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Draft I ntegrated Development Plan 

2015-2016 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 



Ngqushwa Local Municipality IDP Review 2015/2016 


REPORT OUTLINE 


The structure of IDP is as follows: 

Chapter 1: THE VISION 

Chapter one of this IDP provides a concise summary of the municipal vision, mission and values. 

Chapter 2: DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 

This chapter provides a detailed profile of Ngqushwa Local Municipality. 

Chapter 3: STATUS QOU ASSESSMENT 

This chapter provides the situational analysis of Ngqushwa in relation to all Key Performance 
Areas. 

CHAPTER 4: DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES STRATEGIES, PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS 

This chapter provides a detailed breakdown of objectives that indicate what the municipality 
can reasonable achieve within the term of the council period and with available resources, as 
well as strategies and programmes that provide the concrete interventions that Ngqushwa 
Municipality will implement to achieve its objectives. 

CHAPTER 5: SECTOR PLANS 

This chapter provides a list of all Ngqushwa sector plans and their status, with executive 
summaries of the newly Developed Sector Plans. The sector plans contains strategic 
interventions that respond to the status quo assessment. 

CHAPTER 6: FINANCIAL PLAN 

Chapter six provides Ngqushwa financial strategies, medium term expenditure, proposed 
budget as well as the 3 year Capital Plan. 

CHAPTER 7: PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 

Chapter seven provides an overview of the monitoring and evaluation process, a background 
to the Ngqushwa Performance Management Framework. 


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LIST OF ACRONIMS 


ACRONYMS 

DESCRIPnONS 

AG 

AuditorGeneral 

ADM 

Amathole District Municipality 

AIDS 

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 

ASGISA 

Accelerated Shared Growth Initiative of South Africa 

BSD 

Basic Service Delivery 

CFO 

Chief Financial Officer 

DBSA 

Development Bankof Southem Africa 

DEAT 

Department of Environmental Affairsand Tourism 

DFA 

Development Facilitation Act 

DHD 

Department forlntemational Development 

COGTA 

Department of Cooperative Govemance StTiaditional Affairs 

ADM 

Amathole District Municipality 

DoHS 

Department of Human Settlement 

DoL 

Depa rtment of La bour 

DoE 

Department of Enengy 

DoE 

Department of Education 

DSRAC 

Departmentof Sport Recreation Artsand Culture 

DoH 

Department of Health 

DoMR 

Department of MineralsResources 

DH 

Department of Trade and Industry 

DOS 

Departmentof Social Development and Special Programs 

DAFT 

Department of Agriculture Forestry & Fisheries 

DolBD 

Department of Land Reform & Rural Development 

DoARD 

Department of Agriculture and Rural Development 

ECDC 

Eastem Cape Development Corporation 

EHO 

Environmental Health Offices 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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ECDC 

Eastem Cape Development Corporation 

EHO 

Environmental Health Offices 

EMP 

Environmental Management Plan 

EPVUP 

Expanded Public WorksProgramme 

E5 

Equitable Share 

FBS 

Free Basic Services 

rer 

FurtherEducation and Training 

FV&M 

Financial Viabilityand Management 

GG &PP 

Good Govemance and Public Participation 

GKLM 

Great Kei Local Municipality 

HH 

Households 

HIV 

Human Immuno-deficiency Virus 

HR 

Human Resources 

IDP 

Integrated Development Plan 

ID&OT 

Institutio na 1 De ve lo p me nt a nd 0 rga niza tio na 1 Tra nsfo nma tio n 

IDPRF 

Integrated Development Plan Representative Forum 

IGR 

Inter-Govemmental Relations 

ISRDP 

Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Programme 

KPA 

KPI: Key Perfonmance Area 

KH 

KPI: Key Perfonmance Indicator 

L£D 

Local Economic Development 

LGSE1A 

Local Govemment SETA 

LUMS 

Land Use Management System 

MDG 

Millennium Development Goals 

MIG 

Municipal Improvement Grant 

MM 

Municipal Manager 

MSIG 

Municipal SystemslmprovementGrant 

MPAC 

Municipal Public AccountsCommittee 

NSDP 

National Spatial Development Perspective 


1 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 



OHS 

Occupational Health and Safety 

PGDP 

Provincial Gnowth and Development Plan 

PMS 

Performance Management System 

PMICT 

Prevention of Motherto Child Transmision 

SAPS 

South African Police Services 

SEA 

Strategic Environmental Assessment 

SDBIP 

Service Deliveryand Budget Implementation Plan 

SDF 

Spatial Development Framework 

SIA 

Sustainable Uvelihood Approach 

SMME 

Small Medium and Micro Enterprises 

SIAISSA 

Sta tistic s So uth Afric a 

ToR 

Te rms of Refe re nc e 

VUSA 

Wa te r Se rvic es Autho rity 


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Table of Contents 


The Executive Mayor's Foreword 

7 

Municipal Manager's Message 


1 DP Background 

10 

Legislative Framework 

15 

Municipal Powers and Functions 

20 


Chapter 1: The Vision 


Vision, Mission and Core Values 

41 

ChaDter 2: DemoaraDhic Profile 

42 


ChaDter 4 

ObejecQtives and Strateaies and Projects 149 

ChaDter 5 

Sector Plans,Bv-laws and Polices 216 

ChaDter 6 

Performance Manaaement Svstem 219 

Chapter 7 

SDatial DeveloDment Framework 226 


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FOREWORD BY MAYOR 


We once again heed the constitutional imperative which calls upon us as the local 
sphere of government to involve the people in decision-making so that they can 
own the processes geared towards their own development. This we do, not as an 
act of charity or benevolence, but as an exercise in building and deepening our 
democracy, by firmly inculcating transparency and accountability across the 
board. 

Every effort has been undertaken to ensure that members of the community 
articulate the direction that we must pursue towards their development, in 
keeping with Section 34 of municipal systems act and the national call for 
municipalities to go back to basics. This we have ensured through area-wide 
consultations on ward priorities in order to give meaningful effect to the reviewal 
of our five year plan. We are certain that our Integrated Development Plan 
encompasses the outlook of the people of Ngqushwa as we move towards 
2015/2016. 


In the main, infrastructure related matters remain a challenge for our people, 
with specific reference to roads, housing and community amenities. The 
magnitude of these challenges indicates the dire need for us to strengthen 
Private-Public Partnerships in order to ensure that we address infrastructure 
challenges holistically with a measure of sustainability. It therefore becomes 
imperative that we harness our I ntergovernmental Relations (IGR) as a strategic 
platform. Beyond the orthodox platforms, we will make every endeavour to bring 
together coalitions and networks of local interests towards realising our shared 
vision. In the interim, we have acquired a comprehensive fleet of machinery 
plant as a vehicle for addressing infrastructure maintenance with more 
consistency and cost effectiveness. 


Our area has demonstrated huge potential as a viable development node in the 
area Citrus/Pineapple cultivation, beef production, aquaculture and renewable 
energy. Potential exists in the area of lime mining. More oft than not, the fluidity 
in relation to land ownership rights, proves to be a hindering factor in 
exhaustively addressing the developmental needs of our area. The proverbial 
'land question' therefore begs immediate attention if any developmental inroads 
are to be made. All is not lost though given the agricultural schemes that have 
been revived mainly in the area of Glenmore, Ndwayana and Bhinqala. The 
innovative ostrich breeding project currently underway in ward 8 and 9 has given 
local breeders entry into this closed domain. 

Amathole District Municipality has lent tremendous support in the area of water 
and sanitation. Projects aimed at addressing water backlogs are being addressed 
through a comprehensive water reticulation project for new extensions. The 
district continues to render wide-support through the Municipal Support Unit. 

More than anything the IDP seeks to establish a connection with the National 
Development Plan as well as the PGDP towards addressing the needs of the 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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community with the citizenry, civic organisations and sector departments as 
partners. 


CLLR. S.E. NDWAYANA 
MAYOR 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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MESSAGE FROM THE MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


I join the Mayor in submitting the draft reviewed Integrated Development 
Plan for 2015- 2016 financial year. This document forms the basis of our 
planning within the municipality. It will inform all operational plans to be 
evolved within the municipality and, in particular Service Delivery and Budget 
I mplementation Plan (SDBIP). This process will also ensure the integration of 
the Performance Management System (PMS) and its assessment. 

The Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No 32 of 2000) 
Chapter 5 five defines Integrated Development Planning as one of the core 
functions of a municipality in the context of its developmental orientation and 
mandate. It should be framed in such a way that it integrates all available 
resources such as: human, financial, and other related resources. 

Suffice to say; the inclusive, participatory and consultative process 
culminated to the Integrated Development Plan. 

Importantly, this overarching document fulfils the legal requirement, and also 
represents the popular aspirations of the community under Ngqushwa Local 
Municipality J urisdiction. 

I take this opportunity to thank all contributions made in producing this 
document. 

I thank you 


J.GOMOMO 

ACTING MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


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THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 


(1) BACKGROUND TO THIS DOCUMENT 

This document represents the 2015/2016 reviewed Integrated Development Plan (IDP) as prepared for 
adoption by the Ngqushwa council on the 28'*' May 201 5. It is prepared in fulfilment of the Municipal legal 
obligation in terms of Section 32 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000. 


In addition to the legal requirement for every municipality to compile an Integrated Development Plan, the 
Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000 also requires that: 


■ The Municipality monitors and evaluates its performance with regards to the IDP’s 
implementation. 

■ The IDP be implemented. 

■ The IDP be reviewed annually to effect necessary changes and improvements. 

Section 25 of the Municipal Systems Act deals with the adoption of the IDP and states that: “Each municipal 
council must adopt a single, inclusive and strategic plan for the development of the municipality which- 

■ Links, integrates and co-ordinates plans and takes into account proposals for the development of 
the municipality. 

■ Aligns the resources and capacity of the municipality with the implementation of the plan; forms the 
policy framework; and 

■ General basis on which annual budget must be based” 

Section 34 of the Municipal Systems Act further states that: 

“A municipal council must review its Integrated Development Plan annually in accordance with as assessment 
of its performance measurements and to the extent that changing circumstances so demand, 

It went on to say “The Mayor of the municipality must ensure that the Integrated Development Plan is 
approved by the council a month before the end of the financial year. 


(ii) THE IDP REVIEW PROCESS 

In order for Ngqushwa Municipality to comply with Legislative Framework the following activities were performed 
towards review of 201 4/201 5 IDP: 

• The IDP/PMS Budget Process Plan was presented to the IDP/Budget Rep Forum in August 2014. 

• In July 201 4 the Process Plan was Approved by the council 

th 

The 10 of October 2014 there was a IDP/PMS Budget representative forum to present the draft situational 
analysis. 

rd th 

• From the 3 — 4 December 2014 there were IDP/Budget Road shows to solicit community needs 
as presented below. 

• On 1 4'*' February 201 5 a Budget Technical Steering committee was held to present Draft Budget, 
sources of revenue and expenditure inputs from all departments. 

• On the 24-27 201 5 February there was an institutional Strategic Plan Session 

• On the 1 7'*' March 201 5 there was IDP/Budget Rep forum to present 201 5/201 6 IDP Objectives, 
Strategies and 201 5/201 6 Proposed projects, and to solicit inputs from members. 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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• Council Tabled Draft 201 5/201 6 IDP, Draft 201 5/201 6 Budget, Tariffs and SDBIP on 31 March 
2015. 

• Daily Dispatch Advertised availability of the draft documents. 

• From the 21 to 23'"^ April 201 5 there were IDP/Budget road shows, to present the 201 5/201 6 IDP, 
201 5/201 6 Budget, Tariffs and SDBIP also to solicit inputs. 

• On the 1 9"' May IDP/Budget Technical Committee to consolidate inputs. 

• On the 27"' May Rep Forum. 

• The 28"' May 2015 the council meeting to adopt aforementioned. 

In order to address the IDP comments from the MEC all departments were escalated with the areas of focus as 
per the assessment results in order to be able to maintain credible IDP outcomes from the Office of the MEC. 

The participatory structures and meetings dates has been covered under IDP Review process. 


The following is the outline of the public participation events undertaken as means to allow members of the public 
within Ngqushwa jurisdiction to play an active role in the affairs of the municipality. 


N 

o 

Key 

Communica 
tion Activity 
per KPA 

Programme 

Messenger/Depl 

responsible 

Messenger 

Target 

Audience 

Channel 

Time Frame 


Promotion of 

new IDP to 
the people 

Develop IDP 
and Budget 
framework 

IDP Manager, 
Communications, 
Office of the mayor 

Mayor 

Community 

Print Media 

July 2014 


Mondela 

Day 

67 minutes of 
goodwill. 

Support of 
Community 
programmes 

Office of the Mayor 
SPU and 

Communications 

Unit. 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager, 

Communicatio 

ns Unit 

Community 

Electronic 

media 

July 2014 


Women’s 

Month 

Celebrotions 

Celebrating 
Women in the 
Workplace 

Employee Assistance 
Programme (EAP), 
Women’s Caucus, 

SPU and 

Communications 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager, 

Communicatio 

ns Unit 

Officials 

and 

Councillors 

Website, 

Notice boards 
and posters 
and Email, 
group SMS 

August 

2014 


Service 

Delivery 

Doy 

Delivering 
services to the 
people 

All Departments 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

Community 

Electronic 

Media, Posters 
and flyers 

August 

2014 


Local 

Communicat 

ors forum 

Promotion of 

information to 

stakeholders 

Communications 

Unit, All Municipal 
Departments 

Portfolio 

Head: 

Community 

Services 

Ward 

Councillors, 

Ward 

Committees, 

Group SMS 
and invitation 

letters. 

Quarterly 

2014 


Ward 

Committee 

Meetings 

Discussion of 
service delivery 
issues in wards 

Office of the 

Speaker, Council 
Support 

Speaker 

Ward 

Committees, 

CDW’s 

Agenda 

Quarterly 

2014 


Heritage 
and Tourism 

Month 

Fish Festival 

Tourism Unit and 

Communications 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager, 

Communicatio 

ns Unit 

Community 

Electronic 

Media 

September 

2014 


National 

Arbor Week 

Tree planting at 
schools 

Waste and 

Environment Unit 

and Communications 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager, 

Communicatio 

ns Unit 

Schools 

Electronic 

Media 

1-7 

September 

2014 


Clean Up 

Promotion of 

Waste and 

Mayor, 

Community 

Print and 

September 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 1 





Campaign 

waste 

management 

Environment Unit 

and Communications 

Municipal 

Manager, 

Communicatio 

ns Unit 


Electronic 

Media, 

leaflets/flyer 

2014 


IDP Steering 
Committee 

IDP Processes 

IDP/PMS, Budget 
Manager, 
Communications, 
Mayor and 

Speakers Mayor 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

Steering 

Committee 

Members 

Memorandum 

Quarterly 

2014 


Rep Forum 
Meeting 

IDP Processes 

IDP/PMS, Budget 
Manager, 
Communications, 
Mayor and 

Speakers Mayor 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

Community, 

Council, 

Government 

Department 

Print Media 

Quarterly 

2014 


Breost 

concer 

Aworeness 

month 

Awareness 

programme 

Employee Assistance 
Programme (EAP), 

SPU and 

Communications 

Portfolio Head 

MM 

Communicatio 

ns Unit 

Officials 

and 

Councillors 

Website, 

Notice boards, 
e-mails, group 
SMS 

Qctober 

2014 


Service 

Delivery 

Doy 

Delivering 
services to the 
people 

All Departments 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

Community 

Electronic 

Media, Posters 
and flyers 

Qctober 

2014 


IDP 

situational 

needs 

analysis 

Ward needs 

verification 

IDP/PMS Manager, 
Manger: Office of 
the Mayor, 
Communications 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

Community 

Print Media 

November 

2014 


1 6 Days of 
Activism 

Awareness 

programme 

against Women 
and Children 

Abuse 

SPU and 

Communications 

Mayor 

Community 

Print and 

Electronic, 

leaflets/flyer 

November 

2014 


1 6 Days of 

Activism. 

Awareness 

programme 

\Disability 

Month. 

Capacity 
building of all 
people with 
disabilities. 

disabled 

SPU and 

Communications 

Mayor 

Community 

Electronic, 

leaflets/flyer 

November 

2014 


World Aids 
Day 

Awareness and 

information 

sharing 

campaign 

SPU, HR Unit and 
Communications, 

DoH, Love Life, 

Peddie Women 
Support Centre 

Mayor 

Officials, 

Councillors 

and 

Community 

Website, 

Notice board, 
Email, Group 
SMS and 

electronic 

media 

01 

December 

2014 


Local 

Government 

Week 

Awareness on 

Municipal 

Programmes 

Communications Unit 
All departments 

MM, Mayor, 
Communicatio 

n 

Communities 

Electronic 

Media, Print 
Media 

Brochures, 
flyers, etc 

December 

2014 


Christmas 

Lights 

Switch on of 
Christmas lights 
for festive 

season. 

Tourism Unit, 
Communications 

Tourism 

Manager 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

All 

stakeholders 

Electronic 

Media, Print 
Media 

Brochures, 
flyers, posters, 
website etc. 

December 

2014 


Recognition 
of older 

persons 

Christmas Lunch 

Communications, 

SPU 

Mayor 

Older 

persons 

Electronic 

Media, 
website etc. 

December 

2014 


Back to 

school 

campaign 

Mayoral Visit to 
best performing 
school and least 
performing 

Communications, 

SPU and Office of 
the Mayor 

Mayor 

Schools, 

Learners, 

Educators 

Message of 
Support ( 
Community 
Newspapers 

January 

2015 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 2 






school ( Mayors 
Gift to Top 
Students) 




and Electronic 

Media/ 

Community 

Radio Station) 



Service 

delivery 

Day 

Bull Handover 

Agriculture Unit, 
Communications 

Mayor 

Farmers 

Loudhailing, 

Electronic 

Media, 

January 

2015 


Service 

delivery 

Day 

Agro-processing 

Machinery 

handover 

Agriculture Unit, 
Communications 

Mayor 

Farmers 

Loudhailing, 

Electronic 

Media, 

January 

2015 


Service 

delivery 

Day 

Citrus farm 
maintenance(lnfr 
astructure) 
handover 

Agriculture Unit, 
Communications 

Mayor 

Farmers 

Loudhailing, 

Electronic 

Media, 

January 

2015 


State of the 

Nation 

Address 
(SONA ) 

Update on the 
state of the 

Nation 

GCIS 

President of 

the RSA 

Mayor 

Community 


February 

2015 


State of the 

Province 

Address 
(SOPA ) 

Update on the 
State of the 

Province 

GCIS 

Communications 

Premiers Office 

Premier 

Community 


February 

2015 


Service 

Delivery 

Day 

Delivering 

services to the 
people 

All Departments 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

Community 

Electronic 

Media, Posters 
and flyers 

February 

2014 


Annual 

Report 

Roadshows 

(MPAC) 

Public Hearing 
in all Cluster 
(Giving report 
on the 

performance of 
the previous 
financial year ) 

Office of the MM 

Communications 

Mayor 

Community 

Electronic and 
Print Media, 
Posters and 
flyers 

February 

2015 


Hamburg 

Beach 

Festival 

Revive tourism in 
the region by 
promoting and 
showcasing 
Hamburg and 
surrounding 

areas as a 

noteworthy 

tourism 

destination. 

Tourism Section, 
Communications 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

Community 

Electronic and 
Print Media, 
Posters and 
flyers, 
loudhailing 

March 201 5 


IDP and 
Budget 
Roadshows 

Public comments 

on the 

programmes of 
the next fiscal 

year. 

IDP/ PMS Manager 

Communications 

Manager: Office of 
the Mayor 

Mayor 

Community 

Electronic and 

Print Media 

March-April 

2015 


Council 

Open Day 

Comments on 

the conclusion of 

the IDP. 

IDP/PMS 

Communications 

Corporate 

Service/Council 

Support 

Office of the 

Speaker 

Mayor 

Council, 

Community 

Electronic and 

Print Media 

May 2015 


State of the 

District 

Address 

( SODA ) 

Update on the 
State of the 

district. 

ADM 

ADM Mayor 

Community 

Print Media 

and Electronic 

Street Banners 

Posters 

Printing of 

May 2015 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 3 










Internal and 

External 

Newsletter 

Website 

Internal 

Notices 



State of the 

Municipal 

Address 

(SOMA) 

Update on the 
State of the 
Municipality. 

Communications Unit 
Mayors All 
departments 

ADM Mayor 

Community 

Print Media 

and Electronic 

Street Banners 

Posters 

Emails and 
Loudhailing 
Printing of 
Internal and 

External 

Newsletter 

Website 

Internal 

Notices 

May 2015 


Celebration 

of 

Isikhumbuzo 

sasemqwash 

ini 

(Milkwood 

Tree) 


Tourism Unit, 

Communications 

Unit, NGO’s 

Mayor 

Communities 

Electronic 

Media, Posters 
and 

Loudhailing 

May 2014 


Service 

Delivery 

Day 

Delivering 
services to the 
people 

All Departments 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager 

Community 

Electronic 

Media, Posters 
and flyers 

May 2014 


Child 

Protection 

week 

Awareness on 
Children’s Rights 

SPU, 

Communications 

Mayor 

Children 

Posters, Flyers 

June 2014 


Youth 

Months 

Youth Seminar 

SPU, 

Communications, LED 

Mayor, 

Municipal 

Manager, 

Communicatio 

ns 

Youth 

Electronic 

media, 

posters, flyers 

June 2014 


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LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK 

The IDP’s were made a legal requirement for municipalities in the Local Government Transition Act 
(LGTA)/ Second Amendment, (1996). 

The White Paper presented a sound contextual justification of integrated development 
planning as a tool for “developmental local government” for objective orientated resource 
allocation, institutional transformation, interaction within other spheres of government and 
transparent interaction between municipalities and residents, in line with the principle of 
accountability. 

The Constitution of the RSA (1996) provides the primary, overarching framework within which 
local government planning must be contextualized. The Constitutional mandate given to local 
government is to provide democratic and accountable government for all communities and 
ensure the provision of services to communities in a sustainable manner which promotes social 
and economic development, a safe and healthy environment thereby encouraging the 
involvement of communities and community organizations in the matters of local government. 


NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

SUMMARY/SCOPE OF LEGISLATION 

GENERAL MANAGEMENT 

Constitution of the Republic 

of South Africa 1 996 

To introduce a new constitution for the Republic of South 

Africa and to provide for matters incidental thereto 

Local Government: 

To give effect to “developmental local government” 

Municipal Systems Act, 

2000 as Amended 

To set principles, mechanisms and processes to promote 

social and economic development of communities and to 

ensure access to affordable services for all 


To set a framework for planning, performance 

management, resource mobilisation and organisational 
change and community participation 

Local Government: 

Municipal Structures Act, 

1 998 as amended 

To provide for the establishment of municipalities in 
accordance with the requirements relating to the categories 
and types of municipality, the division of functions and 
powers between municipalities and appropriate electoral 

systems 


To regulate internal systems, structures and office-bearers 

Consumer Affairs (Unfair 
Business Practices) Act, 

1996 

To provide for the investigation, prohibition and control of 
unfair business practices in the interest of consumers 

Local Government Cross- 

boundary Municipalities Act, 

To authorise the establishment of cross-boundary 
municipalities, to provide for the re-determination of the 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 5 




NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

SUMMARY/SCOPE OF LEGISLATION 

2000 

boundaries of such municipalities under certain circumstances 
and to provide for matters connected therewith 

Local Government: 

To provide for the demarcation of boundaries of 

Municipal Demarcation Act, 

1998 

municipalities for the establishment of new municipalities. 

Municipal Electoral Act, 

2000 

To regulate municipal elections 

To amend certain laws and to provide for matters 

connected therewith 

Organised Local 

Government Act, 1997 

To provide for the recognition of national and provincial 

organisations representing the different categories of 
municipalities and the designation of representatives to 
participate in the National Council of Provinces etc.. 

Promotion of Local 

To provide for the co-ordination of functions of general 

Government Affairs Act, 

1983 

interest to local authorities and of those functions of local 

authorities which should in the national interest be co- 

ordinated 

Local Government Transition 

To provide for matters relating to municipalities in the 

Act, 1 993 

interim phase, powers and functions of municipalities and 

actions of officials and councillors 

Occupational Health and 
Safety Act, 1 993 

To provide for occupational health and safety in the work 
place and the protection of persons outside the work place 
against hazards to health and safety arising from activities 

of persons at the work place 

Promotion of Access to 

To control and regulate the right of all persons to access to 

Information Act, 2000 

information 

Promotion of Fair 

To give effect to the right to administrative action that is 

Administrative Justice Act, 

2000 

lawful, reasonable, and procedurally fair in terms of the 
Constitution of the Republic of South Africa 1 996 

Promotion of Equality and 

Prevention of Unfair 

To give effect to section 9 read with item 23(1 ) of Schedule 

6 to the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1 996, 

Discrimination Act, 2000 

to prevent and prohibit unfair discrimination and harassment 

To promote equality and to eliminate unfair discrimination 
and to prevent and prohibit hate speech and to provide for 

matters connected therewith 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

SUMMARY/SCOPE OF LEGISLATION 

FINANCE 

Appropriation of Revenue 

Act, 2000 

To provide for a fair division of revenue to be collected 
nationally between national, provincial and local 
government spheres for the 2000/2001 financial year and 

for matters connected therewith 

Businesses Act, 1991 

To repeal certain laws regarding the licensing of businesses 

To provide for the licensing and operation of certain 

businesses, shop hours and related matters 

Debt Collectors Act, 1 998 

To provide for controlled debt collecting 

Income Tax Act, 1962 

To provide for the payment of taxes on incomes of persons 

and taxes on donations 

Insolvency Act, 1936 

To consolidate and amend the law relating to insolvent 

persons and their estates 

Local Authorities Capital 
Development Fund 

Ordinance, 1978 

To provide for the establishment and management of a 
Capital Development Fund and for matters incidental 

thereto 

READ WITH 


Local Government Affairs 


Second Amendment Act, 

1993 


Municipal Accountants’ Act, 

1988 

To provide for the establishment of a Board for Municipal 
Accountants and for the registration of Municipal 

Accountants and the control of their profession 

Municipal Consolidated 

Loans Fund Ordinance, 1952 

To provide for the establishment and management of a 

Consolidated Loans Fund as approved by the Premier 

READ WITH 


Local Government Affairs 


Second Amendment Act, 

1993 


Local Government Municipal 
Finance Management Act, 

2003 

To regulate financial management in the local sphere of 
government to require that all revenue, expenditure assets 
and liabilities of municipalities and municipal entities are 
managed efficiently and effectively, to determine 


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NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

SUMMARY/SCOPE OF LEGISLATION 

responsibilities of persons entrusted with local sphere 
financial management and to determine certain conditions 
and to provide for matters connected therewith 

Pension Benefits for Councillors of 

Local Authorities Act, 1987 

To provide for pension benefits for councilors 

Public Finance Management Act, 

1999 

To regulate financial management in the national and 
provincial governments and, inter alia, provincial public 

entities 

Prescribed Rate Of Interest Act, 

1975 

To prescribe and regulate the levying of interest from 

debtors 

Reporting by Public Entities Act, 

1992 

To provide for the reporting to Parliament by public 

entities 

Value-added Tax Act, 1991 

To provide for the taxation in respect of the supply of 
goods and services 

Local Government Transition Act, 

1993 

To provide for matters relating to municipalities in the 
interim phase, powers and functions of municipalities and 

actions of officials and councillors 

Local Government: Property Rates 

Bill 2000 

To regulate general property valuation 


ADMINISTRATION / CORPORATE AND LEGAL SERVICES 


Electoral Act, 1998 

To manage and regulate elections on national, provincial 
and local government level 

Expropriation Act, 1975 

To provide for the expropriation of land and other 

property for public and certain other purposes and matters 

connected thereto 

Housing Arrangements Act, 1993 

To provide for the establishment of a National and 

Regional Housing Board(s) and the abolition of certain 

existing boards. 

Rental Housing Act, 1999 

To define the responsibility of Government in respect of 
rental housing 

Residential Landlord and Tenant 

Act, 1997 

To provide for the regulation of landlord-tenant relations in 
order to promote stability in the residential rental sector in 
the province. 


TOWN PLANNING AND SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT 


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NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

SUMMARY/SCOPE OF LEGISLATION 

Provision of Certoin Lond for 

Settlement, 1993 

To provide for the designation of certain land and to regulate the 
subdivision of such land and settlement of persons thereon. 

Advertising on Roads & Ribbon 
Development Act, 1 940 

To control advertising on national and regional roads 

Ordinance 113 and LUPO (land 
use planning ordinance) 

To control the land use rights within the former black areas 

Development Facilitation Act, 1995 

To provide for Integrated Development Plans, reflecting 
current planning and to institutionalise development 
tribunals for evaluating applications 

Physical Planning Act, 1991 

To provide guidelines for the drafting of urban 

development 

Plans 

Regulations on Advertisements on 

or Visible from National Roads, 

1998 

To control all advertising on national and regional roads 

Subdivision of Agricultural Land 

Act, 1970 

To control the subdivision of farm land and agricultural 
holdings 

Spatial Planning and Land Use 

Management Act 16 of 2013 

(SPLUMA 13 of 2013 

Spluma will be implemented in the next financial year. 

Most of the Acts listed below will are repealed and will be 
replaced by SPLUMA. The purpose of SPLUMA is to 
promote consistency and uniformity in spatial planning and 

land use management. 

Planning Professions Act, 2002 

To provide for the training and registration of professional 

Planners 

ENVIRONMENT 

Environmental Conservation Act, 

1982 

To provide for environmental impact assessments and 

exemptions, noise control areas etc. 

Environment Conservation Act, 

1989 

To provide for the effective protection and controlled 

utilisation of the environment and for matters incidental 

thereto 

National Environmental 

Management Act, 1998 

To provide for co-operative environmental governance by 
establishing principles for decision making on matters 
affecting the environment and to provide for matters 

connected therewith 


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NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

SUMMARY/SCOPE OF LEGISLATION 

ENG 

NEERING / TECHNICAL SERVICES 

Advertising on Roads & Ribbon 
Development Act, 1 940 

To control advertising on national and regional roads 

Regulations on Advertisements on 

or Visible from National Roads, 

1998 

To control all advertising on national and regional roads 

National Building Regulations and 
Building Standards Act, 1977 

To provide for the promotion of uniformity in the law 
relating to the erection of buildings in the areas of 
jurisdiction of local authorities and for the prescribing of 

building standards 

National Water Act, 1998 

To provide for fundamental reform of the laws relating to 

water resources 

Water Services Act, 1 997 

To provide for the rights of access to basic water supply 
and sanitation, national standards and norms for tariffs and 
services development plans 

SAFETY AND SECURITY 

Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 

To consolidate and regulate procedure and evidence in 
criminal proceedings 

Disaster Management Act, 2002 

To provide for an integrated, co-ordinated and common 
approach to disaster management by all spheres of 
government and related matters 

Fire Brigade Services Act, 1987 

To provide for the rendering of fire brigade services and 
certain conditions to the rendering of the service 

Gatherings and Demonstration Act, 

1993 

To control public gatherings and procession of marches 

Hazardous Substances Act, 1973 

To control matters relating to gas, petrol and liquids 

National Land Transport Bill, 1999 


National Land Transport Interim 
Arrangements Act, 1998 

To make arrangements relevant to transport planning and 

public road transport services 

Urban Transport Act, 1977, as 

amended 1 992 

To promote the planning & provision of adequate urban 
transport facilities 

National Road Traffic Act, 1996 

To regulate traffic on public roads, the registration & 
licensing of motor vehicles & drivers, including fitness 


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NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

SUMMARY/SCOPE OF LEGISLATION 

requirements and incidental matters 

Road Traffic Management 
Corporation Act, 1999 

To provide in the public interest for co-operative and co- 
ordinated strategic planning, regulation, facilitation and 
law enforcement in respect of road traffic matters and to 
provide for matters connected therewith 

Prevention of lllegal Eviction from 

and Unlawful Occupation of Land 

Act, 1998 

To provide for the eviction of unlawful occupants of land 

and the protection of the rights of such occupants under 

certain conditions 

Regulation of Gatherings Act, 1993 

To control public gatherings and procession of marches 

South African Police Service Act, 

1995 

To provide, inter alia, for a municipal (city) police 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Hazardous Substances Act, 1973 

To control matters relating to gas, petrol and liquids 

Health Act, 1 977 

To provide for the promotion of the health of the 
inhabitants of the Republic, for the rendering of health 

services, to define the duties, powers and responsibilities of 

certain authorities which render such services and for the 

co-ordination of the services 

National Policy For Health Act, 

1990 

To provide for control measures to promote the health of 
the inhabitants of the republic and for matters connected 

thereto 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Employment Equity Act, 1998 

To promote the constitutional right of equality and the 

exercise of true democracy 

To eliminate unfair discrimination in employment 

To redress the effect of unfair discrimination in the work 

place to achieve a workforce representative of the 
population 

Basic Conditions of Employment 

Act, 1997 

To give effect to the right to fair labour practice 


To provide for the regulation of basic conditions of 


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NATIONAL LEGISLATION 

SUMMARY/SCOPE OF LEGISLATION 

employment 

Compensation of Occupational 
Injuries and Diseases Act, 1993 

To regulate the categories of persons entitled to 
compensation for occupational injuries and diseases, and to 
determine the degree of disabled employees 

Labour Relations Act, 1995 

To regulate the organisational rights of trade unions, the 
right to strike and lock-outs 

To promote and facilitate collective bargaining and 
employee participation in decision making 

To provide simple procedures for labour disputes 

Skills Development Act, 1998 

To provide for the implementation of strategies to develop 
and improve the skills of the South African workforce, to 
provide for Learnerships, the regulation of employment 
services and the financing of skills development 

Skills Development Levies Act, 

1999 

To provide for the imposition of a skills development levy 

and for matters connected therewith 

South African Qualifications 

Authority Act, 1 995 

To provide for the establishment of a National 

Qualifications Framework and the registration of National 

Standards Bodies and Standards Generating Bodies and 
the financing thereof 

Unemployment Insurance Act, 

1966 

To provide for the payment of benefits to certain persons 

and the dependants of certain deceased persons and to 
provide for the combating of unemployment 


WHAT IS IDP 

The IDP is the Municipality's principal strategic planning document and aims to 
maximize social development and economic growth through the promotion of a 


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local democracy thereby meeting the basic needs and achieving the identified 
developmental goals. 

