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DO NOT REMOVE FROM LIBRARY 



Northeastern University 




ichool of 
Engineering Technology 




Northeastern 
University 

School of 

Engineering Technology 
Bulletin 

1988-1990 



Northeastern University 

Publications 

1.2.8 



Contents 



About This Bulletin 

Teaching Tomorrow's Technologists Today i 
An Introduction to Engineering Technology 2 
School of Engineering Technology 3 
Degree Program Descriptions 4 

Civil Engineering Technology Programs 4 

Architectural Engineering Technology 4 
Environmental Engineering Technology 5 
Structural Engineering Technology 5 
Surveying and Highway Engineering Technology 6 
Mechanical-Structural Engineering Technology 6 

Computer Technology Programs 7 

Electrical Engineering Technology Programs 9 

Energy Systems Program 1 1 

Manufacturing Engineering Technology Program 1 1 

Mechanical Engineering Technology Programs 12 

Aerospace Maintenance Engineering Technology 14 

Telecommunications Program 15 

Course Descriptions 16 

Overview 16 

Civil Engineering Technology 17 

Chemistry 19 

Computer Technology 19 

Economics 22 

Electrical Engineering Technology 22 

English 25 

General Engineering Technology 26 

Human Resources Management 27 

Industrial Engineering Technology 27 

Industrial Management 27 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 27 

Manufacturing Engineering Technology 30 

Management 31 



Contents 

Management Science 31 

Mathematics 31 

Physics 32 

Technical Communications 32 

Northeastern University 33 
A Profile of Northeastern 34 

Where You'll Find Northeastern 34 

Network Northeastern University 35 

University Libraries 35 

Academic Computer Services 36 

Ell Student Center 36 

Sport, Dance, and Exercise Facilities 36 

Social and Professional Clubs 37 

OfiTice of Services for the Handicapped 37 

Counseling and Testing Center 37 

Lane Health Center 37 

Department of Career Development and Placement 37 

Cooperative Plan of Education 38 

Alumni Association 38 

Administrative Information 39 

Admissions 39 

Registration 41 

Academic Standards 42 

Graduation Requirements 45 

Academic and Professional Awards 45 

Additional Opportunities at Northeastern 46 

Financial Information 47 

Tuition and Fees 47 

Financial Aid and Scholarships 48 

Appendix 51 

Faculty 52 

Administration 60 

Governing Boards and Officers of the University 61 

Campus Maps 67 



About This Bulletin 



This Bulletin offers information about the eve- 
ning and weekend programs available at 
Northeastern University's School of 
Engineering Technology. (If you are interested 
in Northeastern University's full-time 
day programs, call the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions, 617-437-2200.) 

For prospective students, we hope that after 
reading this publication you'll agree that a 
career in engineering technology can be excit- 
ing and challenging. As you'll soon discover, our 
evening and weekend programs are designed to 
enable you to pursue a career and an education 
at the same time. 

Students already attending the School of 
Engineering Technology use the Bulletin as an 
important guide to the resources and policies of 
the University. In addition, students use the 
degree program descriptions to plan and track 
their academic careers. 

The School of Engineering Technology Bul- 
letin is divided into two parts: "Teaching 
Tomorrow's Technologists Today" and 
"Northeastern University." 

"Teaching Tomorrow's Technologists Today" 
defines engineering technology and introduces 
you to the School of Engineering Technology. 
This section also contains descriptions of each 
program and course we offer. 

The "Northeastern University" section 
reviews the benefits — the services and 
resources — that attending the largest private 
university in the nation provides. We present 
the University's administrative and academic 
policies, as well as financial aid and 
scholarship opportunities. 



please complete and return the enclosed Stu- 
dent Data Card. The information on the card 
enables us to open a student file for you that 
can be used by the school's academic counsel- 
ing staff whenever you request Eissistance. 

Because we have an open enrollment policy, 
you can register for courses without formally 
applying for admittance to a program. In fact, 
our students earn sixteen credits before peti- 
tioning for entrance to a program. If you are a 
transfer student, you may already be eligible to 
matriculate. For more details, carefully review 
the "Admissions" section. (See page 39.) 

A Fee Schedule and Academic Calendar 
should have been enclosed with this Bulletin. 
The insert includes the current academic calen- 
dar, registration dates, and a list of the 
University's fees. 

Before registration begins, obtain a copy of 
the University College and School of 
Engineering Technology Schedule for the next 
academic quarter. The Schedule indicates which 
courses will be offered next quarter, and when 
they will meet. Note that, since all courses are 
not offered every quarter, you must plan your 
course load for the coming academic year, not 
just the next quarter, by referring to the pro- 
gram and course descriptions contained in this 
Bulletin. For more details, review the "Registra- 
tion" section. (See page 41.) 

Finding Additional Help 

If you have any questions, or are missing any 
of the forms mentioned in this Bulletin, 
call the School of Engineering Technology 
Office, 617-437-2500. 



Taking the Next Step 

If you are planning to attend the School of 
Engineering Technology for the first time, 



Teaching Tomorrow's 
Technologists Today 



An Introduction to Engineering Technology 



Janet Lampke is a branch manager for North- 
rop 's Precision Product Division. Steve Sweeney 
is chair and chief executive officer of the Bos- 
ton Edison Company. Susan Jenkins is a techni- 
cal trainer for Unitrode. David Varney is a 
senior project engineer for Texas Instruments. 

At first glance, you may not think these 
professionals have a lot in common. However, 
the exact opposite is true: they have all built 
exciting careers from degrees in engineering 
technology. 

What is engineering technology? 

Engineering technology is the application of 
engineering principles and modern technology 
to help solve or prevent technical problems. 
Unlike engineering, which is primarily analytical 
and theoretical, engineering technology centers 
on practical applications. 

Engineering technology is a relatively new 
discipline. Before engineering technology pro- 
grams like Northeastern's emerged, people with 
scientific or technical ambitions had a difficult 
decision to make: what kind of education 
should they pursue? College-bound students 
had three choices. 

Choice number one was selecting a major 
from among the pure sciences: physics, chemis- 
try, or biology. However, these majors are only 
appropriate for people interested in pursuing 
additional degrees, laboratory research, or 
careers in education. 

The second option was selecting from 
among the engineering science majors: civil 
engineering, electrical engineering, or mechani- 
cal engineering. But engineering science 
demands highly developed analytical skills, and 
prepares people for careers conceptualizing and 
designing technical devices or systems. 

The third choice was deciding not to attend 
college, but to enroll in a technical or voca- 
tional school. This route is best suited for peo- 
ple interested in the trades: that is, for people 
who want careers physically building or 
repairing machinery. 

Engineering technology curricula introduced 
a fourth option. The programs are designed to 



meet the growing need created by our techno- 
logical revolution for college-educated problem 
solvers who can bridge the gap between the 
blueprints and the production line. These men 
and women can help engineers and tradespeo- 
ple work effectively together. 

Engineering technology programs include 
scientific and engineering principles relevant to 
your chosen field: you will come to understand 
why a system is designed in a particular fashion 
and how it works. This educational focus is 
often absent from a technical or vocational 
school education. 

In addition, engineering technology students 
acquire hands-on technical skills: an element 
given little emphasis in engineering science cur- 
ricula. These technical skills will enable you to 
solve production and system implementation 
problems, and help you to explain your solu- 
tions to tradespeople. 

Who are engineering technologists? 

People who are part of the technology work- 
place include scientists, engineers, technolo- 
gists, technicians, and tradespeople. AH of these 
professionals have specialized educations or 
training beyond the high school level, and often 
have to work together as a team. As on any 
team, the players have different roles that are 
equally important. 

Scientists are concerned with advancing our 
understanding of the laws of nature and our 
knowledge of scientific principles. The scientist 
is primarily involved with research. 

Engineers employ the scientific knowledge 
developed by scientists in planning, designing, 
and constructing technical devices and 
systems. The engineer is a developer of 
technological innovations. 

Engineering technologists work closely with 
engineers in coordinating people, material, and 
machinery in order to achieve the specific goals 
of a particular project. The engineering technol- 
ogist often ensures that the engineer's designs 
and instructions are implemented efficiently 
and according to accepted practices. 



School of Engineering Technology 



You have a special kind of ambition that allows 
you to work full-time and attend University 
after hours. The faculty and administration of 
the School of Engineering Technology shares, 
admires, and respects your desire for profes- 
sional and personal growth through higher edu- 
cation. We are as committed as you. We can 
help you achieve your goals. 

When you enroll in the School of 
Engineering Technology, you are entering 
one of the oldest and finest undergraduate engi- 
neering technology programs in the country. 
Northeastern University established its first 
engineering technology program within the 
Polytechnic School in 1916. During 1926, the 
program was reorganized under a new entity 
within Northeastern: Lincoln Institute, the name 
of which was later changed to Lincoln College. 
The program's most recent transformation 
occurred in 1984, when Lincoln College became 
the School of Engineering Technology. 

Today's School of Engineering Technology is 
a unit of Northeastern University's College of 
Engineering. Although we offer courses at sev- 
eral locations and through the University's tele- 
vision system, Network Northeastern, our 
central offices are in the Snell Engineering Cen- 
ter on the Boston campus. 

All of our engineering technology programs 
require laboratory courses that are conducted 
in facilities on the Boston campus. We've done 
our best to ensure that you can get the most 
out of these courses by equipping our laborato- 
ries with the latest available technology. We 
continue to acquire laboratory equipment that 
allows us to conduct experiments that were 
until recently impractical or impossible. 

As a student at Northeastern 's School of 
Engineering Technology, you are taught by fac- 
ulty who have impressive professional experi- 
ence. Each staff member can provide you with 
practical insights into the field. 

In addition to the many resources offered 
to you as a School of Engineering Technology 
student, you are a fully vested member of the 



Northeastern University community. As such, 
you are invited to take advantage of the many 
assets the University provides. We encourage 
you to read the "Profile of Northeastern" 
section of this Bulletin for details of the 
University's facilities. 

The School of Engineering Technology 
offers day programs in engineering technology 
to full-time students, as well as the evening and 
weekend programs described in this publica- 
tion. All of our programs are at the undergradu- 
ate level, leading to either an associate's or 
bachelor's degree. 

Our fifteen evening and weekend 
degree programs span the following areas 
of concentration. 

• Civil engineering technology, including 
architectural; environmental; structural; 
surveying and highway; and mechanical- 
structural engineering technology 

• Computer technology 

• Electrical engineering technology 

• Energy systems 

• Manufacturing engineering technology 

• Mechanical engineering technology, 
including aerospace maintenance 
engineering technology 

• Telecommunications 

We welcome your interest in Northeastern 's 
School of Engineering Technology. In the fol- 
lowing pages, you can learn about the specifics 
of each of our programs. 



Degree Program Descriptions 



Civil Engineering 
Technology Programs 



Civil engineering professionals plan and con- 
struct a variety of structures and public works. 
The civil engineering technologist's major func- 
tions include preparing surveys (topographical, 
geological, traffic); designing structures 
(buildings, bridges, dams); planning municipal 
systems (water, sewers, flood control); and 
developing transportation facilities (highways, 
railways, waterways). 

We offer associate's degree programs in 
architectural engineering technology; environ- 
mental engineering technology; structural engi- 
neering technology; and surveying and highway 
engineering technology. A bachelor's degree 
program in mechanical-structural engineering 
technology is also offered. 

The associate's degree program in architec- 
tural engineering technology offers preparation 
in planning, designing, and constructing 
buildings. Career opportunities are with archi- 
tectural groups, consulting engineering firms, 
and government agencies. 

The associate's degree program in environ- 
mental engineering technology offers you the 
opportunity to prepare for responsibilities 
related to designing, constructing, and 
supervising municipal plants and systems that 
control the storage and distribution of water. 
Students may also prepare for responsibilities 
associated with the disposal of sewage and 
waste in urban areas, with an emphasis on pre- 
venting contamination and pollution. Career 
opportunities are with town, city, and state 
pubUc works departments, private engineering 
consultants, architects, contractors, and many 
other engineering firms. 

The associate's degree program in structural 
engineering technology offers the opportunity 
to prepare for planning, designing, and 
supervising the construction of buildings, 
bridges, foundations, flood-control projects, and 



other fixed structures. Professional oppor- 
tunities include consulting engineering firms, 
architectural groups, contractors, railroads, 
government agencies, and the military. 

The associate's degree program in surveying 
and highway engineering technology offers 
opportunities in the preparation and calculation 
of preliminary and legal surveys required for 
both basic and complex projects. These proj- 
ects can include subdivision work, individual lot 
layouts, highway layouts, and projects relating 
to sewer systems, pipelines, power transmission 
lines, dams, reservoirs, and aqueducts. Career 
opportunities are with independent surveying 
companies, civil engineering companies, high- 
way transit, railroad planning groups, cartogra- 
phers, construction companies, and contractors. 

The bachelor's degree program in 
mechanical-structural engineering technology 
offers opportunities to prepare for both the 
planning and constructing of structures such as 
buildings, bridges, and docks, and designing and 
producing dynamic machine tools, machinery, 
and other mechanical devices. Career opportu- 
nities are with architectural, construction, civil, 
and mechanical professions and companies. 

Architectural Engineering Teclinology 
(Major Code 025) 

The Architectural Engineering Technology 
Program leads to the associate in engineering 
degree. Degree candidates must earn 102 
credits by completing the following 
four-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineermg Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 



Civil Engineering Technology Programs 



Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics;} 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

CET 4321 Introduction to Structural Design 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

ECN 41 16 Economic Principles and Problems 2 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MET 4301 Mechanics A 

MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 

MET 4315 Stress Analysis B 

Fourth-Year Courses 

CET 4324 Structural Analysis 1 

CET 4331 Steel Design 1 

CET 4371 Concrete Design 1 

CET 4390 Technology of Modern Architecture 

CET 4391 Architectural Design 1 

CET 4392 Architectural Design 2 

Environmentol Engineering Technology 
(Major Code Oil) 

The Environmental Engineering Technology 
Program leads to the associate in engineering 
degree. Degree candidates must earn 102 
credits by completing the following 
four-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 



Third-Year Courses 

CET 4341 Fluid Mechanics 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

ECN 4116 Economic Principles and Problems 2 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MET 4301 Mechanics A 

MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 

MET 4315 Stress Analysis B 

Fourth-Year Courses 

CET 4324 Structural Analysis 1 

CET 4350 Environmental 1 

CET 4351 Environmental 2 

CET 4361 Materials and Soil Mechanics 

CET 4371 Concrete Design 1 

CET 4393 Construction Administration 

Structural Engineering Technology 
(Major Code 012) 

The Structural Engineering Technology Program 
leads to the associate in engineering degree. 
Degree candidates must earn 102 credits by 
completing the following four-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Lab 1 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

CET 4321 Introduction to Structural Design 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

ECN 4116 Economic Principles and Problems 2 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MET 4301 Mechanics A 

MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 

MET 4315 Stress Analysis B 

Continued on Next Page 



Civil Engineering Technology Programs 



Continued from Previous Page 

Fourth-Year Courses 

CET 4324 Structural Analysis 1 

CET 4325 Structural Analysis 2 

CET 4331 Steel Design 1 

CET 4361 Materials and Soil Mechanics 

CET 4371 Concrete Design 1 

CET 4393 Construction Administration 

Surveying and Highway Engineering 
Technology (Major Code 013) 

The Surveying and Highway Engineering 
Technology Program leads to the associate 
in engineering degree. Degree candidates must 
earn 102 credits by completing the following 
four-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus! 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

CET 4341 Fluid Mechanics 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

ECN 41 16 Economic Principles and Problems 2 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MET 4301 Mechanics A 

MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 

MET 4315 Stress Analysis B 

Fourth-Year Courses 

CET 4301 Plane Surveying 

CET 4302 Geodetic Surveying 

CET 4303 Route Surveying 

CET 4307 Legal Aspects of Surveying 

CET 4311 Highway Engineering 

CET 4316 Land Use Planning 



Mechanical-Structural Engineering Technology 
(Major Code 015) 

The Mechanical-Structural Engineering Tech- 
nology Program leads to the bachelor of 
engineering technology degree. The program 
is accredited by the Technology Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology. Degree candidates 
must earn at least 186 credits by completing the 
following seven-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus! 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing ! 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 412! Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics! 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1 

MET 4301 Mechanics A 

MET 4302 Mechanics B 

MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 

MET 4370 Fluid Mechanics A 

MET 4380 Materials A 

MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

Fourth-Year Courses 

CET 4321 Introduction to Structural Design 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MET 4315 Stress Analysis B 

MET 4371 Fluid Mechanics B 

MET 4390 Measurement and Analysis Lab 

MET 4391 Technology Lab A 

MET 4392 Technology Lab B 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 



Computer Technology Programs 



Fifth-Year Courses 

CET 4324 Structural Analysis 1 

CET 4325 Structural Analysis 2 

CET 4331 Steel Design 1 

MET 4303 Mechanics C 

( ) Technical Elective 

( ) Technical Elective 

Sixth-Year Courses 

CET 4332 Steel Design 2 

CET 4371 Concrete Design 1 

CET 4372 Concrete Design 2 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 
) Social Science/Humanities Elective 
) Social Science/Humanities Elective 
) Technical Elective 
) Technical Elective 

Seventh-Year Courses 

MET 4330 Mechanical Design A 

MET 4331 Mechanical Design B 
) Lab Elective 
) Open Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 
) Social Science/Humanities Elective 
) Social Science/Humanities Elective 
) Social Science/Humanities Elective 
) Technical Elective 

Suggested Technical Electives 

CET 4301 Plane Surveying 

CET 4302 Geodetic Surveying 

CET 4303 Route Surveying 

CET 4311 Highway Engineering 

CET 4361 Materials and Soil Mechanics 

CET 4393 Construction Administration 

IIS 4393 Engineering Probability and Statistics 

MET 4340 Thermodynamics A 

MET 4414 Mechanical Vibrations 

MET 4415 Experimental Stress Analysis 

MET 4416 Stress Analysis C 

MET 4481 Materials B 

MET 4482 Applied Metallurgy 



Computer Technology 
Programs 



The computer technology professional's work 
relates to the design and use of computer sys- 
tem hardware and software. Areas of study 



include the design and architecture of the com- 
puter system; software issues include the meth- 
odology and application of problem solving and 
the utilization of the hardware. 

We offer both an associate's and a bachelor's 
degree program in computer technology. 

The associate's degree program in computer 
technology offers you the opportunity to under- 
stand the mathematical and technological foun- 
dations of both hardware and software. In 
addition to providing a more thorough study of 
hardware and software, the bachelor's degree 
program gives you the opportunity to specialize 
in a specific area through your five required 
technical electives. 

Career opportunities may include computer 
programming for engineering, science, and busi- 
ness. Additional employment opportunities con- 
cern designing, engineering, and testing of 
computers; and interfacing computers with vari- 
ous types of equipment used in automation. 
Associate's degree graduates may qualify for 
entry-level positions in the areas listed, while 
bachelor's degree graduates may secure 
employment with more responsibility. 

Computer Technology (Major Code 036) 

The Computer Technology Program leads to the 
associate in engineering degree. Degree candi- 
dates must earn 100 credits by completing the 
following four-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

CT 4105 Pascal/Algorithms 

CT 4150 Computer Organization 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Lab 1 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Continued on Next Page 



Computer Technology Programs 



Continued from Previous Page 

Third-Year Courses 

CT 4310 FORTRAN/File Processing 

EET 4151 Circuit Analysis 1 

EET 4152 Circuit Analysis 2 

EET 4311 Electronics 1 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

Fourth-Year Courses 

CT 4311 Programming with the C Language 

CT 4330 Data Structures 

CT 4345 Assembly Language 

CT 4368 Semiconductor Logic 

CT 4369 Computer Logic 

CT 4374 Introduction to CPU Hardware 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Computer Technology (Major Code 037) 

The Computer Technology Program leads 
to the bachelor of engineering technology 
degree. Degree candidates must earn at least 
183 credits by completing the following 
seven-year curriculum. 



Fourth-Year Courses 

CT 4335 Numerical Methods 

CT 4345 Assembly Language 

CT 4368 Semiconductor Logic 

CT 4369 Computer Logic 

CT 4374 Introduction to CPU Hardware 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Fifth-Year Courses 

CT 4311 Programming with the C Language 

CT 4330 Data Structures 

CT 4355 Micro Peripheral Hardware 

CT 4375 CPU Architecture 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Technical Elective 

Sixth-Year Courses 

CT 4340 Software Engineering Design 

CT 4351 Advanced Computer Organization 

CT 4356 Complex Peripheral Hardware 

CT 4380 Data Communication Methods 
( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Technical Elective 



First-Year Courses 

CT 4105 Pascal/Algorithms 

CT 4150 Computer Organization 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

CT 4310 FORTRAN/File Processing 

EET 4151 Circuit Analysis 1 

EET 4152 Circuit Analysis 2 

EET 4311 Electronics 1 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 



Seventh-Year Courses 

CT 4360 Industry Software 

CT 4365 Industry Hardware 

) Open Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Technical Elective 

) Technical Elective 

) Technical Elective 



Technical Electives 

Programming with Ada 

LISP 

Concurrent Programming 

VLSI Design 

Computer Networks 

Operating Systems 

Computer Graphics Programming 

Database 

Large System Assembly Languages 

Introduction to Simulation Programming 

Bit Slice Microcomputers 

Single-Chip Microprocessors 

Special Problems in Computer Technology 

Computer Security 

PROLOG: An Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 



Suggested 


CT 


4321 


CT 


4348 


CT 


4363 


CT 


4377 


CT 


4379 


CT 


4381 


CT 


4382 


CT 


4383 


CT 


4384 


CT 


4385 


CT 


4387 


CT 


4389 


CT 


4390 


CT 


4395 


CT 


4396 



Electrical Engineering Technology Programs 



Electrical Engineering 
Technology Programs 

Electrical engineering technologists consider 
the design and operation of equipment and 
systems related to power, communications, 
data processing, and electrical control. For 
example, the electrical engineering technologist 
is responsible for the generation, transmission, 
and distribution of electricity for light 
and power. 

We offer both an associate's and a 
bachelor's degree program in electrical 
engineering technology. 

The associate's degree program in electrical 
engineering technology relates to the design, 
development, and operation of communications, 
data processing, and electronic control equip- 
ment. The equipment is applied to computers, 
mihtary and space explorations, and automated 
industrial production equipment. The bachelor's 
degree program, in addition, relates to the 
installation and production of a variety of elec- 
trical and electronic equipment. Fields in which 
such equipment is applied include communica- 
tions, data processing, industry, and in 
generating and utilizing electricity. 

Career opportunities for associate's degree 
graduates include entry-level positions related 
to communications and electrical equipment, 
equipment manufacturing, and data processing 
and control. Career opportunities for bachelor's 
degree graduates are in public and private 
research laboratories; engineering consulting 
firms specializing in industrial and plant appli- 
cations; electric utilities; and organizations 
concerned with the operation, manufacture, 
installation, or sale of electrical or 
electronic equipment. 

Electrical Engineering Technology 
(Major Code 033) 

The Electrical Engineering Technology Program 
leads to the associate in engineering degree. 
The program is accredited by the Technology 
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology. Degree 
candidates must earn at least 105 credits by 
completing the following four-year curriculum. 



First- Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4172 Electrical Engineering Graphics 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Lab 1 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

EET 4124 Circuits Lab 1 

EET 4125 Circuits Lab 2 

EET 4151 Circuit Analysis 1 

EET 4152 Circuit Analysis 2 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

MTH 4123 Differential Equations' 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Fourth-Year Courses 

EET 4310 Electrical Measurements 

EET 4311 Electronics 1 

EET 4312 Electronics 2 

EET 4313 Electronics 3 

EET 4323 Electronics Lab 

EET 4353 Circuit Analysis 3* 

EET 4354 Circuit Analysis 4* 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

•Students not planning to enter a bachelor's degree program 
after graduation can substitute a social science/humanities 
elective for MTH 4123 Differential Equations; EET 4314 Pulse 
and Digital 1 for EET 43-53 Circuit Analysis 3; and an approved 
technical elective for EET 4354 Circuit Analysis 4. 



Electrical Engineering Technology Programs 



Electrical Engineering Technology 
(Major Code 035) 

The Electrical Engineering Technology Program 
leads to the bachelor of engineering technology 
degree. The program is accredited by the Tech- 
nology Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Tech- 
nology. Degree candidates must earn at least 
186 credits by completing the following 
seven-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technoiogj' 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4172 Electrical Engineering Graphics 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

EET 4124 Circuits Lab 1 

EET 4125 Circuits Lab 2 

EET 4151 Circuit Analysis 1 

EET 4152 Circuit Analysis 2 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

MTH 4123 Differential Equations 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Fourth-Year Courses 

EET 4310 Electrical Measurements 

EET 4311 Electronics 1 

EET 4312 Electronics 2 

EET 4313 Electronics 3 

EET 4323 Electronics Lab 

EET 4353 Circuit Analysis 3 

EET 4354 Circuit Analysis 4 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 



Fifth-Year Courses 

EET 4314 Pulse and Digital 1 

EET 4327 Advanced Electronics Lab 1* 

EET 4328 Advanced Electronics Lab 2* 

EET 4330 Energy Conversion 

EET ( ) Technical Elective 

MET 4319 Mechanics 

SPC ( ) Communication Elective 

SPC ( ) Communication Elective 

Sixth-Year Courses 

EET 4329 Advanced Electronics Lab 3* 

EET 4337 Distributed Systems 

EET 4370 Digital Computers 1 

EET 4371 Digital Computers 2 



EET ( 

( 

( 

( 

( 



) Technical Elective 

) Open Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 



Seventh-Year Courses 

EET 4377 Control Engineering 1 

EET 4378 Control Engineering 2 

EET ( ) Technical Elective 

EET ( ) Technical Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

*EET 4341, EET 4342, and EET 4343 Power and Control Labs 1 
through 3 may be substituted for EET 4327, EET 4328, and EET 
4329 Advanced Electronic Labs 1 through 3. 

Suggested Technical Electives 

CT 4374 Introduction to CPU Hardware 

CT 4375 CPU Architecture 

EET 4315 Pulse and Digital 2 

EET 4317 Principles of Communication Systems 1 

EET 4318 Principles of Communication Systems 2 

EET 4319 Principles of Communication Systems 3 

EET 4360 Photovoltaic Technology 

EET 4362 Basic Power Systems 1 

EET 4363 Basic Power Systems 2 

EET 4364 Basic Power Systems 3 

EET 4391 Basic Optics and Optical Systems Design 

EET 4392 Optoelectronics and Fiber Optics 

lis 4360 Engineering Economy 

lis 4393 Engineering Probability and Statistics 

MET 4340 Thermodynamics A 

MET 4380 Materials A 



Manufacturing Engineering Technology Program 1 1 



Energy Systems Program 



Energy systems is an interdisciplinary concen- 
tration demanding skills and knowledge from 
several areas of engineering technology. The 
consumption of energy, and the need for its 
conservation, has increased in the last two 
decades. The importance and the expense of 
natural resources have created a demand 
for individuals who can help develop and 
maintain systems designed to generate or use 
energy efficiently. 

We offer an associate's degree program in 
energy systems. 

The associate's degree program in energy 
systems offers you the opportunity to search 
for more efficient use of energy, both at home 
and at work. Classroom instruction coupled 
with laboratory experience help develop the 
mathematics-science-English core into a 
career-oriented energy systems curriculum. 
There are opportunities to design, install, 
troubleshoot, repair, and maintain heating, ven- 
tilation, and air-conditioning systems. Additional 
career opportunities relate to the design 
and operation of nuclear power plants. 

Energy Systems (Major Code 061) 

The Energy Systems Program leads to the asso- 
ciate in science degree. Degree candidates must 
earn 100 credits by completing the following 
four-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

MET 4344 Energy Systems Theory and Hydronics 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 



Third-Year Courses 

CET 4391 Architectural Design 1 

EET 4320 Electricity and Electronics 

MET 4340 Thermodynamics A 

MET 4341 Thermodynamics B 

MET 4342 Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning (AC) 

MET 4345 Heating, Ventilating, and AC 1 

Fourth-Year Courses 

CET 4393 Construction Administration 

MET 4346 Heating, Ventilating, and AC 2 

MET 4347 Distribution Systems for Mechanical Systems 

MET 4348 Energy Conservation 

MET 4349 Heating, Ventilating, and AC Systems Design 

MET 4350 Heating, Ventilating, and AC Lab 

( ) Technical Elective 

Suggested Technical Electives 

Same as Mechanical Engineering Technology, Suggested Techni- 
cal Electives (see page 14). 



Manufacturing Engineering 
Technology Program 



Manufacturing systems require interactions 
between machines and people. Manufacturing 
engineering technology is concerned with the 
design and use of manufacturing systems in the 
industrial environment. 

We offer a bachelor's degree program in 
manufacturing engineering technology. 

The bachelor's degree program in manufac- 
turing engineering technology offers you the 
opportunity to become familiar with the 
machines, materials, and processes used in 
manufacturing. The program emphasizes the 
emerging use of computers without sacrificing 
attention to traditional areas of a manufacturing 
education. Areas addressed in the program 
include materials and processes, computer- 
aided manufacturing, numerical control, and 
robotics. The core courses, combined with 
hands-on laboratory experiences, allow 
students to develop the skills required to work 
in manufacturing. Career opportunities are 
within various manufacturing industries, such 
as aircraft or electronics manufacturing. 

Continued on Next Page 



12 Mechanical Engineering Technology Programs 

Manufacturing Engineering Technology 
(Major Code 056) 

The Manufacturing Engineering Technology 
Program leads to the bachelor of engineering 
technology degree. Degree candidates must 
earn 187 credits by completing the following 
seven-year curriculum. 



First-Year Courses 


CHM 


4101 


Modern Chemistry 1 


CT 


4105 


Pascal/Algorithms 


GET 


4170 


Engineering Graphics 1 


GET 


4171 


Engineering Graphics 2 


MTH 


4107 


College Algebra 


MTH 


4108 


Pre-Calculus 


MTH 


4120 


Calculus 1 


Second-Year Courses 


ENG 


4110 


Critical Writing 1 


GET 


4306 


Technical Communications 


MTH 


4121 


Calculus 2 


PHY 


4117 


Physics 1 


PHY 


4118 


Physics 2 


PHY 


4119 


Physics 3 


PHY 


4173 


Physics Lab 1 


PHY 


4174 


Physics Lab 2 



Sixth-Year Courses 

MET 4340 Thermodynamics A 

MFG 4351 Assembly Automation 

MFG 4381 Plant Layout and Design 

MS 4332 Statistical Quahty Control 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Technical Elective* 

( ) Technical Elective* 

Seventh-Year Courses 

HRM 4301 Organizational Behavior 

IIS 4360 Engineering Economy 

MFG 4361 Numerical Controlled Machines (Basic) 

MFG 4371 Robotics 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Technical Elective* 

( ) Technical Elective* 

'Suggested technical electives are being developed for the 
manufacturing engineering technology curriculum. 



Mechanical Engineering 
Technology Programs 



Third-Year Courses 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

US 4393 Engineering Probability and Statistics 

MFG 4311 Manufacturing Materials and Processes 1 

MFG 4321 Computer-Aided Manufacturing 1 

MFG 4322 Computer-Aided Manufacturing 2 

MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Fourth-Year Courses 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

EET 4320 Electricity and Electronics 

MFG 4312 Manufacturing Materials and Processes 2 

MFG 4331 Computer Methods in Manufacturing Design 1 

MFG 4332 Computer Methods in Manufacturing Design 2 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Fifth-Year Courses 

IM 4301 Operations Management 

IM 4314 Production Control and Inventory Management 

MET 4301 Mechanics A 

MET 4302 Mechanics B 

MFG 4341 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Technical Elective* 



Mechanical engineering technologists harness 
power resources that help machinery perform 
useful tasks. In contrast to civil engineering, 
which deals primarily with static forces and 
structures, mechanical engineering is concerned 
with the motion and kinetics of devices that are 
activated by hydraulic, electrical, mechanical, 
and thermodynamic forces. 

We offer both an associate's and a bachelor's 
degree program in mechanical engineering tech- 
nology. A bachelor's degree program in aero- 
space maintenance engineering technology is 
also offered. 

The associate's degree offers you the oppor- 
tunity to prepare to be an entry-level technician 
in designing, producing, and installing mechani- 
cal tools, machinery, engines, and transportation 
equipment. The bachelor's degree focuses on 
designing, developing, operating, and installing 
equipment that involves interactions of mechan- 
ical, hydraulic, and thermodynamic forces. The 
equipment may include machinery, engines, 
boilers, furnaces, air-conditioning systems, heat- 
ing systems, and transportation. 

Because of the mechanization of all industry, 
graduates of the associate's degree program in 
mechanical engineering technology may find 



Mechanical Engineering Technology Programs 13 



entry-level career opportunities in almost any 
industry or engineering organization. Career 
opportunities for graduates of the bachelor's 
degree program are in industries that produce 
mechanized and automated equipment, in 
design and engineering organizations, and in 
companies that focus primarily on manufactur- 
ing and production. 

The bachelor's degree program in aerospace 
engineering technology offers preparation for 
designing, developing, operating, installing, and 
producing aircraft and aircraft component sys- 
tems. Career opportunities are available in tech- 
nical, support, and management positions 
within the aircraft industry. Additional op- 
portunities may be found within engineering 
teams that manufacture aircraft or spacecraft 
components, and among design/application 
positions in both the civilian and military 
aerospace markets. 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 
(Major Code 021) 

The Mechanical Engineering Technology 
Program leads to the associate in engineering 
degree. The program is accredited by the 
Technology Accreditation Commission of 
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology. Degree candidates must earn 
104 credits by completing the following 
four-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1 
GET 4364 Kinematics 
MET 4.301 Mechanics A 
MET 4302 Mechanics B 



MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 
MET 4380 Materials A 
MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

Fourth-Year Courses 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MET 431.5 Stress Analysis B 

MET 4340 Thermodynamics A 

MET 4370 Fluid Mechanics A 

MET 4390 Measurement and Analysis Lab 

MET 4391 Technology Lab A 

MET 4392 Technology Lab B 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 
(Major Code 023) 

The Mechanical Engineering Technology 
Program leads to the bachelor of engineering 
technology degree. The program is accredited 
by the Technology Accreditation Commission 
of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology. Degree candidates must earn at 
least 186 credits by completing the following 
seven-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 

MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

Third-Year Courses 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1 
GET 4364 Kinematics 
MET 4301 Mechanics A 
MET 4302 Mechanics B 
MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 
MET 4380 Materials A 
MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

Continued on Next Page 



Mechanical Engineering Technology Programs 



Continued from Previous Page 

Fourth-Year Courses 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

MET 4315 Stress Analysis B 

MET 4340 Thermodynamics A 

MET 4370 Fluid Mechanics A 

MET 4390 Measurement and Analysis Lab 

MET 4391 Technology Lab A 

MET 4392 Technology Lab B 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Fifth-Year Courses 

US 4360 Engineering Economy 

MET 4303 Mechanics C 

MET 4341 Thermodynamics B 

MET 4342 Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning 

MET 4371 Fluid Mechanics B 

MET 4416 Stress Analysis C 

OR 

MET 4481 Materials B 



Sixth-Year Courses 


MET 


4330 


Mechanical Design A 


MET 


4331 


Mechanical Design B 


MET 


4343 


Heat Transfer 


MET 


4393 


Technology Lab C 


MET 


4394 


Technology Lab D 


MET 

( 


4395 
) 


Technology Lab E 

Social Science/Humanities Elective 


( 


) 


Social Science/Humanities Elective 


( 


) Social Science/Humanities Elective 



Seventh-Year Courses 

EET 4320 Electricity and Electronics 

) Open Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Technical Elective 

) Technical Elective 

) Technical Elective 

Suggested Technical Electives 

CET 4301 Plane Surveying 

GET 4331 Steel Design 1 

CET 4371 Concrete Design 

EET 4321 Electricity and Electronics 2 

MET 4414 Mechanical Vibrations 

MET 4415 Experimental Stress Analysis 

MET 4416 Stress Analysis C 

MET 4444 Power Generation 

MET 4481 Materials B 

MET 4482 Applied Metallurgy 



Aerospace Maintenance Engineering 
Technology (Major Code 098) 

The Aerospace Maintenance Engineering 
Technology Program leads to the bachelor of 
engineering technology degree. Before entering 
the program, degree candidates must complete 
the East Coast Aero Technical School airframe 
and power plant technical curriculum or its 
equivalent. In addition, degree candidates must 
complete four prerequisite courses. The prereq- 
uisite courses are: MTH 4107 College Algebra; 
MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus; MTH 4120 Calculus 1; 
and CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1. Degree 
candidates must earn at least 186 credits by 
completing the following five-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4100 Computer Programming for Engineering Technology 

GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 

GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Labi 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Third-Year Courses 

MET 4301 Mechanics A 

MET 4302 Mechanics B 

MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 

MET 4340 Thermodynamics A 

MET 4380 Materials A 

MTH 4122 Calculus 3 

For the last two years, choose either curriculum A or B. 

CURRICULL M A 

Fourth-Year Courses 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

EET 4320 Electricity and Electronics 

MET 4315 Stress Analysis B 

MET 4370 Fluid Mechanics A 

MET 4390 Measurement and Analysis Lab 

MET 4391 Technology Lab A 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 



Telecommunications Program 15 



Fifth-Year Courses 

MET 4481 Materials B 

MET ( ) Technical Elective 

MET ( ) Technical Elective 

) Open Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

CURRICULUM B 
Fourth-Year Courses 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

EET 4320 Electricity and Electronics 

MET 4341 Thermodynamics B 

MET 4370 Fluid Mechanics A 

MET 4390 Measurement and Analysis Lab 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

( ) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Fifth-Year Courses 

MET 4393 Technology Lab C 
MET 4481 Materials B 
MET ( ) Technical Elective 
MET ( ) Technical Elective 

) Open Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

) Social Science/Humanities Elective 

Suggested Technical Electives 

Same as Mechanical Engineering Technology, Suggested Techni- 
cal Electives (see page 14). 



methods of electronic transfer, such as elec- 
tronic signals in wires, light waves in optic 
fibers, and radio waves in the earth's atmo- 
sphere are discussed. There are career opportu- 
nities in the telephone, data processing, radio 
transmission/reception, cable television, service, 
and computer industries. 

Telecommunications (Major Code 038) 

The Telecommunications Program leads to the 
associate in science degree. Degree candidates 
must earn 101 credits by completing the follow- 
ing four-year curriculum. 

First-Year Courses 

EET 4180 Introduction to Telecommunications 
GET 4138 Introduction to Programming for 

Telecommunications 
GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 
MTH 4107 College Algebra 
MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus 
MTH 4120 Calculus 1 

Second-Year Courses 

ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 

PHY 4173 Physics Lab 1 

PHY 4174 Physics Lab 2 



Telecommunications Program 



Telecommunications is an interdisciplinary con- 
centration demanding skills and information 
from several areas of engineering technology. 
Modern society has experienced an unprece- 
dented growth in information processing and 
communications, so that individuals who can 
help design and maintain information and com- 
munication systems are in high demand. 

We offer an associate's degree program in 
telecommunications. 

The associate's degree program in telecom- 
munications offers you the opportunity to 
study the electronic transfer of information 
through voice, data, or video media. Specific 



Third-Year Courses 

ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 

EET 4124 Circuits Lab 1 

EET 4125 Circuits Lab 2 

EET 4151 Circuit Analysis 1 

EET 4152 Circuit Analysis 2 

EET 4381 Telecommunications Systems 1 

EET 4384 Video Communications 

ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 

Fourth-Year Courses 

EET 4310 Electrical Measurements 

EET 4311 Electronics 1 

EET 4312 Electronics 2 

EET 4323 Electronics Lab 

EET 4382 Telecommunications Systems 2 

EET 4383 Telecommunications Systems 3 

MGT 4101 Introduction to Business and Management 1 



Course Descriptions 



Overview 



This section contains the following information 
about each course offered by the School of 
Engineering Technology. 

• Course number. Each alpha/numeric 
course number provides specific informa- 
tion. For example, consider the course 
number CET 4301. 

CET 4301 The alpha code indicates 
which department is offering the course. 
In this case, the department is civil 
engineering technology. 

CET 4301 The first number in the numeric 
code indicates whether the course meets 
during the day or in the evening. All 4000 
series courses are offered in the evening; 
all 1000 series courses are offered during 
the day. 

CET 4301 The last three numbers in the 
code indicate the course level: 001-099 are 
compensatory courses; 100-299 are 
introductory- to intermediate-level courses; 
and 300-699 are advanced-level courses. 

• Course title. 

• Number of quarter hours (QH). One quarter 
hour represents approximately three hours 
of student learning time (fifty minutes of 
lecture plus two hours of independent 
study) per week. If appropriate, class hours 
(CH) and lab hours (lab) are listed as well. 

• Quarters in which the course is offered. All 
courses are not offered every quarter. If the 
code TBA is printed next to a course title, 
call the program coordinator at 617-437-2500 
for scheduling information. 

• Topics discussed in the course. 

• Prerequisites. Complete prerequisites before 
enrolling, unless otherwise specified. 



Use the curriculum listed for your program to 
determine which courses you need to complete 
in the next academic year ("Degree Program 
Descriptions," see page 4). Use the course 
descriptions to read about each specific course 
and to learn the quarters in which the course is 
offered. Because most courses are not offered 
every quarter, plan your course load for the 
entire academic year, not just the next quarter. 

Before registration, get the University Col- 
lege and School of Engineering Technology 
Schedule for the next quarter by calling 
617-437-2500. The Schedule provides you with 
the meeting times and locations for the courses 
being offered during the next quarter. 

Academic counseling is available to help 
plan your course load for the coming academic 
year. If you need help, contact a School of 
Engineering Technology program counselor 
at 617-437-2500. 

Policy on Changes of Program 

The School of Engineering Technology reserves 
the right to cancel, modify, or add to the 
courses in any curriculum. The University fur- 
ther reserves the right to change the require- 
ments for graduation. Any changes that may be 
made from time to time relative to this policy 
shall be applicable to all students in the school, 
college, or department concerned, including for- 
mer students who may re-enroll. 

Guidelines for Choosing Electives 

Many of the degree programs curricula require 
students to complete electives. The electives 
give students the opportunity to either explore 
topics beyond the curriculum's scope or to gain 
extensive knowledge about topics introduced 
by the core courses. 



Civil Engineering Technology 



Open Electives 

Any course except physical education, military 
science, and preparatory courses, is acceptable 
as an open elective. An open elective may be 
either a three or a four quarter-hour course. 

Social Science/Humanities Electives 

Social science/humanities electives are offered 
through University College and must be chosen 
from a list that is available from the School of 
Engineering Technology. Six quarter-hours of 
social science/humanities electives must be in 
the speech communications (SPC) category. 

Technical Electives 

Technical electives must be chosen from the list 
of suggested technical electives appearing at 
the end of the respective degree curriculum. 
Students wishing to take an upper-level course 
that does not appear on the list must petition 
for permission before attending the class. Stu- 
dents should submit a proposed program of 
elective courses — preferably representing a 
minor field of concentration consistent with 
personal career objectives — for approval by the 
program coordinator. 



Civil Engineering Technology 



CET 4301 Plane Surveying 
(4 QH) Fall 

Topics include surveying principles; theory of mea- 
surements; leveling; traverse computations; area cal- 
culation; and stadia principles and topography. 
Prereq.:MTH4108. 

CET 4302 Geodetic Surveying 
(4 QH) Winter 

Students are introduced to practical astronomy for 
surveying, including basic spherical trigonometry. 
An introduction to geodetic surveying includes pre- 
cise leveling, triangulation, EDM equipment, and 
baseline measurements. Prereq.: CET 4301. 

CET 4303 Route Surveying 
(4 QH) Spring 

Studies simple and compound curves; vertical 
curves; earthwork computations; solution of the 
mass diagram; and an introduction to route location 
by photogrammetry. Prereq.: CET 4301. 

CET 4307 Legal Aspects of Surveying 
(4 QH) Winter 

Covers registry of deeds and probate; ownership of 
land; deeds; descriptions of qualifying expression; 



adverse possession; Massachusetts land court; and 
expert witness. Prereq.: CET 4301. 

CET 4311 Highway Engineering 
(4 QH) Spring 

Students examine engineering considerations in the 
planning and con.struction of modern highways and 
highway routing; traffic flow and traffic control; and 
computer applications to transportation problems. 
Prereq.: CET 4301. 

CET 4314 Surveying Practice 1 
(1 CH, 2 lab, 2 QH) Winter 1989 

Subjects include computing and balancing a control 
traverse; calculating exact property lines; vertical 
control survey; and plotting from topographic field 
notes. Prereq.: CET 4303. 

CET 4315 Surveying Practice 2 
(1 CH, 2 lab, 2 QH) Spring 1989 

Topics include scale drawing of the proposed 
subdivision; calculations required by the land court 
for the subdivision; street profiles showing grades; 
and drainage study. Prereq.: CET 4314. 

CET 4316 Land Use Planning 
(4 QH) Fall 

Students examine environmental, sociological, eco- 
nomic aspects, and traditional basis for land use 
planning. Areas covered include objectives, content, 
form, and preparation of plan; community and pub- 
lic facilities; transportation; and environmental 
impact and plan implementation. Prereq.: GET 4171. 

CET 4321 Introduction to Structural Design 
(2 CH, 4 lab, 4 QH) Spring 

Students are presented with tabular methods for the 
design of members and connections using the AISC 
Code. Prereq.: GET 4171 and MET 4314. 

CET 4324 Structural Analysis 1 
(4 QH) Fall 

Topics covered include reactions, shears, bending 
moments, and forces developed by loading systems 
on beams and trusses; influence lines for beams, 
girders, and trusses; and solutions for forces from 
moving load systems on statically determinate 
structures. Prereq.: MET 4315. 

CET 4325 Structural Analysis 2 
(4 QH) Winter 

Covers classical methods of deflection solution 
for beams and trusses. Methods of solving 
statically indeterminate structures are discu.s.sed. 
Prereq.: CET 4324. 

CET 4331 Steel Design 1 
(4 QH) Spring 

Topics include design of steel members in structural 
frames; tension, compression, bending and eccentri- 
cally loaded members; and design of plate girders 
for buildings. Prereq.: CET 4321 and MET 4315. 



Civil Engineering Technology 



GET 4332 Steel Design 2 
(4 QH) Fall 

Topics include design of steel for highway bridges, 
composite design in bridges and buildings, introduc- 
tion to plastic analysis, and design in steel. 
Prereq.: CET4331. 

GET 4341 Fluid Mechanics 
(4 QH) Spring 

Areas of study include hydrostatics; pressure mea- 
surement; hydrostatic forces on submerged areas; 
simple dams; and fluid dynamics. Other topics cov- 
ered are kinematics of flow; continuity, momentum, 
and energy equations; orifices; Pi theorem; and lami- 
nar and turbulent flow. Prereq.: PHY 4117. 

GET 4342 Hydraulics 
(4 QH) Winter 1989 

Subjects include flow in closed conduits; empirical 
formulas for closed conduit flow; minor losses; 
compound pipe systems; and open channel flow. 
Also covered are specific energy and stage relation- 
ships; fluid measurement systems; and hydraulic 
machinery. Prereq.: CET 4341. 

GET 4350 Environmental 1 
(4 QH) Winter 

Students examine principles of water supply engi- 
neering; population forecasting; and quality and 
quantity of water for various uses. Other topics 
include water treatment processes; collection and 
disposal of wastewater and storm water; modern 
treatment methods; and wastewater plant operation. 
Prereq.: CET 4341 and CHM 4111. 

GET 4351 Environmental 2 
(2 GH, 4 lab, 4 QH) Spring 

An examination of the layout and design of water 
treatment and sewage treatment plants; and instru- 
mentation and electrical equipment. Laboratory 
demonstrations are included. Prereq.: CET 4350. 

GET 4352 Environmental Laboratory 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Fall 1988 

Discusses methods and techniques for the physical, 
chemical, and bacteriological examination of water 
and wastewater, as well as treatment through bench 
scale studies. Prereq.: CET 4350. 

GET 4354 Advanced Industrial Wastewater 
Treatment (4 QH) TBA 

A study of environmental analysis, microbiology, 
biological treatment principles, and applications of 
physical-chemical treatment. Other topics include 
unit processes and operations, process trouble- 
shooting regulatory requirements, source reduction, 
and hazardous waste. Prereq.: CET 4355 or 
CET 4356 or permission of instructor 

GET 4355 Biological Industrial Waste 
Treatment Operation (4 QH) TBA 

A study of operating principles and procedures of 
biological waste treatment as applied to industrial 



wastewaters. Process calculations, controls, perfor- 
mance evaluation, monitoring, and microbiology 
will be stressed along with operational problem def- 
inition and solution. Prereq.: CET 4350 or equiv. 

GET 4356 Physical-Ghemical Industrial Waste 
Treatment Operations (4 QH) TBA 

Operational principles and procedures of the 
physical-chemical waste treatment process are cov- 
ered. Chemistry related to precipitation, neutraliza- 
tion, oxidation reduction, and carbon absorption 
will be reviewed as well as operation of ion 
exchange, reverse osmosis, and other membrane. 
Clarification and other solids separation methods 
will be studied along with sludge treatment options. 
Prereq.: CET 4350 or equiv. 

GET 4361 Materials and Soil Mechanics 
(4 QH) Fall 

An examination of the physical properties of port- 
land cement, aggregates, mixing water and admix- 
tures; batch proportioning; bituminous materials; 
index properties of soils, soil moisture and struc- 
ture; compressibility; and theory of consolidation. 
Prereq.: MET 4315. 

GET 4362 Soil Mechanics and Foundations 
(4 QH) Winter 1989 

Topics include shear strength of soils; distribution 
of stress; settlement computations; lateral earth 
pressures; bearing capacity; soil compaction; soil 
stabilization; and site investigation. 
Prereq.: CET 4361. 

GET 4364 Materials and Soil Mechanics 
Laboratory (3 lab, 2 QH) Spring 1989 

Subjects include grain size analysis; specific gravity; 
CBR optimum moisture; direct shear; seepage and 
flow nets; and consolidation test. 
Prereq.: CET 4361. 

GET 4371 Concrete Design 1 
(4 QH) Winter 

Students examine the design of bending members, 
axially and eccentrically loaded columns by elastic 
and ultimate strength principles. 
Prereq.: MET 4315. 

GET 4372 Concrete Design 2 
(4 QH) Spring 

A study of reinforced concrete design of basic struc- 
tures, including considerations of continuity. 
Includes an introduction to prestressed concrete 
member design. Prereq.: CET 4371. 

GET 4390 Technology of Modern Architecture 
(4 QH) Fall 

Students are given a general background of archi- 
tectural styles, both historical and contemporary, 
that emphasize engineering design and construction 
procedures required for the various types of 
buildings. Prereq.: None. 



Computer Technology 19 



CET 4391 Architectural Design 1 
(4 QH) Winter 

Students are introduced to basic architectural 
design concepts: proportion, scale, form, massing, 
color, texture, and lighting. Also examined are 
orientation of structures, site organization, 
and selection of building materials. 
Prereq.: CET 4390, GET 4171. 

CET 4392 Architectural Design 2 
(4 QH) Spring 

In this consideration of the building process, indi- 
vidual architectural design projects are assigned by 
the instructor. Prereq.: CET 4391. 

CET 4393 Construction Administration 
(4 QH) Spring 

Topics include contracts, specifications, and bidding 
procedures; estimating and scheduling, including 
critical path; and discussion of personnel adminis- 
tration and union negotiation. Also included is a bid 
preparation for a small project. Prereq. : None. 



Chemistry 



CHM 4101 Modern Chemistry 1* 
(2 CH, 2.4 lab, 3 QH) Fall 

Students examine fundamental ideas of matter and 
energy, chemical bonding, chemical energy, water 
and solutions, and colloids. Other topics include 
ionic reactions, oxidation and reduction, acidity, 
radioactivity, and air and water pollution. Subjects 
are usually discussed from the viewpoint of recent 
developments. The required lab is CHM 4107. Lab 
fee. Prereq. : None. 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1* 
(2 CH, 2.4 lab, 3 QH) Fall 

Students are introduced to fundamental chemistry 
concepts such as symbols, formulas, equations, 
atomic weights, and calculations based on equa- 
tions. Other topics include gases, liquids, solutions, 
and ionization. The required lab is CHM 41 17. Lab 
fee. Prereq.: MTH 4107 or equiv. 

*This is a University College course offered at a 
different tuition rate. 



Computer Technology 



CT4105 Pascal^Algorithms (formerly 
Introduction to Programming) 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

A study of the Pascal language as an introduction to 
the solution of problems using the computer. Topics 



include problem solving, flowcharting, structured 
programs, loops, counters, and procedures. The stu- 
dent will use the University's computer facilities to 
run program assignments. Prereq.: None. 

CT 4150 Computer Organization 
(4 QH) Spring 

Fundamental aspects of basic computer compo- 
nents are introduced. Topics include the function 
and basic operation of CPUs, main memory, and 
secondary memory; and the functions of an operat- 
ing system and its relationship with a program. 
Prereq.: CT4105. 

CT 4310 FORTRAN/File Processing (formerly 
FORTRAN) (4 QH) Winter 

A presentation of FORTRAN 77 as a second lan- 
guage with emphasis on structured programming 
and modularity. Topics include lists, matrices, sub- 
routines, functions, character-data manipulation, file 
processing, and documentation. The student will 
use the University's computer facilities to run pro- 
gram assignments. Prereq.: CT 4105. 

CT 4311 Programming with the C Language 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Students write programs in C, a general-purpose 
programming language usable for operating systems 
or numerical, text-processing, and database pro- 
grams. A basic knowledge of programming funda- 
mentals is assumed. Topics include basic data types; 
operators and expressions; control-flow (if-else, 
while, etc.); functions and program structure; exter- 
nal variables; scope rules; pointers; address arithme- 
tic; structure and union; and the C I/O Library. 
Prereq.: CT4310. 

CT4321 Programming with Ada 
(4 QH) TBA 

Ada is a programming language for numerical appli- 
cations, system programming applications, and 
applications with real-time and concurrent execu- 
tion requirements. Class topics include readability, 
strong typing, exception handling, data abstracting, 
tasking, and generic units. The student will use the 
University's computer facilities to write programs 
deahng with numerical and system programming 
applications. Prereq.: CT4105, CT4311, GET 4100 
or knowledge of Pascal, C or FORTRAN. 

CT 4330 Data Structures (formerly Non- 
Numerical Algorithms) (4 QH) Winter, Spring 

Studies data structures, storage, manipulation, and 
retrieval methods. Students create data manipula- 
tion programs using the University's computers. 
Topics include stacks, queues, lists, trees, heaps, 
sets, graphs, hashing, searching, sorting, key pro- 
cessing, and relational models. Prereq.: CT 4311. 

CT 4335 Numerical Methods (formerly 
Numerical Algorithms) (4 QH) Fall 

A study of computer methods for solving mathemat- 
ical problems. Students write and run application 



Computer Technology 



programs using the University's computer facilities. 
Topics include deterministic versus stochastic 
methods, random number generators, iterative ver- 
sus noniterative solutions, maxima and minima in 
two and three variables, curve fitting in two and 
three variables, integrals, trapezoidal and Simpson's 
rules, slopes, difference equations in two and three 
variables, vector and matrix algebra, simultaneous 
linear equations, nonlinear equations, permutations, 
and combinations. Prereq.: CT 4105. 

CT 4340 Software Engineering Design 
(formerly Modern Programming Techniques) 
(4 QH) Winter 

Offers structured methods for developing complex 
computer software. Students develop structured 
specifications, structured designs, and the computer 
programs for complex problems, and test the pro- 
grams using the University's computers. Topics 
include partitioning, hierarchical organization, data 
flow diagrams, data dictionaries, structured English, 
decision trees, decision tables, structured charts, 
team design, structured programs, and maintain- 
ability Prercg. .■ CT4S11. 

CT 4345 Assembly Language 
(4 QH) Winter 

Using a typical microprocessor assembly language, 
students write and run homework problems on 
microprocessor-based systems. Topics include CPU 
and system programming model, in.struction sets, 
addressing modes, binary operations, code conver- 
sion, subroutines, macros, and I/O. Prereq.: CT 4105 
and CT 4150. 

CT 4348 LISP 
(4 QH) TBA 

Introduction to an interactive language in which the 
LISP interpreter is commonly referred to as the 
read-evaluate-print loop. A great deal of time will be 
devoted to discussing LISP's various levels of imple- 
mentation. LISP is an excellent medium for imple- 
menting standard techniques in data structure 
manipulation; also explored are techniques for 
recursion, complex data structures, storage 
management, and symbol table manipulation. 
Prereq.: CT 4330. 

CT 4351 Advanced Computer Organization 
(4 QH) Winter 

Students examine the functional characteristics of 
complex and special purpose computer systems, the 
functions of a general purpose multi-user, and a 
multiprocessing operating system. Advanced topics 
include virtual memory and virtual machine archi- 
tectures, distributed and multiprocessor systems, 
array processors, and system performance analysis. 
Prereq.: CT 4356 and CT 4375. 

CT 4355 Microprocessor Peripheral Hardware 
(4 QH) Spring 

Covers the elements of microprocessor peripheral 
hardware and its interfacing. Students design 



and analyze microprocessor systems, including 
detailed schematics, timing diagrams, and technical 
documentation. Topics include serial I/O devices, 
DMA and interrupt control devices, standard buses, 
bus arbitration techniques, and bus support VLSI. 
Prereq.: CT 4374. 

CT 4356 Complex Peripheral Hardware 
(4 QH) Fall 

A study of the interfacing and implementation of 
complex peripheral systems. Topics include disc 
and tape interfaces; graphic display devices; com- 
munication interfaces and subsystems; and I/O 
processors. Prereq. : CT 4355. 

CT 4360 Industry Software 
(4 QH) Fall 

A survey of current commercial software packages 
and methods. Students exercise commercial pack- 
ages implemented on the University's computer 
facilities where applicable. Topics include specific 
packages and methods that vary from year to year 
to maintain currency. They will be drawn from the 
following general categories: database management, 
scientific and statistical analysis, security and pri- 
vacy, software assurance, and documentation. 
Prereq.: CT 4310. 

CT 4363 Concurrent Programming 
(4 QH) TBA 

An examination of the basic principles of concur- 
rent programming. Students will write and run pro- 
grams to demonstrate various aspects of concurrent 
programming techniques and issues. Topics include 
correctness of concurrent programs, material 
exclusion, timing Dekker's algorithms, the 
producer-consumer problem, monitors, semaphores, 
'Ada Rendezvous," critical regions, and conditional 
variables. Prereq.: Experience in either Pascal or C. 

CT 4365 Industry Hardware 
(4 QH) Winter 

A survey of the latest industrial developments and 
trends in computer hardware, conducted as a 
seminar. Prereq.: CT 4356. 

CT 4368 Semiconductor Logic 
(4 QH) Fall 

A detailed analysis of the bipolar and MOS transis- 
tors in saturated and cutoff conditions. Students 
implement these concepts to form basic logic cir- 
cuits and standard logic families, and convert logi- 
cal expressions into hardware configuration 
representations. Topics include Ebers-Moll 
modeling, PMOS, NMOS, CMOS, bipolar characteris- 
tics, and standard logic families. Prereq.: EET 4311. 

CT 4369 Computer Logic 
(4 QH) Winter 

An introduction to the hardware building blocks of 
digital computers. Students specify configurations 
of gates and memory components to achieve combi- 
national and sequential composite logical functions, 



Computer Technology 21 



and perform finite state machine design and analy- 
sis. Topics include gates, flip-flops, registers, decod- 
ers, ALUs, memory arrays, and synchronous and 
asynchronous state machines. Prereq.: CT ^368. 

CT 4374 Introduction to CPU Hardware 
(4 QH) Spring 

Introduces the circuits and operation of microcom- 
puters, focusing on microprocessor components and 
circuits, including detailed timing and functional 
analysis of their interactions. Topics include central 
processing unit, memory, addressing, clocking, bus 
concepts, interrupts, coproces.sors, I/O, and instruc- 
tion timing. Prereq.: CT 4345 and CT 4368. 

CT 4375 CPU Architecture 
(4 QH) Fall 

An examination of high performance microproces- 
sor architecture and hardware interfacing tech- 
niques. Current commercial processors and their 
support components are analyzed. Topics include 
internal CPU architecture, memory management, 
instruction prefetch, privilege .states, bus cycles, 
control lines, I/O, interrupts, exceptions, and pipe- 
lining. Ptercq.: CT4374. 

CT 4377 VLSI Design 
(4 QH) TBA 

Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Integrated Cir- 
cuits (ICs) are the key components of all modern 
computers. Students are introduced to MOS devices, 
circuits, design methods, and fabrication techniques 
used in producing custom VLSI \Cs. Topics include 
MOS transistor characteristics; basic gate circuits; 
scaling; layout tools, both manual and automated; 
wafer fabrication techniques; standards; testing; and 
costs. Prereq. : CT 4369. 



exclusion, sequential and concurrent programming, 
memory, and device and data management. 
Prereq.: CT4150. 

CT 4382 Computer Graphics Programming 
(4 QH) TBA 

Introduction to generalized techniques for the com- 
puter plotting of two- and three-dimensional (2D 
and 3D) shapes. Students write and run programs 
using the University's computer and digital plotter. 
Topics include 2D transforms, 3D to 2D transforms, 
3D transforms, surface representation, shading, hid- 
den line, raster technology-color, introduction to 
interactive graphics, characters, curve fitting, and 
graphic data structures. Prereq.: GET 4100. 

CT4383 Databases 
(4 QH) TBA 

An introduction to database organization structure 
and management. Students write and run programs 
exemplifying techniques developed in class, using 
the University's computer facilities. Topics include 
access methods, attributes, indices, keys, querying, 
searching and matching, file sets, inverted file sets, 
normal forms, and random access. 
Prereq.: CT 4330. 

CT 4384 Large System Assembly Languages 
(4 QH) TBA 

Macro, a VAX-11 assembly language, is applied to 
show how basic components in the CPU are used 
during program execution. Topics include integer, 
real, and character instruction sets, various address- 
ing techniques, procedure linkage, and main and 
system 1/0. Students use the LIniversity's computer 
facilities to run program assignments. 
Prereq.: CT 4345. 



CT 4379 Computer Networks (formerly 
Networking) (4 QH) TBA 

An introduction to the functional and operational 
aspects of computer networks. Topics include the 
ISO Reference Model's seven layers, ARPANET, 
DECNET, and SNA. Prereq.: CT 4380. 

CT 4380 Data Communication Methods 
(4 QH) Spring 

Introduction to the ISO Open Systems Interconnect 
model for communication systems, and to func- 
tional and operational aspects of data communica- 
tion devices and software. A black box approach 
will be used. Topics include modems, control units, 
multiplexers, concentrators, front-end processors, 
and error checking. Prereq.: ("T 4375. 

CT 4381 Operating Systems 
(4 QH) TBA 

The basic principles and organization of operating 
system implementation. Topics include processor 
management, process multiplexing and .synchroniza- 
tion, schedules, atomic operations and mutual 



CT 4385 Introduction to Simulation 
Programming (4 CH, 4 QH) TBA 

Introduces computer methods for solving simulated 
phenomena. Students write and run programs 
implementing simulations specified by instructor. 
Students will not be responsible for the validity or 
evaluation of models except in simple cases. Topics 
include simple queues; multi-server queues; priori- 
ties including first in first out, last in last out; time 
aging of data; simple frequency distributions; and 
use of SIMULA, GPSS, and Standard Subroutine 
Library Routines. Prereq.: CT 1335 or CT 4335. 

CT 4387 Bit Slice Microcomputers (4 QH) TBA 

The epitome of hardware flexibility is represented 
by the bit slice CPU. Students examine the basic 
design ground rules common to this style of hard- 
ware design. Prereq.: CT 4355. 

CT 4389 Single-Chip Microprocessors 
(4 QH) TBA 

When small 8-bit intelligent devices are rewired in 
high volume, the single-chip microproces.sor in the 
form of the 3870, 8048, Z8, and others comes into 



Economics 



play. An understanding of the hardware hmitations 
of a single-chip system is the basis for this subject 
material. Prcreq.: CT 4374. 

CT 4390 Special Problems in Computer 
Technology (4 QH) TBA 

Students perform theoretical or experimental work 
under individual faculty supervision. 
Prereq.: Permission of department chair. 

CT 4395 Computer Security 
(4 QH) TBA 

Covers issues related to security in computing, 
including the history of security, encryption tech- 
niques and applications, secure communications, 
and software protection. Other topics include 
software verification and validation, designing 
security into the hardware, and products currently 
available for securing systems and data. These sub- 
jects will be addressed in terms of privacy as well 
as reliability. Prereq. : CT 4380. 

CT 4396 PROLOG: An Introduction to Artificial 
Intelligence (4 QH) TBA 

Using PROLOCJ as a programming language, the stu- 
dent is introduced to fundamental artificial intelli- 
gence (AI) terms and techniques. Topics covered 
include knowledge representation, search, parsing, 
logic, and inference techniques. Student projects are 
an integral part of the course. Prereq.: CT 4330. 



Economics 



ECN 4115 Economic Principles and 
Problems 1* (3 QH) All Quarters 

The application of the basic principles of economics 
to current public problems is examined. P\icusing 
on macroeconomics, students will explore the 
issues of unemployment, inflation, national income 
and employment theory, and government expendi- 
tures and taxation. Prereq.: None. 

ECN 4116 Economic Principles and 
Problems 2* (3 QH) All Quarters 

Continues ECN 4115, focusing on the role of the 
banking system, the Federal Reserve System, and 
supply-side policies. Topics in microeconomics 
include the role of a market pricing system, supply 
and demand, the costs of production, profits, and 
the supply decision. Prereq.: ECN 4115 or equiv. 

*This is a University College course offered at a 
different tuition rate. 



Electrical Engineering 
Technology 



EET 4124 Circuits Laboratory 1 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Fall, Winter 

Students conduct experiments in DC electrical cir- 
cuits and study various measurement techniques. 
Experiments include use of ammeters, ohmmeters, 
voltmeters, VOMs, and power supplies. Equivalent 
resistance, series and parallel circuits. Ohm's Law, 
Thevenin and Norton Theorems, as well as superpo- 
sition and maximum power transfer theorems are 
studied. Prereq.: EET 4151. 

EET 4125 Circuits Laboratory 2 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Winter, Spring 

Offers further experimentation in electrical circuits 
and measurement techniques. Students become 
familiar with oscilloscopes, audio frequency genera- 
tors, function generators, and their operation. 
Inductance, capacitance, and the effect of frequency 
upon them are investigated. Measurements of ampli- 
tude, frequency, and phase shift are studied using a 
variety of series/parallel RL, RC, and RLC circuitry. 
Circuit time constants and their relation to repeti- 
tion rate are studied, as are resonance, circuit qual- 
ity, and filter circuits. Prereq.: EET 4124. 

EET 4151 Circuit Analysis 1 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Introduces students to Ohm's law, Kirchhoff's cur- 
rent and voltage laws, equivalent resistances and 
sources, mesh and modal analysis, network theo- 
rems, two-port networks and power relations — all 
with respect to direct currents. Also discussed are 
such topics as energy storage, singularity functions, 
and responses of R, L, and C elements to singulari- 
ties. Prereq.: MTH 4120 or PHY 41 19. 

EET 4152 Circuit Analysis 2 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Introduces the time domain (transient) analysis of 
R, L, and C elements; the energy storage in L and C 
circuits; and the responses in source free RL and 
RC circuits. Covers the application of the unit step 
forcing function and the corresponding analysis 
to determine the response in RLC circuits. 
Prereq.: EET 4151. 

EET 4180 Introduction to Telecommunications 
(4 QH) Fall 

Introduces students to voice, video, and data 
communications. Lectures cover the development 
of telephony and the operation of the telephone 
network. Emphasizes current developments in 
communications, particularly the use of digital 
transmission and switching. Introduces terminology 
peculiar to telephony. (Not open to electrical engi- 
neering technology majors.) Prereq. : None. 



Electrical Engineering Technology 23 



EET 4310 Electrical Measurements 
(4 QH) Fall, Spring 

Students examine standards of measurements, 
dimensional analysis, errors and measurements of 
dispersed data, discrete and continuous variables, 
binomial distribution, and normal distribution. 
Other areas include guaranteed error, methods of 
resistance measurements, digital voltmeters and 
analog to digital conversion, voltage references, 
potentiometers, and AC bridges. Prereq. : EET 435S. 

EET 4311 Electronics 1 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Introduces students to solid state electronic 
devices, such as diodes and transistors, emphasizing 
specifications, circuit characteristics, and tech- 
niques for analyzing circuit behavior. Investigates 
applications of diodes in rectification, power supply 
regulation, clipping, clamping, and voltage doubling 
situations. Transistor circuit topologies and bias 
networks are analyzed and designed. 
Prereq.: EET 4152. 

EET 4312 Electronics 2 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Investigates transistor bias stabilization of discrete 
and integrated circuits. Small signal models of 
diodes and RJT, JFET, and MOSFET transistors are 
examined. Analyzes single transistor amplifier con- 
figurations and multistage amplifiers. Investigates 
frequency response, amplitude, and phase charac- 
teristics of transistor circuits utilizing techniques 
such as the Bode plots. Design methods of coupling 
signals from one stage of an amplifier to another 
are presented. Prereq.: EET 4-Jll. 

EET 4313 Electronics 3 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter, Spring 

Focuses on feedback and its application to opera- 
tional amplifier circuits for signal processing and 
generation. Topics include stabilization of gain and 
bias, bandwidth improvement, distortion reduction, 
and impedance variation. Inverting and noninverting 
configurations of operational amplifier circuits are 
analyzed and designed. Typical circuit configura- 
tions analyzed include rectifiers, oscillators, and 
filters. Prereq. : EET 4312. 

EET 4314 Pulse and Digital 1 
(4 QH) Fall 

Topics include switching characteristics of semicon- 
ductor devices; logic gates and the logic families 
ECL, MOS, and Schottky TTL; speed limitations; and 
concepts of wave-shaping and wave-generating cir- 
cuits including comparators, Schmitt trigger, and 
relaxation oscillators. Prereq.: EET 4-Ul. 

EET 4315 Pulse and Digital 2 
(4 QH) Winter 

Topics include digital operations; logic statements 
and theorems; minimization of logic functions; 
flip-flops, counters, registers, and static and 
dynamic memory; introduction to sequential 



circuit design; sample and hold circuits; and 
analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion. 
Prereq.: EET 4314. 

EET 4317 Principles of Communication 
Systems 1 (4 QH) TBA 

Subject areas include signal analysis using Fourier 
methods; noise in communication systems; fre- 
quency selective amplifiers, including wideband; 
transistor power amplifiers AF and RF; oscillators; 
signal sources; and applications. Prereq.: EET 4313. 

EET 4318 Principles of Communication 
Systems 2 (4 QH) TBA 

Areas covered include basic theory of amplitude, 
frequency, phase, and pulse code modulated sys- 
tems; analysis of modulating and demodulating cir- 
cuits; carrier systems using SSB; system block and 
level diagrams; logic control circuits in communica- 
tion systems; and modems. Prereq.: EET 4317. 

EET 4319 Principles of Communication 
Systems 3 (4 QH) TBA 

Topics include fundamentals of digital communica- 
tions; sampling requirements; analog-to-digital con- 
version methods; system capacity and bandwidth; 
comparison of practical digital systems PAM, 
PCM, PFM, PWM; time and frequency division 
multiplexing; data decoding; and selected examples 
from telemetry and computer links. 
Prereq: EET 4318. 

EET 4320 Electricity and Electronics 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter 

Introduction to circuit analysis, resistive networks, 
periodic excitation function, steady state AC cir- 
cuits; study of the physical foundations of electron- 
ics and the physical operation of electronic devices. 
(Not open to electrical engineering technology 
majors.) Prereq.: MTH 4120 and PHY 4119. 

EET 4321 Electricity and Electronics 2 
(4 QH) TBA 

Topics include single-stage electronic circuits, mag- 
netic circuits and transformers, electromechanical 
energy conversion, DC machines, and AC machines. 
(Not open to electrical engineering technology 
majors.) Prereq.: EET 4320. 

EET 4323 Electronics Laboratory 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Spring 

Offers experimentation with nonlinear semiconduc- 
tors. Students become familiar with junction and 
zener diodes. Typical applications include clippers, 
clampers, rectification, filtering, electronic power 
supplies, voltage regulation, and integrated circuit 
regulators. Bipolar and field effect transistors, 
amplifiers and voltage follower configurations are 
studied. Special semiconductors and operational 
amplifiers are also examined. Prereq.: EET 4312. 



24 Electrical Engineering Technology 



EET 4327 Advanced Electronics Laboratory 1 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Fall 

Students conduct experiments dealing with the use 
of oscilloscopes, the examination of transistor 
audio amplifiers, push-pull amplifiers, drivers, pulse 
and video amplifiers, transients and wave-shaping 
circuits, audio frequency oscillators, and the study 
of operational amplifiers. Prereq.: EET 4323. 

EET 4328 Advanced Electronics Laboratory 2 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Winter 

Students conduct experiments dealing with the 
modulation of a class C amplifier, the diode detec- 
tor, basic timing circuits, RF and crystal oscillators, 
astable multivibrators, logic gates, flip-flops, binary 
adders, registers and counters. Considers active 
filters, frequency modulation detectors, and 
analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion. 
Prereq.: EET 4327. 

EET 4329 Advanced Electronics Laboratory 3 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Spring 

Areas covered include spectral studies of FM and 
PM waves; amplitude limiters; the balanced modula- 
tors and single sideband generators; integrated cir- 
cuit timers and monolithic random access memory; 
and monolithic phase-locked loop. Students also 
conduct microwave experiments and a series of dig- 
ital experiments. Prereq.: EET 4328. 

EET 4330 Energy Conversion 
(4 QH) Spring 

Topics include the generalized theory of rotating 
energy conversion devices; steady-state operation of 
the multiply-excited direct-current machine; 
control of speed; special machines; transformers; 
steady-state considerations of induction and syn- 
chronous machines; generalized machine and circuit 
model; and Laplace transform techniques applied to 
the analysis of dynamic operating modes of rotating 
machines. Prereq. : EET 4353. 



EET 4342 Power and Controls Laboratory 2 
(3 lab, 2 QH) TBA 

Students conduct experiments with characteristics 
of DC motors and generators, single- and 
multi-phase transformers, induction motors, 
synchronous motors, and three-phase power 
measurements. Prereq.: EET 4341. 

EET 4343 Power and Controls Laboratory 3 
(3 lab, 2 QH) TBA 

Offers experiments with self-synchronous devices 
such as control transformers, transmitters and 
receivers, AC and DC servomotors, open and closed 
loop response of servo mechanisms and stepping 
motors. Prereq.: EET 4342. 

EET 4353 Circuit Analysis 3 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter, Spring 

Examines the application of differential equations 
to the solutions of linear, time-invariant electrical 
networks. Introduces singularity functions, convolu- 
tion, and time domain transient analysis; network 
topology and duality; and the methods of transfor- 
mation calculus and complex frequency concepts. 
Prereq.: EET 4152. 

EET 4354 Circuit Analysis 4 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter, Spring 

Topics include signal analysis in the frequency 
domain; Fourier series; and Fourier and Laplace 
transform methods. A varied selection of circuit 
problems is solved using Laplace transforms and 
related theorems. Prereq. : EET 4353. 

EET 4360 Photovoltaic Technology 
(4 QH) TBA 

Examines the theory, operation, installation, and 
monitoring of a photovoltaic power system. Topics 
include the physics of silicon photovoltaic cells: 
amorphous, polycrystalline, and single crystal. Lab 
included. Prereq.: EET 4311 and PHY 4119. 



EET 4337 Distributed Systems 
(4 QH) Spring 

An examination of radiation, transmission, and 
reception of electromagnetic waves; distributed-line 
constants and traveling waves of transmission lines; 
and differential equations of the uniform line. 
Prereq. : MTH 4122 and PHY 41 19. 

EET 4341 Power and Controls Laboratory 1 
(3 lab, 2 QH) TBA 

These experiments introduce the student to stan- 
dard laboratory measurement equipment, including 
voltmeters, ammeters, oscilloscopes, and frequency 
counters, as well as data-taking methods and report 
writing. Devices investigated include diodes, bipolar 
transistors, field effect devices, silicon control recti- 
fiers, unijunction transistors, power supplies, regu- 
lators, and various types of feedback transistor 
amplifiers. Prereq. : EET 4330. 



EET 4362 Basic Power Systems 1 
(4 QH) TBA 

Considers power transmission lines; line constants; 
current voltage and power relations; introduction to 
electric-power distribution loads, feeders, and sub- 
stations; and application of matrices. 
Prereq.: EET 43.54. 

EET 4363 Basic Power Systems 2 
(4 QH) TBA 

Studies symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults; 
protective devices — application and coordination; 
power flow in electric circuits; steady-state power 
limitations of systems; and voltage regulation theory 
and application. Prereq.: EET 4362. 

EET 4364 Basic Power Systems 3 
(4 QH) TBA 

Students examine computer applications to power 
systems with emphasis on load-flow studies; and 



English 



25 



basic ideas of systems planning, short-circuit stud- 
ies, and system stability. Prereq. : EET 4363. 

EET 4370 Digital Computers 1 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter 

An introduction to the field of digital computer 
design. Topics include general computer organiza- 
tion, number systems and number representations, 
design characteristics of major computer units, and 
Boolean Algebra applications to computer design. 
Prereq.: EET 4314. 

EET 4371 Digital Computers 2 
(4 QH) Winter, Spring 

An examination of microprocessor architecture and 
organization, and study of the machine language 
and assembly coding of an industry-accepted micro- 
processor. A suitable topic selected from the cur- 
rent literature by the instructor will be analyzed. 
Assembly language coding problems will be 
assigned. Prereq.: EET 4370. 

EET 4377 Control Engineering 1 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter 

An analysis of linear servomechanisms under both 
transient and steady-state conditions. Topics 
include signal flow graphs and Laplace transforms 
used in the formulation of block diagrams, and 
transfer function. Prereq.: EET 4354 
and MTH 4122. 

EET 4378 Control Engineering 2 
(4 QH) Winter, Spring 

Topics include system stability, root locus tech- 
niques, treatment of Nyquist criteria, and Bode dia- 
gram methods for systems evaluation. 
Prereq.: EET 4377. 

EET 4381 Telecommunications Systems 1 
(4 QH) Spring 

A discussion of transmission system fundamentals, 
beginning with the development of the information 
to be transmitted in the form of voice, video, or data 
signals. Students will examine information transmis- 
sion including baseband and multiplex systems. The 
course stresses encoding analog signals into a digi- 
tal format and the multiplexing of digital signals 
into the digital hierarchy. Current digital transmis- 
sion systems such as T-carrier, digital radio, and 
fiber optic systems are examined. (Not open to elec- 
trical engineering technology majors.) 
Prereq. : EET 4152 or equiv. 

EET 4382 Telecommunications Systems 2 
(4 QH) Fall 

An introduction to switching theory and practice, 
historical development, and circuit switching. Stu- 
dents examine packet switching and the basics of 
traffic engineering. Time division versus space divi- 
sion switching, switching systems software, and 
digital switch architecture is covered. (Not open 
to electrical engineering technology majors.) 
Prereq.: EET 4381. 



EET 4383 Telecommunications Systems 3 
(4 QH) Winter 

Continues EET 4381 and EET 4382 by examining 
networks comprised of switching and transmission 
equipments. Networks of particular interest to the 
students will be considered with the interaction 
between private (PABX or key systems) networks 
and the public (local telephone company) network. 
Signaling systems that communicate between por- 
tions of the network will be discussed. Students will 
develop a transmission level plan that will tie 
together the subject matter. (Not open to electrical 
engineering technology majors.) Prereq.: EET 4382. 

EET 4384 Video Communications 
(4 QH) Fall 

An examination of the television signal, synchroni- 
zation, balancing and interleaving, cameras, trans- 
mitters and receivers, video cassette recorders, 
video discs, and cable networks. (Not open to elec- 
trical engineering technology majors.) 
Prereq.: EET 4151, EET 4180, and PHY 4119. 

EET 4391 Basic Optics and Optical Systems 
Design (4 QH) TBA 

Students develop the basics of optical imaging in 
the Gaussian approximation and analyze the various 
designs stemming from lens aberration, intent and 
forms of optical systems, and flux throughput. The 
essentials of a wave description of light are also 
presented along with instrumental designs for 
exhibiting interference and diffraction. No previous 
background in optics is assumed. 
Prereq. : MTH 4108 and PHY 41 19. 

EET 4392 Optoelectronics and Fiber Optics 
(4 QH) TBA 

Presents an overview of the various elements and 
their characteristics utilized in optical communica- 
tion systems — elements that generate light (lasers, 
diodes); modulate light (as in scanning or informa- 
tion encoding); transfer light (optical fibers); detect 
light; and display and store light or its encoded 
information. Prereq.: EET 4391. 

EET 4399 Special Problems in Electrical 
Engineering Technology (4 QH) TBA 

Students engage in theoretical or experimental 
work under individual faculty supervision. 
Prereq.: Permission of department chair. 



English 



ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1* 
(3 QH) All Quarters 

Students participate in a detailed examination of 
the principles and methods of rhetoric, especially 



26 General Engineering Technology 



narration, description, and exposition. Coursework 
includes frequent practice in writing paragraphs and 
themes. A writing proficiency test is given at the 
first class meeting. 

ENG4111 Critical Writing 2* 
(3 QH) All Quarters 

A continued examination of the principles and 
methods of rhetoric, especially persuasion and argu- 
ment, the study of short fiction, and the develop- 
ment of research skills. Coursework includes 
practice in writing persuasive and critical themes 
and preparing research papers. 
Prereq.: ENG 4110 or equiv. 

*This is a University College course offered at a 
different tuition rate. 



together. Topics include algorithms, programming 
philosophy, and flow charts. A high-level 
language will be taught to enable students to write 
programs and run them on Northeastern 
University's computer system. Prereq.: None. 

GET 4144 Introduction to Personal Computer 
(4 QH) TBA 

Explores the use, capabilities, and limitations of the 
DOS Operating System and popular application soft- 
ware packages such as LOTUS 1-2-3, D Base 111, and 
RELAY. Students study BASIC programming lan- 
guage and will write and run introductory programs 
using the University's computers. Costs and benefits 
of different personal computer configurations and 
expansion options will be discussed. (Not open to 
students who have taken CT 4344.) Prereq.: None. 



General Engineering 
Technology 



GET 4170 Engineering Graphics 1 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Students are introduced to manual and computer 
engineering drawing using geometric constructions, 
charts, and graphs. Geometric construction includes 
descriptive geometry, orthographic projection, sec- 
tions, and isometric drawing. Prereq. : None. 



GET 4100 Computer Programming for 
Engineering Technology (4 QH) All Quarters 

Introduction to the use of computers for problem 
solving using FORTRAN 77. Topics include flow- 
charts, DO loops, arrays, subroutines, functions, and 
character manipulations. Students use the 
University's computer facilities to run program 
assignments. Prereq.: MTH 4108. 

GET 4113 BASIC 
(4 QH) TBA 

Introduces BASIC as another programming lan- 
guage. Students write and run programs on the 
University's computers using the Read and Data 
statements; arithmetic operations in BASIC; and the 
Go to. If Then, For and Next, and Input state- 
ments. Also covered will be control of loops, special 
functions, lists and tables, defining functions, and 
matrix operations. (Not open to students who have 
taken CT 4313.) Prereq.: None. 

GET 4120 COBOL 
(4 QH) TBA 

The COBOL language is studied through its applica- 
tions in business problems. The elementary topics 
of COBOL are covered quickly; the emphasis is on 
more advanced topics, including table handling; 
sorting; and sequential, index, random, and dynamic 
file processing. Students are required to participate 
in an extensive project. (Not open to students who 
have taken CT 4320.) Prereq.: None. 

GET 4138 Computer Programming for 
Telecommunications (4 QH) Winter 

An introduction to computers and program- 
ming. Students will be introduced to the major com- 
ponents of the computer and how they function 



GET 4171 Engineering Graphics 2 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter, Spring 

The use of computer and manual drawing in layout 
and assembly graphics is studied. Course topics 
include manufacturing processes, fasteners, gears, 
welding, electric/electronic drawing, architectural/ 
structural drawing, piping, and topography. Students 
are required to submit a design project. 
Prereq.: GET 4170. 

GET 4172 Electrical Engineering Graphics 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter, Spring 

An introduction to manual and computer electronic 
graphics, including symbols, schematics, block and 
logic diagrams, production and cable drawings, and 
military standards. Also covered are single- and 
double-sided printed circuit layouts, integrated cir- 
cuits, electromechanical designs, wiring, and inter- 
connection diagrams, and graphical data 
presentation. Prereq.: GET 4170. 

GET 4306 Technical Communications 
(3 QH) Fall, Winter, Spring 

Students prepare written and oral presentations 
that are to be of a calibre expected of profes- 
sionals. Prereq.: ENG 4111. 

GET 4364 Kinematics 
(4 QH) Winter 

A study of four-bar linkages, sliders, and other 
devices using orthogonal components of vectors, 
instantaneous centers, equivalent linkages, and 
effective cranks. Graphic solutions are emphasized, 
including an introduction to the computer to 
enhance these concepts. Reverted and epicyclic 
gear trains and cam displacement are analyzed. 
Prereq. : GET 4171 and PHY 4117. 



Mechanical Engineering Technology 



Human Resources 
Management 



HRM 4301 Organizational Behavior* 
(3 QH) Fall 

This course examines the fundamentals of organiza- 
tional life, emphasizing the structure and discipline 
of groups typically found in a business setting. Top- 
ics include issues and data related to leadership 
styles, employee motivation, and organizational 
dynamics. Significant student participation 
is required. 

'This is a University College course offered at a 
different tuition rate. 



methods (both quantitative and qualitative), and 
apply them to operation issues. 
Prereq.: MS 4325 or equiv. 

IM 4314 Production Control and Inventory 
Management* (3 QH) Fall 

The theory and practice of the economic control of 
inventories are examined. Students cover a broad 
spectrum of models for production control and 
inventory management, solve problems through ana- 
lytical methods and numerical simulation, and find 
practical ways to apply concepts and techniques. 

*This is a University College course offered at a 
different tuition rate. 



Industrial Engineering 
Technology 



IIS 4360 Engineering Economy 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter, Spring 

A study of fundamental accounting concepts and 
terminology. Topics include assets, liability, net 
worth; analysis of income statement and balance 
sheet; and flow of funds in a firm. Other subjects 
include sources of capital-equity, borrowed, retained 
earnings, depreciation and depreciation accounting, 
and taxes. Prereq.: None. 

IIS 4393 Engineering Probability and Statistics 
(4 QH) Winter 

A study of the algebra of events and sets, as well as 
the laws of probability. Students examine the prop- 
erties of random variables, discrete and continuous, 
including density functions, expectations, and vari- 
ance. The estimation of the parameters of random 
variables is explored, as is point and interval esti- 
mation. Hypothesis, one-sided, two-sided, and mea- 
sures of variances testing is discussed. Normal and 
standard deviation is also studied. 
Prereq.: MTH 4122. 



Industrial Management 



IM 4301 Operations Management* 
(3 QH) Winter 

Students identify and analyze the operating system, 
integrate modeling and simulation techniques and 



Mechanical Engineering 
Technology 



MET 4301 Mechanics A 
(4 QH) Fall 

Topics include forces; moments, couples, statics of 
particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimen- 
sions; distributed forces — external and internal; 
first moments and centroids; and analysis of 
structure-trusses, frames, and machines. 
Prereq.: MTH 4120 and PHY 41 1 7. 

MET 4302 Mechanics B 
(4 QH) Winter 

Topics include friction, second moments, and vir- 
tual work; kinematics of particles-rectilinear and 
curvilinear motion of dynamic particles — force, 
mass and acceleration, work and energy. 
Prereq.: MET 4i01. 

MET 4303 Mechanics C 
(4 QH) Fall 

A study of impulse and momentum of particles; 
kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies, force, 
mass, and acceleration; and dynamics of rigid 
bodies — work and energy. Also covered are impulse 
and momentum and an introduction to mechan- 
ical vibration. Prereq.: MET 4302. 

MET 4314 Stress Analysis A 
(4 QH) Winter, Spring 

Topics include axially loaded members, stress and 
strain, allowable stresses, factor of safety, tempera- 
ture effects, indeterminate members, thin-walled 
pressure vessels, and centric loading of bolted and 
welded connection. Students also examine shear 
and moment beams; eccentrically loaded connec- 
tions; and flexural and transverse shearing stresses 
in beams. Prereq.: MET 4301. 



Mechanical Engineering Technology 



MET 4315 Stress Analysis B 
(4 QH) Fall, Spring 

A study of determinate and indeterminate beam 
deflections and reactions by integration and area 
moment methods. Topics include torsional stresses 
and strains; power transmission; eccentric loads on 
struts, beams, riveted and welded joints; combined 
stresses; principal stresses; Mohr's circle; and theo- 
ries of failure. Prereq.: MET 4314. 

MET 4319 Mechanics 
(4 QH) Spring 

A mechanics course for nonmechanical majors. 
Prereq. : MTH 4120 and PHY 4117. 

MET 4330 Mechanical Design A 
(4 QH) Winter 

An introduction to mechanical design, the design 
process, design factors, creativity, optimization, 
human factors, and value engineering. These princi- 
ples are discussed and developed in an introductory 
manner through simple design projects. Students 
examine principles of design, properties, and selec- 
tion of materials; stress concentrations; strength 
under combined stresses; theories of failure; impact; 
and fluctuating and repeated loads. 
Prereq.: MET 4314 and MET 4380. 

MET 4331 Mechanical Design B 
(4 QH) Spring 

Topics include deformation and design of fasteners, 
screws, joints, springs, and bearings, lubrication, 
and journal bearings. Covers stresses and power 
transmission of spur, bevel, and worm gear, shaft 
design, and clutches and brakes. 
Prereq. : MET 4330. 

MET 4340 Thermodynamics A 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter 

Students are introduced to the general theory 
of heat and matter; laws of thermodynamics; 
energy-transformation principles and availability of 
energy; and properties and processes for pure sub- 
stances and ideal gases. Also covered are thermody- 
namic properties and processes of liquids and 
vapors; tables and charts; mixtures of fluids; and 
vapor cycles. Prereq.: CHM 4111 and PHY 4118. 

MET 4341 Thermodynamics B 
(4 QH) Winter 

Topics include theory of vapor engines and analysis 
of types of actual engines using compression of 
gases and vapors; internal combustion engines; the- 
ory of gas and vapor flow through orifices and noz- 
zles; design and performance of steam and gas 
turbines; spark-ignition and compression-ignition 
engine design and performance; and fan perfor- 
mance. Prereq.: MET 4340. 

MET 4342 Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning 
(4 QH) Spring 

A study of air-conditioning principles, including psy- 
chometrics and heat pumps. Topics include calcula- 
tion of heating and cooling loads in accordance 



with ASHRAE practices; principles of gas compres- 
sion; analysis of vapor compression; refrigeration 
systems; low-temperature refrigeration cycles; and 
absorption refrigeration systems. 
Prereq.: MET 4341. 

MET 4343 Heat Transfer 
(4 QH) Fall 

Students are introduced to the basic principles of 
heat transfer. Thermal conductivity, and thermal 
conductance/resistance concept are explored. Com- 
bined heat transfer mechanisms, the basic equations 
of conduction, and natural and forced convection 
are examined. Students study the hydrodynamic and 
thermal boundary layers, black body radiation, and 
Kirchoff's law. In addition, emissivity and absorptiv- 
ity, the radiation between simple bodies, and heat 
transfer coefficients are discussed. Heat exchanger 
effectiveness, and regenerative and evaporative heat 
exchangers are also examined. Prereq.: MET 4341. 

MET 4344 Energy Systems Theory and 
Hydronics (4 QH) Spring 

A discussion of the elementary principles of heat 
transfer; heat loss calculations of buildings; HVAC 
fundamentals; and architectural technology and 
building materials. Also covered are the election of 
heat transmission coefficients, instrumentation, 
heat transfer coefficients, heating load, combustion, 
and venting. Instruction includes the study of basic 
hydraulics and hot water heating, fluid flow, pumps, 
boilers, and forced circulation. 
Prereq. : MTH 4108 and GET 41 70. 

MET 4345 Heating, Ventilating, and 
Air-Conditioning 1 (4 QH) Spring 

Students examine fundamental design data on HVAC 
including climatic data, temperature variations, 
weather maps, heat gains from sun, industrial 
degree days, and city and well water temperature 
variations. Heat gains and losses from other sources 
are discussed along with requirements for industrial 
plants and office and commercial buildings. Overall 
heat transmission coefficients are discussed. 
Prereq.: MET 4341. 

MET 4346 Heating, Ventilating, and 
Air-Conditioning 2 (4 QH) Fall 

Students explore the properties of moist air and 
interpret air-conditioning processes on the psy- 
chometric chart. Topics include air distribution; out- 
let performance; volume control; noise limitations; 
selection and location of surface outlets; flow mea- 
suring devices; and system balancing. The design of 
complete ductwork systems for both high and low 
velocity systems is developed. Fluid flow duct 
design, centrifugal fans, air cleaning, radiant 
heating, and heat pump are also covered. 
Prereq.: MET 4345. 

MET 4347 Distribution Systems for Mechanical 
Systems (4 QH) Fall 

The distribution and/or collection systems for the 
layout of ducts and pipes for heating, ventilation, 



Mechanical Engineering Technology 



air-conditioning, water supply, and plumbing net- 
works are developed bsised on theoretical consider- 
ation. Emphasis is on empirical approaches used 
within the industry. Codes and standards relating to 
materials selection and estimating aspects are also 
included. Prereq. : MET 4345. 

MET 4348 Energy Conservation 
(4 QH) Winter 

A given building envelope with fixed parameters is 
analyzed considering heat gains and losses and 
energy consumption from various sources. Tech- 
niques for investigating and improving energy con- 
servation factors and influencing energy costs and 
management are examined. These concepts will be 
used to develop energy auditing techniques. 
Prereq. : MET 4347. 

MET 4349 Heating, Ventilating, and 
Air-Conditioning Systems Design 
(4 QH) Spring 

A building with fixed parameters will be examined 
to show how heating, ventilating, and 
air-conditioning systems' main unit sizes are 
selected and how the various working substances 
are distributed into the building. Coursework 
includes presenting plans and schematics of the 
final design necessary to install the systems. 
Prereq.: MET 4348. 

MET 4350 Heating, Ventilating, and 
Air-Conditioning Laboratory (3 lab, 2 QH) Fall 

Lab experiments on the variation of water and air 
flows in pipe and duct systems, and measurements 
of the efficiency of fan systems under various outlet 
conditions. The basic operating conditions of heat- 
ing and refrigeration systems are examined, as well 
as the heat transfer conditions of pipe/duct insula- 
tion and fin coil systems. Prereq. : MET 4345. 

MET 4370 Fluid Mechanics A 
(4 QH) Spring 

Topics include hydrostatics, principles governing 
fluids at rest; pressure measurement; hydrostatic 
forces on submerged areas and objects; simple 
dams; fluids in moving vessels; and hoop tension. 
Discusses fluid flow in pipes under pressure; fluid 
energy, power, and friction loss; Bernoulli's Theo- 
rem; and flow measurement. Prereq.: MET 4302. 

MET 4371 Fluid Mechanics B 
(4 QH) Winter 

A study of pipe networks and reservoir systems, 
flow in open channels, and uniform flow. Also cov- 
ered are energy, friction loss, minor losses, velocity 
distribution, alternate stages of flow, critical flow, 
nonuniform flow, accelerated and retarded flow, and 
hydraulic jump and waves. Prereq.: MET 4370. 

MET 4380 Materials A 
(4 QH) Spring 

Lectures, supported by visual aids, are presented on 
fundamental metallic structures, general metallurgi- 
cal information covering theoretical aspects of 



properties, and testing and failure of metals. Lec- 
tures will be given on alloying and hardening of 
metals, refinement of metals, equilibrium diagrams, 
characteristics of engineering metals, and principles 
of metal fabrication. Prereq. : None. 

MET 4390 Measurement and Analysis 
Laboratory (3 lab, 2 QH) Fall 

Discusses experiments requiring collection and 
analysis of data by graphical and numerical meth- 
ods; examines computer applications and report 
writing to draw conclusions relative to accuracy, 
precision, true values, and measured values as they 
relate to basic mechanical measuring instruments. 
Prereq.: GET 4100, MET 4314, MTH 4122, 
and PHY 41 19. 

MET 4391 Technology Laboratory A 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Winter 

Students conduct experiments to determine 
mechanical properties of materials under normal 
and abnormal environmental conditions. The effects 
of homogeneity, nonhomogeneity, isotrophy, and 
nonisotrophy are also examined. Prereq. : 
MET 4315, MET 4380, and MET 4390. 

MET 4392 Technology Laboratory B 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Spring 

Students conduct experiments to determine the 
physical properties of incompressible fluids, mea- 
sure flow rates and velocities utilizing pitot tubes, 
orifice plates, venturii meter, and weirs flow meters, 
U-tube differential manometers, and piezometers. 
Prereq.: MET 4370 (may be taken concurrently) 
and MET 4390. 

MET 4393 Technology Laboratory C 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Fall 

A study of basic thermodynamic relationships. Stu- 
dents conduct experiments to examine the flow of 
compressible fluids and steam and to examine the 
energy conversion of a fuel into a working sub- 
stance. The related heat transfer mechanisms are 
also examined, as well as operating characteristics 
of thermal generators, engines, and compressors. 
Prereq.: MET 4341 and MET 4390 (may be 
taken concurrently). 

MET 4394 Technology Laboratory D 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Winter 

Students perform experiments to examine the oper- 
ating characteristics and efficiencies of internal 
combustion engines, brake horsepower, indicated 
horsepower, mean effective pressure, fuel consump- 
tion, torque, ignition timing, manifold pressure, and 
compression ratios and internal engines as energy 
conversion systems. Also covered is energy conver- 
sion of fuels. Prereq.: MET 4341, MET 4343 (may 
be taken concurrently), and MET 4393. 

MET 4395 Technology Laboratory E 
(3 lab, 2 QH) Spring 

Students conduct experimental projects to examine 
refrigeration, air-conditioning, and heating pump 



Manufacturing Engineering Technology 



cycles. Experiments are of advanced or specialized 
nature. Prereq.: MET 4342, MET 4343, and 
MET 4390. 

MET 4414 Mechanical Vibrations 
(4 QH) TBA 

An examination of the elements of vibrating sys- 
tems, one degree of freedom, natural frequencies, 
damped free and forced vibration, impedance and 
mobility, sy.stems with more than one degree of free- 
dom, influence coefficients, Lagrange's equations, 
generalized coordinates, and vibration absorber. 
Prereq.: MET 4303. 

MET 4415 Experimental Stress Analysis 
(4 QH) TBA 

Students examine theory and experimentation 
showing the application of extensometers and elec- 
trical strain gauges and transducers in the field of 
experimental stress and strain analysis. Also cov- 
ered is theory and laboratory practice on photoelas- 
tic methods as applied to classical model analysis 
and modern coating analysis. Prereq.: MET 4315. 

MET 4416 Stress Analysis C 
(4 QH) Spring 

Topics include curved beams, nonsymmetrical 
bending of beams, shear center and shear stresses 
on thin sections, and composite beams. Also cov- 
ered are columns, energy absorption and resilience, 
inertial stresses, impact loading, deflection of 
beams by energy methods, and bolted fastenings. 
Prereq: MET 4315. 

MET 4444 Power Generation 
(4 QH) TBA 

A survey of electrical power generation by 
thermo-mechanical, electro-mechanical, nuclear, 
and hydraulic systems. Emphasis is on the analysis 
of thermodynamic cycles as well as the practical 
deviations from the related ideal processes. Acces- 
sory and auxiliary equipment used in such systems 
are considered. Design, performance, economic fac- 
tors, and public issues affecting electric power gen- 
eration are studied. Prereq.: MET 4341. 

MET 4481 Materials B 
(4 QH) Spring 

Inorganic materials and materials having electrical 
and magnetic properties and applications for the 
fabrication and uses of both metals and nonmetals 
are discussed. Structures of metals, imperfections, 
and phase diagrams are examined. The effect of 
temperature on structure and properties of metals is 
explored, as are strengthening mechanisms and the 
mechanical properties of nonferrous metals. Experi- 
ments in preparation of samples, selection, pol- 
ishing, and etching are conducted. Students also 
complete an examination of nonferrous metals. 
Additional lab work includes the construction of 
cooling curves, and binary phase diagrams. 
Prereq.: MET 4380. 



MET 4482 Applied Metallurgy 
(4 QH) TBA 

Mechanical properties of ferrous metals, the iron 
carbon diagram, and high-temperature alloys are 
examined. Hardening methods, impact tests, and the 
effects of environment are explored. Also discussed 
are manufacturing processes and methods of fabri- 
cation. Experiments on analysis of stress-strain dia- 
grams, heat treatment, surface corrosion, tempering, 
and drawing are conducted. Students also complete 
experiments in using nonferrous metals and tests on 
ferrous metals. Prereq.: MET 4481. 



Manufacturing Engineering 
Technology 



MFG 4311 Manufacturing Materials and 
Processes 1 (4 QH) Spring 

Topics include the structures of polymers (thermo- 
plastics, thermosetting, glass, and rubber); manufac- 
turing processes for polymers; thermoforming; 
structures of metals; and the manufacturing pro- 
cesses for metal forming. Alloys, nonferrous metals, 
and various manufacturing methods and processes 
are examined. Prereq.: CHM 4101 and PHY 4117. 

MFG 4312 Manufacturing Materials and 
Processes 2 (4 QH) Fall 

Continuation of MFG 4311. Prereq.: MFG 4311. 

MFG 4321 Computer- Aided Manufacturing 1 
(4 QH) Fall 

An overview of computer-aided manufacturing 
(CAM). Areas covered include group technology; 
material requirements planning; part coding and 
classification; numerical control; part programming; 
and management systems. Broad coverage of each 
area is given to allow the student to gain an appreci- 
ation of the coming reality of the automated factory. 
Prereq. : None. 

MFG 4322 Computer-Aided Manufacturing 2 
(4 QH) Winter 

Continuation of MFG 4321. Prereq.: MFG 4321. 

MFG 4331 Computer Methods in 
Manufacturing Design 1 (4 QH) Fall 

Investigates the use of computers in selected areas 
of manufacturing systems design. Topics include 
numerical control, MRP II, computer-aided process 
planning and control, and other important applica- 
tions of computers to manufacturing. 
Prereq.: MFG 4311 and MFG 4322. 

MFG 4332 Computer Methods in 
Manufacturing Design 2 (4 QH) Winter 

Continuation of MFG 4331. Prereq.: MFG 4331. 



Mathematics 



MFG 4341 Introduction to Computer- Aided 
Design (4 QH) Winter 

Introduces computational and numerical geometry 
for design, and studies the implementation of com- 
puter graphics in design and use of computer-aided 
design packages, as well as principles of numerical 
control techniques in design and manufacture. A 
design project is included in the course. 
Prereq. : CT4105or FORTRAN. 

MFG 4351 Assembly Automation 
(4 QH) Spring 

Examines the field of automatic assembly; topics 
include automatic vibratory feeders, nonvibratory 
feeders, and the automatic orientation of parts to be 
fed. Also covered is the economics of automatic 
assembly. If time permits, there will be a project to 
design an automated assembly system. 
Prereq.: MFG 4322 and MFG 4SS2 

MFG 4361 Numerical Controlled Machines 
(Basic) (4 QH) Fall 

Beginning with a week-long review of numerical 
controlled machines from material covered in MFG 
4321 and MFG 4322, an introduction to DNC and 
CNC systems is followed by study of numerical con- 
trolled machines and programming in the APT pro- 
gramming language. Prereq. : MFG 4322, MFG 4332, 
and MFG 4341. 

MFG 4371 Robotics 
(4 QH) Winter 

Students discuss the concept, classification, and 
structure of robots and their application in manu- 
facturing. Topics include drive and control systems; 
kinetics, coordinate transformations, and trajectory 
interpolators; and the application, programming, 
and integration of robots into the manufacturing 
environment. Prereq.: MFG 4361. 

MFG 4381 Plant Layout and Design 
(4 QH) Fall 

Students examine the use of descriptive and opti- 
mizing models — for example, simulation, queuing 
theory, and linear programming — to design facilities 
and associated material handling systems. 
Computer-assisted layout analysis techniques are 
applied to practical problems. Prereq.: IM 4301. 



Management 



MGT 4101 Introduction to Business and 
Management 1* (3 QH) All Quarters 

Students examine the setting and general structure 
of American business, including objectives and 
practices affecting the American standard of living. 



Topics include the characteristics of private enter- 
prise and the nature and challenge of capitalism and 
other forms of economic enterprise. Types of busi- 
nesses, the structures of organizations, and the 
functions of management are introduced, as well as 
what a managerial career involves, what problems 
must be faced, and what decisions must be reached. 

*This is a University College course offered at a 
different tuition rate. 



Management Science 



MS 4332 Statistical Quality Control* 
(3 QH) Winter 

A practical course in analytical methods of modern 
quality control, emphasizing the application of basic 
statistical controls in the industrial environment. 
Topics include control charts, statistical tolerancing, 
acceptance sampling techniques, life testing, and 
reliability concepts. Prereq.: ECN 4251 or equiv. 

*This is a University College course offered at a 
different tuition rate. 



Mathematics 



MTH 4006 Technical Mathematics 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Reviews high school algebra equations, formulas, 
exponents, polynomials, factoring, scientific nota- 
tion, fractions, radicals, complex numbers, quad- 
ratic equations, and linear equations. (Credit cannot 
be used in the associate in engineering, associate in 
science, or the bachelor of engineering technology 
degree programs.) 

MTH 4107 College Algebra 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Students take a diagnostic exam to ensure appropri- 
ate placement. Topics include exponents, radicals, 
factoring, and operations with fractions; operations 
with sets; and solving linear, quadratic and absolute 
value equations and inequalities. Also covered are 
equations involving radicals; operations with imagi- 
nary and complex numbers; graphing linear, quad- 
ratic, and polynomial functions; direct and inverse 
variation; solving higher degree polynomial equa- 
tions; and an introduction to partial fractions. 
Prereq.: Math diagnostic eram or MTH 4006. 



Physics 



MTH4108 Pre-Calculus 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Topics include composite and inverse functions; 
logarithmic and exponential functions and equa- 
tions; properties of logs and introduction to 
base e; trigonometric functions, identities, and equa- 
tions; and solving triangles by applying law of sines 
and cosines. Also covered are polar form of com- 
plex numbers and DeMoivre's formula; solving sys- 
tems of linear equations by Cramer's rule; solving 
nonlinear systems in two variables; arithmetic and 
geometric sequences and series; and factorials, 
combinatorials, and the binomial expansion 
formula. Prereq.: MTH 4107. 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Topics include plane analytic geometry of the line, 
circle, parabola, ellipse and hyperbola; review of 
inequalities and general function operations; theory 
and evaluation of limits; derivatives of algebraic and 
trigonometric functions; and general rules of differ- 
entiation. Also covered are Rolle's theorem; Mean 
Value theorem; and applications of differentiation 
including velocity, acceleration, related rates, max- 
ima and minima, curve sketching, and approxima- 
tions by differentials. Prereq.: MTH 4108. 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Examines antiderivative and development of the 
fundamental theorem with applications to areas, 
volumes, and rectilinear motion problems. Topics 
include the logarithmic exponential and inverse tri- 
gonometric functions and their applications; tech- 
niques of integration including parts, partial 
fractions, substitution, and the use of tables; numer- 
ical integration (Simpson's and Trapezoidal rules); 
L'Hospital's Rule; improper integrals; and the geom- 
etry of vectors in a plane and space. 
Prereq.: MTH 41^0. 

MTH 4122 Calculus 3 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Studies three-dimensional space and a treatment of 
functions of several variables; multiple integrals 
with applications in areas and volumes; sequences 
and series; and differential equations, including the 
solution with applications of first-order with vari- 
ables separable, first-order linear, and second-order 
linear homogeneous to complete the sequence. 
Prereq.: MTH 4121. 

MTH 4123 Differential Equations 
(4 QH) Fall, Winter, Spring 

Linear differential equations with constant coeffi- 
cients, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous, are 
examined. Explores the variation of parameters and 
undetermined coefficients and simultaneous differ- 
ential equations, the Laplace transform, series solu- 
tion of differential equations, and the F'ourier series. 
Orthogonal functions and numerical solutions of 
differential equations are studied. 
Prereq.: MTH 4122. 



Physics 



PHY 4117 Physics 1 

(4 CH, 4 QH) All Quarters 

Topics include vectors and balanced forces, acceler- 
ated motion, Newton's laws, projectile motion, work 
and energy, momentum, angular motion, centripetal 
force, rotation of rigid bodies, and moment of 
inertia. Prereq.: MTH 4107 or concurrently. 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Topics include elasticity, density and pressure, tem- 
perature, the gas laws, heat transfer, thermody- 
namics, vibratory motion, wave motion, properties 
of sound, and properties of light. 
Prereq: PHY 4117. 

PHY 4119 Physics 3 
(4 QH) All Quarters 

Studies electrostatics, circuit elements, direct cur- 
rent circuits, magnetism, electromechanical devices, 
alternating current circuits, electronics, and electro- 
magnetic waves. Prereq.: PHY 4118. 

PHY 4173 Physics Laboratory 1 
(2.3 lab, 2 QH) Winter, Summer 

Offers experiments in mechanics, elastic deforma- 
tion, work, energy, thermometry, and calorimetry. 
Prereq.: PHY 4117. 

PHY 4174 Physics Laboratory 2 
(2.3 lab, 2 QH) Spring, Summer 

Continues PHY 4173. Offers experiments in gas 
laws, wave motion, optics, electrical circuits, and 
nuclear and atomic physics. Prereq.: PHY 4173. 



Technical Communications 



TCC 4350 Concepts of Modern Technology 1 
(3 QH) Fall 

Surveys applications of physical science to mechan- 
ical devices and introduces the laws of thermody- 
namics. Considers the influence of material 
properties on design and manufacturing techniques. 
Prereq.: MTH 4006 or equiv. 

TCC 4351 Concepts of Modern Technology 2 
(3 QH) Winter 

Surveys applications of physical science to electri- 
cal and electronic devices and introduces electronic 
circuit design. Includes a comparison of various 
devices used for amplification and control, and a 
study of the development of the electronic digital 
computer and the components involved in the man- 
ufacture of computers. Prereq.: TCC 4350. 



Northeastern University 



34 



A Profile of Northeastern 



At Northeaistern University, we value part-time 
evening and weeicend students as highly as we 
do our full-time students. You are important 
members of the academic community and 
reflect the changing profile of today's college 
student, which encompasses new concerns for 
lifelong learning and professional retraining. 
Northeastern supports your pursuit of personal 
and professional goals and wants to contribute 
to your success. In return, you contribute to the 
intellectual and cultural diversity upon which 
this urban institution thrives. You may take full 
advantage of the academic resources and facili- 
ties we offer and join all our students who are 
recognized and supported by the University's 
faculty and administration. 

Founded in 1898, Northeastern University is 
incorporated as a privately endowed, nonsectar- 
ian institution. From its beginning, the 
University's mission has been to identify and 
address the educational needs of a diverse com- 
munity and student body in distinctive and use- 
ful ways. Northeastern did not duplicate the 
programs of other academic institutions, but 
instead became a world leader in new areas of 
educational service. Today, the University is 
comprised of eight undergraduate colleges and 
nine graduate schools. Our undergraduate 
colleges are: 

• Boston-Bouve College of Human 
Development Professions 

• College of Arts and Sciences, including the 
School of Journalism 

• College of Business Administration 

• College of Computer Science 

• College of Criminal Justice 

• College of Engineering, including the School 
of Engineering Technology 

• College of Nursing 

• College of Pharmacy and Allied Health 
Professions 

Our graduate schools are: 

• Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 

• Graduate School of Boston-Bouve College of 
Human Development Professions 

• Graduate School of Business Administration 



• Graduate School of Computer Science 

• Graduate School of Criminal Justice 

• Graduate School of Engineering 

• Graduate School of Pharmacy and Allied 
Health Professions 

• Graduate School of Professional Accounting 

• School of Law 

At Northeastern, we respond to the needs of 
people who already hold jobs or are launched in 
careers, but who wish to advance or change 
their professional lives. There are also classes 
for people pursuing personal interests. The 
University offers a variety of educational 
options — both credit and noncredit — to suit 
your particular objectives. The School of Engi- 
neering Technology offers part-time evening 
and weekend associate's and bachelor's degree 
programs in technological areas, in addition to 
daytime undergraduate programs. University 
College, so-named because it draws upon the 
resources of Northeastern 's other colleges, 
offers part-time day and evening programs lead- 
ing to certificates and to associate's and 
bachelor's degrees. 

