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LIBRARY 

Brigham Young University 


AMERICANA 















































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Wi\t iM0ntl|ly 


^fptmbfr, 1923 

























































WALL PAPER 



The Whitehouse I 

Utah’s largest dealer in Wall Paper and | 
Draperies. “Always first to show the f. 
latest,’’that is why we have been too | ■ 
busy this summer, fitting out the many | 
new homes recently built in Salt Lake I 


Read Carefully the Following: 


$5 00 Papers going at 

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$4.00 Papers going at 

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$3.00 Papers going at 

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$2.00 Papers going at 

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$1.50 Papers going at 

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= 

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75c Papers going at 

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50c Papers going at 

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25c Papers going at 

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And g'ive a harmonious touch to your home. The White 
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We carry fabrics for unholstering', draping and interior 
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And always are our prices, as well as our work 
manship, satisfactory to the customer. 








































THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


1 


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1 Phones Wasatch 2201 and 2202 Prompt Delivery | 

I The FULTON MARKET | 

I TWO STORES j 

I 70 West First South New Strand Market | 

I vSalt Lake City- Utah | 

= FRESH FISH, OYSTERS, POULTRY GAME IN SEASON | 

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(ttalrn&ar for ^rptembrr, 1923 


1— Fri.—First Friday.—St. Giles, Ab. 

Z.^Sat.—St. Stephen, K.C. 

3. —Sun. — 13th after Pentecost. —St. Serapia, 

V.M. 

4. —Mon.—St. Rosalia, V 

5— Tues.—St. Lawrence Justinian, Bp.C. 

6— Wed.—St. Onesiphorus, M. 

7— rhurs. — St. Regina, V.M. 

8— Fri.—Nativity of B.V.M. — St. Adrian, M, 

9— Sat.—St. Peter Claver, S.J., C. 

10— Sun.—14th after Pentecost.—St. Nicholas 

of Tolentino, C.—Bl. Charles Spinola 
and Comp., S.J., M.M. 

11 — Mon.—SS. Protus and Hyacinth, M.M. 

12 — Tues.—The Holy Name of Mary. — St. Guy 

C. 

13 — Wed.—St. Maurilius, BpC. 

14— Thurs.—Exaltation of the Holy Cross. 

15— Fri.—The Seven Dolors. — St. Catherine of 

Genoa, W.—St. Nicomedes, M. 

16 — Sat.— SS. Cornelius, P., and Cyprian Bp. 

M.M. 


17— Sun. — 16th after Pentecost. — Stigmata of 

St. Francis of Assisi. 

18 — Mon. — St. Joseph of Cupertino, C. 

19 — Tues, — SS. Januarius, Bp. and Comp., MM. 

20 — Wed.— Ember Day. — SS. Eustachius and 

Comp,, M.M. 

21— Thurs. — St, Matthew, Ap. 

22— Fri.— Ember Day — St. Thomas of Villan- 

ova. Bp. C. — SS. Maurice and Comp. 
M.M. 

23 — Sat. — Ember Day — St. Linus, P.M. 

24 — Sun. — Ibth after Pentecost. — Our Lady of 

Ransom. 

25 — Mon.—St. Firmin, Bp.M. 

26 — Tues..—SS. Cyprian and Justina, M.M. 

27— Wed.—SS. Cosmas and Damian, M.M. 

28 — 3'hurs.- — St. Wenceslas, K.M. 

29— Fri —Dedication of St. Michael, Arch 

angel. 

30— Sat. St. Jerome, C. D, 


I Bpiineau-Hill Investment Co* j 

I REAL ESTATE — LOANS — INSURANCE I 


Wasatch 4000 


204 BOSTON BUILDING 













2’ 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


... 



I To the Reverend Pastors and Administrators and to the People of the = : 
s Diocese: =! 

= From the day that our slender means and the lack of cooperation s 

= compelled ceasing' the publication of our Intermountain Catholic, the = 
s Diocese has suffered from the lack of a Catholic Diocesan publication, e 

= Whilst we are still unable to publish a weekly Catholic paper, we i ■ 

I are beg-inning- now the publication of THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY, 

E which will be distributed free in every parish in the Diocese. | i 

I THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY will contain parish notes, parish e ' 

E news of local and general interest, diocesan news, diocesan official news, e J 

I and well selected articles on Catholic doctrine. Catholic practice and = 

I other Catholic subjects. In publishing this Monthly, it will be our aim 1 * 
I to create a new interest in life of things Catholic in this Diocese and to = j 
E maintain this interest by solicting' the cooperaton of all our people. = i 

E We have submitted our plans in the matter of publication of this 1 ■ 

E Monthly to the Reverend F^astors of the Diocese and they have given = j 

I unanimous and enthusiastic approval. • I ' 

I We have invited the pastors and the Catholic Societies of the 1 | 

E Diocese to send in news for the MONTHLY and it is our desire to have 1 1 
E every parish represented frequently in the columns of the MONTHLY, i | 
I It is our purpose to make the MONTHLY a distinct and valuable aux- f 

I iliary in each parish of the Diocese. i | 

I We trust that our people will give hearty welcome to THE 1 j 

I DIOCESAN MONTHLY and we ask the cooperation of .all our people = j 

E in the practical way of patronizing our Advertisers. It is the Advertisers i i 

I who make this publication j)ossible and we urge you to patronize them i I 

I ajid to do so in such a wa\' as to encourage them to continue their ads i | 

I m our MONTHLY. || 

I Commending THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY to your kindest = | 

i consideration, I am, 1 


Yours very truly in Christ, 

JOSEPH S. GLASS, 

Bishop of Salt Lake 



1 










THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


3 


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Dry goods 
Shoes 



Women''s 
And childrens 
Apparel 


Visit 

The New Store 


Keith-O’Brien Company 














IIIIIIIIIIUllllllllllllll 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


(Eatljpiiral nf life iJSaieleitte 



6:00 a.m, — Low Mass. 

7:00 a.m.—Low Mass and Instruction. 
9:00 a.m. — Low Mass and Instruction. 


10:00 a.m. — Low Mass and Sermon. 

11:00 a.m.—High Mass and Sermon. 

7:30 p.m. — Organ Recital, Instruction and 


Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament 


SUNDAYS 

Holy Days—Masses at 6, 7, 8, 9, and 12:10. 


Daily Masses—7 and 8. 


First Friday—Mass of E.xposition at 7 o’clock; second Mass at 8. Blessed Sacrament 
remains exposed during the whole day. Holy hour from 7:30 to 8:30 in the evening 


GENERAL COMMUNIONS 


First Sunday of the Month —The Meynell Club 9 o’clock Mass. 
Fourth Sunday of the Month —The Newman Club, 9 o’clock Mass. 


MEETINGS OF PARISH SOCIETIES 


Cathedral Conference of St. Vincent de Paul —Sunday morning, 10 o’clock. 

League of the Sacred Heart —The last Sunday of the month at 4 p.m., in the Chapel 
of the Cathedral Rectory. 

St. CeceliaS Choir — Every Monday evening at 8 o’clock; Ethel Hogan, Organist 
Rev. C. E. Reardon, Director. 

Cathedral Sanctuary Society — Every Saturday morning at 9 o’clock. 

Boy Scout Troop, No,. 25 —Every Friday evening at 7:15 o’clock; L. V. Gibbs, 
Scoutmaster. 

CATHOLIC SOCIETIES OF TOE CITY 

Knights of Columbus — Club rooms, 165 E. S. Temple; "VVas. 7551; Meetings each 
Tuesday, 8 p.m. Very Rev. J. J. McNally, Chaplain. 

Catholic Woman’s League — Meetings, the first Tuesday of the month at the Ladies' 
Literary Club House. 

St. Ann’s Sewing Circle —Meetings each Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Holy 
Holy Cross Hospital, to sew for the Hospital. 

Hospital Committee of the League — Meetings each Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock 


at the Holy Cross Hospital to sew for the Hospital. 

All Catholic ladies of the city are welcome to attend both of these meetings. 


The Newman Club — Meetings, the fourth Sunday of the month at breakfast, following 
the 9 o’clock Mass; the second Thursday evening of the month at 8 o’clock, 
Knights of Columbus Club rooms. 

ADMINISTRATION OF SACRAMENTS 

Confessions —Saturdays and Eves of Feasts, and First Fridays, from 4 to 6 p.m. and 


from 7:30 to 9 p.m., and Sunday mornings between Masses. 

Week days, at any time by requesting a priest at the rectory. 

Children should always come in the afternoon, and only those whom neces¬ 
sity forces, should come on Sundays and Feast days. 


Baptisms —Sunday at 4 p.m. At other times by appointment. 
Marriages —Notice should be given one month in advance. 


..I.Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllll.III!.. 


EVERYTHING IN 

PRAYER BOOKS, BEADS, CRUCIFIXES AND STATUES 


CALLAHAN BOOK AND STATIONERY CO. 


Books of Every Nature 


164 South Main Street 







THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 5 



Dependable 


Groceries 


C^apitolo ]^i*os. 


I 17 East Fourth South Street Phone Wasatch 847 | 



I Icy-Hot I 

= Bottles, Jars, Carafes = 
E and Lunch Kits E 
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A Prescription! 


I Eastman’s Kodaks | 

= Expert Develdpingr and= 
E Printing e 

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To get the best results should be filled by a Reliable Druggist 

Van Dyke Davidson Drng Go. 


Telephone Wasatch 7474 Opposite Newhouse Hotel = 

Will fill your Prescription with Accuracy, Care and Skill, using = 


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I Cotys I 
= Exquisite Toilet e 
E Preparations E 


Squibbs’ Fine Chemicals 


ElllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllE 

I Dainty Light 1 
I Luncheon | 

= Served at Fountain = 


6 THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 

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I KELLY COMPANY | 

I STATIONERS — PRINTERS — BOOK BINDERS | 

I Society Stationery, Engraved Cards, Etc. | 

I No 23 West First South | 

I WASATCH' No. 4180—4181 | 

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CATHEDRAL OF THE MADELEINE 


Rectory, 331 E. S. Temple Street 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Telephone Was. 8826 


Parish Limits — Beginning at 2nd W. and 
6th S., thence easterly along 6th S. to 7th E., 
north on 7th E. to 3rd S., east on 3rd S.to 
the city limits. The Parish is bounded on 
the north and on the east by the city limits. 

At Home — The most desirable hours for 
business calls at the Rectory are: 9 to 12 
a.m. 2 to 4 p.m. 

Instruction — Those desiring instruction in 
the Catholic religion are cordially invited to 
call at the Rectory and make arrangement for 
a private course of instructions. 

Sunday Mass — The obligation to attend 
Mass on Sundays and Holy Days of obligation 
binds under pain of mortal sin. See that 
you are there in time for the beginning of 
Mass, and do not leave the church before the 
Mass has ended. 

Marriages —Arrangements for marriages 
should be made with the Pastor at least three 
weeks in advance of the date set for the cere¬ 
mony, in order that the banns may be pub¬ 
lished on three consecutive Sundays. All 
marriages of Catholics should take place in 
the Church and be followed by the Nu]:.tial 


Mass, Holy Communion and the Nuj'tial 
Blessing. 


DIRECTORY OF PARISHES 


ST. PATRICK’S 

Pastor, Rev. M. F. Sheehan. 

1072 West 4th S. Street. Phone Was. 7928. 
Sunday Mass 8 and 10. Daily Mass 8. 

OUR LADY OF LOURDES 

Pastor, Rev. R. J. Cotter. 

1253 E. 4th S. Street. Phone Hy. 1346 
Sunday Mass 8:15 and 10. Daily Mass 8. 

OUR DIVINE SAVIOUR 

Pastor, Rev. N. J. Wientjes. 

177 E. 9th S. Street. Phone Was. 4449. 
Sunday Mass 8:30 and 10:30. Daily Mass 8. 

ST. ANN’S 

Pastor, V. Rev. J. J. McNally . 

1719 S. 4th E. Street. Phone Hy.. 5206. 
Chapel, 430 E. 21st S. Street. Phone Hy. 3177. 

Sunday Mass 8 and 10. Benediction after 
Alass. Daily Mass 7. 

ST. JOSEPH’S 

Pastor, Rt. Rev. P. M. Cushnahan, V. G. 
Assistants, Rev. J. J. Lambe and Rev. William 
Kennedy. 

514 24th Street. Phone 1417. 

Sunday Mass 6:30, 8 and 10. Daily Mass 8. 


Phone Wasatch 974 


Quality 


= Clothes Insured 
E Work Guaranted 



PH0NEXWASATCH-97il.l 


LEANING & DYEING C 

//4- -//«■ E. BROADWA Y 
SALT LAKE CITY 



Service 


114-116 EAST BROADWAY 
Salt Lake Citjs Utah 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii: 


















THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


7 


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CHURCH OF THE ASSUMPTION 

Park City, Utah. 

Pastor, Rev. Cuthbert Hogan. 

ST. PATRICK’S 

Eureka, Utah. 

Pastor, Rev. John D. Lagan. 

P. O. Box 185. Phone 168. 

Sunday Mass 8 and 10. Daily Mass 7:30. 
Benediction 7:30 p.m. 

HOLY ROSARY 

Bingham, Utah. 

Pastor, Rev. John M. Ryan, C. S. C. 

