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Northeastern College 



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^ Preliminary Announcement 

1916—1917 



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PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES OF NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

of the £ 

BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



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Form of Organization 



'TpHE title "College" is used but the 
"*' organization is on a university basis. 
The schools comprising the College are 
as follows: 

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 
AND FINANCE 

SCHOOL OF CO-OPERATIVE 
ENGINEERING 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



Northeastern College 



Preliminary Announcement 

1916-1917 



■f-ff 



PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES OF NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

of the 

BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



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Calendar 

1916-17 



1916 

June 8-9 First entrance examinations of Co-operative Engineering 

School 
July Practical work for Division A of Co-operative Engineering 

School commences 
September Practical work for Division B of Co-operative Engineering 

School commences 
September 5-9 Examinations for removal of conditions in the School of Law 
September 6-7 Second Entrance Examinations of Co-operative Engineering 

School 
September 11 Senior Year Lectures in School of Law begin 

September 11 Opening of first term of Co-operative Engineering School 

September 11-16 Registration in Schools of Law, Commerce and Finance, 

Engineering 
September 12, 14 Entrance Examinations for advanced standing in School of 

Commerce and Finance 
September 11-15 Examinations for removal of conditions in School of 

Commerce and Finance 
September 18 Opening of First Term of the Schools of Law and Commerce 

and Finance 
September 18-23 Registration in School of Liberal Arts 
September 21 Opening of First Term of School of Engineering 

September 25 Opening of First Term of School of Liberal Arts 

October 12 Columbus Day (School exercises omitted) 

November 30 Thanksgiving Day (School exercises omitted) 

December 18-26 Christmas Recess in the Schools of Law, Liberal Arts, 

Engineering and Co-operative Engineering 
Dec. 23 — Jan. 8 Christmas Recess in the School of Commerce and Finance 

1917 
January 1 New Year's Day 

January 8 Opening of Second Term of School of Engineering 

January 15 Opening of Second Term of Co-operative Engineering School 

January 15-19 Examinations School of Liberal Arts 
January 19 Close of First Term of School of Liberal Arts 

January 22 Opening of Second Term of School of Law 

January 29 Opening of Second Term of School of Liberal Arts 

February 5 Opening of Second Term of School of Commerce and 

Finance 
February 22 Washington's Birthday (School exercises omitted) 

April 9-13 Final examinations in School of Engineering 

April 19 Patriots' Day (School exercises omitted) 

May 14-18 Final examinations in School of Liberal Arts 

May 18 Close of Second Term of School of Liberal Arts 

May 30 Memorial Day (School exercises omitted) 

May 28 — June 9 Final examinations in Co-operative Engineering School 
May 21 — June 15 Final examinations in School of Law 
June 4-8 Final examinations in School of Commerce and Finance 

June 17-23 Commencement Exercises 



^^. . «.» 




Northeastern College 

Historical Review 






THE incorporation of Northeastern College in March 
1916 marked the culmination of a notable development 
in the history of American education. The College is 
not a new institution, but the realization of an ideal carefully 
worked out and persistently followed for a period of twenty 
years. 

Early Period 

The Boston Young Men's Christian Association, estab- 
lished in 1852, had as one of its first lines of endeavor evening 
classes for young men. These included elementary English, 
debating, and mechanical drawing, which were modified and 
added to from time to time, until in 1894, they enrolled several 
hundred men in twelve unrelated subjects who paid $1.00 
a year for their tuition. In case he attended seventy-five 
per cent of the recitations, the student received a refund of 
the $1.00. There was no definite plan of development, no 
trained supervision, or fixed poHcy. 

Modern Period 

In 1896, the Directors of the Association determined to 
establish an evening school system of dignity and purpose. 
Their first step was to call as director an educator with ex- 
perience, both in public and private schools, and to set up a 
definite program. From that date the modern period, culmi- 
nating in the establishment of Northeastern College, may be 
^ssaid to have begun. 

I / Law School Established 1898 

In 1897, Evening Law courses were established under the 
patronage of the Lowell Institute. In 1898, the Association 
took over their management, established an Evening Law 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

School and placed it on a four years' basis, and using this 
school as a nucleus, began to increase and broaden its Evening 
School system. 

School of Automobile Engineering Established 1903 

In 1003, the Association Management established the first 
automobile school in America. 

Law School Incorporated 1904 

The Law School was incorporated with degree granting 
powers in 1904. 

Expansion 

Course after course was added to the general work, the 
teaching staff was increased and improved, and the purchasing 
of equipment of all kinds began. 

Completed Organization 

It soon became evident that a more complete organization 
should be created in order that the various divisions of the 
work might be more perfectly develojjed, and accordingly the 
courses were grouped into schools, and later each of these 
schools was placed in charge of a dean and developed as a 
wholly separate unit. 

Evening Institute, 1906 

4 

At this period the school system, consisting of the Law 
School, the Evening Polytechnic School, the Evening Prepara- 
tory School, the School of Business, and the Automobile School, 
was known as the Evening Institute. It was not long before 
the Institute outgrew the Boylston Street building and it 
became necessary to hire rooms in several buildings in differ- 
ent parts of the city. 

Establishing Day Schools, September 1909 

A new building was in prospect and provision was being 
made for 3,000 evening students. It was realized that to use 
such an extensive educational plant and equipment but three 

[4] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

hours out of the twenty-four would be unthinkable, so an effort 
was made to secure a tenant who would use the school rooms 
during the day and not create a serious conflict of interests. 
After several months of investigation, it was found impossible 
to secure such a tenant, and it was finally decided to establish 
a day school. This school had been established but three 
months when the disastrous fire in the Boylston Street property 
occurred. 

Building and Equipment Destroyed by Fire 

In January 1910, the Association building and contents 
were destroyed by fire, and the schools then numbering some 
2,000 students, were thrown on the street without headquarters, 
books or equipment. Through the courtesy of the city of 
Boston, the Young Men's Christian Union. Boston University, 
and the Institute of Technology', the schools were accommo- 
dated without loss of time, until headquarters could be estab- 
lished on Ashburton Place. 

Ashburton Place, 1910-12 

Here, after three months in several buildings, the various 
departments of the Association and the several divisions 
of the school were assembled and the progress continued. 
Plans for the new central building had been drawn previous 
to this, and the work of construction was about to begin. 

Still Another Move, 1912 

The Association's temporary quarters in Ashburton Place 
passed into the hands of the Boston City Club. This neces- 
sitated moving for a few months into various buildings on 
Huntington and Massachusetts Avenues, and again the school 
system, with its newly assembled equipment and 2,500 students, 
was scattered about the city; but it still continued to grow 
and prosper. 

Co-operative Engineering School 
School of Commerce and Finance 

The School of Co-operative Engineering, with eight stu- 
dents, had been established as a feature of the day school 

[5] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

system in 1909, and at once started upon a successful career. 
While at Ashburton Place in 1911 the School of Commerce 
and Finance established in 1908 was incorporated with degree 
granting powers. Upon entering the Huntington Avenue 
building in 1913 the Evening Polytechnic School was put 
upon a college basis. 

The Huntington School, 1912 

At this time the day preparatory school became known as 
the Huntington School. The entire group then consisted of: 
The Huntington School, the Co-operative Engineering School, 
the Automobile School, the Evening Law School, the School 
of Commerce and Finance, the Evening Polytechnic School, 
the Evening Preparatory School, and the School of Business. 
The students numbered 2,800. 

A Permanent Home At Last 

In September 1913, all of the departments of the Associa- 
tion entered the new building 312-320 Huntington Avenue, 
and the school system for the first time was properly housed 
and equipped. 

A New Problem 

The demand upon us for technical and scientific education 
increasing, and our graduates going in large numbers to distant 
parts of this and other countries, a new problem presented 
itself. There are several thousand Young Men's Christian As- 
sociations in various parts of the world, many of them engaged 
in educational work, some not at all, but varying greatly 
in their standards; as a result the certificate, diploma, or 
degree, granted by one Association School, had little signifi- 
cance in locations where the Association is not strong education- 
ally. This was not true in Massachusetts or New England, 
where the reputation of the Boston Association educational 
work is fully established, but at remote points it was a real 
problem. This led to the conviction that some definite step 
must be taken to dignify the position of our higher institutions 
and to separate them from those of secondary grade. It was 

I6l 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

therefore determined to group the schools of college grade 
under a distinctive title; those of secondary grade to continue 
as formerly under the caption, "Department of Education". 

The Survey and Report, 1914 

Preliminary to this step, an exhaustive examination of 
all of the Boston Association Schools was made by George H. 
Martin, formerly secretary of the State Board of Education, 
and following his general examination, the various technical 
and professional schools were critically surveyed by special- 
ists. The reports of all these gentlemen confirmed the con- 
tention that the professional and technical work of the Associa- 
tion School system was of college or graduate grade, and was 
clearly entitled to bear the name "college". 

The College 

In March 1916, after months of debate, investigation, 
and planning, the professional and technical schools were 
incorporated as Northeastern College. 

A Unique Development 

Elements of compelling interest in this development are 
at once evident to the educationist. Unlike other school 
systems which enter a certain field and there remain, the As- 
sociation system starting with evening courses only, elementary 
in character, brief and inconclusive, and with no endowment, 
adequate space or equipment, and no criteria to guide them, 
have passed successively through the realms of elementary 
education and of secondary education, into the professional 
and technical school realm, retaining and developing nearly 
every feature ever undertaken, and finally emerging as a fully 
organized college with both day and evening courses, splendidly 
housed and equipped. The combined student body of the 
College and Department of Education consists of 3,683 men 
and boys, and employs 214 instructors, lecturers, and assistants, 
making it the third among educational institutions in New 
England, exceeded numerically only by Harvard and Yale. 
The College is housed in the buildings of the Young Men's 

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NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Christian Association, by which institution it is sustained and 
governed, enjoying the use of the following extensive equip- 
ment: 

New Building 

The plant covering nearly four acres and containing over 
4,000,000 cubic feet of space, is on Huntington Avenue, opposite 
the Opera House; the land, buildings, and equipment costing 
in the vicinity of one million five hundred thousand dollars. 
It is rather a group of buildings consisting of 

Administration Building 

in which are located the lobby, administration offices, direc- 
tors' room, committee rooms, library, reading and social rooms, 
and dormitories. 

Bates Hall 

seating five hundred, with a large stage and equipment for 
illustrated lectures. 

Recitation Building 

One hundred and ninety-six by fifty-six feet and six stories 
high, containing over thirty class rooms, laboratories, social 
and club rooms, a small assembly hall, and dormitories. 

Industrial Building 

containing machine shop, electrical laboratories and industijial 
plant. 

Natatorium 

containing one of the best swimming pools in America. This 
pool, seventy-five feet long by twenty-five feet wide, is under 
a glass roof, admitting floods of light and sunshine, and is sup- 
plied with filtered salt water. 

Gymnasium 

with a running track of twelve laps to the mile, special exercise 
rooms, hand-ball and squash courts, indoor golf, six bowling 
alleys, shower baths, special rooms for fencing, wrestling, etc. 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Two Distinct Groups 

The Schools in the system, hereafter, will consist of two 
distinct groups; those incorporated under the title, "North- 
eastern College" and those still known as the "Department of 
Education". 

Northeastern College, 1916 

The Northeastern College group consists of the School of 
Law, now entering upon its nineteenth season; the School of 
Commerce and Finance, entering upon its tenth season; the 
School of Co-operative Engineering, entering upon its seventh 
season; the School of Engineering, entering upon its tenth 
season; and the School of Liberal Arts to be established in the 
Fall of 1916. 

Interesting Figures 

The accompanying figures showing the development of the 
school system during the past twenty years give some concep- 
tion of its progress : ^g^^ ^^^^ p^^ ^^^^ ^^ .^^^^^^^ 

Students 419 3,620 768 

Teachers and Assistants, 12 214 1,682 

Courses 20 330 1,580 

Budget $2,800 $185,418 6,621 

Cost of operation 

The cost of operation of Northeastern College represents 
the interest on nearly four millions of dollars. The endowment 
applicable to this purpose, however, is but ten thousand dollars. 
There is not a school system of this kind in the United States 
of which we have any knowledge operated on such a basis. 
If it were necessary for the schools to pay the customary rental 
and other fixed charges, they would be unable to exist. Being 
provided, however, with rooms, heat, light, and equipment 
by the Association at a minimum cost, it is possible. i 

Business Management 

The business management of the college and the other 
Association Schools is of the highest type. An elaborate 

[9] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

accounting system installed by one of the leading firms of 
industrial engineers is in full operation. Modern business 
methods are employed, accurate records are instantly available 
for each school and department, modern office appliances have 
been installed, and the managerial features of the school might 
safely be taken as a model by manufacturing and industrial 
plants. The charge so often made that schools and colleges are 
inefficiently conducted, certainly does not apply to North- 
eastern College. 

Endowment Needed 

The School is in urgent need of an endowment to be em- 
ployed in the following ways: 

1st. The erection of a large building with a number of 
capacious amphitheatres and lecture halls, additional labora- 
tories, drafting, and recitation rooms. 

2d. The purchase of additional electrical, mechanical, 
physical, and scientific equipment. 

3d. The creation of more liberal scholarship fund. 

Tuition 

Tuition for the various courses in Northeastern College is 
kept at the lowest possible figure compatible with high efficiency. 
It is the desire of the school management to reduce these rates 
as rapidly as an endowment fund can be created. 

Scholarships 

Though the school is operated on a very narrow margin, 
it has nevertheless made it possible for young men to obtain 
eight thousand dollars in free tuition during the past year. 
This beneficence we wish to broaden, and to that end hope to 
create an ample endowment fund. 

Announcement 

Northeastern College will open its doors in September 
1916, with some sixteen hundred students. The trustees and 
officials undertake its development with a determination to 
maintain the traditions of the past and to continue in an ever- 
broadening way the work of enriching and ennobling the lives 

1 lOl 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

of men. Over forty thousand ambitious students have passed 
through the Association School system during these twenty 
years, and have gone out into productive life with higher 
ideals, broader opportunities and a keener sense of their 
responsibilities as men and citizens. 

Our desire is to serve as fully as possible the men of New 
England. The comprehensive, flexible program, freedom of 
election, moderate cost and wealth of opportunity make it 
possible for any self-respecting man or boy to obtain a liberal 
education especially adapted to his powers and needs at con- 
venient hours and under most helpful conditions. To the 
furtherance of this greater usefulness, the co-operation and 
support of all are most earnestly desired. 



11] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



The Trustees of Northeastern College 



President 
ARTHUR STODDARD JOHNSON 

First Vice-President 
ALBERT H. CURTIS 

Second Vice-President 
WILLIAM E. MURDOCK 

Third Vice-President 
GEORGE WHITTEMORE MEHAFFEY 

Secretary 
GEORGE W. BRAINARD, 84 Evans Street, Dorchester 

Treasurer 
LEWIS A. CROSSETT, 304 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston 

Trustees 

George W. Brainard.' Dorchester 

F. W. Carter Newton 

S. B. Carter Brookline 

William C. Chick Brookline 

George W. Coleman Boston 

Lewis A. Crossett ^ Boston 

Albert H. Curtis ^ Dorchester 

H. Bradlee Fenno Boston 

Arthur Stoddard Johnson \ Boston 

Henry G. Lord Brookline 

Francis P. Luce Boston 

George Whittemore Mehaffey * Brookline 

J. Grafton Minot Boston 

W. B. MossMAN Brookline 

WiLUAM E. MuRDOCK "'' Boston 

W. H. Newhall West Roxbury 

SiLu\s Peirce Brookline 

Charles W. Perkins Boston 

Thomas H. Russell Boston 

Sabin p. Sanger Brookline 

Frank Palmer Speare Brookline 

Board of Governors 

Arthur Stoddard Johnson George H. Martin 

Albert H. Curtis William C. Chick 

William E. Murdock Morgan L. Coolet 

George Whittemore Mehaffey Frank Palmer Speare 

[12] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



The Executive Council 

of 

Northeastern College 



FRANK PALMER SPEARE, M.H. 

President of the College 

HERCULES W. GEROMANOS, S.B. 

Dean of the School of Co-operative Engineering 

THOMAS E. PENARD, S.B. 
Dean of the Engineering School 

MARK A. SMITH, A.M. 

Acting Dean of the School of Commerce and Finance 

PHILIP F. CLAPP, B.C.S. 

Associate Dean 
The School of Commerce and Finance 

CHARLES NELSON GREGG, A.M. 

Acting Dean of the School of Liberal Arts 

GALEN DAVID LIGHT, A.B. 

Secretary 



13 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Officers of Instruction and Government 
Northeastern College 



Frank Palmer Speare, M.H. 

President. 
Asa S. Allen, LL.B. 

Assistant Dean, School of Law. 
W. Lloyd Allen, A.B., J.B. 

Lecturer in Agency. 
Walter L Badger, Jr., A.B., M.A. 

Instructor in English. 
Herbert J. Ball., S.B., B.C.S. 

Instructor in Cost Accounting and System Building. 
Charles Neal Barney, A.M., LL.B. 

Professor of Law. 
Herbert L. Barrett, A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Criminal Law. 
Nathan Bidwell, 

Counselor, School of Law. 
James Brough, 

Instructor in Art. 
BuRTis A. Brown, 

Instructor in Concrete. 
Philip F. Cl.\pp, B.C.S. 

Associate Dean, School of Commerce and Finance. 

Assistant Professor of Accounting. 
Joseph A. Coolidge, S.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. 
Arthur S. Dewing, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics. 
John C. Dietz, A.B. 

Instructor in Gorman. 
William E. Dorman, A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of Law. 
Loren N. Downs, Jr., S.B. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 
Daniel V. Driscoll, 

Instructor in Mechanics. 
Carl S. Ell, S.B., M.S. 

Assistant Dean, School of Co-operative Engineering. 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Henry A. Erhart, A.B. 

Lecturer in Financial Problems. 



14] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Officers of Instruction and Government 

— Continued 

Carroll A. Farwell, S.B. 

Instructor in Structural Engineering. 
Elias Field, A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Property L 
Hercules W. Geromanos, S.B. 

Dean, School of Co-operative Engineering. 

Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Charles N. Gregg, A.B., A.M. 

Acting Dean, School of Liberal Arts. 

Assistant Professor of Government. 
Frederick G. Hart well. 

Instructor in Electrical Practice. 
Harry N. Haven, 

Instructor in Salesmanship. 
George L. Hoffacker, 

Instructor in Accounting. 
Guy H. Holliday, A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Common Law Pleading. 
John W. Howard, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Ervin Kenison, S.B. 

Instructor in Descriptive Geometry. 
Raymond G. Laird, B.C.S., C.P.A. 

Instructor in Accounting. 
John R. Leighton, 

Instructor in Surveying and Railroad Engineering. 
Galen D. Light, A.B. 

Secretary of the Faculties. 
Henry T. Lummus, LL.B. 

Lecturer in Moot Court. 
Harold C. Mabbott, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
Hugh D. McLellan, A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of Law. 
Keith McLeod, A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Property II. 
Nathaniel S. Marston, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Harold A. Marvin, C.P.A. 

Director of Courses in Cost Accounting and System Building, 
and Lecturer in Municipal Accounting. 
Edward Mueller, A.B., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Il5l 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Officers of Instruction and Government 

— Continued 

S. Leland Montague, 

Instructor in Real Estate. 
Guy Newhall, A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of Law. 
Clarence L. Newton, Ph.B., J.M. 

Professor of Law. 
Arthur F. O'Malley, A.M. 

Instructor in Accounting. 
W. F. Odom, S.B., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Norman Osann, S.B. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 
Raymond T. Parke, A.M., LL.B. 

Professor of Law. 
John S. Patton, A.B., LL.B. 

Counselor, School of Law. 
Thomas E. Penard, S.B. 

Dean, School of Engineering. 

Professor of Mathematics. 
Marcus F. Pinkham, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
Charles H. Restall, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Railroad Engineering. 
Wiluam B. Ricketts, A.B. 

Instructor in Public Speaking. 
Charles F. Rittenhouse, B.C.S., C.P.A. 

Professor of Accounting. 
Edward W. G. Smith, 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 
Ira Smith, 

Instructor in Electrical Practice. 
Mark A. Smith, A.M. 

Acting Dean, School of Commerce and Finance. 

Instructor in Industrial Organization and Business 
Management. 
W. Lincoln Smith, S.B. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Ellwood B. Spear, A.B., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Samuel A. S. Strahan, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 
Oscar Storer, A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of Law. 



16 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Officers of Instruction and Government 

— Continued 

James B. Taylor, A.M. 

Professor of English Literature. 
Alfred J. Thompson, 

Instructor in Accounting. 
George A. Truelson, 

Instructor in Architecture. 
Percival A. Wakeman, 

Instructor in Electricity. 
James Willing, C.A. 

Instructor in Advanced Auditing. 
William F. Willman, 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 
Chandler M. Wood, A.M., J.M. 

Lecturer in Insurance. 
Sydney R. Wrightington, A.B., LL.B. 

Lecturer in Partnership. 



Il7] 



NORTHEASTERN 



COLLEGE 



Lecturers 



Norman I. Adams, A.B. 
William C. Bamburgh 
W. J. Boardman, A.B. . 
A. P. Brown 
Charles A. Brown 



Morgan L. Cooley, C.P.A. 
Guy W. Cox. A. B., LL.B. 
Albert B. Curtis, B.C.S. 
Howard W. Dickinson, A.B. 
Herbert B. Dow, A.B. 
E. M. Fisher, A.B. . . . 
Herbert F. French, C.P.A. 
Franklin W. Ganse 



Herbert A. Gidney 

Edward L. Harris 
Harry N. Haven 
Ferdinand M. Holmes 



H. R. Lane, A.B., M.C.S. 

Paul L. Lewis .... 

William H. McLeod 

Edward J. Masters, C.P.A. 

John J. Morgan 

Charles C. Parun, A.B. . 

W. T. Pearson, A.B. . . 

Henry C. Sawyer, S.B., LL.B. 

M. E. Smith .... 

Gardiner E. Thorpe . 

F. R. Carnegie Steele, F.C.A., C.P.A. 



Bank Credits. 

Sales Supervision for Public Utilitfes. 

Publicity. 

Commercial Paper. 

The Organization and Administration 
of a Purchasing Department. 

Accounting (Advanced). 

Life Insurance. 

Accounting for Brokers' Offices. 

Publicity. 

Life Insurance. 

Sales Managership. 

Accounting (Advanced). 

Life Insurance and Sales Manager- 
ship. 

Public Service Corporation 
Accounting. 

Commercial Credits. 

Life Insurance. 

Accounting for Executors and 
Trustees. 

Retail Buying. 

Publicity. 

Publicity. ^ 

Advanced Accounting. 

Publicity. 

Publicity. 

Financial Problems. 

Workmen's Compensation Act. 

Publicity. 

Commercial Credits. 

Advanced Accounting. 



I 181 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Assistants in Administration 



Ernest H. Brooke, A.B. 

Supervisor of Special Courses. 

Fred L. Dawson, 

Field Secretary. 

Walter G. Hill, A.B. 
Assistant Bursar. 

Joseph F. Lockett, 

Social Secretary, School of Law. 

Reginald T. Friebus, 
Office Secretary. 

Bertha M. Stratton, A.B., B.S. 

Assistant to the Dean, School of Commerce and Finance. 

Marie C. Fausel, 

Recorder of the College. 

Helen L. Lewando, 

Secretary to the President, and Recorder, School of Law. 

Elsie L. Keegan, 

Recorder, Engineering Schools. 

Jean A. Taylor, 

Office Assistant. 

Annetta G. Pritchard, 

Assistant Bookkeeper. 



19 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

School of Lib eral Arts 
Announcement 

THE value of a college training is becoming so fully recog- 
nized by all classes that a constantly increasing number 
of young men desire to obtain a liberal education. It 
has been recently shown by reliable statistics that the college 
man's chances of success as compared with those of the person 
of limited education are two hundred to one, and naturally, 
ambitious men are willing to make almost any sacrifice in order 
to enrich their lives. Many have arrived at this decision late 
in life and others find that at the outset they are unable to 
finance themselves for four unproductive years of day attend- 
ance. Northeastern College offers for the first time a satis- 
factory solution of this problem. The School of Liberal 
Arts has been established for the express purpose of reducing 
the period required for obtaining a college education, by offer- 
ing two years of actual college work during the evening. This 
arrangement will enable high school graduates or those with 
an equivalent education, to pursue regular college courses 
under college instructors at night, and upon the completion 
of two years' work, to apply for admission to the regular day 
colleges and universities as candidates for advanced standing. 
The College of Liberal Arts, therefore, will reduce by one-half 
the non-productive period necessary for obtaining an A.B. 
degree, and will enable a man while employed during the day 
to obtain this part of his college education, and at the same 
time to save money towards meeting his expenses after entering 
one of the day colleges or universities. Still other men who 
do not plan to give up their employment and take a regular 
day college course, will be able by attending the School of 
Liberal Arts of Northeastern College, to obtain a degree of 
culture and mental discipline which will be of inestimable value. 
Most of the courses in the Schools of Northeastern College 
are vocational. It is the purpose of the faculty to balance 
the program by the establishment of these cultural courses 
on a very high plane, and everything will be done to make them 
worthy of a place in our system. 
[ 20 1 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

GROUPS OF STUDIES 

The subjects of study and courses of instruction are arranged 
in six groups: 

GROUP I — English. 

GROUP II — Ancient and Modern Languages. 

GROUP III — Mathematics. 

GROUP IV — Natural Sciences. 

GROUP V — Social Sciences. 

GROUP VI — Mental Sciences. 

English 

English Composition, Argumentation, English and American 
Literature, Journalism. 

Ancient and Modern Languages 
Latin 

Livy, Latin Composition. 

French 

Elementary French, French Composition, and Conver- 
sation. 

German 

Elementary German, German Composition, and Conver- 
sation. 

Spanish 

Elementary Spanish, Spanish Composition, and Conver- 
sation. 

Mathematics 

Algebra, Trigonometry, Surveying, Analytic Geometry, 
Calculus. 

Natural Sciences 

General Physics, General Biology, General Chemistry, 
Qualitative Analysis, Organic Chemistry, Theoretical Chemistry, 
Industrial Chemistry, Technical Analysis. 

f 211 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Social Sciences 
Economics 

Elementary Economics, Money and Banking, Corporation 
Finance Accounting. 

History 

European History, Advanced American History. 

Government 

Principles of Government, Municipal Government. 

Law 

Elementary Law. 

The following courses in the Law School may be elected by 
students in the School of Liberal Arts: 

Torts, Contracts, Pleading, Corporations, Constitutional 
Law. 

Mental Sciences 

Logic, Ethics, Introduction to Philosophy, General Psy- 
chology, Educational Psychology. 

Pre-Medical Course 

The program of w^ork is as follows : 

Chemistry, Physics, Biology, German or French. * 

Pre-Legal Course 

The program of work is as follows : 

Logic, Argumentation, Elementary Economics, Principles 
of Government and Government in the United States, Advanced 
American History, Elementary Law. 

In any year a course may be omitted for which there is not 
a sufficient demand. 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



School of Law 

Nineteenth Year 



Announcement 

THE School of Law has had a most interesting experience. 
EstabHshed at a time when the great American cities 
were beginning to offer evening instruction in several 
professions, it was determined to give Boston an evening law 
school which would be as nearly a counterpart of the best day 
schools as the circumstances would permit. Its faculty is 
selected with the utmost care from honor men of the great 
University Law Schools who also have had unusual success in 
practice. The course of study was written by the late Dean 
Ames of Harvard Law School and Mr. Samuel C. Bennett, 
then Dean of Boston University Law School, in co-operation 
with the late Judge James R. Dunbar. These gentlemen 
comprised the advisory board and later were members of the 
Corporation of the School of Law. 

The entrance requirements for candidates for the degree 
have been kept uniformly high, the marking is severe, and the 
requirements for graduation are fully as high as those main- 
tained by the best day law schools in America. The School 
was established in 1898, and was incorporated in 1904, and 
empowered to grant the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Nearly 
90% of the graduates have passed the bar examinations in 
Massachusetts and other states and have entered practice or 
identified themselves with large industrial and commercial 
undertakings. Over five hundred men are now in attendance. 
The catalog gives complete information. 



23 



NORTHEASTERN 



COLLEGE 



Program of Instruction 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 


Second Term 


Torts 


Torts 


Contracts 


Contracts 


Common Law Pleading 


Criminal Law 




SECOND YEAR 


Property L 


Property I. 


Agency 


Sales 


Bills & Notes 


Equity I. 


Equity L 






THIRD YEAR 


Partnership 


Property II (Deeds) 


Equity II & Suretyship 


Equity II & Suretyship 


Corporations 


Corporations 


Wills 






FOURTH YEAR 


Bankruptcy 


Massachusetts Practice" 


Evidence 


Moot Court 


Constitutional Law 


Evidence 


Property III. 


Property III, 



24 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

School of Commerce and Finance 

Tenth Year 



Announcement 

THE School of Commerce and Finance was established in 
1907 and incorporated in January, 1911, In March 
of the same year the Massachusetts Legislature granted 
it the power of conferring upon its graduates the degrees of 
Bachelor of Commercial Science (B. C. S.) and Master of Com- 
mercial Science (M. C. S.). The school was formally opened 
as an incorporated institution September 2oth, 1911, offering 
its courses through evening sessions only. 

During the year 1915-16 the school has enrolled 7'23 men, 
whose ages range from eighteen to fifty-five years. These 
men include bookkeepers, office managers, bank clerks, account- 
ants, commercial teachers, lawyers, salesmen and clerks. 
Almost without exception they are men of maturity, judgment 
and ambition who have been attracted to the school because 
of the practical nature of the subjects taught, and because they 
realize the importance of intensified technical training in 
modern business methods. 

The Modern Interpretation of Business 

It is generally recognized that the large percentage of 
failures among business concerns is due to careless and in- 
efficient management more than to any other one cause. Busi- 
ness is no longer regarded as a competition or game in which 
one man or concern seeks to excel another, but rather as a 
profession demanding that the man who would rise and remain 
at the head constantly grow in skill and efficiency, and that the 
corporation or business concern which is to endure be organized 
and conducted in a scientific manner, its past recorded, its 
present constantly checked up, and its future plotted years in 
advance. 

This conception has created a new class of professional 

[25l 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

men, the business organizer and administrator and the pro- 
fessional accountant, who must possess the abihty to scientifi- 
cally study a business, learn its true condition, review its past 
failures and successes, and plan and carry out its organization 
and development. The demand for such men has called into 
being Schools of Commerce and Finance which train those who 
attend them in the technique of scientific business management. 
Such schools are making an important contribution to the 
stability and advancement of commerce. There are numer- 
ous schools of this type in the United States, and among them 
none has had a more rapid rise to prominence, or has created 
more favorable comment than has the School of Commerce 
and Finance. From year to year its courses have been 
strengthened and its standards of instruction and scholarship 
raised to a high plane. Its development and eflSciency are an 
acknowledged achievement. 

Methods Employed 

The aim of the School is to provide a broad and practical 
training for business, and with this object in view the courses 
have been planned to include the proper amount of both 
general and specialized training. It is in this respect that the 
School of Commerce and Finance is pre-eminent. The courses 
of study are in no sense the narrow and inelastic courses fre- 
quently found in schools of accounting and business administra- 
tion, and, on the other hand, they are not over-burdened with 
theoretical and academic subjects. Every effort is made to 
conduct the courses along practical lines and to give the student 
a knowledge of modern business methods which he can apply 
to his every day affairs. General training is given in the prin- 
ciples necessary to lay a firm and broad foundation for intelli- 
gent activity in the modern business world; and specialized 
training is given in order that those who attend the school may 
be able to apply these principles to particular types of business. 

The criticism is frequently made that in many schools of 
commerce and finance the instruction is given largely by means 
of lectures with comparatively little practice work. Lectures 
alone will not develop a finished accountant or administrator. 

l2Cl 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

A broad and elastic knowledge can be obtained only through 
lectures supplemented by a large amount of properly graded 
practice work. 

A consideration of the courses offered by the School of 
Commerce and Finance will show that this criticism has been 
fully met. All of the courses require much more practice work 
than is customary. The lectures are supplemented by a large 
amount of carefully prepared practice exercises, most of which 
are worked up by the student outside of the classroom. All 
practice work assigned is carefully examined, graded, and 
returned to the student. To successfully complete the course 
in professional accountancy , one must devote from 1,600 to 1,800 
hours to accounting subjects alone, of which from 1,000 to 1,200 
hours are given to practice work outside of class. It is believed 
that the laboratory methods employed are the only methods 
which will give the student a thorough and practical prepara- 
tion for business. 

For the coming year, the various courses have been revised 
and strengthened wherever possible. New courses will be 
offered in Transportation, Foreign Trade, Commercial Re- 
sources and Business Organization. Several changes have 
been made in the faculty and it is believed that the staff of 
instructors for the coming year is the strongest and best bal- 
anced that the School has ever had. 

Another new feature will be the Employment Bureau, 
where every effort will be made to place the graduates and 
students of the School in suitable positions. The great net- 
work of Y. M. C. A.'s located in all our great cities gives our 
graduates an opportunity enjoyed by no others to be put in 
touch with scores of centers of industry. The School of Com- 
merce and Finance is not a local institution but international 
in its scope, purpose, and connections. 



27 



NORTHEASTERN 



COLLEGE 



School of Commerce and Finance 
Professional Accountancy 



Four- Year Course 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

Accounting I 
Law I 

Contracts & Agency 



Second Term 
Accounting I 
Law I: 

Sales & Carriers 



Accounting II 
Principles of Economics 



SECOND YEAR 



Accounting II 
Principles of Economics 



System Building 
Money & Banking 
Public Utilities 
Law II: 

Negotiable Instruments 



THIRD YEAR 



Cost Accounting 
Corporation Finance 
Law II: 

Real Estate Law 
Elements of Auditing 



FOURTH YEAR 



Advanced Auditing 

Advanced Accounting Problems 

Industrial Organization and Business 

Management 
Law III: 

Probate Law 

Partnership 



Advanced Auditing (Concluded) 
Advanced Accounting 

Problems (Concluded) 
Industrial Organization and Business 

Management 
Law III: 

Corporations & Bankruptcy 
Public Service Corporation 

Accounting 



Three- Year Course 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

Accounting IIa 
Law I: 

Contracts & Agency 
Principles of Economics 

Th' \Y I parallels the work of the 



Second Term 



Accounting IIa 
Law I: 

Sales & Carriers 
Principles of Economics 



Third ) 
Fourth * 



year of the Four- Year Course 



28 



NORTHEASTERN 



COLLEGE 



School of Commerce and Finance 
Business Administration 



Four- Year Course 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

Accounting I 
Law I: 

Contracts & Agency 



Second Term 

Accounting I 
Law I: 

Sales & Carriers 



Accounting II 
Principles of Economics 



SECOND YEAR 

Accounting II 
Principles of Economics 



Commercial Credits 
Transportation 
Money & Banking 
Public Utilities 
Law II: 

Negotiable Instruments 



THIRD YEAR 

Corporation Finance 
Law II: 

Real Estate Law 
Buying & Commercial 

Resources 
Salesmanship 



FOURTH YEAR 



Investments 

Publicity 

Industrial Organization and Busi- 
ness Management 

Law III: 

Probate Law 
Partnership 



Publicity (Concluded) 

Industrial Organization and Busi- 
ness Management 

Law III: 

Corporations & Bankruptcy 

Sales Managership and Foreign 
Trade 



Three- Year Course 

FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

Accounting IIa 
Law I: 

Contracts & Agency 
Principles of Economics 

Second Year 



Th' d Y I P^^^ll^^s the work of the 



Second Term 

Accounting IIa 
Law I: 

Sales & Carriers 
Principles of Economics 

p, . , I year of the Four- Year Course 



29 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

School of Co-operative Engineering 

Eighth Year 



Announcement 

THE successful combination of theory and practice is 
the ideal for which all educators have striven, and it has 
proved a most difficult problem. This is especially 
true of engineering schools, where laboratory equipment, in 
order to be kept up to date, thoroughly modern, and of commer- 
cial size, calls for a heavy initial outlay and constant renewal. 
So valuable is the actual doing of things in conjunction with 
a knowledge of the "why" that all technical schools seek 
to provide themselves with such equipment. This they are 
largely unable to do on account of the prohibitive cost, and new 
means have been sought to reach this same end. 

A New Type of School 

This striving for the combination of theory with practice 
has resulted in the establishment of what are called part-time 
or co-operative schools, a very few of which, in connection with 
universities, are now located in different parts of America. 
The plan upon which these schools operate is unique and 
interesting. First, a working agreement is made with engineer- 
ing firms to receive students from the school upon a part-lime 
basis, creating one position for a pair of students. Under 
this plan, A goes to school daily for two weeks, while B, his 
mate, is employed by the firm. At the end of the two weeks, 
B enters the school and A takes his place in the industry. 
This method accomplishes several desirable results. It gives 
the school the advantage of a wonderful industrial equipment 
which is kept constantly up to date. It gives the student 
first-hand knowledge of engineering operations, as applied in 
modern industry. It gives the boy while in school the type 
of theory, at precisely the time when he most appreciates its 
need, sees its relation to the practice, and which he can imme- 

[301 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

diately apply. It brings into the industry a high -class intelligent 
body of young men who are anxious to learn the business 
from the ground up, and are focusing all their endeavors to 
that end. These boys grow up in the business, study in logical 
order every process, from the purchase of the raw stock to the 
shipping of the finished product, the accounting and buying, 
selling, and all other features. They, therefore, are most 
valuable employees and are unusually intelligent students. 
The boys are paid while they work so much per hour, and have 
two weeks' vacation, the result being that they are able to 
earn their tuition in the school and make a substantial con- 
tribution toward their clothing and expenses. Such a school 
was established as part of the Boston Association System in 
1909, and it has grown from eight boys to one hundred and 
forty-three. It has never been advertised, or featured, but 
has grown naturally through the service rendered to the boys 
and the satisfaction of employing firms. The demand for 
our students is in excess of the supply. 

High School graduation, or the equivalent, is required for 
admission. The standards of scholarship are very high and 
the courses cover four years. 

Courses are offered in mechanical, electrical, civil, and 
chemical engineering. The instructors are graduates of the 
leading technical schools and are not only trained theoretically, 
but have in many cases had successful commercial and in- 
dustrial experience. An illustrated catalogue giving full 
information is obtainable upon request. 



311 



NORTHEASTERN 



COLLEGE 



I. — Civil Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



First Term 

Mathematics L 

Physics I., Lect. and Rec. 

Physics L, Laboratory 

Descriptive Geometry L 

Mechanical Drawing 

Engineering Computations 

Enghsh L 

Surveying I. 

Surveying I., Field and Plot 



Second Term 



Mathematics I. 

Physics L, Lect. and Rec. 

Physics I., Laboratory 

Descriptive Geometry L 

Mechanical Drawing 

Engineering Computations 

English L 

Surveying I. 

Surveying L, Field and Plot 



Surveying IL 

Surveying IL, Field and Plot 
Topographical Drawing 
Applied Mechanics I. 
Physics II. , Lect. and Rec. 
Physics 1 1., Laboratory 
Mathematics II. 
Elementary Electricity 
Descriptive Geometry IL 
Mechanism 



SECOND YEAR 

Surveying II. 

Surveying II. . Field and Plot 

Topographical Drawing 

Applied Mechanics I. 

Physics II. , Lect. and Rec. 

Physics II. . Laboratory 

Mathematics IL 

Elementary Electricity 

Descriptive Geometry II. 

Valve Gears 

Precision of Measurements 



Railroad Engineering 

Railroad Eng. Field & Draw. 

Mathematics III. 

Structural Drawing 

Highway Engineering 

Materials 

Applied Mechanics II. 

Hydraulics 

Practical Electricity L. & R. 

Practical Electricity Lab. 

Dynamical and Struct. Geol. 



THIRD YEAR 

Railroad Engineering 

Railroad Eng. Field & Draw. 

Theory of Structures 

Structural Drawing 

Highway Engineering 

Materials 

Applied Mechanics II. 

Hydraulics 

Practical Electricity L. & R. 

Practical Electricity Lab. 



Structural Design 

Theory of Structures 

Advanced Structures 

Concrete Construction 

Concrete Design 

Foundations 

Hydraulic & Sanitary Eng. 

Heat Engineering: Thermo. 

Hydraulic Motors (Optional) 

Thesis 



FOURTH YEAR 

Structural Design 

Theory of Structures 

Advanced Structures 

Concrete Construction 

Concrete Design 

Foundations 

Hydraulic & Sanitary Eng. 

Heat Engineering: Thermo. 

Hydraulic Motors (Optional) 

Testing Materials Lab. 

Thesis 



32 



NORTHEASTERN 



COLLEGE 



II. — Mechanical Engineering 



First Term 

Mathematics L 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. 
Physics L, Laboratory 
Descriptive Geometry L 
Mechanical Drawing 
Engineering Computations 
English I. 



Mechanism 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing 
Descriptive Geometry II. 
Mathematics II. 
Physics II., Lect. and Rec. 
Physics II., Laboratory 
Applied Mechanics I. 
Elements of Electricity 



FIRST YEAR 



Second Term 



Mathematics I. 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. 
Physics I., Laboratory 
Descriptive Geometry I. 
Mechanical Drawing 
Engineering Computations 
English I. 

SECOND YEAR 

Mechanism 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing 
Descriptive Geometry II. 
Mathematics II. 
Physics II., Lect. and Rec. 
Physics II., Laboratory 
Applied Mechanics I. 
Elements of Electricity 
Precision of Measurements 
Valve Gears 



Heat Engineering: Thermo. 

Boilers 

Applied Mechanics 11. 

Machine Drawing 

Materials 

Hydraulics 

Practical Electricity Lect. 

Practical Electricity Lab. 

Mathf'matics III. 



THIRD YEAR 

Heat Engineering: Thermo. 

Boilers 

Applied Mechanics 11. 

Machine Drawing 

Materials 

Hydraulics 

Practical Electricity Lect. 

Practical Electricity Lab. 

General Metallurgy 

Foundry Practice 

FOURTH YEAR 



Machine Design, Statics and 
Dynamics 

Applied Mechanics III. 

Engineering Laboratory 

Hydraulic Motors 

Power Plant Design 

Concrete Construction 

Factory Construction and Manage- 
ment 

Boiler Design 

Journals and Reports 

Illumination & Photometry 

Thesis 

Machine Work (Elective) 

Forging, Chipping and Filing (Elective) 

Woodworking and Pattern Making 
(Elective) 



Machine Design, Statics and 
Dynamics 

Testing Materials Lab. 

Engineering Laboratory 

Hydraulic Motors 

Power Plant Design 

Concrete Construction 

Factory Construction and Manage- 
ment 

Surveying I., A 

Journals and Reports 

Thesis 

Machine Work (Elective) 

Forging, Chipping and Filing 
(Elective) 

Woodworking and Pattern Making 
(Elective) 

I33l 



NORTHEASTERN 



COLLEGE 



III. — Electrical Engineering 



First Term 

Mathematics I. 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. 
Physics I., Laboratory 
Elements of Electricity 
Descriptive Geometry L 
Mechanical Drawing 
English I. 
Engineering Computations 



FIRST YEAR 



Second Term 

Mathematics I. 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. 
Physics I., Laboratory 
Elements of Electricity 
Descriptive Geometry I. 
Mechanical Drawing 
English I. 
Engineering Computations 



SECOND 

Direct Current Machinery 

Electrical Problems 

Elec. Eng. L, Lab. and Reports 

Mathematics II. 

Physics II. Lect. and Rec. 

Physics II., Laboratory 

Elementary Elec. Lab. 

Applied Mechanics I. 

Mechanism 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing 



YEAR 

Direct Current Practice 

Electrical Problems 

Elec. Eng. I., Lab. and Reports 

Mathematics II. 

Physics II.. Lect. and Rec. 

Physics II., Laboratory 

Elementary Elec. Lab. 

Applied Mechanics I. 

Mechanism 

Technical Elect. Meas. Lect. 

Precision of Measurements 

Valve Gears 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing 



THIRD YEAR 



Alternating Currents, Lect., Rec. and 

Problems 
Technical Elect. Meas. Lect. 
Elect. Eng. II., Lab. 
Tech. Elect. Meas. Lab. 
Variable Currents 
Mathematics III. 
Heat Eng. : Thermo. 
Applied Mechanics II. 
Hydraulics 

FOURTH 

Alternating Current Machinery Lect., 

Rec. and Problems 
Alternating Current Machinery Lab. 
Illumination and Photometry 
Elect. Transmission of Power 
Central Stations 
Tech. Papers and Magazines 
Elect. Eng. Excursions 
Journals 

Hydraulic Motors 
Engineering Laboratory 
Surveying I., A 
Thesis 



Alternating Current Machinery, 

Lect., Rec. and Problems 
Elect. Eng. II., Lab. 
Tech. Elect. Meas. Lab. 
Variable Currents 
General Metallurgy 
Heat Eng. : Thermo. , 

Machine Drawing 
Hydraulics 



YEAR 



Eng. 



Gen. Probs. in Elect. 

Electric Railways 

Alternating Current Machinery Lab. 

Central Stations 

Tech. Papers and Magazines 

Elect. Eng. Excursions 

Journals 

Testing Materials Laboratory 

Hydraulic Motors 

Theoretical Electricity 

Engineering Laboratory 

Thesis 



34 



NORTHEASTERN 



COLLEGE 



IV. — Chemical Engineering 



First Term 

Mathematics I. 
Physics L, Lect. and Rec. 
Physics L, Laboratory 
Descriptive Geometry I. 
Mechanical Drawing 
Engineering Computations 
English L 

Inorganic Chemistry 
Inorganic Chemistry Lab. 



FIRST YEAR 



Second Term 

Mathematics I. 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. 
Physics I., Laboratory 
Descriptive Geometry I. 
Mechanical Drawing 
Engineering Computations 
English I. 

Inorganic Chemistry 
Inorganic Chemistry Lab. 



Qualitative Analysis 

Mathematics II. 

Physics II., Lect. and Rec. 

Physics 11. , Laboratory 

Applied Mechanics I. 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing 

Mechanism 

Elements of Electricity 



SECOND YEAR 

Qualitative Analysis 
Mathematics II. 
Physics II., Lect. and Rec. 
Physics II., Laboratory 
Applied Mechanics I. 
Mechanical Eng. Drawing 
Mechanism 

Elements of Electricity 
1 Valve Gears 



Organic Chemistry Lect. 
Organic Chemistry Lab. 
Mathematics III. 
Applied Mechanics II. 
Heat Engineering: Thermo. 
Machine Drawing 
Practical Electricity Lect. 
Practical Electricity Lab. 
Hydraulics 
German I. 



THIRD YEAR 

Organic Chemistry Lect. 

Organic Chemistry Lab. 

General Metallurgy 

Technical Analysis 

Heat Engineering: Thermo. 

Machine Drawing 

Practical Electricity Lect. 

Practical Electricity Lab. 

Hydraulics 

German I. 

Theoretical Chemistry Lect. 



Technical Analysis 
Industrial Chemistry Lect. 
Industrial Chemistry Lab. 
Organic Chemistry Lect. 
Organic Chemistry Lab. 
Chemical Engineering 
Theoretical Chemistry Lect. 
Theoretical Chemistry Lab. 
German II. 
Thesis 



FOURTH YEAR 

Technical Analysis 
Industrial Chemistry Lect. 
Industrial Chemistry Lab. 
Organic Chemistry Lect. 
Organic Chemistry Lab. 
Chemical Engineering 
Factory Inspection and Report 

Writing 
German II. 
Thesis 



35 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



School of Engineering 

Eleventh Year 

EVENING SESSIONS 



Announcement 

THE courses of the Engineering School, formerly known 
as the Evening Polytechnic School, are especially adapted 
to train young men who are employed in mechanical 
lines and desire to secure managerial positions, or to train 
those who wish to enter mechanical industries for important 
positions. These courses have been offered for ten years with 
marked success and have proved exceptionally valuable. 
Those who have completed them have secured attractive 
openings wuth large engineering and industrial firms, and in 
many cases have become prominent. These courses are 
recommended to ambitious young men without reservation, 
and will be found to be the most satisfactory substitute for a 
regular day technical school course. * 

Full particulars regarding the requirements for admission, 
courses, rates, etc., will be found in the catalogue of the 
engineering school, obtainable upon request. 



36 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Courses of Study 
I. Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

FIRST YEAR 

Mathematics I 

Practical Physics 

Inorganic Chemistry, Lectures and Recitations 

Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratory 

SECOND YEAR 

Mathematics II 

Qualitative Analysis, Lectures and Recitations 
Qualitative Analysis, Laboratory 
Mechanical Drawing 

THIRD YEAR 

Volumetric Analysis 
Gravimetric Analysis 
German I 

FOURTH YEAR 

Organic Chemistry, Lectures 
Organic Chemistry, Laboratory 
Theoretical Chemistry I 
German II 



FIFTH YEAR 
For Chemical Engineering Students Only 

Technical Analysis 
Theoretical Chemistry II 
Industrial Chemistry 
Thermodynamics 
Practical Electricity 



[371 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Courses of Study 
II. Electrical Engineering 

FIRST YEAR 

Mathematics I 

Mechanical Drawing 

Practical Physics 

Practical Electricity, Lectures and Recitations 

Practical Electricity, Laboratory 



SECOND YEAR 

Mathematics II 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, Direct Currents, 

Lectures and Recitations 
Electrical Engineering, Laboratory, Direct Currents 



THIRD YEAR 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, Alternating Currents, 

Lectures and Recitations 
Electrical Engineering, Laboratory, Alternating Currents 
Technical Electrical Measurements 
Technical Electrical Measurements, Laboratory 
Hydraulic Motors 
Thermodynamics 



FOURTH YEAR 

Advanced Alternating Currents 

Electrical Engineering, Laboratory, Advanced 
Electricity Supply Stations 
Power Transmission 
Electric Railways 
Thesis 



38 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Courses of Study 
III. Structural Engineering 

FIRST YEAR 

Mathematics I 
Practical Physics 
Mechanical Drawing 



SECOND YEAR 

Mathematics II 
Structural Mechanics 
Structural Drawing 



THIRD YEAR 

Theory of Structures 
Strength of Materials 
Structural Design 



FOURTH YEAR 

Advanced Structures 
Bridge Design 
Concrete Construction 



139] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Courses of Study 
IV. Civil Engineering 



j Municipal Engineering 
OPTIONS I Railroad Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 

Mathematics I 
Practical Physics 
Mechanical Drawing 



SECOND YEAR 

Mathematics II 

Plane and Topographic Surveying 
Topographical Drawing 
Highway Engineering 



THIRD YEAR 

Structural Mechanics 
Advanced Surveying 
Railroad Engineering 
Railroad Drawing 



FOURTH YEAR 
To be omitted during 1916-17 

Railroad Engineering and Design (Optional) 

Municipal Engineering Problems (Optional) 

Foundations 

Materials of Construction 

Hydraulic Engineering 



40 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Courses of Study 
V. Mechanical Engineering 

FIRST YEAR 

Mathematics I 
Practical Physics 
Mechanical Drawing 

SECOND YEAR 

Mathematics II 

Mechanism 

Mechanical Engineering Drawing 

Machine Drawing 

THIRD YEAR 
To be omitted during 1916-17 

Applied Mechanics 
Thermodynamics 
Hydraulic Motors 
Materials of Construction 
Foundations 

FOURTH YEAR 
To be omitted during 1916-17 

Boilers and Prime Movers 
Power Plant Design 
Concrete Construction 
Practical Electricity 



41 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Requirements for Admission and 
Graduation 



Admission 

THE colleges and professional schools of America are 
gradually modifying their entrance requirements and 
courses of study to more fully meet present needs. This 
is especially true in the great metropolitan centers where stu- 
dents beyond regular school age are attending evening courses 
of a high professional type. The schools comprising North- 
eastern College have been pioneers in this movement and have 
been able to accomplish most gratifying results for thousands 
of young men who would otherwise have been deprived of the 
benefits of a liberal education. A high school education is 
regarded as indispensable before completing a college course, 
and the extensive school system of the Boston Association 
enables students who have not qualified in the public day 
schools, to do so in the Association Evening Preparatory School, 
which has an annual enrollment of some 800 students, and the 
certificates from which are accepted by several New England 
colleges. The plan of admission followed is to allow the ap- 
plicant to file credentials concerning previous study in other 
schools and then to pursue prescribed courses in the Associa- 
tion Preparatory School, sufficient to make up for any defi- 
ciencies. This academic work may be done in the summer 
school or during the winter, either day or evening. This 
arrangement makes it possible for those who are not high school 
graduates to fully qualify under the most favorable conditions. 
The entrance requirements for the various schools of North- 
eastern College vary somewhat and it is impossible in this 
brief statement to explain them fully. They are all based, 
however, upon the preceding statement and will be found in 
the catalogs of the several schools. 

f 42 1 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Graduation 

The admission requirements of Northeastern College are 
flexible and vary somewhat in the different schools; the re- 
quirements for graduation, however, are arbitrary. The 
marking of the attendance, term work, and examinations 
is severe and no students are promoted or graduated who have 
not fully met these exacting conditions. Flexible entrance 
requirements and high standards for promotion and graduation 
have made Northeastern College a pronounced success. 



43 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Tuition 

School of Law 

$75.00 for year, payable as follows: $25.00 at entrance, $25.00 
November 15, and $25.00 January 15. 

School of Commerce and Finance 

Four Year Courses 

$60.00 for each of first and second years. 
$75.00 for each of third and fourth years. 

Three Year Courses 

$75.00 for each of the three years. 

Note: — Above fees are payable, one-third at entrance, one-third Decem- 
ber 1, and one-third February 1. 

School of Co-operating Engineering 

$125.00 for year, payable as follows: $60.00 at entrance, $35.00 Decem- 
ber 1, and $30.00 March 1. 

School of Engineering 

Chemical, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering 

First Year 

$35.00 for year payable as follows: $15.00 at entrance, $10.00 November 
1, and $10^.00 January 15. 

Second, Third and Fourth Years 

$50.00 for year, payable as follows: $20.00 at entrance. $15.00 Novem- 
ber 15, and $15.00 January 15. 

Structural, Railroad and Municipal Engineering 

First Year 

$30.00 for year, payable as follows: $10.00 at entrance, $10.00 Decem- 
ber 15, and $10.00 January 15. 

Second, Third and Fourth Years 

$50.00 for year payable as follows: $20.00 upon entering, $15.00 Decem- 
ber 15, and $15.00 January 15. 

School of Liberal Arts One semester Two semesters 

One course $15.00 $30.00 

Two courses 30.00 60.00 

The foregoing rates are for courses meeting twice a week 
with one and one-half periods of recitation. 

Note: — The tuition fees as given in all the schools include membership 
in the Y. M. C. A. ($2.00), which is deducted from the first payment. 
For Laboratory Fees and Deposits see special catalogue. Rates for single 
courses will be given upon application. 

I 44] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Technical Equipment 



Mechanical Engineering Department 
Mechanical Laboratories 

THROUGH the courtesy of the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology officials, and also those of the Franklin 
Union, and Wentworth Institute, we are able to avail our- 
selves of the unexcelled Engineering Laboratories of those In- 
stitutions for instruction purposes in the Laboratory Courses of 
the Co-operative School. 

In addition to the foregoing facilities, we have several en- 
gines of our own for use for instruction, as well as the most 
modern equipment for gas and fuel analysis. 

Our own steam engineering plant is completely equipped 
with meters, scales, indicators, and all the necessary accessory 
equipment for making complete boiler tests, and determining 
the efficiencies of the various appliances used in generating 
power, heat, and light for our buildings. This places at 
the disposal of our classes a perfectly equipped, up-to-date, 
engineering department, and gives them the means of carrying 
on boiler tests, determining the efficiencies of various fuels 
and oils, taking indicator diagrams, determining the efficiency 
of modern reciprocating engines and turbines when direct 
connected to generators, as well as renders them familiar with 
all the various auxiliary appliances of such a plant, as condensers, 
pumps, air compressors, tube blowers, etc. The students, 
also have the use of the equipment of our Automobile School, 
thus giving opportunity to study the most advanced ideas 
in gasoline engine practice. 

Mechanic Arts Laboratories 

There are at present two laboratories, one for metal work 
and the other for woodworking and pattern work, which are 
available for the use of our students. 

The metal working laboratory is well equipped, and affords 
the student an opportunity for work with various machines, as 

I 45 1 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

lathes, shapers, drill presses and milling machines. There are 
also a gas forge and brazing furnace, together with all the 
required equipment for bench work instruction. 

The woodworking laboratory has a power band saw, lathes, 
circular saw, buzz planer, and all the necessary equipment for 
woodworking and pattern work. 

In addition to the foregoing, a small, but completely 
equipped, shop for the construction and repair of apparatus, 
and for the use of students in connection with their thesis 
work, has been installed. This shop is equipped with a metal 
and wood working lathe, grinder and all the necessary wood 
and metal working tools. There is also a very complete set 
of cabinet worker's tools for use in woodworking. 

Civil Engineering Department 
Field Instruments 

For work in the field, the Department possesses various 
surveying instruments, representing the principal makes and 
types of instruments in general use. The equipment includes 
transits, levels, compasses, a complete plane table outfit, Locke 
hand level, flag poles, leveling rods, stadia rod, engineers' and 
surveyors' chains, steel and cloth tapes and other accessories. 
For Higher Surveying, an Aneroid Barometer is used for baro- 
metric leveling, and the transits are equipped with neutral 
glasses and reflectors for astronomical observations, as well 
as a sextant, reading to ten seconds, and equipped with neutral 
glasses and telescopes. This year a Buff and Buff Plane Table 
Outfit and a Berger, 18-inch Wye Level, as well as several 
smaller instruments, have been added to the equipment. 

The scope of the equipment and the field work itself are 
designed to train the student's judgment as to the relative 
merits of the various types of field instruments. 

Design and Drafting Rooms 

The School possesses large, light and well equipped drawing 
rooms for the carrying on of the designing and drafting, which 
form so important a part of civil engineering work. These 
rooms are supplied with lockers containing the drawing supplies, 

[ 46l 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

and files containing blue prints and photographs of structures 
that represent the best practice. Many of the prints and photo- 
graphs are of structures erected in and about Boston. 

Electrical Engineering Department 

The Electrical Laboratory is well equipped with apparatus 
for teaching the principles of measurements, and the equipment 
is being steadily increased and developed for the doing of work 
of a higher degree of precision. Among the special pieces of 
apparatus may be mentioned the following : Gary Foster Bridge, 
a modified form of Hoopes Conductivity Bridge, a Laboratory 
Wheatstone Bridge, a Leeds Northrup Potentiometer with Volt 
box, standard cells and low resistance standards, an accurate 
Chemical Balance and other appliances for the close determina- 
tion of currents, resistances and potential differences. 

There are also a set of variable inductances, and a set of 
condensers to the amount of eighty microfarads capacity 
variable in steps of one-tenth microfarad each. 

Among the instruments for testing purposes, for alternating 
current work, may be mentioned the following : Three matched 
voltmeters and three General Electric Type P-3 iron clad 
wattmeters arranged for Y connection, one G. E. Polyphase 
wattmeter with double current and potential ranges, numer- 
ous other voltmeters of various ranges, potential transformers, 
numerous ammeters some with current transformers, three 
integrating meters, one General Electric and one Westing- 
house polyphase, switchboard type,, integrating wattmeters 
and a High Torque General Electric test meter. There is 
also a considerable and increasing assortment of auxiliary 
testing apparatus, such as synchronism indicators, power factor 
indicators, frequency indicators, etc. 

For direct current testing there is a large and increasing 
collection of Weston instruments, both voltmeters and amme- 
ters, of suitable ranges and grades of precision, and two Thom- 
son integrating watt-hour meters, while the- measurement 
of unusual currents and voltages is ensured by four Weston 
milli voltmeters, with an assortment of standard shunts and 
multiplying resistances of various orders of magnitude. 

[47] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

For calibrating purposes a 600 ampere-hour storage battery 
has been added to the equipment for current tests, while for 
voltage work there is a 260-volt potential battery. 

There is also the usual assortment of testing devices, such 
as speed indicators, tachometers, brakes, loading resistances 
and the numerous minor pieces of apparatus needed in prac- 
tical testing and operating of electrical machinery. 

Among the machines of this Department are a pair of spe- 
cially made, matched machines arranged to run as single phase, 
two or three phase generators, or motors, as well as synchro- 
nous converters, double current generators, or on the Direct 
Current side as shunt, series, or compound generators, either 
two or three wire, or as motors. 

There are also a 15 horse power 230- volt Westinghouse 
motor, a new General Electric 10 horse power Interpole 230- 
volt motor, a 500- volt generator, two 500- volt series, and several 
500-volt shunt motors, and a series parallel controller. 

A 45 K. V. A., 60-cycle, single phase, 500-volt generator 
giving a practically pure sine wave, three General Electric 
Type H transformers, each of 3 K. V. A. capacity, a '7}/2 
K. V. A., special General Electric 60-cycle 230-volt alternator, 
with revolving field tapped for either 1, 2, 3 (star or mesh 
connection) 6 or 12 phase connection, which may be operated 
also as a synchronous motor. 

In addition to the above are a 5 H. P. G. E. single phase 
induction motor, which may also be operated as a three phase 
motor and a 10 H. P. Fort Wayne shunt motor driving a special 
Holtzer-Cabot 3 phase 5 K. V. A. Alternating Current Gen- 
erator. This latter machine has two special rotors, permitting 
its use as a squirrel cage or phase wound induction motor, 
there being a three phase regulating resistance for use with 
the phase wound rotor. 

During the past year there has been added a 5 K. W. Holtzer 
Cabot three phase synchronous converter. This is wound 
for 220 volts on the D. C. side and will permit of the use of 
the above mentioned specially matched generators as balancers 
in connection with this unit. 

There is also available for advanced instruction, in co- 

f 48 1 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

operation with the Mechanical Department, the four three-wire 
generators (two driven by reciprocating engines and two by 
Westinghouse-Parsons turbines) in the main generating plant 
of the Association. 

Department of Physics 

There is a large laboratory devoted entirely to Physics to- 
gether with a lecture room. 

The Physics Department has been very completely equipped 
with all necessary apparatus for the experimental work that 
is required of the students, as well as that required for lecture 
demonstration. Among other things have been added: 
verniers, levels, spherometers, calorimeters, thermometers, 
pyrometers, a spectroscope, a microscope, a spectrometer, 
balances, standard gram weight, lecture table galvanometer, 
optical disk with all accessories, lenses, photometer, a full 
set of Weather Bureau apparatus, including a barograph, 
thermograph, hygrometer, barometer, maximum and minimum 
thermometers, etc. These, in addition to the equipment 
already owned, give a wide range to the experimental work 
that can be done. 