All formal courses of study leading to 
degrees through part-time programs are 
approved by the full-time day faculty of 
Northeastern 's Basic Colleges concerned, and 
are governed by the same qualitative and 
quantitative standards. 



Where You'll Find 
Northeastern 



The main campus of Northeastern is a vibrant 
and progressive urban community. To all 
Northeastern students, the physical setting of 
the Boston campus extends opportunities to 
participate in the dynamic, exciting environ- 
ment that we share with city residents. Built 
around a quadrangle, the campus is divided by 
Huntington Avenue, a major artery. It is located 



University Libraries 



in the midst of such cultural landmarks as 
Symphony Hall, the Museum of Fine Arts, the 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Horticultural 
Hall, and the Boston Public Library. You can 
walk to FYederick Law Olmsted's Fenway Park, 
Copley Place, the Back Bay shopping district, 
and a number of internationally renowned hos- 
pitals. In 1910, the University began construc- 
tion on the first piece of land acquired at its 
present site; it is now more than fifty-five acres. 

The Boston campus is ideally situated for 
easy commuting. The MBTA Orange and Green 
lines provide trolley service to the heart of the 
campus. Use either the Orange Line's Ruggles 
Street station or the Green Line's Northeastern 
University stop along the Arborway Branch to 
arrive on campus. The MBTA also has numer- 
ous bus routes that run along Huntington and 
Massachusetts avenues, which are the two 
major city streets closest to the campus. Finally, 
if you need to drive to Northeastern, student 
parking is available at reasonable rates in 
University-owned parking lots. 

To reach increasing numbers of students 
and to make participation in our programs as 
convenient as possible for you. Northeastern 
University has established a number of subur- 
ban campuses and branch locations, as well as 
several off-campus athletic facilities. The cam- 
puses and branch locations house administra- 
tive and classroom facilities for Northeastern's 
graduate, part-time day and evening, and contin- 
uing education programs. The University also 
maintains many affiliations to ensure access to 
facilities and specialized equipment available at 
other institutions and organizations. 

One of Northeastern's most recent acquisi- 
tions is the twenty-acre Dedham campus, just 
north of Route 128. This facility houses the Cen- 
ter for Continuing Education and provides 
space for the College of Business Administra- 
tion's High Technology MBA Program. 

Near the junction of Routes 128 and 3 
in Burlington is the Suburban Campus of 
Northeastern University. Part-time undergradu- 
ate courses in a variety of subject areas and 
part-time graduate courses in engineering and 
business administration are offered. The Bur- 
lington campus also offers special programs for 
part-time, evening, and noncredit continuing 
education courses. 

Situated on fifty acres in Ashland, the 
Warren Center provides a practical laboratory 
for outdoor education and conservation and for 
camping administration, programming, and 
counseling. In the summertime, the center 
becomes an attractive campsite for various 



community and University groups and is avail- 
able for conferences and workshops. 

Twenty miles northeast of Boston, the 
Marine Science and Maritime Studies Center is 
located in Nahant, on Massachusetts Bay. It 
serves as a site for national, international, and 
University research. 

Henderson House, Northeastern University's 
cortference center, is located twelve miles from 
Boston in suburban Weston. This facility 
hosts a variety of activities, including residential 
seminars, workshops, short courses, and 
weekend meetings. 



Network Northeastern 
University 

A unique extension of the University is 
available to you via Network Northeastern 
University (NNU). The cable network uses the 
microwave-based Instructional Television Fixed 
Service (ITFS) system to telecast live classroom 
instruction (in color) on four channels from the 
Boston campus to off-campus students within a 
forty-mile radius. Telecasts are delivered daily 
between 8 a.m. and 10 p.m. Current Network 
Northeastern course offerings include graduate 
engineering, graduate computer science, state 
of the art professional development courses, 
undergraduate engineering technology, arts and 
sciences, and noncredit nursing courses. 

At twenty-two company sites and two sub- 
urban campuses, students view the telecasts in 
reception rooms equipped with television moni- 
tors and a telephone-based talkback system. 
Thus, students off campus can participate as 
fully as those on campus. A courier service 
collects and delivers homework assignments 
and serves as the off-campus student's link to 
the bookstore, Registrar, and other 
Northeastern offices. 



University Libraries 

As a reflection of our serious commitment to 
part-time students, you have access to all seven 
of the University's extensive library units. 
Located on the Boston campus is Dodge, 
Northeastern's main facility, and three libraries 
that house graduate-level collections in chemi- 
cal and biomedical sciences, mathematics and 



Academic Computer Services 



psychology, and physics and electrical engineer- 
ing. There are also libraries on the Burlington 
and Dedham campuses and at the Marine Sci- 
ence and Maritime Studies Center in Nahant. 

Total holdings of all University libraries 
include the equivalent of more than one million 
volumes in print and in microform; 5,000 peri- 
odical titles; 300,000 government documents; 
and 24,000 items in audiovisual and computer 
software formats. In Dodge, the Learning 
Resources Center provides computer-assisted 
instruction, microcomputer facilities, and lan- 
guage and music listening laboratories. The cen- 
ter also houses an extensive set of self-paced 
media materials in various interactive formats, 
including audiotapes, videotapes, and 
computer-assisted lessons and exercises. 

Northeastern 's membership in the Boston 
Library Consortium generally entitles our stu- 
dents to on-site use of libraries at Boston and 
Wellesley colleges, the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, the State Library of Massachu- 
setts, the University of Massachusetts (Amherst, 
Boston, and Worcester campuses), and Boston, 
Brandeis, and Tufts universities. 



Academic Computer Services 



Northeastern 's Academic Computer Services 
supports the learning activities of students at all 
levels, as well as the teaching and research 
undertaken by faculty, research personnel, and 
graduate students. The programming assistance 
offered at the Boston, Burlington, and Dedham 
campuses promotes effective use of all aca- 
demic computer systems. At these three cam- 
puses, two hundred and seventy assorted 
personal computers are linked in local-area net- 
works. Via a wide-area network, students and 
faculty have time-sharing access to five large 
computers through video and hard-copy termi- 
nals arranged in clusters at the three campuses. 
This network connects a Digital Equipment 
Corporation VAX 8650 system plus an additional 
VAX 11/785 and a Data General MV/8000. A vari- 
ety of graphics and output devices are available. 
Electronic spreadsheet and wordprocessing 
packages are available to you, in addition to 
many software libraries for numerical, statisti- 
cal, and financial applications. The primary lan- 
guages supported by Academic Computer 
Services are FORTRAN, COBOL, BASIC, Pascal, 
and Assembler. 



Ell Student Center 



Student recreation and extracurricular activities 
of all kinds are held at the Carl S. Ell Student 
Center. The center houses the Alumni Audito- 
rium, which seats 1,300; special drama facilities; 
a ballroom; a main lounge; fine arts exhibition 
space; student offices; conference rooms; a caf- 
eteria with seating for more than 1,000; and 
a bookstore. 



Sport, Dance, and 
Exercise Facilities 



Northeastern is concerned with providing for 
the health and fitness of our students, and we 
continually expand the sports, exercise, and 
recreational options available to you. All 
part-time students have access to our extensive 
gymnasium facilities from 4:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, and during all open 
hours on Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. The 
University offers you a variety of specialized 
facilities, including basketball courts, dance stu- 
dio, indoor athletic field and running track, 
gymnastics room, combatives room, 
weight-training rooms, swimming pool, crew 
practice tank, racquetball courts, and motor 
performance and exercise physiology laborato- 
ries. The Matthews Arena, with seating for more 
than 5,000 fans, is home to the University's 
varsity and subvarsity hockey and 
basketball teams. 

For organized athletics requiring facilities 
not available on the main campus. Northeastern 
maintains the Northeastern Boat House, which 
is located on Memorial Drive in Cambridge and 
is home to the University's crew teams. The 
Edward S. Parsons Field, on Kent Street in 
Brookline, is the playing ground for the football, 
baseball, women's lacrosse and women's field 
hockey teams, and some intramurals. The Ber- 
nard M. and Jolane Solomon Track, a recently 
completed outdoor track and field facility in 
Dedham, has an eight-lane. Action Trak 200 
running surface and an expansive area for con- 
current jumping and field events. This new 
facility is ready to host dual and championship 



Department of Career Development and Placement 



meet competitions and is a permanent site for 
Northeastern University track athletes. 

You must present a vahd Northeastern stu- 
dent identification card and a photo identifica- 
tion card for access to the facilities. 



The OSH is also the gathering place for the 
Disabled Student Organization of Northeastern 
University, which works cooperatively with 
OSH to plan programs and improve acces- 
sibility of services for handicapped people 
at Northeastern. 



Social and Professional Clubs 



We welcome and encourage part-time students 
in the School of Engineering Technology and 
University College to join in the social 
and professional activities that are organized 
and run by the student body, with the assistance 
of the director of the Office of University 
College-School of Engineering Technology Stu- 
dent Activities. If you and your peers are inter- 
ested in starting new professional clubs, the 
office will help to plan and organize locally 
and nationally. 

All programs are designed to keep pace 
with changing student needs and interests and 
to provide maximum opportunity for 
your participation. 



Counseling and Testing Center 



Whether you are already enrolled or a prospec- 
tive student, you can receive confidential coun- 
seling or testing to address your career, 
educational, or personal concerns. Assistance is 
available to all students during days and certain 
weekday evenings until 8:30 p.m. at the Coun- 
seling and Testing Center. For information and 
appointments, call 617-437-2142 or drop in at 
302 Ell Building. 



Lane Health Center 



Office of Services 
for the Handicapped 



No student should miss or have diminished any 
of the opportunities at Northeastern. Any stu- 
dent who has a disability-related need, no mat- 
ter how small or individual, can receive ready 
support services from the Office of Services for 
the Handicapped (OSH). FYequently, students 
are uncertain about how they may be helped by 
this office; in these situations, a discussion of 
possible alternatives is useful. OSH provides a 
range of support services to eliminate the com- 
petitive disadvantages that a disability may cre- 
ate. Services are tailored individually to meet 
the needs of each student. 

Types of assistance available from OSH 
include providing help during orientation, regis- 
tration, and preregistration, an information 
clearinghou.se, counseling, arranging for 
housing, and services for the hearing-impaired, 
the wheelchair user/mobility-impaired, and 
learning disabled student. 



The well-being of all Northeastern students is a 
crucial concern for the University. The health 
services clinic of the Lane Health Center, 
located on the Boston campus, is equipped to 
deal promptly with medical emergencies at 
all times. 



Department of Career 
Development and Placement 



Career development and advancement are 
important for all our students to consider, 
and frequently are of particular relevance to 
part-time and evening students who may be 
contemplating a career change or are exploring 
different professional options for the first time. 
The Department of Career Development and 
Placement has designed services to support 
your professional development. The department 
can help you to identify career paths, establish 
a network of professional contacts, and is ready 
to assist with job placement. Free services for 
students and alumni include individual career 



Cooperative Plan of Education 



and placement counseling; a job bank of current 
employment opportunities; a reference library 
with company files and employer contacts; 
panels and regularly scheduled seminars on 
such topics as resume preparation and effective 
interviewing; the annual Career Expo during 
evening hours; and on-campus corporate 
recruiting for seniors. 

In Boston, counselors are available by 
appointment; they also travel to the Burlington 
and Dedham campuses for meetings with stu- 
dents and alumni. If you want to make an 
appointment for counseling or wish to receive 
additional information on any of the depart- 
ment's services, call 617-437-2428 or visit the 
Career Development and Placement Office on 
the Boston campus in 124 Ruggles Building. 
Call for office hours. 

If you wish placement assistance, you 
should arrange an appointment with the direc- 
tor of Career Development and Placement, 120 
Ruggles Building, 617-437-2430. 



Alumni Association 



Upon graduation, you will join the more than 
93,000 alumni united within the Alumni Associa- 
tion, which was established to promote a 
mutually rewarding relationship between 
Northeastern and its graduates. Association 
activities include the Homecoming celebration, 
presentation of the Outstanding Alumni Awards, 
and the annual presentation of Professional 
Promise Awards to outstanding seniors in each 
of the colleges. 



Cooperative Plan of Education 



The University is known worldwide by its 
Cooperative Plan of Education, under which 
students alternate periods of work and study. 
Our time-tested, widely acclaimed method of 
education enables students to gain valuable 
hands-on, practical experience in their chosen 
fields as an integral part of their college pro- 
grams. The Co-op Plan also allows students to 
earn money that is used to offset tuition, or 
related costs. All of Northeastern 's undergradu- 
ate day colleges operate on the Cooperative 
Plan, and several of the University's graduate 
schools have structured their programs to 
include the features of cooperative education. 



Administrative Information 



39 



Admissions 
The Student Body 

The student body of the School of Engineering 
Technology is composed of both recent high 
school graduates and adults. Most students are 
employed in industry, with a range of vocational 
experience. They represent many technical 
career categories — industrial, engineering, sci- 
entific, and allied-medical, demonstrating that, 
in our increasingly complex society, the key to 
personal advancement is education. 



Academic Background 



A firm knowledge of the fundamentals of math- 
ematics and science is necessary for success in 
the more advanced technological courses. 

All applicants to the School of Engineering 
Technology are required to be proficient in both 
English and mathematics. In order to enroll in 
ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 or MTH 4107 Col- 
lege Algebra, you must satisfactorily complete 
an English and a mathematics skills test. 

Students who lack the required English or 
mathematics skills must take the appropriate 
review course. In addition, students who feel 
uncomfortable with the level of their English or 
mathematics skills are encouraged to enroll in 
review courses as well. The next paragraphs 
provide brief descriptions of the review courses 
available at the School of Engineering Technol- 
ogy. The review courses are offered on a non- 
credit basis only. 

ENG 4005, ENG 4006, and ENG 4007 
English for International Students 1-3 

This is a three quarter sequence of courses for 
foreign speaking students that provides inten- 
sive training in the English language. Students 
are introduced to English grammar, with an 



emphasis on listening, speaking, and writing. 
The preparation of written and oral reports, as 
well as business and social correspondence, is 
required. In the final quarter, advanced work in 
written and spoken English prepares the stu- 
dents for ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1. 

ENG 4011 Elements of Writing 

This is a writing course that reviews English 
grammar, and offers practice in writing sen- 
tences, paragraphs, and short papers. The 
course prepares students for ENG 4110 Critical 
Writing 1. 

MTH 4006 Technical Mathematics 

This is a mathematics course that reviews 
high school algebra and prepares students for 
MTH 4107 College Algebra. 

Program Counseling 

If you are attending the School of Engineering 
Technology for the first time, we recommend 
that you meet with a program counselor who 
will assist you in planning an academic pro- 
gram. (If possible, please bring school tran- 
scripts to the counseling session.) Counselors 
are available evenings and Saturdays at the 
main campus in Boston most of the year; a spe- 
cial schedule is prepared for the summer. Coun- 
seling at the Burlington campus is scheduled 
at the beginning of each quarter. For further 
information, contact the School of Engineering 
Technology, 617-437-2500. 

Special Students 

Our open enrollment policy allows you to enroll 
in courses without making a formal application. 
As long as you have the proper prerequisites 
or their equivalent, you can enroll as a 
special student. 



Admissions 

Degree Candidates 

To graduate from the School of Engineering 
Technology you must be accepted as a degree 
candidate in a program. An application for 
degree candidate status is available from the 
School of Engineering Technology Office in 
Boston (120 Snell Engineering Center, 
617-437-2500) and from our representative 
in Burlington. 

To declare a major, you must do the following. 

1. Complete sixteen quarter hours in the 
School of Engineering Technology 
degree program at a minimum cumulative 
quality-point average of 2.00 (a grade of C). 

2. Present a high school diploma or its 
equivalent (GED). 

Once your application for admission to a degree 
program is approved, a change of status will be 
recorded on your permanent record and any 
advanced standing credit will be posted. 

Full-Time Students 

In addition to the part-time programs described 
in this publication, the School of Engineering 
Technology offers full-time day cooperative 
education programs. Interested students can 
apply through the Undergraduate Admissions 
Office, 617-437-2200. 

Readmission 

If you are a former student seeking readmission 
to the School of Engineering Technology, we 
suggest you schedule a meeting with a program 
counselor to determine how program changes 
may affect course requirements. We recommend 
that you bring a copy of your previous curricu- 
lum worksheet and a transcript. 

Transfer Students and Advanced 
Standing Credits 

If you are transferring from a community col- 
lege, junior college, technical institute, or other 
college or university, you may transfer applica- 
ble credits toward the degree requirements 
of a program in the School of 
Engineering Technology. 



If you are admitted with transfer or 
advanced standing credits from another institu- 
tion, you must meet the requirements for admis- 
sion as set forth under the regulations stated. 
(See "Degree Candidates.") Advanced standing 
in the School of Engineering Technology may 
be obtained by transfer of credits, proficiency 
examination, or by completing the College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP). 

Transfer of Credits 

You may receive, subject to the approval of the 
Academic Standing Committee, credits for aca- 
demic work completed in other approved 
schools, colleges, or universities if the following 
criteria are met: the content of the course being 
submitted is equivalent to that of the corre- 
sponding course in the School of Engineering 
Technology; the grade achieved in the course 
submitted is C or higher; and the remoteness of 
the time of study does not negate its use as a 
prerequisite for an advanced course. 

If you desire advanced standing credits by 
transfer, please indicate by filing a petition for 
transfer credit. You should request the registrar 
of the institutions previously attended to mail 
an official transcript to the School of 
Engineering Technology Office, 120 Snell Engi- 
neering Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. 

Proficiency Examinations 

If you do not meet all the criteria for the nor- 
mal transfer of credits but are able to supply 
evidence of sufficient knowledge of a technical 
subject, you may petition the Academic 
Standing Committee for a proficiency examina- 
tion. After paying the proficiency examination 
fee and demonstrating proficiency as indicated 
by the examination, you will receive advanced 
standing credit. 

College Level Examination Program 

The School of Engineering Technology awards 
college credit under the College Level Examina- 
tion Program (CLEP). This program is designed 
to enable individuals who have reached 
college-level education to demonstrate their 
achievement through testing and to receive col- 
lege credit applicable toward a degree program. 
(The examination measures basic proficiency in 
the arts and sciences.) After paying the exam 
fee and receiving a passing score, you will be 
awarded advanced standing credits. For further 
information, contact the School of Engineering 
Technology, 617-437-2500. 



Registration 



Registration 

Selecting Courses During Registration 

Each course offered by the School of Engineer- 
ing Technology is Usted in the "Course Descrip- 
tions" section of this bulletin. (See page 16.) 
Part of each course's entry includes a listing of 
which quarters the course is offered. Because 
most courses are not offered every quarter, you 
should plan your course load for the entire aca- 
demic year, not just the next quarter. Academic 
counseling is available to help plan your course 
load for the year. If you need help, contact a 
School of Engineering Technology program 
counselor, 617-437-2500. 



Guidelines for Registering for Eledives 

Many of the School of Engineering Technology's 
degree programs require the completion of elec- 
tives. The electives give you the chance to 
explore topics beyond the core curriculum's 
scope or to gain expertise in a specific area 
introduced by the core courses. 

There are three categories of electives: open, 
technical, and social science/humanities. 

Open Electives 

Any course, except physical education, military 
science, and preparatory courses, is acceptable 
as an open elective. An open elective may be 
either a three or a four quarter-hour course. 

Social Science/Humanities Electives 

Social science/humanities electives are offered 
through University College and must be chosen 
from a list that is available from the School of 
Engineering Technology. Six quarter hours of 
the social science/humanities electives must be 
chosen from the speech communications 
(SPC) category. 

Technical Electives 

Technical electives must be chosen from the list 
of suggested technical electives appearing at 
the end of the respective degree curriculum. 
Students wishing to take an upper-level course 
that does not appear on the list must petition 
for permission before attending the class. Stu- 
dents should submit a proposed program of 
elective courses — preferably representing a 
minor field of concentration consistent with 
personal career objectives — for approval by the 
program coordinator. 



Registration Periods 

Official registration periods are scheduled for 
each quarter during the academic year. We 
strongly recommend that you register for 
courses during these periods. The registration 
dates, times, and locations are listed in the 
enclosed Fee Schedule and Academic Calendar. 

Before the registration period begins, get a 
copy of the University College and School of 
Engineering Technology Schedule for the next 
quarter. The Schedule provides you with the 
meeting times and locations of the courses 
being offered during the next quarter. To get a 
copy of the Schedule, contact the School of 
Engineering Technology, 617-437-2500. 

Changes in Registration 

You can change the courses you are registered 
in by: filing a course drop form at the Regis- 
trar's Office, 120 Hayden Hall; and then regis- 
tering for the desired course. We suggest that 
you make these changes during the official reg- 
istration period, if possible. 

Cross-Registration 

Basic College students registering for School of 
Engineering Technology part-time courses may 
do so only to clear deficiencies or to follow a 
program approved by the appropriate program 
coordinator. As a Basic College student, you 
may register for part-time courses only by com- 
pleting the registration form available in the 
School of Engineering Technology Office by the 
end of the first week of the quarter. You must 
not fill out any other part-time registration 
materials. Approval of the program coordinator 
must be obtained if the course does not appear 
on your approved program sheet. Approval from 
the Department of Cooperative Education is 
required if you take more than one course dur- 
ing a co-op term. Upon completion, approval, 
and submission of the registration form, you 
will be registered automatically for the course. 
If the course is a substitute for a day course, 
the latest grade received is considered for 
quality-point calculations. If you do not appear 
on the part-time roster you will not be admitted 
into the class unless you have an approved reg- 
istration form. In all instances, Basic College 
students must adhere to the academic and 
administrative requirements of the School of 
Engineering Technology part-time course. 



Academic Standards 



Part-time School of Engineering Technology 
students who have been enrolled at 
Northeastern University for one or more quar- 
ters are eligible to register for a limited number 
of Basic College day courses. This policy is 
designed to accommodate previous School of 
Engineering Technology students who have 
experienced employment changes that make it 
impossible for them to continue part-time stud- 
ies. If you are eligible, you may register for 
eight quarter hours of day course credit per 
quarter for a maximum of three academic quar- 
ters. Since you will be a part-time evening stu- 
dent in Basic College courses, tuition, fees, 
student services, and space availability will be 
based on part-time rates and departmental 
policy. If you are interested, you must first 
determine if a specific course is offered in the 
University, complete the registration form in the 
School of Engineering Technology, and have the 
form approved in both the Bursar's and Regis- 
trar's offices. At this point the academic depart- 
ment will determine space availability. 



Coursework 

You will receive different methods of instruc- 
tion in the course of your studies: lectures, 
home assignments, class projects, laboratory 
work, irregularly scheduled quizzes, and formal 
examinations. In addition, you will complete 
midterm examinations in most courses and a 
final examination at the completion of all 
courses. You are responsible for fulfilling all 
the requirements of a course. In the event of 
absence, you must make appropriate arrange- 
ments for makeup with the instructor. 

Attendance 

Chronic absence from regularly scheduled ses- 
sions in any subject, for whatever reason, may 
seriously jeopardize your academic progress 
and status. You are expected to attend all ses- 
sions scheduled in your courses. Excessive 
absence during a quarter may be sufficient 
cause for the Registrar to remove the course(s) 
from your schedule. 



Academic Standards 
Campus Locations 

All courses are offered at the main campus in 
Boston, with some coiu"ses available at the Sub- 
urban Campus, Burlington; Burlington High 
School; the Dedham campus; and Westwood 
Senior High School. Refer to the "Campus 
Maps" section. (See page 67.) 

Quarter Calendar 

Northeastern University operates on a 
quarter-system calendar. All courses are evalu- 
ated in terms of quarter-hour credit. A quarter- 
hour credit is equal to three-fourths of a 
semester-hour credit. 

Class Session 

Classes at Northeastern are scheduled in differ- 
ent modules. In assessing quarter-hour weight 
for courses, the following statement applies: 
One quarter hour of credit is equal to approxi- 
mately fifty minutes of instruction per week, 
plus two hours of individual study. 



Withdrawal 

Ceasing to attend classes or notifying the 
instructor does not constitute official with- 
drawal from a course. To withdraw officially, 
you must notify the Registrar's Office or com- 
plete the appropriate withdrawal form. 

The Registrar will withdraw you from a 
course if you do not attend the first three 
classes at the beginning of a quarter or the first 
two classes at the beginning of a summer term. 

Grading Systems 

You are required to maintain appropriate grades, 
quality-point average, and the quantitative credit 
requirements of your program to satisfy aca- 
demic progress criteria and graduate from the 
School of Engineering Technology. 

The following grading system is used. The 
numerical equivalent for each grade is in 
parentheses. 

A (4.000) Outstanding Attainment 

A- (3.667) 

B + (3.333) 

B (3.000) Good Attainment 

B - (2.667) 

C+ (2.333) 

C (2.000) Satisfactory Attainment 



Academic Standards 



C- (1.667) 

D+ (1.333) 

D (1.000) Poor Attainment 

D- (0.667) 

F (0.000) Failure 

I - Incomplete 

L - Audit (No Credit) 

S — Satisfactory achievement in a 

pass-fail course; counts toward 
total degree requirements 

U — Unsatisfactory achievement in a 

pass-fail course 

X — Incomplete in a pass-fail course 

* — Grade not received 

A general average of D is unacceptable and will 
not allow you to continue in the School of Engi- 
neering Technology or to receive a degree from 
Northeastern University. If you receive an F, you 
can clear the failure by repeating and passing 
the course. 

Pass- Fail Courses 

If you are a degree candidate in good academic 
standing and have completed forty quarter 
hours in a School of Engineering Technology 
degree program, you may register for one 
pass-fail course. Thereafter, you may register 
for one course on a pass-fail basis for each ten 
quarter hours of successfully completed work 
up to a maximum of nine quarter hours of 
pass-fail credit. You must obtain written permis- 
sion from the appropriate academic dean or 
designee and approval of the instructor. You 
may not register for more than one pass-fail 
course per quarter. Pass-fail courses are 
restricted to social science/humanities 
electives only. 

If you are a nondegree candidate, do not 
intend to become a degree candidate, and are 
making good academic progress, you may regis- 
ter for a course on a pass-fail basis with written 
permission from the appropriate academic dean 
or designee and approval of the instructor. You 
may not register for more than one pass-fail 
course per quarter. 

If you become a degree candidate, you may 
use only nine quarter hours of social science/ 
humanities elective credit, where applicable. 

Auditing a Course 

You can audit courses by filing the usual regis- 
tration forms and paying the regular tuition 
fees. There is no reduction in fees for auditing. 



Your decision to audit must be communicated 
in writing to the Registrar prior to the fourth 
class meeting. As an auditor, you may partici- 
pate in class discussion, complete papers and 
projects, and take tests and examinations for 
informal evaluation if desired. However, regard- 
less of the amount or quality of work com- 
pleted, no academic credit will be granted at 
any time for courses audited. 



Makeup Examinations 



Midterms 

If you are absent from a midterm examination, 
you may petition for a makeup examination; 
you do not automatically have the right to make 
up a missed examination. You must file a peti- 
tion for a missed midterm in accordance with 
the published schedule. Petitions may be 
obtained from the School of Engineering Tech- 
nology Office, 120 Snell Engineering Center, 
617-437-2500. 

If the petition is granted, you will be notified 
by mail when and where to make up the exami- 
nation. AH examinations are administered on 
the Boston campus. If you do not take makeup 
midterm examinations as scheduled you will 
forfeit the privilege. There is no fee for a 
midterm makeup. 

Finals 

If you are absent from a final examination, you 
will receive a grade of I (Incomplete) for the 
course. You do not automatically have the right 
to make up a missed final examination; you 
must file a petition for a missed final according 
to the published schedule. Petitions may be 
obtained from the School of Engineering Tech- 
nology Office, 120 Snell Engineering Center, 
617-437-2500. If the petition is granted, you 
must pay a fee before taking the special 
examination. (See enclosed Fee Schedule and 
Academic Calendar). 

You will be notified by mail when and where 
to take the final examination; all are adminis- 
tered on the Boston campus. If you do not take 
makeup final examinations as scheduled, you 
will forfeit the makeup privilege. 

Grade Reports 

The Registrar's Office will mail you a grade 
report that indicates both the quarterly quality- 
point average and the cumulative quality-point 
average. University regulations prohibit issuing 
grades by telephone. 



Academic Standards 

Quality-Point Average 

The quality-points you earn in a given course 
are determined on the basis of your letter grade 
and the credit hours carried by the course. 
The total quality-points earned, divided by the 
total number of credit hours, constitutes the 
quality-point average. 

1. When you receive more than one grade in 
the same course, the most recent grade will 
be used to calculate a quality-point average. 

2. A grade of I (Incomplete) will not be consid- 
ered in the final calculation. 

3. If you are a transfer student, you can receive 
advanced standing credits (ASC) for work 
completed at other institutions. While these 
credits count toward completion of credit 
requirements, neither the credits nor the 
grades earned in such courses are included 
in quality-point averages. 

4. In programs made up of combined 
University College and School of Engineer- 
ing Technology courses, your cumulative 
quality-point average will include all work in 
both colleges. 

For example, if you have registered for thir- 
teen courses, cleared a failure in one of them, 
cleared an incomplete in another by repeating 
the course, and received advanced standing 
credit in another, you may calculate the 
quality-point average as follows. 



Grade Numerical Credit 

Achieved Equivalent x Hours 



A 

A- 
B + 
B 

B- 
C + 

c 
c- 

D + 

D 

D- 

F 

FB 

I 

IC 

ASC 



QPA = 



4.000 

3.667 
3.333 
3.000 
2.667 
2.333 
2.000 
1.667 
1.333 
1.000 
0.667 
0.000 
3.000 

2.000 



Quality 
Points 

16.000 
11.001 

9.999 
12.000 

5.334 

4.666 

8.000 

5.001 

2.666 

3.000 

1.334 

0.000 

9.000 



2 = 4.000 



Totals 39 

Total Quality Points (92.001) 
Total Credit Hours (39) 



92.001 



= 2.359 



The Registrar cannot confirm calculations of 
quality-point averages. Each student's record is 
updated before graduation. In the meantime, 
borderline cases can be checked by a School of 
Engineering Technology counselor. 

Academic Progress Criteria 

You are expected at all times to strive for a high 
record of achievement. The Academic Standing 
Committee reserves the right to review all stu- 
dents' records and deny readmission to those 
who fall below a minimum quality level of 
achievement. This requirement has been estab- 
lished as follows. 

In order to remain in the college, you must 
have a quality-point average of 1.40 at the com- 
pletion of twenty-four quarter hours; 1.50 at the 
end of forty-eight quarter hours; and 1.60 at the 
end of seventy-two quarter hours. 

If you accumulate the equivalent of six 
uncleared failures, you may be considered ineli- 
gible to continue your program of study. 

Scholastic Probation 

The Academic Standing Committee has the 
authority to dismiss from the school or to place 
on scholastic probation any student whose 
scholarship is deficient because of a low 
quality-point average or excessive outstanding 
failures, regardless of quality-point average. 

A student on scholastic probation should be 
particularly diligent in current course work and 
make every effort to clear the academic defi- 
ciencies as soon as possible. Students whose 
academic records do not improve or whose fail- 
ures are not properly cleared may not be 
allowed to register for further courses. 

A student on scholastic probation who has 
cleared all or a substantial part of any 
outstanding failures may petition the Academic 
Standing Committee for removal from the 
probation list. 

Disciplinary Probation 

The Academic Standing Committee has the 
authority to dismiss from the school or place on 
disciplinary probation any student who is 
deemed unworthy because of conduct or char- 
acter. The committee may ask any student to 
withdraw from the school who is obviously out 
of sympathy with its aims and ideals. 



Academic and Professional Awards 



Graduation Requirements 



To receive the degree of associate in 
engineering, associate in science, or bachelor of 
engineering technology, you must meet the fol- 
lowing requirements. 

1. Formal acceptance into degree candidate 
status by the Committee on Admissions. 

2. Completion of all curriculum courses, either 
by attendance at the School of Engineering 
Technology or by receiving advanced 
standing credit. 

3. Completion of associate degree programs 
within eight years and bachelor's programs 
in twelve years from the date of entrance 
into the School of Engineering Technology 
(extensions of time may be granted by the 
Academic Standing Committee). 

4. Attendance for at least a year preceding the 
expected graduation date, and completion of 
at least one-fourth of the work in the School 
of Engineering Technology. 

5. Associate's degree candidates must meet the 
following quality-point requirements. 

• If you graduate no later than September 
1989, you must have a minimum overall 
quality-point average of 1.80. 

• If you graduate in 1990 or after, you must 
have a minimum quality-point average of 
2.00 in all courses in the major and a mini- 
mum overall quality-point average of 2.00. 

6. Bachelor's degree candidates must meet the 
following quality-point requirements. 

• If you graduate no later than 
September 1989, you must earn a minimum 
quality-point average of 2.00 in all courses 
in the major and a minimum overall 
quality-point average of 1.80. 

• If you graduate in 1990 and beyond, you 
must achieve a minimum quality-point 
average of 2.00 in all courses in the major 
and a minimum overall quality-point average 
of 2.00. 

7. Payment of the commencement fee. 
(See enclosed Fee Schedule and 
Academic Calendar.) 

8. You can declare a double major. However, 
only 75 percent of the credits earned in one 
program can be applied to the second. 

9. You must petition for transfer of credits 
completed at other institutions prior to Janu- 
ary 1 of the year in which you are to receive 
the degree. 



Academic and 
Professional Awards 



The academic programs offered by the School 
of Engineering Technology and the teaching, 
counseling, and professional efforts of the fac- 
ulty and staff are aimed at motivating you 
toward the highest levels of academic achieve- 
ment. To encourage scholarly and professional 
excellence and to recognize quality achieve- 
ments, the following awards are made at appro- 
priate times during the academic year. 

Dean's List Scholars 

All matriculated students maintaining honor 
grade averages — a minimum quality-point aver- 
age of 3.00 and no grades below C ' during a 
quarter, while carrying a minimum of eight 
quarter hours of credit — are recognized as 
Dean's List Scholars. If you want a certificate 
attesting to this honor, contact the School of 
Engineering Technology Office. 

« 

Graduation with Honor 

Bachelor's degree candidates who have superior 
achievement will be graduated with honor, high 
honor, or with highest honor, depending on the 
final quality-point average obtained. To be con- 
sidered for graduation with honor, a student 
must have completed a minimum of 72 quarter 
hours of work at the School of Engineering 
Technology. Courses transferred from other 
educational institutions will not be considered 
in determining honor graduates. 

Awards 

University Awards 

The University Awards are presented annually 
to seniors who have achieved high-ranking 
cumulative academic records. Certificates are 
awarded at the annual Class Day Ceremony. 

Technology Awards 

The Technology Awards are presented annually 
to seniors who have demon.strated superior aca- 
demic and professional capabilities in their 
fields. Appropriate certificates are distributed to 
outstanding .students enrolled in the following 
program categories. 



Additional Opportunities at Northeastern 



Aerospace Maintenance Engineering 

Technology 
Computer Technology 
Electrical Engineering Technology 
Mechanical Engineering Technology 
Mechanical-Structural Engineering Technology 

Class Marshal Award 

The Class Marshal Award is presented annually 
at the Class Day Ceremony to the top-ranking 
senior in a baccalaureate program. The award 
consists of a certificate and the President's 
Letter of Commendation. 

Sigma Epsilon Rho Awards 

This award is presented annually by Sigma 
Epsilon Rho, the evening colleges' scholastic 
honor fraternity. The highest-ranking students 
in University College and the School of 
Engineering Technology receive plaques and 
scholarships for outstanding scholastic 
achievement at the end of their junior year. 

Tau Alpha Pi Awards 

This award is presented annually by the Tau 
Alpha Pi National Engineering Technology 
Honor Society to recognize high scholastic 
achievement among students of the School of 
Engineering Technology. The award is intended 
to promote and encourage outstanding 
academic performance by offering membership 
in the society. Finally, the society hopes the 
award will strengthen the desirable qualities 
of personality, intellect, and character among 
its members. Inductees receive certificates 
and pins. 

Alumni Award for Professional Promise 

Established in 1947 by the Northeastern 
University Alumni Association, the Alumni 
Award for Professional Promise is presented 
annually at the Class Day Ceremony. The award 
is made to the senior who has demonstrated 
unusual professional promise through character 
traits, scholastic achievement, and 
professional performance. 



Additional Opportunities 
at Northeastern 

Educational Opportunities at Northeastern for 
Associate's Degree Graduates 

Graduates of associate's degree programs in 
engineering technology or science technology 
programs may be able to transfer applicable 
credits toward the degree requirements of a 
baccalaureate program in engineering technol- 
ogy or industrial technology at Northeastern. 

For information about transferring associ- 
ate's degree credits toward an engineering tech- 
nology bachelor's degree, call the School of 
Engineering Technology, 617-437-2500. For 
information about transferring associate's 
degree credits toward an industrial technology 
bachelor's degree, call University College, 
617-437-2400. 

In addition, engineering technology or sci- 
ence associate's degree graduates who main- 
tained a quality-point average (QPA) of 2.75 may 
be able to transfer applicable credits toward a 
bachelor of science in engineering degree. For 
information, call the College of Engineering's 
Student Services Office, 617-437-2154. 

Educational Opportunities at Northeastern for 
Bachelor's Degree Graduates 

Bachelor of engineering technology graduates 
who maintained a quality-point average (QPA) 
of 2.75 may be qualified to enter the College of 
Engineering's program leading to the bachelor 
of science in engineering degree. For informa- 
tion, call the College of Engineering's Student 
Services Office, 617-437-2154. 



Financial Information 



Tuition and Fees 



This section contains a brief description of the 
fees and charges that the University assesses 
for instruction or other services. The actual fee 
amounts are Usted in the enclosed Fee Schedule 
and Academic Calendar. If you do not have a 
Fee Schedule and Academic Calendar, you can 
request one by calling 617-437-2500. 

Tliition rates, all fees, rules and regulations, 
courses, and course content are subject to revi- 
sion by the President and the Board of Trustees 
at any time. 

Registration and Tuition Fees 

As a new student, you will be charged a 
one-time, nonrefundable registration fee. This 
fee is included in your tuition bill. 

Students are permitted to audit courses; 
however, there is no reduction in fees 
for auditing. 

You may not attend class sessions or take 
any examination until you have paid your tui- 
tion or have made satisfactory arrangements 
for payment. 

You will not be advanced in class standing, 
nor permitted to re-enroll in the University, nor 
have degrees conferred until all financial obliga- 
tions to the University have been met. 

If you are assigned to courses in other 
departments or colleges of the University, you 
will be charged tuition and other fees effective 
in those departments. 

Deferred Payment Privilege 

Occasionally situations develop, usually beyond 
the control of the student, that make it difficult 
to make regular payments. Under such circum- 
stances, we recommend that you discuss the 
problem personally with the Office of the 
Bursar, where you can work out a convenient 
deferred payment agreement. A service fee is 



charged for this privilege. (See enclosed F^ee 
Schedule and Academic Calendar.) 

Late Payment Fee 

A late payment fee is assessed on all accounts 
for failure to make payment or arrange for 
deferred payment by the bill due date. 

Refund of Tuition 

The general tuition refund policy in all schools 
and colleges of the University is as follows. 

The University provides all instruction quar- 
terly for which you must pay at the beginning of 
each quarter. Tuition refunds are granted for 
official withdrawal from a course through the 
first four weeks of a quarter. 

Tuition refunds are granted only on the 
basis of the date appearing on the official with- 
drawal application filed with the Registrar, 120 
Hayden Hall. Nonattendance does not consti- 
tute official ivithdrawal. Requests for refund 
must be made through the Office of the Bursar, 
245 Richards Hall. 

Refunds will be granted in accordance with 
the following schedule. 



Official withdraival 
filed within 
1st week of quarter 
2nd week of quarter 
3rd week of quarter 
4th week of quarter 
5th week or later 



Percen tage of t u it ion 
100"<, 

75% 

50% 

25% 

0% 



Tuition Underwritten by Employers 

If tuition is being paid directly by your 
employer to the University, you should give the 
Office of the Bursar a purchase order or a state- 
ment from an officer of the company, certifying 
that the company is underwriting the tuition. 
Many companies, however, do not pay the 
University directly but will reimburse employ- 
ees upon successful completion of each course. 
In such cases, you are responsible for payment 
in full at the start of each quarter. 



Financial Aid and Scholarships 



You may choose to pay in installments 
on the deferred payment plan. However, 
tuition may not be left unpaid pending 
employer reimbursement. 

Failure to make payments in accordance 
with these regulations will result in a late 
payment fee. 

If you have any questions about student 
accounts, please direct them to the Student 
Account Bursar, 245 Richards Hall, 
617-437-2270. 

Student Center Fee 

If you attend the main Boston campus in the 
evening in a part-time program of study, you 
will be assessed a nominal student center fee. 



Parking Registration Decal Fee 

If you park in the Boston or Burlington campus 
lots, you must obtain a parking registration 
decal by the end of the second week of the 
quarter. You may pay the fee at the Cashier's 
Office, 248 Richards Hall, or at the Burlington 
campus Cashier's Office. 

Proficiency Examination Fee 

Applicants may petition for advanced standing 
credit based on a "proficiency examination." 
There is a fee for each examination requested. 

Graduation Fee 

All candidates for associate's or bachelor's 
degrees must pay a graduation fee. The fee 
is billed whether or not you attend the 
Commencement Exercise. 



Transcript Fee 

You can obtain a transcript at the Registrar's 
Office, 117 Hayden Hall. There is no charge for 
an unofficial transcript. The official transcript 
fee is payable in advance at the Cashier's Office, 
248 Richards Hall. 



Textbooks and Supplies 

You must purchase your own textbooks 

and work materials. The cost varies according 

to the subject. If you are enrolled in 



Engineering Graphics, you should be prepared 
to purchase drawing supplies and a set of draw- 
ing instruments, in addition to the textbooks. 



Financial Aid and Scholarships 



The Office of Financial Aid, located at 254 Rich- 
ards Hall, offers several types of assistance to 
part-time students. All awards are based on 
financial need. Aid granted from programs 
sponsored by the federal government is depen- 
dent upon the amount of funding allocated to 
Northeastern University. 

Pell Grants 

The Pell Grant Program is a federal aid program 
designed to provide financial assistance to 
deserving students who wish to attend 
post-high school educational institutions. Pell 
Grants may be combined with other forms of 
aid in order to meet the full costs of education. 
The Pell Grant is an award and, unlike a loan, 
does not have to be repaid. A half-time student 
taking at least six credit hours each quarter and 
who is a United States citizen or an eligible 
noncitizen may apply. Applications are available 
in the Office of Financial Aid, 254 Richards Hall, 
617-437-3190, or by writing to the Pell Grant 
Processing Center, P.O. Box 4152, Iowa City, 
Iowa 52244. 

Guaranteed Student Loan 

A Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) is a 
low-interest loan made by a lender such as a 
bank, credit union, or savings and loan associa- 
tion. This is not a grant; you must repay this 
money. To be eligible, you must be enrolled at 
least half-time (six to eight QHs) in a degree or 
certificate program. You are required to file a 
Financial Aid Form (FAF^) and a Part-Time 
Financial Aid Application. Applications are 
available in the Office of Financial Aid, 254 
Richards Hall, 617-437-3190. 

Massachusetts Adult Learners Grant 

This program provides assistance to Aid for Fam- 
ilies with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipi- 
ents. To be eligible, you must have been a 



Financial Aid and Scholarships 49 



permanent legal resident of Massachusetts for 
at least one year prior to receiving the award, 
and you must be enrolled as an undergraduate 
student taking at least three quarter hours. You 
must file a Financial Aid Form (FAF). Applica- 
tions are available in the Office of Financial 
Aid, 254 Richards Hall, 617-437-3190. 

Massachusetts Part-Time Grant 

To be eligible for a Part-Time Grant, you must 
have been a permanent legal resident of Massa- 
chusetts for at least one year prior to the 
opening of the academic year as well as a 
United States citizen or eligible noncitizen. You 
must be em-olled for at least three but fewer 
than twelve undergraduate quarter hours. In 
addition, you must be enrolled in a degree or 
certificate program. If you are not so enrolled 
or if you have a prior bachelor's degree, your 
eligibility is restricted to a total of fifteen 
quarter hours. 

You must file a Part-Time Undergraduate 
Application with the Office of Financial Aid and 
a Financial Aid Form (FAF) with the College 
Scholarship Service. Applications are available 
in the Office of Financial Aid, 254 Richards Hall, 
617-437-3190. 

State Grants 

If you are a Massachusetts resident taking at 
least twelve quarter hours for three of the four 
academic quarters, you should apply for a 
Massachusetts State Scholarship. The applica- 
tion is the Massachusetts Financial Aid Form. 
Applications are available in the Office of 
Financial Aid, 254 Richards Hall, 617-437-3190. 

Community Sources 

Students and their families are urged to explore 
community, industrial, and foundation sources 
for collegiate financial aid. Parents' employers 
or the appropriate union organization may be a 
source. In addition, local, civic, political, reli- 
gious, or educational leaders are often aware of 
aid sources in the immediate community. Some 
typical sources include I^A, Kiwanis, Lions, 
Elks, Knights of Columbus, Masons, Sons of 
Italy, Rotary, State Rehabilitation, or the 
American Legion. 



Veterans' Benefits 

Any veteran covered by the Veterans Readjust- 
ment Act of 1966, Public Law 89-358, should 
report to 126 Hayden Hall to fill out the proper 
enrollment forms. Benefits depend on course 
load and increase sharply when a student takes 
more than eight quarter hours per quarter. 

Students needing additional information as 
to eligibility, allowances, or other details are 
urged to contact the local office of the Veterans 
Administration or the Veteran's Benefits Repre- 
sentative at 126 Hayden Hall, 617-437-2283. 

Scholarships and Application Procedures 

The following School of Engineering Technol- 
ogy and University College scholarships and 
awards are available to students who have been 
accepted as degree candidates and are in good 
academic standing. 

Scholarships are awarded once a year by the 
Scholarship Committee. Final selection of 
scholarship recipients is usually made in late 
May, followed by the awarding of the scholar- 
ships in late June or early July. F\inds are usu- 
ally applied to tuition expenses for the 
following academic year. Awards range in 
amount from $250 to $700. 

In January, a mailing list of students who 
have requested applications is prepared, and 
applications are mailed out with the stipulation 
that they be completed and returned to the 
Scholarship Committee's director's office by 
March 31. To be placed on the January mailing 
list, call 617-437-2400 and leave your name, 
address, and student ID number. 

Leslie B. Cutler Aviation 
Scholarship Awards 

Established by the members of the Aero Club of 
New England in recognition of the late Senator 
Cutler's service and devotion to the interests of 
aviation. These awards are made to students 
who most typify the same interest, devotion, 
and leadership demonstrated by Senator Cutler 
during her long and distinguished public career. 

Henry J. Doherty Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 

Established in 1987 through the generosity of 
Doris R. Doherty as a tribute to her late hus- 
band, a 1953 graduate of the School of Busi- 
ness' evening program and a successful 
business leader in legal publishing. The income 
from the scholarship is awarded annually to 



50 Financial Aid and Scholarships 



deserving students with demonstrated financial 
need who are pursuing part-time evening study 
and have been accepted as degree candidates. 

Kappa Tau Phi Scholarships 

Granted annually to those women students in 
the arts and sciences, business, and engineering 
programs who rank highest at the end of the 
upper-middle year. If the chosen student is eligi- 
ble for an award of greater monetary value, the 
award will be made to the next highest-ranking 
woman student. To be eligible for this scholar- 
ship, the student must be enrolled in a program 
of at least two evenings per week and must be 
a candidate for the bachelor's degree. In deter- 
mining the recipient, grades of all courses com- 
pleted in prior years shall be considered. 

Martin Luther King, Jr., Scholarships 

Established in 1969 in memory of the late Rev. 
Martin Luther King, Jr., awards are made, as 
openings occur, to minority-group adults who 
would otherwise be unable to continue their 
education. Stipends will cover tuition expenses 
not to exceed six quarter hours in any academic 
quarter (excluding the summer quarter). 

William J. McGovern Memorial Scholarship 

Established in 1978 by an anonymous donor to 
honor the memory of William J. McGovern. The 
donor wishes to assist others in realizing their 
potential through higher education. The income 
from this scholarship will benefit worthy under- 
graduate students actively pursuing studies in 
the School of Engineering Technology or 
University College. Recipients must be matricu- 
lated, demonstrate financial need and academic 
achievement, and exhibit a high level of 
professional promise. 

Sigma Epsilon Rho Honor Society 
Scholarship Award 

Established in 1974 by the membership of the 
society and awarded annually to undergraduate 
student(s) of the School of Engineering 
Technology and/or University College at 
Northeastern University. Eligible students must 
have a cumulative quality-point average of 3.00 
or better after completing 75 percent or more of 
the required studies. 

H. Patricia Taylor Scholarship Fund 

Established in 1974 by H. Patricia Taylor, a 
graduate of University College, and her hus- 
band, Harry C. Taylor, a graduate of the School 
of Business. The scholarship expresses their 



appreciation for financial assistance made avail- 
able to Mrs. Taylor while obtaining her degree, 
and is an attempt to provide similar funds to 
assist others in realizing potential through 
higher education. The income from the scholar- 
ship fund will be awarded annually to a student 
enrolled in University College or the School of 
Engineering Technology who demonstrates 
financial need and academic stability and who 
meets certain other conditions of ehgibility. 

Mark Caldwell Whitney Memorial Aviation 
Scholarship Fund 

Established in 1981 by the family and friends of 
the late Mark Caldwell Whitney, an outstanding 
1973 graduate of the Aeronautical Technology 
Program. Income from the fund will be awarded 
annually to a student with financial need who 
exemplifies Mr. Whitney's love of flying and 
commitment to excellence in the aviation field. 

Robert G. Keene Memorial 
Scholarship Fund 

Established in 1979 in memory of Robert G. 
Keene, a graduate of Lincoln College, now the 
School of Engineering Technology, Class of 
1972. The endowment fiinds were provided by 
the friends and associates of Robert G. Keene 
and the Polaroid Corporation, where he served 
as an engineering manager. The income from 
the fund will be awarded annually to an under- 
graduate in any college of the University who 
demonstrates financial need as well as strong 
character and initiative. Primary consideration 
will be given to children of Polaroid employees. 



Appendix 



52 



Faculty 



A listing of the School of Engineering Technology's 
faculty follows. 



A listing of the School of Engineering Technology's 
part-time faculty follows. Each entry gives the fac- 
ulty member's name; degrees earned; professional 
affiliation; and University title, department, and year 
of appointment. 



David J. Allen, BSCE, MSCE 

Assistant Professor 
Computer Technology 

Robert B. Angus, Jr., BS, MS 

Assistant Professor 

Electrical Engineering Technology 

Frank C. Bequaert, AB, MS 

Visiting Assistant Professor 
Computer Technology 

Thomas E. Digan, BSEE 

Visiting Assistant Professor 
Computer Technology 

David S. Goldman, BS, MS 

Assistant Professor 
Computer Technology 

Eric W. Hansberry, BS, MS 

Assistant Professor 
Design Graphics 

Nonna K. Lehmkuhl, BA, MEd, MS 

Program Coordinator of Computer Technology and 
Assistant Professor of Computer Technology 

Ernest E. Mills, BS, MS, PE 

Associate Professor 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 

Frederick J. Nohmer, BA, BS, MS 

Assistant Professor 

Electrical Engineering Technology 

Thomas E. Phalen, BS, MS, PE 

Program Coordinator of Mechanical Engineering 
Technology and Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering Technology 

Ronald E. Scott, BASc, MASc, ScD 

Visiting Professor 

Electircal Engineering Technology 



Arnold M. Aaron, BS, MS, PhD 

Engineering, Naval Underwater Systems Center 
Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1974) 

Velda Adams, BS, MS 

Principal Engineer, Digital Equipment Corp. 
Lecturer, Computer Technology (1980) 

Arnold W. Almquist, Jr., BS, MEd 

Mathematics Instructor, Needham High School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1967) 

Francis M. Antczak, BSEE 

Senior Engineer, Mass. Electric Co. 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1985) 

Ara Arakelian, BSEE, MSEE 

Analog Design Engineer, Digital Equipment Corp. 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

Technology (1987) 

Robert J. Averill, BS, MS 

Director of Engineering, EML Research Inc. 
Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, Electrical 
Engineering Technology (1957) 

John C. Balsavich, AS 

Laboratory Supervisor, Electrical Engineering, 

Northeastern University 
Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

Technology (1957) 

Henry G. Barry, AB, MEd 

Mathematics Department Chair, Bigelow Junior 

High School, Newton, MA 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1979) 

Peter J. Barthuly, BS, MS 

Principal Engineer, Comp Dresser & McKee 
Associate Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
Technology (1988) 



Faculty 



S3 



Peter L. Benoit, AE, BS 

Principal Engineer, Polaroid Corp. 
Lecturer, Computer Technology (1984) 

Matteo P. Berardi, BS, MS, PE 

Assistant Chief Engineer, Stone & Webster 

Engineering Corp. 
Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

Technology (1960) 

Maureen P. Berggren, BS 

Mathematics Teacher, Quincy High School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (19f)5) 

Wayne M. Bethoney, BET, BS 

Mechanical Engineer, AMMRC 

Lecturer, Mechanical Etiginecring (1982) 

Ralph S. Blanchard, BSME, MSME, PE (Mass.) 

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering, 

Northeastern University 
Senior Lecturer and Associate Program 

Consultant, Mechanical Engineering 

Technology (1950) 

Robert E. Bobeck, AE, BS, MEd 

Professor, Bristol Community College 

Senior Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1976) 

Edward Bobroff, BSME 

Test and Start-up Manager, Cogeneration 

Management/Hai-vard University 
Senior Lecturer and Program Consultant, 

Mathematics (1946) 

Richard P. Brennan, BSEE, BSCS 

Consultant 

Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1986) 

Michael J. Brier, BS, MS, MCS 

Engineering Technology Staff, (ITE Sylvania 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1985) 

Donald C. Brock, BS, MS 

Mathematics Instructor, Needham High School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1965) 

Kip A. Brown, BS 

Programmer/Analyst, United States Department 

of Transportation 
Lecturer, Computer Technology (1982) 

Thomas J. Bugos, AB, AM, MBA, PhD 

Software Engineer, Prime Computer 

Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1985) 

Morris H. Burakoff, BS, PE (Mass.) 

Consultant, Layered Inc. 

Senior Lecturer, Computer Technology (1957) 



Vincent K. Butler, BS, BET, MS 

Assistant Manager, New England Telephone 
Lecturer, Computer Technology (1982) 

Joseph M. Cardito, BS, MS, PhD, PE (Mass.), 
CHP (American Board of Health Physics) 

Supervisor, Nuclear Fuels and Data Systems, 

Stone & Webster Engineering Corp. 
Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

Technology (1978) 

Robert W. Case, BA, MA, PhD 

Coordinator for Day Program, School of 

Engineering Technology 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1976) 

Walter J. Casey, AB, MEd, MAT 

Mathematics Teacher, Brighton High School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1955) 

Joan M. Chrusciel, BS, MEd, MA 

Mathematics Department Head, Quincy High School 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1980) 

Vincent L. Cocco, BS 

Senior Engineer, Polaroid Corp. 
Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1978) 

Thomas C. Coleman, BSME, MSME, PhD, 
PE (Mass.) 

Senior Project Engineer, ('harles T. Main, Inc. 
Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, 
Mechanical Engineering Technology (1960) 

Robert P. Collins, BS, MEd, DEd 

Mathematics Teacher, Boston Latin School 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1981) 

Wendell R. Collymore 

Electronic Engineering Design CAD/CAM, 

Polaroid Corp. 
Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1976) 

Richard J. Colvario, BSBA, MEd 

Senior Analyst/Data Administrator, Massachusetts 

Department of Revenue 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1987) 

Leonard M. Conlin, AB, EdM 

Mathematics Teacher, F'ramingham North 

High School 
Setiior Lecturer, Mathematics (1967) 

Thomas R. Connolly, BET 

Controls and Instruments Engineer, 

General Electric Co. 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

Technology (1986) 



Faculty 



Roger T. Connor, AB, MEd 

Mathematics Teacher, Milton Academy 
Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, 
Calculus (195S) 

Joseph Z. Cooper, BSEE 

Marketing Manager, Equipment Division, 

Raytheon Co. 
Senior Lecturer, Computer Technology (1967) 

Robert J. Cormier, BS 

Site Planner and Land Architect, Self-employed 

Associate Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
Technology (1984) 

James B. Corscadden, BS, MEd, AMT 

Principal, Barnes Middle School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1967) 

Joseph P. Coughlin, BA, MA, MBA 

Director, System Engineering, Blue Cross 

of Massachusetts 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1987) 

William L. Crenshaw, BSME, MSME, PE (Mass.) 

Research Mechanical Engineer, Army Materials and 

Mechanics Research Center 
Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

Technology (1980) 

David C. Crockett, BS, MS 

Senior Engineer, Raytheon Co. 
Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1969) 

Gregory Czarnowski, AB, MEd 

Advertising Executive, Reeves Advertising 
Lecturer and Course Consultant, Technical 
Communications (1982) 

Thomas R. Deveney, BS, MA 

Principal, Thomas J. Kenny School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1965) 

Jane E. DeVoe, BS, MA 

Lecturer in Mathematics, Northeastern University 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1980) 

Douglas H. Diamond, BSEE, MS 

Program Manager, Analytical Systems 

Engineering Corp. 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1968) 

RafTaele Di Cecca, BA, MA, MS 

Assistant Professor, Wentworth Institute 
of Technology 

Lecturer, Mathematics (1982) 

Giles C. Dilg, BSEE, MSEE, PE (Mass.) 

President, Giles Dilg Co. 

Senior Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1966) 



Mark Domaszewicz, BSEE, MSEE 

Senior Engineer, Raytheon Co. 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1970) 

Leonard F. Dow, BSEE, MS, PE (Mass.) 

Staff Engineer, Boston Edison Co. 
Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1970) 

William J. Dubie, BA 

Product Promotion Specialist, 

Digital Equipment Corp. 
Lecturer, Technical Communications (1986) 

David P. Durant, BS, MEd, MS 

Teacher, Boston Latin School 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1983) 

William V. Durante, BS, MEd, MA 

Lecturer, Boston Latin School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1964) 

Henry B. Eden, BS 

President, Anco Boston, Inc. 

Senior Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1957) 

Peter A. Eggleston, BS, MS 

Senior AI Systems Engineer, AVCO/Everett 

Research Laboratories 
Lecturer, Computer Technology (1987) 

Walter E. Engstrom, BS, MS 

Physics Instructor, Braintree High School 
Associate Lecturer, Physics (1985) 

Adolf J. Erikson, BBA, MBA, PE (Mass.) 

President, A.E. Engineering Corp. 

Senior Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1966) 

Gordon C. Estabrooks, AB, MA, MEd 

Science Teacher, Boston Latin School 
Lecturer, Physics (1983) 

Andreas L. Evriviades, BS, MA 

Teacher of Mathematics, Milton Academy 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1983) 

Thomas C. Fantasia, BSEE, MSEE 

Power Coordinator, Boston Edison Co. 

Lecturer, Electrical Engineering Technology (1981) 

Edwin H. Farr, BS, MS, PhD 

Mathematician, Computer Technology Associates 
Associate Lecturer, Mathematics (1980) 

Paul F. Farrell, BSA, MS 

Education Manager, Wang Labs., Inc. 

Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1988) 

Daniel J. Fennelly, BSCS 

Branch Systems Engineer Manager, 

Data General Corp. 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1985) 



Faculty 



55 



William D. Finan, AB, MA, DEd 

Retired 

Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, 
Mathematics (1946) 

Louis A. Fiore, AE, BBA 

Retired 

Senior Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1956) 

John M. Flaherty, BS, MS, PhD 

Senior Staff Scientist, W.I. Shafer Associates 
Lecturer, Electrical Engineering Technology (1976) 

Richard I. Fox, BS, MS 

Laboratory Supervisor, Northeastern University 
Associate Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
Technology (1986) 

John J. Fraizer, BS 

Senior Engineer, Raytheon Co. 
Lecturer, Physics (1981) 

Thomas G. Fratto, AM 

Mathematics Teacher, Cambridge Rindge and 

Latin School 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1987) 

Lewis J. Fusegni, BSME, MSME 

Project Director, Stone & Webster Engineering Corp. 
Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1983) 

Kenneth W. Gagnon, BS 

Senior Chemist, Massachusetts Department of 

PubUc Safety 
Senior Lecturer, Physics (1977) 

Hassan N. Gharavy, BSEE, MSEE 

Assistant Professor, Mass Bay Community College 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1986) 

Peter D. Gianino, BS, MS 

Research Physicist, RADC, Hanscom Air Force Field 
Senior Lecturer, Differential Equations (1980); 
Mathematics (1965) 

Sheldon L. Glickler, BS, MS 

Software Development Manager, Matra Datavision 
Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1969) 

Bernard F. Goldstein, BS, MS, PhD 

Manager/Controls, Dynamics Research Corp. 
Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1974) 

Gustavo A. Gorrochotegui, AS, BET 

Quality Assurance Engineer, Texas Instruments 
Associate Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1982) 



Philip R. Haberstroh, BSEd, MSEd 

Registrar, Boston Latin School 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1981) 

W. Dale Hall, SB, MA, PhD 

Member, Technical Staff, MITRE Corp. 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1981) 

Gerald D. Halstead, BSEE, MSEE 

Technical Staff, GTE Government Systems 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1985) 

Francis A. Hankard, SB, MA 

Chief of Lab, Massachusetts Department of 

Public Safety 
Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, 

Physics (1946) 

Richard J. Hart, BSEd, MEd 

Computer Education Coordinator, Stone & Webster 

Engineering Corp. 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1983) 

Randall J. Hogan, MS, ME 

Senior Engineer, Raytheon Co. 
Associate Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1986) 

Lewis H. Holzman, BSCE, SMCE, PE (Mass.), 
RLS (Mass.) 

Consultant, Computer Department, Stone & Webster 

Engineering Corp. 
Senior Lecturer, Computer Technology (1966) 

Daniel H. Hornbarger, BS, MS 

Director, Government Programming Systems 

Division, Blue Cross 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1986) 

Abdo K. Ibrahim, BSc, MSc, PhD 

Professor, Boston University 
Lecturer, Physics (1984) 

Ronald L. Jackson, BS, MS 

Senior Engineer, Missile Systems Division, 

Raytheon Co. 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

Technology (1987) 

Charles E. Jacob, BSEE, MSEd, MLS 

Physics Teacher, Umana School 
Senior Lecturer, Physics (1967) 

John Joseph Joyce, BS, MEd, MA 

Mathematics Teacher, Winchester High School 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1983) 

John Kaczorowski, Jr., BSEE, MSEE 

Assistant Director, Northeastern University 
Senior Lecturer and Associate Program 

Consultant, Electrical Engineering 

Technology (1970) 



Faculty 



Stephen M. Kane, BA, MS, EdM 

Associate Professor, Co-op Education, 

Northeastern University 
Associate Lecturer, Mathematics (1987) 

Phillip T. Karatzas, AE, BS, MS 

Senior Radiological Engineer, Boston Edison Co. 
Lecturer, Physics (1978) 

William F. Kasting, BS, MSEE 

Systems Engineer, Raytheon Missile Systems 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1984) 

Louis Katona, BCE, MCE, PE (Mass., N.Y.) 

Senior Hydraulic Engineer, Barnes & Jarnis Inc. 
Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
Technology (1959) 

John G. Kelly, BS 

Associate, The Wyatt Co. 

Lecturer, Computer Technology (1982) 

Marcia J. Kemen, BA, MEd 

Assistant Professor, Wentworth Institute of 

Technology 
Associate Lecturer, Mathematics (1983) 

George F. Kent, BS, MS, MBA, PE (Mass., 
Conn.) 

Department Manager, Continuing Education, Stone 

& Webster Engineering Corp. 
Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, 

Materials (1962) 

David E. Kentley 

President/Treasurer, D-Five Associates Inc. 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1985) 

Lot Khani, BS, MS, PhD 

Project Engineer, General Electric Co. 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1987) 

Bernard J. Kiley, BE, ME, PE (N.H., Mass., 
Conn.) 

Senior Structural Engineer, Stone & Webster 

Engineering Corp.. 
Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

Technology (1958) 

Miroslav L Klun, BS, MS, MS, PhD 

Visiting Assistant Professor, Northeastern University 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1987) 

Peter L. Kobs, MS 

Writing Consultant, Digital Equipment Corp. 
Associate Lecturer, Technical 
Communications (1987) 



Henry M. Krafift, BE 

Senior Materials Engineer, Stone & Web.ster 

Engineering Corp. 
Associate Lectu rer. Mechanical Engineering 

Technology (1986) 

Joseph C. LaCroix, BA, MEd, CAGS 

Chair, Mathematics Department, Dorchester 

High School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1974) 

William F. Lawton, BS, MS 

Systems Engineer, Raytheon Co. 
Associate Lecturer, Mathematics (1986) 

Alvin J. Lesieur, BET, BS, MEd 

Instructor, Instron Corp. 

Senior Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1965) 

Demetre P. Ligor, BSEE, PE (Mass.) 

President, Applied Measurements, Inc. 
Senior Lecturer, Physics (1959) 

Warren J. Little, BS, MS 

Technical Staff, Charles Stark Draper Labs., Inc. 
Senior Lecturer, Physics (1966) 

George M. Livingstone, Jr., BS 

Architect 

Lecturer, Civil Engineering Technology (1975) 

Bertram S. Long, BSME, MSME 

Associate Professor Mechanical Engineering, 

Northeastern University 
Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

Technology (1975) 

Roger G. Long, AE, BBA, PE (Mass.) 

Senior Staff, Arthur D. Little, Inc. 
Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1952) 

Guido W. Lopez, BS, MS 

Lecturer, Northeastern University 
Associate Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1988) 

Phillip A. LoPresti, BSEE, MSEE 

Engineer Supervisor, NEC Electronics Inc. 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Techyiology (1985) 

John F. Lutkevich, AE, BBA 

Engineer-in-Charge, GTE Sylvania 

Senior Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1956) 

Kenneth E. MacDonald, BS, MBA 

Member Technical Staff, GTE Government Systems 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1987) 



Faculty 



57 



Eliot A. Madow, ASEE, BET 

Senior Systems Analyst, AVCO Specialty 

Materials/Textron 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1985) 

Rajendra K. Mathur, BS, BSCE, MSCE, 
PE (Mass.) 

Consultant, Stone & Webster Engineering Corp. 
Associate Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1985) 

Donald P. McCarthy, Jr., BS, MS 

Senior Engineer, New England Research Center 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1985) 

James T. McGrath, BS, MA, MS, MS, MS 

Teaching Assistant, Northeastern University 
Associate Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1986) 

Carl J. Mellea, SB, MS, PE (Mass., R.I., Maine, 
Vt., N.H.) 

Project Engineer, Howard, Needles, Tammen 

& Bergendorff 
Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

Technology (1960) 

Louis A. Moore, AE, BET, BSCE, RLS (Mass.) 

Chief Engineer, Commonwealth of Mass., Land 

Court, Boston 
Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

Technology (1972) 

Wassim G. Najm, BSEE, MSEE 

Teaching Assistant, Northeastern University 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1985) 

Ray O. Oglesby, BSEd, MSEd 

Retired 

Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1967) 

Yesugey Oktay, BS, MS, PE (Mass., N.Y., 
Calif., Maine) 

Division Head, Mechanical & Structural 

Engineering, Boston Edison Co. 
Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

Technology (1970) 

Douglas J. Ordway, BA, MEd 

Computer Coordinator, Boston Latin School 
Senior Lecturer, Computer Technology (1975) 

Francis A. Pepicelli, AE, BS 

Engineer, Northrop Corp. 
Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1976) 

Walter J. Phinney, AE, BET, MBA 

Engineering Manager, Raytheon Mi.ssile Division 
Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1977) 



Dominic A. Piccione, BS, MSPE (Mass., Va.) 

Senior Engineer, Stone & Webster Engineering Corp. 
Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1966) 

Richard H. Pike, BSIE, MBA 

Lecturer, Northeastern University 
Lecturer, Industrial Engineering (1980) 

Norman C. Poirier, BS, MS, PE (Mass.) 

Research Associate, Northeastern University 
Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1966) 

Donald J. Poulin, AE, BSIT, PE (Mass.) 

Retired 

Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1970) 

Daniel W. Pratt, BS, MS 

Mathematics Department, Boston Latin School 
Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, 
Mathematics (1967) 

Charles H. Price, Jr., BSEE, MSEE 

Technical Staff, MITRE Corp. 

Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, Electrical 
Engineering Technology (1960) 

Robert Rancourt, BS, MSEE 

Electrical Engineer, MITRE Corp. 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1984) 

James F. Regan, BSCE, MSCE, PE (Mass.) 

President, J. F. Regan Engineers, Inc. 
Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
Technology (1972) 

Edward L. Rich, BS, MS, PE (Mass.) 

Program Control Manager, Raytheon Co. 
Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
Technology (1956) 

Edward P. Ricupero, AB, MEd 

Head of Mathematics Department, Everett 

High School 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1983) 

Robert J. Ritchie, AE, BS 

Computer (iraphics Supervisor, Boston Edison Co. 
Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1980) 

Robert A. Rosenberg, SB, SM, ScD 

Engineering Consultant, Stone & Webster 

Engineering ('orp. 
Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

Technology (1983) 

Eric A. Roy, AB, MEd, MA 

Senior Teacher, Don Bosco Technical High School 

Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1967) 



Faculty 



Thomas E. Ruden, BS, MS 

Principal Engineer, Raytheon Co. Labs 
Senior Lecturer, Physics (1967) 

Annino D. Salvucci, AS 

Drafting/CAD OP Manager, Honeywell Inc. 
Lecturer, Engineering Graphics (1983) 

Leo D. Salvucci, AB, MEd, MST 

Mathematics Teacher, Boston Latin School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1965) 

Bernard J. Schmitz, BS 

Retired Senior Software Analyst, Honeywell, Inc. 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1985) 

Stephen Schwarm, BSEE 

Software Manager, Axiom Technology 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1985) 

John W. Shaw, AS 

Field Service Engineer 

Lecturer, Electrical Engineering Technology (1985) 

Howard T, Shippen, BSEE, MSEE 

Consultant, Shippen Associates 
Associate Lecturer and Program Coordinator for 
Telecommunications (1987) 

M. Daniel Simkovitz, BSEE, MS 

Manager, Communication Services, Academic 
Computer Resource Center, Northeastern 
University 

Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1986) 

Ronald J. Skilton, BS 

Manager/Systems, Stone & Webster 

Engineering Corp. 
Lecturer, Computer Technology (1983) 

Jay R. Southard, BA, MS 

President, Algorithms System Corp. 

Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1987) 

Joseph E. Steffano, Sr., BS, MS, MBA, PE 
(Mass., Vt., N.H., Conn., Maine, R.I., N.Y., 
Penn.) RLS (Mass., Conn., N.H., Maine, 
R.I., Vt.) 

Chief Engineer, Stone & Webster Engineering Corp., 

Structural Division 
Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

Technology (1965) 

Harold J. Stengel, SB 

Secondary Teacher in Mathematics, Boston 

Latin Academy 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1982) 

M. Carlton Storms, BA, MEd 

Teacher, Braintree High School 
Senior Lecturer, Physics (1967) 



Nabil S. Sukkar, BSCE, MSCE 

Director of QA, Strategic Software 
Associate Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
Technology (1984) 

Raimundas Sukys, BS, MS 

Senior Research Associate in Electrical Engineering, 

Northeastern University 
Senior Lecturer, Course Consultant, Electrical 

Engineering Technology (1962) 

Donald M. Sullivan, Jr., BS, MEd 

Instructor, Dedham High School 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1984) 

David G. Sveden, BA, MEd 

Mathematics Instructor, Town of Needham 
Lecturer, Mathematics (1979) 

Jerome Tapper, ASEE, BSEE 

Chief Electrical Engineer, ARK-LES Corp. 
Lecturer, Electrical Engineering Technology (1982) 

Jason R. Taylor, BS, MS 

President, Jason R. Taylor Assoc. 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1966) 

David K. Toebes, BS 

Design Engineer, Raytheon Co. 
Associate Lecturer, Mathematics (1987) 

Richard W. Torian, MSED 

Chair, Mathematics Department, Ashland 

High School 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1965) 

Hassam Toutanji, BSCE, MSCE 

Instructor, Northeastern University 
Associate Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
Technology (1987) 

John S. Travia, BSEE, MSEE, PE (Mass.) 

Program Manager, Raytheon Co. 
Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1965) 

Edward P. Tribuna, BET, FAA, A&P Certificate 

Systems Programmer, Digital Equipment Corp. 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1985) 

Jeryl J. Trier, BS, MA 

Mathematics Teacher, Lincoln Sudbury Regional 

High School 
Associate Lecturer, Mathematics (1987) 

William J. Tyler 

Staff Manager, New England Telephone 
Associate Lecturer, Telecommunications (1987) 



Faculty 59 



Mohanan K. R. Unni, BS, MS 

Systems Engineer, Optronics Inc. 
Associate Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1985) 

John F. Videler, BS, MS 

Manager, Instrument Standards and Controls, 

General Electric Co. 
Senior Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Technology (1968) 

Marianne Walpert, BS, MS 

Software Designer, Intersoft 
Associate Lecturer, Physics (1985) 

Joel R. Weinstein, BSEE 

President, High Technology Marketing 
Lecturer, Computer Technology (1977) 

James T. Welch, BSEE, MS 

Principal Engineer, Ungermann-Bass Inc. 
Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, Computer 
Technology (1977) 

Willard B. Whittemore, BS, EdM, CAGS 

Retired 

Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1957) 

Joseph F. Willard, BS, PE (Mass.), RLS (Mass.) 

Associate Civil Engineer, Massachusetts Department 

of Public Works 
Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

Technology (1949) 

Albert G. Wilson, BS, MS, PE (Mass.), SE (111.) 
Retired 

Senior Lecturer and Course Consultant, 
Mechanical Engineering Technology (1948) 

Alex Wilson, BS, MA 

Programming Consultant 

Senior Lecturer, Computer Technology (1986) 

Jacob Wiren, BS, MS, PE (Mass.) 

Retired 

Senior Lecturer, Computer Technology (1950) 

Susan L. Wood, BSEE 

Senior Software Engineer, Optical Diagnostic 

Systems, Inc. 
Associate Lecturer, Computer Technology (1984) 

Walter Zagieboylo, MS, ME, PE (Mass.), MAA 

Town Appraiser and Assessor, Wrentham, Mass. 
Senior Lecturer, Mathematics (1969) 



Administration 



Administrative Officers 

Thomas E. Hulbert, BMgtE, MS, PE, Director 
Roy A. Dalsheini, BS, Assistant Director 
Rasma Galins, Assistant Director 
John Kaczorowski, Jr., BS, MS, Assistant Director 
Rosanne L. Bogan, AS, Staff Assistant 

Student Counseling Staff 

Boreslaw P. Berestecky, MEd 

Rosanne L. Bogan, AS 

Roy A. Dalsheim, BS 

Rasma GaUns, Administrative Coordinator 

John Kaczorowski, Jr., BS, MS 

Stephen M. Kane, EdD 

Nonna K. Lehmkuhl, BA, MEd, MS 

Thomas E. Phalen, BS, MS 

Committee on Regulation and Discipline 

Thomas E. Hulbert, BMgtE, MS, PE, Chair 

Roy A. Dalsheim, BS 

Rasma Galins 

John Kaczorowski, Jr., BS, MS 

Academic Standing Committee 

Thomas E. Hulbert, BMgtE, MS, PE, Chair 

Rosanne L. Bogan, Secretary 

Roy A. Dalsheim, BS 

Rasma Galins 

John Kaczorowski, Jr., BS, MS 

Stephen M. Kane, EdD 

Nonna K. Lehmkuhl, BA, MEd, MS 

Thomas E. Phalen, BS, MS 

Academic Advisory Council 

Thomas E. Hulbert, BMgtE, MS, PE, Chair 

Edward Bobroff, BME 

Roy A. Dalsheim, BS 

Rasma Galins 

Francis R. Hankard, SB, MA 

John Kaczorowski, Jr., BS, MS 

Nonna K. Lehmkuhl, BA, MEd, MS 

Thomas E. Phalen, BS, MS 



Ralph S. Blanchard, Jr., BS, MS, PE (Mechanical 
Engineering Electives) 

Edward Bobroff, BME (Program Consultant, 
Mathematics) 

Rosanne L. Bogan, AS 

Robert W. Case, PhD (Coordinator, Day 
Mathematics) 

Roger T. Connor, AB, MEd (Course Consultant, 
Calculus) 

Gregory Czarnowski, AB, MEd (Technical 
Communications) 

Roy A. Dalsheim, BS 

William D. Finan, AB, MA, DEd (Introductory 
Mathematics) 

Francis R. Hankard, SB, MA (Program Consultant, 
Physics) 

Eric W. Hansberry, BS, MS (Engineering Graphics, 
Electrical Engineering Graphics, and Design 
Graphics) 

John Kaczorowski, Jr., BS, MS (Program Consultant, 
Electrical Engineering Technology, Day and Eve- 
ning Programs and Electronic Labs) 

George F. Kent, BS, MS, PE (Materials) 

Nonna K. Lehmkuhl, BS, MEd, MS (Program Consul- 
tant, Computer Technology, Day and Evening 
Programs) 

Demetre P. Ligor, BSEE, PE (Course Consultant, 
Physics) 

Ernest E. Mills, BS, MS, PE (Stress Analysis and 
Advanced Stress Analysis) 

Daniel W. Pratt, BS, MS (First- Year Mathematics) 

Charles H. Price, Jr., BSEE, MSEE (Analog, Digital, 
and Hybrid Computers, Digital Systems) 

Edward L. Rich, BS, MS, PE (Mechanical Technol- 
ogy Laboratory) 

Howard T. Shippen, BS, MS (Telecommunications) 

Raimundas Sukys, BS, MS (Pulse Circuits, Electron- 
ics, and Principles of Communication Systems) 

James Welch, BSEE, MS (Computer Technology 
Hardware Courses) 

Albert G. Wilson, Jr., BS, CE, MS, PE (Statics 
and Dynamics) 



Curriculum Advisory Committee Office Staff 

Thomas E. Hulbert, BMgtE, MS, PE (Academic Kordi N. Heidel 

Administration), Chair Bonnita E. Keelan 

Rasma Galins, Secretary Elsie Man 

Robert J. Averill, BS, MS (Circuit Theory and Tran- 
sistors in Linear Systems) 



Governing Boards and Officers of the University 



61 



The Corporators 

Class of 1988 
§Louis H. Baxnett 
•Thomas E. Cargill, Jr. 
§Michael J. Cronin 

James S. Curvey 

Harry T. Daniels 
§Carl E. Dantas 

* Kenneth G. Fisher 
FYieda Garcia 
Corinne P. Grande 

'Joseph E. Heney 
Edward C. Johnson 3d 

'Robert L. Johnson 
J. Philip Johnston 

* George S. Kariotis 
•Diane H. Lupean 
•Peter F. O'Connell 

Richard C. Ockerbloom 
Paul J. Palmer 
•William J. Pruyn 
IDwight P. Robinson, Jr. 
Ralph B. Rogers 
Ronald L. Rossetti 
Ernest J. Sargeant 
Donald W. Seager 
Sydney Shaftman 
James L. Shanahan 
Robert E. Siegfried 
•Dorothy M. Simon 
Philip A. Singleton 

Paul D. Slater 
^iDonald W. Smith 
tFarnham W. Smith 

O. Phillip Snowden 
•Bernard Solomon 

Robert C. Sprague 

Milton Stern 

David B. Stone 
§Galen L. Stone 
§H. Patricia Taylor 

Lawrence I. Templeman 

Charles H. Tenney II 

Milton A. Thompson 
§W. Nicholas Thorndike 
§Alan D. Tobin 

Paul E. Tsongas 

Joseph F. Turley 
tChaplin Tyler 

William Tyler 



Lloyd B. Waring 

Edward L. Wax 

David T. Wendell 

Donald F. Whiston 
•Robert H. Willis 

Richard W. Young 
tAlvin C. Zises 

Class of 1989 

Julius Abrams 
Yousef A. As' ad 
tDiana J. Auger 
Allen G. Barry 
Lincoln C. Bateson 
liRoy H. Beaton 
tE. Gregg Bemis 
Beverly Ann Bendekgey 
Robert P. Berkowitz 
Alfred M. Bertocchi 
§Stuart Marshall Bloch 
S. Whitney Bradley 
Melvin B. Bradshaw 
Edward W. Brooke 
§William L. Brown 
Wayne Budd 
John L. Burns 
Victor C. Bynoe 
§James F. Carlin 
tRichard P. Chapman 
§Richard P. Chapman, Jr. 
Robert F Chick 
Vessarios G. Chigas 
Livingstone N. Coakley 
Abram T. Collier 
§T. Paul Connolly 
James J. Costello 
Edward Creiger 
H. James Crossan, Jr. 
J.H. Dow Davis 
§Melanie C. Dean 
Virginia S. Devine 
William O. DiPietro 
Alfred di Scipio 
Estelle Dockser 
^William R. Driver, Jr. 
•Ruth S. Felton 

•Member of the Board of Trustees 
tHonorary Trustee 
^Lifetime Trustee, Emeritus 
§Member of the Board of Overseers 



Governing Boards and Officers of the University 



t.Iames V. Fetchero 
'Ernest Henderson III 
Edward L. Hennessy, Jr. 
*D. Brainerd Holmes 
•Carl. R. Hurtig 

* Harvey C. Krentzman 
Dean T. Langford 

*John P. La Ware 

* George J. Matthews 
Robert G. Orr 
Mark Roosevelt 
Ray Stata 
Garrett A. Sullivan 
Wilson B. Tiiffin 
Randel E. Vataha 
Dorothy D. Wade 

*James L. Waters 
Catherine A. White 
Charles A. Zraket 

Class of 1990 

♦William F. Allen, Jr. 

Kenneth W. Ballou 

Alan D. Bell 

Frederick Brodsky 
'Frederick L. Brown 
'Helene R. Cahners 
'Gary L. Countryman 

William S. Edgerly 
§William Elfers 
tByron K. Elliott 
^William P. Ellison 

Robert Erickson 
tFrank L. Farwell 
§Joseph D. Feaster, Jr. 
§Phil David Fine 
§Neal F. Finnegan 
§Albert S. Frager 
§Brenda J. Furlong 

Murray J. Gart 

Paul W. Glennon 

* Lloyd S. Glidden, Jr. 
Rosalind E. Gorin 
John L. Grandin 

+Donald B. Guy 

+Allan M. Hale 
Edmund Blair Hawley 
Michael E. Haynes 

'James S. Hekimian 
William Hellman 
James S. Herbert 
Colby Hewitt. Jr. 
Richard D. Hill 
Robert W. Holmes 
Hartwell G. Howe 
John S. Howe 
Howard M. Hubbard 
Richard P. Johnson 

iHenry C. Jones 
Walter B. Kelley 

+Frances C. Kenerson 
Edward M. Kennedy 



Fenton G. Keyes 

Calvin A. King 
+Asa S. Knowles 

Evelyn M. Lane 

Maurice Lazarus 

Allyn Levy 

Elma Lewis 

George M. Lovejoy, Jr. 
§Peter E. Madden 

Maurice Mann 
'Kathryn M. NichoLson 
'George A. Snell 
'Stephen J. Sweeney 
'D.Thomas Trigg 
'Martin F. Walsh 

Class of 1991 

'Vincent Barletta 

Michael A. Brown 
'Louis W. Cabot 

Philip M. Chrusz 

James E. Cofield, Jr. 

William E. Cook 
'John J. Cullinane 
'Arnold S. Hiatt 
' Kenneth A. Loftman 
'John Lowell 
'Roderick M. MacDougall 
§Robert C. Marini 

Evelyn A. Marran 
^Lawrence H. Martin 

M. Dorothy Massey 

Walter E. Mattson 

Peter H. McCormick 

William J. McCune, Jr. 

John G. McElwee 
'Katherine S. McHugh 

John A. McNeice, Jr. 

Dominic Meo, Jr. 

Donald H. Moore 

James A. Morris 

E. James Morton 

N. Laurence Nagle 

Ex Officio 

Kenneth G. Ryder, President 
Northeastern University 

William H. Nicols, Jr. 

Bernard J. O'Keefe 

Stanley C. Olsen 

James H. Orr 
§Edward C). Owens 

Ara Oztemel 

Edward S. Parsons 

Lawrence T. Perera 

Nicholas V. Petrou 

Edward E. Phillips 
tThomas L. Phillips 

Edward D. Phinney 

Rudolph F. Pierce 

Jerome M. Powell 

Albert Pratt 



Governing Boards and Officers of the University 63 



John F. Prendiville 

George Putnam 
+Francis J. yuirico 

William H. Raye, Jr. 

Kathleen M. Rice 

D. Paul Rich 

Robert Riesman 

Daniel J. Roberts 
•Charlotte B. Smith 
*An Wang 

Seymour L. Yanoff 

Officers of the Corporation and 
the Board of Trustees 

Robert H. Willis, Chair 

John P. La Ware, Vice Chair 

George J. Matthews, Vice Chair 

Charlotte B. Smith, Vice Chair 

D. Thomas Trigg, Vice Chair 

Barbara F. Burke, Secretary 

Vincent J. Lembo, Assistant Secretary 

Byron K. Elliott, Lifetime Chair, Emeritus 

William R. Driver, Jr., Honorary Vice Chair 

Frank L. Farwell, Honorary Vice Chair 

Dwight P. Robinson, Jr., Honorary Vice Chair 

Farnham W. Smith, Honorary Vice Chair 

Class of 1988 

Thomas E. Cargill, Jr. 
Kenneth G. Fisher 
Joseph E. Heney 
Robert L. Johnson 
George S. Kariotis 
Diane H. Lupean 
Peter F. O'Connell 
William J. Pruyn 
Dorothy M. Simon 
Bernard Solomon 
Robert H. Willis 

Class of 1989 

Ruth S. Felton 
Ernest Henderson, III 
D. Brainerd Holmes 
Carl R. Hurtig 
Harvey C. Krentzman 
John P. La Ware 
George J. Matthews 
James L. Waters 

Class of 1990 

William F. Allen, Jr. 
Frederick L. Brown 
Helene R. Cahners 

* Member of the Board of Trustees 
tHonorary Trustee 
tLifetime Trustee, Emeritus 
§Member of the Bt)ard of Overseers 



Gary L. Countryman 
Lloyd S. Glidden, Jr. 
James S. Hekimian 
Kathryn M. Nicholson 
George A. Snell 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
D. Thomas Trigg 
Martin F. Walsh 

Ex Officio 

Kenneth G. Ryder, President 
Northeastern University 

Class of 1991 

Vincent Barletta 
Louis W. Cabot 
John J. CuUinane 
Arnold S. Hiatt 
Kenneth A. Loftman 
John Lowell 

Roderick M. MacDougall 
Katherine S. McHugh 
Charlotte B. Smith 
An Wang 

Lifetime Trustees, Emeriti 

Roy H. Beaton 
F Gregg Bemis 
Richard P. Chapman 
William R. Driver, Jr. 
Byron K. Elliot 
William P. Ellison 
Frank L. Farwell 
Donald B. Guy 
Allan M. Hale 
Henry C. Jones 
Frances C. Kenerson 
Asa S. Knowles 
Lawrence H. Martin 
Francis J. Quirico 
Dwight P. Robinson, Jr. 
Donald W. Smith 
Farnham W. Smith 
Chaplin Tyler 
Alvin C. Zises 

Honorary Trustees 

Diane J. Auger 
James V. Fetchero 
Thomas L. Phillips 

Board of Overseers 

Class of 1988 
Louis H. Barnett 
Michael J. Cronin 
Carl E. Dantas 
Galen L. Stone 
H. Patricia Taylor 
W. Nicholas Thorndike 
Alan D. Tobin 



Governing Boards and Officers of the University 



Class of 1989 

Stuart M. Bioch 
William L. Brown 
James F. Carlin 
Richard P. Chapman, Jr. 
Vessarios G. Chigas 
T. Paul Connolly 
Melanie C. Dean 

Class of 1990 

William Elfers 
Phil David Fine 
Neal F. Finnegan 
Albert S. Frager 
Brenda J. Furlong 
Peter E. Madden 

Class of 1991 

Joseph D. Feaster, Jr. 
Robert C. Marini 
Edward O. Owens 

Ex Officio 

Kenneth G. Ryder, President 
Northeastern University 

Robert H. Willis, Chair 
Northeastern University Corporation 
and Board of Trustees 

President, Northeastern University 
Alumni Association 



Administrative Organization 

Officers of the University 

Philip T. Crotty, AB, AM, MBA, EdD 
Vice President 



John A. Martin, BS, MBA 
Vice President for Business 

John D. O'Bryant, BS, MEd 

Vice President for Student Affairs 

Anthony N. Penna, BS, MA, DA 
Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs 
and Provost 

Eugene M. Reppucci, Jr., BS, MEd 
Senior Vice President for Development 

Daniel J. Roberts, BS, MBA, EdM 
Senior Vice President - Treasurer 

Kenneth G. Ryder, AB, MA; LHD, LittD (hon) 
President 

Royal K. Toebes, BS, MBA 

Vice President for Alumni Development 

Karl Weiss, BS, PhD 
Vice President 

Roy L. Wooldridge, BS, EdM, TLD, LHD (hon) 
Vice President for Cooperative Education 

Academic Deans, Directors of Schools, and 
General Administrative Officers 

Alan R. Benenfeld, BMetE, MLS, MS 
Dean and Director of University Libraries 

Maryann G. Billington, AB, MBA 
Associate Dean and Director of the Graduate School 
of Business Administration 

David P. Boyd, BA, PhD 

Dean of the College of Business Administration 



John A. Curry, AB, EdM, EdD 
Executive Vice President 



Irwin M. Cohen, BS, MS 
Director of Men's Athletics 



Edmund L. Deltano, BA 
Vice President for Finance 



Martin J. Damian, BS 
Bursar 



Christopher F. Kennedy, AB, EdM 
Vice President for Administration 



Charles Devlin, BS, MEd 

Dean of Student Financial Services 



James B. King, BA, LLD (hon) 

Senior Vice President for Public Affairs 

Asa S. Knowles, AB, AM, LLD, LittD, ScD, DBA, ScD 

in Bus Ed (hon) 
Chancellor 



Clifford L. Fralen, BS, MSE, MBA 
Director of Physical Plant 

David R. Freeman, BMgtE, MS, PhD 
Associate Dean of Engineering and Director of the 
Graduate School of Engineering 



Philip LaTorre, BS, MS 

Vice President for Human Resource Management 



William A. Frohlich, BA 

Dean and Director of University Press 

Job E. Fuchs, MD 
Director of Health Services 



Governing Boards and Officers of tlie University 65 



Ronald W. Geason, BS, MS 
Associate Provost 



Norman Rosenblatt, AB, PhD 

Dean of the College of Criminal Justice 



Daniel J. Givelber, AB, LLB 
Dean of the School of Law 



Jeanne L. Rowlands, BA, BS, MA 
Director of Women's Athletics 



James J. Gozzo, BS, PhD 

Associate Dean and Director of the Graduate School 
of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions 

Thomas E. Hulbert, BMgtE, MS 
Director of the School of Engineering Technology 
and Associate Dean of Engineering 

Ellen S. Jackson. BA, EdM, CAGS, DH, DHL (hon) 
Dean and Director of Affirmative Action 

John W. Jordan, BS, MEd 
Dean of University College 

Paul M. Kalaghan, AB, MS, PhD 

Vice Provost for Research and Graduate Education 

William I. Kelly, BS, MS 

Director of the Graduate School of Professional 
Accounting 

Paul H. King, BS, MS, PhD 

Dean of the College of Engineering 



Phyllis M. Schaen, BS, MEd, EdD 
Dean of Administration 

Gerald E. Schumacher, PharmD, MSc, PhD 
Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Allied 
Health Professions 

Alan L. Selman, BS, MA, PhD 

Acting Dean of the College of Computer Science 

Arthur D. Smith, BS, MA, PhD 

Paul Tracy, AB, MA, PhD 

Director of the Graduate School of Criminal Justice 

Janice Walker, AB 

Assistant Dean and Director of the Graduate 

School of Boston-Bouve College of Human 

Development Professions 

Mitchell Wand, SB, MS, PhD 

Associate Dean and Director of Graduate Studies of 
the College of Computer Science 



Paul M. Lepley, BS, MEd, EdD 
Dean of Boston-Bouve College of Human 
Development Professions 

Juanita O. Long, BSN, MSN, CAGS, EdD 
Dean of Nursing 

Robert P. Lowndes, BS, MBA, PhD 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Kathryn Luttgens, BS, MS, PhD 
Associate Provost 

Ronald J. McAllister, AB, MA, PhD 
Acting Associate Dean and Acting Director of the 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 

Philip R. McCabe, BA, MEd 
Dean of Admissions 

Edmund J. Mullen, BA, MEd 
University Registrar 

Paul M. Pratt, BS, MEd 

Dean of the Department of Cooperative Education 

Edward W. Robinson, BS, EdM 
Dean of Students 



General University Committees 

University Council, 1987-1988 

Kenneth G. Ryder, Chair 
John A. Curry, Vice Chair 
Anthony N. Penna, Vice Chair 
Barbara F. Burke, Secretary 



Alan R. Benenfeld 

David P. Boyd 
'Holly M. Carter 

Charles W. Coffin 

Philip T. Crotty 

Edmund L. Deltano 
'William L. Faissler 

Clifford J. Fralen 

Daniel J. Givelber 

Charles L. Hallenborg 

Ellen S. Jackson 

Paul D. Jones 

John W. Jordan 

Paul M. Kalaghan 

Christopher F Kennedy 

James B. King 

Paul H. King 

William E. Kneeland, Jr. 

Philip LaTorre 



* Faculty Senate Representatives 



Governing Boards and Officers of the University 



Vincent J. Lembo 
Paul M. Lepley 
Juanita O. Long 
Robert P. Lowndes 
Kathryn Luttgens 
John A. Martin 
Philip R. McCabe 
Christopher Mosher 
John D. O'Bryant 
Donald G. Porter 
Paul M. Pratt 
Eugene M. Reppucci, Jr. 
Daniel J. Roberts 
Edward W. Robinson 
Norman Rosenblatt 
Phyllis M. Schaen 
Gerald E. Schumacher 
Arthur D. Smith 
Michael J. Tighe 
Royal K. Toebes 
Joy W. Viola 
Karl Weiss 

Raymond R. Williams 
Roy L. Wooldridge 



Marjorie Piatt 
*Paul M. Pratt 

John G. Proakis 
* Norman Rosenblatt 

Eugene J. Saletan 

Michael T. Vaughn 

Nancy Walden 

Edward G. Wertheim 

Robert F. Young 

•Appointed by the President 



The Faculty Senate, 1987-1988 



•Anthony N. Penna, Presiding Officer 



Ralph S. Blanchard, Jr. 

Bruce Bolnick 

Holly M. Carter 

Robert S. Curtin 
*John A. Curry 

William DeAngelis 

John Deller 

Carl Eastman 

Charles H. Ellis, Jr. 

William L. Faissler 

Edith E. Flynn 

Maurice E. Gilmore 
•Daniel Givelber 

Bart Gruzalski 

Carolyn D. Heising 
* John W. Jordan, Jr. 
*Paul Kalaghan 

Debra R. Kaufman 
*Paul H. King 

Andrew M. Klapper 

Michael Kupferman 

Allen Lee 
*Juanita Long 
•Robert P. Lowndes 

Helen Mahut 

James Matthews 

Joseph Meier 

Robert Miller 

Steven A. Morrison 

John Mulhall 



67 



Campus Maps 



Main Campus 




Academic and Service Buildings 



African -American Institute (AF) 
Barletta Natatorium (BN) 
Boiler Plant 
316 Huntington Ave. 

(Northeastern at the YMCA) 
Cabot Physical Education Building (CB) 
Cahners Hall (CA) 
Cargill Hall (CG) 
Churchill Hall (CH) 
Columbus Place 

(716 Columbus Avenue) (CP) 
CullinaneHall(CN) 
Gushing Hall (CU) 
Dana Research Center (DA) 
DockserHall(DK) 
Dodge Library (DG) 
Ell Student Building (Auditorium) (EL) 
Ell Student Center (Student Lounge) (EC) 
Forsyth Building (FR) 
Forsyth Building Annex (FA) 
Forsyth Dental Building (FE) 
Hayden Hall (HA) 
Hillel-Frager(HF) 
Holmes Hall (HO) 
236 Huntington Avenue (HU) 



Huntington Plaza 

(271 Huntington Avenue) (HN) 
Hurtig Hall (HT) 
KariotisHall(KA) 
Kerr Hall (Faculty Center) (KH) 
Knowles Center (Gryzmish Hall) (KG) 
Knowles Center (Volpe Hall) (KV) 
Lake Hall (LA) 
Library Resource Center, 

under construction 
Matthews Arena (MA) 
Matthews Arena Annex (MX) 
Meserve Hall (ME) 
Mugar Life Science Building 

(Peabody Health Professions Center) (MU) 
Nightingale Hall (NI) 
Parker Building (PA) 
Peabody Center 
Richards Hall (RI) 
Robinson Hall (RB) 

Ruggles Building (II Leon Street) (RU) 
Snell Engineering Center (SN) 
122 St. Stephen Street (SS) 
Stearns Center (ST) 
Symphony Place 

(334 Massachusetts Avenue) (SY) 
26 Tavern Road (TA) 



68 



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Full-Time and Day Programs 

This bulletin contains information about the 
evening and weekend programs offered by the 
School of Engineering Technology. If you need 
information about full-time or day programs offered 
by Northeastern University, contact the Department 
of Undergraduate Admissions, 1:39 Richards Hall, 
617-437-2200. 

Fee Schedule and Academic Calendar 

The Fee Schedule and Academic Calendar has been 
enclosed as a separate insert to this bulletin. If one 
has not been enclosed, contact the School of 
Engineering Technology, 617-437-2500. 

Policy on Changes of Program 

The School of Engineering Technology reserves the 
right to cancel, modify, or add to the courses in any 
curriculum. The University further reserves the 
right to change the requirements for graduation. 
Any changes that may be made from time to time 
relative to this policy shall be applicable to all stu- 
dents in the school, college, or department con- 
cerned, including former students who may reenroll. 

Delivery of Services 

The University assumes no liability, and hereby 
expressly negates the same, for failure to provide or 
delay in providing educational or related services or 
facilities or for any other failure or delay in perfor- 
mance arising out of or due to causes beyond the 
reasonable control of the University. Such causes 
include, without limitation, power failure, fire, 
strikes by University employees or others, damage 
by the elements, and acts of public authorities. The 
University will, however, exert reasonable efforts, 
when in its judgment it is appropriate to do so, to 
provide comparable or substantially equivalent ser- 
vices, facilities or performance, but its inability or 
failure to do so shall not subject it to liability. 

The Northeastern University catalog contains 
current information regarding the University calen- 
dar, admissions, degree requirements, fees, and reg- 
ulations, and such information is not intended to be 
and should not be relied upon as a statement of the 
University's contractual undertakings. 

Northeastern University reserves the right in its 
sole judgment to promulgate and change rules and 
regulations and to make changes of any nature in its 
program, calendar, admissions policies, procedures 
and standards, degree requirements, fees, and aca- 
demic schedule whenever it is deemed nece.ssary or 
desirable, including, without limitation, changes in 
course content, the rescheduling of classes, 
cancelling of scheduled classes and other academic 
activities and requiring or affording alternatives for 
scheduled classes or other academic activities, in 
any such case giving such notice as is reasonably 
practicable under the circum.stances. 

Northeastern University will do its best to make 
available to you the fine.st education, the most stim- 
ulating atmosphere and the mo.st congenial condi- 
tions it can provide. But the quality and the rate of 



progress of your academic career is in large mea- 
sure dependent upon your own abilities, commit- 
ment, and effort. This is ecjually true with respect to 
professional advancement upon completion of the 
degree or program in which you are enrolled. The 
University cannot guarantee that you will obtain or 
succeed at any particular job; that will depend upon 
your own skills, achievement, presentation, and 
other factors such as market conditions at that 
time. Similarly, in many professions and occupations 
there are increasing requirements imposed by fed- 
eral and state statutes and regulatory agencies for 
certification or entry into a particular field. The.se 
may change during the period of time when you are 
at Northeastern and they may vary from state to 
state and from county to county. While the 
University stands ready to help you find out about 
these requirements and changes, it is your responsi- 
bility to initiate the inquiry because the University 
has no other way of knowing what your expecta- 
tions and understandings are. 

In brief, the University is there to offer you edu- 
cational opportunities and choices and to assist you 
in finding the direction in which you want to steer 
your educational experience. But you are a partner 
in this venture with an obligation and responsibility 
to yourself. 

Antidiscrimination Policy 

Northeastern University is committed to a policy of 
equal opportunity for all students and employees 
without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual 
preference, national origin, or handicap, marital, or 
veteran status. The University prohibits discrimina- 
tion in all matters involving admission, registration, 
and all official relationships with students, 
including evaluation of academic performance. 

Equal Opportunity Employment Policy 

Northeastern University is an equal opportunity 
employer. It is institutional policy that there shall be 
no discrimination against any employee or applicant 
for employment because of race, color, religion, sex, 
sexual preference, age, national origin, or handicap, 
marital, or veteran status. 

Northeastern University also prohibits discrimi- 
nation against any employee regarding upgrading, 
demotion or transfer, layoff or termination, rates 
of pay or other forms of compensation, and 
selection for training. In addition, Northeastern 
adheres to Affirmative Action guidelines in all 
recruitment endeavors. 

Further, Northeastern will not condone any 
forms of sexual harassment which is defined as the 
use of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for 
favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a 
sexual nature, as an explicit or implicit condition of 
employment, as the basis for employment decisions, 
or U) interfere with an individual's wcjrk perfor- 
mance by creating an intimidating, hostile, or offen- 
sive work environment. 



Inquiries concerning our equal opportunity poli- 
cies may be referred to the University Title IX 
Coordinator/Compliance Officer for Section 504 of 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Affirmative Action 
Office, Richards Hall, 617-437-2133. 

Accreditation Statement 

Northeastern University is accredited by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., a 
non-governmental, nationally recognized organiza- 
tion whose affiliated institutions include elementary 
schools through collegiate institutions offering 
post-graduate instruction. 

Accreditation of an institution by the New 
England Association indicates that it meets or 
exceeds criteria for the assessment of institutional 
quality periodically applied through a peer group 
review process. An accredited school or college is 
one that has available the necessary resources to 
achieve its stated purposes through appropriate 
educational programs, is substantially doing so, and 
gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do 
so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is 
also addressed through accreditation. 

Accreditation by the New England Association 
is not partial but applies to the institution as a 
whole. As such, it is not a guarantee of the quality 
of every course or program offered, or the compe- 
tence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides 
reasonable assurance about the quality of opportu- 
nities available to students who attend 
the institution. 

Inquiries regarding the status of an institution's 
accreditation by the New England Association 
should be directed to the administrative staff of the 
school or college. Individuals may also contact 
the Association: New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, The Sanborn House, 15 High 
Street, Winchester, Massachusetts 01890, 
617-729-6762. 

Insufficient Enrollment Disclaimer 

Northeastern University reserves the right to cancel 
any course if minimum enrollments are not met. 

Tuition and Fees Policy 

Tuition rates, all fees, rules and regulations, courses 
and course content are subject to revision by the 
President and the Board of Trustees at any time. 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights 
and Privacy Act of 1974, Northeastern University 
permits its students to inspect their records wher- 
ever appropriate and to challenge specific parts of 
them when they feel it is necessary to do so. Spe- 
cific details of the law as it applies to Northeastern 
are printed in the Student Handbook and are distrib- 
uted annually at registrations of the University 
College and graduate schools. 



Office of Services for the Handicapped 

The Office of Services for the Handicapped (OSH) 
provides a variety of support services and general 
assistance to all of Northeastern's disabled students 
and employees. The University's efforts to comply 
with section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 
are coordinated by Ruth Bork, OSH director, 5 Ell 
Center, 617-437-2675. (TTY number is 437-2730.) 

International Mission Statement 

Northeastern University, a world leader in 
cooperative education, acknowledges the increasing 
interdependence among nations and, therefore, 
identifies its mission as preparing its graduates to 
live and work in an interdependent world. The 
University deems it essential that its students, both 
in the professions as well as in the humanities, 
develop a greater awareness and understanding of 
those social, political, and economic issues that 
transcend national boundaries. So interconnected 
are these issues that a recognition of them, coupled 
with an appreciation of the diverse culture which 
gave rise to them, is necessary for the development 
of productive and responsible citizens of the 
world community. 

To accomplish this goal. Northeastern 
University actively seeks qualified students from 
abroad to enroll in its undergraduate and graduate 
programs in such numbers and with such geo- 
graphic origins so as to create and foster a truly 
global exchange of ideas and values among stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff. 

The University also encourages all colleges to 
continually develop and expand course offerings to 
include international issues and cross-cultural 
aspects and supports faculty to teach and conduct 
research in the interrelationship among nations and 
peoples. The University promotes international 
understanding and the sharing of ideas with institu- 
tions throughout the world by virtue of its faculty 
and staff exchanges and its study and work abroad 
programs for students. 

Finally, the University recognizes that it has a 
special responsibility to share its expertise and to 
cooperate with international organizations, the local 
community, its alumni, and diverse segments of the 
public in an effort to promote greater awareness of 
global issues and events. 

Emergency Closing of the University 

Northeastern University has made arrangements to 
notify students, faculty and staff by radio when it 
becomes necessary to cancel classes because of 
extremely inclement weather. AM radio stations 
WBZ (1030), WEEI (590), WHDH (850), WRKO (680), 
and FM stations WBCN (104.1), and WROR (98.5) 
are the stations authorized to announce the 
University's decision to close. Since instructional 
television courses originate from live or broadcast 
facilities at the University, neither the classes nor 
the courier service operate when the University 
is closed. 




^- 



^^. 



-y 



\ 



University 

College 

Bulletin 




Q- 




Part-time 

Undergraduate Programs 
1988-1989 



#2/ Northeastern University 



J 



University 

College 

Bulletin 



Part-time Programs 
1988-1989 

Part-time day and evening 
undergraduate programs in: 

Business Administration 
Criminal Justice and Security 
Health Professions and Sciences 
Liberal Arts 



fjj Northeastern University 



Contents 



Introduction 

2 University College 

5 Northeastern University 

8 1988-1989 Academic Calendar 

1 1 University College Offices 

13 Programs of Study 

14 Overview 

17 Certificate Programs 

34 Business Administration Degree Programs 

62 Criminal Justice and Security 
Degree Programs 

70 Health Professions and Sciences Degree 
Programs 

96 Liberal Arts Degree Programs 

123 Alternative Freshman-Year Program 

127 Course Descriptions 

197 Policies and Services 

1 98 Academic Policies and Procedures 
208 Tuition and Fees 

210 Financial Aid 

215 Appendix 

216 Facilities and Resources 

217 Programs at Northeastern 
221 Faculty 

248 University College Administrative Officers 

250 University Governing Boards and Officers 

255 Campus Maps 

260 Index 



Introduction 



University College 



changing professional, cultural, and social 
needs and interests of all our students. 



Profile of the College 

John W. Jordan, Dean 

Ralph T. Vernile, Jr., Associate Dean for 

Aduninistration 

Where would you like to be one year from now, 
five years from now, or even ten? What possi- 
bilities for your future intrigue you the most, 
and where might they take you? With your 
plans and ideas to guide you, you can set your 
sights on any direction at University College. 
Whether you already have a definite plan or 
want to investigate new possibiMties, our pro- 
grams and resources are designed to help you 
get to where you want to be. The College at- 
tracts a talented and purposeful student body 
that represents a spectrum of educational, ca- 
reer, and personal interests. The University en- 
courages and supports your explorations, and 
at the same time the diversity of direction pur- 
sued by part-time day and evening students en- 
livens the entire Northeastern community. 

University College is the part-time under- 
graduate division of Northeastern University, 
which has long been a leader in educational 
programs for adults. We're called University 
College because we tap the energies and re- 
sources of the entire University. Unlike other 
institutions offering similar programs. North- 
eastern opens all its doors, giving you un- 
equaled access to the academic facilities you 
need. At University College, we constantly 
evaluate and update our programs to satisfy the 



Knowing What You Want: The Programs 

Naturally, Northeastern offers all the traditional 
academic programs you expect from a large 
university, including timely and innovative pro- 
grams in business administration, criminal jus- 
tice and security, health professions and 
sciences, and liberal arts. Among these pro- 
grams are four bachelor's degree concentra- 
tions in business that carry the extra prestige of 
full accreditation by the American Assembly of 
Collegiate Schools of Business. 

Many students come to Northeastern Univer- 
sity to take specific, job-related courses. To 
serve these students, we have developed more 
than thirty certificate programs. In most cases, 
these programs incorporate or build on the 
major concentration courses required in each 
of our professionally focused undergraduate 
degree programs. 

Northeastern also offers practical, part-time 
associate degree programs for students who 
are seeking a first-rate, first-level college de- 
gree, as well as bachelor's degrees in all 
four areas. 



Getting the Attention You Need: 
Class Size 

Everyone knows Northeastern is big. What 
many people don't realize is that because we 
operate at fourteen different locations, our 
classes tend to be small. And many of our spe- 
cialized degree and certificate programs enroll 
only small numbers of students because of 
their unique focus. Last year, our average class 
size was fifteen students. Many classes ran with 
fewer students, and only 10 percent of all 
classes offered ran with enrollments larger than 
twenty-seven. 



Making Our Programs Work For You: 
Convenience 

We know you're busy, and finding the time to 
continue your education can be a real chal- 
lenge. To help you out. Northeastern not only 



University College 3 



schedules classes at fourteen different loca- 
tions in eastern Massachusetts, but also pro- 
vides different course formats. Recently the 
University added six- and eight-week courses 
to the regular schedule of twelve- week courses 
to make things that much more convenient. 



Offering Knowledge and Experience: 
The Faculty 

A course is only as good as its teacher. That's 
why University College carefully selects both 
full-time Northeastern University faculty and 
practicing professionals for its teaching staff of 
1,200. Corporate executive officers, published 
authors, established health professionals, art- 
ists, lawyers, professors, and others offer stu- 
dents the benefit of their experience and 
current information about how careers in their 
fields are changing. Many have found teaching 
adults particularly rewarding and have ex- 
pressed their pleasure at having such commit- 
ted, hard-working, and enthusiastic students. 



Meeting Your Colleagues: The Students 

Approximately 15,000 adults come to Universi- 
ty College every year to pursue a degree, up- 
date their careers with a certificate, or take a 
course in a subject that has long interested 
them. These adult students range in age from 18 
to 80 and come from all walks of life: women 
re-entering the work force, young men and 
women seeking to start new careers, older peo- 
ple polishing their skills, people of every age in- 
tent on finishing an education that time or 
circumstances interrupted. All have one thing 
in common — they are making a change in their 
lives through their own actions, expanding their 
world by investing in themselves. This diversity 
is a source of stimulation and enrichment for 
all — students, faculty, and administration alike. 



We're Here to Help: Counseling Services 

University College offers a range of career and 
academic counseling services to assist you in 
making both educational and career decisions. 
The College provides academic advisers and 
career counselors, offers credit and noncredit 
career-planning workshops and special 



programs, and serves as a link to other student 
support services offered by Northeastern 
University. 