This document is reviewed annually in terms Section 34 of municipal systems 
act, thus the municipality has undertaken to review its five (5) year plan. As the 
key strategic plan of the Municipality, the IDP priorities will inform all financial 
planning and budgeting undertaken by the institution and will enable the 
municipality to align these with the institutional resources behind agreed upon 
policy objectives and programmes thereby offering substantive benefits to local 
residents, communities, provincial and national spheres of government and the 
nation as a whole. A special emphasis shall be placed on local economic 
development, community empowerment and redistribution. 

Extremely rapid changes at the global, regional, national and local levels have 
forced Ngqushwa Local Municipality to rethink the way they are organized and 
governed. Ngqushwa Local Municipality intends to find new ways to sustain their 
economy, build their society, protect their environment and eliminate poverty. 


Ngqushwa Local Municipality is of the opinion that national frameworks 
and support from other levels of government are critical in order to ensure 
sustainability. This requires trust between individuals and open and 
accommodating relationships between all stakeholders. In practical terms, 
Ngqushwa Local Municipality aims to focus on building social conditions 
favorable to development through: 


> Building the kind of political leadership that is able to bring 
together coalitions and networks of local interests towards 
realizing a shared vision. 

> Working in partnerships with business, trade unions and 
community based organizations. 

> Ensuring that knowledge and information are acquired and 
managed in a way that promotes continuous learning and which 
anyone can access easily and quickly. 

> Enhancing local democracy 

> Building an awareness of environmental issues. 

> I nvesting in youth development 

> Seeking to empower marginalized groups. 

> Mobilizing community resources for development. 


The Need for I DP'S 

In terms of the Municipal System's Act 2000, "all local authorities are required to 
prepare Integrated Development Plans for their areas of jurisdiction." 


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According to this act, IDP's must aim at integrating the development and 
management of municipal areas in terms of the powers and duties of these 
municipalities. 


The Integrated Development Planning Process puts in place a new system 
of planning and delivery in line with a shared vision of reconstruction and 
development. 


Key characteristics ofthe IDP Process 


> Integrated Development Planning is a participatory process. It aims 
to promote effective, sustainable development through improved 
co-operation, co-ordination and integration across a broad range of 
stakeholders. 

> Integrated Development Planning integrates the various strategies 
required for development: economic, sectional, spatial, social, 
institutional, environmental and fiscal. It also integrates strategic 
planning and operational planning. 

> Integrated Development Planning helps to ensure that clear 
developmental objectives and priorities are set. 

> Integrated Development Planning involves all spheres and sectors of 
government and demands synchronization (working in harmony) 
between the activities of government. 


Fundamentai principies ofthe Integrated Development Planning Process 

• Transformation 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality via Integrated Development Planning 
seeks to promote the objectives of developmental local government as 
outlined in the White Paper on Local Government 1998, thereby 
facilitating local processes of democratization, empowerment towards 
achieving social and economic transformation. 


• Process 

The planning process will determine the direction and course of 
development action within Ngqushwa. All legislative prescripts will be 
clearly understood and developed. I mplementation procedures will be 
adhered to. 


• Comprehensive Planning Approach 


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Ngqushwa will embark on a comprehensive planning approach thus 
allowing the local authority to continuously evaluate performance of 
past practices from a strategic angle and to thereafter develop 
comprehensive action plans for the efficient implementation of 
programmes and projects. 


• Democratizing the Pianning Process 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality shall promote local democracy through 
the direct involvement of citizens and community groups in the design 
and delivery of municipal programmes. 


Ngqushwa Local Municipality acknowledges that while regulation 
remains an important municipal function, it shall be supplemented with 
leadership, encouragement, practical support and resources for 
community action. Special emphasis shall be placed on the involvement 
of youth organizations in this regard. 


Poor and marginalized communities in Ngqushwa will be empowered in 
accordance with the Amathole Regional and Economic Development 
Strategies as well as the Provincial Growth and Development Plan. 


• I ntegration 

The local Municipality of Ngqushwa commits itself to promoting the 
spatial integration of settlements in order to enhance economic 
efficiency, facilitate the provision of affordable services and enable 
social development. The IDP will be considered as a tool for ensuring 
the alignment of local government activities with other spheres in 
development planning at Provincial, National and I nternational levels 
by serving as a basis for communication and continuous interaction. 
The integration of urban and rural areas; the eradication of spatial 
segregation through infrastructural development; the social and 
economic integration of different communities; the integration of 
strategic, operational, sectoral and spatial planning, the integration 
and management of institutional activities; the integration of various 
developmental processes such as planning, management, 
implementation, monitoring and review and the integration of 
development information shall receive particular attention during the 
implementation of action plans identified. 


• Sustainability 


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Local economic development will support the community and the 
benefits of development should be equitably distributed in order to 
sustain them over the long term. 


• Quality of life 

All developmental initiatives identified will be assessed in order to 
ascertain it's true worth and contribution to improving the quality of 
life. 


• Co-operative governance 

The principle of co-operative governance will be adopted. Conscious 
attempts will be put in place to ensure the alignment and co-ordination 
of National, Provincial and local development policies, frameworks, 
plans, programmes and initiatives. 


• Realism and feasibility 

It must be acknowledged from the outset, that limited financial and 
institutional resources exist at local level to resource not only the 
planning process, but also the implementation of reconstruction and 
development. In order to make projects and programmes a reality, it is 
imperative that commitment, honesty and reliability form the 
cornerstones of involvement in a fair process of reconstruction and 
development. 


• Prioritization 

Given the vast demands for development, synergy should allow for the 
realization of systematic progression towards economic transformation 
and reform thus putting in place an ethic of cooperation. 


• Buiiding the future today 

Ngqushwa realizes the urgency for the realization of a better life for all. 


• Cyciicai and Progressive 

The proposed approach realizes the urgency to build a new planning 
system, methodologies and products in response to global, national, 
provincial and local turmoil experienced. The approach will be highly 
interactive, responsive to stipulated needs and must be adaptable and 
flexible in order to benefit from a "learning by doing" concept. 


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• Timeframe 

Time is of the essence in ensuring synergy between short (1 year 
action plans), medium (5 year action plans) and long term (up to 25 
years) developmental plans. 


The Methodology 

The IDP methodology adopted, adhered to and recommended by the Department 
of Provincial and Local Government involves five prescribed phases. Each phase 
involves numerous actions, interventions and activities and includes an analysis 
of the current situation; the development and presentation of strategies through 
the identification of objectives for each priority issue identified; project 
formulation and an integration phase. 


Why an I DP review? 

Local government functions within an ever-changing environment. The dynamic 
nature within the global, national and local environments, constantly presents 
local government with new challenges and new demands. Also the needs of 
communities of Ngqushwa Local Municipality change. The five year 
developmental plans will be reviewed annually so that the local municipality is 
confident that the needs being addressed are real, actual, current, accepted, 
identified and raised by the community thereby promoting good corporate 
governance. 

The IDP annual review: 

• Is legislated in terms of the requirements of the Local Government 
Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000. 

• Establishes a platform for critically re examining current legislation in 
order to acquire a deeper insight into achieving the objectives of local 
government. 

• Assists in the recognition of linkages between development, delivery 
and democracy through the continuous engagement with business, 
citizens and community groups. 

• Is critical in assisting Ngqushwa Local Municipality to assess 
performance, accountability and overall state of local government 
therefore ensuring that the plans are being implemented. It also helps 
the municipality to assess the impact and effectiveness of previous 
development strategies adopted so as to update information in 
collaboration with the Central Statistical Service and make the 
necessary adjustments to the plans as required. 

• Allows for Ngqushwa Local Municipality to assess their administrative 
and financial capacity demonstrated in order to allow for the allocation 
of executive and legislative powers and functions between category B 

municipalities and district governments. 


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The IDP review can serve as a tool in obliging all spheres of 
governnnent to cooperate with one another in mutual trust and good 
faith through fostering friendly relations, assisting and supporting one 
another, infornning one another of, and consulting one another on, 
matters of common interest in order to enhance the implementation of 
policy and programmes. 


Benefits 

IDP Process (Activities and dates) 

- Community Participation (Activities and dates) 


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PROCESS PLAN 2015/2016 

IDP,BUDGET & PMS PROCESS ACTION PROGRAM 2015/16 



Activities 

Timeframe 

Responsible Department 

A 

Preparation phase / Pre-planning 




Council Approval of Process Plans (IDP & Budget) 

21 August 2014 

Municipal Manager/ BTO / Corporate Services 


Advertise IDP Review Process and resuscitate stakeholders 

25 August 2014 

Municipal Manager 


Submission of Process Plan to ADM 

25 August 2014 

Budget & Treasury Office 


Council Workshop on the IDP review process 

September 201 4 

Speaker's Office/Municipal Manager 


IGR Forum meeting 

1 8 November 201 4 

Municipal Manager 


IDP Steering Committee meeting to review Implementation progress and prepare for the 14/15 IDP 

Launch 

1 2 September 201 4 

Municipal Manager 


Submit adopted Plans with Council resolution to MEC - DLGTA 

September 201 4 

Municipal Manager / Corporate Services 


Advertise IDP/Budget Process Plan 

25 August 2014 

Municipal Manager 


DIMAFO Meeting 

17 September 2014 

Municipal Manager 


Launch IDP/PMS/Budget Representative Forum to outline terms of reference, report progress, 
explain review process. 

1 9 September 201 4 

Municipal Manager 


Quarter 1 Performance reporting (July - Sept) - within 4 days after end of quarter 

03 October 201 4 

Heads of Departments 


Conduct quarterly reviews with HoDs 

1 0 October 201 4 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Submit performance report to Performance Audit Committee 

24 October 201 4 

Municipal Manager's Office 

B+C 

Analysis Phase / Monitoring and evaluation 




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*Assessment of existing level of development - Situotionol onolysis 

*Prepare analysis information on existing services, current backlogs and identification of 
development priorities 

*Collect data from other sources, analyze impact of new information and unexpected events 
*Evaluate achievement of objectives and strategies 
*Get inputs from Sector Plan information 

*Assess implementation progress, overview of funding available per department (both from savings 
as well as internal budget and external funds) 

October 2014 - November 

2014 

All Departments / Clusters 


Ward Councillors and Ward Managers to assist in the identification of community needs and 
prioritisation of local issues 

October 2014 - November 

2014 

Speaker’s Office / Municipal Manager's Office 


Budget Steering Committee to assess project spending for first quarter 

24 October 201 4 

Budget & Treasury Office 


IGR Forum meeting (Sector specific analysis information) 

October 201 4 

Municipal Manager 


IDP Steering Committee meeting - Departments/Clusters to present situational analysis reports 

07 November 201 4 

All Departments/Clusters 


Distribute budget templates including growth parameter for 201 5/201 6 based on CPI average 
giving budget indicative amounts 

November 201 4 

Budget & Treasury Office 


DIMAFO meeting (Sector specific analysis information and prioritized local issues 

1 3 November 201 4 

Municipal Manager 


IDP/PMS/Budget Rep Forum meeting (Situational Analysis phase and community needs/ priorities) 

14 November 2014 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Finalise service charge estimates for 2015/16 

December 201 4 

Budget & Treasury Office 


Allocate funding envelopes per department based on DORA 2014 outer year forecast 

December 201 4 

Budget & Treasury Office 


Alignment of Organogram with Payday information - verify warm bodies; identify vacant posts 

December 201 4 

Corporate Services 


Strategic planning session. Adopt proposed overall direction of the 5 year strategic plan (IDP) - 
agree on main themes and key strategic objectives and key financial issues 

03-04 March 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Quarter 2 Performance reporting (Oct - Dec) - within 4 days after end of quarter 

06 January 2015 

Heads of Departments 


Conduct quarterly reviews with HoDs 

1 0 January 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 30 




Submit performance report to Performance Audit Committee 

January 201 5 

Municipal Manager's Office 

D 

Strategies Phase / Refined objectives, strategies, programmes and projects phase 




Refine objectives, strategies, programmes and draft projects as necessary for MTREF period, with 
key performance indicators and targets (as per strategic plan outcame) 

December 2014 - January 

2015 

All Departments/Clusters 


Proposals for new posts, including motivations and job descriptions 

31 January 201 5 

Corporate Services 


IDP Steering Committee Meeting - clusters to present planning and implementation progress 

1 6 January 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office / Cluster Teams 


Submit draft operating budgets, having taken funding envelopes into account 

31 January 201 5 

All Departments 


IDP Steering Committee - Cluster reports on revised objectives, strategies and projects as 
submitted in end of Jan budget documentation.. This report will include inputs from the sector plans 

06 February 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office / Cluster Teams 


IDP/Budget/Representative Forum meeting to present the draft IDP 

25 February 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office/ Budget & 
Treasury Office 


Consolidate all inputs including sector plan information and prepare draft IDP and Budget 

February-March 2015 

All Departments/Clusters 


Formulation of draft tariffs for 2014/15 

January 201 5 

Budget & Treasury Office 


Budget hearings to be held between FloDs and MM to assess budgets that exceed funding 
envelopes 

2 nd vVeek of February 

2015 

Municipal Manager 


Budget Steering Committee to approve draft budget allocations (IDP/ Budget link) 

February 2015 

Budget & Treasury Office/ Municipal 

Manager's Office 


Population of Schedule A template with IDP and Budget infarmation 

February 2015 

BTO / Strategic Planning / Corporate Services 
/ Technical Services 


Finalise Parameters for MTREF using guidelines from Treasury and outer year budgets 

04 February 201 5 

Budget & Treasury Office 


Approvai of the 2014/15 Adjustment Budget by the Council 

28 February 2015 

Budget & Treasury Office 


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IDP Steering Committee meeting to present the draft IDP and Budget 

06 March 201 5 

Municipal Manager's Office 


IGR Forum meeting to get inputs on district-wide development plans and funding commitments 

1 1 March 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Council Workshop on the draft IDP and Budget 

24 March 20 1 5 

Speakers Office 


IDP/Budget/Representative Forum meeting to present the draft IDP (district-wide consultation) 

13 March 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Council approval of the draft IDP & Budget and noting of the SDBIP as weil as 

19 March 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office / BTO / Corporate 

Services 


Submit draft IDP, Budget and SDBIP to MEC - DLGTA, Provincial and National Treasury 

03 April 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office / BTO 


Quarter 3 Performance reporting (Jan - March)) 

03 April 2015 

Heads of Departments 


Draft IDP and Draft Budget published - Advertise for public comment (21 days) 

03 April 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Conduct quarterly reviews with HoDs 

09 April 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Submit performance report to Performance Audit Committee 

April 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 

E 

Reviewed IDP document (Integration/programme implementation and operational plan) 




IDP/Budget roadshows - public hearings 

13-21 April 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office / Budget & 

Treasury Office 


IGR Forum meeting 

17 March 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


IDP Steering Committee meeting (implementation and operational plan) 

29 April 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


IDP/PMS/Budget Rep Forum 

08 May 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


DIMAFO meeting (Sector specific analysis information and prioritized local issues) 

15 May 2015 

Municipal Manager 


IDP Approval/ Council Open Day 

28 May 2015 

Speaker's Office/Communications 


Incorporate relevant comments to the Draft final reviewed IDP 

09 May 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


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F 

Approval phase 




Council Workshop on the final IDP Budget prior to adoption 

05 May 2015 

Speakers Office 


Council Approval of IDP & Budget 

28 May 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office / BTO / Corporate 

Services 


Final IDP and Budget published (within 14 days of approval) 

02 June 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Submit IDP, Budget and SDBIP to MEC - DLGTA, Provincial and National Treasury 

02 June 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office / BTO 


Quarter 4 Performance reporting (April - June)) 

04 July 2015 

Heads of Departments 


Conduct quarterly reviews with HoDs 

09 July 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Submit performance report to Performance Audit Committee 

July 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 

G 

Performance IVIanagement System 




Prepare Annual Report information as the National Treasury format 

22 July 2014 

BTO 


Submission of 201 3/1 4 Annual Financial Statements to Auditor General 

August 2014 

BTO 


Submission of 201 3/1 4 Annual Performance Report to Auditor General 

*Table the 201 3/1 4 Annual Report for council adoption 

August 2014 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Consolidation and distribution of draft annual report for comments 

August 2014 



Submission of annual report information by departments 

September 2014 

All Departments 


Tabling of draft annual report to the Audit Committee 

December 201 4 

Internal Audit 


* Submit mid-year performance assessment report for 2014/15 to Treasury 

January 201 5 

Municipal Manager's Office /BTO/Corporate 

Services 

* Submit mid-year performance assessment report for 2014/15 to Council 

January 201 5 

Municipal Manager's Office /BTO/Corporate 

Services 


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Submit 201 3/1 4 Annual Report to MEC - DLGTA and Auditor-General 

February 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Publicizing of the Annual Report for public comments 

05 February 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Public consultation by oversight on the annual report 

October 201 4 

MPAC 


Adopt oversight report (no later than 2 months after adoption of annual report) 

March 201 5 

Municipal Manager's Office /Corporate 

Services 


Publicize the oversight report (within 7 days of its adoption) 

April 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Submit draft SDBIP to the Mayor for initial approval 

March 201 5 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Submit revised SDBIP to the Mayor for final approval (within 14 days of approval of the Budget) 

June 201 5 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Signing of MM and Section 57 Managers Performance Agreements 

June 201 5 

Municipal Manager 


Mayor approval of the SDBIP with performance agreements (within 28 days after budget) 

June 201 5 

MM/Mayor 


Submit SDBIP and performance agreements to MEC - DLGTA, Provincial and National 
Treasury 

June 201 5 

Municipal Manager's Office 


Submit annual performance report to Evaluation Committee 

July 2014 

Internal Audit 


Pubiicize SDBIP and Performance Agreements no later than 1 4 days after approval 

July 2015 

Municipal Manager's Office 


DRAFT NGQUSHWA 2015/2016 INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


34 



RELEVENT DOCUMENTS 

The following documents should be read with the IDP: 

• Local government: Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000 

• IDP guide and IDP/PMS and Budget Process Plan 

• Various sector plans and programmes. 

• Ngqushwa Municipality Performance management framework. 

• Ngqushwa Spatial Development Framework. 

• Provincial Growth and Development Plan (PGDP) (2004-2014) 

• Provincial Spatial Development Plan (PSDP) 

• National Spatial Development Plan (NSDP) 

• National Development Plan (NDP) 

ALI GNMENT Wl TH NATI ONAL AND PROVI NCI AL PROGRAMS 

- The following National programs informs the IDP process 

- State of the Nation Address (SOMA) 

- State of the Local Government in South Africa 
Municipal Demarcation Board Reports 

- COGTA: Local Government Turnaround Strategy (LGTAS) 

- COGTA: Operation Clean Audit 2014. 

Municipal Powers and Functions. 

- ANC Manifesto 

- ANC J anuary 8'^'^ Statement 


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MUNICIPAL POWERS AND FUNCTIONS 

PART A 

(1) A municipality has executive authority in respect of, and has the right to 
administer- 

(a) the local government matters listed in Part B of Schedule 4 and Part B of 
Schedule 5; and 

(b) any other matter assigned to it by national or provincial legislation. 

(2) A municipality may make and administer by-laws for the effective 
administration of the matters which it has the right to administer. 

(5) A municipality has the right to exercise any power concerning a matter 
reasonably necessary for, or incidental to, the effective performance of its 
functions." 


PART B 

The following local government matters to the extent set out in section 155(6)(a) 
and (7): 

• Air pollution 


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• Building regulations 

• Child care facilities 

• Electricity and gas reticulation 

• Fire-fighting services 

• Local tourism 

• Municipal airports 

• Municipal planning 

• Municipal health services 

• Municipal public transport 

• Municipal public works only in respect of the needs of municipalities in 
the discharge of their responsibilities to administer functions specifically 
assigned to them under this Constitution or any other law 

• Pontoons, ferries, jetties, piers and harbours, excluding the regulation 
of international and national shipping and matters related thereto 
Storm water management systems in built-up areas 

• Trading regulations 

• Water and sanitation services limited to potable water supply systems 
and domestic waste-water and sewage disposal systems 

PART C 

The following local government matters to the extent set out for provinces 
in section 155(6)(a) and (7): 

• Beaches and amusement facilities 

• Billboards and the display of advertisements in public places 

• Cemeteries, funeral parlours and crematoria 

• Cleansing 

• Control of public nuisances 

• Control of undertakings that sell liquor to the public 

• Facilities for the accommodation, care and burial of animals 

• Fencing and fences 

• Licensing of dogs 

• Licensing and control of undertakings that sell food to the public 

• Local amenities 

• Local sport facilities 

• Markets 

• Municipal abattoirs 

• Municipal parks and recreation 

• Municipal roads 

• Noise pollution 

• Pounds 

• Public places 


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• Refuse removal, refuse dumps and solid waste disposal 

• Street trading 

• Street lighting 

• Traffic and parking 


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IDP 

Chapter One 

The Vision 


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Chapter One: The Vision 

Mission 

To be the preferred, vibrant, socio-economically developed municipal area that 
embraces a culture of human dignity, good governance, and characterized by 
good quality of service for all. 

Vision 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality will strive to become a benchmark institution in the 
country in respect of good quality and affordable services, through efficient 
resource mobilization and management, stimulation of economic growth and 
good governance practices. 

Core Values 

Linked to the mission the municipality also identified the following CORE VALUES 
to be adhered to by the councillors, management and the officials of the 
Municipality: 


Competency 

We commit to attract and retain a competent workforce to service our customers 

Honesty and I ntegrity 

We will demonstrate complete honesty and integrity in everything we do 

Diligence 

We will demonstrate caution, commitment and due diligence in discharging our 
Duties 

Transparency 

We will be transparent and fair in all our dealings for utmost accountability 

Accountability 

We will create an environment to be held to account by our stakeholders and 
customers 

Professionalism 

We will always uphold and maintain a professional behavior in executing our 
mandate and individual responsibilities for the furtherance of service delivery 

Value for Money 

We commit derive value for money as return on investment in all business 
engagements with service providers. 


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Batho Pele 


The White Paper on Transfornning Public Service Delivery (Batho Pele) puts 
forward eight principles for good public service. Our municipality is duty bound to 
uphold these principles: 

Consultation: 

Communities should be consulted about the level and quality of public service 
they receive, and, where possible, should be given a choice about the services 
which are provided. 

Service standards: 

Communities should know what standard of service to expect. 

Access: 

All communities should have equal access to the services to which they are 
entitled. 

Courtesy: 

Communities should be treated with courtesy and consideration. 

/ nformation: 

Communities should be given full and accurate information about the public 
services they are entitled to receive. 

Openness and transparency: 

Communities should know how departments are run, how resources are spent, 
and who is in charge of particular services. 

Redress: 

If the promised standard of service is not delivered, communities should be 
offered an apology, a full explanation and a speedy and effective remedy; and 
when complaints are made communities should receive a sympathetic, positive 
response. 

Value- for-money: 

Public services should be provided economically and efficiently in order to give 
communities the best possible value-for-money. 

Importantly, the Batho Pele White Paper notes that the development of a 
service-oriented culture requires the active participation of the wider community. 
Municipalities need constant feedback from service-users if they are to improve 
their operations. Local partners can be mobilized to assist in building a service 
culture. "For example, local businesses or non-governmental organisations may 
assist with funding a helpline, providing information about specific services, 
identifying service gaps or conducting a customer survey" - The White Paper on 
Local Government (1998). 


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IDP 

Chapter Two 

Demographic Profile 


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Chapter Two: Demographic Profile 

2. 1 NGQUSHWA GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality falls within the jurisdiction of the Amathole District Municipality 
which is situated in the Eastern Cape Province, Amathole District Municipality and covers an 
area of 23 SYSkm^ and the Ngqushwa municipal area covers 2245 square kilometers which 
accounts for 10% of the district. The administrative seat of the Municipality finds itself in 
Peddie and the municipal area is divided into 13 wards. 

Ngqushwa is located in the west of the Amathole district and consists of two towns Peddie 
and Hamburg, a portion of King Williams Town villages. It is one of the eight municipalities 
that fall within the Amathole District Municipality. Ngqushwa Municipality consists of 118 
villages. Ngqushwa is bordered by the Great Fish River to the west and the Keiskamma 
River to the East. The southern boundary comprises a part of the coastline of the Indian 
Ocean. 

MAP OF NGQUSHWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 



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The table and the map below depicts the number of wards and villages that are within the 
jurisdiction of Ngqushwa Local Municipality: 


Ward 

Villages 

1 

Zalara, Mtati, Tyeni, Ngqwele, Bhele, Nonibe, Gobozana, Nxopho 

2 

Qaga, Masele, Thamara, Dubu, Tsolo & Jubisa 

3 

Upper & Lower Mthombe, Thyatha, Mtyholo, Qugqwala, Dlova, Nquthu, 

Tildin, Tapushe, Rode, Zimbaba& Mavathulana 

4 

Qawukeni, Mabongo, Khalana, Shushu, Ntsinekana, Mqwashu, Bongweni A, 
Gcinisa North, Hlosini, Bongweni B, Maqosha, Nqwenerhana, Crossman/ 
Mgwangqa, Nomonti & Torr 

5 

Machibi, Moni, Twecu, Upper & Lower Dube, Cwecweni, Madliki, Phole, 

Moni, Nxwashu/Tyip-Tyip, Ngxakaxha & Mdolomba 

6 

Tyityaba/Ferndale, Bodium, Bell, Lover’s Twist, Crossroads, Tuku A, B & C, 
Wooldridge, Hoyi, Leqeni, Begha, 

7 

Cisira, Feni, Dam-dam, Makhahlane, eletyuma,Mahlubini/Nyaniso 

8 

Ndlambe, Ndwayana, Glenmore, Qamnyana, Gwabeni, Mankone, Horton, 
Luxolo & Rura 

9 

Runletts, Woodlands, Pikoli, Nobumba, Ntloko, Mgwalana, Lewis & Paradise 

10 

Peddie Town, Peddie Extension, Power, Luxolweni, German village, Durban 
Location 

11 

Hamburg, Benton, Gcinisa-South, Wesley, Bhingqala/Soweto, Mqheleni, 
Tarfield/Nier, Qobo-qobo/Nuloets,Daninge 

12 

Mpheko, Mgababa, Prudhoe, Mkhanyeni 

13 

Mtati, Ngqowa, Upper Gwalana, Mabaleni, Ntshamanzi, Newtondale, 
Maxhegweni, Upper Qeto, Lower Qeto, Lower Mgwalana, eSigingqini 



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2.2 Demographic profile 
2.2.1 Population 

In accordance with the infornnation from the census it is revealed that the 
total population was estimated to be 84 233 for the year 2001, with an 
observed slight decrease to 83 079 in 2007 to an alarming 72 190 in 2011. 
The number of population of 2011 vs the number of households being 21384 
clearly stipulates that in each household there is quite a number of 
inhabitants distributed unevenly in all households. It is also shocking to note 
that numbers of households have also decreased over the years. This state of 
affairs has to be further studied to understand the prevailing dynamics within 
the municipality and also in the Province as a whole. The figure below 
displays how these changes have affected both population and the number of 
households. 


Total population vs households 



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2. 2. 1.1 Population by Gender 

When observing the population at ward level, it is unevenly distributed as 
depicted on the table below as distributed on gender basis: 


The following table shows a summary of key statistics by gender from statics (2011): 


WARD 

POPULATION BY WARD 

MALE 

FEMALE 

TOTAL 

1 

2 593 

2 962 

5 555 

2 

2 864 

3 100 

5 963 

3 

2 789 

3 041 

5 830 

4 

2 658 

2 902 

5 559 

5 

2 899 

3 166 

6 065 

6 

2 531 

2 812 

5 343 

7 

2 827 

3 224 

6 051 

8 

2 543 

2 847 

5 390 

9 

2 322 

2 574 

4 897 

10 

2 323 

2 688 

5 011 

11 

2 798 

3 167 

5 964 

12 

2 180 

2 603 

4 783 

13 

2 658 

3 120 

5 777 

GRAND TOTAL 

33 984 

38 206 

72 190 


Source: Statistics SA (201 1 ) 


Thus in total on the composition of male and female with the jurisdiction of 
Ngqushwa is distributed as such: 


Population by Gender 



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2.2.1.2 Population by Age 

Gender distribution by Age 


Census 2011 

by Sex and Age in completed years. 

EC126: Ngqushwa. (Numbers) 

4 000 
3 500 
3 000 
2 500 
2 000 
1 500 
1 000 
500 
0 

0 - 4 5 - 9 10-14 20 - 24 30 - 34 40 - 44 50 - 54 60 - 64 70 - 74 80 - 84 85 + 

© Statistics Denmark 
Source: Statistics SA (201 1 ) 

The above figure reflects a high dependency rate with numbers of children aged between 0 
and 19 years, school going age estimated at 28 800 with approximately 14 899 being males 
and 13 901 females. On the other hand, the numbers of those who fall above the 
economically active population (above 60 years) are estimated at 11 675. Of those, 
approximately 7 260 are women and about 4 415 are men. This means that the total number 
of children, youth and elderly is 40 475 which accounts for about 56% of the total population. 

This is very high and means that the municipality has to focus more efforts and funding 
towards children and youth development as well as caring for the aged. 

There is a high rate of school drop outs as well as high unemployment rate. This further 
promotes the need to develop social and youth development programs, provision of basic 
services and vigorous job creation programs. 



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Furthermore the NLM Age is distributed as depicted the figure below where it shows the vast 
number of population is with the age 20-64 which takes 48% of the entire population. 
Whereas 0-4 years takes 11%, 5-19 is at 29% and lastly the older persons from 65 years and 
older take 12% of the population. 


Age Distribution 


Age Distribution 

■ 65 and older ■ 20-64 Years ■S-WYears ■0-4Years 



Socio Economic Profile 

2.2.2 Labour Force Income and Wages 
2.2. 2.1 Household Income 

The figure below depicts the economical standing of the population within Ngqushwa. It is 
potent in such that it stipulates how much the majority earns and thus economically directs 
the income distribution potential. It is reflected that the majority of households are earning 
very low incomes. Statistics SA information shows the number of the employed households 
being 11 538 earning between R9 601 and R38 200 per annum. Ward meetings revealed 
that the majority of the population relies on social grants. They raised that there is a need for 
projects to provide the community with food security. Proposals for skills development and 
provision of institutions of higher learning that will ensure improvement of the labour force 
also came up strongly from the wards. 

The Department of Social Development, Special Programmes and the Local Economic 
Development is engaged and has funded a number of projects and co-operatives , ranging 
from vegetable, livestock & poultry farming, sewing etc. The majority of these projects and 
co-operatives are active and have challenges related to shortage of funding, skills and 
infrastructure like water, electricity, fencing, medication etc. 


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Households income 


R 2 457 601 or more 
R 614 001 - R 1 228 800 
R 153 801 - R 307 600 
R 38 201 - R 76 400 
R 9601 - R 19 600 
R 1 - R 4800 




Rl-R 

4800 

R4801 

- R 

9600 

R9601 

- R 19 

600 

R 19 

601 -R 

38 200 

R38 

201 -R 

76 400 

R76 

401 -R 

153 

800 

R 153 

801- R 

307 

600 

R307 

601- R 

614 

400 

R614 

001- R 

1 228 

800 

R 1 

228 

801- R 

2 457 

600 

R2 

457 

601 or 

more 

■ number of households 

1501 

1982 

6696 

4842 

1666 

725 

347 

137 

21 

11 

23 


Source: Statistics SA (201 1 ) 

2.3.2 Unemployment Rate vs Poverty Rate 


According to the information released by Statistics SA, the jurisdiction of Ngqushwa in 2001 
had an unemployment rate at an atrocious rate of 78% which over the years has gradually 
improved to the last release of 2011 to be 52.8%. This is still rather a high rate for any 
economic enabling environment, but it rather depicts that there has been improvements over 
the years even though not that lucrative when looking at the economic scales. It is of note 
that as much as there has been a national decrease of the unemployment rate, looking at the 
Amathole District, Ngqushwa has always maintained a significantly higher level compared to 
other local municipalities. 


Unemployment Rate within ADM 




DC12: 

Amathole 

EC121: 

Mbhashe 

EC122: 

Mnquma 

EC123: 
Great Kei 

EC124: 

Amahlathi 

EC126: 

Ngqushwa 

EC127: 

Nkonkobe 

EC128: 

Nxuba 

■ Census 2001 

64.7 

69.9 

62.5 

50.1 

61.2 

78.0 

67.6 

53.6 

■ Census 201 1 

42.9 

42.3 

44.2 

29.8 

36.1 

52.8 

48.1 

42.0 


V ' I I I I I I I I ly 


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Source: Statistics SA (201 1 ) 


Employment Rate vs Poverty Rate 


80.00 

70.00 

60.00 

S, 50.00 
nj 

= 40.00 

u 

5 30.00 

o. 

20.00 

10.00 


Employment rate vs Poverty rate 




Poverty rate 

Rate of Unemployment 

Employment Rate 

■ 2001 

70.40 

64.34 

35.66 

■ 2006 

69.40 

51.03 

48.97 

■ 2011 

65.76 

40.17 

59.83 


Source: ECSECC (2011) 

The above figure reflects decreasing poverty levels between 2001, being about 70% to 66% 
in 2011. Unemployment on the other hand also shows a decrease from 64,34% in 2001 to 
about 40,17% in 2011. The employment rate is on the increase from 36% in 2001 to 60% in 
2011 . 

Ward meetings cited poverty and unemployment as one of the major challenges. These 
meetings also suggested that government should provide more support to orphans and child- 
headed households. Over the years the government has been indeed implementing 
strategies that are in-line with alleviating the unemployment rate such as the Expanded 
Public Works Program (EPWP). 

