284 

Smith, Trade Nicole 11... 203, 279 
Smith, Virginia May 9 . . . 229 
Smith, Amanda Gail 10 . . . 214, 282, 

285 

Smith, Craig Anthony 10 . . . 116, 214, 

282. 285 

Smith, James Maxwell ... 10 . . . 214 
Smith, James Shannon 10 . . . 214 
Smith, Jr., John Martin 12 . . . 189 
Smits, Antone Jerome 9 . . . 229 
Smythers, Pamela Denise 12 ... 14, 

97, 178, 189 

Snavely, Donna Faye 9 . . . 229 
Snider, Sean Michael 9 . . . 229 
Snider, Anthony Wayne 10 . . . 122, 
214 


Snider, John Gary Sidney 10 . . . 122, 
128, 214 

Snow, Linda Faculty . . . 236 
Sonner, Mary Ann 9 . . . 229 
Southern, Debbie Sue 9 . . . 229 
Southern, Don Carlton G. . . . 116 
Southern, Marsha Lynn 12 . . . 140, 

189, 278, 282 

Southern, April Renee 10 . . . 214, 285 
Spain, Alison Nicole 12 . . . 14, 124, 

125, 169. 189, 277, 278, 279, 288 
Sparks, Nancy Faculty . . . 48. 236, 279 
Speller, Jason Patrick 11... 85, 203, 
275, 285, 288 

Speller, Tracy Janelle 10 . . . 55. 214, 
285,288 ' ‘ 

Spence, Daniel Stevenson 12 . . > 189 
Spence, James Doulgas 10 ... 214 
Spence, Karen Susan 9 . . . 229. 283 
Spencer, Timothy Brooks 12 . . . 67, 

82, 189, 274, 279, 284 
Spradlin, II. Warren Edward G. . . . 

116 

Speaker, Betty Faculty . . . 236 
Speaker, Karen Ruth 10 . . . 133, 207, 

214.276.285 

Sprouse, Shelenea Dawn 10 ... 214. 
285 

St. Clair, Christopher Lynn 9 . . . 229 
Stancil, Aaron Joseph 9 . . . 130. 229 
Standi, Eric Stephen 10 ... 214, 285 
Stancil, Katrina Anne 10 . . . 214 
Stanley, Danny Lee 11... 28, 116, 
203,281 

Steele, Suzanne Faculty . . . 38, 44 
Steeves, Elissa Fac. .. . 236, 282 
Sleffey, Sarah Deann 10 . . . 69, 211. 
214, 288 

Steffev, Sonya Denise 10 . . . 61, 214, 
288 

Stephen, Chadwick William 12 . . . 

189, 280 

Stephens, Howard Dean 11... 204 
Stephens, Terry Wayne 11... 204 
Stephens, Bruce Randall 10 . . . 128, 
214 

Stigger, Joseph David 11 . . . 204, 275, 

284 

Stilwell, Christine Marie 12 . . . 179, 

190 

Slone, Teresa Gail 10 . . . 214. 288 
Stoots. Brian Allen 9 . . . 130, 229. 275 
Stools. Daniela Rae 11 ... 86. 87, 105, 
204, 278 

Stoots, Erika Jean 12 . . . 169, 190, 274 
Stoots, Kimberlee Ann 10 ... 214 
Stoots, Michael Eugene 11... 204 
Stoots, Sherry Dawn 10 . . . 78, 214, 
277 

Stoots, Susan Jean 11 . . . 204 
Stoots, III, Arthur Lee 11... 198, 204 
Stout, John Wesley 9 . . . 229, 274 
Stowers, Frank Edward 10 ... 214 
Stump, Samantha Lynn 12 . . . 190, 

279 

Stump, Jonathan Andrew 10 . . . 214, 
281 

Stump, Sherry Marlene 10 . . . 214. 

282.285 

Summers, Angela Ann 11... 204 
Summers, Floyd McKinley 10 ... 214 
Sumner, Deanna Renee 12 . . . 190, 
282 

Surface, Sharon Reana 11... 204 
Surratt, Leigh Ann 10 . . . 106. 214, 

285 

Susak, Tammy Sue 12 . . . 96, 190 
Sutherland, Christopher Elwood 11 
. . . 122, 204 

Sutherland, Susan Leigh 9 . . . 222, 
229, 282 

Slithers. Rodney Shane 10 ... 214 



FFA: Agriculture I: Front Row: Chad 
Eanes. Bryan Bailey, Chris Dishon, 
Shannon Charlton, Steve Haynes. 
Danielle Altizer, Derrick Woolridge. 
Second Row: Danny Boyd. Carl 


Cobbey, Angie Atwell. Eddie Coe. 
Tina Horton, Cambi Milstead. Ms. 
Sarah Osborn. Third Row: Eric 
Thornberry, Tim French, David 
Crowder, Charlie Ousley, Tobi 


Thomas. Lori Moody, Ormond 
Honaker, Travis Huff. Back Row: 
Jerry Blessing, Shane Suthcrs, Kevin 
Carroll. Jonathon Martin, Jerred Eller. 
Matt Jackson, Mr. Mike Cox, Advisor. 



