Skip to main content

Full text of "Echo"

See other formats








THE ECHO 


VoL. XV SUMNER HIGH SCHOOL, HOLBROOK, MASS. JUNE 1939 No. 1 



Class B Yearbook 


ECHO STAFF 1938-1939 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
ASSISTANT EDITOR 
BUSINESS MANAGER 
ASSISTANT MANAGER 
LITERARY EDITOR 


Bernadine Ford 

Nancy Cook 

Corinne Terrazano 
Mason Colby 
Jean Gagnon 


LEAGUE REPRESENTATIVE Clara Colburn 

ATHLETIC EDITOR John Card 

ATHLETIC EDITOR Marie Smith 

CLUB EDITORS Edith Brown, Anne McGaughey 

ALUMNI Richard McKinnon 

ART EDITOR Robert Nason 

CLASS EDITORS: 

1939 Madelyn Moran, Agnes Higgins 

1940 Virginia Keoppel 

1941 Annella Card 

1942 Ruth Cossaboom 

TYPISTS Barbara Scott, Nellie Morton, Pauline Rayner, Dorothy Pepper 
FACULTY ADVISER Miss Kathryn Megley 


DEDICATION 

The ''Echo'" Staff dedicates this issue to the 
Class of 1939 with the sincere hope that they 
will find success in their future undertakings. 


2 


THE ECHO 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 


JOHN HENRY 


Y CARD, JR., President Jj 

-iohnny- P' 

• ^tomr^ 1 Ar't m rr » 


Hobby: Stamp collating 


Activities: Rifle Club 1, 2; Association Drama 2; Sophomore Drama 2; Pro Merito 3; 
Gym 1, 2, 3, 4; Class President 2, 3, 4; French Club 2, 3, 4; Echo 4; Senior Drama 4. 


BARBARA MYRTIS BOARDMAN, Vice-President 
''Barb” 

Hobby: Swimming 

Activities: Glee Club 1; Vice-President 2, 3, 4; Lunchroom 3, 4; Style Show 4. 

BARBARA VIRGINIA BARTON, Secretary 
“Babs” 

Hobby: Guitar 

Activities: Gym 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club 3; Lunchroom 4, 

DOUGLAS ROBERT EGLES, Treasurer 
‘"Doug” 

Hobby: Model Airplanes 

Activities: Glee Club 1; Pro Merito 3; Senior Drama; Class Treasurer 3, 4. 




THE ECHO 


3 



Alkxaxdku Wii/rox Ukxvie 
" licii" 

Hobby : Sleeping 
(llee Club 1 : Craft Club 1 : 
Basketball 1. 2: Soccer 1, 
2; Football 1. 2. M. 


UfTII COSSABOOM 
“7? Ktliie” 

Hobby : Swimming 
Glee Club 1 : French Club 
2. ;5 : Ec]io 4. 


Mauy Alice FimuEDCE 
“Mai/ree” 

Hobby: Drawing 
Gym 1, 2 : Basketball 1, 2, 
M : Dramatic Club 2, M : 
Craft Club 2, :> ; Dramatic 
Club Drama M : Librarianl , 
4 : Lunchroom 4. ^ 


I'EitxADixE Alice Fokd 
‘•M tnuiii" 

Hobby : Swimming 
Basketball M : Echo 4 ; 
Basketball manager 4. 


•Teax Makie Gagxox 


'^Xicki'’ 


Hobby: Reading 
Sophomore Drama 2 ; Glee 
Club 1, 2. o ; I*ro Merito 
H ; Echo Drama 3 ; French 
Club 2, 3 ; Senior Drama 
4 : Student Council 4 ; 
Echo 2, 3, 4. 


JoHx Joseph Haoeuty 
“Jack” 

Hobby : Sjiorts 
(Bee Club 1 ; Freshman 
Frolic : Rifle (hub 3 ; Foot- 
ball 2, 3. 4; Track 1, 2, 3 



Aoxes Lolise Higgixs 
“Ma" 

Iloliby : Plating 
(41ee Club 1 ; Gym 2 : Soph- 
omore Drama : Office 4 : 



PffiAXCis Michael Keatixg 
“Kent” 

Hobby : Sports 
PT-eshman Frolic; Craft 1; 
Soccer 1, 2 ; Basketball 1, 
2 ; Football 1, 2, 3 ; Base- 
ball 3, 4. 


Ruth I.,eoxard 
“Ruthlc” 

Hobby : saving pennies 


Gym exhibition 1, 2; Style 
Show 4. ij ‘ 


Ixaxhlebx Marion 
MacPherson 
“Kat” 

Hobby : Horse Back Riding 
Sophomore Drama ; Glee 
Club 1, 2 ; Gym 1, 2. 


f 


4 


THE ECHO 


KH’HAUI) JOSKIMI 

McKix.vox 

-Mac" 

Hobby : •‘Mai" 

(iym 1 : Socc(‘r 1 : Glee 
Club 1, 2 : Kifle Club 1,2; 
S()i)bomoro Drama ; Foot- 
ball 2. ;> ; French Club 2. 
-■> : Senior Drama: r.ask(‘t- 
ball 1. 2. ;>. 4; SDideut 



Lii.a Lkxoka ^Dchakls 
“Li'’ 

Hobby: Keadinsr 
Glee Club 1. 


Axxk Fllkx McGai ghky 
Hobby : Sports 
(Jym 1. 2; French Club 2: 
Echo Drama 2: Fro Merito 
8; Uifle Club 1. 2: Tenuis 
Team 4: F>asketball 1, 
2. 8. 4. 



Madki.yx Axxk Mokax 
-.UaV’ 

Hobby: -Mac” 

Gym 1. 2 ; Basketball 1, 2 : 
Sophomore Drama: Glee 
(dub 1. 2. 8. 4; Senior 

Drama; Style Show 4; 


Nklkik Alkisox Mortox 
‘•Re<r 

Hobby : Music 
Gym 1, 2; Craft 1: Glee 
(8ub 1. 2. 8. 4; Echo 4; 
Style Show 4 : News Edi- 
tor 4. 





IbtUKRT Dki.L NaSOX 
"lioh" 

Hobby; Daucinjr 
So))bomore Drama : Echo 
4 : Art Editor 2 : Student 
Council 4 : Senior Drama, 


Dorothy Mary FKruKR 
“Dot"’ 

Hobby ; Swimming 
Gym 2: Glee Club 1, 2: 
Echo 4 ; Style Show 4, 


ZOE POLISSOX 
“Zowie” 

Hobby : Siwrts 
Gym 1,2: Orchestra 1 , 


French Club 


Craft 


Glee Club 1, 2, 8, 4: Stu- 
dent Council 4 : Stvle 


Pateixe Fraxces Rayxer 
“Polly” 

Hobby : Music 
Craft Club 1 ; Gym 1, 2 ; 
Drawing 1, 2 ; Glee Club 1, 
2, 3, 4 ; Orchestra 4 ; 

Senior Drama ; Echo 4 ; 
St,vle 


Axxe Cox,staxce 
Semexovich 
“Toots” 

Hobby : Walking 
Gym 2 ; Craft 1, 2 ; Glee 
Club 2, 3, 4. 




THE ECHO 


5 





Uakbaua Alicia Scott 
‘^Scottic” 

Hobby : Skating 
Glee Club 1 : Gym 1, 2 : 
Sophomore Drama ; Pro 
Merito 8 : Office 8, 4 ; Echo 
4 ; Senior Drama. 


Mauy Louise Souocco 
Hobby : Sports 
Glee Club 1 ; Gym 1, 2 ; 
Basketball 1, 2 ; Lunch- 

room 8, 4. 


\Y I I.LI A il E I' G E X E 

Woodmax 

“Squeak” 


Ruth Mauie Stoddbu 
“Duchess’^ 

Hobby : Sports 
Gym 1, 2 ; Craft Club 3 
Glee Club 1, 2, 8, 4. 


Muriel Louise M'ilsox 
“KW’ 

Hobby : Horseback Riding 
Glee Club 1 ; Orchestra 1 ; 
Gym 1. 2 : Craft ; Style 
Show 4 ; (iym Pianist 1, 
8, 4. 


Hobby 
Gym 1 : 
Hockey 8, 


: Working 
Soccer 1, 2 ; 

4 ; Baseball 4. 


CLASS ODE 

We have come to end of our high school days, 

And into the world we must go. 

Dear Sumner High we will always praise 
As we go out down life’s wide row. 

We’ll remember with joy all those perfect days 
When we studied there long ago, 

And as now we go forth on our separate ways. 

We shall think of the days loved so. 

But although we must part in this life of ours. 

Still we shall not regret the pain. 

We must scale to the top of those rocky towers; 

We must strive with our might and main 

Will we stand on that peak that we long to reach 

In that good and perfect land. 

Then we shall when we’ve said fond good-bye to each 
E’er recall Sumner’s helping hand. 


6 


THE ECHO 


GRADUATION PROGRAM 


HONORS FOR FOUR YEARS 

1. Jean Gagnon 1, Barbara Scott 


2. John Card 

3. Douglas Egles 


2. Barbara Barton 

3. Nellie Morton 


Senior Honor Roll 

Bernadine Ford 2 Barbara Scott 4 

John Card 3 Douglas Egles 4 

Robert Nason 3 Jean Gagnon 4 

Ann McGaughey 1 

Figures represent number of times on 1938-1939 honor roll 


Class Flower — Gardenia Class Motto — “Effort Brings Success” 

Class Colors — Maroon and Gold 


Activities 

Saturday, June 10, Boat Trip 
Wednesday, June 14, Class Day 
Friday, June 16, Reception 
Thursday, June 22, Graduation 
Topic for Graduation — “Democracy” 


THE ECHO 


7 


CLASS DAY WELCOME 

By John Card, Jr. 

Faculty, Juniors, friends, and especially parents, on behalf of the class of 1939 
of Sumner High School, it gives me great pleasure to welcome you to our class 
day. It is with just pride that we review our high school career. For four years 
we have mixed hard work, good times, eye-straining study, and side-splitting 
joviality to become the best class ever to graduate from the high school of our 
lovable little town. Joy and sorrow, serious study, and pleasant parties have 
mingled to give us all unforgettable and pleasant memories of the best days 
of our life. Often you, our friends, have helped us in our times of despair, 
and now it is with delight that we can invite you to these exercises on this mem- 
orable day. May you enjoy them now by being happy with us, and may you 
enjoy them later as your memories turn back to us and to this day. 

CLASS HISTORY 

By Barbara Barton 

September 1935. Here we were a group of green Freshmen wandering through 
the halls of the high school looking for our rooms. Teachers were standing in the 
doorways waiting for us, telling us where to go. This year the pupils from 
Brookville joined the pupils from Holbrook. Although the teachers insisted 
we were not over bright, we thought we were. Our class was divided into three 
rooms. The College group were in Mr. Hodge’s room, part of the Commercial 
in Mr. Naverouskis’ room, and the rest in Miss Richardson’s. We held our first 
class meeting, a big event in the lives of the Freshmen. The following were 
chosen as officers: President, Richard McKinnon; Vice President, Marjorie 
Kohl; Secretary, Virginia Berry; Treasurer, William Franklin. On the school 
grounds we held a carnival consisting of games and refreshments. Some of our 
class mates distinguished themselves on the gym squad; and others joined the 
orchestra, glee clubs, and other clubs. The rest of the year proved uneventful 
except for Graduation in June. We looked forward to coming back as Sopho- 
mores and leaving the position of “green Freshmen” to the incoming class. 