P. O. Box 81L Phone Bingham 121. 
Sunday Mass 8 and 10:30. Uaily .\lass 8. 
Benediction 7:30 p.m. 

SACRED HEART 

Magna, Utah. 

Pastor, Rev. W. J. Giroux. 

37 2nd E. Street. Phone Magna operator. 
Sunday Mass 8:30. Daily Mass 8. Bene¬ 
diction 7:30 p.m. 

NOTRE DAME de LOURDES 

Price, Utah. 

Pastor, Rev. A. F. Giovannoni. 

3 8th Street. Phone 316. 

Sunday Mass 11. Daily Mass 8. Benedic¬ 
tion 7:30. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 

Vernal, Utah. 

Pastor, Rev. Louis J. Fries. 

Corner 1st W. and 2nd S. Streets. Phone 
Vernal 768. 


Sunday Mass 10. Daily Mass 8. Benedic¬ 
tion 8: 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 

Provo, Utah. 

Pastor, Rev. Joseph G. Delaire. 

Corner 5th W. Street and 2nd N. Street. 
Sunday Mass 10:30. Daily Mass 7:30. Ben¬ 
ediction 7:30 p.m. 

ST MARGUERITE 

Tooele, Utah. 

Pastor, Rev. P. M. O’Brien. 

Utah Avenue. Phone 150 
Sunday Mass 6:45 and 10. Daily Mass 8. 
Benediction. 7:30 p.m. 

ST AUGUSTINE’S 

Austin, Nevada. 

Pastor, Rev. P. F. Kennedy. 

Chapel, Battlemountain, Nevada; Rectory, 
Austin, Nevada. 

Sunday Mass 8:30 and 10 Daily Mass 8. 

CHURCH OF THE DIVINE CHILD 

Caliente, Nevada. 

Pastor, Rev. J. Simon, O. S. M. 

P. O. Box 186. 

Sunday Mass 9. Benediction after Mass. 
Daily Mass 8. 

ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH 

Elko, Nevada. 

Pastor, Rev. Martin Burke. 

Missions, Sacred Heart Chapel, Carlin, 
Nevada. Phone 1694. 

(Continued on page 38) 


I “Yes, We Have No Bananas ! ” = 

I Except the Very Best! The same with all the goods we sell | 


Olentral lHarkpt 


I 52-54 EAST FIRST SOUTH | 

I Fresh and Cured Meats Poultry and Fish | 

= staple, Fancy Imported and Rare Groceries and Delicacies = 

I FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES | 

S Free Delivery Real Pleasure in Every Order Phone Wasatch 160 ^ 

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THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


USE 


STANDARD COAL 


MINED IN UTAH 


A hard, free-burning-, clinkerless coal. Stores 
well. Most economical fuel for furnace. Made 
all sizes. Best preparation. Our Lump 


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Stove and Eg-g- as prepared at our mine, are free 
from dust. 


l§»taLiiclai*cl Fuel Co- 


Office 69 So. Main 


Phone Was. 4600 


USE 


STANDARD COAL 


MINES AT STANDARDVILLE. IN SPRING 
CANYON, CARBON COUNTY, UTAH 


For Car Load Orders, Phone Was. 2560, our 
Expense, and get coal shipped promptly. 






STAiNDARD COAL CO- 


918 Kearns Building 


Salt Lake City, Utah 




®I|f ltnrp0an iiontl|l0 

QIatIje&tal nf tlje iMabplpinp 


Salt Lake City, Utah 

331 E. S. Temple Street Telephone Was. 8826 

RT. REV. JOSEPH S. GLASS, C.M., D.D., LL.D., Bishop and Rector 

REV. D. G. HUNT REV. JOSEPH P. DONNELLAN 

REV. WILLIAM T. HART REV. J. S. KEEFE 

REV. PATRICK MAGUIRE REV. C. E. REARDON 



THE CATHOLIC PUBLISHING CO. 

L. V. GIBBS, Business Manager 
561 Fourth Avenue 
Telephone Was. 4745-W 


Vol I SEPTEMBER, 1923 No. 1 


OPENING OF THE 

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS 


The Catholic schools will re-open for 
the fall semester’s work Thursday, Sep¬ 
tember 6. Regfistration days are Fri¬ 
day, August 31, Saturday, Monday and 
Tuesday, September 1, 3 and 4 The 
parents should see to it that their chil¬ 
dren appear for registration on the 
days set, and that they begin their 
work on the first day of school. 

In addition to the two Grammar 
Schools, which have been conducted 
during the past three years, a Catholic 
High School will be opened tliis fall. 
The new school will be in charge of the 
Sisters of the Holy Cross, with some 
classes taught by the ;oriest of the 
Cathedral.- It is located at Eleventh 
East and Seventh South. 


Salt Lake City, Utah 
August 24,1923. 
Very Rev. J. J. McNally, 

Rev. M. Sheehan, 

Rev. H. J. Wientjes, 

Rev. Dr. R. J. Cotter, 

Salt Lake City. Utah. 

Reverend Dear Fathers: 

You are aware of the splendid work 
that has been done by the two Catholic 
Grammar Schools in this city. To the 
work of the Grammar Schools we have 
added the first and second year High 
School for boys and girls, and begin¬ 
ning this September, we are adding the 
third year of High School. 

Beginning in September, the Cath¬ 
olic High School will be in charge of 
the Sisters of Holy Cross. 

You know how very esential the 
work of the Catholic schools is to the 














10 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


maintenance of the Catholic faith in 
any community, and you know too that 
the schools can be maintained only by 
the faith and g'enerosity of the people 
— by their zeal and and self denial. 
Our Catholic people love the Catholic 
schools and determined to maintain 
them at all costs. They know that 
Catholic education is infinitely more 
valuable to theirc hildren than money, 
social position or worldy succes, for it 
is through Chatholic education that 
these children will save their immortal 
souls. 

The establishment and maintenance 
of our schools has been a great burden 
and a source of great anxiety to us 
though we feel quite sure that every 
Catholic (whether he or she has chil¬ 
dren attending- these schools or not) 
is anxious to do his or her share in 
supporting our schools. 

In order the more satisfactorily and 
the more adequately to obtain the 
funds necessary to the maintenance of 
our schools, we, as the Bishop of the 
Diocese, have decided to assess each 
parish for the support of the schools. 
We, therefore, hereby assess the par¬ 
ishes of the city for the year September 
1, 1923, to August 31, 1924, as follows: 

Cathedral of the Madelaine..$7,000. 


St. Patrick’s. 500 

Our Divine Savior. 700 


Our Lady of Lourdes. 1,500 

St. Ann’s . 300 


We hereby order that one-twelfth of 
the amount assessed for the year be 
paid to our office on or before the tenth 
of each month. 

You will notice that the assessments 
of St. Patrick’s Parish and Our Divine 
Savior Parish are not as large as they 
might be, because of the fact that each 

Follow Cathedral notes... 

of these parishes has a considerable in¬ 
debtedness. 

We leave to you individually the de¬ 
cision as to the manner of collecting the 
amount of your assessment from the 
people in the parish committed to you. 
If by special school collection, etc., you 
canno,t each month, meet the amount 
of your assessment, we direct and order 
that the balance necesary to make up 
your assessment be taken from the par¬ 
ish funds. 

We are quite satisfied that the earn¬ 
est zealous and interested presenta¬ 
tion of this matter of school support to 
the people of the respective parishes 
will make the matter of meeting your 
assessment comparatively easy. 

Knowing your interest in the Cath¬ 
olic training of the children committed 
to your care, and especially conscious 
of your love of souls and your zeal for 
their welfare, we commend the work of 


I TAXICABS, BAGGAGE 
I AMBULANCE | 

I Salt Lake Transportation Co. | 


Open Day and Night 


Phone Was. 560 










THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


11 


CATHEDRAL BOY SCOUTS 
SPEND WEEK CAMPING 
^ IN PROVO CANYON 

Father Reardon, Scoutmaster Gibbs 

and the following- members of the 
- troop spent last week in Provo Canyon, 
camping' at the Cottrell ranch: John 
j- Brennan, Henry Bruneau, Maurice Cal- 
lahan, Plug'h Cottrell, Fisher Davidson, 
i| Paul De Bouzek Jack Fleisch, Malcolm 
; Hall, Anton Hartwig-, Joseph Jones, 

' Frank Log'g'ins, Thomas Log'g'ins, Her- 
if bert Loomis William McDougall, Den¬ 
nis McFall, Clarence Oxley, Jerome 
j Stoffel and Mascot Bill Brennan. 

■ ^ Little Bill was very attentive to the 
cook and undoubtedly found many 
g-ood turns rewarded by her goodies. 

I The boys took turns at K.P. and en- 
I joyed themselves very much, 
i Mr. Gibbs and the scouts desire to 
I express their appreciation to Mr. Cott- 
' rell for the use of the camp and the 
grounds, and to the following mothers 
and fathers who drove the troop up 
and then brought them back: Mrs. 

Charles M. Stoffel, Mr. Edward Jones, 
.Mr. Jean D Bouzek and Mr. Clarence 
W. Oxley. 

There is room in the troop for about 
ten more boys. Application should be 
made at the residence of the scoutmas¬ 
ter on the regular meeting nights, 
which will be on every Fridaj', during 
the school term. 

The members of the troop committee 
are: The Right Reverend Joseph S. 
Glass, Bishop of Salt Lake, chairman; 
Mr. S. A. Cottrell and Jack Malone. 


' maintaining our schools to your enthu- 
I siastic cooperation. 

I With every good wish, 

Yours faithfully in Christ 
JOSEPH S. GLASS, 

Bishop of Salt Lake. 

. 



= STORING, PACKING, SHIP- I 
i PING of HOUSEHOLD | 
i GOODS = 


I M. A. Keyser I 

j Fireproof Storage j 

I Company | 

I 328 West Second South St. | 

i Salt Lake City, Utah = 

I Was. 5722 and 5723 | 

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Your School 
and 


I Our Store | 

I —should be close friends in pro- | 
i moting education. We sell all | 
I that you need in texts and ■ e 
E school supplies, asking you only | 
E fair prices and giving you more | 
E than fair service. i 

I Visit us often during 1923-24. | 

i We can serve out-of-town pa- = 

E trons by mail. Let us know = 
1 what you need. e 

I DESERET BOOK CO. I 


44 E. So. Temple St. 


Salt Lake 




























12 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


CATHOLIC WOMAN’S LEAGUE 
NOTES 


The initial meeting- of the club year 
of 1923-1934 of the Catholic Woman’s 
League will be held Tuesday evening, 
September 4th, at 8 o’clock at the 
Ladies’ Literary Club house on East 
South Temple. The Right Reverend 
Joseph S. Glass will be the guest of the 
League, and will give an address. Dr. 
John J. Galligan will talk on “Modern 
Medicine and Public Welfare.” Special 
music for the meeting is being arranged 
by Mrs. Lydia White Boothby and Miss 
Ethel Hogan. Following the program 
a reception to Bishop Glass will be 
held, and all friends of our Bishop and 
of the League are extended a cordial 
invitation to be present. Tea will be 
served by the entertainment committee. 

The officers of the League for the 
current year are as follows: 

President, Mrs. A. H. S. Bird, First 
Vice- President, Mrs. L. B. McCornick; 
Second Vice-President, Mrs. A. J. Bru- 
neau; Recording Secretary, Miss The¬ 
resa Winter; Corresponding Secretary, 
Mrs. P. J. O’ Gara; Financial Secretary, 
Mrs. R. O. Dobbs; Treasurer, Mrs. Fred 
A. Geue. 

The president, Mrs. Bird, announces 
the following committee chairmen: 

Program committe, Mrs. \\’. H. Binlz; 
Membership committee, Mrs. Jcihn M. 
Murphy; Entertainment committee, 
Mrs. Arthur Kelly, vice-chairman, Mrs. 
Otto Fisher; Hospital committee, Mrs. 
Harry Lambrecht; Catholic Truth com¬ 
mittee, Mrs. Daniel C. Murph3"; Library'- 
committee, Mrs. Frame Rummel; Hos¬ 
pital committee, Mrs. \dctor Young- 
berg, vice-chairman, Mrs. Angu.s Mc- 
Kellar; Press committee. Mrs. P. J. 
O’Carroll; Parochial School committee, 
Mrs. Edgar E. Pegg; St. Ann’s Sewing 
Circle, Mrs. Mary Stolzenberger, vice- 



HAVE YOUR 


I SUIT I 

I “DUNDEE TAILORED” | 

I We design and cut every gar- 1 
I ment in our own tailor shop | 


Perfect Fit Guaranteed 



215 South Main Street 


I Tailors of Quality Clothes | 

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= of character ma5' be beautifully sym- = 

= bolized by your monument if you se- E 

= lect a r.uitable design. Indeed, from E 

= our designs you nmy choose that de- E 

E sign which best seems to fit the re- E 

= quirements. We will also draw up E 

= special sketches for you if you prefer. E 

I Elias Morris & Sons Co. | 

= Opp. Tabernacle Was. 8008 ^ 

= We have given reliable service for 3 

E over half a century § 

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THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


13 


chairman, Mrs. W. L. McDoLig-all: St. 
Ann’s Parish Circle, Mrs. Selmon E. 
Tissue. 