Forensics: Front Row: Mrs. I rish 
Burton, Wendy Cox, Natalie Bowling, 
Mrs. Susan Ficke. Second Row: Drema 
Crist, Natashia Reed, Stephanie 


Lytton. Back Row: Jennifer Cox, 
Robbie Epperlv, Mike Price. Anjanette 
Radford. 



Appalachian Awareness: Front Row: 

Chris White, Michelle Dalton, Angela 
Vaughan, Dr. David Parks. Second 
Row: Chris Pratt. Karen Spence, 

Cindy Cook. Third Row: Kathy Litton, 


Wendy Reynolds, Mike Dunford, Lee 
Ratcliff. Back Row: Benny Hancock, 
Jim Quesenberty, Todd Viers, Daniel 
Learv. 



Girls’ Choir: Front Row: Mr. Gregory 
M. Quesenberry, Paula Back. Christy 
Mills, Shelia Mottsheard. Christy Funk, 
Chandra Anderson, Susie Young. 
Second Row: Lee Ann Davis, Elaine 
Woodard, Misty Powers, Lisa Fisher, 


Karen Spence, Emily Damron, Lori 
Rupe, Windy Pickett, Back Row: 
Myrissa Rollins, I rena McCrosky, Lori 
Akers, Carmen Hanks. Catherine 
Rorrer, Sunni Hall, Christy Wilson, 
Lorie Moody, Mary Dalton. 



VICA: Cosmetology: Front Row: 

Alyson Jones, Angel Wari. Chasidy 
Langelier, Kim Caldwell, Mrs. Martha 
Bassett. Second Row: Til lain Sexton, 
Rachael Long, Cassandra Meadows, 
Susan Mathena, Missi Gravely, Julie 


Williams, Third Row: Kathy Haga, 
Misty Rose, Misty Freeman, Chrissy 
Stilwell. Tammy Castle, Lora McCoy 
Back Row: Christy Crov. Tryphena 
Reed, Hope Ramsey. Lynn Jones, 
Vicki Greenwood, Trade Hall. 


INDEX — 283 
















Video Club: Front Row: Stephanie 
Brown, Douglas Houghton, Tick 
Shrewsberry, Angi Farris. Second 
Row: Stephanie Cook, Cam Coble, 


Kyle Scaggs, Phillip Bird. Back Row: 
Patricia Hayes, Timmy Spencer, Mr. 
Jesse Shelton, Advisor, Sam Harrell, 
Marty Katz. 



FHA: Front Row: Misty Bowman. 
Wendy Woodyard, Daphne Tickle. 
Janet Pickett. Second Row: Diana 
Boardwine, Jennifer Woodyard, Lisa 


Gallimore, Sharon Watson. Back Row: 
Mrs. Mary Kelly, Sponsor, Michelle 
Taylor, Missy Courtney, Mrs. Peggy 
Hemmings, Sponsor. 





lESii.! A 


Ninth Grade Choir: Front Row: 

Carrie Bryson, Betty Dean, Steven 
Donathan, David Chrisley, Suzanne 
Kirby, Linda Smith. Second Row: 
Sabrina Smith, Lee Atm Arnold, Leon 
Crane, Chris Heidt, T.J. Lytton, Laura 


Tolbert. Angela Goad, Jodi Cox. Back 
Row: Missy Courtney, Samantha Carr, 
Tania Rorrer, Bobby Algar, David 
Fore, Mandy Waller, Yocoeona Jones, 
Tonya Smith, Monica Slaughter. 


Sutphin, Julia Kristie 11 ... 48, 204 
Sutphin, Kimberly Ann 12 . . . 190 
Swecker, Jeremy Lee 9 . . . 229 
Swope, Lisa Faculty . . . 236 


T 


Tabor, Dana Allen 9 . . . 229 
Tabor, Daris 11... 204 
Tabor, Holly Marie 9 . . . 229 
Tabor, Kenneth Rov 12 . . . 169. 190, 
279 

Tabor, Kevin Brent 10 ... 214 
Tabor, Roshelle Lynn 9 .. . 229 
Tabor, Jason Thomas 10 . . . 128, 214, 
281 

Talbert, Krystal Dawn 10 . . . 44, 71. 

