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1940 




HOLBROOK CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

Incorporated 1888 

"Your Home-Town Bank" 

Start Saving Now Through Serial Shares 
COME AND SEE US 

Telephone Randolph 0434 



HOOKER BROS. 


ICE CREAM 
Wholesale and Retail 




Telephone Randolph 0470 

Holbrook Massachusetts 



THE ECHO 


VOL. XVI Sumner High School, Holbrook, Moss., June, 1940 NO. 1 



Class B Yearbook 


''ECHO" STAFF 1939-1940 


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Nancy Cook 

ASSISTANT EDITOR John Pickett 

BUSINESS MANAGER Mason Colby 

ASSISTANT MANAGER Robert Little 

ASSISTANT MANAGER Lorrell Keller 

LITERARY EDITOR Annella Card 

LEAGUE REPRESENTATIVE Richard Walsh 

ATHLETIC EDITOR Charles George 

ATHLETIC EDITOR May Wallace 

CLUB EDITOR Mildred Clark 

ALUMNI EDITOR Henry Megley 

ART EDITOR Sulo Nihtila 

ASSISTANT ART EDITOR Eleanor Baker 

JOKE EDITORS John Haggai, Walter Donovan 

CLASS EDITORS: 

1940 Mary Moran 

1941 Clara Colburn 

1942 Elaine Megley 

1943 Shirley Cook 

TYPISTS Barbara Iveson, Beatrice Iveson, Dorothy Morgan, Doris Morgan 
FACULTY ADVISER Miss Kathryn Megley 


DEDICATION 

We, the staff of nineteen hundred and forty, dedicate this issue of 
the ''Echo'' with deep gratitude to the Graduating Class whose un- 
tiring efforts scholastically, athletically, and socially have endeared 
them to us all. 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 


RICHARD L’HEUREDX ODINCY 
175 Plymouth Street 
“Dick” Sports 

“A mans a man for all that.” 

Rifle Club 1; Glee Club 1; Freshman FroFc; Basketball 1, 2; Pro Merito 3; Gym 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 3, 4; Baseball 3. 4; Office 4; Senior Play; Senior President; 

Letter Award 3, 4. 

BARBARA LOLISE IVESON 
92 Union Street 
“Barb” West Bridgewater 

“Tranquil of spirit, with an easy mind.” 

Gym 2; Pro Merito 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; 
\ ice-President 2, 3, 4; Office 3, 4; News Editor 4; Echo 4; Letter Award 4. 

ELEANOR MARION BAKER 
1062 South Franklin Street 
“Bake” Bike Riding 

“She is gentle, she is shy. 

But there is mischief in her eye.” 

Freshman Secretary; Freshman Frolic: French Club 2: Senior Drama; Echo 4; 
Senior Secretary; Craft Club 4. 

EDITH MARION BROWN 
38 Maplewood Avenue 
“Brownie” Swimming 

“A miss so busy from morn ’til night. 

Not a single duty does she slight.” 

(Tlee Club 1, 2; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Echo 3; French Club 2, 3; Senior Treasurer; 

Pro Merito 3. 



THE ECHO 


3 


.hUlN KlCIIAUl) IlKHAX 

Do IMeasant Street 
“Jay" Sports 

“/ unt the iiia-ster of iiiij 
fate 

I dill the eaptdln of my 
soul,” 

Hockey 1, 2, o, 4: Base- 
ball 2. li, 4 ; Letter Award 
J, 4. 


Donald Fuaxcis Clark 
lb Lin wood Street 
“Cruslier” Hunting 
“.I littie learning is a <lan- 
gcroiis thing.” 

IHfie Club 2 ; French Club 
2, M, 4 ; Hockey 1, 2, 4. 


Mii.drkd Saywakd Clark 
11b Fnion Street 
“Deb" (irowing finger nails 
“A (laughter of the Gods, 
Dirinely tall!” 

Concert 4 ; (flee Club 8, 
4 : Echo 4 ; Senior Drama. 


Naxcy Elizabioth Cook 
8;'. Linfield Street 
“Nan" Aviation 
“Faithful forerer.” 
Sopboniore Drama ; French 
Club 2 : Cym Exhibition 1, 
2 : l*ro M(>rito 8 ; (flee Club 
1, 2. 8; Senior Drama: 

Baskc'tball Manager 4; 
Echo Editor-in-Chief 4 ; 
Letter Award 4. 


lloBLRr Wallace Finlay 
41 Fnion Street 
“Bob" Aviation 
“The .fiery charioteer.” 
(flee ('lub 1 : Student 
Council :! : Baseball 8, 4 ; 
Hockey Manager 8 ; Let- 
ter Award 8, 4. 



Bober'I’ Waits i'eli. Fraxz 
801 Union Street 
“Deacon" MModworking 
“Ao noise, no sound ichen 
Fohert is around.” 


Charles Arthur (Ieorge 
I’lymouth Street 
“Nick" Sleeping 
“Think all you speak 
But speak not xvhat you 
think.” 

(flee Club 1 ; Orchestral : 
Fhotography Club 1 ; Foot- 
ball 1, 2 ; Basketball 8 ; 
Fro Alerito 8 ; Baseball 2. 
8. 4 ; Senior Drama 4 ; 

Echo 4 ; French Club 2, 8, 
4 ; Letter Award 3, 4. 


Lillian Rita CIorton 
0 Johns Avenue 
“l‘eggy" Dancing 

“Alieays contented.” 
Ph-ench Club 2 ; (fym Ex- 
hibition 1, 2 : Dramatic 

Club 8 : Glee Club 1, 2, 8. 
4 ; Aliisic Concert 8, 4. 


Herbert C. Hamilton 
143 South PA-anklin Street 
“llap" Alusic 

“All the world loves a 
lover.” 

Orchestra 1, 2 : Glee Club 
1, 2; Rifle Club 1, 2; Pho- 
tography Club 1, 2. 


Philip L. Hammond 
45 Upland Street 
“Ruck" Baseball 

“Quiet hut of much ahil 
ity.” 

Freshman Frolic : Presi- 
dent of Sophomore Class : 
Sophomore Drama ; PA-ench 
Club 2, 3 : Hockev 1. 2, 8. 
4 : Baseball 1, 2, 8, 4 : 

Letter Award 3, 4. 




4 


THE ECHO 


Bkatrick Lorraine Iveson 
02 T’nion Street 
“Bea” Dancing 
“Better late than never/’ 
Fresh. Frolic : (Bee Club 
1 : Soph. Drama : (ivm Ex- 
hibition 1 : Basketball 1, 
- : Fro ^lerito 2 : Dramatic 
Club 2. 8 : Office 8. 4 ; 

Typing Award 8, 4 ; Echo 
4 ; Senior Drama. 

Hr. II VroTORiA .Ioiin.son 
77 Center Street 
••Riitbie” ;Music 

“Manner, ahiliti/. ami t/aod 
•sra.sc a-in the respect of 
a 1." 

(.■le(‘ (''lull 1 ; Freshman 
Frolic : Soiibomore Treas- 
urer : Sopbomon' Drama: 
(\vm Exhibition : French 
Club 2. 8 ; French (^luh 

Fresident 8 : Student ('oun- 
cil Treasurer 2, 8. 4 : Fro 
Merito 8: Letter Award 
•”> : Student ('ouncil Fresi- 
dent 4: 1). A. IL (Jood Cit- 
izen 4 : Senior Drama. 

Oerai.dine T. Kei.i.ey 
1 (> Sprague venue 
“Cerry” Eating 

"I/ap]j)i I am; from care 
I'm free/’ 

Dramatic (dub 2: (Bee 
(^lul) 2 : Basketball scorer 
8. 4 ; Lunchroom 8, 4. 

Virginia Ceoema Koeitee 
oA Spring Street 
••(Bnny” Ice-Skating 
“(1 00(1 thimjs come in lit- 
tle packages." 

Oym 1. 2; Secretary 2; 

Freshman Frolic: Fro' :Mer- 
ito 8 : Student ('ouncil 2, 
8 : Echo .8. 4 : Frencli 

(Bub 2. .8. 4 : (Bee ('lub 
L 2. 8. 4: Drawing 1. 2. 
•”>. 4 : Senior Drama : Sec- 
retary of Student Coun- 
cil 4. 


Leo Fred Kenan 
AlO Flyniouth Street 
“Lee” Digging (Bams 
" Learninf/ makes a good 
man hetter.” 

Basketliall 2. 3. 



Artiicr F. Levangie 
288 South Frankiin Street 
“Art” Movies 

"Slow, bat sure/’ 
Freshman Flay. 


Kichari) Edward Lyons 
ISO Flyniouth Street 
“Bud" Hunting 

“A joke a (lap keeps sor- 
row a wap.” 

Freshman Frolic : Track 
Team 8. 


Francis .Tames Mack 
80 Snell Street 
“Cud" Sjiorts 
"The inconrenienee or the 
heautp of the blush ; 
irhich is the greater?” 
Orchestra 2 : Football 2, 
8 ; Hocke.v 8. 4 : I’.aseball 
3, 4 : Basketball 1. 2, 8, 4 : 
Letter Award 3, 4. 


Henry .Joseph Miogi.ey 
Norfolk Road 
“McKosky'' Sports 
“He argues, oh, hoio he 
argues.” 

Orchestra 1 : French Club 
2. 8 : Basketball 2. 8, 4 ; 
Baseball 2. 8, 4 : Echo 4 ; 
Fro Merito 3 ; Tennis 1, 2, 
8, 4. 


Helen Atkins Mitchell 
808 South Franklin Street 
“Henna’’ Horses 

“A horse, a horse, mp 
kingdom for a horse.” 
(Bee Club 1 : Fresident 
of Class 1 : Sophomore 
Drama : TB-ench (Tlub 2 ; 
Freshman Frolic. 