; Chairman of Departments: 

Art, Literature and Education. Mrs. 

: Elizabeth Geog-heg-an; Secretary, Mrs. 
jjjames K. O’Leary. 

I Civic Welfare: Mrs. Fred Davidson, 
j: Social Service: Mrs. Frank J. Mc- 
iGanne^^. 

I Advisory Board of Leag-ue: Mrs. L. 
iB. McCornick, Mrs. P. J. O’Carrol, Mrs. 
:Fred A. Geue, Mrs. Harry Lambrecht, 
jMrs. Edg-ar E. Peg-g'. The officers and 
: chairmen comprise the executive board 
I which meets monthly at the call of the 
ipresident. The board has met during- 
^the summer and plans for the year’s 
^activities have been outlined, 
i Mrs. W. H. Bintz and her committee 
(have labored zealously during- the sum- 
fmer months and an interesting- and in¬ 
structive prog-ram for the year is the 
'result. The Year Book will be of the 
press within a few days. 

Members in doubt as to their dues 
may communicate with the financial 
secretary, Mrs. P. O. Dobbs, telephone 
Was. 5257-W. 

On Monday, September 10th, at 3 p. 
m., the Current Event Section will hold 
' its first meeting- of the year. Mrs. Eliz- 
I abeth Geog-hegan will read a paper, 
"St. Peter’s and the Vatican.” Mem¬ 
bers will discuss current event. At the 
meeting of the section on September 
24, Mrs. James K. O’Leary will review 
the “Life and Works of St. Ignatius 
Loyola,” and discussions of current 
events will follow. 

The Hospital Section wil Iresume its 
work at the hospital on Thursday, Sep¬ 
tember 13, at 2 o’clock. Members of 
this section, as well as all the members 
of the League, deeply regret the ab¬ 
sence of Sister M. Beneti, who has been 
called to Deming, New Mexico, where 



I SALT LAKE STAMP CO. I 


= Manufacturers of Rubber and Steel = 

= Stamps, Seals, Stencils Metal ^ 

= Signs and Metal Specialties e 

I FREE CATALOG ON REQUEST | 

I 65 West Broadway | 

E Phones Was. 3097 and Was. 3098 e 

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I COOMBS-HAGEN SHOPS | 

= M. E. Callahan, Mgr, e 

I Auto Bodies, Wheels, Springs | 

I and Frames Repaired | 

E 133 E. First South Was, 5077 = 

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imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

I Odorless Dry Cleaning I 



I Cleaning & Dijeing Co. | 


I 156-160 E. 2nd South Was, 580 E 

E Branch; — 1st South and State Street S 
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I SCOTT HARDWARE | 

I COMPANY I 

I 168 Main St. | 

= Hardware, Tools = 

= and E 

E House Furnishings = 

I illlllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllliillliiiillliilllilliiiiiiiiiiiii I 

I Watch Our Windows | 

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14 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


the Holy Cross sisters are opening- a 
new hospital. Sister M. Beneti has al¬ 
ways shown an interest in the League 
and its members and their work, and 
we feel that we have lost a valued 
friend. We wish her success and hap¬ 
piness in her new home. 

St. Ann’s Sewing Circle will meet to 
take up the new year’s work on Wed¬ 
nesday, September 12, at Holy Cross 
Hospital, at 2 o’clock. 

St. Ann’s Parish Circle will meet on 
Thursday, September, 13 at 2 p.m. in 
the sewing room at St. Ann’s Orphan¬ 
age. 

The deep s;^mipathy of the League is 
extended to Mrs. M. E. Finnegan and 
Mrs. E. G. O’Donnell, who suffered the 
loss of their husbands during the 
month. 


LEAGUE OF THE SACRED 
HEART 



I O’DONNELL & COMPANY | 


= UNDERTAKERS AND EMBALMERS = 

E Telephone Wasatch 6461 i 

= 3 

“ a 

E 225-7 S. West Temple St. = 

E Salt Lake City = 

H 3 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 


The Promoters of the League held 
their regular monthly meeting Sunday, 
July 29th. The president called the 
meeting to order and the opening pray¬ 
er was offered by Father Hunt, after 
which the minutes were read and 
accepted. 

Pledges were give for the Hours of 
Adoration on First Friday and Com¬ 
munions of Reparation. 

Prayers were offered for the repose 
of the soul of Miss Mary Owens, who 
was one of the League’s most faithful 
members. 

Several new members were enrolled. 

The National Catholic Welfare 
Council extends an invitation to the 
Deague to send a delegate to the con¬ 
vention to be held in Washington, on 
September 30th, the League being af¬ 
filiated with the Council. 

After the closing prayers, the meet¬ 
ing adjourned. 


i[iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

I GEORGE JAY GIBSON | 

I ATTORNEY-AT-LAW ^ 


Kearns Building 

Salt Lake City, Utah 


miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 

I WILLIAM H. LEARY | 

= and I 

= 3 

I WILLIAM H. BRAMEL | 

E 3 

= ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW | 

E 3 

E 427 Newhouse Building = 

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THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


15 


CATHEDRAL ALTAR SOCIETY 

; On the third Sunday of each month, 
i Altar Society dues are collected after 
each Mass, in the vestibule of the 
; Church. 

I The following' ladies are appointed 
{ to take charge of the altars during the 
I month: Mrs. M. T. Kearns, chairman; 
iiMrs. Thomas Marname, Mrs. A. J. Gil- 
I lis, Mrs. Louis Beuse, Mrs. Ronald 
I Morrison. 

I Mass is said on the third Monday of 
evrey month for members of the Altar 
Society. 


SUNDAY SCHOOL 

\ The Cathedral Sunday School will 
I be re-opened Sunday, Sept'endoer 16, at 
1 10 o’clock. Children between the ages 
f of 6 and 17, who do not attend the 
\ Catholic schools are expected to be 
I present. 

I Rev. D. G. HUNT, Director. 

r, 

j ]MIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

II iHarg’ 


AUGUST SCHOOL COLLECTION 


Acheson, Mrs. H. J. 

$ 1.00 

Ahern, Beatrice 

.50 

Ahern Geo. P. 

.50 

Anderson, Mrs. Nora 

.50 

Belcher, P. W. 

1.00 

Billings, Mrs. T. P. 

1.00 

Bird, Mrs. E. W. 

5.00 

Bowen, Agnes L. 

1.00 

Brennan, J. J. 

5.00 

Buese, Mrs. Louis 

.50 

Burke, James J. 

10.00 

Byrne, L. W. 

3.00 

Bond, Tony 

.10 

Buller, P. M. 

.50 

Cahill, T. F. • 

1.00 

Callahan, M. E. 

5.00 

Carheron, Virginia, 

5.00 

Capitolo, F. 

5.00 

Carlin, M. E. 

1.00 

Carrig, Thos. 

1.00 

Carroll, Katherine 

1.00 

Carroll, Nora 

.50 

Cassidy, Thomas 

.50 

Cavanaugh, Jos. 

2.00 

Chavez, Mrs. M. 

.50 

Clark, Eleanor 

1.00 

Clark, Lucy 

1.00 


AraJipmg 


SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 

I = Accredited to State University 

j ^ Special Courses in 

f I MUSIC, ART EXPRESSION — COMMERCIAL COURSE 




Gymnasium under Expert Instructor 


Send for Catalog to Sister Superior 








16 

THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 



Mllllllllllll.....IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII.Ill.Ill.... 

= 

All Suits and Overcoats Made m 

= 


riTit 

Salt Lake 





OUR GUARANTEE 


= 

I TAILORS 


18 Years of Service without 

a Misfit 

1 


25 West Broadway Phone 

Wasatch 

.^610 ^ 

.....Ill.mill.........Ill.... 

Cleveland, Betty 

1.00 

Fitzpatrick, Genevieve 


1.00 

Collins, Frank 

1.00 

Flanigan, Mrs. J. E. 


1.00 

Connors, J. T. 

.50 

Fleisch, Mrs.. J.. G. 


1.00 

Cook, Mrs. J. H. 

2.00 

Flood, Madelene 


.50 

Cooper, Mrs. T. F. 

.75 

Galligan, Dr. and Mrs. J. J. 


5.00 

Cosgriff, J. E. 

100.00 

Garvin, Lucy R. 


1.00- 

Cotterell, Mrs. S. A. 

1.00 

Gavin, Thos. 


5.00 

Crawford, Mrs. L. M. 

1.00 

Geoghegan, Mrs. E. 


5.0oj 

Cromer, W. H. 

1.00 . 

Geoghegan, Kathleen 


1.00. 

Cunningham, B. 

1.00 

Goeghegan, Gertrude M. 


1.00 

Curley, Mrs. a id Catherine 

2.00 

Geoghegan, John 


1.00 

Connelly, Mrs. Emma 

1.00 

Gibbons, Mrs. A. 


1.00, 

Cooper, Mrs T. F. 

.25 

Goodell, Doris 


3.00 ' 

Daily, M. [. 

5,'^0 

Gorman, J. P. 


5.00 

Daniels, Mrs. Nora 

1.00 

Goulet, J. 


. 2 o; 

Dauquin, Mrs. Nora 

1.00 

Griffin, Mrs. John 


2.50; 

Dearing, Mary 

.50 

Griffin, Lt. 


2.50 ; 

De Bouzek, J. A. 

5.00 

Guthrie, F. P. 


1.00 

De Bus, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. 

2.00 

Halloran, W. J. 


10.00 ' 

De Groot, Mrs. A. J, 

1.50 

Hanrahan, Mrs. 


1:00: 

Derby, J. D. 

1.00 

Harrington, Agnes, 


1.00 

Devine, J. J. 

.50 , 

Harrington, Jos. 


1.00: 

Douglas, Mrs. J. B. 

1.00 

Hart, J. E. 


.25, 

Dovle, Mrs. Annie 

1.00 

Hartwig, A. 


i.5o: 

Dooley, Mrs. J. E. 

5.00 

Harvey, John L. 


l.OOj 

Driscoll, A. T. 

' ' 1.00 

Hennessy, E. 


1.00, 

Driscoll, Chas 

1.00 

Hoffman, Elizabeth 


5.00 1 

Driscoll, R. E. 

1.00 

Hungate, F. E. 


1.00. 

Dubuc, Leonie F. 

5.00 

Hurd, Helen 


1.00, 

DUguet, Mrs. U. 

.25 

Hyland, Mrs. P. B. 


pool 

Dwyer, J. C. 

1.00 

Hoonie, C. H. 


i.ooh 

j 

Emge M. H. 

1.00 

Isom, Mrs. D. A. 


l.OOl 

Fanning, Beatrice 

1.00 

Joyce, S. K. 


Z.OOj 

Farrell, Mrs. E. J. 

.50 

Kane, Mary and Harry 


1.00! 

Farrell, Mr. E. J. 

.50 

Karstorff, Mis sRose 


l.OOj 

Farrell, Mrs. Susan 

.50 

Kavanaugh, Mr. and Mrs. J. 

J. 

2.00' 

Fife, W. E. 

5.00 

Kearns, T. F. 


15.00 


Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^li 
I “You all know ERNEST” | 

I ERNEST LAMBOURNE |l 

= Salt Lake’s Leading Florist E 

I 67 South Main Street Phone Wasatch 1516 |i 









THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 17 


Kierce, Mrs. Theresa 

1.00 

McKellar, A. 

1.00 

Kelly, James 

1.25 

Nelligan, Mr. and Mrs. S. A. 

, 3.50 

Keyting, Mrs. Lee Scott 

3.00 

Nelligan, Mrs. M. J. 

1.00 

Kramer, Mrs. E. C. 

.50 

Niemeier, Mr. and Mrs. B. 

1.00 

'Krauss, J. E. 

.50 

Nickerman, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. 

1.00 

Kronner, Mrs. Wm. 

.50 

O’Brien, Mrs. E. J. 

95 00 

Kronner, Wm. 

.50 

O’Brien, Harold T. 

1.00 

La Branche, J. J. 

1.00 

O’Brien, Mrs. E. J. 

2.00 

Laramie, D. J. 

2.00 

O’Brien, Mrs Jas. 

.50 

•Laramie, F. P. 

2.00 

O’Carroll, P. J. 

1.00 

iLarson, Mrs. C. L. 

2.00 

O'Connor, W. C. 

1.00 

(Leahy, D. Emmett 

2.00 

O’Connor, Genevieve 

1.00 

(Leary, W. H. 

10.00 

O'Connor, Mrs. James 

LOO 

(Loveland, R. M. 

1.00 

O’Dea. Ruth 

1.00 

iLynch, Jos. C. 

.50 

O’Leary, James K. 

1.00 

Lynch, Robl. 

5.00 

O’Leary, F. A. 

. . LOO 

1 Lynch, J. C. 

10.00 

O’Niell, John 

.50 

■ Maguire, Chas. 

2.00 

O’Niell, E. 

1.00 

1 Maher, J. B. 

1.00 

O’Niell, Mrs. F. J. 

.50 

Mahon, P. C. and Mother 

1.00 

O’Rourke, W. 

1.00 

Mallaney, Mary A. 

1.00 

Paddock, Mrs. Geo. H. 

2.00 

Malone, J. F. 

2.00 

Phelan, Michael 

1.00 

Malvey, Mary E. 

1.00 

Piva, Mrs. A. 

