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PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


For The New ThiAkers; 
Hope Lies In The Mind 


A irt'slviiiaii, aitendino the I'lii- 
Aersitv lor ilu' first time, iiiav be 
short (Ml poise, setiirity. money 
:in(\ a dozen other thinos. But the 
l'ni\ersitv makes sure there is no 
shorta|!^e()l one thing — advite. 

So. in line with past e<ht(nials 
to the Ireshinen. herewith is oin 
advice: 

Don I he aha>id to he dillerent. 

There are (ertain limits to what 
vou rati wear, say and do while 
v(»u aie at the I'niversitv. bin 
there is no boundary on \our 
mind. 

A treshmairs. mind shordd be 
rr<.e. atid it should be kept tree. 
11 it loses iLs frt^dom. the I'ni- 
versitv will ora<h»ate in h)ur yea-rs 
a t lass «>f innelfectnal simpletons, 
readv and willinij to lollow Axhen- 
e^er anvone else beckons. 

Bin how. viui will ask, (ould a 
freshman s mind be auythin;^ but 
Ireer How lould he be an\thin!J 
but dillerent? 

We tan oidv airswer that we 
have seen treshmen <<)jne to this 
I'lUNersitv with free minds. We 
h \e seen them lose theii freedom 
of thou'^lu. iheit freedom to think 
differeiHU. 

This pret ious freedom (an be 
l«)>t in manv ways. Perhaps the 
e;tsiesi was is through fear. 

It is easier. h)r instan<e. to ag- 
ree with the other fellow simply 
betause vou lear he will dislike 
you if \nu disagree. It is easier not 
to argue with the professoi when 
you disagree f)e(a'use vou are scar- 
ed of him. 

It is nuuh easier to become an 
academii sheep, to follow blindlv. 
bleating througii four years of col- 
legfe. But the freslimftn who be- 
comes a sfieep has turned into a 

coward. 

* * *■ 

There is .i ureat conformity of 
thinking on ili.: campuses of the 
United States tiula'y. No one kno%vs 
exactlv whv. l>ut it is evident to 
everyone who looks even half- 
closely. 

The rniver<uy of North Caro- 
lina, its historians recall, used to 
be a center ol liber.tl rliongfit. .At 
one time v.'m v ve almost ^ lange 
if yo. ' I . tinuk liberally. 

'It i> (inferent now. While the 
,towii aiid the University remain 
the citadel of liberal thought for 
this St. :e. the strange people no 
lonofer are the' (onser\aii\e think- 
ei^s— thev are the lif)erals. 


J he increasing pressme of state 
politics has been blamed lot this 
phenomenon. A (owardly geneia- 
tion of (ollege student^ has also 
been blamed. 

Wherever the blame lies, this 
fa< t lemains: 

I* It of the hope— pret iselv one- 
louiili of the hope — for the pres- 
er\ation ol the freedoju of man's 
n)ind in the United States lies in 
the groups of fteslnnen who are 
gathering this week in cam|)usis 
aioiuid the touiniy. 

If those freshmen keep their 
mituls open, if thev lefuse lo be- 
come aiadeinii sheep and cowaicls. 
if they \vill stantl up and speak 
their lujnest t(»n\ictions !)eh)re ev- 
ervone else (whethei or not they 
be popidar t onvit tioirs) then they 
Avill lia\e struck ;v haid blow 
against the conformitv of mind 
that is { reeping a( ross the toun- 
tiy. 

We (ould ask nothing mote (»l 
tltis fieshman class. 

And Coeds: 
Our Arms ^ 
Are Open 

.\nd heres some ad\ ice l<»r the 
new Uaroline ('<»eds: 

If e\ei there was a plate lor fe- 
males to get interested in extra- 
cmTitiilais. this is it. 

The woma'u's pl.u e on this cam- 
pus is not in ^lie lounges of the 
coed dorms; nor is it in the soi- 
oritv house kitchens. It is e\erv- 
wheie. 

In prattitallv e\eiv tampus oig- 
ani/ation (with the exception ol 
the athletic teams') the <<>eds are 
invited to join. wt)rk and dirett. 
That intludes everything fioin 
student govenniient organi/ations 
and The Daily Tar Heel to < hurt h 
groups and the Cardboard. 

, Coeds who work in campus org- 
anizations receive an everlastjing 
feeling of self-satisfaction. Tliey 
a'o tan show to their Carolina 
Gentleman friends that, the wo- 
man's plate is not neces-sarily ,in 
the home. 

And. in case you ha\en*t thought 
of it yet, it's a dandy way to make 
friends among the male pipula- 
tion. 


One Legend Isn't True 


1 heie are many legends about 
Cljapel Hill. S«)me of them aie 
true. But the one about the toun- 
try t lul) is false. 

For yeais now. j>eople around 
the state have been referring to 
the Universitv as the "(kjuntry 
Club in the 1 ar Heel education- 
al system. 

If yt)u dt)n't know already, you 
will find out in a couple of weks: 
Carolina isn't a country c\uh. 

The studeius who think it's a 
plersure resoit, a place to escape 
the draft for foin years either (i) 
Discover it is a place of serious 
study, and c hange their haf>its ac- 
cordingly, or (2) Fail out cjf school 
and get drafted. 

The studeins" who stay are us* 
ually the ernes who have found the 
correct mixture of studies and ex- 
trrrinriculars. 

They blend the two together, 
and get something gtHxi out of 


The Daily Tar Heel 

Til*' official student publication of tlie 
Publications Board of the University of 
North Carolina, where? it is published 
daily except Sunday. Monday and exam- 
ination and vacation periods and sum- 
mer terms. Entered as second class mat- 
ter in the post office in Chapel Hill, 
N. C, under the Act of March 8, 1870. 
Subscription rates: mailed. $4 per year, 
$2.50 a semester; delivered. $6 a year, 
$3.30 a semester. 


Editor 


FRED POWLEDGE 


Managing Editor CHARLIE JOHNSON 
News Editor RAY LINKER 


Business Manager 


BILL BOB PEEL 


Fieshman Issue Staff: Fred Powledge, 
editor; Charlie Johnson, managing edi- 
tor; Larry Cheek, sports editor. Bill 
Bob Peel, business manager, and staff 
writers Clarke Jones, Charlie Sloan, 
Ray Linker, Frank Crowther and Bili 
Barnes. 


iheii h)ur years here. 

These are the well-adjusted peo- 
|)le. the people the country-club- 
bers enw. 

And it has been foinid that the 
bctter-adjustetl people in later 
life are those who carefully l)lend 
their social and iiucllectual lives. 
The wise freshman will do well tcj 
apply the same rule here. 

No Beanies 
This Side 
Of Durham 

As a' biand-new fieshman, you 
probably have started to feel a lit- 
tle bad abt)ut one thing: 

Only three nioinhs ago you 
were on the top of the heaj). ^'c)lt 
were seniors, and you haci the te- 
spet t of all the freshmen, soplio- 
moies and juniois. Hut now vcui 
ate back on the l)otiom. 

Well, heie's some consolation: 

While you're at Carolina, you 
probably won't be asked mote 
than a do/en times what class you 
aie in. Votr won't wear a l>eanie. 
(Freshmen at the other univers- 
ity. <»\er in DcHik territory, we 
hear, are distinguished by their 
beaines. When they grow older, 
they aie distinguished !)v their ait 
of siiperiority.) 

Mt)st people here— even lots of 
thitcl-year coed.' — really don't 
tare what class youie in. They 
caic about what sort of person vou 
aie. 

So thete's reallv no need to 
wtirrv about In-ing a freshman: It's 
a nice <Kctipatioti foi a' year. 

But make sure it doesn't last 
longer than a year. 


DR. FRANK REMEMBERS HIS UNIVERSITY TOWN 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1956 


^• 


This Is Center 


Chapel Hill: A Chapel For Spirit, Of Free Thought 
A Hill For Increasing The Vision r 


Dr. Frank Graham 

{Dr. Frank Porter Graham, 
mho is better known around 
here as 'Dr. Frank," ha^ done 
an much as any person of OTiy 
generaiion to mold ihc sluife 
of the University's present . 
and fntnire. A former presi- 
dent of the University, he is 
noic contributing his energies 
to creation of East-Wesi un- 
derstanding in the United Na- 
tions. Here, he remembers 
Cfuipel Hill.) 

Chapel Hill, in the mid.st ul 
primeval forests, hills and 
streams, as the beautiful seat c>l' 
the original University ol the peo- 
ple and as the lovely village home 
of a friendly folk, is rich in b(>th 
its historic heritage and its hu- 
niare hopes. 

The strategic little University 
village has been for more than a 
century and three scon; years the 
symbol of struggles, advances, 
Irustrations and strugs*ks again. 
The words denote a Chapel for 
deepening thi> spirit of youth and 
a Hill for heightening the vision 
of the people. 

The class rooms 'and playing 
fields, the historic buildings from 
other centuries, the moss-coVL"r?d 
rock walls, the ancient oaks, tho 
memorial bell tower and Cupolas, 
the monumental laboratories, hoi - 
barium arboretum, planetarium, 
institutes, graduate and profes- 
sional schools. Memorial Hospital. 
E.xter.sion Division and Commuiu- 
caction Center, discussion fo^uiis. 
music hall, theatre and ait gal 
leries, dormitories and fraternity 
houses, village homes, flower gar- 
dens, streets and a store, campus 
walks vivid with students on th;' 
way to classes and gatherin;^ plac 
es for zestful vnuthful talk before 
and after the hour, the bells ring- 
ing early in the morning and 
youth sin^inK in the evening, the 
alumni returning for the nncnv- 
al of associations and fealties t>> 
alma mater beyond price in the 
brotherhood of the University, 
past, present and yet to be — all 
these are a part of the onnota- 
tions of the life and spirit of Car- 
olina. 

Inherent in thi- place are the 
liberty and learning of the self- 
governing community of teachers 
and scholars, the tested wisdom 
of the ages and the venturesome 
idealism of youth in the campus 
democracy. 

On-going with old and recur- 
ring problems for fresh and zest- 
ful ma.stery, student self-govern- 
ment develops the self-discipline 
of defeat, without bitterness. an:l 
of victory, without vain glory, in 
the common duties and civic 
sen.se of the general life, on the 
way from the campus t() the com- 
monwealth, as old as the Univers- 
ity and a.s fresh as the hopes of 
youth. 
SHADEFUL TREES 

Under its shadeful trees, with- 
in its ivy-clad halls, and, under 
its steepled towers, religion, with- 
out cant, would undergrid, and 
learning, without bias, would en- 
lighten young men and women in 
their quest for truth, goodness 
and beauty. 

It is in the tradition and hope 
of the college that youth win 
freedom without license, find and 
publish facts without fear, organ- 
ize knowledge logically, interpret 
the truth clearly without slanting, 
develop democracy without vul- 
garity, active excellence without 
pride, strengthen lasting friend- 
ships and high loyalties above all 
vicissitudes, serve private and 
public causes without patronage 
or bending, become leaders of the 
people without demagoguery, and 
grow in reverence in the way and 
spirit of Him who, under the Va- 
tberhood of (Jed, would have us 
all become more truly the chil- 



dren of one God and the broth- 

eys of all people. 

-I NOW RBCALI ' 

AJove many scenes, faces and 
events which nGi\^ \ome to mind 
. . . I Aow recall an episode which 
expresses the sense of the one- 
ness of the I'niversity commun- 
ity and still shines through the 
shadows of a dark time. 

The Great Depression had 
brought in its train foreclosed 
farms, bankrupt enterprises, clos- 
ed banks, the mounting state de- 
ficits, increasing legions of unem- 
ployed, desperate and almost de- 
feated men and women. 

Moth(>rs and fathers all over 


in the lowest brackets and to ab- 
sorb the difference in the larger 
cuts to be made in the highest 
brackets. 

This policy had not yet been 
announced ai^d was then unknown 
to the janitors. We were thus pre- 
pared to tell this to the janitors 
fir whatever little value it might 
have in their hard-pressed situa* 
tion. 

The meeting opened with the 
regular procedures and character- 
istic dignity of the association. 
A cho.sen spokesman was recog- 
nized to state the case for the j 
janitors. i 

He spoke not a word about; 


moving part in helping to raise 
in alumni meetings and other con- 
ferences approximately $150,000 
in cash for the Student Loan Fund 
at the bottom of the depression. 
The students borrowed from the 
Loan Fi.nd and paid the Univers- 
ity. 

The Ifniversity, stricken by the 
heavy cuts and blows, came 
through to better days. The jani- 
tors revealed the living Biblical 
truth that those with the least in 
income can give the most in spir- 
it. They made deep and personal 
the fac. that we are members of 
one University family. 

In the fellowship of learning 



THE ETERNAL CHAPEL HILL 

a pUue of hearts tiud saids aiid mntds 


ihe land communicated their anx- 
ieties to the children of the De- 
pression. The State of North Car- 
olina made heavy cuts in the state 
budgets and horizontal slashes in 
the low salaries and wages of tho 
staffs of all state institutions. 

In the mid.st of emergency pres- 
sures an invitation came from the 
.Janitors" Assn. requesting the 
I'niversity president to attend 
tlieir appointed mtH'ting. He glad- 
ly went and expected to hear 
a justifiable petition that the jan- 
itors, if po.ssible, should not be 
cut the full amount of the hori- 
zontal cut. 

A decision had been made, with 
the advice and approval of the 
faculty's own elected advis ny 
committee, to make the cut less 


their own difficult situation. The 
ci.ncern spoken eloquently by him 
and (>thers was only for the plij^'iht 
of the students caught short of 
fur. (Is by the closing of all banks. 

They had heard that the Stu- 
dent Loan Fund was running put 
and that the students were un- 
able to pay the University imd 
other creditors. Therefore, to 
help out as much as they were 
able to do, the spokesman said 
that the janitors had raised a 
small fund to put in the Loan 
Fund for students and hoped it 
would, when added to such other 
funds, help both the students and 
the University to come through 
the hard times. 

This example of sacrifice and 
sense of common loyalty ha^l its 


and struggle, the University lea- 
ches us that we arc one commun- 
ity i.i heritage and hope, loyalty 
and sacrifice. • 

The ties that bind us all reach 
from the Old East Building to the 
Mon>hcad - Patterson Memorial 
Boll Tower, from Davie Poplar lo 
Kenan Stadium, from Battle For- 
est lo Hill Hall, from libraries to 
laboratories, teachers to students, 
janitors to Kenan Professors, 
from centuries gone to centuries 
yet to come, from the immortal 
dead to eternal youth, in the light, 
liberty and brotherhood of the 
University of the people by whom 
it was given birth and for whom 
it lives to serve in spirit and in 
truth from generation to genera- 
tion. 


CAROLINA CAROLEIDOSCOPE: 


Thoughts About The University: 
Notes On Piloting Your Own Ship 


DR. FRANK GRAHAM 

. . . part of Chapel Hill 


Frank Crowther 

(Columnist Crou-ther, like 
Managing Editor Johnson a- 
have, us usually a tough num. 
But vyhen he uHtes- about 
Chapel Hill, he remembers 
very sentuuvntal things.) 
In the next days and weeks you 
will direct many questions to your 
cla.ssmates. your professors, and 
to yourselves, .\mong those may 
be: 

Just what kind of a place is 
Chapel Hiir" 

"What is expected of mc?" 
"Why am I here, anyhow?" 
Each of these is justified. After 
all, this is— we trust— to be your 
home for the next four years. 
You should want these, and, even- 
tually, many others answered. 

MORE WORDS -':. 

Well, all we can do is add to 
the already many thousands of 
plain and fancy words, phrases, 
sentences, paragraphs,* editorials, 
stories and books written in at- 
tempts to answer the first ques- 
tion. 

One almost feels compelled — 
after having been infected with 
Chapel Hillitis — to attempt to 
capture its stray moments, exper- 
iences and feelings: 

The warmth of a summer after- 
noon that covers you with con- 
tentment; the despair of a drip- 
ping fall n.'irning that gilds your 
loi.eliness; the bite of winter tens- 
ing your muscles during a Janu- 
ary walk to the library; spring's 
arrival seeming to ooze the stop- 
per from your bottle of fevered 
emotions and winterized energies; 
shrugging your shoulders and 
going to class unprepared, know- 
ing you will be spotlighted the 
moment you enter the classroom; 


listening while in the barbers 
chair to Chancellor Hous^ and 
Paul Green as they discusjs the 
creative processes, Shakesjpeare, 
higher education, and agnostics: 
sitting on the rock wall in 
front of Batlle-Vance-Pettigrew 
and rhythmically bouncing your 
shoes on the stones while Casual- 
ly, almost disinterestedly, |vvatch- 
ing the passing parade and mull- 
ing over a few thousand things; 
morally supporting the squirrels 
in their unceasing flight from the 
Chapel Hill canine citizenry: and, 
finally, as Dr. Frank P. Graham 
put it. "... a Chapel for deep- 
ening the spirit of youth and a 
Hill for heightening the vision of 
the people." 

These are but a few of the 
many "moments to remember"' 
you may have to savor ... or pass 
over unnoticed. 

EXPECTED j 

.And what is expected of you? 

Sincere effort. No orie is to 
blame but yourself for any type 
of failure. Your previous exam- 
inations have proved that you 
possess the capabilities and meet 
the standards of the University. 

You must build and captain 
your own ship from now on. Do 
not try crying or pleading or self- 
pity or rationalizing or postpone- 
ment. Come out of the .<;hell; ex- 
pose yourself and enjoy it. 

And why are yoii her^'? 

To answer this, we rjiust look 
at the basic essentials land pre- 
requisites. Examine yourself, for 
once, instead of those around you. 
Get outside yourself and look 
back in. Get up in a strong tree 
and look down with a new per- 
spective. Unless the basic drive 
is there, unless there is; sincerity, 


unless there is good, no fruit will 
he borne. 

Only you can make it bear the 
fruit and only you can retain the 
fruit's stains. "It is only with the 
heart that onf can see rightly; 
what is essential is invisible to 
tie eye." 

And don't be a college 'pas.s- 
man; " we can all pass in life. 

Some men are born great; some 
make themselves great; others 
have their greatness thrust upon 
them; but. they all have the same 
basic qualities of honesty, sin- 
cerity, goodness, loyalty, justness, 
and fear of, respect for and faith 
in their God. 


Charlie Johnson - 

(Writer Johnson is The Daily Tar Heel's t 
ryianaging editor, a position ustiaUy calling for* 
lots of grumbling and a rather sarcastic out- 
look on life. But when Managing Editor Johnson 
returned to the cantpus this year, he couldn't 
help but get a little' sentimental about Chapel 
HiU.) 

Chapel Hill and the- University make a unique 
community. The town and Carolina are so interposed 
that they are unsepa/able. 

The melting pot of North Carolina adequately 
describes this locality. People of all races, creedsr 
religions and nationalities live and work here anrf 
get along because they are all seeking the basi<* 
things of life. 

This is a liberal community, and Carolina is a 
liberal university. Freedom of thought and belief 
abounds here with practically no obstruction olhei;. 
than the expression of opinion by the fellow with 
the opposite viewpoint. 

Students who come here grow into the commui^- 
ity and begin to love it. 

W^hat is here that attracts and becomes dear to 
so many? 

Is it its liberal atmosphere, its serenity, its beau- 
ty or its opportunity for anyone who seeks it? 

Or maybe it's the friendliness and brotherhood 
that exist here. It could be football and the thrili 
that goes with seeing Kenan Stadium packed to the 
top rows to see the sons of Carolina give all they've 
got to win for LTNC. 

One who comes and lives here will always re- 
member the noisy hustling and bustling of classes, 
football weekends and Y-Court . . . the beauty o| 
the Arboretum in springtime . . . CU Day, with hun- 
dreds of WC girls milling around . . . that cute 
little coed you spent many happy hours with . . . 
a professor who instiHed many ideals in you . . ^ 
the night you drank coffee all night to stay awake 
to study for a final i. . . or to await the outcome o£ 
an election . . . extra-curricular activities that in; 
terested you ... 

It has often been said that when a person leaves 
here and returns, he will always find someone he 
knows, usually just by running into them on the 
streets. 

Some remember the echo of cheers at football 
games, the first game they go to, the Bell Tower 
wafting out its sweet sounds through the many pines 
and the Alma Mater being sung at the end of ^ 
game — a game that may have ended in defeat for 
the home team, but the song still means as much. 

The day you slept through a quiz and begged 
your prof to let you take it late, the old familiar 
sound of "Go! Tar Heels, Go!" resounding through 
Woollen Gym to urge on a cage victory — all these 
will remain with you. 

Some of you will stay less than a semester, a 
semester, one, two and three or four years or more"; 
and, some of you will stay here for life. You may 
leave, but its been said before — "They always come 
back." 

Fraternity or sorority rush just in the thick of 
your studies . . . dancing at the Patio to a pop tune 
... all night parties for Germans . . . the thousands 
of friends you meet . . . these will forever floofl 
your mind. 

It's hard to say what people see in this place, 
but stay here a while and you'll know . . . You can't 
explain it, but you can feel it. It isn't taught in 
text books, nor is it on file in the library. It's just 
a feeling, and a great one at that. 

Campus Landscapes . 
Offer inspiration 

University of North Carolina Magazine 

Circa 1860 

The College Campus is now arrayed in all the 
charms of Nature assisted by the fostering hand of 
Art, and the soft, balmy air is perfumed by the 
almost eternal flowers that bloom in vernal beauty 
along the works that lead from the Buildings fo 
the Village. 

If it be true that the noblest traits of character 
and intellectual progress and development are the 
effects of such natural scenery — if it be true that 
it is owing to such scenes as these that a W^allace 
and a Tell were reared, and if "the untrammelled 
element of liberty, the safeguard of religion and 
virtue " be there nourished to bloom and bless the 
world — then, surely, it is fortunate for students 
here that such gay, smiling landscapes spread 
out before them, with forests, hills and valleys ex- 
tending in majestic grandeur and the freshness of 
perpetual morning far away to the distant limits of 
the horizon ... 



iRIDAv, 


atl 


THE 


F 


The I 
to fai 
Thai 

Ob^ 
Lcagij 
us b>J 
will 
year. I 
cr sh| 
arr 

Dl 
luxu^ 
mate 
sliml 
on 
part 

Fd 
fnotl 

SllJtj 

pie. 

Avrvrl 
pin 
•al"W 


JUST SITTING AND WATCHING LIFE GO BY 

• i. . mulling over a fete thouaand things 


. 1 


.a.. 


1,. 


i*^ 


! / 


1956 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE THREI 


it 


-rs. 

for" 

[out' 

in't 
ipel 

Inique 
(posed 

lately 
reeds: 
anrf 
basitf 

a 

belief 
olhec. 
with 

ar to 

beau- 

?riiood 

thrili 

lio the 

Ihey've 

ys re- 
: lasses* 
tuty o; 
Ih hun- 
i\ cute 
th . . . 
^u . . . 

iwake 
It) me of 
Ihat in; 

leaves 
lone he 
I on the 

lootball 

Tower 

ly pines 

\d of ii 

feat for 

much. 

begged 

amiliar 

through 

111 thes« 

[ester, a 

more"; 

foil may 

come 

thick of 

(vp tune 

lousands 

flooa 

place, 
fou cant 
mght ih 

It's just 


es 


igazine 

|n all the 

hand of 

by the 

Lai beauty 

fldings to 

character 

\{ are the 

true that 

|a Wallace 

rammelled 

|i;jioR and 

bless the 

students 

;s spread 

(•alleys ex- 

leshness of 

It limits of 


Bachelor 
Life Can 
Be Casual 

By CHARLIE SLOAN 

Coiumnist Sloan, an associate 
editor of The Daily Tar Heel. 
hoo- put so^ne time in Univers- 
ity dormitories. But his secreted 
hotplate got found, amd noic he 
lives in a fraternity house ) 

Most of the many facets of life 
at Tar Heclia-on-Franklin St. have | How to present your prettiest and very best self during the rapid 

been described, extolled or gencr- i succession of rush parties is probably a weighty question in the minces 
ally drooled over in other parts of ^ of many incoming Caroline Coeds. 

this issue. ! » .u u i .u 

I In the rush manual, there is 

However, there is one phase of ' a sketchy description of what-to- 

University existence that draws lit- j wear for each party, but with the 

tie attention, but takes up most of | variable weather prevalent in 

everybody's time. For the sake of | Chapel Hill, this list often needs 

convenience it can be called Caro- j revising somewhat. Let the type of 

liuB Homclife. I party guide your selection of dress 

for the most part. 


JUST TAKES A LITTLE WORK: 


''•^^■% t M 


W O MEN 


^ :P«g Humphrey, Coed Editor 


How To Look Best 


Nattirally, Carolinra Ladies are 
v^ry much aware of this situation, 
and domesticity in the women's 


At a casual affair, your costume 
should definitely be casual. But, 


dorms is more or less passed over i for instance, if sweaters and skirts 


rather casually, according to re- 
ports from the inside. 

But, to the Carolina Gentleman 
facing a heavy date with nothing 
but dirty socks, there is some real 
meaning to 'I have to rinse out a 
few things." Of course he could 
meet his lady-fair bare-footed or 
in sandals, but . . . 

While the young man in ques- 
tion is working on his argyles, his 
roommate — which one does not 
really matter — will usually start 
whipping UD supper. Cooking is not 
allowed in the dorms — draws ants 
and things. So the hot plate comes 
out of the bottom of the trunk, 
the milk off the window sill, and 


arc the order of the day, and the 
thermomctor soars to 108 ft\ a flur- 
ry of Indian Summer enthusiasm, 
the smart coed wil appear at her 
polished best in a simple Ivey 
League skirt and tailored shirt. 

ATTITUDE COUNTS 

One important thing to remem- 
ber is that although clothes are 
important at rush parties, just as 
they are everywhere, they are def- 
initely not the iast word. A natural 
relaxed attitude plus meticulous 
grooming will sell you faster than 
the latest Adcle Simpson or Dior 
creation. 

The stores are crammed with the 


CAROLINE COEDS AT A PARTY 

. . . there are iufonital ones, too 


the other necessary items from , exciting but surprisingly very basic 


similar storage places. 

MUSIC 

Now add music. Carolina Home- 
life is not a silent affair. First, 
tune in the latest rock and roll hit, 
put some Brahms on the hi-fi down 
the hall, tell the dorm's bath tub 
baritone to sing a little louder and 
call in the trumpeter from the 
dorm next door for a jam session. 
The musical stage is almost set. 

For added satisfaction, get a 


selection of new fall fashions. 
Bulky knits, slim tailored lines and 
good tweeds seem to be most popu- 
lar. Black is back, as important as 
ever. Loden green is the biggest 
newcomer, color-wise. The various 
shades of the brown family are 
good, with sand and maple sugar 
the newest and most exciting ones. 

If the temperature should 
plunge, a good knit sheath or a 
tailored wool dressed up with some 


group together, and serenade coeds | simple jewelry would be ideal for 


Chapel Hill. Frills, bangles and 
faddish ensembles are strictly out 
of place. Coeds are alert to the 
latest in good fashion and select 
the basic styles which appear each 
season. This year t^e new blouson 
look and the high-waisted styles re- 
miniscent of 1912 can easily be 
worn at Carolina. These lines are 
appearing in modified forms in 
wools, jerseys and knits. 

SILK SHIRT 

The silk shirt might come in 
handy at one of the dressier par- 
ties, highlighting a jumper or in 


passing under the window with the 
good old college songs. The ones 
Hith the unprintable titles are best. 
D">rm wall decoration varies from 
room to room, with taste ranging 
from "Still Life of a Fruit Bowl 
With Half Eaten Apple" to Marilyn 
Monroe and Diana Dors. Pennants, 
girl friends' pictures and last 
week's shirt are hung impartially 
from available outcroppings in the 
wall. 


the dressy parties. For the teas, 

most girls will be wearing exactly 

what they would wear to church, 

complete with gloves, bag and 

simple hat. Although some may ap- I enough f^r cashmeres and tweeds, 

pear in bouffant, more elaborate I you may be sure they will be worn 

dresses, there is no necessity to | at the informal parties. White col- 
lars frequently spark necklines, 
and skirts are generally slim with 
little or no detail. Tailored shirts 
with good leather belts are always 


Parties:^ 
Ice Water 
And Talk 

Coeds planning to go through 
rush will find an imposing sche- 
dule of parties on their agenda. 

The hectic pace of the sorority 

rush parties is indeed a memorable 

combination with a dressy skirt, | experience even for the coed who 

perhaps in bold plaid. Dressy blous- decides not to pledge one of the 

es in cotton-Dacron are also good. ' six Greek sororities on campus. 

! At the Panhellcnic tea, whidi be- 
If the weather actually is cohi i gj^s ,he festivities, the rushee may 

expect a minimum of conversation 


Dorm Can Be Nice 

Your "home away from home" really can be a joy to live in dur- 
ing your stay at Carolina. 

E^'en with three girls packed 
nto a room, it is quite possible to 
:reate an atmosphere of spacious- 
ness and comfort with carefully 
selected harmonizing furnishings. 
Each room is equiped with one 
bureau, closet, desk and bed p«r 
,'irl. Waste paper baskets, bulletin j| 
boards, ciu"tains and such are sup- ! 
plied by the inhabitants. Each room |i 
has one comfortable chair, but the |' 
girls often add sling chairs. | 

School regulations say no to pok- 
ing holes in the plaster, but the 
molding at ceiling level may be i 
used for hanging pictures. Several I 
girls last year hung a mammouth | 
fish net from their molding on ! 

Rvhich they were able to tack all 
;heir souvenirs and pictures. Two- i 
way tape is useful — with careful ; 
handling, it may be used without | 
lamage to walls. 1 

Notion counters in department ' 
stores offer an abundance of inex- 
pensive containers for garments, 
hats, and shoes for the coed with 
an eye for a neat-looking closet. | 

The plastic paper with a sticky 
back found in dime stores might ' 
be used to cover boxes and shelves. 
This paper is also useful for bureau ! 
tops, for spilled cosmetics can be j 
easily wiped off with a damp cloth. 
Even waste paper baskets can re- 
flect your personality by being cov- 1 
ered with this same paper, pictures, 
or magazine covers. ' 

The current color taste in de- ' 
signing seems to be leaning to- j 
wards the greens and beiges. The | 
popularity of aqua and pink is pre- 
dicted to end shortly. House & 
Garden's forecast colours for 1957 I 
includes a wide range of the beiges 
and off-whites which are assuming 
great importance in decorating. 
For accent colors cantaloupe, 
flame, tangerine, mustard, and saf- 
fron are suggested. 

Generally a scheme of about 
three colors or varying shades of 
one color with an accent of one 
other is a good rule to follow. 
Plants always provide a good touch, 
but it is advisable to have a sturdy 
one, able to withstand temperature 
changes and lack of water when 
you forget. 



:*.M 


wear attire of this sort if you feel 
more at case in conservative de- 
signs. 

Simplicity reigns supreme in ' a perfect topping. 


THE IVY LEAGUE LOOK IS STILL HERE: 


Caroline Coed Picks Clothes 
For Informality And Comfort 


TTie comfortable, casual approach 
to fa."+iion is highly approved by 
Chapel Hill coeds. 

Obvious at Carolina is the Ivy 
League look which took the camp- 
us by storm last fall and probably 
will continue in popularity thi.--: 
year. Back-belted skirts and tailor 
er shirts with matching print belt* 
are -cen everywhere. 

During cold weather coeds don 
luxurious cashmeres to mix and 
n>atc'h with good tweeds, usually 
«Iim in line. Bermudas take over 
on weekends for fraternity cabin 
parties. 

For dressy occasions such a^ 
football games, wool sheaths am 
suits are preferred. Jewelry is sim 
;"|>le, with gold and pearl creation 
mrorn most of the time. One dazzlinj- 
^in and tiny button earrings an 
*ahray.; in good taste. 
Z According to predictions from th' 
•top fashion magazine, Milady wil' 
■jiresent a more softened appear 
''Snce this year. Polished elegancf 


prevail. 

Vogue's editors say the silk shirt 
is the key to the coming era. This 
however, won't mean any radical 
change in the way UNC coeds wil 
be dressing this year . . . only that 
they will add a silk, or perhaps a 
fraile locking, cotton-Dacron shirt 
with tiny ruffle^? to wear with vel- 
vet or bold plaid skirts. 

The costumes which Cecil Bea- 
ton designed for the set of "My 
Fair Lady" have had a thundering 
'mpact on the garment industr>' 
this fall The high-waisted look of 
1912 is appearing not only in ex- 
treme styles, 'highly unsuitable for 
college students, but also in mod- 
ified designs. 

The blouson is another big new- 
-onfer this season which also ap- 
pears styled for the college level, 
instead of purchasing simply a 
suit with a box jacket, why not se- 
'ect one with the drawstring hip- 
length jacket? 

As for shoes, they are due to 


oivith the stress on femininity will have skinnier-than-ever heels with 


with any individual, for at this 
time representatives from all 
groups will be shaking hands and 
exchanging brief words with each 
girl planning to attend the follow- 
ing parties. 
GET ACQUAINTED 

When the parties at the houses 
begin, the rushee will have a bet- 
ter chance to become acquainted 
with members of the different 
arnips. She v.'ill be entertained in 
the finest tradition of Southern 
hospitality at each of the houses. 

As rush progresses, the number 
of rushccs dwindles, anti everyone 
has a chance to become better 
acquainted with her prospective 
sisters. 

During the course of the parties, 
the rushees will be taken on a tour 
of each of the "nouses. Entertain- 


Not In A Sorority? 

Join The Independents I 

The Ind<»pendent Women's Assn. i 
is the legislative organization of ; 
all UNC women i-tudents who do 
not belong to a sorority. i 

The association is composed of \ 
three representatives from each i 
of the women's dorms and three 
representatives from the Town 
Girl's Assn. 

Its purposes are to promote ex- 
tra-curricular activities, aid other 
campus oganization*. provide op- 
portunities for independent coeds 
to participate in campus activi- 
ties, make dorms more home-like 
and to coordinate the activities of 
independent and sorority girls. 


Nearly 200 Expected 
In School Of Nursing 

Elizabeth L. Kcmble, dean 


very pointed toes, but the heel 
height is apt to be about two 
inches. Suede is said to be gain- 
ing in popularity. i ^^^^ ^j,, ^e provided in the form 

Color-wise, black will predomi- j of skits and song-fests. 
nate with loden green and various ice water is served at the first 
shades of brown ah-o important, j round of parties, but each time 

Brown and black are good in thereafter, the refreshments be- I estimated number of undergrad- 
combinalion. and sand is an ex- ' come more complex, with progres- uate students by classes: fresh- 
cellent blouse color as a change sive dinners scheduled for the final i men. 61; sophomores, 52; juniors, 
from stark white. night. ' 41, and seniors', 29. 


Dr 

of the University School of Nurs- 
ing, has estimated approximately 
200 students will be enrolled in 
the School of Nursing this coming 
semester. 
Dr. Kemble gave the following 


Pete The Tailor 


Welcomes You 


. V 'K. 


WE CAN IVY LEAGALIZE YOUR OLD SUIT FOR 

A FRACTION OF THE COST OF A 

NEW ONE 

^ Over Alexander Shoe Store 

Phone 9-2676 135V^ E. Franklin St. 



JULIAN'S COLLEGE SHOP 


WELCOMES 

YOU 


: } 


TO 


U. N. C 


Julian' 



_ 


"the men's fashion center of Chapel Hill" 

Maurice Julian '38 


We/come Students 


M^V^^ 



BUSINESS SUIT 


SPORTS OUTFIT 


iXTRA SLACKS 


CHECK BELK'S FIRST FOR THE BEST IN 

IVY LEAGUE COLLEGE FASHIONS 



NAVAL AND AIR FORCE 

R.O.T.C. SHOES 

Top quality shoes to give you top 

I fit and comfort. Made of finest 

eathers by master craftsmen. 

Both tan and black . . . the 

ideal uniform shoe. Size 

6-12, all widths. Full 

leather sole and 

rubber heel. 


7 


$#95 


Both 
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OPEN EVERY FRIDAY NITE TILL 8:30 


wmmamm 


ttmmmimmma 


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PAGE POUR 


THE 6aiLY TAR HEEL 


PRldAV. SeHeMBER 14, \\i*^ 



FRIDAY 


Four Officers Hold UNC's „ 
Government Executive Power 



SATURDAY 



The Executive powiT of student 
•government iif vested in four stu- 
dent body officers — president, vice- 
president, secretary and treasurer. 
All are elected every spring in \ 
campus»-wide elections. i 

President this year is Bob i 
Young, senior of Aa*heville. The 
other officers are: Vice-President 
Sonny Evans, junior of Durham; 
Secretary Jackie Aldridge, senior 
coed of Winston-Salem, and Treas- 
urer John Kerr, junior of Warren- 
ton. I 

Much of the book work is done by j 
the student government executive 
secretary, who is a hired secretary. : 
This' position is now held by Mrs. j 
H. J. Grassman. I 

The president has the power to 
appoint various committees, ap- 
point a cabinet, to administer and i 
enforce laws enacted by the Stu- 
dent Legislature, to veto acts of ; 
the legislature, to serve as an ex- 
officio member of all committees 
and boards. One of hLs very im- 
portant duties is to represent the 


student body of Carolina in all 
dealings with students of other 
jchools, the University faculty and 
the University trustees. 

The vice-president advances to 
the office of president should that 
office become vacant. He also 
serves as speaker of the Student 
Legislature and presides over its 
meetings; this is his most import- 
ant duty and most of his time is 
spent at this job. 

The secretary maintains all 
records and filec? of the student 
body and arranges for permanent 
preservation of its archives. 

The treasurer disburses all 
monies appropriated by the Stu- 
dent Legislature and serves' as 
chairman of the Budget Commit- 
tee. # 

The president each year delivers 
a State of the Campus address to 
the Student Legislature. He gives 
recommendations and comments. 
of the state of affair^* here at 
Carolina. The president has the 
power to veto legislation, and then 


again, legislation is often passed 
over his' veto. 

Past presidents have received 
much criticism in performing 
their duties, especially in editor- 
ials in The Daily Tar Heel. 


with 

Joel McCrea 

Brian Don levy 




SUN.-MON.-TUES. • i 

The most Intimate story to , 
come out of the war! 

William Holden 
Deborah Kerr 

in 


FRIDAY-SATURDAY 

'QUINCANNON, FRONTIER SCOUT' 

STARRING 
TONY MARTIN — PEGGIE CASTLE 


SUNDAY.MONDAY 

"AUTUMN LEAVES" 

STARRING 
JOAN CRAWFORD — CLIFF ROBERTSOM 


TUESDAY 

INNOCENTS OF PARIS" 

STARRING 
'^ALASTAIR SIM 


// 


The Proud And 


Profa 


ne 


// 


WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY 

"LISBON" 

IN TECHNICOLOR & CINEMASCOPE 

STARRING 
RAY MILLAND — CLAUDE RAINS 
MAUREEN O'HARA — RITA GAM 


Germans 
Brings Top 
Musicians 

The German Club is the organi- 
zation that brings some of the big 
name entertainers to Carolina. It ; 
is an organization of 13 UNC so- 
cial fraternities and sponsors i 
three big weekend dances during . 
the school year. > 

In the past the agenda has in- j 
eluded such big time musical 
men as Louis "Satchmo" Arm- j 
.Hrong, Les Brown, Ralph Mar- 1 
terie, Johnny Long, Tex Beneke, ■ 
and Stan Kenton. It is anticipated i 
to have the Four Freshmen this 
year for one of the dances. i 

These dances are formal and j 
bids are limited to members only, j 
but anyone wanting to go may 
usually obtain a bid from some 
member who does not wish to go. 

The German weekends* usually 
include a concert in Memorial 
Hall and a dance in Woollen Gym. 
The activities are spread over 
Friday and Saturday. 

These weekends are a time of 
big parties — those kind that last 
on and on, usually all night. Stu- 
dents- date coeds for these dances, 
or either date imports from home, 
WC, Meredith, or one of the many 
other girls' schools in the sur- 
rounding area. 

These gala times are often look- 
ed forward to with great enthus- 
iasm by some, whereas, others 
come to Carolina and never at- 
tend one of them during their 
entire college career. 



South Building Is Hdiri^'' 
Of UNCs Top Brass '' 


STUDENTS GATHER IN Y COURT 

-"'. (luite often duHng class breaks. * 

_ " : J v t ' -.1' _ * £ 

Y-Court Is Center Of 
UNC's SBcial Activity 


Where's the center of social ac- 
tivity at Carolina? Ask any upper- 
classman, and he'll tell you that 
the most popular ^•pot on campus 
for casual conversation, friendly 
get-to-togethers, and chatis with 
coeds is a square of asphalt be- 
side South Building known as Y- 
Court. 

The bench-lined square is* lo- 
cated in front of the YMCA, where 
late sleeping students who miss 
breakfast may grab a cup of cof- 
fee and a doughnut during the 10- 
minute break between classes. 

It has been estimated by expert 
ob.v>rvers that a high percentage 
of romances here got their start 
on a bench in Y-Court or perhaps 
on the steps of South Building. 

Y-Court has other uses, in adt 
dition to serving the cause o( 
I'amour. Almost any weekday 
morning, a dedicated scholar may 
be seen paring over a formidable 
looking textbook, obliviou.v to the 
light hearted trivialities of the 
world around him. an expression 
of intent concentration on his 
face. Ah! A straight "A" student, 
you say to yourself. Not .so. The 
poor lad probably gave his all for 
the fraternity cau.se the night be- 
fore, and now must do something 
about that mid-term exam next 
period. 


The administrative moguls in 
South Building also have a good 
use for Y-Court. The brass has 
made Y-Court its favorite retreat 
from th(» cares and worries in- 
volved in running a University. 

For them, Y-Court is* a haven. 
Here they can relax in unsophis- 
ticated (jomfort, rubbing elbows 
with the man from the lower quad 
and tht lowly freshman from 
Hicksville, USA. 

Y-Court is a common denomi- 
nator. It serves as a common meet- 
ing ground for all those who call 
Carolina their home. Football he- 
roes, student leader.?, deans, camp- 
us personalities and just plain old 
Joe College guys gather; all are 
one in Y-Court. 

They've told you about the Car 
olina tradition. This is it. 


Scabbard & Blade 
Is ROTC Honorary 

The Scabbard and Blade is a 
national honorary organization for 
men taking part in the school's Re- 
serve Officers' Training Corp 
(ROTC). 

Each .spring yeveral outstanding 
member? of the Air Force and 
Navy units here are tapped for the 
organization. Membership is by 
election ouiy. 


By CLARKE JONES 

(JoTies was South auUding 
reporter for The Daily Tar Heel 
iast year — Editor' s? note.) 

South Building is the place where 
most of the Consolidated Univers- 
ity and administration officials 
work. 

The first person you v/ill prob- 
ably see when you walk in is Mrs. 
Gustav Harrer at the information 
desk. Called by some the friend- 
liest person in town, she can in- 
form you about almost anything. I 

Let's skip on down the list and ! 
look at other members of the who's '■ 
who club: > 

First are the officers of the Con- ' 
solidated University, very busy 
men as their activities are divided 
among Woman's College in Greens- 
boro, N. C. State College in Ra- 
leigh and UNC. 

W^illiam C. Friday, the actinp 
president of the University heads 
the list. At the age of 35, he is "he 
third youngest man ever to oc- 
cupy the, top executive's chair. Hr 
is prominently mentioned as a can- j 
didate for the permanent presiden- ' 
ty- 
HOUSE 

Chancellor Robert B. House, who 
has become almost synonjTnou? 
with UNC itself, serves in both the 
Consolidated University and the 
administration. Being the adminis- 
trative head at UNC, he represent.^; 
the school in the University. He is 
known also for his harmonica play- 
ing. 

House is facing retirement in Ju- 
ly, 1956, due to the automatic re- 
tirement age of 65. He will remain 
at UNC, however, in a teaching ca- 
pacity. 

i William D. Carmichael Jr. is the 
Consolidated University vice presi- 
dent and finance officer. He con- 
trols the University purse strings 
and assists the president on pro- 
grams of adequate financing 
1 through legislative appropriations, 
! foundation grants, endowments, 
etc. 

j The University Business Mana- 
\ ger, Claude E. Teague, serves as ; 
the assistant to the president on j 
matters of University business j 
' management activities. He also is i 
1 the man behind the ball on the new 


dormitories scheduled to be con- 
structed in the near future. He al- 
so faces retirement next July. 

Dr. William M. Whybum is pres- 
ently serving as acting provost. Be- 
fore taking over the position in 
mid-February, 1956, he was the 
chairman of the L^C Mathematics 
Dept. 
WEAVER 

Turning to the UNC administra- 
tive side, the two top officials are 
Dean of Student Affairs Fred Wea-/ 
ver and Dean of Women Miss Katb- 
erine Kennedy Carmichael (no re- 
lation to the University Finance of- 
ficer.) 

W'eaver is on leave of absence" 
this year in order to get a PhD 
degree. Miss Carmichael was away 
last year touring different colleges • 
and universities to study the his- 
tory and positions of deans of wo-' 
men in light of economic and cul- 
tural changes in this country dur- 
ing and since World War II. Miss 
Isabelle MacLeod, assistant dean of 
women, was acting dean of women 
during Miss Carmichael's absence. 

Ray Jefferies serves as assistant 
to the dean of student affairs. 

The director of student activities 
is Sam Magill, a Carolina student 
in the late 1940's. He came "home " 
last year from Davidson College 
where he was YMCA secretary. He 
also is an ordained minister. 

Miss Martha Decker, who works 
in the dean of women's offiee, is 
the assistant director of student 
activities. 
ARMSTRONG 

The man who admitted you to 
Carolina is Roy Armstrong, the ad- 
missions director. His assistant is 
Charlie Bernard, whom many of 
you will probably get to know. 

Charles M. Shaffer is the direc- 
tor of development. His assistant 
is Roy Holsten, former director of 
student activities. 

Serving as dean of awards and 
distinctions is E^mtst L. Mackie. 

Cecil Johnson, C. P. SpruUl and 
J. Carlyle Sitterson serve as deans 
of the General College, faculty and 
the college of arts and sciences, 
respectively. 

Information about draft status 
can be supplied by Gen. Carlyle 
Shepard who maintains his office 
in 315. 


r^ 



Ty Boyd^'54 


'BREAKFAST WITH BOYD" 7-9- 
WAKE UP TO GOOD MUSIC - THE 
CORRECT TIME AND A CALENDAR 

OF CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY HAPPENINGS 


ON THE DIAL 1360 

FREE 

5 WESTINGHOUSE 
POCKET RADIOS 




5 FREE 


WESTINGHOUSE 



Hank Cheney— -'54 

"MOSTLY MUSIC" 1 0-1 1 :30 - 
AND A LITTLE CHATTER. INTER- 
LUDE" 1-2 P.M. - MUSIC OF THE 
MASTERS 


POCKET 


•^ 


WCHL WILL 
GIVE 5 WESTING- 
HOUSE POCKET RADIOS 
TO 5 LUCKY UNC STUDENTS. 
2 POCKET RADIOS WIL BE GIVEN 
AWAY SEPTEMBER 17th AND ONLY 
FRESHMAN STUDENTS WILL BE ELIGIBLE. 
REGISTER AT THE INFORMATION BOOTH DOWN- 
TOWN ON THE AFTERNOON OF SEPTEMBER 17th. 
LISTEN TO WCHL DAILY FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

1360 ON THE DIAL 


Carl Kasseli—'56 


TRANSISTOR 
RADIOS 



5 FREE 


"DIG THESE" 3-5 P.M. - j 

THE TOPS IN POP MUSIC I 

AND CAMPUS CHATTER. "EVEN*- ' 
SONG" 5 TO $IGNOFF. SOFT AND .. 
EASY SOUNDS FOR THE END OF DAY 


Ed Zimmerman—' 58 


FLYING HIGH" - JAZZ, 
JAZZ AND MORE JAZZ 



Big John Rogers 


(NO CLASS AT ALL) 
i HILLBILLY - 6-7 


n 


SANDY McCLAMROCH- Class of 1950 


General Manager 


r"'li* nJAL 


FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. }9S6 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


Mantovani To Be 
On SEC Program 


Montovani, master of the cascad- 
ing strings, is one of five top per- 
formers scheduled to appear on the 
student entertainment program this 
year. Students are admitted free 
to these SEC programs upon pres- 
entation of ID cards. 

Metropolitan Opera Soprano Li- 
cia Albanese, the- General Platoff 
Don Cossack Chorus, Actor Henry 
Hull, and Jose Limon and Dance 


Radio, TV 
Dept. Is 
Improved 

Another segment of the Uni- 
versity is the Dept. of Radio, Tele 
vision, and Motion Pictures, usual- 
ly referred to aj RTVMP. 

The dept. has two operating sta 
tions: WUNC. 91.5 on your Fre 
quency Modulation dial and first 
born: and WUNC-TV, the Consol 
dated University's educational sta 
tion operating on Channel 4 fron^ 
Greensboro, Ralei^, and Chape 
Hill. 

The department has expanded 
and improved considerably in the 
past few year^:, and today is on 
of the be.st known and best re 
spected in the country. Many of 
the productions have attained na- 
tional recognition and these werr 
produced . to a large extent, b 
the "Students themselvei. 

'"American Adventure." written 
by John Ehle and directed by John 
Clajion, was a radio dramatization 
of '"man in the new world," an:-' 
won the Freedoms Foundation 
Award two years, first award for 
two years from the Institute of Ra- 
dio, 4: Television at Ohio State 

(rated as one of the highest, awards 1 mon and his dancers recently 
in the country), and was cited thi? 
year by the National Conference o 
Christians & Jews. 

One of the outstanding produc 
tions of the te'.evision station las' 
year was their presentation o' 
William Saroyan's 'Hello Out 
There" in its first TV adaptation 
The kinescope reproduction o 
this drama was shown at the Ohio 
Stftte Conference last May and ha 
since been well received through 
out the country. 


Company will also perform for | 
Carolina students in the coming ! 
year. | 

Mantovani, the international re- \ 
cording sensation and his orchestra j 
of 45, will feature his "New Mu- 
jic" on Dec. 6. This Venetian-born 
Londoner, who began the era of j 
new music with his first album 
for London Records, "Waltzing 
With Mantovani," has currently 

nade many records including 

Cara Mia," which was written for 
David Whitfield. 
A versatile concert figure, Man- 

;;vani has music for everybody, be 
it the 300-year-old "Greensleeves," 
i serenade by Tschaikowsky, or the 
itrains of "Charmaine," which ha- 

ome to be his theme song. 
COSSACK CHORUS 
Also internationally famous is 

he Gen. Platoff Don Cossack 
Chorus, directed by Nicholas Kos- 

rukoff, appearing here in its 18th 

ranscontinerital tcur on Feb. 12,1 

957. The booming cossacks have ' 
■jcrfornted in 2.100 concerts in th? 

ISA and appeared in 65 countries | 

n six continents. The Chorus is i 
■omposed of the best vocal an;' 

'ancing talent of the White Russi- | 

n emigres, who have fought com- ' 
nuni.sm in Russia j 

Henry Hull, noted for his per-' 
formance as Mark Twain, will be | 
presented by the SEC on March 1 
26, 1957. Through his four decade ^ | 
in the theatre he has also di.,'ting 
.jished himsflf in such roles a ! ical examinations. 



FOR 


StUdtktS: 


P'.GE FIVt 


Part Time Jobs Are Open 


A great majority of Carolina 
students earn part of their school- 
ing by working part-time. 

U you would like a job, here's 
what you will have to do. 

You will first visit the Student- 
Aid Office in the b^asement of 
Hanej Hall. There you will be in- 


kind of job you are interested in; 
and the kind of work you are cap- 
able of doing. I 

You may have the choice of 
working for cash or you may like ( 
to work for your meals. They will 


Old Well Is Memorable Site 

Th« Old Weil is a plac* well-remembered by Carolina sfudants. 
\i stands across from South Building and is surrounded by a walkr 
way and many beautiful flowers. It was rennovated by the graduating 
class of 1954. 


Look At Infirmary Will 
Come With Physicals 


try to land you the position you 
terv ie^ed and will tell them the want^ In either case, you can earn Lenoir" Hall Carolina Inn, Graham 

Memorial, Scuttlebutt, Monogram 
. j Club, various libraries or one of 

the many other university owned 
',. . j places on the campus. 

AC average is usually required 
to keep a job or scholarship but 
exceptions ..ometimes can be made. 
The reason for this requirement is 
that there are a large number of ap- 
plicants who would like to have 
jobs. 

Mr. Ed Lanier is the head man 
and he will likely talk to you be- 
fore you get approved for a loan, 
job, scholarship or grant-in-aid. He 
i^' the man who will reject or ap- 
prove your application. 

Good grades in high school or 


up to about half of your expenses ! your fir^-t semester here may earn 
by working part time. ! you a scholarship ranging from 

Also available are scholarships, $150 to S500 if you have definite 
loans, and grant.s«-in-aid. These can financial needs, 
all be applied for at the Stu(^ent ' The Student Aid Office thinks 
Aid Office. j | it best that freshmen not work if 

If you get a job working for 'a* aU possible, but they realize 
the University it will likely be at that not all can get by without 


Golden Fleece, 
Valkyries Are Top 
Honoraries H 


The highest honorary organiza- 
tions at Carolina are the Order of 
the Golden Fleece for men and tho 
Valkjries for women. 

Golden Fleece members are jun- 
iors, seniors, graduate students and 
faculty members showing the high- 


undergraduate coed enrollment. 
Founded to promote leadership 
and service amcng women students, . 
they tap new members in secretive i 
pre-dawn ceremonies. 

Members are chose for member- j 
ship on the basis of leadership, j 


w<>rking. 

The Student Aid Office Ls open 
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on week- 
days and until noon Saturdays, 
and have extended a welcome to 
anyone interested in discussing 
any phase of the above mentioned 
program that they handle. 

One thing " should be pointed 
out. Approval of the Student Aid 
Office is not needed if a student 
wants to work at one of the down- 
town eating places, theaters, down- 
town store.i', - filling stations, fra- 
ternity houses or other privately 
owned places. In this case, a stu- 
dent is on his own and his job 
has nothing to do with the Stu- 
dent Aid Office. 


By BILLY BARNES 

New students will get a look at 
the University Infirmary this week 
when they go there for their phys- 


Chances are it won't be a last 
look; for sooner or iattr, there 
will be a sore throat, cold or sogie 
other ailment for whidi they will 
return for medical treatment. 

The pre.vnt Infirmary building 

.vas built during World War II by 

he University and the U. S. Navy. 

The Infirmary staff first occupied 

;t in 1946. 

It is best entered through the 
hospital's clinic entrance if one 
goes there walking, or through 
the side entrance at the rear of 
the hospital if one drives over. 

The {'irA floor houses ,the out- 
patient department, housing con- 
sultation rooms, waiting hall and 
laboratories. 

The second floor provides rooms 

("or overnight patients. It boasts 

some 60 beds, although the aver- 

Kai Jergcnson, Olin Mouzon, Jim t age number of .-ludents' who stay 

my Wallace, and Misses Martha i tiiere at one time is from 20 to 25., 


Vlalvolio in "Twelfth Night," Jes- 
;er Leester in "Tobacco Road." 
ind. Edgar Allen Poe in "Plumes 
n the Dust," along with such 
olays as "Mr. Roberts," "The Trai 
of Joan of Arc." and many others. 
He has also played in "Great Ex- 
pectations." "Objective Burma, ' 
"Lifeboat," and many other mov- 
ies. 

Jose Limon and Dance Compan' 
A-ill perform on April 11, 1957. Li 


swept South America, not with 
native rhythms, but with modern 
;lance selections. 

Licia Albanej3, soprano of thf 
Metropolitan Opera, will open the 
SEC programs on Nov. 1. 

The members of the SEC are: 
tohn Kerr, chairman, Joel Carter 
Don Freeman, George Hamilton 


Barber and Shiralee and Barbaree 
Prestwood. 


UNC Board C^ trustees Is 
The Supreme Governing Body 

7 h e Consolidated University 
Board of lYustees is the supreme 
governing body of the three mem-j 
bel" schools — Woman's College, 


N. C. State and Carolina. 

Consisting of 100 members, at 
least ten of whom are women, the 
trustees have numerous and de- 
tailed powers on matters concern- 
ing the University. The mo.-t im- 
portant, student-wise, are roughly 
as follows: *• 

1. power to make rules an:! 
regulations for the management 
of the University as they see fit. 

2. power to appoint a presi- 
dent and with the president's ap- 


in the University's Art Dept. 

infirmary doctors say they have 
the greatest number of patients 
during -January, February and 
March when respiratory di-^-eases 
are most common. 

Excuses in some cases come from 
the Infirmary. Students may be ex- 
cused from classes for medical 
rea^'ons at the time an illness oc- 
curs, if in the judgment of the 
attending /physician, such excuses 


are justified. It is expected that 
students will meet their obliga- 
tions and accept their responsi- 
bilities- for classroom work. 

E.xcuses are not granted for rea- 
sons other than medical nor for 
trivial complaints where the ful- 
fillment of their obligations does 
not endanger the students' wel- 
fare. 

Excuses are not granted at 
night. Saturday afternoon or Sun- 
day. In the event the student IJ 
ill at home, a signed statement by 
the ph.vsician or parent must be 
presented at the Infirmary before 
the student can be excused from 
those classes mi.-.sed. 

Infirmary hours are 9-11:30 a.m. 
and 2-5 p.m. Monday through Sat- 
urday. Sunday hours are 10-11:30 
a.m. and 2-5 p.m. 

However, the Infirmary's doors 
never close; emergency cases are 
received 24 hours a day, including 
holiday..- and periods when school 
is not in session. 

The Infirmary has equipment for 
laboratory work and routine X- 
rays. plus the opportunity of eon- 
suiting the staff and using the 


est character, versatility and ability character, scholarship and unsel- 
n University life. 

Th? Order was founded in 1903 
through the interest and encou- 
ragement of the late Horace Wil- 


fish service. 

OTHER HONORARIES 

The Order of the Holy Grail is 
an honorary service organization 




liams. Its purpose is to cut across I composed of outstanding Carolina 
sectional boundaries of student in- men selected each year. 

Thirteen rising juniors and seni- 
ors $re honore<d with membership, 
deavor as the occasion should arise, six (jlorm men. six fraternity men, 
The tapping of members into the and the delegata, the choice being 


i terest and to honor the outstand- 
ing men in all fields of campus en- 


Flcece, which is held each year in 
public ceremony in Memorial Hall, 
is the only public function of the 
Fleece. 

The Valkyries is limited to ap- 
proximately two per cent of the 


Administration 
Is Mixed Up 
At Present 


The situation concerning the ! point system. 
Consolidated University of North 
Carolina (Woman's College, N. C. 
State and UNC) is mixed up at 
present. 

How did it get that way? Here's 
the picture in a nutshell: 

Gordon Gray, Uni\'«rsity presi- 
dent a'ince 1949. obtained a leave 
of absence last year to become as 
equipment of the larger Memorial sistant secretary of defense for in 
Hospital. I ternational security affairs. 

No charge is made for u.-nial I In July, 1955, Dr. J. Harris 
treatment because a standard med- 1 Purks, vice president and provoi.'*. 


made largely on character anr! 
achievement. 

The Grail is dedicated to improv- 
ing the Carolina way of life by 
awarding scholarships to deserving 
students, sponsoring informal dan- 
*es, handling senior rings and in- 
vitations, aiding other organiza 
tions and sponsoring campus im- 
provements. 

The Order of the Old Well is an , 
honorary organization open to both 
men and women. Members are se- 
lected for their outstanding partici- 
pation in campus activities by a 


BENNETT and BLOCKSIDGE 

EXTENDS A CORDIAL 

Welcome To Freshmen 

AND INVITES THEM TO SEE 
OUR COMPLETE LINE OF 


^ Fans 


^ Electric Clocks 

-^ Electrical Appliances 


BENNETT and BLOCKSIDGE 

105 E. Franklin St. Phone 6161 


ical fee is including in jrtudent 
fees paid along with tuition. 

However, if treatment requires 
u.se of Memorial Hospital facili- 
ties, the usual hospital expenses 
must be paid by the student 


Sfchool Supplies 
Can Be Bought 
At Book Ex 

The Book Exchange, located in 
the Basement of Steele Dorm on 
th^ South side of the campus, 
selL" used and new books and 
otper School supplies, including 
pia^jer, notebooks, and pencils. 

Mew books are sold at the maark- 
€tj price, but prices of used books 
vary, depending on the condition 
oC the books. The Book-X aU'O 
bdys books back from students for 
from half price on down to noth- 
ing. 

•Hours of the store are 8:30 a.m. 
tfli 5:30 p.m. on class days. 

The Scuttlebutt is located di-j 
agonal ly acro^^'s from the Carolina 
Iitn and Big Fraternity Court. They officio chairman of the full board) 
also sell school supplies in addi- 
ti{in to snacks, sandwiches, soft 
dfinks, magazines, news-papers and 
tdilft supplies. 

•The Scuttlebutt is open from 
7i30 a.m. to 11 p.m. on weekdays 
a(id from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Sun- 
day. 

'The Monogram Club also has a 
snack bar and fountain, known a^; 
tfie Circus Room, and sella* various 
stipplies for the students' use. The 
same hours that are observed by 
tlje Scuttlebutt are kept by the 
Circus Room. 

[ Supplies can alo*o be bought at 
the Y Court from 7:30 a.m. to 5 
p»m., at Lenoir Hall during meal 
iu)urs. and at downtown stores. 


Carolina Playmakers Is A 
AO'Y ear-Old Organization 

By MARCEL1.INE KRAFCHiqK 


The Carolina Playmakers are 
one campus organization whicN has 


For Ser- 
called to 


proval, a provost, business officer brought nation-wide fame to UNC. 
and treasurer, finance officer, j It began as a pioneer folk theatre 
chancellors, professors and other almost 40 years ago, and since then 
University officials a.v may be has trured from Boston to Texas, 
necessary. , including several performances in 


.>itarred in "No Time 
grants ■ before he was 
Hollywood; Bob Armstrong, who 
appears in "Cat on a Hot Tin 
Roof; Dick Adicr. collaborator on 
■Pajama Game '; Shepperd Strud- 
wick, screen, TV, and stage actor; 
Douglas Watson, who has appeared 
in several successful Broadway pro- 


3. power to enact regulations | New York City. Although it claims ^^^uctjons and many others. 


dealing with streets and parking 
areas of the campus. 

In addition to the full board, 
which meets twice a year, there 
are several standing committee.^', 
the most important of which are 
the Executive Committee and the 
Visiting Committee, 

The Executive Committee, chair- 
ed by the governor (who is ex- 


acts for the full board and sub- 
mits in writing all its actions to 
the board. They cannot, however, 
change or nullify any orders of 
the board. This committee of 12 
meet.i* four times annually. 

The Visiting Committee is in 
charge of visiting each of the three 
campuses at least once a year to 
study the problems and needs of 
the institutions. Members of thi • 
committee — there are 12 here al- 
so — 'have power to look into any 
problem considered important to 
the campus general welfare. 


Dance Committee 
Riavs Host Here 

\ Fulfilling the role of host at i 
Oarolina dances and maintaining ' 
order at social functions gi.ven by j 
various campus organizations are j 
the main functions of the Uni- 1 
vtTsity Dance Committee. | 

! Chairman for *this year Ls Pat 
VUnter, senior^ of Charlotte. [ 


University Club Seeks 
To Promofti Enthusiasm 

The University Club is primarily 
a service organization, and all of its 
functions are carried out in the 
interest of the student body and 
University. 

The functions of the club are 
many and varied. Through its co- 
operation with the Athletic As- 
sociation, the club seekit to pro- 
mote and maintain enthusiasm 
and good sportsmanship in all Un- 
iversity events and contests. i 


to be nothing more than a univf»r- 
sity-community theatre, it often 
proves to be a stepping-stone for 
many eventually successful profes- 
sionals in the theatre. 

The Playmakers Theatre is one 
t;f the University's oldest buildings, 
located on Cameron Ave. across 
from Old East Dorm, and has been 
everything from the University 
Library to the 'University Stable" 
during its history. 

It houses four of the six produc- 
tions each year, while the annual 
musical comedy is presented in 
Memorial Hall and the spring out- 
door production is at the Forest 
Theatre, across the road from the 
Monogram Club. 

Besides having produced such 
famous persons as Paul Oreea, 
Thomas Wolfe, -Betty Smith, and 
Kermit Hunter, the UNC Dramatic 
Art Dept. has been the training- 
ground for about thirty profession- 
als recently working in New York's 
theatre and television. 

These include Andy Griffith, who 


The Playmakers' tryouts and ac- 
tivities are completely open to the 
public and the student body. Any- 
one at all who is interested may 
try out for a part or help with the 
backstage work. The name "Play- 
maker" applies to anyone who has 
in any way worked on a production 
— often including representatives 
of such departments as Statistics, 
History, and Economics, as well as 
local housewives, merchants, 
clergymen, and members of the 
faculty. 

This year the Playmakers will 
present a varied program of; "An- 
astasia", a recent Broadway suc- 
cess; "Arvdrocles and the Lion", a 
comedy by Bernard Shaw, which 
will later tour the Carolinas and 
Georgia; "Desire Under the El^ns", 
an American classic by Eugene 
O'Neill; "Brigadoon", one of tHe 
most popular Broadway musicals 
of all time; a premiere production 
of an unknown play introducing a 
promising new playwright; and — 
outdoors — Iben's "Peer Gynt". 


in charge of assisting Gray on edu- 
cational matters of the University. 
became acting president during 
Gray's absence. 

Gray offered his resignation t.") 
the Board of Tru -tees who first 
refused, then later accepted it. 
Purks continued as acting presi- 
dent while a nine-man trustee 
group began searching for a per- 
manent president. 

During the first week of Jan- 
uary, 1956. Purks was appointed 
director of the N. C. Board o*" 
Higher Education. William C. Fri- 
day, then Consolidated Universi- 
ty .'^cretary, stepped in as acting 
president. 

On Feb. 13. 19.56, Dr. William 
M. Whyburn, chairman of the UNC 
Mathematics Dept., was appointed 
acting provost. 

All this "shaking up" has left 
the Consolidated University with 
an acting president, an acting pro- 
vost and a vacancy in the secre- 
tary's position, which Friday held 
before assuming the temporary 
presidency. 



BERMAN'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
Established Since 1914 

WELCOMES THE 
FRESHMEN 


WELCOME FROSH 


Do As So Many Others — Make 
The Town & Campus Your 
' Clothing Headquarters! 


=h::;S.i 


I j I • 

Bob Cox-vlass'49 Monk Jennings-Class '49 



I 


FAdI SIX 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1?55 


October 1 Is Deadline 
for Student Insurance 


October 1 has been set as the 
deadline for applications for stu-i 
dent insurance. 

The cost of the policy is $9.50 I 
a year. According to Ray Jefferies, 
a '.istirvt to the dean of student i 
affairs, the premium's cost has i 
dropped since last year. 

Insured students will be covered 
for up to $1000. and for up to $200 
for surgical expenses. If the slu- 
dcnt dies, his beneficiaries will 
receive $1000. 

Jefferies said. "I think this in- 
surance plan payed off for us last 
year." He pointed out that the in- 1 
« 1 

UNC Club Provides | 

FychAnge Of Ideas | 

The Cosmopolitan Club is the j 
cmpus organization for American j 
and foreign students to come to 
gether to give members an op- 
portunity t3 exchange ideas anlj 
cultures. 

It ha? an object of promoting 
friendship and understanding 
among different nations. There are 
-about 90 regular members. ' 


..trance comes to less than 80 { 
cents a month. 1 

The insurance coverage is for a | 
12-month period, including "le 
periods when ?tudents are travel- 1 
ing to and from Chapel Hill, and j 
while- thoy arc on vacation. Jef- 1 
ferics said la<;t year there were 
not many claims, but during the < 
summer the company payed on j 
policies .'jiveral times. 

An information booth will be 
set up during registration. Appli- 
cations for the insurance will be 
available at the information booth, 
the Y and at Graham Memorial. 

The policy is made available ' 
through the Pilot Life Insurance 
Company, Raleigh. Jefferies ex- 
plained that students here will 
pay a slightly higher premium than 
student? at St^te College because ; 
of the surgical coverage. ' 

He reminded .'students who .•al- 
ready hold policies and are eligi- 
ble to receive payments for claims 
must file claims with the com- 
pany. Blanks are available at his 
office and the Infirmary. 


Hi 
Freshmen! 

WHEN FIXING UP YOUR ROOM 
COME SEE US FOR 


it I>ESK LAMPS it ^ANS 

ir CLOCKS it EXTENSION CORDS 

• ROYAL PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS 

Electric Constrirction Co. 

165 E. Franklin Sr. Established 1935 



New Art Museum^ 
Will Be Erected i 


I Graham Memorial Patronizers Meditate Over Game of CK^ss 

Tvo Carolina students art shown abov* in the Main Lounge of chess anW listen to music over the loud speaker system, Graham 

Oriiham Memorial, the student union building. They art^ involved in Menr>orial will celebrate the 25th Anniversary of its opening this 

a ciame of ch«ss. The Main Lounge of GM is thoroughly used by fall and of its dedication in January. Miss Linda Mann, 1956 UNC 

UNC students to read newspapers, masaiioM, play ch«ck«rs and graduate, is temporary director of ih« building. 


UNC Cardboard Prepares Stunts For Foctbaii Garne Color 


One of the phases of Carolina, 
life that students enjoy and oup | 
that adds enjoyment to college is! 
the UNC Cardboard. i 

The Cardboard is a student or-j 
ganization that design.- and pre- i 
pares the card stunts performed a";' 
halftime entertainment at all 
h?mc football games, and .some- 
times, at games away. | 

Much work and cooperation is 
invv-lvpd in preparation of a stunt 
from the time an idea is submitt- 


ed until it i? finally performed. 
But work is not all 'there is to it. 
At the Cardboard offices, in 
Emerson Stadium, the members 
have a change to meet others, dis- 
cuss different things and have a 
lot of fun working. Work g cs on 
in a voluntary manner during the 
football sca.-jn through the last 
game, for essentially the organi- 
zation is only a fall semester activ- 
ity, but last sea.son there was 
much activity that ran over int^ 


late spring. '" | 

Last .s-eason began what is hoped 
to be an expanding of activity in- 
to other areas besides that of just j 
.'Students. All members were givei' 
transportation and admission to 
the Duke-Carolina came where 
stunt.* were performed before na- 
tior'^1 television cameras. | 

An awards banquet was held 
and awards were ;i'ven to members 
who did outstandina work during 
the season. A scrapbo.ik of the 


iyear's activities was also present- 
ed, and new officers were also in- 
. vailed. 

Late in the spring, a pre-exam 
party was given by the executive 
council. All these activities were 
well received by the ir embers 

New and better activities ar. 
planned ior this year. Among 
these will be more group get-to- 
gethers and partie.'. entries in pa- 
rades and coordinated stunts with 
the Band. 


-'ili^ 


M 


Welcome 


n. 


Your name 
anrd 
address 
here ( 


Students! 






M3t»y of you are away at school for tli<3 first time— V/s weicon^ie 
your accounts. Put your finarices on a sound and sensible basis, 
open a bank account at the beginning of your school year— No 
possibility then of losing cash and you always have receipts for 
every transaction. 


Our officers always available for conferences with students. 


WIUIAM 6, FARNSWOBTH «^ 

:^^ leMAINSfl. ^ !^ 



Insured 
against 
alteration 


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Enjoy the safety features of 
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AFTER FIRST FREE BOOK 
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.•^ip5 




By CHARLIE .JOHNSON | 

Erection of the new, spacious ! 
Ackland Art Museum here on | 
Columbia St. i.' expected to bring j 
about considerable imprcivement j 
in the University's Art Dept. ' 

Work on the building has a'- 1 
ready started and it is anticipated ; 
that it will be completed in a j'car j 
and a half. \ 

The building itself is efitimated i 
at a cost of $800,000 with another I 
$100,000 allocated for equipmen*. I 
The interest on $1 million, donat ! 
ed by William Hayes Ackland 
(figured at approximately $30,000 
per year) will be utilized for the I 
acqui -ition of objects of art for! 
the museum. 

Ackland died in Washington in | 
1940. His will directed that his en- j 
tire $1,500,000 estate go toward e • j 
tabiJshment of a memorial art mu- 
seum, provided the university or i 
college getting the money would j 
install his tomb in the building i 
Duke University would not take it. j 
and Carolina won the bequo 't af I 
ter an eight-year court battle in 
volving Carolina, Duke and Rol- 1 
lins College. | 

The structure is designed in ! 
t'vo parts, with the gallery in the | 
front facing Columbia St. and the ; 
art school behind the gallery. On i 
the first floor of the school wil' I 
be the school of art history, the j 
art library and a lecture hall. i 

The second floor will contain 
clas rooms and art studios. Th? | 
sculpture department will be in j 
the basement. , 

The building will also contain a | 
memorial to the late Ackland. His ; 
white Italian marble tomb will be : 
in the main floor gallery. The new ! 
museum will also contain belong- 
•ngs and personal effects of Ack- 
land, in addition to other art col 
lections. j 

-;REAT ENTHUSIAS.Vl ! 

The University Art Dept !.■ hap 
oy over the new building. It will 
help in various ways, according 1 1 
lohn Allcott, head of the depart 
ment. Tlie new, enlarged gallery 
^jpace will allow for changing exhi 
bitions and a permanent collection 
Varioas collections have in the 
past been offered to the depart- 
ment, but a lack of space prevent 
od accepting them. These gifts can 
be accepted now. 

The new space i ■ tremendoush 
important for consolidation of all 
the effects of the department, All- 
cott .said. They are now spread over 
various parts of the campus. The 
new space will provide excellent 
classrooms and ."tudios and the 
establishment of a fine art library, 
he said. * 

The art staff is now made up of 
six members. "We have a very 
exceptionable staff; you can't beat 
fhcm any where in the country," 
according to Allcott. 

Degrees offered now by the dc 

Carolina Forum 
Celebrates \ 
20th Year \ 

The Carolin-a Forum celebrated 
its twentieth anniversary last 
year. 

Since its founding in 1935 this 
student-run speaker series- has 
brought to the campus national 
and international figures whose 
views have an important meaning 
in current affairs of tiie state, 
nation and world. 

During its two decades of exist- 
ence, the Forum has presented 
such .speakers as Governors Averill 
Harriman and Robert Meyner; so- 
cialist leader Norman Thomas. 
Senators William Knowland, Estes 
Kefauver and Robert Taft. and 
British Ambaayador Sir Roger 
Makins. 


partment include a B.A. and^^ 
M.A. in art hi.-lory or in »tu4i» 
creative ai't. But most of the 4tiC 
dents in the department are gMP 
eral University students who Ma 
taking courses in art but are VOf 
majoring in art. '-«** 

Over 60 art majors were enrol^' 
ed in the department Inst >e»r» 
and there were 575 individual slif' 
dents who took art coiir -JS. •"* 


Planetarium ^ 
ScheduhslO 5 
Fall Programs^ 

Tlie 1956-57 schedule of piM 
grams at the Mnrehead PlanefSP 
ium on the University campus 
was rec«T.t'y announced by Man- 
age,- A. F. Jcnzsno. 

Eight new celestial dramas and 
the populsr Christmas and Easter 
•'ories mke up the ye.ir.'^" pr-sram. 
starting September 25. Until th-;t 
date the interesting ?.n6 tamely 
•'Mars. Planet of Mystery" will be 
presented in the Planetari«i» 
chamber. 

The year's program schedu'e 
follows: September 25-October 22.1 
"Our Sun:"' October 23-November 
19, "Mister Moon:" November 20- 
December 31. "The Chrisim^s 
Story:" Janunry 1 - .January 28, 
"1957 Celestial Preview;" January' 
29-February 25. "Satellite ■:" Feb- 
ruary 26-March 27. "Weath«- 
Whys;" March 28-Aprii 29. "East-; 
er. the Awakening;" April SO-May 
27. "Signals from the Stars;" May 
28-Julv 1. 'Science Fiction;" and 
July 2 through September, 'A Trip 
to Venus." 



Bill Friday 


Bill Friday is acting president 
of the Consolidated University, 
the third youngest man to Hold 
the top executive post. He is 36 
years old. A story about Friday 
appears elsewhere in this paper. 


Serving The Student Body Since 
August 1,1899 



V- >':'■,* -t-x^M K 


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apelHill 


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1 - 


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LACOCK'S SHOE SHOP 


E. Franklin St. 


Phone 9-2976 


. ♦ 


»*<?^^ 


Jl^ 


Friday, septembbr 14, 19S« 


THE DAILY TAR HiEi. 


PAGE SEVEN 


1956 Pigskin 'New Looli' Brings Air Of Optimism To UNC 



Thft freshman of '56 couldn't have picked a better time to 
enter Carolina, athletically speaking. Things are looking up in all 
sports, especially the three that hold the fail spotlight. Football 
has Jim Tatum and the new look. Cross-country has Jim Beatty and 
a host cf rising sophs. Soccer has a goad chance for the conference 
crown. And the freshman football squad looks slighNy terrific. 
GRIDIRON DOPE 

The first lovf of most newcomers to the Hill will probably be Jim 
Talum's t'octball team How long before we'll be national champs, 
you'll ask The answer to that is rather uncertain, but it probably 
v.vn'l be this year Coach Tatum himself will tell you this present 
edition of the Tar Heels has far too many wcalt spots to be a really 
great team. 

Chief early season sore spot has been the line. "Our line lacks 
technique and finesse," says Tatum. "The potential ability is there, 
and if we could just bring it out and start to function, we could 
really go offensively." 
Tatum. speaking at a press conference here last Friday, was be- 
r.-iCaning the loss of his top quarterback, Dave Reed. "That's the worst 
thing that ever happened to me on a football field," he said. Reed suf- 
fered a knee injury that will keep him on the sidelines for the entire 
.s:fcun whea he was tackled from the blind side by an overeager team- 
mate. 'That bJy could have been one of the best quarterbacks in the 
land," he said. "He's the type player who can tear a defense to pieces 
v.hen he's right. With Reed in the lineup, I thought we might spring 
an upset or two this season, but now I'm doubtful," he went on to say. 
With Reed benched for the year, the search for a signal caller 
must begin an:w. Sophomore Curt Hathaway apparently has the inside 
tiuck, but a dark horse candidate named Doug Farmer has served no- 
tice he'll be a hard man to deal with. Farmer, a senior who didn't go 
( ut for football last season, has displayed a nifty touch with the pig- 
skin in fall drills, and could turn out to be a real surprise package. 
Inside tip: . . . Here are some other Tar Heels to wktch: 
Howard Williams and Don Kemper at guard, Vince Olen at end, 
and Emil DeCantis, Jim Varnum and Daley Goff at halfback. 

The Tar Heel backfield should have speed to burn. Ed Sutton and 
Larry McMullen. the starting halfbacks, are sprinters on the track 
t-am. So are Moe DeCantis and Varnum. DeCantis should be the top 
d:tsh man on the cinder squad next spring. Other gridders who double 
in track include Kemper. John Jones and John Bilich, shot put; and 
Luddy Payne and George Stavnitski, javelin. 

I'atum uncovered another possibility at his press conference 
that may come as a surprise to many. The Tar Heel mentor dis- 
closed to the sports scribes that McMullen may be held out this 
year if Sasser is moved back to halfbaci<. "The boy has everything 
a good halfback needs except polish," he said, "and we beHeve a 
little hard -work and close attention would turn him into a great 
player" --—---'---=-•,. 

Whenever anyone is inclined to wax too optimistic over the pig- 
skin cutlook, he need only take a look at the schedule to get a more 
realistic v •w of the situation. Half of the Tar Heel games this season 
i-re against teams rated among the nation's top twenty in many pre- 
s'iflson polls. O.klahoma. Notre Dame, Maryland and Duke are generally 
conceded spots in the top ten, while Tennessee, reportedly on the 
comeback trail, figures to finish somewhere in the second ten. Need 
.vc say more? , 

ON THE MrNOR SPORTS FRONT: 

It looks like a good year for cross-ountry and soccer. AH-.^m^rica 
Jim Beatty is back to pace the harriers, and he will be capably sup- 
I'jrted by soph Wayne Bishop and junior Everett Whatley. 'in spite 
(f intense competition from State and Maryland, we're willing to go 
cut on a limb and predict a conference crown for the runners. 

As for Coach Marvin Allen's hooters, the only thing that ap- 
parently stands in their way is a Nov. 17 date with Maryland's 
defending champs. If they get by this one, they should have a good 
chance to sweep all the marbles. 

Allen and cross-country coach Dale Ranson have issued a call for 
ail interested freshman athletes, runners and hooters both, to turn 
cut for practice as soon as possible, regardless of experience. Some 
if Carolina's greatest athletes have been boys who never played in 
}::gh school. Why not you". 
IT HAPPENED THIS SUMMER: 

UNC athletes were busy this summer. Jim Beatty spent the month 
of June on the west coast participating in track meets. He came home 
v.'ith a second place in the NCAA 5,000 meter run and a host of high 
finishes in other meets. For the past five weeks, the dininutive distance 
runner has been in Finland with an AAU team. 

Charlotte junior Gene Lookabill advanced to the quarterfinal 
round of the NCAA Golf Championships last June. Other Tar rtenl 
representatives didn't fare so well, however. 



Tar Heel Starting Backfield, Minus One 

Above is the backfield tabbed by Coach Jim T turn as his number one unit earlier this season. One 
change since that date has found sophomore Curt Ha «haway taking ever the quarterback duties from in- 
jured Dave Reed. The four are, left to right halfback Ed Sufton, fullback Giles Gaca, left halfback 
Larry McMullen and Reed. 

AMONG THE PICTURESQUE PINES . i 

Kenan Memorial Stadium: Natural 


In a natural valley about two 
, thousand feet from the center oi" 

the campus of the University an 1 
i ju.-'t above the spot long known 

as the Meeting of the Waters. 
I there is a natural amphitheatre, 
I easily approached by paths that 
' follow the lay of the land. 

The brook that flows through this 
! valley has cut a ravine so that the 

floor of the stream is level and 


smooth and the bank.i" rise with 
equal steepness on either side. 

Here is the site of Kenan Me- 
m.orial Stadium. In the complete- 
ness and harmony of its appoint- 
ments, the convenience of its i-oal- 
ing. and the beauty of its design 
and location, Kenan Memorial 
Stadium is unique mong the stadia 
of America. 

The stadium, truly one ol 



JIM TATOM 

...Sunny Jim comes home 



UNC Welcomes Back 
Jim Tatum As Coach 


Chapel Hill's beauty spots, was a 
gift of William Rand Kenan Jr.. 
a distingui.-hed and loyal son of 
the University of the Class of 
1894, and constructed as a me- 
morial to his mother, Mary (Har- 
grave), and his father, William 
Rand Kenan. 

The original cost was $275,000 
but the property is valued at man. 
times that figure now. of coura'C. 
Alter the stadium proper was 
built, a field house was added a 
one end of the field, where both 
the visiting and home teams dress 
for games. 

Conslructi.'n of the stadium wa 
begun in November, 1926t and 
completed in August. 1927. The 
first f>'>tbail game played there 
waiivhetween Carolina and David 
son on Nov. 12. However, the 
formal opening and dedication di 
not take place until the game wit 
Virginia on Thanksgiving Day. The 
Tar Heels won 14-13. 

The stadium, as originally built 
seated 24,000. For many years 
however, an ingeniou.- arrange 
mcnt of portable grandstands, used 
for all the games, has increased th^ 
capacity to 43 917 seats. On o- 
casions even this capacity has bee ■ 
increa.-ed, and games with Vir- 
ginin. Duke. Notre Dame and Tex 
as have accommiidated as many a 
46000. 

On one side of the stadium is 
a gi;es4.-_bpx. used by Trustees o 
the University and other specia" 
gue s. The press box. of simila 
oi't"ard design, is located on th'- 
other side', directly opposite. Gift 
from Mr. Kenan enabled a com 
pletc rebuilding of these structures 
in 1950. The now press box is of 
unique design, different from th 
.•.i-£\vling pre-ss boxes and highlv 
functional for reporters, radio 
men and photographers and has 
been highly praised for its beauty 
and utility. 

The stadium is used primarily 
for football games but on occasion'; 
other functions are held there, in 
eluding the annual Commencement 
e.xerci.-es of the University, con 
ducted in the twi-light. 


New Tatum Regime Will Try 
Jo Better Poor '55 Mark 
Against Rugged Competition 

Sophomore Curt Hathaway Replaces Reed 
At Quarterback; Sutton Shines At Halfback 

By LARRY CHEEK ' ** 

This is the ye;ir of the "new look" in Car »lina football. 
Wholesale rhantie.s have been made all the w:«v down the line in an effort to re.stue 
the Tar Heels from the gridiron doldrura in which they ha\e wallowed for the past 
six years. \ brand new coaching staff heade 1 by Jim Tatum has been brought in to re- 
plal(e the Geoige Barclay regime. New train rs have been added. F.\en the uniforms have 
been altered. ♦ ~ " 

And yet there remain two signifl- during spring drills. When Reed Pell at right tackle with Leu Rus- 
cant items that have changed very was injured, Sasser was shifted savage, victim of a leg injury all 
little!. The schcidule is a back break- i back to his old position. i last season, in the fourth position, 

ing one just , like last season, and ■ Front running candidate for the Russavage, a scholastic junior m 
the 'player personnel is es.sential- j^^y quarterback assignment is a ^'^ ^''"^^ year of varsity competi- 
ly the same as last year's when the six foot sophomore from Norfolk, ^ion, is the biggest man on th3 
Tar JHeels posted a dismal 3-7 rcc- ya., named Curtis Hathaway. Hath- squad, weighing in at 234 lbs. and 
ord.i awav was number one field- general standing six feet four inches taU. 

OPTIMISTIC OUTLOOK for the frosh squad last year and GUARD SPOTS SET 

Still there exists a decided air ; is considered a top prospect by the Transplanted fullback Don Lear 

of (Optimism in the UNC camp. ■ UNC brain trust. Ron Marquette, a ^"*^ Lenoir native Hap Setzer are 

Coach Tatum has termed his half- rangy junior who missed most of | currently rated tops at the guard 

back crop among the finest in the last season due to a leg injury, and spots. Lear, one of the team's top 

' lancl, and golden boy Ed Sutton Doug Farmer, senior veteran who blockers, rates the nod over ag- 

j is rated a prime All-America can- vvas a frosh sensation, are two oth- gf'^ssive but light Jimmy Jones at 

didaite. There s an abundance of er boys battling for the starting ^^^^ guard, with Howard W'illiams, 

I cxpt^'rience at the fullback slot with nod. 

j threje lettermen returning headed 

by slpring sen.sation Giles Gaca. But 


210 lb. junior who was also shift- 
ed from fullback, running third. 

Dick Smith, e 195 lb. Pennsyl- 
vania junior, was shifted from 
tackle to guard by Tatum. and is 


VETERANS TO START 

The halfback spots on opening 
at the quarterback post, there is a ^^y ^■^^^ y,^ canned by a pair of 
real stickler of a problem. battle tested veterans, if all goe- 

On the first day of practice, according to plan. Sutton has the i <^>""rently on the second team be- 
star ing quarterback Dave Reed, ^ight half position sewed up, while ^'""^ ^^^''^'" *^'^^^'" '"^'^ "^'^^ ^'" 
callM -one of the finest quarter- Larry McMullen. a 195 oound sen- 
bac^s I've seen" by Tatum, turned , j^r with speed to burn.* seems set 
up )|vith a knee injury that put him ^^ g^ at the left half slot 
cm the sidelines for the entire sea- 


be a host of shifty ball carriers. 
Emil DeCantis, a soph who doubles 
as a sprinter on the track team, 
is ruftning behind Sutton: while 
Daley: Goff and Dick Darling, a 
pair of juniors, are fighting fir 
the second string assignment be- 
hind McMullen. Juniors Jim Var- 
num, Charley Reed and Francis 


son. This leaves the Tar Heels with 
only one experienced caller, little 
Budjdy Sasser, the Conway, S. C, 
flas|i who was moved to halfback 

UNC Athletic 

Home Located 

Ih Gymnasium \ '^:^T^'X,„, „ ,„„. 

Woollen Gymasium, located on "'"8 ^'^h the first string unit at 

the Isouthea 'iern end of Ihe camp ' fullback. Although the Pennsylvan 

IS on Raleigh Rd., houses all the 1 ^ junior has the inside track, he 

■ithietic. ph.vsical education, and I "^ •^ejng seriously challenged by 

ntriamural offices. | three other junior line busters. 

Tlie model structure contains a ^'^^^y ^'^^^- the teams top punter, 
maip auditorium which covers j '•"* cui'rently running num»>er two; 
more than an acre. This indoor ' ^^^^ Haywood is number three and 
arena can seat 6,000 at basketbal' ^^^^ hmning Joe Temple is num 
'ames and c;ir, accommodate an '^^^ ^^"^- ^**" ^ear. last year's top 
nddor track which is longer than f"»f'a«'f. has been shifted to guard 
Mafjison Square Garden's. , *» '»<»'*t*^^ ^^e Tar Heel line. 

V^hon the seating arrangements -INEIS PROSLEM 


be counted on for duty at guard 
include junior Glenn Daughtry and 
sophs Don Kemper, Ray KryzaJc. 

Backing"up"7he7wo starters will TuJ^^!^ ^"'"V" Kemper, starting 

lullback on last years freshman 


year s 

team who has received praise from 
Tatum, Ls the number three choice 
at right guard, while Kryzak is rat- 
ed immediately behind him. 

The center spot will be capably 
manned by George Stavnitski, let- 
terman from Fairfield. Conn., in 
his third year of varsity play. Sophs 


'.erry, and soph Ed Lipski are oth- 1 H^""'' ^^'^ f "^ ^Z^' "^''d'^^"" ^iVe 

the Tar Heels a three man puneh 

•It center that can he matched by 

few schools in the country. Other 

center candidates are Donnie Kel- 

iey and Df:n Smith, a junior and 


nreltaken out, the firmer accomo 
dates four basketball courts. Bas- 
betball, badminton, volleyball and 
"ther snorts take pi nee here a 
part of the physical educatinn pro- 
gram. 

0|n the main floor. Jim Tatum 
nndi hi.' football staff occupy the 
left end of the building while ath 
letic director. Basketball Offices, 
and! Ticket Offices occupy the 
right end of the building. 

Coaches of intercollegiate and 
physical education sports have of- 
fice$ upstairs, along with the in- 
traiTiural office and three large 
clas^sroom-s-. 

Locker rooms, dressing facili- 
ties! and showers, and other sports 
roopis occupy the basement. 


ED SUTTON 

.flashy Tar Heel halfback 


The face in the above photo i." 
fast becoming a familiar one 
around the Carolina campus. Sunn\ 
Jim Tatum is back at Chapol Hil; 
after a fourteen year absence. And 
his coming has touched off cele 
bration among Carolina football 
followers everywhere. For during 
the fourteen years since he wa.- 
last at Carolina, the genial big 
man has made a name for himsell 
as one of the nation's really grcai 
football coaches. 

James Moore Tatum, 1935 grad- 
uate of Carolina, where he was a 
star tackle and catcher, scaled thi 
heights in his profession during 
his nine years at the University oi 
Maryland in 1947 55. 

Shortly before the opening of 
the 1955 season, the NCAA an- 
nounced that Tatum had the bes 
10-year record of any of the na 
lion's active football coaches. Dur- 
ing that period his teams achieved 
the phenomenal collection of 7( 
victories, 19 defeats and six lies 
Including last season, when Jim 
turned out an undefeated team for 
the third time at Maryland, and hi.'- 
one earlier year as head coach at 
Carolina in 1942, his record shows 
86 victories, 19 defeats and six ties. 


No current coach can match it. 

Tatum had three undefeated, un- 
ied teams at Maryland, five bowl 
'•ams and one natioal champion 
He elevated that school from a 
ootball shambles into a national 
power which annually ranked high 
n the polls. In 1953 he was hon- 
ored as "Coach of the Year." 

A colorful, spectacular and arti- 
ulate fellow, he is a prodigious 
vorker and superb organizer. He 
'<eeps long hour« on his job. F.Tr 
recreation, he likes golf best. At 
the game, characteri.stically, he 
ometimes lacks finesse but is pow- 
erful and potent. 

Th» 42 year old native of McColl. 
S. C. has posted a winning percent- 
age of .812 over his 11 years of 
"oaching. 

While at Maryland Tatum. ii. col- 
'abcration with able assistant War- 
••en Giese. now head coach a! 
"outh Carolina, wrote a scholar!' 
■■•oek called 'Toachin^j Footbal' 
and the Split-T". It has gone into 
many printings and i.s widely used 
IS a textbook. 

Tatum is married to the former | 
Edna Sumrell and they have three 
-hildren: daughters Becky (10) and 
Rcid (2), and son Jimmy (9). 


Footballers 
Have Rigid 
Time Table 

It's been "early to bed and early 
to rise" for Carolina football play 
ers during pre-season practice, 
which began on Sept. 1. 

New head coach Jim Tatum get* 
his stalwarts out of their sacks 
shortly after 6 a.m. every morn 
ing. Immediately upor rising, they 
are fed tomato or orange juice 
according to their preference or al- 
ie'-gies. At 6:45. the athletes report 
to the field, with practice ending 
at 8:30. 

After a rugged workout, the play- 
ers sit down to a hearty breakfas; 
at 9 o'clock. 

After breakfast, until 11 a.m., 
•hev attend to personal affairs 
such as writing to their living dolls, 
p' ay ing checkers, etc. 

Lectures occupy the period from 


11 to 12 each day and dinner fol 
owJ! at 12:30 p.m. 

Dinner is followed by a rest pe- 
•iod. with nap.s recommended, untii 
3:45 p.m.. when they report for af 
ternoon practice. Supper is serveti 
at 6:30 p.m. 

After a streaous day such as that, 
the tired young men usually weJ- 
-•onie a 10 o'ciock curfew for sleep. 

The Tar Htel head coach thinks 

he j probablv was the first head ■ u , j ^ . ,. ^ 

Lu . . 11 .u 1 • „ ^^^^ Coach Jjm Tatum has 

}oath to mstjill the earlv morning I ,. j , . 

.,!.,,. .. ! lined up a freshman coaching 

befpre-breakfast practices, now us ,«[,,• , u- .. 

- i . f. . ./.aff^ of five for this tail. 


ed by a number of coaches 

He hit up(m the idea his first 
year as a hesd coach, back in the 
wai year of 1942 when he first 
oathed the Tar Heels. The heavy 
tnoj-ning dew caused the balls to be 
wr( and slippery, but this paid off 
that very year. The Tar Heels play 
ed their first game, against favor 


ed Wake Forest, in the rain, and ' ^u<iation graduate school, 
nded a two year losing streak with I O^^^s are Ham Wade of Chap 
the Deacons. I ^^ ^'''' ^^*' "Student, who playe 

After the war. against the ad- ' his football as a fullback at Dav 
vice of assistant coaches, Tatum ^ 'dso": Hubert vJim) McGee Jr., oi 
had the pre-break practices I Greenville, alumnus of N. C. Stat 

during his one year ai Oklahoma, and Ea.st Carolina College, grad 
Bud Wilkinson went back to mid 
moirning drills, when he took over, 
but since then has gone back to 
ibc Tatum program. 


sophomore resDectively. 
PAYNE MAY STAR 

Lanky Buddy Payne, who may 
develop into (me of the best ends 
ever to perform at Carolina, is slat- 
ed to hold down the starting po- 
sition on the right flank; while sen- 
ior Larry Muschamp. only punter 
in the first team, currently rates 
the nod over the field at the left 
.»nd spit. 

Payne, a demon on defense and 
a starter last year in his sophomore 
season, may be slowed down by a 
":nee operation he underwent last 
-pring. If he turns un unfit for 
'uty. junior Paul Pulley, one of 
he squad's top pass receivers, will 
ake over. 

Charley Robinson and Vince 01- 
-n, both juniors, are pushing Mus- 
champ for the left end berth, with 
'tobinson. especially, being tabbed 
for future stardom. Other flank- 
men who may figure in Tatum"s 
olans are sophs Bernie Donalelli. 
Clyde Turlington. Charles Shelton 
and Takey Crist; junior Sonny 
'<"orbc^: and senior Bill Ellingtoij, 
the oldest man on the squad at 27. 
7UGGE0 SCHEDULE 

One look at the 10 game sched- 
ule is enough to dampen the hopes 
of the most ardent enthuiast. The 
Tar Heels once again must face 
-ome of the nation's strongest 
teams, beginning with Oklahoma 
in the second game and ending 
with arch-rival Duke in the last. 
In between, they must contend 
with such outfits as Notre Dame, 
Maryland. Tennessee and Georgia, 
not to mention Big Four rivals 
>tate and Wake Forest. 

No miracles are expected in fac- 
ing this back breaking schedule, 
*)ut Carolina's football Im'ers ex- 
pect to have a little fun this year. 

The complete schedule: 

Sept. 22— N. C. State at Chapel 
Hill. 

Sept. 29 — Oklahoma at Norman, 
Okla 

Oct. 6 — South Carolina at Coium- 
bia, S C. 

Oct. 13~Georgia at Chapel HilL 

Oct. 20— Maryland at Chapel Hiil. 

Oct. 27— Wake Forest at Chapel 
Hill. 

Nov. 3 — Tennessee ai Knoxvilie, 
Tenn. 

Nov. 10 — Virginia at Charlottes- 
uate student in Physical educa- ville, Va. 

tionj and John Murphy, forme Nov. 17 — Notre Dame at South 
head coach of Bridgeport, W. Va Bend, Ind. 
Higl^ ScfaooL I Nov. 24— Ouke at Chapel Hill. 


Thti biggest headache lacing Ta- 
'um is a lack of manpo\i^er in thr 
:orwajrd wall. The genial mentor 
has repeatedly warned Tar Heel 
oHowers that the line would not 
•e strong enough to carry the Blue 
md White through the murderou 
schedule that lies ahead. Brightcs; 
>pot In the forward wall is right 
tackle where giant 230 lb. Stewart 
Pell ijrovides a solid anchor foi 
he rest of the line. 

Pell, a transfer student with 
service experiences, was ineligible 
last season, but should be ready to 
terrorize the opposition this year 
Phil Blazer, a junior from Whitak 
•r, Pa., who sat out last season 
with an injury, will be Pell's run 
ling mate at left tackle, although 
he is being hard pressed by senioi 
letterman John Jones and John 
Bilich. Soph Fred Sveai'ngen i. 
runnjng fourth in the battle foi 
the left tackle assignment, wit!. 
Chapiel Hillian Tom ^ Maultsb> 
bringing up the rear. 

Doh Redding,' a rough tough 
soph and Stan Leftwich, 215 lb 
junic»r, are scheduled to back up 

Coaching Staff Set 


Filed Tullai, full-time staf, 
memjber, and head freshman coach. 
willjhave four student assistants 
Tatujm announced. 

Bcfb (Goo-Goo) Gantt of Albe 
mark, star North Carolina back 
in the class of 1952, heads thi» 
groulp. He will be in the physical 


PAGE EIGHT 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 



TEN LETTERMEN RETURN 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER H, 1%^ 


Potent Soccer Squad Sets 
Sights On Conference Title 


Outstanding Newcomers 


Above are four of Coach Jim Tatum's top sophomore prospects. and Hathaway are currently running first strfvig, while the other two 
They are, left to right: tackle Phil Blazer, quarterback Curt are on the second team. 
'Hathaway, center Ronnie Koes and halfback Emil DeCantis. Blazer * .' 


WELCOME 

FROM 

->* 

LEDBETTER-PICKARD / 

YOUR SOURCE FOR 

^ College and Social Stationery 

^ Esterbrook, Parker, And Shaeffer Pens 

^ Hallmark and Gibson Greeting Cards 

i^ School Supplies— Ink, Blotters, Note Books, Pencils, Paper, 
T/pe Ribbons, Rubber Stamps, etc. 

^ Lamps 


Olympic Bound 

Fate and the Olympic trials 
brought t(;g(.'lher a pair of former 
UNC swimming co-captains and \ 
could put them tojitther on the 
plane for Australia and the Olym- ' 
pie Gaines. 

Stan Tinkham of Washington. D 
C. and Donnie Evans of Charlotte. 
1952-53 UNC cu-captains. may go 
to .Melbourne, but in different ca- 
pacities, j 

Tinkham is definitely going, as 

coach of the United States women's 

team. ["Lvans will go as a freestvler ; 

I 
should one of the four regulars ' 

mi.ss the trip. He finished fifth by 

a split decision in the recent De- 

troit trials and was named first al- ^ 

ternate in that event. I 


Coach Marvin 'Allen and his 
North Carolina soccer squad begin 
practice Monday with one though 
uppermost in their mindj-. That 
15 to beat Maryland and" knock 
the Terps uut of the co.nfereiice 
championship .for the first time 
since the Atlantic Coach Confer- 
ence was formed four years ago. 

The Tar Heel booters almos 
made it la.st year, finishing »«3c 
ond to the Terps in the final stand 
ings. The present squad figures, on 
paper at least, to be even strong 
er than last year's edition. Coac'. 
Allen ha.? t.en lettermeft return- 
ing plus a host ol talented sopho 
mores from last fall's unbeaten 
frosh squad, rated by' observers 
as one of the finest in Tar Heel 
hi -Lory. ' 

Tapping the list of returnees i.*^ 
captain Grover Brown, who is se 
to go at one halfback slot. An- 
;)thsr letterman halfback return 


ing is Bill Blair, a mairistay on last 
year's squad. 

At fonvard. Coach Allen can ca!' 
on a trio of lettermen for depend- 
able service. They are Frank But 
ler, Charle..- Covell and Pat Mc 
' ?ormick. one -of the lop scorer.*- 
from las' season's team. 

Fullbacks on hand include Mikf 

Galifianakis. John Harris and Ted 

Tones. Jihn Foster, h junior wh' 

also .•"lines on the tennis courts 

will hold dowh the left wing po- 

■iition, while baseballer Chuck 

Hartman will handle the goalie 

duties. 

; Sev^n booters up from the frosh 

I squad wil greatly strengthen thf 

I varsity. The saphs who should 

•.jarkle are Coleman Barks, Ricky 

i Grausman. Pete Killinger. Jimm\ 

' Purks and Tom Rand, forwards: 

ind Bob Borden and Dave Corkey 

."ullbacks. Ted Yohanna. a native 

)f Baghdad, Iraq, is a transfe: 


student from (jjampbell CoUegr 
who should see jmuch action. 

Tar Heel hopds for a succes.:,*fu 
veason were deplt a jolt earlie- 
this summer wh^n co-captain eleci 
Pete Cothran graduated in sum 
Tier school and 'decided n't to re- 
turn for his finjrt year of eligibility. 
Cothran was the sparkplug of th< 
Tar Heel attack all last season. 

There are two newcomers ti 
this years eight game schedul. 
Lynchburg College will be here for 
the season's opener of Oct. 8. and 
the Davidson Wildcats will pa' 
Chapel Hill a visit Oct. 19. 

Although Duke is reported to b 
stronger thi.- year, the main wo ■ 
ry in the Tar Heel camp is Mary 
land. The Terps look better than 
ever, and will be hard to dislodgf 
from the top of the heap. "Oui 
game with Maryland on the last 
day of the season is the key to 
to the entire year," said Coach 
.\llen. "This is the one we're 


pointing for. and if tilings gtk 
•ight, I believe we can do it," hfe* 
concluded. , «»» 

Coach Allen aL-j issued a call ^ 
all interested freshmen to come 
on down and begin working out 
with the varsity Monday, althoug'i 
freshman practice doesn't official- 
ly begin until the later part of the 
month. 

The varsity schedule: :«w 

Oct. 8 — Lynchbury College Jtt 
Chapel Kill. 

Oct. 16 — Washington 4 Lee at 
Lexington, Va. 

Oct. 19 — Davidson at Chapol 
Hill. 

Oct. 24— N. C. State at Chapel 
Hill. 

Nov. 1 — Roanoke College at SaN 

em, Va. 
Nov. 8 — Virginia at Chapel Hill. 
Nov 13— Duke at Durham. » 

Nov. 17— Maryland at College 

Park. Md. 



OME FROSH! 


For Recreation — Carolina s Newest 
Tavern ~ Next To Town & Campus — 

Cool Beverages & Music 

The Tempo Room 



UNC Head Coach Jim Tatum is shown above flanked by his six 
man staff of assistants. The coaches are, left to right: Pat Preston, 


Eddie Teague, Ed Kensler, Emmett Cheek, Tatum, Fred Tullai and 
Ed Hickey 


Jim Tatum Gathers Six-Man Coaching- 
Staff To Help Tutor UNC Gridders : 


F'art of the celebrated "new look'.' 
ui Carolina footbau is an energetic 
and capable six - man assistant 
coaching staff that head Coach Jim 
Tatum has gathered around him. 

The .six assistants — Emmett 
Cheek, Eddie Teague, Ed Kensler, 
Pat Preston. Jim Hickey and Fred 
Tullai— are all hand picked men 
c.f provtn ability. Here, by way of 
introduction to the UNC students, 
is a rundown on each one of these 
men who contribute so much to 
the making of a Carolina football 
team. 

For Emmett Cheek, it was home- 
coming when he followed Coach 


WELCOME 


FRESHMEN 


,^:^ 


Your Friendly Chapel Hill Barber Shops Are 

Always Willing To Serve You With Expert 

Barbers And Excellent Facilities 


^«<;*> 


'Where Clipping Is Legar 


Carolina 


University 


Tar Heel 


Jim Tatum t(j> Chapel Hill and Car- 
clir.a. Chapelj Hill is his home and 
Carolina his' alma mater. Cheek 
was a star gjuard here under Carl 
Snaveh in the years ol the Justice 
era. i 

While worlking on his Masters 
here in 1949 land '50, Cheek sen ed 
as line coach and head baseball 
ciach at Gujilford. After complet- 
ing work onjhis Master's, he join- 
ed Tatum at jMaryland and remain- 
ed with him for five seasons. 

At Marylahd Cheek and Eddie 
Teague werle the Terps' chief 
scouts. The tWo wrote and publish- 
ed a successjful book on scouting. 
He will work on the field here at 
Carolina in addition to his scout- 
ing duties. 

OUTSTANDING RECORD 

Eddie Teague is another coach 
with a sparkling record as a play- 
er. Teague began his career as a 


brilliant schoolboy performer in 
his nanve Washington, D. C. He 
was a three sport man at N. C. 
State in 1942. and in 1943, he shift- 
ed io Carolina as a serviceman in 
the V-12 program and made the 
All-Conference team and All-.^m- 
erica honorable mention under 
Tom Young. 

Teague was both head coach and 
athletic director at Guilford dur- 
ing the post war years after his 
graduation from Carolina in 194.3. 
He joined Tatums staff at Mary- 
land in 1952. 

Pat Preston, a Wake Forest 
grad, has the most illustrious car- 
eer of anyone on the coaching 
staff. A native of ThcmasviHe. 
Preston gained .All-.America hon- 
ors in his college days while per- 
forming fur both Wake Forest and 
Duke. 

He was an outstanding guard for 
the Chicago Bears pro football 


Village 


WELCOME 
FRESHMEN 


REASONABLE 
PRICES 


HOME-COOKED 
MEALS ' 


PLEASANT 
SERVICE 


I MODERN 

j ACCOMMODATIONS 

I N.C CAFETERIA 

i 

I "HOME OF GOOD FOOD" 
two Doors From Bank of Chapel Hill 


team in 1946, and was termed by 
Coach George Halas as "one of the 
hardest hitting linemen I've ever 
seen.'" 

Preston joined the Wake Forest 
coaching staff in 1951. .serving as 
line coach, end co&ch. talent re- 
cruiter and scout. In an athletic 
upheaval at Baptist Hollow, he was 
named athletic director in 19J4 
and was serving in that capacity 
when brought to Carolina by Ta- 
tum. 

Another man with long expeti- 
ence in the coaching and adminis- 
trative field is Jim Hickey. Before 
joining the staff here at Carolina, 
Hickey had a five-year tenure at 
Hampden-Sydney College. He w^as 
five years head coach there and 
four years athletic director. He 
was named "Coach of the Year" in 
Virginia for the second consecu- 
tive year in 1955 when his team 
had 'an 8-1 record. 

A native of Springdale, Pa. Hic- 
key attended William and Mary 
where he played in the all-impori- 
cmt tailback slot. From William 
and Mary, he moved to John Mar- 
shall high school at Richmond, Va., 
where five years of successful 
coaching stamped him as one . pf 
the nation's outstanding young 
coaches. He went to Harr.pdcii- 
Sydney from John .Marshall. 

The youngest man on the T-ar 
Heel coaching staff is Fred Tullai, 
a 1955 graduate of Maryland. T-ul- 
,!i<i played three years of varsUy 
football at Maryland, and starred 
ai both the center and guard slo4.s 
for the Terps. 

In addition to his college experi- 
ence as a player, Tullai was^ a 
standout as a service player while 
in the Marine Corps. Tullai will 
handle the freshman head coach- 
ing duties here. 

These men work for the most 
part behind the scenes. They work 
with individual players, drill the 
squad for long hours on fundamen- 
tals, and turn in detailed scouti'pg 
reports on opposing teams. Togeth- 
er with head coach Tatum, th'py 
form a well oiled machine desisn- 
to bring football victory to the 
Carolina Tar Heels on Saturday af- 
ternoons 


F' ii 


At 
If 

in 

that 

that 

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will 

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bask< 

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such 

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sendi^ 
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ever 
tice, 
John-H 
Carol 
South! 
new.- 

Tw< 
cludii 
were 

Th( 
paren| 
^Inda 
Mone^ 
Darlir 
.\.C.: 
Bress| 
ton 
ton 
Elizal 
eph 
Pa: 
Al<j|ui^ 
Clark 
Jin 
mont.l 
(230)] 
JosepI 
Va., 
Atlani 

Tacl 
Fayetj 
McCai 
Brunf 
ley, 
(205:, 
Steel 
N.C; 
i235)i 
son 
W. 
(220>j 
Eugeil 
Cynwj 
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R;^bei 
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a el 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER M, 1954 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE NINE 


Talent Laden Harrier Squad Begins Practice Monday 


Athletics At UNC 
Is For Students 


By DAVIS MERRITT, JR. 

UNC Asst. Sports Publicist ' 
Athletics at Carolina? ^ ' 

It's a tremendous area to cover 
in one column. Suffice it to say 
that you are standing at the door 
that leads to a great experien-ce in 
sports. 

Whether you are "athletus acti- 
vus" or athletus armchairus," you 
will find athletics at Carolina big 
enough for pride, yet small enough 
to consider everyone. 

You have the f(M)tball team play- 
ing l>(?fore 40,000 and some other 
sports playing before 40, yet there 
are no 'minor sports* at Carolina. 
'.Minor sport' is a label forbidden 
in the USC Athletic Department. ' 
Sports include not only football, | 
basketball and baseball, but track, ' 
tennis, golf, soccer, lacrosse, wrest- 1 
ling, swimming and cross country. ! 
And on Big Four Sports Day, there ; 
is competition among UNC, N. C. 
State, Wake Forest and Duke in j 
such intra-mural sports as ping | 
pong. Softball, touch football, horse- \ 
shoes, volleyball, badminton and | 
many others. 

• • • 

So this is the athletic program 
that lies before you. It includes 
40,000 seat Kenan Stadium, 5,500 


There are cynics who will voice | 
the "opposite opinion, but these are ' 
the real indispensables of Carolina ; 
athletics. Jim Tatum, .Frank Mc- ; 
Guire, Ralph Casey, all could be 
•eplaced (though admittedly at high ' 
cost), but the* guy in the grand- i 
stand and his folks and friends pay i 
the freight and pull the entire ■ 
train. Without him. the entire pro- 
gram would die from atrophy. 
• • * 

Carolina athletics have had their 
black days as well as their golden 
days — football seasons devoid of ! 
bright spots, contir^ial basketball 
losses to rivals, springs full of mis- 
ery. 

But you are entering this door | 
to athletics at a fortunate time. A ' 
time when all phases of the pro- i 
gram are showing an upward trend. 

Look down the line: 

Track has its All-American in I 
Jim Beatty, a dogged distance run- ' 
ner, plus a host of other rising i 
stars like Ronnie Austell, Wayne | 
Bishop and Dave Scurlock. I 

Basketball is the big hope this j 
year, with All-America Lennie Ros- 
enbluth and a team loaded with 
experiencced veterans and talented 
sophomores. 

Football has Jim Tatum and new 



"Experienced Veterans 
I Will Spearhead Team 


seat Woollen Gym. huge Emerson life, plus a dazzling airay of fresh- 
(baseball) Stadium, Fetzer (track, man recruits, 
soccer) Field, 18 hole Finley Golf Baseball has a host of Jp+termen 
Course, spacious Bowman Gray In- returning with the promise of 
door Pool and six varsity tennis , stronger hitting this spring, 
courts. I . • * • 

These are inhabited by the big | Swimming has All- America Char- 
names, Sutton, Beatty, Rosenbluth, j lie Krepp, the NCAA champion- 
Raugh . . . they have been inhabit- j ships here in March, and an ex- 
ed by other big names — Justice, ; perienced team of returning let- 
Glamack. Simmons, Seixas, Ward, I termen. 

Thomas . . . Bu? they are also in- Wrestling has some experienced 
habited by guys like Jones, O'Don- men for a change and promises to 
nell. Smith and Jackson, and these ' stage a comeback after several bad 
are the real stais. years. 

The guy in the Rep tie and three ' Lacrosse gets another chance fol- 


button coat who sits in Kenan on 
crisp Saturdays: the guy in the Ber- 
mudas who watches baseball in the 
hot spring afternoons; the fresh- 
men, sophomores, juniors and sen- 
iors who pull for the Big Blue all 
year long. 


lowing re-instatement as a varsity 
sport. 

Tennis has three regulars back 
plus the South's finest young pros- 
pects. 

They are all preparing for an- 
other golden era. 


UNC All-America Candidate 

Stewart Pell, giant Tar Heel tackle shown above, is rated one of 
the country's top tackles by experts. Pell will be in the starting 
i lineup when Carolina tangles with State in° the season's opening 
I game Sept. 22. 

Here's How To Get In 

! Carolina students are admitted to home football games when they 
j present their athletic pass books and ID cards at the gate on the home 
I side of the field. 
j For games away from home, if they are with other conference 

teams, students will be able to get in for half price by presenting 
I their pass books and ED cards to the Woollen Gym office about a week 
1 before each away _ game. Stubs with seating location in the stadium 

will be given at the ticket office. Pass books and ID cards must also 

be presented at the away stadium. 
i If a student desires to get a ticket for any game for his date — 

i and she is not a coed — he must present his pass book at the ticket 
j ttfice here during the week before the game in order to get seats 
I together. Date tickets cost the regular adult price. If a student" s date 


8y RAY LINKER 

' What promises to be one of the 
I finest cross-country teams in Caro- 
\ Una history will begin regular 
', practice sessions Monday morning 
I under the experienced eye of 

Coach Dale Ranson. 

I Six returning lettermen from 

' last ycafs state championship 

squad Will form a nucleus for this 

.season's team, while there will be 

I eleven numeral winners from last 

j year's undefeated freshman team 

moving up to try for spots on the 

! varsity squad. 

The list of returnees is headed 

, by renowned Jim Beatty, Charlotte 

: senior who returns next week 

from an AAU tour of Finland with 

I eight other top American distance 

runncxs. 

Beatty, an All-American in the 
; two mile, won the conference cross- 
country championships in both his 
sophomore and junior years, and 
. looms as a heavy favorite to re- 
peat this year. 

I FLASHY SOPH 

Also expected to burn up the 
j trail for the Tar Heels this season 
1 is Wayne Bishop, top man on last 
year's freshman team. Bishop, who 
; Iiails from Greenville, was unbeat- 
en last season and won the state 
I frosh championship. Bishop came 
I within a very few seconds of Beai- 
! ty's record for the freshman 
I course. 

j Letterman E^rerett Whatley, jun- 
ior from Atlanta, and Dave Scur- 

' lock, a sophomore from Greens- 
boro, will be gunning for top po- 


Monogram 
Club Aids 
Athletics 


is a coed, they need only present their pass books at the gate at game 
time. 

The dates that the students must appear for date tickets and for 
r.way game tickets will be announced by the athletic office from time 
to time. 


Fifty Eight 
Candidates 


Freshmen Grid 
Begin Practice 


Paul Russell (205), Bridgeport. 
W. Va. 

Centers: James Edwin Davis 
(190), Elco. Pa.: Robert Michael 
Fitzula (200), Carteret. N.J.; Rich 
ard Finch Need (200), Castleton 


lino, Jr. (215), Monessen. Pa.; 
Charles Dowd Gray (190) Gaston , 
ia. N.C. I 

Quarterbacks Thomas Leon Lit- 
tle (175) Raleigh. N.C: Jerry 
Wofford Amofi (170), Charlotte. 
N.C; Michael Joseph Kopnski 
(182), Morgantown, W. Va.; Rich- 
ard Chapman Pattisall (190), Clint- 
woon, Va.; David Nelson Lowe 


Fifty -eight freshman football ion, Jr. (218), Eddystone, Pa.; 
candidates reported to practice j George Edward Crawley (230). 
at North Carolina last week, with { Wilson, N. C; Stanley Allen Rob- 
Coach Fred Tullai and his staff | erson (205), Henderson, N. C: 
sending them through their first ! Kermit Layfette Guthrie. Jr. (215) 
Forkoul Thursday. | New Bern, N. C; Bobby MyUnger 

• The group, one of the largest Stanton (227), Port^miouth, Va.; 
ever to be invited for early prac- j 
tice, included fullback Cornell 
John^'an of High Point, who chose i 
Carolina over N. C State and ; 
South Carolina alter a publicized i 
newspaper controversy. ; 

Twenty-five native Tar Heels, in- i 
eluding three from New Bern, i 
were in the gn>up. i 

The player.s. with weights in 1 
parenthesis: ! 

«Ends: John Francis Stunda (205), 
Monessen, Pa.; Robert Fairchild | 
Darling (185). Elizabeth City, j 
N.C; Edward Frank Furjanic (218). I 
Sressler, Pa.; Charles Thomas Cot-j 
ton (205). Providence. R.L; Clay- ! 
ton Bernard Smith, Jr., (190), I 
ELizabethtown. N.C; Francis Jos- 1 
eph Dobrowlski (195). Natrona, | 
Pa.; Ronald George Markel (195), 
Alquippa, Pa.: Harold Douglas 
ClaA (200), Hazel wood. N.C; Co- 
Jin Fraser Smith (180), Clays- 
mont, Del.; Alva Donald Stallings 
(230), Rocky Mount, N.C; James 
Jos^h Jenrett (226), Portsmouth 
Va.; Ralph Michael Pittman (198). 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Tackles: Earl Ray Butler (230), 
Fayetteville, N.C; Franci.v Xavier 
MfCann (240), Phoenixville, Pa.: 
Bruno Anthony Ra.so (215), Sewick- 
ley, Pa.; Frederick Otto Mueller 
(205), Iselin, N.J.; Ralph Thoma^ 
Steel (230), Nr>rth Wilkesboro. 
N.C; Michael RicJiard McDade 
(235), Rochester. Pa.; Jimmie Nel 
»on Buzzard (230), Pennsboro 
W. Va.; Phillip Joseph Reinhard' 
<220), Harrisburg, Pa.; Edward 
Eugene Monoghan (235), Bala- 
'Cyo'wyd, Pa.; 

Guards: Robert Albert Bran- 
nan (198), Newton Square. Pa.- 
Robert Edward Kordalski (195), 
S^Iem, Ma.-'s.; Frederick Henry 
Harris (185). Rocky Mount, N.C; 
I>obney Ellis Wooldridge III (190), 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; Joseph Pel- 
ligrinj (198). Yatesboro, Pa.; Luth- 
er Truett Lineberger (180), Gas- 
tonia. N. C; Dominic Josepb Mar- 


(194). N. Wilkesboro, N.C. 

Halfbacks: David Lee Leffler 
(190), Arlington, Va.; James Clar- 
ence Crew (183), Morganton, N.C; 
John B. Cummings (190), Lower 
Merion, Pa.; Herman Edwin Ray 
(185), Burlington, N.C; Ronald 
Herbert Hopman (185), Salem 
N.J.: Larry Gene Frederick (188) 
Goldsboro, N.C: Edward Porcher 
Brunson, Jr. (160). Albermarle, 
N.C; Thoma.-r M. Howerton (170) 
Madison Fla.; Wade Marvin Smith 


! All winners- of Carolina athletic 
' letters are eligible for membership 

in the Monogram Club. 
I One of the main purposes of 
I the club is to act as a service or- 
j ganization. 

The club holds open houses af- 
ter some of the home football 
, game^• for students and alumni. A 
Bowman Gray Indoor Pool next i "^^"^ ^^^^^ ^" important game is 
spring will be the site of Caro- "'"^"^ ^^^^ *^"""S '-^« •^o^^*'*" 
Una's third NCAA championships s^^^^on. 

in three years. I Inuring the spring, the club's ef- 

', I forts are directed toward having 

a successful Blue-White football 
game, wnich is the intra-squad 


NCAA Swimming Meet 
Set Here Next March 


on-Hudson, N.Y.; John Robert Mai- 1 (170). Albermarle, N.C; David 


Eart Smith (187), New Bern, N.C: 
Billy Atkinson (160), New Bern, 
N.C. 

Fullbacks: Loyd J. Hepler (185) 
Thomasville, N.C; James Warren 
Stevens (210), Hazelwood, N.C; 
Harry Cornell Johnson (190), High 
Point, N.C; George Kirk (180). 
Sewickley, Pa. 


The executive committee of the 
NCAA announced recently that 
North Carolina has been awarded 
the 1956-57 swimming champion- 
ships set for March 28-30. It will 
be the .second time that spacious 
Bowman Gray Pool has been host 
to the nation's top collegiate swim- 
mers. The first NCAA .swim meet 
here was in 1949. 

A national tourney will be noth- 
ing new for UNC's athletic pro- 
gram. The Tar Heels put on the 
1955 NCAA tennLs championships 
and the 1956 gymnastics event. 


game between evenly divided 
teams. This game officially ends 
the team's spring practice. 

The club provides programs and 
concessions at this game and help* 
in other ways. 

According to the constitution of 
the club, the purpo^s and ob- 
jectives are to aid athletics of the 
University, to seek to improve our 
intercollegiate relationships 
through the sports program, and *o 
serve the University in any ca- 
pacity in which the club Ls uer.d- 
ed. 


sitions along with Baltimore soph 
Howard Kahn. 

Marion Griffin, Larry Thames 
and Frank Bernhardt, all seniors 
from Charl(>tte, and Ronnie Har- 
wood, senioi* from Winston-Salem, 
are the other lettermen who fig- 
ure prominently in the plans of 
Coach Ranson. 

Bill Luesjing of Huntington, W. 
Va., and Nick Palmer of Valdese, 
two numeral winners last year for 
the freshmen, are expected to im- 
prove with Iversity experience. 

PROVIDE DEPTH 

Ennis Robinson of Wrightsville 
Beach, Walt Mills of Charlotte, 
James Menzel of Southern Pines, 
Don Furtado of Garner, Vic Hug- 
gins of Chapel Hill, and Alex Foe- 
fin of Asheboro won numerals last 
year and should provide depth to 
the varsity squad. 

The UNC cross-country course, a 
distance of 3.7 miles for the var- 
sity, starts on the Fetzer Field 
track and winds around the prac- 
tice football fieid, past Kenan Sta- 
dium, behind the nurses dorm, and 
through the woods and on to the 
Durham Highway. Mter a short 
distance, it leaves the road and 
goes into the woods and finally 
winds around the football practice 
field, ending on the track. 

Freshmeh run a similar course 
but cover a distance of only 2.2 
miles. 

FRESHMAN SCHEDULE 

A scliediiile of eight to ten meets 
is being lined up for the frosh 
squad, according to Coach Ranson. 
Meets are set with Duke, State, 
and Wake! Forest, twice each; the 
state freshman meet; and possibly 
East Meckjlenburg High School and 
Myers Park High. 

The varsity faces a tough eight 
meet schedule. The season opens 
with a dlial meet with Virginia 
here on Obt. 5, and the conference 
meet at Clharlottesville on Nov. 19 
closes the campaign. 

The corhplete schedule: 

Oct. 5J-Virginia at Chapel Hill. 

Oct. 121 — Clemson, State and 
South Carolina at Columbia, S. C. 

Oct. 20; — Maryland and Wake 
Forest at; Chapel Hill. 

Nov. 3 — Tennessee at Knox- 
ville, Tenb. 

Nov. 6-j-Duke at Durham. 

Nov. 12 — State Championships at 
Raleigh. I 

Nov. 10 — ACC Meet at Char- 
lottesville. 

FcH^tball 'Days' Set 

Three Special '^days" will bright- 
en pre-gkme and halftime festivi- 
ties at the Carolina home football 
games this fall. 