THE ECHO 


5 


Mary Jane Morax 
10 Cottage Street 
“Meddy” Sports 

“AHcaus ready to smile.” 
(Jym 1, 2 ; Basketball 1, 2 ; 
Lunchroom 3 ; Student 
Council 4 ; Folio 4. 


Doris Margaret Morgan 
284 South Franklin Street 
“Twin" Dancing 

“7C.S her manner and her 
smile 

That makes knowing her 
worthivhile.” 

Fro Merito 3 ; Concert 3, 
4; Junior Treasurer; Glee 
Club 3, 4 ; Office 4 ; Eeho 
4 ; Letter Award 3, 4 ; 

Senior Drama ; Basketball 
3, 4. 


Dorothy Mazie Morgan 
284 South Franklin Street 
“Chatterbox" Dancing 
‘‘Silence is golden.” 

Pro Merito 3 ; Concert 3, 
4 ; Office 4 ; Eeho 4 : Let- 
ter award 3, 4 ; Basket- 
ball 3, 4 ; Lunchroom. 


Sylyia Katherine Morton 
22 pinion Street 
“Syl" Sports 

“Laugh your girlish laugh- 
ter.” 

Gym Exhibition 2 : Glee 
Club 2, 3. 4 : French Club 
2 ; Drawing 2, 3 ; Con- 

cert 3. 


Ali.en SnirsoN Mgrdock 
45 MapleAvood Avenue 
“Slugger" Aviation 
“Men of few icords are the 
best of men.” 

Glee Club 1 : Orchestra 1 ; 
Sophomore Play ; French 
Club 2. 3; Pro Merito 3; 
Basketball 3, 4 ; Student 
Council 3 ; Baseball 3, 4 ; 
Letter Award 3, 4. 



Howard F r a n c i s N a s o n 
Xorth Franklin Street 
“Jesse" Chemistry 
“I know everything except 
myself.” 

I’hoto Club 1, 4 : Rifle 

Cluli 2 ; French Club 2. 


S r LO Alfred N i h t i la 
174 Weymouth Street 
“Soup” Craft 
“I'm not as bashful as I 
seem.” 

Glee Club 1 ; Student Coun- 
cil 3, 4 : Council Treasurer 
4 : Craft Club 4 ; Senior 
Drama : Echo 4 ; French 
Club 2. 


Helen Genzia Polison 
42 Plymouth Street 
“Polly" Eating 

“Kind helping and true to 
everyone she knetv.” 
Gym 1.2; Concert 4 ; Glee 
Club 1. 2, 3 ; French Club 
2. 3, 4 ; Craft 4 ; Spelling 
Bee 4. 


Willia.m Carlton Poole 
201 Plymouth Street 
“Bill" Sports 

“I came, I sate, I con- 
quered.” 

Photography Club 1 ; Glee 
Club 1. 2 ; Rifle Club 2 ; 
Hockey 3, 4. 


Hoavard Allen Pftt 
200 North Franklin Street 
“Putt" Fishing 

“A little nonsense now and 
then 

Is relished by the wisest 
men.” 

Basketball 4 ; Letter 
AAvard 4. 



6 


THE ECHO 



Hauky E. Robertson 
248 Union Street 
••Hank” Woodworking 
“All men, ar^ tin 

some degree inspired.” 
Gym 3 ; Basketball 2, 


Eleanor Marie Smart 
314 North Franklin Street 
••Sugar” Eating 

••-4 still and quiet girl, in- 
deed. 

But one knows she will 
succeed.” 

Gym 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 


Harry Norman Spieler 
24 South Street 
“Boo” Women 

‘AVhatever is worth doing 
at all is worth doing 
well.” 

Football 2; Rifle Club 2; 
Tennis 3 ; Baseball 3. 4 ; 
Hockey 3, 4 ; Gym 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; Letter Award 3, 4. 


CoRiNNE Maria Terrazano 
101 Spring Street 
‘•Mimi” Riding 

“To sec her is to love her.” 
Freshman Frolic ; Gym 
Exhibition 1, 2 ; Music 

Concert 1. 3: Echo 2. 3; 
French Club 2, 3, 4 : Glee 
Club 1. 2, 3: l*ro Merito 
3 ; Letter Award 3 : French 
I’lay 2, 3 ; Craft 4. 


Bri'Ce Smith 
Weston Avenue 
••Speed” Sports 

“Laugh and grow stout.” 
Rifle Club 2 ; Sophomore 
Flay : Hockey 3, 4 : Base- 
ball Manager 3, 4 ; Letter 
Awards 3, 4. 


John Gilbert Towns 
108 Plymouth Street 
‘•Johnny" Photography 
“Fortune is merry.” 
French Club 2 ; Rifle Club 
2 : Sophomore Play ; Pho- 
tograph Club 1, 3, 4; Sen- 
ior IMay ; Craft Club 4. 


Marie Skilling Smith 
l.‘>4 South Franklin Street 
••Skilly” Dancing 

“The youth of friendship 
is good.” 

Gym 1. 2: Dramatic Club 
3. 4 ; Echo 3 : Pro Merito 
3; Rifle Club: Glee Club 
1. 2. 3. 4 : Basketball 1, 2, 
3. 4. 


Thomas Richard Walls 
515 South Franklin Street 
“Tommy” Hunting 
“Faint heart never won 
fair lady.” 

Gym 1. 


“Still he mused and 
dreamed of fame.” 

Track ; Gym 4. 


Robert Philib Wheeler 
118 Pine Street 
••Bob” Hockey 



THE ECHO 


7 


Graduation 

Program 


HONORS FOR 

FOUR YEARS 


College Course 

Commercial Course 


1. Ruth Johnson 

1. Barbara Iveson 


2. Edith Brown 

2. Marie Smith 


Senior Honor Roll 


Nancy Cook 4 

Henry Megley 

1 

Charles George 4 

Mary Moran 

1 

Barbara Iveson 3 

Doris Morgan 

4 

Beatrice Iveson 1 

Dorothy Morgan 

2 

Ruth Johnson 4 

Allen Murdock 

4 

Geraldine Kelley 1 

Sulo Nihtila 

1 

Virginia Koeppel 2 

Richard Quincy 

1 

Leo Kunan 1 

Marie Smith 

2 

Figures indicate number of 

terms on 1939-1940 roll. 


Class Flower — Talisman Rose Class Motto — “After the Battle, the Reward” 

Class Colors — Blue and Gold 



Activities 

Saturday, June 8, Boat Trip 
Tuesday, June 11, Class Day 
Wednesday, June 12, Reception 
Friday, June 21, Graduation 


8 


THE ECHO 


CLASS DAY WELCOME 

By Richard Quincy 

Parents, members of the faculty, and friends, on behalf of the graduating 
class of 1940 it gives me the greatest pleasure to welcome you to our Class Dav. 

It is with just pride that we can look back at our four years of toil and 
fun, but all this has been obtained only from your faithful assistance in stand- 
ing by us, until now that we have risen to be one of the most likeable classes 
to graduate, indeed, leaving a gap too large to be filled by our understudies. 
We ask them only to follow in our foot-steps and to follow our model as their 
guide. 

May everyone look back to this, our Class Day, with enjoyable memories. 


CLASS HISTORY 

By Eleanor Baker 

In the history book of Sumner High September 3, 1936, will be a never-to- 
be-forgotten date. Why? Because fifty-three little sprouts joined the garden 
as freshmen. Of course we had the ambition to blossom out as seniors, and 
in spite of all the snubbing we received from the upper classes, we finally 
did. As we had a large class, we were in three rooms with Mr. Hodge, Miss 
Knutson, and Mr. Naverouskis as home-room teachers. As we were an “up 
and coming” class, nearly all of us took part in some school activity or other. 
One of the greatest events of the freshman year was the Freshman Frolic. 
Mr. Hodge, Miss Knutson, and Mr. Naverouskis helped us plan a very de- 
li<ditful evening. The greatest event, however, was our first class meeting. 
W ith much excitement and anticipation we gathered in Mr. Naverouskis’ 
room and proceeded to elect our class officers. Helen Mitchell was chosen 
president; Marie Smith, vice-president; Eleanor Baker, secretary; and Wil- 
liam Saville, treasurer. The rest of the year passed uneventfully, and we 
left, hoping that by September we would sprout again, this time with some 
leaves on us. 

Two months passed. Our Sophomore year began. This time only 
forty-nine sprouts came out, but as we had hoped for, with leaves. W^e lost 
several of our members: Joseph Cote, Robert DeW olfe, Henry Ferbert, Eve- 
lyn and Elaine Gardikis, Ralph Storey, and W illiam Saville. Bill left to go 
to New Mexico. W^e gained a few new members though: Bruce Smith, Harry 
Robertson, Sylvia Morton, and Geraldine Kelly. At our first class meeting 
Philip Hammond was elected president; Barbara Iveson, vice-president; Vir- 
ginia Koeppel, secretary; and Ruth Johnson, treasurer. We also chose the 
Talisman rose as the class flower, blue and gold as the class colors, and “After 
the Battle, the Reward” as the class motto. On March 25 our Sophomore 
Drama, “Hello Trouble,” coached by Miss Bartlett, was presented publicly. 
Others who entertained were Robert Nason and Pauline Raynor with their ac- 
cordions, Helen Mitchell with a tap dance, Herbert Hamilton twirling a lighted 
torch, and a farce “The Chink and the Coon” by W illiam Bourne and Charles 
W illiams. Virginia Hanney closed the program with a difficult and graceful 


THE ECHO 


9 


acrobatic dance. The remainder of the year passed with little more excite- 
ment. 

