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Diverse 


Anti-Reds 
MakeMove 
For Congo 


ROYALTY FINAIJSTS— (’hosen last 
Ivian Park for their skating? and skiins: abilities were 
tom, I to r) Kay Hurnin^fhani, Ann Dunkley. (arol 
I'jng;en, Donna McKay and Ryrde Hill as queen fin- 

Snow, But . . . 


alists and (top, 1 to r) Howard l ibel. Richard Rampton. 
Dick Staats and Mack Sumner as kin^ finalists. Absent 
from the picture is Keith Huhbs. Kinjf and queen will 
be named at the fashion show tonij^ht. 


Win in First Winter Carnival Royalty Contest 


iinalists were selected in 
inter Carnival king and 
.’ontcsts held yesterday at 
iaven. The winners earned 
s honors on the basis of 
e skating and skiing abili* 
inonstrating poise, bal- 
td skill. I 

*E ARE five king finalists 
queen finalists from 
the king and queen will 
ed at a fashion show to- 
t 7:30 p.m. Finalists will 
lei winter apparel at the 
show, and the king and 
hosen will reign over and 
» in Winter Carnival 

I 

tsts are Kay Burningham. 
jnkley, Carol Anne En- 
jnna McKay and Byrde 
i Howard Uibel, Richard 


Rampton, Dick Staats, Mack 
Sumner and Keith Hubbs. 

A NEW TRADITION has been 
added to Winter Carnival this 
year with the selecting of a king 
to rule jointly with the queen. 
This came about through AMS 
initiative: AMS felt that having^ 
both a male and female student 
ruler would give more equal 
representation of the student- 
body. “We hope that this will 
become traditional,” said Morris 
Slack of AMS. 

The royalty contest is unique 
in that both men and women 
students may enter and will be 
judged on sports skills rather 
than on beauty. 

THE KING and queen for 
Winter Carnival will reign over 
the remainder of events, includ- 


ing the sports events in w'hich 
they’ll participate. 

Ice skating will begin on Mon- 
day at 4 p.m. at the Provo har- 


King Sisters 
To Appear 
At Carnival 


I The King Sisters, popular re- 
cording group, will present a 
concert and appear at Winter 
Carnival dance. “Alice in Win- 
terland,” according to Dave Lar- 
sen. concert and dance chair- 
man. 

FORMERLY residents of Pleas- 
ant Grove, the King Sisters — 
who are really sisters — were 
nominated for a Grammy award 
in the category of “The Best Per- 
formance by a Vocal Group” for 
tlieir album titled “Imagination.” 

Best selling records of the vo- 
cal group have included such 
discs as “76 Trombones.” “Let's 
Keep Smiling.’ “Imagination. ' 
and “Nitey Nile.” 

Winter Carnivai dance will be 
held Jan. 20 and 21. Franklin 
School and Smith Fieldhouse 
have been scheduled for the 
night of Jan. 20. The dance will 
begin after the University of 
Utah-BYU basketball game. 

J.\N. 21 THE dance will be 
held in the Franklin School im- 
mediately following the King 
Sisters’ concert, w’hich starts at 
7:15 p.m. 

Tickets are $1 for the dance 
and 50 cents for the concert. 
Concert tickets are available at 
Wakefield’s and the Music Cen- 


bor and will feature bottrbroom- 
ball hockey and regular hockey 
competition. Each following day 
at 4 p.m. at the Probo boat har- 
, bor there will be public and ex- 
, hibition ice skating. 

SKIING WILL take place at 
Timp Haven on Jan. 21 at 12 
noon and will feature many rac- 
ing events, besides fun games 
provided for those who will not 
be skiing. 

An assembly, “Never So 
North.” will be presented Jan. 
20 at 10 a m. 

THE CARNIVAL dance. “Alice 
in Winterland.” will follow the 
Jan. 20 BYU-Utah game and the 
Jan. 21 King Sisters concert. 

Many trophies will be aw'ard- 
ed. including the coveted “brok- 
en ski” award made to the or- 
ganization which has accumu- 
lated the greatest number of 
points. 

AMS is directing the week 
with the entire program under 
the direction of Henry Heilesen. 


Dance, Movie 
To Close Week 

International Week activities 
will end this weekend with tha 
annual International WcM?k dance 
and Saturday's presentation ol 
the full-length movie from In- 
dia. “The Tiger and the Flame.” 

Friday’s studentbody assem- 
! bly featured a theme from the 
i Book of Mormon presented by 
the Polynesian Club members. 

‘ A cast of 65 participated in the 
' dancing and singing. 

AT 4 AND 7 P.M. tonight, and 
I at 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, the 
I full-length Indian film will be 
presented in 184 Knight Bldg. 
Featuring romance, dances. In- 
dian music and the dazzling 
court life of old India, this movie 
will show the romantic India of 
past years. 

Scheduled for 5 p.m. Friday, 
Dr. Quinn G. McKay, assistant 
professor of business manage- 
ment. will lecture on Burma and 
the Far EUist. Dr. McKay has 
spent two years at the Univer- 
sity of Rangoon. 

YESTERD.VY A cultural dis-^ 
play was presented by the for- 
eign student clubs in the Smith 
Family Living Center. 

Four hundred forty-seven stu- 
dents representing 42 nations, 
and 2000 returned missionaries 
added international flavor to the 
entire week. 


ter in Provo. 


Forum Schedules 
‘Funniest Woman’ 


“HEinr* PERFORMERS— .\cceptance of first showings 
of “Heidi.** a Youtheatre production, was reportedly good 
if a full house is any indication. Extra chairs had to be 
brought into College Hall to accommodate overflow aud- 
iences Wednesday and Thursday. 


Friday, January 13, 1961 


^ ? SISTh^RS— Appearing at Winter Carnival dances 
i concert are the.se popular sisters, originally from 
ant (»rove. Tickets for the idance are $l and for 
‘ aturday concert, 50 cents. 


Anna Russell, often described 
as the “world’s funniest woman.” • 
will present the Monday forum 
at 10 a m. in Smith Fieldhouse. 

Almost single-handed. Miss 
Russell has brought classical mu- 
sic to life and laughter. > 


LEOPOLDVILLE, The Congo, 
Jan. 13 (UPI) — Anti-Commun- 

j ist troops moved against pro- 

Provo, Utah ^ Lumumba forces on two fronts 
' today to block their attempt to 
jtake over a vast section of Iho 
' Upper Congo. 

President Moise Tshombe ol 
‘ Katanga . Province pitched his 
army and air force against “in- 
I vaders” from Southern Orion- 
I tale and Kivu provinces who are 
I trying to establish their owa 
state in Northern Katanga. 

THE CENTRAL Congo gov- 
ernment, under President Joseph 
Kasavubu and army strongmaa 
Col. Joseph Mobutu, sent hun- 
dreds of reinforcements by aic 
to Lisala to block an invasion of 
equator province across Orien- 
tale’s eastern border. 

The two groups were working 
separately but their aim was the 
same — to drive back and con- 
quer if possible the pro-Lumum- 
ba group that has taken over 
control of Orlentale Province. 