2.3 Access to Social Grants 

As a result of the low level of education and high unemployrrient rate, the 
municipality experiences high levels of poverty, thus increasing dependency on 
government social grants. This was also confirmed by the ward meetings with 
communities having expressed the need for the grant to be increased as it is 
inadequate for their monthly commitments. 

As the government provides a number of social grants, there are many 
challenges that have been enlightened when applicants are making their first 
applications. Such challenges can be from being rejected nor when a reviewal 
period reaches individuals no longer qualify, or themselves have not went in for 


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reviewal at South African Social Security Agency (SASSA). Some of these 
challenges inherently from the Home Affairs Department where a number of 
dynamics link with the social grant applications thus formulate rejections. 
Outlined below are the list of challenges from the sister departments 

2.3.1 Challenges noted by the South African Social Security Agency: 

Old age Grant is paid out to South Africans aging from the age of 60 and 
above. Some of the old age group are unable to qualify for this grant due 
to the incorrect birth dates on their Identity Documents (ID). 

In most circumstances disability grant applicants get rejected by SASSA 
due to in-house doctors as referred by medical doctors whom find 
applicants still fit to be employable. 

Granting Aid grant applicants take a longer awaiting approval period. 

With some of the grants there are a number of fraudulent applicants which 
in-turn delay the process of qualifying applicants, due investigation and 
process that have to take place before any applications is approved. 


2.3.2 Challenges noted by the Department Home Affairs: 

Some applicants have issues of appearing to be married while they are 
not. This is due to the foreigners whom are illegally, in possession of 
identity documents. 

Incorrect information on identity documents, for example age, names to 
name a few, such that grant applications are rejected. 

Duplication of identity documents. This is rectified by the Head office and 
requires supportive documents proving their differences. However the 
process takes long to be verified and corrected and so put a number of 
people in a difficult position. 


2.4 Safety and Security 

The Ngqushwa municipality established the Community Safety Forum as it was 
resolved by the MUNIMEC and is chaired by Portfolio head Councillor of 
Community Service. Currently its administrative support is rendered through the 
secretary of the Community Services Executive Manager, however personnel is 
needed. An administrator for all Community Safety issues is an ideal position. 
There is an Integrated Community Safety Plan which is still on its draft stages 
and has not gone through the council for its approval. A Community Safety Policy 


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has been developed but has not yet been approved through the correct Council 
Structures. 

Engagement with SAPS and CPFs within the district, liquor is playing a major role 
in the commission of crime. The district also has a high number of drugs within 
the communities and some illegal firearms and ammunition. People are 
assaulting each other while drunk and coming from the taverns and shebeens. 
Elderly women and children are most victims of rape and ladies from taverns also 
get raped. Perpetrators are mostly known to the victims. Houses mostly left 
alone are broken into though some, owners were inside. Stock in some areas is 
stolen in the grazing lands and some in the kraals. The Community Safety 
Forum is thus working on a by-law on Liquor trading licence is in the process of 
being promulgated with its stakeholders which will in turn mitigate some of the 
faced challenges. 

2.4.1 Crime Levels 


Figure 5: Crime Levels 


3 000 


2 500 


000 


500 


000 


500 


Crime rates 


MTe 



r 



Number of Cases 
of Murder 

Number of Cases 
of Sexual Crimes 

Number of Cases 
of Common 
Robbery 

Number of Cases 
of Drug-related 
Crimes 

Number of Cases 
of Driving Under 
the Influence of 
Alcohol 

■ 2006 

153 

542 

438 

2 632 

542 

■ 201 1 

157 

587 

326 

2 140 

302 


Source: ECSECC (2011) 


Figure 5 above reflects numbers of reported cases of crime between 2006 and 
2011. The highest numbers are for cases of drug related crimes but have 
decreased from about 2632 cases in 2006 to about 2 140 in 2011. Sexual 
crimes have slightly increased from 542 to 587 for the same years. On the other 
hand, numbers of reported cases of robbery have also decreased from 438 to 
326. This is commendable as the improvement is great in the area of crime 
prevention. Many communities have cited crime as one of the major issues. 


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This could be attributed to the fact that some of the cases are not reported. 
Highlighted from SAPS reports is that burglary in residential areas, and stock 
theft are rated the highest crimes in the Ngqushwa area. 

On the table below, listed is the number of available police station with 
Ngqushwa and the average number of Police Officers availability on the fields as 
well as at the stations on daily basis. 


Police officers on the field and on duty on a daily average: 


POLICE STATION NAME 

FIELD PERSONNEL 

ON DUTY 

PERSONNEL 

Peddie 

2 

5 

Moyeni 

3 

4 

Bell 

4 

6 

Hamburg 

2 

3 

Thyefu 

2 

2 

TOTAL 

13 

20 


2.5 Levels of Literacy 

Figure 6: Literacy levels 


a 

o 

o 

a 

o 

6 


25000 


20000 


15000 


10000 


5000 


Literacy levels 




-t 



No 

schooling 

Some 

primary 

Complete 
d primary 

Some 

secondary 

Grade 
12/Std 10 

Higher 

Unspecifie 

d 

■ No of people 

6320 

22150 

5289 

21077 

7043 

1685 

43 


Source: Statistics SA (201 1 ) 


According to Figure 6, of the total population of 72 190 people, approximately 
31%, being 22 150 have a primary education, whereas about 29%, being 21 077 
have secondary education and only 10% have a Matriculation Certificate. This 
reveals a very low level of education, coupled with a high number of children 
dropping out of school. 

Some challenges were revealed during the ward visits, including shortage of 
classrooms, lack of infrastructure like access roads, water, electricity and 


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sanitation. Increasing numbers of school drop outs were also cited as some of 
the issues resulting from teenage pregnancy and other related challenges. 
Numbers of children per grade, per school were calculated. Figure 8 below 
reflects that at junior level, numbers of children fluctuate probably as a result of 
children having to move from school to school as some only offer junior primary. 
At high school level, a trend of numbers drastically decreasing between grade 10 
and 12 has been noted. This is as a result of either high failure rates or high rate 
of children dropping out of school. 

It is proposed that the Department of Education should form partnership with the 
municipality to raise awareness and also assist to improve the failure rate. This 
will entail in more children completing grade 12 and thereby forming part of the 
community's labour force. 

2.6 Human Development I ndex (HDI ) 


The Human development index (HDI) is used as an indicator of development. 
The HDI is calculated by measuring the overall achievement in respect of the 
three basic dimensions of human development namely longevity (life 
expectancy), knowledge (literacy) and standard of living (income). 

Amathole District Municipalities HDI is 0.48 which is an indication of the low level 
of development. The HDI for Ngqushwa is 0.46 which is one of the lowest for the 
district but comparable to others in the district (e.g. Mbashe-0.42 and Buffalo 
City-0.59). 

The skills levels of the population are very low as reflected by the district picture. 
29% of workers in the Amathole District have either elementary skills or are 
unskilled workers. 4% of Amathole's working people fall into the skilled category 
and 14% have professional skills. 


Findings: 

❖ Only 23.5% (21 263) of the people In the area are employed. 

❖ The sltuatlon Impacts negatlvely on the populatlon's dependency on soclal grants. 

❖ These flgures wlll have a negatlve Impact on the area's growth and development 
potentlal, as there Is llttle money In clrculatlon. 

❖ The low Income levels reflect the Inablllty of resldents to provlde baslc shelter to 
support themselves flnanclally and to pay for munlclpal servlces, thus Influenclng 
the functlonlng of the munlclpallty. 

❖ Human development Index Is low due to low llfe expectancy, low llteracy levels and 
low Income levels/standard of llvlng. 

❖ It Is Imperatlve to ralse the human development Index In order to be successful In 
project and programme Implementatlon. 


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2.6.1 Economic Overview 


Figure 7: Employment by Sector 



■ Agriculture; hunting; forestry and fishing 

■ Mining and quarrying 

■ Manufacturing 

■ Electricity; gas and water supply 

■ Construction 

■ Wholesale and retail trade 

■ Transport; storage and communication 

■ Financial; insurance; real estate and 
business services 

■ Community; social and personal services 

■ Other and not adequately defined 

■ CommunitySurvey2007_Unspecified 


The Economy of Ngqushwa is vastly distributed within the Community, Social and 
Personal Services sector by 22%. The Wholesale and Trade Sector is only out- 
numbered by 1% by Community, Social and Personal Services, which in turn 
both contribute the largest contribution of 43% of the entire economy. The other 
21% could not be specified as per the Community Survey 2007. 

Agriculture being the largest identified sector that aught to provide a number of 
household with employment. Off note is that many people are involved in 
agriculture, but this does not reflect in economic contribution. What is reflected is 
only 4% contribution in the economy. This id due to its informal nature that it 
possess. 

Mining and Quarrying contribute the least at 1% of the economy. Which is 
slightly believed to improve over the years as per identified nodal points within 
Ngqushwa. The unemployment rate of Ngqushwa is thus too high at 52.8% 


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Chapter Three 

Status Quo Assessment 


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Chapter Three: Status Quo Assessment 

3.1 SERVICE DELIVERY AND I NFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT 

Strategic Goal: To ensure effective, efficient and economical provision of 
electricity services and street lights to the community of Ngqushwa by 2017 and 
beyond 

3.1.1 Health Services 

The Amathole District Municipality is responsible for the provision of 
comprehensive primary health care to the community. National and Provincial 
agencies are responsible for welfare and developmental social services as well as 
social security and support services. 

The Eastern Cape is divided into five health regions which differ from district 
council boundaries. The Amathole District Municipality and subsequently 
Ngqushwa fall within Region C which also includes Fort Beaufort, Albany, King 
William's Town, East London and Butterworth. It is believed that the regional 
position will provide an adequate reflection of the situation in Ngqushwa. 

The mortality rate in this region is the lowest in the province with a rate of 33 
deaths per 1000 live births, which is even lower than the national average of 59 
deaths per 1000 live births. The low rate is an expression of the low 
immunization rate of 58% painting a clear picture that better access to health 
facilities could bring about an improvement in health to the region. 

The biggest threat to adult's health status in the district is HIV/AIDS. The 
Eastern Cape Province is rated the fifth largest province with a high HIV/AIDS 
prevalence, where the Amathole region is the third highest within the region. The 
average prevalence rate is 27.10% as recorded for the region. This relates to an 
infection rate of between 20300 and 24090 of the 84234 residents of Ngqushwa 
Municipality. In region C where Ngqushwa falls the rate is 17.8% which is the 
second lowest in the Eastern Cape according to statistics released in 2000. 

Despite statistics indicating an increasing infection rate, the rate of infection 
appears to be slowing in the Ngqushwa area which is a positive indicator. Since 
Ngqushwa is mostly rural, HIV prevention programmes have to deal with 
problems surrounding access to primary health facilities and services. 

The impact of HIV/AIDS is exacerbated by the prevalence of tuberculosis. TB 
prevalence in region C is 5.9% compared with the provincial average of 10.3%. 
The region therefore has the lowest incidence of tuberculosis in the Eastern 
Cape. TB is generally associated with poverty and over-crowding. These factors 


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are also evident in Ngqushwa and it is essential that this be monitored to prevent 
an escalation of this figure. 

6% of the population of Ngqushwa has some form of disability. The highest 
number of people have visibility impairments (25%) followed by those with 
physical impairments (11%). 26% have emotional and intellectual impairments. 

The 2004/15 IDP review, has indicated that the provision and distribution of 
health facilities regarded as adequate but the quality and services rendered was 
found to be inadequate. 

There is one hospital to serve the entire municipal area namely the Peddie 
Nompumelelo General Hospital which has 656 beds. The hospital has undergone 
major repairs and maintenance. 

The remainder of the municipal area is served by 26 clinics and 3 mobile clinic 
units (however only 1 vehicle in operation, therefore there is need for more 
vehicle) that provide access to lower level health care. This means that primary 
health care facility serves 4476 persons. The figure was compared with the World 
Health Organization's indicator of one primary health care facility per 10 000 
people and on the surface appears adequate however most facilities are located 
more than an hour's travel by local transport or foot, which reduces the 
adequacy of the provision. The mobile clinics provide health services on a regular 
monthly basis varying from once per week, to three times a week. However 
during the under review the department of health had indicated the challenge 
around mobile clinic due to non-availability of vehicles to serve this purpose. 

The most crucial issue facing these primary health care facilities is to improve the 
services and quality of services rendered which is currently hampered by 
inadequate equipment and to ensure that there are facilities in each ward. 

Table 3 Personnel available at clinics: 


Number 

Name of clinic 

Personnel: 

Nursing staff 

Administration 

1 

Gateway Clinic 

6 

0 

2 

Bhele Clinic 

3 

0 

3 

Glenmore Clinic 

4 

0 

4 

Gwabeni Clinic 

1 

0 

5 

Hamburg 

2 

0 

6 

Horton 

2 

0 

7 

Jaji 

2 

0 

8 

J ama 

3 

1 


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9 

Matomela 

3 

0 

10 

Norah 

3 

0 

11 

Peddie Extension 

5 

2 

12 

Pikoli 

2 

0 

13 

Robert Mbelekane 

2 

0 

14 

Wesley 

3 

0 

15 

Mthyolo 

1 

0 

16 

Mthombe 

3 

0 

17 

Masele 

2 

0 

18 

Ngqwele 

2 

0 

19 

Punzana 

2 

0 

20 

Tamara 

2 

0 

21 

Twecu 

2 

0 

22 

Zalara 

2 

0 

23 

Nier 

2 

0 

24 

Ndwayana 

2 

0 

25 

Qeto 

4 

0 

26 

Tyata 

3 

0 


NB: There are 6 Medical doctors employed full time and 1 roving 
medical doctor and 1 dentist for the clinics. 


3.1.2 ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS 
3. 1.2.1 CLI MATE 

The municipal area is characterized by different levels of elevation and this result 
in climatic variation. The coast is subtropical and is usually cool and humid 
whereas the conditions inland are hot and semi-arid. Rainfall is low to moderate 


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and varies between 400nnnn in inland areas and 700nnnn per annunn along the 
coast. The area falls within the summer rainfall climatic zone. The coastal areas 
are characterized by high velocity winds. 

The climate of the region is conducive to the tourism potential of the area as it is 
moderate throughout the year with no extremes of temperature or rainfall. 


3. 1.2. 2 BIOPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 

The local bio-physical environment of the Ngqushwa municipality is experiencing 
a steady decline. The decline has accelerated in recent years as the effects of 
increased human activity, population growth and concentration become more 
evident. This decline is evidenced by a prevalence of the following: 

Soil erosion, which is caused by poor veld management, uncontrolled 
burning of the veld and overgrazing. These practices result in a loss of 
fertile agricultural soils and cause a general ecological decline of the 
area. This is especially prevalent in ward 8. 

Deforestation, which is caused by the indiscriminate felling of trees for 
domestic purposes including firewood, construction and medicinal 
purposes. These practices result in a reduction of botanical diversity, 
loss of aesthetic value and economic potential of the area. 

Environmental pollution, resulting from the use of pit latrines, use of 
natural water sources for domestic purposes, indiscriminate solid waste 
disposal, smoke from the burning of refuse and uncontrolled veld fires. 
These practices result in air, soil and water pollution especially in rural 
areas. 

The establishment of alien and invader plants, which is caused by the 
introduction of alien and invader plants. This problem is compounded 
by deforestation and erosion which create a climate that facilitates the 
dispersion of these plants. The result is a loss of arable land. The 
Department of agriculture and the Department of Water Affairs and 
Forestry (DWAF) have programmes to address this issue by eradicating 
these plants thus at the same time create jobs. 

A decline in the aesthetic quality and eco-tourism potential of natural 
areas. 

A lack of environmental regulation which results in indiscriminate 
utilization of natural resources and which ultimately impacts on the 
eco-tourism potential of the municipality. 


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The biophysical environment of Ngqushwa is characterized by diverse ecologically 
sensitive areas. The area has a high degree of aesthetic appeal and is also rich in 
natural resources that are ideal for the eco-tourism industry such as the physical 
landscape (mountains, valleys, the coastline, dune systems, sand beaches, 
estuaries, wetlands, etc.) 

Areas of conservation importance and eco-tourism potential include: 

The coast line and marine resources 

Coastal forests occurring in close proximity to the coastline 
Wetlands including coastal and inland wetlands 
Estuaries, streams and rivers 
Nature reserves 

The municipality has recognized the need and importance of developing 
conservation policies and practices to ensure the conservation of these areas and 
ensure that they are utilized in an ecologically sustainable manner which will not 
only promote the economic potential of the area but also ensure that they are 
available for use by future generations. 

Awareness has increased as to the importance of environmental issues, stressing 
the necessity for the sustainable management of development and settlements. 
This has included a special focus on the persistence of poverty and the effects of 
economic and environmental change on low-income and population groups with 
limited resources. 

There is also a realization that it is impossible to separate economic development 
issues from environmental issues. Many forms of unsustainable development 
models and approaches erode the environmental resources upon which they are 
based and environmental degradation can undermine economic development and 
vice versa. 

High poverty levels have also become an integral part of the environmental 
challenges continuum. As a consequence it has become apparent that there is a 
need to deal with environmental problems by addressing underlying issues of 
poverty and economic decline in the area. 


3.1.3 LAND AND HOUSI NG 

3. 1.3.1 SETTLEMENT PATTERNS 


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Ngqushwa is predominantly rural with only 5% of the population living in the 
urban areas, as opposed to 95% of the population who reside in the rural areas. 

The settlement patterns of Ngqushwa can be divided into the following 
categories: 

Urban Areas 

Peddie and Hamburg are the only two proclaimed towns within the 
municipality. There are peri-urban settlements establishes outside of 
both of these nodes which in the case of Peddie almost encircle it. 


Peddie can be regarded as a regional hub for service rendering to the 
entire municipal area. The majority of the region's services and 
facilities are located here and economic and social functions are 
performed from here. It also plays an important administrative role as 
the seat of the municipality is also in Peddie. Not all areas of the town 
are serviced, particularly the lower income areas which are found in the 
main part of the town. 

Hamburg is primarily a holiday destination. The municipality is 
gradually developing Hamburg and wants it to be a suitable site for 
tourism. 

*> Rural Areas 

The majority of the population that is 95% resides in the rural area 
which means that access to essential services and facilities by the 
majority of the population is also limited. This also compromises the 
municipality's ability to raise revenue on the basis of services. These 
limitations have been recognized by the municipality and are in the 
process of being addressed. 

There are 118 rural villages which are scattered throughout the 
municipal area. These villages are surrounded by commonage land that 
is used for a mix of agricultural purposes including crops and livestock 
which are farmed primarily on a subsistence basis. 

Rural villages can be classified as follows: 

Traditional rural villages such as Bell, Bodium, Crossroad, Lover's Twist, 
etc. which owe their establishment to their proximity to an agricultural 
resource base. 

Rural villages established in response to commercial agricultural needs in 
terms of labour on commercial farms. These villages are primarily in ward 
6, 7 and 11 and include Benton, Tharfield, Jamesdale, Stourpoort and 
Lewis. 

Holiday resorts such as Birha, Mgwalana, and Mpekweni resorts which are 
newly developed in response to the localized resort potential of the coastal 
area. 


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Minor and isolated farnn connnnunities scattered throughout the municipal 
area. 


•> Conservation Areas 

There are a number of environmentally sensitive areas which are categorized 
as conservation areas and which are primarily situated along the coast. 


<* Agricultural Areas 

Agricultural areas are characterized by diverse uses. Subsistence farming of 
crops and livestock takes place. Grazing is however problematic as it is 
uncontrolled. 


The alluvial soils of the Keiskamma River terraces are suitable for subtropical 
fruit production, vegetable production and fodder crop production. Rain fed 
cropping is also a viable option on the coastal plains and plateau. 

3. 1.3. 2 LANDTENURE AVAI LABI LITY AND DISTRIBUTION 

There is sufficient rural and urban land available in Ngqushwa municipal area to 
accommodate the short, medium and long term demand for land. Land release is 
however problematic and numerous tenure and distribution issues needs to be 
addressed. 

In the Ngqushwa municipal area, most urban land is owned by the Municipality. 
Rural land is however primarily state owned and interspersed with a number of 
informal land rights. A need was identified to convert the tenure of the large 
tracts of state owned land to communal ownership. Land release for housing 
projects has either been very slow, or has not been responded to in spite of the 
submission of applications to that effect. Ngqushwa is also characterized by a 
diversity of land uses and land tenure which is primarily attributable to the 
previous dispensation as evidenced by historical forms of land rights, such as 
African freehold, quitrent and permission to occupy (PTO) which are still 
prevalent in the area. 


The land tenure arrangements prevalent in Ngqushwa are summarized in table 
below: 


Land tenure arrangements within Ngqushwa 


Bell/Bodiam 

Freehold/Quitrent 

Tyefu Irrigation Scheme communities of 

Glenmore, Ndwayana, Pikoli-Kalekeni 

PTO's in dense settlement 

Others old nineteenth century 


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and Ndlambe 

Glenmore established late 70's early 

80's, 

Ndwayana 

settlements 

PTO's under TA 

New tenure arrangements introduced 
by 

Ulimocor/irrigation scheme, with foot 
plots, etc., but never with full 
community sanction. 

All other rural settlements 

PTO's 

Surveyed farms, formerly white owned, 
purchased by SANT to consolidate 
former Ciskei 

Currently black owned or "leased" 
pending transfer to black farmers 
(conveyancing problems) or to be 
transferred to groups of occupiers 
with IPILRA rights-CPA. 

Former Ulimocor Pineapple farms, same 
as above. Three separate blocks of land 
in the south east. 

Tenure still under the state, Company 
(Pineco) running pineapple 
production, workers organized under 
Peddie Pineapple Development 

Trust-intention to investigate transfer 
of land to Trust over time. 


There are a number of surveyed farms which were acquired from former 
white owners, some of which are in the process of being transferred to 
black commercial farmers and holders of IPILRA rights. There are also 
farms which have been transferred to former lessees who had Deeds of 
Sale under the Ciskei regime. Delays are however being experienced with 
the transfers of the above properties due to a number of reasons including 
unregistered subdivisions. 


Land redistribution of land is also a complex issue and is a major issue 
within this municipality. The Amathole District Land Reform and 
Settlement Plan identified the following crucial issues in respect of the 
current state land disposal process. 


There is a lack of consultation between the local municipality and 
DLA/.DoA over decisions regarding the disposal of state farms. 

There is insufficient information about the extent and availability of 
land earmarked for disposal available to the local authority and 
communities. 

Legitimate land owners do not have their title deeds. 


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The process whereby the legal occupant of land is identified needs to 
be done faster. 

Connnnunities need to be given information on how to access land for 
farming and the relevant policy provisions. 

There is a need for greater support and communication from DLA 

The restructuring agreements and subsequent land rights and transfers 
between the former parastatal, Ulimocor and the Peddie Community 
Development Trust need to be finalized as there are economic benefits to 
this. There are unresolved land claims that still needs to be resolved 


3. 1.3. 2 PLANNED AND SURVEYED SITES 

The following settlements (Table 5) within the Municipality have recently been 
planned and surveyed as pilot projects in order to facilitate service and 
infrastructural provision as advanced by the Rapid Land Development and 
People's Housing Process. 


Table: Planned and surveyed sites 


Area 

Approximate number of sites 

1. Hamburg 

600 

2. Mpekweni 

1000 

3. Gcinisa 

500 

4. Ntilini 

350 

5. Glenmore 

600 

6. Prudhoe 

350 

7. Feni 

1000 

8. Qaga 

500 

9. Pikoli 

820 

lO.Cisira 

500 

ll.Runlets 

450 

12.Tuku A 

527 

IB.Durban 

500 


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14.Madliki 

500 

IS.Crossroads 

440 

le.Upper Gwalana 

598 

ly.Nonibe 

623 

IS.Ntilini 

121 

lO.Mgababa 

780 

20.Tamara 

500 

Total 

11259 


Additional areas have been identified and a business plan submitted to the 
Department of Housing, Local Government and Traditional affairs for their survey 
and planning. The surveying and planning of Mavathulana was in progress at the 
time of compilation of this report. 


Table 6 Areas identified for survey and planning 


Area 

Approximate number of sites 

Mavathulana 

600 

Dlova 

300 

Lewis 

250 

Mankone 

500 

Total 

1650 


Source: Ngqushwa municipality, 2008 


3.1.4 HOUSING 

Housing demand profile of the municipalitv 

From the previous Housing Sector Plan the following issues (with regards to the 
housing demand in the municipality) were noted: 


• There is no waiting list 

• The demand is 10 320 housing units. 


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• The SDF indicates that the housing demand is 19 380 housing units 
Figures provided by municipality and the discrepancies will need to be 
addressed in future reviews. 

According to the department's database, there are only 2 military veterans within 
Ngqushwa. 

The quantified housing demand in based on information from the 2001 Census, 
2007 Household Survey and DWA structure count, can be summarised as 
follows: 


RURAL 

SOCIAL AND 

RENTAL 

INFORMAL 

SETTLEMENT 

STRUCTURES 

CHILD HEADED 

HOUSEHOLDS 

8 776 

659 

876 (0) 

315 


The table above does provide an accurate estimation of informal settlement 
structures. The dot count reflects that there are no informal structures 
concentrated within informal settlements in Peddie, whilst the Census and 
Household survey figure includes informal structures within existing settlements 
throughout the Municipality. 


Table 7 Access to housing 


Type of dwelling 

% 

Formal 

62.06 

1 nformal 

3.58 

Traditional 

34.14 

Other 

0.22 


Source: Statistics South Africa, 2005 as quoted in IDP review 2006/07 


3. 1.4.1 Housing Subsidy Projects 

There are 2 approved housing projects comprising 2177 units. Of these, 1420 is 
for green field's development and 500 are in-situ development. The Municipality 
is the sole developer of all housing projects. 


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3. 1.4. 2 PAST AND CURRENT HOUSI NG PROJ ECTS 


The housing projects currently undertaken by the Municipality are in Peddie 
(Peddie 710 and Peddie 500). A pilot housing project, consisting of 30 low cost 
houses, has been completed in Hamburg and in Peddie, as 28 low cost housing 
units of the pilot housing project has also been completed. In addition, 395 out 
of 500 housing units of the Masakhane housing project in Peddie Extension have 
also been completed. 

The past and current project details are provided in table depicted below. 

Table 8 Past and Current Housing Projects in Ngqushwa 


Project Title 

Ward 

Area 

Sites 

Project 

Value 

(R'OOO) 

Houses 

Comple 

ted 

No of 
units 

not 

started 
/ under 

constru 

ction 

Project 

Type 

Project 

Status 

Comments 

Peddie 

Masakhane 

10 

500 

7 500 

395 

105 

Green 

Fieids- 

PLS 

The 

project is 
in 

progress 

Now in 

rectification 

processes 

Peddie Ph 

2R/L 2 

10 

1420 

38 802 

710 

710 

Green 

Fieids 

PHP 

The 

project is 
in 

progress 

Upgrading 
of services 

are under 

construction 

Hamburg 
(Low cost Piiot 
Project) 

11 

30 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Not 

Compiete 

d 

Not 

Registered 

Peddie Low 
cost piiot 
project 

10 

28 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Not 

Compiete 

d 

Not 

Registered 

Prudhoe 

12 





1 n-situ 

ADM 

Project 

Not 

Compieted 

Gcinisa South 

11 

500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Pianning 

stage 

Awaiting 
approvai 
from the 

MEC 

Hamburg 

11 

500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Pianning 

stage 

Awaiting 
approvai 
from the 

MEC 

Mpekweni 

12 

500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Pianning 

stage 

Awaiting 
approvai 
from the 


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MEC 

Qaga 

2 

500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Planning 

stage 

Awaiting 
approval 
from the 

MEC 

Peddie Alf 

Dlamini 
heights- 
middle income 

10 

150 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Planning 

stage 

Developer 

already 

Ndlovini 

10 

500 





Planning 

stage 

Layout plan 
submitted to 
Surveyor 
General for 
approval 

German 

Village 

10 

360 





Planning 

stage 

Feasibility 

Study 

Total 


2838 

R46302 

1105 

815 





Source: DHLGTA, 2007; Ngqushwa Municipality 2008 


Housing will always be an ongoing need in municipalities which will be hampered by 
affordability levels. 


3. 1.4.1 Housing Projects 

3. 1.4. 2 Incomplete Proiect 

Peddie 500 was unfinished with 106 units outstanding. The department of 
Housing has prepared an application for funding to complete the project. 

3. 1.4. 3 Housing I nfrastructure 

A Water Services Development Plan (2008) is in place therefore the prioritization 
of water and sanitation projects are guided by this plan. Bulk water supply is 
available to accommodate for existing and additional housing projects identified. 
This however does not apply to sewerage infrastructure. Water borne sewerage 
is only available in Peddie Town where the bucket system has just been 
upgraded in 2007. For the rest of the municipality, VI P toilets are the main form 
of sanitation. The sanitation backlog in Ngqushwa is very high. 93.4% of 
households are below the RDP standard and approximately R97 480 950 million 
is required to eliminate the backlog and this in particular in the rural areas. 


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A major challenge facing the municipality is the difficulty in extending bulk 
infrastructural services to the outlying areas due to the scattered nature of the 
settlements. Efforts have been made to provide water up to the I DP standard 
(public stand pipes) but it has not been possible to connect pipes to individual 
households. This problem equally affects electricity supply because the cost of 
providing new connections for new extensions will further stretch the resources 
of the Municipality. Another challenge facing housing delivery was the difficulties 
experienced in transporting building materials due to the poor state of rural road 
networks. Suppliers of materials are also not able to supply the required 
quantities at the given times. Local contractors are also not able to obtain 
contracts because they are not registered with the NHBRC. 


These challenges will be addressed and explored in terms of Local Economic 
Development opportunities. 


3. 1.4. 4 Housing I mplementation Plan And Project Schedules 

The estimated amount of housing to address the backlog and the cost of 
implementing the needs over the next 5 year period is indicated in table 9.below. 
This amount is calculated on the basis of the current housing subsidy quantum of 
40m2, which is R38 984 and R15 922 for Engineering Services, totaling to R54 
976. The detailed breakdown of the R38 984 is as follows: P1-P3 (R15 542), P4 
(R450) and P5 (R22 992). 

The tables below indicate the housing project schedules for the uncompleted 
projects due to backlogs, planned projects up to 2012 as well as the cash flow of 
current and planned projects projected between 2008 and 2012. 


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1 . PROJECT PIPELINE AND CAPITAL BUDGET 





FEASIBILITY PHASE 


PLANNED ACTIVITIES & COST ESTIMATES 

Project Name 

Target Size 

Pianned Instrument 

Land Identification 

Right to Deveiop 

Beneficiary 

Identification 

Pre-screening 

Buik Avaiiabiiity 

Adequacy of 

Capacity 

EIA Requirements 

(Basic/Fuii) 

STATUS/COMMENT 

11/12 TARGETS 

ESTIMATED BUDGET 

12/13 TARGETS 

ESTIMATED BUDGET 

13/14 TARGETS 

ESTIMATED BUDGET 

14/15 TARGETS 

ESTIMATED BUDGET 

15/16 TARGETS 

ESTIMATED BUDGET 

Peddie Phase 2 500 

1420 

PHP 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 



No activlties can be projected untll land, land acquisition, beneficiary identification, 

bulk availability and capacity conflrmed 

Gcinisa 500 

500 

Rural 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 



No activlties can be projected untll land, land acquisition, beneficiary identification, 

bulk availability and capacity conflrmed 

Hamburg 500 

500 

IRDP 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 



No actlvlties can be projected until land, land acquisition, beneficiary identification, 

bulk availability and capacity conflrmed 

Mpekweni 500 

500 

Rural 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 



No activlties can be projected until land, land acquisition, beneficiary identification, 

bulk availability and capacity confirmed 

Qaga 500 

500 

Rural 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 



No activlties can be projected untll land, land acquisition, beneficiary identification, 

bulk availability and capacity conflrmed 

Prudhoe 300 

300 

Rural 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

No 



Pre Planning 

R 360,900.00 

Ul DU UniLb driu DU pdr Lldl 

services 

R 4,667,400.00 

uunsLruLLiuri ui su uriiLS 

anid 90 partial services 

R 6,640,200.00 

and 150 partial services 

R 11,067,000.00 




Source: Housing Sector Plon (201 1-2016) 


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Table Project Schedule - Current Projects 


Project 

Area/ 

No. 

of 

Project 

Number of units 

Name 

Ward 

sites 

Type 

Yr. 1 

Yr. 2 

Yr. 3 

Yr. 4 

Yr. 5 





2008 

2009 

2010 

2011 

2012 

Peddle 

Peddle 

106 

Green 




105 


Masakhana 



flelds 






Peddle 

Phase 2 

Peddle 

710 

R/L 




285 

425 

Total 


816 





390 

425 


Source: Ngqushwa municipality, 20 

These amounts are calculated at the current houslng subsldy quantum of 40m2 whlch Is R38 984 
and R15 922 for englneerlng servlces totallng R54 976 per house. 

Informatlon from the Amathole Dlstrlct Indlcates that there Is MIG fundlng projects wlthln the 
Ngqushwa Munlclpallty that wlll asslst In the promotlon of houslng dellvery. 


Table 10 Project Schedule - Planned Housing Projects 


Project 

Name 

Area/ 

Ward 

No. 

of 

sites 

Project 

Type 

Number of units 

Status Quo 
2014 

Yr. 1 

2008 

Yr. 2 

2009 

Yr. 3 

2010 

Yr. 4 

2011 

Yr. 5 

2012 

Mpekwenl 

12 

500 

Rural 

houslng 




500 


1 mplementatlon 
phase(Developers 
have been 
Identlfled) 

Gclnlsa 

South 

11 

500 

Rural 

houslng 




500 


1 mplementatlon 
phase(Developers 
have been 
Identlfled) 

Hamburg 

11 

500 

1 n-sltu 

upgradlng 




500 


1 mplementatlon 
phase(Developers 
have been 
Identlfled) 

Qaga 

2 

500 

Rural 

Houslng 




500 


1 mplementatlon 
phase(Developers 
have been 
Identlfled) 


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Al 

Dlamani 

Heights 

10 

150 

Middle 

income 




50 

100 


Total 







2550 

100 



Source: Ngqushwa municipality, 2009 


Table 11 Project Schedule - Current Projects 


Project 

Area/ 

No. 