1.00 

Mara, James 

.25 

Porter, Mrs. W. F. 

.50 

Mark, Mrs. Robert E. 

2.00 

Quigye, C. A. 

10.00 

Martin, Mrs. Geo. Jay 

2.00 

Quinn, Mrs. B. B. 

1.00 

Meharg, Helen E. 

.50 

Quinn, Mrs. J. W. 

.50 

Melick, Mrs. A. R. 

1.00 

Rauscher, Geo. 

.50 

Mitchener, Mrs. W. P. 

1.00 

Redden, Raymond 

2.50 

Mooney, Chas. B. 

1.00 

Retting, Mrs. 

.75 

Morio, Wm. F. 

1.00 

Richards, Francis P. 

.25 

Mulryan, Mrs. 

.50 

Riley, Mrs. J. J. 

1.00 

Murphy, Mrs. D. C. 

2.00 

Riley, Mrs. J. J. 

1.00 

McAlevy, Mrs. Mary 

.50 

Reilly, Mrs. D. J. 

5.00 

McCann, Mrs. H. S. 

1.00 

Rinetti, C. 

5.00 

McCarthy, H. J. . 

1.00 

Roper, W. C. 

1.00 

McCornu:k, Hannah M. 

2.50 

Rourke, Mrs. C. E. 

1.00 

McCornick, Mrs. L. B. 

20.00 

Rourke, Peter N. 

2.00 

McDonough, Margaret 

1.00 

Ryan, Anna 

.50 

McGill, Mr. and Mrs,. M. J. 

3.00 

Ryan, Hugh 

2.00 

McIntosh, Mrs. W. T. 

.50 

Ryan, Mrs. J. P. 

.50 

McKee, E. P. 

1.00 

Schultz, B. J. 

1.00 

McKeever, Mrs. E. V. 

1.00 

Sehy, Mrs. John 

.25 

McKinley, Mrs. T. W. 

1.00 

Shallenberg, Mrs. Geo. 

.50 

McSorley, Mrs. John 

LOO 

Salisbury, O. J. and R. W. 

200.00 


lilllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllOl^* 

I INTER-MOUNTAIN ART COMPANY | 

= Established 1914 = 

I SALT LAKE’S EXCLUSIVE ART SHOP | 

= i66 South Main Street Next to Post Office = 

= Manufacturers of an Exclusive Line of Lamps, Candle Sticks, Picture and Mirror = 
= Frames, Etc. All Our Products are Hand Made and Hand Finished = 

= in Original Designs of Unusual Merit = 

I ARTISTS’ AND CHINA PAINTERS’ SUPPLIES I 







18 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


Smith, Mrs. J. 

1.00 

Spoke, John 

1.00 

Stocker, Chas 

1.00 

Stone, Mrs. 

1.00 

Sullivan, Nell 

1.00 

Sullivan, F. C. 

1.00 

Sullivan, P. J. 

1.00 

Sullivan, Mrs. J. D. 

1.00 

Sullivan, Patrick 

.50 

Sowles, Halloran 

.10 

Thompson, R. L. 

1.00 

Trenor, Mrs. R. C. 

1.00 

Trempe, Mrs. S. C. 

11.00 

Van Nort, Mrs. John 

2.00 

Valerius, Mrs. G. P. 

2.00 

Walsh, J. P. 

1 00 

Ward, W. J. 

1.00 

Waters, Lindsay, 

1.00 

Whiteley, Mrs. S. E. 

1.00 

Welsh, Mrs. H. 

1.00 

Westcott, Mrs. 

1.00 

Whyte, Mrs. Mry 

1.00 

Zwully, Mrs. G. C. 

1.50 


CATHOLICS AND EDUCATION 


From the pamphlet compiled by the 
Publicity Department of the Catholic 
Laymen’s Association of Georgia. 

Here are some pertinent and pointed 
expressions of Protestant views, each 
of a different person, taken from the 
1916 “Educational Number” of “The 
Western Recorder,” one of the oldest 
and best-known Baptist weeklies in the 
country: 

“Secularism is a failure. It has had 
its day, been weighed in the balance 
and found wanting. * * God never 

spoke more urgently to the Israelites 
than He is speaking to us todaj^ to 
go forward in the matter of denomi¬ 
national education. 

“It is a shame to let our children 
grow up and come out of educational 
institutions without a conscience. 
* * The education that fits only 

for this world must die, and bring ruin 
upon the world itself in the end. 

“Do I want my boy to go out into the 
world nothing but an educated fool, 


a blatant unbeliever, a foolish agnos¬ 
tic? Or with the simple Christian 
faith he learned in the home, rounded 
out and developed into stalwart Chris¬ 
tian integrity? When will we ask the 
question on bended knees before God, 
and learn that the positive, inevitable 
answer is, we must do more than we 
have ever done for our denominational 
schools? 

“The moral or spiritual sense, neg- ; 
lected or perverted, is no longer a re- i 
flection of the divine mind; and the j 
education guilty of this sin is the 
wickedest functioning agency in the ! 
world. 

“The heathen never contemplated 
education apart from religion * * 

and the most startling trend of re- 
ligeous and political liberty in modern 
times is to break from God in educa- j 
tion and hiss religion out of this 
great department of life.” 

IjllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMl: 

I Dr. A. T. La Freni ere, D. S. C. I 
I Graduate Chiropodist and = 

I Foot Specialist 1 

= Hours: 9-12, 2-5. Sundays and even- = : 
= ings by appointment = I 

= Arch Troubles Corrected = i 

= Consultation Free. Special attention = ; 
= given to children’s feet. = ’ 

= 411 Templeton Bldg, Was. 5767 = ( 


Salt Lake City 



I McPHEE TRANSFER & | 


I STORAGE CO. | 

I LARGEST MOVING VANS IN UTAH f 
I STORAGE PACKING and SHIPPING | 

S Freight and Household Goods = 
= Handled with Care by S 

= Experienced Men B 

I Phone Was. 1798 | 

E Rear 45 East 1st South = 

iTiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit 







THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


19 

OUR LADY OF LOURDES PARISH 


SCHOOL COLLECTION — 1923 



March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Ager. Mrs. F. H. 

$ 1.00 

$ 1.00 

$ 1.00 

$ 1.00 

$. 

Bailey, Mrs. F. B. 

1.00 

1.00 



1.00 

Beeler, Mrs. \V. G. 




Bixby, Mrs. and Miss 

5.00 

5.00 




Bopp, John 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 


Bruneau, A. J. 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

Barrett, Mr. 


.50 




Burrows, Melvin 


1.00 


1.00 

1.00 

Burke, M. A. 




1.00 


Cameron, F. K. 

1.00 



1.00 


Casserly, Mr. 

2.00 



2.00 


Chance, Mrs. 





Connole, R. W. 

10.00 


10.00 



Daugherty, B. 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

Dowd, Dr. J. E. 

3.00 

3.00 


5.00 


Dunn, Mrs. Katy 

1.00 



.50 


Eldrege, Mrs. D. 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

Erickson, P. E. 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 


Fleckenstrin, Mrs. 

2.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 


Foley, Thos. 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

Freil, Mrs. Patrick 


1.00 




Gamble, L. R. 

.50 





Houghton, Mrs. L. A. 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

Hummer, Dr. L. F. 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

Hyland, Mrs. Jas. 

: .00 

3.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

Ingwerson, J. H. 



1.00 

1.00 


Isom, 'Alfred 



1.00 

.50 


Jones, Mrs. Edward 



1.00 


2.00 

Kearns, J. F. 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 


Laramie, F. P. 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 



Leonard, Mrs. Fred 

1.00 


- 



Lester, M. G. 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 


Mahoney, C. P. 

.50 


.50 



Mulcahey, Mrs. J. 

1.00 


2.00 

1.00 


Murray, J. F. 

.50 





Murphy, J. M. 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

Murphy, J. P. 


1.00 


2.00 


McGill, Mrs. Hugh 

1.00 

1.00 




McEnanny, Mrs. J. F. 

1.00 





Nickerson, Nellie 

.25 

.25 

.25 



O’Carroll, J. Jas. 


2.00 


2.00 


O’Connor, Mrs. Tim 

2.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

O’Neill, Mrs. C. J. 

3.00 

3.00 


6.00 

3.00 

O’Neill, P. J. 

2.50 


5.00 

2.50 


O’Brien, J. L. 





2.00 

Pittman, Mrs. James 

3.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

Schultz, Mrs. C. J. 

1.00 





Schwob, Mr. 

1.00 





Shea, Mrs. E. M. 


.50 




Shea, Mrs. M. G. 


2.00 

1.00 



Smith, Wrn. H. 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 


Stocker, Chas. 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

Stolfell, Chas. 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

Walsh, Emma 

.50 

1.00 

.50 

.50 

.50 

Wheclock, Mrs. 



.50 

.50 

.50 

, Cash 


1.10 


.75 

1.10 

< 

$82.75 

$67.35 

$66.75 

$69.25 

$39.10 


Grand Total, $325.20. 


























































































































20 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


3(00pplj a (Eljurrij 

6:30 a.m.— Low Mass. 10:30 a.m. — High Mass and Sermon. 

8:00 a.m. — Low Mass and Instruction. 7:30 p.m. — Rosary and Benediction of the 

Blessed Sacrament. 

SUNDAYS 

Holy Days— Masses at 6:30 and 9. Daily Mass — 7:30 and 8:30 

First Friday — Masses at 7 and 8. 

Holy Hours — 7:30 to 8:30 p.m., every third Tuesday. 

GENERAL COMMUNIONS 

First Sunday of the Month —Holy Angels Sodality and Children of Mary, 8 o’clock 
Mass. 

Second Sunday of the Month — Senior and Junior Holy Name Societies, 3 o’clock Mass 

MEETINGS OF SOCIETIES 

Knights of Columbus — Wednesday, 8 p.m., at University Club rooms, 26th and 
Washington Avenue. 

St. Vincent de Paul Conference — Every first and third Monday evening at 7:30. 
Children of Mary Sodality —Monthly meeting immediately after the 8 o’clock Mass 
on the first Sunday of the month. 

League of the Sacred Heart — The last Wednesday of the month at 2:30 p.n>.. 
Catholic Woman’s League — The second Tuesday of the month in the Blue Room of 
the Berthana. 

St. Joseph’s Sewfing Circle — Every other Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at St 
Joseph’s Church, to sew for the orphans. 

Senior Holy Name Society — Second Friday evening of each month, at 7:30 in St 
Joseph’s Church. 

Junior Holy Name Society — First Sunday of each month after 8 o’clock Mass. 
Convert Class —Monday evening at 7:30 o’clock. 

Boy Scouts, Troop No, 5 — Friday evening, 7:30 o’clock. 

Confessions —Week days, at any time, by requesting a priest at the Rectory. 

Saturdays, Eves of Feast and of the First Fridays, from 4 to 5 p.m.; and 
from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. 

Children should always come in the afternoon. 

Baptisms— Sunday at 3 p.m. At other times by appointment. 

Marriages — Notice should be given one month in advance. 


IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

I “SEEUSFIRST” I 


I ^Vatson-Tannei* do tiling Co. | 









THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


21 




EVERYTHING FOR THE HOME 



ST JOSEPH’S CHURCH iMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 


Rt. Rev. Monsignor P. M. Cushnahan, 
V. G., Rector 
Rev. J. J. Lambe 
Rev. Wm. Kennedy 

514 Twenty-fourth St. Phone 1417 


At Home —The most desirable hours for 
business calls at the Rectory are; 9 to 12 
a.m. 2 to 4 p.m. 

Instruction — Those desiring instruction in 
the Catholic religion are cordially invited to 
call at the Rectory and make arrangement for 
a private course of instructions. 

Sunday Mass — The obligation to attend 
Mass on Sundays and Holy Days of obligation 
binds under pain of mortal sin. See that 
you are there in time for the beginning of 
Mass, and do not leave the church before the 
Mass has ended. 

Marriages — Arrangements for marriages 
should be made with the Pastor at least three 
weeks in advance of the date set for the cere¬ 
mony, in order that the banns may be pub¬ 
lished on three consecutive Sundays. All 
marriages of Catholics should take place in 
the Church and be followed by the JSiuptial 
Mass, Holy Communion and the Nuptial 
Blessing. 


I Ksplsnls I 



E llllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIII!ll!!!llllllllllllll 

I The House of 

I Kuppenheimer’s 

I Good Clothes 

I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


E 2425 Washington Avenue 



|||||||llllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll>llllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

I When building' your home, the plumbing and heating should be | 
I considered one of the most important features—Our workman- | 
I ship and quality of goods insures you against the dreaded | 
I plumbers’ bills. | 

I UTAH PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY | 

= Ogden’s Leading Plumbers = 


2344 Washington Avenue 


Phone 2570 







22 


TliE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


Subtle Smartness Marks These 

Suits for Fall 

t 

WHEN you are conscious of quality and correct 
style in your Fall suit, you are wearing good 
Clothes They are of unobtrusive refinement— 
indiviuality in cut—distinction in fabrics and 
fashion with super-abundance of value at 

$45 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

I You can buy a $1,000 Savings Account on the Installment Plan | 

I as easily as anything else. | 

I A wishbone is no good without a backbone. | 

I You can spend saved money. | 

I You can’t save spent money | 



Commercial National Bank 


Ogden, Utah 













THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


23 


Og-den, Utah 

514 Twenty-fourth Street Telephone 1417 

RT. REV. MONSIGNOR P. M. CUSHNAHAN, V.G., Rector. 