PATRICE Lumumba, the left- 
ist-leaning former beer salesman 
who became the Congo's first 
premier when it gained inde- 
pendence from Belgium. June 1. 
has been deposed by Kasavubu 
and now is in jail at Camp Har- 
dy, near Leopoldville. 


i 



Page 2 


Daily Universe 


Jan. 13. ^ Ip 






'Sp- 




# 


THE GOOD OLD DAYS-rBetsy Cannon scans 1920 
Issues of “The White and Blue.” Costs of the paper since 
have multiplied five and a half times. 


Paily Universe 


Unsigned editorials are the objective thoughts of the editor , 
written to inform, influence and entertain. 7 he editor assumes 
personal responsibility for matter therein contained: 




... <2 column by Sue Bailey 


Way up high in section Y. Here is the spot on the bench 
which I’ve rented for the game this evening. 


Editorial ... 

Banyan, Universe, Wye 

Financing the Daily Universe has always 
been a near impossible task, but in recent 
years the task has grown so difficult that a 
change must be made and made quicklj . 

In 1915 this paper, then called “The 
White and Blue,” cost $31.00 per issue to 
nroduce During that year students paid a 
$7 50 student artivity fee. In 1920 the same 
activity fee was paid but the Per msue 
had risen to $80.00 per issue. The 1920 W h t e 
and Blue editor, Ernest L. Wilkinson com- 
mented in an editorial, “Under present con- 
ditions, the financing of this paper is an im- 
possible task.” , 

To our knowledge, that impossible task 
has not been alleviated. This year fte Uni- 
verse will cost approximately $440.00 pei 
issne. The student government is doing their 
very best to adequately support the paper by 
appropriating nearly one third ot their en- 
tire budget to the Universe, but they simply 
do not have the means and one third tails tai 
short of needs. 

$31.60 per year is currently taken from 
student tuition— supposedly for student ac- 
tivities. Actuallv only $11.80 was appropri- 
ated for all student government activities, 
including all student publications. In view ot 
this, .$7.50 in 1915 must have looked like a 
mountain of money. 

University administrators are undoubted- 
ly justified in not allowing student activities 
more. So carefully is each penny of “tithing 
money watched that our student budget com- 
mittees have not ben able to justify a larger 
appropriation. The process of building an 
adequate case has simply not been within the 
realm of recent student ability. 

The W^ve magazine is another example 
of budgetary starvation. Two years ago the 
W'ye budget was cut by two thirds. This pub- 
lication is the only purely literary publica- 
tion the studentbody produces. The editor, 
who is practically drafted for the position. 


- They All Need Mone 




i % 


I can already see there will have to be some remodeling 
done around my area. 


In front of me sits a charming young lady, who has her 
liands folded in lier lap and a pleasant smile upon her face 
(I think). Rather, I imag;ine illumination is beaming forth 
from below her vogue hair production piled high upon her 
head. 


I would restyle it if I Iiad some scissors, a comb or a 
glass of water — just to make the game down on yonder floor 
visible. 


The two fellows next to me. I’m sure, hardly know that 
a basket was made or a rebound missed. I gather they are 
both returned missionaries reuniting for the first time since 
their release. 


Hum, Carol and whatever his name is have busted for 
the second and last time since lie got off his mission. (Slop- 
py work ! Could have been done quicker and more efficiently 
by the use of a Dear John after he had been in his faraway 
location for a couple of months.) 


The girl to the left of me seems to know a gieat deal 
about basketball. Maybe if I listen to her narrate the game 
to her date long enough, two will be educated instead of a 
measly one. 


Hello young lovers, whoever you are. Y’our two heads 
together cause loss of sight to the viewer behind you. 


From far and near — every, corner of the fieldhouse 
come apple cores and iX)pcorn wrapped up in tissue paj^er. 
Delightful combination. Looks lovely in my date’s mouth. 


Hi. ho basketball player. Gosh, look, he’s got dimples 
and stands so tall. Where did you come from. I’ve memorized 
your number. If I could only scrape enough pennies together 
to buy a program. I’d look up your statistics. 


earns $3.00 per week for working nei 
hours on the publication. 

The publications committee found' 
essary to charge twenty-five cents, i 
magazine in order to produce two c< p 
year, and this act immediately put tb 
lication in the category of a “luxur; 3 
is consequently ignored by many st^ 
who would otherwise appreciate recj ' 

. . X, » 

The yearbook went up in ijrice thK:.; 
because only $3,800 of the $11,000 recT;.. 
was appropriated. Higher prices mean J;r 
copies sold and the end result of this l,'. 
cycle is a very high price to a very 1 
tunates who can afford to own this pi 
record of life long memories. _ - , 

Increasing-. the amount of advertrr 
not the solution. The Universe canned . 
cent advertising last year and receive | 
erous complaints. Thus far during th: 
ester the percentage has been nearly 
cent and almost every organization q 
pus has voiced complaint. This, desp 
fact that we are printing an average , 
pages more per week than last yeaj } 
dentally the average issue in 1920 ® 
over 50 per cent advertising. 

Universe business managers have 
ed an alternate proposal for each of ^ 
three years that would solve the paper 
lem. Briefly the proposal called for cll 
each student 2 V 2 cents per copy, s«:|v 
tion rate, taken from their tuition a^ 
tration time. 

Apparently we are failures ai 
building” or at even preparing tiny ’ 
adequately because for the third ti 
proposal suffered the same budget-wl 1 
fate. _ I 

This may be a point to ponder as 
vey candidates for next Spring’s el 
Meanwhile we will go right on typi 
copy on those machines so thoughtf^ 
vided us by that 1915 student govet 


Says Dean Rusk . . . 

Marx Ideology 
Poses Threat 


For Free World 


WASHINGTON, Jan. 13 (UPI) 
— Communism is more power- 
ful than ever before and the free 
world faces a “long time strug- 
gle” against it, Secretary of 
State-Designate Dean Rusk said 
today. 

He also said he sees “no pros- 
pect at the present time” of es- 
tablishing diplomatic relations 
with Red China, since this would 
require abandonment of the Na- 
tionalist government on Formo- 


sa. 


I still don’t know who is winning- 
Oaks ? 


-the Seals* or the 


( SU66c5TlON,l 
LINUS... y h 


WH',' DON'T VOU LEI ME TRY 

TO find some sort of 

SUSSTlTVTE FdR YOUR BLANKET? 



MAVBE I COOD SeT VOO A 
dishtoojel or SCMETHINS... 


would you are A staryins 

DOS A ROBBER BONE? 


CP 


lat 


RUSK GAVE his views on in- 
ternational affairs to the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee, 
which must pass on his appoint- 
ment to the top post in Presi- 
dent-Elect John F. Kennedy’s 
cabinet. 

The retiring Rockefeller Foun- 
dation president said that “the 
power and dynamism of Com- 
munism is larger today” than it 
ever has been. In the East-West 
struggle, “the stakes are very 
high and the country will have 
to do what must be done,” he 
added. 

RUSK SAID that some day 
the Communist threat will come 
to an end and “our burden will 
be less.” But he added that it 
would be wrong to expect 'such 
a development now. 

Asked about Red China, Rusk 
said that while the United States 
cannot recognize that govern- 
nowledge “the presence on the 
ment at this time. it. should ack- 
mainland of a large and potent 
force as a fact of modern life 
which we cannot ignore.” 

He said the question of Com-, 
munist China also raises a diffi- 
cult parliamentary problem in 
the United Nations — one which 
“can’t be handled or decided by 
the United States alone.” 