Estimated 

Amniinl' 

Number of units 

Name 

Ward 

of 

sites 

(R'OOO) 

Yr. 1 

Yr. 2 

Yr. 3 

Yr. 4 

Yr. 5 





2008 

200 

9 

2010 

2011 

2012 

Peddie 

Peddie 

106 

722 




722 


Masakhana 









Peddie 

Peddie 

710 

245 031 




11 

233, 

Phase 2 







108 

923 

Total 


816 

245 753 




11 

233, 








830 

928 


Source: Ngqushwa municipality, 2009 


These amounts are calculated at the current housing subsidy quantum of 40m2 
which is R38 984 and R15 922 for engineering services totaling R54 976 per house. 

Information from the Amathole District indicates that there is MIG funding projects 
within the Ngqushwa Municipality that will assist in the promotion of housing 
delivery. 


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3.1.5 I nfrastructure 


3. 1.5.1 Telecommunication 

20% of the population has access to teleconnnnunication in their homes either 
through a land line or their own cell phone. 65% have access to phones at a 
reasonable distance and make use of phones belonging to other persons or public 
phones. 15% have no access or access at a location far from their homes. 

3. 1.5. 2 Electricity 

The electricity supply to the area is provided and maintained by ESKOM in 
accordance with their Rural Electrification Programme. Approximately 90% of the 
population has access to electricity. In the near future the municipality will look at 
its capacity to sell and maintain electricity taking over from Eskom. 

70% of the population makes use of electricity for lighting purposes, but only 11% 
make use of electricity for cooking purposes. Wood is the most commonly used 
source of energy for cooking purposes (52%) which can have serious environmental 
consequences. Paraffin is the second most commonly used fuel for both lighting and 
cooking. 

The Municipality is aware of the load shedding taking place in the country and the 
distribution disruptions and will endeavor to save and conserve energy. 

The Municipality will investigate the use of alternative renewable energy sources, 
such as wind turbines, solar heating and electricity generated from solid waste 
should industrial and commercial expansion require such. 

The Municipality will also investigate ways to conserve energy in view of the current 
national problem of load shedding and resultant distribution disruptions. 

Table 13 Sources of energy consumption 



Source: Stats SA 2011 

3.1.6 Water 

Ngqushwa has a water service development plan which was compiled by 
consulting engineers. This plan provides strategic direction to the municipality 
in this sector and identifies the most crucial projects. It should be noted that 


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Ngqushwa Local municipality is not a water service authority, therefore the 
function of water and sanitation is solely function of the Amatole district 
municipality. 

Bulk water infrastructure is provided by a number of dams and water 
purification works within the municipal area which is operated by the Amatola 
Water Board. Table 14 gives an indication of these facilities. 


TableDams operated by Amatola Water Board in Ngqushwa Municipal area. 


DAM 

DAM'S 

CAPACI TY 

FIRM YIELD 

(Mm3/ pa) 

Dabi Dam 

0.23 

0.50 

Mankazana Dam 

1.85 

1.38 

Ndlambe Dam 

0.06 

0.06 

Rura Dam 

0.05 

0.05 

Sandile Dam 

7.4 

4.14 

Laing Dam 

5.55 

2.76 

TOTAL 

2.84 

2.14 


Source: Extract from the Amatola Water-Amanzi Annual Report (1999-2000) as quoted in 
IDP review 2006/07 

The Amatola Water Board also manages and operates six water treatment plants 
which collectively supply 2.84 million liters of portable water. These water treatment 
plants are as follows: 

> Dabi water treatment works 

> Peddie Regional water treatment works 

> Glenmore (Enxuba) water treatment works 

> Sandile Dam water treatment works 

> Laing dam water treatment works 

In Ngqushwa there is only one pump station which is located at the Water Works in 
Nqwenerana also known as Kingslyn. The water treatment works at Tyefu has been 
closed down and all the areas it used to serve are now being served by Glenmore 
Water Treatment works. 

In Peddie, adequate water is supplied from the King's Lynn scheme which is also 
operated by the Amatola Water Board. In Hamburg, water is supplied by Amatola 
Water Board from Birha scheme which is also considered adequate for the present 
purposes. This source is however supplemented by three boreholes which constituted 


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the town's original supply and which are capable of supplying 25% of the town's 
average requirement. 

Table: Type of sanitation by ward 


Ward 

None 

Flush toilet 

(connected 

to 

sewerage 

system) 

Flush 

toilet 

(with 

septic 

tank) 

Chemicai 

toiiet 

Pit toiiet 

with 

ventiiation 

(VI P) 

Pit toiiet 

without 

ventiiation 

Bucket 

toiiet 

Other 

Grand 

Totai 

1 

178 

10 

15 

78 

57 

1291 

4 

67 

1701 

2 

135 

14 

24 

221 

379 

870 

1 

40 

1686 

3 

28 

21 

15 

192 

1114 

410 

5 

7 

1792 

4 

36 

5 

6 

- 

605 

790 

6 

111 

1558 

5 

178 

3 

9 

13 

221 

483 

- 

8 

914 

6 

80 

15 

13 

13 

479 

1049 

2 

16 

1667 

7 

36 

19 

13 

8 

599 

1262 

1 

5 

1943 

8 

107 

10 

6 

4 

1020 

717 

2 

4 

1871 

9 

22 

7 

8 

5 

1109 

342 

- 

5 

1497 

10 

35 

821 

20 

14 

301 

356 

1 

81 

1630 

11 

123 

53 

77 

2 

826 

728 

1 

29 

1839 

12 

27 

11 

15 

1 

150 

1210 

3 

1 

1418 

13 

67 

6 

27 

14 

229 

1499 

1 

27 

1870 

Grand 

Total 

1052 

996 

248 

564 

7090 

11007 

27 

400 

21384 


Source: Stats SA 2011 


According to the 2011 statistics, only 5.8% of the population has access to flush 
toilets which are either connected to a sewerage system or a septic tank. This results 
in a backlog of 96%. Almost 84.6% of the population makes use of pit latrines. The 
majority of these pit latrines have no ventilation. 2.5% of the population makes use 
of chemical toilets. 0.1% use bucket system and 6.8% of the population has no 
access to toilet facilities. 


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3.1.7 Roads 


The district comprises national, trunk, main, district, minor and access roads. The 
Major towns are linked by an adequate network of roads and there is also a good 
network of proclaimed gravel roads traversing the municipal area. There are 
approximately 1271. 38km of roads in the municipal area. According to the 
Department of Roads and Public Works only 153. 9km of these roads are tarred which 
translates to (12.11%) of the roads in the municipal area. The roads linking the 
various rural settlements are in a poor state of repair and are not adequately 
maintained. 


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3.1.8 TRANSPORT 


The public transport system in the area is limited and primarily constituted by 
private minibus taxis that service the area on a regular basis. There are 
inadequate facilities to accommodate this form of public transport and organized 
taxi ranks and commuter shelters are needed at all settlements. The 
municipality does not have an integrated transport plan to mitigate the above. 

There are privately owned cars and bicycles and the majority of the population is 
pedestrians who have to rely on foot as a mode of travel. Pedestrians are not 
adequately catered for especially in terms of safety. There are no formal crossing 
arrangements to cater for pedestrians and animals between settlements and to 
compound this problem many of these informal crossings traverse national and 
trunk roads which has adverse effects on safety within the area. 

The firm Stewart Scott recently compiled a report for the Amathole District 
Municipality entitled "The Public Transport Status Quo and Interim Transport 
Plan". In this plan they identified the following as being the most crucial 
transportation problems: 

Findings: 

• There is a lack of adequate and suitably located public transport 
infrastructure. 

• Roads are in a poor condition especially in the rural areas. 

• There are inadequate public transport services to meet the needs of 
pensioners, scholars, the sick and the disabled. 

• There are parallel services operating in competition, sub optional 
passengers loading. 


3.1.9 SOLI D WASTE Dl SPOSAL Sl TES 

Percentage of households in 2001 vs. 201 1 refuse removal 


01 

00 

ro 


01 

o. 


80.0 

70.0 

60.0 

50.0 

40.0 

30.0 

20.0 
10.0 



0.0 

Removed by 
local 

authority/priv 
ate company 
at ieast once a 
week 

Removed by 
iocal 

authority/priv 
ate company 
iess often 

Communai 
refuse dump 

Own refuse 
dump 

No rubbish 
disposai 

Other 

■ 2001 

16.4 

0.5 

0.9 

67.6 

14.5 

0.0 

■ 2011 

20.5 

0.3 

1.1 

71.9 

5.5 

0.8 



Source: Stats SA (2011) 


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There are two approved and licensed dump sites in the municipal area which is situated 
at Peddie and Hamburg and which is regarded as being adequate for the current usage. 
20.7% of the people have access to refuse removal service by the municipality. Where 
the refuse removal service is rendered it is done by means of door to door refuse 
removal twice a week. There are no refuse removal sites in the rural areas and as a 
result of the predominantly rural nature of the population this in effect means that 78% 
of the population either make use of informal and unlicensed dump sites or have no 
access to dump sites whatsoever. A further 1% makes use of communal refuse dumps. 


3.1.10 COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

The previous town hall in Peddie has been converted to library and 41 community halls 
and 1 multi- purpose centre, includes 6 community halls under construction or 
incomplete distributed through the remainder of the municipal area. There is a challenge 
on community hall distribution as there is inadequate spread of at the ward levels. 


List of community halls 


Ward 

Community Hall 

No of Villages in the 

ward 

1 

Tyeni Gobozana 

Mtati Ngqwele 

8 

2 

Dubu Qaga 

Masele J ubisa 

6 

3 

Zondeka Dlova 

RHODE (UNDER CONSTRUCTI ON) 

Qhugqwala 

12 

4 

Qaukeni Mgwanqa 

Tyeni Bhogweni 

15 

5 

Machibi Phole 

Madliki 

12 

6 

Bell Crossroads 

Tuku A Leqeni 

12 


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7 

Cisira 

Nyaniso Location 

6 

8 

Qamnyana Mankone 

Glenmore Baltein (UNDER CONSTRUCTION) 

Ndwayana multi-purpose (NGO sponsored) 

9 

9 

Pikoli Lower Qeto 

Woodlands 

8 

10 

Ncumisa kondlo indoor sport centre 

Durban Location Peddie Extension 

6 

11 

Hamburg Wesley 

Benton Mabeleni 

9 

12 

Mphekweni Mgababa 

Mkanyeni (UNDER CONSTRUCTION STAGE) 

4 

13 

Upper Gwalana 

Mabeleni-Mthathi 

11 

Total Number 

41 Community Halls 

118 


3.1.11 Sports Facilities and Municipal Facilities 


Sports facilities are inadequately provided. There is only one recreational club in 
Peddie, of which it is in a poor state of repair and not useable. There is two organized 
sports facility in Peddie Extension and Glenmore village; however they are in poor state 
and in need of upgrading and repair. The Hamburg sports field needs to be relocated and 
is presently underdeveloped as a result of severe soil erosion. 

Other existing sports facilities are limited to a few poorly developed sports fields which 
are mostly associated with the schools. There are no formal facilities in the rural areas 
and proper sports facilities are required in all the wards of the municipality. 

The Municipality has signed an I mplementation Agreement with Sport and Recreation 
South Africa in 2013 for the construction of Sports field in Nobumba ; Ntloko and 
Mphekweni Villages. These Sportsfields are attached to Sobantu S.S.S ; Minenkulu S.S.S 
and Cwala Primary Scool respectively.We are just awaiting SCM processes to unfold 
before the actual construction can commence. The Jubisa Sportfield is now in 
construction 


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There is one registered cemetery in Peddie town. All other cemeteries that are in use are 
not registered. One library situated in the former Peddie town is under construction and 
there are two semi libraries in Mpekweni and Hamburg but they are not fully fledged. 

This could be a compounding factor to the low literacy and education levels in the area. 
There are no community facilities that can be utilized by other community organizations 
which are catering for the welfare and well-being of the residents. 


3.1.12 Integrated I nfrastructure I nvestment Plan 

The local municipality has a Comprehensive I nfrastructure Plan (CIP) 2011 that was 
adopted by the council. The district municipality, local municipality and government 
departments fully participated in the development of the comprehensive infrastructure 
plan for local municipality. For the investment plan Ngqushwa utilizes, MIG grant over 
the MTEF period. Currently the local municipality is dependent on grants as source of 
income for infrastructural programmes. The CIP currently covers the capital budget only. 


3.1.13 Alternative Vehicles to Aid I nfrastructure I nvestment 

The local Municipality has lodge application for funding to DBSA, DPLG and DoRT, 
for infrastructure investment these applications. 


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SOCIAL SERVICES 

Table 3: Social Services Analysis. 


Ward 

High 

Schools 

Junior 

Secondary 

Schools 

Primary 

School 

Junior 

Primary 

Schools 

Creche 

s 

Clinics 

Hospitals 

Commun 

ity 

Halls 

Police 

stations 

Sports 

Facilities 

(formal) 

Post 

office 

Pension 

pay 

points 

Libraries 

Dipping 

tanks 

1 

2 

0 

6 

0 

8 

2 

0 

4 

0 

0 

0 

4 

0 

3 

2 

2 

1 

4 

0 

5 

2 

0 

2 

1 

0 

0 

1 

0 

2 

3 

3 

0 

13 

0 

5 

4 

0 

4 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

4 

4 

2 

1 

13 

0 

9 

0 

0 

2 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

5 

5 

4 

0 

6 

0 

2 

1 

0 

3 

1 

0 

0 

1 

0 

3 

6 

3 

1 

8 

0 

6 

1 

0 

4 

1 

0 

0 

1 

0 

9 

7 

1 

0 

3 

4 

5 

1 

0 

2 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

4 

8 

3 

0 

5 

0 

3 

5 

0 

5 

1 

1 

0 

1 

0 

1 

9 

5 

0 

8 

0 

2 

2 

0 

3 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

6 

10 

3 

0 

2 

0 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 1 

2 

1 

4 

0 

3 

2 

0 

2 

1 

1 

0 

1 

0 

5 

12 

2 

0 

4 

1 

6 

1 

0 

3 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

3 


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13 

2 

2 

4 

0 

5 

1 

0 

Total 

34 

6 

80 

5 

61 

23 

1 


Source: Community Survey (201 2) 


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3 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

4 

39 

6 

3 

1 

14 

1 

51 


84 





NGQUSHWA LM HOUSING SECTOR PLAN 

SOCIAL FACILITIES AND SERVICES 


Main Towns a Schools Health Facilities 


National 

A/Trunk 


A/ District 


□ Police 0 ciinic 
Settlements 


+ Community Health Centre 
District Hospital 


eteetOiafhca.com 
043 7433883 

Pni«ct Ccr. .HoMtlrt 

SctUiflanRevifw 


Source: Housing Sector Plan (2011) 


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3.2 LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


StrategiC Goal: Create an enabling environment that promotes the 
development of local economy and facilitate job creation. 


3.2.1 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality, Amathole District Municipality, Department of 
Economic Development Environment, and Tourism, the Department of Rural 
Development and Agrarian Reform, other government departments, development 
institutions and agencies have a responsibility of ensuring that Local Economic 
Development does take place. The LED section is comprised of Agriculture and Rural 
development, Smmes & Cooperatives, and Tourism all which fall under the 
Community Services Department; which also has the Traffic & Safety, and Waste & 
Environment sections but the municipality has a new orgonogram which will place 
the LED components under planning and development department. 

According of its Spatial Development Framework, the Ngqushwa Local 
Municipality has identified its key LED Principles as follows: 

Guiding developments in a spatially efficient and effective way, whilst 
ensuring linkage and alignment to regional and national development 
policies and programmes; 

Improving linkages within Ngqushwa Municipality and beyond its 
boundaries to stimulate effective and sustainable integrated 
development; 

Directing investment to areas of greatest potential and target areas of 
greatest need to alleviate poverty and promote economic growth; 
Directing public and private investment in areas that would ensure the 
most sustainable return on investment (ROI); 

Directing Development Agencies in decision - making which directly or 
indirectly impacts on the municipal area; 

Creating a strategic framework for the formulation of an appropriate 
land use management system, and 

Protecting the eco-systems (environmental stewardship) in the 
Ngqushwa municipal area. 


According to the human resource, the section has 
LED Manager 

Agriculture & Rural Development Manager 
Intern: Agriculture and Rural Development 
Intern: LED 


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Tourism Manager 
Information Officer, and the 
Cooperatives Administrator 

It is strongly believed that LED is a mainstream issue and that all departments 
and organizations have a role to play in the creation of an enabling 
environment. 


3.2.2 ECONOMIC PROFI LE 


Contribution by Sector to Empioyment 

Just a small portion (8.6%) of the Ngqushwa population is formally employed 
with 91.4% of the population unemployed or not economically active. The 
official figure of unemployment in the municipality stands at 77%. This tallies 
to some extent with the population distribution and indicates that most of 
those who are employed live either in Peddie or Hamburg. The employment 
levels are way below the national average and the unemployment levels are 
24% above the Provincial unemployment figures. The number of people living 
in poverty in the municipality has risen from 64.19% in 1996 to 80.29% in 
2005. Consequently, there is a high dependence on social grants with 
seventy-two point five percent 72.5% of households receiving grants. 

Furthermore, this also means that the rates base for the local municipality is 
almost non-existent. As a result, the municipality is almost completely 
dependent on provincial and national government for funding to support the 
provision of basic services. There is a desperate need for local economic 
development in the municipal area that will create permanent jobs for the 
local population. 

The traditional economically active concerns such as mining, manufacturing, 
construction and retail make a total of 1042 for the area while there are only 
136 agricultural concerns. By comparison Community Services industries total 
2 411 and the overarching majority of industries - 80 235 are undetermined. 

I n terms of the numbers of people employed in these industries, a total of 5 
876 people are formally employed. 

A glimpse of the occupations in which people are employed in the formal 
sector reveals that that the majorities are semi-skilled and skilled labourers 
and employees. The figures indicated that only 351 people are legislators or 
senior officials and professionals. This figure points to the fact that the human 
resource base in the NLM is limited, especially in terms of the skills required to 
develop and support LED. The available educational achievement levels 
figures support this on conclusion. 


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3.2.4 SMME and Cooperative Development 

Currently we have many infornnal trading stalls, which are your hawkers and 
therefore the local municipality aims to develop and invest in the SMME sector in 
order to create employment opportunities. The need for business advisory services 
was identified to be highly imperative to assist in this regard. In addition, the 
Municipality is taking the issue of SMME development very seriously as it remains 
one of the key pillars and priorities for accelerated and sustainable local economic 
development. 

On an annual basis the municipality has a Cooperatives Indaba held for the SMME in 
the jurisdiction of Ngqushwa area in order to plan, develop and track progress in as 
far as Cooperative development is concerned. 

Local government is an important sphere, within which service delivery is expected 
to take place; this of course takes into cognisance the creation of tools and methods 
necessary to aggressively deal with the impediments of smooth and accelerated 
socio-economic development. As the Municipality it is our responsibility therefore to 
take lead in the quest of bettering the standards of living and the livelihood of the 
locals. Externally initiated systems that will assist in the process should always be 
considered imperative in the attainment of our objectives and realisation of our 
vision as an institution. It is also in this light that we encourage and try our level 
best to complement any institution that seeks to transform the socio-economic 
conditions in Ngqushwa. 

The model of Cooperative development as a mechanism and a vehicle to drive 
meaningful and sustainable rural socio-economic development has been most 
welcome by Ngqushwa local authority. To enhance the realisation of the outcome of 
the vision through the model, the Municipality has taken bold steps to support the 
initiative. With fairness the inadequacy of Municipal financial resource and muscle 
would not be able to demonstrate the significance, resilience and will towards 
supporting this sector. Whilst it is strongly believed that this could be the break- 
through for Ngqushwa, resource mobilisation is an imperative input towards the 
process of transforming smme development in Ngqushwa. 

The Municipality has adopted Cooperative development as a vehicle to transform the 
smme sector in the Municipality, and the Cooperative Development Centre (CDC) is 
to be established as a facility to transform the Coop and smme sector 

The CDC is expected to offer various services to cooperatives in Ngqushwa including: 


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Facilitating registration of Cooperative with Companies and Intellectual 
Property Commission (CIPC). 

Provide business development advice and services 

Where an organised and sectored database is updated and readily made 
available. 

A one stop shop to access all government services and programmes relating 
to cooperative development 

Meaningful and high impact market linkages for cooperatives 

Centre for coordinated cooperatives activity including value addition. 

Location where the Cooperatives Representative structure can hold 
developmental meetings for the development of cooperatives. 

A centre to accommodate other related service offerings by other spheres of 
government and development agencies, such as DEDEAT, the dti, SEDA, etc. 

A centre where cooperation amongst cooperatives is facilitated, highly 
encouraged, and realised within and outside the Ngqushwa Municipal area. 

3.2.5 Tourism 

Tourism development is mostly found in both the Municipality inland and in coastal 
areas. Our Tourism nodal points which are also priority areas for Tourism 
I nfrastructure Development include Hamburg, Peddie Central, Pikoli and Nier. These 
nodal areas provide Tourism packages in the form of accommodation, Tourism 
Attractions and Amenities. The area of Pikoli provides homestays accommodation, 
hiking trails, aquaculture opportunities. 

Peddie Central offers: 

Accommodation (B&B's) 

Heritage sites, 

Isikhumbuzo saseMqwashini 
Great Fish Reserve. 

Visitors Information Centre is operational Calvary Barracks 
Hamburg offers the following tourism attraction: 

- The Artist Retreat serves as an anchor project for Tourism development. 

- The Keiskamma Art Project provides training and job opportunities for beadwork, 
crafting, carpet weaving, curio making and articles made from shells that are 
collected on the beaches and sold to tourists during holiday season. 

- Hamburg Beach Festival which an annual event hosted to showcase unspoilt 
natural beach and provide opportunities to locals to showcase their products during 
the event. 


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Aquaculture opportunities in the fornn of fish farnn 

This will help stimulate economic growth particularly in the Hamburg area where 
opportunities already exist. Marketing Hamburg as a tourist destination, coupled 
with provision of required infrastructure will be key to ensure that the existing 
potential is utilised. 

Hamburg has great potential for tourism development since it lies along the Coastal 
belt however there are other resorts such as Fish River Sun and Mpekweni Resort. 

Adventure based tourism such as mountain and quad biking, hiking and canoe trials, 
holds great potential in the municipality. This is owing to its natural environment. 

3.2.6 Agriculture 

The achievement of sustained economic, development and the creation of 
competitive advantage for the municipality rely absolutely on prioritisation of 
interventions which will have the greatest impact both socially and economically. The 
competitive advantage therefore for the municipality points to the broadly defined 
agriculture sector as the one with the most potential to contribute to job creation, 
promoting of livelihoods opportunities and contributing to sustained social and 
economic growth and development. 

The Municipality comprises of rural subsistence communities that rely solely on 
agricultural production as well as the government social security services for 
survival. The municipality has however strategies in place to reverse these high 
levels of dependency on social grants by stimulating agricultural development. The 
LED Strategy 2009, proposed the following strategies in order to stimulate 
agricultural development in the municipality:- 

Support and encourage intensive crop-farming on crops such as pineapples, 
chicory, sugar beet, cotton, citrus etc. 

Support crop farmers to acquire agricultural inputs (fertilizers, seeds, 
seedlings, etc.) 

Provide agricultural inputs and support with mechanization (tractors, 
machinery, equipment) 

Support and encourage livestock farming particularly 

- Cattle (Beef Production) - Breeding programmes I nfrastructure, 
medication, bulls and study tours 

- Goat - I nfrastructure, medication, goats 

- Poultry and Piggery - I nfrastructure and production inputs 

Support and encourage livestock farming with auxiliary service such as 
breeding programmes, veterinary services, infrastructure, and equipment. 
Facilitate and explore market opportunities for farmers 

Provide a one-stop-shop service for all the farmers such as an Agricultural 
Centre (training facility, machinery, tractors, implements, nursery, etc.) 

To provide support in the form of business development to market through 
agro processing i.e. Aloe, honey and sale pens. 


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The Municipality has huge potential for agricultural development and agro- 
processing. In order for this rural hinterland to be developed, it is important to 
obtain support from all government departments and development agencies. It is 
strongly believed that the Agricultural Centre is the starting point for this vision to be 
realized. 

Various potential strategic projects and actions were identified in the 2009 LED 
strategy as areas of focus and development in the agricultural sector. An interview 
with municipal officials revealed what progress has been made to date:- 

■ Livestock I mprovement Scheme - a beef farming project was identified in 
Wesley and funded by the Municipality. The project is up and running. The 
site has been fenced and the municipality has already bought bulls, veterinary 
services, livestock equipment, and this programme has currently extending to 
other villages in the Municipality such as Ngqowa, Gcinisa , Mpekweni, 
Mthathi,Benton and Tuku. 


■ Revival and expansion of Ngxakaxha and Gcinisa North I rrigation 
Schemes - The revival of Tyefu irrigation scheme is in progress and is 
implemented by the Department Rural Development and Agrarian Reform and 
the Municipality provides the support needed. The Municipality also has other 
functional irrigation schemes such as Khalana, Dube, Lower Mthombe, and 
Zalarha. We are in the process of exploring other means to utilize all the 
schemes in the Municipality to ensure local economic development and 
employment creation opportunities. There is also a food security initiative 
taking place in one of the plots in Glenmore, Glenmore forms part of the Tyefu 
Irrigation scheme process. There is a need to plan and establish municipal 
fresh produce market to accommodate all produce that come from local 
farmers. 


3.2.7 ANCHOR PROGRAMMES IN THE MUNICIPALITY 
Small Town Revitalization Programme - 

This is an initiative co-funded by the DEDEA, DBSA, the Municipality and other key 
partners. This initiative seeks to among others regenerate the poverty stricken 
Municipal area into an area where more meaningful and sustainable economic 
activities are evident, economic potential existing exploited, having an acceptable 
infrastructural base to attract investment opportunities, etc. 


Hamburg Development I nitiative - 

An initiative coordinated by the Amathole District Municipality's development agency 
(ASPIRE). This initiative seeks to exploit to the maximum the massive potential that 
is presented by Hamburg. Currently a Hamburg Artist Retreat has been developed 
which is the anchor project of the initiative. Expansion of the programme will also 
extend towards the inland of the Municipality, where the Peddie Town is located. This 


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programme is funded and supported by various stakeholders including the 
Department of Tourism. However more funds are needed for this programme to 
succeed. 




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3.3 GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTI Cl PATI ON 

Strategic Goal: Promote a culture of participatory and good governance. 

Intended outcome: Entrenched culture of accountability and clean governance. 


3.3.1 Politicai Governance 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality is governed by the executive comnnittee type led by the 
mayor who is the political head of the IDP processes. The municipality has four 
standing committees which are chaired by political heads. These standing 
committees report to the executive committee which is chaired by the mayor. The 
executive committee reports on the progress implementation processes to council. 
The council consists of 25 Councilors including the Mayor, the Speaker and the 
portfolio councilors. However the 2011 demarcation process has reduced the number 
of wards from 14 wards to 13 wards. 

Standing Committees: 

I nfrastructure Development Committee 
Budget and Treasury Office Committee 
Corporate Services Committee 
Development and Planning Committee 


3.3.2 Mechanisms and procedures for community and stakeholder 
participation 


The Constitution stipulates that one of the objectives of municipalities is to 
encourage the involvement of communities and community organizations in the 
matters of local government. The White Paper on Local Government also put 
emphasis on public participation. Through the Municipal Systems Act participation in 
the decision-making processes of the municipality is determined to be a right of 


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communities, residents and ratepayers. The IDP has to a large extent addressed 
these legal requirements. In quest for sustained communication and engagement 
with local communities and other stakeholders, the municipality embarked on a Ward 
Based Planning and engagement processes. This process seek to achieve mini IDP's 
which were ward specifics. The municipality also engaged on the verification 
process, where the objectives of the workshops were as follows: 

Verify the data collected and reflected in the baseline survey 2012 
To build and strengthen relationships between communities and the 
municipality 

To empower communities on Integrated Development Planning 


The following methods are being utilized for reaching out to communities: 

IMBIZO focus weeks are set by the cabinet and enable the community to 
interact with politicians and officials, from all spheres and to discuss the 
service delivery and government programmes and opportunities available for 
the public. The municipality is involved in the planning these events and liaise 
with the Office of the Premier and Government Information Systems for the 
deployment of Ministers and MECs. 

I n line with the legal prescripts of the Municipal Systems Act the establishment 
of the Representative forum is advertised in local newspaper calling upon 
interested parties to be part of these forums 

Language used is observed to limit the language barrier that could cause the 
public not to participate fully in matters of government. Two languages are 
being utilizes in communicating with the public namely: English and Xhosa) 

I DP/Budget Roadshows are conducted after the draft I DP and Budget has been 
finalized for comment by the public but this has been a peculiar year where 
the public has been allowed do give comments before the adoption of the 
draft. 

The Ward Committees, the CDWs, and Ward Councilors assist in mobilization 
of communities towards ward meetings 

The municipality has strategies to involve traditional leaders and their 
communities in the IDP process 


3.3.3 Communication Strategy 

The Ngqushwa Municipality has developed and approved a communication 
strategy in 2006; however the strategy was reviewed in 2009/2010 financial 
year. This strategy is due for reviewal this financial year 2014/15. The purpose of 
developing the communication strategy is to focus in the light of changing 
internal and external communications that has an impact on the priority issues, 
objectives, strategies, and programmes of the IDP that are aimed at improving 
the lives of people. 


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The municipality, tribal authorities, ward committees, CDWs, radio, and 
newspapers are utilized for communication with the communities. 


3.3.4 I ntergovernmental Relations 

The municipality has and holds quarterly I ntergovernmental Relations Forum; 
however there are challenges due to inconsistency in attendance by sector 
departments. Sector departments delegate junior officials who cannot take 
decisions at the Forum. 

The challenge that is still faced by the community of Ngqushwa is that many 
Government Departments do not have local offices within the municipality which 
makes it difficult for the communities to access other services. 


3.3.5 Council Oversight 

3. 3. 5.1 I nternai Audit 

The municipality has Internal Audit unit that prepare a risk based audit plan 
and an Internal Audit program for each financial year. Also advise the 
accounting officer and report to the Audit committee on the implementation of 
the internal audit plan and matters relating to: 

I nternal Audit 
I nternal Controls 

Accounting procedures and practices 
Risk and Risk Management 
Performance Management 
Loss control and 

Compliance with this, the annual Division of Revenue Act and any 
other applicable legislation 


Currently, the Internal Audit is facilitating the Risk Management function. The risk 
management strategy and assessment was developed under the current year 
2011/2012. 


3. 3. 5. 2 External Audit 

For the past three years Ngqushwa Local Municipality received disclaimer 
opinion except for the 2009/2010 financial year where the municipality 
received a qualified audit opinion. As a corrective action the municipality 
prepared an action plan with the assistance of the Provincial Treasury to deal 
with the issues raised by the Auditor General's office. 


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3. 3. 5. 2.1 Audit Committee 

The Council took a resolution to appoint the Audit Connnnittee on the 
24 ^^ August 2010 but the Audit Committee was inaugurated in 
December 2010. Contracts have been then renewed by council on the 
28’^'^ January 2014 for another period of three years, with the 
appointment of a new member due to the resignation of the 
chairperson. Mr. V. Mthimkulu temporally pulled out of the committee 
by means of a council resolution to assist the administration in the re- 
engineering of Budget and Treasury Office and Corporate Services 
Department this is because of his vast knowledge and understanding 
of the local municipality. 

The names of the members are as follows: 

Dr. A. Plaatjie(Newly appointed Chairperson) 

Mr. G. Bana 
Mr. W. Gama 
Ms. L. Sibanyoni 

3. 3. 5. 3 Oversight Committee/ Municipai Pubiic Accounts Committee 
(MPAC) 

The Ngqushwa Local Municipality established the Municipal Public Accounts 
Committee is currently led by Cllr S Jali. This committee is comprised of the 
below listed 8 Councillors: 

> Councillor S.A J ali 

> Councillor T.M.Dyani 

> Councillor N.Y. Ndabazonke 

> Councillor A. Ndanda 

> Councillor T. Tusani 

> Councillor N.C. Gxasheka 

> Councillor T.G. Dyibishe 

> Councillor M.C. Mapuma 

> Councillor G. Ntonjane 

The responsibilities of this Committee are as follows: 

To consider and evaluate the content of the annual report and to 
make recommendations to Council when adopting an oversight report 
on the annual report; 

In order to assist with the conclusion of matters that may not be 
finalized, information relating to past recommendations made on the 
Annual Report, must also be reviewed. This relates to current in-year 
reports, including the quarterly, mid-year and annual reports; 

To examine the financial statements and audit reports of the 
municipality and municipal entities, and in doing so, the committee 
must consider improvements from previous statements and reports 


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and must evaluate the extent to which the Audit Committee's and the 
Auditor General's recommendations have been implemented; 

To promote good governance, transparency and accountability on the 
use of municipal resources; 

To recommend or undertake any investigation in its area of 
responsibility, after reviewing any investigation report already 
undertaken by the municipality or the Audit Committee; and 
To perform any other functions assigned to it through a resolution of 
council within its area of responsibility. 

3.3.6 Special Programme Mainstreaming 

3.3.6.1HIV/ Al DS mainstreaming 

The HIV/AIDS Strategy is in place. This Plan was adopted in September 2007 
and it captures Nutrition, Treatment, Care and support for people living with 
HIV and AIDS. Within Ngqushwa Local Municipality HIV/AIDS pandemic is 
prevalent at the rate approximately 27.1%. The Strategy will be reviewed. 
During the 2013/14 financial year there has been an establishment of the Local 
AIDS COUNCIL. This council seeks to advise the municipality on the prevalence 
of HIV/AIDS in Ngqushwa. They have assisted in the establishment of Ward 
Based AIDS Council in all 13 Wards. 