Open House and Registration Week Orientation 
Programs 

Individuals who are thinking about enrolling in 
University College for the first time are encour- 
aged to attend an open house. Open houses in- 
troduce potential students to the many 
University College programs and services de- 
signed to meet the educational, job-related, and 
personal needs of adult, part-time students. 
They also orient new students to the University 
as a whole and address concerns that many stu- 
dents have about 

• course selection and registration, 

• financial aid, 

• student support services, and 

• career planning. 

Students currently em-olled in University Col- 
lege are also invited to attend an open house. 

Open houses ordinarily are scheduled each 
quarter at selected campus sites at or about the 
same time that registration takes place. All per- 
sons wishing to attend should reserve a place 
by calling the Office of Academic and Student 
Affairs, 617-437-2400 (voice), 617-437-2825 
(TTY). Details appear in the Schedule Guide for 
each term. 

Academic Advising 

Academic advisers are available by appoint- 
ment to talk with University College students 
about courses, transfer credit, degree require- 
ments, career counseling referrals, and other 
matters of individual concern. 

To arrange an appointment at a specific cam- 
pus, please call the appropriate number, as 
listed below. 

• Main Boston Campus : Advisers are available 
weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call 
617-437-2400 (voice) or 617-437-2825 (TTY, for 
the hearing impaired only). 

« Burlington Suburban Campus: Call 
617-272-5500. 

• Downtown Boston Campus (5 Liberty Square): 
Call 617-367-6373. 

• All other branch locations : Advisers are avail- 
able from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on the evenings when 
classes are in session. Call 617-437-5544 for 
an appointment. 

During registration, the advising staff in Bos- 
ton is available to meet with students on a 
walk-in basis from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Students 



4 Introduction 



may also call in with questions during these 
times. In addition, registration advisers are 
available at all campuses during registration 
hours to assist students with course selection 
and to explain registration procedures. 

The Health Professions Advisory Committee 
provides counseling for students interested in 
taking courses to meet medical or dental school 
entrance requirements. For medical school en- 
trance requirements and procedures, contact 
Professor Thomas McEneaney, 617-437-2430. 
For information on the scheduling of science 
courses that meet these requirements, call 
617-437-2818. 

Tutorial Services 

University College offers you tutorial assis- 
tance in several subjects. Tutoring, which is on 
a one-to-one basis, provides an opportunity for 
student and tutor to focus on specific problems 
that might not have been covered during class 
time. You may request tutorial information 
from the Office of Academic and Student 
Affairs, 617-437-2400. A flyer describing 
tutorial services is also available at all 
campus locations. 

Self-Assessment and Career Development 

Often one of the strongest motivations for con- 
tinuing education is the desire for career ad- 
vancement or change. In order to help students 
develop career and educational planning skills. 
University College offers a three-quarter-hour 
course in career development, Self-Assessment 
and Career Development (INT 4110). For more 
information, see the course description on page 
163 of this bulletin. 

Job-Search Seminars 

Each quarter the Career Development and 
Placement Office offers a series of two- and 
three-hour evening job-search seminars. The 
seminars are specifically designed for students 
ing a job change and who have identified the 
field or career area in which they would like 
to work. 

These seminars are intended to help students 
assess their skills, develop effective job-search 
strategies, write resumes, and prepare for job 
interviews. Seminar schedules are announced 
in the student newsletter and in classes prior to 
each series. Students who wish to participate in 
the job-search seminars must reserve a 
place by calling the Department of Career 
Development and Placement at 617-437-2428. 



Career Development and Placement Services 

Career development and advancement are im- 
portant for all our students to consider and fre- 
quently are of particular relevance to part-time 
day and evening students who may be contem- 
plating a career change or exploring different 
professional options for the first time. 

The Department of Career Development and 
Placement has designed services to support 
your professional development. The depart- 
ment can help you to identify career paths, 
establish a network of professional contacts, 
and assist you with placement. Free services 
for University College students include individ- 
ual career counseling; a job bank of current 
employment opportunities; a Ubrary with com- 
pany files and employer contacts; panel pre- 
sentations on careers of interest; regularly 
scheduled Seminars on such topics as resume 
preparation and effective interviewing; the 
annual Career Expo, held during evening 
hours; and on-campus corporate recruiting 
for seniors. 

Students enrolled in a degree program are 
eligible for additional career services, such as 
job-placement counseling, placement registra- 
tion, and resume referral to employers. A cre- 
dential service is also available for individuals 
applying to graduate school. 

Students may ask to have copies of current 
job notices sent to them by mail. There is a $10 
charge per quarter for this service. 

In Boston, counselors are available by ap- 
pointment; they also travel to the Burlington 
and Dedham campuses for meetings with stu- 
dents. If you want to make an appointment for 
career counseling or wish to receive additional 
information on any of the department's ser- 
vices, call 617-437-2428 or visit the Career De- 
velopment and Placement Office on the Boston 
campus in 124 Ruggles Building. Call for 
office hours. 

Counseling and Testing Services 

Whether you are already enrolled or are a pro- 
spective student you can receive confidential 
counseling or testing to address your personal, 
educational, or career concerns. Assistance is 
available to all students during days and certain 
weekday evenings until 8:30 p.m. at the Coun- 
seling and Testing Center. For information and 
appointments, call 617-437-2142 or drop in at 
302 EU Building. 



Personal Counseling 

People come to the center for help with a vari- 
ety of personal concerns. Anxiety and depres- 
sion, adjustment reactions to college life, 
personal or family relationship concerns, drug 
and alcohol abuse, and sexual adjustment ques- 
tions are among the issues that University Col- 
lege students may want to discuss with a 
professional therapist. The center is committed 
to short-term therapy, with a maximum of 
twelve consecutive counseling sessions. If the 
center cannot meet your needs, appropriate re- 
ferrals are provided. 

Academic and Life Skills Development 
Workshops 

Academic and life skills development work- 
shops are offered each quarter, generally during 
the day. The Study Skills Development Work- 
shop, among the most popular of these, helps 
students become more effective in organizing 
their time, taking notes, preparing for and tak- 
ing exEims, and other areas of academic perfor- 
mance. Other workshops include Stress 
Management, Assertiveness Training, Overcom- 
ing Procrastination, Surviving Parental Alcohol- 
ism, Food Challenges and Choices, and 
Surviving Fcmiily Break-up. 

Educational-Vocational Counseling 

With so many fields to choose from, students 
sometimes have difficulty choosing a major or 
a career. You may want help in defining your in- 
terests, abilities, and values. At the center, 
educational-vocational counseling usually in- 
volves an evaluation of the student's interests, 
aptitudes, abilities, values, and personality 
characteristics. Many kinds of tests, available at 
the center, may be used in this process. Coun- 
seling is done on an individual basis, although 
small groups may be organized when this ap- 
proach seems useful. 

Career Information 

The center maintains a small reference Ubrary 
of vocational resources. In addition, a computer 
is available to help students in obtaining career 
information, as well as to help clarify values, 
skills, and interests. 

Testing Materials 

Information and appUcation packets for such 
standardized tests as the ORE, LSAT, GMAT, 
MAT, and CLEP exams are available at the cen- 
ter. CLEP exams are given at the center ten 
times each year, and the center is also a nation- 
al testing site for the LSAT, GMAT, MAT, and 
other exams. 



Northeastern University 



Profile of the University 

At Northeastern University, we value part-time 
day and evening students as highly as we do 
our full-time students. You are important mem- 
bers of the academic community and reflect 
the changing profile of today's college stu- 
dent, which encompasses new concerns for 
lifespan learning and professional retraining. 
Northeastern supports your pursuit of personal 
and professional goals and wants to contribute 
to your success. You may join all our students 
in taking full advantage of the acadenuc re- 
sources zmd facilities we offer. In return, 
you contribute to the intellectual and 
cultural diversity upon which this urban 
institution thrives. 

Founded in 1898, Northeastern University is 
incorporated as a privately endowed, nonsec- 
tarian institution. From its beginning, the Uru- 
versity's mission has been to identify and 
address the educational needs of a diverse 
community and student body in distinctive and 
useful ways. Northeastern did not duplicate the 
programs of other institutions, but instead be- 
came a world leader in new areas of education- 
al service. In particular, the University is known 
for its Cooperative Plan of Education, under 
which students alternate periods of work and 
study. All of Northeastern's undergraduate day 
colleges operate on the Cooperative Plan, and 
several of the University's graduate schools 
have structured their programs to include fea- 
tures of cooperative education. Today, the Uni- 
versity is comprised of nine undergraduate 
colleges and nine graduate schools. 

Our undergraduate colleges are: 

> Boston-Bouve College of Human Develop- 

ment Professions 

> College of Arts and Sciences, including the 

School of Journalism 
» College of Business Administration 

> College of Computer Science 

> College of Criminal Justice 

. College of Engineering, including the School 

of Engineering Technology 
. College of Nursing 

> College of Pharmacy and Allied Health 

Professions 
• University College 



6 Introduction 



Our graduate schools are: 

• Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 

• Graduate School of Boston-Bouve College of 

Human Development Professions 

• Graduate School of Business Administration 

• Graduate School of Computer Science 

• Graduate School of Criminal Justice 

• Graduate School of Engineering 

• Graduate School of Pharmacy and Allied 

Health Professions 

• Graduate School of Professional Accounting 

• School of Law 

At Northeastern, we respond to the needs of 
people who already hold jobs or are launched 
in careers, but who wish to advance or change 
their professional Uves as well as pursue 
personal interests. The University offers a va- 
riety of educational options — both credit 
and noncredit — to suit your particu- 
lar objectives. University College offers 
part-time courses leading to certificates and 
to associate's and bachelor's degrees. The 
School of Engineering Technology offers 
part-time evening and weekend associate's 
and bachelor's degree programs in techno- 
logical areas, in addition to daytime 
undergraduate programs. 

All formal courses of study leading to de- 
grees through part-time programs are approved 
by the full-time day faculty of the Northeastern 
Basic Colleges concerned and are governed by 
the same qualitative and quantitative standards. 



Where You'll Find Northeastern 

The main campus of Northeastern University is 
a vibrant and progressive urban community. To 
all Northeastern students, the physical setting 
of the Boston campus extends opportunities to 
participate in the dynamic, exciting environ- 
ment that we share with city residents. Built 
around a quadrangle, the campus is divided by 
Huntington Avenue, a major artery. It is located 
in the midst of such cultural landmarks as Sym- 
phony Hall, the Museum of Fine Arts, the Isa- 
bella Stewart Gardner Museum, Horticultural 
Hall, and the Boston Public Library. You can 
walk to Fenway Park, Copley Place, the Back 
Bay shopping district, and a number of interna- 
tionally renowned hospitals. In 1910, the Uni- 
versity began construction on the first piece of 
land acquired at its present site; it now covers 
more than fifty-five acres. 



To reach increasing numbers of stu- 
dents and to make participation in our 
programs as convenient as possible for you, 
Northeastern University has estabUshed subur- 
ban campuses and branch locations, as well as 
several off-campus athletic facilities. The cam- 
puses and branch locations house administra- 
tive and classroom facilities for Northeastem's 
graduate, part-time day and evening, and con- 
tinuing education programs. The University 
also maintains many affiliations to ensure 
access to facilities and specialized equip- 
ment available at other institutions 
and organizations. 

One of Northeastem's most recent acquisi- 
tions is the twenty-acre Dedham campus, just 
north of Route 128. This facility houses the 
Center for Continuing Education and provides 
space for the College of Business Administra- 
tion's High Technology MBA program. 

Near the junction of Routes 128 and 3 in 
Burlington is the Suburban Campus of 
Northeastern University. Part-time undergrad- 
uate courses in a variety of subject areas and 
part-time graduate courses in engineering and 
business administration are offered here. The 
Burlington campus also offers special programs 
for part-time, evening, and noncredit continu- 
ing education courses. 

Located near the Burlington campus, the Bo- 
tanical Research Station in Woburn contains a 
small arboretum and a spacious greenhouse for 
propagation and research. 

Situated on fifty acres in Ashland, the Warren 
Center provides a practical laboratory for out- 
door education and conservation, and camping 
admiiustration, programming, and counseling. 
In the summer, the center becomes an attrac- 
tive campsite for various community and Uni- 
versity groups and is available for conferences 
and workshops. 

Twenty miles northeast of Boston, the Ma- 
rine Science and Maritime Studies Center is lo- 
cated in Nahant, on Massachusetts Bay. It 
serves as a site for national, international, and 
Uruversity research. 

Henderson House, Northeastern University's 
conference center, is located twelve miles from 
Boston in suburban Weston. This facility hosts 
a variety of activities, including residential 
seminars, workshops, short courses, and 
weekend meetings. 



Northeastern University 7 



University Libraries 

As a reflection of our serious commitment to 
part-time students, you have access to all seven 
of the University's extensive library units. Lo- 
cated on the Boston campus is Dodge, North- 
eastern's main facility, and three Ubraries that 
house graduate-level collections in chemical 
and biomedical sciences, mathematics cind psy- 
chology, and physics and electrical engineering. 
There are also Ubraries on the Burlington and 
Dedham campuses and at the Maiine Science 
and Maritime Studies Center in Nahant. 

Total holdings of all University libraries in- 
clude the equivalent of more than one million 
volumes in print and in microform; 5,000 peri- 
odical titles; 300,000 government documents; 
and 24,000 items in audiovisual and computer 
software formats. In Dodge, the Learning Re- 
sources Center provides computer-assisted in- 
struction, microcomputer facilities, and 
language and music listening laboratories. 
The center also houses an extensive set of 
self-paced media materials in various 
interactive formats, including audiotapes, 
videotapes, and computer-assisted lessons 
and exercises. 

Northeastern's membership in the Boston Li- 
brary Consortium generally entitles our stu- 
dents to on-site use of libraries at Boston and 
Wellesley colleges, the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, the State Library of Massachu- 
setts, the University of Massachusetts (Am- 
herst, Boston, and Worcester campuses), and 
Boston, Brandeis, and Tufts universities. 

Academic Computer Services 

Northeastern's Academic Computer Services 
supports the learning activities of students 
at all levels, as well as the teaching and 
research undertaken by faculty, research per- 
sonnel, and graduate students. The pro- 
gramming assistance offered at the Boston, 
Burlington, and Dedham campuses promotes 
effective use of all academic computer sys- 
tems. At these three campuses, 270 assorted 
personal computers are linked in local-area 
networks. Via a wide-area network, students 
and faculty have time-sharing access to 
five large computers through video and 
hard-copy terminals arranged in clusters 
at the three campuses. This network connects 
a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 8650 
system plus an additional VAX 11/785 and a 



Data General MV/8000. A variety of graphics 
and output devices are available. 

Electronic spreadsheet and word-processing 
packages are available to you, in addition to 
many software libraries for numerical, statisti- 
cal, and financial applications. The primary lan- 
guages supported by Academic Computer 
Services are FORTRAN, COBOL, BASIC, Pas- 
cal, and Assembler. 

Researcli 

Research, whether performed in the laboratory, 
Ubrary, or field, is vital to maintain the Univer- 
sity's thriving academic atmosphere. Through 
research, faculty members and students stay 
abreast of the most recent developments in 
their particular fields. Every department of ev- 
ery college at Northeastern carries out some 
basic or applied research projects. 

At Northeastern University, research and 
scholarship are taken very seriously and are ac- 
tively encouraged. Each year faculty members 
receive funding for an ever-increasing number 
of research projects, for which sponsorship 
comes from a variety of sources. Federal agen- 
cies, private industry and foundations, and the 
University itself all contribute to Northeastern's 
growing research base. 

Although much of this research is carried out 
by faculty members, their graduate students, 
and post-doctoral research associates, ample 
opportunities exist for undergraduate students. 
Research participation can take place as part of 
regular academic programs, as specially de- 
signed independent studies, or through cooper- 
ative work assignments. Research activities are 
encouraged and are limited only by the stu- 
dent's own motivation and curiosity. 

Northeastern University's faculty has numer- 
ous distinguished scholars, many of whom have 
received prestigious awards, including Sloan 
Scholarships, Guggenheim Fellowships, and 
National Institute of Health Research Awards. 
Faculty members lecture worldwide and pub- 
lish extensively; through these efforts the facul- 
ty enhance their teaching and help to ensure an 
exemplary university education. 

In addition, many faculty serve as U.S. gov- 
ernment consultants and participate on a vari- 
ety of national and international comnuttees. 
But because Northeastern considers education 
its primary mission, students will always find 
an enthusiastic and accessible faculty to an- 
swer questions, solve problems, and stimulate 
inquiring minds. 



1988-1989 
Academic Calendar 



Fall Quarter 1988 

Classes begin Monday, September 26, 1988 
Fall Registration Dates 

Belmont High School 

Wednesday, September 7, and 
Tuesday, September 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Boston Main Campus 

Tuesday-Friday, 
September 6-9, 
9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. 
Saturday, September 10, 
9 a.m.- 12 noon 
Monday-Wednesday, 
September 12-14, 
9.30 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Downtown Boston Campus 

(5 Liberty Square) 
Thursday, September 8, 
11 a.m.-7 p.m. 
Monday-Tuesday, 
September 12-13, 
11 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Burlington Suburban Campus 

Wednesday -Thursday, 

September 7-8, 

5:30-8 p.m. 

Friday, September 9, 

12-3 p.m. and 5:30-8 p.m. 

Monday-Tuesday, September 12-13, 

5:30-8 p.m. 



Chelmsford High School 

Thursday, September 8, and 
Tuesday, September 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Dedham Campus 

Thursday, September 8, and 
Monday, September 12, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Framingham North High School 

Tuesday, September 6, and 
Monday, September 12, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Marlboro High School 

Wednesday, September 7, and 
Monday, September 12, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Marshfield High School 

Thursday, September 8, and 
Tuesday, September 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Milford High School 

Thursday, September 8, and 
Tuesday, September 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Peabody Veterans Memorial High School 

Wednesday, September 7, and 
Monday, September 12, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Westwood High School 

Thursday, September 8, and 
Tuesday, September 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Weymouth North High School 

Wednesday, September 7, and 
Monday, September 12, 
5:30-8 p.m. 



1988-1989 Academic Calendar 9 



Fall quarter classes begin 
Monday, September 26 

Columbus Day observed 
Monday, October 10 

Veterans Day observed 
Wednesday, November 11 

Thanksgiving recess 
Thursday-Saturday, November 24-26 

Final examination period for fall quarter 
Monday-Sunday, December 12-18 

Christmas vacation 

Monday-Monday, December 19-January 2 

Winter Quarter 1989 

Classes begin Tuesday, January 3, 1989 
Winter Registration Dates 

Belmont High School 

Tuesday, December 6, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Boston Main Campus 

Monday-Thursday, 
December 5-8, 
9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Downtown Boston Campus 

(5 Liberty Square) 
Monday, December 5, 
11 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Burlington Suburban Campus 

Monday-Wednesday, 
December 5-7, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Chelmsford High School 

Tuesday, December 6, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Dedham Campus 

Monday, December 5, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Fromingham North High School 

Monday, December 5, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Marlboro High School 

Monday, December 5, 
5:30-8 p.m. 



Marshfield High School 

Tuesday, December 6, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Milford High School 

Tuesday, December 6, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Peabody Veterans Memorial High School 

Monday, December 5, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Westwood High School 

Tuesday, December 6, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Weymouth North High School 

Monday, December 5, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Winter quarter classes begin 
Tuesday, January 3 

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday observed 
Monday, January 16 

Presidents' Day observed 
Monday, February 20 

Final examination period for winter quarter 
Monday-Sunday, March 20-25 

Spring recess (or make-up period for lost 

snow days) 

Monday-Sunday, March 27-ApriI 2 



Spring Quarter 1989 

Classes begin Monday, April 3, 1989 
Spring Registration Dates 

Belmont High School 

Tuesday, March 14, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Boston Main Campus 

Monday-Thursday, 
March 13-16, 
9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Downtown Boston Campus 

(5 Liberty Square) 
Monday, March 13, 
11 a.m.-7 p.m. 



10 Introduction 



Burlington Suburban Campus 

Monday- Wednesday , 
March 13-15, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Chelmsford High School 

Tuesday, March 14, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Dedham Campus 

Monday, March 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Framingham North High School 

Monday, March 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Marlboro High School 

Monday, March 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Marshfield High School 

Tuesday, March 14, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Milford High School 

Tuesday, March 14, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Peabody Veterans Memorial High School 

Monday, March 13, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Westwood High School 

Tuesday, March 14, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Weymouth North High School 

Monday, March 13, ; 

5:30-8 p.m. 

Spring quarter classes begin 
Monday, April 3 

Patriots' Day observed 
Monday, April 17 

Memorial Day observed 
Monday, May 29 

Final examination period for spring quarter 
Monday-Sunday, June 12-18 

Commencement 
Sunday, June 18 



Summer Quarter 1989 

Classes begin Monday, June 19, 1989 
Registration for Entire Summer Quarter 

Boston Main Campus 

Monday-Thursday, 

June 5-8, 

9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Burlington Suburban Campus 

Monday- Wednesday, 
June 5-7, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Registration for Second Five-Week Summer Term 

Boston Main Campus 

Monday-Tuesday, 
July 10-11, 
9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Burlington Suburban Campus 

Monday, July 10, 
5:30-8 p.m. 

Summer quarter classes begin 
Monday, June 19 

Second sunmier quarter session classes begin 
Monday, July 24 

Independence Day observed 
Tuesday, July 4 

Labor Day observed 
Monday, September 4 

Final examination period for sununer quarter 
held during last class session of each term 

Calendar changes may be made. The University 
conununity will be notified if such 
changes occur. 



11 



University College Offices 



Chelmsford 


Peabody ^^^ 


^ 


Burlington • 






Marlboro Belmont 






Framingham 


Boston 




• Dedham • 


"■^^J^ 




West wood • 


Weymouth 


\ 






\ 


Millord 


Av 


\ 

• Marshtield 



Map indicates all University College campus 
locations. 



General Information 

617-437-2400 
617-437-2825 (TTY) 

Office of the Registrar 

120 Hayden Hall 

617-437-2300 

Monday-Thursday, 

8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 

Friday, 

8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Belmont HIgli School 

221 Concord Avenue 
617-484-4418 
Tuesday cind Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 

Boston Main Campus 

180 Ruggles Building 

360 Huntington Avenue 

617-437-2400 

TTY: 617437-2825 

(for the hearing-impaired only) 

Monday-Friday, 

8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. 

Saturday, 

8:30 a.m.-l p.m. 

Downtown Boston Campus 

5 Liberty Square 
617-367-6373 
Monday-Thursday,* 
7 a.m.-10 p.m. 
Friday, 

7 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Burlington Suburban Campus 

South Bedford Road 

617-272-5500 

Monday-Friday, 

8 a.m.- 10 p.m. 
Saturday, 

8 a.m.-12 noon 



'Office hours may change due to changes in class schedules. 



12 Introduction 

Burlington High School 

123 Cambridge Street 
617-273-1870 
Monday-Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 

Chelmsford High School 

200 Richardson Road 
508-251-8792 
Tuesday and Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 

Dedham Campus 

Common Street 

617-329-8000 

Monday-Thursday, 

8 a.m.-10 p.m. 

Friday, 

8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Saturday, 

8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Framlngham North High School 

A Street 
508-877-2333 
Monday-Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 

Marlboro High School 

Bolton Street 
508-485-4122 

Monday and Wednesday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 

Marshfield High School 

Forest Street 
617-837-1835 
Tuesday and Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 

ftlilford High School 

31 West Fountain Street 
508-473-2565 
Tuesday and Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 



Peabody Veterans Memorial High School 

485 Lowell Street 
508-532-3090 
Monday-Thursday 
5:30-10 p.m. 

Westwood High School 

200 Nahatan Street 
617-329-3030 
Monday-Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 

Weymouth North High School 

1051 Connmercial Street 
617-335-9112 
Monday-Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 



Summer Office Hours 

Office of the Registrar 

120 Hayden HaU 
Monday-Thursday, 
8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 

Boston Main Campus 

180 Ruggles Building 
Monday-Thursday, 
8 a.m.-8:30 p.m. 

Downtown Boston Campus 

5 Liberty Square 
Monday-Thursday, 
7:30 a.m.-10 p.m.* 

Burlington Suburban Campus 

Monday-Thursday, 
8 a.m.-10 p.m. 

Dedham Campus 

Monday-Thursday, 

8:30 a.m.-10 p.m. 

Friday, 

8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Framingham North High School 

Monday and Wednesday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 

Weymouth North High School 

Tuesday and Thursday, 
5:30-10 p.m. 



*Ofiace hours may change due to changes in class schedules. 



Programs of Study 



14 

Overview 



Business Administration 



At University College, your options are almost 
unlimited. Our programs of study can take you 
in any direction you determine toward the ful- 
fillment of your professional or personal objec- 
tives. You may enroll as a student pursuing a 
degree program or as a nondegree student tak- 
ing a single course or a special program. 

Our programs leading to the bachelor of sci- 
ence, bachelor of science in business adminis- 
tration, and bachelor of arts degrees provide 
opportunities for cultiu-al and professional de- 
velopment equivalent in quaUty and scope to 
those offered in the conventional four-year col- 
lege enrolling full-time students. The bachelor's 
degree at the College requires 174 quarter 
hours of credit or more. 

Programs leading to the associate in science 
degree enable students to estabUsh a knowl- 
edge base in business administration, criminal 
justice and security, health professions and sci- 
ences, or liberal arts. The associate's degree re- 
quires 96 quarter hours of credit and is 
equivalent to the conventional two-year, or ju- 
nior community college program in scope and 
quality. University College also offers certifi- 
cate programs in a wide range of disciplines. 

Degree and certificate programs are offered 
in the following areas. (The numbers indicate 
the page on which detailed curricula appear.) 



Accounting 

Associate in Science 39 
Bachelor of Science in Business 

Administration 51 
Certificate 18 

Business Administration 

Associate in Science 40 
Certificate 21 

Compensation and Benefits Management 

Certificate 22 

Computer Programming and Systems 
Analysis 

Certificate 23 

Computer Systems Specialist Program 

Certificate 24 

Culinary Arts (CheFs Institute) 

Certificate 24 

Electronic Composition 

Certificate 25 

Finance 

Associate in Science 41 
Bachelor of Science in Business 

Administration 53 
Certificate 25 

Food Service Management 

Certificate 25 

Hotel Front Desk Management 

Certificate 27 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Associate in Science 42 

Human Resources Management 

Associate in Science 43 
Certificate 27 

Industrial Management 

Associate in Science 44 

Industrial Technology 

Bachelor of Science (Operations 
Management Concentration) 55 

Bachelor of Science (Electronic 
PubUshing Management Concentration) 56 

Management 

Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration 58 
Certificate 28 



Overview 15 



Management Information Systems 

Associate in Science 46 
Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration 60 

Marketing 

Associate in Science 47 
Certificate 29 

Operations Management 

Certificate 30 

Purchasing and Materials Management 

Associate in Science 48 
Certificate 31 

Real Estate 

Associate in Science 49 
Certificate 31 

Small Business 

Certificate 32 

Transportation and Physical Distribution 
Management 

Associate in Science 50 
Certificate 33 



Criminal Justice and Security 



Corrections 

Associate in Science 63 

Bachelor of Science 64 

Policing 

Associate in Science 65 

Bachelor of Science 66 

Security 

Associate in Science 67 

Bachelor of Science 68 

Healtli Professions and Sciences 



Biomedical Illustration 

Certificate 21 

Chemical-Biological Technology 

Associate in Science 72 
Bachelor of Science 73 

Health Management 

Bachelor of Science 75 
Option in Continuing Care Administration 76 
Option in Community Health Management 77 
General Option 77 

Health Record Administration 

Bachelor of Science 78 
Certificate 80 



Health Science 

Bachelor of Science in Health Science 80 

Medical Laboratory Science 

Associate in Science 84 

Medical Technology, Bachelor of Science 85 

Hematology, Bachelor of Science 86 

Nursing 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (in affiliation 
with the College of Nursing) 89 

Radiologic Technology 

Associate in Science 90 

Therapeutic Recreation Services 

Activity Leader Certificate 92 
Associate in Science 94 
Learning Disabilities Specialization 
Certificate 28 

Liberal Arts 

Advertising 

Certificate 18 

American Sign Language and Deaf Studies 

Certificate 19 

American Sign Language Interpreting 

Certificate 20 

American Studies 

Certificate 20 

Arts and Sciences 

Associate in Science 99 

Business Communication 

Certificate 22 

Economics 

Bachelor of Arts 100 
Bachelor of Science 101 

English 

Bachelor of Arts 102 
Bachelor of Science 103 

Fine Arts 

Bachelor of Arts 104 
Bachelor of Science 104 

Gerontology 

Certificate 26 

Graphic Design and Visual Communication 

Associate in Science 105 
Bachelor of Science 106 
Certificate 26 

History 

Bachelor of Arts 107 
Bachelor of Science 108 



16 Programs of Study 

Journalism 

Advertising Certificate 18 
Public Relations Certificate 31 

Liberal Studies 

Bachelor of Arts 110 

Music 

Bachelor of Arts 1 12 
Bachelor of Science 1 12 

Music Therapy 

Certificate 29 

Political Science 

Bachelor of Arts 1 13 
Bachelor of Science 115 

Psychology 

Bachelor of Arts 117 
Bachelor of Science 118 

Public Administration 

Certificate 30 

Public Relations 

Certificate 31 

Sociology-Anthropology 

Bachelor of Arts 1 19 
Bachelor of Science 120 

Speech Communication 

Certificate 32 

Technical Communications 

Bachelor of Science 122 

Technical Writing 

Certificate 33 

Writing 

Certificate 33 

Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical 
order by subject area beginning on page 129. 



17 



Certificate Programs 



University College offers a variety of certificate 
programs designed to meet the needs of indi- 
viduals who seek specific, job-related skills 
rather than the traditional course sequence of a 
degree program. Students enrolling in our certi- 
ficate programs include 

• individuals who plan to complete an associate's 
degree but first want the marketable skills of- 
fered in a certificate program; 

• individuals who seek intensive study in a disci- 
pline but do not wish to acquire a degree; and 

• individuals who already hold a degree but wish 
to acquire specialized knowledge for a career 
change or professional development. 

Students entering a certificate program 
should file a certificate petition with the Office 
of Academic and Student Affairs. When they 
are within one term of completing their certifi- 
cate, they should file again. Petitions 
are available from the Office of Academic and 
Student Affairs, 180 Ruggles Building, 
617-437-2400, and at all campus locations. 



For assistance in determining course prereq- 
uisites or deciding on the appropriate program, 
call 617-437-2400 for an appointment with an 
academic adviser, or call the number listed for 
each individual certificate program. 

Most certificate programs are designed to fa- 
cilitate transfer into a related degree program. 
In addition, a limited amount of transfer credit 
for introductory courses taken at another 
school may be applied toward certificate pro- 
gram requirements, except for the American 
Sign Language and Deaf Studies and the Ameri- 
can Sign Language Interpreting certificates. The 
number of transfer credits permitted varies 
by certificate. 

A student may be awarded only two certifi- 
cates. Students who choose to complete a sec- 
ond certificate in a subject related to the first 
may find that the two have certain courses in 
common. However, a second certificate will not 
be awarded if more than 50 percent of the 
course work is duplicated. 

On occasion, students have good reasons for 
requesting permission to replace a required 
course with a substitute course. Permission to 
substitute a course must be granted by the ap- 
propriate program office. Students should 
submit a completed Petition for Course 
Substitutions to the appropriate office. Peti- 
tions are available at all campus locations. 

All course credits used to fulfill the require- 
ments for a certificate program must reflect 
acadenuc work completed within five years 
prior to the date on which the certificate is 
awarded. In addition, students must achieve a 
grade of C (2.0) or better in each course in or- 
der to receive a certificate. 



18 Programs of Study 



Accounting Certificate Program 




quarter hours 


ACC 4101 ACC 4102 ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 9 


ACC 4301 ACC 4302 ACC 4303 


Intermediate Accounting 1, 2, 3 9 


ACC 4310 


Cost Accounting 1 3 


FI4301 


Principles of Finance 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


9 quarter hours) 24 



For more information, call 617-437-2418. 



Advertising Certificate Program 



quarter hours 


JRN 4112 


Writing for Media 1 


3 


JRN 4349 


Advertising Basics 


3 


JRN 4350 


Advertising Copywriting 


3 


JRN 4351 


Advertising Practice 


3 


ART 4115 


Graphic Design for Non-Majors 


3 


ART 4143 


Advertising Design 


3 


MTH 4520 


Statistical Thinking 


3 


MKT4301 


Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


Choose one elective. 


MKT4302 


Introduction to Marketing 2 


(3) 


MKT4310 


Advertising and Sales 
Promotion Management 1 


(3) 


JRN 4300 


Photojournalism 


(3) 


ART 4160 


Basic Photography 


(3) 


MGT 4101 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1 


(3) 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 


27 



For more information, caU 617-437-2416 or 617-437-2423. 



Certificate Programs 19 



American 


Sign Language 


and Deaf Studies Certificate Program 


quarter hours 


ASL 4101 


ASL 4102 




American Sign Language 1, 2* 8 


ASL 4201 


ASL 4202 




Intermediate American Sign Language 1,2 8 


ASL 4301 


ASL 4302 




Advanced American Sign language 
Proficiency 1, 2 8 


ASL 4412 






American Deaf Culture 3 


ASL 4410 






Linguistics of American Sign Language 3 


ASL 4411 

or 

ASL 4413 






Deaf History (3) 

or 

American Sign Language Literature (3) 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit for ASL 4101 and ASL 4102: 8 quarter 33 
hours; all other credits must be completed in residence; a 3.0 cumulative grade-point 
average is required to receive this certificate.) 



For more information, caU 617-437-3064 (voice) or 617-437-3067 (TTY). 

*An Advanced Placement examination is available for this course. If ASL 4101 or ASL 4102 is waived, a substitution must be 
made so that the quarter hours earned still total 33. 



American Sign Language Interpreting 
Certificate Program 

The Progrom 

The American Sign Language Interpreting Cer- 
tificate Program is designed to offer students 
education and training as sign language inter- 
preters. Developed for students already profi- 
cient in American Sign Language and English, 
the nine courses in the program cover the the- 
ory and practice of interpreting. Students who 
are looking for entry-level staff positions or 
freelance assignments may find this program 
helpful. Students may also benefit from the 
course work as they prepare for state and na- 
tional interpreter evaluations. 



Admission 

Candidates for admission must have received a 
B or better in Advanced American Sign Lan- 
guage Proficiency 2 (ASL 4302), or have at- 
tained equivalent skills. Prospective students 
must complete an application process in which 
they demonstrate proficiency in English and 
American Sign Language. 

Certification 

Students must complete all required course 
work and maintain an overall average of 3.0 or 
better in the program to attain the certificate. 

For More Information 

Applications and further information are avail- 
able from the Sign Language Programs office, 
276 Holmes Hall, Northeastern University, 
360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts 02115, 617-437-3064 (voice) or 
617-437-3067 (TTY). 



20 Programs of Study 



Course Content 

Courses include the following. 




quarter hours 


ASL 4600 




Introduction to Interpreting 3 


ASL 4601 


ASL 4602 ASL 4603 


American Sign Language Interpreting 1,2,3 12 


ASL 4604 


ASL 4605 


Special Topics in Interpreting 1,2 6 


ASL 4606 




Interpreter Roles and Ethics 3 


ASL 4607 




Interpreting Lab 4 


ASL 4608 




Practicum 4 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


8 quarter hours) 32 



Advanced placement examinations are available for ASL 4202, ASL 4302, ASL 4412, and ASL 4410, 
which are prerequisites for courses for this certificate. 

American Studies Certificate Program 



quarter hours 


HST 4201 


American History 1763-1848 3 


HST 4202 


American History 1848-1917 3 


HST 4203 


American History since 1917 3 


POL 4104 


Introduction to American Govermnent 3 


SOA 4430 


Native North American Peoples 3 


ENG 4234 


Modem American Voices: 

The New Essayists 3 


ENG 4611 


The American Novel 3 


ART 4223 


American Architecture 3 


MUS 4138 


American Musical Theatre 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


9 quarter hours) 27 



Foi- more information, call 617-437-2416 or 617-437-2423. 



Certificate Programs 21 



Biomedical Illustration Certificate 


Program 




quarter hours 


ART 4121 




Principles of Drawing and Composition 3 


ART 4122 




Introduction to Figure Drawing 3 


ART 4123 




Drawing Workshop 3 


ART 4367 




Illustration 3 


BIO 4175 




Anatomy and Physiology 1 3 


BIO 4374 




Histology 1 3 


BIO 4441 




Parasitology 4 


BIO 4801 




Independent Study in Biology 4 


Recommended 


ART 4140 




Graphic Communication and Production (3) 


BIO 4375 BIO 4376 




Histology 2, 3 (6) 


Total Quarter Hours 




26-35 


Business Administration Certificate Program 


quarter hours 


ACC 4101 




Accounting Principles 1 3 


ECN 4115 




Economic Principles and Problems 1 3 


FI 4301 




Principles of Finance 3 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 3 


MIS 4101 




Introduction to Data Processing 

and Information Systems 1 3 


MKT4301 




Introduction to Marketing 1 3 



MGT 4101 MGT 4102 Introduction to Business and 

Management 1, 2 6 

or or 

MGT 4105 Introduction to Business and Management 

Intensive (may be taken in lieu of 

MGT 4101 and MGT 4102) (6) 

SPC 4101 Fundamentals of Human Communication 3 

Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 27 



22 Programs of Study 



Business Communication Certificate 


Program 




quarter hours 


JRN 4335 




Public Relations Basics 


3 


MGT 4101 




Introduction to Business and 
Management 1 


3 


SPC 4102 




Group Discussion 


3 


SPC 4152 




Interviewing 


3 


SPC 4153 




Techniques of Persuasion 


3 


SPC 4154 




Negotiation Skills 


3 


SPC 4155 




Organizational Conununication 


3 


SPC 4251 




Business and Professional Speaking 


3 


Choose one writing course. 


ENG 4380 




Business Writing and Reports 


(3) 


JRN 4112 




Writing for Media 1 


(3) 


TCC 4101 




Technical Writing 1 


(3) 


Or choose any acceptable substitute in written communication, with prior approval of the 
department consultant or program director. 


Total Quorter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 


27 



For more information, call 617-437-2416 or 617-437-2423. 

Compensation and Benefits Management Certificate Program 



quarter hours 


HRM 4310 


HRM 4311 


Personnel Management 1,2* 6 


HRM 4321 




Wage and Salary Administration 3 


HRM 4322 




Employee Benefits 3 


HRM 4323 




Job Evaluation 3 


HRM 4330 


HRM 4331 


Employment Rights 1,2* 6 


Elective in Human Resources Management 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


9 quarter hours) 24 



For more information, call 617^37-2418. 

•This certificate may be taken by students who have aJso completed the Human Resources Management certificate. Asterisked 
courses do not have to be repeated. 



Certificate Programs 23 



Computer 


Programming and Systems Analysis Certificate Program 


quarter hours 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 Introduction to Data Processing 

and Information Systems 1, 2 6 


MIS 4221 


MIS 4222 MIS 4223 COBOL Progranuning 1, 2, 3 9 


MIS 4230 


PC Software for Professionals 3 


MIS 4241 


MIS 4242 Programming in BASIC 1,2 6 


MIS 4301 


MIS 4302 Structured Systems Analysis and 

Design 1, 2 6 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 12 quarter hours) 30 



This certificate differs from the Computer Systems Specialist Program (described below) in that 
the courses for this certificate are regularly offered at all campuses and may be completed over a 
longer period of time than in the Specialist Program. For more information about both programs, 
caU 617-437-2418. 



Computer Systems Specialist Program 

The Program 

This program is designed to offer students 
training as computer systems specialists. In- 
tended for students who are interested in entry- 
level programming positions in business and 
industry, the program addresses the career 
goals of individuals who have little or no aca- 
demic or work-related background in computer 
programming. Students who successfully com- 
plete the program receive a Computer Systems 
SpeciaUst certificate. 

Admission 

College Board Examinations are not required 
for admission. For purposes of evaluation for 
admission, however, a computer-programmer 
aptitude test is adnunistered to appUcants who 
successfully complete the initial screening pro- 
cess. Enrollment is limited. This program is of- 
fered only if a sufficient number of qualified 
candidates apply. 

Time and Place 

The program is scheduled twice during the aca- 
demic year, in the fall and spring quarters. 
Classes are scheduled for thirty weekends: Fri- 
day, 6 to 10 p.m. and all day Saturday, 9 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. Sections offered at the Burlington 
campuses. 



Academic Credit and Certification 

Upon satisfactory completion of the program, 
students will have accumulated 45 quarter 
hours of academic credit, and will receive the 
program certificate. The credits represent 26 
percent of the credits necessary for a 
bachelor's degree. 

Placement Assistance 

Although job placement is not guaranteed, most 
students who successfully complete the pro- 
gram find suitable employment. Placement ser- 
vices include individual counseling; job-search 
seminars on career opportuiuties, self-assess- 
ment, resume preparation and interviewing 
skills; and resume referrals to employers. 

For More Informotion 

For more information about the program and 
an application form, contact the Business Ad- 
ministration Programs Office, Northeastern 
University, University College, 360 Huntington 
Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, 
617^7-2418. 



24 Programs of Study 



Course Content 

Courses include the following. 



quarter hours 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 




Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 




6 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 




Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 




6 


MIS 4221 


MIS 4222 


MIS 4223 


COBOL Programming 1, 2, 3 




9 


MIS 4235 






Advanced COBOL Programming 




3 


MIS 4230 






PC Software for Professionals 




3 


MIS 4241 


MIS 4242 




Programming in BASIC 1, 2 




6 


MIS 4273 






PC DOS and Assembly 




3 


MIS 4301 


MIS 4302 




Structured Systems Analysis 
and Design 1, 2 




6 


MIS 4345 






Database Management Systems 




3 


Total Quarter Hours 








45 


Culinary Arts 


(Chefs Institute) Certificate 
















quarter 


hours 


HTL 4307 






Food Service Engineering and Sanitation 


3 


HTL 4308 






Food and Beverage Cost Control 




3 


HTL 4320 






Food Preparation Intensive 




6 


HTL 4322 






Consumer Food Preparation 




3 


HTL 4324 






Dining Room Management 




3 


HTL 4325 






Intensive Chef's Training 




6 


HTL 4326 






The Joy of Catering 




3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 




27 



Certificate Programs 25 



Electronic Composition 


Certificate 




quarter hours 


ART 4140 




Graphic Commuiucation and Production 3 


ART 4115 




Graphic Design for Non-Mgyors* 3 


ART 4139 




Color Theory and Practice 3 


ART 4151 




Typography 3 


ART 4431 




Graphic Composition Systems 1* 3 


ART 4181 




Introduction to Computer-Aided Design* 3 


ART 4410 




Electronic Imaging Systems 3 


ART 4415 




Electronic Document Production* 3 



ART 4366 



ART 4416 



Promotional and Technical Publications 
Design and Production 



Style Setup for Electronic Document 
Production 



Total Quarter Hours 




30 


•Studio courses 

Finance Certificate Program 


quarter hours 


ACC 4101 ACC 4102 ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


FI4301 


Principles of Finance 


3 


FI4302 


Financial Management 


3 


FI4310 


Investment Principles 


3 


FI 4320 


Credit Principles 


3 


FI4325 


Budgeting and Planning 


3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 


24 



For more information, call 617-437-2418. 



Food Service Management Certificate 



quarter hours 


ACC 4101 


Accounting Principles 1 3 


HTL 4301 


Introduction to Hotel and Restaurant 
Management 3 


HTL 4304 


Hotel and Restaurant Law 3 


HTL 4307 


Food Service Engineering and Sanitation 3 


HTL 4308 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 3 


HTL 4309 


Managerial Accounting for the Hospitality 
Industry 3 


HTL 4320 


Food Preparation (Intensive) 6 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


9 quarter hours 24 



26 Programs of Study 

Gerontology Certificate Program* 



Choice of quarter hours or CEUs 


SOC 4225/SOC 5225 


Social Gerontology 3 


PSY 4242/PSY 5242 


Development: Adulthood and Aging 3 


SOC 4226/SOC 5226 


Work, Leisure, and Aging 3 


PSY 4243/PSY 5243 


Aging and Mental Health 3 


ECN 4312/ECN 5312 


Economic Concerns of Older Adults 3 


PHL 4220/PHL 5220 


The Meaning of Death 3 


POL 4375/POL 5375 


Consumer Advocacy 1 3 


SOC 4240/SOC 5240 


Sociology of Human Service Organizations 3 


HSC 4610/HSC 5610 


Geriatric Nutrition 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


9 quarter hours) 27 



For more information, call 617-437-2416 or 617-437-2423. 

'Course numbers that begin with 4 are for credit; course numbers that begin with 5 are for Continuing Education Units (CEUs). 

Graphic Design and Visual Communication Certificate Program 



quarter hours 


ART 4140 




Graphic Communication and Production 3 


ART 4135 




Design Foundations and Techniques* 3 


ART 4139 




Color Theory and Practice 3 


ART 4151 




Typography 3 


ART 4367 




Illustration 3 


JRN 4349 




Advertising Basics 3 


ART 4141 


ART 4142 


Graphic Design 1,* 2* 6 


ART 4143 




Advertising Design* 3 


ART 4251 




Advanced Graphic Design* 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours; possible NCE credit: 30 

9 quarter hours. See p. 97) 



For more information, call 617-437-2416 or 617-437-2423. 

•3V^-hour studio. 



Certificate Programs 27 

Hotel Front Desk Management Certificate Program 



quarter hours 


ACC 4101 


Accounting Principles 1 3 


HTL 4301 


Introduction to Hotel and Restaurant 
Management 3 


HTL 4303 


Front Office Management 3 


HTL 4304 


Hotel and Restaurant Law 3 


HTL 4307 


Food Service Engineering and Sanitation 3 


HTL 4308 


Food and Beverage Management 3 


HTL 4309 


Managerieil Accounting for the Hospitality 
Industry 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


9 quarter hours) 21 



For more information, call 617-437-2418. 



Human Resources Management Certificate Programt 


quarter hours 


HRM 4301 


Organizational Behavior 3 


HRM 4302 


Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 3 


HRM 4303 


Applied Human Resources Management 3 


HRM 4310 HRM 4311 


Personnel Management 1,2* 6 


HRM 4330 HRM 4331 


Employment Rights 1, 2* 6 


HRM 4340 


Public and Private Sector Collective 
Bargaining in the United States 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 24 



For more information, call 617-437-2418. 

•Courses with asterisks do not have to be repeated. 

tThis certificate may also be taken by students who have completed the Compensation and Benefits Management certificate. 



28 Programs of Study 



Learning Disability Specialization 


Progi 


am 




quarter hours 


REC 4102 






Principles and Practices of Therapeutic 
Recreatipn 3 


REC 4200 






Introduction to Learning Disabilities 3 


REC 4210 






Psychosocial Aspects of Disabilities and 
Illness 3 


REC 4250 






Assessment of Learning Disabilities 3 


REC 4304 






Dynamics of Family Life for the Disabled 3 


REC 4350 






Legal Issues of Disabihty and 

Rehabilitation 3 


REC 4450 






Vocational Planning for the Learning 
Disabled 3 


REC 4470 






The Learning Disabled at Work 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


9 quarter hours) 24 



For more information, call 617-437-2818. 



Management Certificate Program 




quarter hours 


HRM 4301 


Organizational Behavior 3 


MIS 4101 


Introduction to Data Processing 

and Information Systems 1 3 



MOT 4101 

or 

MGT 4105 



MGT 4102 



Introduction to Business and 

Management 1, 2 

or 

Introduction to Business and 



Management Intensive 


(6) 


MGT 4320 Managing Change 


3 


MGT 4323 Motivation Management 


3 


MGT 4330 Essentials for Management of Small 

Business 
or or 
MGT 4329 Managing Small Business 


3 
(3) 


Elective 


3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 


27 



Certificate Programs 29 



Marketing Certificate Program 






quarter hours 


MKT 4301 


MKT 4302 




Introduction to Marketing 1, 2 6 


MKT 4310 


MKT 4311 




Advertising and Sales Promotion 
Management 1, 2 6 


MKT 4315 


MKT 4316 




Sales Management 1,2 6 


MKT 4320 


MKT 4321 




Marketing Management 1, 2 6 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer 


credit: 


9 quarter hours) 24 



For more information, call 617-437-2418. 



Music Therapy Certificate Program 



MUS 4100 



Introduction to Music 



quarter hours 

3 

3 



MUS 4160 



Music Therapy 



MUS 4163 



Sound Health: Music and Relaxation 



PSY 4110 



SOC 4100 



Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 



Roles, Culture, and the Individual 



REC 4200 



SPC 4101 



Introd uction to Learning Disabilities 
Fundamentals of Human Communication 



Choose one. 



MUS 4200 



MUS 4201 



Choose one instrument course. 



MUS 4241 



How to Read and Write Music 



Music Theory 1 



Piano Class 



(3) 



(3) 



(3) 



MUS 4244 



MUS 4247 



Voice Class 



Guitar Class 



(3) 



(3) 



Choose one psychology or sociology course. 
PSY 4111 



Introduction to Psychology: 
Developmental Aspects 



(3) 



PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 
Personal Dynamics 



SOC 4101 



Inequality and Institutions 



SOC 4102 



Institutions and Social Change 



Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 



(3) 



(3) 



(3) 



30 



For more information, call 617-437-2418. 



30 Programs of Study 



Operations Management Certificate Program 


quarter hours 


EM 4301 


Introduction to Operations Management 3 


EM 4302 


Operations Analysis 3 


IM4314 


Productivity Enhancement and Quality 
Management 3 


EM 4317 


Purchasing and Materials Management 3 


EM 4321 


Operations Planning and Control 3 


EM 4326 


Operations Management Policy 3 


MS 4332 


Statistical Quality Control 3 


Total Quorter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 


9 quarter hours) 21 



For more information, call 617-437-2418. 



Public Administration Certificate 


Program 




quarter hours 


POL 4104 










Introduction to American Government 3 


POL 4300 










Introduction to Public Administration 3 


POL 4301 










Case Studies in Public Administration 3 


POL 4303 










Public Personnel Administration 3 


POL 4304 










Public Budgeting 3 


POL 4305 










Organizational Theory 3 


POL 4306 










Public Policy Analysis 3 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 








Introduction to Data Processing and 
Information Systems 1,2 6 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible 


transfer credit: 


9 quairter hours) 27 



For more information, call 617-437-2416 or 617-437-2423. 



Certificate Programs 31 



Public Relations Certificate Program 



quarter hours 



JRN 4112 JRN 4113 Writing for Media 1, 2 6 

JRN 4335 Public Relations Basics 3 



JRN 4336 PubUc Relations Practices 



JRN 4337 Public Relations Problen\s 3 

JRN 4480 Copyediting 3 

MTH 4520 Statistical Thinking 3 



SPC 4153 


Techniques of Persuasion 


3 


Choose one elective. 


JRN 4300 


Photojournalism 


(3) 


MGT 4101 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1 


(3) 


MKT 4301 


Introduction to Marketing 1 


(3) 


ART 4368 


Graphic Design for Media 


(3) 



Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 27 

For more information, caU 617-437-2416 or 617437-2423. 

Purchasing and Materials Management Certificate Program 



quarter hours 



ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


MGT 4101 




Introduction to Business and 
Management 1 


3 


PUR 4351 


PUR 4352 


Purchasing 1, 2 


6 


PUR 4357 




Business Negotiations 


3 


PUR 4358 




Materials Requirement Planning 


3 


PUR 4365 




Production Activity Control 


3 


PUR 4370 




Inventory Management 


3 


TRN 4305 




Traffic Management 


3 



Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 30 

For more information, call 617-437-2418. 

Real Estate Certificate Program 



quarter hours 



RE 4301 RE 4302 Real Estate Fundamentals 1, 2 



RE 4323 RE 4324 Real Estate Appraisal 1, 2 6 

RE 4328 RE 4329 Real Estate Financial Analysis 1, 2 6 

RE 4341 RE 4342 Real Estate Law 1, 2 6 

Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 24 

For more information, call 617-437-2418. 



32 Programs of Study 



Small Business Certificate Program 

The Small Business Certificate program is de- 
signed to help the entrepreneur, small business 
manager, or prospective small business owner 
formulate an effective business plan. 

Students in the program must complete the 
two consecutive courses over two academic 
quarters. Each course carries three quarter 
hours of credit, and neither may be taken as a 
business elective. 



Admission 

There are no admission requirements to the 
first course, but first-time admission to the pro- 
gram at the beginning of the second course is 
not allowed. 

Scheduling 

The program is usually scheduled to begin in 
the fall quarter at the main Boston campus and 
in the winter quarter at the Burlington campus, 
and runs for two consecutive quarters. The 
number of sections and locations that are of- 
fered varies according to demand. 



Small Business Certificate Program 






quarter hours 


MGT 4340 


Small Business 1 


3 


MGT 4341 


Small Business 2 


3 


Total Quarter Hours 




6 



For more information, call 617-437-2418. 



Speech Communication Certificate Program 




quarter hours 


SPC 4101 




Fundamentals of Human Communication 3 


SPC 4102 




Group Discussion 3 


SPC 4150 




Self-Concept and Communication 3 


SPC 4111 




Voice and Articulation 3 


SPC 4151 




Listening 3 


SPC 4152 




Interviewing 3 


SPC 4153 




Techniques of Persuasion 3 


SPC 4154 




Negotiation Skills 3 


SPC 4251 




Business and Professional Speaking 3 


Total Quarter Hours 


(Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 27 



For more information, call 617-437-2416 or 617437-2423. 



Certificate Programs 33 



Technical Writing Certificote Program 



quarter hours 



ART 4140 Graphic Communication and Production 



MIS 4101 MIS 4102 Introduction to Data Processing 

and Information Systems 1, 2 



TCC 4101 TCC 4102 Technical Writing 1, 2 6 

TCC 4105 Editing for Science and Technology 3 

TCC 4301 TCC 4302 Computer Software Technical Writing 1,2 6 

Choose one computer language. 



MIS 4220 Introduction to Programming in COBOL (3) 

or or 

MIS 4240 Introduction to Programming in BASIC (3) 

or or 

MIS 4250 FORTRAN Programming 1 (3) 

or or 

MIS 4270 Pascal Programming 1 (3) 

Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 27 

For more information, call 617-437-2416 or 617-437-2423. 

Transportation and Physical Distribution Management Certificate Program 

quarter hours 



TRN 4301 TRN 4303 Elements of Transportation 1, 2 6 

TRN 4302 TRN 4304 Physical Distribution Management 1, 2 6 

MGT 4101 Introduction to Business and 

Management 1 3 

Transportation electives ^ 

Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 2] 

For more information, call 617-437-2418. 

Writing Certificate Program 



quarter hours 


ENG 4349 


ENG 4350 


Expository and Persuasive Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4352 




Expository Communications 3 


JRN 4112 




Writing for Media 1 3 


JRN 4113 




Writing for Media 2 3 


TCC 4101 


TCC 4102 


Technical Writing 1,2 6 


ENG 4356 




Creative Writing 3 


ENG 4363 




Writing for the Marketplace 3 


Total Quarter Hours (Possible transfer credit: 9 quarter hours) 27 



For more information, caU 617-437-2416 or 617-437-2423. 



34 



Business Administration Degree 
Programs 



Hotel FYont Desk Management 27 

Human Resources Management 27 

Management 28 

Marketing 29 

Operations Management 30 

Purchasing and Materials Management 31 

Real Estate 31 

Small Business 32 
Transportation and Physical 

Distribution Management 33 



Martha P. Welch, Director, Business 

Administration Programs 

Lizbeth C. Roper, Assistant to the Director, 

Business Administration Programs 

270 Ruggles Building 

617-437-2418 



Purpose 



Recognizing that adult students seek educa- 
tional opportunities in business to satisfy many 
professional needs. University College offers a 
wide selection of business and related courses 
as well as structured academic programs. Op- 
tions include certificate programs, associate's 
degree programs, and bachelor's degree pro- 
grams. All certificate and degree programs offer 
students an opportunity to achieve professional 
competence in a formal set of business subjects 
while laying the foundation for further 
professional growth. 



Certificates in Business 

Individuals can build or advance a marketable 
specialization in business in the following certi- 
ficate program areas. 

Page 

Accounting 18 

Business Administration 21 

Compensation and Benefits Management 22 
Computer Programming and Systems 

Analysis 23 

Computer Systems Specialist Program 23 

Culinary Arts (Chefs Institute) 24 

Electronic Composition 25 

Finance 25 

Food Service Management 25 



Associate in Science Degrees 

Programs leading to the associate in science 
degree provide breadth of perspective by incor- 
porating a well-balanced sequence of liberal 
arts courses. Students acquire specialized 
knowledge for future managerial growth 
through a core of professional business courses 
and a major or concentration in a 
business discipline. 

Students who have completed a certificate 
program may then enroll in an associate's de- 
gree program. Although credits earned in a cer- 
tificate program may be applied toward this 
degree, completion of a certificate program is 
not required. To receive the associate's degree, 
a student must successfully complete the 96 
quarter hours of course credit specified for 
the degree. 

Students who wish to earn one of the associ- 
ate in science degrees in business before enter- 
ing a bachelor of science in business 
administration (BSBA) degree program should 
note that these programs include a validation 
requirement for upper-level business courses 
taken while pursuing the associate's degree. 
(See details page 38.) 

Associate's degree programs are offered in 
the following areas: 

Page 

Accounting 39 

Business Administration 40 

Finance 41 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 42 

Human Resources Management 43 

Industrial Management 44 

Management Information Systems 46 

Marketing 47 

Purchasing and Materials Management 48 

Real Estate 49 
Transportation and Physical Distribution 

Management 50 



Business Administration 35 



Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration Degrees 

The BSBA degree program conforms to all 
standards established by the American Assem- 
bly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), 
which has been recognized by the Council for 
Post-Secondary Accreditation and by the Unit- 
ed States Office of Education as the sole ac- 
crediting organization for university bachelor's 
and master's degree programs in business ad- 
ministration. Although there are more than 
2,000 college and university programs in the 
United States, fewer than 10 percent of these 
institutions offer business programs fully ac- 
credited by the AACSB. 

Each BSBA program offered by University 
College combines a broad spectrum of courses 
in the liberal arts with comprehensive prepara- 
tion in the major areas of business. Building on 
this foundation, students may specialize in one 
of the following fields of business. 

Page 
Accounting 51 

Finance 53 

Management 58 

Management Information Systems 60 

University College also offers bachelor 
of science degrees in the following areas. 

Industrial Technology/Operations 

Management Concentration 55 

Industricil Technology/Electronic 

PubUshing Management Concentration 56 



Planning Your Program of Study Toward a Bachelor 
of Science In Business Administration Degree 

Students who plan to work toward the bachelor 
of science in business administration degree 
should submit transcripts of previously com- 
pleted college-level course work and a Transfer 
Credit Petition to the Office of Acadenuc and 
Student Affairs. (Transfer Credit Petitions may 
be requested by calling 617437-2400. They are 
also available at all campus locations.) Students 
will receive by mail a transfer credit evaluation 
and a suggested plan of study to prepare for ad- 
mission to this program. When this paperwork 
has been completed, students are encouraged 
to schedule an appointment to discuss their 
programs with an academic adviser. 

Students who do not have any academic 
courses that may be transferred from another 
educational institution or program should meet 
with an academic adviser early in their studies 
at University College. These students are re- 
quired to complete 80 quarter hours of credit, 
including EngUsh courses ENG 4110, ENG 4111, 
and ENG 4112; mathematics courses MTH 4110 
and MTH 4111; and a social science elective 
from the course list that follows. This course 
work must be completed prior to admission to 
the BSBA degree program. Once students have 
met these requirements, they should complete a 
Petition for Admission to the bachelor of sci- 
ence in business administration degree pro- 
gram and return it to the Office of Academic 
and Student Affairs to initiate the admissions 
process. This petition may be obtained at all 
campus locations or by calling 617-437-2400. 

Admission to the BSBA degree program is re- 
stricted to students who have maintained a 2.0 
cumulative grade-point average and completed 
a minimum of 80 quarter hours of credit. 

Students should choose their 80 quarter hours 
of credit from the course list that follows. 



36 Programs of Study 



Recommended Lower-Level Courses 




ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


BL 4101 


BL 4102 




Law 1, 2 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 


ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 




Statistics 1, 2 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


ENG 4380 


ENG 4381 




Business Writing and Reports 1, 2 


HST 4101 






The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval Worlds 


HST 4102 

or 

HST 4103 






The Civilization of the Early Modern World 

or 

The Civilization of the Modern World 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


MGT 4103 


Introduction to Business 
and Management 1, 2, 3 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 




Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


MS 4325 






Introduction to Modeling and Simulation 


MTH4110 


MTH 4111 




Math 1, 2 


PHL 4100 






Philosophical Thinking 


PSY 4110 






Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


PSY 4111 






Introduction to Psychology: 
Developmental Aspects 


PSY 4112 






Introduction to Psychology: 
Personal Dynamics 


SOC 4100 






Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


SOC 4101 

or 

SOC 4102 






Inequality and Institutions 

or 

Institutions and Social Change 


SPC 4101 






Fundamentals of Human Conununication 


3 quarter hours of a natural 


science elective 





Special Requirements for BSBA Degree Programs 

Northeastern University is unique in the New 
England region in that both its full-time and 
part-time bachelor's degree business programs 
are accredited by the American Assembly of 
Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). 

The following procedures assure that Univer- 
sity College's BSBA programs conform to 
AACSB standards. 



1. Reserved and Open Sections 

Sections of courses in the BSBA programs are 
classified as reserved and open. To be qualified 
to register for a reserved section, the student 
must have earned a total of 80 or more credits 
(including transfer credits). Reserved sections 
are upper-level courses, some of which are 
mandatory for students who have enrolled in 
the BSBA degree program. Reserved sections of 
courses are offered at the Boston, Burlington, 
Dedham, Framingham, and Weymouth cam- 
puses. A student may register for an open sec- 
tion of a course anytime, providing he or she 
has fulfilled the prerequisites. 



Business Administration 37 

The following upper-level courses are offered in both open and reserved sections. Students al- 
ready enrolled in the BSBA program who did not take these courses while pursuing associate's de- 
gree programs must take these courses in reserved sections. 



ACC 4301 


ACC 4302 


ACC 4303 


Intermediate Accounting 1, 2, 3 




ACC 4310 






Cost Accounting 1 




FI4301 






Principles of Finance 




FI4302 






Financial Management 




HRM 4301 






Org£inizational Behavior 




HRM 4302 






Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 




HRM 4303 






Applied Human Resources Management 




IM4301 






Operations Management 




MIS 4301 


MIS 4302 




Structured Systems Analysis 
and Design 1, 2 




MIS 4307 






Communications and Networking 




MKT 4301 






Introduction to Marketing 1 




MKT 4320 






Marketing Management 1 




The courses below are offered only in reserved sections. A schedule of the reserved sec- 
tions offered for the 1988-1989 fall, winter, and spring quarters is included in the Fall 1988 
Schedule Guide. 


ACC 4304 






Intermediate Accounting 4 




ACC 4311 






Cost Accotmting 2 




ACC 4325 






Auditing 1 




ACC 4330 






Internal Auditing 1 




ACC 4340 


ACC 4341 




Federal Income Taxes 1, 2 




FI4303 






Financial Strategy 




FI4311 






Investment Management 




FI 4321 






Credit Management 




FI 4326 






Financial Control 




FI4350 






International Finance 




MGT 4310 






Project Mjinagement Process 




MGT 4350 


MGT 4351 




Business PoUcy 1, 2 




MGT 4355 






Manager and Society 




MGT 4356 






International Business 
Management and Operations 




MGT 4360 


MGT 4361 




Management Seminar 1, 2 




MIS 4345 






Database Management Systems 




MIS 4348 






Information Resource Management 




MIS 4385 






Applied MIS Development Project 





38 Programs of Study 



2. Validation 

Validation is the term used to describe proce- 
dures that test whether an upper-level course 
completed at the lower division of a bachelor's 
program should be accepted for transfer credit 
in the upper division of £m AACSB-approved 
bachelor's degree program. There are three ap- 
proved validation methods: 

• Sequential Course. Students who enroll in a 
bachelor of science in business administration 
degree program can vahdate a course taken at 
University College or elsewhere by successfully 
completing a course that is sequential to the 
one already completed. The sequential course 
must be taken in a reserved section. For exam- 
ple, successful completion of Cost Accounting 2 
in a reserved section can vahdate Cost Ac- 
counting 1, regardless of where the student 
completed Cost Accounting 1. 

• College-Level Examination Program 
(CLEP) and/or Proficiency Examination 
Program (PEP). These standard exanunations 
can be used to vahdate some previously taken 
upper-level business courses. 

• Departmental Examination. In cases where 
a sequential course does not exist or is not de- 
sired by a student, and no appropriate CLEP or 
PEP examination exists, validation can be ac- 
complished through a departmental examina- 
tion. Required upper-level courses are listed 
below under Reserved and Open Sections. 

Program Consultants 

ACC: Accounting 

Consultant: 

Professor Paul A. Janell (College of Business 
Adniinistration) (617-437-4645) 
Associate Consultant (Accounting Principles): 
Dean Walter E. Kearney, Jr. (College of Busi- 
ness Admiiustration) (617-437-2312) 

BL: Business Law 

Consultant: 

Thomas J. Ahern, Esq. (617-426-4211) 

Fl: Finance 

Consultant: 

Professor Jonathan Welch (College of Business 

Administration) (617-437-4572) 

Associate Consultant: 

Joseph Stanford (617-383-9299) 

HTL: Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Consultant: 

Donald A. Witkoski (617-362-2131, x361) 



HRM: Human Resources Management 

Consultant: 

Professor Christine L. Hobart (College of Busi- 
ness Adnunistration) (617-437-4728) 
Associate Consultant: 
Ronald E. Guittarr (617-860-2774) 
IM: Industrial Management 
Consultants: 

Professor Robert A. Parsons (College of Busi- 
ness Adniinistration) (6174374749) 
Joel M. Rosenfeld (617-491-9200) 
Associate Consultant: 
James D. Mulgian (617-451-4004) 
MGT: Management 
Consultant: 

Professor Daniel McCarthy (College of Busi- 
ness Administration) (617437-3255) 
Associate Consultants: 
W. Arthur Gagne (617-263-5819) 
Robert L. Goldberg (617-267-6400) 
MIS: Management Information Systems 
Consultant: 

Professor Victor Godin (College of Business 
Administration) (617-437-2418) 
Associate Consultant (Systems): 
James F. Ferreira (617-969-3100) 
Associate Consultant (EDP): 
Thomas M. Kelly (617-726-2275) 
Associate Consultants (Programming): 
Andrew E. Efstathiou (617-727-6524) 
Bennett L. Kramer (617-588-9100, x208) 
MKT: Marketing 
Consultant: 

Professor Dan T. Duim, Jr. (College of Business 
Adnunistration) (617-437-4563) 
Associate Consultant: 
William T. Hadley (617-266-8400) 
MS: Quality Control and Management Sciences 
Consultant: 

Professor Robert A. Parsons (College of Busi- 
ness Administration) (617437-4749) 
Associate Consultant: 
William E. Grady (617-721-5770) 
PUR: Purchasing 
Consultant: 
Stephen F. Armstrong (617-281-2000, x2519) 

RE: Real Estate 

Consultant: 

Peter Flynn (617-233-2284) 

TRN: Transportation and Physical Distribution 

Management 

Consultant: 

Professor James F. Molloy (College of Business 

Administration) (6174374812) 



Business Administration 39 



Accounting 


Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 470) 


See also Accounting Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Degree, page 51. 


Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 


I quarter hours 


ENG4110 


ENG 4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 


Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 Math 1, 2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 Statistics 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


PSY4110 


Introduction to Psychology: 

Fundamental Issues 3 



PSY4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 



MIS 4221 

or 

MIS 4241 

or 

MIS 4250 



Programming in COBOL 1 

or 

Programming in BASIC 1 

or 

FORTRAN Programming 1 



(3) 



(3) 



Business Administration 


BL 4101 


BL 4102 


Law 1, 2 


6 


MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and 
Simulation 


3 


FI 4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MKT 4301 




Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


Choose one 


computer programm^ing course. 







(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



Major Concentration Courses 


ACC 4101 ACC 4102 


ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


ACC 4301 ACC 4302 


ACC 4303 


Intermediate Accounting 1, 2, 3 


9 


ACC 4310 




Cost Accounting 1 


3 


Nonbusiness eledives 






3 


Total Quarter Hours 






96 



40 Programs of Study 



Business Administration Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 401) 



See also Management Bachelor of Science in 


Business Administration Degree, page 58. 


Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


Math 1, 2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Fundamental Issues 3 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 



(3) 



(3) 



Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


MGT 4103 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2, 3 


9 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 




Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MS 4325 






Introduction to Modeling and 
Simulation 


3 


HRM 4301 






Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 






Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


HRM 4303 






Applied Human Resources 
Management 


3 


FI 4301 






Principles of Finance 


3 


MKT 4301 






Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


Eledives 


Nonbusiness electives 






6 


Open electives 








12 


Total Quarter Hours 






96 



Business Administration 41 



Finance Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 476) 



See also Finance Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Degree, page 53. 


Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 


quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG4112 


Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 Math 1, 2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 Statistics 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


PSY4110 


Introduction to Psychology: 

Fundamental Issues 3 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 



MIS 4221 

or 

MIS 4241 

or 

MIS 4250 



Programming in COBOL 1 

or 

Programming in BASIC 1 

or 

FORTRAN Programnung 1 



(3) 
(3) 



Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 




Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


BL 4101 


BL 4102 




Law 1, 2 


6 


MS 4325 






Introduction to Modeling and Simulation 


3 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 




Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


HRM 4301 






Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 






Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


MKT 4301 






Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


Choose one 


computer programming course. 







(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



Major Concentration 


Courses 






FI 4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


FI 4302 




Financial Management 


3 


FI4310 




Investment Principles 


3 


FI4320 




Credit Principles 


3 


FI4325 




Budgeting and Planning 


3 


Eledives 






3 


Total Quarter Hours 






96 



42 Programs of Study 



Hotel and Restaurant Management Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 472 


Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


Math 1, 2 6 


SPC 4101 




Fundamentals of Human 

Communication 3 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 


Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2 6 


PSY4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Fundamental Issues 3 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 



(3) 
(3) 



Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


HRM 4303 




Applied Human Resources 
Management 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


HTL 4301 




Introduction to Hotel and 
Restaurant Management 


3 


HTL 4303 




Front Office Management 


3 


HTL 4304 




Hotel and Restaurant Law 


3 


HTL 4307 




Food Service Engineering and 
Sanitation 


3 


HTL 4308 




Food and Beverage Cost Control 


3 


HTL 4309 




Managerial Accounting for the 
Hospitality Industry 


3 


HTL 4313 




Introduction to Tourism 


3 


HTL 4320 




Food Preparation Intensive 


6 


Eledives 






12 


Total Quarter Hours 




96 



Business Administration 43 



Human Resources Management Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 477) 



Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 






quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


College Math 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 
Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 



MIS 4221 

or 

MIS 4241 

or 

MIS 4250 



Programming in COBOL 1 

or 

Programming in BASIC 1 

or 

FORTRAN Programming 1 



(3) 



(3) 



Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and 
Simulation 


3 


BL 4101 




Law 1 


3 


FI4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


MKT4301 




Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


Choose one 


computer programming course. 







(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



continued on the next page 



44 Programs of Study 



Major Concentration Courses 



HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 3 


HRM4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 3 


HRM 4303 




Applied Human Resources 

Management 3 


HRM 4310 


HRM 4311 


Personnel Management 1,2 6 


HRM 4330 




Employment Rights — Wage and 

Hour Law 3 


HRM 4331 




Employment Rights — Health, 
Safety, Disability, and Workers 
Compensation Law 3 


HRM 4340 




Public and Private Sector 

Collective Bargaining 3 


Nonbusiness eiedives 


3 


Total Quarter Hours 


96 


Industrial Management Associate in 


Science Degree (Major Code 478 


Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


CoUege Math 1, 2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 6 


EON 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


MTH 4130 


MTH 4131 


Calculus for Nonengineers 1, 2 6 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Fundamental Issues 3 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 



(3) 



(3) 



continued on the next page 



Bvsiness Administration 45 



Business Administration 



MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and 
Simulation 


3 


MS 4332 




Statistical Quality Control 


3 


FI4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


Choose one 


computer programming course. 







MIS 4221 

or 

MIS 4241 

or 

MIS 4250 



Programming in COBOL 1 

or 

Progranuning in BASIC 1 

or 

FORTRAN Programming 1 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



Major Concentration Courses 


IM4301 


Introduction to Operations 
Management 


3 


IM4302 


Operations Analysis 


3 


IM4314 


Productivity Enhancement and 
Quality Management 


3 


IM4317 


Purchasing and Materials 
Management 


3 


IM4321 


Operations Planning and 
Control 


3 


IM4326 


Operations Management Policy 


3 


Eledives 




6 


Total Quarter Hours 




96 



46 Programs of Study 



Management Information Systems Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 475) 




See also Management Information Systems 
page 60. 


Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, 




Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


College Math 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 
Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


SPC 4101 




Fundamentals of Human 
Communication 


3 


Business Admiiustration 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and 
Simulation 


3 


FI4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


HRM 4303 




Applied Human Resources 
Management 


3 


IM4301 




Operations Management 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4221 


MIS 4222 


COBOL Progranmiing 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4230 




PC Software for Professionals 


3 


MIS 4301 


MIS 4302 


Structured Systems Aneilysis and 
Design 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4307 




Communications and Networking 


3 


Electives 






9 


Total Quarter Hours 




96 



Business Administration 47 



Marketing Associate in Science Degree 


Major Code 479) 


Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


College Math 1, 2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


ENG 4380 




Business Writing and Reports 1 3 


SPC 4101 




Fundamentals of Human 

Communication 3 


Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 

Management 1, 2 6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1,2 6 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 3 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing 

and Information Systems 1, 2 6 


MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and 

Simulation 3 


FI 4301 




Principles of Finance 3 


Major Concentration Courses 


MKT 4301 


MKT 4302 


Introduction to Marketing 1,2 6 


MKT 4310 


MKT 4311 


Advertising and Sales Promotion 
Management 1, 2 6 


MKT 4315 


MKT 4316 


Sales Management 1, 2 6 


MKT 4320 


MKT 4321 


Marketing Management 1,2 6 


Nonbusiness eledives 


6 


Total Quarter Hours 


96 



48 Programs of Study 



Purchasing and Materials Management 


Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 432) 


Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH4110 


MTH4111 


CoUege Math 1,2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 

Management 1, 2 6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 6 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing 

and Information Systems 1, 2 6 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 3 


MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and 

Simulation 3 


IM4301 




Operations Management 3 


MKT 4301 




Introduction to Marketing 1 3 


Major Concentration Courses 


PUR 4351 


PUR 4352 


Purchasing 1, 2 6 


PUR 4357 




Business Negotiations 3 


PUR 4358 




Materials Requirements Planning 3 


PUR 4365 




Production Activity Control 3 


PUR 4370 




Inventory Management 3 


TRN 4305 




Traffic Management 3 


Nonbusiness eledives 


12 


Total Quarter Hours 


96 



Business Administration 49 



Real Estate Associate in 


Science Degree (Major Code 471 




Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 






quarter 


hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


MTH4110 


MTH 4111 




CoUege Math 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 




Statistics 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 


ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 
Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 




Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 




Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


FI4301 






Principles of Finance 


3 


HRM 4301 






Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 






Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


RE 4301 


RE 4302 




Real Estate Fundamentals 1, 2 


6 


RE 4323 


RE 4324 




Real Estate Appraisal 1, 2 


6 


RE 4328 


RE 4329 




Real Estate Financial 
Analysis 1, 2 


6 


RE 4341 


RE 4342 




Real Estate Law 1, 2 


6 








Department Offerings 


3 


Nonbusiness eledives 






18 


Total Quarter Hours 






96 



50 Programs of Study 



Transportation and Physical Distribution Management Associate in Science Degree 
(Major Code 483) 



Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


CoUege Math 1, 2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 

Management 1, 2 6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1,2 6 


MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and 

Simulation 3 


FI 4301 




Principles of Finance 3 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 3 


IM4301 




Introduction to Operations 

Management 3 


MKT4301 




Introduction to Marketing 1 3 


Major Concentration Courses 


TRN 4301 


TRN 4303 


Elements of Transportation 1,2 6 


TEN 4302 


TRN 4304 


Physical Distribution Management 1, 2 6 


Transportation electives 


6 


Nonbusiness electives 


18 


Total Quarter Hours 


96 



Business Administration 51 



Accounting Bachelor of Science in Business Administrotion Degree (Major Code 460) 



See also Accounting Associate in Science Degree, page 39. 


Lower-Level Courses (no validation necessary) 
Liberal Arts 


quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


College Math 1,2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Fundamental Issues 3 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



HST 4102 

or 

HST 4103 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 



(3) 

(3) 



ENG 4380 


ENG 4381 


Business Writing and Reports 1, 2 


6 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 

or 

SOC 4102 




Inequality and Institutions 

or 

Institutions and Social Roles 


(3) 
(3) 


SPC 4101 




Fundamentals of Human 
Communication 


3 


HST 4101 




The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval Worlds 


3 



The Civilization of the Early 

Modern World (3) 

or 

The Civilization of the Modern World (3) 



PHL 4100 



Philosophical Thinking 



continued on the next page 



52 Programs of Study 



Business Admmistration 



ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


BL 4101 


BL 4102 






Law 1, 2 


6 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 






Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 






Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


Choose one 


computer programming 


course. 







MIS 4221 

or 

MIS 4241 

or 

MIS 4250 



Programming in COBOL 1 

or 

Programming in BASIC 1 

or 

FORTRAN Programming 1 



(3) 
(3) 
(3) 



MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and 
Simulation 


3 


Upper-Level Courses (must be validated) 


FI 4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


MKT 4301 




Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


FI4302 




Financial Management 


3 


IM4301 




Operations Management 


3 


MGT 4350 


MGT 4351 


Business Policy 1, 2 


6 


MGT 4356 




International Business Management 
and Operations 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


ACC 4301 


ACC 4302 


Intermediate Accounting 1, 2 




ACC 4303 


ACC 4304 


Intermediate Accounting 3, 4 


12 


ACC 4310 


ACC 4311 


Cost Accounting 1, 2 


6 


ACC 4325 

or 

ACC 4330 




Auditing 1 

or 

Internal Auditing 1 


(3) 
(3) 


ACC 4340 


ACC 4341 


Federal Income Taxes 1, 2 


6 


Electlves (no 


validation necessary) 






Natural science elective (BIO, CHM, or ESC) 




3 


Open electives 




24 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



Business Administration 53 



Finance Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Degree (Mojor Code 433) 

See also Finance Associate in Science Degree, page 41. 

Lower-Level Courses (no validation necessary) 

Liberal Arts quarter hours 



ENG 4110 



ENG4111 



Critical Writing 1, 2 



6 



ENG 4112 



Approaches to Literature 



MTH 4110 



MTH 4111 



CoUege Math 1, 2 



ECN 4250 



PSY 4110 



ECN 4251 



Statistics 1, 2 



ECN 4115 ECN 4116 ECN 4117 Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 



Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



HST 4102 

or 

HST 4103 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 



The Civilization of the Early 

Modem World 

or 

The Civilization of the Modem 

World 



(3) 
(3) 



ENG 4380 


ENG 4381 


Business Writing and Reports 1, 2 


6 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the 
Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 

or 

SOC 4102 




Inequality and Institutions 

or 

Institutions and Social Change 


(3) 

(3) 


SPC 4101 




Effective Communication 


3 


HST 4101 




The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval Worlds 


3 



(3) 
(3) 



PHL 4100 



Philosophical Thinking 



continued on the next page 



54 Programs of Study 



Business Administration 



MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 






Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


BL 4101 


BL 4102 






Law 1, 2 


6 


MS 4325 








Introduction to Modeling and 
Simulation 


3 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 






Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


Choose one 


computer programming 


course. 







MIS 4220 

or 

MIS 4240 

or 

MIS 4250 



Introduction to Programming in 
COBOL 



or 



Introduction to Programming in 

BASIC 

or 

FORTRAN Programming 1 



(3) 

(3) 
(3) 



Upper-Level Courses (must be validated) 
Business Administration 


HRM 4301 


Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 


Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


MKT 4301 


Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


IM4301 


Operations Management 


3 


MGT 4350 MGT 4351 


Business Policy 1, 2 


6 


MGT 4356 


International Business 
Management and Operations 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


FI4301 


Principles of Finance 


3 


FI4302 


Financial Management 


3 


FI4303 


Financial Strategy 


3 


FI4310 


Investment Principles 


3 


FI4311 


Investment Management 


3 


FI4320 


Credit Principles 


3 


FI4321 


Credit Management 


3 


FI4325 


Budgeting and Planning 


3 


FI 4326 


Financial Control 


3 


FI 4350 


International Finance 


3 


Eledlves (no validation necessary) 


Natural science elective (BIO, CHM, or ESC) 




3 


Open electives 




27 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



Business Administration 55 



Industrial Technology Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 490) 
Operations Management Concentration 

Engineering or Teclinology Courses 

(Must also include English courses ENG 4110, 4111, 4112, or equivalent.) 



quarter hours 
96 



Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 



ECN 4115 ECN 4116 ECN 4117 Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 



_9 
_3 
(3) 



PSY4110 



Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 





Personal Dynamics 


(3) 


SOC 4100 


Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 

or 

SOC 4102 


Inequality and Institutions 

or 

Institutions and Social Change 


(3) 
(3) 


Business Administration 


MGT 4101 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1 


3 


ACC 4101 ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


BL 4101 BL 4102 


Law 1, 2 


6 


HRM 4301 


Organizational Behavior 


3 


MIS 4101 


Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1 


3 


MKT 4301 


Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


MS 4332 


Statistical Quality Control 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


IM4301 


Introduction to Operations 
Management 


3 


IM4302 


Operations Analysis 


3 


IM4314 


Productivity Enhancement and 
Quality Management 


3 


IM4317 


Purchasing and Materials 
Management 


3 


IM4321 


Operations Planning and Control 


3 


IM4326 


Operations Management Policy 


3 


Nonbusiness eledives 




12 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



56 Programs of Study 



Industrial Technology Bachelor of Science Degree 
Electronic Publishing Management Concentration 



Core Courses 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 Economics 1, 2, 3 


9 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


PSY4111 

or 

PSY 4112 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 


(3) 
(3) 


SOC 4100 




Fundamental Issues in Sociology 


3 


SOC 4101 

or 

SOC 4102 




The Individual £ind Social Roles 

or 

Critical Issues Facing Society 


(3) 
(3) 


Business Administration 


MS 4322 




Statistical Quality Control 


3 


MGT 4101 




Introduction to Business 1 


3 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


BL 4101 


BL 4102 


Law 1, 2 


6 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 


3 


MIS 4101 




Introduction to Data Processing I 


3 


MKT 4301 




Introduction to Marketing 


3 


Technology Courses 


TCC 4101 




Technical Writing 


3 


ECN 4301 


ECN 4302 


Statistics 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4301 


MIS 4302 


Structured Systems and Design 


6 


IM4301 




Introduction to Operations Management 


3 


IM4317 




Purchasing and Materials Management 


3 


IM4321 




Operations Planning and Control 


3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 MTH 4112 Math 1, 2, 3 


9 


CHM4111 




General Chemistry 1 


3 


CHM 4117 




Chemistry Labs 





PHY 4104 


PHY 4105 


General Physics 1, 2 


6 


PHY 4173 


PHY 4174 


Physics Labs 1, 2 


4 


ART 4471 




Quality Control in the Graphic 
Arts Industry 


3 


ART 4469 




Operations Analysis in the 
Graphic Arts Industry 


3 



continued on the next page 



Business Administration 57 



ART 4475 Graphic Arts Production Control 

ART 4479 Estimating Procedures for Graphic Arts 

ART 4461 Applications of Electronic 

Publishing and Printing 



ART 4474 Research and Technology Evaluation for 

Electronic Publishing and Printing 

ART 4443 ART 4444 Imaging Procedures and Systems 1, 2 

ART 4431 ART 4432 Graphic Composition Systems 1, 2t 

ART 4410 Electronic Imaging Systems 

ART 4416 Style— Setup for Electronic 

Document Production* 



JRN 4480 Copyediting 



Major Concentration Courses 

ART 4140 Gra phic Communication and Production 

ART 4115 Graphic Design for Non-Majors* 

ART 4139 Color Theory and Practice 

ART 4151 Typography 



ART 4481 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design 



ART 4415 Electronic Document Production* 



ART 4366 Promotional and Technical Publications 

Design and Production* 3 

Nonbusiness Eledives ]}_ 

Total Quarter Hours 174 

•Studio courses 



58 Programs of Study 



Management Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Degree (Major Code 463) 


See also Business Administration Associate in Science Degree, page 40. 


Lower-Level Courses (no validation necessary) 
Liberal Arts 


quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH4110 


MTH4111 


CoUege Math 1, 2 6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Fundamental Issues 3 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



HST 4102 

or 

HST 4103 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 



(3) 







Personal Dynamics 


(3) 


ENG 4380 


ENG 4381 


Business Writing and Reports 1, 2 


6 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 

or 

SOC 4102 




Inequality and Institutions 

or 

Institutions and Social Change 


(3) 
(3) 


SPC 4101 




Fundamentals of Human Communication 


3 


HST 4101 




The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval Worlds 


3 



The Civilization of the Early 

Modern World (3) 

or 

The Civilization of the Modern World (3) 



PHL 4100 






Philosophical Thinking 


3 


Business Administration 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


BL 4101 


BL 4102 




Law 1, 2 


6 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


MGT 4103 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2, 3 


9 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 




Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MS 4325 






Introduction to Modeling and Simulation 


3 



continued on the next page 



Business Administration 59 



Ctwose one computer programm,ing course. 



MIS 4221 

or 

MIS 4241 

or 

MIS 4250 



Programming in COBOL 1 


(3) 


Programming in BASIC 1 


(3) 


FORTRAN Programming 1 


(3) 



Upper-Level Courses (must be validated) 
Business Administration 






HRM4301 




Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


HRM 4303 




Applied Human Resources 
Management 


3 


FI 4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


FI4302 




Financial Management 


3 


IM4301 




Operations Management 


3 


MKT4301 




Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 






MGT 4310 




Project Management Process: 
Planning and Implementation 


3 


MGT 4350 


MGT 4351 


Business Policy 1, 2 


6 


MGT 4355 




Manager and Society 


3 


MGT 4356 




International Business Management 
and Operations 


3 


MGT 4360 


MGT 4361 


Management Seminar 1, 2 


6 


MKT4320 




Marketing Management 1 


3 


Eledlves (no 


validation necessary) 






Natural science elective (BIO, CHM, or ESC) 




3 


Open electives 




30 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



60 Programs of Study 



Management Information Systems Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 
Degree (Major Code 465) 



See also Management Information Systems 


Associate Science Degree, page 46. 




Lower-Level Courses (no validation necessary) 
Liberal Arts 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


MTH4110 


MTH 4111 


College Math 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 
Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


SPC 4101 




Fundamentals of Human 
Communication 


3 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 



PSY 4111 

or 

PSY 4112 



Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 

or 

Introduction to Psychology: 



HST 4102 

or 

HST 4103 



(3) 





Personal Dynamics 


(3) 


ENG 4380 ENG 4381 


Business Writing and Reports 1, 2 


6 


SOC 4100 


Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 

or 

SOC 4102 


Inequality and Institutions 

or 

Institutions and Social Change 


(3) 
(3) 


HST 4101 


The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval Worlds 


3 



The Civilization of the Early 

Modem World (3) 

or 

The CiviMzation of the Modem World (3) 



PHL 4100 




Philosophical Thinking 


3 


Business Administration 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 ACC 4103 Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


BL 4101 


BL 4102 


Law 1,2 


6 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing 
and Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4221 


MIS 4222 


COBOL Programming 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4230 




PC Software for Professionals 


3 


MS 4325 




Introduction to Modeling and Simulation 


3 



continued on the next page 



Business Administration 61 



Upper-Level Courses (must be validated) 
Business Administration 



FI 4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


FI4302 




Financial Management 


3 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 


3 


HRM 4302 




Introduction to Human Resources 
Management 


3 


HRM 4303 




Applied Human Resources 
Management 


3 


IM4301 




Operations Management 


3 


MKT 4301 




Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


MGT 4350 


MGT 4351 


Business Policy 1, 2 


6 


MGT 4356 




International Business 
Management and Operations 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


MIS 4301 


MIS 4302 


Structured Systems Analysis and 
Design 1, 2 


6 


MIS 4307 




Communications and Networking 


3 


MIS 4345 




Database Management Systems 


3 


MIS 4348 




Information Resource Management 


3 


MIS 4385 




Applied MIS Development Project 


3 


MGT 4310 




Project Management Process: 
Planning and Implementation 


3 


Eledives (no 


validation necessary) 






Natural science elective (BIO, CHM, or ESC) 




3 


Open electives 




21 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



62 



Criminal Justice and Security 
Degree Programs 



Associate in Science Degree Programs 

Programs leading to the associate's degree 
are offered for those who wish to obtain a 
general background in corrections, policing, 
or security and who may later wish to pur- 
sue a bachelor's degree. 

Candidates for the associate in science de- 
gree must complete a minimum of 96 quarter 
hours of credit. This is approximately one-half 
of the requirements for the bachelor of science 
degree and includes at least 48 quarter hours of 
work in a m£gor field. 



Robert D. Croatti, Associate Dean 
Acting Director, Criminal Justice and 
Security Programs 
144 Knowles-Volpe Hall 
617-437-3327 



Purpose 

Criminal Justice and Security programs are de- 
signed to provide a professional focus to stu- 
dents with a broadly based undergraduate 
education, to ensure that program graduates 
are prepared to enter or advance in careers in 
criminal justice or security adnunistration or to 
enroll in graduate or professional schools. 

Requirements for each program are outlined 
on the following pages. Upon petition, students 
may be permitted to substitute other courses 
that will more adequately serve their 
specific objectives. 

Bachelor of Science Degree Programs 

Programs leading to the bachelor of science de- 
gree are offered in corrections, policing, and se- 
curity. Students should choose their mggor in 
consultation with a program adviser. 

Each curriculum provides for not less than 
174 quarter hours of work, including at least 
75 quarter hours of advanced work in a 
major field. 

Transfer students must complete at least 45 
quarter hours of academic work at University 
College immediately preceding graduation in 
order to be eligible for a degree. 



Course Sequence 

Upon completion of the courses required for 
admission, the student should elect courses 
from the core and meyor concentration areas to 
fulfill the requirements for the associate in sci- 
ence and the bachelor of science degrees. 

Degree requirements may be completed at 
the student's own pace. A total of thirty-two 
courses is required for an associate in science 
degree, which can be completed in as few as 
three years, or nine academic quarters. A bach- 
elor of science degree can be completed over a 
period of five years, or fifteen academic quar- 
ters. This schedule averages out to four courses 
per academic quarter. 

Distribution Requirements 

In order to satisfy the distribution requirements 
in any criminal justice and security program, 
students should first discuss their programs 
with an academic adviser. 

EngUsh courses ENG 4110, ENG 4111, and 
ENG 4112 (nine quarter hours) must be taken 
before admission to a degree program. The re- 
maining required courses, amounting to 33 to 
36 quarter hours, should be taken fi"om the core 
and mjyor concentration courses as listed on 
the following pages. 



Criminal Justice and Security 63 



Corrections Associate in Science Degree 


(Major Code 945) 




Core Courses 




quarter 


hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


HST 4202 




American History 1848-1917 


3 


POL 4104 




Introduction to American 
Government 


3 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4186 




Social Control 


3 


CJ4101 




Administration of Criminal 
Justice 


3 


CJ4102 




Crime Prevention and Security 


3 


CJ4103 




Criminology 


3 


CJ4104 




Dimensions of Crime 


3 


CJ4105 




Computer Applications in 
Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4108 


CJ4109 


Criminal Law and Procedure 1, 2 


6 


CJ4110 




Constitutional Law 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


CJ4301 




American Correctional System 


3 


a 4302 


CJ4303 


Correctional Admirustration 1, 2 


6 


CJ4304 




Jail Administration and 
Management 


3 


CJ4305 




Case Management and Correctional 
Services 


3 


CJ4306 




Correctional Security Methods 
and Technology 


3 


CJ4307 




The Rights of Offenders and 
Prisoners 


3 


CJ4308 




Correctional Counsehng 


3 


CJ4309 




Comparative Correctional Systems 


3 


CJ4310 




Community Corrections 




CJ4311 




Probation and Parole 


3 


Electives 


Criminal justice and security electives 




6 


Other electives 




9 


Total Quarter Hours 




96 



64 Programs of Study 



Corrections Bachelor of Science Degree 


(Major Code 944) 




Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 
Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


HST 4101 




The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval World 


3 


HST 4103 




The Civilization of the Modern World 


3 


HST 4202 




American History 1848-1917 


3 


PHL 4100 

or 

PHL 4200 




Philosophical Thinking 

or 

Logic 


(3) 
(3) 


POL 4103 




Introduction to Politics 


3 


POL 4104 




Introduction to American 
Government 


3 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


PSY 4112 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Personal Dynamics 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4102 




Critical Issues Facing 
Society 


3 


SOC 4186 




Social Control 


3 


Mathematics/science courses 




6 


CJ4101 




Administration of Crinninal 
Justice 


3 


CJ4102 




Crime Prevention and Security 


3 


CJ4103 




Criminology 


3 


CJ4104 




Dimensions of Crime 


3 


CJ4105 




Computer AppUcations in Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4106 


CJ4107 


Criminal Justice Research 1, 2 


6 


a 4108 


CJ4109 


Criminal Law and Procedure 1, 2 


6 


CJ4110 




Constitutional Law 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


CJ4301 




American Correctional System 


3 


CJ4302 


CJ4303 


Correctional Administration 1, 2 


6 


CJ4304 




Jail Administration and 
Management 


3 


CJ4305 




Case Management and Correctional 
Services 


3 


CJ4306 




Correctional Security Methods 
and Technology 


3 



continued on the next page 



Criminal Justice and Security 65 



CJ4307 






The Rights of Offenders and Prisoners 


3 


CJ4308 






Correctional Counseling 


3 


CJ4309 






Comparative Correctional Systems 


3 


CJ4310 






Community Corrections 


3 


CJ4311 






Probation and Parole 


3 


Eledives 


Criminal justice and security electives 




24 


Other electives 


i 






30 


Total Quarter Hours 






174 


Policing Associate in Science 


Degree (Major Code 941) 




Core Courses 






quarter hours 


ENG4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


HST 4202 






American History 1848-1917 


3 


POL 4104 






Introduction to American Government 


3 


PSY 4110 






Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


SOC 4100 






Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4186 






Social Control 


3 


CJ4101 






Administration of Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4102 






Crime Prevention and Security 


3 


CJ4103 






Criminology 


3 


CJ4104 






Dimensions of Crime 


3 


CJ4105 






Computer AppUcations in Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4108 


a 4109 




Crinunal Law and Procedure 1, 2 


6 


CJ4110 






Constitutional Law 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


CJ4201 


CJ4202 




Criminal Investigation 1, 2 


6 


CJ4203 


a 4204 




CriminaUstics 1, 2 


6 


CJ4205 


CJ4206 




Patrol Theory and Administration 1, 2 


6 


a 4207 






Comparative Police Systems 


3 


CJ4208 






PoUce Operations 


3 


CJ4209 


CJ4210 




PoUce Management 1, 2 


6 


CJ4211 






PoUce and Social Problems 


3 


Electives 


Criminal justice and security electives 




6 


Other electives 


> 






9 


Total Quarter Hours 






96 



64 Programs of Study 



Corrections Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 944) 



Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


HST 4101 




The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval World 


3 


HST 4103 




The Civilization of the Modern World 


3 


HST 4202 




American History 1848-1917 


3 


PHL 4100 

or 

PHL 4200 




Philosophical Thinking 

or 

Logic 


(3) 
(3) 


POL 4103 




Introduction to Politics 


3 


POL 4104 




Introduction to American 
Government 


3 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


PSY 4112 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Personal Dynamics 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the individual 


3 


SOC 4102 




Critical Issues Facing 
Society 


3 


SOC 4186 




Social Control 


3 


Mathematics/science courses 




6 


CJ4101 




Administration of Crinninal 
Justice 


3 


CJ4102 




Crime Prevention and Security 


3 


CJ4103 




Criminology 


3 


CJ4104 




Dimensions of Crime 


3 


CJ4105 




Computer Applications in Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4106 


CJ4107 


Criminal Justice Research 1, 2 


6 


a 4108 


CJ4109 


Criminal Law and Procedure 1, 2 


6 


CJ4110 




Constitutional Law 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


CJ4301 




American Correctional System 


3 


CJ4302 


CJ4303 


Correctional Administration 1, 2 


6 


CJ4304 




Jail Administration and 
Management 


3 


CJ4305 




Case Management and Correctional 
Services 


3 


CJ4306 




Correctional Security Methods 
and Technology 


3 



continued on the next page 



Criminal Justice and Security 65 



CJ4307 






The Rights of Offenders and Prisoners 


3 


CJ4308 






Correctional Counseling 


3 


CJ4309 






Comparative Correctional Systems 


3 


CJ4310 






Community Corrections 


3 


CJ4311 






Probation and Parole 


3 


Eledives 


Criminal justice and security electives 




24 


Other electives 








30 


Total Quarter Hours 






174 


Policing Associate in Science 


Degree 


(Major Code 941) 




Core Courses 






quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


HST 4202 






American History 1848-1917 


3 


POL 4104 






Introduction to American Government 


3 


PSY 4110 






Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


SOC 4100 






Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4186 






Social Control 


3 


CJ4101 






Administration of Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4102 






Crime Prevention and Security 


3 


a 4103 






Criminology 


3 


CJ4104 






Dimensions of Crime 


3 


CJ4105 






Computer AppUcations in Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4108 


CJ4109 




Criminal Law and Procedure 1, 2 


6 


CJ4110 






Constitutional Law 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


CJ4201 


CJ4202 




Criminal Investigation 1, 2 


6 


CJ4203 


CJ4204 




CriminaUstics 1, 2 


6 


CJ4205 


CJ4206 




Patrol Theory and Administration 1, 2 


6 


CJ4207 






Comparative Police Systems 


3 


CJ4208 






Police Operations 


3 


CJ4209 


CJ4210 




Police Management 1, 2 


6 


CJ4211 






PoUce and Social Problems 


3 


Electives 


Criminal justice and security electives 




6 


Other elective^ 


> 






9 


Total Quarter Hours 






96 



66 Programs of Study 



Policing Bachelor of Science Degree (Majoi 


r Code 940) 




Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and 
Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


ENG4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


HST 4101 




The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval World 


3 


HST 4103 




The Civilization of the Modern 
World 


3 


HST 4202 




American History 1848-1917 


3 


PHL 4100 

or 

PHL 4200 




Philosophical Thinking 

or 

Logic 


(3) 
(3) 


POL 4103 




Introduction to Politics 


3 


POL 4104 




Introduction to American 
Government 


3 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


PSY 4112 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Personal Dynamics 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4102 




Critical Issues Facing Society 


3 


SOC 4186 




Social Control 


3 


Mathematics/science courses 




6 


CJ4101 




Administration of Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4102 




Crime Prevention and Security 


3 


CJ4103 




Criminology 


3 


CJ 4104 




Dimensions of Crime 


3 


CJ4105 




Computer Applications in 
Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4106 


CJ4107 


Criminal Justice Research 1, 2 


6 


CJ4108 


CJ4109 


Criminal Law and Procedure 1, 2 


6 


CJ4110 




Constitutional Law 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


CJ4201 


CJ 4202 


Criminal Investigation 1, 2 


6 


CJ4203 


CJ4204 


CriminaUstics 1, 2 


6 


CJ4205 


CJ4206 


Patrol Theory and Administration 1, 2 


6 


CJ4207 




Comparative Police Systems 


3 


CJ4208 




PoUce Operations 


3 


CJ 4209 


CJ4210 


PoUce Management 1, 2 


6 


CJ4211 




Police and Social Problems 


3 



continued on the next page 



Criminal Justice and Security 67 



Eledives 



Criminal justice and security electives 




24 


Other electives 






30 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 


Security Associate in Science Degree 


(Major Code 943 




Core Courses 




quarter 


hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


HST 4202 




American History 1848-1917 


3 


POL 4104 




Introduction to American Government 


3 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4186 




Social Control 


3 


CJ4101 




Administration of Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4102 




Crime Prevention and Security 


3 


CJ4103 




Criminology 


3 


CJ4104 




Dimensions of Crime 


3 


CJ4105 




Computer Applications in 
Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4108 


CJ4109 


Criminal Law and Procedure 1, 2 


6 


CJ4110 




Constitutional Law 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


CJ4201 


CJ4202 


Criminal Investigation 1, 2 


6 


CJ4403 




Introduction to Security 


3 


CJ4404 




Industrial Safety and Fire Prevention 


3 


CJ4405 




Current Security Problems 


3 


CJ4406 


CJ4407 


Security Administration 1, 2 


6 


CJ4408 




Legal Aspects of Security 
Management and Operations 


3 


CJ4409 


CJ4410 


Physical Security Methods and 
Technology 1, 2 


6 


CJ4411 




Electronic Information Security 


3 


Electives 








Criminal justice and security electives 




6 


Other electives 


> 




9 


Total Quarter Hours 




96 



68 Programs of Study 



Security Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 942) 



Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 Economic Principles and 

Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


ENG4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


HST 4101 




The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval World 


3 


HST 4103 




The Civilization of the Modern 
World 


3 


HST 4202 




American History 1848-1917 


3 


PHL 4100 

or 

PHL 4200 




Philosophical Thinking 

or 

Logic 


(3) 
(3) 


POL 4103 




Introduction to Politics 


3 


POL 4104 




Introduction to American 
Government 


3 


PSY 4110 


( 


Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


PSY 4112 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Personal Dynamics 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4102 




Critical Issues Facing 
Society 


3 


SOC 4186 




Social Control 


3 


Mathematics/science courses 




6 


CJ4101 




Administration of Criminal 
Justice 


3 


CJ4102 




Crime Prevention and Security 


3 


CJ4103 




Criminology 


3 


CJ4104 




Dimensions of Crime 


3 


CJ4105 




Computer Applications in 
Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ4106 


CJ4107 


Criminal Justice Research 1, 2 


6 


CJ4108 


CJ4109 


Criminal Law and Procedure 1, 2 


6 


CJ4110 




Constitutional Law 


3 



continued on the next page 



Criminal Justice and Security 69 



Major Concentration Courses 



CJ4201 


CJ4202 


Criminal Investigation 1, 2 


6 


CJ4403 




Introduction to Security 


3 


CJ4404 




Industrial Safety and Fire 
Prevention 


3 


CJ4405 




Current Security Problems 


3 


CJ4406 


CJ4407 


Security Administration 1, 2 


6 


CJ4408 




Legal Aspects of Security 
Management and Operations 


3 


CJ4409 


CJ4410 


Physical Security Methods 
and Technology 1, 2 


6 


CJ4411 




Electronic Information Security 


3 


Eledives 


Criminal justice and security electives 




24 


Other electives 






30 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



70 



Health Professions and 
Sciences Degree Programs 



Preprofessional Medical Courses 

The information provided below is for students 
who plan to apply for admission to schools of 
medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, podiatry, or 
optometry. Those who wish to pursue veteri- 
nary medicine may need to meet different en- 
trance requirements and should consult the 
chair of the Health Professions Advisory Com- 
mittee for additional advice. 



Paula M. Vosburgh, Director 

Health Professions and Sciences Programs 

266 Ruggles Building 

617-437-2818 



Purpose 

University College offers part-time programs in 
allied health to prepare students for advance- 
ment and service in hospitals and other 
health agencies. 

The associate's and bachelor's degree pro- 
grams are designed to provide both profession- 
al specialization and general education. All 
programs meet the accreditation standards of 
the Committee on Allied Health Education and 
Accreditation (CAHEA) of the American Medi- 
cal Association (AMA) and/or of licensing or 
registration boards where such exist. 



Clinical Assignments 

Clinical assignments generally are available 
for students whose programs require directed 
applied study in a clinical setting. In most 
instances, lectures are presented at the 
University and clinical practice is conducted 
at hospitals or other health agencies in the 
Greater Boston area. Positions in applied 
clinical studies are often offered on a com- 
petitive basis, with the student's academic 
performance used as the basis for acceptance. 
Students who accept clinical assignments in 
health facilities are expected to adhere to the 
requirements of the facihties, which are outside 
University control. 



Medical School Admission Requirements 

Students must complete the following courses 
before they can enroll in medical school, and 
should complete them before taking the 
school's particular admission test (MCAT, DAT, 
and so on). 



Biology 

General chemistry 

Organic chemistry 

Physics 

College mathematics 

College English 



one year (with labs) 
one year (with labs) 
one year (with labs) 
one year (with labs) 
including some 
calculus 
one year 



Northeastern University's Health Professions 
Advisory Committee provides academic ad- 
vice and help with professional school appli- 
cations for students in any of the University's 
health programs. Although advice is avail- 
able to anyone enrolled in a course, the Com- 
mittee can prepare evaluation letters only for 
those who have taken enough course work at 
Northeastern to be able to have at least two 
Northeastern faculty members write letters to 
the Committee. 

Sources of Advice: 

Dr. C. H. Ellis, Jr. 

Chair, Health Professions Advisory Committee 

Biology Department 

Northeastern University 

445 Richards Hall 

617-437-4032 

Professor T. J. McEneaney 

Office of Career Development and Placement 

Northeastern University 

124 Ruggles Building 

617-437-2430 



Health Professions and Sciences 71 



Paula Vosburgh 

Director, Health Professions and Sciences 

Programs 

University College 

266 Ruggles Building 

617-437-2818 

Course Sequences to Meet Minimum 
Admission Requirements 

The following list shows acceptable course se- 
quences that students can take in preparation 
for health professional schools. Completing one 
sequence from each category should meet the 
minimum requirements of most medical or 
dental schools. If you have questions about 
whether other courses might be applicable, talk 
with Dr. Ellis or another member of the Health 
Professions Advisory Committee. 

General biology BIO 4103, BIO 4104, BIO 

4105 — lab must be taken. 
Other biology work, such 
as anatomy and physiol- 
ogy and nucrobiology, 
may be acceptable de- 
pending on the profes- 
sional school. General 
biology is highly recom- 
mended even if you have 
already taken the other 
courses. 

General chemistry CHM 4111, CHM 4112, 

CHM 4113— lab must be 
taken 

Organic chemistry CHM 4261, CHM 4262, 

CHM 4263— lab must be 
taken 

General physics PHY 4117, PHY 41 18, PHY 
4119, and labs PHY 4173, 
PHY 4174* 

Mathematics MTH 4108, MTH 4120, 

MTH 4121 

EngUsh ENG 4110, ENG 4111, 

ENG 4112 

Two additional areas that are often required are 
behavioral science and biochemistry. The fol- 
lowing courses meet these requirements. 

Behavioral science PSY 4110, PSY 4111, PSY 
4112, and/or other psy- 
chology courses 

Biochemistry CHM 4371, CHM 4372, 

CHM 4373 or BIO 4246, 
BIO 4247, BIO 4248 



Program Directors and Coordinators 

Area program directors and the Director of 
Health Professions and Sciences Programs 
have overall responsibility for the academic 
quaUty of the health programs in their areas of 
specialty. TTie program coordinators for each 
area serve as the chief academic advisers for 
students in their programs. 



Health Professions 

HMG: Health Management 

Program, Director: 

Prof. Carl W. Nelson (Health Care Area Coordi- 
nator, Graduate School of Business Administra- 
tion) (617-437-4751) 

HRA: Health Record Administration 

Consultant: 

Prof. Judith Weilerstein (College of Pharmacy 

and AUied Health Professions) (617-437-3663) 

Program Coordinator: 

Annalee Collins (College of Pharmacy and Al- 

Ued Health Professions) (617-437-2525) 

Clinical Coordinator: 

Honey Schmase (College of Pharmacy and Al- 

Ued Health Professions) (617-437-3614) 

HSC: Health Science 

Consultant: 

Dr. Theodore Blank (Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of PubUc Health) (617-727-8614) 

MLS: Medical Laboratory Science 

Program/ Clinical Coordinator: 

Barbara Martin (College of Pharmacy and 

Allied Health Professions) (617-437-4198) 

Nursing 

Academic Coordinator: 
(617-437-2818) 

RAD: Radiologic Technology 

Program Director- 
Kevin J. Powers (University College) 
(617-437-2818) 
Assistant Director: 
Valerie A. Lamb (University College) 
(617-437-2818) 

continued on the next page 



"These courses are scheduled through the School of Engineering 
Technology. Call 617437-2500 for more information. 



72 Programs of Study 



REC: Therapeutic Recreation 

Program Consultant: 

Prof. Frank Robinson (Boston-Bouve College of 

Human Development Professions) 

(617-437-3157) 

Sciences 

BIO: Biology 

Consultant: 

Prof. Fred A. Rosenberg (College of Arts and 

Sciences) (617-437-4042) 

Laboratory Coordinator: 

Jeffrey L. Wain (College of Arts and Sciences) 

(617-4374046) 

CHM: Chemistry 

Consultant: 

Prof. Philip W. LeQuesne (College of Arts and 

Sciences) (617-437-2822) 

Major adviser, ChemicaU Biological 

Technology: 

Carl Moxey (617-437-2260) 

Laboratory Coordinator: 

Bernard Lemire (College of Arts and Sciences) 

(617437-2811) 

ESC: Earth Science 

Consultant: 

Prof. David L. Wilmarth (College of Arts and 

Sciences) (617-437- 2818) 

MTH: Mathematics 

Consultant: 

Francis X. Finigan (Winchester PubUc Schools) 

(617-721-7024) 



Chemical-Biological Technology 

Associate in Science Degree 

The program in chemical-biological tech- 
nology helps provide the chemistry and biology 
foundation required for medical and industrial 
laboratory assistants and technicians and 
for persons who have paramedical responsi- 
bilities. Employment opportunities may be 
found in hospitals, health clinics, research 
foundations, chemical and drug industries, 
public health organizations, water and sani- 
tation departments, and the emerging field of 
oceanographic technology. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the 
Mathematics Placement Test or Introduction to 
College Mathematics 1, 2 (MTH 4001 and 
MTH 4002). 

Bachelor of Science Degree 

The bachelor of science degree program in 
chemical-biological technology integrates theo- 
retical and laboratory courses from the fields of 
chemistry and biology. The program is designed 
to help prepare students for responsibilities in 
laboratory careers and in teaching general sci- 
ence. Employment opportunities may be found 
in a variety of industrial, pharmaceutical, clini- 
cal, and hospital laboratories, and in teaching 
general science, chemistry, biology, and related 
courses at the secondary school level. 

General Science Teacher Option: Students 
who plan to apply to the University's graduate 
Boston-Bouve College of Human Development 
Professions must elect courses in adolescent 
psychology and principles of teaching. 