Department of Chemistry 

This Department is completely equipped in all respects for 
carrying on all lines of Chemical work, from that of a High 
School to that of most advanced College grade. The three 
laboratories, with accommodations for over one hundred and 
fifty students, are very exceptionally furnished with all the 
necessary appliances for chemical work. Some of these are: 
hoods, drying closets, still, steam and hot water baths, elec- 
trolytic circuits, vacuum and pressure apparatus, balances, 
combustion furnaces, complete sets of apparatus for the sam- 
pling and analysis of flue gases and fuels. There are also testing 
machines for oils, viscosimeters, and different sorts of flash 
point apparatus. A chemical museum is connected with this 
Department where is kept specimens for purposes of illustration. 

f 49l 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Libraries 

There is in connection with the School a professional 
library containing books pertaining to both the school work 
of the students and to their practical work. In addition to 
this there also are current periodicals on engineering and scien- 
tific subjects for their exclusive use. All members of the 
School are entitled to take books from the Boston Public 
Library, and this offers a very unusual opportunity to our 
non-resident students. 



50 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



Student Life 



Lectures 

MANY of the lectures offered by the Association are avail- 
able to students, free of charge. These are under the 
direction of the social and the religious work depart- 
ments. Space does not permit giving detailed information of 
this important feature. Special pamphlets, prepared by the 
foregoing departments, give the list of speakers and courses 
available. 

Clubs 

A large number of clubs are organized and conducted by the 
various departments, the most important of which are as 
follows : 

Congress 

The Congress is organized similarly to the National body. 
Anyone may become a member by adhering to the rules of the 
organization and by naming the state he will represent. Mem- 
bers introduce bills and participate in the debates and dis- 
cussions. In this way experience in public speaking is gained. 
We recommend that those who wish training in public address 
and in parliamentary practice join the Congress. 

Current Events Club 

Those who are not interested in the Congress may be 
interested in joining the Current Events Club. The name 
indicates the character of the Club. Each week, discussions 
in the form of debates take place. One can secure valuable 
training in public address by joining either of the aforemen- 
tioned clubs. 

Orchestra 

Those musically inclined will find recreation and an oppor- 
tunity to improve their musical education by joining the 

[511 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

orchestra. It is under the leadership of an experienced musi- 
cian and leader, and the benefits a member derives from the 
rehearsals and concerts are considerable. The orchestra is 
in great demand and finds many opportunities to make itself 
useful. 

Glee Club 

The Glee Club is another musical organization which 
attracts the best musical talent of the membership. It is 
under the direction of a man who has had much experience 
in choral work. Concerts are given throughout the year, 
and much valuable training is received by the members. Ability 
to read simple music is the only necessary qualification for 
membership. 

Athletics 

By paying a small additional fee, students may avail 
themselves of the privileges of the gymnasium and swimming 
pool. Competitive games are held with athletic clubs. An 
inspection of our athletic facilities will show that they are 
among the finest in New England. Opportunity is given for 
athletics before the opening of the evening sessions or during 
the vacant periods. 

The following teams are organized each year: basket ball, 
swimming, track, gymnastic, wrestling, baseball, tennis, 
bowling. There are usually a number of teams for each branch 
of sport, making it possible for every student to play on one 
of them. 

For those not interested in games, opportunity is given 
to join one of the many gymnasium classes which are directed 
by experienced men. The rates for the various branches of 
physical work may be had by applying to the Director of the 
Department of Recreation and Health. 



52 



GENERAL DEPARTMENTS 

BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



Department of Recreation and Health 

ALBERT E. GARLAND M.D., B.P.E., Director 
This Department offers the best recreation that re-creates. Privi- 
leges as follows: Three Gymnasituns, Swimming Tank of Filtered Salt 
Water, Baths of all kinds, Classes of Music, Six Bowling Alleys, Tennis — 
Indoor and Out, Handball, Squash, Indoor Golf, Athletics — Indoor and 
Out, Basket-baU and Games, Boxing, Wrestling and Fencing. Best 
of Instruction. Medical Direction. Come in any time. 

Department of Religious Work 

EDWIN W. PEIRCE, Secretary 
In order that yoimg men may secure a well-balanced development 
and attain the true foundation for successful living, the Association 
advises each member to so plan his schedule that he may enter into one 
or more of ttie following activities: 

Character Building Classes Training for Christian Service 

Young Men's Sunday Forum Lectures and "Talks" 

Personal Interviews Workers' Library 
Twenty-four-hour-a-day-Club 

Department of Social Work 

DAVID M. CLAGHORN, Director 
The attention of members is called to the many opportunities in 
the Association for social service, and the following social features: 

A Newly Equipped Game El Club Sarmiento (Pan-Amer- 

Room ican Club) 

The Association Congress The Land and Water Club 

Popular Social Evenings Concerts and Entertainments 

Department of Council and Placement 

FREDERICK W. ROBINSON, Director 
Advice given to young men concerning their vocational future and 
efforts made to place them in positions best adapted to their varied abili- 
ties. It also acts as a clearing house for young men seeking work and 
employers desiring to engage reliable help. Its service is not limited 
to members, but ^e latter are given liberal discoimts and effort is made 
to notify them when good positions are open. 

Boys* Division 

JAMES G. BARNES, S.B., City Boys' Work Secretary 
The Boys' Division is made up of boys from Greater Boston whose 
needs are ministered to by a force of yotmg men who have made a care- 
ful study of "boyology". The Division comprises boys from twelve 
to eighteen years of age, whose needs are studied and whose problems 
we try to solve. Activities are conducted along social, physical, edu- 
cational, and spiritual lines. The annual membership fee is $2.00; 
gymnasium and natatorium privileges are open to the boys at special rates. 



Printed by The Advertisers Press, Inc., 141 Franklin St., Boston 



Northeastern College 



CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF 
LIBERAL ARTS 



1916-1917 



PUBLISHED BY 

NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

of the 

Boston Young Men's Christian Association 

Number 316 Huntingrton Avenue 

BOSTON, MASS, 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

OF THE 
BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



gCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Beginning with the fall of 1916, courses of college grade in English, 
Mathematics, Science, History, and Education will be offered. Professors 
and instructors of New England colleges will be engaged. These courses 
Vkill be open to graduates of high schools and to others who can meet the 
entrance requirements. 



QCHOOL OF LAW 

Established in 1898; incorporated in 1904. Provides a four-year 
cotirse in preparation for the Bar and grants the Degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. 



CCHOOL OF COMMERCE AND FINANCE 

Established in 1907; incorporated in 1911. Offers the following 
three and four-year courses leading to the degree of B. C. S. (Bachelor of 
Commercial Science) : Business Administration, and Professional Account- 
ancy. Anyone passing the examination for advanced standing is enabled 
to complete either of the regular courses and secure the degree in three 
years. Special courses in addition to regular courses. 



CCHOOL OF CO-OPERATIVE ENGINEERING 

Four-year courses in Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical and Civil 
Engineering, in co-operation with business firms. Students earn while 
learning. Open to High School graduates. 



QCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

A school oflEering three and four-year courses in Chemistry, Chem- 
ical, Electrical, Structural, Railroad and Municipal Engineering. 



For further information concerning any of the above schools, 
address FRANK PALMER SPEARE, President of the College, Boston 
Y. M. C. A., 316 Huntington Ave. Tel. Back Bay 4400. 



Northeastern College 



CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

SCHOOL OF 
LIBERAL ARTS 



1916-1917 



PUBLISHED BY 

NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

of the 

Boston Young Men's Christian Association 

Number 316 Huntington Avenue 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Northeastern College 

Boston Young Men's Christian Association 



Officers and Members of the Corporation 

ARTHUR S. JOHNSON, President 

ALBERT H. CURTIS, First Vice-President 

WILLIAM E. MURDOCK, Second Vice-President 
GEORGE W. MEHAFFEY, Third Vice-President 
GEORGE W. BRAINARD, Secretary 
LEWIS A. CROSSETT, Treasurer 

F. W. Carter J. Grafton Minot 

S. B. Carter W. B. Mossman 

Wm. C. Chick H. W. Newhall 

George W. Coleman Silas Peirce 

H. Bradlee Fenno Chas. W. Perkins 

Henry G. Lord Thos. H. Russell 

Francis P. Luce Sabin P. Sanger 
Frank P. Speare 



Officers of the College 

FRANK P. SPEARE, M.H., President 

GALEN D. LIGHT, A.B., Secretary-Bursar 



Board of Governors 

William E. Murdock, Chairman 

Albert H. Curtis Arthur S. Johnson 

Morgan L. Cooley George W. Mehaffey 

Wm. C. Chick George H. Martin 

Frank P. Speare, Ex-Officio 





Calendar 


1916 






September 


18-23 


Registration 


September 


25 


Opening of First Terra 


October 


12 


Columbus Day 


November 


25 


Thanksgiving 


December 


18-26 


Christmas Recess 


1917 






January 


1 


New Year's Day 


January 


15-19 


Examinations 


January 


19 


Close of First Term 


January 


29 


Opening of Second Term 


February 


22 


Washington's Birthday 


April 


19 


Patriots' Day 


May 


14-18 


Final Examinations 


May 


18 


Close of Second Term 



Faculty 



Officers of Administration 

FRANK P. SPEARE, M.H. 

President 

GALEN D. LIGHT, A.B. 

Secretary-Bursar 

CHARLES N. GREGG, A.M. 
Acting Dean 

Faculty 

CHARLES N. GREGG, A.M., Acadia University 
Assistant Professor of Economics and Government 

ARTHUR S. DEWING, Ph.D., Harvard 
Professor of Money and Banking and Corporation Finance 

ELLWOOD B. SPEAR, Ph.D., University of Toronto 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

CHARLES F. RITTENHOUSE, B.C.S., C.P.A.. 

Northeastern College School of Commerce and Finance 
Professor of Accounting 

THOMAS E. PENARD, S.B., Massachusetts Institute Technology 
Professor of Mathematics 

JAMES B. TAYLOR, A.M., Harvard 
Professor of English Literature 

JOHN CHILTON SCAMMEL, A.B., Harvard 
Instructor in English 

HUGH D. INIcLELLAN, A.B., L.L.B., Columbia University 
Professor of Contracts 

MARK A. SMITH, A.M., University of Wisconsin 
Instructor in Industrial Organization and Business Management 



At the time of going to press instructors have not been elected 

to fill all positions, so it is impossible to publish a 

complete list of the Faculty for 1916-1917. 



School of Liberal Arts 

THE value of college training is becoming so fully recog- 
nized by all classes that a constantly increasing number 
of young men desire to obtain a liberal education. It 
has been recently shown by reliable statistics that the college 
man's chances of success as compared with that of the person 
of limited education are two hundred to one, and naturally, 
ambitious men are willing to make almost any sacrifice in 
order to enrich their lives. Many have arrived at this decision 
late in life and others find that at the outset they are unable 
to finance themselves for four unproductive years of day 
attendance. Northeastern College offers for the first time 
a satisfactory solution of this problem. The College of Liberal 
Arts has been established for the express purpose of reducing 
the period required for obtaining a college education, by 
offering two years of actual college work during the evening. 
This arrangement will enable high school graduates or those 
with an equivalent education, to pursue regular college courses 
under college instructors at night, and upon the completion of 
two years' work, apply for admission to the regular day colleges 
and universities as candidates for advanced standing. The 
College of Liberal Arts, therefore, will reduce by one-half, 
the non-productive period necessary for obtaining an A. B. 
degree, and will enable a man while employed during the day 
to obtain this part of his college education, and at the same 
time to save money towards meeting his expenses after entering 
one of the day colleges or universities. Still other men who 
do not plan to give up their employment and take a regular 
day college course, will be able by attending the School of 
Liberal Arts of Northeastern College, to obtain a degree of 
culture and mental discipline which will be of inestimable 
value. 

Most of the courses in the schools of Northeastern College 
are vocational. It is the purpose of the faculty to balance the 
program by the establishment of these cultural courses on a 
very high plane, and everything will be done to make them 
worthy of a place in our system. 



N ORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Requirements for Admission 

THE best test of the fitness of young men for college work, 
whatever the method of admission, is their success or 
failure in previous study; those who succeed are retained, 
those who fail are eliminated. Entrance examinations and 
certificates of preparation are merely means for making a 
preliminary sorting of the applicants, and are nowhere looked 
upon as infallible. As between examinations and certificates, 
experience shows that the latter, when conscientiously 
given and based on the actual work of the student in the 
preparatory school, are the more reliable. The best promise 
of success in college is demonstrated success in the preparatory 
school. 

Admission to Regular Standing 

For admission to the Freshman class without condition 
candidates must meet the following requirements: 

Required 

English 3 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Foreign Language 2 units 

History 1 unit 

Science 1 

Electives 

Seven are to be selected from the following electives, to make 
a total of fifteen units: 

Advanced Composition 1 or J^ unit 

Algebra 1 

History 1, 2, or 3 units 

Bookkeeping 1 unit 

Botany 1 

Chemistry 1 

Commercial Geography Yi 

Economics 1 or }4 

French 1, 2, or 3 units 

German 1, 2, or 3 

Government 1 or 3^ unit 

Latin 1, 2, 3, or 4 units 

[6] 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Mechanical Drawing 1 or J^ unit 

Physical Geog 3^ 

Physiology J^ 

Physics 1 

Plane Geometry 1 

Public Speaking )^ 

Shorthand (100 words per minute) 1 

Solid Geometry J^ 

Spanish 1, 2, or 3 units 

Trigonometry J^ unit 

Typewriting (Complete Course) J^ 

Admission by Certificate 

Graduates of high schools or the Evening Preparatory- 
School of the Boston Young Men's Christian Association who 
have pursued a course of study which includes the required 
group of subjects will be admitted to the Freshman class 
without examinations. 

Admission on Condition 

Students may be admitted on condition, provided they have 
completed nine units of work in a recognized secondary school. 
This work must meet the approval of the committee on 
admission. 

Admission as Special Students 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Admission 
persons more advanced in years than the ordinary college 
student may be admitted to college as special students to 
pursue selected studies. Applications for such admission 
must be accompanied by evidence of qualifications to carry 
on the proposed work to advantage. 



[7] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



T 



Groups of Studies 

HE subjects of study and courses of instruction are 
arranged in six groups: 

GROUP I. — English 

GROUP IL — Ancient and Modern Languages 

GROUP in. — Mathematics 

GROUP IV. — Natural Sciences 

GROUP V. — Social Sciences 

GROUP VI. — Mental Sciences 

ENGLISH 

6. English Composition 

This course in practical English Composition is intended for 
a limited number of advanced students who, writing with 
facility, desire personal criticism and direction. The greatest 
freedom in the choice of subjects is given and each student 
is required to submit for revision a considerable number of 
manuscripts which will help him to develop his individual 
bent. In connection with the class discussions, there will 
be talks upon essentials of English Composition as adapted to 
advertising, law, buying, selling and the routine correspond- 
ence of the practical business man. A thesis of five thousand 
words or more will be required at the close of the course. 

7. Argumentation 

Selection and arrangement of material. Principles involved 
in argument. Public presentation. 

8. English and American Literature 

A survey of the literature of England and America. Special 
emphasis upon its relation to the economic and social 
conditions. 

9. Journalism 

A study of the principles of Journalistic writing. News- 
paper administration. Reporting. Development of ability 
to write saleable articles for newspapers and magazines. 

[8] 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

ANCIENT AND MODERN LANGUAGES 

Latin 

5. Livy 

Designed to enable the student to acquire the facility in 
reading Latin, and to instruct him in the use of Latin texts 
as a means of gaining a knowledge of Roman History. A 
thorough review of Latin grammar. 

6. Latin Composition 

A systematic study of the principles of Latin syntax as well 
as practice in the writing of Latin. 

French 

5. Elementary French 

Grammar, reading, and composition. 

6. French Composition and Conversation 

This course is conducted mainly in French. The work is 
based upon selected texts, and drill is also given in the writing 
of French themes and letters. 

German 

5. Elementary German 

Grammar, reading, and composition. 

6. German Composition and Conversation 

This course is conducted mainly in German. Work is 
based upon selected texts, and drill is also given in the writing 
of German themes and letters. 

Spanish 

5. Elementary Spanish 

Grammar, reading, and composition. 

6. Spanish Composition and Conversation 

This course is conducted mainly in Spanish. Work is based 
upon selected texts, and drill is also given in the writing of 
Spanish themes and letters. 

[9] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

MATHEMATICS 

6. Algebra 

Permutations and combinations, theory of equations, 
determinants, partial fractions, logarithms, continued 
fractions, inequalities, variation, probability. 

7. Trigonometry 

Trigonometric functions, transformations, trigonometric 
equations, solution of right and oblique triangles, construction 
of logarithmic and trigonometric tables, etc. 

8. Surveying 

Measuring of heights and distances, chaining, calculation 
of areas, dividing of land, triangulation, levelling, plotting, 
topographical drawing, etc. 

9. Analytic Geometry 

The different systems of co-ordinates with the trans- 
formation of equations from one system to the other, the 
equations of the straight line and conic sections, tangents, 
normals and polars to the conic sections, with the commoner 
properties of the various loci. 

10. Calculus 

Differential calculus-differentiation of algebraic and trans- 
cendental functions with applications to finding tangents and 
normals to curves, indeterminate forms, expansion of func- 
tions in series, maxima and minima, singular points, curvature, 
envelopes, etc. ; integral calculus-integration considered as the 
inverse of differentiation, definite integrals considered as a 
summation, rectification of curves, areas of plane curves and 
surfaces of revolution, volumes of solid bodies. 



[10] 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

5. General Physics 

This course acquaints the student with dynamics, molecular 
physics, heat, optics, acoustics, electricity, etc. 

6. General Biology 

The structure of animals and plants, functions of organs, 
development of organisms, classifications. An outline of the 
more important biological theories, such as evolution, natural 
selection, variation, mutation and heredity, and the principles 
upon which modern hygiene and sanitation are based. 
Laboratory work. 

7. General Chemistry 

A study of the important elements and their compounds. 

8. Qualitative Analysis 

A practical course relating to the identification of the 
common metallic elements and the ordinary acids. Each 
student is expected to make complete and accurate analyses of 
various mixtures, alloys and chemicals used in industries. 

9. Organic Chemistry 

The course is devoted to lectures, conferences, and labora- 
tory work, on the principles of organic chemistry. The 
student is required to prepare in the laboratory a number of 
organic compounds, selected to show the characteristic 
reactions, and to give training in the practical separation and 
purification of organic substances. After this synthetic 
work, the students are given a practical course in organic 
analysis. 

10. Theoretical Chemistry 

A course on chemical equilibrium and electro-chemical 
topics. The course will include lectures, experiments and 
discussion of problems on the law of mass action applied to 
the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions, the effect of 

[11] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

temperature and pressure, the conduction of electricity by 
solutions, the production of electricity by chemical change, 
the electromotive force of voltaic cells and single potential 
differences. Problems for independent solution by the 
student will also be given. 

11. Industrial Chemistry 

A course on the more important chemical processes. At- 
tention is given to many operations of a general nature 
common to chemical industries, such as crushing, grinding, 
filtration, evaporation, distillation, etc., and to the apparatus 
employed in these processes. Some of the more important 
industries will be taken up in detail. 

12. Technical Analysis 

A course on analysis of gases; analysis and testing of mineral, 
animal and vegetable oils; the origin, manufacture, properties, 
uses and analysis of the various fuels, and the determination 
of the heat value of fuels by the use of the calorimetric bomb. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Economics 

2. Elementary Economics 

This course is intended as a survey of the entire economic 
field. Chief emphasis is laid on the fundamental definitions, 
laws, and principles. With these laws and principles as a 
basis economic problems are discussed. Some of the im- 
portant topics discussed are value, prices, profits, rent, 
interest, wages, money, banking, corporations, tariff, rail- 
roads, socialism, and taxation. 

3. Money and Banking 

Principles and history with special reference to the ex- 
perience of the United States and to the problem of currency 
reform. 

4. Corporation Finance 

The legal status of the corporation, sources of corporate 

[12] 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 



funds, corporate mortgages, types of corporate bonds, 
vestment of capital funds, creation and use of surplus. 



in- 



5. Accounting 

This course is designed to cover the fundamental principles 
of accounting theory and practice. 

History 

5. European History 

A general survey of the principal factors in the history of 
western Europe from the fourth century to the present time. 

6. Advanced American History 

A topical study of the leading events in the history of 
America. 

Government 

2. Principles of Government and Government 

in the United States 

This is a course in practical citizenship, and considers not 
so much theoretical government as actual government. 
Study is given to the text of the Constitution. The following 
subjects are emphasized: units of representation, suffrage, 
party and machine, primary, majority government, pro- 
portional representation, judiciary, colonial and territorial 
administration, foreign intercourse, commerce and trans- 
portation. 

3. Municipal Government 

A general survey of the government of American cities. 

Law 

1. Elementary Law 

Outlines of Jurisprudence. Intended for students who 
expect to enter the profession of Law, and for those who desire 
some knowledge of Law for practical purposes. The aim of 
the course is to give a general view of the whole field of Law 
with an introduction to its terminology and its fundamental 
ideas. 

[13] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

The following courses in the Law School may be elected 
by students in the School of Liberal Arts: 

Torts 

General principles; assault and battery; false imprisonment; 
trespass; conversion; slander and libel; enticement and 
seduction; deceit; slander of title; malicious prosecution; 
negligence, and incidental points. 

Contracts 

Offer and acceptance; consideration; performance of, or 
promise to perform non-contract obligation as consideration; 
moral obligation as consideration; antecedent act or agree- 
ment as consideration; parties to a contract, including aliens, 
executors and administrators, guardians, infants, insane 
persons, intoxicated persons and married women; omitting 
agents, corporations and partners on account of these sub- 
jects being given in other courses; contracts under seal, 
including the form, requisites thereof, delivery and the 
matter of consideration; rights of beneficiaries under a con- 
tract; rights of assignees of a contract; conditional and 
unconditional contracts; rescission of contracts; damages for 
breach of contract. 

Criminal Law 

Sources of criminal law; nature of crime; common law and 
statutory offences; criminal acts; intent in general, and as 
affected by circumstances, such as insanity, intoxication, 
infancy, coercion, ignorance or mistake; justification; neces- 
sity; agency; consent; condonation; contributory acts; 
domestic relations; parties in crime; jurisdiction. 

Crimes against the person; against property; against public 
policy; health; peace; justice; decency and morality. 

Criminal procedure; arrest; extradition; examination and 
bail; indictment and criminal pleading; trial; evidence; 
proceedings after verdict; error. 

Pleading 

Common law pleading; common law actions; pleadings; 
their history, form and effect; the rules of pleading. 

[14] 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Corporations 

Nature of a corporation; difference between corporation 
and partnership; distinction between stockholders and cor- 
poration; promotion of corporations; formation of cor- 
porations; corporations de jure; corporations de facto; 
dissolution of corporations; interpretation of charters; powers 
of a corporation; doctrine of ultra vires; liability for torts and 
crimes; corporation and the State; shares of stock, dividends; 
rights of stockholders; stockholders' liabilities; voting rights 
of stockholders; voting trusts; rights and liabilities of directors 
and officers ; rights and remedies of creditors against property 
of corporations; foreign corporations. 



Constitutional Law 

Written and unwritten constitutions; history and scources of 
written constitutions in the United States, state and national; 
establishing and amending constitutions; distribution of 
powers between the national and state governments; distri- 
bution of powers among the three departments; theory and 
consequences of this distribution; the judicial department; 
nature of judicial power; jurisdiction of the federal govern- 
ment, criminal and civil; express, implied and resulting 
powers; citizenship; civil and political rights; the police power; 
the right of eminent domain; taxation; impairment of con- 
tracts, ex post facto and retrospective legislation generally; 
regulation of commerce. 



MENTAL SCIENCES 

1. Logic 

A study of the mental processes that constitute good 
thinking as attention and interest, observation, reflection, 
defining, assertion, proof, induction. Considerable time is 
spent in the critical analysis of arguments, with a view to 
developing the student's power of detecting fallacies and of 
consistent reasoning in debate. 

[15] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

2. Ethics 

This course aims to present the principal theories as to 
the basis of right and wrong, to discuss practical questions, 
such as come before men in business and social life, and in 
citizenship. 

3. Introduction to Philosophy 

xA.ttention will be paid to the essential relations which 
philosophical problems and insights bear to the civilizations 
and social conditions out of which they arise. The relation 
of philosophy to other typical interests of life, especially those 
of science, literature, art, history, morality, and religion will 
be emphasized. 

4. General Psychology 

This course aims to present in brief and comprehensive form 
an outline of the subject, to serve as an introduction to more 
advanced work and to lay a foundation for other courses 
that deal primarily with mental life. 

5. Educational Psychology 

A study of the application of psychology to the problems of 
education. This course aims to correct defective methods in 
study. It is very desirable that those taking this course 
should previously have completed the course in General 
Psychology. 



[IG] 



SCHOOL 



O F 



LIBERAL 



ARTS 



Work Leading to The Degree of 
A.B. or B.S. 

STUDENTS completing the prescribed two years of college 
work will be granted certificates admitting them to the 
Junior year of colleges that receive students to advanced 
standing by certificate. 

Granting of Certificates 

The School of Liberal Arts of Northeastern College will 
grant certificates to students in all subjects in which a grade of 
80% or above has been made. 

Courses Leading to the Degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science 









Freshman Year 






For A.B. 




( Twelve Hours Required) 


For B.S. 




English 






English 




Language 






Language 




History or 


Mathematics 


Science 




Elective 






Mathematics 




Electives open 


to Freshmen: 




1. 


Argumentation 




5. Federal and State Government 


2. 


Physics 




6. Logic 




3. 


Biology 




7. Psychology 


4. 


Economics 




Sophomore Year 






For A.B. 




{Twelve Hours Required) 


For B.S. 




English 






Language 




Language 






Science 




Elective 






Elective 




Elective 






Elective 




Electives open 


to 


Sophomores : 




1. 


Journalism 




8. Municipal Government 


2. 


History 




9. Contracts 




3. 


Mathematics 




10. Torts 




4. 


Chemistry 




11. Ethics 




5. 


Money and Banking 


12. Philosophy 


6. 


Corporation Finance 


13. Elementary Law 


7. 


Accounting 




14. Constitutional Law 



(Note 1. The student is not permitted to take more than six hours in one academic year. ) 

[17] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Pre-Medical Course 

A SPECIAL TRAINING for persons entering upon the 
study of medicine is now required by medical schools. 
In addition to a four year high school course, at least 
one year 6f college work in physics, chemistry, biology, and 
a modern language is essential. 

The School of Liberal Arts offers excellent opportunities 

for medical students who desire to fulfil this requirement. 

It is advised that students planning to take the Pre-Medical 

College work in one year should have taken the courses in 

physics and chemistry in a preparatory school. 

The program of work is as follows: 

Chemistry 

A study of the important elements and their compounds. 

Physics 

This course acquaints the student with dynamics, molecular physics, heat, 
optics, acoustics, electricity, etc. 

Biology 

The structure of animals and plants, functions of organs, development of 
organisms, classifications, an outline of the more important biological theories, 
such as evolution, natural selection, variation, mutation and heredity, and the 
principles upon which modern hygiene and sanitation are based. Laboratory 
work. 

German or French 

These courses consist of grammar, reading, and composition. 



[18] 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 



Pre-Legal Course 



STUDENTS who expect to enter the Law School are 
advised, upon completing their preparatory work, to 
pursue those courses in the college, which will enable 
them to enter upon the study of Law with greater facility. 
The purpose of this course is to provide additional training 
for those men who wish to make a greater success in the 
Legal profession. 

The program of work is as follows: 

1. Logic 

A study of the mental processes that constitute good thinking as attention 
and interest, observation, reflection, defining, assertion, proof, induction. 
Considerable time is spent in the critical analysis of arguments, with a view to 
developing the student's power of detecting fallacies and of consistent reasoning 
in debate. 

2. Argumentation 

Selection and arrangement of material. Principles involved in argument. 
Public presentation. 

3. Elementary Economics 

This course in intended as a survey of the entire economic field. Chief 
emphasis is laid on the fundamental definitions, laws, and principles. With 
these laws and principles as a basis economic problems are discussed. Some of 
the important topics discussed are value, prices, profits, rent, interest, wages, 
money, banking, corporations, tariff, railroads, socialism, and taxation. 

Principles of Government and Government in the 
United States 

This is a course in practical citizenship and considers not so much theoretical 
government as actual government. Study is given to the text of the Con- 
stitution. The following subjects are emphasized; units of representation, 
suffrage, party and machine, primary, majority government, proportional 
representation, judiciary, colonial and territorial administration, foreign inter- 
course, commerce and transportation. 

Advanced American History 

A topical study of the leading events in the history of America. 

Elementary Law 

Outlines of Jurisprudence. Intended for students who expect to enter the 
profession of Law, and for those who desire some knowledge of Law for practical 
purposes. The aim of the course is to give a general view of the whole field of 
Law with an introduction to its terminology and its fundamental ideas. 

In any year a course may be omitted for which there is not 
a sufficient demand. 

[19] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Examinations 

EXAMINATIONS are held in all subjects at the close of 
each term and the standing of each student who has com- 
pleted the work is recorded. Students are advised to pur- 
sue courses in full and take all examinations, for later there may 
be need of an official rating. While the standing of students 
in regard to scholarship is determined by means of examina- 
tions, regularity of attendance (75%, at least), and faithful 
performance of required work are considered equally essential. 

The grading is as follows: 

A, 90-100 Very Good 

B, 80-90 Good 

C, 70-80 Fair 

D, 60-70 Poor 

F, below 60 Failure 



Tuition 



T 



HE tuition rates for courses in the School of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences are as follows : 

One Semester Two Semesters 

One Course $15.00 $30.00 

Two courses 30.00 60.00 



The foregoing rates are for courses meeting twice a week 
with one and one-half hour periods of recitation. 

The above fees include membership in the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 

The laboratory fee for Chemistry is $2.00, and Biology $2.00. 
A deposit of $3.00 is made in Chemistry to cover breakage. 
The unused portion is returned at the close of the course. 

Tuition as given above refers to the courses given in the 
School of Liberal Arts. Any courses pursued in other schools 
of Northeastern College will be paid for at the rate given in 
the catalogues, but in no case should two full courses exceed 
$60. 

Tuition is payable in two installments. One half at the 
opening of the year, and one half February 1st. 

[20] 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Student Life 
Lectures 

MANY of the numerous lectures offered by the Associa- 
tion are available to members, free of charge. These are 
under the direction of the social and the religious work 
departments. Space does not permit giving detailed in- 
formation of this important feature. Special pamphlets, 
prepared by the foregoing departments, give the list of 
speakers and courses available. 

Clubs 

A large number of clubs are organized and conducted by 
the various departments, the most important of which are as 
follows : 

Congress 

The Congress is organized similarly to the National body. 
Anyone may become a member by adhering to the rules of the 
organization and by naming the state he will represent. 
Members introduce bills and participate in the debates and 
discussions. In this way experience in public speaking is 
gained. We recommend that those who wish training in 
public address and in parliamentary practice join the Congress. 

Current Events Club 

Those who are not interested in the Congress may be 
interested in joining the Current Events Club. The name 
indicates the character of the club. Each week, discussions 
in the form of debates take place. One can secure valuable 
training in public address by joining either of the aforemen- 
tioned clubs. 

Orchestra 

Those musically inclined will find recreation and an op- 
portunity to improve their musical education by joining the 
orchestra. It is under the leadership of an experienced 
musician and leader, and the benefits a member derives from 

[21] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

the rehearsals and concerts are considerable. The orchestra 
is in great demand and finds many opportunities to make 
itself useful. 

Glee Club 

The Glee Club is another musical organization which 
attracts the best musical talent of the membership. It is 
under the direction of a man who has had much experience in 
choral work. Concerts are given throughout the year, and 
much valuable training is received by the members. Ability 
to read simple music is the only necessary qualification for 
membership. 

Physical Training 

By paying a small additional fee, students may avail 
themselves of the privileges of the gymnasium and swimming 
pool. Competitive games are held with athletic clubs. An 
inspection of our athletic facilities will convince you that 
they are the finest in New England. Opportunity is given 
for athletics before the opening of the evening sessions or 
during the vacant periods. 

The following teams are organized each year: basket ball, 
swimming, track, gymnastic, wrestling, baseball, tennis, 
bowling. There are usually a number of teams for each 
branch of sport, making it possible for every student to 
play on one of them. 

For those not interested in games, opportunity is given 
to join one of the many gymnasium classes which are directed 
by experienced men. The rates for the various branches of 
physical work may be had by applying to the Director of the 
Department of Recreation and Health. 

Buildings 

The location, surroundings, and physical appointments of 
a school are of primary importance. The location ought to be 
healthful, accessible, and attractive. The buildings ought to 
be properly heated, lighted, and ventilated, and, above all, 
conducive to the health and progress of students at all seasons 

[22] 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

of the year. The buildings of the Boston Young Men's 
Christian Association occupied by Northeastern College com- 
bine all these good qualities. They are located on Hunt- 
ington Avenue in the section of Boston noted for its 
institutions of learning: accessible from all parts of the city 
and suburbs; and free from the outside influences which 
distract the attention of students. Nearly four acres of 
land are devoted to buildings and an athletic field. 

Looking at the building from the front, one gains the 
impression of a large square structure, 240 x 200 x 90, but 
this is not the case. There are, in reality, six buildings 
(Administration, Assembly Hall, Educational, Natatorium, 
Gymnasium, and Vocational), each on its own foundation, 
and, with the exception of those facing the front and west, 
which are 90 feet high and 58 feet deep, the buildings are 
comparatively low, connected by corridors and bridges. 
This arrangement gives exceptionally fine light and air to all 
the buildings. 

Administration Building 

Located in the Administration Building are the lobby, 
various offices of the administrative staflF, the directors' 
room, committee rooms, libraries, reading and social rooms. 
This building is the social center of the plant. 

Recitation Building 

This building is 196 feet long by 58 feet wide and six stories 
high. In the basement are located the heating and ventilating 
systems of the entire plant. The first floor includes game, 
social, and club rooms, and a small assembly hall. On the 
second, third, and fourth floors are located class rooms, 
drafting rooms, and laboratories. On the fifth and sixth 
floors are dormitory rooms. 

Gymnasium 

This structure is known as the Samuel Johnson Memorial 
Gymnasium, the funds for which were provided by relatives 
and friends of the late Samuel Johnson. On the main floor 

[23] 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

is the gymnasium proper, which is equipped with the most 
approved apparatus. In the building are handball and 
squash courts, lockers, six bowling alleys, shower baths, 
rooms for special exercising, fencing, wrestling, etc., a running 
track, and a visitors' gallery. The gymnasium is so arranged 
that, by a system of sliding partitions, it can be divided 
into one, two, or three separate compartments, making it 
possible to conduct a number of activities at the same time. 
Many new features in gymnasium construction and equip- 
ment have been introduced. 

Natatorium 

This building, located between the Assembly Hall and the 
Gymnasium, is easily accessible from the locker rooms. The 
swimming pool is 75 feet by 25 feet and is under a glass roof 
which admits abundant light and sunshine. The pool is 
supplied with filtered salt water from our own artesian well, 
and is heated to a proper temperature by an elaborate system 
of pipes. The Natatorium is one of the largest and best 
equipped of its kind. 

Vocational Building 

The Vocational Building is located directly back of the 
main group. This is a substantial structure of three stories, 
150 X 58, in which are located the woodworking plant, the 
electrical laboratories, machine shops, and lecture halls. 

Assembly Hall 

The Assembly Hall has a seating capacity of nearly 500. 
A large stage, suitable for entertainments of all kinds, is 
provided. The moving-picture machine provides a feature 
which is of interest to our students. Many films on 
educational topics are shown each term. 



[24] 



Printed by The Advertisers Press. Inc. 141 Franklin Street. Boston 



March PuUettn 1916 



CATALOG 

OF THE 

CO-OPERATIVE 

ENGINEERING 

SCHOOL 

1916-1917 



PUBLISHED BY 
NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

OF THE 

Roston Tonng Men's Christian Association 

Number 316 Himtinftton Avenue 

BOSTON, MASS. 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 
AND AFFILIATED SCHOOLS 

Northeastern College 

LAW SCHOOL Evening Sessions Only 

Established in 1898; incorporated in 1904. Provides a four years' course in 
preparation for the Bar and grants the Degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

SCHOOL OF COMMERCE AND FINANCE Evening Sessions 
Established in 1907; incorporated in 1911. Offers the following four-year 
courses leading to the degree of B.C.S. (Bachelor of Commercial Science): 
Banking, Business Administration, Finance and Bond Salesmanship, and Pro- 
fessional Accountancy. Anyone passing the examination for advanced stand- 
ing is enabled to complete any one of the four regular courses and secure the 
degree in three years. Special courses in addition to regular courses. 

CO-OPERATIVE ENGINEERING SCHOOL Day Sessions 

Four years' courses in Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical, and Civil Engineer- 
ing, in co-operation with business firms. Students earn while learning. Open 
to High School graduates. 

POLYTECHNIC SCHOOL Evening Sessions 

A school offering three- and four-year courses in Chemistry, Chemical, Electri- 
cal, Structural, Railroad and Municipal Engineering. 

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS Evening Sessions 

Beginning with the fall of 1916, coursesof college grade in English, Mathema- 
tics, Science, History, and Education will be offered. Professors and instructors 
of New England colleges will be engaged. These courses will be open to grad- 
uates of high schools and toothers who can meet the entrance requirements. 

Affiliated Schools 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Day and Evening Sessions 

Offers all of the courses of the regular Business School program, and additional 
cultural courses, preparing for business and admission to our School of Com- 
merce and Finance. 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL Evening Sessions 

A school of high school grade which prepares for all colleges and technical 
schools and the classified Civil Service. Special business courses. Standards 
are the same as those maintained by the best day schools. Three sixteen-week 
terms each year. 

HUNTINGTON SCHOOL Day Sessions 

A high grade school offering seven years of work, which prepares for colleges 
and technical schools. Special technical and business courses are given to those 
who are not going to college. This school appeals particularly to boys of ex- 
ceptional scholarship. 

AUTOMOBILE SCHOOL Day and Evening Sessions 

Deals with the construction, care, repair and operation of all types of gasoline 
vehicles; a large staff of teachers; ample equipment and garage. 

For further information concerning any of the above schools or departments 

address the Director of Education 

FRANK PALMER SPEARE, 316 HnntmAton Avenae. Boston. Maa«. 



P o 

Northeastern College 



g= 



Catalog 

OF THE 

CO-OPERATIVE 

ENGINEERING 

SCHOOL 



BOSTON 
1916-1917 



C> 



Catalog of the Instructing Staff, together with a State- 
ment of the Requirements for Admission and a 
Description of the Courses of Instruction 





YEARLY CALE NDAR 




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20 


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27 


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JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


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8 


9 






3 


4 


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31 


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SO 


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31 


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29 

















School Periods for Division A indicated by type thus: 12 3. 
School Periods for Division B indicated by type thus: 12 3. 
I'eriods when School is not in session indicated by type thus: 12 3. 



Index 



Calendar 1916-1917 
School Calendar 
Officers of Administration 
Advisors .... 
Officers of Instruction . 
General Information: 

General Statement 

Object of School . 

Plan of Operation of School 

Co-operating Firms 

Schedules of Practical Work 

Earnings 

Expenses 

Relation of School to High School 

Number of Students 

Courses Offered . 

Summer Schools . 

Application for Admission 

Preliminary Fee and First Tuition Payment 

Length of School Year 

Attendance 

Books and Supplies 

Educational Certificate 

Status of Students 

Examinations 

Reports of Standing 

Conduct 

Requirements for Graduation 

Tuition Fees 

Refunds 

Payments 

Residence 

Location of School 

Special Students . 

Three Year Courses 

Socials 

Vacations 

Summer Employment . 

Probation Period 

Post-Graduate Opportunities 
Requirements for Admission: 

General .... 

Admission to First Year 

Entrance Examinations in Boston 

Order of Examinations 

Subjects for Examination 

Admission by Certificate 

Entrance Examination Conditions 

Outlines of Entrance Subjects 
Courses of Study: 

Civil Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 
Synopsis of Courses 
Equipment 
Application Blank 



PAGE 

2 

4-5 

6 

6 

7 

9 
10 
11 
12 

13-14 
15 
16 
16 
17 
17 
17 
18 
19 
19 
19 
20 
20 
20 
20 
21 
22 
22 
23 
24 
25 
25 
25 
25 
26 
26 
27 
27 
27 
27 

29 
30 
30 
31 
31 
32 
33 
33 

36-37 
38-39 
40-41 
42-43 
44-69 
70-75 
77 



Calendar 1916 



January 17, Monday 

Second Term begins for Division A 

January 31, Monday 

Second Term begins for Division B 

February 22, Tuesday 

Washington's Birthday (School exercises omitted) 

April 19, Wednesday 

Patriots' Day (School exercises omitted) 

May 29 to June 10, inclusive 
Final Examinations 

May 30, Tuesday 

Decoration Day (School exercises omitted) 

June 6, Tuesday 
Graduation 

June 8-9, Thursday and Friday 

First Entrance Examinations of Co-operative Engineering School 

June 12-September 9 
Summer Vacation 

July 

Practical work for Division A commences 

September 

Practical work for Division B commences 

September 6-7, Wednesday and Thursday 

Second Entrance Examinations of Co-operative Engineering School 

September 11, Monday 

First Term of school year for Division A commences 

September 25, Monday 

First Term of school year for Division B commences 

October 12, Thursday 

Columbus Day (School exercises omitted) 

November 30, Thursday 

Thanksgiving Day (School exercises omitted) 

December 18-26, inclusive 

Christmas Recess (School exercises omitted) 



Calendar 19 17 



January 15, Monday 

Second Term begins for Division A 

January 29, Monday 

Second Term begins for Division B 

February 22, Thursday 

Washington's Birthday (School exercises omitted) 

April 19, Thursday 

Patriots' Day (School exercises omitted) 

May 28 to June 9 inclusive 
Final Examinations 

May 30, Wednesday 

Decoration Day (School exercises omitted) 

June 5, Tuesday 
Graduation 

June 7-8, Thursday and Friday 

First Entrance Examinations of Co-operative Engineering School 

June 11-September 8 
Summer Vacation 

July 

Practical work for Division A commences 

September 

Practical work for Division B commences 

September 5-6, Wednesday and Thursday 

Second Entrance Examinations of Co-operative Engineering School 

September 10, Monday 

First Term of school year for Division A commences 

September 24, Monday 

First Term of school year for Division B commences 

October 12, Friday 

Columbus Day (School exercises omitted) 

November 29, Thursday 

Thanksgiving Day (School exercises omitted) 

December 24-29 inclusive 

Christmas Recess (School exercises omitted) 



■ Officers of Administration ■ 



General Administrative Officers 

ARTHUR S. JOHNSON, President 

ALBERT H. CURTIS, Vice President 

GEO. W. BRAINARD, Recording Secretary 
LEWIS A. CROSSETT, Treasurer 

GEORGE W. MEHAFFEY, General Secretary 

Educational Committee 

WILLIAM E. MURDOCK ALBERT H. CURTIS 

WM. C. CHICK 

MORGAN L. COOLEY GEORGE H. MARTIN 

Educational Administrative Officers 

FRANK P. SVE ARE, Director of Education 

GALEN D. LIGHT, Asst. Director ofEduc. and Bursar 
WALTER G. HILL, Asst. Bursar 

ERNEST H. BROOKE, Registrar 

F. L. DAWSON, Field Secretary 



Advisers 

The following gentlemen are acting in an advisory capacity on 
the more important executive matters of the School where their ser- 
vice is of greatest value to us : 

Dr. Richard Maclaurin, President of Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology. 
James P. Munroe, Secretary of Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Corporation. 
William McKay, General Manager, New England Gas & Coke Co. 
Paul Winsor, Chief Engineer, Boston Elevated Railway Company. 



■ Officers of Instruction ■ 

H. W. GE ROM AN OS, S. B., Dean 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

CARL S. ELL, S. B., M.S., Assistant Dean 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

J. A. COOLIDGE, S. B. 
Mathematics and Physics 

LOREN N. DOWNS, Jr., S. B. 

Electrical Engineering 

D. V. D RISCOLL 

Mechanics 

CARL S. ELL, S. B., M. S. 
Ci'uil Engineering 

H. C. M ABBOTT, S. B. 

Mechanical Engineering 

H. W. GEROMANOS, S. B. 
Chemistry and Metallurgy 

JOHN R. LEIGHTON 
Ci'vil Engineering 

WALTER L BADGER, Jr., A. B., M. A. 

English 

JOHN W. HOWARD, S. B. 

Sur<v eying 

ER VIN KEN ISON, S. B. 
Descripti've Geometry 

W. F. ODOM, S. B., M.S. 
Chemical Engineering 

THOMAS E. PEN ARD, S. B. 

Mathematics 

M. E. PINKH AM 

Mathematics 

CHARLES H. RESTALL, B. S. 
Topographical Draiuing 

JOHN C. DIETZ, B. A. 
Modern Languages 

W. LINCOLN SMITH, S. B. 
Electrical Engineering 

ELLWOOD B. SPEAR, A.B., Ph.D. 

Chemistry 

EDWARD MUELLER, A. B., Ph.D. 
Theoretical Chemistry 

At the time of going to press, our annual election of instructors for the year 

has not been held, and so it is impossible to publish 

a complete list of the faculty for 1916-1917. 




THE NEW NAME 

■ Northeastern College ■ 

lOR MANY years the terms Evening Law 
School, School of Commerce and Finance, and 
Co-operative Engineering School, have been 
applied to the corresponding schools of the 
Department of Education. These names, however, were 
not distinctive, and both graduates and students have 
requested that a regular title be given the schools doing 
work of college grade. As a result of their activities, 
the schools concerned have been very thoroughly investi- 
gated by outside educational experts, to see if the scope 
and grade of work done would properly measure up to 
that of the recognized colleges and technical schools. 
Such was found to be the case in all the schools, and 
upon the submission of the various reports by the Edu- 
cational Committee to the Board of Directors of the 
Association, the latter Board voted to apply the name 
" Northeastern College " to the group of schools com- 
prising the following : — 

Evening Law School 

School of Commerce and Finance 

Co-operative Engineering School 

Polytechnic School 

School of Liberal Arts 

These schools will henceforth be known as the 
regular schools of Northeastern College, of the Boston 
Young Men's Christian Association. 




General Information ■ 

'T HAS generally been conceded that where the prac- 
tical and the theoretical elements of education can 
be taught simultaneously, the greatest good is de- 
rived by the student, and efforts are being made in all 
departments of education to accomplish this greatly desired end. 

Technical school instruction, depending on class-room 
work and laboratories, must always lack some of the vital char- 
acteristics of an actual manufacturing plant, owing to the fact 
that one is carried on for educational purposes, while the other 
is operated for dividends. It is this latter fact that gives the 
Co-operative School idea one great advantage over our usual 
educational plan. Instead of protecting the student, and 
training him for several years for a line of work to which he 
may later find himself to be entirely unfitted, the Co-operative 
School at once puts the boy to work in a commercial plant. 
There he learns life in its vital issues, as well as the problem of 
getting along with men ; thus early finding out whether he has 
made a wise, or unwise, choice of his life work. This training, 
too, shows him the use and value of his school work, and finally 
gives him an unusual opportunity to acquire from actual expe- 
rience that rare thing, executive ability, without which his life 
probably will always be spent on the lower levels of industry. 

That the young men of New England might have an op- 
portunity to attend such a technical school, where both practice 
and theory are correlated, and at the same time be enabled to 
defray a large part of the expense of their education by the 
returns from their practical work, the Co-operative Engineering 
School of the Boston Young Men's Christian Association was 
started in 1909. 

This School has now been in operation for seven years, 
and the continually increasing interest in it, as well as its rapid 
and steady growth, show that it was much needed to fill a place 
that is filled by no other school in this vicinity. 



Object of the School 

The fundamental aim of this School is to train, for posi- 
tions in Engineering work, young men who are unable to 
attend the highest grade technical schools or colleges. Thus 
they are enabled to advance farther and more rapidly in their 
chosen work than they could reasonably expect to do without 
further education than that of a high school course. The 
training is not in any sense that of a trade school, nor is it ex- 
actly that of our best scientific schools, but it stands between 
the two. The work done is that of a regular engineering 
school of high standards, but only the essential subjects are 
taken, and they only so far as they will have a direct bearing on 
the life work of the student. In other words, it is a limited 
technical training of high grade. The fact that most of our 
instructors are graduates of, or instructors in, the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, will show the character of work being 
done. 

At present there are four lines of Engineering work being 
given, and the end sought is to give to students who have 
already had a high school preparation, or its equivalent, a good 
training in the fundamental sciences of Mathematics, Chemistry 
and Physics, and in the important applications of the principles 
of these sciences to the several branches of engineering. More 
stress is laid on the development of the ability to apply the 
acquired knowledge to new engineering problems, than to the 
memorizing of a multitude of details and very abstract theory, 
which, while valuable, cannot be gone into too deeply in a 
course of this type. 

The class-room instruction is given to small sections, and 
in the drawing rooms and laboratories the students receive a 
great deal of personal attention. The independent solution of 
assigned problems forms a large part of nearly all courses. 

The courses differ from those of many schools, in that a 
student is not permitted a wide range of subjects from which to 
choose, in the belief that better results are obtained by pre- 
scribing, after the student has selected the line of work for 
which he desires to prepare himself, the principal studies which 
he is to pursue. 



Plan of Operation of the School 

To illustrate the idea of the curriculum at the School, take, 
for instance, the case of a young man "A," who desires to take 
our Mechanical Engineering Course. 

" A " is assigned to one of the plants of a firm that is co- 
operating with us. Here he is put to work, and spends two 
weeks working for the firm. Then " B," his alternate, who 
has spent the first two weeks in the School, takes " A's " place 
with the firm, and " A " puts in the next two weeks at school. 
Thus the work goes on, the two men exchanging places at the 
beginning of each two-week period. The studies pursued in 
the course have a direct practical bearing on the outside work, 
with the exception of a few courses added, because of the aim 
which we have to produce a better citizen as well as a better 
employee. The courses given have been decided upon after 
conference between the co-operating employers and the school 
authorities, and are the result of the best ideas of both. The 
subjects are taught in a practical, not in an abstract or a theo- 
retical way. Thus, in mathematics, instead of teaching algebra, 
analytic geometry and calculus, as so many separate subjects, 
they are correlated and taught as instruments for the solution of 
practical problems arising in engineering work. The aim 
throughout the course is to give it practical bearing, and yet 
have it complete and thorough in all the needed essentials. 

Correlation of Practical and 
Theoretical Work 

The outside work of the student is as carefully planned as 
that at the School, and it is progressive. The employers who 
co-operate with us generally agree, where practicable, to employ 
the boys in all the different departments of their establishments 
during their periods of practical duties ; this training is just as 
complete as the school work, and is just as thorough. Where 
possible, the course of the learner is from the handling of the 
raw material to the shipment of the finished product. This 
practical training includes the use of the machines as well as the 
executive duties of the plant, so that at the end of his course 
the graduate may not only know how to do things, but also 
why they are done in certain ways ; and he may, we hope, be 
of value in improving methods of work. 

ELEVEN 



Co-operating Firms 

The following is a list of the firms which are co-operating 
with us at the present time : — 

Boston Elevated Railway Co. 

Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 

Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 

AsPiNWALL & Lincoln, Civil Engineers. 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 

Bay State Street Railway Co. 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co. 

H. F. Bryant, Civil Engineer. 

Simplex Electric Heating Co. 

Simplex Wire and Cable Co. 

Frank E. Sherry, Civil Engineer. 

Gray & Davis, Inc., Electrical Devices. 

Whitman & Howard, Civil Engineers. 

H. F. Beal, Civil Engineer. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Land Court. 

R. Evans, Essex County Engineer. 

United Shoe Machinery Co. 

Saunders & Kendall, Civil Engineers. 

American Steam Gauge and Valve Co. 

J. L. Carr, Civil Engineer. 

Dennison Manufacturing Co. 

H. C. Red Label Chemical Co. 

International Engineering Corporation. 

Frank Ridlon Co., Electrical Supplies. 

CoNDiT Electrical Manufacturing Co. 

TiLESTON & HOLLINGSWORTH PaPER CO. 

Thus far we have secured new positions for our students 
as the growth of the School has demanded. However, to be at 
all sure of work in his chosen branch of engineering, an appli- 
cant should file his application early, as the number of positions 
in any one line is necessarily limited. 



T W E L v E 



Schedules of Practical Work 

Below are typical schedules of practical work that have 
been prepared for our students by some of the companies which 
are giving them employment : — 

Boston £levated Railw^ay Co. 

First Year. — Six months, pit work in carhouse. 

Six months, armature room. 
Second Year. — Twelve months, machine shop work. 
Third Year. — Six months, mechanical drafting room. 

Six months, power station work. 
Fourth Year. — Six months, line department. 

Six months, electrical engineer's department. 

Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 

Six months, air brake shops. 

One year, erecting work. 

One year, machine shop. 

One year, engine house repairs. 

Six months, drafting room and testing work. 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 

Nine months, data takers. 

Three months, office. 

Three months, pipe fitter's helpers. 

Three months, pump man's helpers. 

Three months, blowers and exhausters. 

Three months, laboratory. 

Three months, boiler room. 

Three months, generator house. 

Three months, steam fitters. 

Three months, machine shop. 

Three months, assistant engineers. 

Six months, laboratory. 

Three months, distribution department. 

Simplex Wire and Cable Co. 

Six months. Insulating Department. 

Six months, Braiding Department. 

Six months. Cable Shop. 

Six months, Twisting Department. 

Six months. Machine Shop Construction Gang. 

Six months. Electrical Construction Gang. 

One year. Testing Room. 

THIRTEEN 



y^ year 



M year 



Simplex £Iectric Heating Co. 

Machine Department ...... 1 year 

Grinding Department ...... 1 month ^ 

Stock Department ....... 4 months { 

Winding Department ...... ^ month j 

Enamelling Department ..... i^ month j 

Assembling Department ..... ^ year 

Testing Department, First Division • • • Yt. year 

Testing Department, Second Division . . . K year 

Shipping Department, approximately ... 2 months \ 

Drafting Department, approximately ... 4 months ' 

General Shop experience ..... j^ year 

The Gondit Electrical Manufacturing Co. 

Shipping or Receiving . 
Cost and Estimating 
Stock Room . 
Machine Department 
Direct-Current Assembly 
Alternating-Current Assembly 
Inspecting and Testing Department 
Experimental Department 
Drafting Department 
Switchboard Department 
Engineering Department 

The Dennison Manufacturing Co. 

First Year. — Carpenter's Helper ...... 4 months 

Pattern Maker's Helper ..... 3 months 

Elevator, Fire Door, Shafting, etc . • 2 months 

Helper in Millwright's and Electrician's gangs 3 months 

Second Year. — Machine Shop Stock Room .... 1 month 

Machine Shop ...... 9 months 

Grinding Room ...... 2 months 

Third Year. — Power Plant work (the time to be put in at 

the option of the Company) ... 3 months 

Accident Prevention Work .... 4 months 

Experimental Work (machine work) . . 3 months 

Filing Plans, Blue Printing, Tracing, etc. . 3 months 

Fourth Year. — Tracing and general work .... 2 months 

Detailing and general Drafting ... 10 months 

The above programmes show what the boys do in their 
practical work, and the courses of study pursued at the School 
show what they do along academic lines. It will be seen that 
there is the greatest possible degree of correlation between 
theory and practice in the work they take up. The men under 
whose supervision the boys have been in their outside work, are 
practically unanimous in approval of our plan, and speak highly 



months 

months 

months 

months 

months 

months 

6 months 

3 months 

3 months 

6 months 

6 months 



FOURTEEN 



of the enthusiasm, earnestness and inteUigence the students have 
shown in the performance of their duties. 

Attitude of Co-operating Firms 

Almost all the concerns which co-operated with us last year 
took one, or more, additional pairs of our students this year, 
which in itself is significant of their attitude toward our plan. 

Elarnings 

For the practical work the student does he is paid a cer- 
tain amount per hour at the start, and a definite increase per 
hour after completing fixed periods of service. The sum 
earned is more than enough to pay the tuition and the necessary 
expenses of schooling, but will not cover the cost of living. 

In some cases the boys are paid at a higher rate than is 
called for by their schedule of pay, but that is a courtesy of the 
company that gives them employment, and is not in any way to 
be expected as a regular thing. The co-operating firms may 
make any salary schedule they desire, so long as it does not fall 
below that originally agreed upon. 

The companies which co-operate with us agree to pay our 
students ten (10) cents per hour during their first year of serv- 
ice ; twelve (12) cents per hour during the second year; four- 
teen (14) cents per hour during the third year, and sixteen (16) 
cents per hour during the fourth year. 

Basing the earnings on this scale, the student will earn 
from five (5) to six (6) dollars per working week during the 
first year, and an increase of approximately one (1) dollar per 
working week for each succeeding year of the four. As there 
are about thirty weeks of work per year, the earnings will be 
from one hundred and fifty dollars upwards. 

Frequently a student is able to earn much more than the 
regular rate, owing to getting extra pay for overtime work. 

A census of our students who were working in January, 
1914, gave the following data in regard to earnings: — 



Minimum weekly wage 

Maximum weekly wage 

Minimum earnings for January, 1914 

Maximum earnings for January, 1914 
*Minimum earnings for year 1913 
*Maximum earnings for year 1913 

*Based on a total working period of thirty weeks. 

FIFTEEN 



$5 00 

12 65 
9 60 

31 65 
150 00 
375 00 



Expenses 

As the earnings of the students average from $150 to $300 
a year, while expense for tuition, books, drafting supplies, etc., 
and membership in the Y. M. C. A. is not over $125, there is 
a considerable balance for incidentals. 

While the School supplies all books, drawling instruments, 
slide rules, etc., it has been found impracticable to furnish the 
students with notebooks, paper, drawing ink, pencils, etc. In 
consequence of this, the student will have a slight expense, of 
probably less than two dollars, for paper, pencils, etc. 

Relation of the Co-operative School to High Schools 

This School is peculiarly adapted to the high school grad- 
uate who, although financially unable to continue his studies 
further, still has the ambition and ability to get ahead if given 
the opportunity. Thus boys, being graduated from high school, 
can still live at home, but spend their time in fitting themselves 
for something better in the future. 

This year the School has a student body made up of grad- 
uates of the following High Schools : — 

Abington High School Maiden High School 

Amesbury High School Marblehead High School 

Beverly High School Marlboro High School 

Boston English High School Medford High School 

Boston High School of Commerce Medway High School 
Boston Mechanic Arts High School Merrimac High School 

Brockton High School Milford High School 

Bromfield High School Natick High School 

Cambridge High and Latin School Newburyport High School 

Canton High School Northbridge High School 

Chicopee High School North Chelmsford High School 

Concord High School Norwood High School 

Danvers High School Peabody High School 

Dennisport High School Pepperell High School 

Everett High School Petersham High School 

Foxboro High School Plainville High School 

Framingham High School Portland High School (Me.) 

Groton High School Reading High School 

Hamilton High School Rindge Technical High School 

Hanover High School Salem High School 

Hardwick High School Somerville English High School 

Haverhill High School Stoughton High School 

Hebron Academy Sudbury High School 

Holden High School Tilton Seminary 

Huntington Preparatory School Waltham High School 

Hyde Park High School Westboro High School 

Lynn English High School Weston High School 
West Roxbury High School 

SIXTEEN 




MAKING A HIGH POTENTIAL TEST ON A 
CONCENTRIC FEEDER 

Chatham Street Substation Edison Electric Ilhiminatin<a; Company 




IN THE RESEARCH LABORATORY 

A. D. Little Company, Incorporated, Engineering Chemists 

Hydrolyzing Wood Fiber into Alcoho 



m 



Number of Students 

The number of positions at our disposal in any one branch 
of engineering is necessarily limited, and so the number of stu- 
dents who can work part time in that line is also limited. In 
consequence of this, those students who apply first will get first 
consideration in the matter of positions, and those who wish to 
enter should present their applications as soon as possible. 

Those applicants who apply for admission to the School 
too late to be assigned to practical work, may attend the School 
every period, or every alternate period, as they may wish, and 
will be assigned to practical work as soon as an opening occurs. 

Outside Interests 

A moderate participation in social and athletic activities is 
encouraged by the Faculty, although a standard of scholarship 
is required of the students which is incompatible with excessive 
devotion to such pursuits. 

Four- Year Courses 

Regular four-year courses, leading to a diploma, are offered 
in the following branches of engineering : — 
I. Civil Engineering 
11. Mechanical Engineering 

III. Electrical Engineering 

IV. Chemical Engineering 

Descriptions of these courses and schedules, showing the 
subjects of instruction included, will be found on succeeding 
pages. 

Summer Schools 

There are day and evening summer preparatory schools, 
conducted by the Educational Department of the Association, 
and students having entrance conditions, or requiring further 
preparation for the entrance examinations, may avail them- 
selves of this opportunity to cover the desired work. 

Those of our students who fail to pass in any of their 
school work may be permitted to take up the study in the Sum- 
mer School conducted by the Institute of Technology, provided, 
of course, that Institution is offering such a course. Those stu- 
dents desiring this privilege should consult the Dean, as special 
permission must be obtained to attend many of the courses. 

SEVENTEEN 



Physical Training 

Those students who desire gymnasium instruction may ob- 
tain the same by the payment of the gymnasium fee in addition 
to their tuition. This will entitle the student to exercise with 
the regular classes, as well as to use the gymnasium at other 
times. The same condition is true of the Swimming Pool. 

Requirements for Admission 

Detailed information in regard to the requirements for ad- 
mission to the courses of instruction in the School, will be found 
on succeeding pages. In general, the preparation necessary to 
enable an applicant to pursue one of the Courses, corresponds 
with that given by good high schools in their four-years' 
course. 

Application for Admission 

Each applicant for admission to the School is required to 
fill out an application blank, whereon he states his places of pre- 
vious education, as well as the names of persons to whom refer- 
ence may be made in regard to his character and previous 
training. 

A deposit of five (5) dollars is required when the applica- 
tion is filed. Should the applicant be rejected, without being 
permitted to take the entrance examinations, one-half this fee 
will be returned to him. Should the application be approved, 
the fee will be retained to cover the cost of his registration, ex- 
aminations, etc. This fee is non-returnable. 

The last page of this catalog is in the form of an applica- 
tion blank, which may be detached and filled out to send in with 
the $5 matriculation fee. 

Upon receipt of the application blank, properly filled out, 
together with the required deposit, the School at once looks up 
the applicant's references and high school records. When re- 
pHes have been received to the various inquiries instituted, the 
applicant is at once advised as to his eligibility to admission to 
the School. All applicants must meet the Dean for a personal 
interview before being finally accepted by the School. 

EIGHTEEN 



PreUininary Fee and First Tuition Payment 

Should a student wish to be assigned to a position with a 
co-operating firm before the regular opening of School, he is 
required to fill out an attendance card and also an application 
for membership in the Association. A twenty-five (25) dollar 
fee, which is credited as part payment of tuition, must be paid be- 
fore he will be assigned to any position at practical work. 
Once the student has been assigned to such a position, and has 
accepted it, this fee is non-returnable. 

Before any student shall be allowed to attend classes, or 
be given supplies, he shall have made a total payment of sixty 
(60) dollars. This is entirely separate from the application fee 
of five (5) dollars. 