REV. J. J. LAMBE 
REV. W. KENNEDY 

llllllllllllllllllillllllMllllllllllillillllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllllllllllllllllili 


I OGDEN COUNCIL NO 777 
' KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS 
^ PURCHASE A HOME 


Og-den Council, Knig-hts of Colum- 
J bus are happy to report the consum¬ 
mation of a deal wherebj^ they will 
take over the David C. Eccles home 
on the corner of Twenty-fifth Street 
and Jefferson Avenue. The lot upon 
which the horne is situated is 171 feet 
on Twenty-fifth Street, by 132 feet on 
Jefferson Avenue. The Knig-hts expect 
to close up all the details relative to the 
deal in the near future, so that they 
may be able to move into their new 
quarters by October 1. 

The property is ideally situated for 
club purposes, being- but two blocks 
from the Church, as well as two blocks 
from Washing-ton Avenue, with two 
street cars running- past its door. 

A billiard and pool room, reading- 
rooms, card rooms, and loung-ing- rooms 
will be fitted up immediately for club 
members. 

The Knig-hts are very enthusiastic 
over the undertaking-, and feel that 
they will have the full cooperation of 
all the members, and that, in the words 
of the Rev. Monsig-nor, “it is a timely 
move in the rig-ht direction.” 


In the death of Mr. Thos. C. Hanley, 
Og-den lost an old-time Catholic. He 
was faithful to God in life, and God 
streng-thened him by His Sacraments 


for the g-reat sacrifice, and he passed 
to his reward, leaving- to us a model ol 
a true Christian death. We g-rieve with 
the stricken family, but we know the\" 
see -Lhe wisdom of God in their trial. 
This is their consolation. 


We offer our sincerest sympathy to 
Mr. and Mrs. Roche on the death of 
their little son. “Let them not mourn 
as those who have no hope.” God, in 
His wisdom, called him in the flower 
of his innocence. He pleads in Heaven 
with his Father for those who loved 
him on earth. 


Baptisms during- the month were as 
follows: 

Robert Jefferson Hampton. 

Ruth Anna O’Toole. 

Chester Andrew Burke. 

John Raymond Deru. 

Virg-inia Manfredi. 

Louis Frag-a. 


OGDEN PARISH NOTES 


The dream of a lifetime has become 
a reality. Througfh the untiring- energ-y 
of one man and the ardent cooperation 
of his people, the new St. Joseph’s 
School, a monument to practical Cath¬ 
olicity, is ready to carry on the g-ood 
work of Christian education. For a 
number of years the Catholics of 
Og-den have sent their children to the 
old-fashioned building- on Twenty- 










24 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


sixth street and Washing'ton avenue, 
and old St. Joseph’s, notwithstanding- 
its modest appearance, notwithstand¬ 
ing- its poorly furnished classrooms, in 
spite of all of its disadvantag-es, has 
sent out boys and g-irls who keep, and 
with God’s help, ever will keep, the 
lamp of faith burning- in the homes of 
the west. For its successor you need 
never bow your head in shame. It 
stands a school among- schools, unsur¬ 
passed by any in the land, and when 
you realize that no unlimited resources 
could be called on to build it; when 
you realize that you, a small minority 
in the community, have, by your g-en- 
erosity, made it possible; realize also 
with honest pride that your names g-o 
with it in honor, to posterity. Never 
cease to thank God that your hope is 
a reality. Never cease to thank Him 
that your children and your children’s 
children have every opportunity to pre¬ 
serve the treasure of Divine faith, but 
above all, and be3mnd all, thank God 
for the builder, the noble priest who 
has gfiven so many years in your serv¬ 
ice, and pray that he may long- be 
spared the vineyard “where the harvest 
is g-reat and the laborers are few.” 

millllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHij 
= Announcements to appear in the ^ 
= Diocesan Monthly should be given ^ 
E to Father Lambe. = 


A HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION 


A g-reat many folks, old ones as well { 
as young- ones, are under the impres¬ 
sion that completing-, and being- grad¬ 
uated from the g-rammar school course, 
is sufficient in the way of an education ! 
for our boys nd girls. These people 
seem to reason that the proficiency 
in the three R’s, g-ained by the course 
in the grammer school, fits a young 
person amply for future success, and 
all that is further necessary is to se¬ 
cure a position with some good house 
or business concern, stick closely to; 
the job and thus gradually g-ather up 
by experience, the practical knowledge: 
that ultimately spells success. This is ,, 
a hard road to travel nowadays, and 
while a great many men and women , 
with only a common school education ■ 
are successful, they all say, that if they ; 
liad been fortunate enough to have had j 
the advantages of higher education be- | 
fore starting out to earn a living, they 
would have reached their success in a 
much shorter period of time and by a i 
much more direct route. These same jj 
men and women are the ones who are :i 
today sending- their sons and daugh- j! 
ters to high school and college, in order ij 
that their children may start out at th&j 
point reached only after j’-ears of hard , 
experience on the part of the parents,' 
and so avoid the difficulties encoun-1 


McBRIDE DRUG CO. 


Phone 38 


= 2463 Washington Avenue 


The House of Quality e | 




1 

I 





THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


25 


:ered in the strusTgle. But success, 
vvith only common or grammar school 
sducation back of it is rare nowadays, 
and it rests largely with men and 
women well along in life. I am sure 
I say, that if these same men and 
women were to try a similar experi- 
Jnent today they would find themselves 
unable to compete with the great num¬ 
bers who are specially trained by high¬ 
er education for profficiency in their 
respective callings. They would un¬ 
doubtedly be left far behind in the 
race for success. On the other hand, 
young persons starting out in business 
with a high school or college diploma, 
have made remarkably rapid progress. 

It is furthest from my mind to infer 
in any way, that there is anything to 
be frowned upon in the practice of 
earning honest wages. There are but 
'few of us who cannot point with pride 
to the fact that our parents earned a 
living for themselves and made a good 
home for us by working with their 
hands. And it is a sad commentary on 
some forms of education, or the lack 
of it, that makes some folks look with 
contempt on hard work. As a matter 
of fact, it is the persistent avoidance 
of the hard work of the kind done by 
'our fathers and mothers, that is re- 
Isponsible for the so-called unrest of 
today. It is not unrest we are ex¬ 
periencing. It is a widespread wave 
of down-right laziness This indiffer¬ 
ence to hard work is the underlying 
cause of the high cost of living dis¬ 
cussed so wdely just now, and no true 
form of education can teach a person 
[that a competency can be earned with¬ 
out work and plenty of it. 

A high school education is a neces¬ 
sity nowadays for the young man or 
woman entering business. Some folks 
were of the idea that a high school 
education was only necessary to pre- 



Phones 267 and 368 Prompt Service = 


I Launderers : Dry Cleaners | 



= 2149-53 Pingree Ave, E 

= 2447 Hudosn Ave. E 

= Suits Sponged and Pressed = 

IMIlllllllillllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMlllim 


‘ liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 
= L. B. Westholder, Florist Mgr. = 

E Geo. T. O’Keefe, Asst. = 

I ARTISTIC FLORAL CO. | 
I 2411 Hudson Avenue | 

E Ogden’s Largest Exclusive = 

= “Flowerstore” = 

E Designing and Decorating our = 

E Specialty = 

E Phone 611 = 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij 

I JOHN FARR COAL CO. | 

I CLEAN I 

I COAL I 

I FROM I 

I CEMENT 1 

I FLOOR I 

i Phone - 2T - Phone I 

I Ogden I 

= Prices Always the Lowest = 

imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 





26 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


pare one for college, but such an idea 
is quite erroneous. Into my own pro¬ 
fession, a young man may come with a 
good common school education and 
plenty of talent, serve his apprentice¬ 
ship diligently and faithfully and ap¬ 
parently imbibe all the principles of a 
practice of architecture, yet he cannot 
take the examination that the state re¬ 
quires for the issuance of a license to 
practice, unless he has completed a 
four-year high school course or its 
equivalent This means that the 
young man is sentenced by the state 
to a life of earning wages as a drafts¬ 
man only. He cannot hope to practice 
for himself, or exercise individually his 
talents Outside the requirements of 
the state. I have found that the young 
man who enters our profession without 
the advantages of a high school educa¬ 
tion is lacking in a great many essen¬ 
tials necessary to perfect himself as a 
practicing architect. For instance, 
without the training in English and 
other languag'es that is part of a high 
school education, a young man is not 
fitted to write, prepare a specification 
or an agreement for the execution of 
work, clearly express himself to a 
client; without the knowledge of high¬ 
er mathematics he is forced to go about 
the solving of ordinary problems by 
most laborious and round-about meth¬ 
ods, or suffer the humiliation of seeing 


the trained man called in to do the job 
for him; without the familiarity that ! 
high school training gives in the ele¬ 
ments of science he is unable to reason ' 
out and cope with obstacles encoun- ; 
tered by the action of natural forces; 
and with the advanced knowledge of ! 
history he is unprepared to trace the ' 
development by man of the art he is ' 
pursuing, or to take advantage of the 
progress achieved in the art by men 



I IF YOU DON’T BUY A | 


I DUNDEE I 

I SUIT I 

I WE BOTH LOOSE MONEY i 



= 2431 Hudson, by Alhambra Theatre 



E All of our lumber is kept under shed, which insures nice, clean 
I bright stock. We invite your inspection before buying. |i 

I BADGER COAL AND LUMBER COMPANY |i 

I 2069 Washington Avenue || 

I Phone 865 Ij 

..I.... 






THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


27 


f during- the centuries of its recorded ex¬ 
istence. 

And so it is in the other professions. 

I No young man can secure a license to 
I practice structural engineering unless 
; he passes the examination required by 
: the state, for which high school credits 
I are necessary. No young man can 
enter a night law school, or the regu- 
‘ lar college course, for that matter, un- 
|j less he has these same high school 
credits. The medical schools demand 
i! these credentials from candidates for 
I entry, and you all know that a young 
t lady must have her high school credits 
f- if she wishes to enter the normal 

If, 

i school. Without a high school educa- 

i tion, or its equivalent, the door to 

ii every college or university is closed. 

■ The high school education is therefore, 

the preparation or foundation for all 
higher and specialized forms of edu- - 
cation and it is, in itself, a broad edu- 
: cation along its first principles in any 
f branch of higher learning. With a high 
school education, a young man or wo- 
f man can perfect himself or herself in 
r any profession, either by practical 
i training, or by a night college course, 
both methods permitting opportunity 
i for registration to practice, by recourse 
s to state examinations. 

In any ordinary commercial business, 
such as banks and mercantile houses, 
j contracting firms and insurance offices, 
the young man or woman who enters 
. as a graduate of a high school has an 
\ immediate advantage, becomes in a 
i very short time a trusted employe, and 
i is soon the holder of a responsible po- 
! sitioa. I have often noticed that the 
^ stenographer who is equipped with 
: high school training is at once marked 
; for promotion. This rapidity of ad- 
i vancement is usually due to the fact 
i that the young person soon displays an 
intelligent familiarity with the policy 



I OGDEN CITY FLORAL | 

= Geo. Sharratt, Prop. = 


FRESH FLOWERS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 


2277 Washington Avenue 


= Office Phone 2686 Res. Phone 2878-W = 



= Over McBride’s Drug Store Ogden = 


J. P. DINNEEN 

DENTIST 


= 2465 Washington Ave. Phone 225-W = 



er Cent Discount with This Ad = 


= Men’s Half Soles . $1.25 = 

= Men’s Rubber and Leather Heels .50 = 

= Ladies’ Half Soles . 1.00 = 

= Ladies’ Rubber Heels . .40 = 

= Ladies’ Heels Straightened . .30 = 


= Children’s Half Soles ..50c and up = 

= All Work Guaranteed = 

I W. EDWARD & SONS | 

= Shoe Repair Service = 

= Next Door to Piggly Wiggly = 

iTrillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllim 



FOUR SUITS PRESSED—$2.00 


I STRAIGHT PRESSING—75c | 

I SUITS MADE TO ORDER | 

I $5.00 UP I 

I H. L. MILLER, Tailor | 

= 2381 Hudson Avenue Ph»ne 517-W S 

iiiliiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiT? 










28 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


iMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi 

I MESSENGER’S I 

I Apparel for Women | 


2461 Washington Avenue 


I COATS — MILLINERY DRESSES — SKIRTS — BLOUSES | 

iiTiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinTi 


of the house. This is important. It 
follows that the successful executive 
of a successful house is the emj'iloye 
who is most familiar and can best in¬ 
terpret and carry out its policy. The 
employe’s education opens the way for 
complete success. The salesman who 
desires success must understand his 
line thoroughly, from the raw material 
to the finished product. , It he is a high 
school graduate, his knowledge of the 
elements of science and mathematics 
enables him to grasp this process of 
manufacture in a very short time. His 
knowledge of English permits his con¬ 
veying to the prospective customer, in 
clear, concise and convincing language 
the merits of his goods. 