Chemical-Biological Technology Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 803) 


Core Courses 


quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG4112 


Approaches to Literature 3 


HST 4101 


The Civilization of the Ancient and 

Medieval Worlds 3 


HST 4102 


The Civilization of the Early Modern World 3 


HST 4103 


The Civilization of the Modern World 3 


MTH 4110 

or 

MTH 4107 


MTH 4111 MTH 4112 Math 1, 2, 3 (9) 

or 
MTH 4108 College Algebra and Introduction to 

Calculus (8) 


MTH 4120 


MTH 4121 Calculus 1, 2 8 



continued on the next page 



Health Professions and Sciences 73 



Major Concentration Courses 



BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 


BIO 4105 


Biology 1, 2, 3 




12 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 


BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 


1,2,3 


9 


BIO 4190 


BIO 4191 


BIO 4192 


Microbiology 1, 2, 3 




9 


CHM 4111 


CHM 4112 


CHM 4113 


General Chemistry 1, 2, 3 




9 


CHM 4261 

or 

CHM 4221 


CHM 4262 
CHM 4222 


CHM 4263 
CHM 4223 


Organic Chemistry 1, 2, 3 

or 

Analytical Chemistry 1, 2, 3 




(12) 
(9) 


PHY 4104 


PHY 4105 


PHY 4106 


General Physics 1, 2, 3 




6 


Eiectives 


Social Science 








9 


Chemistry or 


Biology as needed to complete total credits 






Total Quarter Hours 








97-101 


Chemical-Biological Technology Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 804) 


Core Courses 








quarter hours 


ENG4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 




6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 




3 



MTH 4110 

or 

MTH 4107 



MTH 4111 MTH 4112 

MTH 4108 



Math 1, 2, 3 (9) 

or 

College Algebra and Introduction to 

Calculus (8) 



MTH 4120 


MTH 4121 




Calculus 1, 2 


8 


BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 


BIO 4105 


Biology 1, 2, 3 


12 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 


BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 


9 


CHM 4111 


CHM 4112 


CHM 4113 


General Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


9 


PHY 4104 


PHY 4105 


PHY 4106 


General Physics 1, 2, 3 


6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 


ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


HST 4101 






The Civilization of the Ancient and 
Medieval Worlds 


3 


HST 4102 






The Civilization of the Early Modern World 


3 


HST 4103 






The Civilization of the Modern World 


3 


PSY4110 






Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 
Issues 


3 


PSY 4111 






Introduction to Psychology: Developmenteil 
Aspects 


3 


PSY 4112 






Introduction to Psychology: Personal 
Dynamics 


3 


SOC 4100 






Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 






Inequality and Institutions 


3 


SOC 4102 






Institutions and Social Change 


3 



continued on the next page 



74 Programs of Study 



Major Concentration Courses 



BIO 4190 


BIO 4191 


BIO 4192 


Microbiology 1, 2, 3 


9 


BIO 4224 


BIO 4225 


BIO 4226 


Ecology 1, 2, 3 


9 


BIO 4235 

or 

BIO 4246 


BIO 4236 
BIO 4247 


BIO 4237 
BIO 4248 


Genetics 1, 2, and Lab 

or 

Cell Biology 1, 2, and Lab 


(8) 
(8) 


BIO 4374 


BIO 4375 


BIO 4376 


Histology 1, 2, 3 


9 


CHM 4221 


CHM 4222 


CHM 4223 


Analytical Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


9 


CHM 4261 


CHM 4262 


CHM 4263 


Organic Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


12 


CHM 4321 

or 

CHM 4323 


CHM 4322 




Instrumental Analysis 1, 2 

or 

Radiocheraistry 


(6) 

(3) 


CHM 4381 

or 

CHM 4371 


CHM 4382 
CHM 4372 


CHM 4383 
CHM 4373 


Physical Chemistry 1, 2, 3 

or 

Biochemistry 1, 2, 3 


(9) 
(9) 


ESC 4210 






Physical Oceanography 


3 


ESC 4211 






Biological Oceanography 


3 


ESC 4212 






Geological Oceanography 


3 


Electives as 


needed to complete total credits 






Total Quarter Hours 






175-178 



Health Professions and Sciences 75 



Health Management 

The health care industry is changing rapidly 
in response to increasing competition, rising 
costs, technological advances, the growth 
of alternative delivery systems, and an 
aging population. 

University College's bachelor of science de- 
gree program in health management is intended 
for those who wish to prepare, on a part-time 



basis, for entry into or advancement in manage- 
rial positions in the health care field. 

The program combines professional compe- 
tencies with a liberal arts education to help di- 
rect students toward either entry-level 
positions or positions of increasing responsibil- 
ity in health services administration. The cur- 
riculum also provides a foundation for graduate 
studies in MBA and MHA programs. 



Health Management Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 860) 




Core Courses 
General Education 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


MTH 4112 


Math 1, 2, 3 


9 


HMG 4200 






Health Science Statistics 


3 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 


ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


SOC 4100 






Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


POL 4103 






Introduction to Politics 


3 


PSY 4110 






Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 
Issues 


3 


COM 4101 






Foundations of Computer Literacy 


4 


Management 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 




Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


6 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 




Accounting Principles 1, 2 


6 


FI4301 






Principles of Finance 


3 


HRM 4301 






Organizational Behavior 


3 


MKT 4301 






Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


HMG 4301 






Health Care Delivery Systems 


3 


HMG 4100 


HMG 4101 




Hospital Organization and Management 1, 2 


6 


HMG 4325 






Health Planning and Regulation 


3 



continued on the next page 



76 Programs of Study 



HRA4302 


Medical Terminology Survey 


3 


HMG 4390 


The Patient's Impact on Decision Making 


3 


HSC 4310 


Public Health 1 


3 


HMG 4580 


Information Processing in Health Care 


3 


HMG 4215 


Health Law and Ethics 


3 


HMG 4400 HMG 4401 


Health Care Financial Management 1, 2 


6 


HMG 4445 


Health Care Marketing and Communication 


3 


HMG 4440 


Health Care Operations Management 


3 


HMG 4260 


Senior Seminar in Health Care Management* 


1 


HMG 4429 


Health Care Delivery's Changing 
Environment* 


2 


HMG 4650 


Supervised Field Experience/Independent 
Study It 


6 


HMG 4651 


Supervised Field Experience/Independent 
Study 2t 


6 


Electives 


Health science or health management electives 




6 


Liberal arts electives 




12 


Management electives 




6 


Science electives (CHM, BIO, ESC, MTH) 




12 



•Must be taken concurrently during the student's last year in the program. 

tStudents must have completed 75 percent of their degree requirements before taking these courses. Students must apply for each 
assignment no later than two full quarters prior to the desired starting date. 



Professional Specialization 

Students may choose to complete their course 
of study by electing one of the following 24 
quarter-hour options to meet their professional 
objectives. 

Option 1: Continuing Care Administration 



Licensure as a nursing home administrator requires an internship, a licensure examination, and a 
bachelor's degree. The required courses in this option help prepare students for the Massachusetts 
Licensure Examination. Students are advised, however, to contact the Board of Registration of 
Nursing Home Administrators for the specific eligibility requirements needed for this examination. 



HMG 4600 


HMG 4601 


HMG 4602 


Long-Term Care Administration A, B, C 


18 


Gwose 9 quarter hours from 


the following. 






SOC 4225 






Social Gerontology 


(3) 


HMG 4300 






Home Health Care 


(3) 


HSC 4610 






Geriatric Nutrition 


(3) 


REC 4401 






The Nursing Home Experience 


(3) 


REC 4460 






The Process of Aging 


(3) 


HSC 4210 






Basic Nutrition 


(3) 


HSC 4220 






Basic Pharmacology 


(3) 



Health Professions and Sciences 77 



Option 2: Community Health Management 



HMG 4310 


HMG 4311 


Principles and Practices of 
Community Health 1, 2 


6 


MLS 4341 


MLS 4342 


Epidemiology 1, 2 


6 


HSC 4311 




Public Health 2 


3 


Choose 12 quarter hours from the following. 


SOC 4215 




Medical Sociology 


(3) 


HMG 4300 




Home Health Care 


(3) 


HMG 4550 


HMG 4551 


Contemporary and Controversial 
Health Care Issues 1, 2 


(6) 


HMG 4610 




Principles and Practices of 
Community Mental Health 


(3) 


HSC 4315 




Environmental Problems and Health 


(3) 


ACC 4110 




Management Control for Nonprofit 
Organizations 


(3) 


Choose 15 quarter hours from the following. 


HRM 4320 




Techniques of Employee Selection 


(3) 


HRM 4340 




PubUc Sector Collective Bargaining 
in the United States 


(3) 


MKT 4335 




PubUc Relations 1 


(3) 


SOC 4241 




Human Services Professions 


(3) 


SOC 4240 




Sociology of Human Service Organizations 


(3) 


Option 3: General 


Choose courses from (HMG, HRA, HSC, MLS, REC, RAD)* 


15 


Choose 12 quarter hours from the following. 


ECN 4130 




Medical Economics 


(3) 


ECN 4321 




Urban Economic Problems and Policies 


(3) 


ENG 4380 




Business Writing and Reports 1 


(3) 


FI 4326 




Financial Control 


(3) 


FI4325 




Budgeting and Planning 


(3) 


FI4321 




Credit Management 


(3) 


HRM 4321 




Wage and Salary Administration 


(3) 


HRM 4322 




Employee Benefits 


(3) 


HRM 4323 




Job Evaluation 


(3) 


HRM 4341 




Private Sector Collective Bargaining 
in the United States 


(3) 


MGT 4320 




Managing Change 


(3) 


POL 4300 




Introduction to Public Administration 


(3) 


Total Quarter Hours 




175 



*These courses must be taken at Northeastern University. 



78 Programs of Study 



Health Record Administration 

The health record administrator's varied 
responsibilities relate to health information 
systems and include the organization, oper- 
ation, and management of health record ser- 
vices. Required skills for this profession include 
the ability to design health information and 
retrieval systems; plan, organize, and di- 
rect health record services; develop, analyze, 
and evaluate health records and indexes; work 
with medical and administrative staffs in devel- 
oping methods for evaluation of patient care; 
and conduct research projects using health 
care information. 

Students who successfully complete this pro- 
gram qualify for admission to the professional 
registration examinations conducted by the 
American Medical Record Association. 

Potential students must be interviewed by 
the Program Director. Arrangements can be 
made through the Health Records Office, 205 
Mugar Building, 617-437-3663. 

Professional Certification 

An individual who wishes to qualify for regis- 
tration as a medical record administrator and 
already holds a bachelor's degree in another 



field of study from a college or university 
acceptable to Northeastern University may 
take the Health Record Administration Certif- 
icate Program. Upon completion of this 
program with a cumulative quality-point aver- 
age of 2.5 or higher, students will receive 
certification from University College. In 
addition to the required courses, students 
must complete one year of a natural science, 
such as biology, chemistry, or microbiology. 
Students must also demonstrate an under- 
standing of the principles of descriptive 
statistics. This requirement may be satisfied 
by successful completion of an approved 
statistics course with a grade of C or better. 
These requirements are in addition to the 
laboratory course in anatomy and physiology. 

In designated professional courses (*), stu- 
dents must obtain a grade of C or better. Only 
one professional course may be repeated. Stu- 
dents who receive a grade of D in more than 
one professional course will be asked to with- 
draw from the program. 

Students who apply for the clinical courses 
HRA 4335, HRA 4336, and HRA 4337 must have 
a quality-point average of 2.5 and the approval 
of their adviser. 



Health Record Administration Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 866) 


Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 


Math 1, 2 6 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


PSY4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Fundamental Issues 3 


PSY 4111 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Developmental Aspects 3 


PSY 4112 




Introduction to Psychology: 

Personal Dynamics 3 


BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 BIO 4105 


Biology 1, 2, 3 12 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3* 9 


ECN 4250 

or 

HMG 4200 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2* (6) 

or 

Health Science Statistics (3) 



continued on the next page 



Health Professions and Sciences 79 



Choose either: 



HST 4101 




The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval Worlds 


(3) 


HST 4102 




The Civilization of the Early 
Modern World 


(3) 


HST 4103 

or 

POL 4103 




The Civilization of the Modern World 

or 

Introduction to Politics 


(3) 
(3) 


POL 4104 




Introduction to American Government 


(3) 


POL 4105 




Introduction to Comparative Politics 


(3) 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


(3) 


SOC 4101 




Inequality and Institutions 


(3) 


SOC 4102 




Institutions and Social Change 


(3) 


Major Concentration Courses 


HMG 4215 




Health Law and Ethics* 


3 


HMG 4301 




Health Care Delivery Systems 


3 


HRA 4305 


HRA 4306 


Language of Medicine 1, 2t 


4 


HRA 4308 




Hospital Management for Health Record 
Administrators* 


3 


HRA 4310 


HRA 4311 HRA 4312 


Health Record Science 1, 2, 3* 


18 


HRA 4313 


HRA 4314 


Health Record Science 4, 5* 


12 


HRA 4320 


HRA 4321 HRA 4322 


Organization of the Health Record 
Department 1, 2, 3 


9 


HRA 4335 


HRA 4336 HRA 4337 


Clinical Practicum 1, 2, 3* 


8 


HRA 4330 




Health Record Computer Science* 


3 


HRA 4332 




Topics in Health Records 


3 


HRM 4301 




Organizational Behavior 


3 


HSC 4301 


HSC 4302 


Foundations of Medical Science 1,2* 


6 



MIS 4101 



Introduction to Data Processing and 
Information Systems 1 (3) 



or 

COM 4101 


or 

Foundations of Computer Literacy 


(4) 


Eledives 


Social science or humanities electives 




21 


Total Quarter Hours 




177-178 



'Students must obtain a grade of C or better in this course. 

tA challenge examination is available for this course. Call 617-437-2525 for details. 



80 Programs of Study 



Health Record Administration Certificate Program (Major Code 867) 



Core Courses 






quarter 


hours 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 


BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 


9 


HMG 4215 






Health Law and Ethics 


3 


HMG 4301 






Health Care Delivery Systems 


3 


HRA 4305 


HRA 4306 




Language of Medicine 1, 2* 


4 


HRA 4308 






Hospital Management for Health Record 
Administrators 


3 


HRA 4310 


HRA 4311 


HRA 4312 


Health Record Science 1, 2, 3 


18 


HRA 4313 


HRA 4314 




Health Record Science 4, 5 


12 


HRA 4320 


HRA 4321 


HRA 4322 


Organization of the Health Record 
Department 1, 2, 3 


9 


HRA 4324 


HRA 4325 


HRA 4326 


Applied Health Record Science 1, 2, 3 


8 


HRA 4330 






Health Record Computer Science 


3 


HRA 4332 






Topics in Health Records 


3 


HSC 4301 


HSC 4302 




Foundations of Medical Science 1, 2 


6 



MIS 4101 

or 

COM 4101 



Introduction to Data Processing and 

Information Systems 1 (3) 

or 

Foundations of Computer Literacy (4) 



Total Quarter Hours 



84-85 



'A challenge examination is available for this course. Call 617-437-2525 for details. 



Health Science 

The bachelor of science degree in health sci- 
ence is available to students holding registra- 
tion, certification, or licensure (as defined by 
University regulations) in a specific health pro- 
fession. A further prerequisite is training in an 



approved program accredited by an appropri- 
ate medical association, such as the American 
Medical Association, National League for Nurs- 
ing, or American Dental Association. 

Students interested in this program should 
consult with an academic adviser to determine 
their eUgibifity. 



Health Science Bachelor of Science in Health Science Degree (Major Code 865) 




Core Courses 


9 


ENG4110 ENG4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 Approaches to Literature 


3 


Humanities 


(ART, ASL, DRA, ENG, JRN, LN, MUS, PHL, SPC, TCC) 


9 


Social Sciences 


(ECN, HST, POL, PSY, SOA, SOC) 


9 


General 


Choose 15 quarter hours from any of the humanities or social science areas listed above. 



continued on the next page 



Health Professions and Sciences 81 



Basic Sciences 



BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 




Biology 1, 2 


8 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 


BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 


9 


BIO 4190 






Microbiology 1 


3 


COM 4101 






Foundations of Computer Literacy 


4 


CHM 4111 


CHM 4112 


CHM 4113 


General Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


9 



MTH 4110 

or 

MTH 4107 



MTH 4111 
MTH 4108 



Math 1, 2 

or 

College Algebra and Introduction to 



(6) 









Calculus 


(8) 


Advanced Sciences 


Choose a minimum of 9 quarter hours from 


the following. 




BIO 4235 


BIO 4236 


BIO 4237 


Genetics 1, 2, and Lab 


(8) 


BIO 4246 


BIO 4247 


BIO 4248 


CeU Biology 1, 2, and Lab 


(8) 


BIO 4258 


BIO 4259 




Advanced Human Physiology 1, 2 


(6) 


BIO 4320 






Medical Microbiology 


(4) 


BIO 4461 






Immunology 


(4) 


CHM 4261 


CHM 4262 


CHM 4263 


Org£mic Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


(12) 


HSC 4600 






Advanced Nutrition 


(3) 


HSC 4601 






Advanced Pharmacology 


(3) 


MLS 4321 






Hematology 


(3) 


MLS 4322 


MLS 4323 




Morphologic Hematology 1, 2 


(6) 


Major Concentration Courses 
Basic 


HMG 4200 






Health Science Statistics 


3 


HSC 4301 


HSC 4302 




Foundations of Medical Science 1, 2 


6 


HMG 4100 


HMG 4101 




Hospital Organization and Management 1, 2 


6 


HSC 4320 


HSC 4321 




Training and Development in the Health 
Professions 1, 2 


6 


Choose 18 quarter hours fron^ 


I the following. 






HMG 4215 






Health Law and Ethics 


(3) 


HMG 4301 






Health Care Delivery Systems 


(3) 


HMG 4310 


HMG 4311 




Principles and Practices of Community 
Health 1, 2 


(6) 


HMG 4550 


HMG 4551 




Contemporary and Controversial Health 
Care Issues 1, 2 


(6) 


HMG 4610 






Principles and Practices of Community 
Mental Health 


(3) 


HSC 4210 






Basic Nutrition 


(3) 


HSC 4220 






Basic Pharmacology 


(3) 


HSC 4310 


HSC 4311 




PubUc Health 1, 2 


(6) 


HSC 4315 






Environmental Problems and Health 


(3) 



continued on the next page 



82 Programs of Study 



MLS 4341 






Epidemiology 1 


(3) 


REC 4460 






Process of Aging 


(3) 


Students with a clinical laboratory background may choose 18 quarter hours from the 
following instead. 


BIO 4235 


BIO 4236 


BIO 4237 


Genetics 1, 2, and Lab* 


(8) 


BIO 4246 


BIO 4247 


BIO 4248 


Cell Biology 1, 2, and Lab* 


(8) 


BIO 4461 






Immunology* 


(4) 


CHM 4224 






Analytical Chemistry 


(4) 


CHM 4381 


CHM 4382 


CHM 4383 


Physical Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


(9) 


Advanced 


Choose 6 to 9 quarter hours fi 


rom the following. 






HMG 4210 


HMG 4211 




Medical Care and Current Social 
Problems 1, 2 


(6) 


HMG4400 


HMG 4401 




Health Care Financial Management 1, 2 


(6) 


HMG 4430 


HMG 4431 




Communications for Health Care 
Personnel 1, 2 


(6) 


HSC 4602 






Methods and Materials in Public Health 
Education 


(3) 


HSC 4610 






Geriatric Nutrition 


(3) 


HSC 4613 






Oral Microbiology 


(3) 


HSC 4614 


HSC 4615 




Advanced Periodontology 1, 2 


(6) 


MLS 4342 






Epidemiology 2 


(3) 


RAD 4450 






Computerized Body Tomography 
Pathology 


(3) 


RAD 4400 






Anatomy of the Head and Neck 


(3) 


Students with a clinical laboratory background 
following instead. 


may choose 6 to 9 quarter hours from the 




BIO 4191 


BIO 4192 




Microbiology 2, 3 


(6) 


BIO 4258 


BIO 4259 




Advanced Human Physiology 1, 2* 


(6) 


BIO 4320 






Medical Microbiology* 


(4) 


CHM 4321 


CHM 4322 




Instrumental Analysis 1, 2 


(6) 


CHM 4323 






Radiochemistry 


(3) 


MLS 1323 






Hemostasist 


(2) 


MLS 1324 






Histochemistry t 


(2) 


MLS 1331 






Clinical Immunologyt 


(3) 


MLS 1333 






Immunohematologyt 


(2) 


MLS 4322 


MLS 4323 




Morphologic Hematology 1, 2* 


(6) 


MLS 4365 






Quality Control 


(3) 


Eiectives and/or transfer credits to equal 


40-43 


Total Quarter Hours 






174 



'These courses may be used in only one category; requirements must be fulfilled in each category. 
tTuition for this course is at the Basic College rate. 



Health Professions and Sciences 83 



Medical Laboratory Science— Medical 
Technology 

Medical laboratory science (MLS) is concerned 
with laboratory examination of material for 
monitoring health and for diagnosing and treat- 
ing illness. Medical laboratory technicians and 
technologists work in a variety of specialized 
fields such as microbiology, blood banking, he- 
matology, or clinical chemistry, or as general- 
ists in all these areas. 

The medical laboratory technician holding an 
associate's degree works under the direct su- 
pervision of a medical technologist and per- 
forms most common medical laboratory tests. 
The medical technologist, who must have a 
bachelor's degree, is considered qualified to 
perform all levels of laboratory tests with little 
or no direct supervision. With additional educa- 
tion or experience, medical technologists can 
become educators, researchers, or supervisors. 
They may serve as sales and technical repre- 
sentatives for scientific supply and equipment 
comparues or hold government positions. 

Both degree programs are conducted in 
affiliation with Boston-area hospitals and 
are accredited by the Committee of Allied 
Health Education and Accreditation of the 
American Medical Association. Upon success- 
ful completion of either program, the student is 
eligible to take a national certification examina- 
tion given by the National Certification Agency 
for Medical Laboratory Personnel or the Board 
of Registry of the American Society of 
Clinical Pathology. 

The basic courses in medical laboratory sci- 
ence, science, and education are offered eve- 
nings, but the advanced medical laboratory 
science courses and the clinical experience are 
offered full-time during the day only. 

Associate's Degree Professional Requirements 

A clinical applied study program (or appropri- 
ate work experience) is required toward this 
degree. Work experience is acceptable if it 



meets the requirements for certification of 
either the National Certification Agency for 
Medical Laboratory Personnel or the Board of 
Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pa- 
thologists. Students without appropriate work 
experience can apply for clinical applied stud- 
ies through the University College MLS Clinical 
Coordinator, 206 Mugar, 617437-3664. This 
should be done one year in advance of the an- 
ticipated entry into cliiucal courses. 

Prerequisites for clinical applied studies are a 
minimum of 2.0 quality-point average in the re- 
quired courses and a C- or better in each medi- 
cal laboratory science (MLS) course. These 
basic courses are available during the evening 
and on an every-other-year basis through the 
College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Profes- 
sions. Students register for these courses in 
the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Pro- 
fessions, 206 Mugar. Tuition is at the Basic Col- 
lege rate. These courses should be completed 
within three years of applying to the AD-MLT 
Clinical Applied Studies. 

Bachelor's Degree Professional Requirements 

Clinical applied study courses are available on 
a full-time basis only and are offered through 
the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Pro- 
fessions. Students must apply for applied study 
courses one year in advance. A minimum of 
four quarters of full-time study is necessary for 
completion of the program requirements. Dur- 
ing this time the student must meet all the re- 
quirements of the last four quarters of the 
undergraduate Basic College curriculum for the 
bachelor of science degree. Students register 
for clinical applied study in the College of Phar- 
macy and Allied Health Professions, 206 Mugar. 
Tuition is at the Basic College rate. 

Prerequisites for clinical appUed study in- 
clude completion of each MLS course with a C- 
or better within five years of application to the 
applied study and completion of all other 
courses with a quality-point average of 2.5 
or better. 



84 Programs of Study 



Medical Laboratory Science — Medical Laboratory Technician Associate in Science 
Degree (Major Code 800) 



Core Courses 






quarter hours 


ENG4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


HMG 4210 






Medical Care and Current Social Problems 


3 


HMG 4215 






Health Law and Ethics 


3 


MTH 4107 


MTH 4108 




College Algebra and Introduction to 
Calculus 


8 


BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 


BIO 4105 


Biology 1, 2, 3 


12 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 


BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 


9 


CHM 4111 


CHM 4112 


CHM 4113 


General Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


9 


CHM 4224 






Analytical Chemistry 


4 


Major Concentration Courses 


MLS 4301 






Medical Laboratory Science Orientation 


2 


MLS 1321 


MLS 1322 




Basic MLS Hematology 1,* 2* 


4 


MLS 1330 






Basic MLS Immunohematology* 


2 


MLS 1331 






Basic MLS Clinical Immunology* 


3 


MLS 1341 






Basic MLS Clinical Microbiology* 


4 


MLS 1351 






Basic MLS Clinical Chemistry* 


4 


MLS 1311 






Basic MLS Urinalysis* 


2 


Electlves 


Computer science 






3 


Humanities 








6 


Social science 








3 


Open electives 








6 


Totol Quarter Hours 






96 



•Tuition for this course is at the Basic College rate. 



Health Professions and Sciences 85 

Medical Technology—Medical Technologist Bachelor of Science Degree 



(Major Code 


801) 




quarter hours 


Credits from Medical Laboratory Science associate's degree program 96 


Core Courses 


BIO 4190 




Microbiology 1 3 


BIO 4235 


BIO 4236 BIO 4237 


Genetics 1, 2, and Lab 8 


BIO 4246 


BIO 4247 BIO 4248 


CeU Biology 1, 2, and Lab 8 


CHM 4261 


CHM 4262 CHM 4263 


Organic Chemistry 1, 2, 3 12 


MLS 4341 




Epidemiology 1 3 


PHY 4104 


PHY 4105 PHY 4106 


General Physics 1, 2, 3 6 


PHY 4174 




Physics Laboratory 2 2 


Major Concentration Courses 


Please refer to the current Northeastern University Basic Day College Course Description and 
Curriculum Guide for course descriptions of the following cUnical applied-study courses. Tuition 
for these courses is at the Basic College rate; to register, call 617-437-3664. 


MLS 1523 




Applied Hematology 4 


MLS 1532 




Applied Immunohematology 3 


MLS 1544 




Applied Clirucal Microbiology 7 


MLS 1552 




Applied Clirucal Chemistry 7 


MLS 1621 


MLS 1622 


Advanced Hematology 1, 2 5 


MLS 1631 




Advanced Immunohematology 2 


MLS 1642 




Medical Parasitology 2 


MLS 1643 




Medical Mycology 3 


MLS 1645 


MLS 1646 MLS 1647 


Advanced Clirucal Microbiology 1, 2, 3 6 


MLS 1651 


MLS 1652 MLS 1653 


Advanced Clinical Chemistry 1, 2, 3 6 


MLS 1661 




MLS Education 2 


MLS 1665 




MLS Management 2 


MLS 1680 




MLS Special Topics 2 


MLS 1681 




MLS Senior Seminar 2 


MLS 1890 




Undergraduate Research (Optional) (2) 


Eledives 


Psychology and statistics are strongly recommended electives. 


Computer science 


3 


Humanities 




3 


Social science 




3 


Open electives 




3 


Total Quarter Hours 


203-205 



86 Programs of Study 



Medical Laboratory Science — Hematology 

Hematology is a specialty wdthin medical labo- 
ratory science. Hematology technologists may 
be employed in hospitals and clinical laborato- 
ries, where they perform specific laboratory 
tests that aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and 
follow-up of infections, anemias, leukemias, 
and bleeding disorders. 

The requirements for categorical certifica- 
tion in hematology are indicated by the Board 
of Registry of the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists and the National Certification 
Agency. Students should contact the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists, Board of 
Registry, P.O. Box 96215, Chicago, lUinois 



60693, and the National Certification Agency 
for Medical Laboratory Personnel, P.O. Box 
705, Ben Franklin Station, Washington, D.C. 
20044, for details concerning eUgibility to write 
the hematology examination. 

The hematology curriculum is designed pri- 
marily for those who already work in this field. 

All professional clinical courses in medical 
laboratory science are offered directly through 
the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health 
Professions. Students must register for the 
courses through this college, 206 Mugar, 617- 
437-3664. Tuition is at the Basic CoUege rate. A 
grade of C- or better is required in the 
professional courses. 



Hematology Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 807) 




Core Courses 






quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


MTH 4107 


MTH 4108 




College Algebra and Introduction to 
Calculus 


8 


BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 


BIO 4105 


Biology 1, 2, 3 


12 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 


BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 


9 


BIO 4190 






Microbiology 1 


3 


BIO 4235 


BIO 4236 


BIO 4237 


Genetics 1, 2, and Lab 


8 


BIO 4246 


BIO 4247 


BIO 4248 


CeU Biology 1, 2, and Lab 


8 


CHM 4111 


CHM 4112 


CHM 4113 


General Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


9 


CHM 4221 

or 

CHM 4224 


CHM 4222 


CHM 4223 


Analytical Chemistry 1, 2, 3 

or 

Analytical Chemistry (Summer Intensive) 


(9) 
(4) 


CHM 4261 


CHM 4262 


CHM 4263 


Organic Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


12 


HMG 4100 


HMG 4101 




Hospital Organization and Management 1, 2 


6 


HMG 4210 


HMG 4211 




Medical Care and Current Social 
Problems 1, 2 


6 


HMG 4215 






Health Law and Ethics 


3 


PHY 4104 


PHY 4105 


PHY 4106 


General Physics 1, 2, 3 


6 


PHY 4174 






Physics Laboratory 2 


2 



continued on the next page 



Health Professions and Sciences 87 



Major Concentration Courses 






HSC 4320 HSC 4321 


Training and Development in the Health 
Professions 1, 2 


6 


MLS 1311 


Basic MLS Urinalysis* 


2 


MLS 1321 


Basic MLS Hematology 1* 


2 


MLS 1322 


Basic MLS Hematology 2* 


2 


MLS 1323 


Advanced Hemostasis Techniques* 


2 


MLS 1324 


Histochemistry* 


2 


MLS 1330 


Basic MLS Immunohematology* 


2 


MLS 1331 


Basic MLS Clinical Immunology* 


3 


MLS 1333 


Immunohematology* 


2 


MLS 1341 


Basic MLS Clinical Microbiology* 


4 


MLS 1351 


Basic MLS Clinical Chemistry* 


4 


MLS 1642 


Medical Parasitology (offered days only)* 


2 


MLS 1890 


Undergraduate Research* 


2 


MLS 4301 


MLS Orientation (required if not working in 
the field) 


2 


MLS 4322 MLS 4323 


Morphologic Hematology 1, 2 


6 


MLS 4365 


Quality Control 


3 


Eledives 


Histology, psychology, economics, sociology, statistics, hematology, a computer course, and 
epidemiology are strongly recommended electives. 




Humanities 




9 


Social sciences 




9 


Open electives 




18 


Total Quarter Hours 


187- 


192 



"Tuition for this course is at the Basic College rate. Please refer to the current Northeastern University Basic Day College Course 
Description and Curriculum Guide for the course description. To register, call 617-437-3664. 



Programs of Study 



Nursing (Evening Section) 

University College offers a bachelor of science 
in nursing degree program for registered nurses 
in collaboration with the College of Nursing, 
which is fully accredited by the National 
League for Nursing. 

The program is unique in that it allows 
students to fulfill, in the evening, both class- 
room and clinical components of Nursing Tran- 
sition (NUR 4300), Community Health Nursing 
(NUR 4500), Contemporary Nursing (NUR 
4501), and Introduction to Nursing Research 
(NUR 4502). It is unique, too, in that a registered 
nurse who completes Nursing Transition (NUR 
4300) successfully is eligible for 22 quarter 
hours of advanced placement credit, plus any 
transfer credits University College may accept 
from another institution. 

Admission Procedure 

The following credentials are required to en- 
ter the part-time evening program and should 
be forwarded to the Director of Academic and 
Student Affairs, University College, Northeast- 
ern University, 180 Ruggles, 360 Huntington 
Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. 

. a resume detailing education, professional 
work experience, and professional and 
conununity activities 



official transcripts from high school, college or 
university, and basic nursing school (the nurs- 
ing school transcript should include a senior 
summary statement) 

> a copy of your Massachusetts Registered 
Nurse license 

. a completed Nursing Program AppUcation 
(available from the Office of Academic and 
Student Affairs) 

. a reference from your most recent 
nursing employer 

. proof of satisfactory completion of the NLN 
Mobility Profile II Examination. 

Pre-admission counseling is available by call- 
ing the Office of Academic and Student Affairs 
at 617-i37-2400. 

Planning a Program of Study 

Potential students must plan their program of 
study with the Academic Coordinator. Appoint- 
ments can be arranged by calling 617-437-2818. 

Potential and current students are encour- 
aged to attend group information sessions in 
order to increase their awareness of University 
College and College of Nursing policies. These 
sessions cover course requirements, promo- 
tional policies, advanced placement examina- 
tions, and nursing course petition procedures. 
To register, call 617-437-2818. 



Health Professions and Sciences 89 



Nursing (Evening Section) Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree (Major Code 809) 



Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 


Biology 1, 2 


8 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 


9 


BIO 4190 




Microbiology 1 


3 


CHM4111 


CHM 4112 CHM 4113 


General Chemistry 1, 2, 3 


9 


NUR 4302 

or 

HSC 4601 




Pharmacodynamics 

or 

Advanced Pharmacology 


(3) 

(3) 


PSY4110 




Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 
Issues 


3 


PSY4111 




Introduction to Psychology: Developmental 
Aspects 


3 


PSY 4112 




Introduction to Psychology: Personal 
Dynamics 


3 


PSY 4240 




Development: Infancy and Childhood 


3 


PSY 4241 




Development: Adolescence 


3 


PSY 4242 




Development: Adulthood and Aging 


3 


PSY 4270 


PSY 4271 


Social Psychology 1, 2 


6 


SOA 4101 




Cultural Anthropology: Preliterate Societies 


3 


SOA 4102 




Cultural Anthropology: Industrial Societies 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 




InequaUty and Institutions 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


NUR 4300 




Nursing Transition* 


9 


NUR 4301 




Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursingt 


7 


NUR 4400 




Maternal and Child Nursingt 


9 


NUR 4401 




Medical Surgical Nursingt 


9 


NUR 4500 




Community Health Nursing 


9 


NUR 4501 




Contemporary Nursing 


5 


NUR 4502 




Introduction to Nursing Research 


4 


Electives 


Humanities 






9 


Open electives 






15 


Total Quarter Hours 




153 



*To enroll in NUR 4300, students must submit a petition to the Academic Coordinator at least one full quarter in advance of registering. 

Students must also obtain a health clearance from the Lane Health Center and present evidence of having had a tuberculin skin test 

within the previous twelve months. Advanced standing credit of 22 quarter hours is awarded upon successful completion of 

this course. 
tChallenge examinations are available for this course through the NLN Mobility Profile II Examination, a component of the 

admissions process. 



90 Programs of Study 



Radiologic Technology 



The Radiologic Technology Program is a joint 
offering of the University and several area 
hospitals. Classroom experience is provided 
by the University, and the laboratory prac- 
ticum is conducted at an assigned affiliated 
hospital. The program is accredited by the 
Council on Medical Education of the American 
Medical Association. 

The radiologic technologist is an important 
figure in the diagnostic and therapeutic envi- 
ronment of the hospital or clinic, and in indus- 
trial production, quality control, and inspection 
laboratories. Responsibilities demand rapport 
with internists, surgeons, pathologists, nurses, 
and laboratory personnel. Industrial competen- 
cy requires close association with metallurgists, 
production and manufacturing specialists, engi- 
neers, and scientists. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of 
three years of high school math (Algebra 1 and 
2 and geometiy), one year of biology, and one 
year of chemistry or physics. Applicants must 
also satisfactorily complete the Scholastic Apti- 
tude Test (SAT) and submit one letter of recom- 
mendation from a science instructor. In 
addition, applicants must satisfy general Uni- 
versity requirements and satisfactorily com- 
plete the University's Mathematics Placement 
Test. Candidates who successfully meet the 
above requirements may then schedule an in- 
terview with the Radiologic Technology 
Program director. 



Associate in Science Degree Full-Tlme Day Program 

The associate in science degree program is a 
full-time day program. Graduates are eUgible 
to take the examination for certification by 
the American Registry of Radiologic Technol- 
ogists. Students who complete the associate's 
degree and are interested in a bachelor's degree 
may want to consider the health science or 
health management major. These students are 
encouraged to discuss these options with an 
academic adviser. 

Associate in Science Degree Part-Time Evening 
Program 

A part-time evening option exists for students 
unable to participate in the full-time day pro- 
gram. Candidates must recognize that a full- 
time day cUnical practicum commitment is 
necessary after completion of all part-time eve- 
ning course requirements. 

Part-Time Evening Program for Radiographers 

University College also offers an associate 
of science degree program for registered 
technologists, which requires fewer major 
concentration courses. 

Candidates who wish to apply to this pro- 
gram must be certified by the American Regis- 
try of Radiologic Technologists. 



Radiologic Technology Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 806) 



Core Courses 






quarter hours 


BIO 4103 






Biology 1 4 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 


BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 9 


COM 4101 






Foundations of Computer Literacy 4 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 3 


HMG 4100 






Hospital Organization and Management 1 3 


MTH4110 


MTH 4111 




Math 1, 2 6 


PSY4110 






Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 
Issues 3 



continued on the next page 



Health Professions and Sciences 91 



Major Concentration Courses 








RAD 4100 


RAD 4101 






Radiologic Technology Orientation 1, 2 6 


RAD 4102 


RAD 4103 






Radiologic Science 1, 2 8 


RAD 4104 


RAD 4105 






Principles of Radiology 1,2 8 


RAD 4106 


RAD 4107 






Radiologic Photography and Exposure 1,2 8 


RAD 4116 
RAD 4119 


RAD 4117 


RAD 4118 


Radiology Practicum 1, 2, 3, 4 

16 


RAD 4121 


RAD 4122 






Principles of Photography and Exposure 

Lab 1, 2 2 


RAD 4304 








Cross-Sectional Anatomy 4 


RAD 4305 








Advanced Radiologic Technology 1 4 


RAD 4306 








Radiation Protection — Radiobiology 4 


Total Quarter Hours 






98 


Part-Time Associate in Science 


Degree Program for Radiograpliers (Major Code 810) 


Core Courses 








quarter hours 


Transfer credit for completion of prerequisite* 


50 


BIO 4103 








Biology 1 4 


COM 4101 








Foundations of Computer Literacy 4 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 






Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 








Approaches to Literature 3 


HMG 4100 








Hospital Organization and Management 3 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 






Introduction to College Mathematics 1, 2 6 



PSY4110 

or 

SOC 4100 



Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 

Issues (3) 

or 

Roles, Culture, and the Individual (3) 



PSY4111 

or 

SOC 4101 



Introduction to Psychology: Developmental 

Aspects (3) 

or 

Inequality and Institutions (3) 



Major Concentration Courses 


RAD 4300 


Advanced Radiologic Technology 1 


4 


RAD 4303 


Radiation Protection — Radiobiology 


3 


RAD 4304 


Cross-Sectional Anatomy 


4 


RAD 4460 


Medical Imaging Quality Assurance 


3 


Total Quarter Hours 




96 



* Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of a certificate program in radiologic technology or registration by the American Registry of 
Radiologic Technologists. 



92 Programs of Study 



Therapeutic Recreation Services 

Therapeutic recreation is the use of recreation 
services to improve or maintain physical, 
mental, emotional, and/or social functioning to 
assist individuals in expressing independent 
lifestyles. Comprehensive therapeutic 
recreation services involve a continuum of 
care, including 

• treatment that uses activities to remediate or 
rehabilitate functional abilities and to assist 
in diagnosis; 

• leisure education that uses activities to acquire 
skills, knowledge, and attitudes that facilitate 
an independent lifestyle and avocational 
competence; and 

• recreation that uses activities to enhance 
health, grov^1;h, development, and 
independence. 

This comprehensive approach uses the 
needs, interests, and abilities of the cUent, 
as well as the mandate of the service agency, 
to direct the therapeutic recreation 
services provided. 



The Therapeutic Recreation Certificate veri- 
fies that a basic level of competence in this 
field has been attained. The Massachusetts Rec- 
reation and Park Association recognizes both 
the certificate and associate's degree programs 
in its professional registration plan. The associ- 
ate's degree program leads to a paraprofes- 
sional classification with the National Council 
for Therapeutic Recreation Certification. 

Students in the certificate and associate's 
degree programs may go on to pursue the 
bachelor of science degree in health manage- 
ment or sociology in University College, or the 
bachelor of science in therapeutic recreation 
degree in the undergraduate day program of 
Northeastern's Department of Health, Sport, 
and Leisure Studies. 



Therapeutic Recreation Services Activity Leader Certificate Program (Major Code 601] 



Core Courses 






quarter hours 


ENG4110 






Critical Writing 1 3 


Major Concentration Courses 


REC 4101 


REC 4102 


REC 4103 


Principles and Practices of Therapeutic 
Recreation 1, 2, 3 9 


REC 4110 


REC 4111 




Group Dynamics and Leadership 1, 2 6 


REC 4500 

or 

REC 4802 


REC 4501 
REC 4803 




Field Practicum 1, 2* (8) 

or 

Independent Study 1, 2t (8) 



continued on the next page 



Health Professions and Sciences 93 



Eledives 



Choose 6 quarter hours from the following. 


REC 4300 


REC 4301 


Arts and Crafts 1, 2 


(6) 


REC 4310 




Social Recreation 


(3) 


REC 4311 




Music Therapy 


(3) 


REC 4312 




Media Resources and Techniques 


(3) 


REC 4313 




Therapeutic Use of Dramatics 


(3) 


Choose 6 quarter hours from the following. 






REC 4401 




The Nursing Home Experience 


(3) 


REC 4410 




Therapeutic Recreation in Rehabilitation 


(3) 


REC 4425 




Mental Illness and Retardation 


(3) 


REC 4430 




Therapeutic Recreation in Child 
Development 


(3) 


REC 4440 




Humanistic and Holistic Approaches to 
Therapeutic Recreation 


(3) 


REC 4445 




Community Recreation for the 
Handicapped 


(3) 


REC 4460 




The Process of Aging 


(3) 


REC 4461 




Camping for the Disabled 


(3) 


REC 4462 




Leisure Counseling 


(3) 


REC 4200 




Introduction to Learning Disabilities 


(3) 


REC 4210 




Psychosocial Aspects of Disabilities 
and Illness 


(3) 


REC 4250 




Assessment of Learning Disabilities 


(3) 


REC 4304 




Dynamics of Family Life for the Disabled 


(3) 


REC 4350 




Legal Issues of Disability and 
Rehabilitation 


(3) 


REC 4450 




Vocational Planning for the Learning 
Disabled 


(3) 


REC 4470 




The Learning Disabled at Work 


(3) 


Total Quarter Hours 




38 



*See course description for prerequisites; eligibility is determined by the program consultant. Petitions can be obtained in the Health 
Professions Program office and should be filed at least one quarter in advance of the start of the practicum. 
tPermission is required for this option. 



94 Programs of Study 



Therapeutic Recreation Services Associate 


in Science Degree (Major Code 600) 




Core Courses 






quarter hours 


BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 




Biology 1, 2 


8 


BIO 4175 


BIO 4176 


BIO 4177 


Human Anatomy and Physiology 1, 2, 3 


9 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


HRA4302 






Medical Terminology Survey 


3 


HSC 4301 


HSC 4302 




Foundations of Medical Science 1, 2 


6 


PSY 4110 






Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 
Issues 


3 


PSY4111 






Introduction to Psychology: Developmental 
Aspects 


3 


PSY 4112 






Introduction to Psychology: Personal 
Dynamics 


3 


SOC 4225 






Social Gerontology 


3 


Major Concentration Courses 


REC 4101 


REC 4102 


REC 4103 


Principles and Practices of Therapeutic 
Recreation 1, 2, 3 


9 


REC 4110 


REC 4111 




Group Dynamics and Leadership 1, 2 


6 


REC 4420 






Activity and Movement Analysis 


3 


REC 4500 

or 

REC 4802 


REC 4501 
REC 4803 




Field Practicum 1, 2* 

or 

Independent Study 1, 2t 


(8) 
(8) 



continued on the next page 



Health Professions and Sciences 95 



Eledives 



Choose 6 quarter hours from the following. 


REC 4300 


REC 4301 


Arts and Crafts 1, 2 


(6) 


REC 4310 




Social Recreation 


(3) 


REC 4311 




Music Therapy 


(3) 


REC 4312 




Media Resources and Techniques 


(3) 


REC 4313 




Therapeutic Use of Dramatics 


(3) 


Choose 24 quarter hours from the following. 






REC 4401 




The Nursing Home Experience 


(3) 


REC 4410 




Therapeutic Recreation in Rehabilitation 


(3) 


REC 4425 




Mental Illness and Retardation 


(3) 


REC 4430 




Therapeutic Recreation in Child 
Development 


(3) 


REC 4440 




Humanistic and HoUstic Approaches to 
Therapeutic Recreation 


(3) 


REC 4445 




Conimunity Recreation for the 
Handicapped 


(3) 


REC 4460 




The Process of Aging 


(3) 


REC 4461 




Camping for the Disabled 


(3) 


REC 4462 




Leisure Counseling 


(3) 


REC 4200 




Introduction to Learning Disabilities 


(3) 


REC 4210 




Psychosocial Aspects of Disabilities 
and Illness 


(3) 


REC 4250 




Assessment of Learning Disabilities 


(3) 


REC 4304 




Dynamics of Fanuly Life for the Disabled 


(3) 


REC 4350 




Legal Issues of Disability and 
Rehabilitation 


(3) 


REC 4450 




Vocational Planning for the Learning 
Disabled 


(3) 


REC 4470 




The Learning Disabled at Work 


(3) 


Total Quarter Hours 




103 



*See course description for prerequisites; eligibility is determined by the program consultant. Petitions may be obtained in the Health 
Professions Program office and should be filed at least one quarter in advance of the start of the practicum. 
tPermission is required for this option. 



96 



Liberal Arts Degree Programs 



Marilyn Wiener, Associate Dean, 
Director, Liberal Arts Programs 
Diane Wald, Assistant to the Director, 
Liberal Arts Programs 
266 Ruggles Building 
617-437-2416 



Purpose 



Through the liberal arts curricula offered by 
University College, students are guided in their 
independent and creative discovery of ideas 
and methods in the areas of the humanities, 
natural sciences, and social sciences. 

University College holds that a liberal arts 
education enables students to make more intel- 
ligent and realistic appraisals of self and career. 
The Liberal Arts Programs at the College pre- 
sent students with both a challenge to bring 
meaning and focus to the educational experi- 
ence and an opportunity to acquire marketable 
knowledge and skills. As the president of a 
large corporation put it, "It is no longer enough 
for management to be well-trained rather than 
well-educated." 



Programs 

The College offers bachelor of arts and bache- 
lor of science degrees in art, English, history, 
music, political science, psychology, and 
sociology-anthropology. Unlike the bachelor 
of science degree, the bachelor of arts degree 
includes a language requirement. Bachelor of 
science degrees are offered in graphic design 
and visual communication, economics, and 
technical communications; the technical com- 
munications degree includes a professional 
experience opportunity. In addition, degree 
programs in English, political science, and 



sociology-anthropology present pro- 
fessional concentrations designed to teach 
specialized skills. 

Bachelor's Degree in Liberal Studies 

University College offers a bachelor of arts de- 
gree in liberal studies designed to help students 
develop communication, analytical, and re- 
search skills while exploring the great ideas of 
the ages and contemporary issues. The pro- 
gram's courses are grouped in four areas: 

• Communication and Critical Thinking 

• Cultural Heritage 

• Science, Research, and Quantitative Methods 

• Contemporary Studies 

The courses in each area are selected 
to provide students with a breadth of 
disciplinary perspectives. 

Forty-five quarter hours of elective credits 
are awarded to allow students to take a certifi- 
cate program or select individual courses 
in accordance with their personal and 
career interests. 

Upon approaching completion of individual 
course work in Cultural Heritage and Contem- 
porary Studies, students take an interdisciplin- 
ary seminar in each area to integrate their 
learning experiences. 

Bachelor's Degree in Graphic Design and Visual 
Communication 

In response to the rising demand for profes- 
sional training in visual communications. 
University College has introduced a bachelor of 
science degree program in graphic design cind 
visual communication. 

The program has a unique, three-tiered 
structure that enables students to begin with 
the certificate program, continue through the 
associate's program, and finish with the 
bachelor's program. 

Business Administration Minor 

Liberal arts bachelor's degree candidates have 
the option of completing a minor in business 
administration. Students who elect to do so 
must apply some of the open electives permit- 
ted in their degree programs to this purpose, 
and should meet with an academic adviser 
from the Office of Academic and Student Af- 
fairs to identify the appropriate courses. These 
students are permitted to accumulate up to 44 
quarter hours (25 percent of the credits toward 



Liberal Arts 97 



a bachelor's degree) in business subjects. Busi- 
ness credits accumulated beyond this limit 
cannot be used to fulfill the graduation require- 
ments for a bachelor of science degree in a lib- 
eral arts area. 

Associate in Science Degree 

An associate in science degree program in arts 
and sciences is offered for those who want a 
general background in liberal arts, but who do 
not want to pursue a major field of concentra- 
tion for the bachelor's degree. 

Certificate Programs 

Students who seek specialized skills to advance 
their careers may choose fi-om the following 
liberal arts certificate programs, which they 
may take independently or in coi\junction with 
degree study: advertising, American Sign 
Language and deaf studies, American Sign Lan- 
guage interpreting, American studies, geron- 
tology, graphic design and visual communica- 
tion, public administration, public relations, 
technical writing, speech communication, 
and writing. 



honors theses, seminars, reading projects, 
directed independent study, or creative 
work. Flexibility is the keynote, with every 
consideration given to the individual needs 
and requirements of the student. Honors 
advisers are chosen from the faculty of the 
department concerned. 

Students who have earned 96 quarter hours 
of credit toward their bachelor's degree and 
who have a grade-point average of 3.0 or better 
are eligible to apply to the Director of Liberal 
Arts for admission to the program. 



Fieldwork Courses 

To provide students the opportunity to apply 
their academic background to practical prob- 
lems, the history, psychology, sociology, and 
technical communications departments offer 
six quarter-hour courses in their curricula enti- 
tled "Fieldwork in " Please refer to course 

descriptions for details. To obtain guidelines 
and an appUcation, call 617-437-2416. 



Directed Study 



Students admitted to a bachelor of arts or bach- 
elor of science degree program may be eligible 
to enroll in a maximum of two directed study 
courses in a liberal arts major. Directed study is 
intended primarily for the senior who is unable 
to take an upper-level course (i.e., other than a 
"foundations" course) required for graduation 
because of circumstances beyond his or her 
control. Thus, if a requisite course is not avail- 
able for two consecutive years, a student may 
petition for a directed study co'urse by contact- 
ing the program office to obtain an application. 
Students should not petition for directed study 
in a course that was available on the 
open schedule. 



Honors Program 

An upperclass honors program enables superi- 
or students to pursue studies in their m^or 
fields in greater depth than is possible in 
regular classes. 

The nature of the program is determined by 
the department concerned. Programs may in- 
volve special research projects culminating in 



Credit for Noncollegiate Experience (NCE) 

University College degree candidates may ob- 
tain up to 16 quarter hours of noncollegiate ex- 
perience credit (NCE) in all Uberal arts areas 
except modern languages. In addition, graphic 
design and visual communication certificate 
students may obtain up to 9 quarter hours of 
NCE credit but may not have other transfer 
credit. (A certificate will not be issued unless 21 
quarter hours in graphics are taken at 
University College.) 

Business degree candidates may earn up to 
16 quarter hours of noncollegiate experience 
credit in all Uberal arts areas except modern 
languages. These credits may only be applied as 
open electives. NCE credit is not available for 
business courses or for any required course in a 
business degree program. 

Whenever possible, NCE should be used as a 
substitute for specific liberal arts courses (for 
example, substituting NCE in PubUc Speaking 
for SPC 4251). When a specific course is 
deemed critical to the academic soundness of 
the mgyor, a student may be asked to take the 
course but may, in addition, receive NCE credit 
in the subject area in which he or she has ac- 
quired special knowledge. 



98 Programs of Study 



To apply for NCE credit, a student must file a 
petition listing the relevant courses for which 
credit should be received and reasons that the 
credit should be accepted toward the degree. 
He or she should also attach any materials that 
might serve as documentation. For NCE credit 
in graphics, students must submit a portfolio 
(ten samples minimum) to show competency 
for the relevant course work and take a written 
examination. For NCE credit in technical com- 
munications, students must submit samples of 
work (accompanied by a corroborating letter 
from a supervisor) and must take an 
examination. 

Notification of acceptance or rejection of 
the petition is issued by the Office of Academic 
and Student Affairs, as directed by the Director 
of Liberal Arts, with the advice of the con- 
cerned departmental consultant(s). The latter 
determines whether the petitioner's NCE is 
equivalent to the course listings as claimed. Cri- 
teria for such evaluation may or may not in- 
clude a formal examination, an interview, 
departmental consultation, or a request for 
additional documentation. 

If positive action is taken on the petition, the 
resulting NCE credits may be applied toward a 
bachelor's degree. However, students should be 
aware of certain constraints. To have NCE 
credit counted to qualify for a given June 
graduation, the petition must be filed at least 
six months before the commencement date. 
NCE cannot be used to fulfill residence require- 
ments. NCE credit carmot be given for courses 
that can be accredited through the CLEP test- 
ing program at the time of the petition. Grades 
are not assigned to NCE credits. It is possible 
that NCE credit may be applicable toward a de- 
gree in University College only. 

Program Consultants and Advisers 

ART: Art and Graphics 

Consultant: 

Prof. Peter Serenyi, Art Dept. (College of Arts 

and Sciences) (617-437-2347) 

Associate Consultant and Program Adviser: 

Frank Trocki 

(617-437-2390) 

ASL: American Sign Language 

Consultant and Program Adviser: 
Nancy V. Becker, Coordinator, Educational Ser- 
vices, ASL Program (College of Arts and Sci- 
ences) (voice 617437-3064; TTY 617437-3067) 



ECN: Economics 

Consultant: 

Prof. M. A. Horowitz, Chair, Economics Dept. 
(College of Arts and Sciences) 
(617437-2882) 
Associate Consultant- 
Prof. H. Goldstein, Executive Officer, Econom- 
ics Dept. (College of Arts and Sciences) 
(617437-2882) 

Assistant Consultant/Program Adviser: 
Herbert J. Eskot (617-9644718) 

ENG: English (Literature or Writing) 

Consultant- 
Prof. M. X. Lesser, English Dept. (College of 
Arts and Sciences) (617437-2512) 
Program Adviser: 
Wallace Coyle (U. Mass./Boston) (617-922-8141) 

HST: History 

Consultant- 
Prof. Raymond H. Robinson, Chair, History 
Dept. (College of Arts and Sciences) 
(617437-2660) 

Associate Consultant/Program Adviser: 
Prof. GerEild H. Herman, History Dept. (College 
of Arts and Sciences) (617437-2660) 

JRN: Journalism, Public Relations, or Advertising 

Consultant and Program Adviser: 
Prof. Larue W. Gilleland, Chair, Journalism 
Dept. (College of Arts and Sciences) 
(617437-3236) 

LIB: Library Science 

Consultant 

Susan Yates, (Northeastern University Library) 

(617437-3398) 

LN: Modern Languages 

Consultant: 

Prof. Holbrook Robinson, Chair, Modem Lan- 
guages Dept. (College of Arts and Sciences) 
(617437-2234) 

Modem Languages includes the following: 
LNA: Arabic LNJ: Japanese 

LNF: French LNL: Latin 

LNG: German LNN: Swedish 

LNH: Hebrew LNR: Russian 

LNI: Italian LNS: Spanish 



Liberal Arts 99 



MUS: Music 

Consultant: 

Prof. Joshua R. Jacobson, Music Dept. (College 
of Arts and Sciences) (617-437-2240) 
Associate Consultant/ Program Adviser: 
Charles Mokotoff, Music Dept. (College of Arts 
and Sciences) (617-437-2240) 

PHL: Philosophy and Religion 

Consultant- 
Prof. Susan Setta, Philosophy Dept. (College of 
Arts and Sciences) (617-437-3636) 

POL: Political Science 

Consultant: 

Assoc. Prof. L. Gerald Bursey, Political Science 

Dept. (College of Arts and Sciences) 

(617-437-2796) 

Program Adviser: 

Prof. Robert Gilbert, Chair, PoUtical Science 

Dept. (College of Arts and Sciences) 

(617-437-2796) 



PSY: Psychology 

Consultant/Program Adviser: 
Prof. Charles Karis, Psychology Dept. (College 
of Arts and Sciences) (617-437-3076) 
Associate Consultant- 
Prof. Harold Zamansky, Psychology Dept. (Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences) (617-437-3076) 

SOA: Sociology-Anthropology, and SOC: Sociology 

Consultant- 
Prof. Arnold Arluke, Sociology Dept. (College of 
Arts and Sciences) (617-437-2686) 
Associate Consultant/ Program Adviser: 
Prof. Elliot Krause, Sociology Dept. (College of 
Arts and Sciences) (617-437-2686) 

SPC: Speech Communication 

Consultant/Program Adviser: 
Prof. Roberta Kosberg, Speech Communica- 
tions Dept. (College of Arts and Sciences) 
(617437-5517) 

TCC: Technical Communications 

Consultant/Program Adviser: 

Neil F. Duane (Boston Documentation Design) 

(617-965-5300) 



Arts and Sciences Associate in Science Degree (Major Code 372) 



Core Courses 



quarter hours 



ENG 4110 



ENG4111 



Critical Writing 1, 2 



ENG 4112 



Approaches to Literature 



Major Concentration Courses 



Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, ENG, JRN, UB, LN, MUS, PHL, SPC, TCC) 



24 



Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, PSY Labs) 



24 



Social Sciences (ECN, HST, POL, PSY, SOA, SOC) 



Electives 



21 



Total Quarter Hours 



96 



100 Programs of Study 



Economics Bachelor of Arts Degree (Mojor 


Code 390) 


Core Courses 


quarter hours 


ENG4110 ENG4111 


Critical Writing 1,2 6 


ENG 4112 


Approaches to Literature 3 


Modem Language 


Elementary or Conversational 12 
Intermediate 12 


Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, ENG, JRN, LIB, LNA to LNS, MUS, PHL, SPG, TCC) 24 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, PSY Labs) 18 


Social Sciences (HST, POL, PSY, SOA, SOC) 


18 


Major Concentration Courses 




ECN 4115 ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 9 


ECN 4250 ECN 4251 ECN 4252 


Statistics 1, 2, 3 9 


ECN 4310 


Labor Economics 3 


ECN 4342 ECN 4343 


Money and Banking 1, 2 6 


ECN 4344 


Government Finance 3 


Eiedives 


24 


Economics 


27 


Open electives 


24 


Total Quarter Hours 


174 



Liberal Arts 101 



Economics 


Bochelor of Science Degree 


with Certificate in Finance (Major Code 390 


Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


Social Sciences (HST, POL, PSY, SOA, SOC) 




18 


Major Concentration Courses 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 


9 


ECN 4215 




Macroeconomic Theory 


3 


ECN 4216 




Microeconomic Theory 


3 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 ECN 4252 


Statistics 1, 2, 3 


9 


ECN 4310 




Labor Economics 


3 


ECN 4342 


ECN 4343 


Money and Banking 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4344 




Government Finance 


3 


Finance Certificate Courses 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 ACC 4103 


Accounting Principles 1, 2, 3 


9 


FI4301 




Principles of Finance 


3 


FI4302 




Financial Management 


3 


FI4310 




Investment Principles 


3 


FI4320 




Credit Principles 


3 


FI4325 




Budgeting and Planning 


3 


Electives 


Economics 






21 


Liberal arts 






42 


Open electives 




24 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



102 Programs of Study 



English Bachelor of Arts Degree (Major Code 330) 




Core Courses 


quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 


Approaches to Literature 


3 


Modern Language 


Elementary or Conversational 
Intermediate 


12 
12 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, PSY Labs) 


18 


Social Sciences (ECN, HST, POL, PSY, 


SOA, SOC) 


24 


Major Concentration Courses 


ENG 4120 


English Literature: Faith and Humanism 


3 


ENG 4121 


Enghsh Literature: Reason and 
Romanticism 


3 


ENG 4122 


English Literature: Victorians and Moderns 


3 


ENG 4123 


Early American Literature: Faith, Reason, 
and Nature 


3 


ENG 4124 


American Romantics and American 
Reahsts 


3 


ENG 4125 


American Literature: The Modem Temper 


3 


ENG 4131 


God, Gods, and Heroes: The Literature of 
the Ancient and Medieval Worlds 


3 


ENG 4132 


Man, Reason, and Imagination: Literature 
from the Renaissance to the Romantic Age 


3 


ENG 4133 


Order and Disorder: Literature of the 
Moderns 


3 


ENG 4349 ENG 4350 


Expository and Persuasive Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4352 


Expository Communications 


3 


ENG 4602 


M^jor Figures in Poetry 


3 


ENG 4603 


Major Figures in Fiction 


3 


ENG 4658 


Shakespeare the Dramatist 


3 


Choose one of two concentrations for : 


27 quarter hours. 




I. Literature 

Select nine courses from the ENG 4200 or ENG 4600 series in the course descriptions on 
pages 149-151. 


II. Writing 

Choose six courses from the ENG 4300 
and three courses from either the JRN 


or ENG 4500 series in the course descriptions on page ] 
or TCC courses on pages 163 and 194-196. 


150, 


Eiedives 


English 




9 


Open electives 




18 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



Liberal Arts 103 



English Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 330) 




Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ENG4110 ENG4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, ] 


PHY,] 


PSY Labs) 


18 


Social Sciences (ECN, HST, POL, PSY, 


, SOA, 


. SOC) 


24 


Major Concentration Courses 


ENG 4120 




English Literature: Faith and Humanism 


3 


ENG 4121 




EngUsh Literature: Reason and 
Romanticism 


3 


ENG 4122 




English Literature: Victorians and Moderns 


3 


ENG 4123 




Early American Literature: Faith, Reason, 
and Nature 


3 


ENG 4124 




American Romantics and American 
Realists 


3 


ENG 4125 




American Literature: The Modem Temper 


3 


ENG 4131 




God, Gods, and Heroes: The Literature of 
the Ancient and Medieval Worlds 


3 


ENG 4132 




Man, Reason, and Imagination: Literature 
from the Renaissance to the Romantic Age 


3 


ENG 4133 




Order and Disorder: Literature of the 
Moderns 


3 


ENG 4349 ENG 4350 




Expository and Persuasive Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4352 




Expository Communications 


3 


ENG 4602 




Major Figures in Poetry 


3 


ENG 4603 




Major Figures in Fiction 


3 


ENG 4658 




Shakespeare the Dramatist 


3 


Choose one of two concentrations for 


27 quarter hours. 




I. Literature 

Choose nine courses from the ENG 4200 or 
pages 149-151. 


• ENG 4600 series in the course descriptions on 




II. Writing 

Select six courses from the ENG 4300 or ENG 4500 series in the course descriptions on page 
150, and three courses from either the JRN or TCC courses on pages 163 and 194-196. 


Electives 


English 






9 


Open electives 






42 


Total Quarter Hours 






174 



104 Programs of Study 

Fine Arts Bachelor of Arts Degree (Major Code 327) 



Core Courses 








quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 








Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 








Approaches to Literature 3 


Modern Language 








Elementary or Conversational 12 
Intermediate 12 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, ] 


PHY, 


PSY Labs) 18 


Social Sciences (ECN, HST, 


POL, 


PSY, 


, SOA, SOC) 24 


iWajor Concentration Courses 


ART 4100 








History of Art 3 


ART 4101 








History of Art to the Sixteenth Century 3 


ART 4102 








History of Art to the Twentieth Century 3 


ART 4106 








Introduction to Art 3 


Eledives 


Art 








39 


Open electives 








48 


Total Quarter Hours 








174 


Fine Arts Baclielor of Science 


Deg 


ree 


(Major Code 327) 


Core Courses 








quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 








Critical Writing 1, 2 6 


ENG 4112 








Approaches to Literature 3 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, ] 


PHY, 


PSY Labs) 18 


Social Sciences (ECN, HST, 


POL, 


PSY, 


SOA, SOC) 24 


Major Concentration Courses 


ART 4100 








History of Art 3 


ART 4101 








History of Art to the Sixteenth Century 3 


ART 4102 








History of Art to the Twentieth Century 3 


ART 4106 








Introduction to Art 3 


Electives 


Art 








39 


Open electives 








72 


Total Quarter Hours 








174 



Liberal Arts 105 



Graphic Design and Visual Communication Associate in Science Degree 
(Major Code 362) 



Core Courses 


quarter hours 


Communication 


ENG4110 ENG4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 


Approaches to Literature 


3 


PHL 4100 


Philosophical Thinking 


3 


SPC 4101 


Fundamentals of Human Communication 


3 


Social Sciences 


HST 4101 


The Civilization of the Ancient and 
Medieval Worlds 


3 


HST 4102 


The Civilization of the Early Modern World 


3 


HST 4103 


The Civilization of the Modern World 


3 


SOC 4100 


Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 


InequaUty and Institutions 


3 


Business 


MGT 4101 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1 


3 


MKT 4301 


Introduction to Marketing 1 


3 


ACC 4101 


Accounting Principles 1 


3 


Major Concentrotion Courses 


Art/Graphics 


ART 4105 


Art through the Ages 


3 


ART 4110 


Modern Art 


3 


ART 4121 


Principles of Drawing and Composition* 


3 


ART 4122 


Introduction to Figure Drawing* 


3 


ART 4175 


History of Graphic Design 


3 


Graphic Design and Communication Certificate 


ART 4135 


Design Foundations and Techniques* 


3 


ART 4139 


Color Theory and Practice 


3 


ART 4140 


Graphic Conmiunication and Production 


3 


ART 4141 ART 4142 


Graphic Design 1,* 2* 


6 


ART 4143 


Advertising Design* 


3 


ART 4151 


Typography 


3 


ART 4251 


Advanced Graphic Design* 


3 


ART 4367 


Illustration 


3 


JRN 4349 


Advertising Basics 


3 


Additional courses in humanities 


are recommended 


12 


Total Quarter Hours 




96 



*3V^hour studio. 



106 Programs of Study 



Graphic Design and Visual Communication Bachelor of Science Degree 
(Major Code 360) 



Core Courses 




quarter hours 


Credits from associate in science degree in 


graphic design and communication 96 


Business Commimication and Research 


ENG 4380 ENG 4381 




Business Writing and Reports 1, 2 6 


UB 4325 




Business Research Tools 3 


SPC 4251 




Business and Professional Speaking 3 


ECN 4115 




Economic Principles and Problems 1 3 


MGT 4324 




Essentials for Managers of Small 

Businesses 2 


Computer, Math, Science 


COM 4101 




Foundations of Computer Literacy 4 


MTH 4110 MTH 4111 


MTH 4112 


Math 1, 2, 3 9 


Choose one of the following 


pairs. 





BIO 4103 


BIO 4104 


or 




CHM 4111 


CHM 4112 


or 




ESC 4103 




ESC 4104 





or 

PHY 4104 



PHY 4105 



Biology 1, 2 (6) 

or 

General Chemistry 1, 2 (6) 

or 

Introduction to Earth Sciences: The SoUd 

Earth (3) 

Introduction to Earth Sciences: The Fluid 

Earth (3) 

or 

General Physics 1, 2* (6) 



Major Concentration Courses 


ART 4160 


Basic Photography* 3 


ART 4176 


International Directions in Graphic Design 3 


ART 4181 


Introduction to Computer-Aided 

Graphic Design* 3 


ART 4182 


Computer-Aided Graphic Design 

Workshop* 3 


ART 4183 


Electronic Publishing Design* 3 


ART 4366 


Promotional and Technical Publications: 
Design and Production 3 


ART 4368 


Graphic Design for Media 3 


ART 4500 


Senior Project 3 


ART 4501 


Portfolio Development 3 


Eledivest 


15 


Total Quarter Hours 


174 



*3'/4-hour studio or lab. 

tPhysics and additional courses in humanities are recommended 



Liberal Arts 107 

History Bachelor of Arts Degree (Major Code 323) 

Core Courses quarter hours 

ENG4110 ENG4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 6 

ENG 4112 Approaches to Literature 3 

Modern Language Elementary or Conversational 12 

Intermediate 12 

Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, ENG, JRN, LIB, LN, MUS, PHL, SPC, TCC) 24 

Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, PSY Labs) 18 

Social Sciences (in three of the following areas: ECN, POL, PSY, SOA, SOC) 18 

IWojor Concentrotion Courses 

Introductory Courses 

HST 4101 The Civilization of the Ancient and 

Medieval Worlds 3 

HST 4102 The Civilization of the Early Modem World 3 

HST 4103 The Civilization of the Modem World 3 

HST 4201 American History 1763-1848 3 

HST 4202 American History 1848-1917 3 

HST 4203 American History Since 1917 3 

Historical SkUl Requirement 

HST 4241 The Historian's Craft 3 

HST 4265 Introduction to Public History 3 

Regional Distribution 

Choose one course from each of the following three regional groupings. 

European: any course with an HST 44 prefix 3 

American: any course with an HST 45 prefix 3 

Other: any course with an HST 46 prefix 3 

Thematic Distribution 

Choose four courses from any one of the following thematic groupings. 

America's Ethnic Roots (HST 4404, 4434, 4435, 4455, 4466, 4467, 4501, 4543, 4602, 
4604,4611,4632,4636) (12) 

America's Social and Economic History (HST 4530, 4540, 4542, 4547, 4548) (12) 

Contemporary History (HST 4424, 4425, 4460, 4468, 4469, 4513, 4549, 4602, 4603, 

4611, 4622, 4645) (12) 

Technological History (HST 4301, 4302, 4303, 4304, 4305) (12) 

Women and Family History (HST 4434, 4435, 4540, 4542, 4640, 4641) (12) 

Honors (HST 4811, 4812, 4813) (12) 

Eledives 36 

Total Quarter Hours 174 



108 Programs of Study 

History Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 323) 



Core Courses 






quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 




Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 




Introduction to Data Processing and 
Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


SOC 4321 


SOC 4322 


SOC 4323 


Social Research Methods 1, 2, 3 


12 


Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, 


ENG, JRN, UB 


, LN, MUS, PHL, SPC, TCC) 


24 


Social Sciences 






18 


Choose two i 


sequences of three courses from 


the following. 




EON 4115 


ECN 4116 


ECN 4117 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2, 3 


(9) 


POL 4103 






Introduction to Politics 


(3) 


POL 4104 






Introduction to American Government 


(3) 


POL 4105 






Introduction to Comparative Politics 


(3) 


PSY 4110 






Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


(3) 


PSY 4111 






Introduction to Psychology: 
Developmental Aspects 


(3) 


PSY 4112 






Introduction to Psychology: 
Personal Dynamics 


(3) 


SOA 4100 






Physical Anthropology 


(3) 


SOA 4101 






Cultural Anthropology: Preliterate 
Societies 


(3) 


SOA 4102 






Cultural Anthropology: Industrial Societies 


(3) 


SOC 4100 






Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


(3) 


SOC 4101 






Inequality and Institutions 


(3) 


SOC 4102 






Institutions and Social Change 


(3) 



continued on the next page 



Liberal Arts 109 



Major Concentration Courses 



Introductory Courses 



HST 4101 



The Civilization of the Ancient 
and Medieval Worlds 



HST 4102 



The Civilization of the Early Modern World 3 



HST 4103 



The Civilization of the Modem World 



HST 4201 



American History 1764-1848 



HST 4202 



American History 1848-1917 



HST 4203 



American History since 1917 



Historical Skill Requirement 



HST 4241 



The Historian's Craft 



HST 4265 



Introduction to Public History 



HST 4263 



Oral History 



HST 4821 



Fieldwork in History (or 
related NCE credit) 



Regional Distribution 



Choose one course from each of the following regional groupings: 



European: £iny course with an HST 44 prefix 



American: any course with an HST 45 prefix 



Other: any course with an HST 46 prefix 



Thematic Distribution 



Choose four courses from any one of the following thematic groupings. 



America's Ethnic Roots (HST 4404, 4434, 4435, 4455, 4466, 4467, 4501, 4543, 4602, 
4604, 4611, 4632, 4636) 



(12) 



America's Social and Economic History (HST 4530, 4540, 4542, 4547, 4548) 



(12) 



Contemporary History (HST 4424, 4425, 4460, 4468, 4469, 4513, 4549, 4602, 4603, 
4611, 4622, 4645) 



(12) 



Technological History (HST 4301, 4302, 4303, 4304, 4305) 



(12) 



Women and Family History (HST 4434, 4435, 4540, 4542, 4640, 4641) 



(12) 



Honors (HST 4811, 4812, 4813) 



(12) 



Eledives (preferably other than history) 



33 



Total Quarter Hours 



174 



110 Programs of Study 



Bachelor of Arts in 


Liberal Studies Degree 


(Major Code 495) 




Core Courses 






quarter hours 


Communication and Critical Thinking 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


INT 4200 






The Creative Process 


3 


PHL 4100 






Philosophical Thinking 


3 


PHL 4105 






Philosophy of Knowing and Reality 


3 


PHL 4200 






Logic 


3 


SPC 4101 






Fundamentals of Human Communication 


3 


SPC 4102 






Group Discussion 


3 


SPC 4251 






Business and Professional Speaking 


3 


Cultural Heritage 


ART 4105 






Art Through the Ages 


3 


ECN 4137 






History of Economic Thought 


3 


ENG 4131 






God, Gods, and Heroes: Literature of 
the Ancient and Medieval Worlds 


3 


ENG 4132 






Man, Reason, and Imagination: Literature 
from the Renaissance to the Romantic Age 


3 


ENG 4133 






Order and Disorder: Literature of 
the Moderns 


3 


HST 4101 






The Civilization of the Ancient and 
Medieval Worlds 


3 


HST 4102 






The Civilization of the Early Modem World 


3 


HST 4103 






The Civilization of the Modern World 


3 


MUS 4120 






History of Musical Styles 


3 


POL 4110 






The Great Political Thinkers 


3 


INT 4201 






Cultural Heritage Senunar 


3 



continued on the next page 



Liberal Arts 1 1 1 



Science, Research, and Quantitative Methods 



CHM 4105 




Chemistry and the Environment 


3 


ECN 4250 


ECN 4251 


Statistics 1, 2 


6 


ESC 4680 




Science, Technology, and Ancient Societies 


3 


ESC 4681 




Science, Technology, and Modern Societies 


3 


UB 4310 




Critical Research Tools 


3 


MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing and 
Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MTH 4110 


MTH 4111 MTH 4112 Introduction to College Mathematics 1, 2, 3 


9 


Contemporary Studies 


ECN 4115 


ECN 4116 


Economic Principles and Problems 1, 2 


6 


ECN 4334 




Comparative Economic Systems 


3 


POL 4105 




Introduction to Comparative Politics 


3 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Fundamental Issues 


3 


PSY4111 




Introduction to Psychology: 
Developmental Aspects 


3 


SOA 4155 




Individual and Culture 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 




Inequality and Institutions 


3 


SOC 4102 




Institutions and Social Change 


3 


INT 4202 




Contemporary Studies Seminar 


3 


Electives 






45 



Electives may be used 

• to take a University College certificate program 

• to study a modem language or other area in greater depth 

• to study areas of personal or career interest 

Students are encouraged to make an appointment with a University College counselor for help in 
selecting electives. Call 617-437-2400 for an appointment. 



Total Quarter Hours 



174 



1 1 2 Programs of Study 



Music Bachelor of Arts Degree (Major Code 328 




Core Courses quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 Approaches to Literature 


3 


Modern Language Elementary or Conversational 

Intermediate 


12 
12 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, PSY Labs) 


18 


Social Sciences (ECN, HST, POL, PSY, SOA, SOC) 


24 


Major Concentration Courses 


MUS 4120 History of Musical Styles 


3 


MUS 4121 Medieval and Renaissance Music 


3 


MUS 4122 Music of the Baroque 


3 


MUS 4123 Music History of the Classical Period 


3 


MUS 4124 Music History of the Romantic Era 


3 


MUS 4125 Music History of the Twentieth Century 


3 


MUS 4201 MUS 4202 MUS 4203 Music Theory 1, 2, 3 


12 


MUS 4241 Piano Class 1 


3 


MUS 4254 MUS 4255 MUS 4256 Music Tutorial 1, 2, 3 


9 


MUS 4301 Form and Analysis 


3 


Electives 


Music 


15 


Open electives 


39 


Total Quarter Hours 


174 


Music Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 328) 


Core Courses quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 Approaches to Literature 


3 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, PSY Labs) 


18 


Social Sciences (ECN, HST, POL, PSY, SOA, SOC) 


24 



continued on the next page 



Liberal Arts 113 



Major Concentration Courses 



MUS 4120 History of Musical Styles 


3 


MUS 4121 Medieval and Renaissance Music 


3 


MUS 4122 Music of the Baroque 


3 


MUS 4123 Music History of the Classical Period 


3 


MUS 4124 Music History of the Romantic Era 


3 


MUS 4125 Music History of the Twentieth Century 


3 


MUS 4201 MUS 4202 MUS 4203 Music Theory 1, 2, 3 


12 


MUS 4241 Piano Class 1 


3 


MUS 4254 MUS 4255 MUS 4256 Music Tutorial 1, 2, 3 


9 


MUS 4301 Form and Analysis 


3 


Eledives 


Music 


15 


Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, ENG, JRN, UB, LN, PHL, SPC, TCC) 


15 


Open electives 


48 


Total Quarter Hours 


174 


Political Science Bachelor of Arts Degree (Major Code 322) 


Core Courses quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 Approaches to Literature 


3 


Modem Language Elementary or Conversational Intermediate 


12 


Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, ENG, JRN, LIB, LN, MUS, PHL, SPC, TCC) 


24 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, PSY Labs) 


18 


Social Sciences (in three of the following areas: ECN, HST, PSY, SOA, SOC) 


18 


Major Concentration Courses 


POL 4103 Introduction to Politics 


3 


POL 4104 Introduction to American Government 


3 


POL 4105 Introduction to Comparative Politics 


3 


POL 4331 International Relations 


3 


POL 4370 Introduction to Political Theory 


3 



continued on the next page 



1 1 4 Programs of Study 



American Government 



Choose three of the following. 


POL 4310 




American Political Thought 


(3) 


POL 4313 




State and Local Government 


(3) 


POL 4314 




Urban and Metropolitan Government 


(3) 


POL 4318 




The American Presidency 


(3) 


POL 4319 




The Legislative Process 


(3) 


POL 4320 




American Constitutional Law 


(3) 


POL 4321 




Civil Liberties 


(3) 


POL 4322 




Procedural Due Process 


(3) 


Comparati^ 


ve Government 






Choose two 


of the following. 






POL 4330 




Comparative Politics 


(3) 


POL 4338 




European Political Parties 


(3) 


POL 4339 




Government and Politics in the Soviet 
Union 


(3) 


POL 4342 




Communism in Eastern Europe 


(3) 


POL 4350 




Politics and Policies of the Developing 
Nations 


(3) 


POL 4352 




Government and Politics of Latin America 


(3) 


POL 4356 




Government and Politics of Northern 
Africa 


(3) 


POL 4357 




Government and Politics of South Africa 


(3) 


POL 4359 




Government and Politics in the Middle East 


(3) 


POL 4362 




Government and Politics of Southeast Asia 


(3) 


POL 4365 




Government and Politics of China 


(3) 


POL 4367 




Government and Politics of Japan 


(3) 


International Relations 


Choose one of the following. 


POL 4332 




International Organization 


(3) 


POL 4333 




International Law 


(3) 


POL 4335 




Formulating American Foreign Policy 


(3) 


POL 4336 




American Foreign Policy 


(3) 


POL 4341 




Soviet Foreign Policy 


(3) 


POL 4364 




China's Foreign Policy 


(3) 


Theory and Methodology 


Choose one of the following. 


POL 4371 




Contemporary Political Theory 


(3) 


POL 4311 




Research Methods 


(3) 



continued on the next page 



Liberal Arts 115 



Eledives* 




Political science 


18 


Open electives 


27 


Total Quarter Hours 


174 



'Students may use these electives to take the Public Administration Certificate Program. See page 30 for certificate 
program requirements. 



Political Science Bachelor of Science Degree (Major Code 322) 




Core Courses 


quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 Critical Writing 1 , 2 


6 


ENG 4112 Approaches to Literature 


3 



EON 4250 


ECN 4251 


ECN 4252 


Statistics 1, 2, 3 


or 

MIS 4101 


MIS 4102 




Introduction to Data Processing and 
Information Systems 1, 2 





Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


Choose one of the following. 


MIS 4220 


Introduction to Programming in COBOL 


(3) 


MIS 4240 


Introduction to Programming in BASIC 


(3) 


MIS 4250 


FORTRAN Programming 1 


(3) 


MIS 4270 


Pascal Programming 1 


(3) 


Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, ENG, JRN, UB, 


LN, MUS, PHL, SPC, TCC) 


12 


Social Sciences (in three of the following areas: ECN, HST, PSY, SOA, SOC) 


18 


Wlajor Concentration Courses 


POL 4103 


Introduction to Politics 


3 


POL 4104 


Introduction to American Govemment 


3 


POL 4105 


Introduction to Comparative PoUtics 


3 


POL 4331 


International Relations 


3 


POL 4370 


Introduction to Political Theory 


3 


American Govemment 


Choose three of the following. 


POL 4310 


American Political Thought 


(3) 


POL 4313 


State and Local Govemment 


(3) 


POL 4314 


Urban and Metropolitan Govemment 


(3) 


POL 4318 


The American Presidency 


(3) 


POL 4319 


The Legislative Process 


(3) 


POL 4320 


American Constitutional Law 


(3) 


POL 4321 


Civil Liberties 


(3) 


POL 4322 


Procedural Due Process 


(3) 



continued on the next page 



1 1 6 Programs of Study 



Comparative Government 



Choose two of the following. 


POL 4330 


Comparative Politics 


(3) 


POL 4338 


European Political Parties 


(3) 


POL 4339 


Government and Politics in the Soviet 
Union 


(3) 


POL 4342 


Communism in Eastern Europe 


(3) 


POL 4350 


Politics and Policies of the Developing 
Nations 


(3) 


POL 4352 


Government and Politics of Latin America 


(3) 


POL 4356 


Government and Politics of Northern 
Africa 


(3) 


POL 4357 


Government and Politics of South Africa 


(3) 


POL 4359 


Government and Politics in the Middle East 


(3) 


POL 4362 


Government and Politics of Southeast Asia 


(3) 


POL 4365 


Government and PoUtics of China 


(3) 


POL 4367 


Government and PoUtics of Japan 


(3) 


International Relations 


Choose one of the following. 


POL 4332 


International Organization 


(3) 


POL 4333 


International Law 


(3) 


POL 4335 


Formulating American Foreign PoUcy 


(3) 


POL 4336 


American Foreign Policy 


(3) 


POL 4341 


Soviet Foreign Policy 


(3) 


POL 4364 


China's Foreign Policy 


(3) 


Theory and Methodology 


Choose one of the following. 


POL 4371 


Contemporary Political Theory 


(3) 


POL 4311 


Research Methods 


(3) 


Eledives* 


Political science 




18 


Open electives 




72 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



'Students may use these electives to take the Public Administration Certificate Program. See page 30 for certificate 
program requirements. 



Liberal Arts 117 



Psychology Bachelor of Arts Degree (Major Code 319) 






Core Courses 


quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 Critical Writing 1, 2 




6 


ENG 4112 Approaches to Literature 




3 


Modem Language Elementary or Conversational 

Intermediate 




12 
12 


Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, ENG, JRN, LIB, LN, MUS, PHL, SPC, TCC) 




24 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, PSY Labs) 




18 


Social Sciences (in three of the following areas: ECN, HST, POL, SOA, SOC) 




18 


Major Concentration Courses 


PSY 4110 Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 

Issues 


3 


PSY 4111 Introduction to Psychology: Developmental 

Aspects 


3 


PSY 4112 Introduction to Psychology: Personal 

Dynamics 


3 


PSY 4220 PSY 4221 PSY 4222 Statistics in Psychology 1, 2, 3 




9 


PSY 4231 Psychology of Learning 1 




3 


PSY 4272 PersonaUty 1 




3 


PSY 4351 Physiological Psychology 1 




3 


PSY 4381 Sensation and Perception 1 




3 


PSY 4561 PSY 4562 Experimental Psychology 1, 2 




6 


PSY 4611 Senior Seminar in Psychology 




3 


Eledives 


Psychology 




21 


Open electives 




21 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



1 1 8 Programs of Study 



Psychology 


Bochelor of Science Degree (Major Code 319) 






Core Courses 






quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 




6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 




3 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY) 






30 


iWajor Concentration Courses 


PSY 4110 




Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 
Issues 


3 


PSY4111 




Introduction to Psychology: Developmental 
Aspects 


3 


PSY 4112 




Introduction to Psychology: Personal 
Dynamics 


3 


PSY 4220 


PSY 4221 PSY 4222 


Statistics in Psychology 1, 2, 3 




9 


PSY 4231 




Psychology of Learning 1 




3 


PSY 4272 




Personality 1 




3 


PSY 4351 




Physiological Psychology 1 




3 


PSY 4381 




Sensation and Perception 1 




3 


PSY 4561 


PSY 4562 


Experimental Psychology 




6 


PSY 4611 




Senior Seminar in Psychology 1 




3 


Eledives 


Psychology 








21 


Open electives 






75 


Totol Quarter Hours 






174 



Liberal Arts 119 



Sociology-Anthropology Bachelor of Arts Degree (Mojor Code 321 



Core Courses 






quarter hours 


ENG 4110 ENG 4111 






Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 






Approaches to Literature 


3 


Modem Language 






Elementary or Conversational 
Intermediate 


12 
12 


Humanities (ART, ASL, DRA, 


ENG, JRN, UB, L^ 


[, MUS, PHL, SPC, TCC) 


24 


Math-Science (BIO, CHM, ESC, MTH, PHY, 


PSY 


Labs) 


18 


Social Sciences (in three of the following areas: 


ECN, HST, POL, PSY) 


18 


Major Concentration Courses 


SOA 4100 






Physical Anthropology 


3 


SOA 4101 






Cultural Anthropology: Preliterate 
Societies 


3 


SOA 4102 






Cultural Anthropology: Industrial Societies 


3 


SOC 4100 






Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 






Inequality and Institutions 


3 


SOC 4102 






Institutions and Social Change 


3 


SOC 4300 SOC 4301 


SOC 4302 




Social Theory 1, 2, 3 


9 


SOC 4321 SOC 4322 


SOC 4323 




Social Research Methods 1, 2, 3 


9 


Eledives 


Sociology-Anthropology (at least 9 quarter 


hours in SOA) 


21 


Open electives 








24 


Total Quarter Hours 








174 



120 Programs of Study 



Sociology-Anthropology Bochelor of Science Degree (Major Code 321) 




Core Courses 




quarter hours 


ENG 4110 


ENG 4111 


Critical Writing 1, 2 


6 


ENG 4112 




Approaches to Literature 


3 


Social Sciences (ECN, HST, POL, PSY) 




18 


Major Conceirtmtion Courses 


SOA 4100 




Physical Anthropology 


3 


SOA 4101 




Cultural Anthropology: Preliterate 
Societies 


3 


SOA 4102 




Cultural Anthropology: Industrial Societies 


3 


SOC 4100 




Roles, Culture, and the Individual 


3 


SOC 4101 




Inequality and Institutions 


3 


SOC 4102 




Institutions and Social Change 


3 


SOC 4300 


SOC 4301 SOC 4302 


Social Theory 1, 2, 3 


9 


SOC 4321 


SOC 4322 SOC 4323 


Social Research Methods 1, 2, 3 


9 


Electives* 


Sociology-Anthropology (at least 9 quarter hours 


} in SOA) 


39 


Open electives (preferably in the humanities and math-science) 


72 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



•Students may use these electives to take the Human Services Concentration or the Gerontology Certificate Program. See page 26 
for certificate program requirements. 



Liberal Arts 121 

Human Services Elective Concentration (open only to BS degree condidates) 



quarter hours 


SOC 4125 






Social Problems 


3 


SOC 4240 






Sociology of Human Service Organizations 


3 


SOC 4241 






Human Services Professions 


3 


SOC 4245 






Poverty and Inequality 


3 


SOC 4260 


SOC 4261 


SOC 4262 


Introduction to Social Work Practice 1, 2, 3 


9 


PSY 4110 






Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental 
Issues 


3 


PSY 4111 






Introduction to Psychology: Developmental 
Aspects 


3 


PSY 4112 






Introduction to Psychology: Personal 
Dynamics 


3 


PSY 4372 


PSY 4373 


PSY 4374 


Abnormal Psychology 1, 2, 3 


9 


Total Quarter Hours 






39 


Recommended Electives for Human Services Concentration Students 


ECN 4130 






Medical Economics 


3 


ECN 4311 






Human Resource Planning 


3 


ECN 4315 






Income Inequality and Discrimination 


3 


POL 4300 






Introduction to Public Administration 


3 


POL 4301 






Case Studies in PubUc Administration 


3 


POL 4306 






Public Policy Analysis 


3 


POL 4321 






Civil Liberties 


3 


PSY 4240 






Development: Infancy and Childhood 


3 


PSY 4241 






Development: Adolescence 


3 


PSY 4242 






Development: Adulthood and Aging 


3 


PSY 4272 






Personality 1 


3 


SOC 4170 






Race and Ethnic Relations 


3 


SOC 4185 






Sociology of Deviant Behavior 


3 


SOC 4186 






Social Control 


3 


SOC 4190 






Juvenile Delinquency 


3 


SOC 4215 






Medical Sociology 


3 


SOC 4220 






Sociology of Mental Health 


3 



SOC 4225 Social Gerontology 



122 Programs of Study 



Technical Communications Baclielor of Science Degree (Major Code 380) 




quarter hours 


Advanced Standing Credit, including ENG 4110, 
or their equivalents 


ENG 4111, ENG 4112, 


83 


Core Courses 


Basic Communication 


ART 4140 




Graphic Communication and Production 


3 


PHL 4100 




Philosophical Thinking 


3 


PHL 4200 




Logic 


3 


ENG 4349 


ENG 4350 


Expository and Persuasive Writing 1, 2 


6 


JRN 4112 




Writing for Media 


3 


UB 4325 




Business Research Tools 


3 


SPG 4152 




Interviewing 


3 


Technology 


MIS 4101 

• 


MIS 4102 


Introduction to Data Processing and 
Information Systems 1, 2 


6 


MTH4110 




Math 1 


3 


PHY 4104 


PHY 4105 PHY 4106 


General Physics 1, 2, 3 


9 


PHY 4173 


PHY 4174 


Physics Lab 1, 2 


4 


Choose one of the following. 


MIS 4220 




Introduction to Programming in COBOL 


(3) 


MIS 4250 




FORTRAN Programming 1 


(3) 


MIS 4270 




Pascal Programming 1 


(3) 


Major Concentration Courses 


TCC 4101 


TCC 4102 


Technical Writing 1, 2 


6 


TCC 4105 




Editing for Science and Technology 


3 


TCC 4340 




Technical Writing Portfolio Development 


3 


Choose four of the following. 


TCC 4110 




Technical-Promotional Writing 


(3) 


TCC 4301 


TCC 4302 


Computer Software Technical Writing 1, 2 


(6) 


TCC 4311 


TCC 4312 


Instruction Manual Writing 1, 2 


(6) 


TCC 4320 




Proposal Writing 


(3) 


TCC 4330 




The Business and Technical Presentation 


(3) 


Electives 






18 


The following electives are recommended. 


ACC 4101 


ACC 4102 


Accounting Principles 1, 2 


(6) 


ART 4366 




Promotional and Technical PubUcations: 
Design and Production 


(3) 


ENG 4352 




Expository Communications 


(3) 


MGT 4101 


MGT 4102 


Introduction to Business and 
Management 1, 2 


(6) 


JCC 4805 




Field work in Technical Conununications 


(6) 


Total Quarter Hours 




174 



123 



Alternative Freshman-Year 
Program 



Richard Wilson, Coordinator, 
Alternative Freshman-Year Program 
281 Ruggles Building 
617-437-4626 



Program Goals 

Students in the Alternative Freshman-Year Pro- 
gram are considered full-time day students and 
are degree candidates with an undeclared ma- 
jor. The program is designed to help students 
strengthen their basic skills in writing and 
mathematics. While helping them gain confi- 
dence in their ability to do college-level work, 
the program offers students an opportunity to 
consider several areas of study before commit- 
ting themselves to a specific major. Through 
the combination of a carefully prescribed cur- 
riculum and the attention of professional coun- 
selors, each student is helped to establish a 
program suited to his or her individual needs. 
These same counselors normally are available 
throughout the student's entire freshman year. 



Program Structure 



Students in the Alternative Freshman-Year Pro- 
gram normally take 16 quarter hours of credit 
during each of their three freshman quarters, 
but may also take 12 quarter hours during the 
first quarter and still be considered full-time 
students. Students in the health science track 
take 17 quarter hours in their third quarter and 
12 quarter hours in their fourth quarter. 



After completing the prescribed Alternative 
Freshman-Year Program and achieving both a 
cumulative quality-point average of 1.4 or bet- 
ter and specific program requirements as noted, 
students generally may continue their degree 
programs by transferring with sophomore sta- 
tus to any program in the College of Business 
Administration or the College of Criminal Jus- 
tice as well as certain nonscience programs in 
the Boston-Bouve College of Human Develop- 
ment Professions and the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Students may also continue their de- 
gree programs within University College. In ad- 
dition to the cumulative quality-point average 
of 1.4 or better, the College of Business Admin- 
istration requires a 1.80 average in five key 
courses: MTH 1113, ENG 4013, ENG 4014, 
ECN 4601, and MGT 4110. Additional program 
requirements for students who seek sophomore 
status in the College of Pharmacy and Allied 
Health Professions are listed in the Student , 
Handbook for Basic Colleges. 



Faculty and Resources 

For the Alternative Freshman-Year Program, 
the University has carefully selected faculty 
members who are aware of the individual 
needs and goals of students working to adjust 
to a college program. Faculty and students 
meet in small classes of not more than 
twenty-five students. 

As members of the program, students are 
considered regular Northeastern University day 
students even though they have unique sched- 
ules and a distinctively tailored curriculum. 
Therefore, they generally have access to all 
counseling services, physical education facili- 
ties, dormitory arrangements, and extracurric- 
ular programs at the University's main campus 
in Boston. 

Alternative Freshman-Year students are 
encouraged to make extensive use of the 
up-to-date, progranuned learning resources 
available for self-instruction through North- 
eastern's Learning Resources Center. For addi- 
tional assistance, these students are also 
referred to the Academic Assistance Center or 
the Math/Writing Center. A third and very im- 
portant resource, the Counseling and Testing 



124 Programs of Study 



Center, is available to students for personal and 
academic counseling as well as for vocational 
testing and counseling. 



take the 44 programmed credits are entitled to 
a 4-quarter-hour tuition ac^ustment at the regu- 
lar freshman rate. 



Tuition and Fees 



Application Procedures 



Tuition and fees for the Alternative Freshman- 
Year Program are the same as for students in 
the Basic Day Colleges. Payment of the stan- 
dard tuition during the first three academic 
quarters of residence entitles students to 48 
credit hours of instruction. Thus, those who 



For more information on the Alternative Fresh- 
man-Year Program, or to request an applica- 
tion, write or call the Dean of Admissions, 
Department of Admissions, Northeastern 
University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, 
Massachusetts 02115, 617-437-2200. 



Sample One- Year Program; Business Track 



quarter hours 


Quarter 1 


ED 4003 


Integrated Language Skills A 


4 


ENG 4013 


Fundamentals of English 1 


4 


MTH 1000 


Mathematical Preliminaries 1* 


4 



HST 4110 

or 

ECN 4601 

or 

MGT 4110 



HST 4110 

or 

MGT 4110 

or 

ECN 4601 



History of Civilization At (4) 

or 

Economics 1$ (4) 

or 

Survey of Business and Management^: (4) 



Total Quarter Hours 




12-16 


Quarter 2 


ED 4004 


Integrated Language Skills B 


4 


ENG 4014 


Fundamentals of English 2 


4 


MTH 1010 


Mathematical Preliminjiries 2* 


4 



History of Civilization A (4) 

or 

Survey of Business and Managements (4) 

or 

Economics It (4) 



Total Quarter Hours 




16 


Quarter 3 


ECN 4601 


Economics 1 (or Directed Elective) t 


4 


HST 4111 


History of Civilization B 


4 


MGT 4110 


Survey of Business and Management 
(or Directed Elective) 


4 


MTH 1113 


Mathematics for Business* 


4 


Total Quarter Hours 




16 



'Students will be placed in one of three math courses depending on placement test results. Those receiving advanced placement have 

the option of completing MTH 1114 during freshman year. 

tEligible students may take HST 4110 in the first quarter; all others take HST 4110 in the second quarter. 
^Business Track students may be assigned to ECN 4601 or MGT 4110 in any quarter, but all are required to complete both courses by 

the third quarter. 



Alternative Freshman- Year Program 1 25 



Sample One- Year Program: 

Criminal Justice, Education, Arts and Sciences Track 



quarter hours 


Quarter 1 


ED 4003 


Integrated Language Skills A 


4 


ENG 4013 


Fundamentals of English 1 


4 


MTH 1000 


Mathematical Preliminaries 1* 


4 


SOC 4010 


Principles of Sociology 1 


(4) 


Total Quarter Hours 




12-16 


Quarter 2 


ED 4004 


Integrated Language Skills B 


4 


ENG 4014 


Fundamentals of English 2 


4 


HST 4110 


History of Civilization At 


4 


SOC 4011 

or 

MTH 1010 


Principles of Sociology 2 

or 

Mathematical Preliminaries 2 


(4) 

(4) 


Total Quarter Hours 




16 


Quarter 3 


HST 4111 


History of Civilization B 


4 


POL 4106 


Introduction to Politics 


4 


SOC 4011 


Principles of Sociology 2 (or Directed 
Elective) 4 


Directed Elective^ 




4 


Total Quarter Hours 




16 



'Students wiU be placed in one of two math levels, depending on placement test results. 

tEligible students may take HST 4110 in the first quarter, followed by an elective in the second quarter. Most students will take 
HST 4110 in the second quarter. 
tThe Directed Elective is to be chosen with consideration for the student's intended m^or. 



126 Programs of Study 



Sample One- Year Program: 


Health Sciences Track 


quarter hours 


Quarter 1 


MTH 1010 


Mathematical Preliminaries 2 4 


ENG 4013 


Fundamentals of English 1 4 


CHM 1110 


Pre-Chemistry 5 


ED 4001 


Integrated Language SkiUs Development 1 2 


Total Quarter Hours 


15 


Quarter 2 


MTH 1106 


Fundamentals of Mathematics 4 


CHM nil 


General Chemistry 1 5 


ED 4002 


Integrated Language Skills Development 2 2 


ENG 4014 


Fundamentals of English 2 4 


Total Quarter Hours 


15 


Quarter 3 


BIO 1140 


Basic Animal Biology 1 4 


CHM 1112 


General Chemistry 2 5 


ENG nil 


Freshman English 2 4 


Directed Elective 


4 


Total Quarter Hours 


17 


Quarter 4 


BIO 1141 


Basic Animal Biology 2 4 


MTH 1107 


Functions and Calculus 4 


Directed Elective 


4 


Total Quarter Hours 


12 



Course Descriptions 



128 



Course Descriptions 



Not all courses listed in this bulletin are offered 
every year. 

A final list of courses to be offered is con- 
tained in the University College Schedule 
Guide, which gives the hours and days that 
classes meet and their locations. These sched- 
ules are issued prior to the fall, winter, spring, 
and summer quarters. 

Abbreviations 

q.h.: quarter hours (credit earned) 
el: hours required in class per week 
Prereq.: Prerequisite 
CEUs: Continuing Education Units 



Key to 


Department Codes 


ACC 


Accounting 


ART 


Art and Graphics 


ASL 


American Sign Language 


BIO 


Biology 


BL 


Business Law 


CHM 


Chemistry 


CJ 


Criminal Justice and Security 


COM 


Computer Literacy 


DRA 


Drama 


ECN 


Economics 


ED 


Educational Skills 


EMS 


Emergency Medical Science 


EN6 


English 


ESC 


Earth Sciences 


Fl 


Finance 


HMG 


Health Management 


HRA 


Health Record Administration 


HRM 


Humjin Resources Management 


HSC 


Health Science 


HST 


History 


HTL 


Hotel and Restaurant Management 


IM 


Industrial Management 


INT 


Interdisciplinary 


JRN 


Journalism 


LIB 


Library Science 


LNA 


Language — Arabic 


LNF 


Language — French 


LNG 


Language — German 


LNH 


Language — Hebrew 


LNI 


Language — Italian 


LNJ 


Language — Japanese 


LNL 


Language — Latin 


LNN 


Language — Swedish 


LNR 


Language — Russian 


LNS 


Language — Spanish 


MGT 


Management 


MIS 


Management Information Systems 


MKT 


Marketing 


MLS 


Medical Laboratory Science 


MS 


Management Science 


MTH 


Mathematics 


MUS 


Music 


NUR 


Nursing 


PED 


Physical Education 


PHL 


Philosophy and Rehgion 


PHY 


Physics 


POL 


Political Science 


PSY 


Psychology 


PUR 


Purchasing 


RAD 


Radiologic Technology 


RE 


Real Estate 


REC 


Recreational Therapy 


SOA 


Sociology-Anthropology 


SOC 


Sociology 


SPC 


Speech Communication 


TCC 


Technical Communications 


TRN 


Transportation 



Accounting 129 



Accounting 

ACC 4101 Accounting Principles 1 (3 q.h.) 
Study of accounting issues and objectives for prep- 
aration and interpretation of financial statements. 
Covers the nature, function, and environment of ac- 
counting, the basic accounting model, and the ac- 
counting cycle, while emphasizing accounting for 
service and merchandising businesses. Also covers 
cash and accounts receivable. 

ACC 4102 Accounting Principles 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of ACC 4101. Emphasizes issues in fi- 
nancial reporting, valuation, and income measure- 
ment. Includes inventories, plant and equipment, 
bonds, stockholders' equity, and changes in financial 
position. Prereq. ACC 4101. 

ACC 4103 Accounting Principles 3 (3 q.h.) 
Preparation and interpretation of cost accounting in- 
formation and its use in the managerial decision- 
making process. Includes ratio analysis, present 
value, analysis of cost-volume relationships, fixed 
and variable costs, break-even analysis, job order, 
and process cost systems. Prereq. ACC 4102. 

ACC 4105 Accounting Principles 1 and 2 (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as ACC 4101 and ACC 4102. 

ACC 4120 Essentials of Personal Income Taxation (3 q.h.) 
Special course for nonaccounting mjgors, designed 
to teach important aspects of personal income 
taxation on both federal and state levels. Emphasizes 
tax laws, tax planning, and the preparation of 
individual returns. 

ACC 4301 Intermediate Accounting 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to financial accounting concepts, tech- 
niques, and procedures. Areas emphasized are the 
development and fi-amework of accounting theory, 
basic financial statements, and cash and receivables. 
Prereq. ACC 4103. 

ACC 4302 Intermediate Accounting 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of the study of accounting concepts 
and procedures. Detailed examination of inventories, 
tangible and intangible assets, and depreciation. 
Prereq. ACC 4301. 

ACC 4303 Intermediate Accounting 3 (3 q.h.) 
Comprehensive examination of stockholders' equity 
and earnings per share. Other topics include ac- 
counting changes and statements of changes in fi- 
nancial position. Prereq. ACC 4302. 

ACC 4304 Intermediote Accounting 4 (3 q.h.) 
In-depth analysis of such topics as deferred income 
taxes, pensions, leases, and price-level accounting. 
Prereq. ACC 4303. 

ACC 4306 Intermediate Accounting 1 and 2 

(Intensive) (6 q.h.) 

Same as ACC 4301 and ACC 4302. Prereq. ACC 4103. 

ACC 4310 Cost Accounting 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to cost accounting, including terminol- 
ogy, purpose, and relationship to financial account- 
ing. Familiarizes students with product costing 
systems and their usefulness. Prereq. ACC 4103. 



ACC 4311 Cost Accounting 2 (3 q.h.) 
Budgetary planning and control, the use of cost 
data for current operations, special decisions, and 
long-range planning. Prereq. ACC 4310. 

ACC 4313 Cost Accounting 1 and 2 (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as ACC 4310 and ACC 431 1. Prereq. ACC 4103. 

ACC 4320 Advanced Accounting 1 (3 q.h.) 
Problems associated with business combinations. A 
study of the purchase and pooling methods of con- 
solidations. Prereq. ACC 4304. 

ACC 4321 Advanced Accounting 2 (3 q.h.) 
Accounting problems associated with partnerships 
and multinational corporations. Includes accoimting 
for nonprofit organizations. Prereq. ACC 4320. 

ACC 4325 Auditing 1 (3 q.h.) 

Auditing concepts and standards relevant to the at- 
test function. Includes the legal and ethical responsi- 
bilities of the independent certified public 
accountant, internal controls, an overview of EDP 
auditing and sampling, and auditor reports. Prereq. 
ACC 4303. 

ACC 4326 Auditing 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continued examination of auditing concepts and 
standards relevant to the attest function. Includes 
compliance and substantive tests as they relate to 
specific transaction cycles and the use of EDP and 
statistical sampling techniques. Prereq. ACC 4325. 

ACC 4327 Auditing 1 and 2 (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 

Same as ACC 4325 and ACC 4326. Prereq. ACC 4303. 

ACC 4330 Internal Auditing 1 (3 q.h.) 
Examination of how the modern internal audit func- 
tion reviews and appraises diverse operations. In- 
cludes standards for professional practice, codes of 
ethics, administration of the internal audit depart- 
ment, review of internal controls, development of au- 
dit programs, an overview of EDP auditing and 
sampling, and auditor reports. Prereq. ACC 4303. 

ACC 4331 Internal Auditing 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continued exanunation of the modern internal audit 
function. Includes specific audit techniques such as 
statistical sampling and the computer as an audit 
tool; the development of audit programs, work pa- 
pers, and reviews; operational audits; and fraud is- 
sues. Prereq. ACC 4330. 

ACC 4340 Federal Income Taxes 1 (3 q.h.) 
Application, of federal taix laws to the individual's in- 
come, gains, losses, and expenses. Study of the indi- 
vidual's itemized deductions. Prereq. ACC 4303. 

ACC 4341 Federal Income Taxes 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of ACC 4340. Covers property transac- 
tions, including nontaxable transactions; and funda- 
mental tax law relating to corporate formation and 
operation, partnerships, and S corporations. Prereq. 
ACC 4340. 

ACC 4342 Federal Income Taxes 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of ACC 4341. Covers application of fed- 
eral tax laws to estates, gifts, and trusts; and corpo- 
rate and partnership taxation. Prereq. ACC 4341. 



130 Art and Graphics 



Art and Graphics 

ART 4100 History of Art (3 q.h.) 
Survey of history of Western art from prehistoric- 
times to the end of the Roman Empire. Includes the 
study of mgjor monuments, artists, and stylistic de- 
velopments that evolved during the Prehistoric, 
Primitive, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Aegean, Greek, 
and Roman periods. Slide lectures and discussions. 

ART 4101 History of Art to the Sixteenth Century (3 q.h.) 
Survey of history of Western art from the end of 
the Roman Empire to the late sixteenth century. 
Includes the study of mjgor monuments, artists, and 
stylistic developments that evolved during the Early 
Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, 
Gothic, Early and High Renaissance, and late 
sixteenth-century Mannerist periods. Slide lectures 
and discussions. 

ART 4102 History of Art to the Twentieth Century (3 q.h.) 
Survey of history of Western art from the late six- 
teenth century to the twentieth century. Includes 
the study of mzyor monuments, artists, and stylistic 
developments that evolved during the Baroque 
and Rococo periods, and in nineteenth- and 
twentieth-century Europe and America. Slide lec- 
tures and discussions. 

ART 4105 Art Through the Ages (3 q.h.) 
Concentrated historical survey of Western art from 
prehistoric cave paintings to the twentieth century. 
Includes the study of m^or monuments, artists, and 
stylistic developments found in the Pre-Classical, 
Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque pe- 
riods, and in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Eu- 
rope and America. Slide lectures and discussions. 

ART 4106 Introduction to Art (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the language, techniques, aesthetics, 
and visual styles of painting, sculpture, graphic art, 
and architecture. Includes individual and compara- 
tive studies of msyor works of art in each field, dis- 
cussion of terminology, and historical examination of 
the social, political, and cultural significance of each 
art form. Slide lectures and discussions. 

ART 4107 Introduction to the Great Museums of Europe 

(3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the great museums of Europe, their 
settings, and important examples from their collec- 
tions through a slide-lecture format. Includes the 
Egyptian Museum, Cairo; the National Museum, Ath- 
ens; the Uffizi and Pitti Museums, Florence; the 
Prado, Madrid; the Louvre, Paris; and the National 
Gallery, London. 

ART 4110 Modern Art (3 q.h.) 

Examination of the major movements and develop- 
ments in painting, sculpture, and eirchitecture from 
the late nineteenth century to the present. Empha- 
sizes changing aesthetic views and the autistic, philo- 
sophical, historical, sociological, and political influ- 
ences shaping those views and the modern move- 
ment as a whole. Slide lectures and discussion. 

'Courses designated "(Studio)" meet for 3-3'/2 hours. 



ART 4115 Graphic Design for Non-Majors (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to graphic design processes, principles, 
and concepts. Students learn how to estimate jobs, 
design layouts, and prepare mechanicals and page 
layouts. Other topics include typography and type 
specification, copyfitting, design terminology, and an 
introduction to printing processes. 

ART 4118 Sculpture Basics (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Creative, three-dimeasional expression in papier- 
mache, cardboard, castoff, junk, clay, wire, and 
other materials. Includes a comprehensive exam- 
ination of the design, dynamics, and energy flow of 
sculptural works. 

ART 4119 Sculpture Experiments (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
New look at sculpture techniques, including 
casting, carving, and additive, subtractive, and 
mixed-media expression. 

ART 4120 Sculpture Studio* (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to modeling the human form using clay. 
Focuses on creating three-dimensional sculptures of 
either the head or the full figure, using proportion, 
space, movement, line, tension, and texture. Covers 
the complete sculptural process, from making the ar- 
mature to casting in plaster. References to sculptural 
styles through slide presentations. 

ART 4121 Principles of Drawing and Composition (Studio)* 

(3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the fundamental principles of draw- 
ing and composition through formal graphic studies 
of line, shape, value, form, light, space, pattern, and 
texture. Stresses the use of pencil, charcoal, conte 
crayon, and other dry media. Critiques and slide lec- 
tures as needed. (Laboratory fee.) 

ART 4122 Introduction to Figure Drawing (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Infroduction to drawing the human form. Includes 
basic studies in anatomy, proportion, negative/ 
positive space, contour, gesture, mass, line, com- 
position, and drawing technique. Slide lectures, cri- 
tiques, and weekly sessions drawing from the model. 
(Laboratory fee.) 

ART 4123 Drawing Workshop (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to more advanced problems in the anal- 
ysis of visual language and its creative organization. 
Emphasizes sfrengthening drawing techniques and 
developing a personal style. 

ART 4127 Basic Painting (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the fundamentals of painting. In- 
cludes formal studio assignments in the study of col- 
or, light, pictorial space systems, form, texture, and 
composition to establish a foundation for more indi- 
vidual, creative expression. Critiques and slide lec- 
tures as needed. 

ART 4128 Intermediate Painting (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Review of fundamental principles of painting, fol- 
lowed by more advanced studies in shape, scale, tex- 
ture, bmshstroke, and edge as well as color, light, 
form, and composition. Examines problems in a vari- 
ety of stylistic approaches and techniques from the 
past and the present. Critiques and slide lectures 
as needed. 



Art and Graphics 131 



ART 4129 Painting Workshop (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Individual development through a structured, 
project-oriented approach. Encourages recognition 
of the conceptual aspects of painting as well as the 
development of a personal painting style and unique 
visual imagery. Critiques and shde lectures as 
needed. 

ART 4130 Printmaking: Relief (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Fundamental course in the production of prints using 
the relief process. Includes woodcut, linoleum, 
block-cut, arid other reUef print techniques. Also ^^x- 
plores paper stocks, inks, and carving and printing. 

ART 4132 Printmaking: Intaglio (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Fundaimental course in the production of prints using 
the intaglio process. Includes etching, aquatint, dry 
point, engraving, sugar-lift, and other intaglio tech- 
niques. Focuses on drawing and design skills and on 
understanding the printmaking craft. 

ART 4134 Color and Design Practice (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Intermediate-level problems in the aesthetic organi- 
zation of color and design elements. Includes expres- 
sive possibilities of color orchestration, color 
harmorues, light as color, and the spatial charac- 
teristics of color. 

ART 4135 Design Foundations and Techniques (Studio)* 

(3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the basic principles of two-dimen- 
sional design. Emphasis on tools and techniques 
used in the design field. Projects in two-dimensional 
visual perception and organization of forms in com- 
position. Students develop their "design sense" while 
beconiing proficient with fundamental board skills. 