We came back to school in September 1936 and were glad to see our school- 
mates. We were now Sophomores. This year Marjorie Kohl, Francis Bagley, 
and Ulmer Hill left us while Francis Bettencourt and Bernadine Ford joined our 
class. Mary Sorocco joined the Commercial division after spending her first 
year with the College division. At our class meeting the following officers were 
chosen: President, John Card; Vice President, Barbara Boardman; Secretary, 
Jean Gagnon, and Treasurer, Richard McKinnon. On December 16, 1936, we 
presented the Sophomore drama, “The Rebellion of Mrs. Barclay.” This was 
a comical story of family life and was acted out very well. All seemed to fit 
their parts. Those taking part in the play were John Card, Jean Gagnon, 
Ann McCaughey, William Franklin, Barbara Scott, Agnes Higgins, Kathleen 
MacPherson, Madeline Moran, and Richard McKinnon. The year passed quickly, 
and once again we left dear old Sumner to return as Juniors. 

In September 1937 back to school we trudged as Juniors. This year looked 
more promising because we took a more active part in the social life of the 


8 


THE ECHO 


school. Our officers were elected as follows: President, John Card; Vice Presi- 
dent, Barbara Boardman; Secretary, Barbara Barton; Treasurer, Douglas Egles. 
Our class colors were chosen: maroon and gold, and our class motto was “Al- 
ways Lead, Never Follow.” This was a big year to us because we received our 
class rings. They were gold with a raised emblem having the letter “S” on 
it. Below the “S” was the word Holbrook. The number 1939 was on the sides 
and our initials were inside. On the first Friday in May we held our Junior 
Prom. The Grand March was led by the four class officers while the “Big 
Apple” was led by John Card, Barbara Boardman, Robert Nason, and Virginia 
Berry. There were many different kinds of novelty dances. The Junior class 
was well represented in the glee club, the dramatic club, the baseball team, the 
football team, and the basketball team. John Card was coming right along 
with his work in gym and we had high hopes for him in the Senior year. To 
conclude the end of a perfect year, the Juniors escorted the Seniors at their 
graduation. 

Back again, in September 1938, but this time we came back as the high 
and mighty Seniors. The officers remained the same as those of the Junior year: 
President, John Card; Vice president, Barbara Boardman; Secretary, Barbara 
Barton; and Treasurer, Douglas Egles. Ann McGaughey left us in October, but 
just had to come back to us in December. William Franklin, we are sorry to 
say, left to go to Stoughton. On October 27, 1938, the Senior Dance was held,' 
and I am sure everyone had a good time. The hall was decorated appropriately 
for Hallowe’en, there were many novelty dances, and all danced merrily to the 
excellent music furnished by the Roal Palms. Then came the Senior Drama, 
“Take My Advice.” This was a comedy dealing with the life in a small town 
and what happens when a person comes from the city to make the town famous. 
Those taking part were John Card, a wizard at making small towns famous; 
Douglas Egles, the hero and editor of the paper; Richard McKinnon, a dis- 
grace to the town, but a lovable character; Madeline Moran, the perfect sec- 
retary; Jean Gagnon, the town’s snooty gossip; Pauline Rayner, the villain’s 
haughty daughter; Robert Nason, the villian; and Barbara Scott, the heroine. 

A new venture by this class was that of sponsoring a style show. We were able 
to do this through the courtesy of Porters Inc. of Brockton. Many odd styles in 
hats were shown ; also many beautiful dresses, suits, and evening gowns were * 
modeled by the following girls of the Senior Glass: Pauline Rayner, Barbara 
Boardman, Dorothy Pepper, Agnes Higgins, Nellie Morton, Ruth Leonard, Zoe 
Polisson, Muriel Wilson, and Madeline Moran. On March 17, with the Asso- 
ciation, we enjoyed a Barn dance. The hall was decorated in true barn style 
and all who attended came in costume. The few who didn’t were obliged to 
have a patch sewed on before they could dance; furthermore, the patch cost 
ten cents. John Card was the only Senior to go in for gym this year, but he came 
through with flying colors and won the cup at the Gym Exhibition. He had 
won awards in Lynn previous to this. A distinction for our class — that of being 
the first class to wear caps and gowns for graduation. They are maroon with 
a gold tassel, the class colors. Our graduation activities are this Class Day, a 
boat trip to Provincetown, the Reception, and finally Graduation. Thus comes 
the end of four perfect and happy years for us, and I am sure we all feel a 
pang of regret for leaving dear old Sumner High. 


THE ECHO 


9 


CLASS STATISTICS 

By Ann McGaughey 

On may second of this year the illustrious Class of 1939 met to vote on some 
history-making decisions. Our class statistics! Applying ourselves seriously 
and industriously to our task, we finally reached the point where we decided 
our records were fitting to be handed down to posterity through the annals of 
history. 

First of all came the best looking — a very difficult decision to make in a 
class so possessed of pulchritude, but we decided at long last on Douglas Egles, 
with a tie between Ruth Leonard and Bunny Ford. Then came our smartest girl 
and boy — Jean Gagnon and Johnny Card. It seems Johnny must be able to 
squeeze much studying into little time, for he was chosen our Night Owl and 
Fastest Driver — two titles which need much practice to be thought worthy of. 
We have, too, some happy-go-lucky people in our class, because Agnes Higgins 
was chosen the best-natured; Mary Eldridge, the class giggler; Jack Hagerty, 
the class clown; Pauline Rayner, the most vivacious. Our best dressed and 
cutest girl is Ruth Leonard, while John Card is the best dressed boy and Class 
Romeo. Billy Woodman is our cutest boy. 

It now seemed that our class must be divided into two parts. Those who 
were of a romantic trend of mind must be segregated from those who were not. 
We found it too difficult to pick a most romantic, so we had to grant the title to 
three people: Richard McKinnon, Bunny Ford, and Johnny Card. Then came 
our woman-hater, or misogynist as he prefers to be called, Doug Egles, and our 
man-hater, Ruth Cossaboom. We’re beginning to doubt our decision on both 
of these already. 

Figures came next — and I don’t mean Arabic or Roman numerals! Our 
tallest girl is Ruth Cossaboom, our tallest boy, Richard McKinnon, while our 
shortest boy is Billy Woodman and our shortest girl, Ruth Stodder. The thin- 
nest member of our class is Dorothy Pepper; the heaviest, Mary Sorocco. The 
young man with the bulging muscles is our Class Hercules, Johnny Card. 

After a rest for our weary, overworked brains, we turned back to our work 
and compiled the following list of miscellaneous titles: 

Best boy and girl dancer — John Card and Bunny Ford. 

Teachers’ pet, most athletic, class orator, class wit, best politician fhe 
got to be president, didn’t he?) and worst speller — John Card. 

Most popular boy and girl — John Card and Mai Moran. 

Class gum-chewer and nosiest — Billy Woodman. 

Best secretary — Nellie Morton. 

Most studious — a tie between Doug Egles and Jean Gagnon. 

Quietest — Ruth Stodder. 

Laziest — Alexander Benvie. 

Most sophisticated — Barbara Scott. 

Most tardy marks — Ruth Cossaboom (evidently Ruth believes in the say- 
ing, “Better late than never.”) 


10 


THE ECHO 


Most agreeable — the Senior Class. 

Most likely to succeed — Class of 1939. 

Most daring — Pauline Rayner. 

Most musical — Muriel Wilson. 

Best actress — Jean Gagnon. 

Neatest — Ruth Leonard. 

Best singer — Barbara Barton. 

Most charming — Barbara Boardman. 

Most conscientious, most artistic, class idealist, most original, most am- 
bitious, and best actor — Douglas Egles. 

Most forgetful — Alexander Benvie. 

Biggest fusser — Dorothy Pepper. 

Most versatile — Me. 

Meekest — tie between Barbara Barton and Ruth Leonard. 

Biggest eater — Agnes Higgins. 

Class procrastinators — All of us. 

Now, with a knowledge of a job well done, we give a deep sigh of relief 
and entrust these important, epoch-making decisions to your memories, realiz- 
ing to the greatest extent that we are a class in a million. 

CLASS PROPHECY 

By Richard McKinnon 

Here it is 1959, twenty years since I was graduated from good old Sumner 
High, and here I am walking down Franklin Street, the main street of the great 
manufacturing city of Holbrook. I can look around me and see most of my 
old school mates, for they are the ones who have built Holbrook up to its 
enormous size. Right after the graduation in 1939 the little town of Holbrook 
began to grow and grow. 

There goes John Card, the mayor of this fine town. He always did have 
a good head for politics. He is waving a casual greeting to Douglas Egles who 
is coming out of a big drafting building which he owns. General Jack Hagerty 
is with Douglas, trying to get him to draw some plans for a new army airplane. 
Jack is leading a very comfortable life now. He lives in his big mansion up on 
Strawberry Hill (a bachelor of course). I haven’t seen Robert Nason for quite 
some time because he has taken a trip to England where he is teaching royalty 
how to play the accordion. Billy Woodman, the editor of the “Holbrook Daily 
Blab,” is having a hard time keeping in touch with his foreign news reporters, 
Alexander Benvie and Francis Keating, because as usual they are roaming from 
one country to another just making things hum. Mai Moran runs the biggest 
store in Holbrook. It is called The Moran’s 2 and 4 cent Store. It is just the 
same as a 5 and 10 cent store except that Mai cut the prices down to make more 
sales. Bunny Ford, who was left $4,000,000 by her husband who died in 1949, 
now takes life easy. Zoe Polisson is President of the biggest fruit company in 
America. Of course we had a home girl in our class. Ruth Leonard is married 


THE ECHO 


11 


and lives in her own little house where she sits in the afternoon doing her knit- 
ting and waiting for her loved one to come home from work. 

Agnes Higgins is doing very well on the stage where her outstanding role 
is Juliet in Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Barbara Barton is in the movies. 
She sings western songs in practically all the cowboy pictures. Anne McGaughey, 
the city’s outstanding debutante, is going to put on a huge banquet for the hos- 
pital fund. She has to step lively now to keep her name the most outstanding 
on the society page because she has a very keen rival, Anne Seminovich, an- 
other of the city’s debutantes. From where I am standing I can see the Acme 
Jewelry Company of which Barbara Boardman is President. She buys all her 
best watches from Ruth Stodder who owns the Stodder Watch Manufacturing 
Company on Plymouth Street. Kathleen MacPherson manages that big beauty 
salon situated at the corners of Union and Franklin Street. I guess that the art 
of barbering runs in her family. The building next to it is Sorocco’s Restaurant. 
She got the idea from the Sumner High lunch room, I guess. The Holbrook Pub- 
lic Library is still situated in the same old place, supervised by Mary Eldredge. 
In the town hall tonight is a rare treat. Pauline Rayner and her all-girl swing 
band is going to render a selection of the latest swing tunes. 

We have some experts in our class too. Barbara Scott and Nellie Morton 
are both typewriter experts. They have a typewriting School in the business 
section of the city. Jean Cagnon is an expert on the English language. I re- 
member the big words she used to use in high school. You can imagine how 
long these words are now since they have had twenty years to grow. Ruth Cos- 
saboom is a clothing expert. She creates all the new styles in women’s dresses 
all over the country. Of course they all look silly, but that is what the girls 
like in these modern times. We also have a musical expert in our class. Muriel 
Wilson is an expert on the great Beethoven’s classics. She can play them bet- 
ter than he could. There goes an airplane overhead. I believe that is Lila 
Michael’s plane winging her back to Hollywood where she will make another 
moving picture. Speaking of airplanes, I heard that Dorothy Pepper is going 
to test out the new stratosphere plane recently invented. She always did find 
it very easy to go up in the air. 

What a class! Anyone could have seen that when they were graduated, 
they would become successful. Twenty years of hard work had brought the 
class of 1939 to the top of the ladder. 

''DARBY AND JOAN" 

Paw: (to Maw as they stood ’neath “The Old Apple Tree in the Orchard”) 
“We’ve Come a Long Way Together.” Remember the day we met “Down by the 
Old Mill Stream”? 