The battle with Georgia, Oct. 13, 
will mefk the traditional Home- 
coming igame, wiiii all the trim- 
mings abd the old grads I'eturn- 
ing. 0<t. 20, with Man-land's 
strong l"erps in town, will be 
Dad's Day, and the Oct. 27 date 
with W|ake Forest marks Band 
Day, when several thousand high 
school musicians will gatlier on 
Kenan's! turf for a gigantic and 



DAVE REED 

sidelined by knee injury 


WELCOME 

TO 

CAROLINA 


UGGINS 


ARDWAR 


colorful 


WELCOME 

NEWCOMERS 

We Are Set Up 
To Serve You With 


MODERN SHOE 
REPAIR EQUIPMENT 

EXPERT WORKMEN 


ALL TYPES OF SHOE 
POLISH AND SUPPLIES 

QUICK, EFFICIENT AND 
ECONOMICAL SERVICE 


COLLEGE SHU-FIXERY 

Two Doors From Post Office 


halftime show. 



ANY WAY YOU 
LOOK AT IT.... 


You Caii 
Get Clipped 

FOR LESS 
AT 


Graham Memorial 
Barber Shop 




IN THE 

BASEMENT 

OF 

GM 


HOURS 9-5:30 
MONDAYSATURDAY 


?"^*^r 


Mr{.% 


Haircuts Are 
Just 90^ 

GRAHAM MEMORIAL BARBER SHOP 


STEVEKS^ SHEPHERD 

EXTENDS A CORDIAL . 

WELCOME! 


TO 


FRESHMAN STUDENTS 

MAY YOUR YEARS AT THE UNIVERSITY BE THE 
HAPPIEST OF YOUR LIFE. 

Come In - Register - Win 

OUR 

BACK TO SCHOOL 

CONTEST! 

Be The Lucky Winner Of One of The Following 

Prizes: 

1st PRIZE — Imported Tweed Sport Jacket 
2nd PRIZE— Crew-Neck Shetland Sweater 
3rd PRIZE— Ivy League Dress Shirt 

No Purchase Necessary! 

Simply Register In The Store 

FOR ALL YOUR CLOTHING NEEDS: SHOP THE 
FINEST MEN'S SHOP ON ANY 

CAMPUS! ^ 


•"'tr' 


STEVBKS- SHBPHERD 


\ 



■-■r--^— ' 


..'•-'rf * j^t . «. i*i ^M.mt^tLJlJla^^0f^iJa 




PACE TEN 


THI DAILY TAR HECL 


miOAY, fiPTPMBCR 14/YfSf 


GM Is Center Of UNC Extracgrriculars 


By CLARKE JONtS 
The stitdent uflkm buadillg— ^t- 
ter known as Gribam HtJAwiid^ 
is the center of student extracurri- 
cular life. Let's tatt« a \otik d'tiie 
different rooms in the hoildtng and 
briefly note what they are used 
for. 

tlie place to start is on the main 
floor. The main attraction htit is 
the spadous lounge where shidents 


come to read, talk or maybe just a cup of coffee and pastries from 
relax, listening to music piped j a machine. 

through from the information of- j Adjoining the coffee room-kit- 
fiee's hi-n set. | chen is a television room, equipped 

Sometimes you wiU see two stu- i to seat about 25 TV viewers. 
dents en^ged in a game <rf chess, j You walk through the coffee 
On Sunday nights, the Petite MUsi- j room-kitchen and go all the way 


be play you a record— GM recently j south end is the assistant directors all the canipus acti\ities. 


cj|les acre presented here. 

At the nwth end (xf the building 
is a eombiiiatien coffee room-kit- 


down to the end of the hall. Here 
is the information office, where 
the person in charge will check out 


ehen. Here you can buy for a dime, ! to you ping-pong equipment, may- 1 


acquired 100 new hi-fidelity re- 
cords — or simply provide you with 
information. 

Jtist around the comer from the 
information office is the office of 
the director — ^Miss Linda Mann, a 
1956 UNC graduate. 

The two stairways leading to the 
second floor each have mezzanine 
landings about midway. On the 


(Dan Turner) office and mimeo- i Across the hall from the fund of- 
graph and embossograph machines, i fice are the offices of The Daily 
The north end is the office of the j Tar Heel, campus nev/spaper. 


Constant U^e Is Made 
0/ University Library 


Carolina Quarterly, student liter- 
ary magazine. 
SECOND FLOOR 

At the top of the stairs is the 
Student Activities Fund office. 
£[eaded by Harry Kear, the office 
tiikes care of the accounting for 



WELCOME 


INCOMING 


:jf ^ 


•A;0^ X^^i'-m 




CAROLINA 


C 




STUDENTS 




'i* iir^ ■ 


X r*""* t,*-' •«- i'^i^ 


The Welcome Mat is ouf-We want to meet you and get ac- 
quainted. We invite your inspection and will welcome your 


criticism. 


. ra 


In order to make it more appealing, we will have 


OPEN HOUSE 


-^ -,f 


4 i 




Tv 




On Freshman Day 

Refreshments Will Be Servedl 
Souvenirs For Coeds! 




^. ':^- t 


n 


iv «*■ 


Be Our Guests! 


''m 


^-y^...-. 




l.\ 


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I Down the hall past the newspa- 

! per offices and the fund office 

I are the Roland Parker Lounges 1, 

2 and 3. Large meetings are held 

in these rooms, which hold 150-200 

persons. 

Carolina's two political organiza- 
tions, the student Party and the 
University Party, stage their meet- 
ings here. 

Directly opposite th(j RP Lounges 
are the student government offices 
where the student bcdy president 
— thi.'. year Bob Young, senior from 
Asheville — and other student body 
officers work. 

Next to the president's office is I 
the Woodhouse Conference Room, i 
Meetings and conferences of dif- | 
ferent sorts are held here. The I 
room gets its name irom Edward | 
i James Woodhouse, a political sci 
j ence professor here J'rom 19?6-54. 
! Adjoining this room is the Coun- i 
cil Room, where violators of the , 
! campus and honor codes are tried 
I by the men's and women's councils. I 
I The Women's Residence Council i 
I also holds meetings here. ! 

; Directly opposite the Council ' 
Room is the joint office of the 
Publicationis Board and the Caro- 
lina Foriim. 
At the end of the hall on the 
: left is the Graham .Memorial Ac- j 
[ tivities Bo^rd office. GMAB annu- ' 
1 ally sponsors such activities as 
band concerts, bridge and dance in- 
stiuctions, free movies and Petite 
Musicales. 

The Grail Room, the last room 
on this floor, is across from the ' 
GMAB office. The order of the 
Holy Grail meets in this room, con- 
sidered by many tne nicest room 
upstairs. Other small conferences 
are alsp held here. 
BASEMENT 

The basement is the last floor in 
the "tour " The APO Room is the 
first stop. APO, Carolma's service 
fraternity, holds meetings here. 
Other small groups n:eet here also. 
Just off the APO Room is the 
ping-pong room. The room has two 
brand new tables inside and two 
old tables In the alleyway just out- 
side the r0om. 

About miidway down the hall are 
several vending machines, where 
j'ou can buiy a snack lunch between 
games of pool in the pool room, 
right across the hall. The room, 
open to cOeds as well as Carolina 
gentlemen; is the most-used room 
in the building. 

Next to the pool room is the 
Rendezvous Room, i .sed for quiet 
recreation purposes. It is complete 
with a jukebox, piano and has 20 
tables which will seat up to 40 
couples. The room is also often 
used for small Graham Memorial- 
sponsored parties. 

The Yackety Yack. the student 
annual. h4s its office just beyond 
the vending machin(?s. 

Around jthe corner on the right 
is the darkroom, recently renovat- 
ed, with riew equipment installed. 
Lockers aite available for rent. Gra- 
ham Memorial furnishes everything 
but chemicals, which you must ob- 
tain yoursjelf. 

The m$in obliga'aon on those 
who use the room -s to clean up 
the place Ibefore leaving. 

The barbershop, located at the 
end of the hali. serves the students 
with 90 cent haircuts, the cheapest 
in town. The barb«'rs — there are 
three — can afford che lower rate 
due to having no overhead. 

Graham J'llemorial gives them 
the space with the understanding 
that the price will not exceed 90 
cents. 


The University's Louis Wilson 
Library is the one building ihal't 
in use constantly from morning un- 
til night. 

Eh'en the toughest football game , 
down in Kenan Pines won't keep j 
some students from the library. It ' 


peare, Bialeigh, Wolfe, folklore, 
Latin, American studies. Southern 
literature, romance languages, 
W^orld Wars I and U, maps, prints, 
graphic arts, and books by and 
about the Negro. 
Other places of interest are: the 


will be used many times during Rare Book Room, which houses 
the coming months for reference I many literary treasures from long 


' work, reading assignments and a 
place for quiet textbook study. 

And don't forget the library's so- 
cial side: For years now, it has 
been the perfect place for Carolina 
Gentlemen and thein dates to study 
together. 

The library contains almost 800.- 
000 volumes, most of which are in 
the Main Library building, named 
for Louis R. Wilson, longtime pro- 
fessor of library science here. 

Special collections of importance 
include: The Southern Historical 
Collection of more than two and a 
half manuscripts, the North Caro- 
lina Collection of items relating to 
the state, the Hanes Collection re- 
cording the development of the 
book; 

The Whitaker Collections of 
Johnson. Dickens and Cruikshank. 
the Jenkins Collection of public 
documents, the Nolen Collection of 
city and regional planning, the 
Archibald Henderson Collection of 


times past; Current Affairs and 
Public Documents Reading Room, 
a bureau of information on current 
information and thoughts; the Sir 
Walter Raleigh Rooms furnished as 
in 1800; the Early Carolina Rooms 
equipped as in 174C; the Print and 
Map Rooms; the Assembly Room 
and the Bull's Head Bookshop, 
where students, faculty and towns- 
people browse, Iwrrow and buy the 
latest books. Individual libraries 
are also assigned to different de- 
partments of instruction. 

Freshmen \nill have to spend a 
l^v of time in the General Collegf 
library, where Hhey will do read- 
ing assignments in first-year sub- 
jects. Elxhibits are also displayed 
in the halls of the library. 

The largest room in the lihrary 
is the Reference Room. It is on the 
second floor in the front of the 
building and is a place where sto- 
dents often seek and find quiet 
surroundings to pour out their 


Materials Relating to George Bern- ^ meditations on their studies. 


ard Shaw; 


The different librarians and staff 


The August Thomas Collection of } members are always willing to help 
dramatic manuscripts, together ' students in any way possible. They 
with unusual collections of Ameri- 1 are there to serve you and they flo 
can drama. Spanish drama, Shakes- just that. 

Entire Y Program Here 
Operated By Students 


The students operate and run 
the entire program of the YMC.\ 
and the YWCA and have three 
adult leaders to guide them. 

Officer are located in the Y 
Building near South Building. Mr. 
Claude Shotts is the YMCA Gen- ^ 
eral Secretan.'. John Riebel is the 
Associate Secretary' and Anne 
Queen is YWCA Director. Mrs. j 
Nora Kurd is the Y receptionist. 

The two student organizations' ' 
— the YW for women and YM for '. 
men — have separate identities, : 
but the programs of the two are 
often planned together. The full : 
time staff works together for both ■ 
groups. 

Organization of the two groups ; 
is divided into committees and . 
many of the committees have joint i 
chairmen, a member from the YM ■ 
and one from the YW^ j 

A few changes in the building j 
and i'taff are now taking place to : 
enable the staff members of the I 


YW'-YM to work more closely to- 
gether and more efficiently. 

Postions newly created, which 
will be filled soon, are an in- 
training graduate assistantship ahd 
a staff office managerial post. 

Mii-s Queen has been in Vpr 
position since June 1. She has 
previously been with the YWCA 
at the University of -Georgia and 
with the American Friends Ser- 
vice (Quakfer) in Greensboro. 

Mr. Riebel has been associate 
secretary for about five y<*ans. 
He had previoui'ly been with the 
organization in California. 

Mr. Shotts, a long-time worker 
and counselor in the Y, came to 
Carolina from Northwestern. He 
did his undergraduate work at the 
University of Alabama. 

Gerry Mayo, junior from Falk- 
land, is president of the Y^cA, 
and Martha Richardson, senW^ 
from Midlothian, Va. is president 
of the YWCA. 


Six National Sororities Have 
Chapters Here On Campus 


Six national sororities have chap- 
ters on this campus — Delta Delta 
Delta, Chi Omega, Pi Beta Phi, Al- 
pha Delta Pi, Kappa Delta and Al- 
pha Gamma Delta. 

All six of those sororities have 
their own houses in which many 
of the members live and most of 
the members eat their meals. Many 
other activities are also carried on 
there, such as coffee breaks. 

Sorority rush week, which be- 
gins soon after school begins, is 
controlled by the Panhellenic Coun- 
cil. It is made up of representa- 
tives from the six sororities, a rep- 
resentative from the Stray Greeks 


WELCOME 
FRESHMEN 

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161 E. Franklin St. Phone 3176 


and an advisor from the Dean of 
W^omen's office. It coordinates sor- 
ority life and plans special proj- 
ects. 

Many coeds remain independent, 
but coeds interested in joining a 
sorority can usually find a group 
with which to affiliate. Sorority 
houses are centers from which girls 
participate in campus activities. 

As a member of a sorority each 
girl experiences a close fellowship 
among her group and at the same 
time realizes the importance of so- 
cial and intellectual responsibility. 
Pan-hel awards a scholarship cup 
each year as an additional incen- 
tive to hard work. 

Further information concerning 
sororities can be found in the Pan- 
hellenic Rushincr Manual. 


237 Students Expected 
To Enroll In Pharn»acy . 

Dr. E. \ Brecht. dean of the 
School of Pharmacy, has estimated 
that a total of 237 students would 
be enrolled in pharmacy when 
school opens. 

Estimated registration by classes 
follows: freshmen. 60; sophomores, 
65; juniors. 55; seniors. 48 and nine 
graduate students. The September 
enrollment last vear was 232. 


Les Petites Musicales 
Presented Each Sunday 

Les Petite Musicales are musical 
programs presented each Sundi^ 
evening in the Main Lounge of 
Graham Memorial, the student un- 
ion building. "Phey are presented 
by the Graham Memorial Activities 
Board. 

The programs u.sually include 
different kinds of classical and 
semi-classical music and are per- 
formed by students and townspeo- 
ple, either in groups or individual- 
ly. Classical music-lovers usually 
find these programs worthwhile 
and entertaining. 


\*^ 


\, 1956 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER M, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE ELEVEN 


In 2s &\ 


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CAROLINA FRATERNITY PLEDGES 

go all out in icorking in the annual Greek Week ivork day ,'''.' 


Carolina Has 24 Social Fraternities 


One thing on the mind of many 
a young man who is going to col- 
lege is fraternities. Carolina has 
24 social fraternities. 

Fraternities have long been an 
integral part of college life, li us- 
ed to be that a boy wanted to be 
in a fraternity more than anything 
.else while at college. At one time, 


it was almost necessarj to be in 
one to enjoy college life to the ful- 
lest extent. 

That situation no longer exists 
Social fraternities here play an im- 
portant part, but they are not nec- 
essary to a well-rounded college 
life. 

The 24 social fraternities here 


SP And UP Furnish 
UNC Political Activity 


.< - Students are free to join either 
q{ the two political parties on 
campus or to remain independent. 

•• . However, students dont have to 
>oin either party. The president of 

>Jhe student body last year was an 
independent. Bob Young, the pres- 
ent president, is a member of the 
Student Party. Student Party mem- 

. bers also occupy the offices of 

-..yice-president and secretary. The 
treasurer is a member of the Uni- 

. yersity Party. 
' • The Student Legislature is pretty 

--well evenly divided among mem- 
bers of both parties. 

The Student Party tends to be 
liberal; the University Party tends 
to be conservative. The Student 
Party usually introduces more bills 
in legislature and is a little freer 
in appropriating student govern- 
ment monies. 

t Most of the active members of 
student government belong to 

.either of the two parties. A stu- 
dent can become a member of the 

. Student Party by attending two 

^ meetings and paying a small party 

. .fee. Members of the University 
Party either represent different or- 

. ganizations on campus or become 
members by turning in a petition 
signed by 25 students. 

At election time posters go up 
on all conceivable and inconceiv- 
able places, from sidewalks- around 

. campus to walls and doors in dorm- 

■ itory bathrooms. 


Much of the campaigning tim*' 
by candidates is spent telling stu- 
dents how much more qualified 
they arc for effice than the fellow 
running against them. One thing is 
certain: A student cant believe 
everything he nears. because often 
he will hear contradicting views 
and opinions, not facts. 

The politicians — who will 
ually say they are not politicians- 
do seem to maKe an iionest attempt 
to carry out their promises, but 
they are often blocked by other 
members of the legislature, includ- 
ing members of their own party. 

It is seldom that any proposal 
can carry without support from 
seme of the members of both par- 
ties, since the legislature is so 
evenlv divided. 


are: Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta 
Pi, Chi Phi, Chi Psi. Delta Kapp: 
Epsilcn, Delta Psi. Kappa Alpha. 
Kappa Sigma. Lambda Chi Alpha 
Phi Delta Theta. Phi Gamma Del 
ta. Phi Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa Al 
pha. Pi Kappa Phi. Pi Lambda Phi 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi. 
Sigma Nu. Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau 
Ep&ilon. Phi. Theta Chi, Zeta Beta 
Tau and Zeta Psi. 

Students interested in joining a 
'raternity will be given a fratern- 

GM Supplies 
Place For 
Foto Fixing 


- ■> ♦ 

regulations 


Many bills are introduced into 
the Student Legislature, and some 
bills pass and are enacted and stay 
on the books for a long time. 
Others are wiped out by those in 
power who follow them and some 
are killed before they have half a 
chance to become law. 


Voting for the candidates is done 
by districts. Ballot boxes are placed 
■n convenient places around camp- 
us. 


In the basement of Graham Me-^ 
mor-al. there is a source of poten 
j tial enjoyment for frustrated "foto- 
usu- 1 bugs." 

Though "'basement" often con- 
notes dust and corrosion, the rooms 
composing the photo lab have been 
completely renovated and include 
all equipment necessary for pro- 
cessing photographs. 

The GM photo lab is composed 
of three rooms. The first includes 
machinery for printing and devel- 
oping, the second is used for film 
loading, while the third has equip- 
ment for washing and drying. An 
Omega B2 enlarger is one of the 
valuable machines placed at thi 
students' disposal. 
• A charge for the use of this 
equipment is refunded at the term 
ination of residence. The equip- 
ment and iab is available for ust 
any time Graham Memorial is op 
en. Additional information con 
cerning use of the equipment and 
lab can be obtained at the infor- 
mation office of Graham Memorial. 


ty interest card during registra- 
ion on which he will list those 
raternities in which tie is inter- 
ested. 

It'' 
DECISION 

The decision to join a .Iratern- 
ly IS an important one. There is 
.nuch to gain from fraternity life 
in the way of lasting friend.'hips. 
\ fraternity is more man a party 
^roup. The boys in the house will 
je living companions for four 
years. 

Certain rules and 
governing conduct of the fraterni- ! 
.ies are made and enforced by the 
interfraterniiy Council. It is made 
up of the president of each fra- 
ternity and a representative from '[ 
each house. Within the IFC is a ; 
jourt that enforces these rules. | 

The rules concern social activi 
lies, coed visiting, fraternity drink- 
ing and other conduct. ' 

Fraternity rush comes earlier i 
this year than in previous years. ; 
If a student pledges a fraternity, 
he is eligible to be initiated at the \ 
end of the first semester if he has 
a "C" average. 

Students who do not wish to join 
during formal rush and need more 
time to make up their minds can ! 
wait and go through informal rush, ; 
which is held at various times dur- 
, ing the school year. 


hiazing Not 
Custom At 
Carolina 

By FRANK CROWTHER 

j If you are coming to Carolina 
expecting to be pushed, pulled. 
: shoved, sworn at, or hazed, you , 
; have been reading the wrong prop- 
I aganda sheet. Freshman hazing at 
I UNC is a thing of the past. 

There are colleges and univers- 
j ities in the country and in this 
! state which still adhere to the 
i practice of "putting the Freshmen 
; m their place" when they reach 
: their respective campuses. If you 
i look closely in the vicinity of the 

■ Duke Chapel you can see an ex- : 
I ample of this continued practice. ! 

I We treat our Freshmen with re- 

■ spect, consideration, and confi- \ 
I confidence. It is our objective not i 
I to "put you in your place" but to \ 
I instill in you the confidence and i 
1 respect we think all Carolina Gen- ' 

■ tlemen should command. Being in ! 
\ your first year, moving into a new 

i environment and faring for your- 1 
! self, making many of your own de- 
cisions, and budgeting your time ; 
and money will be enough to keep 
you fully occupied for some time i 
i to come. We upperclassmen don't 
I feel that we or the Univeriity 
: should add any more hazards; con- 
i tranly. we think that it is our duty 
} as Carolina Gentlemen to help you 
{ orient yourself in our — and now 
! your — world oi books, buildings. 
squirrels and Sile it Sam. 

We will give some words of cau- 
tion. 

1 Don't put up an Iron Curtain of 
defense between yourself and the 
people around you. If something 
troubles you, go see your advisor 
!)r counselor or even a good friend: 
■ou will be surprised how accep- 
tive and helpful they can be when 
you most need it. Too many stu- 
dents come to college with a men- 
tally formed shroud under which 
thev function. 


Go out and familiarize yourself i 
with the campus. No matter how \ 
many maps or charts you look at, ; 
it all appears different when first 1 
visited. j 

Study in the librar>- until you 
think you are accustomed to dorm 
itory life and have learned to bud- 
get your time appropriately. 

And don't . . . don't ramble on 
as we are when preparing your 
first theme for English 1 or 2. 

You will be surprised and warm- 
ed, we hope, with the friendly at- 
mosphere at Carolina. You will 
find it hard to walk across the cam- 
pus without smiling and saying, 
"Hello." to those whom you pass. 
Reticence is a sickness on this cam- 
pus. 


YDC And YRC 
Operate Here 
At Carolina i 

v,.^ Both national political parties, 
• are well represented on campus by 
, the Young Democrats Club and the 
Young Republicans Club. Their ac- 
tivities are expected to go along 
at 4 high rate of speed this year 
because this is an election year. 

Both clubs meet regularly, spon- 
sor rallies, bring noted men here 
to speak and have their fun by 
sponsoring parties at various times 
in the year. 

Students are usually solicited to 
join either of the two by club 
members during registration. Both 
kfc'Clubs have small dues. 

It is anticipated by YDC mem- 
bers to get Governor Frank Clem 
ent of Tennessee, keynote speaker 
at the Democratic Convention, to 
come here to speak this year. 
Students who are politically 
»>"»fninded and wish to get in on the 
^hick of politics can join the one 
'►-r^f the two clubs that coincide with 
,i,.their t>e)icfs and political affilia- 
•-"^ions. This election year is a good 
>. uye;ir to get slarteci in. 


Meet Me 
At 


THE LITTLE SHOP 


WELCOME TO 
CHAPEL HILL 

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Free Delivery To All Dorms & Frat Houses Daily 


PAGE TWetVE 


THE OA<LY TAR HEEL 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1956 


3 Major Publications 
Put Out By Students 


Three major publication^ are 
published here by Carolina stu- [ 
dents — The Daily Tar Heel, Yack- 
ety Yack and Carolina Quarterly, ! 
all of which are connected with i 
the Publications Board. 

The I>aily Tir Heel, student 
newspaper, is published every day I 
except Monday, and is delivered to | 
all students. It is run entirely by j 
students. No control is exercised 
over it or its editorial policy by | 
the faculty or administration. It ' 
has alisolutely no tie-in with the | 
Carolina School of Journalsim, ex- 
cept for a plan thereby journalism i 
students gain practical newswriting I 
experience by working periodically I 
on the staff. 

Fred Powledge, senior from Ra- ■ 
leigh, is editor of The Daily Tar 
Heel. Students are welcome t.- 
work on the staff of the four-page 
paper. Occasionally, it publishes 
six, eight and 10 pages, depending 
on volume of advertising. \ 

Offices of the Daily Tar Heel are i 
on the south end of the second ; 
floor" of Graham Memorial. It has 
the wire services ^f Associated 
Press, national advertising services 
and several national news features. 

The paper became a controversi- 
al campus issue last year when 
Co-EIditors Louis Kraar and Ed i 
Yoder were forced to run in a re- . 
call election after a petition was 
circulated and signed by studeqts i 
dissatisfied with the paper's edi- 
torial policy. I 

Circulation of the petition began 
shbrtly after the editors criticized 
the hiring of head football Coach 
Jim Tatum. The editors said he 
would bring "professionalism" in 
football to the University. 1 

YACKETY YACK | 

The Yackety Yack is Carolina's 


annual. It also is .:;tudent published. 
The Yack staff last year put out 
an annual with a red, white and 
gold cover. 
In the Yack are recorded those 

IDC Controls 
Activities Of 
Men's Dorms 

The controlling body of the men'-; 
dormitories is the Interdormitory 
Council. Sonny Hallford, senior of 
Rocky Mount, is president this 
year. 

The IDC is made up of the presi- 
dent of each men's dorm and a rep- 
resentative elected by each dorm. 
It chooses its own officers each 
spring to serve for one year. The 
officers have the power to author- 
ize and carry out dorm elections 
each year. 

Powers of the council itself are 
to make rules affecting conduct of 
men in dorms, represent dorm men 
in dealings with the University, 
promote social activities in the 
dorms for the residents and pro- 
vide for continuation and operation 
of the council and the IFC court 
during summer school. 

The Men's Dormitory Executive 
Committee is composed of the pres- 
ident, .vice - president, secretarv- 
treasurer, and IDC representative. 
The executive committee has the 
power to make such special rules 
concerning conduct in the respec- 
tive men's dormitories that shall 
not conflict with the rulings of the 
Student Legislature and IDC. It ial- 
so has the power to plan and pro- 
pose all activities of the respective 
dorms. 


elements of Carolina that will in 
future years bring back the memo- 
ries of college life. Students are 
welcome to work on the staff. Of- 
fices arc in Graham Memorial's 
basement. Tommy Johnson of Nor- 
folk, Va., is editor of the college 
yearbook. 

The Yacks comi^ cut early in 
May. Every student gets one. Addi- 
tional copies can be purchased. An- 
ticipatitr. and enthusiasm build up 
around the time when they come 
out, bocau.sc ca'.h student is anxi- 
ous to see how iiis 'mug shot" — 
class portrait — turned out. 

CAROLINA QUARTERLY 

Crjative talents of Carolina stu- 
dents are put to good use in the 
Carolina Quarterly, which is the 
literary magazme published three 
times a year by UNC students. Edi- 
tor for this year is Miss Marcelhne 
Krafchick of Philadelphia, Pa. Its 
offices are also in Graham Memori- 
al. Students with creative writing 
ability are welcome to contribute 
to it. Other posts that do not re 
quire creative ability are also open 
on the Quarterly. 

UNC's humor magazine is dead. 
Tarnation, long known over the na- 
tion for its good college humor, 
quit publication last >ea" because | 
of financial difficulties. ] 

It received no appropriations 
from student funds, as do the 
other three publications, and thas 
it could not hold up under the fin- 
ancial strain. It will be greatly ^ 
missed by humor-loving collogians. 
Various other publications are 

. the books, magazines and phamph- 
lets published for orientation pur- [ 
poses, such as the Carolina Hand- [ 
book, the Women's Handbook, the 1 

; Interfraternity Handbook and the \ 
Student Directory. 



Most Popular UNC 
Activity Is Dating 


SILENT SAM, CONFEDERATE MEMORIAL,! 

. . . atancb tall and proud in GM's front yardl 


'Old Sam' Is Permanant Part Of Tradition 





BUY USED 





One guy students at Carolina ' 
he^r a lot about and see a lot of is 
Silent Sam. He is a statue of a i 
Confederate soldier and b'tands 
tall and pr;)ud in Graham Memor- 
ial's front yard. | 

He was erected in memory of 
"the sons of the University who 
entered the war of 1861-65 in 
answer to the call of their country 
and whose lives taught the le.sson 
of their great commander that 
duty is the atiblimest word in the j 
English language." ^ 

Erected under the auspices of 
the North Carolina Division of the 
United Daughters of the Confed- 
eracy and aided by alumni of the 
University. Si. em Sam has become 


a permanent part of Carolina tra- 
diti<|>n. 

It is told down here that every- 
time a virgin walks by him, he 
fire^ his rifle. That may be so, 
but I most students have never 
heaixl his gun go off. 

Pk^ank-'ters hiw been known to 
hid<^ behind the statue -and thro v 
firecrackers out when eirls walk 
by. 'One girl once would not walk 
by it after her boy friend had tol 1 
her; the legend. 

At present, "Old Sam" i.* adorn- 
ed iin spots with red paint either 
frohl the brushes of N. C. State 
Collegfe enthusiasts or publicity 
meh of Sound di Fury, a musical 
shdw presented by student*'. 




• «y>^r»»-' 


And Save 


Students Will Hedr Lot About 
UNC's Bill Friday While Here 




W i- 


Check Our Prices Before You Buy 


^-- ■.»»«. 


[U- .-Xi 


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t . 



,n'i^;f ./ ■'."■ 


=-►-.41 


FREE 


-= .r -t'i -Si 


J 


Come In And Get Your Free .^ 
fee Cream Cone Or Coffee The 


Bill Friday is one man you 
will hear plenty about while you 
are at Carolina. He is Acting 
President of the Consolidated 
University, which consists of 
tlie Woman's College at Greens- 
boro. State College at Raleigh 
and Carolina. 

Last March 1 he succeeded J. 
Harri • Purks, who had been act- 
ing president since the depart- 
ure of former President Gordon 
Gray. Various newspapers have 
lately urged that he be named 
president. 

Friday is a young man of 36 
years and is well liked by hi.u 
associates. He served as assistant 
to the president and later as 
secretary of the Consolidated 
University. Prior to that, he 
served for three yea^ as assist- 


ant dean of students here at 
Ciarolina. • 

Reared in Dallas, N. C, he 
attended Wake Forest College 
iri 1937-38 and was graduated 
fijom N. C. State College in Ral- 
eigh in 1941 with a B.S. degree^ 
rie entered the Law School here 
ii^ 1946 and received his L.L.B. 
irj June oi 1948. He passed the 
North Carolina Bar in August 
of that same year. 

At State College, he was pres- 
ident of the 1941 senior class, 
president of the North Carolina 
piederation of Student Govern' 
ments and a member of the Gold- 
en Chain. He served as president 
of the Law School Assn. while 
at Carolina and was a member 
of the Golden Fleece, highest- 
ranking honor organization. 


By LARRY CHEEK 

(Dating at Carolina in the 
eves Off a Carolina Gentleman) 

Perhaps the most popular extra- 
curricular activity here at Carolina 
is dating. And the most persistent 
question heard on campus is 
"Where can I get a date?" 

For upperclassmen, this is no 
problem. They've been here long 
enough to learn the ropes and cul- 
tivate contacts. But for incoming 
freshmen, especially this year, it's 
a different story. 

In the past, Carolina freshmen 
have chosen Woman's College in 
Greensboro as their happy week- 
end hunting ground. But this year, 
the ruling that freshmen may not 
have cars in Chapel Hill has com- 
plicated matters considerably. 

No longer is it possible for the 
enterprising .first year man to 
hop in his convertible and take off 
for WC, or any. other of the numer- 
ous girls' schools that surround 
Chapel Hill. Instead, he must turn 
to local girls, a skimpy field at 
best. 

UNC coeds will give him little 
encouragement. .Most of the thous- 
and-plus girls here are juniors and 
seniors with eyes only for the old- 
er college men. There are a few 
lasses in the School of Nursing, 
however, who are freshmen them- 
selves, and can sometimes be per- 
suaded to look with favor upon 
their male classmates. 

Or the lonely yearling student 
may decide to study industriously 
during the week and import his 
old hometown sweetheart from 
^igh .school days for that special 
weekend. This is rather hard on 
the youth who yearns for frequent 
female companionship, however. 

And then there are the local high 
school and working girls. These 
girls have always proved to be 
pleasant and willing company for 
the college freshman who is a long 
way from home. Warning: look out 
for irate high school romeos. 

Of course, the best solution to 
the problem is to talk an older 
buddy out of his jalopy lor an ev- 
ening and pay a visit to Greens- 
boro and WC. Carolina students 
have \n)tn^ integrated into the in- 
t«»rior decorating in most dorms 
there, and the welcoming mat is 
alwaj's out (up until midnight on 
weekends, that is). 

Even if you don't have a date 
when you get there, don't despair. 
Just walk in any of the freshman 
dorms, look appropriately lonely, 
and get the receptionist to help 
you out. You'll be surprised at the 
results. No money back if this does 
: not work, though. 

You might even want to chal- 
lenge the State students by invad- 
ing some of the Raleigh institutions 
: attended bv eligible young ladies. 
Meredith, Peace and St. Mary's all 
are possibilities, although the dif- 

iculties encountered here are stif- 
I fer than at WC. . 

I The alternatives are many, and 
j the results can be rewarding. Take 
i vour Dick: Greener pastures over 
j the hill, good old home cooking, or 
j iust sitting and waiting for the one 
i and only. 


By PEG HUMPHREY 

(Dating at Carolina as seen 
bij a Caroline Coed) 

"How to get a date?" is often a 
question puzzling Carolina fresli- 
men. 

The men find themselves facing 
an age barrier / when it comes to 
dating the junior and senior coeds 
which, however, is often penetra- 
ble depending on the maturity of 
the individual. 

Open houses in the dormitories 
take placp during the first week 
of school. This is an excellent op- 
portunity for the freshman to be- 
gin his dating campaign, for at this 
time many of the coeds haven't had 
a chance to meet young men on 
"the hill." 

If this 'fails, there is always the 
classroom romance. Suggesting a 
coffee break in Y-Court after class 
is often a successful approach. 

The library has a notorious rep- 
utation of being a date bureau as 
well as a place for concentrate^ 
study. The reserve reading room is 
the most famous spot for arrang- 
ing coffee break dates for the Pine 
Room. 

If you are in the depths of des- 
pondency over the looks of your 
social calendar, there are always 
the nearby women's colleges, such 
as WC, Meredith and St. Mary's. 
The dormitories there usually in- 
vite whole dorms from Carolina ov- 
er during the first weeks of school. 

However, don't despair if your 
first attempts fail and decide that 
dating girls from other colleges is 
the only solution, for there is b 
surprisingly number of Carolina 
coeds who remain with a good book 
on Saturday night simply because 
their classmates assume they are 
dating. 

Those who join fraternities will 
have an opportunity to meet coeds 
in the various sororities as parties 
between the Greek groups are fre- 
quently planned. 

Many campus romances begin in 
the extracurricular groups. This is 
where you meet others with com- 
mon interests, and age differences 
mean less. .^ 


Sf ray Greeks 
Is Sorority 
Organization 

The Stray Greeks is an organi- 
zation composed of sorority girls 
whose chapters are represented on 
this campus. 

Its aim is to provide a social out- 
let for its members and to preserve 
the bonds of unity and sisterhood 
in sorority life. 
I 'The group was founded in lft44 
under the leadership of Twigg 
i Branch. It has gained more and 
i more recognition on campus since 
then, and its membership now to- 
tal^ almost 30. 

Last year they handled the Pan- 
, hellenic Post Office during soror- 
j ity rush week and each member 
1 served as a Panhel ad\'iser in her 
\ own dorm. Thev also took part in 
the women's athletic program, ser- 
vice projects and social activities. 


4'i ' ^H O i^'-'-l. z'.*:^'^- S *W i 4. -^ ^- *^* ■•*' 


'tSvitc 


First Day Of Classes 


*;*>$»-'' •:*' 


Intimate Bookshop 


Oppsite The Campus 


•w> '■««» 


Open Evenings 




Welcome Class of '60 

i^ilton w«lcom«s you and extiends tvery courtesy to you. 
Want you to feel at hom« when yeili com* ip «nd brouse around. 

You've probably heard or hopt ^eu've hoard that we initiatod 
ivy styling on this campus. Our shocks art now conH>l*t* with 
all those clothes you've dreamed about wearing when you came 
to the Hill. The nicest part about this is that you'll find our 
apparel most popularly priced to fit into your clothing budgets 
and allowances. Neither Milton nor any of his personnel will 
offer you one stitch of clothing thaf doesn't fit or is net suitable 
to you. We pride ourselves with our integrity. ' ; v, 

Since you are about to become a Carolina gentleman we 

invite you to open an account with us and send the bill home, 

offering you the same servicos as home, but with the choice of 

smart apparel worn on the Carelini cantpus. 

I 

So take heart and put zest into your fall ensemble. 

Clottitns Cupboarb 


Official Governing Body 
Is Student Legislature 


The official governing body of 
the student body here at Carolin; 
is the Student Legislature. 

This 50-member body is auth- 
orized under the Student Conatitu 
tion to make certain rules and 
regulations to govern UNC stu- 
dents. It has the power to levy all 
student fees except athletic fees 
appropriate funds for student 
publications, make lafws concern- 
ing elections- and to levy laws 
necessary for carrying out the 
constitution. 

One of its most important pow- 
ers is the determining of offenses 
against tiie student body, categoriz- 
ing each offense, and fixing max- 
imum and minimum penalties and 
punishments for each category. 
Another important function — and 
one that requires a lot of work — 
is setting up the annual student 
budget of approximately $100,000. 

The student Legislature also ap- 
proves or rejects appointments of 
the s-tudent body president, and 
has the power of impeachment of 
any elected official. 

The powers of the body are some- 
what limited. Of course, it does 
not control class attendance regula- 
tions and other important matters | 
which are left up to the faculty , 
and administration. But the UNC ] 
constitution is considered all over' 
the nation to be very liberal. I 

Legislators meet every Thursday j 
night to hash out the various ^ 


•ssues that oome before them. Some 
)f them take their work seriqys 
and live, eat and Aeep legislature. 
It's important to them; they kn»w 
it and they work hard at it. 

Others get elected just to know 
they've got another honw and ju«t 
let it go by. 

Party lines — there are two politi- 
cal partie* here at UNC — are us- 
ually split down the middle, and 
members vote just that way. But 
on mediocre, usual bills, nothing 
is said and they usually pass them 
unanimously. 

Words are spouted by the dozens 
in long orations in attempts to get 
across certain points. The Student 
Legislature provides good speak- 
ing training, and it has through 
the years produced many good and 
efficient speakers. 

Quotations of famous statesmen 
flow freely in attempts to influ- 
ence voting. Oftimes, accusations 
are made of "crooked politics," 
but if they be there, they ar^ 
never exposed. 


Norfolk Big Contributor' 

NorfDik. Va.," has made the 
biggest contribution — quantity wl»? 
— to Carolina football for idSS 
with three players, Buddy Payne, 
John Haywood and Curtis Hatha- 
way. Duryea, Pa. tnd Dunn, N. C, 
each have sent two stalwarts. 




X/ / 


DIFFERENCE 

Extracurriciulars and studying. 
There's a diff erance. S— Pa«a 2. 



3r() c Daily M^ar Keel 


WEATH ER 

LiHie warmei-, with axpacted 
hiflh of 78. 


NO. 1 


Complete {JP) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, N. C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 19S6 


Offices in, Graham Memorial 


EI3HT PAGES THCS ISSUE 


UNC Asks More 
Operating Money 


By CLARKE JONES 

R.\LEIGH, Sept. 19— The Um- 
versity today requested more mon- 
ey from the state lor its facul- 


o£ the University divisions made 
during the meeting. They were 
recomrne'hded by the Board of 
Higher Education. They are for 


ty members and library resources. ' ^^^ years 1957^8, 193S-59, respec- 
The requests were presented to t'^ely; 


mission as part of the state Board 
the state Advisory Budget Com- 
of Higher Eiducation's recommen- 


N. C. State College of Agricul- 
ture and Engineering. $4,044. 575 
for 1957-58, $4,055,880 for 1958-59; 


dation's for a $6 million approp- Agricuiltural Experiment Station, 
riations increase for the state's $1,793,299, $1,793,299; Coopera- 
colleges and Utiiver/.ty during the **^* Agricultural Extension Ser- 
bienniura 1957-59. j vice, $2,512,602, $2,512,602; Uni- 

Thi5 year is the first year the ' versity of North CanDlina at Chap- 
state Board of Higher Education I «1 Hill, $5,042,783, $4,993,903; 
has had a hand in presenting the Division of Health Affair.-, $2,- 
University's budget requests*. Cre- 118,277, $2,118,277; N. C. Memor- 
ated in 1955, the Board now acts i »«1 Hospital $1,332,462, $1,332,462; 
as a naddleman for the 12 state ' Ps.vchriatric Center. $437,338. 
supported institutions. I ''*37. 338; Woman's College, $2.- 

Salary increases for Consoli-' ^'-^l**' $1,981,853; Consolidated 
dated Univer-lty officers were also ' Office of the University of North 
recommended. j Carolina, $169,675. $171,241. and 

Other divisions asking for more ^^^ In.*titute of Fisheries Research, 
money were N. C. State College j 576.828, $76,828. 
of Agriculture and Engineering, i The request for state appropria- 
the Agricultural Expe.iment Sta- ^'""^' ^^^ nurchase of library books 
ton, the Co.aperative Agricultural ^^^ ^^^ biennium 1957-59 was as 
Extension, the Division, of Health fo^ows: 
Affairs. N. C. Memorial Hospital.' University of 


Campus 
Seen 


Student amazing automobile 
registrars in Woollen Gym loith: 
Wiiat do yon do when yon have 
four cars? 

* * * 

Students slowly but sttrely 
dragging through the registrar 
tion line. 


Graham Mem4>riai ;illed icith 
students a,v neic year opens. 

* • « 

Sttident who had just become a 
proitd papa pasi;tng out cigars in 
registration line. 

«- « * 

Hvndred of cars on camnpus 
ami streets that indicated that 
upperclassm^n had returned. 


Housing Situation Becomes Worse 
As All Available Living Spaces 
Are Sought By University Students 

" 7,000 Enrollment Aids 
Rising Living Problem 


COURT MARTIAL 

A special Marine court martial 
in Parris Island, S. C, will try a 
corporal on a charge of maltreat- 
North Carolina, ing a rookie. According to Private 
the Psychiatric Center, Women's' *1 85,000 for 1957-58. $165,000 for Donald Hemisfar of Norwalk, Ohio. 
College in Greensboro and the In-i 1958-59; State College of Agricul- the corparal slugged him in the 
stitute of Fisheriej. I *"''® ^^^ Engineering, $120,000, abdomen for not addressins him as 
Concerning salary increases fori^H^-^^' ^"^ Woman's College, -Sir", causing an injury that re- 
faculty mc'mbers, Con.solidated »«>.000. $40,000. .quired and operation. 

University Ac-ting President Will- 1 
iam C. Friday pointed out the dan-j 
ger of losing so man>' profesj-ors. 
"WiB must keep the people we ^ 
have and we must get good and , 
qualified people," he said. I 

In order to keep those already 
at the University, Friday said 
there are four ways. He outlined 
them a.»" follows: 

1. Salary increases. 

2. Give the staff the essential 
and necessary equipment with 
which to work. 

3. Do something about the li- 
brary resources. 

4. Provide the University with I 
research money. I 

UNC Chancellor Robert B. Hou^s^e 
said 'I would like to emphasize 
that item of research. We're not 
talking about great projects; we're 
talking about the lifeblood of the 
institution. 

"As to the library, you cannot 
be overextravagant. It is the work- 
shop for the entire community, 
the powerhouse and lighthouse for 
the entire state." 

The increase in salary for the 
Consolidated University officials 
are as follows:. 

President, to $18,000, an in- 
crease of $3,000; vice president 
and finance officer, to $15,500, 
an increase of $2,000; vice presi- 
dent and provost, to $iB.500, an 
increa^ of $2,500, and business 
officer and treasurer, to U3,000, 
an increase of $1,000. 

Here are the different requests 



By RAY LINKER 

Approximately yr, male students spent last night in the 
Irasement ol Cobb Dormitory. Meanwhile, every available 
living space in CThapel Hill was being .sought after by male 
and female, man ied and unmarried .students. 

. .\s enrollmem ne.red the 7.000 mark yesterday, the 


30 Winners In Student 
Quiz Contest Announced 


President Young Asks 
For Fair Sportsmanship 

Student Body President Bob be true Carolina ladies and Caro- 
Young this week i.ssued a state- lina gentlemen.*' he said. 
ment calling upon the student body j "We are hosts for five football 
to remember their obligation dur- 1 games this season. Let's conduct 
ing the coming football season. | ourselves properly at all times. 
*In victory and def<»at." he said ; ^irsU remember that there are 
"we »ust display good sport.«iman- * many parents in 1he 'stands ever>' 
ship" and remember that "victory Saturday. Please, lets not create 
is important but not necessary, ^ny .scenes that might be embarass- 
Lefs be true Carolina ladies and i"g ^^r o""" guests. Lets be con- 
gentlemen." siderate of our parents. 

His complete statement is as fol- 'Second, throwing rolls of toilet 
lows: tissue may be exciting but it's also 

'With football season opening dangerou.s. We have been fortun- 
Saturday, let's see where we're go- ate not to have had a serious in- 
mg" this year. Athletic Direvtor jury result from a throw. Just re- 
(Chuck) Erickson and the football member," he said,, "that any roll 
coaches say it should be a good you throw may hit someone. Would 
year from all indications. We may you want one to hit you? Plea.se. 
not win them all but the spirit and let's leave toilet ti.ssuc in its ap>- 
attitude are right. propriate place, and this place is 

"I think most of us, as students, not Kenan Stadium, 
are rather optimistic about pro- "Third, Head Cheerleader Jim 
spects for the year. Even with an Bynum and the other cheerleaders 
undefeated season," he said "this have really been working to get 
year could still be a failure. This ready for the season. They've got 
s where you and I come in. We a cheer for most every situation, 
^lave an obligation also. . Let's all back these cheerleaders. 

"In victory or in defeat we must j But let's remember that we can 
display good sportsmanship. Let's i support our Tar Heels without 
"Al "yell our lungs out." Let's hope "damning" the officials or the 
to win every game. However, let's other team. Let's have respect for 
always remember that victory is the officials and for the fans and 
important but not necessary. Let's [ visiting team members. We will 

! want respect when we visit. Let'.*; 
make our team proud of the way 
we treat the visitors," he said. 

"Let's all work together. Let's 
all support the Tar Heels. Let's dis- 


New Students Patronize Merchants Assn/s Information Booth 

Two new Carolina Coeds are shown above at th information booth set up by the Chapel Hill-CaTr- 
boro Merchants Assn. to welcome new students. T 10 booth was in operation last Monday in the most 
extensive welcome ever given new University stud nfs by the local association. Shown above, left to 
right, are Oliver .Watkins and Mrs. Roland Giduz o the Merchants Assn. Trade Promotions Committee 
and new students Miss Opal Sheppard of Jacksonv ilc and Miss Anita Whitener of Lenoir. (Photo by 
GiduT) . 


housing situation be<;ame worse. ' 
The housing office had only a 
couple of places intown listed for 
rent and les." than a dozen places 
outside of town, all of which 
would require the renters to have 
cars or some other means of trans-! 
portation. 

There are no rooms for women 
in or around town. Housing Di- 
rector James Wadsworth said yes*- 
terday. He added he felt there 
were a few rooms lor men located 
outside of town. 

On campus, all men's dorms 
were fillet!, including 15 three- 


news 

in 
brief 



(By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS) 

President Eisenhower broadcast 
an assurance tonight that he is 
physically fit for four years more 
in the White Hou.«e, 

And stressing one of the Repub- 
lican campaign themes— peace- — 
the President asserted that his ad- 


ninistration has defended freedom 
man-to-a-room dorms, all women's ' without recourse to war. 


dorms were filled and only three 
vacancies remained in the iix so- 
rority houses. 

There are 2,000 males in three- 
man dorm rooms, leaving only 1,- 


* * * 

Adlai Stevenson says he gets 
pretty disgusted hearing Republi- 
can campaigners claim credit tor 
ncr.asing the national rninimuai 


Yack Photo ^^^ Freshmen Are Generally 

«' Opposed To Automobile Bah 


Schedule 
Announced 

The i-chedule for making the in- 
dividual class pictures for the 
1957 Yackety-Yack, the UNC an- 
nual, was released yesterday by 
Editor Tommy Johnson. 

The pictures will be made in 
th the Graham Memorial basement 
from 1 to 7:30 p.m. 

Girls were asked to wear dark 
sweater*, black, brown, or dark 
blue, with one strand . of pearls. 
Men should wear dark coats, white 
shirts, and con.servative rep ties. 
The schedule is as follow:?: 
Oct. 1-5 — Freshmen and Nurs- 
ing Schooi (except Senior 
Nurses) 

Oct. 8-12— Sophomores, Phar- 
macy School, Dental School, and 
Dental Hygiene student.-- 

Oct. 1.5-19 — Juniors, Medical 
School. Law School, and Grad- 
uate School. 


j 010 men students in the double- 1 ^^'^S^ ^o *1 an hour. Stevensop XoxA 
i men rooms. Only Cobb, Winston, j '^^^teel workers Union Convention 
Joyner and Connor are two-men 
dorms. . . 

For married stu■d<^tUs, "there i ■ 
2. great need and shortage of mod- 
erately priced homes," Wadsworth 
said. . , 


Ffeshmen at the University are tion.*, which have not been out- 
generally oppo.*.>d to the new law wardly contested, has come in 
banning cars, by first-year stu- dormitory meetings and late-into- 


dents. 

They realize, however, the acute 
traffic problems which last year 
prompted action by the Student 
Legislature, placing stri-"t r:'gula- 
tions on freshmen this year and 
on .vtphomores beginning in 1957- 
f>S. Those .sentiments were ex- 
pi-essed during week-long orienta- 
tion activities just completed on 
the university campus and speak 
generally for .some 1,700 new .-lu- 
dents here. 

The Student Legislature, upon 
recommendation of a stuient traf- 
fic advi.sory commission, said last 
year that only exceptions to the 
freshman rule would be in ca.*AS 
of commuters, veterans and physi- 
cally handicapped students. 

And to further the curtamment 


All of the 356 apartments in 
Victory Village are taken by mar- 
ried students, and the waiting list 
has 500 names. Wad.vworth said. 

The Glen Lennox Rental Of- 
fice, which has 440 apartments for 
rent to couples, is completely full 
It came early in the week when, anj ha.v a waiting list of 200. Man- 
ager C. E. Mcintosh said he felt 
the people on the waiting list 
would find rooms elsewhere. 

Approximately 55 girls' dorm 
rooms are being used as trinle 
rooms, according to Miss Isabelle 
MacLeod, executive secretary of 
the dean of women's office. 

There are 567 coeds living in the 
• X girls' dorms, while of the total 
150 living spaces in all sorority ; 
houses, there were only three va- 
cancies yesterday. 

From 35 to 50 people have in- 
quired at the dean of women's of- 


thc-night. got-acquainted sessions 
which have drawn hundreds of 
new students. 


with only a relative handful of 
student.* here. Chapel Hill's streets, 
campus parking lots and alley 
ways were already showing signs 
of severe congestion. And there 
were many more vehicles to come. 

In one dorm meeting, a firs^- 
year .'.udent questioned whether 
the University could prohibit his 
keeping a car in Carrboro, using 
it only on weekends for traua'por- 
tation to his home. 

Other schemes, too, were being 
discussed arf a few students at- 


n Los Angeles: 

"That increase was made possi- 
ble by a Democratic Congress 
which pushed it through over the 
expressed objections of the Presi- 
dent." 

* * * 

Another Geneva Summit Con- 
Terence — This one on Suez — is sug- 
gested by Russian Premier Buigan- 
in. 


tempted to bypass the new regu- 1 fice for rooms in town. Miss Mac- 


lations. But while they opposed it 


The names of the 30 winners of 
a campus quiz contest conducted 
for the benefit of new Carolina 
students were announced yester- 


20 Busloads Of 
WC Girls To Be 
Here Saturday 


SUEZ CONFERENCE 

London reports after the first 
play the best sportsmanship in the day of the new Suez Conference of 
i entire conference throughout the 18 nations that a strong feeling has 
j year. Even though we may be on built up among deleeatf's for t^k- 
day by the Chapel Hill-Carrboro ; the short end of the score, we will ing the dispute to the United Na- 
Merchants Assn., sponsors of the , still be victorious," he concluded, j tions. 
contest. 

Held in conjunction with the ex- 
tensive welcome given new Jtu- 
dents last Monday, the contest 
was open to all participants in 
every member store. 

Winners of the contest will be 
recipients of a $10 gift certificate 
redeemable in merchandi^^e at any 
member store. The certificates are 
to be presented not later than 
October 15. The winners are asked 
to come to the Merchants Assn. 
office in the Smith Building at 
117 N. Columbia Street and pick 
up their certificates immediately. 

The 30 winners are as follows: 
Danny Allen, A. W. Benthall, J. 
Robert Bingham, Frank T. Bowen 


of growing traffic problems, the i verbally, most freshmen agreed 
Legislature set sophomore car re- , the Legislature's action wa.? need- 
striction^' which would go into ef- j od to curtail an already serious 
feet on an academic basis, begin- 1 problem. 

ning with the 1957'-58 school year. \ 

Second vear students will not be i 


alowcd to keep cars in this over- 
crowded town if they do nod main- 
tain a "C" average or higher, ac 
corning to the regulations. 
Opposition to the new restric- 


NO WAR • - 

Arriving homo in North Africa 
from a visit to France, the Pricmier 
of Tunisia said tonight: "The war 
of Suez will pot take place." 


Leod said, but no count waa* avail- 
able of how many girls were liv- 
ing in town. 

In order to live in town, a 'wo- 
man student must be a graduate 
and be 24 years old or older. 

The School of Nursing reported 
there is no doubt that the School 
of Nursing Dormitory will be full. 
An enrollment of 175-200, includ- 
ing 50 freshmen, i.^* expected in 
Nursing. 


What Are These People Doing? 


Twenty busloads of girls from 
Woman'i* College in Greensboro 
will arrive on campus Saturday to 
join in the festivities of Consoli- 
dated University Day. 
' The activities will begin with 
the State-Carolina game at 2 p.m. 
in Kenan Stadium. Special half- 
time atcivities have been planned. ■ Jr., Reid Brawley, Jim Carroll, 
A reception will be held at Gra- Mike Collin.-, Bill Davis, Monty 
ham Memoi-ial immediately follow- i D*?Witt. Phil Goodson, Herb Ellis, 
ing the game. | Jr., John R. Griffin, John Horney, 

The highlight of C. U. Day wiU - Edward L. Jennings, Charles Las- 
be the presentation of the Con- 1 ley. 

solidated University Queen at an. Charles H. Little. George G. 
informal dance in Woollen Gym. | Menke, Teddy Moore. Marvin Mor- 
Three coeds from each of the three I ton, Donald H. Partin, Hfcrvey 
branches of the Con.-alldated Uni- Peck. Gayle Ramsey, Mary L. 
versify. Woman's CoHege, North Roundtree, Elizabeth Russell. Sus- 
C^rolina State College, and Caro- 1 an Saunders. Ferrell Shuford, Ho- 
lina, will compete in the contest. 1 hart T. Steele Jr. J. A. Turner 

The dance, sponsored by the Jr., John Wilbur, and Sara Will- 
Grail, 'jvill begin at 8 p.m. iamson. I 



New Students 
Invited To 
Work On DTH 

students who want to work on 
The Daily Tar Heel have been in- 
vited to "come up and get ac- 
quainted." 

Editor Fred Powledge ;-aid "The 
Daily Tar Heel welcomes any and 
j all students who want to work. 
I As the present staff will gladly 
testify, this is perhaps the most 
rewarding work on the campus." 
He emphasized that all a>.udents 
— freshmen, new coeds, old stu- 
dents, and those in and out of 
the Schooi of Journalism — are wel- 
come on the staff. The Daily Tar 
Heel has no connection with the 
Schol of Journali.-.n, but journal- 
ism .students have in the past 
combined their studies with work 
on the newspaper. 

Powledge said a general staff 
meeti;ig will be held this after- 
noon at 4 o'clock in The Daily 
■ Tar Heel's new. 'room. 
I "Al this meeting," he said, "we 
i will meet all aspiring staffers, 
; and »e will attempt to explain the 
newspaper's working to them." 
A tour of the newspaper'^- offices 
will be held, he said. 

"There are vacancies on the news, 
editorial, sports and business and 
advertising staff.*." he said, "and 
we are looking for hard-working 
new people to fill them." 

At the meeting this afternoon 
plans will be announced for the 
first Daily Tar Heel party of the 
school year. New staffers will be 
invited to the party, Powledge 
said. . ,,- 


■z r.. ^^ 


GWEN HEINZEN 


SHIRLEY DEES 


FRAflKIE BLACK MARY LEE BREECE 

Don't Know? Then Turn To Page 3 

t 


HAROLD V<>ILLIA/VidUN 


Fowledge Ph6tos 


YAck Staff To Meet; 

All staff members and students 
interested in working on the 1956- 
57 Y.ickety-Yack, the UNC annual, 
have been asked to attend an im- 
portant meeting today at 2:30 p.m. 
in th? Yack office in the ba.^ment 
of Graham Memorial. 

Accordi'ng to Tommy Johnson, 
Yack Editor, much help will be 
needtid to put out this year's an- 
nual. Anyont interested in help- 
ing u'ith any phase of the annual 

i is invited to attend the meeting 

[ today. 


X 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1956 


Circle Studying/ Too, 
On Those Activity Cards 

^■' ^l^iihmAn Oif) ■ Old St udeiH ( ) Transfer f 


DANTE WHO? 




IJIBAHAM MEMORIAL .ACtlVJTlES 
H&ftAHA» Mf:MORUl. STllJKNT V 


I 
I 


B0u\H5> OMAB; UK \ 

SlON 1 

i 

( « C«!vn«Jar t>?^n5!ta' 


DlSCi-SSiOX, DEBATE: 


:.■•- .^ .-vs.: 


MUSICAL : ; 


-\s the heslinian with tht- above 
atiiyity card will soon tiiul out. 
it"s easy to spread yoiusell too thin 
on 'he r\C campus. 

I( \onre a joinei— and most ol 
n> were in hij^h sthoo! — you pi<»b- 
.ihly clurked more than half a 
(lo/en orttnii/ati(ms on the student 
attixitv cards handed oiu dining 
(n ientation. 

Now. (Ju'ckiniT them is fine. It 
means you have an idea which ex- 
tracurricular activities youd like 
to lake part in durins^ the ct)mins' 
year and. perhaps, throughout 
vour college life. 

But one word of taution: 

When you get your l)ooks bought 
and your rooinniates' names mem- 
orized and when you go around to 
the campus organizations to see 
liow they operate, don't spread 


yourself KM) iliin. 

Don't attempt to give an hour 
a d.iv to del>ating. two hours to 
publications and ;^o miiuues to .stu- 
dent goexrnment. ^'ou'l! soon learn 
iha't \ou (ant do anything well 
bv doing a d<i/en things at once. 

.\nd theies the little matter of 
studving. VOu'l! find the two hours 
per subject jht night, recommend- 
ed l)v the I ni\ersitv for new ( om- 
ers here, mightv haid to keep. Some 
of you can get bv on less than ttvo: 
others will ha\e to studv e\en hard- 
er than the normal. 

liut. remember, get the studying 
done first. It is fjad to spread your- 
self too thin on the exirac iifricul- 
ais here. And it is suicide to let 
extracmriculars (omj)letelv ovei- 
shadow studying. 


Move Over, South Carolina 

Xou-, ii-i' art not ^ii,oing to defy the tSul/rftnc) Comt, hut I'll 
fell you u'luit we are gomg to do. We are ^^oiua to u.se evet^ legal 
meaus we am devise to insure that the efforts of what we feel is an 
erroneous de( iston hy the Sufiretne Court arr not forced on oui state 
iti a fa.yl'inn wliid: could deprive us of one oi our dearest possessions: 
namely — ou> Imhlic schools. It is to that end that we are assent hied 
here in sfjecjuj, session. — Xorth Carolina Gov. Luther Hodges, •he- 
fore special session of the General As.<:enihly. July 23. 1956. 


r*-< '" 7ot his V ish. .A 
the \oting people ot 


The gc- 
majorir- 

Nor' Tnolina felt his Pearsall 
Amciuiment to escape public 
school devegregation was better 
than alU)wing the stated s( hoal 
svstem to continue as is. with 
probable integregation of students. 

liiu the passing of the ameiid- 
ment immediatelv placed on shaky 
Sr(HJnd the system of Iree and pub- 
lic schools, which (iov. Modges 
calls "one of our dearest p>SNess- 
ions. " he amendment reads: 

'■. . . the (ieneral Assembly may 
pro\ide for a uniform svstem ol 
local option whereby atiy local op- 
tion imit. as defined f>y the Cien- 
etal Assemblv. mav choose by a 
majoiitv \ote of the qualified vot- 
ers in the unit \oting on the ques- 
tion to susj)end or to authcjri/,e the 
suspensic^i of the cjperatton of one 
or more of the public scluxils in 
that ujiit." 

That means our public sdioo! 
system, which in the past was being 
guaranteed bv the state ccmstitu- 
lion. can be wiped otit by a simple 
election: 

While we had it. that guarantee 
was double-edged. It protected the 
sch(M>l irom the citizens' emotional 
cHitbt^rsts. It proteded them frcmi 
politician" who were not too con- 
scious ol the state's educational 
needs. 

The Daily Tar Heel 

The ofticial student publication of the 
Publications Board of the University of 
North Carplina. where it is published 
daily except Sunday. Monday and exam- 
ination and vacation periods and sum- 
mer terms. Entered as second class mat- 
ter in the post office in Chapel Hill, 
N. C. under the Act of March 8. 1870. 
Subscription rates: mailed, $4 per year, 
$2.50 a semester; delivered, $6 a year, 
S3.$G a semester. 


Editor 


FRED POVVLEDGE 


Maaaging Editor . CliARLIE JOHNSON 


News E]ditor 


Business Manager 


RAY LINKER 


BILL BOB PEEL 


Now. ihe bars arc down. .Ml we 
need is an emotionally enflamed 
majoritv of the voteis in the hnal 
option unit: all we need is a group 
of scheming j>oliticians who place 
personr.'I gain alnive education for 
the state. 

Then well be right beside 
South (avolina and Mississippi in 
the hog-wallows of educational in- 
difference. 

Another Year 
Starts With 
No President 

Ihe I'niversity is o\erstuffed 
with acting people. 

No. we don t measi the C^arolina 
Play makers. Or the Sound and 
Fuiy people. We're talking afM>ut 
ihc wav the I'niversity tills empty 
offices. 

We have an acting president. 
\Ve have an acting provost. There 
are acting heads of departments. 

Some of the 'acting" titles are 
needed because of c ire uinstaiices 
peculiar to the particular depart- 
ment. Iku c^ne such office should 
be done away with right away. 

That's the olfice of the presi- 
dent of the Consolidated I'niveis- 
ity. It has not f>een filled with a 
full-fledged president since Cror- 
don Cray went to the Pentagon 
early last summer. 

Presently the president's office 
is being capably filled by William 
Fiiday. 

Friday lias proven he can handle 
the job of the presidem with ef- 
ficiency. skill, iionesty. and cour- 
age. It is the consensus of most Vn- 
i\ersity - wauhcrs and this news- 
paper tiiK IwW make a fine |)erm- 
anent present. 

The Board of Trustees, the I'ni- 
versity !x>dy which decides who 
will be president, has had more 
than a year to find its man. A 
special ccmnnittee of the board has 
met dozens of times to hear rec- 
onnnendations for the job. 

It's time the f)oard picked the 
man to head the Constjlida'ied I'n- 
iversity. .A.nrl it is time the lK>ard 
named William Friday to the job. 


So Whatism— Whither Education? 


By ED YODER 

(This is- the first of three parts 
of ail e.'isay by fonmier Daily 
Tar Heel Editor Yoder. Future 
pieces with the Yoder byline 
icill be dateiined England s'ince 
he unll soon be- taking a place 
at Oxford University as a 
Hhode.; Sctiokir.) 

Ix'cturing to his class a tew 
months ago in this same Univer 
sily, in this same town of Chapel 
Hill, a certain English inslruclor 
was shocked to drop with no 
visible effect on his listeners the 
name of — Dante Alighicri. 

He thereupon administed a brief 
quiz; and the question of course 
was: Who was this Dante Alighi- 
eri? One student, as I remember, 
guessed rightly, or knew, that 
Dante, one of the sublimest of 
poets, author of The Divine Come- 
dy, patriot of Italy in the days 
of the Guelf-Ghibelline battle, 
lived in the 14th Century and had 
something to do with poetry. 

Other guesses missed the mark, 
some by odd and long shots. 

There were votes for "noted 
French General," for example, 
and "hacj something to do with 
Julius Caesar." To be centered 
around one of the half-do;',en 
great- poets, it was all in all an 
apalling display of ignorance. 

To an entering freshman, the 
most natural response to all this 
may well be an undcflated 'sn 
what?" And unle.s.^ -which would 
probably set him apart from hun- 
dreWs of his fellow freshmen — he 
has reason to know or caro Viho 
Dante was or what he did for a 
livmg, we can only sympathize. 
Interest in Dantes doesn't grow 
unplanted: and to top that, the 
freshman lives in a school era 
when "so what?" may be spok- 
en fashionably, with respect, even 
appiause, from many — and even 
by the supposedly "educated. ■" 

It may be applied with impuni- 
ty not only to Dante, but to 
Shakespeare ?nd Goethe and 
Keats; to Bach and Mozart and 
Beethoven; to .Michelangelo and 
da Vinci and Rembrandt and EI 
Greco; to Herodotus and Thucydi- 
des and Tacitus; to Planck anc! 
Ein.stein. ET ALII. In short, tb all 
of those vague-sounding •'ames 
adorning the rolls of cultivation 
— of civilization. 

"So what?' is probably and old 
question. Certainly it is at times 
a valuable question. But for those 
who have traditionally sought 
"education." it has not alv/aya 
been respected as applied to thn 
great poets, scientists, artists, and 


musicians. In fact, before there 
was much of today's broad de- 
bate about Wi.Hi 'education'" do-s 



RHODES SCHOLAR YODBR 

mean, say in John Milton's age, 
there were deiinito boundaries to 


it^ possible meaning. 

Milton and his contemporaries 
may have disputed the word as 
much as we. But the latitude was 
narrower — and John Milton and 
his polite company would have 
considered it unpardonable edg- 
ing on the despicable for an ed- 
ucated person to confuse Dante 
with French generals or to say 
thai he "had something to do 
with Julius Caesar." 

If Mozart or Beethoven had 
composed by Milton's day, an ed- 
ucated person would have known, 
at best, the themes of the great 
.symphonies by movement; and, 
at worst, one ^eat symphony 
from the others. But if we are tp 
day's attitude differs, since to- 
judge by the record boxes, to^ 
day is tpe day of a syncopated, 
blasting song called "Roll Over 
Beethoven." The gist of the song 
is, as I recollect, that Beethoven 
is to tell Tschaikovsky that Elvis 
Presley has rung in a new era in 


musical art, and that the word 
for t.he masters is Rest in Peace. 

But it wasn't always so. To be 
precise, John Milton wrote in his 
1644 essay Of Education: 

"I call ... a compleat and gen- 
erous education that which fits 
a man to perform justly, skilfully 
and magnanimously all the offices 
both private and publick of peace 
and war." For Milton such an ed- 
ucation called for rigorous study 
of language, literature, music, 
the sciences, mathematics, even 
military strategy; in a word, Mil- 
ton's ideal education was to be 
in liberal arts. 

Notice several features: He call- 
ed not only for preparation for 
"publick" office — which, except 
for the Republicn administration, 
may be well taken care of today 
— but for "private" office as well. 
I interpret this as what might be 
called "private life", something 
related to the "secret" 'life of 
Walter Mitty. 


'It's Best To Keep Ahead Of Me' 





0ftiOu«Ji. 


One Way . . 


\ \ 


A Freshman Writes His Parents 


. r 


By BARRY WINSTON 

eCoiumnist XNinsUm recently 
acquired an orientation conn- 
selior's uianual ttiat .ttartcd 
him thinking hack on his first 
days at Carolina. Beloiv is an 
iinoginary letter he might 
liave H>ritten irere he a fresh- 
man, today.) 

September 20, 1956 
Dear Folks, 

Well I been here a week now 
and I mean to tell you I really 
have been oryented. Everything 
started out pretty quiet-like last 
Thursday night with a big get 
together in the meeting hall they 
have at this place. 

Some differnt gUys all dressed 
up like those men in the magazine 
ads stood up and talked to us [or 
awhile about the stuff that goes 
on around here and what we shud 
expect and how we shud act and 
things like that. 

They all talked about some- 
thing they called the carolinaway- 
alife which I aint too clear on and 
nobody around here seems to 
know a awful lot about. But class- 
es start tomorrow and maybe one 
of my perfessors can tell me what 
its all about. 

But anyhow that was just the 
beginnin. The next day which wa.s 
Friday I was supposed to meet 
my cownseiler in front of the 


South building at nine o'clock in 
the morning so after I had got 
me something to eat at Lenor 
Hall (thats a sort of a big mcetin 
place where everbody goes to sit 
and talk at meal time) 1 looked 
at the sun and then struck out 
tr.rds the South figurin to run 
into this building directly. 

Well its just a good thing I run 
into somebody who new what he 
was doin cause that darn place 
wasnt South at all. It was North. 
Anyhow after while I found him 
(that fella I was supposed to meet 
I mean) and he said good now 
that everbodys hen? we can go 
get our fisicals and I said whals 
that and he just looked at me 
kinda funny and said youll find 
out purty quick. 

Well as it turned out I didnt 
find out purty quick at all cau=e 
first we walked a couple a milos 
-ar.;i then we stood in a line til 
I begun to thinTt that maybe they 
had run out of them fisicals thoy 
was givin away. And I wood have 
left e.xcept that there was so 
many people there all just stand- 
in around that I decided those 
things must be purty good so I 
stayed. 

I shuda left when I had the 
chanct. I was pushed and poked 
and prodded and looked at and 
into and thru til I begun to feel 


like a head of cattle at a auction. 
And if that werent enuf they had 
to stik me with about fourteen 
differnt kinds a needles so I 
wudnt get sick they told me. Boy 
I felt purty healthy til they got 
holt of me. ■ 

When we left there we went 
and took some tests an-1 I never 
seen the like of some of the ques- 
tions they gave us but I gue^s I 
musta done purty good cause they 
want me to come back next week 
and take some more. 

Seem*: like all we done all week 
Avas walk and take tests and walk 
and meet our cownsellers a<id 
walk and stand in line. Last Sun- 
day I stood in line for an hour 
and half just shake hands with 
some old guy who looked like 
Santa Claws without no beard 
and had a harmonica sticking out 
of his pocket. 

And there was something call- 
ed registrashun. I'd tell you all 
about that too but my roommate 
says the sooner I forget about it 
the sooner I'll be able to sleep 
nignts so maybe I better not talk 
about it rite now. 

There was one real nice thing 
tho. All the girls around here got 
together tonight and had a big 
party for all of us where they 
live. It was real nice with punch 
and cookies and all that sort of 


stuff and everybody sat around 
and talked about the weather and 
do-you-kncw-so-and-so but one 
girl ast me didnt I think it was 
aw-ful hot and I said no I was 
purty darn cold and after that 
nobody said much to me e-xcept 
its time to go home now young 
man and I said thank you mam 
but I reckon I better stay in town 
cause I got a class at eight o'clock 
in the morning and I doubt if I 
could get back in lime for it if 
I went home this late. 

Theres gonna be a big fight this 
Saturday afternoon down in the 
woods between some fella name 
Tatum and inother guy I think 
his name is Murray or something 
like that and everybody is sup- 
posed to go and watch and holler 
so I reckon I ought To go see what 
its all about but from what I 
hear these two fellas aint really 
mad at each other so it probably 
wont be much of a fight. But 111 
write and let you know if Tatum 
is as tough as cousin Lem u.sed 
to be before he fell down the 
stairs. I think hes the one Im sup- 
posed to holler for. 

Somebodj's poundin on the door 
yellin for me to stop wTiling 
cause the scratchin of my pen is 
keepin him awake so I better 
close for now. Write soon. 

Your loving son, 

Barry 


IV\ Abner 


Bv Al Capp 



Era Of Change 
In South' s Mind 

By WOOPY SEARS 

(Co^iimnijt Sears comn!,ents on the tlioughis 
high in ttie niinds of his native South, and tae 
era oj change prompting tiiein.) 

This is an era of change. I don't think there 
arc many who will dispute that fact. Changes come 
almost daily now, and each change brings its own 
particular problems. 

Paramount in the aggregate mind of the South 
today is the "social matamoi-phosis" which is bring 
ing with it a myriad of problems. No problem is 
insifrmountable when all parties involved can work 
together for an amicable se-ttlement. 

However,' the South lacks the necessary unamimi- 
ty of purpose and ideals wUhout which the settling 
of these unprecedented problems v/ill be slow and 
tedious;. Yet progress will b<! achieved. 

We must keep in mind, though, that no real prq- 
gress can be made through the use of force. Nor 
can any friends of the "new idea" be cultivate^ 
through the use of tanks, guns, and militia. It's con> 
men knowledge that people can be led, and some- 
times almos. herded, but rarely can they be pushed 
with any degree of lasting effectiveness. 

Of course, fear is a powerful weapon in the 
hands of those who wish to mold public opinion 
and create unnatural circumstances. Fear can be 
evoked by display of forceful determination, such 
as tanks and militia. But bully tactics seldom, if 
ever, create good will, without which the "new idea'* 
will be a predestined failuri;. 

In a recent election to let the people of North 
Carolina express their opirion of the "new idea". 
Chape' Hill had the singular distinction of being the 
only city or town in the whole state to approve it. 
It is fitting, I supposo. for this center of liberalism 
to be a forerunner in this new social movement. 
This places Chapel Hill, aid the University, in a 
unique situation. 

To many people. Chape! Hill is loved as a cen- 
ter of culture, knowledge, and progressiven 1 s. To 
many others, it is despised as a hot-bed of radical^ 
ideas, a haven for intellectual day-dreamers living 
in the abstact world of theories, hypothese, anS 
text books. 

If Chapel Hill can take the "new idea' »nd 
transform it into an applied science, then perhaps 
it will prove itself to the greatness it acclaims. 

If. however, the "new idea " can't be put inla. 
actual practice, successfully and peacefully. Chapel' 
Hill will deserve the scornful laughter and the "I 
told you so's." 

To the social reformers who would revamp our 
society, I offer the following prayer composed by 
Di. J. H. White. Negro President of thv Mississippi 
Vocational College for Negroes al Itta Bena; "Lord, 
give me the patience to accept those things which 
cannot be changed, the courage to change those 
things which can be changed, and the wisdom to 
know the difference." 


Switched Camps 
On The Nile " 

(Tlie jolloicing sketch of Egypt's strong j:ion . 
Abdel Nai,ser appeared in The Neiv York Ti'mes.) ""', 

N-cknanied "Tiger ' for his toughness and "Fox*' 
for his wanness, Eg>prs Premier Gamal Abdel Nas- ', 
scr has been described as "a dictator by default"" 
in a "revolution without a doctrine." 

Not so long ago, the 33-year-old lieutenant colon- 
el who ousted King Farouk was looked on generally 
with approval from outside Egypt and with close 
to adulation inside his country. 

He was regarded by many as moderate man wh«»-^ 
did not seek power but, when it came to him, honest-" 
ly and efficiently began to resape Egypt's rotted^ 
society and political structure. 

But as a leader wno relies on empiricism — he 
had prepared no dogmatic blueprint for Egvpt for- 
its post-Farouk period — Col. Nasser has recently 
emerged as a man who has acquired a taste for 
power. 

While his popularity with his countrymen is ap- 
parently as jhigh as it has ever been, much of tho 
non-Egyptian world is beginning to worry. 

Premier Nasser is welding an Arab* bloc and, 
according to British charges, is fomenting anti- 
British sentiment throughout the Middle East. 

An advocate of what he calls "positive neutral- 
ism," Premier Nasser has risen in the estimate of 
neighboring Arabs as well as Egyptians since he 
purchased arms from Communist Czechoslovakia 
and vastily improved the Egyptian Army. 

Privately— in the past— Premier Nasser has said 
that he recognizes Israel's rights as a nation, and 
—in the past— he has given orders to the press on 
occasion to play down criticisms against Israel 

But today many of the Arabs are lookin.-r to Col 
Nasser as the logical leader in their conflicts with 
Israel. 

Pi-emier Nasser is a man of patience. As an un- 
known instructor in the Army staff college he wait- 
ed and planned for ten years for the revolution that 
ousted King Farouk. 

Known as violent and kind, impulsive and serene 
Premier Nasser began fighting against the authori- 
ties when he was 17 years old. He recalls p-oudl^ 
mat he came upon a group of demonstrators in a 
Cairo street being belabored by club-swinging police- 
men. 

He entered the fray and was beaten, arrested"' 
and taken to jail. Only then did he ask a cellmate 
what the trouble was ail about. 

The handsome, wall-built Premier -he is just 
over six feet tall and weigh. 200 pounds-still 
carries a head scar he received in 1935. when ho 

he l^Z7^' ''"'r'^ '" ' demonstration against 
the Bluish Demonstrations and rebellion were pa. t 
of his growing diet. ^ 

On his first assignment to garrison duty after 
he was graduated from the military academy, he 
led a cabal against the senior officers 

In those days, the corruption of Eevptian mili- 
tary ana social life, epitomized in the iuxury-loving 
Kin. Farouk Jired Col. Nas.er', zeal fo. correction - - 
if neces.*ary by rebellion. 


THUI 

THE^ 


JUi 


TmjRSOAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE THREE 


THEYI^E LEADING CHEERS, OF COURSE: 


thts 
line 


lere 
lomo 
Iowa 

nith 
ring- 
is 
-'ork 

iimi- 

tling 
and 

pr<(- 

No» 

[ateS 

:on» 

shed 

the. 

Inion 

be 

such 

if 

Idea"' 

forth 
ea", 
the 
fe it- 
ilism 
lent, 
in a 

een- 

To 

zsJL 

^ving 

an^ 

arr.d 
["haps 

5. 

into^ 

lapel^ 

> I 

our 
\d by 

sip-pi 
[Lord, 

.hich 
I those 
l>m to 


Irian « 
les.) '_^ 

Nas-Z 
taulf- 

[rolon- 
irally 
I close 

who--^ 
)nest5f*; 
|-otte4^ 

he- 
for- 
tently 
[£• for 

lis ap- 

\i the 

and, 
anti- 

^utral- 
3te .jf 
|c;e he 
:;vakia 

said 
and 

pss on 

|i> Col. 
with 

in un- 

wait- 

that 

lerene, 
jthori- 
i-oudljr 
a 

jolice- 

Prested 

llmate , 

ju.>>t 

-still 

Icn he 

[gainst 

|e pai t 

after 
ly, he 

mill- i 
[loving 5 
Ect'.on,"*" 



Calisthenics And 
Sunrise Sessions 


By FRED POWLEDGE 

While Sunny Jira Tatum's 
getting his football players up 
at dawn to practice for the UNC- 
State game Saturday, another 
fellow named Jim is getting hia- 
team in shape. 

He's Jim Bynum, a senior 
from Raleigh. He is the Tar 
Heels' head cheerleader this 
year, and his team of 12 students 
alternately cusse s and praises 
him. 

The other cheerleaders cuss 
him good-naturedly because he 
gets them up at sunrise and 
starts calisthenicj. They praise 
him because, they say, he's got 
the best chocrleading squad Car- 
olina's seen for many years. 

Bynum was head cheerleader 
back at Needham Broughton 
High School four years ago. He 
was named to the job here in 
campus - wide elections last 
spring. 

"The cheerleaders this year 
have said themselves they're in 
better shape than ever before," 
say..' Bynum. 

"They know their cheers bet- 
ter, and are a much closer group 
than in the past. They love each 


other." 
Why? 

Bynum and his cheerleaders 
attribute part of the answer to 
the fact that Bynum' is a student 
naval officer (Naval Reserve Of 
ficers' Training Corps). He ^-pent 
six weeks this summer with the 
Marine Corps Schools' Training 
and Test Regiment at Quntico, 
Va. 

CALISTHENICS 

Tliere, he says, he learned the 
value of calisthonici*. He came 
back and applied what he learn- 
ed to his cheerleaders, both co. 
cds and malej. 

Even the coed members of the 
cheering squad say they feel 
better than ever after doing 
regular exercises. Legs and arms 
were sore for the firo-t few days, 
but by yesterday the girls were 
happy they had done those deep- 
knee bends. 

Bynum also started practice 
earlier this year. 

The squad came back to 
school 10 days early to start 
getting into ^'hape. Since Sept. 
10 the cheerleaders have been 
practicing twice a day — from 
6:45 until 10 a.m., and from 4 
to 6 p.m. 



JUMPING JACKS (TOP) AND DEEP KNEE BENDS (BELOW) 

. . . Qrianticcjti lesacms pay off in Chapel Hill 


SHIRTS-19C 


EA. 


(Packaged In Cellophane) 




uiithMRE 


With or Without -^ 
Starch 

Prompt Service f'^/k^^ '^) 

Glen Lennox Loundromat 



22 

25 

26 

28. 
29 
.31. 
32. 


44 


ACRO.SS 

Jury 
member 
Frenzy 
Vegetable 
Girls name 
Distress 
signal 
King's son 
Exclama- 
tion of 
pleasure 
Showered 
ice and snow 
Exclar-.a- 
tjon of 
contempt 
Wolfs cry 
Former 
Japanese 
i.sland 
Title of 
respect 
Discourage 
through fear 
German 
river 
Half ems 
Giant beATi, 
Small i.sland 
Unit of con- 
ductance 
(Elec.) 
Defame 
Interjection 
Backbone 
(anat ) 
Distant 
Ohio city 
Capital 
<Switz. ) 
Antlered 
animal 
(poss.) 
Floating 
in water 
DOWN 
Girls 
nickname 
Steady 
River (Sp.) 


Hawaiian 
bird (pi ) 
Registered 
Nur.se 
(abbr. ) 
Fire 

prevention 
officer 

7 Regent of 
the .sun" 
( Milton) 

8 Lease 
At one t!me 

10. Bamboo- 
like grass 

14. Farm 

implement 

1.5 Dwelling 

16. VVor.sted 
suitings 

18 Strikes 


21. Compas.s 
point 
(abbr) 

22 Asiatic 
kingdom 

23 Small 
ink 
bot- 
tle^ 

21 Re- 
place 
turf 

Greeting 
(Slang) 

30. Malt 

beverages 

31 Acid 

discharge 

33 N'ail 

34 Body of 
water 


r-iniMB BOSQ I 

DHHH !nn:?n 

aRDHIl L=4a&!IL2 
[SQBD sua DS 
SB RE!r;[l UfJIl 

Gmnn aaDaaa 

□□D[^ DDHB 


Yrt(rr(la.v'* An«v 


35 Land 
measure 

38. Not many 

39. Con.stel- v, 
lation 

41. Bachelor of 
Art.s (abbr.) 

42. What? 



^-kO 


Wentworth & Sloan 

S.fcs tSte pen and pencil 
every student wants! 

Porker "21" 


8.95 Set 



in handsomt 
gift box 


"must" for cver>' student ... the new 
Parker "21" pen with electro-polished 
J\ point for smooth writing and long service. 
Easy filling Perfectly balanced for writing 
case . . . never scratches or skips. Has 
large visible ink supply. Pencil has smooth 
. propel-repel action. Large eraser. Beauti- 
ful plastic barrels in blue, red, green, black. 
Pen points: medium, fine, extra-fine. Get 
this special back-to-school set today. 

Headquarters For School Supplies 

Wentworth & Sloan 
Jewelers 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C 


HEAD CHEERLEADER JiM BYNUM 

. . Uiey're gdiig to be ready for State 



(Author 0/ "Barefoot Bny w\tk Cketk." ttc.f . I 


ANOTHER YEAR, ANOTHER DOLLAR 

Today I begin the third year of writing this col- 
umn for Philip Morris Cigarettes, and I am meny in 
mj' heart. x 

I am merry for several reasons. First, because I am 
being paid. 

Not. let me hasten to state, that an emolument was 
necessary. "Sir.s," I said a fev*- days ago to the makers 
of Philip Morris, who underneath their dickeys are as 
friendly as pups and twice as cute. "Sirs," I said to this 
winsome assemblage, "there is no need to pay me for 
writing this column. If I can introduce America's college 
men and women to Philip Morris's natural tobacco good- 
ness, if I can inaugurate them into the vast sodality of 
Philip Morris smokers and thus enhance their happiness, ., 
heighten their zest, upgrade their gusto, magnify their 
cheer, broaden their bliss, augment their glee, and in* - 
' crease their PQ— " 

"PQ?" said the makers, looking at me Askance. 

"Pleasure Quotient." I explained. 

"Ah!" said the makers, nodding their sweet, shaggy 
heads. 

"If," I continued. "I can do these splendid things for 
the college population of America, there is no need for 
money, because I am more than amply repaid." 

We wept then. 1 am not ashamed to say it. WS 
WEPT! I wish the wiseacres who say big business is 
cold and heartless could have been there that day. 1 wish 
they could have witnessed the deep, croaking sobs that 
racked the gathering, the great, -shimmering t^ars that 
splashed on the boardroom table. We wept, every man- 
jack of us. The makers wept. The secretaries wept. I 
wept. My agent, Clyde Greedy, wept. We wept all. 

"No, no!" cried one of the makers, whose name u 
Good Sam. "We insist on paying you." >. 

"Oh, all right." I said. 

Then we laughed. The gloom passed like a summer 
shower. We all laughed and chose up sides and played 
stoop-tag and had steaming mug.s of cocoa and lit plump, 
firm, white cigarettes, brimming full of natural tobacco 
goodness. I mean Philip Morris, of corris! 


t "%s' 


*-> 




*.'*:* 

•>}■ 



!- 


Refreshed and exalted, we returned to the busi- 
ness at hand. "Now then." said one of the makers, whose 
name i.s Merry Andrew, "what will you write about in 
your column this year?" 

"About students and teachers," I said. "About classes 
and cutting. About eds and coed.s. About Greeks and 
independents. About the important issue* that occupy 
the supple young minds of college America." 

"Like what?" asked one of the makei-s. whose name 
is Td'able David. 

"Like how to finance a full .social life without a re- 
volver," I replied. "Like how to wear Bermuda shorts 
though your knees look like brain-coral. Like how to 
double-date in an MG." 

"And will you," asked one of the makers, whose name 
is Peter-Sit-by-the-Fire, "from time to time say a pleas- 
ant word about Philip Morris Cigarettes, which are now 
available in two sizes — Regular in the familiar Sr^ap- 
Open Pack, and Long Size in the new Crushproof Box?" 

"Crazy kid!" I chuckled, pushing my fist gently 
again.st his jaw. "You know I will." 

And we all shook hands - .silently, firmly, manlily — 
and I left, dabbing at my eyes with my agent, and hurried 
to the nearest typewriter. 

€Max Shulnwn. 195C 

The tnaken of Philip Morri$, take plenaure in brining y»m 

thii uncensored, free-teheeling column each week during tfc« 

'M:hool year — and also in bringing you today's nete PbUtp 

Uorris, packed tcith natural tobacco goodness, lip end to tip end. 




WE ARE IN BUSINESS TO SERVE YOU! 


A COMPLETE LINE OF: 
COLLEGE STATIONERY 




SCHOOL SUPPLIES 


PENNANTS 


GREETING CARDS 


GIFTS 



LEDBEHER - PICKARD 


PAdC FOUR 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


^THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20. 1956 


Berman's 

Est. 1914 ^ 

ROTC 
STUDENTS 

Plain Toe Shoes 

by Crosby Square 

Khaki Trousers 

Black, White and Khaki 

Socks 


Large Selection 

Gym& 

Basketball 

SHOES 

In All Price Ranges 


For Medical Students 
White Duck Pants 


FOR 

Your Room 

Lamps, Towels, Sheets, 
jiankets, Bates Spreads, 
Drapes, Canvas Hitch- 
hiking Bags 


NEW 

All-Wooi Fall 
'^port Coats and Pants 
vy Lr.igue and Regular 


NEW 

Wash and Wear 

No Press 

Winter Weight 

Gabardine Pants 


Open All Day 
Wednesday 

PERM^N'S 

DFPT. STOR3 


'56 YACKS 

Anyone who did not receive his 
1956 Yack may pick it up upon 
presentation of his ID card at 
jither the GM Information Office 
or the Yack office. 


CAMP PICTURES 

Anyone wishing to order s 
iresiidian camp picture may do s > 
at the YMCA office through next 
lonciay. I hv tliar^e lor each pic- 
ture is $1.50 


DTH Publishes First Issue 



: ANNOUNCING COLGATE'S. 

\miSK\ 

: FLUORIDE Toothpaste : 


With this edition The Daily Tar 
Heel start • it publication schedule 
for the academic year. 

The newspaper will be publish- 
ed six mornings a week, Tuesday 
through Sunday, for the whole 
schorl year. 

Fred Powledge, senior from 
Raleigh, is editor of the newspap- 
er this year Hi..* managing editor 
is Charlie Johnson, senior from 


Le.noir. Bill Bob Peele, senior from 
William.slon. is business manager. 

Editor Powledge said yesterday 
he will announce new staff ap- 
pointments within the next few 
days. 

The Daily Tar Heel Freshman 
Issue, a 12-page preschool edi- 
tion published for freshmen and 
transfer -'.udents, was distributed 
last Friday. 


Managing Editor Johnson an- ' 
nounced that a limited number of 
extra copies of the freshman edi- 
tion may be picked up at the news- 
paper's offices on the second floor 
(1 Graham Memorial. 


INTRAMURAL OFFICIALS 

Students majoring in physical 
education are needed as intramu- 
ral officials for tag football. Those 
interested have been asked to 
come to 301 Woollen Gym on 
Tuesday sjt 4 p.m. 



HARDENS TOOTH ENAMEL 
WORKS ALL DAY... 

to defeat tooth decay! 


f/on'r he 

CAM FUSED 




Ity your 


COMPLKXIO.N! 


/-< 


Z)'^- 


f) 


DOILS; 

"I'lir cunipus 'hull' 
Mighl think you're slii-k. 
Bui wliat of the B.M.O.C.'i 
■|"o be Hirr your cainpl««ioii 
l';iss«>i 'kiitsiiif inapertioii' . . . 
(Jrmi olToid makr-up with 

TKN-0-}«I>^. please!" 

OUYSf 

" rtml icurtroan 'iaiie' 
U illi .ohape aiid britiii 
Han niso two eyaa that won't 

liiisii you . . . 
Keepyourskiiiclearaiidniale-y 
JseTKN-O-Sl.X daily. 
*>r. nhe'll ouly be »ren . . nut 
>rni with vou! " 



Baptist Church Welcomes New Students 

The Baptists of Chapel Hill could teach the ass ^mbly line factories of Detroit a thing or two with 
the feeding techniques they employed this week. N w students, above, were treated to a picnic cVner 
' r .'ed in eight fast-moving chow lines In the chur h basement. About 750 students attended, alolag 
with members of the congregation and rookies in th . Highway Patrol School here. (Photo by Gidui) 


Daily terdbbinir with Tcn-O-Six help* 
rid skin of impurities that cause many 
skin problems . . . Combines antiseptic 
eleansins and thernpeuiie healinc . . . 
Effeetivc for dry, oily or normal skin. 
Ui» Ten-0-Six for a clear, clean com- 
plexion, tl and 12 plus tax. 


'^"^a^^i^ ^).&.^^^^ ^^"^tm^^yji TEN-0-SIX 




Coming Soon # Our Semi-Annuai Gigantic 
'One Cent Saie"— Watch For This One In October 


DRUG STORE 


"The Tar Heel's Prescription Center" 
Free Delivery Phone 9-8781 







All Ihe thrills of sport ... ail the joy of family 
occasions . . . can be captured forever on film 
. . . when you make your own movies. See our 
wide range of home movie cameras, projectors 
end screens. 


FOISTER'S 
Camera Store 



Now 'n Our Third Generation . . 


\\ 


ff 


YOUR BANKING HOME 
AWAY FROM HOME 

We always look forward to meeting the new class 
of students entering the University. For each year 
we not only make many new friends, but run into 
familiar names of the past. 

Since 1899, tUe 3ank of Chapel Hill has been the 
Community Bank of Chapel Hill. For a number of 
years, we have been greeting sons of former Uni- 
versity students who— like father, like son— want 
to handle their University expenses in a business- 
like mar.ner. 

More recently, .even a few third generations have 
begun to show up. (How time flies!) 
Bui whether you are the third or the first genera- 
tion attending Carolina, the welcome mat is out. 
Serving you is, to us, not only a duty but a privi- 
lege. 


ThcBnnlf^^iaprl Hill 


Glen Lennox 


Member Federal OeP9<it Insurance Corp. 

Carrboro 


Chapel Hill 


Free To All Students 

Your Name and Address Imprinted 
On Your First Book Of Checks 


Your 
name 



Insured 
against 
alteration 


In a matter of moments v^e will imprint your 
name and address on your chacks and make 
them unmistabably yours. What's more, each 
check is imprinted on special safety paper and 
is insured against fraudulent alteration. Open 
your account with us and enjoy this added pro- 
tection. 


Cowering 
TheCampus 


VARSITY GLEE CLUB 
The Varsity Glee Club has Invit- 

jii ai. iiK'n inierestod in singing to 
aft inlormal meeting on Wednes- 
' ila;. at 5:00 p'm. in Hill Hall." Re- 
Ireshments will be served and a 
sh:n\ concrt by the Cilee Club wii! 
be presented.. 
DANCE COAAMITTEE 

AU members of the University 
Diuct Commiilec will be required 
to work at tiic Grail Dance Satur- 
day Lijiht, according to Chairman 
Don Miller. 
PROGRAM SELLERS 

.Students interested in selling 
programs at home football games 
iiis year h:n - b'M^n asked to at- 
tend a meeting at 4 p.m. today in 
ii)t Woollen (iym. 
ART EXHIBITION 

A lollcction of reproductions of 
famous paintings, which are cur- 
rently on exhibition in the Person 
Hall .Art Gallery, will be available 
lor rent beginning September 26 at 
9:0!) am. 

.V picture may be reserved for 

rental for 25 cenls per month per 

picture plus a $100 deposit. Each 

picture may be rented for a three 

; mnnMis period. 

This service is offered to Chapel 

MEN'S GLEE CLUUB 

All members of the UNC Men's 
' Glee Club have been asked to meet 
in Hill Hall .Monday at 4:30 p.m. 
for the first meeting o4 the year. 


Want Your 
OLD SUIT 

Ivy 

Lcagueired 

We take cut pleats, Re- 
cut Shoulders, convert 
to 3 button, put belt in 
the back. 

Fast and Efficient 
Service 

Fete the Tailor 


^■..>^ -j^-^^- ^i/:^u::^f- 


^tm 


l*f^^^ m 




Then Avail Yourseif Of 
Our Compiete: 
SHOE SUPPLIES 

INCLUDir:G- \ 
LACES, POLISH, TRECS, DYEING a OTHERS 

and 




Expert Workmanship 
Keeps Old Shods On 
Job Months Longer 
Than You Expacted! 



COLLEGE 
SHU-FIXERY 


Stevens-Shepherd's 
: BACK TO SCHOOL - - 

CONTEST! 
ComQ In! 


Regisferl 


1 


Wmt\ 


ISi PRIZE-IMPORTED TWEEP SPORT JACKET : 

k 

2ND PRIZE-CREW-NECK SHETLAND SWEATER: 

3RD PRIZE-IVY LEAGUE DRESS SHIRT 

> 

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY! : 

WE WANT EVERYONE TO COME DOWN Ta^ 
SEE US AND BROWSE AROUND OUR SHOP. YOl^ 
WILL FIND AN EXCELLENT SELECTION OF: 
CLOTHES WITH DISTINCTIVE TAILORING AND; 
THE TRADITIONAL COLLEGE STYLE, THAT HAS: 

BEEN LABELED "THE IVY LOOK." \ 

• 

MAKE STEVENS-SHEPHERD YOUR CHOICE FORZ 
ALL YOUR CLOTHING NEEDS. ^ 

WE WELCOME YOUR CHARGE ACCOUNT, t 

« 

DRKSS WELL; YOU CANT AFFORD NOT TO! : 



STEVBKS^SHBPHBRD : 


THE 

GOODY SH 

OP 

• DINNERS 

• SANDWICHES 

• BEER 
• PETE AND SPERO 


I 


off 


• 

we< 

» 


» 

to 

* 

the 

« 

urd 

1 

V 

• 

ing 

» 

iny 


ber, 

fina 

• 


\ 

N. < 
T 


con 

f 

cast 

» 

% 

lem 

> 

Sail 

\ 

fine 


Did 




kGV. 


the 


auai 


fine 


and 




Ti 


fens 


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— \\\ 


fron 

Larr 


ed. 


he i 




H( 

X 

been 

and 




abou 




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ins-t 


Univ 



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»•»!•**■ v^»lj^% ^ ■: x^wt. ■ ^ <-^-«.i w r- * . i w>« » l»i > ' ^ 


W. 19S6 


THURSDAY. SEPTEMftER 20, 195« 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


FAGI FIVI 


r 


:et 

JER 


you: 
OF: 

AND- 

has: 


for: 

m 

o! : 


[ 


^11 


Tar Heels Wind Up Heavy Work For Wolf pack Contest 


latum Fears Wolf pack 
Backs, Passing Attack 


A Tuesday scriramage capped 
off heavy work for Carolina this 
week, aj the Tar Heels prepared 
to open their first season under 
the new regime of Jim Tatum Sat- 
urday in Kenan Stadium. 

With the same first string play- 
ing together that has been operat- 
ing in practice since early Septem- 
ber, the Tar Heels underwent their 
final full scale scrimmage against 
N. C. State playj. 

Tatum, in a Tuesday noon press 
conference with writers and broad- 
casters, said that his main prob- 
lem in coping with the Wolfpack 
Sa lure' ay would-be stopping the 
fine Slate backs Dick Hunter, 
Dick Christy and George Marin- 
kov. He is a'.-) concerned about! 
the Tack's passing attack, as' 
quarterback Tom Katich has two 
line receivers in ends John Lows 
and John Collar. 

Tatum pointed out that bis de- 
fensive secondary will contain on- 
ly one man— halfback Ed Sutton 
—with aoy game experience. Up 
front, hi ends— Buddy Payne and 
Larry Muschamp — are experienc- 
ed, but elsewhere down the line 
he is thin on experience. 

He said that his offense had 
been pleasing in late sessions 
and that he is more concerned 
about • opping the 'Pack than 
scoring on them. 

It will be the 46th meeting be- 
tween N. C. State and UNO, sister 
iuit'tutions in the Consolidated 
University of North Carolina. 

A5 in last years' opener with 
Oklahoma, the Tar Heels will be- 
gin the jjason with a sophomore 
— operating the split-T offense. Cur- 1 
tis Hathaway, a 6-0, 189 Norfolk, | 
product will take charge of i 
the Tar Hels, backed by halfbacks \ 
Sutton and Larry McMullen and j 
fullback Giles Gaca. 

While Hathaway has had no 


Tar Heels Get 
New Uniforms 
This Season 

TJe UNC footbaU squad this 
season is wel! fitted out with a 
complete new wardrobe. 

This not only includes three 
new seU of game gear, in varying, 
striking colors, but also a wide as- 
sortment of practice equipment 
which the Tar Heels have been 
ive work going on in strict secreoj- 1 making good use of in preparing 


college varsity game experience, 
he perfwmed well as a freshman 
and irapress«d Tatum in spring 
drills so much that he was running ' 
second team behind Dave Reed 
when Reed was injured. Behind 
Hathaway will be Doug Farmer, a | 
non-letterman senior, and junior; 
Ron Marquette. 

For 10 daj-s leading up to Sat- ] 
urday, Tatum has had his defens- 


Intramural Program Is 
Set Up For This Fall 


behmd a canvas erected on Navy 
Field. Offensive drills have gone 
on outside, but the defense de- 
vised the stop the 'Pack's decep- 
tive multiple offense has been 
kept top secret. 


North Carolina 

Muschamp 

Blazer 

Setzer 

Stavnitski 

Lear 

Pell 

Payne 

Hathaway 

McMullen 

Sutton 

Gaca 


L^ 

LT 

L". 

C 

Rl 

RT 

RE 

QB 

LHB 

R IB 

F3 


N. C. State 

Collar 

Szuchan 

Tokar 

Oddo 

Compton 

DeAngelus 

Lowe 

Katich 

Hunter 

Christy 

Guerrieri 


; for its opener with N. C. State 
here Sept. 22. 

The main line of practice uni- 
forms' are numbered, which is an 
aid to the coaches in keeping the 
players identified. 

In addition, the squad now is 
equipped with several -sets of slip- 
over scrimmage jerseys of differ- 
ent colors, enabling two or three 
scrimmages to go on at the same 
time, with the players all attired 
in different colors. 

The travelling squad also will one big change has been made 
have brand new Jim Tatum Texas („ the intramural program for the 
hats to wear on trips. i coming season. The graduate, pro- 

Thc Tar Heels never had it so | fessional. and independent divis 
good. I ion will be included with the dorm 


The following schedule has been 
posted concerning the first intra- 
mural manager's meeting: Fra- 
ternity—Thursday, Sept. 27. Dorm- i 
itory — Tuesday, Oct. 2. Joint Man- 1 
agers Meeting — Nov. 27. 

The intramurals department is i 
in need of tag football official.?. ' 
Any one interested is requested 
to go by room 315 in Woollen 
Gym anytime after 1 p.m. 

Rufus Hackney has been named 
chief assistant to Walter Rabb in 
the department. The undergrad- 
uate assistants are Bill Bailey and 
Tommy Johnson. 

Another Field and Gun meet 
will be held thi.r yeaV on October 
25. The meet will be sponsored 
jointly by the intramurals depart- 
ment and Graham Memorial. SAE 


division. Last year, the three form- 
ed a separate division. This will 
leave only two intramural divis- 
ions: Dorm and Fraternity. 

Tag football play will get under- 

j way in early October. The fratern- 

I ity division will begin play on Oct. 

I 2 and the dormitories will start 

shortly after on Oct. 9. 

Fraternity entries will close 
Sept. 27 and dorm entries on Oct. 
2. The tag football program will 
be round robin play. 

The single elimination tennis 
schedule will begin on Oct. 9 for 
both fraternity and dorm divis- 
both fgraternity and dorm divis- 
ions. Entries close on Oct. 2. 

Qualifying rounds fc- intramur- 
al golf will end on Oct. 9 and 


fraternity is the defending champ- ! i"atch play will start Oct. 11. 


Barclay To Aid 
On UNC Grid 
Radio Airings 

Former Carolina head football 
coach George Barclay will add 
color and expert opinion to Big 
Four football broadcast* this fall 
on a statewide network originat- 
ing with WPTF, Raleigh. 

Barclay will work with Jim Reid 
of that station in carrying UNC, 
Duke, N. C. State aUd Wake For- 
est games to NortU Carolinians. 

All five North Carolina home 
games are on the slate, plus home 
appearances by other Big Four 
schools. Barclay'j comments will 
come during the game itself as 
well as during halftime. 

Coach here for three years, Bar- 
clay is now operating a service 
station. 


Taturn Will Appear On Radio, 
Television Shows This Year 

Carolina football coach Jim Ta- Asheville, WLOS-TV (13); Char- 


tum, never accused of not staying 
busy all the time, will carry a 
big load this autumn in addition 
to all the chores and ramifications 
of coaching his football team. 

Tatum is booked for weekly tele- 
vision and rdio shows. 

His brand new television pro- 
gram, called the "Jim Tatum 
Show," will be filmed by the 
"Home Security TV network" and 
shown on six North Carolina tele- 
vision stations, starting next week. 
It is sponsored by a Duriiam Life 
Insurance Company (Home Securi- 
ty). 

The stations will present the 
shown on different days, the 
schedule to be announced by 
them. The network consists of 


lotte, WBTV (3); Durham WTVD 
(11); Greensboro, WFMY (2); 
GrefinviUe, WNCT (9): and WU- 
mington, WMFD-TV (6). 

Tatiim, who had a similar high- 
ly successful, show on a Washing- 
ton television station whea h^ 
coached at the University of Mary- 
land, plans^ to give scouting re- 
ports on Carolina games and will 
use blackboard and game films 
in an expert analysis of what the 
fans have seen or many expect to 
see. 

His weekly radio show, in the 
form of an interview with UNC 
sports publicist Jake Wade, will 
be carried by 40 North Carolina 
c'tations afffli^d^d with the Tobac- 
co sports rWtwork and opens this 
week. 



N.'c."sTATrCOLLEGT— COLISEUM^ 

N. C. Stota G)ll«g«— COLISEUM - 

P. O. Box 5905— RALEIGH. N C. I 

— .ADULT Tickets ot $ each $ • 

CHILD Tickets at $ eoch % | 

PteoM Include 25c for Postage and Handling $ 25 I 

Amt. of Check or Money Order Er>cl. — Totol $ I 

Price: $3.00 D $2.50 H $2.00 O $1.50 n| 

Children Vi Price Fridoy Matinee Only 
Mon. Nite Sept. 24....n Frid. Mot. Sept. 28. ...D J 

Tue. Nite Sept. 25....n Frid. Nite Sept 28....n ■ 

Wed. Nite Sept. 26....n Sot. Mat. Sept 29...0 
Thur. Nite Sept. 27....0 Sot. Nite Sept 29.. ..D | 

Nightly 8:30 — Fridoy Motinee 3:30 — Soturdoy Matinee 2 30| 

Nome .....•••••,•• , .„«....... ■ 

Address 


m 3jg)^^^^a8aaf . .: .i . . ...% m^ "^^SiSSSiS^^^^ fiaarmwM ....._ -. , ^ 

P_^^ ™* y""^^^^ City Phone | 


i^ 


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it ROYAL PORTABLE TLPEWRITERS 


A.. 


Electric Construction Co. 

165 E. Franklin St. $ ?« Established 1935 


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WIN AN ENGLISH BIKE 
OR MOTOROLA TABLE RADIO 

STUDENTS ONLY! 

ALL YOU HAVE TO DO 

IS BRING THIS AD INtO 

OUR STORE AND REGISTER 

NOTHING TO BUY! 


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PHONE 6981 




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THE CAROLIKiTPLAYMAKERS 


•i* » 




I 


Androcles And The Lion 

November 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18. The Playmakers 
Theatre— As a part of the GeOrge Bernard Shaw Cen- 
tennial Celebration, we present his most delightful 
comedy. This production will tour the Carol inas and 
Georgia. 


ANNOUNCE THEIR THIRTY - NINTH SEASON 


Anastasia 

October 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21. The Playmakers The- 
atre—The recent smash hit in both New York and 
London, by Marcelle Maurette (adapted by Guy Bol- 
ton). "Enthralling— filled with suspense, love, joy, 
and fear." 


>1 


=>n*> 


»nibi 


,:. JA .ir 


■^•vaM 


'uO 


> ..»a- 


*;'., 


Brigadoon 




March I, 2 and 3. Memorial Hall— At last we are stag- 
ing the musical show which has been requested 
most often by our patrons. Music by Frederick 
Loewe; book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. 



Desire Under The Elms !I . C^ * 

December 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18. The Playmakers 
Theatre— Eugene O'Neill, one of the greatest play- 
wrights this country has prorduced, gives us here a 
startling tragedy of the American scene. 


4 


Peer Gynt 


■^A 


May 1 0, 1 1 and 1 2. The Forest Theatre— Henrirck Ib- 
sen's fantastic satire on human nature, especially 
translated and adapted for outdoor production by 
the director. ., f?-^*;. ,-..■- 


'*» firt' ■ 


^c 


A New Play 


Season Tickets $5.00 
Save 50% 


March 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31. The Playmakers The- 
atre—A premiere production of a new script by one 
of our own playwrights which we hope will be chal- 
lenging and timely. 


On Sale At Abernethy Hall 

(next to Scuttlebutt) and Ledbet- 

ter-Pickard 


AS AN ADDED ATTRACTION, THE STEPHEN ROSE PRODUCTION OF "THE BEST OF STEINBECK" STARRING IN PERSON CONSTANCE BENNEH, TOD ANDREWS, FRANK MCHUGH, 

ROBERT STRAUSS-MEMORIAL HALL-SAT. DECEMBER 1 

Mail Orders to: Playmakers Business Office, Box 1050, Chapel Hill, N. Ce i 


■■;^ i ^ i 


PAGE SIX 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


THURSDAY, $«PTlM»eR 20, 1V56 


THUI 



Sutton And Stavnitski 
Named As Co-Captains 


EO SUTTON 

new Tar Heel ctxxtptoin 


Flajhy senior halfback Ed Sut- 
ton and veteran center George 
Stavaitski hav« been named co- 
captains of the UNC football team 
for the 1056 season. The selections 
were announced by Coach Jim 
, Tatum in a Tuesday press confer- 
ence. 

Sntton, ' a 200 pound scatback 
f^om CuUewhee, has been tabbed 
by Coach Tatam »-• one of the 
fine.v halfbacJu Around. The Cull- 
owhee Comet, a star under George 
Barclay for two years, will hold 
down the starting right halfback 
slot Saturday when the Tar Heels 
entertain N. C. State in the sea- 


Stavnitski, a strapping 210 
pounder from Fairfield, Conn., 
will anchor the Tar Heel line at 
the pivot post this season. Stav has 
been a starter off and on for tA'o 
seasons. 

Sutton has been activ-e off the 
field as well as on. The curly 
haired youth is here at the Uni- 
versity on a Morehead scholarship 
and is active in campus affairs. 
During his first two ^ears here, 
Ed turned in a creditable perform- 
ance with the Carolina basketball 
ball team. 


Baseball Practice Set 

Fall baseball practice will get 
under way next Wednesday aft- 
ernoon at 3 p.m. on Emerson 
Field. 

A meeting will be held for all 
interested candidates Tuesday at 
4 p.m. in room 304 of Woollen 
Gym. 

Practice sessions will be held 
daily at 3 p.m. for three weeks 
until the 15th or 16th of October. 


Thirlecn North Carolina towns 
had populations of less than 1,000 
according to the 1860 census. 




Carblfna Caravan 


GEORGE STAVNITSKI 

. . . named co-captain 


Never Lower Than Fourth scored early 

Despite ^harp competition, Uni The 1955 UMC football team 
versity of North Carolina footbaU j ^^'"'^^^ '" the first period of five 
teams have .tayed in the fir.-t di- ' S^""^' last fall, including its first 
vision of the Atlantic Coast Con- ^^^^^ gamej. 
ference standings all three years 

the conference haj operated. The The Wilmington "Star", found- 
Tar Heels have been third twice ed in 1867, njs North Carolina's old- 


and fourth once. 


est newspaper. 


* .^. 


SPECIAL 

Afternoons 




■t- J.V 


®^ 


.ri 


1 AT 


THE PATIO 

- >. Regular-25^ 
King Size-35< 
_ 1 to5 ; 


By JAKE WADE 

Pre-season football practice at 
Carolina draws to a close this 
week, as the Tar Heels step into 
their opener with N. C. State in 
Kenan Stadium Saturday . . The 
long, gruelling conditioning pro- 
gram has been interesting. 

The only person not directly af- 
filiated with the j'iuad who was 
present at every practice, without 
a single miss, was a local theatre 
man, E. Carrington Smith, long a 
devout supporter of the Tar Heels 
with passionate and unwavering 
loyalty. 

Mind you, our Tar Heels drilled 
every morning before breakfast, a 
Jim Tatum innovation that dated 
from his fir.-t year as a head 
coach, at North Carolina in 1M2 
And Mr. Smith is a night worker 
at his theatre. But that didn't 
keep him from rising with the 
birds, joining Coach Tatum a* 
Woollen Gymnasium, riding with 
him to the field house and then 
walking through the woods in the 
morning dew to check in with the 
first candidates on the field. 


Mr. Smith is a pipe smoker and 
a stranger might have taken hin- 
for a meditating professor, com- 
muning with nature, as he made 
his twice-daily trip to the practice 
field, arriving for the first one 
with the dawn and departing from 
the second one after sunset. 

The Chapel Hill theatre man 
who is also president of the en- 
terprising Chapel Hill Atlilctic 
Club, also has the dignity of a pro 
feasor, has never been seen with 
out a tie and maintained his sartor 
ial perfection during the hottest 
hours of practice. We plebian.*^ 
sweated in sport shirts and some- 


times j-liorts, but good old E. Can- 
rington»k)oked cool and detachetf* 
as fee etood In the broiling sun 
and watdied Ed Sutton and others 
gallop. 

Mr. Smith was annoyed only 
once, and then mildly. When the 
two-a-day practice program ended. 
Coach Tatum forgot to tell his 
biggest booster. So K. Carrington 
the next day was up at six, as 
ujual, and sat for a long time in 
Woollen Gymnasium waiting for'^ 
the coach, who was having his first" 
morning slumber since Sept. 1. 
"Jim shouldn't have forgotten ttj ' 
tell me," luid Carrington sadly and 
somewhat deflated. 


Wbile no other sideliner had a 
perfect practice sejiion attendance 
record, there have been many loy-^ 
alists who by now are pretty well 
acquainted with Ed Sutton, Stew- 
art Pell, Curtis Hathaway and 
the other lads who go to battle this 
weekend. 

Dr. W. P. Jacocks is one of 
them. He is a retired University 
alumnus who gets rao.-t of his 
recreation by following his alma 
mateVs sports teams. He, too is 
a coat-and-tie man. like Smith, 
and is a familiar figure on the 
practice field sidelines. 

University Acting President Bill 
Friday has caught the big scrim- 
mages and Chancellor Robert Be 
House has been down almost every 
afternoon, after knocking off from 
work. He has been the mcot ag- 
gressive of the practice viewers, 
often s.'traying on the field and 
ioining in the team huddles. If he 
doesn't know the numbers of the 
key plays by now. he is not as ob- 
servant as I think he is. 


.© 


o^ 


WELCOME BACK TO U.N.C. 

^\ ' , And To 

MICHAEL'S GRILL 

We ser\'e all meals and snacks at reasonable prices 


Chapel Hill— A Good Place To Livel 


These Carolina Alumni Liked Chapel Hill So Much 

They Stayed! 


jmk 


^ «-J4M. 



And stayed we did! And that's not the half of it, we're going to 
keep right on staying! We love Chapel Hill . . . and so far, Chapel 
Hill loves us! You might say it's because we carry the finest men's 
clothes in town, or you might say it's because we think you, the 
customer, are also the boss. Bjjt besides those things above, it's 
really because you know you're ALWAYS welcome around our 
way. Just tell 'em youll meet 'em at the TOWN & CAMPUS, 
and we'll be mighty proud. Come on in. Stranger, you won't be 
a stranger long! 



;..;^:» V-*->» t*, .^^ f- V -.' 


WELCOME 
STUDENTS 


It hasn't been too many years ago that we were 
students too. Therefore, we try to look at things 
from the- student's viewpoint. For instance, we al- 
ways keep up with the fashion in student men's 
clothing, and have clothes that will please you and 
keep you well-dressed. Stop by today and see for 
yourself some of these IVY LEAGUE Clothes . . . 
FRANKLIN Suits and Slacks . . . KEYS & LOCK- 
WOOD Ties . . . GREENHAIX Cloth Belts . . . GUT- 
STEIN-TUCK Ivy League Slacks and Walking ShorU 
. . . BYFORD English Socks ... Ivy League Button- 
Down Dress Shirts by MANHATTAN . . . and Ivy 
League Crewneck Sweaters ^y BANTAMAC and 
TOA\TS^ & KING. 


A Fine Men's Store Carrying Nationally Known Brands 

BOTANY 500 Suits and Sport Coats . . . PHOENIX Suits . . . GORDON Clothes . . . BOTANY BRANDS Slacks . . . ALLIGATOR 
Top Coats . . . BOTANY Wool Ties . . . HARRIS tweed Top Coals . . . HARRIS Tweed Sport Coats . . . FORSTMANN'S Cash- 
mere Sweaters . . . Lamb's Wool Sweaters by TOWN & KING OF CALIFORNLV . . . DOBBS Hats . . . EXETER and INTER- 
WOVEN Socks . . . MANHATTAN Shirts . . . VAN HEUSEN Shirts . . ..COOPER and HANES UNDERWEAR . '. . PLEETA\'AY 
Pajamas . . . fflCKOK Belts . . . Sport Shirts by MANHATTAN, VAN HEUSEN. and BOT.\NY . . . HICKOK Jewelry . . . 
AFTER^IX Formal Wear . . Tailoring Line by HAAS of BAl^IMORE . . . Jackets by BANTAMAC . . . Swim and Sports 
Wear by GANTNER. *• 



WELCOME TO 
CHAPEL HILL! 


Our name is Town & Campus, and we like for you 
to think that whether you are from town or campus, 
you're always welcome at our store. Many of the 
students make it their headquarters for clothing 
and just congregating down town. We'd like for 
you to do the same. All of our suits have that good, 
clean, fresh look that helps make you look so well. 
And the accessories will bring out the finishing 
touch. We take pride in listing as some of our best 
customers and friends . . . the townspeople of our 
Viliage. After you're settled down in your new 
room, apartment or home, stop in to see us. We'll 
try to please you! P.S. Welcome to Chapel Hill 
we hope you like it as much as we do. 


CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 


;».;'. 


MiiM 


m 


■No\\| 
install 
of th( 

-The! 
smder 
made 
merit 

Stuc 
Youni 
S. Bej 
and gi 
submil 
the n^ 

Bcni 
to thj 
who t| 
in the 
-Youl 
m«it 
of doi| 
care 
agains| 
will 
that el 

His 
low.s: 

•Firl 
the col 
nort. 
grount 
the p^ 
every 
r'cs. .\J 
nctt tl 
imiiKHll 
t(i him 

1 thnu| 

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he refd 


i 


20, 1956 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE SEVEN 


n 


E. Car- 
detached' 
^ing sun 
id others 

only 

1 the 

ended, 

tell his 

Irrington 

six, as 

time in 

ting for 

[his first 

;pt. 1. 

)tten to 

idly and 


ir had a 

[endance 
lany loy- 
itty well 
Stew- 
ly and 
kttk this 

one of 

liversity 

of his 

lis alma 

too is 

Smith. 

on the 

;nt Bill 

scrim- 

|>bert B^ 

5t every 

)ff from 

lost ag- 

iewers. 

?ld and 

;. If he 

of the 

bt as ob- 


Men Asked To Take Care 
Of New Phones In Dorms 


I 


New telephones are now being Committee and they made an ad- aware of how fortunate we are 
mstalled on every floor of most justment in the University budget Let's not abuse this privilege. 
oi the men's dormitories. , which was necessary for us to re 

.The phones, long sought-after by j eeive these new telephones, 
student government here, were '■ \ 

RESPONSIBILITY 


made available through an adjust 
m»;;it in the University budget. 

Student Body President Bob 
Vqung last summer talked with J. 
S. Benne'.t, director of buildings 
aad grounds about bhe matter and 
submitted a request to him for 
the new phones. 

Bennett turned the request over 
to the State Budget Committee 
who then made a provision for it 
in the University budget. 

-Ydung this week issued a state- 
ment regarding the responsibility 
of dormitory residents 


"As you know, they are now be- 


"For many years student gov- 
ernment has sought to have tele- 
phones placed on every floor of 
the dorms. Now we have achieved 

ithis 


Freshmen Fellowship Planned 
For Tonight In Lenoir Hall 

All freshmen have been invited | ing will be available for exper- 
to attend a supper meeting of the , ience in public speaking and lead- 
Freshmen Fellowship, a group er&hip. 
sponsored by the YMCA, today at 
6:30 p.m. in Lenoir Hall. 


mg mstalled on every 'floor of ; g^^^' student will b2 appreciative 
most men sdorm.tories. This places 3„^ considerate of this additional 
added responsibility in the hands .^rvice. If you appreciate your new 
of dormitory residents. ^Ve must j^^ne then show it by taking care 
not damage these phones, he said 


If we do. they will be removed 
immediately. 

"It was necessary for us to re- 
move coin boxes from all tele- 
phones but one in every dormitory. 
During the past year, the Universi- 
ty lost as much as $30 from one 
telephone because of students 


Two other social events are 
planned for September. On Sun- 
Students planning to attend have ! day, Sept. 23, approximately 150 
been asked to get their suppers on girfs are coming to the campus 

« the main floor of x^noir hall and j from Averett College in Danville, 

oal. I am very confident that then bring their trays to the South Va. A reception will be held in 

Room. A short business meeting Graham Memorial. Refrejhments 
will be held after supper in the i ^ill be served and a combo v^ill 

Library Assembly Room, begin- v^ „„ i. , . . , 

be on hand to provide music. 

On Saturday, Sept. 29, the Fel- 


Baby-Sitting Strvices 
Available On Saturday 

Baby-sitting services will be 
available on football Saturdays 
from 1 to 5:15 p.m. at the Victory, 
Village Nur-^ry to children of 
students, faculty and University 
employees. ■ 

Only phiJ-^^oa seven years and , 
und«r will be accepted. The mini- 
num charge will be $1.50 per, 
child for the first child, and $1 
for each additional child from '. 
the .same family. The charges are 
for the entire afternoon. i 


Planetarium Shows Exceeded 
Expectations This Summer 


of it." Young concluded. 


The length of North Carolina 
from east to west is greater than 
any state east of the Mississippi 
River. 


ning approximately at 6 p.m. andj 
I lasting until 6:45 p.m. I 

i The fellowship program for this | 'o^^^hip group will go to Danville 
y«ar will be a varied one and will ! ^or % dance with the Averett 
include socials, dapcej and dis- ' girls. Final plans for these social 
cussion groups, acocrding to an events will be made at the meet- 
announcement. Leadership train- ' ing tonight. 


Kannapolis, N. C. has the largest 
towel mills in the world. 


Public interest in the Morehead 
Planetarium here this summer ex- 
ceeded aM expectation, according 
to Manag:. A. J. Jenzaro. 

More than 7,835 peisons saw 
"Mars, Planet of My^rtery." More 
than 300 peered at the lusty red 
planet thrcmgh the telescope atop 
the Planetarium. j 

Jenzano says the interest evi-, 
denced this summer is attributable : 


to Mars' bein^ in its most favorable 
viewing po^'.tion in 17 years. 

Two Planetarium patrons came 
all the way from Asheville to 
Chapel Hill solely to see the dem- 
onstration and to look through 
the telescope. The weather being 
unfavorable for viewing on the 
night .they arrived, the couple 
stayed over till the next day to 
get a look at Mars. 



in taking 

care of the phones. He warned cheating then with long distance ' 

against damaging them as "they ^^"'''- ^'^ cannot have this happen j 

■ "^ • • during the coming year," he said. 


will be removed immediately" in 
that event. 

His complete statement is as fol- 
lows: 

"First, let me say that without 
the cooperation of Mr. J. S. Ben- 
nett, director of buildings and 
grounds, we would not be enjoying 
the privilege of a telephone on 
every floor of the men's dormito- 
ries. After conferring with Mr. Ben- 
nett this summer, he took action 
immediately. I submitted a request 
to him for the new telephones that 
I thought we could use. 

"When he received this request, 
he referred it to the state Budget 


"The coin-box phones are now 
in a private booth for our conven- 
ience for making long distance 
calls. If it is found that students 
continue to cheat the company, 
then the coin-box phones will be 
placed in a hallway in a most con- 
spicuous place. I urge each student 
to cooperate and be fair in using 
these facilities. If a few students 
cheat, then all of us must suffer. 

"Another reminder is that we 
are very fortunate not to have to 
pay for local calls. On any other 
campus it costs lOtf to call from 
one dormitory to another. Please be 


FOR THE 

Ultimate 


IN 


Enjoyment and Relaxation 


VISIT CHAPEL HILL'S 
NEWEST AND BEST 


The Tempo Room j 



ANY WAY YOU 
LOOK AT IT... 

You Can 
Get Clipped 

FOR LESS 
AT 


HOURS 9-5:30 
MONDAY-SATURDAY 


Graham Memorial 
Barber Shop 

IN THE 
BASEMENT 

OF V ^ 

GM ^ 

Haircuts Are 
Just 85^ • 


GRAHAM MEMORIAL BARBER SHOP 


USED TEXT? 


NOVEL? 


CHILDREN' BOOK? 


THE 

INTIMATE 

BOOKSHOP 

HAS IT 


MODERN UBRARY? PAPER BACK? RARE BOOK? 


''5^ •«?'"* 


ON THE DIAL 1360 


>t'. 


14 



t^.i 




Ty Boyd-'54 


AV . 


FREE 


BREAKFAST WITH BOYD" 7-9- ^. 

WAKE UP TO GOOD MUSIC-THE 
CORRECT TIME AND A CALENDAR 

OF CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY HAPPENINGS 


2 WESTINGHOUSE 
POCKET RADIOS 


FREE 


WESTINGHOUSE 



Hank Cheney— '54 


'MOSTLY MUSIC" 10-11:30- 
AND A LITTLE CHATTER. INTER- 
LUDE" 1-2 P.M.-MUSIC OF THE 
MASTERS 


Barry Clark— 58 
Ed Myers- 58 


•^ 


PAGE EIGHT 


THE OAILV tar heel 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 195* 


Passbooks For 
Students' Wives 
Go On Sale 

students at the University who 
have wives living in Chapel Hill 
are entitled to purcha^^ season 
athletic books for their wives at 
the special rate of $10, according 
to an announcement from the UNC 
Sports Publicity Office. 