I need not dwell on the evident fact 
that success in business usually spells 
success in society. Nor is it necessary 
for me to tell you that success, viewed 
from a social standpoint, can be main¬ 


tained for no great length of time by 
limiting- one’s conversation to the state 
of the weather. One’s ability to carry 
on a conversation must have a greater 
scope than this, and it is only through 
education that a person can lay up a 
systematic stock of general informa¬ 
tion. 

I should not urge young men and ; 
women of today to enter high school ■ 
if the opportunity for further educa¬ 
tional training- were difficult to obtain; 
but the means of gaining a high school 
education are quite easily accessible. , 
You have here in your parish a high 
school, conducted under the personal ^ 
direction of the pastor, an ardent and < 
tireless worker for higher education, 
equally ambitious that every child in 
his parish advance himself; add to this * 
a teaching faculty second to none, com- ( 
posed of members of a great order of | 
teaching nuns, who do not leave their ! 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


KIRKENDALL UNDERTAKING COMPANY | j 

I i 


Phone 150 



i 

1 










THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


29 


work on the stroke of the clock or 
threaten to walk out if their compensa¬ 
tion is not increased. One has ihe 
option, in our high srhools, ol taking' 
the reg-ular classical or scuMtihc 
course, and in addition to tlie thori ugh 
secular training received there is the 
essential religious and moral training 
that is equally necessary in business. 
Catholic high school graduates usually 
are given preference for positions of 
trust and responsibility, because the 
shrewd employer is conscious of the 
moral training received. A good moral 
character is of prime importance. And 
it is for this reason that you very sel¬ 
dom read of a treasurer or a bank 
cashier, graduate of this Catholic 
school S 3 'stem, absconding with the 
funds. 

We honor these bright boys and girls 
who have just completed their first 
step only in the process of their edu¬ 
cation. It would be unfair, even cruel, 
to send these children out into this 
present-day world without fitting' them 
with sufficient training to fight the 
battle of existence. If we are to honor 
them properly for their success in 
their grammar school work, we should 
promise ourselves that they will have 
the opportunity of entering high school 
next September to gain the additional 
educational advantages offered. Thus 
they will be empowered to meet the 
competition of brains when they enter 
the serious business of comniercial ad¬ 
vancement and the earning of a com¬ 
petency. We cannot, we must not, send 
them out unprepared. To do so would 
be selfish, indifferent, and careless of 
their future. Whatever sacrifice we 
may make in order that these boys and 
girls may continue in their education 
will not be made in vain. — Joseph W. 
McCarthy. 


BIGOT ATTACK 

IN YORK, PA., IS 
PROVING BOOMERANG 


Scotching, wdth the powerful weapon 
of facts, the perennial slander against 
private schools in general and Cath¬ 
olic schools in particular which has 
now raised its head in York, Pa., Anna 
Dill Gamble, president of the Catholic 
Women’s Club, of that city, has set 
forth for the exponents of bigotry 
there a lesson in the meaning and prin¬ 
ciples of Americanism which shocdd 
permeate even through the cloak of 
anonymity under which, as usual, these 
human scorpions are seeking to spread 
their nefarious doctorines and contam¬ 
inate the minds of their fellow citizens. 

Her letter, which appeared in the 
correspondence colum of the York 
“Gazette and Daily” on July 28, is re¬ 
produced here in full. In it, she an- 



1 Gri*ill Marltet i 


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THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


swers the attack which has been di¬ 
rected against private schools in the 
form of stickers which are broadcast 
on private property and public con¬ 
veyances and which bear the slogan, 
“One school, one law, one flag.” 

Recalling some facts of the early 
history of this nation, she shows that, 
far from proving a menace to our 
democracy, private schools and the 
principle of freedom in such matters 
as education have been, and still are, 
the safeguard of America, while, on the 
other hand, the drab and compulsory 
uniformity which these Prussianized 
Americans propound are the gateway 
through which the soviet and other 
enemies of America seek to enter and 
destroy the existing social fabric of 
this nation. 

Her letter is as follows: 

“Editor, The Gazette and Daily”. 

“A dishonest and anonymous form of 
advertising has recently been started 
in York that is intended to throw dis¬ 
credit upon the private school system 
of education. The legend, in the form 
of a sticker. ‘One school, one law, one 
flag,’ has been appearing on the win¬ 
dows of street cars and stores, etc. In 
most cases these stickers are removed 
by the owners of the property as soon 
as they appear. 

“I have said that this advertising is 
dishonest, first because it expresses a 
lie, and second because it uses other 
people’s property for advertising pur¬ 


poses without paying for it. It is a lie 
because it implies that to send one’s 
children to a private school is un¬ 
patriotic — that the true American 
should be loyal not only to one flag, 
but to one school and ‘one law,’ what¬ 
ever that may mean. As we have both 
a federal and a State law, the subltely 
of the ‘one law’ slogan is completely 
lost on me. 

“However, the g-eneral drift of the 
catch words is clear. They convey the 
idea that the American citizen should 
be standardized under one flag'. V'.'ho 
these new Americans are who beleive 
in the standardization of our citizenry 
according to certain fomulae that have 
come into fashion since the World 
War, I am not pretending to guess. 
They themselves are careful to con¬ 
ceal their identity. But that they know 
little of the history of their own coun¬ 
try or of its institutions is entirely 
manifest. It is no derogation to the 
public school system to call attention 
to the fact that it did not always exist 
as part of our country’s system of 
education. It was intended to supple¬ 
ment and not to supercede the private 
schools. In this connection I can do 
no better than to quote from a state¬ 
ment issued by the Catholic Laymen’s 
Association of Georgia, to counteract 
this very sort of propaganda: 

“ ‘There is no trace of the public 
school in our American foundations. 
It is not mentioned in our national 



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THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


Constitution. It was not mentioned in 
any of the constitutions of the original 
States. It did not exist in the Colonies. 
It did not exist in the States for more 
than fifty years after the form.ation of 
the Union. Not one who signed our 
Declaration of Independence or v/lio 
fought in our American Revolution or 
who helped to frame our American 
Constitution ever saw a public school. 
The United States had been going for 
a century before we had a president 
who was educated in the public school; 
and almost that long before we had 
a senator, a congressman, a State legis¬ 
lator, a governor or a judge, who was 
educated in the public school.’ 

“I do not believe, therefore, that I 
an one whit less a patriotic American 
because 1 was educated at the York 
Collegiate Institute than my neighbor 
who was educated in the public school. 
Many of the most valued citizens of 


. 31 

York, both Catholic and Protestant, 
not to mention their grandfathers and 
their grandmothers, were educated in 
private schools. 

“The persons who utter these slogans 
are themselves ill-instructed. They 
know nothing of the history of educa¬ 
tion either in this country or abroad. 
They have picked up phrases and pass 
them along glibly and mechanically, 
without understanding v/hat they are 
talking about. Many of these phrases 
are made by people who do not love 
our institutions, but who are trying to 
sway public opinion through the clever 
use of catch words. 

“ ‘One school, one law, one flag’ 
Sound;: more Prussian than American. 
But even in Germany, so long ago as 
Bismark’s time, the effort to clamp 
the religion and education of the 
people into one iron system failed be¬ 
cause the people were too intellegent. 



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■ 




32 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


In Russia, where the people are ig'no- 
rant, it has succeeded. Nevertheless, 
these anonymous educational drill 
sergeants (who evidently belong to 
that numerous class of persons who 
beleive that ‘history is bunk’) would 
like to start a ‘kulturkamp’ in America. 
But as the American people are at least 
as intelligent as the German people, 
these one-school, one-law, one-flag folk 
will end in the Bismarckian fiasco 
known to history as ‘going to Canossa.’ 

“The ideal of real Americanism is 
variety in unity. It is the ideal of a 
democracy, not the ideal of a dull mili¬ 
taristic uniformity — ^the kaiser’s sys¬ 
tem or that of the ‘socialist State.’ 
Trotsky has recently stated in 
‘Isvestia,’ the Soviet organ, th ■t when 
America has completely centralized 
and bureaucratized itself, then accord¬ 
ing' to the laws of social evolution, our 
Republic will drop, a ripe plum, to the 
dictatorship of the proletariat,’ ready 
to receive it; and he definitely lays his 
finger upon the principal obstacle to 
the fulfilling of Soviet dreams in our 
country, namely our system of 
sovereign States in union, whereby 
through the uncontrolled and incal¬ 
culable variety of our American 
democracy, we are able to preserve our 
liberties. 

“When we as a people cease to value 
liberty of teaching and religious free¬ 
dom, and really begin seriously to 
adopt the ‘one-school, one-law, one- 
flag, one-idea’ of these insane zealots, 
then we can expect to go the way of 


DR. ELIOT REGRETS 

THE LACK OF 

RELIGION 

(By N. C. W. C. News Service.) 


Boston, Oct. 23. — Charles W. Eliot, 
President Emeritus of Harvard Uni¬ 
versity, has joined the number of those 
who realize the havoc wrougdit by the 
absence of religious teachings in the 
public schools of xMnerica. In an ad¬ 
dress on education, he refered to the 
falling oft' of the attendance in the 
Protestant churches and implied that 
such falling off was due to the lack of 
religious education. 

After touching upon the develop¬ 
ment of religious freedom in the 
Constitution Dr. Eliot said: 

“But it has had one grave conse¬ 
quence. Many religions exist and are 
loved in this country by many groups 
of the population. There is dispute as 
to which is the largest group. We 
don’t know really whether the Roman 
Catholic Church has the largest num¬ 
ber of communicants, or the Methodist, 
while some beleive that the Baptist has 
the largest number. 

“But what has been the consequence 
in the American public school — ^what 
we call the free schools of the country? 
No religious instruction. That is the 


all despotism, to chaos and extinction. 

“ANNA DILL GAMBLE, 
“President Catholic Women’s Club of 
York.” 


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THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


33 


ultimate consequence. What is the 
result? Most of our children go out 
into the world without having" received 
in their schools any knowledg-e of re- 
1, ligion. They may have acquired 
I some in their churches, though that 
I is a doubtful proposition for boys, a 
i, very doubtful proposition. 

? “It is now maintained that the act¬ 
ual majority of the men, women and 
children in the United States are un¬ 
churched, never go to church, know 
nothing about church. 

“I have noticed of late the coming 
in of another method of conducting a 
religious service. I received the ad¬ 
vertisements of undertakers who notify 
the family in which a death occurs that 
all they have to do is to press a button 
and the undertaker will not only take 
care of the body and provide a grave, 

■ but he has in his establihment a chapel 
in which any form of service can be 
conducted if only the undertaker shall 
order it. 

“And I am also told that this method 
is extensively prevailing and that 
many American families find it wholly 
unnecessary to employ a minister in 
any way when there is a death in the 
family. What shall we say of these 
i things? Do we not all kno'v. Doesn’t 
; each one of us recognize that religdon 


is the motive power in hum.an life.-* It 
is and always has been and always vdU 
be.” 

But Dr. Eliot’s' plan to provide re¬ 
ligious teaching is that of an indefinite 
ethic which will give offense to no one, 
Christian, Chinese, Buddhist or Hindu. 


IN NEW ENGLAND’S 

FIRST SCHOOLS. 


Over the door of every New England 
college and school from 1637 until 1840 
there were inscribed these words; “Re¬ 
ligion, Citizenship and Science,” writes 
Bishop Walsh in the Maine Catholic 
Historical Magazine. Since that time 
some of these letters have been stealth¬ 
ily removed so that now the word re¬ 
ligion is either very faint indeed or 
entirely obliterated. But in the Catho¬ 
lic schools it is as bright as ever 
though in other schools the Christian 
religion plays a very small part. If 
John Harvard could come back to life 
today, he would regret to see religion 
barred from the plan of education for 
which he made sacrifices of time and 
money. He would find only in the 
Catholic schools of New England the 
religious instruction that he and his 
contemporaries beleived was all im¬ 
portant in education. 


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34 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


REAL EDUCATION 

MUST HAVE A 

RELIGIOUS BASIS 


You cannot have education without 
relig'ion at the bottom, says Alexander 
Meiklejohn, president of Amherst Col¬ 
lege. Speaking- at the University of 
Pennsylvania, in 1919, on “The Four- 
year American Cultural Colleg'e,” Mr. 
Meiklejohn said; “The unified con¬ 
ception of the old cultural colleg'e is 
just this: A boy or a g-irl or a man 
or a woman g-ets what we mean by a 
liberal education when he beg-ins to 
understand and appreciate what hu¬ 
man living- is. I don’t care whether 
he g-ets it inside of colleg'e or outside 
of colleg'e; I don’t care when he g-ets 
it. The one thing- we mean by liberal 
education is that one should, in terms 
of knowledg-e and appreciation g-et 
something- of what it means to be in 
this life that men and women are liv¬ 
ing-; what sort of a thing- it oug'ht to 
be to be a man or a woman in this 
life. * * * We know that in order to 
have a liberal education in that sense 
every student must g-et at the g-reat 
characteristic beliefs of the human race 
with regard to the nature of the world 
we are living in, and that is religion. 
You cannot have liberal education 
without that, without religion at the 
bottom.” 