Maw: I wore my “Deep Purple” dress and “Put on My Old Grey Bon- 
net”. I’m glad you brought up “My Reverie”. “Thanks for the Memory” of “Our 
Love”. We were “Sweethearts” then and are still. I said “I Promise You” in 
“The Chapel in the Moonlight”. On our honeymoon we had “A Room with a 
View”, overlooking the “Blue Danube”. By the way. Paw, I got in “A Senti- 
mental Mood”. Well, it makes me feel old. 

Paw: I don’t feel old. I’ve got a long way ahead of me, and “Heaven 
Can Wait”. 


12 


THE ECHO 


CLASS GIFTS 

By Agnes Higgins and Douglas Egles 


The school chiirs cramp poor Benvie’s hack 
And cause him misery. 

So we will give this pillow soft 
To show our sympathy. 

Our singer’s Barbara Barton. 

No doubt she’ll soon be tops. 

So now to ward away all ills. 

We give her Smith’s cough drops. 

To Barbara we give this shorthand pad 
Because we know it will make her glad. 
And when dictation she does take, 

Mer accuracy and speed will be no fake. 

To John we give this Indian boy. 

We know that all his years of knowledge 
Will enable him to discover with joy 
That it’s the emblem of Dartmouth College. 

To Ruth we give this clock to ring 
In the morning from her sleep to bring. 

So she may hop right out of bed. 

And think of what Mr. Neal has said. 

If miracles were now in style 
And Egles learned to dance, 

This dancing book would teach him how 
The latest steps to prance. 

We give to Mary this little mop 
Because ’twill put her on the hop. 

And when in a lunchroom she does work. 
We know that she won’t be a shirk. 

To Bunny we give this little phone 
For then she’ll never be alone. 

And when she hears it ting-a-ling. 

She’ll jump and hop and dance and sing. 

A puzzle hard we have for Jean — 

Two keys to take apart. 

To disentangle these, we know, 

Would take one who is smart. 

A gift for short haired Hagerty 
With which he’ll never part. 

We know, because the gift’s a comb 
So he’s licked right from the start. 

A curler new for Agnes 
To keep her hair in trim. 

She needn’t twirl it anymore 
During every class she’s in. 


A rattle bright for Francis 
To keep him quiet and good. 

We hope he’ll take fine care of it 
And act just as he should. 

To Ruth we give this recipe hook. 

In hopes that she may learn to cook. 

For when her Bob comes home at night. 
He’ll be able to eat with great delight. 

Miss MacPherson gets a horn 
Which she should always keep. 

It gives a most delightful noise. 

In fact, it goes “Beep-Beep.” 

We’ve all seen Mac’s old Chevvie, 

Or heard it anyhow. 

So here’s a brand new Chrysler 
That’s certainly a wow. 

To Lila we give this little bunny. 

For she’s cute and always funny. 

When the bunny doesn’t behave. 

We know that she won’t rant and rave. 

McGaughey needs this emblem 
To show from whence she is. 

The way she moves from school to school 
Keeps us really in a whiz. 

To Mai this letter “H” we give 
To help her gain in knowledge. 

It ought to catch the eye of one 
Who hails from Harvard College. 

To Nellie we give this little pencil 
So she may figure out the stencil. 

And when to future schools she goes. 

We know she’ll be there on her toes. 

To Bob we give this brand new flute. 

We know that on it he will toot. 

Everyone knows he’s a musical fellow, 
And soon, who knows, he may play a cello. 

To Dot we give this cedar chest, 

In which she must put all the best 
Of things she’s saved for that great day 
When Daddy dear gives her away. 

To Zoe we give this little store 
And wish that many come to the door 
To buy fish, meat, and pickles dilled. 

And keep the register always filled. 


THE ECHO 


13 


Pauline now gets a powder puff 
To keep her nose from shining. 

With her good looks and everything 
She’ll have the boys all pining. 

To Anna we give this pair of soles, 
To keep her shoes free from holes, 
We know to Avon she likes to walk. 
To see the boys and have a talk. 

For Scottie here’s a choo-choo, 

A nice, new, shiny train. 

She won’t have any trouble 
In getting up to Maine. 


To Mary who is an excellent cook 
We give this bright and shiny spoon. 

Now when her family comes home at night. 
They’ll sing a merry, merry tune. 

We couldn’t think of a gift for Ruth; 

Our brains we’ve racked and vent. 

So go and get just whate’er you want. 
With this new, shiny cent. 

For Muriel a music sheet 
For practice loud and long. 

We hope that she shall find it 
A most delightful song. 


To Billy we give this package of gum. 
Hoping that he may have some fun. 
And if he doesn’t chew too fast. 

We hope for him it will always last. 


WILL 

By Barbara Boardman 

We the members of the Senior Class of 1939, of Sumner High School, Town 
of Holbrook, Massachusetts, being uncertain as to the frail life we are living, 
do therefore ordain, publish, make, and declare this to be our last will and 
testament. 

Item 1 — To the teachers, Mr. Neal, and the School Committee we leave our 
grateful appreciation for helping us through these four years of struggle. 

Item 2 — To the faculty as a whole, we leave all the pleasant memories of 
this wonderful Class of 1939, that is so marked in the history of Dear Old 
Sumner. 

Item 3 — To Mr. Walsh we leave our reputation of being the most forget- 
ful class that ever graduated from Dear Old Sumner. 

Item 4 — To the incoming seniors we leave the back seats at assemblies. 
We hope they will consider this as much of an honor as we did even though you 
can’t see so well. We also leave our greatness, intelligence, and high scholastic 
ability. 

Item 5 — To these same incoming Seniors we leave the watching of the 
clocks from 8:10-1:45. We wouldn’t want those clocks lost. 

Item 6 — To them also we leave all books, papers, pencils, desks, and room 9, 
and hope they will cherish it as we did. 

Item 7 — To the incoming Freshmen we leave our records and noble deeds 
as a monument of what is achievement. 

Item 8 — To the student body we leave the memory of the dignity of the 
Seniors in their caps and gowns. 

Item 9 — Mr. Hodge’s Physics class leaves happy memories of trips to al- 
most everywhere in Massachusetts. 

Item 10 — The lunchroom girls leave their ability of making sandwiches 
to Gerry Kelly, Lillian Gordon, and Mary Moran. 


14 


THE ECHO 


Item 11 — John Card leaves his ability to fly through the air like the man 
on the flying trapeze to Richard Quincy. 

Item 12 — Pauline Rayner leaves her musical ability to Marjorie Smart. 

Item 13 — To Barbara Iveson, Barbara Scott leaves her typing ability. 

Item 14 — To Jimmy Jones, John Card leaves the great privilege of being 
Sumner’s Romeo. 

Item 15 — To Clara Colburn we leave Barbara Barton’s blushing. Barbara 
will be glad to get rid of it. 

Item 16 — Francis Keating leaves his ability of telling tales as high as 
Woolworth’s Building to Harry Speiler. 

Item 17 — John Card leaves his ability to dance proficiently to Allen Mur- 
dock. 

Item 18 — Jean Gagnon leaves her efficient conduction of the Student 
Council and assemblies to Ruth Johnson. 

Item 19 — Muriel Wilson leaves her job of pianist to Eleanor Baker. 

Item 20 — Mai Moran leaves her giggle to Helen Mitchell. 

Item 21 — Nellie Morton leaves her shorthand ability to Barbara Iveson. 

Item 22 — Mary Eldredge leaves her ability to talk in class to Lillian Gor- 
don. 

Item 23 — Jack Hagerty leaves his jitterbug dancing to William Poole. 

Item 24 — To all classes and all future classes we bequeath the school and 
everything that goes with it. 

We attest this to be a true copy of the last will and final testament of the 
Senior Class of Sumner High School, Holbrook, Massachusetts, this fourteenth 
day of June in the year of our Lord, One Thousand, Nine Hundred and Thirty- 
nine. 

(Signed) The Class of 1939 

Witnesses : 

Presidents of underclasses. 


SENIOR DANCE 

The Senior Class Dance was held October 27 in the high school hall. The hall 
was beautifully decorated in the Hallowe’en colors, black and orange. Music 
was furnished by the “Royal Palms” orchestra of Stoughton. The Prize Waltz 
was won by Nancy Cook and Leo McKinnon. A balloon dance was also en- 
joyed by all. The faculty members who supervised were Miss Megley, Mr. 
Neal, Miss West, Mr. Allen, and Miss Knutson. The dance was a social suc- 
cess. 

Madelyn Moran 


THE ECHO 


15 



SENIOR DRAMA CAST 


Row 1; J. Gagnon, B. Scott, M. Moran, P. Rayner. 

Row 2: D. Egles, R. Nason, Miss Kathryn Megley, (coach), R. McKinnon, 
J. Card. 


SENIOR DRAMA 

"TAKE MY ADVICE" 

On the evening of Friday, January 20, 1939, the senior cast presented the play, 
“Take My Advice.” 

Richard McKinnon, who acted the part of Judd Fenton, with his whimsical 
way and elderly walk, took the eye of the audience. His arguments with Mrs. 
Nelson-Dodd were very humorous. The part of Mrs. Nelson-Dodd was taken by 
Jean Gagnon with a great deal of skill. John Card, as Jimmy Samson, a waker 
of towns, was very amusing with his monotonous and clever sales talks. The 
part of Bob Mannion, the head newspaper reporter, was taken by Douglas Egles. 
He was in love with Peggy Acton, played by Barbara Scott, who later was known 
as Peggy argrim. Their love scenes were entertaining. These two having 
the leading parts acted them beautifully. Robert Nason took the part of John 
Wargrim, a wealthy business man who was always ready to order someone 
around. argrim had a very sophisticated daughter, Marcia, whose part was 
taken by Pauline Rayner. Virgy Mannion was Bob’s young, snappy sister; this 
part was taken by Aladelyn Moran. 

The cast surely caught the characters’ personality throughout the play 
which went off without a hitch. The play was coached by Miss Kathryn Alegley 
of the faculty. 



16 


THE ECHO 


STYLE SHOW 

The Senior Class presented a style show, March 3, in the High School Audi- 
torium. The clothes modeled by eight Senior girls were demonstrated bv Mrs. 
Porter of the Porters Inc., Brockton. Beautiful spring styles including eve- 
ning dresses, three-piece suits, coats, and street dresses were very well modeled 
by Pauline Rayner, Ruth Leonard, Agnes Higgins, Dorothy Pepper. Barbara 
Boardman, Nellie Morton, Madelyn Moran, Muriel Wilson, and Zoe Polisson. 

The models entered through an arch in the center of the stage, then walked 
off the stage on a runway extending over half the hall’s distance. The arch and 
the runway were decorated artistically in the school color, blue. A very able 
pianist was furnished by Mr. and Mrs. Porter. 

Before the show a brief entertainment was offered. Patricia Allen tap- 
danced, Edrie MacPherson and Barbara Barton gave vocal solos, accompanying 
themselves with their guitars, and Marjorie Smart gave accordion selections. 

Mrs. Porter was presented with a beautiful bouquet by John Card, the 
senior class president. 

Madelyn Moran, Class Editor 

Sewing Club 

A group of the Senior Girls have formed a sewing club called the “Chain 
of Eight.” The club meets once a week at the girls’ houses. The girls in the club 
are Ruth Stodder, Ruth Leonard, Dorothy Pepper, Zoe Polisson, Pauline Ray- 
ner, Bernadine Ford, Anne Simenovich, and Kathleen MacPherson. 


Wouldn't It Be Queer If. . . . 