“IT WILL have to be contiu- 
ally studied, in light of its bear- 
ing on the disarmanaent prob- 
lem.” he said. “It is difficult to 
envisage any real progress in 
disarmament without participa- 
tion by the potent force of main- 
land China.” 


KLANE FORSGREN 

“This Week We Honor . . .” 


ARLENE \\TM» 


Forsgren, Wimmer Get Ho^ 
High Scholarship Emphas 


%lso from the College of En- 
gineering Sciences we honor 
Klane Forsgren. a senior from 
Preston, Idaho, majoring in 
chemical engineering with a 
grade point average of 3.8. 


KLANE WENT to Preston 
High School from 1950-54. and 
then 'entered Brigham Young 
University in the fall of 1954 on 
a Hickley-Rowbury scholarship. 
After attending BYU for two 
years he took time out to fulfill 
a mission in Australia, return- 
ing again to school in the winter 
of 1959. 


Klane was elected student 
body president of BYU for the 
summer session of 1960, while 
he did research in the field of 
chemical engineering. 


This year he is on an Upper- 
classman Award scholarship and 
is also active in student affairs. 
He is Intra-Organizations Coun- 
cil president, a member of Phi 
Kappa Phi and the Viking social 
unit, and is 2nd Councilor in the 
BYU 33nd Ward Bishopric. He 
is also teaching a Math 101 class. 


Klane plans to continue his 
education in graduate school and 
go into the field of industry. 


This week we hon< 
Wimmer, a junior fron 
lege of Physical and i 
ing Sciences, majoring 
istry teaching and mi 
math, with a 3.8 gri 
average. 

Arlene was born ir^ 
house in Nine Miles, ^ 
County, Utah, and 
school for the 3rd, 4t! 
7th grades in a one-n 
house where her moth' 
teacher. She went on 
esne High School, wi 
student body presidei 
senior year and was 
torian of her gradual 


II 


UPON GRADUA' 
high school Arlene ca; 
ham Young University 
tinued her busy schei* 
year she was secretai 
Lambda Delta, sophoi 
en’s honorary, arid at tl 
time she is secretar; 
American Chemical S 
BYU Chapter, a mei 
Calcares, Sunday Sci 
ian in the BYU 25th _ 
Inter-Honorary presidei 


SHE ALSO won 
hours a week doing'^ 
research for Dr. Roei” ' 
Dr. J. J. Christensen. 



k961 


Daily Universe 


jid BYU Continue as a Member of NSA? 
utive Council to Announce Final Decision 


Pace S 


10 Reading Classes Available 


we belong or shouldn’t 
NSA unsettled contro- 
Brigham Young Unl> 
^will be discussed Iree- 
neeting of student gov- 
leaders and students.' 
day evening. \ 

eeting will begin at 8 
1 Knight Bldg. The Ex- 
Cotincil, Cabinet and 
ill attend and all inter- 
Si^dents are invited. 

‘:ntbody president 

egar will conduct the 

- He defines its purpose 
Ktsss the pros and cons 

- 4 


of NSA and our relationship to 
I the association.” 

After this meeting a bill con- 
taining the decision of the Exec- 
utive Council will be presented 
I to the Senate. Action on this bill 
will decide the fate of NSA at 
BYU. 

NSA also was the subject of a 
meeting Tuesday evening at 
which Robert Bennett, former 
national vice-president of NSA 
in 1956-57, discussed the prob- 
lem. 

BENNETT gave two reasons 


Having A Party? 

Need Refreshments? 

CONTACT 

BYU FOOD SERVICES 
CATERING 

Extension 2637 

Please Call Between 9 and IT a.m., 
1:30 and 4 p.m. 

Tuesday through Friday 


as being adequate reasons for 
withdrawal — because the school 
has nothing to^offer NSA or be- 
cause the school leaders disagree 
with the basic principles for 
which NSA stands. 

He said that during his time 
in the national office, NSA tried 
to stay away from national and 
international questions and con- 
cern itself with studenU as such. 
He said that he felt NSA should 
not move in those directions. 

THOSE WHO have questioned 
the activities of NSA feel that 
this is exactly the direction in 
which NSA moved. 


I Reading improvement classes 
for students who feel that they 
are having trouble reading are 
being offered next semester by 
the Counseling Service at Brig- 
ham Young University. 

There will be no charge and 
no credit for the course. 

PRELIMINARY 8 c r e e n i n g 
tests are being conducted now 
through Jan. 27. It is necessary 


for all those interested in taking 
the course to take the test on 
reading speed and comprehen- 
sion and vocabulary power. 

Those interested in taking the 
class (there will be about 10 
sections) should contact the 
Counseling Service as soon as 
possible, for this class will not 
be available through the regular 
registration procedures. 


Elder Wheat Dies 

j (Dn Jan. 9 a car accident 
I claimed the life of a former 
Brigham Young University stu- 
dent, Kenneth Edwin Wheat. 
Elder Wheat had three months 
remaining before his release 
from the French Mission, 

While at the Y, Wheat was 
a member of the Tau Sigma So- 
cial Unit. He played football 
! during his freshman year and 
was a member of the varsity 
squad during his sophomore 
I year. 

I He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edwin Wheat of Palisade Hills, 
Calif. 


- DIAMONDS - 

See 

Karl J. Thalman, Jeweler 

at 

THOMAS’ 

240 North University 
CONVENIENT TERMS 


Bob Wolsey is now back and invites all his old friends 
to drop in. And if you haven't met Bob, do so today. 

Y barber shop 

494 North University Ave. 

• 3 full-time barbers to serve you 

• Guaranteed barber service 

• Conveniently located on North University 
Avenue — close to B.Y.U. and ciowntown. 


Smeath^s Fossd JMarket 


Hast 8th North 


We Deliver 


Provo, Utah 


NNIVERSARY SALE 


f Pups 


Delicious A&R Hot Dog 
On Stick, Dipped in Batter 
Served Hot All Day Saturday 


Only 5 


U E SIMON, APPLE & CHERRY 


FROZEN JUICE 


IS 2 for 79e ORANGE 5 cans $1 


PICTSWEET, ASSORTED 


Meat Pies 5 for $1 


bUlVD STEAK 

jlECK ROAST 

U. S. CHOICE 

IGA TABLERITE 

U.S. CHOICE 

TABLERITE 

lb. 79e 
lb. 4:ic 

NIPPY LONGHORN 

CHEESE 

lb. 59c 

IS' FLAPJACK 

OUR 

4 lb. bag 49( 

CAMPBELL'S 

TOMATO SOUP 

9 cans $1 

1 WHITE 

jfapefruit 

8 LB. BAG 

43( 

FRESH CRISP 

CELERY 

lb. 7( 

IGA 14 OZ. 

Catsup 

5 for $1 

IlNG - CARNATION 

TALL CANS 

GROUND BEEF 

fresh' lean 2 lbs. 79c 

ILK 0 tor //( 

COTTAGE CHEESE 


lb. 28c 

IvHITE LARGE MED. A, CARTONED 

[GGS 47 

GOLDEN RIPE 

BANANAS 

10^ 


NEHI ASSORTED 

CARTON OF 6 

Soda Water 

35c 


Page 4 


Daily Tniverse 


Jan. 13, 19 


Diamond 

Misplaced June in January weather must be bringing in an 
epidemic of spring fever. At any rate engagements and pinning 
announcements are still flowing into the Daily Universe Society 
desk. 