211, 214, 277. 285 
Talbert, Michelle Renee 10 . . . 284 
Talbert, |r., Lynwood Michael 12 . . . 
18. 88, 89, 190 

Tate, Evelyn Faculty . . . 236, 276 
Tate, Leslie Mechelle 11... 204. 279, 
288 

Taylor. Adam Weston 9 . . . 29, 229 
Taylor, Adele Latrice 9 . . . 229, 281 
Taylor, Alice Marie 11... 204 
Taylor, Brian Lee 12 . . . 57, 190 
Taylor. Charlotte Michelle 12 . . . 190 
Taylor, Deborah Michelle 11... 204, 
281, 284, 288 

Taylor, Jerry Keith 12 . . . 190. 275 
Taylor, Kevin Joel 9 . . . 229 
Taylor, Larry Ray 9 . . . 229 
Taylor, Maxine Fac. . . . 236 
Taylor, Melissa Dawn 9 . . . 229, 282 
Taylor, Sharia Leigh 12 ... 35, 68, 

190. 288 

Taylor, Shawn Douglas 11... 204 
Taylor, Shawn Drake 11... 204 
Taylor, Shawn Steven 12 . . 190 

Taylor, Susan Lavone 9 . . . 229 
Tavlor. Aimee Denise 10 ... 214, 277, 
25 

Taylor. Drema Dawn 10 . . . 37, 44, 
214 

Taylor, Jennifer Elaine 10 ... 214, 
278,282 

Taylor, Kevin Remelle 10 . . . 113, 

128,214 

Taylor, Lisa Gail 10 ... 214, 282, 285 
Taylor, Steven Dannill 10 ... 214 
Terrell, John Bradley 12 . . . 190, 278, 
279 

Terrell. Christopher Scott 10 . . . 214, 
275 

Terry', Travis Kevin 12 . . . 69, 190 
Terry, Vic ... 59 
Theda's Studio . . . 273 
Thomas, Barbara Faye 9 . . . 229 
Thomas, Todd Steven 12 ... 191 
Thomas, Tobi Nicole 10 . . . 89, 214 
Thomas, Jr., Jerry Wayne 12 . . . 191 
Thompson, Ashley Ann 9 . . . 229 
Thompson, Christy Dawn 11... 204, 
279 

Thompson, Jennifer Fac. . . . 232, 233, 
236 

Thompson, Sheri Contina G. . . . 22, 
23,275 

Thompson, Christopher Price 10 . . . 
128,214 

Thompson, Jr., Cecil Allen 10 . . . 214 
Thornsberry, Eric Dwain 9 . . . 229 
Thornton, James Edward 10 ... 214 


Thornton. Renee Annette 12... 191, 
281 

Thornton, II, Donald Andrew 10 . . . 

42.285 

Thorpe, Philip Duane II... 204 
Thorpe, Stephen Douglas 10 ... 214 
Tickle, Daphne Dawn 11... 97, 104, 
204, 280, 284, 285 
Tickle, Gregory Allen G. . . . 121 
Tickle. Ruby . . . 236 
Tickle, Violet Louise 12 ... 191 
Tickle, Derek Lee Lee 10 . . . 214, 280, 
285 

Tilson, Sarah Robin 12 . . . 14, 67, 97, 
124, 125, 183, 191, 282 
Todd, Marv Faculty . . . 230, 231, 236, 
281 

Tolbert, James Kevin 12 . . . 62, 191, 
277 

Tolbert, Kristal Joy 9 . . . 229, 282 
Tolbert, Laura Ellen 9 . . . 158, 159. 