Barbara were Irish instead of Scott 
Betty were Pans instead of Potts 
Vernon were Cabbage instead of Pease 
Nancy were a Baker instead of a Cook 
Eleanor were a Butcher instead of a Baker 
John were a City instead of a Town 
Edith were Red instead of Brown 
Annella were a Book instead of a Card 
Dorothy were salt instead of Pepper 
Marie were Carpenter instead of Smith 
Jack were Slat instead of Pickett 
Muriel were Brockton instead of Quincy 
Marjorie were Stupid instead of Smart 
Howard were Drive instead of Putt 
Douglas were Hawks instead of Egles 
Edwin were Peter instead of Paul 
Billy were Puddle instead of Poole 
Shirley were Tom instead of Howard 
Bunny were a Buick instead of a Ford 
Bill were a Singer instead of a Woodman 


THE ECHO 


17 


JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 


Sumner Eddy President 

Barbara Iveson Vice President 

Dorothy Morgan Secretary 

Doris Morgan Treasurer 

The Junior Class has added the following members this year: 

Paul and Mildred Clark from Quincy; Dorothy and Doris Morgan from 
Randolph; Sumner Eddy from South Easton; Richard Wilhem from the South. 

Richard has now gone to Knoxville, Tennessee, Mildred has gone to Elorida 
and returned after three months, and Paul has left school to go to work. 

JUNIOR PROM 

A VERY delightful Junior prom was held successfully Eriday evening May 5, in 
the High School Hall with a fine group of young people in attendance. The hall 
was tastefully decorated in picturesque Spanish style. Gayly colored shawls 
helped much to carry out the effect. Those who made the decorations a success, 
under the supervision of Miss Helena Homer, were Eleanor Baker, Corinne Ter- 
razano, Virginia Koeppel, Allen Murdock, and Sulo Nihtila. Ushers for the 
evening were Barbara Iveson, vice-president; Dorothy Morgan, secretary; and 
Doris Morgan, treasurer. Music was furnished by the “Silhouette” orchestra. 
The grand march was led by the class officers and their partners. There were 
many special dances, among which were the “Paul Jones,” a balloon dance, 
and prize waltz. Three prizes were awarded for the prize waltz to Ouida Holmes 
and Clarence Allen, Dorothy Morgan and William Poole, and Nancy Cook and 
Leo McKinnon. 

Refreshments were served under the direction of Lillian Gorton, Geraldine 
Kelly, Mary Moran, and Irene De Costa. 

Checking was in charge of Henry Megley and Arthur Levangie. 

Chaperons for the evening were Mrs. Earle Iveson, Mrs. Hobart Morgan, 
Mrs. Garland Neal; class adviser. Miss Anna Damon, Miss Miriam West, and 
Miss Elna Knutson of the faculty. 


I DO NT 

Look at those foolish boys go after the girls. 

... I don’t! 

I, Douglas Egles, believe in this “go-after-girl stuff”? 
Huh! ... I don’t! 

And to think some one said I go after the fairer sex. 
... I don’t! 

Why, you wouldn’t think I would have any fun at all. 
... I don’t! 


18 


THE ECHO 



SOPHOMORE 

Row 1: A. McLaughlin, P. Albonetty, H. Lawrence, D. Chaplic, M. Hogan, 
D. Kierstead, A. Card, S. Howard, B. Potts, M. Wallace, M. Emmett. 
Row 2: J. Haggai, L. Smith, L. Proverb, J. Mahoney, S, McKay, P. Jones, 

L. Hooker, R. Walsh, C. Anderson, E. Grover, E. Jocquin. 

Row 3: B. Jennings. A. Robertson, C. Bagley, D. McKay, M. Colby, M. Mack, 

M. Smart, H. Moran, 


Annella Card 
Madeline Hogan 
\^'alter Pawlowski 
Dorothy Kierstead 


Sophomore Class Officers 

President 
Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 


Sophomore Entertainment 

The annual Sophomore drama “Under Suspicion” was presented at a matinee 
performance on April 28, 1939. Having practised for several months the play- 
ers presented the play in very good form. 

The school orchestra, under the direction of Miss Margaret Murphy, opened 
the entertainment. The first act was then presented. This play proved very 
entertaining and had an interesting plot. Mrs. Benton, a very nervous hostess, 
lost her pearls, and suspected her new maid, Mary, and Mary’s lover, Michael, 
of stealing them, Michael had given Mary a string of pearls as an engagement 
present, and Mary, thinking Michael stole them, hid them in a vase of flowers. 
Virginia, a neighbor’s child who was visiting the Bentons, found Mary’s pearls 
and gave them to Mrs. Benton. The situation was very puzzling when Mrs. 


THE ECHO 


19 


Kelly, Michael’s mother, claims the pearls. Mrs. Lyman, sister to Mrs. Ben- 
ton, solves the problem when she brings in Mrs. Benton’s pearls from the gar- 
den where they fell. Mary’s pearls are returned, and Michael is given a job 
by Mr. Benton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Benton, who are hostesses to some guests, were ably por- 
trayed by Payson Jones and Betty Potts. Madeline Hogan played the part of 
Mrs. Lyman, Mrs. Benton’s sister, very well. The parts of Mr. James Talbot and 
his nervous daughter Geraldine, who are the Bentons’ guests, were performed 
by Mason Colby and Marie Mack. Annella Card enters as Virginia Carter, a 
neighbor’s young daughter, who is very much attached to her play dog. Rib- 
bon. Mary Murphy, a new maid at the Benton House, was played skillfully by 
Mary Emmett. Leo Smith portrayed the comical role of Michael Kelly, Mary’s 
lover. Mrs. Patrick Kelly, an old Irish woman, mother of Michael, was well 
played by Dorothy Kierstead. The play was coached by Miss Marcia Bartlett of 
the faculty. 

The school orchestra with Richard Croft as soloist played several numbers 
between the acts. After the second act guitar selections by Edrie MacPherson 
and Barbara Barton were enjoyed. Arlene Cote gave a clever tap dance, and 
delightful accordion selections were contributed by Marjorie Smart. Betty 
Potts’ exhibition of baton twirling was well received and enjoyed by all. A 
novelty dance by Stewart McKay, Donald McKay, Allan Jones, John Card, 
George Hagerty, and Robert Townsend as Minski cast-offs was the concluding 
number which proved very humorous. 



SOPHOMORE DRAMA CAST 

Row 1: M. Emmett, M. Colby, L. Smith, P. Jones, B. Potts, M. Mack. 
Row 2: D. Kierstead, M. Hogan, Miss Marcia Bartlett (coach), A. Card. 


20 


THE ECHO 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

Row 1: D. Hooker, W. Donovan, A. Smith, C. Mossesso, A. Jones, S. Cook, 
H. Pierson. A. Cote, R. Andrew, M. Schiitt. 

Row 2: . Cote. D. Keating, B. Seeliger, M. Quincy, B. Caspersen, J, Fitzpat- 

rick, I. Marble, E. Megley, L. Keller, K. Chandler, G. Ferbert. 

Row 3: D. Hanney, A. Brindle, H. Terrazano, S. Czapla, B. Woodman, B. Hig- 
gins, R. Townsend, D. Esterbrook, P. Wilson, G. Higgins, H. Barton. 


Freshman Class Officers 

Allan Jones 
Shirley Cook 
Katherine Mossesso 

Anna Smith 


President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 


The College Freshmen presented a Thanksgiving assembly November 24 with 
Allan Jones as Master of Ceremonies and Phyllis Wilson, Bernice Berndhart, 
Richard Croft, and the orchestra, under the leadership of Richard Croft enter- 
tained. A play, “A Modern Thanksgiving,” with the following pupils par- 
ticipating: Elaine Megley, Charles Mann, Gertrude Higgins, Walter Don- 
ovan, Shirley Cook, Chester Ignatowitz, Wesley Cote, Marjorie Schutt, Lorrell 
Keller and Phyllis Wilson. The play was very well given, being presented in 
two parts: a modern Thanksgiving, and an old fashioned one. In the modern 
version the three children all had places to go for the holiday. The mother 
really wished to stay home, but the children wanted to be modern so the par- 



THE ECHO 


21 


ents decided to take a plane to the city. The three children then found out that 
they had to stay home after all. They turned on the radio and heard the old 
fashioned Thanksgiving. This was cleverly presented on the stage, with beau- 
tiful lighting effects. It showed the whole Pilgrim family dressed in appropriate 
costumes and seated around the Thanksgiving table. 

After this was finished, the modern family thoughtfully returned to the 
stage, and the children were then informed of the crashing of the airplane which 
their parents were supposedly on. An exciting few minutes followed, but in the 
end the parents came back to say that they had changed their minds, and they 
hadn’t taken the plane. An old fashioned Thanksgiving then occurred with din- 
ner at home. 


ALUMNI NEWS 

Record of our Post Officers 

1938 

B. U. School of Administration 
S. C. Military Academy “The Citadel” 
Chandler Secretarial 
Working in So. Braintree 

1937 

President: William Sands B. U. School of Administration 

Vice President: Mary Smith Bridgewater Teachers College 

Secretary: Rose Moran Secretary in Braintree 

T reasurer : George Mullin University of Maine 


President: George Gagnon 

Vice President: Charles Jervey 
Secretary: Ruth Clooney 
Treasurer: Myrtle Churchill 


President: Roland Kearns 
Vice President: Irving Barrows 
Secretary: Ruth Martin 
T reasurer : Ada Clooney 


1936 

Boston College 

B. U. School of Administration 

Stenographer 

Training at Boston City Hospital 


1935 

President: Gardner Mills Babson’s Institute 

Vice President: Geraldine Behan Bridgewater Teachers College 

Secretary: Edith Waters Secretary in Boston 

Treasurer: Hallet Thayer Clerk in business office 


1934 

President: Joseph Moran First National Store, Randolph 

Vice President: Rolf Caspersen U. S. Army 

Secretary: Rita Moran Manager of Fanny Farmer Candy Store, Brockton 

Treaurer: Ruth Smith Mrs. O’Connell 


22 


THE ECHO 


President: William Hutchinson 
Vice President: Myrtle Boss 
Secretary: Lucy Cartullo 
Treasurer : Sisag Garabedian 


1933 

Newspaper man at Honolulu 
Working in Holbrook Building, Brockton 

Mrs. Berstein 

Automobile Mechanic 


1932 

President: Francis Moran 
Vice President: Frances Ahern 
Secretary: Laura Blanchard 
Treasurer : Ernest iggins 


Teacher at Kingston 
Mrs. LaCrosse 
Mrs. Eldridge 
L nited Shoe Company of Boston 


1931 

President: Norman Smith 
Vice President: Everett Hayden 
Secretary: Annie Johnston 
Treasurer: Dorothy Mills 


Teacher at Avon 
Engineer in W orcester 
Married 
Mrs. Elton Briel 


1930 

President: Wallace Hancock Ensign in U. S. Coast Guard 

Vice President: Stanley \\ hite Bethlehem Ship Yard 

Secretary: Dorothea Loeffer Mrs. R. Orcutt 

Treasurer: Myron Holbrook Orchestra Leader 


President: Basil Martin 
Vice President: Thomas Ahern 
Secretary: Louise Hutchins 
Treasurer: Marjorie Meara 


1929 

Aviator wtih U. S. Coast Guard 

Employed with a Contracting Company 

Mrs. Sanburn 

Mrs. Barnhardt 


SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

At the Graduation exercises of 1938, the following Scholarships and awards 
were received. - — 

F riendship Club Scholarship, Charles Jervey. 

Alumni Association Scholarship, Ruth Clooney. 

Senior Class Scholarship, George Gagnon. 

W'ashington-Franklin Award, William Wood. 

D. A. R. Good Citizenship Award, Ruth Clooney. 

Essay U. S. Constitution Mass. State Award, Charles Jervey. 
Typewriting Award, Marilynn Chase. 

Massachusetts S. P. C. A. Poster Contest, Douglas Egles. 