3. 3. 6. 2 Gender Mainstreaming 

Gender equity is considered in line with the Employment Equity Plan, though it 
has not reached an acceptable stage. 

3. 3. 6. 3 Speciai Group Mainstreaming 

The special groups are currently taken into consideration in the procurement 
processes of the municipality. The institutional arrangements in supporting 
the youth, women, disabled, the elderly and the children (special groups) exist 
within the municipality. The special programmes unit is in place but lacks 
funding to implement some of the programmes necessary for these groups. 

3. 3. 6. 4 Youth and Women Mainstreaming 

Ngqushwa has established a Youth Council Women's Forum. The Children 
Advisory Forum will be established by 30'^'^ J une 2014 

3. 3. 6. 5 Older Person's Forum 

Older Person's Forum - Look after the needs of Ngqushwa Senior citizens 
which as older persons are known. 

3. 3. 6. 6 Disability Forum 

A Ngqushwa Disability Forum was established. They say "Nothing about us 
without us" this is the slogan associated with People Living with Disabilities. 


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This forums looks after the needs of people living with disabilities. They are 
running their own affairs and are advising the Municipality on new 
developments that affects People with Disabilities. 

3. 3. 6. 7 Sport Development 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality Sports Council - Responsible for any Sport 
development in Ngqushwa.This is the link between Ngqushwa Local 
Municipality and the Community with regards to sport matters. Responsible for 
advising the Municipality on Sport needs 


3.3.7 Monitoring and Evaluation Tools 

The Municipal Systems Act and the Performance Regulations Framework specify the 
council structures that must be in existence as follows and in the logical 
chronological order: 


Ideal Section 79 and section 80 committees as well as those that are IDP structures: 


Tool/ 

system 

Council 

structure 

Administrative, 
Operations' 
management/ M&E 

Councillor 

oversight 

Frequency 

IDP, budget, 

PMS 

SDBIP 

Department 

al SDBIP 

scorecard 

developed 

and 

approved 

Section's scorecard 

and individual 

indicator activity 

plans developed from 

the section's 

scorecard for each 

custodian's scorecard 

Full 

understandin 

g of the 
SDBIP by 

councillors 

and detailed 

understandin 

g of 

departmental 
scorecard by 

EXCO and 

MPAC. MPAC 

to assign 

specific 

After 

approval of 

the SDBIP 

annually 


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members of 

MPAC the 

specific 

department 

to lead 

oversight of. 


Activity plans 

and the 

referred 

items, 

corresponden 

ce and 

required 
reports by the 
Accounting 
Officer/ MM 

Secretaries 

Forum 

• Departmental 

secretaries 
meet together 
as the 

Secretaries 
coordination 
forum, which 
is chaired by 
the PA to the 
MM. The 

agenda has to 
cover the 

issues of the 
correspondenc 
e sent to the 
respective 
departments - 
what has been 
submitted and 
not responded 
to as per the 4 
working day's 
turn around 

cycle; the 

consolidation 
of the 

municipal 
weekly 

calendar with 

the Council's 

monthly 

agenda, 

resolutions 

tracking and 

resolutions 

consolidation, 

challenges 

they are 

encountering, 

etc. 

• Weekly activity 
plans 

developed and 
discussed on 
Mondays first 


After the 

SDBIP 

approval 

and 

frequently 

for the 

weekly 

plans 


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thing in the 
morning and 
submission of 
the previous 
week's 
activities 
report by each 
staff member 
in the section 
and by 

supervisors in 
the case of the 
public works 
department's 
of the 

municipality, 
where the job 
cards would 
form the basis 
of the weekly 
plans and 
weekly report 
with events' 
reports 

submitted (it 
is advisable 
that the small 
memo books 
be used by the 
supervisors for 
recording the 
events and 
summarised 
reports of 
work done as 
per the job 
cards issued to 
them . 

Management report 
items to be drafted 
and submitted to 
Councii support for 
the consoiidation of 
the MANCO agenda 
which has to be 
deiivered to MANCO 
on Friday at 10 am 
for the ensuing 
Tuesday's MANCO 
meeting. 


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Consolidated 

resolutions from the 

previous council 

structures meetings 
must be updated 
accordingly and be in 
the agenda package. 

The minutes of the 

Secretaries forum 

must also be 

attached to the 

MANCO agenda for 

consideration b 

MANCO and 

corrective measures 

be considered by the 

MANCO. 

• Each HOD to 
submit to the 
MM the weekly 
plan with the 
week's report 

high level 
[refer to the 
attached 
template]. 

• MM submits 

the weekly 

plan with the 
previous 
week's report 
to the Mayor 



SDBIP, MFMA 

calendar, 

corresponden 

ce 

managennent 

as informed 

by the 

secretaries' 

forum and 

Resolutions of 

council 

Managemen 

t Committee 

[MANCO] - 
Bi-weekly 

Refer to the attached 

draft revised agenda 

of MANCO 

Reports get improved 
as per the MANCO 

discussions and 

resolutions to the 

next ensuing council 

structures. 

Reports get 

submitted by the 

Portfolio 

head to meet 

the HOD 

alone to 

discuss the 

previous bi- 

weeks 

programme 

and the next 

bi-week's 

programme. 

Bi-weekly 


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respective HOD to 
the Council support 
within two days after 
the HOD meeting for 
the Council support 

to consolidate the 

agenda for the 

standing committee. 



Management 

of the 

municipal 

expenditure 

Expenditure 
Managemen 
t working 

committee 

Municipal officials 

meeting at 

operations 

management level, 
constituted by the 


Twice a 

month 


Extended 

managemen 

t meeting 

To discuss the SDBIP 

progress and report 
on the projects that 
are affecting more 
than one department 
and those projects 
that are internally 

commissioned to 

another project. For 
example, the LED 
infrastructure project 

must be 

commissioned for 

implementation by 

Technical Services 

and be handed over 

to LED on completion 

of construction. 

Another example is 
the commissioning to 

Technical services for 

the design of the 
community halls, 

construction and 

development of the 
operations and 

maintenance plans 


Once 

monthly to 

inform the 

departmental 
and standing 

committee 

agenda. 


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for community 

services to run the 

community halls as 
the municipal 

amenities. The 

minutes of this 

extended 

management 
meeting will inform 
the agenda and 
reports of the Cluster 
meetings as below. 



SDBIP; 

expenditure 

managennent 

and over 

sighting; 

overlapping 

risk and audit 

issues. 

Cluster 

meetings 
chaired by 
the portfolio 

head 

responsible 
for the key 
strategic 
area, like 

Financial 

Managemen 

t and 

Viability. 

This will also be 

attended by the 

HODs of the member 

departments as well 

as the section heads 

of the same member 

departments. 

The reports will 

inform the EXCO 

agenda for the 

individual cluster to 

report to EXCO and 
subsequently to 

Council. 

Oversight by 

EXCO 

members 

Once a 

month before 

the standing 

committees 

SDBIP, MFMA 

calendar, 

corresponden 

ce 

management 

for the 

standing 

committee's 

consideration 

and allocation 

of tasks, 

reports from 
the respective 

Standing 

committee 

Within two days from 
the standing 

committee meeting 
the reports must be 
improved accordingly 

with 

recommendations to 

the EXCO. 

The minutes of the 

standing committee 

to both the EXCO 

and to Council must 

not be taken as 


Once 

monthly 


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councillors 

and officials 

that have 

attended the 

training and 
meetings as 
per the 

corresponden 

ce and 

attendance 

and 

Resolutions of 

council 


reports to Council as 
separate individual 
reports must be 
developed and 

submitted. 

Council support must 
also within two days 
of receipt from the 
standing committees 

consolidate the EXCO 

agenda and be 

distributed 

accordingly. 



SDBIP, MFMA 

calendar, 

corresponden 

ce 

management 

for the 

standing 

committee's 

consideration 

and allocation 

of tasks, 

reports from 
the respective 

councillors 

and officials 

that have 

attended the 

training and 
meetings as 
per the 

corresponden 

ce and 

attendance 

and 

Resolutions of 

council 

EXCO 

EXCO interrogates 

the reports and the 
process plan 

attached to each of 

the reports in line 

with the relevant 

legislation and 

required submission 

dates. 

EXCO interrogates 

the Internal Audit 

report, the SDBIP 

scorecard, the audit 
action plan to 

ensure that work has 

been done in order to 

also monitor the 

corrective measures 

and to assess if the 

corrective measures 

have made any 
impact on the 

ground. [the 

outcome will inform 

the dash board 

report update and 

MPAC over 

sights the 

executive 

Once a 

month 


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direct involvement 

and ownership of the 
dashboard by the 
Mayor and the MM. 

Council support must 
also within two days 
of receipt from the 
standing committees 

consolidate the EXCO 

agenda and be 

distributed 

accordingly. The 

critical lAU project 
reports will be 

updated as the 

minutes and reports 

of the EXCO will be 

submitted to Internal 

Audit for review and 

update of the lAU 
reports. lAU 

manager to collect 

these from Council 

support as these 

would have been 

updated accordingly 
after the meeting. 




Audit 

comnnittee 

whether 

directly or in 
directly 
[this is 

determined 

by the 

Review and 

comments for 

recommendations to 

the MPAC for 

consideration. [in 

this way, the MPAC 
role will no longer be 

an aftermath as the 

AG requires every 
council meeting to 
have a report on all 

the matters in the 

agenda by the 

Council as 

Audit 

committee 

advises 

Council 

Once a 

quarter; 

monthly 

electronically 

and also 

when there is 

a special 

council 

meeting for 

the AFS and 

APR. 


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MPAC]. 



SDBIP; 

budget; 

investigations 

where 

necessary; 

conduct 

projects field 

visits 

MPAC 

Interrogates the 

reports and prepare 
the MPAC input in 

the Council w.r.t. the 

items discussed and 

as per 

recommendations of 

the Audit committee. 

Oversight 

1 nterrogates 
the quarterly 
report; 

Meet once a 

month to 

hold 

departmental 
hearings and 

field visits to 

the projects 

Council 

meeting as 

per the MFMA 

calendar 

Council 

The council to be 

presented with the 

minutes of the 

various standing 

committees and the 

clusters. Separate 

items for reports 

must be submitted 

over and above the 

minutes of these 

standing committees. 

Council 

At least 4 

times a year 


Oversight 

Councillors sitting in the DM need to work on the report and deliberate in the NLM 
council the NLM's input in the ADM agenda. The Councillors also have to make 
report back to Council. 

The portfolio head holds at least bi-weekly one on one meeting with the HOD of the 
department and not sit in the departmental meeting. The portfolio heads will engage 
the officials outside the Council and EXCO meeting in the cluster meetings. The 
departmental meeting is purely an administrative platform for the officials only. 

Review of the council structures' agenda: 


DEPARTMETNAL MEETI NGS' AGENDA: 

1. Opening and welcome 

2. Apologies 


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3. Confirmation of the agenda 

4. Presentation by external parties : Do Human settlements or the private person 

( the item on presentations is counter productive as the councii's 
productivity is chaiienged. Therefore, the item may have to be pushed 
to the end of the agenda. ) 

5. Minutes of the previous council 

6. Minutes of the various standing committees 

7. Resolutions tracking 

8. Matters considered urgent by the Speaker 

9. Reports (for each report the MPAC input is required as standing item on the 
agenda.) 

10. Reports from individual departments based on project's service delivery 
reporting and monitoring 

11. Compliance as per the MFMA and MSA calendar - this must be the standing 
item so that if there is no matter for reporting, a process plan for that report 
be tabled for noting. This will ensure that the management and oversight 
structures are aware of preparations for the project/report and that some 
work has commenced.(for each report the MPAC input is required as standing 
item on the agenda.) 

12. Risk management (for each report the MPAC input is required as standing item 
on the agenda.) 

IB.Audit action plan (for each report the MPAC input is required as standing item 
on the agenda.) 

14.1 nput by Councillors participating in the District municipal council 

IS.CIosure 


3.3.8 IDPApproval 

The draft IDP and the budget was adopted by the Council on the 31^‘ March 2015 
and the final IDP document will be approved by Council on 28'^'^ May 2015 There after 
the documents will be submitted to Government Departments and the District 
Municipality. The documents will be distributed to all relevant stakeholders within the 
Ngqushwa Local Municipality jurisdiction. 


3.3.9 Ward Committee 

The municipality has 13 functional ward committees, with 130 ward committee 
members who are paid a monthly stipend of RIOOO.OO a month. The ward committee 
is chaired by the Ward Councillor. Ward committees reports to the Speaker's office 
and all the reports are channelled through this office. The Ward Committees term of 
office is in line with the term of Councillors. 


3.3.10 Traditional Leaders 


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The Member of the Executive Council responsible for Local Government and 
Traditional Affairs in the Eastern Cape Province published in terms of Section Section 
81(2) (a) and (4) of Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, 1998 of (Act No. 
117 of 1998) the names of the identified traditional leaders who may participate in 
the proceedings of the municipal council as listed in schedule 1 and also the 
guidelines regulating the participation of Traditional Leaders in the municipal council. 

Below is the Traditional Leaders identified for participation in the Ngqushwa 
Municipal Council. 

> Prince B. Matomela 

> Prince G.L. Zitshu 

> Prince N. Mhlauli 

> Princess N.V. Njokweni 


3.3.11 Community Development Workers 

The Department of Local Government and Traditional Affairs appointed 
Community Development Workers to assist the municipalities in enhancing public 
participation by ensuring that communities are consulted and their problems are 
communicated through all government departments. 


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3.4 MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY 

Strategic Goal: To improve overall financial management in the municipality by developing 
and implementing appropriate financial management policies, procedures and systems 

3.4.1 State of Financial Administration 

The Financial Services Department is responsible for: 

Financial Management: 

• Cash management, insurance and investments 

• Revenue management [billing and collection] 

• Expenditure managements 

• Expenditure on staff benefits 

• Funds transferred to the municipality (e.g Grants) 

• Budget preparations and implementations 

• Assets and liability management 


Other responsibilities: 

• Banking and bank reconciliation 

• Supply chain management 

• Financial reporting to Council and other stakeholder 

• Annual Financial statements 


The institutional analysis has assessed the status quo with regard to service rendering at 
the municipality. In order to address the shortcomings, it is necessary to consider 
institutional factors that hamper service delivery. It is acknowledged that not all of the 
identified shortcomings can be addressed in the short term due to limited resources and 
the municipal processes that are required to put them in place. It is however essential 
that strategies be developed in the next phase of the project to deal with these 
impediments. 


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The following factors may play a contributing role in under performance: 

The skills levels of employees are below the required level and need to be 
developed to make employees more efficient and effective. 

Resources (Financial, skills and human resources are required to facilitate 
better service delivery). 

V 

The rural nature of Ngqushwa, results in them having a low income base from 
assessment rates. The 2013/14 IDP review indicated that only 32% of their income is 
generated from rates and the remainder is primarily government funding. 

This means that it is essential for the municipality to consider ways and means to 
enhance its own revenue base. To mitigate the above, the municipality is in the process 
of appointing debt collector on a commission bases. 

The credit control by-law was adopted by the council in the year 2014/15 financial year, 
however the municipality still have a challenge of fully implementing the by-law because 
the municipality does not provide water and electricity as they both provided by Amatole 
District municipality and Eskom respectively. 

Ngqushwa has made the necessary institutional arrangements to facilitate its financial 
management such as the development of policies, insurance control mechanisms and IT 
systems. 


3.4.2 Status of Financial Position 
Cash and Cash Equivalents 

Even though the municipality had a favourable bank balance in the year 2013/14, 
the creditors were more than the amount available as at year end. 

Asset management 

The municipality has a fully GRAP compliant asset register and the asset 
management unit will continuously update the asset register. 

3.4.3 Policy development and Reviews, internal control and Procedure 
Manual 

Budget policies related to the tabling of the MTREF 2015/16 and budget 
procedure manual was workshoped and now waiting for Council adoption. 
These policies will be implemented as soon as they are adopted by Council. 
These policies are reviewed on an annual basis, promulgated into by-laws and 
gazetted. 

These prescribed statutory policies are as follows; 

»4 Cash and Investment policy 
^4 Borrowing policy 


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Asset Management policy 
Supply chain management policy 
Unforeseen and unavoidable policy 

Irregular, unauthorized, fruitless and wasteful expenditure policy 

Expenditure management policy 

Petty cash policy 

Budget management policy 

Virement policy 

Credit control and Debt collection policy 
Credit control and debt collection by-law 
Rates policy 

Appointment of Consultancy policy 
Tariffs policy 

Funding and reserves Policy 

I ndigent policy 

Free basic services policy 

Supply chain management 

The municipality has a functional Supply chain management unit reporting 
directly to the Chief Finance Officer. The unit is in compliance with the Supply 
Chain Management Regulation with the three bid committees being appointed 
by the Accounting Officer; Bid Specification Committee, Bid Evaluation 
Committee and the Bid adjudication Committee. 

The Contract Management is under the Supply Chain management Unit. The 
turnover rate for the procurement processes is one to two weeks depending on 
the procurement ranges and the nature of the service to be procured. 

Revenue management 

The municipality has a revenue section that bills consumers on a monthly basis 
as per the norms and standards of Revenue management. The collection of 
revenue is based on all rateable areas, off which most of people in these areas 
are indigent. 


The percentage of budgeted income that was realised in the past two years is 
as per the below template; 


REALISED INCOME 

2012/ 13 

2013/ 14 

2014/ 15 

Business 

67% 

64% 


Residential 

57% 

89,3% 


Government 

1 mprove/vacant 

55% 

25% 


Farms Agricultural 

8,7% 

33% 


Pl S& servitudes 

0 

0 


Schools & clinics 

0 

0 



1 1 1 


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There has since been an improvement on the collections during 2013/14 
compared to 2012/13 

Valuation roll 

The Supplementary Valuation SV - 2014 2.1 has been finalised and has been 
loaded into the billing system. The objection phase was completed on the 17'^'^ of 
March and the implementation date is the 17'^'^ of March 2014. 


Challenges affecting the municipality 

Prior to the implementation of the BTO re-engineering exercise, the 
municipality experienced the under mentioned challenges. The institution is 
not out of the woods yet, however with the enhanced management team in 
place, the challenges mentioned hereunder should be resolved. 

Sufficient ongoing monitoring and supervision. 

I nconsistency with reporting 

Lack of proper implementation of policies, procedures and 
techniques. 

High degree of noncompliance with legislation. 

IT system of the municipality which may lead to internal control 
deficiencies. 


3.4.4Audit Report 

Disclaimer opinion in 2013/2014 
Disclaimer opinion in 2012/2013 
Disclaimer opinion in 2011/2012 
Disclaimer opinion in 2010/2011 
Qualified audit opinion 2009/2010 
Disclaimer opinion in 2008/2009 


An audit action plan to address the audit findings for 2013/14 financial year was tabled 
to Council on the 19'^'^ of December 2014. This plan is being implemented on daily and 
monthly bases by all Departments. The Management and Council took a decision that 
the Municipality be audited twice by AG i.e in March 2015 and April 2015 with the belief 
that this plan will assist our Municipality to achieve a better audit opinion. 


3.4.5 Budgeting 


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Below is the summary of Ngqushwa Municipality Draft Annual Budget for 2015/16 which 
is prepared as per Municipal Finance Management Act and National Treasury 
Regulations: 

The following are the funds allocated to Ngqushwa Municipality for budget: 


Equitable Share 


R 82 952 000 
R 967 000 
R 1 950 000 
R 24 147 000 
R 1070 000 
R 59 363 


^ MSIG 
^ FMG 
^ MIG 
^ EPWP 


^ LGSETA 


The Councillor remuneration is 7.42 % of the operational budget and the employee costs 
is 39.74 % of the operational budget for 2015/16 financial year. 

Repairs and maintenance are 8.00% of the total budget for 2015/16 financial year. 

24.85 % of nnunicipality's capital budget has actually been spent to date for 
this financial year. 

30% has been spent on capital budget for 2012/13 and 50% for 2013/14 

The municipality has spent 82.02% of MSIG funds for 2014/15 financial year 
up to February 2015. 

As Ngqushwa Municipality we are intending to focus more on the following project as 
outlined in the I DP: 


Roads as a Capital project - we are intending to buy our own equipment 
like grader in improving our roads infrastructure. 

Agriculture and LED are one of our pillars we are intending to direct a 
certain portion them. 

^ SMMEs 

Job creation is also identified as a priority. We are intending to employ 
interns and there are various posts particularly in Budget and Treasury 
and Corporate Services Department. 

Revenue enhancement is one of areas that we will focus on in the next 
financial year by implementing Revenue enhancement policy and credit 
control policy. 

Driver's license testing centre is up and running to boost our revenue. 
Lastly we want to direct our efforts in good Governance and improved 
Audit outcomes. 


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3.5 MUNICIPALTRANSFORMATION AND I NTSITUTI ONAL DEVELOPMENT 


Strategic Goal: Transformation and capacity building in the Municipality 

3.5.1 Municipal Structure 

There are 172 positions on the staff structure of the municipality. The 
management structure is indicated in table 18 below. 

Table 16 Management Structure 


EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT TEAM 


MuniOpal Maruio**’ 


J 


J Ex«cutlv« M«fwio«r: 
Infractructure Oeveiopment 


I Executtv* Maruio**^ 

Communlty ServicM 



Exocuttv* Manxo**^ 
Budoet & Tr«Mury 


I Executw* Mx f uio**^ 
Corporate Sefvieee 


Sefvlces Charters 


Servtces Charters 



Servlces Charters Servloes Charters 


Executive Management Team 


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The Municipal Manager is the Administrative Head and Accounting Officer of 
the Municipality. He/ she is responsible for the implementation of the IDP 
and SDBIP under the direction and guidance of the Municipal Council. The 
Municipal Manager is supported by a team of executive managers appointed 
in terms of section 56 of the Municipal Systems Act, 2000 in this context, 
efforts should be made to develop leadership and management skills at this 
level to ensure proper succession planning. 


FUNCTIONS CLUSTERING 



Figure 1 

3. 5. 1.1 Office of the Municipal Manager 

This is the administrative nerve centre that sends pulses throughout the 
Municipality and 

Therefore, the office needs to be capacitated to fulfill its mandates in support of 
the Municipal Manager. The Municipal Manager's office is composed of the 
following personnel: (IDP/ PMS Manager and Officer, PR/ Communications 

Manager, Internal Auditor, SPU Manager and Executive Secretary) all reporting 
to the Municipal Manager. In essence, the total number of direct reports to the 
Municipality will be nine (9) inclusive of those within his/ her office. 

3. 5. 1.2 I nfrastructure Development Department 

The I nfrastructure Development Department, formerly the Technical Services, is 
responsible for the development and implementation of processes, systems and 


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strategies designed to procure and sustain infrastructural capacity required by 
the Municipality in its quest to provide quality services to the connnnunity as well 
as ensuring that resources at the Municipality's disposal are equitably distributed 
to all areas of operation to enhance service delivery to benefit the people. 

This entails ensuring the provision of acceptable technical services in respect of 
sewerage/ water purification / electricity and building projects. The Departnnent 
is also responsible for the following: 

Ensure acceptable water and sanitation services (Develop and implement 
monitoring mechanisms for provision of water services by the District 
Municipality), Provide approved building plans and site inspections, 

Ensure effective electricity distribution to consumers (Develop and 
implement monitoring mechanisms for provision of electricity by Eskom), 
Ensure effective project design, planning and management of technical 
projects, 

Provision of effective repairs and maintenance of municipal infrastructure, 
Management of all sewer plants and operations (Develop & implement 
monitoring mechanisms for the actual management of sewerage system 
by the District Municipality) 

Appraise/ report to Council and EMT on any infrastructure related projects 
of the Municipality, 

Ensure compliance to building maintenance regulations as per National 
Building Regulations, 

Ensure compliance to building health regulations, 

Provision of municipal public works to any of the functions within the 
Municipality, 

Development and management of waste disposal sites, 

Construction and maintenance of roads and storm water infrastructure, 
Execution of council resolutions relating to infrastructure and technical 
services. 


3. 5. 1.3 Community Service Department 

The Community Services Department is responsible for ensuring provision of 
acceptable standard of Social Services, Emergency Services, Environmental and 
Health Services, Community Safety and Road Traffic Management as well as 
Sports, Arts and Cultural Services to the communities. The Department will also 
be responsible for the following: 

Provision of efficient and coordinated health and occupational health 
services, 

Manages and monitors the implementation of pollution and environmental 
degradation prevention strategy (Develop and implement monitoring 
mechanisms for the provision of this services by the District Municipality), 
Provision of efficient and coordinated firefighting services (Develop and 
implement monitoring mechanisms for provision of this services by the 
District Municipality), 

Manages and monitors the implementation of crime prevention strategies 
thereby improving safety and security in communities. 


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Develops and implennents strategies to stimulate, promote and develop 
Sports, Arts and Culture and other recreational activities, 

Manages the provision of efficient and coordinated community welfare 
services such as: 

0 Day-care centers, 

0 Proper pension payouts, 

0 HIV/AIDS Education / Awareness, 

0 Sports, Arts and Culture Development, 

0 The Aged and the Disabled, 

Protection and maintenance of sensitive, vulnerable areas and cultural 
heritage sites to sustainable levels, 

Proper management of Municipal community facilities including, sports, 
community halls, 

Public spaces and recreation centres, parks, facilities, etc. 

3. 5. 1.4 Development and Planning 

The primarily be responsible of the department is to promote of the local 
economic development initiatives and job creation in sectors such as commerce: 
small, medium and micro enterprises; agriculture; tourism; and labour intensive 
public works and includes Town Planning, land and housing and Estate. The 
Department will also be responsible of the following: 

Management and stimulation of economic development within the 
Municipality 

Develops and implements the strategic plan, policies and programmes for 
the local economic rejuvenation, 

Identify local economic opportunities and advise local businesses to take 
advantage of them, 

Identify suitable land for agricultural purposes, developed business people 
and render a coordinated advisory service on economic development 
issues, 

Develop and maintain the LED Strategy/ Plan, 

Develops investment policies that will attract funding and investment 
growth for various basic community needs and projects 
Conduct proper research in terms of local economic development and 
planning, 

Approval of Building plans and building control function 


3. 5. 1.5 The Budget & Treasury Department 

The department is responsible for providing strategic direction on financial 
planning, management and accounting as well as guidance and support to the 
senior managers within the Municipality regarding the implementation of and 
compliance with the Municipal 


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Finance Management Act and related Treasury Regulations. The Department is 
also responsible for the following: 

Establish/maintain an efficient and transparent system of financial 
management and internal controls to ensure sound financial control by 
developing, implementing and monitoring financial control systems. 
Establish/maintain appropriate policies, systems and procedures to ensure 
effective and efficient management of resources by maintaining updated 
financial guidelines and ensuring adherence to these policies & procedures. 
Prepare financial statements for each financial year in accordance with the 
generally recognized accounting practices by ensuring the production of 
financial reports of the Municipality as well as providing oversight and 
management of reconciliations of sundry and suspense accounts. 

Ensure that revenue and expenditure of the Municipality are in accordance 
with internal controls (budgets) and legislative prescripts governing 
finance within the Municipality by maximizing revenue collections, 
optimizing expenditure, monitoring cash flow as well as ensuring that 
expenditure is within allocation limits. 

Follow up on the implementation of actions resulting from Audit 
Committee and Auditor-General's reports by developing effective 
implementation strategy for implementation of corrective measures 
Supply chain management 


3. 5. 1.6 The Corporate Services Department 

The department is responsible for the general operations of the Municipality 
including administration, human resources, fleet and document management. In 
addition to oversight of the central administrative functions of the Municipality, 
the role of the Corporate Services Department will also be to provide secretarial 
services and guidance to Council and other governance structures of the 
Municipality, and safeguarding the interests of the municipal stakeholders 
(communities, staff, etc.). The Municipal Structures Act, 1998 identifies three 
primary areas that fall under the auspices of the corporate services: 

The Council support: Guides the councillors as to their duties and 
responsibilities and makes them aware of relevant legislation and 
regulations; ensures proper orientation and induction of councillors; 
provides practical support and guidance (including training) and raises 
matters of importance; ensures that councillors have access to information 
and manages council papers and documents (council resolutions and 
record keeping). 

The Municipality: Ensures statutory and regulatory compliance; ensure 
council resolutions are communicated to relevant persons for execution; 
provides guidance and advice on ethics and good governance. 


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Functional areas per organogram 


Approved positions 

Number of 
approved posts 
per department 

Filled posts 

Vacant posts 

Municipal Manager 

27 

13 

14 

Corporate Services 

33 

29 

4 

Community Services 

99 

83 

16 

Budget and Treasury 

26 

15 

11 

Technicai Services 

27 

20 

7 

Planning and Development 

23 

9 

14 

TOTAL NUMBER 

235 

169 

66 


I nfrastructure Development Department staff registered with professional bodies 


1 nfrastructure 

Development 

Department 

Total number of 

technical service 
Managers 

Total number 
registered in the 
accredited 
professional 
body 

Total number 
pending registration 
confirmation in the 

accredited 
professional body 

Total number 
not yet 
registered in 
the accredited 
professional 
body 


4 

0 

0 

4 


Office of the Municipal Manager staff registered with professional bodies 


Office of the 
Municipal 

Manager 

Total number of 
Managers in the 
Office of MM 

Total number 
registered in the 
accredited 
professional 
body 

Total number 
pending registration 
confirmation in the 

accredited 
professional body 

Total number 
not yet 
registered in 
the accredited 
professionai 
body 


7 

1 

0 

6 


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Corporate Services staff registered with professionai bodies 


Corporate 

Services 

Department 

Total number 
of Corporate 

Services 
Managers 

Total number 

registered in the 
accredited 
professional 
body 

Total number 

pending 
registration 
confirmation in the 

accredited 
professional body 

Total number 

not yet 

registered in 

the accredited 
professional 
body 


3 

0 

0 

3 


BTO staff registered with professionai bodies 


Budget & 

Treasury Office 

Total number of 
BTO Managers 

Total number 

registered in the 
accredited 
professional 
body 

Total number 

pending 
registration 
confirmation in the 

accredited 
professional body 

Total number 
not yet 

registered in 
the accredited 
professional 
body 


6 

1 

0 

5 


Community staff registered with professionai bodies 


Community 

Services 

Department 

Total number of 

Community 

Services 

Managers 

Total number 

registered in the 
accredited 
professional 
body 

Total number 

pending 
registration 
confirmation in the 

accredited 
professional body 

Total number 
not yet 

registered in 
the accredited 
professional 
body 


3 

0 

0 

3 


Planning and Development registered with professional bodies 


Planning and 
Development 
Department 

Total number of 

Planning and 
Development 
Managers 

Total number 

registered in the 

accredited 

professional 

body 

Total number 

pending 

registration 

confirmation in 

the accredited 

professional body 

Total number 

not yet 
registered in 

the accredited 

professional 

body 


4 

1 

0 

3 


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3.5.2 Employment Equity 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality recognizes the legacy of past discrinnination during 
which people were denied opportunities to quality education, employnnent and 
development on the basis of race, gender, HIV/AIDS, marital status, sexual 
orientation, religion; ethnic/social origin, age and disabilities. In endeavor to 
redress those imbalances, NLM has committed itself to the principles of equal 
opportunities, fair employment practices and people development 

V The NLM is committed to the implementation of employment Equity to 
redress the legacy of past discrimination during which people were denied 
access to equal opportunities based on their race, gender, HIV/AIDS, 
marital status, sexual orientation, religion; ethnic/social origin, age and 
disabilities; 

V NLM is committed to redress the past legacies through the establishment 
of EE Forum; 

V in order to guide its implementation process and review, the municipality 
developed an Employment Equity Plan covering a period between 2012 
and 2016; 

V The plan needs to be continually reviewed and updated annually to ensure 
that it is consistently in line with the economic realities of the Municipality. 


3. 5.3.1 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

The NLM has a primary purpose to provide accredited, quality training for both 
employed and unemployed candidates within its jurisdiction. This is in line with 
the Skills Development Act No. of 97 of 1998, Skills Development Levy Act No. 
09 of 1999, South African Quality Assurance (SAQA) Act No 58 of 1995 and 
Employment Equity Act No 55 of 1998. 

The unit co-ordinates, monitors and evaluates all skills development initiatives to 
ensure that they enhance Service Delivery and Corporate Governance, as well as 
improve financial viability of the municipality within its jurisdiction, stimulate 
local economic development which would subsequently alleviate poverty, and 
being change agents for effective Municipal Transformation and I nstitutional 
Development. 

In 2012/13 NLM undertook training for the entire Councillors and officials. The 
training programmes are aligned to applicable Legislation, Policies, Political 
pronouncements and IDP linkage as follows; 

<* Councillors 

-Advance Certificate in Public administration 


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Officials 


- Indigent Data Management Training 

- Anti- corruption training 

- MCSA Window Server 2012 

- VI P training 

- Performance Management Systems 

- Records management 

- Advance Project Management NQF 6 

- Project planning 

- Population, Environment and Development for IDP 

- Customer care workshop 

- Training of training committee 

- Conflict management training 

- Supervisory training 

- Bid committee training 

- Plant Operator training 

- Electrical Trade Training 

-LED Learnership for unemployed in progress 

- Quad bike training 


3.5.5 Employee Assistance & Occupational Health & Safety Office 

The objectives of the Employee Assistance and Occupational Health & Safety 
Office are to promote health by providing the employees with ongoing education, 
information and communication in all health related aspects. They are also 
encouraged to be proactive about their health and modify their lifestyle for their 
own health benefits. The office has a responsibility of ensuring a safe work 
environment of all the employees at work and safety during operations. 

This is to comply with the Occupational Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993, 
Medicine and Related Substances Control Act 101 of 1965, Employment Equity 
Act 55 of 1998 and the Compensation of Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act 
130 of 1993. 