These b^aks will admit bearers 
to all athletic events at home to 
which student may go. They are 
now on sale at the ticket office in 
Woollen Gymnasium and can be 
picked up by students- as soon as 
they have registered. It may be 
necessary for the student to pre- 
sent some evidence that his wife 
is residing in Chapel Hill. 


Greensboro Minister To 
Speak At Y-Nite Tonight 


Dr. John Redhead, miniiter of 
the First Presbyterian Church of 
Greensboro .will speak at the first 
Y-Nite of the new school year to- 
night at 7 in Hill Hall. 

Also on the program will be 
Dave Davis and "His Boys," a 
novelty singing group, and the 
Y-Nite mixed chorus, led by Jean 
Vavoulio. The chorus has been as- 
sembled especially for the Y-Nite 
programs scheduled throughout 
the year. 

Plans for the programs began 
last year with emphasis on attract' 
ing a wider cross section of Car- 
olina students. According to Miss 
Nancy Shuford, Y-Nite chairman, 


the plan is not intended to offer 
a substitute for church, nor will 
it be entirely a social hour. 

Instead, it will be a place where 
the entire student body can unite 
for fellowship and good times as 
well as for the spiritual uplift 
neces.ury in campus life, she said. 

The first Y-Nite was held last 
spring with Dr. Bernard Boyd, 
chairman of the Religion Dept., as 
the featured speaker. A picnic 
>upper and singing by George 
Hamilton added to the evening's 
activities. 


Orientation Plays Havbc 
With 'Gung Ho' Freshmen 


NOTHING CHANGED 





SAME CLE HARRY! 
SAME OLE MRS. MAC! 
SAME OLE DRAFT BEER! 
SAME OLE WONDERFUL SANDWICHES! 
SAME OLE GOOD MEALS! 


harry's 


ES£0 GAS 


Reg: 29.9 HT. 32.9 


CASH 


Whipple's Esso Service 

ACROrS FROM CHAPEL HILL NURSERY— DURHAM HWY. 

BUY EARLY— SAVE— NATIONALLY ADVERTISED 

PERMANENT ANTIFREEZE $2.75 Gal. 


EXTRA! 


EXTRA! 


EXTRA! 


Bring this ad and receive one cent per gallon off on gis, and 
five cents per quart off on oil. This makes ESSO gas 28.9 and 
31.;. Good Sept. 20, 21, 24, 25, & 26, 1956. 


f.^.V 


/linj^ 



Welcome 

Each Of You!! 


Our Very Best Wishes for A Wonderful Year 

• H. FREEMAN CLOTHES 
• FLORSHEIM SHOES 
GENUINE IVY STYLES 


For The Finest In Clothing And 
Shoes Visit Us At 


Julian' 



t ftiiop 


Cardboord To 
Hold First 
Meet Tonight 

The UNC Cardboard will hold 
its organizational meeting tonight 
at 7 p.m. in the Roland Parlter 
Lounges of Graham Memorial, ac- 
cording to W. S. Pate, president. 

The Cardboard is the organiza- 
tion which stages displays- during 
half-time at football games. Color 
slides of last year's stunts will be 
shown at the meeting. 

The program for the evening 
will also feature explanatory talk.' 
by the president and by the three 
department heads. Functions of 
the departments and the awards 
>(>stem will be discussed. 

President Pate invited every- 
one to attend "even if it L- for 
curiosity." He announced, how- 
ever, that applications for mem- 
bership in the Cardboard will be 
accepted at the meeting, and that 
he expects that the membership 
quota will be "more than met." 
Anyone who is interested in join- 
ing is reminded to bring his ath- 
letic passbook with him to the 
meeting. 

• The Cardboard will go into ac- 
tion Saturday at the State game, 
it was announced. Anyone inter- 
e ted in working on this week's 
program has been asked to come 
bv the Cardboard office, second 
floor of Emerson Stadium, on 
Thursday and Friday from 2 un- 
til 5 p.m. 


By DOUGLAS EISELE 

Orientation at the eldest state- 
supported university in the nation 
plays havoc with energetic, "gang 
ho" freshmen. 

For, by week's end, the average 
new student at the University is a 
pooped out, tired-legged reminder 
of a 17-year-old in his first week 
of boot camp. 

And the average "Fredna and 
Freddy Freshman" might easily 
have outwalked many a soldier's 
14-mile hike, or been handed more 
literature than civic clubs pick up 
in a good Sunday's paper drive. 

This is orientation. It is a once 
unthought-of, now necessary prac- 
tice which trains the new student 
in campus life, familiarizes him 
with the outlay of educational and 
other buildings. . 

And it is a period in which fresh- 
men get to know freshmen. It is 
such a conglomeration of events 
th^t only the person who goes 
through it knows what it is. 

With it comes this advice: "Boys, 
have fun while you can. Classes 
start Thursday, and then begins 
the grind." That grim reminder us- 
ually soaks in. 

At ITNC emphasis is centered on 
the student-inaugurated and main- 
tained honor system and campus 
'•ode. It is the importance of these 
basic traditions that is made clear 
to eveVy freshman. 

But outside of orientation activi- 
ties, new students get to really 
know their roommates and other 
freshmen "down the hall." They 
sit late into the night to joke, to 
talk . . . and to complain. 

For it is not unusual to be kept 
lyir? awako by a sinking guitar 
on th*> one side, and a french horn 
or baritone on the other. Among 
the manv oersonalites is the youns : 
lover with tales of romanticisms j 
over the nation. | 

There is the world traveler who I 
tolls of buying English luggage i 
while on a trip to Hong Konc. tho I 
politician who shakes more hands j 
than Kofauver on election day, and | 
the humor-filled Dutchman who | 
brin<js laughter late into the night, i 

Mix these together, add a dose 


A MILLION DOLLAR DOUBLE-CROSS 
EXPLODES IN 
LISBON! 


of upturned dormitory rooms and 
up with orientation at UNC and 
homesick students, and you'll come 
up with orientation at UNC and 
major universities across the na- 
tion. 


Picnic For Graduate 
Students Is Today 

The Graham Memorial Activi- 
ties Board i.* sponsoring a picnic 
at 5:30 p.m. Thursday on the lawn 
behind Mclver Dormitory., 

All new graduate studenta and 
their wives have been invited. 
Two hundred and fifty students 
are expetced to attend. Miss Lin- 
da Mann, director of GMA^, and 
Dan Turner, assistant director of 
OMAB, are in charge of details. 

This event will be the conclus- 
ion of orientation of the new grad- 
uate studentii. Tliis is the first 
year that any orientation program 
has been set up for .students of th« 
Graduate School. 



Scholarship Winner Named 


GERALD MAYO 

. . toins scholarsiiip 


A junior student from Falkland, 
Pitt County, has been awarded tbi 
second annual Burlington In- 
dustries Scholarship at the Uni- 
versity. 

The student, Gerald Mack Mayo, 
i' among nine rising juniors in 
the same number of colleges aiid 
universities who were chosen this 
yeajr for the awards, which pro- 
vide $500 annually during the 
junior and senior years. 

A total of 16 two-year scholar 
ships are offered by the Founda- 
tion under thio- program. Seven 
awards were given last year. 

Selection of Mayo, an interna- 


tional relations majoi*, was an- 
nounced by Prof. D. D Carroll, un- 
til recently chaiman of the facul- 
ty committee on scholarships. • 



TODAY 

There Is No Might Like the 
AAight of Moby Dick! 




lUCHARP, Leo 
BaS£hart G£KNr 

IKTMI 

JOHKjUJSTOn 

rmMucTioii or himun Mtivmci 


JVlPBy Dfcjc 


ca.M •.Tfchnicolor 

Prices This Attraction 
Adults 65<-Chiidren 15^ 


MILTON WELCOMES YOU 
WITH STARTING SPECIALS 


Group belts including elastic repps and leather backed chailis, 

values to $3.50, yours for $.99 

By popular demand we have reduced our dacron/cotton suits, 
the poplins and the baby cords from $39.75 to $27.99. 
Ivy white or blue oxford button-downs — $4.50 
Ready cuffed cotton baby cord slacks for only $4.95 
Spasnoli sweaters, imported from Italy, full fashioned, blend of 
lambswool and angora, values to $25.00, V-necks and long tleeve 
polo sweathers, all reduced to $12.50. Entire stock short sleeve 
Ivy button-down shirts reduced. Large assortment of wool flannel 
slacks, all ivy model — from $13.95. 

Handsewn loawers in rich dark brcwn or black, leather soles 11.95 
Cordovan loafers, fully leather lined, gugaranteed not to rip, or 

loafers will be replaced $20.00 

Worsted flannel suits with neat black stripes; imported tweed 
-Shetland suits in black/brown or olive/black — all with rich un- 
usual foulard linings $59.95 

For an exclusive approch to sportswear, you must see our dif- 
ferent array of sport jackets , from $42.50 

BILLS MAILED HOME 

Milton's Ciothinq Cupboard 

163 East Franklin St. 


. 


THE LADY 
MILTON SHOP 


That different sportswear shop 
in Milton's Clothing Cupfcoard 
Welcomes you to view the new 
fall collection. * 

Just received complete shipr 
ment of new colors m pullover^ 
and cardigans in famous Braenv 
9r cashmeres — from $29.50. 

Rich asortment of ivy worsted 
flannel and lightweight tweeo 
aKirrs in ivy model ... at $12.95; 
New group of those irresistibi* 
Lady Hathaway Shirts tronf 
$5.95. 

Ivy model shirts in blue, black, 
red or helie — $5.95. 

I 
Very complete assortment of 
jackets in cottons, tianneis, 
tweeds, from $9.95. 

Group Spagnoli Italian sweaters, 
also soiled Bernhara Mirmon 1 
cashmeres at 40% off regular 
price. 

Men's imported jrew neck 

sweaters in ladies sixes — $13.95.' 

BILLS MAILED HOME 


MILTON'S 
Clothing Cupboard 

163 E. Franklin St. 


>^%: 


} ' 


The staff- of the U. S. Public 
Health Service, the Children's Bu- 
reau and other agencies of the 
U. S. Department of Health, Edu- 
cation and Welfare participate in 
the teaching program of the Uni- 
versity School of Public Health. 


CUSSFIEDS 


AVON CALLING — T. V. AD- 

vertising rings the bell and 
helps you sell Avon. Earn your 
Christmas money now. Write 
Avon, Camellia Dr., Fayetteville, 
N. C. 

LOST: ONE WALLET. FINDER 
please return to James Harry 
Menzel, DU House, East Rose- 
mary StreeL 

WOULD LIKE TO GET IN TOUCH 
with daily commuter to Chapel 
Hill from Burlington. Interest- 
ing proposition. Call 5-8253. 
Burlington. 




WITHOUT 


A 


STRAINED SMILE 


We Say 


4.>. 


v< 


Welcome! 


tG^ a nmytmte 

WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF SHOES 
SUITABLE FOR: . 
DRESS - WORK - LEISURE 
ALSO MILITARY SHOES FOR ALL THE 

ROTC Students 


And if "Ole Man Wear" 
is getting you down, 
bring us your problem. 
Our modern sh6e repair 
department will quickly 
solve it. 






.'V 



LACOCK'S 

E. Franklin St. 


.J";^ 


,?"•«?(. «i|riU:f. Uiu-;.-, 

■»«'i.';r<:i,Ti.'. ^ 


■ ,M. 


,■ P 



. ^ So your summer was a fantasy of 

sunshine and swimming. Or perhaps it 
was marked by hectic weeks at camp. Or 
' .v r* 1 maybe, in your special memory book you've re- 
corded moonlikht and the beach. Perhaps your summer 
meant bright flowers and happiness ... or perhaps you re- 
member broken romances and rain. Maybe your summer meant 
hard work ... or colorful travel . . . travel to the corner store or 
across the continent or across the sea. No matter how the summer 
influenced your outlook.. . . whether it gave you a touch of con- 
tinental ways, contentment, bitterness, achievement or frustra- 
tion ... a whole new world of experience will be yours in Chapel 
Hill. And J. B. Robbins takes this opportunity to welcome y&u. 
Without a false, strained smile: Welcome, one and a!!. 


. :iV ' 


. .1 


of Chapel Hil 




U.«.C. ■ LtBRARt 
SERIALS DEPT. 
BOX 870 
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. 


Pep Rally To Kick Off Football Activity Tonight 


WEATHER 

Mostly tunny and cool, with •*- 
ivccted high of 70. 


VOL. LVIIi, NO. 2 



2rar Heel 


GRAHAM 

Hit dtparfure presents several 
problems. See editorial, page 2. 


Complete (/P) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, N. C, FRIDAY, SEPTEMUER 21, 1956 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PAGES THIS ISSU6 


Parade Will Start 
At 8 p.m. At Gym 


A parade and pep rally tonight I unless the students show a desire 
will precede tomorrows opening to continue, Bynum said. 
football game with N. C. State i All the cheerleadero- have been 
^^^' I working on the arangements of i 

Head cheerleader Jim Bynum , the night's program. Bynum said, j 


said the parade would start at 8 
p.m. in front of Woollen Gym. 
Bynum plans to lead the parade 
through the campui. circling past 
all the dorms, and winding back 
to the intramural field beside the 
gym, where the pep rally will get 
under way about 8:30 p.m. 

The cheerleaders, riding in con- 
vertibles, along with other stu- 
dents in cars, walking people, peo- 


The cheerleaders will make their 
first appearance of the year be- 
for the entire student body tonight. 
They are Misses Mary Lee Breece, ; 
Gwen Heinzen. Patsy Poythress, 
Amy Morje, Val Von Ammon, 
Shirley Dees, and Larry Ford, Tom 
Davis. Frankie Black, Harold Wil- 
liamson, Pete Julia, Miss Joan 
Wender and Bynum. 

"I hope the student body will 


people in West Raleigh can hear 
that we mean business," Bynum 
said. 


pie on bikes, and possibly part of i t"*"" out en masse so that the 
the band will be in the parade, 
BjTium said. 

The cheerleaders will unveil 
several new cheers, on which they 
have been practicing since Sept. 
10. j 

Exact details- were incomplete ■ 
last night but Bynum said the pro- 
gram will be completed early to- 
day. The rally will last for about 
an hour after the parading stu- 
dents reach the intramural field, 


Sorority 
Rush Week 
To Begin 


Sorority Ra:*h will begin formal 
ly today w ith the Pan Hellenic Tea | 
in Graham Memorial. I 

By attending this tea a girl in-i 
dicates her intention of partici-| 
pating in sorority rtiehing, accord- i 
ing to Miss Harriet Lewis of the 
Pan-Hellenic Council. All girls at- 
tending this tea automatically re- 
ceive invitation from the six so- 
rorities on campuc" for the first 
round of parties Monday. Failure 
to attend the tea eliminates a girl 
from rush. 

Girls wishing to participate in 
rush and unable to attend the tea 
should notify the office of the 
Dean of Women, Miss I^wis said. 
Tea invitation time? are as fol- 
lows: 7 p.m.. Smith, Carr, Nurses' 
dormitories; 7:30 p.m.. Alderman; 
8 p.m., Mclver, and 8:30 p.m., 
Spencer. 

The Pan-Hellenic Council has 
urged that this schedule be strict- 
ly followed. At the tea, girls will 
be introduced to Miss Martha 
Decker, advisor to the council; 
members of the council; the soror. 
ity presidents; and the sorority 
rush chairmen. 


Students Invited To 
Ball In Rock Hill 

The Winthrop Recreation Assn. 
of Rock Hill, 5. C. has invited the 
Univ€r..':ty student body to its 
"Bermuda Ball" on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 9. in the Peabody Gym- 
nasium In Rock Hill. 

Student President Bob Young 
received the invitation this week. 
The ball will be from 8 to 11:45 
p.m. 



Money For Dorms 
To Be Authorized 
Here Tomorrow 

By CLARKE JONES 

Contracts for the building of the three mens dormitories and an addition to Spencer 
uoniens dormitory have not yet been awarded. 

A ,spe( iai meeting of the Consolidated U niversity Board of Trustees will be held here 
toincvrow at ii:^;o a.m. to formallv authoriz- .$2 mjllion for the new buildings here. 

Iloldiiio up the routract-n^vardinq;. acco din'^ to Iniversity Business Manager Claude 
Vca^iuc, are the arrhitcctural plans. "The architects (George Watts Carr' and Raymond 
Weeks, both of Dm ham) are working on them all r.-long." he said. 


Frat Men Plan Protest 
Against Parking Bans 


UNC Students Wait Fcr Drop-Add Processing 

Students wait wearily in line to get their class schedules changed at tha Central Records Office in 
Hanes Hall. Drop-adJ closas tomorrow at noon. Studants wirh drop-add problems hava been urged to 
report to the Hanes Hai! basement as soon as possi j|e with the proper drop-add forms. Freshman and 
sophomores must obtain the forms from their advisors. Upper classmen are required to have slips from 
their advisors and the dean of their respectiva schools. (Photo by Truman Moora) 


Campus 
Seen 


Students loalking past Grahani 
Merr.nrial vnth squirrel sitting on 
shoulder. 

* * :; 

Soccer team stopping practice 
as elderly lady walks across '"•«!• 
die of soccer field. 


Three Coeds Named For UNC's 
Representatives in Annual 
CU Queen Contest Tomorrow 


The Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity 
plans to protest the parking regu- 
lations imposed by the Chapel Hill 
aldermen last summer banning 
I parking on Rosemary Street. 

The fraternity mm who are 

temporarily being allowed to park 

at the old Institute of Government 

I building, feel that the regulations 

I leave them "in the midcHe" and 

I '"in a hole." 

I The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fra- 
1 tornity, which is affected by an- 


DiSCRIMINATiON 

"It's just plain discrimination 
against fral men," according to 
Charlie Tompkins. 
"We feel Lhat the main problem," 
Jack Jones said, "is to have to 
come back from classes every day 
to use that fluid we have to clean 
little blue marks from our tires." 


"It takes a good while to dra\^ 
up plans. As .soon a.' they are ready 
they will be reviewed," he said. 
It will take about "a month or six 
weeks" to let the contract to bid- 
ders. 

The actual construction of the 
buildings will not start probably 
for a couple of months, Teague 
jaid. 

The dormitories were proposed 
last fall after a request for a i2 
million government loan was 
granted by the Federal Govern- 
ment's Housing and Finance Agen- 


The Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity cy. Teague made th request un- 


expresses the views that the regu- 
lations leave frat men with no 
place to turn and that frat men 


Three Carolina Coeds have l)een 
selected as UNC's contestants in 
the race for Consolidated Uni- 
versity Queen. 


news 

in 
hnei 



'Ruby Gentry' 
Will Be Shown 
Free Tonight 

"Ruby Gentry," the first of the 
new movies in the Graham Mem- 
orial Activities Board Free Film 
Series, will be shown twice to- 
night in Carroll ,Hall, at 8 and 
10 p.m. 

According to (}fficial8 in charge, 
the film is a story of a "beautiful, 
passionate woman of the swamp- 
lands of ea^'tern North Carolina 
who fights the easy way for a 
position in a community of aris- 
tocrats." Starring are Jennifer 
Jones and Charlton Heston. It's 
a movie "that's a must for any 
patriotic Carolinian," they said. 

No smoking will be allowed 
dtiring the presentations. 


INFIRMARY 


These in the lnflrn»ary yattar- 
day included: 

Clay F. Church; William G. 
Lynch, Earl T. Ki'lcman, Donald 
C. AAcMlllion, Claudius L. Carl- 
Ion, Alvin W. Smith, Harry M. 
Giles Jr., Michaal P. Cap, Harry 
L. Ellsrta Jr., Harcourt A. Mor- 
gan III. 


FRANKFORT, KY. {JP) — Har- 
ry Lee Waterfield, acting gov- 
ernor of Kentucky, said last night 
a decijion on whether to with- 
draw the National Guard from 
the towns of Sturgis and Clay 
will depend upon what action j 
courts take in school integration 
suits. This means the troops will 
be on hand at least until early 
next week. 

LONDON iJP) — Twelve of the 
nations attending the meeting on 
the Suez Canal in London have 
accepted the plan for a canal us- 
er/ association. Sources close to 
the big three say they think all 
of the nations except Pakistan, 
and possibly Sweden, will adopt 
a dccaration of intention to set 
up the association. The London 
conference ends today. 

In Washington the State De- 
partment invited 10 American 
siiip pilots to come in and talk 
things over. The pilots have ap- 
plied for passports to go to Egypt 
to work at the Suez Canal. Ac- 
cording to the State Department, 
there is no restriction on their 
going, but it feels they ought to 
know the tensions they would 
walk into. 

Meanwhile, in Cairo the cap- 
tain of a British rms :jhip said 
yesterday that Egyptian recruit- 
ing agents lured away 16 of his 
crew members with promises of 
high-paid jobs in Egypt. The cap- 
tain said he had to speed out 
to sea from a port in Libya to 
keep other crew member.? from 
deserting. None of the deserters 
was British. 


UNC Campus Is 
Used For Civil 
Rights Filming 

The Carolina campus was the 
scene yesterday for the filming 
of a picture by the Fund for the 
Republic, an organization sponscr- 
sored by the Ford Foundation. 

The film deals with ciail rights 
and UNC was chose nfor a sub 
ject o'ince integration has been in 
effect here since 1951 with no 
violent opposition as there is in 
some southern schools. This year 
13 Negros have enrolled. 

The film deals with civil right.'; 
and UNC was cho.sen for a sub- 
tury Studios of Raleigh, will show 
interior and exterior scenes. Ap- 
proximately 600 feet of film, 
which would last 18 to 20 minuie.<: 
if nothing is cut out. was shot. The 
film will be made available for 
CBS-TV, NBC-TV, and all major 
network syndicates. 


They are Mi.*3 Lucinda Holder 
ness of Spencer Dormitory, Mis 
Jane Welch representing tiie Chj 
Omega Sorority and MLss Jane Lit 
tie representing the Pi Beta Phi 
Sorority. 

The CU Queen will be selectei 
;rom nine contestants, three from 
Wrvman's College in Greensboro 
three from N. C. State in Raleigh 
and the three from UNC 

She will be crowned at a aance 
'n Woollen Gym after the game 
sponsored by the Order of th"- 
Holy Grail. All nine contestants 
^«ill be presented at the halftime 
of the football game tomorrow. 

Other girls in the contest to 
select the 3 *o represent Carolina 
were: Mi.-fscs Dickey Pickerrell. 
Kappa Delta; Phil Kraftt, Mclver; 
Pat Dillion. Alderman: Ann Smith. 
Alpha Gamma Delta: Barbara 

Subscriptions 

Students, faculty members and 
tcwnspeople who wish to con- 
tinue receiving the Daily Tar Heel 
by mail have been asked to notify 
Dale Staley, subscription man- 
ager, at 9-3361. Rates are $4 per 
srhool year. Students who wish 
to send the Daily Tar Heel home 
can do so at the same rate. 



other phrase of the regulations re- i keep the town in busines and are 


' 'ohnson. Car and Marion Dickens, 
Smith. 

All nine contestants in the CU 
^ueen contest will receive gifts 
Vom a local merchant and a cor- 
age from a local florist. 

CU Day is sponjored by the 
Consolidated University Student 
Council, which will meet Saturday 
Tiorning with the University Trus. 
tees in the Morehead Building. The 
reception after the game is also 
sponsored by the Council. 

The reception will be in front 
)f Graham Memorial immediately 
'ollowing the football game. 

Approximately 1,000 WC girls 
•»re expected to come for the game 
and other CU Day activities. 


stricting parking on Columbia I 
Street, is backing up the protest I 
very strongly. These frat men feel I 
they are being placed at the mercy ! 
of the town. Several men, having 
talked wth some townsmen, indi- 
cate that the regulations are meant 
to apply pressure on the Univer- 
sity to build its own parking lot.s. 


Lanner of SAE. "No one uses the 
space except fraternity men; it's 
ridiculous to make a guy move his 
car when no one else is using the 
space. I think W? just a reason to 
keen cars away from school." 

"It makes things crowded and 
harder on frat men: they took 
awav another lot, you know. I just 
don't like it," Dudley Baird said. 


der authorization of the 1955 Gen- 
eral Assembly. 

There was only one men's dorm- 
itory — to be built behind Kessing 
Pool — to start with and would 
have housed over 700 students. 
Construction was expected to 
have begun on it and the additioa, 
which will iwovide for spptoiA- 
mately 75 coed.s, shortly after 
Christmas, 1955. 

Later it wa^ decided three 
should be built with space for 
a total of 800-650 students. Thia 
protesting individually. They hope ' caused the architects' plans to be 
to ease the problem by building I changed. The bidding and con- 
their own parking lot, for v/hich struction was also put off. 
some money has already been ap- The special meeting of the 
propriated. j Board of Trustee.^ was called for 

A few other groups plan to meet ! the formality of authorizing the 


due a little consideration. j 

The Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity j 
has taken a mild approach to" the j 
parking regulatioDS because it has | 
its own parking lot; but various ' 
members feel it'? -» little incorj- 
venient, although they plan no pro- , 
test. i 

The PI Beta Phi Sorority feels ' 


"I feel it is unjust," says Mike left "in a hole." The girls plan no 


formal protest, although a few are 


to discuss the regulations; so, by 
no means, is this parking situation 
settled yet! 


INTRAMURAL OFFICIALS 

Students majoring in physical 
education are needed as intramural 
officials for tag football. Those in- 
terested have been asked to come 
to 301 Woollen Gym on Tuesday at 
4 p.m. „ 



YDC Mem'oers Solicit For Members 

^mbers of the Carolina Young Democrats Club are shown above 
soliciting students to join their club. From tha Stevenson-Kefauver 
signs they w using, they seem to be taking advantage of the com- 
inf year, ^Photo by Truman Moo'c) 


Playmakers To 
Give Program 
Here Today 

"Adventures in Playmaking" is 
he program scheduled for the 
Playmakers Theatre tonight at 7:30 
•'clock, to introduce informally The 
Carolina Playmakers, dramatic 
?roup at the University. 

Samuel Selden, chairman of the 
Department of Dramatic Art and 
Playmaker director, will give his 
annual illustrated lecture, includ- 
ing a history of the famous Uni- 
versity theatre. 

Members of the department will 
tell about its history and that of 
the Playmakers, now entering 
their 39th season of playj. Sel- 
den V ill announce plans for the 
coming season's activities and 
describe types of participation 
open to everyone. 

The name "Playmaker" is given 
not only to members of the de- 
partment and stud^ntj" of Dramat- 
ic Art, but to everyone who par- 
ticipates in a Playmaker produc- 
tion, all of which are open to the 
public. 

Six productions planned for the 
1956-57 season are "Anastasia," 
recently given on Broadway; "An- 
drocles and the Lion," by Shaw: 
O'Neill's "Desire Under the Elms": 
the musical comedy, "Brigadoon": 
a new play in it.* first production: 
and "Peer Gynt" by Henrik Ibsen. 


October 1 Is Deadline 
For Student Insurance 


funds. Teague explained the loan 
has already been approved but 
the trustees have to formally 
adopt a resolution adopting it. 

The loan will be paid back in 
30 years, Teague hopes, from sur- 
oluses received from a $30 increase 
in dormitory room rent per per- 
c-on. The increase went into ef- 
fect last fall. 


CAMP PICTURUES 

Anyone wishing to order a 
freshman camp picture may do so 
at the YMCA office through next 
Monday. The charge for each pic- 
ture is $1.5Q. 


October 1 has been set as the 
deadliine lor application.? for stu- 
dent insurance. 

The cost oi the policy is $9.50 
a year. .According to Ray Jefferies, 
assistant to the dean of student 
affairs, the premiums" cost has 
dropped jince last year. 

Insured students will be cover- 
ered fo up to $1000, and for up 
to $200 for surgical expenses. If 
the student dies, his beneficiaries 
will receive $1000, 

Jefferies said, "I think this in- 
surance plan payed off for us last 
year." He pointed out that the in- 
surance comes to less than 80 
cents a month. 

The insurance coverage is for a 
12-month period, including the 
period.' when students are travel- 


while they are on vacation. Jef- 
feries said last year there were 
not many claims but during the 
summer the company payed on 
policies several times. 

Applications for the insurance 
are available at the Y and at 
Graham Memorial. 

The policy is made available 
through the Pilot Life Insurance 
Company, Raleigh. Jefferies ex- 
plained that student? here will 
pay a slightly higher premium 
than students at State Ccl'ege be- 
cause of the surgical coverai?e. 

He reminded students who al 
ready hold policies and are eligi- 
ble to receive payments for claims 
mu..'t file claims with the com- 
pany. Blanks are available at his 


ing to and from Chapel Hill, and office and the Infirmary. 


Governor 'Drops Drawers' To 
Advertise N. C. Products 


RALEIGH, SEPT. 20 {JP)— Gov. 
Hodges will do a lot to advertise 
North Carolina's products. 

He'll take a shower wearing a 
native North Carolina suit or 
even drop his pantj slightly to 
show off Tar Heel made drawers. 

Hodges is shown in these two 
poses in a seven-picture layout in 
the new issue of Life Magazine. 
The Governor .-aid he got an ad- 
vance copy last night and "pro- 
ceeded to hide it under the pil- 
lows so Mrs. Hodges wouldn't 
see it." 

Mrs. Hodges finally did see the 
pictures, he said, "but she didn't 
make any outcry" when d-he saw 
the pose of the governor standing 
next to his bed with his pants 
dropped slightly adjusting a pair 
of "indigeaous" drawers made at 


Asheboro. 

A girl reporter wanted to 
'enow just what are "indigenous" 
drawers*. 

Hodges replied, "they are 
drawers that stay where they be- 
long." 

The governor said there was a 
picture "even worse" than the 
one showing him adjusting the 
drawers that the magazine did- 
n't use. 

Hodges admitted with a smile 
that a governor hz? to make a 
lot of "sacrifices." 


GM SLATE 


No aetivitias are tchaduled on 
the Graham Memorial slata for 
today. 


Senior Yack 
Pictures Are : ' 
Being Made 

Senior class pictures for the 
1957 Yackety-Yack are now being 
made in the basement of Graham 
Memorial, according to Editor 
Tommy Johnson. 

Hours are from 1 to 7:30 p.m. 
everj' day except Saturday and 
Sunday. Seniors have until Fri- 
day, September. 28 to have their 
pictures made. 

Girls have been asked to wear 
dark sweaters, biack, brown or 
lark blue, with one strand of 
oearis. Men have been asked to 
A car dark coat-, white shirts, and 
conservative rep ties. 

The schedule for taking the 
photographs of other students is 
Ls follows: 

Oct. 1-5 — FYeshmen and Nurs- 
ng School (except Senior Nur.'ss) 

Oct. 8-12 — Sophomores, Phar- 
macy School, iDcnta! School, and 
Dental Hygiene students 

Oct. 15^19 — Juniors, Medical 
School, Law School, and Graduate 
School. 


Library Gets Autograph 
Book Of Civil War Man 

The autograph book of a Ral- 
eigh druggist and Ci\il War vet- 
eran has been acquired by the 
Southern Historical Collection in 
the Wilson Library. 

The book belonged to James 
McKimmon. class of 1860, and was 
signed by his classmates and other 
students at the Universitjr ber«. 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1956 


Woman's College Situation: 
All's Not Love And Kisses 

CLASS OI- i<),S2: Dr. Kdu-nxi K. Graham, n'lio resiii^tird in 
Max a.s chain fllo) of ]]'(>nian's CoUcge o/ f'.V(.' at (Uernshnio 
after sen'i}i^ there sitne m;-,o. lias hern af>l}f)iiited dean of the 
Liberal Arts Colleirr of lioslon i'niversity. He and Mrs. Graham 
and their three children — Susan, Julia and Edward K.— enter iijion 
their neu- f>ost on Sefit. i .— 7'lie Ahimiii Re\it'\\. 



'I Need the Money For Text Books!' 


So. in two st-ntemes. The Alum- 
ni Review of this month closes 
the book on another North Caro- 
lina educator wlio has gone to 
search lor greener pastures. 

It wasn't a ca.se of Chancellor 
CirrL^iani's not getting paid enough, 
ah hough that would have been 
a gfKxi reason. 

It was a case of his being reinox- 
ed, ever so ptilitely. from the head 
office of our sister institution in 
Greensboro. 

* * * 

'] he rumblings at (ireensboro 
came last \ear after a rcpjrt was 
lllv-d uiih the Board of Trustees 
fiom its X'isiting C.onnnittce. Fhe 
report said: 

■"With respect t<i the administra- 
tive j'roblems existing at the Wo- 
m;in s (lollege. and particuiarlv to 
I Fie differen(e between some of 
the fatultx members and the ad- 
ministrati(m. this (onniiittee has 
recpiested the acting president of 
the rniversity (William Friday) 
to make a detailed investigation 
and re{)ort (oncerning the prob- 
lems which he finds existing at 
Woman's College, together with a 
recommended plan of action for 
the solution of such problems . . " 

1 he committee met, investigated 
and turned^ out its report. Once 
all the excess language has been 
burned off the rejx)rt, it says: 

1. "The coimnittee received 
much e^ ident e of the chancellor's 
efforts to upgi.ide the Woman's 
College, both academically and 
structurallv. The vigor with which 
he executed thee efforts, it is 
thought, has f)et n responsible for 
some of the opp isiiion which has 
developed." 

2. I heie are (XMmxuces ivhich 
exist between tJie Tm iilty and the 
administiatioii .iud beiv\c'en facul- 
ty groups." Th -M crilcuncLs were 
•"impai. the internal organiza- 
tion ; rr' vffective operation of the 
c-.,I!ege.' 

Ohanre11(»r Cfraham resigned as 
ni(el\ as a man under fire can re- 
sign. .\ ' t hange in administration 
is clearlv lucesary as the first step 
towi-rd a(hie\ing the degree of 
campus unitv and (<»nfiden(e whi( h 
is essential hir the college to move 
ahead." he told the trustees in his 
lesignation letter. 

The trustees told him thev were 
sorry he was lea\ ing. voted to ac- 
(cpt his resignation and started 
looking lor a new (hancelh^, all 

in one day. 

*' « # 

As a residt of the C.reensboro 
rumblings atid sufxsequent resigna- 
tion of Chancellor (iraham, the 
Consolidated I'nixersity now has 
iwc) f>ig problems: 

1. Who will be the new chan- 
cellor? 

2. How will the "differences' 
that existed at (.reensboro be re- 
solved? From the looks of the 


trustees' re|)ort Chancellor C.raham 
was not totally responsible for 
those differences. The lacidty wai 
at fault, too. 

.As h)r the first pr(»l)lem. the 
I'nixersity will proba'blv hide its 
linte mnil WC leathers are smcMMh- 
ed down. It probably will bring 
in a chancellor fiom the other side 
(»l the coumry. one whose views 
aie not too widely known. 

But a larger problem Avont be 
s(*lved. That is the j)roblem that 
comes when the State gets i id of 
a fine, intelligent, native North 
Catolina educator. Dr. (iraham 
belongs to Boston l'ni\ersitv. now. 
lie wont be educating .North Ciar- 
olininas any more. 

As for the second jjioblem that 
I'.as residted from the (ireensboro 
pmge. the resolution of the ■'dif- 
ferences: " 

From the tone of the report, the 
Woman's C-ollege facultv needs 
straightening out. .Accepting Dr. 
(irahams resignation helped pla- 
cate the faculty. It was easier to 
get rid of Chancellor (iiaham than 
it would have been to fire half 
the faculty. But the facidty dif- 
ferences still exist under the sur- 
face at th.e schcK)! wlieie the pretty 
young ladies go. 

So, while the rest of the state 
wonders what really happened at 
(ireensboro, the Consolidated Vn- 
iversitv would do well to straighten 
oiu the faculty fa>itions that helped 
bring on Dr. Grahant's dismissal. 

And the l^niversity might al.so 
consider wavs of keeping its best 
educators in this state. 

Button-Down 
Collars Are 
Also Stylish 

Times are getting worse than 
we thoiiglit. 

The Vackety Yack advises stu- 
dents to wear "conser\'ai'»ve rep 
ties ' wheti thev get pictures taken 
h)r the class .sections of next 
spiings yearbook. 

This is going too far. 

There was a time when a stu- 
dent coidd have his yearbook pic- 
tme taken in pruKtically anything 
— chec kerlioard tie. Mister B collar 
or \erti( ally-striped jacket. 

But the woifl is "conservative 
rep lies." 

The trend toward conformity 
has reac hed the Vack. a book which 
usually tries each vear to be less 
like the one the year before. 

Our suggestion to students on 
gettitig their a'unual pictures taken: 
Forget the ^'ack's instructions. 
^^'ear what you like. A checker- 
board tie would look nice in the 
midst of all those pages of conser- 
\ati\e reps. 


You Got 'Em: Now Keep 'Em 


n you're a freshman or a trans- 
fer student jiving in a men's dc^rm 
itory, you wont notice the differ- 
ente. Bi»t if you've been here be- 
fore and had to walk dowtistairs 
to make a telej)hone call, you'll 
aj>j)rec iate ihe new telephones on 
all fl(H>rs. 

It t<K>k just a few minutes' con- 
suita'tion between student body 

The Daily Tar Heel 

The official .student publication of the 
Pubhcations Board of the University of 
North Carolina, where it is published 
daily except Sunday. Monday and exam- 
ination and vacation periods and sum- 
mer terms. Elntered as second clas.s mat- 
ter in the post office in Chapel Hill, 
N. C. under the Act of March 8, 1870. 
Subscription rates: mailed, $4 per year, 
$2.50 a semester; delivered, $6 a year, 
$3.50 a semester. 

Editor FRED POWLEDGE 

Managing Editor CRAfiLIE JOHNSON 


News Editor RAY LINKER 

Businese Manager BILL BOB P££L 


President IJob Young and Director 
of Operations j. .S. liennett. Then, 
the I'niveisity started installing 
telephones on every floor of n.ost 
men's dormitories. 

Their ac tion has eliminated one 
of the rniversity's most vicious 
pests: the third-flooj student who 
answers your tall for .someone liv- 
ing on the .second floor, and Avho 
is too lazy to walk twcj flights of 
steps. 

Now most men smdents can 
transmit and receive telephone 
calls with a minimum of efforts. 

Young and Bennett a'ls(j were 
wise ti^ advise students that mis- 
tieated telephones will be re<noved 
'immediately.' In the past several 
dormittory telephones have been 
beaten, thrown, ripped and torn 
with legulariiy every Saturday 
night. 

Ihe men students have griped 
about not having telephones. Now 
they have them, thanks to Young 
and Bennett. Whether the tele- 
phones say is up to* the students. 


Fraternity Rush, 

Lookmg Ahead 

To Hectic Time 

Barry Winston 

Rome had its gladiators. The 
Borgias had their Iron Maidens. 
Spain had its Inquisiton. We have 
all three. We call it F'ormal Rush. 

It is. Sunday, the thirtieth of 
September, shortly after two in 
the afternoon, and over a thous- 
and Freshmen are venturing 
forth from the comparitivc safety 
of their rooms to begin participa- 
tion in a week-long sacrificial 
ceremony to the god of Chaos. 

Freddy Schraink, Graduate of 
East F'etuch High School, emerges 
from Old North doi-mitory and 
starts hopefully down the street 
in the direction indicated by the 
arrows on his map of the campus 
and environs. 

Tightly clutched in his little 
hand are a half a dozen bids, tho 
most important of which is the 
one bearing the heading: Eata 
Bita Pi. His Dad was an EBP. 
That's the one for him. 

He has read ru.shing rules care- 
fully. Very carefully. In fact, he 
has them memorized. He has no 
intentions whatsoever of violating 
them. 

Freddy .starts down the street 
now, arms swinging, head high, 
stride full of confidence, his rep 
tie streamint; proudly in the 
breeze. At the corner he pivots 
sharply, and there, looming large 
and magnificent ahead of him in 
the di.stance, is the HQUSE, its 
bronze letters gleaming in the 
sun. 

TIME OF DECISION 

In the middle of the street his 
step falters. Should he go directly 
to the EBP house? Or should he 
first dispose of the other five, 
saving the dessert for la^t. as it 
were? FYought by indecision, he 
is nearly impaled by the hood 
ornament on a now Olds looking 
for .1 place Tn park. 

In lerrctr. he leaps for the side- 
walk, loo.ses his footint; on a hwr 
can, and tumbles headlong 
through a hedge to find hinisell' 
sprawled on the front lawn of 
one of the other five. His de- 
cision is made for him. 

Climbing gracefully to his feet, 
he saunters causually up the front 
steps and through the door and is 
greeted by the beaming face anc* 
iron grip of the doorman. In the 
space of three minutes his hand 
is shaken forty more times, he 
loses 'lis name tag, consumes a 
gallon and a half of rather in- 
sipid punch and is given four pep 
talks on the glories of Mu Mu Mu 
social fraternity. 

The story is much the same at 
the remaining four houses. Final- 
ly, wearily, he turns his steps to- 
ward THE house. 

GETTING ACQUAINTED 

For the next four days, all is 
confusion. He is introduced to, 
and expected to recognize on 
sight, sixty-some brothers of EBP. 
He manages, always smiling, to 
remain his own natural self in 
this most natural situation. 

Uppermost in his mind at all 
times is the advice in the hand- 
book: Get To Know The Men; 
You'll Be Living With Them For 
The Next Four Years. And of 
course, he follows the advice. He 
gets to know the men by chatting 
with them about Saturday's game, 
his last trip to W.C, the great 
flick he saw yesterday, and the 
rising price of Old Horseshoe. His 
conviction is concrete now. This 
is the place for him. 

THE BIG NIGHT 

And then, Thursday night, one 
of the older boys takes him aside 
and begins, "I want you to know 
that we all feel terrible about 
this, but you see. there was this 
one guy who didn't think that 
you ". 

Aud it won't be until next year 
sometime that he finds out that 
the real reason was that his fa- 
ther didn't go to Carolina. He 
went to Dook. 



On Learning— Part 2 

Understanding The Great Writings 


Ed Yoder 


(This- i.s the sfecand of Yod- 
er'.s- thres--part essay on the 
yneanhig of U'aming.) 

That meant that if a man was 
ti be a lawyer and enter the In- 
ner Temple his education must 
fit him for such a "publick ' of- 
fice. But if he was to be educated 
to suit Milton, he would not stop 
with the study of law alone, but 
would delve besides into the ed- 
ucational amenities. Those amen- 
ities, though perhaps not vital for 
making his living in society, 
would be absolutely vitifl for mak- ' 
ing his life as a person, in private, 
as an individual human being, 
meaningful. 

The educated dmh might not 
need to identify oSitc or a piece 
of baroque chamber music to be 
successful at law — expect inci- 
dentally in so far as knowing 
about great poets and great works 
of music might temper his style 
of speech, his tone, his angle on 
the problems of justice, or might 
hone the edges of his logic and 
power to argue. 

If you want to get down to 
money cases, today's vogue, the 
education for private life was not 
es.sential to getting food and 
raiment. Justice, skill, magna- 
nimity, private office — these pa.ss- 
ed above and beyond economic 
wants. 

It is perhaps here that today's 
college freshman, faced with all 
the educational salesmen, like mc, 
faced with their wares — from nu- 
clear ph.vsics to Dante's Divine 
Comedy— departs John Milton's 
way. He will, he says, equip him- 
self to be a successful business 
man or lawyer or doctor: but as 
for the "private" life, he would 
rallier study personnel problems 
or management than Paradise 
LosI and mutations. 

Since this i.s the age .f Mr. 
Spectorsky's Exurbanite who 
commutes by train to work, wears 
gray flannel, owns an Olds, a 
Buick and a Cadillac and a 
ranch-style home in Westchester 
or Fairfield; since the image of 
what is termed "succe^'sful edu- 
cation" gets back to the towns 
of the South and of North Caro- 
lina, the college freshman is 
looking first of all at what will 
provide a bigger pay check. For 
that, as a product of the massed 
goals of his parent.,- and friends, 
he won't apologize. 

So. like the freshman who says 
"so what?" to ignorance about 


Dante; like the freshman who 
will leave Chapel Hill as a grad- 
uate more under the poetic in- 
fluence of a Satevepost Richard 
Armour than of Shakespeare; 
more under the influence scien- 
tifically of the science page of 
Time Magazine than of hard 
hour.^' spent with physics prob- 
lems; more under the influence, 
musically, of Presley than of 
Bach — he will leave without once 
having awakened to the dimens- 
ions of real education. In effect, 
he will shrug his shoulders and 
squander his most preciou.-.- op- 
portunity For Chapel Hill, a 
giant among liberal arts institu- 
tions in America, ha.s spent dec- 
ade upon decade educating these 
who really wanted to be edu- 
cated. 


but perhaps read his absorbing 
histories. Only there will Shake- 
speare and Mozart and Michelan. 
gelo and Tacitus cease to be ab- 
straction and skeletons, barely 
conceived, barely seen. Ab^.*trac- 
tions can be made whole; bones 
can gain flesh. 

When a political wit .like Adlai 
Stevenson says; "Eggheads of the 
world unite; you have nothing 
to lose but your yolks." he 
knows, from a familiarity with 
the Communist Manifea'tc. that a 
cleveh joke is involved — unlike 
a certain newspaper reporter 
who. hearing Stevenson, missed 
the point entirely and quoted him 
as having said: '^Eggheads unite; 
you have nothing to,, lose." 



CHAPEL HILL 

... a giant. 

I am not talking about getting 
the most out of General College — 
as important as that i.;. General 
College is the place where you 
may, if you listen, hear Dante's 
name dropped once to a dozen 
times — but perhaps not at all. In 
the rare instance, you, as fresh- 
men, may have some instructor 
who will tell you more than the 
baic-l handful of biographical 
facts about the Italian gentleman, 
or maybe even induce you to read 
a few lines of his work. But it is 
only when you move into the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, where 
not only Dante but his co-stars in 
the firmament of civilization are 
dealt with every day. that you 
will begin to see what John Mil- 
ton, in the mid-17th Century, was 
talking ab;>ut. It is only there that 
you may not only find out who , 
Herodotu.-?" was, where he lived, 


Voters' Choice 

(Carolina Times) 

The Negro voter must choose 
between "tweedledum and tweed- 
ledee" at the polls this Novem- 
ber, editorializes the current is- 
sue of The Crisis, journal of the 
National Association of the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People. 
Commenting on the civil rights 
planks of the two major parties, 
the editorial says: 

■ Both parties ignored the fact 
that 1956 is not 1952. We now live 
in perilous times in race relations, 
especially in the Deep South. We 
have the U. S. Supreme Court de- 
cision on segregation in public 
education, and rulings on discrim- 
ination in public recreation and 
travel. 

"We have Montgomery, Ala- 
bama, and the implications of the 
bus boycott. We have had nullifi- 
cation resolutions and a Congres- 
sional manifesto insulting the 
highest tribunal in the land and 
advocating virtual rebellion. We 
have had U. S. senators travelling 
up and down the land urging the 
people not to obey the Supreme 
Court. And we have had cam- 
paigns of villification and terror 
and violence visited upon sec- 
tions of our population which 
merely asked that the law of the 
land be obeyed." 

The Crisis, the editorial ex- 
plains, 'had expected more forth- 
right civil rights planks than the 
ones adopted by either party" be- 
cause both 'are anxious to win 
the balance-of-power Negro vote 
this fall." 

"We had not expected much 
of the Democrats because of their 
pro-segregation southern wing, 
but we had expected a little bet- 
ter of the Republicans." 


LiTAbner 


By Al Capp 



AMERICAN AID HELPS 

India's Five Year 
Plan For Progress 

NeaE Stanford 
In The Christian Science Moniter 

India's first five-year plan that ended this spring 
turned out better than New Delhi had hoped. 

Its second five-year plan, now under way, should 
also outrun its blueprints, if the recent unprecedent- 
ed United States $360 million food loan just con- 
summated is any indication. Which suggests that 
India is ultraconservative in anticipating the pro- 
gress it can make over a five-year period. 

When India charted its first five-year plan, back 
in 1950, it had anticipated large balance of pay- 
ments deficits in operating the program. It got them 
— but not to the degree anticpated. It had expected 
to drop $609 million from its sterling balances; in- 
stead it used ^p only $317 million in foreign assets 
in carrying out the plan. • 

Likewise India had expected a certain amount of 
foreign help — but not to the extent received. It had 
counted on some $328 million in external assistance; 
instead it received some $408 million. On both counts 
then India did better than it had hoped. 

Its program cost less, and its friends helped more 
than expected — something unusual if not unique 
in international affairs. 

The United States was the greatest contributoB of 
foreign aid to India during this period. It contribut- 
ed a total of $298 million in grants and loans — not 
to mention a $190 million wheat loan that had been 
consummated just prior to the five-year plan. 

Next largegst contributor was the Colombo Or- 
ganization, representing British Commonwealth 
countries. Australia, Canada. New Zealand, and the 
United Kingdom together contributed some $100 
million. 

The United States-India program actually got 
under way with the general agreement of January, 
1952. 

Such projects as community development, tube 
wells, river-valley developments, fertilizers and steel 
for agricultural purposes were stressed. 

And up lo 1953-54 these were the main activities 
in which United States aid was channeled. But with 
the 1953-54 program there came a widening scope — 
and the activities selected for United States aid 
were more in the field of transport and industrial 
development. 

Under the 1954- program some 200,000 tons of 
United States steel were imported for use by In- 
dian i-ailways. by steci-processing industries such 
as shipbuilding, manufacture of hospital equipment, 
oil drums and containers, pipes and tubes and in- 
dustral machinery, and for requirements of river- 
valley rievelooment. 

Then under the 
1955 program 
some 138.000 tons 
of billets, sheets, 
plates, etc., were 
provided for iur- 
ther aid to rail- 
ways, to alleviate 
critical steel 
shortages, for the 
-tube - well p r o- 
gram and other 
rural development 
projects. Some 
10 locomotives 
and approximate- 
ly 8,000 freight 
cars were includ- 
ed in this aid 
total. 

During the five years, United States aid has in- 
creased every year but one. For 1951-52 some $50 
million ,was authorized; the next year it was re- 
duced to $39 million; but in 1953-54 it jumped to 
$62 million; and for the last two years it was first 
$73 million and then $74 million. Of the total for 
the period— $298 million— some $150 million still 
remains to be delivered because of the recognized 
delay in delivery — or whaf is called the "pipeline." 
* * * 

In the field of agriculture the most important 
contribution by the United States was fertilizer. Im- 
ports of ammonium sulphate from the United States 
were primarily responsible for increasing agricul- 
tural production in India. 

Ground water irrigation was next most important 
agricultural activity carried out by the United 
States program. Some 5.000 tube wells were con- 
structed—a tube well irrigating on the average 400 
acres. The program also undertook to help solve 
India's grain storage problem. 

As a demonstration project two 10.000-ton-capacity 
silos with elevators, and features for aeration, dry- 
ing, disinfection, bulk handling, etc., were built. 



FLOOD3 

. . money helps 



STUDENTS IN BOMBAY LIBRARY 

. . . training minds to handle money 

Next to agriculture India's greatest shortage is 
in steel. Under the United States aid program some 
700.000 tons of steel have been allocated to India 
over this five-year period— 150,000 tons for produc- 
tion of agricultural implements, 100.000 tons for the 
railways. 

India is running a deficit of 245,000 tons of steel 
for its railways annually— but aid and expanded 
steel production is expected to meet this crisis. 

River valley projects rank next to agricultural 
and steel in America's aid to India program. The 
United States has helped build such projects as 
the Riband Dam, the Hirakud Dam, Kakrapara, Mahi, 
Ghataprabho, Chambal, and several other similar 
projects. 


FRiOAl 

Pr 
Coi 

"One 01 
of our tir 
roe, Uni^ 
professor, j 
whether tl 
not perfoJ 
them und| 

This is 
Monroe 
teaches "J 
United StJ 
fall. 

The coul 
for credil 
Univer^ntyj 
station, wi 
into som< 
the presei 
emments. | 

"At no 
this been] 
porta nee 
roe; a 
field, said] 

The ceni 
is a de.^cr 
nriunicipal | 
emment.- 
they do a J 
people mj 
other for 
added. 

Phase.': 
■which wi| 
course 
mental U 
ervation, 
of fugitii 
lobbies. 


956 


FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 21, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE THREE 


r 

S 

ring 

lould 
lent- 
I con- 
that 

pro- 

Iback 
pay- 

Ihem 

cted 

in- 

ssets 

It of 

had 

ince; 

)unts 

lore 
iique 

|oi of 

ribut- 
-not 
been 

Or- 

^ealth 

Id the 

$100 

got 
juary, 

tube 
steel 

Svities 
with 
ppe — 
b aid 
istrtel 

|)ns of 
by In- 
such 
)ment, 
nd in- 
river- 

ler the 
gram 
[iO tons 
sheets, 
were 
or lur- 
o rail- 
leviate 
steel 
or the 
p ro- 
other 
pment 
Some 
otives 
i mate- 
freight 
nclud- 
is aid 


Prof To Teach Credit 
Course On WUNC-TV 


"One of the leading questions 
of our times," Dr. David G. Mon- 
roe. University political science 
professor, declared recently, "is 
whether the state* shall or shall 
not perform the functions given 
them under the Constitution." 

This is one of the questions Dr. 
Monroe will take up when he 
teaches "State Government in the 
United States," over television tliis 
fall. 

The course, which will be taught 
for credit over WUN€-TV, the 
University's educational television 
station, will give people an insight 
into sonve of the basic issues of 
the present crisis facing state gov- 
ernments. 

"At no time in our history has 
this been a subject of such im- 
portance as it is now," Dr. Mon- 
roe, a recognized authority in the 
field, said. 

The central theme of the course 
is a description of "state, county, 
municipal and special district gov- 
ernment;': wKat they are, what 
they do and how they serve 'more 
people more frequently than any 
other form of government,' " he 
added. 

Phases of state government 
which will be covered during the 
course will include intergovern- 
mental tax immunity, peace pres- 
ervation, grants-iU'^iid. rendition 
of fugitives, presimre groups and 
lobbies, financial administration 


and law enforcement. 

The course will begin on Sep- 
tember 25 and continue through 
Feb. 7, 1957. There will be two 
lectures each week. Students may 
enroll in the course for credit or 
for non-credit. 

"I think television courses such 
^cT this one provide a wonderful 
opportunity for busy people to 
get an education," Dr . Monroe 
said. 
He added that as far as he know?, 
this is the first course in state 

j government ever taught in the 

I nation over television. 

j Dr. Monroe, who also taught a 
course over TV on the national 
government last year, is not only 

! a political scientist, but also an 

' attorney. 

He is a member of the Ameri- 
i can Bar Assn, the Ohio Bar Assn., 
I and the Southern Political Science 
! Assn. He hold* a bachelor of his- 
! tory degree from the University 
: of Chicago, a law degree from 
1 Baldwin Wallace College, Berea, 
i Ohio, and a Ph.D. degree from 
I Northwestern University. 

i He is a well-known author in 
I the field of law and political 
, science, raving written "The State 
I and Provincial Police" and co- 
I authored "Village Government in 
j Winnetka. Illinois." At the pres- 
j ent time, he is working on a book 
about state government. 



Freshmen Gets Early Study 

A freshman is seen above gattinfl an early start with the bo6ks 
in tha Wilson Library, used by many studants for a quiet haven. Ha 
is probably ono of the few studants there as ntany others wore 
going through the processes of drop-add. (Photo by Truman Moore) 

Covering The Campus 


RED'S CAFETERIA 

> 
WATCH YOUR BARBECUE COOK 

IN THE PIT! 

Chicken - Steaks - Chops 

Open from 6 A.M. Til 1 1 P.M.! 
Alt UNC Personei Welcome! 

All Sorts of Cool Beverages 

Main St., Carrboro 


BABYSITTING SERVICES 

Baby-sitting services will be 
available on football Saturdays 
from 1 to 5:15 p.m. at the Victory 
Village Nursery to children of stu- 
dents, faculty and University em- 
ployees. 

Only children seven years and 
under will be accepted. The mini- 
mum charge will be $1.50 per child 
for the first child, and $1 for each 
additional child from the same 
family. The charges are for the en- 
tire afternoon. 
PASSBOOKS 

Students at the University who 
have wives living in Chapel Hill 
are entitled to purchcase season 
athletic books for their wives at 
the special rate of $10, according 
to an announcement from the UNC 
Sports Publicity Office. 

These books will admit bearers 
to all athletic events at home to 
which student may go. They are 
now on sale at the ticket office in 
Woollen Gymnasium and can be 
picked up by students as soon as 
they have registered. It may be 
necessary for the student to pre- 
sent some evidence that his wife 
I is residing in Chapel Hill. 
I VARSITY GLEE CLUB 
I The Varsity Glee Club has invit- 
I ed all men interested in singing to 
I an informal meeting on Wednes- 
1 day at 5:00 p.m. in Hill Hall. Re- 


WC Acting Chancellor Pierson Says 
Sijpreme Court Overstepped Powers 


GREENSBORO, Sept. 20 (AP)— 
By quoting others and asking un- 
answered questions, Dean W. W. 
Pierson, acting chancellor of 
Woman's College intimated that he 
feels the Supreme Court overstep- 
ped its bounds when it made its 
famed ruling against segregation. 

The general feeling of the acting 
chancellor at Ihe local institution 


Free To Students! 


freshments will be served and a 
short concert by the Glee Club will 
be presented. 
DANCE COMMITTEE 

All members of the University 
Dance Committee will be required 
to work at the Grail Dance Satur- 
day night, according to Chairman 
Don Miller. 
ART EXHIBITION 

A collection of reproductions of 
famous paintings, which are cur- 
rently on exhibition in the Person 
Hall Art Gallery, will be available 
for rent beginning September 26 at 
9:00 a.m. 

A picture may be reserved for 

rental for 25 cents per month per 

picture plus a $1 deposit. Each pic- 

i ture may be rented for a three 

j months period. 

j This service is offered to Chapel 
! Hill residents. 
MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

All members of the UNC Men's 
Glee Club have been asked to meet 
in Hill Hall Monday at 4:30 p.m. 
foi- the first meeting of the year. 
'54 YACKS 

Anyone who did not receive his 
1956 Yack may pick it up upon 
presentation of his ID card at either 
the GM Information Office or the 
Yack office. 
APO 

Alpha Phi Omega, Carolina's 
service fraternity, will hold its first 
meeting of the year on Monday 
night, Sept. 24, at 7:30 p.m. 



Hospital Gets 
Display Case 

A bronze display case has been 
presented to the North Carolina 
Memorial Hoi.'pital by Mrs. Birdie 
Pritchard Davis in memory of her 
late husband, Dr. Royall 0. E. 
Davis. 


Dr. Davis received his bachelor's 
degree from UNC in 1901 and was 
awarded a Ph. D. degree in 1903. 
He remained at the University as 
a member of the faculty until 
1909. 

Dr. Davis joined the U.^S. 
Dept. of Argiculture in 1909 and 
remained with that organization 
until the time of his death in 1949. 

Mrs. Davis is a volunteer worker 
at the hospital. She has been do- 
ing volunter work since before 
the hospital actually opened Sept. 
2, 1952. At the present time Mrs. 
Davis average? 160 hoia-s a month 
volunteer work. 

Mrs. Davis has done more work 
at the hospital than any other 
volunteer worker. She works most- 
ly in the sewing room and the 
linen room. 

She was among the firet women 
to graduate from the University. 
The University first accepted wo- 
men students in 1897. 

Dr. Robert R. Cadmus, hospital 
director, said the display cas| 
would be used for various types 
of exhibits concerning the UNC 
Divicrion of Health Affairs. 

The Division of Health Affairs 
is composed of the hospital and the 
UNC Schools of Dentistry, Medi- 
ciiMt, Nursing, Pharmacy and Pub- 
lic Health. 

The display case is built into 
the wall near the information 
desk at the entrance of the hos^ 
pital. At the present time pictures 
are being displayed in it that 
show the hospital building while 
it was being constructed. 


seemed to be that the Supreme 
Court made a new law when it 
ruled that the "seperate but 
equal" doctrine, upheld 60 years, 
was no longer right. 

Making new laws is the business 
of the legislative branch of govern- 
ment and is beyond the power of 
the judicial, Dean Pierson pointed 
out. 

The separate but equal doctrine 
was followed in the interest of 
social peace, he said, quoting the 
late Dr. Howard Odum of Chapel 
Hill. 


Many thoughtful people believe 
that the Supreme Court ruling has 
increased racial animosity, hatred 
and tension instead of social peace. 
Dean Pierson said. 

He said he sees no prospect of 
a solution of^the race problem at 
an early date on a rational basis, 
either in the United States or else- 
where. 

American citizens have been 
warned by Jefferson, Jackson, Lin- 
coln and the "two Roosevelts" 
from time to time that the Supreme 
Courts OJ?. occasions, stepped out of 


j character as defender of the Con- 

I stitution and added legislative 

I powers the dean said. 

I If the constitution is what the 
Supreme Court says it is, then 
shouldn't law abiding citizens read 
and swear to uphold the court's 
decisions rather than saying they 
will defend the constitution? Dean 
Pierson asked. 

Dean Pierson was dean of the 
graduate school of UNC from 1930 
until last spring, when he became 
acting chancellor of Woman's Col- 
lege. 



N. C. STATE COLLEGE — COLISEUM^ 

N. C State Coll«g»-COLtSEUM , 

f . O. BoK 5905— RALEIGH, N. C I 

..ADULT TKkM% or $ :^..«(Kh $ _■ 

.-..:....„. I 

25 1 


. — WKh $.. 

CHILD Ticl(«n at $ Mch $. 

FfeMM Indude 25c for Poctoo* end Handling $ 


A§m. «f Chack or AAoncy Ordw End.— Total $ ...„ | 

^»*« M.O0 n $2.50. a $2.oo.„....a $1.50 .ni 

Children Vi Price Friday Matin** Only 
Mb^ Nit* Si!pt. 24....a Frid. Mot. Sept. 28...£] | 

Tu*. Nit* S*pt. 25...r] Frid Nit* S*pt. 28....n ■ 

W*d Nit* S*pt. 26....n Sot. Mot. S«pt. 29...0 
Thur. NH« Sept. 27....Q Sot. Nit* S*pt. 29.„JII | 

NlBh»»y t:30 — Friday Matin** 3:30 — Sah^rday Matin** 2:30| 

... , 


10 Blli PRODUCTIONS • 20 GRtAT ACT 


Addi«« 
City ...... 


Phon*.. 



Telephone 
9-2681 or 8-1357 

located over 
Sutton's Drug Store 


TYPEWRITING 


SHORTHAND 

Classes Begin September 24 

(Special Section of Personal Typing for Housewives) 


town classes 

tor college men mnd women 

Chapel Hill, Norih Carolina 


Now YOU CAN ENJOY the prcstige of a pockct-sizc ^^f ^ookjith each 
check handsomely imprinted with your own name and address . . at no 
Tstto yon ! You'll like this personal touch that adds to the safety of your 

^""mie^ of waiting days or weeks for your imprinted checks, you have 
them in a matter of mom.n^.-thanks to the new Todd Imprmter we have 
iust installed. This machine prints your name and address in sharp clear 
letters right here at the bank, in about the time it takes you to make an 
ordinary deposit! _ , , , « u 

Stop in at the bank and gel your book of imprinted checks. Remember, 
there's no charge for imprinting and service is fast. Get your checks today. 


Art Museum Is 
Expected To 
f^elp Art School 

treetion of the new, spacious 
Ackland Art Maseum here on 
Columbia St. is expected to bring 
about considerable improvement 
in the University'c- Art Dept. 

Work on the building has al- 
ready started and it is anticipated 
that it will be completed in a year 
and a half. 

The building itself is estimated 
at a cost of $800,000 with another ! 
$100,000 allocated for equipment. 
The interest on $1 million, donat- 
ed by William Hayes Ackland 
(figured at approximately $30,000 
per year) will be utilized for the 
acquisition of objects of art for 
the mu^um. 

Ackland died in Washington in 
1940. His will directed that his en- 
tire $1,500,000 estate go toward es- 
tatlishment of a memorial art mu- 
seum, provided the university or 
college getting the money would 
install his tomb in the building: 
Duke University would not take 
it, and Carolina won the bequest 
after an eight-year court battle in- 
volving Carolina, Duke and Rol- 
lins- College. 



-4. 


jMor^ chickens 


r . / 



« ^ 

cross ilie road 


CLASSIFIEDS 


AVON CALLING — T. V. AD- 
vertising rings the bell and 
helps you sell Avon. Earn your 
Christmas money now. Write 
Avon, Camellia Dr., Fayetteville, 
N. C. 


LOST: ONE WAI.LET. FINDER 

-^^^.^.«. .— ._ .^m m^.^m»^ wb».hmI pleBfie rcturtt to James Hirty 

YOUR HRST BOOK OF CHECKS FREE Menzel DU House East Ros. 




in front of CheirolMs 


I than any other car I 

1^ \ 



Btl ^ir Sport S«da» 
with Boay br Fith*f. 


TheB 



lrKr%t 


Glen Lennox 


apeimil 

Carrboro Chapel Hilt 


mary Street. 


WOULD LIKE TO GET IN TQIICH 
with daily commuter to Chapel 
Hill from Burlington. Interest' 
ing pr^osition. Call 5-8253, 
Burlington. 

FOUND ON CAJIPUS — TWO 
large denomination billa^-OwMr 
contact Lenny Sack?, 107 Fra- 
ternity Court 


\ye\\, sure. There are more Chevies on the road. More people bay *«n y^ar after year. And this year, Chevrolet's 
the most popular car again-by a margin of more than 150,000 se far. . . . Must be the best one to buy, for sure! ' 

Tm'o million more people own Cheirolets 



Only franchised Chevrolk'ieaien ctisplhy this famous trademark 



See Your Authorized Chevrolet Dealer 


4 

J 


PAae pouft 


THt DAILY TAR HIEL 


FR'DAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 19S4 


111 
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sc: 

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Tar Heels Wind Up Practice For Battle With Wolfpack 


Pack Girds To I ^'"^^^ Runners Work 

Test Tar Heels 


RALEIGH, Sept. 20 (AP)— North 
Carolina State's Wolfpack polished 
its offense today in a brisk two- 
hour workout in preparation for 
Saturday's opening game with Caro- 
lina at Chapel Hill. 

There was no contact work. Dur- 
ing the first part of the session, 
Coach Earle Edwards put the three 
teams through passing tests against 
the frosh. 


Fifteen candidates for the 
freshman cross-country team are 
going through their paces on 
Fetzer Field in preparation for 
the season's opening meet with 
Duke here Oct. 5. 

Anoong the outstanding pro- 
spects reporting for practice are 
Cowles Liipfert, State high school 
mile champ from Winston-Salem; 
Paul^Wachendorfer from Vienna, 
Austria; and Fick Aurther of 
GrMnville. 





.arfv v-ne^ 


The long awaited and much dis- 
cussed 1956 football season gets 
under way tomorrow afternoon 
with a sparkling array of intersec- 
tional feuds and neighborly dog- 
fights lined up for Big Four and 
Atlantic Coast Conference teams. 

Holding the center of the spot- 
light will be Kenan Stadium clash 
between the Jim Tatum led Caro- 
lina Tar Heels and the upset mind- 
ed State Wolfpack. This one shapes 
up as a spectacular offensive show 
between two squads now very much 
in the rebuilding stage. 

Other Saturday contests involv- 
ing Bg Four squads find Duke in- 
vading South Carolina to do battle 
with the youthful Gamecocks, and 
Wake Forest's undermaned Deac- 
ons traveling to Williamsburg, Va.. 
to challenge the William it Mary 
Indians of the Southern Confer- 
ence. 

KICKOFF FOR TATUM REGIME 

The Chapel Hill contest between 
Carolina and State has attracted 
widespread interest for a number 
of reasons. One, of course, is that 
this is the debut of Sunny Jim 
Tatum as Tar Heel Head Coach. 
It's the year of the new regime in 
Carolina football, and the fans are 
anxious to see just what the big 
man with the ready smile has cook- 
ed up since his arrival on the Caro- 
lina campus. 

Also, the game is shaping up as 
something of a grudge battle be- 
cause of the recent recruitng 
squabble between Carolina and 
State over the services of High 
Point schoolboy star Cornell John- 
son. UNC landed Johnson after the 
High Point youth had signed an 
agreement that he would attend 
State, and this caused the Wolf- 
pack to howl bloody murder. 



WHICH WAY 



S^^i^iine €tt 0to^4no€icU 


T^OES k sorpriM. yod diat Nordi Ctfotlni \tk\% tiit 

nacion m textile, tobacco and housdxjU (umiture pro^ 

^occioo, ]rec ranks 43rd m per capita iooooe? ,^^y 

W!iy is it that 22 of North Carotma*s 100 cetmcks W 
population in die last census deca<!e? Whjr an so manjr 
tk. our o>llege graduates seeking careets cbewhere? 

■ low can we remedy a situaciofi ufougm mi \ff IM 
tai^ a percentage oi non-agricultural workets in low-w^ 
'hradtets. and the hrgest farm population in the natioa, 
mndi o£ k fighting a losing battle with mechanised agri- 
culture and competitk>n from chemical substitutes for farm 
products? 

Contmm Hodges IndttstriA Development Program k 
4 Positive Approsch to One of North CtroUnas Pressing 
Prohl 


ems. 


Write the Dcpt. of Conserration & Development ia 
Raleigh for the free booklet on Community^Organizadoa 
for Industrial Development. It is a guide book to the right 
turn at our economic crossroads. 


STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

DEPARTMENT OF 
CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

This is No. 1 of a scries of adveftitemcnts pablisiic<l hf du* 
newf|Mper, ■ member of the North Caroiiiu Press Assodatiaa, 
wititoat cost to the Sute, as a Public Snvice in prescatiag !a> 
fennatieB about the Industrial Development Profram. 


u 





state hasn't tasted victory in 
their series with the Tar Heels in 
13 years, and are sure to be hungry 
for a win tomorrow. Last year the 
Tar Heels captalized on Wolfpack 
errors to take a 25-18 win over in 
Raleigh. 

OFFENSIVE BATTLE LIKELY 

Both teams are reported to have 
their offensive machinery in high 
gear, so touchdowns should come 
fast and thick. State has a bevy of 
pony backs and a razor sharp pass- 
ing attack that could spell trouble 
for the Tar Heel defense. Coach 
Tatum is confident that his offen- 
sive punch will be more than am- 
ple, although he has expressed con- 
cern over the defense. 

l^oth squads are relatively weak 
at quarterback as each has inex- 
perienced signal callers in starting 
positions. Soph Curt Hathaway will 
take over for injured Dave Reed 
as Tar Heel mastermind, while 
youthful Tom Katich will be at the 
controls for the Pack. 

From this angle, the game looks 
to be a wide open affair with fire- 
works aplenty. Regardless of which 
way the decision goes, it should be 
a real crowd pleaser. The winner? 
How about Carolina, 27-20? 

GAMECOCKS MAY BE 
DANGEROUS ""■■ ' 

The South Carolina Gamecocks 
could prove to be rather pesky if 
the Blue Devils from Durham let 
down their guard. The Gamecocks 
have a team loaded with talented 
sophomores, and witii one game al- 
ready under their belt, they may 
give the Blue Devils more trouble 
than expected. 

Duke is figured by experts t • 
have another powerhouse this 
year, and early season rankings 
have placed them among thf? na- 
tion's elite. The only possible weak 
point that may plague them tomor- 
row is 'first game letdown', a dis- 
ease that has often crept up on the 
best of teams. We believe the Blue 
Devils will prove to be too strong 
for South Carolina, though it might 
be close. Duke 34, South Carolina 
13. 

DEACS IN OWN CLASS 

The third Big Four team. Wake 
Forest, steps outside the confer- 
ence for a tilt with William & 
Mary. The Deacs, under their new 
head coach, Paul Amen, are start- 
ing an extensive rebuildng pro- 
gram this year. As a consequence, 
the manpower on hand is rather 
limited; so limited, in fact, that it 
may be hard for them to compete 
on even terms with other schools 
such as Maryland and Duke. 

This is one case, though, where 
the Deacons will be playing in their 
own league. The Indians have a 
small squad and shouldn't be too 
tough a morsel for Wake Forest 
to chew. Wake Forest 20. William 
& Mary 14. 



]Squad Runs Through 
Brisk Final Workout 


Carolina's Tar Heels rounded out 
their pre-season football sessions 
here yesterday in preparation for 
their big four battle with N.C. 
State in Kenan Stadium tomorrow. 

This was the last practice session 
for Coach Jim Tatum's charges be- 
fore they do battle with their big 
rival from Poileigh in the Atlantic 
Coast Conference game of the 
week. 

BRISK WORKOUT 

Tatum, who nev^r carries his 
squad on the practice field the day 
before a game, sent the Tarheels 
through a final brisk workout. 
Quarterbacks Curtis Hathaway, 
Doug Farmer, and Ron Marquette 
ran their teams through pass pat- 
terns, with the teams alternating 
on offense and defense. The squad 
was dressed in shoulder pads and 
pants. 

Coach Tatum will move his club 


to Durham tod^ where it will 
spend the nght at the Washington 
Duke Hotel to get away from pre- 
game festivities on the campus. 
Their will be a movie and a squad 
meeting for the team toniglit'"*^ 
Tatum completes preparations for 
the big opener Saturday. 

According to athletic director 
Chuck Erickson, a crowd of at least 
30,000 is expected to be on hand 
for tomorrow's 2:00 p.m. kickoff. 
EIrickson said that ticket sales had 
been "brisk" and that if the v.'^ea- 
ther was right, he expected at- 
tendance to exceed 30,000. 


Officials Needed 

Students are needed at intra- 
mural officials for tag football. 
Those interested h»ve been asked 
to conte to 301 WooHen Gym en 
Tuesday, September 25, at 4 p.m. 


Cross-Country 
Team Prepares 
For First Meet 

Some fifteen candidates for the 
varsity cross-country squad began 
limbering up muscles stiffened by 
a summer of inactivity Monday in 
preparation for the season's open- 
ing meet with Virginia Oct. 5. 

Absent from th^ harrier's pre- 
liminary workouts was all-american 
star Jim Beatty, now on an AAU 
tour in Finland. Beatty is due back 
in Chapel Hill tomorrow. 

Only casualty of the season so 
far is junior star Everett Whatley, 
suffering from an unidentified ail- 
ment that has kept him on the 
sidelines for most of the week. 

Coach Ranson announced yester- 
day that the squad will hold an 
organizational meeting tomorrow at 
4 p.m. on Fetzer Field. 


Eight Veterans 
To Spark UNC 
Soccer Squad 

I E^ght lettermen form the back- 
1 bone of Coach Marvin Allen's soc- 
I cer team which began practice this 
I week. 

Allen said yesterday that letter- 
men will start in most positions 
when the team opens against 
Lynchburg Oct. 8. But he expects 
several new men, including some 
outstanding sophomores, to see 
plenty of action. 

The practices, which started 
Monday, have revealed that some 
talented material is on hand. Coach 
Allen said. Thirty-two men showed 
up for the first drills. 



5 New Advisers Named 
in UNC General College 

Five new advisors in the Gen 
eral College have been announced 
by Dean Cecil Johnson. 

They will bring to 12 the num- 
ber of faculty members v/ho ad- 
vise students during their first 
two years of University study. 

The new advisers -^re : Cmdr. 
John H.' Graves, asjfociate profes- 
sor of naval science, represent- 
ing the Navy ROTC Unit; William 
R. Straughn Jr., assistant pro- 
fessor of bacteriology. Medical 
School; Robert A. Howard, as- 
sistant professor, Dept. of Art; 
George E. Shepard, professor of 
physical education, repr'esenting 
the Education' School, and S. 
Young Tyree Jr., associte profes- 
sor, Chemistry Dept. 


TODAY 

There Is No Might Like the 
Might of Moby Dick! . 


JL i MiUJ 


fflBH 


DAILY CROSSWORD 


ACROS.S 
1. Yield 
5. Musical 

instrument 
9. Dress of 
pilgrims to 
Mecca 
10. To wait for 

12. Claws 

13. Scope 

14. Parasitic 
insecta 

15. Arid 

16. Music note 

17. Like 

18. Low ialand 
1». Property 

<L> 
20. Flowed 

23. Carry 

24. Foretold 
26. Suspend 
28. Vocation 

31. Sorcery 

32. Pig pen 

33. Musical note 

34. Maaurium 
(sym.) 

35. Part of , 
"to be" 

M. Underwater 
craft (short- 
ened) 

M. Notoriety 

40. Morning 
reception 

41. A napped, 
tanned skin 

42. Measurea 
(Heb.) 

43. Plant ovula 

44. Beveragea 

DOWN 

l-Two- 

wheeleil 

oarriag* 
t-Man'a nam* 


3. Valley 
(poet.) 

4. City 
(Prusa.) 

S.Tom, Dick 
and 

6. Absent 

7. Flowed 

8. Little pij^ 

9. A relative 
by marriage 

11. Plague 

15. Takes 
away 

IS. Cask 

19. Traveled 

21. Narrow 
road- 
way 


22. Tote 

23. Thrice 
(mus.) 

25. Beam 

26. Dwell- 
ings 

27. Count- 
ing 
de- 
vice 

29. Live 
coals 

30. Stands 
up 

32. Satis- 
fled 

35. Walk 
through 
water 


aCDDEm nQHI3H 

nPiH HBnraaa 

uxs (^HSSaSlD 
ROffi cascsn 
Eonisnrin hop 
rai^nsi:! [ficiaciB 
^iriH (3Draa!:?i3n 
annw nms 
offlaHcaHci SB 

ESaQB OnDEtB 


Vrdrrdmy't Aiitwer 

36. (Covered 
with small 
figures 

37. Part of eye 

39. Sheltered 
side 

40. Fate 


Pecjc 


lUCHAKP, JJBO 
BaSehart Genn 

JOHNHaSTON- 

rHOnuCTION 0» HIRMAN MClVlltrS 


lve>Bv Dfcjc 


COLO! i.TECHNICOI-OR 

Prices This Attraction | 
Adults 65<-Children 15<i 


MILTON^S- 
The Mecca of Connoisseurs 

Choice Ivy Model Flannel Slacks at $13.95 

Over 100 Belts, values to $3.50, now ^ .99 

Very Complete Array of English Wool 

Challis Tie and Belt Sets 5.00 & 6.00 

Cashmerized Cotton Hose in Ribs or 

Argyles— from , 1.25 

Complete Range of Off White D,acron/ 

Cotton Poplin London Fog Raincoats at 29.75 
Sport Jackets at their unusual best from 42.50 

Shetland Crew Neck Imported 
See our New Collectcion of Very Shaggy 

Sweaters at 13.95 

You'll never in your whole life see such a vast 
assortment of (dress shirts in both the ivy button- 
<down and the English tab mo<dels. Since we senci 
out so many of our shirts throughout the country 
and overseas we're able to offer you a far greater 
assortment than any other store anywhere. We 
have a standing offer of a free shirt to anyone 
who can name us another store in the country 
who has a more complete assortment of shirts 
than we. 
Our Customized Cordovan Shoes are ' 

stocked from size 6 to 13, widths 

A to EE— plain toes and wing tips from 18.95 
Handsewn Plump Veal Loafers in Dark ^ 

Wine or Black 11.95 

So if you really want to put some spice into your 
outfit, Milton's is the place for you. 

MILTON'S ; 
Clothing Cupboard 


USED TEXT? NOVEL? 


CHILDREN' BOOK?- f 


^ 




INTIMATE 
OOKSHOP 


MODERN UBRARY? PAPERBACK? RARE BOOK? 



II H C LIBRARY 

SERIALS DEPT. 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C 
8-31-49 


WEATHER 


G«n*rally fair Mtd warmar, with 
t«mp*rature around 76 to tS. 



Sfl) c 3)aity ^^Tar Jiecl 


VOL. LVIII, N0.3 


Complete (JP) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, N. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


DORMITORIES 

Th«y are way bahind. Sea Editor* 
iai, paga 2. 


POUR PAGES THIS ISSUE 


Tar Heels Will Meet N. C. State Today In Season's Opener 


Today's Activities Include 
Game, Reception And Dancey 
1000 WC Girls Are Coming 


Approximately 1,000 girls from ' 
Woman's College and many stu- j 
dents from State College will ar- 
rive here today for the Carolina- , 
State football game and Consolidat- 
ed University Day. 

Activites of CU Day, sponsored : 
by the Consilidated University Stu- 
dent Council, will include a recep- ! 
tion at Graham Memorial following ! 
the game, a dance in Woollen Gym 
and the crowing of the CU Queen. \ 

This is the first of three CU Days 
to be held this year. One each is 
held annually on the campuses of i 
UNC, State and WC. ! 

The reception, also sponsored by i 


the CUSC, will be for all students j 
from the three sister institutions of 
the University. Punch and cookies 
will be ser\'ed. 
GRAIL DANCE 

The dance, sponsored by the 
Order of the Holy Grail, will be 
held from 8-11 p.m. Bill Langley 
and his Stardreamers, a 12-piece 
band, will play. 

Tickets will cost SI each, stag 
or drag. The dance will be inform- 
al, according to Grail dance chair- 
man Don Miller. 

Boys have been requested to 
wear coats and ties. 

The dance will be the biggest of 


Three Girls From Each 
School In Queen Race 

Three students of Woman's Col- dated University State College 
lege in Greensboro and three girls Committee, and were selected from 


the year here as thefe will be no j 
Coed Ball, said one member of the j 
Grail. The organization, which ! 
holds the dance concession here, ' 
will turn the proceeds over to the ■ 
Grail scholarship fund or to chari- ■ 

t.v- ; 

The Consolidated University 
Queen will be announced during 
intermission at the dance. She will 
be chosen from among nine cm- 
tpstant.s, three each from UNC. 
State and WC. The nine contestants 
will be presented at halftime dur- 
u.g the game today. 

Representing UNC will be Misses 
Lucinda Holderness of Spencer 
dormitor>', Jane Welch of Chi 
Ome?a sororty and Jane Little of 
Pi Beta Phi. 


representing State College in Ra- 
leigh will participiite in today's 
Considated Universitj' Queen con- 
test along with three contestants 
chosen from Carolina. 

WCs representatives chosen in a 
recent campus-wide election will i 
be Misses Ann Fitzhugh, a senior; 
Pat Mane, a junior; and Nancy 
Morrison, also a junior. j 

Representing State College will 
be: Miss Pat Ponder of Raleigh, a 
freshman at State; Miss EVeverly 
Little of Jefferson, a freshman 
nuclear engineering major attend- 


a group of thirteen nominees. A 
beauty contest was staged at State 
to determine which of the girls 
would represent the college. 

Carolina's contestants will be 
Miss Lucinda Holderness, of Spen- 
cer Dormitory; Miss Jane Welch 
representiftg the Chi Omega Sorori- 
ty; and Miss Jane Little, represent- 
ing the Pi Beta Phi Sorority. . ! 

Representatives from all dorm.s 
and sorority houses particpated in 
the contest this week to select Car- 
olina's coed contestants. Those par- 
ticipating were Misses Dickey Pick- 


Pep Rally 
Held Here 
Lest Night 


ing State College on a Lockheed errell. Kappa Delta; Phil Kraftt, 


scholarship: and Miss Ursula Swiss- i 
good of Raleigh, a sophomore in 
General Studies at State. 

State's contestants in the contest 
were chosen by a 15-man Consoli- 

Forum Bringing 
Dr. K. Tong 
To Speak Here 

Dr. Hollington K. Tong. ambass- 
ador of the Chinese Republic to the 
United States, will give a public 
address here Thursday night. 

Dr. Tong's appearance is being 
sponsored by the Carolina Forum, 
non-partisan student organization 
which brings to the campus from 
tiA»e to time prominent speakers 
"who reflect varying shades of po- 
litical and economic thought." 

"The Success of the New Tactics 
of the Chinese Communists" is the 
tentative topic for Dr. Tong's 
speech, to be given at 8 p.m. in 
Hill Hall. 

Forum chairman James H. 
Holmes announced that Dr. Tong | 
will be honored at a private ban- j 
quet preceding his address, and \ 
at a public reception following in 
Graham Memorial. 

Dr. Tong became Ambassardor 
to the United States in May, 1956. j 
after serving as the first postwar 
Chinese Ambassador to Japan. A 
former journalist, he was editor 
or managing editor of a number of 
North China newspapers before 
World War H. 

Chairman Holmes, a junior from j 
Washington, D. C, said that an- 
nouncements will be made soon of 
five other prominent speakers who 
will visit the campus under Forum 
sponsorship. 


Mclver; Pat Dillin, Alderman; Ann 
Smith, Alpha Gamma Delta: Bar- 
bara Johnson. Carr; and Marion 
Dickens, Smith. 

The contestants from the three 
campuses of the Consolidati-d Uni- 
versity will be presented at the 
halftime of today's game, and the 
winner will be crowned at tonights 
dance in Woollen Gym, to be spon- 
sored by the Order of the Holy 
Grail. 


news 

in 
brief 



The Student Body staged a 
most enthusiastic "Beat State" pep 
rally last night. 

Preliminary "firing up" events 
iacluded a dani>8 fire-blaefng ba- ' 
ton twirling demonstration by Jo 
Carpenter, head majorette, and 
spontaneou - singing of "Dixie" 
and "Hark the Sound." 

The parade, going up Raleigh 
Road to Columbia St. to East Cam- 
eron and down Raleigh back to 
the gym, was led by the majorettes, 
the band, and a motorcade of 
cheerleaders, with the students 
joining en masse. 

The enthusiasm of tlie crowd 
grew so inten..'e once with so much 
toilet tissue streaming through the 
air. the batons cracking some 
heads, that a slight melee almost 
occurred between students and 
majorettes, but thi^.' was quickly 
broken up by Head Cheerleader 
Jim Bynum. 

The pep rally ended with a large 
crowd, gathered around a huge — 
and hot — bonfire on the Intramur- 
al Field, cheering the team on 
to victory today. 


INFIRMARY 


Students in the Infirmary y—- 
t*rday included: 

Miss Oonna L. Anderson, Miss 
Mildrad A. Disaker, Clay F. 
Church Jr., Durwood G. Whit- 
fiald, John G. Bur«wyn. William 
Grant Lynch, Earl T. Kirkman, 
Donald C. McMillion, John M. 
Spivay, Alvin W. Smith, Harry 
M. Giles Jr., and Klarcourt A. 
Morgan ill. 



Wolf pack Is 7 Point 
Underdog Against UNC 

By LARRY CHEEK 
Daily Tar Hetl Sports Editor 

Cloach jim Tatiim's a-jTibitious but untested Carolina 
Tar Heels uill receive their baptism under fire here this af- 
teinoon in Kenan Stadium when ihey play host to the dan- 
;j[eious .\. C. State Wolf pack. 

The game, expected to draw a throng of move than 30,- 
000. is slated to get underway at 2 p.m. under crisp cloiidle.ss 
skies. 

C:"olina has been made .1 7-point favorite by tlie odds- 

■ — — ♦ makers, but most observers rate 

• the content a tossup. Both squads 
are figured to be improved over 
last season when the Tar Heels 
took a 25-18 decision. Each has 
a potent offensive punch, while 
both Tatum and State Coach Earle 
Edwards have been moaning 
about inadequate defenses. 


CAROLINA'S SOPHOMORE QUARTERBACK CURTIS HATHAWAY 

. . . replaces tnjured Dudc Reed nt signal caller's post 


While You Were Gone 


THE FRANK GRAWAM POR- 
TRAIT caused con.siderable con- 
troversy over where it should be 
hung. It was hung in the .Vlorehead 
Building, but several students 
thought it should have been placed 
in Graham Memorial. Different 
opinions were expressed in editor- 


of tickets to 
August. 


all persons in early 


THE PSYCHIATRY DEPT. re 

ccived a grant of .SliiO.OOO from Ihe 
National Institute of Mental Health 
of the U. S.. Public Health .Service. 

THE INSTITUTE OF GOVERN- 


ials and letters to the editor in the MENT moved into its new buiidinj 


LONDON (/P)— The Suez Canal 
Users' Assn. has comp into being 
— at least on paper. A majority of | 
the 18 nation.^ at the second con- : 
ference here have supported the 
organization. The pact wrs cooled > 
by refusal of the French to go 
along at this time. 

Secretary of State John Foster 
Dulles said he was very satisfied 
with the outcome. 

In PARIS, the French Cabinet 
will hold a special meeting today | 
to consider results of the London 
conference and hear a report from 
Foreign Minister Pineau. He said 
last night the users' plan is too 
hazy on canal tolls. | 

In CAIRO, the Middle Ea^t : 
News Agency announced the Big 
Three of the Arab nations will I 
hold another meeting next week. | 
Attending will be President Nasser | 
of Egypt, President Kuwatly of 
Syria and King Saud of Saudi i 
Arabia. 

In WASHINGTON the State \ 
Dept. approved passports for seven j 
Americans who want to work as 
pilots on the Suez Canal. 

' WASHINGTON (/P) — Politics 

j continued here. President Eisen- 
hower returned to the Capitol af- 

! ter a two-day visit to Iowa. Demo- • 

i cratic carididate Adlai Stevenson 

I talked labor matters and party fin- 
ance with organized labor leaders. \ need of donations of "A-Positive" 

I IN MINNEAPOLIS, Vice Presi- 1 type blood. His condition, inherited 

j dent Richard Nixon continued his | from his mother's ' family, was 
defense of the administration farm j brought on by a cerebral hemor- 

j program. It is working, and will '. rhage last week. The lad's uncle is 
restore proi-perity to agriculture, j also in Memorial Hospital with a 

I he said. 1 hemophiliac condition. 


Playmalcers 
To Begin 
Tryouts 

The Carolina Playmakers will 1 
hold tryouts for their first produc- j 
tion of the season, the recent 
Broadway success, "Anastasia", on | 
Monday at 4 and 7:30 p.m. in the i 
Playmakers Theatre. 

The play will be directed by , 
Samuel Selden, chairman of the j 
Dept. of Dramatic Art and Director 
of the Playmakers, and will appear | 
at the theatre October 17 through 
21. 

"Anastasia" is a suspenseful 
drama of a girl involved in a plot 
to claim as the heir to the Rqs- 
sian dynasty. The play has thirteen 
characters. Copies of the play are 
available at the reserve desk in 
the library. Tryouts are open to 
everyone, according to Selden. 


Summer School Weekly 

TRACK STAR JIMMY BEATTY 

failed in his attempt to gain a 
place on the United States Olympic 
Track Team, but finished second 
in the 5,000 meter race of the 
NCAA meet. 

THE UNC GOLF TEAM failed lo 
qualify in the NCAA tournament. 

UNIVERSITY OFFICIALS asked 
the state for $16 million for perm- 
anent improvements, including a 

new' pharmacy building and three ; Hill and visited Coach .Jim Tatum. 
new dormitories. | She met Tatum while he \va.- 

coaching at Maryland. 


past Woollen Gym on the Ralei^^ii 
Road. 

100 NEW RECORDS WERE ao 

quired for Graham Memorial's col- 
lection. 

ONE OF CAROLINA'S ALL 
TIME GREAT football stars gave 
up a business career to return here 
and become a member of Coach 
.lim Tatum's football coaching staff. 

GLORIA DE HAVEN, glamorous 
Hollywood actress, came to Chapel 


A-Positive Blood Needed! 
For Youth At Hospital ' 

Wayne Brov/n, 12 - year - old 
munity In southern Chatham, is 
battling a rare hemophiliac (in- 
ternal bleeding) condition at Me- 
morial Hospital and is greatly in 


DEAN MAURICE WENTWORTH 

LEE of the School of Economics 1 
and Business of the State College ^ 
of Washington was appointed Dean 
of the UNC School of Business Ad- 
misisttation. | 

SCHOLASTIC HONORS for last | 
year were won by Delta Psi fra- 
ternity and Pi Beta Phi sorority, 
according to an announcement is- 
sued last s-ummer. 

DR. EDWARD KIDDER GRAH- 
AM, who resigned' last year as 
chancellor of the Woman's College 
in Greensboro, was named Dean of 
the College of Liberal Arts of Bos 
ton University. 

MISS LINDA MANN, a 1956 grad- 
uate of Carolina, was named tem- 
porary director of Graham Memor. 
ial to succeed Jimmy Wallace who 
resigned.. 

MISS LiBBY MCDOWELL repre- 
sented Chapel Hill in the Miss 
Carolina contest, but failed to 
place. 

CAPTAIN ALEXANDER M. PAT- 
TERSON succeeded Col. Robert C 
Burns as commander of the Navy 
ROTC unit here. 

NEGRO INQUIRIES about swim 
tickets for the use of the Un:.''r.s- 


A COMMITTEE to assist in find- 
ing a chancellor to replace Robert 
House, who will retire next June, 
was appointed by Acting President 
Bill Friday. 


Averett Girls 
Will Visit i 

Here Tomorrow 

One hundred and fifty girls who , 
are freshman and sophomores at i 
Averett College in Danville, Vir- 
ginia will be on campus tomorrow 
afternoon. 

They will attend a show at The 
Morehead Planetarium and a re- 
ception following in Graham Mem- 
orial. 

All freshmen have been urged 
to attend the reception at Graham 
Memorial at 4 p.m. 

A return trip for Carolina men 
will be held in Danville on Sep- 
tember .27. This will be an annual 
dance, sponsored by the Freshmen 
Fellowi'hip group of the YMCA. 
Bus transportation will be pro- 
vided to Danville, which is 55 


Rameses VII 
Will Be On \ 
Hand Today \ 

Rameses VII, who was christened j 
at the Carolina-Oklahoma game 
last year, will be back today before 
kick-off time of the Carolina State 
game. ^ 

.\lthough the Carolina mascot ; 

will be down on the field, his guar- 1 

dian for the 1955 season, Glenn \ 

Hogan. has. retired. Replacing Ho- 1 

gan after 28 years of service, is j 

his nophow , Robert C. Hogan, who ■ 

will have the responsibility of car- 1 

i ing for and protecting Ramese.s. j 

; Both Hogans live on the Hogan ' 

' farm on Rt. 2 where Rameses lives 1 

■ when not on duty. I 

Thirty months old and 50 pounds , 
heavier. Rameses is an authentic 1 
ram with a black face and horns ; 
and IS sire for 50 sheen on the Ho- 
gan farm. The present mascot is 
a direct descendent of Rameses V, 
a gifi from a Carolina alumni in , 
Texas. 

Yesterday, an extra heavy guard ' 
was placed on the ram in the hop- 
es of preventing the recurrence of 
an abduction by State students 
such as has happened in past years. 

Rameses will enter with the Caro- 
lina students and proceed down the 
aisle through the Carolina cheer- 
ing section to the field. His arrival 
is set for 1 p.m. 

The mascot, with his bearded 
game attendent. Bushy Cook, will 
come to all home games and will 
probably be at the Wake Forest 
game and possiWy the Virginia con- 
test. 

In 1924 Vic Huggins. head cheer- 
leader, started the tradition of hav- 
ing s ram as mascot. "State had 
their wolf. Army its mule. Navy 
its goat, and Georgia its bulldog," 


Yack Photo 
Taking Is 
Going Slow 

A mid-afternoon check yesterday 
showed that very few seniors had 
appeared for their Yackety-Yack 
photographs in the second day cf 
scheduled picture taking. 

Twenty members of a class of 
approximately 800 had shown up at 
3:30 yesterday, according to Editor 
Tommy Johnson. 

"We hope to have an unpreced- 
ented number of class jSictures in 
the annual this year." Johnson 
stated, "but it cannot be Hone un- 
less classes cooperate by using 
their scheduled time to the great- 
est advantage." 

Johnson urged that members of 
the schools and classes turn up 
early in their sche<kiled times to 
facilitate the photographing and 
for lh*>ir own convenience. 

Seniors will have until Friday. 
September 28, to be photographed 
for this year's annual. The sche- 
dule for other classes and schools 
I is as follows: 

I Ocf. 1-5 — Freshmen and Nurs- 
ing School (except Senior nurses..) 
' Oct. 8-12 — Sophomores, Phar- 
macy School. Dental School, and 
Df^^'-nl ffif tone students. 
I Oct. 15-19 — Juniors, Medical 
' School. Law Scho.'l. and Graduate 
I School. 

I Johnson expressed the hope that 
more fraternity men would turn j 
out this year to be photographed j 
He pointed out that the Yackety- j 
YaeV is one of the best means of 
publicity for fraternities because 
of its large circulation among high 
.schools and prep schools. ! 

Individual annual photograps arc 
being made this year by Smith 
Studios of Raleigh. | 


Campus 
Seen 


Student roashing hvf face at 
the Old Well fmintain. 


Student lighting up cigar in 
class the first day. 


ity's outdoor pool stopped the sale miles from Chapel Hill. 


Mars Show To 
Close At 
Planetarium 

"Mars, Planet of Mysten." will 
close at the Morehead Planetarium 
here on Monday night after a speci- 
ally arranged football weekend 
schedule of performances. 

So that N. C. State and Univer- 
sty football fans may view the cur- 
rent demonstration, performances 
will be given at 11 a.m. and imme- 
diately following the game today, 
in addition to the regular 8:30 
Vic Huggins said. Carolina took the o'clock nightly demonstrations. To 

morrow's schedule of matinees at 
2. 3, and 4 p.m. will remain un- 
changed, and the final offering of 
the Mars show will be Monday at 
8.30 p.m. 

An entirely new demonstration 
titled "Our Sun" will open on 
Tuesday night, September 25. 


Rameses I was introduced at the 
Carolina-VMI game. Carolina took 
VMI three to nothing to break a 
two game loing streak. Rameses I 
was accepted as a symbol of good 
fortune. Rameses is the continua- 
tion of a 34 year tradition. 


SECRET DRILLS 

Tatum has been putting his 
:«[uad through secret drills all 
week long in a effort to shore up 
his sagging defensive fences, but 
still is uncertain as to what may 
happen this afternoon when Ed- 
wards turns loose hi^- speedy crop 
of racehorse backs, and his potent 
passing attack. 

"We have no way of knowing 
what our boys will do under game 
conditions," he said yesterday. 
"Our defense is untested and inex- 
perienced, so we don't know what 
to expect," he went on to say. 

The Tar Heel offense should be 
able to take care of itself, ftom 
all indications. Tatum has a flock 
of fine backs headed by veteran 
halfbacks Ed Sutton and Larry 
McMullen. Hard running junior 
Giles Gaca should capably handle 
, the line plunging chores. Backing 
I the •-• three up will be Buddy Sas- 
ser and Daley Goff at the second 
string halves, and Wally Vale, the 
team's leading punter, at the num- 
ber fullback slot. 

QUESTION MARKS 

Only possible question mark 
spot in the backfield is quarter- 
back where sophomore Curt Hath- 
away i..- set to start in place of 
injured Dave Reed. Hathaway, a 
190-pounder from Norfolk, Va., 
lacks game experience, but Tatum 
is confident he will prove a com- 
petent mastermind for the Tar 
Heel attack. 

Doug Farmer, senior non-letter- 
man whorti Tatum calls "the best 
passer we have" has been the sur- 
prise of fall practice so far, and 
will 6>&e plenty of action with the 
second unit in today's game. 

Up front, veteran ends Buddy 
Payne, a rangy junior, and Lar- 
ry Muschamp will handle the pass 
receiving duties. Paul Pulley and 
Vince Olen. a pair of promising 
juniors, will spell the two starters. 

The remainder of the Tar Heel 
line finds Stuart Pell and Phil 
Blazer at tackles. Don Lear and 
Hap Setzer at guards, and co-cap- 
tain George Stavnttski at center. 

SPEEDY BACKS 

State will trot out a fast, tricky 
starting backfield and a multiple 
offense which could spell trouble 
for the Tar Heel defense. Dick 
Hunter and Dick Christy, two jun- 
iors with a year of experience un- 
der their belts, will open at the 
halves, diminutive Tony Guerrieri 
at fullback, and youthful Tom 
Katich at quarterbcak. Guerrieri 
and Katich are also juniors*. 

j In addition to the four boys 
above. Coach Earle Edwards ha« 
a trio of high steppers who are 
just about as good. George (Wag- 
on-Wheel,"?) Marinkov. the game 
captain for the Pack, is considered 
to be the squad's" most dangerous 
runner, although he is weak on 
defense. Billy Franklin is an ex- 
perienced signal caller, and shifty 
Hike Miller is alway.s a threat at 
halfback. 

John Lowe and John Collar 
will start at end for the Wolfpack; 
John Szuchan and Dick DeAngelis 
will be at tackles; Julius Compton 
and Franci.>- Tokar are set at 
guards; and Jim Oddo will be at 
center. 

j WEIGHT ADVANTAGE 

The Tar Heels will outwei^ 
State by an average of 15 pounds 
State by n average of 15 pounds 

i (See FOOTBALL. Page 3) 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1954 


SATURI 


Si 


Carolina Housing Problem: 
Just One Generation Back 


ON LEARNING - PART 3 


Just about a year ago the l^ni- 
versity was reasonably certain it 
would get money ior new dormi- 
tories. Now the Bt>ard ol Trustees 
is gcttiJi,2j around to aiuhorizing the 
expenditure. 

This is tvpical of Pr<.)gTess in 
Chapel Hill. 

It isn't the trustees' fault. Bv law 
they had to wait until all the de- 
tails were decided, then gather in 
special session to approve the 
dormitory contracts. 

\'ou can't place the blame for 
the vear-long delay on anyone in 
particular. The Tniversity just 
took j(K) long to get the dormitor- 
ies started. 

This is bad. as the men studen;.i 
cmrcntly living in the basement of 
C'obb Dormitorv will gla^lly testi- 
fv. While the University's housing- 
planners are fiddling around with 
plans atid bhie{>rints. the over- 
ciowded dorm men and women 
arc burning. 

Foi years now the I'niversitv has 
been about a generation behind her 
suideuits. She saiv tlie present trend 
toward a bulging enrollment far 
before it got here. She has been 
slrnv to. do anything about it. 

More than a year ago former 
President (iordon Ciray of the 
Consolidated University told the 
people of North Carolina in his 
President s Rep)ort: 

■■\Ve are confronted with tfve 
the prospect of greatly increased 
enrollments . . . there is the prob- 
lem of dormitorv facilities, for 
1x)th married and unmarried stu- 
dents. .\t present, despite the con- 
struction of new dormitories in , 
recent years, wc are overcrowded, 
with three students in many rooms 
designed for two at State College 
and Chapel Hill, and there are 
long waiting lists.' 

At the time the 1953 General 
Assembly iiad tcfused to give the 
Unixersitv hero anv money with 
which to bui.'il dormitoi ies. In- 
stead, the I "ii latois passed an en- 
abling: a .^ allowing UNC to bor- 
row : - i.iillicHi for dormitory con- 
iij .:ciion. 

While most rni\ersity officials 
and planners were happv to get 
the enabling act, some of them 
didn't change their pained express- 
ions. Bv liie time the dorntitories 
are built." one said, ■well be just 
as ctowded as before. Where will 
that get us?"* 

While the tonstiuction delay is 
bad from the standpoint of cramp- 


ed students, it is even worse when 
\iewed in the liglit of fiuure Leg- 
islature appropriations. 

The University is asking the 
state for money from a $10 million 
revoh ing fui'd. That monev would 
be used to build new self-li(juidat- 
ing dormitories to house 700 un- 
married students. 

.Now. what will the it);,; (.eiieral 
.Assembly sav when the Universi- 
ty ask.s lor the monev? 

Chances are it will sav: 'Whv 
haven't you spent that S2 million 
yet? \'ou ask us for more monev 
when you ha>\ent even spent what 
vou"\e got." 

In the eyes of the state, it will 
be like the little boy with two 
handfulls of marbles who wants 
an<jilu'r do/en. 

The greatest housing sin com- 
mitted re(enilv on this campus is 
the lack of adequate housing for 
married students. 

Married students who li\e in 
Ch.tpel Hill have four choices: 

1. They can cross their fingers 
and maybe get one of \'i( tory ViU 
Kvges inade<|uate units. This may 
take vears. 

2. riiey can scramble with oth- 
eis for the houses and apartments 
available in town. Rent, while not 
so high heie as in some other col- 
lege towns, is still high to the 
student who must work afternoons 
and nights. 

■^. . They can biiv traileis and 
live in then>. 

4. They can go somewhere else 
to school. 

For a long time the University 
lias failed to do ativthing ol (on- 
sequence to alleviate the pioblem 
of married students' housing. S<.)mh 
Building and Capital Square ears 
have turned suddenly deaf at pleas 
for action from men like Gordtm 
Gray. The University appears to 
still believe that the married stu- 
dent is the exception lu the rule, 
while modern survevs prove more 
and more people are getting mar- 
ried and raising a family while 
going to school. 

.Meanwhile, baik in South Build- 
ing, plans are slowly being drawn 
for additional housing of approxi- 
inaielv 700 immarried students. 
Bv the time the new dormitories 
are built, students will be living in 
the halls. .\nd the married stu- 
dents will be living in tents. 


Broader Street And Mind 


If the town does .something the 
student doesn t like, the student 
(barges the town is ganging up on 
the students. 

That's a pretty .safe rule in 
(ihapel Hill, as in most iniiversity 
towns. Often the merchants and 
townspeople forget where their 
monev comes from, and take ad- 
vantage of t*lie student body. 

.\s we said, that rule works in 


The Daity Tar Heel 


The official student publication of the 
Publications Board of the University of 
North Carolina, v*-here it is published 
daily except Monday and examination 
and vacation periods and summer terms 
Entered as .second class matter in the 
post office in Chapel Hill. N. C. under 
the Act of March 8, 1870. Subscripton 
rates: mailed. $4 per year, $2.50 a semes- 
ter: delivered, $6 a year. $3.50 a semes- 
ter. 


Editor 


FRED POWLEDGE 


Managing Editor . G|L\RUE JOHNSON 


News Ekiitor 


RAY LINKER 


Business Manager BELL BOB reEL 


most (ases. liut in the ( ase of park- 
ing on Rosemary St.. it doesn't 
hold true. 

"Its just plain (list rimination 
against frat men," said one (ireek 
society brother about the towns 
decision to ban parking on both 
sides of the l>usy stieet. 

What the fraternity man didn't 
know is that the town has spent 
more than one year studying Chap- 
el Hill parking and street patterns. 
The town hired a traffic expert 
from State College to studv routes 
and make pPans for the increased 
traffic that is bound to come in a 
grownig town like this one. 

The fraternity man. we susjiect, 
was speaking cjuite selfishly when 
he charged discrimination. He was 
h)rgetting about the thiitrsands, of 
automobiles that daily pass up and 
down narrow Rosemary St. 

When the town was considering 
elimitiation of jiarkitig on the 
street a vear ago, it circulated let- 
ters to all resideiHs of Rosemary 
St., asking their opinions on the 
plan. .Most bf the residents — in 
fact, just abfjut all except for the 
few fraternities on Rosemary — 
were in favor of the ban. 

The others were satisfied to park 
their cars elsewhere in <»rder to 
make Rosemary a wider, safer 
street to travel. Most of the fra- 
ternities weren't. 

This, we believe, is narrowmind- 
edness. .And Rosemary St. is narrow 
enough. 


Liberal Arts, The Fox 
And The Hedgehog 


Ed Yoder 

(This is the final part of Yod- 
der's essay.) 

All educational exposure aier- 
ges in the exposed — making him 
livelier, freer, making him feel 
his place in the universe, or at 
least have deeper questions about 
it. There is reason to think, too, 
that education can take effect up- 
on character: certainly it takes 
effect upon outlook and philos- 
ophy. 

How would the world's course 
since 1930 have been changed if 
Adolph Hitler had been civlized 
at G-oettingen? Of course, there 
was his arch-compatriot. Benito 
-Massolini, a newspaper editor and 
self-styled egghead — showing that 
you never know. Perhaps he 
could have been civilized by a Mo- 
zart symphony early every morn- 
ing. Karl Barth. the austere Swiss 
theologian, has recently revealed, 
indeed, that Mozart is such a 
daily apertif for him. 

A thousand related conse- 
quences, features, come to mind. 
One who ventures upon liberal 
education with a will had better 
be forewarned that a little bit is 
as teasing as a tidbit of anything 
vastly good. 

The question marks can become 
marching obsessions; the quest 
for a bit develop into a mad 
search for great quantities — for- 
tunate, in that the well-known 
poem beginning "A little learning 
is a dangerous thing"" has often 
proved itself so crucially right. 
QUESTION MARKS 

It is in .Arts and Sciences, if 
one applies himself, that the un- 
deflated "so what?" of a green, 
unknowing freshman may be 
changed as if magically into a 
thousand question marks. There 



BOOKS 

. . . of iminy things 

are those who think, with reason, 
that education in liberal arts at 
its best is the creation of ques- 
tion marks. It is certainly closer 
to that than it is to having your 
mind crowded to the cobwebby 
corners with detail — like a great 
canvas. 

But there are obstacles. Let us 
a.ssume. perhaps wildly, that you 
decide as a freshman to enter his- 
tory or English or classics rather 
than businejjs.. You will be con- 
fronted sooner or later by a hard- 
shelled, unreconstructed friend 
from the B. A. School or from 
Pharmacy, who will badger v*ou 
with arguments like: "Why amass 
facts about Italian poets when 
you'll forget them all inside 10 
years?" 

You may lack a ready answer. 
But experience will teach the 
falsity of that argugment, since 
the eventual object of education 
is seldom to amass facts. 
MEMORY 

Studying Dante is not like mem- 
orizing a list of criteria fo success- 
ful hiring or conveyor-belt effic- 
iency. This is not to say that you 
cannot approach Dante that way: 
or that you cannot be like the 
memory experts who glance at 
pages and never forget a word of 
them. 

It is to say, instead, that unless 
you possess a trickster's memory 
or uncommon genius in your 
chosen field, your best hope as 
a liberally-educated person is 
something intangible, but akin to 
what happene to the mind of 
our theoretical lawyer. 


This lawyer had his style tem- 
pered, the edges of his logic and 
his power to argue honed. What 
has happened to the liberall.v-edu- 
cated person, more than that he 
or she has amassed facts or learn- 
ed to perform cerebellum-springs, 
is that he or she has gained a 
certain spirit that only education- 
al peers know about. The fresh- 
man has gained as his own a 
small area of civilization. 

He has read with appreciation 
some — perhaps many, but quali- 
ty counts more than quantity in 
this enterprise — of the great 
books. He has looked perceptive- 
ly at some great painting, or a 
Venus de Milo of sculpture. He 
has listened penetratingly to some 
good music. He has begun to find 
out what, in layman's terms. Ein- 
sten was getting at when he ad- 
vanced the General Theory. 

The venturer upon liberal edu- 
cation — education, to return to 
Milton, for "private" offices — 
had better be forewarned in ad- 
dition that old affections for com- 
monplace ideas, for commonplace 
intellectual currency, for medi- 
ocre goals, may be smashed and 
swept aside. 

Certain prevalent brands of con- 
formity may become totally for- 
eign and obnoxious to you as a 
graduate cxpo.sed to liberal edu- 
cation, when they were next door 
an J compatible to you as a fresh- 
man. You may even want to be 
diftorent from the other hundreds 
in your class. 

Climax of climaxes, you may 
want to think independently of 
the old thoughgt patterns you 
were brought up in. Such are 
the hazards of being exposed to 
learning. 
DILEMMA 
And if you really get in deeply. 
- you will no doubt come to the 
Fox-Hedgehog dilemma. 

The German philosopher Hegel 
drew this distincton between the 
fox and the hedgehog: that the 
fox knows a little about a lot of 
things, whereas the hedgehog 
knows a lot about one big thing. 
Exposed to education, .vou may 
come to this dilemma — particular- 
ly if a synthesis has taken place 
in your curiosity, and ever>- field 
of study seems part of a greater 
whole about which your curiosity 
is equally burning This .synthesis, 
this coming-together, explains in 
part why it seldt)m makes sensa 
to an educated person to hear an- 
other say: "I am crazy over Eng- 
lish literature, but I hate to study 
history." 

Here, and as it happens, be- 
tween any two liberal discplines 
or fields, it all, in the long run, 
begins to look like grist to the 
small mill. 

But the fox-hedgehog dilemma 
— as I've found it— is this: Will 
I spend the summer vacation read- 
ing the complete works of Ed- 
ward Gibbon? Or will I read the 
Portable Gibbon among three doz- 
en other hooks in a dozen differ- 
ent areas'* Will one concentrate 
all his energy upon a footnote, 
the reading and writing for which 
may take a day? 

Or will he forc^sake this slow 
enterprise for a dashing offensive 
on all fronts? It becomes a both- 
ersome, puzzling question, even 
if some ave more suited to be 
hedgehogs than others. 
STUMBLING BLOCK 

.And, lastly, there is a negative 
proolem that will bear warning. 
Education can create, or bellow 
out of low coals, or plant, nt^bili- 
ty. But it can also create wliat the 
Noftli Carolina - born journalist 
Gerald Johnson has called cynical 
foppism. 

Liberal education at premium 
must create a critical instinct, 
taste, a certain persistent dissatis- 
faction with the half-done, the 
poor in taste, the mediocre, the 
colorless, the commonplace, in 
the realms of both ideas and arti- 
fice. 

But cynical foppism appears 
when critical instinct and taste 
mistake their objectives, when 
they make themselves absolute 



CD CD 



Dating: For Pleasure 
Or Personal Prestige 


Reserved Parking 
Hurting Students 


Woody Sears 

I have often wondered ii girls 
talked as much about boys as 
boys talk about gigrls and related 
subjects. 

On occasion I'll ask a girl that 
question, just out of curiosity, 
and I always get some sort of 
shim-sham which amounts to the 
same thing as "no." I've never 
been thoroughly convinced, but I 
suppose that's just a matter for 
each man's speculation. 

Every now and then you hear 
something on the subject that 
strikes your funny bone. I heard 
the other day about a freshman 
who had such a good line and 
was so good at meeting all the 
good-looking girls on campus that 
he had to put the names in a 
little black book. But he got so 
many names so fast that he could- 
n't remember who was who. I 
think it's funny, anyway. 

On the subject of girls still. I 
had occasion the other day to 
wonder why bovs date girls, but 
en a different level of thought. 
While talking to a grad student. 
I found out that a boy is really 
expected to date a "queen" in 
some circles. 

This is okay. I guess, but it 
boils down to the fact that one 
often dates a girl for a show-piece 
rather than for any other of the 
more usual reasons. I wondered 
what the girls thought of this, or 
if they were aware of it. .\nd 
then I thought that possibly they 
do the same thing. 

This same grad student said 
that he had dated a lot over at 
WC, and that it was important to 

menarchs, when they sour into a 
pucker at everything and ever5-- 
body. 

Cynical foppism becomes down- 
right intolerant of imperfection; 
it 'oecomes especially irritating 
because it seldom if ever looks 
into the mirror and it forgets that 
learning, like the universe, may 
be finite but that it is unbounded. 


date some, of the "wheels " on the 
campus. He justifed this by say- 
ing that he had been told that a 
girl will ask who a boy has dated 
before she will accept a blind 
date. If said boy has dated some 
of the big names on campus, then 
he is all right. 

So I guess it boils down lo the 
old adage that one is judged by 
the company he keeps. This is - 
undeniably true, and something 
that everyone should already 
know. The thing thats interest- 
ing to me is the varying motives. 

Not having had any psychology 
courses to date. I don't know 
about the motivating forces, other 
than those of "companionship. " 
Yet it does seem strange that a 
boy needs to date a beautiful girl 
as a crutch for his own sagging 
ego. or to try to keep up with the 
other guys. 

So many of us on the male side 
of the fence are far from being 
worthy of the things we expect 
in our dates by the complete ab- 
sence of good manners and rudi- 
mentary courtesies that we so of- 
ten display. 

However, that. too. is a matter' 
for speculation, for often you s«e 
mighty nice girls dating boys 
whose actions and general atti- 
tudes are almost unbelievably 
crude, by even minimum stand- 
ards. 

So that leads me to believe that 
to even certain "nice" girls 
such actions and activities are 
amusing and pleasant. In the 
event that you don't know what I 
mean, just take a look around 
you when you go to the football 
games this year. But then on 
the other hand, maybe I m just 
a prude. 

But whatever our motives for 
dating the girls we do might be, 
I think that we should watch our 
deportment a little closer, for is- 
n't this supposed to be the home 
of 'Southern Gentlemen?"' 

Who wants to laugh first? 


Barry Winston 


I have a car. It's a very nice car, but the wind- 
shield just isn't big enough. The fact is, it's begin- 
ning to look rather cluttered. Something has got to 
go. But I've forgotten which of the stickers is this 
year's, so I may just have to muddle through as \^st 
I can, peering through the cracks in the decals. 

If I can find some one who knows what color 
the new one is supposed to be, maybe I can locate 
it (this may be difficult since I'm color-blind) and 
scrape off all the old one. Except I think maybe 
they're ;ili thafs been holding my windshield to- 
gether since last 
June when some 
^ _^„,_^ ... drunk fell out of 

a tree and put a big crack in it. 


ONE MY 


Li't Abner 


By Al Capp 



I guess I could buy a new one, but I'm just about 
broke what with buying stickers and license plates 
and parking permits and paying off the protection 
collectors. 

I had to buy a slate license plate, a county plate, 
and two city tags: an uptown parking sticker, a down- 
town parking sticker and a campus parking sticker; 
an iridescent sign for my back bumper reading Slow 
Down and Live, one for the front imploring every 
pedestrian I run over to See Rock City., and a tourist 
decal for Bulgaria.. Now when am I ever going to 
get a chance to go to Bulgaria with this miserable 
semester system? 

I read in the paper the other day (or maybe it 
was on one of those several dozen forms I had to 
fill out to pick up my class tickets) that the proceeds 
from this bizarre bazaar are going into somebody's 
piggy-bank until enough is stashed away for a couple 
of parking lots. At the rate they've betp denting my 
checking account, construction ought to start some- 
time the middle of next week. And when they do 
finish them, I bet all the spaces will be marked Re- 
served for General Officers and Trustees of the Uni- 
versity. I saw some men from Buildings and Grounds 
putting up those Reserved signs down in Kenan 
Woods the other day. Those guys get all the good 
spots. 

And parking tickets! Just you wait. Pretty soon 
now they'll have the campus policeman patroling the 
dorms and ticketing you for oversleeping. 

With eight men to a room, everybody's going to 
have to sleep in shifts. I saw three tickets on a tri- 
cylce that was ovreparked in front of South Build- 
ing today, and they were getting ready to tow it 
away when the kid that owned it showed up and 
promised to appear in court next Tuejjday. 

I'm told that all of this exaction stems from 
the fact that there 
are not enough 
parking facilitic;- 
to go around. 1 
ifuess the people 
oehind all this arc 
figuring that pret- 
ty soon we'll de- 
cide it's cheaper 
to take a taxi and 
start leaving our 
cars at home. 



uMivERsiry wmm 

A.HB 

visrmfts 



RESERVE1D 

all the choice places 


So.Tiebody told me yesterday that I may have lo 
pay for a sticker that will allow me to park in my 
own front yard, but the board of trustees is going 
to restrict possession of cars to grauate botany stu- 
dents next fall, anyhow. 

Aiiybody know where ' can buy a pogo stick? 


«} 


JeMis 

well-l| 
and 2] 

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PA(SE THREE 


Ind- 

to 
hhis 


>lor 

cate 

land 

^ybe 

to- 

last 

>me 

It uf 


Six Top Teams Debut Today 

Nofre Dame Gets First 
Test Against Mustangs 


Ufftiversity Qiorus Is 
Conducting Auditions 


Cardboard To Periorm Stunts 



PHIL BLAZER 

. starts at tackle a^ainiit Pack 


COMMUNITY 

CHURCH 
CHAPEL HILL 


IS CONCERNED WITH PERSONAL 
AND SOCIAL MORALITY 

JeMis brings to men princ iples that arc essential to the 
Avell-being of the indivithial and the increase ot justice 
and gcMxi-will in society. Believing this we want our 
Church to play a critical and corrective role within the 
haniework of our common life. 

We are concerned with the smial problems of mankind- 
war, proverty, diser.>e, crime, prejudice and all the im- 
moralities of our s<xia]. economic and jx>litical piactices. 
The existence ol" black, white and yellow races is accepted 

gladlv and re\erently as a part of God's purpose for the 

enrichment of human life. 


ENCOURAGES FREEDOM OF 
THOUGHT 

(iod has spoken in \arious times and divers places." 

So no church, indeed no single religion, has the complete 

and final truth aboiu (.od and mans relationships to 

him. 

«« 

We cherish the opportunity to join with other seekers 
after religious truth with no constraint save a devotion 
to truth and right as they are made known. We would 
rcmii'in humble and teachable in the conviction that 
God will lead us into fidler truth. 

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED. 
WORSHIP SUNDAY 1 1:00 A. M. 

HILL MUSIC HALL 

(On The Campus) 


DAILY CROSSWORD 


ACROS.S 

1. Mid- 

VVeat 

city 
8. Perform 

11. Takes away 

12. Conjunction 

13. The palm 
coc'kato 

14. Cord 

16. Member of 
family 

17, MU'ir not* 

19. Spani.sh 
duke of 
16th C. 

20. Thin cookie 

22. Interjection 
— same as 
•Od- 

23. Lawyer's 
retamers 

26. Entire 
amount 

27. Kind of 
poetry 

28. Concise 

30. Part of 
'to be' 

31. Lifted 

33. Music note 

34. Lines of 
Junction 

35. River (Sp.) 

37. Sun god 

38. Refciound 

41. Daughter of 
Tantalus 
(Gr. Myth.) 

43. Pin set 
in boat 
fi;unwhal« 

45 Weep 

46. Home 
appliance 

48. Man's 
nickname 
(poas.) 

49. Neatest 


DOWN 

1. Stuff 

2. Leading 
actor 

3. Mohamme- 
dan priest 

4. Heart 
(anat.) 

5. Mountain 
slide 

6. Earth as a 
goddess 
(Gr.) 

7. Malt kiln 
( var. ) 

8. Indigo 

9. Shake with 
laughter 

10. Pedaled 
15. Conflict 
18. Astern 


20. Chinese 
river 

21. Gauged 
2.3. Mans 

name 

24. Passe- 
rine 
bird 

25. Anger 

26. Skill 
29. Large 

worm 
32. Rowing 

implement 
34. Weep 
36. Boy's name 

(po«s.) 

38. Sleep 
lightly 

39. Malt 
beverages 


naaac] nnnna 
fan nr^n nriH 

L.'jLJi>li4i-tl'l bbJuiy 

HPiLiwy wnniriH 


Vcttrrday't Amtwar 

40. Saucy 
42. Newt 
44. Game 

of 

cat's 

cradle 

(Haw.) 
47. Smallest 

state (abbr. 



By WILL GRIMSLEY 
The Associated Press 

Six leading contenders for na- 
tional college football honors, in- , 
ciuciing always potent Notre Dame 
and bowl-hardened Georgia Tech, 
make their debut today in a far- ; 
flung program which would be a 
credit to mid-^-aason. 

The South Bend Irish, rated No. 
3 in the Associated Press' pre- 
season poll, invate the Cotton 
Bowl at Dallas for their perennial 
opener with Southern Methodist 
University. The night game, (9 
p.m. EST) will broadcast nation- 
ally by Mutual. 

Georgia Tech, fielding virtually 
the same :.quad which whipped 
: Pittsburgh in the Sugar Bowl, in- 
vades Lexington, Ky., to test its 
No. 4 pre-season rating against 
Kentutfky in television's game of 
the day. 


No. 9 which meets Villanova at 
College Station; and Pittsburgh, 
No. 10 which has an unusually 
early date with its old rival from 
the coal and steel belt, West Vir- 
ginia. 

The Eastern and Middle West- 
ern sections of the country are 
relatively quiet, with moo-L of the 
heavy firing in the South, South- 
west and Far West — the latter 
area still suffering the shell-shock 
of the summer sanity code probes. 

Stanford, the team many are 
picking to grab the Rose Bowl 
bid, has a night engagement with 
Washington State at Spokane, 
Wa^'li. The Indians have one of the 
nation's leading passers in John 
Brodie, who completed 76 last 
year for 1,024 yards, while Wash- 
ington State was rebuilding un- 
der Jim Sutherland. 

Southern California, suffering 


The Music Dept. has announced 
that Dr. Wilton Mason, recently re- 
turned from a year's study in Italy, 
will assume direction of the newly- 
formed University Chorus. 

Chapel Hill audiences should al- 
ready be familiar with Dr. Mason's 
activities as a chora! conductor, ba- 
causo he is musical director of the 
Carolina Playmrfters, and has serv- 
ed as composer and director of the 
famous Boone summer drama, 
'Horn in the West." 

Auditions for the new group are 
now being held in 204 Hill Hall 
and will cc^tinue through today. 

Two seasons ago he conducted 
the performances of Mozart's Mar- 
riage of Figaro, the first operatic 
prAentation of the Music Dept. 


The University Chorus, which | 
will carr>' one unit of academic j 
credit, was organized last spring to 
provide opportunities for students | 
to take part in a mu.eical activity, i 
and to perform 'andard and mod- \ 
ern classics. Membership is open to 
anyone regularly enrolled in the 
University. 

"I am very enthusastic about this 
new group," Dr. Mason said. "I 
firmly believe that withn the large 
student body of this University we 
can find a group that is interested 
irt singing the very best choral lit- 
eratiure according to exacting stan- 
dards of performance. I am look- 
ing forward with keen interest to 
try-outs to see what talent is avail- 
able." 