THE ECHO 


23 


Pro-Merito Honors 


Ann McGaughey 
Virginia Clark 

Frances Lyons 

Douglas Egles 


Myrtle Churchill 
Jean Cagnon 
Barbara Scott 
Ceorge Cagnon 


Class of 1938 

Hazel Buckley Training in Arlington Heights Hospital 

Phyllis Christiansen Training in Arlington Heights Hospital 

Elinor Welsford Training in Arlington Heights Hospital 

Alice Eranklin Stoughton Secretarial School 

James Mahoney Bryant & Stratton 

Arthur Neal Burdett College 

Eleanor Thomas Fanny Farmer’s Cooking School 

William Wood Thayer Academy 

Marilynn Chase Brockton Business College 

Donald MacQuarrie Bentley’s School of Accounting 

Victor Albonetty Cochran Shoe, Stoughton 

Roger Baker Hancock Inspirator Company, Boston 

Edmund Bestoso Edmund’s Dairy 

Russell Cann Kunan’s Greenhouse 

Charles Caspersen Kunan’s Greenhouse 

Edith Day Madame Gaudette’s, Brockton 

Robert Cole Auto Mechanic 

Harold Eldredge Norfolk County Hospital 

Allen Flanagan Raising guinea pigs 

Evelyn Hanney Mrs. Bradbury 

Mildred Harty Stenographer 

James Higgins Avon Sole 

Marion Johnson Secretary in Boston 

Irvin Long Painter 

Frances Lyons Secretary in Boston 

Martha Morse Training for Nurse 

Viola Mosesso Silk Hosiery Operator 

Robert Mullin Blacking Business 

Robert Potts Attendant at Gas Station 

Mildred Strain Employed in Braintree 

William Townsend ^ Adams Cut Rate Store 

Herbert Tucker Holbrook Shoe Company 

Dorothy Ward Holbrook Shoe Company 

Chester Wiggins Percival Jewelry Company 

Charles Williams Painter 

Esther Williamson , Holbrook Shoe Company 

Louis Leonard West Tree Service 


24 


THE ECHO 


Alumni 

The Alumni has held two events this year. One was the Annual Christinas party 
which was held on December 15, 1938, in the High School hall. There was 
entertainment, dancing, and refreshments. The entertainment was furnished by 
members of the High School. The Dramatic Club, coached by Mr. Naverouskis, 
presented their Christmas play; Pauline Rayner and Robert Nason gave ac- 
cordion selections; and Edrie MacPherson and Barbara Barton sang a group 
of songs with guitar accompaniment. Noel King was Santa Claus and distributed 
gifts to all. 

Another event was the Annual Bridge and Whist Party. At this party was 
realized the money for the hundred-dollar scholarship to be given to a deserv- 
ing member of the graduating class of 1939. It was attended by the enthusiastic 
townspeople who won many prizes that the Alumni had set up for the best bridge 
and whist players. 

The last event of the 1938-1939 year will be the annual banquet in June. 

Sumner Movies 

Detention Class 
Report Cards 
Juniors 

Benvie, Keating, \^"oodman 
Nancy Cook 

Hodge’s Room 

Graduating 

runs in girls’ stockings 

Holbrook 

Eleanor, Marjorie, Audrie 

Senior Class 


Sumner Songs 

“After the Ball is Over” Howard Johnson’s - 

“Honest I Ain’t Lazy, I’m Just Dreamin’ ” Howard Nason 

“Small Ery” Bob Townsend 

“I Cry for You” Vacation Week 

“That Old Feeling” ’ Flunk Cards 

“My Heart Belongs to Daddy” Week before Prom 

“Who Are We to Say?” The Seniors 

“Happy Davs are Here Again” June 22 

“Nice Work^If You Can Get It” All A’s 

“You Leave Me Breathless” Report Cards 

“Sweet Little Headache” History lesson 

“Stand Up and Fight” Sumner High 

“Pennies from Heaven” Class Treasury 

“My Reverie” Detention 

“Ride Tenderfoot Ride” Bruce Smith 

“Thanks for the Memory” Senior Class 

“Heigho, Heigho” Vacation 


“Persons in Hiding” 
“The Awful Truth” 
“That Certain Age” 
“Three Muskateers” 
“Vivacious Lady” 
“Bovs’ Town” 

“Grand Illusion” 

“Fast and Loose” 

“Big City” 

“Three Smart Girls” 
“Gone V ith the Wind” 


THE ECHO 


25 


ATHLETICS 



GIRLS’ BASKETBALL 

Row 1 : M. Smart, M. Quincy, 1. Marble, M. Smith, D. Morgan, D. Morgan. 

Row 2: B. Iveson. B. Jennings, C. Colburn, M. West, P. Albonetty, A. Card. 

GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

The team successfully opened their 1939 season with a win over Wrentham. 
Only b) one point, but, nevertheless, a win. From then on the exciting games 
were played hard, fast, and with splendid co-operation. Dorothy Morgan, Doris 
Morgan, and Irene Marble were high scorers. We had losses and victories, but 
all in all, it was an interesting and enjoyable season. 


FIRST TEAM 


Doris Morgan, Center forward 
Dorothy Morgan, Left forward 
Irene Marble, Right forward 
Marjorie Smart, Center guard 
Marie Smith, Left guard 
Muriel Quincy, Right guard 


Marie Smith, Captain 1st team 
Barbara Iveson, Captain 2nd team 
Bernadine Ford, Manager 
Geraldine Kelly, Scorer 
Agnes Higgins, Timer 
Miss Miriam West, Coach 


26 


THE ECHO 


GIRLS' BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 





Opponents 

Sumner 

January 

9 

■" W rentham 

20 

21 

January 

13 

*Alumni 

36 

35 

January 

20 

West Bridgewater 

58 

31 

January 

24 

Randolph 

20 

29 

January 

25 

* Alumni 

35 

24 

January 

27 

^Medfield 

10 

33 

February 

3 

*Randolph 

25 

26 

February 

7 

Pembroke 

32 

11 

February 

15 

Randolph 

22 

15 

February 

17 

* Pembroke 

13 

27 

February 

28 

W rentham 

35 

23 

March 

7 

W est Bridgewater 

39 

35 


* Indicates games at home. 



BOYS’ BASKETBALL 
Row 1: L. Smith, S. Eddy. 

Row 2: L. Kunan, H. Megley, F. Mack, A Murdock, P. Jones. 

Row 3: R. Walsh, manager, J. Hagerty, J. Mahoney, R. McKinnon, C. George, 
G. Hagerty. 



THE ECHO 


27 


BOYS' BASKETBALL 

1'he basketball season opened on January 5 at Weymouth. With no former let- 
ter men back, a new and inexperienced team took the floor. It was evident that 
experience is a deciding factor. Throughout the season the scorers were Mack, 
Murdock, Eddy, Megley, and George, who was easily the high scorer. 

Though the team didn’t win many of its games, we know they all fought 
bravely, tried earnestly, and lost victoriously. Congratulations to all. 


THE TEAM 


Position 


1st Team 

2nd Team 


Right Guard 


P. Jones 

S. Eddy 


Left Guard 


A. Murdock 

L. Kunan 


Center 


R. McKinnon 

G. Hagerty 


Left Forward 


C. George 

H. Megley 


Right Forward 

F. Mack 

J. Mahoney 


Utility 


J. Hagerty 

L. Smith 




BOYS' BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 





Opponents 

Sumner 

January 

5 

Weymouth Vocational High 53 

33 

January 

9 

*Wrentham High 

50 

21 

January 

13 

* Alumni 

32 

27 

January 

20 

West Bridgewater High 

23 

12 

January 

24 

Stetson High 

56 

22 

January 

27 

^Medfield 

22 

31 

February 

1 

Alumni 

33 

28 

February 

7 

Pembroke High 

36 

.15 

February 

13 

Wrentham High 

37 

25 

February 

15 

*Stetson High 

60 

16 

February 

17 

■^Pembroke High 

37 

23 

March 

7 

*West Bridgewater 

26 

16 

March 

8 

Sharon at Y.M.C.A. 

36 

17 


^ Indicates games played at home. 

HUMOR 

In our physics class we have some fun 
Showing teacher that homework is done. 
When he doubts us, we’re blue 
’Cause he gives us “eyes,” too 
In our study of heat from the sun. 


28 


THE ECHO 



GY-M GROUP 

Rtnv 1: C. Bagiev, A. Cote. B. Jennings, H. Pierson, A. Card, Miss Miriam 
West (coach). 

Row 2: D. Hanney, R. Quincy, G. Hagerty. Mr. G. L, Neal, (coach), B. Cas- 
persen, J. Haggai, G. Neal. 

Row 3: H. Barton. R. Townsend. M. Colby, J. Fitzpatrick, D. Keating. 


GYM EXHIBITION 

The sixth annual Gym Exhibition was held on Friday evening April 14, 1939. 

The marching by the Junior High School Girls under the supervision of 
Miss Dorothy Scanlon was exceptionally well done. 

The exhibition by the high school girls of folk dancing, calisthenics, paral- 
lel bar work, free hand drill, games, stunts, and pyramids was w^ell received. 
All this had been coached by Miss Miriam West. 

The work of the boys, excellently coached by Principal G. L. Neal, was 
parallel bars, rings, horizontal bar, diving, and tumbling. A humorous boxing 
bout by J. Hagerty and H. Hamilton, both dressed as clowns and on roller skates, 
added to the interest of the evening’s performance. 

The prizes for the evening were aw^arded as follows: Girls. First, Betty Jen- 
nings; second, Annella Card; and third, Charlotte Bagley. Boys. First, John 
Card; second, Richard Quincy; and third, Harry Spieler. On the Freshman 
boys’ team the awards were first, Robert Townsend; second, Burwell Casperson. 
There was an added feature this year, high diving, won by John Card, with 
George Hagerty a close second. 



THE ECHO 


29 


The judges were Edwin Koenig, B, T. School of Physical Educalion, and 
Miss Lillian Mancini, Sargent School. Prizes were awarded by Mr. Victor 
Hogan, a member of the school committee. 

The boys’ team for this year consisted of: H. Barton, J. Card, B. Casperson, 
M. Colby, J. Fitzpatrick, J. Haggai, G. Hagerty, D. Hanney, D. Keating, R. 
McPherson, G. Neal, R. Quincy, H. Spieler, R. Townsend. 

The girls’ team: C. Bagley, A. Card, A. Cote, B. Jennings, I Pierson. 


BASEBALL 

Before the Baseball season started, an active town committee co-operated with 
a Legion committee to raise money for the purpose of buying new baseball uni- 
forms. Representative Roy Smith donated a Toastmaster to be put on chances; 
this with a successful card party provided ample funds. 

Before the season got under way, the Legion donated a watch fob to the 
player who should have the highest batting average for the season. At the time 
this was written, midway in the schedule, Charles George leads with a .364, 
Richard Quincy second with .319, Allen Murdock third, with an even .300 and 
fourth finds Chester Ignatowitz, only a freshman, with .235. 

Baseball practice got under way in earnest right after the April vacation. 
Coach Walsh had only two veterans, Charles George and Philip Hammond; 
however, by April 28, a team was listed to play Stetson High at Randolph. The 
boys were new and handed Stetson a game 13 to 2. On May 1 and 2 we dropped 
two more, the former to Weymouth Trade by an 18-8 decision, and the latter to 
West Bridgewater by a heart-breaking 11-10. The Weymouth game was played 
here. On May 5 we entertained West Bridgewater and avenged the 11-10 heart- 
breaker by winning 10-9. On May 19 Cohasset came here and walked away with 
a 23-14 victory. On May 11 in Avon we suffered another defeat to the tune of 
19-3. At home on May 14 Thayer proved fodder for our second win by a 16-10 
triumph. 