Engaged are Kaye Ciuininghame, senior elementary education 
major from Bodega, Calif, and Gerald Hall, a graduate in zoology 
from Tooele. Kaye is dorm president of Bowen Hall while her fi- 
ancee is teaching seminary in Price. The couple are planning a 
June wedding. 

A Brigham City couple, Natalie Strate and Wallace Bunnell 
are engaged. She is a freshman nursing major and he is a senior 

at Utah State University. . r> v tt 

Engaged are senior Norma -lolinson and former B Y U 
Ariz. sophomore majoring in speech therapy, to Cliffton Franks, 
Wheaton, 111. He attended the “Y” last year and is now undergoing 
flight training with the navy in Pensacola, Florida. j 

Senior sociology major Barbara Riley is engaged to I.,arry Key- j 
nolds a junior from Arco, Ida. She is from Reedley, Calif. , 

Judy Core, freshman from Grand Junction, Colo., is engaged to j 
DeWayne Shunway, sophomore physics major from Blanding. ; 

Julie Taylor was recently engaged to Ken Chambers of Bakers- 
field, Calif. Julie is a freshman majoring in Humanities. Ken works 
for Firestone and is a partner in the cattle business. As yet no date 
has been set, but the couple plan to reside in Bakersfield. 

Engaged are. senior are major Norma Johnson and former BYU 
student Charles Rose. Norma is from Nampa, Ida. and Charles from 
Berkeley, Calif. He is now attending Harvard University. 

Setting a June 16 \vedding date are >Iarilyn Cameron and John 
Crandall. She is a junior HDFR major and he a senior pre-dental 
major from Mesa, Ariz. He will attend the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in San Francisco after graduation from BYU. 

BONNIE HEDDINGER, senior elementary education major and 
Sanford (Skip) Stewart, junior secondary education major are en- 
gaged. Both are from Eugene, Ore. Sanford recently returned from 
the Eastern States Mission. 

Another June wedding being planned is that of Marolyn Barton 
Moab senior in elementary education and speech, and Gil Moen, in- 
dustrial arts graduate from Union, New Jersey. She is a member of 
Nautilus social unit and he is now working in New Jersey for Amer- 
ican Telephone and Telegraph Co. 

Engaged on Christmas day were Margaret^^Iillet and Kay Tracy, 
Both from Mesa, Ariz. She is a graduate spe*ech and physical edu- 
cation major teaching school in Mesa and he is a junior sociology 
major. He fulfilled a mission to Canada. 

Receiving a diamond Dec. 25 from Robert 3IcCuan, was Carolyn 
Phillips, junior from Richmond, Ind. majoring in HDFR and ele- 
mentary education. Robert is from Marion, Ind. and is a junior 
majoring in accounting. He is a returned missionary from the Great 
Lakes Mission. The couple plan a late summer wedding. 

Hailing from Bellflower, Calif., Ruth Stanfield is engaged to Bob 
Rees, former BYU student who is doing graduate work at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow. He is from Long 
Beach, Calif., and was affiliated with Vikings and Blue Key. Ruth is 
doing graduate work at the “Y” and is a member of Cami Los social 
unit and White Key. 

Engaged are an Emmett, Ida. couple, Janice Cheney, and Bill 
Bt^sley. She is a freshman elementary education major and he is 
a freshman at the University of Idaho. 

Transfer student from Ricks College Lorena Cummings is en- 
gaged to Jerry Luber, freshman accounting major from Eau Claire, 
Miss. She is from Idaho Falls and a junior in homemaking education. 

Diane Stirland, junior english major is engaged to ElmaG. Mat- 
thews, graduate from BYU in business management. She is from 
Chinook, Mont, and he is from Evanston, Wyo. doing work at the 
University of Utah. He is an employee of the New York Life Com- 
pany. The couple are planning a June 12 wedding in the Salt Lake 
Temple. 


Fashion Show 
To Feature 
Winter Attire 

With hopes for snow some- 
time in the near future, fashion- 
able winter sports wear will be 
modeled at 7:30 p.m. Friday in 
Cannon Center. 

The show will officially kick 
off Winter Carniyal Week held 
Jan. 16 through Jan. 21. Model- 
ing the winter apparel will be 
the ten king and queen finalists 
of Winter Carnival who will be 
announced at the Friday morn- 
ing assembly. 

Winter Carnival King and 
Queen will be announced at the 
fashion show. These two will 
reign over the entire week of ac- 
tivities. 

Fashion wise winter clothes, 
provided by local downtown 
merchants, will be modeled at 
the event. These will include ski 
suits of all varieties as well as 
all other types of winter apparel. 

Besides modeling winter 
clothes at the Associated Wom- 
en Students-Associated Men Stu- 
dents event, special entertain- 
ment including student talent 
and a ski film will be provided. 

Titled “Skiing With Cham- 
pions,” the film concerns “ski 
races and winter sports of inter' 
est to all sports fans.” .according 
to Morris Slack, publicity chair- 
man for the week. 




r I 


WINTER WEATHER WEARABLES — Fashions like these mo 
by Marilyn Johnson and Will Godfrey will be featured I 
Winter Carnival Fashion Show held Friday evening. 


Freshmen Set Party; 
AFROTC to Hold Dance 


MONEY OPPORTUNITY 

FIVE BYU MEN to head direct sales division. • Represent 
America's largest stainless steel mfg. 75 years proven suc- 
•cess. Must be able to devote approximately 20 hours week- 
ly. Car essential. Your earnings will average $100 per week 
if qualified. Prefer Returned missionaries or other "profes- 
sional" salesmen. Please do not waste my time unless you 
need the lob and are willing to learn and earn. Contact 

M. R. ROGERS 

Center at University, Provo 


“Wonderland by Night” willi 
be held in Cannon Center Sat- j 
urday night beginning at 8:30 1 
p.m. Freshmen and their dates j 
will dance to the music of the , 
Y'S Men at their class party. 

Class cards or 75 cents per 
person will be admission. Cas- 
ual dress will be the style for 
the evening. 

The theme for the dance will 
be carried out by a large winter 
scene mural on one wall of the 
hall, said Dave Bowen, assistant 
social chairman. Also stars and 
other night symbols will be used. 

Freshman social chairman of 
the dance is Linda Rokes. Her 
assistants are Dave Bowen and 
Hillary Atwooll. 

Dance committee members in- 
clude Joanie Shaw, Emma Lou 
Webb, Brent Gramp and Lloyd 
Smith. 

Shirley Cutler is in charge of 
decorations; Mary Jane McCune 
is in charge of refreshments; Do- 


BUSINESS DIRECTORY 


VELVA'S 

BEAUTY SALON 

for the ver 7 finest In styllBg 
consultation and personalized 
service. 

Call FR S-6534 anytime or come 
by and see ns at 121 B. 5 No. 


UNIVERSE 

ADVERTISING 

PAYS! 


retta Gillens will be a patron. 

Hillary Atwooll is in charge 
of entertainment fo rthe even- 
ing; Dick Rees, Dave Bowen, 
Marion Stewart and Merilee 
Johnson are in charge of public- 
ity for the dance. 

The entertainment for the ev- 
ening will be furnished by the 
“Coeds,” girls trio. 

“Winter Wonderland” is the 
theme of the AFROTC dance 
that will be held Saturday night 
at 8:30 p.m. 