September 1938 rolled around. This year the forty-nine leaves had buds. 
Although we lost during the year Dorothy Beere, who moved to Braintree; 
Thelma Bill, to Brockton; Rose Sacco, William Seaverns, William Sprague, 
and Robert Wheeler, we gained Richard Wilhelm from the South, Dorothy 
and Doris Morgan from Randolph, Paul and Mildred Clark from Quincy, 
Sumner Eddy from Easton, and Virginia McLaughlin to make the count still 
forty-nine. Dick left during the year to return to the South, and Paul left 
to go to work. The junior year was a very important one. At our first class 
meeting we elected Sumner Eddy, president; Barbara Iveson, vice-president; 
Dorothy Morgan, secretary; and Doris Morgan, treasurer. During the year 
we elected Ruth Johnson, Allen Murdock, and Sulo Nihtila to represent us 
on the Student Council. Our class also had the distinction of leading all the 
classes in the magazine drive. A very important class meeting was held on 
January 25, as we discussed our class rings. We really felt quite proud and 
grown-up to have real class rings of our own. The big event of our junior 
year came on May 5, the night of our Prom. The outstanding event was the 
Grand March led by our officers. The Prom was a grand success, and an 
event long to be remembered by us. Finally June came, and we left realiz- 
ing that at last we would blossom out as Seniors. 

Blossom we did but with only forty-three in our class. We lost during 
the year Alma Anderson, Irene DeCosta, Frank Vascovitch, Virginia McLaugh- 
lin, and Sumner Eddy. Robert Wheeler came back to finish with us. Our 
first class meeting was held on October 10. The class officers had been elected 
previously on October 6, with Richard Quincy, president; Barbara Iveson, 
vice-president; Eleanor Baker, secretary; and Edith Brown, treasurer. At 
our class meeting we decided to have a class photographer; the choice was 
Vantine from Boston. Their photographer came out to the school to take our 
pictures. The first event of the senior year was the Senior Dance, on Octo- 
ber 26. The Grand March was led by the officers, and everyone had a won- 
derful time. Then came our Senior Drama, “Little Women.” This was a 
great success financially as well as dramatically. Extra chairs had to be 
brought in to seat everyone, and some did have to stand. A great amount of 
cred't is due Miss Kathryn Megley for her fine coaching. The four “Little 
Women” were played by Nancy Cook as Jo; Mildred Clark as Meg; Eleanor 
Baker as Beth; and Beatrice Iveson as Amy. John Towns played the part 
of Laurie Lawrence, Charles George as John Brooke, Ruth Johnson as Han- 
nah, Doris Morgan as Mrs. March, and Richard Quincy as Mr. March. Sulo 
Nihtila played the part of Professor Bhaer. All acted fully as cleverly as 
professionals. At the end of the third act Richard Quincy presented Miss Meg- 
ley with a large bouquet in behalf of the cast. Ruth Johnson was elected 
as the good citizen to represent the class at the D. A. R. convention in Bos- 
ton. At last came the end of the year and our final activities. A boat trip 
to Provincetown on June 8, Class Day June 11, a Graduation Service for 
the Senior Class at the Brookville Baptist Church June 16, Reception June 12, 
and Graduation June 21. Now we have gone from little seedlings to great 
blossoms, and take with us the happiest memories of our lives of our four 
years in Sumner High School. 


10 


THE ECHO 


CLASS OF 1940 STATISTICS 

By Nancy Cook 


It gives me great pleasure at this time to submit the statistics of the illus- 
trious class of 1940. It was a great fight, but we all won. 

To start off on the rio;ht foot, the best looking students of our class are 
Helen Mitchell and Leo Kunan. Leo also won top honors as being the best 
dressed boy and the class Romeo. He tied for first place with Richard Quincy 
for the most popular boy, but Richard was voted the most athletic boy and 
the class Hercules. 

Away from the serious to the more silly. Henry Megley and Bruce 
Smith were voted the most comical and the biggest eaters. Henry was also 
voted the class clown, the best politician, the biggest fusser, and the biggest 
bluffer. Bruce came out as the noisiest and the heaviest. Bruce and Beatrice 
Tveson tied as the class gum-chewers; Henry and Howard Nason tied as the 
most daring; Howard and John Behan tied as the most forgetful. Beatrice took 
honors as the best dressed girl, the most popular girl, the class flirt, and the 
class giggler. 

Howard Nason was voted the sleepiest, the laziest, and the class sci- 
entist. Allen Murdock came out on top with the most likely to succeed, the 
most studious boy, and the most conscientious. Ruth Johnson was chosen 
most studious girl, teacher’s pet, and the most ambitious. Ruth tied with 
Mildred Clark as the most sophisticated. Mildred was voted the best singer, 
and the most charming. Nancy Cook was elected the best actress, the most 
versatile, and the best girl dancer. 

Others to attain honors were: 


Cutest Girl 

Quietest 

Class Wit and Best Actor 
Most athletic and tallest 

Worst Penman 

Shortest Girl 

Shortest Boy 

Tallest Boy , 

Thinest 

Class night-owl and fastest driver 

Most talented and most musical 

Most agreeable and most artistic girl 

Most artistic boy 

Class idealist and most original 

Meekest 

Class jitterbug and best boy dancer 
Biggest procrastinators 


Corinne Terrazano 

Eleanor Smart 

John Towns 
Morgan Twins 
Charles George 
Virginia Koeppel 
Richard Lyons 
Harry Robertson 
Mary Moran 
Harry Spieler 
Herbert Hamilton 
Eleanor Baker 
Sulo Nihtila 
Robert Finlay 
Robert Franz 
William Poole 
Senior Class 


For evident proof that we are a great class we have animals in our midst 
such as Lyons. Men of trade have been known to be present in the names 
of Smith, Baker, and Cook. Great cities and even countries are represented 


THE ECHO 


11 


by Quincy and Franz. For color we have a Brown, For bits of scenery we 
have Poole. For the ability of the class as a whole we have Smart. 

We have uncovered the family tree of Mildred Clark, and we find that she 
is a descendant of Siward of whom Shakespeare speaks in his great plav 
“Macbeth.” 

Thus ends the statistics of another of the graduating classes of Sumner 
High School. 


THE CLASS PROPHECY 

By Doris Morgan 

In 1950 a palmist told the story of the class of 1940 — 

The biggest line in anyone’s hand is called the line of life. You’ve all 
walked far along that line, and now it’s time to look around at your neighbors. 

Branching from this center line is one that’s called success. Neighbor 
Quincy has found this groove with plans produced for aeroplanes. The line 
of fortune was won by Johnny Towns whose snap-shots enlarged until they 
became favorite moving pictures. However, he has changed his technique. 
Now the people are allowed to pose for their pictures. 

Across the hand from finger to wrist there is the fine line of travel which 
represents the traveling salesman’s route of Harry Spieler, the speed demon. 

Just below the little finger several lines form a small cluster. Here we 
see the famous Kunan nurseries with fences built around the edge, to keep out 
the prize cows of Bruce Smith. 

In the middle of each finger is a line which stands for Ruth Johnson, the 
sewing teacher; Eleanor Baker, the art teacher; Helen Mitchell, the riding in- 
structress, and Howard Putt, the big fierce lion trainer. 

Eleanor Smart’s story shows a heart in this large palm, for she has married 
a business executive. However, that heart could stand for Beatrice Iveson, too, 
for she has found her man and now teaches Junior how to giggle. 

A large circle marks Barbara Iveson’s work, for she is a star reporter 
and has just written an article entitled, “\\ hat Harry Robertson Has Done 
at the Head of the Holbrook Water Department.” 

From a star shown at the finger tip of the imaginary hand there was the 
fate of Howard Nason who plays the best tennis game in all the L. S. A. 
He shares his place as star with Philip Hammond, who made all America sit 
up and take notice when he pitched that no-hit, no-run baseball game in the 
world series last year. 

A small square represented Henry Megley’s soap-box stand. As expected, 
Henry became an orator and now is a full-fledged politician. Henry’s right- 
band man is Sulo Nihtila who wins Henry’s elections by drawing cartoons 
for the daily news. 

Donald Clark and Arthur Levangie stood for the bachelors’ marks, and 
my! the girls they used to have! 

Our palmist showed that Lillian Gorton has become the owner of a beauty 
shop; Helen Polisson, the owner of a grocery store; Mary Moran, a learned 


12 


THE ECHO 


buyer at the Richard Lyons’ Lingerie Shop, and, believe it or not, Robert Franz 
owns the “Franz, Fill ’Em L p Quick, Gas Station.” To help him gain his 
speed John Behan lends a hand. 

With hats off we saw Charles George’s fortune. He became, from study 
and work, a prominent physician. Allen Murdock and Robert Finlay have 
dreams fulfilled by the air-line which they own. 

In one part of our hand there is an indication of William Poole. Bill 
is now the famous, jitter-bug, farmer, “who trucks to work each morn.” 

Marie Smith was shown as a first-class secretary, and Gerry Kelley has 
found interesting work in a modern milk company. She still follows the man 
with the white bottle. 

A small cross at the base of the thumb, our palmist told me, was our 
musical members. Herbert Hamilton renowned band leader still plays Irish 
tunes for his petite sweetheart. Corinne Terrazano is another success in music. 
Her voice led her to the New York Stage. 

The most surprising event is that Francis Mack now entertains our radio 
friends with yodeling selections. 

Sylvia Morton is settled in a little white house with problems arising 
when Junior insists on being late for supper. 

It was proved that two of our girls are happily situated. Mildred Clark 
has her name in bright lights when her performances are shown on the Ameri- 
can stage, and Virginia Koeppel has won the Academy Award for her acting 
ability on the American screen. 

By little lines around the wrist we saw that Thomas Walls is a man in- 
teresting to all American women. He is the second Robert Taylor of Holly- 
wood. Small lines from this one showed that Robert Wheeler has become 
a very good public accountant. Figures seemed to fascinate him. 