Covering, The Campus 


The IJNC Cardboard makes its 
1956 debut in Kenan Stadium this 
afternoon at the Carolina-State 
football game. 

Headed by Cardboard president 
Bill Pate, the Cardboard will furn- 
ish entertainment at halftime to- 
day as well as at all home games. 

The CardboM^ will give a "wel- 
come home" for "Big Jim Tatum" 
who sends his 1956 editon of UNC 
football against N. C. State. The 
Cardboard will also offically ring 
open the curtains of the new sea- 
son. This stunt will .begin with a 
stage curtain that will open with 
successive flips and will reveal 
a football with 1956 imprinted 
upon it. Several puns depicting a 
Carolina victory- will follow the 
opening stunts. 

This year, the Cardboard is mak- 
ing an attempt to publish and 
make known instructions on how to 
operate the Cards. There will be 
a stunt caller who will announce 


the stunt number to be performed. 
He will also lead the students so 
that the stunts can be done in uni- 
son. 

Each student sitting in the Card 
Section will find an instruction 
card beneath his seat with the 
stunt number on it. Colors wili be 
stamped beside the numbers so the 
student can see what color is 
stamped by that number and hold 
it up when the stunt is called. 

When the stunt is called, the 
entire section is to follow the call- 
er on the count of three by lifting 
their cards from their laps upward 
in an arc. The cards must be held 
at nose level. 

The most important thing to re- 
member in performing the st,:nts 
is to listen to the caller's instruc- 
tion and to follow them exactly. 
"If this is done by everyone," said 
Pate, "the stunts should be a per- 
fect success." 


The contest ^11 be televised na- i conference penalties which force 


tionally, starting at 2:30 p.m., EST 
by the National Broadcasting co. 

Other members of football's pre- 
season top 10 in action are Mary- 
land. No. 6, host to Syracuse at 
College Park; Texas Christian, 
! Christian, No. 7, which takes on 
Kansas' at Lawrence; Texas A&M, 

Student Passbooks 

Student passbooks which are 
lost will not be replaced, and 
neither ere they transferable. 
Anyone finding another student's 
passbook is urged to return it to 
the owner. 


SAVAGE 
PASSIONS! 



NOW SHOWING 



LATE SHOW TONITE 
SUNDAY -MONDAY 


THECKYTHAT I 
ROCKED^ 

THE ItfORLDS^ 
HOTTEST 
STRTP 


ifev*^"^! 


^21 



its seniors to play only half the i 
schedule, will send Jon Arnett & 
Co. into the first five game*-, mak. | 
ing the Trojans a slight choice \ 
over Texas in anotlier night game 
at Austin. j 

Oregon State, rebuilding under j 
Tommy Prothro, throws its s-ingle 
wing attack against Missouri at 
Columbia. Oregon plays at Colo- 
rado and California, hoping for a 
return to its golden yesterdays, 
is host to Baylor— with the Tex- 
ans conceded the edge. 

In the Southea.-tern Conference, 
Vanderbilt is favored over a Geor- 
gia team of unknown quantity in 
a game at Nashville; Mississippi 
State meets Florida in a tossup at 
State College. Miss.; and Tulane 
is given an edge at New Orleans 
over Virginia Tech, an out-of-con- 
ference rival. 
^ere are other games: 

^outh— Virginia vs. VMI, Wake 
Forest vs. William & Mary. The 
Citadel vs. Newberry. Duke vs. 
South Carolina, North Carolina 
vs. North Carolina State. 

Midwest — Cincinnati vs. Dayton: 
Marquette vs. Detroit: Nebraska 
vj. South Dakota; Kansas State 
vs. Oklahoma A&M; George Wash. 
ington vs. Miami of Ohio. Louis- 
ville vs. Toledo. 

Southwest — Arkansas vs. Hard- 
in-Simmons. Texas Tech vs. Texa-J 
Western. Alabama vs. Rice (at 
night). New Mexico A&M vs. New 
Mexico. 

Far West— Denver vs. Utah State, 
Nevada vs. Idaho State. Washing- 
ton vs. Idaho, College of Pacific 
vs. Colorado A&M, Arizona State 
at Tempe v.\ Wichita, Montana 
State vs. North Dakota. 


Officials Needed 

students are needed as intramur- 
al officials for tag football. Stiv 
dents interested have been asked 
to come to 301 Woollen Gym on 
Tuesday, Sept. 25 at 4 p.m. 


Carolina 


RIDING A 
HABIT HE 
CAN'T STOP! 


2Ctl CHtif) Fit prcscRtt 

JAMES MAserf 

BARBARA RUSH 



Late Sh«w 

Tonight-1 1 :30 P,M. 

Sun.-MON.-Tue. 


BABY-SITTING SERVICE 

Baby-sitting services will be 
available on football Saturdays 
from 1 to 5:15 p.m. at the Victory 
Village Nurset"}' to children of stu- 
dents, faculty and University em- 
ployes. 

Only children seven years and 
under will be accepted. The min- 
imum charge will be $1.50 per 
child for the firjt child, and $1 
for each additional child from th^ 
same family. The charges are for I 
the entire afternoon. | 

VARSITY GLEE CLUB I 

The Varsity Glee Club has in- i 
vited all men interested in sing- 
ing to an infomal meeting on Wed- 
nesday at 5 p.m. in Hill Hall. Re- 
freshments will be served and a 
short concert by the Glee Club 
will be presented. 
DANCE COMMITTEE 

All members of the University 
Dance Committee will be required 
to work at the Grail Dance tonight, 
according to Chairman Don Mill- 
er. 
ART EXHIBITION 

A collection of reproductions of 
famous paintings, which are cur- 
rently on exhibition in the Pear- 
son Hall Art Gallery, will be avail, 
able for rent beginning Septem- 
ber 26 at 9 a.m. 

A picture may be reserved for 
rental for 25 cents per month 
per picture plus a $1 deposit. 
Each picture may be rented lor 
a three months period. This ser- 
vice is offered to Chapel Hill rec-i- 
denfs. 
MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

All members of the UNC Men's 
Glee Club have been asked to 
meet in Hill Hall Monday at 4:30 
p.m. for the first meeting of the 
year. 
'W YACKS 

Anyone who did not receive his 
1956 Yack may pick it up upon 
presentation of his ID card at 
either the GM Information Office 
or the Yack office. 
APO 

Alpha Phi Omega. Carolina's 
service fraternity, will hold its 
firi«t meeting of the year on Mon- 
day night at 7:30 p.m. 
ALPHA GAM TELEPHONE 
' The telephone number of the 
Alpha Gamma Delta sorority 
house has been changed to 8-9083. 
WINTHROP COLLEGE DANCE 

The Winthrop Recreation Assn. 
of Rock Hill. B.C., has invited the 
University student body to its 
"Bermuda Ball" on Saturday, 
Sept. 29, in the Peabody Gymnas 
ium in Rock Hill. The ball wUl be 
from 8 to 11:45 p.m. 
DTH SUBSCRIPTIONS 

Students, faculty members and 
townspeople who wish to continue 
receiving The Daily Tar Heel by 
mail have been asked to notify 

Fresh Soccer 

Freshman soccer coach John 
Wienants would like for all boys 
interested hi trying out for the 
team to report to the athletic 
epuipment office in Woollen 
Gym Monday at 2:30 p.m. 



CLASSIFIEDS 


Inema: 
COLOR by Do Luxe 


TODAY 

There Is No Might Like the 
Might of Moby Dick! 




lUCHAHP, Leo 
B aSehxrt Gekpi 

INTMI 

JbHNKJSTOH 

r*opucTioN or hihhM Miviiict 


IVlCBy^Cjc 


I 

I 
Prices This Attraction ! 

Adults 65<-Chiidren }5i\ 


AVON CALLING — T. V. AD- 
vertising rings the bell and 
helps you sell Avon. Earn your 
ChHstmas money now. Write 
Avon, Camellia Dr., Fayetteville, 
N C. 

LOST: ONE WALLET. FINDER 
please reium to James Harry 
Menzel, DU House, East Rose- 
mar>' Street. 


FOUND ON CAMPUS — TWO 
large denomination bills. Owner 
contact Lenny Sacks, 107 Fra- 
ternity Court. 


LOST: BLACK POCKETBOOK 
with green billfold inside plus 
driver.^' license. Probably lost in 
Peabody Hall. If found, please 
return to Elizabeth Hightower, 
Smith Dorm. 


Dale Staley, subscription manager, I 
at 9-33ffl. Rates arc $4 per school j 
year. Students who wish to send 1 
The Daily Tar Heel home can do , 
so at the same rate. { 

I 
INTRAMURUAL OFFICIALS I 

Students majoring in physical . 
education are needed as- intra- 
mural officials for tag football. 
Those interested have been asked 
to come to 301 Woollen Gym on j 
Tuesday at 4 p.m. 

CAMP PICTURES { 

Anyone wishing to order a fresh- j 
man camp picture may do so at i 
the YMCA office through Monday. 
The charfe for each picture is $1.- 
50. 

Football 

(Contimied from P<vge 1) 

per man in the forward wall with 
230 pound Stewart Pell leading the 
way. Pell and tackle running mate 
Pil Blazer, a 210 pounder playing 
in his first varsity contest, will , 
I spearhead the Tar Heel defense. 
i Most of the Tar Heel offensive 
! punch will be built around a 
j stroCBg ground game operating out 
of the split-T formation with co- 
I captain Ed Sutton bearing the 
major part of the load. The pass- 
i ing arms of Hathaway and Farmer 
I will be used as the situation de- 
mands. 
j The Wolfpack squad is report- 
I ediy fired up to a fever pitch for 
j this afternoon's game. State has- 
I n't beaten Carolina fince 1942 
when, ironically, Tatum was serv- 
: ing a one-year coaching hitch here. 
j It will make the 46th meeting 
j of the two schools. The Tar Heels 
are far ahead in the series with 
35 wins and five losses. Five 
i games have ended in tie?. 


JEREMEY r40RTH'S BOOKSHOP AND GALLERY 

1931 CHAPEL HILL ROAD, DURHAM 
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The most interesting stock of old prints and drawings in the 
south . . . « rkh' variety of unusual and attractive pieces from 
SI .00 and up. 

PICTURE FRAMING AT REASONABLE PRICES 

AND, OF COURSE, BOOKS TO BROWSE AMONG . . . 

Open Weekdays 9 to 12 and 1 to 6, 
Extended On Friday and Saturdays Until 9 P.M. 


Your 
name 



PATRONIZE YOUR 
• ADVERTISERS • 



Left Holding 
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dropped texts. Bring them in! 

THE INTIMATE 
BOOKSHOP 

205 E. Franklin St. 
Open Till ^C P.M. 



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Carrboro 


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Telephone 

9-2681 or 8-1357 

located over 

Suttpn's Drug Sfore 


TYPEWRITING 


SHORTHAND 


Classes Begin September 24 

(Special Section of Personal Typing for Housewives) 


lawn classes 

for college men and women 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 


PAOt FOUR 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22. ^9U 



'Sr 


^ 


1 


•>{''^ ■.j^K^ir-r-^^-' 










'■'"' ''; w-.^' ''*'-K' 


v./o: 


"t '^.A •* ■ • ^ ■» 


J>-i.— -.„ 




WE'RE WITH 


.^■'"y. 


YOU CAROLINA 


Bennett & 
Blocksidge 


Carolina 
Sport Shop 


Fitch 

Lumber Co. 


ThelPs 
Bake Shop 



Nu-Way 
^'Sanitone'^ Service 







St' "■ 




Riggsbee-Hinson 
' Furniture Co. 


Pete 
The Tailor 


Stevens- 

Shepherd 


^m^tffie, 




^ ,-^ 


r«BM|»t- 


Wentworth 
& Sloan 


Carolina 


Coffee Shop 


Village 
Laundry 


■ - r- 


Foister's 
Camera Shop 


WniMfHIIJ 


tr.ir.c. * ttBRART 

SERIALS CSPT. 

BOX 870 

CHAPEL HILL* N.C 


WEATHER 

Expected generally feir and 
wermer, with expected high of 74. 


OThc 



STarHcel 


REVIEW 

A new Daily Tar Heel service 
starts today on page 2. 


VOL. LVIII, NO. 4 


Complete (JP^ Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1956 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PACE^ THIS "'UE 


N. C. STATE OVERPOWERS TA 



WC Girl Named CU 
Day Queen Here 


By CHARLIE JOHNSON 

Hundwds of Woman's College 
and N. C. State Co'iege students 
came to Chapel Hill yesterday for 
the annual Consolidated Univers- 
ity Day activities. 

Highlights of the activities in- 
cluded the football game between 
UNC and State, a reception at 
Graham Memorial after the game 
and a dance in Woollen Gym, 
which included the crowning of 
the CU Day Queen. 

A WC senior. Miss Ann Fitz- 
hugh, was named Consolidated 
University Day Queen. She won 
out over eight other girls from 
the three schools. Also introduced 
were the chairmen of the Consoli- 
dated University Student Councils 
from State and WC and Bob 
Young, president of the UNC stu- 
» dent body. 
RECEPTION 

Students gathiered around Gra- 
ham Memorial for a reception af- 
ter the game and friends from the 
three institutions iraid their "'hel- 
los." 

Suez Canal 
Is First j 
Di Debate ,' 

The Stwz Canal problem will be 
debated by the Dialectic Senate in ■ 
its Ilrst meeting of the year next 1 
Tuesday, according to President ! 
Stan Shaw. ! 

The Senate meets on the third i 
floor of New West building, which 
is directly across the street from 
Memorial Hall. The meeting will '■ 
start at 8 p.m. | 

The president and the society has | 
extended an invitation to all fresh- : 
men, transfers and upper classmen 
who have an interest in debating 
topics of current interest to attend. I 
A short reception will be held af- 
ter the meeting so that new stu- 
dents will have an opportunity to 
get acquainted with members of 
the society. 

The Dialectic Senate was found- 
ed in 1795 shortly after the Uni- 
versity opened its doors as the first 
state supported institution in the 
country, and it enjoys the unique 
position of being the oldest debat- 
ing society on any campus in the 
country. 

The Di and its sister society, the 
Phi, were the originators, and, for 
many years, the only expression of 


This was the first cf thtee CU 
Days to be held this year. One 
is held on each campus annually. 

WC's Queen contestants* were 
Misses Fitzhugh; Pat Mane, a 
junior, and Nancy Morrison, also 
a junior. 

State's girls who put in their 
bid for Queen were Misses Pat 
Ponder of Raleigh, a freshman at 
State: Beverly Little of Jefferson, 
also a freshman, and Ursula Swiss- 
good of Raleigh, a sophomore. 

UNC'.:.- Queen contestants were 
Miss Lucinda Holderness, Miss 
Jane Weich and Miss Jane Little. 
JUDGES 

Judges who selected the Queen 
were Charlie Bernard. Miss Har- 
old Lee and Tony Jenzano. She wa.< 
selected after the game and was 
presented at the dance in the 

gym- 

Jim Kimsey, chairman of the 
UNC delegation of CUSC. said he 
thought CU Day was a great suc- 
cess. "Approximately 3.000 at- 
tended the reception at Graham 
Memorial. The contestants for 
Queen were most charming." he 
said. Kimsey expressed thanks for 
help given in carrying out the ac- 
tivities to Miss Linda Mann, di- 
rector of Graham Memorial; Ray 
Jefferies and the beauty queen 
judges. 



LS, 26 TO 6 

I 

j Slashing Ground Game Sets 

' Up 4 IDs For Wolf pack As 

Carolina's Defense Falters 

By LARRY CHEEK 

'' ' Daily Tar Heel Si>orts Editor 

I'iicd up \. f;. Statr i^ave Carolina Coac'i Jim Tatmii a l)iiicr weUonie home present 
lure \esier(lay aliernoon m Kenan Stadium a, they imleaslied a .sa\aoe olleUMve attack to 
lake.i one-sided 2(>-() \ irtorv. their first in ij^ years o\er a Tar Heel team. 

In a <;ame pla\ed helove ;{7.o()o lans and r ciondle-ss skies, the \\'oIipa(k unleashed a 
slashinj; nniltij)le ollen.se that toie the Carol na defense to shreds. The Pack dominated 
play from start to Finish, striking lor two tou.hdo\vns in tlie second quarter and two more 
in the fourth. Carolina's only TD came on a 20 yard end sweep by halfback Ed Sutton in 

♦ the second period. ♦ " 

All the State markers came The Statistics 
through the air, although it was 


Lear Blocks 'Pack Field Goal Try 


Counselors 
Named For 1 
Coed Dorms | 

Five University graduate stu- 
dents have been nam.d to serve 
as counselors in undergraduate 
women's dormitories during the 
1956-57 school year. 

Dr. Katherine K. Car.-nichael, 
dean of women, announced that 
couttw-eling posts will be filled by 
Misses Elizabeth Anne Barnes. 
Kingsport, Tenn.; Harriet D. Holl. 
Chapel Hill; Mary Sue Honaker, 
Hinton, W. Va.; Lydia Moody, Siler 
City; and Mary Louise Stirewalt, 
Granite Falls. 

Miss Barnes, a UNC graduate in 
English literature, has been as- 
signed to Spencer Hall. Now work- 
ink toward an M. A. degree, she 
has done newspaper work for the 
Richmond, Va., News Leader and 
the Kingsport. Tenn., Times-News; 
has taken a European tour; and 
has worked with Kings-port Blue 
Cross. 

Miss Holt, couselor in Carr 


Don Lear, No. 61, senior Tar Heel left guard, bl sts through the State forward wall to block the 
field goal attempt by the Wolfpack in the first qOa te» of yesterday's game. Lear was the spark of the 
Carojind defense alt afternoon. (Photo by Truman Moore.) 

■ •••■ ••• :», -.- 

Sutton Highly Complimentary 
Of Victorious Wolfpack; Say$ 
Will Be Ready For Oklahoma 



Late football scores (see details 
on page 4.) 

South Carolina 7, Duke 0. 

Wake Forest 39, William and 
Mary 0. 

Syracuse 26, Maryland 12. 

Virginia 18, VMIO. 
I 


Fumbl-es Lost 
Yds. Penalized 


By BILL KING 

Daily I' in Hrel !H>oit.\ II' j iter 
" A slAm group of Carol ma Tar 
Heels filed into the home team 
dressing-room yesterday aflernooi 
following a devastating defeat suf- 
fered at the hand.? of Big Four 
rival. N. C. State. 

The Wolfpack had spoiled Jim 
Talum's 1956 debut with a dazz- 
ling display of speed, passing and 
just do)\n right efficiency. The 
Wolfpack had won a well deserved 
victory after a 13-year famine 
against their Consolidated Uni- 
versity brother. 

Coach Tatum could not be *o- 
cated following the game but he 
made this official .^atemcnt to 
the press: 'State College has got 
a great football team, and they've 


might have caught a plane to Co| j said the congenial senior from 
iumbia, S. C, immediately fol l»w»| C ullowhee. "They were probably 
ing the--«a#n<*> f«J"'S*^^<*-'ton5gWN*V-tTrtto rtiorr- ■^Tirod' iip than we 
game between South Carolina and 
Duke. The Tar Heels play South 
Carolina in Columbia Ocl:;ber 6, 
and finish the season against the 
Blue Devil' in Kenan Siadium 
November 24. 


WASHINGTON (/P) — Secretary 
of State Dulle.-.- returned to the 
United States from London this 
afternoon. He said the Suez Canal 
decision offers a fair and peace- 
ful solution of the dispute. The 1 average of 6.6 per trip. 
French announced that they will j 
join the Suez Canal Users' As- i 
sociation, but with strong r^jsrva- i 
tions. 


the Wolf pack's devasting ground 1st Downs 
game thai set up each score. Quar. Rushing Yds. 
terbacks Tom Katich and Billy i Passing Yds. 
Franklin proved themselves to be Passes 
more than adequate replacements Passes interc. by 
for departed star Eddie West as Punts 
they each uncorked a pair of 
touchdown strikes. 

Halfbacks Dick Christy and 
Dick Hunter sliced the Tar Heel 
defense almost at will as they 
dazzled the crowd with a swivel 
hipped display of ball carrying. 
Hunter was the leading ground 
gainer for the Pack, racking up 
a total of 83 yardj in 17 carries. 
Christy followed close behind with 
80 yards in only 12 carries, *?n 


NCS 

24 

253 

B3 

7-14 

1 

1-14 



10 


Carolina 

H 

21S 

38 

3-8 



3-27 

2 

2S 


over left guard for five yards to 
the Tar Heel ten. .After a loss of 
one yard on the next play, Katich 
spotted end John Collar in the 
end zone, and hit him with an 11 
yard strike for the TD. Hunter 
^dded the extra point. 


TAR HEEL SCORE 

The Tar Heels took the follow- 
ing kickoff and put together their 
_ _ , only touchdown push of the day. 

SUTTON SPARKLES 1 ^u^y ..-ept 71 yards in only eight 

Carolina s supposedly potent of- pi^j.^ f^r the score. 
fense showed flashes of brilliance, gutton and sub halfback Jim 


PREVALENT GLOOM 

.Most of the Tar Heel .squad 
.showered and dressed quickly in 
order to get away from the pre- 
valent gloom amidst the Carolina 
dressing mom. Quarterback Doug 
Farmer, who was injured in the 
third quarter, was in the treatment 
room, but commented that he wa.< 
okay. "Just a few brui..vs," said 
Farmer. 

Co-captain Ed Sutton, the one 
got too much for us. I guess a man i bright star in the Tar Heel's dis- 


has to take this every now and j 
then in hi.* life to see what he's j 
made of. That's all you can say." j 
There was a good deal of specu- ' 
lation among the press that Tatum 


astrous opener and one of the few 
who stayed around for an.\ length 
of time, was highly complimentary 
of the Wolfpack. 
"They (State) have a good club," 


student government on the Caro- 1 Dormitory and a student in the 


lina campus. The present student 
government and our Honor System 
grew out of the two societies. In 
addition to this, the University Li- 
brary was originally endowed with 
the libraries of the two debating 
societies. 


Law School, is a graduate of the 
University of Minnesota. She has 
worked in San Francisco, Calif, 
with Dun and Brad^-treet, an im- 
I>ort house, and a law firm. 

Miss Honaker received her A.B. 

(See COUNSELORS, Page 4) 


UNC Coeds Begin Rush 
Parties Here Tomorrow 


Sorority rush begins here tomor- 
row night. 

Rushees will visit the sorority 
houses on either tomorrow or 



CU Queen Contestants Pose 


The candidates for the title of Miss ConsolidatKl University pose for cameramen at haiftime of 
yesterday's game here. The Tar Heels were hosts ti the N. C. State Wolfpack on rhe field and to over 
1,000 students from Woman's College in the stands fjr the annual CU Day. 


Tuesday night, according to Pan i 
hellenic Council officials. I 

Three one-hour parties are sched j 
uled, beginning at 6:30 and laslin.^ j 
until 10 both tomorrow and Tucs | 
day. I 

The rushees can pick up their , 
party schedules at the Panhellenic 
post office in the three Roland 
Parker Lounges in Graham Memor- 
ial. The post office will be open 
tcmorrow from 9:00-1:15 and a.'^ain 
on Wednesday at the same hours. 

Coeds who did not attend the 
Panhellenic tea on Friday ni^ht 
may not participate in rush unless 
they contact the Dean of Women's 
office. They will be eliminated 
from rush if they do not visit all 
six sorority houses tomorrow and 
Tuesday. 

Since their arrival on campus, 
sorority girls and rushees havo 
been allcwod only to exchange 
greetings with no further conver- 
sation permitted. This silence p:'- 
riod will continue through bid day, 
Wednesday, Oct. 3. The purpose of 
silenf*e pr-riod, aceording to Miss 
Harriet Lewis of the Panhellenic 
Council, is to avoid unfair rush ng 
and to allow each rush:'e to make 
up her o'vn mind without pressure. 

Miss Lewis also cautionecj each 
rushee to read her rushing manual 
thoroughly because she will be re- 


were. \\\' iluuiglil we could take 
them, but we difinitely weren't 
over-confident." 

"They were more ready for us 
than we were for them," Sutton 
continued. They are more exper- 
ienced than we are and they play- 
ed a fine game." 

Asked about the Tar Heel'..' de- 
fense, Sutton said that it wasn't 
as good as the team thought it 
would be. 'Still, they all played 
a good ball game," he added. 
OKLAHOMA 

What about Oklahoma, Sutton 
was asked'' "What can you say 
when you're playing the nations 
number one team," he answered. 
"I believe we'll be more ready for 
Oklahoma. We'll give them a good 
game." 

Over in the Slate dres.-ing room 
the scene was naturally quite dif- 
ferent. The jubilant players were 
making the mr)st of the happy mo- 
ment. Nobody was in a hurry to 
go anywhere. Everjbody was quite 
content just to sit around and cele- 
brate. 

Smiling from ear to ear. coach 
Earl Edwards was overjoyed. 
"We're delighted," he smiled. 
"Fourteen year..* is a long time and 
thats an understatement," said 
Edwards. Nothing at Michigan 
St3te could ever match this," said 
the former Michigan State assist- 
ant coach. 

"I think we were pretty well 
prepared fo Ihi^' one." said Ed- 
wards, "but we weren't especially 
up for it. The boys just wanted 
it." 
GAMBLED 

"We gambled a lot." he said. 
"We didn't know just how strong 
our reserves were and we had to 
gamble. I thought the boys were 
very pois^^d out there today. " 
See SUTTON. Page 4) 


' seven Americans are due to ar- 
rive .sum. 

Meanwhile, in SAUDI .ARABIA, 
I the Big Three of the Arab world 
are beginning talks at the sum- 
mit. Presumably they arc discuss- 
ing Suez. 


but never really got going against varniim 

Klrvcn I'oii.sli (ana! pilots have a ru^fged State line that refus-^d 

arrived in CAIRO to take jobs on to give. Sutton was just about the 

I the Suez Canal. Fifteen Russians only Tar Heel to make a dent 

I are in training for this work, and in the Wolfpack defense as he 

bore the brunt of the Carolina of- 
fense. The Cullowhee Comet was 
the game's leading ground gainer, 
racking up ninety yards on only 
ten carries, an average of nine per 
! carry. 

State took the opening kickoff 

and launched a drive from their 

A hurricane watch has been or- own 28 yard line that consumed 

dered along the Louisiana and up- nine minutes and seventeen pay^ 

per Texas coasts in connection before it was halted by a blocked 

with the tropical .- orm called field goal attempt on the Tar Heel tra point, but this was of no con 
Flossy. The disturbance has been 21 yard line. The two teams battled 
picking up speed and energy in on comparatively even terms dur- 
the Gulf of Mexico, and was last jng the remainder of the opening 
reported about 450 miles south of . period as neither could initiate a 
New Orleans. I sustained drive. 

Vigorous political campaigning. ^.^^^gg^^i^ggp^YDIRT 
continued with Steven.,()n appear- 
ing in NEWTON. Iowa just 24' E^""'-^' '" ^he second quarter. 


did most of the work, 
operating behind the qijsrter back- 
ing of Doug Farmer, who tooJc 
overover when ^farter Curt Hath- 
away was shaken up. With the ball 
on the Carolina 43, Sutton took a 
pitchout from Farmer and raced 17 
yards to the Wolfpack 40 with the 
help of a key block from Vanium 
on the midfield stripe. 

After Farmer had gained one 
through the line, Varnum blasted 
his way for 19 to the State 20. 
Then, on the next play. Sutton 
..'.vept end for 20 yards and the 
score. Phil Blazer missed the ex- 


sequence as it turned out. 

QUICK TD THRUST 

The Pack wasted little time on 
the next kickoff getting their sec- 
ond touchdown of the day. George 
.Marinkov returned the kickoff to 
the 39 and from there, Wallv 


Early in 
hours after Eisenhower Steven 1 ^^^^^ ^^^^ posses.non on their own Prince 3nd Dick Christy combined 
son charged that the President has ^7 .vard line and began their first ; to move ihe ball down to the UNC 
become an almost passive figure. I Payo^^ P"s^i- Hunter and Christy j 21. From here. Franklin fired a 


and has failed to give the leader 
ship he promi.vd four years ago. 

The change drew quick response 
from Postmaster General Summer- 
field who said Eisenhower has 
dominated the administration. 

A medical team of U. S. Army 
and civilian personnel from the 


shared the ball carrying duties to i 21 yard pass to end Bob Pepe in 
move the baM down to the Tar ^ the end zone. Thi.- gave the Pack 
Heel 31-yard line where it was a 13-6 margin at haiftime. 


first and ten. \ 'Although State controlled the 
Wally Prince, hard-running re- ball lor most of the third period, 
serve fullback ^.-abbing for injured Carolina managed lo hold them in 
Tony Guerrieri, took over at this ! check. The third Pack TD drive 
point and moved the balj to the , began late in the third quarter 
Panama Canal Zone" has arrived ^4 on a well executed draw pla.v. when Tar He^j fullback Giles Gaca 
in Nicaragua to help treat Somoza. Quarterback Katich went to the 15 fumbled and State recovered on 
.. _ _.^on a bootleg, and Christy slammed | (See N. C. STATE ^ Page 4) 


Boy At Hospital Not 
in Need Of Blood 

The stor>- in yesterday's Daily 
Tar Heel saying that "Wayne 
Brown, a 12-year-old boy. is batt- 
ling a rare hemophilias condition 
at Memorial Hospital and is greatly 
in need of donations of Apositive' 
typo blood" is incorrect. The in- 
formation furnished The Daily Tar 
Heel was incorrect. 

The boy is not in need of blood, 
according to a blood bank spokes- 



man at Memorial Hospital. Besides, 
sponsible for the contents and will i the boy's blood type is "O-positivc," 
be disqualified from rush if in- not "A-positive," according to the 
vulved in an infraction. ' spokesman. 


Hunter Gains For N. C. State 


N. C State's Dick Hunter tears around end for a first down before running into a Tar Heel tackier 
in the first half of yesterday's game between the Tar Heels and State. Wolfpack quarterback Tom Ka- 
tich. left, No. 16, who made the handoff to Hunter, looks on. (Photo by Truman Moore.) 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 195f 


SUNDAY 


The Week In Re view: Fall Classes Open, 
Hodges Displays Drawers, Siate Wins 




Housing Still Problem, 
1,800 New Students Here 

Carolina and St^itc supp<;mis januntd Kenan Stadinm 
ytstcrday afternoon for the lar Heels' lirst game and lir.st 
losj> to State sintc 1912. 

F(M)tball season eolors, dress and spirit permeated the 
air around Cirafiam Memorial yesterday after the <»ame as 
students <>atheied for a tea field in (onnettion \\ith (".onst)li- 
dated rniversity Day. 

Iwenty f>usloads of girls tame to the- Hill from Wo- 
man's College in (ireensboro to attend the game and many 
festivities plamied by various campus organizations in (on- 
neition uith C^l' Day. Highlighting last night's a( tivities was 
a dante sponsored b\ tlie Order of the (iraiU 

In aieordance with a decision made last spring, stu- 
dents entering the l^niversitv as freshmen this year are not 
allowed to have cars on the Tniversitv lainpus. 

I he three exceptions to this ruling itulude veterans, 
((innnutess and handicapped students. Rav jefferies. assis- 
tant to the dean of student affairs, said last week, that .stu- 
dents granted student parking permits nnist display the 
stickers on this automobiles at all times. 

.Stickers this year are issued on pa\ment of a St>.-,o park- 
ing lee. earmarked towards future parking improvements. 

jamming on the Carolina frcmt is not restricted to traf- 
fic. A student body of 7.000 ha* found itself assigned to 
three-man rooms in all but the f«)in newest dorms. The over- 
flow of studcms has been assigned to dormitory basement 
and apartments in Chapel Hill. 

The VM-Y\VCA sponsored ^'-Xite was presented 
Thursday night with approximately 300 interested stu- 
dents on hand to hear Dr. John Redhead of the First Pres- 
bvterian Church of Greensl>oro speak on how he found 
God. 

Entertainment A\as provided by Da\e Davis and his 
noveltv singing group and the Y-Nite chorus, assembled 
especial I v for the Y-Nite programs throughout the year, 
led b\ Jean \avoulis. 

At 8:26 last night fall officially struck Chai)el Hill. 
With the Autumnal Equinox conies the traditional activuies 
of students just returned to school, football games, chilly 
mornings, and :. cascade of muUi-colored leaves. 

Tiie first pep rallv of the year was held Friday evening. 
Honking horns, shouting and a march through campus dem- 
onstrated student j)acking for the Tar Heels opening game 
against the WoffjJack yesterday afternoon. 

Some 191 freshnrin came to the Hill five days before 
formal oripnta::;iii to aiti'u; the V.MCA sjumsored freshman 
camp. • 

Tn M)iie of two frigid nights and widespread hayfever, 
the liisiimen returned to campus from the campsite at Camp 
New Ffope. eight miles north of Chapel Hill, more aware 
)l Carolina s tiaditions. iiistruc tors, courses and many facets 
of extras urricular life. 

1 hroiigh Orientation Week, Carolina's 1,200 fresh- 
man learned about the honor system, the locaticm of build- 
ings, dorm and L'ni\ersitv regulations and something of the 
workings of South Building. 

Young Greets New Students, 
Outlines Student Government 

l^.st Monday night Bob 'Soung, president of the stu- 
dent hod\ greeted the new students cm campus in a speech 
presenting the basic structure of student gcnernment. 

In his message, ^'oung lcM)ked back on his first year at 
Carolina when he first "heard Chancellor Hou.se plav his 
hamicjnica and sav. Welcciine, Class of \<)i)- "■ Young ex- 
pressed his sincere desire that the new stiulents will find 
their ci.mpus exj>eriences as enjoyable and rewarding as did 
he. 

Young told the new students that "things are not per- 
fect at Clarolina." He explained that, although one of the 
best, the fac iiltv makes mistakes and^ while highlv Capable, 
the administration sometimes falteis. 

He called the students' positicm in this svstcm adangei- 
ous one inasnuuh as students are held lesponsible for their 
own actions and for the actions of their classmates. 

In the lemainder of his speech. Young briefly outlined 
the makeup and workings of .student government. 

\Vhile descril)ing the honor councils, \'oiuig reminded 
the new students that soiliecme has called the hcmor system 
perfect, but it is the people living under it who sometimes 
falter. Young asked that it not he anyone in his audience 
who falters. 
"^ In c leasing. Young iiuited the new students to talk 
with the student government officials and to express their 
cjpinions to them. 


The official student publication of tfie Publications Board of the 
University of North Carolina, where it is published daily except Mon- 
day and examination and vacation periods and summer terms Entered 
as second cla.ss matter in the post office at Chapel Hill, N. C, under 
the act of March 8. 1870. Subscription rates: Mailed, $4 a year, $2.50 
per semester; delivered, $6 a year, $3.50 a semester. 


Editor 


FRED POWIvEDGE 




Managing Editor _- 

■—— -- 

CHABMF JOHNSON 

Night News Editor 


--- RAY LINKER 

Business Manager 


_ BnJ, BOB PEEL 


The State: Third Suez Meeting- 
Humor And Dulles' SCUA Approved 

Highways 


The governor dropp<;d his 
pants for Life Magazine, North 
Carolina highways have been 
promised a boost and the state 
has been asked for more money 
for teachers and facilities-. 

It was a medium week for 
North Carolina, broken by chuc- 
kles throughout the state when 
Life .Magazine came out with 
pictures of Gov. Luther Hodges. 

The governor fed a cat. ex- 
posed his shortj to the lens, 
hung up the Mansion wash with 
clothes pins in his mouth and 
took a shower in water-resistant 
clothes — all to adverti:re the state. 

Tar Heel highways may be ex- 
panded due to an increased fed- 
eral allotment of $43 million 
this year and $51 million next 
year. It will be the largest sum 
the iitate has ever received from 
the government for highway de- 
velopment. 

The State Board of Higher Ed- 
ucation asked for $50 million to 
be used for better facilities and 
higher pay at state in.rlitutions 
of higher learning. Profes.sors at 
the various colleges and the Un- 
iversity here would get a crack 
at 10 percent pay increases. 


While Carolina Students were 
picking up their class tickets last 
week, the rest of tha world was 
watching a conference in London. 

Representatives of 18 nations 
gathered in that city for the second 
Seuz Conference. Secretary of 
State' John Foster DuUe.: arrived 
by air from the United States 
bearing his proposed User's Plan 
and a promise of $500 million to 
the western European countries 
agreeing to boycott the Suez Canal. 

Here at home the political scene 
consisted of Prc'ldent Eisenhower 
talking peace, prosperity and prog- 
ress in a television address Wed- 
nessday night, and preparing for 
a campaign tour of the Iowa farm 
belt. 

The ••onference ended Friday 
night with majority agreement to 
form the Suez Canal Users' As.so- 
clation. SCUA. within ten days. 

One of SCUA's first tasks will 
be to seek help from the United 
Nations in reaching final settle- 
ment of the Suez di.»pute by the 
middle of October. 

Meanwhile Adiai Stevenson pre- 
pared for his forthcoming tour 
of the South and midwe^;!. Steven- 
son predicts that the southern 
states that abandoned the Demo- 
cratic party in 1952 will this year 
return to the Democratic side of 
the fence. 

A feeling of optimism about the 

INTERPRETING THE NEWS 


midwestern farm vote is circulat- 
ing in the Republican Camp. 
Cheering crowds greeted Eisen- 
hower in Dej" Moines last week and 
appeared in many places along 
the 60 mile route from that ci'iy 
to Boone, where the first lady 
visited her aunt and uncle. 

In a speech Friday, the Presi- 
dent asked that judgment on his 
policies concerning farm issues be 
held until he can outline them in 
a major political speech next 
week. 

A talk billed as Eisenhower's 
"major" farm speech of the cam- 
paign is scheduled for Peoria, 111. 
Tuesday. 

In the vice presidential part of 
the campaign. Senator Estes Ke- 
fauver rejected Vice President 
Nixon's demand that he apologize 
for saying Eisenhower has fought 
again.t "the best interest of the 
little people." 

On the home front, the Union 
County School Board voted to bar 
Negro students from public schools 
in Sfurgis. Ky. Negro students 
have been barred from attending 
the Clay Ky.. consolidated school 
pending court decision. 

Harry Lee Waterfield. acting 
governor of Ky., said that the 
withdrawal of National Guard 
from the towns of Sturgis- and 
Clay depends upon court action. 


There's A Struggle Going On 
Within Adiai's Staff Mind 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL WEEK IN REVIEW 

Editor : . CHARUE SLOAN 

Staff Writers GEORGE PFINGST and INGRID CLAY 


James Reston 

WASHINGTON— A quiet strug- 
gle is going on here within Adiai 
E. Stevenson's .staff, and in- 
deed within Sfevencon's mind, 
over the tone and direction of 
his campaign for the Presidency. 

So far. the Democratic nomi- 
nee's principal political advisers 
— James Finnegan. Hy Raskin, 
Wilson Wyatt and James Rowe 
— have had the upper hand in ad- 
vocating a campaign of political 
opportunity ahd expediency. 

Now Stevenson has gathered 
here a group of writers and in- 
tellectuals who are unhappy about 
the tone of his public speeches 
to date and want him to revert 
to the nobler themes of his 1952 
campaign. 

In this group are John Hersey, 
the novelist; Arthur Schlesinger 
Jr.. the Harvard historian; Ken- 
neth Galbraith. the Harvard econ- 
omist, and John Bartlow .Martin, 
a magazine writer and a Steven- 
son biograpther. They are work- 
ing under the direction of Will- 
ard Wirtz of DeKalb, 111., who is 
Stevenson's law partner. 

Some of these men think that, 
in his efforts to stir up the Dem- 
ocrat'c party workers during the 
period since the nominating con- 
vention in Chicago, Stevenson has 
lost a great deal of the appeal he 
had in the 1952 campaign for 
the independent voter.N*. They 
want him now to plan a differ- 
ent kind of campaign for the 
second phase of the race, now 
beginning. 

The question, therefore, is 
which Stevenson the voters are 
going to hear in the next seven 
weeks, and the meetings he is 
having here this week in Wash- 
ington may very well answer this 
questionr 

There is. for example, the Stev- 
enson of the last month, concen- 
trating on the Democratic party 
workers, attacking President Eis- 
enhower personally, implying the 
possibility of ending the mili- 
tary draft, throwing out charges 
of "legal corruption," and argu- 
ing that "almost one-fifth" of 
the American people are living 
in poverty and insecurity. 

In contra.st, there is the Ste- 
venson of 1952, whose theme 
was quite different. 

"What concerns me," he said 
then, "is not just winning the 


election, but how it is won, how 
well we. can take advantage of 
this great quadrennial opportun- 
ity to debate is./ues sensibly and 
.soberly. 

"I hope and pray that wo 
Democrats, win or lose, can cam- 
paign, not as a crusade to ex- 
terminate the opposing party, as 
our opponents seem to prefer, 
but as a great opportunity to 
educate and elevate a people 
whose dei-liny is leadership, not 
alone of a rich and prosperou.'--, 
contented country as in the pa.st, 
but of a world in ferment tack and political expediency. 


week. 

Finally, he blurted out. half in 
je.'. and half in earnest. "Am 1 
master in my own hou.se?" — A 
reference ti) the fact that, the 
night before, he had accused 
President Eisenhower of not be- 
ing master of the Republican 
house. 

In short. Stevenson, while 
agreeing on the necessity of 
forging a stronger party organi- 
zation than he had four 'years 
ago. is clearly not happy with a 
campaign devoted mainly to at- 


•'The ordeal of the twentieth 
centurv — the bloodiest, most tur. 
bulent era of the Christian age — 
is far from over. Sacrifice, pa- 
tience, understanding and im- 
placable purpose may be our lot 
for years to come. Let'.; face it. 
L/et's talk sense to the Ameri- 
can people. 

"Let's tell them the truth, that 
there are no gains without pains, 
that we are now on the eve of 
great decisions, not easy decis- 
ions Let'.-,' <bc) unafraid of 

ugly truth, contemptuous of lies. 

half-truths, circuses and dema- 

goguery." 

TACTIC CHANGED 

The voters have heard very 
little of this sort of thing from 
the Democratic nominee this 
year. He started out this way 
in hi.-.' early primary campaigns, 
but his defeat by Estes Kefauver 
in Minnesota had a profound ef- 
fect on his tactics. 

Thereafter, in Florida and 
California, he adopted the old- 
fashioned combination of hand- 
shaking the voters and scalding 
the opposition, and this i^■■ what 
he has been doing in the series 
of fence-mending regional con- 
ferences he has had in the last 
month. 

The arrival here of the intel- 
lectuals, however, and the gener- 
al criticism of his first major 
televi.'lon address in Harrisburg. 
Pa., have revived the doubts be 
had about placing primary em- 
phasis on political organization 
and attack. 

He had a meeting here with 
his staff on a recent night during 
which he listened to conflicting 
advice about how he should pro- 
ceed in the second phase of the 
campaign. This begins in the 
Farm Belt at the end of this 


It is interesting, incidentally, 
that the Republican staff around 
President Eisenhower is going 
through something of the same 
debate. Here again, Leonard Hall, 
like Finnegan, his counterpart 
in the Democratic organization, 
i.-,- arguing: 

"This high-level stuff is all 
right, but we must find things 
to be against; we must stir things 
to.be against; we must stir things 
up." 



DIRECTOR LINDA MANN AT HER FANCY DESK 

llic studcul Hfii<)n\\ liclling (lie wonuui's touch 


SHE'S DIRECTING GRAHAM MEMORIAL: 


New Job For Miss Mann: 
Pool Room To Ping-Pong 


Charlie Sloan 

Miss Linda Mann and her parents were enjoying 
a tour of Europe last summer when a letter from 
student body President Bob Young reached them in 
Paris. 

The letter offered Miss Mann the position of Gra- 
ham Jlemorial director when she returned to the 
United States. It al.so asked her to reply immedi- 
ately. 

Two weeks had e'apsed between the. arrival in 
Paris of the letter and the arrival of the Manns, but 
the details were soon straightened out. When Miss 
Mann arrived in New York, she continued straight 
to Chapel Hill. 

Recalling her days as a psychology major— she 
graduated last June — Miss Mann noted how pleased 
she is that she can be back in Chapel Hill this fall. 

"I adore Chapel HUi," she said, adding that she 
had hated to leave the town and campus last spring. 

Her original plans ftere to enter some form of 
guidance work near her home town of Hollywood, 
Fla.. where her family has lived for 18 years. 

A real Southern belle, Miss Mann was born in 
Memphis. Tcnn. Since she has lived in the South 
most of her life, her voice bears that pleasant set 
of sounds known as a Southern accent. 

.\s director of Graham Memorial she is directly 
and indirectly responsible for the building, its up- 
keep and improvement, the personnel and schedul- 
ing of rooms for meetings of the many activities 
centered in GM. 

Miss -Mann served as a vice president of the Gra- 
ham Memorial Activities Board last year. With this 
experience, she says she has "been doing fine so 
far" this year. 

Her appointment came after a tentative director 
from the student union of another university decid- 
ed he could not take the post until next year. 

Mi.ss Mann started right to work under the in- 
struction of former GM Director Jimmy Wallace. 
WALLACE'S PLANS 

Miss Mann remarked that her first few weeks as 
director will he relatively easy since Wallace had 
made many long-rango plans which will be carried 
out under her supervision. 


One of the changes in GM this year is the ex- 
change of the sandwich machine for a pastry ma- 
chine. Miss Mann said the change came as a result 
of complaints that the machine was not regularly 
.serviced. She said rather than risk one of the stu- 
dents getting food poisoning from two or three-day 
old sandwiches, the machine has been taken out. 

Other, less important, items come up every day. 
When school opened this fall. Miss Mann recalls, 
some students mistook the student union building 
for Memorial Hall and Graham Dormitory. Mail is 
occasionally missenl in the same manner. 

Dominating the Graham Memorial Director's of- 
fice i^: a long, curved desk defying clear descrip- 
tion. This desk proves a major point of interest for 
visitors in the office. 

The ritual for Carolina Gentlemen stopping by 
the directors office appears to be: Exchange greet- 
ings with Miss Mann, reveal reason for visit, sud- 
denly realize presence of desk, stand a moment in 
drop-jawed silence, then ask how the desk is put 
together and crawl around it to see for themselves. 

A variation on thi? is the friendly group passing 
the office door and suddenly discovering the un- 
usual curvature of the desk. 
SAME OLD DESK 

Miss Mann seems to enjoy showing off her mod- 
ern office. The secret of the desk is that it is the 
same old desk with a tremendous new top and two 
more legs. 

Wallace found the old setup, with him behind 
the desk at one end of the officce, and his guests 
scattered around the rest of the room, awkward for 
conferences and meetings, so he had the new desk 
made this summer. 

Miss Mann has added to the room a desk set 
she bought in Italy last summer. 

Since the presenco of students is essential to the 
existence of a student union, Miss Mann says she is 
'thrilled to death at all the people playing pool, 
ping-pong and sitting in the lounge.'' 

She added that she expects the crowd to slacken 
a little after classes get down into their time-con- 
suming routine, but she hopes students will continue 
to make use of the many facilities available in Gra- 
ham Memorial. 


Pogo 


By Walt Kelly 



Li1 Abner 


By Al Capp 



A CUK&F.Osi ME,.'.'- 
eOVL-ESS AH v,/AS 
BORN -Arj eoVi.F-bS 

Am i 


OH, E>OVi ;;SS 
E>AlLFV.':'-.-K_)Virf 

KIN >0' 00 

t>>i LIVIN t»^) 
eOVLESSLV -^ 


r 



Wl 
Aft. 

After 
W^NC- 

with reg^ 
, Channel 

The stai 
ly one shl 
rest, •Todl 
TV opera I 
leigh. an( 

The edl 
Consolidai 
few yeara 
statev, kie I 
recognitif 

The tell 
gi-owth of I 
an institi 
operation! 
these sta^ 


HI 


m 


\ 


SUNDAY, SEPTBMBSR 23, \9S6 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE THREI 


cx- 

ma- 

lesult 

[larly 

stu- 

-day 

Kit. 

day. 
kcalls, 
tiding 
(ail IS 

's of- 
scrip- 
5t for 

by 
;reet- 
sud- 
^nt in 
Is put 
lelvcs. 
assing 
ic un- 


mod- 
lis the 
Id two 

behind 
guests 
rd fur 
>' desk 

fsk set 

to the 

she is 

> pool, 

slacken 
ne-con- 
)nunue 
in Gra- 


— 4 


PP 


WUNC-TV Returns To Air 
After Four- Week Vacation 


After a four week vacation, 
WTjNC-TV returns to the air today 
with regular iaily programs on 
Channel 4. 

The staff has been presenting on- 
ly one show during its four week 
rest. Today on the Farm." WUNC- 
TV operates from Greensboro, Jla- 
leigh, and Chapel Hill. ■ 

The educational station of the 
Consolidated University — in its 
few years' operation— has gained 
statewide importance and national 
recognition. ; 

The televison station is an out- 
growth of the radio station WUNC. 
an institution now having been in 
operation over five years. Both of ; 
these stations originated as ideas 


LATE SHOW TONITE 
SUNDAY -MONDAY 


THECWTTIMT p 

ROCKED 
1 THE WORLDS^ 
HOTTEST 
STRIP 

OF 
HELL... 


of the Dept. of Radio, Television 
and Motion Pictures, a department 
which is respected in its field as 
one of the best in the country. 

WUNC has presented — in addit- 
ion to its regular programs — pro- 
ductions of special interest or im- 
portance in the past several years. 
Produced in the main by the stu- 
dents themselves, these programs 
have attained national recognition. 

WUNC-TV was cited for national 
recognition in its presentation of 
William Saroyan's "Hello Out ; 
There," in its first TV adaptation. ; 
A kinescope reproduction of this i 
drama was shown at the Ohio State ; 
Conference last May, and has since : 
been well received throughout the i 
country. ■, 

THE STORY OF 
THE HANDFUL OF | 
HOPE THAT BECAME ! 
A FISTFUL OF HELL! 


J 


^ ^ 


iHOeiMICIIUMi 
iGieERI ROLAND 



COLOR b>D«LuM 

NOW PLAYING . 




NOW PLAYING 




They're smart on campus 



They score in sports... 



They rate on a date ..* 



:-;-:/wr;5»d4'>?K'^:«i!;'X*x«->T-a'-vi<W<«^«:-J 


They're I KPDS1 

...they're great! 


United S4«««s Rubber 

fcuketclUr Centar, Hfm Ycrk 20. N. Y. 




FASHIONS AT THE GAME: 


Winter Cottons, Light 
Wools Spark Stands 

By PEG HUMPHREY bright scarf at the neckline. 

Leiiaing that needed dash of«:oI- 
Carolina coeds sparked the foot- 1 ^^^ ^,^^^ gy^.^ coeds as Sally Pat- 


bail stands in winter cottons, light 
weight wools, and sweater-skirt 
combinations. 

Attire leaned toward the dark 
side with black and brown sheaths 
prevailing. "Pee Wee" Batten wore 
a suit of brown winter cotton with 
a tiny black stripe. Her shoes were 


terson who graced the stands in 
a red plaid winter cotton by Ann 
Fogarty. It had the mandarin neck- 
line and a rather tricky belt. Her 
black leather shoes were by Del- 
manette. 

Carolyn Thompson cheered in a 
brown cotton tweed suit with a 


Cardboard Says "Hi!' 


As the scoreboard in the background indicates the halftime score of State 13, Carolina 6, the Card- 
board section flashes a message across the field ts the opposing fans. It says simply, "Hi," with a big 
exclamation point. 


Churches Start Student 
Activities Here Today 


The churches of Chapel Hill 
will this Sunday begin their pro- 
grams and activities for the stu- 
dents. 

This will be the first Sunday of 
the fall semester in the church 
calendar. Although not a complete 
picture, the general programs are 
as follows: 

The Episcopal Chapel of the 
; Cross on Franklin St. will hold 
its' regular morning services; at 
6 p.m. the Canterbury Club will 
hold its first meeting of the fall 
semester at the parish house, op- 
posite the Planetarium. The guest 
speaker for the evening will be 
Chancellor Robert B. House, who 
will talk on the various problems 
of .studies at the University. It 
is anticipated that the famous har- 
monica of the Chancellor's will 
accompany him to the meeting. A 
welcome has been extended to all 
new students and all old members 
who desire to attend. 

At the Baptist Church on S. 

Columbia St., Morning Services and 

Sunday School will be held. In 

the evening, at 6 p.m., a student 

j supper will be served, to be fol- 

I lowed by a worship service at 7 

I p.m. 

j The Congregational Christian 
j Chiiich on Cameron Ave. will ob- 
j serve its morning services, Bible 
; Study group at 10 and Regular 
Worship Service at 11, to be con- 
ducted by Mr. Harvey L. Carnes. 
the new minister of the Congre- 
gational Church. The members of 


the United Student 
have been invited to a supper 
given by the J. R. Ellis-" at their 
home on Davey Circle. Students 
are asked to meet at the church at 
6 p.m.. where they will be driven 
to the Ellis home. 

The Lutlieran Church on Rose- 
! mary St. will hold its student ser- 
and Morning 


At The 
Planetarium 


vice at 9:45 am. 
Service at 11. 

At 6 p.m. the Lutheran Stu- 
dent Asoti will hear J. B. Rhyne 
of the Psychology Laboratory at 
Duke University in a talk entitled: 
"Extra Sensory Perception." 

The j:atholic Church in Ger- 
rard Hall will hold Mass Services 
at 8. 10. and 11. 

Morning Worship Services will 
be held in the University Meth- 
odist Church at 11 a.m. The stu- 
dent activities' in the afternoon 
will include a recreation hour at 
5:30 p.m. followed by a program, 
supper, '^nd worship service. 

Th€ Chapel Hill Presbyterian 
Church will hold a Bible Class at 
9:45 a.m. in the lounge of Graham 
Memorial. Morning Services will 
be held in the church on East 
Franklin St. at 11 a.m.. The even- 
ing program and supper will be 
presented in the Hut at 6 p.m. 
The title of the program is en- 
titled: "Introducing We:>timinister 
Fellowship". 


The Morehead Planetarium pres- 
Fellowtfhip entalion, "Mars, Planet of Mys- 
tery," will be shown Mond^' night 
for the last time. "Our Sun" will 
run Sept. 25-Oct. 22. 

Photographs by UNC students 
are now on display in the South 
(ialler>-. In the North Gallery, there 
are exhibits of Leonardi da Vinci'.s 
inventions consisting of 26 plates. 
These plates belong to the IBM 
Corporation. 


in that rich new shade of brown, j ^^^^^ f j^^j, jacj^g^ and a stand up 
taupe leather and suede. j ^^^^^j. u^ed in yellow. Her jacket 

A black pin striped winter cot- , ^^g ^^^^ ijned in yellow at the hip. 

Brown jewelry and alligators com- 


ton sheath was seen on a tall blond. 
She was wearing black leather 
heels and gold jewelry. Evelyn Hos- 
terms^n cheered enthusiastically in 
her gray sheath of winter cotton. 

Doris Adkins displayed her 
school spirit in a brown sheath 
with a bateau neckline. Her beige 
duster was lined with the fabric 
of her dress. Beige was also the 
choice of Kater Poteat. Her heavy 
linen dress with brown and black 
figures had a matching box hip- 
length jacket. 

Nancj' Suttlc appeared in a slim 
black cotton with a white ruffled 
bib. Black leather pumps, white 
string gloves and silver loop ear- 
rings completed her outfit. A brown 
winter cotton was worn by Anne 
Melton. Her sheath was accented 
by lizagator pumps and bag and a 


pleted her ensemble. 

Other fashionably attired coeds 
included Nan Schaeffer in a match- 
ing cashmere sweater and skirt, 
Anne Newsome in a dark sheath, 
and Liz Gardner in a dark gray 
wool suit with hip-length jacket. 

Gold jewelry was worn almost 
exclusively, with button earrings 
and bangle bracelets especially fa- 
vored. Leather wis popular in foot- 
wear, and it is apparent that black 
and brown will be the favorites 
for the fall. 


Bible Course 
Jo Be Taught 
OverWUNC'TV 

"The Origin and Significance of 
the Bible" will be taught over the 
University television station be- 
ginning Tuesday. Charles F. Mil- 
ner, acting director of the UNC 
Extension, said yesterday. 
i The instructor for the course 
I will be Dr. Bernard Boyd, who is 
! a James A. Gray professor of Bib- 
\ lical literature at UNC. He will lec- 
ture each Tuesday and Thursday 
! at 7:15 p.m., over WUNC-TV, Chan- 
; nel 4. 

j The course will carry three 
semester hours credit towards a 
degree. Students may, however, 
I take the course for non-credit. 

Dr. Boyd received his A.B. de- 
i gree from Presbyterian College, his 
I Th. B. degree from Princeton The- 
ological Seminary, his M.A. from 
! Princeton, and his Th.D. from Un- 
I ion Theological Seminary. 

Although he has been offered 
pastorships at large churches all 
j over the countr\-, he h.^s preferred 
; to remain in the teaching profes- 
j sion. UNC student polls have fre- 
i quenlly rated him among the fav- 
I orite teachers on the campus. 


A script film on the Suez Canal 
gives the history, construction, and 
operation of this first great inter- 
national waterway indicating its 
importance in contemporary world 
affairs. 

In October, the North Gallery 
will have an exhibit of 15 paintings 
called "Winston-Salem Portraits." 
There wil also be an exhibit by the 
Oak Rid^ Atomic Energj Museum, 
"Summary of Atomic Energy." 

Students have been invited to at- 
tend the shows arid fhe exhibits it 
the Planetarium. Programs are 
shown on weekdays at 8:30 p.m. 
On Saturdays, at 11 a.m.. 3. and 
8:30 p.m.. except on home football 
game days when they are shown 
at 11 a.m.. 5 and 8:30 p.m. Pro- 
grams' are shown on Sundays at 3, 
4, and 8:30 p.m.. and on holidays 
at 3 and 3:30 p.m. 


Left Holding 
The Bag? 

We'll find a market for yo«r 
dropped texts. Bring them in! 

THE INTIMATE 
BOOKSHOP 

205 E. Franklin St. 
Open Till 10 P.M. 


Buy With Confidence At 
VARLErS Men's Shop 

Featuring: 

Arrow Shirts Bostonian Shoes 

McGregor Sportswear Interwoven Socks 
Mayfair Slacks Paris Belts 

English Pipes and Smokers Accessories 


V Men's 


eyf 

Shop 


EST. 1938 


Political 
Activity 
To Begin 

By NEIL BASS 

Carolina political activity will 
shift into high gear with the ad- 
vent of party meetings Monday 
and Tuesday nights. 

The Student Party 1|ets the jump 
on the University Party with a ses- 
sion Monday night. Not far behind, 
the UP holds its initial meeting 
Tuesday night. 

According to SP Chairman Tom 
Lambeth, his party get-together 
•will be highlighted by an address 
by Student Body President Bob j 
Young. Other itenis on the SP j 
agenda include opening remarks 
by Lambeth and a social .gathering 
after the business portion of the I 
meeting. j 

UP Chairman Mike Wefrimah | 
was not a.yailal51e for comment. 

Also on tap during the coming 
week, a busy one for the poHticos 
who will he seeking to solid new 
membership, is a session of the 
Student Legislature. 

At present the Legislature is | 
controlled by the Student Party. ! 
The SP legislators, under the di- \ 
rection of Jim Holmes, floorleader. [ 
have a one vote majority — ^25-24. j 

University Party legislative ac- | 
tioB is under the supervision of I 
Mike Weinman, currently serving 1 
as floorleader. 

Both parties have urged any and ^ 
'all sfudents 'who lire interested in ' 
participating in student govern- 1 
ment to attend the opening ses- 1 
sions. ! 

Both parties wfll meet in Gra- 
ham Memorial at 7:30. { 

The Student Legislature will 
hold its kick-off meeting — and 
all subsequent sessions — in the 
Phi Hall on the fourth floor of 
New East Building. 


Playmakers Begin 
Tryouts Tomorrow 

The Carolina Playmakers will 
hold tryouts for their first produc- 
tion of the season, the recent 
Broadway success, "Anastasia." to- 


morrow at 4 and 7:30 p.m. in the 
Playmakers Theatre. 

The play will be directed by 
Samuel Sclden, chairman of the 
Dept. of Dramatic Art and Director 
of the Playmakers. and will appear 
at the theatre October 17 through 
21. 



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PAGE FOUR 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1956 


State Win Ends 13 Game Losing Streak To Hapless UNC 


Wake Forest Upsets W & M 
39-0 With Barnes Starring 


Spahn 
Comments 
On Bums 

By CHUCK CAPALOO 

MILWAUKEE. Sept. 22 (JP)—\ 
Warren Spahn, the graybeard of j 
the Milwaukee pitching s'taff, be- j 
lieves the Braves have lost what- 
ever mound advantage they might ! 
have had over Brooklyn. 

Discu<>sing the hectic National 
League pennant race today before 
the Braves took the field against 
the Chicago Cubs, the 35-year old 
lefthander said: 

"There's no doubt that we had 
the edge earlier in the season, but 
times have changed. We had five 
starters at one time. Then the two 
rookies. Taylor Phillips and Bob 
Trowbridge came along and you 
might say we had seven. 

"But. that's all changed now. 
Brooklyn has as good a pitching 
staff as anyone in the league, us 
included. They've got Sal Maglie, 
Don Newcombe, that old head Carl 
Erskin and guys like Clem Labine 
and Don Bessent. 

"For my money there's nothing 
wrong with that staff." 

What Spahn left unsaid is the 
almost complete about face of the 
Braves' staff, once conifidered the 
finest — bar none — in the majors. 

Right now Manager Fred Haney 
is going with only three starters — 
Spahn. Lew Burdette and Bob 
Buhl He is using Ray Crone and 
Gen Conley, earlier members of 
the Braves' "big 5" in relief, along 
with the rookies. \ 

And, unfortunately for the 
Braves. Burdette and Buhl haven't , 
been overly effective of late. Both ! 
have had their troubles and be- ! 
cause of it, the Braves have I 
slipped, although not far enough ; 
to put them out of contention. | 
Spahn has won three in a row. but I 
even he needed help against the 
last place Cubs Friday night. 

The Braves' staff has turned in 
only two complete games in their ! 
las"t 18 starts. Spahn accounted j 
for both of them. 

That's the prime reason why, ; 
since Labor Day. the Braves have j 
won only 8 of 18 games. I 


Sutton 

(Continued from Page 1) 
The losa- came as somewhat of , 
an upset for the slightly favored > 
but untested Tar Heels. Next week • 
the story will be different and the j 
Tar Heels could profit by yester- 
day's defeat. Against Oklahoma, { 
they will be the underdog as State ; 
was today. Coach Tatum has sev- 
eral scores to settle with Bud Wil- 
kinson and his Sooners; thus the 
Tar Heels should definitely be at 
a mental peak next week in Nor- 
man. 


WILLIAMSBURG, Va., Sept. 22 { 
(JP) — Bill Barnes, a long-legged 
fullback with amazing ability to ! 
elude tacklers, broke loose on ; 
three long touchdown runs today 
as Wake Forest's football team ; 
stunned William and Mary 39-0. I 

A crowd of 8,000 looked on in ; 
disbelief as Barnes, striking on j 
the first play from scrimmage, | 
zig-zagged his way 67 yards on a 
burst over his own. right guard j 
and put the via'iting Deacons ahead i 
with only 40 seconds gone. j 

Barnes, 187-pound senior from \ 
Landis, N.C.. kicked up his heels | 
again before the first period end- 1 
ed, grabbing William and Mary 
halfback Charlie Sidwell's kick on 1 
his 23 and knifing 77 yards to the j 

Terps Upset 
By Syracuse 
In Opener 

COLLEGE PARK. Md.. Sept 22 ] 
(i**) — Syracuse used Jim Brown to ! 
rip along the ground and scored 
twice on passes and a 71-yard re- i 
turn of a fumble by end Dick i 
Lasse to beat Maryland's mixed i 
up football team 26-12 in their 
season's opener today. j 

Brown, a bruising 212-pounder, ! 
caught one touchdown pass from 
Jim Ridlon, blasted four yards 
around end for another, and zoom- 
ed 78 yards to set up a third. ; 

Syracuse, beaten 34-13 las-t sea- ' 
son when Maryland was coached ; 
by Jim Tatum, practically gave j 
Maryland its second touchdown ' 
just_J)efore the game ended with 
third stringers playing on both 
sides. 

Maryland started off impressive- 
ly for the lirst time under Coach 
Tommy Mont by taking a 6-0 lead 
soon after the opening kickoff. 
But Syracuse marked right back ■ 
to the tying townchdown and lead- ' 
ing extra point by Brown to take , 
charge the rest of the way. j 

John McVicker, Terp Halfback, ■ 
returned a punt 67 yards to put 
Maryland in its e.^irly scoring po- : 
sition. Quarterback John Fritsch 
plunged for the touchdown and 
then he dropped the pass from ; 
center on the extra point try which 
fullback Tom Selep was waiting 
to kick. 

The Maryland subs returned a 
short Syracuse kickoff 47 yards 
in the clo.sing minutes with Jack 
Mealy going over just before the 
final gun. ' 

Syracuse 7 6 6 7—26 

MarylancJ 6 6—12 

Syracuse Scoring — Touchdowns: 
Brown (24, pass-run from Ridlon: 
4, run): Lasse (71, runback fum- 
ble); Ridlon (4, pass from Zim- 
merman). Conversions: Brown; 
Ridlon (Pass from Zimmerman). 

Maryland Scoring — Touchdowns: 
Fritsch (1, plunge): Healy (2, 
plunge). 


pay window. He added his- longest 
touchdown sprint of the day — ^A 
78-yard beauty — in the fourth. 

Quarterback Charlie Carpenter, 
halfback Jim Dalrymple and substi- 
tute fullback Deane Hillenbrand 
shared the spotlight with Barnes 
with touchdown excursions of their 
own. 

Carpenter scooped up a deflect- 
ed punt and scooted 19 yards to 
the goal secondo- after the second 
period started. Dalyrmple swung 
around right end for seven yards 
and six points to climax a 90- 
yard drive to put Wake Forest 
ahead 25-0 at halftime. 

Hillenbrand ripped up the mid- 
dle of the Indians' sagging line 
with time running out in the game 
and fled 32 yards. 

Barnes made good on the con- 
ver^>-ion after his second and third 
touchdowns. Sophomore quarter- 
back Dave Toothman split the goal 
posts after Hillenbrand's score. 
Wake Forest 12 13 14—39 

William & Mary 0-0 

Wake Forest Scoring — Touch- 
downs: Barnes 3 (67, run; 77, punt 
return: 78, run): Carpenter (19, 
returned blocked kick): Dalyrm- 
ple (7. run): Hillenbrand (32, 
run). Conversions: Barnes' 2, 
Toothman. 


DTH Deadline 

A 3 p.m. dcadlint for material 
for storiM for The Daily Tar 
Heel will be enforced this year, 
according to Managing Editor 
Charlie Johnson. 

This means that all material 
for all stories, except these orig- 
inated by Daily Tar Heel staffers, 
must be in by 3 p.m. in the after- 
noon for those stories to appear 
in the next day's paper, he said. 


Counselors 

(CoTitinH«d fror.1 Page I) 

degree from Randolph-Macon Wo- 
man's College and has been study- 
ing for an M. A. in musicology at 
VNC during the past year. She 
has been named couselor for Smith 
Dormitory. 

Both Miss Moody and Miss Stire- 
walt are working for master 6f 
education degrees, with majons 
in guidance. 

Miss Moody received her A. B. 
degree in recreation from Wo- 
man's College in Greensboro, and 
has attended summer se.-sions at 
UNC aijd at Columbia University. 
She has been a city recreation di- 
rector in Winston-Salem and rec- 
reation director-counselor at Hock, 
aday School in Dallas, Tex. 

The second UNC graduate in 
the group. Miss Stirewalt attended 
Lenoir-Rhyne College. She com- 
pleted an A. B. degree in educa- 
tion, with a major in English at 
UNC, and taught at Parkton High 
School. 


DAILY CROSSWORD 


150 Averett Girls Will 
Visit Campus Today 

Approximately 150 freshmen and 
sophomores from Averett College 
in Danville, Va., will visit the cam- 
pus this afternoon for a Morehead 
Planetarium show and a reception 
in Graham Memorial. 

All UNC freshmen have been 
urged to be at Graham Memorial 
at i p.m. for the reception, where, 
YMCA officials said, it will be a 
good time to get acquainted with 
some of the girls who will enter- 
tain University freshmen at a 
dance in panville next Saturday. 

This event is an annual affair 
sponsored by the Freshmen Fellow- 
ship of the YMCA- Trai^portation 
to Danville will be provided. 


CLASSIFIEDS 


LOST: ONE WALLET. FINDER 
please return to James Harry 
Menzel, DU House, East Rose 
mary Street. 


LOST: BLACK POCKETBOOK 
with green billfQld inside plus 
driver^- license. Probably lost in 
Peabody Hall. If found, please 
return to Elizabeth Kightower, 

Smith Dorm. 

_j : . 

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES 
5 weeks old, registered. Best of 
bloodlines from national and in- 
ternational champions. Phone 
Durham 5-0289. 


ACROSS 

1. Shut 
6. Game of 
skill 

11. Seraglio 

12. Midday meal 

13. Across 

14. Male goose 

15. Selenium 
(aym.) 

16. Least whole 
number 

17. Nickel 
(«ym.) 

18. Printer's 
error 

21. Man's 
nickname 

22. Anger 

23. Wading: 
bird 

25. Keep 

27. Will ^ 
Harrison 

28. Light, 
colored 
volcanic 

, tuff 
SO. Owns 
31. Snakelike 

fish 
22. Frequented 
S6. lUlian 

river 
27. Dispatched 
S8. Music note 
39. Covered 

with a 

metal 
41. Pack away 

43. Anxioua 

44. Clamor 

45. Thin strata 
(reel.) 

48. Narrow 
roadway 


2. Cleanser 

3. Metallic 
rock 

4. Indian 
weight 

5. Girl's 
nickname 

8. Demands 

7. Search for 

8. Finish 

9. Stagie back' 
ground 

10. Contract* 
14. African 

antelope 
16. Shoshonean 

Indian 

19. Competitor 

20. God of 
war 
(Gr.) 


21 Brag 

24. Con- 
junc- 
tion 

25. Euro- 
pean 
tracts 
of 

level 
land 

26. SmaU 
treas 

29, Filmy, 
thin 
fabrics 

30. Rude 
dwelling 

S3. Particle of 
addition 

34. Appearing 
as if eaten 


f.'iMai-iiii piK 

^r\'i': r.in ;onrj 
::in>;i.!H iiciKflM 

U..U'i !J(;1HMH(-'l:) 


fatardty't Aaswer 
35. U. S. 

admiral 
37. Branch 

40. Turkiah title 

41. Peruvian 
coin 

42. Sesame 
44. Sodium 

(sym.) 


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3 

4 

5 

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1 

r- 

9 

10 

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1 







State Tops Tar Heels 


It's A First Down For State 


N. C. state's Dick Crisfy, No. 40, picks up 20 yards as he moves past Ed Sutton, No. 30, of Carolina 
before being brought down by Tar Heel Hap Setzer, No. 62, on the nine yard line to set up State's 
first score. (Photo by Truman Moore.) 


(Continued from Page 1) 
their own 38. Marinkov turned in 
a 20 yard jaunt to the UNC 39, 
Katich hit Pepe with a pass on the 
26, Hunter went to the 20, Katich 
flipped a pass to John Collar on 
the 10. and the State end rambled 
over the goaline. ^ 

This just about spelled the end 
for Carolina, but the Wolfpack 
hadn't finished. Burly tackle John 
Szuchan blocked a Wally Vale 
punt on the Carolina 34, Larry 
Cox recovered for State, and the 
Pack had their fourth and last 
touchdown a few minutes later. 
A pa^-s from Bill Franklin to Mike 
Miller accounted for the score. 

Both squads cleaned their 
benches during the last few list- 
less minutes. 

The 26 point total racked up by 
the Wolfpack was the largest num. 
ber of points scored by a State 
team against Carolina since the 
1895 season. In 1942, State scored 
21 while beating the Tatum led 
Tar Heels. 

Statistics reflected the story of 


the game. State piled up 24 first 
downs to Carolina's 14, and amass- 
ed 273 yards on the ground to 
Carolina's 218. Passing netted the 
Pack 83 yards compared to the 
Tar Heel's 36. 

Coach Tatum's squad looked very 
shaky but also very promising. 
The line held like a s-tone wall 
each time State penetrated deep 
into Tar Heel territory. Only by 
going to the air could the Wolf- 
pack counter. 

The offense sputtered all after- 
noon, but with Ed Sutton and a 
pcir of adept quarterbacks, it 
should do better on succeeding 
Saturdays. Hathaway and Farmer 
both turned in creditable jobs at 
the signal calling slot, although 
each was shaken up slightly dur- 
ing the game. 

Next Saturday the . Tar Heels 
travel to Norman, Okla., for a bat- 
tle with the nation's top team, 
Oklahoma. According to an an- 
nouncement made yesterday, the 
game will be played before a 
packed house of 60,000 people. 


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WEATHER 

Rain becoming modtrat«, with 
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/ 


3r() e Dally ^^Tar Keel 


NASSER 

Maybo it's tinw to quit being 
biuHod. S«e page 2. 


VOL. LVIfl, NO. 5 


Complete (JP) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1956 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PACES THIS '**Ui 


Prof Named To Aid 
Senate Commitree 


University prof. Alexander 
Heard has been appointed by Sen. 
Albert Gore as Consultant to the 
United States Senate Subcommit- 
tee on Privilege.? and Elections, 
it was announced recently. 

Heard will commute to Wash- 
ington, D. C, periodically during 
the Committee's current investiga- 
tion of political campaign finan- 
cing. 

Director of the "Money in Poll- 
tits" research project at the Uni- 
versity's Institute for Research in 
Social Science. Heard testified be- 
fore the committee in 1955, and 
wao the lead off witness at the 
hearings which began on Sept. 
10 of this year. 

At the conclusion of Heard's 
testimony on the latter occasion, 



Sen. Gore extended the invitation 
to him to act as consultant. 

Dr. Heard's research on the role 
of money in the political process I 
has been accorded wide publicity j 
in several American and foreign i 
publications, including The Econ- j 
omist of London. A series of six I 
newspaper articles was releas-ed j 
in August by United Features Syn- 
dicate. 

Earlier this month the Public 
Affairs Committee, a non-profit ed- 
ucational organization, published 
one of its Public Affairs Pamph- 
lets, written by Heard and called 
"Money and Politics." This pamph- 
let, which is being distrit>uted 
throughout the country, contains 
a summary of the results of some 
of the research that has been com- 
pleted at the University. This ma- 
terial will be supplemented and 
published later in a book which 
he is now writing. 



Graduate Counselors Named For Women's Dorms 

Shewn above, laft to right, are Missei. Elxabath Anna Barnes, Harriet D. Holt, Mary Sue Honakar, 
Lydia Moody and Mary Louise Stirewalt. These five UNC students were recently named graduate coun- 
selors for the women's dormitories. 


Young Lists Car Rule, 
Book Return, Phones 
As Accomplishments 



Workmen vrnkirig h-asty ad- 
jii^iments on the sundial due to 
the cloutiy weather. 

General College Dean'a car 
parked hesnde SoiUh Building 
bearing a parking ticket. 


Band^ New Uniforms 
Praised After Game 

Students who noticed anything on after a minimum of rehrarsal, 
different about the UNC Marching . at the State game. Drum Major 
Band last Saturday may be inter- Don Jefferson put his large, well- 
ested to know that it's the biggest ' dressed band and four majorettes 
since 1950, in the" days of Charlie j through their paces with precision. 


"Choo Choo" Justice. 
Also, brand new uniforms give 


Only one complaint concerning 
the band was voiced: "Couldn't 


By CLARKE JONES 

Student body President Bob 
Young last night listed the student 
government accomplishments since 
the March 27 election and briefly 
pointed out the problems facing it 
this year. 

He addressed the Student Party 
at its first meeting of the year. Ap- 
proximately 125 old members and 
interested newcomers attended. 

Young, in speaking of several 
main accomplishments, listed fresh- 
man automobile restriction and the 


New Faces Seen Among 
UNC Faculty This Year 


the band that "new look" Caro- hear 'cm, sitting down at the front 
I lina's bandsmen are so enthusias- ' like that." In 1954, the band sat 
j tic about. Those beautiful, new j at the top of the card section, af- 
i blue and white uniforms dress up i fording Carolina students plenty of 


I the University's fine band in do- 
i serving .style, according to specta- 
I tors at Saturday's game. 


easily-heard spirited music. 

Any musicians who wore unable 
to audition for the band during 


New faces will be seen among 
the faculty as well as in the stu- 
dent body this semester. 


Medical School's Pathology Depart 
mcnl; Miss Mary Walker Randolph 
professor in the School of Nursing; ! 
and Sigurdur Jonsson and Earl T. j 
Brown, associate professor and as- 
sistant professor, respectively, in 
the School of Pharmacy. | 


They are. incidentally, the first ^ the first week have been invited to 
entirclv new set of uniforms since ! contact Mr. Herbert W. Fred at 


Dr. Wilton Mason 

Or. AAason, above, will direct 
th« campus' nswast choral group, 
the University Charua, which 
will hold its first meeting of 
tha new yoar today at 4:30 p.m. 
in 108 Hill Hall. Organized last 
spring the chorus is open io all 
UNC students and will perform 
"standard and moredn classics 
•f the choral repertory." 


Speeding L^ads 
Police Blotter 


Several of the new faculty mem- \ 
\ bers are returning to their alma ' 
mater after teaching elsewhere, j 
and others are coming to Chapel ! 
Hill from West Coast and New Eng I 
land institutions. j 

Among those beginning their ! 
new teaching duties this week are i 
Joe S. Floyd Jr.. associate pro- 1 
fessor of finance. School of Busi- [ 
ness Administration; Rolfe E. > 
Glover HI, assistant professor, Dc- i 

partfnent of Physics: William R- j Por AA/^AKPTld 
Cattoo Jr.. assistant professor. De- 1 ^^ ^ ' ^^IV^I t%M 
partment of Sociology; Ransom T. 
Taylor, assistant professor. Depart- 
ment of Germanic Languages; and 
Roy Klmer SommerficM, assistnal 
professor of education in extension. 

New personnel in the Division 

of Health Affairs include Dr. Wal- 

: tcr R. Benson and Dr. William W. 

I Forrest, assistant professors in the 


1930. The Student legislature ap- 1 Hill Music HaJl for information 
propriated $1,800 of the better than I about the band. Band officers for 
$6,000 expenditure for the band, 11956 57 arc: Don Jefferson, presi- 
the remainder being donated by i dent; Eddie Bass, vice president; 
the Athletic A.ssn. Included in i and John Hamp, secretar>-treasur- 
that figure is the cost of repairing er. Artie Sobel is business manag- 
and roconditioning University-own- er. and Dale Glover holds the po- 
ed instruments — eight tubas, ten ' sition of quartermaster. Herbert 
drums, four baritone horns, and ' W. Fred.- conductor, formulates the 
various other smaller horn.s. • I plans for all band formations, and 

The band drew much prai.se after I Bert Davis and Calvin Hubcr are 
its excellent half-time show, put ' his assistants. 


4 Artists Will Appear 
In Concert Series 


Four concerts featuring distin- 
guish'^d musical arti.sts will be held 
in Chapel Hill this year as a part 
of the Chapel Hill Concert Series. 

Appearing on the program will 


stalled on every floor yet but will 
be soon, he said. 

About the return of the library 
books, he said reports had been 
received last year for several 
months about books being stolen, 
torn and underlined* A drive was 
put on to restore the stolen books 
and over 200 were returned. 
PROBLEMS 

Young listed some of the main 
problems faced this year by stu- 
dent government as follows: 

(1) The parking problem; (2) 
Compulsory or non-compulsory 
physical education for veterans; 
(3) The installation of vending 
machines in the dormitories; (4) 
A reading day between the last 
day of classes and the first day of 
examinatons and (5) The present 
class attendance policy which many 
feel is inadequate. 
Children's Choir is a fairy tale of Student Party Chairman Tom 
modern times. The beautiful sing- 1 1-ambeth, in welcoming the new 


$2.50 registration fee, the placing 
of telephones on each floor of most 
men"s dormitories and the return 
of over 200 lost books to the Wil- 
son flbrary. 

Concerning the car restriction, 
Young said "The crisis forced on 
us was very unpleasant. We hope 
this year's freshman class is the 
only one to suffer" under the rule. 

Young felt the money from the 
registration fees would help to- 
ward getting parking lots for stu- 
dents. 

The telephones have not been in- 


ing, fresh innocense and charm of 
these 30 girls and six boys is evo- 
cative of Grimm's Fairy Tales and 


be Eileen Farretl, Oct. 10, the Chi- \ fantasies of Hans Christian Ander- 
cago Opera Ballet, Jan. 22, the ! sen. 


Phi To Debate 
Banning Girls 
At UNC Tonight; yocHc Confrocts 

Must Be Signed 


A bill proposing that UNC re- 
turn to its original status as an 
all-male institution will be debated 
at the fir^ meeting of the Phil- 
antropic Assembly thij evening at 
8 o'clock in Phi Hall, located on 
the top floor of New East building. 

The Ways and Means Commit- 
tee, in proposing the bill, was 
motivated by the fact that exclus- 
ion of women would help alleviate 
overcrowded 

dormitories by allowing men to 
jnpve into the vacated women'j 
dormitories, according to Lawrence 
Matthews, speaker for the Phi. 
Also, the diversion from academic 
pursuits caused by the presence .of 
coeds would be eliminated, he 
said. 

The Phi, along with its- sister 
society, enjoys the distinction of 
being the oldest debating society 
in the United States^ added Matt- 
hews. The Assembly's many alum- 
ni who have become prominent 
state and national figures' exempli- 
fy the success of the Phi in teach- 
ing extemporaneous public speak- 
ing, parlimentary procedure and 
lilerarj' awareness, he concluded. 
.All students Mnterested in the 
debate have been invited to at- 
tend the meeting. 


By Oct. W 


All organizations desiring space 
in the 1956-57 Yackety Yack must 


! Since the start of school, stu- 
dents have found themselves in a 
variety of situations. Chapel Hill 
police found necessary to report, 
ranging from parking on the side- 
walk and going the wrong way on 
a one-way street, to speeding and 
I driving recklessly. 
j Speeding led the field, with three 
i violation registered. The list, com- 
' piled from the Chapel Hill Police 
blotter, is as follows: Edith Linn 
Cashwell, parking on sidewalk; 
Zane A. Grey, parking tickets; 
John Vernon Whitaker Jr., Public 
display; Samuel Ulysses Burchcttc, 
public drunkenness; Jackie Der- 
ring Worley (State College), reck- 
less driving; Charles Wills, (Duke) 
speedmg; David Richard Dean, 
wrong way on one way street 


Carolina Men Invited To Dance At Averett 

The group from Averett College bcgin.s at 8:30. Refreshmcnti will 
which visited .the camfMw Sainl«.**| be .♦rrvert at intermission and snp- 
is sponsoring a dance on .Saturday, per at niidni;k'ht 
and all Carolina genHeinen have 
been invited. 

Averett College for Women is lo- 
cated in Danville. Vircmia. 

Bob Cleveland's orchestra will 


Obernkirchen Children's Choir, 1 
Feb. 21, and Witold Malcuzynski, i 
March 28. 

The passcssor of one of the 
greatest voices this country has 
ever produced, Eileen Farrell is 


Tho sreat piano traditons of Cho- 
pin, Listz, and Paderewski arc con- 
tinued unbroken in the gifted play- 
ing of the internationally acclaim- 
ed virtuoso, Witold Malcuzynski, an 
artist wth few living peers today. 


also recognized by critics through- 1 He was the celebrated protege of j 

out the land as a superb musician | Paderewski. 

Season tickets can be ordered I 
by sending a check or money order I 
to: Chapel Hill Concert' Series. Gra- 
ham Memorial, Box 30, Chapel Hill. 
Rates art $7.50 for resen-ed mem- 


persons present, called the SP 
"the best campus political party" 
because of the things it gets dona. 
"The Young administration is a 
daily evidence of the truth of that 
statement." 

He also stated "it is an open 
party . . . where ideas and individ- 
uals and — the professional cynics 
to the contrary — principle are 
more important than victory or 
I numbers." 


Bu.s.sps will be chartered and in- 
fere.sted pcrson.s have been asked 
to contact tho YMCA office or at- 
tend the Froshm.m Fellowship 
meeting on Thursday at a time and FAIRY TALE 


and artist. She is beloved by au- 
diences across the continent as one 
of America's warmest concert per- 
sonalities. 

The Chicago Opera Ballet will 
anpear in the original ballets "The 
Merry Widow." and "Revenue" 
(from "II TYovatore") with a com- 
pany of 45. soloi.sfs. corps de bal- 
let, complete scenery, costumes 
and orchestra. 


N. C. Public 
Still Prefers 


bcrship for the season. $6.60 for ] ^ - _ 

'unreserved membership for the \' \j(rt nnf^lfn nAtJ^t^ 
ficaaon and .$2.50 for unreserved' w*#v#i,##v# #riwafW 

seats for a single concert. 

Tickets can also be obtained 
from Mr^. Dojiglas Fambrough at 
the Graham Memorial Information 
Office every day except Sunday 


furnish the music and the dance , place to be announced later. 


The story of the Obernkirchen from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 


OF 200 APPLICANTS: 


100 Named As NROTC Cotract Men 


After processing more than 200 j Charlotte; Alan G. .^twcll. John 
applicants for the Navy's ROTC C. Jester III, Edmund H. Schench, 
Contract Program, the Universty Edward W. Slei.^ht, and David C. 
NROTC unit has accepted 100 ! Wible. Greensboro: Sheldon C. 


freshmen as contract students. 

Captain A. M. Patterson, com- 
mander of the unit, said that so 


sign contracts in the Yack office jg^es Gooden Exum Jr., speeding; t lection was based on high school 


in the basement of Graham Mem- j p^ed Marshall Daniel Jr., speed- j 
, , o"al by Oct. 10, according to Edi- , jng. gillie Farrington, passing stop 

conditions m mens t^r Tnmmv Tnhnson • r- ... lV- . . 

j lor lommy jonnson. j g,gn. Ernest Horn, public drunken- 

Contracts may be signed from ^ess. 
2 to 4 p.m. any weekday after- 
noon. 

Yack senior class pictures will 
be taken today througli Friday in 
the basement of Graham Memor- 
ial. Senior girls will be photo- 
graphed in "black drapes. It is ad- 
visable that they wear skirt.? and 
sweaters. Men are requested to 
wear white shirts, and dark ties 
and coats. 


- Officials Needed 

*• students are needed as intra- 
mural officials for tag football. 
Those interesed have been asked 
to come to 301 Woollen Gym at 
4 p.m. this afternoon. 


INFIRMARY 


students in the Infirmary ye»- 
ttrday included: 

Miss Patricia B. Shoras; Miss 
Halen L. Yatas; Ml»» Martha J. 
Slllay; Miss Ann C. Brown; Miss 
Isabel A. Holbrook; Mrs. J«nat 
E. Summarall; John G. Burgwyn; 
Hal M. Millar; James K. Coward; 
Timothy Harris; Bob S. ftoWr* 
son; Clarence E. Smith Jr.; Alvin 
W. Sntith; and Kannath H. Oak- 
ley Jr. 


Correction 

The change in tha telephone 
number of the Alpha Gamma 
Delta sorority house was report- 
ed incorrectly in the Saturday 
Daily Tar Heel. The correct 
number is 8-9089. 


First UP Meeting Set 
For Tuesday, Oct. 9 


academic records, college entrance 
test scores and individual inter- 
views. 

Capt. Patterson also said that 
he was gratified with the interest 
shown in the Na\'ys program, and 
that he was "impressed with the 
highcaliber of the young men ap- 
plying for the Contract Program. 

He added that he regretted that 
quota limitations had preventcii 
the acceptance of more of the stu 
dents who applied. 

The 100 students arc in additi )n 
to 32 previously selected by na 


Austin Jr., James L. Carter, Rich- 
ard M. Daily Jr. .Andrew P. Den- 
mark, Tommie L. Little and 
Charles G. Poole III. Raleigh. 

David S. Evans. Michael S. Lan- 
hani, Junius S. Williams Jr., and 
James A. Moss II, Fayetteville; 
Donald R. Andrews and James O 
Bledsoe, New Born; James S. Belk. 
Hickory; Tommy L. Brceland, Wil- 
mington; Paul C. Clark Jr., Candor; 
Alfred L. Cope Jr., Elizabeth City; 
James W. Crawford Jr., Oxford; 
Edward W. Crow, Hanes; Charles 
M. Dewitt Jr., Concord; and 
Thoma.s C. Fisher III, Salisbury. 

Other North Carolinians accept- 
ed for the Contract Program are. 
James R. Frazier, Rock Mount; 


The Univers-ity Party will not 
meet tonight as was reported in 
Tlie Daily Tar Heel earlier. The 
party will meet Tuesday night, 
October 9, acocrding to Mike 
Weinman, party chairman. 

Weinman listed his reason for 
cancellation of this week's meet- 
ing aj- "sorority and fraternity 
rushing." 

Weinman's full statement con- 
cerning party prospects for this 
yiear is as follows: 

"I am looking forward to an- 
other outstanding year for the 
University Party. I have spoken 
to many promising incoming stu- 
dents who are interested in the 
UP, and we are indeed interested 
in them. If you are a new student 
or a battle weary veteran you are 


"I urge all old party members 
to be on the lookout for fresh tal 
ent. Refre ,+inients will be served 
at the first meting, which will be 
in the nature of a get-acquainted 
gathering. Some of the party's 
most outstanding men will be on 
hand to say a few words." 


Donald D. Haithcock, Durham; 
James M. Harper, Southport; John 
K. Horncy, Guilford College: 


tionwide competitive examinations | Stephen S. Girard, Cumberland: 
for the NROTC Regular Program. 

Both programs are designed to 
train young men as midshipmen 
luring their college careers. Upon j George W. Jackson, Belhaven; 
graduation they will receive com , Thomas H. Jordan, Wilson; Robert 
missions in either the Navy or N- W. Knott, Ashcboro; Luther T. 
Marine Corps as regular or reserve I Lineberger, Gastoniai Harold S. 
officers. i Manning Jr., Windsor; Charles C. 

Students selected for the Con ^Tason. Dillshoro; Dewey L. Mur 
tract Program include .59 North Phy. Stokcsdalc: David W. Myers 


Carolinians: 

Jerry W. Amos, Charles A. Bare- 
foot! Frederick L. Hirsch, Thomas 
C. Guiles, Edward L. Vinson .Jr., 
and Lawrence R. Withrow, all of 


Polio Vaccine To Be Given 
To Students At $1 Per Dose 


Salk polio vaccine is now avail- 
able to the entire student body on 
a voluntary basis through the stu- 
dent health ^rorvice. 

First doses were begun yester- 
day and will be given through 
October 5; the second dose, one 
month later; the third, during 
always cordially invited to attend the first two weefcs of May. These 


any and all UP meetin|s. 


shots can be obtained Monday — 


Saturday during regular office 
hour:-.' at the student infirmary. 

Salk shots will be given at costs, 
$1 per dose. Students will be billed 
through regular channel-s. 

This vaccine is now recognized 
as an effective and safe procedure 
in the prevention of polio, accord- 
ing to Infirmary officalj. 

Students have been urged to 


Elkin; and Robert F. Neal, Hen- 
derson. 

Edgar L. Nealon. Burlington; 
Clifton W. Paderick, Kinston; 
Hugh L. Patterson. Edenton; Bruce 
G. Pearson, Ft. Bragg: Ashmead P. 
Pipkin. Reidsville; Teddy L. Raab, 
Garner; Robert A. Sherrill. Lenoir; 
N'orman B. Smith, Franklin. 

Wade M. Smith, Albemarle: Alva 
P Smithson. Cre.swell; Chester W. 
Taylor, Castle Hayne; Charles S. 
Walters, State Road; Thomas L 
White Jr.. Lumberton; and Charles 
A. Webb, Asheville. 

Freshmen in the regular NROTC 
orogram from North Carolina arc 
Dennis P. L. Dooley, Thomas L. 
Overman. Stephen B. Honeycutt, 
and John B. Mayo, all of Raleigh: 
William N. Franklin, Grady H. 


Greensboro; Edward L. Cameron. 
Raeford: Michael L. Collins, High 
Point; Thomas L. Cordlc, Charlotte: 
Gary R. Greer, Spindale; Henry 
W. Harris Jr.. Winston-Salem; 
.Jackie L. Lawing, Marion; Theo- 
dore C. Moore Jr., Chapel Hill: 
George W. Reese Jr., Taylorsville: 
Robert M- Rhodes and Howard P. 
Troutman, Lenoir; and James N. 
Thomas, Cherry Point. 

Out-of-.state students under the 
Contract Program are Sanford L. 
.Ainslie .Ir., Huntington, W. Va.; 
f. Bodenheimcr. New Orleans, La.: 
Charles W. Baldwin. Baldwin, N 
Y.; Theodore N. Bodcn and Henry 
Dixon W. Christian, Vicksburg. 
Miss.; Robert K. Cofed. New York, 


nev5 

in 
brief 



STORM STRIKES 

FT. WALTON, Fla. iJP) —Hurri- 
cane Flossy hit the coast of North- 
west Florida last night and then 
began to weaken. 

The storm struck the coast near 
here with 100-mile-an hour winds. 
A short time after it struck it was 
reported that the winds had died 
to 80 miles an hour around the 
center. 

The hurricane caused at least 
four deaths yesterday on the coast 
of Alabama and Louisiana. 
'DIVIDE AMERICA' 


N. Y.; Marion K. Costcllo and ; 
Thomas T. Lawson, Roanoke, Va.; '• 
John B. Cummings, Philadelphia, i 
Pa.; James R. Cunningham, Char- j 
leston, W. Va.; Houston S. Everett, j 
Baltimore, Md.; Wallace A. Gra- ' 
ham, Homestead, Fla.; Peyton S. j 
Hawes, Elberton, Pa; Charles H. { 
Howson III, Villanova, Pa.; Ben- 1 
nette E. G. Keys, Greenville, S. C; ; 
and Arthur L. Kilpatrick. Chesire, ■ 
Conn. 

Other out-of-staters are David L. 
Leffler and Joseph L. Loughran 
Arlington, Va.; Peter C. Liman, j 
Hewlett, N. Y.; Frank W. Lockett, ; 
John H. Oliver, and George N. \ 
Schroeder, Summitt, N. J.; Denton j 
Lotz, North Port, N. Y.; John N. ! 
Mcintosh, Savannah, Ga.; Philip V. j 
Moss, Kew Gardens, N. Y.; Willara 
F. Palmer, West Long Beach. N. J.; I 
Charles G. Reeder, Laurel, Miss.; ] 
Herbert A. Ross, South Orange, N. j 
J.; and Paul Russell, Bridgeport, i 
W. Va. I 

Others include Henry C. Simp- 
.ijon Jr.. Lexington. Ky.: Hoke S. i 


Rock 'n roll may have its North 
Carolina devotees, but where sym- 
phonic music is concerned, the 
North Carolina public prefers the 
j s>ca]Ied standard orchestral li-t- 
j crature. In fact, the concert-goer*' 
i taste is probably better than you 
I think it is. 

! This much is learned from a 

j questionnaire which the North 

Carolina Symphony Society sent 

j out to hundredo- of its members, 

, who were given the opportunity 

; to st-te preferences in orchestral 

compositions as request selections 

to be considered in programming 

concerts for the 1957 ovason. 

The Franck Symphony received 
the greatest number of requests, 
and next in popularity were the 
Beethoven Symphonies and 
Brahms' First Symphony. After 
these, the Tschaikowsky Sixth 
(Pathetique) was mojt in demand. 
Sibelius' "Finlandia" seemed al- 
so to be a favorite of the public 
and various Mozart works were re- 
quested. One of the surprises was 
the small number of votes for 
Wagner. 

Very few modern works were 
even mentioned, although two 
votes were registered for Straviiv 
s'ky and one for a work by Hinde- 
mith. Only two requests were 
made for Gershwin. Some of the 
old (sentimental pieces received 
only one vote each. 

Stu^ of the returns indicates 
only that the public prefers the 
old standard orchestral literature, 


Simpson Jr., Larchmont, V- Y. 

Arthur W. Sims. Orange, Va.; i '" the opinion of Dr. Benjamin F. 

James A. Turner Jr., St. Stephen, ' Swalin, director of the society and 


S. C; Paul L. Wachindorfer, Ponte 
Vcdra, Fla.; Gale F. Wallace, Ips- 
wich. Mass.; Mark K. Wilson HI. 
Chattanooga. Tenn.; Dabney E 
Wooldridge III. Cuyahoga Falls, 
Ohio; and Michael A. Rosen, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Out-of-state students under the 
regular program include Robert M 
Congdon, Hingham, Mass.; Clyde 
O. Draughon Jr., Mobile, Ala.: 
Hugh C. Embry, Fredericksburg 


take advantage of this opportunity. I Phillips, and Charles D- Sheets, 


S.\LT LAKE .CITY, i,Pi — Vice j Va.; Harold H. Fortner, Anderson 
President Richard Nixon Jast night s. C; Charles H. Fuller, South 
accused Adlai Stevenson of con- Charleston, W. Va.; John W. John 
ducting a campaign aimed at divid- j son, Belford, N. J.; John G. Jones 
ing Americans— class against class Clayton, Mo.; Edwin Levy Jr.. Nev 
and group against group. Orleans, La.; Francis J. McGarry 

Nixon, speaking at a rally here, Raynham, Mass.; Henry T. Mehl 
said it becomes more and more ap- 1 Mechanicsburg, Pa.; Charles W 
parent that all Stevenson has to \ pittman Jr., Columbia, S. C; Willi- 
offer the American people is a car- 1 ^^ j^ p^^er, Orchard Park, N. Y.- 
bon copy of what he calls the "same j ... tt i. iu _i m. o j 

t ^«i tj^oi A .^o.,^.,.^^ 'Julian H. Tolbert, Macon, Ga.; and 
type of political demagoguer>' ; 

which characterized the Fair Deal I William S. Webster, Virginia' 
of'Harn^ Truman. Beach. Va. 


conductor of the North Carolina 
Symphony Orchestra. This prefer- 
ence, he believes, is conditioned 
by the recordings which are being 
bought and heard. 


Art Rental Exhibition 
Closes In Person Today 

PercDn Hall Art Gallerj-'s exhi- 
bition of its Picture Rental Col- 
lection will close todaj'. 

Beginning tomorrow, universi- 
ty students and residents of 
Chapel Hill can rent pictures of 
their choice from the collection. 

The rental charge is 25 cents 
oer month per picture, pax'able 
in advance. Pictures may be rent- 
ed for not le:'s than one month 
nor more than three months. A 
deposit of $1 is also payable in 
advance and will be refunded up- 
m return of the picture. 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEBL: 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1956 


TUESDAYJ 

DTH 

The D| 

a staff me 
Editor Fr^ 
purpose of 
to discuss 
important 
all cid an| 
the rneetir 


Maybe A Litfle Boycott 
Would Bluff Col. Nasser 


REACTfON PIECE 


Readjusting to The United States 


It is cN idem that F.gvptian Presi- 
dent Nasser. like many Middle 
Eastern powers, stands continually 
on shakv ground. His regime was 
built and (ontinnes to exist on a 
kind ot personal jX)pularity that is 
foreign to the Ameri<an political 
system. 

Nasser unist placate his snhjetts. 
or he may he lemoved in the same 
wav he came to jx)wer. 

F<'r this reason, it wonld he wise 
hir the Western j^ouers to consider 
bov{<)tring his country. Then, per- 
haps Nasser would start talking aiid 
acting sensihlv about the Sue/ 
Clanal. 

The rnited .States, for example, 
holds an axe high above Nassers 
head, but refuses to dr{»p it. Ac- 
cording to New ^■ork Times ex])ert 
I homas%|. Hantilton: 

*■ There seems to l>e no intention 
in Washington oi invoking the 
most |ioiini \ve.ij>on ol all. the lilt- 
ing oi testrittions on the produc- 
tion ot long-staple cotton ii\ the 
liiited Slates. Fhese lestrictions 
lia\f heljHil keep up the prite h)r 
Kgyptian long-staple cotton, which 
is KgApt s chiel expoii; iheir re- 
moval would pi*obablv break tlie 
market and reduce KgApt's loreign 
exchange resources acocrdinglv." 

Cihaiues are strong that a West- 
ern bovcott of Fgvpt Avc^uld hint 
Nasser's popularitv among his 
subjects, something that means a 
lot in Fgypt. 

C'.ertainlv. we would have to fig- 
ure on the possibilities of Russia s 
nio\ing in where the West had 
mo\ed out. But indications are the 



NASSER 

■. ... boycott? 

' The Reporter 

Soviet I iiion woiilcln't ha\e enough 
inonev to make up lor the Wests 
patient jiatronage of Kgypt. 

.Nasser has used the bluff better 
than most people. While he ob- 
viously woni get the .\suan High 
Dam built wiihoiu help from the 
outside (that was his ■'reason " for 
seizing the Canal in Jnly). he has 
succeeded in shuffling the diplo- 
matic pomic lies of the rest of the 
Avorld. 

It is time ofr the Western na*- 
lions to cjuit playing the part of 
the f)lufee and to ^el to \\ork on 
Nasser. An economic boycott 
woidd be hi>»hlv effectixe. 


Fall: Time To Contemplate 


Autumn canu o\er the weekend. 

The arrival <.f the autiminal 
equinox confimied what we had 
suspected for quite some time: The 
summer is fading awav. although 
vve still wear lic^it clothes; fall and 
winter are coming in. and Nature 
is dying for a little while. 

Now, remindel by the fact that 
jr is officiiliv l..;i, we see more 
dead L on the ground. The 

grass < . -vhich this university rests 
is taking on a different hue, and 
the sunlight is coming from a total- 
ly difterent cjuarter. 

The graitmier and high school 
students are begimiing \isit the 
PPIPanPetarinm in their thcm.s- 
and-toloied school buses. The 
girls from Woman's College and 
the girls from .\verett College 
have come and gcjne, and a whole 
new rasli .of leters fjetvveen here 
and Danville and betwen here and 
(.reensboro will soon develop. 

l-irst examinations will be given 
beh)re too long, another sure sign 
:»f the seasons' change. In just a 
few weeks Walter Spearman will 
have his high school journalists 
here for a weekend of talk and 
exploration, and in only a little 
while the cars will be lined up late 
at night before the gasoline stat- 
tions' antifree/e cans. 

The .Xrboretiun will become 
alntost — but n<»t cjuiie— too cold 
a place to take your date, but some- 
how both of vol! will live through 


The Daily Tar Heel 


The official student publication of the 
Publicatiuns Board of the University of 
North Carolina, where it is published 
daily except Monday and e.xaminatioii 
and vacation periods and .summer terms 
Entered as second class matter in the 
post office in Chapel Hill. N. C, under 
the Act of March 8. 1870. Subscripton 
rates: mailed. $4 per year. $2.50 a semes- 
ter; delivered, $6 a year, $3.50 a semes 
ter. 


another winter on those 
benches. 


irecn 


Editor 


FRED POWLEDGE 


Managing Editor CHARLIE JOHNSON 


News EMitor 


RAY LINKER 


Business Manager BILL BOB PEEL 


As we learned in grammar school, 
the leaves will pile themselves upon 
the ground, and thev will decay. 
They will make new. greener grass 
for next spring — taller, thicker 
trees for next summer . 

The leaves also m.ike the woods ' 
aroimd the Ihiiversity soft and 
springy. They are nice to walk on 
these aiuumn days. .\s ycui walk 
on them, voii think harder, and 
you think about deeper subjects 
than last v\eekend's date and how- 
to oxercut' without getting an K. 

For this reason, primarily, an-"" 
tunm is a gcM)d season. It is a sea- 
son o fself-contemplation, of men- 
tal and emotional prejjaration lor 
the long months of little sunlight. 

Kxcept lor s|)ring, a better sea*, 
son couldn't ha\e been invented 
for students. 


Now, Let's 
Get Down To 
Essentials - 

Carolina's loss to .State College 
down in Kenan Pines .Saturday 
seived onci good puipose. It made 
S(»me peojile realize that Coac h )im 
Tatum is human. 

There was coirsiderable doubt 
about this fact beh)re the game. 
Some overeager alumni— and manv 
students, too — had the feeling that 
Tatcnn's ariival here would im- 
mediately set I'.NC back into the 
justice Kra. 

Of course, anything o fthe soi t 
uoidd have been pine coincidence. 
V\ hile Taium is known from coast 
to coast as otie of the country's best 
h)otbaill coaches, he is not knovvn 
as a magic ian. 

If, as his advance pid)Iicity 
claims, he has thc*^ ability to give 
(Carolina a wimiing hiotball team- 
within the conference rules and 
regulations .u)d within the frame- 
work of the University — then it 
will take a little time for him to 
do it. 

Foi those few who already have 
started yelling goc»d-Jiaturedlv for 
Tatmn's head, a little patience. 

.And for (ioach latum and our 
football team, more j)ower and 
practice. 


Dave Mundy 

David Mundy u> a IXi. 
ftsychology major if ho rr- 
iin)ird a inonl/i ai!;o from a 
\rar of study and travel in 
f.uropc. He sj)eut two se- 
mesters at Georg August 
L'niversitaet i>i Goettiuge^i. 
('•eruiany. as the first e\' 
</m><t;c student in a pro- 
gram arranged hy admiu- 
isfration. faculty, and stu. 
dent agencies of I'XC ami 
(ioettingen. Muridy is a 
former Dail\ Tar H e e I 
.staffer who has also been 
active iyi sfxieral other e\- 
tra-curriculars. He returns 
to the I) I'H this semester 
it'ith his old column. "Re- 
at tiou Piece." 

The fir.st thing to which I log- 
ically could be expected to re- 
act is the mast recent, and big- 
gest, experience of my jrhort and 
blue-eyed lite: a year in Euro'pe. 
That at least provides a rich 
field for reactions of all shapes, 
colors, sizes and odors: and 
those reaction.^■ may well range 
from "Sex Life of the .Average 
European Student" to an article 
on "Sein Excellenz. Herr Bunde- 
spraesident Theodor Heuss von 
Schwaben." 

Just pardon the recurrence of 
the pronoun.*! "I" and "me." If 
these ■"reactions'" seem di.sjointert, 
it s only because my experiences 
were di.sjointed. 

Anything I say about the UNC- 
Goetlingen exchange program 
must of necessity show a strong 
personal influence, even to the 
point of an honest admission that 
I can 33 of yet offer no objective 
evaluation of the program. 

The year was spent in compar- 
ative isolation from "The Amer- 
can Culture," Excepting two 
graduate students from L^NC 
whose company I enjoyed on oc- 
casion, the very well-welcomed 
Daily Tar Heels and an occasion- 
: aly European edition of Tnuc?, 
the isolation was almost com- 
plete. 

Even after a month in the 
U.S. I ffeel less -in place." albeit 
far happier, than in Goettingen. 
But I still cant speak German. 

I spent eleven months in Goet- 
fiihgcn, one in Berlin, one in 
Bonn, and .something more than 
one month just traveling around. 
The winter seme.-ter extends 
from November through Febru- 
ary, the summer semester from 
May 1 until the end of July. The 
amount of time spent in Goet- 
tingen is not indicative of my 
like of that ci(:ty. but of my dis- 
like for traveling. 

There are no compulsory class 

SIDEBAR 


attendance rules fo mo.-.'t lectures 
at German universities, so a stu- 
dent can take a two or three week 
vacation smack in the middle of 
a semester if the five months of 
regular vacation isn't enough for 
him. 

Admittedly I could have been 
ether than a diligent student had 
Goettingen offered a few means- 
of con.suming time other than 
just plain studying. So sometimes 
I was bored stiff. 

My disillusionments were many, 
whether petty or seriou.-.-. The 
greatest one was in regard to 
the German universities: they 
just aren't the fine institutions 
I had expected. In the un.settled 
years after Police .\cUon Num- 
ber One many profes.vors came 
to the ITnited States. 

During the National Socialist 


era the university staffs enjoyed 
the possibilitie.s- of being Nazi- 
fied > National Socialized), kick- 
ed out of the glorious thousand- 
year Reich-, allowed to escape the 
land of the supermen to Eng- 
land or the United States, gassed, 
shot, or jujt quietly liquidated. 

During Police Action Number 
Two many staff and faculty mem- 
bers were casaulties of war, 
whether by action on the fronts 
or by American and English 
"Terror Attacks." Most ot the 
buildings, in.^'titutes and librar- 
ies were pulverized in these at- 
tacks. 

After the end of the Police 
Action, the Universities were 
denazified, which meant that 
much of the remaining teaching 
staff was forbidden to teach, al- 
though some in West Germany 


were retired on s-alary. 

The natural science faculties 
weathered these storms better 
than the other faculties, but 
even they were deeply hurt. 

So, despite the efforts of sev- 
eral very able profesa-ors in the 
post-1945 era, some German uni- 
versities are still academically 
bankrupt. 

Their chief asset is a stupen- 
dously efficient and thorough 
school system. American univers- 
ities would be far better had they 
.-Mch a system behind their stu- 
dents. 

I had a whole slue of disillus- 
ionments and disappointments in 
regard to the beauties of the 
"fair" sex in Europe. On that 
i-core it is a distinct pleasure to 
be again in North Carolina. 


'Those Poor Freshmen Have To Walk!' 



'BAiCMftSi, 


Re-Announcing, A Forgotten Candidate 


t:-v 


Charlie Sloan 

Columnist Sloan sf)ends 
most of his time around the 
Daily Tar Heel office with 
hehind-the-.scenes stuff, hut 
frou) time to time lie finds 
time tt) break through tite 
f)ile of maiiu.<icrij)ts on his 
desk to fiound out one of 
own. 
This columns overline, the 

word between the cartoon and 
the headline, is one of the more 

Pdgo 


printable term.s heard around 
GM's second floor snake pit, the 
offices of The Daily Tar Heel. 

The word's exact meaning ha.-; 
something to do with an allied 
story. That is. a story about the 
story that made the story. Sim- 
ple? 

• • • 

Riggest national news in mr.st 
ncwspaper.v thes days is what 
the candidates for president are 
doing to get votes. 

Unfortunately it seems that 


only two of the 
major candidates 
are getting any 
recognition. This 
is a gross injuo'^ 
tice. 





'Missing from POGO 

the front pages. .. iV/r. Caricfidatg 
of our nation's papers is the 
name of a candidate who has 
been well known to students- for 
years. 


Without further beating around 
the bush, let it now be said that 
I find myself Pog chairman for 
this paper, and. as such, am in 
po.--session of a passel oi "I Go 
Pogo" buttons. 

A real campaigner would go 
running madly about the camp- 
us thrusting the buttons at every 
peison he met. So, if my read- 
er in interested, ho can come 
up to The Daily Tar Heel office 
and pick up his button. 

So much for tub-thumping. 


hf\i 


By Wait Kelly 



MV MKD 


^rupyiN AN A- 

'- AN' I eguevf 

1^ '30\!^ MAP£ 


r 



A n/^V 


'^ 


gaar cow \ AiN*r 
sTtHJ if Ml.'$t f»W U^Al- 

OF 066N ^(ye ' t^5 WAV7 J 

WAP T. 


r^ouSu^ \vA5, wr£)^f/ 



Li'l Abn^r 


By Al Capp 


/^re You a Run-down 
Ridiculous Runt? 



Of Course You Are ! 



9 ir 


▼Vovild you 
like to look 
like m«? 

I, Stanley 
Strongnose . 
can make a 
MAN of you! ! 
Send in 
a photo of 
your anemic, 
pitiful body 
and I will 
teach you how 
to build your- 
• elf up ! ! 


WHAT A BUILT.'.'- AH'uL SEND IN A 
PirCHER. O MAN AMEMIC, PiTiFUL 
e>ODV, AN' MEBE>f STRONGNOi:>F^ 
h- IN HELP ME.':'' 


l^-y 



I Carolina 
Caroleidoscope 

Frank Crowther 

I wonder just what goes through a professor's 
mind the day before his first class of the" secest§t 
(wind!) V, 

Some of them undoubtedly fret over their first 
impression made on the students. Some think they 
must be harsh and scare hell out of them; others 
don't think too much about; and others, most likely, 
become more benevolent and are very anxious to 
return to the classrooms. 

But what comes out that first day is nev^r pre* 
dicctable. 

"If you haven't heard of me, you'll wish you 
never had after this semester!" from an old FYencli 

stalwart. 

"Do you realize that one half of the graduating 
have never had any American History?" from the 
students that march across Navy field every year 
history professor. 

"If you study until 6 a.m. in the morning aiid 
sleep through my class, my heart will bleed for 
you," in th& Psych section. 

"Look out the windoy, and you'll see the pro- 
fessors riding on bicycles while the students drive 
Cadillacs!" said the Social Science instructor. 

"IVe been in this racket for 25 years, so don't 
try anything!" from the BA school. 

"Miss Carolyn Jones?" asked the instructor call- 
ing the role. 

"That's Mrs. Jones," came tht reply. ' 

"Oh! I'd better make a note of that," said the 
D. A. Assistant. • 

"Miss or Mrs. Joan McCleod?" he asked, con- 
tinuing. 

"Here. That's Miss XlcCleod, sir," she stated. * 

"Ah," he said. 'I'll have to m|ke a note of that, 
too!" : 


I have just come upon the true characterization 
of the Philosophy Department. 

They have the men who spend much time and 
effort explaining to us the explinations that ex- 
planations of the explainers who explained the first 
explanations . . . er . . . well, that's what he said. 

I was complaining that Philosophy left one with 
the feeling that he had come in hanging n midair 
and was sailing back out in the same predicament. 

"Philosophy is supposed to do that." replied the 
professor. "You are supposed to be left hanging In 
abeyance. We don't necessarily have to take a stand 
or state oiu- beliefs. We just put forth the opinions 
of others and let you knit your own sweater." 
Izzat so? . . . Drop-Add. 


A thought . 
fusius. 


by a new author of promise, Con- 


"Learning without thought brings ensnarement. 
Thought without learning totters. Study as if you 
were never to master it; as if in fear of lo.sing it." 


YOU Said It: 


:.^'^ 


I - *>'■>, i'- I 


Ivy League Look, 
Sign Of Peasant 

Editor: ■ . -. r • • . > 

When one sees all the students dressed in what 
seems to be the "college uniform" around here all 
day and realizes it is representative of the con- 
formity that has pervaded this place, it is not sur- 
prising that we still have the three-cut rule. 

Last year a plan was presented by the legislature 
which was a compromise for the present three-cut 
rule. Without going into particulars it was essential- 
ly the same thing except you didn't fail; your grade 
was lowered after the third cut. It was turned down 
as academically unsound. What they meant to say 
was, it was almost as academically unsound as the 
one we've got. '?= ^ 

This is supposed to be a student governed school. 
Yet we have Saturday classes which no one includ- 
ing the instructors want and >re fail after three cuts 
which puts both studerrts a/id instructors under 
pressure. 

The mos academically sound thing that can be 
done is to make the three-cut rule null and void. 
This would, at least, eliminate the tension of com- 
pulsory attendance six days a week and no one 
would fail who probably wouldn't have failed any- 
way. 

If the stuf^ents could see past their striped, but 
ton-down shirts they would realize it is peasant at- 
tire and the absolute monarchy is in South Building. 

Byren Frtaman 



Wc 

If o| 


Ivy 

Lec 


We tak 
cut Sh( 
to 3 bu 
the bac 
Fast 


Pete 


F 

E 
E 


i 






TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 25, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE THRBI 


tu 


lou 
Feb 


the 


Iro- 


kn't 


all- 


Ithe 


PA- 


lat. 


kticm 


and 
ex- 
first 
lid. 

with 
idair 
lent. 

I the 
»g in 
tand 
lions 
ler." 


Con- 


DTH Staff Meeting 

The Daily Tai* H«el will hold 
« staff meeting at 4 p.m. today. 
Editor Fred Powledge said the 
purpose of the meeting would be 
to discuss accuracy and. other 
important items. He urged that 
all eld and new staffers aHend 
the meeting. 


Trustees Make Progress 
On President Selection 


Covering The University Campus 


Want Your 
OLD SUIT 

Ivy 

Leagueized 

We take out pleats. Re- 
cut Shoulders, convert 
to 3 button, put belt in 
the back. 

Fast and Efficient 
Service 

Pete the Tailor 


The University Trustees's com- 
mittee to recommend a nominee 
for President of the Consolidated 
University is making good prog- 
ress. Governor Hodges told the 
full Board in its meeting here 
Saturday morning. 

In i«ome informal remarks on 


Left Holding 
The Bag? 

We'll find a 'market for your 
dropped texts. Bring them ini 

THE INTIAAATE 
BOOKSHOP 

205 E. Franklin St. 
Open Till 10 P.M. 


the quest for a successor to 
Gordon Gray, the Governor add- 
ed that the presidency commit- 
tee, headed by attorney Victor 
Bryant of Durham, might re- 
quest another meeting of the 
Trustees soon to make its rec- 
ommendation so that the Board 
might elect a Preaident. 

The Board also approved reso- 
lutions authorizing $2,000,000 in 
bonds each for construction of 
new dormitories on the campus 
at Chapel Hill and at State Col- 
lege. A resolution was passed to 
build additional dormitory facil- 
itie.v in the amount of $1,000,000 
under a similar bond issue at 
the Woman's College in Greens- 
boro. 


I RALEIGH MUSIC ASSOCIATION I sentee ballot, write the League of 
j The Raleigh Civic Music Assn. Women Voters, Box 1038, Chapel 

will present seven concerts by the [ Hill, or Call Mrs. Robert Sager at 

world's leading soloists, symphonic j &-2679. 


F 
R 
E 
E 


WIN AN ENGLISH BIKE 
OR MOTOROLA TABLE RADIO 

STUDENTS ONLY! 

ALL YOU HAVE TO DO 

IS BRING THIS AD INTO 

OUR STORE AND REGISTER 

NOTHING TO BUY! 


F 
R 
E 
E 


VOTING INFORMATION 

The League of Women Voters 
will give detailed information con- 
cerning all States' laws on absentee 
voting. Persons away from home 
who want to vote in the national 
election, may call Mrs. Robert 
Sager, 82679, or write to the 
League of Women Voters, P. 0. Box | 
1083, Chapel Hill. I 


and choral organizations on its 
1956-57 concert series, and will in- 
clude a performance by the famed 
Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, ac- 
cording to Charles Stepaenson Jr., 
president of the association. 

Memberships may be secured 
from Miss Louise Ward of the Bac- 
teriology Dept., Memorial Hospital 
in Chapel Hill. 
CHESS CLUB 

The UNC Chess Club will hold 
its first meeting of the year to- 
night at 8 in Roland Parker Lounge 
3 in Graham Memorial. All old 
members and other interested per- 
sons are urged to attend, according 
to President Jack Speir. 
YOUNG ADULT FCLLOWSHtP 

The Young Adult Fellowship will 
meet at the University Methodist 
Church tomorrow night at 8 p.m. 
All graduate students have been 
invited. A party has been planned 
in honor of new students. 
ABSENTEE BALLOTS 

The League of Women will assist 
any non-resident of age to vote by 
absentee ballot. For any informa- 
tion concerning any state's ah- 


PW DELTA KAPPA 

The Phi Delta Kappa, Beta Theta 
chapter of the professional frater- 
nity for men in education, ask all 
UNC members and brothers of 
other chapters to attend their meet- 
ing in Lenoir Hall at 6 p.m. on 
Thursday. Dr. Guy B. Phillips, pro- 
fessor of education at UNC and 
director of the survey of the Golds- 
boro Schools, will discuss the tech- 
niques, findings, and recommenda- 
tions of the Goldsboro Schools 
survey. 
PUBLIC HEALTH SCHOOL 

A total of 137 students have been 
registered in the University School 
of Public Health, according to Dr. 
E. G. McGavran, dean of the school. 
INTERVARSITY FELLOWSHIP 

The Inter-Varsity Christian Fel- 


!l 


B.F.Goodpich 


FIRST IN RUBBER- Fll^Sr IN TUBELESS 


BROWN'S AUTO SUPPLY 

312 W. FRANKLIN ST. 
PHONE 6981 


ESSO GAS 


Reg. 29.9 H.T. 32.9 


- CASH - 


iSr^i 


Whipple's Esse Service 

ACROSS PROM CHAPEL HILL NURSERY— DURHAM HWY. 

BUY EARLY— SAVE— NATIONALLY ADVERTISED 

PERMANENT ANTIFREEZE $2.7S Gal. 

EXTRA! ^XTRA! EXTRA! 

Bring this ad and receive one cant p*r gallon off on gat, and 
fivo contt per quart off on oil. This makos ESSO gas M.9 and 
31.9. Good Sept. 25 Thru Oct. 1, 19S6. ^ 


Soccer Squad 
Is Shaping Up 

Coach Marvin Aliens Carolina 
soccer squad is gradually rounding 
into shape. No starting lineup for 
the season's opener Oct. 8 has been 
set yet, as Coach Allen is experi- 
meotioe with various combinations 
to determine the best possible unit. 

Sunday, Coach Allen, Freshman 
Coach John Wienants and varsity 
captain Grover Brown attended a 
rules clarification meeting at Char- 
lottesville, Va., along with repre- 
sentatives of the other four teams 
in the ACC. 


»*ri^«iT.f.. v<^\' tt^irjii/j :!-♦*:_♦ "i fr,,/'';^-^-'^ 


i-f*-- 


't^-jt ^- ■ rrc^ / 


^ SUTTONS 

Wednesday Only, Sept. 2^th 




Mushroom Discussion 
On WUNC Today 

Some of the n(v>'ths about mush- 
rooms will be exploded when 
WUNC-TV presents its first in- 
school program of the 1956-57 
school year today at 2 p.m. op 
Channel 4. 

Dr. John Couch, head of the 
Dept. of Botany, an expert on 
mushrooms, will outline the dif- 
ferences between poisonous and 
edible mushrooms on the first pro- 
gram in the series, "Science and 
Nature." He will also discuss some 
of the superstitions regarding 
them. 





i«t Us Treat Your Rmltmgi^ 








^ed, storting tomorrow, you con bring your 

Remington Electric Shaver to our store and 

hove it cleaned, oiled, sterilized and adjusted 

absolutely without cost or obligation by a 

factory-trained Remington Shaver expert f 

Damaged or worn ports replaced at 

low factory prices. If your 

Remington isn't giving satisfaction, 

be sure to bring it in tomorrow. 




FREE 

HOME TRIAL... 


we will hold your old shaver until 
the trial period is up. 

$29.50 
7.50 


Regular Price 
Less Trade-In . 


1'" * 


1^^ Pa^a^ ^22.00 


SAVE REAL MONEY ON 
A NEW REMINGTON I 

$7.50 is almost one quarter of the full 
purchase price of d new Remington 
60 De Luxe. Yet, that's exactly what 
we will allow you for your old stand- 
ard moke electric shaver as a trade- 
in. Dig out that old shaver and bring 
it in . . . YOU'LL SAVE REAL MONEY I 


PRESS-LIBRARY SHOW 

One of last year's outstanding 
educational TV programs will re- 
turn In a new fall scries Tuesday 
at 7 p.m. on WUNC-TV. On alter- 
nate weeks, Andrew Horn, Univer- 
sity Librarian, and Lambert Davis, 
Director of the University Press, 
will preside on the programs. This 
Tuesday there will he a joint in- 
troduction to the series bj»the two 
hosts. 


CLASSIFIEDS 


LOST: BLACK POCKETBOOK 
with green billfold inside plus 
driver;/ license. Probably lost in 
Peabody Hall. If found, please 
return to Elizabeth Hightower, 
Smith Dorm. 

STUDENT WANTED FX)R PAKT- 
time work, preferably upper- 
classman with automobile who 
has some circulation experience 
on newspapers. Guaranteed sal- 
ary plus commission. Write Bmc 
XYZ, stating qualifications and 
giving references. 


IXIST — BILLFOLR. FRIDAY IN 
Lenior Hall or Law School be- 
tween 10 a.m. and noon. Con- 
tains valuable personal papers 
and approximately $200. Money 
for nurses attending my wife 
who has a fatal disease. If finder 
feels he needs money more than 
me, please return papers. $S0 
reward offered for honesty. Con- 
tact E. M. Murry at Law School. 


WANTED — RIDE TO RALEIGH 
Mon. thru Fi-i., arriving in Ra- 
leigh prior to «:30 a.m., return- 
ing to Chapel Hill approximate- 
ly 5.00 p.m. Contact Lee Gotten 
at Milton's Clothing Cupboard 
or call Durham l-862h after 6:00 
p.m. 


FOR RENT — ADJACENT TO 
campus conveient, furnished two 
room apartment. Electric kitch- 
en, bathroom with shower, cen- 
tral heat, j)ris«te entrance. Also 
— ^Attractive studio-bedroom, pri- 
vate entrance. Call 5421. 


LOST: ONE WIVES PASSBOOK. 
Lost Saturday in or around Ken 
an Stadium. Finder please call 
M362. 