Summing up the foregoing : 

When a student applies for admission to the School, he 
makes a deposit of five dollars, which is not considered as part 
of the tuition, but is used to cover registration expenses. Of the 
hundred and twenty-five (125) dollar tuition, twenty-five (25) 
dollars must be paid before an applicant will be assigned a position 
at practical work, and an additional thirty-five (35) dollars, or in 
all sixty dollars, must be paid before a student will have books 
and supplies issued to him and be allowed to attend classes. 

An application blank will be found just inside the back 
cover of this catalog. Fill it out in ink and mail it, together 
with the required five (5) dollar deposit, to H W, Geromanos, 
Dean, 316 Huntington Ave., Boston, Mass. Make all checks 
and money orders payable to the Boston Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

School Year. 

The term begins September 11, 1916, and on succeeding 
years the school year will commence on the second Monday in 
September. The school exercises are suspended on legal holi- 
days and for one week at Christmas. The School closes at the 
end of the second week in June. 

Attendance. 

Students are expected to attend all exercises in the sub- 
jects they are studying, unless excused by the Dean. With the 

NINETEEN 



exception of one hour in the middle of the day, exercises are 
held, and students are, in general, expected to devote them- 
selves to the work of the school between 9 A. M. and 5 P. M, 
There are no exercises on Saturday after 1 P. M, 

Books and Supplies 

The student is furnished with all books, drawing instru- 
ments, slide rules and general supplies required for his work. 
This material is loaned to him during the school year, and must 
be returned in good condition, on demand, or else paid for. 

No pens, pencils, notebooks, notebook paper, etc., are 
issued to the student, but the cost of these minor supplies 
should not run much over two dollars per year. 

Birth and Edncational Certificates 

The passage of the recent law, by the Legislature, in re- 
gard to the hours and conditions of labor by minors, makes it 
necessary that all students under twenty-one years of age shall 
obtain Educational Certificates before they can be accepted by 
co-operating firms. For those students who plan to take the 
practical work, and who live outside of Boston, it will save time 
and trouble to bring a certificate of birth, or an Educational 
Certificate, with you on coming to Boston. The Educational 
Certificates are obtained free, upon request, from the Superin- 
tendent of Schools in the city or town where the student lives, 
if he lives in Massachusetts. For students living in other states 
a certificate of birth, or its equivalent, is all that will be 
necessary. 

Statns of Students 

The ability of students to continue their courses is deter- 
mined in part by means of examinations ; but regularity of at- 
tendance and faithfulness to daily duties are considered equally 
essential. 

Any student failing to make a satisfactory record, either in 
school or practical work, may be removed from his position in 
practical work, or from the School. 

Examinations 

Examinations in all subjects are held at the close of each 
school year, in May and June, and cover the work done during 

TWENTY 



the year. All students who maintain a year's average of 80 per 
cent, or over, in their daily w^ork and informal examinations, in 
any subject, may be excused from the final examination in that 
subject, at the discretion of the instructor in charge, and vi^ith 
the approval of the Dean. When a final examination is taken 
the year's rating in the subject is based half on the examination 
and half on the record of the year's work. 

Students will not be admitted to professional work in the 
several courses without satisfactory records in those previous 
subjects on which this work especially depends. That is, for 
illustration, a student cannot take Advanced Surveying until he 
has completed Elementary Surveying with a clear record. 

Exceptions to this rule may be made in individual cases, 
after special consideration by the instructor in charge and the 
Dean. 

Failure to take an examination at the proper time, unless 
excused, counts as a complete failure, and no other examination 
may be taken by the student in that subject, without special 
permission and a payment of five dollars for each examination. 

Reports of Standing 

Informal reports in all subjects are sent every two months, 
and formal reports covering the year's work are sent at the 
close of each year. These reports are sent to students, and to 
the parents, or guardians, of the students. Notification will be 
made to parents, or guardians, in all cases of students advised, or 
required, to withdraw, or placed on probation. 

Owing to the short school year, it is of vital importance to 
the student that he get a clear record in all his work each week, 
and where a student fails to pass in any subject, a notification 
is sent to his parents, or guardian, to that effect, at the close of 
the week in which the failure was recorded, so that we may 
have the home influence exerted to bring his work up to a 
higher rating the next week. 

Every effort is made to keep the student up in his studies, 
and parents and students are always gladly welcomed by the 
Dean for conference upon such questions. Special reports on a 
student's work will be sent to parents at any time, upon request. 

TWENTY- ONE 



Elective Subjects 

Students electing any course, not included in their regular 
schedule, will be required to take all examinations in the sub- 
ject, and to attain a passing grade before they will be eligible for 
the diploma of the School. 

Conduct 

It is assumed that students come to the School for a serious 
purpose, and that they will cheerfully conform to such regula- 
tions as may from time to time be made. In case of injury to 
any building, or to any of the furniture, apparatus or other prop- 
erty of the School, the damage will be charged to the student, 
or students, known to be immediately concerned ; but if the 
persons who caused the damage are unknown, the cost of re- 
pairing the same may be assessed equally upon all the students 
of the School. 

Students are expected to behave with decorum, to obey the 
regulations of the School, and to pay due respect to its officers. 
Conduct inconsistent with the general good order of the School, 
or persistent neglect of work, if repeated after admonition, may 
be followed by dismissal, or, in case the ofifense be a less serious 
one, the student may be placed upon probation. The student 
so placed upon probation may be dismissed if guilty of any 
further offense. 

It is the aim so to administer the discipline of the School 
as to maintain a high standard of integrity and a scrupulous 
regard for truth. The attempt of any student to present, as his 
own, any work which he has not performed, or to pass any ex- 
amination by improper means, is regarded as a most serious 
offense, and renders the offender liable to immediate expulsion. 
The aiding and abetting of a student in any dishonesty is also 
held to be a grave breach of discipline. 

Requirements for Graduation 

To receive the diploma of the School the student must 
have attended the School not less than two years, which must 
be those immediately preceding his graduation, except as post- 
ponement may be specially permitted. He must have completed 
the prescribed studies of the four years, and must, also, pass final 

TWENTY-TWO 



examinations, if required, on subjects pertaining especially to his 
Course. In addition to this, he must have completed his period 
of practical work to the satisfaction of his employer. 

The student must, also, prepare a thesis on some subject 
included in his course of study, or an account of some research 
made by him, or an original report upon some machine, work of 
engineering, or industrial plant. This thesis, or design, must be 
approved by the Dean. Theses are to be written on one side 
only of paper of good quality, 8 x 10^ inches in size, with an 
inch margin on each side. Theses must be handed to the 
Dean not later than the day on which the first annual exam- 
ination occurs. 

All theses, and records of work done in preparation of 
theses, are the permanent property of the School. 

The diploma of the School represents not only the formal 
completion of the subjects in the selected course of study, but 
also the attainment of a satisfactory standard of general effi- 
ciency. Any student, who does not show in the fourth-year 
work of his Course, that he has attained such a standard, may 
be required, before receiving the diploma, to take such addi- 
tional work as shall test his ability to reach that standard. 

No diploma can be given until all dues to the School are 
discharged. 

The diplomas awarded graduates will be signed by both 
the School authorities and the employers. 

Students completing the school course, without being en- 
gaged in any practical work, will receive a special diploma. 

Tuition Fees 

A fee of five (5) dollars is to be paid when the application 
is filed, as a matriculation fee. This fee is non-returnable, if 
the applicant is permitted to take the entrance examinations. 
If he is rejected, without taking the examinations, one-half the 
deposit will be returned. 

The tuition fee is $125 per year, and must be paid by enter- 
ing students as follows : — 

Twenty-five dollars preliminary fee (see previous page). 

Thirty-five dollars additional, before receiving any supplies. 
or, 

TWENTY-THREE 



Sixty dollars on, or before, attending classes and receiving 
supplies. 

Thirty-five dollars December 1. 

Thirty dollars March 1. 

One-half the year's tuition will be charged any student who 
attends the School during six school weeks. 

Any student whose application for entrance to the School, 
together with the required deposit of $5, was received on or 
before December 31, 1915, is entitled to the $110 rate of 
tuition. 

Upper class students whose tuition rate is $110 shall pay it 
as follows : — 

Forty dollars at beginning of fall term. 

Forty dollars December 1. 

Thirty dollars March 1. 

Students who were enrolled in the School, when the tuition 
was increased from $100 to $110 per year, will be allowed to 
complete their course at the same rate of tuition that existed 
at the time of their entrance. 

Such students shall pay their tuition as follows : — 

Thirty dollars at beginning of fall term. 

Forty dollars December 1. 

Thirty dollars March 1. 

Failure to make the required payments on time renders 
the student liable to be barred from his classes until the matter 
has been adjusted with the Bursar. 

This tuition fee includes membership in the Association, as 
well as the use of all books, drawing instruments, etc., which are 
required in the school work. Such supplies as are required by 
the student for his school work, are loaned to him by the School, 
and must be returned on demand, in good condition, or else 
paid for. 

Refunds 

Students who are compelled, for any reason, to leave the 
School before the end of the school year, shall be charged at 
the rate of seven and one-half dollars per week for each week 
of school attendance, and in addition to this, shall be charged 
an extra twenty dollars over and above this weekly rate. The 

TWENTY-FOUR 



date of withdrawal of any student shall be the day on which 
the School receives formal notice of his intentions to leave, at 
which time also all his supplies shall be returned, or paid for. 
No application for refunds will be considered until the student's 
supplies have all been returned, or paid for. 

Laboratory Fees and Breakage 

Beginning September, 1916, all students taking Chemical 
Laboratory work will be charged a nominal fee of $5 per year. 
Students will also be charged for all breakage and destruction of 
apparatus in all laboratories. 

Payments 

All payments should be made to Galen D. Light, Bursar. 
Make checks payable to Boston Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

Residence 

For those students who will not be living at home, there 
are excellent accommodations, at very moderate rates, in the 
dormitories that are in our new building. These rooms may be 
had separately, or in groups with a common reception room, 
and the price varies from $1.50, or $2.00 per week, upwards. 
As board costs from $3.50 to $5.00 a week, a student could get 
room and board for from $5.00 a week to $6.00 per week. 

The School officials have no authority in the matter of 
dormitory assignments. For rooms in the dormitories, write the 
House Secretary. 

Location 

The buildings are located on Huntington Avenue, just be- 
yond Massachusetts Avenue, and are within easy access to the 
various railroad stations, and the business and residential sections, 
by electric cars. 

Special Students 

It is possible for students to enter the School and spend 
either every period at school, or else every other period at school, 
without being placed in practical employment. There will be 
extra charge under these conditions, if the student takes more 

T WENTT-FIVE 



than two subjects above the regular schedule for the course and 
year for which he is entered. 

A student obtaining a low rating on his entrance examina- 
tions, or who may not be eligible to assignment to practical 
work, for other reasons, may, by special permission, be allowed 
to attend school either every period or every alternate period, 
and, if his record for the year justifies it, may be assigned to 
practical work the following year. 

Three-year Course 

It has been found possible for students to attend school 
every week and to complete the course in three years. To do 
this, the student must have had a good high school education 
and cannot do the practical work in connection with the course. 

Special permission to take a three-year course must be 
granted by the Faculty before a student will be permitted to 
enroll for such a course. 

Students completing the course in three years will be 
required to pay the full tuition of the four-year course, namely, 
five hundred (500) dollars, before being awarded a diploma. 
The extra tuition shall be added to the regular tuition as 
follows : — 

First year — Fifty dollars. 
Second year — Fifty dollars. 
Third year — Twenty-five dollars. 

The dates on which the partial payments of these extra 
sums shall be payable are to be apportioned in any year on a 
proportional basis to the amounts due on the regular tuition. 

The foregoing regulations do not apply to those students 
enrolled in the School before January, 1916. 

Socials 

In order to provide for the social intercourse of the stu- 
dents, as well as to enable the men in the different divisions to 
meet one another, socials and entertainments are held monthly 
for their exclusive enjoyment. An out-door field meet is also 
held yearly, at the close of the school year, at which time vari- 
ous interclass competitive games are enjoyed. 

T W E NT Y-SI X 



Vacations 

The employers may allow our students one week's vacation 
at Christmas, and two weeks' vacation during the summer. They 
are not paid for this time. Whether a student shall have a full 
week at Christmas, or not, is at the option of the employer. 

Summer £)mployment 

When a student, for good reason, is unable to continue his 
practical work during the summer, while the School is not in 
session, it is sometimes possible to get him leave of absence for 
the summer so that he can return to his employer in the fall. 
All special arrangements for the summer work must be referred 
to the Dean. 

Probation Period 

When, for any reason, it is deemed advisable, the School 
reserves the right to place any entering student upon a period 
of probation, extending from one to three months, before plac- 
ing him at practical work. Whether he shall be placed at work 
at the end of this time will be determined by the character of 
the work that he has accomplished during this probationary 
period. 

Post-Graduate Opportunities 

While the courses of the School have been carefully investi- 
gated by men who are recognized as authorities in their pro- 
fessions, who have pronounced the work to be of the grade and 
scope of good scientific schools, no degree is granted upon 
graduation. 

For those who wish a degree, it may be obtained as follows : 

By arranging a special schedule for the last two years of the 
Co-operative School course, and then putting in a full year in 
our School of Commerce and Finance, a student may get a 
valuable education in both Engineering and Accounting and 
qualify for the degree of B. C. S. 

Students of good ability, on completing the Co-operative En- 
gineering Course, have the opportunity to attend the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, if they care to, and by taking 



T WENTT-SEVEN 



special extra work in the Co-operative School during their 
course, they may reasonably expect to complete the Technology 
work and get their degree in two years. Through conference 
with the officials of the Institute, it has been found that those 
of our courses equivalent to theirs will probably be accepted in 
place of theirs, and the student given a clear record in such sub- 
jects, either by passing examinations, or at the discretion of the 
head of the Department. Since a large number of our courses 
are covering the same ground as those at the Institute, a capable 
student should be able at the end of his course to get a clear 
rating at Technology equivalent to at least two years' work 
there. This offers a rare opportunity for an ambitious, capable 
young man to get the most valuable kind of an education at 
small cost. 

For further information about the School, write to 

H. W. Geromanos, Dean, 

316 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 



T WENT Y- EIGHT 




Requirements for Admission ■ 

'N GENERAL, the preparation necessary to enable 
an applicant to pursue successfully one of the regular 
courses, corresponds with that afforded by high 
schools of the better grade, offering a four-year 
course of study. Experience has shown that students who have 
not a complete high school course, or its equivalent, are severely 
handicapped in their work, so that such previous training is 
regarded as just as essential for entrance as the satisfactory 
passing of the required examinations. 

In very exceptional cases a student who is not a high school 
graduate, may be allowed to enter as a special student, but only 
after his case has been passed on favorably by the Faculty 
and the Dean. 

Every applicant must furnish references as to his char- 
acter and ability, and must show cause why he may reasonably 
be expected to make a success of his course, both in the practi- 
cal work and at the School. He must be willing and able to 
work hard, both mentally and physically. 

For those unable to carry on the Engineering Courses ow- 
ing to inadequate preliminary training, it has been found pos- 
sible to plan special courses, of one or two years' duration, in 
the Preparatory School to fit for the Engineering School. 

All applicants planning to take the examinations shall 
notify the Dean not less than ten days previous to the date of 
the examinations. For those students who may not be prepared 
to take the examinations in June, but who desire to work dur- 
ing the summer and then take the examinations in the fall, ar- 
rangements may be made by consultation with the Dean, 

Any subjects not passed in the June examinations may be 
passed at the September examinations. 

Applicants for admission to the Co-operative Engineering 
School are, in general, required to pass the entrance examina- 
tions of the School. Certificates of entrance examinations 
passed for admission to colleges, or technical schools of good 
standing, may be accepted in lieu of examinations. 

T WENT T- NINE 



The last page of this catalog is in the form of an applica- 
tion blank. It should be filled out in ink and forwarded, with 
the required five dollar deposit, to H. W. Geromanos, Dean, 
316 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. Make all checks and 
money orders payable to The Boston Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

Admission to the First Year 

The student intending to enter the School should bear in 
mind that the broader his intellectual training in any direction, 
and the more extensive his general acquirements, the greater 
will be the advantages he may expect to gain. The importance 
of thorough preparation in the subjects set for examination also 
is great, for the character and the amount of instruction given 
in the School, from the outset, leave little opportunity for one 
imperfectly fitted to make up deficiencies, and render it im- 
possible for him to derive the full benefit from his course, or 
perhaps even to maintain his standing. The training given in 
the best high schools will, in general, afford suitable preparation. 

The requirements of age and scholarship specified are re- 
garded as a minimum in all ordinary cases, and only exceptional 
circumstances will justify any relaxation. Parents and guardians 
are advised that it is generally for the ultimate advantage of the 
student not to enter under the age of eighteen years. 

Entrance Examinations in Boston 

Examinations for admission to the first year class will be 
held at 316 Huntington Avenue on June 8 and 9, and on 
September 6 and 7, 1916. 

Students are advised to attend the June examinations, if 
possible, in order that any deficiencies then existing may be 
made up in September, before entrance. 

Examination Fees 

Before taking the examination the applicant must have 
filed his application, together with the required five dollar de- 
posit. If he gets a clear record in his examinations, he may pay 
the sixty (60) dollar first payment of his tuition fee, at any time 
before school opens. If, however, he wishes to start practical 

THIRTY 



work, he must pay the preliminary fee of twenty-five dollars 
before being assigned to a position. 

Order of Examinations 

Thursday, June 8, 1916. 

10.00 A. M. to 12.00 N Algebra 

1.00 P. M. to 3.00 P. M Plane Geometry 

Friday, June g, igi6. 

10.00 A. M. to 12.00 N English 

1.00 P. M. to 3.00 P. M Physics 

No fees are to be paid at this time. 

Subjects for Eixaminatioii 

To be admitted as a student to the first-year class, the 
applicant must have attained the age of seventeen years, and 
must have passed satisfactory examinations in the following 
subjects : — 

Elementary Algebra. 

Plane Geometry. 

English. 

Elementary Physics. 

The examination in Physics is not required, but students 
not receiving a clear record in it, by examination or otherwise, 
will be required to take a special course in Physics, in addition 
to their regular first-year work. 

The detailed requirements in the various subjects are as 
follows : — 

Plane Geometry 

The usual theorems and constructions of good text-books, 
including the general properties of plane rectilinear figures ; the 
circle and the measurement of angles ; similar polygons ; areas, 
regular polygons and the measurement of the circle. The solu- 
tion of numerous original exercises, including loci problems. 
Applications to the mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. 

Algebra 

The four fundamental operations for rational algebraic 
expressions ; factoring, determination of highest common factor 
and lowest common multiple by factoring ; fractions, including 

THIRTY- ONE 



complex fractions ; ratio and proportion ; linear equations, both 
numerical and literal, containing one, or more, unknown quan- 
tities ; problems depending on linear equations ; radicals, includ- 
ing the extraction of the square root of polynomials and num- 
bers ; exponents, including the fractional and negative. 

English 

The examination in English will be as far as possible a test 
of the candidate's ability to express himself in writing in a manner 
at once clear and accurate. 

The candidate will be required to write upon subjects 
familiar to him. His composition should be correct in spelling, 
punctuation, grammar, idiom and formation of paragraphs, and 
should be plain and natural in style. He will be judged by 
how well, rather than by how much he writes. 

Physics 

The candidate will be expected to be familiar with the 
fundamental principles of Physics. It is especially desirable 
that he should have a good knowledge of general mechanics and 
of the mechanics of solids, liquids and gases. A knowledge of 
physical hypotheses is comparatively unimportant. Text-book 
instruction should be supplemented by lecture-room experiments. 
A sufficiently extended treatment of the subject will be found 
in any of the principal text-books now in use in secondary 
schools. Ability to solve simple problems will be expected. 

Students presenting laboratory notebooks in Physics, prop- 
erly endorsed, will be allowed 10 per cent on the examination 
rating, for such books as are accepted. That is, an accepted 
notebook adds 10 per cent to whatever rating is obtained on 
the written examination up to 100 per cent. 

Arithmetic 

The requirement in Arithmetic for entrance has been 
waived. 

Admission by Certificates 

Students presenting certificates from a preparatory school, 
which has the certification privilege, in any, or all, subjects 
required for entrance, may be given credit in those subjects, 

THIBTY-T wo 



without an examination, upon application to the Dean. Such 
applications, together with a certificate from the principal, or 
instructor, stating the work done and the ranks received, shall 
be filed with the Dean, not less than ten days preceding the 
examination date. 

The right is reserved to require any applicant to take the 
Entrance Examinations, without regard to such certification, 
should it be deemed necessary. 

Conditions 

A candidate failing in only one or two of the examination 
subjects, may be admitted with " conditions." A candidate in- 
curring conditions in June must repeat, in September, examina- 
tions in those subjects in which he has failed. 

In any case of a condition existing after a second examina- 
tion in a subject, special arrangements must be made with the 
Dean before a student will be allowed to attend classes. 

Modem Languages 

There is no requirement in the modern languages for en- 
trance to the School, and students who desire to take up these 
subjects during their course may do so, provided they show the 
capacity to handle such work in addition to the required subjects. 

Outlines of Subjects Required for Entrance 

By writing the Dean, prospective applicants may receive a 
brief outline covering the subjects in Physics and Algebra upon 
which the Entrance Examinations are based. These outlines 
are issued in order that the applicant may concentrate his study 
upon subjects that are essential to the work, and not spread his 
eflforts over too large a field. 



THIRTY-THREE 



Courses of Study 




General Information 

HE SCHEDULES of the various courses are given 
on the following pages. The first-year vi^ork of all 
([) courses is practically the same, with a few excep- 
iy tions, which are made because of the need of the 
student for elementary training in his professional subjects. 
This is done so that he may gain more from his early practical 
work, as well as be of more use to his employer by reason of a 
better understanding of the duties he may be called upon to 
perform. 

The school year comprises eighteen weeks of class work, 
and one week of examinations for each division. The eighteen 
weeks are divided into two terms of nine weeks each, and the 
subjects in the Course Outlines on the following pages have 
been arranged by terms. Opposite these subjects will be found 
the number of hours of class work in recitation, laboratory or 
the drawing room, as well as the hours of outside preparation 
that have been assigned as the minimum weekly required amount 
for each subject. 

The number in parenthesis, following the subject in the 
" Outlines of Courses," is the number by which that subject is 
identified in the descriptive matter under " Subjects of Instruc- 
tion." 

The work is so planned that the student will be required 
to spend from 50 to 60 hours in preparation and class work 
during each school week. 

When a student elects a Course, he is required to complete 
all subjects in that Course, not indicated as " Optional," in order 
to receive a diploma. No subject is to be dropped, or omitted, 
without the consent of the Dean. 



THIRTY- FIVE 



Civil Engineer ing 

The purpose of this Course is to give the student a broad 
education in those subjects which form the basis of all branches 
of technical education, and a special training in those subjects 
comprised under the term "Civil Engineering." It is designed 
to give the student sound training, both theoretical and practi- 
cal, in the sciences upon which professional practice is based. 

Civil Engineering covers such a broad field that no one can 
become expert in its whole extent. It includes Topographical 
Engineering, Municipal Engineering, Railroad Engineering, 
Structural Engineering, and Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineer- 
ing. It covers land surveying, the building of railroads, har- 
bors, docks and similar structures ; the construction of sewers, 
waterworks, roads and streets ; the design and construction of 
girders, roofs, trusses, bridges, buildings, walls, foundations 
and all fixed structures. All of these branches of Engineering 
rest, however, upon a relatively compact body of principles, 
and in these principles the students are trained by practice in 
the class room, drawing room, the field and the testing laboratory. 

The course is designed to prepare the young engineer to 
take up the work of assisting in the design and construction of 
structures ; to aid in the location and construction of steam and 
electric railways, sewerage and water supply systems ; and to 
undertake intelligently supervision of work in the allied fields 
of mining, architectural and electrical engineering, and general 
contracting. 



THIRTY-SIX 



I. — Civil Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 



Mathematics I. (10) .... 5 5 

Physics I., Lect. and Rec. (20) 4 4 

Physics I., Laboratory (21) . 2 2 

Descriptive Geometry I. (42) . 4 1 

Mechanical Drawing- (40) . . 6 

Engineering; Computations (14) 2 

English I. (1) 3 3 

Surveying.!. (50) 2 2 

Surveying 1., Field and Plot (51) 6 



SECOND TERM 

Mathematics I. (10) .... 5 

Physics I., Lect. and Rec. (20) 4 

Physics I., Laboratory (21) . 2 

Descriptive Geometry I. (42) . 4 

Mechanical Drawing (40) . . 6 

Engineering Computations (14) 2 

English I. (1) 3 

Surveying I. (50) 2 

Surveying I.,Field and Plot(51) 6 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 
5 



SECOND YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 

Surveying II. (52) 2 2 

Surveying II., Field & Plot (53) 6 

*Topographical Drawing (54) . 2 

Applied Mechanics I. (30) . . 3 4^^ 

Physics II., Lect. and Rec. (32) 3 3 

Physics II., Laboratory (23) . 2 2 

Mathematics II. (11) .... 4 6 

Elementary Electricity (126) . 2 2 

Descriptive Geometry II. (43) . 2 

Mechanism (90) 3 3 



Hours 
SECOND TERM per Week 
Ex. Prep. 

Surveying II. (52) 2 2 

Surveying II., Field &'"Plot(53) 
♦Topographical Drawing (54) . 
Applied Mechanics I. (30) . . 
Physics II., Lect. and Rec. (32) 
Physics II., Laboratory (23) . 
Mathematics II. (11) .... 
Elementary Electricity (136^ 
Descriptive Geometry II. (43) . 

Valve Gears (90) 

Precision of Measurements (13) 



6 





2 





3 


4}^ 


3 


3 


2 


2 


4 


6 


2 


•7 


2 





1 


2 


1 


1 



THIRD YEAR 



FIRST TERM 

Railroad Engineering (57) . . 
Railroad Eng. Field &Draw.(58) 
Mathematics III. (12; . . 
Structural Drawing (73) . 
Highway Engineering (56) 

Materials (81) 

Applied Mechanics II. (31) 
Hydraulics (110) .... 
Practical Electricity L.&R.(134) 
Practical Electricity Lab. (135) . 
Dynamical andStruct.Geol.(160) 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 
3 4K 

6 

2 2 

2 

1 
2 

4K 
3 
2 
2 
2 



SECOND TERM 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 

Railroad Engineering (57) . . 3 41/2 

RailroadEng. Field &Draw.(58) 6 

Theory of Structures (70) . . 3 4^ 

Structural Drawing (73) ... 3 

Highway Engineering (56) . . 1 1 

Materials (81) 2 2 

Applied Mechanics II. (31) . . 3 4>^ 

Hydraulics (110) 2 3 

Practical Electricity L.&R. (134) 2 2 

Practical Electricity Lab. (135) 3 2 



FOURTH YEAR 



Hours 

FIRST TERM per Week 
Ex. Prep. 

Structural Design (74) ... 6 

Theory of Structures (71) . . 5 10 

Advanced Structures (72) . . 2 2 

fConcrete Construction (80) . 2 2 

Concrete Design (80A) ... 3 

JFoundations (82) 1 1 

Hydraulic* Sanitary Eng. (112) 3 3 

HeatEngineering: Thermo. (95) 3 4% 

Hydraulic M otors (Optional) 

(111) 2 3 

Thesis 3 



SECOND TERM 

Structural Design (74) . . 
Theory of Structures (71) . 
Advanced Structures (72) 
tConcrete Construction (80) 
Concrete Design (80A) . . 
^Foundations (82) .... 
Hydraulic* Sanitary Eng.(112) 
HeatEngineering. -Thermo. (95) 
Hydraulic Motors (Optional) 

(111) 

Testing Materials Lab. (34) 
Thesis 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 




10 
2 
2 

1 
2 
4K 

3 





♦Structural Drawing (73) will be given instead of Topograpical Drawing (54). 
t Materials (81) will be given instead of Concrete Construction (80). 
X Highway Engineering (56) will be given instead of Foundations (82). 



THIRTY-SEVEN 



Mechanical £! n^ i neer ing 

This Course is designed to give a broad foundation in 
those fundamental subjects which form the basis for all pro- 
fessional engineering practice, and to especially equip the young 
engineer with a thorough knowledge of the various phases of 
Mechanical Engineering. The Course embraces instruction by 
text-book, lecture, laboratory and work-shop practice, with 
special references to the following branches : Steam Engineering, 
Hydraulic Engineering, Power Plant Design, Machine Design, 
Applied Electricity, Heat Engineering, and allied fields of the 
engineering profession. 

The Course affords training in the methods, and gives 
practice in the process of Construction, which develops in the 
student the capacity for thinking along mechanical lines, thus 
enabling him to base all of his work upon fundamental prin- 
ciples already learned, rather than upon empirical rules. It is 
the endeavor to give the student a thorough theoretical training 
and meanwhile devote sufficient time to the practical work, so 
that he may become a proficient mechanical engineer, both in 
theory and in practice, in all of the various branches of 
Mechanical Engineering previously mentioned. 



THIRTY- EIGHT 



II. — Mechanical Elngineering 



FIRST YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Mathematics I. (10) .... 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. (20) 
Physics I., Laboratory (21) . 
Descriptive Geometry 1. (42) 
Mechanical Drawing (40) . . 
Engineering Computations (14) 
English I. (1) 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 



SECOND TERM 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 

5 5 



Mathematics I. (10) .... 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. (20) 
Physics I., Laboratory (21) . 
Descriptive Geometry I. (42) . 4 1 
Mechanical Drawing (40) ... 12 
Engineering Computations (14) 2 
English I. (1) 3 3 



SECOND YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Mechanism (90) 3 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing (91) 9 

Descriptive Geometry II. (43) . 2 

Mathematics II. (11) .... 4 

Physics II., Lect. and Rec. (22) 3 

Physics II., Laboratory (23) . 2 

Applied Mechanics I. (30) . . 3 

Elements of Electricity (126) . 2 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 



4M 
2 



SECOND TERM 



Mechanism (90) 3 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing (91) 9 

Descriptive Geometry II. (43) . 2 

Mathematics II. (11) .... 4 

Physics II., Lect. and Rec. (22) 3 

Physics II., Laboratory (23) . . 2 

Applied Mechanics I. (30) . . 3 

Elements of Electricity (126) . 2 

Precision of Measurements (13) 1 

Valve Gears (90) 1 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 



4K 
2 
1 
2 



THIRD YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Heat Engineering : Thermo. (95) 

Boilers (95) 2 

Applied Mechanics II. (31) . . 3 

Machine Drawing (92) .... 9 

Materials (SI) 2 

Hydraulics (110) 2 

Practical Electricity Lect. (134) 2 

Practical Electricity Lab. (135) . 3 

Mathematics III. (12) .... 2 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 



4^ 
1 

'04 




SECOND TERM 



Heat Engineering : Thermo. (95) 

Boilers (95) 2 

Applied Mechanics II. (31) . . 3 

Machine Drawing (92) .... 9 

Materials (81) 2 

Hydraulics (110) 2 

Practical Electricity Lect. (134) 2 

Practical Electricity Lab. (135) 3 

General Metallurgy (147) ... 2 

Foundry Practice (99) . . . . 1 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 
3 4>4 



1 

4y2 


2 
3 



FOURTH YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Machine Design, Statics and 
Dynamics (93) 

Applied Mechanics III. (33) . 

Engineering Laboratory (97) 

Hydraulic Motors (111) . . 

Power Plant Design (96) . . 

*Concrete Construction (80) . 

fFactory Construction and Man 
agement (104) 

Boiler Design (100) .... 

Journals and Reports (105) 

Illumination & Photometry (132) 

Thesis 

Machine Work (103) (Elective) 

Forging, Chipping and Filing 
(101) (Elective) 2 

Woodworking and Pattern Mak- 
ing (102) (Elective) .... 3 



Hours 


per 


Week 


Ex. 


Prep. 


12 


3 


2 


2 


3 





2 


3 


3 





2 


2 


3 





3 





1 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 






Hours 
SECOND TERM per Week 

Ex. Prep. 

Machine Design, Statics and 

Dynamics (93) 12 3 



Testing Materials Lab. (34) . . 2 
JEngineering Laboratory (97) . 3 
Hydraulic Motors (111) . . . 2 
Power Plant Design (96) ... 3 
♦Concrete Construction (80) . . 2 
(■Factory Construction and Man- 
agement (104) 4 

§Surveying I., A (50A) ... 3 

Journals and Reports (105) . . 1 

Thesis 6 

Machine Work (103) (Elective) 3 
Forging, Chipping and Filing 

(101) (Elective) 2 

Woodworking and Pattern Mak- 
ing (102) (Elective) .... 3 



♦Alternates with Materials. 
tNot given in 1917. 
JFirst three weeks only. 
§For three weeks only. 



Not given in 1917. 



THIRTY- NINE 



Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering having in recent years developed 
along lines demanding a thorough appreciation of physical 
theory, as vv^ell as a broad working knowledge of Mathematics, 
it is essential that students planning to take this Course should 
realize the fundamental necessity of obtaining a solid grounding 
in these subjects upon which to build. 

It is not the purpose of the Course to attempt the impos- 
sible aim of turning out fully trained engineers in the various 
branches of the science, especially as it is becoming daily more 
and more differentiated and specialized ; but rather to lay a 
broad and thorough foundation for future progress along the 
lines of work which may particularly appeal to the individual, 
by giving him a good working acquaintance with the essential 
principles which underlie each of the more specialized branches 
of professional activity. Parallel with the theoretical work, 
runs a carefully planned course of laboratory work which is in- 
tended to develop the student's powers of accurate observation, 
of planning work and methods for himself, with due regard to 
saving of time and precision of results. For more detailed 
matters the reader is referred to the description of the several 
courses and subjects of instruction. 



III. — Electrical Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



FIRST TERM 

Mathematics I. (10) . . . . 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. (20) 
Physics I., Laboratory (21) 
Elements of Electricity (126) 
Descriptive Geometry I. (42) 
Mechanical Drawing (40) 

English I. (1) 

Engineering Computations(14) 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 

5 5 



SECOND TERM 

Mathematics I. (10) . . . . 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. (20) 
Physics 1., Laboratory (21) . 
Elements of Electricity (126) 
Descriptive Geometry I. (42) 
Mechanical Drawing (40) 

English I. (1) 

Engineering Computations (14) 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 



SECOND YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Direct Current Machinery (129) 2 

Electrical Problems (125) . . 2 
Elec. Eng. I.,Lab. and Reports 

(112A) 5 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 



Mathematics II. (11) 

Physics II. Lect. and Rec. (22) 3 

fPhysics II., Laboratory (23) .) „ 
JElementary Elec. Lab. (124) . ( 

Applied Mechanics!. (30) . . 3 

Mechanism (90) 3 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing (91) 3 



4K 

3 





SECOND TERM 



Hours 

per Week 
Ex. Prep. 

Direct Current Practice (129) . 2 2 

Electrical Problems (125) . . 2 1 
Elec. Eng. I., Lab. and Reports 

(112A) 5 

Mathematics II. (11) .... 4 6 

Physics IL, Lect. and Rec. (22) 3 3 

fPhysics II., Laboratory (23) .) „ „ 

fElementary Elec. Lab. (124) . ( "^ '' 

Applied Mechanics I. (30) . . 3 4K 

♦Mechanism (90) 3 3 

^Technical Elect. Meas. Lect. 

(130A) 2 2 

Precision of Measurements (13) 1 I 

Valve Gears (90) 1 2 

Mechanical Eng. Drawing (91) 3 



THIRD YEAR 



FIRST TERM 

Alternating Currents, Lect. 

Rec. and Problems (138) 
Technical Elect. Meas. Lect 

(130A) 

Elect. Eng. II. , Lab. (122B) 
Tech. Elect. Meas. Lab. (130B) 
Variable Currents (131) . 
Mathematics III. (12) . . 
Heat Eng. : Thermo. (95) 
Applied Mechanics II. (31) 
Hydraulics (110) .... 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 



1 

2 
2 
2 
2 

4^ 
3 



SECOND TERM 

Alternating Current Machinery, 
Lect. Rec, and Problems(139) 
Elect. Eng. II. , Lab. (122B) . 
Tech. Elect. Meas. Lab. (130B) 
Variable Currents (131) . 
General Metallurgy (147) 
Heat Eng.: Thermo. (95) 
Machine Drawing (92) 
Hydraulics (110) . . . 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 



7 

2 

2 

1 

1 

4>^ 



3 



FOURTH YEAR 



FIRST TERM 

Alternating Current Machinery 

Lect., Rec. and Problems(139) 
Alternating Current Machinery 

Lab. (139A) 

Illumination and Photometry 

(132) 

Elect. Transmission of Power 

(120) 

Central Stations (121) .... 
Tech. Papers and Magazines 

(137A) 

Elect. Eng. Excursions (121A) 

Journals (137) 

Hydraulic Motors (111) . . . 
Engineering Laboratory (97) . 
§Surveying I. A (50A) . . . 
Thesis 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 



SECOND TERM 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 



Gen. Probs. in Elect. Eng. (136) 2 2' 

Electric Railways (133) ... 2 2 
Alternating Current Machinery 

Lab. (139A) 5 5 

Central Stations (121) .... 1 1 
Tech. Papers and Magazines 

(137A) 1 3 

Elect. Eng. Excursions (121A) / „ , 

Journals (137) \ '' ^ 

Testing Materials Lab. (34) . 2 

Hydraulic Motors (111) ... 2 3 

Theoretical Electricity (127) . 2 2 

♦Engineering Laboratory (97) 3 

Thesis 12 



* First three weeks of second term. 

t These subjects alternate every other week. 

i Last six weeks of second term. 

§ First three weeks only. 

FORTY- ONE 



Chemical JBn^ineer ing 

During the great industrial advance of recent years, chem- 
ical industry has been in the front rank of progress, and perhaps 
the most potent reason for this may be found in the replacement, 
by scientific guidance, of the old rule of thumb methods. 

Again, owing to the keenest competition, manufacturers 
have been compelled to utilize every product of their plants, and 
this has called for skilled chemical knowledge. 

The Course in Chemical Engineering has, for its purpose, 
the training of students competent to take responsible places in 
the operation of industries based on chemical principles. 

During their course the students are employed in chemical 
industries, as gas manufacturing plants, chemical engineering 
companies, etc., so that they not only get an excellent training 
in the theory of such work at school, but get a thorough famil- 
iarity with the technical side of the industry as well. 

The class work includes a training in Inorganic, Analytical, 
Organic, and Industrial Chemistry, which is accompanied by 
appropriate laboratory work. 

In addition to the foregoing subjects, the student is given 
a good knowledge of mechanical and electrical subjects, as 
Drawing, Applied Mechanics, Direct Current Practice, Tech- 
nical Electrical Measurements, etc., which are taken up in a 
way to give them especial bearing on the work of the Course. 



FORTY-T wo 



I V. — Chemical Engineering 



FIRST YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Hours 

per W*ek 

Ex. Prep. 



Mathematics I. (10) 5 5 

Physics I., Lect. and Rec. (20) . 4 4 

Physics I., Laboratory (21) . . 2 3 

Descriptive Geometry I. (42) . 4 1 

Mechanical Drawing (40) ... 3 

Engineering- Computations (14) 2 

English I. (1) 3 3 

Inorganic Chemistry (142) . . 4 4 

Inorganic Chemistry Lab. (142) 6 



SECOND TERM 



Mathematics I. (10) .... 
Physics I., Lect. and Rec. (20) 
Physics I., Laboratory (21) . 
Descriptive Geometry I. (42) 
Mechanical Drawing (40) . . 
Engineering Computations (14 

English I. (1) 

Inorganic Chemistry (142) 
Inorganic Chemistry Lab. (142 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 



SECOND YEAR 



FIRST TERM 

Qualitative Analysis (143) 
Mathematics II. (11) 
Physics II., Lect. and Rec. (22) 
Physics II., Laboratory (23) 
Applied Mechanics I. (30) 
Mechanical Eng. Drawing (91) 
Mechanism (90) .... 
Elements of Electricity (126) 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 



3 

6 
3 

2 


3 
2 



SECOND TERM 

Quantitative Analysis (144) . 
Mathematics II. (11) . . . 
Physics II., Lect. and Rec. (22 
Physics II., Laboratory (23) . 
Applied Mechanics I. (30) 
Mechanical Eng. Drawing (91 

♦Mechanism (90) 

Elements of Electricity (126) 
Valve Gears (90) 



Hours 
per Week 
Ex. Prep. 

12 3 



6 
3 

2 


3 



THIRD YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Hours 

per Week 
Ex. Prep. 

Organic Chemistry Lect. (145) . 3 3 

Organic Chemistry Lab. (145A) 6 

Mathematics HI. (12) .... 2 2 

Applied Mechanics II. (31) . . 3 4% 

Heat Engineering: Thermo. (95) 3 4^2 

Machine Drawing (92) .... 3 

Practical Electricity Lect. (134) 2 2 

Practical Electricity Lab. (135) . 3 2 

Hydraulics (110) 2 3 

German I. (170) 2 2 



SECOND TERM 

Organic Chemistry Lect. (145) 
Organic Chemistry Lab. (14oA) 
General Metallurgy (147) . . . 
Technical Analysis (148) . . . 
Heat Engineering : Thermo. (95) 
Machine Drawing (92) .... 
Practical Electricity Lect. (134) 
Practical Electricity Lab. (135) . 

Hydraulics (110) 

German I. (170) ... ... 

Theoretical Chemistry Lect.(149) 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 



3 


2 

1 

4^ 



2 

2 

3 

2 

2 



FOURTH YEAR 



FIRST TERM 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 

Technical Analysis (148) ... 4 2 

Industrial Chemistry Lect. (146) 3 3 

Industrial Chemistry Lab. (146A) 6 

Organic Chemistry Lect. (145) . 2 2 

Organic Chemistry Lab. (145A) 6 

Chemical Engineering (150) . . 3 3 

Theoretical Chemistry Lect.(149) 3 3 
Theoretical Chemistry Lab. 

(149A) 3 

German II. (171) 3 3 

Thesis 3 3 



SECOND TERM 



Technical Analysis (148) . . . 

Industrial Chemistry Lect. (146) 3 

Industrial Chemistry Lab. (146A) 6 

Organic Chemistry Lect. (145) . 2 

Organic Chemistry Lab. (145A) 6 

Chemical Engineering (150) . . 3 
Factory Inspection and Report 

Writing (151) 3 

German II. (171) 2 

Thesis 6 



Hours 

per Week 

Ex. Prep. 

4 2 



* First three weeks only. 



FORTT-THREE 




Subjects for Instruction ■ 

'NSTRUCTION is given by lectures and recitations, 
and by practical exercises in the field, the laboratories, 
and the drawing rooms. A great value is set upon 
the educational effect of these exercises, and they 
form the foundation of each of the four courses. Text-books 
are used in many subjects, but not in all. In many branches 
the instruction given differs widely from available text-books ; and, 
in most of such cases, notes on the lectures and laboratory work 
are issued, and are furnished to the students. Besides oral 
examinations in connection with the ordinary exercises, written 
examinations are held from time to time. At the close of the 
year, in May and June, general examinations are held. 

In the following pages will be found a more or less detailed 
statement of the scope, as well as the method of instruction, of 
the subjects offered in the various Courses. The subjects are 
classified, as far as possible, related studies being arranged in 
sequence. 

The subjects are numbered, or numbered and lettered, for 
convenience of reference in consulting the various Course 
Schedules. As the total number of hours per term devoted to 
a subject sometimes varies in different Courses, these hours are 
not in every case given in connection with the following descrip- 
tions. 

The requisites for preparation include not only the subjects 
specified by number, but also those required as a preparation 
for them. The reason for this is that to properly carry on the 
more advanced subjects, the student must have become proficient 
in all subjects necessary for a clear comprehension of the last 
subject. Some studies, specified as being required in prepara- 
tion, may be taken simultaneously. The student must complete 
such subjects before starting on more advanced work. 

By careful consideration of the Course Schedules, in con- 
nection with the following Description of Subjects, the appli- 
cant for a special Course may select, for the earlier part of that 
Course, such subjects as will enable him to pursue later those 
more advanced subjects which he may particularly desire. 

FORTY- FOUR 



Applications for exception, for sufficient causes, from the 
required preparation, as stated in connection with each subject 
described below, will always be considered by the Dean. 

The topics, included in the list which follows, are subject 
to change at any time by action of the School authorities. 

Synopsis oi Courses 

I. English I. 

This is a course in the principles of composition and letter 
writing. Special attention is given to spelling, punctuation and 
grammar. 

The latter half of the work is devoted to writing business 
letters, to descriptions of processes and machinery, and to all 
other possible means of enabling the student to express himself 
with accuracy and precision, both orally and in writing. 

lO. Mathematics I. 

Preparation: Algebra, Geometry 

Variation, logarithms, slide rule, exponential equations, the 
uses of formulas in Physics and Engineering. 

Trigonometry, including circular measure, co-ordinates, 
trigonometric ratios, formulas, law of sines, law of cosines, solu- 
tion of right and oblique triangles and applications to problems 
in Physics and Engineering. 

II. Mathematics II. 

Preparation: 10 

Co-ordinates, plotting of functions, interpolation, the straight 
line, curves represented by various equations, graphic solution 
of equations, determination of laws from the data of experi- 
ments. Rate of increase, differentiation, determination of max- 
ima and minima by differentiation, integration, definite integrals, 
determination of mean value, area and volume by integration, 
center of gravity, moment of inertia, partial differentiation. 

12. Mathematics III. 

Preparation: 10, 11 

A review and continuation of Mathematics 11. The con- 
sideration of Differential and Integral Calculus, as applied to 
problems in Engineering. 

F O RT T- FI V E 



13. Precision of Measurements 

Preparation: 10, 11 

This course, which is required of all students in the second 
half of the second year, comprises a thorough discussion of the 
fundamentals of the Theory of Measurements, including a study 
of the Sources of Error, the Best Representative Value of the 
result of a series of measurements, the determination of the sev- 
eral Precision Measures of the result of one's work, the con- 
verse problem of how best to proceed in order to reach a given 
degree of precision, and a thorough consideration of the proper 
use of Significant Figures. 

14. Engineering Computations 

This course is taken by all first-year students and is an un- 
prepared exercise coming two hours per week throughout the 
first year. The work covers arithmetical computations of the 
various kinds common to engineering practice, such as addition, 
subtraction, division and multiplication of whole and mixed 
numbers, problems in the use of fractions, percentage calcula- 
tions, square root, etc. 

19. Revie'Hr Mathematics 

This course is given in the first year to those students who 
have had inadequate mathematical training previous to entering 
the School. The work covers Algebra and Geometry and aims 
to strengthen the student on his weak points. Students whose 
records in Mathematics I. are not satisfactory may be required 
to take this course. 

20. Physics I. 

The subjects considered are general mechanics, molecular 
mechanics, wave-motion and optics, which topics are discussed 
both mathematically and experimentally. It is the purpose of 
the course to lay a thorough foundation for subsequent study of 
experimental and technical physics. Hence it is planned with 
immediate reference to familiarizing the pupil with the funda- 
mental principles of the science. The lectures are illustrated 
by suitable experiments. 

FO RT T-SI X 



21. Physical Laboratory I. 

Preparation : 20 

A course of experimental exercises in the first year, laid out 
individually for each student. The experiments are correlated, 
so far as practical, with the lecture and class-room work, the 
first year being devoted to experiments in mechanics. The use 
of the various instruments of precision is taught, as far as may 
be^ in connection with experiments, each of which illustrates 
some different method or principle. The experiments relate to 
the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases. 

22. Physics II. 

Preparation : 20 

A course of experimental lectures, which is a continuation 
of Physics I. In this work the student completes the study of 
physics started in Physics I. 

23. Physical Laboratory II. 

Preparation : 22 

A series of experiments in the second year, correlated as far 
as practicable with the lecture course. The experiments in 
Optics include the use of a compound microscope, the determi- 
nation of the focal length of lenses, gas photometry, indices of 
refraction, and elementary spectrum analysis. All work is strictly 
quantitative, and the attention of the student is especially 
directed to the precision discussion of his results. 

29. Revie-w Physics 

A course covering the essentials of Physics as taught in the 
best high schools, and designed to help those students who have 
had insufficient preparation before entering the Engineering 
School. Students whose records in Physics I. are unsatisfactory 
may be required to take this course in addition to their other 
work. 

30. Applied Mechanics I. 

Preparation : 10, 11, 20, 22 

The course comprises a study of the general methods and 
applications of statics, including the determination of reactions, 
stresses in frames ; of distributed forces, center of gravity ; of 
moment of inertia and radius of gyration of plane areas and 

FORTY-SEVEN 



solids. Kinematics and dynamics are also included in this 
course, together with the equations for uniform and varying rec- 
tilinear and curvilinear motion, centrifugal force, pendulum, 
harmonic motion, rotation, combined rotation and translation, 
momentum and angular momentum, center of percussion, impact, 
work, power and kinetic energy. 

31. Applied Mechanics II. 

Preparation : 30 

This course comprises a study of the strength of materials, 
mathematically treated. In the first term the subjects studied 
are : the stresses and strains in bodies subjected to tension, to 
compression and to shearing ; common theory of beams, with 
thorough discussion of the distribution of stresses, shearing forces 
and bending moments ; longitudinal shear, slopes and deflections, 
and the strength of shafts and springs. In the second term a 
study is made of the combined stresses in beams subjected to 
tension and compression, as well as bending ; also of the strength 
of hooks and columns, the design of riveted joints and thin, 
hollow cylinders. A brief consideration of strains, and the re- 
lations of the stresses on different planes in a body, and the 
stresses in simple frames subjected to bending forces, is taken up 
in the latter part of the course. 

33. Applied Mechanics III. 

Preparation : 31 

A course treating of the laws of friction, including a study 
of the distribution of friction on shaft journals and pivots ; also 
a study of the transmission of power by belting and by ropes, 
and of the friction reducing power of lubricating oils. 

34. Testing Materials Laboratory 

Preparation : 31 

The work done by the students in the Testing Materials 
Laboratory includes tests to determine the modulus of elasticity, 
limit of elasticity, yield point and tensile strength of steel bars ; 
tests of the deflection and of the transverse strength of a 
wooden beam subjected to a transverse load ; tests to determine 
the modulus of elasticity and tensile strength of wire ; tests on 
cement mortars, including practice in laboratory methods. 

FORTY- EIGHT 



40. Mechanical Draw^ing 

This course extends throughout the first year, and is taken 
by all first-year students. The work is planned on the assump- 
tion that the student has had no experience in the use of 
drafting instruments, and so at the start he is taught the me- 
chanical processes involved in the use of the various instruments. 
Then he takes up line work, use of French curve, geometrical 
constructions, tracing and simple projection work. 

A student who has completed work equivalent to the 
course before entering the School may, upon presentation of his 
plates and the passing of a satisfactory examination, be excused 
from the work at the discretion of the instructor in charge. 

42. Descriptive Geometry I. 

The course covers the simpler problems on the point, line 
and plane and various constructions in the projection of solids, 
including sections and developments. 

In the latter half of the course the problems on the line 
and plane are completed, and the projection of solids is contin- 
ued through the intersection of solids bounded by plane faces. 
Isometric drawings and several practical applications are given. 

43. Descriptive Geometry II. 

Preparation : 42 

The course is a continuation of Descriptive Geometry L, 
and deals with single and double curved surfaces ; their intersec- 
tion by oblique planes, tangent planes, penetrations, develop- 
ment, and so forth. Various practical problems are given to 
illustrate the applications of the principles studied. 

50. Surveying I. 

Preparation : 10, 11 

This course consists of two lectures or recitations per week 
during the first year. The student is taught the theory of the 
various instruments used in plane surveying, the methods of 
carrying out various surveys, and the application of contour 
maps to the solution of problems of drainage, road location, 
landscape engineering, etc. The text-book used is The Princi- 
ples and Practice of Surveying, by Professors Breed and Hosmer, 
Vol. I. 

FO RT T- NI N E 



50 A. Surveying I A. 

This is a brief course for students taking Courses II. and 
III. to give them instruction in the essential principles of 
surveying practice. 

51. Surveying I. (Fieldw^ork and Plotting) 

Preparation : 50 

This course is taken simultaneously with Surveying I., and 
consists of six hours of exercise per week throughout the year. 
The student is taught the use of the chain, tape, compass, 
transit and various forms of leveling instruments. The work in 
the drawing room consists in making the computations which 
arise in the work of a surveyor and in making scale drawings by 
the methods in common use. 

52. Surveying II. 

Preparation : 50, 51 

This course is a continuation of Surveying I., and consists 
of two lectures, or recitations, per week throughout the second 
year. The student is taught the theory of the stadia and plane 
table in topographic surveying, the methods of making astro- 
nomical observations and of conducting city and photographic 
surveys. The text-books used are The Principles and Practice of 
Surveying, by Professors Breed and Hosmer, Vols. I. and II. 

53. Surveying II. (Fieldw^ork and Plotting) 

Preparation : 52 

This course is taken simultaneously with Surveying II., and 
consists of six hours of exercise per week throughout the second 
year. A stadia survey is first made, and later a topographical 
map made from the notes taken in the field. The practice of 
plane table surveying, the determination of elevations by barom- 
eter, and the conduct of photographic surveys are also studied. 

54. Topographical Drawing 

Preparation : 50, 52 

This course consists of two hours of exercise per week 
throughout the year. A study is made of the different topo- 
graphical signs used on surveying maps, both in pen and ink and 
in wash color. Each student is required to make a number of 
plates of each kind of topography, and to become reasonably 
proficient in the making of topographical maps. 



56. Hlghw^ay Engineering 

Preparation : 57 

This course consists of one lecture or recitation a week 
throughout the year. A study is made of the principles govern- 
ing the location, construction and maintenance of roads and the 
construction and maintenance of the various kinds of pavements 
for city streets. The text-book used is Baker's work on Roads 
and Pavements. 

57. Railroad Engineering 

Preparation : 50, 51, 58 

This course consists of three hours of exercise a week 
throughout the year. A study is made of the mathematics of 
the various curves used in engineering, with their application to 
the location of railroads, highways, sewers, pipe lines, etc. The 
easement curve is also studied, and the various methods of stak- 
ing out and computing earthwork. The text-books used are 
Professor Allen's Railroad Curves and Earthwork, and his Field 
and Office Tables. 

58. Railroad Field-work and Dra^ving 

Preparation : 57 

This course consists of six hours of exercise a week 
throughout the year, A reconnoissance is first made of a rail- 
road about a mile and a half in length, followed by a preliminary 
survey with transit and level for the determination of contours, 
as a basis for fixing the location survey. All this work follows 
modern practice in laying out railroads. The greater part of 
the fieldwork is devoted to a systematic drill in running incurves 
of various kinds, including transition curves, and in staking out 
fieldwork. The drawing consists in plotting up the preliminary 
survey of the railroad surveyed. 

TO. Theory of Structures 

Preparation : 31 

This is a course of thirty exercises in the third year, devoted 
to class and drawing-room work in studying the loads, reactions, 
shears and moments acting upon structures of various kinds as 
roofs and bridges. A thorough study is also made of the various 
functions of the influence line and the methods used to deter- 
mine the position of moving loads to produce maximum shears 

FI FT Y- O N E 



and moments on bridges. The text-book used is Professor 
Spofford's Theory of Structures. A study is also made of the 
practical design of beams and girders. 

71. Theory of Structures, Bridges and Similar Structures 

Preparation : 70 

This course treats of the computation and design of struc- 
tures of wood, steel and masonry, by analytical and by graphical 
methods. The subjects considered are : the plate girder, roof 
and bridge trusses of various types ; such as simple trusses, bridge 
trusses with secondary web systems, including the Baltimore and 
Pettit Trusses, and trusses with multiple web systems, lateral 
and portal bracing, transverse bents, viaduct towers and cantilever 
bridges. A study is also made of the design of columns, tension 
members, pin and riveted truss joints, trestles of wood and 
steel, and arches of metal and stone. In the latter part of the 
course the student is given training in the use of the standard 
handbooks in structural work. The object is to train the student 
thoroughly in the application of mechanics to the design of 
structures. The text-book used is Professor Spofford's Theory 
of Structures. 

72. Advanced Structures 

Preparation : 71 

This course consists of a thorough study of graphical 
statics, deflection and camber, and continuous girders, after 
which it treats of the computation and design of retaining walls, 
masonry dams, masonry arches, continuous girders, and movable 
bridges. Only the more simple cases are considered. 

73. Structural Dra>ving 

The course in structural drawing consists of one exercise 
of two hours each week throughout the third year in the draw- 
ing room, devoted to the drawing of standard sections of struc- 
tural steel shapes and connections, and the preparation of 
drawings representing elementary structural details. This course 
is designed to familiarize the student with the conventional signs 
for riveting, riveted connections and the dimensioning and 
detailing of structural parts. 

FI FT Y-T wo 



T4. Structural Design 

Preparation : 72 

A course of six hours per week throughout the fourth 
year, in which the students are instructed in the design of 
structures of wood, stone and metal. Each student is given a set 
of data, and is required to perform all the computations and to 
make designs and working drawings for structures, such as plate 
girder bridges and wooden roof trusses. His work is criticized 
as it progresses. 

80. Concrete Construction 

Preparation : 72 

A course consisting of lectures and drafting, in which instruc- 
tion is given in the theoretical and practical principles involved 
in the design of structures of plain and reinforced concrete. 
The course includes a study of the simple reinforced concrete 
beam, the design of slabs, T-beams, columns and footings. In- 
struction is given by means of lectures and text-books, in con- 
junction with which each student is given practical problems in 
design to be worked out in the drawing room. 

80A. Concrete Design 

A course of three hours per week throughout the fourth 
year, in which students are given instruction in the design of 
structures of concrete, plain and reinforced. Each student is 
given a set of data, and is required to make all computations 
and to make designs and working drawings for several concrete 
structures, including a masonry dam, plain concrete arch, a rein- 
forced concrete floor system, and a reinforced concrete retaining 
wall. 

SI. Materials 

Preparation : 72 

This course consists of two lectures, or recitations, per 
week throughout the third year, in the study of the methods of 
manufacturing, properties and strength of various materials used 
by the engineer, such as brick, cement, concrete, iron and steel. 
A study is also made of the properties of wood and stone. The 
text-book used is Johnson's The Materials of Construction. 

FIFTY- THREE 



S2. Foundations 

Preparation : 71 

A course of eighteen lectures during the fourth year. The 
subjects treated in this course are as follows : Building stones 
and concrete, bearing power of different kinds of soil, examina- 
tion of the site, designing the footings, whether of masonry or 
of steel and concrete, independent piers, pile foundations, com- 
pressed air processes, freezing processes, retaining walls, together 
with some details of buildings for industrial purposes, constructed 
of steel, or of reinforced concrete. Baker's Masonry Construc- 
tion and Foundations for Bridges and Buildings are used as text- 
books. 

90. Mechanism and Valve Gears 

Preparation : 11, 40, 42 

This course includes a systematic study of the motions and 
forms of the various mechanisms occurring in machines, and the 
manner of supporting and guiding the parts. 

The latter part of this work is devoted to a discussion of 
the fundamental systems of gearing, together with their applica- 
tions and limitations. 

The theory and practice of designing valve gears for steam 
engines, including the plain slide valve, link motions, radial 
valve gears, double valves and drop cut-off valves are also studied. 

91. Mechanical Engineering Dra>ving 

Preparation : 40, 90 

In this course the student makes drawings showing the 
application of simple machine details, such as bolts and nuts, 
screws, springs, keys, flanges, pipe fittings, etc.; systems of 
dimensioning, conventional representations, and blue printing 
are also taught. The larger part of the work consists of draw- 
ing, illustrating the class-room work in connection with the 
courses in Mechanism and Valve Gears, including the design of 
cams, gear teeth, slide valves, double valves, etc. 

92. Machine Draw^ing 

Preparation : 91 

The aim of the course is to teach the proper way of mak- 
ing the necessary dimensioned drawings for use in practice, good 
shop systems being adopted. The instruction includes the 

FI FT T-F O U R 



making of working detail and assembly drawings of machinery 
from measurements. 

93. Machine Design, Statics and Dynamics 

Preparation : 91, 31 

The main object of the course is the application of prin- 
ciples already learned to the solution of problems in design. For 
each design the constructive details are carefully discussed; each 
student then makes all the necessary calculations to determine 
the dimensions of every part, and finally he completes the work- 
ing drawings. The scope of the designs is such as to include 
most of the elementary principles of design, and yet is sufficiently 
limited to enable the student to complete every detail, as it is 
believed that only by such thorough work can real benefit be 
obtained. 

The work in Dynamics includes a number of the principal 
applications of Dynamics to moving machinery, such as governors, 
fly-wheels, the action of the reciprocating parts of the steam 
engine, running balance, whirling speed of shafts, etc. The 
work is supplemented by a course in drafting. 

Problems of both static and dynamic nature are given, 
illustrative of the principles studied. 

Many problems, illustrating the methods of determining the 
stresses in machine parts, are given in connection with the 
course. 

95. Heat Engineering : Thermodynamics and Boilers 

Preparation: 10,11,31 

The course includes a study of the principles of thermody- 
namics ; a discussion of the properties of gases, saturated and 
superheated vapors, especially of air and steam ; of the flow of 
fluids through orifices, nozzles, pipes and meters, a discussion of 
the action of the steam injector ; a study of the various cycles 
of the hot air, internal combustion and steam engines, of the 
turbine, air compressor and refrigerator systems. These engi- 
neering applications are treated from the physical, analytical and 
graphical points of view, so as to give the student a good founda- 
tion in the principles of thermodynamics, in the solution of actual 
heat engineering problems. The course also includes a study of 
the simple, compound and multiple expansion steam engine, of 

FIFT Y-FI V E 



the different types of gas engines, of the gas producer, of com- 
pressed air and refrigerator machines, and the methods of testing 
such machines. 

The various types of steam boilers, with their advantages 
and appHcations as regards construction, installation and opera- 
tion, form the latter part of the course. Steam turbines are also 
discussed. 

96. Power Plant Design 

Preparation: 31, 93, 95 

The course consists largely of drawing-room work and cal- 
culations, with such lectures as may be needed from time to time. 
The work of the course consists in making the working draw- 
ings necessary to show the location of boilers, engines, auxil- 
iaries, piping, coal pockets, etc., for a power house, and also 
drawings and calculations of some of the details. 

97. Engineering Laboratory 

Preparation : 95 

This course consists of exercises and tests upon the various 
forms of appliances in use in the power plant, such as : — 

Setting Plain Slide Valves, Riding Cut-ofif Valves, Corliss 

Valves, etc. 
Analysis of Flue Gases. 

Calibration of Pressure and Vacuum Gauges. 
Calibration of Orifices and Nozzles. 
Flow of water over weirs and through a Venturi Meter. 
In addition to the foregoing, exercises are given on the 
Steam Calorimeter, Flow of Steam, Air Fans and Blowers, Flow 
of Air, Smoke Observations, Steam Boiler Testing, and Steam 
Engine Indicator Practice. 

99. Foundry Practice 

A lecture course, in which is studied the general principles 
and practice of pattern making, and taking up a consideration of 
sands, tools, molds, cores, ramming, venting, facing, spruing, 
risers, gateing, use of chills and simpler types of sweep molding. 