The Arnold Air Society and 
Angel Flight, sponsors of the 
dance, invite the whole corps to 
join the festivities. 

The dance will be held in the 
Maeser School. Music will be 
provided by the Y’s Men Com- 
bo. Refreshments will be served 
and admission will be free, an- 
nounced Ed Bak and Julie Hull, 
co-chairmen of the event. 

George Harmon and Pam 
Packer are in charge of decora- 
tions. 


“Tell me your sad story a 
but this time with gypsy vi 
accompaniment.” 



HEADACHE? 
BLURRED VISION? 

Eye Glasses, Properly Fitfl 
Relieve This and Other ll 
See 

DR. G. H. HEINDSELM4 
Optometrist 
for accurately fitted gl 

SPECIAL RATE 
TO STUDENTS! 

Heindselman Optic^ 
and Jewelry Co. 

124 West Center St. 


Ferguson's Bike Shop 

“We Sell the Best 
and Service the Rest” 
795 South State in Provo 
FR 3-3750 


Cox Brothers 
SINCLAIR SERVICE 

303 West 1st North - Provo 
DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS 


SPEED - WASH 
Provo's 

Meweat And Finest Coin Operated 
Laundry 

1275% North 150 East 
Rear of Madsen’s Drive-In Cleanara 


Rx 


Free Prescription 
Delivery 


Berntsen 

Pharmacy 


MEDICAL CENTER 
PHARMACT 
214 K. 1275 N. UnlT. 

FR 3-1010 ^ ♦•29T0 


Join the University 
VAGABOl^D CLUB 

SEE EUROPE IN 1961* 

(On BOAC Bristol Britannian Turbojet) 

New York-London: August/, 1961 
Paris-New York: September 17, 1961 
Total Round Trip Fare: $290.00 

and lecture on Sv/itzerland 

Come to meeting on Saturday, January 14, 2:00 p.m., at University of Utah 
Union Building, Beehive Room 

For further information call CR 7-4393 in Salt Lake City, or write to 
University Vagabonds, Union Building 
University of Utah, Salt Lake City 12, Utah 

*Sp8ce allocated on first come, first served basis. 

Deadline for membership (fee, $8.00), February 1, 1961 




The 


^ta^iihe 


by Terry falvert 


ce the ruling this year prohibits bringing in snow 
iv sculpturing by the social units, it is likely that that 
X Winter Carnival will be held later — unless nature 
u] little less and snow makes the scene. 

y:TAr> UNIT HASKETHAI.L competition began this 
Pj^fending champs Tau Sigma claims the best coaciies 
^3 Burton and Jim Kelson, both members of the var- 

'^1 Val Norn — Val Hyric exchange will be this week- 
pi snow party at Timp Haven is the gind of fun. They 
^ iggoning is at its peak up there now. 
ijlLTA PHI WII.U HOI.U its exchange with Alcyone 
Al urday night in the J.S. Banquet Hall. Their chorus 
U g at the Utah State Prison evening service in the 
J ek or two. 

I vote for the most exciting new club bn campus — the 
•ing Club. Gayland Brown is the president. With all 
d weather the club has been practicing their idea 
s every Saturday. If anyone is interested in watch- 
1 1 now they would be glad to have you below. And, of 
( ;hey welcome members. 


I iy Farewell 
sides Held 

n groups on campus are 
<L firesides this Sunday. 

■ah Club will hold a fire- 
18:45 p.m. Sunday, in 
19 of the McKay Bldg. 
ISmith of KSL-TV will 
\ speaker. All returned 
J’ies, former pageant 
unts and residents of the 
Instates Mission are in> 


nonial fireside will be 
the California Mis- 
wlub beginning at 8:30 
|.day. It will be held at 
of Craig Jones; 159 
^ North, Provo. 

rmer members of the 
Jrican Mission are invit- 
pnd a fireside to be held 
Sunday in 116 McKay 
lim Rawls, Brigham 
University student, will 
eaker. 

lentral States member^ 
rned missionaries will 
reside Sunday at 8:30 
U McKay Bldg. Former 
will be the special 


^ S' 

Eli!', 


11 testimonial services 
David Norman Wright 
Id this Sunday evening 
in Manavu Ward, 4th 
North. Elder Wright 
last year’s president of 
Sigma Honorary Fra- 
will serve in the 
man Mission. 


I P. E. ASHTON I 

BUICK - CHEVROLET I 

ACROSS FROM SEARS S 
^Regular lubrication is thrifty be- £ 
Ycause it protects your car. Invest S 
few cents today and save dol- y- 
Uars worth of future mechanical X 
7 , trouble. X 

Lubrication Regularly $1.75 v 
SPECIAL WITH THIS AD | 

(j. Only 98c ^ 

w Offer Expires February 1 \ 


FREE DESK 
CALENDARS 


University 

Cleaners 


Four convenient 
locations to serve you 


cing for the Wisest Way 
ilSpend Your Clothing Dollar? 

Iwtantial savings on reconditioned articles of all kinds, 
&jr shopping at our large, friendly store. Here are a 
I' the Items that are available: (every size, color, and 
i^ot guaranteed, of course). 

[the girls... For the boys... 
lixirts - sweaters - ~ shirts - suits - 


Houses - shoes - 
uoats 


slacks - shoes. 


Jo best clothing values in town are found here! 










Daily Universe 


Page 9 


W of ch For . . . 

AlplrM CIvb meet Monday «t S:30 . Off campu* dhtrict IS meet •*. 
pm. South W««t doer of th« ncldbouM the women's gym Saturday at 1:30 pm 
to view the Winter Carnival events , and then go to Vivian Park for Ice 
• • • I skaUng. 

Aritona Club will hold a western j s • ■ 

dance Friday at 8 pm for members' Tribe of Manv Feathers -sil] meet Frl- 
only In the Social Hall. Club members day at the indiea education office at 
will meet Saturday at 10 a.m. in Can- :6:30 pm. and then go to TJsp Haven 
non Center for a -now party. . for a tobogganing party 


DAILY IM\ EK.se 

PubIKbed Mockday through Friday 
during the aradetnlc year eatept dur- 
ing \a(atk>n and examination period 
b« the Asaoriated Students of Brigham 
Young I'nixersily. Second ctase mail 
prisileges authorised at Proa-o. Utah. 
Re-entered Sept. I#, I9S8. under act 
of .March 3. 1119. Subscription price 
of IS. 59 per year. Printed by the 
Brigbam Young I'niverslty Frew. 


I 



PENlVEYlSl ^ 


AtWATS flkSr OUAtlTY> 


F}: 

MEN'S 

FAVORITE 
SKI PARKAS 


TERRIFIC SAVINGS AT PENNEY'S ON 
REVERSIBLE NYLON TAFFETA PARKAS 


COMPARE THESE FINER 
JACKETS WITH JACKETS 

SEtUNG FOR DOLLARS MOREI s. M l. xi. 

WondM^ v^om Ski* fllwt protaclkm odoW tK# eJ»m*nS ... to Rghlwolght yem 
olpioe woodar If Wl Cotaplotoly wotofKopoMool. ooW tupw-imis with eiotHc «S 

«wff, owd woM*. tfioso hlghfy-oolotod jaoho*, oto tmotlly ^kod om omo alo, wIlS 
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Sttptot B Kjt h l ao a o th o MOf DooS adit SSt btgl 


CORDUROY SLACKS 

PR 

These slacks are priced to clear! Be 
sure to come in early for the savings! 
Corduroy in medium and dark tones 
. . . sizes 32 to 38. 