Nancy Cook and Dorothy Morgan have done social service work, and 
although fame from the outside world has not been experienced, the work 
accomplished by them is incomparable. Edith Brown, too, has given untold 
services in her career as a nurse. 

Yes, we’ve had all walks of life represented by our class, and anyone can 
speak of I940’s class with pride. 

CLASS WILL 

By Beatrice Iveson 

We, the members of the Senior Class of 1940, of Sumner High School, Town 
of Holbrook, County of Norfolk, State of Massachusetts, United States of 
America, being uncertain as to the frail life that we are living, do, therefore, 
make, ordain, publish, and declare this to be our last will and testament. 

Item 1. To all the teachers. Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, and the 
Janitors, we leave fond memories of the most brilliant and illustrious class 
to ever be graduated. 

Item 2. The Senior Class leaves to all other classes their dignified air 
and sophistication, so that by the time they are Seniors, they will not be silly, 
but dignified instead. 


THE ECHO 


13 


Item 3. We, the Seniors, leave to the janitors a germ killing disease to 
spray all rooms so the rest of the classes won’t catch our disease of brilliancy. 

Item 4. To the Juniors we leave our books in which are many notes and 
answers. 

It-^m 5. We, the Class of 1940, leave to the incoming Senior Class Miss 
Megley’s room, to love and to cherish as we did. 

Item 6. The Senior office force leave to the Juniors the ability and capa- 
bility of taking care of the office. We hope they will be as efficient as we were. 

Item 7. To the Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors, we leave the privi- 
lege of receiving the “Honor Room Banner.” 

Item 8. To the Incoming Seniors we leave the back row for all assem- 
blies. It’s not what is taking place, but to sit in the seats which our class 
once sat in! 

Item 9. The Seniors leave to the Juniors, the watching of the clocks 
from 8:07 to 1:48, and hope they will take as good care of them as we did. 

Item 10. The lunchroom girls leave their ability of making “Tuna Fish” 
Sandwiches to Charlotte Bagley, Clara Colburn, and Alice McLaughlin. 

Item 11. To Leonard Hooker, Harry Spieler leaves his instructions of 
careful driving. Harry is such a careful driver! 

Item 12. Ruth Johnson leaves to Dorothy Kierstead the supervision of 
the Student Council. 

Item 13. To Mr. Hodge, we bequeath memories of the Physics classes and 
their adventurous journeys to parts unknown. 

Item 14. To some Junior who is willing and able, we give Henry Meg- 
ley’s ability to argue. 

Item 15. Nancy Cook leaves her ability as an actress to Annella Card. 

Item 16. Billy Poole leaves his prize waltzes to “Jimmie” Jones. 

Item 17. Eleanor Baker leaves her job as seamstress for Mr. Neal to 
Muriel Quincy. 

Item 18. Charles George leaves his penmanship to Walter Wallace and 
we hope that by the time he graduates, his writing will be readable. 

Item 19. Bruce Smith leaves to Dickie Walsh the management of the 
baseball teams. 

Item 20. We bequeath to Donald Hanney, Richard Quincy’s form as 
the “Man on the Flying Trapeze.” 

Item 21. Robert Finlay leaves his aeronautic knowledge to John Thayer 
of the Freshman Class, hoping that John, too, will know the serial numlDer 
of every plane that goes over when he’s a Senior like Robert. 

We attest this to be a true copy of the last will and final testament of the 
Senior Class of 1940, Sumner High School, Holbrook, Massachusetts, this 
12th day of June in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred 
and Forty. 

{Signed) The Class of 1940. 

Witnesses: 

Presidents of Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior Classes. 


14 


THE ECHO 


Class Gifts 


To Eleanor a pencil blue, 

And we hope ’twill play a part 
In helping her to reach her goal 
Along the road of art. 

A spark plug for John Behan’s car, 
We’re sure it needs no more. 

Now he can ride out very far 
’Cause the motor hits on all four. 

Brownie’ll be a nurse we’re sure. 

And temperatures she’ll take. 

So here’s a thermometer clean and pure. 
Use it, for goodness sake. 

“Crusher” gets this sparring mate 
For a boxer he will be. 

And right on top he’s going to rate; 

In the winter he will ski. 

To “Mille” we give this book of plays, 
W^e know she’ll use it in future days. 

To Sumner High she’ll bring great fame, 
By having lights spell out her name. 

To Nancy Cook this printer’s ink, 

And if she will not shirk, 

She’ll go to great extents, we think. 

In literary work. 

What else could Finlay possibly get? 
And when he’s soaring through the sky. 
Let’s hope he will never, never forget 
The wonderful days that are gone by. 

W'e give to Franz a tiny bow 
To keep his hair in place. 

For when he’s standing up in class. 
We’d like to see his face. 

“Charlie” George is a baseball star; 

A super-batter is he. 

So here’s a bat to hit the pill far. 

As far as the eye can see. 

Lillian has a pretty face. 

Her features are oiiite dollish. 

To her we give this powder base 
So her nose won’t polish. 

To Herby here’s a book on notes 
To keep his mind at home 
Because without the lines and bars. 

His thoughts are apt to roam. 

To Phil we give this little ball. 

And when he’s pitching for the Sox, 

W'e hope he won’t forget us all. 

So carry it always in your box. 


To the Iveson twins a notebook each 
Though in other ways they vary 
We know that each is sure to win 
As a private secretary. 

Ruthie gets this picture frame, 

W ho’ll go in we will not name. 

But he brings her to school each 
morning bright. 

Except the days they’ve had a fight. 

To Gerry here’s a cook book 
So always she will know' 

The greatest w'ay to cook a meal 
Wdiere ever she may go. 

To Ginny w'e give this mirror 
To help her to portray 
More characters like Aunty March 
Upon the stage someday. 

To Leo Kunan roses. 

And not because he’s sweet. 

But just because he does excel 
In growing flowers neat. 

A.rthur is a paper boy; 

His papers won’t stay in his bag. 

W^e hope these elastics bring him joy. 
Don’t worry Art; it’s only a gag. 

To Buddy here’s a piece of tape 
Just stick it on your feet. 

For when you’re racing ’round the track. 
We hear you’re hard to beat. 

To Francis Mack this little fan 
To hide his girlish blushes. 

You wouldn’t think that one so shy 
W^ould have such sudden crushes. 

To Henry Megley this book on law. 

We hope he will excel 
In arguments he gives in court — 

The thing he does so well. 

To Helen here’s a Date Book 
To keep the boys in line, 

And she will take but one quick look 
To find where next she’ll dine. 

To Mary Moran here’s a piece of string 
To tie around her finger 
So when to Sumner fame she’d bring 
We hope “40” she’ll e’er remember. 

To the Morgan Twins a lotion 
To use upon their feet. 

For every time the music starts. 

Their feet swing to the beat. 


THE ECHO 


15 


Sylvia gets this dime store watch, 

So that she may be on time. 

For if she’s not, the broth will scotch. 

And “hubby” will call it a crime, 

Murdock gets this picture book. 

He may glance at it when he has a fancy. 
Because if he takes a very good look, 

He’ll find the pictures are all of Nancy. 

To Nason we give this little clock. 

We hope that when he has a job. 

He’ll be on time to sell the stock. 

But don’t, we warn, let it wake up Bob. 

To Sulo we give this little hat 
To cover up his hair, 

For it is so superior 
It really isn’t fair, 

“Bill” is surely a wonderful jitterbug. 

He “stomps” and “pecks” just right. 

If he wants to keep on “cutting the rug,” 
He needs Wheaties to restore the ol’ fight. 

Helen will soon be running the store. 

And barrels of money she’ll make. 

To straighten up her daily score, 

Here’s a bank that she can take. 

Howard gets this difficult puzzle. 

He has so very much time to spare. 

We hope it keeps him all in a fuzzle. 
Keeps him so busy he’ll tear out his hair. 

This bright blue address book we give to 
“Dick,” 

He knows so many a girl. 

To remember them all would be a trick. 
They keep him all in a swirl. 

To Harry this book of jokes. 

He rea’ly is supreme. 


And when he’s on the radio. 

We know he’ll make folks scream. 

Eleanor’s one of the “Three Smart Girls,” 
And a hairdresser she will be. 

So here is a curler to make the curls. 
Permanents are had for a nominal fee. 

To Bruce we give this candy bar 
To add another yard. 

For if he should get thin and sleek, 

We’d lose our finest guard. 

Marie will use this gift we think, 

To write small notes with pen and ink. 

It’s just a habit now you see. 

Though someday she a writer may be. 

To Spieler we give this special brake 
To use upon his car. 

For when he’s driving out at night. 

He goes too fast and far. 

For Corinne Terrazano, our singing star. 

We give this music sheet. 

If she will study faithfully. 

She will be hard to beat. 

To Johnny we give this flashlight bulb. 

For we think he’s so good 
That with a little practice. 

He’ll land in Hollywood, 

We’re sure that “Tom” has a girl somewhere. 
But where we do not know. 

So here’s a dime for your carfare. 

Please tell us where you go. 

“Bob” likes to take motors apart. 

And so a mechanic he’ll be. 

Here’s a motor to give you a start. 

When it’s fired, we’ll give you the key. 


Heard in Classes 

A coach was giving some final instructions to his team before the biggest 
game of the season. Suddenly spying a sub on the bench who had not seen 
action all season he said, “What would you do if we were on their ten-yard 
line, and they intercepted our pass?” 

The sub paused for a second and finally said, “In that case. I’d probably 
move farther up the bench to see better.” 

The high tide in the ocean is caused when a certain person from Brook- 
ville goes swimming! 

* « * « * 

If a horse fell into my bathtub. I’d pull the plug out. 


16 


THE ECHO 



SENIOR DRAMA 

First ro'w: R. Johnson, E. Baker, M. Clark, D. Morgan, B. Iveson, V. Koeppel. 
Second row: R. Quincy, S. Nihtila, Miss Kathryn Megley, Coach, C, George, 
J. Towns. 