100. Boiler Design 

Preparation : 95 
This course is devoted to a consideration of the most modern 
methods of boiler designing and construction. In connection 

FIFTY-SIX 



with the lectures, the student is required to make calculations 
and drawings necessary in the design of some approved type of 
boiler. 

101. Forging, Chipping and Filing 

This course consists of one two-hour exercise per week, or 
its equivalent. In the forging work the student is instructed in 
the building and care of fires, heating, drawing, bending, up- 
setting and welding. 

The exercises in Chipping and Filing give instruction about 
the various tools and files used, and then the student is given 
practice in their use by various problems in chipping chamfers, 
keyways, etc. ; and then in filing problems, as parallel surfaces, 
filing to template, slide and drive fits, etc. 

102. Woodworking and Pattern "Work 

This is a course designed to give students facility in the 
common operations of carpentering and cabinet work, together 
with the use and care of woodworking machinery, as lathes, saws, 
planers, etc. The course includes instruction in Woodturning, 
having special application to Pattern-work, an illustrated dis- 
cussion of the principles of moulding, to explain clearly and 
show reasons for " Draft " on patterns and methods of allowing 
it, instruction in the use and making of core-boxes, and methods 
of building up patterns. 

103. Machine Work 

This course is to train students in the common operations 
of metal working, as chipping and filing, forging and machine 
work, as that done on lathes, drill presses, shapers and milling 
machines. 

104. Factory Constrnction and Management 

This course embraces a study of the types of buildings used 
for manufacturing purposes, and the principles of construction, 
covering brick and stone work, floors, columns, and roofs. The 
use of concrete, the principles of slow-burning construction, the 
methods of fire protection, and the elementary principles of shop 
sanitation, are considered in this course. It also includes a 
study of the organization and relations of the various depart- 

FIFTY-SEVEN 



ments of an industrial establishment, process mapping, or routing, 
scheduling of work, the office and engineering departments, 
methods of superintendence, and a brief discussion of cost 
accounting. Several lectures and drawing-room exercises are 
devoted to a study of manufacturing methods in multiple pro- 
duction processes as applied to such industries as gun making 
and automobile manufacture, with the design of simple drilling, 
milling and broaching fixtures. 

105. Journals and Reports 

This course consists of three hours a week of outside read- 
ing in standard engineering publications, with one hour per 
week for class discussion. The course is designed to acquaint 
the student with general engineering literature and to enable him 
to read intelligently discussions upon Mechanical Engineering 
Practice. 

110. Hydraulics 

Preparation : 31 

A course of three exercises per week, during the third year, 
taken by all students. Both Hydrostatics and Hydrodynamics 
are discussed and numerous practical problems are solved 
throughout the work. 

Under Hydrostatics, the pressures on submerged areas, to- 
gether with the points of application are studied ; while under 
Hydrodynamics, the flow of water through orifices, short tubes, 
nozzles, over weirs, and through pipes and open channels are 
taken up for discussion. 

111. Hydraulic Motors 

Preparation : 110 
A series of exercises, mainly recitations, based upon a text- 
book, so as to embrace the laws of flow in open channels, and 
of the dynamic pressure and work of water flowing over curved 
surfaces. The time is principally given, however, to a study of 
impulse wheels and reaction turbines, with reference to their 
proper construction, regulation and testing, and to the various 
sources of loss of energy in their operation. 

112. Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering 

Preparation : 110 
This course treats of the drainage of lands, together with a 
course in irrigation, in which are studied the constructions and 

FI FT Y- EI G HT 



methods employed in this and other countries, including the 
arrangement and proportioning of canals and distributaries, and 
modes of applying water to the soil. A study is also made of 
the location and capacities of reservoirs and the location and 
construction of earth and loose rock dams. The student is in- 
structed in the use of hydraulic diagrams for the discharge of 
conduits and canals, and the flow of water in open channels. 
Instruction is also given in the theory and practice of stream 
measurements and the various methods and instruments used in 
stream gauging. The text-books used are Wilson's Irrigation 
Engineering, Swan and Horton's Hydraulic "Diagrams, and Hoyt 
and Grover's River Discharge. 

120. Electrical Transmission of Po^v^er 

Preparation : 128, 139 
This course is devoted to a thorough study of the design 
and construction of modern high tension transmission lines. It 
is in two sub-divisions, the first dealing with the electrical char- 
acteristics of the line, such as potentials used, size and spacing of 
conductors, inductive and capacity reactance, skin effect, coronal 
loss, effect of harmonics, conditions of resonance, effect of high 
tension lines on neighboring circuits, etc.; the second covering 
the parallel problems of rights of way, location of poles, towers 
and conduits, insulation and insulating devices, protective devices 
against lightning, flash overs, etc., and, in brief, a discussion of 
the problem of material realization of the line, as previously 
planned and calculated. 

121. Central Stations 

Preparation : 95, 111, 128, 129, 139 
This course is given to a consideration of the central station 
for the production of electrical power, both steam and hydraulic 
types being considered. Very little time is given to the discus- 
sion of the machinery involved, such matters being fully covered 
in the required preparatory courses. Particular attention is given, 
however, to the problems of control, protection of apparatus, 
switching, etc. The course is in the form of lectures, with free 
use of published descriptions of existing plants, collateral reading, 
etc. Attention is also given to the problems of development of 
a water power, location of steam plants, the central station as a 
power producer, selling at wholesale to other utilities. The 

FI FT Y- NI N E 



course closes with a brief discussion of the relations between the 
utility company and the community served. 

121 A. Electrical Engineering Excursions 

This course, which is given in connection with courses 
No. 120 and No, 121, consists of inspection trips to electric 
plants and factories in the vicinity of Boston. The purpose is 
to familarize the student with the various applications of elec- 
tricity to the commercial field. 

122A. Electrical Engineering I., Laboratory and Reports 

Preparation : 126 
This course of exercises, given throughout the second year, 
is devoted to a carefully selected series of experiments, intended 
to exemplify qualitatively, and in the simplest manner, the prin- 
ciples developed in the courses on Direct Current Machines 
and Direct Current Practice. The purpose of this course being, 
in part, to develop correct methods of work, it is intended that 
practically the whole of the preparatory work and working up 
of results shall be done in the laboratory, under guidance of the 
instructor, so far as necessary. 

122B. Electrical Engineering II., Laboratory and Reports 

Preparation : 122 A 
This course is given over to the study of the characteristics 
of direct current machines, involving an investigation of such 
matters as Characteristic Curves of different types of gener- 
ators. Speed and Torque Curves of Motors, Heat Runs, etc. 
Then follows a series of experiments involving the testing of 
machines for Efficiency, and as the course progresses the student 
is thrown more and more upon his own resources ; a desired 
result is stated to him, and he is required to plan out his own 
method, settle upon the apparatus needed, solve his precision 
requirements, calibrate his instruments, if necessary, and finally 
turn in a detailed report covering all phases of his work. 

123. Studies in Electrical Construction 

Preparation : 120, 121 
This course, which is given in connection with No. 120 
and No. 121, consists of visits to plants, manufactories, etc., so 
far as possible, and written papers by the students upon the 
various questions involved, together with the reading of the same 
and their discussion by the class. 

SIXTY 



124. Elementary E)Iectrical Laboratory 

Preparation : 20, 21, 126 
This course includes a series of experiments intended to 
illustrate the fundamental principles of electrical measurement, 
and to familiarize the student with the handling of the ammeter, 
voltmeter, etc., preparatory to the work of the more advanced 
courses. It is required as preparation for all courses in the 
Electrical Laboratory except 122A. 

125. Ellectrical Problems 

Preparation : 126 
This is purely a recitation course, based on Lyon's Problems 
in Electrical Engineering as a text-book, and covers the matter 
contained in the first eight chapters (omitting the seventh) , 
namely , Resistance, Ohm's Law, Kirchofi's Laws, Energy and 
Power, Direct Current Generators and Motors, and the Elec- 
tromagnetic Field. It is really designed for the working out of 
actual engineering problems, illustrating and developing the 
matters discussed in the parallel courses of Direct Current Ma- 
chinery and Direct Current Practice. 

126. Elements of Electricity 

Preparation : 10, 14, 20 
This course of thirty-six exercises is taken by all students 
in the second year, except those in the Electrical Engineering 
Course, who take it in the first year. It consists of a thorough 
discussion of the fundamental principles of electricity, and is 
supplemented by a very considerable amount of problem work 
upon which the utmost importance is placed. The last nine 
exercises are given to a discussion of the Rules of the National 
Electrical Code as they apply to the utilization of electricity in 
the home, office and shop. 

127. Theoretical Electricity 

Preparation: 126, 130, 131, 138 
This course, given in the fourth year, involves a careful 
study of the conduction of electricity through solid, liquid and 
gaseous conductors, and a discussion of power transformation, 
together with a study of modern electrical theory, so far as is 
required for an intelligent reading of current publications, such 
as the General Electric Review, Proceedings of the Institute of 
Electrical Engineers, etc. 

SI XT T- O N E 



138. Direct Current Machinery 

Preparation : 126, 127 
This course, which runs parallel with No. 127, returns to 
the starting point of the inducing of an Electromotive force by 
motion of a conductor in a magnetic field, and discusses in 
detail the theory of direct current generators and motors, arma- 
ture winding, characteristic curves, etc. The text-book is 
Franklin and Esty's Direct Currents. 

129. Direct Cnrrent Practice 

Preparation : 128 
In this course, which follows immediately after No. 128, 
requiring it as preparation, is given some detailed study of the 
operation of direct current apparatus, the Edison 3-wire sys- 
tem of distribution, storage batteries, and the more important 
industrial applications of direct current power. 

130 A. Technical Electrical Measurementfs, Lectures 

Preparation : 13, 126 and 122A 
This course, given during the last six weeks of the second 
year, and continuing through the first term of the third year, 
consists of two parts ; the first being intended to familiarize the 
student with the principle types of measuring instruments, used 
in both commercial work and the standardizing laboratory of the 
Supply Company, the manner of their use, sources of error, etc. ; 
the second, giving the principles of the fundamental methods 
of measuring the several electrical quantities — Resistance, Cur- 
rent, Electromotive Force, Capacity, Inductance, Power and 
Energy. 

130B. Technical Electrical Measurements, Laboratory and 
Reports 

Preparation : 130A 
This course, given during the third year, and running 
parallel with 130A, consists of a series of experiments intended 
to bring out the principles therein developed, and involving such 
matters as the determination of Specific Resistance, Insulation 
Resistance, Conductivity, Magnetic Induction, Electrostatic Ca- 
pacity, and the use of special apparatus, such as the Kelvin 
Bridge, Cary-Foster Bridge, Potentiometer in the calibration 
of voltmeters and ammeters, etc. 

SIXTY-TWO 



All through, particular stress is laid on the correct use of 
apparatus and methods, and precision discussions are required 
throughout. 

131. Variable Currents 

Preparation : 10, 11, 12 {taken concurrently) , 125 
This course, which is preparatory to the more advanced 
study of alternating currents, is devoted to a thorough consider- 
ation of the general differential equations for current in an elec- 
trical circuit of variable resistance, reactance and capacity, 
developed from the general energy equation, and introduced by 
a consideration of the discharge of condensers through inductive 
circuits. Some study is also given to the discussion of waves 
set up in oscillating circuits and the fundamental principles in 
wireless transmission of energy. 

132. Illumination and Photometry 

Preparation : 20 
A course of lectures dealing with the application of elec- 
tricity to lighting, the principles of illumination and the labora- 
tory measurement of the various quantities concerned. The 
text-book used is Wickenden's Illumination and Photometry. 

133. £lectric RaiWays 

Preparation : 128, 129, 139 
A course of lectures, including a discussion of the general 
problem of supplanting steam with electric traction, followed by 
a discussion of the principal systems of electric traction ; namely, 
Direct Current, high and low voltage. Single Phase Alternating 
Current systems and Three Phase Alternating Current systems, 
and a study of the construction, equipment and cost of operation 
of existing systems. 

134. Practical Electricity 

Preparation : 20, 21, 126 
This course is a continuation of Elements of Electricity, 
and is given to all students in the Civil, Mechanical and Chem- 
ical Engineering Courses during the third year. The first term 
will be devoted to a consideration of the various direct current 
machines, their characteristics and applications. The second 
term work will cover alternating current apparatus in the same 
manner. Recitations and problem work will be based largely on 
practical applications. 

SIXTY-THREE 



135. Practical Electricity Laboratory 

Preparation : 134, 126 
This course parallels, in the laboratory, the work given in 
the above course. The laboratory work is at all times closely 
related to the class-room work, and the methods of testing and 
operating the various machines are carefully discussed in the 
recitations, A written report on each experiment is required, as 
the ability to draw accurate conclusions from laboratory work is 
one of the important objects of any laboratory course. 

136. General Problems in Electrical Engineering 

Preparation : 126 
A course devoted entirely to the solution of problems. 
From fifty to one hundred carefully selected problems will be 
assigned. The course has two objects in view : first, to give a 
thorough review of the principles of electricity covered earlier in 
the course ; and, second, to require the student to correlate and 
apply these principles in the solution of practical problems. 

137. Journals 

This course consists of written papers, two by each student, 
in the course of the year, upon some of the various matters ob- 
served in " Excursions," together with the reading of the same 
before, and their discussion by, the class. 

137A. Technical Papers and Magazines 

The purpose of this course is to give the student practice 
in using the Electrical Magazines and Proceedings of the Engi- 
neering Societies. The work consists of two types : in the first 
the student may be required to summarize from published papers, 
throughout a certain period, the work that has been done upon 
a given subject ; in the second, to summarize the important 
matter found in a number of magazines during, say, a given 
month, upon various subjects ; or again, he may be asked to 
look up a certain matter in the Patent Office Reports and 
report upon it. 

Each report made by the student is read before the class 
and open for criticism by the members. 



81 XT T-F o u B 




CLASS IN THE ELECTRICAL LABORATORY 




ENGINEERING LABORATORY 
Taking Indicator Diagrams 



138. Alternating Currents 

Preparation : 128, 129 
This course concerns itself with the general theory of alter- 
nating current circuits and the application of these principles to 
various engineering problems. In connection with the work, 
considerable importance is attached to the solution of problems 
selected with reference to their engineering application, two 
hours per week being devoted to this work. 

139. Alternating Current Machinery 

Preparation : 138 
This course of lectures, recitations and problems is devoted 
to a careful discussion of the various types of alternating current 
machinery for the generation, transmission and distribution of 
power. The special properties of each machine are considered 
for the machine as a unit, and when it is used as a part of any 
electrical system ; some of the general considerations concerning 
long distance power transmission are also included. One two- 
hour period per week is devoted to the solution of various 
problems pertaining to the work. 

139A. Alternating Current Machinery Laboratoiry 

Preparation : 138, 139 
The work includes such tests as efficiency, heating, regula- 
tion and determination of characteristics for alternating current 
machinery. The work in the laboratory is supplemented by 
conferences. 

142. Inorganic Chemistry 

Preparation : 10, 20 
The fundamental principles of the science are taught in 
connection with the descriptive chemistry of the non-metallic 
elements. The lectures are designed to precede the work of 
the laboratory, in which the students are expected to verify and 
illustrate the principles and facts which have been discussed in 
the lecture room. Careful manipulation, thoroughness in obser- 
vation, accuracy in arriving at conclusions, and neatness in note 
taking, are required of each student. The course lays the 
necessary foundation for subsequent chemical study. 

81 XT T- FI v E 



143. Qualitative Analysis 

Preparation : 142 
A practical course in qualitative analysis for the separation 
and identification of the common metallic elements and the 
acids. Each student is also required to make a complete and 
accurate analysis of various mixtures, alloys and chemicals used 
in manufacturing. The laboratory work is supplemented by a 
course of lectures and conferences, devoted to a general study of 
the properties of the common metals and their compounds. 

144. Quantitative Analysis 

Preparation : 142, 143 
A course in gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Special 
attention is given to accurate manipulation, the preparation of 
standard solutions, the calibration of instruments, and to the 
principles of stochiometry. In the latter part of the course 
some time is given to electro-analysis and to rapid methods for 
iron and steel The laboratory work is supplemented by a course 
of lectures and conferences. 

145. Organic Chemistry 

Preparation : 144 
A course of lectures on the principles of organic chemistry, 
as illustrated by the methane and benzene derivatives. 

145A. Organic Chemical Laboratory 

Preparation : 145 

The course aims to familiarize the student with the common 
apparatus and general procedure used in organic work. To this 
end he carries out such operations as fractional distillation, ex- 
traction, crystallization, and determinations of boiling and melting 
points. The compounds prepared are such as to give instruction 
in general methods of preparation, as oxidation, reduction, 
saponification, nitration and sulfonation. 

The student also makes a study of the general principles of 
organic analysis, and carries out the quantitative determination of 
carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and a halogen in organic compounds. 

146. Industrial Chemistry 

Preparation : 143, 144, 145 
This course consists of a series of lectures and recitations 
upon the more important technical chemical processes, including 

SIXTY-SIX 



those of Metallurgy. Much attention is given to the general 
operations common to many industries, such as crushing, grind- 
ing, lixiviation, filtration, evaporation, distillation, crystallization, 
etc., and to the details of various types of apparatus used for 
carrying on these processes. Some of the more important manu- 
facturing industries, such as the production of alkali, fertilizers, 
glass, pigments, cement, soap, explosives, paper, as well as wood 
distillation, the refining of petroleum, etc., are also considered in 
detail. 

146 A. Industrial Chemical Laboratory 

Preparation : 146 
A course in the quantitative study of the preparation and 
purification of some chemical product, selected as a type of reac- 
tion of industrial importance. The processes employed are care- 
fully controlled and the final product is analyzed to determine its 
purity. When the work is completed, a careful detailed report 
of the whole process is made and discussed in class. 

147. General Metallurgy 

In this course a study is made of the ferrous and non-ferrous 
metals most used in engineering work. The production of iron, 
steel and the more common non-ferrous metals is taken up, and 
the characteristic properties of each substance are studied, to- 
gether with its more common uses. Corrosion and its preven- 
tion, together with bearing metals, and the more commonly 
used alloys are given thorough consideration. 

148. Technical Analysis 

Preparation : 145 
A course devoted to the following : — 
Analysis of gases. 

Analysis of oils, mineral and vegetable. 
The origin, manufacture, properties, uses and analysis of 
the various fuels, and the determination of the heat value of 
fuels by the use of a calorimetric bomb. 

149. Theoretical Chemistry 

Preparation : 142, 143, 144 
In this course the more important principles of Theoretical 
Chemistry are considered ; but these are treated with great 

SIXTY-SEVEN 



thoroughness and are illustrated by applying them to a large 
variety of problems. The principles are further illustrated by 
lecture experiments. During the course the following subjects 
are considered : pressure volume relations of gases and solu- 
tions, derivation of molecular and atomic weights, conductivity 
of solutions, ionic theory and mass action law, efiEect of tem- 
perature on chemical equilibrium, the laws of energy with ref- 
erence to the production of heat and work, the electro-motive 
force of voltaic cells and other electro-chemical topics. 

149A. Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory 

This course comprises a series of exercises to give the student 
a knowledge of the methods employed in molecular weight de- 
terminations, in studying the important properties of solutions. 
While reasonable accuracy is required, especial emphasis is laid 
on the underlying principles upon which all work of this charac- 
ter is based. 

150. Chemical Engineering 

The aim of this course is to train the student to get a clear 
comprehensive estimate of chemical engineering work, such as he 
may be called upon to do in the ordinary pursuit of his profes- 
sion, and to deduce correct and practical inferences from his 
studies. To this end a carefully planned, systematic study is 
made of the more important operations as they are carried out 
in industries of a chemical nature. The various types of equip- 
ment, capable of being used for such work, are studied as well 
as the types which are best suited to certain kinds of work. 

151. Factory Inspection and Report Writing 

This course consists of visits to chemical plants, and other 
manufacturing establishments in Boston and vicinity. After each 
visit, written reports upon the processes studied are submitted to 
the instructor and discussed in class. In writing these 
reports the student is expected to supplement the information 
obtained upon the inspection trip with that obtained from other 
sources, such as the technical journals and other publications. 
Especial attention is paid to the use of clear, though concise, 
English, and to the general appearance of the report. 

SIXTY- EIGHT 



152. Elementary Photography 

This is a brief lecture and laboratory course, intended to 
familiarize the student with the fundamental principles and 
operations of photography. The construction and operation of 
the more common types of plate and film cameras are explained, 
and a few representative plates, films, and printing papers dis- 
cussed. The operations of exposing and developing are discussed 
in some detail, together with the making of positives, both upon 
paper and upon lantern slides. The laboratory work con- 
sists of taking, developing, and printing pictures under the 
supervision of the instructor. No previous knowledge of chem- 
istry or photography is required. The course is given at the 
beginning of the second term, and is optional for any student in 
the School. 

160. Dynamical and Structural Geology 

This course treats of earth movements and the various 
terrestrial applications of solar energy. The more important 
geological processes, erosion, sedimentation, deformation and 
eruption are taken up and discussed. 

The latter part of the course is devoted to lectures on the 
broader structural features of the earth's crust and the applica- 
tion of the principles of structural geology to practical engineer- 
ing problems. 

170. German I. 

This course is planned to give the student a knowledge of 
German grammar, as well as a working vocabulary of scientific 
terms. During the course, easy scientific reading is begun. 

171. German II. 

Preparation : 170 
A continuation of German I., in which the student is given 
full opportunity to extend his vocabulary of technical words, as 
well as to become familiar with technical books and scientific 
articles in the current German periodicals. 

200. Engineering Practice 

This covers the courses in practical engineering work which 
the student gets with his employing firm. The exact duties per- 
formed vary with the different courses, and also vary with the 
firm. The students are marked for their work bi-monthly and 
the grades received are regularly noted on the report cards 
which are sent out every two months. 

SI XT T- NI N E 



■ Equipment ■ 

THE School is now housed in the new building of the As- 
sociation, and has very exceptionally equipped quarters for 
carrying on the work of the Engineering Courses. 

Mechanical Elng i neer ing Department 

Mechanical Laboratories 

Through the courtesy of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology officials, and also those of the Franklin Union, and 
Wentworth Institute, we are able to avail ourselves of the un- 
excelled Engineering Laboratories of those Institutions for in- 
struction purposes in the laboratory Courses of the Co-operative 
School. 

In addition to the foregoing facilities, we have several en- 
gines of our own for use for instruction, as well as the most 
modern equipment for gas and fuel analysis. 

Our own steam engineering plant is completely equipped 
with meters, scales, indicators, and all the necessary accessory 
equipment for making complete boiler tests, and determining 
the efficiencies of the various appliances used in generating 
power, heat, and light for our new building. This places at 
the disposal of our classes a perfectly equipped, up-to-date, engi- 
neering department, and gives them the means of carrying on boiler 
tests, determining the efficiencies of various fuels and oils, taking 
indicator diagrams, determining the efficiency of modern recip- 
rocating engines and turbines when direct connected to genera- 
tors, as well as renders them familiar with all the various auxiliary 
appliances of such a plant, as condensers, pumps, air compressors, 
etc. The students also have the use of the equipment of our 
Automobile School, thus giving opportunity to study the most 
advanced ideas in gasoline engine practice. 

Mechanic Arts Laboratories 

There are at present two laboratories, one for metal work 
and the other for woodworking and pattern work, which are 
available for the use of our students. 

SEVENTY 



The metal working laboratory is well equipped, and affords 
the student an opportunity for work with various machines, as 
lathes, shapers, drill presses and milling machines. There are 
also a gas forge and brazing furnace, together with all the re- 
quired equipment for bench work instruction. 

The woodworking laboratory has a power band saw, lathes, 
circular saw, buzz planer, and all the necessary equipment for 
woodworking and pattern work. 

In addition to the foregoing, a small, but completely 
equipped, shop for the construction and repair of apparatus, and 
for the use of students in connection with their thesis work, has 
been installed. This shop is equipped with a metal and wood- 
working lathe, grinder and all the necessary wood and metal 
working tools. There is also a very complete set of cabinet 
worker's tools for use in woodworking. 

Civil Engineer ing Department 

Field Instruments 

For work in the field the Department possesses various 
surveying instruments, representing the principal makes and 
types of instruments in general use. The equipment includes 
transits, levels, compasses, a complete plane table outfit, Locke 
hand level, flag poles, leveling rods, stadia rod, engineers' and 
surveyors' chains, steel and cloth tapes and other accessories. 
For Higher Surveying, an Aneroid Barometer is used for baro- 
metric leveling, and the transits are equipped with neutral glasses 
and reflectors for astronomical observations, as well as a sextant, 
reading to ten seconds, and equipped with neutral glasses and 
telescopes. This year a Buff and Buff Plane Table Outfit and 
a Berger, 18-inch Wye Level, as well as several smaller instru- 
ments, have been added to the equipment. 

The scope of the equipment and the field work itself are 
designed to train the student's judgment as to the relative merits 
of the various types of field instruments. 

Design and Drafting Rooms 

The School possesses large, light and well equipped drawing 
rooms for the carrying on of the designing and drafting, which 
form so important a part of civil engineering work. These 

SEVENTY- ONE 



rooms are supplied with lockers containing the drawing supplies, 
and files containing blue prints and photographs of structures 
that represent the best practice. Many of the prints and photo- 
graphs are of structures erected in and about Boston. 

Electrical Engineering Department 

The Electrical Laboratory is well equipped with apparatus 
for teaching the principles of measurements, and the equipment 
is being steadily increased and developed for the doing of work 
of a higher degree of precision. Among the special pieces of 
apparatus may be mentioned the following : Gary Foster Bridge, 
a modified form of Hoopes Conductivity Bridge, a Laboratory 
Wheatstone Bridge, a Leeds Northrup Potentiometer with Volt 
box, standard cells and low resistance standards, an accurate 
Chemical Balance and other appliances for the close determina- 
tion of currents, resistances and potential differences. 

There are also a set of variable inductances, and a set of 
condensers to the amount of eighty microfarads capacity variable 
in steps of one-tenth microfarad each. 

Among the instruments for testing purposes, for alternating 
current work, may be mentioned the following : Three matched 
voltmeters and three General Electric Type P-3 Iron clad watt- 
meters arranged for Y connection, one G. E. Polyphase Watt- 
meter with double current and potential ranges, numerous other 
voltmeters of various ranges, potential transformers, numerous 
ammeters some with current transformers, three integrating 
meters, one General Electric and one Westinghouse polyphase, 
switchboard type, integrating wattmeters and a High Torque 
General Electric test meter. There is also a considerable and 
increasing assortment of auxiliary testing apparatus, such as 
synchronism indicators, power factor indicators, frequency indi- 
cators, etc. 

For direct current testing there is a large and increasing 
collection of Weston instruments, both voltmeters and amme- 
ters, of suitable ranges and grades of precision, and two Thomson 
integrating watt-hour meters, while the measurement of unusual 
currents and voltages is ensured by four Weston millivoltmeters, 
with an assortment of standard shunts and multiplying resistances 
of various orders of magnitude. 

8EVENTY-T WO 




CHECKING VOLTMETERS 
Head Place Station Edison Electric Illuminating Company 




MILLING INSULATOR ENDS 
Machine Shop Boston Elevated Railway Company 



For calibrating purposes a 600 ampere-hour storage battery 
has been added to the equipment for current tests, while for 
voltage work there is a 260-volt potential battery. 

There is also the usual assortment of testing devices, such 
as speed indicators, tachometers, brakes, loading resistances and 
the numerous minor pieces of apparatus needed in practical 
testing and operating of electrical machinery. 

Among the machines of this Department are a pair of spe- 
cially made, matched machines arranged to run as single phase, 
two or three phase generators, or motors, as well as synchro- 
nous converters, double current generators, or on the Direct 
Current side as shunt, series, or compound generators, either 
two or three wire, or as motors. 

There are also a 15 horse power 230-volt Westinghouse 
motor, a new General Electric 10 horse power Interpole 230- 
volt motor, a 500-volt generator, two 500-volt series, and several 
500-volt shunt motors, and a series parallel controller. 

A 45 K. V. A,, 60-cycle, single phase, 500-volt generator 
giving a practically pure sine wave, three General Electric Type 
H transformers, each of 3 K. V. A. capacity, a 7/^ K. V. A., 
special General Electric 60-cycle 230-volt alternator, with re- 
volving field tapped for either 1, 2, 3 (star or mesh connection) 
6 or 12 phase connection, which may be operated also as a syn- 
chronous motor. 

In addition to the above are a 5 H. P. G. E. single phase 
induction motor, which may also be operated as a three phase 
motor and a 10 H. P. Fort Wayne shunt motor driving a 
special Holtzer-Cabot 3 phase 5 K. V. A. Alternating Current 
Generator. This latter machine has two special rotors, per- 
mitting its use as a squirrel cage or phase wound induction 
motor, there being a three phase regulating resistance for use 
with the phase wound rotor. 

During the past year there has been added a 5 K. W. 
Holtzer-Cabot three phase synchronous converter. This is 
wound for 220 volts on the D. C. side and will permit of the 
use of the above mentioned specially matched generators as 
balancers in connection with this unit. 

There is also available for advanced instruction, in co- 
operation with the Mechanical Department, the four three-wire 



SEVENTY-THREE 



generators (two driven by reciprocating engines and two by 
Westinghouse-Parsons turbines) in the main generating plant 
of the Association. 

Department of Physics 

There is a large laboratory devoted entirely to Physics to- 
gether with a lecture room. 

The Physics Department has been very completely 
equipped with all necessary apparatus for the experimental 
work that is required of the students, as well as that required 
for lecture demonstration. Among other things have been 
added : verniers, levels, spherometers, calorimeters, thermome- 
ters, pyrometers, a spectroscope, a microscope, a spectrometer, 
balances, standard gram weight, lecture table galvanometer, 
optical disk with all accessories, lenses, photometer, a full set of 
Weather Bureau apparatus, including a barograph, thermo- 
graph, hygrometer, barometer, maximum and minimum ther- 
mometers, etc. These, in addition to the equipment already 
owned, give a wide range to the experimental work that can be 
done. 

Department of Chemistry 

This Department is completely equipped in all respects for 
carrying on all lines of Chemical work, from that of a High 
School to that of most advanced College grade. The three 
laboratories, with accommodations for over one hundred and fifty 
students, are very exceptionally furnished with all the neces- 
sary appliances for chemical work. Some of these are : hoods, 
drying closets, still, steam and hot water baths, electrolytic cir- 
cuits, vacuum and pressure apparatus, balances, combustion fur- 
naces, complete sets of apparatus for the sampling and analysis 
of flue gases and fuels. There are also testing machines for 
oils, viscosimeters, and different sorts of flash point apparatus. 
A chemical museum is connected with this Department where 
are kept specimens for purposes of illustration. 

Libraries 

There is in connection with the School a professional li- 
brary containing books pertaining to both the school work of the 
boys and to their practical work. In addition to this there also 

SEVENTY- FOUR 



are current periodicals on engineering and scientific subjects for 
their exclusive use. All members of the School are entitled to 
take books from the Boston Public Library, and this offers a 
very unusual opportunity to our non-resident students. 

Department of Physical Training 

Our nev^^ gymnasium with all the latest modern equipment 
gives ample accommodation for all students. 

There is a running track on the grounds adjoining, together 
vi^ith tennis and hand ball courts ; also a large natatorium vv^here 
swimming is taught by competent instructors. 

In connection with this Department there are also six 
excellent bowling alleys, which may be used by the students 
upon the payment of a nominal fee. 

For all further information, write 

The Co-Operative Engineering School, 

316 Huntington Ave., Boston, Mass. 



SEVENTY- FIVE 



The Co-operative Engineering School 

Boston IToang Men's Christian Association 

Boston, Mass 19 

To the Dean: 

I, , hereby respectfully 

apply for admission to the Engineering Course 

of the Co-Operative Engineering School for the school year 19 - 
19 , and submit the following statement: 

Name in full Age 

Residence St City, or Town 

State Tel 

Parent's (father's) name 

address 

Graduate of High School. Year 

If not a graduate, how many years were you in High School? .... 

When did you leave? 

Why did you leave? 

Name of principal 

// employed since graduation, what is name of employer? 

Emp layer's address 

I\ames and addresses of two other persons, not ministers, to whom 
we may direct inquiries concerning you. (Give former employers, 
if possible.) 



Do you plan to complete the full four years' course?. 
Do you wish employment with a co-operating firm? . 

When do you wish to start practical work? 

Where will you live during the school-year? 

Weight Height 

Have you any physical infirmities? 

Is your general health good, fair, or poor? 



Remarks 



GENERAL DEPARTMENTS 

Department of Recreation and Health 

ALBERT E. GARLAND, M.D., B.P.E., Director 
This Department offers the BEST RECREATION that RE-CREATES. 
Privileges as follows: Three Gymnasiums, Swimming Tank of Filtered Salt 
Water, Baths of all kinds, Classes to Music, Six Bowling Alleys, Tennis — 
Indoor and Out, Handball, Squash, Indoor Golf, Athletics — Indoor and Out, 
Basket-ball and Games, Boxing, Wrestling and Fencing. Best of Instruct 
tion. Medical Direction. Come in any time. 

Department of Religions Work 

EDWIN W. PEIRCE, Secretary 

In order that young men may secure a well-balanced development and attain the 
true foundation for successful living, the Association advises each member to so 
plan his schedule that he may enter into one or more of the following activities: 
Character Building Classes Training for Christian Service 

Young Men's Sunday Forum Lectures and "Talks" 

Gospel Team Worker's Library 

Personal Interviews Twenty-four-hour-a-day Club 

Department of Social Work 

DAVID M. CLAGHORN, Director 

The attention of members is called to the many opportunities in the Association 

for social service, and the following social features : 

A Newly Equipped Game Room El Club Sarmiento (Pan-American Club) 

The Association Congress The Land and Water Club 

Popular Social Evenings Concerts and Entertainments 

Department of Conncil and Placement 

FREDERICK W. ROBINSON, Director 

Advice given to young men concerning their vocationaf future and efforts made 

to place them in positions best adapted to their varied abilities. 

It also acts as a clearing house for young men seeking work and employers 

desiring to engage reliable help. 

Its service is not limited to members, but the latter are given liberal discounts 

and effort is made to notify them when good positions are open. 

Boys* Division 

JAMES G. BARNES, S.B., City Boys' Work Secretary 

The Boys' Division is made up of boys from Greater Boston whose needs are 
ministered to by a force of young men who have made a careful study of "boy- 
ology." The Divi.sion comprises boys from twelve to eighteen years of age, 
whose needs are studied and whose problems we try to solve. Activities are 
conducted^ along social, physical, educational, and spiritual lines. The annual 
membership fee is $2.00; gynmasium and natatorium privileges are open to the 
boys at special rates. 



THE 

CO-OPERATIVE 

ENGINEERING 

SCHOOL 

FOUNDED FOR THE INSTRUCTION 
OF YOUTH IN THE THEORY AND 
PRACTICE OF ENGINEERING 




THE FRANK WOOD PBES6 
BOSTON 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



CATALOG 

OF THE 

EVENING 

SCHOOL OF 

ENGINEERING 

1916-1917 




Pablished by 

NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

OF THE 

BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

316 HUNTINGTON AVENUE. BOSTON. MASS. 



Northeastern College 

OF THE 
BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCUTION 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

Established in 1898; incorporated in 1904. Provides a four-year 
course In preparation for the Bar and grants the Degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. 



SCHOOL OF COMMERCE AND FINANCE 

Established in 1907; incorporated in 1911. Offers the following 
three and four-year courses leading to the degree of B. C. S. (Bache- 
lor of Commercial Science) ; Business Administration/ and Profession- 
al Accoimtancy. Anyone passing the examination for advanced 
standing is enabled to complete either of the regular courses and 
secure the degree in three years. Special courses in addition to 
regular courses. 



SCHOOL OF CO-OPERATIVE 
ENGINEERING 

Four-year courses in Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical and Civil 
Engineering, in co-operation with business firms. Students earn 
while learning. Open to High School graduates. 



EVENING 
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

A school offering three and four-year courses in Chemistry. 
Chemical, Electrical, Structural, Railroad and Municipal Engineer- 
ing. 

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Beginning with the fall of 1916, courses of college grade in Eng- 
lish, Mathematics, Science, History, and Education will be offered. 
Professors and mstructors of New England colleges will be engaged. 
These courses will be open to graduates of high schools and to 
others who can meet the entrance requirements. 

For further information concerning any of the above schools, 
address FRANK PALMER SPEARE, President of the College, 
Boston, Y. M. C. A., 316 Huntington Ave. Tel. Back Bay 4400. 




z 

I— ( 

Q 

3 

CQ 

g 
< 
o 
< 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



CATALOG 

OF THE 

EVENING SCHOOL 
OF ENGINEERING 

BOSTON 

1916-1917 



Published by 

NORTHEASTERN COLL;EGE 
Boston Young Men's Christian Association 



Catalog of the Instructing Staff, together with a 
Statement of the Requirements for Admission 
and a Description of the Courses of Instruction 



Calendar 1916-1917 



September 18-21 
REGISTRATION 

September 21 
OPENING OF SCHOOL 

October 12 

COLUMBUS DAY 

HOLIDAY 

November 30 

THANKSGIVING DAY 
HOLIDAY 

December 18-25 
CHRISTMAS RECESS 

February 22 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 
HOLIDAY 

April IJf 
CLOSE OF SCHOOL 



Two 



Northeastern College 

BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 

President 
ARTHUR S. JOHNSON 

1st Vice-President 
ALBERT H. CURTIS 

2nd Vice-President 
WILLIAM E. MURDOCK 

3rd Vice-President 
GEORGE W. MEHAFFEY 

Secretary 
GEORGE W. BRAINARD 

Treasurer 
LEWIS A. CROSSETT 

F. W. Carter J. Grafton Minot 

S. B. Carter W. B. Mossman 

Wm. C. Chick H. W. Newhall 

Geo. W. Coleman Silas Peirce 

H. Bradlee Fenno Chas. W. Perkins 

Henry G. Lord Thos. H. Russell 

Francis P. Luce Sabin P. Sanger 
Frank P. Speare 

OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

President 
FRANK P. SPEARE. M.H. 

Secretary-Bursar 
GALEN D. LIGHT. A.B. 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Chairman 
WILLIAM E. MURDOCK 

Albert H. Curtis Arthur S. Johnson 

Morgan L. Cooley George W. Mehaffey 

WnxiAM C. Chick George H. Martin 

Frank P. Speare 

Three 



Officers of Instruction 



THOMAS E. PENARD, S.B. 

Mass. Inst. Tech. 
Dean 



JAMES BROUGH 

FREEHAND DRAWING AND INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

B. S. BROWN 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

C. p. ELDRED, S.B. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

CARL S. ELL, S.B.. M.S. 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 

C. A. FARWELL, S.B. 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 

FRED G. HARTWELL 

ELECTRICAL PRACTICE AND CONSTRUCTION 

JOHN W. HOWARD, S.B. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

J. R. LEIGHTON 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 

H. C. MABBOTT, S.B. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

NATHANIEL S. MARSTON, S.B. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

EDWARD MUELLER, A.B., Ph.D. 

CHEMISTRY 



Four 



Officers of Instruction 

(Continued) 
W. F. ODOM, S.B., M.S. 

GERMAN 

THOMAS E. PENARD, S.B. 

MATHEMATICS 

M. F. PINKHAM 

MATHEMATICS 

CHARLES H. RESTALL, S.B. 

RAILROAD ENGINEERING 

E. W. G. SMITH 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

mA SMITH 

ELECTRICAL PRACTICE AND CONSTRUCTION 

W. LINCOLN SMITH, S.B. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

ELLWOOD B. SPEAR, A.B., Ph.D. 

CHEMISTRY 

SAMUEL A. S. STRAHAN 

CHEMISTRY 

GEORGE A. TRUELSON 

ARCHITECTURE 

W. F. WILLMANN 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 



FRED L. DAWSON 

FIELD REPRESENTATIVE 



Five 



THE NEW NAME 
NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

T70R many years the terms Evening Law School, 
■*• School of Commerce and Finance, Polytechnic 
School and Co-operative Engineering School, have been 
applied to the corresponding schools of the Department 
of Education. These names, however, were not dis- 
tinctive, and both graduates and students have re- 
quested that a regular title be given the schools doing 
work of college grade. As a result of their activities, 
the schools concerned have been very thoroughly in- 
vestigated by outside educational experts, to see if the 
scope and grade of work done would properly measure 
up to that of the recognized colleges and technical 
schools. Such was found to be the case in all the schools, 
and upon the submission of the various reports by the 
Educational Committee to the Board of Directors of 
the Association, the latter Board voted to apply the 
name "Northeastern College" to the group of schools 
comprising the following : — 

Evening Law School 

School of Commerce and Finance 

Co-operative Engineering School 

Polytechnic School 

(Now Evening School of Engineering) 

School of Liberal Arts 

These schools will henceforth be known as the regular 
schools of Northeastern College, of the Boston Young 
Men's Christian Association. 

The name of the Polytechnic School has been changed 
to Evening School of Engineering, to be in agreement 
with the names of the other schools of the system. 



Six 



FOREWORD 

A/f ANY men employed in engineering 
and other work of a technical 
nature, feel the need of special instruc- 
tion but cannot afford to take the time 
to attend the regular technical day 
schools. To such men the Evening 
School of Engineering offers a large 
number of special courses, and to those 
who are willing to give three evenings 
per week for a period of from three to 
five years the school offers several reg- 
ular courses of very high grade which 
compare favorably with similar courses 
given in the good technical schools of 
the country. 

On the following pages will be found a 
complete description of the regular and 
special courses, requirements for ad- 
mission, rates of tuition and other 
general information. 



Seven 



Courses of Study 

Regular Courses 

I. — Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 
II. — Electrical Engineering 
III. — Structural Engineering 
IV. — Civ-il Engineering 

V. — Mechanical Engineering 



Schedule of Subjects 



lo. 


Course 


No. Weeks 


Evenings 


Time 


2 


Mathematics I 


28 


Mon., 


Thurs. 


Sect. A 
Sect. B 


7.00-7.45 
7.45-8.30 


3 


Mathematics II 


28 


Mon., 


Thurs. 


Sect. A 
Sect. B 


7.00-7.45 
8.30-9.30 


10 


Mechanical Drawing 


6 


Wed. 


(or Thurs.) 


7.00-9.30 


11 


Adv. Mech. Drawing and 


Ortho- 












graphic Projections 28 


Wed. 






7.00-9.30 


12 


Machine Drawing 


28 


Wed. 






7.00-9.30 


20 


Architectural Drawing I 


28 


Mon., 


Fri. 




7.00-9.00 


21 


Architectural Drawing II 


28 


Mon., 


Fri. 




7.00-9.00 


22 


Architectural Drawing III 


28 


Mon., 


Fri. 




7.00-9.00 


30 


Freehand Drawing I 


28 


Tues., 


, Thurs. 




7.30-9.30 


31 


Freehand Drawing II 


28 


Tues.^ 


, Thurs. 




7.30-9.30 


35 


Industrial Design 


28 


Tues.: 


, Thurs, 




7.30-9.30 


38 


Life Class 


28 


Tues., 


, Thurs. 




7.30-9.30 


40 


Inorganic Chemistry Lect. 


28 


Mon., 


, Thurs. 




7.00-7.45 


41 


Inorganic Chemistry Lab. 


28 


Wed. 






7.00-9.30 


42 


Qualitative Analysis 


28 


Mon., 


, Tues. 




A 


43 


Volumetric Analysis 


14 


Mon., 


, Tues. 




A 


44 


Gravimetric Analysis 


14 


Mon., 


, Tues., 


Wed. 


A 


45 


Organic Chemistry 


28 


Mon. 


, Tues., 


Wed. 


A 


46 


Technical Analysis 


28 


Mon. 






A 


47 


Theoretical Chemistry I 


28 


Wed. 






8.30-9.30 


48 


Theoretical Chemistry II 


28 


Thun 


i. 




7.00-7.45 


49 


Industrial Chemistry 


28 


Mon. 






7.45-8.30 


60 


Practical Electricity 


28 


Mon. 


, Thurs 




7.00-7.45 


61 


Practical Electricity, Lab. 


28 


Wed. 






7.00-9.30 


62 


Elem. of Elect. Engineering 


; Direct 












Currents 


28 


Mon. 


, Thurs. 




7.45-9.30 


63 


Elect. Engineering, Lab. 


Direct 












Currents 


28 


Wed. 






7.00-9.30 

Eight 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 



No. Course No. 

64 Elem. of Elect. Engineering; 

Alternating Currents 

65 Elect. Engineering, Lab. 

Alternating Currents 

66 Technical Elect. Measurements 

67 Tech. Elec. Measurements, Lab. 

68 Adv. Alternating Currents 

69 Elec. Eng. Lab. ; Advanced 

70 Electricity Supply Stations 

71 Power Transmission 

72 Electric Railways 
75 Thesis 

100 Practical Physics 

110 Structural Drawing 

111 Structural Design 

112 Bridge Design 

113 Structural Mechanics 

114 Theory of Structures 

115 Strength of Materials 

116 Advanced Structures 

117 Concrete Construction 

130 Topographical Drawing 

131 Plane and Topo. Surveying 

132 Advanced Surveying 
135 Materials of Construction 
140 Foundations 

145 Highway Engineering 

150 Railroad Engineering 

151 Railroad Drawing 

153 R. R. Engineering and Design 

160 Municipal Engineering 

170 Mechanism 

171 Mech. Eng. Drawing 
175 Applied Mechanics 

180 Thermodynamics 

181 Boilers and Prime Movers 

182 Power Plant Design 

185 Hydraulic Engineering 

186 Hydraulic Motors 

200 German I 

201 German II 



Weeks Evenings 


Time 


28 


Mon. 


8.00-9.30 


5 


Thurs. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Mon. 


7.00-8.00 


23 


Thurs. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Tues., Thurs. 


7.00-8.30 


28 


Wed. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Tues. 


8.30-9.30 


14 


Thurs. 


8.00-9.30 


14 


Thurs. 


8.00-9.30 


28 


Fri. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


8.30-9.30 


28 


Tues. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Tues. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Tues. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


7.00-8.30 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


7.00-8.15 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


8.15-9.30 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


7.00-8.30 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


8.15-9.30 


20 


Tues. 


7.00-8.30 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


7.00-8.30 


8 


Mon., Thurs. 


8.30-9.30 


18 


Mon., Thurs. 


7.00-8.15 


8 


Mon., Thurs. 


7.00-8.15 


28 


Tues. 


8.30-9.30 


20 


Mon., Thurs. 


8.30-9.30 


28 


Tues. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Tues. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Tues. 


7.00-9.30 


28 


Mon. 


7.00-8.30 


28 


Thurs. 


7.00-8.30 


28 


Mon.,*.Thur3. 


8.15-9.30 


28 


Tues. ' 


7.00-8.00 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


7.00-8.15 


28 


Tues. 


7.00-8.30 


28 


Mon., Thurs. 


8.30-9.30 


28 


Tues. 


8.00-9.30 


28 


Wed. 


7.00-7.45 


28 


Wed. 


7.45-8.30 



A. Hours of instruction will be announced at opening of school. 
Note: For prices see schedule of rates, page 47. 



Nine 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

COURSES OF STUDY 
L Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

First Year 

Course No. 

Mathematics I ...... . 2 

Practical Physics ....... 100 

Inorganic Chemistry, Lectures and Recitations . . 40 

Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratory . . . . 41 



Second Year 

Mathematics II .... . 

Quahtative Analysis, Lectures and Recitations 
Qualitative Analysis, Laboratory 
Mechanical Drawing .... 



3 

42 
42 
10 



Volumetric Analysis 
Gravimetric Analysis 
German I 



Third Year 



43 

44 

200 



Fourth Year 



Organic Chemistry, Lectures . 
Organic Chemistry, Laboratory 
Theoretical Chemistry I 
German II . 



45 

45 

47 

201 



Fifth Year — For Chemical Engineering Students Only 



Technical Analysis 


46 


Theoretical Chemistry II 


48 


Industrial Chemistry 


49 


Thermodynamics .... 


180 


Practical Electricity 


60 



Note: For hours of instruction see schedule of subjects on pages 8 and 9. 
For descriptions of courses see pages 15 to 39. 



Ten 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 



COURSES OF STUDY 
II. Electrical Engineering 

First Year 

Mathematics I .... . 

Mechanical Drawing .... 
Practical Physics ..... 
Practical Electricity, Lectures and Recitations 
Practical Electricity, Laboratory 



Course No. 

2 

10 

100 

60 

61 



Second Year 

Mathematics II ...... . 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, Direct Currents, 
Lectures and Recitations ..... 

Electrical Engineering, Laboratory, Direct Currents 



62 
63 



Third Year 

Elements of Electrical Engineering, Alternating Cur- 
rents, Lectures and Recitations .... 64 

Electrical Engineering, Laboratory, Alternating 

Currents ....... 65 

Technical Electrical Measurements ... 66 

Technical Electrical Measurements, Laboratory . 67 

Hydraulic Motors ...... 186 

Thermodynamics ....... 180 



Fourth Year 

Advanced Alternating Currents 

Electrical Engineering, Laboratory, Advanced 

Electricity Supply Stations 

Power Transmission .... 

Electric Railways ..... 

Thesis 



Note: For hours of instruction see schedule of subjects on pages 8 and 9. 
For descriptions of courses see pages 15 to 39. 



68 
69 
70 
71 

72 
75 



Eleven 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 
in. Structural Engineering 

First Year 



Mathematics I 
Practical Physics . 
Mechanical Drawing 



Course No. 

2 

100 

10 



Mathematics II 
Structural Mechanics 
Structural Drawing 



Second Year 



3 
113 
110 



Theory of Structures 
Strength of Materials 
Structural Design . 



Third Year 



114 
115 
111 



Advanced Structures 
Bridge Design 
Concrete Construction 



Fourth Year 



116 
112 
117 



Note: For hours of instruction see schedule of subjects on pages 8 and 9. 
For descriptions of courses see pages 15 to 39. 



Twelve 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 



COURSES OF STUDY 
IV. CIVIL ENGINEERING 

n^f.^^c i Municipal Engineering 
options — ^ Railroad Engineering 

First Year 



Mathematics I 
Practical Physics . 
Mechanical Drawing 



Course No. 

100 
10 



Second Year 



Mathematics II . 
Plane and Topographic Surveying 
Topographical Drawing 
Highway Engineering 



3 
131 
130 
145 



Structural Mechanics 
Advanced Surveying 
Railroad Engineering 
Railroad Drawing 



Third Year 



113 
132 
150 
151 



Fourth Year— To be omitted during 1916-17 

Railroad Engineering and Design (Optional) 
Municipal Engineering Problems (Optional) 
Foundations ..... 

Materials of Construction 
Hydraulic Engineering .... 



153 
160 
140 
135 
185 



Note: For hours of instruction see schedule of subjects on pages 8 and 9. 
For descriptions of courses see pages 15 to 39. 



Thirteen 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 



COURSES OF STUDY 
V. Mechanical Engineering 

First Year 



Mathematics I 
Practical Physics . 
Mechanical Drawing 



Course No. 

2 

100 

10 



Second Year 

Mathematics II . 
Mechanism . . . . . 

Mechanical Engineering Drawing 
Machine Drawing 



3 

170 

171 

12 



Third Year— To be omitted during 1916-17 



Applied Mechanics 


175 


Thermodynamics .... 


180 


Hydraulic Motors 


186 


Materials of Construction 


135 


Foundations ..... 


140 



Fourth Year— To be omitted during 1916-17 



Boilers and Prime Movers 
Power Plant Design 
Concrete Construction . 
Practical Electricity 



181 

182 

117 

60 



Note: For hours of instruction see schedule of subjects on pages 8 and 9. 
For descriptions of courses see pages 15 to 39. 



Fourteen 




Referexce Library 




Drafting Room 



Subjects of Instruction 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Director: 

Thomas E. Penard, S.B. 

Instructors: 

Thomas E. Penard, S.B. Mr. M. F. Pinkham 

THE importance of mathematics as a means of mental 
discipline, and as a necessary basis for those intending to 
pursue engineering as a profession, cannot be overestimated. 

Students taking the regular courses in Chemistry and 
Engineering are given two years instruction in applied mathe- 
matics, as outlined in Mathematics I and II. Special attention 
is called to these two courses in practical mathematics, which are 
intended to cover the field in so far as mathematics is ordinarily 
employed in the usual engineering computations. They are 
designed primarily for students taking the regular engineering 
courses, but may be taken to advantage by those regularly 
employed in engineering work who wish to obtain a more thor- 
ough grasp of applied mathematics. 

Courses in advanced applied mathematics will be given 
provided a sufficient number of men apply to form a class. 

1. Mathematics P. (Evening Preparatory School) 

Preparation: Arithmetic. 

This course of two periods per week during the prepara- 
tory year is designed primarily for students taking the regular 
engineering courses; it is hoped, however, that it wall be found 
adapted to the needs of others who wish to obtain a practical 
knowledge of elementary mathematics. The student is assumed 
to be thoroughly familiar with the fundamental operations of 
arithmetic. It includes: 

Review arithmetic. 

Algebra, including definitions and notation, fundamental 
operations, factoring, fractions, simple equations, powers and 

Fifteen 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

roots, ratio and proportion, variation, with applications to 
problems chosen from electricity and mechanics, formulas. 

Geometry, including useful theorems relating to plane fig- 
ures, measurements of triangle, polygons, circle, polyhedrons, 
cylinder, cone and sphere. 

2. Mathematics L 

Preparation: Mathematics P (1), or equivalent. 

This course of two periods per week during the first year, 
is a continuation of Mathematics I. It includes: 

Review Algebra and Geometry. 

Logarithms, the use of slide rules, discussion of precision 
and rules for significant figures. 

Trigonometry including circular measure, co-ordinates, 
trigonometric ratios, formulas, law of sines, law of cosines, 
solution of right and oblique triangles, applications to problems 
in Physics and Engineering. 

3. Mathematics IL 

Preparation: Mathematics II (2), or equivalent. 

This course of two periods per week during the second year 
is a continuation of Mathematics IL It includes: 

Plotting of functions, interpolation, the straight line, 
curves represented by various equations, graphic solution of 
equations, determination of laws from the data of experiments, 
simplification of formulas. 

Rate of increase differentiation, determination of maxima 
and minima by differentiation, integration, definite integrals , 
determination of mean value, area and volume by integration, 
centre of gravity, moment of inertia, partial differentiation. 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus. 

See Mathematics II 



Sixteen 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

DEPARTMENT OF DRAWING 

Instructors: 

Mr. James Brough Mr. E. W. G. Smith 

Mr. George A. Truelson Mr. W. F. Willmann 

The courses in Mechanical and Architectural Drawing, 
as outlined, afford the essentials of drafting for those contem- 
plating office work and are equally valuable and necessary to 
those working in the allied trades. 

The art courses are varied and the work is thorough and 
complete, and of a high order. Great care is taken to develop 
the student along the line of his natural inclinations, and, so far 
as possible, to have the work of the school bear directly upon 
his daily employment and other courses attended. 

10. Mechanical Drawing. 

This course consists of work in the drawing room, occupy- 
ing one evening a week throughout the entire first year. The 
drawing is of an elementary character, beginning with instruc- 
tion in the use of instruments and the fundamental rules for 
executing engineering drawings. In conjunction with the 
drawing, the elementary principles of orthographic projections 
are studied, and the student prepares a number of plates il- 
lustrating the reproduction of objects in the shape of working 
drawings. 

For students taking electrical engineering the course will be 
limited to the first fourteen weeks. 

11. Advanced Mechanical Drawing and Orthographic 
Projections. 

This course is a continuation of Mechanical Drawing (10) 
It includes : 

Problems on the point, line and plane, projections of solids, 
single and double curved surfaces and their intersections by 
oblique planes, and practical illustrations of the principles 
studied. 

Seventeen 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

12. Machine Drawing. 

The aim of the course is to teach the proper way of making 
the necessary dimensioned drawings for use in practice. The 
instruction includes : (a) The making of sketches of the parts 
of a machine from measurements; (6) the detail scale drawing 
from the sketches and a tracing; (c) an assembly drawing of the 
machine. 

20. Architectural Drawing I. 

An elementary course, including the fundamental prin- 
ciples underlying all kinds of mechanical and architectural 
dra^ving; geometrical problems; orthographic and isometric 
projections; classical mouldings; Roman alphabet, and roof 
problems. 

In connection wdth this course the instructor wdll outline 
a course of reading in architectural history. 

2L Architectural Drawing II. 

The orders of Architecture. Practical architecture and 
details of construction. In this course the student is taught the 
component parts of buildings. Typical details of construction 
are dra^^^l to a large scale and in isometric projection. 

22. Architectural Drawing III. 

This course covers the making of complete plans, eleva- 
tions and working drawings of some elementary problem. 
Special Students 

Students desiring special work in Architectural Drawing, 
not outlined above, should consult "^Ndth the instructor. 

30 and 31. Freehand Drawing. 

Considering the great importance of the study of freehand 
draTvdng to all who are engaged in, or anticipate being engaged 
in any industrial art, artistic trade or profession, we offer a very 
complete course in this line, and call attention to the splendid 
advantages provided. 

Eighteen 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

The work is adapted to the requirements of each individual 
student, so far as is practical and consistent with a thorough 
training in freehand drawing. There are two classes in both 
freehand drawing and industrial design. 

Class I. The work of this class is intended to meet the 
wants of those students who have no previous knowledge of 
freehand drawing and is recommended to all students who 
intend to become craftsmen, designers, architects or artists, and 
also to others who may wish to take up the study as an accom- 
plishment. The work will consist of drawing from typical 
models, by which students learn a sense of proportion and the 
principles of perspective; groups of still life for the study of 
composition and color; also drawing of historic ornament, and 
details of the human figure from the cast, by which students 
are taught to observe form, and the principles of hght and shade. 
Class II. The course of study in this class is of a more 
advanced nature than that of Class I, and in addition to the 
more complicated forms of ornament, the full-length human 
figure from the antique is added, also rendering in pen and ink 
and pencil, advanced shading in charcoal, painting groups of 
still life in monochrome and polychrome, in oil and water colors. 

35. Industrial Design and Interior Decoration. 

The courses in industrial design and interior decoration are 
specially helpful to those students who are already engaged in 
or anticipate being engaged in such arts and crafts, as wood and 
stone carving, wrought and bent-iron work, brass and copper 
work, stained glass, furniture and drapery, interior decoration, 
book covers, wall paper, fabrics and other allied industrial arts, 
including lettering and commercial designing for advertising 
purposes. No limitation is placed upon the student who shows 
ability to take up the work prescribed for the class he wishes to 
enter, and students who so desire may spend part of their time 
in the freehand class and part in the industrial design and inte- 
rior decoration class, without extra charge. The instructor is 
a certified art master and one of the leaders of the profession. 
Students in industrial design are recommended to take archi- 
tecture. 

Nineteen 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Class I. The studies in this class include the work of the 
freehand drawing in Class I, vriih the addition of special studies 
given for the purpose of design, such as a systematic study of 
the various styles of historic ornament, studies of animal and 
plant form, and the elementary principles of design. 

Class 11. Students who have an elementary knowledge of 
drawing and design are considered ehgible for this class and are 
taught the more advanced principles of composition, form and 
color in design, also rendering the same in various mediums, 
including charcoal, pencil, pen and ink, water and oil colors. 

Our special library can be consulted by the students in 
these classes. 

38. Life Class. 

At the repeated request of a number of advanced students 
we offer this class which will give an exceptional opportunity 
to students who wish to pursue their studies for the purpose of 
acquiring a more perfect knowledge of the figure, and will be of 
great advantage to those who wish to become more proficient 
in this branch of art. At the present time the use of the figure 
is introduced into nearly every form of art work, not only in 
a purely artistic sense, but also in many forms of commercial 
work, and to be able to draw the figure well is a great achieve- 
ment to the artist and designer. 

Mechanical Engineering Drawing. See Dept. of Mechanical 

Engineering 

Raih-oad Drawing. See Dept. of Ci\'il Engineering 
Structural Drawing. " " Structural Engineering 

Topographical Drawing. " " " 



Twenty 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING 

Director: 
Ellwood B. Speah, A.B., Ph.D. 
Instructors : 
Ellwood 3. Spear, Ph.D. Edwaed Mueller, S.B., Ph.D. 
AND Assistants 

The wonderful advance in the application of science to the 
arts during the past few years has caused a great demand for 
technically trained men. Nearly every large manufacturing 
concern now employs chemists regularly, or else has experts 
whom it can consult at short notice. The scientific and techni- 
cal schools are each year sending out large classes of young men, 
especially trained to meet this demand. For a young man to 
acquire this education requires four years at a scientific, or 
technical school, in addition to the four years necessary for 
preparation at the secondary school, and an outlay of from two 
to three thousand dollars. These necessary expenditures of 
time and money are such that many young men, who are men- 
tally capable of taking such courses, are obliged to give up their 
ambitions and fill inferior positions. 

Formerly the practical knowledge which young men ac- 
quired by contact with their work was sufiicient, but today 
the degree of specialization is such that a theoretical knowledge 
is essential to success in many industries where chemical pro- 
cesses are utilized. 

There are many men who, by close application to the 
practical side, have acquired responsible positions in technical 
industries, but are unfamiliar with the theoretical side of their 
chosen work. 

Such men are unable to advance in their special lines, 
because they cannot read the many valuable books written on 
special technical subjects, which presuppose a general knowl- 
edge of the theory of chemistry. 

At the present time, the requirements of admission to the 
higher institutions of learning, even for special students, are 

Twenty-one 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

such that the doors are practically closed to these men, although 
many of them could take special courses with profit. Again 
the only available hours for such men are during the evening. 
There is a demand, therefore, for a systematic evening course 
in chemistry, which will be open to men engaged at the present 
time in technical industries. 

Regular Students. 

The school offers a thorough four-year course in the general 
principles and applications of inorganic, organic and analytical 
chemistry, sufficiently complete to enable students to pursue 
their work with intelligence; to correlate theory and practice; 
to read technical works with profit; to test the quality and 
purity of chemicals and to become familiar with the laboratory 
methods of the trained chemist. 

To the student who can pursue his studies an extra year, 
and who has had the necessary training, the school offers a 
course in chemical engineering. It is the aim of this course to 
prepare men to aid in the operation of industries based on 
chemical principles. 

Special Students. 

Any of the courses in chemistry may be taken singly, pro- 
vided the head of the department is satisfied that the student 
can pursue the work with profit. 

Special courses may be arranged with the head of the 
department. 

Students are especially urged to take the entire work on 
the schedule of each year. A good grounding in mathematics, 
physics and German is essential to success in the chemical 
subjects of the third and fourth years. 

Laboratories. 

The laboratories in the new building on Huntington Avenue 
are fitted with an excellent equipment in up-to-date apparatus, 
to give thorough instruction in all the courses offered. 

A laboratory deposit of three dollars for the first year, and 
four dollars for all other years, must be paid before desks will be 

Twenty-two 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

assigned. Students who have not checked up their desks by the 
end of the school year will be charged one dollar extra. 

Owing to the increased prices of all materials used in the 
chemical laboratories, due to war conditions, a laboratory fee 
of two dollars will be charged to each student taking courses 
in the chemical laboratories. 

The School makes an effort to secure positions for those 
who have successfully completed the course in chemistry, or 
chemical engineering. 