During 2012/2013 financial year the Division engaged in different programmes 
for Ngqushwa Municipal Councillors and employees including those based in our 
Hamburg satellite office, to meet its objectives. 

3.5.6 Employee Assistance Programme 


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During the World Aids day conducted for municipal employees in the previous 
year, one other major aspect we focused on was to raise awareness on 
Substance abuse in the workplace. A guest speaker from SANCA presented on 
the effect of alcohol and drugs abuse on job performance; how to recognize a 
substance abuse problem; and how to get help for a drug or alcohol problem. 

Some employees who are suffering from chronic illnesses such as high blood 
pressure, diabetes; HIV & AIDS etc., who have medical aid with SamwuMed have 
been beneficiaries of receiving free medical through the Chronic lllnesses 
programme. Employees are issued with forms to be filled by their medical 
doctors and send them to Samwu Med for assessment before it's confirmed 
whether employees will qualify or not. 

HIV/AIDS, TB Sl STIs workshops was conducted for municipal employees with the 
aim to raise awareness and address negative attitudes towards people living with 
HIV/AIDS, TB Sl STIs and increase awareness among our employees. This is to 
equip them with knowledge and skills to care for themselves and their families as 
well as to engage in healthy life style. 

Personal Financial Management workshops were conducted to all municipal 
councillors and employees to raise awareness in assisting employees to better 
manage their finances. Stakeholders such has Capitec, National Credit Regulator 
and Old Mutual are among the institutions who were invite to present on financial 
management to educate our staff. 

Stress management counselling sessions is being arranged for BTO Managers 
after it was resolved in the Re-engineering meeting. 

The Health Awareness day was held for employees and a total of 78 employees 
attended, the objective is to encourage them to be proactive about their health 
and that their health is their responsibility. Different service providers dealing 
with health attended the event to render service to the employees, CANSA 
conducted 33 breast examinations and 24 prostate cancer examinations; 24 
employees were tested for Pap smear and 60 other employees were vaccinated 
Hepatitis A immunization by Dr Yapi; 64 employees were tested for TB through 
the assistance from Peddie Extension Clinic; while Khathala Optometrist tested 
49 employees on eye test. Nurses from Peddie Extension Clinic were also on site 
and 29 employees submitted themselves for HIV counselling and testing. 

A World Aids Day was conducted for all municipal councillors and employees with 
the aim to raise awareness on HIV & AIDS and TB management. Information was 
shared on the theme of the current year and what each one of us is supposed to 
do to get to Zero new infections, HIV related deaths, stigmatization and 
discrimination by 2015. 


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3.5.7 Occupational Health 


All employees that are exposed to risks that are detrimental to their health 
undergo medical check-ups which includes special tests such as eye test, flu 
vaccinations, kidney functioning and TB. Hepatitis A was administered to 60 
employees working at refuse section, parks and amenities section. 


3.5.8 Occupational Safety 

All work areas have safety representatives who are responsible for identifying 
hazards from the work environment or emanating during the work processes 
which may have a negative effect on the health and safety of the employees. 
These Representatives should make the employees and their supervisor aware of 
these hazards and also report them to the Safety Committee which is chaired by 
the Human Resources Manager. 

It is the responsibility of each department to budget for protective clothing for its 
employees, although purchasing thereof is done by Corporate Services 
Department. All deserving employees were provided with protective clothing on 
yearly intervals and when necessary. The protective clothing is purchased and 
issued according to the risk that the employees are exposed to. All employees 
working with refuse; parks and cemeteries are issued with overall, safety boots, 
rain suits and warm jackets, consideration is given to employees that are 
exposed to risks that need special protective clothing such as masks, ear muffs, 
and gloves. 


Challenges experienced by the Office: 

No Employee Assistance and Health & Safety Plan has been developed. 
Mismanagement of personal finances has resulted in a number of 
employees in debts. 

Lack of compliance in plants with regards to safety standards. 

I nadequate office space 

Delays by service providers to supply and deliver protective clothing 
during the procurement processes. 

No change rooms and shower space has been provided for general 
assistance workers 

Poor attendance of Section Managers and Councillors to EAP workshops 
Delays experiences when seeking assistance from Doctors to conduct 
medical check-ups to municipal employees. 

Employees working in remote areas are exposed to life threatening 
conditions. 


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SWOT analysis 
Technical Services 


STRENGTHS 

WEAKNESSES 

• Experienced and competent workforce. 

• Efficient financial and information management 
systems. 

• Training opportunities and Employee Assistant programs 
in place 

• Good 1 nter-Municipal relations and support from 
provincial government e.g. DLGTA and ADM 

• Good communication arrangements with Communities 
in consultation with CLLRs. 

• Payments of creditors within 30 days. 

• 

• Under spending of allocated budgets and grants 

• Unavailability of operational funds that results to poor 
performance. 

• Lack of strategic leadership and decision making due to 
shortage of senior managers. 

• Lack of knowledge sharing among the staff. 

• Lack of SMME development programs 

• Working against SDBIP 

• Shortage of competent plant operators. 

• Late appointment of service providers 

• Silo planning 

• 

OPPORTUNITIES 

THREATS 

• Geographic location of Ngqushwa situated near the 
coastal area 

• Being located between two major routes that is N2 and 

R 72 

• External funding opportunities and twinning agreements 
with other countries. 

• Environmental Management Program. 

• Tourism potential zone (Hamburg and coastal towns). 

• Growing transportation sector due to rehabilitation of 
N2. 

• 

• Shortage of land to meet increasing demand of both 
residential and business development as the land is mostly 
owned by private and other departments. 

• Ageing infrastructure (Roads and storm water). 

• 1 ncreasing crime hot spots and vandalism of social amenities. 

• HIV/AIDS pandemic and high unemployment rate. 

• lllegal connections to Municipal services and uncontrolled 
illegal buildings without building plans. 

• Dented Municipal Corporate Image due negative publicity 

• Uncoordinated planning resulting in unfunded mandates from 
other levels of government. 

• 1 nsufficient funds to eradicate infrastructure backlogs 


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• Poor implementation of maintenance plans. 

• Huge backlogs from previous years. 


4.3.3 Community Services 


STRENGTHS 

WEAKNESSES 

• Departmental Integration 

• SMME Trainings and skills development 

• Rural and local development initiatives by sector departments 

• Enterprise development - SMME's 

• Geographical location of developmental nodes. 

• Organizational Design : Availability of organogram suitable for 
the section 

• Municipal Buildings :Scarcity of municipal buildings 

• Valuation of properties 

• Availability of property rates policy and bylaws 

• Use ofADMGIS 

• Building control policy and bylaws were adopted by Council. 

• Geographical location of developments per zoning 

• Resource management 

• Development of by-laws 

• Revenue enhancement 

• Basic Service Delivery 

• Timeous refuse collection 

• Regular maintenance of Parks & Cemeteries & other public 

• Lack of communication and silo mentality 

• Funding for agricultural trainings is limited 

• Limited infrastructure funding 

• Market Linkages - poor product quality 

• Not sustainable due to lack of resources.funding 

• Lack of critical personnel 

• Minimum monitoring and evaluation 

• Unfavorable climatic conditions 

• Lack of sustainability on projects 

• Land ownership 

• Shortage of staff 

• Lack of training 

• Gaps between valuation roll and billing system 

• Non collection of revenue from billboards 

• Non submission of building plans, leading to non 
collection of revenue. 

• Lack of Municipal owned Geographic 1 nformation 
System 

• Not all communities are aware of policies and 


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annenities 

• Great Fish River (Double Drift) Nature Reserve 

• Situated in a very critical position; N2 on the way between KWT 
and Grahamstown and boarded by Fish River and Keiskamma 

River which were used as a boundary during the Time of Land 
Dispossession. R72 between Port Alfred and East London, on the 
Sunshine Coast which consists of numbers of attraction. 

• Beautiful Beaches and Rivers; Hamburg beach, Bhirha beach. 

Great Fish River and Keiskamma River. 

• Beautiful scenery range from mountains, rivers, 

• Heritage sites. 

• Bed Sl Breakfasts 

• Improved Inter- Governmental Relations 

• Attraction resources 

• The section is protected by the National Traffic Act 93/ 1996 

• It give you powers to enforce law and order under the road traffic 
act and it give you arresting powers in the jurisdiction of 

Ngqushwa Municipal Area. 

• Strong collection strategy to generate money for the municipality 
with the testing of learners and drivers licences. 

• As uniform officers discipline play a huge role in the traffic 
profession. 

• Treat all staff with respect and lead by example 

• 

bylaws, workshop was conducted to inform rate 
payers of Peddie Town, Hamburg and Coastal 
Ratepayers 

• Lack of updated information, such as SDF map 

• Lack of appropriate machinery for maintenance of 
grounds 

• Lack of GIS system to monitor our projects 

• Limited budget 

• Lack of strategy to Collect outstanding traffic fines 
beyond Municipal jurisdiction 

• Working relations within the section 

OPPORTUNITIES 

THREATS 

• Communication through farm structure 

• Farmers received accredited trainings on different sectors 

• Silo mentality 

• Minimum monitoring and evaluation 

• Unfavorable climatic conditions 


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Agriculture development and food security 
Suitable environment 
Departmental Integration 
Synchronized planning 

Availability of land and properties for development of sustainable 
human settlements 

Availability of land for development of sustainable human 
settlements 

Synchronized planning, where all developmental locations are 
identified. 

Numbers of jobs will be generated and sustainable 
Coordination of events on these strategic positions can assist in 
terms of attracting or exposing heritage sites to visitors. 

Sport in Tourism like Canoeing, Sunrise and Sunset boat ride, 
Fishing and other activities. 

Sport in Tourism Motor Bike Race Ride. 

Exposed to visitors. 

The municipality has a unique natural environment fit for 
adventure based tourism 

Urban greening and open space opportunities 


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• Climate change 

• Lack of sustainability on projects 

• Land ownership 

• Lack of critical personnel 

• Minimum monitoring and evaluation 

• Unfavourable climatic conditions 

• Lack of sustainability on projects 

• State owned land that is not easily accessible for 
development 

• State owned land and properties that is not easily 
accessible for development 

• Failure of I ntergovernmental Relations, non 
attendance of Department of Rural Development and 
Land Reform 

• Failure of I ntergovernmental Relations, non 
availability of Department of Human Settlements to 
conduct Consumer Education. 

• State owned land that is not easily accessible for 
development 

• Non availability of needs register to replace waiting 
list. 

• Change in Town Planning Regulation 

• No approved zoning scheme regulations, not 
proclaimed yet 

• Non submission of building plans 

• Cancellation of bookings at the last moments /game 
poacher 

• Lack of attendance in these events 

• Lack of experienced of well-trained tour guides 

• Additional activities around or nearby heritage sites 

• Signage can be a threat due to lack of recognition for 


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4.3.1 Municipal Manager Office 


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these sites. 

• CriiTie rate 

• Lack of access to beaches 

• Corruption on the road / Motor Vehicle Registration 
and DLTC. 

• Traffic section not secure enough, staff work with 
money 

• Rebate of Rate payers 

• Delays on delivery of basic services 

• Negative clinnate change on the environment 

• None existence of a coastal management plan can 
lead to mismanagement of valuable coastal area 


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STRENGTHS 

WEAKNESSES 

• Sound policies are in place. 

• Culture of comnnunity participation 

• Ward committees are in place and each ward committee is 
assigned a responsibility in accordance to the 5 municipal KPAs 

• Community Development Workers (CDWs) are in place except 
for ward 10 and ward 13 has 2. 

• Special Program designated groups structures(people with 
disability, older persons, youth ,sports council, care givers, 
HIV/AID and primary health care givers) are in existence and 
fully functional at ward level. 

• Ward based plan is in place 

• There is an active MRM. 

• An existing Audit Committee that sits on a quarterly basis. 

• Community Development Workers MOU signed. 

• Gaps arising from Ward Committees Workers being employed 
in other programmes are filled. 

• Project steering committee meetings are now sitting. 

• Engagement with the traditional leaders who are not part of 
the Council is now effective. 

• Audit action plan developed and due dates set to address the 
AG issues. 

• Policy and bylaws not fully implemented 

• Community participation not institutionalized. (working in 
silos when it comes to public participation events this then 
gives rise to event clashes.) 

• CDW reports are seldom submitted, and when submitted are 
not talking to the core municipal functions. (KPA differential 
issues between the province and the municipality.) 

• Non-submission of reports by ward committees. 

• Lack of relationship between Ward Committees, Community 
Development Workers and Ward Councillors. 

• MPAC is not fully effective due to non-attendance by other 
members. 

• Non institutionalisation of Audit. 

• Poor build up for Audit. 

• Compliance is not institutionalized. 

• Non availability of ICT systems for Internal Audit. 

• Non accessibility to emails when outside the work place. 

• Strengthening needed for the 1 ntergovernmental Relations 
Forum. 

• Non sitting of IDP Rep Forums 

OPPORTUNITIES 

THREATS 

• Councillors trained on Local Government. 

• Learning and sharing initiative for MPAC. 

• Training on Corporative Governance at various levels for 
municipal staff. 

• Rebranding of municipal image starting internally between 

• Under staffing in critical areas such as Internal Audit and 
Communication etc. 

• Councillors not having office space and their own 
secretariat. 

• Non sitting of IDP Rep Forums. 

• Non sitting of both political and technical IDP/Budget 


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administration and councillor - Municipal Performance 

steering committees. 

Regulations Section 30(3). 



4.3.4 Budget and Treasury 


STRENGTHS 

WEAKNESSES 

• Budget Policy, Virement Policy and Procedure manuals in place 

• Virements that take place within Smonths after budget approval. 

• Development of credible municipal draft budget, annual budget and 

• Budget that does not talk to SDBIP projects. 

adjustment budget in time. 

• Delay of submitting 72 reports in time due to non availability of 

• Submission of section 71, Quarterly reports, Grants reports, and 

information from other departments e.g. performance information 

other MFMFA reports timeously. 

• Financial System that allow expenditure to votes that has no budget 

• Monitoring of budget and expenditure 

that leads to negative balances. 

• Revenue polices are in place 

• Figures that changes on the system after month end (due to control 

• Improved co-ordination of audit 

of closing of system). 

• Financial system up and running 

• Silo mentality ( lack of teamwork/synergy 

• Improved co-ordination with government grants 

• Incomplete information of rate payers in accurate billing 

• Fully insured assets. 

• Unknown ownership of other properties 

• Risk Management adequately managed 

• No revenue turnaround strategy in place 

• Leasing of properties and development within the Ngqushwa area 

• Incomplet / incorrect f GV roll low revenue base 

Investment management 

• The lack of capacity for infrastructure conditional assessment 

• Asset register on the system 

• 90% percent non-compliance with asset management policy and 

• Depreciation is automated on the system 

procedures 

• SCM policy is in place and reviewed annually 

• Poor co-ordination of the audit due to late submission/loss of 

• Quarterly reports on the implementation of scm are submitted 

information 

timeously to the relevant structures 

• Ineffective safe guarding of assets - building not fully secured. 

• Non-performance of reconciliations 

• Misallocation between votes - e.g. capital classified as operating 

• Low reliance on consultants 

• Lack of Capacity ( staff to assist to asset management) 

• Improved co-ordination of the audit 

• Inadequate asset maintenance 


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• Improvement on payment of creditors 

• Continual training and support on the system 

• Improved synergy within BTO 

• Improved departmental setup within BTO 

• Credible Financial reporting 

• Improved Work ethics 

• Weekly sections operations management meetings 

• Improved records /document management 

• Sittings of Departmental meetings do not sit as scheduled 

• Risk Management adequately managed 

• Investment management 


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• Infrastructure backlog 

• Assets not fully utilised 

• Poor co-ordination of the audit due to late submission/loss of 
information 

• Over and under spending of vote numbers 

• Non availability of procurement plans 

• Incomplete supplier database system 

• Use of suppliers not in the database 

• Non-compliance with CIDB and MFMA 

• Poor Contract Management (service providers) 

• Incomplete register for wasteful, irregular and unauthorised 
expenditure 

• Lack of synergy within BTO and between BTO and other 
departments ( Silo Mentality) 

• Poor records/ document management 

• Non implementation of actions entailed within the risk register and 
audit action plan 

• Silo mentality (lack of teamwork/synergy) 

• Lack of monitoring of the budget ( Unauthorised Expenditure) 

• The lack of capacity (lack of understanding of GRAP 17) 

• Poor co-ordination of the audit due to late submission/loss of 
information 

• Misallocation between votes - e.g. capital classified as operating 

• Ineffective implementation of/non-compliance with Expenditure 
policies 

• Poor Contract Management (service providers) 

• Lack of synergy between BTO and other departments (Silo 
mentality 

• Capacity challenges 


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• Electronic viewing (financial system)of budget and expenditure 
votes 

• Lack of proper review of budget expenditure(at section level) 

• Non adherence to set systems and controls 

• Non adherence to set internal controls and systems. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

THREATS 

• Appointment of CFO is assisting 

• Appointment of Chief Accounting 

• Existence of Internal Audit Unit 

• Improved asset management plans 

• Technological changes for asset improvement 

• Ignorance to people when they make requisitions 

• Working outside system 

• Non consistence in keeping Month end procedure dates 

• Reluctance to pay due to discrepancies in accounts 

• Asset loss/Theft 

• Asset damages 

• Fraud and corruption 

• Negative publicity by suppliers 

• Difficulties of end users to adapt to new system 

• Urgent procurement by end users 

• Titanic prices charged by local suppliers 

• Late deliveries by suppliers 

• Poor Audit outcomes - risk of inability to comply with National 
targets for 2015 


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4.3.2 Corporate Services 


STRENGTHS 

WEAKNESSES 

• Dedicated person (Skills Dev. Facilitator) 

• Training are not aligned/linked to performance and 

• Development of WSP 

municipal objectives (out) 

• 1 nternship programme 

• 1 mplementation of training is not adequate 

• Skills Development Employment Equity Forum 

• No succession plan (mentoring & coaching) 

• Community Bursary (out) 

• Not enough funding 

• Training is evaluated and monitored 

• Inconsistent sitting of SDEEF meetings 

• Existence of Skills Development Employment Equity Forum 

• Lack of accredited SP 

• Existence of Employment Equity Plan 

• Non-sitting of SDEEF 

• Existence of EEA 

• Non reporting of members of the SDEEF to 

• Existence of Recruitment policy 

Departments 

• Alignment of Recruitment policy to national regulation on 

• Level of nominees representing departments in the 

appointment of SNR Managers 

SDEEF 

• Support provided by District, SALGA and COGTA and other 

• Inability to attract employees from designated 

relevant stakeholders 

groups (especially disabled) 

• Policies are in existence 

• Non implementation of other assessment 

• Reviewed annually 

techniques to all levels of employees 

• Records Management Policy 

• Non representation of specialists in the recruitment 

• Policies are in existence 

panel for Section 57 & 56 Managers (out) 

• Reviewed annually 

• Delays in advertising and filling of vacant posts 

• Developed and adopted municipal Calendar Council Support 

• Lack of a strategy to attract & retain scarce skills 

Procedure Manual 

• Non existence of procedures to implement in some 

• Dedicated personnel to provide support 

policies 

• Leave Policy 

• Non dedicated section for monitoring of 

• Electronic Clocking System 

implementation of policies 

• Functional Local Labour Forum 

• Non dedicated Manager for policy development 

• Bi-lateral meetings 

• Lack of capacity 

• Support from district & SALGBC 

• Lack of space 

• Dedicated employee dealing with the employee wellness 

• Unapproved file plan & Registry procedure manual 

• Developed policy 

• Non existence of procedures to implement in some 

• Participation of employee to sport activities 

policies 


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• Awareness of wellness progrannnne 

• OHS Committee established 

• H&S policy 

• Reviewed & approved organogram 

• Fleet Management Policy 

• Fleet management system 


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• Non dedicated section for monitoring of 
implementation of policies 

• Non dedicated Manager for policy development 

• Lack of capacity 

• Lack of space 

• Unapproved file plan & Registry procedure manual 

• Delivery of council notice in good time 

• Non recording of discussions leading to resolutions 

• Lack of management of leave from Sections 

• Abuse of sick leave by personnel 

• Minimum/and or lack of monitoring of 
leave/attendance by line managers 

• Minimum preparation / discussion of LLF issues with 
Top Management 

• Minimum management of labour relations by 
Section Heads 

• Low morale 

• Lack of consultation room 

• Minimum utilisation of employee support by staff 
members 

• Lack of OHS strategy and plan 

• Approved organogram not aligned to the Integrated 
Development Plan 

• Partial implementation of the policy 

• Partial use of the fleet management system 


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OPPORTUNITIES 

THREATS 

• We surrounded by institutions of higher learning and technical 

• Rural nature of the municipality which can cause 

colleges 

people to leave after being trained 

• Existence of employees with potential to learn 

• Staff will not have time to study 

• Existence of qualified females to occupy posts that used to be 

• No leave type for study purposes 

occupied by males. 

• Low percentage of people living with disabilities 

• Monitoring and support from DoL 

• Recruitment of qualified but incompetent 

• Existence of qualified staff in the labour market 

candidates 

• Support from other institutions 

• Qualified people who are unwilling to relocate to 

• Existence of Acts & Collective Agreements 


• Existence of qualified staff in the labour market 

r6QQI6 

• Support from other institutions 

• Other municipalities/institutions offering better 

• Existence of Acts & Collective Agreements 

salaries 

• Support from Department of Sport Recreation Arts & Culture 


• Legislations guiding running of Municipalities 

• Development of policies that do not compliment the 

• Partial implementation of Council resolutions 

legislations 

• Signing of resolution register 

• Changing of national acts 

• Room to improve by line ,managers 


• SALGBC Collective Agreements 

• Recruitment of qualified but incompetent 

• Organised workforce 

candidates 

• 1 nter-municipal relations 

• Qualified people who are unwilling to relocate to 

• Department of Health 

Peddie 

• Professional Practitioners & advisors 

• Other municipalities/institutions offering better 

• 1 ndoor sport centre 

salaries 

• Existence of Compensation Commission 


• Department of Health 

• Development of policies that do not compliment the 

• Private Doctors 

legislations 

• Protective Clothing 

• Changing of national acts 

• Existence of 1 DP 

• Loss of valuable information 

• Benchmarking with other municipalities 

• Natural disaster 


• Wasteful expenditure 


• Minimum preparation / discussion of LLF issues with 


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Top Managennent 

Minimunn management of labour relations by 
Section Heads 
Labour unrest 

Resignation of staff due to unattended personal 

problems 

Fatal injuries 

Communicable diseases 

Qualified and competent staff 

Non filling of approved posts due to financial 

constraints 

Misuse of council fleet 
Over speeding by Drivers 
High maintenance costs 


138 




mh 





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139 





3.5.10 COMMUNITY SURVEY 


This desk top analysis report is a synthesis of the status quo analysis as presented in existing 
policy documents in the municipality. The information has been synthesized with the ward 
profiling information gathered during the ward visits for the Ward Based Planning Process. 
The purpose of this process is to present a yardstick with which to evaluate the collected 
data. It serves as the situational analysis to inform the Ward Based Plans and subsequently 
form the basis for the Integrated Development Plan Situational Analysis phase. 


3.5. 11 Ward Priorities as captured per ward: 
Ward 1 Ciir J oweia 


Viiiage 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Zalara 

Hall 

Water - Newly built houses 

Creche 

Mtati 

Access Roads 

Dipping Tank 

Water(Ext sites) 

Tyeni 

Access Roads 

Dam Purification 

Fencing 

Ngqwele 

Access Roads 

Water - (Ext sites) 

RDP Houses 

Bhele 

Hall 

Access Roads 

Funding for Co- 

ops 

Nonibe 

Hall 

Access Roads 

RDP Houses 

Gobozana 

Water on Newly built 

houses. 

Electricity - Newly built 

houses 

RDP Houses 

Nxopho 

Access Roads 

Water - (Ext sites) 

Fencing 


Ward 2 Ciir Coto 


Viiiage 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Qaga 

Electricity Extensions 

Roads- Internal 

Youth Programmes 

Masele 

Roads- Internal 

Water(Extensions) 

Electricity Extensions 

Thamara 

Community Hall 

Water( Extensions) ) 

Roads- Internal 

Dubu 

Water(Extensions) 

Roads- Internal 

Electricity Extensions 

J ubisa 

Roads- Internal 

Water(Extensions) 

Youth Programmes 

Tsolo 

Shushu 

Roads- Internal 

Water(Extensions) 

Youth Programmes 


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Ward 3 Cllr Sithole 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Upper 

Mthonnbe 

Roads- Internal 

Community Hall 

Electricity-New 

Extensions 

Lower 

Mthonnbe 

Roads- Internal 

Community Hall 

Dipping Tank 

Tyatha 

Roads- Internal 

Toilets 

Water 

Quqgwala 

Roads- Internal 

Fencing of Grave Yards 

Funding of Projects 

Dlova 

Roads- Internal 

Toilets 

Water (in-fill 

households) 

Nquthu 

Roads- Internal 

Community Hall 

Water-New 

Extensions 

Tildin 

Community Hall 

Roads 

Electricity-New 

Extensions 

Tapushe 

Community Hall 

Roads 

Electricity-New 

Extensions 

Rode 

Community Hall (Not 
Complete) 

Roads- Internal 

Fencing 

Mavathulana 

Community Hall 

Roads 

Toilets 













Zinnbaba 

Roads- Internal 



Zondeka 

Roads- Internal 

Community Hall 

Renovation 

Funding of Projects 


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Ward 4 Cllr Maphekula 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Mabongo 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access 

road) 

Hall 

RDP houses 

Khalana 

Roads- Internal 

Scheme 

revalitazation 

Water (in-fills) 

Shushu 

Hall 

Roads (maintenance 

of main access 

road) 


Ntsinekana 

Hall 

RDP houses 

Dip 

Mqwashu 

Clinic 

Hall 

RDP houses 

Bongweni A 

Clinic(Mqwashini 
Villages as the 
center) 

Hall 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access 

road) 

Gcinisa North 

Hall 

Water 

Clinic(Mqwashini 
Villages as the 
center) 

Hlosini 

Clinic(Mqwashini 
Villages as the 
center) 

RDP houses 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access 

road) 

Bongweni B 

Clinic(Mqwashini 
Villages as the 
center) 

RDP houses 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access 

road) 

Maqosha 

Clinic(Mqwashini 
Villages as the 
center) 

Roads (maintenance 

of main access 

road) 

RDP houses 

Nqwenerhana 

Hall 

Clinic(Mqwashini 
Villages as the 
center) 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access 

road) 


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Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Crossnnan 

Dip 

RDP houses 

Roads 

(construction of 

access roads) 

Nomonti 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance 

of main access 

road) 

Transport 

Torr 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance 

of main access road 

and widen existing 
bridge on main 
access road) 

Water 

Bulukazi 

RDP houses 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access roads 

and access road) 

Water 

Baltein 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance 

of main access 

road) 

Fencing 

Mrhathaza 

RDP houses 

Roads(Mrhataza to 

Torr) 

Roads(l nternal 

Roads) 

Qawukeni 

Roads-I nternal 

Water 

Clinic (Centre for 

Shushu, Kalana 
and Mabongo) 


Ward 5 Cllr Yolelo 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Machibi 

Roads- Internal 

Fencing of Camps 

Cleaning of Dams 

Moni 

Community Hall 

Fencing of Camps 

Roads- Internal 

Twecu 

Community Hall 

Fencing of Camps 

Roads- Internal 

Upper Dube 

Roads- Internal 

Fencing of Camps 

Crech 

Lower Dube 

Roads to projects 

Fencing of Camps 

Roads- Internal 

Cwecweni 

Roads- Internal 

Fencing of Camps 

Roads 


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Madliki 

Access Roads and a 

Bridge 

Fencing of Camps 

Roads- Internal 

Phole 

Roads- Internal 

Fencing of Camps 

Cleaning of Dams 

Nxwashu/TyipTyip 

Community Hall 

Phase 2-Roads 

Dipping Tank 

Ngxakaxha 

Roads to projects 

Roads- Internal 

Fencing of Camps 

Mdolonnba 

Community Hall 

Fencing of Camps 

Roads- Internal 


Ward 6 Cllr Mapuma 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Tyityaba 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

Roads (maintenance of road 
from R345 to Tyityaba) 

Bodium 

RDP houses 

1 nterior roads 

VI P toilets 

Bell 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

Roads (maintenance of 

interior roads) 

Lovers Twist 

RDP houses 

Roads (informal 

road - 

construction) 

Toilets 

Crossroads 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

Roads (maintenance of road 

from R345 into Crossroads) 

Tuku A 

VI P toilets 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

road from R345 

into Tuku A) 

RDP houses 

Tuku B 

RDP houses 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

road 

fromMthwebu 

area to Tuku B) 

VI P toilets 

Tuku C 

Roads (maintenance 

of interior access 

roads) 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

Wooldridge 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

Roads (from Mthwebu to 
town) 

Hoyi 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

Roads (maintenance of road 
from R345 into Hoyi) 

Leqeni 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

Roads (maintenance of road 
from R345 into Leqeni) 


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Ward 7 Cllr Magazi 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Cisira 

Village Access 

Roads 

Taps to newly built 

houses 

Sanitation 

Feni 

Water taps on new 

sites 

Sanitation 

Roads (Dabane - 

Feni - Mvemve - 

Magqaza) 

Mahlubini/Nyaniso 

Road(N2 - 
Mahlubini) 

Sanitation 

Houses 

Makhahlane 

Road (R345 - 
Makhahlane) 

RDP Houses 

Water taps on new 

houses 

Celetyuma 

Road (Celetyuma - 
Mahlubini) 

RDP Houses 

Electricity on new 

houses 

Dam-Dam 

Electricity on new 

houses 

RDP houses 

Water taps on new 

houses 


Ward 8 Cllr Mtshakazi 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Ndlambe 

Ndwayana 

Glenmore 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance 

of road from R345 to 

Rura) 

More transport services (need 
for bus to operate in village) 

Qamnyana 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

Roads (maintenance of road 

from R345 to Rura) 

Gwabeni 

VI P toilets 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance of road 
from Gwabeni to Zizeni) 

Mankone 

Horton 

RDP houses 

VI P toilets 

More transport services (need 
for bus to operate in village) 

Rura 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance 

More transport services (need 


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Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 



of road from R345 to 

Rura) 

for a bus to operate in 
village) 

Luxolo 

VI P toilets 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance of road 
from R345 to Rural) 


Ward 9 Cllr Ndabazonke 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Runletts 

Roads (maintenance of main 

access road from Peddie 

extension to Runletts) 

RDP houses 

Transport 

Woodlands 

Roads (construction of main 

access road from N2 to 

Woodlands) 

RDP houses 

Toilets 

Pikoli 

Roads (maintenance of main 

access road from N2 to 

Greyfish to Pikoli) 

Water 

RDP houses 

Nobumba 

RDP houses 

Toilets 

Water 

Ntloko 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance of 

main access road from 

N2 to Ntloko) 

Toilets 

Mgwalana 

RDP houses 

Toilets 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access road 

from R72 to 

Mrhelentuba) 

Lewis 

RDP houses 

Toilets 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access road 

from N2 to Lewis) 

Paradise 

RDP houses 

Electricity (in-fill 
households) 

Roads (construction 

of main access road 

from Runletts road 

to Paradise 


Ward 10 Cllr Seysman 


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Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Peddie town 

Sewerage system 

Roads 


Peddie Extension 

Community Hall 

RDP houses 


Power 

Grave Yard 

Roads- Internal 

Solid Waste Disposal 

Luxolweni 

Roads- 1 nternal & 

Acess 

Electricity Extensions 

Water 

Gernnan Village 

Roads 

Electricity 

RDP houses 

Durban Location 

Roads- 1 nternal & 

Access 

RDP houses 

Bush Clearing(Path 

from Durban to 

Nompulelo Hospital) 

Ndlovini 

RDP houses 

Roads- Internal & Access 

Electricity 


Ward 11 Cllr Ndanda 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Hamburg 

Road (R72 

Hamburg) 

Sanitation 

Villages access roads 

Benton 

Road (R72 - N2) 

RDP housing 

Villages access roads 

Gcinisa - South 

RDP Houses 

Village access roads 

Sanitation 

Wesley 

RDP Houses 

Sanitation 

Village access roads 

Bhinqala/Soweto 

Road (Mahlubini- 
Bhinqala) 

RDP Houses 

Water Taps on newly built 

houses 

Mqheleni 

RDP houses 

Road (Wesley- 
Mqheleni) 

Sanitation 

Tarfield/Nier 

RDP houses 

Road (Peddie - Nier - 

R72) 

Sanitation 

Qobo- Qobo/ N u loets 

Water Taps 

Sanitation 

Roads (R72 - Qobo/Qobo 
- Hamburg) 

Daninge 

Water Taps 

Sanitation 

Roads (Gcinisa - 
Daninge) 


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Ward 12 Cllr Dyibishe 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Mpheko 

RDP houses 

Roads (maintenance of 

main access road from N2 

to Mpheko) 

Water 

Mgababa 

RDP houses 

Electricity (street lights to 
be maintained) 

Roads (maintenance 

of main access road 

from N2 to R72) 

Prudhoe 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

main access road 

from R72 to 

Prudhoe) 

Electricity (street lights to 
be maintained) 

Water 

Mkhanyeni 

RDP houses 

Electricity 

Roads (maintenance 

of main access road 

from Fungiso to 
Mkhanyeni) 


Ward 13 Cllr Mntanga 


Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 

Mtati 

Roads (maintenance 

of road from tar to 

Ezicrossini) 

Transport 

Toilets 

Ngqowa 

Roads (maintenance 

of road from tar to 

Ngqowa) 

Transport 

RDP houses 

Upper Gwalana 

RDP houses 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

road from tar to 

village) 

VI P toilets 

Mabaleni 

Roads (maintenance 

VI P toilets 

Taps 


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Village 

Priority 1 

Priority 2 

Priorities 3 


of road from tar into 

the village) 



Ntshamanzi 

VI P toilets 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

road from tar into 

the village) 

RDP houses 

Newtondale 

Roads (maintenance 

of road from tar into 

the village) 

VI P toilets 

Transport 

Maxhegweni 

VI P toilets 

RDP houses 

Roads 

(maintenance of 

road from tar 

into the village) 

Upper Qeto 

Roads (maintenance 

of road from tar to 

village) 

RDP houses 

Transport 

Lower Qeto 

Roads (construction 

of road) 

Toilets 

RDP houses 

Lower Mgwalana 

Roads (maintenance 

of road from tar into 

village) 

Transport 

RDP houses 

Lower Gwalana 

Roads (maintenance 

of road from tar into 

village) 

RDP houses 

VI P houses 


3.5.11 NEEDS Assessment Analysis: WARD REPORTS 

In reviewing the IDP 2014/15 Ngqushwa Local Municipality clustered all wards into 3 
clusters, where all wards were represented. The needs assessment analysis were held 
as per clusters in order to ascertain the challenges faced by each individual ward. The 
approach was that, each cluster was divided into 5 desks, namely, Good Governance, 

I nfrastructure, Local Economic Development, Social Responsibility and Safety and 
Security. These ward needs assessments were conducted during the period of 
November 2013 and the IDP road shows were conduct in March 2014 involved the 
participation of all ward committee members; community development workers; ward 
councilors; chairpersons of various associations, example sport bodies, school 
governing councils, etc. ; tribal authorities; and members from the Royal Houses all 
communities. 