Sumner Baseball Line-up 1939 

First String 


Richard Quincy, Short stop 
Henry Megley, Right field 
Charles George, Center field 
Allen Murdock, First base 
Philip Hammond, Left field, pitcher 


William Woodman, Second base 
Lester Proverb, Third base 
Chester Ignatowitz, Catcher 
Robert Finlay, Pitcher 


30 


THE ECHO 


Seconds 


Harry Spieler, Infield 
Payson Jones, Infield 
Joseph Mahoney, Infield 
Allen Jones, Outfield 
Francis Keating, Outfield 


Charles Mann, Catcher 
Francis Mack, Pitcher 
John Behan, Pitcher 
Coach, Mr. John Walsh 


Baseball Schedule 


April 10 — Medfield 
April 28 — At Randolph 
May 1 — Weymouth Trade 
May 2 — At W. Bridgewater 
May 5 — W. Bridgewater 
May 8 — Cohasset 
May 11 — At Avon 
May 15 — Thayer J. V. 


May 18 — Avon 

May 22 — At Thayer J. V. 

May 23 — At Weymouth Trade 
May 29 — Randolph 
June 1 — Sacred Heart High at Wey- 
mouth ( pending ) 

June 6 — Sacred Heart High (pend- 
ing) 


SCHOOL NOTES 

HONOR ROLL 



Junior 


Virginia Koeppel 2 


Allen Murdock 1 

Dorothy Morgan 4 


Ruth Johnson 4 

Doris Morgan 4 


Henry Megley 2 

Barbara Iveson 1 


Marie Smith 1 

Charles George 3 

Sophomore 

Nancy Cook 1 

Walter Pawlouski 4 


Madelyn Hogan 3 

Elizabeth Potts 4 


Annella Card 4 

Mason Colby 4 


John Haggai 3 

Dorothy Kierstead 3 


Stewart McKay 2 


Freshman 


Helen Pierson 4 


Stacia Czapla 4 

Elaine Megley 4 


Allan Jones 4 

Bernice Bernhardt 1 


Elizabeth Hollis 3 

Ruth Andrew 3 


Shirley Cook 1 

John Picket 1 


Muriel Quincy 3 

Catherine Mosesso 2 

Anna Smith 2 

Doris Estabrook 2 


The number signifies the number of times on 1938-1939 honor roll. 


THE ECHO 


31 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

Row 1: C. Terrazano, J. Gagnon, R. Johnson, Mr. G. L. Neal. 

Row 2: V. Koeppel, M. Smart, B. Potts, S. Nihtila, R. Nason, R. McKin- 
non, Z. Polisson, C. Colburn, G. Ferhert. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

Early in the school year 1938-39 the Student Council was formed at the sug- 
gestion of Mr. Garland Neal, principal of this hish school, for the purpose of 
financing school athletics and activities and settling any questions that might 
come. It was also to see that ballots were prepared for any elections and to see 
that the school was run according to parliamentary order. The representatives 
to the Council were elected by majority in the proportion of four Senior repre- 
sentatives, three Junior, two Sophomores, and one Freshman. Each club and 
squad in the school was also allowed to elect one representative. In October the 
first official meeting was called and the following officers were elected: chair- 
man, Jean Gagnon; secretary, Pauline Rayner; and treasurer, Ruth Johnson. 
Pauline Rayner was later replaced by Corrinne Terrazano. The council was 
then ready for action and started upon the problem of financing; school sports. 
The first activity toward this end was a bean supper, in which the Council was 
aided by Miss Elna Knutson, Miss Anna Damon, and Mr. Garland Neal. Next 
the council joined with the Senior class in the arranging of a St. Patrick’s Day- 
dance. There were also social activities in which the Council members took part. 
The first of these was a conferenee in Boston to which the delegates were Zoe 
Polisson and Ruth Johnson. The topic of discussion was “How Can the Student 
Council Help Promote Public Safety.” The semi-annual Conference of Stu- 


32 


THE ECHO 


dent Councils of the Southeastern Division of Massachusetts was held in Whit- 
man. Three delegates: Zoe Polisson, Ruth Johnson, and Jean Gagnon attended. 
From both these gatherings much good was derived and there are high hopes 
that good work may continue on the part of the Student Council. Finally as- 
semblies presented during school time have completed the program for the 
financial support of the school. All these activities were successful, and the 
Council is very grateful to all those who patronized them. 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Association, which has been in existence for six years, is of bene- 
fit to the students of Sumner High School in many ways, for it saves them money, 
is convenient, and aids the school. This year the association was started on 
October 7 and will end in thirty-two weeks on June 2. This means that the 
members, who number about ninety, will have paid in $3.20 in return for which 
they will have received $5.45. Among the entertainments to which Association 
members have been admitted are the Barn Dance, the Senior Dance, the Junior 
Prom, all the Home Basketball games, the Senior Drama, five evening movies, 
the Gym Exhibition, and an assembly. They will also have $.80 of their class 
dues paid and receive a copy of the Yearbook. 

It is easy to see that the Association is well worth belonging to; however, 
the members of the Association would have received even more if there had 
been a larger membership so next year let’s derive all possible benefit from our 
Student Association and have a record membership. 

ORCHESTRA 

The Sumner High School Orchestra for 1938-1939 though composed mostly 
of new members, has made fine progress under the excellent leadership of 
Miss Margaret Murphy. 

Besides entertaining at the Annual Spring Music Festival, they played 
at a Jamboree which was held for the benefit of the Infantile Paralysis Fund, 
Episcopal Church Eair, both being held in the Town Hall, and will play also 
at the Junior and Senior High Graduations. 

On a few occasions we have been directed by our student leader, Richard 
Croft, of the freshman class. 

Notwithstanding the fact that we haven’t any Juniors or Seniors, the or- 
chestra is progressing rapidly. 

It is composed of the following: violins, Walter Pawlouskie, Helen 
Mackey, Audrey Smart, Eleanor Kennedy; saxophones, Arnold Soule, Virginia 
Hogan; piccolo, Donald McKay; baritone horn, Richard Walsh; trombones, 
Stewart McKay, George Hagerty; trumpets, John Haggai, Audrey Robertson, 
Barbara Smart; drum, Richard Croft; piano, Maria Mack. 

Soloists, Xylophone, Richard Croft; Accordion, Pauline Rayner. 

Marie Mack, Stewart McKay 


THE ECHO 


33 


ASSEMBLIES 

The students have enjoyed many fine assemblies this year. Some of them were 
movie assemblies which cost each person five cents to help finance them. The 
programs were varied. One was a fire assembly to bring out to the students 
methods of fire prevention. On Armistice Day was an assembly to celebrate 
that holiday. Appropriate exercises were held, the principal part being an ad- 
dress given by a speaker from Norwood, obtained by Commander Thomas 
Kennedy of the William D. Dalton Post of the American Legion. At Thanksgiv- 
ing time we enjoyed Thanksgiving plays coached by Miss Elna Knutson and 
presented by members of the Freshman Class. Christmas time brought forth 
Christmas plays. Mr. Vincent Naverouskis, as coach of the dramatic club, 
showed what excellent talent the girls had. The best entertainments we had, 
I think, were the W. P. A. concerts. Toward the end of the year we have been 
having local talent, and we have found it very enjoyable indeed. Some of the 
performances were tap dancing, singing, piano playing, accordion playing, 
guitar playing, original plays written by the students, and reports of delegates 
to various meetings. To add to these was a style show with boys modeling girls’ 
clothes. We have appreciated all our assemblies and we would appreciate more, 
because they are so delightful. 

E. Brown, ’40 

OFFICE STAFF 

Each year seven girls are selected to serve as office assistants. These girls must 
have passing grades, be reliable, and trustworthy, and have the consent of their 
parents. The senior girls chosen this year were Barbara Boardman, Agnes Hig- 
gins, Bernadine Ford, and Barbara Scott; the junior girls were Barbara Iveson, 
Beatrice Iveson, and Marie Smith. 

Each girl has a different period each day, and must make up the work lost 
while in the office. This training is of benefit to the commercial girls because 
it gives them the practical work of an office as they must learn to handle the 
various types of work as it comes. It is enjoyable work, however, and the senior 
girls in leaving know that next year’s group will be as enthusiastic about the 
work as were they. 

M.I.T. LECTURES 

The Society of Arts Lectures at M.I.T. were given in December, January, and 
February. Students from Mr. Hodge’s and Miss Knutson’s chemistry classes 
attended. The lectures: “How a Pilot Navigates the Air,” “The Approach to 
the Absolute Zero of Temperature,” “Rocks from the Sky” were given by Charles 
S. Draper, Sc. D. professor of Aeronautical Engineering; Frederick Keyes, Ph. 
D., Sc. D, professor of physical Chemistry and Fredrick K. Norris, respectively. 
The lectures were demonstrated by slides and were followed by discussion. 
They were all interesting and instructive. 

Each and every person 
Can have a lot of fun, 

//elping to keep the “Echo” always 
On the run. 


34 


THE ECHO 



GLEE CLLB 

Row 1: M. Moran, N. Cook. N. Morton, S. Morton, D. Morgan, D. Morgan, 
A. Anderson, M. Quincy, C. Mossesso, G. Higgins, A. Card. 

Row 2: C. Terrazano, L. Gorton, A. Terrazano, G. Ferbert, V. Brindle, S. 

Czapla, A. Robertson, H. Pierson, M. Hogan, A. McLaughlin, R. 
Andrew, D. Kierstead, 1. DeCosta, M. Emmett, S. Cook, H. Moran. 
Row 3: H. Lawrence, D. Chaplic, P. Albonetty, A. Simenovich, Z. Polisson, 
R. Stodder, H. Polisson, S. Howard, E. Megley, L. Keller, M. Smith, 
P. X’^'ilson. 


GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

The Girls’ Glee Club, fifty-five in number, began this years’ activities in Sep- 
tember with Miss Margaret Murphy as conductor and Stewart McKay as stu- 
dent accompanist. The club sang at a Christmas assembly with Mildred Clark 
and Phyllis \\^ilson as soloists. At the annual music concert held in the school 
hall, March 24, the girls rendered three selections. They were “Springtime,” 
“The Rosary” and “The Italian Street Song.” Throughout the year many mem- 
bers have taken active parts in the various school assemblies. 

The club attended the annual Mayflower Association Spring Concert at 
W eymouth on the morning of May 6. The concert was most enjoyable. The girls 
repeated two selections at the concert. The whole meeting was a grand expe- 
rience for the members of the Glee Club. 

Music was furnished at the Senior graduation by the Glee Club. At the end 
of the season, the girls enjoyed their usual picnic to Nantasket beach to com- 
plete the year’s work. 


THE ECHO 


35 



LUNCH ROOM STAFF 

M. Sorocco, B. Barton, M. Eldridge, L. Gorton, G. Kelly, 
Miss Anna Damon, supervisor. 


LUNCH ROOM STAFF 

The Lunch Room staff is under the supervision of Miss Anna Damon, of the 
faculty, who plans the menus and instructs the girls. 

This year the Seniors, Barbara Boardman, Barbara Barton, and Mary So- 
roceo, who were members of last year’s staff; and the Juniors, Lillian Gorton, 
Geraldine Kelly, Mary Moran, and Mary Eldridge are on the staff. 

Two periods are devoted to the work: the one preceding recess to the prepa- 
ration of food, and the one following recess to cleaning up. Sandwiches, cakes, 
cookies, ice cream, milk, milk shakes, and candy are offered for sale. The girls 
enjoy the work. At Christmas this year there was a party at the home of Miss 
Anna Damon where we had a tree, exehanged presents, and enjoyed a pleasant 
evening of games and Christmas musie. We hope to have our usual picnic at 
some favorite beach or resort, and a hike through the Blue Hills before the 
school season is closed. 

Miss Damon wishes to thank all those who have co-operated with her in 
making this a successful year. 