40. Inorganic Chemistry. 

A course of fifty-six experimental lectures on the fundamen- 
tal laws and principles of inorganic chemistry. The course aims 
to familiarize the student with the properties and preparation of 
the following elements and their most important compounds : — 
oxygen, hydrogen, the halogens, sulfur, nitrogen, phosphorus, 
carbon, silicon, the alkali and alkaline earth groups, iron and 
aluminum. The course is to be taken in conjunction with 
(41). 
Text book : 

General Chemistry for Colleges, Smith. 

41. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. 

A laboratory course of 28 weeks, 90 periods in which the 
student is expected to verify and illustrate the facts and prin- 
ciples that have been discussed in the lectures. To be taken 
in conjunction with (40). 
Text book : 

Laboratory Experiments in Inorganic Chemistry, Spear. 

Courses (40) and (41) are well adapted to the needs of those 
who wish to take the College Entrance examinations. 

42. Qualitative Analysis. 

Preparation: (40) and (41), or an equivalent. 

A practical course in qualitative analysis of 28 weeks, 
140 periods duration, in the second year. The course relates 
to the identification of the common metallic elements and the 
ordinary acids. 

Twenty-three 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Each student is expected to make complete and accurate 
analyses of various mixtures, alloys and chemicals used in the 
industries. The laboratory work is supplemented by lectures 
and conferences. 
Text books: 

General Chemistry for Colleges, Smith. 

Qualitative Chemical Analysis, A. A. Noyes. 

43. Volumetric Analysis. 

Preparation: (40), (41), (42) or equivalent. 

A course of 14 weeks, 98 periods, in the third year on 
volumetric determinations, involving the use and the standardi- 
zation of burettes, pipettes and measuring flasks. The course 
includes alkalimetry, acidemetry, indicators, oxidimetry, iodi- 
metry, chlorimetry. The laboratory work is supplemented by 
lectures and conferences. 
Text book: 

Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Talbot. 

44. Gravimetric Analysis. 

Preparation: (40), (41), (42), (43) or equivalent. 

A course of 14 weeks, 98 periods, devoted to the principles 
and practice of gravimetric analysis. The laboratory work is 
supplemented by lectures and conferences. 
Text books: 

Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Talbot. 

Analytical Chemistry, Treadwell and Hall, Vol. 2. 

45. Organic Chemistry. 

Preparation: (40), (41), (42), (43), (44). 

A course consisting of 196 periods during the fourth year. 
The course is devoted to lectures, conferences and laboratory 
work, on the principles of organic chemistry, as illustrated by 
the methane and benzene derivatives. The student is required 
to prepare in the laboratory a number of organic compounds, 
selected to show the characteristic reactions, and to give train- 
ing in the practical separation and purification of organic 

Twenty-Jour 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

substances. After this synthetic work, the students are given 
a practical course in organic analysis. 
Text books: 

Holleman, Text-book of Organic Chemistry; Gatterman, 
Practical Methods in Organic Chemistry, translation by Scho- 
ber. Laboratory notes by the instructor. 

46. Technical Analysis. 

Preparation: (45) or an equivalent. 

A course of 28 periods in the fifth year, on the following: 

Analysis of gases. 

Analysis and testing of mineral, animal and vegetable oils. 

The origin, manufacture, properties, uses and analysis 
of the various fuels, and the determination of the heat value 
of fuels by the use of a calorimetric bomb. 

47 and 48. Theoretical Chemistry I and II. 

Preparation: (3), (42), (43), (44). 

A course of 56 lectures and conferences on chemical equi- 
librium and electro-chemical topics. The course will include 
lecture experiments and discussion of problems on the law of 
mass action applied to the rate and equilibrium of chemical 
reactions, the effect of temperature and pressure, the conduction 
of electricity by solutions, the production of electricity by 
chemical change, the electromotive force of voltaic cells and 
single potential differences. Problems for independent solu- 
tion by the student will also be given. 

49. Industrial Chemistry. 

Preparation: (42), (43), (44), (45). 

A course of 28 lectures and conferences on the more im- 
portant chemical processes Attention is given to many opera- 
tions of a general nature common to chemical industries, such as 
crushing, grinding, filtration, evaporation, distillation, etc. 
and to the apparatus employed in these processes. Some of 
the more important industries will be taken up in detail. 
Text book : 

Thorp, Outlines of Industrial Chemistry. 

Twenty-five 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 
DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Director: 
Nathaniel S. Marston, S.B. 

Instructors : 
Nathaniel S, Marston, S.B. C. P. Eldred, S.B. 
Mr. F. G. Hartwell Mr. Ira Smith 

The course in electrical engineering is intended primarily 
to cover the needs of two classes of men: (1) men who are 
working in the electrical trades, or other mechanical trades 
involving the use of electricity, who desire to increase their 
knowledge of practical electricity and to gain a thorough under- 
standing of the electrical engineering principles and their broad- 
er application, such as to prepare them for positions of foremen, 
superintendents, or operating managers in their particular 
field; (2) young men in business possessing a good general 
education, who wish to gain a knowledge of the technical 
matters of electricity, together with a sufficiently broad con- 
ception of the theories underlying all electrical engineering 
work, in order to render themselves more useful in their line 
of business by the combined general and technical training. 

The ideal condition for laying out a single course to serve 
the variety of needs represented by the individual interests of 
the students, would obviously be exact equality of preparation 
for all students beginning the work of the first year. Though 
such equality cannot be expected of all the men entering the 
first year, there must be a certain general basis of preparation, 
in order that the work may be of the greatest benefit to the 
largest number of men; therefore, the work of the first year 
has been laid out in such a way as to be of no special difficulty 
to those with a high school training or the equivalent thereof; 
at the same time, certain men who have not had such prepara- 
tion, but whose experience in practical life has sufficiently 
matured them, should be able to enter the first year with success 
though they may be required to make up some of the prepara- 
tory work, while they may be excused from certain portions 

Twenty-six 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

of the practical work with which their experience may have 
brought them into contact. It is recommended that such men 
should consult with the Dean or the Director in arranging their 
schedule. In general, a man entering the first year should 
(1) have easy command of the English language, such as to 
enable him to express himself and write clearly, (2) be familiar 
with elementary mathematics and algebra. 

Men with advanced training and experience will be ad- 
mitted to the second or third year, in accordance with their 
preparation. Such men should not only study the program 
presented below, but should submit their case to the Dean or 
Director. 

Students are invited to avail themselves of consultations 
with the various instructors, whenever desirable. 

60. Practical Electricity. 

First Year — ^Two classroom exercises per week for 28 
weeks. 

This course of lectures and problem work covers the follow- 
ing practical subjects. 

1. Simple electrical apparatus such as annunciators, 
burglar alarms, gas-hghting systems, arc and incandescent 
lamps; the wiring of such apparatus, together with a thorough 
discussion of electric- wiring devices; moulding, conduit, knob, 
tube and cleat work; methods employed in wiring old and new 
houses. 

2. Different types of d-c. motors and generators, and 
devices for their control; methods of installing and connecting 
motors and generators, and their complete circuit; practical 
operation of d-c. motors and generators; their troubles, causes 
thereof and remedies therefor; switchboard wiring and switch- 
board devices for direct current, both for two- and three-wire 
systems. 

It is not intended to cover in this course the details of 
large generating stations and complex distribution systems 
with comphcated apparatus and special devices, but rather 
those of small installations as apphcable to small private plants 
and to the average central-station consumer. In all this work 

Twenty-seven 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

special emphasis is placed on the rules embodied in the National 
Electric Code and on the best methods of modern practice. 

In the course of the work, reference is made to such prin- 
ciples of electrical engineering as are necessary to give a clear 
understanding of the subject under consideration, and, in that 
respect, this course serves as a definite preparation leading up 
to the second-year course on Elements of Electrical Engineering. 

61. Practical Electricity Laboratory. 

First Year — One entire evening each week during the last 
14 weeks. 

This laboratory course is to be taken simultaneously with 
the lecture course on Practical Electricity. The experiments 
cover the subjects treated under Practical Electricity. 

62. Elements of Electrical Engineering, Direct Currents. 

Second Year — Two 1^-hour periods per week for 28 weeks. 

This course of lectures, recitations and problem work is 
devoted to the study of the laws and properties of electric and 
magnetic circuits, and of the principles and operation of direct- 
current machinery, and of direct-current practice. 

The following topics are considered : 

General principles of magnetism, the magnetic circuit. 

The electric circuit, Ohm's law, Kirchhoff's law, units of 
resistance, current and potential. 

Electromagnetic induction, the dynamo. 

Direct-current generMors and motors, their construction, 
operation and applications. 

Direct-current systems, generation and distribution of 
power, storage batteries. 

Electric lighting and photometry. 

A great variety of problems based on practical engineering 
conditions are solved, both in class and outside, by the students. 

63. Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Direct Currents. 

Second Year — One entire evening each week for 28 weeks. 

The experiments performed in this course are intended to 

supplement the class-room work of the course on Elements of 

Twenty-eight 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

Electrical Engineering. The first experiments cover Ohm's 
law, the storage battery, the operation of a dynamo as a motor 
and generator, the photometer, etc. In the subsequent work, 
the characteristics of d-c. generators and motors are deter- 
mined experimentally; efficiency, losses, regulation, heating 
are carefully studied in the laboratory. Each student is re- 
quired to furnish a complete report, including theory, method 
of procedure, results and conclusions, on each experiment 
performed by him. 

64. Elements of Electrical Engineering, Alternating Currents. 

Third Year — One l^^-hour period per week for 28 weeks. 

This course of lectures, recitations and problem work, 
covers the principles of electrostatics, the theory of variable 
currents in the simple series circuit containing resistance, 
inductance and capacity, the general theory of harmonic 
alternating currents, single-phase and polyphase circuits, non- 
sinusoidal currents and voltages. The last part of the course 
deals vnth. the alternator, its regulation and efficiency, the 
transformer, its ratio, regulation, efficiency and application. 
The problems illustrating the various principles are taken, 
whenever possible, from the field of practical engineering. 

65. Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Alternating Currents. 

Third Year — Five evenings during last third of year. 

A series of 5 laboratory exercises in the latter part of the 
third year are devoted to the experimental study of a-c. circuits, 
the alternator and the transformer, supplementing the corre- 
sponding classroom work. 

66. Technical Electrical Measurements. 

Third Year — One hour per week for 28 weeks. 

In this course of lectures and recitations the theory, con- 
struction and operation of the more common types of measuring 
instruments are studied, together with the various methods of 
measurements employed in modern engineering practice. 
Emphasis is placed upon the useful field of application, as well 
as on the specific practical limitations of each instrument or 
testing process. 
Twenty-nine 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

67. Technical Electrical Measurements, Laboratory. 

Third Year — One evening per week in the first two thirds 
of the year, five exercises during the last third of the year. 

The experiments carried on by the students in this course 
illustrate the use of the instruments and the testing methods 
studied in the course on "Technical Electrical Measurements," 
as well as the principles covered in the lectures on "Elements 
of Electrical Engineering; Alternating Currents." Each experi- 
ment is to be covered in a comprehensive report submitted by 
each student. 

68. Advanced Alternating Currents. 

Fourth Year — One hour per week for 28 weeks. 

This course of lectures, recitations and problem work is 
devoted to the detailed study of the common types of a-c. 
machines, such as the induction motor, the synchronous motor, 
the rotary converter, etc. 

69. Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Advanced. 

Fourth Year — One evening per week for 28 weeks. 

In this course the work of the third-year course in Electrical 
Engineering Laboratory is continued. The more complicated 
types of a-c. machines are tested, and power-plant tests of the 
Y. M. C. A. electric plant are made. Complete reports are 
required on each test performed, as in the second and third- 
year laboratory courses. 

70. Electricity Supply Stations. 

Fourth Year — One exercise per week for 28 weeks. 

This course deals with the layout, construction and opera- 
tion of electric power generating stations, substations and dis- 
tribution systems. Emphasis is placed upon the character- 
istics, both technically and economically, of each type of 
station, steam power-operated, water-wheel-driven and inter- 
nal-combustion-motor-operated. The various rate systems 
and their specific fields of merit will also be discussed. 



Thirty 





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Chemistry Laboratory 

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ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

71. Power Transmission. 

Fourth Year — One 1^-hour exercise per week for 14 weeks. 

In this course are considered the economic problem of 
power transmission, the principles governing the design and 
the construction of transmission lines. 

72. Electric Railways. 

Four Year — One IJ^-hour period per week for 14 weeks. 

This course includes the following subjects: Train resist- 
ance, characteristics of railway motors, design of motor equip- 
ment, electric locomotives, design of power generating and 
distribution system for electric railways; also such details as 
car construction, rails, bonding, trolley and third-rail construc- 
tion. The subjects of storage-battery traction, and steam- 
railroad electrification are also briefly discussed. 

75. Thesis. 

During the final year, each student in order to qualify for a 
diploma, must prepare and present a report upon some piece 
of original work, investigation of some piece of machinery, con- 
sideration of some practical problem, or similar subject, the 
students working either alone or in pairs, and at such time as 
they please, within limits, the subjects being selected in con- 
sultation with one of the instructors, who will have immediate 
supervision of the work. 

The object of this work is to develop the student's powers 
of original investigation and to teach the principles upon which 
the study of special problems of various kinds should be ap- 
proached. It is hardly expected that the immediate results of 
the investigation will be of great value, in view of the time allow- 
able, considered as contributions to engineering knowledge 
but it is expected and believed that the value to the student 
himself will be very great. 



Thirty-one 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 

Director : 
C. S. Ell, M.S., S.B. 
Instructors : 
Carl S. Ell, S.B., M.S. C. A. Farwell, S.B. 
J. R. Leighton 

The four years' course in structural engineering covers 
thorough instruction in mathematics, mechanics and the theory 
and practice of drafting, detaihng, estimating and designing. 
Thorough instruction is given by means of lectures and class- 
room work in the important theoretical and practical principles 
of design, supplemented by the execution of detail drawings 
in the drafting room. 

100. Practical Physics. 

This course consists of two lectures per week, on Monday 
and Thursday evenings, throughout the year. Instruction is 
given in the practical application of physical laws. Each 
lecture, as far as possible, is accompanied by practical tests in 
the lecture room on large size apparatus, built especially for 
this course, so that the student may actually see a demonstra- 
tion of the truth of the various laws, thus enabling him to grasp 
readily the underlying principles. The course is devoted to a 
study of the mechanics of solids, liquids and gases, heat and 
its effects, together with lectures on light and sound. Practical 
problems covering each phase of the work are given throughout 
the year which are designed to fix in the student's mind the 
fundamental principles taken up in the lectures. The supplies 
for this course are a set of notes on "Practical Physics" pre- 
pared by C. S. Ell, a pair of small 4 or 5 inch triangles and a 
4-inch cardboard protractor. 

110. Structural Drawing. 

The course in structural drawing occupies one evening a 
week throughout the entire second year. The course consists 

Thirty-twc 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

in the working out of various graphical problems of mechanics 
on the drawing board, drawing standard sections of structural 
steel shapes, structural details and the preparation of drawings, 
representing simple structures. The purpose of this course 
is to familiarize the student with detailed drawings and teach 
him where and how to dimension structural parts on working 
drawings. 

111. Structural Design. 

The course in structural design consists of work in the draw- 
ing room, one complete evening each week throughout the third 
year. It is a continuation of the course in structural drawing 
given in the second year, and includes the execution of elemen- 
tary structural design, taking up in a practical way the prin- 
ciples given in the course in Theory of Structures. Each stu- 
dent is given data for various problems, the designs for which he 
works out in the drawing-room, making all necessary computa- 
tions and executing all drawings necessary for the preparation 
of a complete design of a number of engineering structures. 

112. Bridge Design. 

The course in bridge design occupies one complete evening 
a week throughout the fourth year. Most of the work is done 
in the drawing room, but instruction is given from time to time 
by means of lectures. The work includes the execution of 
complete designs for several types of railroad bridges and the 
execution of complete working drawings. 

113. Structural Mechanics. 

This course consists of one period on Monday and Thursday 
evenings, throughout the second year. The course covers the 
fundamental principles of statics, a study of the centre of gravity 
and the moment of inertia of plane figures and the application 
of the various principles of mechanics to the solution of simple 
structural problems. The work consists of lectures, recitations 
and the solution of problems, many of which are done in the 
drawing room. 

Thirty-three 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

114. Theory of Structures. 

This course occupies one period on Monday and Thursday 
evenings throughout the third year and consists of lectures, 
recitations and solution of problems. In this course instruction 
is given in the fundamental theory of structures including the 
theory of beams, computation of reactions, moments, shears for 
static and moving loads. The work in the class-room is sup- 
plemented by the solution of many practical problems in the 
drawing room. 

115. Strength of Materials. 

This course occupies one period on Monday and Thursday 
evenings throughout the third year, consisting of lectures, 
recitations and the solution of problems. Instruction is given 
in the strength of materials, mathematically treated, including 
the stresses and strains in bodies subjected to tension, to com- 
pression and to shearing; common theory of beams, with thor- 
ough discussion of the distribution of stresses, shearing forces, 
bending moments, slopes, and deflections. 

A study is also made of the strength of hooks, columns, 
shafts, and springs, and combined stresses in beams subjected 
to tension and compression, as well as bending. A brief con- 
sideration of strains, and the relations of the stresses on different 
planes in a body and the stresses in simple frames subjected 
to bending forces, is taken up in the latter part of the course. 

116. Advanced Structures. 

This course occupies one period on Monday and Friday 
evenings, throughout the fourth year. It is a continuation of 
the theory of structures given in the third year and takes up the 
fundamental principles involved in the design of various en- 
gineering structures, such as buildings, bridges, retaining walls, 
arches and other structures, as the time permits. Instruction 
is given by means of lectures and recitations and the various 
theoretical principles are applied in the execution of practical 
designs in the drawing room. 

117. Concrete Construction. 

This course occupies one period on Monday and Thursday 
evenings throughout the fourth year. Instruction is given in 

Thirty-jour 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

the history and early use of cement; different kinds of cement 
manufacture; sand, gravel, broken stones, and methods of 
mixing; description of concrete work; roadways, sidewalks, 
building work, footings, foundations, conveying concrete, 
placing, finishing and waterproofing; principles of reinforced 
concrete, formulas for calculating strength, tables of strength, 
values; reinforcing steel, expanded metals, wire fabrics; design 
and construction. Simple formulas and application, use of 
tables, beams, and girders, bearing power of soil, forms and 
molds, removal of forms, problems in beam, slab and girder 
designs, and arches. Cost estimating and requirements of 
the building laws. 

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Director : 
John W. Howard, S.B. 

Instructors : 
John W. Howard, S.B. Charles H. Restall, S.B. 

The courses in Railroad Engineering and Municipal En- 
gineering which have heretofore been given separately have been 
combined to form the course in Civil Engineering which is 
herein outlined. 

Two options are offered in the fourth year; one in Rail- 
road Engineering and one in Municipal Engineering. 

Students wishing to take separate subjects may do so on 
approval of the Dean. 

130. Topographical Drawing. 

Preparation: Mechanical Drawing (10). 

This course of 28 weeks in the second year is primarily 
designed to give training in the interpretation and drawing of 
topographical maps. It consists of one and one-half hours per 
week in the drawing room, devoted to the study of the different 
conventional signs employed, and each student is required to 
make a number of plates and to become reasonably proficient 
in the preparation of such maps. Particular attention is given 
to the study of contour maps, and the solution of problems 
relating thereto. 

Thirty-five 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

131. Plane and Topographic Surveying. 

Preparation: Trigonometry or Math. II (3) 

The course in plane and topographic surveying consists of 
three hours instruction each week during the second year. 

The first term is devoted to a study of surveying instru- 
ments, the methods of making surveys and the solution of 
problems in plane surveying. 

In the second term the methods used in topographic sur- 
veying, together wdth the problems relating thereto, are taken 
up in detail, as well as advanced and special problems in plane 
surveying. 

Special emphasis is laid on the construction and use of the 
various kinds of maps and plans with which the surveyor should 
be familiar. 

132. Advanced Surveying. 

Preparation: Plane and Topographic Surveying, (131). 

This course consists of three hours instruction per week 
for the first eight weeks of the third year. Higher problems 
in surveying such as triangulation, precise, trigonometric and 
barometric leveling, map projection, and the plane table are 
discussed. | 

135. Materials of Construction. 

A course of two and one-half hours per week during the 
first eighteen weeks of the fourth year, taking up a consideration 
of the properties of the various materials used in engineering 
construction, such as wood, iron, steel, brick, stone, cement and 
concrete. 

140. Foundations. 

A course of two and one half hours per week during the last 
ten weeks of the fourth year. 

It consists of the method of construction and design of the 
various kinds of foundations used in engineering construction 
together with a study of the bearing power of different kinds 
of soil. 

145. Highway Engineering. 

A course of one hour per week throughout the second year, 
in which are treated the following subjects: 

Thirty-six 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

The construction of roads and city streets, the problems 
of drainage and maintenance, quahties of trap rocks, good 
gravel, binding materials, paving blocks and bricks, concrete 
foundations, and the uses of asphaltic oils and other bituminous 
materials. 

150. Railroad Engineering. 

Preparation: Plane and Topographic Surveying (131). 

This course in railroad engineering is given three hours per 
week during the last twenty weeks of the third year. It con- 
sists of the computation and methods of laying out simple, 
compound, reverse, and easement curves; frogs, switches, and 
turnouts; the computation of earthwork by different methods, 
slope stakes, borrow pits and cross section work. 

151. Railroad Drawing. 

Preparation: Plane and Topographic Surveying (131). 

This course is given one evening per week during the third 
year. 

From field notes a map and profile of a preliminary survey 
for a railroad are plotted. The location is discussed and ad- 
justed to the preliminary map. Other drawings involving the 
study of problems common to railroad practice will be taken up. 
The course is supplemented by lectures. 

153. Railroad Engineering and Design. 

Preparation: Railroad Engineering (151) and Railroad 

Drawing (152). 

This course is given three hours per week during the fourth 
year. It consists of a study of yard design, passenger and 
freight yards, gravity yards, hump yards, yard accessories, 
stations, terminals, elimination of grade crossings, signals, 
methods of construction and making estimates. 

A large part of the work is supplemented by lectures. 

160. Municipal Engineering. 

A course of three hours per week in the fourth year dealing 
with various engineering problems encountered by town and 
city engineers such as construction of sewers, retaining walls. 

Thirty-seven 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

bridges, grade crossing problems, making of contracts and 
writing specifications for various construction work, methods of 
inspection and handling of public service properties, such as 
poles, lines, conduits, tracks, etc. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Instructor: 
H. C. Mabbott, S.B. 

This course is designed to give a broad foundation in those 
fundamental subjects which form the basis for all professional 
engineering practice. 

170. Mechanism. 

This course of one and one-half hours per week, throughout 
the second year, takes up a study of the principles in machinery 
and power transmission apparatus. The problem work goes 
into the design of pulleys, belts, gearing and gear teeth develop- 
ment, cams, and quick return motions found in machine tools 
such as shapers, slotters, and planers. 

171. Mechanical Engineering Drawing. 

This course of one and one-half hours per week supple- 
ments the course in mechanism. It consists in the actual 
design of cams and gears, with graphical solution of velocity 
and force problems. 
175. Applied Mechanics. 

This course of 70 hours in the third year comprises a study 
of statics, including the determination of stresses in frames; 
centre of gravity, moment of inertia and radius of gyration; 
kinematics and dynamics including uniform and varying recti- 
linear and curvilinear motion, centrifugal force, momentum, 
impact, work, power and kinetic energy. 

180. Thermodynamics. 

This course of one hour per week during the third year is 
devoted to the study of the theory of perfect gases and thermo- 
dynamics. The use of steam and entropy tables and solutions 
of general problems in steam; also heating and ventilation. 

Thirty- eight 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

181. Boilers and Prime Movers. 

This course of two and one half hours per week, in the 
fourth year, is devoted to the study of the practical operation 
of boilers and boiler accessories and the principles of boiler 
design. The work also covers the essentials of steam engine and 
turbine design and strength of parts of steam engines such as 
pistons rods, cylinders, crossheads, flywheels, etc. 

182. Power Plant Design. 

A course of one and one-half hours per week, partly lectures 
and partly drawing room work, in power plant design and lay- 
out. The course treats of the proper layout of boilers, pipes, 
condensers, separators, ash and coal handling machinery, and 
calculation of the building itself, as well as engine beds, chim- 
ney design, and chimney foundations. 

185. Hydraulic Engineering. 

A course of one and one-half hours per week. The course 
consists of two parts. The first is devoted to the study of 
theoretical hydraulics dealing with hydrostatic and hydro- 
dynamic pressure, the flow of water through channels, pipes, 
orifices and nozzles and over weirs. The second part deals with 
such practical problems as the study of stream flow and storage 
and the development of water power. 

186. Hydraulic Motors. 

A course of one and one-half hours per week, mainly reci- 
tations covering the principles of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic 
pressure, the flow of water through open channels, pipes, 
orifices and nozzles and over weirs. Half the time is given to 
a study of impulse wheels and reaction turbines, with reference 
to their proper construction, regulation and testing, and to the 
various sources of loss of energy in their operation. 

DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES 

200 and 201. German I and H. 

These courses of one hour per week throughout the third 
and fourth years respectively, are planned to give the student 
a knowledge of German grammar as well as a working vocabu- 
lary of scientific terms. 

Thirty-nine 



Equipment 



THE School is now housed in the new building of the As- 
sociation, and has very exceptionally equipped quarters for 
carrying on the work of the Engineering Courses. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Mechanical Laboratories. 

Our steam engineering plant is completely equipped with 
meters, scales, indicators, and all the necessary accessory 
equipment for making complete boiler tests, and determining 
the efSciencies of the various appliances used in generating 
power, heat, and light for our new building. This places at 
the disposal of our classes a perfectly equipped, up-to-date, 
engineering department, and gives them the means of carrying 
on boiler tests, determining the efficiencies of various fuels and 
oils, taking indicator diagrams, determining the efficiency of 
modern reciprocating engines and turbines when direct con- 
nected to generators, as well as renders them familiar with all 
the various auxiliary appliances of such a plant, as condensers, 
pumps, air compressors, etc. The students also have the use 
of the equipment of our Automobile School, thus giving op- 
portunity to study the most advanced ideas in gasoline engine 
practice. 

Mechanic Arts Laboratories. 

There are at present two laboratories, one for metal work 
and the other for woodworking and pattern work, which are 
available for the use of our students. 

The metal working laboratory is well equipped, and affords 
the student an opportunity for work with various machines, as 
lathes, shapers, drill presses and milling machines. There are 
also a gas forge and brazing furnace, together with all the re- 
quired equipment for bench work instruction. 

The woodworking laboratory has a power band saw, lathes, 
circular saw, buzz planer, and all the necessary equipment for 
woodworking and pattern work. 

Forty 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

In addition to the foregoing, a small, but completely 
equipped, shop for the construction and repair of apparatus, and 
for the use of students in connection with their thesis work, has 
been installed. This shop is equipped with a metal and wood- 
working lathe, grinder and all the necessary wood and metal 
working tools. There is also a very complete set of cabinet 
worker's tools for use in woodworking. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Field Instruments. 

For work in the field the Department possesses various 
surveying instruments, representing the principal makes and 
types of instruments in general use. The equipment includes 
transits, levels, compasses, a complete plane table outfit, Locke 
hand level, flag poles, levehng rods, stadia rod, engineers' and 
surveyors' chains, steel and cloth tapes and other accessories. 
For Higher Surveying, an Aneroid Barometer is used for baro- 
metric leveling, and the transits are equipped with neutral 
glasses and reflectors for astronomical observations, as well as a 
sextant, reading to ten seconds, and equipped with neutral 
glasses and telescopes. This year a Buff and Buff Plane Table 
Outfit and a Berger, 18-inch Wye Level, as well as several smaller 
instruments, have been added to the equipment. 

The scope of the equipment and the field work itself are 
designed to train the student's judgment as to the relative merits 
of the various types of field instruments. 

Design and Drafting Rooms. 

The School possesses large, light and well equipped drawing 
rooms for the carrying on of the designing and drafting, which 
form so important a part of civil engineering work. These 
rooms are supplied with lockers containing the drawing supplies, 
and files containing blue prints and photographs of structures 
that represent the best practice. Many of the prints and photo- 
graphs are of structures erected in and about Boston. 



Forty -one 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

The Electrical Laboratory is well equipped with apparatus 
for teaching the principles of measurements, and the equipment 
is being steadily increased and developed for the doing of work 
of a higher degree of precision. Among the special pieces of 
apparatus may be mentioned the following: Cary Foster Bridge, 
a modified form of Hoopes Conductivity Bridge, a Laboratory 
Wheatstone Bridge, a Leeds Northrup Potentiometer with Volt 
box, standard cells and low resistance standards, an accurate 
Chemical Balance and other appliances for the close determina- 
tion of currents, resistances and potential differences. 

There are also a set of variable inductances, and a set of 
condensers to the amount of eighty microfarads capacity vari- 
able in steps of one-tenth microfarad each. 

Among the instruments for testing purposes, for alternating 
current work, may be mentioned the following : Three matched 
voltmeters and three General Electric Type P-3 Iron clad watt- 
meters arranged for Y connection, one G. E. Polyphase watt- 
meter with double current and potential ranges, numerous other 
voltmeters of various ranges, potential transformers, numerous 
ammeters some with current transformers, three integrating 
meters, one General Electric and one Westinghouse polyphase, 
switchboard type, integrating wattmeters and a High Torque 
General Electric test meter. There is also a considerable and 
increasing assortment of auxiliary testing apparatus, such as 
synchronism indicators, power factor indicators, frequency indi- 
cators, etc. 

For direct current testing there is a large and increasing 
collection of Weston instruments, both voltmeters and amme- 
ters, of suitable ranges and grades of precision, and two Thomson 
integrating watt-hour meters, while the measurement of unusual 
currents and voltages is ensured by four Weston millivoltmeters, 
with an assortment of standard shunts and multiplying resist- 
ances of various orders of magnitude. 

For calibrating purposes a 600 ampere-hour storage battery 
has been added to the equipment for current tests, while for 
voltage work there is a 260-volt potential battery. 

Forty-two 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

There is also the usual assortment of testing devices, such 
as speed indicators, tachometers, brakes, loading resistances and 
the numerous minor pieces of apparatus needed in practical 
testing and operating of electrical machinery. 

Among the machines of this Department are a pair of spe- 
cially made, matched machines arranged to run as single phase, 
two or three phase generators, or motors, as well as synchro- 
nous converters, double current generators, or on the Direct 
Current side as shunt, series, or compound generators, either 
two or three wire, or as motors. 

There are also a 15 horse power 230-volt Westinghouse 
motor, a new General Electric 10 horse power Interpole 230- 
volt motor, a 500 volt generator, two 500-volt series, and several 
5 00- volt shunt motors, and a series parallel controller. 

A 45 K. V. A., 50-cycle, single phase, 500-volt generator 
giving a practically pure sine wave, three General Electric Type 
H transformers, each of 3 K. V. A. capacity, a lyi K. V. A., 
special General Electric 60-cycle 230-volt alternator, with re- 
volving field tapped for either 1, 2, 3 (star or mesh connection) 
6 or 12 phase connection, which may be operated also as a syn- 
chronous motor. 

In addition to the above are a 5 H. P, G. E. single phase 
induction motor, which may also be operated as a three phase 
motor and a 10 H. P. Fort Wayne shunt motor driving a special 
Holtzer-Cabot 3 phase 5 K. B. A. Alternating Current Genera- 
tor. This latter machine has two special rotors, permitting its 
use as a squirrel cage or phase wound induction motor, there 
being a three phase regulating resistance for use with the phase 
wound rotor. 

During the past year there has been added a 5 K. W. 
Holtzer-Cabot three phase synchronous converter. This is 
wound for 220 volts on the D. C. side and will permit of the 
use of the above mentioned specially matched generators as 
balancers in connection with this unit. 

There is also available for advanced instruction, in co- 
operation with the Mechanical Department, the four three- wire 
generators (two driven by reciprocating engines and two by 

FoTiy-three 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Westinghouse-Parsons turbines) in the main generating plant 
of the Association. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

There is a large laboratory devoted entirely to Physics to- 
gether with a lecture room. 

The Physics Department has been very completely equip- 
ped with all necessary apparatus for the experimental work 
that is required of the students, as well as that required for 
lecture demonstration. Among other things have been added: 
verniers, levels, spherometers, calorimeters, thermometers, 
pyrometers, a spectroscope, a microscope, a spectrometer, 
balances, standard gram weight, lecture table galvanometer, 
optical disk with all accessories, lenses, photometer, a full set of 
Weather Bureau apparatus, including a barograph, thermo- 
graph, hygrometer, barometer, maximum and minimum ther- 
mometers, etc. These, in addition to the equipment already 
owned, give a wide range to the experimental work that can be 
done. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

This Department is completely equipped in all respects for 
carrying on all lines of Chemical work, from that of a High 
School to that of most advanced College grade. The three 
laboratories, with accommodations for over one hundred and 
fifty students, are very exceptionally furnished with all the neces- 
sary appliances for chemical work. Some of these are: hoods, 
drying closets, still, steam and hot water baths, electrolytic cir- 
cuits, vacuum and pressure apparatus, balances, combustion fur- 
naces, complete sets of apparatus for the sampling and analysis 
of flue gases and fuels. There are also testing machines for 
oils, viscosimeters, and different sorts of flash point apparatus. 
A chemical museum is connected with this Department where 
are kept specimens for purposes of illustration. 



F orty-fovr 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

LIBRARIES 

There is in connection with the School a professional library 
containing books pertaining to both the school work of the 
boys and to their practical work. In addition to this there also 
are current periodicals on engineering and scientific subjects for 
their exclusive use. All members of the School are entitled to 
take books from the Boston Public Library, and this offers a 
very unusual opportunity to our non-resident students. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Our new gymnasium with all the latest modern equipment 
gives ample accommodation for all students. 

There is a running track on the grounds adjoining, together 
with tennis, and hand ball courts; also a large natatorium where 
swimming is taught by competent instructors. 

In connection with this Department there are also six 
excellent bowHng alleys, which may be used by the students 
upon the payment of a nominal fee. 

RESTAURANT AND BARBER-SHOP 

Attention is called to the fact that there is a spa on the 
first floor and restaurant in the basement of the Association 
building. There is also a barber shop in the basement. 

For all further information, write 

THE EVENING SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING, 

316 Huntington Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Forty-five 



Additional Information 

The School reserves the right to retain for its annual 
exhibition, and for any other purpose which it may deem nec- 
essary, drawings made by students. 

Scholarships. 

As an aid to worthy men who desire an education and are 
unable to pay in full even our slight charges, a limited number 
of scholarships have been provided, which will be judiciously 
distributed by the Educational Committee, to whom applica- 
tion should be made. 

Entrance Requirements. 

Any man of good character, regardless of age, occupation 
or creed, with adequate general education may be enrolled in 
the School, provided he can show that he is sufficiently prepared 
to take up the studies of the first year. High School graduates 
should find no difficulty. 

A student may elect any subject, or combination of sub- 
jects, which best serves his particular needs. However, to 
prevent loss of time and expense to the student, he will not be 
allowed to elect courses which, on account of inadequate pre- 
liminary training and experience, he could not pursue with 
profit. The Dean should be consulted before registration. 

Certificates. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of any of the regular, 
or special courses, the student is entitled to receive a certificate. 
No certificates will be given, however, unless the student has 
successfully performed the prescribed work and passed the 
necessary examinations. 

Suburban Members. 

All tickets held by members of the Cambridge, Chelsea, 
Everett, Lynn, Maiden, Melrose, Newton, Quincy, Salem and 
Somerville Associations, will be honored for membership in the 
Boston Association. 

Forty-six 



Schedule of Rates 

Courses I and II (Chemistry and Electrical Engineering) 

First year, $35, including membership payable as follows: — $15 upon 
entering, $10 November 15 and $10 January 15. 

Second, third and fourth years, $50 each, including membership, payable 
as follows: — $20 upon entering, $15 November 15 and $15 January 15. 

Courses III, IV and V (Structural, Civil and Mechanical Engineering) 

First year, $30, including membership, payable as follows: — $10 upon 

entering, $10 November 15 and $10 January 15. 

Second, third and fourth years, $50 each, including membership, payable 

as follows: — $20 upon entering, $15 November 15 and $15 January 15. 

Special Note — The following rates are in addition to membership ($2). 
In case more than one course is taken, a discount of $3 for each additional 
course will be made. 



Course Tuition 

68 Adv. Alternating Currents 
11 Adv. Mech. Drawing and 

Orthographic Projections 

116 Advanced Structures 
132 Advanced Surveying 
170 Applied Mechanics 

20 Architectural Drawing I 

21 Architectural Drawing II 

22 Architectural Drawing III 
181 Boilers and Prime Movers 
112 Bridge Design 

117 Concrete Construction 
65 Elec. Eng., Lab. A. C. 

63 Elec. Eng., Lab. D. C. 

69 Elec. Eng., Lab., Advanced 

70 Electricity Supply Stations 
72 Electric Railways 

64 Elements of Elec. Eng. A. C. 
62 Elements of Elec. Eng. D. C. 

140 Foundations 

30 Freehand Drawing I 

31 Freehand Drawing II 

185 German I 

186 German II 
*44 Gravimetric Analysis 
145 Highway Engineering 

150 Hydraulic Engineering 

151 Hydraulic Motors 
35 Industrial Design 

*49 Industrial Chemistry 

*40 and 41 Inorganic Chemistry 



Course 



Tuition 



515.00 


38 Life Class 


$20.00 




12 Machine Drawing 


13.00 


13.00 


135 Materials of Construction 


24.00 


24.00 


2 Mathematics I 


15.00 


13.00 


3 Mathematics II 


15.00 


18.00 


10 Mechanical Drawing 


10.00 


10.00 


171 Mechanical Eng. Drawing 


18.00 


10.00 


170 Mechanism 


18.00 


13.00 


160 Municipal Eng. 


30.00 


24.00 


*45 Organic Chemistry 


50.00 


24.00 


71 Power Transmission 


13.00 


24.00 


131 Plane and Topo. Surveying 


24.00 


12.00 


100 Practical Physics 


15.00 


20.00 


60 Practical Electricity 


24.00 


15.00 


Power Plant Design 


18.00 


13.00 


*42 Qualitative Analysis 


38.00 


13.00 


151 Railroad Drawing 


24.00 


12.00 


165 Railroad Engineering 


18.00 


24.00 


153 R. R. Engineering and Design 


30.00 


13.00 


115 Strength of Materials 


24.00 


10.00 


111 Structural Design 


24.00 


10.00 


110 Structural Drawing 


24.00 




113 Structural Mechanics 


24.00 




*46 Technical Analysis 


25.00 


30.00 


66 and 67 Tech. Elect. Meas'ments 


24.00 


18.00 


47 Theoretical Chemistry I 


18.00 


18.00 


48 Theoretical Chemistry II 


18.00 


13.00 


114 Theory of Structures 


24.00 


10.00 


180 Thermodynamics 


13.00 


18.00 


130 Topographical Drawing 


18.00 


24.00 


*43 Volumetric Analysis 


30.00 



*Owing to the increased price of all material used in the chemical laboratories, due to 
war conditions, a laboratory fee of two dollars will be charged to each student taking 
courses in the chemical laboratories. 



Forty-seven 



NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

The tuition for all courses payable in advance unless stated 
to the contrary in which case times of payment are indicated. 
Numbers preceding courses refer to description of courses, 
pages 15 to 39. 

Students who discontinue a course, but who have attended 
four or more recitations in the subject, will be required to pay a 
term's tuition. 

No student is permitted to transfer from one course to 
another without consulting the Dean beforehand and receiving 
a transfer order which must be presented at the main office for 
the proper ticket. 

POLYTECHNIC ASSOCIATION 

This is an organization formed and managed by the stu- 
dents. Its object is to provide social gatherings for the Engi- 
neering students, and to establish a bond of friendship among 
the men. 

All men entering the Engineering School may join this 
association by filling out the proper blank at the educational 
office. Membership is free. 

A school pin, pennant and engraved stationery with Poly- 
technic design may be ordered by the members. 



14835 

Forty-eight 



General Departments 

Department of Recreation and Health 

ALBERT E. GARLAND, M.D., B.P.E., Director 

This Department offers the BEST RECREATION that RE-CREATES. 
Privileges as follows: Three Gymnasiums, Swimming Tank of Filtered Salt 
Water, Baths of all kinds. Classes to Music, Six Bowling Alleys, Tenuis — 
Indoor and Out, Handball, Squash, Indoor Golf, Athletics — Indoor and Out, 
Basket-ball and Games, Boxing, Wrestling and Fencing. Best of Instruc* 
tion. Medical Direction. Come in any time. 

Department of Religious Work 

EDWIN W. PEIRCE. Secretary 

In order that young men may secure a well-balanced development and attain 
the true foundation for successful living, the Association advises each member to 
so plan his schedule that he may enter into one or more of the following activitiea: 
Character Building Classes Training for Christian Service 

Young Men's Simday Forum Lectures and "Talks" 

Gospel Team Worker's Library 

Personal Interviews Twenty-four-hour-a-day Club 

Department of Social Work 

DAVID M. CLAGHORN, Director 

The attention of members is called to the many opportunities in the Association 

for social service, and the following social features: 

A Newly Equipped Game Room El Club Sarmiento (Pan-American Club) 

The Association Congress The Land and Water Club 

Popular Social Evenings Concerts and Entertainments 

Department of Council and Placement 

FREDERICK W. ROBINSON, Director 

Advice given to young men concerning their vocational future and efforts made 

to place them in positions best adapted to their varied abilities. 

It also acts as a clearing house for young men seeking work and employer* 

desiring to engage reliable help. 

Its service is not limited to members, but the latter are given liberal discounts 

and effort is made to notify them when good positions are open. 



Boys' Division 

JAMES G. BARNES, S.B., City Boys' Work Secretary 

The Boys' Division is made up of boys from Greater Boston whose needs are 
ministered to by a force of young men who have made a careful study of "boy- 
ology." The Division comprises boys from twelve to eighteen years of age, 
whose needs are studied and whose problems we try to solve. Activities are 
conducted along social, physical, educational, and spiritual lines. The annual 
membership fee is $2.00; gymnasium and natatorium privileges are open to the 
boys at special rates. 



n 



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HIKETEEETH YEAR 



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XTORTHEASTERH COLLEGE OP tB.^ ^ 

BOSTOIT YOU^G MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIAllON 1 



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NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

o£ the 
Boston Youn^ Men's Ckristian Association 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

Established in 1898; incorporated in 1904. Provides a four-year cotirse 
in preparation for the Bar and grants the Degree of Bachelor of Laws. 



SCHOOL OF COMMERCE AND FINANCE 

Established in 1907; incorporated in 191 1. Offers the following four-year 
courses leading to the degree of B. C. S. (Bachelor of Commercial Science): 
Banking, Business Administration, Finance and Bond Salesmanship, and Pro- 
fessional Accountancy. Anyone passing the examination for advanced standing 
is enabled to complete any one of the four regular courses and secure the degree 
in three years. Special coxirses in addition to regular courses. 



SCHOOL OF CO-OPERATIVE ENGINEERING 

Four-year courses in Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical and Civil Engineering, 
in co-operation with business firms. Students earn while learning. Open to 
High School graduates. 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

A school offering three and four-year courses in Chemistry, Chemical, Elec- 
trical, Structural, Railroad and Mxmicipal Engineering. 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Beginning with the fall of 1916, courses of college grade in English, Mathe- 
matics, Science, History, and Education will be offered. Professors and in- 
structors of New England colleges will be engaged. These courses will be 
open to graduates of high schools and to others who can meet the entrance 
requirements. 



For fxirther information concerning any of the above schools, address FRANK 
PALMER SPEARE, President of the College, Boston Y. M. C. A., 316 Hunting- 
ton Ave. Tel. Back Bay 4400. 



.a 



NORTHEASTERN 
COLLEGE 

SCHOOL OF LAW 



Nineteenth Year 

1916-1917 



*HE LAW SCHOOL WAS KNOWN 
SINCE ITS ESTABLISHMENT AS 
THE EVENING LAW SCHOOL OF 
THE BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

THIS NAME WAS CHANGED IN 

APRIL 1916 TO J^prtljeastccn 
(^allege g>cl)ODl of 2jaui of 

THE BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



Published by 

NORTHEASTERN COLLEGE 

Boston Young Men's Christian Association 

316 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



:gL 



Calendar 



191(3 




Sept. 5 - Sept. 9 


Condition Examinations 


Sept. 5-16 


Registration 


Sept. 11 


Senior Class Lectures begin 


Sept. 18 


Lectures begin 


Oct. 12 


Columbus Day 


Nov. 23 


Thanksgiving Day 


Dec. 18-26 inc. 


Christmas Recess 


1917 




Feb. 22 


Washington's Birthday 


April 19 


Patriot's Day 


May 30 


Memorial Day 


June 17 


Baccalaureate Address 


June 20 


Commencement 



The social features will be announced from time to time. 

CONDITION EXAMINATIONS, 1916 

Tuesday, Sept. 5 Criminal Law, Property I, Corporations 

Wednesday, Sept. 6 Torts, Equity I, Property II (Deeds) 

Thursday, Sept. 7 Common Law Pleading, Agency, 

Partnership 

Friday, Sept. 8 Contracts, Bills and Notes, Equity II 

Saturday, Sept. 9 Sales, Wills 

Examinations must be taken at the time scheduled, as no 
speciarexaminations will be given. 

3 



Northeastern College 

BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers and Members of the Corporation 
ARTHUR S. JOHNSON, President 
ALBERT H. CURTIS, First Vice-President 

WILLIAM E. MURDOCK, Second Vice-President 
GEORGE W. MEHAFFEY, Third Vice-President 
GEORGE W. BRAINARD, Secretary 
LEWIS A. CROSSETT, Trensurer 
F. W. CARTER J. GRAFTON MINOT 

S. B. CARTER W. B. MOSSMAN 

WM. C. CHICK H. W. NEWHALL 

GEO. W. COLEMAN SILAS PEIRCE 

H. BRADLEE FENNO CHAS. W. PERKINS 

HENRY G. LORD THOS. H. RUSSELL 

FRANCIS P. LUCE SARIN P. SANGER 

FRANK P. SPEARE 

Officers of the College 

FRANK P. SPEARE, M. H., President 
GALEN D. LIGHT, A. B., Secretary- Bursar 

Board of Governors 

WILLIAM E. MURDOCK, Chairman 

ALBERT H. CURTIS ARTHUR S. JOHNSON 

MORGAN L. COOLEY GEORGE W. MEHAFFEY 

WM. C. CHICK GEORGE H. MARTIN 

FRANK P. SPEARE, Ex-Officio 



Corporation of the Law School 

SAMUEL J. ELDER, President 
GEORGE W. MEHAFFEY, Secretary 
ROBERT G. DODGE LEWIS A. CROSSETT 

ARTHUR S. JOHNSON 

4 



Faculty and Special Lecturers 

FRANK PALMER SPEARE, M.H., President and Dean 
ASA S. ALLEN, LL.B., Assistant Dean 
GALEN D. LIGHT, A.B., Secretary 



ASA S. ALLEN, LL.B. 
Massachusetts Practice 

W. LLOYD ALLEN, A.B., J.B. 

Agency 

CHARLES NEAL BARNEY, A.M., LL.B. 
Equity I and II 

HERBERT LUTHER BARRETT, A.B., LL.B. 

Criminal Law 

WILLIAM EDWIN DORMAN, A.B., LL.B. 

Constitutional Law 

ELIAS FIELD, A.B., LL.B. 
Property I 

GUY HAROLD HOLLIDAY, A. B., LL.B. 

Common Law Pleading 

HENRY TILTON LUMMUS, LL.B. 

Moot Court 

HUGH DEAN McLELLAN, A.B., LL.B. 

Contracts 

KEITH McLEOD, A.B., LL.B. 
Property II and Bankruptcy 

GUY NEWHALL, A.B., LL.B. 
Property III 

CLARENCE LUCIAN NEWTON, Ph.B., J.M. 
Corporations and Wills 

RAYMOND TASKER PARKE, A.M., LL.B. 

Bills and Notes, and Sales 



OSCAR STORER, A.B., LL.B. 
Torts and Evidence 

SYDNEY RUSSELL WRIGHTIXGTON, A.B., LL B 

Partnership 



ARTHUR A. BALLANTINE, A.B., LL B. 
Of Goodwin, Procter & Ballantine 

HOWARD W. BROWN, LL.B. 
Of Davis, Peabody & Brown 



ALBERT P. CARTER, A.B., LL.B. 

Attorney at Law 



ROBERT CUSHMAN, A.B., LL.B. 
Of Roberts, Roberts & Cushman 



FAY B. KENDALL, LL.B. 

Of Sprout & Kendall 



EDWARD F. McCLENNEN, LL.B. 
Of Brandeis, Dunbar & Nutter 



HUGH W. OGDEN, A.M., LL.B. 
Of Whipple, Sears & Ogden 

CHANDLER M. WOOD, A.M., J.M. 

Attorney at Law 



JAMES A. BELL, Jr., Ph.B., A.B., Chainnnn of Coriimittec on Admission 

JOHN S. PATTON, Jr., A.B., LL.B., Counselor 

NATHAN BIDWELL, Counselor 

JOSEPH F. LOCKETT, Social Secretary 



C. MARVIN CADY, M.A., Librarian 
6 



The Study of Law 

Statistics show a larger number of men attending the 
American Law Schools than any other type of professional 
school. 

This class of unusually intelligent men would not decide 
upon the law unless there were excellent reasons. These are 
plain, however, to one in touch with industrial, commercial 
and political life and may be summed up as follows. The 
law, treating of every phase of human relationship, fits the 
student in a most unusual manner to deal with men and 
affairs, trains him to think, to think straight, to think a prop- 
ositioii clear through to the end and then to act in accordance 
with judgment based on a clean-cut analysis of the facts, 
pro and con. This habit of analytical thinking and judicial 
action is indispensable to the practitioner of law and of equal 
importance to the business man and those in political life, 
and accounts in large measure for the marked success attend- 
ing legally trained men in these lines of activity and the large 
number constantly going from the Law Schools into diversi- 
fied occupations. 

Another valuable feature of the study of law, quite apart 
from most subjects, is the fact that one begins to grow men- 
tally as soon as he begins to study and his progress may be 
noted from the outset, while the frequent application of the 
things learned is most strikingly evident to the business man. 
A law course, therefore, like money on interest, begins to jdeld 
a return from the beginning which rolls u]) month by month. 
The student of law if obliged to withdraw after a limited period 
finds himself stronger, broader, more intelligent and logical 
in his reasoning and acts. These facts have become known to 
thousands of men and have led to the heavy attendance in 
reputable schools. 

Massachusetts has maintained two of the most prominent 
day law schools in America for a great many years, the ones 
at Harvard and Boston Universities. There are, however, a 
large number of ambitious and competent men who are em- 
])loyed during the day and cannot enter these universities, 



and who yet desire the best equivalent. Through the 
co-operation of three of the leading teachers and practitioners 
of law, the Association Evening Law School, now known as 
the Northeastern College School of Law of the Boston 
Young Men's Christian Association, was established and 
developed. Its success has been noteworthy and has 
earned for it the warm commendation of those familiar with 
the facts. Being part of a great educational system and 
wholly devoid of commercialism, it has been able to establish 
standards and maintain a grade of requirements which have 
won for it a high position among American Law Schools. 
Its methods are progressive, modern and in accordance with 
the best practice. Its faculty are honor men of the great day 
schools who have not only graduated with high rank after 
completing an extended course in the university and law 
school, but have achieved success in the profession. The 
notable list of men on the faculty attests to the quality of 
work done by the school and its position among the members 
of the Bar. 

The work of all the Association schools is absolutely non- 
sectarian and any man of good character, regardless of his 
financial or social standing or creed, is admitted on an equal 
footing. No evening Law School could work under better 
conditions and none has achieved a more enviable reputation. 

Close investigation is invited by all those interested in the 
study of law and every opportunity will be afforded to inspect 
thoroughly the school, its methods, courses of study, past 
examination papers, lists of graduates and their present occu- 
pations. 

A recent questionnaire sent to our alumni following the idea 
of the one issued by the Harvard Law School has shown a 
most gratifying advance made by our graduates in the pro- 
fession, business and political life of the country and many of 
the men have become prominent and extremely useful. 



Historical Review 

The Association Law School, now known as the North- 
eastern College School of Law of the Boston Young Men's 
Christian Association, was established in 1898 in response 
to a demand for a school which should be so thorough 
in its work and conducted on such a high plane that its grad- 
uates would stand well at the Bar and be recognized as men 
of professional attainment and ethical standards. 

Every effort has been made to establish and maintain 
high standards of entrance and graduation. A four years' 
course was announced at the outset in order that those desiring 
a short cut to the Bar might be deterred from entering. 
Students have been able, after two years of study, to pass the 
Bar examinations, but no official reference has ever been made 
to this fact, and the men have been prohibited from attempting 
any such intensified and necessarily superficial procedure. 

The student body consists of men of ability who devote 
themselves to their work with marked fidelity, and upon 
graduation pass the Bar examinations successfully and enter 
practice. 

The school was established through the co-operation 
of the Hon. James R. Dunbar, the late Prof. James Barr 
Ames, Dean of the Harvard Law School and Mr. Samuel 
C. Bennett, then Dean of the Boston University Law School. 
Under the direction of this board of advisors the School was 
organized. 

Successful Career 

Being thus auspiciously inaugurated, the first evening 
law school of Massachusetts entered upon what has proved to 
be a most successful career. Thirty-one hundred and seventy- 
six students have been enrolled, including clerks from the 
offices of leading attorneys; clerks and officers from every 
court in Boston; state, city and government officials; teachers 
and students from other law schools, in addition to a large 
number of able men engaged in different lines of business. 

Incorporation 

In January, 1904, a bill was introduced into the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature seeking the incorporation of the school 

11 



with the power to grant the degree of Bachelor of Laws. The 
rapid passage of this bill by the Legislature and the cordial 
recognition and endorsement of the school by the Bench, Bar 
and heads of our great day law and other professional schools, 
testify in no uncertain tones to the position the school oc- 
cupies in the educational activities of the Commonwealth. 

High Standards 

The work of the past eighteen years has been character- 
ized by strict and impartial administration, expert instruction 
and devotion on the part of the students. The success of our 
graduates in passing the Massachusetts Bar examinations, 
nearly 90 per cent of them having been successful in this 
and other states, and later in practice, has amply justified 
what may at times have seemed to be undue severity. 

If passing the Bar examination were the only end to be 
attained, the work would l^e less difficult, but reputable in- 
stitutions concern themselves much more with the future 
prospects of their students than witn the fitting of any number 
of men for certain tests; and to this end the courses as herein 
announced were arranged to duplicate as nearly as possible 
those of the best day law schools. 

The study of law recjuires diligent application and regular 
attendance at the lectures and other exercises of the school; 
also a large amount of reading and thought in order to compre- 
hend clearly and to assimilate properly the many difficult 
problems presented. A successful lawyer must have not only 
a thorough knowledge of the law, but the power to apply that 
knowledge in each particular case, no matter how complicated 
the conditions may be; and it is this latter phase of the pro- 
fession's requirements that makes hasty preparation of so 
little value to one who hopes to be successful in active prac- 
tice; for, though he may in this way gain admission to the 
Bar, he will be incompetent to give counsel worthy the name. 

Method of Instruction 

There are three methods of instruction employed by law 
schools: the lecture method, in which the instructor gives a 

12 



presentation exercise and assigns cases to be read in relation 
thereto; the case method, in which cases are assigned to be read 
in advance, which are then discussed in class and commented 
upon; and a combination of these two systems, in which the 
instructor gives a lecture or presentation of the essentials, 
followed by the discussion of cases previously read. 

Eighteen years' experience has led the School of Law 
to adopt a modification of the latter method, namely : lecture, 
citation and discussion, followed by a quiz. In addition, 
special quizzes are held several times each week by regular 
quiz masters, wiiose duty is to review the work of preceding 
lectures, clear up the difficult points, and assist those who 
require aid. The value of this method is clearly demon- 
strated by the success of our students at the Bar examinations 
and later in practice. 

The New Year 

The school enters upon the work of 1916-17 better housed, 
equipped and organized than ever before. The faculty 
includes several additions of prominent practitioners who have 
achieved success in teaching and practice. 

Greeting 

Students who desire the best, who are willing to sacrifice 
and work for a great ideal are invited to join our ranks. 
Success has come in large measure to the hundreds who have 
completed our courses,' graduated and entered practice. It 
will come to you if earned. Our pleasure and privilege is to 
extend the hand of fellowship and assistance. 



13 




BOWLING ALLEYS 




POOL 



Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission to the school must present 
satisfactory evidence of moral character and must be at least 
eighteen years of age, for admission to the work of the first 
year class. Graduates of colleges, technical schools, and 
four year courses in high schools of good standing are admitted 
without examination upon presentation of certificates or 
diploma. 

Those who enter as candidates for the degree and are not 
high school graduates, but have attended high school for one 
or more terms, must present their credentials to the Chairman 
of the Committee on Admission to be passed upon. He will 
prescribe from the following course of study the necessary 
work to fulfil the school requirements. 

I. English 

Reading and study similar to that required by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. A detailed description of the 
English work can be found in the catalogue of the Preparatory 
School. 

//. Latin or French 

Latin — Beginners' Latin Lessons completed and the 
equivalent of the first four books of Caesar's "Gallic War." 

French — Knowledge of the ordinary forms of construc- 
tion; ability to translate simple prose and to compose in the 
language simple sentences based upon the matter read. 

III. Mathematics 

Algebra, sufficient to include radical forms and quadratic 
equations of two unknown quantities. 

/ V. History 

The history and civil government of Massachusetts and 
the United States. 

15 



V. General Subjects 

Any two of the following: 

1. Physics. General elementary course. 

2. Chemistry. General elementary course. 

3. Physiology. General elementary course. 

4. Physical Geography. General elementary course. 

5. Plane Geometry. Five books. 

6. German (two units). Same as French. 

7. Economics. Elementary course covering the prin- 
ci])les of Economics. 

8. Ancient History. History of the ancient world up to 
800 A.D. 

9. Spanish (two units). Same as French. 

10. Mechanical Drawing. A course covering the ele- 
ments of drafting, such as is usually given in six hours a week 
during a school year. 

11. Bookkeeping. Double Entry. 

12. Stenography. Principles of a standard system and 
ability to write one hundred words a minute. 

REMOVAL OF ACADEMIC CONDITIONS 

The Evening Preparatory^ School of the Department of 
Education of the Association, attended in 1915 by 800 men, 
has been in operation for a number of years and has fitted 
a great many men for the colleges, universities and Bar. Its 
diploma is accepted by the Bar Examiners as sufficient prep- 
aration, and certificates by the College entrance board. 
The school is in operation throughout the entire year, making 
it possible for law students to remove their academic condi- 
tions when the Law School is not in session. All conditions 
must be removed before entering the Senior Class of the Law 
School. A special pamphlet is issued by this school which 
may be obtained upon application. Appointments are made 
by addressing, The Evening Preparatory School, or by tele- 
phoning Back Bay 4400. 

Advanced Standing 

Candidates for admission to advanced standing, will 
file their applications and credentials regarding previous study 
of law with the Dean. 

16 



Students from other law schools, applying as above, will 
be required to present a letter from the Deans of said schools 
regarding their standing and general work. 

Special students as announced hereafter, will be admitted 
to the Law School under certain conditions at the discretion 
of the Dean. 

Special Notice. Owing to the delay each year on the part of the 
students and the consequent rush on the opening night, those desiring 
admission are requested to register during the two weeks previous to the 
opening of the school. 

For application blanks for admission to the school, or for further 
information, address the Dean of the Law School. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

The requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
point of age, period of attendance at the school, and the passing 
of examinations, are as follows: 

At the time of receiving the degree one must have attained 
the age of twenty-one years. 

The required period of attendance at the school is four 
years. One or two years' attendance at an accredited three- 
year day law school or an accredited four-year evening laAV 
school may be counted as a part of the four years. 

The right to take examinations, as well as the privilege of 
continuing one's membership in the school at any time, is 
conditioned upon regular attendance at the exercises of the 
school. Attendance at 75 per cent of the lectures in each 
course is required. Those failing to attend 75 per cent willbe 
required to attain 70 as a passing mark in that subject. 

All examinations must be taken at the time scheduled, 
and no student is allowed to present himself for examination 
more than once in the same subject, provided he passes at the 
first trial. If, for good and sufficient reason, a student finds 
that he will be unable to take an examination at the time 
scheduled, he must previously obtain permission from the Dean 
to take said examination at the second trial. 

No student who has more than one condition standing 
against him on the work of the first two years will be allowed to 
register as a regular third-year student, and no student having 
any condition will be admitted as a regular student to the fourth 

17 



year. He may, however, although registered as a third-year 
student, take and be credited with a Hmited number of fourth- 
year subjects, the number varying according to the number 
of his conditions. 

No student who fails on account of conditions to receive 
his degree in due course will be permitted, except by special 
vote of the faculty, to remove his conditions later than two 
years after the graduation of his regular class. 

Every person who, while a member of the school, passes 
a satisfactory examination in one or more subjects will be 
entitled to a certificate, stating the length of time he has been 
a member of the school, and specifying the subjects in which 
he has passed. 

Special Students 

Less than 10 per cent, of the men of America graduate 
from high schools. When anj^ of the remaining 90 per cent., 
after school age, wish to take up a profession in an evening 
school, they find it necessary to make up more or less high 
school work. Should any work of this kind be necessary, 
the student enters the Law School under the caption, "special 
student" and while taking the regular work with his class 
remains under this classification until his academic conditions 
are wholly removed. 

Law schools and colleges dealing with students who come 
directly from the high school and who have been prepared 
specifically for college examinations, can be more or less arbi- 
trary in their admission requirements, but they are becoming 
less so, are allowing substitutions and equivalents and instead 
of barring out worthy young men, are taking a much more 
lenient attitude and encouraging their attendance. An Evening 
School dealing largely with men beyond high school age seeks 
to be as helpful as possible to men who have been deprived of 
extensive educational opportunities and is justified in admit- 
ting those who though not fully prepared along academic lines, 
are, in the opinion of the faculty, men of promise, aptitude and 
ambition and willing to meet all requirements. 

The School of Law takes this attitude and while requir- 
ing every student who is a candidate for the degree to remove 

18 



all academic conditions before entering the senior class, 
admits capable men who are not high school graduates and 
then, through the Evening Preparatory School of the Associ- 
ation, enables them to make up these deficiencies in a thor- 
oughly^ satisfactory manner. The wisdom of this procedure 
has been shown by the high degree of scholarship displayed 
by such students, the ease with which they have passed the 
Bar examinations and their success in the profession. 

Each case is decided on its merits after conference and an 
investigation of the applicant's school and business experience. 