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Ward Reports: Needs Assessment Analysis. 


Prioritised 

Needs 

Challenges 

Wards 


Access to clean, good quality running water. 

5; 6; 7; 11; 12; 


Water collected fronn rivers 



No taps installed 

2; 6; 


Comnnunity dependent on water stored in 
tanks and drums. 

2 


Taps present but no water pipes installed. 

6 


No taps, but water pipes present. 

6; 9; 10; 11; 12 


Water pipes and taps required. 

2 

Water 

No water available for agricultural activities. 

5; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12 

No watering holes/dams for cattle farming. 

5; 13 


Existing dams and rivers need to be cleaned. 

5 


Waste and alien vegetation needs to be 
removed from dams. 

7; 12 


Frequent water interruptions 

12 


Need for irrigation pipe lines for crop 
farming. 



Better water supply and infrastructural 
delivery. 

6; 8; 9; 10; 11; 13; 


Water tanks needed. 

10; 13 


Mobile clinic needed. 

1; 3; 13 


Doctors more readily available 

1; 3; 6; 7; 9 

Health 

Central Clinic Needed 

4; 


Anti-retro viral supply programmes needed. 

1; 3; 5; 6 


Patient transport system needed. 

1; 9; 13 


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Prioritised 

Needs 

Chaiienges 

Wards 


Poor health linked to poor water quality. 

2; 5; 7; 13 

Clinics needed due to far distances travelled 

3; 6; 9; 13 

HIV/AIDS education needed. 

5; 6; 13 

Better services at clinics with medication 

6; 7 

Poor health linked to poverty and poor 
dietary intake. 

6; 13 

Mobile clinics to provide anti retro viral 
drugs. 

9 

More staff needed in clinics due to lengthy 
waiting period. 

All Wards 

Skiiis 

deveiopment 

training 

Need skills to create employment 
opportunities and to eliminate poverty. 

All Wards 

Conduct skills audits 

11; 10; 9; 5 

Mentoring and monitoring of projects and 
programmes 

All Wards 

Need for the establishment of co-operatives. 

10; 5 

Roads 

Roads to be maintained more regularly. 

All Wards 

Tarred roads to replace main access roads 

1 

Improved quality of access roads. 

All Wards 

Upgrading of tarred roads. 

5 

Tarring of roads. 

6; 8; 13 

Civil engineering 1 nfrastructure required to 
maintain roads. 

6; 8 

Roads inaccessible during rainy periods. 

6; 8 

Need for fencing along main access roads 

9 

Maintenance of access roads leading to 
villages. 

13 

Bridges to be constructed over rivers. 

13 

Sanitation 

Pit latrines seen as unhygienic and unsafe. 

2; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 13; 


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Prioritised 

Needs 

Chaiienges 

Wards 



14. 


Need for innproved sanitation 

5; 12 


Poor sanitation linked to poor water 
infrastructure and water shortage. 

8; 9; 10; 12; 13; 7; 11 


Need for flush system to replace pit latrines 

7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12; 13; 


Need for jobs. 

All Wards 

Empioyment 
and poverty 

Need for skills programmes to improve 
employability. 

2; 5; 6; 12; 13 

Request for business skills training. 

2; 5; 6; 12 


Need for skills audit. 

2; 5; 6; 13 


Training on establishments of co-operatives. 

5; 6; 12 


Need for food security. 

6; 12; 13. 


Patients raped on route to clinics. 

2 


House breaking, violent assault and theft 
linked to unemployment. 

2; 13 


Need for improved community police 
forums, law enforcement structures and job 
creation. 

2; 13 


Need for more police stations or more 
personnel at existing stations. 

8 

Crime 

Need to establish cause of criminal activities. 

8 


Need for improved resources (equipment 
and staff) 

9; 10; 11 


Need for improved response time from 
police stations. 

9; 10; 11; 13 


Police vehicles needed. 

12 


Theft of livestock due to lack of fencing and 
marketing. 

5; 7; 13. 


Rape. 

13 


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Prioritised 

Needs 

Chaiienges 

Wards 


Conditions of taxis poor. 

2; 5; 6 


Unreliability of pick up times. 

2; 5 


Safety of passengers. 

2; 5 


Poor roads linked to poor transport. 

2; 5 


Need for state buses. 

6 

Transport 

Need for transport to clinics for frail and 
elderly. (Increase number of vehicles.) 

9; 12 


Need for efficient, safe and reliable public 
transport service. 

11; 12 


Vehicles not roadworthy. 

11 


Transport for children to school. 

11 


Need for bridges to improve access to 
villages. 

5 


Need for better sport facilities. 

2; 5 


Sport facilities not level. 

2; 5 


Demarcation of municipal boundaries 
affecting sporting competition resulting in 
traveling distances to compete in sporting 
events. 

2 


Need for community halls. 

8; 7; 10 


Need for multi-purpose centres. 

7; 12; 13 

Sport and 
Recreation 
faciiities 

Need for indoor facilities 

5; 11 

Need for sports fields at schools. 

10; 11 


Need to investigate sport across cultural 
divides 

10; 11 


Need to develop water sports like canoeing, 
sailing and surfing. 

10; 11 


New sport facility needs to be developed. 

11 


Incomplete community halls or contractors 
not paid 

8; 10; 11; 13 


Poor security at halls leading to vandalism. 

8 


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Prioritised 

Needs 

Chaiienges 

Wards 


Need for connnnunity security education. 

8 


Improved agricultural development and 
intervention planning. 

3 


Pursue commercial farming 

3; 10 


Make tractors available on rotational basis 
between villages 

3 


Ensure fencing to reduce stock loses 

5; 7 


1 nfrastructure for farming activities must be 
well coordinated. 

6 

Economic 

Deveiopment 

Secure machinery for agricultural farming 
and cattle farming. 

6 

Agricultural and beef farming potential to be 
investigated. 

9; 10; 11; 12 


Tourism development and awareness 
campaigns for Xhosa and indigenous cultural 
groups as beneficiaries. 

11 


Land redistribution challenge to be 
expedited. 

12; 13 


Churches requested to conduct audit of 
arable land. 

13 


Integrated LED approach required. 

12 


Land released for tourism potential. 

12 

Housing 

Need for housing 

6; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12 

Skills development in housing delivery 
needed. 

9 


Need for electricity in future developed 
houses 

6; 7; 8; 9; lO'; 11; 12 

Eiectricity 

Need for street lighting or high mast 
lighting. 

7; 8; 12 


Need for infrastructure to supply good 
quality electricity. 

8 


No electricity (Gwabeni ) 

8 


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Prioritised 

Needs 

Chaiienges 

Wards 


Low voltage causing electricity supply to trip 
regularly. 

8 

Schooiing 

Need for properly managed and resourced 
schools. (Stationary and equipment). 

8 

Need for qualified teachers. 

8 

Need for reliable transport to schools to 
reduce absenteeism. 

8 

Need for a Further Education and Training 

All Wards(One that will 
be housed in Ngqushwa) 

Good 

governance 

Need for improved communication between 
the local, district municipalities and sector 
Department 

12 


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COMMON SITUATIONAL NEEDS ACROSS ALL WARDS 


CLUSTER DESK 

PRIORITIES 

Good Governance 

SCM Systems 

Sustainability on projects 

Public Participation 

IGR 

Oversight Committee 

Training on good governance stakeholders 

1 nfrastructure 

Road Maintenance 

Sanitation 

RDP Houses 

Halls 

Fencing of graveyards 

Electricity- Street Lights 

Water 

Sport fields 

Renovations of vandalised RDP Houses. 

Local Economic Development 

Livestock improvement 

Fencing of grazing Camps 

Dipping Tanks 

Tractors 

Cleaning of Dams 

Craft Centre-Marketing 

Mealing and Feed Plant 

Exporting of Goods 

EPWP- Alien Plants 

Funding and Training of Coops 

Agricultural Centre 

Assistance in Land tenure 

Social Responsibility 

Education- Scholar Transport, Computers, 

Staff Shortages, Shortage of early childhood 
centres(Creche), Stipend for Creche 
educators 

Health- Clinics, Mobile clinics, Shortage of 
Medicines, Shortage of ambulance, Shortage 
of Staff, 

Sport- Sport gear and equipment sponsors, 
maintenance and formation of sport fields 
Home Affairs- Birth certificates for infants, 
Correction of older person's ID books (age) 
SASSA- Shortage of social grant ATMS ,Pin 
code problems, Food parcels 


Safety and Security 

Youth programnnes 


Police patrols 


Formation of Police Forums 


Government to make funding for Sporting 


facilities at schools 


Communities being educated on crime 


prevention and their roles 


Police visibility 


Moral regeneration programmes 


Restricted operation hours of sheebens 


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IDP 

Chapter Four 

Development Objectives and 

Strategies 


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Chapter Four: Development Objectives and 
Strategies 

4.1 I ntroduction 

This Strategic Plan presents Ngqushwa Local Municipality's aspirations and spells out what the 
municipality would like to achieve at the end of 30 June 2017. In this regard the vision, 
mission, strategic objectives and strategies presented in this plan serve to define both the 
desired state of Ngqushwa LM and in broad terms what the municipality needs to focus on in 
order to accomplish the envisaged state, put simpler, the strategic plan provides a road-map 
to be pursued by Ngqushwa LM from 1 j uly 2014 to 30 j une 2017. 

In context, this Strategic Plan encapsulates key institutional strategic issues/challenges 
identified by management per Key Performance Area (KPA) through a situational analysis 
exercise (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats - SWOT), and the broad strategic 
objectives and strategies formulated by council and management to address the challenges 
and as well set the strategic direction for Ngqushwa LM for the 2014/15 financial year. 
Furthermore, the objectives and strategies set out in this strategic plan direct Ngqushwa LM's 
efforts not only to address key challenges on its core business but also enhance Ngqushwa 
municipality's contribution and relevance to the broader government policies and priorities. 

The details in terms of accomplishing the broad strategic objectives and strategies contained 
in this Strategic Plan in terms of projects, budget, targets and responsible persons will be 
contained in the organisational and departmental Service Delivery Budget I mplementation 
Plan to be developed by Budget and Treasury in conjunction with other user departments. 
The SDBIP is separate but complementary to the Strategic Plan. 


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PROJ ECTS FOR 2014/ 15 Fl NANCI AL YEAR 
NGQUSHWA MUNICIPALITY 
INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 
FIVE YEAR CAPITAL PLAN 


2011/ 12 

Ml G ALLOCATI ON 

R17,257 000.00 

2012/ 13 

Ml G ALLOCATI ON 

R20,983 000.00 

2013/ 14 

Ml G ALLOCATI ON 

R21,493,000.00 

2014/ 15 

Ml G ALLOCATI ON 

R22,769,000.00 

2015/ 16 

MIG 

R24,147,000.00 

Lower Gwalana Connnnunity 

Hall (MIG) 

Ntloko(l nternal) Access 

Road(MIG) 

Durban & German Village 
High Mast(MIG) 

Glenmore Sports field 

Mgwalana Access 

Roads (MIG) 

Jubisa Community Hall (MIG) 

Feni Internal Road(MIG) 

Jubisa Sportfield(MI G) 

Nquthu Internal Roads 

Dube Scheme 

AccessRoad (MIG) 

Woodlands Community 
Hall(MIG) 

Nyeleni-Qeto Access 
Road(MIG) 

Zalara Scheme Access 

Road(MIG) 

Lovers Twist 1 nternal 

Road 

Ngxakana Scheme 
Access Road (MIG) 

Machibi Access Road (MIG) 

Peddie Extension Internal 

Roads(MIG) 

Bingqala Access 

Road(MIG) 

Feni Community Hall 

Hamburg Sportfield 

Tyeni-Gobozana Access Roads 
(MIG) 

Bongweni Community 
Hall(MIG) 

Twecu-Phole Internal 

Road(MIG) 

Gwabeni Community Hall 

Tuku A internal roads 

Peddie Extension Community 
Hall(MIG) 

Qhugwala Community 
Hall(MIG) 

Tyata Community Hall 

Tildin Access Road 

Mqwashu Community 
Hall(MIG) 

Ngqwele Community Hall(MIG) 

Prudhoe Community 
Hall(MIG) 

Cheletyuma Community 

Hall 

Nxopo Community Hall 

Nier/Tarfield 
Community Hall 


Kalana Community 

Hall(MIG) 


Tsolo Community Hall 

Ndlambe Community 
Hall(MIG) 



Luxolweni Connnnunity 
Hall(MIG) 


Lewis Internal Roads 





Runlets Comnnunity Hall 





Mkhanyeni Community 

Hall 



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Service Delivery and Infrastructure Development 

Strategic Goal: Eradicate backlogs in order to improve access to services and ensure proper operations and maintenance 
Intended outcome: Sustainable delivery of improved services to all households (in line with the term of council, 2014- 2018) 


Strategic Key 
Priority 1 ssues 
(from SWOT) 

Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

Performanc 
e 1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 

Poor 

implementation of 
electrical 

maintenance plan 

Electricity 

Technical 

To ensure 
effective, 
efficient and 
economical 
provision of 
electrical 

Maintenance 
of lights in 
rural areas 

No of lights 
maintained 
in a village 

Maintenance of 
lights in rural 
areas 

Maintenance 
of lights in 
rural areas 

Maintenance 
of lights in 
rural areas 




services and 
street lighting to 
the community 
of Ngqushwa. 

Maintenance 
of street 
lights and 
high mast 
lights in 
urban areas. 

No of street 
lights and 
high masts 
lights 

maintained in 
urban areas. 

Maintenance of 
street lights and 
high mast lights in 
urban areas 

Maintenance 
of street lights 
and high mast 
lights in urban 
areas. 

Maintenance 
of street 
lights and 
high mast 
lights in urban 
areas 

Lack of provision of 
electricity 




Facilitation 

of 

1 nstallation 
of electricity 
in village 
extensions 

No of 

meetings and 
list of village 
extensions 

Facilitation of 
Installation of 
electricity in 
village extensions 

Facilitation of 

1 nstallation of 
electricity in 
village 
extensions 

Facilitation of 
Installation of 
electricity in 
village 
extensions 





Conduct 
feasibility 
studies for 
installation 
of solar 
water 

geysers 

Feasibility 

study 

conducted in 
Peddie Town 
and Flamburg 

Depending on the 
outcomes of the 
feasibility study 
done in 15/16 







Conduct 
feasibility 
studies for 
converting 

Feasibility 
studies 
conducted in 
Wesley and 

Depending on the 
outcomes of the 
feasibility study 
done in 15/16 




Strategic Key 
Priority 1 ssues 
(from SWOT) 

Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

Performanc 
e 1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





of electrical 
street lights 
to solar 
street lights 

Prudoe. 




Lack of 

communication 
between NLM and 
ADM in issues of 
water and 
sanitation 

Technical 

Technical 

To ensure a 
proper 

communication 

between 

Ngqushwa LM 
and ADM in 
issues of water 
and sanitation 

Arranging 

and 

attending of 
meetings for 
water and 
sanitation. 

No of 

meetings 

attended 

Arranging and 
attending of 
meetings for water 
and sanitation. 

Arranging and 
attending of 
meetings for 
water and 
sanitation. 

Arranging and 
attending of 
meetings for 
water and 
sanitation. 

Minimise roads and 
storm water 

Backlogs and 
dilapidated road 

Roads and 
storm water 

Technical 

Construction of 
existing access 
roads and 
internal streets. 

Construction 
of Mgwalana 
internal 
roads 

No of km's of 
gravel road 
constructed 




infrastructure 




Construction 
of Dube 
Scheme 
access road 

No of km's of 
gravel road 
constructed 








Construction 

of 

Ngxakaxha 

Scheme 

access 
roads. (W6) 

No of km's of 
gravel road 
constructed 








Construction 
of Tuku A 

access 
road.( Wll) 

No of km's of 
gravel road 
constructed 







Maintenance of 
existing access 
roads and 

Blading of 
existing 
gravel roads 

No of km's of 
existing 
gravel roads 

Blading of existing 
gravel roads in 
rural areas. 

Blading of 
existing gravel 
roads in rural 

Blading of 
existing gravel 
roads in rural 


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Strategic Key 
Priority 1 ssues 
(from SWOT) 

Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurabie Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 

15/ 16 

Key 

Performanc 
e 1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 




related storm 
water. 

in rural 

areas. 

bladed 


areas. 

areas. 

Pothole 
patching in 
urban areas 

Square 
meters of 
pothole 
patched in 
urban areas. 

Pothole patching 
in urban areas 

Pothole 
patching in 
urban areas 

Pothole 
patching in 
urban areas 

Patch 
gravelling 
and storm 
water 
cleaning in 
urban areas 

Square 
meters of 
gravel roads 
patched and 
no of storm 
water drains 
cleaned 

Patch gravelling 
and storm water 
cleaning in urban 
areas 

Patch 

gravelling and 
storm water 
cleaning in 
urban areas 

Patch 

gravelling and 
storm water 
cleaning in 
urban areas 

Facilitate the 
maintenance of 
provincial roads 
and related 
stormwater. 

Facilitate the 
maintenance 
of provincial 
roads by 
department 
of roads and 
transport 

No of 
meetings 
arranged and 
attended 
between NLM 
and DRPW 

Facilitate the 
maintenance of 
provincial roads by 
department of 
roads and 
transport 

Facilitate the 
maintenance 
of provincial 
roads by 
department of 
roads and 
transport 

Facilitate the 
maintenance 
of provincial 
roads by 
department of 
roads and 
transport 

Minimise backlog of 
Community halls 

Proj ect 

Management 

Unit 

Technical 

Construction of 
Community 

Halls 

Construction 
of Mqwashu 
Community 
Hall (W4) 

% 

Completion 
of Mqwashu 
Community 
Hall 




Construction 
of Nier 
Community 
Hall (Wll) 

% 

Completion 
of Nier 
Community 
hall 




Construction 
of Ndlambe 
Community 

% 

Completion 
of Ndlambe 





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Strategic Key 
Priority 1 ssues 
(from SWOT) 

Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurabie Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

Performanc 
e 1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





hall (W9) 

Community 

Hall 








Construction 

of 

Ntsinekana 

Community 

hall 

% 

Completion 

of 

Ntsinekana 

Community 

Hall 








Construction 
of Rhode 
Community 
hall 

% 

Completion 
of Rhode 
Community 
Hall 




Lack of sports 
facilities 

Proj ect 

Management 

Unit 

Technical 

Construction of 
Sports field 

Construction 
of Hamburg 
Sports field 

% 

Completion 
of Hamburg 
sports field 




Under spending on 
conditional grants 

Proj ect 

Management 

Unit 

Technical 

Commitment of 
MIG expenditure 
for the 2015/16 
financial year 

100 % 
Spending of 
MIG funds 
for 

2015/2016 

FY 

% 

Completion 
of MIG funds 
for 

2015/2016 

FY 

100% Spending of 
MIG funds for 
2016/2017 FY 

100% 

Spending of 

Ml G funds for 
2017/2018FY 

100% 

Spending of 

MIG funds for 
2018/2019 FY 




Monitoring of 
funds in MIG 
projects 

Monthly 
cash flow 
monitoring 
in 2015/16 

FY projects. 

% funds 
spent in each 
project. 

Monthly cash flow 
monitoring in 
2016/17 FY 
projects. 

Monthly cash 
flow 

monitoring in 
2017/18 FY 
projects. 

Monthly cash 
flow 

monitoring in 
2018/19 FY 
projects. 




Commitment of 
EPWP 

expenditure for 
the 2015/16 
financial year 

100 % 
Spending of 
EPWP funds 
for 

2015/2016 

% 

Completion 
of EPWP 
funds for 
2015/2016 

100 % Spending 
of EPWP funds for 
2015/2016 FY 

100 % 

Spending of 
EPWP funds 
for 2015/2016 
FY 

100 % 

Spending of 
EPWP funds 
for 2015/2016 
FY 


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Strategic Key 
Priority 1 ssues 
(from SWOT) 

Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 

15/ 16 

Key 

Performanc 
e 1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





FY 

FY 





Resolution by Plenary 

The report from the commission was adopted by the plenary as adequately mapping the linkage between the strategic issues, strategic objectives and 
strategies. 


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COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT- 2015/ 16 FINANCIAL 
YEAR 


PROJ ECT NAME 

BUDGET 

Section: Waste and Environment 

Coastal Management Maintenance 

R500 000 

Establishment of landfill site 

R120 000 

Renovation of parks 

R150 000 

Sport Ground maintenance 

R25 000 

Life saviour 

R228 000 

Ngqushwa entrance beautification 

R300 000 

Phase 2 of Pound 

R150 000 

Fencincig of Peddie cemetery 

R250 000 

Section: Traffic and Safety Services 

TCS Licensing Fees 

R65 000 

Callibration of speed cameras 

R50 000 

TOTAL BUDGET 

R 1 838 000 


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PLANNI NG AND DEVELOPMENT - 2014/ 15 Fl NANCI AL YEAR 


PROJ ECT NAME 

BUDGET 

Section: Spatial Development 

SPLUMA 1 mplementation 

R80 000 

Building Plan Approvals 

R106 200 

Land Use Applications 

R60 000 

Section: Housing 

Maintenance of Municipal Building 

R500 000 

GIS 

R200 000 

Lease Agreement 

R70 800 

Bill Boards & Signage 

R5 342.50 

Section: Local Economic Development 

Mentoring 

R225 000 

Section: Agriculture 

Coordinate Annual exhibitions of agricultural 
products, market promotions, product quality 
and healthy completions 

R50 000 

Co-ordinate an Agricultural 1 ndaba for 
participation of relevant stakeholders to 
capacitate Local Emerging Farmers 

R180 000 

Livestock Improvement (Provision of support 
in fencing of camps,bulls,medication. 

R249 900 

Provision of agro-processing equipment for 
emerging farmers 

R498 000 

Mechanisation of ploughing fields(30 
ha).Operation includes 
Ploughing,discing,planting and spraying 

R350 000 

Provision of infastructure to irrigation 
scheme (fencing,mantainance and 
production inputs) 

RIOO 000 


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168 





Mentoring for irrigation scheme and 

livestock farmers 

R250 000 

Provision of support to citrus farmers such 
packing shed and maintenance of road 

R600 000 


Section: Tourism 

Maintenance of existing 8 heritage sites and 

1 Hiking Trail 

R80 000 

Attend Festivals and Events Tourism 

1 ndaba,Macufe Festival, Amathole District 
Municipality Tourism Imbizo, Amahlathi Craft 
Mania, Wild Coast J ikeleza Festival 

RIOO 000 

Biking Trail and coastal events and Water 
sports 

R50 000 

Hamburg Beach festival 

R600 000 

Fish Festival and Craft Display 

R50 000 

Construction of Mqwashu Heritage, Revival of 
Dick King Memorial 

R200 000 

Community Based Organisation Projects 
(Isivivana Project, Mqhwashi Heritage, Dick 
King Memorial and Mamu james Homestay 

RIOO 000 


TOTAL BUDGET 

R 4 699 900 


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Local Economic Development 

Strategic Goal: Create an enabling environment that promotes the development of the local economy and facilitate job creation 
Intended outcome: Improved municipal economic viability (in line with term of council, 2014 - 2018). 


Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Tourism 

Planning and 
Development 

To promote 
tourism in order 
to position 
Ngqushwa 
municipality as 
the Tourist 
destination by 
2017 


No. of business 
plans submitted to 
potential funders 

Source and 
monitoring 
funding from 
DEDEA, ADM, 1 DC 
and National 
Heritage Council 

Source and 

monitoring 

funding from 

DEDEA, 

ADM,IDC and 

National 

Heritage 

Council 

Source and 
monitoring 
funding from 
DEDEA, ADM 
and National 
Heritage Council 

Tourism 

and 

SAPS 

Planning and 
Development 
(Tourism) 
and SAPS 

To promote 
tourism in order 
to position 
Ngqushwa 
municipality as 
the Tourist 
destination by 
2017 


Number of 

meetings 

attended. 

Participation in 
community safety 
forum- awareness 
campaigns 

Participation 
in community 
safety forum- 
awareness 
campaigns 

Participation in 
community 
safety forum- 
awareness 
campaigns 

Tourism 

Planning and 
Development 
(Tourism) 

To promote 
Tourism within 
NLM area in 
order to position 
the municipality 
as a tourism 
destination in 
2017 


No. of Tourism 
sport performed 

Participate in 

Sports tourism 

Participate in 

Sports 

tourism 

Participate in 
Sports tourism 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Tourism 

Planning and 
Development 

To promote 
Tourism within 
NLM area in 
order to position 
the municipality 
as a tourism 
destination in 
2017 


No. of heritage 
sites identified 

Revitalization and 
commemoration 
of heritage site 

Revitalization 

and 

commemorati 
on of heritage 
site 

Revitalization 

and 

commemoration 
of heritage site 

Heritage 

and 

Tourism 



Number of reports 
prepared on 
marketing support, 
generated 
turnover and job 
created 

Facilitate craft 
product 

development and 
marketing 

Facilitate craft 
product 
development 
and marketing 

Facilitate craft 
product 
development 
and marketing 





Agricultu 

re 

Planning and 
Development 

To maximise 

economic 

growth, and 

Agriculture 

development 

taking place in a 

conducive 

environment 

within 

Ngqushwa by 
2017 


Established and 
functional chicken 
value-chain farm 

% adherence to 
the MCPP Service 
Level Agreement 


Monitor 
functionality 
of the chicken 
value-chain 
farm 

Monitor 

functionality of 
the chicken 
value-chain 
farm 

Agricultu 

re 

Planning and 
Development 

To maximise 

economic 

growth, and 

Agriculture 

development 

taking place in a 

conducive 


• Number of 
agric 

development 
programmes 
identified and 
supported 

Promote and 
Support 
agriculture 
development 

Promote and 
Support 
agriculture 
development 

Promote and 
Support 
agriculture 
development 


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Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Agricultu 

re 

Planning and 
Development 

environment 

within 

Ngqushwa by 
2017. 


• No. of 
coops/SMMEs 
supported for 
agro- 

processing. 

• Number of 
reports 
prepared 

To facilitate value 
chain and 
mentoring of 
coops and SMME 

To facilitate 
value chain 
and mentoring 
of coops and 
SMME 

To facilitate 
value chain and 
mentoring of 
coops and 

SMME 

Traffic 

Services/ 

Human 

Resource 

s 

Community 

Services(Traff 

ic) 

To continuously 
reduce road 
accident 

• 

Collection of 
outstanding 
infringement 
notices, Law 
enforcement and 

awareness 

campaigns 

• Road 

Safety 

campaigns 

/awarenes 

s 

• Reduce 
road 

carnages 

within NLM 

through 

promotion 

of road 

safely 

regulations 

• Review 
of 

organo 

gram 

• Road 
Safety 
campai 
gns/aw 
arenes 

s 

• 

Reduce 

road 

carnag 

es 

within 

NLM 

throug 

h 

promot 

ion of 

road 

safely 

regulati 

ons 

Review of 
organogram 


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Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 









Land and 
Housing/ 
Spatial 
Planning 

Planning and 
Development 

To ensure 
access to land 
properties for 
development 
and integrated 
human 
settlement 
pattern by 2017 


No. of business 
plans submitted 

Monitoring the 
progress of these 
business plans 

Monitoring the 
progress of 
these business 
plans 

Monitoring the 
progress of 
these business 
plans 

Land and 
Housing/ 
Asset 
Manager 

Planning and 
Development 

To continuously 
maintain an 
updated 
municipal asset 
register 


No. of properties 
registered 

Collect data on 
unregistered 
municipal 
properties and 
register 

Collect data 

on 

unregistered 
municipal 
properties and 
register 

Collect data on 
unregistered 
municipal 
properties and 
register 

Land and 
housing 

Planning and 
Development 

To continuously 
ensure efficient 
and economical 
maintenance of 
municipal 
buildings by 

2017 and 
beyond 


No. of municipal 

buildings 

maintained. 

Maintenance of 
municipal building 

Maintenance 
of municipal 
building 

Maintenance of 

municipal 

building 

By-law 

Enforce 

ment 

BTO, 

Community 
Services, 
Planning and 
Development 

To continuously 
ensure effective 
regulation of the 
environment 


Number of reports 
submitted 

Effective 
enforcement of 
by-laws 

Effective 
enforcement 
of by-laws 

Effective 
enforcement of 
by-laws 


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Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Land and 

Housing/ 

Revenue 

Planning and 
Development 

To continuously 
maintain an 
updated general 
valuation roll for 
the municipality 
by 2017 and 
beyond 


Updated General 
Valuation Roll 

Conduct 

supplementary 

valuation 

Conduct 
supplementar 
y valuation 

Develop a new 
General 

Valuation 

Land and 
Housing 

Planning and 
Development 

To enhance 
revenue, ensure 
security of 
tenure, and 
improve asset 
register 


Number of 
disposed Municipal 
properties 

Collection of data 

Disposal of 

Municipal 

properties 

Disposal of 

Municipal 

properties 

Land and 
Housing 

Planning and 
Development 

To ensure 
provision of 
adequate and 
sustainable 
human 

settlements by 
2017 and 
beyond 


Needs register 
developed 

Development of a 
needs register. 

Development 
of a needs 
register. 

Development of 
a needs 
register. 

Spatial 

Planning 

Planning and 
Development 

To continuously 
ensure that 
property 
development in 
Ngqushwa is in 
line with 
building laws 
and regulations 
by 2017 and 
beyond 


• No. of 
submitted and 
adjudicated 
business plans 

• Turnaround 
time for 
adjudication of 
applications 

1 mplementation, 
monitoring and 
review of policies 
and bylaws 

1 mplementatio 
n, monitoring 
and review of 
policies and 
bylaws 

1 mplementation, 
monitoring and 
review of 
policies and 
bylaws 

Spatial 

Planning and 

To ensure 


% compliance with 

1 mplementation 

1 mplementatio 

1 mplementation 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 174 



Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Planning 

Development 

access to land 
and properties 
for development 
and continuous 
of an efficient 
and integrated 
settlement 
pattern by 2017 


the SDF 

and review of SDF 

n and review 
of the SDF 

and review of 
the SDF 

Spatial 

planning 

Planning and 
Development 

To enhance 

Municipal 

revenue 


• Number of 
building 
plans 
approved 

• Identificatio 
n of land 
for Retail 
complex 

• Adjudicatin 
g building 
plans 

• Workshops 

• Engageme 
nt with 
prospectiv 
e 

developers 

• Adjudic 
ating 
buildin 
g plans 

• Worksh 
ops 

Engagement 

with 

prospective 

developers 

• Adjudicat 
ing 

building 

plans 

• Worksho 

PS 

Engagement 
with prospective 
developers 

Spatial 

Planning 

Planning and 
Development 

To modernise 
and beautify the 
image of 
Peddie/Hambur 
g in order to 
attract investors 
by 2017 


• No. of business 
plans 
developed 

Submission of 
business plans to 
relevant 
departments 

Monitoring of 

implemented 

projects 

Monitoring of 

implemented 

projects 

Environ 

mental 

Manage 

ment 

Community 

Services 

To ensure 
effective, 
efficient and 
economic 
management of 


• Adopted 
management 
plan 

. % 

implementation 

1 mplementation 
and monitoring 

1 mplementatio 
n and 
monitoring 

1 mplementation 
and monitoring 


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Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 



the environment 
by 2017 and 
beyond. 


of the EMP 




Environ 

mental 

Manage 

ment 

Community 

Services 

To ensure 
effective, 
efficient and 
economic 
management of 
the environment 
by 2017 and 
beyond 


• Number of 
workshops 
conducted. 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of policy 

• Conduct 
capacity 
building. 