ART 4136 Basic Watercolor Painting (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Practice aind creative expression in the technical fun- 
damentals of watercolor. 

ART 4137 Watercolor Painting Practice (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Creative expression in various watercolor 
techniques. Prereq. ART 4136 or 
instructor's permission. 

ART 4138 Techniques of Watercolor Painting (Studio)* 

(3 q.h.) 

Advanced expression in watercolor. Prereq. ART 

4137 or instructor's permission. 

ART 4139 Color Theory and Practice (3 q.h.) 
Exploration of the objective nature and expressive 
possibihties of color. Through classwork and proj- 
ects students examine the m^or theories and laws of 
color, its harmonies and special characteristics as 
well as color psychology, symbolism, and orchestra- 
tion. Students discover their intuition for color and 
develop its appUcation in art and design. 

ART 4140 Graphic Communication and Production (3 q.h.) 
Overview of the design and production processes of 
printed materials. Examines the designer's role in 
concept development and layout and introduces 
reprographics, typesetting, printing and color tech- 
niques, paper, and bindery methods. The scheduling 
and economics of bringing a piece to print are 
also addressed. 



ART 4141 Graphic Design 1 (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to professional problem solving in 
graphic design, including typographic and pictorial 
elements and their integration with verbal content 
to communicate ideas. Emphasis is on the fund- 
amentals of visual thinking, concept development, 
and two-dimensional layout. Students gain experi- 
ence with design from thumbnail sketches to the 
finished mechanical. Prereq. ART 4150 or 
instructor's permission. 

ART 4142 Graphic Design 2 (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Intermediate study and creative work in professional 
problem solving in graphic design, with emphasis on 
creating design concepts. Students explore effective 
problem-solving techniques by taking a variety of 
projects from concept to finished presentation. 
Prereq. ART 4141. 

ART 4143 Advertising Design (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to advertising and to the language and 
design problems commonly met in the field. Study 
and creative work in advertising research analysis, 
layout, and preparation of client presentations. Mar- 
keting fundamentals are also addressed. Prereq. in- 
structor's permission. Prereq. for Advertising 
Certificate students: ART 4115. 

ART 4151 Typography (3 q.h.) 

The evolution of typography and its current applica- 
tions. Emphasizes understanding basic typographic 
terms and techniques, acquiring composition skiUs 
such as copyfitting and type specification, under- 
standing typography as symbol and as written record, 
exploring design concepts through typography, and 
learning the creative potential of new typesetting 
systems. Field trips to view state-of-the-art 
photo-typesetting systems. 

ART 4160 Basic Photography (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Use of the camera, the negative, and the black-and- 
white print for the beginning student. Includes week- 
ly shooting assigriments, demonstrations, and hands- 
on darkroom experience. (Laboratory fee.) 

ART 4162 Photography Workshop (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Through close interaction with the instructor, stu- 
dents refine their technical skills and learn to make 
meaningful decisions about their relation to the 
world through the use of photography. Alternative 
processes such as infrared, toners, and large format 
are demonstrated and used. Frequent slide presenta- 
tions illustrate contemporary trends in photography. 
(Laboratory fee.) Prereq. ART 4160 or equivalent. 

ART 4163 Introduction to Color Photography (Studio)* 

(3 q.h.) 

Introduction to basic color theory and contemporary 
photographic processes and practices. Students 
work with color negative materials and print 
from color slides and negatives. Color printing 
faculties are provided. Lectures and critiques 
when appropriate. (Laboratory fee.) Prereq. ART 
4160 or equivalent. 

'Courses designated "(Studio)" meet for 3-3'/2 hours. 



132 Art and Graphics 



ART 4171 The American Film: From Arcade to Dream Factory 

(3 q.h.) 

Rise of the American film from the early days of ki- 
netoscope peepshows and primitive aircade projec- 
tions through the 1930s and 1940s and the golden age 
of Hollywood. Films representing msgor aesthetic, 
technical, or industry developments through 1946 are 
screened and discussed. Lectures, discussions, and 
assigned readings. 

ART 4172 The American Film: Hollywood Aher Television 

(3 q.h.) 

Development of the American film fi-om the late 
1940s to the present. Examines the threat of televi- 
sion, the breakdown of the studio system, the rise of 
the independents, and the latersd development of the 
maioT studios within entertainment conglomerates. 
Emphasizes recent activity in American films, includ- 
ing the work of Coppola, Lucas, Spielberg, Allen, 
Altman, and others. Key recent films are screened 
and discussed. Lectures, discussions, and 
assigned readings. 

ART 4173 International Directions in Film (3 q.h.) 
Comparative study of international film movements 
since 1950 and their influence on film as an art form. 
Emphasizes key recent films, major directors, and 
writers. Includes Italian Neo-Realism (1940s); Polish 
and Czech postwar films; the French New Wave; the 
personal cinema of FeUini, Bergman, and others; the 
American "whiz kids"; New German Cinema; and 
the Australian school. Lectures, discussions, and 
assigned readings. 

ART 4175 History of Graphic Design (3 q.h.) 
Graphic design from the mid-nineteenth century (the 
Industrial Revolution) to the present, with references 
to earlier influences. Focuses on the evolution of the 
graphic design field, its nature and function, m^or 
periods and trends, and the influence of technology 
and society. Slide lectures and discussion. 

ART 4176 International Directions in Graphic Design (3 q.h.) 
Contemporary theories and practices in international 
graphic design. Focuses on design activities in such 
m^jor industrial nations as Germany, Italy, France, 
England, Canada, Japan, and the United States. Case 
studies reflecting graphic design solutions to a vari- 
ety of visual communication problems are examined. 
Slide lectures and discussion. 

ART 4181 Introduction to Computer-Aided Graphic Design 
(Studio)* (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the terminology, concepts, and appli- 
cations of computer-aided graphic design. Through 
lectures, demonstrations, and labs, students explore 
the range of computer graphics technology from per- 
sonal computers to large-scale, dedicated, turnkey 
systems; input and output devices and their applica- 
tions; the advantages and limitations of computers as 
design tools; and the future impact of computer 
graphics on graphic design and commimication. Lec- 
tures are complemented by hands-on computer ses- 
sions. Guest lecturers and field trips. Limited 
enrollment. (Laboratory fee.) Prereq. ART 4140. 



ART 4182 Computer-Aided Graphic Design Workshop 

(Studio)* (3 q.h.) 

An interdisciplinary course further exploring the cre- 
ative potential of computer graphics applications. 
Students work with input and output devices to be- 
come acquainted with the artistic potential of each 
interface. Limited enrollment. (Laboratory fee.) 
Prereq. ART 4181 or equivalent. 

ART 4183 Electronic Publishing Design (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the creative potential of designing 
within an electronic pubUshing environment. 
Through studio problems, students explore issues of 
content, quality, and aesthetics in the electronic me- 
dium. Readings, lectures, and critiques. (Laboratory 
fee.) Fr^eq. ART 4141 and ART 4181. 

ART 4204 Italian Renaissance Art (3 q.h.) 
Survey of Itahan painting, sculpture, and architecture 
of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, with special 
attention to their historical, cultural, and social con- 
texts. Considers how Renedssance ideals were re- 
flected in the renewed interest in classical harmony 
and order, and in the growing self-awareness, indi- 
vidualism, and naturalism of the time. Covers such 
artists as Giotto, DonateUo, Botticelli, Michelangelo, 
da Vinci, Raphael, and Titian. 

ART 4207 Chinese Painting (3 q.h.) 
Examination of work from the Ch'in and Han dynas- 
ties, the period of the Three Kingdoms, the Tang Dyn- 
asty, the Five Dynasties, the Northern and Southern 
Sung, the Yuan, Ming, and Ch'ing Dynasties, and 
twentieth-century developments. 

ART 4208 Japanese Art (3 q.h.) 

Development of Japanese painting, sculpture, and ar- 
chitecture from its inception through the twentieth 
century. Includes work from the Jamon period, the 
Suiko style, the Tang style (Nara and Early Heian), 
the Shinto Shrines period, the Later Heian period, the 
Kamakura period, the Ashikaga period, and the Mo- 
moyama period as well as the work of more recent 
artists such as Hokusai and Hiroshige. 

ART 4210 French Painting (3 q.h.) 
Development of French painting from the French 
Revolution through the nineteenth century. Exam- 
ines Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impres- 
sionism, and Post-Impressionism, focusing on such 
figures as David, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Degas, 
Monet, Renoir, Cezanne, and Van Gogh. Also exam- 
ines French interest in formal painting problems and 
the painting process as distinct from narrative 
content. 

ART 4213 Modern Pointing (3 q.h.) 
Developments in painting from the late nineteenth 
century through the early 1930s, examining mj^or 
schools, movements, jmd artists from Post-Impres- 
sionism through Surrealism. Focuses on important 
shifts in painting concepts and the rise of innovative 
modes of expression instrumental in establishing the 
foundation of Modernism. 

"Courses designated "(Studio)" meet for 3-3'/2 hours. 



Art and Graphics 133 



ART 4214 Contemporary Painting (3 q.h.) 
Developments in painting from the early 1940s to the 
present, including magor schools, movements, and 
artists. Focuses on the cultural impact of the exodus 
of artists from Europe to the United States prior to 
World War H, the meteoric rise of Abstract Expres- 
sionism, and the diversity of movements since World 
War n, such as Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, 
and New Realism. 

ART 4217 Latin American Art (3 q.h.) 
Development of architecture, sculpture, painting, and 
the decorative arts in Latin America from the Pre-Co- 
Ivmibian period to the present. Includes the classic 
Maya and Toltec Maya of Central America and Mexi- 
co; the Aztecs of Mexico; the Mochica, Masca, Tia- 
huanaco, Chimu, and Incas of South America; and 
the rise of national artistic directions in modem 
Latin America. 

ART 4219 American Indian Art (3 q.h.) 
American Indian architecture, painting, sculpture, 
and the minor arts and crafts from Pre-Columbian 
cultures to the present. Includes the arts of 
Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, the Plains, 
the Northwest Coast, and the Eastern United States. 

ART 4220 American Painting and Sculpture (3 q.h.) 
American painting and sculpture from colorual times 
through the early 1930s. Includes the study of paint- 
ing from itinerant colonial "limners" through Copley, 
Bergamin West, and the Enghsh tradition; the Hud- 
son River School; Eakins, Hopper, Marin, Stella, and 
O'Keeffe; and the founding of American Modernist 
painting. Also examines sculpture from colorual 
gravestone reliefs through Rush, Augur, and the pub- 
lic monuments of FYench, Saint-Gaudens, and Calder. 

ART 4221 Women in Art and Women Artists (3 q.h.) 
Women in the arts from prehistoric times to the pre- 
sent. Focuses on women as symbols, religious fig- 
ures, and erotic objects, and on idealized images of 
femininity. Examples include fertility images, Venus 
images. Madonnas, portraits, and geru-e works. Also 
examines the historical role of women as artists. 

ART 4223 American Architecture (3 q.h.) 
American architecture from the colonial period 
through the early 1930s. Includes the seventeenth- 
century Early American style, the eighteenth-century 
Georgian style, the Republican style, mid-nineteenth- 
century Revival styles, the Stick-and-Shingle styles, 
Richardsoniarusm, Sullivan and the rise of the sky- 
scraper, and Frank Lloyd Wright. 

ART 4228 Twentieth-Century Architecture (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to European and American architecture 
of the twentieth century. Examines Gropius's Bau- 
haus tenets concerrung housing, urban planning, and 
utilitarian mass production; Mies van der Rohe, Le 
Corbusier, and the International style; Frank Lloyd 
Wright; and the foundation of American architectural 
Modernism as exemplified by Neufra, Johnson, 
Saarinen, and Buckminster Fuller. 

'Courses designated "(Studio)" meet for 3-3'/2 hours. 



ART 4230 History of Photography (3 q.h.) 
Developments in photography from the early da- 
guerreotypes to the present. Includes mzyor move- 
ments, styles, artists, and significant technological 
developments. Slide lectures and assigned readings. 

ART 4231 Contemporary Photography (3 q.h.) 
Evolution of styles and techniques in contemporary 
photography since World War II. Emphasis is on the 
variety of image-making techniques and photograph- 
ic styles and concepts of the last twenty years. Slide 
lectures and assigned readings. 

ART 4251 Advanced Graphic Design (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Portfolio-development course for students who have 
successfully completed all other Graphic Design and 
Visual Conununication certificate program require- 
ments. Emphasis is on professional design skills and 
personal style. Prereq. 27 quarter hours of graphic 
certificate courses. 

ART 4311 New York Art Seminar (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the painting collections in the Mefro- 
politan Museum of Art, Frick Collection, Museum of 
Modern Art, and the Guggeriheim Museum. 

ART 4366 Promotional and Technical Publications: Design 
and Production (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Design, production, and economics of promotional 
and technical publications. Using a case-study ap- 
proach with a nvicro-based computer system, stu- 
dents explore design and production of marketing, 
advertising, and sales-support publications as well as 
techiucal service matnuals, operating guides, and oth- 
er documentation. Prereq. ART 4150. Not open to 
students who have taken ART 4364 or ART 4365. 

ART 4367 Illustration (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to promotional and editorial illustration, 
including applications in advertising and publishing. 
Covers the objectives, tools, and techniques unique 
to illustration. Lectures, demonstrations, and hands- 
on studio projects. 

ART 4368 Graphic Design for Media (3 q.h.) 
Surveys the expanding use of slide-tape, multi-image, 
and multimedia video and film in areas ranging from 
public relations and sales to documentary and enter- 
tainment presentations. Exploration of the collabora- 
tive role of writers, producers, and art directors in 
the design and production of media projects, particu- 
larly audiovisual projects. 

ART 4402 Marketing Strategies for Printing and Publishing 

(3 q.h.) 

Topics include the integrated nature of marketing; 
the relationship of marketing to product develop- 
ment; advertising, promotion, and sales; the creation 
of marketing support materials; and the development 
of an overall marketing plan and timeline. 

ART 4410 Electronic Imaging Systems (3 q.h.) 
An introduction to current black-and-white and color 
image scanning, processing, and separation technol- 
ogy for page and film assembly. Includes concepts, 
terminology, and techniques of manipulating, merg- 
ing, and creating graphics elecfronically. 



134 Art and Graphics 



ART 4415 Electronic Document Production (3 q.h.) 
Current principles and methods of electronic pub- 
lishing and document production. Presents text in- 
putting, markup, and editing during the review cycle, 
selection of style prior to input/composition, tagging, 
development of page layouts, graphics development, 
integration, and manipulation. 

ART 4416 Style Setup for Electronic Document Production 
(Studio)* (3 q.h.) 

Style specifications for electronic document produc- 
tion. Presents format definitions; pagination, hyphen- 
ation, and justification specification; page layout 
definition; and use of interactive layout tools. Prereq. 
ART 4415. 

ART 4421 Methods of Book Design (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
The basic terminology, tools, and skills of book de- 
sign. Students practice drawing layouts, casting off 
manuscript, specifying type, and dummying pages. 
Prereq. ART 4141. 

ART 4431 Graphic Composition Systems 1 (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Current principles and methods of photocomposition 
as compared to desktop pubUshing systems. Covers 
all aspects of the composition process, including 
markup, copyfitting, parameter setup, input, correct- 
ing, and output. A variety of popular software includ- 
ing Pagemaker, Ready-Set-Go, Ventura Publisher, 
and Deskset Design Edition II is translated and out- 
put on laser and photocomposition systems. 

ART 4432 Graphic Composition Systems 2 (Studio)* (3 q.h.) 
Emphasis is on computer mainframe interfacing, ACI 
operation and telecommunications, networking, de- 
veloping translation tables, word processing/data 
conversion, automatic tabulation, and pagination. 
Frereq. ART 4431. 

ART 4443 Imaging Procedures and Systems 1 (Studio)* 

(3 q.h.) 

Methods and operations involved in producing film 
negatives and assembled flats. Students have the op- 
portunity to create line and halftone negatives. Also 
covered are contacting, darkroom, and film assembly 
procedures; signature imposition, halftone, and com- 
bination flat techniques; and reflection transmission 
densitometry. 

ART 4444 Imaging Procedures and Systems 2 (Studio)* 

(3 q.h.) 

The creation of black-and-white and color mechani- 
cal separation masks by conventional contacting 
methods. Includes planning and preparing separation 
masks for "fake" color, selecting screen tint values, 
and making and correcting color proofs; creating 
special effects with posterization, making duotones, 
and process color-flJm assembly. Prereq. ART 4443. 

ART 4461 Applications of Electronic Publishing (3 q.h.) 
Examination of how electronic and desktop pubUsh- 
ing technology applies to pubUshing, typesetting, and 
printing. Topics include a review of electronic pub- 
lishing fundamentals, state-of-the-art systems, and 



trends in graphic arts technology, with sessions de- 
voted to book pubUshing; magazine pubUshing; pre- 
press and type house applications; commercial, 
corporate, or in-plant publishing; newspaper pubUsh- 
ing; and government and small business appUcations. 
Also covers organization structure, business issues, 
product, and in-depth analysis of production/work- 
flow procedures and cost justification criteria. 

ART 4465 Business Operations for the Graphic Arts (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to operations management specificaUy 
designed for the graphics industry. Basic business 
concerns of accounting, finance, budgeting, market- 
ing, planning, communications, personnel, motiva- 
tion, and leadership. 

ART 4466 Establishing and Operating a Small Graphics 
Business (3 q.h.) 

The positioning process used to determine the prop- 
er market for the service or product. Students ex- 
plore how positioning and market research affect 
image, pubUc relations materials, advertismg, pricing, 
and actual production methods for a given graphics 
business. Topics covered include estabUshing hourly 
rates, record keeping, job quoting, billing procedures, 
sales techniques, and state and federal tax require- 
ments for small businesses. 

ART 4468 Safety and Health Issues for the Graphic Arts 

(3 q.h.) 

A thorough exjimination of potential hazards includ- 
ing fire, electricity, sound, chemicals, and toxic 
fumes. Study of the rules and regulations of OSHA, 
the role of safety committees in complying with 
OSHA requirements, and the effect these require- 
ments have on various business operations within 
the company. Additional information is provided on 
ergonomics, job stress, and employer-employee 
rights and responsibiUties. 

ART 4469 Operations Analysis for the Graphic Arts Industry 

(3 q.h.) 

The principles and practices of work simplification 
as they apply to the graphic arts industry. Topics 
include process analysis, operations analysis, 
motion and micromotion study, plant and workplace 
layout, equipment design and selection, labor cost re- 
duction, operator training, human relations prob- 
lems, time study and time standards, and techniques 
for improving productivity. 

ART 4471 Quality Control in the Graphic Arts Industry 

(3 q.h.) 

Basic concepts and costs of quaUty; organization for 
quaUty; programs for improving quaUty and reducing 
waste and spoilage; materials processes; and quaUty 
control related to printing and pubUshing. Basic sta- 
tistical quaUty-control concepts such as process ca- 
pabiUty and analysis, control charts, and sampling. 



'Courses designated "(Studio)" meet for 3-3'/2 hours. 



Art and Graphics — American Sign Language 135 



ART 4474 Research and Technology Evaluation for Electronic 
Publishing and Printing (3 q.h.) 

Developing and conducting needs assessment tools 
to identify appropriate electronic publishing technol- 
ogy. Topics include a description of various electron- 
ic publishing businesses; current and future staffing 
and training needs; current and future control forms; 
current design standards; determining productivity 
levels; and matching vendor functions and features 
to the needs of the organization. 

ART 4475 Graphic Arts Production Control (3 q.h.) 
The techniques of managing production in commer- 
cial printing and publishing plants. Specialization 
versus standardization; production forecasting and 
control; routing and planning; records of production; 
quality control; and effective use of personnel. Var- 
ious production management controls of web- and 
sheet-fed, commercial, aind publication printing are 
presented, analyzed, and discussed. 

ART 4479 Estimating Procedures for the Graphic Arts (3 q.h.) 
Basic estimation procedures and principles for sin- 
gle- and multicolor printing. All facets of planning the 
job for estimating design and layout, typography, pa- 
per, prep and plates, presswork, binding, and finish- 
ing. Students participate in solving practical 
estimation problems. 

ART 4500 Senior Project (3 q.h.) 

Seruors choose a final major project to demonstrate 
professional proficiency and originality in a specific 
area of design. Finished projects are reviewed by a 
board of design faculty with the student present to 
discuss and defend the effectiveness and merit of 
the project. 

ART 4501 Portfolio Development (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for students to select jind refine their 
best design pieces and create a unified, professional 
portfolio. Concentration is on materials and options 
available for showing two- and three-dimensional 
works in one-to-one and group situations. Attention 
is also given to the design resume and to interview 
and presentation skills. 

ART 4800 Directed Study 1 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for qualified students to take an upper- 
level required course when the needed course is not 
available in an every-other-year cycle. Petitions and 
procedural instnactions are available in the Liberzil 
Arts Program office. Allow at least six weeks to com- 
plete the petition process. Prereq. 87 quarter hours. 

ART 4801 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 

Opportunity to initiate a second individual study as 

described in ART 4800. Prereq. ART 4800. 

ART 4810 Honors Program 1 (4 q.h.) 
Independent work in a selected area under the direc- 
tion of members of the department. Prereq. Program 
Director's approval. 

ART 481 1 Honors Program 2 (4 q.h.) 
Second opportunity to do independent work as de- 
scribed in ART 4810. Prereq. ART 4810 and Program 
Director's approval. 



ART 4812 Honors Program 3 (4 q.h.) 
Additional opportunity to do independent work as 
described in ART 4810. Prereq. ART 4811 and Pro- 
gram Director's approval. 

American Sign Language 

ASL 4101 American Sign Language 1 (4 q.h.) 
Introduction to American Sign Language, used by 
members of the deaf community in the United States 
and parts of Canada. Focuses on conversation in 
signs, basic rules of grammau", and cultural aspects of 
the deaf community. 

ASL 4102 American Sign Language 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of basic American Sign Language and 
culture study, with emphasis on building receptive 
cind expressive sign vocabulary; use of signing space; 
use of nonmanual components, including facial ex- 
pressions and body postures; and an introduction to 
finger spelling. Prereq. ASL 4101 or by examination. 

ASL 4201 Intermediate American Sign Language 1 (4 q.h.) 
Further development of receptive and expressive 
skiUs, finger spelling, vocabulary building, and gram- 
matical structures. Encourages more creative use 
of expression, classifiers, body postures, and the 
signing space. Introduces sign variations (regional 
and ethnic), and political and educational institu- 
tions of the deaf community. Prereq. ASL 4102 or 
by examination. 

ASL 4202 Intermediate American Sign Language 2 (4 q.h.) 
Intensive practice involving expressive and receptive 
skills in storytelling and dialogue. Introduces liin- 
guage forms found in ASL poetry and cultural fea- 
tures as they are displayed in art and theatre. Prereq. 
ASL 4201. 

ASL 4301 Advonced American Sign Language Proficiency 1 

(4 q.h.) 

Vocabulary building and mastery of grammar 
through rigorous receptive and expressive language 
activities. Includes student-led discussions, debates, 
and prepared reports on topics in deaf culture, soci- 
ety, and current affairs. Prereq. ASL 4202. 

ASL 4302 Advanced American Sign Language Proficiency 2 

(4 q.h.) 

Continuation of ASL 4301. Prereq. ASL 4301. 

ASL 4410 Linguistics of American Sign Language (3 q.h.) 
For skilled ASL signers with no previous training in 
linguistics. Conducted in ASL, the course is descrip- 
tive and data-oriented rather than theoretical. In- 
cludes the parts of a sign; building words in ASL; 
sentence structure (questions, statements, relative 
clauses, etc.); the meaning and issue of iconicity; or- 
gainization of sentences according to old and new in- 
formation; and the structure of stories. Also, 
grammatical features of ASL, such as classifiers, 
specifiers, verb modulations and aspects, and the 
role of facial expression. Not open to students who 
have taken ASL 4404. 



136 American Sign Language — Biology 



ASL44n Deaf History (3 q.h.) 

The history of deaf people in the Western world, with 
emphasis on the American deaf community, its lan- 
guage, education, and relation to hearing society. Not 
open to students who have taken ASL 4403. Prereq. 
ASL 4101 or instructor's permission. 

ASL 4412 American Deaf Culture (3 q.h.) 
The status of deaf people as both a linguistic and cul- 
tural minority group. Designed for individuals who 
may or may not have had prior experience with deaf 
people, the course raises questions concerning the 
nature of sign language and its varieties, the educa- 
tion of deaf people, the historical treatment of deaf- 
ness, the sociological and cultural makeup of deaf 
individuals, and the nature of ASL literature and po- 
etry. Not open to students who have taken ASL 4402. 

ASL 4413 American Sign Longuage Literature (3 q.h.) 
Students read and discuss in ASL various genres of 
American Sign Language literature. Concentration 
is on the work of current recognized narrators in 
both literary and face-to-face storytelling tradi- 
tions. Includes selected autobiographical sketches, 
lectures, stories, and letters from the early 1900s 
by such figures as Clerc, Veditz, Hotchkiss, Gallau- 
det, and others. A videotaped research essay is 
required at the end of the course. Not open to stu- 
dents who have taken ASL 4401. Prereq. ASL 4202 
or by examination. 

ASL 4600 introduction to Interpreting (formerly ASL 4501 
Sign Language Interpreting 1) (3 q.h.) 
An overview of the interpreting profession, including 
the responsibUities, ethics, and aptitudes of inter- 
preters; professional associations; the law and busi- 
ness of interpreting; the bicultural, bilingual context 
in which interpreting takes place; basic translation 
and interpretation; environment and audience; spe- 
cial populations; freelance versus in-house positions; 
and evaluation and certification. Prereq. ASL 4202 or 
instructor's permission. 

ASL 4601 American Sign Language Interpreting 1 (4 q.h.) 
Translations dealing with a variety of styles and reg- 
isters, study of the interpreting process, discourse 
analysis, and consecutive interpreting. Prereq. ASL 
4410; ASL 4302 and ASL 4600 may be taken 
concurrently. 

ASL 4602 American Sign Language Interpreting 2 (4 q.h.) 
Breakdown of the simultaneous interpretation task 
into several phases. Emphasizes divided attention, 
paraphrasing, cloze skills, and flexibility in English 
and ASL. Prereq. ASL 4601. 

ASL 4603 American Sign Language Interpreting 3 (4 q.h.) 
Refinement of skills learned in ASL 4601 and 
ASL 4602. Prereq. ASL 4602. 

ASL 4604 Special Topics in Interpreting 1 (3 q.h.) 
Topics concerning interpretation for special deaf 
populations, including the oral, deaf-blind, and emo- 
tionally and multiply handicapped. Covers theory and 
practice. Prereq. ASL 4601. 



ASL 4605 Special Topics in Interpreting 2 (3 q.h.) 
Topics in interpretation in specific situations, includ- 
ing educational, legal, psychiatric, and medical. Em- 
phasizes work with the intermediary interpreter. 
Prereq. ASL 4601. 

ASL 4606 Interpreter Roles and Ethics (3 q.h.) 
Discussions, hypothetical situations, and role playing 
that explore ethical standards and dilemmas in sign 
language interpreting and in other professions. Also, 
culturally objective standards, ethics, and profession- 
al principles; power versus responsibility; and the 
RID Code of Ethics. Prereq. ASL 4601 and ASL 
4412, which may be taken concurrently. 

ASL 4607 Interpreting Lab (4 q.h.) 
Practice in simultaneous interpreting skills, with con- 
structive feedback. Prereq. ASL 4603. 

ASL 4608 Practicum (4 q.h.) 

Practical interpreting experience in agencies serving 
deaf people. Biweekly seminar focuses on linguistic 
and ethical questions and dilemmas. Requires six 
hours per week of work in an agency. Prereq. ASL 
4603, ASL 4604, ASL 4605, ASL 4606, and 
ASL 4607. 

ASL 4800 American Sign Language Interpreting Seminar 

(formerly ASL 4507-ASL 4510 American Sign Lan- 
guage Interpreting Seminars) (1 q.h.) 
Short-term training opportimities for currently prac- 
ticing sign language interpreters, scheduled for two 
Saturdays each fall, winter, and spring quarter. Be- 
cause the topics or skill areas addressed change from 
quarter to quarter, students may take this course re- 
peatedly for credit. Limited enrollment. For topic in- 
formation, call American Sign Language Programs, 
617437-3064 (voice) or 617-437-3067 (TTY). 

Biology 

BIO 4103 Biology 1 (General) (3 cL, 3 lab., 4 qii.) 
Biology of the cell, including its ultrastructure, func- 
tion, diversity, genetics, and reproduction. Also ex- 
amines the molecular composition of cells, including 
enzymes, chemistry, bioenergetics, respiration, and 
photosynthesis. (Laboratory fee.) To receive credit 
for this course, you must also register for BIO 4153, 
Lab for BIO 4103. 

BIO 4104 Biology 2 (Animol) (3 cl., 3 lab., 4 q.h.) 
Systematic comparative study of the diversity of ani- 
mal life forms, including structure, function, environ- 
ment, and evolution. (Laboratory fee.) To receive 
credit for this course, you must also register for 
BIO 4154, Lab for BIO 4104. Prereq. BIO 4103 
or equivalent. 

BIO 4105 Biology 3 (Animal) (3 cl., 3 lab., 4 q.h.) 
Functional anatomy of animal organ systems, includ- 
ing locomotion, nutrition, internal transport, gas ex- 
change, molecular regulation, defense systems, 
nervous and hormonal control, and sensory recep- 
tion. Also covers ecology, population dynamics, and 
the origin of life. (Laboratory fee.) To receive credit 
for this course, you must also register for BIO 4155, 
Lab for BIO 4105. Prereq. BIO 4104 or equivalent 



Biology 137 



BIO 4175 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 

(2 cl., 2 lab., 3 q.h.) 

Introduction to human gross anatomy, including os- 
teology, myology, and angiology of the thorax, abdo- 
men, pelvis, head, and neck. The laboratory generally 
includes a study of human bones and cat dissection. 
(Laboratory fee.) The required laboratory is BIO 
4195, Lab for BIO 4175. 

BIO 4176 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2 

(2 cl., 2 lab., 3 q.h.) 

Anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, en- 
docrine glands, senses, respiratory system, and mem- 
branes. The laboratory generally includes gross and 
microscopic anatomy of the nervous and endocrine 
systems, and physiology of the nerves, muscles, vi- 
sion, hearing, and respiratory system. (Laboratory 
fee.) The required laboratory is BIO 4196, Lab for 
BIO 4176. 

BIO 4177 Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 

(2 cl., 2 lab., 3 q.h.) 

Anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular, diges- 
tive, urinary, and reproductive systems; and fetal de- 
velopment. The laboratory generally deals with the 
microscopic anatomy of these systems and the physi- 
ology of the blood, heart, and urinary tract. (Labora- 
tory fee.) The required laboratory is BIO 4197, Lab 
for BIO 4177. Prereq. BIO 4176 or equivalent. 

BIO 4185 The Natural World of Massachusetts 1 

(3 cl., 3 q.h.) 

Ecological analysis of the human situation and hu- 
man interaction with other orgarusms; the necessary 
foundation of biological principles. 

BIO 4186 The Natural World of Massachusetts 2 

(3 cl., 3 q.h.) 

Continuation of BIO 4185. Prereq. BIO 4185 or 

equivalent. 

BIO 4190 Microbiology 1 (2 cl., 3 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Survey of morphology and biochemistry of 
bacteria. (Laboratory fee.) The required laboratory 
is BIO 4200, Lab for BIO 4190. Prereq. BIO 4105 
or equivalent. 

BIO 4191 Microbiology 2 (2 cl., 3 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Survey of pathogenic microorgarusms. (Laboratory 
fee.) The required laboratory is BIO 4201, Lab for 
BIO 4191. Prereq. BIO 4190 or equivalent. 

BIO 4192 Microbiology 3 (2 cl., 3 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Examination of the characteristics and role of micro- 
organisms in the environment. (Laboratory fee.) The 
required laboratory is BIO 4202, Lab for BIO 4192. 
Prereq. BIO 4191 or equivalent. 

BIO 4224 Ecology 1 (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
Environmental factors, such as the soil system, wa- 
ter, the atmosphere, temperature, light, wind, and 
pressure; physico-chemical factors such as carbon 
dioxide, nitrogen, and mineral nutrients; the habitat; 
and the distribution of plants and animals in the 
world according to temperature and precipitation. 
Prereq. BIO 4104 or equivalent. 



BIO 4225 Ecology 2 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Study of the ecosystem; ecological ruches; producers, 
consumers, and decomposers; the pond, desert, for- 
est, and seashore ecosystems; energy cycle and effi- 
ciency of energy utilization; mass, weight, and energy 
pyramids. Prereq. BIO 4224 or equivalent. 

BIO 4226 Ecology 3 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Study of population ecology, biotic communities and 
population growth, relations between the species, 
symbiosis, competition, predation, and succession. 
Prereq. BIO 4225 or equivalent. 

BIO 4235 Genetics 1 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Topics include nucleic acid structure, replication of 
genetic materials, mitosis, meiosis, and Mendelian in- 
heritance. Prereq. BIO 4103. 

BIO 4236 Genetics 2 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Examination of mutation, regulation of gene expres- 
sion, population genetics, engineering, and genetics 
of bacteria and viruses. Prereq. BIO 4235. 

BIO 4237 Genetics Laboratory (4 lab., 2 q.h.) 
Laboratory exercises involving principles of Mende- 
Uan inheritance, linkage, and crossing-over. Classical 
genetics utilizing Drosophila; biochemical studies 
utilizing Neurospora and E. coli. (Laboratory fee.) 
Prereq. BIO 4236 or equivalent. 

BIO 4246 Cell Biology 1 (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
Chemical composition, structure of ceUs and organ- 
elles, transport processes, cell motion and excitabil- 
ity, and growth. Prereq. BIO 4103, BIO 4236, and 
CHM 4263 or equivalent. 

BIO 4247 Cell Biology 2 (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
Examination of cellular energy supply, enzyme func- 
tion, respiration and metabolism, photosynthesis and 
other synthetic pathways, and control of cellular pro- 
cesses. Prereq. BIO 4246 or equivalent. 

BIO 4248 Cell Biology Laboratory (4 lab., 2 q.h.) 
Laboratory techniques in cell biology, microscopy, 
structure and chemical composition of ceUs, enzyme 
measurements, photosynthesis, respiration, active 
transport, and growth. (Laboratory fee.) Prereq. 
BIO 4247 or equivalent. 

BIO 4258 Advanced Human Physiology 1 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Study of human physiology emphasizing cellular pro- 
cesses and underlying organ functions and the inter- 
actions and control of organ systems. Selected 
physiological topics are corisidered as time allows. 
Prereq. BIO 4177 and CHM 4113 or equivalent. 

BIO 4259 Advanced Human Physiology 2 (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
Continuation of BIO 4258. Prereq. BIO 4258. 

BIO 4320 Medical Microbiology (2 cl, 4 lab., 4 q.h.) 
Study of m^or characteristics of disease-producing 
organisms. (Laboratory fee.) The required laboratory 
is BIO 4330, Lab for BIO 4320, which generaUy 
meets on a different night. Prereq. BIO 4192 or pro- 
fessional laboratory experience in bacteriology. 



13B Biology — Chemistry 



BIO 4374 Histology 1 (2 cL, 2 lab, 3 q.h.) 
Examination of cell structure and tissue organiza- 
tion, including epithelium, muscle, and corrective tis- 
sue. Also covers cartilage, bone, and nervous system. 
(Laboratory fee.) The required laboratory is BIO 
4384, Lab for BIO 4374. 

BK) 4375 Histology 2 (2 cl., 2 lab, 3 q.h.) 
Examination of the blood, skin, cardiovascular and 
lymphatic systems, as well as the gastrointestinal 
system, including the oral cavity, GI tract, liver, and 
gall bladder. (Laboratory fee.) The required Uiborato- 
ry is BIO 4385, Lab for BIO 4375. 

BIO 4376 Histology 3 (2 cl., 2 lab, 3 q.h.) 
Examination of the respiratory, urinary, and male 
and female reproductive systems, as well as the en- 
docrine glands and the eyes and ears. (Laboratory 
fee.) The required laboratory is BIO 4386, Lab for 
BIO 4376. 

BK) 4441 Parasitology (2.5 cl., 3.25 lab, 4 q.h.) 
Parasitic organisms, particularly those affecting hu- 
mans and domestic animals, and their life cycles, 
modes of transniission, and diagnosis and treatment. 
Includes microscopic exaimination of prepared and 
live material. (Laboratory fee.) The required labora- 
tory is BIO 4451, Lab for BIO 4441. Prereq. 
BIO 4103 or instructor's permission. 

BIO 4461 Immunology (2 cl., 4 lab., 4 q.h.) 
Biological, chemical, and physical attributes of anti- 
gens and antibodies, together with their serological 
interactions. (Laboratory fee.) The required labora- 
tory is BIO 4462, Lab for BIO 4461, which generally 
meets on a different night. Prereq. BIO 4192, 
CHM 4263, or equivalent. 

BIO 4801 Independent Study in Biology (4 q.h.) 
Students focus on an area of special interest and rel- 
evance to their professional goals. Each student is 
paired with a faculty preceptor, who monitors and 
evaluates the completed project. Arrangements must 
be made with the Program Director prior to register- 
ing for the course; caU 617-437-2818 for details. 

BIO 4802 Independent Study in Biology (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of BIO 4801. 

Business Law 

BL 4101 Low 1 (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the legal system. Study of the nature, 
formation, and essential elements of contracts, in- 
cluding performance and remedies for breach. Also 
covers agency law, including the rights and duties of 
principal and agent, the scope of authority, and rela- 
tionships to third persons. 

BL 4102 Law 2 (3 q.h.) 

Sales as governed by the Uniform Commercial Code, 
including the law of warranty, business organiza- 
tions, partnerships, corporations, and other impor- 
tant business forms. Prereq. BL 4101. 



BL 4103 Law 3 (3 q.h.) 

Commercial paper, the function of negotiability, bank 
checks and promissory notes, real property, personal 
property, bailments, bankruptcy, and secured trans- 
actions. Prereq. BL 4102. 

BL 4105 Law (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as BL 4101 and BL 4102. 

BL 4115 Law and Social Issues (3 q.h.) 
Structure and dynamics of the American legal system 
through analysis of selected cases dealing with 
social issues. 

BL 4120 Low for Personal Planning (3 q.h.) 
Legal aspects of personal and family planning, in- 
cluding consumer rights, wills and estate planning, 
marital law, real estate purchase, tenants' rights, and 
other selected topics of interest. 

Chemistry 

CHM 4105 Chemistry and the Environment (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Fundamental chemical principles, using examples 
from the geochemical and internal environments 
of human beings as well as the home, farm, 
and workplace. 

CHM 4110 Chemistry Workshop (3 cl., q.h.) 
Discussion and problem-solving session to reinforce 
and reexamine material covered in CHM 4111, 
CHM 4112, and CHM 4113. Classes are smaU and in- 
formal, and content is programmed according to 
students' needs. 

CHM 4111 General Chemistry 1 (2 cl, 2.4 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Fundamental chemistry concepts, such as symbols, 
formulas, equations, atomic weights, and calculations 
based on equations. Also covers gases, liquids, solu- 
tions, and ionization. (Laboratory fee.) The required 
laboratory is CHM 41 17, Lab for CHM 4111. Prereq. 
MTH 4112 or equivalent (can be taken 
concurrently). 

CHM 4112 General Chemistry 2 (2 cl, 2.4 lab., 3 qJi.) 
Atomic structure, bonding, molecular structure, oxi- 
dation and reduction reactions, and equilibrium and 
kinetics. (Laboratory fee.) The required laboratory is 
CHM 4118, Lab for CHM 4112. Prereq. CHM 4111 
or equivalent. 

CHM 4113 General Chemistry 3 (2 cl, 2.4 lab., 3 qJi.) 
Thermochemistry and electrochemistry, acids, bases, 
and solubility products, nuclear chemistry, introduc- 
tory organic chemistry, and biochemistry. (Laborato- 
ry fee.) The required laboratory is CHM 4119, Lab 
for CHM 4113. Prereq. CHM 4112 or equivalent 

CHM 4221 Analytical Chemistry 1 (2 cl, 2.4 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Principles of gravimetric and titametric analysis (wet 
chemistry). Introduces statistics as applied to analyt- 
ical chemistry and examines such topics as chemical 
equilibrium and acid-base equilibria in simple and 
complex systems. Gravimetric and titametric experi- 
ments are performed. (Laboratory fee.) The required 
laboratory is CHM 4227, Lab for CHM 4221. Prereq. 
CHM 4113 or equivalent 



Chemistry 139 



CHM 4222 Analytical Chemistry 2 (2 cl., 2.4 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Continuation of CHM 4221. Covers complex forma- 
tion titration, precipitation titrations, and oxidation- 
reduction titrations. Electrical methods of analysis, 
such as potentiometry, electrolysis, couloinetry, and 
polarography are discussed and titametric analyses 
and experiments involving electricity are performed. 
(Laboratory fee.) The required laboratory is CHM 
4228, Lab for CHM 4222. Prereq. CHM 4221 
or equivalent. 

CHM 4223 Analytical Chemistiy 3 (2 cl., 2.4 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Spectrophotometry as a method of analysis, includ- 
ing ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and fluorescence 
methods; flame emission; and atonuc absorption. 
Studies solvent extractions and chromatographic 
methods of separation, such as gas-liquid chromatog- 
raphy and liquid chromatography. (Laboratory fee.) 
The required laboratory is CHM 4229, Lab for CHM 
4223. Prereq. CHM 4222 or equivalent. 

CHM 4224 Analytical Chemistry (Lectures and lab., 4 q.h., 
summer quarter only) 

Principles and theories of volumetric, gravimetric, 
and instrumental analysis. Application made in the 
laboratory with analyses of unknown samples. (Labo- 
ratory fee.) The required laboratory is CHM 4226, 
Lab for CHM 4224. Prereq. CHM 4113 or equivalent. 

CHM 4261 Organic Chemistry 1 (2 cl., 4 lab. and 
discussion, 4 q.h.) 

Nature of carbon in organic compounds. General 
principles of structure, nomenclature, preparation, 
uses, and reactions of aliphatic hydrocarbons: al- 
kanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes, cycloalkanes. Posi- 
tion and geometric isomerism. Introduces free 
radical and ionic mechanisms of reactions. The labo- 
ratory generailly deals with the preparation and prop- 
erties of compounds discussed in the lecture. 
(Laboratory fee.) The required laboratory is CHM 
4267, Lab for CHM 4261. Prereq. CHM 4113 or 
equivalent. 

CHM 4262 Organic Chemistry 2 (2 cl., 4 lab. and 
discussion, 4 q.h.) 

Structure of benzene, electrophilic aromatic substitu- 
tion reactions. General principles of structure, no- 
menclature, preparation, uses, and reactions of the 
various types of orgaruc compounds, including alco- 
hols, alkyl and aryl halides, ethers and epoxides, and 
carboxylic acids. Also covers optical isomerism and 
introductory chemical kinetics. The laboratory gen- 
erally deals with the preparation and properties of 
compoimds discussed. (Laboratory fee.) The re- 
quired laboratory is CHM 4268, Lab for CHM 4262. 
Prereq. CHM 4261 or equivalent. 

CHM 4263 Organic Chemistry 3 (2 cl, 4 lab. and 
discussion, 4 q.h.) 

Continuation of CHM 4262. Emphasizes the applica- 
tion of chemical conversions to synthetic problems. 
Includes functional derivatives of carboxylic acids. 



sulfonic acids and their derivatives, amines, diazoni- 
um compounds, phenols, aldehydes, and ketones. 
The laboratory generally dejils with the preparation 
and properties of compounds discussed. (Laboratory 
fee.) The required laboratory is CHM 4269, Lab for 
CHM 4263. Prereq. CHM 4262 or equivalent. 

CHM 4321 Instrumental Analysis 1 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Basic theory of electrochemistry and electrochemi- 
cal methods of analysis, including electrode and cell 
potentials, potentiometric titrations, direct potenti- 
ometry (pH meters and specific ion electrodes), 
coulometry, voltametry, polarography, electrogra- 
vimetry, and conductometric methods. Prereq. 
CHM 4223 or equivalent. (This course may serve 
as preparation for certain graduate courses.) 

CHM 4322 Instrumental Analysis 2 (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
Basic theory of absorption and emission spectros- 
copy, including ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy, 
molecular fluorescence and phosphorescence, atom- 
ic absorption spectroscopy (flame, arc, spark, and 
plasma), and infrared and X-ray spectroscopy. 
Prereq. CHM 4321 or equivalent. (This course may 
serve as preparation for certain graduate courses.) 

CHM 4323 Radiochemistry (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
Basics of radioisotopes, including basic physics; the 
atomic nucleus; properties and production of radio- 
isotopes; properties of nuclear radiation; dose calcu- 
lations; ionization chambers; proportional, Geiger- 
MuUer, and crystal and liquid scintillation counters; 
and the statistics involved in counting radiation. 
Prereq. CHM 4322 or equivalent. 

CHM 4371 Biochemistry 1 (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
Cellular organization, pH buffers, and the biochemis- 
try of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, and vitamins. 
Prereq. CHM 4263 or equivalent. 

CHM 4372 Biochemistry 2 (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
Biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic 
acids; bioenergetics; and the metabolism of carbohy- 
drates. Prereq. CHM 4371 or equivalent. 

CHM 4373 Biochemistry 3 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Metabolism of lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides 
and the biosynthesis of proteins, DNA, and RNA. 
Prereq. CHM 4372 or equivalent. 

CHM 4381 Physical Chemistry 1 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, First and Sec- 
ond Laws, entropy, and free energy in spontaneous 
processes. Prereq. CHM 4113 or equivalent 

CHM 4382 Physical Chemistry 2 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Chemical equilibria, acids and bases, electrochemis- 
try, coUigative properties, phase diagrams, thermody- 
namics of multicomponent systems, and kinetic 
molecular theory. Prereq. CHM 4381 or equivalent 

CHM 4383 Physical Chemistry 3 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Kinetics, quantum chemistry, and photochemistry. 
Prereq. CHM 4382 or equivalent 



140 Chemistry — Criminal Justice and Security 



CHM 4801 Independent Study in Chemistry (3 q.h.) 
Chemical-biological technology students focus on 
areas of special interest and relevance to their pro- 
fessional goals. Each student is paired with a faculty 
preceptor, who monitors and evaluates the complet- 
ed project. Arrangements must be made with the 
Program Director prior to developing the project or 
registering for the course; call 617-437-2818 
for details. 

Criminal Justice and Security 
CJ 4101 Administration of Criminal Justice (3 q.h.) 
Survey of the contemporary criminal justice system 
from initial contact with the offender through pros- 
ecution, disposition, incarceration, and release. Em- 
phasis on m^or systems of social control: police, 
corrections, juvenile justice, mental health systems, 
and their policies and practices relative to the of- 
fender. Legal, empirical, and sociological 
materials covered. 

CJ 4102 Crime Prevention and Security (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the concept that all citizens are re- 
sponsible for preventing crime and promoting securi- 
ty. Content ranges from the theoretical level to 
community, organization, and personal sfrategies 
necessary to prevent crime. 

CJ 4103 Criminology (3 q.h.) 

Classical and contemporary criminological theories. 
Examines of their historical development and empiri- 
cal bases, as well as their significance to the crinninal 
justice process and the rehabilitation/deterrence/ 
punishment of offenders. 

CJ 4104 Dimensions of Crime (3 q.h.) 
An examination of empirical knowledge about crime: 
the magnitude of the crime problem in the United 
States; characteristics of those who commit crimes 
and of victims; information about dangerous repeat 
offenders; and financial costs of crime to neighbor- 
hoods and communities. Assessment of current 
crime measurement techniques, especially the Uni- 
form Crime Reports and victimization surveys. 

CJ 4105 Computer Applications in Criminal Justice (3 q.h.) 
A survey of computer technology applications to 
criminal justice research and decision making in 
criminal justice agencies. Topics include statistical 
and database software, database management, word 
processing, computer mapping, forecasting tech- 
niques, simulations and modeling, and 
mainframe relations. 

CJ 4106 Criminal Justice Research 1 (3 q.h.) 
A survey of methods for basic and applied research 
in criminal justice, combining statistics and research 
methods. Examines research techniques including in- 
terviews, questionnaires, observations, and scales for 
survey analysis, and issues of measurement and 
casual reasoning. 



CJ 4107 Criminal Justice Research 2 (3 q.h.) 
An extension of Criminal Justice Research 1. Focus- 
es on the uses of data from the field of criminal jus- 
tice. Covers basic descriptive statistics, including 
measures of central tendency, tests of significance, 
probability, sampling, and methods of forecasting. 
Discussion of the general role of research in the dis- 
cipline and specific contributions advanced by stud- 
ies in the field. Prereq. CJ 4106. 

C J 4108 Criminal Law and Procedure 1 (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the concepts, responsibilities, and li- 
abilities of criminal law and procedure. Reviews the 
evolution of the criminal law system to the present. 
Topics include analysis of substantive criminal law 
and the procedural process, as well as basic defini- 
tions; discussions of interaction between federal and 
state constitutions as they relate to criminad law. 

CJ 4109 Criminal Law and Procedure 2 (3 q.h.) 
Application of vital constitutional and statutory con- 
cepts, including selected statutory crimes, law of ar- 
rest, right to counsel, search and seizure, and 
applicable criminal procedures. Students are expect- 
ed to be familiar with basic concepts as well as 
changing interpretations so that they can cite cases 
to support their conclusions. Prereq. CJ 4108. 

C J 4110 Constitutional Law (3 q.h.) 
The history and development of the U.S. Constitution 
and amendments using text commentary and case 
analysis. Topics include the Conunerce Clause, pro- 
cedural due process, state's rights, individual rights 
and civil liberties, the concept of federail supremacy, 
and state constitutions. Prereq. CJ 4109. 

CJ 4201 Criminal Investigation 1 (3 q.h.) 
The evolution of contemporary investigative tech- 
niques. Topics include investigative effectiveness and 
organization, and modern investigative techniques, 
especially as they relate to particular crimes such as 
arson, sexual offenses, larceny, burglary, robbery, 
forgery, and homicide. 

CJ 4202 Criminal Investigation 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of Criminal Investigation 1. Focuses on 
staffing the investigation unit, informational manage- 
ment, control of evidence, establishment of investiga- 
tive priorities, fiscal restraints, and the relationship 
between criminal investigation and patrol and special 
units. Examines special police operations such as 
electronic surveillance, raids, and undercover oper- 
ations; affadavit construction, court preparation, and 
the use of scientific methods; and Federal law with 
regard to due process and other constitutional pro- 
tections. Prereq. CJ 4201. 



Criminal Justice and Security 141 



CJ 4203 Criminalistics 1 (3 q.h.) 

Survey of the elements of microscopy, spectroscopy, 
and basic chemistry as they apply to physical evi- 
dence. Covers the procedures for searching, sketch- 
ing, and photographing crime scenes as well as the 
recognition, collection, marking, and handling of 
physical evidence, emphasizing the importance of 
maintaining the chemical integrity of each sample. 
Studies the types of analysis, and their value and 
limitations with regard to glass, soil, hairs and fibers, 
firearms, toolmarks, and questioned documents. 

CJ 4204 Criminalistics 2 (3 q.h.) 

An introduction to the analysis of biological items of 
physical evidence collected at the scene of the crime 
or submitted for laboratory examination, and to the 
fields of serology and toxicology. Covers methods of 
collecting samples and the value of blood distribu- 
tion patterns, as well as laboratory techruques used 
to identify and characterize stains of blood and other 
body fluids. Pharmacology and toxicology of medical 
and chemical substances having potential for misuse 
and abuse are studied. Includes laboratory demon- 
strations and practical exercises to examine types of 
physical evidence. Prereq. CJ 4203. 

CJ 4205 Patrol Theory and Administration 1 (3 q.h.) 
History of the evolution of patrol practices; the 
changing patrol function over time; the history of pa- 
trol management and supervision; the development 
of preventive patrol and rapid response to calls for 
service; theories of patrol allocation; the influence of 
operations research; and the development of commu- 
nity relations as an adjunct to patrol. 

CJ 4206 Patrol Theory and Administration 2 (3 q.h.) 
Contemporary patrol developments and functioning: 
directed patrol, team amd conununity policing, the re- 
emergence of foot patrol, the legacy of community 
relations; neighborhood beat construction, patrol 
management amd supervision; and current research. 

CJ 4207 Comparative Police Systems (3 q.h.) 
Comparative study of police systems in Anglo-Saxon, 
Continental, Asian, Russian, African, and other cul- 
tural traditions with focus on the influence of nine- 
teenth-century English and twentieth-century 
American police traditions on policing systems in 
other cultures and countries. 

CJ 4208 Police Operations (3 q.h.) 
A general survey of police operational procedures, 
including traffic safety and control, report writing, in- 
terviews and interrogations, and identification 
and records. 

CJ 4209 Police Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the philosophy and theories of man- 
agement in policing. Includes historical view of the 



development of "professional/bureaucratic" manage- 
rial approach in policing; the development of organi- 
zational strategy; and understanding and managing 
the external environment within which 
police operate. 

C J 4210 Police Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Internal management of police organizations: 
policy development, implementation, maintenance 
of ongoing operations, and evaluation of 
program outcomes. 

C J 4211 Police and Social Problems (3 q.h.) 
Investigation of police functioning with regard to 
contemporary social problems: drugs, prostitution, 
domestic assault, gangs, serial murderers, dangerous 
offenders, illegal aliens, and others, with focus on re- 
lated research into police functioning. 

C J 4212 Police Community Relations (3 q.h.) 
The role and function of police with both individuals 
and groups, including minority groups; police respon- 
sibilities regarding civil rights, civil disorders, and 
public protection. 

C J 4213 Police Discretion (3 q.h.) 
The nature and impact of discretion as it relates to 
police decision making. Covers the forms of police 
discretion smd ways in which it can be structured, 
confined, and checked. Students examine sample po- 
bce department policies and study different methods 
for their development; and also study the relation of 
discretion to controlling police behavior 
and corruption. 

CJ 4301 American Correctional System (3 q.h.) 
A critical analysis of the American system of correc- 
tions. Covers important historical developments and 
the range of treatment and/or punishment options 
available to goverrunent, including prisons, jails, re- 
formatories, and community treatment programs. 
Probation and parole are considered as an integral 
part of corrections. Current correctional philosophy 
and treatment approaches on federal, state, and local 
levels of government are assessed. The interrelated 
nature of all aspects of corrections is emphasized, 
with particular focus on policy amalysis and 
decision making. 

CJ 4302 Correctional Administration 1 (3 q.h.) 
An intensive examination of the American correc- 
tional process. Programs, services, standards, meth- 
ods of service delivery, and contracting procedures 
are anailyzed. Critical issues in personnel administra- 
tion and management are discussed, as are the allo- 
cation of scarce resources and staff development and 
training programs. Stresses motivation, productivity, 
jmd accountability in corrections, and the role of 
community outreach and interface programs and vol- 
unteer services. Prereq. CJ 4301. 



142 Criminal Justice and Security 



CJ 4303 Correctional Administration 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of intensive examination of the correc- 
tioned process, with focus on special problems facing 
correctional administrators. Topics include the man- 
agement of offenders with special needs (dangerous 
and/or violent offenders and inmates with histories 
of substance abuse); management and control of 
prison violence; and preventive techniques and pro- 
grams. Institutional management of illegal immi- 
grants and other special prisoners explored, and the 
needs of female offenders are discussed. Prereq. 
CJ 4302. 

CJ 4304 Jail Administration and Management (3 q.h.) 
Study of local adult correctional iristitutions ranging 
from police lock-ups to jails and houses of correc- 
tions. Topics include administrative, management, 
and security issues; intake, regional, and network ap- 
proaches; local versus state control; offender classifi- 
cation, programs, residential care, inspection, and 
standards; pretrial detention; staffing patterns; inter- 
face with courts and law enforcement; release pro- 
grams; emergency management; and suicide 
prevention. 

CJ 4305 Case Management and Correctional Services (3 q.h.) 
An overview of treatment and rehabilitative work 
conducted in jail and prison environments. Basic 
counseling concepts and techniques, individual and 
group therapy, and institutional services are dis- 
cussed. Case studies and class projects illustrate of- 
fender and iiunate management in a variety of 
settings. Students study a range of innovative ap- 
proaches in corrections and assess their fiscal and 
persormel requirements, and effectiveness. Prereq. 
CJ 4301. 

CJ 4306 Correctional Security Methods and Technology 

(3 q.h.) 

Exaniination of the technology and management 
methods that provide a secure, safe, and humane en- 
vironment in which to incarcerate offenders while 
protecting both inmates and staff. A primary course 
objective is creating a correctional environment that 
supports productive human relations. 

CJ 4307 The Rights of Offenders and Prisoners (3 q.h.) 
Study of the rights of persons under correctional 
control. Examines traditional methods and assesses 
the magnitude and pace of judicial intervention in 
corrections. Topics include access to courts and le- 
gal services; health and medical care; searches; non- 
discriminatory treatment; rehabilitation; retention 
and restoration of rights; rules of conduct, disciplin- 
ary procedures; grievance procedures; exercise of re- 
ligious beliefs and practices. 

CJ 4308 Correctional Counseling (3 q.h.) 
Survey of basic counseling concepts and principles, 
individual and group therapy carried on in the cor- 
rectional field, and institutional services. Includes 
case studies and projects. Prereq. CJ 4301. 



CJ 4309 Comparative Correctional Systems (3 q.h.) 
Correctional systems and practices in selected juris- 
dictions in the United States and other countries. In- 
troduces innovative approaches in community 
corrections, local correctional institutions, prisons, 
alternatives to incarceration practices, rehabilitative 
and reintegrative programs, and improved manage- 
ment approaches. Prereq. CJ 4301. 

CJ 4310 Commmunity Corrections (3 q.h.) 
The concept of community corrections from histori- 
cal, philosophical, and pragmatic perspectives, and 
analysis of program alternatives to imprisonment or 
institutionalization. Discusses work and study re- 
lease programs, family visiting furloughs, and 
community-based correctional efforts aimed at help- 
ing offenders become law-abiding citizens. Issues in- 
clude private and public programs, control and 
surveillance issues, residential and non-residential 
programs, marshalling and coordinating community 
resources, and volunteer involvement. Prereq. 
CJ 4301. 

C J 431 1 Probation and Parole (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to probation and parole as dispositions, 
systems or subsystems, processes, and offender sta- 
tuses. Includes the history of probation and parole, 
their conditions and revocation procedures, offender 
eligibility requirements, supervision styles, due pro- 
cess issues, and prediction and measurements of ef- 
fectiveness. The role of volunteers, and probation 
and parole officer responsibilities also discussed. In- 
troduces students to presentence investigations, 
shock probation, probation subsidy, expansion of 
probation into pretrial and restitution programs, and 
to current debates on the governmental framework 
of probation and parole, parole boards, and parole 
hearings. Prereq. CJ 4301. 

C J 4312 Correctional Planning and Management (3 q.h.) 
Issues and techniques of anadysis, planning, and eval- 
uation in corrections. Demonstrates how a correc- 
tional orgaruzation's climate, structure, and 
leadership style affect its responses to changing envi- 
ronmental conditions. Topics include long-, interme- 
diate-, and short-range planning for administrative 
and operation functions; regional, state, and local 
planning techniques; capital and operations budget- 
ing procedures; organizational goals and objectives; 
key social, economic, and functional influences; the 
development of monitoring, assessment, and evalua- 
tion procedures; corrections interfaces with the leg- 
islative and judicial branches of criminal justice; and 
the development of irtformation systems to support 
the corrections mission. Prereq. CJ 4301. 



Criminal Justice and Security 143 



C J 4313 Correctional institutions (3 q.h.) 
The historical development of correctional institu- 
tions in the United States and present trends in cor- 
rectional practices with focus on institutions. Topics 
include the characteristics of correctional facilities; 
issues of deterrence, rehabilitation, and reintegra- 
tion, and the social environment for irunates and 
staff. Students discuss security issues, reception and 
classification, institutions for women, disciplinary 
and grievance procedures, and prerelease programs, 
as well as education and vocational training, reli- 
gious, recreation, and counseling services, prison la- 
bor and industries. Prereq. CJ 4301. 

C J 4314 Classification of Offenders (3 q.h.) 
Surveys major methods of classifying offenders and 
constructing offender typologies. Topics include 
classification for risk, security, management, and 
program assignments within institutions and for pro- 
bation, parole, and related community programs. The 
reliability and validity of classification methodolo- 
gies are assessed, as are their relevance to explaining 
criminal and deviant behavior. Also examined are 
classification systems at the locail and state levels, 
suicide prevention techniques, and classification 
for reintegrative purposes such as education, 
work-release, and furlough programs. Prereq. 
CJ 4301. 

CJ 4403 Introduction to Security (3 q.h.) 
The organization and administration of security and 
loss prevention programs in industry, business, and 
goverriment. Emphasizes the protection of assets, 
personnel, and facilities, aind the relations between 
security organizations and government agencies. 

CJ 4404 Industrial Safety and Fire Prevention (3 q.h.) 
Problems, methods, and technology in establishing 
safe working envirorunents. Emphasizes the preven- 
tion of accidents and the effects of natural disasters 
with special focus on hazardous substance risks. 
Prereq. CJ 4403. 

CJ 4405 Current Security Problems (3 q.h.) 
Contemporary security problems affecting society in- 
cluding, but not limited to, white-collar crime, drug 
abuse, theft control, espionage and sabotage, and ter- 
rorism. Prereq. CJ 4403. 

CJ 4406 Security Administration 1 (3 q.h.) 
The historical basis of the security management 
function and the development of the overall field and 
its specialties. Examines concepts of organizational 
security and risk-management methods. Prereq. 
CJ 4403 

CJ 4407 Security Administration 2 (3 q.h.) 
Orgariization, administration, and management of the 
security function, including the systems approach to 
security operations. Focuses on the responsibilities 
of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, control- 
ling, representing, and iimovating. The manager's re- 
sponsibility is also explored. 



CJ 4408 Legal Aspects of Security Management and 
Operations (3 q.h.) 

A comprehensive examination of the legal environ- 
ment and issues with impact on security operations 
and management. Elements of criminal, civil, proper- 
ty, regulatory, and business law are analyzed from 
the perspective of organizational security manage- 
ment. Topics include legal basis of security practices, 
civil liability, corporate security, investigations, labor 
law, industrial espionage, governmental security is- 
sues. Prereq. CJ 4403, CJ 4406, and CJ 4407. 

CJ 4409 Physical Security Methods and Technology 1 (3 q.h.) 
An examination of the management methods and 
technology that comprise a cost-efficient security 
program. Students develop planning and manage- 
ment skills to integrate personnel, equipment, and 
procedures with the goal of organizational security. 
Concentrates on the technologies of barriers, intru- 
sion detection, security containers, amd access con- 
trol. Prereq. CJ 4403. 

C J 4410 Physical Security Methods and Technology 2 (3 q.h.) 
A continuation of CJ 4410. Concentrates on the 
technologies of closed-circuit television, 
computer-assisted systems, information security, 
communications, merchandise protection, personnel 
protection, natural hazard detection and control, and 
aids to investigations. Prereq. CJ 4409. 

CJ 4411 Electronic Information Security (3 q.h.) 
Survey of the complex and developing security prob- 
lems iriherent in the use of electronic information 
systems. Provides a comprehensive examination of 
the management methods and technology used to 
counter the security risks related to the use of com- 
puters, word processors, and other communication 
devices and methods. Prereq. CJ 4403. 

CJ 4501 Patterns of Criminal Behovior (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the theories and research on the for- 
mation, structure, and basis for criminal behavior 
patterns. Surveys current knowledge concerning the 
various forms of criminal behavior. Topics include 
the construction of types of crime, the formulation 
and use of typologies of crime based on criminal be- 
havior systems, and critical research on a range of 
criminal behavior patterns. Prereq. CJ 4103. 

CJ 4502 Fire Investigation, Arson, and Explosives (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to examination and behavior of fire, in- 
cluding related phenomena such as convection, radi- 
ation, conduction, and ignition. Arson, explosions, 
asphyxiations, and combustibility are addressed, 
with emphasis on the chemistry of other combustible 
materials. Sessions cover the recovery, analysis, 
and evaluation of physical evidence from fires 
and explosioris. 

CJ 4503 Forensic Laboratory (3 q.h.) 
A hands-on laboratory course focusing on individuzil 
experimentation. Surveys the basic examinations and 
techniques performed in a crime laboratory. Topics 



144 Criminal Justice and Security — Drama 



include general microscopy, hairs and fibers, blood 
and other body fluids, paint, glass, soil, fingerprints, 
gunshot residue, toxicology, questioned documents, 
and firearm and toolmark examinations. Prereq. CJ 
4203 and CJ 4204. 

CJ 4504 Juvenile Justice 1 (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the contemporary juvenile justice 
system, with focus on the key decision points within 
the juvenile justice system including jurisdiction, po- 
lice, detention, court intake, at^udication, disposi- 
tion, and aftercare. Critical issues facing the juvenile 
justice system components are discussed. 

CJ 4505 Juvenile Justice 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of material discussed in CJ 4504. In par- 
ticular, addresses the history of juvenile justice in the 
United States; the m^or reforms of the juvenile jus- 
tice system (diversion, the development of due pro- 
cess, decriminalization of status offenders, deinstitu- 
tionalization, and waiver to adult court); and 
future trends in juvenile justice. Prereq. CJ 4504. 

CJ 4506 Crime Victims (3 q.h.) 

Examination of current theories and research relat- 
ing to victims of crime. Particular emphasis on spe- 
cial victim groups such as children, the elderly, and 
women. Victim interactions with the criminal justice 
system are explored. Current victim initiatives such 
as restitution, mediation, compensation, and victim 
rights legislation are also assessed. Prereq. CJ 4101 
and CJ 4103. 

CJ 4507 Organized Crime (3 q.h.) 
The nature and problen\s of organized crime, its 
causes and effects, comparative and historic roots, 
and activities, organization, and economics. Consid- 
ers possible solutions and the scope of techniques 
used in combating orgariized crime. 

CJ 4508 Crime Scene Investigation (3 q.h.) 
A competent search of a crime scene demands spe- 
cialized training. This course covers basic consider- 
ations, guidelines, and procedures that help the 
crime scene technician avoid oversight, ensure thor- 
oughness of search, and comply with both the legal 
and scientific requirements pertaining to the use of 
physical evidence. The procedures for recording the 
crime scene — that is, note-taking, sketching, and 
photography — as well as the basic steps that mini- 
mize the omission or contamination of evidence are 
studied in detail. 

CJ 4509 White-Collar Crime (3 q.h.) 
Basic survey of white-collar crime. Covers the 
nature and extent of white-collar crime, the 
social-psychological makeup of white-collar crime 
typologies, present efforts directed toward its con- 
trol, and interagency and jurisdictional problems and 
the benefits of cooperation. 

CJ 4510 Terrorism (3 q.h.) 

An overview of what terrorism is and why it has be- 
come so popular. Topics include the role of news me- 
dia, political consequences of terrorism, the military 
as a resource, and the role of the hostage. 



CJ 451 1 Survey of Criminal Evidence (3 q.h.) 
The fundamentals of criminal trial procedure and the 
rules of evidence as they apply to the trial of a crimi- 
nal case. Students read and brief criminal court 
cases. Prereq. CJ 4108 and CJ 4109. 

C J 4512 Women and the Criminal Justice System (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to issues relating to roles taken by 
women involved with the criminal justice system and 
to the system's responses to women in these roles. 
Specific focus on women as victims of crime, as of- 
fenders, and as practitioners. 

CJ 4801 Directed Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
Faculty-guided research in individually selected top- 
ics relating to the criminal justice system. 

CJ 4802 Directed Study 2 (4 q.h.) 
Faculty-guided research in individually selected top- 
ics relating to the criminal justice system. 

CJ 4803 Directed Study 1 (8 q.h.) 
Faculty-guided research in individually selected top- 
ics relating to the criminal justice system. 

CJ 4804 Directed Study 2 (8 q.h.) 
Faculty-guided research in individually selected top- 
ics relating to the criminal justice system. 

Computer Literacy 

COM 4101 Foundations of Computer Literacy (4 q.h.) 
Introduction to computers, including database man- 
agement, word processing, systems analysis and de- 
sign, software packages, artificial intelligence, and 
trends in specialized types of office automation. Stu- 
dents have the opportunity to learn to program in 
BASIC. Hands-on labs reirrforce lectures. 

Drama 

DRA 4101 Introduction to Theatre* (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to how a theatrical performance is 
made through the eyes of those who make it: writers, 
producers, actors, designers, and audience. Designed 
to increase the student's awareness of theatre as a 
business as well as to provide a basis for eryoyment 
of theatre as an art form dealing with ideas and emo- 
tion. Visits to local theatres and viewing of perfor- 
mances in the Boston area. Guest lectures by 
practicing professionals. 

DRA 4120 Acting for the Nonactor (3 q.h.) 
"All the world's a stage — " according to Shake- 
speare. We are all actors in our private and profes- 
sional lives. Basic acting principles and performance 
experiences can benefit anyone who interacts with 
other people. This course deals with stress, relax- 
ation, presentation of self, status in relationships, and 
performance anxieties. Acting exercises assist the 
student in finding methods for dealing comfortably 
and positively with real-life situations. 



Drama — Economics 145 



DRA 4130 Prizewinning Plays (3 q.h.) 
What makes a play win a Pulitzer Prize or a Tony 
Award? To find out, students examine selected plays 
that have received one or more of these prizes. 

DRA 4140 Workshop for the Actor 1 (3 q.h.) 
Physical preparation for the actor, including basic 
stage movement and deportment, control of the stage 
voice, analysis £ind establishment of characterization 
through observation and awareness of the body, and 
improvisations and short scenes. 

DRA 4141 Workshop for the Actor 2 (3 q.h.) 
Psychological preparation for the actor, including 
analysis and establishment of characterization 
through memory, emotion, imagination, and recall; 
analysis of specific roles; the creation of a character 
analysis book; and improvisatioris and short scenes. 
Prereq. DRA 4140 or instructor's permission. 

DRA 4160 Drama Movement and Therapy (3 q.h.) 
Exploration of teaching and rehabilitative methods, 
using the techniques of creative dramatics and 
dance/movement therapy. Emphasizes the excep- 
tional child and the physically and emotionally 
handicapped. 

DRA 4170 Creative Dramatics for Teachers (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the methods and creative techniques 
of using dramatics for programs in schools, 
churches, and recreational facilities. Teachers can 
learn how to use improvisation for self-improvement 
with students of all ages. 

DRA 4200 The Comic Theatre* (3 q.h.) 
Comic performance, from its beginnings in ancient 
Greece through its use in radio and television sit- 
coms, movies, and by stand-up comediams. Includes 
an examination of comic theory, the comic writer, 
and the comic performer. The central premise is that 
comedy is serious business. Lectures, movie and tele- 
vision viewing, and attendance at live performemces. 

DRA 4210 The Shakespeare Experience* (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity to view and critique live productions 
and/or motion picture and television versions of 
plays by WiUiam Shakespeare. 

DRA 4230 The Boston Theatre Scene* (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity to view and critique Uve performances 
presented in the Boston area's miyor and 
"off-Broadway" theatres. 

DRA 4240 The Creative Cinema* (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity to view and critique films and the 
work of directors, performers, and other 
creative personnel. 

Economics 

ECN 4001 Overcoming Statistics Stress (noncredit) 
This seminar is designed to show students how to 
put aside anxieties by understanding the components 
of statistics and developing techniques to simplify 
seemingly difficult word problems. Mathematical 
skills needed include addition, subtraction, division, 
multiplication, knowledge of square roots, and 
basic algebra. 

•Cost of theater tickets not included in tuition. 



ECN 4115 Economic Principles and Problems 1 (3 q.h.) 
Application of the basic principles of economics to 
current public problems. Focusing on macroecono- 
mics, students explore imemployment, inflation, na- 
tional income and employment theory, and 
goverrunent expenditures and taxation. 

ECN 4116 Economic Principles and Problems 2 (3 qii.) 
Continuation of ECN 41 15. Focuses on the role of the 
banking system, the Federal Reserve System, and 
supply-side policies. Topics in microeconomics in- 
clude the role of a market pricing system; supply and 
demand; the costs of production; profits; and the sup- 
ply decision. Prereq. ECN 4115 or equivalent. 

ECN 4117 Economic Principles and Problems 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of ECN 4116. Focuses on markets and 
the allocation of resources. Topics include competi- 
tive markets, monopoly, oligopoly, factor markets, 
and income distribution. Economic principles are ap- 
plied to selected problem areas, including poverty, 
pollution, energy, international trade, and the balance 
of payments. Prereq. ECN 4116 or equivalent. 

ECN 4118 Economics (Intensive) (9 q.h.) 

Same as ECN 4115, ECN 4116, and ECN 4117. 

ECN 4130 Medical Economics (3 q.h.) 
Topics include heedth care trends in the United 
States; causes for increases in medical care costs; 
supply and training of health care personnel; the na- 
tion's need for physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and 
other allied health personnel; the quality of medical 
care; economics of health insurance plans; and con- 
sumer demand for health care, medical facilities, and 
professional and semiprofessional personnel. 

ECN 4137 History of Economic Thought (3 q.h.) 
Development of economic thought, including Mer- 
cantilism as the first economic doctrine; analysis of 
the older, classical school with its later refinements 
(Modem Marginalism) and its important critics 
(socialists, Marxists); and Keynesian and modern 
developments. 

ECN 4140 Economics of Crime (3 q.h.) 
Theoretical and empirical analyses of the economic 
causes of criminal behavior. The social costs of 
crime, its prevention, and techruques for designing 
optimimi law enforcement policies. 

ECN 4150 Energy Economics (3 q.h.) 
Economic, political, and historical background of en- 
ergy and other resource problems, including exami- 
nation of the future impact of primary resource 
limitations on U.S. and world economics, and feasi- 
bility studies of resource substitution. 

ECN 4215 Macroeconomic Theory (3 q.h.) 
A discussion of conceptual and empirical problems 
of creating and using national accounts; price index 
problems; conceptual and empirical evaluation of 
several consumption and investment functions emd 
their policy implications; and multiplier and accelera- 
tor models. Includes a brief history of recent cyclical 
fluctuations, and an analysis of inflation and growth 
theories in light of recent economic history. Prereq. 
ECN 4117 or equivalent. 



146 Economics 



ECN 4216 Microeconomic Theory (3 q.h.) 
Topics include supply and demand analysis, elasticity 
concepts and applications, theory of consumer de- 
mand, theory of production, and derivation of cost 
curves. Also covers pricing and output behavior in 
the several market structures, their welfare impUca- 
tions, and the pricing of resources. Prereq. ECN 4117 
or equivalent. 

ECN 4250 Statistics 1 (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the collection and organization of 
data, including the measurement, presentation, and 
uses of elementary set theory; measures of central 
tendency and variability; basic probability; and 
probability distributions. 

ECN 4251 Statistics 2 (3 q.h.) 

Sampling and basic estimation techniques, "t" distri- 
bution, testing of statistical hypotheses, and analysis 
of variances. Prereq. ECN 4250 or equivalent. 

ECN 4252 Statistics 3 (3 q.h.) 

Methods of econometric estimation and forecasting, 
including linear regression analysis, correlation 
analysis, time series analysis, and index numbers. 
Prereq. ECN 4251 or equivalent. 

ECN 4253 Statistics Intensive A (formerly Statistics 

Intensive) (9 q.h.) 

Same as ECN 4250, ECN 4251, and ECN 4252. 

ECN 4254 Statistics Intensive B (6 q.h.) 
Same as ECN 4250 and ECN 4251. 

ECN 4255 Hands-On Statistics (4 q.h.) 
Statistics techniques and applications, including fre- 
quency distributions, measures of central tendency, 
measures of dispersion, probability and probability 
distributions, and sampling and estimation tech- 
niques. Class time is divided equally into lecture and 
laboratory; the latter focuses on individual, super- 
vised problem solving. Not open to students who 
have taken ECN 4250. 

ECN 4310 Labor Economics (3 q.h.) 
Economic analysis of the labor market, including the 
labor force, the demand for labor, and the institu- 
tions and policies dealing with them. Examines em- 
ployment, unemployment, wage determination, and 
the development and efficient use of labor resources 
collective bargaining issues, and their economic con- 
sequences. Prereq. ECN 4117 or equivalent. 

ECN 4311 Human Resource Planning (3 q.h.) 
Assessment of government and private efforts to 
fight poverty and improve the labor market position 
of impoverished groups. Considers the relationship 
between causes of poverty and discrimination and 
possible remedies. Also considers training programs, 
negative income tax, family allowances, and other in- 
come maintenance schemes. 

ECN 4312 Economic Concerns of Older Adults (3 q.h.) 
Designed to provide a basic knowledge of economic 
principles as they apply to senior members of the 
commimity. Includes how the U.S. economic policies 
and market system determine the price, quality, and 
availability of medical care and other allied services. 



ECN 5312 Economic Concerns of Older Adults (3 CEUs) 
Same as ECN 4312. 

ECN 4313 Women in the Labor Force (3 q.h.) 
Economic analysis of women's labor market position 
in the context of the changing econonuc structure 
and labor market institutions. Analysis of female la- 
bor force participation differences; male-female 
differentials in earnings and unemployment; occupa- 
tional concentration and segregation; theories and 
evidence of discrimination; and new opportimities. 

ECN 4315 Income Inequality and Discrimination (3 q.h.) 
Analysis of the composition of impoverished groups 
and recent trends. Examines the labor market, demo- 
graphic and institutional forces contributing to pov- 
erty, the role of education, the economics of race and 
sex discrimination, the public welfare system, and 
proposed reforms. 

ECN 4321 Urban Economic Problems and Policies (3 q.h.) 
Economic analysis of selected urban problems 
such as housing, poverty, transportation, educa- 
tion, health, crime, and the urban environment. In- 
cludes discussion of public policies relating to 
such problems. 

ECN 4322 Economics of Transportation (3 q.h.) 
Topics include transportation and land-use patterns, 
ownership, regulations, financing, social costs and 
benefits of various modes of transportation, and 
economies of new technology. 

ECN 4330 Economic Growth and Development (3 q.h.) 
Prospects for economic growth and development in 
impoverished nations as indicated by economic anal- 
ysis and historical experience. Includes the social, 
cultural, and institutional determinants of growth 
and an analysis of agriculture and development. 

ECN 4331 American Economic History (3 q.h.) 
Economic development of the United States, with 
emphasis on the post- Civil War period and the effect 
of certain European developments. 

ECN 4333 European Economic Development (3 q.h.) 
Historical survey of European economic develop- 
ment from overseas expansion to the dissolution of 
empires and the Common Market. Examines the en- 
vironmental impact of industrialism and the implica- 
tions of living in a technological society. 

ECN 4334 Comparative Economic Systems (3 q.h.) 
Competing types of theoretical economic systems; 
analysis of the organization and operation of current- 
ly existing types of communist, socialist, and capital- 
ist economies; and comparison and evaluation of the 
economic behavior and performance of different 
economic systems. 

ECN 4335 international Economics 1 (3 q.h.) 
Economics of international trade, including tariffs, 
use of resources, and balance-of-payment mecha- 
nisms. Prereq. ECN 4117 or equivalent. 

ECN 4336 International Economics 2 (3 q.h.) 
International commercial policy, financial organiza- 
tions, and recent problems. Prereq. ECN 4335 
or equivalent. 



Economics 147 



ECN 4342 Money and Banking 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to money and credit, commercial bank- 
ing structure, and money creation as well as the 
problems and policies of centralized banking in the 
United States. Prereq. ECN 4117 or equivalent. 

ECN 4343 Money and Banking 2 (3 q.h.) 
Topics include theory of money, prices, and mone- 
tary policy; interest theory; debt management; £md in- 
ternational monetary problems and analysis. Prereq. 
ECN 4342 or equivalent. 

ECN 4344 Government Finance (3 q.h.) 
Topics include fiscal functions, institutions, and poli- 
tics; growth of the public sector; expenditure plan- 
ning in theory and practice; cost-benefit analysis; 
principles of taxation and tax incidence; m^or taxes 
at federal, state, and local levels; fiscal policy for high 
employment, price stabihty, and growth; and current 
fiscal problems, such as tax reform, urban fiscal 
problems, fiscal federalism, and income maintenance 
programs. Prereq. ECN 4117 or equivalent. 

ECN 4345 Business Cycles 1 (3 q.h.) 
Intermediate macroeconomic theory, including the- 
ory of cyclical fluctuations in the context of multipli- 
er and accelerator models. Prereq. ECN 4117 
or equivalent. 

ECN 4346 Business Cycles 2 (3 q.h.) 

Business cycle analysis, measurement, and public 

policy. Prereq. ECN 4345 or equivalent. 

ECN 4347 Business Cycles 3 (3 q.h.) 

Business cycle forecasting methods and services. 

Prereq. ECN 4346 or equivalent. 

ECN 4348 Business Cycles (Intensive) (9 q.h.) 

Same as ECN 4345, ECN 4346, and ECN 4347. Prereq. 

ECN 4117 or equivalent. 

ECN 4350 Introduction to Econometrics (3 q.h.) 
Methods of econometric estimation and forecasting, 
including various statistical techniques. Students are 
given the opportunity to construct their own models 
and use computer facilities for estimation and fore- 
casting. Prereq. ECN 4117 and ECN 4252. 

ECN 4351 Problems in Economic Research (3 q.h.) 
Research methods used by practicing economists. 
Topics include typical problems fi'om areas of ap- 
plied economics, such as choices of modeling frame- 
work, development of static and dynamic adaptive 
policy models, problems of data collection, review of 
estimation techniques, and interpretation of results. 
Prereq. ECN 4117 and ECN 4252. 

ECN 4353 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to mathematical analysis, with an in- 
depth study of theory of distribution. Prereq. 
ECN 4117 or equivalent. 

ECN 4360 Managerial Economics (3 q.h.) 
Theory of demeind, price, and output as applied to 
business firms and capital budgeting. Prereq. 
ECN 4117 or equivalent. 

ECN 4362 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (3 q.h.) 
Theoretical framework for analysis and evaluation of 
the static and dynamic performance of real markets. 



Examines empirical studies that test the usefulness 
of applying theory to real markets and the existence 
of antitrust laws as a public policy designed to pro- 
mote better market performance. Prereq. ECN 4117 
or equivalent. 

ECN 4363 Government and Business 1 (3 q.h.) 
The rationale for government involvement in mar- 
kets, the role of government in national economic af- 
fairs, and the relationship between government and 
business, including the application of antitrust laws 
to business. 

ECN 4364 Government and Business 2 (3 q.h.) 
The government's role in economic activities. The re- 
lationships between the government and industry, la- 
bor, agriculture, public utilities, and consumers. The 
changing role of government from laissez-faire policy 
to direct intervention in the economy. Wage and 
price controls, environment and antipollution poli- 
cies, consumer protection, conglomerate mergers, 
and regulation of indusfries. 
ECN 4384 The Economics of the Stock Market (3 q.h.) 
Topics include the organization of the stock ex- 
change, the highly speculative nature of the stock ex- 
changes, the functions of the exchanges, capital 
gains, equity, dividends, stock options, spUts, puts 
and calls, the crash of 1929, the crash of 1987, the 
Great Depression, controls on the stock market, and 
the Federal Reserve Board. 
ECN 4490 Directed Study 1 (3 q.h.) 
Opportimity for qualified students to take an upper- 
level course in their mjyor. Petitions and procedural 
instructions are available from the Liberal Arts Pro- 
gram office, 617^37-2416. Prereq. 87 q.h. 
ECN 4491 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity to initiate a second individual study as 
described in ECN 4490. Prereq. ECN 4490. 
ECN 4492 Economic Policy Seminar (3 q.h.) 
Most advanced course for senior economics mjyors, 
with emphasis on independent study and contempo- 
rary issues. Prereq. ECN 4117 or equivalent. 
ECN 4495 Honors Program 1 (4 q.h.) 
Independent work in a selected area under the direc- 
tion of members of the department. Prereq. Program 
Director's approval. 
ECN 4496 Honors Program 2 (4 q.h.) 
Second opportunity to do independent work as de- 
scribed in ECN 4495. Prereq. ECN 4495 and Pro- 
gram Director's approval. 
ECN 4497 Honors Program 3 (4 q.h.) 
Additional opportunity to do independent work as 
described in ECN 4495. Prereq. ECN 4496 and Pro- 
gram Director's approval. 
ECN 4601 Economics 1 (4 q.h.) 

Development of macroeconomic analysis, review of 
nationjil income concepts, national income deter- 
mination fluctuation and growth, the role of the 
banking system and the Federal Reserve system, gov- 
ernment expenditures and taxation, international 
trade, and balance of international payments. For 
Alternative Freshman-Year students only. 



148 Educational Skills — English 



Educational Skills 

ED 4001 Integrated Language Skills Development 1 (2 q.h.) 
Reading comprehension and related study and lan- 
guage skills. Time, discussion, and considerable prac- 
tice devoted to basic reading comprehension and 
interpretation, including work in critical reading and 
other interpretational acts (inferences, understand- 
ing imagery, and symbolic usage). Study skills, pre- 
viewing, finding main ideas and details, outlining and 
summarizing, £ind interaction of all the communica- 
tions skills — reading, writing, listening, and speaking. 
For Alternative Freshman-Year students only. 
ED 4002 Integrated Language Skills Development 2 (2 q.h.) 
Continuation of ED 4001. For Alternative Freshman- 
Year students only. Prereq. ED 4001. 
ED 4003 Integrated Language Skills A (4 q.h.) 
Covers basic reading comprehension and interpreta- 
tion; study skills such as previewing, finding main 
ideas and details, outlining, and sunimarizing; and the 
interaction of communications skills, such as read- 
ing, writing, listening, and speaking. For Alternative 
Freshman-Year students only. 
ED 4004 Integrated Language Skills B (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of ED 4003. Emphasizes such study 
skills as researching, writing, and organizing term pa- 
pers. Explores critical thinking in relation to the 
learning process. Addresses how to choose an aca- 
denuc mjyor and career direction, with emphasis on 
self-assessment and personal decision-making. For 
Alternative Freshman-Year students only. Prereq. 
ED 4003. 

ED 4050 College Reading and Study Skills (3 q.h.) 
Reading comprehension, text and lecture note-taking 
skills, and examination-taking skills. Students prac- 
tice with excerpts from texts and taped lectures, and 
apply the skills to materials in other courses. Intend- 
ed for students who are beginning college work and 
wish to develop reading and study skills. (Not for stu- 
dents who have already taken the Basic Day College 
courses Reading/Study Skills 1 or Integrated Lan- 
guage SkiUs Development 1.) 

English 

ENG 4005 introduction to English as a Second Language 

(noncredit) 

Introduction to the grammar and rhetoric of English 
as a second language. Practice in listening, speaking, 
and writing, with selected readings amd exercises for 
improving vocabulary and pronunciation. 
ENG 4006 Intermediate English as a Second Longuage 
(noncredit) 

Intermediate course in English as a second language. 
Practice in preparing written and oral reports, in- 
cluding business and social letters. Prereq. ENG 
4005 or equivalent. 

ENG 4007 Advanced English for International Students 
(3 q.h.) 

Advanced course in English as a second language. 
Practice in special forms of writing to improve clar- 
ity, syntax, and orgaruzation. Prereq. ENG 4006 or 
instructor's permission. 



ENG 4011 Elements of Writing (3 q.h.) 
Review of the structural patterns of current English. 
Practice in writing sentences, paragraphs, and 
short papers. 

ENG 4012 Elements of Grammar (3 q.h.) 
A study of grammar and the way the Enghsh lan- 
guage works. Helps students understand the parts of 
speech, the mechanics of punctuation, and the vaga- 
ries of spelling. Exercises in solving problems of 
number, case, tense, degree, and usage. 
ENG 4013 Fundamentals of English 1 (4 q.h.) 
Intensive introduction to the principles of effective 
expository writing, emphasizing description, para- 
graph construction, and organization. Includes 
a review of the conventions of English usage, punctu- 
ation, and syntax. Essay assignments. For Alterna- 
tive Freshman-Year students only. 
ENG 4014 Fundamentals of English 2 (4 q.h.) 
Intensive instruction in exposition, argument, and 
academic essay and research paper writing, in addi- 
tion to continued study of the conventions of English 
usage, punctuation, and syntax. Essay assigrmients. 
For Alternative Freshman-Year students only. 
Prereq. ENG 4013 or equivalent. 
ENG 4110 Critical Writing 1 (3 q.h.) 
Detailed examination of the principles and methods 
of rhetoric, especially narration, description, and ex- 
position. Includes frequent practice in writing para- 
graphs and themes in those modes. A writing 
proficiency test is given at the first class meeting. 
ENG 4111 Critical Writing 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continued examination of the principles and meth- 
ods of rhetoric, especially persuasion and argument, 
the study of short fiction, and the development of 
research skills. Includes practice in writing persua- 
sive and critical themes amd in preparing research 
papers. Prereq. ENG 4110 or equivalent. 
ENG 4112 Approaches to Literature (3 q.h.) 
Further refinement of writing and analytical skills 
through the study of drama and poetry. Practice in 
writing longer critical papers. Prereq. ENG 4111 
or equivalent. 

ENG 4120 English Literature: Faith and Humanism (3 q.h.) 
English literature from its beginnings to 1700, includ- 
ing works by Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, 
and Milton. 

ENG 4121 English Literature: Reason and Romanticism 
(3 q.h.) 

English literature from the Neoclassical period to the 
Romantic age, including works by Pope, Swift, John- 
son, Blake, Wordsworth, and Keats. 
ENG 4122 English Literature: Victorians and Moderns (3 q.h.) 
English literature from the Victorian Age through the 
twentieth century, including works by Browning, Ar- 
nold, Hardy, Yeats, and Eliot. 
ENG 4123 Early American Literature: Faith, Reason, and 
Nature (3 q.h.) 

American literature from its beginnings through the 
nineteenth-century Transcendentalists, including 
works by Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Franklin, 
Emerson, and Thoreau. 



English 149 



ENG 4124 American Romantics and American Realists 

(3 q.h.) 

The fiction and poetry of nineteenth-century Amer- 
ica, including works by Hawthorne, Melville, Whit- 
man, Dickinson, Twain, James, Crane, and Dreiser. 
ENG 4125 American Literature: The Modern Temper (3 q.h.) 
The prose and poetry of twentieth-century America, 
including works by Eliot, Stevens, Fitzgerald, Hem- 
ingway, Wright, and Plath. 
ENG 4131 God, Gods, and Heroes: The Literature of the 
Ancient and Medieval Worlds (3 q.h.) 
Literary traditions of the ancient world and the Mid- 
dle Ages in the work of such writers as Homer, Virgil, 
Sophocles, Aristophanes, Dante, and Chaucer as weU 
as in the art of biblical narrative. 
ENG 4132 Man, Reason, and Imagination: Literature from 
the Renaissance to the Romantic Age (3 q.h.) 
Literary traditions of the Renaissance, Neoclassi- 
cism, and Romanticism in the work of such writers 
as Shakespeare, MUton, Voltaire, Racine, Words- 
worth, and Whitman. 

ENG 4133 Order and Disorder: Literature of the Moderns 
(3 q.h.) 

Literary traditions of Realism and Modernism in the 
work of such writers as Dostoyevsky, Ibsen, Joyce, 
Kafka, Woolf, and O'Neill. 
ENG 4210 Science Fiction (3 q.h.) 
Myths and rhetorical strategies of science fiction, in- 
cluding such novels as Frankenstein, Childhood's 
End, and Stranger in a Strange Land. 
ENG 421 1 Fantasy Literature (3 q.h.) 
Development of fantasy literature in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries, focusing on the works of 
such authors as Lewis Carroll, Lord Dunsany, Ken- 
neth Grahame, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Richard Adams. 
ENG 4212 Horror Fiction (3 q.h.) 

Horror literature and its concerns with the supernat- 
ural, the irrational, the nature of evil, and the land- 
scape of dreams, including such novels as Dracula, 
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and The Turn of the Screw. 
ENG 4213 Detective Fiction (3 q.h.) 
Elements of intrigue, logic, and thought converge in 
this study of the whodunit. Students sample a wide 
range of detective fiction to explore the questions of 
irmocence aind guilt, action and responsibility, power 
and authority, and victim and victimizer, and to see 
connections between this popular form of literature 
and its classical antecedents. 
ENG 4214 The Psychological Novel (3 q.h.) 
A study of the mental and emotional processes af- 
fecting the form and style of such works as Crime 
and Punishment, The Metamorphosis, and 
The Stranger. 

ENG 4220 Children's Literature (3 q.h.) 
The psychology of creation, the ways of the imagina- 
tion, and the role of fantasy and play in such chil- 
dren's books as Alice in Wonderland, The Wizard of 
Oz, and Charlotte's Web. 
ENG 4221 Images of Women in Literature (3 q.h.) 
Images of women and their underlying archetypes in 
imaginative literature. Includes such writers as 
Homer, Austen, Ibsen, and Lawrence. 



ENG 4222 American Women Writers (3 q.h.) 
Representative nineteenth- and twentieth-century 
American women writers, including such poets as 
Dickinson and Plath and such novelists as Chopin 
and Cather. 

ENG 4223 British Women Writers (3 q.h.) 
Important historical and thematic connections in the 
work of British women writers of the last two hun- 
dred years, including the novels of Austen, Eliot, 
Woolf, and Lessing. 

ENG 4230 Modern Irish Literature (3 q.h.) 
Irish literature in English from 1885 to the present, 
including such writers as Yeats, Joyce, O'Casey, 
and Behan. 

ENG 4231 Irish Writers in America (3 q.h.) 
Irish themes and attitudes in the fiction and drama of 
twentieth-century America, including such writers as 
O'Neill, Donleavy, Alfred, and McHale. 

ENG 4232 Ethnic Literature in America (3 q.h.) 

The range, variety, and themes of ethnic literature in 

America in the work of such writers as Philip Roth, 

Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, and 

F. Scott Momaday. 

ENG 4233 Outside the Mainstream: The Literature of 
America's Subcultures (3 q.h.) 

Literature that reflects the specific interests, values, 
and concerns of America's diverse subcultural popu- 
lations, including such works as Black Elk Speaks, 
City of Night, Woman Warrior, and the stories of 
Isaac Bashevis Singer. 

ENG 4234 Modern American Voices: The New Essayists 

(3 q.h.) 

Major nonfiction of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, 
stressing the fresh styles and often disturbing cultur- 
al perspectives of such works as Mailer's The Armies 
of the Night, Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle 
Maintenance, Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, and 
Brautigan's Trout Fishing in America as weU as the 
"new journalism'' of such writers as Joan Didion, 
Tom Wolfe, Susan Sontag, and Woody Allen. 

ENG 4240 Fiction and the Movies (3 q.h.) 
Reading and seeing: an examination of the success 
(and failure) of turning famous novels aind stories 
into movies. Original works such as The Great 
Gatsby, Lolita, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and 
Looking for Mr. Goodbar are compared to film ver- 
sions. Includes elementary film theory and criticism. 

ENG 4241 Topics in Film (3 q.h.) 

Examination of a theme or problem in film, a period 
in film history, a film genre, or the work of a particu- 
l£ir director in order to assess technique and meaning. 
Topics change from quarter to quarter — for example, 
film and society, American films of the forties, the 
western, Hitchcock — so that students may take this 
course more than once. 

ENG 4250 Biography and Nonfiction (3 q.h.) 
Study of biography in an attempt to understand how 
individual behavior and achievement relate to social, 
cultural, political, and artistic values. 



150 English 



EN6 4260 The Literature of Adolescence (3 q.h.) 
Adolescence as depicted in works drawn from differ- 
ent cultures and times. Examines popular versus lit- 
erary views of adolescence, focusing on such themes 
as the struggle for self -definition, the role of peers, 
and the effects of gender and class. 

ENG 4261 The Literature of Old Age (3 q.h.) 
Old age as depicted in works drawn from different 
cultures and times. Examines popular versus literary 
views of old age, focusing on such themes as old age 
as a period of psychological reassessment; the role of 
family, class, and gender; and the emotional implica- 
tions of confronting death. 

ENG 4349 Expository and Persuasive Writing 1 (3 q.h.) 
Designed to help students develop confidence and 
proficiency in writing. Through first drafts to revi- 
sions, weekly writing assignments concentrate on 
mastering the skills of subject focus, clarity of ex- 
pression, controlled development, and organization. 
Prereq. ENG 4110 or equivalent. 

ENG 4350 Expository and Persuasive Writing 2 (3 q.h.) 
Development of precise jmd persuasive writing pat- 
terns through experiments with various rhetorical 
strategies. Students are expected to write extensively 
on topics of current interest to gain fluency and to 
learn how to target their writing toward different au- 
diences. Assignments also provide practice in per- 
suasive writing and in using different writing models 
to gain control of the material. Prereq. ENG 4349 
or equivalent. 

ENG 4352 Expository Communications (3 q.h.) 
Workshop in expository prose, emphasizing the prac- 
tical problems of the writer on the job in advertising, 
pubUc relations, or publishing. Includes practice in 
designing and writing special projects. Prereq. ENG 
4349 or equivalent. 

ENG 4356 Creative Writing (3 q.h.) 
An opportunity to write and develop a variety of 
forms, including experiments in journals and short 
stories, plays and poems. Features in-class discus- 
sion of students' work and a final project of choice. 

ENG 4357 Creative Writing: Poetry (3 q.h.) 
Practice in writing different forms of poetry for be- 
girming poets. Includes discussion and criticism of 
student work and selected texts. 

ENG 4358 Creative Writing: Fiction (3 q.h.) 
Practice in writing various types of short stories for 
beginning writers of short fiction. Includes discus- 
sion and criticism of student work and selected texts. 

ENG 4359 Creative Writing Workshop (3 q.h.) 
Discussion and criticism of student manuscripts for 
practicing writers. 

ENG 4360 Topics in Writing (3 q.h.) 
An examination of a subject, geru-e, or figure in non- 
fiction prose, such as the language of politics, the in- 
formal essay, or the work of E. B. White. Because the 
topics change from quarter to quarter, students may 
take this course more than once, provided they focus 
on a different topic each time. 



ENG 4363 Writing for the Marketplace (3 q.h.) 
Workshop for writers venturing into the marketplace, 
designed to provide a working knowledge of the pub- 
lishing industry and useful practice in prepairing amd 
editing manuscripts for publication. Includes the de- 
velopment of effective strategies for composing que- 
ry letters, synopses, outlines, and sample 
manuscripts. 

ENG 4380 Business Writing and Reports 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the vocabulary and philosophy of 
business communications. Practice in planning, writ- 
ing, and analyzing effective business letters and 
memorainda. A writing proficiency test is given at 
the first class meeting. 

ENG 4381 Business Writing and Reports 2 (3 q.h.) 
Methods and principles of research and documenta- 
tion of semitechnical analyses and business reports. 
Practice in organizing and writing complex forms of 
business commurucations. Prereq. ENG 4380 
or equivalent. 

ENG 4383 Business Writing and Reports (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as ENG 4380 and ENG 4381. A wHting profi- 
ciency test is given at the first class meeting. 

ENG 4500 The English Language (3 q.h.) 
Development of modern EngUsh from its pre-Anglo- 
Saxon beginnings. Effects of Roman, Scandinavian, 
and Norman invasions; dialect geography; evolution- 
ary change; and word formation and borrowing. 

ENG 4501 Linguistics (3 q.h.) 

Theories of the nature and origin of language, review 
of historical and comparative linguistics, prescriptive 
and descriptive grammars, and structural and gener- 
ative-transformational phonology, morphology, 
and syntax. 

ENG 4502 Semantics (3 q.h.) 

The relation between language and behavior, levels 
of abstraction in communication, habits of evaluation 
of linguistic phenomena, and the modification of 
such habits for human understanding and survival. 

ENG 4600 Topics in Literature (3 q.h.) 
Examination of a variety of subjects amd themes, 
such as the relationship between literature and the 
arts; the censored novel; aUenation; and the Holo- 
caust. Because the topics change from quarter to 
quarter, students may take this course more than 
once, provided they focus on a different topic 
each time. 

ENG 4602 Major Figures in Poetry (3 q.h.) 
In-depth examination of the work of one poet, such 
as Chaucer, Milton, Dickinson, or Frost, from appren- 
ticeship to maturity. Students may take this course 
more than once, provided they focus on a different 
figure each time. 

ENG 4603 Major Figures in Fiction (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the work of one fiction writer, such 
as Austen, Joyce, Hemingway, or Bellow, from ap- 
prenticeship to maturity. Students may take this 
course more than once, provided that they focus on a 
different figure each time. 



English — Earth Sciences 151 



ENG 4610 The American Short Story (3 q.h.) 
Development of the American short story from its 
nineteenth-century origins to its present forms. In- 
cludes such writers as Poe, Hawthorne, James, 
Hemingway, Roth, and Updike. 
ENG 4611 The American Novel (3 q.h.) 
Development of the novel in America and its charac- 
teristic qualities. Includes such writers as Cooper, 
Melville, James, Wharton, Faulkner, and Ellison. 
ENG 4612 Contemporary American Poetry (3 q.h.) 
Structure and themes of poetry in post-1945 America. 
Includes such writers as Ginsberg, Plath, Snodgrass, 
£md Wilbur. 

ENG 4640 The Twentieth Century (3 q.h.) 
The prose and poetry of Yeats, EUot, Joyce, Law- 
rence, Woolf, Thomas, and Lessing. 
ENG 4641 Contemporary English Poetry (3 q.h.) 
Structure and themes of poetry in post-1945 England. 
Includes the work of Gunn, Hughes, and Larkin. 
ENG 4642 The English Novel (3 q.h.) 
Development of the English novel from its begin- 
nings in the eighteenth century through its concern 
with maimers and morals in the nineteenth century 
to the experimentation of the twentieth century. In- 
cludes such writers as Fielding, Richardson, Austen, 
Dickens, Eliot, and Woolf. 
ENG 4649 European and English Short Story (3 q.h.) 
Development of the short story in Europe and Eng- 
land in both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Includes such writers as de Maupassant, Balzac, 
Mann, Camus, Kipling, Lawrence, Greene, and Boll. 
ENG 4650 Modern Bestsellers (3 q.h.) 
The fascinating world of modern bestsellers, a world 
of romance and adventure, of high living and sinister 
intrigue, by such popular writers as Rona Jaffe, Har- 
old Robbins, Jacqueline Susann, and Irving Wallace. 
ENG 4651 The Continental Novel (3 q.h.) 
Development of the European novel through its var- 
ious forms and themes, fi-om Balzac and Tolstoy to 
Proust and Mann. 

ENG 4652 Russian Masterworks (3 q.h.) 
The work of such Russian masters of the novel and 
the short story as Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, 
and Tolstoy in the nineteenth century and Zamyatin, 
Pasternak, Babel, and Solzhenitsyn in the twentieth. 
ENG 4653 Latin American Fiction (3 q.h.) 
The variety of Latin American fiction of the past gen- 
eration of writers, such as Marquez and Puig, Borges 
and Cortazar, Bombal and Lispector. 
ENG 4655 Contemporary Fiction (3 q.h.) 
The range and variety of such post-1945 fiction writ- 
ers as Bellow, Updike, Lessing, Gordimer, Baldwin, 
and Roth. 

ENG 4658 Shakespeare the Dramatist (3 q.h.) 
Detailed examination of representative plays from 
Shakespeare's early, middle, and late periods. Stu- 
dents trace his development as a dramatist and 
define principal themes in such plays as A Midsum- 
mer Night's Dream,, Romeo and Juliet, and King 
Lear. 



ENG 4659 Shakespeare: The Major Tragedies and Comedies 

(3 q.h.) 

Study of examples of Shakespeare's mature dramatic 
art, such as As You Like It, Much Ado About Nothing, 
Hamlet, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. 
ENG 4800 Directed Study 1 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for qualified students to take an upper- 
level required course when the needed course is not 
available in an every-other-year cycle. Petitions and 
procedural instructions are available in the Liberal 
Arts Program office. Allow at least six weeks to com- 
plete the petition process. Prereq. 87 quarter hours. 
ENG 4801 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity to initiate a second individual study as 
described in ENG 4800. Prereq. ENG 4800. 
ENG 4802 Honors Program 1 (4 q.h.) 
Independent work in a selected area under the direc- 
tion of members of the department. Prereq. Program 
Director's approval. 
ENG 4803 Honors Program 2 (4 q.h.) 
Second opportunity to do independent work as de- 
scribed in ENG 4802. Prereq. ENG 4802 and Pro- 
gram Director's approval. 
ENG 4804 Honors Program 3 (4 q.h.) 
Additional opportunity to do independent work as 
described in ENG 4802. Prereq. ENG 4803 and Pro- 
gram Director's approval. 
Earth Sciences 

ESC 4103 Introduction to the Earth Sciences: The Solid Earth 
(formerly Earth Sciences 1) (3 q.h.) 
Study of the differential structure of the solid Earth, 
including the components and forces responsible for 
the organization of its internal structure and for the 
formation and reshaping of its external .surface. 

ESC 4104 Introduction to the Earth Sciences: The Fluid Earth 

(formerly Earth Sciences 2) (3 q.h.) 
Study of the liquid and gaseous components on and 
surrounding the sohd Earth. Includes the way in 
which these components are organized, the factors 
and forces that differentiate them, the dynamics of 
the interactions between them, and the long-range 
consequences of their interactions in shaping and re- 
shaping land masses. 

ESC 4105 Introduction to the Earth Sciences: The Celestial 
Earth (formerly Earth Sciences 3) (3 q.h.) 
Analysis of the Earth and its satellite, the moon, as 
objects in space. Includes their probable mode of ori- 
gin, their physical characteristics of shape, mass, sur- 
face, magnetism, and differentiated motions; their 
usefulness as a model for understanding the other 
planets and satellites in the solar system, and how 
the solar system may serve as a model for under- 
standing the universe. 

ESC 4109 Introduction to the Earth Sciences (Intensive) 
(9 q.h.) 

Same as ESC 4103, ESC 4104, and ESC 4105. 
ESC 4200 Principles of Geology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Crustal components of the Earth, their modes of for- 
mation, the forces involved in their shaping, and the 
relation of these factors to the structure and pro- 
cesses of the Earth's interior. Prereq. ESC 4103. 



152 Earth Sciences 



ESC 4201 Principles of Geology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Forces and processes involved in the alteration, 
transportation, and deposition of crustal materials, 
their effects on the Earth's land forms, and the inter- 
actions of the oceans with the land masses. ESC 
4200 recommended. 

ESC 4202 Principles of Geology 3 (3 q.h.) 
Study of sedimentary and radiochemical deposits of 
the Earth and their relevant contributions to under- 
standing the history of the Earth. ESC 4201 
recommended. 

ESC 4203 Gemology (3 q.h.) 

Topics include aspects of crystallography and phys- 
ical properties of minerals relevant to gemstones; 
gem cutting methods; origin of color in minerals; be- 
havior of light in minerals and its influence on gem 
cutting; types of inclusions found in gemstones and 
their effects on optical properties (star sapphire, 
cat's eye); techruques of growing crystals; geology 
and geography of selected gem deposits; properties 
of the mayor types of gemstones and imitations. One 
or more field trips to local museums are scheduled. 

ESC 4210 Physical Oceanography 

(formerly ESC 4215) (3 q.h) 

Origin of the global ocean, the physical and chemical 

properties of sea water, the development of ocean 

currents and their effects on land masses of the 

world, and the problems of ocean pollution. Prereq. 

ESC 4104. 

ESC 4211 Biological Oceanography 

(formerly ESC 4216) (3 q.h.) 

Study of habitat zones and organisms of the sea 

and the economic importance of renewable marine 

resources for an expanding world population. 

ESC 4210 recomm,ended. 

ESC 4212 Geological Oceanography 

(formerly ESC 4217) (3 q.h.) 

Topics include physiography and structure of ocean 
basins; marine geological processes and features; 
sedimentation, erosion, shorelines, and the topogra- 
phy of the ocean floor; and methods and techniques 
of marine geological exploration. ESC 4211 
reccnnm,ended. 

ESC 4213 Marine Resources (formerly ESC 4332) (3 q.h.) 
Quantitative and qualitative considerations of marine 
energy and current technological developments in 
the use of tidal power, offshore oil, natural gas, and 
thermal and nuclear energy from the sea. Topics in- 
clude food resources of the sea, including analysis of 
world marine food production and technology, con- 
servation, and mariculture; and shore erosion and 
coastal zone recreation resources. Prereg. ESC 4104. 

ESC 4215 Principles of Oceanology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Origin of the global ocean, the physical and chemical 
properties of sea water, the development of ocean 
currents and their effects on land masses of the 
world, and the problems of ocean pollution. Prereq. 
ESC 4104. 



ESC 4216 Principles of Oceanology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Habitat zones and organisnts of the sea and the eco- 
nomic importance of renewable marine resources for 
an expanding world population. ESC 4215 
recommended. 

ESC 4217 Principles of Oceanology 3 (3 q.h.) 
Physiography and structure of ocean basins; marine 
geological processes and features; sedimentation, 
erosion, shorelines, and the topography of the ocean 
floor; and methods and techniques of marine geologi- 
cal exploration. ESC 4216 recomm,ended. 

ESC 4230 Principles of Meteorology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Composition and structure of the atmosphere, the is- 
sue of solar energy input, and the physical conse- 
quences for the dynamics of the atmosphere. Prereq. 
ESC 4104. 

ESC 4231 Principles of Meteorology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Study of formation, behavior, and interactions of air 
masses and the formation of fronts and storms. ESC 
4230 recom^mended. 

ESC 4232 Principles of Meteorology 3 (3 q.h.) 
Practices and procedures of weather reporting and 
forecasting, the formulation of weather maps, jind 
the historical weather record and its value for studies 
of world climatology. ESC 4231 recom,m,ended. 

ESC 4239 Observational Astronomy 

(formerly ESC 4159) (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the planets, stars, and constellations 
visible to the naked eye. Includes lectures, visits to 
the planetarium, and actual viewing sessions. Em- 
phasizes stars and constellations easily seen from 
mid-northern latitudes. Prereq. ESC 4105. 

ESC 4240 Historical Astronomy 

(formerly ESC 4248) (3 q.h.) 

Study of the numerous efforts to comprehend the na- 
ture of the universe through unaided observations 
and simple instrumental techruques. ESC 4239 
recommended. 

ESC 4241 Archaeo- Astronomy 

(formerly ESC 4249) (3 q.h.) 
Artifacts, sites, and alignment factors that have re- 
cently been recognized as evidence that primitive 
cultures had a very sophisticated understanding of 
the night sky and its apparent behavior. ESC 4240 
reco7nm,ended. 

ESC 4242 Solar System Astronomy 

(formerly ESC 4390) (3 q.h.) 

Study of individual components of the solar system. 
Contemporary results from the space probes are 
used to reassess our imderstanding of the origin and 
development of the solar system. Prereq. ESC 4105. 

ESC 4243 Celestial Astronomy 

(formerly ESC 4391) (3 q.h.) 

Topics include the sun as a model star; variations of 
characteristics in single stars, star systems, and stel- 
lar populations; the H-R diagram and steUar evolu- 
tion; and the significance of radio astronomy for 
stellar structure and stellar evolution. ESC 4242 
recom/mended. 



Earth Sciences — Finance 153 



ESC 4244 Cosmology (formerly ESC 4392) (3 q.h.) 
Topics include structure and organization of the 
Milky Way galaxy; the nature of interstellar and inter- 
galactic space; quasars, pulsars, and black holes; and 
cosmology. ESC 4243 recommended. 
ESC 4250 Conservation and the Nation (formerly ESC 

4420) (3 q.h.) 

Study of conservation problems and land-use 
practices in the U.S. Includes an in-depth study 
of the irrelevance of national boundaries to 
conservation issues. 
ESC 4251 Conservation and the Community (formerly ESC 

4421) (3 q.h.) 

Study of conservation problems and land-use prac- 
tices at the local level. Includes an in-depth study of 
urban development and its impact on the environ- 
ment. ESC 4250 recommended. 
ESC 4252 Conservation Management (formerly ESC 4422) 
(3 q.h.) 