SENIOR DRAMA 

"LITTLE WOMEN" 

This year “Little \^"omen” was selected as the Senior Class Play, and it proved 
a very wise selection. Nancy Cook, as Jo, did justice to her part, playing it 
very true to the character. Meg, Beth, and Amy played by Mildred Clark, 
Eleanor Baker, and Beatrice Iveson respectively were portrayed charmingly. 
Doris Morgan made a delightful mother, Mrs. March; and Hannah, the maid, 
was played ably by Ruth Johnson. An excellent piece of acting was given 
by Virginia Koeppel when she was the crochety Aunt March. John Towns 
was the perfect selection for Laurie, and no one could have been better than 
Sulo Nihtila for Prof. Bhaer. John Brooke, played by Charles George, and 
Rev. Mr. March played by Richard Quincy were beautifully acted. The hall 
was filled to capacity, and I’m sure we can say the play from all points of 
view was one of the biggest successes in years. 

« * * * * 


When we are going to build a house using chemicals. I’m going to build 
an igloo: frozen H-2 0. 

The Ocean said nothing to the Sky. It just waved. 


THE ECHO 


17 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Front row: E. Grover, H, Moran, A. Card, J. Williams, E. MacPherson, E. 
Joughlin, S. McKay, J. Haggai, R. Little, M. Hogan, G. Hagerty, P. Albonetty, 
L. Proverb, M. Smart, A. McLaughlin, L. Smith. 

Back row: W. Lawrence, W. Palowski, D. McKay, P. Jones, M. Wallace, B. 
Potts, M. Mack, S, Howard, D. Kierstead, A. Robertson, C. Colburn, H. Law- 
rence, C. Bagley, R. Walsh, L. Hooker, J. Mahoney, M. Colby. 


President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 


JUNIOR CLASS 

John Haggai 
Robert Little 
Madeline Hogan 
Stewart McKay 


The Student Council Representatives are Mason Colby, Annella Card and 
Dorothy Kierstead. 

When school opened in September, we found that we had lost one stu- 
dent, Mary Emmet, who was married during the summer vacation, and after a 
month of school we lost Dorothy Chaplic but gained Thomas O’Connor who 
had left us in his Freshman year to go to Prince Edward’s Island. We now 
have thirty-six bright students in our class. 

Our rings, the designs of which are plain gold, black onyx with a gold 
crest, blue spinel with the gold crest, and others ruby with the gold crest, ar- 
rived in March, and all were much pleased with them. The numeral, 1941, is 
engraved on each side of the ring, and the crest is especially beautiful with 
a large “S” in the center with “Sumner” engraved below it. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

First roiv: E. Leonard, D. Hanney, E. Seileger, B. Woodman, A. Smith, C. Ig- 
natowitz, S. Cook, M. Quincy, J. Hollis, N. Blook, L, Gill, R. Croft. 
Second row: 1. Cote, 1. Pierson, W. Cote, H. Barton, J. Pickett, J. Fitzpatrick, 
B. Caspersen, G. Carter, W. Gelzer, D. Keating, R. Andrew, M. Schutt. 
Back row: S. Czapla, 1. Marble, E. Megley, D. Esterbrooks, K. Chandler. 



SOPHOMORE DRAMA 

Front row: S. Czapla, C. Mossesso, E. Megley, P. Wilson. 

Second row: C. Ignatowitz, C. Mann, W. Donovan, Miss Marcia Bartlett, coach. 



THE ECHO 


19 


SOPHOMORE CLASS 


President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 


Chester Ignatowitz 

Shirley Cook 

Catherine Mosesso 
Anna Smith 


This year there are thirty-nine members in the Sophomore Class. Eight mem- 
bers have been on the 1939-1940 Honor Roll. 

This year Allan Jones, Gertrude Higgins and Virginia Brindley left us, 
but Louis Gill from Somerville has entered our class. 

The class representative to the Student Council is Muriel Quincy. 

Those that belong to the Echo Staff are Walter Donovan, Shirley Cook, 
Lorrell Keller, and Elaine Megley. 

Charles Mann, Walter Donovan, and Edwin Paul belong to the boys’ bas- 
ketball team, and Irene Marble belongs to the girls’ basketball team. 

The Girls’ Glee Club members from our class are Ruth Andrews, Kath- 
erine Chandler, Shirley Cook, Arlene Cote, Stacia Czapla, Doris Estabrook, 
Beverly Higgins, Lorrell Keller, Elaine Megley, Catherine Mosesso, Isabelle 
Pierson, Hilda Terrazano, Phyllis Wilson, Irene Marble, and Marjorie Schutt. 

The members of the French Club are Shirley Cook, Phyllis Wilson, Mar- 
jorie Schutt, Muriel Quincy, Loirell Keller, Elaine Megley, and Richard Croft. 


SOPHOMORE DRAMA 

The Sophomore Drama entitled “Aunt Hetty” was presented on March 1 in 
the school hall. The entire cast played their parts in an excellent manner. 

The play centers about Sally, a young girl, who planned to have a house 
party at Parker Lodge. After many of the guests had arrived the phone rang 
announcing the coming of cranky, old “Aunt Hetty” for a week’s visit. Every- 
body just knew that the party would be a flop because “Aunt Hetty” was such 
a kill-joy. Soon after Sally received a message calling her to town to stay 
over night. This left Sally’s brother Ted and the gang to entertain “Aunt 
Hetty.” Toots, played by Isabelle Pierson, tried her best to please the old 
Aunt. Later on Ted was called over to a neighbor’s house. The gang de- 
cided they couldn’t have “Aunt Hetty” there for the party so by dressing up 
as a gypsy and a maid, Dorothy and Irene hoped they might scare “Aunt 
Hetty.” Not until a ghost appeared did “Aunt Hetty” really become fright- 
ened. Light Fingered Louie, a mysterious character, added to the excitement. 
“Aunt Hetty” turned out to be Sally in disguise, and Light Fingered Louie, Ted. 


20 


THE ECHO 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

First row: I. Benvie, M. Lyons, E. Grover. E. Grover. J. Boles, A. Mann, L. 
Tilton, P. Donovan. W. Hollis, E. Kennedy, E. Card, G. Hnlbert, E. Eaton, 
A. Schntt, E. Finnegan, A. Bestoso, E. Putt, H. Macintosh, 

L. Yeager, G. Robertson. 

Second row: L. O’Connor, P. Mitchell, C. Emmett, R. Richardson, H. DeMars, 
P. Colby, G. Johnson, R. \ incent, W. Meins, W. Wallace, W. Bagley, E. Hooker, 
W . Vi illiamson, M . Howland, H. Packard, R. Lutz, G. Neal, R. Purchase, 
V. Hogan. 

Bock row: B. Gagnon, D. Porter, M. Walsh, G. Currier, M. Creighton, R. Jen- 
nings, F. Moran, C. Williams, C. Schutt, J. Thayer, B. Simmons, M. Eaton, 
A. Smart, R. Weatherhy, H. Mackie, R. Cann, G. Mahoney, T. Haggai, W. Mal- 
colm, F. Tevlin, R. Chandler, F. McGaughey, H. Davis, W. Miles. 


FRESHMAN CLASS 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 


Windsor Hollis 
Eleanor Kennedy 
Elizabeth Card 
Patrw^a Donovan 


The large Freshman Class was divided into three groups in:tead of the usual 
two. Brookville had seventeen entrants, while Holbrook had fifty-six. Air. 
Hodge and Air. Naverouskis became the homeroom teachers of the Commercial 
group. Aliss Knutson’s room became the college group homeroom. 

In October Walter Howland entered, and Claire Alurphy, because of 
illness, left. 

The Clubs that Freshman pupils have entered are as follows: Glee Club, 22; 
Orchestra, 5; and Girls’ Basketball Team, 5. 



THE ECHO 


21 


HONOR ROLL 


Juniors 


A. Card 4 

M. Colby 4 

J. Haggai 4 

M. Hogan 4 

S. Howard 4 


P. Jones 1 

D. Kierstead 4 
M. Mack 2 
S. McKay 2 
W. Pawlowski 4 


B. Potts 4 


S. Czapla 1 

D. Estabrook 1 

C. Mann 1 


Sophomores 


A. Smith 2 


E. Megley 4 
I. Pierson 4 
M. Quincy 2 


E. Card 4 
R. Chandler 1 
L. Coulter 1 
H. Davis 2 
B. Gagnon 3 
V. Hogan 3 
W. Hollis 4 
G. Hulbert 3 
E. Kennedy 1 
R. Lutz 1 


Freshmen 

H. Mackie 4 
A. Mann 2 
H. McIntosh 3 
P. Mitchell 1 

F. Moran 2 
B. Simmons 4 
J. Thayer 2 
L. Tilton 1 
R. Vincent 1 
R. Weatherby 1 
M. Yeager 1 


SUMNER 

S is for success, the name for which Sumner stands — 

U is for the usefulness of teacher’s helping hand. 

M is for the memories on us it has impressed — 

N is for the nature of the pupils’ earned success. 

E is for efficiency — we never shall forget — 

R is for the rareness of disgrace, misuse, neglect. 

In all it spells “Sumner” — to us so plain and clear — 

The school we shall remember through the future coming year. 

Virginia Koeppel 


22 


THE ECHO 


ALUMNI NEWS 

Class of 39 

Barbara Barton is attending Brockton Business College. 

Barbara Boardinan is working in Parker’s Employment Bureau in Boston. 
Mary Eldridge is attending night school in Brockton. 

Bernadine Ford is attending Brockton Business College. 

Jean Gagnon is attending Simmons College — Librarian Course. 

John Hagerty is a cadet in the V. S. Merchant Marine. 