229, 274, 281,284 
Tolbert, Stephen Douglas 10 . . . 214 
Tomlinson, Zacharv Kent 10 . . . 214 
Toney, April 11 ... 204, 279. 285 
Townley, Amy Beth 9 . . . 229 
Townley, Paul Duane 12 . . . 182, 191 
Trail, Jeffrey Douglas 12 . . . 191. 277 
Trail. Jeremy Robert 9 . . . 229 

Trail, Marie Fac_236 

Trail, Jr., Donald Wayne 10 . . . 214 
Trail. Jr., Jerry Wayne 9 . . . 229 
Tribble. Julie Ann 12 ... 191. 277 
Tribble. Lewis Faculty . . . 237 
Trivett, Jr., Markie Lee 9 . . . 229 
Trompeter, Jennifer Roseanna 12 . . . 
191 

Trotter, Marianne Faculty . . . 237 
Trower, Dr. W.P. ... 78 
Trueheart, Clarence Dean 11... 204, 
279 

Trull, Carhi Ann 10 ... 216 
Trump, Diane ... 51 
Tuck, Brian Andrew 11... 204 
Tucker. Douglas 9 . . . 130. 229 
Tucker, Jim ... 64 

Tucker, Tamara Leigh 11... 40, 204, 
280, 282 

Turman, Kevin Todd 11... 204 
Turman, Misty Ann 11... 204 
Turner, Bessie Maude 9 . . . 229 
Turner, Latitia Henrietta 11... 204 
Turner, Todd Anthony 9 . . . 130, 

229,275 

Turner, Tonya Jean 10 . . . 216, 275, 

278.281.282.285 
Turner, Vicki Dawn 12 . . . 191 
Turner, Patricia Ann Stearnes 10 . . . 

216 

Turner, Tonya Jean 10 . . . 114 
Turpin, Goldie Fac. . . . 237 
Turpin, Janet . . . 282 
Turpin. Jeffrey Andrew 12 . . . 191 


U 


Umberger, Stephen Edward 9 . . . 99, 
229, 276 

Umberger, Thomas Wade 10 . . . 128. 
216, 285 

Underwood, Barry Lucas 12 . . . 191 
Underwood, Jill Marie 9 . . . 137, 158, 
159, 218, 229, 274. 281 
Underwood, Stephen Wayne 9 . . . 
229, 275 

Underw'oocl, Vicki Gail 11 . . 137, 

204, 276, 280 


Underwood. Jennifer Leigh 10 . . . 93, 
132. 133, 216, 285 
Underwood, Paul Langston 10 . . . 

128, 129, 216, 285 

Underwood, Terry Wayne 10 ... 215, 
216 


V 


Van Epp Deborah G. .. . 246 
Vansise, Stacy Leigh 9 . . . 137, 229 

Vaughan, Erik Nathan G_118, 119 

Vaughn, Angela Dawn 10 . . . 100, 

216, 278, 281, 283 
Vaught, Barry James 10 ... 216 
Vest, Larry Daniel 12 ... 24. 191, 275. 
277 

Vest, Lora Nell 9 . . . 47, 229, 285 
Vest, Sherry Lynn 9 . . . 12, 229, 274 
Via, Carrie Lynn 9 . . . 229, 274 
Viars, Kevin Wayne 11... 204 
VICA . . . 279 

Vickers, Phillip Faculty . . . 237 
Viers, Jason Todd 12 . .. 100, 101, 

192, 276.277 

Viers, Ted Faculty ... 41, 237 
Viers, Jr., George Marvin 11... 204, 
277 

Vires, II, Harry Franklin 11... 204 
Volk, Jr., George Alien 12 . . . 192 


IV 


Waddell, Derick Dewayne 9 . . . 229 
Waddell, Melena Gail 10 ... 216 
Wade, Heather Yvonne 11 ... 124, 
204, 281, 282 

Walker. Carnell Orlando 9 . . . 229 
Walker. John Clinton . . . 229 
Walker, Mary ... 281 
Walker, Ronald Elbert 12 . . . 192, 280 
Walker, Sonya Rene 12 . . . 192 
Walker, Leonard Oliver 10 ... 216, 
281 

Walker, Robert 11... 204, 279, 284 
Walker. Vanessa Gayle 10 ... 216 
Wall, Rhonda Lynn 9 . . . 229 
Wall, Ricky Lee 11... 204 
Wall, Jr., Janies Andrew' 9 . . . 229 
Wallace, Whitney Erin 9 ... 77, 229, 
274 

Waller, Amanda Renee 9 . . . 229, 274, 
282, 284 

Waller, Brenda Faculty . . . 237 
Warburton, Reed Thomas 9 . . . 226, 
229 

Ward, Charles Faculty . . . 237 
Ward, Eva Marrika 11... 204 
Ward, William Daniel 11 . . . 45, 205, 
274 

Ward, Carmen Leigh 10 . . . 216, 282, 
285 

Ward. Charlie Fac. . . . 280 
Warden, Cheryl Jean 9 . . . 229 
Warden. Holly Anne 11... 205 
Warden, Brian Shane 10 ... 216 
Warden, Joe Francis 10 . . . 22. 128. 
216, 278, 281 

Warden, Tony Lamont 10 ... 216 
Warf, Angela Leigh 12 . . . 57, 169, 

192 





OM: Piper McMillan, Melissa Smith. 