EDUCATION 

BEFORE THE 

REFORMATION 


“Certain people would have us 
believe,” says the New Zealand Tablet, 
“that we owe the origin and progress 
of elementary schools to the Refor- | 
mation. Yet it was after the Refor- 
mation that Martin Luther ac- [\ 
knowledged their collapse, writing in 
1524 to exhort the civil powers to help 
to improve them. From that time the 
State began to interfere and usurp the , 
natural rights of parents and the : 
Church, and in the end to arrogate to 
itself full power over education. To ; 
the Reformation the origin and pro- ; 
gress of this injustice is no doubt due. I 
In pagan times a few private schools j 
existed, and a very small percentage ^ 
of the people were educated. With 
the growth of the Catholic Church 
schools multiplied and education 
spread among- the populace in an ever j 
advancing- wave. Primary schools j 
were necessary to the Church in the ■ 
fulfilment of her mission. No sooner 
were the ages of persecution ended 
than schools were instituted by 
bishops, priests, and especially by re¬ 
ligious orders. They were under ec¬ 
clesiastical supervision and often 
taught by the clergy, who, however, 
were aided by the laity in many cases. 


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THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


35 




In the Middle Ages the schools were 
known as parish schools. They were 
! huilt close to the parish church, and 
/though reading and writing and kin¬ 
dred subjects were taught their chief 
end was the religious upbringing of 
the young. The Middle Ages are often 
miscalled the dark ages; hardly ever 
did primary schools flourish as then. 
Inll24, the Abbot Guibert bears witness 
that there was scarcely a village in 
, all France but had its school. In 1576 
Claudius, Bishop of York, slates that 
before the Reformation every parish 
of importance in his diocese had its 
own schools. In 1738, there were in 
Paris forty-one teachers of elementary 
schools. Cologne had eight schools in 
1400, and in the diocese of Prague at 
the same time there were said to be 
lio less than 64^1 schools. Before the 
Reformation it is calculated that in all 
Germany there were as many as 
40,000 elementary schools. 


THIRD PLENARY COUNCII. 

ON CATHOLIC 

HIGHER EDITCATION 
, Daily there is an increase in the 
number of Catholic boys and girls who 
after graduation from our elementary 
ischools are led by their parents to look 
fahead for opportunities of higher ed¬ 
ucation. Some of the boys have aspir¬ 
ations for the Sacred Ministry; others 
join with many girls in choosing one 
of the liberal professions. In Catholic 
colleges and seminaries ample pro¬ 
vision has been made for those who 
plan to devote themselves to the work 
fof the Sacred Ministry; for the others 
better and more available means to 
carry out their desires must be pro- 
ivided. Would that now (and this we 
jhope will surely come to pass) arrange- 
jments could be made and definitely re- 
jduced to fact to the end that our Cath- 
r 


olic boys and girls might be able to 
enter into Catholic high schools from 
our Catholic elementary schools and 
through these continue on to the goal 
of their aspirations. Only too fre¬ 
quently it happens that dutiful and in¬ 
nocent boys and girls pass from the 
security of Christian family life and 
from the protection of the Catholic 
school into non-Catholic institutions of 
learning and return, proud indeed of 
their knowledge but deprived of their 
charity, faith and Christian morals. 

We therefore admonish our faithful 
people by all that is sacred in the Lord, 
and we entreat them that they may 
hasten by united action towards those 
blessed conditioins wherein high 
schools, colleges and Catholic universi¬ 
ties will be so numerous and so highly 
reputed that every Catholic boy and 
girl may be able to find under Catholic 
auspices all desireable knowledge, 

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THE DIOCESArvI MONTHLY 


whether sought for them by their par¬ 
ents or selected by themselves. 

That this may be accomplished soon, 
we exhort parents in the Lord that 
they send their children who desire on 
completing ther elementary education 
to secure secondary training to the 
Catholic high schools now in operation. 
If, however. Catholic high schools are 
not convenient for their children be¬ 
cause of the need of special study we 
earnestly admonish them to keep re¬ 
moved from their offsprng ' whatever 
may prove dangerous to faith and 
morals, holding clear in memory the 
words of the Master: “What doth it 
profit a man if he gain the whole world 
and suffer the loss of his own soul. 

We ask by the affectionate mercy 
of God and we beg for the honor of 
the Catholic name that those of the 
faithful who have been enriched with 
an abundance of earthly wealth may 
give of their plenty, especially that 
opportunities and means of education 
may be allowed Catholic boys and 
girls, who in ability, character and 
virtue give indications of future prom¬ 
inence and superiority. With the great¬ 
est gratitude we learn that in several 
dioceses many noble Catholic men and 
women, most generous in this work of 
charity, which is truly Catholic, have 
merited for themselves the gratitude of 
boys and girls the praise of all good 
citizens the warm approval of the Su¬ 
preme Pontiff and the benediction of 
Almighty God. Would that in all di- 
oces wealthy men and women would 
imitate this praisworthy example and 
to this extent that in the future it may 
be unnecessary to continue the warn¬ 
ing given Catholic priests in the past. 
Thus their duty is brought home to 
them from those who are not of the 
fold even from their enemies of the 
Church. 


MINISTER GIVES CATHOLICS 
HONOR FOR 

SCHOOL stand; 


In a sermon delivered here by the!' 
Rev. Dr. Edward S. Boyer, of Chicagcll 
an instructor in the Chicago Training ! 
School, Protestant churches were adj 
vised to follow the example of the,* 
Catholic Church and formulate a deji"! 
finite program of religious and moral| 
education if they desired to functioiilf 
efficiently in the future. 

“There are two conflicting currents 'l 
of our day injuring* Church morale, |;|j 
Dr. Boyer said. “There is the element j 
stressing relig'ious education, whilPj 
there is the other element that insists, 
solely upon an evangelistic program|;jj 

jad 


The Catholic Church is leagues ahead 


of us in the Protestant churches in the j 
matter of religious education. I sa 3 ( [ 
all honor to the Catholics for the prini'j 


II'1 














THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


37 


ciple they have laid down in reg-ard to 
religrious education. I am in favor of 
a program worked out to g'ive our boys 
and g'irls a better chance to know God. 
■What you would have in the life of the 
ichurch you must put in your schools. 
This will not come through your 
preaching methods. 

I “With many of the men overseas 
Muring the world war, religion was a 
mere convention. We must give more 
attention to the youth. New demands 
(are for truer education of the child. 
iWe must balance our secular edu¬ 
cational system with a better develop¬ 
ed religious educational system.” 

' Declaring that the world is more in 
‘need of Chritsian leadership today than 
[■ever before, Dr. Boyer went on: “The 
^question is being asked, ‘Can the 
Jchurch save itself?’ Again, ‘What 
‘must the church do to be saved?’ Fig¬ 
ures show that 56 per cent of the people 
!‘of this country are not members of any 
church. Three out of four children up 
to the age of 18 years recei\'e no re- 
iligious education.” 


VERNAL PARISH NOTES 


• Mass at Myton on second Sunday of 
(Month at 7; Mass at White Rocks on 
fourth Sunday of month at 7; Mass at 
Neola, Ft. Duchesne, Roosevelt and 
Duchesne once a month on week days. 


Donations 


The following donations have been 
received during the past month. 

The sum $1,2CX).00 from Mr. N. J. 
Meagher. 

A vestment case from Mrs. Richard 
Haddock. 

The sum of $50.00 from Miss Frances 
Reilly. 


Mass vestments and altar linens from 
the “Children of Mary Tabernacle So¬ 
ciety,” of Chicag'o. 

Benediction cope and veil from the 
Catholic Church Extension Society. 

Altar Stone and Stations of the Cr> )ss 
from Rt. Rev. Bishop Josei)h S. Glass. 

Candlesticks and Holy Water font 
from Mrs. Michael Hughes of Bayside, 
Long Island. 

Sanctuary Lamp from Mrs. Augu'-ta 
Manning of New York. 


PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS 


Oregon has forbidden private schools. 
It might be well, first, to improve the 
public schools, where it is imposible to 
give children individual attention, be¬ 
cause the classes are too large, so that 
the schools become like sausage mills. 

In the Character Builder, Dr. John T. 
Miller writes: 

“During the past three weeks the ed¬ 
itor has spent most of his time in the 
Catholic schools and has been very 
much impressed by the intelligence 
and devotion shown by the sisters in 
their work. The care they take in 
their health gives them a good reserve 
supply of vitalitj^ and they demon¬ 
strate that the lack of vitality found 
in many of our public-school teachers 
is not as much due to the work of the 
school room as to a lack of observance 
of the laws of health culture. 

“If there is any difference in their 
work, the sisters in the Catholic par¬ 
ochial schools live a more strenuous 
li.fc in the school room than mo.st of 
the teachers in the public schools. As 
the writer is not a Catholic, he is mere¬ 
ly giving his observations from an un¬ 
biased point of view. The sisters make 
teaching a conscientious profession 
and not a business. It would be well 
for our public schools if as much could 










38 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


be said for all who teach in them. It 
is the self-sacrificing- spirit of the 
Catholic sisters that accounts for the 
fact that there are 3,000,000 boys and 
girls in the Catholic schools of Amer¬ 
ica. Forty-five thousand men and 
women devote their lives to the care 
of those boys and girls. Here is food 
for thought. The above figures were 
given in an address by the president 
of St. Thomas College of St. Paul, 
Minn., in December, 1933. “The sisters 
show a strong desire to secure anything 
helpful for their boys and girls. There 
has been no difficulty in getting the 
editor’s character building talks into 
their schools. It is evident everywhere 
that the sisters not only give theii 
lives to the children, but they live so 
carefully that they have efficient lives 
to give.” 

Another reason why so many parents 
take their children out of the public 
schools is the steady growth of medical 
interference, so that it has become nec¬ 
essary to form a Public School Pro¬ 
tective League, to inform parents of 
their rights, when children are 
threatened with medical examinations 
and operations.—L. A. Times. 


COLORADO GOVERNOR 

INDORSES CHURCH 

SCHOOL 


One of the strongest endorsements 
of religious education ever voiced by 
a public official in the United States 
was given by William E. Sweet, gov¬ 
ernor of Colorado, at the cornerstone 
laying of Carroll hall at Regis college, 
Denver. 

“I am a believer in the Church 
school. Without religion the fabric of 
the nation will not hold,” he declared. 

“When I go to the University of 
Colorado and see those magnificent 


buildings being reared on the campusi 
I love to think of the 3,000 student? 
there. But when we think of the histoj 
ry of America educationally, we canno| 
escape the influence of the Church 
schools and Church colleges. Harvard 
and Yale and Princeton were all great 
Church schools. Dartmouth and 
Williams and Amherst, that trinity of 
colleges in New England, were all 
Church colleges, as well as Fordhamj 
Georgetown and Villanova. Coming 
further West, we find Western Reserve, 
Ohio Wesleyan, Norte Dame, Beloitf 
Colorado College, Denver University 
and Whitman College. All these great 
Church colleges dot the land from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, from the Great 
Lakes to the Gulf. WTiile I admire 
our public schools, as you do, and while 
I admire our State universities, as you 
do, still I believe these Church colleges 
are necessary. In these colleges, we do 
not have to apologize for the teaching 
of religion, and without the teaching 
of religion the foundation of this i 
nation cannot endure.” The Church . 
school, he said, is founded on the re¬ 
ligion of God and that, in essence, is ' 
brotherhood. ' ■ 


Parish Directory —Cont. * 

Sunday Mass, Carlin, 8; Elko, 10. Dailys 
.Mass 8. 

SACRED HEART CHURCH I 

Ely, Nevada. j 

Pastor, Rev. Janies O’Grady, |i| 

McGill Mass 9:30 first and third Sunday 
Ruth Mass, second and fourth Sunday. Sun-^ 
day Mass, Ely, 8:30. Daily Mass 8. ).. 

ST. JOAN OF ARC ’ 

Las Vegas, Nevada. •[( 

Pastor, Rev. Edmond F. Sheehy. .'j| 

Second Street. Phone 129. s 

Misions, Goodsprings and Searchlight. 
Time of Mass—Winter months 8 and 9:30; 
Summer months, 7 and 8:30. M 

ST. PATRICK’S I 

Tonopah, Nevada. K' 

Pastor, Rev. Edward Noonan. 

201 Summit Street. Phone 1853. B 

Sunday Mass 8 and 10. Daily Mass ^ 
Benediction 7:30 p.m. B 













THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


39 



SACRED HEART ACADEMY 


>■ 

I SACRED HEART ACADEMY 
' NOTES 

i 

j School reopened at Sacred Heart 
Academy on Tuesday morning", Sept- 
: ember the fourth, with the usual large 
' attendance. The new students as well 
I, as the old ones have shown enthusiastic 
; interest in their work. This is indic¬ 
ative of a most successful scholastic 
year. 

i The members of faculty have return- 
' ed from their Summer School work. 

Some of the teachers attended the Uni- 
!| versity of Utah, others took advanced 
I work at Berkley and at the University 
^ of Norte Dame. 

During' the summer months many im¬ 
provements have been made in the 
Academy building'. Among' others, a 
Physics laboratory' was equipped with 
the newest apparatus. 


WE MUST HAVE RELIGIOUS 
SCHOOLS 


For a Catholic it were nf^edless to 
arg'ue at g-rcat leng'th on the necessity 
of a Catholic, a relig'ious school. From 
the vast amount of material upon 
which one might dratv to pro-wi this 
contention we indicate but one thougrhf 
either the Cath.;)lic school or plain ma¬ 
terialism, which is tantamount to athe¬ 
ism and ag'nosticism — denial oi doubt 
of the very exitsent:e ol God. 