Francis Keating is working at the Blue Hill Dairy Farm. 

Ruth Leonard is working at Kresge’s. 

Richard MacKinnon is attending Boston Lhiiversity. 

Madelyn Moran is working at the Waverley School. 

Nellie Morton is working for hitman Cleansers. 

Robert Nason is attending Boston Lhiiversity. 

Zoe Polisson is attending Brockton Business College. 

Pauline Rayner is attending school for business machines. 

Anne Simenovich is working in Stoughton. 

Mary Sorocco is working in Boston. 

Muriel \^dlson is attending the Conservatory of Music. 

Barbara Scott is doing office work in Boston. 


ALUMNI CARD PARTY 

This year the Alumni held a successful bridge and whist party for the schol- 
arship award for the class of 1940. The president this year is Ernest Wig- 
gins. Let’s hope that this organization will continue to bo a success. 


SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

At the 1939 Graduation exercises the following awards were given: 
Friendship scholarship to John Gard who is attending Dartmouth Gollege. 
Alumni scholarship to Anne McGaughey who is attending Sargent’s School for 
Physical Gulture. 

Class of 1935 to Douglas Egles who is at Northeastern University. 

W ashington-Franklin medal to Douglas Egles. 

D. A. R. Good Citizen medal to Jean Gagnon. 

Typewriting pins to Agnes Higgins, Pauline Rayner, Barbara Scott, and 
Nellie Morton. 

Pro Merito pins to Robert Nason, Barbara Boardman, Barbara Barton, Ber- 
nadine Ford, and Ruth Cossaboom. 


THE ECHO 


23 



GIRLS’ BASKETBALL TEAM 

First raw: M. Smith, G; P, Albonetty, LG; Dy. Morgan, LE ; A. Card, F; 

1. Marble, RE. Smart, RG; C. Colburn, CG; Ds. Morgan, CF. 

Second row: G. Kelley, scorer; E. Finnegan, F; A. Smart, G; M. Eaton, F; 

R. Weatherby, G; E. Kennedy, F; N. Cook, Manager; Miss West, Coach. 

Girls" Basketball Report 

This year we had no divided groups in basketball; instead we had one squad. 
This seemed to work out much better than having first and second teams, for 
the girls had a very successful year. 

Dorothy and Doris Morgan and Irene Alarble made their share of the 
baskets. Annella Card and Barbara Iveson did exceptionally well playing, 
when one considered their handicap of being so much shorter than their op- 
ponent. 

Marjorie Smart, Marie Smith, and Clara Colburn made up the three guard 
combination. Other guards who saw action were Ruth Weatherby, May Eaton, 
Audrey Smart, and Pauline Albonetty. 

Guards were plentiful, while forwards were scarce. 

While we didn’t win all our games, we did win enough to be able to be 
proud of this year’s team. 

This year we lose a few of the more experienced girls: Dorothy and Doris 
Morgan, Marie Smith, Barbara Iveson, and also our manager and time-keeper, 
Geraldine Kelly and Nancy Cook. But to replace these we have new mem- 
bers who look promising and undoubtedly many freshmen will appear at 
practice. 




GIRLS’ GYM SQUAD 

First row: J, Boles, A, Cote, A. Card, C. Bagley, A. Bestoso, E. Kennedy, 
G. Bagley. 

Second row: M. Eaton, G. Robertson, P. Donavan, Miss Miriam West, coach, 
H. Mackie. E. Card, C. Cote. 



GYM SQUAD 

First row: G. Neal, R. Quincy, D. Hanney, H. Spieler. 

Second row: T. Haggai, J. Haggai, Mr. Neal, coach, D. Keating, G. Hagerty. 






THE ECHO 


25 


GYM 

There was a good response to the Boys’ and Girls’ Gym Squads this year in 
spite of the fact that we only have our annual Demonstration as an incentive. 
While many of the larger schools have Gym teams, we do not find any in our 
class to compete with. The annual Demonstration held April 5 was very 
well attended, and the squads did some excellent work. The cup for the best 
all-around work among the girls was won by Betty Jennings. Second place 
by Annella Card, and third place by Charlotte Bagley. Alice Bestoso won 
the Freshman award. In the boys’ competition Richard Quincy did some 
fine work to win the trophy; Harry Spieler placing second, and John Haggai 
third; Gordon Neal taking first place in the Freshman competition. 

The boys entered in the Massachusetts State Gym Meet held at Braintree, 
and Quincy won third place for us. Lynn English won first; Braintree, sec- 
ond; and Sumner, third which is very good considering the difference in size 
and facilities of the schools. Later in the season the combined Squads enter- 
tained a group from Boston under Mr. E. Koening instructor at B. U. and 
Fitchburg. 

The girls’ squad was very large this year, and the competition was very 
keen and close. The boys will feel the loss of Spieler and Quincy, and the 
girls will feel the loss of Betty Jennings, but with the aid of the new mem- 
bers next year we should see another creditable squad. 


Sumner Movies 

“The Amazing Mr. Williams” 

“Babes In Arms” 

“Disputed Passage” 

“Each Dawn I Die” 

“Escape” 

“Man About Town” 

“Miracles Eor Sale” 

“Our Leading Citizen” 

“The Real Glory” 

“Stagecoach” 

“That’s Right — You’re Wrong” 

“Too Busy to Work” 


James Williams 

Freshman 

College 

School 

Graduation 
Henry Megley 
Class of ’40 
Deacon Franz 
Honor Roll 
. Spieler’s Car 

Civics Class 

Charley Mann 


Sumner Songs 


“Can I Help It” 

“It’s All Yours” 

“The Man With the Mandolin” 

“If I Were a Millionaire” 

“Happy Little Motor” 


Hank Robertson 

From the Seniors to the Freshmen 

Charley George 

Art Levangie 

Howey Putt 


26 


THE ECHO 



BOYS’ BASKETBALL TEAM 
First roiv: F. Moran, F. Mack, A. Murdock, H. Putt. 

Second rote: R. alsh, manager, H. Megley, E. Paul, C. Mann, G. Hagerty, 
P, Jones, Vincent Naverouskis, Coach. 

BOYS' BASKETBALL SQUAD 

Position 1st Team 2nd Team 


Left forward 

Megley 

Paul 

Right forward 

jMurdock 

Donavan 

Center 

Mack 

Putt 

Left Guard 

Jones 

Smith 

Right Guard 

Mann 

Hagerty 

Manager 

R. als h 

Moran 

Keating 


Coach — Mr. Vincent Naverouskis 

BOYS' BASKETBALL 

The Sumner High basketball team completed a most successful season, win- 
ning seven out of fourteen scheduled games for an average of 500. For the 
second successive year Sumner played in the annual South Shore Tournament. 
Sumner fans enjoyed every bit of the type of aggressive play displayed by 
this year’s squad. Much credit should go to Coach Naverouskis whose untir- 
ing efforts have made the season a success. Vlurdock, Vlack, and Megley kept 
Sumner in many games with their fine offensive play, while Jones, Mann, and 
Paul played brilliantly defensively. Congratulations to all, especially to Mur- 
dock, Mack, and Vlegley who will be lost through graduation. 


THE ECHO 


27 



BASEBALL 

First row: J. Behan, C; H. Megley, LF ; P. Hammond, P; R. Finlay, P; 
R. Quincy, 2B; A. Murdock, IB. 

Second row: B. Smith, manager; C. George, CF ; H. DeMars, P; A. Levansie. 
3B; F. Mack, P; P. Jones, RF; W. Williamson, SS; E. Paul, 3B; H. Spieler, 
2B; John Walsh, coach. 


BASEBALL 

Sumner’s Baseball Team has looked most impressive in the games which it 
has played. Its great infield with Paul at third and the fast double play com- 
bination of Williamson and Quincy along with Murdock at the initial sack 
have provided many sparkling plays. The outfield of Megley, George, and 
Jones have teamed up with the infield to make an enviable defensive team. 
Behind the bat Sumner has its dependable catcher, Behan, who is a great help 
to the pitchers. Sumner’s one weakness at present seems to be the pitching 
staff although Hammond, Mack, and Finlay have done their best to win. To 
off set this pitching weakness, Sumner batsmen have packed great power at 
the plate. 


Consolation for Seniors 

Don’t worry if your jokes are small — 
And your rewards are few. 

Remember that mighty oaks 
Were once just nuts like you. 


28 


THE ECHO 




SCHEDULES 





Girls' Basketball 






Opponents 

Sumnei 

January 

5 

Wrentham 

35 

40 

January 

10 

Kingston 

33 

26 

January 

12 

Avon 

21 

30 

January 

19 

West Bridgewater 

28 

33 

January 

23 

* Pembroke 

18 

25 

January 

‘30 

Randolph 

35 ' 

32 

February 

2 

*West Bridgewater 

22 

31 

February 

6 

Avon 

24 

59 

February 

27 

Pembroke 



February 

28 

Randolph 

24 

21 

March 

5 

Kingston 



* Indicates games at home. 





Boys' Basketball 





Opponents 

Sumner 

December 

18 

Weymouth Trade 

•*33 

18 

December 

19 

Alumni 

16 

23 

January 

5 

Wrentham 

20 

24 

January 

10 

Kingston 

24 

19 

January 

12 

Avon 

22 

41 

January 

19 

West Bridgewater 

26 

17 

January 

23 

Pembroke 

22 

28 

January 

30 

Stetson 

27 

22 

February 

2 

West Bridgewater 

29 

25 

February 

6 

Avon 

25 

33 

February 

27 

Pembroke 

29 

19 

February 

28 

Stetson 

23 

17 

March 

1 

* Wrentham 

0 

2 

March 

5 

Kingston 

20 

25 

* Forfeit. 







Baseball 





Opponents 

Sumner 

April 

25 

At Randolph 

12 

7 

April 

30 

Thayer J. V. 