OM: Meg Folsom, Jessica Piediscalzo, 
Justin Phelps. 


FFA: Agricultural Production and 
Natural Resources: Front Row: 

Johnny Reece, Roy Carter, Danny 
O’Dell, Bill Davis, Mike Mannon, 
Jonna Linkious, Tammy Miller. 
Second Row: Mike Me Peak, Scotty 


McCoy, Nathan Lovingood, Jody 
Burton. Mike Talbert, Sam Harrell, 

Dr. Karl Poison, Mr. James Graham. 
Third Row: Sam Burnette, Jeremiah 
Bryson, Kelley Riggins, David Dobbins, 
Josh Duncan, Harry Giles, James 


Reavis, Tracy Chrisley. Back Row: 
Robert Walker, Eddie Farmer, Ray 
Murphy, Kevin Austin, David Stigger, 
Randy Counts, Grant Atkins, Danny 
Akers. 


284 — INDEX 















Warren, Stephen Nathaniel 12 ... 38. 

169, 174, 183, 192, 277, 278 
Watson, Cindy Faculty ... 41, 237 
Watson, Marie Fac. . . . 237 
Watson, Sharon Marie 11 ... 74, 205, 
279.281, 284 
Watson, Terry .. . 285 
Wayne. Christi Lee 11... 107, 205, 
285, 288 

Wayne, Joy G. . . . 249 
Wayne, Tammy G. . . . 270 
Weaver, Kellev 11... 205, 276, 282 
Webb. Amy Michele 11... 108, 109, 
205, 274, 278. 282 
Webb, Jlee Shawndel 9 . . . 130. 229 
Webb, Keith ... 100 
Webb, Vidal Abrahan 11 ... 128 
Webb, Cory Douglas 11... 63, 205 
Webb, Natoya Janeice 12 . . . 12, 192 
Weddle, Mathew Brock 12 . . . 116, 

192. 278 

Weddle, Jessica Leigh 10 ... 216 
Weddle, Kerri Leigh 10 . . . 64, 73. 
216. 274, 285 

Weiant. Jonathan Charles 10 . . . 216 
Weikle, Jennifer Michelle 11... 205, 
285,288 

Weikle, Mickey Faculty . . . 48, 49, 

237, 

285 

Weikle, Sandra Diana 11... 205, 279, 
285,288 

Welker, Angi Nicole 9 . . . 229 
Welsh, Rhonda Faculty - . . 23, 76, 98, 
237 

Weschke. Burt Faculty . . . 237 
Wheeling, Teresa . . . 242 
Whitaker, Cindy Kathleen 11 ... 116, 
195, 205, 276, 277, 281 
Whitaker, Jennifer Gave 10 . . . 114, 
216, 281. 285 

White, Bryan Whitman 12 . . . 192 
White, Christopher Ray 12 . . . 100, 
169, 192, 276, 277, 283 
While, David Allen 9 . . . 229 
White, Gaberil Scott 12 . . . 192 
White, Jennifer Lynn 9 . . . 229 
White, Jesse Faculty . . . 237 
White, Patsy Elaine 12 . . . 192, 285 
White, Amy Leigh 10 ... 216, 277, 

285 

White, Georgette Francine 10 . . . 114, 
216, 277, 285 

White, Kimberly Renee 10 ... 216 
White, Kimberlv Shea 10 ... 71,92, 
216, 277, 281, 282 
Whited, Belinda Lynnett 10 ... 216 
Whitlock, William Eugene 9 . . . 130, 
229 

Whitlock, Janna Marie 10 . . . 143, 

216, 282 

Whitman, Jeanne G. . . . 257 
Whitt, Charles David 10 ... 216, 285 
Whittaker, Gerri Denise G. . . . 23, 275 
Wittaker, Hope Michelle 11... 205, 
275, 277 

Whittaker. Rhonda Lynn 9 . . . 229. 
282 

Williams, Ann FAC . . . 237 
Williams, Carl Jay . . 192 
Williams, Cheryl . . . 282 
W'illiams, Julie Ann 11... 205, 280 
Williams, Lee 11... 205 
Williams. Mia Terelle 11... 205 
Williams. Reuben Faculty . . 237 
Williams, Scarlett Nicole 12 . . . 72, 86, 
87, 105, 137, 169, 171, 183, 192 
Williams, Stephanie Lynn 9 . . . 229 
Williams, Tiffany Ayanna 9 . . . 229, 
274,281 