WOOL SWEATERS 

sgoo 

Exciting buy on these better sweaters 
In bulky and novel knits with shawl 
collar and v-neck. . . Warm 100% 
wools in dark and medium tones in 
sizes 36 to 46. 


MEN’S CORDUROY SUITS REDUCED 

These better suits are all reduced to a fraction of the original 
price! Smart 3^butJon continental styling in lustrous wide wale 
corduroy. Green or gold sizes 38 to 44. Reg. longs 

MEN'S DEPT. - MAIN FLOOR 





Page 6 


Daily Universe 


Jan. 13, 


Cougars Travel for 


Pair 


by Jack £atchler 
Universe Sports Writer 

Brigham ‘Young University’s 
Cougars hit the road this week- 
end and go over the big hill to 
play two games. Their first game 
Will be tonight against the Rams 
of Colorado State. Tomorrow’s 
game will be against the Univer- 
sity of Wyoming Cowboys. 

THE COUGARS, who put up a 
very uninspired front against the 
Grizzlies of Montana, will have 
to be strong to beat the Rams 
who have already racked up one 
conference win, and that at the 
expense of Denver’s five game 
win streak, 

Saturday night’s contest for 
the Cats will be in Laramie, and 
the ’Pokes will be out to take 
their first conference win in 
three starts. 

LAST WEEKEND the Cow- 
boys went down to New Mexico’s 
Lobos 71-64 and to Denver 81- 
66. This will be their first home 
conference tilt of the new season. 
If the Cougars are able to main- 
tain a sustained drive they could 
drub the ’Pokes. 

REVERSING the order of 


COME THE SUND8WNERS! 

Ae fun people, fervent 
people. They have a tremen- 
rfous urge to keep breathing 
ONE OF DCBOMN 

THE 

10 BEST 
FILMS 
-OF 

1960 igsfsm’i 




/mmmi 





MD/immns 

TMi"' 

SuMDomm 



A Picture of the Family 
And for the Family 


EE 


tt; 


bfa 


TODAY at 1:15 

PRICES — with Discount Card 
50c 'til 3 then 75c 

Feature: 1:50 - 4:23 - 6:59 - 
9:35 

UINTA - 5:15 Today 

Frank Sinatra 

"OCEAN’S 11" 

John 'Wayne 

"THE SEARCHERS" 


games, Utah State also goes over 
on the “suicide trip,” so named 
because it has wrecked many a 
conference title hopeful’s 
chances, and plays the Pokes and 
the Rams. 

Without the help of Charlie 
Walker, the Farmers could be in 
trouble up in the mountain coun- 
try of Wyoming Friday. The 
game will be a toss-up on paper, 
but the home floor advantage 
could weigh in favor of Coach 
Bill Stranigan’s quintet, as it 
could Saturday against the Brig- 
hams. 

SATURDAY night the Utags 
go to Colorado Springs and this 
is another game which could go 


either way, especially if the 
Rams are able to contain high- 
scoring Cornell Green. 

UTAH’S high-flying Redskins 
will get into action Saturday 
against the Denver Pioneers, and 
little hope is held out for the 
traveling troupe from the East- 
ern slopes of the mountains. The 
Utes hosted New Mexico on 
Thursday night and came out 
victors. 

NEW MEXICO will continue 
in a northerly direction and will 


Volleyball 
Forfeits Dot 
’Mural Play 

by Merrill Johnson 
Universe Sports Writer 
Intramural volleyball competi- 
tion is in its second month of 
play and there is an increasing 
number of forfeits, both single 
and double. * 

In volleyball the team that 
wins two out of three games is 
the winner. A team must win a 
game by two or more points. 

Results of the past week: 
January 4 

CR2 defeated CL2, 15-12 and 
15-7. 

ERl defeated ELS, 15-10, 4-15 
and 15-5. 

FRl defeated FR3, 9-15, 16-14 
and 15-11. 

18 Ward lost to 21 C Ward, 

3- 15 and 7-15. 

San Diego A defeated Cassia, 
15-9, 12-15 and 15-13. 

Iranian defeated Chinooks, 15- 
6 and 15-11. 

Drink Team No. 2 lost to 
Moorlock, 12-15 and 10-15. 

! EL2 lost to ER2, 13-15 and 13- 
,15. 

I Tausig lost to Bricker No. 1, 

4- 15 and 11-15. 

! CRl lost to CR3C, 15-11, 9-15 
and 11-15. 

January 5 

I CR3B lost to CR2, 15-3 and 

115- 7. 

I DL3 No. 1 lost to DL2, 15-5 
‘and 15-9. 

] EL2 defeated ELS No. 2, 15-8 
and 15-10. 

[ 20 Ward lost to 21 B Ward, 8- 

|l5 and 11-15. 

' Moorlock lost to Chinooks, 4- 
;i5, 15-10 and 13-15. 

I Drink Nee 2 lost to Macabees, 

1 16- 14, 9-15 and 12-15. 

Val Hyric lost to Bricker No. 
1, 14-16 and 7-15. 


7/ie OLct JcmeA. 



“If you want the world to 
beat a path to your door, just 
lie down to take a nap.” 


TERROR . . . MYSTERY. . . ROMANCE ! 


Gregory 

PECK . 

Br«deri<ii ' 

CRAWFORD 
Rita GAM 
Anita 6J0RK 



Adults .25 
Children .15 


167- McK. 


Wed., Thurs., Pri. 

4:15 - 7:00 p.m. 
Saturday 

2:00 - 7:00 p.m. 



IN OREM 

ENDS WEDNESDAY 

Jerry Lewis 

IS 

FABULOUS i 
FUN 
’ AS 


Jem u»i> IWmima) J 




7^oiirmv\n 


Judith Anderson 

Henry Silva- Robert Hutton 


... Count Bme .rinsAvu 

RtMiLNd Biftd iMturitj; Joe Williams 


Anna Maria 
Alberghetti 

as “The Princess" 

• Pn»l«(4 b> JwiI U*is • 

Emst D. ClKliau«-Wnit«i»H[Hr»rtrtbjFn»kt»shE» 
Bwiy »«rr»j «i4 Jitb A 

Tfxhsicolor- * ^ 


face the Montana Grizzlies for 
the Grizzlies’ home-conference 
opener, 

MONTANA, who have now 
officially lost their leading scorer 
due to academic difficulty, which 
will leave them in the position 
of having to start sophomores 
against the more experienced 
Lobos. 


KELSCH’S 
SHOE REPAIR] 

DYED RESUEDEDj 

COMPLETE SHOE 
SERVICE 

‘ at RANDALL’S 
154 West Center 


To Whom It May Concern . . ? 

That comedy riot “CARRY ON NURSE” is back for * 
a limited return engagement— 

STARTS TONIGHT FOR 5 DAYS 

SHOWS FRIDAY AT; 6:00 - SKH) 

SATURDAY AT: 1:10 - 3:30 - 5:30 - 7:40 - 9:50 


Get Your Tickets Now Tor this Special 
Big Show — 

SEE IT AT 
YOUR OWN RISK./ 



Bring Your 
Ghoul Friend 



.SCARE UP A PARTY-JOIN TRECHMK’ 
-BETHRILLfD-HAVEfUN/, ' 


ALL SEATS $1.00 
NOW ON SALE 


See “BUCKET OF BLOOD” and 
“THE GIANT LEECHES” 


ENDS TONIGHT 
Elvis Presley in 
“FLAMING STAR” 


Announcing ... 