Examination of current conservation practices at the 
local level. Includes the role of relevant agencies, 
sources of knowledge and assistance, the nature and 
scope of practices needed, and the feasibility of com- 
munity action. ESC 4251 recomm,ended. 
ESC 4680 Science, Technology, and Ancient Societies 
(formerly ESC 4650) (3 q.h.) 

Interdisciplinary course using an independent study/ 
seminar approach. An examination of changes in sci- 
ences, technologies, and societal structures from pre- 
history through classical cultures and the beginning 
of the Renaissance. 

ESC 4681 Science, Technology, and JModern Societies 
(formerly ESC 4651) (3 q.h.) 

Interdisciplinary course conducted using an indepen- 
dent study/seminar approach. An examination of 
changes in sciences, technologies, and societal struc- 
tures from the begirming of the Renaissance through 
the period of industrialization and the present day. 
ESC 4682 Science, Technology, and Society (Intensive) 
(formerly ESC 4652) (6 q.h.) 
Same as ESC 4680 and ESC 4681. 
ESC 4801 Independent Study in Earth Science (3 q.h.) 
Students focus on areas of special interest and rel- 
evance to their professional goals. Each student is 
paired with a faculty preceptor, who monitors and 
evaluates the completed project. Arrangements must 
be made with the Program Director prior to register- 
ing for the course; call 617-437-2818 for details. 

Finance 

Fl 4101 Personal Finance (3 q.h.) 
A practical approach to problems involved in manag- 
ing personal finances. Includes financial planriing, 
budgeting, obtaining credit and loans, income 
taxes, savings and investments, life insurance, 
home buying, and estate planning. Subjects are treat- 
ed in a nontechnical manner. Recommended for 
nonfinance m^ors. 
Fl 4301 Principles of Finance (3 q.h.) 
The scope and nature of finance, introducing basic fi- 
nancial concepts and principles. Includes financial 



analysis, financial planning, working capital manage- 
ment, the time value of money, and an introduction 
to financial markets and different types of securities. 
Prereq. ACC 4102 and ECN 4116. 
Fl 4302 Financial Management (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to financial management from both a 
domestic and an international perspective, using the 
case-method approach. Includes valuation, leverage, 
financial analysis and planning, working capital man- 
agement, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and long- 
term and short-term financing decisions. 
Spreadsheets used. Prereq. Fl 4301. 
Fl 4303 Financial Strategy (formerly Financial Manage- 
ment 2) (3 q.h.) 

Financial management using the case-method ap- 
proach. Includes Eidvanced capital budgeting, capital 
structure, decision making, dividend policy, leasing, 
convertibles and warrants, mergers, failures and re- 
organization, and the timing of financial policy. 
Prereq. Fl 4302. 

Fl 4304 Financial Management (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as Fl 4302 and Fl 4303. Prereq. Fl 4301. 
Fl 4310 Investment Principles (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to investment concepts, practices, amd 
procedures. Reviews various types of investments, 
including the role of security markets and security 
analysis. Prereq. Fl 4301. 
Fl 4311 Investment Management (3 q.h.) 
Relationship between the economy and stock prices. 
Covers corporate analysis, earnings, dividends, and 
cash flow and introduces portfolio analysis. Studies 
technical analysis versus fundamental factors. 
Prereq. Fl 4310. 

Fl 4312 Investments (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as Fl 4310 and Fl 4311. Prereq. Fl 4301. 
Fl 4320 Credit Principles (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to credit and its functions. Examines 
the role of the credit executive, credit investigation, 
documentary credit, trade credit, and organization of 
the credit department. Prereq. Fl 4301. 
Fl 4321 Credit Management (3 q.h.) 
Forms of credit and collection services, including 
analysis of financial statements, determination of 
credit-worthiness, creditors' rights, adjustment bu- 
reau operations, credit insurance, and guarantees. 
Prereq. Fl 4320. 

Fl 4325 Budgeting and Planning (3 q.h.) 
Managerial planning, budgetary control, and financial 
analysis. Studies the interrelation between functional 
areas in an organization using consolidated profit 
planning as an integrating device. Covers fundamen- 
tal financial analysis, comprehensive profit planning, 
general expense planning, production planning, ma- 
terijils planning, and purchasing. Prereq. Fl 4301. 
Fl 4326 Financial Control (3 q.h.) 
Development and application of variable budgets, 
planning and control of capital expenditures, com- 
puter applications in profit planrung, cash flow plan- 
ning and control, cost-profit-volume analysis, 
performance reporting, and analysis of budget vari- 
ations. Prereq. Fl 4325. 



154 Finance — Health Management 



Fl 4330 JManagement of Financial Institutions (3 q.h.) 
Operation of bank and nonbank financial institutions 
and their role in the economy. Discusses operating 
objectives, services, asset management, and sources 
of financing and profitability. Prereq. FI 4302. 

Fl 4335 Bank Manogement (3 q.h.) 
Financial management of commercial banks and 
thrift institutions. Problems of liquidity and invest- 
ment management, loan portfolio and capital man- 
agement, and various pricing problems in the context 
of a changing economic and regulatory environment. 
Lectures, discussions, and case studies. Prereq. 
FI 4302. 

Fl 4350 International Finance (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to international finance management in 
the multinational corporation. Analyzes basic prob- 
lems and finance considerations involved with inter- 
national investments, trade, and payments. Also 
covers planning in the international environment re- 
lated to exchange rates, financial strategy, sources of 
capital, working capital management, fund flows, and 
management control through accounting and finan- 
cial reporting. Prereq. FI 4303. 
Fl 4360 Commodities and Futures Markets (3 q.h.) 
Commodities and futures markets and their objec- 
tives and operations, including hedging and specula- 
tion. Examines the role of bar\ks and produce 
institutions in these markets and the techniques used 
to protect prices and positions. Prereq. FI 4311 or 
instructor's permission. 
Fl 4383 Personal Financial Planning (3 q.h.) 
Development of financial planning expertise useful 
to those considering careers as personal financial 
plaimers. Includes budgeting, insurance, taxes, estate 
plarming, basic investment vehicles and strategies, 
and related legal aspects. Prereq. FI 4301. 

Health Management 

HMG 4100 Hospital Orgonization and Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Study of hospital organizational structure and admin- 
istration. Focuses on the complex nature of health 
administration, its interdependent relationships and 
organizational strategy. 

HMG 4101 Hospital Organization and Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of HMG 4100, emphasizing organiza- 
tional issues and management techniques. Prereq. 
HMG 4100. 

HMG 4103 Hospital Organization and Management 
(Intensive) (6 q.h.) 

Same as HMG 4100 and HMG 4101. 
HMG 4200 Health Science Statistics (3 q.h.) 
Designed to give health practitioners the opportunity 
to learn to apply basic statistical techniques in 
the gathering, display, and interpretation of health 
data. Discusses principles of research design and 
agencies involved in collecting statistical data. 
Prereq. MTH4111. 

HMG 4210 Medical Care and Current Social Problems 1 
(3 q.h.) 

Presentation of some of the complex dilemmas faced 
in medical ethics today through lectures, seminars, 
and case studies. Includes the escalating cost of 



health care versus the ability to pay; teenage 
pregnancy; abortion; genetic counseling and screen- 
ing; behavior control; alcoholism; and the "right to 
health care." 

HMG 4211 Medical Care and Current Social Problems 2 
(3 qii.) 

Introduction to such problem areas as child abuse; 
suicide; euthanasia; the withholding of treatment; the 
concept and exercise of informed, voluntary consent; 
patients' rights; the living wiU; human experimenta- 
tion; and the allocation of scarce medical resources. 
Prereq. HMG 4210. 
HMG 4215 Health Law and Ethics (3 q.h.) 
Basic hospital legal issues relating to corporate 
and individual liability. Includes an analysis 
of consent and competency in health care, empha- 
sizing bioethiC£il questioris raised by the removal 
of life-support systems. 
HMG 4300 Home Health Care (3 q.h.) 
Programs and techniques for providing effective 
commimity home health care and the impact of these 
programs on the health care delivery system. 
HMG 4301 Health Care Delivery Systems (3 q.h.) 
The structure, function, and orgariization of health 
care services. 

HMG 4310 Principles and Practices of Community Health 1 
(3 q.h.) 

Conununity health care activities. Emphasizes com- 
munity health promotion and the coordination and 
integration of medical and self-care activities with 
the needs, goals, and resources of the commimity. 
HMG 431 1 Principles and Practices of Community Health 2 
(3 q.h.) 

Continuation of HMG 4310. Emphasizes specific 
conununity health problems. Prereq. HMG 4310. 
HMG 4325 Health Planning and Regulation (3 q.h.) 
Analysis of past and present interventions that affect 
the supply and demand side of the health care system 
at the community, state, regional, and national levels. 
Planning and regulations are discussed in the context 
of political considerations influencing their imple- 
mentation and effectiveness. 
HMG 4390 The Patienfs Impact on Decision Making (3 q.h.) 
Exploration of some of the personal dimensions of 
illness and treatment and the nature of the relation- 
ships between ill people and those trying to care for 
them. Emphasis on how this interaction effects and 
influences health management decisions. 
HMG 4400 Health Care Financial Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to health care flnancicd management, in- 
cluding issues in fund accounting, control, and reim- 
bursement. Prereq. FI 4101. 
HMG 4401 Health Care Financiol Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of HMG 4400. Prereq. HMG 4400. 
HMG 4429 Health Care Delivery's Changing Environment 
(2 q.h.) 

Health care delivery systems are experiencing a mul- 
titude of changes. Keeping up with the changes and 
anticipating future changes are the subjects covered 
in a series of five seminars. Topics include quality 



Health Management — Health Record Administration 1 55 



health care in the 1980s, financing health care, alter- 
native health care delivery systems, computers and 
health care, and future trends. 
HMG 4430 Communications for Health Care Personnel 1 
(3 q.h.) 

Two-part course examining the need for careful in- 
terviewing techniques, thorough record keeping, and 
accurate and articulate health care correspondence. 
Emphasizes effective interaction between patients 
and health care personnel, and between health care 
workers and staff members of health care agencies. 
HMG 4431 Communications for Heolth Care Personnel 2 
(3 q.h.) 

Continuation of HMG 4430. Prereq. HMG 4430 or in- 
structor's permission. 

HMG 4440 Health Care Operations Management (3 q.h.) 
An applications-oriented case course focusing on se- 
lected operations management planning, restructur- 
ing, and control problems common to hospitals and 
other health service organizations. 
HMG 4445 Health Care Marketing and Communication 
(3 q.h.) 

The how and why of marketing in health care. Pre- 
sents basic principles, including formulating a mar- 
keting plan, strategic marketing practices, and 
specific marketing for specialized organizations such 
as HMOs and mental health nursing homes. 
HMG 4550 Contemporary and Controversial Health Care 
Issues 1 (3 q.h.) 

Study of current health care problems. Emphasizes 
the interrelationships between the economic, social, 
political, and environmental factors involved in the 
development and delivery of health care. 
HMG 4551 Contemporary and Controversial Health Care 
Issues 2 (3 q.h.) 

Continuation of HMG 4550. Prereq. HMG 4550. 
HMG 4580 Information Processing in Health Care (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to computer applications and manage- 
ment in health care facilities, including the evolution 
and application of computer use in health, clinical, 
and business irrformation systems; patient care; man- 
agement; public health; and reimbursement. The in- 
formation flow of clinical and nonclinical patient 
data is applied to the principles of information sys- 
tem life-cycle development. The role of the health 
manager in selecting, implementing, and evaluating 
information systems for health care facilities is 
considered. 

HMG 4600 Long-Term Care Administration 1 (6 q.h.) 
Organization of care for the long-term and chronical- 
ly ill patient. Examines the goals, purposes, and de- 
sign of long-term care facilities as well as budgeting, 
financing, capital funding, and administration. 
Prereq. HMG 4101. 

HMG 4601 Long-Term Care Administration 2 (6 q.h.) 
Study of internal and external systems pertinent to 
the long-term care facility. Examines such topics as 
the nursing unit, the role of the physician, therapies, 
licensing cigencies, hospitals, and methods for im- 
proving services. Prereq. HMG 4600 or equivalent or 
permission of Director of Health Professions. 



HMG 4602 Long-Term Care Administration 3 (6 q.h.) 
Long-term care institutions and their impact on the 
health care industry. Considers the nature and prob- 
lems of aging and the care of the elderly in the home, 
in the community, and in institutions. A general sur- 
vey and summary of the Massachusetts Nursing 
Home Administrators Licensure Examination is in- 
cluded. Prereq. HMG 4601 or equivalent or permis- 
sion of Director of Health Professions. 
HMG 4610 Principles and Practices of Community Mental 
Health (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the principles of community mental 
health, emphasizing the development, implementa- 
tion, operation, delivery, and use of community men- 
tal health services. 

HMG 4620 Senior Seminar in Health Care Management 
(1 q.h.) 

A review of current health care management topics, 
expanding on topics covered in HMG 4429. Must be 
taken concurrently with HMG 4429. 
HMG 4650 Field Experience/Independent Study 1 (6 q.h.) 
Working in conjunction with a preceptor, the student 
performs independent work within an administrative 
setting. Projects include problem identification, data 
gathering, analysis of alternatives, and implementa- 
tion of a plan of action. Students must have complet- 
ed 75 percent of the degree requirements before 
registering for this course. Applications for regis- 
tering mv^t be submitted two full quarters prior to 
the desired starting date. 

HMG 4651 Field Experience/Independent Study 2 (6 q.h.) 
A continuation of HMG 4650. 

Health Record Administration 

HRA 4302 Medical Terminology Survey (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the medical terminology of a 
variety of medical disciplines. Not open to health 
record students. 

HRA 4305 Language of Medicine 1 (2 q.h.) 
Analysis and definition of medical terms, including 
anatomical, diagnostic, operative, symptomatic, and 
pathological terms. Prereq. courses in anatomy 
and physiology. 

HRA 4306 Language of Medicine 2 (2 q.h.) 
Continuation of HRA 4305. Prereq. HRA 4305. 
HRA 4308 Hospital Monagement for Health Record Adminis- 
trators (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to health care facility management prin- 
ciples. Examines the interaction of the board of trust- 
ees, administration, staff, and interdisciplinary 
departments within a facility as well as licensing and 
accrediting agencies that set the standards and poli- 
cies for health care facilities. 
HRA 4310 Health Record Science 1 (6 q.h.) 
Introduction to health records, covering health 
record history, numbering, filing, security, and the 
health record administrator's relationship to the 
health care facility. Stresses quantitative and qualita- 
tive analysis of the record; includes laboratory 
experience. Prereq. 80 quarter hours, including 
BIO 41 77 and HRA 4306. 



156 Health Record Administration — Human Resources Management 



HRA 4311 Health Record Science 2 (6 q.h.) 
Methods of record retention, security, and preserva- 
tion; laws related to patient care and health records; 
classification theory; basic disease coding; and word 
processing and transcription. Prereq. HRA 4310. 

HRA 4312 Health Record Science 3 (6 q.h.) 
Basic principles of compiling statistics for hospital 
and health facilities. Includes preparation of reports, 
vital statistics reporting, classification theory, princi- 
ples of disease coding, and special indices. Prereq. 
HRA 4311. 

HRA 4313 Health Record Science 4 (6 q.h.) 
Topics include health care legislation, quality assur- 
ance, utilization review, PSROs, and plarming agen- 
cies and their impact on record management. 
Introduction to specialized record systems. Prereq. 
HRA 4312. 

HRA 4314 Health Record Science 5 (6 q.h.) 
Continued study of specialized record systems. In- 
cludes ambulatory care, home care, and long-term 
care, approached in terms of information manage- 
ment and quality assurance. Discusses problems pre- 
sented by changing patterns in health care delivery 
and reviews current literature. Prereq. HRA 4313. 
HRA 4320 Orgonization of the Health Record Department 1 
(3 q.h.) 

The health record department and its organization, 
lines of responsibility and authority, and personnel 
roles and functions. Stresses management principles 
and practices. Prereq. HRA 4308, HRA 4312, and 
HRA 4324, or Clinical Coordinator's permission. 
HRA 4321 Organization of the Health Record Department 2 
(3 q.h.) 

Study of health record department office manage- 
ment problems and their solutions, including quality 
control, time standards, budgeting, office manuals, 
and work simplification systems. Prereq. HRA 4320. 

HRA 4322 Organization of the Health Record Department 3 

(3 q.h.) 

Advanced management studies designed to address 
practical applications in health record management. 
Prereq. HRA 4321. 

HRA 4335 Clinical Practicum 1 (formerly Applied Health 
Record Science 1) (3 q.h.) 

Clinical practicum in health record science in the 
general hospital. Prereq. HRA 4312. 
HRA 4336 Clinical Practicum 2 (formerly Applied Health 
Record Science 2) (3 q.h.) 

Clinicjil practicum in heailth record science in spe- 
cialized health settings. Prereq. HRA 4324. 
HRA 4337 Clinical Practicum 3 (formerly Applied Health 
Record Science 3) (3 q.h.) 

Clinical practiclun in health record management in 
the health care facility. Prereq. HRA 4325. 
HRA 4330 Health Record Computer Science (3 q.h.) 
Electronic data processing in the health record and 
hospital environment. Assesses state-of-the-£irt infor- 
mation systems and their future in health record 
management. Prereq. MIS 4101 and HRA 4314. 



HRA 4332 Topics in Heoith Records (3 q.h.) 
Current issues in health record administration, focus- 
ing on inservice, personnel management, health care 
finance, and computer apphcations and trends. 

Human Resources Management 

HRM 4301 Organizational Behavior (3 q.h.) 
Fundamentals of organizational life, emphasizing the 
structure and discipUne of groups typically found in a 
business setting. Issues and data related to leader- 
ship styles, employee motivation, and organizationzil 
dynamics. Requires significant student participation. 
HRM 4302 Introduction to Human Resources Management 
(3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the rights and responsibilities of em- 
ployer orgaruzatioris, individual employees, and em- 
ployee organizations and how they influence 
personnel and labor relations activities within an or- 
ganization. Prereq. HRM 4301. 
HRM 4303 Applied Human Resources Management (3 q.h.) 
Goals and structures of various employer and em- 
ployee orgaruzations are examined ai\d evaluated in 
terms of effective human resources management. 
How the collective bargaining process changes in an- 
ticipation of future labor-management relations. 
Prereq. HRM 4302. 

HRM 4304 Organizational Behavior and Introduction to Hu- 
man Resources Monagement (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as HRM 4301 and HRM 4302. 
HRM 4310 Personnel Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Study of the role of the human resources manager, 
the role of the personnel department in personnel 
plarming and selection, and employment develop- 
ment and evaluation programs. Sigiuficant student 
participation required. 
HRM 431 1 Personnel Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continued examination of human resources manage- 
ment. Includes labor-management relations, compen- 
sation programs, safety, and affirmative action 
functions. Case-study analyses require student par- 
ticipation. Prereq. HRM 4310. 
HRM 4313 Personnel Management (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as HRM 4310 and HRM 4311. 
HRM 4320 Techniques of Employee Selection (3 q.h.) 
Recruitment, selection, and placement techniques, 
including interviewing and employment testing. 
HRM 4321 Wage and Salary Administration (3 q.h.) 
Wage and salary determination, including merit 
and incentive plans, wage and salary structure, 
compensation methods, and the impact of 
employer-employee relations on 
compensation systems. 
HRM 4322 Employee Benefits (3 q.h.) 
Study of private and public programs related to job 
and worker income security. Includes unemployment 
compensation, training and employment services, 
private guaranteed income, retirement pension plans, 
and disability and group irvsurance. 
HRM 4323 Job Evaluation (3 q.h.) 
Wage-payment systems, wage determination, job ele- 
ments, rating scales, the writing of job descriptions 
and specifications, selection of plans, development of 
wage structures, and principles of merit rating. 



Human Resources Management — Health Science 157 



HRM 4324 Creative Problem-Solving (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity to learn and practice new ways of 
thinking. Discusses ways to sense and analyze prob- 
lems, develop ideas, and evaluate and implement so- 
lutions, and examines the attitudes and climates 
conducive to creative thinking. Also provides meth- 
ods for developing imagination, the key part of the 
creative process. 

HRM 4330 Employment Rights— Wage and Hour Law 

(3 q.h.) 

Topics include minimum wage, hours of work, over- 
time, and other pertinent rules and regulations, and 
child labor laws, such as the Fair Labor Standards 
Act, the Davis-Bacon Act, and the Walsh-Healy Act. 
Prereq. HRM 4303. 

HRM 4331 Employment Rights— Health, Safety, Disability, 
and Workers Compensation Law (3 q.h.) 
Study of laws dealing with health, safety, disabihty, 
and compensation for work-related irguries. Covers 
OSHA, ERISA, Social Security, Unemployment Com- 
pensation, Workers Compensation, Federal Employ- 
ees Liability Act, and other related laws. Prereq. 
HRM 4303 

HRM 4332 Employment Rights — Fair Employment Law 

(3 q.h.) 

Examination of the old Civil Rights Laws (Sections 
1981, 1983, 1985 [3], 1988); Title VI, VII, and IX of the 
Civil Rights Act of 1964; Age Discrimination in Em- 
ployment Act; Equal Pay Act; Sections 503 and 504 of 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; Equal Opportimity Act 
11246; Affirmative Action and related areas; and cur- 
rent rulings and court decisions regarding discrimi- 
nation on the basis of race, sex, reUgion, national 
origin, age, and disabUity. Prereq. HRM 4303. 

HRM 4340 Public and Private Sector Collective Bargaining in 
the United States (formerly Private Sector Collective 
Bargaining in the United States) (3 q.h.) 
Comparison of critical issues and problems ciffecting 
collective bargainng between unions and national, 
state, and local governments; and between unions 
and the private domestic sector of the economy. Stu- 
dent participation required. Prereq. HRM 4303. 

HRM 4345 Comparative International Labor Relations 
Systems (3 q.h.) 

Comparison and contrast of selected international la- 
bor relations systems with that of the United States, 
including recent developments such as worker par- 
ticipation £ind codetermination. Research and prep- 
aration of position paper by the student; class 
discussion. Prereq. HRM 4303. 

HRM 4346 Negotiations in Labor Management 

(3 q.h.) 

Negotiation skills, the use of mediation and fact-find- 
ing in collective bargaining agreements, the inter- 
pretation and appUcation of such agreements, and 
the use of arbitration. Student participation in simu- 
lated negotiation and grievance procedures. Prereq. 
HRM 4303. 



Health Science 

HSC 4210 Basic Nutrition (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to nutrition for students in the health 
field. Focuses on current scientific knowledge of nu- 
trition and how this knowledge can guide an individ- 
ual toward making appropriate food choices. 
Students should have a high school background in 
chemistry and biology. 
HSC 4220 Basic Pharmacology (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the m^or classes of drugs. Presents 
the mode of action, common side effects, dosage, 
pharmaceutical forms, rate and route of administra- 
tion, and known interactions and toxicities of the 
most commonly used drugs. Prereq. BIO 41 77, CHM 
4113, or equivalent, or instructor's permission. 
HSC 4301 Foundations of Medical Science 1 (3 q.h.) 
The pathophysiology of msyor diseases. Discusses 
diagnosis and treatment, emphasizing inflam- 
mation, inimunology, infectious disease oncology, 
endocrine disorders, and trauma. Prereq. BIO 41 77 
or equivalent. 

HSC 4302 Foundations of Medical Science 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of HSC 4301. Uses an organ-system ap- 
proach to disease. Emphasizes cairdiovascular, gas- 
tro-intestinal, puknonary, and musculoskeletal 
diseases. Prereq. HSC 4301. 
HSC 4310 Public Health 1 (3 q.h.) 
Study of principles of pubUc health and current men- 
tal and physical health problems. Includes communi- 
cable diseases, mental health, maternal and child 
health, alcohoUsm, and chronic diseases. Also exam- 
ines federal, state, and community resources mobi- 
Uzed to aid in prevention, identification, treatment, 
and rehabiUtation. 
HSC 4311 Public Health 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of HSC 4310. Includes environmental 
health; official, voluntary, and international health 
organizations; preventive medicine; and public 
health education. 

HSC 4315 Environmental Problems and Health (3 q.h.) 
Environmental conditions on land and in the air and 
water, including the causes of pollution, its effects on 
human and other Ufe, and a general discussion of 
current control methods. Emphasizes the signifi- 
cance of environmental problems for the individual. 
HSC 4320 Training and Development in the Health 
Professions 1 (3 q.h.) 

Educational program design for the practitioner, 
including program plarming, teaching strategies, 
and the development and evaluation of educational 
objectives. 

HSC 4321 Training and Development in the Health 
Professions 2 (3 q.h.) 

Continuation of HSC 4320. Emphasizes program im- 
plementation and evaluation and student motivation. 
Prereq. HSC 4320. 
HSC 4600 Advanced Nutrition (3 q.h.) 
Study of food chemistry, nutrition, and physiology as 
applied to diet. Includes recent developments in nor- 
mal nutrition and a critical review of the literature 



1 58 Health Science — History 



and experimental data on which principles of hun\an 
nutrition are based. Prereq. BIO 4103, HSC 4210. 

HSC 4601 Advanced Pharmacology (3 q.h.) 
Prereq. HSC 4220 or equivalent. 

HSC 4602 Methods and Materials in Public Health Education 

(3 q.h.) 

Introduction to public health education. Prereq. HSC 

4311 or instructor's permission. 

HSC 4610 Geriatric Nutrition (3 q.h.) 
Integration of basic nutrition principles with the 
most current iriformation on the aging process. Re- 
views state, local, and federal nutrition programs in 
terms of services, eligibility, and effect upon the el- 
derly. Prereq. knowledge of basic nutrition or in- 
structor's permission. 

HSC 5610 Geriatric Nutrition (3 CEUs) 
Same as HSC 4610. 

HSC 4613 Oral Microbiology (3 q.h.) 
Study of microbiota inhabiting the ecologic niches of 
the oral cavity. Examines factors that contribute to 
the role of bacteria in oral pathology, particularly 
caries and periodontal disease, and the relationship 
of bacteria and therapy. Prereq. BIO 4190. 

HSC 4614 Advanced Periodontology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Diagnosis, treatment, and control of periodontal 
diseases, starting with a review of the structure and 
purposes of the periodontal tissues. Emphasizes the 
role of the dental hygienist in recognizing and 
treating disease, motivating and instructing the 
patient, and carrying out periodontal maintenance 
therapy. Includes mucogingival problems, furcation 
involvements, acute gingival infections, root 
planing, and gingival curettage. Students prepare a 
paper on a topic of special interest. Prereq. Dental 
Hygiene Certificate. 

HSC 4615 Advanced Periodontology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Latest advances and theories in periodontology. In- 
cludes the role of bacteria in pathology, immuno- 
pathology, and therapeutic alternatives. Class 
participation is stressed. Prereq. Dental Hygiene 
Certificate or instructor's permission. 

HSC 4801 Special Topics in the Health Professions 1 (3 q.h.) 
Independent study enables health science, health 
management, and health record students to focus on 
areas of special relevance to their professional goals. 
Materials are developed with the aid of a faculty ad- 
viser to reflect the student's special background and 
needs. Arrangements should be made with the facul- 
ty adviser prior to registering for the course. Not 
open to medical laboratory science students. 

HSC 4802 Special Topics in the Health Professions 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of HSC 4801. Not open to medical labo- 
ratory science students. 

HSC 4803 Special Topics in the Health Professions 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of HSC 4802. Not open to medical labo- 
ratory science students. 



History 

HST 4101 The Civilization of the Ancient and Medieval 
Worlds (formerly History of Civilization 1) (3 q.h.) 
Development of human institutions up to the end of 
the Middle Ages. Emphasizes the continuities and 
changes that occur within civilizations and the simi- 
larities, differences, and relationships that exist 
among contemporary civilizations around the world. 
Explores implications of each historical period for 
our lives today. 

HST 4102 The Civilization of the Early Modern World 

(formerly History of Civilization 2) (3 q.h.) 
The period from the end of the Middle Ages to the 
French Revolution in 1789. Emphasizes the intellec- 
tual, technological, and political expansion of Europe 
and the reactions of the rest of the world to it. Spe- 
cial attention is given to such topics as the rise of dy- 
nastic states, the rise and fall of mercantilism, the 
scientific revolution, exploration and gunpowder 
technology, and order and revolution. 

HST 4103 The Civilization of the Modern World 

(formerly History of Civilization 3) (3 q.h.) 
The world from 1789 to the present. Includes 
capitalism, industrialization, nationalism, imperial- 
ism, the clash of ideologies in the runeteenth century, 
and a study of total war in the present century. 
Based on this historical study, explores prospects for 
the future. 

HST 4110 History of Civilization A (4 q.h.) 
Mayor ideas and institutions of civilizations from an- 
cient times to 1648. For Alternative Freshman-Year 
students only. Not open to students who have taken 
HST 4101 or HST 4102. 

HST 4111 History of Civilization B (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of HST 4110. Covers the period since 
1648. For Alternative Freshman-Year students only. 
Not open to students who have taken HST 4102 or 
HST 4103. 

HST 4201 American History 1763-1848 (formerly Ameri- 
can History 1) (3 q.h.) 

America from 1763 to 1848, with attention to the de- 
velopment of political, economic, and social institu- 
tions in the new republic. 

HST 4202 American History 1848-1917 (formerly 
American History 2) (3 q.h.) 

The United States from 1848 to 1917, with attention 
to the Civil War, economic development thereafter, 
and the Progressive Era. 

HST 4203 American History since 1917 (formerly Ameri- 
can History 3) (3 q.h.) 

The United States since 1917, an age of urbanized in- 
dustrialism and international involvement and crisis. 

HST 4241 The Historian's Craft (3 q.h.) 

Discussion of ways in which the historian studies the 

past, with emphasis on research and writing. 



History 159 



HST 4263 Oral History (3 q.h.) 

Learning history from those who lived it. Students 
conduct tape-recorded interviews of firsthand expe- 
riences in a selected area of twentieth-century histo- 
ry. Students need access to £in audiotape recorder. 

HST 4265 introduction to Public History (3 q.h.) 
Topics include the new discipline of public his- 
torical archiving, the construction of historical 
displays and exhibits, the preservation and restora- 
tion of historic sites and structures, the editing of his- 
torical documents and journals, the operation of 
historical societies, and the production of historical 
media programs. 

HST 4301 Technological Transformation of Society (3 q.h.) 
The relation between technological irmovations and 
the world in which they take place. Discusses condi- 
tions necessary for discovery and irmovation and the 
impact of technology on the political, economic, and 
social environment. (Thematic Group D) 

HST 4302 History of Flight and Space (3 q.h.) 
Begirming with the ancient Greeks' and Leonardo 
da Vinci's dreams of flight, the course traces the his- 
tory of nonpowered flight from the balloon experi- 
ments of the Montgolfler brothers to contemporary 
hang- gUders; of powered flight from the Wright 
brothers through supersonic transport; and of rock- 
etry and space travel from their begirmings through 
the Enterprise. (Thematic Group D) 

HST 4303 History of the Automobile (3 q.h.) 
History of the automobile in Europe and America. In- 
cludes invention, production, impact on social and 
economic life, and the problems of pollution and en- 
ergy. (Thematic Group D) 

HST 4304 History of Energy (3 q.h.) 
Examination of how human beings have mobilized 
the forces of nature to survive, to alter and improve 
their lifestyles, and to dominate their feUow human 
beings. Emphasizes the transformation from one en- 
ergy source to the available dtematives and the rea- 
sons for the choices made. Includes the change from 
human power to animal and machine power, the en- 
ergy crisis of the sixteenth century, the turning from 
wood to water and coal power, the rising use of elec- 
tricity and fossil fuels, the birth of the Atomic Age, 
and the contemporary history of the oil crisis. 
(Thematic Group D) 

HST 4305 Health and Sickness: Historical Perspectives 

(3 q.h.) 

Survey of medical theories from ancient times to the 
present, emphasizing concepts of disease causation 
and the health care systems or institutions derived 
from them. Medical theory and practice are related to 
both the general history of the period and the par- 
ticular political, economic, or social circumstances 
that influenced attitudes regarding health care. 
(Thematic Group D) 



HST 4401 Ancient Middle East (3 q.h.) 

Study of ancient cultures and peoples in the Middle 

East to the rise of Islam. 

HST 4403 History of the Jews 1 (3 q.h.) 

Cultural and intellectual survey of the Jews from the 

end of antiquity to early modem times. 

HST 4404 History of the Jews 2 (3 q.h.) 

Role and position of the Jews in modern history. 

(Thematic Group A) 

HST 4407 Ancient Greece (3 q.h.) 

Origin and development of Greek civilization. 

HST 4408 Ancient Rome (3 q.h.) 

Study of ancient Roman civilization, emphasizing the 

rise of the Republic and the decline of the Empire. 

HST 4410 The Middle Ages (3 q.h.) 

History of Europe from the fall of Rome to 1350. 

HST 4412 Islamic History (3 q.h.) 

History of the Muslim Arab world from the seventh 

century to the end of the Abbasid Caliphate in 1258. 

HST 4420 Renaissance and Reformation (3 q.h.) 
History of Europe from 1350 to 1648, with attention 
to intellectual, religious, political, and economic 
developments. 

HST 4424 Europe 1870-1921 (3 q.h.) 
Background of World War I, including nationalism, 
militarism, imperiaUsm, and the alliance system, as 
well as the making of war and peace. (Thematic 
Group C) 

HST 4425 Europe since 1921 (3 q.h.) 
Europe after World War I; World War H; the Cold 
War; and the efforts to urufy the continent. (Thematic 
Group C) 

HST 4434 Family History (3 q.h.) 
History of the fjimily in Europe and America from 
1600 to the present. Includes the changing nature and 
role of the family, marriage and divorce, child rear- 
ing, and aging. (Thematic Group E) 

HST 4435 Women in European History (3 q.h.) 
Historical examination of the position and role of 
women in European hfe. (Thematic Group E) 

HST 4443 European Intellectual History since 1815 (3 q.h.) 
Main currents of European thought from Romanti- 
cism to the present and their social and political 
contexts. 

HST 4455 Ireland since 1800 (3 q.h.) 

The Irish question in British politics from the Act of 

Union to the present. (Thematic Group A) 

HST 4460 Hitler's Germany (3 q.h.) 
Origii\s and nature of Hitler's Third Reich, emphasiz- 
ing the personal Uves of Nazi leaders in an attempt to 
understand how seemingly ordinary people could en- 
thusiastically promote wars of aggression and revel 
in genocidal policies. (Thematic Group C) 



160 History 



HST 4466 History of Eastern Europe since 1500 (3 q.h.) 
Topics include Stefan Bathory and papal interest in 
Orthodox Russia; Western interference in Russia's 
"Time of Troubles"; Swedish invasions and the 
Northern War; the decline of Poland through Starus- 
law Poniatowski and Czarina Catherine the Great of 
Russia. Also covers the partitions of Poland and Ta- 
deusz Kosciuszko; Napoleon; revolutionEiry move- 
ments through 1848; Slavic romantic revolutionaries 
and the^n de siecle; World War I and the reconstruc- 
tion of eastern Europe; Hitler; Stalin; World War II; 
and the Iron Curtain. 
HST 4467 Russia to 1917 (3 q.h.) 
Emergence of Russia as a recogiuzed European pow- 
er; traces history of the Russian people and govern- 
ment to the revolutions of 1917. 

HST 4468 Russia since 1917 (3 q.h.) 
The revolutions of 1917 and the subsequent history 
of the Russian people and government, with special 
emphasis on foreign relations. (Thematic Group C) 

HST 4469 Russian Expansionism (3 q.h.) 
Russia's quest for territory after 1500, with attention 
to the conquest of neighboring territories, the Sino- 
Russian disputes, and current issues in Soviet geo- 
politics. (Thematic Group C) 

HST 4501 American Indians (3 q.h.) 

Survey of Native Americans from pre-Columbian 

times to the present. (Thematic Group A) 

HST 4502 Colonial America (3 q.h.) 
Topics include exploration and settlement of North 
America; the development of political, social, and 
economic institutions; and the international rivalry 
to 1763. 

HST 4503 The American Revolution (3 q.h.) 
British-American relations after 1763; war and peace. 

HST 4505 The Making of the American Constitution (3 q.h.) 
Beginning with the weaknesses of the Articles of 
Confederation, this course examines the movement 
for a stronger national government, the drafting of 
the Constitution and the first twelve amendments, 
and their implementation in the early years of 
the Republic. 

HST 4511 Populism and Progressivism (3 q.h.) 
Topical history of the United States from 1890 to 
1920, concentrating on its reactions to industrializa- 
tion and urbanization. 
HST 4512 The Age of Roosevelt (3 q.h.) 
Topical history of the United States in time of world 
war, prosperity, depression, and war again. 
HST 4513 Contemporary America (3 q.h.) 
Study of the American people from the close of 
World War 11 to the present. (Thematic Group C) 
HST 4523 American Diplomatic History (3 q.h.) 
Selected topics in the history of American foreign re- 
lations and policy since 1789. 
HST 4530 American Economic History (3 q.h.) 
Selected topics in the development of the capitalist 
economy in the United States, with attention to the 
role of govermnent since 1789. (Thematic Group B) 



HST 4540 American Social History (3 q.h.) 

Selected topics in the Ufe of the American people 

since 1789. (Thematic Group B or E) 

HST 4542 Women in American History (3 q.h.) 
Historical examination of the position and role of 
women in American life. (Thematic Group B or E) 

HST 4543 African-American History (3 q.h.) 

History of African Americans firom colonial times to 

the present. (Thematic Group A) 

HST 4547 History of Sport in America (3 q.h.) 
History of the mzyor sports and their impact on 
American life. (Thematic Group B) 

HST 4548 American Heroes (3 q.h.) 
Comparative exploration of the nature eind functions 
of heroism in American history, using such individ- 
uals as George Washington, Jesse James, Amelia Ear- 
hart, Martin Luther King, and Bruce Springsteen as 
specific case studies. (Thematic Group B) 

HST 4549 American Inquisitions (3 q.h.) 
Study of inquisitions in modem America, concentrat- 
ing on the suppression of radical movements by both 
goverrunent and private groups. (Thematic Group C) 

HST 4550 Boston to 1822 (3 q.h.) 
Study of the Town of Boston fi-om its establishment 
in 1630 to 1822 and the development of political, eco- 
nomic, and social institutions. 

HST 4551 Boston since 1822 (3 q.h.) 

Study of the City of Boston, its annexations, and the 

changes in the ethnic nature of the population. 

HST 4602 Contemporary Latin America (3 q.h.) 
Social, economic, and political development of the 
Latin American republics in the twentieth century. 
(Thematic Group A or C) 

HST 4603 The United States, Central America, and the 
Caribbean (3 q.h.) 

Latin American countries nearest the United States 
and most affected by U.S. policies, particularly Cuba, 
Mexico, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Em- 
phasizes the historical background of current issues. 
(Thematic Group C) 

HST 4604 Mexico since 1848 (3 q.h.) 
Political, economic, social, and cultural evolution of 
Mexico since the Mexican-American War. Other top- 
ics and issues include the Juarez Reforma, Diaz's dic- 
tatorship, the Revolution of 1910, and the ongoing 
Institutional Revolution. 

HST 4606 Canadian History (3 q.h.) 
The history of Canada from the time of the European 
settlement to the present, with emphasis on Canadi- 
an relations with the U.S. and the background of the 
Quebec separatist movement. 

HST 4611 Africa since 1885 (3 q.h.) 
The European impact on Africa, the rise of African 
nationalism, and the emergence of independent Afri- 
can states and their relations with other nations. 
(Thematic Group C) 



History — Hotel and Restaurant Management 161 



HST 4622 Modern Middle East (3 q.h.) 
The Middle East since 1914, with attention to Zion- 
ism, Pan-Arabism, the effects of two world wars, and 
the postwar settlements. (Thematic Group C) 

HST 4632 China since 1850 (3 q.h.) 
A century of China's history, emphasizing the West- 
ern impact on Chinese civilization, China's struggle 
to maintain independence, and the victory of com- 
munism in the mid-twentieth century. (Thematic 
Group A) 

HST 4636 Jopon since 1850 (3 q.h.) 
Analysis of Japanese domestic developments and 
foreign relations since the mid-nineteenth century. 
(Thematic Group A) 

HST 4640 Third World Women (3 q.h.) 
Role of women in the less developed, Third World 
areas, with special emphasis on aspects of change, 
development, and continuity. (Thematic Group E) 

HST 4641 Global Women's Movement (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the origins, issues, organizations, net- 
works, and resources of the global women's move- 
ment. Attention is given to the place of the U.S. 
women's movement within this global movement, the 
movement in developing countries, and the role of 
the United Nation's Conferences on Women in fos- 
tering the movement's development. (Thematic 
Group E) 

HST 4645 History of the Vietnom Wars (3 q.h.) 
History of military conflict in Vietnam, with attention 
to the rise of the Viet Minh during World War 11, the 
struggle against the French in the first Indochina 
War, the impact of the Cold War, and the involvement 
of the United States after 1950 in Laos and Cambodia 
(now Kampuchea) as well as in Vietnam. Emphasizes 
the role of communism and nationalism in Indochina 
and the motives for American intervention. Includes 
films revealing American reaction to the escalating 
conflict. (Thematic Group C) 

HST 4801 Directed Study 1 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for qualified students to take an upper- 
level course in their m^or on ein individual basis. Pe- 
titions and procedural instructions are available from 
the Liberal Arts Program office, 617-437-2416. Prereq. 
87 quarter hours. 

HST 4802 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 

Opportunity to initiate a second individual study as 

described in HST 4801. Prereq. HST 4801. 

HST 481 1 Honors Program 1 (4 q.h.) 

Prereq. Program Director's approval. (Thematic 

Group F) 

HST 4812 Honors Progrom 2 (4 q.h.) 

Prereq. HST 48 11 and Program Director's approval. 

(Thematic Group F) 

HST 4813 Honors Program 3 (4 q.h.) 

Prereq. HST 4812 and Program Director's approval. 

(Thematic Group F) 



HST 4821 Fieidwork in History (6 q.h.) 
Extracollegiate experience doing historical research 
or working in historical agencies. (Refer to page 97 
for a general description of fieidwork courses.) 
Prereq. HST 4101, 4102, 4103; HST 4201, 4202, 
4203, 4241; and Program Director's approval. 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

HTL 4301 Introduction to Hotel and Restaurant Management 

(3 q.h.) 

The hospitality industry in today's economy. Empha- 
sis is on industry growth and development, manage- 
ment problems, and principles of hotel and 
restaurant management. 

HTL 4303 Front Office Management (3 q.h.) 
Role and functions of the front office as they relate 
to the operation of the entire hotel. Covers front of- 
fice structure, registration, payment, reservations, 
£ind night audit. 

HTL 4304 Hotel and Restaurant Law (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the fundamental laws, rules, and 
regulations applicable to the hospitality industry. 
Includes hospitality maneigement policies that mini- 
mize the danger of legal liability; innkeeping; 
restaurant management; alcoholic beverage control; 
labor laws; and legislation affecting the 
hospitality industry. 

HTL 4305 Food Preparation 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the fundamentals of food preparation 
and service, with emphasis on food service industry 
terminology and equipment. Includes menu planning, 
requisitioning, pricing, and preparation and service. 
In addition to classroom instruction, students 
prepare food in a smaU-quantity laboratory. 
(Laboratory fee.) 

HTL 4306 Food Preparation 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of HTL 4305. Prereq. HTL 4305. 
(Laboratory fee.) 

HTL 4307 Food Service Engineering and Sanitation (3 q.h.) 
Organization of the maintenance and engineering 
function. Includes the technical information neces- 
sary to establish effective preventive programs. De- 
tails the fundamentals of sanitation for food service 
employees and includes practical guidelines for safe 
food handling. Provides the future hospitality man- 
ager with an opportunity for certification in Applied 
Food Service Sanitation from the National Institute 
for the Food Service Industry. 

HTL 4308 Food and Beverage Cost Control (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to management attitudes toward cost 
controls through analysis of all aspects of the food 
service operation. Includes classification of food ser- 
vice facilities, cost accounting, purchasing, inventory, 
production control methods, and the essentials of 
food and beverage controls. Develops management- 
mindedness through examination of organizational 
structures of food service and specific topics, such as 



162 Hotel and Restaurant Management — Industrial Management 



menu pricing, break-even analysis, aind cost-volume- 
profit theory. Emphasizes forecasting and achieving 
a profitable bottom line. 

HTL 4309 Managerial Accounting for the Hospitality Industry 
(3 q.h.) 

Financial practices and systems used in the hospital- 
ity industry. Analyzes controls, budgeting, financial 
statements, and specialized industry accounting pro- 
cedures. Prereq. ACC 4102. 
HTL 4310 Hospitality Marketing Management (3 q.h.) 
The market in which the hospitality industry oper- 
ates. Students have the opportunity to develop and 
implement a marketing plan to meet operational 
goals. Prereq. MKT 4301. 
HTL 4313 Introduction to Tourism (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the science, art, and business of at- 
tracting, transporting, £ind accommodating visitors 
and graciously catering to their needs and wants. In- 
cludes sociological and psychological aspects, mar- 
keting, and the economics of tourism. 
HTL 4320 Food Preparation (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as HTL 4305 and HTL 4306. 
HTL 4322 Consumer Food Preparation (3 q.h.) 
Concepts and skills learned in HTL 4305 and 
HTL 4306 are applied in a restaurant setting. Includes 
preparation of complete menus for a service dining 
room, including appetizers, soups, salads, entrees, 
vegetables, and desserts. Stresses costing, menu 
planning, quantity recipe production, menu terminol- 
ogy, and kitchen organization. Coordinates food pro- 
duction with students in the dining room service 
course (HTL 4324). Classical kitchen stations are 
worked on a rotating basis. Prereq. HTL 4306 or 
HTL 4320. 

HTL 4324 Dining Room Beverage Operation and Preparation 
(3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the operation of a dining room with 
beverage service. Includes organization, personnel, 
methods of table service, menu terminology, table ar- 
rangement, requirements for supplies and equipment, 
sales promotion techniques, and revenue control. 
Students serve meals prepared by students in the 
food production course (HTL 4322). Also covers wine 
service and alcoholic beverage preparation and con- 
trol. Prereq. HTL 4301. 
HTL 4325 Intensive ChePs Training (6 q.h.) 
For the individual who already has a culinary back- 
groimd and wishes to continue to upgrade his or her 
skills and understanding of the changing role of to- 
day's food industry. Exsimines understanding be- 
tween chef and management and the preparation 
of finer cuisine for hotels, restaurants, clubs, 
catering, and buffet. Practical demonstrations 
from hors d'oeuvres, through fancy desserts. Table- 
side and wine cookery, ice carving and extensive 
menu plarming. 

HTL 4326 The Joy of Catering (3 q.h.) 
How to create truly great dinners and buffets. Gar- 
nishing, vegetable carving, hors d'oeuvres, bartend- 
ing, and liquor planning. How to cost out a party and 
plan staff, equipment, and food quantities. 



Industrial Management 

IM 4301 Introduction to Operations Management (formerly 

Operations Management) (3 q.h.) 
Concepts and principles related to the management 
of operation functions, taught from a management 
point of view. Explores relationships to other busi- 
ness functions. Study of operations, as a transforma- 
tion process, with inputs of materials, investment, 
and people producing finished goods/services. Top- 
ics covered include product and process design, fore- 
casting demand, capacity planr\ing, facilities design, 
aggregate planning, scheduling, and quality control 
and assurance. Prereq. MS 4325. 

IM 4302 Operations Analysis (3 q.h.) 
Structuring problems and the application of analyt- 
ical techruques in the development of solutions to 
operating systems problems. Topics covered include 
operations planning and scheduling, analyzing oper- 
ating performance, quality issues, facilities layout, 
materials planning, and workforce plarming. Exami- 
nation of the operations audit as it relates to manu- 
facturing and service organizations developed as a 
tool for operations analysis. Prereq. IM 4301. 

IM 4314 Productivity Enhancement and Quality (formerly 
Production Control and Inventory Management) 
(3 q.h.) 

The fields of quality control and productivity as a 
body of managerial, technological, behaviorial, and 
economic knowledge, together with the organized 
application of this knowledge to the practical im- 
provement of operations. Introduction to various 
productivity improvement programs currently in use, 
including measurement and control; the relationship 
between increase in productivity and meinaging for 
higher quality examined. Reviews management prac- 
tices of modem quality control and the different ap- 
proaches to optimizing quality. Includes the 
economics of total quality, internal and external qual- 
ity, and management of long-term qusdity and reli- 
abiUty. Prereq. MS 4332. 

IM 4317 Purchasing and Materials Management (formerly 
Materials Management) (3 q.h.) 
Development and analysis of factors considered in 
the acquisition process and subsequent management 
of the materials function. Examines the relationships 
among price, quality, and delivery performance. Top- 
ics covered include the make-or-buy decision, corpo- 
rate purchasing strategies, setting customer service 
levels, inventory analysis, facility location, storage 
and material handling, and selection of the transpor- 
tation mode. Prereq. IM 4301. 

IM 4321 Operations Planning and Control (formerly Man- 
agement and Operational Control Systems) (3 q.h.) 
The nature of control in general and the specific 
characteristics of management and operations con- 
trol. Examines control structures, processes, and 
bases for design and implementation. Prereq. 
IM 4301. 



Industrial Management — Journalism 163 



IM 4326 Operations Management Policy (3 q.h.) 
Analyses of complex operating situations faced by 
business managers. Students are exposed to integra- 
tive cases and are expected to identify problems in 
organizations, to develop viable courses of action, to 
conduct detailed analyses, and to identify a set of 
recommendations and an implementation strategy. 
Prereq. IM 4314, IM 4317, IM 4321. 

Interdisciplinary 

INT 4110 Self-Assessment and Career Development (3 q.h.) 
Understanding the concept of Life and career plan- 
ning and its practical implications for future educa- 
tion and/or work. Students complete a self- 
assessment, including an evaluation of their compe- 
tencies and skills, and receive training in career 
decision making, with practice in the use of field 
survey techniques. Overview of job campaigning 
includes introduction to resume preparation and 
interviewing techniques. 
INT 4200 The Creative Process (3 q.h.) 
Thought processes that allow individuals to be cre- 
ative or original. Through interactive exercises and 
special projects in composition and problem solving, 
students can learn how to tap their own creativity. 
Students are asked to create an original piece of art, 
music, literature, or research. 
INT 4201 Cultural Heritage Seminar (3 q.h.) 
Study of the interconnected ways in which art, mu- 
sic, literature, religion, and specific historiceil events 
have shaped our culture, values, and self- percep- 
tions. Students undertake projects dealing with one 
or more themes included in their Cultural Heritage 
Studies. Prereq. 27 quarter hours in Cultural Heri- 
tage Studies (see Liberal Studies program, page 
110) or instructor's permission. 
INT 4202 Contemporary Studies Seminar (3 q.h.) 
Analysis and discussion of selected problems of the 
contemporary world, using analytical tools appropri- 
ate to the disciplines contained within the Liberal 
Studies curriculum. Prereg. 27 quarter hours in Con- 
temporary Studies (see Liberal Studies program, 
pa^e 110) or instructor's permission. 

Journalism 

JRN 41 12 Writing for Media 1 (formerly Fundamentals of 
Newswriting) (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to how to write leads, organize basic 
news stories, gather facts, and interview. Analyzes 
news values and the structure of news organizations. 
JRN 4113 Writing for Media 2 (formerly Newsgathering 
and Reporting) (3 q.h.) 

Writing of multisource stories, both news and fea- 
ture; public affairs reporting; advanced interviewing 
techniques; and legal issues. Prereq. JRN 4112 
or equivalent. 

JRN 4114 News Reporting Techniques (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to writing in-depth stories requiring sig- 
nificant research and introduction to investigative re- 
porting. Includes libel, privacy invasion, and other 
legal matters affecting news media. Prereq. JRN 
4113 or instructor's permission. 



JRN 4250 Interpreting the News (3 q.h.) 
The impact, both good and bad, of newspapers, tele- 
vision, radio, and other news media on American life. 
Examines how news is gathered, processed, and dis- 
seminated by the various media. "How much do we 
need the press as a watchdog on government?" and 
"Who is watching the watchdog?" are among the 
questions addressed. 
JRN 4300 Photojournalism (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the use of the camera, the negative, 
and the print in news or feature stories. Includes 
weekly photo shooting assignments and darkroom 
work. (Laboratory fee.) 
JRN 4335 Public Relations Basics (3 q.h.) 
Concepts, components, and methods of public rela- 
tions, including planning and research, processes of 
influencing public opinion, and policies concerning 
corporate and institutional relations with the media 
cind various publics. 
JRN 4336 Public Relations Practices (3 q.h.) 
Study of specific practices and techniques employed 
in public relations, especially in relation to the han- 
dling of information and organization of activities 
and events. Also discusses how to define PR "targets" 
and how to deal with such publics as employees, 
stockholders, and consumers. 
JRN 4337 Public Relations Problems (3 q.h.) 
Research and communication techniques used to 
solve public relations problems and practical 
experience with individual PR projects, programs, 
and campaigns. 

JRN 4349 Advertising Basics (3 q.h.) 
Study of the evolution of advertising, including so- 
cial, economic, and legal aspects; how advertising 
agencies and departments function; how advertising 
fits into the marketing mix; and the basic steps 
of research. 

JRN 4350 Advertising Copywriting (3 q.h.) 
Writing effective advertising copy for both print and 
electronic media; coordinating copy with other cre- 
ative functions. Elements of good ad copy are ana- 
lyzed and common pitfalls are reviewed. 
JRN 4351 Advertising Practice (3 q.h.) 
Study of media planning and selection. Includes de- 
fining objectives and determining target audiences; 
establishing the advertising budget; analyzing the 
market and the competition. 
JRN 4480 Copyediting (3 q.h.) 

Practice in the many facets of the editorial process, 
including editing copy, writing heads, and laying out 
pages. The course also includes photo selection, 
cropping, and outline writing. Prereq. JRN 4112. 
JRN 4522 Magozine Writing (3 q.h.) 
Practice in writing and freelancing magazine articles. 
Analysis of magazine markets, preparation of query 
letters, techniques of research, and submission of 
manuscript. Travel, how-to, profile, personal experi- 
ence, and other formats included. 



164 Library Science — Language (German) 



Library Science 

LIB 4310 Dotobase and Research Skills (3 q.h.) 
Wide variety of electronic and printed research skills 
and skills critical for using on-line and library re- 
sources effectively. Includes evaluating research re- 
sults in terms of authority and time and money spent. 

LIB 4321 Introduction to Reference Moterials and Methods 

(3 q.h.) 

Basic tools and methods for locating information. 
Includes evaluation of dictionaries, encyclopedias, 
gazettes, atlases, handbooks, almanacs, directories, 
and indices. 

LIB 4322 Reference Work in the Social Sciences (3 q.h.) 
The scope and use of outstanding reference materi- 
als in the social sciences, including government pub- 
lications. Includes resources from econonucs, 
education, political science, sociology, and allied 
fields. Prereq. LIB 4321 or equivalent. 

LIB 4323 Reference Work in the Humanities (3 q.h.) 
Approaches to the solution of reference problems in 
the humanities, with special emphasis on literature. 
Frereq. LIB 4321. 

LIB 4325 Business and Database Research (3 q.h.) 
Study of databases, printed materials, and other 
information resources in business, economics, and 
related fields. Includes content related to such areas 
as banking and finance, stocks and bonds, company 
and industry profiles, business law and taxes, mar- 
keting and advertising, personnel and human re- 
source management, and international business. 
Presents the fundamentals of plarming and conduct- 
ing research. Lectures and assignments are designed 
to help students locate and evaluate business data 
available from libraries, government agencies, and 
conunercial vendors. 

LIB 4331 Descriptive Cataloging (3 q.h.) 
Theory and practice of descriptive cataloging, intro- 
ducing techniques for compiling author, corporate, 
and serial entries. 

LIB 4332 Subject Heodings and Classification (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to Dewey Decimal Classification and 
Sears subject headings and further study of descrip- 
tive cataloging in book and nonbook materials. 
Prereq. LIB 4331 or equivalent. 

LIB 4333 Library of Congress Classification (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the significant differences between 
the Library of Congress (LC) and Dewey Decimal 
systems of classification. Includes notes on original 
cataloging and techniques of classification within 
the LC scheme and exercises in the use of LC 
schedules and subject headings. Prereq. LIB 4331 
or equivalent. 

Language 

LNA 4101 Elementory Arabic 1 (4 q.h.) 
Introduction to the Arabic language and culture 
through speaking, reading, and some writing. 



LNA 4102 Elementary Arabic 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNA 4101 with practice in elemen- 
tary conversation, reading, and writing. Prereq. LNA 

4101 or equivalent. 

LNA 4103 Elementary Arabic 3 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNA 4102. Builds the basic skills 
necessary to carry on a conversation. Prereq. LNA 

4102 or equivalent. 

LNF 4101 Elementary French 1 (4 q.h.) 
Essentials of grammar, practice in pronunciation, 
and progressive acquisition of a basic vocabulary and 
idiomatic expressions. 

LNF 4102 Elementary French 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of grammar study, with oral and writ- 
ten exercises. Prereq. LNF 4101 or equivalent. 

LNF 4103 Elementary French 3 (4 q.h.) 
Reading of French prose of increasing difficulty, with 
written and oral exercises based on the materials 
read and practice in conversation. Prereq. LNF 4102 
or equivalent. 

LNF 4104 Intermediate French 1 (4 q.h.) 

Review of grammar, with practice in composition 

and conversation. Prereq. LNF 4103 or equivalent. 

LNF 4105 Intermediate French 2 (4 q.h.) 

History of French civilization, with discussions and 

conversation. Prereq. LNF 4104 or equivalent. 

LNF 4106 Intermediate French 3 (4 q.h.) 
Inter\sive reading of modern French prose, with prac- 
tice in conversation. Prereq. LNF 4105 or equivalent. 

LNF 4801 French Directed Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
Directed Study Option: When a University College 
student is imable to continue study of an upper-level 
language, or when a language course needed for a de- 
gree is not scheduled at appropriate intervals, ar- 
rangements can be made to take three directed 
studies for a total of twelve quarter hours. Course 
numbers for French Directed Study 1, 2, 3 are 
LNF 4801, LNF 4802, LNF 4803; for Spanish, LNS 
4801, LNS 4802, LNS 4803; and so forth. Petitions and 
procedural instructions are available from the Liberal 
Arts Program OfQce. Allow at least six weeks to com- 
plete the petition process. Prereq. 87 quarter hours. 

LNF 4802 French Directed Study 2 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNF 4803 French Directed Study 3 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNG 4101 Elementary German 1 (4 q.h.) 

Essentials of granunar, practice in pronunciation, 

and progressive acquisition of a basic vocabulary and 

idiomatic expressions. 

LNG 4102 Elementary German 2 (4 q.h.) 

The more difficult points of grammar, particularly 

the uses of the subjunctive mood. Prereq. LNG 4101 

or equivalent. 



Language (German) — Language (Swedish) 165 



LN6 4103 Elementary German 3 (4 q.h.) 
Reading of simple German prose, with oral and writ- 
ten exercises based on material read. Conversation 
in German is encouraged. Prereq. LNG 4102 

or equivalent. 

LNG 4104 Intermediate German 1 (4 q.h.) 

Review of grammar, with practice in composition 

and conversation. Prereq. LNG 4103 or equivalent. 

LNG 4105 Intermediate German 2 (4 q.h.) 

History of German civilization, with discussions and 

conversation. Prereq. LNG 4104 or equivalent. 

LNG 4106 intermediate German 3 (4 q.h.) 
Intensive reading of modern German prose, with 
practice in conversation. Prereq. LNG 4105 
or equivalent. 

LNG 4801 German Directed Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNG 4802 German Directed Study 2 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 480L 

LNG 4803 German Directed Study 3 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNH 4101 Beginning Conversational Hebrew 1 (4 q.h.) 
Acquisition of basic oral skills by introduction of the 
essentials of Hebrew granunar. Includes extensive 
practice in pronunciation and acquisition of an idi- 
omatic core vocabulary. 

LNH 4102 Beginning Conversational Hebrew 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNH 4101. Introduces Hebrew prose 
of moderate difQculty. Prereq. LNH 4101 
or equivalent. 

LNH 4103 Beginning Conversational Hebrew 3 (4 qii.) 
Continuation of LNH 4102. Continued emphasis on 
conversation and on building a solid vocabulary. 
Prereq. LNH 4102 or equivalent. 

LNI 4101 Elementary Italian 1 (4 q.h.) 
Essentials of grammar, practice in pronunciation, 
and progressive acquisition of a basic vocabulary and 
idiomatic expressions. 

LNI 4102 Elementary Italian 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of grammar study, with oral and writ- 
ten exercises. Prereq. LNI 4101 or equivalent. 

LNI 4103 Elementary Itolion 3 (4 q.h.) 
Reading of Italian prose of increasing difficulty, with 
written and oral exercises based on the material read 
and practice in conversation. Prereq. LNI 4102 
or equivalent. 

LNI 4104 Intermediate Italian 1 (4 q.h.) 

Review of grammar, with practice in composition 

and conversation. Prereq. LNI 4103 or equivalent. 

LNI 4105 Intermediate Italian 2 (4 q.h.) 

History of Italian civilization, with discussions and 

conversation. Prereq. LNI 4104 or equivalent. 

LNI 4106 Intermediate Italian 3 (4 q.h.) 
Intensive reading of modern Italian prose, with prac- 
tice in conversation. Prereq. LNI 4105 or equivalent. 

LNI 4801 Itolion Directed Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 480L 



LNI 4802 Italian Directed Study 2 (4 qii.) 

See LNF 4801. 

LNI 4803 Italian Directed Study 3 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNJ 4101 Elementary Japanese 1 (4 q.h.) 

Basic, practical Japanese, emphasizing the essentials 

of granunar, pronunciation, progressive acquisition 

of a core vocabulary, and the use of current, 

idiomatic expressions. 

LNJ 4102 Elementary Japanese 2 (4 q.h.) 

Continuation of LNJ 4101. Progressive acquisition of 

practical skills. Prereq. LNJ 4101 or equivalent 

LNJ 4103 Elementary Japanese 3 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNJ 4102. Prereq. LNJ 4102. 
LNJ 4104 Intermediate Japanese 1 (4 q.h.) 
Review of grammar, with practice in composition 
and conversation. Prereq. LNJ 4103 or equivalent. 
LNJ 4105 Intermediate Japanese 2 (4 q.h.) 
History of Japanese civilization, with discussions and 
conversation. Prereq. LNJ 4104 or equivalent. 
LNJ 4106 Intermediate Japanese 3 (4 q.h.) 
Intensive reading of Japanese prose, with practice in 
conversation. Prereq. LNJ 4105 or equivalent. 
LNJ 4225 The Japanese Mentality (formerly Japanese 
Culture and Society) (3 q.h.) 

By studying various aspects of Japanese cultural his- 
tory, education, work ethics, male-female relations, 
and other areas, students gain insight into the Japa- 
nese mentality and how this homogeneous race is 
surviving in a heterogeneous world. 
LNJ 4801 Japanese Directed Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNJ 4802 Joponese Directed Study 2 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 480L 

LNJ 4803 Japanese Directed Study 3 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNL 4101 Beginning Latin 1 (4 q.h.) 
Study of grammar needed for reading elementary 
Latin prose as well as for understanding some basic 
etymologies. Recommended for those interested in 
enriching their knowledge of English and Romance 
languages and those who want to read classical lit- 
erature in the original. 
LNL 4102 Beginning Latin 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNL 4101. Prereq. LNL 4101. 

LNL 4103 Beginning Latin 3 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNL 4102. Prereq. LNL 4102. 

LNL 4801 Latin Directed Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNL 4802 Latin Directed Study 2 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNL 4803 Latin Directed Study 3 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNN 4101 Beginning Conversational Swedish 1 (4 q.h.) 
Acquisition of basic oral skills by introduction of the 
essentials of Swedish grammar, with extensive prac- 
tice in pronunciation and acquisition of an idiomatic 
core vocabulary. 



166 Language (Swedish) — Management 



LNN 4102 Beginning Conversational Swedish 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNN 4101. Introduces Swedish prose 
of moderate difficulty. Prereq. LNN 4101 
or equivalent. 

LNN 4103 Beginning Conversational Swedish 3 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNN 4102. Prereq. LNN 4102 
or equivalent. 

LNN 4801 Swedish Directed Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNN 4802 Swedish Directed Study 2 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNN 4803 Swedish Directed Study 3 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNR 4101 Elementary Russian 1 (4 q.h.) 
Essentials of granunar, practice in pronunciation, 
and progressive acquisition of a basic vocabulary and 
idiomatic expressions. 

LNR 4102 Elementary Russian 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of grammar study, with oral and writ- 
ten exercises. Prereq. LNR 4101 or equivalent. 

LNR 4103 Elementary Russian 3 (4 q.h.) 
Reading of Russian prose of increasing difficulty, 
with written and oral exercises based on the material 
read and practice in conversation. Prereq. LNR 4102 
or equivalent. 

LNR 4225 Russian Culture and Society (3 q.h.) 
Study of various aspects of Russian cultural history, 
education, work ethics, male-female relations, and 
other areas, for insight into the Russian mentality. 

LNS 4101 Beginning Conversational Spanish 1 (4 q.h.) 
Acquisition of basic oral skills by introduction of the 
essentials of Spanish grammar. Extensive practice in 
pronunciation and acquisition of an idiomatic 
core vocabulary. 

LNS 4102 Beginning Conversational Spanish 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNS 4101. Introduces Spanish prose 
of moderate difficulty. Prereq. LNS 4101 
or equivalent. 

LNS 4103 Beginning Conversational Spanish 3 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of LNS 4102. Continued stress on con- 
versation, wlule building a solid vocabulary. Prereq. 
LNS 4102 or equivalent. 

LNS 4104 Intermediate Spanish 1 (4 q.h.) 
Review of grammar, with practice in composition 
and conversation. Prereq. LNS 4103 or equivalent. 
LNS 4105 Intermediate Spanish 2 (4 q.h.) 
Examination of Spanish civilization through texts of 
average difficulty. Intensive reading of modem prose, 
with occasional oral or written translation and con- 
versation practice based on assigned readings. 
Prereq. LNS 4104 or equivalent. 

LNS 4106 Intermediate Spanish 3 (4 qJi.) 
Examination of Spanish-American civilization 
through texts of average difficulty. Intensive readings 
of modern prose, with occasional oral or written 
translations and conversation practice based on as- 
signed readings. Prereq. LNS 4105 or equivalent. 



LNS 4801 Spanish Directed Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNS 4802 Spanish Directed Study 2 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

LNS 4803 Spanish Directed Study 3 (4 q.h.) 
See LNF 4801. 

Management 

MGT 4101 Introduction to Business and Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Study of the setting and general structure of Ameri- 
can business, including objectives and practices af- 
fecting the American standard of living. Examines 
the characteristics of private enterprise and the na- 
ture and challenge of capitalism and other forms of 
economic enterprise. Introduces types of businesses, 
the structures of organizations, and the functions of 
management as well as what a managerial career in- 
volves, what problems must be faced, and what deci- 
sions must be reached. 

MGT 4102 Introduction to Business and Management 2 

(3 q.h.) 

Methodologies in plarming, organizing, directing, and 
controlling production, marketing, sales, and pricing 
within the American free enterprise system and in 
contrast to other business systems. Examines tech- 
niques for coping with the intricacies of systems 
management. Prereq. MGT 4101. 

MGT 4103 Introduction to Business and Management 3 

(3 q.h.) 

Basic management concepts and techniques 
necessary to successful decision making. Empha- 
sizes management as a continuous, active process by 
introducing methods of designing an organization; 
understanding and dealing with people; evaluating 
the political, social, and economic environment; and 
effectively planning, directing, and controlling an or- 
ganization. Prereg. MGT 4102. 

MGT 4105 Introduction to Business and Management 

(Intensive) (6 q.h.) 

Same as MGT 4101 and MGT 4102. 

MGT 4108 Women in Business Organizations: Structurol and 
Behavorial Fundamentals (formerly INT 4102) (3 qii.) 
Effective management practices and the factors that 
impede women from acquiring them; the importance 
of effective commimication and dealing with criti- 
cism; and the validity of common behavioral assvmip)- 
tions, including fears of success, inadequate 
motivation, lack of social access, and disinclination 
to take charge or withstand pressure. Prereq. 
MGT 4102. 

MGT 4109 Women in Business Organizations: Leadership and 
Communications (formerly INT 4103) (3 q.h.) 
Study of dynamics of leadership as they relate to the 
successful woman manager, including managing con- 
flict, securing control, instituting change, motivating 
and disciplining others, gaining respect, and distin- 
guishing supervisory from msmagement performance 
standards. Role playing amd case studies assist in the 
development of leadership and problem-solving ca- 
pabilities. Prereq. MGT 4102. 



Managemen t 167 



MGT 4110 Survey of Business and Management (4 q.h.) 
Introduction to the setting and general structure of 
American business, the characteristics of private en- 
terprise, and the nature and challenge of capitahsm 
and other forms of economic enterprise. Covers the 
forms of business, organizational structure, and func- 
tions of management. Through lectures and class dis- 
cussion, students are given an overview of the 
methodologies used in planning, organizing, direct- 
ing, and controlling the functions of production, mar- 
keting, sales, pricing, and finance. For Alternative 
Freshman-Year students only. 

MGT 4120 Monagement of Nonprofit Organizations (3 q.h.) 
Nonprofit organizations are found in many areas: 
medicine, education, human services, arts, reli- 
gion, and professional associations. This course 
examines the scope and environment of the nonprof- 
it segment of our economy and investigates charac- 
teristics related to governance, membership, 
organizational structure, financial management, and 
operational techniques. Special emphasis is placed 
on business/management needs and professional 
skills for those interested in or affiliated with 
non-profit organizations. 

MGT 4310 Project Management Process: Planning and Imple- 
mentation (formerly Project Planning and Control) 
(3 q.h.) 

The entire process of implementing a project, from 
project definition to the evaluation of feasibility, 
scheduling, and financial and budgetary factors. Man- 
agement techniques and requirements are used in 
case analyses, along with using computer software to 
help oversee projects. Prereq. IM 4301. 

MGT 4320 Managing Change (3 q.h.) 
Application of managerial concepts and practices to 
real-world situations with policy or resource con- 
straints. Explores decision making related to the im- 
pact of change on the organization and its persormel: 
develops a conceptual framework for handling 
change in one's own business career. Prereq. 
MGT 4102. 

MGT 4321 Managing for Results (formerly IM 4320 Man- 
aging for Results) (3 q.h.) 
A forum for the discussion of the wide-ranging 
management theories of Peter Drucker and other 
managerial theorists. Covers the concepts and 
methods available to the results-oriented manager 
and relationships between theory, practice, and im- 
plementing for results. Prereq. MGT 4102. 

MGT 4323 Motivation Management (3 q.h.) 
Designed to help students differentiate between the 
managerial position as such and a leadership role, 
evaluating the impact of leadership and management 
styles on human behavior. Introduces and analyzes 
important motivation concepts through study of the 
working environment and the processes that influ- 
ence both performance and outcome. Includes 



readings from contemporary behavioral scientists 
and individual research projects, with reports for 
group discussion and analysis. Prereq. MGT 4102. 

MGT 4328 Creating New Ventures (3 q.h.) 
The nature of entrepreneurship and potential for 
self-employment by the individual. Includes the se- 
quence from generation of an idea through the com- 
pletion of a plan for owning and operating a small 
business. Prereq. MGT 4102. 

MGT 4329 Managing Small Businesses (3 q.h.) 
Study of managerial operations of a small business. 
Presents issues and problems encountered by those 
considering entrepreneurial and small business en- 
deavors. Includes the facets of financing, planning, 
market research, and strategy for small businesses. 
Prereq. MGT 4102. 

MGT 4330 Essentials for Managers of Small Businesses 

(3 qii.) 

Designed for small business enfrepreneurs or per- 
sons interested in running a small business. Covers 
fundamental business concepts, including ownership 
forms; ongoing market research, capitalization, and 
management and operating issues; personnel and 
benefits; risk management; tax considerations; oper- 
ating finances; and small business strategic position- 
ing. Generally offered in six half-day sessions. 

MGT 4340 Small Business 1 (3 q.h.) 
Development and completion of a fuU business plan 
for entrepreneurs or persons interested in operating 
a small business. Covers the nature and characteris- 
tics of entrepreneurship; personal analysis; genera- 
tion of ideas and market identification; legal and tax 
ramification of ownership forms; marketing research 
and planning. Optional Lotus 1-2-3 seminar. Not open 
to students who have completed MGT 4323, MGT 
4326, or MGT 4327 for academic credit. 

MGT 4341 Small Business 2 (3 q.h.) 
The research and development of the marketing por- 
tion of the overall business plan. Covers new busi- 
ness capital requirements, including the differences 
in venture and equity funding; and developing the fi- 
nancial management portion of the overall business 
plan, along with business strategy impUcations, per- 
sormel matters, and the use of computers. Prereq. 
MGT 4340 

MGT 4350 Business Policy 1 (3 q.h.) 
For advanced students building on all previous man- 
agement courses and on numerous functional and 
procedural courses. Examines the total management 
process from formulating to implementing strategy. 
Covers the development of corporate objectives, 
plans, and policies, emphasizing the interaction be- 
tween the enterprise and its environment. The eco- 
nomic and social responsibilities of business and 
managers are also considered. Prereq. 100 quarter 
hours and completion of all core courses 
in business. 



168 Management — Management Information Systems 



M6T 4351 Business Policy 2 (3 q.h.) 
Study of organizational and administrative methods 
for converting plans into achievements. Explores 
concepts of strategic planning and implementation 
from the perspective of the general manager, with at- 
tention to top management functions, responsibil- 
ities, styles, values, and organizational relationships. 
Includes cases from profit and nonprofit enterprises 
of various types. Prereq. MGT 4350. 

MGT 4352 Business Policy (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as MGT 4350 and MGT 4351. Prereq. 100 
quarter hours. 

MGT 4355 Manager and Society (3 q.h.) 
For managers, potential managers, and others inter- 
ested in the national and international issues con- 
fronting business and industry in their relationships 
with governments, societies, and individuals. In- 
cludes issues of changing work environments and 
the variety of influences and pressures that need to 
be taken into account when making socially respon- 
sible business decisions. Prereq. MGT 4350. 

MGT 4356 International Business Management and 
Operations (3 q.h.) 

Principles and practices of international business, 
comparing domestic and international business ac- 
tivities, responsibilities, and influences. Explores the 
economic, social, political, and legal contexts of con- 
ducting business in a multinational environment and 
examines how the "foreign" factor in the business 
equation influences behavior. Prereq. MGT 4350. 

MGT 4358 Contemporary Management Issues (3 q.h.) 
Study of local, regional, national, and international 
business and management issues affecting today's 
management decisions. Includes upcoming changes 
in our economic system and the economy; corporate 
culture; social responsibility; ethics; worker needs, 
motivation, ai\d satisfaction; demographics; and man- 
agement-labor interactions. Prereq. MGT 4102. 

MGT 4360 Management Seminor 1 (3 q.h.) 
Capstone course requiring individu£il and/or group 
investigation and jinalysis of a substantive manage- 
ment issue. Projects should involve broad, interdisci- 
plinary knowledge and experience, use a variety of 
research techniques, and be original in analysis and 
conclusions. Topics to be selected with the advice 
and approval of the instructor. Prereq. MGT 4350. 

MGT 4361 Management Seminar 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MGT 4360. Prereq. MGT 4360. 

MGT 4362 Advanced Management Seminar (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of group projects from MGT 4360 and 
MGT 4361. The project must be of mjgor manage- 
ment significance, involving research of a manage- 
ment issue, a management audit, or an organizational 
analysis, usually of a real company. Enrollment is 
limited; both enrollment and the project must be ap- 
proved by the Area Consultant and the Program Di- 
rector. Prereq. MGT 4361. 



Management Information Systems 

MIS 4101 Introduction to Data Processing and Information 
Systems 1 (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to data processing and computers, in- 
cluding an overview of data processing history, busi- 
ness data processing concepts, data processing 
orgainization, computer hardware, the internal rep- 
resentation of data, software applications (word 
processing and spreadsheets), and data 
communications concepts. 

MIS 4102 Introduction to Data Processing and Information 
Systems 2 (3 q.h.) 

Continuation of MIS 4101. Concentrates on software 
and systems. Includes the systems-development life 
cycle, programming tools and program preparation, 
the use of computers for specific business applica- 
tions, data-base management systems, and high-level 
programming and planning languages. Also intro- 
duces computer programming in BASIC. Prereq. 
MIS 4101. 

MIS 4103 Introduction to Doto Processing and Information 

Systems (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 

Same as MIS 4101 and MIS 4102. 

MIS 4221 COBOL Programming 1 (3 q.h.) 
Begirming computer problem solving and program- 
ming using COBOL. Includes structured flow-chart- 
ing and programming techniques, use of an editor for 
program generation, input/output record layouts, and 
basic concepts, such as COBOL divisions and verbs. 
Students prepare and test several programs using the 
University computer system. Prereq. MIS 4102 or 
MIS 4103. 

MIS 4222 COBOL Progromming 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4221. Includes logic confrol 
breaks, creation of multipage reports, sign and class 
tests, verification of input data, and table handling 
(subscription and indexing). Students prepare and 
test several programs using the University computer 
system. Prereq. MIS 4221. 

MIS 4223 COBOL Programming 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4222. Includes advanced pro- 
gramming techniques, such as the internal sort facili- 
ty and indexed file processing. Students prepare and 
test several programs using the University computer 
system. Prereq. MIS 4222. 

MIS 4225 COBOL Programming (Intensive) (9 q.h.) 
Same as MIS 4221, MIS 4222, and MIS 4223. Prereq. 
MIS 4102 or MIS 4103. 

MIS 4230 PC Software for Professionols (formerly End 
User Software) (3 q.h.) 

Study of the large and rapidly growing collection of 
software geared toward the needs of the nontechni- 
cal end user. Includes discussion of various software 
packages, such as spread sheets, data bases, and 
graphics, for use on both mainframe and personal 
computers. 



Management Information Systems 169 



MIS 4231 Advanced PC Software (3 q.h.) 
Advjinced skills in Lotus 1-2-3 (spreadsheet, graphics, 
and database, RBase relational database, and ad- 
vanced conunands in PC/MS-DOS). Includes lectures, 
in-class demonstration, and extensive assignments 
that apply skills. Not for the first-time personal com- 
puter user. Prereq. MIS 4230. 

MIS 4235 Advanced COBOL Programming (3 q.h.) 
Several kinds of programming disciplines for the CO- 
BOL programmer. Techniques include STRING and 
UNSTRING; CALL subroutines; tab handling with 
one, two, and three dimensions; indexed sequential 
access methods (SAM) for file processing; DEBUG; 
communications; and COPY library. Prereq. MIS 
4223 or MIS 4225. 

MIS 4241 Programming in BASIC 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to computer progrjinuning using BASIC. 
Includes arithmetic operators, variables, expressions, 
arrays, functions, and formatted printing. Students 
write, debug, and run a number of programs on the 
computer. Prereq. MIS 4102. 

MIS 4242 Programming in BASIC 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4241. Covers more sophisticated 
BASIC programming techniques. Includes subrou- 
tines, nested loops, sorting, and file handling. Stu- 
dents write, debug, and run a number of programs on 
the computer. Prereq. MIS 4240 or MIS 4241. 

MIS 4250 FORTRAN Programming 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to computer programming using FOR- 
TRAN, a high-level language used primarily in scien- 
tific applications. Includes variables, constants, 
expressions, arithmetic operations, and looping. Stu- 
dents write, debug, and run a number of programs on 
the computer. Prereq. MIS 4102. 

MIS 4251 FORTRAN Programming 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4250. Covers more complex 
FORTRAN programming. Includes arrays, functions, 
and subroutines. Students write, debug, and run a 
number of programs on the computer. Prereq. MIS 
4250. 

MIS 4252 FORTRAN Progromming 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4251. Emphasizes applications 
and case studies. Students write a series of programs 
for scientific and business problems to gain profi- 
ciency in the FORTRAN language. Typical topics in- 
clude simulation, sorting and merging, plotting, and 
financial zmalysis. Students write, debug, and run a 
number of programs on the computer. Prereq. MIS 
4251. 

MIS 4253 FORTRAN Programming (Intensive) (9 q.h.) 
Same as MIS 4250, MIS 4251, and MIS 4252. Prereq. 
MIS 4102. 

MIS 4260 Assembly Programming 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the VAX- 11 Assembler running un- 
der the VMS operating system. Includes the binary 
representation of instructions and data, looping, in- 
struction modification, indexing, indirect addressing. 



and data retrieval. Includes a brief survey of As- 
sembly languages in general. Prereq. demonstrat- 
ed familiarity with any currently available 
computer language. 

MIS 4261 Assembly Programming 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4260. Includes addressing struc- 
tures, floating-point techniques, coding, use of macro 
instructions, input-output routines, use of the operat- 
ing system for job scheduling resource allocation, 
and file handling. Prereq. MIS 4260. 

MIS 4262 Assembly Programming 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4261. Includes advanced use of 
the operating system, device-independent file han- 
dling, and blocked £ind unblocked file manipulation. 
Prereq. MIS 4261. 

MIS 4270 Pascal Programming 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to computer programming using the 
Pascal language. Includes arrays of records, text files, 
record files, and procedures and functions. Students 
write, debug, and run a number of programs on the 
computer. Prereq. MIS 4102. 

MIS 4271 Pascal Programming 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4270. Covers more sophisti- 
cated Pascal features. Includes multidimensional 
arrays, recursion, file sorting and merging tech- 
niques, sets, and structures. Students write, debug, 
and run a number of programs on the computer. 
Prereq. MIS 4270. 

MIS 4273 PC DOS and Assembly (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the Disk Operating System (DOS), a 
collection of progrjims that manages the activities 
among personal computer components. The Personal 
Computer (PC) Assembly language is also discussed. 
Students have the opportunity to write a small As- 
sembly language routine and one or more DOS batch 
routines. Prereq. MIS 4102. 

MIS 4276 Programming in C (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to programming in C, originally 
developed at Bell Laboratories and most notably 
associated with the UNIX operating system. Students 
learn how to write programs in C and solve spe- 
cific problems using the Uruversity's computer sys- 
tem. Prereq. knowledge of at least one other 
'programming language. 

MIS 4280 Computer Operating Systems 1 (3 q.h.) 
Intended for those famihar with data processing and 
interested in developing, evaluating, and using sys- 
tems programs. Examines the full range of features 
available in a vjiriety of computer operating systems 
in terms of structure and form. Compares operating 
systems implementation techniques employed by dif- 
ferent computer manufacturers, with emphasis on 
their value as tools for application program develop- 
ment. Refers generally to IBM operating systems, but 
also to other manufacturers, including Digital and 
Data General. Prereq. MIS 4220 or MIS 4221. 



170 Management Information Systems — Marketing 



MIS 4281 Computer Operating Systems 2 (3 q.h.) 
Building on concepts amd techniques presented in 
MIS 4280, introduces distributed systems and 
networking software, a variety of database systems, 
and the UNIX operating system. Includes discussions 
of local and wide-area networking systems and oper- 
ating systems features. Expands data management as 
an operating systems feature to include database sys- 
tems available from various computer manufacturers 
and software suppliers. Prereq. MIS 4280. 

MIS 4301 Structured Systems Analysis and Design 1 (3 q.h.) 
Systems analysis and design cycle, with emphasis on 
the analysis phase. Includes the history and life-cycle 
of business information systems, the role of the 
systems analyst, analytical tools useful to the sys- 
tems study process, development of feasibility stud- 
ies, and presentation of study phase findings. Prereq. 
MIS 4102. 

MIS 4302 Structured Systems Analysis and Design 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MIS 4301. Emphasizes the design 
phase. Includes detailed systems design proce- 
dures and techniques, system testing, specifica- 
tion and procedure writing, documentation, design of 
auditing and control procedures, performance mea- 
surement techniques, hardwjire and software selec- 
tion and planning, and project management. Prereq. 
MIS 4301. 

MIS 4305 Structured Systems Analysis and Design (Intensive) 

(6 q.h.) 

Same as MIS 4301 and MIS 4302. 

MIS 4307 Communications and Networking (3 q.h.) 
Communications, networking, and distributed pro- 
cessing from the user's rather than the designer's 
point of view. Includes the economics of distributed 
processing, communications concepts, local-area 
networks, and vendor selection. Prereq. MIS 4302. 

MIS 4345 Database Management Systems (3 q.h.) 
Infroduction to the database approach to design of 
integrated information applications. Covers the three 
methods of database design; data structures; dia- 
gramming; data definition languages; data manipula- 
tion languages; database implementation and 
evaluation; and the role of the database adminisfra- 
tor. Prereq. MIS 4222, MIS 4230, and MIS 4302. 

MIS 4348 Information Resource Management (3 q.h.) 
Advanced information systems management, empha- 
sizing planning, organizing, and controlling the cor- 
porate information resource. Includes personnel 
career planning, turnover, facilities and capacity 
planning, the user interface, standards development, 
RFP generation and vendor selection, hardware and 
software conversion problems, amd disaster recov- 
ery. Prereq. MIS 4345. 

MIS 4350 Auditing Data Processing (3 q.h.) 

EDP audit techniques, programming, and operations, 

emphasizing EDP standard practices, procedures, 



documentation, and safety and security. Defines EDP 
business risks and related exposures, such as fraud, 
embezzlement, misuse or destruction of company as- 
sets, and business interruption. Offers discussion of 
the EDP portion of accounting requirements of the 
Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977. Course con- 
tent is oriented toward EDP managers, internal audi- 
tors, and public accountants. Prereq. MIS 4102. 

MIS 4360 Computer Privacy and Security (3 q.h.) 
Threats posed by and to modern electronic comput- 
ers and their users. Includes a review of the issue of 
privacy and approaches, techniques, and tools used 
to safeguard computers. Uses actual case studies of 
computer abuse. Prereq. MIS 4102. 

MIS 4385 Applied MIS Development Project (3 q.h.) 
Capstone systems course integrates knowledge and 
abilities gained through other computer-related 
courses in the curriculum, within a comprehensive 
systems development project. Prereq. MIS 4348. 

Marketing 

MKT 4301 Introduction to Marketing 1 (3 q.h.) 
The key concepts of the marketing field. Includes de- 
velopment of product, distribution, promotion, and 
pricing decisions in consumer and industrial 
orgariizations. 

MKT 4302 Introduction to Marketing 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MKT 4301. Develops the link be- 
tween marketing theory and practice. Covers specific 
marketing issues and problems. Includes case study 
analysis and current marketing issues. Prereq. 
MKT 4301. 

MKT 4304 Introduction to Morketing (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as MKT 4301 and MKT 4302. 

MKT 4310 Advertising and Sales Promotion Management 1 

(3 q.h.) 

Overview of advertising and sales promotion man- 
agement and the implementation of these tools by 
commercial and nonprofit organizations. Prereq. 
MKT 4302. 

MKT 4311 Advertising and Sales Promotion Management 2 

(3 q.h.) 

Continuation of MKT 4310. Surveys why and how ad- 
vertising works and includes challenging and practi- 
cal case studies. Prereq. MKT 4310. 

MKT 4312 Advertising and Sales Promotion Management 
(Intensive) (6 q.h.) 

Same as MKT 4310 and MKT 4311. Prereq. 
MKT 4302. 

MKT 4315 Sales Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
The management of a sales force: setting objectives, 
structuring the sales force, developing sales people, 
rewarding and evaluating performance. Prereq. 
MKT 4302. 



Marketing — Medical Laboratory Science 171 



MKT 4316 Sales Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MKT 4315. Covers supervision and 
evaluation of the sales force. Case studies, role play- 
ing, and simulations. Prereq. MKT 4315. 

MKT 4317 Sales Management (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as MKT 4315 and MKT 4316. Prereq. 
MKT 4302. 

MKT 4320 Marketing Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Case method approach used to analyze business 
problems and create marketing plans. Includes defi- 
nition of marketing problems, demand analysis, mar- 
keting research; and establishment and control of 
marketing budgets. Prereq. MKT 4301. 

MKT 4321 Marketing Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MKT 4320. Presents skills for con- 
trolling marketing plans, and is designed for a more 
thorough understanding of overall marketing func- 
tion. Emphasizes managerial effectiveness through 
practical applications. Prereq. MKT 4320. 

MKT 4322 Marketing Management (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as MKT 4320 and MKT 4321. Prereq. 
MKT 4301. 

MKT 4330 Marketing Research 1 (3 q.h.) 
Use of marketing research in planning and evaluating 
marketing activities and in formulating marketing de- 
cisions. Introduces marketing information systems, 
primary and secondary research, quantitative and 
qualitative research, sampling techniques, and mea- 
surement processes. Prereq. MKT 4301. 

MKT 4331 Marketing Research 2 (3 q.h.) 
Techniques of data collection, processing, and analy- 
sis, emphasizing the reporting of research findings; 
the use of market research for demand measurement 
and forecasting; product research; advertising re- 
search; and test marketing. Prereq. MKT 4330. 

MKT 4335 Public Relations 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the basic principles, purposes, and 
practices of public relations in both commercial and 
nonprofit organizations. Emphasizes orgaruzation, 
research, and writing fundamentals. 

MKT 4336 Public Relations 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MKT 4335. Emphasizes the develop- 
ment of public relations programs for specific pub- 
Ucs. Prereq. MKT 4335. 

MKT 4337 Introduction to Advertising (3 q.h.) 
For nonbusiness mjyors, although business mj^jors 
may take the course. Focuses on advertising, sales 
promotion, public relations, publicity, and personal 
selling as important elements in the marketing pro- 
cess. Also examines the ethical, social, and economic 
aspects of advertising and promotion. 

MKT 4340 Retail Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Concepts and techniques of store operations and 
merchandise management. Focuses on the activities 
and contributions of various retailing institutions, 



such as independents, chains, dealerships, specialty 
stores, supermeirkets, discount stores, and fran- 
chises. Also includes retail management, retail profit 
and loss, starting a retail business, store location, 
store plarming, £ind the retail organization. Prereq. 
MKT 4301. 

MKT 4341 Retail Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MKT 4340. Emphasizes store oper- 
ations; merchandising planning, control, and manage- 
ment; pricing; buying; sales promotion; customer 
service; retail accounting; and expense management. 
Prereq. MKT 4340. 

MKT 4352 Professional Selling Skills (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Opportunity to develop effective selling skills. Exam- 
ines the customer buying process and the company 
sales process. Discusses prospecting, preparation, 
presentation, and post-sale activities and introduces 
advanced selling techniques, such as team selling. 
Focuses on situations where personal selling is a ma- 
jor element of marketing strategy, such as in industri- 
al-product, professional-service, and high-technology 
marketing. Prereq. MKT 4302. 

MKT 4355 High-Technology Marketing (3 q.h.) 
The company's marketing function in transforming 
technology into products. Discusses planning for 
product innovation, linkages between marketing and 
engineering, and communications strategies for mar- 
keting high-technology products. Prereq. MKT 4302. 

MKT 4358 Marketing and Sales Seminar (3 q.h.) 
Capstone marketing elective focusing on the formu- 
lation and implementation of overall marketing strat- 
egy. Prereq. MKT 4331. 

Medical Laboratory Science 

MLS Courses at Basic College Tuition Rate 

Course descriptions for medical laboratory science 
courses numbered MLS 1 — are available from the 
College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, 
206 Mugar Building. 

MLS 4301 Medical Laboratory Science Orientation (2 q.h.) 
Scope, responsibilities, opportunities, and education- 
al requirements for the medical laboratory science 
professions. Medical terminology and laboratory 
mathematics are included. 

MLS 4321 Hematology (1 cL, 3 lab., 3 qii.) 
Basic hematological techruques, including discussion 
of the differential smear and observation of the nor- 
mal morphology of human red cells, white cells, and 
platelets. (Laboratory fee.) Prereq. BIO 4104 or 
equivalent. Not open to medical technology or 
hematology majors. 

MLS 4322 Morphologic Hematology 1 (1 cL, 3 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Morphologic and etiologic classification of the ane- 
mias. Related diagnostic tests are discussed. (Labora- 
tory fee.) Prereq. HMG 4425 or equivalent 



172 Medical Laboratory Science — Mathematics 



MLS 4323 Morphologic Hematology 2 (1 cl., 3 lab., 3 q.h.) 
Studies of pathologic and physiologic deviations of 
the white ceils series as observed in leukemias and 
irifections. Sonne animal hematology is included. 
(Laboratory fee.) Prereq. MLS 4322 or equivalent. 

MLS 4341 Epidemiology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Basic concepts in epidemiology, the distribution in 
determinants of diseases, and iryuries in human pop- 
ulations. Descriptive and amalytical epidemiology 
studies are included. 

MLS 4342 Epidemiology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Microbiological distributions in determinants of in- 
fectious diseases; hospital epidemiology. 

MLS 4352 Basic MLS Electronics and Instrumentation (2 q.h.) 
Electricity, with coverage of introductory elec- 
tronic circuits. Emphasizes medical laboratory 
ir^trumentation and related electrical processes 
of measurement. 

MLS 4365 Quality Control (3 q.h.) 
Development of quality control programs in each 
medical laboratory specialty. Includes applications of 
statistical methods to medical laboratory quality 
control programs. 

MLS 4381 Seminar in Medical Technology (3 q.h.) 

Current topics in medical technology. Includes re- 
quired readings and presentations by students and 
guest lectures. Prereq. instructor's permission. 

Management Science 

MS 4325 Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (3 q.h.) 
Modeling as a method for gaining insight into the un- 
derlying mathematical structure of business prob- 
lems. Discusses specific modeling techniques, such 
as linear prograniming, PERT-CPM, and simulation. 
Prereq. MTH 4111 and ECN 4251. 

MS 4332 Statistical Quality Control (3 q.h.) 
Practical overview of analytical methods in quality 
control. Covers the application of basic statistical 
controls in the industrial and service sectors. In- 
cludes control charts, statistical tolerancing, accep- 
tance sampling techniques, life testing, and reliability 
concepts. Prereq. ECN 4251. 

MS 4333 Management of Quality Control (3 q.h.) 
Management practices of modern quality control and 
the different approaches to optimizing quality. In- 
cludes organizational strategies, economics of qual- 
ity, internal and external quality, and management of 
long-term quality and reliability. Prereq. MS 4332. 

MS 4334 Advanced Quality Control (3 q.h.) 
Quality control topics of current interest. Typical 
subjects include Asian quality methods, advanced 
process capability techniques, use of computers in 
quality control, and integration of quality and reliabil- 
ity programs. Prereq. MS 4333. 



MS 4335 Principles of Materiol Inspection (3 q.h.) 
Presentation of principles that bridge the gap be- 
tween manufacturing and data analysis, with empha- 
sis on the measuring process. In-class labs provide 
hands-on training in the use of a wide variety of me- 
chanical measuring devices. Lectures demonstrate 
the fundamental measuring principles involved and 
illustrate their extension to all measuring processes. 

MS 4336 Industrial Experimentation (3 q.h.) 
Practical techniques for data collection that can 
greatly extend students' problem-solving skills. In- 
cludes instruction in extracting maximum informa- 
tion from small samples and avoiding many common 
data-analysis pitfalls. Other topics include random- 
ized tests, multilevel tests, two-level multifactor 
tests, and Taguchi methods. Prereq. ECN 4251 
or equivalent. 

MS 4337 Principles of Quality Assurance (3 q.h.) 
The modern quahty function from its begirmings in 
product design to vendor selection, incoming inspec- 
tion, monitoring of the manufacturing process, final 
product testing, and customer acceptance. Includes 
defining quality, quality organization, sampling plans, 
control charts, and quality assurance reporting. 

Mathematics 

MTH 4001 Introduction to Mathematics 1 (3 q.h.) 
Review of elementary algebra, including operations 
on integers, algebraic expressions, exponents, equa- 
tions, word problems, and graphing. Credit for this 
course cannot be applied to School of Engineering 
Technology degree programs. 

MTH 4002 Introduction to Mathematics 2 (3 q.h.) 
Further review of mathematics, including operations 
with polynomials, factoring, fractional expressions, 
and radicals. Credit for this course cannot be applied 
to School of Engineering Technology degree pro- 
grams. Prereq. MTH 4001. 

MTH 4006 Technical Math* (4 q.h.) 
Comprehensive review of high school algebra 
including equations, formulas, exponents, poly- 
nomials, factoring, scientific notation, fractions, 
radicals, complex numbers, quadratic equations, 
and linear equations. 

MTH 4107 College Algebra* (4 q.h.) 
Diagnostic exam to ensure appropriate placement of 
student. Includes review of exponents, radicsds, fac- 
toring, and operations with fractions; operations with 
sets; solving linear, quadratic, and absolute value 
equations and inequalities; equations involving radi- 
cals; operations with imaginary and complex num- 
bers; graphing linear, quadratic, and polynomial 
functions; direct and inverse variation; solving higher 
degree polynomial equations; and an infroduction to 
partial fractions. Prereq. Math diagnostic exam or 
MTH 4006. 



•This is a School of Engineering Technology course, which is of- 
fered at a different tuition rate than that of University College. 



Mathematics 173 



MTH 4108 Pre-Calculus* (4 q.h.) 

Composite and inverse functions; logarithmic and ex- 
ponential functions and equations; properties of logs 
and introduction to base e; trigonometric functions, 
identities, and equations; solving triangles by apply- 
ing law of sines and cosines; polar form of complex 
numbers and DeMoivre's formula; solving systems of 
linear equations by Cramer's rule; solving nonlinear 
systems in two variables; arithmetic and geometric 
sequences and series; and factorijils, combinatorials, 
and the binomial expansion formula. Prereq. 
MTH 4107. 

MTH 4110 Math 1 (3 q.h.) 

Exponents, polynomials, factoring, radicals, algebra- 
ic fractions, linear equatioris, and word problems. 
Prereq. one year of high school algebra or its equiv- 
alent. A placement test is given during the first class 
meeting. Students who receive an unsatisfactory 
score on this test are advised to enroll in MTH 4001 
instead for additional preparation. Credit for this 
course cannot be applied to School of Engineering 
Technology degree programs. 

MTH 4111 Math2(3q.h.) 

Word problems, quadratic equations and related 
problems, graphs and functions, and systems of 
equations. Credit for this course cannot be applied to 
School of Engineering Technology degree programs. 
Prereq. MTH 4110. 

MTH 4112 Math 3 (3 q.h.) 

Exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences, 
and series. Introduction to calculus. Credit for this 
course cannot be applied to School of Engineering 
Technology degree programs. Prereq. MTH 4111. 

MTH 4113 Mathematics (Intensive) (9 q.h.) 

Same as MTH 4110, MTH 4111, and MTH 4112. 

MTH 4114 Mathematics 1 and 2 Combination (6 q.h.) 
Same as MTH 4110 and MTH 4111. 

MTH 4120 Calculus 1* (4 q.h.) 

Plane analytic geometry of the line, circle, parabola, 
ellipse, and hyperbola; review of inequalities and 
general function operations; theory and evaluation of 
limits; derivatives of zilgebraic and trigonometric 
functions; general rules of differentiation; Rolle's 
theorem; Mean Value theorem; and applicatioris of 
differentiation including velocity, acceleration, relat- 
ed rates, maxima and minima, curve sketching, and 
approximations by differentials. Prereq. MTH 4108. 

MTH 4121 Calculus 2* (4 q.h.) 
The antiderivative and its applications to areas, 
volvunes, and rectilinear motion problems. Logarith- 
mic exponentials, inverse trigonometric functions, 
emd their applications are covered, along with tech- 
niques of integration, including parts, partial frac- 
tions, substitution, and the use of tables. Numerical 
integration (Simpson's and Trapezoidal Rule), L'Hos- 
pital's Rule, improper integrals, and the geometry of 
vectors in a plane and space are also included. 
Prereq. MTH 4120.* 



MTH 4122 Calculus 3* (4 q.h.) 

Study of three-dimensional space; functions of sever- 
al variables; and multiple integrals with applications 
in areas and volumes. Includes extensive treatment 
of sequences and series; and an introduction to 
differential equations, including solutions with ap- 
plications of first-order with variables separable, 
of first-order linear, and of second-order linear 
homogeneous. Prereq. MTH 4121. * 

MTH 4123 Differential Equations* (4 q.h.) 
Linear differential equations with constant coefiB- 
cients, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous; vari- 
ation of parameters; simultaneous differential 
equations; Laplace trar\sforms; series and solution of 
differential equations by series; Fourier series; and 
orthogonal functions. Prereq. MTH 4122. * 

MTH 4130 Calculus for Nonengineers 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introductory course intended for students in liberal 
arts, business administration, and other nonengineer- 
ing curricula. Includes fundamentals of differential 
calculus, rules of differentiation, rates of change, 
graph sketching, and growth and decay function. 
Credit for this course cannot be applied to School of 
Engineering Technology degree programs. Prereq. 
MTH 4112 or equivalent. 

MTH 4131 Colculus for Nonengineers 2 (3 q.h.) 
Applications of differential calculus, including prob- 
lems in optimization, velocity and acceleration, com- 
pound interest, population growth, and the fitting of 
equations to data. Introduces integral calculus, areas, 
average values of functions, marginal cost and profit, 
and depreciation. Credit for this course cannot be 
applied to School of Engineering Technology degree 
programs. Prereq. MTH 4130. 

MTH 4132 Calculus for Nonengineers 3 (3 q.h.) 
Calculus of trigonometric functions, techniques of in- 
tegration, numerical methods, and differential equa- 
tions. AppUcatioris include pricing, allocation of 
funds, present value of an investment, manufacturing 
efficiency, and product reliability. Credit for this 
course cannot be applied to School of Engineering 
Technology degree programs. Prereq. MTH 4131. 

MTH 4140 Mathematics for Business Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Mathematics topics applicable to business manage- 
ment, such as linear equations and inequalities, ma- 
trix algebra, linear programming, sets, and counting 
techniques. Prereq. MTH 4112 or equivalent. 

MTH 4141 Mathematics for Business Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Business appUcations of probability, decision theory, 
Markov chains, game theory, and competitive analy- 
sis. Prereq. MTH 4140. 

MTH 4143 Mothematics for Business Management (Intensive) 

(6 q.h.) 

Same as MTH 4140 and MTH 4141. 



•This is a School of Engineering Technology course, which is of- 
fered at a different tuition rate than that of University College. 



174 Mathematics — Music 



MTH 4520 Statistically Thinking (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to statistical mode of thinking. Presents 
the essential logic of statistical analysis to allow the 
student to critically evaluate research published in 
professioned journals as well as newspapers. The 
process of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data 
is discussed, as well as the use of computers in sta- 
tistical analysis. Lectures used in coryunction with 
discussions of outside readings illustrate concepts. 

Music 

MUS 4100 Introduction to Music (3 q.h.) 
Selected works from earliest times to contem- 
porary styles. Primarily a survey and listening course 
that emphasizes styles, basic theory, forms, and the 
torical, social, and artistic periods each 
work represents. 

MUS 4103 Music and Society (3 q.h.) 
The artist's involvement with recurring social themes 
such as self-image, the search for peace and under- 
standing, personal relationships, and others. Exam- 
ines paintings and literary works in addition to works 
by Beethoven, Schoenberg, Britten, and selected 
jazz composers. 

MUS 4105 Music of the U.S.A. (3 q.h.) 
American music from Puritan psalm singing to the 
present. Covers folk music of ethnic origin, concert 
music, ragtime, jazz, and contemporary styles. 

MUS 4106 Women in Music (3 q.h.) 

The historical role of women in music, as composers, 

performers, patrons, and inspiration. 

MUS 4110 Music in Popular Culture (3 q.h.) 
Investigation of American attitudes toward 
culture, art, and beauty through consideration of 
contemporary popular music. Compares the differ- 
ent styles of pop music (jazz, rock, MOR, and R&B) 
and traces their evolution. Examines the manipula- 
tion of public tastes by large corporations for 
commercial purposes. 

MUS 4111 Rock Music (3 q.h.) 

History of rock music from its origins in American 
blues and other styles through the popular music of 
the 1950s, the political styles of the 1960s, and the di- 
verse trends of the 1970s. Emphasizes the formative 
years of rock. 

MUS 4112 Jan (3 q.h.) 

Jazz, from its origins in New Orleans to the avant- 
garde experiments of today. Includes analysis of the 
rhythmic, harmonic, instrumental, and stylistic char- 
acteristics of jazz. Covers the works of such creative 
jazz artists as Armstrong, Beiderbecke, Parker, Ell- 
ington, and Coltrane. 

MUS 4120 History of Musical Styles (3 q.h.) 
Chronological examination of Western music, includ- 
ing its role in society and the contributions of influ- 
ential Western composers. Reviews representative 
works from each period, with music by Bach, Handel, 
Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Berlioz, Wagner, 
Mahler, and Stravinsky. 



MUS 4121 Medieval and Renaissance Music (3 q.h.) 
Development of sacred and secular monophony, vo- 
cal and instrumental works, and polyphonic music 
from their beginnings to about 1600. 

MUS 4122 Music of the Baroque (3 q.h.) 
The period of the emergence of the orchestra, the 
chorus, and the virtuoso performer and the develop- 
ment of the oratorio, opera, concerto, and symphony 
in the works of Monteverdi, Corelli, Vivaldi, Handel, 
and J. S. Bach. 

MUS 4123 Music History of the Classical Period (3 q.h.) 
Study of changing musical styles from Stamitz and 
the Mannheim School through the works of Haydn, 
Mozart, and early Beethoven. 

MUS 4124 Music History of the Romantic Era (3 q.h.) 
Musical styles of the nineteenth century, including 
the role of music and the musician in the changing 
social, economic, political, and cultural structure of 
Europe. Analyzes music by Beethoven, Schubert, 
Berlioz, Brahms, Verdi, and Wagner. 

MUS 4125 Music History of the Twentieth Century (3 q.h.) 
The diversity of styles from Debussy through Stravin- 
sky, Schoenberg, Bartok, and Hindemith and more 
recent developments, including miisique concrete, 
chance music, and electronic music. 

MUS 4130 The Symphony (3 q.h.) 
The symphony as the m£^jor geru^e in the Classical, 
Romantic, and contemporary periods. Covers works 
by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Tchaikov- 
sky, Brahms, and Sibelius. 

MUS 4132 The World of Opera (3 q.h.) 
Opera as a dramatic form, including discussion of 
aria, recitative, ensemble, and other basic elements. 
Considers numbers opera, music drama, and Sing- 
spiel and such composers as Mozart, Wagner, Verdi, 
and Puccioi. 

MUS 4133 Great Choral Literature (3 q.h.) 

Sacred and secular choral literature from medieval to 

contemporary times. 

MUS 4136 Music and Art (3 q.h.) 
How European composers used the works of Span- 
ish, English, and German painters as inspiration for 
their musical scores. Analyzes European museum 
paintings and their musical counterparts to give stu- 
dents an understanding of the broad influence of art 
on musical composition. 

MUS 4137 Music of the Dance (3 q.h.) 
The world of the dance, with emphasis on the cre- 
ative art of ballet. Probes the dynamic qualities of 
music for the dance and the people who brought it to 
its present position as a fusion of all the arts. 

MUS 4138 American Musical Theatre (3 q.h.) 
Historical survey and analytical study of musical 
shows. Students attend performances and write 
critical reviews. 



Music 175 



MUS 4140 Life and Works of Mozart (3 q.h.) 
Mozart's musical development from child prodigy to 
mature artist, traced from his own letters and from 
biographies. Includes analysis of many of his mjgor 
works, including operas, symphonies, concertos, and 
chamber music. 

MUS 4141 Life and Works of J. S. Boch (3 q.h.) 
The genius who simuned up the Baroque era and 
whose every note reflected his profoundly humariis- 
tic approach to religion. Works examined include 
large choral masterpieces, such as the St. Matthew 
Passion, the Brandenburg Concertos, the WeU-Tem- 
pered Clavier, and the Suites. 

MUS 4144 Life and Works of Debussy (3 q.h.) 
Debussy's impressioriist music as the turning point 
toward modern trends. Studies much of his work for 
piano, orchestra, and opera, including Suite pour le 
Piano, Suite Bergamasque ("Clair de Lune"), Images 
for piano and orchestra. Nocturnes, La Mer, and the 
opera PeUeas and Melisande. 

MUS 4145 Life ond Works of Beethoven (3 q.h.) 
The complex personality and art of this figure, 
including his relation to the turbulent times 
in which he lived and his role in Classical and 
Romantic music. 

MUS 4160 Music Therapy (3 q.h.) 
Use of music as a therapeutic medium, emphasizing 
the musician and nonmusician alike. Course is ex- 
perimental in nature and covers such topics as music 
liinguage and the brain, music and specied popula- 
tions, and music and relaxation. 

MUS 4163 Sound Health: Music and Relaxation (3 q.h.) 
Opporturuty to experience a heightened awjireness 
of the power of music to effect physical and emotion- 
al change, and to examine the effects of music on the 
body, mind, and spirit. An exploration into the aware- 
ness of sound and the physiologicad changes caused 
by music. Covers theories and techruques used to fa- 
cilitate positive change, relaxation, and reduction of 
sfress. Includes sound pollution, the effects of vibra- 
tions on the body, guided imagery, music and medita- 
tion, and New Age and environmental music. 

MUS 4165 The Music Industry (3 q.h.) 
Business-related areas of the music industry. Ad- 
dresses the structure of the record industry and mu- 
sic publishing world, the function of performing 
rights organizations (ASCAP and BMI), and the role 
of concert and orchestral managers. Features 
guest lecturers from various fields and trips to 
"behind-the-scenes" locations. 

MUS 4168 Building a Career in Musical Performance (3 q.h.) 
Designed for performers representing themselves or 
for those interested in managing other artists. Topics 
include auditions, job investigation, resumes, photo- 
graphs, press kits, recording, and debut recitals. Stu- 
dents assemble press kits, write press releases and 
PSAs, and learn effective ways to gamer and handle 
publicity, to differentiate among the various audio 
and video formats, and to essay their ideas on novel 
methods of promoting themselves or others. 



MUS 4171 Computers and Music (3 q.h.) 
History of the use of computers for music composi- 
tion, music and sound analysis, sound sampling and 
synthesis, and music scoring and printing. Empha- 
sizes the latest technology, including the use of MIDI 
(Musical Instrument Digital Interface). Also features 
hands-on use of computers, music software, and 
synthesizers. 

MUS 4172 The Recording Studio (3 q.h.) 
The history and methods of audio reproduction from 
Edison's gramophone to today's multifrack digital 
techniques. Includes instruction and hands-on expe- 
rience at the recording facility in the College's new 
Media Studio. Features guest lectures from experts 
in the field and visit to a local professional studio. 

MUS 4180 Introduction to World Music (3 q.h.) 
The varied musicjil cultures of non- Western soci- 
eties. Exploration of characteristics common to all 
musical systems, followed by investigation of music 
in the Middle East, southern and eastern Asia, Africa, 
South and Central America, and the Caribbean. 

MUS 4181 Music of Africa (3 q.h.) 
The music of Africa is as varied as its many linguistic 
and tribal identities. Surveys the breadth of African 
musical traditions and their historical, social, and 
cultural background as well as Africa's approaches 
to musical organization, musical practice, and 
significant aspects of style. Also examines the 
possible contributions to contemporary 
African-American music. 

MUS 4182 Music of the Middle East (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the music and fraditional instruments 
of selected Near Eastern and Arab cultures, such as 
Persian culture in the East and Ethiopian and Berber 
cultures in Africa. Also, covers cantillation styles and 
practices of various chants of the Hebrew, Christian, 
and Islamic traditions. 

MUS 4200 How to Read and Write Music (3 q.h.) 
Basics of musical notation for students with little 
or no theory or performance background. Focuses 
on the use of the symbols of pitch and duration. 
Includes sight-reading simple melodies, foUowing 
scores, arranging music for small instrumental 
groups, transposition, and elementary rhythmic and 
melodic composition. 