WANT ADVENTURE, TRAVEL, 
driving experience? Want to go 
to Ann Arbor, Mich., Thursday 
at noon? Back for Monday class- 
es. Share gas bill. Call Powl- 
c#9e, 9^mi, «lter 2 p.n. 


lo.Tship will hold its first meeting 
today at 7 p.m. in the Hill Hall 
Choral Room. 

FULBRIGHT AWARDS 

Opportunities for study abroad 
in Europe, Asia, Latin America 
and other parts of the world are 
available this fall, according to Dr. 
Sturgis E. Leavitt, chairman of the 
local Fulbright committee at UNC. 

Nov. 1 is the deadline for sub- 
mitting applications, he said. Ful- 
bright awards, made on a national 
competitive basis, are available for | 
study in 19 countries. ' 


DTH To Carry Police 
Blofter Report Nov^ 


The Daily Tar Heel will carrj- 
the Chapel Hill poiice blotter from 
now on, according to the paper's 
editor. 

Editor Fred Powledge said yes- 
terday "We wil check on and print 
the names and charges listed on 
the police blotter with regularity. ' 

He warned students who may get 
into trouble with the police, and 
who would want their names and 
charges withheld from the student 
newspaper, that 'publication of 
the blotter is part of The Daily 


Tar Heel's 
community. 


responsibility to its 
We will not withhold 


any name or any charge. 


6EISHA vs NAVY WIFE 
BATTLE OF THE SEXES! 


THE STORY OF JUNGLE LOVEl 

UNTOUCHED 

A Strange and tender 
love in a place which 


6ENIETT 

SHItI 

MERSIll • TAMiieUCHi j 




NOW 
PLAYING 


■I, 



i . 


NEW sights, HEW experiences . . . 
" and solid comfort... when you 


€!• 


TRAILWAYS 


CHAPEL HILL TO 

ATLANTA 

• 3 trips, 1 thru-linar 

WILAAINGTON 

• 2 trips, direct route ^ 
plus add'1 daily service 

NORt^OLK 

• 7 trips, 4 thru-liners 


1-way 

CHAPEL HILL TO 1-way 1 

$8.95 

AAEMPH1S $16.00 1 


• 6 trips, 3 thru-liners 

$4.25 

^^'^- -'4..r.--\"*'^ 

>ltW YORK $n.20 

■ Sanford, 

• Thru (no chang*) service via 
Washington 

$5,35 

(plus tax) 

CHARLOTTE $ 3.90 

• 7 trips daily 1 

(plus tax) 1 


UNION BUS TERMINAL 

311 W. FRANKLIN ST. PHONE 4281 

Or catf your n«or«it TraHways Agitcyl | 



TRAILWAYS 

The route off the Thru-L-Inersl ^ 


^AGf pout 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


TUESDAY, SEPTTEMBER 25, 19S5. 


Hippy With One Point Win 


Wilkinson Fears 
Tar Heel Squad 


latum Makes 
Lineup Shifts 
ForOkla. Tilt 

Sept. 24 — un — Retrenching for 
Saturday's battle with mighty Okla- 
homa after a 26-6 loss to N. C. State 
last week, Coach Jim Tatum did 
some shifting of personnel on the 
Carolina football team today. 

Most noticable changes of sever- 
al was the return of Don Lear to 
fullback after a stint at guard. 
While the stocky Lear played a 
fine ball game at guard Saturday, 
he has been returned to fullback 
to hoisted that corps. 

Jim Varnum, who picked up 39 
yards in four carries against State, 
was promoted to first string left 
halfback today, with Jim Jones 
filling in at Lear's old left guard 
spot and Dick Smith moved into 
right guard's first spot. 

The remainder of^ the probable 
starters remain the same. 

Ed Sutton, whose brilliant run- 
ning was the Tar Heel offensive 
highlight Saturday, sat out the 
sessions with a bruised elbow. 
However, the injury was not seri- 
ous and Sutton will be back in gear 
Wednesday. 

Dave Reed, slated as the starting 
quarterback before he was injured 
this fall, was back jogging around 
the field. 

Reed may be held out for the re- 


♦ OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. 24 <^V- 
"If we win by one point, I'll be 
very, very delighted" Bud Wilkin- 
son, coach of the No. 1 rated Okla- 
homa Soeners, said today in speak- 
ing of his team's first test against 
North Carolina's football team 
Saturday. 


Wilkinson, speaking at the week- 
ly Oklahoma City Quarterback 
Club meeting, was commenting on 
optimistic talk after North Caro- 
lina was upset in its first game 
of the season by North Carolina 
State 26-6. 

Net known for his optimisim, 
Wilkinson told some 300 persons, 
"We may play the same kind of 
a game as North Carolina. I hope 
we won't," he said. 

"They played *a sound game but 
it was a typical opener. We are 
in top physical condition but I 
don't know if we are sound men- 
tally." 

Oklahoma was rated in the pre- 
season Associated Press poll as 
the nation's No. 1 team. The Soon- 
ers won the national title last year 
and stretched their winning streak 
to 30. 

He also pointed to last week- 
end's football upsets and added 
that this is a "yardstick of what 
will happen all season." 


mainder of the season if his knee 
injury fails to come around prop- 
erly. Today was his first tr>' at 
running since the injury. Return- 
ing to full scale work was full- 
back Joe Temple of Valdese, who 
had been sidelined over a week 
with a concussion. 


IT'S FOR REAL! 


by Chester Fi«ld 


1^. 





'*To (»tch a man,** aaid Violette 

"Hie wisest gals (day hard to get!** 
To seem remote and quite akwf 
She sat six years upon the roof. 

"It doesn't seem to work" she said 
And so she clobbered ihem instead. 

She dirugged, "I do the best I can 
(JnamaeiouB or not^ e nmn it a manF' 


¥^ 




Moaaii Faint pleaeurs ain't pteasursT 
In smoking too, take your pleasure BIG. 
&&oke tor ml . . . smoke Cherterfiekl. 
Packed mote smoothly by A tm-tt m f 
it's the gmoothtM tasting onoke today. 


DAILY CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1. Performer 
6. Shore road 

of Hong 

Kongr 

11. Speech 

12. Competitor 

13. Girl's name 

14. Capital of 
Colombia 

15. Negative 
word 

16. Afternoon 
perform- 
ance 

17. Thulium 
(sym.) 

18. VenUlated 

19. Philippine 
trees 

31. Smallest 
■Ute (abbr.) 

32. Exclama- 
tion of 
disgust 

29. Song bird 
98. Kamas of 

tribes 

(comtt. 

form) 

30. Bon« 
(aaat.) 

SO. Se«l 
coating 

31. Insects 

33. Type 
mcasurs 

34 Contami* 
nated 

37. Half ems 

38. Kitchen, aid 
88. Supporting 

timber 

40. Man's name 

41. Swell 

42. Equals 

43. Genhan 
dty 


DOWN 

1. One of the 
hills of 
Rome 

2. Republic 
(S.A.) 

3. Slant 

4. Tuber (S.A.) 

5. Music note 

6. Necessary 
food element 

7. Unbending 

8. River (Eng.) 

9. WestraUan 
eucalypt tree 

10. Wings 
14. English 
coonsel 
14. Music note 


18. Tree 

20. Grow 

old 

22. Stripe 

23. Status 
of 


24 


an 
alien 
Steers- 
men 

2«. Work- 
ers 

27. Fuel 

31. Collier 

32. Man's 
nickname 

a. Cup holding 
diamond for 
cutting 


3nL411 Ljrj:aLi:LlLJ 

PiLj jQuna nil 
L-uiiaanz Jim 


Vesterdky't Aaawer 

35. Fencing 
sword 

36. Festival 

37. Lampreys 
39. Public 

vehicle 
41. Exist 



Up Car ^ 
SPORT" 


Urry Cheek. Sports Editor 


The gloom around the Carolina campus Saturday night 
was thick as London fog, and rightly so. Coach Jim Tatum's 
Tar Heel football team, much ballyhooed in pre-season pub- 
licity, had gone down to stunning defeat at the hands of 
State in the season's opener that afternoon. And the students 
were bitterly disappointed. The expected miraculous trans- 
figuration of last year's losing teatn'into a conference power- 
house this season hadn't taken place. 

Is the outlook as bad as a hasty look would seem to itidicate? 
We don't think so. We still have one dt the country's best coaches, 
and a team with lots of potential. There are nine more games ahead 
of the Tar Heels, and each Saturday is a new day when anything 
could happen. 
DEFENSE IS WEAK SPOT 

Let's take stock of the situation. A lot of things went wrong 
against State, but many of these are flaws that can be cleared up with 
time and » lot of hard work. The >^cefully inadequate Tar Heel de- 
tetfse was the chief sore spot, but this was not entirely unexpected. 
Tatum had issued repeated warnings that his defense might not be 
up to par, that it was unpredictable. 

The Tar Heels spent no time on the defensive phase of the 
game last spring, and very little this fall. Lack of preparation proved 
disastrous Saturday when State Coach Earle Edwards unleashed his 
colorful and confusing multiple offense. The Pack crossed midfield 
seven times during the game, and four times they countered for 
touchdowns. Each score came through the air, as the Tar Heel 
ground defense stiffened near payoff territory. 

Prospects for remedying the weak defensive situation are good. 
Tatum is a recognized master at cooking up impenetrable defenses, 
as Maryland opponents for the last few years will testify, and chances 
are he will field a tougher Tar Heel defensive team in future games. 
OFFENSIVE PUNCH SHOWS PROMISE 

On the plus side of the ledger was the Tar Heel offensive punch. 
This too left something to be desired, but at least Ed Sutton and Co. 
demonstrated some ability to move the ball. Five times during the game 
they penetrated State territory, and on every occasion but one, some 
unforseen incident prevented a successful payoff push. 

On the first drive, Sutton went 20 yards for a touchdown, on 
the second they were stopped by the halftime buxzer on the Pack 
22, the third found them losing a fumble on tha State 43, a punt 
was blocked on the fourth, and a pass intercepted on the fifth. Add 
to this the fact that Stae controlled the ball throughout most of the 
game, and the reason for Carolina's sputtering offense becomes clear. 
Top individual performer for the Tar Heels was without a doubt 
flashy halfback Ekl Sutton, who more than lived up to advance notices. 
Sutton was the day's top ground gainer with 90 yards in 10 carries. 
The Tar Heel co-captain ran through, around and over the Wolfpack, 
and looked like one of the greatest backs to wear the Carolina blue 
and white in years. On his 20 yard TD dash, the curly haired senior 
went the last 8 yards with a psir of would be State tacklers hanging 
on hi.s back, unable to bring him down. 

Other Tar Heels had their moments. Curt Hathaway and Doug 
Farmer, although lacking polish, displayed a skillful touch at quarter- 
back. Speedy Jim Varnum broke loose for a couple of nifty runs. 
And scrappy Don Lear sparked the Tar Heel line in his first game at 
guard. 


Cross-Country 
Team We/come 
Jim Beatty Back 

Varsity cross-country stock took 
a big jump Sunday with the return 
of number one ace Jim Beatty from 
an AAU sponsored tour of Finland. 

Beatty spent six weeks abroad 
with several other American dis- 
tance runners. During that time, 
he worked on training methods 
and running styles with the Scan- 
dinavian runners. 

Coach Ranson said yesterday that 
the squad as a whole had a long 
way to go before the opening meet 
with Virginia Oct. 5. Beatty is in 
top flight shape after his European 
trip, but others on the squad still 
haven't reached good form follow- 
ing a long summer layoff. 

A pair of sophomores, Wayne 
Bishop and Dave Scurlock, are pro- 
gressing rapidly and head the list 
along with Beatty. Everett What- 
ley, number two man from last 
year, has been slowed down by a 
virus infection, but should get 
down to heavy work this week. 

First time trials of the season 
will be held Friday. 


Fall Baseball Practice 
Meeting Set For Today 

Coach Walter Rabb has announc- 
ed that all boys, (freshmen inclu- 
sive) interested in baseball tryouls 
are urged to report to room 314 
Woollen Gym this afternoon at 4 
o'clock. 

Rabb said that if anyone inter- 
ested had labs or previous com- 
mitments today, he could report 
to Emerson Stadium tomorrow at 
3 p.m. After today, practice ses- 
sions wil be held at Elmcrson every- 
day beginning at 3. 



We Have Just Bought In 
A Small Library Of 

EUROPEAN 
HISTORY 

If your interest runs that way, 
take a look in our Old Book 
Corner. 

THE INTIMATE 
BOOKSHOP 

205 E. Franklin St. 
Often Till 10 P.M. 


Managers Meet 

Fraternity intramural manag- 
ers are urged to be present in 
room 301a, Woolen Gym Thurs- 
day night. Each fraternity must 
have a representative at the 
meeting. 


the Magic 
Pin 

By Chapel Hill's Own 

Ina B. Fergus 

A wonderful, warm, magic 
book for the 6 to 10 age group. 

$2.50 

at 

The Intimate 
Ek>okshop 

205 E. FRANKLIN ST. 
OPEN TILL 10 P.M. 


SHIRTS -19c 


EA. 


(Packaged In Cellophane) 


I'^mffiiHim 


We handle 


uiithCARE 


With or Without 
Starch 

Prompt Service 



Glen Lennox Laundromat 


. , . near Howard Johnson's 
on the Chapel Hill— Durham Blvd. 


^^4:.^iM' 



""'^^rv^Tt.^l^^^i^ 






'/ 


For The Young In Heart, 
Thrifty and Smart ... 


Ti 


^k> 


■■■ 




r- *f>;fi> 


GOOD FURNITURE 

:•^•■f-^J..',,•l '■■'»»';■ Jl* 

GUARANTEED SAVINGS^ "^ ' ^^ ' '^ 




/ 


Open Week Nights Til 9 
(Saturdays Til 6) 




^(^' 


9MB 



■1-n ::^t.i:^ 


'(' ':■■ 


THE PATIO 


Afternoon Cocktail Hour 


.'.Jts- 


1-5 P. M. 




1203. BEER 25c 
1603 BEER 35c 


i;:^i' 


Membership Cards For 
1956-57 Season 

Now On Sale 

' r~' -. - , ■ 

Avoid Cover Charge 

GOLF DRIVING RANGE 
BEER-DANCING 


/ 


1- 


THE PATIO 


si^^ 


F 
R 
E 
E 


'NOTHER 
CHANCE 


To Register For 
1957 Westinghouse 

Transitor Radio 
To Be Given Away 

FREE 

This Friday Afternoon 

We'll Call You On 
'Dig These. " Be Home! 

WCHL 


I; 


Phone 

Address 

Name 

Clip This Out and Mail To WCHL, Chapel Hill 


■■'^ 


1360 


F 
R 
E 
E 


mmmmmtm "mmmmmmmmmm 


' I 


ff « C LIW^ART 
SERIAL. DEPT. 
CHAPEL HILL, H. C* 
8-3X-49 


WEATHER 

Rain, with eyp«ct«d high of 74. 


VOL. LVIII, NO. 6 



V 

3rar Xecl 


YOUNG 

Editor comments on Student 
Body President. See page 2. 


Complete {/P) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1956 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PAGES THIS ISSUE 


f rat Rush 
Bids Go 
Out Today 

s 
All men students may obtain 
their fraternity rushing bids be- 
tween the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 
p.m. today at Gerrard Hall. 

Rushing bids will be available 
for three days, today, tomorrow 
and Friday. Gerrard Hall will be 
open from 9 a.m. to noon tomor- 
row and from 10 a.m. to noon on 
Friday, the final day for picking 
up bids. 

Rushing will then begin on Sun- 
day, Sept. 30. 

Interfraternity Council regula- 
tions stipulate that rusheej must 
visit every fraternity from which 
they receive bids. Failure to do so 
will eliminate them from further 
rushing in all fraternities. 

Rushees may begin attending the 
fraternities of their preference af- 
ter they have once vi^'ited every 
fraternity from which they re- 
ceived a bid. 

To^orow at 9 p.m., an IFC rep- 
resentative will visit the social 
room of each men's dormitory to 
give a short talk to all freshmen 
going throi^h rush, and to answer 
any questions concerning the rush- 
ing program. 



Yac!< Staff Members Find Time To Loaf And Work 


Yack staffers (in the picture at left). Miss Lari Lawrence, left, 
junior of Bradford, and Miss Bootsie Fowler, right, junior of Greens- 
boro find no seniors appearing to have their pictures made for the 
Yackety-Yack. But business picks up in the photo on the left. Miss 


N^nry M'-Far*den, senior of Atlanta, Ga , and Miss Sandra Clarke, 
senior of W. Palm Beach, Fla., fill out the necessary cards and pre- 
pare to face the photographer Seniors have until Friday to have 
their class pictures made. (Photos hy Norman Kantor.) 


October 15 Is Deadline 
For Student Insurance 


Quarterly Asks 
Students To 
Join Staff 

Students interested in working 
on the UNC literary magazine. The 
Carolina Quarterly, have been in- 
vited to come to the Quarterly of- 
fice in the north mezzanine of 
Graham Memorial today between 
4 and 6 p.m. 

According to Editor Marcelline 
Krafchick, the University literary 
magazine is the oldest in the 
South. In a recent issue of "Writ- 
er's Digest," The Quarterly was 
given highest rating among liter- 
ary magazines, ranking with "The 
Chicago Review," "The Atlantic 
Monthly" and "Harpers," she 
said. 

Positions are open on the fic- 
tion and poetry staffs, for volun- 
teer typing or office services and 
for help in the circulation and 
ousiness diepartments. 

Students are welcome to submit 
stories, articles and poetry for pub- 
lication in The Quarterly, Miss 
Krafchick said. Material for pub- 
licatioti should be sent to: The 
Quarterly, Box 1117, Chapel Hill. 
Stamped, self-addressed envelopes 
should also be sent with the ma- 
terial, she said. 


October 15 has been c-2t as the 
deadline for applications for stu 
dent insurance. 

It was recently reported that 
the deadline was October 1. but 
this was incorrect. 

The cost of the policy is $9.50 
a year. According to Ray Jeffries, 
a-'jistant to the dean of student 
affairs, the premium's cost has 
dropped since last year. 

Insured students will be cover- 
ed for up to $1,000 for any ex- 
pense caused by an accident and 
for up to S200 for .%'urgical ex- 
penses caused by sickness If the 
student dies. hi.s beneficir.ries will 
receive 81,000. 

Jeffries said recently. "I think 
this insurance plan payed off for 
us last year." He pointed out that 
the insurance comes to less than 
80 cents a month. 

The coverage is for a H-month 
period, including the pericd when 
••tudents are traveling to a^d from 
Chapel Hill, and while they are on 
vacation. Jeffries said last year 
there were not many claims but 
during the summer the company 
payed on policies several times. 

Applications for the insurance 
are available at the Y, Graham 
Memorial and the student govern- 
ment office. Jeffrie.- reminded 
students who already hold policies 
and are eligible to receive pay- 
ments for claims must file with 
the company. Blanks are available 
at his office in South Building and 
at the Infirmary. 

Students who have already paid 
premiums can pick up their 
identification cards at the student 
government office. But students 
who now sign up for the insur- 


anci> will have their cards mailed 
to them, so they should give their 
addresses when filling out the 
blaniis. 


INFIRMARY 

Students in the Infirmary yes- 
terday included: 

Miss Martha Jean Sitlay, John 
G. Burgwyn, Hubert H. Hs^vkins, 
Timothy L. Harris, Bob S. Rober- 
son, Clarence E. Smith Jr., Miss 
Isabel A. Holhrook, Miss Janet 
E. Summerell, Alvin W. Smith 
and Kennrfth H Oakley Jr. 


nev5 

m 
brief 



Mascot And Miss 

Rameses VII started his second season as Carolina's official mas- 
cot at the Carolina-State game on Saturday. He's shewn above with 
Patsy Poythress of Chapel Hill, junior Carolina coed and one of the 
Tar Heel cheerleaders. 


University Radio Will Debate On Frats is Tomorrow 

Start Operation Thurs. 


The Univer^'ity's educational 
radio station, WUNC, will return 
to full-time activity tomorrow, af- 
ter having an idle late summer. 

Oxford Man To 
Speak Here \ 
October 10-11 

Prof. .Alfred Ewert of the Ro- 1 
mance Languages faculty at Ox- . 
ford University will deliver two | 
addresses at the Univer^-ity on 
October 10 and 11. I 

His lecture on "Judas Iscariot 
in Medieval French Literature" is 
scheduled for 8 p.m. on Thursday, 
Oct. 11, in the Louis R. Wilson 
Library auditorium. He will speak \ 
on the afternoon of Oct. It) to < 
graduate students in the Romance j 
Languages Dept. 

Professor Ewert's address in the 
library auditorium will be open 
to the public, but his address to j 
graduate -.-tudents, entitled "The 
Strasbourg Oaths and the Eulalia," ; 
will be limited to persons in that. 
departmenL 


The station, broadcasting at 91.5 
on the FM dial, will begin its fall 
programming with a three day 
Festival of .Music beginning to- 
morrow and running through Sat- 
urday. 

On Sunday, the 30th, the station 
will begin regular programming 
with a host of new programs of 
both local and outside origination. 
Prcgramc' will consist of a variety 
of subjects . ranging from the 
lighter vein to the music of the 
m.asters. 

There will be drama, interview, 
documentary, and special news 
programs presenting a v/ider cov- 
erage of newsworthy events. 

Station Manager Joe Young ha.v 
announced that the new station 
staff is now being completed, and 
has extended an invitation to Uni- 
versity students interested in radio 
to make applications to join the 
staff. 

In addition to the Festival of 
Muiic, WUNC will begin its fall 
activities with a broadcast of an 
address by Dr. Hollington K. Tong, 
jmbassadpr of the Chinese Repub- 
lic to the United States, at 8 p.m. 
tonjorrow. 


'Views on fraternity and inde- 
pendent life will be aired by advo- 
cates of botTi sides tomorrow night 
at seven o'clock in the library as- 
sembly room. 

The discussion and debate will 
be sponsored by the YMCA F'cllow- 
ship group. Bob Leonard of the 
YMCA will be in charge of the 
program. 

All freshmen planning to pledge 
fraternities have been urged by 
the Y to attend the discussion. 

According to the Y circular an 


nouncing the debate, representa- 
tives from both sides will present 
the advantages of joining a fra- 
ternity. 


DIRECTORY DEADLINE 

Today is the deadline for cor- 
rections to be placed in the Stu- 
dent Directory, according to Jon 
Dawn, editor. 

Corrections of telephone num- 
bers or addresses should be 
turned in by calling the YMCA, 
6761, today. 


BROOKS WIN NO-HITTER 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. ;/pi— Sal 
Maglie pitched a no-hit game 
last night to keep the Brooklyn 
Dodgers within one-half of the 
first p'ace Milwaukee Braves in 
the National League pennant 
race. 

Maglie beat the Philadelphia 
Phillies, S to 0. 

Maglie, allowed only 3 Phillies 
tc reach base — two on walks and 
one when hit by a pitch. 

Milwaukee, with three games 
left, now has a record of 91 and 
6C Brooklyn has 90 and 60. (Sec 
A/.i'waukee results, page 4.) 

SUEZ CRISIS REACHES UN 

NKW YORK tAP)— The eyes of 
the wo.'ld will be looking at the 
Suez Canal crisis today through the 
windows of the UN Security Coun- 
cil. 

Both sides involved in the dis- 
pute — Egypt, which seized the wa- 
terway, and the western powers 
and 3ther shippers — will be trying 
to make their points. 

Britain and France — who brought 
the casf^ to the Council — are tryins 
to boat down a counter-attack by 
Kgypt. which claims Anglo-French 
moves are endangering peace. 

The United States, meanwhile, i.- 
keeping its stand to it.sclf. 

IN PARIS, British Prime .Minis- 
ter Eden and Foreign Secretary Scl- 
wvn Lloyd plan to discu.ss the Suez 
crisis with French leaders today. 
It is reported that the French are 
consideriiig promoting a new oil 
Dipeline across Israel to move Ara- 
bian oil to the Mediterranean in 
the event the United Nations fails 
to act on Suez. 

IN NEW YORK. Wall Street bro- 
kers attributed a sharp decline in 
the stock market yesterday to un 
certainties over the Suez Canal and 
to tight money. There were losses 
of more than $5 per share. 

ADLAI ASKS ACCEPTANCE 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. tAP)— Ad- 
iai Stevenson, in a speech here last 
night, called on Southerners to ac- 
cept the Supicme Courfs school 
'lesegregation decision as law-abid- 
■ng citizens. 

IN OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla., 
Vice President Ni.xon interrupted 
1 speech last night because of an 
attack of influenza and laryngitis. 


AT 8 P.M. IN CARROLL HALL: 


Civil War Scholar Speaks Tomorrow 


Dr. Bell I. Wiley of Emory Uni- 
versity, one of the nation'^- lead- 
ing authorities on the American 
Civil ^'ar, will deliver a public 
address tomorow night in Carroll 
Hall. 

The 8 p.m. address will be the 
fitst in a series of three scheduled 
to be given this year under s-pon- 
sorship of the Graduate History 
Club, Phi Alpha Theta history 
frati^rnity, and Graham Memorial. 

Other prominent historians 
slated to appear for the addresses , 


are Prof. Sidney Painter of John • 
Hopkins University and Prof. Hen- 
ry Steele Commager of Columbia 
University. Their addresses will be 
given in November and March, 
respectively. 

Tomorow's speaker, after -serv- 
ing as chairman of the hi.lory de- 
partments of the University of 
-Mississippi and of Louisiana State 
University, was appointed profes- 
sor of American History at Emory 
University in 1948. 

His pioneer volume, "Southern , 


Negroes, 1861-1855," v.dn the Mrs. 
Simon Baruch Prize and was pub- 
lished by the Yale University 
Press in 1938. Three of his later 
books are "The Plain People of 
the Confederacy." "The Life of 
Johnny Reb," and The Life of 
Billy Yank." 

Professor Wiley's address in Car- 
roll Hall, entiteld 'A Time of 
Greatness," will sum up his years 
of research into the role of the 
common soldier of the Confederacy 
and his views of that conflict. 


IDC Mo/ces Chinese Diplomat 
Plans For Speaks Tomorrow 

This Year 



Interdormilory Council plans for 
the coming academic year were j 
presented, in part, to a meeting of i 
dormitory presidents Monday ' 
night. 

President Sonny Hallford laid 
out a suggested agenda for the 
fall semester for each dorm pres- 
ident to mull over. 

Items far up on the Council's 
agenda which were mentioned are: 

(1) Nominating seuons for 
dormitory secretaries, treasurers, 
IDC representatives and intramur- 1 
al managers to be held tonight 
or tDmorrow night, as each in- i 
dividual dormitory sees fit. 

(2) Turning tn of candidate^,'' 
names for the respective offices 
to the IDC office in Now East An- 
nex by Friday. Sept. 28. 

(3) Elections in the individual 
dormitories on Tuesday, Oct. 2. 
(4) Interdormilory Council ban- 
quet to be held in the Carolina 
Inn. Oct. 10 at 6:45 p.m. 

After Hallford had 'announced 
these high spots on the immediate 
Council agenda, ether Council of- 
ficers ;?poke briefly to the assem- 
bled presidents. 

Council Vice President Neil Bass 
explained attendance regulations 
to the presidents and urged regu- 
lar attendance. 

Treasurer gob Carter then pre- 
sented a a"tatement of current fin- 
ances to each of the dorm presi- 
dents for their respective dormi- 
tories. Carter a • so explained 
necessary processing which mus-t 
occur before dormitories n^ay se- 
cure fund.s from the Council. 

The next Council meeting will 
be held on Oct. 10 at the Carolina 
Inn. University dignitaries will 
also attend the banquet. 



DR. K. TONG 

. io sjjeak here 


Editorial Staff 
Of Yack Named 
By Tom Johnson 

Editorial appointments for the 
1956 Yackety-Yack have been 
completed, editor-in-chief Tommy 
John-,-jn announced yesterday. 

The recent appointments are: 
managing editor, Gene Whitehead; 
assistant to the editor. Miss Judy 
Davis, chief photographer, Tru- 
man Moore; senior class editor. 
Miss Ann Melton; junior class 
editor. Miss Barbara Stockton; 
sophomore class editor, Clem 
Davis; 

Freshman cla.^B editor. Ken 
Walker; professional schools edi- 
tor, Miss Nancy Turner; activities 
co-editors, Frank Schrimsher and 
Tom Ray; student government ed- 
it;>r. Bert Davi.*: sports editor, Don 
Millen: • 

Sororities editor, B. J. .Madison: 
fraternities editor, Larry Harris; 
R.O.T.C. editor. Bill Kane; hon- 
oraries editor, Martie Whedbee; 
secre'ary to the editor. Miss Bobbi 
Smith. , 


Dr. Hollington K. Tong, Chinese 
ambassador to the U.S., will deliver 
an address in Hill Hall tomorrow 
night at eight o'clock. 

Dr. Tong will be the first of a 
series of speakers to be presented 
to the campus by the Carolina 
Forum. Jim Holmes, chairman. 

Dr. Tongs schedule includes: 

(li 5:52 p.m.: arrival at Raleigh- 
Durham Airport with probable 
coverage by Durham television 
station, ,WTVD. 

(2) 6:30 p.m.: banquet at the 
Carolina Inn with student leaders 
and University officials in attend- 
ance. 

(3) 8 p.m.: deliverance of ad- 
dress in Hill Hall. 

(4) 9 p.m.: Reception to be held 
in Dr. Tong's honor in the down- 
stairs lounge of Graham Memorial. 

Dr. Tong, who became ambassa- 
dor to the United States in May, 
1956, will speak on the subject. 

The Success of the New Tactics 
of the Chinese Communists." 


Seniors have 
Only 3 Days 
For Pictures 

Seniors have until Friday to 
have their class pictures for the 
Yackety-Yack made. 

The pictures are now being 
mad3 in the basement of Graham 
Memorial from 1 to 7:30 p.m. 

Editor Tommy Johnson said a 
new drape featuring a rounded 
neekhne is being used for senior 
girls this year to replace the V- 
necked drape used in previous an- 
nuals. 

The remainder of the picture- 
faking schedule is as follows: Oct. 
1-5 — Freshmen and Nursing School 
(except senior nurses). 

Oct. 8-12— Sophomores, Phar- 
macy School, Dental School, and 
Dental Hygiene students. 

Oct. 15-19 — Juniors, Medical 
School, Law School and Graduate 
School. 



Weil Lighted Reminder 


Miss Sylvia Yelton, UN£ graduate student and runner-up for the 
title of Miss Chape! Hill last spring, serves as a photogenic reminder 
of the Jaycees' annual light bulb sale, to be staged house-to4)ouse 
throughout the community this evening. 


Students Going 
To Averett Sat. 
Must Sign Up 

Slucients -"ho plan to attend the 
dance at Averett College in Dan- 
ville, Va., this weekend should 
sign up tomorrow in the Y, accord- 
ng to Bob Leonard of the YWC.\. 

The trip is sponsored bj: the 
Freshman Fellowship of the 
YMCA, but is open to upperclass- 
men as well as freshmen. Busses 
have been chartered and will leave 
at 6:15 p.m. on Saturday. 

The dance starts at 8:30 p.m. 
and ends at midnight.. Music at 
the dance will be furnished by a 
nir:e-piece band. Refreshments and 
a snack supper will be served. 

Total cost of the trip is $2, 
which is for the bus trip. 


Discussions On 
Rush Will Be 
Held Thursday 

Tho Interfraternity Council is 
sponsoring a discussion of frater- 
nity rushing for all freshmen and 
transfer students tomorrow at 9 ' 
p.m. in the social room of each 
dorm. I 

One member of the IFC, who 
will speak and answer questions 
on rush, has been assigned to each 
dorm, except Cobb and Battle- 
Vance-Pettigrew. Cobb has been 
assigned two and BVP three. i 

"We feel, ' said Dave Ward, IFC 
vice-president and chairman of 
rushing, "that rush means much 
more to boys if they attend these 
meeiings, which are designed to 
enlighten and answer all questions 
concerning rush." | 

• This is the second year that any 
system of dormitory discussion on , 
rush has been used. Students who 
have problems concerning rush 
either before or after the meeting 
have been asked to contact Ray i 
Ambassador of the Chinese Repub- j 


Alex Shepard Named Acting 
University Business Officer 


Acting President William Fri- 
day recently announced the ap- 
pointment of Alexander H. Shep- 
ard to be acting business officer 
and treasurer of the Consolidated 
University. 

The position approved by the 



ALEX SHEPARD .,. 

, . . new CU officer. 


1955 General .\.ssembly, was fiU'Cd 
by action of the executive com- 
mittee of the UNC Board of Trus^ 
tees and Shepard's appointment 
is effective immedjately. It is one 
of the major positions in the con- 
solidated office. 

Shepard has been assistjint to 
the UNC bu.^\ness manager. 

Friday stated. "Mr. Shepard's 
superior capabilities and his inti- 
mate knowledge of the functions 
and details of finances and busi- 
ness management of the Universi- 
ty are the reasons why he was the 
natural choice in making the selec- 
tion. His years of devotion to duty 
in the University, his knowledge 
of University affair." and his fun- 
damental ability were prime con- 
siderations." 

Shepard is a native of Wilming- 
ton and a graduate of Davidson 
College. He has been with UNC 
since 1932. and has been assistant 
to the bu.'iness manager since 
1943. He is married to the former 
Miss Sallie Cowell who was from 
Washington, N. C, and they have 
a son and a daughter. 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 19S6 


President Young: The Best 
In A School Generation 


THE LIVESPIKE: 


B«ib \'r>un<> has pro\en liimseH 
the best student bodv president in 
his college oreneration. 

.\s he said modestly at a politi- 
cal ineetin<» this week, his admin- 
istiation already has stained work 
on some of the students' hardest 
problems, and lia;*, turned out some 
fine residts. 

^'ouno listed these thiee areom- 
plishments abo\e the others: 

1. .Strict registration of student 
automobiles and enforcement of 
restrictions. 

2. Telephones on all floors of 
most men's dormitories whit h for- 
merK had only two telephones to 
serve three floors. 

;. Return of more than 200 lost 
books to the Wilson Library. 

It was personal action — good, 
hard, sweating work — on the part 
of President Voimg that turned 
up these results so soon after his 
election last spring. And there are 
indie; tions he has just got started. 

^olnlg stepped in the day alter 
his election to start solving the au- 
tom()])ile problem. Facing an ul- 
tiiii.uum from the Board of Trus- 
tees, lie s.iw the onlv satisfactory 
answer to the problem of too many 
cars — no automobiles for fresh- 
men. 

It was a nasty job to do. but 
"^'oung did it swiftly and fairly, 
and lost little respect from his 
classmates in doing it. 

^oung has shown that he can 
deal effectively with all sides of 
the campus — students, faculty, ad- 
ministration, the town. He is re- 
spected from all those quarters. 

We caimot afford to let him rest 
at this point, because* student tiody 
presidents like Young are rare. If 
studeiu politicians would concen- 


trate their efforts on heljiing 
^oln^g build a better campus this 
year — instead of raising some of 
the pettv arguments that ha\e 
(ome up in past years — this I'ni- 
\ersity would be improved tenfold 
bv commeiuement day. 

Hope. Left: 
People Are 
Still People 

When vou get to worrying too 
much af)out the State of North 
Carolina going to hell in a ballot- 
box, and when campus life appears 
a bit too dull, remember this: 

The Phi debated a bill to get 
rid of coeds here. 

The Hi was working over tlie 
Sue/ Canal dispute. 

You can get polio vaccine, 
through the courtesv and interest 
of the rniversity Infirmarv. for 
Si a shot. 

^ou can rent a work of art for 
;v month from Person fiall for two 
bits plus a dollar de{>osit. 

I'our top musical artists will ap- 
pear here on the Chapel Hill Con- 
cert Scries schedule. 

The head of the Mens Honor 
Clouncil has been charged with 
speeding. 

That, plus the smile of a cute 
C.aroline Coed at your 8 ockxk 
class, plus a good dose of Franklin 
St. friendliness, is enough to con- 
vince anyone tliat the I'niversiiy's 
a fine place. < 


Car Problem Is Continuing 


Studen^^ with automobiles have 
shelled out their S2.r,o toward im- 
proving the traffic lacilities. Fresh- 
men have been s\v(»rii not to main- 
tain automobiles. 

But a look at th:- • treets of Cha- 
pel Hill, the (logged thor-ugh- 
Lres, th^' I :.. .:lca lots iKninJ dor- 
niitories— .his suggests a continu- 
ing i . .. at the parking problem. 

^ludent government, under the 
astute leadership of student Presi- 
dent Young, has done a great deal 
to tem|>oia>ily alleviate the prob- 
lem. But the mounting stream of 
automobiles into this liny town 
shows that parking lots — huge 


parking lots, capable of holding 
thousands of automobiles — must 
be built soon. 

In another 10 years the enroll- 
ment will liave almost doubled. 
The number of student-owned 
<avs wiil rise proportionatelv. Re- 
strictions on freshmen will not be 
enough. 

Fhe only lasting, true answer to 
the parking and traffic problems 
is a system of parking lots, legated 
on the fringes of the campus. Stu- 
dent and trustee planners should 
keej) the plan in mind as they 
bank the autcjmobile registratioii 
lees. 


THE GREENSBORO DAILY NEWS: 


Aim For Prime Essentials 


The Consolidated I'niversity of 
North Carolina concentrated cjn 
prime essentials for the life of 
learning in requests made this year 
t(j the .\dvisory Budget Commis- 
si cjn. 

What seemed once to l>e a pre- 
occup;v.ion with building build- 
ings has given wav to a concern lor 
lacultv salaries, research in huma- 
nities and the need for ijiore li- 
brary lM)oks. 

But this fervor h)r putting new 
life into the heart of the Cnivers- 
itv imist be conmninicated not on- 
ly to the budget conmiission but 
to the new Legislature. 

Of the S J. -,00,000 increase per 
vcar asked for operational lunds, 
more thr-i %2.^\\■J.•]•-^i^ would be for 
the purpo.se of increasing faculty 
salaries— an overpowering neces- 
sity over which Acting President 
1 riday sounded the alarm serine 
montlis back. 

l.ovalty won't hold liimgiy pro- 
fessors. Chancellor House of Cha- 
pel Hill inferred at the budget 
hearing. The I'niversity. he .said, 
must compete in n seller's market, 
and this l)udget inc re.' se is asked 
mainly to keep the' present faculty 

The Daily Tar Heel 

The official .student publication of the 
Publications Board of the University of 
North Carolina, \\^here it is published 
daily except Monday and examination 
and vacation periods and summer terms. 
Entered as second class matter in the 
post office in Chapel Hill, N. C , under 
the Act 01 March 8. 1870. Subscription 
rates: mailed, $4 per year. $2.50 a semes- 
ter; delivered, $6 a year. S3.50 a semes- 
ter. 


Eciitor „_ FRED POWLEDGE 


intact. 

Book appropriatioirs must be 
lipped; libraries at the state col- 
leges and imiversities have slipped 
shamelully in the last lew yeais. 
Heie a lot of missic%nary zeal must 
be used on legislators, who last ses- 
sion indicated their attitude on 
books bv sharply slashing book 
buying recjuesls. 

It is almost odd to hear I'nivers- 
itv ofJicials stressing humanities. 
Originallv the heart and core of a 
liberal education, the humanities 
have gotten short shrift in .North 
CriTulina and elsewhere in recent 
years. 

Foiindations for subsidizing 
fcjotball players have been formed. 
Professional and busine.is groups 
have banded together to foster and 
promote training of young lledg- 
lings. )n\t there have l)een jjiacti- 
cally lU) alumni asscn iations of la- 
tin or history majors. 

Iiicrca,>ed funds hir humanities 
research, said Or. |. Harris Purks. 
state director of higher education, 
would encouiage sc holarly researc h 
in a field where little money is 
now available. Added Chancellor 
House: 

■'We are not thinking of great 
jHojects. but we are thinking ol 
encouraging the faculty members 
along the lines of their ability, of 
their geniu.s. which is the lifcblocxl 
of the I'niversity." 

Ihe.se are laudable olijectives— 
more monev for professors, tor li- 
brary bcKiks and for research in 
humanities. (Ujupled with higher 
entrance requirements, the I'ni- 
versity's cducern for prime essen- 
tials of education is a gcM)d sign 
for North Carolina. 


Gov. Hodges: Convention Go-Getter 


Fred Powledge 

(Editor Powledge covered the 
Democretic National Conven- 
tion last summer for The Ra- 
leigh Times. Later he chaired 
a college editors' conference 
in Chicago at the ninth Nation- 
al Student Assn. congress.) 

North Carolina's Gov. Luther 
Hodges displayed a convincing 
style of leaders-hip at the Demo- 
cratic National Convention. 

Not that 1 agreed with every- 
thing he did — I didn't — but the 
governor fooled some oldtime ob- 
5erver« U'ho thought he'd sit 
back and let the convention run 
on its ov\-n steam. 

When Hodges arrived in Illi- 
nois Central Station, he was a 
Southern governor who had been 
mentioned — partially in jest — 
aa- a protest candidate for Presi- 


d'ent. He wasn't known too well. 
One Chicago reporter, quizzing 
Hodges on the Tar Heel delega- 
tion's feelings, said "Thank you, 
Gov. Hodge." 

'That's Hodges," th€ gover- 
nor corrected. Don't forget the 
final 's'." 

The governor remembered too 
well the case of Orville Hodgr. 
Illinoi.f politician who stole 
money from the state treasury. 
He didn't want his name even 
loo.-.cly connected with Hodge's. 

When the governor left Chica- 
go at the end of the convention, 
he was quite well known. He was 
known by Steven.son people as 
the man who more or less swung 
the North Carolina delegation in- 
to line behind Adlai. 

H« was volunteered as a brief 
candidate for vice president by 
the Tar Heel delegation, and 


even got four votes from South 
Carolina, whatever good that 
did him. 

And Hodge.^- had the distinc- 
tion of sitting on the convention 
platform while Adlai Stevenson 
tha.nked his fellow Democrats for 
his nomination. The North Caro- 
lina governor was reimbursed 
kindly for his efforts to get Stev- 
enson nominated. 

In short, Hodges came home 
from Chicago considerably more 
valuable politically than -when he 
arrived. He increased his value 
in several ways. 

First, he smashed any of the 
Tar Heels' hopes of entering hi^- 
name as a favorite son Presi- 
dential candidate. From North 
Carolina's first caucus on, Hod- 
ges was talking Stevenson right 
and left to fellow Tar Heels- and 
fellow Southerners. 


'r Said There'd Be Trouble, And I Won't Have You Making 
A Liar Out Of Me' 





Speaking Of Many Things 


Ken Sanford 

Writer Sanford is a former 
managing editor of The Oatiy 
Tar Heel. He has just returned 
from a tour of duty with the 
Army. 

Speaking the sentiments of a 
host of other veterans. I yay. 
"We are happy to be back." Act- 
ually "veteran" for most of us 
just returned is a misnomer. 
The only thing I can boast is 
that I was a member of th^ Oc- 
cupation Army in South Caro- 
lina. 

* -k -k 

Some suggejted reading for 


I'.NC students is an article in 
two parts publishcni in the cur- 
rent and past week's issues of 
'•Life'N.'. It i.v a brief but compre- 
hensive evaluation of Tom Wolfe 
who came down from the hills 
beyond Chapel Hill to this Uni- 
versity and went on to reach a 
literary height that far surpassed 
his physical height (six feet, six 
inche •;. Wolfe was a campus 
leader here, being, among other 
things, editor of The Tar Heel. 
• • • 

Discerning movie goers are 
going to be treated to one of the 
Italian film industries' finest 
productions when a Chapel Hill 


theater presents "Umberto 'D". 
This movie present.^• an Italian 
social problem through the eyes 
of a man living it. It rivals 
•The Bicycle Thief" for taking 
the viewer inside a man's heart 
and mind. 

• • * 

Welcome back Pogo! The Daily 
Tar Heel's two comic strips, 
Li'l Abner and Pogo. contain 
some of the be^-t satire on the 
American scene. The.'se two strips 
are a sugar-coating for those 
who don't like their politics 
straight. Both Pogo and General 
Bullmoose (of Li'l Abner) have 
•been supported for the presi- 


It was Hodges who appeared 
considerably hurt the week be- 
fore the convention when Steven- 
son made his famous statement 
favoring desegregation. Hodges 
had rea^'on to be hurt; he haci 
just finished working more than 
energetically for passage of this 
state's Pearsall Plan, an action 
designed to side.^'tep the Supreme 
Court's desegregation order. 

But when Hodges got to the 
convention and saw Harry Tru- 
man back Averell Harriman for 
the Presidency, be lost all his 
distru.l of Stevenson. He started 
politicking immediately for the 
Illinoisian's nomination. 

Newsmen hiad trouble keeping 
up with the governor. He was 
rarely at either of his two hotel 
suites, and he bounced in and 
out of his seat in International 
Ampitheatre with the regularity 
of a five-year-old in a candy fac- 
tory. 

W^here was' he? Out getting 
vote* for Stevenson. 

Even the North Carolina dele- 
gates who swore and bedamned 
before the convention that they 
wouldn't crusade for Stevenson 
were sheepishly wearing Adlai 
buttons by the second day. 

Hodges- led the cielegation's 
caucuses, and he led them well. 
He gave no room for doubt about 
his choice for the nomination. 
And he got his way. 

Hodges didn't w^ork only for 
Adlai. He was missing from his 
seat when Tar Heel Democratic 
chairman John Larkin.^- dropped 
his name into the vice president- 
ial hopper. Where was he'? 

"I was out trying to round up 
some votes for Kefauver," he 
said. And there was sweat on his 
forehead. 

There was s<)me speculation 
among North Carolina newsmen 
about the reason for all the gov- 
ernor's running around. Some 
guessed he's trying to be more 
and more valuable to the Nat- 
ional Democratic Party, with 
maybe an eye cocked toward a 
Presidential or vice presidential 
nomination in the future. 

Others opined he will run for 
a .seat in Congre.-s four years 
from now. after he has served 
his term as governor. Still oth- 
ers, more friendly toward the 
governor, said he was simply do- 
ing his job and trying to lead a 
confu.'ad delegation down the 
right path. 

Whatever the governor was 
doing, he did it well. He gained 
respect from the people who 
watched him do it. 


dency. I am partial to Pogo. 

Senator W. Kerr Scott recent- 
ly made what was perhaps the 
opiening attack on the man who 
most likely will oppose him in 
a campaign for his re-election to 
the Senate in 1960, Governor 
Luther Hodges. Scott said that 
the governor should intervene in 
a squabble over rural electrifica- 
tion. The governor replied to this 
that he doea* not intend to step 
in. The governor will be looking 
for a new job when his up-com- 
ing term expires in 1960. and 
this could result in one of North 
Carolina's biggest political bat- 
tles. 


Pogo 


By Walt Kelly 



Li'l Abner 


By Al Capp 



South Searching 
For Legal Ways 

Josephine Ripley 

hi The Christian Science Monitor 
Shoutina and riots along the school integration 
front mean little in comparison with the "massive 
resistance" on the legal front. For it is not in emo- 
tional explosions, regardless of their sensational- 
ism, but in the courts that the decisive battle will 

take place. , o .. 

And it is by legal action that the South is brac- 
ing for its most determined stnnd and the one on 
which it hopes to hold its ground. In such measures 
the opponents of desegregation see their strongest 
hope of maintaining the traditional color line. 

Eight southern states have already passed laws 
designed to circumvent integration in one way or 
another. Mississippi has a law that openly defies 
the Supreme Court order by forbidding mixed 
schools within its borders. Other southern states 
have gone about it more indirectly. 

Two methods, in particular, are favored. These 
include the abolition of public schools through a 
cut-off of state funds to any school permitting in- 
tegration; and/or adoption of a pupil assignment 
plan under which pupils could be assigned to differ- 
ent schools on a wide range of qualifications, none 
openly mentioning race. 

Net result of the pupil assignment plan — and ^ 
its obvious intention — would be to assign white ■[ 
pupils to- one school and Negro pupils to another. - 
As for the cutting off of state funds to local schools,", 
this would be tantamount to closing thtf public ■ 
schools since the local communities could hardlyj 
support them alone, and the white population would- 
probably refuse to do so if they were desegregated..t 
Without state or local support, schools would irt-~ 
evitably have to close their doors. — - 

A number of states, such as Virginia, have al-* 
ready paved the way for such a move by amending • 
their constitutions to permit the use of state funds \ 
for private tuition of those refusing to attend in' 
tegrated schools. .-m 

Virginia, ready to lead this new rebellion is rush-^ 
ing the erection of legal bulwarks. The legislatur*. 
is now in special session with more than seventj^ 
bills before it, all keyed to the integration issu*'- 
and most of them designed to circumver.t it. 

The largest program of full integration has bees- 
undertaken is in the District of Columbia. Here.T 
some 70.000 Negro students — two-thirds of the 
entire school population-— have been integrated inlol 
the public schools. "■ 

Some integration has also taken place in cities., 
in West Virginia. Delaware, Maryland. Kentucky^ 
Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. But obviously, thc- 
movement is limited to the so-called border states, 
or to areas where the percentage of Negro popu 
lation is small and opposition to integration com- 
paratively mild. 

Unyielding is a solid bloc of southern states 
which arc braced for defiance with every legal tool 
to be mustered. These states include: Virginia. 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida. 
Alabama. Mississippi, and Louisiana. 

Such legal maneuvers as are now in the making 
may be of no avail in the end but they will un- 
doubtedly delay the coming of school integration 
in the South. Possibly that is all that is hoped for, 
providing that delay is prolonged. 

In all fairness to the South, it should be remem- 
bered that any large measure of integration presents 
many problems — not only those involving the gen- 
eral objections to racial mixing, but practical 
problems of educational disparity and of adequate" 
school facilities. 

Integration has been accomplished with a mini- 
mum of difficulty in the District of Columbia, but 
even here the problem of the lower scholastic stand- 
ing of the Negro has been diffcult, particularly in 
view of the lack of teachers for special catch-up 
classes. 

There is also the fact that many Negroes in 
the South have little or no desire to move into a 
white school. It is mainly through activity of the 
National Association for the Advancement of Co'- 
ored People that the issue is being forced. 

It is not being forced indiscriminately, but 
rather on the basis of cases which appear to the 
NAACP to have the strongest moral and legal basis. 
Thus is the battle shaping in the courts, while the 
South itself prepares legislation that may well dis- 
rupt its public schools for a generation or more. 

SIDEBAR 


The Invasion 
Of Fall 

Charlie Sloan 

F'all is slowly but surely invading the campus. 
Already falling acorns compete with an occasional 
rainstorm; classroom radiators are again developing' 
a friendly warmth and coeds arc wandering around 
with their heads enveloped in bright kerchiefs. 

Chapel Hill has experienced cold nights and 
warm days in rapid succession. In not-too-many 
weeks, students will greet each other with sharp 
fneezes and bleary eyes. 

Soon Y-Court coffee will be a welcome treat, and 
even the stuff dished out by the GM coffee machine 
will at least impart an inward warmth. 

Fall wiil bring with it the collection of smells 
usually drooled over by poets. Burning leaves, pipe- 
loads of super-masculine tobacco and the sharp 
smell of mothballs are as much a part of fall as 
football games and fraternity parties. 

Unfortunately fall is not* all coffee and colored 
leaves. Desk lamps will have to be turned on earlier. 
and. as the semester progresses, will stav on later. 
Colder weather will follow shortly, bringing with it 
dark mornings and night air that snaps at the clouds 
of breath trailing students around the campus. 

Once again pained bellows will reverberate 
through the halls of men's dorms as bare feet hit 
ate flicks will be more like incidents by Jack Lon- 
late flicks will be more like ncidents by Jack Lon- 
don than routine strolls. 

Pleasant or not. fall is .something that has to 
be faced, so why not enjoy it? -■■ ' 


WEONESI 

Two 
Begii 

Two sor 
here — one 
rector — havj 
with the 
Kappa Delt 

Mrs. Err 
boro. who 
of absence | 
houje. has 
sorority, re 
Morris of 

A new 
Gorman ol 
house mot! 
ta Delta 
native of 
Carolina. 

A gradiiJ 
College an^ 
of the Uni^ 
ceived a 
eastern Ui 
Washingtor 
ber of tw( 

She has I 
Insurance 


A^' 


D 


5 

9. 

10. 
11. 
12. 


14 

15 
17 

18.1 
20] 

2?\ 
24J 
25| 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HIEL 

A. 


PAGE THREI 


9 

S 


tion 

isive 

lemo- 

|onal- 

will 

[brac- 

on 

sures 

igest 

laws 
»y or 
lefies 
lixed 
states 

'hese 
»gh a 
»g in- 
iment 
liffer- 

none 

and ' 
(white ^ 
)then— 

loolCT 
>ublir— 

;ate(L« 
Id iiF^ 

[ve aP- 

tnding- • 
funds I 
id ia'v 

ruslf^ 
Hatur«>.. 
jventJ2 

beei»~ 

Here;r 

)f the- 


cities^ 
^tuckr;- 
By, the* 
I states, 

popu- 
com- 

states 

kal tool 

rginia, 

lorida, 

laking 

fill UB" 

ration 

tor, 


roes in' 
into a. 
of the^ 

of Col-- 


Two Sorority House Mothers 
Begin Their Duties Here 


Two sorority house directors 
here — one of them a former di- 
rector — have begun their duties 
with the Delta Delta Delta and 
Kappa Delta sororities. 

Mrs. Ernest Graham of Golds- ! 
boro. who took a one year's leave 
of absence from the Kappa Delta 
hou.^«. has returned to direct that 
sorority, replacing Mrs. Katherine 
Morris of Elkin. 

A new director, Mrs. Lewis W. , 
Gorman of Chapel Hill, will be 
house mother this year at the Del- 
ta Delta Delta sorority. She is a 
native of Craven County, North 
Carolina. 

A graduate of Flora MacDonald 
College and the Woman's College 
of the Univers'ity, Mrs. Gorman re- 
ceived a law degree from South- 
eastern University Law School, 
Washington. D. C, and is a mem- 
ber of two bar associations. 

She has practiced law in the 
Insurance Claims Divi-non of the 


U. S. Veterans Administration in 
Washington. D. C, San Francisco, 
Calif., and Denver, Colo. After the 
death of her husband. L. W. Gor- 
man, Mrs. Gorman returned to 
North Carolina. 

Mrs. Graham, wife of the late 
Ernest (Tiny) Graham, a famouif 
athletic star at Davidson College, 
is the former Mary Borden of 
Goldsboro. She was an active 
member of the Kappa Delta soror- 
ity during her college days at Hol- 
lins College in Roanoke, Va. 


YOUR PENNIES 
GO A c^fc^ 

WA^^^AT OUR 

ffONe 

4 1.CEMT 
SALE 

6 BIG DAYS 

Starts Monday 
OCTOBER Isff 


0Xitti 


Covering The Campus 



ORuc ST a fie 


CMATCW MliX.M.^ 


iVixe^ie^HClpeHa/ DRUG store 


Student SEC 
Programs Are 
Announced 

The student entertainment se- 
ries at the University for the 
school year will begin Nov. 1 with 
the appearance of Licia Albanese. 
Metropolitan Opera soprano. 
! Others to appear will be: Man- 
' tovani and his 45-piece orchestra. 
Dec. 6; the General Platoff Don 
Cos^rack Chorus. Feb. 12: Henry 
Hull, veteran actor of stage and 
screen. March 26; and Jose Limon 
and Dance Company. April 11. 

The chairman of the Student 
Entertainment Committee is John 
Kerr of Warrenton. Other mem- 
bers include Joel Carter. Kai Jur- 
gensen and Olin Mouzon of the 
faculty; and student members Miss- 
es Martha Barber. Durham: Donald 
Freeman. Raleigh and Barbara ' 
and Shirlee I*restwood., Lenoir. | 
SEC programs are , financed bv-j The indoor swimming pool is 
student fund^.- and are open to open for recreational swimming 
students without charge. Non-stu- Monday through Friday from 4-U 
when seating j p.m., Saturda.v from 2-6 p.m. and 
Sunday 2-5 p.m. Swimmers may } 
wear their own bathing suits in- j 
stead of the special suits issued ' 
by the gym. j 

YACK CONTRACTS | 

All organizations desiring space ' 
: in the 1956-57 Yackety Yack must 
sign contracts in the Yack office in 
the basement of Graham Memorial 
by Oct. 10. according to Tommy ; 
Johnson. Contracts may be signed 

any weekday from 2-4 p.m. j 

I 
DEMOLAY 

The Order of Demolay will hold 
its first meeting of the year to- 
night at 7:30 in the Masonic Lodge 1 
on W. Franklin St. .\11 members] 
or pro.'spective members have been ' 
urged to attend and wear coats and 
ties. ; 



Glee Club Asks Men To Join 


The UNC Varsity Glee Club has , 
invited all men interested in sing- ' 
ing to its first meeting at Hill Hall I 
today at 4:30 p.m. | 

• The afternoon's program will ' 
include refreshments, a short con- ' 
cert by the club, and talks by i 
Zane Eargle and Charlie Shoe, 
president and the business man- i 
ager of the choral group. j 

Under the direction of Dr. Joel : 
Carter, the cju*" will present a1 
program, October 12, University ; 


We Have Just Bought in 
A Small Library Of 

EUROPEAN 
HISTORY 

If your interest runs that way, 
take a look in our Old Book 
Corner. 

THE INTIMATE 
BOOKSHOP 

205 E. Franklin St. 
Open Till 10 P.M. 


Day. From November 7-10 the 
group will tour Virginia, stopping 
in Charlottesville to give a concert 
with the Virginia Glee Club. The 
group will also participate in the 
Mozart Festival. December 2. 


FRESHMEN: 

DO YOU KNOW 

WHAT 

CHEESE BLINTZES 

ARE? 

Find Out 
At 

HARRY'S 


Pell And Russavage Pack A Lot Of Tar Heel Weight 


Shown above are Stewart Pell (left) and Leo Russavage, the two 
heaviest players on this year's football team. Pell is a junior of 


Lykens, Pa., plays tackle and weighs 230 lbs. Russage is a junior of 
Duryea, Pa. and tilts the scales at 234 lbs. 


INDOOR POOL 



NEW FACES 

- On the 48< Shelf 

- On the 72< Shelf 

- On the 97< Shelf 

IT'S FUN TO BUY 
OU> BOOKS AT 

THE INTIAAATE 

BOOKSHOP 

205 E. Franklin St. 
Open Till 10 P.AA. 


Oct. 4-6. A recording of the na- 
tional convention keynote speech 
by Governor Frank Clements t)f 
Tennessee will be played. 

CLASSIFIEDS 

WANT ADVENTURE. TRAVEL, 
driving experience? Want to go 
to Ann Arbor, Mich., Thursday 
at noon? Back for Monday class- 
es. Share gas bill. Call Powl- 
edge, 9-3361, after 2 p.m. 


STUDENT WANTED FOR PART 
time work, preferably upper- 
daysman with automobile who 
has some circulation experience 
on newspapers. Guaranteed sal- 
ary plus commission. Write Box 
XYZ, stating qualifications and 
giving references. 


THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT 

ON YOUR CAMPUS 
IS A GOOD MAN TO KNOW 

George L Coxhead 

Nylic 

NEW YORK LIFE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 


UNC, '42 
A Mutual Company 


Campus Representative 
Founded 1845 


WUNC 

I Today s schedule for WUNC. the 1 

' University's FM radio station, 91.5 : 

j megacycles: 

1 12:44— Sign On 

' 12:45— Music 

i 1:00— Today On Farm 

i 1:30— Play Period 

; 2:00 — Career for You 

2:30— Sign Off 
j 5:44 — Sign On 
j 5:45 — Music . 
; 6:00 — Magic Lantern 

6:30— News 
i 6:45— Sports 
I 7:00— Best Things 
I 7:30— Desk for Billie 
i 8:30— Long Village 
' 9:00— Living Together 
j 9:30 — American Politics 
j 10:00— Final Edition 
: 10:05— Sign Off 


i 


f 


LOST — BILLFOLD FRmAY IN 

Lenior Hall or Law School be- 
tween 10 a.m. and noon. Con- 
tains valuable personal papers 
and approximately $200. Money 
for nurses attending my wife 
who has a fatal disease. K finder 
feeis he needs money more than 
me. please return papers. $80 
reward offered for honesty. Con- 
tact E. M. Murry at Law School. 


WANTED — RIDE T(5 RALEIGH 
Mon. thru Fri., arriving in Ra- 
leigh prior to 8:30 a.m., return- 
ing to Chapel Hill approximate- 
ly 5 p.m. Contact Lee Gotten 
at Milton's Clothinu Cupboaif! 
or call Durham 7-8635 after 6 
p.m. . 


LOST: ONE WI\^S PASSBOOK 
Lost Saturday in or around Ken 
. an Stadium. Finder please call 
9-6362. 


DAILY CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1. Frontier- 
man's shoes 

5. Enclosure 

9. Old com 
(Or.) 

10. Across 

11. Rock 

12. Former 
President 
of Czecho- 
slovakia 

14. Neuter 
pronoun 

15. Number 

17. Compas.s 
point (abbr. ) 

18. Plexus 
20. To pluck 

again 
2.3. Epochs 

24. Club's rules 

25. Indian 
(Utah) 

27. Lamprey 

28. Former 
Russian 
workers as- 
sociation 

31. Seaweed 

34. Draw- 
aimless 
designs 

35. Indian 
peasant 

36. Building 
addition 

37. Wine 
receptacle 

39. From 
(prefix) 

40. Slant < 
43. Sets of 

nested boxes 
(Orient.) 

45. German 
river 

46. Large flat- 
lx)ttomed 
boat 


47. Cereal 
grains 

48. Observed 

DOWN 

1. Worker 
in clay 

2. Finnish 
seaport 

3. Vied 

4. Killed 

5. Male 
swan 

6. Hail! 

7. Universally 

8. Heretofore 
11. Title of 

respect 
13. Lizard 
16. Sphere 
19. Redund- 
ancy 


21. Organ 
of 
sight 

22. Pass- 
age 
of 

cheeks 
( Bank- 
ing) 

26. Build- 
ing 
addi- 
tion 

2S. Fruit 
drinks 

29. Canary 

30. Body 
of 
water 

32. Oriental 
warehouse 


riL-JllHiJ ^'ri7J'J3 

iJij;j!ia.ii: unci 
:•!.,! in' 1.1 ;■•:•'>■: 

Ul4 ?u3iJ UyUDi 


l>H«rdBy'« Anvwrr 

33. Groddess of 

infatuation 

<pos8.) 

38. Fail to hit 

41. Letter of 
alphabet 

42. Bitter vetch 
44. Spawn 

of fish 


YDC 

The Young Democrats will meet 
tomorrow night in Roland Parker 
Lounges 2 and 3 in Graham Me- 
morial at seven o'clock. Plans will 
be submitted for the YDC Conven- 
tion to be held in Winston-Salem 


PATRONIZE YOUR 
• ADVERTISERS • 


ATTENTION: ALL PHYSICS MA- 
jors, students of physics, and in- 
terested persons are reminded 
that there will be a meietihg of 
the. physics club on Thursday at 
8 p.m. in 250 Phillips Hall. 

1-5834-2 

Sunday new york times de 

livered to your door. For further 
information call 8-0572 or 8-0368 
after 5 p.m. 1-5833-5 



F 
R 
E 
E 


WIN AN ENGLISH BIKE 
OR MOTOROLA TABLE RADIO 

STUDENTS ONLY! 

ALL YOU HAVE TO DO 

IS BRING THIS AD INTO 

OUR STORE AND REGISTER 

NOTHING TO BUY! 


F 
R 
E 


I 


B.F.Goodi'ich 


FIRST IN RUB»<R- flUSf IN TUiEliSS 

BROWN'S AUTO SUPPLY 

312 W. FRANKLIN ST. 
PHONE 6981 


SHIRTS-19C 


EA. 


(Packaged In Cellophane) 


\iim(fi^ 


Oie hdndte 


a;ith£ARE 


With or Without 
Starch ' < ' 


Prompt Service ^^'^^"^^ 




Glen Lennox Laundromat 


HERE ARE THE 

WINNERS! 

OF 

Stevens-Shepherd's 
Back To School Contest 

1st PLACE - DICK HUDSON- K.A. HOUSE 
Imp. Tweed Sport Jacket! • 

2nd PLACE - MIKE HERRING - 312 GRAHAM 
Hand Woven, Crew-Neck Shet. Sweater 

3td PLACE - TOM MAULTSBY - 
1101 ROOSEVELT AVE. 
Ivy League Dress Shirt 

You Can Be A 
Winner, Tool 

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PAGE FOUR 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 195^ 


Freshman Footballers To 



Sunny Jim Tatum. who saw N. C. 
State deal his Tar Heel football 
team a sound lacing Saturday, is 
looking forward to this week's 
game against powerful Oklahoma 
with mixed apprehension and op- 
timism. 

Speaking at a press luncheon 
here yesterday, Tatum admitted a 
healthy respect for the Sooners of 
Coach Bud Wilkinson, but said 
■'there's no reason to be pessimis- 
tic. We're going out to play a 
ball game and we're going to try- 
to learn something. It should be 
good for us." 

•BEAT THE TAR OUT OF US' 

Tatum talked freely about last 
week's debacle against the Wolf- 
pack. 'We're ail embarrassed and 
downhearted about what happened 
Saturday. State just beat the tar 
out of u^," Tatum said. "Their 
quarterbacks. Katich and Franklin, 
called a near perfect game. 

"Everything we did was ill 
conceived and poorly executed. 
Our squad was just trying too 
hard, and nothing ran true to 
form. The boys would have done 
better on defense if I had just 
turned them loose and told them 
to go to it. As it was, they were 
overcoached and too careful." 

The Tar Heel mentor went on 
to explain some of the line-up 
changes he made earlier this week. 
"We moved Don Lear back to full- 
back because Giles Gaca, our start- 
er, broke his nose in the State 
game, and we needed more depth 
in that position. And anyone at 
the game Saturday knows why Jim 
Varnum is our starting left half- 
back now." 

Tatum surprised the gathering 
of sports scribes by announcing 
that ace quarterback Dave Reed, 
sidelined with a knee injury dur- 
ing pre-season practice, might 
net b* held eut for the entire 

Coach Is Optimistic 


season if his knee responds to 
treatment. "We're not in a posi- 
tion to hold anyone out," said 
Tatum. 

The quarterback situation is not 
very good now, according to Ta- | 
turn. "Curt Hathaway, our starter | 
i in the State game, suffered a con- 
cussion Saturday, and it remains 
to be seen just how he'll come 
around. Right now, it looks like \ 
Diug Farmer may start against j 
Oklahoma." 

OKLAHOMA HEAT BAD ' 

Tatum expressed concern over 
the possible hot weather his team ' 
may face in Oklahoma. "It's usu- 
ally hot as blaze*; out there this 
time of year," he said. "I'm afraid 
our boys may wilt in the heat after 
practicing in such cool weather 
here." 

The Tar Heels will follcw a I 
regular practice routine this 
week with equal amounts of time 
being spent on offense and de- 
fense. The Tar Heel Coach said 
that his defense should be fairly 
steady against a straight split-T 
team such as Oklahoma. 

This year's Sooner team should | 
be just as strong as last year's 
national champions, from all indi- i 
cations. Coach Wilkinson lost only 
five first stringers via graduation, 
and he has a host of capable re- 
placements to fill their shoes. 

When asked if he thought the 
Sooners would use their famous 

■quick opening plays' against the 

i Tar Heels, Tatum replied, "We 

wouldn't be surprised if they did 

We've been using our freshman 

team to prepare for it, so we hope 

not to be caught short/' 



Field Strong Team, Says Tullai 

* Squad Promises To Have 
Depth As Well As Talent 


Frosh Whiz Cornell Johnson 

Cornell Johnson, High Point schoolboy star who ciecided to cast 
his lot with Carolina over strong objections from State College, 
should be a mainstay in the Tar Baby backfield this year. Johnson 
will be in the starting lineup when the Carolina Frosh meet Wake 
Forest in their opening game of the season in Greensboro Oct. 5. 


By JIMMY HARPER | 

"This is the finest group of ; 
freshman football players I have j 
ever seen." Thus has Coach Fred 
Tullai described this year's fresh- 1 
man football team. 

This opinion is not Tullai's 
alone, but is shared by his assist- 
ants and members of the varsity 
coaching staff, as well. 

When asked to name stan<louts 
in practice Tullai was hesitant, ex- 
plaining that to do so would eijtail 
naming the entire roster of candi- 
dates. This might seem unusual in 
light of the fact that there are 61 
players on the squad, but to em- 
phasize the fact, at least seven 
tackles are rated evenly. 
ENTHUSIASTIC SQUAD 

Much more enthusiasm than in 
past years has been noticed among 
the players, and a large number of 
boys out are not on athletic schol- 
arships. The great depth in all 
positions has created keen compe- 
tition for starting berths. 

However, there is no implication 
that the team has no good indi- 
vidual prospects. Some of the top 
prep and high school players in 
the nation last year are on the 
squad. 

One of these, Francis Dobrowl- 
ski, 195-pound end from Natrona, 
Pa., was picked as one of the top 
prep stars in Pennsylvania last 
year by Sports Illustrated. 

Another, Cornell Johnson of 
High Point, is rated by Tullai as 
good enough to play any backfield 
position. Johnson is presently 


working out at halfback. 

LOADED AT QUARTERBACK | 

At the quarterback post, the Tar 
Babies have both depth and talent. 
Currently fighting for the starting 
role are Nelson Lowe, John Cum- 
mings, and Jerry Amos. All are 
good passers, ball handlers, and 
field generals. Coach Tullai rates 
them almost on a par, giving Cum- 
mings only a slight edge on his 
punting ability. 


Tullai is definitely optimistic 
about his team's ability to move 
the ball and plans to mould his 
attack around a strong ground ' 
game. If the necessity arises the j 
team can break out a strong pass- j 
ing attack. j 

In recent practices, much em- 1 
phasis has been given to strength- | 
ening the defense and a great deal : 
of improvement has been noted 
there. ! 



The Tar Heels will embark for 
Oklahoma Friday morning at 8 
a.m. by plane from the Raleigh- 
Durham Airport. They will make 
their c^mp in Oklahoma City, 18 
miles from Norman, home of the 
University of Oklahoma. 


Frosh Harriers Look 
For Successful Year 


By CHARLIE HOUSON 

Since a week ago, some ten to 
fifteen candidates for the fresh- 
man cross-country team have been 
going through their paces on 
Fetzer Field under the watchful 
eye of Coach Boyd Newnam. 

Coach Newnam, who has gath- 
ered a promising crop of runners 
under his wing, was optimistic 
over the coming season when in- 
terviewed Monday. "I believe we'll 
have a good year," he said. "We've 
got some good boys out such as 
Arthur Fickland from Greenville, 
Paul Wachendorfer from Vienna, 
Austria; and Cowles Liipfert of 
Winston-Salem." Liipfert was last 
year's North Carolina State high 
school mile champ. 

Because the freshman team car- 
rires an unlimited number of 
squad members. Coach Newnam 
emphasized the need for more 
candidates, experienced or not, to 
join the squad. He said that he 


only wants those boys who are 
willing to work hard at the sport. 
At present the team is prepar- 
ing for their first meet with the 
Duke frosh Oct. 5 in Chapel Hill. 
A tentative schedule of meets has 
been drawn up. , 

The schedule: 

Oct. 5— Duke at Chapel Hill. 
Oct. 10 — Wake Forest at Chap- 
el Hill. 

Oct. 15 or 16— N. C. State at 
Raleigh. 

Oct. 20— Wake Forest at Chap- 
el Hill. 

Oct. 24 — N. C. State at Chapei 
Hill. 

Nov. 6 — Duke at Durham. 
Nov. 12 — State Championships 
at Raleigh. 


Mural Meet 
Set Tomorrow 
In Woollen 

An important fraternity man- 
agers' meeting will be held this j 
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in Room 
301 of Woollen Gym. All fraterni- 
ties arc required to have a rep- 
resentative at the meeting. 

Entries for tag football in the 
fraternity division will be due at i 
this meeting, apd a drawing will 
be held for the round robin toui- ' 
nament which is to begin Octo- 
ber 2nd. j 

The dormitory division will not I 
hold its first managers' meeting 
until next week on Monday. The 
Intramural Dept. .advises all dorm- 
itories to hold a meeting soon in 
order to elect their respective in- 
tramural managers or appoint a 
representative for the coming 
meeting. 

More referees are needed before 
intramural play begins. Seventeen 
students have signed up so far, 
but at least eight more are need- 
ed to assure the presence of an 
official at every intramural con- 1 
test. 

An cnthusiastc turnout is expect- 
ed when intramural play opens in 
early October. Competiton will be 
keen in tag football as the fra- 
I ternity teams will strive to depose 
Sigma Chi, last year's winners, for 
the championship'. Cobb won the 
championship last year in the 
I dormitory division. Dormitory play 
j is scheduled to begin on October 9. 

Several sports will be held dur- 
ing the open house, including bad- 
minton, handball, table tennis, 
squas'n, and fencing. 


Braves Still On Top 


\i^»^ 


Milwaukee Tops Reds 
Behind Warren Spahn 


trictly upper-class... 
through many semester 
' of satisfaction! 


B O B and M O N K 
of 

TOWN& 
CAMPUS 

SALUTE 
Athlete Of The Week 




Frosh Basketball 

Coach Buck Freeman has an- 
nounced that freshman basketball 
practice will start Monday, October 
15, at 3:30 p.m. at Woollen Gym- 
nasium. , 

All candidates have been a$ked 
to fill out an information form m j 
the basketball office, Room 20£, ' 
Woollen Gym before Friday, Octo- j 
ber 5. 


Athletic Passbooks 

Vernon Crook, athletic de- \ 
partment business manager, said ' 
yesterday that students who 
have lost their athletic pass- I 
books can not obtain another j 
and therefore will have to pay | 
full price to get in to future 
Carolina athletic events. 

Many students have either lost 
their passbooks or had them ' 
stolen since school started. Any- 
one finding a passbook should : 
take it to the ticket office as 
soon as possjble. 


LADY MILTON SHOP 

it's raining crew neck Shetland 
sweaters at Milton's. 

Just received 8 delicious fla- 
vors, imported from Scotland — 
liglitsray; beige; blue heather; 
green heather; black/brown; 
Mack/ blue; deep charcoal; 
black/green; all futl fashioned 
and hand-framed ; by McGeorge 
— S13.W. 

Also just added is a very com- 
plete assortment of Bermuda 
shorts in ivy model in brown 
watch tartan, rich assorted flan- 
nel stripings, and many interest- 
ing contbinations — from $5.95. 


cut-ins Cupboarb 


By JACK HAND 

CINCINNATI. Sept 25. iJf>— 
Warren Spahn assured Milwaukee 
of holding the National League 
load alone for at least 24 more 
hours as he won his 20th game, 
7-1 today behind a 15-hit attack 
that virtually snuffed out Cincin- 
nati's pennant hopes. 

The victory boosted the Braves' 
lead a full game over Brooklyn, 
which plays tonight. 

The 35-year-old lefthander be 
came the third pitcher in National 
League history to win 20 or more 
in seven seasons, a feat topped 
only by Christy ' Mathewson, 13. 
and drover Cleveland Ale.xander, 
9. 

Spahn had been tied with the 
Phils' Robin Roberts and Morde- 


The Magic 
Pin 

By Chapel Hill's Own 

ina B. Fergus 

A wonderful, warm, magic 
book for the 6 to 10 age group. 

$2.50 

at , 

The Intimate 
Bookshop 

205 E. FRANKLIN ST. 
OPEN TILL 10 P.M. 


I cai Brown at six 20-win years. 
I Spahn, a stylish veteran of the 
! 1948 champion Boston Braves, 
drove in enough runs to win his 
■ own game with a two-run double 
I to left center that chased 36-year- 
I old Larry Jansen in the second 
inning. 

I The Braves whacked an array 
of Cincinnati throwers* for 15 hits, 
including four doubles and a triple 
and left 13 on base. 

Birdie Tebbetts\ Redlegs needed 
only one home run to tie the 
Giants' all-time major league rec- 
ord of 221, setin 1947. 


FLORSHEIM SHOES 

for U.N.C. 

Imported Scotch grain and genuine cordovan in 
mahogany and black. 


«J4/, 


Julian' 



e&iiop 


ED sunoN 

Senior halfback Ed Sutton 
from Cullowhee has been named 
Daily Tar Heel Athlete of the 
Week for outstanding perform- 
ance in the State game last 
week. Sutton was the day's lead- 
ing ground gainor, rushing for 
90 yards in 10 carries. Sutton, a 
Morehe^d Scholar, is co-captain 
of the Tar Heel squad this 
season. 

We want him to drop by 
TOWN & CAMPUS and pick out 
a shirt to his liking — complf- 
ments of the house. 

We want the old and young 
alike of Chapel Hill to make 
TOWN & CAMPUS their head- 
quarters for the finest in men's 
clothing. Drop in today. 

TOWN & : 
CAMPUS 


TdGETHEit 
for the first time! 


IJInID® is the most scandalous 'foreign Affair" in laugh history! ^ 




P 

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OLIVIA de HAVIllAND 
lOHNFORSYTHEDimNAlOYADOLPHEMENlOU 


I ^ie^l)a8sado]^])ai]^ite] 


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WEATHER 

Ktin, with exiMcttd high of 74. 


VOL. LVIII, NO. 7 



m c Dally liSrat He c I 


COORDINATION 

There's a lack of it on campus. 
See page 2. 


Complete (/P) Wtrc Service 


CHAPEL HILL, NOltTH CAROLINA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 19M 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PACES THIS ISSUE 


Acting President Friday Refuses 
Comment On Permanent Prexy 


By CLARKE JONES 

Consolidated University Acting 
President Willam C. Friday yes- 
terday would malte no comment 
concerning the permanent presi- 
dency of the University. 

Friday, who has frequently been 
mentioned as the successor to for- 
mer President Gordon Gray, avoid- 
ed committing hinwtlf on the sub- 
ject by saying only four words— 
**I have no comment." • 

At a press conference yesterday, 
Friday was questioned on this and 
the chancellorships here and at 
WC. the problem of the University 
losing many faculty members, the 
shortage of housing facilities, the 
increased enrollment and the in- 
tegration begun at Woman's Col- 
lege this year. 
CHANCELLORS 

Concerning the positons of chan- 
cellor at UNC and WC. Friday said 
the tM'o committees set up to rec- 
ommend candidates are now at 
work. 

UNC Chancellor Robert B. House 
retires this summer. The position 
at WC was left vacant last spring 
when Edward K. Graham resigned. 
W. W. Pierson, on leave from his 
position as head of the UNC Grad- 
uate School, has served as ■•icting 
chancellor since that time. 

"The committee of 17 people 
made up of faculty representa- 
tives, alumni and members of the 
Board of Trustees who were ap- 
pointed," he said, referring to 
House's replacement, "have had 
an organizational meeting and will 
meet in Noveml>er. They have 
been asked to submit three names 
to the president." j 

About the WC job. Friday said 
the 15-man committee, appointed 
during the summer, "has had two 
meetings." This body, "made up of, 
facwUy members, alumni and trus- 



news 

m 
brief 



UN APPROVES SUEZ TALKS 

NEW YORK (* — The UN Se 
curity Council has approved hold- 
ing a debate on the Suez Can**' 
crisis beginning next week. At 
least five foreign ministers plan to 
take part personally in the dis- 
cussions. 

IN P.VRIS. British and Jfrench 
leaders have begun secret talks on 
the Suez Canal. The British and 
French are reported to feel tfe 
United States has been too soft on 
Egypt. 
ADLAI CRITICIZES IKE 

KANSAS CITY. Mo. {/P* — Adla' 
«=tovrnson said last night Presidcn 
Eisenhower had rejcfcted the pos- 
tivc responsibilities of leadershir 
throughout his administiiatioo. 

Vice President Nixon, alao in 
Kansas Tity. declared Stevenson i' 
not in the same Icacup with Presi. 
dent Eisenhower wh^n It comes tcj 
nii;»lifirations for leading th - 
United States internationally. 


Carolina Forum, History Club 
Present Speakers Here Tonight 


\' t 


The President Talks Across The Desk 

Acting Consolidated University President William Frjday pauses 
for Daily Tar Heel reporter Clarke Jones to take down a note in a 
press conference with the President yesterday. (Photo by Norman 
Kantor.) 


Egyptians Take Sfand 
I In Di Favoring Nasser 

j Four Egyptian graduate students , popular election last June. He also 

[ at the Dialectic Senate Tuesday attempted to convince the Senate 

j evening took a stand in favor of i that Nasser's sympathies were not 

I Nasser and the Egyptian govern- ; with the Communists; that he had 

' ment in the debate over the Suez | only attempted to get economic aid 

Canal issue. from Ruiisia. aid which be could 

,r ., ^ . .,•.,... 'ind no place else. j 

•Y. M. Dessouky, first of theU-^ - — .— .- . -| 

Egyptian guests to speak, empha- Neither Dessouky nor Hassen ; 

tees has also been asked to submit sized there is no reason to expect : went to the rostrum until they had 

three names for consideration," he Nasser to ever close the Canal to 

s*Jd. { the present shipping traffic. He 

Friday reported last spring to ! said that such action could only 
the Board q{ Trustees the problem ; make enemies of Egypt's most 
of the University losing many fac- i valuable allies, allies which he felt 
ulty members, mainly because of i Nasser cannot afford to lose, 
salary. i 

He said yesterday "The Univer- 
sity administration is doing every- j 
thing possible to improve the sal- j 
ary situation and is asking for a I 


Young Republicans 
Plan StDtegy Tonight 

Campus Young Republicans will 
get together tonight to plan their 
strategy .for the November nation- 
al elections. 

President Keith Snyder said re- 
freshments will be served at the 
get-acquainted session, to be held 
in GM's Roland Parker Lounges 
1 and 2 at 7 p.m. 

Last year's^ Young Republican 
Club meml>ers will welcome the 
newcomers, Snyder said. 

Approximately 50 of last year's 
members are here this year. TTie 
club's officials, after soliciting 
new members during registration," 
estibate their present strength at 


^ 


special sum of money to be used 
in making salary adjustments to 
help prevent further losses in our 
faculty." 

He said in the last 18 months 
"we have lost over 200 faculty 
members in the three institutions 
(See FRIDAY, Page 3) 


Several times in the roiirso of 
debate Nasser was likened to Hit- 
ler. Tawfik Hassan violently chal- 
lenged this and pointed out that 
Nasser was chosen president by 99 
per cent of the ballots in a free 


INFIRMARY 


2 Days Left 
To Pick Up 
Rushing Bids 

Men students have two days re- i 
maining in which to pick up their 
rushing bids. 

The bids may be picked up to- 1 
day between 9 a.m. and noon and 
Friday between 10 a.m. and noon i 
at the YMCA Building if it i:,- 
raining, or Gerrard Hall if the 
weather is clear. Students unable 
to collect their bids will receive 
them in their rooms. No one will 
get any more than one envelope, 
containing from one to 24 bids. 

Approximately 10,000 bids have 
been sent out by fraternities. Fif- 
teen hundred individuals receiv- 
ed bids, according to Ray Jeffer- 
ias. There i* no master list which 
names the individuals and the 
fraternities from which they re- 
ceived bids. Any student who los- 
es his bids and forgets the hous- 
es he must attend, have been ask- 
to contact Ray Jefferies. 

Each person receiving a bid 
from any house must, according to 
regulations-, within the first two 
days of rush attend that house. 
Although a student is usually not 
required to present his invitation 
at each house, a record of atten- 
dence is kept. |f a student fails 
to attend a fraternity, he will be 
ineligible for ru.-hing until next 
year. There is no way a man can 
skip formal rush and still pledge 
a fraternity this year. 

An IFC member, in speaking of 
tonights' talks about rush, said. 
"This dij'cussion will let a boy 
know what to expect, and, also, 
give hhn a good, clear picture of 
rush. 


Student in the Infirmary yes- 
terday included: 

Miss Franklee Gilt>«rt, Miss 
Martha J. Sillay, John G. Burg- 
wyn, Herbert H. Hawkins, James 
E. Holshouser, John H. Stratton, 
Timothy L. Harris, Bob S. Rober- 
son, Clarence E. Smith Jr., Wil- 
liam C. Elliott Jr., James H. 
Epps, III, William S. Michael, 
Miss Isabel Holbrook, Alvin W. 
Smith, Kenneth Oakley Jr. and 
Richard A. Reavis. 


heard all of the debate, pro and 
con. of the senators. j 

The bill of the evening, which 
wns introduced by .Tim Holmes, 
called for continued international 
holdi.ng of the canal by peaceful 
methods if possible, but by force 
if necessary. The bill was defeat- 
ed 21-3. 

: Senator Holmes blamed the en- 
I tire crisis on President Nasser and 
I said that the Western World must 
I prove that it will not accept such 
I violation of international law. 

Senator David Mundy argued 
that if the bill of the evening were 
carried out it would only turn the 
A.rabic nations again.st the West 
and leave them open to commu- 
nism. 

An invitation was extended for 
the four Egyptian guests to be- 
come members of the Senate. 
Three of the students arc in this 
country on Egyptian government 
grants: the other is sent hy the 
World Health Organization of the 
United Nations. 


Med School Man ; "^ , 
Completes Study 

Dr. J. Logan Irvin, associate 
professor of biochemistry at the 
University School of Medicine, has 
recently completed nine months 
of research at the National Insti- 
tute of Health at Bethesda, Mary- 
land. 

His research on the biosynthesis 
of proteins and nucleic acids of 
normal liver and of liver tumors 
was supported by a fellowship 
from the Guggenheim Memorial 
Foundation. 


Widely Differing Subjects j; 
To Be Aired By Speakers 

University students, faculty and townspeople will have 
1 choice ot two prominent speakers on two widely-diflering 
subjects tonight when the Chinese Republic's ambassador to 
the Ihiited States and a pre-eminent authority on the Amer- 
ican Civil War will give public addresses on tlie campus. 

Or. Ha|^hn<ifon K. long. Cliinese ninbassador since last 
Nfay. will appear at 8:13 p.m. in Hill Hall under sponsorship 

of the Carolina Forum. He i.r ex- 
pected to speak on "The Success of 
the New Tactics of the Chinese 
Communists." 

The second speaker will be 
Prof. Bell I Wiley, professor of 
American hij^tory st Emory Uni- 
versity and past president' of the 
Southern Historical Association. 
His address on 'A Time of Great- 
ness," .?et for R- p.m. in Carroll 
Hall, will sum up his years or re- 
search into the role of the com- 
mon soldier of the Confederacy 
and his views of the conflict be- 
tween the states. 

Both programs will be open to 
the public. Professor Wiley will 
be the first of three speakers who 
'.vill be presented this year by the 
Graduate History Club, Phi Alpha 
Theta history fraternity and the 
Graham Memorial Student Union. 
The Carolina Forum, an offici- 
al, non-partisan student body 
agency which irponsors speakers 
of various political and economic 
tiiought, will honor Dr. Tong at 
a private banquet at the Carolina 
Inn tonight before his main ad- 




Dr. H. K. TONC? 

talks here tonight 


Frat Talks 
Set Toni 


ght 


CIVIL WAR JCriOLAR BELL I. WiLEY 

Will speak on I he common confederate soldier 

of the Civil War Book Club. 

Among his writing.s are "South- 
ern Negroes, 1861-1865." which 
won the Mrs. Simon Baruch Prize; 
"The Plain People of the Con- 
federacy." "The Life of Johnny 
Feb." and "The Life of Billy 
Yairfc." 


editor or managing editor of a 

number of North China newspa- 
j pers before World War II. After 

wartime duty as a high-level in- 
j formation officer, he re.-'umed 
I his journalism work. In 1950 he 
i was named managing director of 
j the Broadcasting Corporation oi 

China and chairman of the Board 


Brecht, Hammemete 

Will Be Honored Todev 

Dr. E. A. Brecht. dean of the 
University School of Pharmacy, 
and Dr. F. C. Hammemess, faeul- 
ty member, win be inducted into 
the North Carolina Academy of 
Pharmacy at Charlotte today. 
Membership in the academy L: 
considered one of the highest 
honors that can come to a pharm- 
acist. 


80 Student Midshipmen Officers 
Named For Naval Training Unit 


Student midshipmen officers of 
the ;»faval ROTC unit for the fail 
semester were announced yester- 
day by Capt. A. M. Patter.,'on, USN, I 
professor of naval science. 

They include 80 student partici- ' 
pants in the naval training pro- 1 
gram. Capt. Patterson pointed out ■ 
that 60 per cent of the appoint- 1 
ments went to UNC students from ; 
North Carolina. 

The top rank of battalion com- 
mander went to Midship man G. B. 
Hall of Camden, N. J. Others 
named are as follows: 

Battatfion stafif: Midshipmen 
D. E. Kentopp of East Orange, 
N. J.; L. H. Hodges, Raleigh; D. L. 
Ward, New Bern; C. G. Mackie, 
Mt. Pleasant, N. J.; and L. R. 
Williams, Concord. 

Drum and Bugle Corps: Midship- 
men F. C. Byrum of Edenton and 
W. T. Davis of Nashville. 

Color Guard: Midshipmen M. 
Glatzer, Kenoington, Md.; T. Ma- 
haffy, Jacksonville, Kla.; W. T. 
Rose, South Miami, Fla.; and G. C 
Pridgen, Sharpsburg. 

Drill Team: Midshipmen J. K. 
Bryant, Elkin, and W. E. Barbee, 
Durham. 

A Company: Midshipmen M. M. 


Pritchett of Lenoir; H. B. Cowan 
of Ann Arbor, Mich.; W. G. Branch 
of Winter Haven, Fla.; and D. C. 
Kerby of Charleston Heights, S.C. 

First Platoon: Mid.^hipmen W. E. 
Cable, Greensboro; D. Steine, Ral- 
eigh; W. H. Redding, Asheboro; 
C. S. Dawson, Charleston, ^i ^C; 
P. Fulton, Walnut Cove, and C. E. 
Smith. Raleigh. 

Second Platoon: Midshipmen 
W. H. Baddley, Water Valley, 
Miss.: H. L. McCall, Bennettsville, 
S. C. : C. A. Barrington, Fayette- 
ville; W. N. Keever, Hiddenite; 
R. S. Sirkin, Miami, Fla.; and 
J. B. Roberts, Charlotte. 

Third Platoon: Midshipmen C. R. 
McMillan, Houston, Texas; C. D. 
Stevens, Salisbury; J. N. Black- 
welder, Statesville; J. J. Murphy. 
Hamlet; J. T. Duvj^ll, Ononset 
Point. R. I.; and W. F. Snell, Wins- 
ton-Salem. 

B Company: Midshipmen J. E. 
Martin of Charlotte; S. F. Wells. 
Reidsville; T. R. Brenner of Riviera 
Beach. Fla.; and R. Mines of Kins- 
ton. 

First Platoon: Midshipmen D. M. 
Michaux, Jacksonville, Fla.; B. L. 
Burbridge, Jacksonville, Fla.; C C 
Davis, Havana, Cuba; W. K. Wible, 


Greensboro; H. G. Snipes, Knox- 
ville. Tenn.; and E. N. Evans, Dur- 
ham. 

Second Platoon: Midshipmen J. 
M. Ludwig, New Orleans, La.; H. E 
Whitlock. Baltimore, Md.; T. H. Up- 
ton, Raleigh; W. D. Alexander, 
Statesville; and W. G. Jones, Lou- 
isville, Ky. 

C. Company: Midshipmen J. J 
Bynum, Raleigh; G. R. Brown, Dur- 
ham; G. P. Hunter, Charlotte; and 
P. L. Hogaboon, Arlington, Va. 

First Platoon: Midshipmen D. E 
Bollard, Charlotte; W. S. Pate, 
Pikeville; H. J. Sommer, Aberdeen 
Proving Ground.;, Md.; J. B. Dunn, 
Winston-Salem: E. L. Meekins, Ral 
''igh; and D. W. Nichols. Neuse. 

Second t*latoon: Midshipmen D 
M. Connor, Durham: R. L. Fowler 
Hillsboro; C F. Rouse, Raleigh: 
E. D. M. Schacnner. Charlotte; J. 

A. Snow, St. Petersburg, Fla.; and 
L. C. Wardrup, Middlesboro, Ky. 

Third Platoon : Midshipmen T 

B. Garrett, Danville, Va.; S. S 
Shaw, Hamilton, Ohio; D. H. fill- 
er. Cedar Rapids, Ohio; F. T.Set 
zer. Rural Hall; H. D. Shepherd 
North Wilkesboro; Jid R. L. Stap- 
leton, Gastonja. 


Two events arc planned for to- 
night to acquaint freshmen and 
transfer students with the proce- 
dures of rushing and the pros and 
00ns of fraternity memt>ei'ship. 

Advocates of both Sides will air 
their views of fraternity and inde- 
pendent life in a session under the 
sponsorship of the YMCA FellW- 
ship group from 7 to 8 p.m. in 
the library assembly room. 

In another meeting, at 9 p.m. the 
IFC will conduct discussions in the 
social rooms of the men's dormi- 
tories. 

Ed H u d g i n s, Interfraternity 
Council president will represent 
the IFC in the debate at the libran 
at 7 p.m. 

Representing the Interdormitory 
Council will be Jimmie Womblc of 
^ocky Mount, president of Grimes 
^nd Intramural coordinator for the 
IDC. 


dress. A. public reception will be , ^^j Directors of the Central Daily 


held afterward in Graham Me- 
morial. ] 

Born in Chekiang Province, Dr. 
Tong studied in the United Stat«s 
at Park College in Missouri, the 
University of Missouri, and Co- j 
lumbia Univer.''ty, where he was 
a member of the first class of the 
Pulitzer School of Journalism. 

As a pioneer in modern journ- 
alism in Chima, Tong served as 


News, both in Taipei, Formosa. 
Dr. Tong was the first postwar 
ambasj-ador from his country to 
Japan, holding that post from 
1.952 to 19.56. 

Author of several noted boaks 
on \)\\e Civil War days. Dr. Wiley 
formerly taught at the University 
of Mississippi and Louisiana 
State University. He is currently 
a member of the editorial board 


Studer\H May 
Suggest New 
Chancellor 


'Flossy' Heads 
To Va. Coast; 
16 Are Dead 

CAPE HATTERAS. N. C. <;P> — 
Propical storm Flossy, a weakened 
killer that .«howed signs of possi- 
Iv regaining hurricane force swirl- 
ed toward the Virginia coast la.st 
night. 

In her wake were at least 16 
deaths, perhaps that many miss- 
ing persons, and m.illions of dol- 
lars in property damage, princip- 
ally on the Gulf Coast. 

Flo.ssy had picked up speed 
slightly, to 20 miles an hour, and 
was about 20 miles north of Wil- 
mington at 11 a.m. EST. She was 
moving cast-northeast with off- 
shore squalls of 45 to 50 miles an 
hour, and winds of 35 miles an 
hour 250 miles to the -north and 
east. 

The Weather Bureau warneci 
that the storm might intensify as 
it moved up the coast. 

Tides two to three feet higher 
ban normal were predicted from 
Cape Hatteras on North Carolina' 
Outer Banks to northern New TcI* 
iey. 

The tides and torrential inland 
"■ains, in some places up to six 
inches within a 12-hour period 
*irought a threat of localized 
floods. 

Much of the interior of Georgia 
South Carolina and North Carolina 
■vhich got the most rain, had l)eer 
suffering from drought. This wa 
expected to minimize the flood 
threat. There was slight prpspec* 
for a repeat of last year's disas- 
rous Hoods, which resulted from 
a succession of hurricanes thai 
taxed nmoff and reservoir capac 
•ty to the breaking point 


Weil-Known Musicians 
Will Give Show Here 


Two internationally-known ar- 
tists. Yella Pessl, harpsichordist 
and Mischa Mischakoff, violinist, 
will play a concert here in Hili 
Music Hall Tuesday at 8 p.m. tc 
open the Tuesday Evening Series 
I for the fall semester. 
I The University Music Dept., 
I headed by Dr. Glcn Haydon. spon- 
j sors the musical series which is 
; open to students and others with- 
! out charge. 

! Tuesday's concert, co-sponsored 
i by Graham Memorial Student 
j Union, will mark the dedication of 
the Music Dept. new Macndler 
Schram harpsichord, made accord- 
ing to the department's specifica- 
tions by Maendlcr of Munich. Ger- 
many. 

This concert model two-manual 
harpsichord is similar to the fine 
Maendlcr harpsichord belonging to 1 
Nfiss Pessl. 

She is one of the best known of 
American harpsichordists. Born in 
Vienna, she was a graduate in Key- 

Legislature 
Holds Meet 
At 7 Tonight 

By NEIL BASS 

The first fall session of the 21st 
legislative assembly will begin at 
7 o'clock tonight in New East 
Building. 

According to Speaker Sonny 
Evans, two bills are scheduled to 
*>e thrown into the legislative hop- 
per. These are: 

(1) A bill placing an indivdual 
n the board of directors of the 

V^ictorj' Village Day Care Center 

(2) A bill completely revamping 
he current Elections Law. 

Another item scheduled on the 
-genda deals with the appointment 
>f three individuals to the Graham 
Memorial board of directors. Of 
the three, one will be a sophomore, 
one a junior, and one a senior. 


.^1* 


i>oard Instruments and Composi- 
ion, 19.31: and in America at Man 
hattanville College. Her early edu 
cation was at Vienna Academy o 
Music. 

The harpsichordist made hei 
.\merican debut at concerts of 
^chola Cantorum and the Lcagut 
of Composers of 1931. She con 
certized throughout the Uniter 
States and appeared on several 
radio broadcasts. 

Miss Pessl was selected three 
times by Toscanini to appear with 
the NDC Symphony; was in charge 
of programs of the Bach Circle and 
ha.s taught at Eastman School of 
Music. 

Since 1938 she has been a fac- 
ulty member of Columbia Univer- 
sity and Barnard College. She has 
also made many recordings. 

Equally well known is Mischa 
Mischakoff. He is perhaps best 
known as concertmaster of the 
former NBC .Symphony of Arfuro 
To!5canini. 

The violinist was born April 3, 
1897, at Pro.skoiirv. Ru.ssia, and is 
considered in the great tradition 
of Ru r-ian-born violinists, along 
with such artists as Hcifetz and 
Milstcin. Mischakoff comes from a 
large family of well-known pro- 
fessional musicians. 

He wai- concertmaster of the 
New York Symphony Orchestra 
for four year seasons; of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra under 
Stokowski; of the Chicago Sym- 
phony; and accepted Toscanini's 
invitation in 1937. 

It will be the first Chapel Hill 
appearance for both artists. 


I Universitjj' students may now 

make suggestions as to a .successor 

for Chancellor Robert House, ac- 

; cording to student body President 

Bob Young. 

The suggestion;? are to be made 
I to a three-man committee appoint- 
• ed for the purpose by President 
j Young. They will be forwarded 
I to President Young and then to 
i the principal selections committee 
; headed by R. Mayne Albright, Ral- 
' eigh attorney. 

Members of President Young's 
'onimittec are Tom Lambeth. Son- 
ny Evans, chairman, and Miss Mar- 
tha Barber. 

The committee was established, 
according to Youn2. upon request 
of Chairman Albright. 

House Ls retiring at the end of 
the present academic year. 

Albright's letter to Young sug- 
gesting that the student's voice 
be heard in he selections matter 
reads, in part: 

"I write e.."pecially to let vou 
know that our committe for the 
selection of a chancelor welcomes 
student suggestions and participa- 
tion in the choice. 

'We will be pleased to have 
you appear briefly before our 
i committe at its propo.sed meeting 
I on Oct. 27, if you have some re- 
i pert to bring in at that time." 
Young's answer, in part, reads: 
"I am quite sure that all stu- 
riepts realize that we can never 
find anyone to replace Chancellor 
House . . . Your sugge.rtion for get- 
ting student sentiment will be 
used." 


WUNC Asks 
New Students 
To Meeting 

The University's radio station. 
WLfNC. has announced that a meet- 
ing will be held tomorrow at 4; 15 
p.m. in Swain Hall for all new and 
transfpr students inf<^rested :n 
participating in any phase of the 
broaHcasting. 

The Frequency Modulation sta- 
tion is operated on professional 
standards by students in the Uni- 
Activties scheduled for Gra- j v«rsitv who participate on a volun- 


GM SLATE 


ham Memorial today include: 

Carolina Forum, 8:15 p.m.. 
Main Lounge; Sigma Kappa Ep- 
silon, 7 p.m., Grail Room; Young 
Republicans, 7 p.m., Roland Par- 
ker 1; Young Democrats, 7 p.m., 
Roland Parker 2; Orientation 
Committee 2 p.m., Woodhouse 
Conference R9om. 


tary basis. There are no salaried 

positions for students. 

Dave Setzer. assistant manager 

of the station, said th^re were a 
I limited number of vacancies still 
j open in all departments. 
j Any interested students have 
I been urged to attend Friday's 
i meetmg. 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAH HEEL 


Well, We're At It Again, 
Like Chickens Sans Heads 


GOETTINGEN LETTER 


\Vt'';t' Iw'fii ;4<)in.>5, to" classes 
alKUit a week, and already it's 
starte«i. 

I he laik of (oordiuaiioji of 
campus exeiits will l>t* shown bii- 
terly tonight. If yon re a reason- 
al)ly interested student, and fin- 
ish vonr stndvinfj; aronnd supper- 
time, (heck out of Lenoir Hall 
al)oitt 7 j>.m. and want to do some- 
thiiii; besides ?.»(> to tire movies, 
yon tan do ihesi- tliitijj.s: 

At 7 p.m. yoii can rij) over to 
(irahain Memorial and attend .i 
Voinig DenKKrais' Clid> meeting. 
Or. if von re a Repnhlitan. von 
tail go down the hall and meet 
with the V«>inig Republicans. So 
far. so gotjd. 

If you are interestetl in hearing 
both sides of fijaternity and in- 
tlependent. voull have to run. A 
^■M(■. A -sponsored dist ussion of 
the subjt-tt starts at 7 p.m. in the 
librar\. 

.Vi S p.m. \ou (an hear a sthol- 
ar speak on llie subjett of the Cliv- 
il War. He is Dr. Bell 1. Wiley of 
I-.morv rni\ersity. and he speaks 
in Carroll Hall. But there are 
(omjilitations. Dr. HollingttMi K. 
roiio. the Chinese ambassador to 
the I'jiitod States, starts speaking 
ai S (Vclock in Hill Hall. 

If von are still alive and breath- 
ing, you can nni l)a( k to the dorm- 
itory and hear an Interfraternity 
Couiu il-sfMmsored discussion of 
fraternity rushing. 

Maybe von want to attend some 
of these meetings, take part in 
some of the organizations which 
meet. It is impossible to go to all 
of them. .\nd it will be hard to 
decide what to leave ont; all of 
them are interesting atid educa- 
tional. 

l.aik of s<>me sort of campus 
(leariug house (.luses all those or- 
ganizations -to sdvedule their 
events «»n lite s.Tme night. The 


same lack will hold attendance 
down at ail of the e\ents. ' 

litre's a pioblem student bodv 
President l)ob \"oinig and t Ik- 
Si udent Legislature should w<»rk 
oui rapidly. \\'h\ not establish an 
agent \ of student goxernment to 
nrtiniain a st hedide of all tamp- 
us e\ents"- 1 he st hedule would be 
ax.iilable lo all orgajiizations h)r 
plainiing pinposcs. 

Then ni.i\be wc wouldn't ha\e 
the Chinese and)assador, a Ci\il 
^> ar s( holar and both nation; I po- 
lilital parties meeling on the 
same night, plus two dist iissions (»f 
fiaiemity life going on at the 
same tinu-. 


Governor's 

Dignity 

Remained 

K\erybody else has had his say 
(»n (iov. Hodges and his drt)pped 
diawcrs. so \\e'\\ have ours. 

The go\ernor showed great 
coinage to show off North Ciaro- 
lina-manufa; tmed skiwies to the 
readers ol Life Magazine, and he 
kept his gidiernatorial dignity at 
the same time. 

He obviously did a great deal 
for the state's industry — and in- 
dustry that will l)e(()me more im- 
}x>rtant as more small farmers go 
out of birsiness. He tfid it in good 
tiimior, and he is taking the after- 
publication wisetratks with a 
grain of salt. 

He helped us in-staters. ttw): 
He didn't knt)w about the elastic 
shoelaces that are manufactured 
at Charlotte. Went out and got a 
pair; they're excellent. 


Ike's Already Forgetting 



Prf^^ru-nt tisenliower, we see 
frtni iiic wire reports along cam- 
paign trail, has attacked the Dem- 
ocrats on the 
farm issues. 

I h e Demo- 
crats' rigid price 
s u p |)o r t prt)- 
grani. says Ike, 
is a 'jxjlitital 
gtab iMg" that 
h (X I d s nothing 
1> u t "mot kery 
and deceit " h)r 
.\meritan farm- 
ers. And his opj^onetits ^lave been 
"politi(king at the farmers* ex- 
pense. " lie says. 

^V'el!. well. well. We wonder if 
candidate lisenhower remembers 
the biggest jwjiitital grab bag of 
I he year — his Soil Bank program? 

.And d()es he remember how 
liard he fought to get Soil liank 
diet ks in the hands of the larm- 


IKE 


ers before the November elet t- 
ions? 

Does he remember how he was 
politicking to give the farmers 
graphic exidente (via fat (hecks 
at the taxpayers' expense) of the 
Republicans' big brotherliness? 

Ike's Soil liank ( het ks were be- 
ing mailed vesteidav Irom the .\g- 
ritiiltural StatbilizatiiMi and i'xnx- 
seiAalion oflite in Hillsboro. ()l- 
fitf workers there had (ounted up 
more than S2 1,000 in checks for 
tobatto farmers and smaller 
amounts for those who withheUl 
their wheat and totton crops. 
Lhats just for Orange Cotnny, 
too. 

I sk. tsk. .And Kisenhower's 
talking about political grab bags. 
Polititians (t'\cn intumbents) 
have ;iwfid short memories along 
alK)ut the end of .September of an 
elet t ion vear. - .. . 

/ 


Congratulations to Lhe Satur- 
day Kvening Post. 

The Post, long the st ion of 
.American weekK magazines, (ante 
Ota this week in favor of President 
Lisenhower for another term. The 
ina>a/ine gave its "tonsidered 


The Daily Tar Heel 

The official student publication of the 
Publication.s Board of the University of 
North Carolina, where it is published 
daily except Mondav and examination 
and vacation periods and summer terms 
Ent«Ted as .second class matter in the 
post office in Chapel Hill, N. C, under 
the Act oi March 8. 1870. Subscription 
rates: mailed, S4 per year, $2.50 a semes- 
ter; delivered, $6 a year, $3.50 a semes- 
ter. 


Editor 


FRED POWLEDGE 


opinion " in the form of a full- 
page editorial titled 'The Coun- 
try Still Needs Kisenhower.' 

Now, we don't agree with what 
The Post said. Kven if the (oun- 
trv did need Kisenhower, it would 
get Kisenhower's friends for an- 
other four veavs, and that defin- 
itely would J)c l)ad lor the tountry. 

What wc like is the fat t th\»t 
The Post can\e out with a vigor- 
ous, full-page editorial. In the 
Ameritan magazine industry, this 
is an uncommon event. 

Magazine editors in general ap- 
pear to be somewhat scared to tell 
.Amerita what they believe. They 
have a great fear of t ant el let! sub- 
scriptions and dropped advertising 
(ontracts. The result: No editorial 
page, or at best a jellied, watered- 
down one that stirs^ip no (ontro- 
versy and elicits no letters-to-the- 
editor. 


Managiog Editor . . CHARLIE JOHNSON 


lint The Post ha« somewhat 
broken this barrier. It's a g<»od 
sign for the .American magazine 
Business Manager BILL BOB PEEL industry. ^ 


Getting Adjusted To German Life 


Dan Southerland 

(Writer Southerland and 
'John Raper have received the 
stucient government scholarship 
to study in Goettingen Univer- 
sity. They »rt presently study- 
ing German at the Goethe-In- 
stitute in Rochei, Bavaria.) 

: Since leaving the States on 
July 3. I've spent ten days cross- 
i^ig the Atlantic, a week in Lon- 
don, fi\e days in Goettingen, and 
a month in the Ecumemical Work 
Camp in Wie.-.-baden. On Septem- 
ber 3, I started a language course 
hei*e at Roche! am Lee which 
will last until October 28. Time 
was also spent on a short moun- 
tain-climbing tour in Switzer- 
land before coming here. 

During the week of July 13 to 
July 20, a Niverian friend of 
mine, probably the most popular 
fellow on our boat, and I stayed 
with an English family in the 
suburb- of London. Following 
that, I went on to Goettingen 
where I met the people, saw their 
way of living and also spoke 
with t)avid Mundy, last year's ex- 
change student to Goettingen. 

In the work camp at Wiesbaden 
we lived very clo.sely together 
under rather crude conditions. 
The work was down-right hard, 
which wa.' an unexpected develop- 
ment. 

The twenty-five of us in the 
camp represented many different 
church denominations including 
t h e Coptic and Orthodox 
Churches. Our international 
group was made up of people 
from eight different nations. To- 
gether we built a street for the 
workers of the DyckerHoff Ce- 
ment Company and helF>ed them 
with the new homes they are 
building for nine worker's fam- 
ilies. 

In Germany there i.? quite a 
rift between the church and the 
industrial worker. Therefore our 
job was not only to build homes 
and streets for the workers, but 
to do what we could to strengthen 
the worker's relationships with 
the church. 

Rochei is a nice, quiet, little 
town of about 5.000 persons. It 
is a health resort, and as a re- 
sult, is visited by quite a few 
tourLsts. 1 am living with a fam- 
ily in the town. Sharing my room 
is a boy from Thailand. So far 
my main diversions have been 
talking with the people and get- 
ting to know them, rowing and 
dancing. La.;t weekeUd, a friend 
and I bicycled around some of 
the surrounding countryside. 

While on our cycl<? trip, we 
stopped off at a cloister in a 
small village and watched them 
bring in wagons loaded with hay 
from the fieltls. We went swim- 
ming, and. later, sat in the tav- 
ern of an almost primitive vill- 
age, watching the farmeri' drink- 
ing beer and playing cards amid 
shouting and roars of laughter. 

I'm satisfied with the .school, 
and think that the instructors 
are fairly good. Fifty of us from 
nine nations are divided into 
lour cla.s.'js. John Raper and I 
are in the third class (next to 
the top) with about 13 other stu- 
dents. 

Learning a new language is a 
lot of fun, but also quite hard, 
for even though I learned quite 
a bit of German while at Wie.s- 
baden. my grammar Ls still not 
veffy good. 


'I Thought Sure This Was Where We Parked' 


The Post Becomes A Man pogo 



(4: 

YOU Said It: 

Same Old Thing' Hurts UNC Pride; 
Student Dislikes Blotter Feature 


Editor: 

Does the University of North 
Carolina live or is it dead; or is 
it neitTier exactly, but simply 
limping along like a wounded 
giant'.' This is t-s '.'ntialiy a letter 
concerning f(;otbail. but un- 
avoidably it goes further than 
that. It is involved with the prin- 
ciple of school spirit in general. 

On Saturday afternoon, thirty- 
seven thousand football fans 
found themselves* in Kenan 
Stadium watching what they were 
ready to admit by ' the fourth 
quarter was "the .'-ame old 
thing, only worse'. We beat 
State last year. 

I don't know exactly what the 
Carolina portion of that great 
crowd expc'dcd, for I don't be- 
lieve they knew too exactly them- 
selves. They expected something 
to lift their faltering egos. That 
much was fairly easy to feel. 
And, when it did not come, the 
di.iappointment was as bitter as 
it was silent. Defeat was unac- 
ceptable, yet unavoidable; and 
Tar Heel pride lay shattered with 
the broken whiskey bottles. 

I have faitli in the school, the 
football team, the human value 


enoi jh to Ix'lieve that there are 
enough students in this school 
who feel a.- 1 do. that we will win 
every last game lelt on the sched- 
ule, and to make our team know 
it before they leave for Okla- 
homa. If we let them know that 
we believe, win or lose, they are 
the best, nothing can stop them, 
—or us. Roy Talley, Jr. 

Grad School 
Dean's Office 
In South Bidg. 

Editor: 

We read The Daily Tar Heel 
too. Reference is made to your 
column that appeared in the Sep- 
tember 14th issue entitled "South 
Building is Home of UNC's 'Top 
Brads'." 

For your irtformation, the Grad- 
uate School is located in 202 
South Building. While Dean W. 
W. Pier.son is away on leave as 
.Acting Chancellor of the Wo- 
man's College of the University 
of North Carolina, .\ssociatc 
Dean A. K. King is carrying on 
in his usual fa..-hion in seeing 


that our approximately 1,000 
graduate students are properly 
fuided in degree programs. 
Mrs. Ruth Ann Ford, Secretary 
Mrs Allette Hill, Secretary 
Mrs. Sally Coe, Secretary 
Mrs. Shirley Daye, Secretary 
Editor: 

.Ml throughout orientation per- 
iod, the Honor System and the 
Campus Code were given extra 
stress. Many of the Council mern- 
bera* gave speeches concerning 
violations, trials and student 
rights. It was made clear to me 
and to my constituents that a 
violator's name would not be 
publicized. 

In Tuesday's Daily Tar Heel, 
an article was written ;'aying that 
the Chapel Hill police blotter 
would be a regular part of the 
paper. If I am not mistaken, 
many of the violations on the 
blotter are subject to Campus 
Code trials. Why, then, are these 
names now being publicized in 
the school paper when we were 
told that our violations would be 
kept silent? I believe that this 
publication of names to be ma- 
licious rather than corrective. 
Michael Fieisher 


By Wait Kelly 


I THiMK ru. 6rr INTO 9o*'\i ot^s? Veojf 

U«Jg OF COMMUMICATICM"" / W6 ,^ 

IT AIN'T AS WUCH P'M 5? ^' / CALLIM'? 


H06 A\'wH6er^ \r3ir 

'-wriAfee voj 


rr mi ttJAT I c^N'f v^i 

MAltMAMNIN'"" Bur TMf t\K 

eote jjjT Of It wH^M 


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W\H A PgCK Of P06X CAEW TO 

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M?PV PAY AHSAP Of MI,V\, , \ 
^r—^ PfAPiN'A^J' CHUCKUNJ'"^ 
<^i^ But NOWARAY^ 

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/ <X^BOQy A\A1HN' ^fjff 



Lil Abner 


By AI Capp 


News Editor RAY LINKER 



THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 19M 



Letter Home On 
Saturday s Brawl 

Barry Winston 

Dear Folks, ^ ' ^ 

Well I been pretty busy se thats why you ainl 
heard nothin from me since last week. I guec the 
thing you probly want to hear about most is that 
big fight in the woods that I went to last Saturday. 
Well acktully it wasnt much of a brawl. Anywise 
nothing like some of the ones the boys used to get 
into down in the city every weekend. 

Me and my roommate got there about one thirty 
or 50 and I wish you could this here place. We 
was walking through the woods and all of a sudden 

^ there was this 
^y§- big fence and 
___„_„»„„ ™_— couple a things 

thaHo^eFlike purty solid outhouses and a couple 
a million p&ople running around at least. 

So I s.ays to my roommate is it always this many 
people at one of these fights and he says just wate 
til the dock game whatever thai is. 

So anyhow there we were stand!,, outside and 
then we were standin inside and then we was at 
the edge of this big hill with seats all around look- 
in down into a pretty green field that made me 
right homesick. .";' 

After while we found us a place to sit down 
and we had no more than got sat down good when 
a couple aguys come along and said hey stupid 
you got our seats and I says who me and he says 
yes you ^nd they was bigger than us so we found 
some other seats that were better anyhow cau.se 
we could see the whole field better. Thats what 
my roommate said anyway. 

Pretty soon a bunch of people came out on the 
field and started running around and after a while 
I said to my roommate whens the fight goin to 
start and he said its already the second quarter 
dummy and I .said whats that and said he was go- 
ing to get a drink and that was the last I seen of 
him 'til the next day. 

I got tired of waiting for the fight to start di- 
rectly so I left and ^ent back to my room and took 
a nap. I never did find who it was that won the 
fight if they ever had it. 

Guess I got to tell you that I had my first date 
last Saturday night. My roommate said he was 
tired at looking at me so he fixed mo up with a 
real doll. Thats what he told me. Theres still a 
whole lot about this place that I aint to clear on 
but Im sur gonna find out what a dol is so HI know 
better next time. 

I picked her up at the dorm where she stays 
about eight o'clock and the only time she stopped 
talking all night was when she had her mouth full 
of popcorn which wasnt very long cause she finish- 
ed off those three boxes of the stuff in about ten 
minutes. 

I aint seen nothing like the way that girl ate 
popcorn since they had that big steam shovel in 
town diggin the basement for the new store. 

W^hen we got put of the show she said dent you 
like to dance and I said yes mam do you know 
anywhere around here where we can go and dance 
and she said theres always the rondayvoo room and 
I said is it and she said is it what. 

We never did get it settled what it was that 
we were talking about but we did find this ronday- 
voo room only we didnt stay long cause she didnt 
know how to square dance and I didnt see any point 
in just sittin there watchin all those people just 
sorta standin around out in the middle of the floor 
while music was playing so I took her home. 

When we got there I said I had a real fine time 
and she said so did I why dont you call me up 
again for another date sometime next fall. But I 
bet she forgets my name by that time so I probly 
wont bother. 

Ivc got to read, something in my book about 
higene so I have to close for now. 

Your loving son, 
. Barry 


OTHER NEWSPAPERS SAY: 

Alabama Council 
Anti-Rock 'N Roll 

The Saint Louis Post-Dispatch 

"Rock and roll" music, so dear to the hearts 
of teenagers as of even date, has come under 
attack in Alabama on— ol all grounds!— the basis 
of racial prejudice. The leader of the Klan-like 
North Alabama White Citizens' Council, Asa Carter, 
says some "rock and rcll' records are immoral and 
he is going to a.sk juke-box operators to throw them 
out. A Dixieland band leader in Birmingham, Gerald 
Scott, says the songs aren't immoral but they are 
"not even music . . . worse than bo-bop or even 
hillbilly. " 

Our authority on things musical, popular divi- 
sion, tells us that "rock and roll" is simply fast 
blues, and is sometimes somewhat suggestive oc- 
casionally perhaps a little more than somewhat, but 
no more so than many other songs in the popular 
genre that neither rock nor roH. We suspect, how- 
ever, that Bandleader Scott is right when he savs. 
Teenagers don't know what the words mean. If 
they did, they couldn't stand them." The words of 
popular songs are seldom to be borne. 

The governing fact about the matter, howev.r 
IS tliat teenagers love this wretched cater-wauling; 
and If they love it. it is g^ing to stay until, in their 
own good time, they move on to a taste for some 
thing that sounds worse. Mr. Carter can put that 
in his pipe and swallow it. "Rock and roll" music, 
predict we, wiU roU to the punch, and rock right on. 


THURSDAY,! 


-Fri 

(Continiii 

OJSC, N. C. 
College." 
HIGHER EDI 

"Hie Board 
during the 
Commission 
recommendec 
propriation il 
solidated Unj 
million for ej 
nium l»57-5£ 

"In this t( 
the sum of 
creases for 
here in Chap| 

Also incluj 
mendations i| 
for library b^ 
a sizable incr 
quisition fur 
was requests 
the Board, tl 
general facul 
main UniversI 

The enroll 
sity, as of laS 
sents an jn< 
students in 
said. 

UNC lists 
State 5.505 
2,329. "This 
cent years" 
DORMITORH 

Concerijin^ 
dormitories. 


i ^i- 


; f 


F()< 


At 

in yofl 
you 

down J 
goodr 
listed 


tani 
(hos 


tol 

P'l 

al 

SI 


f. 


195^ 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27. 1956 


THE bAILY TAR HEtL 


PAGE THREC 


n —Friday (Conference— 
I 


aint 
M the 
lat 

lay. 

vise 
to get 

I thirty 

We 

Ridden 

this 

and 

nngs 

iuple 


many 

wate 


and 

'as at 

look- 

le me 

down > 

when 

[stupid 

|e says 

found 

cause 

what 

Ion the 
while 
join to 
luarter 
?as go- 
keen of 

tart di- 
id took 

the 

[•St date 

le was 

with a 

still a 

llear on 

11 know 

|e stays 
Slopped 

luth full 

finish- 

)ut ten 

I girl ate 
lovel in 


lent you 
^u know 
Id dance 

)om and 


.-as that 
ronday- 
^he didnt 
my point 
)ple just 
[the floor 
Ime. 

fine time 

me up 

111. But I 

I probly 

!>ok about 
son. 


(Continued from Page I) 

(UNC, N. C. State aftd Woman's 

College." 

HIGHER EDUCATION 

The Board of Higher Education, 
(luring the State Advisory Budget 
Commission hearings last week 


passed by the 1955 General As- 
sembly wh€h enabled us to bor- 
row $5 million— $2 millon each 
for UNC and State and $1 million 
for WC — for dormitory construc- 
tion. 

Last Saturday the Board of Trus- 


recommended to the Board an ap- tees authorized the money and we 

propriation increase for the Con- are going ahead," he said, 
solidated University of over $4.3 

million for each year of the bien- Housing for married students 

niiim 1957-59. was also discussed by Friday. He 

"In this total," Friday said,' 'is referred to the Board of Higher 

thf sum o£^97.000 for salary in- Educations recommendations 

creases for the main University which said "The Board is greatly 


here in Chapel Hill. 

Also included in these recom- 
mendations is the sum of $165,000 
for library books. This represents 
a .sizable increase for the book ac- 
quisition fund, he said. $50,000 
vva.s requested and approved by 


concerned about housing of mar- 
ried students and has come to the 
conclusion that the State cannot 
advisedly undertake to provide 
housing for married students ex- 
cept thrse in professional schools 
and those doing graduate work 


the B«ard, the sum to be used for ^^'^ ^^'^" "^ s"ch cases only to a 
general faculty research for the limited extent. .^ , 

main University here. ; The Board explained this stand 

The enrollment at the Univer-' ,^3 taken because "most of the 
sity. as of Ust Friday night, repre- { graduate and professional school 
sents an increase of over 1,100 j students are older than ander- 
students in the three schools, he ] graduates and from their ranks we 

must recruit our college and many 


said. 

UNC lists 6,969 students. N. C. 
State 5.505 and Woman's College 
2.329. "This is the highest in re- 
cent years" Friday said. 
DORMITORIES 

Concerijing the need for more 
dormitories, he said an act was 


of our public school teachers." 

About the three Negro girls who 
applied and were admitted to WC 
this fall, Friday said "The situa- 
tion at Greensboro is proceeding 
in an orderly fashicm." 


Population Up 
To 2,500 In 
Last 3 Months 

Chapel Hill's population has 
been boosted by an estimated 2,500 
persons over a period of the past 
three months. 

According to Tom Rose, Chapel 
Hill city manager, this addition is 
the result of a series ot annexa- 
tions which increased the total 
land area of Chapel Hill by approx- 
imately 75 per cent. The annexa- 
tions, which took place between 
June 1 and Sept. 1, 1956, raised ! 
the Chapel Hill estimated popu- { 
lation of 9,500 to 12,000 persons, j 

Rose stated that most of the peo- j 
pie living in these fully developed j 
outside areas work in the town of , 
Chapel Hill and had voted 3 to 1 j 
to be included in the town limits. 
All services of the town will be 1 
extended to inelude these newly 
annexed regions. 


YACK CONTRACTS 

All organizations desiring space 
in the 1956-57 Yackety Yack must 
sign contracts in the Yack office 
in the basement of Graham Me- 
morial by Oct. 10, according to 
Editor Tommy Johnson. 



Concert Series Offers 
Special Student Price 


Students Still Inhabit Cellar Of Cobb Dorm 

Mitchell Borden, at th? left, junior from Charlotte, and C. T. Stephens, junior of Bel Air, Md., relax 
among the crowded living conditions in Cobb Dormitory basement. Housing Director Jim Wadsworth 
said yesterday there were still approximately 50 students living there. The University is in the proc- 
ess of moving them out, but it is going slow at the present. Wadsworth said it should pick up next 
week, however. He said the big problem is the lack of rooms in Conner, graduate dorm, for graduate 
students who ask for them, and the lack of two-m an room? for men who ask for them. (Photo by Nor- 
man Kantor.) 


A special ticket price for the 
Chapbl .Hill Concert Series is be- 
ing offered the University student 
body, t 

A season seat in the unreserved 
orchestra may be obtained for $5 — 
only $1.25 per concert. Student 
tickets may be purchased in the 
office of Graham Memorial during 
regular office hours. 

A concert by Eileen Farrell will 
open the series on Oct. 10. Oth^r 
presentations include a pair of 
ballets by the Chicago Opera Bal- 
let, a recital by the world-famed 
Obernkurchen Children's Choir, 
and a concert by virtuoso pupil of 
Paderewski. Witold Malcuzynski; 
distinguished artists for a discrim- 
inating audience. 

In addition to this special stu- 
dent rate, the Concert Series has 
adopted a new policy concerning 
ushers. Ushers this year will have 


a special section for themselves, 
consisting of the first everal rows 
of the orchestra section. After 
seating the audience, they will be 
be allowed to hear the concert 
from some of the best seats in 
the house. AIjo, each usher will 
be issued a free pass to each par- 
ticular concert he works. This 
pass will entitle a friend to join 
him in the usher's section for the 
concert. 