0, 

3 

May 

2 

West Bridgewater 

Postponed 


May 

6 

At Weymouth Vocational 

10 

1 

May 

9 

At Avon 

3 

4 

May 

13 

Weymouth Vocational 

9 

15 

May 

16 

Avon 

10 

4 

May 

21 

At West Bridgewater 



May 

23 

At Thayer J. V. 



May 

29 

Randolph 



June 

3 

Braintree 



June 

6 

Pending 




THE ECHO 


29 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

First row: V. Koeppel, R. Johnson, Miss Elna Knutson, Mr. Garland Neal, 
S. Nihtila, A. Card. 

Second row: A. Smart, C. Mann, iNI. Colby, H. Megley, M. Moran, M. Quincy, 
D. Kierstead. 


STUDENT COUNCIL 

For its second year the Student Council was organized to help finance sports 
and help in the management of school affairs with membership as follows: 
four seniors, three juniors, one sophomore, one freshman. The officers elected 
were chairman, Ruth Johnson; secretary, Virginia Koeppel; treasurer, Sulo 
Nihtila. Representatives from the various clubs were added as advisers, and 
Miss Elna Knutson became a faculty adviser. Mr. Garland Neal continued 
as faculty adviser. Class elections were conducted by the Council similar to 
town elections. The first activity of the year was the annual bean supper 
which was a success. Quite some profit came from a magazine drive spon- 
sored by the Council. The sale of tags for recess dancing was enjoyable to 
the .students and not for profit. At the April conference of the Southeastern 
Division of Massachusetts Student Councils held at Durfee High School, Fall 
River, Miss Elna Knutson, Ruth Johnson, Annella Card, Mason Colby, Charles 
Mann, and Sulo Nihtila represented Sumner. This year the Student Council 
wore ribbons for ushering at school activities and awarded an Honor Room 
Banner to the neatest and best maintained room in the high school. 



30 


THE ECHO 



GLEE CLUB 

First row: E. Smart, L. Gorton, C. Mossesso, C. Terrazano, P. Albonetty, 

D. Porter, S. Howard, B. Gajinon. B. Simmons, A. Smart, M. Eaton, H. Moran, 

A. Cote. A. McLaughlin. M. Creighton. H. Terrazano, B Higgins, R. Weatherby, 

R. Cann. 

Second row: R. Andrew, E. Eaton, L. Yeager, J. Currier, K. Chandler, D. Kier- 
stead. M. Smith. S. Cook, 1. Marble. Ds. Morgan. Dy. Morgan, D. Esterbrook, 

M. \^’alsh. H. Mackie. A. Bestoso, 1. Benvie, E. MacPherson, E Kennedy. 

Third row: 1. Pierson. S. Czapla. H, Lawrence, J. Boles, E. Megley, M. Hogan, 

P. Donovan, A. Schntt, G. Robertson. 

GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

The Girls’ Glee Club, about sixty-two in number, started this year’s work 
in September with Miss Margaret Murphy as conductor and Stewart McKay 
as student accompanist. The Club often took part during the year in as- 
semblies. At the annual “Spring Concert” held in the school hall, April 11, 
the girls sang three selections: “Lift Thine Eyes,” “Hansel and Gretel Prayer,” 
and “Allah’s Holiday.” Throughout the year many members have taken 
part in various school assemblies. 

The Club attended the annual Mayflower Association Spring Concert at 
Marshfield on the Morning of May 4. The concert was enjoyed by all the 
members. The girls repeated two of the selections from the concert. All in 
all the meeting was another grand experience for the members of the Glee Club. 

At the Senior graduation music was furnished by the Glee Club. At the 
end of the season, the girls enjoy their picnic at some beach and amusement 
center to complete their year’s work. 


L. Keller 


THE ECHO 


31 


CLUBS 

THE ASSOCIATION 

This association is one of the many convenient beneficial enterprises offered 
by our high school. The pupils who belong pay ten cents a week to rep- 
resentatives in their respective home rooms. Those pupils can then attend all 
sport occasions, several dances, movies, and obtain a year book free of charge. 
By doing this the pupil saves several dollars a year. It brings more peo- 
ple to school functions and provides a means for more movies and dances. 
This year the members paid S3. 20 and received in return $4.60. 

FRENCH CLUB 

At the first meeting of the French Club, Corinne Terrazano was elected presi- 
dent. 

On Wednesday, December 20, a Christmas party was held at the close 
of school in the assembly hall under the supervision of Miss Bartlett of the 
faculty. A program was as follows: A French play “Les Etrennes” with 
Mason Colby and Corinne Terrazano as a young married couple discussing 
their Christmas presents; a dialogue in French given by John Haggai who 
took the part of a doctor and Stewart McKay as his patient; Phyllis Wil- 
son’s song in French. After these proceedings, gifts were exchanged. This 
was followed by refreshments. The Freshman Latin class was invited, and 
a pleasant time was enjoyed by all. 

This year the club is planning to make scrapbooks containing letters from 
France, poems, newspaper items and illustrated pictures based on France and 
French life. These will be shown on exhibition night. Other work for exhi- 
bition will also be done by the different French classes. 

In June the club is planning an outing to some beach. 

ORCHESTRA 

The Sumner High School Orchestra for 1939-1940 is composed mostly of 
last year’s members. 

Besides giving a creditable performance at the Annual Spring Concert, 
the orchestra has appeared at school assemblies, and at a Parent Teachers’ 
Association Meeting which was held at Brookville, and will play at the Senior 
and Junior High Graduations. None of the members will graduate this year, 
and Miss Margaret Murphy, the director, hopes to continue her fine progress 
next year. 

The members are Violins: Walter Pawlowski, Eileen Mangott, Eleanor 
Kennedy, Helen Mackie, Audrey Smart; flute: Donald McKay; saxophones: 
Arnold Soule, Victor Hogan; trombones: George Hagerty, Stewart McKay; 
trumpets: Paul Mitchell, Barbara Smart; drums: Richard Croft; and piano: 
Marie Mack. 


32 


THE ECHO 


PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

The Photography Club was started in November with fifteen members on the 
roll. John Towns was the student instructor with Howard Nason and James 
Williams assisting. The members are as follows: Joseph Mahoney, president: 
Walter Donovan, vice-president; Theodore Haggai, treasurer; Raymond Vin- 
cent, secretary; Richard Jennings, V alter V allace, George Johnston, Clarence 
Williams, Edward Joughlin, Joseph Joughlin, Robert Purchase, James Rich- 
ardson, Harold Packard, V alter Meins, and Harry Davis. The club bas been 
very active this year, and the members have learned to develop films, to print 
and enlarge pictures, to do oil coloring of photographs, and to do indoor 
portraiture. Several illustrated lectures from Eastman Kodak Company have 
been secured, and these proved to be extremely helpful. Many of the mem- 
bers have purchased their own outfits and are processing and even enlarging 
at home. All the members wish to express their sincere gratitude to jMr. Hodge, 
the faculty adviser, for his much needed help. 


THE DRAMATIC CLUB 

The Dramatic Club is a club for dramatic work and consists of the follow- 
ing members: Lillian Gorton, President; Jean Hollis, Mary Eaton, Clara Col- 
burn, Secretary-Treasurer; Hilda Terrazano, Audrey Smart, Stacia Czapla, 
Barbara Iveson, Ruth Weatherby, Marie Smith, Shirley Cook, and Catherine 
Mosesso. 

The Dramatic Club meets every V ednesday with Mr. Naverouskis as ad- 
viser. At each meeting this work involves the acting of the different paces of 
every day life. Since 1938 the dramatic club has grown into a most success- 
ful group. Part of the dramatic club’s work is assisting in the various en- 
tertainment assemblies of the school year. Work now has begun on a one- 
act play, “Buried Treasure.” The girls who take part in this club put their 
work ahead of their play, thus giving some excellent work. 


PHYSICS CLASS OUTINGS 

The Physics class, accompanied by Mr. Hodge, went on three sight-seeing trips 
which proved not only enjoyable but educational. 

The first trip was to the East Boston Airport and the Ford Plant in Som- 
erville. At both places the whole group saw the makings of airplanes and 
automobiles and seemed very much interested in both. 

The second trip was to the Charlestown State Prison and Bunker Hill 
Monument. At the prison many interesting things were revealed to us. The 
climb up the monument was quite an experience for most of us, and we thought 
it worth the climb to say we had been up the monument. 

The last trip was a baseball game at Fenway Park to see the Red Sox play. 




THE ECHO 


33 



First row: B. Iveson, G. Kelley, C. Colburn, M. Smith, A. McLaughlin. 
Second row: C. Bagley, Doris Morgan, Dorothy Morgan, Miss Anna Damon, 
Adviser. 


LUNCH ROOM 

The lunch room is under the management of Miss Anna M. Damon, of the 
faculty, assisted by Dorothy Morgan, Marie Smith, Geraldine Kelley, Barbara 
Iveson, Alice McLaughlin, Clara Colburn, and Charlotte Bagley, and Lillian 
Gorton. 

Sandwiches, plain and chocolate milk, ice cream, cookies, cakes and candy 
are sold. Very little or no profit is made as a maximum charge of five cents 
is strictly maintained. The object being to give the pupils all the possible 
benefits. 

At Christmas, a party was held at the home of Miss Damon with the 
usual tree and exchange of gifts. A very enjoyable evening w^as spent play- 
ing games and ended with the singing of Carols. 

Miss Damon wishes to thank all the girls who have contributed so gen- 
erously their free period time in making another year successful. 


34 


THE ECHO 



ECHO STAFF 

First row: A. Card, Ba. Iveson, E. Baker, Be. Iveson, M. Colby, N. Cook, 
J. Pickett, L, Kelleher, R. Little, INI. Wallace, S. Cook. 