MUS 4201 Music Theory 1 (4 q.h.) 
Basics of music theory as a foundation for further 
musical study and activity. Begins with aural and vi- 
sual identification of pitches, intervals, mjgor and mi- 
nor scales, and triads in the G and F clefs. Includes 
rhythmic and simple melodic dictation, sight-reading, 
elementary melodic writing, and chord construction. 

MUS 4202 Music Theory 2 (4 q.h.) 
Visual identification of pitches in the soprano, 
alto, and tenor clefs; transposition; some elementary 
arranging; writing and aural identification of 
cadences; elementary musicjil analysis; melodic and 
rhythmic dictation; and sight-reading. Prereq. MUS 
4201 or equivalent. 



176 Music 



MUS 4203 Music Theory 3 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of MUS 4202. Covers elementary four- 
part writing, introduction to figured bass, score 
reading, and harmonic analysis. Activities include 
harmonic as well as melodic dictation and part sing- 
ing by sight. Prereq. MUS 4202. 

MUS 4231 Musical Performance 1 (1 q.h.) 
Participation in rehearsals and public performances 
and/or research; and composition, arranging, con- 
ducting, and solo and ensemble activity with the NU 
Symphony Orchestra, the Early Music Players, the 
NU Chorus, the NU Bands, or other ensembles under 
the supervision of a faculty member. Evaluation 
of student progress at the end of the quarter by 
audition or other method. Prereq. audition or 
instructor's permission. 

MUS 4232 Musical Performance 2 (1 q.h.) 
Continuation of MUS 4231. Prereq. MUS 4231. 

MUS 4233 Musical Performance 3 (1 q.h.) 
Continuation of MUS 4232. Prereq. MUS 4232. 

MUS 4234 Musical Performance 4 (1 q.h.) 
Continuation of MUS 4233. Prereq. MUS 4233. 

MUS 4235 Chamber Music 1 (3 q.h.) 
Weekly one-hour sessions for rehearsal, study, and 
performance of music for two to six players 
(matched according to level) under the guidance of a 
faculty coach. Repertoire selected from the full range 
of European concert music by the instructor in con- 
sultation with the students. Special tuition rate for 
Northeastern University staff. For details, contact the 
Department of Music, 307 EU Building, 617-437-2440. 

MUS 4236 Chamber Music 2 (3 q.h.) 

Continuation of MUS 4235. Prereq. MUS 4235 or 

instructor's permission. 

MUS 4237 Chamber Music 3 (3 q.h.) 

Continuation of MUS 4236. Prereq. MUS 4236 or 

instructor's permission. 

MUS 4241 Piano Class 1 (3 q.h.) 

For beginning piano students who want to progress 

at their own pace. Grades are awarded after passing 

various step levels. Ownership of a piano is not 

required. 

MUS 4242 Piano Class 2 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction of scales, arpeggios, and triads to 
help students perform more advanced music. Reper- 
toire consists of original compositions by the 
instructor and simple works by Bartok and Kaba- 
levsky. Prereq. MUS 4241 or equivalent, or 
instructor's permission. 

MUS 4243 Piano Class 3 (3 q.h.) 
Two-octave scales, arpeggios, and triads in all keys. 
Repertoire consists of Bartok, Kabalevsky, original 
compositions by the instructor, and duets specifically 
arranged for this course. Prereq. MUS 4242 or equiv- 
alent, or instructor's permission. 



MUS 4244 Voice Class (3 q.h.) 

Basic vocal production required for fine singing. Rep- 
ertoire, both classical smd contemporary, is chosen 
for each student to learn and perform in lessons and 
outside of class. Includes lectures concerning dic- 
tion, the physiology of singing, resonance, registers, 
interpretation, and the basics of music reading and 
sight-singing. Also includes class analysis of record- 
ings of great vocal artists. 

MUS 4247 Guitar Class 1 (3 q.h.) 
Intended for beginners. Covers basic classical guitar 
techniques, including proper sitting and hand posi- 
tions, note reading, and ensemble playing. Instru- 
ments, preferably nylon-strung, are required. 

MUS 4248 Guitar Class 2 (3 q.h.) 
Intended for those who have taken MUS 4247 or 
who already have a basic knowledge of classical 
guitar techniques and note reading. Introduces 
both solo and ensemble repertoire suitable to the 
advanced beginner. Prereq. MUS 4247 or 
instructor's permission. 

MUS 4249 Guitar Class 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MUS 4248, with repertoire suitable 
for early intermediate students. Prereq. MUS 4248 or 
instructor's permission. 

MUS 4250 Conducting (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to how to develop a clear beat 
technique and prepare, teach, and polish a 
work in rehearsal. Provides exposure to a basic rep- 
ertoire and the essentials of vocal-instrumental pro- 
duction. Prereq. Fundamental knowledge of music 
reading and concurrent membership in a 
performing ensemble. 

MUS 4254 Music Tutorial 1 (3 q.h.) 
Individual instruction in a musical instrument or in 
voice. Features weekly forty-five-minute lessons at 
any level, presenting suitable instrumental technique 
and repertoire. Requires those taking the course for 
credit to play an audition examination at the end of 
the quarter. Fee for individualized instruction; special 
rate for Northeastern University staff. For details, 
contact the Department of Music, 307 Ell Building, 
617-437-2440. 

MUS 4255 Music Tutorial 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of MUS 4254. Prereq. MUS 4254. 

MUS 4256 Music Tutorial 3 (3 q.h.) 

Continuation of MUS 4255. Prereq. MUS 4255. 

MUS 4301 Form and Analysis (3 q.h.) 
The principles of unity and variety in musical compo- 
sition. Representative works from all periods of 
Western music are used to analyze and study such 
single-member forms as theme and variation, rondo, 
minuet and trio, sonata-allegro, passacaglia, canon, 
and fugue. Prereq. MUS 4203 or equivalent. 



Music — Nursing 177 



iNUS 4800 Directed Study I (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for qualified students to take an upper- 
level required course when the needed course is not 
available in an every-other-year cycle. Petitions and 
procedural instructions are available in the Liberal 
Arts Program office. Allow at least six weeks to com- 
plete the petition process. Prereq. 87 quarter hours. 

MUS 4801 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 
Second opportunity to do independent work as de- 
scribed in MUS 4800. Prereq. MUS 4800. 

MUS 4810 Honors Program 1 (4 q.h.) 
Independent work in a selected musical area under 
the direction of members of the department. Limited 
to qualified students with the approval of the 
department chair and only by special arrangement 
with the supervising instructor. Prereq. Program 
Director's approval. 

MUS 4811 Honors Program 2 (4 q.h.) 
Second opportunity to do independent work as de- 
scribed in MUS 4810. Prereq. MUS 4810 and Pro- 
gram Director's approval. 

MUS 4812 Honors Program 3 (4 q.h.) 
Additional opportunity to do independent work as 
described in MUS 4810. Prereq. MUS 4811 and Pro- 
gram, Director's approval. 

Nursing 

NUR 4300 Nursing Transition (9 q.h.) 
The first nursing course for registered nurses in the 
bachelor's degree program, introducing program ob- 
jectives and philosophy. Through guided and inde- 
pendent study, covers roles and role conflicts, 
communication, group dynamics, and the nursing 
process, specifically with patients experiencing the 
stresses of aging, chronic and long-term illness, and 
the presence of death. Also examines human nutri- 
tional needs, with emphasis on the aged and chron- 
ically Ul. Registration by permission of the Academic 
Coordinator. Prereq. BIO 4104, BIO 41 77, BIO 4190, 
CHM 4113, and PSY 4112. 

NUR 4301 Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing (7 q.h.) 
Development of knowledge of mental and emotional 
illness through a basic understanding of the dynam- 
ics of human behavior and beginning skills in thera- 
peutic intervention. Also introduces the concepts of 
family and group therapy and crisis intervention 
techniques. Registration by permission of the Aca- 
demic Coordinator. Prereq. NUR 4300. 

NUR 4302 Pharmacodynamics (3 q.h.) 
Intended for registered nurses. Introduces pharma- 
cologic principles, the pharmacotherapeutics of drug 
groups, and individual drug substances of particular 
importance in the treatment and diagnosis of disease. 
Prereq. CHM 4113. 

NUR 4400 Maternal and Child Nursing (9 q.h.) 
Maintairung optimal health for child-bearing and 
child-rearing families from various cultural and so- 
cial backgrounds. Students examine individuals at 



selected developmental stages. Provides opportuni- 
ties to apply the nursing process in client-care set- 
tings and to assist families in coping with stresses 
that interfere with health. Registration by permission 
of the Academic Coordinator. Prereq. NUR 4300, 
NUR 4302, and PSY 4241. 

NUR 4401 Medical-Surgical Nursing (9 q.h.) 
Effects of acute illness on individuals, families, and 
society. Discusses alterations and adaptations in 
physiology characteristic of acute illness, the nurse's 
role, the impact of iUness on living patterns, and the 
need for health education and continuity of care. In- 
cludes guided clinical experiences, emphasizing the 
nursing process and the development of skiUs neces- 
sary to care for the acutely ill adult. Registration by 
permission of the Academic Coordinator. Prereq. 
NUR 4300, NUR 4301, NUR 4302, and PSY 4241. 

NUR 4402 Health Assessment (4 q.h.) 
Additional theory and skills relevant to the clinical, 
decision-making role of the nurse as a primary care- 
taker, including history-taking and physical and psy- 
chosocial assessment. Emphasis is on how the 
analysis and synthesis of data obtained firom a holis- 
tic health assessment leads to the identification of 
common health abnormalities and enhances clirucal 
decision-making skills. Limited eru-oUment. 

NUR 4500 Community Health Nursing (9 q.h.) 
Introduction to ways in which families, groups, and 
communities meet the health and welfare needs of 
their members, with particular attention to the 
nurse's role. Includes the political implications of 
health care delivery eind current research affecting 
family and group health and community nursing. 
Laboratory experience involves work with individ- 
uals, families, £ind communities. Registration by per- 
mission of the Academic Coordinator. Prereq. 
NUR 4300, NUR 4302, NUR 4400, NUR 4401, and 
PSY 4242. 

NUR 4501 Contemporary Nursing (5 q.h.) 
Intended for seniors. Covers current trends and is- 
sues in nursing and health care delivery. Students de- 
fine their objectives, pursue an area of nursing in 
which they are particularly interested, and evaluate 
their own performance. Synthesizes m^or concepts 
through lectures, semin£irs, and student participation. 
Registration by permission of the Academic Coordi- 
nator. Prereq. NUR 4301, NUR 4400, NUR 4401, and 
SOA 4102. 

NUR 4502 Introduction to Nursing Research (4 q.h.) 
Builds on prior exposure to selected nursing studies. 
Covers qualitative and quantitative research and the 
value of each to nursing and the health care field. 
Also discusses the importance of nursing to both 
practitioner and consumer. Prereq. NUR 4300, NUR 
4301, NUR 4302, NUR 4400, and NUR 4401. 



178 Physical Education — Philosophy 



Physical Education 

PED 4200 Cardiovascular Health and Exercise (1 cl., 3 lab., 
3 q.h.) 

StrucUired exercise program meeting three times per 
week and offering a choice of jogging, swimming, or 
aerobic exercise classes and a weekly czuxiiovascular 
health lecture. Participants receive two comprehen- 
sive cardiovascular medical and physical fitness eval- 
uations, prior to and at the completion of the 
program. Includes a cardiopulmonary examination 
by a cardiologist, blood chemistry profile, pulmonary 
function testing, resting EKG, graded exercise tread- 
mill (stress) test with EKG and blood pressure evalu- 
ation, assessment of percent body fat (ideal weight 
and projected weight loss where applicable), and 
functional assessment of the lower back. Each par- 
ticipant receives a computerized report; individual 
exercise programs are based on test results. 
(Laboratory fee.) 

Philosophy 

PHL 4100 Philosophical Thinking (3 q.h.) 
Methods and vzilues of thinking philosophically. Re- 
veals strategies of dialogue and of informational 
discovery through understanding and use of the So- 
cratic method of intellectual exchange. Analyzes the 
universal quest for truth in order to distinguish be- 
tween knowing and not knowing, dogma, and igno- 
rance. Proves value issues through questions in 
ethics and moral philosophy. 
PHL 4105 Philosophy of Knowing and Reality (3 q.h.) 
The difference between knowledge and belief. Areas 
of theoretical focus include the nature of ultimate re- 
ality, the nature of human knowledge, and the nature 
and existence of God. The investigation of a variety 
of problems and alternative solutions helps students 
think independently and self-critically. Emphasizes 
the development of discipline and precision in 
commurucating ideas. 

PHL 4110 Philosophy of Right and Justice (3 q.h.) 
Ethics and social and political philosophy. In ethics, 
addresses the questions "What sorts of things are 
good or bad?" and "What actions are right or wrong?" 
In social and political philosophy, examines theories 
of human nature, social change, social institutions, 
and mi^jor twentieth- century political theories. Pos- 
sible additional topics include aesthetics and philos- 
ophy of history. 

PHL 4165 Moral Problems in Medicine (3 q.h.) 
Social and moral problems created by medical sci- 
ence. Questions investigated include "Should a hu- 
man life be prolonged imder any condition and at any 
cost?" "What are the moral problems caused by the 
cvurent medical definitions of death?" and "Is it mor- 
ally right to predetermine the physical characteristics 
of future generations by genetic engineering?" 
PHL 4170 The Human Search for Meaning (3 q.h.) 
Examination of selected philosophical problems of 
human existence, such as fi-eedom, death, sexuality, 
Jilienation, and becoming a person. 



PHL 4180 Business Ethics (3 q.h.) 
Ethical principles and considerations involved in 
making moral business decisions. Studies basic ethi- 
cal viewpoints as a foundation; analyzes specific 
characteristics of business life through particular 
cases and examples. 
PHL 4200 Logic (3 q.h.) 

Essentials of lucid thinking in terms of basic logical 
concepts, including deductive and inductive reason- 
ing, valid and invalid arguments, and the varied func- 
tions of language and definition. Also examines how 
to recognize and evailuate different kinds of argu- 
ments, methods of detecting and avoiding common 
errors in reasoning, and the lir\k between structured 
thought and effective communication. 
PHL 4220 The Meaning of Death (3 q.h.) 
Various philosophical and religious views concerning 
the meaning of death. Discusses such questions as 
"What attitude should one take regarding one's own 
death?" "What role does death play in our personal 
relations to others?" and "Is it necessary to believe in 
an afterlife in order to give meaning to this life?" 
PHL 5220 The Meaning of Death (3 CEUs) 
Same as PHL 4220. 

PHL 4223 Philosophy of Consciousness (3 q.h.) 
Theories of consciousness, the possibility of higher 
states of consciousness, and some techniques, such 
as meditation, alleged to lead to higher states of con- 
sciousness. Readings may include psychological and 
parapsychological literature on the subject. 
PHL 4230 Ethics in Theory and Practice (formerly Ethics 1) 
(3 q.h.) 

MajOT ethical theories, emphasizing ethical natural- 
ism, utilitarianism, moral sense theories, intuition- 
ism, and theological theories. Applications of these 
theories are discussed and compared. 
PHL 4231 Current Topics in Ethics (formerly Ethics 2) 
(3 qh.) 

Problems and issues encountered in important areas 
of moral concern, such as euthanasia, punishment, 
professional conduct, and moral responsibility in 
general. Explains various approaches to these prob- 
lems within the framework of m^or ethical theories. 
PHL 4235 Personal Ethics (3 q.h.) 
As we live our lives, we face many decisions about 
the "rightness" or "wrongness" of our ideas and ac- 
tions. Explores two different approaches to moral di- 
lemmas: utilitarian theory, which defines the good as 
the best possible outcome, and deontological theory, 
which believes that actions themselves are either 
good or evil. Applies these ethical theories to the 
moral choices we make on issues such as abortion, 
the AIDS epidemic, capital punishment, nuclear 
anns, taxation. 
PHL 4243 Existentialism (3 qh.) 

Existential philosophy as understood through study 
of its greatest representatives, such as Kierkegaard, 
Nietzsche, Dostoyevsky, Heidegger, Jaspers, Camus, 
Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. Focuses on self-alien- 
ation, authenticity, and existential experiences. 



Philosophy 179 



PHL 4245 Philosophy of Religion (3 q.h.) 
The arguments for the existence of God. Covers 
natural and moral evil, the soul, immortality, 
the evidence for miracles, and the nature of 
religious knowledge. 

PHL 4247 Theistic, Atheistic, and Agnostic Philosophies 

(3 q.h.) 

Selected theistic, atheistic, and agnostic philos- 
ophies. Questions studied include "Is the belief in 
God necessary for a comprehensive philosophy of 
life?" "How does an atheistic philosophy explain and 
justify the 'higher values' such as love, beauty, and 
justice?" and "How is it possible to base a philosophy 
on the principle of agnosticism?" 

PHL 4249 Women's Spirituality (formerly Feminist 
Spirituahty) (3 q.h.) 

Women's religious experience as described in classi- 
cal and contemporary sources. Readings include 
such works as Womanspirit Rising, The Politics of 
Women's Spirituality, and Dreaming the Dark. 

PHL 4250 Philosophy of Human Nature (3 q.h.) 
Philosophical and literary study of human nature. 
Questions include "What is human nature?" and 
"What is a human being?" Examines some of the 
philosophical answers to these questions, with spe- 
cial attention to the significance of tradition, social 
role, freedom, and decision. 

PHL 4251 Images of Women in Philosophy (3 q.h.) 
Philosophical approach to the study of women in so- 
ciety. Drawing from sources within the history of 
philosophy and literature, includes the role (ideal and 
actual) of women in society, love and marriage, op- 
pression and isolation, and the cult of virgiruty. 

PHL 4252 Women's Ethical Issues (3 q.h.) 

The emerging feminist ethos as distinct from fradi- 

tional descriptions of feminist morals and values. 

Discusses questions of politics, power, values, 

and actions. Readings include such works as De 

Beauvoir's The Ethics of Ambiguity and Daly's 

Gyn-Ecology. 

PHL 4255 Women and Religion (3 q.h.) 
The role and place of women in the mjyor religions 
of the world and contemporary feminist challenges 
to these traditional understandings. Readings include 
such works as Carmody's Women and Religion and 
Daly's Beyond God the Father. 

PHL 4256 Introduction to Feminist Thought (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to feminist scholarship in various fields. 
Discovery of what constitutes knowledge when 
women's experiences, rather than men's, frame the 
questions, provide the data, and interpret that data. 

PHL 4265 Contemporary Religious Issues in America (for- 
merly Understanding Religion in America Today) 
(3 q.h.) 

America's remarkable religious pluralism. Includes 
contemporary Christianity and Judaism, nontradi- 
tional Christian and non-Christian movements, cults. 



sects, and quasireligious organizations. After becom- 
ing fsuniliar with American religious foundations, stu- 
dents study the cormections between religion and 
sociotechnological change, sex, biomedical ethics, 
politics, and the media. May include guest speakers. 

PHL 4266 The Religious Right in Contemporary America 

(3 q.h.) 

Evangelism, fundamentalism, extremist groups, and 
nontraditional Jewish and Christian movements. Also 
examines "priesthood of all believers," grace and the 
idea of the "elect," and the state of being "born again" 
as well as the New Deal, the Great Society, and the 
"conservative revolution." Includes background on 
the roots of these movements, from precolonijil Eu- 
rope and Puritan America to the development of the 
Social Gospel. May include guest speakers. 

PHL 4270 The Great Western Religions (3 q.h.) 

Study of the basic teachings of Judaism, Christiaruty, 

and Islam. 

PHL 4273 Judaism (3 q.h.) 

Philosophy of the Jewish religion, its metaphysical 
and ethical beliefs, and the philosophical origins of 
these beliefs. 

PHL 4275 The Great Eastern Religions (3 q.h.) 
Study of the basic teachings of Taoism, Confucian- 
ism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Shintoism. 

PHL 4277 Hinduism (3 q.h.) 

The Hinduism of the Upanishads, the most explicit 
of the mystical religions. Also includes the devo- 
tional aspect of Hinduism as expressed in the 
Bhagavad Gita. 

PHL 4279 Buddhism (3 q.h.) 

Cenfral teachings of Buddhism, including the doc- 
trines that there is no independently existing im- 
mutable self or soul, that all phenomena are 
impermanent, that existence is suffering, that 
suffering has a cause, and that there is a way to 
eliminate suffering. 

PHL 4280 Islam (3 q.h.) 

History of Islam, its conflicts with the West in the 
past and in the present. Islamic beliefs, and the future 
of Islam as a world religion. 

PHL 4293 Mysticism: East and West (3 q.h.) 
Inquiry into mystical experience through a compara- 
tive study of the writings of Christian, Buddhist, and 
Hindu mystics and of secondary interpretive sources. 
Explores the potential oneness of humanity with 
God, the conflict of mysticism with fraditional forms 
of religion, and the possibility of a common, cross- 
cultural basis for mysticism. 

PHL 4315 Understanding the Bible: The Old Testament 

(3 q.h.) 

Exploration of the fraditions of the Hebrew people 
in cultural and historical perspective. Topics to be 
considered include changing ideas of the nature of 
God, the roles of prophet, priest, and king, and the 
development of the covenant motif. 



180 Philosophy — Political Science 



PHL 4316 Understanding the Bible: The New Testament 

(3 q.h.) 

Christianity began as a reform movement within Ju- 
daism but soon became a unique religious tradition. 
Examines earliest Christianity in its cultural and his- 
torical setting focusing on the Gospel portraits of Je- 
sus, the Kingdom of God, theories of afterlife, and 
Pauline theology. 

PHL 4330 The Encounter of Psychology and Religion 
(3 q.h.) 

Exploration of the ways the sense of self shapes and 
is shaped by religion. Emphasis on dominant West- 
ern psychologies and religions. Examination of the 
role of religious values in defining cultural values, 
and of these values in determining a sense of self. 

Physics 

PHY 4117 Physics 1 (Mechanics)* (4 q.h.) 
Vectors and balanced forces; accelerated motion; 
Newton's laws; projectile motion; work and energy; 
momentum; angular motion; centripetal force; rota- 
tion of rigid bodies; and moment of inertia. Prereq. 
MTH4107.* 

PHY 4118 Physics 2 (Properties of Matter, Heat, Wave 
Motion, Sound, Light)* (4 q.h.) 

Elasticity; density and pressure; temperature; the gas 
law; heat transfer; thermodynamics; vibratory mo- 
tion; wave motion; properties of sound; and proper- 
ties of Ught. Prereq. PHY 4117.* 
PHY 4119 Physics 3 (Electricity, Magnetism)* (4 q.h.) 
Electrostatics; circuit elements; direct current cir- 
cuits; magnetism; electromechanical devices; alter- 
nating current circuits; electronics; and electro- 
magnetic waves. Prereq. PHY 4118.* 
PHY 4173 Physics Laboratory 1* (2.3 lab, 2 q.h.) 
First quarter of a two-quarter physics laboratory. In- 
cludes experiments in mechanics, elastic deforma- 
tion, work, energy, thermometry, and calorimetry. 
Prereq. PHY 4417. 

PHY 4174 Physics Laboratory 2* (2.3 lab, 2 q.h.) 
Continuation of PHY 4173. Includes experiments in 
gas laws, wave motion, optics, electrical circuits, and 
nuclear and atomic physics. Prereq. PHY 41 73. 

Political Science 

POL 4103 Introduction to Politics (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to contemporary political science, in- 
cluding consideration of basic concepts in political 
analysis, the role of government institutions, political 
representation, political ideologies, and the scope 
and methods of political science. 
POL 4104 Introduction to American Government (3 q.h.) 
American governmental and political processes, 
constitutional institutions, political behavior, 
and liberties. 

POL 4105 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 q.h.) 
Comparative study of constitutional and totalitarian 
systems, including the Western European and 
Soviet patterns. 



POL 4106 Introduction to Politics (4 q.h.) 
Basic political concepts and forces of organization 
from the classical Greeks to the modem nation-state. 
The Soviet Union and the United Kingdom are con- 
trasted as contemporary illustrations of the institu- 
tional distinction between a totalitarian and a 
constitutional system. For Alternative Freshman- 
Year students only. 

POL 4110 The Great Political Thinkers (3 q.h.) 
The great political thinkers from ancient Greece to 
the twentieth century. Probes the creative genius of 
such theorists as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, 
Hegel, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx. 

POL 4300 Introduction to Public Administration (formerly 
Public Administration 1) (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the theory, forms, and processes of 
administration at the national and state levels. 

POL 4301 Case Studies in Public Administration 2 (formerly 
Public Admirustration 2) (3 q.h.) 
Case-study examination of the relation between the 
theory and practice of public administration. Prereq. 
POL 4300 or equivalent. 

POL 4302 Public Administration (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as POL 4300 and POL 4301. 

POL 4303 Public Personnel Administration (3 qJi.) 
Basic elements of persormel administration, includ- 
ing recruitment, training, classification, promotion, 
and executive development. Pays special attention to 
current problems, such as equal opportunity, public 
employee imionism, and collective bargaining. 

POL 4304 Public Budgeting (3 q.h.) 
Politics, procedures, and goals of government bud- 
geting at the federal, state, and local levels. Includes 
expense, capital, and program budgeting. 

POL 4305 Organizational Theory (3 q.h.) 
People and organizations, focusing on organizational 
and societal problems as a way of understanding 
how we can survive in a bureaucratic system. 

POL 4306 Public Policy Analysis (3 q.h.) 
Procedures for the analysis of public policy, includ- 
ing discussion of selected cases of public policy at 
the local, state, or federal level. 

POL 4307 The Politics of Health (3 q.h.) 
The problems of health in developing countries, par- 
ticularly during the last decade. Examines the politi- 
cal dynamics at the viUage, national, and global levels 
that have hindered efforts to establish health care de- 
livery systems. Analyzes issues of nationalism and 
problems of refugees. 

POL 4310 American Politicol Thought (3 q.h.) 
Political thought from the colonial period to the pre- 
sent, including study of the impact of religious, eco- 
nomic, and judicial theories on the structure of 
American ideas. 



'Indicates a School of Engineering Technology course, which is 
offered at a different tuition rate than that of University College. 



Political Science 181 



POL 4311 Research Methods (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to some of the most conunon methods 
of conducting political science research. Includes 
problems of theory construction jind data gathering 
and such analytical research tools as bibliographical 
aids and the computer. 

POL 4312 Political Parties and Pressure Groups (3 q.h.) 
Party government in the United States and Great 
Britain, focusing on the interaction of party 
and government. 

POL 4313 State and Local Government (formerly Govern- 
ment and Politics and the States) (3 q.h.) 
State and local goverrunents, their problems, and 
functional and operational responses to 
these problems. 

POL 4314 Urban and Metropolitan Government (3 q.h.) 
Political, structural, and functional problems of an 
urbanizing United States, including an jinalysis of ur- 
ban, suburban, and metropolitan governments. 

POL 4318 The American Presidency (3 q.h.) 
The nation's chief executive. Includes the presiden- 
tial electoral process, the president's many constitu- 
encies, and the differing styles of twentieth-century 
presidents. Also includes constitutional and extra- 
constitutional powers of the office. 

POL 4319 The Congress (3 q.h.) 
Institutional and functional analysis of the roles of 
Congress, the chief executive, and political parties in 
the legislative process. 

POL 4320 American Constitutional Law (3 q.h.) 
Case analysis of the development of Federalism, the 
separation of powers, and the role of the federal and 
state courts in constitutional development. 

POL 4321 Civil Liberties (formerly CivU Rights) (3 q.h.) 
Examination of quality and content of civil liberties 
in the United States. Emphasizes the first, fifth, 
sixth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to 
the Constitution. 

POL 4322 Procedural Due Process (3 q.h.) 

Studies of due process in the American constitutional 

scheme. 

POL 4325 The Politics of Films (3 q.h.) 
The relationship between films and politics. Films 
are analyzed for their political content and impact on 
specific controversies and on politics and society as 
a whole. 

POL 4327 Sex Roles in American Politics (3 q.h.) 
The roles of women in American government and 
politics, including the traditional roles — or absence 
thereof — of women in American politics, the suffrage 
movement, the impact of sex on achieving political 
power and office, the growing importance of the 
women's vote, the women's movement, and political 
action to support women's issues. 

POL 4330 Comparative Politics (3 q.h.) 
Political culture, organization, and behavior in differ- 
ent national settings. 



POL 4331 International Relations (3 q.h.) 
Elements of and limitations on national power. Dis- 
cusses contemporary world politics, problems of 
war, and peaceful coexistence. 

POL 4332 International Organization (3 q.h.) 
Development of international organizations, empha- 
sizing the United Nations, specialized agencies, and 
regional organizations. 

POL 4333 International Law (3 q.h.) 
Procedural and substantive study of the legal rela- 
tions among nation-states. 

POL 4335 Formulating American Foreign Policy 

(3 q.h.) 

The Constitution and political instruments for the 

formulation of American foreign policy. 

POL 4336 American Foreign Policy (3 q.h.) 

Studies of recent and current American foreign 

affairs. 

POL 4337 The Politics of Arms Control (3 q.h.) 
The nuclear arms rivalry between the United States 
and the Soviet Union, along with opportunities for 
curtailing it through arms control. Includes the na- 
ture and purposes of nuclear weapons, past arms- 
control agreements, and recent breakthroughs. 
Explores current options for arms control. 

POL 4338 European Political Parties (3 q.h.) 
Political party systems in England, France, and 
Germany, emphasizing ideology, organization in 
and out of Parliament, electoral strategies, and 
voter behavior. 

POL 4339 Government and Politics in the Soviet Union 

(3 q.h.) 

Modern totalitarian theory and practice, followed by 
study of the ideological and historical bases of the 
Soviet dictatorship. 

POL 4341 Soviet Foreign Policy (3 q.h.) 
Evolution of Soviet foreign policy since 1917, 
emphasizing the development of the international 
Communist movement. 

POL 4342 Communism in Eastern Europe (3 q.h.) 
Conditions surrounding the establishment of Com- 
munist regimes in eastern Europe following World 
War n and their relations with the Soviet Union. 

POL 4350 Politics and Policies of the Developing Nations 

(3 q.h.) 

Colonialism, the struggles for independence, and the 
common problems of developing nations. Includes 
economic development, urbaruzation, cultural frag- 
mentation, and revolution. 

POL 4352 Government and Politics of Latin America 

(3 q.h.) 

Historical background of the Latin American nations 
and their cultural, economic, social, and political 
characteristics, including political violence and the 
breakdown of democratic goverrunents. 



182 Political Science — Psychology 



POL 4356 Government and Politics of Northern Africa 

(3 q.h.) 

Comparative analysis of pobtical culture, organiza- 
tion, and behavior of African states north of the Sa- 
hara, with emphasis on Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, 
and Egypt. 

POL 4357 Government and Politics of South Africa (3 q.h.) 
Analysis of political culture, organization, and behav- 
ior of South Africa. Examination of South African 
history to show how South Africa got where it is to- 
day, including the nature, implications, and problems 
of apartheid, and prospects for the future. 

POL 4359 Government and Politics in the Middle East 

(3 q.h.) 

Political change, economic growth, and social adap- 
tation in selected countries. The emergence of the 
Middle East from subjection to self- assertion is ex- 
amined, focusing on such topics as the influence of 
Western Modernism, Muslim fundamentalism, inter- 
Arab rivalries, Arab-Israeli conflict, and the civil 
strife in Lebanon. 

POL 4362 Government and Politics of Southeast Asia (3 q.h.) 
Political instability and problems of establishing 
democratic structures and processes in the Philip- 
pines, Thailand, and India. 

POL 4364 China's Foreign Policy (3 q.h.) 
Peking's relations with Africa, the rest of Asia, the 
Soviet orbit, and the West. Covers policy objectives, 
strategy, tactics, and the methods of decision making 
in both the party and state apparatus. 

POL 4365 Government and Politics of China (3 q.h.) 
Chinese political culture, emphasizing the nine- 
teenth-century cultured, economic, and political im- 
pact of the West, the emergence of the Conununist 
party under the leadership of Mao, and the progres- 
sive disintegration of Kuomintang leadership. 

POL 4367 Government and Politics of Japan (3 q.h.) 
Historical development of the Japanese nation, with 
particular attention to the growth of fascism and 
efforts to create a viable democracy since World 
Warn. 

POL 4370 Introduction to Political Theory (3 q.h.) 
Development of the political ideas of the Western 
world, including the ideas of the mayor philo- 
sophers of Greece, Rome, the Christian Era, and 
the Renaissance. 

POL 4371 Modern Political Theory (3 q.h.) 
Political ideas and systems of political thought 
from Machiavelli to the present. Prereq. POL 4370 
or equivalent. 

POL 4372 Contemporary Political Thought (3 q.h.) 
Analyzes current ideas, ideologies, and political 
movements. Examination of such topics as neo- 
conservatism, neoliberalism, neo-Marxism, and 
women's liberation. 

POL 4373 Islamic Political Thought (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to Islamic thought and political theory. 
Analyzes such classical theorists as Avicenna, 



Averroes, Al-Ghazali, and Ibn Khaldun, and such 
modern theorists as Abduh, Iqbal, and Shari'ath. 

POL 4375 Consumer Advocacy 1 (3 q.h.) 
Pragmatic course designed to define and expand the 
role of consumers in the marketplace. Focuses on 
contemporary consumer issues, touching upon the 
legal, social, economic, and political aspects of con- 
sumer problems and the role of consumer lobbies as 
special interest groups. More specific consumer 
problems, such as those of the elderly, may also 
be explored. 

POL 5375 Consumer Advocacy 1 (3 CEUs) 
Same as POL 4375. 

POL 4376 Consumer Advocacy 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of POL 4375. Prereq. POL 4375 
or equivalent. 

POL 4377 Consumer Advocacy 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of POL 4376. Prereq. POL 4376 
or equivalent. 

POL 4378 Current Political Issues (3 q.h.) 
Constitutioneil and political basis of selected prob- 
lems in American political life. 

POL 4830 Honors Program 1 (4 q.h.) 
Independent work in a selected area under the direc- 
tion of members of the department. Limited to 
qualified students with the approval of the 
department chair and only by special arrangement 
with the supervising instructor. Prereq. Program 
Director's Approval. 

POL 4831 Honors Program 2 (4 q.h.) 
Second opportunity to do independent work as de- 
scribed in POL 4830. Prereq. POL 4830 and Program 
Director's Approval 

POL 4832 Honors Program 3 (4 q.h.) 
Additional opportunity to do independent work as 
described in POL 4830. Prereq. POL 4831 and Pro- 
gram Director's Approval. 

POL 4840 Directed Study 1 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for qualified students to take an upper- 
level course in their mayor on an individual basis. Pe- 
titions and procedural iristructions are available in 
the Liberal Arts Program office, 617-437-2416. Prereq. 
87 quarter hours and Program Director's Approval 

POL 4841 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity to initiate a second individual study as 
described in POL 4840. Prereq. POL 4840 and Pro- 
gram. Director's Approval. 

Psychology 

PSY 4110 Introduction to Psychology: Fundamental Issues 

(formerly Fundamental Issues in Psychology) (3 q.h.) 
Fundamental principles and issues of contemporary 
scientific psychology, which are approached as a 
method of inquiry as well as a body of knowledge. 
Examines the origins and methods of psychology, 
biological foundations of behavior, states of con- 
sciousness, learning, and memory. 



Psychology 183 



PSY 4111 Introduction to Psychology: Developmental Aspects 

(former^ Developmental Aspects in Psychology) (3 qi\.) 
Growth and the life-cycle, language, mental abilities, 
sensory and perceptual processes, and social interac- 
tion. Prereq. PSY 4110 or equivalent. 
PSY 4112 Introduction to Psychology: Personal Dynamics 
(formerly Personal Dynamics in Psychology) (3 q.h.) 
Motivation, emotion, personality theory and mea- 
surement, abnormal psychology, and therapy. Prereq. 
PSY 4110 or equivalent. 

PSY 4113 Introduction to Psychology Intensive A (formerly 
Psychology Intensive) (9 q.h.) 
Same as PSY 4110, PSY 4111, and PSY 4112. 
PSY 4114 Introduction to Psychology Intensive B (6 q.h.) 
Same as PSY 4110 and PSY 4111. 
PSY 4220 Statistics in Psychology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Scales of measurement in psychological research, 
measures of central tendency, and variability. Prereq. 
PSY 4111 and PSY 4112 or equivalent. 
PSY 4221 Statistics in Psychology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to measures of correlation, introduction 
to probability, and statistical distributions. Prereq. 
PSY 4220 or equivalent. 
PSY 4222 Statistics in Psychology 3 (3 q.h.) 
Parametric £md nonparametric tests of significance, 
including chi square, t-test, F test, and simple analy- 
sis of variance. Prereq. PSY 4221. 
PSY 4231 Psychology of Learning 1 (3 q.h.) 
Basic principles and techruques of operant and 
Pavlovian conditioning amd their applications to 
therapeutic, educational, and specialized train- 
ing programs. Prereq. PSY 4111 or PSY 4112 
or equivalent. 
PSY 4232 Motivation (3 q.h.) 

Various aspects of motivation, including primary and 
secondary reinforcement, unconscious motivation, 
effectuate motivation, and the assessment of mo- 
tives. Prereq. PSY 4112 or equivalent. 
PSY 4240 Development: Infancy and Childhood (formerly 
Developmental Psychology: Infancy and Childhood) 
(3 q.h.) 

Human development from infancy through late child- 
hood. Covers physical, cognitive, and psychosocial 
development, including the development of language, 
morality, and interpersonal relationships. 
PSY 4241 Development: Adolescence (formerly Develop- 
mental Psychology: Adolescence) (3 q.h.) 
Development during the second decade of life, em- 
phasizing the tasks and problems confronting the in- 
dividual adolescent. Includes biological, social, and 
cognitive changes as they relate to the creation of a 
stable, individucil identity. 

PSY 4242 Development: Adulthood and Aging (formerly 
Developmental Psychology: Adulthood and Old Age) 
(3 q.h.) 

Unique features and problems of development from 
the adult years to death. Emphasizes changes that ac- 
company career, marriage, and family developments 
and the specific psychological adjustments required 
of the aging person. 



PSY 5242 Development: Adulthood and Aging (3 CEUs) 
Same as PSY 4242. 

PSY 4243 Aging ond Mental Health (3 q.h.) 
Emotional reactiorxs to age-related issues, such as re- 
tirement, bereavement, and health status. Covers de- 
pression and suicide, behavior disorders, substance 
use problems, and the dementias of old age and the 
effects these problems have on families and the com- 
munity. Includes a survey of special assessment tech- 
niques, mental health services for the elderly, and 
public health policies for improved care. 

PSY 5243 Aging and Mental Heolth (3 CEUs) 
Same as PSY 4243. 

PSY 4262 Cognitive Psychology (3 q.h.) 
Mental processes involved in the acquisition, organi- 
zation, and use of knowledge, including pattern rec- 
ognition and memory. Prereq. PSY 4111, PSY 4112, 
or equivalent. 

PSY 4263 Psycholinguistics (3 q.h.) 
The nature amd structure of language, various theor- 
ies of human production and perception of language, 
and related experimental findings. Prereq. PSY 4111 
or equivalent. 

PSY 4270 Social Psychology 1 (3 q.h.) 
The socialization process, social motives, interper- 
sonal perception, and group membership and struc- 
ture. Prereq. PSY 4111 or equivalent. 

PSY 4271 Social Psychology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Attitudes, prejudice and ethnic relations, leadership, 
mass behavior and social movements, and the effects 
of mass media on commimication. Prereq. PSY 4270 
or equivalent. 

PSY 4272 Personality (3 q.h.) 

The normal personality and its growth and develop- 
ment. Includes envirorunental and genetic contri- 
butions, assessment of personality, research, and a 
survey of the mjoor personality theories. Prereq. 
PSY 4112 or equivalent. 

PSY 4275 Group Processes (3 q.h.) 
An analysis of group structure and its effect on be- 
havior. Topics include leadership, communication, 
conflict resolution, and group problem- solving. Stu- 
dent participation used to illustrate and develop 
group-related concepts. 

PSY 4276 Stress and Its Management (3 q.h.) 
An analysis of stress and its effects on human behav- 
ior. Considers the causes of stress from a variety 
of theoretical perspectives. Techniques and proce- 
dures for stress management and reduction exam- 
ined in detaU. 

PSY 4280 Human Sexuality and Love (3 q.h.) 
Examination, both theoretical and experimental, of 
psychological, biological, and social aspects of sex- 
uality and loving. Topics include sexual anatomy and 
physiology; birth control; gender identity and gender 



184 Psychology — Purchasing 



role; romantic love (with emphasis on successful 
love relationships); diverse sexual lifestyles; sexual 
dysfunctions and therapy; and enhancement of one's 
own sexual awareness and pleasure and that of 
one's partner. 

PSY 4290 Psychology of Women (3 q.h.) 
Women, historically and in contemporary life, 
including their social roles and their behavior as 
determined genetically, physiologically, and psycho- 
logically. Examines implications for women's future 
lifestyles, roles, and contributions. Prereq. PSY 4111 
or PSY 4112 or equivalent. 

PSY 4351 Physiological Psychology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to how nerves function and work to- 
gether in the nervous system; how our sense organs 
provide the brain with information about the outside 
world; how the brain acts to produce behavior; and 
how such psychological concepts as perception, 
learning, motivation, arousal, and emotion may relate 
to nervous system activity. Prereq. PSY 4111 or 
PSY 4112 or equivalent. 

PSY 4352 Drugs and Behavior (3 q.h.) 
Application of quantitative behavior techniques in 
animals and humans to determine the behavioral ef- 
fects of pharmacological agents. Includes systematic 
survey of experimental literature. Prereq. PSY 4111 
or PSY 4112 or equivalent. 

PSY 4370 Impact of Psychology on Society (3 q.h.) 
Developments such as the uses of intelligence and 
aptitude tests, psychosurgery and electroconvulsive 
therapy, techniques of behavior modification and 
control, minority and women's rights movements, di- 
rect brain stimulation by implzmted electrodes, use of 
psychoactive drugs, use of the lie detector, and the 
application of experimental techniques to human be- 
ings. Prereq. PSY 4111 or equivalent. 

PSY 4372 Abnormal Psychology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the etiology and dynamics of the ab- 
normal personaUty. Prereq. PSY 4112 or equivalent. 

PSY 4373 Abnormal Psychology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Symptomatology and treatment of the neuroses and 
psychoses. Prereq. 4372 or equivalent. 

PSY 4374 Abnormal Psychology 3 (3 q.h.) 
Psychosomatic, psychopathic, and organic disorders; 
varieties of psychotherapy. Prereq. PSY 4373 
or equivalent. 

PSY 4381 Sensotion and Perception (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the nature of the perceptual world, 
the nature of object recognition and identification, 
spatial organization, contextual effects, learning and 
perception, and the influence of attitudinal, motiva- 
tional, and personality factors on perception. Prereq. 
PSY 4111 or equivalent. 

PSY 4390 Industrial Psychology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Psychology as applied to industry, including such 
topics as selection and placement procedures, em- 
ployee assessment, individual differences and their 
evaluation, and the place of psychological tests in in- 
dustry. Prereg. PSY 41 11 or PSY 41 12 or equivalent. 



PSY 4391 Industrial Psychology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Personnel training and development, motivation and 
work, attitudes and job satisfaction, engineering psy- 
chology, and human factors in accident causation. 
Prereq. PSY 4390 or equivalent. 

PSY 4392 industrial Psychology 3 (3 q.h.) 
Supervision and leadership, morale, personnel coun- 
seling, the psychology of labor-management rela- 
tions, humam relations, and organizational behavior. 
Prereq. PSY 4391. 

PSY 4471 Psychological Therapies (3 q.h.) 
Techniques used for treating deviant behavior, from 
classical psychoanalytical therapies through meth- 
ods of behavior modification. Prereq. PSY 4374 
or equivalent. 

PSY 4561 Experimental Psychology 1 (3 q.h.) 
Students conduct experiments focusing on the scien- 
tific method in the design, execution, analysis, and 
reporting of psychological investigations. Prereq. 
PSY 4222. 

PSY 4562 Experimental Psychology 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of PSY 4561. Prereq. PSY 4561. 

PSY 4611 Senior Seminar in Psychology (3 q.h.) 
Small groups of students meet to discuss topics 
of mutual interest in psychology. Each seminar has 
a different focus, depending upon the student 
group and the instructor. Prereq. Senior status or 
instructor's permission. 

PSY 4811 Directed Study 1 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for qualified students to take an upper- 
class course in their mayor on an individual basis. Pe- 
titions and procedural instructions are available in 
the Liberal Arts Program office, 617-437-2416. Prereq. 
87 quarter hours. 

PSY 4812 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 

Opportunity to initiate a second individual study as 

described in PSY 4811. Prereq. PSY 4811. 

PSY 4813 Fieldwork in Psychology (6 q.h.) 
Refer to page 97 describing fieldwork courses. To 
be discussed with department consultant or advi- 
ser prior to registration; subject to Program 
Director's approval. 

PSY 4891 Honors Program 1 (4 q.h.) 
Prereq. Program Director's approval. 

PSY 4892 Honors Program 2 (4 q.h.) 

Prereq. PSY 4891 and Program Director's approval 

PSY 4893 Honors Program 3 (4 q.h.) 

Prereq. PSY 4892 and Program Director's approval 

Purchasing 

PUR 4351 Purchasing I (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to the function of purchasing in the in- 
dustrial orgamization. Includes purchasing responsi- 
bilities, objectives, organization, and personnel 
requirements; purchasing policy and systems; the 



Purchasing — Radiologic Technology 185 



role of the computer in regulating purchasing plan- 
ning, transactions, and information retrieval; acquisi- 
tion of purchased materials, development of sources 
of supply, and quality assurance; and determination 
and maintenance of required inventory levels. Also 
covers control of inventory investment, price deter- 
mination, cost and price analysis of purchase trans- 
actions, make or buy decisions, and the role of 
standardization and value analysis. 

PUR 4352 Purchasing 2 (3 q.h.) 

The process of purchase negotiations, budgets, and 
purchase of capital equipment. Includes purchsising 
for public and nonprofit institutions, disposition of 
surplus and obsolete materials, traffic and material 
handling, forward buying and speculation, ethical 
considerations in purchasing, purchasing law, con- 
tract cancellations, purchasing reports, evaluation of 
purchasing performance, and control and audit pro- 
cedures. Prereq. PUR 4351. 

PUR 4353 Purchosing (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as PUR 4351 and PUR 4352. 

PUR 4357 Business Negotiations (3 q.h.) 
Buyer-seller communication and exchange. Explores 
the interactive process for arriving at a satisfactory 
agreement between buyer and prospective vendor 
and accepted strategies employed by both parties. 
Explores economic and techrucal considerations and 
the psychological and interpersonal environments of 
negotiations. Prereq. PUR 4351. 

PUR 4358 Materials Requirements Planning (3 q.h.) 
Determination of material requirements based on the 
master production schedule. Calculations of the time 
periods in which materials must be available. The 
computer-based MRP system may be used as prep- 
aration for APICS certification exams. 

PUR 4365 Production Activity Control (3 q.h.) 
Principles, approaches, and techniques used to plan, 
schedule, control, and evaluate the effectiveness of 
factory production operations. Includes scheduling 
and control techniques used in various manufactur- 
ing environments. Course may be used as prepara- 
tion for APICS Certification examinations. 

PUR 4370 Inventory Management (3 q.h.) 
Basic inventory management objectives, from the 
control of raw materials to finished goods and distri- 
bution inventory management. Includes aggregate in- 
ventory controls, lot sizing, customer service 
objectives, and the finemcial and physical controls 
necessary for effective inventory management. 
Course may be used as preparation for APICS 
Certification examinations. 

PUR 4380 Advanced Purchasing Techniques (3 q.h.) 
Purchasing for individuals with previous experience 
in the field. Discusses new techniques, such as "just- 
in-time" purchasing and computerized purchasing, 
and managing vendor quality and value analysis tech- 
niques. Concentrates on strategies to reduce the cost 



of purchased materials and the investment in inven- 
tories as well as on managing the effectiveness and 
continuity of sources of supply. Prereq. PUR 4352 
or equivalent. 

Radiologic Technology 
RAD 4100 Radiologic Technology Orientation 1 (3 cl., 3 q.h.) 
History of X-radiation, radiology department organi- 
zation, medical terminology, patient care and nursing 
procedures, and contrast media. 

RAD 4101 Radiologic Technology Orientation 2 (3 cl, 3 q.h.) 
Study of medical and surgical diseases. Prereq. 
RAD 4100. 

RAD 4102 Radiologic Science 1 (4 cl, 4 q.h.) 
Basic concepts of physics, units of measurement, 
Newton's law of motion, work, energy, atomic theory 
of matter, electric currents, magnetism, generators, 
motor production, control of high voltage, and X-ray 
production. Prereq. MTH 4110. 

RAD 4103 Radiologic Science 2 (4 cl., 4 q.h.) 
Topics include interaction of X-rays and matter; 
modern X-ray tubes; X-ray circuits; simulator experi- 
ments; fluoroscopic systems; and properties of sol- 
ids, liquids, and gases. Also covers temperature and 
heat transfer and their application. Prereq. 
RAD 4102. 

RAD 4104 Principles of Radiology 1 (4 cl., 4 q.h.) 
Practical, basic radiation protection and the princi- 
ples of positioning patients for radiographic studies. 
Prereq. RAD 4114. 

RAD 4105 Principles of Radiology 2 (4 cl, 4 q.h.) 
Principles of precise body positioning for detailed ra- 
diographic studies. Prereq. RAD 4104. 

RAD 4106 Radiologic Photography and Exposure 1 

(4 cl., 4 q.h.) 

Basic principles of image formation, electromagnetic 
spectrum. X-ray tube construction, and factors con- 
trolling radiographic quality- Prereq. RAD 4103 and 
MTH 4110 or equivalent. 

RAD 4107 Radiologic Photography and Exposure 2 

(4 cl, 4 q.h.) 

Mathematical formulas used in radiography. Includes 
in-depth study of sensitometry, phototiming princi- 
ples, tomography, and radiographic film techniques. 
Prereq. RAD 4102 and RAD 4106. 

RAD 4116 Radiology Practicum 1 (4 q.h.) 
Students apply theoretical principles by performing 
radiographic procedures under supervision in a di- 
rect patient-care setting. Requires four hours of 
classroom education and assigned homework per 
week. Emphasizes patient safety, radiation protec- 
tion, and basic, routine diagnostic procedures. 

RAD 4117 Radiology Practicum 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of RAD 4116. Emphasizes routine diag- 
nostic procedures, including fluoroscopy, operating 
room and portable radiography. Prereq. RAD 4116. 



186 Radiologic Technology — Real Estate 



RAD 4118 Radiology Procticum 3 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of RAD 4117. Emphasizes advanced di- 
agnostic procedures, including invasive and interven- 
tional studies. Minor rotations are scheduled for 
related imaging departments. Prereq. RAD 4117. 

RAD 4119 Radiology Practicum 4 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of RAD 4118. Final clinical practicum 
leads to demonstration of accomplishment of termi- 
nal clinical competencies. Prereq. RAD 4118. 

RAD 4121 Principles of Photography and Exposure Lab 1 

(2 q.h.) 

Energized x-ray laboratory activities designed to 

complement RAD 4106. 

RAD 4122 Principles of Photography and Exposure Lab 2 

(2 q.h.) 

Continuation of RAD 4121. Designed to complement 

RAD 4107. 

RAD 4305 Advanced Radiologic Technology (4 cl., 4 q.h.) 
Special procedures including cardiovascular proce- 
dures, neuroradiology, lymphangiography, and inter- 
vention studies. Covers exam methodology, required 
equipment, specied patient care, contrast media, and 
contra indications. Prereq. RAD 4103, RAD 4105, 
RAD 4107. 

RAD 4306 Radiation Protection— Radiobiology (4 cl, 4 q.h.) 
Atomic structure, properties of radioactive materials, 
uruts of radiation, long- and short-term biological ef- 
fects, life span shortening, radiation detection and 
survey instruments, radiographic facilities design, re- 
duction of exposure to patients, federal x-ray stan- 
dards, and radiopharmaceuticals. Prereq. RAD 4107. 

RAD 4304 Cross-Sectional Anatomy (4 cl., 4 q.h.) 
Regional approach to anatomy. Reviews standard 
anatomy, with emphasis on relations of organs and 
structures to transverse and longitudined section aph 
pearance. Prereq. RAD 4114 or equivalent. 

RAD 4400 Anatomy of the Head and Neck (3 q.h.) 
Anatomy of the head and neck in regional approach. 
Presents both standard and sectional anatomy. Top- 
ics include brain, orbits, nasal cavity and paranasal 
sinuses, oral cavity and pharynx, larynx, thyroid and 
salivary glands, and angiology of head and neck. 

RAD 4450 Computerized Body Tomography Pathology 

(3 q.h.) 

Abnormal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, 
and pelvis as demonstrated by computed tomog- 
raphy. Appropriate correlations made to normal ana- 
tomic structure. Prereq. RAD 4304 or consent 
of instructor. 

RAD 4460 Medical Imaging Quality Assurance (3 q.h.) 
Establishing, conducting, and interpreting the results 
of a medical imaging quality assurance program. Ba- 
sic imaging chain, film characteristics and sensito- 
metry, test equipment and operation, data collection 
and interpretation. Prereq. RAD 4305 or equivalent. 



Real Estate 

RE 4301 Real Estate Fundamentals 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the basic principles and termi- 
ology of real estate useful in various real estate 
business practices. 

RE 4302 Real Estate Fundamentals 2 (3 q.h.) 
Practices of real estate brokerage, including real es- 
tate appraisal, finance, development, management, 
and investment. Upon successful completion of RE 
4301 and RE 4302, students may take the Massachu- 
setts broker's or salesperson's examination. Prereq. 
RE 4301. 

RE 4303 Real Estate Fundamentals (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as RE 4301 and RE 4302. 

RE 4304 Real Estate Fundamentals (Brokers) (4 q.h.) 
Review of the general principles and practices of real 
estate fundamentals. General principles are exam- 
ined with specific attention given to those areas of 
real estate that are tested on the Massachusetts 
broker's real estate exiimination. On successfully 
completing RE 4304, students are certified, which en- 
ables them to take the Massachusetts broker's exam. 
Prereq. RE 4302 or permission of instructor. 

RE 4305 Real Estate Title Examination (3 q.h.) 
Review of the general principles of abstracting and 
the function of the Registry of Deeds in the real es- 
tate business. General principles of title examina- 
tions are explored in detail, with attention given to 
recording deeds and the transfer of title in the con- 
veyance of real estate. The function of the land court 
and registered land is also treated. Prepares the stu- 
dents for a possible career in title examination and 
may require field work at the Registry of Deeds. 

RE 4323 Real Estate Appraisal 1 (3 q.h.) 
Fundamental survey of the appraisal of single-family 
residences. Examines city or town neighborhood in- 
fluences, site evaluation, building diagnosis, depreci- 
ation, the various approaches to value, and appraisal 
report preparation. Prereq. RE 4302. 

RE 4324 Real Estate Appraisal 2 (3 q.h.) 
Specialized overview of the appraisal of income 
properties. Includes application of the cost, market, 
and income approaches to apartment buildings and 
other conrunercial and industrial properties and of 
the various methods of capitalization and residual 
techniques. Prereq. RE 4323. 

RE 4326 Appraising a Single-Family Dwelling (3 q.h.) 
Fundamental survey of the appraisal of single-family 
dwellings for the begirming appraiser, real estate 



Real Estate — Recreational Therapy 187 



broker, salesperson, lender, assessor, or builder. 
Includes city and neighborhood analysis, site 
evaluation, building materials and cost, and depre- 
ciation. Also includes selected research into 
appropriate market data, assembling pertinent in- 
formation, applying relevant analytical techniques, 
and preparing appraisal reports, including 
FNMA/FMAC report forms. 

RE 4328 Real Estote Financial Analysis 1 (3 q.h.) 
Analysis of how to critically examine and auialyze any 
proposed real estate investment. Explores in detail 
the financial aspects of acquisition, ownership, and 
disposition, and addresses taxation of investments, 
forms of property ownership (organization of the 
venture), analysis of operating statements, financial 
accounting, use of leverage, "tax- sheltered" invest- 
ments, and special situations. Develops criteria of 
risk and return on investment (ROI) that should be 
established by various types of investors. Prereg. RE 
4324 or instructor's permission. 

RE 4329 Real Estote Financial Analysis 2 (3 q.h.) 
Detailed analysis of the risks and rewards of real es- 
tate investments and problems involved in financing 
income properties, using case studies, homework 
problems, and class discussion and debate. Stresses 
class participation. Prereq. RE 4328. 

RE 4330 Real Estate Financial Analysis (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as RE 4328 and RE 4329. Prereq. RE 4324. 

RE 4340 Real Estate Development (3 q.h.) 
Practical, step-by-step approach to the organization 
and development of a real estate project for the en- 
trepreneur, banker, or broker. Includes the role of 
the developer, acquisition of land, site analysis, con- 
struction finance, gap financing and permanent com- 
mitments, project budgeting for capital costs and for 
income and expense, selection of professionals, ne- 
gotiations of agreements with contractors and own- 
ers, and marketing the completed project. Case 
studies and guest lecturers may be featured. Prereq. 
RE 4329 or instructor's permission. 

RE 4341 Real Estate Law 1 (3 q.h.) 
Private real estate law, including ownership rights in 
land, leasehold rights, and easements in the land of 
another; legal forms of ownership; the transfer and 
acquisition of title and of other interests; recording of 
deeds, leases, and other instruments; and the land- 
lord-tenant relationship. 

RE 4342 Real Estate Law 2 (3 q.h.) 
Public real estate law, including government powers, 
rights, and controls on privately owned real estate; 
zoning and subdivision controls; conservation con- 
trols; taxation of real estate; rent controls; and emi- 
nent domain. Prereq. RE 4341. 



RE 4344 Real Estate Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Analysis of the practical problems of real estate man- 
agement. Stressed the requisite day-to-day manage- 
ment of commercial, industrial, and residential 
properties as well as the need for a management 
strategy relating to long-term property values. 
Prereq. RE 4302 or instructor's permission. 

RE 4345 Real Estate Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of RE 4344. Prereq. RE 4344. 

RE 4346 Real Estate Management 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of RE 4345. Prereq. RE 4345. 

RE 4347 Real Estate Title Examination (3 q.h.) 
Specialized examination of real estate titles and the 
preparation of a complete report. Prereq. RE 4341 or 
instructor's permission. 

Recreational Therapy 

REC 4101 Principles and Practices of Therapeutic 
Recreation 1 (3 q.h.) 

Overview of the field, including rationale, history, 
philosophy, goals, treatment settings, problems of 
institutionalization, a4junctive therapies, and 
professional development. 

REC 4102 Principles and Practices of Therapeutic 
Recreation 2 (3 q.h.) 

Basic medical terminology with an overview of trau- 
matic, sensory, neurological, orthopedic, and cardio- 
vascular disabilities. Also includes prosthetics, 
orthontics, and an examination of attitudinal and so- 
cietal barriers for the handicapped. Prereq. REC 
4101 or consultant's permission. 

REC 4103 Principles and Practices of Therapeutic 
Recreotion 3 (3 q.h.) 

Integrated case-method and systems approach to 
planning with individuals and groups. Focus is on as- 
sessment; quality assurance; designing, charting, and 
understanding the fundamental elements of activi- 
ties; current legislation; and standards of service. 
Prereq. REC 4102. 

REC 4110 Group Dynamics and Leadership 1 (3 q.h.) 
Self-awareness, identity, and interpersonal and inter- 
group commimications. Includes process factors 
influencing the need to join the group; motivation 
to participate; membership screening; size and 
purpose of the group; open-ended and closed ap- 
proaches; group problem solving; brainstorming; and 
conflict resolution. 

REC 41 1 1 Group Dynamics and Leadership 2 (3 q.h.) 
Organization, development, and structure of groups; 
team building; role and value clarification; ramifica- 
tions of change; group characteristics; and leadership 
styles and techniques. Prereq. REC 4110. 

REC 4112 Group Dynomics and Leadership (Intensive) 

(6 qJi.) 

Same as REC 4110 and REC 4111. 



188 Recreational Therapy 



REC 4200 Introduction to Learning Disabilities (3 q.h.) 
Review of the behavioral characteristics of people 
with deficits in perceptual, integrative, or expressive 
processes that impair learning. Appropriate curricula 
and teaching methods surveyed. 

REC 4210 Psychosocial Aspects of Disabilities and Illness 

(3 q.h.) 

Exploration of issues and attitudes related to disabil- 
ity, such as societal understanding, handicapping 
conditions, adjustments, social networks, coping, and 
the interaction of care providers with the disabled. 

REC 4250 Assessment of Learning Disabilities (3 q.h.) 
Presentation of the formal and informal assessment 
procedures for general, specific, eind behavioral 
learning deficits. Techniques for the remediation of 
these deficits in schools and home are reviewed. 
Prereq. REC 4200. 

REC 4300 Arts and Crafts 1 (3 q.h.) 
Overview of the creative media available for individ- 
ual projects. Includes how to develop the techrucal 
capability to use a wide variety of materials in imagi- 
native ways and the compilation of a personal arts 
and crafts manual as a reference tool. 

REC 4301 Alls and Crafts 2 (3 q.h.) 
Adaptation of creative skills to a therapeutic setting. 
Emphasizes continued development of technical ca- 
pabilities and of instructional skills (one-to-one and 
group). Also discusses the plarming, implementation, 
and integration of craft programs. 

REC 4302 Arts and Crafts (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as REC 4300 and REC 4301. 

REC 4304 Dynamics of Family Life for the Disabled (3 q.h.) 
Survey of the internal and external dynamics of fam- 
ily life. The significance of these factors to the mental 
health of the disabled is explored. Approaches to 
working with families is reviewed, as well as the ef- 
fects of disabilities on the family unit itself. 

REC 4310 Sociol Recreation (3 q.h.) 
Planning, orgaruzation, and motivation for social rec- 
reation activities, including ice breakers, mixers, ac- 
tive and inactive games, joint projects, and special 
events geared to a variety of settings. 

REC 4311 Music Therapy (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the field of music therapy, including 
an exploration of historical and current theories and 
various techniques used in clinical settings. Also in- 
cludes a survey of the literature of therapy, covering 
special education and psychiatric and geriatric areas. 

REC 4312 Media Resources and Techniques (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to how to design overlays, transparen- 
cies, posters, brochures, and other materials and cre- 
atively use slides and tapes. Also includes the 
operation of public address systems, 16 mm. opaque 
film strips, overhead projectors, and other photo- 
graphic devices. 



REC 4313 Therapeutic Use of Dramatics (3 q.h.) 
The value of reinforcement and socialization 
through pantomime, improvisations, puppetry, skits 
and stunts, dramatic games, storytelling, and 
one-act plays. Emphasizes creativity in the 
therapeutic setting. 

REC 4350 Legal Issues of Disability and Rehabilitation 

(3 q.h.) 

An analysis of sigruficant legal issues pertaining to 
rehabilitation and disability in education, employ- 
ment, and housing. Pertinent federal and state 
statutes covered. 

REC 4401 The Nursing Home Experience (3 q.h.) 
Exchange of empirical data relating to case experi- 
ences and institutional procedures encountered by 
activity leaders and other practitioners in nursing 
homes. Examines the feasibility of functional iimova- 
tions in relation to present practices. 

REC 4410 Therapeutic Recreation in Rehabilitation (3 q.h.) 
Philosophy, goals, and background in rehabilitation; 
team membership concepts. Includes the role of 
therapeutic recreation in the acute and chronic 
hospital, the rehabilitation center, and in various 
community settings. 

REC 4420 Activity and Movement Analysis (3 q.h.) 
Basic anatomy as it relates to the identification of 
muscle groups in action. Analyzes both the move- 
ment and the ingredients of the activity and their 
suitability with given disabilities. Prereq. BIO 41 75. 

REC 4425 Mental Illness and Retardation (3 q.h.) 
Origins and manifestations of mental illness and re- 
tardation. Historical and contemporary overviews in- 
clude discussions of treatment, settings, case studies, 
and trends. 

REC 4430 Therapeutic Recreation in Child Development 

(3 q.h.) 

Growth and development patterns from birth to age 
12. Includes study of the need for play, learning 
through play, and the therapeutic value of play. Ex- 
amines biological, psychological, and sociologicad as- 
pects by watching children at play. 

REC 4440 Humanistic and Holistic Approaches in Therapeutic 
Recreation (3 q.h.) 

Use of trust, imagination, verbal and nonverbal com- 
mimication, intuition, emotions, the will, spirit, motor 
coordination, sensory awareness, and self-responsi- 
bility to develop irmovative programming. 

REC 4445 Community Recreotion for the Handicapped 

(3 q.h.) 

Development and initiation of a comprehensive spe- 
cial needs program in the commuruty by integrating 
efforts with school and special education depart- 
ments, municipal officials, and parent groups. Covers 
needs statements, concepts of budgeting and fund- 
ing, publicity, and program development. Site visits. 



Recreational Therapy — Sociology- Anthropology 189 



REC 4450 Vocational Planning for the Learning Disabled 

(3 q.h.) 

Survey of the issues aind processes that need to be 
taken into consideration when assisting the learning 
disabled in making vocational choices. Resources 
available for placement and training are covered, as 
well as how to design a skill assessment and interest 
inventory. The ultimate aim is to assist the client in 
the process of self-assessment, goal- setting, and the 
job search process. 

REC 4460 The Process of Aging (3 q.h.) 
Psychosocial dynamics of growing old, physical 
changes as a result of aging, the needs of people as 
they age, and attitudes toward work, retirement, and 
leisure. A study of dependency versus independence, 
remotivation, death and dying, and programs and ser- 
vices that add quality to the long life. 

REC 4461 Camping for the Disabled (3 q.h.) 
Basic goals, values, and procedures for operating 
outdoor education and camping programs. Empha- 
sizes social integration with nondisabled children 
and the development of irmovative programs. 

REC 4462 Leisure Counseling (3 q.h.) 
Remedial and developmental process designed to 
produce behavior and attitude changes in the client's 
leisure patterns. Includes development of compe- 
tence in identifying, using, and referral to appropriate 
recreational resources. Compares leisure counseling 
fundamentals in a variety of recreational settings. 

REC 4470 The Learning Disabled at Work (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the learning disabled in the work- 
place, how their performance may be impacted, and 
what accommodations in job content may be neces- 
sary. The aim is to develop problem-solving strate- 
gies that facilitate the positive contributions a 
learning disabled person can make with some 
accommodations. 

REC 4500 Field Practicum 1 (4 q.h.) 
Assigned field experience in a treatment facility un- 
der supervision of a qualified professional. Students 
have the opportunity to learn about the direct service 
application of classroom theory through observation 
and participation and written reports, evaluations, 
and seminars. The experience averages eight hours a 
week for twelve weeks. Prereq. REC 4103 plus 12 
quarter hours of professional courses and prax;ti- 
cum coordinator's permission. 

REC 4501 Field Practicum 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of REC 4500. Prereq. REC 4500. 

REC 4802 Independent Study 1 (4 q.h.) 
Research study, through survey and other methods, 
geared to the individual's area of professional 
focus. Students are expected to gather, analyze, and 
evaluate data and periodically submit progress re- 
ports to the research adviser. Prereq. REC 4103 and 
consultant's permission. 



REC 4803 Independent Study 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of REC 4802. Prereq. REC 4802. 

Sociology-Anthropology 

SOA 4100 Physical Anthropology (formerly Anthro- 
pology 1) (3 q.h.) 

Introduction to elements of physicd anthropology, 
covering such subjects as primates, fossil humans 
and evolution, problems of heredity and genetics, 
race and racial classifications, and the bases of cul- 
tural behavior. Not open to students who have credit 
for SOC 4010. 

SOA 4101 Cultural Anthropology: Preliterate Societies 

(formerly Anthropology 2) (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to sociocultural anthropology. Exam- 
ines the nature of language and the cultural institu- 
tions of human groups with simple foraging and 
horticultural adaptation. Not open to students who 
have credit for SOC 4011. 

SOA 4102 Cultural Anthropology: Industrial Societies 

(formerly Anthropology 3) (3 q.h.) 
The irvstitutions and cultures of technologically ad- 
vanced societies and states. 

SOA 4103 Anthropology Intensive A (6 q.h.) 
Same as SOA 4100 and SOA 4101. 

SOA 4104 Anthropology Intensive B (formerly Anthropol- 
ogy Intensive) (9 q.h.) 
Same as SOA 4100, SOA 4101, and SOA 4102. 

SOA 4146 Peasant Societies in a Changing World (3 q.h.) 
Changes affecting traditional peasant cultures in the 
non- Western and Western worlds. Examines the pro- 
cesses occurring in situations involving culture con- 
tact, conquest, and colonialism. 

SOA 4155 Individual and Culture (3 q.h.) 
Cross-cultural comparisons of the socialization and 
acculturation of children and adults with respect to 
roles, values, and personality. Examines theories and 
methods used in psychological anthropology. 

SOA 4160 Sex, Sex Roles, and the Family (3 q.h.) 
Analysis of popular and scientific notions about sex 
and the family by examining the social patterning of 
interactions in our culture, other cultures, and other 
species. Emphasizes the changing relationships be- 
tween men and women. 

SOA 4221 Culture and Medicine (3 q.h.) 
Perspectives on medicine and health care are rapidly 
changing. As costs skyrocket, alternatives to "cura- 
tive" medicine are being sought. Uses an anthropo- 
logical perspective and draws on the vast amount of 
cross-cultural literature in exploring the impact of 
sociocultural factors on the incidence, definition, 
treatment, and prevention of illness as well as the or- 
ganization of health services. 

SOA 4266 Folklore (3 q.h.) 

Folklore, art, and song in various societies and 
how they are studied. Includes contemporary 
American materials. 



1 90 Sociology -Anthropology — Sociology 



SOA 4322 Anthropological Theory (3 q.h.) 
History of the m^or orientations and philosophies of 
anthropology, including evolutionist, culture area, 
and historic£il approaches and functional, structural, 
ecological, and cognitive modes of analysis. 

SOA 4430 Native North American Peoples (3 q.h.) 
Past and present circumstances of a number of na- 
tive North American peoples. 

SOA 4431 African Peoples and Cultures (3 q.h.) 
Topics include African geography, prehistory, and 
culture; the spectrum of societal complexity ranging 
from Mbuti egaiitarianism to Ashanti federation; and 
the problems of political, economic, and social 
change in contemporary Africa. 

SOA 4434 Latin American Peoples and Cultures (3 q.h.) 
Tribal and peasant adaptations of native and 
Hispanic populations to changing conditions in 
Latin America. 

SOA 4470 Religion in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 q.h.) 
Comparative analysis of the rituals, behefs, and reli- 
gious institutions of various groups. 

Sociology 

SOC 4010 Principles of Sociology 1 (4 q.h.) 
Introduction to basic concepts and theories relating 
to the study of people as participamts in group life. 
Emphasizes socialization, culture, social structure, 
primary groups, family, social stratification, and pop- 
ulation. For Alternative Freshman-Year students 
only. Not open to students who have credit for SOC 

4100 or SOC 4101. 

SOC 401 1 Principles of Sociology 2 (4 q.h.) 
Continuation of SOC 4010. Emphasizes critical analy- 
sis of American society with particular attention to 
problems of social, political, urban, and industrial 
change. For Alternative Freshman-Year students 
only. Not open to students who have credit for SOC 

4101 or SOC 4102. Prereq. SOC 4010 or equivalent. 

SOC 4100 Roles, Culture, and the Individual (formerly 
Fundamental Issues in Sociology) (3 q.h.) 
Basic theoretical perspectives, research methods, 
and concepts of sociology, including society, status 
and role, socialization, and social groups. Not open to 
students who have credit for SOC 4010. 

SOC 4101 Inequality and Institutions (formerly The Indi- 
vidual and Social Roles) (3 q.h.) 
Involvement of individuals in society, including 
culture, social interaction, deviance, sex roles, 
sexuality, and family. Not open to students who have 
credit for SOC 4010 or SOC 401 1. Prereq. SOC 4100 
or equivalent. 

SOC 4102 Institutions and Social Change (formerly Critical 
Issues Facing Society) (3 q.h.) 
Examines important social factors, including busi- 
ness cind industry, population and ecology, science 



and technology, class, and race and ethnic relations. 
Not open to students who have credit for SOC 4011. 
Prereq. SOC 4100 or equivalent. 

SOC 4103 Introduction to Sociology Intensive A (formerly 

Sociology Intensive) (9 q.h.) 

Same as SOC 4100, SOC 4101, and SOC 4102. 

SOC 4104 Introduction to Sociology Intensive B (6 q.h.) 
Same as SOC 4100 and SOC 4101. 

SOC 4120 Sociology of Boston (3 q.h.) 
The city is a laboratory for exploring the people's 
search for a Ufestyle and the satisfaction of their 
needs. Study of the City of Boston from the perspec- 
tives of environmental development, neighborhood 
and intergroup relations, institutional services, and 
symbolic meanings. Includes field frips with work- 
book and requires use of documentary and literary 
sources for term paper report. Does not meet elective 
requirements for Sociology-Anthropology major. 

SOC 4125 Social Problems (3 q.h.) 
Contemporary American social problems and the ap- 
plication of sociological concepts, methods, and prin- 
ciples to these problems. 

SOC 4147 Urban Sociology (3 q.h.) 
Various causes, characteristics, and effects of urban- 
ization in several different cultures. Gives specific at- 
tention to the problem of urban and suburban living 
and the changing structure of the city. 

SOC 4154 Sex and Gender Roles in Society (formerly Sex 
in Society: The Study of Sex Roles) (3 q.h.) 
Historical and contemporary developments, examin- 
ing the ways in which men's and women's changing 
roles are related to society at large. 

SOC 4155 Sociology of the Family (formerly Sociology of 

the Family 1) (3 q.h.) 

The family as a social iristitution in several selected 
cultures; family interrelations with political, econom- 
ic, and educational institutions; and the changing na- 
ture of the family. 

SOC 4156 Violence in the Family (formerly Sociology of 

the Family 2) (3 q.h.) 

Physical, emotional, and sexual violence that occurs 
in families, emphasizing child and spouse abuse. 
Analyzes definitions, prevalence, causes, prevention, 
and treatment of specific cases of violence. Primary 
focus is on social and policy issues and problems of 
legal intervention. 

SOC 4170 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 q.h.) 
Relationships among various racial, national, cultur- 
al, and religious groups, emphasizing the develop- 
ment of black-white relationships in American 
society. Also covers the problems of contemporary 
minority peoples in American and other societies. 

SOC 4175 Sociology of Work (3 q.h.) 

The world of work, focusing on the development of 

occupational cultures, the nature of careers, and the 



Sociology 191 



meanings and implications of professionalization. 
Students are encouraged to do a project on a career 
they are considering or one in which they have had 
practical experience on co-op. 

SOC 4176 Business and Industrial Sociology (3 q.h.) 
Role of industry in modem society. Examines simi- 
larities and differences among industrial societies, 
bureaucracy and its jiltematives, unions, supervision 
democracy and manipulation, the individual on the 
assembly Une, sabotage of the organization, and the 
role of wages and aUenation. 

SOC 4185 Sociology of Deviant Behavior (3 q.h.) 
A variety of social problems and their relation to the 
organization of society. Pays particular attention to 
alcoholism, sexual offenses, drug abuse, mental dis- 
orders, and other responses to conditions of urban 
industrial society. 

SOC 4186 Social Control (3 q.h.) 

Group membership as a determinant of behavior, in- 
cluding analysis of status and role, patterns of au- 
thority, power, and group ideology as factors in the 
evaluation of conduct. 

SOC 4190 Juvenile Delinquency (3 q.h.) 
Factors involved in juvenile delinquency and 
their impUcations for prevention, rehabilitation, 
and treatment. 

SOC 4195 Drugs and Society (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the sociology of drugs. Examines so- 
cial definitions of drugs, conditions of their use, and 
socialization into drug use. Considers deviant drug 
use and effects of social control on definitions and 
use. A range of licit and illicit drugs is considered. 

SOC 4202 Sociology of Drinking (3 q.h.) 
Exploration of how different groups and societies or- 
ganize drinking as a social act, and the consequences 
of that organization. Covers the cultural meaning as- 
signed to drinking, the social elements found in all 
drinking situations, how members of social groups 
learn how to drink, and the social and psychological 
functions of drinking. 

SOC 4205 Law and Society (3 q.h.) 
Topics include functions of law in modem society; 
legislation, Utigation, and abjudication as social 
processes; the legal profession, the courts, and 
the administration of justice; laws and judicial 
decisions on controversial social issues; and laws 
regulating domestic, industrial, and other mjgor 
social relationships. 

SOC 4215 Medical Sociology (3 q.h.) 
Sociological concepts and research relating to pat- 
terns of behavior in the Jireas of health and disease. 
Emphasizes the family, community, medical organi- 
zations, class, and status as social subsystems related 
to the field of health. 



SOC 4220 Sociology of Mental Health (3 q.h.) 
Sociological aspects of mental hezilth and mental dis- 
order. Examines the socicd history of mental illness, 
epidemiological and cross-cultural approaches to 
mental disorder, the career of the mental patient, the 
functions of psychiatry in society, community and 
social treatment modaUties, and social psychiatry. 

SOC 4225 Social Gerontology (3 q.h.) 
Issues and questions of aging, with special attention 
to socizil and economic consequences of the aging 
process, such as retirement and productivity, health 
care problems, nursing home residences, widower- 
and widowhood, and the approach of death. Gives 
examples relating to aging in other cultures in a 
search for new answers to social problems of aging 
in the United States. Discusses how to anticipate, 
cope with, and even prevent problems of aging that 
concern self, family, and chents or patients. 

SOC 4235 Death and Dying (3 q.h.) 
The treatment of death and dying, including prob- 
lems faced by health care professionzils, family mem- 
bers, institutions, the funeral industry, and the dying 
themselves. Includes cross-cultural perspectives, the 
social distribution of mortahty, the changing nature 
of death, and the ethical problems in determining Ufe 
and death with particular attention to such issues as 
abortion, suicide, and ceasing medical intervention. 

SOC 5225 Sociol Gerontology (3 CEUs) 
Same as SOC 4225. 

SOC 4226 Work, Leisure, and Aging (3 q.h.) 
Theory and practice of leisure time activities as they 
relate to the older adult. Covers the social, cultural, 
and economic aspects of work, including housework, 
and the meaning of leisure. Explores various types of 
leisure activities and resources as well as how to 
build skills and design and implement activities. 

SOC 5226 Work, Leisure, and Aging (3 CEUs) 
Same as SOC 4226. 

SOC 4240 Sociology of Human Service Organizations (3 q.h.) 
The contradiction between what human service orga- 
nizations set out to do and what they actueilly accom- 
plish. Includes how human service organization goals 
are defined, how clients become labeled, and how so- 
cietal constraints are placed on chents, workers, and 
the organizations. 

SOC 5240 Sociology of Human Service Organizations 

(3 CEUs) 

Same as SOC 4240. 

SOC 4241 Human Services Professions (3 q.h.) 
Human services as viewed from the perspectives of 
the recipient, the worker, and the society at large. In- 
cludes analysis of why they are needed, how agen- 
cies and programs have developed, and the basic 
skills, attitudes, values, and knowledge required of 
the human service worker today. 



192 Sociology 



SOC 4245 Poverty and Inequality (formerly Sociology of 
Inequality) (3 q.h.) 

Historical analysis of American class and ethruc dif- 
ferences, drawing on comparisons with other coun- 
tries. Includes criticeQ evaluation of sociological 
research and theories relating to the causes and 
effects of poverty and societal responses to it. Suit- 
able for students in applied fields, such as nursing, 
criminal justice, education, allied health, pre-med, 
and pre-law. 

SOC 4255 Sociology of Sport (3 q.h.) 
Games and sport from a sociological perspective, 
with particular reference to contemporary American 
society. Includes such topics as the role of play in 
modern society, the social organization of specific 
games and sports, and the relation of organized sport 
to the larger society. 

SOC 4260 Introduction to Social Work Practice 1 (3 q.h.) 
Functions of the helping profession of social 
work, its settings and methods. Covers specific tech- 
niques, such as interviewing, history taking, and 
recording skills. 

SOC 4261 introduction to Social Work Practice 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of SOC 4260, with particular attention 
to the functioning of social workers in selected set- 
tings. Prereq. SOC 4260 or equivalent. 

SOC 4262 Introduction to Social Work Practice 3 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of SOC 4261. Emphasizes enhancement 
of practice skills. Prereq. SOC 4261 or equivalent. 

SOC 4276 Sociology of Popular Culture (3 q.h.) 
Significance of expressions of popular culture, such 
as film, television, music, and literature. Examines 
media production, organization, technology, and 
audience consumption. Also explores the relation- 
ship between popular culture and existing 
socioeconomic institutions. 

SOC 4300 Social Theory 1 (3 q.h.) 
Historical survey of sociological theorists, including 
the work of de Tocqueville, Comte, Marx, Durkheim, 
and Cooley. Prereq. Instructor's permission or 12 
quarter hours in Sociology-Anthropology. 

SOC 4301 Social Theory 2 (3 q.h.) 
Mayor theoretical issues in sociology. Discussion 
concentrates on systematic questions and topics 
rather than on particular theorists, but material is 
drawTi from such theorists as Weber, Simmel, Thom- 
as, ManrUieim, Merton, and Parsons. Prereq. SOC 
4300 or equivalent. 



SOC 4302 Social Theory 3 (3 q.h.) 
Seminar focusing on questions of theoretical interest, 
such as the problem of order, the problem of change, 
and the role of the individual in change. Students pre- 
sent papers in class. Prereq. SOC 4301 or equivalent. 

SOC 4303 Social Theory (Intensive) (9 q.h.) 
Same as SOC 4300, SOC 4301, and SOC 4302. Prereq. 
Instructor's permission or 12 quarter hours in Soci- 
ology-Anthropology. Not open to students who have 
credit for SOC 4300, SOC 4301, or SOC 4302. 

SOC 4310 Class, Power, and Social Change (3 q.h.) 
Theories of social equality and inequality as applied 
to the exercise of power and to the growrth and de- 
velopment of social movements and group conflict. 
Takes a large-scale, social-change point of view. 

SOC 4321 Social Reseorch Methods 1: Generating and 
Investigating Research Problems (3 q.h ) 
Methods for gaining knowledge through social re- 
search. Emphasizes the practical aspects of research, 
such as the problems sociologists face in doing re- 
search and how they have been solved. Students are 
required to design a small study. 

SOC 4322 Social Research Methods 2: Tabulating and 
Analyzing Social Data (3 qh.) 

Methods of tabulating, presenting, summarizing, and 
analyzing data, including elementary descriptive and 
inferential statistics and how to use them. Empha- 
sizes statistics as a tool and introduces the use of the 
computer. Prereq. SOC 4321 or equivalent. 

SOC 4323 Social Research Methods 3: Doing Social Research 

(3 q.h.) 

Students carry out the study they designed in SOC 
4322, analyze data, and report results. Includes the 
ethics and politics of social research and the interre- 
lationship of social action, social research, and the- 
ory building. Prereq. SOC 4322 or equivalent. 

SOC 4348 Seminar in Urban Studies (3 q.h.) 
Interdisciplinary approaches to analyses of urban is- 
sues. Includes continuing student projects. Prereq. 
One course in an urban studies field. 

SOC 4375 Sociology of Occupations and Professions (3 q.h.) 
Social relations within occupational groups; occupa- 
tional structures; and the institutional aspects of an 
occupation. Also discusses relationships among su- 
pervisors, peers, colleagues subordinates, and clien- 
tele and their significance for work-role behavior. 

SOC 4376 Sociology of Industry (3 q.h.) 
Comparison of preindustrial and industrial society, 
stressing the impact of industry on society and the 
interrelationship of industry, culture, and values. 
Also discusses diversification, specialization, human 
relations, and formal and informal groups. 



Sociology — Speech Communication 193 



SOC 4800 Directed Study I (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for qualified students to take an upper- 
level course in their mag or on an individual basis. Pe- 
titions and procedural instructions are available in 
the Liberal Arts Program office, 617-437-2416. 

SOC 4801 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 
Second opportunity to initiate individual study as de- 
scribed in SOC 4800. Prereq. SOC 4800. 

SOC 4805 Field Work in Sociology (6 q.h.) 
Refer to page 97 describing fieldwork courses. To be 
arranged with a department fieldwork adviser prior 
to registration. Students eligible for department hon- 
ors courses may take any combination of fieldwork 
and honors totaling three courses, subject to the Pro- 
gram Director's approval. Prereq. major in Sociolo- 
gy-Anthropology and completion of 15 quarter 
hours in Sociology. Students may receive credit for 
only one departmental fieldwork course. 

SOC 4820 Honors Program 1 (4 q.h.) 
Independent work in a selected area under the direc- 
tion of members of the department. Students may 
take any combination of field work and honors total- 
ing three courses. Prereq. SOC 4302, SOC 4323, and 
Program Director's approval 

SOC 4821 Honors Program 2 (4 q.h.) 
Second opportunity to do independent work as de- 
scribed in SOC 4820. Prereq. SOC 4820 and Program 
Director's approval. 

SOC 4822 Honors Program 3 (4 q.h.) 
Additional opportunity to do independent work as 
described in SOC 4820. Prereq. SOC 4821 and Pro- 
gram Director's approval. 

Speech Commimication 

SPC 4001 Speaking Skills for International Students 1 

(3 q.h.) 

Introductory instruction in pronunciation and intelli- 
gibility for formal zind informal situations. Monitors 
communication skiUs through use of video and au- 
diotape recordings and work in the language labora- 
tory. Following diagnostic testing, students 
participate in individualized small- and large-group 
instructional situations. Placement tests are given 
during the first week of class. 

SPC 4002 Speaking Skills for International Students 2 

(3 q.h.) 

Intermediate-level course designed for persons who 
have previously studied English, but who need to de- 
velop oral communication proficiency. Monitors 
communication skills through use of video and au- 
diotape recordings and work in the language labora- 
tory. Following diagnostic testing, students 
participate in individualized small- and large-group 
instructional situations. Placement tests are given 
during the first week of class. 



SPC 4003 Speaking Skills for International Students 3 

(3 q.h.) 

Advanced-level covirse designed for students who 
have previously studied English and who can make 
themselves understood easily, but who have difficul- 
ty conversing. Includes task-oriented interaction, a 
variety of two-person conununication situations, and 
small-group interactions. Progress is monitored 
through use of video and audiotape recordings. 
Placement tests are given during the first week 
of class. 

SK 4101 Fundamentals of Human Communication (former- 
ly Effective Conununication 1) (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to development of personal conununi- 
cation skills, shaping messages, sending messages, 
listening, understanding nonverbal cues, trusting, giv- 
ing and receiving feedback, interacting, and coping 
with the barriers to conununication. 

SPC 4102 Group Discussion (formerly Effective 
Conununication 2) (3 q.h.) 
Topics include small-group communication, ele- 
ments of group structure, task and maintenance 
functions, leadership, and formalized methods of 
group problem solving and decision making. 

SPC 4104 Effective Communication (Intensive) (6 qh.) 
Same as SPC 4101 and SPC 4102. 

SPC 4111 Voice and Articulation (3 q.h.) 
Development of the speaking voice, with emphasis 
on articulation, pitch control, and vocal variety 
and flexibility. Includes basic theory of the 
vocal mechanism. 

SPC 4150 Self-Concept and Communication (3 q.h.) 
Examination of the ways conununication patterns 
are formed and how they work in our personal and 
professional lives. Emphasizes how self-concept 
affects communication. By combining thinking, feel- 
ing, and doing, students can develop awareness of 
their attitudes and habits and explore alternative 
communication patterns. 

SK 4151 Listening (3 q.h.) 

Listening effectiveness in professional and personal 
situations. Presents reasons for poor listening, 
techniques for effective listening, and giving and 
receiving feedback. 

SK 4152 Interviewing (3 q.h.) 
Fundamental communication principles and how 
they apply to the interview process. Examines these 
principles from the perspectives of the interviewer 
and the interviewee, helping students to prepare for 
both roles. Gives special attention to employment, in- 
formation retrieval, and persuasive interviews. 



194 Speech Communication — Technical Communications 



SPC 4153 Techniques of Persuasion (3 q.h.) 
Communication strategies used when attempting to 
influence others. Examines instances of persuasion 
as they occur in advertising, politics, social interac- 
tion, sales, and business. 

SPC 4154 Negotiation Skills (3 q.h.) 
Skills involved in bringing matters to mutually ac- 
ceptable settlements. Through lectures, discussions, 
case studies, and classroom activities, students ex- 
amine conflict resolution in both personal and 
professional settings. 

SPC 4155 Organizational Communication (3 q.h.) 
Exploration of communication management with- 
in organizations. Topics include the role of com- 
munication in management, the management 
and control of information flow, and strategic 
communication planning. 

SPC 4160 Communication and the Media (3 q.h.) 
Overview of the structure, functions, and history of 
American mass media. Presents a basic understand- 
ing of the process of mass media as it intersects 
society in general, and the lives of individuals 
in particular. 

SPC 4201 Argumentation (3 q.h.) 
Basic concepts of argumentation, such as evidence, 
research, and refutation, with emphasis on the psy- 
chology of the audience and various types of 
group discussion. 

SPC 4221 Interpersonal Communications 1 (3 q.h.) 
Ways of becoming more aware of one's self and one's 
relationship to others. Presents options for commu- 
nicating and for increasing one's knowledge of the 
group process. Limited enrollment. 

SPC 4222 Interpersonal Communications 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of SPC 4221. Prereq. SPC 4221 or 
instructor's permission. 

SPC 4225 Family Communicotion (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to how communication affects the de- 
velopment and maintenance of family relationships. 
Topics include marital, parent'child, sibling, and ex- 
tended family commimication patterns; and problem 
identification and problem-solving skills in 
family communication. 

SPC 4231 Female/Male Communication 1 (3 q.h.) 
Ways in which female/male relations are created, 
maintained, developed, or dissolved through commu- 
nication. Examines the influence of family, friends, 
the media, and "significant others" in sustaiiung ster- 
eotypes for both sexes and the impact of such stereo- 
typing on the self £md on effective communication. 
Also looks at the use of verbcil and nonverbal com- 
munication to understand the types of relationships 
between men and women and how different female/ 
male Ijmguage styles affect these relations. 



SK 4232 Female/Male Communication 2 (3 q.h.) 
Interaction and transactional approaches to analyz- 
ing existing relationships. Provides the opportunity 
to develop skills in diagnosing communication trans- 
actions and in developing strategies for effective 
communication. The influence of supportive and de- 
fensive environments and the commurucation behav- 
ior of each are examined and applied to strategies for 
improving relationships between males and females. 
Prereq. SPC 4231 or instructor's permission. 

SPC 4251 Business and Professional Speaking (3 q.h.) 
Practice in the organization and presentation of ma- 
terial to fit varying audiences. Emphasizes delivery 
techniques and effective presentation of ideas. 

Technical Communications 

TCC 4030 Word Processing for Writers and Editors (2 q.h.) 
Basic, intermediate, and selected advanced functions 
of one or more of the most widely-used word 
processing programs, such as Wordstar, Multimate, 
or Word Perfect. Minimal typing skills 
are recommended. 

TCC 4050 Wordstar (2 q.h.) 

Composing and writing on a computer screen using 
Wordstar, the professional text-editing system used 
by many technical writers, editors, and other publish- 
ing professionals. Course provides interpretation of 
the instruction manual as weU as hands-on experi- 
ence with University- supplied personal computers 
and software. 

TCC 4060 Multimate (2 q.h.) 

Using this powerful, menu-driven word processor 
with University-supplied hardware, students learn to 
create, format, and modify various types of docu- 
ments. Selected advanced functions also covered. 
Minimal typing skills are recommended. 

TCC 4101 Technical Writing 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to basic technical writing skills, empha- 
sizing selecting and organizing data. Includes audi- 
ence analysis, research techniques, and descriptions 
of objects, mechanisms, and processes. Provides 
practice in descriptive writing, classification and 
defirution, paragraphing, jmd preparing technical 
documentation outlines. Includes frequent technical 
writing exercises and projects applicable to both 
software and hardware writing tasks. A writing pro- 
ficiency test is given at the first class meeting. 

TCC 4102 Technical Writing 2 (3 q.h.) 
Application of the information gathering, organiza- 
tional, and technical writing skills acquired in TCC 
4101 to more advanced projects. Extensive practice 
in formatting, organizing, writing, and editing techni- 
cal reports. Prereq. TCC 4101. 

TCC 4103 Technical Writing (Intensive) (6 q.h.) 
Same as TCC 4101 and TCC 4102. A writing profi- 
ciency test is given at the first class meeting. 



Technical Communications 195 



TCC 4105 Editing for Science and Technology (3 q.h.) 
Fundamentals of editing as they apply to scientific, 
technical, and engineering writing. Includes the role 
of the editor in business, industry, and the sciences; 
basic editorial services such as proofreading, copy 
and content editing, production editing, and project 
editing; analysis and critique of manuscripts; 
work with authors; the editor as writer and inter- 
viewer; and science interpretation and technical 
translation. Accelerated work for students already 
skilled in spelling and grammar. Prereq. TCC 4101 or 
instructor's permission. 

TCC 4110 Technical-Promotional Writing (3 q.h.) 
Structure, style, and graphic presentation of techni- 
cal-promotional writing in a high-tech environment. 
Students are trained to combine technical knowledge 
and writing skills in developing quality technical bro- 
chures, articles, product catalogs, demonstration 
kits, slide presentations, and video scripts. Prereq. 
TCC 4101, TCC 4102, or instructor's permission. 

TCC 4301 Computer Software Technical Writing 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the tasks and problems unique to 
software technical writing. Includes review of 
fundjunental software concepts, the role and impor- 
tance of software documentation, component parts 
of software technical manuals and their purposes, 
tutorial and reference functions of manuals, research 
tools for manual writing, and the writing process 
itself. Prereq. TCC 4101 and MIS 4102 or 
instructor's permission. 

TCC 4302 Computer Software Technical Writing 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of TCC 4301. Prereq. TCC 4301. 

TCC 4303 Seminar in Software Technical Writing (3 q.h.) 
Advanced case-study seminar on contemporary 
problems in technical writing for the working or 
prospective writing professional. Emphasizes 
integrating the viewpoint of the software developer 
with the task-oriented needs of the end user. In- 
cludes system manual design; computer design; 
modularity; and system evolution. Prereq. TCC 4302 
or instructor's permission. 

TCC 4311 Instruction Manual Writing 1 (formerly Hard- 
ware Technical Manual Writing 1) (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the fundamentals of technical manual 
writing, including the theory and practice of manual 
design, organization, and content. Covers copyright 
law, product liability, graphic design, readability, 
manual specifications Jind standards, illustrations, 
and reproduction techniques. Emphasizes hardware 
operations manuals. Includes individual and class 
design and writing projects. Prereq. TCC 4101 and 
TCC 4102. 



TCC 4312 Instruction Manual Writing 2 (formerly Hard- 
ware Technical Manual Writing 2) (3 q.h.) 
Application of skills acquired in TCC 4311 to an en- 
try-level technical manual writing project. Students 
elect individual or group writing and production 
projects for high-technology equipment or systems 
lacking adequate documentation. Includes instruc- 
tion in writing safe, legible operating instructions 
and descriptions of installation procedures, princi- 
ples of operation, and maintenance. Also covers 
manual changes and updates. Prereq. TCC 4311 or 
instructor's permission. 

TCC 4313 Instruction Manual Writing intensive (6 q.h.) 
Same at TCC 4311 and TCC 4312. Prereq. TCC 4101 
and TCC 4102. 

TCC 4320 Proposal Writing (3 q.h.) 
Background in the preparation of proposals, includ- 
ing how to analyze a request for proposal or bid set. 
Introduces the various types of proposals generated 
by industry and provides an opportunity to prepare a 
proposal in a simulated situation, through role play- 
ing and participation on a proposal preparation team. 
Includes considerable analysis and writing practice. 
Prereq. TCC 4102 or instructor's permission. 

TCC 4330 The Business and Technical Presentation (3 q.h.) 
Application of the principles of technical communi- 
cation to audiovisual presentations. Includes audi- 
ence analysis, techniques of organization, script 
preparation, media selection, the design and produc- 
tion of visuals, the influence of physical factors on 
commurucation, and the elements of effective deliv- 
ery. Participants prepare and deliver presentations 
and receive video playback and peer critiques. 

TCC 4340 Technical Writing Portfolio Development (3 q.h.) 
Techniques and methods of developing a profession- 
al portfolio of published technical writing projects. 
The organizational and con\munications skills 
acquired in lower-level technical writing courses 
are brought together and applied to practical 
technical writing problems. Prereq. TCC 4302 or 
instructor's permission. 

TCC 4350 Concepts of Modern Technology V (3 q.h.) 
Applications of physical science to mechanical de- 
vices, including an introduction to the laws of ther- 
modynamics and the influence of material properties 
on design and manufacturing techniques. Prereq. 
MTH4006.* 

TCC 4351 Concepts of Modern Technology 2* (3 q.h.) 
Applications of physical science to electrical and 
electronic devices, including an introduction to elec- 
tronic circuit design, a comparison of various devices 
used for amplification and control, and a study of the 
development of the electronic digital computer and 
the components involved in the manufacture of com- 
puters. /Vereg. TCC 4350.* 



•Indicates a School of Engineering Technology course, which is 
offered at a different tuition rate than that of University College. 



196 Technical Communications — Transportation 



TCC 4353 Modern Electronics* (3 q.h.) 
Components available to the designer of electronic 
devices, including linear integrated circuits and digi- 
tal building blocks. Topics include operational ampli- 
fier characteristics, truth tables and the synthesis of 
digital logic, logic families and specifications, 
counters, registers and decoding, digital instruments, 
and digital-to-£inalog conversion. Prereq. TCC 4351. * 

TCC 4800 Directed Study 1 (3 q.h.) 
Opportunity for qualified students to take an upper- 
level, required course when the needed course is not 
available in an every-other-year cycle. Petitions and 
procedur£il instructions are available from the Liberal 
Arts Program office, 617-437-2416. Allow at least six 
weeks to complete the petition process. Prereq. 87 
quarter hours. 

TCC 4801 Directed Study 2 (3 q.h.) 

Opportunity to irutiate a second individual study as 

described in TCC 4800. Prereq. TCC 4800. 

TCC 4805 Fieldwork in Technical Communications (6 q.h.) 
Opportunity for technical commimications mjyors to 
complete a documentation project in a departmental- 
ly approved work setting. Students may contact the 
Career Placement Office, 124 Ruggles Building, 617- 
437-2428, for help in finding an appropriate job. 
Detailed field work guidelines are available in the 
Liberal Arts Office, 266 Ruggles Building, 
ol7-437-2416. Prereq. 18 quarter hours in 
technical communications. 

Transportation 

TRN 4301 Elements of Transportation 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to regulatory, economic, and manage- 
ment aspects of transportation. Covers concerns of 
shipping industry, goverrunent, and carriers. Includes 
history of cost, rate-making, operations, entry, merg- 
ers, and intercity passenger and cargo carriage. Es- 
sential to students in business, law, or government. 

TRN 4303 Elements of Transportation 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of TRN 4301. Examines new thrust of 
lower costs, including contracting and negotiating for 
carrier service that has resulted from deregulation. 
Prereq. TRN 4301. 

TRN 4302 Physical Distribution Management 1 (3 q.h.) 
Introduction to the physic£il distribution manage- 
ment concept. Studies time and place utility of manu- 
factured products. Includes customer service and 
profitability requirements: getting merchandise to the 
customer at the right time, place, and in the right 
condition. Covers transportation alternatives, inven- 
tory control, warehousing, cost control, and location 
strategy. Contemporary texts and case methods 
are used. 

TRN 4304 Physical Distribution Management 2 (3 q.h.) 
Continuation of TRN 4303. Analytical skills are devel- 
oped through presentation of problems and cases. 
Prereq. TRN 4303. 



TRN 4305 Traffic Management 1: Rotes and Tariffs (3 q.h.) 
The interpretation and use of tariffs. Includes classi- 
fications, rate scales, tariff rules, rate-making proce- 
dures, and ICC law and practice. Prereq. TRN 4301. 

TRN 4316 Carrier Management (3 q.h.) 
The transportation system from the carrier view- 
point. Covers managerial response to a heavily regu- 
lated and rapidly expanding envirorunent. Includes 
carrier decision-making involving routes, scheduling, 
financing, and pricing of services. 

TRN 4321 Transportation Negotiations (3 q.h.) 
Principal elements of transportation regulation, pub- 
lic policy, and the role of federal and state regulatory 
agencies. Includes types of commerce, carriers, and 
services subject to changing regulation, entry and 
exit requirements, economic and cost considerations, 
and selective rate and tariff construction rules. Ex- 
amines industry practices covering performance, re- 
quirements, liabilities, and responsibilities of 
shippers, regulated carriers, and exempt forms of 
transportation. Covers rules and procedures estab- 
lished by the ICC and Massachusetts DPU. Prereq. 
TRN 4301. 

TRN 4325 Management of Warehouse Operations (3 q.h.) 
Management of warehouses. Includes site selection, 
construction, finance, operations, measurement of 
performance, and warehouse technology. 

TRN 4334 Private Trucking (3 q.h.) 
The formation of a private trucking operation from a 
management focus. Includes legal guide-lines, pur- 
chase versus lease, operations, and performance 
measurement. 

TRN 4340 Air Transportation (3 q.h.) 
Economics and regulation of air carriage certified by 
the Civil Aeronautics Board. Includes entry, oper- 
atioris, pricing, mergers, cost iinalysis, and financing. 

TRN 4341 Commuter Transportation (3 q.h.) 
The scope and status of transportation in the metro- 
politan area. Includes plarming and financing urban 
transportation systems; the role of local, state, 
and federal government units; and the problems of 
transit management. 

TRN 4342 Transportation Loss, Damage, and Other Claims 

(3 q.h.) 

Rules, regulations, and other pertinent elements of 
transportation claims resulting from the loss or dam- 
age of cargo, overcharges and undercharges, and re- 
lated carrier and shipper activities. 

TRN 4350 International Transportation and Distribution 
Management (3 q.h.) 

The safe and efficient overseas transportation of 
products by air or water. Covers m^jor indirect sup- 
porting business and agencies involved in the inter- 
national movement of people and goods. 



'Indicates a School of Engineering Technology course, which is 
offered at a different tuition rate thjin that of University College. 



Policies and Services 



198 



Academic Policies and 
Procedures 



Enrollment and Registration 

Open Enrollment 

University College has an open enrollment 
policy that enables students to take most 
courses simply by registering for the course. 
Applications for admission, entrance examina- 
tions, and College Board Examination scores 
are not required. The open enrollment policy 
applies to both degree and nondegree students 
at University College. Credits earned for indi- 
vidual courses taken at University College may 
be applied to a degree program. 

Students who are enrolled at University Col- 
lege and who decide to pursue a degree pro- 
gram must apply for admission to the program. 
See page 202 for more information on the ad- 
mission process. Special requirements apply to 
students entering the Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration degree program. For 
information on the admission process for this 
program, please see pages 36-38. Students must 
be admitted to a degree program in order to be 
eligible for most financial aid. See page 210 for 
more iitformation on obtaining financial aid. All 
international students must be admitted to a 
degree program in order to apply for an 1-20 
form. See page 200 for more information on in- 
ternational students. 

Both degree and nondegree students are enti- 
tled to make use of the student support ser- 
vices offered by University College. 

Registration 

Students may register for courses by report- 
ing to any University College campus during 
the registration periods that are scheduled each 
quarter. It is not necessary to register at the 
campus where a particular course actually 
meets; students may register at any campus for 
a course scheduled at any other campus. Atten- 
dance at class, even with the instructor's per- 
mission, does not constitute registration unless 



the student has filled out a registration form. 
Academic credit will not be awarded to stu- 
dents who are not properly registered. See the 
Academic Calendar on pages 8-10 for a com- 
plete registration schedule. 

Courses listed in this bulletin are not neces- 
sarily offered each quarter. Students may not 
be able to take all of the courses required 
for a particular program at any one campus lo- 
cation. Each fall, winter, spring, and summer 
quarter the list of courses being offered is 
printed in a University College Schedule Guide. 
Schedule guides are distributed at all campus 
locations. To request a schedule by mail, call 
617-437-2400. 

Course Selection 

Academic advisers (see page 3) are available by 
appointment at all campuses to help students 
plan their academic programs and select 
courses. 

Students who have earned credits from other 
schools are urged to have their transcripts eval- 
uated prior to the registration period to avoid 
duplicating course work completed elsewhere. 
Students should allow at least three weeks for 
processing transfer credit petitions. During the 
official registration periods at all campuses, ad- 
visers are available without an appointment to 
answer general questions and to help students 
make iiutial course selections. Because the pro- 
cess of evaluating transfer credit is complex, 
students should not expect advisers to evaluate 
their petitions during advising appointments. 

Academic Integrity 

The Code of Student Conduct states that "any 
attempt of a student to present as his or her 
own work that which is not his or her own or 
aiding and abetting another student in such 
an attempt" results in a charge of miscon- 
duct, which is cause for disciplinary action. 
Students must accept the responsibility to be 
honest and to respect ethical standards in 
meeting their academic £issignments and re- 
quirements. Integrity in academic life requires 
that students demonstrate intellectual and aca- 
demic achievement independent of all assis- 
tance except that authorized by the instructor. 
Consequently, all work submitted to meet 
course requirements, whether it take the form 
of papers, examinations, laboratory reports, 
computer projects, quizzes, or any other work 
assigned, is expected to be the student's 
own work. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 199 



In the preparation of all papers and other 
written work submitted to meet course require- 
ments, students should be careful to distinguish 
between ideas which are their own and those 
which have been derived from other sources. 
Proper forms of citation must be used, and 
sources must be indicated. Students who 
have questions about these procedures should 
see their instructors before beginning their 
projects. Improper attribution of sources 
is plagiarism. 

Computer programs written to meet course 
requirements, like papers, are to be the original 
work of the student submitting them. Copying a 
program from another student or from any oth- 
er source is a form of academic dishonesty. 

Collaboration in the completion of written 
assignments is also a form of academic dishon- 
esty, unless exphcitly permitted by the in- 
structor. Students must acknowledge any 
collaboration/editing and its extent in all 
submitted work. 

Students may not submit the same paper in 
two or more courses without the prior written 
permission of the instructors involved. 

Students who fail to meet the responsibility 
of academic integrity as defined here are sub- 
ject to disciplinary sanctions ranging from a re- 
duction in grade or failure in the assignment or 
course to dismissal from the University. Com- 
plete discipUnary procedures are outlined in 
the University College Student Handbook. 

Academic Monitoring 

All students are monitored once each academic 
year, after the end of spring term. Nondegree 
students, undeclared majors, and unadmitted 
students whose quality -point average falls be- 
low 2.0 are contacted by the Office of Academic 
and Student Affairs and are offered all possible 
assistance. These students may also be subject 
to academic review, probation, and dismissal 
from University College when such action 
is warranted. 

Students who feel they would benefit from 
academic assistance are encouraged to work 
closely with an academic adviser. Students may 
make appointments by calling 617-437-2400 
(voice) or 617-437-2825 (TTY for the 
hearing-impaired only). 

Academic Standing Committee 

The University College Academic Standing 
Committee convenes at least once each month, 



and more often if necessary, to consider stu- 
dent petitions and requests for exceptions to 
the academic policies and procedures con- 
tained in this bulletin. The Committee has the 
power to dismiss students who do not meet the 
academic standards of University College. The 
Committee also serves as a hearing board for 
academic grievances, as outlined in the Univer- 
sity College Student Handbook. 

Attendance 

University College expects students to meet at- 
tendance requirements in all courses to qualify 
for credit. Attendance requirements vary, and it 
is the student's responsibihty to ascertain what 
each instructor requires. Absence from regular- 
ly scheduled classes may seriously affect the 
student's academic standing. 

If a student is consistently absent without 
having made arrangements with the instructor, 
the instructor may take this to mean that the 
student has withdrawn and may issue a final 
grade of W. Permission to make up work 
missed because of absence may be granted 
by the instructor on presentation of a 
reasonable excuse. 

Auditing Policy 

Students are permitted to audit courses upon 
submitting the usual registration forms and on 
paying the regular tuition fees. There is no re- 
duction in fees for auditing. An auditor may 
participate in class discussion, complete papers 
and projects, and take tests and examinations 
for informal evaluation. However, regardless of 
the amount or quahty of work completed, aca- 
demic credit will not be granted at any time 
for an audited course. 

The student's decision to audit a course must 
be communicated in writing to the Registrar's 
Office prior to the fourth class meeting. Excep- 
tions to this procedure cannot be approved 
without authorization by the University College 
Academic Standing Committee. 

Change of Address or Name 

Change of address and/or name should be re- 
ported in writing both to the Registrar's Office, 
120 Hayden Hall, Northeastern University, 360 
Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 
02115, and to the Office of Academic and Stu- 
dent Affairs, 180 Ruggles Building. 



200 Policies and Services 



Class Changes 

University College reserves the right to cancel, 
divide, or combine classes when necessary. Al- 
though this policy ensures that students will al- 
most never be excluded from a class because it 
is oversubscribed, it also means that a course 
may occasionally be canceled because of inad- 
equate enrollment. Cancellations are more like- 
ly to occur among upper-level or advanced 
courses than among introductory courses. 
While students may register as late as the first 
week of class, cancellation decisions are based 
on pre-registration figures. Students are there- 
fore encouraged to register in advance to in- 
crease the likelihood that the courses they 
want wiU run. Seniors who are adversely affect- 
ed by course cancellations should contact an 
academic adviser or their program office for 
help in identifying alternatives. 

Credit Hours: Quarter-Hour Credit 

Credit hours are assigned to a course based on 
the established educational standard of one 
credit hour for every three hours of student 
learning time per week over a term. Thus one 
hour of lecture or discussion plus two hours of 
individual study outside of class equals 
one credit. 

Northeastern University operates on a 
quarter-hour credit system. A quarter-hour 
credit is the equivalent of three quarters of a se- 
mester hour. Most University College courses 
are assigned 3 quarter hours (q.h.) of credit and 
meet for two hours and ten minutes each week. 

Students who would like to take courses at 
Northeastern and then transfer these credits to 
another school are urged to receive permission 
fi"om an adviser at the other school prior 
to registering. 

Disciplinary Action 

The University College Board of Inquiry has the 
authority to warn, censure, suspend, expel, or 
remove from the list of degree candidates any 
student who, because of disruptive or illegal 
conduct or poor character, is considered an un- 
suitable member of the College community. 
The Board of Inquiry is convened to hear a case 
when a member of the University College com- 
munity charges a student with a violation of the 
Code of Student Conduct. Complete proce- 
dures are contained in the University College 



Student Handbook, which generally can be ob- 
tained at all campus locations or by calling 
617-437-2400 (voice) or 617^7-2825 (TTY). 

Examinations 

Tests are scheduled throughout each quarter at 
the option of the instructor and are regarded as 
part of the term's course work. A final examina- 
tion is held at the end of each quarter in each 
course unless an announcement is made to the 
contrary. The procedure for making up final ex- 
aminations missed due to student absence may 
be found on page 206. 

Homework 

The specific work required for each course in 
University College is determined by the instruc- 
tor. In general. University College students are 
expected to spend an average of six to eight 
hours per week outside of class on assignments 
for each course. Students who are absent are 
responsible for obtaining their homework as- 
signments from their instructors or from other 
students. Homework assignments are not avail- 
able from the Office of Academic and 
Student Affairs. 

International Students 

Northeastern University is authorized under 
federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien stu- 
dents. For information regarding eligibility to 
enroll in University College call 617^37-2400 or 
visit the International Student Office in 
270 Holmes Hall, 617-437-2310. 

Maximum Course Load Policy 

It is recommended that students not take more 
than 12 quarter hours of credit per term. Stu- 
dents with a 3.0 quality-point average may take 
up to 18 quarter hours per term without special 
permission. Students with a 2.0 to 2.99 quahty- 
point average must seek permission to take 
over 12 quarter hours per term. In no case may 
a student with a quality-point average under 2.0 
take more than 12 quarter hours per term. 

Petition for Course Overload forms are avail- 
able fi*om the Office of Academic and Student 
Affairs, 180 Ruggles Building, 617-437-2400. 