PROVO SPORTING GOODS’ 

HIGH TRADE-m SALE 

Trade in your old skis and receive a fabulous allowance 
on a new pair of 

HARTS KNEISSEL 

KASTLE VOSTRA 

and many other brands 

Also . . . 

QUILTED PARKAS $1688 

STRETCH PANTS $1995 

FINNISH SWEATERS 995 

Complete Charge Account — Layaway 

PROVO SPORTING GOODS 

FR 3-5960 281 North University 



11 


IS. 1«61 


Daily Universe 


Paje 7 


lozeman Triangular Meet Beckons Y 


fiangutar meet in Bozeman, 
ina wili provide the Brig- 
Young University matmen 
Tioi'c intersectional compe- 
Saturday, prior to the 
» of regular Western Divis- 
^ M atchos. 

their last outing the Cou- 
0 |t to the Montana State 
ts 12-23, a Provo. In a pre- 
cuntest the Brighams de- 
Mes^ College, 16-14. 

|gOT STATE will .be the 
squad in the Montana com- 
>n. 

Bch Carl Bair expects a bet- 
mowing from his team in 
Blay's matches. 


"Because of the layoff during 
the Christmas holidays, we w'ere 
not in the best physical shape 
for our first two matches.” said 
Bair, “But we are concentrating 
on conditioning again.” 

THE COUGAR grappling team 
will be strengthened this week- 
end with the return of sopho- 
more, Steve Goodsell in the 
191-pound division. Goodsell 
missed the first two matches be- 
cause he was unable to get down 
to the weight limit. 

Challenge matches were sche- 
duled all this week to determine 
which wrestlers will be making 


the trip to Bozeman. The follow - 1 Phil Kresge; 167, LeGrandej BYU will open iU Western 
(Boyer; 177. Bill Yancy; 191, Division matches against Utah 
123 Hardie Rawlins; 130. Ea>l| Steve Goodsell; HW, Kent on January 21. in Salt Lake 
Kanzler; 137, Rod Kimball; 147, 1 Horne. Icity. 


k’YWEIGHT HORNE — Bijf Kent Horne, undefeated 
heavywei^rht wrestler, shown here winninK 
inst Montana State in last week’s match In- Provo. 

Con^ar continKent that will compete in a 
[itch with MS(' and Minot State this week. 


a H 


f, 4 inst Monta 
head the 
Ul j njiular mal 

IRLS 

EXPERT 
ILTERATIONS 

Now Available 
at 

^^HOMAS’ 

it 

'40 North University 


SELL FISH? 

When was the last time you 
had sardines and a chocoiate 
Dairy Queen? They’re deli- 
cious. Ail fishermen eat Dairy 
Queens. It's too bad more 
people don't like fi.shermen. 1 
guess their occupation makes 
them selfish. (Read it again, 
Dobe!) 

Bill's Dairy Queen Store 

Across from the Fieldhouse 


Year-End Clearance 

The brands are quality stock featuring 
Hart Schaffner & Marx, Clotncropt, & Varsity Town. 


SUITS 

Now 

4375 

to 

TOPCOATS 

Now 

3975 

to 

Regularly 55 to 125 

9875 

Formerly 50 to $5 

6775 

CAR 

COATS and JACKETS 


SPORT COATS 

Reductions to 

25 % 

Now 

2775 

to 

SLAX 

Now 

1175 

to 

Usually 35 to 75 

5975 

Were 15 to 25 

1875 


FLORSHEIM SHOES 

Selected styles up to 24.95 

now 1 ^80 & 1 080 


SPORT SHIFTS 

A good selection of long sl''^e ard short 
sleeves. Normally 5.00 to 7.95 

now 294 to 49 c 


CHARGE IT! 
Pay 1 ''3 Monthly 


DRESS SHIRTS 

Your favorite styles; whites and colors, from 
frmcu.s name stock. Regularly up to 6.95 

new 035: 3 fer ] QOO 


Store Hours: 

10 e.m. to 5:40 p.r 


16 W, Center 


Clas.sifiecl 

CALL JERRY 

Ex. 2077 from 8:00-5:00 FR 3-4384 after 5:00 


nrlMV 

1-18 


SINGSRS. Having trouble Hlth high tonw; 
not fttudyl.ig novr? S<m J.W. McAllistw 
FR 3-1464. 1-23 


U Appliance RcHMiif 


I Barber SIwtt 


or Al. On* block west of HaUman 
Allay 
1-27 


H Bniqt I frescripHoits 


if mpicte 24-hour medical 
dj icciderrf insurance worth 
|han 4c a day to you? 
^ Student Irjwance Plan 
»?i ^ust such protection . . . 

r can obtain your policy 
Becomes effective as 
» IS you pay the permium 
■>n‘t expire till June 9. 
ist? Only $6 for entire 

. t ■>®re? Cachier's Office. 
ie?er Bldg. 

|l i6n? Now through Feb- 
ry 6. 

r PUT IT OFF AN- 
DAY. 

th Iho <jF.iUU,D WALTON R.\LL- 
-MNCE GUILD taaches baginniog. 
idlate. and advanced classes m 
swing, atid rhumba 2 
laaekly 00 monthly. Phone 
1-13 


NEED EXTRA ENERGY? 

If you do don't pass up these 
money saving vitamin values. 

0 Vltera: 100 capsules, reg- 
ularly $5.49, now only $4.00 
0 Abdol: 100 capsules, were 
$3.89, now only $2.00 
0 Vitamin C: 100, 250 mg. 
tablets only $ 1 .49 

Also, we fill all full-time stu- 
dent's prescriptions for less. 

STUDENT HEALTH CENTER 
PHARMACY 


17 leweki 

GL&AMLIGHT fine diamooda. Big'dlaeount 
to atudants CaU Cary Goodaon. PR3- 
4oe4 i-aa 

1$ Ba*o I T.V. Servlet 

UNIVKRSI^'Y TV S^Tca. For furaati^ 

•ervlca on all makes call rR 8-1143. 
aiR w Canter 5-26 

RALPH'S Radio A TV.”91 8 300 W. FIU- 

4713. Ot-ar 26 years sarvica in Utah 
County. 5-26 


U Wilch ReaHe 

EXPERT watch repair. Clean, adjust only 
S3 00. Will raplaca crystals, stems, 
main-springs, etc Satisfaction guar- 
anteed or money back Phone WliUam, 
the campus watchmaker. FR 3-4990 
after 4:00 p.m.. 266 North 4th Bast 
2-7 

WATCHES claanad and ovarhauSad. parti 

* Includad. work guaranteed. 04.50. Jack 
Staala, 127 B 4tb N.. A S-4333. 

1-27 

M OM C« 

PLAYHOUSE NXntSSRY — Provo's nawast. 

SM N. 2ad. B. FR 3-3959, AC 5-1838. 