36 


THE ECHO 


PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

The Photography Club was very small this year having only four members: 
John Towns, President; Edward Joughlin, Treasurer; John Pickett, Secretary; 
and James Williams, Vice-President. These boys have been instructed and ad- 
vised by Mr. Eldrid Hodge of the faculty. The hoys have taken different types 
of pictures, with special lights, candid shots, etc., and have studied the different 
camera equipment. Some of the members have visited the camera exhibits in 
Boston and have attended the Brockton Camera Club. All the members have 
enjoyed their work this year and wish to express their thanks to Mr. Hodge for 
his help to them throughtout the year. 

MAGAZINE DRIVE 

Shortly before the Christmas vacation started, a committee was formed to 
bolster up the athletic funds by obtaining new subscriptions and renewals of 
old subscriptions to some of the more popular magazines. 

Nancy Cook, Dorothy Morgan, Annella Card, Richard Walsh, Jean Hol- 
lis, and Elaine Megley were the leaders. 

The outstanding room was Room 10 where Ruth Johnson led. Enthusi- 
astic support was given by most of the rooms. 

A grand total of fifty dollars was turned over to the athletic fund. 

Daughters of the American Revolution Convention 

The forty-fifth state conference of the Massachusetts Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution was held Wednesday, March 22, 1939, at the Copley Plaza Hotel 
in Boston for the purpose of selecting a student to go to Washington from 
Massachusetts as a representative in the Good Citizenship Pilgrimage annually 
sponsored by this organization. One girl of the one hundred and twelve rep- 
resentatives of secondary schools present was to be chosen. Each year every 
state in the United States sends one such representative to Washington for the 
national convention. The good citizen pilgrim is chosen by the members of 
the senior class and approved by the faculty. She is chosen for her leadership, 
her dependability, her co-operativeness, and her patriotism. The meeting opened 
at ten o’clock, and Mr. Maurice J. Tobin, Mayor of Boston, greeted the assembly 
and expressed his pleasure with the fine work the Good Citizenship Pilgrimage 
was doing. We then heard reports of all officers of the organization including 
those of the state regent and Miss Ruth Drowne, Chairman of the Good Citizen- 
ship Committee. Following the presentation of guests and the remaining re- 
ports, Mr. Walter F. Downey, State Commissioner of Education, spoke on the 
subject of education in the secondary schools. His speech was broadcast over 
station WNAC. Then came the exciting event of the day, choosing of the good 
citizen. Miss Oliva Bromley of Rockland was the lucky one. The business and 
announcements were then completed, and the delegates were served luncheon 
in the dining room, after which the pilgrims were shown over the Boston Public 
Library by a guide who explained the painting and statues of the building. This 
being the last event, the girls turned their faces homeward after a very enjoy- 
able day. 



ECHO STAFF 

Row 1: V. Koeppel, P. Rayner, C. Colburn, M. Colby, C. Terra :ano, B. Ford, 
N. Cook, J. Card, B. Scott, A. Card. 

Row 2: Miss K. Megley, A. McGaiighey, A. Higgins, R. Cossaboom, M. Moran, 
R. McKinnon, R. Nason, N. Morton, D. Pepper, J. Gagnon, M. Smith, E. Brown. 


LEAGUE MEETING 

OCTOBER, 1938 

The first meeting of the Southeastern Massachusetts League of School Publica- 
tions was held at Plymouth High School on October 19, 1938. From 3:30 to 
4:00 reception and registration were held in the entrance hall. 

At 4:00 all of the delegates were welcomed by Wayne Shipman, principal 
of Plymouth High School. At 4:15 all adjourned to attend the Departmental 
Clinics. At this first meeting of the 1938-1939 season there were only three de- 
partmental meetings. They were Costs, Cuts, and Copy. Miss Kathryn Megley 
and Clara Colburn attended the advisory board meeting. Jean Gagnon, Madeline 
Moran, John Towns, Edith Brown, and Robert Nason attended Copy; Bernadine 
Ford, John Card, Barbara Iveson, and Richard McKinnon attended Cuts; Ann 
McGaughey, Mary Moran, Ruth Johnson, and William Franklin attended Costs. 

From 4:45 to 5:30 an Olympic Meet was held in the Gymnasium. Hol- 
brook had for its representative John Card. Great feats of strength were per- 
formed, such as dropping clothespins into the milk bottle, playing badminton, 
and blowing up balloons until they burst. 


38 


THE ECHO 


From 5:30 until 6:15 a “Battle of Wits” was held in the auditorium at 
which we were represented very ably by Jean Gagnon. 

Following this contest everyone raced to the cafeteria where a delicious 
supper, accompanied by plenty of noise, was served from 6:15 to 7:00. 

We then returned to the auditorium where the Business Meeting was held 
at which the prizes were awarded to the winners of the magazine and newspaper 
contests among all members of the League. The following were the winners: — 
Class A (Magazine): First Award, Unquity Echo, Milton; second 
Award, Reflector, Weymouth; honorable mention, Wompatuck, Braintree. 

Class B (Magazine) : First Award, Students Pen, East Bridgewater; 
Second Award, Abhis, Abington; honorable mention, Eastoner, North 
Easton. 

Class C (Newspaper): Eirst Award, Periscope, Bridgewater; hon- 
orable mention. Partridge, Duxbury. 

Class D (Yearbook): Eirst Award, Wampatuck, Braintree; Second 
Award, Unquity Echo, Milton; honorable mention. Reflector, Wevmouth. 
Eollowing these three yearbooks, the judge rated the next five to include 
those from some smaller schools. 

fourth prize — Pilgrim, Plymouth; 
fifth prize — Eastoner, North Easton; 
sixth prize — Echo, Holbrook; 
seventh prize — Periscope, Bridgewater; 
eighth prize — Oracle, Randolph. 

This meeting was adjourned at 7:30, and we were then pleasantly surprised 
with several selections from the Girls’ Glee Club of Plymouth. At 7 :45 the guest 
speakers of the evening Max Grossman, Professor of Journalism at Boston Uni- 
versity, and Gordon Smith, Cartoonist for the Boston Post, were introduced. 
Thev were both welcomed very heartily and were interesting speakers. Much 
merriment was caused by the delightful caricatures with which Mr. Smith en- 
tertained us. Dancing was then enjoyed in the gymnasium until 9:45 when all 
returned home in high spirits. 

Clara Colburn, League Representative 
JANUARY 

The Midwinter meeting of the year 1938-1939 of the Southeastern Massa- 
chusetts League of School Publications was held on January 18, 1939. Despite 
a snowstorm the ten Holbrook delegates arrived safely at Milton High School. 
After registration in the lobby we were all welcomed by the Principal of Milton 
High School, George C. Marsden. Principal Marsden introduced the speaker 
of the afternoon. Dr. Fhank Palmer Spears, President of Northeastern Univer- 
sity, who spoke on opportunities of boys and girls today. At 5:00 we adjourned 
to respective conferences. Miss Megley and Clara Colburn attending the execu- 
tive meeting; John Card, Barbara Scott, and Madeline Moran, the Use of Pho- 
tography meeting; Robert Nason, Marie Smith, and Jean Gagnon, the Layout 
of the Publication meeting; Bernadine Eord and Agnes Higgins, the Work of 
the Editorial Boards meeting. 


THE ECHO 


39 


At 5:45 a delicious supper was served in the ‘school cafeteria. Durins sup- 
per we were entertained by a swine trio consistine of Harry Chagnot, Richard 
Komenda, and Robert Saltmarsh. Richard Komenda provided plenty of enjoy- 
ment with his drums. Stephen Halpin and Hils Renwick, gave some very pleas- 
ing and delightful solos. Dorothy Noon contributed some very fine songs in 
hillbilly fashion. 

Following supper a business meeting was held in the auditorium in charge 
of President John McKnelland. At 7:30 we were entertained with a plav pre- 
sented by the Milton High School Dramatic Club. It was called “The Old 
Pinter Place,” and an especially pleasing act was put on by George Moulton 
who played an Englishman who “believed everyone else stupid,” to perfection. 
Dancing was held from 8:15 until 9:30 in the gymnasium after which we all 
returned home in high spirits. 

Clara Colburn, League Representative 
MARCH 

The third meeting of the Southeastern Massachusetts League of School Pub- 
lications was held on March 15, 1939, at Duxbury High School, Duxbury. 

The “Echo” delegates arrived at 3:45, and registration took place in the 
lobby until 4:15. From there all went to the auditorium where they were wel- 
comed bv Mr. George MacKneeland, President of the League. The president in- 
troduced Mr. George E. Green, Principal of Duxbury High School who pre- 
sented the league delegates with the key to the town and complete instructions 
for departmental meetings which were attended by the following: 

Advisory Board, Mr. Allen and Clara Colburn; Editorial, Bernadine Ford, 
Jean Gagnon; Alumni and Exchange, Richard McKinnon and Agnes Higgins, 
John Card; Photography, Robert Nason and Madeline Moran. 

In the assembly Hall after the meetings an address was given by Edgar 
Baker, Jr., Supervisor of Employment at the Hood Rubber Company, Water- 
town, Massachusetts. He chose for his subject “How to Get a Job,” and I think 
some good advice was obtained. At six o’clock that which all had been looking 
forward to had come at last. Everyone raced to the School Lunch Room where 
a supper of tomato juice and crackers, baked ham, parsley, potatoes, carrots, 
cabbage salad, mustard and pickles, rolls, cocoa, and ice cream with choco- 
late sauce was served. The supper was accompanied with cheering by the various 
schools. 

Everyone looked satisfied as he entered the auditorium, where a general 
business meeting was held. 

Erom 7:30 to 9:30 we were entertained by movie shorts, games, and danc- 
ing. Music for dancing was furnished by Jay Womba and his orchestra. Even 
a few of the timid souls from Holbrook were seen shaggin’ and truckin’. 

All enjoyed themselves and returned home with singing hearts. 

MAY 

The last meeting of the year of the Southeastern Massachusetts League of 
School Publications was held on Wednesday, May 17, 1939, at Weymouth High 
School. After registering, the Holbrook group visited the print shop in the Vo- 
cational School receiving souvenirs of the meeting. Promptly at 4:00 we were 


40 


THE ECHO 


called to the assembly hall where the meeting was opened. We first sang one 
stanza of America and then were welcomed by Mr. W. L. Whittle, Principal of 
the Weymouth High School. John MacNeeland, president of the league, gave 
instructions for the departmental meetings. At 4:15 we dispersed to our different 
meetings, C. Colburn and Miss K. Megley to the Advisory Board; B. Ford to the 
Editor-in-Chiefs; R. Nason, J. Card, and A. Card to the Art; A. McGaughey and 
M. Colby to the Business; A. Higgins and E. Brown to the Athletics. At 5:15 
we reported at the assembly hall to hear an address by Paul Wiggins, former 
league president and graduate of Sumner High School. At 6:00 a very tasty 
meal which every one enjoyed was served in the cafeteria. At 7:30 we were 
called back to the assembly hall for the business meeting. Reports were heard 
from the secretary and treasurer, and officers of the following year were pre- 
sented as follows: President, George Sampson; Secretary, Nina Pierce; Treas- 
urer, Meridith Williams. The Vice President’s office is to be left open until 
next year. At 7 :50 an entertainment was put on which was enthusiastically re- 
cei\ed by every one. Clara Colburn, League Representative 

GREATER BOSTON PRESS CONFERENCE 

The Holbrook delegates to the Greater Boston Press Conference left for North- 
eastern University at 8 o’clock Saturday morning, January 14, 1939. Those 
going from Holbrook were Annella Card, John Card, Robert Nason, Madeline 
Moran, Richard McKinnon, Clara Colburn, Marie Smith, John Towns, Ruth 
Johnson, Sylvia Morton, and Miss Kathryn Megley. 