Williams. Misti Dawn 10 . . . 87, 142, 
143. 216, 278 

Williamson, Luke Amar 10 . . . 57, 216 
Wilson, Christina Kay 11... 205 
Wilson, Dewey Faculty ... 31, 237 
Wilson, Wildie Allen 11... 205 
Wimmer. Michelle Renea 9 . . . 229 
Winebarger, Joyce Katina 11... 205 
Wingo, Donna Jean 10 . . . 216 
Wolfe, Jason Wiley 12 . . . 63. 192 
Wood, Anthony David 9 . . . 138, 229 
Woodard, Elaine Hope 10 ... 216 
Woodie, Christopher Scott 9 . 229 


Woodrum, Christopher Mikeal 11... 
118, 205 

Woods, Martha Leeann 12 . . . 192, 

281 

Woodyard, Brian Thomas 11... 205 
Woodyard. Gregory Dean 11... 205 
Woodvard, Jennifer Lvnn 11... 205, 

279, 284 

Woodvard, Sabrina Ann 12 . . . 18, 

193 

Woodyard, Wendy Michelle 9 . . . 229, 
282, 284 

Woodyard. Julia Marie 10 ... 216 
Woodvard, Jr. Darrell Lynn 9 . . . 229, 
285 

Woolley, Rebecca Ann 12 ... 19, 35, 
193, 277,279,288 

Woollev, Eric William 10 . . . 138, 216, 
275' 

Woolridge, Derrick Lane 9 . . . 89, 229 
Wooten, Wayne Faculty . . . 39. 237 
Workman, Christina Michelle G. . . . 
275 

Worley, Jr. Eric Duane 10 . . . 216, 

285 

Worrell, Jana Leigh 12 . . . 193, 281 
Worrell, Kimberly Amanda 11... 

205. 

274, 281, 282 

Worrell, Lisa Renee 11 ... 193 
Worrell, Michael Wesley 12 . . . 127, 
128, 193, 278 
Worrell, Pat . . . 237 
Worrell, Misty Ellen 10 . . . 47, 93, 
216,282 

Worthington, Tamara Kathleen 11... 
205 

Worthington, William Eugene 10 . . . 
216 

Wright. Anjanette Marie 12 . . . 193 
Wright, David Faculty .. . 106. 107, 
135, 237 

Wright, David Bradley 12 . . . 29, 193, 

280. 282 

Wright, David Sherman 12 . . . 57. 

103, 193 

Wright, James Garry 11... 60, 205 
Wright, Lori Ann 11 ... 205 
Wright, Tracy Lynne 9 . . . 229, 282 
Wright, Bradlev Duane 10 . . . 122, 
216,285 

Wright, Travis William 10 ... 216 
Wright, II Roger Lee 12 . . . 193, 277 
Wroten, Elizabeth May 12 . . . 193 
Wyatt, David Allen 12 . . . 193 
Wyatt, Deanna Jon 12 . . . 17, 70, 72. 

' 104, 193, 274, 276, 277 
Wyatt, Jason Bradley 12 . . . 193 
Wyatt, Patricia Dawn 12 ... 41, 88, 

'193,282 

Wyatt, Scottie Lee 10 . . . 138, 139, 

216 


r 


Yates, Eric Duane 10 . . . 121, 122, 
128, 216, 281,285 

Younce, Elaina Dawn 11 ... 14, 201. 
205, 281, 282 

Young, Grady Faculty . . . 237 
Young. Rhonda Lynn 12 . . . 193 
Young, Tammy Suzanne 12 . . . 95. 
193, 279 

Young, Tracie Lynn 10 ... 216 
Younger, Jr. Richard 11 ... 1 13, 128, 
205 


Z 


Zel, Erin Elizabeth 10 ... 216, 285 


SADD: Front Row: Amy White, 
Darrell Woodyard, Leigh Ann Surratt, 
Aimee Taylor, Lori Vest, Lori Rupe, 
Lee Graham. Tracy Speller. Second 
Row: Lisa Taylor, Danny Johnson, 
Tonya Turner, Wendy Arnold, Alyssa 
Rollins, Trish Crowder, Tracy Jones, 
Lisa Knick. Third Row: Brian 
Chandler. Becky Cregger, Tracie 


Mitchell, Kevin Alexander, Angela 
Hall. Stacey McPeak, Lee Ann Davis, 
Kim White, Kim Branscome. Back 
Row: Anthony Smith, Krystal Talbert, 
Nichole Moore, Mark Barnes, Joshua 
Henry, Jason Speller, Jennifer Weikle, 
Sandra Weikle, Blake Hughes, Christi 
Wayne. 