19 



Program of Instruction 



Mr. Storer 



First Year 
Torts 
Monday, throughout the year, 7.0Q-8.30 



Contracts 
Mr. McLellan Tuesday, throughout the year, 7.00-8.30 

Common Law Pleading 
Mr. Holliday Thursday, first half-year, 7.00-8.30 

Criminal Law 
INIr. Barrett Thursday, second half-year, 7.00-8.30 



Mr. Field 



Second Year 

Property I 
Monday, throughout the year, first half- 
year, 7.00-8.15; second half-year, 7.00- 
8.30 



Agency 
Mr. W. Lloyd Allen Monday, first half-year, 8.15-9.30 

Bills and Notes 
Mr. Parke Wednesday first half-year, 7.00-8.30 

Sales 
Mr. Parke Wednesday, second half-year, 7.00-8.30 

Equity I 
Mr. Barney Friday, throughout the year, 7.00-8.30 

Third Year 

Partnership 
Mr. Wrightington Monday, first half-year, 7.00-8.30 

20 



Property II (Deeds) 
Mr. McLeod Monday, second year, half-7.00-8.30 

Equity II and Suretyship 
Mr. Barney Wednesday, throughout the year, 7.00- 

8.30 

Corporations 
Mr. Newton Friday, throughout the year, first half- 

year, 7.00-8.15; second half-year, 7.00- 
8.30 

Wills 
Mr. Newton Friday, first half-year, 8.15-9.30 



Fourth Year 



Mr. McLeod 



Bankruptcy 
Monday, first half-vear, 7.00-8.30 



, Massachusetts Practice 
Mr. Asa S. Allen Monday, second half-year, 7.00-8.15 

Aloot Court 
Judge Lummus Monday, second half-year, 8.15-9.30 

Evidence 

Mr. Storer Wednesday, throughout the year, 7.00- 

8.30 



Mr. Dorman 



Constitutional Law 
Friday, first half-year, 7.00-8.15 



Property III 

Mr. Newhall Friday, first half-year, 8.15-9.30; second 

half-year, 7.00-8.30 

22 



Outline of Courses 

First Year 
Torts 

General principles; assault and battery; false imprison- 
ment; trespass; conversion; slander and libel; enticement and 
seduction; deceit; slander of title; malicious prosecution; 
negligence, and incidental points. 

Bigelow on Torts. 

Ames' and Smith's Cases on Torts. 

Chase's Cases on Torts. 

Simpson's Cases on Torts. 

Contracts 

Offer and acceptance; consideration; performance of, or 
promise to perform non-contract obligation as consideration; 
moral obligation as consideration; antecedent act or agreement 
as consideration; parties to a contract, including aliens, execu- 
tors and administrators, guardians, infants, insane persons, 
intoxicated persons and married women; omitting agents, 
corporations and partners on account of these subjects being 
given in other courses; contracts under seal, including the form, 
requisites thereof, delivery and the matter of consideration; 
rights of beneficiaries under a contract; rights of assignees of 
a contract; conditional and unconditional contracts; rescission 
of contracts; damages for breach of contract; illegality; 
duress; mistake; statute of frauds; quasi-contracts. 

Keener's Cases on Contracts, Second Edition. 

Criminal Law 

Sources of criminal law; nature of crime; common law 
and statutory offences; criminal acts; intent in general, and 
as affected by circumstances, such as insanity, intoxication, 
infancy, coercion, ignorance or mistake; justification; neces- 
sity-; agency; consent; condonation; contributory acts; domes- 
tic relations; parties in crime; jurisdiction. 

Crimes against the person; against property; against 
pubhc policy; health; peace; justice; decency and morality. 

23 



Criminal procedure; arrest; extradition; examination and 
bail; indictment and criminal pleading; trial; evidence; pro- 
ceedings after verdict; error. 

Beale's Cases on Criminal Law, Second Edition. 

Pleading 

Common law pleading; common law actions; pleadings; 
their history, form and effect; the rules of pleading. 
Scott's Cases on Civil Procedure. 
Stephen on Pleading. 
Shipman on Common Law Pleading. 

Second Year 
Propsrty I 

Distinction between real and personal property; nature 
and acquisition of rights in personal property; acquisition of 
rights not under former owner; transfer of rights in personal 
property; possession of personal property; real property; 
tenure in general; division of estates; seizin and conveyances 
to uses and trusts; mines; wild animals; border trees; emble- 
ments; fixtures; waste; rights in another's land; natural rights; 
easements; covenants running with tiie land; public rights; 
franchises; rents. 

Gray's Cases on Property, Vol. I and II (Second Edition). 

Equity I 

Nature and limits of jurisdiction; the jury in equitj'; 
equitable parties; the maxims; equitable conversion; accident, 
mistake and fraud; specific performance of affirmative and 
negative contracts, including part performance, partial perfor- 
mance with compensation, defenses; specific reparation and 
prevention of torts by injunction, including particularly 
jurisdiction in waste, trespass, nuisance and in industrial 
disputes; accounting, subrogation and other pecuniary 
remedies. 

Ames' Cases on Equity Jurisdiction, Vol. I, Parts 1-6. 

Barney's "Equity and Its Remedies." 

24 



Bills and Notes 

The provisions of Revised Laws of Massachusetts, Chap- 
ter 73 (Negotiable Instruments Law). Formal requisites of 
negotiable and non-negotiable bills of exchange, checks and 
notes; obligations and rights of the various parties to such 
instruments, makers, acceptors, drawers, drawees, payees, 
indorsers and indorsees; suits upon bills and notes; pleading 
and defences; accommodation paper; guaranty and generally 
of the transfer, indorsement and extinguishment of bills and 
notes. 

Revised Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 73. 

Colson's Huffcut on Negotiable Instruments, Second 
Edition. 

Norton on Bills and Notes, Fourth Edition. 



Sales 

Sales and mortgages of personal property; subject matter 
of sales; when title passes; risk of loss; rights and remedies 
of seller and buyer in executed, executory and conditional 
contracts of sale; warranties of title and quality; seller's 
lien and stoppage in transitu; bills of lading and other docu- 
ments of title; fraud; statute of frauds; factors and recording 
acts; actions and defences. Provisions of Sales Act. 

Massachusetts Acts of 1908, Chapter 237. 

Woodward's Cases on Sales. 

Tiffany on Sales, Second Edition. 

Williston on Sale's, 1909 Edition. 

Burdick on Sales. Third Edition, 1913. 



Agency 

Who can be an agent; who can be a principal; what acts 
may be done through an agent; how an agent is appointed; 
the agent's power to subject his principal to liability upon 
contracts, for torts, crimes, etc.; the agent's liability to third 
parties; what parties are liable upon writings signed by an 
agent; undisclosed principal, including rights and liabilities 

25 



of the agent, the undisclosed principal and the third party; 
the duties of the principal and agent to each other; termination 
of an agency; ratification. 

Wambaugh's Cases on Agenc}'. 

Third Year 
Equity II 

Nature and requisites of a trust; a trust distinguished 
from a debt, charitable trusts, etc.; language necessary to 
create a trust; consideration; the Statutes of Frauds and 
Wills; subject-matter of a trust; the cestui que trust; the 
trustee; nature of the cestui que trust's interest; transfer 
of trust property, rightful and wrongful; extinguishment of 
a trust; duties of the trustee; constructive and resulting trusts. 

Ames' Cases on Trusts. 

Property II (Deeds) 

Acquisition of real property inte?' vivos, original acquisi- 
tion; statute of limitations; prescription; form of conveyances; 
description of property granted; boundaries; estates created; 
incorporeal hereditaments; covenants for title; estoppel by 
deed; execution of deeds; signing and sealiag; delivery; 
dedication. 

Gray's Cases on Property, Vol. Ill (Second Edition). 

Wills 

Kind of wills; testamentary power; beneficiaries; prop- 
erty given; who may make a will; contract to make a will; 
form of will; incorporation of outside documents; signing; 
witnesses; publication; mistake; fraud; undue influence; 
revocation; repubUcation; grant of probate and administra- 
tion; the estate of an executor or administrator; alienation of 
administrators and executors; legacies; distribution; construc- 
tion. 

Costigan's Cases on Wills. 

Gray's Cases on Property, Vol. IV (Second Edition). 

Corporations 

Nature of a corporation ; difl"erence between corporation 
and partnership; distinction between stockholders and corpora- 

26 



tion; promotion of corporations; formation of corporations; 
corporations de jure; corporations de facto; dissolution of cor- 
porations; interpretation of charters; powers of a corporation; 
doctrine of ultra vires; liability for torts and crimes; corporation 
and the State; shares of stock,dividends; rights of stockholders; 
stockholders' liabilities; voting rights of stockholders; voting 
trusts; rights and liabilities of directors and officers; rights and 
remedies of creditors against property of corporations; foreign 
corporations. 

Canfield and Wormser's Cases on Private Corporations. 

Partnership 

The creation of a partnership; incidents of partnership; 
the partnership property and the interest of a partner therein ; 
rights and remedies of creditors; the power of a partner to act 
in behalf of the partnership, before and after dissolution; rights 
and duties of partners inter se and actions between partners; 
dissolution and termination of partnership; unincorporated 
associations. 

Ames' Cases on Partnership. 
Gilmore on Partnership. 
Lindley on Partnership. 

Suretyship 

Comprising the rights and obligations subsisting among 
the three parties involved in a suretyship transaction, namely, 
principal obligor, surety and creditor. 

Ames' Cases on Suretyship. 

Fourth Year 
Evidence 

Judicial notice; judge and jury, or law and fact; burden of 
proof; presumptions; admissions; confessions; principles of 
exclusion; relevancy; character evidence; hearsay evidence 
and exceptions thereto, including declarations as to matters 
of pedigree, matters of public interest, pubhc records, declara- 
tions in regular course of business, account-books, declarations 
against interest, res gestae, dying declarations, declarations 

27 



made under oath, declarations showing physical or mental 
conditions; ojDinion evidence; best evidence; writings as evi- 
dence; examination of witnesses. 

Greenleaf on Evidence. 

McKelvey on Evidence. 

Thayer's Cases on Evidence. 

Wilgus' Cases on Evidence. 

Wigmore's Cases on Evidence. 

Property III 

First half-year: Conditional and future interests in real 
and personal property, including conditional estates, reversions 
and remainders, rule in Shelley's Case, and rule against per- 
petuities; forfeiture and restraints on alienation. 

Second half-year: Priority and registration, mortgages, 
landlord and tenant, and joint ownership. 

Gray's Cases on Property, Vol. V and VI. 

Gray's Rule against Perpetuities. 

Gray's Restraints on the Alienation of Property. 

Constitutional Law 

Written and unwritten constitutions; history and sources 
of wTitten constitutions in the United States, state and 
national; establishing and amending constitutions; distri- 
bution of powers between the national and state governments; 
distribution of powers among the three departments; theory 
and consequences of this distribution; the judicial department; 
nature of judicial power; jurisdiction of the federal govern- 
ment, criminal and civil; express, implied and resulting powers; 
citizenship; civil and political rights; the police power; the 
right of eminent domain; taxation; impairment of contracts, 
ex post facto and retrospective legislation generally ; regulation 
of commerce. 

Thayer's Cases on Constitutional Law. 

Cooley's Principles of Constitutional Law. 

McClain's Cases on Constitutional Law. 

Boyd's Cases on Constitutional Law. 

Bankruptcy 

History of bankruptcy legislation, state and national, 
extent and operation of state insolvency laws; who may 

28 



become a bankrupt; who may be petitioning creditors; acts 
of bankruptcy, including fraudulent conveyances, preferences 
and assignments for the benefit of creditors; what property 
passes to the trustee; dissolution of liens; what claims are 
provable against the bankrupt's estate; duties and powers of 
the trustee; duties of the bankrupt; discharge from bank- 
ruptcy; compositions in the bankruptcy court; bankruptcy 
procedure. 

United States Bankruptcy Act of 1898, with amendments. 

AVilliston's Cases on Bankruptcy. Second Edition. 

Massachusetts Practice 

Courts in Massachusetts and jurisdiction of each; venue 
of actions, local and transitory; Avrits, including service of 
same; arrest on mesne process and on execution; attachment 
on mesne process and by trustee process; what property is 
exempt; entry of actions; appearances; non-suit and default; 
pleadings, including declaration, answers, demurrers, etc.; 
set-off, recoupment and cross actions; tender; offer of judg- 
ment; interrogatories; depositions; masters and auditors; 
trial; exceptions; motions for new trial; motion to vacate 
judgment; writs of review, error and audita querela; appeals; 
execution; replevin; summary process to recover land; writ of 
entry; mechanics' liens; extraordinary writs; Statute of Limit- 
ations; equity pleading and practice; probate practice; 
marriage and divorce. 

Buswell and Walcott on Massachusetts Practice. 

Moot Court 

In response to an urgent demand, a Moot Court will be 
conducted the last half of the year by Judge Lummus. This 
court will take up the preparation of cases, the filing of various 
papers and general court procedure. 

Many of the best Law Schools in the country are now 
offering such laboratory courses with evident success. Our 
endeavor will be to have this course deal with those branches 
of the profession with which the graduate just entering prac- 
tice is largely unfamiliar, ])ut which are essential for the 
proper preparation and trying of cases. 

29 



Bar Examination Review 

It is customary with students to review thoroughly 
the work of each year and especially upon the completion of 
the four-year course just previous to taking the Bar Exam- 
inations. Mr. Asa S. Allen, Assistant Dean of the Law 
School, is most effective in this review work and his classes 
assembled for this purpose are largely attended, not only by 
our ow'n students, but by graduates of the other New England 
Law Schools. 

In order to make the w'ork of our Law School as valuable 
as possible, an arrangement has l)een made whereby each 
qualified member of the senior class, who either has obtained 
his degree or is a candidate for the degree, may attend this 
review course without expense. 

This opportunity for free instruction will be available 
to our students but once and then only upon the presentation 
of a card of admission signed by the Dean. Graduates of 
other law schools, undergraduates and post graduates will 
arrange with Mr. Allen, personally, as in previous years. 

Public Speaking 

The ability to speak in public is of the greatest value 
to a lawyer in his handling of a jury, meeting clients, and mak- 
ing addresses. So general had become the call for instruction 
of this type that the Law School faculty established such a 
course in 1915 under the direction of Mr. W. B. Ricketts of 
Harvard University, formerly instructor in Parhamentary Law, 
Debating and PuIjHc Speaking at Dartmouth College. Mr. 
Ricketts has conducted several courses the past year with 
marked success and the law students have been especially ap- 
preciative of the results accomplished. This course is held 
at an hour which does not conflict with the regular work of the 
law school and may be attended during one course without 
additional expense. 

Special Lectures and Courses 

Special lectures are offered from time to time on subjects 
not included in the program, and special courses are also 

30 



given without additional expense to members of the school. 
Mr. Chandler M. Wood conducted a course on Insurance 
during 1915-1916 which is the first in a cycle to cover a 
period of three years. The other subjects to be offered will 
be anaounced. 



Accounting 

Lawyers are becoming most active in the affairs of busi- 
ness concerns and the modern lawyer should have a knowledge 
of accounting. This knowledge enables him to analyze a 
balance sheet, separate real from fictitious assets, and in 
the case of bankruptcy proceedings, make a detailed study of 
conditions. Lawyers are also prominent as members of the 
boards of directors or corporations, and their advice is eagerly 
sought. With a knowledge of accounting and business 
methods, the services of any lawyer are doubly valuable. 
The School of Commerce and Finance of Northeastern College 
is a successful and aggressive school, and numbers of Law 
School graduates are attending. The Student Council of 
the Law School having petitioned the faculty, arrangements 
have been made whereby graduates of the Law School may 
attend the School of Commerce and Finance, taking up the 
subjects of accounting and economics with the advanced 
Sophomore Class which begins its work in September. 



Preliminary Bookkeeping 

As a necessary preparation for the accounting course, 
those who are not thoroughly familiar with double-entry 
bookkeeping will either be obliged to devote two years to the 
courses in the School of Commerce and Finance, or attend 
a course in brief but intensive bookkeeping, beginning Sep- 
tember first, which will qualify them for admission to the 
School of Commerce and Finance. The regular rate for these 
several courses is $90.00. The special rate for Law School 
graduates for the same subjects will be $45.00, payable one- 
third upon entering, one-third November 15, and one third 
January 15. 

31 



General Information 

Quizzes 

In addition to the formal lectures the students meet reg- 
ularly^ throughout the year for a systematic review of the 
material covered by the regular lectures. These "quizzes" are 
conducted by experienced instructors. 

Students are also encouraged to form cjuiz clubs among 
themselves, since in law, as in other branches of knowledge, 
discussion develops mental power. 

Examinations 

Written examinations are regularly held during the months 
of February and May. Those failing to pass these examina- 
tions, also applicants for advanced standing, are required to 
present themselves for examination in September. The 
examination schedule for September, 1916, will be found on 
page 3. 

Tuition 

The rate of tuition is $75 per year, payable $25 on entrance, 
$25 on November 15 and $25 on January 15. This fee includes 
membership in the Association. Candidates for the degree are 
assessed $5 as a graduation fee. 

Single subjects when authorized, will be charged for at the 
rate of $25 for eight, and $15 for four months' courses, not 
including membership in the Association. 



Text-books 

Text or case books are required in most of the courses. 
These books may be purchased by the student, or, if conven- 
ient, the books of the Law Library may be used in the building. 
It is advantageous for a student to own the books in order 
that he may better employ his hours at home. 

Note books and general supplies may be obtained at the 
office at reasonable rates. 

32 



Notes 

Students are required to take notes of all lectures in person 
and to be prepared to hand in their note books for examination 
when called for. 

Law Library 

The Law Library is located in the Administration Building 
and is large, well equipped and furnished. In it may be 
found case and text books on all of the subjects taught in 
the school as well as on related subjects, the State Reports 
of Massachusetts and New York, the English Reports, United 
States Supreme Court Reports, etc. The Library is open 
daily from 9 a. m. to 10.30 p. m., and is kept thoroughly up- 
to-date. 

Class Rooms 

The school has adequate class rooms with diffused light, 
and comfortable furniture. 

Dormitories 

Nearly three hundred dormitories are provided where 
men may live with all the comforts of a great hotel. Students 
may enjoy any or all of these comforts at a minimum charge. 

Physical and Recreative Opportunities 

An enthusiastic and inexperienced man eager to gain 
admission to the Bar as soon as possible will exclaim when the 
gymnasium or social features are mentioned, "I have neither 
time nor inclination for these, what I wish is the study of law 
first, last and all the time." This attitude is perfectly natural, 
and we have heard the remark hundreds of times, but the point 
is not well taken and often leads to disastrous results. An 
employed man who is giving adequate service for his wages is 
tired when the day's work is over and, for him to add the 
burden of an Evening School course, of necessity implies an 
overload. Most men can carry this load without difficulty, 
however, if they adjust their lives to the new order of things, 
and take on in addition to the school work, other features 
which offset the strain. 

33 



The study of law is a man's work, requiring close applica- 
tion, a clear head and persistent effort. In order to do the 
work successfully, pass the examinations and finish the four 
years in good physical condition, one must find time for phys- 
ical exercise and a reasonable amount of recreation and social 
enjoyment. 

This Law School is the only one of its kind which can 
meet these conditions fully, owing to its magnificent equip- 
ment and great diversity of features. The Law School 
is all that science, years of experience, high ideals and careful 
attention to detail can make it, and it is backed by a physical 
department and social features of the most attractive and 
valuable nature. The hours are such that men may go from 
their business to the l)uilding, take some light exercise in the 
gymnasium, or a plunge in the pool or a shower bath and after 
a light lunch, go to their class rooms with minds receptive, 
active and capable of obtaining all that the courses offer. 
We impress all our students with the necessity of a well- 
balanced program, mental, physical and social, and hun- 
dreds of our men avail themselves of these advantages. The 
same reasons which lead the colleges to expend vast sums for 
the physical and social development of their students actuate 
us. Our gymnasium, the largest in New England, affords 
every opportunity for keeping in fine physical condition. The 
swimming pool, bowling alleys, billiard room and general 
library, game rooms and special exercise rooms, fencing, boxing, 
indoor golf, all contribute to the development of the student. 

The Association restaurant supplies unusually satisfactory 
service at reasonable cost. 

Social Life of the School 

Among the prominent and valuable features of the Asso- 
ciation Law School is the opportunity for forming the acquain- 
tance of influential men attending the Law and other Asso- 
ciation schools. Lectures, receptions, "get together" meetings 
occur throughout the year. 

The Congress, consisting of an unusually able body of 
men, offers opportunities for debate, discussion and extempo- 
raneous speaking. 

34 



This Law School is the only evening school of the kind 
which provides the finest advantages along legal lines and at 
the same time, the attractive features found in the great uni- 
versities. The student, therefore, not only obtains a thorough 
legal training, but enjoys these stimulating and refining in- 
fluences by coming in contact with thousands of congenial, 
ambitious and high grade men who are pursuing the various 
branches of knowledge offered by the Association school 
system. 

Strikingly effective are the opportunities and wholly 
unhke those of a small public or private school which offers 
only the professional side of any subject, of necessity omitting 
the social, physical and recreative features so valuable in pre- 
serving a proper balance and symmetrical development. 

The Northeastern College School of Law offers the ad- 
vantages of a high grade Law School and a University and 
is irresistible in its appeal to discriminating men. 



3(1 



Building and Equipment 

In the fall of 1913 we moved into our magnificent new 
building on Huntington Avenue, opposite the Opera House, 
the land, buildings and equipment costing in the vicinity of 
one million five hundred thousand dollars. It is the finest 
group of buildings of the kind in existence consisting of the 

Administration Building 

in which are located the lobby, administration offices, directors' 
room, committee rooms, library, reading and social rooms. 

Bates Hall 

seating five hundred, with a large stage and complete equip- 
ment. 

Educational Building 

One hundred and ninety-six by fifty-six feet and six stories 
high, containing over thirty class rooms, laboratories, social 
and club rooms, and the small assembly hall. 

Natatorium 

containing one of the largest swimming pools in America. 
The pool is 75 feet long by 25 feet wide and is under a glass 
roof admitting floods of light and sunshine and is suppHed with 
filtered salt water. 

Gymnasium 

with running track, twelve laps to the mile, special exercise 
rooms, hand ball and squash courts, indoor golf, six bowling 
alleys, shower baths, special rooms for fencing, wrestling, etc. 

Industrial Building 

containing machine shop, electrical laboratories and in- 
dustrial plant. 

37 



Alumni Association 

"The object of this Association shall be to ad- 
vance the cause of legal education, to promote the 
interests and increase the usefulness of the Boston 
Y. M. C. A. Law School, to work for the welfare of 
the community at large, and to promote mutual 
acquaintances and fellowship among all members of 
the Association." — Constitution, Article II. 

Early in the spring of 1912, the Akimni Association, which 
had been in existence for many years, took on new hfe, elected 
officers and outlined a program for the year. 

Several matters of importance have been projected and 
put into operation, including a course of supplementary lec- 
tures, given to the undergraduates and a course of graduate 
lectures on Conveyancing, given by Messrs. Charles Racke- 
mann, Frank W. Grinnell, Alfred C. Vinton, and Francis N. 
Balch. 

The Alumni Association is completing plans for a series of 
receptions to the undergraduates, the creation of a scholarship 
fund, and other important matters. All graduates of the Law 
School are cordially invited to unite with the Association and 
benefit by the good fellowship as well as the professional 
advantage of being closely identified with over four hundred 
practicing attorneys. 

Officers 

President — Francis W. Kimball, '08 
Vice-Presidents — John Quinn, Jr., '06 

Timothy J. Buckley, '02 

Joseph T. Brennan, '04 

John J. Attridge, '05 

Herman A. McDonald, '10 
Secretary — Asa S. Allen, '12 
Treasurer — Chester W. Pike, '11 

Council 

Term ending 1915 Term ending 1917 

George P. Hitchcock, '10 F. Chester Everett, '09 

Alfred M. Weismann, '11 Robert B. Mount, '14 

Arthur L. Woodman, '06 Philip A. Carroll, '13 

Term ending 1916 Term ending 1918 

Harry A. English, '11 George W. Hopkins, '08 

John Speirs, '03 Fernald Hutchins, '07 

James E. Farrell, '08 James P. Roberts, '12 

38 



Graduates 



The following men have been granted the Degree of LL.B,, 

in previous vears: 

Class of 1902 

Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

Charles Bartlett Boston 1901 

♦William Williams Bartlett Roxbury 

Corrill Ellsworth Bridges Charlestown 1902 

Dennis Francis Buckley Georgetown 1903 

Timothy John Buckley Charlestown 1902 

Timothy Francis Collins Arlington 1902 

Frederick A. Gaskins Milton 1903 

William John Greene Cambridge 1902 

Mederic Guilbault Medford 1903 

George Latimer Boston 1903 

John Bailey Loring Dorchester 1901 

Charles Henry Lutton South Boston 1902 

Edward MacHarrie Somerville 1902 

George Alexander McKinnon Cambridge 1902 

George Henry Magurn East Boston 1903 

William Peyton Boston 1902 

Joseph Louis Philip St. Coeur Cambridge 1902 

James Joseph Sheehan Peabody 1902 

James Boniface Vallely Cambridge 1902 

Class op 1903 

Robert Ross Thompson Bower Boston 1903 

John Henry Coakley Chelsea 1903 

Arthur Lester Connolly Boston 1903 

Edwin Horace Cooley Brookline 1903 

Isidor Fox Revere 1903 

Walter William Graves Salem 1902 

Reginald Hainsworth Cambridge 1903 

John Edward MacKinnon East Boston 1903 

Francis Louis Maguire Arlington 1903 

Frederick William Otto Dorchester 1902 

George Whitehouse Reed Roxbury 1903 

Julian Seriack Dorchester 

John Speirs Dorchester 1902 

Class of 1904 

Grosvenor Tarbell Blood Newburyport 1904 

Joseph Thomas Brennan Cambridge 1904 

Frederic Carroll London, England 1904 

Alfred Pugh Clark AUston 1904 

Charles Carthage Connor New Bedford 1904 

James William Dolan Waltham 1904 

Peter Jefferson Donaghue Dorchester 1904 

Michael Lawrence Fahey Charlestown 1904 

Carl Gerstein Boston 1904 

August George Gutheim Washington, D.C. 1904 

William Barton Jensen East Boston 1904 

Leo Sidney JoUes Roxbury 1904 

Louis Levin Boston 1905 

Thomas Francis Mansfield East Boston 1904 

George Yenetchi Parker Charlestown 1902 

39 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

Ralph Merrill Smith Somerville 1904 

Arthur Asher Sondheim Roxbury 1904 

Henry George Spence Roxbury 1904 

William Joseph Welch Roxbury 1905 

David White Boston 1904 

Jonathan Brack White Watertown 1904 

Class op 1905 

John Joseph Attridge Boston 1906 

Walter Watson Chambers East Dedham 1906 

John McLean Crawford Charlestown 1905 

John Francis Dunn Dorchester 1907 

John Henry Ells Dorchester 1904 

Horace Porter Farnham Peabody 1905 

John Gregory Fortune Maiden 

Morris Burton Frankel Boston 1905 

Isaac Gordon Boston 1905 

Samuel Hurwitz Roxbury 1905 

Abram Hyman Boston 1906 

Bernard Charles Kelley South Boston 1907 

Hugh Boniface McEachern South Boston 1907 

Leonard Wesley Parker Boston 1906 

Joseph Albert Sedgwick Quincy 

William Payson Smith Dorchester 1905 

Daniel Sullivan, Jr Boston 

Ralph Lewis Theller Cambridge 1911 

Arthur William Vaughan Somerville 1905 

Alonzo Ernest Yont Dorchester 1904 

Class of 1906 

Henry James Angell California 1906 

Sanford Bates Dorchester 1906 

Philip Anthony Brine Somerville 1906 

Dennis Francis Carpenter Dorchester 

William Francis Connor Waltham 1906 

John Cornelius Cronin South Boston 1906 

Patrick Joseph Dowd Waltham 1906 

Michael Joseph Doyle Boston 1906 

John Mix P'inch Everett 1907 

Hamlet Samuel Greenwood Lowell 1906 

John Hamilton, Jr. . . Jamaica Plain 1907 

Edward Warren Harnden Boston 1906 

John Michael Hayes Dorchester 1906 

Walter Lawrence Hobbs Boston 1906 

Albert Edward Hughes Somerville 1907 

*Charles Sumner Johnson South Boston 

Thomas Kelley Boston 1905 

Percy Francis Lannon Roslindale 1907 

George Henry Locke Colorado 

James Alvin McKibben Dorchester 1905 

Thomas Joseph Maloney Charlestown 1906 

Peter Francis Minnock Waltham 1906 

Francis Maloney Charlestown 1906 

Stephen Francis Morgan Charlestown 1906 

Hubert Aloysius Murphy Dorchester 1905 

John Quinn, Jr Boston 1906 

John Edward Quinn Cambridge 1906 

Ernest Orlando Raymond Somerville 1906 

Henry Burgess Roberts Somerville 1906 

John Francis Rogan Charlestown 1905 

Charles Henry Rogers New York 1906 

40 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

Samuel Rothblum Dorchester 1906 

Joseph Francis Sullivan Charlestown 1906 

John Foster Tufts Watertown 1908 

Arthur Lorrin Woodman Cambridge 1906 

Class of 1907 

George Pomeroy Anderson Boston 1909 

William Henry Barter Dorchester 1907 

*Charles Currier Beale West Medford 1907 

Roscoe Hosmer Belknap Framingham 

Thomas Francis Brennan Cambridge 1908 

Michael John Carey Somerville 1908 

John Joseph Coady Dorchester 1906 

Daniel Francis Cunningham Brighton 1907 

Maurice Francis Cunningham Chftondale 1907 

Michael John Dennen Winchester 1907 

Daniel John Daly Brookhne 1907 

John Henry Devine Brighton 1907 

Albert Coolidge Fames Boston 1908 

Walter Frank Foss Norwood 

Harry LeRov French Waltham 1907 

Martm Gilbert Roxbury 1908 

Dennis William Haggerty Boston 1907 

Daniel Melbourne Herlihy Boston 1907 

William Hirsh Dorchester 1907 

William Jason Holbrook South Weymouth 1906 

*John Hughes Boston 

Fernald Hutchins Dedham 1907 

Loring Pierce Jordan Boston 1907 

Arthur Francis Keefe Everett 1907 

Thomas James Lawler Dorchester 

Everett Charles Lewis Medford 1907 

Frederick William McEnery Cambridge 1907 

Bernard Francis Murphy Waltham 1909 

Edward Clarence Ramsdell Brighton 1907 

Daniel David Rourke Boston 

Koran Calvin Small Waltham 1906 

William Joseph Stone Dorchester 1908 

Frank Brown Swain Brockton 1907 

Edward Armstrong Thomas Winthrop 1908 

Henry Partick Trainor Waltham 1906 

Abraham Hermann Weinstein Boston 1906 

James William Wickwire Dorchester 1907 

Edward Hermann Ziegler Roxbury 1906 

Class of 1908 

Arthur Wykeham Ashenden Dorchester 1909 

Benjamin Franklin Beale Boston 

Edward Sherman Bennett South Boston 1908 

Francis Henry Blackwell Boston 1907 

Robert Campbell Boston 1908 

Henry Elton Chamberlin Boston 

Francis Aloysius Cronin Roxbury 

William John Daly Winchester 1907 

John Bernard Dayton Somerville 1908 

James Michael DriscoU Brookline 1907 

James Edward Farrell West Newton 1908 

Charles Augustus Ferguson Maiden 1909 

Edward Ferguson Cambridge 1909 

41 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

Edward Richard Flavell Boston 

Wallace Alfred Gleason West Roxbury 1908 

Michael Aloysius Henebery Worcester 1908 

George Willard Hopkins Concord 1909 

Charles Edward Houghton Hyde Park 1909 

Morris Jolles Roxbury 1908 

Max Manuel Kalman East Boston 1910 

Richard Ernest Kent East Boston 1908 

Francis Warren Kimball Chelsea 1908 

♦Howard Newton Legate Roxbury 1908 

Harrison Loring, Jr Roxbury 1908 

Edwin Tibbetts Luce Arhngton 1908 

Edward Aloysius McEttrick Brookline 1907 

Charles Leroy Moore Maiden 1907 

Thomas Vinson Nash Weymouth 1910 

William Nelson Boston 1907 

Edward Waterman Raymond Boston 

Fred Louis Roberts West Somerville 1909 

Elmer Gould Royce Northboro 1909 

Charles Marcus Smith Boston 1908 

Robert Wilham Stanley Boston 1908 

Thomas Francis Sullivan Cambridge 1910 

Nelson Barnard Todd Lynn 1908 

Frank White Tucker Somerville 1908 

George Edward Walker Wakefield 1908 

Jacob Wasserman Boston 1 907 

Otto Aloysius Wehrle East Boston 1908 

Class of 1909 

Thomas Donald Adair Roxbury 1909 

Henry Nathaniel Andrews Boston 1909 

Wilhams Brooks Baker Danvers 1910 

Gilbert Bezanger Winthrop 1909 

Thomas Herbert Bilodeau Boston 1909 

Henry Victor Charboneau Lowell 1909 

Charles Alfred Colton Winthrop 1909 

Henry Wesley Davies Ballardvale 1908 

Samuel Davis Boston 1907 

Ernest Doane Easton Providence, R. L 

Chester Everett Boston 1909 

David William Everett Boston 1909 

Andrew Franklin Faden Jamaica Plain 

Thomas Jefferson Fitz Melrose Highlands 1911 

William Philip French West Somerville 1908 

Don Gleason Hill, Jr Dedham 1909 

Perry Brooks Howard Watertown 1910 

William Francis Howard Dorchester 1909 

Lawrence Woodbury Huse Boston 1909 

Daniel Francis Lynch Roxbury 

James Francis McDermott Boston 1909 

Frank Ehot Marble Lynn 1910 

George Nelson Boston 1910 

William Ignatius Norton Boston 1909 

Charles Joseph O'Connell Worcester 1909 

James Lewis Roche Lincoln 1909 

George Edward Roewer, Jr Boston 1909 

William DeForest Ross WoUaston 1909 

William Thomas Salter Boston 1909 

Arthur Lawrence Stevenson Newton 1908 

42 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

William Booth Stevenson Newton 1909 

James Aloysius Sullivan Boston 1909 

Dana Scott Sylvester Boston 1909 

James Irwin Tucker West Somerville 

Alexander Thurrott Walker Forest Hills 1909 

Robert Winthrop Young Boston 1909 

Class of 1910 

Walter Pennington Abell Roslindale 1910 

William Antcliffe Bellamy Taunton 1910 

John Bianchi Newtonville 1910 

Lyman Warren Brooks Watertown 1911 

William Herbert Burke Worcester 1911 

Ralph Norman Butterworth Revere 1909 

James WiUiam Byron Concord 1910 

John Bernard Canfield Newton 1910 

George Henry Carrick Cambridge 1910 

James Thomas Carter Dorchester 1910 

Fred William Cousins Medford 1910 

Adolph Isaac Dinner Roxbury 1910 

Shirley Howe Eldridge Waltham 

Wilham Caleb Frye W' inthrop 1910 

Clarence Jesse Funnell Boston 1909 

Jos. JuHan Orphee Gingras Lynn 1910 

Walter Howard Gleason WatertoAvn 1910 

Ralph Clifton Ghdden Reading 1910 

♦Thomas Max Gurin Boston 1911 

Frank Howard Hallett Dorchester 1910 

John Emmett Hanlon Dorchester 1910 

Thomas Aloysius Henry Salem 1910 

Wilham Martin Henry Salem 1910 

Jeremiah George Herlihy Roxburv 1910 

Ralph Eugene Hiland Everettr 1910 

George Preston Hitchcock Brookhne 1910 

Jesse Allen Holton Boston 1910 

William Everett Home Quincy 1910 

Guy Atwood Jackson Dorchester 1910 

George Marshall Jewell Everett 1910 

Louis Agassiz Jones West Somerville 1910 

Wilbur Aaron Jordan, Jr Dorchester 1910 

Maurice Kronick Boston 1910 

Henry Lawrin Boston 1910 

Harold Wesley Loker Swampscott 1910 

Herman Albin MacDonald Beverly Farms 1910 

James Preston Mackin Boston 1912 

Patrick Joseph Madigan Boston 1910 

Frederick Huntley Magison Haverhill 1910 

Augustus Vincent Murphy Dorchester Centre 1910 

Alexander William Murray Cambridge 1910 

Albert Leslie Partridge Waltham 1910 

William John Pike Chelsea 1910 

Peter Ratzkoff Roxbury 1910 

Arthur Bickford Rigney Haverhill 1910 

Allan Robinson Revere 1910 

Elmer Ernest Spear Everett 1911 

James Wilham Sweeney Quincy 1910 

James Wilham Spicer Melrose Highlands 

Israel Mark Ullian Roxbury 1910 

Robert Comey Van Amringe Roxbury 1910 

43 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

John Joseph Ward Medford 1910 

Maynard Addison Wood West Somerville 1910 

Frank Hubert Wright Boston 

Class of 1911 

David James Aaron Allston 1911 

PhiUp JuHus Aaronofsky Roxbury 1911 

John Alfred Anderson Boston 1911 

Charles Wilham Babson Dorchester 1911 

Edward Holbrook Baker, Jr Cambridge 1911 

George Grant Brayley West Somerville 1910 

Leslie Nicholas Brock Cambridge 1911 

Winslow Page Burhoe Somerville 1910 

Richard Walter Burnes Everett 1911 

Moses Caplan Boston 1911 

Hugh Augustus Carney Roxbury 1911 

Benjamin Harrison Chertok Dorchester 1911 

Edgar Weston Cobb Medford 1911 

Joshua Aaron Crawford Boston 1911 

Otis John Auguste Dionne Walpole 1911 

Harvej^ Alexander English Jamaica Plain 1911 

Percival Fitzgerald Mattapan 1912 

David Flower Roxbury 1911 

William Forbes Boston 1911 

William Joseph Geegan West Newton 1910 

William Francis Hill Dedham 1911 

Henry Hopkinson Jamaica Plain 1911 

Frederick Austin Kennett Dorchester 1911 

Alfred Carl Malm Brighton 1911 

Frederick William McGowan Medford 1911 

John Henry Mattson Lynn 1910 

Andrew Potter Nichols Fall River 

Orton Abner Peck Boston 1911 

William Henry Peterson Cambridge 1911 

Chester William Pike Dorchester 1912 

John Isaac Preston Wakefield 1911 

George Prussian Roxbury 1911 

Frederick Robinovitz Boston 1911 

John William Roome Dorchester 

Louis Joseph Rouleau Jamaica Plain 1911 

Wilham Theis Smith Somerville 1911 

Edmund Michael Stanton Roxbury 1912 

Theodore Einar Stevenson Roxbury 1910 

George Burchstead Tinkham Roslindale 

Lewis Augustine Twitchell Dorchester 

Calvin John Upham Dorchester 1911 

Samuel Parsons Vatcher Lynn 1911 

Howell Brackett Voight Dorchester 

James Andrew Waters Newton Centre 1910 

Alfred Mayer Weismann Jamaica Plain 1911 

Augustine Walter Welch Watertown 1911 

Alfred Little West Somerville 1911 

Charles Chester Willard Cambridge 1912 

Ralph Howard Willard Boston 1911 

James Graham Wolff Allston 1911 

Class of 1912 

Asa Samuel Allen Belmont 1912 

Harry Lee Bagley Brookline 1912 

James Thomas Baldwin East Braintree 1912 

44 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

Charles Edward Baltzo Melrose 

Henry Albert Bascom Maiden 1912 

William Henry Bazley Everett 1912 

Samuel Tompkins Bennett Maiden 1912 

Robert Edward Bigney South Boston 1912 

John Joseph Burke Boston 1912 

Warren Frederick Card Lynn 1912 

Cyrus Stewart Ching Boston 1912 

George Cohen Somerville 1912 

John Joseph Conway West Roxbury 1912 

Lester Wilkins Cooch Everett 1912 

Ralph Bertrand Currier Chelsea 1912 

Wilfred James Doyle Mattapan 1912 

Leo Joseph Dunn Roslindale 1911 

John William Eldracher Boston 1912 

George Robert Ellis Foxboro 1912 

Norman Farquhar Boston 1912 

Philip Joseph Feinberg Boston 1912 

Frank Hervey Fittz Waltham 1912 

Frank Freundlich Boston 1912 

John Francis Gannon Worcester 1912 

Abraham Goldberg Boston 1911 

Harry Klauser Good Roxbury 

Charles Emmett Gorman Roslindale 1912 

Reuben Bertram Gryzmish Boston 1912 

Charles Edward Halliday, Jr Lynn 1912 

John Joseph Haney Medford 

Joseph Charles Hannon West Newton 1912 

Edward Lavant Harris Arlington 1912 

Walter Joseph Hendrick Boston 1912 

Frederick Hoitt Boston 1912 

Gustav Fredinand Hollstein West Roxbury 

William Frank Joseph Howard South Boston 1912 

Myer Harry Isaacson Dorchester 

Walter Scott Jardine Arlington 

Frank Roland Keith Dorchester 1912 

Luke Joseph Kelley Jamaica Plain 

Samuel Thomas Lakson East Boston 1912 

Timothy Francis Leonard Charlestown 1913 

Finch Elbert Lewis West Somerville 1912 

Henry Nathaniel Longley East Braintree 1912 

John Michael Lyons East Weymouth 1912 

Thomas Bernard McCaffrey Brookline 1912 

Wilham John Maclnnis Gloucester 1912 

Abner Sterling McLaud Lynn 1912 

Arthur Hawes McLean Dorchester 1912 

John Cornelius Mahoney Worcester 1913 

Wilham Raymond Mahoney Cambridge 

George Albert Mansfield, Jr Waltham 1912 

LesUe Rogers Moore Newton 1912 

Alexander Nagle Boston 1912 

Reginald Ebenezer Peters Cambridge 1911 

Benjamin Rabalsky Boston 1911 

Arthur Elmer Reimer South Boston 1912 

Ralph Henderson Robb Boston 1912 

James Percy Roberts Dedham 1911 

Francis James Rogers East Boston 1912 

Michael Seretto Boston 

Leon Leland Silbert Roxl ury 1911 

45 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

Nicholas John Skerrett Worcester 

Walter McCabe Smith Cambridge 1912 

George Edwin Stebbins Boston 1911 

Richard Rogers Sullivan Charlestown 1912 

James Francis Terry Boston 

Ralph Carl Thulin ' Brighton 1912 

Frederick J. Turner California 

Nathan Ullian Boston 1912 

Joseph Vecchioni Boston 1912 

Charles Gordon Whitcomb Allston 

Harold Willis Brookline 1912 

Edward Joseph Ziegler East Dedham 1912 

Class of 1913 

Frank Auchter Boston 1913 

Daniel Asher Worcester 1912 

Harold Clifton Berry Dorchester 

Walter Francis Blaser Somerville 1913 

Edgar Alden Bowers South Framingham 

Aaron Philip Brest East Boston 1913 

Philip Augustine Carroll Dorchester 1913 

William Joseph Carroll Cambridge 1913 

Fred Martin Colby Everett 1913 

Robert Shaw Corrigan Natick 1913 

Lyman Croan Roxbury 1913 

John Dodd Daly Salem 1913 

John Patrick Dimond South Boston 

Roy Leslie Duren Bostoia 

Fred Winslow Fisher Medford 1913 

James Francis Flaherty Brighton 1913 

James C. Flannery Boston 1913 

John Daniel Fogarty Roxbury 1913 

John Charles Gilbert West Somerville 1913 

Morris Hillel Freedson Roxbury 1913 

Alfred Raphael Ghiloni Marlboro 1913 

Martin John Heihgmann, Jr West Roxbury 1913 

*Ralph Waldo Hobbs Quincy 1913 

George Frank Howland South Framingham 1913 

Lewis Hyman South Boston 1913 

Paul Norris Jewett Dorchester 1913 

William Francis Johnston Somerville 1912 

Max Jolles Roxbury 1912 

George William Kennev Wakefield 1913 

Albert Edwin Lamb . / Melrose 1913 

A. Robert Martin Forest Hills 1913 

James Gervin Moran Mansfield 

Michael Joseph Mulkern South Boston 1913 

Norman David Nechtovich Boston 1913 

John Saunders Chmo Nicholls East Boston 1913 

Joseph Sanderson Pickford Dorchester 1913 

William Amber Reed, Jr Chelsea 1913 

James Frederic Rollins Dorchester 1913 

Josiah Hirsh Rosenberg Boston 1913 

Israel Ruby Chelsea 1913 

Benjamin Joseph Shoolman Maiden 1913 

William David Stein Maiden 1913 

John Gerald Sullivan Medford 1913 

Daniel Gordon Thompson, Jr Hyde Park 1913 

James Frederick Tobin Roxbury 1913 

46 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

Carlton Walen Wonson Boston 1913 

Jacob Benjamin Zuckernik Boston 1913 

Class of 1914. 

Robert Ernest Archibald Dorchester 1913 

Charles Elmer Bartlett Boston 1913 

Samuel Bergson Dorchester 1914 

John Thomas Comerford Brookline 1913 

Thomas Francis Connolly RosHndale 1914 

Samuel Henry Davis Reading 1913 

Clement Charles Desaulniers Salem 1915 

William Benjamin Doggett, Jr Dorchester 

James Michael Downey Dorchester 1913 

Robert Saunders Dowst West Virginia 1914 

Nathan Efron Boston 1913 

Carl Rudolph Felton Boston 

Frank Hugh Flagg Dorchester 1914 

John Joseph Flaherty Lowell 1913 

Leslie Nathaniel Gebhard Everett 

Isaac Greenburg Everett 1913 

John Edward Hand Cambridge 1913 

Ralph Rodney Harris Leominster 1915 

Reuben Harris Dorchester 1913 

William Martin Hieligmann Roxbury 

Thomas Francis Edward Higgins Newton 1914 

Roy Howard Hoffman North Reading 1914 

Frank Radford Hope Melrose 1915 

John Jeremiah Humphrey Dorchester 1915 

Harry Eugene Jenkins Boston 

Harold Pratt Litchfield Cohasset 1913 

WiUiam MacConnell Dorchester 1916 

Richard Henry MacDonald Randolph 

Harry Benjamin Mendelsohn Dorchester 1913 

Michael Joseph Miles East Boston 1916 

Robert Benjamin Mount Dorchester 1913 

John Sidney Patton, Jr Boston 1913 

Peter William Pezzetti Boston 1913 

Arthur Carter Pickering Salem 1914 

Maurice James Power Charlestown 1915 

Carl Fisher Prescott Quincy 

Frank Xavier Reilly Westboro 1915 

John William Robbins Somerville 1913 

Harry L. Saipe Chelsea 

Philip Samuels Maiden 1913 

Walter Simonds Milton 1914 

George William Skuse Boston 

Charles Harrison Sloan Waverly 1913 

Max Smith Boston' 1914 

Milton Anthony Stone Boston 1913 

WiUiam Allen Stone Dorchester 1914 

Lucius Byron Weymouth Hyde Park 1914 

Class of 1915 

Walter John Anderson Wakefield 1915 

WiUiam Ambrose Arthur Revere 

Pierce Brigham Bennett West Medford 

George Frederick Blood, Jr Hyde Park 

James Alfred Brickett .North Cohassett 1915 

47 



Passed Bar 
Name Residence Examinations 

Benjamin Irving Erudno Eorchester 1915 

Walter Alfred Burnham fc'omerville 1915 

Daniel Francis Collins South Boston 1916 

William Augustine Connelly East Boston 

John Alfred Crowley Lowell 1915 

James Edmund Curry Cambridge 1915 

Leopold Harris Dinner Roxbury 1913 

George Joseph Ganer Roslindale 1915 

Borouch Osher Gofung Boston 1915 

Harry Goldkrand Jamaica Plain 1914 

Howard Allison Gray Somerville 1915 

James Gerard Harnedy Brookline 1916 

Joseph Hubbard Hefflon Winchester 1916 

Ralph Henry Hermann Boston 

Allan Clare Inman West Somerville 1915 

James Edward Karins Boston 

Walter Albert Lambert AUston 1915 

John Joseph LiUis, Jr Everett 1915 

Brent Bradley Lowe Roxbury 1915 

Leo Francis McAleer Newton 

Thomas Florence McCarthy Waltham 1916 

Benjamin Harrison McKinley Lowell 1916 

Gustave Hai'old Madsen Woburn 1915 

F'rederick Roberts Makepeace Maiden 1915 

Rupert Lamert Mapplebeck Roxbury 1915 

Clifford Orland Mason Winchester 1916 

John Joseph Murray Arlington 

*Frank Joseph Neylan Somerville 1915 

A. Lincoln Niditch Boston 1915 

Robert Clement Orpin Medford 1913 

George Stephen Parker Dorchester 1916 

Seneca Arthur Paul Woburn Maine Bar 1916 

Samuel Pitchel Boston 

William Henry Powers. Jr East Boston 

Lynn Melvin Ranger Lynn 1915 

Joseph Edward Riley Hopkinton 1914 

Leon Rubenstein Dorchester 1915 

Simon Schwartz East Boston 1916 

Mark Shain Roxbury 1915 

Bernard Shalit Dorchester 

Isaac Edward Simons Roxbury 1916 

Howard Yeaton Stearns Arlington 

Israel Stolper Chelsea 

Dean Judson Tolman Boston 

Frank Harvey Towne Salem 

Alonzo Joseph Ward Cambridge 

Albert Franklin Welsh Ipswich 1913 

George Franklin Wenrich Maiden 

Harry Edward Wheeler Boston 1916 

Albert Freeman Wigley Dorchester 

George Wilinsky Boston 1915 

*Deceased. 



48 



GENERAL DEPARTMENTS 
Boston Young Men's Christian Association 

Department of Recreation and Health 

Albert E. Garland, M.D., B.P.E., Director 
This Department offers the best recreation that re-creates. 
Privileges as follows: Three Gymnasiums, Swimming Tank of 
Filtered Salt Water, Baths of all kinds. Classes of Music, Six 
Bowling Alleys, Tennis — Indoor and Out, Handball, Squash, Indoor 
Golf, Athletics — ^Indoor and Out, Basket-ball and Games, Boxing, 
Wrestling and Fencing. Best of Instructon. Medical Direction. 
Come in any time. 

Department of Religious Work 

Edwin W. Peirce, Secretary 
In order that young men may secure a well-balanced develop- 
ment and attain the true foundation for successful living, the 
Association advises each member to so plan his schedule that he 
may enter into one or more of the following activities: 
Character Building Classes Training for Christian Service 

Young Men's Sunday Forum Lectures and "Talks" 
Gospel Team Workers' Library 

Personal Interviews Twenty-four-hour-a-day Club 

Department of Social Work 

David M. Claqhorn, Director 
The attention of members is called to the many opportunities 
in the Association for social service, and the following social features : 
A Newly Equipped Game El Club Sarmiento (Pan-Amer- 

Room ican Club) 

The Association Congress The Land and Water Club 

Popular Social Evenings Concerts and Entertainments 

Department of Council and Placement 

Frederick W. Robinson, Director 
Advice given to young men concerning their vocational future 
and efforts made to place them in positions best adapted to their 
varied abilities. It also acts as a clearing house for young men 
seeking work and employers desiring to engage reliable help. Its 
service is not limited to members, but the latter are given liberal 
discounts and effort is made to notify them when good positions 
are open. 

Boys* Division 
James G. Barnes, S.B., City Boys' Work Secretary 
The Boys' Division is made up of boys from Greater Boston 
whose needs are ministered to by a force of young men who have 
made a careful study of "boyology." The Division comprises boys 
from twelve to eighteen years of age, whose needs are studied and 
whose problems we try to solve. Activities are conducted along 
social, physical, educational, and spiritual lines. The annual 
membership fee is $2.00; gymnasium and natatorium privileges 
are open to the boys at special rates. 



14430 



HUNTINGTON 

SCHOOL 




1916 



1917 



THE 

HUNTINGTON 

SCHOOL 

FOR BOYS 

WITH 

COUNTRY DAY-SCHOOL FEATURES 



UNDER THE AUSPICES OF 

BOSTON YOUNG MENS 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



316 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

1916-1917 



Olabuftar 



1916 

May 1 to Se])t. 1. Period of Registration 

Sept. 26. School year begins 

Oct. 12. Columbus Day 

Nov. 30. Thanksgiving Day 

Dec. 20. Close of Fall Term 

1917 

Jan. 3. Winter Term begins 

Feb. 22. Washington's Birthday 

March 30. Close of Winter Term 

April 9. Spring Term begins 

April 19. Patriots' Day 

May 30. Decoration Day 

June 8. Commencement Day 



at 

JUIyr Snfltun Ifnitng Men's QII|riHtiau Aaaurtutiun 

General Administrative Officers 

ARTHUR S. JOHNSON ALBERT H. CURTIS 

President Vice-President 

LEWIS A. CROSSETT 

Treasurer 



GEORGE W. MEHAFFEY 

General Secretary 

Educational Committee 

of 

The Department of Education 

WILLIAM E. MURDOCK. Chairman WILLIAM C. CHICK 

ALBERT H. CURTIS MORGAN L. COOLEY 

GEORGE H. MARTIN 

Spjiartmntt nf EburatUnt 

FRANK P. SPEARE. M.H. 

Director 

GALEN D. LIGHT, A.B. 

Asst. Director and Bursar 

FRED L. DAWSON 

Field Secretary 

Advisory Committee 

of 
The Huntmgton School \ 

EDWARD H. ROCKWELL 

Professor of Structural Engineering, Tufts Vollege 

WILLIAM M. WARREN 

Dean, College of Liberal Arts, B. U. 

PAUL H. HANUS 

Professor of Education, Harvard 

REV. ENDICOTT PEABODY 

Principal of the Groton School 

CHARLES S. CLARK 

Supt. of Public Schools, Somerville 

WILLIAM ORR 

Deputy Commissioner of Education 

FREDERICK P. FISH 

Chairman of State Board of Education 

5 



Jantltij 



IRA A. FLINNER, A.B. 

(Harvard University) 
Headmaster 



CHARLES H. SAMPSON, S.B. 

(University of Maine) 

Head of the Technical Division 

WILLIAM S. SPENCER, A.M. 

(Harvard University) 

Head of English Instruction 

ARTHUR W. HALE, A.I5. 

(Amherst College) 

Head of Department of Mathematics 
Faculty Director of Athletics 

AVn.LIAM L. i:STERBERG, B.C.S. 

(Northeastern College, School of Commerce and Finance) 

Head of Commercial Division 
JOHN C. DIETZ, A.B. 

(University of Pittsburgh) 
Harvard University University of Paris 

Head of Language Department 

HAROLD I. WILLIAMS, B.S. 

(Vermont University) 

Head of Electrical Department 

ALBERT E. GARLAND, M.D., B.P.E.- 

(Union Medical College) (Springfield College) 

Director of Physical Education 

JAMES B. TAYLOR, A.M. 

(Harvard University) 

Head of History Department 
CHESTER A. JENKINS. B.S. 

(Dartmouth College) 
Head of Science Department 

WAYNE M. SHIPMAN. A.B. 

(Harvard University) 

Latin, History 

JAMES A. BELL, A B. 

(Harvard University) 

Mathematics 
CHARLES N. GREGG. A.M. 

(Arcadia' University) (Harvard University) 

Latin and English 

JAMES METIVIER, A.B. 

(Hai^ard University) 

Modern Languages 

LUTHER F. ELLIOTT, B.S. 

(Bridgewater Normal) (Harvard University) 

PreHminary Year 



FREDERICK C. HOSMER, A.B. 

(Boston University) (Harvard University) 

English, Commercial Subjects 

JAMES BROUGH 

(Certified Art Master) 
Freehand Drawing, Industrial Design and Interior Decoration 

ARTHUR B. KING, A.B. 

(Middlebury College) 

Latin 
IRVING O. SCOTT. B.S., A.M. 

(Dartmouth College) (University of Maine) 

Mathematics 

WILLIAM A. SWICK, A.B. 

(Allegheny College) 
Mathematics 

NEWELL W. EDSON, A.B. 

(Harvard University) 
French and German 

W. CHAPMAN HALL 

(Harvard University) 
French and German 

LEVI L. LAMB, B.S. 

(Pennsylvania State College) 

History 
Athletic Coach 

CHARLES F. SEAVERNS 

Mechanical Drawing 

LESLIE W'. MacKAY, B.T.E. 

(Lowell Textile School) 
JVoodwortiitig 

BYRON W. REED. LL.B. 

(Formerly Director of Music, University of Porto Rico) 

Choral Director 

JOSEPH A. AUDET 

Director of Musical Clubs 

LOriS FREDERICK LAUN. B.P.E. 

(Springfield Y. M. C. A. College) 

Gym nasin m Instructor 

ARTHUR EDMOND DOME 

Sivimming Instructor 

EUSTACE L. GRAVES 

Executive Secretary 

CAROLINE L. MILLER 

Secretary 

RUTH E. BABCOCK 

Secretary 

ELIZABETH F. LANE 

Secretary 



AIM AND SCOPE 

The School has as its first object the preparation of boys for 
the colleges and the scientific schools. It also provides training 
along engineering and business lines for those who do not expect 
to enter college. The developing of character and the training 
of the body form a fundamental part of the y)urpose of the school. 

HISTORY 

The Huntington School is now in the eighth year of its 
history. It opened in September, 1909, with an encouraging 
enrollment of excellent young men from the many cities and 
towns of eastern Massachusetts. The attendance has increased 
each succeeding year until now there are enrolled three hundred 
boys who are preparing for colleges and technical schools or 
for business. Although a large proportion come from Massa- 
chusetts, yet nearly every state in New England and the Middle 
Atlantic group is represented. The fact that it has had such a 
growth proves conclusively that the School has the confidence 
of the public and that its administration, organization, aims 
and purposes are in accordance with the best principles of 
education. 

THE BUILDINGS 

The location, surroundings and physical appointments of a 
school are of primary importance. The location should be 
healthful, accessible and attractive; buildings should be so 
heated, lighted and ventilated as to promote the health and 
progress of students at all seasons of the year. The buildings 
occupied by the Huntington School fulfill these requirements. 




Game and Social Room — Older Boys 




Game and Social Room — Younger Boys 



Their location on Huntington Avenue, in a section of Boston 
noted for its institutions of learning, makes them accessible 
from all parts of the city and suburbs and free from outside 
influences which distract the attention. On looking at the 
buildings from the front, one gains the impression of a single 
large, square structure, but there are in reality six buildings, 
each on its own foundation, connected by corridors and bridges. 
This arrangement gives exceptionally fine light and air to all 
of them. 

These six buildings are as follows: Administration, Assem- 
bly, Recitation, Natatorium, Gymnasium and Vocational. 

In the Administration Building are the lobby, 
Administration various offices of the administrative staff. 
Building directors' rooms, committee rooms, libraries, 

reading and social rooms. 

The Jacob P. Bates Hall has a seating capacity 
Jacob P. Bates of nearly five hundred. A large stage, suitable 
Hall for entertainments of all kinds is provided. 

The Hall has a moving picture machine which 
is used for instruction purposes. Here are held the chapel 
exercises and lectures of the school. 

This building is one hundred and ninety-six 
Recitation feet long, fifty-eight feet wide and six stories 

Building high. In the basement are the heating and 

ventilating plant, shops, and laboratories. 
The first floor contains game, social and club rooms, and a 
small assembly hall. On the second, third and fourth floors 
are class rooms, drafting rooms, and laboratories. The fifth 
and sixth floors are dormitories. 

The ventilation represents the highest of 
Ventilation modern engineering skill. Large volumes of 

fresh, pure air, thoroughly washed by a special 
process, are forced into the schoolrooms by fans in the basement 
and drawn out by others on the roof. Humidifiers are a part 
of the system; the proper degree of moisture is maintained. 

Located between the Jacob P. Bates Hall and 
Natatorium the gymnasium, this building is easily acces- 

sible from the locker rooms of the latter. The 
pool, seventy-five feet long by twenty-five feet wide, is under 

11 




Genehai, LmuAKV 




Dhafting llooM 



a glass roof which admits floods of light and sunshine. It is 
supplied with filtered salt water from our own artesian well, 
heated to the proper temperature. The Natatorium is one of 
the largest and most perfectly appointed of its kind. 

This structure, the funds for which were 
Gymnasium provided by relatives of the late Samuel 
Johnson, is known as the Samuel Johnson 
Memorial Gymnasium. On the main floor is the gymnasium 
proper, which contains the most approved apparatus. In the 
building are handball and squash courts, lockers, six bowling 
alleys, shower baths, rooms for special exercising, fencing, 
wrestling, etc., a running track and a visitors' gallery. The 
main floor is so arranged that it can be divided by sliding parti- 
tions into three separate compartments, making it possible to 
conduct many activities at the same time. Other new features 
in gymnasium construction and equipment have been intro- 
duced. 

The Vocational Building is directly back of 
Vocational the main group. This is a substantial struc- 

Building ture three stories high, in which are a wood- 

working plant, electrical laboratories, machine 
shops and lecture halls. 

EQUIPMENT 

The school is especially fortunate in having 
Laboratories laboratories that are better fitted to carry on 

work in the sciences than are provided by 
many colleges. There are three large chemical laboratories, 
one large physical laboratory and a specially fitted lecture room, 
all excellently equipped with apparatus for demonstration and 
for individual experiments. 

The electrical laboratory is equipped with apparatus of all 
kinds for making electrical tests and measurements. 

The School has excellent facilities for study in 
Library the libraries and reading rooms. Besides the 

special reference libraries of the various de- 
partments which are equipped with dictionaries, cyclopedias 
and special works for carrying on the work of the school in a 
most effective way, the students have access to a general library. 

l.S 







M-'-^< 






Physics Laboratory 




Chemistry Laboratory 
(One of Three) 



There are three large drafting rooms, well 
Drafting lighted with both natural and artificial light. 

Rooms The equipment provided is of the best. 

A liberal amount of equipment is supplied for 
Shops courses in wood working and machine shop 

practice. 

FEATURES 

In the Huntington School the individual is neither em- 
barrassed nor retarded by the class, but is encouraged at all 
times to do his best, with the inspiration that individual help 
offers. 

The following features will commend themselves to pa- 
rents and students: male teachers, small classes, personal in- 
struction, close supervision, frequent reports; complete chemi- 
cal and physical equipment, modern buildings; lectures, prac- 
tical talks; athletics, gymnastics, social features, vocational 
guidance. 



15 




Study Hall 




Physics Lkctlre Room 



(^mnni dintnrmatiun 

THE students are under the most wholesome influences. 
The school is non-sectarian but thoroughly Christian in 
character. The relations between teachers and students are 
close and friendly, constituting a distinctive element in the life 
of this school. The discipline is firm but reasonable. Students 
are expected to cultivate self control, truthfulness and a right 
sense of honor. The discipline is not adapted to boys who 
require severe restrictions. A boy ivhose influence is felt to he 
injurious in any way will be removed from the school. 

The progress of the students is watched very 
Reports closely. Instructors make weekly reports to 

the Headmaster of the work accomplished by 
each student. Semi-monthly reports, signed by the Headmaster, 
are sent to the parents. In cases where it is deemed necessary 
reports are sent more frequently, and an effort is made in this 
and other ways to secure effective co-operation between parents 
and teachers. Special reports are sent home at the close of 
each division of the year. 