Second row: J. Haggai, E. IMegley, C. George, Dy. Morgan, Ds. Morgan, H. 
Megley, Miss Kathryn Megley, Faculty Adviser, R. Walsh, M. Clark, S. Nihtila, 
M. Moran. W. Donavan. 


"ECHO" YEAR'S ACTIVITIES 

The Echo Stcff of the Sumner High School had quite a busy year. At the first 
League Meeting it was voted that the League delegates meet in Sumner High 
School for the May meeting. Preparations for our meeting were made through- 
out the year. 

A new^ paper, “Snoops and Scoops” was published and w^as supported 
quite well by the student body. The proceeds went towards the publishing 
of the year book. 

A Sadie Hawkins Dance was held May 3 in which the whole Staff took 
part decorating and entertaining. The proceeds paid for the banquet at the 
League Meeting. 

The editors of the various departments attended the three League Meet- 
ings and brought back interesting reports. Some of the suggestions were very 
helpful to the rest of the Staff. 

Advertisements were obtained from the business men of the town for the 
year book. The business men were willing to support us. The members of 
the Staff entered into the work of publishing the year book very well. 

It is quite evident that the Staff of the Echo had a very successful year. 



THE ECHO 


35 


LEAGUE MEETINGS 

The Southeastern Massachusetts League of School Publications held four 
meetings this year: in October at Middleboro, in January at Weymouth, in 
March at Stoughton, and in May at Holbrook. 

At each meeting welcomes were given the delegates by the principals and 
superintendents of the entertaining schools. The usual departmental meet- 
ings were held, and as usual very delicious and enjoyable suppers were served. 

Addresses heard at these meetings were by Mr. John Sweeney, District 
News Reporter, (October) ; Mr. Arthur Sampson, sports writer for a Boston 
newspaper, (January); Mr. Lewis Marcy of the United Press, (March); Miss 
Susan Meara, librarian of the Boston American, Record and Advertiser; 
and Mr. Thomas Buckley, former state auditor and associated with the Quincy 
Ledger, (Holbrook). 

The entertainments for the delegates were varied. At Middleboro dramas 
by the Dramatic Club, at Weymouth musical selections, at Stoughton drama 
and pantomime, and at Holbrook xylophone and accordion selections, also a 
movie “News on the Air.” At all four meetings the evenings concluded with 
an hour or two of dancing. 

At the final meeting, which Holbrook was delighted to have charge of, 
the new officers for the coming year were elected. Mr. Kean, chairman of 
the advisory board of the League, gave pins to the retiring officers. 

BOOK REVIEW 

Title: “What We Didn’t See!” 

Author: Nancy Cook. 

Setting: Place — Holbrook, Boston, Somerville. 

Time — March 28, 1940. 1:00-5:00 p.m. 

Background — Physics trips. 

Characters: Mr. Hodge’s physics class. 

Plot: Auto Trip to East Boston. 

Visit to East Boston Airport. 

Travel around rotary circle to find right road to Somerville. 

Visit to Ford Plant. 

Tragedy of the swinging doors. 

No souvenirs. 

Climax: Howard’s ride in the trunk of “Daisy.” 

Catastrophe: “Rosy” out of gas, helped by “Daisy’s” pushing. 

Conclusion: Feeding of famished stomachs. “Susy” pushing “Daisy” to save 
gas. Safe arrival home. 


36 


THE ECHO 


SENIOR DANCE 

The Senior Dance, a Hallowe’en Dance, with the Silhouette Orchestra furnish- 
ing music, took place on October 26. The untiring efforts of the various 
committees, assisted by the teachers, helped to make a successful evening. 
At 8:30 a grand march took place led by the class officers and followed by the 
other members of the school and the guests. Favors of lollypops were used 
for cut-ins. At twelve o’clock the dance ended with everyone leaving having 
spent a very enjoyable evening. 


JUNIOR PROM 

The Junior Class of Sumner High School held its annual Prom on May 26. 

The hall was beautifully decorated by a committee who worked untiringly 
under the guidance of Miss Rowell, the drawing supervisor. The motif car- 
ried out in decorations was “Music.” Miss Helen Lawrence, Miss Clara Col- 
burn, Miss Madeline Hogan, Mason Colby, and Robert Little comprised the 
decorating committee. Music was furnished by Don Gillespie’s orchestra. 
General novelty dances were enjoyed by everyone. During intermission, re- 
freshments were sold by the committee in charge, who were Charlotte Bag- 
ley, Richard W^alsh, and Alice McLaughlin. This Prom was a success both 
financially and socially. 

The patrons and patronesses of the evening were Miss Anna Damon, Miss 
M iriam \^"est. Miss Kathryn Megley, Miss Elna Knutson, Mrs. Arthur Win- 
kley, Mrs. Peter L. Vincent, Mrs. Preston McKay, Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Neal, 
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Hogan, Mr. E. Hodge, and Mr. Vincent Naverouskis. 


ASSOCIATION DANCE 

The Association Sport Dance was held April 10 in the Gym. The hall was 
decorated suitably for the dance with large figures of boys and girls taking part 
in some sport, and streamers of blue and white, the school colors. The decora- 
tions were in charge of Eleanor Baker, Jean Hollis, Shirley Howard, John 
Haggai, and Windsor Hollis. The music was furnished by Art Davis and his 
orchestra and was very enjoyable. In the grand march, led by Harry Spieler 
and Marie Mack, novelty hats were given to each person. Special dances were 
held throughout the evening, among them the Virginia Reel, prize waltz, and 
cut-in dance. There was some close competition between the McKinnon 
brothers during the prize waltz, but finally Leo won out with Muriel Quincy. 
Refreshments were served by the lunch room girls. During the evening the 
Photography Club took photos for ten cents. Chaperons for the evening were 
Miss Elna Knutson, Miss Kathryn Megley, and Mr. Garland Neal of the faculty. 

* * * w * 

A girl who works in a candy shop stands 5'5" high and wears 5^^ shoes. 
V hat does she weigh? — (CanRy) 


THE ECHO 


37 


SADIE HAWKINS DANCE 

The Sadie Haw kin’s Dance w as held in the High School hall, May 3. The hall 
was decorated to represent a hill-billy dance. Various colored streamers and 
flowers were hanging about. The attendants were costumed representing “Daisy 
Mae” and “Little Abner.” The grand march was led by Annella Card and 
Charles Mann with Nancy Cook as director. At the end of the march the 
patrons selected the best costumes. Annella Card and Richard Walsh were 
selected as “Daisy Mae” and “Little Abner,” while Clara Colburn and Herbert 
Hamilton were chosen the most comical. After the prizes of corn-cob pipes 
were presented by Nancy Cook, the two couples did solo waltzes for the other 
dancers. Many novelty dances, led by Richard Walsh, were enjoyed through- 
out the evening. Nancy Cook and Payson Jones won the prize waltz wdth tin 
toy music boxes as prizes. 

Miss Kathryn Megley, Miss Miriam West, Miss Anna Damon, Mr. John 
Walsh, and Mr. Vincent Naverouskis of the faculty were present. It was an 
enjoyable party. 


FRESHMAN FROLIC 

A Freshman Frolic was held on December eighth, and a good time was had 
by all. Many games w^ere enjoyed, and music for dancing was furnished by 
the school victrola. Chaperons for the evening were Miss Knutson, Mr. Hodge, 
and Mr. Naverouskis. 


* * * 


A teacher was trying to demonstrate a simple experiment in the genera- 
tion of steam. 

“V hat have I in my hand?” he asked. 

“A tin can,” was the answer. 

“Is the can an animate or inanimate object?” 

“Inanimate.” 

“Exactly. Now can any boy tell me how, with the can, it is possible 
to generate a surprising amount of speed, and powder almost beyond control?” 
One little boy raised his hand. 

“You may answer, William.” 

“Tie it to a dog’s tail.” 


* « * 


* 


Did you know that Batson Belfry just invented a device which enables 
people to look thru walls? Well, he did — a window! 

Since you’re building a subway and it won’t be ready for a year, I guess 
I can’t wait that long. I’ll take a taxi. 


i'MMMMa’ 


THE ECHO 



THANK YOU 


The "Echo" Staff of 1940 appreciates the support of 
the faculty, the fellow students, the subscribers, and adver- 
tisers. Our most grateful "Thank You" to all who co- 
operated to make this publication such a success. As the 
advertisers have been very kind to comply with our wishes, 
we should give them all possible business. 


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160 BOYLSTON STREET 


BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 


NORTHEASTERN 

UNIVERSITY 



College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the 
understanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. 
The. purpose of this program is to give the student a liberal and cultural educa- 
tion and a vocational competence which fits him to enter some specific type of 
useful employment. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the prin- 
ciples of business with specialization in Accounting, Journalism, Banking and 
Finance, Public Administration, Industrial Administration or Marketing and 
Advertising. Instruction is through lectures, solution of business problems, 
class discussions, motion pictures and talks by business men. 

College of Engineering 

Provides complete college, programs in Engineering with professional courses 
in the fields -of CIVIL, MECHANICAL {WITH DIESEL, AERONAUTICAL 
and AIR CONDITIONING OPTIONS), ELECTRICAL, CHEMICAL, INDUS- 
TRIAL ENGINEERING, and ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION. General 
engineering courses are pursued during the freshman year; thus the student 
ne.ed not make a final decision as to the branch of engineering in which he 
wishes to specialize until the beginning of the sophomore year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperclassmen in all courses, pro- 
vides for a combination of practical industrial experience, with classroom in- 
struction. Under this plan the student is able to earn a portion of his school 
expenses as well as to make business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 

Bachelor of Aris Pre-Legal Programs Available Bachelor of Science 

FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 

Northeastern University 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Please send me a catalog of the 

□ College of Liberal Arts □ Pre-Legal Program 

□ College of Business Administration 

□ College of Engineering 

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Address