1-27 

WILL tend yuu.ig children daytime* my 

home- -Consklerable Experience FR 4- 
1141 1-16 

45 Dresgutklai Iifcihl 

DRESSMAKING and alterations Mrs. 
Brown. 477 N. Uotversity. Call rR3- 
8837 T F N 

PATTERN not required Bring ptetara or 

aketch. Work guaranteed Wedding 
dresses my .spaoalty. MUdrad's BMal 
Shop. 42 North 1st. Beat FB SUS37 

T F N 

DRESSES. Skirts. Formate, Ooata hung 

and hemmed. $l-$2. Machine Covered 
Buttons. Oos-erad Balts. CsU FR 4-2426 
4:30 to 9:30 p.m. 3-10 

KNIT suits shortaoad Knitted wear hat>d 
k^ — not mschlna HU 9-6138 
1-18 

u TjHe 

BXPCRT TYPING of all kinds. Miona Mrs. 
Smith. AC 5-1841. 1-13 

TYPING; electric tjmewriter with wide 
‘ carriage. LuciUe. FR 4-0248 after 5K)0 
pm 1-18 I 

55 IttlMTMtS i 

. "Obting Pit for Kings. " Ubles for twa | 

' fine food by candlelight, entertain- 
1 ment Parties by arrangement All this 

1 et the Roundtable Inn. 837 N. 7th £.. 

! PR 3-9489 or FR 3-1523. 1-13 

ENJOY Mexican food at KI Uariaehl — 

1 parlies and banquets. 3rd South ^d 

1 7tb Bast FR 3-6411. r-37 


64 Nr Sile->NlsceBM)eMK I 

I'SED Slid rebuilt vacuum cleaners and 
(low polishers FR 3-3039 T.F.K | 

AKGKNTINK mission Sell Haliiirraftert | 

SX-99 recalvw. Heath DX-40 trans- 
mitter. alto saxa^tone. Dkh PR 3-4133 ‘ 
1-20, 

TAPE recorder and player coesp— 835 
Call FR 4-0444 or FR 3-1740 1-13 

SKIS and boots. sIm. lOU. and MlUw 

bindings (or $30 FR 4-0105 1-13 

COMHUhSMT Hl-Fl eaui|Riient — origmal 

cost $600 — will sacnfice Phone FR4- 
0051. 1-13 

WRINGER washer and rinse tuba. Make 

off»r FR 3-1414 1-17 

o.AMvjtsU weddh.g and engagmnmt aet 
rhesp Phone TO S-843S. 1-17 

1 nnKi skia $39 Raal bergaln prices oo 
! other ski equipment PR 4-1494 1-19 

66 Hisicil histnaeits 

1 ALTO saxophone. King. Make an offm’. 

1 Curt Diehl. PR 3-30M. 1-13 

1 71 ABiftMeiti for BcH 

aud dadT CamforUMe 

rooms — Hiilcrest MotaL 1675 South 

ft-e-n 1-20 1 

lur 4 gtrla in lovaiy. vary 
modarn home New furniture, dish 
washer. CloM to school. Call PR3- 
tA04 T-PN. 

bUv'ai.Y furnahed baiamant apartment 

for 2 or 3 girla Cloaa to adiool. Call 

PR 3-3804 TFN 

iWO or taree gtrU to share apartmant 
near campus. Also two bedroom apart- 
ment $45.. family or boya. PR 3-3085. 

TPN 

IX'R.MSHEO tbrae room apartment for - 
co<ii^ 319 Bast 1st btorth. 1-16 

NEV furnisbed apartment for girls. ISO 
^t 7Ui North. PR 4-1771. 1-13 - 

LOVELY 2 bedroom apartatent for a 
young married coupla Closa to achool r 
Call FR 3-3804 TFN 

2 LARGE roams tor rant. Excellent ■ 
factlitkw PR 4-A1A8 1-13 

EXCELLENT HOUSING for girls Reason- 
able rates — 2ad.86einrster. FR 3-8605. i 
1-27 


72 Rmiis with Board 


SECOND SEMESTER — $65 a 
MONTH 

3 meals 7 days a week 
•/2 block from campus 
N. 4th. E. FR 4-2473 


tfirf 


UiAmouM itiriushed housa for $ stu- 
dents Cloaa to -Y." PR 3-6aei. T.FN 


fnmilv or studaota 


a month. 421 N 8th K. Pravo. 
recreation room. AvailaMa Pabniar 
Call Fit g-6453 


7S Homes for Sale 


this neat home — oo loan coata. 2 bed- 
room. rull besesnent with extra bed- 
room. garage, carpets, drapes, etc 
Phone. Bldon J Card Real EsUte. AC5- 
2359 or FR 3-1273 1-16 


H Biqrdes Hatofcydes 


Roy's Bika Shop gdiwrioa Daalw Iff 0 
W 1st South n 3-1744 


ft Altos tor sate 


117 Tralers 








' 


Daily Universe 


Grade ReporHng Procedure 
Changed For Fall Semester 


A new procedure for the dis - 1 student’s registraion card. Those 
tribution of grade reports and j who have address changes 
assembly report cards has been | should report the change before 
announced by Alma Burton, , Feb. 1 at the information booth 
Dean of Admissions and Rec- | in the Smith Family Living Cen- 
ords. ter. Cards will be mailed Feb. 

20 

Grade reports for all fall sem- ^ 

ester students will be mailed to ! FORUM ASSEMBLY report 
the local address written on the cards will be distributed before 


and after the last forum on Jan. 
23 and devotional cards on Jan. 
25. Students who registered for 
forum and devotional must have 
attended 11 out of 14 forum as- 
semblies and 11 out of 15 de- 
votionals in order to qualify for 
credit. 


Universe Campus Quickies . . . 


Students who haven’t attend- 
ed the required number or who 
fail to report their attendance 
will receive a failing grade. The 
grade will count on the over-all 
grade point average. 


Carnival Applications Due M 1 


Applications for entries in the 
Winter Carnival ice skating and 
skiing competition must be turn- 
ed in by 5 p.m., Friday at the 
intramural office in the Smith 
Fieldhouse or at the AMS offices 
in the Clark Student Service 
Center basement. 


i Interviews to select secretar- 


ies and receptionists 
newly created Traffic Co 
be conducted by Suprem 
Secretary Marilyn Wat' 
day. 

The interviews will 
from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m 
the Supreme Court Offic 
basement of Clark Stud* 
vice Center. 




T' 


Semi-Annua! Storewide Clearance Sale! 



distinctive 
sport coats /3 

These harrdsomely tailored sport coats 
come In the smartest college styles. 
Muted stripes and herringbones; deep, 
rich hues. Excellent values while they 
last! 


Puritan & at savings of 

Catalina 33% 

Sweaters 

Bulky knits In cardigans and pull-overs. 
The season's most popular weaves, col- 
ors and necklines. 




Timely and Phoenix Suits | 


A fine selection still 
available. Custom de- 
tailed In the most 
tasteful patterns and 
colors. 


6c r 


originally 


now reduced 

30“ o 


8C'* 
I a r 




CUkivrit.^ values to 6.00 

Smarts 294 

sport and dress shirts — long 
and short sleeves. Still a wide 
range of sizes, colors 'and pat- 



‘odd vests’ 

to add that extra touch 
fashion to your ward- 
robe. Priced to sell at 


of 

498 



Crosby Square & 
French Shriner 

Shoes in broken sizes. 

Wide variety 
of styles and 
leathers. 


Dedicated to serve you 
through years of correct 
dressing! 



77 N. University