How to prevent the lower third of the class 
The Prepara- from interfering with the progress of the upper 
tion of Lessons two-thirds and at the same time do full justice 

to the lower third, has always been a difficult 
problem to solve. Nearly every boy finds difficulty with at 
least one of his studies. This may be due to various causes, 
such as a lack of natural aptitude, defective early training, lack 
of concentration, poor memory, laziness or some similar failing. 
Whatever the cause may be, the case always calls for special 
treatment if progress is to be made. At this school there are 
two distinct ways in which we overcome these difficulties. 

First: By maintaining small classes and doing individual 
teaching. 

Second: By employing teachers who supervise study, and 
give assistance to those who need it. Such supervisors remain 
until five o'clock each day. 

17 




s 



Except where prolonged illness interferes, a student does 
a week's work in a week's time. The student who is absent 
from any recitation or recitations is obliged to make up the 
work before the close of the week. 

The students of the school who are nmsically 
Activity inclined have an opportunity to become mem- 

Clubs bers of the Glee Club and the Orchestra. 

Musical specialists are employed to take charge 
of this work and members will find that the time thus spent 
will not only be pleasant but profitable. The orchestra and 
Glee Club unite in giving concerts during the year. Credit 
is given toward graduation to members of a musical organi- 
zation. Those interested in public speaking or dramatics may 
take part in the Debating Club, the Public Speaking Club or the 
Dramatic Society. There are also a Language Club and an 
Arts and Crafts Club which attract those interested in these 
directions. 

All members of the school become members 
Y. M. C. A. of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

Membership Because of such membership students enjoy 

many privileges not generally found in private 

schools. 

Students can lunch at our restaurant. Prices 
Lunches are reasonable and the food is wholesome. 

Students from a distance may, by early appli- 
Rooms cation, secure rooms in the building. Excel- 

lent table board can be had also. The charge 
for rooms ranges from $2.00 to $4.00 a week; table board is 
furnished for $5.00 a week up. Students of the School who 
room in the building are subject to the regulations of the Boston 
Young Men's Christian Association. 

While the Huntington School enrolls three 
Organization hundred boys, it is so organized that the 

advantages of the small school are retained. 
The students are divided into three groups: the business 
division, the technical division and the preparatory divi- 
sion, each under the direction of a supervisor. They 
are again sub-divided into units of from twenty to twenty- 
five boys. Each of these units is in charge of a head of a depart- 

19 



ment who is assisted by an instructor. Each teaclier of the 
school, therefore, is responsible for twelve or fifteen boys. 
In this way close touch is kept with each student. 

Few schools have such facilities for physical 
Recreation training as are found at Huntington. The 

and Health gymnasium with its running track, three 

basketball courts, wrestling room, special 
exercising room, handball courts, and bowling alleys, is one of 
the most complete in New England. The swimming pool 
under a glass roof, filled with filtered salt water, heated to the 
proper temperature, compares favorably with the best. 

The outdoor facilities are exceptional for a city school, 
making it possible to introduce many features common only 
to country schools. Adjoining the building is a large field 
equipped for athletics. Here are four tennis courts, outdoor 
gymnasium, handball court, basketball courts, jumping pits, 
board track, cinder track with a 100-yd. straightway, and 
baseball and football fields. We are near enough to the Charles 
River to maintain a crew, and our proximity to the Arena where 
ice hockey is played, gives additional means of exercise. 

Before students are assigned to physical work 
Physical they are given a physical examination; the 

Examination examiner advises as to the kind of exercise 

best suited to the needs of each. All students 
])hysically able are required to take this physical work which 
has for its aim the symmetrical development of the body. In 
addition to this work students participate in games and sports. 
Many different sports are offered each season: during the 
fall term, football, cross country, track, tennis, outdoor basket- 
ball, association football, and field hockey; during the winter 
term, track, indoor and outdoor basketball, swimming and 
hockey; during the spring term baseball, track, tennis, soccer, 
cross country and rowing. Each sport is directed by teacher 
coaches, men who were prominent in athletics at college, and 
have had experience in directing athletics. 

The school maintains that the greatest good is secured 
through a system of physical training that gives each boy 
regular exercise under the leadership of men whose standards 
of living are right. 

21 




Juniors in the Gymnasium 




Ox Your Mark 



It has been found advisable to have a uniform 
Gymnasium suit for the gymnasium classes. Therefore, 
Uniforms new pupils are requested not to get their suits 

before entering. Orders will be taken in the 
Physical Department, immediately upon the opening of the 
School in the fall. 

The school is in session five days each week. 
Hours of Attendance on Saturday morning may be 

Attendance required of students who are behind in their 

work, or for disciplinary reasons. 
The preliminary year follows the same schedule as Forms 
1, 2 and 3. When advisable, pupils in the preliminary year 
may be dismissed at 3.00. 

Supervised study between 4.00 and 5.00 for all Forms is 
optional with parents. 

The daily schedule follows: 



Lower School 


Upper School 


Forms 1, 2 and 3 


Forms 4, 5 and Senior 


8.55 to 10.20— recitations 




10.20 to 11.00— assembly and study 


8.55 to 10.20 — recitations 


11.00 to 12.20— recitations 


10.20 to 11.00— assembly and study 


12.20 to 1.00— lunch 


11.00 to 1.00— recitations 


1.00 to 1.40— recitations 


1.00 to 1.40— lunch 


1.40 to 3.00 — recreation period 


1.40 to 2.20— recitations 


S.OO to 4.00 — recitations 


2.20 — recreation period 



On Wednesdays and Fridays both Lower and Upper 
Schools are dismissed at 2.20. It is expected that outside ap- 
pointments made by parents will be confined to these days. 

Each morning the students assemble for morn- 
Chapel ing exercises. A portion of the period is given 
Exercises over to devotional exercises; the remainder 

is devoted to music, current events, Bible 
study, moving pictures of an educational nature, or to a lecture 
on some interesting subject by a specialist. The time thus 
sp>ent commends itself as most valuable and practically helpful. 



23 



CHAPEL TALKS 



The following is a partial list of lectures given by prominent 



men. 

Frank P. Speare 

Director of Education, Y. M. C. A. 



Addresses on 

"Planning a Career" 

Pres. H. C. Bumpus. Ph.D.. Sc.D., LL.D. "Whv go to College.^" 
Tufts College 



Deax Albers 
B. U. Law School 

Geo. W. Tupper. D.D. 

International Committee, Y. M. C. A. 

Deputy Chief Tabor 
Boston Fire Department 

Rev. John Abraham Muste 
Newton Highlands 

Robert Lincoln O'Brien 
Editor of the Bosion Herald 

Captain J.\.ck Crawford 
Indian Scout 

Mr. a. G. Reynolds 

Executive Staff, Boston Elevated R.R. 

Pres. J. M. Thomas, D.D., LL.D. 
Middlebury College 

Charles F. Rittevhoi-se 
Simmons College 

Mr. Chas. S. Crosmax 
Curtis Publishing Co. 

Rev. E. H. Byington 
West Roxbury 

Mr. F. W. Taft 
Carters Ink C<j. 

Mr. R. D. Hall 

International Sec "y for Indian Work 

Rev. L. H. Bigbee 
Maiden 

Mr. William Orr 

Commissioner of Education 

Pres. W. A. Shanklin, L.H.D., LL.D. 

Wesleyan University 

Mr. Horace Taylor 
Brookline 

Captain Rexmigius F.iesch 
Basel, Switzerland 

Dean W.\rrex 
Boston LniversitN- 



"Law as a Profession" 

''The Alien" 

"Fire Prevention" 

Six Addresses on '"The Christian 
Interpretation of Life" 

".Tournalism as a Profession" 
"Personal Experiences'" 
"Transportation Problems'" 
"The Small College" 
"Accountancy as a Profession" 
"The Production of a Magazine" 

"The Manufacture of Ink" 
"Tiie Indian" 
"Choosing the Best" 
"Teaching ;us a Profession " 
"Ideals of Education" 
"Evolution of Bird Life" 
"Swiss Military .System" 
"I-'oundatioiis of Life" 



24 



Stttranr? lExamtnattntia 

Preliminary Year 

Pupils who have completed the fifth grade of a public 
school will be admitted to the Preliminary year without exam- 
ination. Pupils who have not been prepared in the public 
schools will be required to pass examinations in the following 
subjects : — 

English. Ability to read readily and intelligently, to spell 
common words, to reproduce a short story after hearing it read. 

Arithmetic. Familiarity with the fundamental operations 
and simple fractions, and ability to perform simple practical 
problems. ___„ 

Geography. A knowledge of the most important parts of 
elementary geography as it relates to the United States, par- 
ticularly Massachusetts. 

Boys in this grade range in ages from nine to thirteen years. 
No boy over thirteen will be admitted. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 
First Form 

Boys who have completed the Preliminary year or the 
sixth grade of a public school will be admitted to the First Form 
without examination. All others will be obliged to satisfy the 
School that they have satisfactorily completed an equivalent 
course of study. 

Pupils in the First Form range in ages from eleven to four- 
teen. No pupil over fourteen years of age will be admitted to 
this form. 

Graduates of grammar schools are admitted to the Third 
Form without examination. Slight changes are made in the 
subsequent course to conform to their preliminary training. 

Courses will be arranged for those who have pursued a 
partial high school course. 

25 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

For graduation from the School the appUcant must have 
completed the work of the first two forms and in addition sixteen 
hours of English, fifteen hours of mathematics (algebra and 
geometry), ten hours of a foreign language, five hours of a 
science, and five hours of history. The remaining twenty -four 
hours of the requirements for graduation may be from the 
elective courses. An opportunity is thus given to select such 
work as is required by the college for which the student is pre- 
paring or to take vocational courses should he wish to complete 
his education with the work of this school. He must have 
been in attendance one full year and have completed at least 
twenty hours of work with a rank of C. 



t6 



PRELIMINARY YEAR 

English Literature. Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," "Legend 
of Sleepy Hollow"; Dickens' "A Christmas Carol"; Scott's 
"Ivanhoe"; Longfellow's "Courtship of Miles Standish"; 
Selections from Elson's Reader. 

Language and Composition. Dictation, oral and written 
compositions, letter forms, paragraphing, spelling, memorizing 
of good literature. 

Grammar. Simple analysis of sentence, recognition of 
parts of speech, memorizing of good literature. 

History. European beginnings of American history. 
American history through the Revolution. 

Arithmetic. Review of the work of the fifth year. Simple 
and decimal fractions, denominate numbers, introduction to 
percentage. 

Geography. A review of the essentials of the work of the 
fifth year. Elements of physical geography, and application to 
Africa, Australia, and eastern North America. Special study 
of Massachusetts. 

Penmanship. The Palmer system of penmanship. 

Drawing. Map drawing, theory of color, water color work. 

Music. Drill in the essentials of music. Chorus work. 

Physical Training. Simple class gymnastics, games, and 
dance steps. 



27 



PREPARATORY DIVISION 

SIX YEAR COURSE 

(College) 

First Form 

English B 6* Science B 3 

Mathematics B 5 Fine Arts B 1 

French B 4 Music B 1 

History B 3 

Second Form 

English A •'> Science A 4 

Mathematics A .5 Music A 1 

French A 4 Fine Arts A 1 

Latin A 2 History A 3 

Third Form 

English 1 5 Latin 1 5 

Mathematics 1 5 History 1 3 

French 2 5 IVIusic 1 

Fourth Form 

English 2 5 Latin 2 5 

Mathematics 2 5 History 2 5 

French 3 3 

Fifth Form 

English 3 3 Latin 3 5 

Mathematics 3 5 History 3 5 

French 4 ~ German 1 5 

Senior Form 

English 4 3 German 'i 4 

Mathematics 4 o Chemistry or / . 

Latin 4 5 Physics f 

♦Refers to number of hours a week. 



This course will prepare a student for any college or techni- 
cal school. 

Certification from this course will admit the ii;radnate with- 
out examination to any institution which admits by certificate. 

28 




Corner of Electrical Laboratory 




Architectural Drawing Room 



SIX YEAR COURSE 

(General) 

First Form 

English B 8 Fine Arts B 1 

Mathematics B 5 Music B 1 

History B 3 Woodworking 2 

Science B 3 

Second Form 

English A 8 Music A 1 

Mathematics A 5 Fine Arts A 1 

History A 3 Woodworking 2 

Science A 4 

Third Form 
Required Courses 

English 5 French, German or Latin .... 5 

Mathematics 5 

Elective Courses 

Latin 5 German o 

Elementary Science 2 Shorthand 5 

English History 5 Freehand Drawing 2 

Bookkeeping 4 Woodworking 1 

Mechanical Drawing 4 Typewriting 5 

French 5 

Fourth. Form 
Required Courses 

English 5 French, German or Latin .... 5 

Mathematics 5 

Elective Courses 

Latin 5 Spanish 5 

French 5 Ancient History 5 

German 5 Mechanical Drawing 4 

Machine Drawing 5 Bookkeeping 4 

Electricity 2 Freehand Drawing 2 

Woodworking 2 

Fifth Form 

Required Courses 

English 3 Mathematics 5 

Elective Courses 

Latin 5 American History 5 

French 5 Industrial History 3 

German 5 Commercial Law 3 

Spanish 5 Economics 3 

Physics 5 Ancient History 5 

Chemistry 5 Machine Drawing 4 

Bookkeeping 4 Architecture 4 

Shorthand 5 Woodworking 4 

Typewriting 5 

Electricitv 5 

30 




^VooD^voRKI^'G Laboratory 




Woodworking Laboratory 



Senior Form 
Required Courses 
English 3 

Elective Courses 

Latin 5 Review Mathematics 5 

German .5 Solid Geometry 3 

French o Trigonometry 3 

Chemistry 5 Architecture 4 

Physics 5 

Electricity 4 

Illustrating and Cartooning ... 4 

This course permits of consideralile election. Students who 
wish a general training select their work from this course. 

TECHNICAL DIVISION 

The Technical Division offers instruction along technical 

lines to grammar and high school graduates. All courses are 

practical, but are in no sense trade courses. The following 
are offered. 

1. Four Year Technical — composed of English, pure and 
applied mathematics, science, electricity and the elements of 
machine, electrical and architectural drawing. 

2. Three Year Technical — similar to the four-year course, 
but drawing woik not so comprehensive. 

3. Electrical Course, Three Years — Electricity, mathe- 
matics through trigonometry, special applied mathematics, 
science, English, drawing and woodworking. 

4. Architectural — a large amount of architectural draw- 
ing, mathematics, science, English, woodworking and allied 
subjects. 

5. One Year Technical Course for high school graduates. 
Mathematics, shop problems, materials, drawing. 

6. Two Year Architectural Drawing Course. Consisting 
of drawing and lectures on architectural construction and 
history. 

7. One Year Machine Drafting Course — Elements of 
drawing, practical drafting work as applied to the design and 
construction of machinery. 

Catalog giving complete details sent on request. 

32 



BUSINESS DIVISION 

The Business Division offers commercial training to 
grammar and high school graduates. 
The following courses are offered: 

1. Four year Commercial course. 

2. Two year Bookkeeping course. 

3. Two year Stenographic course. 

4. One year Bookkeeping course. 

5. One year Stenographic course. 

The various courses are made up in accordance with the 
requirements of each pupil approved by the Headmaster and 
include instruction in the following branches : 

Bookkeeping as used in all kinds of business, Commercial 
Law, Shorthand (Pitman), Penmanship, Typewriting (touch), 
Commercial Geography, Industrial History, English Grammar 
and Composition, Correspondence, Written and Mental Arith- 
metic, Rapid Calculation, Filing and Cataloging, Spelling, 
Spanish, French and German, and such subjects of the Prepara- 
tory and Technical Division as are suited to the students' needs. 

Catalog giving complete details sent on request. 



i>ub;^rt0 nf Jttatrurttnn 

ENGLISH 

THE course in English, planned both for students entering 
college and for students entering business, is designed to 
instruct them to speak, to read and to write English with ease, 
intelligence and taste. Supplementary reading and reports 
are required of all classes. Frequent consultations for critical 
discussion of essays are arranged. 

English B. Literature. Hawthorne, "True Stories"; Dick- 
ens, "Paul Dombey"; selections from Lamb's "Tales from 
Shakespeare." Language and Composition. Dictation, oral 
and written reproduction and original compositions, punctua- 
tion, spelling and memorizing of good literature. Grammar. 
Simple, complex, compound sentences; phrase and clause; 
parts of speech; analysis of sentences. 

English A. Literature. Reading from Old Testament; 
Macaulay, "Lays of Ancient Rome"; Lowell, "Vision of Sir 
Launfal." Composition. Weekly themes, letter writing, 
spelling, oral expression, memorizing. 

English 1 (5)*. Applied Grammar. Punctuation, Dicta- 
tion, Letter Writing. Irving's Sketch Book; Scott's "Mar- 
mion"; Longfellow's "Courtship of Miles Standish." 

English 2 (5). Applied Rhetoric. Oral Expression. Bun- 
yan's "Pilgrim's Progress"; Homer's "IHad"; Ehot's "Silas 
Marner"; Stevenson's "Treasure Island"; Coleridge's "The 
Ancient Mariner." 

English 3 (3). Argumentation, written and oral. History 
of English Literature. Addison's "Sir Roger de Coverly 
Papers"; Tennyson's "Idylls of the King"; Shakespeare's 
"Merchant of Venice," "Juhus Caesar." 

English 4 (3). Composition, oral and written. History of 
American Literature. "Macbeth"; "L' Allegro," "II Pense- 
rosa and Comus" ; "Washington's Farewell Address" ; "Webster's 
Bunker Hill Oration"; Macaulay's "Life of Johnson;" Pal- 
grave's "Golden Treasury." 

♦Numbers refer to hours a week. 

34 




Typewriting 




Penmanship 



THE MODERN LANGUAGES 

Much attention is accorded to modern languages in this 
school, in view of the great importance which these languages 
have assumed in college, business and every day life. The 
weak points in the student's linguistic equipment, viz., verbs, 
grammar, composition and vocabulary, receive constant 
attention. A carefully planned system for the acquisition of a 
comprehensive vocabulary enables the student to acquire in 
four years two thousand words and idioms. 

FRENCH 

French B. In this class an attempt is made to acquaint 
younger boys with some of the elementary steps in the study of 
French, such as the pronunciation of simple words and con- 
struction of easy sentences. 

French A. French A is a continuation of French B and is 
directed along the same general lines. In these classes boys 
are prepared for the serious study of French. 

French 1 (5) . Chardenal's Complete French Course. French 
Life (Allen & Schoell), Malot's Sans Famille, La Bedolliere's 
La Mere Michel et son chat, etc. 

French 2 (5). Chardenal's Complete Course. Vocabularies, 
Idioms and verbs. Blanchaud's Idioms. Buffum's Short 
Stories, About's Le Roi des Montagues, La Brete's Mon Oncle 
& mon Cure, Sand's La Petite Fadette, etc., are read. Some 
three hundred pages are translated. 

French 3 (5). Fraser and Squair Grammar. Blanchaud's 
Idioms. Francois Composition. A'ocabularies and Verbs. 
Texts: Scribe's le Verre d'eau, Sardon, Les Pattes de Mouche, 
Les Boulinard, Loti's Pecheur d'Islande, Vigny's Cinq Mars, 
etc., are read. Over three himdred ])ages are translated. 

French 4 (5). French 4 is a parallel coin-se to French 3. 
More difficult texts are read; grammar and composition are 
emphasized. 

GERMAN 

German 1 {5} . This course lays a good foundation for upper 
class work in German. Harris' German Lessons or an equiva- 



lent book is used for i>raininatieal work and exercises. About 
125 pages of German is read in this class. 

German 2 (5) . Bacon's Elements of German is used as the 
grammar. The composition exercises are numerous. Verbs 
and vocabularies written daily. Texts. Rosseger's Lex von 
Gutenhag, Gerstacker's Irrfahrten, Germelshausen, Der Wild- 
dieb, Ernst's Asmus Sempers Jugendland, etc., are translated. 
Some three hundred pages of text are read. 

German 3 (5) . Joyes-Meissner German Grammar. Pope's 
German Composition. Vocabularies and verbs. Texts — Su- 
dermann's Fran Sorge, Schiller's Der Neffe als Onkel, Goethe's 
Egmont and equivalent texts. Kron's German Daily Life. 
Over three hundred pages of text are translated. During the 
Spring Term much stress is laid on written exercises and gram- 
mar drill. 

German 4 (5). German 4 is a parallel to German 3. The 
texts to be translated and the composition work are of a more 
advanced character. 

SPANISH 

Spanish 1 (5). Coester's Spanish Cirammar is used. The 
vocabularies and verb drill begin early in the course. Text — 
Part of Spanish Daily life, Padre Isla's Gil Bias, El Capitan 
Veneno. El si de las ninas, Tres Comedias modernas, etc. 

Spanish 2 (5). Coester's Spanish Grammar, or Hill and 
Ford's Grammar. Much attention is devoted to vocabulary 
and verb drill and composition. Spanish Daily Life. Texts — 
Valdes' Jose, Don Quijote, Galdos' Marianela, Valera's Pepita 
Jimenez, etc.. are read. Some three hundred pages of Spanish 
are translated. 

LATIN 

Latin A (2). An introductory course to Latin. 

Latin 1 (5). Beginners' Latin. First year Latin lessons 
complete. Easy Latin prose. 

Latin 2 id). Caesar, Salhist and Latin Composition. Re- 
view of constructions, forms and applicati<m of rules of syntax. 

37 



Latin 3 (o). Cicero's Orations against Cataline, for the 
Manilian Law, for Archias. Grammar. Composition. Trans- 
lation at sight from Caesar and Salhist. 

Latin 4 (5). VirgiVs Aeneid. Translation at sight from 
Ovid. Salhist and others. Composition. 

HISTORY 

History B. United States History completed. 
History A. English History; Re\'iew of United States 
History; Civics. 

History 1 (3). Introductory course in Ancient History. 

History 2 (5). Ancietit History. The ancient world to 
800 A.D. Emphasis is placed on the life, literature, art and 
poUtical, social and religious institutions of the foremost nations 
as these have influenced modern civilization. College re- 
quirements. 

History 3 (5). United States History. Includes enough of 
English history to enable one to understand American. Em- 
phasis is placed on the careers of eminent men, on civic legisla- 
tion and on territorial and constitutional expansion. College 
requirements. 

History 4 (^) . Industrial History. The aim is to acquaint 
the student with the great sea routes and ports, the products 
transported; the changes produced by wars, steam and elec- 
tricity in the long period covered by ancient, mediaeval and 
modern history. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics B. Review of Fractions. Practical Meas- 
urements. Percentage and its applications. 

Mathematics A. Arithmetic completed. Observational 
Geometry. Introduction to Algebra. 

Mathematics 1 (5). Algebra I. The essential operations 
of algebra to quadratics. The emphasis is on the fundamental 
principles. 

Mathematics 2 (5). Algebra II. Covers the college en- 
trance refjuirements. 

.?8 



Mathematics 3 (o). Plane Geometry. The five books. 
A large number of original exercises. 

Mathematics 4 {2). Solid Geometry. The standard theo- 
rems in solid and spherical geometry. Stress' is laid upon 
numerical exercises involving mensuration of solid figures. 

Mathematics 5 (<?). Plane Trigonometry. Logarithms. 
The solution of right and oblique triangles. Goniometry. 

Mathematics 6 (o). Rerieiv of Algebra and Geometry. This 
course covers the requirements of Algebra and Geometry for 
college entrance. 

Mathematics 7 (5). Applied Mathematics. Practical ap- 
plications of algebra, geometry, physics, trigonometry, loga- 
rithms, slide rule and graphs. 

Mathematics 8 (2). Arithmetic. A course covering the 
essentials of practical arithmetic. 

SCIENCE 

Science B. (a) Reviewof Elementary Geography. Physi- 
cal and political geography of United States, other countries 
of North America, and the countries of Europe. Drill in map 
drawing and use of outline maps. 

(6) Physiology and Hygiene. The skin; bones; muscles; 
exercise; digestion; circulatory system; organs of respiration 
and speech; excretion; nervous system; special senses; accidents, 
emergencies and contagious diseases. 

Science A. (o) Physical and political geograj^hy of coun- 
tries of South America, the West Indies, Asia, Africa, Australia, 
Malaysia and the other islands of the Pacific. Drill in map- 
drawing and use of outline maps. 

(6) General Science. Some elementary physical ideas wnth 
experiments, elements of Botany, Astronomy, Physiography. 

Science 1 (3). A course in Elementary Scierice dealing with 
the common things of life. The course is arranged as an in- 
troduction to science and is intended to give one a broad and 
helpful view of the })hysical sciences. 

Science 2 (5). Physics. Recitation and laboratory work 
covering preparation for college. Constant drill in the solution 
of problems involving the elementary principles of Physics. 

39 



Science 3 (5). Inorganic Chemistry covering the work of 
preparation for college; recitations, lectures, demonstrations 
and laboratory work. Independent work, observation and 
reasoning are insisted upon. 

COMMERCIAL STUDIES 

Commerce 1 (5). Penmanshi'p. Spelling and business 
papers. 

Commerce 2 {3). Commercial Arithmetic and rapid cal- 
culation. 

Commerce 3 {2). Commercial Geografhy. The products 
of leading nations; soil and climate; commercial relations; 
transportation. Emphasis placed on the commercial geography 
of New England States. 

Commerce 4 (5). Bookkeeping. Single and double entry 
bookkeeping. 

Commerce 5 (5). Shorthand. Principles of Ben Pitman 
Shorthand. Practice in writing and reading. Shorthand dic- 
tation and transcription of notes. Office practice. 

Commerce 6 (5). Typewriting. The touch method of 
typewriting; carbon copying, filing, mimeographing, dictation, 
tabulating, office practice 

Commerce 7 (2). Economics. Elements of Economics. 

Commerce 8 {2). Industrial History. Social economic 
and industrial history of the United States. 

Commerce 9 {3). Business English. Numerous forms of 
letters and business forms. Emphasis is placed on punctua- 
tion, details of construction, capitalization and choice of words. 

Commerce 10 {2). Commercial Law. A course covering 
the elements of business law. 

MANUAL ARTS 

Wood- Working (4). Bench work in wood with tools, from 
drawings made by the student. 

Wood-turning (4) and general speed lathe work from 
standard designs; patternmaking. 

40 



DRAWING 

Several drawing courses are offered. These are classed 
as Mechanical Drawing, Machine Drawing, Architectural 
Drawing and Freehand Drawing. 

The students electing either Machine or Architectural 
Drawing must first complete the required work of the Mechani- 
cal Drawing course. The instruction covers all the necessary 
fundamentals such as lettering, geometrical problems, ortho- 
graphic projection and development and intersection of surfaces. 
Much attention is given to the proper use of the various drawing 
instruments . 

The Machine Drawing course teaches one to make detail 
and assembly drawings properly. Instruction is given in 
freehand sketching as applied to machine drawing. The stu- 
dent learns how to draw cams and gears. Especial attention 
is given to the methods employed for the production of a tracing 
or well inked drawing. 

Architectural Drawing students are given thorough instruc- 
tions in isometric projection and perspective, building details, 
classic mouldings, the orders of architecture, shading and 
rendering in pen and ink and water color. Several original 
designs are required for a proper completion of the work of the 
course. 

The work in Freehand Drawing includes instruction in 
pencil, pen and ink, charcoal and water color. Work may be 
pursued along various lines such as cartooning, interior decora- 
tion, furniture design and sketching. 

ELECTRICITY 

Electricity 1 {2). The subjects taught in this course are 
broadly covered by the general titles; wiring methods, batteries, 
bells and annunciators, spark coils and ignition devices. 

Electricity 2 (4^). Among the subjects considered : dynamo 
machinery, direct current motors, distribution of power, electric 
lighting, etc. 

Electricity 3 (4). Elements of alternating currents, alter- 
nators, transformers, motors, conversion of A. C. to D. C. 
electrical measurements, etc. 

41 



BIBLE INSTRUCTION 

Bible instruction is offered once a week; attendance is 
required of every boy. The School is non-sectarian. No 
attempt, therefore, is made to bias the student, the only objects 
being to inspire respect for the teachings of the Bible, and to 
familiarize the student with its contents. 

MUSIC 

The school has on its faculty a skilled teacher of music who 
has charge of the chorus and the general musical features of the 
School. Pupils in the 6th year of the Lower School and the 
first three years of the Higher School receive systematic class 
instruction in the elements of music. 



42 



Unrattnnal (iimbaitr^ 

THE aim of this School is to enable the student who will 
continue his education beyond the secondary school stage 
to select intelligently and as early as possible the vocation in 
which his interests, natural aptitudes and abilities will make 
him most successful, and to direct his course toward it; to 
advise the student who does not expect to enter a higher insti- 
tution of learning of the fields of labor best suited to his training, 
his ability and inclinations, and to provide suitable courses for 
a number of such vocations. 

The graduate of any school or college, upon seeking em- 
ployment, is asked by a cold, critical world, two searching 
questions: "What can you do?" "How well can you do it?" 
How these are answered determines his standing in society, 
income, comforts, and fullness of life. It should be the busi- 
ness of schools to so advise students and so plan their 
work^ that when they have completed the course of study 
they can answer these questions satisfactorily. 

At Huntington no attempt is made to decide for the student 
what occupation he should choose, but every effort is made to 
help him come to true conclusions for himself. Information, 
inspiration and co-operation is the motto. 



is 



ifunttngtnn ^umm^r ^rljnnl 

The summer session of the Huntington School opens 
June 26, 1916, and continues for ten weeks. The aim of the 
school is to provide tutoring and class instruction for those 
who are conditioned in grammar school, high school, or college 
subjects, for those who wish to complete a four year high school 
course in three years, and for those who wish to make special 
preparation for the entrance examinations to Harvard, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology and the other New England 
colleges. 

All of the courses usually offered for admission to college 
are scheduled. 

The teaching force is made up of men of the regular school 
faculty, who have had a large experience in preparing students. 

The school has been successful in preparing for examina- 
tions. During the summer of 1915 one or more boys entered 
each of the following schools: Harvard, Yale, Dartmouth, 
Boston University, Tufts, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology and Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

The courses are so conducted that much individual in- 
struction is given. It is possible, therefore, to accomplish a 
great deal during the session. At the opening of the term, the 
student announces his plans and every effort is made to have him 
realize them. 

The tuition rate is $oO; $30 payable upon entering, and 
the balance at the beginning of the sixth week. 

Books are rented by the school to those who make a deposit 
of $5. Four dollars of the deposit is refunded when the books 
are returned. 

A special circular of this school will be forwarded upon 
request. 

Summer Camps 

The Headmaster is in touch with summer camps, located 
both inland and on the coast where many of our students spend 
their summers. Information about them will be gladly given. 

44 



Jfftnanrial 



The rates of tuition of the Huntington School are lower 

than those of other good private schools. This is made possible 

through the liberal endowment in buildings and equipment: 

Preliminary Year $150 

Preparatory Division 

Forms 1, 2 $17o 

Forms 3, 4, 5, Senior $200 

Business Division $200 

Technical Division $200 

One Year Technical Course $125 

Architectural Drawing $75 

Machine Drawing $75 

For special courses, rates will be quoted on application. 

The tuition fees are payable in advance, three-fifths at the 

time of entrance and two-fifths on or before February 1st. 

Students entering before November 15 are charged from the 

beginning of the school year. 

Members of the School previous to the year 1915 pay the 

tuition which was in force when they entered upon their course 

providing they have been in continuous attendance and register 

before July 1st. 

The tuition fee includes, besides instruction, membership 

in the Y. M. C. A,, gymnasium and swimming pool privileges. 

A registration fee of $5 is due from all new 

Registration students when a place is reserved. It is a part 

Fee of the tuition and will be credited on the first 

payment. When once paid it will not be 

refunded. To insure a place in the school registration should 

be made before September 1st. 

When an applicant enrolls in the school, it is understood 

unless otherwise specified, that he enrolls for the entire year and 

is liable for the tuition for that period. No refund is made for 

a period less than a half year, excepting in case of illness. 

All students buy their own books and supplies. 

Books and This material can be purchased from the book 

Supplies store. 

45 



Mechanical 
Drawing 

Manual 
Training 

Chemistry 



Huntington 
General 
Association 
Fee 

Graduation 



Students' 
Tickets 

Payments 



Students enrolled in the di-awing courses pay 
a fee of $1 tt) cover the cost of materials and 
the use of instruments. 

Students who take manual training are charged 
with the material used when the articles made 
are removed from the department. 
Owing to increased cost of chemical supplies, 
in many instances five to ten times the cost 
in normal years, a fee of $5 Avnll be charged all 
students taking chemistry. 
All students pay a fee of $10. This secures 
membership in the Huntington General As- 
sociation and provides the funds for the major 
social and athletic activities of the school. 
The school paper is also published by this fund. 
All students graduated from the School are 
charged $5, which covers the cost of the dip- 
loma and expenses incidental to graduation. 
Students who live in suburban towns can 
secure railroad tickets at greatly reduced rates 
by applying at the office of the railroad. 
Make all checks payable to the Boston Young 
Men's Christian Association. 



SCHOLARSHH»S 

A limited number of scholarships are available for pupils 
of exceptional ability who are otherwise acceptable to the school. 
Fitness of applicants will be determined by written and oral 
examinations and by the applicant's previous school record. 
Complete information will be furnished on request. 

THE HUNTINGTON CLUB 

This club, known among the boys as the "O. K. Club," 
consists of those students who meet the requirements of a three- 
fold standard. They must be physically sound, mentally alert, 
and morally straight. In addition, they must possess some 
notable ability in one direction or more. Boys who qualify for 
the scholarships mentioned above, would be eligible also for 
the Huntington Club. 



46 



ifunttngtnn ®rgattiEatt0n0 

HUNTINGTON CLUB 

President WILLIAM B. HAGAN 

Vice-President, ROBERT B. STARBUCK 

Secretary-Treasurer, ERNEST R. JEFFERSON 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

IRA A. FLINNER. Ex-officio 

WILLIAM B. HAGAN 

ROBERT B. STARBUCK 

ERNEST R. JEFFERSON 

STANLEY E. COLLINSON 

NICHOL A. PEDERSEN 

GUY V. GOODRICH 

HUNTINGTON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

FRED A. WATSON, 13 ROBERT E. JACKSON. 14 

President Vice-President 

WILLIAM H. CARTLAND, '14 

Secy and Treas. 

ARTS AND CRAFTS CLUB 

LESLIE W. MacKAY, Director 

President, JESSE T. COBURN 

Vice-President, CLARENCE W. RUSSELL 

Craftsman, LAWRENCE P. DAKIN 

MANDOLIN CLUB 

JOSEPH A. AUDET, Director 

President, LEON F. JACKSON 

Vice-President, WILLIAM D. TOOMEY 

Secy-Mgr., LESTER F. KRONE 

47 



GLEE CLUB 

BYRON W. REED, Diredor 

President, ERNEST R. JEFFERSON 

Secretary, RANDOLPH H. MILLIGAN 

Music Committee, ERNEST R. JEFFERSON and PAUL T. BUDGELL 



DRAMATIC CLUB 

NEWELL W. EDSON, Director 

President, SEBASTIAN SMALL 

Secy-Trea.0., JAMES A. KNOWLTON 



MODERN LANGUAGE CLUBS 

JOHN C, DIETZ, Director 

French Section 

President, WILLIAM D. TOOMEY 

Viee-Pres., HUBERT G. RIPLEY. Jr. 

German Section 

President, SAMUEL D. HATHAWAY 

Vice-Pres., REGINALD C. WILLIAMSON 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President, W. JOHNSON MARLING 

Vice-Pres., ARTHUR R. RICO 

Secy-Treas., ARTHUR W. COLLINSON 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

IRA A. FLINNER, Ex-officio 

ARTHUR W. HALE, Faculty Supervisor of Athletics, Chairman 

LEVI L. LAMB, Coach 

W. JOHNSON MARLING 

ARTHUR R. RICO 

ARTHUR W. COLLINSON 

and Captains of the teams of sports in season 

48 



1915-16 ATHLETIC TEAMS 



Sport 
FOOTBALL 
TRACK 
SWIMMING 
HOCKEY 
BASEBALL 
TENNIS 
ROWING 
WRESTLING 



Captain 
Arthur R. Rico 
W. Johnson Marling 
W. Johnson Marling 
Edmund F. Jewell 
Michael R. Roach 
Stanley E. Collinson 
Harold F. Ogden 
Charles E. Crockett 



Manager 
Ralph W. Short 
Bradley S. Dawes 
Harold F. Ogden 
Arthur W. Collinson 
Elmer B. Harper 
Stanley E. Collinson 

Levi L, Lamb 



"THE BLAZE" EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief, ROBERT B. STARBUCK 

literary Editor, ARTHUR W. COLLINSON 

Business Managers, ELMER B. HARPER, GORDON D. GILBERT 

Circulation and Distribution, H. BEACH WARD 

Art Editor, GORDON P. ROWE 

Exchange Editor, BRADLEY S. DAWES 

Athletics Editor, W. JOHNSON MARLING 

Alumni Editor, LEON F. JACKSON 

"Sparks' Editor, WALTER A. BUCKLEY 

Kindlings Editor, EDMUND F. JEWELL 

Assistants— STANLEY E. COLLINSON, ROLAND W. DAY, A. F. N. 

CREED, WINTHROP R. SHEPARD, GUY V. GOODRICH 

Faculty Adviser, WILLIAM S. SPENCER 



49 



We refer, by permission to the following patrons: 

Herbert VV. Angier, Master Mechanic, Rice & Hutchins, Curtis Factory 65 

Church St., Marlboro, Mass. 
Frank P. Anthony, Mgr. Imperial Motor Car Co., Boston. 5i Sargent St., 

Winthrop, Mass. 
George W. Brainard, Real Estate and Insurance, 50 State St., Boston, Mass. 
Frank I. Capen, Civil Engineer, 31 Walnut Ave., Stoughton, Mass. 
E. E. Chesley, Examiner, Old Colony Trust Co., Boston. 6 Wabon St., 

Roxbury, Mass. 
John W. Collinson, firm of A J. Lloyd & Co., Boston. 28 Crystal St., Greea- 

wood, Mass. 
Thomas A. Cushman, Baker and Caterer, 525 Washington St., Whitman, Mass. 
Frank E. Day, N. E. Representative Newark Varnish Works, Medfield, Mass. 
Francis W. DowTiing, 38 Temple St., Reading, Mass. 
Warren F. Freeman, Real Estate and Insurance, 100 Theodore Parker Rd., 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
Edward E. Gage, Last Model Maker, 4 Washington St., Canton, Mass. 
Dr. Charles W. Haddock, Hotel Hemenway, Boston, Mass. 
Gardiner Hathaway, Real Estate and Insurance, Marblehead, Mass. 
W. R. Haysom, Foreman, Fore River Ship Building Corpn., 305 Beale St., 

W'ollaston, Mass. 
Lionel R. Hodgkins, Groceries and Provisions, 42 Wellington St , Waltham, 

Mass. 
Frank M. Jewell, Customs Agent, U. S. Treasury Department, Gardner St., 

AUston, Mass. 
George E. Kimball, Lumber Dealer, Hingham, Mass. 

Charles M. Lawrence, Supt. T. G. Plant Co., 11 Myrtle St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Alfred H. McCulloch, Manufacturer, 10 Radford Lane, Ashmont, Mass. 
A. Byron McLeod, Treas. and Gen. Mgr., Abbott & Fernald Co., 237 Congress 

St., Boston, Mass. 
J. William Milligan, Dentist. 46 Fairfield St., Cambridge, Mass. 
George A. Newhall, Jones, Peterson & Newhall Co., Retail Shoes, 467 Wash- 
ington St., Newton, Mass. 
Dr. William B. Osgood, 40 Poplar St., Melrose, Mass. 
Leland T. Powers, Leland Powers School, Boston. 4 Regent Circle, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Fred A. Preston, Manufacturer, 12 Madison Ave., Winchester, Mass. 
Mrs. Hanson Henry Reed, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

C. E. Searles, Wholesale Confectioner, 22 W. Main St., Marlboro, Mass. 
Mrs. Brackley Shaw, 77 Englewood Ave., Brookline, Mass. 
Mrs. W^alter Shepard, 29 Bloomfield St., Dorchester, Mass. 
George W'. Stone, WTiolesale Lumber Dealer, 102 Grand View Ave., Quincy, 

Mass. 



50 



1015-1910 



Sanuarg 28. 19 IE 



Abbott, Bradbury Reuben 
Adams, Barrett 
Adams, Warren Lincoln 
Allen, Gordon Hewes 
Ames, Harold Farrington 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, Earle Gordon 
Angier, Fred Raymond 
Anthony, Carroll Gilman 
Ashton, John Daniel Andrew 
Bacon, Lewis Joel 
Baer, Leonard Thomas 
Bangs, Harold Nathan 
Barr, Alfred Thompson 
Barrett, Harold Crehan 
Basso, John James 
Beauregard, Winfield Scott 
Beecher, Leslie Dade 
Bell, Charles Frank 
Bevan, Charles Ormrod Rea 
Bieberstein, Herbert von 
Bigelow, Harry Glover 
Blaha, Carl Thurston 
Blossom, John Alden 
Bogle, Kennon Mitchell 
Bolton, Fred Stanley 
Booth, Lester William 
Bossi, Eugene Anthony 
Bowser, Frederick Howard 
Bracken, Barrie 
Bradley, Robert Ivan 
Bradley, Walter Norman 



Brookline 

Jamaica Plain 

Somerville 

Reading 

Wobum 

East Boston 

Woburn 

Marlboro 

Winthrop 

Brewster 

Faneiiil 

Somerville 

Winthrop 

Lowell 

Hingham Center 

Boston 

Framinghara 

Somerville 

Boston 

Melrose Highlands 

Cambridge 

Winchester 

Dorchester 

Watertown 

Cambridge 

Roxbury 

West Somerville 

Dorchester 

Wobum 

Brighton 

Jamaica Plain 

Winchester 



51 



Brainard, Robert Friend 
Brown, Frank Kenneth 
Brown, Franklin Wonson 
Brown, George Wellington, Jr. 
Bruno, Philip, Jr. 
Bruns, Ralph Fowler 
Buckley, Walter Allan 
Budgell, Paul Turner 
Buttner, P'rederick Daniel 
Cadigan, John Raymond 
Caldwell, John Edward 
Caldwell, Wellington Lord 
Capen, Frank Herbert 
Carper, Harold Goodrich 
Casson, Kenneth Hogdsox 
Chesley, Wolcott Ellsworth 
Clark, Rufus Campion 
Cleary, Alexander Edgar 
Clench, William James 
Cobb, Richard Eastman 
CoBURN, Jesse Theodore 
Coleman, John Dennis 
Collins, William Armstrong 
CoLLiNSON, Arthur William 
Collinson, Stanley Earl 
CoNLET, Edward Joseph 
Connell, Robert James 
Connor, John Lloyd 
Cook, Frederick Sargent, Jr. 
Cook, Harold St. Clair 
CooLEY, Howard Hewitt 
Corcoran, Harold Joseph 
Cowan. William Robert 
Cowen, Theodore Davis 
Creed, Andrew Fred Nelson 
Crockett, Charles Edward 
Crockett, Harold Taylor 
Crook, Daniel Milton 
Currier, Ralph Charles 



Dorchester 

Boston 

Winthrop 

Dorchester 

Boston 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Somerville 

Jamaica Plain 

Dorcliester 

Winchester 

Winchester 

Stoughton 

Somerville 

Roslindale 

Roxbury 

Winchester 

Roslindale 

Dorchester 

Reading 

^^obu^n 

Roxbury 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Greenwood 

Greenwood 

Charlestown 

Beverly Farms 

Marlboro 

Brookline 

Dorchester 

Newton Center 

Winthrop 

Dorchester 

Cambridge 

Beverly 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Fall River 

Lexington 



51 



Cdshman, Raymoxu J. 
Cutler, Clarkndox Channing 
Dakin, Lawrence Pierce 
Dalrtmple, Ernest Clarence 
Daniell. Walter Whitcomb 
Daniels, John Edmiston, Jr. 
Davenport, John Tolman 
Davidson, Edgar Cole 
Dawes, Bradley Stevens 
Day, Roland Wight 
Deacon, John Russell 
Dean, Edward Keith 
Dedrickson, Paul Jeremiah 
Delehanty, Michael Joseph, Jr. 
DeRobertis, Francis 
DeRobertis, Henry 
Desmond, W'arren Wardwell 
Dewart, Hartley 
Dillon, William Albert 
DoDDS, Oscar Harold 
Donaldson, Frank Sterling 
Dorr, Melbourne Stanwood 
Dow, Ken-neth Cushman 
Downing, Willard Corey 
Dbiscoll, William Francis 
Eaton, Clarence Willard 
Eaton, William, Jr. 
Edson, Eugene Rowell 
Ehrlich, Louis Hecht 
Ehrlich, Samuel Hecht 
Ellms, Carlton Tanner 
Engel, Carlton Bailey 
Erickson, Alfred Henning 
Falconer, Robert Norris 
Farrar, Leonard Charles 
Fay, John William 
Fitton, Willard Gardner 
Fitzgerald, John Francis, Jr. 
Fleming, Carl Leon 



Whitman 

Roslindale 

Cambridge 

Marlboro 

Melrose 

Boston 

Brain tree 

Poison, Montana 

Marlboro 

Medfield 

Quincy 

Falmouth 

Wellesley 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Lawrence 

Cambridge 

Charlestown 

Mattapan 

Brookline 

Maiden 

Newton Highlands 

Reading 

Boston 

Lynn 

Brookline 

Portsmouth, N. H. 

Boston 

Boston 

Ashmont 

Arlington Heights 

Allston 

Hyde Park 

Revere 

Brookline 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Waltham 



53 



Fletcher, Richard Boynton 
Fltnn, Thomas Aquinas 
FoBGiE, James Bryce 
Foster, Kendall Willson 
Fo^\TiER, Albert Edwin, Jr. 
FoT, John Francis 
Freeman, Warren Franklin, Jr. 
Gage, Charles Knowles 
Gallagher, Ernest Francis 
Gammon, Irving Parker, Jr. 
Garfield, Francis Laavrence 
Getchell, Charles Edward 
Gifford, Ranson Dale 
Gilbert, Gordon Davidson 
GiLLETT, Clifford Keen 
(ioDDu Lloyd Whitman 
Good, Herbert Shelley 
Goodrich, Guy Vivl\n 
GoRMLEY, Frank Leslie 
Gormley, Harold Reed 
Gould, Harold Isaac 
Gould, Howard Paine 
Grant, Donald Livingstone 
Grant, Robert, Jr. 
Gbeenleaf, Wendell Otis 
Haddock, Charles Colvocobessess 
Hagan, Oliver, Jr. 
Hagan, William Becker 
Hailparn, Alfred Joseph 
Hall, Elisha Winthrop 
Hamilton, Clarence Moore 
Harper, Elmer Bruce 
Hathaway, Samuel Deveraux 
Hayes, James Benjamin 
Haysom, William Frederick 
Henderson, Henry Webster 
HoDGKiNs, Merle Young 
Holmes, George Henry, Jr. 
Holt, George Augustus 



Dorchester 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

Dorchester 

Boston 

Newburyport 

Brookline 

West Roxbury 

Canton 

Somerville 

Brookline 

Allston 

Wellesley 

Dorchester 

Roslindale 

West Somerville 

Winchester 

Roxbury 

Somerville 

Mattapan 

Mattapan 

Marlboro 

Newton Upper ^Falls 

Needham 

Needham 

Aubumdale 

Boston 

Brookline 

Brookline 

Brookline 

Marshfield Hills 

West Somerville 

Dorchester 

Marblehead 

South Manchester, Conn. 

W^ollaston 

Winthrop Highlands 

Waltham 

Cambridge 

Beverly 



54 



Howe, Reginald McLellan 
Hudson, Alan Bedford, Jr. 
Ironmonger, Thomas Dupuy 
Irwin, George Clayton, Jr. 
Jackson, Leon Farnham 
Jackson, Richard Percy, Jr. 
James, Morrison Cutler 
Jefferson, Ernest Rogers 
Jenkins, Donald Albert 
Jewell, Edmund Francis 
Johnson, Howard Chester 
Johnson, Neal Oscar 
Jones, Robert Burckes 
Jones, Roland Jacob 
Jones, Samuel Finley, Jr. 
JoRDON, Edwin Sefton 
Kaffenburgh, Albert, Jr. 
Kelso, Walter Alexander 
Kendall, Charles Benjamin 
Kidder, Gordon Lewis 
KiERNAN, Patrick Bernard 
Kiggen, Thomas Ewen 
Kimball, Arthur Reginald 
Kimber, Frank Hughes 
King, Raymond Stoddard 
Kingman, Winslow Morrison 
Kinley, George Walter 
KiRSTEiN, Lincoln Edward 
Knott, Kenneth Woodhouse 
Knowlton, James Adams 
Koshland, Stephen Abraham 
Krone, Lester Frederick 
Kronenberg, Nelson DeWitt 
Lambert, John Holme 
Lane, Stuart Gardner 
Lawrence, Arthur MacDougall 
Leavitt, Albert Willard 
Lee, Sam 
Leeman, Harold Raymond 



Boston 

Cambridge 

Jamaica Plain 

Dorchester 

Aubumdale 

Watertown 

Chelsea 

Marlboro 

Boston 

Allston 

West Medford 

WakeBeld 

Somerville 

Jamaica Plain 

Newtonville 

Winthrop 

Brookline 

Winthrop 

Cambridge 

Somerville 

Lynnfield 

Hyde Park 

Hingham 

Cambridge 

Peabody 

West Somerville 

Newton 

Boston 

Boston 

Melrose 

Boston 

Roxbury Crossing 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Winchester 

Jamaica Plain 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Somerville 



66 



Leong, Goon Daugh 
LiBBY, George Monroe 
Lincoln, Harry Lowell 
LoKER, William Wright 
Lord, Edwin Augustus 
McCloskey, John, Jr. 
McCoy, William BroWxV, Jr. 
MacDonald, William Cuyler 
MacDonald, Sumner Bigelow 
McGlenen, Henry Allen 
McLaughlin, Forrest Joseph 
McLeod, Alexander Byron, Jr. 
McLeod, Robert Crofton 
McLeod, Robert Randall 
McLeod, Webb Curtis 
McMennamin, Stanley S. 
Maccabe, Lister Plummer 
Manson, Warren Hubert 
Mahkell, Manuel 
Marling, Wentworth Johnsijn 
Mayo, George Samuel 
Mehaffey, Graham Tyler 
Merrick, Robert Jones 
Merrill, John Sherman 
MiLLiGAN, Randolph Hall 
Mills, Herbert Franklin 
Moffatt. Kenmore Waltep-s 
Moody, Henry Spencer 
Moore, Frederick W. 
Moore, Walter Chadbourne 
MoRANG, Lloyd Clayton 
Morrill, Charles Frederick 
Morrill, Orville Lamont 
Morrison, Gordon Mackay 
Morrison, James Murray 
Morse, Milton Isaac 

MUIR, WlLLI-VM EdMOND 

MuLLiN, Charles King 
Munroe, Russell Felton 



Portland, Oregon 

Winchester 

Charlestown 

Natick 

Brookline 

Dorchester 

Cambridge 

Roslindale 

Gloucester 

Dorchester 

South Boston 

Mattapan 

Winthrop 

Mattapan 

Jamaica I'lain 

Ruraford, Me. 

East Boston 

Walpole 

Chelsea 

Beverly 

East Milton 

Brookline 

Stoughton 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

West Soraerville 

Dorchester 

Brookline 

Winsted, Conn. 

Lynn 

West Somerviiie 

Roxbury 

Sanford, Maine 

East Boston 

Belmont 

Dorchester 

Roslindale 

Wollaston 

Marblehead 



66 



Mtjkpht, Albert Gerard 
Murphy, William Amos 
Murphy, Thomas Wili.iston 
Murray, John Fuller 
Naphen, Peter Leo 
Neilson, Ralph 
Newhall, William Gordon 
Norton, Myron Edward 
Nyman, Daniel Eugene 
Ogden, Harold Franklin 
Ogden, Karl Bruce 
O'Hara, Ezra Fitch 
O'Hara, Skidmore 
Orem, Dean Chester 
Orne, Edward Moy 
Osgood, Carleton Guild 
Otis, Leonard 
Packard, Walter Scott 
Palonsky, Henry 
Parker, Albert Dinnie 
Patterson, Lawton Elliott 
Pedersen, Nichol Andrew 
Perkins, Robert Holbkook 
Pervere, Ernest Frank 
Pfeiffer, Leslie Herbert 
Philbrook, William KETTELr 
Phillips, Louis 
Piscopo, Benjamin J., Jr. 
Piscopo, Frank Joseph 
PoMEROY, Richard Bruce 
PosKus, Albert 
Powden, Russell Sinclair 
Powers, Haven Merrill 
Pratt, James Cromwell 
Preston, Burnham Goddu 
Quan, Victor 
QuiMBY, Thayer 
QuiNN, David Harold 
Reid, William Joseph 



Dorchester 

Gloucester 

Boston 

Soutli Boston 

Worcester 

Arlington 

Brookline 

Melrose Highlands 

Melrose Highlands 

Winchester 

Winchester 

Waltiiain 

Walthaiii 

Sharon 

Boston 

Melrose 

Brookline 

Boston 

New liedford 

lioston 

( 'harlestown 

Beverly 

Melrose 
Salem 

South Natick 
('liarlestown 

Boston 

Winthrop 

Winthrop 

Gloucester 

North Weymouth 

Walthara 

lirookline 

Somerville 

Winchester 

Boston 

Weliesley Hills 

Boston 

Roxbury 



57 



Rich, Edwin Newell 
Rico, Arthur Raymond 
Ripley, Hubert George, Jr. 
Roach, Michael R. 
RoBAUT, Francis Harold 
Roberts, Roland Wheeler 
Robinson, Kenneth 
RocKwooD, Arthur George 
Rowe, Gordon Payne 
Russell, Clarence Wilson 
Salt, George Egerton 
Sargent, Winthrop Otis 
Saul, Mason Davis 
Sayward, William Sewall, Jr. 

SCHWOLLMAN, AlEX.\NDER 

Seager, Theodore Dwight 
Seale, William Arnold 
Sewell, William George 
Shaw, Jackson 
Shaw, Robert Malcolm 
Shepard, Winthrop Russell 
Shepherd, Thomas Elwell 
Sherman, Howard Franklin 
Short, Ralph William 
Shum, Alden Francis 
Shum, Raymond Edward 
Small, Norman Aldrich 
Small, Sebastian 
Smart, Charles^Elliott 
Smith, John Augustus 
SouTHACK, Theodore Lyman, Jr. 
Smith, Wendell Phillips 
Spooneb, Wallace Kellogg 
Stait, Frederick Harold Keith 
Stanton, Leo J. 
Starbuck, Robert Barklet 
Stearns, Ralph Sargent 
Steves, Noble Reeder 
Stickel, Faxtl Jelly 



NewtoQ 

Brookline 

Newtonville 

Boston 

Boston 

Melrose 

Portland, Me. 

West Medford 

WoUaston 

VVintliester 

Arlington 

Lawrence 

Cambridge 

Wollaston 

Jamaica Plain 

Brighton 

Wellesley Hills 

Dorchester 

Natick 

Brookline 

Dorchester 

Boston 

Dorchester 

Aliston 

Boston 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Concord 

Brighton 

East Boston 

Dorchester Center 

Stoneham 

Sherman Mills, Me. 

Newton Center 

Somerville 

Cambridge 

Manchester 

Boston 

Lexington 



58 



Stone, Robert Gilmour 
Stuart, Clyde William 
Sullivan, William Doogue 
Symonds, Milton Warren 
Taft, Lorado Edson 
Talbot, Henry Perkins 
Taussig, Felix, Jr. 
Thalin, Robert William 
Thresher, Seward Edwin 
Thurlow, Raymond Hale 
TiLTON, Warner Belknap 
Todd, Charles Russell 
Todd, Haskell Clifford 
TooMEY, William Daniel 
Torgebson, Fritzof Oscar 
ToRREY, Ralph Crockett 
True, Osmond Sxl^.lley 
Tyler, Norman Edwin 
Verder, Walter Montgomery 
VoGEL, Leopold Otis 
Walker, Alton Mitchell 
Walker, Lothrop Earl 
Wallace, William 
Wallis, Donald Edson 
Ward, Hubbard Beach 
Wardle, William Heath 
Warner, Leigh 
Warren, Howard Whitney 
Webster, Clarence Lindley 
Webster. George Walton, Jr. 
Weis, Leonard Cordes 
Welch, Charles Joseph 
White, Daniel Luther, 2nd 
Whitman, Fred Ernest 
Williams, Charles Oliver 
Williamson, Reginald Charles 
Wilson, Leslie Jordon 
Wolf, Bernard Mark, Jb. 
Wolf, J. Robert 



Wollaston 

Brookline 

Roxbury 

Reading 

Gloucester 

Holliston 

Brookline 

Roslindale 

Melrose Highlands 

Newburyport 

Raymond, N. H. 

Dorchester 

West Somerville 

East Boston 

Roxbury 

Wellesley Hills 

Readville 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Jamaica Plain 

Lexington 

Taunton 

Roxbury 

West Somerville 

Brookline 

Dedham 

Boston 

Winchester 

WakeBeld 

Wakefield 

Dorchester 

Natick 

Winthrop 

West Medford 

Roslindale 

Roslindale 

Medfield 

Boston 

Boston 



59 



Wood, Abel Farnsworth Dorchester 

WooDARD, Edward Patson Brookline 

Wright, Kenneth Yerxa Arlington 

Wright, Warren Wells Dorchester 

Young, Edmund Standish Braintree 

Young, Henry Brooks Brookline 

Zahn, Gilbert Lewis Boston 

Ziegler, Ralph Robert Boston 



13702 

60 



THE 

HUNTINGTON 

SCHOOL 



TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS 
DIVISIONS 



1916 1917 



THE 

HUNTINGTON 
SCHOOL 

FOR BOYS 



1916-1917 



Technical and Business 
Divisions 



Boston Young Men's Christian Association 
316 Huntington Avenue 



Frank P. Speare, M.H., 
Director 

Ira a. Flinner, A.B., 
Headmaster 

Charles H. Sampson, S.B., 
Head of Technical Division 

William L. Esterberg, B.C.vS., 
Head of Business Division 



FALL TERM OPENS SEPTEMBER 26, 1916 
SPRING TERM CLOSES JUNE 8, 1917 



FOREWORD 

For many and varied reasons not all young men can attend 
college. This should not mean, however, that those belonging 
to this class be unprepared at graduation to attack the chief 
problem of life — the means of earning a livihood. It is to be 
regretted that there are high schools which graduate many 
who at this important time in life find themselves utterly 
unprepared to do any definite thing. The result is that these 
unfortunates usually take anything that may offer, provided 
by so doing even a living wage may be obtained. Conditions 
such as these do not tend to produce results beneficial either to 
the individual or the community at large. 

The HUNTINGTON SCHOOL has recognized the prevaiHng 
state of affairs, and has in addition to its preparatory division, 
technical and business divisions comparable to the best. 
Young men wishing a thorough technical or business training 
will find here those opportunities amid surroundings not found 
in vocational schools. The equipment is complete, the build- 
ings of the most modern type of construction, and the 
courses practical. 



TECHNICAL DIVISION 



THE development of engineering and scientific industries 
has created a field of service that makes a strong appeal 
to young men possessing natural mechanical and scientific 
ability. Those wishing to follow a calhng of this![sort must 
bring themselves to realize, however, that technical training is 
necessary' if they anticipate advancement into responsible 
positions. 

The Technical Division of the Huntington School offers to 
worthy and ambitious young men the opportunity to obtain 
instruction along technical lines. All the courses are practical 
and complete, and are planned with the fixed purpose to pre- 
pare students to fill technical positions intelligently. 

Grammar school graduates and others giving satisfactory 
proof of the equivalent of a grammar school training are eligible 
for admittance. Good character, good health, and a genuine 
interest in the subjects to be pursued are necessary for the 
best success in the work. It is assumed that applicants for 
admission shall possess these qualifications. 

None of our technical courses are of the so-called "trade" 
class. We aim to give the student work which will prove to be 
a foundation upon which to build a future career along technical 
lines. 

FOUR YEAR TECHNICAL COURSE 

Intended primarily for the grammar school graduate not 
wishing to prepare for college, this course is so arranged that 
should he decide later to attempt college entrance, a student 
may secure credits on college preparation. It prepares for 
positions as draftsmen, engineers' assistants, and positions con- 
nected with the design, manufacture, and construction of 
machinery and of buildings. 




Chemistry Laboratory 

(One of Three) 




Physics Laboratory 



The Huntington School 



Fir si Year 

Algebra I 5 

English I 5 

Arithmetic 3 



hrs. 



Elementary Science 
Freehand Drawing . 

Drafting 

Woodworking . . . 



Total 



, 2 

4-2 
2-1 



181 hrs. 



Second Year 

Algebra II 5 hrs 

English II 5 

Plane Geometry .... 5 
Civil Government ... 2 

Drafting 5-2 i 

Pattern Making . . . 3-1 1 



Total 



21 hrs. 



Third Year 

English III 3 

Materials 2 

Trigonometry 2 

Industrial History .... 3 

Practical Electricity ... 5 

Drafting 5-2^ 



Fourth Year 

hrs. English IV 3 hrs. 

Applied Mathematics . . 3 " 

Physics 5 " 

Practical Electricity . . 5 " 
Architectural Drafting, b-2\ " 



Total 



171 hrs. Total 18* hrs. 



At the completion of the course the student is grounded in 
the elements of machine, electrical, and architectural drawing. 



THREE YEAR TECHNICAL COURSE 

For those who have pursued a partial high school course and 
wish to prepare themselves in a comparatively short time for 
technical positions. Many of the subjects listed here will be ac- 
cepted as credits for college entrance should the student at 
any time wish to change to a college course. 



First Year 

Algebra I 5 hrs. 

English I 5 

Arithmetic 3 



. 2 

2-1 

4-2 

Woodworking 2-1 



Elementary vScience 
Freehand Drawing . 
Drafting 



Second Year 

Algebra II 5 hrs 

English II 5 

Plane Geometry .... 5 
Industrial History ... 3 

Drafting 5-2 § 

Pattern Making ... 2-1 



Total 



19 hrs. 



Total 2U hrs. 



Third Year 

Applied Mathematics ... 3 hrs. 

English III 3 " 

Shop Problems 3 " 

Materials 2 " 

Drafting 10-5 " 

Trigonometry 2 " 

Total 18 hrs. 




Woodworking Laboratory 















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Electrical Laboratory 



The Huntington School 9 

ELECTRICAL COURSE 

The Electrical course of the Huntington School appeals to 
the grammar school graduate who does not expect to enter 
college. The course is planned to give the student, in addition 
to instruction in Electricity, such subjects as are closely related 
to it and are valuable in laying a broad foundation. Graduates 
have no difficulty in filling such positions as draftsmen, engi- 
neers' assistants, switchboard operators, testers, and similar 
positions demanding a knowledge of the principles of electricity. 

The following schedule is adhered to: 

First Year Second Year 

Algebra I 5 hrs. Algebra II 5 hrs. 