Pep Club 10: Front Row: Marcia 
Meadows, Tonya Turner, Janel 
Sheffey, Karen Spraker, Jennifer 
Whitaker, Mandy Morris. Tracy 
McCoy, Carl Carter, Eric Yates, Kelly 
Campbell, Carrie Linkous, Amiee 
Taylor, Amy White, Lisa Taylor. 
Second Row: Diana Boardwine, Mary 
Grubb, Paula Back, Stacy Schwenk, 


Lori Rupe, Beth Riggins, Shelenea 
Sprouse, Elizabeth Hatcher, Jennifer 
Minnick, Randi Biggs, Shannon 
Atkinson, Elizabeth Morgan. Third 
Row: Tammy Edwards, Carrie ODell, 
Jennifer Quesenberry, Jennifer 
Underwood, April Southern Sherry 
Stump, Casey Hopkins, Angel 
Montgomery, Derick Kemp, Angela 


Hall. Lea Quesenberry, Wade 
Unberger. Back Row: Christy Funk, 
Becky Covey, Missy Blankenship, 
Crystal Phy, Heather Atkins, Sally 
Sandidge. Amanda Folsom, Erin /.el, 
Kerri Weddle. Mary Knarr, Georgette 
White, Chasity Friend, Christy 
Landreth, Lori Moody, Eric Standi. 



HERO: Front Row: Sonja Mathena, 
Toni Hubbard, Angie Newcomb, 
Tracy Hoover, Lenora Ramsey, 
Daphne Tickle, Cristy Mills. Angela 
Cole. Second Row: Judy Slate, Tonya 
Lane, Sandra Lytton, April Toney, 


Pamela Howell, Jeannie Jarrells, Angie 
Patrey, Atesha Banks, Claudia 
Harrison. Third Row: Jennifer 
Edwards, Tracie Horton, Shelia 
Johnson, Renita Barrett, Jennifer 
Weikle, Kristie Duncan, Beth Lively, 


Terry Watson, Mrs. Mickey Weikle. 
Back Row: Brandy Cobb, Jennifer 
Gallimore, Kristi Dean, Patsy White, 
Mona Fewell, Carolina Sharier, Angie 
Bond, Kim Brown, Fannie Prim. 



FFA: Agriculture II: Front Row: Ami 

Dudding, Cliff Phillips, Ben 
Armbrister, Brad Wright, Kenny 
Eaves, Beth Riggins, Willie Lowe. 
Second Row: David Whitt, Gregg 
Ratcliffe, Travis Clark, Cindy Palmer, 


Carmen Ward, Amanda Smith, Kris 
Knode. Third Row: Eddie Hughes, 
Mike Gallimore, Paul Underwood, 
Stephen Parks, James Blankenship, 
Eric Jarrells, David Perdue, Andv 
Thornton. Back Row: Stephen Kilby, 


Jamie Cooper, Eric Worley, Derek 
Tickle, Ernie Ratcliffe, David Burton. 
Jeff Hedge, Mr. James Graham. Brad 
Dalton. 



INDEX — 285 






* ^ 


✓ 


/ 



To the beat of a different drum. Prom night. May 
12, 1990, found the juniors, seniors and their 
escorts joining together in an evening dubbed “A 
Night on the Nile.” The Boomers, a local band, 
played a variety of music for those attending. 

Almost done. Mr. Steve Hester puts the final 
touches on a pig he is painting for a little girl. Face 
painting was a fund raiser for the National Art 
Honor Society at the annual Count Pulaski Day in 
Jackson Park. According to Mr. Hester, NAHS 
sponsor, the day was a big success. 


286 — CLOSING 





/f 



As the leaves that fell last fall 
were replaced with brand new 
green buds, the population of the 
1 school soon realized that there 
, were only a few months until 
school would be out. The 
atmosphere changed from one of 
stress and high pressure to one of 
. great anticipation about summer 
i activities. 


The buses departed for the final 
afternoon, leaving students to 
ponder the year’s events and 
changes, while leaving some 
students to question what the year 
to come might have in store for 
them. 

Many will be returning to this 
school, while some plan to leave 
for college or find a job or enter 



> 


b 


the military. Future goals caused 
students to travel in a variety of 
directions. 