Students interested in helping 
wth the producton of the Ballet 
program will receive two tickets 
each, for the Ballet, the Children's 
Choir, and Malcuz>'nski. Students 
interested in this series or in ush- 
ering have been invited to con- 
tact Mrs. Douglas Fambrough in 
the GM office between the hours 
of 9 to 12 in the morning, or see 
John Ludwig at the St. Anthony 
Hall. 



QaCanQOfi 


with 


t Author of '-Bmrtfo^t Baf H'llA Chmk," «te.} 


FOOTBALL: ITS CAUSE AND CURE 

At next Saturday's football game, while you are sitting 
in your choice student's seat on the ten-yard line, won't 
you give a thought to Alaric Sigafoos? 

Who, you a.sk. is Alaric Sigafoos? Corae closer, sit 
down, light a Philip Morris, .savor that natural tobacco 
goodness, sigh contentedly, cross your fat little legs, and 
li.sten. 

Alaric Sigafocs (186S-1934) started life humbly on a 
farm near Thud, Kan.^as. His mother and father, both 
named Ralph, were bean-gleaners, and Alaric became a 
bean-gJeaner too. But he soon tired of the work and went 
to Memphis where he got a job with a logging firm. Here 
the ex-bean-gleaner worked as a stump-thumper. Then 
he drifted to Texas where he tidied up oil fields (pipe- 
wiper K Then to Arizona where he strung dried fruit 
(fig-rigger). Then to Virginia where he was a research 
assistant (book-looker). Then to Long Island where he 
dressed poultry (duck-plucker ) . Then to California where 
he lectured young women who were about to get married 
(bride-chider). Then to Minnesota where he cut up frozen 
lakes (ice-slicer). Then to Nevada where he determined 
the odds in a gambling house (dice-pricer). Then to 
Milwaukee where he pasted camera lenses together 
(Zeiss-splicer). 

Finally he went to Omaha where he got a job in a 
tannery, beating pig-hides until they were soft and supple 
(hog-flogger). Here he found happiness at last. 



}ie fpUiiicf happittCSi <f/ Uit"- 


Why, you ask, did he find happiness at last as a hog- 
flogger? Light another firm and fragrant Philip Morxis, 
taste that true tobacco flavor, puff, relax, let sweet lassi- 
tude possess your limbs, and listen. 

Next door to the hog-floggery was an almond grove 
owned by a girl named Chimera Emrick. Chimera wa-s . 
pink and white and marvelously hinged, and Alaric was 
hopelessly in love the moment he clapped eyes on her. 
Each day he came to the almond grove to woo Chimera, 
but to no avail. He tried with all his vigor and guile, 
but she, alas, stayed cool. 

Then one day Alaric got a brilliant idea. It was the 
day before the annual Omaha Almond Festival. On this 
day, as we all know, every almond grower in Omaha 
enters a float in the big parade. The floats always consist 
of large cardboard almonds hanging from large cardboard 
almond trees. • 

Alaric's inspiration was to stitch pieces of pigskin 
together and inflate them until they looked like big, 
plump almonds. "These sure beat skinny old cardboard 
almonds," said Alaric to himself. "Tomorrow they will 
surely take first prize for Chimera, and she will be mine !" 

Early the next morning Alaric came running to 
Chimera with his inflated pigskin almwids, but she, alas, 
told him .she was not entering a float that year. In fact, 
she had just sold her almond grove ar.d was moving East 
to try out with the Boston Red Sox. 

Alaric, upon hearing these glum tidings, flew into a 
violent rage. He started kicking his j)igskin almonds all 
over the place. And who should be walking by at that 
very instant but Abner Doubleday! 

Mr. Doubleday, who had invented baseball some years 
earlier, was now trying to invent football, but wHhout 
success. The trouble was, he couldnt figure out what kind 
of ball to use. Nov/, seeing Alaric kick the pigskin 
spheroids, his problem was suddenly solved. "Eureka !" 
he cried, and ran to his drawing board, and the rest is 

history . ^^^^ Shulm»n. 1953 

When you go to next Saturday'it game, the mmlten of PMUp 
Morru, aponaort of thU column, tuggeat you take along tkm 
perfect football eompmnion-Philip MorrU, of eorrUt 


Covering The Campus 


Placement Officer Named 


ENGLISH CLUB 

The first social meeting of the 
Elngl'sh Club for the fall semester 
will be held tonight in the Library 
Assembly Room at 7.30. Refresh- 
ments will be served. All old mem- 
bers and all new graduate students 
in EInglish have been invited to 
attend. 

II4000R POOL 

The indoor swimming is open 
for recreational swimming Won 
days through Friday from 4-6 p.m.. 
Saturdays from 2-6 p.m. and Sun 
days from 2-5 p.m. Women swim- j 
mers may wear their own bathing 
suits, but men students are re- : 
quired to wear the special suits ! 
issued by the gym. I 

YDC 

The Young Democrats will meet j 
in Roland Parker Lounges 2 and : 
3 of Graham Memorial tonight at 1 
7. A recording of the national con- 1 
vention keynote speech by Cover- 1 
I nor Frank Clement of Tennessee 
will be presented. 

I WUNC 

Today's schedule for WUNC, the 
University's FM rado station, 91.5 
megacycles: . . , 

12:44 — Sign On 
12:4.'5 — Music 

1:00— Today On Farm 

1:30— Music In View 

2:00— Your Child , * ' . 

2:30— Sign Off • . ' ■ v 

5:44 — Sign On 

5:45 — Music 

6:00— Magic Lantern * 

6:30— News 


CLASSIFIEDS 


^STUDENT WANTFD FOR PART- 
time work, preferably upper- 
classman with automobile who 
has some circulation experience 
on newspapers. Guaranteed sal- 
ary plus commission. Write Box 
XYZ, stating qualifications and 
giving references. 


LOST: WILL PERSON WHO, UN- 
intentionally or otherwise, took a 
B. A. 72 text. Elementary Ac- 
counting, from Lenoir Hall be- 
tween 9 & 9:30 a.m. Wed., Sept. 
26, return it to owner. Bob Ga.il- 
lard, 21a AjFcook 


6:45 — Sports 

7:00— Mental Gymn. 

7:15— Bible Course 

8:00— Dr. Shivers 

8:4.5 — State Government 

9:30 — American Holiday 
10:00— Final Edition 
10:05— Sign Off 


Miss Margaret McGowan has ac- 
cepted a position as assistant di- 
rector of the University Placement 
Service, succeeding Miss Marcella 
Harrer. 

Formerly associated with the 
Wachovia Bank and Trust Com- 
pany of Charlotte, she began her 
new duties a week ago. 

Miss McGowan will offer coun- 


sel and advice to students, particu- 
I 
larly senior women desiring em- 

j ployment on completing academic 

I studies. 

I The Placement Service, directed 
I by J. M. Galloway, aids all univer- 
' sity students in securing jobs by 
I arrangement with perspective em- 
ployers. 


Broadcasters Will Hold 
Meet Here This Weekend 

Some 50 directors and broad- 
casters from radio and television 
stations in the two Carolinas are 
expected here this weekend for the 
fail nreeting of the Radio and Tele- 
vision News Directors Association 
of the Carolinas. 

Ernie Greup of Station WTVD- 
TV, Durham, president of the As- 
sociated Press's television report- 
ers a^'sociation, said Vice Presi- 1 
dent Lyle C. Wilson of United j 
Press, Washington, D. C. will be j 
keynote speaker at the semi-annual ! 
meeting at the Carolina Inn. ! 


When YouVe 
Broke . . . 

Come loaf in 

Good Company 

in that amiable 

emporium 

The Intimate 
Bookshop 

205 E. FRANKLIN ST. 
OPEN TILL 10 P.M. 


iil « 


LOST — BILLFOLD FRIDAY IN 
Lenior Hall or Law School be- 
tween 10 a.m. and noon. Con- 
tains valuable personal papers 
and approximately $200. Money 
for nurses attending my wife 
who has a fatal disease. If finder 
feeis he needs money more than 
hie, please return papers. $20 
reward offered for honesty. Con- 
tact B. M. Murry at Law School. 

LOST: ONE WIVE'S PASSBOOK. 
Lost Saturday in or around Ken 
an Stadium. Finder please call 
9-6362. 



NEW 1956 SAV-A-STAA/iP CATALOG JUST OUT! 

NOW-EXCITING NEW itsmmm 


,4 


GIFTS FOR YOU! 


A wonderful New Catalog with hundreds of thrilling, Tamous- 
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new and different premiums, the Sav-A-Stamp catalog is brim-' 
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delighted with the bigger values in the new Sav-A-Stamp 
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Je»Be JetoeU. Fro»en Chicken 

Pol Pies 

4 "^.T 69<= 


Quaker Brand Quick 


MASTS 


^4 



39 


RIB END 

3 10 31/2 LBS. 
AVG. WT. 

LOIN END ROAST l'bs^avg is 49c 
HALF LOIN ROAST ibVavg lb 53c 


Regular or 
Drip Grind 


ATTENTION: ALL PHYSICS MA- 
jors, students of physics, and in- 
terested persons are reminded 
that there will be a meeting of 
the physics club on Thursday at 
» p.m. in 250 Phillips Hall. 

1-5834-2 

SUNDAY NEW YORK TIMES DE- 
livered to your door. For further 
information call 8-0572 or 8-0368 
after 5 p.m. 1-5833 5 

STUDENTS EXPERIENCED ON 
Linotype or open presses may 
obtain part time work at Colon- 
ial Pre^s. Phone 333-6. 


REDCATE RICH RED TOMATO ^^^^ 

W WV W f% Vp Regular 29e 

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CINNAMON 

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JESSE JEWELL FROZEN 

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SAUSAGE > 33e 

C:HEF'S PRIDE CHICKEN 

SALAD >^^ 45c 


LB 65c 
LB 45c 
LB 49c 


Half 'Price SALE ! 


GOLD LAREL TEA 


Buy One at Regular Low Price . . . 
Get 2nd Package at Half Price! 


6-OL 
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THE DAILY TAR HBBL 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1f54 


Soccer Team Will Be Strong Contender For ACC Title 


Booters To Be More 
Powerful This Season 


By DICK TANNENBAMM 

This year the North Carolina 
Soccer team looks to be one of 
the strongest contenders for the 
Atlantic Coast Soccer Crown with 
probably the best team in its his- 
tory on hand. 

Coach Mar\in Allen said, "This 
year's team is better than last 
j-ear's and they like to play soc- 
cer." 

The toughest team to beat will 
be Maryland, who has won the 
ACC crown every year since it 
was started in 1953. 

The others in this conference 
»re Duke (who had one of the 
strongest freshman teams last 
year, most of it to be used on the 
varity this year), Virginia, and 

Meeting Held 
To Push Gym 
Team Here 

A group of veteran gj'mnasts 
held an informal meeting last 
night in Joyner Dormitorj' to dis- 
cuss the possibility of having a 
gjmnastics team here this year. 

Gymnastics has been discontin- 
ued as an intercollegiate sport ait 
use due to the lack of a coach. 
Last year's coach. Bill Meade, left 
the University this summer to be- 
come head gymnastic coach at 
Southern Illinois University. 

It has been reported that gym 
nasties was dropped here due to 
lack of interest in the sport. How- 
ever, it was pointed out at the 
meeting that interest in the sport 
has not waned. For the first time 
there are freshmen enrolled in 
school who have had previous 
gymnastic experience. In addition, 
there are fifteen returning squad 
me#ibers. 

About twenty students were at 
the meeting, and representatives 
were appointed to meet with Ath- 
letic Director Chuck Erickson on 
Menday. This group will ask Ath- 
letic Director E^rickson to investi- 
gagte the possibility of resuming 
gymnastics as an intercollegiate 
sport. 

The representatives will report 
their findings at a meeting Mon- 
day night at 7 o'clock in Room 
102, Joyner Dormitory. All persons 
interested in resuming gymnas- 
tics have been invited to attend. 


N. C. State. 

Captained by one of last year's 
co-captains, Grover Brown, the 
team is in good physical cocndi- 
tion. Many lettermen are back to 
form the backbone and with the 
players from last year's freshman 
team coming up, Coach Allen 
hopes .to have a "winner." 

Oa the forward line will be John 
Foster at left wing. Ted Jones or 
Ted.Yohanna (Yohanna is a trans- 
fer student from a Junior College 
and is not affected by the usual 
rule of waiting one year before 
playing a sport) at left inside, 
Grover Brown at center forward. 
Coleman Barks, a Morehead Schol- 
ar, at right inside, and Pat Mc- 
Cormick at right wing. Brown, 
Foster, and McCormick are return- 
ing lettermen. 

The backs will be Bob Borden 
at left half. Dave Corkey at center 
half. Bill Blair at right half, Ted 
Jones at left fullback, and Mike 
Galifianakis, a returnee from the 
armed services, at right fullback. 
Blair, Jones, and Galifianakis are 
returning lettermen. 

The goalie will be Chuck Hart- 
man who was one of the contend- 
ers for all-conference goalie last 
year. 

Coach AJlen has expressed the 
wish that as many people as pos- 
sible attend the games this year 
to cheer the boys on. He also 
stated that although the freshman 
team is already working under the 
direction of Mr. .John Wienants 
(who played goalie for the team 
that won the National Soccer 
Championship last year), he would 
appreciate it if any other boys 
who are interested in the sport 
would come down and try out for 
the team. 


Cagers Engage 
Utah In Classic 

Coach Frank McGuire's Tar 
Hdel cagers will meet the Uni- 
versity of Utah in the opening 
round of the Dixie Classic, which 
begins* m Raleigh, December 27. 
Utah is the defending champion 
of the Skyline Conference. 

McGuire drew the Utes at a 
meeting of the Big Four basket- 
ball coaches held in Raleigh yes- 
terday. 


Carolina Caravan 


By JAKE WADE 

This week it's mighty Oklahoma 
for the humbled Carolina Tar 
Heels. It's a long journey out there 
and it could be a longer one back, 
but heads are high here. 

Maybe the loss to N. C. State 
isn't forgotten, but on the practice 
field and in the coaches' inner 
councils right jjow there is talk 
only of those great Sooners and 
this week's ball game. 

The Tar Heels were soundly 
whipped last Saturday by a mighty 
fine N. C. State team, but there 
does not appear to be a defeatist 
attitude on the vanquished squad 
as it prepares for its contest with 
the team ranked number one in 
the nation. 

• « • 

THE TRIP!— The Tar Heels will 
have a good many supporters in 
that 60,000 sellout crowd at Nor- 
man this week. 

University alumni living out 
there in the open spaces have 
planned a luncheon in the Univer- 
sity of Oklahoma student union 
buildihg, beginning at 11 o'clock 
Saturday, game day. 

Jack Davidson ('38) is heading 
the arrangements with alile assist- 
ance from Dr. J. J. lUiyne ('19), 
James E. Webb ('28), Dick Buck 
('37) and others. 

Mr. Webb, former. UiMlersecre- 
tary of State and Director of the 
United States Budget, has written 
letterr to alHmni throughout the 
Southwest in drumming up a 
crowd. 

And that Dick Buck is the one 
time Tar Heel star end who cap- 
tained the 1936 team. Dick's big- 
gest moment perhaps was in 1934 
when he was a sensational pass 
catcher in a 7-0 win over Duke. 
Among his teammates: Jim Tatum. 

♦ • • 

FROM HBRll— A number of 
Chapel Lilians also will be out 
there to see the Tar Heels in theur 
brave challenge against the Soon- 
ers. 

The Tv Heeb will travel by 


chartered airplane and they were 
able to get one of those really big 
ones for this journey. In addition 
to the squad and its attaches, there 
will be the travelling press and 
some distinguished guests from the 
faculty. 

A large and fine press will ac- 
company the Tar Heels to Norman 
and the folks back home will be 
well and. expertly advised about 
the game, win, lose or draw. Ray 
Reeve will broadcast it over the 
Tobacco Sports network, with his 
old sidekick. Bill Currie, doing the 
color. 

Incidentally, this year there are 
nearly 60 stations affiliated with 
the Tobacco Sports network, mak- 
ing it one of the largest in the 
nation and definitely the largest in 
its history. 

* ♦ * 

FOOTBALL WEIGHTS— Some of 

the customers may be confused 
about weights of North Carolina 
players, since two sets have ap- 
peared in printed form. 

Football weights are variable. In 
an original list, weights of Caro- 
lina players of last spring were 
used. For the official roster this 
year, the weights of the players, 
as t^ken at their physical exam- 
inations, were published. 

The latter are those shown on 
the center spread of the Carolina 
game programs. Even those cannot 
be guaranteed, as the weights of 
players frequently change and 
some of our big fellows have work- 
ed off weight since these were 
taken, or maybe even added a few 
pounds on their grade-A cuisine. 

In the old days a lot was made 
of weights, and coaches and school 
officials frequently were charged 
with altering the weights for pub- 
lication. I doubt if any school does 
this any more. Coaches think more 
about speed than beef these days 
and it is old hat trying to con- 
fuse a foe about weights. 

Sooner or later we will have all 
our weights jibe in the statistical 
program which hounds the sports 
publicity offices these days. 



Gridders Work Inside 
As Hurricane Strikes 


The »kirts of Flossy forced Car- 
olina's Tar Heels indoors for the 
first time yesterday afternoon as 
wind and heavy rain assaulted the 
campus all day. 

Coach Jim Tatum had his forces 
in Woollen Gym running through 
offensive and defensive forma- 
tions. Rain failed to halt Tar Heel 
work Tuesday, as the team 
prepped for its date with mighty 
Oklahoma .Saturday. 

Trainer John Lacey reported 
that star halfback F>i Sutton's 
bruised elbow was responding to 
treatment and that the Cullowjice 
('omet should be ready for full 
scale work against the Sooners. 
Sutton bruised the joint in the 
opening loss to N. C. State. 


TOGETHER 
for the first time! 

\ 

WHAT 
ERTEITMMIEKT! 


UlnlDS is the most 

scandalous foreign Affair* 

in laugh history! 




Bums Lose To Philly, 
Fall One Game Behind 


BROOKLYN «»— The Philadel 
phia Phillies defeated Brooklyn 
today, 7-3, knocking .the second 
place I>odgers a full game behind 
the idle Milwaukee Braves in the 
tense National League pennant 
race. Brooklyn and Milwaukee 
now have only three more games 
to play, and the Dodgers are one 
down in the important loss col- 
umn. 

If Milwaukee can sweep its 3- 
game series opening Friday night 
at St. Louis and ending Sunday, 
the Braves can clinch the flag re- 
gardless of whether Brooklyn 
sweeps its set at home against 
Pittsburgh starting Friday night. 

Robin Roberts, who had lost his 
last four decisions to the Dodgers, 
slipped over the deadly body blow 
this time as he held the Brooks 
to five hits, two of them home 
runs by Duke Snider. They were 
his 40th and 41st of the year. 

Phladelphia jumped on Don 
Newcombe, Dodger ace who had 
won eight in a row and was 26-6 
for the year, with a 3-run blast 
in the second inning. Roberts won 
his 19th victory against 17 losses. 

The box: 
Philadelphia 
Ashburn, cf .... 
Blaylock, lb _.. 

Lopata, c 

Ennis, If 

Jones, 3b .^ 

Valo, rf 3 

Hemus, 2b 

Roberts, p 

Smalley, ss 


Totals __'„ 

Brooklyn 

Gilliam. 2b 

Reese, ss 

Snider, cf 

Robinson, 3b . 
Amoros, If ...„ 

Hodges, lb 

Furillo, rf ..^._ 
Campanella, c 
Newcombe, p 

Bessent, p 

a-Mitchell 

Labine, p 


2, Bessent 2. HO — 'Newcombe 5 in ' 
5, Bessent 5 in 3, Labine in 1. 
R—E21— Roberts 3-2, Newcombe | 
4-2, Bessent 3-3, Labine 0^. HBP— 
By Newcombe (Hemus). W— Rob- 
erts (19-17). L— Newcombe (26-7). 


NEW FACES 

- On the 48^ Shelf 
~ On the 72< Shelf 

- On the 97i Shelf 

IT'S FUN TO BUY 
OLD BOOKS AT 

THE INTIMATE 

BOOKSHOP 


205 E. 
Open 


Franklin St. 
Till 10 P.M. 


■ 


Tailored 
SUITS 

AS YOU LIKE THEM 

W* aro ropretenting fhe finost 
ivy tailoring house — D'Alonzo- 
Lancaster. Perfect fit quaran- 
tood — all choice patterns avail- 
able — Delivsry — 3 weeks — from 

$64.00 

Clotftintt Cupboarb 


5 ^^JhassadorS • 

■■ * .n CINKMaScOP^ 

» TCCNMCOUM • ItHnnd THru Umtti ArtMi 

LAST TIMES TODAY 


M-GM presenb 

A SOL C. SIEGEL 
PRODUCTION 

starring 

BING CROSBY 

GRACE KELLY 

FRANK SINATRA 

in the hilarious low down on high life 

"HIGH 
j SOCIETY" 

I lo VISTAVISION and COLOR 

i CELESTE HOLM 
i ^ JOHN LUND 
[ LOUIS ARMSTRONG 

I t AND HIS BAND 

j 15?:l^ COLE PORTER- 

I PRICES THIS ATTRACTION 
ADULTS 65^ CHILDREN 15( 

j NOW PLAYING 


CORDUROY I 

hasa 
greater percentage of ^ 

DACRON 

WASH 'N WEAR 

conoN 



TiWurre 




Dacron woven in the length 

and in the width 

of the fabric 

to give you the maximum 

comfort and 
long-lasting good looks 

Julians 


■Cii Hm Wa<»wa tt l«r r«(vMt*r ihm 


AB 

H 



A 

5 

1 

1 

1 

4 



9 

1 

5 

1 

9 

1 

5 

3 

2 



4 

1 

2 

2 

3 

1 

2 



3 

' 1 

2 

3 

3 







4 

2 



1 

36 

10 

27 

9 

AB 

H 



A 

4 



1 

5 

4 



3 

3 

4 

3 

5 



4 





2 

4 

1 





3 

1 

11 



2 



3 

1 

3 



4 



2 





1 









1 
















Totals „ 31 5 27 12 

a — Struck out for Bessent in 8th. 

Philadelphia 031 000 304—7 

Brooklyn 110 001 000—3 

R — Lopata, Ennis 3,3 Jones, 
Valo. Hemus, Snider 2, Amoros. 
E — Amoros Lopata. RBI — Snider 2, 
Smalley 2, Roberts, Ennis ^ones 2, 
Valo. 2B — Smalley, Hodges, Snider, 
Valo. HR— Snider 2, Ennis. SF— 
Roberts. DP — ^Furillo and Hodges. 
Left—Philadelphia 6, Brooklyn 2 
BB — ^Roberts 1, Newcombe 1, Bes- 
* sent 1. SO — ^Roberts 10, Newcombe 


DAILY 

ACROSS 

1. Remove 

beard 
6. Bundle of 

wheat 

11. Greek 
poet 

12. Net-like 
fabric 

13. Leave out 
i4. To hold 

conferenca 

15. Free 

16. Dove's call 

17. Biblical city 

18. Half an em 

19. Dry 

20. Indian 
(Utah) 

21. Emblem 

23. Compass 
point 

24. Lofty 
mountain 

25. Moimtain 
defile 

26. Belonging 
to me 

28. Touch 

lighUy 
31. Frozen 

water 
S2. Found on 

a leashore 
t3. Exclama- 

tion 
34. Chinese 

river 
S5. Emmet 
86. Part of 

the faca 
37. Copier oi 

manu> 

scripts 

40. Manuf ae« 
ture 

41. Shun 

42. Mistake* 
(slang) 

43. Prevent 


CROSSWORD 

44 


Measures 

(Heb.) 
DOWN 
1. Props 
2 grita 

3. Amon^ 

4. Velerinar. 
ian (short* 
ened) 

5. Erbium 
(sym) 

6. Endured 

7. A vandal 

8. Sprite 

9. Aleutian 
natives 

10. WeaseMikt 

animal 
14. Wind 
16. Harvest 
19. Dexterous 


» 


20 Afri. 
can 
river 

22. Hair 
on 

horse's 
neck 

23. Part 
of 
a 
sentence 

28. Jargon 

26. Failed 
to hit 

27. PendanI 
of ice 

28. Walking 
stick 

29. Member of 
Millennial 
Church 




YMterdsr'a A«»ir«s 
SO. Planters 
32. Cavalry 

sword 
36. Girl's nam* 

38. Groove 

39. Chemical 
suffix 

40. Mother 
42. Small \>of 





uv 


THE PATIO 

I 

Afternoon Cocktail Hour 
1-5 P. M. 


•^j- 


■X,-: 


m 


12 Oz BEER 25c 
16 Oz. BEER 35c 

Membership Cards For 
1956-57 Season 

Now On Sale 




j-'«-^^?i 


^'/.. 


:'i .i» . •»»• 


Avoid Cover Charge 

GOLF DRIVING RANGE 
BEER-DANCING 

THE PATIO 


■BBSflBSHIP^S 


SERIALS DEFT. 

BOX 870 

CHAPEL HILL, N.c. 


WEATHER 

Continued heavy rains, with ex- 
pected high of 65-70. 



m e lOaily |i ^Tar Heel 


DEMAND 

Editor sees demand for libeul 
arts majors. See page 2. 


VOL. LVm, NO. 7 


Complete (/P) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, N. C. FRKXAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1956 


Office;! in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PAGES THIS ISSUE 


Phi Defeats Bill 
To Exclude Coeds 


t,..^^^' 


"A Bill to Elxclude Women from 
th€ University of North Carolina" 
was defeated Tuesday night in 
tlte initial meeting this term of 
the Philanthropic Literary Socie- 
ty. 

The bill was defeated by a vote . 
of 26 to 8. i 


are 19 million working women ia 
the United States, constituting one 
third of Americas' working force. 
For these jobs, women must be 
trained. They need more educa- 
tion, not less." 

The debate followed a history of 
the Phi. now in its 161st year, b/ 


Legislature Calls For Removal 

Of Columbia St. Parking Ban; 

Campus Coordination Asked 


Miss Katherine Carmichael, j Past-Speaker John Curtis. 
Dean of Women, stated in opposi- ! Speaker Lawrence Matthews 
tion to the proposed bill, 'There presided at the session. 




New Fashions, Jewelry 
Appearing For Coeds 


Tong Lambasts Communists 

Hollington K. Tong, Chinese Ambassador to the U.S., is shown 
above as he told a Hill Hall audience last night of his views on the 
communists in Asia. The speech was the first this year to be present- 
ed under the sponorhip of the Carolina Forum. 

(Photo by Norman Kantor) 

Tong Hits New Policies 
Of Double-Talk Masters 

By NEIL BASS weapon •'after a period of frantic 

"The Communists, since the days , preparation." 
of Lenin, have been past masters | Dr. Tong called this action "hy- 
in the art of double-talk." Chinese ; pocrisy ' citing how on March 31, 
ambas.sador to the U.S. Hollington \ of this year "Russia proposed with 
K. Tong told an audience in Hill j a straight face at the London dis- 
Hall last night. 

Ambassador Tong's speech was 
presented under the auspices ol 
the Carolina Forum, ,Jim Holmes, 
chairman. 

Tong assailed the new commu- 1 
nist policy of "peaceful co-exist- : 
ence." by saying: 

■"A communist does not use such 
an enticing and emotion-charged , 
word as "peace" in order to con- 
vey a meaning: he uses it as a 
weapon to secure an emotional and 
unreasoning effect from his hear- 
ers.'' 

Tong, in a speech outlining and 
lambasting "Communist Advance 
in Asia." said, "Peace is not a mat- 
ter of empty words. It should be 
demonstrated by deeds and ac- 
tions." 

Going on to outline how "the 
deeds of communism during the 
last few weeks belie all its pre 
tensions to a genuine quest for 
peace,' Dr. Tong. first post-war 
ambassador from his country to 
Japan, listed numerous actions. 
FRANTIC PREPARATION 

(1) How Khrushchev and Bul- 
ganin had made a number of 'barn- 
storming tours" to various coun- 
tries talking "peaceful co-exist- 
ence," and yet on Aug. 24, in Si- 
beria, Russia exploded a hydrogen 


armament talks that all hydrogen 
weapon tests be banned by the 
powers." 

(2) The shooting down of an 
American plane in August, off the 
coast of the Chinese mainland. 

The ambassador called it an 
"outrage" that the Chinese com- 
munist regime scoffed at attempts 
to search for bodies of the dead 

and possible survivors. The CJjin- 

ese communists called such action 
a "grave provocation." 
RUSSIAN INSTRUMENT 

Dr. Tong, who was born in the 
Chekiang Province and educated at 
Columbia University, ha:I harsh 
words for Chinese Communist gov- 
ernment, calling it "the faithful in- 
strument of Soviet Russian policy 
in Asia. The l.^o huge communist 
regimes are marching in lockstep," 
he said. 

Then the ambassador enumerat- 
ed several "aggressive" actions by 
Red China to substantiate his ac- 
cusation. 

(1) The innudation of Red Chin- 
ese troops into Burma. 

"If Red China follows the pat- 
tern which she set in North Korea 
and North Viet Nam, we may ex- 
pect to see Burma delivered, help- 
less and broken, to the Chinese 
(See CHINESE, Page 3) 


By PEG HUMPHREY 

The impact of the Broadway 
adaptation of Shaw's Pygm'alion is 
bein'4 felt throughout the country 
and is particularly noticeable in 
the new fashions and jewelry ap- 
pearing for young ladies of taste. 

The costumes which Cecil Bea- 
ton designed for the set of the mu- 
sic;*! with the einpire look and 
other styles reminiscent of 1912 
are appearing in modifications 
which even the Carolina coed can 
fit into a college wardrobe. 

Emphasis is definitely on the 
feminine more softened side in con- 
trast to the more tailored look of 
last .season. To achieve the "My 
Fair Lady, look," it is important 
♦o wear jewels that blend well with 
the gentle picture. 

For simple Saturday night dates, 
gold creations predominate. Gold 
and pearl combinations are deli 
caicly designed to spark plain wool 


Bryant To Address 
Faculty Club Tuesday 


or knit sheaths. The textured look 
is gaining in importance. Basket 
weaver patterns of delicate golden 
wires and hand-tied knots ol 
parallei golden ribbons are two 
such examples of the "MFL" ap- 
proach. 

The gold safety pin which loom- 
ed so important last year still en- 
joys high esteem in accenting 
casual costumes. To achieve the 
meltingly beautiful look of My Fair 
Lady, why not try pinning on a big 
flower or a scarf.' Pins may appear 
almost anywhere for that needed 
spark ... at the collar, on a cuff, 
on the bodice, and are always good 
on a belt especially a heightened: 
otie. 

Color-wise, the warm rich shades' 
of brown are making headlines this 
year. The Napier Company is turn- 
ing out many new designs in Topaz, 
Carnelian, Tortoise Shell, and Cin- 
namon Topaz. 

For dressier occasions the de 
signs become more elegant but arr 
always sparingly displayed. A mass 
of pearls at the throat with simple 
pearl button earrings is often just W 



Vice President Addresses Legislators 

Student body Vice President Sonny Evans, center, addresses the opening session of the Student Legis- 
lature last night as they convened in New East Building. At left is Clerk Sylvia Phillips, and'at the right 
is Parlimentarian Sonny Hailford. 


Victor S. Brj^ant. I^urii^m at- ^ eaouxh for a black sheath 




torney and member of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees, will be guest speaker 
at the first fall meeting of the 
Faculty Club here on Tuesday, 
Oct. 2. at 1 p.m. In the Carolina 
Inn Ball Room. 

Bryant, who is also chairman of 
the Trustees' committee to recom- 
mend on the appointment of a new 
University president, will speak 
on "The Functions of a Trustee 
in a State University." 

The Faculty Club, open to all 
full-time faculty members and ad- 


UNC Prof to Preside 
At Dental Meeting 

Dr. William W. Degieritt, assis- 
tand dean of the UNC School of 
Dentistry, will preside as chair- 
man of the pedodontics section of 
the 97th annual meeting of the 
American Dental Association in 
Atlantic City, N. J. on October 
1-4. 

Dr. Demeritt also will present a 
paper before the Amertoan Dental 


Sundial Is 

National 

Landmark 


Rushees Get Day Of Rest; 
More Parties Are Tomorrow 


Today is the first lime of rest 
for sorority rushees since rush' 
.^.^pacti^ 'beDjan^Moiiday night. 


Assistants Association; which is 
ministrative staff of equivalisnt I meeting with the American Den- 
rank, will meet on alternate Tues- I tal Association, 
days during the fall. j Two other members of the UNC 


Dr. Alexander Heard, club-presi- 
dent, said that new faculty mem- 
members will be introduced at 
Tuesday's nveeting. Other officers 
are Herbert R. Baer, Law School, 
treasurer; and Df. Andrew H. 
Horn, University Librarian, sec- 
retary. Dr. Heard is on the Politi- 
cal Science Department staff. 


School of Dentistrj fjM^ulty will 
collaborate in presenting a clini- 
cal demonstration at the nveeting. 
Dr. Clifford M. Sturdevant and 
Dr. Roger E. Barton will give a 
demonstration of Uset of Rubber 
Impression Material with a Newly 
Designed Syringe for Multiply In- 
lay Impressions." 


Radio, TV 
Assn. Meets 
Here Today 

A two-day fall meeting of the 
Radio and Television News Di- 
rectors Association of the Caro- 
linas will get underway this morn- 
ing at the Carolina Inn. 

Registration will begin at 10 a.m. 
prior to an afternoon session of 
panel "shop talk." 

Norvin Duncan of Station WFBC- 
TV in Greenville, S. C, association 
president, will preside at the meet- 
ing. Associstion directors will con- 
vene at a closed session tonight. 

Highlights of the Saturday pro- 
gram will be a discussion on 
"What's New in Radio and Tele- 
vision Reporting?" and 7 p.m. ban. 
quet with United Press Vice-Presi- 
dent Lyle O. Wilsoy of Washing- 
ton, D. C, as the main speaker. 

INFIRMARY 

Students in the Infirmary yes- 
terday included: i 

Miss Frank lee Gilbert, Miss 
Frances M. Raid, Miss Isabel Hol- 
brook, John C. Burgwyn, Herbert ; 
H. Hawkins, James E. Holshous- | 
er, John H. Stratton, Thimothy ! 
L. Harris Clarence E. Smith Jr., 
William C. Elliott Jr., William i 
S. Michael, Reginald Mallett, Earl j 
T KirWman, Alvin W. Smith, 
Peter V VanStory and Richard 
A. Raavis. 


Common Soldiers Of Civil War 
Were Real Heroes, Wiley Says 


■The Morchead Planetarium Sun- 
dial has become a national land- 
mark, according to Planetarium 
Director Tony Jenzano. 

Official confirmation has been 
received from the Dept. of Com- 
merce, Office of the U. S. Coast 
and Geodetic Survey. A survey 
of the location of the mark was 
made on .'X.ug. 8 determining the 
location to be latitude 35° 54' 51.- 1 
462" North and longitude 79^ 03 
04.432" West. 
Following the receipt of the of- 
1 ficial confirmation, University 
i workmen installed a circular 
I bronze plaque at the base of the 
j arm of the sundial which pro- 
i claims it a triangulation station. 
; a position cf known latitude and 
longitude, of the U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic Survey. 

The plaque also states a $250 
I fine warning to would-be tamper- 
i ers. This is the second triangula- 
tion station to be established on 
the campus of the University. 
I The first station is located in 
the center of the oampus between 
I South Building and the Library. 



cmpus 

SEEN I 


disease rate in both armies. Prosti- 
tution was rampant in both Rich- 
mond and Washington. .An official 
complaint was made in 1864 by 
the Army of Tennessee to the com- 
mander of the post at Dal ton, Ga. 


The greatest fighters the world j Reb." 
has over known were the plain \ Among the revelations disclosed 
soldiers of the American Civil War, by Wiley in his speech are the fol- 
a historian stated here last night. lowing: 

Too many history books are "writ- 1. The plain soldier, in his let- 
ten i.bout bigwigs; the common j ter writing, wrote poorly or not 
folk are crowded into the back- 1 at all, and usually had to get some- { 'Complaints are made daily to me 
ground — or worse, distorted into I one to write letters for him and ! of the number of lewd women in 
impossible caricatures" it was de- to read to him. One Alabama pri- this town, and on the outskirts of 
clared at a special history confer- vate carried on a love correspon- 1 the .irmy. They are said to be im- 
ence by historian Bell I. Wiley of j dence for several of his comrades pregnating this whole command." 
Emory University. | and got three of them engaged 5. Son>e soldiers were critical of 

An authority on the Civil War, within a month. their officers. One Florida soldier 

He was poetic, too, and once wrote: "Our officers are not fit to 


Prof. Wiley told intimate details 
about the life of common soldiers 
taken from 30,00 letters and manu- 
scriDt diaries written by private 
soldiers. 

The jokes, the profanity, the 
womon camp followers and the 
2jr?s back home, the leters, camp 
life, ragged clothing and wormy 
food, gambling, drinking, fighting, 
griping all were related by the 


wrote: 
"When this you se*, 

remember me, 
Thotigh many miles a part 

we bea. 
My pen is bad, my ink 

is pale. 
My love for you shall 

never fale." 
2. Speaking of a very thin m-.v 


tot6 guts to a bear." A Masachu- 
setts soldier said, "I wish to God 
on«' half of our officers were kn<M;k- 
ed in the head by slinging them 
aganst the other half." 

6. Another Yankee soldier didn't 
think much of the medics. He 
wrote: "The surgeon insisted on 
sending me to the hospital for 
treatment. I in.sisted on taking the 


Georgia historian. He told also of that was killed for beef, a soldier field and prevailed — thitrking I had 
the courage and heroism of the '■ wrote, "It takes two soldiers to better die by rebel bdllets than by 


soldiers — as well as a few examples 
of cowardice displayed by both 
Confederates and Yankees. 

The common soldiers of the 
Civil War "proved themselves 
worthy ancestors of the khaki-clad 
neroes who covered themselves 
with blood and glory at Belleau 
Wood and on the beaches of Nor- 
mandy," said Wiley. "Indeed the 
world has known no greater fight- 
ers than Billy Yank and Johni^ 


hold up one beef to shoot it." ; Union quackery." 

Describing the tattered clothing, i 7. Letters and diaries contained 
an Atlanta private wrote: "In this many references to girls. A Texan 
Army one hole in the seat of the j wrote: "Give Laura tny love, not 


britches indicates a captain, two 
holes a lieutenant, and if the seat 
of the britches is all gone, the in- 
divdual is a private. 
3. Of all cuss words the "time- 


best respects, but love by "G-d." 
8. They bore hardships without 
complaint, picking upon grains of 
corn where horses had eaten, and' 
parching the corn for meals. They 


honored SOB was a favorite" said walked over icy reads ih their bare 
Wiley. ! feet. 

4. There waa a heavy venereal (See COMMON. Ppie 3> 


' Miss Rehder 
Publishes 
New Novel 

Miss Jessie Rehder, who teaches 
creative writing in the English 
Department, is the author of a 
new novel, •'Remembrance Way." 
which will be publLshed Oct. 5 by 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, Publishers, 
of Now York City. 

The novel is described by Dr. 
C. Hugh Holman as "the sensitive 
ly toid st^ry of the crucial and 
maturing experiences of a girl 
attending ^ summer camp, but it 
is more than the story of the 
change from adolescence to ma- 
turity, for its implications as 
shown in the later lite of its hero- 
ine are mature and pervasive." 

The bn-^k has already received 
high praise from pre-publication 
readers, among them Frances Grey 
Patton. Betty Smith, and Paul 
Green. . 

Miss Rehder. who holds the posi- 
tion of lecturer in English, is a 
publishers' representative in ad- 
ditibn to her work with the Uni- 
versity's creative writers, and she 
has been published in a number 
of national magazines, among them 
"Harper's." . j 


Stitilfitl wnlki)!'^ ill rain 
cnnyitt'^ miiicaal and linl. 

* -1: * 

AFROl'C, Ill/Ill lini.sliino, 
liitlliuir his niiijoriii foo^r/hri 
in ( hi.ss. 

Piof essay askiiiii sludt'iil 
to ri'iid [jiiffcr in (lass and 
sludcnl rcltiying "Alond^" 

GMAB Brinas 
Combo Here 

Graham M.emoriai's Activity 
Board will inaugrate its 1956-57 
program of free comb:) dancing in 
the Rendezvous Room tonight and 
tomorrow night. 

Starting at 8 p.m. this evening, 
a campus combo headed by Bob 
Neal will present two hours of 
dartcing music. Brunos Combo 
will make the music for dancing 
tomorrow night from 8 till 11. 
Both dances arc free to all. 

G. C. Pridgen. manager for Bru 
nos' Combo, reports that the re- 
cently formed group is planning 
an extensive schedule of engaj^e- 
ments starting in early October 
throughout North Carolina. The 
grouo, which performed at the 
Freshmen Picnic, will be present- 
ing "new concept in cr)mbo music" 
t'lmorrow nisht as a warm-up for 
the forthcoming' tour. 


The second round, of one-hour 
parties was completed last night. 
.«r^nvitations to third i*ound of 
event.s will be issued today from 
1 to 3:15 p.m. in the Roland Park- 
er Lounges on the second floor of 

(iraham .Memorial. 

Events scheduled for the week- 
end include four 45-minute par- , 
tics, from 2 to 5:45 p.m. tomorrow. 

The rush schedule designates , 
Sunday as a time of rest, with fin- 
al parties set Monday and Tuesday 
nights. 

Bids will go out again Wednes- 
day. 


Person Art Gallery 
Holds Sketch Classes 

Person Hall Art Gallery has an- 
nounced a Wednesday evening 
sketch class beginning Oct. 3.' 

The class will include sketch- 
ing from life, and there will be 
opportunity to plan compositions, 
:iccording to Lynette Warren, cura- 
tor of Person Hall Art Gallery. 

The class will meet 7 to 9 p.m. 
and will be under the direction 
of John Allcott of the Dept. of 
.^rt. The fee is $13 for 13 weeks 
and includes materials. 

Students interested in joining 
have been invited to come to the 
first class Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. 


Cosmopolitan Club 
Meets Here Sunday 

The Cosmopolitan Club 


will 


By CLARKE JONES 

Thd Student Legislature last 
night passed a bill calling for the 
establishment of a student govern- 
ment commission to act on the 
Cilum.bia St. parking situation. 

The commission would aim to- 
ward removing the recently-en- 
acted two hour parking limit on 
Columbia St. between Franklin 
St. and Cameron Ave. 

Introduced by University Party 
Chairman Mike Weinman, the 
measure was passed by special or- 
der of business. 

Gardner Foley and Andy Milnor, 
both Student Party members, in- 
troduced a bill proposing a stu- 
dent committee for the purpose of 
coordinating campus events. 

Foley stated lack ot coopera- 
tion betwen sponsoring organiza- 
tions has frequently caused two 
or more events of interest to con- 
flict. 

The bill will come up for ap- 
proval at next week's meeting. 
PARKING 

The parking situation bill norm- 
ally would also be held over to 
next A'cek. The Board of Alder- 
men, however, are meeting Oct. 
14 and Weinman wanted .some ac- 
tion taken by that time. 

Weinman gave four reasons for 
the bill, which are as follows: 

1. "Columbia St. is not a com- 
mercial street between Franklin 
St. and Cameron Avenue. 

2. "There is no need to limit 
parking on a street which is not 
commercial as this limit serves no 
jbvious puipose. 

I 3. •"It is the aim of student gov- 
; "rnment to look out for (he inter- 
ests of all students. 
4. "The parking limit recently ef- 
! lected on Columbia St. works great 
hardship on those students who 
live on Columbia St. and the Stu- 
dent Legislature feels that this 
hardship has been invoked un- 
necessarily." 

Weinman called upon the stu- 
dent body president to appoint a 
three-man investigating commiss- 
ion at his convenience to study the 
mntter. The commission would al- 
so work with a similar commiss- 
ion set up by the Interfratemity 
Council. 

COORDINATING 

Foley and Milnor, in the coor- 
dinating measure, asked for a five- 
man committee, known as the 
Committee for Coordinating Cam- 
pus Events. This organization 
would assist in scheduling the im- 
portant campus events and form 
a schedule to prevent conflicts of 
these events. 

The Legislature also received 
the following appointments by stu- 
dent body President Bob Young: 
Don Furtado. Joel Fleishman and 
Clamm Shankle to the Graham 
Memorial Board of Directors; Miss 
Jean Peay, replacing .Miss Sylvia 
Tarantino on the Women's Honor 


hold its fir.st meeting of the year Council and Burt Warren, replac- 


in the Library Assembly Room at 
t p.m. Sunday. 

This club was organized to pro- 
nrte friendship and understand- 
ng between nations by giving 
members an opportunity to ex- 
•hange ideas and cultures. 

Intere.sted students have been 
i nvited to attend. ' 


Vets Don't Want 
ToTakePhys. Ed: 


A petition to the effect that veterans enrolled in the General Col- 
lege should not be required to take courses in physical education 
wMll be posted today in Sout^ Building by the Veterans Affairs Com- 
mittee. 

The committee has asked that all persons favoring the petition 
sign it at their earliest convenience. 

The petition will be posted in room 308 of South Building today 
through Oct. 4. 

Darwin L. Bell, chairman of the Veterans Affairs Committee, 
states that the petition provides that no physical education courses 
be required of veterans. 

The present curriculum set-up requires veterans to take one year 
of physical education in individual sports and those other than the 
basic requirements for students in the General College. 


ing Dan Southerland on the ap- 
pointments committee. 

The approval by the Legislature 
will be held over until a week 
from Thursday instead of this 
Thursday because of Rush Week. 
Phil Malone and Tom Kenan, 
both of the University Party, were 
sworn in as new members by 
Speaker Sonny Evans. 


Today Last Day 
For Yack Photos 


[ Today is the last day for seniors 
to have their picture made for the 
1957 Yackety-Yack. 

Pictures will be made in the 
basement of Graham Memorial 
from 1 to 7:30 p.m. 

The picture-taking .schedule for 
other classed and schools is as 
follows: Oct. 1-5 — Freshmen, Nurs- 
ing School (except Senior Nurses) 
and Fourth-year Medical students. 

Oct. 8-12 — Sophomores, Pharm- 
acy School, and Dental Hygiene 
students. 

Oct. 15-19 — Juniors. Medical 
School, Law School and Graduate 
School. " , . 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S, 1956 


FRIDAY 


The Liberal Arts Major: 
There's Still A Demand 

"ilif IcitifilatioH la \if'l<l on ^yoiinds of f'\j)e(iicncy lo fiopnlur 
deifuoids )oi the .\o}t of hainin;^ which protnisrs quick tnonclary 
rcivtud.s -will Ite great, '/'his is not to disfjorage those itustilutioiis 
frankly orie)ited to ftvactical vocations and skills. For a xuniety of 
reasons we need more rather than fewer such. What I do say is thai 
desffiie hard times and adverse' f)ressure. the liberal arts colleges 
mnst not falter in fjnrsning with a whole heart and witho.ut menial 
resen'ation the f nil )nt'asure of their historic fiiirjjosr. IIV know thai 
close aj)f)li<alioy\ will find an an<>ice} lo the ffrohfems and hard work 
will do the if>l>."— President Harold \V. Doddsot Pi iiict'toii rniveiNi- 
tv. at bireiiteiinial tonvocation this week. 


ONE WAY . . . 


The PriiuetoM president's wor- 
ries are well foundtd. American 
("olIeL^es anil universitie^, now lair- 
Iv sately througfi the Red Pro- 
fessor Period, have another prob- 
lem to contend with: 1 he in<rca?.- 
iny importance in most peoj)les 
minds ol a college diploma. 

The diploma is impf^rtant. But 
fur ttK) many pet»ple think it is im- 
portant l)ea( use it means move and 
qui< ker money. For too many peo- 
ple a diploma is a license to prac- 


stitiition ol higher Icarnini";. he 
rti>istcrs with a |)la(ement seiAi<c 
on his (ampiis. II his work is 
spe{ iali/ctl. il he knows a lot about 
a little, be probabh will set a 
job (piickei and \vith move pay 
than the student who has develop- 
ed broad interests in a lot. 

ri.ie people who hire ,y;raduaies 
are most at faidt. It is their !»hort- 
sij>htedness that makes some stu- 
dents i»rope iov the diploma, tlie 
almi<>hiv dipl(»ina. instead ot .^^rop- 


tite some small part ot some large in,i» h)r the lij;ht of learning. 
Ntxation. But there arc indications that 

Spec iaii/ation is the kev to these some employers have seen the value 
pi"oj)le. Ihev spend their college 
lile hitddled in one (ornev of a 


very hi;; roojn. AV'hen they lea\e 
thfv tan ,ui\e the exatt specifica- 
tions and dimensions of that corn- 
er, but thev know nothing about 
the whole ro<^m. 

C onsetjuentlv. when they start 


Ol ; lilieral arts, education. W'heth- 
ei it is because they themselves 
where liberal arts people we do 
not know, but reports are steadily 
< (Mning in ol employers who advise 
a placement ser\ice: 

"We dont care what he major- 
ed in. just give us a man who has 


to practice living thev lack the a good, solid education. Well train 
ability to understand much ot life. l»im on our time after we hire 
These people, then, have lacked him. 


what is called at Carol in." the lib- 
era] arts education. That education 
is obtained here in most of the 
< lassrooms on the east side of the 
flagpole. It also is obtained in 
dormitorv rcxjms, in the Wilson Li- 
bvarv. o\er coffee, in novels and 
on the brick walkwavs. 

Nowadays, A\hen a student is 
about to be giaduated from aai iu- 


That is a good sign. But not 
goocl enough. 

What is needed, as Dr. Doilds 
suggests, is the universities' and 
cc>lleges' close application to the 
task of fulfilling the need for peo- 
ple, educated in the liberal arts. 
.\s he says, "hard work will do the 
job. " . • 


McCarthy's Boys Sinking 


As The NeAv Republic editorial 
savs so nicely elsewhere in this 
(ohnnn. the .\meucan Legion is 
going dcjwn. 

It s about tnne. 

Never has sue h a narrow-m'nded 
collection nl Ha^-<va\eis been so 
successft i in c laiming so many 
meml: v \evei has so much mud 
bcvu slung by so many pecjple at 
so manv innocent bvstanders, and 
never have the mudslingers got 
awav with tlu'ir slinging with such 
ease. 

It is interesting to c«)mj)ave the 
rise (*1 -the Legion's power with 

THE NEW REPUBLIC: 


that ot the man who represents it 
best: Joseph McCarthv. .\ud now, 
sincie SicClarthy has suffered severe 
setbacks in his business ot manu- 
facturing slander, the Legion ap- 
pears to Ikt on the downswing. 

Nothing better could happen for 
freedom in the L^nited States. You 
know, tieedom: Respect for one s 
fellow citizens, the right to believe 
what one wants to believe, the 
ri'^ht to worship a flag and a (iod 
cjuietly. as well as when wearing an 
oversca'S cap and when at annual 
c<tn\entions. " 


Business As Usual 


In Los Angeles this mcjnth. ;^.200 
American Legion delegates passed, 
without debate, the usual resolu- 
tions attacking LNLSCiO. the Fimd 
\tir the Republic, the admission of 
Cionnnunist China to the I'N. tlie 
IN Ciovenant on Human Rights, 
etc. 

The Usual investigations were 
urged, including one this yehr of 
the International Labor Organi/a- 
ticjii. 

And the ivsu; ! National Com- 
mander — whose military service 
consisted ot onlv basic training — 
was elected and made the usual 
Legion speech attac king 'the crim- 
son philosophv " which Avas "con- 
(ei\ecf in the womb of Scnialism, 
born in an eva of social and eco- 
nomic conflict and nursed in the 
l.Tp ol (!f>nnminism " and is 'gnaw- 
ing at (he \itals of our society and 
threatening the destruction of our 
nation.' 

The onlv debates that did take 
place were o\er the admission of 
peacetime ser\ icemen to the Leg- 
ion fno. thev will not be); the in- 
ternal power fight betweeti the na- 
ticmal executi\e committe and the 
40 et 8. an allegedly "elite " group 

The Daily Tar Heei 

The ofticial stucient publication of the 
Publication> Board of the University of 
North Carolina, whyrc it is published 
daily except Monday and examination 
and vacation periods and summer terms 
Entered as second class matter in the 
post office in Chapel Hill, N. C, undei 
the Act 01 -March 8. 1870. Subscription 
rates: mailed. $4 per year, $2.50 a semes 
ter; delivered, $6 a year, $3.50 a semes- 
ter. 


Editor 


FRED POWXBDGE 


of Legicmnaires (the committee 
won); the deletion ot a 'Csucasian 
only " cause from the 40 et H con- 
stimtion (it's still in): and the act- 
mission of Chiropractors to prac- 
tice in \'A hospitals (thev're still 
oin). 

I'he Legion has become less able 
to cope with its own reactionary 
elements. Nobodv is willing, any 
longer, to tight the I'NLSCiO cpies- 
tion since e\esybodv knows what 
the result will be. States lights is 
becoming a new rallying cry h>r 
the Legicju. 

And although it is difficult to 
judge political orientation frcjm the 
respectful silence accorded Nixon 
and the boos given Stevensc:>n. it 
did appear that the majcnity ot 
delegates were Republicans. 

On the (i\il-iights questions, 
the U'liti-integration forces seemed 
dominant, although no official 
resolution on this matter was pre- 
sented to the convention. 

The very intemperateness ol 
Legion political language is driv- 
ing many njembers into inactivity 
and ultimately into leaving the or- 
ganization. (Membership has fallen 
to 2.8 million fvcjm a postwar 
high of ;{.2f,o.ciooi. Is the day com- 
ing when all who remain will be 
those who together with Wlothei ' 
Hobavt, the founder of the Legion 
ladies auxiliary, believe that the 
problem ol Connnunism is suscep- 
tible of a wonderlully .simple so- 
lution: 

■We'll pu.sh them out and push 
them out until we have them all in 
Russia. .\nd then we'll have a c ircle 
of gcjod bcjndjers and every weapon 
we ran find and that will take care 
ol iheui." 


Special Bargain For A Bit Of Culture 


Barry Winston 


a half a dozen people on this gain of the year, 

campus who don't mind culture For a limited time only, (.some- 

Hoo Boy! Every body loves a in small, infrequent doses. Well. thing like eighteen months), the 

bargain. And there must be all of then, here is the cultural bar- Chapel Hill Concert Series is of- 

'Let's Not Go Hog Wild' 



CAROLINA CAROLEIDOSCOPE 




fering each and every one of 
you the opportunity to save 
enough gold to last you through 
a night at the Tempo. If you drink 
your cokes real slow. Hoo Hal 

Actually, its a pretty good 
deal. To Whit: A Student Season 
Ticket to the Series for only five 
of your worthless old inflated 
dollars. That covers all four of 
the presentations for this aca- 
demic year, and five divided by 
four is, ah, well . . . ask some 
math major. 

The important thing is that the 
regular price is six and a half, 
and just think of all the things 
you can do with that extra dol- 
lar fifty: buy 150 pieces of bub- 
ble gum, 75 two-cent stamps or 
50 three-cent stamps, eat three 
meals at Lenoir Hall, or make a 
down-payment on a movie ticket. 

Ushers for the Series this year 
get: (1) Special reserved section 
consisting of the first rows of the 
Orchestra, (2) a free ticket that 
may be used for a guest who gets 
lo sit with you. if you're an usher. 
And (3) a personally autographed 
member of the Oberge^rkinich 
Children's Choir, complete with 
a year's supply of Pablum. 

And To Top It All Off: In ex- 
change for a measly old eight 
hours (apiece) of their worthless 
time, the fifteen lucky people 
who volunteer their services as 
stage hands for the Chicago Ope- 
ra Ballet will get two (count 'em, 
two) tickets for the Ballet and 
each of the following perform- 
ances and a special, reserved 
section in the basement of Hanes 
Hall. Or is it the lop floor of Al- 
derman'? I forget. Trying to re- 
member all this information to 
disseminate (HaI^) to you fortu- 
naleT)eople has been a .strain on 
my memory, no end. 

So rush right down to the in- 
formation office at GM (I think) 
and grab a ticket \vhile there are 
still some left. 

Don't forget to take your five 
bucks with you. They're awfully 
fussv about lOU's. 


About yhls Game They Play In Washington, 
And On Growing Old In A Reluctant Way 


Frank Crowther 

Well, old John Fo-^er Dulles, 
our wandering minstrel and 
Foreiiin policy i^hredder, has 
pulled one of Charlie (what's 
good for General Motors is good 
for the nation) Wilson's stunts — 
the clodhopper in the mouth 
routine. 

Now I'm just an average guy 
Avho wants to keep up with world 
affairs .so that I know exactly 
when they plan to blow the place 
to smithereens. So last Sunday 
night I turned the television set 
on to NBC's Meet The Press 
program. 

Bless my bones if Flying Fos- 
ter wasn't their guest. 

Well, I thought, here's where 
they pump the old boy for some 
extra information relating to the 
touchy international situation. 
Sure enough, the first question 
related to the Suez Canal furor. 

Foster looked very fatherly and 
all-knowing when he replied. 
"Well, in this game of world 


peace . . . 

That did it. That was enough 
for me before he went any fur- 
ther. 

So it's games we are playing 
with these other countries. I'm 
sure glad he told me otliefwise 
I might have grown up ♦I'lth a 
warped idea about our govern- 
mental policies. If we are only 
playing games, why worry atwut 
our national debt, or immigf^ion 
laws, or the maintainance of over 
125 Embassys, Consulates, and 
Legations around the world, and 
such. But, if Foster says we are 
only playing games, why concsern 
ourselves. ^ 

• • • 

I've never heard more talk 
about puttmg old people away 
than on WUNC-TV's new World 
Of Man show which started last 
Monday evening. The topic of 
discussion was, 'Our Aging Pop- 
ulation." 

Two things that were not cov- 
ered, unfortunately, were proper 


mental conditioning and prema- 
ture retirement. 

It, may be difficult for those 
of us who are still screeching 
through our extuberant youth to 
stfjp and contemplate old age. 
We don't bother ourselves about 
thoughts of growing old and dy- 
ing . . . there's always time for 
that tomorrow. 

But if we do for a moment, I 
for one do not want to think that 
when an alarm clock goes off, I 
am going to be put in some home 
to rock. rest, and rust. 

If we condition ourselves, there 
vill be no fear of aging. After 
all, senility is in many cases self- 
inflicted. 

Also, premature retirement is 
folly. Why is it that people think 
that they must retire at a certain 
age and. when it arrives, plunge 
into inactivity without the slight- 
est preparation. 

Many men and women have 
worked well beyond the supposed 
prime of their lives. G. B. Shaw. 


when he was past 90 and still 
writing, said liiat he had had 
his share of fun and saw no rea- 
son why he should not go on 
h.iving it indefinitely. 

Goethe finished the second 
part of Faiist a year before his 
death at 83. 

William Randolph Hearst at 
84 still ruled his vast newspaper 
empire. 

Connie Mack, the grand old 
man of baseball, directed his 
Philadelphia Athletics from the 
dugout at 85. 

Winston Churchill, in his 60's. 
rallied Briton's to their "finest 
hour" and. now in his 30's, 
has been writing of the history 
and many conflicts of his home- 
land. 

Can wf say that these men let 
themselves be prematurely re- 
tired? 

I certainly hope that the next 
in theii series will deal with some 
of the brighter aspects of "Our 
Aging Population." 


Pogo 


By Walt Kelly 



J Mjfkze"' 1 rou u 
reuTH'-: c^,av m 

y<E you WA4 
eomK PUMH 
Him INI -r^i 
NO$e. 



Li'l Abner 


By A! Capp 



Stanley Strongnos e. 



My latest photograph. 

fv:»/7e to /ooj^ //Aw jTx? 

Seotf for my cr?urs9. ■ 


(DONT BOTHER ANSWERtMG. 
I VOKUM'S LETTER. JUST 
\ RUM rHAT AD.'.'- WE'UL CiET 
f A MILLION MEW 


CUSTOMERS 



A l^££K LAJ£R 


NO REPLY 
' FOM MR. 
SrROMGNOSE 
VET TINV .'.'■ 


GUESS AH . 

IS yOQ VWEAi^ 

AN' RUN DOWN 

f=0' HIM T' 

&OTHER WIF.'T 



TEACH US TO REAP^ 

Fast Reading 
Course Needed 

Woody Sears 

I think the University should afford every stu- 
dent the opportunity to learn lo read. 

Im referring to the speed reading program, that 
was conducted on the campus last spring. I'm re- 
ferring to the program which is supposed to double 
and even triple one's reading speed. I'm referring 
to the program that could make everyone's work 
load easier by cutting down on the time required 
to read the assigned textual material and the bur- 
densome oiitside reading. 

This increased reading speed is also reputed to 
improve the reader's comprehension, thus, in many 
cases, doing away with the necessity for re-reading. 

In addition to all these other features, just think 
how much this improved reading speed could mean 
to one who likes to keep up with the new books 
that come out, but never has ihe time to read 
them. Think, too, of the student who leaves the 
University to take a job which requires the em- 
ployee to keep abreast of the new developments in 
his field by reading trade journals and associated 
literature. 

STJtINGS ATTACHED 

However, when it was presented last spring, th« 
program wasn't open to everyone. At least not with- 
out a lot of strings attached. Before a student could 
get into the program he had to fill out more forms 
than are required during registration. The questions 
concerned everything from home life to high school 
background and grades throughout high school and 
college. 

Then there was an interview, and for those who 
did not make the grade there was another interview 
where the student was told that unfortunately he 
could not enter the program then, but maybe there 
would .be another chance next year. It seems that 
the folks who were planning to go on to some sort- 
of graduate school got priority. 

Well, that's all well and good. It's easy to see 
where such a course would be an invaluable aid 
to a grad student. And it's easy to see how that's 
going to make him a better doctor, lawyer, or mer- 
chant. 

BUT what about the rest of us. the folks 

who aren't going to grad school? Are we going to 
get the opportunity to take advantage of this won- 
derful program for sclf-improvcmcnl? Your guess 
is as good as mine. 

Last year out of the 399 students who applied 
for this no-credit, no-cost program, only 202 were 
accepted. And according to the oficial report issued 
on the results of the program by the University 
Testing Service, which is handling the program, 
only ■"139 students . . . can be considered to have 
completed all aspects of the course." ^ 

This fact is 
aiost discouraging 
in view of the 
number of people 
who were not per- 
mitted to take the 
course. Those w'ho 
dropped out did 
so of their own 
accord, as no one SPEED 

was "flunked" ■ " ^ thing for grad students? 
out. This means that better than forty per cent of 
t^e orignal enrollment failed to complete the 
course. 
DEAD BEATS 

It is on the basis of this fact that I am opposed 
to small enrollments of this course. For so long as 
the enrollment is restricted, there will be "dead- 
beats" who will deprive a more earnest student of 
a chance to participate. This 40'u. mortality rate 
shows the inability of the Testing Service to screen 
out the chaf, as it were. Therefore, there will al- 
ways be an element of injustice involved. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Steps are bemg taken, however, to see that the 
program can accommodate more students. In the of- 
ficial report previously mentioned, the Reading Pro- 
gram Director, Paul Irvine, mentions in his list of 
recommendations that. "Instruction in reading and 
study skills should be offered as a regular part of 
the University's program." 

At the present time, Ir\'inc is running his pro- 
gram on an emergency budget secured from the 
funds appropriated to the University Testing Serv- 
ice. 

Last year, Irvine ran the program with the help 
of five half-time grad .students. It was for this 
reason that the program had to be restricted. It 
will be run this semester, but according to reports 
from Peabody Hall, even fewer students can be 
accommodated. It is hoped that the spring session 
will be larger even than last year's, but that is a 
matter for speculation. 

At the present time, Irvine's report is rin the 
hands of the State Advisory Budget Commission. 
If the commission approves the report and allots 
funds for the program, it will be expanded ac- 
cordingly. But even if they do. it will be next fall 
l>ctorc the money can be secured. 

PAY AS YOU GO 

Sources in Peabody have disclosed that a plan 
whereby each student would pay his own way was 
considered before adopting thfe present set-up. but 
it seems that often the students who need the help 
the most are the ones who could least afford the 
additional financial burden. For this reason, the 
plan was abandoned. 

Possibly a plan could be conceived which would 
enable needy students to take the plan at the ex- 
pense of the Testing Service, and those who can 
afford to pay do so. The fact that a pay-as-you-go 
plan was ever considered would seem to indicate 
that the co.st would be of a nominal amount- 
As to whether or not the Budget Commission will 
appropriate the money for next year, or if the 
powers that be will attempt to arrange for the 
Reading Program on a fee basis are both unan.swcr- 
ablc questions at this time. 

But in the meantime, the program will be re 
stricted to those with the most need, with sonu* 
priority given to seniors and grad students. ' 



commur 
passage 
said. 

(2) Tli 
vance ii 
Northeri 

This 
keeps lij 
hibtts he 
to remoi 
mesc 

(3) t:^ 

ncsian 
leaders 

Such 
may leal 
e.xponenj 
communl 
SPIDER 

Assail! 
pendent 
smiles a| 
serted t| 
into a ' 

"The 


I, 1956 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 195$ 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE THRtf 


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jm that 
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double 
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work 
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ited to 

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heading. 

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opposed 
long as 
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ident of 
ity rate 
screen 
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that the 
the of- 

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list of 

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icted. It 

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session 

hat is a 


Chinese Ambassador -Common Soldier- 


(Continued from Page 1) 
communist aggressors before the 
passage of many more months,"' he 
said. 

(2^ The Chinese Communist ad- 
vance in Nepal and Tibet on the 
Northern border of India. 

This aggression. Dr. Tong said, 
keeps India's hands tied and pro- 
hibits her from using her influence 
to remove communists from Bur- 
mese soil. 

(3) Evident courtship of Indo- 
nesian officialdom by communist 
leaders. • 

Such false "wooing, " Tong said, 
may lead Indonesia, "one of the 
exponents of neutralism," into the 
communist camp. 
SPIDER WEB 

Assailing the "wooing" of indc- ■ 
pendent peoples by Communist 
smiles and promises. Dr. Tong as- I 
serted that they were being led 
into a "spider web."' \ 

"The Republic of China," Tong \ 


said, will never give up its resis- 
tence to Godless and cruel com- 
munism. And in the end, with God's 
help, the Republic of China will 
prevail." 

Tong, who assumed his present 
position last May, concluded his 
address by saying: 

"We can only halt the advance 
of international communism when ! 
men everywhere awaken to the ag- j 
gressive purposes of the commu- 
nists. The time for that awakening 
is now."' ! 

The ambassador was feted a 
private banquet at the Carolina 
Inn. at which student leaders and [ 
University officials were present, ! 
prior to the address. ' 

After the address was concluded, ' 
a public reception was held in the 
main lounge of Graham Memorial ! 
!() enable students, faculty, admin- 
istraf.ion and visitors to meet and: 
speak personally to Ambassador ! 
Tcng. I 


(Continued from Page 1) 
9. Many were ennobled in com- 
bat. A Rebel private named Mattix. 
injured in the left arm at Mur- 
freesboro so that he could no long- 
er fire his musket, went to his com- 
mander and said. ""Colonel, I am 
loo badly wounded to use my gun 
but I can .carry the flag; may I? 
Three standard bearers had been 
killed already, but when the 
colonel gave his consent. Mattix 
grabbed the colors, stepped bold- 
ly in front of his regiment and 
bore them through the remainder 
of the fight. 
REMEMBER THE CIVIL WAR 

Pi'ofessor Wiley said we should 
not iorget the Civil War. People 
often ask the question: "Why 
stress the Civil War? Doesn't it 
mean reviving hatreds that should 


; be left alone?" 

Answering "No," Wiley explain- 
ed: "The Civil War was the great- 
est experience this nation ever had. 
• It is our richest heritage. The con- 
' flict made enormous demands on 
[ the people, and especially on the 
masses. It was their testing time: 
It proved to be their time of great- 
ness. For they acquitted ^hemselves 
in a more laudable manner than 
any other group in society. By their 
magnificent conduct in this time 
of the nation's greatest crisis, they 
proved their right to share fully 
in this nation's limitless oppor- 
tunities." 

The appearance of Wiley on the 
campus was sponsored by the 
Graduate History* Club, Phi Alpha 
Theta history fraternity and the 
Graham Memorial Student ynion. 


Covering The Campus 


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ENGLISH CLUB 

The first social meeting of the 
English Club for the fall semester 
will be held tonight in the Library 
Assembly Room at 7:30. Refresh- 
ments will be served. All old mem- 
bers and all new. graduate students 
in English have been invited to 
attend. 

INDOOR POOL 

The indoor swimming pool is 
open for recreational swimming 
Mondays through Fridays from 4-6 
p.m., Saturdays from 2-6 p.m. and 
Sundays from 2-5 p.m. Women 
swimmers may wear their own 
bathing suits, but men students are 
required to wear the special suits 
issued by the gym. 

STUDENT WIVES CLUB 

The Student Wives Club will hold 
Its first meeting this fall on Tues- 
day at 8 p.m. at the Victory Village 
Nursei-y. according to Secretary 
Pat Howard. All Student Wives 
have been invited to attend. 
PHARMACY WIVES 

The Pharmacy Wives will hold a 
uicnic tomorrow at 5 p.m. at the 
home of Mrs. W. J. Smith on Ar- 
rowhead Rd. In case of rain, it will 
be held in the Institute of Pharm- 
acy Building. 
YACK CONTRACTS 

All organizations desiring space 
in the 1956-57 Yackety Yack must 
sign contracts in the Yack office 
in the basement of Graham Me- 
morial by Oct. 10. according to 


Editor Tommy Johnson., Contracts 
may be signed from 2 to .4 p.m. 
any weekday afternoon. 
EVENING SKETCH CLASS 

Person Hall Art Gallery. Chapel 
Hill, has announced a Wednesday ' 
evening sketch class, beginning : 
Oct. 3. The class will include 
sketching from life, with drawing j 
in various materials. The class, to | 
meet from 7-9 p.m.. will be under | 
\ John Allcott of the Dept. of Art. 
i The fee is $13 for 13 weeks in- 
I struction, including materials. 
Those interested in joining have 
been invited to come to the first 
meeting o<" the class next Wednes- 
day, at 7 p.m. ' . > ;, 

wuNC-Tv ;-'■; 

Today's schedule for WUNC-TV, 
the University's educational tele- 
vision station, Channel 4: 
12:44— Sign On 
12:45— Music 

1:00 — Today on Farm 

1:30 — Notes on Music 

2:00 — Engineering 

2:30— Sign Off 

5:44— Sign On 

5.45 — Music 

6:00— Children's Corner 

6:30— News 

6:45— Sports 

7:00— Science Fair 

7:30— Arts Around L's 

8:00— Coffee 

8:30 — Pi-elude 

9:00— Art Museum .■^^. -^t . 
10:00— Final Edition " _ •. 
10:05— Sign Off 


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PACE FOUR 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


Tar Heels Leave Today For Battle With Oklahoma 

Team Is In Excellent 


Harrier Practice Hampered 
By Injuries, Bad Weather 


Injuries and cold rainy weath- 
er have slowed the Carolina cross- 
country team's pre-season prepara- 1 
tions down to a walk with the 
opening meet of the season only 
one week off. ! 

According to Coach Dale Ran- i 
son, the Tar Heels still have a long 
way to go before the season's 
opener with Virginia here next j 
Friday. Three of his top boys j 
have been plagued by ailments of i 
one sort or another since the start I 
of practice with only veteran ace 
Jim Beatty and soph whiz Dave 
Scurlock going at top speed. 

Soph Wayne Bishop, undefeat- 
ed ace on last year's freshman 
team, is the latest adjlition to the 
casualty list. Bishop aggravated an 
old knee injury Wednesday that 


may slow him down for a while. 

Junior Everett Whatley, strick- 
en by a virus infection last week, 
has just about shaken off the bug, 
and is once more going through 
full scale workouts. Soph Howard 
Kahn has been slowed /own by a 
knee injury in early practice sess- 
ions, but is gradually rounding 
into shape. 

Coach Ranson still isn't sure 
just which boys he will be count- 
ing on for points in the meet with 
Virginia. Sixteen boys are out 
fighting for the eight starting 
positions. 

Coach Ranson would like for all 
boys interested in cross-country, 
freshman or otherwise, to report 
to Fetzer Field for practice any 
afternoon. 




LITTLE WEEK-END HOUSECLEANING 

SALE 

DROPPED TITLES IN RELIGION, 
INSPIRATIONAL BOOKS, AND PSYCHOLOGY. 

Starts Tomorrow 
THE INTIMATE BOOKSHOP 

205 E. Franklin St. Open Till 10 P.M. 



4 


Buddy Payne: Ace Tar Heel Flankman 


CALL THIS ONE WHAT YOU WILL - 
LAST ONE WAS 

^'STARDUSr' 





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ACROSS 

1. Shade of red 
6. Cut wool 
H. Sheeplike 

12. Door joint 

13. Cougars 

14. Beginning 

15. To diminish 
front (Mil.) 

16. Fish 

17. Nickel 
(sym.) 

18. Water god 
( poss. ) 

19. Tree 

20. Devoured 

21. Fears 

23. Sound of 
a goose 

24. Underworld 
river 
(Myth.) 

26. A small 

piece 
29. Line from 

upper 

corners of 

sail to the 

yard 

33. Youth 

34. Fortify 

35. Disfigure 

36. Part of 
"to be" 

37. Underworld 
god (Myth.) 

38. Church part 

39. Having sides 

41. Mistreat 

42. Scarf 

43. Warning 
signal 

44. Shouts 

45. Lords 

DOWN 

1. Caught 
r slang) 

2. Of the ovul« 
iBot) 


3. Full 
of 
fissures 

4. White 
ant 

5. Man's 
nickname 

6. Agitated 

7. Female 
red deer 

8. Half ems 

9. Deputies 
10. Binds again 
16. Wheels on 

swivel 

frames 
1 9. Poem 
20 Sloth 
22. Lofty 

mountain 


23. Femi- 
nine 
pro- 
noun 

25. Son 
ot 
Noah 

26. Sty- 
lish 
(slang) 

27. A 
de- 
scend- 
ant of Ham 

28. Fish ( var. ) 

30. Unclean 

31. Egypt's 
president 

32. Putting 
areas 


All uuHH aiuy 
nniii-iaa ;iini:3a 

- 'JHUrj Had 


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an nnu naa 


Yesterday'* Antwer 
34. Helpers 

37. Valley 
(poet) 

38. Man's 
nickname 

40. Dollar 
(abbr.) 

41. Viper 


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Buddy Payne, veteran Tar Heel end, is stated to start against Bud Wilkinson's Oklahoma Sooners to- 
morrow. Payne, a letterman from Norfolk, Va., has been tabbed by Coach Jim Tatum for stardom 
this season. 


Condition For Contest 


Fresh Booters 



The freshman soccer squad be- ! 
gan practice yesterday under the 
supervision of coach John Wien- 
ants. 

Coach Wienants is a graduate 
student in Physical Education. 
He attended Brockport State 
Teachers College in Rochester, 
New York. 

Coach Wienants said that all 
freshmen interested in playing 
soccer should meet him on Fetzer 
Field at three o'clock today. 


SPORTS 

, S^atxy Cheek. Sports Editor 


Dorm Man,agers 

Dormitory managers for intra- 
mural sports will have their first 
meeting Monday. Oct. 1. The In- 
tramural Department has asked 
that all dormitories appoint rep- 
resentatives. 


PATRONIZE YOUR 
• ADVERTISERS • 


TOGETHER 
for the first time! 


WHAT 
EKTERTAINMENT 



If the favorites fall in this 
weekend's football games around 
the Big Four circuit as they did 
last weekend, a lot of pigskin 
prognosticators, including yours 
truly, will throw away their slide 
rules and start coin flipping to 
pick the winners. 
Nothing went according to form 
last Saturday, as upsets occurred 
in all three games involving mem- 
bers of the Big Four. State wallop- 
ed Carolina, South Carolina turned 
back Duke and Wake Forest whip- 
ped William & Mary. 

SOONERS ARE FAVORED 

Tar Heel supporters would like 
nothing better than to see last 
week's upset trend carried over 
into tomorrow's games. Oklahoma 
has been made a 27 point favorite 
over the Tar Heels in their gdmc at 
Norman. 

Coach Jim Tatum's squad 
showed promise in their loss to 
the Pack, but hardly enough to 
compete with such a powerhouse 
as Oklahoma. The Sooners are 
currently ranked number one in 
the country by the Associated 
Press. Coach Bud Wilkinson lost 
only a very few men from last 
year's Orange fiowl champion- 


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ship squad, and has enough m*n- 
power on hand to field three al- 
most equally strong teams. 

Although playing the nation's 
top team is admittedly an honor 
and a sure thing at the box office, 
it tends to be rather hard on a 
school's won-iost record. In all 
probability, the Tar Heels will find 
this out tomorrow. Give Tatum 
three years and a lot more fire- 
: power, and it might be different. 
Oklahoma 27. Carolina 0. 
OTHER BIG FOUR GAMES 
! Wake Forest also has an unenvi- 
lable assignment tomorrow. The 
fiery Deacons will catch Maryland 
on the rebound following the 
; Tcrp's surprise loss to Syracuse 
I last week. The Terps have the 
horses, and if they ever start to 
click under new Coach Tommy 
Mont, il will be goodbye for some- 
body. Maryland 27, Wake Forest, 
13. 

Duke, despite their loss to the 
Gamecocks, still has a potential 
powerhouse, and Virginia, even 
with the Plunging Persian Jim 
Bahktior, will be lucky to hold 
them down as did South Caro- 
lina. Duke 20, Virginia 6. 
State will try to live up to the 
showing they made in the Carolina 
game tomorrow when they meet 
VPI. The Gobblers gave Tulane a 
pcckful of trouble Saturday, but 
will have to go some to match 
the Wolfpack 'new look'. State 27, 
VPI 6. 


CLASSIFIEDS 


By LARRY CHEEK 

Coach Jim Tatum and his Tar 
Heel football team, still feeling the 
effects of last week's unexpected 
trouncing at the hands of N.C. 
State, will leave by airplane early 
this morning for Oklahoma City 
and a Saturday afternoon date with 
the nation's number one football 
team, mighty Oklahoma. 

The Tar Heel traveling party was 
scheduled to board a 70 passenger 
charter plane at the Raleigh-Dur- 
ham Airport at 8 a.m. Scheduled 
time of arrival in Oklahoma City 
is 11:40 a.m. CST. The Tar Heels 
will make their camp in the Okla- 
homa Biltmore Hotel in Oklahoma 
City, 22 miles from Norman where 
the game will be played. 

Except for possible limbering up 
exercises, the Tar Heels will take 
it easy today. Oklahoma has sche- 
duled a short afternoon practice 
session. 
WET PRACTICE SESSION 

The Tar Heels woitnd up pre- 
game d* lis yesterday with a soggy 
workout on rain soaked Navy 
Field. The first team spent most 
of the afternoon working on a de- 
fense against Oklahoma plays, 
while the second and third units 
engaged in a two-hour offensive 
scrimmage. 

The entire squad is in good 
shape with the exception of full- 
back Joe Temple and quarterback 
Dave Reed, who have not seen ac- 
tion this year. 

The oddsmakers have establish- 
ed the Sooners as 27 point favorites 
in the contest. Coach Bud Wilkin- 
son's crew was ranked as the coun- 
tr>''s top team in the latest AP 
poll. The Sooners have a wealth 
of manpower, and are three deep 
at every position. 

McDonald may be sidelined 

Sooner halfback Tommy McDon- 
ald, a top All-America prospect, 
may miss the game due to a leg 
sprain. McDonald has been out of 
action since Sept. 12. 

Wilkinson, known for his prolific 
use of the crying towel, feais the 


Tar Heels may be rougher than 
most people think. "This will be j 
our toughest game of the season," i 
he said. "I don't say Carolina will j 
have the best team we meet. But 
they do have fine personnel and j 
a world of morale and enthusiasm j 
because of their new coaching | 
staff. It's our key game." ' 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1954 

When You're 
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205 E. FRANKLIN ST. 
OPEN TILL 10 P.M. 


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Activitits scheduled for Gra- 
ham Memorial today include: 

Panhellenic Council, 12:30 
p.m., Roland Paricr Lounges 1, 2 
and 3; Women's Honor Council, 
2 p.m.. Council Room; Sfudenf 
Audit Board, 3:30 p.m. Wood- 
house Conference Room. 


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Heieisrt ttiru UWTtO ARTisrs 


LOST — BILLFOLD FRmAY IN 
Lenior Hall or Law School be- 
tween 10 a.m. and noon. Con- 
tain.'; valuable personal papers 
and approximately $200. Money 
for nurses attending my wife 
who has a fatal disease. If finder 
■ feeis he needs money more than 
me, please return papers. $20 
reward offered for honesty. Con- 
tact E. M. Murry at Law School. 

STUDENTS EXPERIENCED~ON 
Linotype or open presses may 
obtain part time work at Colon- 
ial PrCoS. Phone 333-6. 


LOST: ONE WI\'E'S PASSBOOK. 
Lost Saturday in or ground Ken- 
an Stadium. Finder please call 
9-6362. 


TODAY 




SUNDAY NEM' YORK TIMES DE- 
livered to your door. For further 
information call 8-0572 or R-036B 
after 5 p.m. i-5833-5 

WANTED — RIDE TO RALEIGH 
Mon. thru Fri., arriving in Ral- 
eigh prior to 8:30 a.m., return^ 
ing to Chapel Hill approximately 
5:00 p.m. Contact Lee Gotten at 
Milton's Clothing Cupboard or 
Call Durham 7-8685 after 6:00 
p.m. 


Big model on campus, that is. It's the new 
Arrow. University shirt . . . all-around choice 
of smart college men, from button-down 
collar in front — to center button and full 
box pleat in back. And these men are really 
traveling in style with their Ar.row*ties . . . 
in the season's highest rated patterns. 

Oxford cloth shirt (in white and five muted 
colors, including new "linen"), $5.00; same 
model in authentic tartan stripes, $5.95 ; 
checks and stripes in cotton-rayon, $7.95, 



ARROW 

CASUAL W£AR 


BUY ARROW SHIRTS AT 


Var leys Mens Shop 


SERIALS DSPT. 
CHAPEL HILL, U. C« 
8-31-49 


WEATHER 

Partly cloudy and warmer, with 
high in 7Cs. 


OThc 



star Xecl 


. SNOBBERY 

For editor's comments on aca- 
domic snobbery, see p. 2. 


VOL: LVIII, NO. 8 


Complete (/P) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1956 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PAGES THIS ISSUE 


Tar Hpels Tangle With Nation's Top Team In Headliner Game 


Fats Domino, Billy May Band 
Scheduled For Fall Germans; 
Sam Donahue To Appear Also 


A twin bill of Fats Domino and 
the Billy May Band, led by Sam 
Donahue, will be featured at the 
1956 Fall Germans next month. 

The concert, from 3 to 5:30 p.m., 
and the dance, from 9 to 1 a.m., 
will be held Friday, Oct. 26, ac- 
cording to George Ragsdale of 
the German Club. Thi^ wUl be the 
Friday before the Wake Forest 
football game, he said. 

Both bands will play at both the 
concert and the dance. 

Fats Domino, known through- 
oat the South as "The Little Fat 
Man from New Orleans," will be 
a treat for all the 'rock 'n' roll" 
fans on campus. Many students 
have attended his shows through- 
out the state. 

Fats began singing in New Or- 
leans in his early teens. Soon be- 
coming a favorite around southern 
Louisiana, he was signed and cut 
a session for Imperial Records. 

His first record, "Goin Home." 
immediately rose to popularity 
among "rhythm and blues" fans. 
His following records, including 
"Where Did You Stay." "Rose- 
mary" and 'I'm Gonna Pack My 
Suitcase" were also popular in 
this field. , 

ftIG BREAK 

His biggest break. how«ver, ! 
came with his recording of "Ain't 
That A Shame," which after climb- i 
ing to the top spot on th« R & B ; 
popularity charts moved over into | 
the Popular record listings. The ' 
"Rock 'n roll" conscious American ■ 
listening audiences rode this tune, 
(written by Domino himself), to 
sixth spot in the nationwide pop- 
ularity song charts, and it re- 
mained there for several weeks. 


^ TV'*^ jj 

m^ 

^H 

m'. 

mm 

11^^,,^^^ 

HHk 

!^^*Sj 

BB 

Ik> 

^H^l^!^ 

^Hm« 


FATS DOMINO 

. . . rock 'n' roll nian 

Since then he has kept at least 
; one of his songs on one of the 
I nations' hit parades. Juke boxes 
all over the country, including 
' many on the UNC campus, carry 
: his records. Some of his latest re- 
! leases are: "I'm In Love Again," 
] "My Blue Heaven," "When My 
Drcamboat Comes Home," and 
: -Blueberry Hill." 
i 

Sam Donahue began his musi- 
cal career, as did Domino, while 
still in high school. In his senior 
year he organized a dance band. 
Some of the members of this band 
are sttU with him. 

After graduation and a summer 
of professional work he decided 

! that in order to gain national rec- 

■ ognition he would have to play as 
a side man with some of the more 

; famous bands. During this stint 
in his career he played with such 

I leaders ri<i Benny Croodmnn. Gone 

i Krupa and Harry James. 



Dance Is Tonight 

Deadline is Extended 
For Trip To Averett 


The deadline to make reserva- 
tions for a dance tonight at Aver- 
ett College, Danville, Va., has 
been extended to noon today by 
the YMCA, which is handling ar- 
rangements. 

Approximately 100 people have 
signed up to leave here at 6:15 
p.m. today, acocrding to John Rie- 
bel, Associate Secretary of the 
YMCA. 

Riebel said he would like to 
have as many more people who are 
interested to sign up by noon. Up- 
perclassmen as well as freshmen 
are invited, he said. 

Buses will be chartered for the 
55-mile trip, and a fee of $2 is 
being charged each person to cov- 
er the cost. There will be no other 
charges. Some students will go up 
in cars. 

The girls at Averett are putting 
on this dance solely for Carolina. 
The nine-piece band of Bob Cleve- 
land, regarded as the best in 
southern Virginia, will furnish the 
music, and refreshments and a 
snacl^ supper at mid^i^t will be 
furnished free. 

Plans are to have the dance start 
at 8:30 p.m. and end at midnight. 
The bu.s«s will leave Danville for 


INFIRMARY 

Students in the Infirmary yes- 
terday included: 

Miss Isabel A. Helbroek, Miss 
Sue B. Gilliam, John G. Burgwyn, 
James E. Holshouser Jr., Marvin 
D. Harriss, Alfred J. Julian, 
Thimethy L. Harris, Clarence E. 
Smith, Jr., William C. Elliot, Jr. 
Reginald Mallet, Earl T. Kirkman, 
William H. Hathaway. Michael 
P. Cap, Miss Mary D. Dance, Al- 
vin W. Smith, Peter V. Vanstory, 
Clautfhis L. Carlton, Richard A. 
Reavis and Rebert A- Barnwell. 


the return trip about 12:45 or 
later if the men want to leave 
later. 

Riebel said all who are going 
should eat before leaving Chapel 
Hill. 

Arrangements are being coor- 
dinated by Bob Leonard of the 
YMCA. Riebel said. 

The Carolina men will be re- 
turning a visit which about 130 of 
the Averett girls made to the UNC 
campus this past Sunday. They at- 
tended the Planetarium show and 
a reception in Graham Memorial 
and were guests of the various 
night church groups. 


SAM DONAHUE 

...heads Billy May Hand 

SAX MAN 

By this time he was becoming 
recognized as one of the outstand- 
ing tenor sax men in the country. 

Feeling that he had gained the 
necessary experience, Sam rejoin- 
ed his .own band, which had re- 
mained almost entirely intact dur- 
ing hLs absence, and opened at the 
Roseland Ballroom in 1941. One 
night stands and an opening at 
the Glen Island Casino followed. ; 
Donahue peemcd set for a long j 
and successful stay there until the | 
Navj' called hint «r service and he ' 
was forced to disband. 

In the service, Sam had his own 
band and played on service pro- ■ 
grams and United Kingdom broad- 1 
casts. 

After his discharge, Donahue 
went back to playing in ballrooms 
and theaters until his career was 
again interrupted by the Korean ' 
War. After about six months, an 
old back injury began to act up 
and once more Sam got an honor- ; 
able discharge. 

Sam planned to rejoin his own ; 
band but an offer from Tommy j 
Dorsey as an assistant leader j 
couldn't be refused. 

It was, as a result of this di- 1 
versified experience, that Billy ' 
May chose Sam Donahue to go out ' 
with his already popular band j 
when May elected to stay in Los ; 
Angeles with Capitol Records. | 

Debbie Brown will be fe?tured I 
as vocalist with the band at the 
concert and dance here. I 


First Frat 
Parties Set 
Tomorrow 

The first day of fraternity rush \ 
parties will begin tomorrow af-.i 
ternoon. 

Formal invitations for tomor- 1 
row's parties, set for 2:30 to 5:30 j 
p.m., went out earlier this week. '■, 
The rushing manual stipulates : 
that men arc required to accept ■ 
all initial bids fo parties, or be 
disqualified from rushing. 

Parlies next week are scheduled | 
for Monday, 7 to 10 p.m.; Tues- | 
day, 7 lo 9:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 
7 to 9:30 p.m.; and Thursday, 7 
to 9:30 p.m. 

Friday is set as .shake-up day, 
and strict silence will be observed 
from 9 p.m. Friday until Monday 
noon. The afternoon of Monday, 
Oct. 8, will be pledge day. 

.After accepting their initial 
bids, men may visit fraternities, 
of their preference. 



cflnpuSi 

SFFN 


/ ivo slnt'crittg freshmen 
^tandini:^ at Monou^rarn Cluh 
III 7 ni I he inornintr fo see 
team off lo OhUt- 


loot hall 
hoina. 


Coed lifliiiii^ ff><>t lo lie 
sliDf (itid faliih^, hooks und 
all. 


Big Sooners Favored Over UNC 
By 27 Points; Game Begins At 3 

By LARRY CHEEK 
Daily Tar Heel Sports Editor , ■ « 

.\ORM.\N. (;kl,i. Sept. 29-Upset-minded North Carolina will be trying to bounce 
Ijack fi(jm an opening,- :<aiiic loss to .N. C. State here this afternoon when they tangle with 
the naiiona'l dianipion Oklahoma Sooners in college football's game of the day. 

The imer.st't tional headliner will kick off at 3 p.m. (EST) hi Oklahoma's Owen Sta- 
dium bciore a throng of (io,ooo. The game will be telecast locally by station WKY-TV. Ok- 
lahoma Citv, : 1(1 will be broadcast nationally by Harry Wismer over the Mutual Broad- 
i listing System. Ray Reeve and the Tobacco Sports Network will p ipe the game back to 
'- '■ ♦ North Carolina. ♦ ~~ ~" 



Yack Grants 

Reprieve 

To Seniors 

I 

Seniors have been given one!' National Scholarship Winners 

more chance to have their picture^! ^ Shnown h«r« wifh Rj^y^Armslrong^ director of •dmiisions, leff, and 
ckely Yack.l RobeTtB. 'House, chancellor, right, are three Norifji Carolina ^uths 


made fortEe 19.5^ Yack ely 
cditbr Tommy .Johnson announced j 
yesterday. 1 

Seniors who have not had their 
pictures made may do so Monday I 
through Wednesday, at a cost of i 
$1 per student. . ' 

Pictures will be made in the j 
basement of Graham Memorial 
from 1 to 6:30 p.m. 

The rest of the photograjHiy 
schedule is as follows: Oct. 1-5 — 1 
Freshmen, Nursing School, and j 
fourth year Medical School. ! 

Oct. 8-12 — Sophomores, Pharm- ] 
acy School. Dental Hygiene. Den- 
tal School. 

Oct. 15-19 — .Juniors. l,aw School, 
rest of Medical School. Graduate 
School. 


who are attending the University this year on National Merit Pro- 
gram scholarships. Standing in the center is Otis William Jones of 
Z'rconia. Seated, left to right, are Murphy Bryan Conry of Rockwell 
and William Happer Jr. of Lenoir. The scholarships were awarded 
on the basis of ability and promise to benefit from a college educa- 
tion. 


YDG President Warns About 
Seriousness Of Ike's Health 


Chopei Hill 
Scenes Go 
On Exhibit 

A new exhibit, entitled "Chap- 
el Hill Scenes by Sam Boone," 
was put up this week in the Uni- 
versity Library, in five cases oh 
the main floor. 

The exhibit of 36 photographs, 
which will be on view through Oc- 
tober, represents a selection of 
Sam Boone's best photographs of 
University buildings, campus 
scenes, local churches and flower- 
ing trees. Included, also, are a 
few studio portraits of indivic^ial 
flowers in close-ups. 

Boone, a native of Gates, served 
with the U. S. Army Signal Corps 
in North Africa and Italy from 
1942 to 1945. He graduated from 
the University in 1949 with an 
A. B. in Journalism. From 1950 
to 1952 Boone worked as a pho- 
tographer in the University's Cen- 
tral Photo Laboratory, and since 
1952 he has been head of the 
Library's Pbotoreproduction Ser- 


Vogue Begins 

Prix De Paris 
NafI Contest 


By PEC HUMPHREY 

Two weeks in Paris or $1,000 in 
cash is being offered by Vogue 
Magazine to the college senior who 
proves her capabilities in Vogue's 
22nd Prix de Paris contest. 

The Prix is open to all senior 
women with a yen for a career in 
writing, publishing, ' advertising, 
merchandising or decorating. Con- 
testants will be judged on writing 
ability, grasp of subject matter, 
general intelligence, originality 
and demonstration of special tal- 
ents. 

Using Vogue as their textbook, 
Prix competitors must complete 
two quizzes of four questions each, 
based on actual editorial prob- 
lems. Those who satisfactorily an- 
.swer both quizzes will be eligible 
to write a 1500-word thesis on one 
of the topics in Vogue's Ameri- 
cana issue of F«b. 1, 1957. 


LATE SPORTS SCORES 

Miami 14, S. C. 6. 
Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 5. 
Qreoklyn vs. Bitt»burg, Ppd., rain 


237 In Pharmacy 
Brecht Announces 

Dr. E. A. Brecht. dean of the 
University School of Pharmacy, 
yesterday announced the rnroM- 
ment of the UNC Pharmacy 
School. 

A total of 237 students are tak- 
ing undergraduate work. This is 
an increase of 16 students over 
last year's enrollment. 


By HIL GOLDMAN 
"The American people shruld 
be aware of the situation con- 
cerning the seriousness of Presi- 
dent Eisenhower's condition when 
! they go to the polls in November." 
, This warning was given Thurs- 
i day night by George Miller, presi- 
j Jent of the UNC Young Democrat- 
■'c Club, during the organization's 
first meeting of the year. 

He stressed the possibility of 
Richard Nixon succeeding to the 
presidency in ca.se of illness be- 
falling the chief executive, adding, 
"We hope nothing will." 

Speaking on Steven.son's chances. 
Miller said that since the 1952 
election there has been a definite 
trend away from the incumbent 
Ei.senhower and that all indica- 
tions point to a Democratic vic- 
tory in the coming election. 


The YDC leader continued, sav 


The Tar Heels, rated 27 point I 
underdogs by the experts, landed i 
in Oklahoma City yesterday after ' 
a smooth and unenventful plane i 
ride out. Coach Tatum, as is his f 
custom, did not take his boys onto j 
the practice field yesterday. Ok- ! 
lahoma ran through a brief warm- 1 
up drill. 

WEATHER MAY HELP j 

The weather is one factor that j 
i may play a vital role in the Tar i 
Heel performance tomorrow. The I 
; temperature is expected to climb j 
{ into the 90's by game time, and I 
the humidity makes the atmosphere '■ 
j sticky and muggy. i 

i Carolina worked out all week 
long in rain from Hurricane Flos- j 
sy and cool fall temperatures. Just 
how the stifling heat here may af- , 
feet them- remains to be seen. 

Tatum has announced four ' 
changes in the lineup that started j 
last week's opener against the j 
Wolfpack. Don Lear, who played j 
h=s first game at guard last week, i 
has been shifted back to his old , 
I fullback slot and will start in 
place of Giles Gaca. Jim Varnura 
1 replaces Larry McMuUen at one 
I halfback post. Varnqm' turned in 
several spectacular runs against 
the pack. | 

JUNIORS START | 

Juniors Dick Smith and Jimmy] 
Jones have moved into first .string ! 
guard spots replacing Lear and 
Hap Setzer. who is reportedly; 
bothered by a Charley horse. ! 

Pacing the Tar Heel attack will j 
be wheelhorse halfback Ed Sutton, ' 
star of last week's tilt with the ' 
Wolfpack. Sutton, a powerful run- 
ner with speed to .spare, rushed 


ing the club will exert all its ef- j for a total of 90 yards in 10 car- 
fort in getting out the vote, and ' ries last week. 


in the next few days will launch 
a button campaign designed to 
furthor the goals of Stevenson and 
Kefauvcr. Miller pledged the sup- 
port of the group in helping out 
at the polls on Nov. 6. 

The club has A-ritlen to Wash- 
ington asking permission to have 
Governor Frank Clements of 
Tennessee speak at Chapel Hill in 
the coming weeks. If Clements is 
not available, an allornatc fi'^ure 
of national importance will be 
sought. 

A tape recording of the Gov- 
ernors Democratic National Con- 
vention keynote address was play- 
ed back for the gathering, esti- 
mated at 150. X 


The quarterback starting assign- 
ment is still uncertain, but it looks 
like soph Curt Hathaway will get 
the nod for the second straight 
week. Doug Farmer will alternate 
with Hathaway. 
WEAK UNC DEFENSE 

hTe Tar Heels, so ob\iously weak 


Team Telegram Needs 
Signing By 10 A.M. 

Students who desire to sign 
th* telegram being sent to th« 
Carolina football team in Nor- 
man, Okia., have been asked to 
do so before 10 a.m. todiy. 

The message can be signed at 
the Y, Graham Memorial, and 
the downtown stores. 

The telegram, which is being 
sponsored by the Chapel Hill 
Athletic Club, will be delivered 
to the team this afternoon in the 
field house before they take the 
field against Oklahoma. 

The message reads: "The soon- 
er you get under the Sooner'* 
goal post the sooner you'll bring 
us a win. We know you won't 
let Coach Tatum down." 

on defense against State, plan no 
special tactics to stop the Sooners. 
Coach Tatum is confident his 
boys will have less trouble against . 
a straight split-T offense such . as 
Oklahoma uses than against a 
State style multiple offense. 

A long string of Oklahoma ,wc- 
fories will be at stake this after- 
noon The amazing Sooners have 
w-on 30 in a row since a 7-7 tie 
with Pitt in the second 1953 game. 

Last year, the Tar Heels scared 
the daylights 6ut of Oklahoma be- 
fore bowing. 13-6, in the seaspns 
opening game at Chapel Hill. In 
the only other mePtmg of the two 
clubs, the Sooners stopped Charlie 
Justice and Co. in the 1949 Sugar 
Bowl. 
EQUAL IN WEIGHT 

The two clubs are .iust about 
equal in the average weights 
cohtmn. Bulwarking the Tar He-jl 
line will be giant Stewart Pell, 
230 pounds of muscle at tackle. 
Other starters up front for The 
Big Blue are Buddy Payne and 
Larry Muschamp at ends; Phil Blaz- 
er at the remaining tackle post: 
Smith and Jonus at guards: and 
(See FOOTBALL. Page 4) 


YRC Seeks Democrats Help 
In Taking Preference Vote 

Campus Young Republicans straw vote on the presidential 


Thursday night unanimously adopt- 
ed a resolution challenging the 
Young Democrats Club to cooper- 
ate in prompting a campus-wide 


Total University Enrollment Is Now 6,97/ 


By BILLY BARNES 

A near-record total of 6.971 stu- 
dents registered for UNC's fall 
semester, according to a report 
i.ssued this week by the Central 
Records Office. 

This is the highest enrollment 
of students since 1§49, when 7.- 
419 students were here. 

The total this year is an in- 
crease of 396 over last fall's en- 
rollment. 

Seventy-nine per cent of the stu- 
dents arc North Carolinians. But 
1,377 out-of-state students list 
home addre.s.scs that include all 
but four of the forty-eight states. 
Virginians make up the largest 
group of out-of-staters, followed 
by New Yorkers and South Caro- 
linians, respectively. 

Foreign students number 89 and 
hail from such far-off lands as 
Pakistan, Lebanon. Viet Nam and 
Korea. A seven-member Costa Rica 
and delegation leads the group, 
followed closely by six Canadians 
and six Chinese. 

Women students at UNC number 
1.215, supporting a male-female 
ratio of five to one. The College 


of Arts and Sciences claims 315 
coeds; Elucation, 244; Graduate 
School, 165; General College, 54; 
Library Science, 32; Social Work. 
30; Journalism, 25; Business Ad- 
ministration, 15; and Law, 5. 
Ex-servicemen and women make 


26 per cent of the student body. 
Twenty-one coeds are among UNC's 
vcte'-ans. Only 15 remain of the 
host of men that once attended 
UNC using the W^orld War H "GI 
Bill." Korean W'ar Veterans at- 
tending UNC under the "Korean 


UNC Typewriter Ribbons 
Would Reach To Greensboro 


The ribbons used yearly in the University-owned typewriters 
wculd reach almost to Greensboro if laid end to end. 

.According to H. R. Ritchie, general manager of the University 
Retail Stores, there are approximately 1,400 typewriters seeing serv- 
ice throughout the campus, including over 50 electric ' machines. 

The keyboards, which require a staff of 375 secretaries to operate 
them, eat up an average of S5,000 in repairs and maintenance every 
year. Carolina possesses all leading models including Remington, 
IBM, Royal, and Underwood. 

Ritchie made il known that any student desiring to rent one of 
the 200 additional machines available to them may do so at a cost of 
from $^ to $6 a month, depending upon the condition of the type- 
writer. "Often," he added, "a student may wish to make use of this 
facility for a term paper or theme. I have been told that this may 
raise his mark as much as ten per cent." 

Al' profits from r«>ntals go to ♦bp TTnivprsity S/'hnlarship Trust 
Fund. 


Bill" number 1,430. 

General College rolls list 1.181 
freshmen, 1.440 sophomores and' 
three special students. Total Gen- ' 
cral College enrollment falls 196 i 
students short of last years' num- j 
her. I 

Upper college enrollments are i 
headed by the College of Arts and | 
Sciences, with 1,175, folowed by; 
Graduate School, 878; Business I 
Administration, 540; Education, , 
311; Law, 241; Journalism, 63: So-| 
cial Work, 44; and Library Science, 
41. I 

The Division of Health Affairs ; 
has an enrollment of 1.054. "niis i 
figure represents students in the j 
Schools of Dentistrj'. Medicine, , 
Nursing, Pharmacy and Public ! 
Health. | 

In addition to the total Univers- ' 
ity enrollment, there are 125 in- j 
ternes. residents and fellows as- j 
sociated with the Medical School j 
and Memorial Hospital. Other ad- 
ditional students are 56 members i 
of Special Education Classes and 
96 enrolled at the Cliariotte Grad- 
uate Center. i 


preference of UNC students. 

President Keith Snyder com- 
mented that officials of the YDC 
had repeatedly been approached 
concerning the project, but that 
they made no comment. 

"The Republicans," Snyder said, 
'are on the upswing in North 
Carolina. The YDC is obviously 
afraid that Ike would beat Adlai 
worse this year than he did in 
1>52, when Ike won the campus- 
wide straw vote by 3 to 1 over 
Stevenson." 

The club worked out campaign 
strategy at Thursday's meeting, 
and formulated plans for a daace 
and an election-night victory cele- 
bration. 


UNC Reading Course 
Applications Begin 

Students interested in taking 
the Testing Services reading 
course should apply at 108 Pea- 
body Monday through Friday of 
next week, according to Paul Ir- 
vine Jr. of the Testing Service. 

Applications will be received 
only from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
on those days. Applying takes only 
30 minutes, Irvine said. 

The reading classes will meet 
three hours a week. No credit is 
given for the course, which is de- 
signed to help students improve 
their reading and studying effic- 
iency. 


FA6E TWO 


THE DAILY TAJl HEEL 


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 19S6 


SATUi 


2 


Tilted Noses And Other 
Unrelated Things 

i 

"The Hoaid is greatly iomonrd ahoiil liousini:^ of man led .\hi- 

(it'nf\ and has come lo the (oik lusidti that thr State (aiinol ad\'isf'dl\ 

undertake to provide Itoitsiii*^ hn married students except those in 

iirofessiofhil schools and those doinji i^raditate woik. and even in 

such cases only to a limited extent, justification fo) this disli)iction 

is (onnd in the fact that . ... it is essetitial to the ;j^ood refnitalio)! 

and educational rank of our I'nixersity system tJiat slrona^ pro>!^ranLs 

o\ prolessional and advanced 'graduate en u< til ion he maintained."— 

Recommencbtunvs i>l the Board of Hijilicr Kdiuaiioii lor the hicii- 

nitim •0.",7-Kj')f). 


SKYSCRAPER CAMPUS 


Tl»f t <)nne<ti(»n hetwt-eii liousino; 
married students enrolled in pro- 
fessional and graduate sthoois and 

lilt proi>Tams carried out by those 

schools escapes lis. 

Alur all, students are students, 
whether ;hev be married or unniar- 
rietl, nnderj>raduates planning or 
not planning on entering profess- 
ional or graduate sthools. or stu- 
<!ents already in these outstanding 
di\isi(»irs of the I'nixersitv. .\nd 
without students of any or all of 
the al)o\e (ategories the l^niversi- 
tv uoidd be at a loss, if not for 
students, at least for the outstantl- 
ing indi\iduals who fit in one of 
the missing categories. 

But the Board would rather pre- 
ser\e the high academic standing 
of the graduate and professional 
scliool than see the 20 per cent of 


the student hodv which is man ied 
properly housed, providing of 
course there is some coiniection 
between the two. 

I'or the graduaie and j>i<)fess- 
ional schools to lose the high stan<l- 
ing tiiey hold among the nation's 
institiuions woidd be a tragedy, 
biu the loss which is already fx - 
curring is also lujfortunate. That is 
the loss of outstanding individuals 
who ne\er come to the I'niversi- 
ty betause they (ant find a pla';e 
for their family at prices they, as 
studeius, (an afford. 

The connection of housing for 
maried students with the standing 
of the giaduate and professional 
MJiools of the I'nixersity seems 
more like a case of academic snob- 
bery tlian soinid reasoning. 


An Old Standby Returns 


.\n old stand- !)y is back on 
campus. -Nothing exists as openly, 
or is condennied as often as stu- 
dent apathy. Every vear student 
leaders, It'iiversitv officials and 
casual b\s"t.nirteis carefully point 
out that participation just doesn't 
seem to be as \> :de as in years past. 

There arc nujM'MdUs reason, for 
studcn: : •■ !i\. init from time to 
tune one icasofi stands out above 
the rot. 

I'nr ('ir'ent outstanding ])ack- 
ground belli id this falls "S(^ 
\Vliatism ■ it will be necessary to go 
bad. ala Bridey Murphy. t(» the 
time before the mental rebirth that 
supj)o.sedlv (H(urs after entering 
college. 

l*>aik lo h'gh s( hool then, to .see 
where tlu- weeds of apathy are 
sown. 

The Tnixersity is a liberal place, 
free lifieral. not leftist liberal, but 
often students arrive with .sour 
t.isies in their mouths from having 
Noiuhful ardor squelched by high 
school teachers. 

\V'ith the alarming rise in juven- 
ile delin(juen(y in places where it 
lias never been noted before, higli 
schtxjl administrators and educau 
tors ha\e a riglit to be leery of 
bursts of independence on the part 
of pre-college students. 

So new students airive on camp- 
us and as a general rule split into 
two groups. I here aie those who 
have not tasted Carolina's kind ol 


The Daily Tar Heel 

The official .student publication of the 
Publications Board of the University of 
North Carolina, where it is publishcci 
daily except Mondav and examination 
and vacation periods and .summer terms 
Entered as second class matter in thf 
post office in Chapel Hill, N. C, undei 
the Act oi March 8, 1870. Subscription 
rates: mailcKl, $4 per year, $2.50 a semes- 
ter; delivered, $6 a year, $3.50 a semes- 
ter. 


Editor 


FRED POWLEDGE 


Managing Editor CHARLIE JOHNSON 


News Elditor 


RAY LINKER 


Business Manager 


BILL BOB PEEL 


freedom and lose control of them- 
selves: and there arc those wlui 
have observed, or even felt the 
thrill of doing what they please, 
and find themselves an imjKirtant 
part of extras urriculais. '1 here 
aie also small groups of individual 
cases who. for variou.s reasons. ne\ - 
lv !..i\e cared about imuh of any- 
thing. 

.A challenge stands before the 
upperclassmen, then, a challenge 
to drop their air of boredom and 
show that freedom at ("arolina is 
more than consuming as much al- 
cohol as jxissible, and forsaking 
studies for any diversion that pre- 
sents it sell. 


Orientation 
Important For 
Grads Too 


Although the Tniversity takes 
great pride in its graduate school, 
the individuals enrolled in it have 
been left on the outside of campus 
life. 

(Most graduate students are older 
and tnore mature than the normal 
imdergraduate, facts which, with 
the higher educaticm which be- 
longs to the grad. tend to separate 
them from the undergraduates. 

It all boils down to the fact that 
the graduate students, outside ot 
studying, are left out of campus 
ac ti\ ities. 

\i orientation time new students 
and freshmen were led around the 
campus, and told exac ilv who to 
see for everything from books to 
advice for the lovelorn. Not so for 
the graduate students. There was 
suppcj.sed to be an orientation pro- 
gram, but when registration time 
came around many grad students 
didn't kjiow whete to go. Some of 
them still don't know the build- 
ings as well as fre.shmen who went 
through a more complete training' 
])eriod. 

.\\ present a group is being or- 
ganized to rectify all this. If it siu - 
ceeds the giaduate students will 
probably be(()me a more integral 
part (jf Carolina instead of the left 
out ingrediant. ^^ 


Moscow University Starting Place 


Chuck Hauser 

Author Hauser is a former 
acting editor and managing edi- 
tor of The Daily Tar Heel He 
gathered the following impres- 
sions of the University of Mos- 
cow during a trip to Russia this 
past summer while on leave of 
absence from The Chapel Hill 
Weekly. He has recently joined 
the staff of The Charlctte Ob- 
server. 

I knew the University of Mo.s- 
ron' was tjoinu to be different 
from the liiii- 
versit.v of .\orth 
Carolina, b u t 
I'm afraid I 
was still a bit 
startled by what 
I found. 

In the first 
place. instead 
oi having a 
sprawling hori. 
zonlai campi.^^. 
this academic 
world is biiilt 
on a vertical 
plane. The 
main University 
building, a huge 
monster of a 
structure, has a 
central tower 
storie.s inta the 

surrounded bv 




ivy League, Moscow Style 


A male student with shaved scalp (not required) and a Russian coed check out books at the Univefo 
sity of Moscow's geology department library. 


Hauser 

. in tlie KrcitiUu 
which soars 33 
Russian .sky. 
The tower is 


four wings, two of wtiich rise 18 
stories and two of which reach 
only nine. Cla.ssroom.s, laborator- 
ies, libraries, dormitory facilities, 
and the other rc^quirements of a 
student body of 22,000 are al- 
most entirely housed in the one 
building. 

This is the new campus of Mos- 
cow University, opened on!:' 
three years ago in the rolling 
area known as Lenin Hills on the 
southea.st edge of the capital 
city. The old campus, in down- 
town .Moscow, is of a more famil- 
iar .vtvie. and i.s .still being u.^ed. 


The new campus is unquestion- 
ably magnificent, but at the same 
time it has a sterile look. The 
area around the main structure, 
dotted with a handful of addi- 
tional buildiniis (including an in- 
door track and a basketball stad- 
ium), is almost devoid of trees 
of any size. A formal garden is 
laid out 2* fhe rear of the cen- 
tral building. 

At the front door you run into 
the University's own ve.'sion of 
the Iron Curtain in the form of a 
stony-faced young woman wear- 
ing a blue uniform and a per- 
petual frown. No visitors are al- 
lowed to enter without special 
permits. ' / 

When you try to take her pic- 
lure, she shakes her fist once 
and then retreats behind a door 



Iron Curtain Campus 

This uniformed young lady is a door guard at the front entrance 
of the University of Moscow. With her aid, the University maintains 
its own Iron Curtain, and visitors may be admitted only with. «pecial 
passes. >,^»?( 


out of the reach of the camera's 
long lens. 

A large wooden platform drap- 
ed with red crepe paper has been 
erected on the front steps of the 
building. Workmen are busily 
setting up microphones and test- 
ing television equipment. Sum- 
mer vacation is about to begin, 
and a big sendoff is planned for 
thousands of students who have 
"volunteered" to help farmers in 
the fields during the warm 
months. 

Your interpreter obtains the 
necessary passes, and the young 
woman in the blue uniform re- 
luctantly permits you to pass 
through her door. 

Inside, you find polished mar- 
ble and a tomb-like atmosphere. 
An enormous batterv of elevators 
waits to take students to classes 
in their vertical campus. In the 
great hallway, a large book stall 
displays scientific publications 
and general magazines. 

The University has no central 
library. Each department and 
school, scattered up and down 
the 33 floors of the building, has 
its own stacks and reading room. 
In the geology department library 
on the 29th floor a man with a 
shaved head and a pla nly dress- 
ed young woman wait patiently 
for textbooks. 

Living quarters for students, 
in one of the wings, are comfort 
ably furnished and well lighted 
No three-men-to-a-room routine 
here. Each student has individ- 
ual quarters, equipped with bed. 
desk, dresser, bookca.se. reading 
lamps, a chair and a state-provid- 
ed radio with which he tunes in 
(you guessed it) Radio Mo.scow. 

Each undergraduate is provid- 
ed a room containing eight .square 
meter?. For each two rooms, 
there is a shared bath. 

Russian youngsters earn their 
places and free tuition and ex- 
pen.ses at the University through 
competitive examinations. They 
attend classes in 48 "professions" 
under 12 major departments and 
schools. 

In the student cafeteria, at 
ground level below the main 
floor, food is appetizing and 
amazingly cheap. A ham sand- 
wich sells for one ruble ( less 


than 10 'cents in true value); a 
bowl of salad costs one ruble; 
and a glass of milk goes for only 
50 kopeks (one-half a ruble). 

At a table in the cafeteria sits 
a young girl in a white smock 
and a while kerchief, adding up 
her counter's receipts on a black- 
beaded abacus, the standard "add- 
ing machine" of the Soviet 
Union. There is noise here in the 
dining hall, and youthful sound, 
and the friendly clatter of dishes 
and silverware. 

The huge central auditorium of 
the University is dominated by a 
sweeping mosaic dealing with 
world peace (practically every 



One Man Rooms 

.. .author's- interpreter tries bed 

mural and mosaic in the country 
hammers peace slogans at you) 
and Soviet history. 

Marble columns, fluorescent- 
tube chandeliers and rich drap- 
eries add an air of magnificence 
to the immense chamber. 

Flanking the stage are en- 
graved marble plaques bearing 
quotations from Lenin and Sta- 
lin. Over the words are bas-re- 
liefs of the two Russian dicta- 
tors, poised high over the au- 
dience like all-seeing Big Broth- 
ers, even in death. 


Pogo 


By Walt Kelly 



I AMP >C:. WA$ y^Z V/iTN "W? 

COPr Of r.i 5:NK,;V>AM ^//jPA^^ 

iNTO OJZ 0A0y 0RA1H$-'' iT „ 

AiM'f P0U1B ro Ncr co^'^ uiuH' 
'0 P5\v ya eggf'K^. 



Li'l Abner 


By Al Capp 


At AM£/f/tl/\-5 FOREf^tOSr 
0ODy-3U/LD£R, Mil '^/OU 
S£l£Cr ~A4fi. &EALJT/FUL. 
OF 1956' AT rȣ CATTLE 
SHOtV. MR STROVQ/'AD&f.^ , 

, :^^ 

OKAY. 






World- f-^^^^J^r^ 
physical specimen* 

to compet^ 



AH ADMIRES FiNt 
VOUNJG PHV^ICAU 
SPEClMENS Vs'ISHT 

AH WAS ONEr.'' 
WISH'T AH COULD 

GO SEE ^M 



ONE WAY . . . 

Poinf Oi Honor; 
A Missing Wallet 

Barry Winston 

This isn't very funny. It isn't even intended to 
be. 

A week ago Friday, on the 21st of this month, 
shortly before ten o'clock in the morning, a man 
stepped out of Manning Hall and walked the fifty 
yards or so to Lenoir Dining Hall, It was just an- 
other coffee break. 

At ten o'clock he got up from his table and 
went to the cashier's sfand by the magazine rack 
in the north end of Lenoir. He made another pur- 
chase and paid his tab with a dollar bill from his 
wallet and eight cents out of his pants' pocket. 
Then he walked the fifty yards or so back to the 
Law School. 

Two and a half hours later he made a dis- 
covery. His wallet was missing. So he went to look 
for it. He didn't find it. I just finished talking to 
him, and he still hasn't found it. He's just about 
given up on it. Can't say as I blame him, since it's 
been a week, now. 

What was in the wallet? Just a driver's license, 
some notes aifd the usual odds and ends that a man 
carries around in his billfold. And two hundred 
dollars. 

The fifty yards between Lenoir and Manning is 
all open ground— sidewalk, mostly. In two and a 
half hours a couple of hundred students shuffled 
their way to class along that sidewalk. 

_ The man asked at the cashier's stand in Lenoir. 
Nobody had seen it. He posted a notice in the 
Law School. Nobody had seen it. He ran an ad in 
the Tar Heel. Nobody had seen it. 

But somebody saw it. Somebody HAD to, be- 
cause it's not, there anymore — not in Lenoir, not 
in the Law School, and not on the aidewalk. I think 
it's in somebody's pocket. 

This is not an isolated incident. It is an extreme, 
but the same thing happens every day on this 
campus, to a lesser degree. Textbooks disappear. 
Raincoats are "lo-st". And billfolds somehow rarely 
ever get back to their owners, once gone. 

It seems to me that I remember reading some- 
thing, a long time ago when I was a freshman, 
that started out. "I am on my honor, as a gentle- 
man " 

I thought everybody had to sign that thing be- 
fore they could get into school. It must be that some 
people figure that because they were given no 
choice about signing it, they're not really morally 
obligated to abide by it. But they did have a choice. 
Nobody made them come to CiroJina. So they did- 
n't have to sign it, did they? 

But they did. And I'm betting that one of them 
is losing sleep nights, trying to figure out how 
he's going to spend that two hundred bucks. 

I hope he has a real big time. 

REACTION PIECE 


More Opinions 
On Sunny Jim 

Dave Mundy 

The time has come for Tatums' turn. For Uiose 
who are interested, I am organizing the first chap- 
ter of a string of "Tatum's Scalp" (or T S for 
short) clubs in honor of Sunny Old Big Jim Tatum. 
It IS hoped that the clubs will stretch from Manleo 
to Murphy, or at least from Raleigh Road to Frank- 
lin Street. 

Our program is very simple: it calls for the im- 
mediate retirement, resignation, traasfer, dismissal 
(all with reluctance, of course) or promotion of one 
Tatum as Head Football Coach. Dean of the Faculty 
and acting president of the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. As long as soitiething is 
done. 

This is not to declare that we advocate the 
complete severance of his relations with the Uni- 
versity. If sufficient additional funds can be ob- 
tained we plan to raze the library and endow in its 
stead the Snavely-Barclay-Tatum Institute for post- 
graduate advanced research in football te<rhniques. 

But is will be no ivory "football" tower. To 
keep the members of the institute down-to-earth, 
they will be required to hold seminars for football 
players on such subjects as hew to pronounce "aca- 
demic curriculum." 

If these don't pan out, we are almost certain 
of persuading the trustees to give Tatum a special 
Kenan professorship in football research. They 
know as well as you do that this university will 
never get its name in a single national newspaper 
until it has a better football business. 

Admittedly, we shouldn't be judging boss Ta- 
tum so early in the season. Decision cmild be post- 
poned until after the Oklahoma game but why 
wait? 

As a special adjunct to the Snavely-Barclay- 
Tatum Institute there should be a "Department 
of Cheerleading", inasmuch as this also seems to 
be one of the professions most valued by college 
students. It is difficult to decide whether it should 
be named after Keichskanzler Hitler or Cheerlead- 
er By num. 

The simplest way to decide would be to call 
Adolf back from the dead and pit them against 
one another in a straight contest, with impartial 
people like me for judges. (Even though I have 
a strong prejudice in favor of Adolf, secretly.) 

Adolf (Hitler, not Bynum) would probably do 
all right down in Kenan Stadium, although it com- 
pares with neither of the stadia in Berlin or Nurn- 
berg. I can hear it now: "Geben sie mir bitte ein' C 
.... Geben sie mir bitte ein' A . . .Geben sie 
mir bitt^ ein" R . . , Bet B.vnum couldn't roll and 
R like Adolf. And he has no moustache. 

But the cheerleader (BjTium, not Adolf) might 
even up the score with his arm-waving and high- 
pitched screams. Thanks to his calisthenics he 
might even • do pretty good at goose-stepping. 
(Wonder if Adolf took calisthenics every morning?) 

Ths is just a suggestion, but what about 'Pel- 
vis' Presley as the first Professor of Cheerleading 
and Mob Action? At least he should be invited over 
to try out for the job. Now isn't that fair enough? 


Pf>. 
first 
lature'l 
night. 

App| 
of 49 
call- 
Sonny 
abscnc 
rushinl 
lecturd 

As 
flictini 
Party 
Andy 
bill tol 
for be| 

This 
Legisl| 
for a 
ed by 
Youn^ 

The! 


YardN 

tormJ 


19. 19S6 

r; 
\let 

fnded to 

month, 

a man 

ie fifty 

Ijiut an- 

t)le and 

[ne rack 

Jier pur- 

|rom his 

pocket. 

to the 

a dis- 

to look 

bkjng to 

ft a-bout 

jince it's 

license, 

|t a man 

lundrt'd 

ming is 
and a 
shuffled 

Lenoir. 

in the 

|n ad in 

to, be- 

loir, not 

I think 

Extreme, 

|on this 

sappear. 

rarely 

|g some- 
eahman, 
gentle- 
ling be- 
^at some 
iven no 
I morally 
choice, 
ley did- 

)f them 
)ut how 
?ks. 


^ SATURDAY, SEfTEMBER W. 1995^ 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


PAGE THREE 


or tliose 
rst chap- 
S. for 

Tatum. 

Mariteo 
Frank- 

the im- 
lismissal 
n of one 
Faculty, 
)f North 
rthing is 

ate the 
the Uni- 
be ob- 
)w in iU 
or post- 
hniques. 
wer. To 
to-earth, 

football 
ice "aca- 

certain 
special 
They 
'sjty will 
wspaper 


29 Scions Attend 
Legislature Meet 


By CLARKE JONES 

Poor attendance marked the ! 
first meeting of the Student Legis- [ 
lature's 21st assembly Thursday' 
night. I 

.Approximately 60 per cent— 29 ! 
of 49 members answered the roll 
call — were in attendance. Speaker 
Sonny Evans explained the many , 
absences were due to sorority i 
rushing, various meetings and two 
lectures held at the same time. 

As a result of the several con- i 
flicting campus events. Student | 
Party members Gardner Foley and ! 
Andy Milnor jointly sponsored a 
bill to set up a student committee i 


Campus 
Seen 


Committee for Coordinating Cam- 
pus Events, would "notify all cam- 
pus organizations to submit a pro- 
posed schedule of events in order 
that they might be fitted into ; 
and checked with the maMer j 
schedule," according to Foley, i 

President Young was not avail- 
able for comment on the bill. He 
has been called home due to his 
father's illness. 

Some controversy arose con- ; 
cerning the approval of thre mem. ' 
bers — Don Furtado, Joel Fleish- 
man and Clemm Shankle — to the 
Graham Memorial Board of Di- ; 
rectors. 


for better scheduling of the events, i 

This measure, if passed by the j The approval, to be held over 
Legislature next week, provides j for two weks due to coed rush- 
for a five-man committee appoint- i ing, caused a small disagreement 
ed by student body President Bob between University Party chairman 


Young 

The committee to be called the 


Mike Weinman and Student Party 
member Andy Milnor. 






M Off/ THERE WILL BE A 
BRIEF CATCH -YOURMEATN' I 
INTERMISSION EACH SN0WM8! 


WAfiNER BROS present 

t/i» 2-yeMr-run stage sensation with th» priz9-wmning east of tho play ' O 


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SUN.-MON.-TUES. 


Carolina 


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ATTRACTION: 

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By appointment purveyors of soip to the late King George VI, Yardley & Co., Ltd., Lendoti 

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C' . . . . 

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tops of f any shave, electric or lather I 

• soothes, refreshes the skin 

• helps heal razor nicks 

• counteracts dryness 

• gives brisk, masculine, non-linger!n{| scent 

Starts you off with your besf face forward I 

At your campus store, $1.10 and $1.50, plus tax 

Yardley products for America are created in England and finished in the U.S.A. from the orifinst CngKtli 
(•rmulae, combming imported and domestic ingredients. Yardley of London, Inc., S20 Fifth Ave., H.I.C. 