English I 5 " English II 5 ' 

Arithmetic 3 " Plane Geometry .... 5 

Elementary Science . 2 " Electricity 3 

Electricity 3 " Drafting 4-2 

Drafting 5-2^ " Electrical Laboratory . 4-2 

Pattern Making . . 2-1 " 



Total 2U hrs. Total 22 hrs. 

Third Year 

Applied Mathematics ... 3 hrs. 

English III 3 

Electricity 3 

Drafting 4-2 

Shop Problems 3 

Materials 2 

Trigonometry 2 



Total 18 hrs. 



ARCHITECTURAL COURSE 



The study of architecture not only involves a knowledge of 
scientific principles, but also requires a thorough artistic train- 
ing. The course in architecture as outlined below covers in a 
most complete way the general requirements of the profession. 
A large amount of time is devoted to the elements of mechanical 
drawing; much attention is given to freehand drawing and its 
practical application; all of the principles of isometric and 
perspective are thoroughly covered, thus insuring, during the 
first year, a solid foundation for the actual architectural work to 
follow. 

Among the subjects covered in the drafting part of the 
course are : Details of Building Construction, Details of Classic 



10 



The Huntington School 






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The Huntington School 



11 



Mouldings, the orders of Architectttre, Architectural Design, 
Planning, Building Materials and Specifications, Shading and 
Rendering in Pen and Ink, Water Color, History of Architec- 
ture, and Histor}^ of Ornament. 

Lectures on architectural subjects are given weekly; trips 
are frequently taken to examine buildings under construction; 
and considerable time is spent in the Museum of Fine Arts as a 
supplement to the work in Design. 

An idea of the other subjects covered, in addition to the 
drawing, may be obtained by an examination of the following 
schedule : 



First Year 

Algebra I 5 hrs. 

English I 5 

Arithmetic 3 

Elementary Science ... 2 
Freehand Drawing . . . 2-1 

Drafting 4-2 

Woodworking 2-1 



Total 



19 hrs. 



Second Year 

Algebra II 5 hrs 

English II 5 

Plane Geometry .... 5 
Industrial History ... 3 
Architectural Drafting, 5-2^ 
Freehand Drawing . . 2-1 



Total 2U hrs. 



Third Year 
Applied Mathematics ... 5 hrs. 

English III 5 " 

Shop Problems 3 " 

Materials 2 " 

Architectural Drafting . 15-7^ " 



Total 



22 i hrs. 



ONE YEAR TECHNICAL COURSE FOR HIGH SCHOOL 

GRADUATES 

This is an excellent course for the high school graduate who 
upon graduation finds himself fitted for no definite vocation 
and for the graduate who had intended to enter college but finds 
it impossible at the last inoment. The course is open only to 
those who have completed a high school course or its equivalent. 

The following subjects are pursued: 



Applied Mathematics 3 hrs. per week 

Shop Problems 3 " " " 

Materials 2 " 

Drafting 15 " " " 

Trigonometry 2 " " 



12 



The Huntington School 




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C-- \. 







The Huntington School 13 

'All of these subjects are exceedingly practical and have a 
direct bearing upon those things most essential to the training 
of the technical man. A great deal of time is devoted to the 
study and application of mathematics. This science is always 
closely allied to all sorts of technical work. 

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING COURSE 

This is a coiu-se usually requiring two years for completion. 
A student may enroll at any time. As soon as the work is 
completed a certificate will be granted. 

The course fits young men to become architectural draftsmen. 
Applicants should possess a knowledge of arithmetic, of ele- 
mentary algebra, and of plane geometry — geometrical con- 
struction especially. 

The following outline of the required work conveys an idea 
of the work accomplished. 

The first forty plates in "Mechanical Drawing and Practical 
Drafting" and in addition plates 67 to 76 inclusive. These 
drawings cover the subjects of lettering, geometrical construc- 
tion, developments, intersections of surfaces, isometric, per- 
spective, methods of inking and tracing. 

The student must take enough freehand drawing to enable 
him to execute properly two drawings from typical models or 
still life and two of details of the figure. These may be done 
in pencil, charcoal, or water color. 

Architectural Detail plates 39- A to 70-A inclusive. Also four 
other plates on Advanced Construction. 

Original drawings inust be made of the following : A Garage 
with Living Quarters for the Chauffeur — A Five-Room Bunga- 
low — A Four to Eight Room Schoolhouse, Bank, Theater, or 
Other Public Building — A Dwelling House to Cost Not Less 
Than $10,000 — A Monumental Structure such as a Park 
Entrance, a Triumphal Arch, or some form of Public Memorial, 
the design of which must be based upon some one of the four 
orders or some type of Gothic architecture. 

The architectural detail plates cover all types of architectural 
construction as well as complete drawings of all the orders of 
architecture. 

Every student must demonstrate his ability to letter well 
before he can be graduated from the course. 




Free Hand Drawing 




Mechanicai. Drawing 



The Huntington School 15 

MACHINE DRAFTING COURSE 

This course has been introduced for those who desire to fit 
themselves as draftsmen; for those who wish to obtain a 
knowledge of the subject for the purpose of reading blueprints ; 
for those who contemplate becoming teachers of the subject; 
and for others who find a knowledge of drafting necessary or 
valuable in their work. 

The instruction covers in a very complete nianner all the 
fundamentals, such as lettering, orthographic projection, de- 
velopments and intersections of surfaces. Details of machine 
parts and assembly drawings are made in sufficient quantity 
to insure a proper understanding of the methods in common 
use. Much time is devoted to machine sketching and dimen- 
sioning. Many drawings are inked and traced. Everything is 
done as nearly as possible in the manner demanded by actual 
drafting room practice. Additional instruction is given in 
isometric projection, perspective, and elementary machine 
design. 

The course as laid out in the book "Mechanical Drawing and 
Practical Drafting" must be completed before a certificate is 
granted. One may enroll at any tiine. The nuinber of hours 
devoted to the work each day will largel}^ determine the total 
period required to finish the course. Many students have been 
able to obtain a certificate in less than six months after entrance. 
The course continues throughout the calendar year. 

MANUAL TRAINING COURSES 

The Huntington School maintains a completely equipped 
Manual Training Department. Students may enroll for special 
work in woodworking. Skill at bench work, pattern making, 
wood turning, etc., can be acquired here. 

One may enter at any time. Special rates are charged, 
depending upon the amount of work pursued and time devoted 
to the work. 




Penmanship 




Typewriting 



The Huntington School 17 



BUSINESS DIVISION 



The Business Division of the Huntington School provides a 
thorough commercial training for those who expect to enter 
business. It also offers business courses to students preparing 
for higher institutions, who wish to supplement such preparation 
with special business training. 

For the young man who enters business of his own choice or 
of necessity before having completed a college or a technical 
school course, there are few fields which offer so great oppor- 
tunities as shorthand. There is a demand for male stenog- 
raphers, and this demand is increasing. The stenographer of 
ability comes in close contact with men of affairs, and is in 
line for promotion. 

The college student who can write shorthand finds it useful 
in his course, and can make it a source of income while in 
college, or during the summer months. 

Every man should have a knowledge of the principles of 
bookkeeping; a business or professional man who does not is 
at the mercy of his employees. He should be able to check up 
their work and understand the various transactions. It is a 
fact that ninety per cent of the men who engage in business for 
themselves fail and, at the age of sixty, are dependent upon 
others for a livelihood. Such failures are often due, not to a 
lack of industry but to sHpshod business methods. These 
failures would be lessened if the men in business had a fuller 
knowledge of booldceeping and business methods. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

1. One-year Stenographic coiirse. 

2. One-year Bookkeeping course. 

The above courses are open to high school graduates and 
students of equivalent preliminary training. 

3. Two-year Stenographic course. 

4. Two-year Bookkeeping coiirse. 

5. Four-vear Coinmercial course. 



18 The Huntington School 

These courses are made up accordint^ to the needs of each 
pupil. They include instruction in the following branches: 

Bookkeeping as used in all kinds of business, Commercial 
Law, Shorthand (Pitman), Penmanship, Typewriting (touch), 
Commercial Geography, Industrial History, English Grammar 
and Composition, Correspondence, Written and Mental Arith- 
metic, Rapid Calculation, Filing and Cataloging, Spelling, 
Spanish, French and German, and such subjects of the Pre- 
paratory and Technical Divisions as are suited to the 
students' needs. 

BOOKKEEPING 

In teaching bookkeeping we combine theory and practice; 
this must of necessity be done if the best results are to be 
secured. We teach the pupil to make entries, post, take a 
trial balance, make statements of the condition of the business, 
and close an ordinary ledger, before giving him vouchers to 
handle. From this point on the work is just as practical as 
in any office. 

Practical instruction is given in the special systems devised 
for certain classes of business. The science of partnership, 
wholesale and retail, corporation accounts, etc., is thoroughly 
taught; the latest ideas are applied and the routine of an 
office strictly observed. 

Those who wish to enter business after completing the 
elementary work may do so and pursue advanced work in 
the School of Commerce and Finance during the late afternoons 
and evenings. Our graduates are admitted to advanced 
standing in this school without examination. (See Catalogue 
of School of Cominerce and Finance.) 



PENMANSHIP 

A clear hand is of greatest importance in commercial pursuits, 
especially to the bookkeeper, the correspondent, and the 
stenographer. The beautiful flourish, although valuable as an 
accomplishment, is not a necessity in business. The aim of 
this department is to enable the student to write rapidly, 
neatly, and legibly. 



The Huntington School 19 

SPELLING 

Correct spelling is indispensable to stenographer or book- 
keeper. Every business student is obliged to take the instruc- 
tion in spelling. The school has demonstrated that even the 
poorest spellers can, by close application, learn to spell. 



ENGLISH 

Too often pupils are sent into an office with an imperfect 
knowledge of grammar and the forms of correspondence. We 
give thorough training in the elements of composition and 
thorough drill in correspondence forms. The department is 
especially strong; English beyond the ordinary correspondence 
work is provided for those who wish to take an extended course 
to prepare for secretarial position. 

SPANISH AND FRENCH 

Attention is called to the courses in the modern languages. 
The opening of the Panama Canal and the great conflict raging 
in Europe will tend greatly to increase trade with Spanish 
countries. Persons who have a knowledge of Spanish will be 
in great demand in the near future. 



COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC 

A knowledge of arithmetic is an essential qualification of the 
bookkeeper. Accuracy is the first demand made upon the 
student, and thereafter emphasis is laid on rapidity. Special 
attention is given to the fundamental operations, fractions, 
decimals, percentage, interest, discount, etc. Mental arithmetic 
is given prominence. 



RAPID CALCULATION 

In connection with the work in written and mental arithmetic, 
the student is taught methods of rapid calculation which greatly 
facilitate his work, stimulate his mind, and enable him to com- 
pute with ease and rapidity. The daily work is extremely 



20 The Huntington School 

practical. Thorough drills are given, not merely in rapid 
addition, but in all operations of the ordinary business office. 
Short-cut methods are introduced; the application of these in 
the regular accounting room is shown. 

SHORTHAND 

We teach the Ben Pitman system of shorthand, as we have 
found that no other system offers so wide a field of advance- 
ment. The method of instruction is a combination of individual 
and class work. Each student's efforts are corrected and his 
errors noted, thus securing accuracy. Where it can be done to 
advantage, the students are grouped for dictation and practice. 
In this way we preserve the class stimulus while giving the 
individual attention necessary to insure thoroughness. Most 
students are able to master the theory in four to six months. 
The time thereafter is spent in acquiring speed. 

TYPEWRITING 

The touch system of typewriting is used, since greater speed 
can be obtained and neater work turned out by this system. 
Accuracy and neatness as well as speed are indispensable, for 
the employer bases his estimate of the stenographer's ability 
upon the correctness and appearance of the typewritten page. 
Recognizing this, the school places emphasis on these qualities. 

COMMERCIAL LAW 

Instruction is given in the principles of the law of contracts, 
negotiable instruments, agency, bailment, partnership, corpora- 
tions, insurance, real and personal property, etc. The course 
includes much of the law used in every-day transactions. This 
is of great value to the business man. 



The Huntington School 21 



VOCATION AND PLACEMENT 
DEPARTMENT 



It is a fact that very little assistance is ordinarily given in, 
aiding boys and young men to select vocations suited to their 
requirements. They are permitted to grope about, trying 
this kind ot work and that, until at last they settle upon some 
line which may or may not be adapted to them. Such hit-or- 
miss methods often end in their entering the so-called blind- 
alley occupations. This happens frequently because the 
immediate returns are usually greater than those from callings 
which require a liberal training, and in which one can, after 
several years, rise to a good position. 

Every effort is made to assist a boy in intelligent selection of 
life work. He is studied and advised where his greatest possi- 
bilities lie. We also assist him in getting a position after com- 
pleting his course. We do not guarantee to place every boy, 
but in the past have been very successful in securing employ- 
ment for those wishing assistance. No charge is made for this 
service. 



22 The Huntington School 



FINANCIAL 



The rates of tuition of the Huntington School are lower than 
those of other good private schools. This is made possible 
through the liberal endowment in buildings and equipment. 

The yearly tuition for all regular courses in the Technical 
and Business Divisions is $200. The rates for special courses 
follow : 

One-year Technical course, $125 
Architectural Drafting course, $75 
Machine Drafting course, $75 

For other special courses, rates will be quoted on applica- 
tion. 

The tuition fees are payable in advance, three fifths at the 
time of entrance and two fifths on or before February 1st. 
Students entering before November 15th are charged from the 
beginning of the school year. 

Members of the School previous to the year 1916 pay the 
tuition which was in force when they entered upon their course, 
providing they have been in continuous attendance and register 
before July 1st. 

The Tuition The tuition fee includes, besides instruction, 

membership in the Y. M. C. A., gymnasium 
and swimming pool privileges. 

Books The practise of furnishing books and supplies 

was discontinued in 1915. 

Registration A registration fee of five dollars is due from 

Fee all new students when a place is reserved. It 

is a part of the tuition and will be credited on 
the first payment. When once paid it will not be refunded. 
To insure a place in the school registration should be made 
before September 1st. 



The Huntington School 23 

When an applicant enrolls in the school, it is understood, 
unless otherwise specified, that he enrolls for the entire year 
and is liable for the tuition for that period. No refund is made 
for a period less than a half year, excepting in case of illness. 

Manual Students who take manual training are charged 

Training with the material used when the articles made 

are removed from the department. 

Drawing A charge of one dollar is made for use of 

drawing instruments and supplies. All 
students taking drawing work must pay this fee. 

Huntington All students pay a fee of ten dollars. This se- 

General cures membership in the Huntington General 

Association Fee Association and provides the funds for the 
major social and athletic activities of the school. 
The school paper is also published from this fund. This fee 
is not required from students enrolled in special courses where 
tuition is less than SI 25. 

Graduation All students graduated from the School are 

charged five dollars, which covers the cost of 
the diploma and expenses incidental to graduation. 

Payments Make all checks payable to the Boston Young 

Men's Christian Association. 



Griffith-Stillings Press 
Boston. Mass. 



THE EVENING 

PREPARATORY 

SCHOOL 



; Catalogue ; 
1916-1917 



Boston Young Men's Christian Association 



The 

Evening Preparatory 
School 



/// 



1916-1917 



Published by 
Boston Young Men's Christian Association 



The Advertisers Press, Inc. 
Boston, Mass. 



(Jnntent; 













Pages 


BUSINESS DIVISION 22-26 


Bookkeeping Course 










24-25 


Electives 










25-26 


Stenographic Course 










22-23 


CALENDAR 










5 


CIVIL SERVICE 










27 


CLUBS 










. 31 


COURSES OF STUDY 










13-19 


Chemistry 










. 19 


Economics 










. 17 


English 










13 


French 










. 16 


Geography . 










. 19 


German 










. 15 


Government 










. 17 


History 










. 17 


Latin 










. 14 


Mathematics 










. 18 


Physics 










. 18 


Spanish 










. 16 


EXAMINATIONS 










. 31 


FACULTY 










. 8-9 


HISTORY . 










10-12 


LIBRARIES 










. 38 


MEMBERSHIP 










. 39 


REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 






20-21 


Classical Course .... 






. 20 


General Preparatory Course 








. 20 


Scientific Course . 








. 20 


SCHOLARSHIPS 








. 37 


SESSIONS 








. 38 


STUDENTS' TICKETS 








. 37 


TUITION RATES . 








. 30 


TUTORING 










. 33 



Ol^aku&at: 





Winter Term — 1916 17 


Sept. 19-22 




Registration 


Sept. 25 




Opening of Winter Term 


Nov. 30 
Dec. 18-26 


inc. 


Thanksgiving Day (Holiday) 
Christmas Recess 


Jan. 15-19 




Examinations 


Jan. 19 




Close of Winter Term 




Spri 


ing Term — 1917 


Jan. 29 
Feb. 22 
May 14-18 




Opening of Spring Term 
Washington's Birthday (Holiday) 
Examinations 


May 18 




Close of Spring Term 



Summer Term — 1917 

May 28 Opening of Summer Term 

Sept. 3 Labor Day (Holiday) 

Sept. 10-14 Examinations 

Sept. 14 Close of Summer Term 



Winter Term — 1917-18 

Sept. 24 Opening of Winter Term 



®rgantEatton 



of 
THE BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



General Administrative Officers 

ARTHUR S. JOHNSON ALBERT H. CURTIS 

President Vice-President 

LEWIS A. CROSSETT 
Treasurer 

GEORGE W. MEHAFFEY 
General Secretary 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Educational Committee 

WILLIAM E. MURDOCK, Chairman WILLIAM C. CHICK 

ALBERT H. CURTIS MORGAN L. COOLEY 

GEORGE H. MARTIN 

Executive Officers 

FRANK P. SPEARE, M.H. IRA A. FLINNER, A.B. 

Director Supt. Secondary Schools 

GALEN D. LIGHT, A.B. FRED L. DAWSON 

Asst. Director and Bursar Field Secretary 

Advisory Committee 

PAUL H. HANUS, Professor of Education, Harvard 
WILLIAM M. WARREN, Dean, College of Liberal Arts, B. U. 
FRANK E. HASKINS, M.D., Secretary, Tufts Medical and Dental 

Schools 
CHESTER N. GREENOUGH, Professor of English, Harvard 



Sfaculty 



JAMES A. BELL, A.B. 

(Harvard University) 
Principal 

WALTER A. BALDWIN, A.B. 

(Ohio Wesleyan University) (University of Chicago) 

(Harvard University) 

Physics and Chemistry 
WILLLAM T. BENTLEY, A.B. 

(Harvard University) 
English 

ERNEST L. CALDWELL, A.B. 

(Yale University) 

Mathematics 
JOHN C. DIETZ, A.B. 

(University of Pittsburgh) 
(Harvard University) (University of Paris) 

Spanish and German 
NEWELL W. EDSON, A.B. 

(Harvard University) 
French and German 

WILLL^M L. ESTERBERG, B.C.S. 

(Northeastern College School of Commerce and Finance) 
Shorthand and Typewriting 

HARRY K. GOOD, LL.B. 

(Jamestown Business Colleae) (Northeastern College School of Law) 

Bookkeeping and Commercial Law 

CHARLES B. GRAY, A.B. 

(University of Winnepeg) 
Typewriting 

CHARLES N. GREGG, A.M. 

(Acadia Universiiy) (Harvard University) 

Economics and Government 



ARTHUR B. KING, A.B. 

(Middlebury College) 
Latin 

JAMES METIVIER, A.B. 

(Harvard University) 
Modern Languages 

MANUEL MATIENZO, A.B. 

(Wesleyan University) 
Spanish 

NEWMAN M. MARSILIUS 

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) 
Mathematics 

M. K. McKAY, A.B., A.M. 

(Ohio State University) (Harvard University) 

History 

FREDERICK ROBINSON, JR. 

(Harvard University) 
EngUsh 

IRVING O. SCOTT, B.S., A.M. 

(Dartmouth College) (University of Maine) 

Mathematics 

JOHN C. SCAMMEL, A.B. 

(Harvard University) 
English 

WILLIAM A. SWICK, A.B. 

(Allegheny College) 
Civil Service 

JAMES B. TAYLOR, A.B., A.M. 

(Harvard University) 
History 

MILLARD BLACK 

(Harvard University) 
Executive Secretary 



iS(l)t ifuHtiug Prj^ijaratory i>cl|aal 



HISTORY 



The Preparatory School was founded in 1897 in response 
to the demand for instruction on the part of men who were 
employed during the day and could not avail themselves of 
the opportunities afforded by day classes. Throughout this 
period the School has experienced a steady growth, so that 
today it gives work of the same high standard as maintained 
by the best secondary day schools. By maintaining such 
quality of work, the School has been able to prepare a large 
number of men for Harvard, Yale, Brown, Boston Llniver- 
sity, Tufts, Dartmouth, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Northeastern, and other colleges. 

The enrollment has increased from fewer than fifty stu- 
dents at the beginning to eight hundred at the present time. 
To keep pace with this growth, the School has established 
a larger and more efficient teaching force; it has systematized 
and outlined the courses of study in order to do more thorough 
and intensive work; and it has moved into the best equipped 
buildings, for educational purposes, in the country. 

Mere numbers, however, afford no proper test of the 
worth of the School. That worth is determined rather by the 
cjuality of work the institution performs, and this in turn 
depends on the character of its teachers and its students. 
The teachers are college and university trained men ol large 
teaching experience who know of and are in sympathy with 
the aims and purposes of the ambitious men in the School. 
The students constitute a body of unusually earnest men who 
have entered upon their educational work as a part of the 
business of life, rather than as an elegant pastime. They 
come, in the main, from homes in which the habits of industry 
and economy are necessarily fostered. They feel the necessity 
of working and enter the evening school with definite aims 
for the future. All of the students are engaged in work 
during the day. 

AIM AND SCOPE 

The aim of the Preparatory School is to prepare young 
men of intense purposes for college, scientific schools, and 
for the various advanced schools operated by Northeastern 
College. The subjects offered are those commonly given 

10 



in the eighth grade of a grammar school and in the four years 
of a day high school. The amount covered in each subject 
during the two terms of sixteen weeks each is the same as 
covered in a year in a day high school. This is possible, for 
the students pursuing the work are mature and in earnest. 
The work is further facilitated by the elimination of non- 
essentials. 

BUILDINGS 

The location, surroundings, and physical appointments of 
a school are of primary importance. The location ought to 
be healthful, accessible, and attractive; the buildings, properly 
heated, lighted, and ventilated as to guarantee health and 
promote progress of students at all seasons of the year. The 
buildings occupied by the Association Schools combine all 
these good qualities. They are located on Huntington Avenue 
in the section of Boston noted for its institutions of learning; 
accessible from all parts of the city and suburbs; and free 
from the outside influences which distract the attention of 
students. Nearly four acres of land are devoted to buildings 
and an athletic field. 

Looking at the building from the front, one gains the 
impression of a large square structure, but there are, in 
reality, six buildings, each on its own foundation, and con- 
nected by corridors and bridges. This arrangement gives 
exceptionally fine light and air to all the buildings. 

Administration Building. This building is the social 
center of the plant. In it are located the lobby, various 
offices of the administrative staff, the directors' room, com- 
mittee rooms, libraries, reading and social rooms. 

Educational Building. This building is one hundred 
ninety-six feet long, fifty-eight feet wide, and six stories high. 
In the basement are located the heating and ventilating 
systems of the entire plant. The first floor includes game, 
social, and club rooms, and a small assemble hall. On the 
second, third, and fourth floors are located class rooms, 
drafting rooms, and laboratories. On the fifth and sixth 
floors are dormitory rooms. 

Gymnasium. This structure is known as the Samuel 
Johnson Memorial Gymnasium. On the main floor is the 
gymnasium proper, which is equipped with the most approved 
apparatus. In the building are handball and squash courts, 
lockers, six bowling alleys, shower baths, rooms for special 
exercising, fencing, wrestling, etc., a running track, and a 
visitors' gallery. The gymnasium is so arranged that, by a 
system of sliding partitions, it can be divided into one, two, 

11 



or three separate compartments, making it possible to con- 
duct a number of activities at the same time. Many new 
features in gymnasium construction and equipment have 
been introduced. 

Natatorium. This building, located between Bates 
Hall and the Gymnasium, is easily accessible from the locker 
rooms. The swimming pool, seventy-five feet by twenty- 
five feet, is under a glass roof which admits abundant light 
and sunshine. It is supplied with filtered salt water from 
our own artesian well, heated to a proper temperature by an 
elaborate system of pipes. The Natatorium is one of the 
largest and best equipped of its kind. 

Vocational Building. The Vocational Building is lo- 
cated directly back of the main group. This is a substantial 
structure of three stories, in which are located the wood- 
working plant, the electrical laboratories, machine shop, 
and lecture halls. 

Bates Hall. The hall has a seating capacity of nearly 
five hundred. A large stage, suitable for entertainments 
of all kinds, is provided. The moving-picture machine 
provides a feature which is of interest to our students. 



12 



OJourses of ^tuby 



ADMISSION 

Any young man of good moral character, regardless of 
occupation or creed, who has completed at least six grades of a 
grammar school course, or the equivalent, may be enrolled in 
the School. 

Courses adapted to the needs and education of such 
applicants are offered each term. It is not advisable, however, 
for one younger than fifteen years of age to enroll, for the 
courses are adapted to those who are sulihciently mature and 
physically able to work during the day and to study at night. 



Qflie S^partm^ntB 



ENGLISH 

The work of the Department of EngUsh comprises courses in com- 
position and literature, which aim: — (1) to give the student a command 
of correct and clear English, spoken and written; and (2) to enable him to 
read with intelligence and appreciation. 

To secure the first end, training in grammar and the simpler principles 
of rhetoric, and the writing of frequent compositions are essential. The 
student learns to spell, capitalize, and punctuate correctly. He is further 
able to show a practical knowledge of the essentials of English grammar, 
including ordinary grammatical terminology, inflections, synta.x, and the 
use of phrases and clauses; a thorough training in the construction of 
the sentence; and familiarit}' with the principles of paragraph division 
and structure. 

To secure the second end, the student reads and studies in the class- 
room the works named in the various courses. 

English Aa, Ab — Elementary Course. This course is 
for those who need drill in elementary spelling, punctuation, 
grammar, and oral and written composition. The aim is to 
prepare a student for the first year course in high school. 

English la, lb — Applied Grammar. Composition. Ele- 
mentary work in the theme, the paragraph, and the Sen- 
tence: Letter Writing. Irving's Sketch Book; Scott's 
Marmion; Longfellow's Courtship of Miles Standish; 
Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome. 

13 



English 2a, 2b — Rhetoric and English Composition, 
Oral and Written. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress; Homer's 
Iliad; Eliot's Silas Marner; Stevenson's Treasure Island; 
Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner. 

English 3a, 3b — History of English Literature. Argu- 
mentation, written and oral. Addison's Sir Roger de Coverly 
Papers; Tennyson's Idylls of the King; Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice and Julius Caesar. 

English 4a, 4b — History of American Literature. 
Composition, oral and written. Shakespeare's Macbeth; 
Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso and Comus; Burke's 
Speech on Conciliation with America; Macaulay's Life of 
Johnson; Palgrave's Golden Treasury. 

English 5a — English Composition (Advanced Course). 
A careful training in the principles of prose composition 
with special emphasis upon usage. Particular attention 
is given to punctuation, the construction of sentences and 
paragraphs, and the use of words. Besides the daily themes, 
longer themes of 1000 words or more, involving practice in 
Exposition, Description, Narration and Argument, are 
written. The object of the course is to enable the student 
to express his thoughts freely, clearly, and forcibly; the 
writing of straightforward English is the end toward which 
the efforts of the student are directed. The course is equiva- 
lent to one-half of English A of Harvard LIniversity. Open 
to men who have completed course 4a and 4b and others who 
can profit thereby, 

English 5b — Public Speaking. This course is intended 
to provide systematic training in enunciation, inflection, 
emphasis, and other essentials of public speaking. A practical 
and business-like style of speaking is inculcated, the chief 
aim being to train the student to think upon his feet and 
express his thought effectively. Timid speakers are encour- 
aged to persevere and do their best. Considerable time is 
given to extempore speech, to debating and to the presen- 
tation of argumentative material. 

LATIN 

A careful study of Latin benefits the average student in several ways. 
In addition to quickening his observation, strengthening his reasoning 
powers, and fortifying him in the ability to do hard work, it gives him an 
understanding of English grammar such as he cannot possibly obtain 
from exclusive drill in English alone, and furnishes the essential principles 
required in the study of any of the modern European languages. Famil- 

14 



iarity acquired with the meanings of Latin words and with important 
principles of word formation enables the student to recognize on first 
sight the meanings of a large percentage of English words that will be new 
to him, and gives him an insight into the real significance of hundreds 
of words with which he is already loosely familiar. The practice of accurate 
translation gives the student greatly increased facility in the choice of 
English words, and helps him thereby to make forceful use of the English 
language. 

Latin la, lb — Beginner's Latin. First year Latin 
lessons complete. Easy Latin prose. 

Latin 2a, 2b — Caesar, Sallust and Latin Composition. 
Review of constructions, forms and application of rules of 
syntax. 

Latin 3a, 3b — Cicero's Orations Against Cataline, for 
the Manilian Law, for Archias. Grammar. Composition . 
Translation at sight of Caesar and Sallust. 

Latin 4a, 4b — Virgil's Aeneid. Translation at sight 
from Ovid, Sallust and others. Composition. 



GERMAN 

The aim of the first year is to enable the student to acquire a correct 
pronunciation, to gain a complete mastery of fundamental grammatical 
forms and principles, and to get a vocabulary that will make it possible 
to read simple German texts intelligently. 

In the second year the forms and principles of German grammar 
are thoroughly reviewed, the working vocabulary constantly enlarged, 
and exercises both in composition and conversation continued daily. 

German la, lb — Harris' German Lessons; Guerber's 
Marchen und Erzahlungen. Special emphasis is placed on 
pronunciation and the acquiring of a vocabulary. 

German 2a, 2b — Study of grammar continued. Special 
attention to syntax. Selected readings. Students who com- 
plete German 1 and 2 are prepared to take college examinations 
in Elementary German. 

German 3a, 3b — Becker's Deutsch fur Auslander; 
Wildenbruch, Das edle Blut; Baumbach's Die None von 
Lilencron, Anno 1870; Keller's Kleider machen Leute; Heine's 
Die Harzreise; Meyer's Das Amulet; German Composition. 

German 4a, 4b — Schiller's Wilhelm Tell or Die Jung- 
frau von Orleans; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm; Goethe's 
Egmont, Hermann und Dorothea, and critical essays on 
Germany, its people and its literature. 

15 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 
FRENCH 

The courses in French are planned with the purpose of giving to 
students (1) an appreciative comprehension of French, both as a Hterary 
and as a spoken language; and (2) a sufficient knowledge to fit them for 
advanced work in higher schools. The essentials of the grammar are 
thoroughly mastered by continued drill with constant application. The 
attainment of a good pronunciation receives careful attention, and from 
the beginning the ear of the student is trained to understand spoken 
French. Conversation is included in every course. 

French la, lb — French Grammar. Selected readings. 
Special emphasis placed on pronunciation and the acquiring 
of a vocabulary. 

French 2a, 2b — French Grammar. Special composition 
work and selected readings. Students who complete both 
F'rench 1 and 2 are prepared to take college entrance examina- 
tions in Elementary French. 

French 3a, 3b — Fraser and Squair's Grammar; La- 
martine's Revolution Francaise; Selections from Maupassant, 
Th. de Banville, Meilhar at Halevy, and others; Koren's 
French Composition. 

French 4a, 4b — Classic plays, and selections from Balzac, 
and others; Victor Hugo, Hernani; Rostand, Cyrano de 
Bergerac; critical essays on France, its people and its litera- 
ture. 

SPANISH 

Owing to the opening of the Panama Canal, Spanish has become the 
leading Romance language in America today. Many young men, seeing 
the great opportunities in business with the South American countries, 
feel that a command of Spanish is essential to success. The Department, 
therefore, is prepared to give to the student a practical command of 
Spanish as a medium of expression. 

Spanish la, lb — Elementary Course. The basis — 
correct pronouncing and accent. Conversation. Monsanto 
& Languellier's Grammar and Text Books. 

Spanish 2a, 2b — Continuation of Spanish I. Grammar, 
conversation and composition, suitable Text Books. 

Spanish 3a, 3b — Commercial Course Entirely. Read- 
ing, writing, translating and conversing on commercial sub- 
jects: commercial correspondence, business terms. South 
American customs. A forceful and easy style of expression. 
Monsanto & Languellier's Grammar. A Trip to South 
America and Spanish Daily Life. 

Spanish 4a, 4b — Advanced Commercial Course. Pit- 
man's Spanish Correspondence. 

16 



GREEK AND ITALIAN 

Classes will be organized in these languages if the number 
of applicants is large enough. 

HISTORY 

The aim of the department of History is to give a broad knowledge 
of the vital conditions in the growth of the leading countries of the world. 
This includes the study not only of the important facts, but more especially 
of the processes of development in government, society, business, religion, 
and education. The past is studied that the present may be better under- 
stood. 

History la — United States History (Elementary Course). 
This course is primarily for those students who have never 
studied American history. Its aim is to prepare one for a 
thorough study of United States History. 

History 2a, 2b — United States History. Division 2a 
deals with the Colonial Period — from the era of discovery 
to the meeting of the Federal Convention in 1787. Division 
2b includes the National Period — from the foundation of 
the constitution to the present time. 

History 3a — English History. A study of the great 
lessons of Anglo Saxon-development in freedom and intelli- 
gence. 

History 4a, 4b — Ancient History. The first division 
is devoted to the history of Greece; the second, to the history 
of Rome. The course aims to place the principal emphasis 
upon the characteristic elements of these civilizations and 
the contributions which they made to modern civilization. 

GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMICS 

While these courses are designed to serve as preparatory courses for 
those planning to enter business, and for those expecting to take up ad- 
vanced work in some special field, they are intended, also, to give to the 
general student information and training of value in the exercise of intelli- 
gent citizenship. Some grasp of general principles, some knowledge of 
concrete problems, and some insight into current practical problems will 
be derived from these courses. 

Government la, lb — American Government. This 
course includes classroom lectures, discussions and theses 
on political theory in general and the national, state and 
local government of the United States in particular. Reading: 
Bryce, Hart, Wilson, and other standard authors. 

Economics la, lb — Principles of Economics. This 
course is designed not only to give an introduction to economic 
theory, but also to furnish some insight into a number of 

17 



practical economic problems. Thus, there are elementary 
studies of transportation, currency, trusts, the tariff, and 
socialism. Reading: Bullock, Fisher, Taussig, Seager, and 
other standard authors; supplemented by questions and 
problems. 

MATHEMATICS 

The purpose of the courses in mathematics is two-fold: (1) to make 
the student acquainted with such mathematical methods as are most 
likely to be useful in the study of other subjects and particularly in practical 
affairs; and (2) to give him a thorough training in such fundamental 
branches as shall furnish a sufficient basis for advanced mathematical 
studies. 

Mathematics 1 — Arithmetic Al. A course in general 
arithmetic, covering much of the ground usually covered 
in grammar schools. The course includes the most essential 
subjects. 

Mathematics 2 — Algebra la, lb. The essential opera- 
tions of algebra to quadratics. The emphasis is on the 
fundamental principles. 

Mathematics 3 — Algebra 2a. Covers the college en- 
trance requirements. Designed for students who have 
acquired the fundamental principles. 

Mathematics 4 — Plane Geometry la, lb. The five 
books. A large number of original exercises stimulate the 
power to reason clearly and to derive logical proofs. Special 
attention is given to those who expect to take entrance examin- 
ations. 

Mathematics 5 — Solid Geometry 2a. The standard 
theorems in solid and spherical geometry. Stress is laid 
upon numerical exercises involving mensuration of solid 
figures. This course is intended primarily for those who are 
preparing for college. 

Mathematics 6 — Trigonometry la. This course is 
intended for those who wish to ofTer trigonometry for college 
entrance, or for those who intend to take up engineering work. 

SCIENCE 

Science 1 — Physics la, lb. The work offered in physics 
presents an elementary introduction to the general subject. 
Mechanics, heat, magnetism, electricity, and light are taken 
up, usually in the order named. The course aims to encourage 
in the student a habit of observation, and to develop his 
ability to think intelligently about simple physical facts, 
many of which are observable in every day life. It will 

18 



prepare anyone who completes the work satisfactorily to 
pass the entrance examinations of any college. 

Science 2 — Inorganic Chemistry la, lb. The general 
purpose of this course is similar to that of Physics 1. The 
work is divided between lecture-room discussion and demon- 
stration of the fundamental principles and facts of the science, 
on the one hand; and, on the other, experimental work in 
the laboratory by the students individually. This latter 
work is closely supervised and the student is required to do 
his work neatly, observe results carefully, and endeavor to 
reason from these results to legitimate conclusions. He must 
also keep systematic records of this work, as directed. At 
least fifty experiments are performed. 

Physical Geography la — This course gives a large 
amount of practical information, bearing directly on the 
physical conditions that affect customs, occupations, and food 
distribution. 

Commercial Geography la — A study of the various 
countries, relative to their commercial intercourse. The 
student is made familiar with the principal waterways, cities, 
products, imports, exports, etc. The course is a continuation 
of History la. 

Physiology and Hygiene la — This course includes a 
study of the structure, the various systems and organs of 
the body, and the observance of the laws of health. 



19 



S^qmtcnmttfi for ^ra&uatiou 



Students are graduated from the classical, scientific, or 
general preparatory course when they have completed fifteen 
units of work. A unit of work as counted by the College 
Entrance Board is the amount covered in this school in two 
terms of sixteen weeks each. 

The following courses of study leading to a diploma are 
ofTered : 

Classical Course 

Students who prepare for Harvard or for classical courses 
of other colleges are advised to select this course: 



Prescribed 


Uni 


its 




English 




4 


units 


Latin 




4 


" 


Algebra 




U 


units 


History 




1 


unit 


Science 




1 


" 


Plane Geom. 




1 


" 



Elective Units 



be 



Two and one-half units to 

selected from the following: 

French 2 or 3 units 

German 2 or 3 " 

Ancient History 1 unit 

U. S. History 1 " 

Physics 1 " 

Chemistry 1 " 

Solid Geom. i " 



Prescribed Units 



Scientific Course 

Students who prepare for the Mass. Institute of Tech- 
nology or for other scientific schools are advised to pursue 
this course: 

Elective Units 

Two are to be selected from the 
following: 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Adv. French 1 '" 

Ad\'. German 1 " 

Mechanical Drawing 1 or J unit 

Trigonometry § unit 



English 


4 


units 


German 


2 


" 


French 


2 


" 


Algebra 


U 


units 


Plane Geom. 


1 


unit 


Solid Geom. 


1 


" 


History 


1 


" 


Physics 


1 


" 



English 

Latin, French, German, 
or Spanish 



General Preparatory Course 

Prescribed Units 

4 units Algebra 1 unit 

History 1 " 

2 units Science 1 " 



20 



Elective Units 



Advanced Composition 

Algebra 2a 

Ancient History 

Bookkeeping 

Business English 

Chemistry 

Commercial Arithmetic 

Commercial Geography 

Economics 

English History 

French 

German 

Government 



unit 



1 or ^ unit 

^ unit 

i, 2, 3, or 4 

units 
1, 2, 3, or 4 

units 
1 or ^ unit 



Latin 

Mechanical Drawing 
Physical Geography 
Physics 
Physiology 
Plane Geometry 
Public Speaking 
Shorthand (100 words 

a minute) 
Solid Geometry 
Spanish 

Trigonometry 
Typewriting (40 words 
a minute) 



1, 2, 3, or 4 
units 
or 5 unit 
unit 



, 2, 3, or 4 
units 
unit 



21 



IBuBiness iiutsiou 



The school aims to provide a thorough training for those 
who expect to enter business pursuits. The usual courses in 
shorthand and bookkeeping are ofifered and, in addition, a 
general course covering the work in the shorthand and book- 
keeping departments and other commercial subjects closely 
related to business work. There are also a large number of 
courses of college grade in the School of Commerce and 
Finance open to our graduates. The program of studies is 
therefore complete and insures to students a broad training 
along business lines. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Stenographic Course — There are few fields which 
offer so great opportunities with so little outlay as short- 
hand. The demand for young men stenographers has never 
been filled, nor is it likely to be filled at present. Our aim 
is to put out as many first class stenographers as possible, 
confident, in so doing, that we are performing a two-fold 
service. We are supplying a constant demand, and we are 
starting young men in work that is not only pleasant and 
profitable in itself, but which can be made a stepping stone to 
the best positions in the business world. How often we learn 
that the head stenographer has been promoted to a managerial 
position. This happens because the stenographer is closer 
than any other man to the head of the firm. During the 
period of his employment, the manager or superintendent has 
been telling him about the business in the most intimate way. 
If the stenographer has ability, it can readily be seen that he 
is of necessity in line for promotion. 

Not only is there opportunity to secure positions and pro- 
motion in private business houses, but there are also large 
opportunities in the government service for stenographers of 
ability. In recent years the government has employed almost 
exclusively male stenographers. The demand for well- 
trained men is far in excess of the supply. To substantiate 
this statement we need only quote extracts from a recently 
published letter of the U. S. Civil Service Commission: 

"For a number of years the supply of male eligibles in 
stenography and typewriting has been inadequate to meet the 
demands of the various departments of the Government. 

22 



Every effort has been made by the Commission to bring this 
condition of affairs to the notice of the pubHc, both by state- 
ments pubHshed in the annual reports and other publications 
of the Commission and by reading notices and reviews in the 
newspapers. 

"The salary usually paid to stenographers and typewriters 
upon entrance to the Government service ranges from $720 to 
$1200 per annum. Prospects for promotion, however, are 
excellent, especially in view of the face that, on account of the 
nature of their duties, stenographers are more readily able to 
acquire a knowledge of the work of an office than other clerks. " 

Shorthand — We teach the Ben Pitman system of short- 
hand, for we have found that no other system offers a wider 
field for advancement than does this. The method of in- 
struction is a combination of individual and class. The work 
of the individual student is corrected and errors noted, thus 
securing accuracy that can be gained in no other way. Herein 
lies the success of the student. Where it can be done to 
advantage, the students are grouped for dictation and prac- 
tice. In this way we preserve the class stimulus while giving 
the individual attention necessary ^ insure thoroughness. 
Most students are able to complete the theory work in three 
months. The time spent thereafter is used to get the re- 
quired speed. The majority of students are able to write 
rapidly enough at the end of a year to hold a position. Those, 
however, who wish greater speed will have to spend a longer 
time on the course. 

Typewriting — The touch system of typewriting is used 
since it has been found that greater speed can be obtained 
and neater work turned out in this way. In this system, 
the machine is operated without looking at the keys. It is 
possible, therefore, for the typist to read notes while writing, 
thus saving time. Accuracy and neatness are indispensable, 
for the employer bases his estimate of the stenographer's 
ability upon the correctness and appearance of the type- 
written page. Recognizing this fact, the school places 
emphasis on these qualities. 

English — Too much emphasis cannot be placed upon 
the value of English to both the bookkeeper and the steno- 
grapher. Too often pupils are sent into the office with only a 
superficial knowledge of English grammar and the forms of 
correspondence. We aim to give our students a thorough 
training in the elements of composition and a thorough drill 
in all forms of correspondence. The department is especially 
strong, and English beyond the ordinary correspondence 
work is provided for those who wish to take an extended 

23 



course to prepare for secretarial positions. A systematic 
attempt is made to increase the vocabulary of students so 
that they will be familiar with the words in common use and 
can take dictation more easily. 

Spelling — Correct spelling is absolutely essential to 
the stenographer or bookkeeper. Every student who expects 
to enter business work is obliged to take the instruction in 
spelling. The school has demonstrated that even the very 
poorest spellers can become proficient by close application. 
No attempt is made to teach students words not generally 
used. The words are selected from a list compiled by Dr. 
Ayers of the Sage Foundation who tabulated the common 
words used in 20,000 business letters. 

Bookkeeping Course — Every young man, whether he 
intends to enter business as a bookkeeper, or not, should 
have a knowledge of the principles of bookkeeping. A busi- 
ness or professional man who does not have this knowledge 
is at the mercy of his employees. He should be able to 
check up their work and understand the \'arious transac- 
tions. It is a fact that 90% of the men who engage in 
business for themselves fail and at the age of sixty are de- 
pendent upon others for a livelihood. Such failures are not 
caused by lack of industry but because of slipshod business 
methods. Many men in business figure their profits and 
losses on scrap paper which reaches the waste basket shortly 
after a careless estimate has been made. The failures would 
be lessened if the men had a knowledge of bookkeeping and 
business methods. 

Hon. Chauncey M. Depew says, "A business training is 
absolutely necessary and the best thing that you can have, 
whether you come from the common school, from the academy, 
the seminary, or from the university." 

Hon. Lyman J. Gage said, ''Thirty-eight years ago I took 
a business course. That drill, that information, that edu- 
cation I look back upon and count as of the greatest practical 
value of any I have ever received." 

Considering the short time required to become proficient 
in bookkeeping, every young man should avail himself of this 
training. It will give him a means of gaining a foothold in the 
business world. If he enters business for himself it may 
mean the difference between failure and success. The young 
man trained in business methods has one more asset which will 
aid him to climb the ladder of success. 

Bookkeeping — In teaching bookkeeping we combine 
theory and practice. This method is necessary if the best 

24 



results are to be secured. We teach the pupil to make entries, 
to post, to take a trial balance, to make statements of the 
condition of the business, and to close an ordinary ledger, 
before giving him vouchers to handle. From this point on, 
the work is just as practical as in any office. 

Practical instruction is given in the special systems devised 
for certain classes of business. The science of commission, 
wholesale and retail, corporation accounts, etc., is thoroughly 
taught; the latest ideas are applied and the routine of the 
office strictly observed. 

Commercial Arithmetic — A knowledge of arithmetic 
is an essential qualification of the bookkeeper. Accuracy 
is the first demand made upon the student, and thereafter 
emphasis is placed on rapidity. The essential divisions of 
the subjects are dwelt upon to give the student a knowledge 
of the various computations which arise in business. Special 
attention is given to fractions, decimals, percentage, interest, 
discount, etc. Mental arithmetic is also given considerable 
prominence. 

Penmanship ^ The ability to write well is of great 
importance to those who are employed in commercial pursuits. 
It is indispensable to the bookkeeper or correspondent; 
no other accomplishment, save typewriting, is of more value 
to the stenographer. The beautiful flourish style of writing, 
although valuable as an accomplishment, is not a necessity 
in business. It is the aim of this department to give the 
student instruction that will enable him in a short time to 
write rapidly, neatly, and legibly. Any one, who takes 
pains to practice the exercises outlined, can acquire a plain 
business hand while he is pursuing the course in bookkeeping 
or shorthand. 

Rapid Calculation — In connection with the work in 
written and mental arithmetic, methods of rapid calculation 
are taught which greatly facilitate the pupil's work, stimulate 
his mind, and enable him to compute different problems with 
ease and rapidity. The daily work is extremely practical. 
Thorough drills are given, not merely in rapid addition, but 
in all classes of problems incident to the ordinary business 
office. Short-cut methods are here introduced, and students 
are taught to apply them in the regular accounting room. 

ELECTIVES 

Commercial Law — Instruction is given in the princi- 
ples of the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, 
bailment, partnership, corporations, insurance, real and per- 

25 



sonal property, etc. The course includes much information on 
the legahty of every-day transactions, which is of great value 
to the business man. No attempt is made to make lawyers of 
our pupils, but we aim to give them information that will en- 
able them to carry on business in a business-like manner. 

Should students wish to pursue the study of law more 
extensively, they may enter the Law School of Northeastern 
College where a complete course in law leading to the LL.B. 
may be pursued. 

Spanish, French, and German —Successful business 
men today realize that the completion of the Panama Canal, 
the war in Europe, and other recent events will make won- 
derful changes in our commercial relations. The most im- 
portant change to which the people of the United States must 
give attention is the recent rapid growth and development 
of the Latin-American republics. These countries comprise 
an area of 9,000,000 sq. miles (three times that of the United 
States) and they contain 70,000,000 people, with governments 
modeled after our own. Their foreign commerce amounts to 
more than $3,000,000,000 annually, showing an increase of 
more than 200 per cent since 1897. 

For these reasons and the fact that our relations with 
these republics must soon become more intimate, we desire to 
call the attention of young business men to the importance of 
studying Spanish which is spoken by one-tenth of all the people 
claiming relation under the American Flag. 

Beginning classes in Spanish, French, and German are 
formed each term. 

In addition to the foregoing subjects students who wish to 
take an extended course may select courses from the large list 
offered in the Preparatory School. There will be found all the 
subjects usually offered in a first-class high school. This is a 
great advantage to students who wish to combine a general 
course with their special business work to prepare them for the 
more responsible secretarial or accountancy positions. 



CERTIFICATE COURSES 

Certificates are issued to students who complete the work 
as outlined: 

Group A Group B Group C 

Bookkeeping Shorthand Bookkeeping 

Com. Arithmetic Typewriting Shorthand 

Penmanship Business English Typewriting 

Business EngUsh Com. Arithmetic Com. Arithmetic 



Business English 



26 



OJiml ^erutCB 



The United States Government offers to the ambitious 
young man many advantages over private employment. It 
pays better salaries than do private employers for the same 
class of work. No day is missed and pay day is never delayed. 
Promotion is rapid, depending, of course, upon the individual; 
however, ability to advance is not checked in any way. The 
hours of labor are short, seven and eight hours being the 
general rule, and vacation allowances are liberal, 30 days 
being given in some branches of the service, and, in addition, 
30 days' sick leave, if needed. Again, employees are per- 
fectly safe and secure in their positions. Permanency is 
assured during good behavior and efftcient service. The 
rules strictly forbid removal except for good cause, which 
must be stated in writing. Another advantage is the op- 
portunity for advancement in commercial life. By using the 
spare time which a Civil Service position gives, one may 
prepare for better things either in other departments of the 
Government or outside of the service. No young man need 
deprive himself of a position which will relieve him from 
worry as to the security of it, and which, at the same time 
will give him ample opportunity for recreation and self- 
improvement. 

Civil Service Law 

In 1883, a law, known as the Civil Service Reform Act, 
was passed by Congress. This law was enacted for the follow- 
ing purposes: (1) to procure, by means of competitive ex- 
aminations, competent employees for the Government ser- 
vice; (2) to place Government positions beyond the control of 
politicians, thus making appointment depend upon fitness 
and not upon party affiliations; and (3) to give all an equal 
opportunity to attain government employment and to keep 
their positions so long as they show themselves faithful and 
capable. 

The law provides for three commissioners who, with their 
assistants, give the examinations, correct the papers, and see 
that the Civil Service rules are fully complied with. These 
men do not have, however, any power of appointment or re- 
moval, they simply certify those eligible for positions. 

The many advantages of the law, therefore, make service 

27 



under the Government of the United States very desirable. 
Success depends upon personal merit, political "pull" and 
personal influence no longer being able to help the applicant. 
All that is necessary is to pass the examination in order to be 
placed on the eligible register. If an average of 70% or 
more is attained in the examination (65% or more for persons 
honorably discharged from the United States Military or 
Naval Service for disability incurred in the time of duty), 
the applicant becomes eligible for appointment. The higher 
he is marked, the more quickly will the applicant's appoint- 
ment follow. The names of the three persons standing highest 
on the register are certified by the Commission when a vacancy 
occurs and the appointing officer is required to make a selec- 
tion from these, with sole reference to fitness. The two 
remaining names are returned to the register and, together 
with the fourth on the list, are certified for the next vacancy. 

Positions 

The positions which the Government must fill under the 
Civil Service Law cover a broad field. Some of these are 
positions in the Railway Mail Service, the Post Ofiice Service, 
the Rural Free Delivery Service, the position of fourth-class 
postmaster in all states, the Internal Revenue Service, Depart- 
mental Service, the Life Saving Service, the Steamboat 
Service, Immigrant Service, etc. 

The age limits and entrance salaries of some of these 
positions are as follows: 

Age Limits Entrance Salary 

Post Office Service 17 to 55 $600 to $3000 

Custom House Service 18 upward $600 to $1950 

Railway Mail Service 18 to 35 $900 

Internal Revenue 18 upward $500 to $2500 

Immigration Service 20 to 55 $1380 

Examinations 

The examinations given by the Commission are of three 
grades or degrees of difiiculty, known as first, second and third 
grades. The first grade is the most difficult and the third grade 
the least difficult. Most of them are designed to test general 
qualifications; thus a wide range of positions can be filled from 
a single kind of examination, increasing the applicants' op- 
portunities for appointment. The subjects which cover the 
three grades given arc spelling, arithmetic, penmanship, 
geography, civil government, letter writing, copying and 
correcting manuscript, copying from plain copy, copy- 
ing addresses, reading addresses, etc. 

28 



The different subjects in each examination are given rela- 
tive weights according to their importance. These weights 
represent the value of each subject in the whole examination. 
In order to make clear how the average grade is found in all 
examinations when the subjects are given different weights, the 
following illustration of a railway mail clerk examination will 
suffice: 

Railway Mail Clerk 

Relative 





Weights 


( 


jrades 


Products 


Spelling (first grade) 


10 


X 


95 


950 


Arithmetic 


20 


X 


80 


1600 


Letter Writing (first grade) 


20 


X 


90 


1800 


Penmanship 


20 


X 


92 


1840 


Copying from Plain Copy 


20 


X 


86 


1720 


Geography of the United States 


10 


X 


94 


940 



Total 100 8850 

8850 ~ 100 = 88.5, average grade. 

To the young man w^ho has his evenings to himself and who 
has not decided what he would like to be, our course in Civil 
Service is open. He can devote his spare time to profitable 
study without interfering with his regular occupation. In this 
way he is qualifying for more lucrative and congenial employ- 
ment. It may be that Civil Service will be used as a stepping- 
stone to positions outside the service. 

To obtain one of the many desirable positions with the 
Government the very best instruction is desirable. The point 
is not merely to pass the examination but to rank among the 
highest. We are able to give proper and thorough coaching 
whereby the earnest student can take his examination wnth 
assurance. This is due to obtaining experienced men who have 
an intimate knowledge of the examinations, and are qualified 
to give thorough instruction. Furthermore, the personal 
direction by the instructor is most important to the student. 
Trying to prepare for an examination without skilled help is a 
waste of time, for the student does not know what to study. 

New courses begin in September, February, and June. 



29 



TUITION RATES 

The tuition rates are as follows: 

One subject $7 . 00 

Two subjects $12.00 

Three subjects SIS . 00 

Four subjects $18.00 

Civil Service $15 . 00 

The foregoing rates are for subjects meeting two nights 
a week for a term of 16 weeks. 

The laboratory fee for Chemistry is S5 . 00 and for Physics 
$2 . 50 for 16 weeks. A deposit of $3 . 00 is made in Chemistry 
to cover breakage, the unused portion of which is returned 
at the close of the course. 

It is very desirable that students pay the full amount of 
their tuition charge when they enroll. For those who find 
this impossible, the following method of payment is per- 
mitted: 

One-third on entrance 

One-third at end of fourth week of term. 

One-third at end of eighth week of term. 

Students who have been enrolled in a course four or more 
evenings will be required to pay for entire course. 

The tuition rates are in addition to the Y. M. C. A. mem- 
bership fee of $2 . 00. 



30 



general ilnfnrmatiau 



Terms 

The year is divided into three terms of sixteen weeks 
each. The winter term includes the period from October 
to February, the spring term from February to June, and the 
summer term from June to October. 

The work is so conducted that in any two terms a year's 
work in any subject as counted by high schools is completed. 
By attending full calendar years, a four year high school 
course can be completed in less than four years as a rule. 
Students pursue but three subjects each term. 

Beginning classes are offered in a large number of subjects 
each term. It is possible for a student to enter at the be- 
ginning of any term and select courses suited to his advance- 
ment. A number of half courses are also offered each term. 

Examinations 

Examinations are held in all subjects at the close of each 
term and the standing of each student who has completed a 
term's work is recorded in our record books. If a student 
pursues a course part of the term and then drops it, no record 
of his class standing is kept at the office. Students are 
advised, therefore, to pursue courses in full and take all 
examinations, for later they may need an official rating. 
While the scholarship of students is determined by means of 
examinations, regularity of attendance (75% at least) and 
faithful performance of required work are considered equally 
essential. 

Lectures 

Many of the numerous lectures offered by the Association 
are available to members, free of charge. These are under the 
direction of the social and the religious work departments. 
Space does not permit giving detailed information of this im- 
portant feature. Special pamphlets, prepared by the fore- 
going departments, give the list of speakers and course avail- 
able. 

Clubs 

A large number of clubs are organized and conducted by 
the various departments, the most important of which are as 
follows : 

31 




PHYSICS LABORATORY 



1 


■ 


H" 


■ 


■MH 


H n 




tj 


V 


«- 


Pl^^l 


Ml^^l^^ 




r^-J ^ 


m J 


Saa: 




DH 


Bi^te^HK^B^^M 


pj 




■ 


^*^v^uflki^M 




1 



CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 
(One of Three) 



Congress — The Congress is organized similarly to the 
National body. Anyone may become a member by adhering 
to the rules of the organization and by naming the state he 
will represent. Members introduce bills and participate in 
the debates and discussions. In this way experience in public 
speaking is gained. We recommend that those who wish 
training in public address and in parliamentary practice 
join the Congress. 

Current Events Club — Those who are not interested 
in the Congress may be interested in joining the Current 
Events Club. The name indicates the character of the Club. 
Each week, discussions in the form of debates take place. 
One can secure valuable training in public address by joining 
either of the aforementioned clubs. 

Orchestra — • Those musically inclined will find recreation 
and an opportunity to improve their musical education by 
joining the orchestra. It is under the leadership of an ex- 
perienced musician and leader, and the benefits a member 
derives from the rehearsals and concerts are considerable. 
The orchestra is in great demand throughout the Association, 
and finds many opportunities to make itself useful. 

Glee Club — The Glee Club is another musical organiza- 
tion which attracts the best musical talent of the membership. 
It is under the direction of a man who has had much exper- 
ience in choral work. Concerts are given throughout the 
year, and much valuable training is received by the members. 
Ability to read simple music is the only necessary quali- 
fication for membership. 

Moving Pictures 

The Association has in Bates Hall a modern moving pic- 
ture machine which is used frequently to provide entertain- 
ment and instruction. Many notable educational films are 
shown each year, which are worthy of the attention of the 
students. Much information can be received in this way in a 
short time with little effort. 

Tutoring 

Every year a large number of men come to us to be tutored. 
We are able to furnish tutors in any preparatory subject at 
$1.00 an hour. The members of the regular faculty are 
usually available for such work. We are able, however, owing 
to our proximity to higher institutions of learning, to furnish 
tutors, should members of our own force be unable to arrange 
suitable hours. 

33 



DRAFTING ROOM 




PHYSICS LECTURE ROOiM 



Discipline 

One reason why the students of the school iire alile to pro- 
gress rapidly is that no time is wasted in obtaining discipline. 
Our students are earnest men who are sacrificing time and 
money for an education. Not since the school has been 
founded has it been found necessary to expel or even suspend 
a student. Our teachers use the entire recitation period for 
instruction. The work is not retarded by frequent requests 
for attention. 

Students' Tickets 

Students residing in suburban towns may travel on nearly 
all railroads at greatly reduced rates. Those under twenty- 
one years of age are eligible to receive reductions. Application 
should be made at theof^ce of the railroad regarding these rates. 



Dormitory Rooms 

Students from a distance may secure rooms in the build- 
ing. Excellent table board can be had, also. The charge 
for rooms ranges from $2.00 to $4.00 a week; good table 
board, from S5 . 00 a week up. The rooms and dining facilities 
are not under the direct management of the school, but of 
the Boston Y. M. C. A. Students of the school who room in 
the building are therefore subject to the regulations of the 
Association. 

Scholarships 

As an aid to worthy men who desire an education and are 
unable to pay in full even our slight charges, a limited number 
of scholarships have been provided, which will be judiciously 
distributed. Application should be made to the principal of 
the school. 

In addition to these scholarships there are others in the 
schools of Northeastern College available for graduates of 
the Preparatory School. Each year graduates of the Pre- 
paratory School are granted free tuition for one year in the 
Law School, the School of Commerce and Finance, the Poly- 
technic School, or the Co-operative Engineering School. 
The value of these scholarships varies from $50.00 to $125.00. 

These are awarded to graduates who have pursued in this 
school ten of the fifteen units required for graduation and have 
maintained a ranking of at least five A's and five B's. A 
further condition is that the student must enter the advanced 
school free of conditions. 

37 



Sessions 

The school sessions are held on each week day evening, 
excepting Saturday, from 7 to 10 o'clock. A student's 
schedule may include 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 evenings a week, depending 
on his selection. As a rule, subjects are given on two evenings 
a week. It must be remembered, however, that the prepara- 
tion of lessons is all done outside the classroom. It has been 
found that because the students are mature and in earnest 
they can do the work of the course in fewer recitation periods 
than is customary in a day high school. 

Text Books 

Students buy their books. It has been found advisable 
for they will be a source of great convenience in future years. 
The book store has on hand all books and supplies used in 
the school. These are sold at slightly lower rates than prevail 
in the public book stores. 

Libraries 

The school has excellent tacilities for study in the libraries 
and reading rooms. These are equipped with dictionaries, cy- 
clopedias, and special texts for carrying on the work of the 
school in the most effective way. 

Preparation for College 

Students who expect to enter college are advised to see the 
principal. He will outline the most economical way in which 
a course can be pursued. Students who maintain the grade 
of ''B" or above in any subject may be certified for college. 
The Preparatory School is the evening division of the Hunt- 
ington School. 

The tests given at the close of a course are modeled after 
college entrance examinations. The standards maintained 
are similar to those of the best day schools. 

Special Students 

A number of our students do not expect to enter higher 
institutions of learning. To these students the School olTers 
special courses or combinations of subjects which will benefit 
them in the work in which they are engaged during the day. 

Athletics 

By paying a small additional fee, students may avail 
themselves of the privileges of the gymnasium and swimming 
pool. Competitive games are held with the other Y. M. C. A.'s 

38 



and athletic clubs. An inspection of our athletic facil- 
ities will convince you that they are the finest in New England. 
Opportunity is given for athletics before the opening of the 
evening sessions or during the vacant periods. 

The following teams are organized each year: Basket 
ball, swimming, track, gymnastic, wrestling, basi4)all, tennis, 
bowling. There are usually a number of teams for each branch 
of sport, making it possible for every student to play on one of 
them. 

For those not interested in games, opportunity is given to 
join one of the many gymnasium classes which are directed by 
experienced men. The rates for the various branches of 
physical work may be had by applying to the Director of the 
Department of Recreation and Health. 

Membership 

All educational work is conducted as part of the larger 
activities of the Young Men's Christian Association. The 
Boston Association now has nearly 7000 members almost half 
of whom are enrolled in the Department of Education. The 
annual membership dues are $2 . 00. By paying this sum, one 
becomes a member of the largest association in the world and 
may enjoy, free of additional cost, many features of its great 
work. Such membership also gives one privileges in other 
associations in America, subject to local regulations. 



39 



m