Sacred Heart Academy has been ac¬ 
credited to the University of Utah for 
some years. During' the past year the 
school was affiliated to the Catholic 
University at Washing-ton, D. C. This 
should be an additional incentive to 
Catholic parents to send their pupils 
to such an institution. 


■i. ■ 
















40 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHEY 


With malice towar^ls none and char¬ 
ity for all, we emphatically declare 
with all the force of our being-; Either 


The parallel is exact and the conse¬ 
quences will be identical. 

Several centuries ago the schools of • 



Mt. Majestic—Zion National Park 

Reached by Union Pacific System 


Catholic children must be educated in 
Catholic schools, or the future genera¬ 
tions of Catholics in this country will 
absolutely dwindle to nominal numbers 
precisely the same way that the Prot¬ 
estant denominations have suffered. 


this country — all the schools — were en- i 
shrined in a religious atmosphere. Usu- > 
ally the Protestant form of belief was I 
accentuated, but it was Christian. The 
children were taught the truths of the, 
Christian morality; they were familiar 















THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


41 


with the events of the life of Christ 
and the story of His relig'ion; they took 
pride in being' Christians, and the Prot¬ 
estant churches and meeting- houses 
were well filled with devout worship¬ 
pers. 

I When God was banished from the 
schools they g-rew up a generation, yes, 
1 and many generations, of indifferent 
I men and women. They learned from 
materialists to scoff at Christianity and 
religious morality. They were ashamed 
of the simple doctrines of the Gospel 
of Christ. They avoided, to a great 
extent, Christian names for their chil¬ 
dren, Biblical references in their dis- 
i courses, religious tone in their morals. 
I Soon a looseness of thought and e.':- 
pression, a laxity in morality, a fine 
scorn for the marriage tie became ap¬ 
parent; with all this followed an ex¬ 
odus from the churches, until today the 
Protestant denominations are at their 
wits’ end to draw a respectnble cong-rc- 
gation even once on Sunda 3 ^ win ire for¬ 
merly their houses of woi'ship over¬ 
flowed with pious and devout men and 
women. 

This is a picture of wl'iat will happen 
even among Catholics if timy fail to 
realize the importance ol their schools, 
if they fail to come to the rescue of 
those schools in this hour of peril. For 
\ peril there is. It lurks within from the 
j inJifference of many so called Catho¬ 
lics: it rages without, from the opno- 
sition of atheists, of tlie immoral, the 
degenerate, and the enemies of all law 
and order so rampant in our cmmtry. 
j It has already showed its pernicious 
j and sinister head in New Jersey and 
j Nebraska, in Florida and Michigan, 
|| thus proving how widespread is the 
j' spirit of defiance of the rights of Chris- 
[ tian people. Its pestiferous breath has 
j been felt even i-n our own state, 
j® The late Archbishop Ireland thus 


characterized the dangers from a pure¬ 
ly secular education: 

The state school tends to elimin¬ 
ate religion from the minds and 
hearts of the youth of the country. 

This is my grievance ag'ainst the 
state school of today. Believe me, 
my Protestant fellow citizens, I am 
absolutely sincere, when I declare 
that I speak for the weal ol the 
Protetsantism as well as for that 
of Catholicism. I .am a Catholic, 
of course, to the tiniest fibre of my 
heart, unflinching and uncompron^- 
ising in my faith. But God forbid 
that I should desire to see in Amer¬ 
ica the ground which Protestant¬ 
ism now occupies swept by the de¬ 
vastating blast of unbelief. Let 
me be your ally in wa-rdiag off 
from the country irreligion destroy¬ 
er of Christian life and of Christian 
civilization. What we have to fear 
is the m.aterialism that does not s^-e 
beyond the univeiv.e of a living 
God, and the agnosticism that re¬ 
duces Him to an unknown Perhaps. 
Irreligion is abroad, scorning the 
salvation which is offered in the 
teachings and graces of Chr'.ot 
Jesus, sneering at the Bibical page 
warring upon the sacredness of the 
Christian Sabbath and the music 
of its church bells that tell of the 
Heaven and of the hopes of im¬ 
mortal souls. Let us be on our 
guard. In our fear lest Protestants 
gain some advantage over Catho¬ 
lics, or Catholics over Protestants, 
we play into the hands of unbeliev¬ 
ers and secularist. We have given 
over to them the school, the nur¬ 
sery of thought. Are we not secur¬ 
ing to them the mastery of the 
future. 

The above words, uttered by an ack¬ 
nowledged master and leader; are prov- 







42 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


NUNS WHO TAUGHT 

RELIGION MUST FACE 

SOVIET COURT 


THE SYSTEM 

OF PARISH 

SCHOOLS 


(By N. C. W. C. News Service.) 

Catholic missionaries, according- to 
the gazette published by Russian emi- 
g-rants in Berlin, will hereafter be barr¬ 
ed from emig-ration to Russia. 

The g-azette says that instructions to 
this effect have been received by the 
diplomatic representatives of the Mos¬ 
cow g-overnment in Berlin. It has also 
been announced from Moscow, says 
the same publication that a process 
will beg-in shortly ag-ainst the thirteen 
Russian nuns who have been charg-ed 
with anti-revolutionary activities, 
which consisted chiefly in the teach¬ 
ing- of religion. 


ing- and prophetic, and as true today 
as when hrst proclaimed by the distin- 
g-uished prelate just thirty j^ears ag-o, 
before a great convention of the Na¬ 
tional Educational Association in Min¬ 
neapolis. In fact, Protestant churches 
today, with their well-nigh empty pews 
and sparse cong-regations, are a mute 
testimonial to the correctness of the 
vision which Archbishop Ireland paint¬ 
ed for the national educators. 

Another valiant leader has arisen in 
the place of the Giant of the Northwest 
and the present Archbishop utters the 
same prophecy and sounds the same 
warning which have now become his¬ 
toric and which are more portentous 
by reason of the terrible fulfillment 
which is going on even now in our very 
midst. Is there a Catholic who will re¬ 
main deaf to this repeated and fervent 
appeal for religious education? Is there 
one who will not rally around the '.ause 
with material means and heartfelt co¬ 
operation? 


The most marvellous accomplish¬ 
ment of any religion in this counrty, 
or in the world for that metter, is the) 
great educational system foi.mded and: 
maintained by Catholics of the United 
States. It affords the best answer to: 
the lie that Catholics are not interested ' 
in education, and it is the grcate.st 
proof of the Church’s loyaity to Christ, 
who was so fond of children, and who- 
certainly longs for nothing more than 
to have the seeds of virtue.and the love 
of God planted in their youthful hearts. 
The tens of millions of dollars invested 
the Catholic educational institu¬ 


m 


tions, and the millions spent annually 
for their maintenance, certainly be¬ 
speak the Church’s interest in the child, 
but not half so much the dedication 
of 60,000 lives to the Christian instruct- 
ion of the rising generation. 

Even our country’s greatest boast isli 
its popular educational system, on|i! 
which nearly one-half of all local andg! 
state taxation is spent, although every 
property owner in the land, including^' 
Catholics, contribute towards its ex¬ 
pansion and maintenance. How tre¬ 
mendous, then, is the achievement o 
Catholics, since their educational 
system is as thorough, and as efficient 


)f « 


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THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


43 


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I PHONE 454 FOR | 

I ROSARIES, PRAYER BOOKS | 

= Books, Stationer}^, School and Office Supplies = 






SPARGO’S — A BOOK STORE 

OGDEN, UTAH. 


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as the one which all the power of the 
. state is back of! 

The last injunction which Our 
Saviour left with His. Apostles was “to 
j teach the nations,” and the Church has 
, ever felt that she must execute this 
. commission. From the day sJie emerg'- 
I ed from the Catacombs, ai^'d was no 
: long'er prevented from obeying- the 
; Master’s orders, she has faithfully' dis- 
charg'ed her duty in this regard. School¬ 
ing the nations always went hand in 
, hand with Christianizing the nations, 

; and for long centuries the Church was 
the world’s only educator. Not only 
. did she lend herself to the instruction 
of the little ones, but she built up great 
I Colleges and Universities. The most 
I famous in Europe today, such as 
j Oxford, Cambridge, Paris, Salamanca, 
were her schools until they were wrest¬ 
ed from her. Long before Harvard was 
I founded the Catholic Church was giv¬ 


ing higher education even in the New 
World. 

The prevalent impression that the 
Public School system in the United 
States was long in operation, and that 
Catholics alone were dissatisfied with 
it and undertook to build up a rival 
system, is most erroneous. Catholic 
schools existed first, so did the religious 
schools of other denominations; in fact 
the Colonies, and the States themselves 
until 80 years ago, had none other than 
religious schools. 

We call ours a Christian nation, but 
there is nothing in the educational 
system of the nation calculated to keep 
it such. Careful not to offend the sensi¬ 
bility of many gToups of people, whose 
children are being trained in the public 
schools, the State confines its educat¬ 
ional interests to the things which pre¬ 
pare the child for economic and liter¬ 
ary success during his worldly exist- 


^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi 

I ENSIGN HERRICK | 

I OPTOMETRIST | 

E 352 T-wenty-fourth Street Ogden, Utah. = 




n 




44 


THE DIOCESAN MONTHLY 


MATERIALISM MUST 
BE OFFSET 

BY EDUCATION 


$50,000 DONATION 

TO COMPLETE CRYPT j 
OF NATIONAL SHRINE i 


“It is only ii\ the sqirit of true hu¬ 
manity that there is any approach to 
the better things of life. Ech.: n. on 
is the process by which each inch vici¬ 
nal re-creates liis own universe and de¬ 
termines its dimensions. As civiliz¬ 
ation advances, the need becomes, not 
less, but more. The present industrial 
methods, with all their dependence up¬ 
on invention,' with all their subordi¬ 
nation to science, are yet narrowing', 
rather than broadening', in their effect 
upon the general mass of their employ¬ 
ees. The requirement of efficiency has 
reduced much of modern industrial life 
a mere mechanical operation. Under 
more primitive conditions this was not 
the case. Those who were perhaps en¬ 
tirely untrained in the schools found 
ample opportunity for complete person¬ 
al expression in their daily employ¬ 
ment. 

“The tendency in modern industry 
has been to change these conditions 
very materially in the direction of re- 


ence. We are not censuring the State 
for not doing more; in fact we main¬ 
tain that she is not authorized to do 
more, because the sphere of her author¬ 
ity is bound by the temporal. The duty 
of training the child for the next world 
belongs to the Church. However, since 
it is to the interest of the State to have 
a citizenry guided by the great truths 
of faith, imbued with love of God, and 
possessed of consciences which will not 
tolerate dishonesty, immorality and 
crime, it should give every encourage¬ 
ment to any group of people who, at 
their own expense, provide a Christian 
education for their children. 


The crj'pt of the National Shrine of 
the Immaculate Conception at thei^ 
Catholic University' is expected to be'j 
completed by September, 1924, accord- 1 
ing to an announcement made by thq; 
Right Rev. Thomas J. Shahan, rector | 
of the University at the annual com- 1 
mencement exercise. 

Bishop Shahan announced that Sir'j 
James J. Ryan, of Philadelphia, had! 
given to the Shrine the sum of $50,000, | 
with permission to use the donation' 
in the construction of the crypt. Ac¬ 
cording to specifications, the crypt will 
be two hundred feet in length, twenty- 
two feet in height, and will seat l,8O0f 
persons. It will -correspond in shaped 
and size to the g'reat sanctuary^ of then 
Shrine, which will be erected above it,■■ 
and which will be capable of accommo¬ 
dating more than one thousand ecclesi¬ 
astics. 


ducing the arts to the position of a 
trade. This in no degree Jetracts front 
the dignity of work, but it has pro¬ 
duced a kind of work which is \'cry 
different in its effect on the develop¬ 
ment of the individual. / 

“This whole scheme of things does 
not diminish, but enlarges, the require 
ment for a liberal education, the lib* 
eral culture which is taught in the 
schools, and the maintenance of tin 
opportunities for broader culture, apari 
from the trades and vocations of liveli^ 
hood, outside the schools. The ma 
chines of the shops have a tendenc: 
to make machines of the employ'ees 
This must be offset, it must be met b] 
a counter tendency. There is but one 
some kind of cultural activity.” 















illllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 


IlflllMlllllllllllilllllllllllMIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllilllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilllllllllli 


To the Pastors and Contributors of 
Notes and News: 


All Notes and Copy must be in, on 
or before the 20th of the Month pro¬ 
ceeding- Publication. 


Send all copy to 

THE CATHOLIC PUBLISHING CO. 
Care of L. V. GIBBS, 

561—4th Ave. 

SALT LAKE CITY, 

UTAH. 










Individual Service 




The needs of each depositor are likely 
to be different. It is for this reason 
we make a special effort to accommo¬ 
date our service to the requirements 
of ALL who seek it. 

Professional or business men, retailers 
or wholesalers, employes or employers 
having- accounts find that we have a' 
courteous reg'ard for the vrants of Aid. 
of our customers. 



The National Copper Bank 

Opposite Postoff'ice 


Salt Lake City 




















VOL. 1 


Published Monthly at Salt Lake City 

1923 


No. 3