But with each milestone they 
passed, students began to realize 
that even the smallest task, such as 
turning on a computer, would 
lead them one step closer to that 
goal of GOING PLACES in their 
lives. 

Shana Taylor 

Singing for their supper? The Concert Choir 
members sing Christmas carols for the four pods. 
Caroling in the pods is a yearly event for this choir. 


CLOSING — 287 




















GOING, GONE! 


The 1991 “Cougar Pinnacle” was 
published by Jostens/Hunter Publishing 
Company in Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina. There were 1400 copies printed. 

The cover consists of lithographed 
white, PMS maroon color 201, and gold 
mylar. Cover type was set in metro black, 
Americana regular and Americana bold. 
Mr. Steve Hester, art teacher and 
photography adviser, provided the art 
work for the cover. 

Pages 1-16 were printed on embossed 
paper, and pages 17-288 were printed on 
gloss paper. Body copy was Baskerville in 
10 point, and captions were in 8 point. 
Senior names were printed in Snell 
Roundhand in 12 point with senior 
statistics done in 6-point Baskerville. 
Headlines were 48 point with lead-ins in 


36 point. 

The headline styles for the various 
sections were Opening, Closing, Colophon 
and Dividers — Art and Metroblack 
#186; Student Life — Busorama 
Medium #209; Academics — Century 
Italics #168; Individuals — Garamond 
Italics #119 for headline and Shelly 
Andante #154 for lead-ins; Clubs — 
Baskerville Italics #197; Sports — 
Americana #220; Ads — Venture Script 
#156. 

Underclassmen photographs were 
taken and developed by Max-Ward 
Delmar Studios. Senior protraits were 
made by Max-Ward Delmar Studios and 
local photographers. 

The “Pinnacle” staff would like to 
thank the following people for their 


contributions, time and support 
throughout the year: Mr. Charles 
Garrison, our representative from 
Hunter Publishing Company, who has 
meant more to us than just a liaison; Mr 
Steve Hester, photography adviser; Mrs. 
Melba Knox, financial adviser; Miss 
Suzanne Steele, who spent many hours 
proofreading copy. 

Also, we express many thanks to Mr. 
Dewey Wilson, principal and “The 
Southwest Times” and PFS in Radford 
for some of the photographs. 

The staff would also like to give many 
thanks to our advisers, Mrs. Chime Saltz 
and Mrs. Pat Huber. 

Becca Woolli 



“Cougar Pinnacle” Staff. Front Row: Mrs. Pat 
Huber, adviser; Crystal Carden; Carrie Linkous; 
rammy McMillan; Peri Horsley; Tracy Speller; 
Teresa Stone. Second Row: Mrs. Melba Knox, 
financial adviser; Natashia Reed; Shana Taylor; 
Becca Woolley; Fong Lui; Jessica Sifford; Sonya 
Steffey; Sarah Steffey. Third Row: Wendy 
Foushee; Alison Spain; Cindy Cook; Sarah James; 
Shirene Broadwater; Carrie ODell; Toni Ratcliff; 
Michelle Taylor; Michele Simpkins. Back Row: 
Angela Clark; Michelle Parnell; Leslie Tate; Sandr 
Weikle; Mr. Steve Hester, photography adviser; 
Jason Speller; Mark Barnes; Mrs. Chime Saltz. 
adviser; Jennifer Weikle; Christi Wayne. 


288 — COLOPHON 






































































COUGAR PINNACLE STAFF 1991 


Mark Barnes 
Shirene Broadwater 
Crystal Carden 
Angela Clark 
Cynthia Cook 
Wendy Foushee 
Sarah James 
Carrie Linkous 
Fong Lui 
Tammy McMillan 
Carrie O’Dell 
Michelle Parnell 
Toni Ratcliffe 
Jessica Sifford 
Michelle Simpkins 
Alison Spain 
Jason Speller 
Tracy Speller 
Sarah Steffey 
Sonya Steffey 
Teresa Stone 
Leslie Tate 
Michelle Taylor 
Shana Taylor 
Christi Wayne 
Jennifer Weikle 
Sandra Weikle 
Becca Woolley 


Editor 

Junior Class Editor 


Academics Editor 
Freshman Class Editor 
Photographer 
Assistant Editor 
Senior Class Editor 


Faculty Editor 

Photographer 
Index Editor 
Photography Editor 


Sophomore Class Editor 
Photographer 
Editor 

Clubs Editor 
Student Life Editor 
Editor 


p CHS LIBRARY 
3414 Cougar Trail 

uublm, VA 2An 


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