WUNC-TV 

Today's schedule for WUNC-TV, 
the University's educational tele- 
vision station, Channel 4: 6:29 — 
Sign on; 6:30— World, Weather, 
man; 7:00 — Your Child. 7:30 — 
Frontiers to Health; 8:00 — Point 
of View; 8:30 — American Politics; 
9:00 — Final Edition; and 9:05— 
Sign Off. 
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB 

The Cosmopolitan Club will 
hold its first meeting of the sea- 
son in the Assembly Room of the 
library at 4 p.m. tomorrow. The 
; club was organized to promote 
I friendship and understanding be- 
! tween the nations by giving mem- 
bers an opportunity to exchange 
I ideas and cultures. All who are in- 
i terested have been invited to 
! come. The membership is usually | 
divided "about evenly" between ] 
I Americans and those from other i 
countries, it was stated. 
I FRATERNITY BIDS 
j It is reported that there are a ! 
I number of fraternity bids still in ! 
I the office of Ray Jefferies, assis- , 
j tant to the dean of student affairs. ! 
I Students who have not received i 
! their bids should drop by this of- 
I fice to pick them up. j 

INDOOR POOL I 

The indoor swimming pool is 
open for recreational swimming 
Mondays throi>gh Fridays from i 
4-6 p.m., Saturdays from 2-6 p.m. i 
and Sundays. 2 - 5 p.m. Women ' 
swimmers may wear their own 
bathing suits, but men swimmers ' 
are required to wear the special i 
suits issued by the gym. 
STUDENT WIVES CLUB 

The Student Wives Club will 
hold its first meeting this fall 
on Tuesday at 8 p.m. at the Victory 
Village Nursery, according to Sec- 
retar>- Pat Howard. All Student 

Tong Delighted 
With Invitation 
To Speak Here 

Dr. Hollington K. Tong, speak-] 
er presented by the Carolina For- 
um Thursday night, said he was ' 
extremely "pleased" by the pre- 
speech banquet at the Carolina 
Inn. 

Tong, who was presented at the 
banquet by Forum Chairman Jim 
Holmes, expressed delight at be- 
ing invited by student government 
and not the University. 

Present at the banquet were: 

Chairman Holmes, Chancellor 
Robert B. House, Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Magill, Dean Katherine Car- 
miehael, Minister F. S. Chu, Doc- 
tors Alex Heard and W. D. Perry, 
Ray Jeffries. Mr. and Mrs. Jim 
Wallace. 

Students attending the banquet 
were: 

Bob Young, Luther Hodges, 
Miss Ester Ballentine, Lloyd Shaw, 
Mike Strong. Stan Pearman and 
John Bish; 

Neil Bass, Stan Shaw, Brandon 
Kincaid, Cecil Hartsoe, Pao Chien 
Yang. 


Passions 

gone wild 

in an outlaw 

wilderness! 


Frosh Discuss Frats, 
Start Plans For Year 

By JERRY ALVIS | on Sept. 23, and the planned trip 

The Freshman Fellowship, spon-j to Danville, Va., on Sept. 29, to 
sored by the YMCA, met last night I an Averett-sponsored dance. 

"Freshman Fellowship offers a 
real opportunity to any freshman 
to become active in an organi- 
zation that is tailored to meet his 
needs. We like to think of the Fel. 
lowship not as an end in itself 
but as a chance for a freshman to 


at 7 p.m. in the assembly room j 
of the Library to discuss their j 
plans lor the coming year and j 
hear the views of members of j 
fraternity and independent circles. 
Ed Hudgins, president of the 
IFC, from Greensboro, elaborated 
on the advantages of fraternity ' 


GM To Present Jazz 
Music Every Monday 

The best in recorded jizz music, 
will be heard in the Main Lounge 
of Graham Memorial on Mondays 
from 7-9 p.m., according to GM 
Director Linda Mann. 

In the past, the music of the { 
Main Lounge, supplied from a hi- 1 
fi set located in the information j 
office, has basically been along . 
classical, semi-classical and light- , 
classical lines. Repeated requests ' 
from students influenced the init- i 
iation of the jazz program. i 

Although the present jazz in- j 
ventory of the GM record library 


Bruno^s Combo To Pfdy Here 

Bruno's Combo will provide* the music tonight from 8 to 11 for 
tije first Graham Memorial Activities Board sponsored Rendezvous 
Room informal dance. 


WEEK SPECIAL 
All Capitol Records 



TncicZeiitr 

^ TRUCOLOIt 


by Consolidated Film Industries 

LlNDIBARNELL* DALE ROBERTSON 
JOHN LUKO*WARB BOM 

REGIS TOOMEY • SKIP HOUilEIER 

IRVING BACON JOHN OOUCETTE 

WHIT eisseu 

Written by FREDERIC LOUIS FOX 
Hiiociati Producer MICHAEL BAIRD 
bi/ectad by LEWIS H. FOSTER 
> HtPUy.lC PROOUCTIOM 



find and develop his real inter-' •',••. j * „ k u 

I IS limited, staff members have con 
«sts in his college career," said 


life. Grimes Dormitorv President i 

Jim Womble of Rocky' Mt. upheld!"" "' '"' "^^""^^e career, saio | rented to supplement, the stock 

th^ freedoms of the independents, j J^^ Associate Secretary Riebel. > from their personal libraries. 

According to John Riebel, as- 
sociate secretary of the YMCA, 
bol;h talks were more of an in- 
formative instead of an argument- 
ative nature. 

Following the talks, fellowship 
menjbers filled out interest query 
sheets with topics ranging from 
"Social Etiquette for College So- 
cial Functions" to "A Saturday 
Stu<ly Retreat with Freshman Girls 
fron) Duke University in Durham." 
Th^' sheets were divided into "I 
Am Interested" and "I Want To 
Help Plan" columns. Query sheets 
for freshmen unable to attend the 
meeting are available at the Y. 

A nine-member council was al- 
so solicited. Members include: 
Danny Allen, Forest City: Tommy 
Allred. High Point; Jon Q. Clark, 
Rockville, Md.; Jim Cunninghar.. 
Charleston, W. Va.; Frank H. 
Lance, Jr., Rosman; Bob Mathews, 
Herford: Robert Murray, Hender- 
sonville; Laurence Wilson, Mt. 
Oliver, and Larry Withrow, Char- 
lotte. 

Bob Leonard, chairman of fresh, 
man work and director of the 
freshman camp, convened the 
meeting and met with the council- 
men to plan the next meeting and 
discuss the interests and ilesires 
of the freshman class. 

Two of the most current activi- 
ties of the group included the re- 
ception of the Averett College girls 


WEEK-END HOUSECLEANING 

-V SALE 

TODAY — Shopworn books and dropped titles 
in RELIGION, INSPIRATIONAL READING, 

and PSYCHOLOGY. - ^ '^ 

Next Week— Biography, History and Philosophy. 

THE INTIMATE BOOKSHOP 


Wives have been invited to attend. 
PHARMACY WIVES 

The Pharmacy Wives will hold 
a picnic this afternoon at 5 p.m. 
at the home of Mrs. W. J. Smith 
on .Arrowhead Rd. In case of rain, 
it will be held in the Institute of 
Pharmacy Building. 
EVENING SKETCH CLASS 

Person Hall Art Gallery has an- 
nounced a Wednesday evening 
sketch class beginning Oct. 3. The 
class will include sketching from 
life with drawing in various ma- 
terials. The class, to meet 7 to 9 
p.m., will be under John Allcott 
of the Dept. of Art. The fee is $13 
for 13 weeks instruction, including 
materials. Those interested in 
joining have been invited to come 
to the first meeting of the class 
next Wednesday at 4 p.m. 


205 E. Franklin St. 


Open Till 10 P.M. 


Series 

List 

Special 

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W- 

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All EP's $100 Per Record 
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OLD GOLD'S GREAT NEW GAME 


TOGETHER 
for the first time! 



M-G M prwMHi 

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GRACE KELLY 

FRANK SINATRA 

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"HIGH 
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k VISTAVISION M CMOIt 

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«i JOHN LUND 
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PRICES THIS ATTRACTION 
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w 


A total of 24 puzzles will appear before the Christmas 
holiday. Get started now in Old Gold's exciting new 
game for college students only. -, - 

Here are the Official Tangle Schools 
Rules! SAVE THEM! 


1. PRIZES (■) P. Lorillard Company, the makers of 
OLD GOLD CKJAKETTES, will award a total of 86 
prizps, valued at more than $15,000— to college atudenU 
in th*- I'nited States in accordance with the (ullowing 
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K%a\e will consist of twenty-four (24) monogratnnaed 
puzzle drawinRS to be published in this and other 
colleKe ocwpapers; three puzzles each week for eight 
weeks, and a series of tie-breakinK puzzles, if needed, 
as outlined in rule 2. (c) Contestants must arrange the 
scrambled letters from esrh of the 24 monogrammed 
drsAinga so that they corri-ctly spell the name of a 
certain American college or university. In the scrambled 
drawings there are no supertluous letters, no distortion 
of letters, and no letters are left out to confuw or mis- 
liiad entrants. A clue will be furnish>*d with each draw- 
ing lo help identify the correct answer to the puzzle. 

2. (•) The person couplyiog with all the rules of the 
game and holving the highest number of puzzles 
correctly will be declared the winner of the first prize, 
a 40-day tour of the world for two persons -the winner 
and another p«'rson of his oho<*eing or. at the option of 
the winner, the first prize shall consist of 15,000 to be 
paid to the winner. The person complying with all ihe 
rules of the game and solving ihn second highest number 
of puzzlex correctly will be declared the winner of the 
seconrf prize. In Ilk*' manner, the winners of the remain- 
ing M4 prizes will l>e determine^, (b) In case more than 
one person solves correctly the same number of puzzles, 
the prize tied for, and as many subsequent prizes as 
there are persons tied, will be reserved and those so t}°ing 
will be re<iuired to solve a set. of tie-breaking puzzles, to 
determine the order in which the reserved prizes will be 
awarded. Each oX the tie-tareakiqg puzzles will be com- 
prised of scr8rol>k'd letters forming the names of either 
one, two or three American colU-ges or universities. Clues 
with each puzzle drawing will indicate whether the 
puzzle contains one, two or three schools to be iden- 
tified. If, after solutions have lieen submitted to this 
•eoond set of puzzles, a tie or ties still remain, those tied 
will be required to solve another tie-breaking puzzle. Kc- 
coinpaaying this tie-breaker will be an oflicial list of 
American coHeges and universities. From these, contest- 
ants will make up a list of schools and colleges in accord- 
ance with instructions to be given at that time. The 
contestant earoio]; the highest soo.'e in so doing will b« 
awarded the highest of the prizes tied for. 1 he next 
highest prize will be awarded the contestant earning the 
second h.ghett score and so on down through the re- 
served prizes that have been tied for. These tie-breaking 
puzzles, if necessary, will be mailed to each contestant. 


P. Lorillard Company reserves the right (only in the 
event of further tie or ties) to require contestants lo 
•dive as many tie-breaking puzzles under supervision, 
and without assistance, as are necessary to determine 
a single winner for each prize. 

3. NOTE (a) When entrants have completed solutieus 
to the complete aet of 24 initial puzzles, which are to be 
published three per week in this paper, the solutions 
are to be printed or typewritten by the entrant in the 
answer space provided on the puzzle (or a reasonable 
facsimile). The complete set of 24 puzzles mtlst be 
anewered, neatly trimmed and enclosed in nn envelope, 
flat and not rolled and add r e sse d to:— Tangle Schools, 
P. O. Box 26A, .Mount Vernon 10, N. Y., and mailed 
bearing a postmark not later than December 19, I9.S6. 
De<-oraied, pasted or embellished puzzles are not per- 
mitted. Kach set of 24 puzzles must be accompanied by 
a wrapper from any type OLD GOLD CIGARETTE 
package -(KEG ITLAR, KING-vSIZE OR FILTER 
KINGSi or a reasonable facsimile thereof, (b) More de- 
tailed instructions on tlie mailing of completed sets of 
pu7.2.1es will l)e published lat«r. No .Solutions are to be 
sent in separately. Save the puzzles and your solutions 
so that they may be sabmitted as a complete set at the 
end of the game. Entrants are not limited as to the num- 
l>«rof complete sets of Solutions. However, each set miist 
be submitted individually, and only one prize will be 
awarded to any one entrant, (c) .\fter the deadline for 
mailing solutions, the correct answers to all 24 puzzles 
will be published in a single issue of this paper. Each 
cxiiiti'stant must keep an accurate record of all solutions 
and check his answers wit h t he (published correct answers. 

4. WHO MAY ENTER: (a) Thi.s game is open to all bona 
fide college students in the United States: that is, 
persons w ho, at the time of entering, are duly registered 
in an accredited ccjlege or university within the 
continental boundaries of the I'nited States, exc<>pt that 
the game is not open to students whose immediate fami- 
lies are «mpioyed by P. I»rillard Company or its adver- 
tising agencies. Contest is subject to all State and 
Federal regulations, (b) Contestants may, if they 
prefer, make copies of the puzzles by hand. Copies of 
the puzzles bnd of OLD GOLD package wrappers 
reproduced hy a multiple process such as carbon paper 
or mim>H>graph are not acceptable. Entrants who want 
back puzzles and copy of Official Rules may obtain them 
by addressing their request lo Tangle .Schools Back 
Puzzles, P. (). Box 9, Grand Central .\nnex, New York 
17, NI. Y., enclosing 5t in payment for each puzzle 
dt«ired and/ or rules, together v.ith a ST.\MPED 


SELF-.*DDRESSED envelope, (c) Prior to rec«v-fng 
a prize each winner may be required to sign an a(h- 
davit certifying that he or she is eligible to compete in 
accordance with rule 4-a; that he or she has not bought, 
sold or exchanged the puzzle solutions and is not 
acting for, either by proxy or in collaboration with, any 
person who is not qualified to participate under the rules. 

5. METHOD OF JUDGING: Decision of the judges is 
final and contestants so agree upon entering the game. 
Solutions to the puzzles will be judged on correctness, 
including the spelling of the names. All entries become 
the property of P. Lorillard Company. None will be 
returned. P. Lorillard Company cannot be responsible 
for any solutions unduly delayed or lost in the mails; 
this also applies to mail from the P. Lorillard Company 
to any contestant. On entering the game, each c»n- 
t4Btunt accepts the foregoing rules as binding. P. 
Lorillard Company reserves the right to disqualify any 
entrants not conforming. Evidence indicating collusion 
by or ineligibility of contestants will automatically 
disqualify such contestants. P. Lorillard Company 
reserves the right to correct any typographical errors or 
other errors which may appear in any published matter 
in connection with this game. P. Lorillard Co., insofar 
as publication of puzzles is concernnd, is responsible 
only for submitting material for publication to newt- 
papers involved. 

Copyright 1956, Harry H. Hollister- 


SAMPLE PUZZLE 



CLUE: The third oldest institution of 
higher education in theUnited States, this 
university was chartered in 1701, and 
later named for a native of Boston. Walter 
Camp was a great football coar-h here. 

ANSWER: YALE 


Save this alphabet. Letters shown in all puzzles 
will have the same characteristics. Notice tiie 
M's have straight sides; the W's are slanted. 
Note the difference between the N's and the Z's. 

ABCDEFGHIJKLM 
NOPQRSTUVWXYZ 


QTAPT N AW I ^^^^^ smoking those great Old Gold cigarettes . . . start playing the great 
IHH I HUfl ■ new game/'Tangle Schools"! Win a free tour of the world for two! 



PUZZLE NO. I 



CtUE: Situated in an attroctive New 
Kngland town, thie college for wottiph 
op<>n«d in 1875. .4 traintng school fur 
wom*n n*val ittQ^iera wag held herv during 
W.>f1d Wurll. 


A.\SWER_ 

S' a lite 

AiUras — 


City 

College — 


-Sftite- 


PUZZLE NO. 2 



CLUE: This university is located in the 
^lidwast. and i.s known for its large 
engineeriiig SJ-hools. It was first oi»ened to 
students in 1«74. 


ANSWER 
Same 


Adtlress- 
City 


College 


-SUiie- 


PUZZLE NO. 3 



CLUE: Founded in 1!<.14. this university 
acquired its present name .SO years later — 
in 18S4. Originally a medical college, it 
iiwued the first degree in medicine con- 
ferred in the .South we.st. 

A NS W E R 

Ka me 


Adilrens- 
City 


Cullege- 


SUite-^ 


f fv»n«t.»i4i»fticHs m iilM»Iiil«i iiiiiif iT*/.* » i 


t 


I 


PAteC POUft 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29/195* 


Football 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Co-Captain George Stavnitski at 
center. 

Although the Sooners are top- 
heavy favorites to win No. 31 in a 
row, there is an unmistakable air 
of _ apprehension around the 
campus here. Incurably pessimistic 
Bud Wilkinson has been moaning 
as usual in his pre-game state- 
ments, but some observers feel 
there may be a slight note of au- 
thenticity in his crying. 

•Tatum and his Tar Heels are 
naturally not overly optimistic, but 
nevertheless they are not content 
to sit back and take their lick- 
ing. Tatum himself is not promts- ! 
ing anything, but neither is he ' 
backing down. He says his stal- 
warts are big enough so they won't 
be blown off the field, but beyond 
that, he doesn't know. 

The starting lineups: 


UNC 

Pos. 

Okla. 

Payne 

E 

Stiller 

Muschamp 

E 

Bell 

Pell 

T 

Greenlee 

Blazer 

T 

Emerson 

Smith 

G 

Krisher 

Jones 

G 

Northcutt 

Stavnitski 

C 

Tubbs 

Hathaway 

QB 

Harris 

Sutton 

HB 

McDonald 

Vamum 

HB 

Thomas 

Lear 

FB 

Pricer 



Baseballers Hold Outdoor Drill 
As Weather Conditions Improve 


son, Joe Shook, and Delon Lam- 
bert. Jim Love is currently the 
number one candidate for the 
catching chores. 


PATRONIZE YO«R 
• ADVERTISERfl( • 


BROOKS POSTPONED 

BROOKLYN. (/P) — Rain and 
cold weather postponed the open- 
er of Brooklyn's crucial, windup 
three-game series with the Pitts- 
burgh Pirates last night. It was im- 
mediately re-scheduled as part of 
a doubleheader for this afternoon. 

CLASSIFIEDS 


FOR SALE — 1950 CHEVROLET 
convertable, topnotch condition, 
new top. all extras (Powerglide, 
radio, heater, M-hite walls). See 
C. S. Jones, Wilson Hall, 2-5 
daily. 

BLACKBURN'S MARKET 

(across from ice plant). Open 7 1 
days a week, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Fresh fruit and vegetables. Also 
beer. 

LOST — BILLFOLD FRIDAY IN 
Lenior Hall or Law School be- 
tween 10 a.m. and noon. Con- 
tains valuable personal papers 
and approximately $200. Money 
for nurses attending my wife 
who has a fatal disease. If finder 
feeis he needs money more than 
me, please return papers. $20 
reward offered for honesty. Con- 
tact E. M. Murry at Law School. 

STUDENTS EXPERIENCED ON 
Linotype or open presses may 
obtain part time work at Colon- 
ial. Preas. Phone 333-6. 


COACH BIG JIM TATUM 

. meets IVilknisoti again 


Oklahoma Starts Defense 
Of National Title Today 


LOST: ONE WIVE'S PASSBOOK. 
Lo»t Saturday in or around Ken- 
an Stadium. Finder please call 
9^362. 


SUNDAY NEW YORK TIMES DE- 
livered to your door. For further 
information call 8-0572 or 8-0368 
after 5 p.m. 1-5833-5 

WANTED — RII«: TO RALEIGH 
Mon. thru Fri., arriving in Ral- 
eigh prior to 8:30 a.m., return- 
ing to Chapel Hill approximately 
5:00 p.m. Conta^ Lee Cotten at 
Milton's Clothing Cupboard or 
Call Durham 7-8685 after 6:00 
p.m. 


By HUGH FULLERTON JR. 
By The Associated Press 

Oklahoma, a football team that i 
seems destined for as long a run ; 
of triumphs as the musical show ' 
of the same name, begins the de- ; 
fense of its unofficial national col- j 
legiate championship Saturday on ' 
an afternoon that could dim the | 
title hopes of a go<>d many teams, i 

Coach Bud Wilkinson's Sooners. ^ 
whose record is unsmirched since I 
they lost to Notre Dame and were i 
tied by Pitt at the start of the 
1953 season, go after their 31st \ 
consecutive victory against North : 
Carolina. 

They're facing the coach, but ■ 
not the team, that gave them a ' 
real run for national honors last ' 
season and wound up on the other j 
side of the Orange Bowl on New j 
Year's day. Jim Tatum, whose | 
Maryland team finished third in I 
the Associated Press national 
ranking poll last year, now is [ 
North Carolina's coach. And one I 
oddity of this already upset-riddled 
season is that both Tatum and 
the team he left behind lost their 
opening games this year. 

North Carolina, soundly thump- 
ed by N. C. State last week, hardly 
looks like a threat to Oklahoma, 
which is reported deep in talent 
despite some pessimistic state- 
ments by Wilkinson. 

Elsewhere the day's most im- 
portant and exciting games appear 
to be Georgia Teach vs. Southern 
Methodist at Dallas. Michigan 
State vs. Stanford at Palo Alto. 
Calif., Auburn vs. Tennessee at 
Birmingham, Ala., and Pittsburgh 
vs. Syracuse at Pittsburgh. 

After only one week of major 
college play, and before many of 
the top-rated teams even opened 
their seasons, Georgia Tech and 
SMU advancd to second and fifth 
places in the weekly AP poll rat- 
ings. The SMU Mustangs, with 
Tommy Arnold sparking a sensa- 
tional air attack, overpowered No- 


tre Dame 19-13 last week. Georgia 
Tech, 14-6 winner over stubborn 
Kentucky, could run into the same 
kind of trouble. 

Stanford and Michigan State 
have been tabbed as the top teams 
in the Pacific Coast and Big Ten 
conferences. Tliis meeting of Stan- 
fords' passing attack and Michi- 
gan State's multiple offense, most- 
ly running, could be a Rose Bowl 
preview but for one thing — State 
isnf eligible two years running. 

Tennessee and Auburn are rated 
as two leading challengers of 
Georgia Tech for the Southeastern 
Conference title. This game, listed 
as a toss-up, could eliminate one. 


By BILL KINO 

Fall baseball practice at Caro- 
lina finally got a break weather- 
wise yesterday after a three-day 
dominace by Hurricane Flossy 
which kept the Tar Heels indoors 
for their first three practice sess- 
ions. 

40 FRESHMEN OUT 

Coach Walter Rabb said there 
were some forty freshmen among 
the seventy candidates who report- 
ed to practice Monday. Rabb was 
unable to make any predictions at 
this early date but appeared to 
be quite enthused about the 
number of pitchers that showed 
up for the first three days of prac- 
tice. 

The candidates went through a 
brisk workout in Emerson Stadium 
yesterday and will practice there, 
weather permitting, for at least 
two more weeks. 

Rabb commented that there 
were a number of boys who looked 
good during their indoor sessions 
but added that he could make very 
little judgment on this. 

STRONGER PITCHING SEEN 

Asked about the pitching de- 
partment which lacked depth la.s^t 
sca.son, Rabb stated that he felt 
the Tar Heels wo'uld be much 
stronger in that department this 
season. 

Two of the hurlers who are ex- 
pected to boost the Tar Heel 1956 
lefthander, and righthander Don 
mound staff are lefthander Joe 
Morgan and righthander Charles 


Aycock. Both have just returned 
from military service. 

A couple of last years' freshman 
moundsmen are also expecliad lo 
aid veteran hurlers Jim Raugh 
and I>on Saine. Bill Harding a j 
Jackson were the two aces otf the | 
Ta/ Heel's '55 freshman club. [Rabb j 
was al.so pleased that veteran j 
righthander Tom Maultsby •ik'ould \ 


be back after a one year absence. 

Rabb has not had a chance to 
see the outfielders and infielders 
in actual practice and was unable 
to make any predictions in that 
department. The Tar Heels do, 
however, have veterans Chu;.k 
H«rtman, Carson Oldham, and Don 
Lewis back for infield duty along 
with veteran outfielders Dick Hud- 


YACK CONTRACTS 

All organizations desiring space 
in the 1957 Yackety Yack must 
sign contracts in the Yack Office 
in the basement of Graham Mem- 
orial by Oct. 10. according to Edi- 
tor Tommy Johnson. Contracts 
may be signed from 2 to 4 p.m. 
any weekday. 


IDC To Include Intramurals 
In Judging Best Dormitory 


Intramurals wifi be an evien 
more important feature of dormi- 
tory life this year due to a in- 
novation by the Interdormitory 
Council. 

The IDC announced it will in- 
clude intramural participation of 
the dormitories as a consideration 
in the rating of the best dormi- 
tory for. 1956-57. 

The Intramural Dept. again has 
urged all dormitory presidents to 
have the intramural managers of 
their respective dorms elected as 
soon as possible in order to be 
represented at an important man- 
agers' meeting to be held Tuesday, 
Oct. 2. 

MANAGERS MEET 

The first fraternity managers' 
meeting was held Thursday night. 
The four - man nominating com- 
mitte was appointed during the 
meeting. Buddy Clark of Theta 
Chi was made chairman. Other 
members are Paul Fulton, Zeta 


Psi; Pete Williams, SAE; and Bill 
Mason, ATO. 

Tag football competition has 
been postponed for a while due 
to poor weather conditions. The 
officials' clinic has not had an op- 
portunity to work outside as yet. 
and the fraternity teams have not 
been able to work out. Another 
reason for the postponement was 
the coming rushing period which 
would prevent several teams from 
participating. 

FIELDS OPEN 

All the intramural fields will 
be open next week for both frater- 
nity and dormitory teams. Any 
teams desiring to reserve a field 
should call the Intramural Dept. 
at 9424. Official^ will be assigned 
to call the practice games. 

Dormitories are especially urged 
to reserve fields. The officials 
present will help any new mem- 
bers with the rules of the game 
or any other questions. 


ONE WEEK SALE! 
All Capital Records 


Series 

List 

Sale 

T 

$4.12 

$2.75 

W 

$5.15 

$3.75 


All Angels-Special 
Ail Columbia: 


Series 
ML 
SL 
OL 


List 
$4.12 
$5.15 
$5.15 


Sale 
$2.75 
$3.7$ 
$3.75 


All Victor: 


List ' Sale 

LM Series $4.12 $2.75 

i^AW EP 45 RPM $1.05 ea. 

-^All 10" LP. $1.45 ea. 

(Except Elektra— Angel 

L'Oylyre — Telef unken) 


207 E. Franklin St. 



DAILY CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1. Shade of red 
6. Cut wool 

11. Sheeplikc 

12. Door joint 

13. Cougars 

14. Beginning 

15. To diminish 
front (Mil.) 

1«. Fish 

17. Nickel 
(■ym.) 

18. Wattr god 
(poss.) 

19. Tree 

20. Devoured 

21. Fears 

23. Sound of 
a goose 

24. Underworld 
river 
(Myth.) 

26. A small 

piece 
29. Line from 

upper 
' corners of 
• sail to th« 

yard 

33. Youth 

34. Fortify 

35. Dlafigur* 

36. Part of 
"to b«" 

37. Underworld 
god (Myth.) 

38. Church part 

39. Having sides 

41. Mistreat 

42. Scarf 

43. Warning 
signal 

44. Shout* 

45. Lord* 

nawn 

1. Cauffht 
(slang) 

2. Of the ovul* 
(Bot) 


3. Full 
of , 
fissures 

4. W^it* 
ant 

5. Man's 
nickname 

6. Agitated 

7. Female 
red deer 

8. Half ems 

9. Deputies 
10. Binds again 
16. Wheels on 

swivel 
frames 

19. Poem 

20. Sloth 
22. Lofty 

mountain 


23. Femi. 
nine 
pro- 
noun 

SS. Son 
of 
Noah 

26. Sty. 
iish 
(slang) 

27. A 
d«. 

scend- 
ant of Ham 

28. Fish (var.) 

30. Unclean 

31. Egypt's 
president 

32. Putting 
areas 


:i]:-i:j :ij nciaau 

-!u Liuaa iijiiy 

[lOLii-jria iiinaa 

'2&U Han 

Lin rjdU Fin<3 


♦-» 


V«tt«r4s|r'« Aatwcr 
34. Helpers 

37. Valley 
(poet.) 

38. Man's 
nickname 

40. Dollar 
(abbr.) 

41. Viper 


TT 


ar 


3r 


?* 


19 


AX 



W 




»-B 


W. 


i 


3T 


^ 


Ta 


i 


i 


1 

ao 


^ 


4S 


4? 


^ 


sr 


17 


31 


tx. 


PENNIESGO ALONG WAY... 


AT OUR 



GIGANTIC 


*al 


' . >" 


BIG DAYS... 

STARTS MONDAY OCTOBER 1st 


Woj^xceK' 



Fraternity Rushing 
Begins Tomorrow! 

WHAT DOES YOUR WARDROBE ^ 
I LOOK LIKE? 

}i ARE YOU STILL PLAGUED WITH ^^ 
\; OUT-OF-DATE STYLES? / ' 

Whether you ^x^ trying to create the proper im- 
pression for rushing -purposes, or whether you 
simply want to present the proper appearance 
at all times: «^ , :! 

You can't beat the well-tailored look you'll 
have when you are wearing a smart-looking suit 
or sport jacket by SOUTHWICK. 

In cbthing, furnishings, and accessories, 
youMI find the best buys and widest selections at: 



H51KCY DBtfC SIO«t 


CMAMi H4U..M.C. 


STEVEKS " SHEPHERD 


*"**«is<»»_ 


•^m-j 


\ 
?. 


Old Gold's Exciting New Game 
for College Students Only 


^m 


r^'^M 


How would you like to spend next summer on a 40- 
day tour of the world? All expenses paid! Visit 
England, France. Italy, Greece, India, Siam, Hong 
Kong, Japan . . . the far-away places you've dreamed 
of seeing! • - - '-i- 


1 Q^ PflTA All-expense, 40 -day tour of the world for 
* ^ * ■ ■ ■ ^^ rwo, OR $5,000.00 in cash 


2nd Prize 


lO-dcy all-expense poid trip to Paris 


3rd-6th Prizes ;;,t°;jJ'^-'""'°""'"'"' "'"' 


7th- 16th Prizes 


RCA Hi-Fi sets— MARK iV 


*!I>4.J5 


-A 


17th. 36th PriTl^C ^100 B'^'^s Brothers 
Alin-OOin ITIZe^ wardrobe certificotes 

50 Additionai Prizes $25 Brocks 

Brothers wordrobe certificates 

Beprinninia: this week and continuing throughout the Fall 
semester, thh paper will publish three puzzles a week, con- 
taining the letters which make up the names of American 
colleges and universities. The letters are scrambled and must 
be re-arranged to form the names of the schools. Clues with 
each puzzle will help you identify the correct answer. 

It's fun . . . it's easy . . . start now! 


YOU'LL GO FOR 
OLD GOLDS 

Either REGULAR, KING SIZE or *■'' ' 
The GREAT NEW FILTERS. 

Old Golds taste terrific! The reason: 
Old Golds give you the best tobaccos. 
Nature-ripened tobaccos . .'. 

SO RICH, SO LIGHT, 
SO GOLDEN 
BRIGHT! 


Coiurrigiit 1966, Harry H. HoUiater 



Rules and First Three Puzzles Appear on Next Page V 


'i^j^ip*^ 


WEATHER 

Partly cJoudy and warmer, with 


Serials Oept. 
Cbapal Hlll» N. C. 


high in 70's. 



VOL. LVill, NO. 9 


m e Dattu M^xMt d 


REVIEW 

Campus, State and National 
News of the week in review. See 
page 2. 


Complete (A^) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL. NORTH CAROLINA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1956 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PAGES THIS ISSUE 


MIGHTY SOONERS STOP TAR HEELS, 36-0 



60,000 Fans See Oklahoma Offense 
Roll Over Weak North Carolina Team 


Aldermen AskStudenfs 
To Give Parking Ideas 


By CLARKE JONES 

I A member of the town Board ol 

.^liloimen said Friday the board 

I w ,iikl be happy "to hear any sug- 

j gestions from students" concern- 


terfraternity Council. Both would 
work jointly tow^.d removal ol 
the restriction. 

University Party Chairman Mike 
Weinman, who introduced the bill, 


► By LARRY CHEEK 

Daily Tar Heel Sports Editor 
NORMAN, Okla., — Oklahoma's 
big and powerful Sooners handed 
Coach Jim Tatum's undermanned 
Carolina Tar Heels their second 
one-sided lacing in as many weeks 
here yesterday as • they smashed 
the Tar Heels, 36-0. in a game 
played before a sellout crowd ol 
60,000 fans under a blazing sun. 
The Sooners, ranked No. 1 in 


NC Opponents 
Break Even 

Four of the football teams slat- 
ed to meet the Carolina Tar Heels 
later on this season won their 
games yesterday, and three other 
opponents to-be wound up the day 
on the short efid of some big scores. 

., ^. .,,,..„ ,, Georgia, Maryland. Tennessee, 

ing the parkmg restrictons on Co- gave four reasons for the measure the nation in the lale^i^AP poll, ^^^ ^^^^ ^j, ^^^^.J^^^ j^ victories 
' ' " • - - • ■ - •• proved their right to this position ^ ^.^jje South Carolina.. Wake For- 


lunibia St. and Rosemary St.. . which are as follows 

Wiilam M. Alexander, assistant 1. "Columbia St. is not a corn- 
manager of radio station WCHL, ' mercial street between Franklin 

said the Aldermen, who meet Oct. St. and Cameron Ave. 

14, ■ very definitely would want 2. "There is no need to limit 

to hear them." parking on a street which is not 

ilis statement followed a bill commercial as this limit serves no 

passed by the student Legislature obvious purpose. 

Thursday night calling for the re- 3. •Jt is the aim of student gov- 

mr.val of a two-hour parking ban ernment to look out for the in- 


as they mowed down the Tar Heels 
with a sharp slashing offense and 


est and Virginia lost. 


South Carolina, wno will play 
L ""''''^..^^^^"'l ^^^^ '^?^^.'' "osl to the Tar Heels Saturday. 

lost to powerful Miami, 14-6, Fri- 


Carolina cold all afternoon. Coach 
Bud Wilkinson wore down the Tar 
Heels in the 90-degree heat by 
alternating two and sometimes 
three teams with just about equal 
effectiveness. 


on Columbia St. between Franklin 
St. and Cameron Ave. 
Th? measure, passed by special 


tcrests of all students. 

4. The parking limit recently ef- 
fected on Columbia St. works great 


day night. 

A field goal was the only thing 
that enabled Georgia to edge Flori- 
da State, 3-0. The Georgians wili 
visit Chapel Hill Oct. 13 in the Tar 


Coach Tatum's team held the Heel's next home game. 
Sooners scoreless in both the Maryland and Wake Forest, who 
first and third quarters, but in will be at the Hill on Oct. 20 and 


order of business, asked for the hardship on those students who the second and fourth, the Ok!a- Oct. 27, respectively, b'attled down 


They Direct Alumni Annual Giving Program Here 


Pictured above is the council which directs the Alumni Annual 
Giving program at the University. This group will meet with William 
H. Ruffin, Durham, chairman of advance gifts, and alumni from 57 
towns and cities in the state here Thursday to map out plans for 
this phase oi the program to be conducted during October and 
November. They are, left ro right, back row; Mayor E. J. Evans, 
Durham; Charles M. Shaffer and Dr. Sterling A. Stoudemire, Chapel 


Hill; James W. Poole, Greensboro; Richard E. Gordon, Asheville; 
and J. Maryon Saunders; front row: Tom Bost Jr., Chapel Hill; James 
Webb, Greensboro; R. Mayne Albright, Raleigh; Archie K. Davis, 
Winston-Salem; Chancellor Robert B. House and Dr. John N. Couch, 
Chapel Hill. Not pictured are John W. Harden, Greensboro, and 
James L. Godfrey, Chapel Hill. 


establishment of a student govern- 'ive on Columbia St. and the Stu 
ment commisson of three to work dent Legislature feels this hard- 
with a similar group from the In- ship has been invoked unnecessari- 


Lenoir Hall Revamped 
For Cost Of $60,000 


By JERRY ALVIS 

During the past year, $60,000 has 
been spent reconditioning, repair- 
ing, and purchasing new equip- 
ment for the Lenoir Hall dining 
facilities. 

George Prillaman. director of 
the hall since 1951, revealed 
that Lenoir is serving more stu- 
dents this year than at any time 
since 1948. 

Monday's tabulations reflected 
that 5,250 paying customers. 80 
patrolmen, 40 athletes and 196 em- 
ployees were served. Including the 
Pine Room, which is a part of the 
same operation, an estimated 7,500 
people dined in the hall. 

In order to perform the gigantic 
and demanding task of feeding the 
student body, with a minimum cost 
and maximum efficiency, Lenoir 
employs 60 regular workers and 
150 students who work on a part- 
time basis. 

The employees have recently 
been supplied with lockers in the 
basement of the hall which are 
designed to supply the worker with 
a clean serving jacket upon the 
insertion of a dirty one — another 
improvement by Prillaman who 
trys to keep the hall "modernistic 
and up-to-date in all respects." 
MODERNISTIC 

In keeping with the "modernis- 
tic" policy of the hall, a new dish- 
washer, installed at a cost of 810, 
500. went into operation in the 
basement of Lenoir at breakfast 
OR Tuesday, Sept. 25 

The main problem of the dish- 
washing section in the past, in- 
volving the easily stained plastic 
dishes used in the hall, is expected 
to be solved by the extremely high 
temperature capabilities of the 
new machine. 

The pre-wash section of the mac- 
hine is maintained at temperatures ' 
of 120 and 130 degrees Farenheit, 
the two wash tanks average 160 
degrees and the rinse section 180 
t(j 200 degrees. "This machine will 

INFIRMARY 

Students in the Infirmary yes- 
terday included: Misses Mary J. i 
Douglas, Evelyn B. DeHeart, Sue 
B- Gilliam, Carol T. Covington, 
Jane E. Palmer, Ann P. Ha.ncy, i 
and Mary D Dance, and John G. 
Burgwyn, James E. Holshouser, | 
Marvin W. Hareless, Alfredo J, ' 
Julian, Reginald Mallett, Earl T. ' 
Kirkman, Micheal P. Cap, William I 
V.' Burress, Robert A. Barnwell, i 
Alvin W. Smith. 


, take care of all the dishwashing 
I worries well ever have, " Prilla- 
man said. 

The Lenoir bakery, although not 
a recent operation, has been re- ; 
i equipped with new stainles.s steel 
equipment including a revolving 
oven costing S5.500, a tempering i 
machine for the raising of bread, 
a batter mixer and various tables, 
trays, pans and other utensils. 

More new equipment has been 
ordered -for the bakery, which is 
now three-fourths complete, and 
is expected within the next two 
weeks. 

Early October has been set as 
the "projected completion date of 
the overall bakery renovation, 
which will cost in the vicinity of 
$18,000. All baked goods, with the 
exception of light bread, served 
in Lenoir Hall and its affiliate, the 
Pine Room, are products of the 
bakery. 

REfJOVATION 

i Another recent accomplishment 

was the renovation of three rooms 

on the second story of the hall. 

These rooms were decorated by a 

Durham interior decorator and 

furnished with new furniture. 

! The largest of the three rooms is 

presently being used for serving 

i the varsity football team; but all 

I three, the front with a capacity , 

I of 80 persons, the middle 30 and 

the back 50, are available to any 

student group or organization upon 

reservation. 1 

Worth note are the air condition 
ed and spotlessly clean vegetable : 
and ifie.Tt preparation r;)nms lo- 
cated in the basement of the hall. 
The.se rooms, once merely unwall- 
ed areas, were designed by Prilla- 
man. They are completely tiled 
; arl furnished with stainless steel 
I equipment including some specially 
made implements designed by the ; 
director. Other sections of the food i 
preparation and storage layout in- 1 
elude air-condtioned meat, milk ; 
and vegetable storage rooms, a • 
general store room with a $5,000 , 
inventory, a bake shop, chef's de- 
partment, and salad and desert de- 
partments. 

Serving as an example of the 
Prillaman "up-to-date" policy is : 
the new combination toaster and 
sandwich freshener of the Pine \ 
Room which has been on the mar- 
ket only 60 days. Future plans for 
up-to-datedness include the instal- 
lation of a conveyer system lead- 
ing from each of the dining rooms 
to the dishwashing section in the] 
basement of the hall. Such a sys- j 
tem is estimated to cost $55,000. | 



cflnpus 

SEEN I 


Three coedv xtrolliyig through 
the rain, singing love songs to 
providv music- for t}iosv trho do 
not carry portables to the arhorr- 
turn. 

* ♦ « 

Political Science professor 
stating that Eisenhower and 
Kefauver will get most of the 
labor vote in the November elec- 
tion. 

Injured Girl 
Wins Radio 

By WOODY SEARS 

People are always happy when 
they win something, especially 
when it comes as a complete sur- 
prise. 

No one could have been more 
happy than Miss Mary Ruckcr 
when she was called Friday al- 
ternocn and informed that she 
had won one of the new all- 
transitor radios offered by radio 
station WCHI.. 

Ed Myers, the disk-jockey on 
the "Dig These" show, who 
called Miss Pucker said, "I 
don't know who was the more 
excited, Miss Rucker or me. It's 
really wonderful. If we ran the 
show like one of the "heart- 
line' type we couldn't have pick 
ed a more deserving person to 
give the radio to. It wa.s a real 
thrill to pull that ticket with 
th" Memoral Hospital address." 
INJURY 

Miss Rucker, a member of Chi 
Omepa sorority here, was in- 
jured in an automobile accident 
last April 28. and has been in 
and out of Memorial Hospital 
since then. She is here now for 
a new cast and physical therapy 
treatment. 

"I'm so excited I can hardlv 
stand it," Miss Rucker said. "I 
bet my pulse was goin? 200 
miles an hour." When the phone 
rang .Miss Rucker was working 
on a stole she is crocheting 
"for a member of the family," 
and talking to .several visitors. 

"Gosh." she said after the first 
rush - of excitement was over. 
"I've n'.'vcr won anything before. 
I never dreamed I'd win it. One 
of my f'-iends brought me a 
copy of The Daily Tar Heel and 
I paw the contest blank and sent 
it in. Golly, I nevei' thought I'd 
win." 


Di To Air 
Opinions 
Of Nixon 


Controversial Vice President 
Richard Nixon will be the topic 
of discussion at the regular Tues- 
day night meeting of the Dialectic 
Senate, acocrding to President Pro- 
tem Pat Adams. 

The bill will commend Nixon 
^ "for his excellent service to the 
nation." 

j The proponents of the bill will 

' probably cite Nixon's "good will " 
missions abroad and his strong 
civil rights stand as an indication 

! of his service. Opponents are ex 
pected to counter with attacks up- 
on his campaign fund and his 

I honorary membership in the Nat- 
ional Assn. for the Advancement 
of Colored People. 

The meeting will be held at 8 
p.m, on the third floor of New 
West. Visitors are welcome, ac- 
cording to President Pro-Tern 
Adams. 


New Y Club 
■ Plans Events 
i for Grads 

I By ANN DRAKE j 

^ The Graduate Student Fellow- 
j ship, a new organization sponsored 
by the YMCA-YWCA, is making 
pl|ins to sponsor formal and in- 
formal programs and social, even^ , 
I iW graduate and professional stu-' 

denLs. 
I The first meeting will be a cof- 
I fee hour Sunday, Oct. 7. in Gra- 
ham Memorial. In addition to grad- 
uate and professional students, 
i nurses, dieticians, teachers and 
I other college graduates employed 
I in Chapel Hill have been urged 
! to attend. Further details about 
' this meeting will be announced 
I later. 

1 Although there are 1,060 graduate 
and professional students enroll- 
ed at UNC, there is little planned 
social activity for them, accord- 


PROTEST 

Several days ago a protest was 
raised by Tau Epsilon Phi frater 
nity on Rosemary St., where all 
parking has been banned. Pi Beta 
Phi Sorority also complained al- 
though planning no formal protest. 

The Board of Aldermen first 
placed a no-parking ban on one 
block of Rosemary as an experi- 
ment. Recently the ban was ex- 
tended to cover the whole street. 

Alexander said the restrictions 
wer(> not the' result of "hasty ac- 
tion" but had been in the making 
for some time." 
TRAFFIC EXPERT 

The town hired a traffic expert, 
Mr. Babcock. to deal with "the ter- 
rific traffic problem here, " said 
Alexander. 

Babcock studied the town's traf- 


homa offense clicked with almost to the wire with the Terps of Mary- 
effortless precision. The Sooners land winning, 6-0. 
racked up three touchdowns in Tennessee beat Auburn, 35-7, in- 
the closing minutes of the first dicating they will be mighty tough 
half to take a commanding lead, when the Tar Heels go to Knox- 
then added the remaining 15 ville Nov. 3. 
points in the last period. Powerful Duke, which will be 

Deepest Tar Heel penetration of here Nov. 24. had a field day in 
the day came in the third quarter trouncing Virginia. 40-7. Carolina 
when they drove to the Sooner also meets Virginia, in* Charlottes- 
six-yard line before being stopped. \ ville Nov. 10. 
The drive covered 34 yards and \ ~ ~ 
consumed 11 plays from the Okla- 
homa 40. 

Longest gain of the thrust was 


The Tar Heels did a good >ob 
of holding their more powerful 
opponents in check for" 24 minutes 
by fullback Giles Gaca, who car- of the first half. At this point, how- 
ried from the 30 down to the 17. ever, the dam broke and the 


From the 17, quarterback Curt 
Hathaway drove to the 12. Half- 
back Ed Sutton picked up four 
down to the 8. and here the 
push stalled with the Sooners tak 
ing over on the six three plays 
later. 

The Tar Heel's longest play came 
late in the fourth period when UNC 


ing to Bob Rennick. Spokesman for „„h.a St. instead of the two-hour 
the group. The Graduate Student 
Fellowship will be an opportunity 
for graduate students to meet oth- 
er department students and to 


fie problems a ydbr, then submit- third-string quarterback Ron Mar- 
ted a thoroughfare plan which the 
Board adopted. The plan was 
thought to be the best for the fu- 
ture of the community as a whole. 
.Mexandcr said. 

He stated Babcock originally pro- 
posed a one-hour restriction on Co- 


ban now in effect. 

The blame could not be placed 
on anyone, he said. "The planning 
ten years ago was obviously neg- 
learn of other walks of life, fields Ugent in not preparing for the 
of interest, and customs of for- tremendous influx of cars h(*re." 


quette flipped a 49-yard pass to 
halfback Moe DeCant s. on the 
Sooner 46. The Tar Heels couldn't 
move from there, however. 

The game's sad tale is clearly 
shown by the statistics Oklahoma, 
sporting at least a dozen hard-run- 
ning bs- ks, rushed for 369 yards 
to Carolina's 93, and gained 61 
yards through the air compared 
to 47 for the Tar Heels . The 
Sooners also had 20 first downs 
to five for Carolina. 


Sconer touchdowns came thick and 

fast, three of thctn in a little over 

five minutes, to be exact. 
The first Oklahoma score came 

with 6:29 remaining in the second 
period on a tricky lateral play 
from halfback Dave Baker to 
quarterback Jay O'Neal. The Soon- 
ers started their drive on their 
own 48yard lin«. and moved 52 
yards in only 7 plays. The payoff 
punch came from the Carolina 17- 
yard line when Baker flipped a 
desperate lateral to O'Neal as he 
was being tackled. The Sooner 
s:)ph gnthered in the pigskin and 
rambled across the goal unmolest- 
ed. 

In four minutes, the Sooners had 
their second marker. After a 78- 
yard quick kick by Sooner full- 
back Billy Pricer had put the Tar 
(See SOONEiRS. Page 4) 


SP To Fill 
3 Vacancies 
On Monday 

The Student Party will hold an 
election tomorrow night at its 
weekly meeting to fill three va- 
cancies in Student Legislature 
seats, according ).o party Chair 
man Tom Lambeth. 


The vacancies are in Dorm 
Mens' districts II, III and V. j 

Dorm Men's II consists of Alex- j 
ander, Connor and Winston dorm- 
itories; Dorm Men's III, Battle 
Vance-Pettigrew, Steele, Old East, 
Old West and Whitehead and 
Dorm Men's V, Stacy, Grimes, Ay- 
cock, Lewis and Everett. | 

The SP will also: 

1. Vote on an amendment to the | 
party bylaws calling for removal ! 
of the dues requirement. A fee of 
$1.50 is now required for mem- 
bership. 

2. Fill a vacant position on the 
party's Advisory Board. 

3. Hear some remarks by Chair- , 
man Lambeth. 1 


eign countries, he said. 

Tentative plans call for a series 
of programs geared to promote 
fellowship and discussion. These 
programs will include mixers, 
dances, square dances, and dance 
instruction if desired. A weekly 
friendship hour with refreshments, 
stimulating conversation and good 
music is planned. 

The group hopes to incorporate ' 
"faculty firesides," meetings in 
the professors's homes when stu- 
dents have a chance to know their 
professors "as human beings," is 
their program. According Rennick, 
this idea has proved very popular 
:;t the University of Wisconsin and 
other campuses. 


Members of the Board, in addi- 
tion to Alexander , are Obie Davis, 
g^s station proprietor; Dr. Paul j 
Wager, UNC political science pro- 1 
fessor; Gene Strowd. local mer- 1 
chant; Kenneth Putnam, insurance 
man and Hubert Roberson, Negro 
who works on the Morehead Plan- 
etarium staff. 


Frat Rushing Starts 


Today marks the start of a some- 
what hectic week for most fresh 
men and unpledged upperclass- 
men. 

The first fraternity rush parties 


New Personnel Advisor 
To Women Announced 


Mrs. Richard V. Neill, a Univer- 
sity graduate from Richmond, Va., 


Also the group hones i■^ sponsor has taken over the duties of per 


programs with Duke and N. C. ; sonr.jl adviser to women at U.NC. 
St.ite graduate students. 

Some of the graduate students 
feel there is a definite need for 
a more extensive orientation pro- 
gram, to inform them about the 
history and traditions of UNC and 
to let them know what is exp<!cted 
r{ them as students here. Thev 


Dr. Katherine Carmichael, dean 
of women, yesterday announced 
the selection of Mrs. Neill to suc- 
ceed Mrs. John Rendleman, who 
has movad to Greensboro. 

Mrs. Neill, whose husband is a 
first-year law student, is the form- 


hone to encourage a program for '-''" Ann Mason Chapin of Rich- 
next year that will contain more in- 
formation on the University in- 
cluding such routine matters as 
how to register for classes. 

Anvone interested in planning 
"ith this group may contact Bob 
R^nn'^V of th*» Sociolopv D»^rtt. or 
Miss Eleanor Riggins at the YWCA. 


mond, Va. Her duties will include 
working with the Women's Resi- 
dence Council and other student 
r.roan'-'alions. She will also hold 
regularly scheduled interviews with 
;ne women students. 

While an undergraduate at the 
UniveiMty, Mrs. iVcui wa» a intiii- 
ber of the Valkyries, highest honor- 
ary group for women; the Student 
Council; Graham Memorial Board 
of Directors; and the Splash Club. 



' are set for 2:30 to 5:30 this after- 
noon. 

Asst. to the Dean of Student 
Affairs Ray Jefferies had this bit 
of advice for rushees: "Just be 
yourself." 

"Fraternity rushing can be very 
enjoyable for both parties if the 
the rushee goes into it with the 
idea of meeting friends, rather 
than trying to impress everyone. 
It can be a terrible drudgery if 
you "put on an act.* The people 
you meet will be your friends for 
four years, even if you don't join a 
fraternity," Jeffries said. 

Parties ne.xt week are scheduled 
for Monday. 7 to 10 p.m.; Tuesday, 
7 to 9:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 7 to 
9:30 p.m.; and Thursday, 7 to 9:330 
p.m. 

Friday is set as shake-up day, 
and strict silence will be observed 
from 9 p m. that day until the 
following -Monday at noon. The af- 
ternoon of Monday, Oct. 8, will be 
pledge day. 

After accepting their initial bids, 
men mav visit fraternities of their 
preference. 


STUDENT WIVES CLUB 

The Student Wives Club will 
hold its first meeting this fall 
on Tiie.sday at 8 p.m. at the Victory She was also vice president of the 
Villa.ge Nursery, according to Sec- campus YMCA and rush chairman 
retarv Pat Howard. All Student , of Delta Delta Delta social sorority. 
Wives have been invited to attend. 1 After completing her A. B. de 


MRS. MASE NEILL 

. . . official nltf/ointnu'Jif 

gree in sociology in 1954, she work- 
ed for a Richmond insurance ad- 
justing firm, and later at Fort Gor- 
don, Ga., where her husband was 
stationed with the U. S. Army. 


Yack Pix 

Seniors who have not had their 
pictures made may do so tomorrow 
through Wednesday, at a cost of 
SI per student. 

Pictures will be mad«^ in «*ie 
basement of Graham Memoral 
from 1 to 6:30 p m. 


PAGE TWO 


THi DAILY TAR HBSL 


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1956 


The Week In Review: Oklahoma Wins, 
UN To Talk Suez And Flossy Passes 



Discussions and Sorority Rush The StotG' 
Go On In Spite Of Wet Weather _ . ' , 

Clanijjus iutivitifs "ot oil u> a Imsv start last week in V*f ffflC A^K l%J 

spite o\ the rain aiitl mist wliiili < loiuiecl the tainpus the 
tirst tew days. 

At Thursday iiij;ht'> ineetiiv^ of tlie Student Legislature 
a bill uas sponsored pro\idin<>; for a student (oinniittee lor 
better sthedulini; ol laiiipus events. 

Ihe l.eoislatme meetins; was marked by poor attend- 
anee (hie to sorority rush and two speakers present on tite 
campus. 

Speaking that evening were Holhngion K. fong.' C'hi- 
neie ambassador to the I'nited States, in Hill Hall: and Hell 
I. Wilev, professor o[ hisiovr at l.morv rnivcrsii\. iti (iar- 
rol Mali. 

Kong spoke on the ■(^(jnununist Advance in Asia." In 
his speech he charged that the Communist uses such words 
as "peace"' as "'a weapon to secme an emotional an<l un- 
reasoning effect from his hearers. ' 

.\fter the* lecture there was 
a reception in the lounge of 
Ciraham Memorial in honor 
(j| Amba>.«>ador Kong. 

W'ilev's subjei t \\as the c om- 
mon s(ndier in the Civil War. 
Speaking ol the aspects of the 
war other than the faiiYous 
men and great fjaitles. he (ited 
samples from the letters of 
diaries of "johnnv Reb ' and 
• liillv Yank." 

liiggest e\ent of llie week 
for the coeds was soroiitv rush. 
The rush period started Fri- 
day a week ago with a Pan- 
AMBASSADOR KONG hellenic Tea in the niam 

...u-amings of Red double talk lounge of (iraham .Memorial. 
Last .Monday and Tuesday the girl gieeks held open 
house for the rushees. After a f:)reak in rush partie<i and 
open houses Fi iday night the weeding process resumed with 
each liouse holding four forty-fi\e parties yesterday alier- 
noon. y 

I^'jst Tuesday, the two oldest debating societies cm 
campus, the Dialectic Senate and the Philanthropic Societ\, 
held their first meetings of the fall semester. 

The Phi div iissed ".X Bill to Exclude Women From the 
I'niversity of North Carolina. " The bill was defeated by a 
vole of 2t)-S. 

In the Di. tlie currently vital issue of the Sue/ Canal 
"ivas debated. Four L;^y!/ijan students spoke at the invitati(m 
of the socic • . I -c four ;.'.l s^.oke in favor of Nasser and the 
Egvptia' At. nment. 

^- •- -l.tht- vote was taken, the bill calling for continued 
in:c!i:.:ional holding of the canal by peaceful methods it 
po«^sib!e l)ut by force if necessary Avas defeated 2i-:?. 

Dr. Alexander Heard was appointed C>>ivstdtant to the 
Senate Subcommittee on Privileges and Flections by Sena- 
tor Albert (.oie last week. Heard is the director of the re- 
seaich project "Money in Politics" now being carried on 
at the Institiue for Research in Stxia'! Science here at Car- 
olina. 

Ihe VMCA-Sponsored Freshman Fellowship met V\\- 
day night to make future plans and hear the president ot 
the Inter-lrateniiiv C'oinuil and the president of Crimes 
Dormitorv discuss the relative merits oi fraternity and non- 
Iraternity. 

Last iiii^ht two busloads and se\eral carl«)ads of stu- 
dents traveled to Danxille. \irginia h>r a dame at Averett 
>Vomcn".s C.ollege. 

.\ctinsf President of die Consolidated I'niversity Will- 
iam C. Frida\ had no comment concerning the permament 
presidencv ol the Lnixersiiv Wednesday. 

Fi iday said coimiiittees which have been set up to select 
new chancellors lor Women's College and the arm of the 
Consolidated I'niversity here ha\e already had several meet- 
ings, (ihancellor Robert B. House is due to retire this sum- 
mer and the post at WC was left \acant when Fdward K. 
Craham resigned last Spring. 

Last spring Frich y ad\ised the Board of I rustees that 
the Consolidated I'nixersity was losing main faculty mem- 
bers. mainK because ol salary. Wednesday he revealed that 
in thf l.ist i.S months the three divisions of the Consoli- 
dated I'niversitv has lost over 2oo lac iiltv members. 

.As of Frida-v a week ago the enrollment at Ciarolina 
stcMKi at <>.t>(H). -Although a lew students are still housed in 
C6bb basement, the housing oflice reports that as soon as 
vaianc ies become a\ailable in the dorms students are moved 
iino the rooms. 

Fraterniiv invitations went out to students last week 
in preprration for the rush parties which start this afternoon. 
Approximatefv lo.ooo bids ha\e been sent out to i..'>oo in- 
dividuals, reported .\ssistaiu to the Dean ot Student .Vffairs 
Ray Jefferies. 


A Storm Rages In Washington 
And The Campaigns Continue 


Industries 

Up to six inches of rain tell in 
variou.s parts of North Carolina 
last week when a faltering Hur- 
rican Flossy revived long enough 
to bring moisture . to drought- 
stricken areas in many parts of 
♦the state. 

The North Carolina Research 
Triangle Committee, Inc., was 
formed in Raleigh last week un- 
der the leadership of Go\-. Luth- 
er Hodges. The committee is de- 
signed to encourage industrie.s to 
locate research laboratories in the 
vicinity of the researcn facilities 
of the University, Duke, and 
State College. ^ 

The six convicts who escaped 
from the Burnsville prison farm 
Monday were back in captivity 
Thursday after the last two were 
captured in a stolen car near Big 
Stone Gap. Va. 'Earlier in the day 
three others were rounded up. 
One surrendered Tuesday night. 

Crime in North Carolina in- 
creased during the last six-month 
period over the same period last 
year, the FBI disclosed last 
week. 

Crime in four catagories, mur- 
der and non-neglii?en< manslaugh- 
ter, aggravated assault, burglary, 
breaking and entering, larceny 
and theft and auto theft, increas- 
ed in North Carolina during the 
first six months of 1956. and 
decreased in only one — robbery, 
said the FBI report. 


A soggy lady named Flossy 
struck the Southern seaboard last 
week. The hurricane lashed out 
of the upper Gulf of Mexico into 
northwest Florida with, winds of 
100 miles an hour, and swept 
across the southern states into 
the Atlantic where the winds sub- 
sided. Then, reduced to a tropi- 
cal storm, Flossy headed across 
the northeastern states, leaving 
23 persons dead in her wake. 

Elsewhere ih the nation there 
were storms of another sort as 
the NAACP attempted to bring 
pressure on the special House 
Subcommittee investigating inte- 
gration in Washington. D. C^The 
investigators were told by a 
Washington health official that 
one fourth of the Negro child- 
ren attending public schools in 
the District of Columbia were 
born out of wedlock. 

The majority of witnescs ha"c 
said that Washington should not 
be held up as an example and 
that more time should have been 
required before integration was 
adopted by the Washington .school 
system. 

Elsewhore in the United States, 
the presicjential contestants con- 
tinued their campaigning. Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, speaking at 
Bradley University last week, at- 
tacked the farm program of \dlai 
Stevenson as "mockery and de- 
ceit." The Pi-esident pledged con- 
tinuance of the flexible price-sup- 
port program and offered hope 
for a brighter future for farmers 
than they have had in years. 

Meanwhile Stevenson reaffirm- 
ed his support of the Supreme 
Court decision outlawing segre- 

INTERPETING THE NEWS 


gated public schools in Little 
Rock, Ark. Eisenhower's foreign 
policy in the Middle East was ac- 
cused of being completely off the 
track — morally, poltically and 
economically by the Democratic 
candidate. 

In the United Nations, the Se- 
curity Council decided to debate 
the British-P'rench complain I 
against Egypt's nationalization ol 
the Suez Canal Company, and the 
Egyptian counter-complaint accu.s- 
ing Britain atld France of action.-^ 
threatening international peace 
and security and of violatng the 
UN Charter. 

In Cairo, the Egypt Suez Canal 
Authority was informally notified 
by the United States that Soviet 
pilots will not be taken aboard 
its warhips going through the 
waterway. 

The first of the five American 
Sea Captain reported to the Suez 
Canal Authority headquarters 
Wednesday and were jubilantly 
met by the Egyptians. The pilots 
accepted the jobs after having 
been warned by the State Depart- 
ment that they could lose their 
citizenship for working for a 
foreign government under certain 
conditions. 

Babe Didrickson Zaharias. one 
of the greatest sportswomen that 
this country has ever produced, 
died of cancer at Sealey Hospital 
in Galveston, Texas Thursday 
morning after a three year battle 
with the dreaded disease. 



MINISTERIAL MATERIAL 


Suez Users' Association Proves 
Weakness Can Be Strength 


Hard Work Has Marked Road 
To Presidency For Bob Young 


Thj official student publication of the Publications Board of the 
University of North Carolina, where it is published daily except Mon- 
day and examination and vacation periods and summer terms. Entered 
as second cla.'.s matter in the post office at Chapel Hill, N. C. under 
the act of .March 8. 1370. Subscription rates: Mailed, $4 a year, S2.50 
per semester; delivered, $6 a year, $3.50 a semester. 


Editor 


FRED POWLEDGE 


Managing Editor 


CHARUE JOHNSON 


News Editor 


RAY LINKER 


Business Manager _ _ BILL BOB PEEL 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL WEEK IN REVIEW 

Editor CHARLIE SLOAN 

Staff Wrrters GEORGE PFINGST and INGRID CLAY 


Joseph C. Harsch 

/»i T}>e Ctiristifin Sciey^ce Monitcr 

WASHINGTON—By one set of 
standards the second meeting of 
Suez Cannel users was an abys- 
mal failure. 

It was not able to perfect an 
agreement to put effective pres- 
sure upon Eg>pt. In fact, it went 
so far the other way that France 
was farely induced to have any- 
thing to do with the watered- 
down version of a users' associa- 
tion which emerged and the Brit- 
ish Government was left with 
the embarra.ssing problem of what 
to do with all the troops it had 
once so militantly moved to the 
eastern Mediterranean. 
• • • 

But it should be noted that on 
the day after the meeting broke 
up. Prime Minister Nehru of In- 
dia spoke of Egypt's behavior 
over the Suez affair more cri- 
tically than he had allowed him- 
self to speak during the period 
when there appeared to be a pos- 
siblity that the countries of West- 
ern Europe might employ force 
against Egypt. 

Also. Mr. Nehru did this just 
before leaving for Saudi Arabia 
for a talk with officials of a 
country which has racial and re- 
ligious ties with Eigypt but a very 
large interest in the market for 
its oil in Western Europe. 

The main thing that happened 
at the second London conference 
was not, it seems to me the achi- 
evement of the users' association, 
but the final dispelling of any 
idea that Britain and France 
would resort to arms as a means 
of obtaining what they want at 
Suez, or even resort to the weap- 
on of full-scale economic boycott. 

This idea was not easy to dis- 
pel. Mr. Dulles had to go to the 
unusu'il extent of declaring that 
his country would never ""shoot 
its way through the canal." and 
also to make it very clear public- 
ly, that despite earlier, appear- 
ances, he did not regard the 
users' association as an instru- 
ment for putting pressure on 
Egypt, but as a base for future 
negotiation. 

But by these moves Mr. Dulles 
did finally succeed in drawing 
from the Western position the 
idea of using force, either the 
military variety or all out econom- 


ic boycott. 

This is a basic change. It pro- 
vides a clear line of division be- 
tween what can be accurately 
called the ""Suez crises" and the 
sequel to the crisis which now 
lies ahead. 

During the "crisis" the exist- 
ence of the po.ssibility of the use 
of Western European force 
against a .Middle Eastern countrv 
was having the inevitable effect 
of giving President Nasser of 
Egypt allies. He was rapidly be- 
coming not only a hero but "the 
hero" of the Arab and Moslem 
worlds. The range was even wid- 
er. India is largerly Hindu, not 
Moslem. But India had another 
kind of tic with Egypt. They are 
both former members of the Brit- 
ish Elmpire. And the Soviet Em 
pire. And the Soviet Union loves 
to pose as the champion of form 
er colonies of Western countries. 

The period of the real "crisis " 
was the period in which Colonel 
Nasser could, and did. represent 
himself as the potential victim 
of what he called "collective col- 
onialism." You could see and feci 
the Arab-.Moslem world drawing 
around him. with India forced to 
be .sympathetic and Moscow look- 
ing on benignly. We will, I think, 
come to see that President Nasser 
was the principal beneficiary of 
the threat of force. 

During 'hat "crisis" period it 
was impossible for many of the 
countries involved to recognize 
that they had any interests in 
common with those countries 
which were thinking and talking 
of using force. 

But now that the threat of 
force is rcmovad, the other in- 
terests can begin to operate. In- 
dia for example, depends heavily 
on shipping through Suez for the 
supplies it wants for its five-year 
plan. 

Iran and Saudi .\raba are set- 
tng on top of vast pools of mar- 
ketable nil which they wish to 
market in Western Europe. Ethio- 
pia obtains almost all of every- 
thing it imports through the 
cannel. .Japan's economy would 
be injured* by the extra costs of 
sl5ipping around the Cape of 
Good Hope rather than through 
Suez. 

• • • 

As long as President Nasser 
could present himself in the 


guise of a prospective victim of 
Western force, he could compel 
the support of a large portion of 
the world. But when he is de- 
prived of that threat, when he 
no longer is being coerced, when 
he can only tilt against so ob- 
viously harmless a windmill as 
the users" asociation. ho faces a 
far greater threat to himself. • 

He is threatened now with is- 
olation. There is less excuse now 
for Moscow to go to his rescue — 
there being no danger to rescue 
him from. .Mr. Nehru can afford 
to question the propriety of Col-, 
onel Na.ssers behavior. The Arab 
countries with oil to vsell can be- 
gin to worry about their markets. 

There can be strength in weak- 
ness. The users' association is so 
weak and harmless that it has se- 
parated Colonel Nasser fronj his 
martyrs crowli. Without that 
crown he soon could find him- 
self in most uncomfortable iso- 
lation from his allies of the 
""crisis period." 


George Pfingst 

Most students at the University are familiar 
with Bob Young, president of the Student Govern- 
ment. The majority of upperclassmen will remem- 
ber voting for him in the elections last spring. 
The freshmen, should be able to recall the speech 
on the structure of our student government which 
he made to thenTduring orientation week. 

Bob is one of a family of eleven children. He 
arrived at the University as a freshman in 1953. 
Since his arrival, via. the Andrew 
Burshak Scholarship, Young has 
been very active in politics as 
well as numerious other activities 
on and off campus. 

During his freshman year ^ 
Carolina. Young was a member 
of the student legislature. He went 
on to become the president of his 
cla;-»s the following year, and was 
initiated into the Order of the 
Holy Grail the same year. While 
he was a junior. Bob served as 
president of the Graham Memor- 
ial .\ctivities Board and became ^ 
member of The Order of the 
Fleece. Meanwhile, he continued 
being active both in the VMCA and the Methodist 
church here in Chapel Hill. 



YOUNG 


Mr. Young sits behind his desk in Graham 
Memorial six davs a week, when not in clas.ses, ful- 


filling the respcm;ibilities of his office. Such prob- 
lems as the campus traffic situation, class attend- 
ance problems and consequent disciplinary action 
come before him. 

Nothing but praises echo through the halls of 
GM for Bob. One of the janitors took time out from 
dusting the tables in the Rendevous Room, to re- 
mark. "You want to know something about Bob 
Young? He's the nicest guy on campus. He's the 
kind that tries to do something for everybody. He's 
the most honest guy on campus." 

As if that weren't enough, his secretary ex- 
pressed her amazement at the amount of woric 
that has been accomplished since Bob has taken 
over the job. There is still quite a bit to be done, 
but she feels confident that he can handle the 
task. 

Young is^ extremely modest about his success 
here on campus. He attributes it to the efforts of 
friends and the student body, seemingly unaware of 
his power to attract people and inspire trust and 
confidence in them. 

Young's reaction to Chapel Hill is, ""It means 
more tj me than any place but home. This is a 
place that can't be replaced. It is a place where 
Tve made friends' who will always have a deep 
meaning ^or me". 

From the response that he obviously receives 
from the student body, and the capability and ef- 
ficiency he has displayed, looks as if it will take a 
mighty big man to fill Bob Young's shoes when he 
leaves Carolina in June for divinity school. 


Pogo 


By Walt Kelly 



HOW CAN you so OH l<( 

If \^ re ^M4JP!f"' ID ^HAgg 
WHAT Or^ifl'i HAVi"'rO &XAW 

r^'uvi"' -ro i!^AN— to /i^or- 

9l?CWMCi ID «CHgM0'-'ANp 

No.v YOu'P Bt UHrnu^r 




Li'i Abner 


By Al Capp 



SUNI 


GM 
Less 

Dar 
fered | 
dents 
orial 

.Mrs 
Sludi^ 
hallrd 
night 
Room! 


I 


205 


30, 19S« 


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 19S« 


THE DA4LY TAR HEEL 


GM Offers Free Dance j ON THE SOCIAL SCENE; 


PAGE THREf 



Lessons This Year 

Dancing lessons are being of- 
fered free again this year to stu- 
dents as part of the Graham Mem- 
orial Activities Board program. 

Mrs. V. L. Bounds of the Bounds 
Studio of Dance here will start the 
ballroom dancing class Tuesday 
night at 6:30 in the Rendezvous! 
Room of Graham Memorial. i 


Air Society. 
Holds Firy' 


Parties, PInnings And 

Marriages; AH Hit UNC '^^eefrngWere 


By PEG HUMPHREY 
And JOAN MOORE 

A Hurricane Party was the high 
light of the Sigma Nu social calen 



Brand New, and 
Pretty as a Possum! 

^ The, 

POGO 
PARTY 

GRAB A BUCK 
and Run to 

The Intimate 
Bookshop 


205 E. Franklin St. 


Open Till 10 P.M. 


Such prob- 
tiass attend- 
In ary action 

the halls of 
le out from 

foom. to re- 
about Bob 
s. He"s the 

Kbody. He's 


k' ret ary ex- 
it of work 
has taken 

I to be done, 
handle the 


his success 
|c efforts of 

unaware of 
|e trust and 

•It means 

This is a 

)lace where 

JVC a deep 

iy receives 
flity and ef- 

will take a 
>es when he 
:hool. 


They're smart on campus 


lelly 



They score in sports . . * 



dar last week. It was planned at 
lunch time Wednesday, when they 
heard Flossy was on her way, and 
given that afternoon. 

The Sigma Nus started having 

hurricane parties this summer 

when a number of them were at 

j the beach and encountered fre- 

I quent stormy weather. Last Satur- 

I day they had a party at Honig's 

Cabin with Phil Lathams combo 

providing music. 

Chi Psi's entertained their en- 
trants in the Yack Beauty Contest 
with a dinner at the Lodge last 
night. They are planning a house- 
party for the latter part of October 
which will carry the theme of the 
"Ri)aring 20's." 

John Gorman, Chi Psi from Win- 
terville is pinned to WC student! 
Betty Anne Roper of Hickory. Chi 
l^si Don Hall. Chapel Hill, is en- 
gaged to Iowa eoed Peggj- Thomas. 
Iowa City. 

PINNINGS I 

ATO Pete Kelley is pinned to | 
Pi Phi Happy Watson. The ATOs 
gave a party at the Saddle Club i 
Saturday and will entertain the ; 
Kappa Deltas Monday night after j 
rush parties. I 

The Sig Eps engaged the Star- 
dusters for their party at Lloyd's 
Barn last Saturday. On Oct. 18. 
j they are giving a ShipuTeck Party 
j for the KD's SPE Bill Self, Shelby, \ 
married Barbara Hedberg, former- \ 
I ly of Charlotte, this summer. Vi*' 
i Paderick. SPE from Kinston. mar- 
1 ried Nancy Lewis, High Point. 
I ADPi engagements include that 
I Of Shirley Williams to Bob Schrod- 
[ er, Duke Delta Tau Delta, Pat 
'• Howard. High Point to Phi Gam 
Erie Haste. Edenton. and Sue Ow- 
! en, Sharleston, S. C. Dick Arm- 
' strong Chi Phi. Mary Miller Her- 
man, Statesville. is pinned to Jim 
Cole, KA from Statesville. 
Student members of the Campus 
, Cooperative Society now living in 
I the former DU house are holding 
' open house for members of the 
advisory board and other guests 
thisf afternoon. 
; WEDDINGS 

Phi Kappa Sigs Dick Hart, Win- 
ston, married Jean Schinn. Leaks- 
[ ville. last spring. Another Phi Kap 
I marriage was that of Bob Nichols, 
Durham, to Harriet Watson. 
iJohn Dickson, P i k a f r o nj 
I Wrightsville Beach, is pinned to 
' Donna Hosteller. Tri Delta from 
j Florida. Pika Roy Mann. Elizabeth 
City, is engaged to Frances Par- 
ham. Oxford. Wiley Fisher, Rocky 
Mount, is pinned to Marg Proctor. 
Rockj' Mount. Skip Knox. Pitts- 
burgh, is engaged toBetty Ivey, 
Rocky Mount. 

The Lambda Chis are givng a 

black and white tacky party for 

I the Kappa Deltas on Oct. 8. Jeep 

1 Myatt, m Gam from High Point 

j has given his pin t© Betsy Bab- 

cock, Duke coed. 

Harr>- Steele, KA from North 

Wilkesboro, has pinned Shirley 

Culler, Salisbury, and Barbara 

I West, ADPi from Jacksonville, i» 

{ pinned to Pat McCormick KA from 

i Rutherford. 

The KAs plan a pre-rush party 
' with a combo at Smith's Lake to- 
I night. SAE Pete Williams is en- 
i gaged to Dutchy Milligan, and SAE 
Snyder Garrison is engaged to 
I Nancy Shuford. 

I Alderman is planning a dorm 
j dance for Oct. 19. Chi Phi Clyde 
I Mears married Frances Timber- 
I lake, and Jim Smth married Midge 
I McMann. 


WtTHO<A PEL HILl CHURCHES: 


Religious Activities In 2nd Week 


They rate on a date ... 


M Capp 



j UNC Reading Course 

I Applications Begin 

j students interested in taking the 
j Testing Service's reading course 
i should apply at 108 Peabody to- 
j morrow through Friday of this 
j week, according to Paul Irvine Jr., 
1 Of the Testing Service. 
i Applications will be received 
I only from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
j on those days. Applying takes only 
30 minutes, Irvine sad. 


CLASSIFIEDS 


»• •!»»««**»*»»= •'K***''**''**'**''*^*''? 

I®' 


They're \ REDS' 

...they're great I 


United Stales Rwbbei 



FOR SALE — 1950 CHEVROLET 
convertable, topnotch condition, 
new top, dll extras (Powerglide, 
radio, heater, white walls). See 
C. S. Jones, Wilson Hall, 2-5 
daily. 


BLACKBURN'S MARKET 
(across from ice plant). Open 7 
days a week, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Fresh fruit and vegetables. Also 
beer. 


STUDENTS EXPERIENCED ON 
Linotype or open presses may 
obtait) part time work at Colon- 
ial Prea's. Phone 333-6. 


SUNDAY NEW YORK TBIES DE- 
livered to your door. For further 
information call 8-0572 or 8-^368 
after S p.m. 3.-5833-5 


' Members of the Arnold Air So- 
ciety held their first meeting of 
the school year last we^. 

The AAS is an honorary society 
composed of outstanding senior 
AFROTC cadets. Commander of 
Jthe society for the "SO-'S? school 
year is James M. Howey. 

Organization of a brother soci- 
ety, the Sabre Air Command, an 
honorary society for basic AFROTC 
cadets, was officially completed 
and made autonomous. SAC was 
established during the *56 spring 
semester but was not officially in- 
dependent. 

Plans were discussed for various 
field trips during the year. Com- 
mander Howey will attend the area 
conclave held this year at Penn 
State on Oct. 5th. 6th. and 7th. 

'Operation Buildup." a program 
designed to promote interest in the 
Air Force, was further planned. 
A.\S members had appeared be- 
fore freshmen during orientation 
to talk Air Force. On University 
Day at leading high schools, when 
universitj* officials will be on hand 
to talk UNC, AAS members will be 
on hand to talk AF. 

The society this year has 20 
members. Other officers are: 

Don Strictland, deputy command- 
er; Al Mojse. operations officer; 
Jose Stuntz, recorder; and Joe 
Murray, comptroller. 


Student church activities here in 
<- hapel Hill are now iri their second 
week. 

THE CATHOLIC CHURCH will 
hold regular services at 8 a.m... 
10 a.m. and 11:30 a. m. The New- 
man Club will meet in Gerrard 
Hall at 7 p.m. 

THE EPISCOPAL (CHAPEL OF 
THE CROSS) will have Holv Com- 
munion at 7:30 a.m.. family service 
at 9:15 a.m.. students Euchrist at 
9:30 a.m.. morning prayer at 11 
a.m. and evening prayer at 8 p.m. 

The Right Reverend Richard 
Henry Baker, D.D. will speak at the 
Canterbury Club Sunday night at 
the 6 p.m. dinner meeting. His top- 
ic will be The Christian Minis- 
try.' Pete Kelley. president of the 
Canterbury Club, has invited afl 
University students to attend. 

THE LUTHERAN CHURCH will 
hold a discussion group at 9:45 
a.m. The regular church service is 
scheduled for 11 a.m. The minister 
will opeak on "Law and Life". Stu- 
dents will meet at the church at 
5 p.m. for a picnic at Camp New 
Hope. « 


THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

i will conduct services at 9:45 a.m. 
I and 11 p.m. The minister's sermon 
I is entitled "Man's Response to 
! God's Gifts" ThI is one of a series 
' of sermons on the ten command- 

mandments. The Westminster Fel- 
■ lowship will assemble at 6 p.m. 

for a dinner meeting. Dr. Arnold 

Nash will address th Westminster 

Fellowship at 7 p.m. 

THE BAPTIST CHURCH will 

hold Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. 

and morning worship at 11 p.m. 

The rnorning sermon is entitled 

"Haunted By Goodness '. The Bap- 

i tist Student Union will meet at 6 

p.m. for a supper forum. "The Na- 

; ture and Content of Faith'" will be 

i discussed. Following, a short wor- 

I ship service will be conducted by 

I students. 

THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
I CHURCH will have Sunday morn- 
ing services at 11 a.m. at 11 a.m. 
j in the lecture room of Carroll Hall. 
I THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 
j will conduct church services at 11 
I a.m. in the Grail Room of Graham 
I Memorial. 


THE UNITED CONGREGATION- 
AL CHRISTIAN CHURCH will be 
gin Sunday school at 10 a.m. and 
church services at 11 a.m. The ser- 
mon is entitled "No One Needs To 
Stay The Way He Is!" A dinner 
meeting for students will be held 
at the pastor's home, 78 Hayes 
Road, at, 3 p.m. 

THE METHODIST CHURCH will 
conduct services at 9:45 a.m. and 
11 a..m. The Wesley Foundation 
will meet at 6 p.m. 

THE COMMUNITY • CHURCH 

will have a Sunday morning ser- 
vice at 11 a.m. in Hill Music Hall. 
Undergraduates having no denom- 
inational church preference or 
whose denomination has no (fhurch 
here are invited to have supper to- 
gether at 6 p m. in an upstairs 
room at Lenoir Hali. 

This meeting is planned for stu- 
dents concerned to find others with 
whom they may search and learn 
together, who can search and dif- 
fer, who can accept one another as 
they are and not expect everyone 


"I WON'T WEAR A THING 
BUTTOWNEAND KING!" 



THE TRUE AND IMMORTAL 

STORY OF INDIAN AGENT 

JOHN PHILIP CLUM! 


nyi HECTOR LIBERACHI. ptpstick eftai^. 

SNOWBANK, ALA., Sept. 10. 

Rated the fastest man oa a pogo nick 
»iiK« S»r Vitus. Hettor drcli^ tis_dld 
man's bam on his bouncing broomstick 
m 7.3 sec. n«t. a new reeortl. Hector's 
hobbies are taxidermy, fiddlin' and 
girls. When interviewed, he said 
modestly. "'Twarn'i nuthin*. I had a dry 
track!' Hector, a 7-color sweaterman. 
says Townella Sweater Shirts are bi« 
four season favorite. 

Townella Sweater Shirts; premium 
quality imported fibres. 6 California 
colors; S-M-L-XL- 10 95. Crew length 
SOX in matching colors; lOVi.i3_1.95. 

TowNE AND King. ltd. 

Coordinated Knitwear 
595 Brof.d»tiy. Rednood City. California i 



Science fUm 
To Be Shown 
Here Tuesday 

' 'Time and Eternity." one of the 
1 latest Moody Institute of Science 
I flms, will be presented by the UNC 
I chapter of the Inter- Varsity Chirst- 
j ian Fellowship on Tuesday. 
' This film employs many unusual 
' camera effects to assist the viewer 
in visualizing and understanding 
something of Einstein's theory of 
relativity. The spiritual significance 
I of time as related to human life 
i is p;e.sented in a penetrating man- 
I ner. according to members of the 
! Fellowship. 

I There will be no admission 
j charge for this film vVhich will he 
j shown in Gerrard Hall at 7 p.m. 

I to be that which he is not or can- 
not be. according to members. 

Students have been asked to go 
! through the cafeteria line at 5:45 
in order that the major part of the 
j hour may be spent in a general dis- 
; cu.ssion of religious problems. This 
' me-^ting is liberal and non-deuom- 
I inational. 

TO THE PUBLIC: This is the Broadway het play called 
'too sensational' for motion pictures. Warner Bros, 
believe that YOU should decide for yourself — that 
there is pure excitement in its daring love and its 
sheer terror and it will grip you as few motion pic- 
tures ever have. 





Cinemascope 

TECHNICOLOR 1 

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A hidden shame out in.the open -and t'he most 
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ANNE BANCROFT • PAT CROWLEY 

lu. CHARLES DRAKE • tobjmt rall • jay wvreKBSEUi 

Omttd b, jeSSE HIBBS ■ Soeenpuy'tiy GIL DOUD intf JACK SHER • f>ni«uc«i iw AARON R0SEN6E6G 

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MONDAY 




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ADULTS ONLY 


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MOrEITHUEWiLL 
BMEF 'CATCHYOUK 
INTERMISSION EACH 



WARNER BROS, present 

tfte 2-year'njr stage sensation with the prize-winring east of the p'ay ' 


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HOURS OF SHOWS: 12:30—2:41—4:52—7:03—9:14 
LATE SHOW TONIGHT PRICES THIS 

SUN.-MON.TUES. ATTRACTION: 

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PACE FOUP 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1956 


Cross Country Team Shaping Up 
For First Meet Here Next Friday 


By JIMMY HARPER 

The varsity cross country team 
held its first time trials of the 
season in a practice session Friday. 

Coach Dale Ranson said the re- 
sults were "fairly" good for this 
stage of the season. The first meet 
is scheduled for Friday. ' 

Ace harrier Jim Beatty, who re- 
turned recently from a trip to Fin- 
land, was among the first to finish 
but turned in no outstanding time, 
Coach Ranson pointed out, as he 
was serving as pace man for the 
squad. Beatty is in good shape, 
having run in competition all sum- 
mer. After completing thb regular 
course, he continued to run the 
freshman course as well. 

The entire squad is in good phy- 
sical shape with the exception of 
sophomore Wayne Bishop. Bishop 
injured a knee in practice recently 
and did not participate i^ the 
trials. 

Times for the trials, which cov- 
ered the 3.7 miles varsity course 
are as follows: 

Dave Scurlock, 22:00:5; Marion 
Griffin, 22:11; Everett, Whatley 
22:19; Jim Beatty, 22:19; 

John Reaves, 22:54; Perrin Hen- 
derson, 22:55; Ben Williams, 23: 
04; Alec Coffin. 23:10; Doug Hen- 
derson, 23:26; 

Walt Mills, 23:26; Howard Kahn, 
23:37; Jim Hunter, 23:38; Bailey 
Liipfert, 25:44; Nick Palmer. 25: 
44; and Bill Luesing, 25:53. 

The freshman squad also held 
time trials yesterday. Cpach Ran- 
son noted with disappointment that, 
••Only seven freshmen have report- 
ed for practice when we should 
have at least 50." 

The seven freshmen, in the order 
they finished, are: Coles Liipfert, 
Fick Arthur, Paul Washendorfer, 



Tar Heels Roll On 


Tar Heel cross country runners, ledt to right, Wayne 
Jim Beatty and Everett Whatley, go through their paces 
Fetzer Field track in a practice session. (Photo by Norman 


Bishop, 

on the 

Kantor.) 


Tullai's Footballers 


^'i*'. 


Top 3 Frosh Units 
Look Evenly Matched 


Coach Fred Tullai ran his squad ♦ 
of freshmen football playcrsi 
through a grueling two-hour scrim- [ 
mage Friday, the repercussions of j 
which will be heard around the I 


Sooners 


John Richardson, Ray Bagwell, Joe campus for the next four years. 


Friedberg Sirianni. 


There's • 
Fresh 
Treasure 
In The 
Old Book 
Corner! 
Come See- 

The Intimate 
^ Bookshop 

205 E. FRANKLIN ST. 
OPEN TILL 10 P.M. 


Thi-s group of talent is the nuc- 
leus around which Jim Tatum plans 
to mould a Carolina powerhouse. \ 

This was the "make or break" ^ 
session to determine the starting 
eleven for next Fridays opener 
with the Wake Forest frosh. No an- 

I nouncement w^s made of Tullai's 

1 choce of starters. 

i Coach Tullai was not available 
for comment but it was apparant 
that Utile distinction can be made 


(Contirmed from Page 1) 

Heels in a deep hole, quarterback 
Curt Hathaway booted out to the 
Carolina 37-yard line where the 
Sooners took over. Clendon Thom- ' 
as and Pricer alt«rnaled carrying 
the ball for four plays, and the 
Sooners had their second score. '\ 
Thomas tallied on & 12-yard burst I 
through the line. ' 

A little more than a minute lat- j 
er. the Sooners scored their third i 
and last TD before the half. The \ 
1 big break came when Thomas i 


between the first three teams ! intercepted an Ed Sutton pass on 


These units operated with almost 
equal effectiveness both on offense 
and defense. 

Individual performances were far 
overshadowed by the spirited tean; 
play. Noteworthy, however, were 
the booming punts off the toe ot 
quarterback John Cummmgs. 

End Fran Dobrowlski sustained 
a knee injury early in the session 
but the trainer who treated him 
said that barring complication:', 
Dobrowlski will be able to partici 
pate in heavy work next week. 


w 


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Of course. Most 
everyone does— often. 
Because a few moments 
over ice-coid Coca-Cola 
refresh you so. 

It's sparkling with natural goodness, pure and 
wholesome — and naturally friendly to your tigure. ' 
Feel like having a Coke.-* 

DURHAM COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

IpTTLep UNDER AUTHO«irr or thi coca-cola company »v 


the Sooner 39 and romped to the 
Tar Heel 11 before being stopped. 
It took only two more plays for 
the Sooners to score with Harris 
passing to McDonald for the final 
four yards with only 44 seconds 
left. This gave the Sooners an 
overwhelming 21-0 lead at the half- 
way point. 

The two squads battled on al- 
most even terms for most of the 
third period before the Sooners 
initiated their fourth touchdown 
push. The score came in the first 
minute of the last quarter. All- 
America Tommy McDonald did the 
honors from two yards out after 
halfback running mate Clendon 
Thomas had set up the tally with 
a 16-yard burst from 18 yards out. 

Oklahoma's No. 3 unit racked 
up the day's last TD with 1:58 re- 
maining in the game when quar- 
terback Lonnie Holland swept 
end from 13 yards out. The final 
Sooner points came with 8:20 left 
to play when tackle Steven Jen- 1 
nings threw Marquette in the end 
zone for a safety. 

Today's win was No. 31 in a row 
for Oklahoma and the 107th con- i 
secutive game in which they have i 
scored. The magic number 31 ties 
the modern times record for con- j 
secutive victories, also set by the i 
Sooners. I 

Coach Bud Wilkinson cleaned i 
his bench in the closing minutes \ 
in an effort to hold down the 
score, but the Sooner subs played j 
hard inspired football. In all. Ok- 
lahoma used 61 men. 

Gaea led the impotent Tar Heel ' 
ground offensive with 25 yards in i 
four carries. Sooner sub halfback 
Baker was the day's leading i 
ground gainer, picking up 64 yards 
in 11 trios. 

The Tar Heels today disolayed ■ 
occasional flashes o£ brilliance, 
but more often thev were grab- 
bing at air as the Oklahoma run- 
ner went by, or pounding their 
heads against the stone-like Soon- 
er defense. 


Managers Needed 

Coach Walter Rabb urges anyone 
interested in acting as manager 
for the freshman baseball team to 
contact him in the intramurals of- 
fice in Woollen Gym. 

There are openings for several 
mana^prs, and Coach Rabb says 
that this year's freshmen mana- 
gers will move up to the varsity 
next year. 


i^^kMi 



Heavy Kraft Paper 

Shopping Bag 

With any purchase at 
our Drug Department 
during this BIG ONE 
CENT SALE. 



Get TWO 

for 1c 
More! 


Reg 45^ 

Walgreen 

TOOTHPASTE 

Anti-Enzyme Action 
decay ^ ^^^^^ ^U 


NON-FATTENING 

CONCENTRATED 

LIQUID 

SWEETENER 



ADD Ic ■ 

GST ONE 

MORE.' 


SUTTON'S 


159 E. Franklin St. 
FRfE DELIVERY 


DRUG 
STORE 


Phone 9-8781 


EXPERT PRESCRIPTION SERVICE 


Ion., Tues., Wed., Thur., Fri. & Sat* 
OCTOBER 1, 2, 3, 4/ 5 & 6 


VITAMIN BUYS ! 


G Geriatric Formula 

Reg. $6.79. Bottle of 100 . 

D Aytinal with Minerals 

Reg. $3.98. Bottle of 100 . 

DM.39 Cod Liver Oil 

PLAIN. 16-oz. bottle 


'Wa0^A£eH,Cl0eHC4/ DRUG STOj?f| 


Regularly ^5.98 

SUPER AYTINAL 


Plus Red Vitamin B-12 


14 vitamins, 10 minerals | 
OLAFSEN. A r g-gg 
Bottle of 100 . .^SU"" 



^^'SACCHARIN 


EFFERVESCENT 
!/4 GRAIN 

BOTTLE 1000 


^'TkIOOINE 


U.S. p. 
1-OZ. BOTTLE 



a '2.89 JR. AYTINAL njnso 

Vitamins & Minerals. lOO's fc > ^ 

O Multi-Vitamin Elixir O S 1 99 

Reg. $1.98. Pint bottle., fc » I "~ 

D '2.98 Thiamin ChJorideo ^ A99 

50-Mg. Bottle 100 tablets . Z « L — 


mOOTH BRUSH 


STERIDENT 

4STyiES 


tiTB^ 


^PIPEClEANERSTo2^26^ 


RIGHTS RESERVEP TO UMIT QUANTiTIES 


WALGREEN 

MiiiERAL oi^cQLD mmm 

T«<t'a«|i»ir«.o<lej^4ss Nen - Fattanma 


64' 

2199' 


16 0]r-.^,1^o»tr** 





G 63' Keller Lozenges «| 

Antibiotic. Tube of 12 . 

G 9d< NASAL SPRAY 

Anefrin. Mt-oz. size .... 


Physicians & Surgeot\$ 

98c BODY 
MASSAGE 

Refreshing! 

16 oz 2 5 QQC 

bottle . mm R ^%# 




OFfCT/ 


5c LUXURY 

Fruit Drops 

or Mints 

Eleven Flavors 
2 FOR 6^ 



98c WALGREEN 

MEDICATED 
lOUGH SYRUP 

Antihistaminic 

2 s 99' 



^ 


3-OZ. 

bottle 




TmEtRlESf 


Q White Pine & Tar o g 

with Creosote. 8-oz. size ^ R 

D 89' ANEFRIN APC os 

Cold Tablets. Tube of 24 ^ R 


MEDICINE CHEST !B 


D RUBBING ALCOHOL 

Walgreen. 16-oz. bottle . . 

D 3^ BORIC ACID 

Powder or Crystals. 8-oz. 

D 49*^ CASTOR OIL 

Aromatic. I6-07. bottle . . 

D Children's Aspirin 

Reg. 33c. Bottle of 50 . . . 

D Buffered Aspirin 

Walgreen. Bottle of 72 . . 

D Octine Eye Drops 

Reg. 49c. V4-0Z. size . . . . 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


150' 
138' 
150' 
134' 
s80' 
150' 


59' Cold Capsules t\ 

mpho-Lyptus.Tin of 25^ 

□ COLD SORE BALM i\ 

Keller, '/b-oz. tube ^ 


90' 
90' 
60' 
40' 


a HAND CARE STICK 

cr Lotion. HILROSE K . . 

D 98' HAIR SPRAY 

Formula 20. 5-oz. aerosol 

D Bubbling Bath Oil 

Reg. 98c. 8-oz. bottle . . . 


BABY NEEDS! 


98' "Perfectien" 

Hand Cream p 

It's lanolized to c^^z 

soften hands. fmimmA 

29-oi99^H|- 


ion^ 


Cfeaini 


D 45' BABY OIL 

Lanolized. 5-oz. bottle 

D Babykof Cough Syrup o ^ 

Reg. 69c. 3-oz bottle . . . fc »» 

D 55' BABY SHAMPOOo^ci; 

So Gentle. 4-oz. bottle . . . fc R *JU 


2s4l 
s70 


n 89' Cream Shampoo 

Formula 20. 4-oz jar . . . 


VM 


Reg. S^ 
49' 

Walgreen^'" ^"^ 

Pure 5-grain 

Aspirin 

Bottle of 100 

NONE ^^^""""^^^S/-. 
FINER! ^r '- - 

COSTUME 
JEWELRY 

Earrings, bracelets, 
necklaces and pins 


Your 
. choice i 


SHUNEEOS! 


Plui Fed. Tax on Toiletiio, Billiolds end Jtv 


D 39' BABY POWDER 

Cools, soothes. 5-oz. can . 


2140 


c D 98° SHAVE CREAM 

or Lotion. Briargate . . . 

c n Pre-Electric Shave 

PO-DO. 4-oz bottle . . . . 


2:99' 
2s70' 


TERRIFIC VALUES! 


But TOO OOOD TO LEAVE OUT 


Reg. si.59!fc^ 
OOLPH ^0\ 

MOTH m 
PROOFER// 

Aerosol Spray // 


12- 


D Hot Water Bottle 

or Fountain Syringe .... 

D M.19 UTILITY KIT 

sturdy Plastic. Tan-Navy 

D CUTTERBOARD 

Reg. 49c. Hardwood . . . . 


"SHORELAWN" 

PACKAGE 
STATIONERY 

Finest Quality 


2il6 


D Fever Thermometer 

Reg. 75c. Oral or rectal . , 

D ICE CREAM SCOOP 

Reg. 98c. Buy two 




Genuine Leather 

BILLFOLDS 

For men and women 


D Cotton Applicators 

Reg. 19c. Box of 100 . . 

D 69« FLASHLIGHT 

2 Cell. Powerful beam . 


2s33' 
2189' 


WALGREEN GUARANTEED 

ALL PURPOSE 
FILM 

No. 127.38 89^ 

No. 620 OS QQC 
No. 120^"%/O 


vtn,iyi'>,-ll 


~\ 




all purpose 
FILM 


I 3 ROLL PACK 


D 39' STATIONERY 

'Letters Random.' Pack 30 

b Children's Scissors 

"Penquin Pete." Safe . . . 

D 65« RUBBER GLOVES 9 rQQ, 

Test-Rite. Sm, med orlg ^ r vw 


Regl 
47c 

PO-DO] 

Lanolized 

LATHER] 

SHAVE 
CREAM 

l39' Brushless^ 

.2s40' 


Regul9f tSc 

SAFETY PINS 


Buncfi 
of la . . . 


2 1 16' 


* ^ r I- 


IB W e LIB!?ARY 
SERIALS DEPT. 
CHAPEL HILL. N. fi« 
8-31-49 




WEATHER 

Cloudy and not so warm with 
occasional light rain. 


3rh c Da( 



Sat 



AUTOS 

Editor discustes car problem. 
See Editorial on page 2. 


VOL. LVill. NO. 10 


Complete (JP) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956 


Offices in Graham Memorial 


FOUR PAGES THIS ISSUE 


SP "New Party 
Says Lambeth 


n 


/ By CLARKE JONES 

Student Party Chairman Tom 
Lambeth last night called the SP 
a "new party" and said by staying 
behind student body President Bob 
Young'.s administration we can ac- 
complish a great deal. 

Speaking at the party's second 
meeting of the year, Lambeth 
pointed out 'there arc a lot of new 
people in the party and the party's 
goals are much clearer now." 

He urged members of the party, 

which is •100''; behind Young's 

administration now ' to stay behind 

it. 
/ 

The main activities, in addition 

to Lambeth's remarks, were: 

1. Filling two vacant seats in 
the Student Legislature. 

2. Electing a member to a vac- 
ancy in the party's Advisory Board. 

3. Approving an amendment to 
the party's bylaws calling for re- 
moval of the compulsory $1.50 
membership fee. 

^ EUected to the Legislature seats 
until the fall election on Nov. 13 
were Gary Greer, freshman from 
Spindale, Dorm Men's II and Ev- 
erett James, freshman from Ro- 
bersonville. Dorm Men's V. A third 


vacancy, Dorm Men's in, was held 
over rntil next week's meeting. 

Ed Proescher, a transfer from 
N. C. State College, was elected 
to the open position on the Advi.s- 
j ory Board. 

I The amendment passed concern- 
i ing removal of membership dues 
means persons can become mem- 
I bers of the party by simply attend- 
j ing two meetings and showing a 
j preference to join. 

j Lambeth also spoke on a SP- 
I sponsored bill, introduced last 
I week to the Legislature by John 
i Brooks, which calls for placing bal- 
I lot bo.xes in each dormitory during 
I an election. They are presently lo- 
I cated in central areas on the cam- 
! pus during elections. 

j About the measure, Lambeth said 
j it is in "keeping with the best 
; ideals of fair campus elections. . . 
I and the facts will prove removal 
I of dorm ballot boxes would mean 
lower participation in campus elec- 
tions." 

He urged both the SP and the 
University Party to vote for the bill 
when it comes to a vote Thursday, 
Oct. 11 at the Legislature meet- 
ing. 


Phi, Di Meet Tonight 


Di Will Discuss 
Merits Of Nixon 

Controversial Vice President 
Richard Nixon will be the topic 
of discussion at tonight's meeting 
of the Dialectic Senate, according 
to President Pro-Tem Pat Atams. 
The bill will commend Nixon 
"fon his excellent service to the 
nation." | 

The proponents XtT^tiG Wtl will' 
probably cite Nixon's "good will" j 
ttlssions abroad and his strong | 
civil rights stand as an indication ' 
of his service. Opponents are ex- 
pected to counter with attacks up- ' 
on his campaign fund and his 
honorary membership in the Nat- j 
ional Assn. for the Advancement , 
of Colored People. ,1 

The meeting will be held at 8, 
p. m. on the third floor of New j 
West. Visitors are welcome, ac- 
cording to President Pro - Tern 
Adams. 


Phi To Debate Bill 
On Free Farm Mart 

A bill to "restore a free market 
for agricultural products" will be 
debated by the Philantropic Socie- 
ty tonight. 

This is considered to be one of 
the. most controversial farm ques- 
tions to confront political parties 
in recent years as both the Demo- 
crats and Republicans are putting 
on vigorous campaigns to get the 
farm vote, according to Phi Speak- 
er Lawrence Matthews Jr. 

The debate will be held at 8 
p.m. in Phi Hall on the fourth 
floor of New East. Guests have 
been invited to attend and par- 
ticinate in the debate. 

The bill calls for a sradual de- 
crease of supports with all Fed- 
eral farm subsidies to be discon- 
tinued by Jan. 1, 1958. 


Harpsichord 
Dedication 
Set Tonight 

A sonata recital and the dedi- 
cation of a new harpsichord will 
form the first fall program to- 
night of the Tuesday Evening Se- 
ries. 

Guest artists Yella Pessl, harp 
sichordist, and Mischa Mi.schakoff. 
will perform at 8 p.m. in Hill 
Music Hall. The Music Dept. and 
Graham Memorial will co-sponsor 
the program, which is open to tie 
public without charge. 

Two Bach Sonatas, in A Major 
and E Major, Mozart's Sonata in 
C Major and A Major, Fresco- 
baldi's Toccata, and Milhaud's So- 
nata for Harpsichord and Violin 
will be presented by Miss Pessl 
and Mischakoff. 

It will be the first public per- 
formance on the Music Dept's re- 
cently acquired Maendler Sch- 
ramm harpsichord, made by 
Maendler of Munich, Germany. 

A keyboard instrument that 
preceded the piano, the harp i- 
chord is played by plucking its 
strings ^i-ith a resulting sound 
that resembles that of an organ. 
The instrument was commonly us- 
ed by all musicians until late in 
the 18th century, when Mozart be- 
gan developing the piano. 

Miss Pessl comes to Chapel Hill 
from New York City. Mischakoff 
is currently concertmaster of the 
Detroit Symphony Orchestra. The 
t'.vo artists have made numerous 
recordings together. 

Arrangements are being made 
to accommodate a capacity audi- 
ence in the 700-seat Hill Music 
Hall for the concert. 

Senior Pictures Must 
Be Made By Tomorrow 

Seniors have until tomorrow t.i 
be photographed for the 1957 
Yackety Yack. 

Seniors will be charged $1 tr» 
be photographed, due to the de- 
lay in the pV^ptography schedule 
which necessitated extending the 
deadline for Senior shots. 

The rest of the picturetakins 
schedule is as follows: through 
Oct. 5 — Freshmen, Nursing School 
and Fourth Year Medical School. 

Oct. 8-12 — Sophomores. Pharm- 
acy School, Dental School, Dental 
Hygiene. 

Oct. 15-19 — Juniors, Law School, 
rest of Medical School, Graduate 
School. 



Dormitory Men Will 
Hold Elections Today 


Bryant Talks 
To Facui 
Club Toi 


f/fy 


>day 


MISCHAMISCHAKOPF, LEFT, AND YELLA PESSL 

. . . wiLl herfGrvi here tonight 


Rhodes ocholarship 
Blanks Due Oct. 10 


Application blanks for select'or 
of Rhodes Scholars for next yeai 
must bo handed in to Dean C P 
Spruill. of the UN'C Rhodes Se 
lection Cjmm''.iee by Oct. 10, it 
was announced , yesterday b> 
Spruill. 

Application blanks and informa 
tion concerning the two-year scho- 
larship for study at Oxford Uni 
versity in England may be obtain 
ed in room 303 South Building 

Thirty-two scholarships for.tAo 
years study at Oxford are offerer 
each year in the United StatcB to 
unmarried male students bct\yeen 
the ages of 19 and 25. The valU' 
of a Rhodes scholarship is^600 
pound5, approximately $1.8.')0 it 
American currency. 

To be eligible for selection, can 
didates must have at least junior 
standing at "some recognized de 
grec-granting university or crlf 
lege in the United States of Am- 
erica," the current memorandum 
on the scholar.ship states. 

Nominees from UNC will be <;e 
lected by a faculty committee 
headed by Dean J. Carlylc Sitter- 
son for consideration by the State 
Committee of Selection. Final el- 
imination and selection will be 
made by a District Committee, 


yhich will select from 12 final- ' 
sts four men to represent th?! 
district. 

Recent UNC Rhodes students 
■vho won the Rhodes Scholarsh.pj 
include Ed Yoder, a 1956 gradu- 
ate, Dick Baker anc;! Paul Likins. 

The basis of selection as sat 
down by donor Cecil Rhodes in- 
cludes 'literary and scholastic 
ability and attainments, qualities 
of manhood, truthfulness, cour- 
.ige, devotion to duty, sympathy, 
kindness, unselfishness and fel- 
lowship, exhibition of moral force 
of character and of instincts to 
lead and to take an interest in 
his fellows, and physical vigor, 
:as shown by fondne.>s for and suc- 
cess in sports." 


INFIRMARY 


Misses Evelyn B. DeHeart, Eliza- 
bath A. Baumann, Erma A 
Mary D. Dance, Carol Covington, 
Jane Palmer, Anne Haney, Ann 
Hartford, Jane Kolshouser, and 
John Burgwyn, Marvin Harless, 
Alfredo Julian, Donald Kemper, 
John Corbett, Michael Cap, Craig 
White, Hugh Price, Alvin Smith, 
Enno Rekendorf and Norman 
Smith. 


Victor S. Bryant, Durham at- 
torney and member of the Exe(;u 
live Committee of the Board of 
Trustees, will be guest speaker 
at the first fall meeting of the 
Faculty Club here at 1 p.m. today 
in the Carolina Inn Ballroom. 

Bryant, who is also chairman of 
the Trustee committee to recom- 
mend a new president, will speak 
on 'The Functions of a Trustee 
in a State University." 

The Faculty Club, open to all 
full-time faculty members and ad- 
ministrative stall of equjvalent 
rank, will meet on alternate 
Tuesdays during the fall. 

Dr. Alexander Heard, club pres 
ident, said that new faculty mem- 
bers will be introduced at today's 
meeting. 

Other officers of the club are 
Herbert R. Baer, Law School, trea- 
surer; ahd Dr. Andrew H. Horn, 
University Librar<ian, secretary. 
Dr. Heard is on the Political Sci- 
ence Department staff. 

GM's Dancing Lessons 
Begin Tonight At 6:30 

An organizational meeting will 
i be held tonight at 6:30 in the Ren- 
1 dezvous Room of Graham Memor- 
j ial for all students who plan to 
' join the free dancing classes of 
I the Graham Memorial Activities 
1 Board. 

i The cia.sses will be under direc- 
! tion of Mrs. V. L. Bou,nds and 

are open to all U.VC student3. 
i They will be held each Tuesday 
I evening and will feature many of 
I the new steps students request as 

time permits. Fundamentals will 
' also be taught. . 


Dormitory men will go to the 
polK today to elect officers for 
the coming academic year. 

Elach dormitory will name m^n 
to fill the following posts: 

Secretary, treasurer, Interdormi- 
ory Council representative and 
intramural manager. 

Dormitories held nominating ses- 
sions the latter part of last week 


I YACK CONTRACTS 

I .\!1 organizations desiring space 
! in the Yackety Yack must sign con 
; tracts in the Yack office in thr 
i basement of Graham Memorial b; 
I Oct 10, according to Editor Tomm? 
' Johnson. ' 




Four coeds hitchhiking from 
east end of campxis to rrnrh par- 
ty at Tri Belt houce. 
• . * * 

History student, in answer to 
professor's question, giving the 
story in a nutshell of Little 
Black Sambo. 

Library Shows 
Exhibition I 

On Press Week j 

The University Library is ob- 
serving National Newspaper Week, 
with the 1956 theme, "Your News- ' 
paper — ^Freedom's Key to Better 
Living," in an exhibition on the 
iQain floor. 

In one case, books and pamph- 
lets are featured on the freedom 
of the press, fre«d<Mn of informa- 
tion and communication, freedom 
to read, and the peoples' rijht 
to know. 

In honor of local newspapers, 
the Chapel Hill Weekly. Chapel 
Hill News Leader, and News of 
Orange C6unty and the Daily Tar 
Heel, n Second case presents a 
sample issue of each, with an ac- 
count of their history and growth. 
Tnd individual clippings selected 
from these newspapers to show 
how they attempt to further '"bet- 
ter living" in Chapel Hill. 

The special exhibit was prepared 
by Mrs. Myra Lauterer of the 
QNC Library staff . 


to pick the following candidates: 

Manly: Alec Coffin, secretary; 
Bill Yates, treasurer; Rex Moser, 
intramural mansqer: L«?on Rooke, 
Billy Wearnouth. Harold Vaden, 
.Joe Browning, IDC representatives. 

Everett: L. R. Calclough, Buck 
Hundley, secretary; .John Devogt, 
Bob Jones, treasurer: Drk Frazi^r, 
Rudy Edwards, IDC repre.senta- 
tive;George Stetier. intramural 
manager. 

Winston: Fi'ank Eagles, Tom 
Clark, secretary; Dan Hilliard. trea- 
surer; Bill Blon, R. Burlson, intra- 
mural manager: .Jimmy Sullivan, 
Billy Burke, Tally Eddings, IDC 
representative. 
MANGUM 

Mangum: Ted Smith, .John Dal- 
'cn, vice-president: Robert Pender- 
graph, secretary; Ed Evans, trea- 
surer; Harold Johnson. Lou Hardy, 
IDC representative; Doug Bayliff, 
Bill Russell, intramural manager. 

Old East: Frank Gibhs, secretary; 
Tommy Davis, Frank Williams, 
treasurer; John Fitchett, Mason 
Wilkins, intramural manager: Paul 
Carr," Bill McLester, Di?k Robinson. 
Don Gray, IDC representative; Bob 
Hicks, Howard Jones, Randel Shel- 
ton. socal chairman. 

Connor: Donald Ross, seciotary; 
Barkev Siroonian, treasurer; John 
\ffigne. IDC representative: Ben- 
jsmin Mast. Allan Dickenson, Earl 
, Diamond, Lloyd Smith, floor rep- 
resentative. 

Avcock: Dick Clark, secretary, 
Carlisle Jackson, treasurer; Ed 
Jennings. intramural manager; 
Jack Lynn, IDC reDrt»sentative. 
(See DORM MEN. Page 3) 


DTH Staff €frs to Meet 

The Daily Tar Heel news staff 
will meet t:)day at 4 p m., accord- 
ing to the newspaper's officials. 

Purpose of the meeting will be 
to reshape the news staff. The 
meeting will be held in the news- 
room. 

Editor Fred Powledge said 
"This will be a major realignment 
of the staff. The whole News 
Dept. setup will be changed." 

He invited all staffers to attend, 
including these who indicated in- 
terest in the newspaper earlier 
in the year. 



Sorority Rushir\g Finishes Tonight 


Sorority rushing ends tonight 
with three progressive dinner par- 
ties lasting from 5:40 until 9:35. 

The first party, at which the 
rushees will have an appetizer or 
first course, will begin at 5:40 
and end at 6:40. 

There will be 20-minutP breaks 
between each party. The second 
party begins at 7 p.m. and ends 
at 8:15 p.m. The main course will 
be served at this party. The last 
party, at whiih dessert will be 

served, begins at 8:35 p.m. and 
is over at 9:35 p.m. 
The Pan-Hellenic tea last F i- 


day night marked the open ng of the times stipulated by Pan-H 1- 

sorority rush on the UNC cam- lenic for the individual sororities 

pus. Last Monday. Tuesday, Wed- to put on their skits, 
nesd^y and Thursday ni.hts were On Saturday and Monday ths 

Passerby Rejected By KDs 

S.iturday aftrrnoon there was posted on the front of th? Kappa 
Drita house a sign reading "K D College of Musical Knowledge", 
which referred to the skit which the Kappa Deltas gave during the 
rush parties. 

A passerby believing that music was actually taught there start- 
ed un the walk saying that she had always wanted to study music. 

One of the ru.shces waiting outside stopped her before she actu- 
ally reached the do(»r. i 


parties w«re devoted to friendly 
conversation. Today the sororities 
will give the final dinner parties 
that formally mark the end of 
rush. A sorority may use any 
theme or ceremony that it wishes 
at this party, according to Mivs 
Harriet Lewis of the Pen-Hel 
Council. 

Rushees can pick up their bids 
to the.se narties this morning from 
8:30 until 11:30 at the Pan-Hel 
post office. In the event that a 
rushce is unable to come at this 
time, she can pick up her bids 
at the Dean of Women's Office. 


UNC Sororities Entertain Rushees With SUits During Rush Weel< 


At upper left, rushees receive ice cream with cone "chasers" 
served over the bar at the Chi Omega House. Davy Crockett becomes 
a local hero at the Alpha Gam House, at lower left. At lower left 
center, the PI Phis put on "Back to the Farm" or "Jills From the 


Hills." At lower right, the Tri Delts give on* of four presentations 
<*f the Mexican Hat Dance. The Kappa Deltas are mixing up a 
"Devil's Brew" at upper right. These skits were presented by the 
sororities during rush week last -week. (Photos by Chal Schle?) 




•y» 


PAGE TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1. 1956 


Students And Townspeople 
Can Work Out Car Problem 


FOLLOWING COLLSION WITH STOCKHOLM 


Chapel Hill Niartfd out. like 
most towns, as a tiiiv villa<>f. It 
UmI no |>arking uoiries and there 
was no traffit |»vohlen> to speak ol. 
But the I'nixersity greu. and 
the town j;ie\v with it. Pretty soon 
the touu was tairly bursting with 
automobiles — studetits" automo- 
biles, fatuity members' automo- 
biles, administration's amomobiles, 
townspeoples' aiuomobiles. 

When Mejuoria'l Hospital open- 
end. hundre(K more people lame 
to li\e lud work in Chapel Hill. 
Manv ol them brought wives and 
families, ami ahvavs thev brought 
mote automobiles. 

And the town remaine<l prettv 
nnj( h the >ame >i/e. It was ob\ ions 
that the town wa> approaching a 
♦ risis. 

The Towji Hoaid of .Mdermen 
realized more than a vear ago that 
the ( risis was {<nning. f'he board 
hiit'd a tiaffii and parking expert 
to >tudy Cha-pei Hill and tome up 
>\ ith re< otnmendaiions. 

I he expert eomitetl ears and he 
meaMired the rate of automobile 
flow at dilferent hours of the dav. 
Ifc sur\e\ed: he et)unted noses: he 
asked tpiestions. Me tame up with 
a rei>oft. 

The long-iange portion of his 
report tailed f«)r a series of traffic 
f>elts around the town, on the 
north, south, east a;u<i west. This 
would somewhat allexiate the 
strain tansed t>n the tt)wn by driv- 
ers passing through. 

The short-range portion recom- 
mended restriction of parking iti 
certain areas t)f ttiwn. One such 
area wa.s Rosemary St.. the busv 
"back of the main street" road. 
Another was Columbia St. be- 
tween Franklin St. and Cameron 
Ave. 

The town a* cepted runst of the 
rejx>rt and Avtnt to work imple- 
menting it. .A'dermen ruled out 
paiking om much of congested 
Rosemaiv St. This brtiught pro- 
tests of distrimination from some 
memf)ers of fr.tiL'riuty houses lo- 
cated f>n t/iat streetu 

The -Akleinien also chose to 
limit Ct>lumbi.j St. parking tt) two 
ht)urs. This bsniiiht howK. along 
A\ith '1 T ■ Msjfie intrtKiucetl and 
passed ':.isi week in the Student 
leg] !'.. ;ne. The measure called 
foi repeal of the two-ht)ur limit 
DU Cohnnbia between Franklin 
ami Cameron. 

One of the reasons for the mea-- 
stne. gi\en bv University Party 
Chaiiman Mike Weinman, was 
thai Columbia 'is nt>t a commer- 
tial «>tuet between the other twt) 
roatls. 

"There is no neetl to limit park- 
ing <m a street which is not ttim- 
mert iai. as this limit serves nt> t)b- 
vions purpose." s;iid Weinman. 

■ The paiking limit . . . works 
great hartlship on tht)sc students 
wht> live on Columbia St., antl the 
Sttident Legislature feels that this 
hardshij) has been invtiked imnec- 

essarily. ' 

« * * * 

First ol all. no hardship has been 
in\<iked. 

It IS (»b\ious that Weinman was 


speaking lor the automobile-own- 
ing membeis of the fraternity 
house adjacent tt) Coliitnbia St. 
when he spt)ke t)l "haidship," 
What he meant was that these peo- 
ple tloti t like to walk moie thij.i 
7-, vartls to theii autoiiiobiles. 

Weiinnan said the street is "not 
tdrnmeit ial." l\\ tl.at we suppt)se 
he means there is no business on 
the street. 

That is true. But Ct)luntl)ia' S». 
runs straight in to Chapel Hills 
busiest street. Parkin'^ on Cohnn- 
bia shoidtl be restritled h)t p:'o- 
ple going tlownto\.n for less than 
two ht)urs. 

The stutlent whi» paiks his au- 
tomobile t)n Columbia .St. lor ilavs 
at the time, «)idv to (rank it up 
on weekentis or ot t asionallv, is 
(heating the re>t of Chapel I fill. 

It would n<»t hurt XH'einntan's 

tonslitueiHs to tlo a little walking. 

I here is enough parking spa(e to 

the west of ("ohnnbia St. to take 

tare of Big Fraternity Coint. 

Ihe town of Chapel Hill. too. 
migiit take a hitit from the hurt 
feelings of the students tlepri\ed 
of tlieir traditional jiaiking spat- 
es, whether they be de|)ii\ed 
lightlv 01 wronglv. 

We pitjpose a joint totintil ol 
students and town Aldermen. tt» 
be formetl spetiliralK to merejy 
talk over the pinking and trafiit 
problems. 

The group woidd ha\e no a( - 
tual power. It woultl ser\e onlv . 
to give the town the students' 
feelings on parking, and to give 
the students an inkling of the 
problems that confroiu the town. 

Perhaps situatitms sudi as Wein- 
man's Student I.egislatine mea- 
sure then woultl not aiise. There 
is reflectetl in that measure great 
ignorante of the town's pretlita- 
nient. 

The town has been guilty of not 
going tt) the students for ad\ ice. 
The students have been guiltv t)f 
acting hastily and witht)ut respon- 
sibility. 

Some Profs 
Weigh Them 
For Grades 

We tlon't know where H. R. Rit- 
thie got his information, but we 
get ouis elsewhere. 

Ritchie was tpioted, bv a report - 
et as saying studetits sometimes 
rent ty|>ewriters IVom the l'ni\eis- 
ity Retail Stores, whith he m.tn- 
ages. ft)r the tvping of term papers 
aiwl themes. 
# "I ha've been toltl, ' he saitl. 'that 
this mav raise (the stutletn's) mark 
as nnich as 10 pertent. " 

Now, where di<l he get that? 
We'Ve always tht)ught that type- 
written term papers were muth 
tt)f) easy lor the professor to read. 
The worse the haiitlwriting. wt 
heat, the better the giade. ;' ' 


Paradox At Woollen Gym 


Outside room ^{i-, of South Build- 
ing, there's a petition. It calls for 
sigtiatures of men who want to 
alM)lish tt)mpuisory veterans' phy- 
sical edncatit>n on this campus. 

The Daily Tar Heel 

The official stutfent publication of the 
Publications Board of the University of 
North Carolina, where it is published 
daily except Monday and examination 
and vacation periods and summer terms 
Entered as second class matter in the 
post office in Chapel Hill, N. C, undei 
;he Act oi .March 8, 1870. Subscription 
rates: mailed, $4 per year, $2.50 a semes- 
ter; delivered, $6 a year, $3.50 a semes- 
ter. 


Editor 


FRED POWLEDGE 


Managing Editor CHARLIE JOHNSON 
News Editor ^ JIAY LINKER 


Busjnt?ss Manager BILL BOB PEEL 


Advertising Manager Fred Katzln 

BUSINESS STAFF: Rosa Moore, Johnny 
VV^itaker, Diek Leavitt, Petw Alper. 


The petitioti is really unnetes- 
.saiy. \'eteran» should never have 
been tompelletf to take physical 
edutation in the first plate. 

Most of the veteiaiis we have 
obser\ed on this campus are pret- 
t\ serious peo|)le. Thev work, for 
liie most j)art. ttj get themseKes 
through sthool. Many t)f them 
have families tt) Mtppt)it, and ev- 
ery ht)ur outside the classrtxim 
means they t^n afford mtire of the 
basic materials of life. 

This alone, of course, is not en- 
ough to warrant their excuse from 
physical edutatit)n. But there's an- 
t)ther reason that the University 
seems bound to ignore.*' 

Those veterans — all of them — 
spent mt)nths in basit ttaining. 
Thev got then, and tontinued to 
get, hard physical exercise. They 
learned tt)ordinatit)n (which is 
one of the reasf)ns the University 
has physical ediitatit)n) or they got 
rheir teeth kntwked out. And they 
gtit tpiite a bit of training In 
.sportsmanship and team work. 

Lets ht)pe the petition gains 
names and stietches t lear down to 
the first fltK)r of South Building. 
The silly regulation has been en- 
forced far too long. 


Rescue Vessels Rushed To Doria 


John Underwood 

Underwood, a junior majoring 
in English, took part in the re- 
scue operaHons following the Ar- 
drea Doria — Stockholm collision 
last July. 

It was our last night out. to- 
morrow we docked in New York, 
and I was looking forward to it 
with immense anticipation. I wa.i 
serving abroad the Pvt. W. H. 
Thomas, of the Military Sea 
Transportation Service, as a civi- 
lian waiter for the summer mo- 
nths between college semesters. 
We were just completing a twen- 
ty-three day voyage to the Metli- 
terranean Sea area. 

The night of Wednesday, July 
25. .so ominous and frightening, 
left everyone with an eerie sense 
of premonition. Great waves of 
fog rolled over the ship, so dense 
that visibility for more than a 
few yards was impossible. 

Off in the gray mixture of fog 
and twilight, the blasts of the 
horn of an unseen near-by ship 
penetrated the fog; each blast 
seeming to come from a different 
location. Our foghorn answered 
into the thickness at regular in- 
tervals. 

The next day someone mention- 
ed that this was. perhaps, the An- 
drea Doria passng us. 

Anxious for tomorrow, and New 
York, to come. I went to bed ra- 
ther early. I was awakened by 
talking from the room across the 
hall. I heard the second steward 
use the word "emergnncy,' but I 
thought at first that this pertain- 
ed oniy to the room stewards, to 
whom he was speaking, and 1 
hoped the waiters wouldn't lie dis- 
turbed until the usual time at six 
thirty. I thought it was probably 
already pretty close to that time, 
and that we'd have to get up soon 
anyway. 

Then: ".•Ml hands man your 
boat stations" sounded through 
the ship; everyone began jump- 
ing out of bed. running this way 
and that, grabbing clothes and life 
jackets. I kept thinking it was 
a drill, not understanding why 
it was being held at that time. 

Deep down inside. I wondered 
secretly if something hadn't hap- 
pened to the ship: could it be 
possible that we were sinking*!" 

Being accustomed in the weekly 
drills to having the fire drill im- 
mediately preceeding the boat 
drill. I proceeded unthinkingly 
to my fire station, located near 
passenger's cabins on the second 
deck. When I arived there. 1 saw 
a woman come hurrying out of a 
compartment in her night clothes 
and knock on Ihe next door, say- 


ing to her husband when he ap- 
peared. "You'd better get dressed, 
something's wrong." 

Then I heard "Lower all boats " 
over the p. a. system. I realized 
I was at the wrong station, and 
if they were lowering the boats, 
something must be wrong. I had 
visions as I scrambled up to the 
main deck of all the boats leav- 
ing without me. but when I reach- 
ed my boat station on the port 
side I found only a few crew 
members there. 

I noticed Ihe fog had disap- 
peared, and the night was perfect- 
ly still and clear, a spangled ar- 
ray of stars twinkling overhead. 

I asked another crew member 
what was wrong, but he didn't 
know either. I asked him the time, 
and he said one thirty. One thirty: 
I was astounded. What was going 
on? 

Off in the darkness the lights 
of several ships could be seen. 
The .Andrea Doria was ponted out 
to me directly off the starboard 
beam. The ship was almost com- 
pletely dark except for a row of 
lights high above the water, and 
onlv after a few minutes could I 


was taking place, that very near 
to us people were dying. 

Then the show began. Two life- 
boats (the only ones equipped 
with motors) had been sent in an- 
swer to the .Andrea's plea for life- 
boats. The whole ship waited their 



EYEWITNESS UNDERWOOD 

■\aitiinin:i Assniialcd Press j)i<hins of disasler 



SAFETY 

. . ."soiju' jmi itared b\ank\y" 

distinguish that the ship was list- 
ing away from us, and the lig'ils 
were the deck lights of the main 
deck high out of the water. 