All arrived safely at Northeastern about 9:00 A.M. and after registering in 
the lobby' of the V est building proceeded to inspect the exhibits on the second 
floor. At 9:30 Alfred H. Marchant, Advertising Director of the Boston Post 
spoke on Journalism as a vocation. From 10:15 until 11:15 Lincoln O’Brien, 
Boston Transcript, spoke very interestingly about layouts, typography, and 
make-up of the Publication. Bill Cloney, Jr., School Sports Editor of the Bos- 
ton Herald, spoke about qualifications of school reporters. At 12:00 at Bates 
Hall a delicious luncheon was served to all delegates. After dinner there was 
dancing to the enjoyable music of the school orchestra, the Bachannalians. 

At 1 :00 Clifford R. Davis, Advertising Counselor of the Boston Post, spoke 
on designing advertisement. At 2:00 Mr. Ralph Blagden spoke on “What Role 
Should the Press Play in 1939?” At 4:30 the conference was over and every- 
one left for home with happy hearts, tired but glad. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Clara Colburn, League Representative 


Trip to the Ford Plant 


On Monday, April 10, the Senior Physics Class, accompanied by Mr. Hodge, 
visited the Ford Assembling Plant at Somerville. The group was conducted 
on a very interesting tour along the assembling line where the cars are assem- 
bled, painted, and tried out. The pupils who went to Somerville are the follow- 
ing: Madelyn Moran, Richard McKinnon, Robert Nason, Ann McGaughey, and 


Zoe Polisson. 


Ann McGaughey, ’39 


Burdett College 


COURSES FOR 
YOUNG MEN 
AND WOMEN 

Business Administration 
Accounting, Executive's As- 
sistant (tor men). Executive 
Secretarial. Stenographic 
Secretarial. Shorthand. Type- 
writing, Bookkeeping, and 
Finishing Courses. 

One- and Two-Year Programs. 
Previous commercial training 
not required tor entrance. 
Leading colleges represented 
in attendance. Students 
trom ditferent states. Place- 
ment service tree to gradu- 
ates. Visitors welcome. 


ST YEAR BEGINS 
SEPTEMBER. 1939 




• • 


umm^ 


As ail iiisiitution, Burdett College i.s now an 
acknowledged leadei in the field in which its 
work is done. Statesmen, financiers, bank officials, 
presidents, vice presidents, treasurers, and many 
others holding important business positions are 
numbered among its alumni, ^'et its pride as an 
institution rests not alone upon the achievements 
of the illustrious, but upon the accomplishments 
of that large numbei of men and women who, 
l)ecause of the practic. I nature of the training 
received, now hold respon . 

sible positions in various [’ 

lines of business in many 
states. 


Write or telephone for Day or Evening Catalog-. 


156 STUART STREET, BOSTON 


m nr 

Tf ri iinirsntnti 


HANcock 6300 



HOOKER BROS 


ICE CREAM 


Wholesale and Retail 


Telephone Randolph 479 


Holbrook 


Massachusetts 


ERNEST S. ROGERS 


President 


THE AMERICAN HOME 
The Safeguard of American Liberties 
Start Saving Now 

HOLBROOK CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

Town Hall Building 


GEORGE W. PORTER 


T reasurer 


HAMILTON'S GARAGE, INC. 


CHEVROLET 



OLDSMOBILE 




Telephone Randolph 0209 


Weymouth fir Plymouth Street — Holbrook, Mass. 




SANDERSON BROTHERS 


North Abington, Massachusetts 
Telephone Rockland 800 



PAUL E. LONG 


PAINTING CONTRACTOR 


Telephone Randolph 0705 


j Holbrook 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 


Massachusetts 


McCarthy & Simon, Inc. 

Manufacturing Specialists 

7-9 West 36th Street, New York 

Just off Fifth Avenue 

Specialists in 

CHOIR VESTMENTS 
PULPIT GOWNS 
CAPS, GOWNS, HOODS 
for All Degrees 

Outfitters to over 1500 Schools, 
Colleges, and Churches 


Wilfred 

Training 

the practical course 

An entire building is devoted 
to spacious classrooms and 
lecture halls for practical 
training in every phase of the 
arts and sciences of Beauty 
Culture. 

It rite for illustrated Booklet. 

Free Placement Service 



WILFRED ACADEMY 

OF HAIR AND BEAUTY CULTURE 


j 492 Boylston St., Boston 


KENmore 7286 


FRENCH AND BROOKS 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Telephone Randolph 0676-W or 0298 

55 Union Street Holbrook, Massachusetts 

FRANK T. WHITE CO. 

— : FLORIST 


JACK'S SERVICE STATION 


30 Union Street 


Holbrook 


Massachusetts 


BAGLEY ICE AND OIL 


Telephone Randolph 0678 


Holbrook 


Massachusetts 


GEORGE A. NASON 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 


31 North Franklin Street 
Holbrook, Massachusetts 

Randolph 0747-W 


884 Broad Street 
Weymouth, Massachusetts 

W eymouth 0873 




WALLACE DAY 

THE NEW ENGLAND 

SUNOCO PRODUCTS 

AUTO PARTS 

No. Franklin St. Holbrook, Mass. 


CHAPMAN'S 

AUDREY MARIE 

BEAUTY PARLOR 

DRY GOODS 

A Modern Shop Using 

GREETING CARDS 

Only the Best 

Plymouth St. Holbrook, Mass. 


“THE WILSON SCHOOL” 

Prepares students for career positions as Medical Laboratory Technologists, X-ray 
Technicians, Physiotherapists, and Secretaries to Doctors 
Co-educational day and evening classes. Limited enrollment. Free placement. 

Write for catalog. 

THE WILSON SCHOOL 

285 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 




RAY WEEKS' OIL SERVICE 

FRANK W. HOLBROOK 

RANGE AND FUEL OILS 

General Insurance Notary Public 

Metered Deliveries 

Telephone 107-M 

Corner Franklin & Linfield Streets 

Telephone Rand. 0663 

Holbrook Massachusetts 

Be a regular patron at 

GUY'S BARBER SHOP 

HOBART'S 

FILLING STATION 

A good CLEAN CUT business 

PLYMOUTH STREET 

1 

1 9 Plymouth St. Holbrook, Mass. 

Holbrook Massachusetts 


The 

Avon Cool & Groin Co. 

Brockton Enterprise 

COAL & FUEL OILS 

says 


"MADE IN BROCKTON 

Irrespective of Price, men's and 

ladies' shoes made in Brockton, 

Mass, area are from the hands of 


the worlds' best shoemakers." 

AVON MASSACHUSETTS 

Enjoy 




SIMPSON SPRING 

New 

BEVERAGES 

England's 


Favorite 

TASTE-TESTED FOR THIRST 

For 93 Years 


HOOD'S MILK 

* w w w ^ ^ -r -r 



ENGLISH'S DAIRY 


FARM 

RANDOLPH 

♦ 

THEATRE 

Our milk is fresh from our own 
farms. It is milked, pasteurized, 
and delivered to your home within 

24 hours. 


Fresh Milk is the Best Milk 


DARI-RICH CHOCOLATE 


Tel. Ran. 0896 

Holbrook, Mass. 

WATCHES 

For Boys $7.50 up 

For Girls $9.50 up 

All guaranteed and In smart styles 

AVON 

SOLE COMPANY 

Pen and Pencil Sets 

Priced from $1.00 up 

❖ ❖ ❖ 

We stock Parkers, Watermans, 
Moores and Wahls 

Pearl Beads 

Attractive strings $1.75 up 

Du-Flex Soles and Heels 

GURNEY'S 

Jewelers 

122 Main Street Brockton, Mass. 

Avon 

Massachusetts 


Blue Hills View 

HOLBROOK COAL 

Dairy 

Company | 

! 

PURE MILK 

t 

dealers in | 

From Our Own Tested Herds 

NEW ENGLAND COKE 


BLUE COAL, RANGE AND 


FUEL OILS 1 

Telephone Randolph 0538-W 

j 

424 N. Franklin St. Holbrook 

1 

Prompt Service Tel. Ran. 0232-R j 

♦ 

J. P. Conlon M.D. 

1 

DIEGES & CLUST j 

"If we mode it, it's right" j 

Manufacturers of the j 


SENIOR CLASS RINGS 


73 Tremont St. Boston, Mass. | 


WILDE & MORRISON 

1 I.G.A. Store 

VEGETABLES, GROCERIES 

1 AND MEATS 

1 Telephone Randolph 0712 

SEMENSI COAL COMPANY 
CHARCOAL 

All Sizes of New England Coke 
Range, Furnace and Fuel Oil, 
Roof Coating and Cement 

Coal, Coke, Oil and Grain 

Office Ran. 0627M Res. Ran. 0627J 

Center Street Holbrook, Mass. 

1 HOLBROOK CASH 

MARKET 

I CHOICE MEATS 

1 FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

HOLBROOK TAXI 

RALPH WALLACE, Proprietor 

Telephone Randolph 0522 — 0693 

WILDE'S STORE 

P. 0. Square 

j HARDWARE GRAIN 

I GROCERIES FLOUR 

1 

1 VEGETABLES 

HOLBROOK PHARMACY 

JOHN P. GATANTI, Reg. Ph. 

Telephone Randolph 0693 

j THOMAS J. O'BRIEN 

1 FLORIST 

! 

j Telephone Randolph 0586-R 

j 390 North Franklin St. Holbrook 
j 

DR. L C. WIGGINS 

DENTIST 

5 Boylston Street Cambridge 

Telephone Kirkland 6145 

Holbrook Wednesday and Sunday 

Telephone Randolph 0576 

j E. F. BOLLES 

CHANDLER'S 

j REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 

Grocery Store 

j 289 Union Street Holbrook, Mass. 

Plymouth Street Holbrook, Mass. 






MILAVA LUNCH 

Eva Hamilton and Millie Moffet 

ALL HOME COOKING 

73 Union Street Holbrook 

YOUR 

NEIGHBORHOOD STORE 

Kathryne L. O'Brien 

GROCERIES and MEATS 

Socony Filling Station 

447 Franklin Street Holbrook 

BENNETT McLAUGHLIN 

E. C. POOLE 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

Pure Milk from Our Own 


Dairy 1 

MacPHERSON'S 

L FRANCIS MEGLEY 

BARBER SHOP 

Union Street Holbrook 

NEWSPAPERS & PERIODICALS 

ARNOLD EAGER'S 

EDMUND'S FARM 

A Little Store with a Big Stock 

PURE MILK AND FRESH EGGS 

Cigars, Candy, Cigarettes 

Prompt Dependable Deliveries 

GROCERIES 

W. Division St. Holbrook 

BUNGALOW STORE 

BLIGH HILTZ 

PINE HILL 

Telephone 8896 

AUTO GARAGE 

Brookville Massachusetts 

So. Franklin St. Brookville, Moss. 


NORTHEASTERN 

UNIVERSITY 



College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the 
understanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. 
The. purpose of this program is to give the student a liberal and cultural educa- 
tion and a vocational competence which fits him to enter some specific type of 
useful employment. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles 
of business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING AND FINANCE, 
or BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. Modern methods of instruction, including 
lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, professional talks by 
business executives, and motion pictures of manufacturing processes, are used. 

College of Engineering 

Provides complete college, programs in Engineering with professional courses 
in the fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL {WITH DIESEL, AERONAUTICAL 
and AIR CONDITIONING OPTIONS), ELECTRICAL, CHEMICAL, INDUS- 
TRIAL ENGINEERING, and ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION. General 
engineering courses are pursued during the freshman year; thus the student 
need not make a final decision as to the branch of engineering in which he 
wishes to specialize until the beginning of the sophomore year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperclassmen in all courses, pro- 
vides for a combination of practical industrial experience, with classroom in- 
struction. Under this plan the student is able to earn a portion of his school 
expenses as well as to make business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 

Bachelor of Arts Pre-Legal Programs Available Bachelor of Science 

FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 

Northeastern University 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog of the 
□ College of Liberal Arts D Pre-Legal Program 

O College of Business Administration 
D College of Engineering 

Name 

Address 


H-66