Pass/Fail Courses 

Students may register for one elective course 
per quarter on a pass/fail basis and may not 
take more than five pass/fail courses total at 



Academic Policies and Procedures 201 



University College. To be eligible for pass/fail 
status, the student must be in good academic 
standing (have at least a 2.0 quality-point aver- 
age) and must also meet all prerequisites for 
the course. 

To be graded on a pass/fail basis, the student 
must file a Pass/Fail Petition and have it signed 
by an academic adviser. Pass/Fail Petitions are 
available from the Office of Academic and Stu- 
dent Affairs, 180 Ruggles Building, 617-437-2400. 
Requests to take a course on a pass/fail 
basis must be made prior to the fourth class 
meeting. Exceptions to this procedure cannot 
be approved without authorization from 
the University College Academic 
Standing Committee. 

Placement Tests 

Placement tests are given to students enrolled 
in Critical Writing 1 (ENG 4110), Business Writ- 
ing and Reports 1 (ENG 4380), and Technical 
Writing 1 (TCC 4101) during the first class ses- 
sion. Some students may be requested to regis- 
ter for Elements of Writing (ENG 4011), a three- 
quarter-hour course offering additional help in 
writing, or English for International Students 
(ENG 4005, ENG 4006, or ENG 4007). 

Students registering for Mathematics 1 (MTH 
4110) must take a placement test on the first 
night of class. The results will determine 
whether the student should take Basic Math- 
ematics 1 and 2 (MTH 4001 and MTH 4002) pri- 
or to taking Mathematics 1. Students registering 
for CoUege Algebra 1 (MTH 4107) must also 
take a placement test at the first class meeting. 
Some students may be asked to register for In- 
troduction to Mathematics 1 and 2 (MTH 4081 
and MTH 4082) for additional help in math. 

Prerequisites 

Before registering for a course, students should 
read the course description in this bulletin to 
determine if they need to have taken a prereq- 
uisite course. In order to ensure academic suc- 
cess, students are strongly advised to adhere to 
course prerequisites. Students with questions 
about prerequisites should contact the program 
oflBce that administers the course. 

Special Students 

University College students who wish to take 
Basic College courses may, in certain instances, 
enroll on a term-by-term basis. These students 
must obtain prior approval from both the Office 
of the Dean of the college offering the course 



and the University College Office of Academic 
and Student Affairs, 180 Ruggles Building. Stu- 
dents must collect both signatures on a Special 
Registration Form and submit the form to the 
Registrar's Office. Tuition is charged at the Ba- 
sic College rate. 

Basic College students who wish to enroll in 
University College courses must obtain prior 
approval from the academic dean of their col- 
lege or, if they are first-year students, from the 
Office of Freshman Affairs, 203 EU Building. 

Student Records 

In accordance with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, Northeastern 
University permits students to inspect their rec- 
ords whenever appropriate and to challenge 
specific parts of them when they feel it is nec- 
essary. Specific details of the law as it applies 
to Northeastern are available in the University 
College Student Handbook. 

Students' Rights and Responsibilities 

The University subscribes to the view that all 
students have certain rights and freedoms. For 
these reasons, the University has adopted and 
pubUshed specific poUcies and procedures gov- 
erning student rights and freedoms, general 
conduct, student discipline, grievance proce- 
dures, disclosure of information from student 
records, and University judicial procedures. Ju- 
dicial procedures are related to issues of disci- 
pline and conduct, the right of students to 
appeal judgments of their academic perfor- 
mance, grievances based on the fact that a 
student is handicapped, and allegations of 
sexual harassment. All policies and procedures 
governing the above matters may be found in 
the University College Student Handbook. 
Copies are available in the Office of Academic 
and Student Affairs or by calling 617-437-2400. 
In general, copies are also available at each 
campus location. 

Withdrawal Policy 

Students who wish to withdraw from a course 
must complete a Course Drop Form in the Reg- 
istrar's Office or notify the Registrar in writing 
of their intention to withdraw prior to the week 
in which final examinations are given. These 
forms are available at all campus locations. 

Students who withdraw from a course will 
have no record of the withdrawal on their tran- 
scripts. See page 209 for information on 
tuition refunds. 



202 Policies and Services 



Degree Program Policies and Procedures 

Applying for Admission to a Degree Program 

To be admitted to University College as a 
degree candidate you must follow one of 
the following. 

Option 1 

In general, students who want to apply for ad- 
mission to a degree program must have 

• completed at least 18 quarter hours of credit, 
which may include transfer credit, and must in- 
clude EngUsh courses ENG 4110, ENG 4111, 
and ENG 4112 or their equivalents; 

• a minimum grade-point average of at least 2.0 
(C) at University College; and 

• a high school diploma or a high school equiva- 
lency certificate (GED). 

Students who meet these requirements must 
file an application for admission in the Office of 
Academic and Student Affairs or at any branch 
campus. Applications may also be submitted by 
mail. Call 617-437-2400 (voice) or 617-437-2825 
(TTY) to obtain an application. Students will be 
notified of their acceptance by mail. 

Option 2 

Students who want to apply for admission but 
do not meet the above requirements must 

• complete an Option 2 application for 
admission, 

• arrange an admission interview with an aca- 
demic adviser, and 

• bring to it their completed application and high 
school transcript or GED certificate to the Of- 
fice of Academic and Student Affairs. 

Interviews may be arranged at the Boston, 
Burlington and Liberty Square campuses only. 

Students must be admitted to a degree pro- 
gram to be eligible for most financial aid. 

Students who have been admitted to a degree 
program under Option 2 will have their tran- 
scripts reviewed after one academic year to en- 
sure that they are making satisfactory academic 
progress, defined as follows. 

• Completion of at least 18 quarter hours of Uni- 
versity College or transfer credit. This credit 
must include English courses ENG 4110, ENG 
4111, ENG 4112, or their equivalents. 

• A minimum grade-point average of at least 2.0 
(C) at University College. 

The Office of Academic and Student Affairs 
will notify the Office of Financial Aid of those 



students who are not making satisfactory aca- 
demic progress. 

Note: Students who wish to be admitted to the 
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 
degree program must meet additional require- 
ments, as listed on pages 36-38. 

Academic Probation 

All students are monitored once each academic 
year after the end of spring term. Students who 
have been admitted to a degree program must 
maintain an overall quality-point average of not 
less than 2.0 (C) and a 2.0 (C) average in the ma- 
jor concentration courses in order to be consid- 
ered in good academic standing. Any degree 
student whose overall quality-point average or 
major concentration average falls below 2.0 is 
placed on academic probation for a one-year 
period. Students receive formal notification of 
their probation and the level of performance re- 
quired to return them to good academic stand- 
ing. Students on probation should meet with 
their adviser at least once per term. 

Students who do not raise their overall qual- 
ity-point average or major concentration aver- 
age to 2.0 within the probationary period will 
have their cases referred to the University Col- 
lege Academic Standing Committee for review. 
This Committee has the power to remove stu- 
dents from their degree programs but allow 
them to continue taking courses at University 
College, or to dismiss them from 
University College. 

Students who have been dismissed from Uni- 
versity College must petition the Academic 
Standing Committee no sooner than one year 
from the date of dismissal if they wish to return 
to University College. 

Additional Degree Status 

Any student who has received a bachelor' s- 
level degree from University College and wish- 
es to earn a second bachelor's degree must ful- 
fill 45 quarter hours in residence after full 
completion of the first degree, at least 12 
quarter hours of which must be in the new 
major concentration. 

A student who has already received an asso- 
ciate's- or bachelor's-level degree from Univer- 
sity College and who wishes to earn a second 
degree at the associate's level must fulfill 24 
quarter hours in residence after full completion 
of the first degree, at least 6 quarter hours of 
which must be in the new major concentration. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 203 



In either case, the additional degree and ma- 
jor must be distinctly different from the pre- 
viously conferred degree. This poUcy does not 
apply to students earning an associate's degree 
who wish to go on for a bachelor's degree. 

Certificates Contained Within Degrees 

When a certificate is contained within a degree 
program (such as economics or graphic design), 
the grouping of certificate courses is treated 
like all other courses and the student receives a 
diploma only. However, if the student wishes to 
receive both a diploma and a certificate, the 
higher standards for certificate courses (mini- 
mum quahty-point average of 2.0 in each certifi- 
cate course and a five-year statute of 
limitations) will apply. 

Change of Major 

Students wishing to change mgyors within Uni- 
versity College should file a Change of Mayor 
Petition with the Office of Academic and Stu- 
dent Affairs, 180 Ruggles Building. Petitions are 
available at all campus locations, or by calling 
617-437-2400 (voice), 617-437-2825 (TTY). Stu- 
dents with an associate's degree and who are 
now working toward a bachelor's degree 
should be sure to change their mayors to the 
new program. 

Changes in Requirements 

The continuing development of University Col- 
lege requires fi"equent revisions. When no hard- 
ship is imposed on students because of these 
changes, students are expected to meet the re- 
quirements of the most current bulletin. If a 
particular student finds it impossible to do so, 
the bulletin for the year in which he or she de- 
clared a msyor is binding. University College 
makes every effort to inform students who are 
admitted to a degree program when there are 
changes in the curriculum. 

Academic programs, course content, and 
rules and regulations are subject to change 
without notice. 

Course Substitutions 

Students may request to replace a required 
course in an academic program with another 
comparable course. Although such requests are 
not encouraged, the University recognizes that 
students may occasionally have very good rea- 
sons for requesting such substitutions. Students 
must complete a Petition for Course Substitu- 
tions and submit it to the Office of Academic 



and Student Affairs. Petitions are available at 
each campus location or by calling 617-437-2400 
(voice), 617-437-2825 (TTY). Petitions are rou- 
tinely forwarded to the appropriate program di- 
rector. The program director reviews the 
request and notifies the student of the outcome. 
A copy of the completed request is in the stu- 
dent's file in the Office of Academic and 
Student Affairs. 

Dean's List 

All degree candidates who have taken a mini- 
mum of 27 quarter hours in three consecutive 
quarters (for example, fall, winter, and spring) 
and who have completed aU their courses with 
a quality-point average of 3.0 or better are 
placed on the Dean's List. These students re- 
ceive certificates of commendation fi"om the 
Dean of University College. See page 207 for in- 
formation on graduation with honor. 

In Absentia Status 

If a student moves beyond a reasonable com- 
muting distance from University College or its 
branch campuses and has completed 135 or 
more quarter hours of credit (including no 
more than 60 quarter hours of transfer credit), 
the Committee on Academic Standing will con- 
sider a petition to allow the student to com- 
plete requirements for a University College 
degree at another approved college. The re- 
maining courses must be completed within two 
years of the date of official in absentia status 
approval. The student must submit course de- 
scriptions to the Committee for approval prior 
to taking the courses. 

Status Reports 

The Office of Academic and Student Affairs 
provides status reports for students who want 
to know where they stand in a particular aca- 
demic program. Status Report Request forms 
are available at all campus locations and by 
calling 617-437-2400, 617-437-2825 (TTY). 

No more than one status report for the same 
program will be issued to a student in a given 
academic year. Generally requests are held to 
be processed in either February or August. The 
Office of Academic and Student Affairs will is- 
sue status reports at the time of request only 
under the following circumstances: 

• when issuing a transfer credit award; 

• when the request is for a senior status report; 



204 Policies and Services 



• when the curriculum changes in an academic 
program; 

• when the student has been away from 
University College for a period of time and has 
noted this on the request form; or 

• when the student is changing majors and has 
noted this on the request form. 

Transfer Credit Policies and Procedures 

Students may transfer credit from accredited 
institutions of higher education when courses 
completed are applicable to the student's 
program in University College. The minimum 
course grade acceptable for transfer credit 
is C, or 2.0 on a four-point scale. The 
total amount of transfer credit that may be 
awarded may not exceed 128 quarter hours. An 
accredited institution of higher education is 
an instituion having recognition and mem- 
bership in one of the six regional accrediting 
associations recognized by the Council on 
Post-Secondary Accreditation. 

Transfer Credit Procedure 

Students who would like to obtain an evalua- 
tion of credits earned from another institution 
must file a Transfer Credit Petition with the Of- 
fice of Academic and Student Affairs. The stu- 
dent must then write to the registrar of the 
institution previously attended and request that 
an official transcript (one bearing that institu- 
tion's seal) be forwarded to the Office of Aca- 
demic and Student Affairs, University College, 
180 Ruggles, Northeastern University, Boston, 
Massachusetts 02115. Upon receipt of official 
transcripts, the Office of Academic and Student 
Affairs issues an evaluation of all credits as 
they apply to the student's program in Universi- 
ty College. Students should allow at least three 
weeks for processing transfer credit petitions. 
Since the process of evaluating transfer credit 
is complex, students should not expect evalua- 
tions of their transcripts during advising ap- 
pointments. Official awarding of credit is 
recorded on the student's University College 
transcript when admission to a degree program 
is approved. Students who wish to be admitted 
to a degree program must file a separate peti- 
tion for adnussion. 

Validation of Required Upper-Level Business 
Courses for Transfer Credit 

Students entering the bachelor of science in 
business administration (BSBA) degree 



program may be required to vaUdate required 
upper-level business courses that they have 
taken outside the framework of the program. 

The bachelor of science in business adminis- 
tration degree programs offered by University 
College conform to all standards established 
by the American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business (AACSB). AACSB has been 
recognized by the Council for Post-Secondary 
Accreditation and by the Uruted States Office 
of Education as the sole accrediting organiza- 
tion for university bachelor's and master's de- 
gree programs in business administration. 

VaUdation is the set of procedures that tests 
whether an upper-level course completed at the 
lower division of a bachelor's degree program 
should be accepted for transfer credit in the up- 
per division of a bachelor's degree program rec- 
ogruzed and approved by the AACSB. 

In general, students are able to vaUdate pre- 
viously earned course credits by taking a se- 
quential course in a reserved section, a depart- 
ment-approved examination, or a CLEP (Col- 
lege Level Examination Program) or PEP (Pro- 
ficiency Examination Program) examination. 

For more information on course validation, 
see page 38. Students should talk with a Univer- 
sity College academic adviser for information 
about the validation of upper-level business 
courses for transfer credit. 

Evaluation of International Educational Credentials 

Students requesting an evaluation of interna- 
tional educational credentials for transfer cred- 
it at University College will be charged a fee of 
$40. The evaluation is issued by the Office of 
Academic and Student Affairs upon receipt of a 
Transfer Credit Petition, a completed Educa- 
tional Chronology Form, official copies of all 
transcripts translated into English, and a check 
in the amount of $40, payable to Northeastern 
Uruversity. The official assessment of interna- 
tional educational credentials is made in accor- 
dance with current standards for awarding 
transfer credit at University College or as rec- 
ommended by the Center for International 
Higher Education Documentation. 

Course(s) at Another College or University 

Students who are admitted to a degree program 
at University College and want to complete one 
or more courses at another institution for 
transfer purposes must first file a petition to 
enroll in such courses and provide course de- 
scriptions to the Office of Academic and 



Academic Policies and Procedures 205 



Student Affairs. Courses taken at other institu- 
tions may be disallowed unless a petition has 
been submitted and approved in advance. Stu- 
dents may not take courses at any other institu- 
tion during their senior year for the purpose of 
transferring credit. See the section on Resi- 
dence Requirement on page 207. 

Credit by Examination 

University College awards credit by exEimina- 
tion, provided the examination does not dupli- 
cate previously earned academic credit. Credit 
is granted for successful completion of exami- 
nations currently available through the College 
Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the Col- 
lege Entrance Examination Board and through 
the Proficiency Examination Program (PEP) of 
the American College Testing Program. Both 
programs have been designed to help students 
obtain college-level credit for knowledge ac- 
quired through nontraditional means, such as 
on-the-job training; educational television; or 
correspondence, extension, or independent 
study. University College defines a passing 
score as 500 on General Examinations and 50 
on Subject Examinations. Information about 
these programs is available from the Office of 
Academic and Student Affairs at University 
College and from the Northeastern University 
Counseling and Testing Center. 

Modem Language Proficiency Examination 

Students may be eligible to receive credit for 
proficiency in a modern language. Examina- 
tions are currently offered in French, Spanish, 
German, and ItaUan. Students should contact 
the Liberal Arts Program office, 617-437-2416, 
for more information or an appUcation form. 

Noncoltegiate Experience Credit 

Some degree students may petition for noncol- 
legiate experience credit, which is available 
only for liberal arts courses. Students must be 
admitted to a Uberal arts or business degree to 
apply. See page 97 for details. 

NoncoUegiate experience credit is not avail- 
able for business courses, except through CLEP 
or PEP examinations. (See Credit by Examina- 
tion, above.) 

Credit cannot be awarded through NoncoUe- 
giate Experience Petitions or examinations 
when an appropriate examination is available 
through CLEP or PEP. 



Credit for Extra-institutional Learning 

Extra-institutional learning is learning that 
takes place outside the sponsorship of legally 
authorized and accredited post-secondary 
educational institutions. The term applies 
to learning acquired from formal courses spon- 
sored by associations, governments, business, 
and industry. 

In awarding credit for extra-institutional 
learning, University College uses the National 
Guide to Credit Recommendations for Noncol- 
tegiate Courses, published annually by the 
American Council on Education. 

Students applying for credit for extra-institu- 
tional learning must submit a Transfer Credit 
Petition and provide official credentials from 
the sponsoring noneducational organization to 
the Office of Academic and Student Affairs. The 
credit may be applied toward degree require- 
ments at University College if recommended in 
the National Guide, provided credit is not oth- 
erwise obtainable through CLEP, PEP, or non- 
collegiate experience credit programs at 
University College. 



Grading System Policies and Procedures 

Grading System 

A student's work in each course is evaluated by 
the instructor, who awards a letter grade at the 
end of the quarter. This grade is officially re- 
corded by the Registrar's Office. The grades 
and symbols used are given below, together 
with the numerical equivalents used for com- 
puting quahty-point averages. 

A (4.000) 

A- (3.667) 

B-h (3.333) 

B (3.000) 

B- (2.667) 

C -H (2.333) 

C (2.000) 

C- (1.667) 

D-h (1.333) 

D (1.000) 

D-(.667) 

F (0) 

I Incomplete 

L Audit (no credit) 

S Satisfactory (pass/fail grade) 

U Unsatisfactory (pass/fail grade) 

X Incomplete (pass/fail grade) 

* Grade not received 



206 Policies and Services 



Change of Grade Policy 

The period for clearing an I grade is restricted 
to one calendar year from the end of the quar- 
ter in which the course was originally taken. I 
grades outstanding for twelve months or longer 
will remain permanently on all records. 

Beginning with grades recorded at the end of 
Fall Quarter 1986, the period for changing 
any grade is restricted to one calendar year 
from the end of the quarter in which the course 
was taken. 

Requests for exceptions to this policy must 
be made to the University College Academic 
Standing Committee, 180 Ruggles Building. 

Grade Reports and Transcripts 

All efforts are made to mail grades prior to the 
begiiming of the following quarter. A supple- 
mentary grade report is issued when a missing 
grade or a grade change is received. University 
regulations prohibit issuing grades by tele- 
phone. Grade reports of degree candidates indi- 
cate both their quarterly quaUty-point average 
and their cumulative quality-point average. 
Problems with grades not received (*) or grade 
changes that have not been posted on tran- 
scripts should be addressed to the Program Of- 
fice that administers the course. 

Students may obtain a transcript of their 
grades by making a request in writing to the 
Registrar's Office, 117 Hayden Hall, Northeast- 
ern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. 
Unofficial transcripts are issued free of charge; 
official transcripts bearing the University seal 
cost $2. 

Incomplete (I) Grades 

The I grade (incomplete) may be given only 
when the student fails to complete a mgjor re- 
quirement of a course, such as a term paper or 
a final exam, but has been in regular atten- 
dance. Students who have missed a substantial 
number of class meetings without the instruc- 
tor's permission receive a grade of W. An in- 
structor may decide that a student has done so 
poorly in the course that even a perfect grade in 
a makeup final examination could not raise the 
grade from F; in this case F is the proper grade, 
regardless of the missed final examination. 



All deficiencies must be made up in the man- 
ner prescribed by the instructor no later than 
twelve months following the recording of the I 
grade. Students requesting an exception to this 
poUcy must petition the University College Aca- 
demic Standing Committee in writing. To re- 
move an I grade, the instructor must file a 
change of grade form with the program office, 
to indicate the grade that the student is to re- 
ceive. A student who elects to make up an I 
grade by taking the same course over again will 
be given a new grade and will be billed accord- 
ingly. The original I grade will remain on the 
student's record. 

Missed Final Examinotions 

Students who miss a final examination are 
given a grade of I (incomplete) imless the stu- 
dent has done so poorly in the course that even 
a perfect grade on a makeup final could not 
raise the grade from F, in which case an F will 
be given as the proper grade. Students do not 
automatically have the right to make up a 
missed final examination. Students must peti- 
tion and pay a fee of $50 for each makeup ex- 
amination. Petitions are available at each 
campus location or by calling 617-437-2425. 
Students are notified whether or not their peti- 
tions have been approved prior to the date of 
the makeup examination. 

Students who make up a missed final exami- 
nation will have the appropriate letter or 
pass/fail grade substituted for the I grade on 
their transcripts. 

Pass/Fail Grades 

Satisfactory completion of work in all courses 
taken on a pass/fail basis is designated on the 
transcript by the letter S. Unsatisfactory work 
is designated on the transcript by the letter U. 
Any unsatisfactory grade must be handled ac- 
cording to the existing policy of University Col- 
lege but may never be cleared by enrolling in 
the same course on the basis of the pass/fail 
system of grading. 

An incomplete in a course taken on a pass/ 
fail basis is designated by the letter X on the 
transcript and is treated according to the nor- 
mal procedure for grades of incomplete. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 207 



Quality-Point Average 

To obtain the quality-point average, the numeri- 
cal equivalent of each grade received is mul- 
tiplied by the credit hours earned, the quality 
points are added together, and the total quality- 
points are divided by the student's total 
quarter hours. 

Grade Numerical Credit Quality 

Achieved Equivalent Hours Points 

A 4.000 3 12.0 

B- 2.667 3 8.0 

C 2.000 6 12.0 

F 0.000 3 0.0 

Total Quality Points (32.0) 



Quality-Point Average = Total Credit 2.13 

Hours (15) 

The quality-point average is equal to the total 
quality points (in this case, 32.0) divided by the 
total credit hours (15), which comes to an aver- 
age of 2.13. 

Pass/fail grades (S, U, and X), incompletes (I), 
and audits (L) are not included in the quality- 
point average. Similarly, transfer credits are not 
included in quahty-point averages. However, 
the total earned hours appearing on the stu- 
dent's transcript include both transfer credits 
and S grades. 

A cumulative quality-point average below 2.0 
is unacceptable and does not allow a student to 
continue in University College or to receive a 
degree from Northeastern University. The F 
grade is a failure and requires repetition of the 
course in its entirety. 



Graduation Policies and Procedures 

Residence Requirement 

Every candidate for the bachelor's or associ- 
ate's degree must fulfill the minimum residence 
requirement, which is defined as the satisfac- 
tory completion of at least 45 quarter hours of 
course work for the bachelor's degree, or 24 
quarter hours of course work for the associ- 
ate's degree, in University College immediately 
preceding graduation. At least 12 of the 45 
quarter hours, or 6 of the 24, must be in the can- 
didate's m^or field of study. 

Because of this residence requirement, stu- 
dents may not take courses at any other institu- 
tion during their senior year for the purpose of 
transferring credit. 

Students whose enrollment in a degree pro- 
gram is interrupted for a period of one year or 



more will be reinstated in that program or a 
comparable program at the time of re-entry 
into University College. 

Graduation Requirements 

Except for certain health professions programs, 
the requirement for graduation from University 
College is 174 quarter hours for a bachelor's de- 
gree and 96 quarter hours for an associate's de- 
gree, with attainment of an overall quality-point 
average of 2.0 (C). In addition, the student must 
have a 2.0 average in the major concentration 
courses. Although the credits allowed for ac- 
ceptable work completed elsewhere by transfer 
students count toward fulfillment of quantita- 
tive graduation requirements, neither the cred- 
its nor the grades earned in such courses are 
included in the quality-point computations for 
graduation. Course requirements for each de- 
gree are outlined in this bulletin. 

Graduation with Honor 

Graduation with honor is reserved for 
bachelor's degree candidates who have com- 
pleted a minimum of 72 quarter hours of work 
at University College and who have demon- 
strated distinctly superior academic achieve- 
ment as evidenced by the following 
quality-point averages: 

Graduation with Honor 3.00 to 3.49 

Graduation with High Honor 3.50 to 3.74 
Graduation with Highest 

Honor 3.75 to 4.00 

Courses transferred from another edu- 
catioucil institution are not considered in 
determining honors. 

Credit by Examination During the Senior Year 

CLEP or PEP examinations (see pages 38, 204) 
may be taken by students during their final year 
of study provided they have met the 45 or 24 
quarter-hour residence requirement for gradu- 
ation described above. Because of the time it 
t£ikes for CLEP and PEP examinations to be 
graded and returned to the University, students 
requesting June graduation must take their 
CLEP and PEP examinations no later than the 
winter quarter of their senior year, and students 
requesting September commencement must 
take their examinations no later than the spring 
term of their senior year. 

Senior Status Procedure 

Each student who intends to graduate during 
the current academic year must notify the 



208 



Office of Academic and Student Affairs of his 
or her intention to graduate by filing for a se- 
nior status report. 

Senior status reports are issued to assist 
students with selecting the courses they need 
to complete their program requirements. Se- 
niors are encouraged to request their senior 
status reports during the summer prior to the 
acadenuc year in which they plan to graduate. 
Petition forms are available at each campus 
location or by calling 617^37-2400 (voice) 
or 617-437-2825 (TTY). At this time, seniors 
are also encouraged to clear up missing grades, 
incompletes, transfer credit, adnussions, or 
other problems. 

Once a Senior Status Report has been com- 
pleted, the Office of Academic and Student Af- 
fairs mails the student a Commencement Data 
Card, which the student must return by the 
date specified on the card to be guaranteed in- 
clusion on the official graduation list. 

Academic Audit of Seniors 

The Office of Academic and Student Affairs 
conducts an academic audit of all seniors ap- 
proximately one month prior to graduation. 
During this audit, academic problems such as 
incompletes or missing grades are noted. Every 
effort is made to relay this information to the 
student through mail and telephone contact. If 
these problems remain unresolved, seniors are 
notified by certified mail that they have failed 
to qualify for their degree. 

Commencement Ceremony 

Information concerning conunencement is 
mailed to all seniors who have returned a Com- 
mencement Data Card (see Senior Status, 
above) during the spring term, for June 
graduation, or the summer term, for 
September graduation. 

Attendance at Commencement for aU Univer- 
sity College degree candidates is optional. Stu- 
dents who do not attend Commencement 
should receive their diplomas by mail approxi- 
mately six to eight weeks after the ceremony. 

Students must have cleared all academic, fi- 
nancial, and/or disciplinary deficiencies in or- 
der to graduate. The graduation fee must be 
paid whether or not the student attends the 
commencement exercises. Students who have 
questions about the commencement ceremony 
should direct them to the Commencement Of- 
fice, 617-437-3190. 



Tuition and Fees 



Tuition 

Tuition for all credit courses is $98 per quarter 
hour of credit. Checks and drafts for all charges 
are to be made to the order of Northeastern 
University. Charges for registration and tuition 
for special courses are at the rate specified for 
each course, with the exception of drama and 
nontutorial courses. There is no reduction in 
fees for auditing courses. 

Noncredit courses are charged at quarter- 
hour rates comparable to those of credit 
courses meeting on an equivalent 
contact-hour schedule. 

Students are not permitted to attend class 
sessions or take any examination or test until 
they have paid their tuition fees or have made 
satisfactory arrangements for payment. 

It is the student's responsibility to ensure 
that all tuition charges and fees are paid when 
due. If a bill has not been received prior to the 
start of classes each quarter, the student should 
come in person to the Bursar's Office, where a 
bill will be processed. 

Any discrepancies in billing should be imme- 
diately brought to the attention of the Bursar's 
Office. If there is a billing problem, the undis- 
puted portion of the bill should be paid on time 
to avoid any additional late fees. Failure to re- 
ceive a bill through the mail or to pay the un- 
disputed portion of the bill is not justification 
for late payment of amounts actuMly owed. 

Students will not be advanced in class stand- 
ing or permitted to re-enroll in the University 
nor will degrees be conferred until all financial 
obligations to the University have been met. 

Tuition for Courses in Other Northeastern 
Departments or Colleges 

University College students assigned to courses 
in other departments or colleges of the 



Tuition and Fees 209 



First payment 
Second payment 

Balance 



University are charged the tuition fees effective 
in the departments or colleges in which they 
are enrolled. 

Initial Registration Fee 

A nonrefundable $10 registration fee for first- 
time University College students is billed with 
tuition fees. 

Tuition Budget Payment Plans 

Occasionally situations develop — usually be- 
yond the control of the student — that make it 
difficult to meet the payments in the manner 
outlined above. Under such circumstances, the 
student is advised to contact the Bursar's Of- 
fice to arrange for deferred payment. The only 
deferred payment plan offered is as follows and 
applies only to the amount owed for the 
current quarter: 

1/3 due first week of quarter 
1/3 due approx. fourth week 
of quarter 

1/3 due approx. eighth week 
of quarter 

Such arrangements should be made before the 
end of the first week of the quarter or within 
one week of the date of registration if the stu- 
dent enters late. Deferred payment of tuition 
entails a fee of $10, which is levied on all ac- 
counts not paid by the end of the second week 
of classes. Failure to take immediate action will 
result in a late payment fee of $50. 

Tuition Underwritten by Employers 

An increasing number of companies are un- 
derwriting part or all of the cost of tuition of 
students in their employ. In cases where pay- 
ment is to be made directly by the employer to 
the University, the student should furnish the 
Bursar's Office with a purchase order covering 
registration or a statement fi-om an officer of 
the company certifying that the company is un- 
derwriting the tuition. In cases where stu- 
dents are being reimbursed by their employer, 
tuition must be paid by the student according 
to the prescribed regulations to avoid late 
payment charges. 

Veterans' Benefits 

Any veteran covered by Public Law 89-358 
should report to 116 Hay den Hall to fill out the 
proper enrollment forms. 



Late Payment Fee 

Bills for tuition and fees are payable in accor- 
dance with the due date shown. A late pay- 
ment fee of $50 is charged for failure to 
make payments in accordance with the 
prescribed regulations. 

Refund of Tuition 

The general policy in aU schools and colleges of 
the University with respect to refunds of tuition 
is as follows: The University provides all in- 
struction on an academic-quarter basis, for 
which students pay at the beginning of each 
quarter. Tuition refunds are granted through 
the first four weeks of a quarter only when spe- 
cific conditions are met and are granted only on 
the basis of the date appearing on the official 
withdrawal application when filed with the 
Registrar in 120 Hay den Hall. Nonattendance 
does not constitute official withdrawal. Ques- 
tions regarding refunds should be discussed 
with the Bursar. 

Refunds are granted in accordance with the fol- 
lowing schedule: 

OfQcial withdrawal 
filed within 

First week of quarter 
Second week of quarter 
Third week of quarter 
Fourth week of quarter 



Percentage of 
tuition credited 

100% 

75% 
50% 
25% 



Fees 

New Low Rate for Friday and Saturday Intensives 

University College offers a selection of six- 
quarter-hour courses at the Boston and Burl- 
ington campuses on Friday evenings and 
Saturdays at a special reduced tuition rate of 
$440 ($100 less than the normal tuition). Check 
the current Schedule Guide for a list of 
these courses. 

Student Center Fee 

All students in University College on the main 
Boston campus are charged $.75 each quarter 
for the services available in the Student Center. 

Laboratory Fees 

Students enrolled in courses that carry a labo- 
ratory fee must purchase a Laboratory Fee and 
Deposit Card from the Cashier's Office ($15 for 
extra cards). 



210 



A fee of $45 is charged for biology courses 
and for those health professions courses that 
include a laboratory. For chemistry courses, 
cards cost $60 per quarter with the possibihty 
of a $5 refund at the end of the quarter, depend- 
ing on breakage. Upon completion of the 
course or withdrawal during the quarter, the 
student must check his or her status with the 
laboratory attendant. The Cashier's Office will 
then refund any unused balance shown on 
the card. 

A laboratory fee of $40 is also charged for 
film and photography courses, for some art stu- 
dio courses, and for arts and crafts courses. A 
$40 fee is charged for the food preparation 
course in the hotel and restaurant management 
program. Music students enrolled in a music tu- 
torial pay a special rate. For details contact 
Charles Mokotoff, University College Music 
Coordinator, 307 EU Building, 617-437-2440 or 
617-437-2442. 

Graduation Fee 

The University graduation fee, charged to those 
who are candidates for the bachelor's or asso- 
ciate's degree, is $40. 

Missed Final Examination Fee 

Students absent fi-om the regularly scheduled 
final examination at the end of a course may 
petition for a missed final examination. The 
fee for each exanunation requested by the stu- 
dent is $50. The fee must be paid when the 
petition is filed in the Office of Academic 
and Student Affairs. 

Transcripts 

Students may request official transcripts of 
their grades at the Registrar's Office. There is a 
charge of $2 per copy, payable in advance. Un- 
official transcripts are issued fi:ee of charge. 



Financial Aid 



Scholarships 

The following University College and School of 
Engineering Technology scholarships and 
awards are available to students who have been 
accepted as degree candidates and are in good 
academic standing. 

Scholarships are awarded once a year by the 
Scholarship Committee. Final selection of 
scholarship recipients is usually made in late 
May, followed by the awarding of the scholar- 
ships in late June or early July. Funds are usual- 
ly appUed to tuition expenses for the following 
acadenuc year. Awards range in amount from 
$250 to $700. 

Application Procedure 

In January, a mailing list of students who 
have requested applications is prepared and 
appUcations are mailed out with the stipulation 
that they be completed and returned to the 
Office of the Dean by March 31. A student can 
be placed on the January mailing Ust by 
calling 617-437-2400 and leaving his or her 
name, address, and student ID number with 
the receptionist. 

Dean Kenneth W. Ballou Family Scholarship Fund 

The Dean Kenneth W. Ballou Family Scholar- 
ship Fund was established in 1986 by the gener- 
osity of the Kenneth W. Ballou family. Dean 
Ballou served Northeastern University in var- 
ious capacities from 1957 to 1978, including as 
director of Undergraduate Admissions, dean of 
University Relations, assistant to the President, 
dean of Adult Education Programs, and dean of 
University College. This scholarship is awarded 
annually to a University College student(s) who 
demonstrates financial need, academic prom- 
ise, and leadership potential. 

Henry J. Doherty Memorial Scholarship 

The Henry J. Doherty Memorial Scholarship 
Fund was established in 1987 through the gen- 



Financial Aid 21 1 



erosity of Doris R. Doherty, as a tribute to her 
late husband, a 1953 graduate of the Evening 
School of Business and a successful business 
leader in the field of legal publishing. The 
income from the scholarship is awarded annu- 
ally to deserving students wdth demonstrated 
financial need who are pursuing part-time 
evening study and have been accepted as 
degree candidates. 

Electronics Industries Personnel Association 
Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in 1980 
through the generosity of the Electronics In- 
dustries Personnel Association. The income is 
awarded annually to one or more students 
whose studies, to a significant extent, are in the 
field of human resources management at Uni- 
versity College. Recipients will demonstrate fi- 
nancial need, soundness of character, and 
academic stability. 

Vincent A. Forte Memorial Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in 1985 in 
memory of Vincent A. Forte, a graduate of 
Northeastern University. The endowment funds 
were provided through the generosity of his 
family, friends, and associates. Forte was an 
ambitious student pursing a full-time business 
career while attending school part-time. He re- 
ceived an associate's degree from Lincoln Insti- 
tute in 1957, a Bachelor of Business Adminis- 
tration degree in 1958, and a Master of Business 
Administration in 1967. The income fi-om this 
fund is awarded to undergraduate students in 
University College who are pursuing a bache- 
lor's degree in business, who demonstrate 
financial need, and who are maintaining a 
cumulative quality-point average of 3.0 
or better after completing at least 44 quarter 
hours of credit. 

Koppa Tau Phi Scholarships 

The Kappa Tau Phi Sorority Scholarship Fund 
annually makes scholarship awards available to 
women students in the science, business, engi- 
neering, and Uberal arts programs who rank 
highest at the end of the upper-middle year. In 
the event that the chosen student is eligible for 
an award of greater monetary value, the award 
is made to the next highest-ranking woman stu- 
dent. To be eligible for this scholarship, the stu- 
dent must be enrolled in a course meeting at 
least two evenings per week and must be a can- 
didate for a bachelor's degree. In determining 



the recipient, grades of all courses completed 
in prior years are considered. 

Martin Luther King, Jr., Scholarships 

This scholarship fund was established in 1969 
in memory of the late Reverend Martin Luther 
King, Jr. Awards are made, as openings occur, 
to a limited number of adults from minority 
groups who would otherwise be unable to con- 
tinue their education. Stipends can cover tu- 
ition expenses not to exceed 6 quarter hours in 
any academic quarter (excluding summer quar- 
ter). Northeastern University's Office of Finan- 
cial Aid, located in 254 Richards Hall, adminis- 
ters these scholarships. 

Alan A. and Shirley A. Mackey Scholarship Fund 

The Alan A. and Shirley A. Mackey Scholarship 
Fund was established in 1987 upon the retire- 
ment of Alan A. Mackey from Northeastern 
University. Dean Mackey served Northeastern 
University in a wide array of capacities: as dean 
of administration, University registrar, dean of 
continuing education, and as a member of the 
mathematics faculty of University College. 
The scholarship fund provides annual 
scholarship awards to deserving University 
College students. 

Timothy F. Moron Scholarship Fund 

This scholarship fund was established upon the 
retirement of Dean Timothy F. Moran, associate 
dean at University College and director of the 
law enforcement programs. During his second 
career as an educator. Dean Moran, a retired 
state police officer, was an innovator and lead- 
er in the education of law enforcement officers 
both in New England and throughout the world. 
His former students, colleagues, and friends 
made substantial contributions to establish 
this fund in his honor. This scholarship is 
awarded annually to students majoring in 
criminal justice and security or corrections 
who demonstrate academic excellence and 
financial need. 

William J. McGovem Memorial Scholarship 

The William J. McGovem Memorial Scholarship 
was established in 1978 by an anonymous do- 
nor to honor the memory of William J. McGov- 
em. The donor wishes to assist others in 
realizing their potential through higher educa- 
tion. The income from this scholarship benefits 
worthy undergraduate students actively pursu- 
ing studies in University College or the School 



212 Policies and Services 



of Engineering Technology. Recipients must 
have declared a m^or, demonstrate financial 
need and academic achievement, and exhibit a 
high level of professional promise. 

Professor Joseph A. Mullen Scholarship 

The Massachusetts Chapter of the American 
Society for Training and Development has es- 
tablished a fund to provide annual scholarship 
awards to deserving part-time students upon 
the recommendation of the dean of University 
College. 

Eva Needle Memorial Scholarship 

The Eva Needle Memorial Scholarship Fund 
was established in 1965 with the aid of the Nor- 
man ICnight Charitable Foundation and is main- 
tained through the generosity of the friends of 
Bob and Ted Needle in memory of their mother. 
The income from the fund is awarded annually 
to a deserving student in the accounting pro- 
gram who demonstrates superior academic 
achievement. The recipient is selected jointly 
by Ted Needle, a long-standing member of Uni- 
versity College's accounting faculty, and the 
Scholarship Committee. 

Harry Olins Memorial Scholarship 

The Harry Olins Memorial Scholarship Fund 
was established as an expression of a belief in 
University College students and "what they 
stand for." The fund, presented by Mrs. Olins in 
recognition of her husband's long service on 
the business faculty, makes available an annual 
tuition award to students who, in terms of scho- 
lastic achievement, character, and personal 
need, best typify the spirit of Northeastern Uni- 
versity. To be eligible for this award, the stu- 
dent must be a business administration degree 
candidate and carry a full academic load during 
the school year. 

Sigma Epsilon Rho Honor Society Scholarship Award 

The Sigma Epsilon Rho Honor Society Scholar- 
ship Award, established in 1974 by the member- 
ship of the Society, is awarded annually to 
undergraduate students of University College 
or the School of Engineering Technology. Eligi- 
ble students must have a cumulative quality- 
point average of 3.0 or better after completing 
75 percent or more of their required studies. 

The H. Patricia Taylor Scholarship Fund 

The H. Patricia Taylor Scholarship Fund was 
established in 1974 by H. Patricia Taylor, a 
graduate of University College, and her hus- 
band, Harry C. Taylor, a graduate of the School 
of Business. The scholarship expresses their 



appreciation for financial assistance made 
available to Mrs. Taylor when she was obtain- 
ing her degree and is an attempt to provide 
similar funds to assist others in realizing their 
potential through higher education. The income 
fi"om the fund is awarded annually to a student 
enrolled in University College or the School of 
Engineering Technology who demonstrates fi- 
nancial need and academic stability and who 
meets certain other conditions of eligibiUty. 

Transportation Club of New England Scholarship 

The Transportation Club of New England pro- 
vides approximately eight scholarships annual- 
ly for persons employed in transportation and 
industry traffic departments. Scholarships are 
applicable toward tuition, books, and incidental 
expenses involved in transportation manage- 
ment courses. Their purpose is to afford a limit- 
ed number of people an opportunity to expand 
and improve their education by systematic 
study of transportation and distribution man- 
agement. Scholarships are administered coop- 
eratively with the Scholarship Committee of the 
Transportation Club of New England. Applica- 
tions may be secured from and filed with Frank 
Smith, Secretary, Transportation Club of New 
England, P.O. Box 121, Reading, Massachusetts 
01867. Each applicamt must be sponsored by a 
member of the Transportation Club. 

U.S. Navy Field Training Supervisors Association 
Memorial Scholarship 

A scholarship fund has been established 
through the generosity of the U.S. Navy Field 
Training Supervisors Association in commemo- 
ration of the Association's deceased members. 
The scholarship is awarded annually to a de- 
serving student, selected by the Scholarship 
Committee, who is a management m^or work- 
ing toward a bachelor's degree in the evening 
program at University College. 

University College and the School of Engineering 
Technology Faculty Society Memorial Scholarship 
Awards 

The Faculty Society of University College and 
the School of Engineering Technology offers 
two awards annually, primarily for excellence 
in studies, to bachelor's degree candidates in 
University College and the School of Engineer- 
ing Technology who have carried and are cur- 
rently carrying a minimum of 24 quarter hours 
annually. Applications, available during the 
winter quarter, must be returned before the 
spring quarter. These awards are given in com- 
memoration of the Faculty Society's deceased 
members. 



Financial Aid 213 



Roberta Macycove Wasserman Memorial Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in 1976 
through the generosity of family members and 
friends of Roberta Macycove Wasserman, who, 
at the time of her death in 1975, was pursuing 
liberal arts studies within University CoUege. 
The income from the fund is awarded aimually 
to a deserving female student who is a home- 
maker with family responsibilities and who is 
pursuing part-time studies within University 
College. The recipient shall demonstrate finan- 
cial need, soundness of character, and aca- 
demic stability. 

Awards 

John W. Robbins Prize 

The John W. Robbins Prize was established in 
1984 under the terms of the will of the late Lena 
C. Robbins, in memory of her husband, John W. 
Robbins, an alumnus of Northeastern Universi- 
ty. The income from this memorial gift is 
awarded aimually to the outstanding student 
(Class Marshal) of the graduating class of Uru- 
versity College. 

Financial Aid 

The Office of Financial Aid, in 254 Richards 
Hall, offers several types of assistance to 
part-time students. All awards are based on 
financial need. Aid granted from programs 
sponsored by the federal or state govermnent 
is dependent upon the amount of funding allo- 
cated to Northeastern University. The 
University does not award financijil assistance 
in any form to students who are not citizens 
or permanent residents of the United States. 
All part-time students who wish to apply for 
financial aid and who have not declared a 
major (been admitted to a program) must com- 
plete an appUcation, available at the 
University College Office of Academic and 
Student Affairs, 180 Ruggles Building. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid 
Recipients 

Recipients of financial aid are required to make 
satisfactory academic progress in order to con- 
tinue their eUgibility for aid. University College 
defines "satisfactory academic progress" as 

• a minimum course load of 6 credit hours per 
quarter (requirements vary for the Massachu- 
setts Part-time Grant Program, the Massachu- 
setts State Scholarship, and the Adult Learners 



• Program); and 

• a minimum average of C, or 2.0, in these 
courses. 

If, at the end of any given academic year, a 
student receiving financial aid has failed to 
make satisfactory academic progress toward 
his or her degree, the Office of Financial Aid 
will be notified by University College. 

Pell Grant 

The PeU Grcint Program is a federal aid pro- 
gram designed to provide financial assistance 
to degree candidates who need it to attend 
post-high school educational institutions. To be 
eligible for a Pell Grant you must 

• be enrolled in a degree or certificate program 
that is at least six months in length; 

• be taking at least 6 credit hours per quarter; 

• be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen; and 

• be achieving satisfactory academic progress. 

To apply, you must submit either a Financial 
Aid Form (FAF) or an Application for Federal 
Student Aid to the proper agencies; forms are 
available in the financial aid office. 

In order to receive a Pell Grant, you must 
submit to the Office of Financial Aid a valid 
Student Aid Report (SAR) and a Northeastern 
University Aid AppUcation (available in the Of- 
fice of Financial Aid). The amount of your Pell 
Grant will be determined by the following: 

Quarter Hours Tolcen Funding 

0-5 quarter hours No funding 

6-8 quarter hours Half-time award 

9-11 quarter hours Three-quarter time award 

12 or more quarter hours Full-time award 

Pell Grant recipients should direct all ques- 
tions to the Pell Grant section of the Office of 
Financial Aid, 275 Richards Hall, 617-437-3804. 

Massachusetts Part-Time Student Grant Program 

The Massachusetts State Legislature has estab- 
lished a grant program for part-time students. 
These funds, earmarked for Massachusetts 
part-time students only, provide a maximum 
grant of $1,000 per year. 

To be eligible, the student must be a perma- 
nent legal resident of Massachusetts for at least 
one year prior to the opening of the academic 
year, and be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen. 
He or she must also be enrolled in at least 3 but 
fewer than 12 quarter hours per academic term. 

Students who are not enrolled in a degree or 
a certificate program or who already have a 
bachelor's degree are eligible for not more than 
15 quarter hours of aid. 



214 Policies and Services 



Awards will be based on financial need dem- 
onstrated through the Financial Aid Form 
(FAF) and the Northeastern University Aid Ap- 
plication. The FAF must be mailed to Prince- 
ton, New Jersey for processing. The completed 
Northeastern University Aid Application must 
be returned to the Office of Financial Aid. 

Applications are available in the Office of Fi- 
nancial Aid, 254 Richards Hall. 

Massachusetts State Scholarship 

Massachusetts residents enrolled as full-time 
students (i.e., those taking 12 credit hours per 
quarter for fall, winter, and spring) may be eligi- 
ble for a Massachusetts State Scholarship. To 
apply, students must submit the Massachusetts 
version of the Financial Aid Form (MFAF). The 
priority date for submitting the MFAF is May 1. 
Massachusetts State Scholarships are awarded 
based on need as determined by the Massachu- 
setts Financial Aid Form (MFAF). 

Adult Learners Program 

The Massachusetts Board of Regents of Higher 
Education has established the Massachusetts 
Adult Learners Program as a need-based, state- 
funded, financial aid program designed primar- 
ily to assist Aid for Dependent Children (AFDC) 
recipients in obtaining a college education. 
The amount of each award varies depending 
on the applicant's demonstrated need. The 
maximum award is the same as the Massa- 
chusetts State Scholarship. 

To be considered for the program, applicants 
must be full- or part-time undergraduate stu- 
dents at Northeastern, taking at least one three- 
quarter-hour course. They must also have been 
permanent, legal residents of Massachusetts for 
one year prior to receiving the award. Awards 
are made only to current AFDC recipients and 
are made on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Applications are available at the Office of 
Financial Aid. 

Guaranteed Student Loan Program 

The Guaranted Student Loan Program enables 
a student to borrow a maximum of $2,625 per 
academic year for the first two years of a pro- 
gram and $4,000 per academic year for the next 
three years directly fi"om a participating lender 
in the student's home community. The loan is 
guaranteed by a state or private nonprofit agen- 
cy and is insured by the federal government. 
The interest on the loan is paid by the federal 
government while the student is in school and 



is subsidized during repayment after the stu- 
dent has left school. This loan must be repaid. 

Students may be eligible for a loan if they are 
enrolled or have been accepted for enrollment 
on at least a half-time basis in a degree or 
certificate granting program, are citizens or 
permanent residents of the United States, and 
can show financial need in accordance with the 
federal guidelines. 

The legal maximum loan that can be bor- 
rowed through the Guaranteed Student Loan 
Program for an entire undergraduate program 
is $17,250. 

In order to have a Guaranteed Student Loan 
application processed by the Northeastern Uni- 
versity student loan office, part-time under- 
graduate students must have a Northeastern 
Part-Time Aid Application on file with the Of- 
fice of Financial Aid and have submitted a Fi- 
nancial Aid Form to the College Scholarship 
Service prior to submitting the loan application 
for processing. 

Repayment of a Guaranteed Student Loan 
usually begins six months after a student with- 
draws or graduates from an educational institu- 
tion or ceases to carry at least a half-time 
course load. The repayment period may be as 
long as ten years. The amount of the payments 
depends upon the size of the debt, but must be 
at least $50 per month. During the first four 
years of repayment the loan carries a simple in- 
terest rate of 8 percent per year and 10 percent 
thereafter. 

Note: For students who have outstanding loans 
at 7 percent or 9 percent, the interest rate on 
subsequent loans will continue at the 
same rate. 

Repayment on loans may be deferred under 
certain circumstances. For details, contact 
your lender. 

Students who borrow funds through this pro- 
gram must report any of the following changes 
to their lenders: 

• withdrawal from school 

• transfer to another school 

• reduction of course load to less than half time 

• change of address or parents' address 

• change of name. 

Additional information about financial aid is 
available ft-om the Office of Financial Aid, 
254 Richards HaU, 617-437-3190. 

All federal financial aid programs are 
subject to change depending on adequate 
and continuing federal support. 



Appendix 



216 



Facilities and Resources 



Sport, Dance, and Exercise Facilities 

Northeastern is concerned with providing for 
the health and fitness of our students, and we 
continually expand the sports, exercise, and 
recreational options available to you. All part- 
time students have access to our extensive 
gymnasium facilities from 4:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, and during all open 
hours on Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. The 
University offers you a variety of specieilized fa- 
cihties, including basketbaill courts, dance stu- 
dio, indoor athletic field and running track, 
gymnastics room, combatives room, weight- 
training rooms, swimming pool, crew practice 
tank, racquetball courts, and motor perfor- 
mance and exercise physiology laboratories. 
The Matthews Arena, with seating for more 
than 5,000 fans, is home to the University's 
varsity and subvarsity hockey and 
basketball teams. 

For organized athletics requiring facilities 
not available on the main campus. Northeastern 
maintains the Northeastern Boat House, which 
is located on Memorial Drive in Cambridge and 
is home to the University's crew teams. The Ed- 
ward S. Parsons Field, on Kent Street in Brook- 
line, is the playing ground for the football, 
baseball, women's lacrosse and women's field 
hockey teams, and some intramurals. The Ber- 
nard M. and Jolane Solomon Track, a recently 
completed outdoor track and field facility in 
Dedham, has an eight-lane. Action Trak 200 
ruiming surface and an expzinsive area for con- 
current jumping and field events. This new fa- 
cility is ready to host dual and championship 
meet competitions and is a permanent site for 
Northeastern University track athletes. 

You must present a valid Northeastern stu- 
dent identification card and a photo identifica- 
tion card for access to the facihties. 



Social and Professional Clubs 

We welcome and encourage part-time students 
in University College and the School of Engi- 
neering Technology to join in the social and 
professional activities that are organized and 
run by the student body, with the assistance of 
the Office of Academic and Student Affairs. If 
you and your peers are interested in starting 
new professional clubs, the office will help to 
plan and organize locally and nationally. Call 
617-437-2400 for more information. 

All programs are designed to keep pace with 
changing student needs and interests and to 
provide maximum opportunity for 
your participation. 

Sigma Epsilon Rho Honor Society 

Sigma Epsilon Rho is the University College 
honor society. It aims to promote fellowship 
among those students who have attained high- 
est scholastic standing in the College; to stimu- 
late the student body to higher scholastic 
accomplishment through the bearing, influence, 
and work of these selected men and women; to 
develop methods of mutual improvement and 
advancement among members; and to support 
high moral, professional, and scholastic ideals. 
Only honor graduates or seniors with honor 
standing at the end of their junior year are eligi- 
ble for admission to the society. Admission is 
by invitation after nomination by the society. 

Ell Student Center 

Student recreation and extracurricular activi- 
ties of all kinds are held at the Carl S. Ell Stu- 
dent Center. The center houses the Alumni 
Auditoriimi, which seats 1,300; special drama 
facilities; a ballroom; a main lounge; fine arts 
exhibition space; student offices; conference 
rooms; a cafeteria with seating for more than 
1,000; and a bookstore. 

Office of Services for the Handicapped 

No student should miss or have diminished any 
of the opportunities at Northeastern. Any stu- 
dent who has a disability-related need, no mat- 
ter how small or individual, can receive ready 
support services from the Office of Services for 
the Handicapped (OSH). Frequently, students 
are uncertain about how they may be helped by 
this office; in these situations, a discussion of 
possible alternatives is useful. OSH provides a 
range of support services to eliminate the com- 
petitive disadvantages that a disability may 



217 



create. Services are tailored individually to 
meet the needs of each student. 

Types of assistance available from OSH in- 
clude providing help during orientation, regis- 
tration, and preregistration, an information 
clearinghouse, counseling, arranging for hous- 
ing, and services for the hearing-impaired, the 
wheelchair user/mobility-impaired, and learn- 
ing disabled student. 

OSH is also the gathering place for the Dis- 
abled Student Organization of Northeastern 
University, which works cooperatively with 
OSH to plan programs and improve accessibil- 
ity of services for handicapped people 
at Northeastern. 

Lane Health Center 

The well-being of all Northeastern students is a 
crucial concern for the University. The health 
services clinic of the Lane Health Center, locat- 
ed on the Boston campus, is equipped to deal 
promptly with medical emergencies at all times. 

Alumni Association 

Upon graduation, you will join the more than 
93,000 alumni united within the Alumni Associ- 
ation, which was established to promote a 
mutually rewarding relationship between 
Northeastern and its graduates. Association ac- 
tivities include the Homecoming celebration, 
presentation of the Outstanding Alumni 
Awards, and the annual presentation of Profes- 
sional Promise Awards to outstanding seniors 
in each of the colleges. 



Programs at Northeastern 



Undergraduate Colleges 

Boston-Bouv6 College of Human Development 
Professions 

Offers programs leading to the bachelor of sci- 
ence in education in early childhood education, 
elementary education, human services, physical 
education, athletic training, cardiovascular 
health and exercise, and school and community 
health education; the bachelor of science in 
recreation and leisure studies; and the bachelor 
of science in physical therapy. For more infor- 
mation, call 617-437-2200. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Offers programs in the arts, humanities, social 
sciences, and mathematics/sciences leading to 
the bachelor of arts and bachelor of science de- 
grees. Programs are normally four years in 
length on a full-time plan or five years in length 
on the cooperative plan. For more information, 
call 617-437-3980. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a five-year, cooperative education pro- 
gram leading to the bachelor of science in busi- 
ness administration. Students complete a six- 
course concentration in accounting, human 
resources management, marketing, finance and 
insxu-ance, management, international business 
administration, entrepreneurship and new ven- 
ture management, management information 
systems, or transportation £ind physical distri- 
bution management. For more information, call 
617-437-2200. 

College of Computer Science 

Offers a five-year, cooperative education pro- 
gram leading to the bachelor of science in com- 
puter science, with emphasis tracks in data- 
base management, programming languages, 
and systems. For more information, call 
617-437-2462. 



218 Appendix 



College of Criminal Justice 

Offers a five-year, cooperative education pro- 
gram leading to the bachelor of science degree. 
For more information, call 617-437-3327. 

College of Engineering 

Offers five-year, cooperative education pro- 
grams in chemical, civil, electrical (including a 
power systems option and a computer engi- 
neering option), industrial, and mechanical en- 
gineering leading to the bachelor of science 
with specification according to the department. 
A more general program leading to the bache- 
lor of science without specification is also of- 
fered. For highly qualified students, the 
electrical and computer engineering, mechani- 
cal engineering, and industrial engineering and 
information systems departments offer five- 
year programs leading to the bachelor's and the 
master's degree; students carry course over- 
loads begiiuiing in the third year. The College 
also offers a six-year, part-time evening pro- 
gram leading to the bachelor of science degree 
in civil, electrical, or mechanical engineering. 
For more information, call 617-437-2154. 

College of Nursing 

Offers a program of academic study combined 
with cooperative work experience that leads to 
a bachelor's degree in nursing. The registered 
nurse may complete requirements for the bach- 
elor of science in nursing either full- or part- 
time. The College of Nursing collaborates with 
University College in offering the evening sec- 
tion for registered nurses. The program is ac- 
credited by the National League for Nursing. 
For more information, call 617-437-3103. 

College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions 

Offers five-year, cooperative education pro- 
grams leading to the bachelor of science in 
pharmacy, respiratory therapy, and toxicology, 
and to the bachelor of science with specifica- 
tion in medical laboratory science and health 
record administration. Associate's degree pro- 
grams are offered in medical laboratory science 
and dental hygiene. The College also offers 
post-baccalaureate certificate programs for 
physicians' assistants, health record adminis- 
trators, and respiratory therapists. For more in- 
formation, call 617-437-3321. 

School of Engineering Technology 

The School of Engineering Technology, a divi- 
sion of the College of Engineering, offers pro- 
grams leading to the associate in engineering. 



associate in science, and bachelor of engineer- 
ing technology degrees. A full-time, five-year 
cooperative education plan is offered, at the 
baccalaureate level, in electrical and mechani- 
cal engineering technology and computer tech- 
nology. In addition to the majors mentioned for 
full-time study, part-time evening and weekend 
programs are available at the associate and 
baccalaureate levels in telecommunications, 
energy systems, architectural, environmental, 
structural, and surveying and highway engi- 
neering technology. A baccalaureate degree 
program in aerospace maintenance engineering 
technology is available for transfer students, 
both full- and part-time. Many of the technol- 
ogy courses are televised via Network North- 
eastern to satellite campuses and company 
sites. For more information, call 617-437-2500. 



Graduate Schools 

Boston-Bouve College of Human Development 
Professions 

Offers full- and part-time programs leading 
to the master of science degree with special- 
ization in counseling psychology; exercise 
sciences; physical education; recreation, 
sport, and fitness management; rehabilitation 
counseling; speech-language pathology 
and audiology. 

The master of education degree may be 
earned with a specialization in counseling, con- 
sulting teacher of reading, curriculum and in- 
struction, educational research, human 
development, or special education. The doctor 
of education degree may be earned in leader- 
ship: admirustration and supervision, with a 
specialization in counseling, educational ad- 
nunistration, or rehabilitation administration. 
For more information, call 617-437-2708. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Offers programs leading to the master of arts 
degree in economics, English, history, journal- 
ism, political science, psychology, sociology, 
and sociology-anthropology. The master of sci- 
ence degree is available in biology; chemistry; 
economic policy and planning; law, policy, and 
society; mathematics; and physics. The master 
of technical and professional writing, the mas- 
ter of science in health science, the master of 
journalism in news media management, and the 
master of public administration degrees are 
also offered. In addition, there are programs 



Programs at Northeastern 219 



leading to the certificate of advanced graduate 
study in advanced literary study and to the doc- 
tor of philosophy degree in biology; chemistry; 
economics; law, policy, and society; mathemat- 
ics; physics; psychology; and sociology. There 
are also certificate programs in economics of 
the workforce and development planning and 
in technical writing. Most programs may be 
completed through either full- or part-time 
study. For more information, call 617-437-3980. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers five programs leading to the master of 
business administration (MBA) degree. Options 
include a cooperative education MBA program, 
a full-time MBA program, and a part-time MBA 
program. An executive MBA tailored to the 
needs of experienced managers and a high- 
technology MBA designed for professionals in 
the high-technology conununity are also of- 
fered on a part-time basis. A nondegree pro- 
gram leading to the certificate of advanced 
study is available. For more information, call 
617-437-2714. 

The Graduate School of Professional Ac- 
counting offers a full-time, fifteen-month mas- 
ter of science in accounting program designed 
for students who hold bachelor's degrees in the 
arts and sciences. The program includes a 
three-month paid internship with a CPA firm. 
For more information, call 617-437-3244. 

The Center for Management Development of- 
fers nondegree programs and graduate work- 
shops, including the Management Development 
Program, the Management Workshop, and the 
Management Workshop — High-Tech. For more 
information, call 617-437-3272. 

College of Computer Science 

Offers full- and part-time programs leading to 
the master of science in computer science with 
concentrations in artificial intelligence, com- 
munications and networks, data bases, systems 
software, and theory. The doctor of philosophy 
in computer science program includes theory, 
artificial inteUigence, data base management, 
operating systems, programming languages, 
computers, and their architecture and hard- 
ware. For more information, call 617-437-3539. 

College of Criminal Justice 

Offers both full- and part-time programs lead- 
ing to the master of science in criminal justice. 
Criminal justice students may concentrate in 
administration and planning, criminology and 



research, or security administration, or develop 
their own multidisciplinary concentration un- 
der the supervision of a faculty adviser. For 
more information, caU 617437-3327. 

College of Engineering 

Offers programs leading to the master of sci- 
ence with specification in chemical, civil, indus- 
trial, and mechanical engineering; electrical and 
computer engineering; computer systems engi- 
neering; information systems; and transporta- 
tion. A five-year program leading to both a 
bachelor's and a master's degree is offered in 
electrical, industrial, and mechanical engineer- 
ing. Professional engineer's degrees are offered 
in electrical, industrial, and mechanical engi- 
neering. The doctor of philosophy degree is of- 
fered in chemical, civil, electrical, and mech- 
anical engineering and in industrial engineering 
and information systems. A doctor of engineer- 
ing is offered in chemical engineering. A Wom- 
en in Engineering and a Women in Information 
Systems program are also available. For more 
information, call 617437-2711. 

College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions 

Offers programs leading to the master of sci- 
ence degree in biomedical science, hospital 
pharmacy, medical laboratory science, medici- 
nal chemistry, and pharmacology. The master 
of health professions is offered with options in 
general, health policy, physician assistant, and 
regulatory toxicology. A doctoral degree 
is offered in biomedical science with spe- 
cialization in medical laboratory science, 
medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, 
pharmacology, or toxicology. A graduate pro- 
gram in clinical pharmacy leading to the doctor 
of pharmacy is also available. For more infor- 
mation, call 617-437-3211. 

School of Law 

Offers a full-time day program leading to the 
juris doctor degree. The three-year curriculum 
includes four quarters such as in judges' cham- 
bers, law offices, or government agencies. For 
more information, call 617-437-2395. 

Division of Continuing Education 

The Center for Continuing Education, located 
in Dedham, Massachusetts, was estabUshed to 
respond to continuing educational needs 
through a wide range of workshops, confer- 
ences, seminars, forums, and special training 



220 Appendix 



programs. For more information on any of 
these programs, contact the Division Office at 
617-437-5828. 

State-of-the-Art Engineering Program 

The State-of-the-Art Engineering Program of- 
fers evening courses, seminars, and on-site 
training designed for working professionals 
seeking practical, hands-on education in a job- 
related area of technology. The curriculum in- 
cludes telecommunications, industrial 
automation and robotics, data conununications, 
microelectronics engineering, quality assur- 
ance, microcomputers, artificial intelligence, 
technology management, CAD/CAM, program- 
ming languages, and VLSI design. 

Building Teclinology Program 

Designed for a broad spectrum of professionals 
either presently in or considering some aspect 
of the building technologies, the course offer- 
ings in the Building Technology Program range 
from introductory to advanced and are con- 
ducted in an intensive, total-immersion setting. 
Evening courses, on-site training, and certifi- 
cate programs include architecture, building in- 
spections, building technology, construction 
law, construction management, construction 
superintendent, facilities management, fire pro- 
tection, general construction, HVAC systems 
design, real estate, engineer-in-training Ucense 
examination preparation, and Massachusetts 
electrician's code review. 

Health Sciences Program 

The center offers four Health Sciences Pro- 
grams: The EMT Basic Program, designed to 
train emergency medical technicians; the Para- 
medic Training Program, which expands on the 
EMT Basic Program and covers advanced life 
support techniques; The Search and Rescue 
Program, conducted in the White Mountains 
National Forest; and the Nursing Program, for 
RNs and other health professionals. 

Paralegal Program 

The Paralegal Program offers a twelve-week 
Paralegal Certification Program and extended 
courses designed to enable practicing parsile- 
gals to sharpen their skills. 

Automobile Damage Appraisal Program 

The Automobile Damage Appraisal Program is 
designed to prepare insurance claims profes- 
sionals, auto body technicicins, and others for 
the Automobile Damage Appraisal License Ex- 



amination administered by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. The program also offers 
training in efficient auto repair center 
management. 

Test Preparation Program 

The Test Preparation Program offers courses 
designed to help prepare students for the LSAT, 
GMAT, GRE, and SAT examinations, providing 
the participant with an in-depth exposure to 
the subject matter. 

Urban Mass Transit Program 

The Urban Mass Transit Program is designed to 
help participants develop improved methods of 
meeting the unique challenges facing manage- 
ment persormel in the urban mass transporta- 
tion industry. The program provides a means of 
getting a practical educational experience in 
modern management theory and practice. 

Insurance and Financial Services Institute 

EstabUshed to foster excellence in the insur- 
ance and financial services communities in the 
Boston area, the institute offers courses and 
senunars in general insurance, risk manage- 
ment, insurance licensing, and financial ser- 
vices. These study programs are designed to 
help students develop professioncil credentials 
and to keep professionals current in their field. 

Network Northeastern 

Developed to serve the need of the high-tech 
conununity with flexible education and training 
programs. Network Northeastern broadcasts 
live instruction from the University campus di- 
rectly to company sites and the Burlington and 
Dedham campuses. Live classroom instruction 
is telecast in color to these remote sites, where 
it is viewed in reception rooms equipped with 
television monitors and a telephone talk-back 
system. Videotapes of nussed classes are pro- 
vided, and a courier service delivers and col- 
lects homework assignments and serves as a 
link to the Registrar, bookstore, and other Uni- 
versity services. Network Northeastern offers 
courses in graduate engineering, computer sci- 
ence, undergraduate engineering technology, 
state-of-the-art engineering, and graphic arts. A 
recently installed Ku-band sateUite dish enables 
the University to broadcast courses throughout 
the United States and to redistribute live satel- 
Ute programs to subscribing company sites via 
the microwave system. Via the satellite. Net- 
work Northeastern is a local distributor for 
IEEE videoconferences. 



221 



Faculty 



Sumy A. Abdel-Boky, Ph.D. 

Chemistry 

Northeastern University 

Barbara Abeles, M.BJL 

Management 

Abeles Associates 

Hon. Herbert Abmms, NLL* 

Criminal Jiistice and Security 

Superior Court of Massachusetts 

Michael J. Abrunese, M.BJL* 

Information Systems 

University of Massachusetts Medical 

Center 

Deborah A. Adair, Mi. 

Health Record Administration 

Stephen D. Adair, M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

Henry Adieman, B.S.* 

Information Systems 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

John M. Aflague, Mi. 

Health Science 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Paul D. Ahem, M.BJL 

Accounting 

Elkay Products, Inc. 

Thomas J. Ahem, Jr., J.D.* 

Business Law 

Silver and Ahem 

Joseph Aieta III, M.A.* 

History 

Lasell Junior College 

Edward E. Alessi, MJL 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Bedford VA Hospital 

Faribo Aliloo, M.S. 

Information Systems 

City of Cambridge 

Mary T. Allard, B.S. 

Medical Laboratory Science 

Children's Hospital 



Angeio S. Allegretto, CP.A. 

Accounting 

Carlson Metalcraft Company, Inc. 

Israel Aluf, Ph.D.* 

Modem Language 

Northeastern University 

Patricio L Alves, B.S. 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Katherine Gibbs 

Richard J. AmorosI, D.F.A. 

English 

Cardinal Spellman High School 

Craig A. Andersen, B.S. 

American Sign Languxige 

Northeastern University 

Paul 6. Anderson, Bi.* 

Art 

Artist 

R. Wayne Anderson, Ph.D.* 

History 

Northeastern University 

Roe Andre, Ph.D. 

Human Resources Management 

Northeastern University 

Linda A. Andros, J.D. 

Real Estate 

Massachusetts Attorney General's 

Office 

Joseph F. Angeramo, Esq. LLB.* 

Finance 

Retired 

Robert B. Angus, M.S.* 

Mathematics 

Angus Associates 

Mary F. Annas, M.A.T. 

Alternative Freshman/English 

Stanley S. Antoniotti, M.A.* 

Economics 

Bridgewater State College 

Robert F. Anzenberger, B.S.* 

Human Resources Management 

Robert J. Anzenberger, MJL 

Human Resources Management 

Zayre Corp. 

Carol V. Apt, BJL 

Alternative Freshman/Sociology 

Alia A. Arasoughly, B.S. 

Art 

Joon L Arches, Mi.* 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Regis College 

Joseph T. Arcidiacono, Bi.* 

Information Systems 

Digital Equipment Corp. 



Edward A. Arees, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Northeastern University 

Arnold B. Ariuke, Ph.D.* 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

John C Amiington, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Northeastern Uruversity 

Stephen F. Armstrong, Sr., M.BJL* 

Purchasing 

Varian Associates 

Jane Aroian, Ed.D. 

Nursing 

Northeastern University 

Gilbert N. Aronson, M.Ed. 

Technical Com,munication 

Codex Corporation 

Steven A. Aronson, Bi. 

Information Systems 

The Gillette Company 

Judy A. Arraj, Ph.D. 

Biology 

Enunanual College 

Roger Atherton, D.BJL 

Management 

Meredith 0. Atkinson, MJL 

English 

Chris Attaya, M.B.A. 

Health Management 

Home Care Group, North Shore 

David J. P. Aurelio, H.S.D. 

Radiologic Technology 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Soul H. Auslonder, M.BJ^. 

Finance 

Bridgewater State College 

Alice D. Avakian, Mi. 

Biology 

Emerson College 

Joson M. Avergun, M.BJL* 

Marketing 

York International Corp. 

Warren F. Averill, M.S.* 

Chemistry 

Hanna Instruments, Inc. 

Ralph R. Avery, Mi. 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Northeastern University 

Paula L Aymer, MJL 

Alternative Freshman/ 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

Kenneth P. Ayoob, MJL 

Music 

Northeastern University 



'Denotes senior lecturer as of October 1987. 



222 Appendix 



Virginia Ayoob, MJL 

Music 

David R. Ayotte, NLPh. 

Medical Laboratory Science 

Dovid L. Bochroch, Ed.D.* 

Psychology 

Boston VA Medical Center 

Philip N. Backstrom, PI1.D. 

History 

Northeastern University 

Zeynep Bagana, MJL 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

Benjamin Bahon, M.Ed. 

American Sign Language 

Deborah J. Baiano, MJL 

Alternative Freshman/ Sociology 

Anthony J. Bojdek, MJL* 

History 

Northeastern University 

Avo Baker, M.BJ^. 

Management 

Northeastern University 

Edward A. Boker, Jr^ M.BJL 

Finance 

BarJc of New England 

Edward F. Baker, NLS. 

Mathematics 

Westwood High School 

Errol H. Baker, Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Boston VA Medical Center 

Sara K. Boker, A.B. 

Art 

Romoiya Bolochondra, D.BJL 

Management 
Peter S. Boletso, M.S.* 

Biology 

Lynn Public School System 

George B. Boliester, WUL 

Information Systems 

Fidelity Investments 

Kenneth W. Bollou, MJL 

Management 

WeUesley Motor Coach Company 

Virginia A. Bollou-Hunt, BJL 

English 

Self-employed 

David M. Banosh, J.D.* 

Business Law 

Self-employed 

Louis L Bonderet, Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

U.S. Army Research Institute 

Brendan Bannister, D.BJL 

Human Resources Management 

Northeastern University 



John J. Boronofsky, M.S.* 

Management 

Raytheon Company 

Antonio Borbogallo, MJL 

Modem Language 

Salem High School 

Ema Barker, MJL 

Modem Languages 

Northeastern University 

David R. Barkmeier, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Northeastern University 

Raymond S. Bamstone, M.B.A.* 

Finance 

Codex Corp. 

Boiirara R. Barry, Ph.D. 

Mu^ic 

New England Conservatory of Music 

Scott P. Bartis, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Lighthouse School 

Bernard N. Bosch, M.BJL* 

Information Systems 

F. W. Faxon Co., Inc. 

Norman D. Bates, J.D.* 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Northeastern University 

William W. Bouser, MJL 

Philosophy/Religion 

Anthony Beodle, BJL 

Mu^ic 

Marcus A. Beorse, Jr., Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Northeastern University 

Paul Beoulieu, Jr., A.S. 

Radiologic Technology 

Advanced NMR Systems, Inc. 

Goil M. Becker, A.S. 

Health Record Administration 

Boston University Medical Center 

Nancy V. Becker, M.Ed.* 

American Sign Language 

Northeastern University 

Robert Beckett, M.S. 

Management Sciences 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Judith L Bedford, MJL 

Music 

Judith A. Bednotz, Mi. 

Technical Communication 

Lifeline Systems 

Stanley A. Beecoff, M.B.A.* 

Management 

Cole Hersee Co. 

Roger Beer, M.S. 

Information Systems 

Digital Equipment Corp. 



Caroline H. Beeti, M.A. 

Economics 

Northeastern Uruversity 

Richard L Belonger, B.S.* 

Management 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Cynthia H. Beihumeur, B.S. 

Therapeutic Recreation 

Athlete's Comer 

Russell Beliveou, M.BJL 

Information Systems 

Self-employed 

Robert L Bell, MJL 

Art 

Trendlines, Inc. 

Diane M. Bellavance, M.BJL 

Marketing 

D. Bellavance, Agency 

Ralph C Belmonte, Ed.D.* 

Speech Communication 

Revere Public Schools 

Barbora A. Beltrand, M.A. 

Accounting 

Lasell Junior College 

John Bona, J.D. 

Real Estate 

Racach Aronson Shuman 

Patricia Bench, B.S. 

Alternative Freshman/Mathematics 

Richard F. Benedetto, MJL* 

Alternative Freshman/Management 

Merrimack College 

Paulo Bennett, Ph.D.* 

English 

Maria F. Benotti, M.A. 

Music 

New England Conservatory 

Extension 

Marcio A. Bergman, M.Ed. 

Alternative Freshman/Language 

Skills 

Benjamin A. Bermon, BJL 

Transportation 

Bei\jamin A. Berman Assoc. 

Samuel J. Bernstein, Ph.D.* 

English 

Northeastern University 

James A. Beny, M.S. 

Accounting 

Johnson & Johnson 

Brvno A. Berszoner, M.A. 

Economics 

Northeastern University 

Said Bhyer, M.Ed. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 



Faculty 223 



Henry Wl J. Biagi, MJL 

Hotel & Restaurant Management 

City of Somerville 

Daniel B. Bibel, Ph.D. 

Criminal Jtbstice and Security 

Massachusettes Commission on 

Criminal Justice 

Jane H. Bick, Ph.D. 

Speech Communication 

Northeastern University 

Maryann 6. Billington, M.B.A. 

Marketing 

Northeastern University 

Peter J. Billington, D.B.A. 

Management 

Deirdre Bird, Ph.D. 

Marketing 

Samuel S. Bishop, M.FJL* 

Art 

Northeastern University 

Susan Bjomer, NILS. 

Library Science 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

Al Block, M.BJL 

Accounting 

Coif Blockmon, B.S.* 

Accounting 

Carl Blackman & Co. 

Chormorie J. Bloisdell, Ph.D.* 

History 

Northeastern University 

Robert J. Blonch, Ph.D.* 

English 

Northeastern University 

Dennis Bionchord, MLBJL 

Information Systems 

Hills Department Stores 

Theodore Blank, Ed.D.* 

Health Science 

Massachusetts Department of 

Public Health 

Carolyn L Biitch, WUL* 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

Kathleen Bobick, B.S. 

Therapeutic Recreation 

Phillip L Bodrock, Ph.D. 

English 

Paul J. Bolster, Ph.D. 

Finance 

Northeastern University 

Laurie L Boris, BJL 

Art 

Vincent C Borman, M.BiL* 

TVansportation 

Raytheon Company 



Lorraine M. Bossi, AILS. 

Nursing 

ChaHes R. Botticelli, Ph.D. 

Biology 

GTE Laboratories 

Guy E. Bottiglio, M.S. 

Information Systems 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

James V. Botto, Bi. 

Speech Communication 

MA Computer Associations, Inc. 

Mark S. Bourbeau, J.D. 

Real Estate 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Almo Boumazian, BJL 

American Sign Language 

Massachusetts Commission for 

the Deaf 

Andre J. Bourque, B.S. 

Chemistry 

Northeastern University 

Theodore R. Bousquet, B.S.* 

Information Systems 

Honeywell Bull 

Patricia A. Bowen, MJL 

Speech Communication 

John F. Bowes, Jr., NLBJL* 

Information Systems 

MBTA 

George S. Bowling, Ed.D.* 

Human Resources Management 

Massachusetts Regan Commission 

Richard W. Boyden, B.S. 

Information Systems 

Millbrook Distributors, Inc. 

Charles M. Boyer, NLA. 

Alternative Freshman/English 

Alan Brodshaw, M.S.* 

Mathematics 

Sun Financial Group 

Thomas P. Brady, Jr., M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

Rowe & Brady 

Russell S. Braese, BS. 

Real Estate 

NYNEX Properties Corp. 

Eugene G. Branca, fVLS.* 

Mathematics 

Barbara Breen, CPJL 

Accounting 

Peatmarwick Mitchell 

Carlo Bregman, Esq., J.D. 

Business Law 

Marc Bremer, M.BJ^. 

Finance 

Northeastern University 



David L Brett, M.S. 

Information Systems 

Reading Memorial High School 

Caroline B. Bridgeman-Rees, M.A. 

History 

International Institute 

Edward J. Brigman, M.A.* 

Economics 

Barbara K. Britt, B.A. 

Human Resources Management 

Britt Associates, Inc. 

Milton L. BriHon, MJL 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Office of Probation 

George M. Brooker, M.B.A.* 

Economics 

Dean Junior College 

Miriam G. Broob, M.A. 

Art 

Scudder Stevens & Clark 

William K. Brotchie, M.S. 

Chemistry 

Belmont High School 

James Brough, H.S.D. 

English 

Self-employed 

Fern M. Brown, M.Ed. 

English 

Angela Browne, Ph.D. 

Criminal Justice and Security 

ChaHes K. Brownlee, J.D. 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Massachusetts Trial Court Division 

Ann S. Broyer, BJ^. 

Women's Career Program 

N. S. Stone, Inc. 

Gordon L. Bramm, Ph.D.* 

Philosophy/Religion 

Richard P. Bucci, M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Self-employed 

Eugene L Bucco, M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Newbury College 

Debra F. Buckley, M.BJL 

Management 

Boston Water & Sewer 

Commission 

Leo F. Buckley, Jr., M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Wang Laboratories 

Michael L. Buckley, M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Anthony A. Buglio, M.S.* 

Speech Communication 



224 Appendix 



Kenneth R. Bujo, B.S. 

TVansportation 

Transportation Consultant 

Bruce Bunten, B.S.* 

Human Resources Management 

Human Resource Services 

Paul Burgoyne, B.S. 

Real Estate 

Curran Associates 

Maiy P. Burke, Ph.D. 

History 

Northeastern University 

Robert K. Burke, M.BJL 

Information Systems 

Century Mortgage Co., Inc. 

Kothy S. Burleson, B.FJL 

Art 

Emerson Lane Fortuna 

Alfred C Burmeister, M.BJL* 

Information Systems 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

Abigail Bums, J.D. 

Real Estate 

Casey and Dennis 

Pomoja Burrell, Esq., J.D. 

Real Estate 

Budd WUey & Richlin 

Gerald L Bursey, Ph.D. 

Political Science 

Harvey Burstein, Esq., J.D. 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Data General 

Charies F. Burt, M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

H. J. Stabile & Son, Inc. 

Karen Bunard, Ph.D. 

Speech Communication 

Ronald J. Byrnes, M.BJL* 

Management Sciences 

CUBA Coming Diagnostics 

Robert T. Cadigan, Ph.D. 

Health Management 

Department of Public Health 

Janice L Cagan-Teuber, NLEd. 

American Sign Language 

Suson M. Coldarella, WIA. 

Psychology 

Northeastern University 

Bridget K. Callahan, MJL 

Alternative Freshman/English 

Joanne M. Callum, JO. 

Speech Communication 

The Right Gift 

William A. Colore, B.S. 

Hotel & Restaurant Management 

Rindge Latin School 



Charies Calusdion, M.B.A.* 

Industrial Management 

Raytheon Company 

David S. CalveHey, Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Frank R. Campognoni, Ph.D. 

Information Systems 

Northeastern University 

Bollard C Campbell, Ph.D. 

History 

Northeastern University 

Susan C Campbell, NLEd. 

English 

Mosaic Software 

James A. Conino, M.A. 

Sociology/ Anthropology 

Northern Essex Community College 

Janonne S. Cannon, M.BJ^. 

Marketing 

Edgar T. Canty, Mi.* 

Mathematics 

Bridgewater State College 

Brian R. Coputo, M.BJL* 

Management Sciences 

Raytheon Company 

Donald A. Corbone, M.Ed. 

Accounting 

Greater Boston Regional Education 

Center 

Mary T. Coriione, B.A. 

English 

Massachusetts Bay Community 

College 

Anthony M. Carilli, M.A. 

Economics 

Olga F. CaritO; Mi. 

Mathematics 

ChoHes J. Corr, M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

The New Can Co., Inc. 

Janet H. Corr, MA. 

English 

Northeastern University 

Joanne Corr, M.S. 

Earth Science 

Rural Housing Improvements 

William F. Corr, LLB.* 

Business Law 

Puopolo & Carr, P.C. 

J. Christopher Carroll, M.S. 

Journalism 

William S. Carroll, Esq., J.D.* 

Health Management 

Brigham and Women's Hospital 

Norman J. Cortmill, M.B.A.* 

Management 

Camor Incorporated 



Michelle Casorio, M.A. 

Economics 

Northeastern University 

Patricio M. Casey, M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Brandeis University 

Robert W. Casey, M.Ed. 

Speech Communication 

Burlington High School 

Margaret P. Casper, Ph.D.* 

Mathematics 

King Philip Regional Schools 

Christopher L Cass, MJL 

Sociology! Anthropology 

Badger Engineers, Inc. 

Edward C Cass, Ph.D. 

History 

Northeast Consultants 

Sharron G. Cassavant, Ph.D. 

English 

Simmons College 

Christopher J. Cassidy, M.S.* 

Information Systems 

Northeastern University 

Paul D. Coyer, M.BJL 

Finance 

Building #19, Inc. 

Anthony M. Celoto, M.Ed. 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Somerville Public School System 

Linda A. Champa, MJL 

English 

Burdett School 

Terry H. Chapman, Ph.D. 

Women's Career Program 

Chapman Associates 

Sylvia P. Charshoodion, MJL 

English 

Linda K. Cheatham, B.S. 

Chemistry 

Northeastern University 

Michael D. Chefitz, J.D. 

Business Law 

Johnson Schwartzman 

Kenneth Cheraock, M.BX 

Information Systems 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

Joseph W. Chevoriey, Jr., D.BJL 

Management 

Catherine Chiang, M.A. 

Alternative Freshman/Economics 

Northeastern University 

Anthony Chieffalo, M.D. 

Health Science 

Boston VA Medical Center 



Faculty 225 



Linda Chinsen, B.S. 

Radiologic Technology 

New England Deaconess Hospital 

John T. Chirban, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Harvard University and Hellenic 

College 

Catherine A. Chokola, M.F.A. 

Art 

Curtis C Chui, NLD. 

Health Science 

Regional Health Center, Wihnington 

Henry 0. Chukwuezi, Ph.D. 

Health Management 

Chuzi Corporation 

Warren W. Church, M.S. 

Radiologic Technology 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration 

Anthony Cicerone, M.A.* 

Economics 

Bridgewater State College 

David L Clapp, MlEd. 

Biology 

Massachusetts Audubon Society 

Albert F. Clark, Jr., M.BJL 

Finance 

Continental FI Resources 

Claudia A. Clark, BJL 

Mathematics 

Digital Measurement Systems 

Philip Clark, Esq., J.D. 

Real Estate 

Flynn Realty, Inc. 

Geoffrey Clarkson, D.BJL 

Management 

Fred W. Oarridge, Jr., Mi.* ^ 

Earth Science 

Wellesley Public Schools 

James A. Clattenburg, A.B. 

Art 

Ingalls, Quinn, and Johnson 

Howard S. dayman, BJL 

Information Systems 

Dynamics Research Corp. 

Richard W. Clayton, Jr., M.Ed. 

English 

Dover Regional High School 

Hermine M. Cleary, B.S. 

Alternative Freshman/Lanagua^e 

Skills 

Paul F. Cleary, NLA. 

Economics 

Occupational Analysis 

Paul Clemente, Jr., M.S. 

Accounting 

Boston University 



Jennifer L. Clifford, MJL 

Economics 

Patricia A. Cloonan, M.S. 

Nursing 

Northeastern University 

William M. Cloran, J.D.* 

Criminal Justice and Security 

DiCara, Selig, and Holt 

Langdon D. Clough, MX 

Earth Science 

Barbara A. Coorr, B.S. 

Medical Laboratory Science 

Shariene V. Cochrane, Ph.D. 

History 

Boston College 

Joseph D. Codispoti, M.S. 

Journalism 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Gerald F. Cody, BJL* 

Marketing 

Dean Witter Reynolds, Inc. 

Mary C Cody, Bi. 

American Sign Language 

Northeastern University 

Cathy Cogen, M.Ed.* 

American Sign Language 

Northeastern University 

William G. Coggan, Ph.D.* 

Human Resources Management 

Massasoit Community College 

Dennis L Cohen, M.S. 

Political Science 

Dorr & Shett Field Research 

Edward H. Cohen, M.S. 

Earth Science 

Edward S. Cohen, M.A.* 

Information Systems 

Hampden Automotive Sales 

Richard A. Cohen, B.S. 

Real Estate 

City of Boston 

Robert F. Cohen, Bi. 

Accounting 

Self-employed 

Robert L Cohen, M.S. 

Information Systems 

Sharon M. Cohen, M.S.M.L 

Health Record Administration 

Trans-Med 

Jaimee W. Colbert, M.A. 

English 

Janis I. Cole, B.S. 

American Sign Language 

Massachusetts State Association for 

the Deaf 



Annolee Collins, R.R.A., B.S.* 

Health Record Administration 
Northeastern University 
Eleanor J. Collins, B.A. 

Alternative Freshman/Mathematics 

Richard J. Comings, MJL* 

Business Management 

Northeastern University 

Clinton H. Condon, M.BJL 

Real Estate 

John J. Condon, Jr., M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

Avco Systems Division 

Paul C Condon, M.B.A. 

Marketing 

Xyplex Inc. 

Elizabeth M. Congdon, M.A.* 

History 

Peabody School System 

Norman J. Conklin, B.S. 

Information Systems 

Honeywell Information System 

Christine M. Conley, M.F.A. 

Art 

Spencer F. Conley, B.S. 
Journalism 

Spencer F. Conley Associates 

Leonard M. Conlin, Sr., M.Ed.* 

Mathematics 

Framingham North High School 

John F. Connelly, Ph.D. 

Information Systems 

Boston Edison Company 

Thomas F. Connerty, B.A. 

Information Systems 

Prime Computer, Inc. 

Joseph N. Connors, M.P.A.* 

Political Science 

Liberty Security 

Linda W. Conrad, J.D. 

Journalism 

Moquin & Daley 

Louis E. Conrad, M.S. 

Journalism 

Northeastern University 

John Conway, M.A. 

Technical Communication 

Jack Conway Associates 

James Cook, A.B. 

Management 

Lindsay Cook, M.S. 

Accounting 

Liberty Financial Services 

Ellen M. Cooney, M.A. 

English 

Self-employed 



226 Appendix 



Ronald P. Corbett, Jr., M.S. 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Massachusetts Trial Court 

John S. Corcoran, M.S. 

Technical Communication 

Peter V. Corea, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Emerson College 

Dyer Cornell, M.BA* 

Finance 

Bank of Boston 

Richard S. Corrente, M.B.A.* 

Management 

Raytheon Company 

Leon L. Cort, Ph.D. 

Political Science 

Edward V. Cosgrove, Ph.D.* 

Biology 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Wliliom H. Costello, Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Self-employed 

James W. Cottom, MJL* 

History 

Massasoit Community College 

William J. Coughlin, M.A. 

Art 

Blue Hills Regional Technical 

Institute 

Thomas F. Coveney, M.B.A.* 

Information Systems 

Stone & Webster Eng. Corp. 

Carol L. Crane, M.S. 

Women's Career Program 

Self-employed 

Steven Crapser, BJL 

Purchasing 

The Kendall Company 

Bryan D. Craven, B.S. 

Information Systems 

General Electric Company 

Salvatore A. Crisafulli, M.BJL* 

Information Systems 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Department of Public Welfare 

John F. Cronin, Jr., M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

Raytheon Company 

Joseph V. Cronin, Jr., J.D.* 

Business Law 

Massachusetts Trial Court 

Joseph W. Cronin, B.S.* 

Management Sciences 

Sanders Associates 

Hugh J. Crossland, LLM.* 

Accounting 

Weston Financial Group 



Bernard Crowley, M.BJV. 

Finance 

Putnam Investment 

Brian C Crowley, M.BJI.* 

Accounting 

Signatron, Inc. 

Mark D. Crowley, M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Autex Systems, Inc. 

Edmund Cuoco, B.A. 

Technical Communication 

Lexicon, Inc. 

Helen M. Curiey, M.A.* 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Victor A. Curran, B.A. 

Art 

D.C. Heath 

Joan Curtice, NLA. 

Human Resources Management 

Micrion Corporation 

Robert S. Curtin, Ed.D. 

History 

Northeastern University 

John J. Curtis, M.A. 

Music 

Emerson College and Northeastern 

University 

Madelyn A. Curtis, MJL 

Music 

Northeastern University 

Roseann Cutroni, M.S. 

Health Science 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Albert C D'Amato, M.Ed.* 

English 

Northeastern University 

Miriam F. D'Amato, MJL* 

English 

Professional Editorial Services 

Ralph A. D'Amelio, B.S. 

Information Systems 

Wang Laboratories 

Patricia Dacey, NLEd. 

Women's Career Program 

YWCA 

Maria N. DaCosta, Ph.D. 

Econom.ics 

Northeastern University 

Robert L Doidone, J.D. 

Business Law 

Ricklets, Uehlein & Son 

Carol A. Dalto, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

John Hancock 

Dennis P. Dalton, M.FJL 

Art 



Mario M. Damiano, H.S.D. 

Radiologic Technology 

Brigham & Womens Hospital 

Bonnie S. Dann, B.F.A. 

Art 

Laurie Dart, Esq., J.D. 

Real Estate 

Flynn Realty, Inc. 

Arnold E. Daum, B.S.* 

Marketing 

Arnold E. Daum Co. 

Ann M. Dovey, B.S. 

Real Estate 

Ellen Davey, bq., J.D. 

Real Estate 

Davey & Davey 

Mary Davey, Esq., J.D. 

Real Estate 

Davey & Davey 

Francis L David, M.Ed. 

Industrial Management 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

Gerald L Davis, Ph.D. 

Medical Laboratory Science 

Northeastern University 

Lawrence A. Davis, M.B.A. 

Information Systems 

The Groton Group 

Robert L Davis, M.BJ^. 

Accounting 

R.E. Davis and Assoc. 

Brace A. Dean, J.D.* 

Criminal Justice and Security 

District Attorney, Middlesex County 

Lance M. Dean, M.A. 

Alternative Freshman/English 

Peter U. Decenzo, Bi. 

Mathematics 

Ashland High School 

Peter F. DeCosta, M.S. 

Earth Science 

United States Army 

Joyce Delorey, M.A. 

Alternative Freshman/Mathematics 

Northeastern University 

David A. Deluca, J.D. 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Murphy, Hesse, Toomey, & Lehane 

John B. Deluca, J.D. 

Business Law 

Data General Corporation 

Romine R. Doming, Ph.D.* 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Northeastern University 



Faculty 227 



Aion DelWola, WIA. 

Art 

Northeastern University 

Robert J. Dennehy, M.BJL* 

Accounting 

Robert J. Dennehy, C.PA. 

Paul J. Derby, M.B.A.* 

Information Systems 

Honeywell, Inc. 

Joseph B. DeRoche, M.F.A.* 

English 

Northeastern University 

Stephen R. Derosier, M.B.A. 

Management 

Northeastern University 

Normand J. Des Marois, M.B.A. 

Purchasing 

Honeywell 

Harry G. DeSolvatore, NIS. 

Therapeutic Recreation 

New England Memorial Hospital 

Ernest P. Desimone, J.D. 

Real Estate 

McNamara & Desimone 

Debra Desmorois, A.S. 

Radiologic Technology 

Margaret D. Devaney, M.Ed. 

English 

Braintree High School 

Peter B. Devaney, NLA. 

Reai Estate 

Comm Land Title Ins. 

Richard K. Deveney, M.Ed. 

Mathematics 

Jamaica Plain High School 

James D. Devlin, B.S. 

Marketing 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Robert DeVries, MJl. 

Music 

Self-employed 

Emily Dexter, M.A. 

American Sign Language 

Learning Center 

Brian S. Dextradeur, 6.S.* 

Management Sciences 

Polaroid Corp. 

Jeffery E. Di luglio, NLA. 

English 

Francis J. Di Sabotino, NLA.* 

Chemistry 

Quincy High School 

Augusto Diana, NLA. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 



Norma NL Diandrea-Alfonso, iX 

Radiologic Technology 

University Hospital 

John Diffenboch, D.B.A. 

Information Systems 

Howard T. Dimmick, NLEd.* 

Earth Science 

Town of Stonehsim 

Rosemarie M. Dittmer, NLA.* 

English 

Judith R. Dituri, NLA.* 

English 

James L Doan, Ph.D. 

English 

Chamberlayne Junior College 

Mark Domaszewia, M.S.E.L* 

Mathematics 

Raytheon Company 

Frederick Donahoe, J.D. 
Real Estate 

Donahoe Associates 

Diane NL Donatio, NLS. 
English 

West Suburban Elder Services 

Jane A. Donnelly, NLA. 

Speech Communication 

Rosemory T. Donnelly, Ed.D. 

English 

Eileen M. Donovan, B.A. 

English 

Timothy R. Donovan, Ph.D.* 

English 

Northeastern Uruversity 

Edward NL Dormody, BJL 

Information Systems 

Mast Industries 

Lynn L Domink, NLA. 

Alternative Freshman/English 

James W. Dottin, Jr., NLBJL 

Information Systems 
Prime Computer, Inc. 
Nadine V. Dowiing, M.BA 

Human Resources Management 
Emerson College 

Nancy L Dowiing, NLEd.* 

Alternative Freshman/Language 

Skills 

Northeastern Uruversity 

Mary L Dowse, Ph.D. 

Earth Science 

Rose A. Doyon, NLA.* 

English 

Ronald Draper, M.BX 

Management Sciences 
Gillette 



Joan F. Drexelius, Ph.D.* 

Speech Comm.unication 
Northeastern University 

Claire Driscoll, NLA. 

Alternative Freshman/Mathematics 

James L Driscoll, NLB.A. 

Accounting 

Bank of New England 

John NL Driscoll, NLA. 

Economics 

U.S. Postal Service 

William Driscoll, Ph.D. 

Accounting 

Internal Revenue Service 

Dovid C Dronsick, NLA.* 

Earth Science 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Neil F. Duone, NLS. 

Technical Communication 

Boston Documentation Design 

Edward L Dube, M.BA* 

Management 

ELD Associates 

Catherine Dube-Fortin, Bi. 

Technical Communication 

Self-employed 

Gary L Duehr, NLF.A. 

English 

James Ducey, NLB.A. 

Accounting 

Walter Martinson, C.PA. 

Torrance J. Duggan, NLBJL* 

Finance 

Self-employed 

Daniel T. Dunn, Jr., D.B.A. 

Marketing 

Northeastern University 

Laura W. Dunn, MJL 

English 

Edward A. Duprez, Jr., NLBA* 

Management 

Emmanuel College 

Douglas F. Durant, NLFJL 

Music 

Northeastern University 

Stephen Duricin, Esq., J.D. 

Business Law 

Law Offices of Robert Kams 

Paul J. Duval, NLBJL 

Information Systems 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Bari)ara Dvorchak, NLS. 

Mathematics 
Northeastern University 



228 Appendix 



William C. Dwyer, M.B.A. 

Management 

Sherwood Lumber Corp. 

Cari W. Eastman, MJ^.* 

Speech ConiTnunication 

Northeastern University 

William T. Edgett, MJL* 

Human Resources Management 

Northeastern University 

John C Edmunds, D.BX 

Finance 

Gary A. Edwards, M.B.A. 

Accounting 

U.S. Department of Labor 

Richard K. Edwards, M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

Andrew E. Efstathiou, BJL* 

Information Systems 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Kathryn A. Efstathiou, B.A. 

Information Systems 

Judith R. Ehlen, MJL 

English 

David M. Ehrmann, B.S. 

Speech Communication 

John Hancock Insurance Co. 

Abdelmoujib El-Memissi, NIS. 

Alternative Freshman/ Mathematics 

James H. Elgin, M.B.A.* 

Information Systems 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

Irene A. Elios, H.S.D. 

Art 

Susan J. Engelman, A.S. 

Radiologic Technology 

University Hospital 

Louis J. Ennis, M.BJi.* 

Human Resources Management 

Brandeis University 

Binnur Ercem, MJL 

Alternative 

Freshman/Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

Virginia Eskin, NLA. 

Mu^ic 

Northeastern University 

Herbert J. Eskot, Ph.D.* 

Alternative Freshman/Economics 

James A. Evangelista, B.S. 

Health Science 

Leonard Morse Hospital 

Ugo E. Evangelista, M.S. 

Mathematics 

Revere High School 



Richard P. Evans, B.A. 

Human Resources Management 

Management Collaborative 

Anne C Ewers, MLA. 

Music 

Self-employed 

Robert M. Fahey, M.Ed.* 

Information Systems 

NLxdorf Computer Corp. 

Sheryl L Fairchild, B.S. 

Therapeutic Recreation 

Maiden Hospital 

Eugene F. Fallon, M.BJV.* 

Finance 

GenRad, Inc. 

Thomas J. Fallon, NLB.A. 

Marketing 

Digital Sales Associates 

Edward J. Falvey, M.B.A.* 

Management 

Keystone-Massachusetts Group 

Ellen Falvey, B.S. 

Real Estate 

Ghodratallah Forahoni, NLA. 

Political Science 

Boston University 

Richard J. Faulstich, A.B. 

Human Resource Management 

Raytheon Company 

Joseph R. Favaloro, M.B.A. 

Finance 

Bank of Boston 

Trudi R. Feinstein, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Eileen Feldman, NLA. 

English 

Self-employed 

George G. Ferrar, M.S. 

Art 

Art Institute 

Elizabeth M. Ferrarini, B.S. 

English 

James F. Ferreira, M.B.A. 

Information Systems 

Technical Aid Corp. 

James L Ferrier, NLS. 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Northeastern University 

James J. Ferriter, NLBJL 

Health Management 

Industrial Medical Center 

William A. Ferson, M.A.* 

Economics 

U.S. Department of Labor 

George W. Fiddler III, M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Textron Corp. 



Stephen L Fielding, Ph.D. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

Barbara Ann P. Filo, Ph.D.* 

History 

CSA Financial Corp. 

William D. Finan, Ed.D.* 

Mathematics 

Chories A. Findley, Ph.D.* 

Speech Communication 

Francis X. Finigan, M.Ed.* 

Mathematics 

Winchester Public Schools 

Joseph L Finigan, M.Ed. 

Mathematics 

Kenneth Fmkelstein, Ph.D. 

Earth Science 

National Oceanic and ATM 

Administration 

Albert J. Finney, Jr., B.S.* 

Accounting 

Raytheon Company 

Susan L B. Fintonis, J.D. 

Management 

Endicott College 

Harold R. Fisher, J.D. 

Information Systems 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Marjorie Fisher, B.S. 

Health Record Administration 

Harvard University Health Services 

William H. Fisher, MJL 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Massachusetts Department of Mental 

Health 

James L Fitzgerald, M.A. 

Modem Language 

Leo J. Fitzgerald, M.B.A.* 

Industrial Management 

General Electric Co. 

Kevin T. Fitzpatrick, M.B.A.* 

Finance 

Boston Public Library 

J. Joseph Fitzsimmons, M.BJL* 

Management 

Polaroid Corp. 

Roberta Rtzsimmons, J.D. 

Business Law 

Law Offices of Roberta Fitzsimmons 

James C Flaherty, M.LS. 

Library Science 

Framingham Public Library 

Ruth W. Flaherty, M.BJV. 

Human Resources Management 

Frances B. Fleming, B.FJL 

Art 

Frances Fleming, Graphic Design 



Faculty 229 



William P. Fleming, M.B.A. 

Marketing 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Peggy L Fletcher, M.B.A. 

Finance 

David E. Floreen, M.P.A.* 

Political Science 

Massachusetts Bankers Association 

Leo M. Flynn, M.BJ^.* 

Real Estate 

Leo Flynn, R.E. & Appraising 

Peter E. Flynn, J.D.* 

Real Estate 

Flynn Realty, Inc. 

Thomas J. Flynn, J.D. 

Human Resources Management 

Thomas J. Flynn & Assoc. 

William B. Flynn, Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Philip S. Fogelman, MJ^. 

Alternative Freshman/ English 

Robert L Foley, M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Council for Economic Action, Inc. 

Murray Forbes, M.F.A. 

Art 

Navigator Foundation 

Jacqueline M. Fortier, M.A. 

Psychology 

McLean Hospital 

Armand L. Fortin, B.S. 

Purchasing 

Honeywell, Inc. 

James Foss, Jr., LL.B. 

Human Resources Management 

Federal Mediation and Counseling 

Services 

Gale P. Foster, B.S.* 

Marketing 

Foster & Associates 

William M. Fowler, Ph.D.* 

History 

Northeastern University 

Fox Tree, M.A.T.* 

AH 

University of Massachusetts 

Robert M. Fox, M.BJI.* 

Marketing 

Gerber Electronics 

Laura L. Frader, Ph.D. 

History 

Northeastern University 

Thomas B. Francis, Jr., IW.P.A. 

Human Resources Management 

City of Boston 



Diane Franklin, Ph.D. 

Human Resources Management 

Northeastern University 

Harriet Eraser, M.Ed. 

Alternative Freshman/Language 

Skills 

Howard H. Freedman, M.S.* 

Accounting 

Raytheon Company 

Paula M. French, M.BJ^. 

Management 

Northrup Corporation 

Melvin W. Friedman, M.B.A.* 

Management 

M. W. Friedman Associates 

Kurt M. Frim, M.B.A. 

Management 

General Electric Company 

Ingeborg Fulepp, M.A. 

English 

Robert L Fulford, B.S. 

Purchasing 

Varian/Extrion 

Vincent J. Furlong, M.A. 

Industrial Management 

Defense Supply Agency 

W. Arthur Gagne, Jr., M.B.A.* 

Management 

Edadcon Services Co. 

Nona Gainsforth, B.A. 

Music 

Self-employed 

John M. Gale, M.BA 

Radiologic Technology 

University Hospital 

Ronald M. Galiano, M.Ed. 

American Sign Language 

Northeastern University 

Esther M. Gallagher, D.M.D.* 

Health Science 

Tufts University 

Richard R. Gallagher, B.A. 

Information Systems 

Marshfield High School 

Mory E. Gomerman, B.A. 

Biology 

Northeastern University 

Chun Xin Gao, M.S. 

Chemistry 

Northeastern University 

Adrian R. Gardner, M.S. 

Criminal Justice and Security 

Harvard University 

David A. Gardner, Ph.D. 

Technical Communication 

Lotus 



Donald L Garrant, M.B.A. 

Real Estate 

Wakefield Savings Bank 

Louise H. Garrido, J.D. 

Business Law 

Goodhue, Colt & Steffensen 

Paul C Gay, J.D.* 

Business Law 

Harrison & McGuire 

Jonathan Gbur, M.B.A. 

Transportation 

Northern Transportation, Inc. 

Jonathan Ml Geer, B.S. 

Earth Science 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Department of Environmental 

Management 

Sandra E. Geer, M.Ed.* 

Psychology 

Samuel S. Geller, M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

FSC, Inc. 

Leonne M. George, B.A. 

Art 

Self-employed 

Anne Nl Germain, Ph.D. 

Information Systems 

Self-employed 

Lorine M. Getz, Ph.D. 

Philosophy/Religion 

Boston Theological Institute 

Ara Ghozarians, M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

David M. Ghazil, M.BJL 

Human Resources Management 

Honeywell 

James G. Giammorinaro, M.B.A. 

Finance 

Gillette Company 

Dominic Giarratoni, J.D. 

Real Estate 

U.S. Postal Service 

Peter F. Gibbs, M.BJ^. 

Transportation 

Peter F. Gibbs & Associates 

Adrian T. Gilbert, M.S. 

Biology 

Northeastern University 

Katherine L. Gilbert, BX 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern University 
Robert E. Gilbert, Ph.D. 
Political Science 
Northeastern University 
Mary L Gill, MA 
Health Management 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield 



230 Appendix 



La Rue W. Gilleland, M.A. 

Journalism 

Northeastern University 

Ruth Giileran, M.BJL 

Accounting 

The Gillette Company 

William J. Gillespie, Ph.D. 

Therapeutic Recreation 

Northeastern University 

Louis F. Giorgetti, M.S. 

Medical Laboratory Science 

Milton Medical Lab 

Alon B. Gladstone, B.S.* 

Accounting 

Alan Gladstone, CPA 

Phyllis S. Glick, O.BJL 

Political Science 

James L Glinos, Mid.* 

Human Resources Management 

Glinos Associates 

Shiomo Globerson, D.BJL 

Industrial Management 

Victor B. Godin, D.B.A. 

Information Systems 

Northeastern University 

Robert M. Gogon, Jr., MJL 

English 

Chamberlayne Junior College 

Maureen D. Goggin, M.A. 

English 

Northeastern University 

Meryl Goldberg, M.A. 

Music 

Robert L Goldberg, M.BJL* 

Management 

Daniel Golden, Ph.D. 

English 

Wheaton College 

Kenneth L Golden, M.B.A. 

Information Systems 

Prime Computer, Inc. 

Frederick T. Golder, Esq., LLJN.* 

Human Resources Management 

Self-employed 

Stan Goldman, J.D.* 

Political Science 

Massachusetts Department of Mental 

Health 

Harold M. Goldstein, Ph.D. 

Economics 

Northeastern University 
Howard I. Goldstein, J.D.* 
Business Law 
Self-employed 
M. Alvin Goldstein, A.B.* 
Information Systems 
Consultant 



Robert J. Goldstein, M.A.* 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Susan J. Goldwitz, A.M. 

English 

Northeastern University 

Maria G. Gonzalez-Rivera, B.A. 

Economics 

Robert S. Goodman, M.A. 

Human Resources Management 

Grossmans, Inc. 

Stephen Goodyear, M.A.* 

Modem Language 

Daniel D. Gordon, M.A.* 

Alternative Freshman/Economics 

Salem State College 

Robert L Gore, B.S. 

Radiologic Technology 

Carney Hospital 

Myron S. Goretsky, Esq., J.D. 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

New Hampshire Technical Institute 

S. Peter Gorshel, LL.B. 

Real Estate 

Self-employed 

Mary Jane Gorton, M.Ed.* 

Art 

Babson College 

Leslie C Gosule, B.S.* 

Accounting 

Leslie C. Gosule & Company 

Daniel Z. Gould, M.BJI.* 

Industrial Management 

GTE 

Helen F. Gould, M.S. 

Nursing 

VA Outpatient Clinic 

Frank S. Govern, M.S. 

Health Management 

JCRT Harvard Medical School 

Saeed Gozashti, M.S. 

Chemistry 

Northeastern University 

David F. Grace, CA.G.S.* 

English 

Lasell Junior College 

Daniel A. Grady, M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

Bose Corp. 

William L Grady, M.BJL* 

Industrial Management 

Grady & Associates 

Robert T. Granfleld, M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Northeastern University 

Daniel J. Grant, Jr., MJL 

Art 

Avco Systems 



William H. Grass, M.A. 

Music 

Boston Conservatory of Music and 

Boston University 

Joan Grasso, A.S. 

Radiologic Technology 

Lahey Clinic 

Leon S. Graubard, MJL* 

Economics 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Albert E. Gravelle, M.P.A. 

Transportation 

Mass Bay Transportation Authority 

Alec Grey, J.D. 

Real Estate 

Arthur M. Graziano, B.S. 

Human Resources Management 

Sweet Life Retail 

Lewis Greenberg, MJL 

Psychology 

Northeastern University 

Claire M. Greene, M.BJL 

English 

Northeastern University 

John T. Gregg, B.A.* 

Real Estate 

Beal & Company 

Kristo A. Gregory, M.B.A.* 

Finance 

Prudential Bache Securities 

Ann M. Grennell, MJL 

Alternative Freshman/History 

Boston College 

Ralph Grieco, M.BJL 

Accounting 

Northeastern University 

Gerald R. Griffin, Ph.D.* 

English 

Northeastern University 

Julia A. Griffin, Ph.D. 

Music 

Northeastern University 

John L Griffith, B.S.* 

Management 

State Department of Environmental 

Management 

Randall P. Grometstein, J.D. 

Business Law 

Donna P. Grosjean, B.S. 

Biology 

Brigham & Womens Hospital 

John J. Guarino, Mi. 

Biology 

Northeastern University 

Cherif Guenoune, MJL 

Alternative 

Freshman/Sociology/Anthropology 



Faculty 231 



Ronald E. Guittarr, 6.S.* 

Human Resources Management 

Raytheon Company 

Bony C Guthroy, Esq., J.D. 

Business Law 

Conunonwealth of Massachusetts 

Securities Division 

Herbert R. Haber, NLA. 

English 

Compugraphic Corporation 

Reginald W. Hache, M.A.* 

Music 

Northeastern University 

Kotherine K. Hacker, M.BJL 

Management 
Sheraton Corporation 
James Haddad, B.S. 
Mathematics 
Quincy Junior College 
Joanna Hadjicostandi, Ph.D. 
Sociology I Anthropology 
Northeastern University 
William T. Hadley, B.S.* 
Marketing 

The Hadley Company, Inc. 
Vivian M. Haggis, NLS. 
Information Systems 
Haggis Consulting 
George W. Hahn, MJLT. 
Earth Science 

New England Marine Educational 

Services. 

Gary J. Hajduk, M.B.A. 

Finance 

Designpak Inc. 

Kenneth W. Hale, M.BJI. 

Accounting 

Ernst & Whinney 

John P. Haley, CA.G.S. 

Information Systems 

City of Revere 

Joy A. Halfond, M.BJL 

Management 

Barry D. Hall, B.S. 

Radiologic Technology 

Beth Israel Hospital 

James F. Hall, M.A.* 

Chemistry 

Northeastern University 

Paul M. Holloran, B.S.* 

Information Systems 

Raytheon Company 

Michael C Halpem, B.S. 

Information Systems 
Digital Equipment Corp. 



Pomelo A. Halpem, M.S. 

Information Systems 

Comp All Systems, Inc. 

Isodore Halzel, M.