I returned to the port side to 
see if any activity was occuring 
at my boat, hut finding none. 1 
returned to the starboard side. \n 
impressive sight met my eyes: 
closing in on the dark Andrea Do- 
ria was an immense ship, illumi- 
nated from bow to stern like a 
gay carnival; and most colorful 
of,ail. blazing into the night from 
between the two stacks, was the 
large: ILE DE FRANCE. 

Nobody was quite certain ex- 
actly what the story was. The first 
version I heard was that the .An- 
drea Doria was hit by an" oil ta'nk- 
er. Even after the nane 'Stock- 
holm' reached us, we were still 
uncertain as to her type. 

I was standing at the rail, gaz- 
ing at oil and wreckage floating 
by on the water, when an orange 
life preserver drifted by the side 
of the ship. It was torn, and the 
insidf> stuffings trailed behind the 
jacket. .As I looked at that. I rea- 
lized that a great human drama 


return: rugs were spread tiver the 
d cks to prevent slipping, ladders 
were lowered over the sides, nur- 
ses and soldiers stood by the blan- 
kets and hot drinks. 

Soon, through the darkness, 
there appeared a small light, quite 
far (iff. It approached, its beam 
light turning from one direction 
to another. Then, out of the in- 
distinctive distance into the vis- 
ible sphere of light cast from our 
ship, appeared one of the life- 
boats. 

It contained practically all wo- 
men. Most of them crouched over 
in their sea:.s. hugging life jack- 
ets strapped around them. They 
were very still, some of them 
stared up at the ship as the boat 
drew alongside, some of the jnst 
staj-ed blankly off into nothing- 
ness. 

Ropes were tossed down over 
each of the ladders and were 
tied around the waists of the wo- 
men as they began ascending. 
Their faces were very tight; there 
was no moaning nor crying out. 
One quite elderly woman closed 
her eyes as her hands slipped 
from the ladder, and the crew, 
tugging on the rope tied to her, 
pulled her over the side. As 
each survivor reached t h e 
deck, someone placed a blanket 
over her shoulders and led her 
off. The general strength and 
stamina prevailing was express- 
ed in the attitude of one short, 
thin woman who, as the blanket 
was thrown over her shoulders, 
said, in a voice half assuring, 
half thankful, "I'm all right, 
just give me a cigarette." 

One Italian woman and her 
thrtje children sat in a corner, 
their clothes soaked in oil from 
the Doria. 



ANDREA DORIA GOES DOWN AMONG HER OWN DEBRIS 

..."a great Jinrnan drauia teas taking place" 


AP Photo 


When the beds were prepared, 
the survivors were led into the 
room to them. More passengers 
kept coming, and soon men pas- 
sengers w?re among the women. 
There was little talking, as if the 
sense of unrealness still held 
each of them., perhaps unsure yet 
that this was all happening to 
them. 

Close to nine o'clock in the 
morning, the Thomas left for New 
York. Crew members, passengers, 
and survivors crowded the deck 
for a last look at the deserted 
liner, an awesome slence over all. 

Standing in the doorway to the 
main lounge, an Italian woman 
stared after the slowly diminish- 
ing picture of the Andrea Doria, 
her eyes full of tears. 

The survivors had a half day of 
comparative rest before the mass 
confusion accompanying the dock- 
ing at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. 
Newspaper reporters boarded 
with the pilot in the harbor. Thev 
immediately besieged the survi- 
vors, who had been ushered into 
the dining room in one large 
group. 

At the dock, the ship was met 
by large crowds and TV cameras. 
Many tearful reunions occurred. 
The most outstanding of them, if 
one could, be said to have contain- 
ed more emotion than another, 
took place between a mother and 
l\er one and a half year old baby 
from whom she had been separat- 
ed the night before. 

As the mother embraced the 
baby, the crew members and pass- 
engers watching from the ship's 
decks applauded. 

Finally all the survivors had 
departed from the ship, and the 
dock became dark and silent, the 
day of drama drawing to a close. 

During the evening a friend 
casually reminded me of an inci- 
dent which had occured just as we 
were entering the Mediterranean 
It was during dinner, and word 
got around that a luxury liner 
was passing very near to us. 
Eveiyone excitedly" Rooked out 
portholes or»ran out on deck to 
see the famous Italian ship, the 
Anrrea Doria. 

I had my camera with me, wait- 
ing to take a picture of the Rock 
of Gibralter, and my friend sug- 
gested I take a picture of the 
liner. I looked at him and said, 
"What do I want a picture of a 
luxuiy liner for? You can see 
them anywhere, I'm much more 
interested in getting the Rock of 
Gibralter." 


Pogo 


By Walt Kelly 



U'l Abner 


By Al Capp 


ALL STATE / 


\AU 


Hammus-Al&b&mfWK 
CtDntesI: 

*Mr. E>e*ut li a 1 '0H9 S fc 
to be cruwned - 
Pi«r^ recital by 
Loverbpyni k . accompa^»iM 
ijy his brother Morris 
("A special treat Jbf 
tha ladies.^ 



Carolina 
Caroleidoscope 

Frank Crowther 

I dropped a subtle question upon entering the 
Daily Tar Heel office this afternoon, "Whom should 
we back for Chancellor?" 

Talk about reaction. . ."Mickey Spillane". . ."Walt 
Kelly". . "Why doesn't someone ask Billy Graham*?' 
(another Graham?). . .'Lionel Hampton". . .murmer 
from the background, "Please don't feed the colum- 
nist any peanuts". . ."How about Bill Poteat?". . . 
"Man, let's get Elvis!'. . .(please, I've just had my 
lunch). . .'Old banjo Pegram would string a few 
things up! ". . .another serious vote for Bill Poteat 
(he's" gaining ground and followers). . .'I like Frank 
Klingberg of the History Department ". .Ray Linker 
nominates Rav Linker, "but only if tjiis isn't going 
to be printed ". . ."I'd suggest Pogo, but he's running 
for President ". . ."Hey, I want to withdraw Walt 
Kellv and nominate John Foster Dulles" (you mean 
out jet-propelled scty. of State?). . ."Irving Berlin ". . 
"PMF ". . .(that's Pierre Mendes France, Sam). . . 
"Let's railroad Bill Poteat into the office". . .(well 
we may not have to do that if we just think about 
it a minute).'. .'What about old 'fast-buck'?". . . 
sure he could install HiFi sets in every dorm and 
sell the Vets Club for profit. . ."One vote for 
Peanuts". . ."I think that Pogo should run for the 
Chancellery and withdraw from the Presidential 
race; after all, the Presidency would ruin his 
health!" . . ."How about Dr. Lyons". . .from the 
outer office, "How about him!?". . .(don't know 
if that was positive or negative). . ."Spillane would 
be a good one; then you really couldn't walk through 
the Arboretum at night ". . .AND A FINAL VOTE 
FOR WILLL\M H. POTEAT. 



BILL POTEAT 

. . . top contender for cliancellors'hip 

O. K., what has Poteat got and who is he? 

He is an Associate Professor of Philosophy who 
was born in China in 1919 and returned to the 
United States with his parents in 1929. 

His father was a Baptist minister. His grand- 
father, Edwin McNeill Poteat, was a Baptist minis- 
ter and President of Furman University. His great 
Uncle was William Louis Poteat, President of Wake 
P'orrest College. 

Well, is he qualified educationally? 

Yup. He went to grammar school and High School 
in Raleigh. 

He received his A.3. in 1941 from Oberlin; his 
Bachelor of Divinity from Yale in 1944; and his 
Ph.D. from Duke in 1951. 

He is married to the former Marion Kellv, and is 
well settled in Chapel Hill. 

Ask anyone who has taken one of his classes 
whether they respect the man. Without question. 

So, what does this add up to? 

It adds up to a man who can fill the job with 
youth, energy, prestige, personality, and educational 
competance. 

Let's have some more reaction. 


YOU Said \h • ^ . 

'Hey\ Dirty Ram 

Editor: 

To the visiting students from other lands, one 
of our common expressions is rather puzzling. It 
IS our use of the expression "Hey!" 

Just what does "Hey" mean? To me, Hey" means 
"hello. I'm glad to see you." Add a warm smile, and 
it means, 'Tm very glad to see you." Wave the 
aand in passing, and it means that I'm very busj. 
but in passing I want to say "hope you're getting oii 
well." 

We say ' Hey " to our closest and dearest friends 
and to those we have not yet come to know. It 
means though we seem to be strangers, it is not so 
for 'Hey " also means, * we understand and here is 

our out-stretched hand." Hey. 

Evelyn Sinha 
Editor: 

We can clearly understand why the Tar Heel 
spirit was low (at the State Game). One look at 
that black ram would be enough to discourage any- 
body! 

If Carolina's record at the end of the football 
season is as black as Rameses VH, it wll be a pretty 
dark year for the Tar Heels. That mascot of ours 
needs a new blanket just as Carolina needs and 
has. a new perspective on football with Sunny Jim 
So come on and lets get Rameses VU cleaned up.' 

Walter Pool* 
_ Tommy Phillips 


TUESDAY 


Tol 
Real 


Fill 


"Tobaccl 
here Thii 
film serit 
Committ€ 
ial Activil 

The fi) 
shown in 
days at 
films ma) 
for the 
Informati(| 
Pickard. 
Yack Oftj 
the first 

The reg 
mester ar 
( Russian)] 
of St. Ti 
1; "M" 
"Flamencti 
"Lifeboat'] 
"Incorrigij 
10; "Ar.sej 
erican). J| 

Selectet: 
shown wij 
the series! 


DELP 
THE 

Dormsl 

Fraterl 
Room! J 

than 
Subscr 
Nursed 
Infirr 

Hosp^ 
Victor! 
DTH 
ham, Hi( 
ways, 
McCauleil 
nues. T^ 
for cor 
If you 
gories ar 
Tar Hee( 
ager, 9h 
and 10 


S 


D 


10 
12. 
13. 

14. 

15. 
16. 
17. 

18 


19. 
20. 
23. 
25. 
26. 

29 


32. 
33. 


35. 
36. 


37 
38. 


40. 


42. 
43. 


44.1 
45.1 


i. 


R 7. 1956 


pe 


ering the 
)m should 

•Walt 

draham?" 

.murmer 

the colum- 

teat?". . . 

st had my 

ing a few 

iill Poteat 

like Frank 

lay Linker 

isn't going 

s running 

iraw Walt 

(you mean 

Berlin"'. . 

Sam). . . 

. .(well 

link about 

uck?". . . 

dorm and 

vote for 

in for the 

residential 

ruin his 

from the 

ont know 

ane would 

Ik through 

.\L VOTE 


s-hip 

he" 

(sophy who 
led to the 

His grand- 

ptist minis- 

His great 

nt of Wake 


liyh School 

)hprlin; his 
*4, and his 

welly, and is 

his classes 
qui'.stion. 

he job with 
iducational 


^am 


r lands, one 
puzzling. It 

Hey' means 
m smile, and 
."' Wave the 
11 very busj, 
re getting on 

farest friends 

to know. It 

), it is not so, 

i and here is 

Evelyn Sinha 


the Tar Heel 

One look at 

iscourage any- 

f the football 
11 be a pretty 
ascot of ours 
a needs, and 
h Sunny Jim. 
II cleaned up: 
Walter Pool* 
ny Phillips 


TUESDAY, OCTOilR % 1956 


THE DAILY TAR H^BL 


PAGi THREI 


'Tobacco 
Road' Opens 
Film Series 

Tobacco Road" will be shown 
hire Thursday as the first of the 
film series put on by the Film 
(.'ommittee of the Graham Memor- 
ial Activities Board. 

The film series movies are 
shown in Carroll Hall on Thurs- 
d..ys at 8 p.m. Tickets for these 
films may be obtained at only $2 
for the entire series at the GM 
Information Office, Ledbetter- 
P.ckard. Abernathy Hall. Yackety 
Yack Office and at the door at 
the first showing. 

The rest of the films this se- 
mester are: "Alexander Nevsky" 
(Russian), Oct. 16; "The Belles 
(if St. Trinians" (English), Nov. 
1; "M" (German), Nov. 15; 
•Flamenco" (Spanish), Nov. 29; 

Lifeboat" (American), Dec. 13; 

Incorrigible" (Swedish), Jan. 
10; "Arsenic and Old Lace" (Am- 
erican), Jan. 17. 

Selected short subjects will be 
.shown with most of the films in 
the serfes. 


High Schdol Press 
Will Hear Top Men 


—Dorm Men- 


By BUCK PAYSOUR 


DELIVERY ROUTE OF 
THE DAILY TAR HEEL 

Dorms (men and women) 

Fraternities and Sererities 

Rooming Houses with mors 
than 3 students 

Subscribers .^ , 

Nurses' Derm 

Infirnfary and Memorial 
Hospital 

Victory Village 

DTH Boxes en Raleigh, Dur- 
ham, Hillsboro, Pittsboro High- 
ways, and on Franklin Street. 
McCauley and Cameron Ave- 
nues. These are pick-up points 
for comntuttng students. 

If you fall into the above cata- 
gories and are not receiving the 
Tar Heel, Call Circulation Man- 
ager, 9-6362 between hours of S 
and 10 p.m. 


When North Carolina high 
school editors gather here Friday 
and Saturday for their fifteenth 
annual N. C. Scholastic Press In- 
stitute, they will hear talks by 
Manly Wade Wellman, author of 
numerous juvenile books, and 
Barry Farber, former editor of 
The Daily Tar Heel, who just re- 
turned from a two-month^ trip to 
Russia and Europe. 

Wellman is the featured speak- 
er at the opening session Friday 
afternoon at 5 o'clock. Among his 
books for high school readers are 
"The Wild Dogs of Drowing 
Creek," "The Mystery of Lost Val- 
ley," "Gray Riders" and "Flag on 
I the Levee." This fall his book for 
I adults, "Rebel Boast," a study of 
J five Confederate soldiers from En- 
I field, N. C, will be published by 
j Henry Holt and Co. 
I Farl)er, former student editor 
i from Greensboro, will speak at ! 
I the closing banquet "Saturday ev- { 
I ening at 7 o'clock at the Carolina 
i Inn. He will discuss his recent ' 
trip behind the Iron Curtain and | 
tell the high school editors his i 
impressions of life in Russia to- 1 
day. 

Saturday will be devoted to 
talks and panel discussions on 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Stacy: Charles Allen, secretary; 
i Eddie House, treasurer; Andy Den* ^ 
'• mark, intramural manager; Benny ! When sclwol began at the Uni- 
: Thomas, IDC representative. | ^«"'ty ^^^ ""• ^^^ Graham Mem- 

'■ GftlMES I ^^'^^ Student Union — "a home 

Grimes: Don Howard, Bob Her- *^*y '""o™ *>o">e" — »>«8an its 25th 
ford, secretary; Fred Schneel, Wal- y^^"" <*' service to students 


GM Begins 25 th Year 


MANLEY WADE WELLJMAN 

. . . author of many books 

news writing, feature writing, ad- 
vertising, editorials, sports, make- 
up, yearbook procedure, photog- 
raphy and other topics to help 
the high school students improve | 
their publications. 


ly Kuralt, Ronald Hamilton, trea- 
surer; Mike Hayes, IDC representa- 


It was exactly 25 yeare ago that 
most of the recreational life Of 


tive; Gary Nichols. Chuck Harky,j**>* building, which headquarters 
intramural manager. JUNC students, was completed and 

Lewis: John Riley, Jim Sparger, I ^^^^ '^^ ^^^ 'i"t time. 
Don Marion, vice president; B. J. | ^nd it was in January of the 
Moffett, Wiley Shearin, Tom Fish- j game school year that a Charlotte 
er. secretary; George Worsley, j man. Charles W. TiUett, Jr., dedi- 
David Fox, Bert Joyner, treasurer; i jated the building as a "lasting 
Jim Summey, intramural manager; j n,emorial' to Edward K. Graham. 
Frank Clontz, Jack Mason, IDC re- j University president from 1914 

through 1918. 

The next several years proved 
to be an eventful period, both for 
Graham Memorial and ihe history 
of the world. 


presentative. 

Alexander: David Jones, CJeorge 
Reese, Carroll Glenn, Bob Jacobus, 
vice president; Charles Pittman, 
Al Dodge, secretary; Leon Weilons, 
Hobart Steele, treasurer; Doug 
Henderson, intramural manager. 

Ruff in: Burton Horwitz, Dave Su- 
kow, Robert 


Women were clamoring for more 

Lowder secretary- ' **'"^"*^' ^^^ '" government and 
T ^ T^ K r^,' secretary, ^^ ^j,^ University. One bravb coed, 
Ljndon Deborde, treasurer; Ken | „„„,„^.„„ . ;. >= "»« ^ ^-v^u, 
r-^^^^-- „♦- 1 1 according to the student news- 

Goodman, intramural manager; _,„„, .,^„ ... « ^i. 

*" ' • paper, "paved the way for the 

fairer sex's use of the pool tables 

in Graham Memorial." 


Bob Hill, Pat Leonard, IDC repre- 
sentative. 
COBB 
Cobb: Leon Froshing, Erwin Ful- 
A new feature of the institute i ^^^' secretary; Avery Thomas, Sam 


Want Your 
OLD SUIT 

Ivy 

Leagueized 

We take out pleats, Re- 
cut Shoulders, convert 
to 3 button, put belt in 
the back. 

Fast and Efficient 
Service 

Pete the Tailor 


for Saturday morning will be two | 
panels on how to produce prize- 
winning newspapers and year- 1 
books. The newspaper panel will j 
be led by Chris Folk, faculty ad- j 
viser at Central High School in I 
Charlotte, assisted by David Mc- j 
Swain, editor of the Rambler at | 
Central High, and Ro!>ert Kirk- \ 
Patrick, managing editor. j 


Dorsett. Dick Robinson. Willam 
Dean, treasurer; Henry Rodenhei- 
mer, Aruthur Kutz, intramural 
manager; Mike Rosen, Hank Cald- 
well, Bill Beck, First floor IDC 
representative; Bob Noble, Jim 
Barbee. Second floor IDC repre- 
sentative; Bill McGee, John Fox, 
Kenneth Anderson, Jerry Sullivan, 
Sherwood Thompson, Third floor 


IDC representative: Otis Oliver, 
The panel on Prize-winnning j ^on Markins, Don Kroe, Mike Fleis- 

her, Jerry Blumenthal, Fourth 
floor IDC representative. 

Old West: Robert Cowan, secre- 
tary, James James, treasurer; Joe 
Cheekmore, intramural manager; 
Richard Jennings, William King, 


yearbooks will include Miss Mary 
Humphrey, yearbook adviser for 
the New Hanover School in Wil- 
mington; Betty Parker, editor of 
the yearbook at High Point High 
School; Bob Denham and Kay 


Swain, editors at James A. Gray ' Julius Banzet, IDC representative. 


SH1RTS-19C 




High School in Winston-Salem, 
and Mrs. Ruth Barfield and Jan- 
ice Parker of North Melklenburg 
High School in Charlotte. 

The annual institute is sponsor- 
ed by the University School of 
Journalism. The Daily Tar Heel 
and the Extension Division of the 


Steele: Jerry Shields, secretary; 
Tom Long, treasurer; Charles 
Reed intramural manager; Gene 
Weathers. IDC representative. 

Whitehead: Wayne Martin, vice 
president; Eli Atteyek, secretary; 
Grayson Montgomery. Norman 
Hall. Jim Bell. Billy Gibson, trea- 


University, with Walter Spearman j surer; Bobby Gaucom, Charlie Sa- 


EA. 


\(^mtUki 


a)€ handle 


oiithCARE 


With or Without 
Starch 

Prompt Service 



f^^. 


Glen Lennox Laundromat 


of the Journalism School as di- 
rector. 

Officers for the 1956 institute 
are Miss Pat Brown of Goldsboro, 
president; Miss Linda Diggle of 
Charlotte, vice-president; Mias 
Betty Woodbury of Wilmington, 
secretary; and Miss Theresa Pe- 
lone of Charlotte, treasurer. 


blston. Artie Shaw. IDC represen- 
tative. 

Battle-Vance-Pettigrew: Bert 
Warren, Bob Kuhns, secretary; 
Dave Mundy. John Smith, Gus Da- 
vis, treasurer; Rick Orr, intramu- 
ral manager; Courtland Edwards. 
Arthur Jones. Jim Merritt, IDC 
representative. 

Graham: Randy Oglesby. secre- 


Covering The Campus 


DAILY CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1. Claw 
5. Hastened 
9. F*rovisioni 
stored by 
explorers 
10. A hue 

12. Ghastly pale 

13. A fruit used 
as a relish 

14. Periods 
of time 

15. Enemy 

16. Half an em 
IT. Shilling: 

(abbr.) 
18 Drinks in 
small 
amounta 

19. Road (abbr.) 

20. Hit 
23. Throw 

25. Some 

26. Chum 

27. Courage 
29. Walked 

across a 

river 
32. Sun god 
23. Prepare for 

publication 
35 Greek letter 

36. NTeuter 
pronoun 

37. Pole 

38. Glass in 
fusion 

40. Musical 
instrument 

42 Erected 

43 Device for 
detecting 
underwater 
craft 

44 Narrow 
roadway 

45. Timber 
trees 
(K.I.) 


46. Vehicle with 18. Firma- 


runners 
DOWN 
1. Cipher 

2. Meaaurf 
of land 

3. ^titchbird« 

4. Guided 

5. Large ladle 

6. The North 
star 

7. High prieat 

8. Capital oC 
DelAwar* 
(poss.) 

9. Rank ', 
11. Teara 

violent!/ 
15. Exclama* 
tion 


ment 

21. Meas- 
ure 
(Siam) 

22. In. 
ward 

24. Ancient 

26. Kettle 

27. Suit- 
cases 

28. Propor- 
tions 

29. Splicing 
tool 

90. Banished 
from one's 
country 

91. A kind 
of song 


;^Ufej KLJa 'JliH 

:<izm:-^ ■rjrj;i'nii:-i 
n'2[i. Mjri] I'j'rj 


8»t«r4m)r'i Aatwcr 

34. Movable 
barriers 

38. Not empty 

39. Vex 

41. Miscellany 

42. A roulette 
bet 



PHARMACY WIVES 

The Pharmacy Wives will meet 
tomorrow at 8 p.m. at the Institute 
of Pharmacy. All Pharmacy wives 
have been invited to attend. 
WESLEY CHOIR 

The Wesley Choir of the Wesley 
Foundation will hold rehearsal to- 
day at 7 p.m. in the University 
Methodist Church. All interested 
persons have been invited to at- 
tend.. 
BAND MEMBERS 

All UNC Band members have 
been requested to .be on Emerson 
Field at 4:30 p.m. for band rehear- 
sals. 
INDOOR POOL 

The indoor swimm.ing pool is 
open for recreational swimming 
Mondays through Fridays from 4 
to 6 p.m., Saturdays from 2 to 6 
p.m. and Sundays, 2 to 5 p.m. Wo- 
men swimmers may wear their 
own bathing suits, but men swim- 
mers lare required to wear the 
special suits issued by the gym. 
EVENING SKETCH CLASS 

Person Hall Art Gallery has an- 
nounced a Wednesday evening 
sketch class beginnng tomorrow. 
The class will include sketching 
from life with drawing in various 
materials. The class, to meet 7 to 
9 p.m. will be under John Allcott 
of the Dept. of Art. The fee is $13 
for 13 weeks instruction, includ- 
ing materials. Those interesting in 
joining have been invited to come 
to the first meeting of the. class 
tomorrow at 4 p.m. 


But the male students did not 
give ground easily. 

"Once they (the girls) start to 
bowl, the boys gather around in 
high sarcastic glee," a UNC stu- 
dent wrote. "Masculine snickers 
drive blushes into their resentful 
cheeks, or drive them away alto- 
gether." . ' 

DEPRESSION 

The nation, during the early 
days of Graham Memorial's history, 
was recovering from a financial de- 
pression. At that time, it cost each 
student three dollars to operate 
Graham Memorial. Today, due to 
the higher cost of bving and the 
increased services provided by the 
Student Union, it costs six dollars, 
ham Memorial was established, a 

And at about the same time Gra- 
ham Memorial was established a 
young upstart called Hitler was 
making speeches in German beer 
parlors — speeches which were to 
change the world — and Graham 
Memorial. 

The Student Union, which spon- 
sors roost of the campus entertain- 


CLASSIFIEDS 


BLACKBURN'S MARKET 
(across from ice plant). Open 7 
days a week, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Fresh fruit and vegetables. Also 
beer. 

STUDENTS EXPERIENCED ON 
Linotype or open presses may 
obtain part time work at Colon- 
ial Pre.vs. Phone 333-6. 


ANNOUNCEMENT: THERE IS 
room for two more men at the 
campus cooperative Houae, 208 
W. Franklin St. Interested per- 
sons leave their name, address, 
and telephone numl)er at tite 
"Y" or come by the house. 


YDC 

The YDC is planning an open 
house especially for coeds. They 
will serve punch accompained by 
the rhythm of a combo from 7:30 
to 9 p.m. Thursday evening in the 
Rendezvous Room, Graham Mem- 
orial. 

COED SWIAAMING j 

The Women's Physical Educa- j 
tion Dept. will gve swmming and 
tennis tests today and Thursday 
from 3 to 4 p.m. 

All women students must have 
successfully completed a course in 
swimming and an individual sport, 
or have passed the above tests in 
order to graduate. 

STUDENT WIVES 

The Student Wives Club will 
meet tonight at 8 at the Victory 
Village Nursery, according to Sec- 
retary Pat Howard. All student wi 

ves have been invited to att nd. 

I • ■ 

READING COURSE 

Students interested in taking the 
Testing Service's reading course 
should apply at 108 Peabody some 
time this week, according to Paul 
Irvine Jr. of the Testing Servce. 

SCIENCE FILM 

"Time and Eternity," one of the 
latest Moody Institute of Science 
films, will be presented by the In- 
ter-Varsity Christian Fellowship to- 
night at 7 p. m. in Gerrard Hall. 

WUNC-TV 

Today's schedule for WUNC-tV, 
the University's educational tele- 
vision station, Channel 4: 
12:44 Sign on 
12:45 Music 

1:00 Today on Farm 

1:30 Music in Air 

2:00 Science & Nature 

2:30 Sign Off 

5:44 Sign On 

5:49 Muse 

6:00 Magic Lantern 

6:15 Sports Clinic 

6:30 News 

6:45 Sports 

7:00 Books L People 

7:15 Bible Course 

8:0U Dr. Shivers 

8:45 State Gov't. ; 

9:30 Final Edition ! 

10:05 Sign Off j 


tary, Don Owens, Billy Gautier, 
Jim Moore, treasurer; Jerry Long, 
Tom Nettleman, Curt Champlain, 
intramural manager, Bill Burress, 
Ken Jenkins, IDC representative. 

Joyner: John Alexander, Gene 
Maloney, treasurer. 

Dormitory presidents and vice 
presidents were elected last spring 
in accordance with a new stagger- 
ed electoral policy of the IDC. 

Some dormitory vice presidents 
didn't return to their respective 
i dorms this fall, necessitating new 
elections. 


ment, has seen many fads come 
and g(k during its history. Ellvis 
Presley is by no means the first 
craze it has wtnessed. In the mid- 
thirties, the director of Graham 
Memorial seriously considered ban- 
ning fhe "big apple" at the Stu- 
dent Union. 

The Student" Union has alwf»ys 
tried to stay within the l>ounds 
of the law in its activities. There 
was, for example, the time the dir- 
ector of Graham Memorial led a 
pep rally on Times Square in New 
York just before UNC was to meet 
the New York University in a foot- 
ball game. 
f 

"We couldn't build a bonfire 
because it was raining," the direc- 
tor said. 

"And also," he added, "it is 
against the law." 

NIGHT CLUB 

Then there was the time the 
board of directors decided to set 
up a "night club" for students. 
They hastened to explain, however, 
that the only cocktails to be served 
would be milkshakes and ice- 
cream. 

When Hitler's armies marched 
into Poland, the United States be- 
gan 'juilding up its defenses. The 
University responded with the ac 
nouncement that it would furnish 
beds and other accommodations for 
soldiers passing through Chapel 
Hill. Graham Memorial did its part 
by 4'urntishing entertainment for 
the troops. 

Graham Memorial continued to 
support the war effort after Japan 
the war. it staged dances and con- 
attacked Pearl Harbor. All during 
the war. it staged dances and con- 
certs for the benefit of the War 
Bond Drive. 

During its quarter-of-a-century 
history, Graham Memorial has had 
18 directors. The first was Noah 
Goodridge, who is now a Washing- 
ton D. C. businessman. The latest 
was Jimmy Wallace who recently 
resigned. Miss Linda Mann, the 
third woman ever to head Graham 
Memorial, is now acting director. 

INCOME 

Graham Memorial, which has 
steadily expanded its activities dur- 
ing the past 25 years, is still en- 
larging its program. In 1952, for 
example, its income was $15,000. 
In 1955, it was $55,000. 

In fact, its is jfrowing so much 
that is staff members now say that 
there just isn't enough roo.m for 
all its activties in the present build- 
ing. The building is much smaller 
than was originally planned. 

Included in the services offered 
to students at Graham Memorial 
are a barber shop where students 
can get a haircut cheaper than the 
going prices and a modem dark 
room for amateur photographers. 
Graham Memorial also houses bil- 
liard and ping-pong rooms, several 
conference rooms, a lounge with 


TV and rado, a room for daneng 
and the student government and 
publications officers. 

The Graham Memorial Activities 
Board is the first student program- 
ming group at UNC. It sponsors 
and schedules musical events, free 
movies and ether entertainment for 

students. 

Another function of Graham 
Memorial is to house the office of 
the Carolina Forum. Amojjg out- 
standing speakers presented last 
year by the Forum, a nonpartisan 
student group, were Sen. William 


Knowland, Rep. Sam Rayburn, Dr. 
Frank Graham and Sen. Wayne 
Morse. 

As Graham Memorial begins its 
25th year, its staff can truly say 
this has ben true to one of its slog- 
ans: "Graham Memorial is the liv- 
ing room of the campus." 


George L Coxhead | 


U.N.C. '42 
Campus Representative 


AUTOCONDITiONING 

The New Way to a Successful 
Life 

Hornell Hart 

By Duke's Own 
How to live consistently on a plans 
of confidence, satisfaction, and 
achievement. We have a copy for 
you, complete with Mood-Metsr, 


I for only 



NEW YORK LIFE 

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$4.95 

THE INTIMATE 
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205 East Franklin Street, 

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Open Till 10 P.M. 


DIH Reports $5,500 Gain 
Over Previous Fiscal Year 

The Daily Tar Heel gained better spent during 1954-55. 
than $5,500 in funds last year over 
the previous fiscal year, according 
to the Carolina Publicatons Union 
1955-56 financial statement. 

The Tar Heel's surplus was used 


It had an 
and spent 
deficit of 


income of $40,474.67 

$41,192.76, leaving a 

$718.09. 

Due to the Tar Heel's financial 

standing, the paper will run six 
to cover losses by the Yackety [ days each week all year, excepting 
Yack and the Carolina Quarterly, I exam periods ana holidays. Plans 


which amounted to more than $1, 
300. 

Official figures, submitted by 
Harry A. Kear, auditor, show the 
Tar Heel operating on a $49,601.15 
income during 1955-56, had a total 
expenditure of $46,591.41, leaving 
a balance of $3,099.74. The 1954- 
55 Tar Heel had a total income of 
$41,760.74, and spent $44,278.20— 
leaving a deficit of $2,517.46. 

In the fiscal year ending June 7, 
1956, the Carolina Quarterly over- 
spent $377.37. The Quarterly work- 
ed from a total income of $2,494.39, 
and its total expenses were $2,- 
871.76. The previous year the 
Quarterly went $240.80 into the 
red. 

During the 1955-56 fiscal year, 
the Yackety Yack went $996.22 in- 
to debt. The total expense was 
$44,070.32; the total incoipe only 
$43,074.10. The Yack also over- 


for a monthly magazine to be put 
out by the Tar Heel staff are now 
shaping up. 


PATRONIZE YOUR 
• ADVERTISERS • 


FREE 

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6:30 p.m. 

Sponsored By G.M.A.B. 


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WARNER BROS, present 

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PA6i POUR 


.THE DAILY TAR HHEL 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 7955 


Reed Returns To Heavy Duty Workouts 



A Sound Licking — But No Disgrace 

The nation's number one team gave Carolina a bad beating Sat- 
urday, but the Tar Keels had nothing to be ashamed of. It was simply 
a case of a minor league team stepping out of it's class to play the 
country's best, and the result was inevitable. 

Oklahoma doesn't hav* just a good team, they have a great one. 
The Sooners displayed channelled power and precision in every 
phase of the game in their runaway victory over the Tar Heels. 
Sharp slashing blocking and savage tackling were not the exception, 
but the rule, as they always seem to be with a Bud Wilkinson Coach- 
ed team. 

And the Sooner backs never stopped their hard driving forward 
motion until at least three Tar Heels were sitting on them. When they 
were hit and dropp^, the Oklahoma ball carriers would bounce to 
their feet like rubber balls and hustle back to the huddle to get the 
next play under way. 
SOONER SPEED UNDER A HOT SUN 

The accent, respite the burning temperatures, was on speed, speed 
and more speed. The line was fast, the backs were swift as jackrabbits, 
and the resting time between plays was at the barest minimum. And 
the flow of fresh hungry reserves off the heavily laden Sooner bench 
was like a spring torrent. 

To most observers in the press box, the Sooner subs looked 
•very bit as good as the number one unit. When the Tar Heels were 
knocking at the goaline gate in the third quarter, they were moving 
well against Oklahoma's first string. When the Carolina push reach- 
ed the Sooner eight yard line, however. Coach Wilkinson rushed 
his second unit into action, and the Tar Heels went no further. 
VICTORIOUS BUT STILL DISAPPOINTED 

The Sooner players themselves were happy to win, but seemed 
a little disappointed over their overall performance. Coach Bud Wilkin- 
san and his proteges were distrubed by the frequent fumbles and 
penalties that plagued them, but marked the miscues down to opening 
game spottiness. 

Most of the Sooners thought the Tar Heels were big and hard 
hitting, but just ran out of steam too soon. Or, as halfback Dave 
Baker aptly put it, "They just had too few personnel." 

Among the Tar Heels singled out for special praise by the Sooners 
were big Stewart Pell at tackle, Ed Sutton at halfback. George Stav 
nitski at, center. Dick Smith at guard and Curt Hathaway at quarter- 
back. ■ 1 
CUFF NOTES FROM SOONER LAND 

The Tar Heels looked bright and sassy in their Carolina blue 
Stetson hats when they stepped off the plane in Oklahoma City. Photo- 
graphers were out in force, and the papers next day were liberally 
sprinkled with pics of the Carolina football team and their "Tatum 
special" headgear. 

It <was a drastic switch from cool Carolina temperatures to the 
parching Oklahoma sun. The thermometer was in the nineties for the 

gmm: ^ 

Some phases of the athletic program at the U. of Okla. may be 
rather surprisng to the rabid Big Four basketball fan. The big winter 
sport and crowd drawing card is not basketball, but wrestling. When 
the grunt and groaners from Oklahoma and Oklahoma A&M met last 
winter at Norman, over 6,000 frenzied fans turned out. The Aggies are 
perennial national champs, with the Sooners not far behind. 
KEY TO PLAY WAS FORWARD, NOT LATERAL 

Game movies show that the Dave Baker to Jay O'Neal lateral that 
gave Oklahoma their first TD was not a lateral after all, but a forward. 
Wouldn't have made much difference in the long run, though. 

UNC Coach Tatum was responsible for the sellout crowd and 
tremendous interest in the game. Sunny Jim formerly coached at 
Oklahoma, and his Maryland teams and Oklahoma have been fierce 
Orange Bowl rivals in the past. Sooner sports publicist Harold Keith 
said the game wouldn't have drawn a capacity crowd if it hadn't sold 
out before the Carolina-State clash. 



^Wally Vale Is Shifted 
To Halfback Position 


Stavnitski Out 

George Stavnitski, Tar Heel veteran center, is still under obser- 
vation in an Oklahoma City Hospital from injuries received in the 
UNC-Oklahoma game. It was reported by hespitaf officials yesterday 
that he is resting comfortably with no broken bones or paralysis 
but with his condition not completely determined. 


May Not Start W ednesday 

Maglie Sidelined 
By Stomache Ache 


Spartans Second; Tech Third 


By ED WILKS 

BROOKLYN, Oct. 1 (>P)— Sal The 
Magnificent Maglie had the mis- 
eries today, leaving wide open the 
question of who will be Brooklyn's 
pitcher against. the New York Yan- 
kees and lefthander Whitey Ford 
in Wednesday's World Series open- 
er at Ebbets Field. 

The Dodgers, hungry for some 
relaxation after the fr.intic finish 
to the National League pennant 
race, had the day off. But when 
Maglie showed up with the rest 
to pick up his ticket allotment, he 
admitted to an upset stomach and 
reported his shoulder "a bit stiff." 

That confirmed Manager Walt 
Alston's worry over the 39-year- 
old righthander, who proved the 
Big Guy in the stretch run. The 
Dodger skipper, given little chance 


Sooners Top Poll 
After Routing NC 


By HUGH FULLERTON JR 
The Associated Press ' 

Oklahomii, Michigan State and 
Georgia Tech are the nation's top 
three football teams in the opin- 
ions of sports writers and broad- 
casters. Then, with their minds 
on the World Series, they're ap- 
parently paraphrasing an old base- 
ball question and asking: Who's 
in fourth? 

Although there were few, if any, 
major upsets last weekend, the 
second weekly Associated Press 
ranking poll resulted in another 
big reshuffling of the top 10 teams 
Eight of last week's, first 10 re- 
tained their places in the upper 
group, hu' except for Oklahoma's 
No. 1 ranking, none held the same 
spot. 

Oklahoma received 60 first- 
place votes out of 97 ballots cast, 
20 more for second place and 
polled 883 points on the usual basis 
of 10 for first, nine for second, 
eic. As usual the balloting dropped 
off a bit during the excitement 
over the end of the baseball sea- 
son. 


Michigan State, an impressive 
winner over Stanford in its season- 
al debut, moved ahead of Georgia 
Tech into second place with 17 
firsts and 773 points to Tech's five 
and 662. 

Oklahoma, the top choice in the 
AP pre-season poll, stopped North 
Carolina, 36K), while Michgan 
State whipped Stanford 21-7. 
Meanwhile Georgia Tech chalked 
up its second close one of the sea- 
son, beating Southern Methodist, 
early conqueror of Notre Dame, 
by a 9-7 count. 

After these three, the writers 
and broadcasters participating in 
the AP poll indicated a lot of 
doubt as to how the teams should 
be rated. On the point scores they 
came out in this order: Ohio State, 
Michigan, Mississippi, Pittsburgh, 
Texas Christian, Tennessee and 
Southern California. 

The strong opening perform- 
ances of the Big Ten appar- 
ently made a big impression. Oho 
State moved up from eghth place 
and Michigan from 13th. 


All Premiums And Draft 

T. V. — Good Place To 

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Bring Your Date 

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Phone 9-2846 


United States 
Tops Italians 
In Cup Play 

FOREST HILLS, N. Y.. Oct. 1 (/P) 
— Texan Sam Giammalva, stung 
by an Italian slight, crushed string 
bean Orlando Sirola, 12-10, 6-3. 6-2, 
today to give the United States a 
4-1 rout in the Davis Cup inter- 
zone tennis final at West Side Sta- 
dum. 

The bowlegged Houston young 
ster, a third-day substitute after 
America had clinched the series 
with a doubles victory yesterday, 
played with a vengeance when 
he learned that the other member 
of the Italiar^ team, Nicola Pie- 
trangeli, had refused to play him. 

In the first of the two super- 
fluous singles matches, the color- 
ful but temperamental Pietrangeli 
downed 19-year-old Mike Green of 
Miami, 3-8, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. 

The referee, Don McNeill, 
came to me and said 'You play 
Giammalva,' " Pietrangeli said. 
"I said nobody tells me whom I 
play. I said I will play Green or 
nobody. 

"I have -nothing against Giam- 
malva. personally I have never 
played him in my life. But I didn't 
want anybody telling me what I 
had to do." 


to enjoy his second consecutive 
pennant has doubted whether Sal 
could get the job done after only 
three days rest. 

"Maglie's the logical choice," 
said Alston, "but he may need 
more rest. I know he pitched that 
no-hitter last Tuesday with only 
three days rest, but how can you 
be sure he can come back again?" 

Sal. who has been comng back 
all season, figured the stiffness 
might work out of his shoulder in 
a pre-game warmup, and Alston 
followed the lead. 

STARTER UNCERTAIN 

"I won't know who starts for us 
until just before game time," he 
said. 

"And if it isn't Maglie, it might 
be Carl E^kine, or Roger Craig, 
or maybe even Clem Labine. I 
just don't know." 

> "It's Ford, all right," said Case 
as his Yanks worked out at the 
stadium today. 

"Yeah, yeah, I know. They say 
those guys the Dodgers have a 
picnic wth lefthanders over there 
in Brooklyn's bandbox ballyard. 
But I can't afford to wait 'til we 
get over here, so I gotta go with 
my best and my best is Ford." 

WEEK'S REST 

Ford, 28, hasn't worked since 
last Wednesday, when he lost his 
shot for a 20th victory at Balti- 
more. That gives him a full week's 
rest going into the opening game, 
scheduled for 1 p. m. E:DT 'n 
predicted cool and clear weather. 

Whitey, however, hasn't won 
yet in Ebbets Field, although his 
3-1 World Series record includes 
two of the Yankees' three vic- 
tories over the Brooks last year. 
In his only start at Ebbets, Whitey 
lasted just one inning, giving three 
hits and three runs in the fourth 
game of the 1953 classic. 

Still, the bookmakers have 
junked the idea that Brooklyn'.* 
righthanded hitting power will 
ruin Ford again as he works in 
the snadow of the nearby left field 
stands in Ebbets Field. They've 
made the Yankees a 6-5 choice 
in the opener, picking Labine for 
Alston. If it's Ford against Mag 
lie, however, it's 6-5 and "pick 
'em." 


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Bring this ad and receive one cent per gallon off on gas, and 
five cents per quart off en dil. This makes ESSO gas 28.9 and 
31.9. Good Oct. 2 Thru Oct. 8, 1956. 


Carolina's Tar Heels, with two 
straight one sided lickings under 
ther belt, welcomed back ace quar- 
terback Dave Reed wth open arms 
yesterday as they began work for 
Saturday's game with the surpris- 
ingly powerful South Carolina 
Gamecocks at Columbia. 

Reed, who had been counted on 
by Coach Jim Tatum for he3vy 
duty this season, tore a ligament in 
his knee on the first day of fall 
practice and has been out ever 
since. The 160 pound junior from 
Shomokin, Pa., had originally 
been pronounced out or the entire 
season, but the injured knee re- 
sponded to treatment sooner than 
had been anticipated. 

VALE AND VARNUM AT HALVES 

Reed worked with a backfield 
unit yesterday that included Jim 
Varnum and transplanted fullback 
Wally Vale at the halves, and Don 
Lear at fullback. Vale was trans- 
ferred from fullback after the loss 
to 0^1ahoma Saturday. 

In front of that quartet was a 
line composed of Buddy Payne and 
Larry Muschamp at ends. Stewart 
Pell and Phil Blazer af tackles. Hap 
Setzer and Jim Jones at guards and 
Ronnie Koes at center. Halfbacks 
Larry McMullen and Ed Sutton al- 
ternated with Varnum and Vale. 

STAVNITSKI STILL 
HOSPITALIZED 

Koes replaced co-captain Stavnit- 
ski, who was injured in the Sooner 
contest, at the center slot. Stavnit- 
ski, who was knocked out on the 
second half kickoff, is still under 
observation in an Oklahoma City 
hospital. Latest word received here 
today is that he is resting com- 
fortably with no bones broken or 
paralysis, but with his condition 
'still not completely rletermined. It 
is thought that he may have suf- 
fered a concussion. 

The Tar Heels were continuing 
their search for a potent offense 
to replace the one that racked up 


140 yards rushing and passing 
against the Sooners. The defense 
was not much more impressive, al- 
lowing the Sooners to move for 
430 yards total and giving up 20 
first downs. 

GAMECOCKS ARE TOUGH 

This weekend's tilt with South 
Carolina promises to be another 
rough and tumble affair for the 
luckless Tar Heels. In two starts 
to date, the Birds have split even, 
whipping mighty Duke 7-0 in the 
season's opener; and losing to high- 
ly rated Miami by a single touch- 
down last Friday night. By com- 
parison, the Tar Heels have been 
dealt decisive setbacks in both 
their games. They dropped their 
opener to State by a 26-6 count, 
and then went down before Okla- 
homa, 36-0. 

An added attraction involved in 
the contest with the Gamecocks 
is the teacher-student relationship 
that exists, or has existed, between 
SC coach Warren Giese and Caro- 
lina head man, Jim Tatum. Last 
year at Maryland, Tatum was head 
coach and Giese his right hand 
assistant. 


Harriers Hold 
Trials Today 

This afternoon on Fetzer Field, 
Wie Carolina varsity and fresh- 
man runners will hold their fin- 
al time trials before the initial 
meets of the season against Vir- 
ginia and the Duke Frosh respec- 
tively here Friday. 

When asked whether or not 
sophomore Wayne Bishop would 
be able to run in the trials, var- 
sity Coach Dale Ranson replied, 
"I think he is going to run." Pre- 
viously Bishop had been hamper- 
ed by a knee injury which pre- 
vented extensive workouts. 

The Tar Heel head mentor also 
said that it was too early in the 
season to predict the success of 
the team. He added. However, that 
the team should show definite 
improvement over last year. 

This afternoon's trials are sche- 
duled to start at 4:30. 


Soccer Squad 
Aiming Toward 
Opening Meet 

In spite of bad weather for the 
past few days, the Carolina soc- 
cer team has been going through 
stiff workouts in preparation for 
the season's opener with Lynch- 
burg College here Oct. 8. 

Although little is known of 
Lynchburg, a newcomer to the 
Tar Heel schedule, UNC Coach 
Marvin Allen expects a tough 
match. Last year, Lynchburg beat 
Roanoke, a team that was one of 
Carolina's conquerors. 

Coach Allen said yesterday that 
the squad worked hard last week 
in an effort to strengthen its 
weak points. The Tar Heel head 
mentor feels that the squad at 
this stage of the season is better 
than last year's. 

Managers Meet 

The first intramural dormitory 
manager's meeting will be held 
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Room 301- 
A of Woollen Gym. Graduate and 
Professional Schools are also in- 
cluded. 


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WEATHER 

Partly cloudy and moderaUly 
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Seri-ns Dept. 
ehapel Hill. M. C. 
8-31- 


VOL. LVill, NO. 11 



COORDINATION 

Editor praises bill. See editorial, 
page 2. 


Complete tJP) Wire Service 


CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1956 


Offices in Graham ^emttrial 


FOUR PAGES THIS ISSUE 


Chapel Hill Man Fined I Second Round 

For Assault On Prof 


By WALLY KURALT 

A Chapel Hill man was fined 
yesterday for assaulting a Univer- 
sity psychology instructor. 

Ernest Taylor, owner of an Old 
Fraternity Row rooming ho I a, 
was found guilty of assault and 
battery in recorder's court. He was 
fined $50 and costs, and appealed 
his case to Orange Superior Court. 

The psychology instructor, Al 
Krebs, was unavailable for com- 
ment after court yesterday. 

Mrs. Krebs gave this account of 
the incident: 

Duo to the recently imposed 
parking ban, Krebs could not find 
a parking place Friday morning, 
and finally parked his car at 8 a.m. 
in front of Taylor's rooming 
house. When she and Krebs re- 
tmned at 1 p.m., Taylor walked 
up to them and pointed out they 
had parked on private property, 
disregarding his 'No Parking" 
sisn. 

Krebs replied he thought it was 
public property. 

A car had parked behind Krebs 
car, blocking the alley, and Tay- 
lor refused to tell whose car it 
was. Krebs then left to get Officer 
Graham Creele, who reportedly 
ccould not leave his post. 

Krebs called the police, told 
them his stor>', and was told Ihe 
car would be moved, Mrs. Krebs 
said. 

Krebs returned to his car. Tay- 
lor invited Krebs to call proper 
authorities and ascertain whether 
the alley, was public or private. 
Krebs said if he found the alley 
were public, he intended to park 
there every day, Mrs. Krebs said/ 

Taylor hit Krebs in the mouth. 

Krebs and his wife then walked i 
to the police station and swore 
out a warrant for Taylor's arrest. I 


terday, had this to say: 

"My car was parked right up 
out by going forward. He (Krebs) 


Set Tonight 


Freshmen and unpledged upper 
classmen will continue in the sec- 


Playmakers Show Of 'Anastasia' 
Will Be Presented In Two Weeks 


In Bryant Speech:, . 

Faculty Stiiories, Preserving 
Acaclei^ic Freedom Stressed 


„„» K „. ■ r J TT /., L I ond round of rush parties tonight 

out b going forward. He (Krebs) ' 


parked his car within 13 inches in i 
back of mine, blocking me in, < 
locked his car, and had his wheels ! 
turned so I couldn't push it back, j 
He had plenty of room farther ! 
back. There was a space of about I 
30 feet behind him. His car was 
parked, one foot in front of my 
steps." 

A Coffee Shop worker drove up, 
said someone had taken his park- 
ing place farther down the alley, 
and asked permission to park his 
car behind Krebs' car. Taylor said 
it was "all right with me; I'm 
blocked in anyway." The worker 
could not get his car in the space, 
so he left it blocking the alley. 

Krebs came back to his car and 
"said he didn't care about the no 
parking sign," said Taylor. "Said 
he'd park here any time he want- 
ed. He was mad. He said, 'I'm 
going to park it here Saturday and 
six days next week.' " 

Both Taylor's and Krebs" cars 
were then blocked in by the third 
automobile. 

"1 told him I was blocked in for 
four hours, and I didn't care if 
he stayed there until tomorrow 
morning. Then he went to get the 
police." 

"I told the police whose car it 
was, but I wouldn't tell him." Tay- 
lor said. "He was real mad." 

"My deed calls for a 19 foot 
drive. That alley is the only ac- 
cess to my place. 

Taylor said he could, but is not 
going to pay the $50 and costs. He 
has appealed to Superior Court 
plans to hire a lawyer, swear oul 
a warrant against Krebs for tres- 
passing and leave it up to the law- 
yer. 

"I'm "hot through fighting." said 


from 7 to 9:30. 

Parties will continue tomorrow 
night and Friday is scheduled as 
shake-up day. 

Formal bids will go out Monday 

from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Gerrard 

! Hall, at which time men pledging 

I will sign pledge cards and pay 

i fees. 

Rushing began Sunday afternoon 
and Monday, when men were re- 
quired to visit all fraternity hous- 
es from which they had received 
invitations. 

In the second round of parties, 
which continues . tonight, men arc 
permitted to visit houses of their 
preference. 

Assl. to the Dean of Student Af- 
fairs Ray Jefferies advises rushees. 
"Just be yourself." I 


Taylor, reached at his home yes- j Taylor. 


Alumni Giving Committee 
Chairmen Meet Here Tomorrow 


Individual chairmen from 57 
towns and cities throughout North 
Carolina will meet here tomorrow 
at noon in the Caroiiaa Inn with 
State Chairman William H. Ruf- 
fin of Durham to map out final 
plans for the advance gifts phase 
of the Alumni Annual Giving pro- 
gram this year. 

The advance gifts campaign will 
get imder way on Oct. 15 and will 
continue through Nov. 30. 

Ruffln has appointed seven vice- 
chairmen to assist him. These 
chairmen are Marion R. Cowper, 
Kinston, District I; R. D. Lee Co- 
vington, Raleigh, Dictrict II; 
Franklin S. Clark, Fayetteville, 
District III; James W. Poole, 
Greensboro, District IV; Esley O. 
Anderson Jr., Charlotte, District 
V; Gerald Cowan, Asheville, Dis- 
trict VI; and William E. Stevens, 
Jr., Lenoir, District VII. 

On June 30 Alumni Annual 
Giving wound up its fourth year 
at the University. A total of 3,773 
alumni contributed $57,621.89 for 
an average gift of $15.26. 

The Alumni Annual Giving 
Council held its annual fall meet- 
ing here on Sept. 30 and made 
grants to the University in such 
vital areas as faculty research, 
faculty travel, faculty retirement, 
Chancellor's Emergency Fund, 
student welfare, etc. Archie K. 
Davis of Winston-Salem, chairman 
of the Alumni Annual Giving 
Council presided over this meet- 
ing. 

The towns and cities in the state 
in which the advance gifts solici- 


tation will be conducted and the 
districts in which they are located 
are as follows: 

District I: Elizabeth City, Green- 
ville, Kinston, New Bern, Rocky . , ,,„. ,, .... 
„ \ ,„ . ,„ ,. / „,.. strains of Charmaine, which has 

Mount, Tarboro, Washington, Wil- ^^^^ . . . . .. „„„ „ 

' „ . ^ ' t come to be his theme song, 

son, and Edenton. 

District II: Raleigh, 


Albanese 
To Open 
SEC Card 

Licia Albanese, Metropolitan 
Opera-soprano, will be the first of 
five top performers who are to ap- 
pear on the student entertainment 
program this year, beginning Nov. 
1. 

Other artists who will perform 
for Carolina students during the 
coming vear include Mantovani, 
master of the cascading strings; 
the General Platoff Don Cossack 
Chorus, Actor Henry Hull and 
Jose Limon and Dance Company. 

Students are admitted free to 
these SEC programs on prefenta- 
tion of ID cards. 

Mantovani and. hjj orcliestra ttl 
45, will feature his "New Music" 
on Dec. 6. This Venetian-born 
Londoner, who began the era of 
new music with his first album 
for London Records. "Waltzing 
With Mantovani," has currently 
made many records including 
"Cara Mia," which was written for 
David Whitfield. 

A versatile concert figure, Man- 
tovani has music for everybody, be 
it the 300-year-old "Greensleeves," 
a serenade by Tschaikowsky, or the 


The Carolina Playmakers wil 
open their current theater seasoi» 
two weks from tonight, with five 
performances of "Anastasia", re 
cent Broadway success about exil 
ed Russian nobility, at the Play 
makers Theatre, UNC campus. 

Adapted from the French o. 
Maicelle Maurette by Guy Bolton 
the story is set in Berlin early in 
1926. The action is based on a 
rumor that one of the Czar's chy- 
dren, Princess Anastasia. then 17, 
escaped the massacre of the Roy- 
al family by the Bolshevists in 
1918 and fled, into Geimany. 

Prince Bounine, exiled Russian 
nobleman, finds a destitute girl, i 
Anya, and builds up the story that 
she is t'he Princess Anastasia who, 
because of waunds and privations, 
has lost her memory. The attempt 
to convince those who knew the 
princess reveals a series of sur- 
prises about the unusual Anya. j 

Rusti Rothrock, Aniston; Ala., 
is cast in the title role. Mrs. Roth- 
rock, wife of a UNC graduate 
a.^sistant. has acted with several 
community theatres, at Cherokee 
in "Unto These Hills" and at the 
University of Arkansas. She is how 
a speech therapist for Durham 
County. 

Marion Fitz-Simons, Chapel Hill, 
portrays the formidable Dowager 
Empress, grandmother of Anas- 
tasia, wiho presents t'lc strongest 
challengs to the plan of Bounine. 
Mrs. Fritz-Simons, wife of a UNC 
professor, has appeared in a long 
list of P'lymaker productions, in- 
cluding "Macbeth", "Medea", "Ar- 
senic and Old Lace", "Dark of the 
Moon', "Lysistrata". and last year's 
"Blood Wedding". 

Morgan Jackson, freshman from 
Charlotte, plays Prince Bounine. 
A Korean War veteran, Jackson 
has acted with fihe Paris Ameri- 1 
can Hi f t n! <Jr©tfp Iff TStts 
Weisbaden Theatre Guild in Ger- 
many, The University of Alabama 
Theatre, and "Unto These Hills". 

Joe Whiteaker, Pine Bluff. Ark., 
appears as Prince Paul, childhood 
sweetheart of Anastasia. A Navy 
veteran, Mr. Whiteaker was active 
with the University Theatre at iH" 
U. of Arkansas, where he received 



I Provision of "adequate" facu!t> 1 the UNC Faculty Club 

! salaries, and preservation of aca- 
demic freedom were two points 
stressed by Victor S. Bryant in an 
address yesterday afternoon before 


Geology Dept. 
Seeks Facts 
On Earthquake 


The UNC Dept. of Geology has 
requested that any persons who 
were in the region of eastern Ten- 
nessee and western North Caro- ■ 
Una during the earthquake shocks 
which occurred Sept. 7 and felt 
the resulting tremors contact the 
UNC Dept: of Geology and Geog- 
raphy or Gerald R. MacCartliy, 
professor ol Geology and Geophy- 
sics at UNC. 

MacCarlhy states that the Dept. 
of Geology wishes to know the 
exact locations at which the quake 
was felt, and additional informa- 
tion as to the number of shocks 
felt and the sensations produced. 

The shocks were recorded on 
the seismograph at UNC, Mac- 
Carlhy says, but . geologists have 
been unable so far to pin down 
the exact location of the quake. 
The shocks are known to hlave 
been fcli throughout much of wes- 
tern North Carolina and adjacent 
areas, he states. 


j Bryant, a member of the Execu- 
'■ tive Committee of the Board of 
i Trustees, discussed 'The Responsi- 
I bililies of Trustees of a State Uct- 
i versify," emphasizing that he was 
presenting "my individual views" 
! and was not authorized to speak 
: "either for the Board or any group 
I of Trustees." 

1 He outlined the trustee's respon- 
i sibilities to "four distinct entities: 
i thi state, the University admin- 
i istration. the faculty, and the stu- 
i dent body." 


Maintaining an adequate salary 
schedule for both faculty and ad- 
I ministrative officers is "peculiarly 
the responsibility of the trustee," 
Bryant said. "This schedule should 
be one which will enaole the con- 
tinual recruitment of an outstand- 
ing faculty, and at tiie same time 
enable the University to retain its 
present distingushed faculty. 

"We must expect our faculty 
i members to receive offers to go 
; elsewhere, but we should be pre- 
I pared through financial and other 
means to fight to hold them." Bry- 
ant said. 

He expressed gratitude to those 
faculty members who have re- 
ceived such offers but "who have 
chosen to cast your future lot 
here with fhis University." 


.i,.OKoMiM jMcKaON, LEFT. AND MRS. RUSTI ROTHROCK 

. . . //; l*hfstn<ihi')s' Pro(ht( llott 


an acting award last spring.. 

The Rev. W. Robert Insko. Chap- 
Iain to Epi.scopal students at UNC, 
takes the role o'. Dr. Scrensky. who 
knows the pretender. .\nya. in an- 
other identity trom that of a prin- 
ces.s. 

Others in the cast are: Russell 
^jj^!4lnk» Jamaica. N. Y., as Chernov: 
Gene Duke. Oxford. , a.s Potriivin; 
Peter O'SulIivan. Valhalla. N. Y., 
as Counsellor Drivinitz; Betty Jin- 
nette. Goldsboro, as the Charwo- 
man; Hope Sparger, Scarsdale. N. 
Y., as Varya: Frank Rinaldi, Water 
bury. Conn., as Sergei: John Sned- 
en, Tenafly. N. J., as the Sleigh 
Driver; and Eve Janzan. of Chapel 
Hill, as Baroness Livenbaum. i 


"Anastasia" is under the direc- 
tion of Samuel Selden, Chairman 
of the UNC Department of Dra- 
matic Art. Sta-^e Manager is Dick 
Newdick. Augusta, Maine, and the 
set is designed by Tommy Rezzuto, 
Ashville, Technical Director for 
thePlaxTnakcrs. - 

Oniy 50 specially-priced season 
ticket books arc left, at a saving 
of fifty-percent, and can be ob- 
tained at 214 Abernethy Hall, Led- 
bellrr-Pickard's, or Bo.\ 1050. Rcgu 
liir reserved scat tickets will be 
available for each production ten 
days in advance for season ticket 
holders, a week in advance for the 
general public. I 


English Dept. 
Adds Stoffers 


. OBLIGATION 

I However, Bryant said, "I cannot 
.; feel that the state has any right to 
profit financial iy from such loyai- 
I ty on your part. The University is 
j under a great obligation to you.' 


The speaker, who heads the 

: Trustees' committee which will 

Three new instructors have been j recommend on the appointment of 

added to the Dept. of English, Dr. j a new UNC president, predicted 

Dougald MacMillan, chairman, an- , a glorious future immediately 

aounced recently. \ ahead for this University" and 

Beginning new teaching duties asked the facuJiy members to 

with the fall semester Were Rich- ( hold on a little longer." 


song. 
COSSACK CHORUS 

Also internationally famous is 

the Gen. Platoff Don Cossack 

Chorus, directed by Nicholas Kos- 

trukoff, appearing here in its 18th 

boro, Clinton, Jacksonville, Lau- transccontinental tour on Feb. 12, 


Durham, 
Chapel Hill, Henderson, ' Oxford, 
Roxboro, and Sanford. 

District III: Fayetteville, Golds- 


Graham Portrait Likely 
Will Stay In Morehead 


rinburg, Lumberton, Southern 
Pines, Pinehurst, Whiteville, and 
Wilmington. 

District IV: Greensboro, Win- 
ston-Salem, High Point, Burling- 
ton, Reidsville, Mt. Airy, Leaks- 
ville, Asheboro, and Liberty. 

Distri<n V: Charlotte, Gastonia, 
Concord, Kannapolis, Belmont, 
Shelby, Rockingham, Hamlet and 
Albemarle. 

District VI: Asheville, Brevard, 
Canton, Hendersonville, Marion, 
and Waynesville. 

District VII: Hickory, Lenoir, 
Lexington, Morganton, Salisbury, 
Statesville, and Thomasville. 


Cardboard 
Membership 
Has Quota 


The UNC Cardboard has an- 
nounced that their quota of 106 
members has been accepted for the 
1956-57 season. 


INFIRMARY 


Thosa in tht irtflrmary yaster- 
c!ay included: 

Mistas Evelyn Baatrlea Da 
Hart. Mary Danca, Jana Elixa- 
bath Painter, Ann Haney, Linda 
Paul, Sua Giltiam, Julia Mart- 
anna Black, and Marvin Hariess, 
Donald Kamper, John Cerbatt, 
Hugh Prica, Clayton Smith, 
Crais White, Millar Smith, Al- 
vin Smith, Earl Covington, Enno 
Rarkandorf and Norman Smith. 


A successful campaign made it 
possible for old and new students 
to become acquainted with ths or- 
ganization, according to President 
Snyder Pate. 

President Pate said, "We would 
like to take this opportunity to 
thank everyone who helped make 
this campaign so effective. 

'Stunts at the State-UNC game 
were a tremendous success. Of 
course, as usual, a few cards of 
the wrong color appeared, but pos-; 
sibly ,ths can be corrected in fu- 
ture games. The Cardboard wishes 
to congratulate the student body 
for such a fine performance." 


1957. 

The booming Cossacks have per- 
formed in 2,100 concerts in the 
USA and appeared in 65 countries 
on six continents. The Chorus is 
composed of the best vocal and 
dancing talent of the White Rus- 
sian emigres, who have fought 
communism in Russia. 

Henry Hull, noted for his per- 
formance as Mark Twain, will be 
presented by the SEC on March 
26, 1957. Through his four decades 
in the theatre he has also distin- 
guished himself in such roles as 
Malvolio in "Twelfth Night." Jest- 
} er Leester in "Tobacco Road," and 
I Edgar Allen Poe in "Plumes in 
j the Dust," along with such plays 
I ds "Mr. Roberts," "The Trail of 
Joan of Arc," and many others. 
He has also plaved in "Great Ex 
pectations." "Objective BUrma," 
"Lifeboat." and many other mov- 
ies. 

Jose Limon and Dance Company 
will perform on April 11, 1957. Li- 
mon and his dancers recently 
swept South America, not with 
naliye rhvthms. but with modern 
dance selections. 

The members of the SEC are; 
John Kerr, chairman, Joel Carter. 
Don Freeman, Georee Hamilton. 
Kai .lereenson, Olin Mouzon, J'lm- 
mv Wallace, and Misses Martha 
Barber and Shiralee and Barbaree 
Prestwood. 


Rushees 

Ed Hudgint, presidant of the 
IPC, taid last night that no fra- 
farnity had bean eonvictad of 
dirty rushing, and that no fra- 
iirnltf hi* ^•n barrad from 
rushing or pMdging, as has bean 
rUmcfrM. 


By CLARKE JONES 

The portrait of Dr. Frank Gra- 
ham is still in the Morehead Build- 
ing faculty lounge. 

And the painting of the former 
University president is likely to 
remain in its "temporary" home 
for some time, according to an in- 
formed South Building source. 

The reason for its staying there 
for awhile, said the source, k be- 
cause some persons have been so 
up in the air as to where it should 
be hung permanently. 

Chancellor Robert B. Hou.se, who 
will determine its permanent site, 
has apparently for that reason de- 
cided to let things settle down be- 
fore deciding where to put it. 
CONTROVERSY 

The storv behind the controversy 
goes like this: 

Last spring, toward the end of 
the school year, the portrait was 
unveiled in Hill Hall, then moved 
10 the Morehead Building faculty 
lounge. 

P*rotests immediately followed 
ihis action. Many persons thought 
•iince Dr. Graham was such a good 
friend of the students while he 
was here it should be placed in 
Graham Memoriral where they 
could see it everyday. The faculty 
lounge was rarely visited by stu- 
dents, some said. 

Members of the committee, how- 
ever, seemed a little doubtful 
about putting it in Graham Me- 
morial — named for Dr. Edward 
Kidder Graham, another former 
Universi.ty president. It would be 
a slight upon 
they felt. 

And that's how it stands today. 
The South Building source, how- 
ever, said it will be moved, that 
it is there only temporarily. 
FIRST STEPS 

The fir.st steps toward obtaining 
a portrait of Dr. Frank Graham 
were taken by University students 
in 1949, the year he resigned the 
presidency to accept appointment 


to the U. S. Senate. 

Many students contributed small 
amounts but they did liot raise 
enough to obtain the type painting 
flesired. Accordingly, at the re- ' 
quest of some of the students, a 
committee was organized in LQ.'i.5 , 
to receive contributions from 
friends of Graham. The committee 
included such persons as Dean of 
Student .\ffairs Fred Weaver. State - 
Board of Higher Education Chair- 
man D. Hiden Ramsay and John I 
Sanders, Raleigh lawyer. I 


Atomic Energy 

Exhibit Set 

At Planetarium 


A modern age exhibit, 'The 
Summary of Atomic Energy," 
which has been prepared by the 
American Museum of Atomic E.n- 
ergy at Oak Ridge, Tenn, opened 
yesterd^v at the Morehead Plane- 
tarium. 

Free to the public, the exhibit 
will be on display througi Oct. 
12 only in the North Science Ex- 
hibit room of the Planetarium. 

"The Summary of Atomic Ener- 
gy" has been developed to famili- 
arize the average person with the 
basic principles and uses of atom- 
ic energy. It includes stale mod- 
els of the Oak Ridge atomic and 
uranium reactors and a model of 



mm 

SEEN 


^\ 


Squirrel sitting on lann ivatcfv- 
tiro men on Graham Memonal 
roof. 

* * * 

Dog .sleeping through French 
3 tecttirc — didn't learn a thing.' 


ard P. Dotithit, Mrs. fYances Gray 
Palton, and Derek Roper. 

Roper received his A.B. degree 
from the University of Durhani, 
England, and is a candidate for 
the B.Litt. degree from Oxford. 

Mrs. Patton, who is teaching two 
sections of Freshman English, is 
the author of the best-selling nov- , 
el, "Good Morning, Miss Dove,'" 
and a resident of Durham. 

Douthit comes to UNC from 
Louisiana State University, where 
he also received his M.A. Degree. 
He is expecting to receive his 
Ph.D. Degree from LSU soon. 

Dr. MacMillan also said that 
there are three new graduate 
teaching fellows on the staff of 
the English Dept. They are Daniel 
J. Gore of Fayetteville, Barbara 
Donnell of Honolulu, Hawaii and 
H. Ray McKnight of Charleston. 
W. Va. ! 


Student Leaders Air 
Problems Facing UNC 


the latter Graham, i ^" ^^""^'^ P^'^^r P'an» as well as 
I panels explaining the parts, en 
ergy and differencs of atoms, neu- 
trons used as bullets, uranium and 
thorium, production of radioiso- 
topes and their uses in industry, 
agricultore and medicine. 

The exhibit may be viewed daily 
from 2 to 5 p.m. and from 7:30 
to 10 p.m., Saturdays from 10 a.m. 
to 10 p.m., and Sundays from 1 
to 10 p.m. 


Leaders of student government 
will talk with their South Build- 
ing counterparts about four cam- 
pus problems. 

The problems, agreed at a meet- 
ing yesterday, are: 

1. The parking situation, as it 
confr.ints members of the Inter- 
f'-aternity Council. 

2. Tlie need for a student group 
to coordinate campus activities. 

3. CompuI<^'ory physical educa- 
tion for veterans. 

4. Allocation of men's dormitory 
vending machine profits. 

The meeting yesterday was at- 
tended by members of the Stu- , 
dent Government Executive Coun- j 
cil, headed by student body ! 
President Bnb Young. The coun- 1 
cil will meet Friday with mem- j 
bers of the administration's Coun- 1 
cil on Student Affairs. 1 

President Young said the pur- | 
pose of the joint meeting "is to j 
familiarize the student affairs i 
council \jith what we feel are the i 

Pi Lambs Add Members 

Pi Lambda Phi has added three 
new members to their fraternity. 
Dick Oresman of Providence, R. 
1., Stanley Greenspon of Raleigh, 
and Harvey Salz of Brooklvn. N. 
Y. became brothers last week 


problems that confront student 

avemment." 

Members of the Student Gov- > 
?rnment Executive Council, in ad- 
dition to Young, are Luther Hod- 
ges Jr., Student Council; Tom 
Lambeth, GMAB; Ed Hudgins, In- 
terfraternity Council; Fred Pow- 
ledge, The Daily Tar Heel; Son- 
ny Hallford, Interdormitory Coun- 
cil; Miss Peggy Funk, Women's 
Residence Council; 

John Bilich, Monogram Club; . 
Jim Bynum, head cheerleader; , 
Sam Wells, attorney general; Tom ; 
Johnson, Yacketv Yack; Miss Pat 
McQueen, V*^omen's Council; 

Jim Exum, Men's Council; Ger- 
ald Mayo, YMCA; Stan Shaw, Na- 
tional Student Assn.; Sonny Ev- 
ans, student government vice 
president; Miss Jackie Aldridge, ', 
student government secretary; 
Miss Sally Price, Panhellenic 
Council, and Miss Elaine Burns, 
Independent Women's Council. 

Members of the administration'.-* 
Council on Student Affairs are: I 

Samuel Magill, student activi ^ 
ties; J. M. Galloway, placement: i 
Dr. E. McC;. Hedgpeth, Univers- i 
ity physicianj E. S. Lanier, cen- ^ 
tral records and student aid; Miss 
Katherine Carmichael, dean of ' 
women; W. D. Perry, testing serv- ( 
ice, and J. E. Wadsworth, hous- j 
ing. , ... , . . 1 


i Referring to important Univer- 
.sity positions now filled on an act- 
ing basis. Bryant said. "These will 
be filled, and I believe filled well, 
with all reasonable dispatch. What 
might have seemed stumbing 
blocks will be stepping stones to 
belter days ahead. 

ACADEMIC FREEDOM 

Three principles of academic 
freedom summarized by Br>'ant 
were: ' 

1. Full freedom in research, and 
the right to publish the results of 
his research. 

2. Absolute freedom in teaching 
those subjects which a faculty 
memoer has been assigned to 
teach, assuming that the instruc- 
tion is "of a scholarly nature, and 
compatible with the dignity of the 
profession." 

3. The right to formulate and 
express his opinions outside the 

(See BRYANT, Page 3) 

Film Series 
Starts Thurs. 

The first of the film series put 
on by the Film Committee of Gra- 
ham Memorial Activities Board, 
"Tsbacco Road.' will be presented 
Thursday. 

To be shown in Carroll Hall, 
the film series will be seen on 
Thursdays at 8 p.m. 

The rest of the films this se- 
mester are: "Alexander Nevsky" 
(Russian). Oct. 16: "The Belles 
of St. Trinians" (English), Nov. 
1; "M" (German), Nov. 15; 
"Flamenco" (Spanish). Nov. 29; 
"Lifeboat" (American). Dec. 13; 
"Incorrigible" (Swedish). Jan. 
10: ".-Arsenic and Old Lace" (Am- 
erican). Jan. 17. 

Selected short subjects will be 
shown with most of the films in 
the series. 


GM SLATE 


Activities scheduled for Gra- 
ham Memorial today include: 

Pan Hellenic Post Office, 8:30- 
12:30 p.m., Roland Parker 1, 2, 
3; Jehovah's Witnesses, S-9:30 
p.m., Roland Parker 1; Graduate 
History Club reception, 4-^ p.m.. 
Rendezvous Room; Pan Hellenic 
Committee, 9:30-11:00 a.m., Rth 
land Parker 3. 


PACt TWO 


THE DAILY TAR HEft 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1»56 


WEDNESDAY 


There's A Place For Court you Said it: 


In Chariging The Rule-Book y^^ Qp^^^ l^ff^^ Jq YeterOnS 

". . . (he meiniitiv of a coti.slihitioH is lixed xchcn it is irriften m 


the meaning of a constitution is fixed when it is iryitten 
and is not difU'rcnl at ati\ siihseqiwut tune ii'hen a (ourt has occasion 
to p(Lss on //.■— North Cinolina Sen. Sam ). Krxin Jr.. speaking to 
tlie state Bottlers' Assn. 


II what Sen. Kr\in said is tiue. 
the I'nited States of America would 
be dull, dissipated and deiaved. 

The Constitution ot the Tnited 
States has been in full force and ef- 
fect since 17S9. and it has chanoed 
tremendously since then. 

It has been changed, in a few 
cases, by the will of the people, it 
has been chaiioed. temporarily, by 
Presidents. And it has been changed 
by U>f Supreme Court. 

It was meant to be that wa'N. It 
is what professors cjf political 
science and authors of b(K>ks on 
the subject call 'the dynamic Con- 
stitution.' It is responsible for the 
dvn^mic .\merita we live in. 

Amerii a could not move forward 
if she weie bound solidlv to a set 


of rules adopted in i7<^ci- Those 
rules ha\e to be changed as .\meri- 
ca changes. 

Changinii the rules bv amend- 
tnent is a good prcxess. but it takes 
many vears. Changnig the rules 
bv interpretation— as the Supreme 
Court has dor.c — is a risky f)tisi- 
ness, because Supreme Courts are 
not geneni'Ilv known as the most 
judicious of l)odies. But the Su- 
jneme Court was correct in its in- 
terj)retation this time. The Daily 
Tar Heel feels. 

\Vithout judicial inierpretalion 
of the Constitution, the riiitetl 
States of America still would l)e li\ - 
ing in the iHtli century. Senator 
Sam knows th.tt, loo. 


I would, like to borrow a few 

minutes of your time now, with 

the hope that you can be repaid 

in hours, days, and indeed years. 

I would like to talk first about 
unity. 

Unity, as defined by Webster, 
is the state of being one in con- 
cord, harmony, conjunction, 
agreement and accord. Unity is 
essential to power: power, in 
some degree is the key to action 
and specifically change. And 
change brings to light the second 
and main poiQt I want to talk 
about. 


Perhaps the news hasn't 
reached you yet, but in room 315 
of South Building there is a pe- 
tition addressed to Dr. Oliver 
Cornwell. chairrpan of the physi- 
cal education department, ask- 
ing that the physical education 
requirements for us veterans be 
removed. As you know, the pres- 
ent requirement is one year. 

Now. you know about the bill. 
But what are you going to do 
about it? From the 159 signatures 
that have been appended tj the 
petition since its birth on Sep- 
tember 27. I think it is destined 
for 'file thirteen". That's a great 


show for a bill that has the po- 
tential backing of 1.836 vets, 
representing 26 per cent of the 
entire enrollment of the uni- 
'versity. 

How about you, Joe? Wouldn't 
you like to spend more time out 
in the village with Ann. Joe, Jr., 
and little Sue? Wouldn't it be 
wonderful to get home in time 
for lunch every da^v? You might 
even break Joe, Jr. from holding 
his fork like a club. 

And you. Bob, you've been 
griping more than anyone else. 
You have to work part-time to 
supplement the old $110, and 


'Well, Nobody Can Say I'm Not Keeping On A High Level' 


Let's Get Coordinated 


At their next meeting student 
legislators u ill ha\e a c hance tcj do 
a great deal for the liTiversity. 

riuv will \()te on a bill propos- 
ing a "student committee for the 
purpose ol coordinating e\ents on 
the campus. " If passed, the bill will 
set up aTive-member conmiittce to 
'coordinate and assist in the 
sc heduling of all important campus 
events and to form a master .sched- 
ide t(j prevent time conflicts of 
these events.' 

If the committee is set up, it 
can do much to prevent Jiiixups 
such as last week's, when Chanel 
Hill was the scene of half-dozen 
meetings, all important and all (jf 
innnense interest to the students. 
The committee would ask camp- 
us organizations to ^submit pro- 
posed schedules of events. Once 
comjMlecl. these events would be 
fitted into a master schedule. The 
Jiiasie; schedule could be checked 
by other organf/ations. when plan- 
ning other events. 

The result, it the (omviinre 
would do i:*^ v:r \ uel'. ^\orld be 
less coll.' and a smoother sthed- 
u!e 1'^ r\tracunicular events for 
tlie sludeiUS. 


It is a go<»d bill, and the Studeiu 
l.egisiatiue shoidd [)ass if. 

Big Brother 
Forgot About 
Adiai's Talk 

Raleigh s News, and Observer, 
which covets Kastern North C'ar- 
olina like Kerr Scotts black-top- 
ped roads, forgcjt the other clay. 

It was the day after .\dlai Stev- 
enson, speaking at Little Rock. 
Ark., asked for "law abiding" ac- 
ceptance of the Supieme Court s 
decision abolishing segregation in 
the public schools. 

Newspapers all over the country 
headlined Steven.sons statement the 
next day. But iu The N&O: Narv 
a word — or at least there w-as noih- 
iny in the ediiiuu wliicii hits Chap- 
el Hill. 

This soon before the election, 
too. 





THAT NASTY OLD WORD AGAIN: 


yoy don't have the time to study 
and you don't ever »have any 
fun. Well, here's your chance, 
boy. get up there and sign that 
bill. If this petition goes through, 
you'll have time to be more 
thorough with that physics and 
maybe even get a chance to take 
that cute little coed out. 

Jim. I realize that your cir- 
cumstances are somewhat dif- 
ferent. Your father helps foot 
the bills and you aren't espec- 
ially pressed for time, but there's 
something in the bill for you 
too. If it goes through, you can 
pick up another course that will 
prove more beneficial to your 
career. Don't you think you 
learned enough about physical 
education during those four years 
you spent in the service? 

Don't try to sneak out on me, 
Sam. You're the man I want to 
talk to most of all. Have you 
ever been on a campus where the 
vets were organized, where there 
was unity and brotherhood among 
the ex-servicemen, where other 
■.Joes" and "Bobs" and "Jims" 
and "Sams" had a strong voice 
in campus activities? No, Sam, 
I don't think you have. Just be- 
cause you've already met the 
physical education requirements 
you don't care whether the bill 
passes or not. That's truly a mar- 
velous attitude, Sam. Your 
knowledge of. the benefits of 
unity, brotherhood and organi- 
zation overwhelm me. But, Sam, 
some day you're going to learn 
about these things — some day 
you're going to want something. 
And. Sam, if you don't drag it up 
to South and sign this bill, 
you're not^ going to get that 
something you want, because the 
small amount of 'esprit de^ corps'' 
we veterans have now is going to 
be broken by you slackers, you 
people with the "I-don't-give-a- 
damn" attitudes. It's now or 
never. Sam. If we move now, 
we'll weld our unruly ranks in- 
to a strong, efficient force, oper- 
ating for and from the needs of 
all veterans arid future veterans. 
Leave that coffee on the table, 
Sam, let's go sign that petition. 
Let's have unity. 

Thank you for your time. 
' ' Jerry Aivis 

P.S. You 21 lady vets sign, too. 


FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES; 


Is Apathy Super-Sophistication? 


Power, Diplomacy, Canal wo»dy sears 

' ■ • Hpre'i; that unrH acnin- An.TtViv 


Hanson W. Baldwin 

Two major military lessons ha\e 
been re-emphasi/ed sliarjjly by tl»e 
Sue/. C"anal crisis. 

One is the militarv and politic.il 
liabiliiv of over-dependence on a 
nuclear strategv. The other is the 
necessity ol a jjroper uiderstanding 
of the lole ol force, military jx>wer. 
in iiuernational relations. 

When Carnal Abdel .Nasser. 
President ot Kgvpt. nationalized 
the I'niversal Suez Canal Com- 
])zn\ the immediate goverinnental 
and pid)lic reaction in Britain and 
France was forcefid. .Military ac- 
tion was enxisaged. liut neither 
Britain nor France was ready to 
applv militarv power of a type 
suited to the situation. 


The Dally Tar Heel 

The official student publication of the 
Publications Board of the University of 
North Carolina, where it is published 
ddilv except Mondav and examination 
and vacation periods and summer terms 
Entered as second class matter in the 
post office in X'hapel Hill, N. C, under 
the Act oi March 8. 1870. Subscription 
rates; mailed, S4 per year. $2.50 a semes 
ter; delivered, $6 a year. $3.50 a semes- 
ter. 


Editor 


FRED POWLEDGE 


Managing Editor CHARLIE JOHNSON 


News Editor . . - RAY LINKER 


Business Manager 


BDLL BOB PEEL 


Advertising Manager Fred Katzin 

BUSINESS STAFF: Rosa Moore. Johnny 
Whitaker, Dick Leavitt, Peter Alper. 


If force was Ui be employed the 
only pcjssible objective that made 
sense was seizure of the Suez C'anal 
— and seizure in such a manner 
that the canal coidd not be block- 
ed for any Icjug-term pericxl bv 
the defenders. 

Neither Britain nor France was 
jjrepared lor any sucli operation. 

Thus, though both Britain iiiid 
F'rance talked of military action, 
thev did not ha\e innnediatelv 
a\ailablc the type of armed force 
needed to carry oiu such ac tion on 
the Sue/ crisis. Time, perhaps the 
most piecicjus of militarv and po- 
litical coumiodities. was recjuired 
to assemble the task loices needed, 
and e\en then Peter was robbed 
l() |)av Paul. 

The other great lessoti of tlie 
Suez Crisis \\as mentioned inter- 
entially Sundav bv Secretary of 
State i)ulles. Mr. Dulles warned 
that the "'danger of war would re- 
cur" unle,ss a' Suez solution could 
be obtained. 

When the Sue/ crisis first de- 
\ eloped Mr. Dulles indicated by 
his actions that he did not belie\e 
vital -interests were iincilved. Pres- 
ident Nasser learned that the \Vest 
was divided and that the Cnited 
States would not use force and 
\vould oppo.se its use by others. 

Mr. Dulles has now restoied 
lone to its traditional plnre in in- 
ternational politics. Bin it would 
ha\e been better if Western jk)W- 
er had been obvious and readv 
but neither forsworn nor in\<)ked. 

I'nfortunatelv, military power is 
a continuing factor in the world of 
men. 

.\ realization of the proper place 
of force in international relations 
is essential to a sound diplomacy. 
But, more than ever in the nut lear 
age. the homely policv of Fheo- 
dore Roose\eli is siill applicable: 
■'Speak softly and carry a big stick."' 


Here's that word again: Apathv 
Recently it has become one 
the most discussed words on the 
campus. And its' about time foi 
people to wake up and see what's 
going on, and what they're 
part of. 

Apathy is not like an epidemic " 
of influenza that the folks out 
at the Infirmary can clear up. It 
is not like much of anything at 
all. It is rather an absence of 
everything. 

Webster defines apathy among 
other things as being an "indif- 
ference to what appeals to feel- 
ings or intere.'^l." Anyone who 
will stop a moment to cinsidcr 
the question is bound to see the 
same thing that so many people 
have seen of late; That there is 


no interest, or feeling, or emo- 
tion on this campus. 

What's the matter? Whose fault 
is if.' A lot of people would like 
to know the answer to these 
questions. There are more things 
going on on this campus than 
mast of the students have ever 
been exposed to before. Oppor- 
tunities are constantly present 
for a student to improve himself 
or to broaden his field of inter- 
est, but they ail seem wasted. 

Almost everyone likes jazz, in 
some form, so a big jazz festival 
was planned last spring. Eight of 
the best bands in this area were 
here, competing with one an- 
other with a .S500 prize in the 
balance. Each band was at its 
very best, and the music heard 
that afternoon was really superb. 
One of the best-known disc- 


jiK-keys in the area was here to 
emcee the program. But where 
were the students? 

Only a very few were there. 
Memorial Hall was less than h.ilf 
full. Tickets were only $1 a- 
piece, buying almost tliree hours 
of good jazz. But where were the 
students? 

Eventually, those who plan 
student activities are going to 
give it up as a lost cause, and 
tell the students to amuse them- 
selves, which apparently they 
seem to do already. 

Football, basketball, tennis, 
baseball, soccer and all the rest 
of the athletic activities suffer 
from this prevalent attitude of 
apathy. The whole campus is sick 
with it. And it is indeed a shame. 

Probably everyone has his own 
theory of the cause, and will ad- 


mit to cognizance of the affect 
But no one seems to be able to 
combat it. 

Maybe it's an attitude of sup- 
er-sophistication on the part of 
the student body as a whole. All 
indications seem to poin^ that 
way. But where does this idea 
originate? Who are these great 
intellect.s? 

Are they the students who 
mope about the campus, going 
to class, doing the minimum and 
giving nothing of themselves in 
return? Are they the students 
who poke along in the driving 
rain, unable to wax enthusiasm 
even for getting out of the rain? 

But that seems typical of 
these super - sophisticates, tjo 
blase even to get in out of the 
rain. 


Ppgo 


By Walt Kelly 



^ I'M NOT A Y IP VOU WON'T 
"'^ CASPiPATB \ O'JV'U-r i£4ffr 

ID THieow , , > TmCow our TWg 


I 6 CON^B ovgc TO ue< 

BALL, h^imn one 




l\'\ Abner 


By Al Capp 


(Ah 


AND MOV^, I HE STAR 
or PHF- CATTLF SHOW, 
STANLEY STRONGNOSE, 
WHO WILL Sf I ECT *MR 
BFAUTIFUL OF iPSfc'.T 




iOMMLJr-OY, 

AH HAi^ H/S 
&afLT -HIS 


(-irs SSO HHOr-.f-ANO 
THIS COffSET 15 H-K/L 





Terms Change -- 
No One Notices 


Barry Winston 



How long is the memory of the American press? 
How just are the rules by which it, as a collective 
institution, judges the relative merit of a given 
news item, and accordingly allots it an amount of 
spa(:e on the proper page? 

Brief months ago, the headlines of nearly every 
newspaper in this country were ablaze with ban- 
neni announcing, "Six Die in Parris Island Tradg- 
edy" 

The mothers of Arnerica rose up as a body, 
screaming for the crycifixion of one man. The en- 
suing shake-up was felt by every Marine from the 
conrmandant on down. The word was out. 

Parris Island is a concentration camp, run by 
sadistic butchers who delight in torturing and maim- 
ing the flower of young American manhood. Drill 
instructors are vicious fiends, trained in the fash- 
ion of the Spanish Inquisition, venting their drunk- 
en wrath on our poor defenseless boys. 

The man was crucified. His brothers, to the man, 
became the subject of disdain for every indignant 
citrcen that considered himself a qualified authority 
on instruction ^n the art of warfare. The ^ame of 
the Marine Corps was Mud. 

Last week, at Camp Lejune, another drama of 

Marine stupidity 
unfolded. It was 
during a period 
instruction on the use of the Mark 11 fragmentation 
type hand grenade. 

One instant, all was quiet; the next, there was 
a live, sputtering grenade in the midst of a group 
of trainees. It had been blown completely out of 
the demolition pit, and had already lived at least 
two seconds of its brief, four and a half second life. 
For one paralyzed moment, no one moved. And 
then, in the typically vicious and brutal manner of 
all Marine instructors, the sergeant in charge of 
the detail did move. And what did this symbol ''•i 
terror do? He threw himself on it. That's right — 
he threw himself on a very live hand grenade. 

You see it all the time in the movies, but this 
wasn't the movies. Th's was lior real. His name 
wasn't John Wayne. The grenade wasn't a dummy. 
Do you begin to get the idea? 

When it exploded, only one man was injured. 
Guess who. The last time I could find anything 
about- the incident in any of the local papers, he 
w-as in the hospital and not expected to live much 
longer. 

The life of one man is, perhaps, not much. But 
this man knew what he was doing. He wasn't a 
runny-nosed little brat, disobeying orders. He wasn't 
clowning. He didn't need disciplining. He knew the 
statisticfs on the destructiveness of a grenade at 25 
yards, so it follows that he had a pretty good idea 
of the effect of one at a range of six inches. 

All this wasn't necessary stark heroism. More 
likely, it was the result of training. Boot Camp 
Training You know — Parris Island, where they 
drown people. ' 

And the story? I found it buried on page seven 
of one of our local papers. The follow-up? If it's' 
been written, and I'm beginning to have my doubts, 
it must be in the small print at the bottom of the 
want-ad page. 

Does the voluntary death of one man, to save 
the lives of half a hundred more deserve less at- 
tention that the death of five who died because they 
couldn't learn to grow up? I think not. ' .. - v 

The Hill: No Place 
For Spartan Type? 

Charles Craven • 

fn The Xcics afid Obsen'er 
News and Observer columnist Cr«v«n atttndtd 
the University. 

All the hope you can summon goes with 'em . . . 
Folks work their fingers to the bone getting em 
ready, put beautiful new uniforms on "em, see that 
their shoes don't pinch their big feet, feed 'cm 
steaks, make "em study so they'll be eligible, run 
'cm out past a big noisy band amidst roars of good 
will. And what happens? A starved bunch of 
Wolves — some of 'em not much bigger than a .45 
caliber bullet — just kicks the living . . . 

Sob! I can't go on . . . 

+ * * 

I had to be excused a moment to pitch some 
cool water on my face . . . 

Maybe Chapel Hill is too beautiful . . . Maybe the 
languorous atmosphere forbids the necessary Spar- 
tan life of a good athlete . . . Maybe there are too 
many coeds, convertibles, lush fraternities . . . 

Whatever it is, it is death to any kind of spirit 
that enables a line to charge fast and hard and 
backs to drive until they are stone cold smothered 
.-. . even then they should have the will to wriggle. 

Perhaps the single-track intelleclualism. ex- 
pounded by the intense, bi-focaled type young men 
who gravitate to the college publications is right . . . 
Maybe a university IS a place where scholarship 
alone should reign without the "hysteria" and ex- 
citement engendered by a big winning football 
team . . . 

But if so. let's cut the schedule . . . Let's not play 
Oklahoma and Notre Dame . *. . Let's arrange for 
contests with lesser foes. East Carolina might not 
be too tough. Elon and Guilford always provide en- 
tertaining contests . . . and, too. .maybe we could 
arrange football contests between English classes, 
with the cardinal rule that participants should trim 
their finger nails so that no one, simply no one, will 
get .scratched . . . 

Btit I'll tell you what . . . My football appetito 
has to be satisfied. I require seeing at least three 
"big lime" football games a season . . . This season 
I'm following the WoUpack . . . just as often as I 
can corner a pass. 

« * * 

One other thing: Some of the underpaid pro- 
fessors at Chapel Hill can supplement their pay 
bountifully by selling soft drinks at the home games. 
The going price is 15 cents per bottle. 


Gas 
Tuiti 

A senior froj 
selected as t| 
of a Union 
Corporation si 

Alfred Leo| 
mathematics 
uate of Gastoi 
been granied| 
^00 for the 
57. 

Established 
est in business 
sciences, the 
ship goes to a I 
is in either 
matics or ocoi 
scholarship cl 
George E. Nif 

Nicholson 
is also to proj 
tistics as a fiel 
for the ultimj 
human underJ 
prove the tea| 
ods. 

The progra 
Statistics is al 
the Universitj 
senior year sJ 
outstanding \\| 
be awarded 
through his 
reer. 
. Rhyne. of 

Bryai 

•* (ContinueX 

classroom an^ 
er's chosen f| 
lessors fail 
opinions carrj 
that laymen l\ 
as official spc 


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WEDNiSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1956 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


FACE THREE 


Gastonia Senior Wins I ^^* Rosemary Kent, Public Health Professor 

Tuition Scholarship I ^'^''^ '''^'^ ^"P ^"^ ^^'' ''''"''' '''''"*' 


A senior from Gastonia has been 
selected as this year's recipient 
of a Union Carbide and Carbon 
Corporation scholarship at UNC. 

Alfred Leonard Rhyne Jr., a 
mathematics major and 1953 grad- 
uate of Gastonia High School, has 
been granted full tuition plus 
$200 for the academic year 1956- 
57. 

Established to stimulate inter- 
est in business problems and basic 
sciences, the senior-year scholar- 
ship goes to a person whose major 
is in either the field of mathe- 
matics or economics, according to 
scholarship committee Chairman 
George E. Nicholson, Jr. 

Nicholson said the ^ scholarship 
is also to promote interest in sta- 
tistics as a field of graduate study, 
for the ultimate improvement of 
human understanding and to im- 
prove the teaching of such meth- 
ods. 

The program of the Dept. of 
Statistics is a graduate course at 
the University. A holder of the 
senior year scholarsihip who does 
outstanding work could expect to 
be awardea graduate scholarships 
through his entire graduate ca- 
reer. 

Rhyne. of Gastonia. played on 


Dr. Rosemary Kent, associate I baseball coach. She didn't expect 



LEONARD RHYNE JR. 

. . . wins grant 

varsity squads of the three major 
sports during his high school ca- 
reer. He also took part in other 
high school activities. 

Through last year he was on the 
UNC football squad and was 
awarded a letter for his partici- 
pation. Rhyne is married to the 
former Rebecca Neel of Burling- 
ton. 


professor of public health educa- 
tion of the School of Public Health 
has just returned from a three 
month inspection trip in the West 
Pacific. 

Her trip was sponsored by the 
World Health Organization of the 
United Nations. 

During the past 10 years the 
UNC School of Public Health has 
had 51 students from this area. 
Dr. Kent said the pucpose of her 
trip was to bring back to the 
School of Public Health first hand 
information about the public 
health programs and problems of 
the East. 

In Thailand (some still call the 
country Siam) Dr. Kent found 
many public health officials who 
had been trained at the UNC 
School of Public Health. 

Remember the old story about 

how former UNC Baseball Coach 

I Bunn Hearn was introduced to 

King George V of England. Ac- 


to see the King of Siam, but in 
the courtyard of the Emerald Wat 
(Temple of the Emerald Buddiha) 
Thais and visitors were told to 
be seated. The king was leaving 
worship. Dr. Kent had a grand- 
stand seat on the pavement with- 
in 10 feet of the royal procession. 

Dr. Kent says Tliailand's healiti 
problehis are aggravated by its 
lack of physicians. Many Thais 
have never seen a medical doctor. 
With a population of 20,000,000 
the country has fewer physicians 
than North Carolina, with a pop- 
ulation of about 4,000.000. 

Two weeks were spent at For- 
mosa. Here Dr. Kent found that 
public health doctors were show- 
ing ' concern for better under- 
standing of customs, attitudes and 
health education of rural people 
in order to plan public health 
measures understandable and ac- 
ceptable to t^ese people. 

Also in Formosa Dr. Kent visit- 


cording to the tellers of tall tales, | ed in the home of aa iceman who 


; -Big Steam," as Bunn was called. 

; tipped his baseball cap to the 

i king, shook hands with him and 

; said, "Howdy, Mr. King."* 

\ SEES KING 

I Dr. Kent stands a little more 

I on formality than did the former 


Bryant Points Out Academic Freedom 

(Continued jroni Page 1) : tution regardless of the subject on | and guardian for discovered 

which they may choose to express I knowledge, but it must in addition 

themselves. " ' insist on the extension of the 

A variety of ways of thinkmg \ known boundaries of knowledge 

and "respectable viewpoints" 


classroom and beyond the teach- 
er's chosen field. "At times pro- 
fessors fail to realize that their 
opinions carry great weight, and 
that laymen frequently judge them 
as official spokesmen of the insti- 


had tuberculosis. Despite this, all 
three members of the family slept 
in the same small bedroom. 

In the Philippines Dr. Kent 
found about 35 former student^ 
of the UNC School of Public 
Health. While there she visited 
President Magsaysay's training 
program for community develop- 
ment officers at Los Banos. 
LACK POOD 

Of all the countries visited by 
the UNC teacher, only Thailand 
produces an excess of food, yet 


according to the national direc- 
ior of nutrition, malnutrition is | 
one of the country's major prob- 
lems. The diet of the average per- 1 
son ooasist of one pound of rice , 
a day. | 

Dr. Kent found that sanitation, j 
'omnmnicable disease, parasitism, 
maternal and ciiild health school 
health and nutrition are <a few of 
the public healtti problems of the 
East. . 

Among the many souvenirs Dr. 
Kent brought back from ihe East 
is a chop. This is not an imple 
ment for eating but a rubber 
stamp gadget made of ivory with 
Dr. Kent's name on it. 

Her name in Chinese, given her 
in Formosa, is Kan Lo Sho. This 
translates into Health, Hiappiness 
and Long Life. 


Three UNC Freshmen 
On Merit Schobrships 


Seniors Get Last Go 

Today '}S the last day for senior.'* 
to be photographed for the 1957 
Yackety Yack. 

Seniors will be charged $1 to be 
photographed, due to the delay in 
the photography schedule which 
necessitated extending* the <iead- 
Ime for Senior shots. 

The rest of the picture-taking 
schedule is as follows: through 
Oct. 5 — Freshmen, Nursing School 
and Fourth Year Medical School. 

Oct. &-12 — Sophomores, Phar- 
macy School, Dental School, Dental 
Hygiene. 

Oct. 15-19 — Juniors, Law School, 
rest of Medical School, Graduate 
School. 


advisable on a University faculty, 
Brj'ant said. "The University must 
serve not only as the repositorj' 


ONE WEEK SALE! 
All Capital Records 


Series 
T 
W 


List 
$4.12 
$5.15 


Sale 
$2.75 
$3.75 


All Angels-Special 
Ail Columbia: 




Series 
ML 
SL 
OL 


List 
$4.12 
$5.15 
$5.15 


. All Victor: 

List 
LM Series $4.12 

*AII EP 45 RPM 

*AII 10" LP. 

(Except Elektra— Angel 
L'Oylyre — Telefunken) 


Sale 
$2.75 
$3.75 
$3.75 


Sale 

$2.75 

$1.05 ea. 

$1.45 ea. 


by a relentless search for truth. 

A professor, he continued, faces 
the 'inexorable tests of integrty. 
competence and citizenship" just 
as does a physician, a lawyer or a 
business man. "A university pro- 
fessor, like it or not, is judged by 
his integrity and his professional 
competence as demonstrated in his 
research and teaching." 

Bryant warned of inevitable col- 
lision with "established and ortho- 
dox beliefs" while enjoying and 
exercising academic freedom. 
"Your views may conceivably be 
offensive to others.. They may con- 
ceivably be wrong. But right or 
wrong, you have the right — and 
sometimes the obligation — to form- 
ulate and express your conscien- 
tious beliefs so long as they are 
not immoral or illegal. 
TRUSTEES' DUTY 

It is the trustee's duty to "pro- 
tect to the fullest your rights un- 
der academic freedom." Bryant 
said, adding that "it may be an 
unpalatable task to rescue some 
academic exhibitionist who has 
chosen to float upstream, but it 
must be remembered that Galileo, 


TV Seen As Important Part 
Of Future Learning Process 

"I thiiA it will someday become [ "We are very anxious about the 
very integral part of our ed- 1 new course and Tiave noted con- 


Three students at the Univers- 
ity entered as freshmen this year 
on Natiopal Merit Scholarships. 

The three youths are among 14 j 
North Carolina winners in the I 
program, which had 58,158 appli- 
cants for the 554 scholarships giv- i 
en. j 

Enrolled at UNC are Murphy 
Bryan Conry of Rockwell, William j 
Happer Jr. of Lenoir and Otis Wil- 
liam Jones of Zirconia. 

The three students who are us- ; 
ing their four-year scholarships 
in the University were graduated j 
from high school last spring. Es- { 
tablished during the past year, i 
the Merit Scholarship program is j 
a nationwide search for high ; 
ichool seniors who have demon- j 
strated ability and promise to ; 
benefit from a college education j 

An independent non-profit org- 


ucational program." 

In those words Dr. David G. 
Monroe, UNC political scientist, 
summed up what he believes the 
future holds for television. 

And, with his first full-legnth 
course over television now under- 
way, the professor did not limit 
its effect to within a small ra- 
dius of Chapel Hill. 

"It changes the frontiers of ed- 
ucation from the University cam- 
pus to the frontiers of the .state," 
he declared. "It brings education 
into the home." "-' 

Dr. Monroe, professor of politi- 
cal science and advisor in the 
General College, began a 36-hour 
course on slate government over 
station WUNC-TV recently. 

rt was the first 36'hour course 
to be taught by the lawyer and 
authoritative political scientist. 


siderable interest in it." said Ex- 
tension Director Charles F. Mil- 
ner after the first lesson. 

However, Milner pointed out. 
persons who have indicated 'an in- 
terest in the course and who have 
not yet signed up must do so by 
tomorrow if credit is to be re- 
ceived. 

The first lesson over the local 
television station Tuesday, in form 
of a lecture, dealt with the era 
up to 1066 under Anglo-Saxon 
turlnciples, then followed through 
to 1400 and touched on vital de- 
velopments of that period. 

Dr. Monroe, who said he was 
"very well pleased" with the first 
lesson, discussed the "Colonial 
Heritage" in his second program. 

Lectures will be given over the 
station each Tuesday and Thur.s- 
d-ny night, through February 7. 
1957. from 8:45 to 9:30 p.m. 


4 Students 
Represent UNC 
At Union Meet 

Tom I..ambeth, Warren Miller, 
Lloyd Shaw and Mike Strong will 
depart from Chapel Hill on Thurs- 
day morning to attend the seventh 
annual conference of region four 
of the Association of College Un- 
ions at Tuskegee Institute, Ala. 

The conference will be of a 
three-day duration, tomorrow 
through Saturday. 

Lambeth will chair a meeting 
for the discussion of student-fac- 
ulty relations. 

Shaw will serve as a member of 
the Conference Constitution Com- 
mittee, and Miller and Strong will 
attend as delegates from the Uni- 
versity. 


anization, tlie National Merit 
Scholarship Corporation provides 
more than a million dollars a year 
for the grants. 

Business organizations' offers j 
of funds to the program are mat- I 
ched from additional funds avail- 1 
able from the scholarship pro- j 
giam. The \ialue of the four-year 
scholarships awarded last year is 
estimated at about two and three- 
quarter million dollars. 

Conry, who ranked third in a 
class of 61 at Rockwell High 
School, lists his main academic in- 
terests as chemistry and mathe- 
matics. 

Jones, who was graduated from 
the Flat Rock High School, first 
in a class of 55, will major in 
transportation in the School of 
Business Administration. 

Also top man in his gr'aduating 
class, Happer ranked first among 
103 seniors at Lenoir High School. 
Holder of a Morehead Scholarship 
for study at UNC, Happer will ma- 
jor in physics. Last spring he won 
first place in the 19.56 state-wide 
High School Mathematics Contest, 
competing with 1,385 othar stu- 
dents. 


Ratledge Represents 
UNC At AK Psi Meet 

Bob Ratledge. senior from Guil- 
ford, represented the Alpha Tau 
chapter of .\lpha Kappa Psi at the 
recent national convention in De- 
troit, Michigan. 

Ratledge is president of the lo- 
cal chapter of the business fra- 
ternity. 


UNC Offers 
Only O.K'd 
Dent. Course 

The University offers the only 
correspondence course for dental 
assistants in the United States that 
meets the educational require- 
ments of the Americacn Denial 
Assistants Association. 

This and other facts conperning 
the course being offered by the 
UNC School of Dentistr>- and ^he 
UNC Extension* Division was 
brought out in a recent article ap- 
pearing in "The Dental Assistant,* 
the journal of the ADAA. 

The article is written by Mrs. 
Mira Lindeman of Spring Lake, 
Mich. She was one of the original 
seven students who enrolled in a 
course for certification for dental 
assistants when the course was in- 
augurated in 1954. The course con- 
sists of 25 assignments. 

When Mrs. Lindeman had com- 
pleted her correspondence work, 
she came here to take the exam- 
ination for the course at the UN^^ 
School of Dentistry. "No student 
has been given a more heart 
warming welcome than I was given 
at the School of Dentistry. AH 
this, plus being the first person 
to take the examination made my 
trip complete," she said.. 


Just Bought In! 
A small library of 

Books About 
Drama 

You'll find them displayed 
in our Old Book Corner. 

The Intimate 
Bookshop 

205 E. FRANKLIN ST. 
^ OPEN TILL 10 PM. 


^TUtRMiirktMeSteryir 
MRetbl 


VITTOMO Ot SICA'S GtEA-TEST I 


Persons who still are interested 


course in 
summer. 

Generally, there was an atmos 
phere of enthusiasm over this la- } in tha course are urged to write 
test full-credit course being offer- j immediately to: Correspondence 
ed through the University Exten- 1 and TV Courses, University Ex- 
sion Division. i tension Division, Chapel Hill. 


1^ 


207 E. Franklin St. 


DAILY 

ACROSS 

1. Distant 
4. High priest 

7. A cavity 

8. Unable 
to And 
one's way 

10. Tribunal 

11. Burrowing 
animals 

13. Minstrel 
showman 
(2 words) 

15. Back of 
the neck 

16. Tribe of the 
Naga Hills 
(Assam) 

17. Present 
time 

19. Fresh 

20. Snare 
23. Place for 

growing 
flower* 
25. Any coin 
of trifling 
value 
( colloq. ) 

27. Spawn 
offish 

28. Enclosure 
on ranch 

31. A manger 
for feedings 
animals 

34. Girl's name 

35. Any split 
pulse (Ind.) 

■ 37. State 
(abbr.) 
38. Measure 
40. Snout 
beetle 
43. Sweetening 

45. Attempted 

46. Sheer 

47. Hastened 

48. Habituar 
drunkard 


CROSSWORD 

49. Conclude 21. Ad- 

justs 
DOWN 22. Com- 

1. Cross a river mon 
by wading level 

2. Astringent 24. Fabu- 

3. Re-equip lous 
with men bird 

4. Tree 26. Tablet 

5. Aquatic bird 28. Crowns 


[ar=!H HOD" an 

Hi^naiiiaa oan 

F§ua HQgca 

asaDQ eagmB 

aflfj'aa aaauc 
Nana aaun 


Sir Issac Newton. Roger Bacon, | although he instructed a shorter 
the Nazarene of the first century, course in political science last 
and a now respectable host of 
others were at one time branded 
as heretics." 

In protecting academic freedom, 
trustees must "refrain from any 
attitude which has the appearance 
of spying or methods which smack 
of intimidation. If su^h would hap- 
pen it would properly be resented 
by the faculty," Br>-ant said. 

In regard to higher education in 
general, Bryant suggested that ^ 
"too » many of our students are j 
coming to our University poorly i 
prepared and without a clear un- ' 

derstanding of why they come." . have been invited to attend. YDC 

He further questioned "whether or INDOOR POOL The YDC is planning an open 

not the intellectual efforts in our | The indoor swimming pool us , house especially for coeds. They 
universities are being subprdinated j open for recreational swimming i will serve punch accompained by 


i8^ 


SUSAN H/nrWARD 

RtCHAEDCONTE 
EOME ALBERT- 10 VAN Hin 



"BRILLIANT! 
FAULTLESS!" 

"A ma*l«rpi«c«rj 


"ONE 9f THE 
YIAD'SBEST!'^ 


THE BiSTOF DE SICA'S 
GREAT PICTURES!" 

— Crow«»(w, N.y. Timm 

"EXCELLENT! 
PERFECT 
ARTISTRY!* 

— Wjmran, N.Y. pMf 

"A BEAUTIFUL 
PICTURE!" 


NEW YORK 

FILM CRITICS 

AWARD! 

"Best Foreit^^n tanouaoe 
film Of the Year'" 


— ZiMuvr, 
N.V. H»ro/d Tril 


vinomo DE sicas g«£atesti 


NOW PLAYING 



HERE ARE YOUR OLD GOLD 



PHARMACY WIVES faculty of the Dental School. The 

The Pharmacy Wives will meet ; reception will he at 8 p.m. Sunday 
tonight at 8 p.m. at the Institute ; and refreshments will be served 
of Pharmacy. All Pharmacy wives ; and refreshments will be served, 
have been invited to attend. 


to the social and extra curricular | Mondays through Fridays from 4 

to 6 p.m.. Saturdays from 2 to 6 
p.m. and Sundays, 2 to 5 p.m. Wo- 
men swimmers may wear their own 
bathing suits, but men swimmers 
are required id wear the special 


activities of the students. 

"I do not exceed my preroga- 
tives as a tru.stee when I insist 
that this University be dedicated 
to excellence in teaching, the high- 


6. Native of 
an island 

7. Fame 

9. Conical * 

tent 
10. Deed 
12. Stitched 
14. Strong ale 

(Kng.i 
19. Conflict 


29. Hatred 

30. Legal 
pro- 
fes- 
sion 

32. Covered 
with 
Ivy 

33. Destitute 
of hair 


YestMday'a Aacwcr 

36. Underworld 
river 
(Myth.) 

39. Edible 
rootstock 

41. Ireland 

42. Contended 
44. Steep flax 


est in scholarship, and the best in ; .suits i.ssued by the gym. 


research," Bryant said. "My ambi- 
tion for the University of North 
Carolina is that it will justly earn 
a reputation for being the gr^at 
liberal university of the South." 


DENTAL DAMES 

Jhe Dental Dames will have a 


the rhythm of a combo from 7:30 
to 9 p.m. tomorrow evening in the 
Rendezvous Room, GM. 
COED SWIMMING 

The Women's Physical Education 
Dept. will give swimming and ten- 
nis tests tomorrow from 3 to 4 
p.m. 

All women students must sue- 




\ <: t' ;" r ' . 

WIN 
A TOUR 

FOR 

TWO 
AROUND 

THE 
WORLD 

START 
NOW! 





PUZZLES 


fr.,. . i^ »•'.».■ ft "1 ■ ■ • 



SHIRTS-19C 


reception in the Main Lpbby of j cessfully complete a course m 
Graham Memorial for dental stu- j swimming and an indivdual sport, 
dents, their wives or dates, and j or pass the above tests in order to 

graduate. 
VETS 

The Veterans Office has asked 
that all Korean veterans who have 
not filed their Monthly Certificate 
of Training forms for the month 
of September should do so imme- 
diately. 


PUZZLE NO. 4 



CLUE: Organized by Congregational ists 
and Presbyterians in territory opened by 
the Black Hawk War, this coeducational 
college is noted for courses in anthropology. 

ANSWER 

Addrexs 

City StaU 

CoUcne 

Hold until you have complPt<Ki all 24 puzzl(« 


PUZZLE NO. 5 



CLUE: This Florida college stresses a con- 
ference plan and individualized curricu- 
lum. It was founded by Congregationalista 
and chartered in 1885. 

ANSWER 

Address 

Ciiy StaU 

College 

Hold until you have complpted all 24 pu2:z!o8 


EA. 


\mmtU^ 


m hnndle 


uiithMRE 


With or Without 
Starch 

Prompt Service 



Glen Lennox Laundromat 


CLASSIFIEDS 


BLACKBURN'S MARKET 
(acrosiS from ice plant). Open 7 
days a week, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Fresh £ruit and vegetables. Also 
beer. 


STUDENTS EXPERIENCED ON 
Linotype or open presses may 
obtain part time work at Colon- 
ial Pres's. Phone 333-6. 


ANNOUNCEMENT: THERE IS 
room for two more men at the 
campus cooperative House, 208 
W. Franklin St. Interested per- 
sons leave their name, address, 
nnd telephone niimlwr at the 
'V" or come by the house. 


YOU'LL GO FOR 
OLD GOLDS 

Either REGULAR, KING SIZE M 
the GREAT NEW FILTERS 

Old Golds taste terrific! The reason:' 
Old Golds give you the best 
tobaccos. Nature- 
ripened tobaccos . . . 

SO RICH, 
SO LIGHT, 
SO GOLDEN 
BRIGHT! 


BEST TASTE YET 

IN A FILTER CIGARETTE 

fMrrifht 1950. HuriT R. Ilelllcu* 




*CLUE: Chartered in colonial days by 
George III. this university's name was 
later changed to honor a Revolutionary 
soldier. 


ANSWER. 
Ka nif 

Address 

Citv 


^to/e_ 


CnUfge 
Hold tinril you have completed all 24 puzzles 


HOW TO PLAY! 

Start today! Play Tangle Schools. Re- 
arrange the letters in each puzzle to 
form the name of an American College 
or University. 

. ... .. ,« 


PAGE FOUR 


THE DAILY TAR HEEL 


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1954 


I 

Dodgers And Yanks Square Off Today In Series Opener 

*♦• *•• *«« ••* ♦♦• 

Totum Terms Tar Heels 'Mystery 



Minor Sports All But Forgotten 

In all the hustle and bustle over Jim Tatum's football team, 
the minor sports such as soccer, cross-country and even freshman 
football have been relegated to the background. 

All of these get rolling this weekend, and all of them are looking 
forward to banner seasons. 
SOCCER SQUAD SHOULD BE STRONG 

The soccer team, ably coached by Marvin Allen, is the strongest 
outfit fielded by" Carolina in years, and should be Maryland's chief 
riva? for the conference title. The Terps have become known as the 
New York Yankees of Atlantic Coast Conference soccer, because every 
year since the formation of the league in 1953, they have won the 
conference crown. No one has yet been able to hand the Terps a loss 
in loop play. 

This year's Tar Heel team is loaded with talented sophomores and 
seasoned veterans, but whether they have enough to cope with Mary- 
land is a question that will be answered Nov. 17 when the two teams 
meet at College Park, Md. 
HARRIERS PLAGUED BY INJURIES , 

Coach Dale Ranson's harriers, with Jim Beatty leading the pack, 
figui-ed to be odds-on favorites for championship honors a few days 
ago when practice began, but recent developments have cast an air 
of pessimism over the UNC camp. 

Sophomore star Wayne Bishop, of whom much was expected, 
took a spill during time trials yesterday when an old trick knee 
gave out on him. Although no official word has been released, it 
is feared that he may be lost for the entire season. 
Other men on the squad are rounding into shape very slowly, and 
with the opening meet against Virginia only two days away, the situ- 
ation is critical. As of now, only Beatty and lanky soph Dave Scurlock 
arc in peak form. 
FROSH PIGSKIN SQUAD OPENS FRIDAY 

The widely publicized freshman football team will debut Friday 
night under the lights in Greensboro against Wake Forest. Little is 
known aboat the frosh footballers, but the word is that Coach Tatum 
has done his u.sual superb job of recruiting. 

No less than seven of the squad mentbers tip the scales in ex- 
cess of 230 pounds. The starting Tar Baby line averages well over 
200, with a pair of 230 pound tackles leading the way. Cor^ch 
Tatum put forth a special effort this year to bring in some rough 
tough linemen, and from the looks of the Tar Baby tackles and 
guards, he attained his goal. 
The trend toward recruitng out of state boys was reversed if the 
starting backfield is any indication. All four starters are from North 
Carolina, strange as it may seem. 
LEAVING SATURDAY, A BUS TO COLUMBIA 

Any student who doesn't have a ride to the game Saturday may 
still get one if he hurries. A charter bus will leave Woollen Gym at 
7 a.m. Saturday for the game at Columbia that afternoon. 

Although only a few seats are left, you may be able to get a 
spot if you call radio station WCHL at 8-484 here in Chapel Hill. 
The trip, which takes approximately 4 hours each way, costs a to- 
tal of $14.00. The fee includes a round trip bus ticket for one, a 
ticket to the game and a box lunch. 

The bus is expected to arrive back in Chapel Hill about midnight 
Saturday. 
A BRIEF CALL FOR HELP 

In closing, we would like to issue one more pl^a to any and all 
Carolina freshman. The soccer and cross-country freshman teams are 
desperately in need of more participants, and anybody who has any 
interest or desire in either sport is urged by the coaches to come on 
out. You may have a lot of fun. 


Bishop Injured In 
Harrier Time Trials 


Time trials were held for both 
the Carolina varsity and freshman 
cross-cauRtry runners yesterday. 
And the trials may prove rather 
costly to varsity coacR Dale Ran- 
son. j 

Sophomore star Wayne Bishop, j 
number one man on last season's 
frosh squad, had to be carried off 
the course on a stretcher after a 
trick knee had given out on him 
while running. The seriousness of 
his injury has not yet been de- 
termined, but it looks like he may 
be lost to the squad for the en- 
tire season. 

Only four of the thirteen run- 
ners that started the race in the 
varsity division finished. Jim 


Beatty led the way, finishing in 
19:25. Perrin Henderson was sec- 
ond in 22:35, Alec Coffin third 
in 23:08. and Jim Hunter was 
fourth v/ith 23:25. 

In the freshman division, Cowles 
Liipfert led the pack with a time 
of ":42 over the 2.3 mile course. 
Fick Arthur was second in 12:05. 
Friedburg and Green finished in 
12:50, John Richardson was next 
in 12:57, and Pakcard was next 
in 13.26. Sirianni and Funderburg 
also finished. 

Opening meets for both squads 
are scheduiled for Friday, The 
varsity runners will meet Virginia 
here, while the frosh will go a- 
gainst the Duke yearlings. 


Ford And 
Maglie Go 
On Mound 

By JACK HAND 

BROOKLYN, Oct. 3. (i^)— Sal 
Maglie. Brooklyn's 39 - year - old 
"comeback kid." faces Whitey 
Ford, the New York Yankees, left- 
handed ace, in the opener of the 
seventh Dodger-Yank World Se- 
Hps today at Ejbets Field with 
I*resident Eisenhower in a box 
near tne home dugout. 

Although the Yanks finally were 
beaten by the Dodgers last fall in 
seven games and must play the 
first two games in enemy terri- 
tory, the oddsmakers rate the 
American League champions 3 to 
2 favorites to win the best-of-sev 
en series. The opener is 6 to 5 
and take your pick. 

Fair weather with temperatures 
around 65 was forecast for game 
time at 1 p.m. (ESYT) with a 
throng of between 34.000 and 36,- 
000 m the ancient stands. The 
game was to be beamed on net- 
work radio (Mutual) and television 
(NBC). 

Maglie, rescued from the scrap 
heap when he was acquired on 
waivers from Cleveland in mid- 
May, had been a doubtful starter 
because of a stiff arm. When he 
' told Manager Walter Alston he 
! was ready at today's final workout 
■ old Sal got the nod. 

'My shoulder is a little stiff, " 
said Maglie. "But I am sure it will 
I be okay tomorrow." 

Maglie (13-5), will be working 
with only three days rest. How- 
ever he has done the same thing 
in his two most recent starts in- 
cluding the no-hitter. .\ cunning 
curve ball pitcher with sharp con- 

1 trol and an uncanny ability to 
cash in on a batter's weakness, 

i Maglie is a real "old pro." 

In Magglie's only series start 
j against the Yankees he lasted five 

innings for the New York Giants 
i in the fourth game in 1951. He was 

charged with the defeat. 

Ford (19-6) beat the Dodgers 
twice last year, both times at Yan- 
kee Stadium, and lasted only one 
; inning in 1953 at Ebbets Field. Al 
j though the Brooklyn park is sup- 
posed to be a graveyard for left-' 
banders, Johnny Antonelli of the j 
Giants and Joe Nuxhall of Cin- 
cinnati beat the Dodgers in their 
j own cozy park with its handy left 
I field stands this year. 

Manager Casey Stengel de- 
scribed Ford as "a big league 
professional pitcher" as he sat in 
the dugout at Yankee Stadium be- 
fore today's final workout. "I cant 
rest my No 1 because they say 
! it's a bad park for him. Between 
i you and me, he has pitched the 
j best ball on the team. If I wait 
: for the right park, the series will 
be over.' 

I Stengel indicated Don Larsen, 
j (11-5) will be his second ga.me 
I pitcher although he added this res- 
I ervation. 'If we win the first, I 
j might change my mind." Alston 
said Don Newcombe (27-7) would 
I be Brooklyn's second game start- 
er. 

I The Yank-Dodger series com- 
petition is top heavy in favor of 
the Yanks with a 5-1 edge in pre- 
vious series. The 1955 world 


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the National's 19th to 33 by the 
American. ' 



Coach Jim Tatum admitted yes- [ 'The biggest prouiem we face 
terday that the Carolina football going into this game is not 
team, one sided losers for two 
games in a row, is "a complete 
mystery to me.'" 


strengthening our offense or de- 
the ball game with all we've got, 
fense, but getting the boys up," he 
said. "If we go out there and pla> 


back. Tatum said Vale would be 
used at either halfback or fullback 
to make best use of his talented 

toe. 


Speaking at a press luncheon ! ^^e rest will take.^ care of itself." 
here yesterday, the Tar Heel head TERRIBLE SHAPE 


mentor said he was unable to put 
his finger on just why the squad 
has done so poorly this season. "I 
don't understand it," he said. "We 
have two good backfields and a 
number one line thk potentially 
could be a great one. And I still 
say Ed Sutton is just as good a 
right halfback as I've ever had. We 


Tatum described the Tar Heels 
as being in "terrible shape" after 
their bruising battle with the 
Sooners. Ends Larry Muschcamp 
and Vince Olen, guard Don Kem- 
per and center George Stavnitski 
are all laid up with injuries, and 
j their status- for Saturday's game 
is doubtful. 

i Stavnitski, who suffered a se- 
I vere head injury on the second 
have no apparent weaknesses, but ^ half kickoff against the Sooners, 
we're still losing. j will definitely be lost to the squad 

"Tu K t .u- .u . u u for the remainder of the season. 
The best thmg that could hap- ' , ^ ,, , 

I The Tar Heel co-captam was un- ! 
pen to us right now is winning a | conscious for an hour after bemg \ 
football game," he went on to say. | struck in the face by Oklahoma I 
"Whenyou'relosing, it seems like I ^f-ter Jerry Tubbs on a hard | 
„ ^ , , block. He is presently confined m 

all the breaks go against you. We I ^^ Oklahoma City hospital, but is 
still have great hopes despite the ' reportedly doing well. | 

bad start we're off to." j Kemper is out with a broken 

__. xp<T ' nose, while both Muschamp and 

I Olen have bad ankles.. Muschamp, 

Tatum is looking forward to this ! a starter, has been replaced by 

week's game with South Carolina ! Charley Robinson on the number 

^u .Li-r .c . , L- ,^ ! one unit, 
as another stiff test for his Tar ; 

Heels. "If South Carolina plays Wally Vale, the team's best pun- 
like they did against Duke and we t^r who booted one 84 yards 

. , , . .J against the Sooners, was shifted 

play like we ve been playing, it., , ,,, , , •♦», + i,:.^ 

*^ ■' * -^ *' to halfback because without him, 

will be a sad day for us," said the j ^^ere would be no kicker in the 
big man. The Gamecocks upset lineup when recently returned 
Duke, 7-0, two weeks ago. Last Dave Reed was playing quarter- 
week Coach Warren Giese's tean 
lost a one touchdown decision to 
Miami. 


ar baby Marter At uuarterbacK 

Nelson Lowe, former North Wilkesboro schoolboy star, will be di- 
recting the Carolina Tar Babies from the important signal calling post 
when they take the field Friday night against Wake Forest in the 
season's opener. 


Frosh Starting Unit 
Announced For Opener 


Freshman football coach Fred 
Tullai yesterday announced the 
starting lineup for Friday's op- 
ener with the Wake Fores* frosh 
in Greensboro. 


while the backfield will average 
a shade over 190. 

The two tackles lead the squad 

weightwi.se. Furjanic weighing in 

! at 235 while Butler tips the scales 


Starting at end will be John I at 230 
Stunda from Monessen, Pa. and 
Ed Furjanic from Bressler, Pa. 
The tackles will be Earl "Moose" 
Butler from Massey Hill. N. C. 
and Mike McDade of Rochester. 
Pa. The guards are Ellis Wool- 
ridge of Cuyahoga Falls. Ohio and 
Fred Jueler from Iselin. N. J. 
The center post will be manned 
by Jim Davis from Elco, Pa. 

Interesting to note is that the 
starting backfield consists entire- 
ly of North Carolinians. 

Getting the nod at quarterback 
will be Nelson Lowe from North 
Wilkesboro. At the fullback slot 
will be Jim Stevens of Hazelwood. 
Right halfback will be Cornell 
Johnson from High Point and at 


Deacs Work On 
Passing Game 
In Workout 


WINSTON-SALEM, Oct. 2 — 
(AP) — Wake Forest's football 
team concentrated on its passing 
game