• 

1 mplementatio 
n and 

monitoring of 
air quality 
management 

Conduct 

capacity 

building 

1 mplementatio 
n and 

monitoring of 
air quality 
management 

Conduct 

capacity 

building 

1 mplementation 
and monitoring 
of air quality 
management 

Waste 
Manage 
ment/ 
DEDEAT 
/ DEA 

Community 

Services 

To protect and 
preserve the 
environment of 
Ngqushwa 
through 
effective 
,efficient, and 
economical 
methods of 
waste 

management by 
2017 


• No. of capacity 
building 
workshops 
conducted 

• Adopted waste 
by-law 

• Procurement of 
appropriate 
machinery for 
refuse 
collection 

To conduct 
capacity building 

To conduct 

capacity 

building 

To conduct 

capacity 

building 

Waste 
Manage 
ment/ 
DEDEAT 
/ DEA 

Community 

Services 

To protect and 
preserve the 
environment of 
Ngqushwa 
through 
effective 


Adopted 

Integrated Waste 

1 nformation 

System 

Development of 

1 ntegrated 

1 nformation 

Waste 

1 nformation 

Svstem 

1 mplementatio 
n of the 

Waste 

Management 

System 

1 mplementation 
of the Waste 
Management 
System 


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Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 



,efficient, and 
economical 
methods of 
waste 

management by 
2017 






Waste 

Manage 

ment 

Community 

Services 

To protect and 
preserve the 
environment of 
Ngqushwa 
through 
effective 
,efficient, and 
economical 
methods of 
waste 

management by 
2017 


Construction of 
new Landfill site 

Site Identification, 
application for 
licensing 

Construction 
of landfill 

Construction of 
landfill 

Parks 

and 

Cemeteri 

es 

Community 

Services 

To ensure 
effective, 
efficient and 
economical 
management of 
cemeteries by 
2017 and 
beyond 


Development of 
cemetery policy 
and bylaws 

Development, 

1 mplementation 
and monitoring 
bylaw and policy 

Review, 

1 mplementatio 
n and 
monitoring 
bylaw and 
policy 

Review, 

1 mplementation 
and monitoring 
bylaw and policy 

Costal 

Manage 

ment 

Community 

Services 

To ensure 
effective, 
efficient , and 
economical 
coastal area to 
stimulate local 
and 


Adopted Coastal 
Management Plan 

Review, 

1 mplementation 
and monitoring 
of Coastal 
Management Plan 

Review, 
implementatio 
n and 

monitoring of 
Coastal 
Management 
Plan 

Review, 

1 mplementation 
and monitoring 
of Coastal 
Management 

Plan 


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Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 



international 
tourists inflow 
and access into 
the Ngqushwa 
Municipal area 
by 2015 and 
beyond 






Costal 

Manage 

ment 

Community 

Services 

To ensure 
effective, 
efficient , and 
economical 
coastal area to 
stimulate local 
and 

international 
tourists inflow 
and access into 
the Ngqushwa 
Municipal area 
by 2015 and 
beyond 


Approved 
maintenance plan 

1 mplementation 
of Coastal 
maintenance plan 

1 mplementatio 
n of 

maintenance 

plan 

1 mplementation 
of maintenance 
plan 

LED - 
SMME 
and Co- 
operative 
s 

Develop 

ment 

Planning and 
Development 

To continuously 
provide 
adequate and 
effective 
support to local 
SMMEs for 
increased local 
economy by 

2017 and 
beyond 


• Number of 
micro- 
business 
initiatives 
supported 

Provide business 
development 
support through 
capacity building 
and technical 
support to 
existing micro- 
business 
initiatives 

Provide 

business 

development 

support 

through 

capacity 

building and 

technical 

support to 

existing 

micro- 

business 

Provide business 
development 
support through 
capacity 
building and 
technical 
support to 
existing micro- 
business 
initiatives 


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Focus 

Area 

Department 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 







initiatives 


LED/ 

BTO 

Planning and 
Development 

To continuously 
provide 
adequate and 
effective 
support to local 
SMMEs for 
increased local 
economy by 

2017 and 
beyond 


• Number of 
contractors 
capacitated 

• Value of 
business 

• CIDBgrading 

Provide technical 
and business 
support to local 
contractors 

Provide 
technical and 
business 
support to 
local 

contractors 

Provide 
technical and 
business 
support to local 
contractors 

LED- 

Anchor 

project 

(High 

1 mpact 
Projects) 

Planning and 
Development 

To continuously 
provide 
adequate and 
effective 
support to local 
businesses for 
increased local 
economy by 

2017 and 
beyond 


• Number 

business plans 

developed 

submitted. 

Development and 
submission of 
business plans to 
source funding 

Monitoring 

Monitoring. 


Resolution by Plenary 

The report from the commission was adopted by the plenary as adequately mapping the linkage between the strategic issues, strategic objectives and 
strategies. 


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MUNI Cl PAL MANAGER'S OFFI CE - 2014/ 15 Fl NANCI AL YEAR 


PROJ ECT NAME 

BUDGET 

Section: 1 DP and PMS 

PMS review / Rollout 

R1 000 000 

IDP 

R427 000 

Section: Communications 

1 ntergovernmental Relations 

R192 000 

Newsletter 

R168 000 

Municipal Branding 

R160 000 

Communication Strategy Development 

R250 000 

Section: Risk 

Risk Management 

R200 000 

Section: 1 nformation Communication 

Technology 


Computer costs 

R104 800 

1 .T infrastructure & security 

R298 000 

Software 

R300 000 

Office equipment 

R438 000 

Maintenance - 1 .T. 

R200 000 

Section: Municipal Manager's Office 

1 nternational Relations 

R600 000 

Legal Fees 

R2 000 000 

1 nstitutional Realignment 

R1 200 000 

Section: Special Programs Unit 

SPU 

R2 723 000 

TOTAL BUDGET 

R3 337 800 


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Good Governance and Public Participation 

Strategic Goal: Promote a culture of public participation and good governance. 

Intended outcome: Entrenched culture of accountability and clean governance (in line with term of council, 2014- 2018) 


Focus 

Area 

Departm 

ent 

Strategic/ Me 

asurable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2014/ 15 and Three outer Years) 

14/ 15 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

15/ 16 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Municip 

al Public 

Account 

s 

Commit 

tee 

(MPAC) 

Office of 

the 

Speaker 

To continuously 

ensure an 

effective and 
compliant 
system of 
municipal 
governance by 

2017 and 

beyond 

• Effective 

MPAC 

functionality 
(implementati 
on of the 
programme of 
action) 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of council 
resolutions 

• No of MPAC 
sittings 

. % 

implementat 
ion of the 
programme 

• 

• No of MPAC 
reports to 
council 

• Implementat 
ion of 
council 
resolutions 

• Quarterly 
Sittings of 
MPAC 

• MPAC 
meetings to 
form part of 
annual 
calendar 

• 1 mplementat 
ion of the 
programme 
of action 

• Streamline 
strategic 
plans 
through 
annual 
action for 
shorter lead 
times 

• Effective 

MPAC 

functionality 
(implementati 
on of the 
programme of 
action) 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of council 
resolution 

1 mplementatio 
n of new 

SALGA 

regulations 

• Effective 

MPAC 

functionality 
(implementati 
on of the 
programme of 
action) 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of council 
resolutions 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of new 

SALGA 

regulations 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


Resourcing 

of 

Committee 

(Appointmen 

t of MPAC 
Researcher) 

Oversight on 
I mplementat 
ion of 
council 
resolutions 
(review and 
report 
council 
quarterly) 


oversight on 
municipal 
performance 
and 

expenditure 

quarterly 


Oversight on 

Compliance 

with 

regulations/ 

Circulars 












Public 

Participat 

ion 

Office of 

the MM 

To ensure 

effective, 

efficient, 

economical and 

compliant 

public 

participation 
systems by 

2017 and 

beyond 

• Development 
of a Public 
Participation 
Framework 
and plan 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of the Public 
Participation 
Plan 

% 

implementation 

of the ward 

committee 

programme. 

• Implementat 
ion of the 
Ward 

Committee 
programme 
of action 
(streamlined 
programme 
for reporting 
of ward 
Committees 
on monthiy 
basis) 

• Capacitation 
of Ward 
Committees 
on effective 
implementati 
on of Ward 
Operational 
Plans 

1 mplementation 

of the Ward 

Committee 

programme of 

action 

(streamlined 
programme for 
reporting of ward 
Committees) 

1 mplementation 

of the Ward 

Committee 

programme of 

action 

(streamlined 
programme for 
reporting of ward 
Committees) 


. % 

implementat 
ion of the 
Public 

Participation 

Plan 

• Centralisatio 
n of 

institutional 

Public 

Participation 
Programmes 
to the Office 
of the 

Speaker in 
alignment 
with the 
institutional 
communicati 
on plan 

1 mplementation 

of the Public 

Participation 

Framework and 

plan 

1 mplementation 

of the Public 

Participation 

Framework and 

plan 


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184 









• Alignment of 
PPP with 
statuary 
requirement 
s 

• Monthly 

Ward 
meeting 
reports to 
Speakers 
Office to 
inform 
quarterly 
report to 
council 



To continuously 

ensure 

effective, 

efficient and 

compliant 

customer 

management 
by 2017 and 
beyond 

• Establishment 
of the 

Petitions 

Committee. 

• Effective 
implementatio 
n of the 
petitions 
policy. 

implementation 
of the petitions 
policy 

• Effective 
implementati 
on of the 
petitions 
policy. 

• Acknowiedg 
ement and 
closing of 
petitions 
within 
stipulated 
timelines 

• Monthly 
meetings of 
the petitions 
committee 

Effective 

implementation of 
the petitions 
policy. 

Effective 

implementation of 
the petitions 
policy. 


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185 









• Maintenance 
of up-to - 
date 

quarterly 

Petitions 

Register 



Strategy 

1 mpleme 

ntation 

and 

Monitorin 

g 

Office of 

the MM 

To continuously 

ensure 

effective and 

compliant 

municipal 

business 

oversight in 

line with 

approved plans 
by 2017 and 
beyond 

Monthly meetings 
between Mayor, 
Portfolio Head, 

MM and HOD on 

departmental 

performance. 


Monthly 
meetings 
between Mayor, 
Portfolio Head, 

MM and HOD on 

departmental 

performance. 

Monthly meetings 
between Mayor, 
Portfolio Head, 

MM and HOD on 

departmental 

performance. 

Monthly meetings 
between Mayor, 
Portfolio Head, 

MM and HOD on 

departmental 

performance. 

Audit 

committe 

e 

Office of 

the MM 

To ensure 

effective and 

compliant 
systems of 

assurance on 

internal 

controls, 
service delivery 

and financial 

reporting in 

line with 

legislation by 

• Submission of 
advisory Audit 
Committee 
reports to 
Council. 

• No of Audit 
Committee 
meetings. 

• 

• Submission of 
advisory Audit 
Committee 
reports to 
Council and 
Management 

• 4 Ordinary 
Audit 

Committee 

meetings. 

• Submission of 
advisory Audit 
Committee 
reports to 
Council. 

• No of Audit 
Committee 
meetings. 

• Submission of 
advisory Audit 
Committee 
reports to 
Council. 

• No of Audit 
Committee 
meetings. 


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186 






2017 and 

beyond 






1 nternal 

Audit 

Services 


To ensure 

effective and 

compliant 
systems of 

assurance on 

internal 

controls, 
service delivery 

and financial 

reporting in 

line with 

legislation by 

2017 and 

beyond 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of AG's 

Action Plans 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of the Risk 
Based Audit 
Plans 

. % 

implementat 
ion of the 

AG 

improvemen 
t plans 

• Number of 
audits 

implemented 

. Co- 

ordination 

and 

facilitation of 

AG's Action 
Plans on 

quarterly 

basis 

. 1 mplementatio 

n of the Risk 
Based Audit 
Plans 

. 1 mplementatio 

n of AG's 

Action Plans 
. 1 mplementatio 

n of the Risk 
Based Audit 
Plans 

. 1 mplementatio 

n of AG's 

Action Plans 
. 1 mplementatio 

n of the Risk 
Based Audit 
Plans 

1 nternal 

Audit 

Services 


To achieve an 

improved audit 
outcome by 

2016 and 

beyond 

• 

. 75 % 

implementat 
ion of 

Auditor 

General 

audit 

findings 

. Facilitate 
and co- 
ordinate the 

1 mplementat 
ion of the 
Audit Action 
Plan 

quarterly 

• 

• 

Commu 

nication 

Office of 

the MM 

To ensure 

effective, 

• Development 
of the 5 year 
communicatio 

. Communicat 
ion strategy 
adopted by 

. Effective 

implementatio 
n of the 

. Effective 

implementatio 
n of the 

. Effective 

implementatio 
n of the 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


187 




s 


efficient, 

economical and 

compliant 

public 

participation 
systems by 

2017 and 

beyond 

n strategy and 
action plan. 

• Workshops 
and trainings 
for 

Councillors, 
CDW's and 

Ward 

Committees 
on roles and 
responsibilities 

• Effective 
distribution of 
information to 
all relevant 
stakeholders. 

• Effective 
contribution to 
consultative 
meetings, 

(IDP ward 

clustered 

meetings) 

council 

• No of 
workshops/t 
rainings 
conducted 

• No of times 
for 

distribution 

of 

information 

• No of 
credible WC 
and CDW 
reports to 
Speakers 
office 

. % 

contribution 
in 1 DP ward 
clustered 
meetings 
quaterly 

communicatio 
n strategy 

and 

communicati 
on action 
plan. 

• Strengthen 
the Local 
Communicat 
or's Forum 
through 
quarterly 
sittings. 

• Effective 
contribution 
to 

institutional 
corporate 
identity, 
image and 
branding of 
NLM 

• Co- 

ordination of 

common 
identity for 
municipai 
events 

communicatio 
n strategy 
action plan. 

• Capacity 
building for 
Councillors, 
CDW's and 

Ward on roles 
and 

responsibilities 

• Effective 
distribution of 
information to 
all relevant 
stakeholders. 

• Effective 
contribution to 
institutional 
corporate 
identity, 
image and 
branding of 

NLM. 

• Co-ordination 
of common 
identity for 
municipal 
events 

communicatio 
n strategy 
action plan. 

• Capacity 
building for 
Councillors, 
CDW's and 

Ward on roles 
and 

responsibilities 

• Effective 
distribution of 
information to 
all relevant 
stakeholders. 

• Effective 
contribution to 
consultative 
meetings, 

(IDP ward 

clustered 

meetings) 

1 nter- 

Office of 

To ensure an 

Development of a 

MOU signed by 

Monitor 

Monitor 

Monitor 

Governm 

the MM 

effective and 

Memorandum of 

municipality and 

implementation 

implementation of 

implementation of 

ental 


efficient IGR 

Understanding 

department 

of signed MOU 

signed MOU 

signed MOU 

Relations 


function by 

(MOU) with the 







2017 and 

department of 






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beyond 

Health in relation 

to health issues in 

the wards. 






Office of 

the MM 

and all 

departme 

nts 


Development 

and 

implementation 

of the 1 GR 

Terms of 

Reference 

1 mplementation 

of 1 GR Terms of 

Reference 

Coordinate 

planning and 
reporting by 

sector 

departments in 

line with 

2015/ 2016 IDP 
through 1 GR 

1 mplementation 

of 1 GR Terms of 

Reference 

1 mplementation 

of the IGR Terms 

of Reference 




Facilitate Health 

1 ndaba on 

health 

infrastructure 

and health 

issues ( 10 000 
people per 

Clinic vs 

scattered areas) 

No of health 

1 ndaba/seminar 

s held. 

Capacity 
building for 

local health 

practitioners 

annually 

Facilitation of 

infrastructure 

development in 

identified areas. 

Functional clinics. 

Municipal 

Events 

Office of 

the MM 

and all 

departme 

To ensure 

effective, 

efficient and 

economical 

Development of 

an event 

management 
policy and 

Development 

and 

implementation 

of local 

Development 

and 

implementation 

of the annual 

1 mplementation 

of the Events 

management 

policy 

1 mplementation 

of the Events 

management 

policy. 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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nts 

coordination of 

municipal 
programmes/e 
vents by 2017 
and beyond 

procedures 

government 

events.and 

Communication 

plan 

local 

government 

events.and 

Communication 

plan. 



• Adherence to 
the 

government 
communicatio 
n cycle with 
regards to 
open council 
meetings. 

• No of council 
open days 

• Adherence to 
government 
communicati 
on cycie with 
regards to 
annual open 
council day. 

• Adherence to 
government 
communicatio 
n cycle with 
regards to 
annual open 
council day 

• Adherence to 
government 
communicatio 
n cycle with 
regards to 
annual open 
council day 

Risk 

manage 

ment 

MM's 

Office 

To continuously 

ensure that the 

NLM has and 

maintains an 

effective 

processes of 

risk 

management 
by 2017 and 
beyond 

• Conduct risk 
assessments 
(operational 
and strategic) 

• Coordinate the 

1 mplementatio 
n of Risk 

Action Plans 

• Coordinate 
risk 

committee 

meetings 

• No of Risk 
Assessment 
workshops 
conducted 

• Coordinate 
the 

1 mplementat 
ion of Risk 
Action Plans 

• Implementat 

• Conduct 
annual risk 
assessments 
(operational 

Q and 
strategic) 

• Coordinate 
the 

1 mplementat 
ion of Risk 
Action Plans 

on a 

• Review of the 
Risk Register 

• Coordinate the 

1 mplementatio 
n of risk 
action Plans 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of Risk and 
anti-Fraud 

Policy 



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ion of Risk 
and anti- 
Fraud 

Policies 

• Capacitate 
the Risk 
Management 
Unit 

• Review Risk 
Management 
Strategy 

quarterly 

basis 

• Workshop 
the Risk and 
anti -fraud 
policies 
annually 

• Capacitate/ R 
esource Risk 
Unit 

1 mplementat 

ion Risk 

management 

Strategy 



1 nstitutio 

nal 

Performa 

nce 

Manage 

All 

departme 

nts 

To continuously 

ensure 

effective, 

efficient, 

economical and 

compliant 

75% achievement 

of all institutional 

targets 


80% 

achievement of 

all institutional 

targets 

90% achievement 

of all institutional 

targets 

95% achievement 

of all institutional 

targets 


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ment 


integrated 
planning, 
resourcing, 
implementation 
, monitoring 

and evaluation 

by 2017 and 
beyond 

• Departmental 
meetings 
between Hods 
and Section 
heads 

• Strict 
monitoring of 
SDBIP 

implementatio 
n (regular 
meetings 
between the 
Mayor , 

P/Heads, MM, 
Hods) 

• Effective 
implementatio 
n of PMS 
Framework 

• No of 
meetings 
held 

between 

Hods and 

Section 

heads 

• No of 
meetings 
held 

between the 
Mayor , 
P/Heads, 

MM, Hods) 

. Departmenta 

1 meetings 
between 

HODs and 
Section 
heads on 
SDBIP 

. Strict 

monitoring 
of SDBIP 
implementati 
on (regular 
meetings 
between the 
Mayor , 

P/ Heads, 

MM, HODs) 

. Effective 
implementati 
on of PMS 
Framework 

. Departmental 
meetings 
between Hods 
and Section 
heads on 

SDBIP 

. Strict 

monitoring of 
SDBIP 

implementatio 
n (regular 
meetings 
between the 
Mayor , 

P/Heads, MM, 
Hods) 

. Effective 

implementatio 
n of PMS 
Framework 

. Departmental 
meetings 
between Hods 
and Section 
heads 

. Strict 

monitoring of 
SDBIP 

implementatio 
n (regular 
meetings 
between the 
Mayor , 

P/Heads, MM, 
Hods) 

. Effective 

implementatio 
n of PMS 
Framework 

1 nstitutio 

nal 

Performa 

nce 

Manage 

ment 


Automation of 

PMS 

. % 

automation 
of PMS 

• No of people 
trained on 
automated 
system. 

N/ A 

Pending 
optimisation of 
maturity level 

1 mplementation 

of the PMS 

automated 

system. 

1 mplementation 

of the PMS 

automated 

system. 

TRANSF 

ERTO 

MUNICI 

PAL 

TRANSF 

ORMATI 

Office of 

the 

MM/Corpo 

rate 

Services/ 

To ensure 

continuous 

institutional 

compliance 
with the 

legislation by 

• Development 
and 

implementatio 
n of a 

compliance 

framework 

• Quarterly 
workshops for 

. % 

1 mplementat 
ion of the 
compliance 
framework 
. No of 
workshops 
conducted 

TRANSFER TO 

MUNICIPAL 

TRANSFORMATI 

ON 

. 1 mplementatio 

n and 

. 1 mplementatio 

n and 

monitoring of 
the 

compliance 
framework 
. Quarterly 
workshops for 

. 1 mplementatio 

n and 

monitoring of 
the 

compliance 
framework 
. Quarterly 
workshops for 


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ON 

1 nstitutio 

nal 

complian 

ce 

SDF 

2017 and 

beyond 

Councillors 
with SALGA, 
Treasury and 
LGTA on 
promulgated 
regulations 
and 

legislations 
• Adherence to 
the 

government 
regulations on 
appointment 
of section 56 
mangers. 

• %complianc 
e with 

government 

regulations 

on 

appointment 
of section 56 
managers 

monitoring of 
the 

compliance 

framework 

• Quarterly 
workshops for 
Councillors 
with SALGA, 
Treasury and 
LGTA on 
promulgated 
regulations 
and 

legislations 

• Adherence to 
the 

government 
regulations on 
appointment 
of section 56 
mangers. 

Councillors 
with SALGA, 
Treasury and 
LGTA on 
promulgated 
regulations 
and 

legislations 
• Adherence to 
the 

government 
regulations on 
appointment 
of section 56 
mangers. 

Councillors 
with SALGA, 
Treasury and 
LGTA on 
promulgated 
regulations 
and 

legislations 
• Adherence to 
the 

government 
regulations on 
appointment 
of section 56 
mangers. 

1 nformati 

on 

Commun 

ication 

Technolo 

gy 


To ensure an 

integrated, 
responsive and 

efficient ICT 

function for 

NLM by 2017 
and beyond 

• Development 
of ICT 
governance 
framework 

• Alignment and 
implementatio 
n of 1 CT 
strategy and 
plan with 
municipal 
business 
strategies 
(including 
business 
continuity) 

• Adoption of 
the ICT 
government 
framework, 
strategy and 
plan by 
council. 

. % 

implementat 
ion of the 

ICT strategy 
action plan 

1 mplementation 

of the 1 CT 

strategy and 
action plan 
(including 

business 

continuity) 

1 mplementation 

of the ICT 

governance 

framework and 

strategy action 
plan (including 

business 

continuity) 

1 mplementation 

of the ICT 

governance 

framework and 

strategy action 
plan (including 

business 

continuity) 

Special 


To ensure 

1 mplementation 

% 

• Review of the 

• 1 mplementatio 

• 1 mplementatio 

Program 


effective and 

of the SPU 

implementation 

SPU Strategy 

n of the SPU 

n of the SPU 






• Launch of 

Strategy and 

Strategy and 


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mes 


compliant 
mainstreaming 
of special 

programmes 

into municipal 
plans and 
strategies by 
2017 and 

beyond 

Strategy and 
action plan 
(Facilitate 
development of 

sustainable 

programmes for 
SPU, facilitate the 
functionality of 
vulnerable group 

structures at ward 

and local levels 

of the SPU 

action plan 

integrated 

programmes 

in 

compliance 
with the 
municipal 
communicati 
on plan 

action plan 
(Facilitate 
development 
of sustainable 
programmes 
for SPU, 
facilitate the 
functionality 
of vulnerable 
group 

structures at 
ward and local 
levels 

• Securing of 
infrastructure 
(Vulnerable 
group centres) 

action plan 
(Facilitate 
development 
of sustainable 
programmes 
for SPU, 
facilitate the 
functionality 
of vulnerable 
group 

structures at 
ward and local 
levels 

• 1 nvestor 

conference for 
funding to 
ensure 
sustainability 


To continuously 
promote the 
unearthing and 
nurturing of 

talent in 

various 

sporting codes 
within NLM by 

2017 and 

beyond 

1 mplementation 
of Sport 
Development 
Strategy action 
plan 

% 

implementation 
of the Sports 
development 
action plan 

1 mpiementation 
of Sport 
Development 
Strategy action 
plan 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of Sport 
Development 
Strategy 
action plan 

• Securing of 
infrastructure 
(Ward based 
group centres) 

• 1 mplementatio 
n of Sport 
Development 
Strategy 
action plan 

• Securing of 
infrastructure 
(Ward based 
group centres) 

Commun 

ication 


To promote 

and enhance 

effective and 

efficient 

internal and 

external 

• Continuous 
update of 
Ngqushwa 
website 
(section 21 of 
the systems 

Act and 

. % 

compliance 
with the 
section 21 
(MSA and 
section 75 
(MFMA) 

• Continuous 
update of 
Ngqushwa 
website 
(section 21 of 
the systems 

Act and 

• Continuous 
update of 
Ngqushwa 
website 
(section 21 of 
the systems 

Act and 

• Continuous 
update of 
Ngqushwa 
website 
(section 21 of 
the systems 

Act and 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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communication 
throughout 
NLM by 2017 
and beyond. 


section 75 of 
the MFMA). 
Development 
of newsletter. 

I mplementatio 
n of the 
customer care 
policy action 
plan. 


No of 

newsletters 

developed. 

% 

implementat 
ion of 
Customer 
care policy 
action plan. 


section 75 of 
the MFMA). 


Development 
of municipal 
newsletter 
per semester 


section 75 of 
the MFMA). 
Development 
of newsletter. 

I mplementatio 
n of the 
customer care 
policy action 
plan. 


section 75 of 
the MFMA). 
Development 
of newsletter. 

I mplementatio 
n of the 
customer care 
policy action 
plan. 


Resolution by Plenary 

The report from the commission was adopted by the plenary as adequately mapping the linkage between the strategic issues, strategic 
objectives and strategies. 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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BUDGET AND TREASURY OFFI CE - 2014/ 15 Fl NANCI AL YEAR 


PROJ ECT NAME 

BUDGET 

Section: Revenue 

Free Basic Services 

R 984 960 

TOTAL BUDGET 

R984 960 


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Municipal Financial Viability and Management 

Strategic Goal: To improve overall financial management in the municipality by developing and implementing appropriate financial management policies, 
procedures and systems 


Intended outcome: Improved financial management and accountability (in line with terms of council, 2014- 2018) 


Focus Area 

Departme 

Strategic/ Mea 


Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 



nt 

surable 

Objective 


and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





Performance 








1 ndicator 




Expenditure 

BTO 

To have and 

Reviewal of 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Management 


maintain an 

existing policies 

reviewed policies 

reviewed 

reviewed 

reviewed 



efficient and 

and the 

and procedure 

policies and 

policies and 

policies and 



effective system 

procedure 

manuals by 

procedure 

procedure 

procedure 



of expenditure 

manuals and its 

Council for control 

manuals by 

manuals by 

manuals by 



management by 

implementation 

environment 

Council for 

Council for 

Council for 



2015/16 and 

and monitoring. 


control 

control 

control 



beyond. 



environment 

environment 

environment 




Full compliance 

with MFMA sec 

65 by paying 

service 



Timeously 

Timeously 




Timeously 

reconciliation 

Timeously 
preparation and 

-submission of 

preparation 

and - 

submission of 

preparation 

and - 

submission of 

credible payroll 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 97 



Focus Area 

Departme 

Strategic/ Mea 


Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 



nt 

surable 

Objective 


and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





Performance 








1 ndicator 







providers within 

prepared based 

credible payroll 

credible payroll 

reconciliation. 




30 days 

on the age 
analysis from the 
financial system. 

reconciliation. 

Reconciliation. 

Payment of all 




Effective 

management of 
payroll system. 

Payment of all 
Officials, 

Councillors and 
third parties with 
the required 
period. 

Payment of all 
Officials, 

Councillors and 

third parties 

with the 

required period. 

Payment of all 
Officials, 

Councillors and 

third parties 

with the 

required 

period. 

Officials, 

Councillors and 

third parties 

with the 

required 

period. 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 

and Three outer Years) 

15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 

Financial 

Management and 
MFMA Reporting 

and all relevant 

legislation that 
governs local 
government.( 1 nter 
nal controls) 

All 

department 

s 

To continuously 

ensure 100% 

compliance with 
legislation on 

MFMA financial 

reporting 
requirements by 
2015/16 and 
beyond 

Enforce 

compliance with 
legislated 

deadlines and 

requirements 

Credible and 

compliant 

Financial 

management 
system and 
reporting. 

Monthly 

preparation and 

submission of 

financial reporting 

for control 

environment. 

Full 

compliance 

with 

legislation 

Credible and 

compliant 

Financial 

managemen 

t system and 
reporting 

Full 

compliance 

with 

legislation 

Credible 

and 

compliant 

Financial 

manageme 

nt system 

and 

reporting 

. Full 

compliance 

with 

legislation 

Credible 

and 

compliant 

Financial 

manageme 

nt system 

and 

reporting 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

Strategic/ Mea 


Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 



nt 

surable 

Objective 


and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





Performance 








1 ndicator 




Revenue 

ALL 

To continuously 

Development, 

Approved 

Monitor the 

Monitor the 

Monitor the 

Management 

DEPARTME 

ensure an 

Reviewal and 

reviewed policies 

implementation 

implementation 

implementation 


NTS 

efficient, 

Monitoring of 

and procedure 

of Revenue 

of Revenue 

of Revenue 



effective system 

Revenue 

manuals by 

Management 

Management 

Management 



of revenue 

Management 

Council for 

Policies, 

Policies, 

Policies, 



management by 

Policies, 

/control 

procedure 

procedure 

procedure 



2015/16 and 

procedure 

environment 

manuals. 

manuals. 

manuals. 



beyond. 

manuals and 








the 








development of 








revenue 








turnaround 








strategy. 








Monitor the 



Monthly 

Monthly 




implementation 

of the Revenue 

Turnaround 

Strategy as well 

Monthly debtors 

Monthly debtors 

and collection 

reports that 

reflects increase 

debtors and 

collection 

reports that 

reflects 

debtors and 

collection 

reports that 

reflects 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 

and Three outer Years) 

15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 




as the credit 

control policy to 

increase the 

collection by 

60% of current 

and outstanding 

debtors. 

and collection 

reports that 

reflects increase 

in revenue 

collection and 

approved revenue 

turn around 

strategy. 

in revenue 

collection. 

increase in 

revenue 

collection. 

increase in 

revenue 

collection. 

Revenue 

management 

BTO 

Ensure indigent 

households 

within 

Ngqushwa Local 
Municipality 
jurisdiction are 
registered for 

Free Basic 

Services 

Developed 
credible indigent 
register. 

Ensure fully 
updated 

indigent register 
and subsidising 
deserving 

households. 

Ensure fully 

updated 

indigent 

register and 

subsidising 

deserving 

households. 

Ensure fully 

updated 

indigent 

register and 

subsidising 

deserving 

households. 

Revenue 

Management 

ALL 

DEPARTME 

NTS 

Data Cleansing 
(sound billing 
system for 
sustainability) 

Accurate and 

reliable of 
monthly billing 

information 

system that will 

Accurate and 

reliable of 
monthly billing 

information 

system that will 

Accurate and 

reliable of 
monthly billing 

information 

system that 

Accurate and 

reliable of 
monthly billing 

information 

system that 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

Strategic/ Mea 


Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 



nt 

surable 

Objective 


and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





Performance 








1 ndicator 








be reconciled with 

be reconciled 

will be 

will be 





valuation roll on a 

with valuation 

reconciled with 

reconciled with 





monthly 

roll.(Monthly 

valuation 

the valuation 





bases.(Monthly 

billing report) 

roll.(Monthly 

roll.(Monthly 





billing report) 


billing report) 

billing report) 

Supply Chain 

ALL 

To ensure and 

Review of the 

Approved 

1 mplementation 

1 mplementatio 

1 mplementatio 

Management 

DEPARTME 

maintain an 

existing scm 

reviewed policies 

and monitoring 

n and 

n and 


NTS 

effective, 

policies and 

and procedure 

of SCM 

monitoring of 

monitoring of 



efficient, 

procedure 

manuals by 

policies(monthly 

SCM 

SCM 



fair,transparent. 

manuals and 

Council for control 

and quarterly 

policies(monthl 

policies(monthl 



compatitive. 

implementation. 

environment 

SCM reporting) 

y and quarterly 

y and quarterly 



economical and 

monitoring and 



SCM reporting) 

SCM reporting) 



cost effective 

system of supply 
chain 

reporting 







management by 

Ensure that 







2015/16 and 

there is 


Accurate, 





beyond 

database 

management 

Accurate, credible 

credible and 

implementable 

Accurate, 

credible and 

Accurate, 

credible and 




system through 

implementable 

database in the 

financial system. 

database in the 

implementable 

implementable 




credible 

processes in line 

with SCM 

financial 

system. 

database in the 

financial 

database in the 

financial 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 

and Three outer Years) 

15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 




regulations and 
policies. 



system. 

system. 

Supply Chain 
Management 

BTO 

To ensure and 

maintain an 

effective, 

efficient, fair, 

economical and 

effective system 
of supply chain 
management by 
2015/16 and 
beyond. 

1 mplementation 

of contract 

management 
system as per 

sec 116 of the 

MFMA. 

Timeously 
reporting on 
performance of all 
municipal services 
providers to 

ensure that there 

is value for 

money for 

services 

rendered. 

Timeously 
reporting on 
performance of 
all municipal 

services 

providers to 

ensure that 

there is value 

for money for 

services 

rendered. 

Timeously 
reporting on 
performance of 
all municipal 

services 

providers to 

ensure that 

there is value 

for money for 

services 

rendered. 

Timeously 
reporting on 
performance of 
all municipal 

services 

providers to 

ensure that 

there is value 

for money for 

services 

rendered. 

Budget 

Management 

ALL 

DEPARTME 

NTS 

Effective budget 
management 
systems by 
2015/16 and 
beyond. 

Reviewal of 

existing policies 

and the 

procedure 

manuals and its 

implementation 
and monitoring. 

Approved 
reviewed policies 
and procedure 
manuals by 

Council for control 

environment 

Monitor the 

implementation 
of budget 
Management 

Policies, 

procedure 

manuals. 

Monitor the 

implementation 
of budget 
Management 

Policies, 

procedure 

manuals. 

Monitor the 

implementation 
of budget 
Management 

Policies, 

procedure 

manuals. 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 203 




Focus Area 

Departme 

Strategic/ Mea 


Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 



nt 

surable 

Objective 


and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





Performance 








1 ndicator 







Preparation of 


Adopted budget 

Adopted 

Adopted 




a budget 


process plan by 

budget process 

budget process 




process plan in 


council before 

plan by council 

plan by council 




line with MFMA 

Adopted budget 

31 August and 

before 31 

before 31 



To continuously 

and MSA. 

process plan by 

monitor its 

August and 

August and 




council before 31 

implementation. 

monitor its 

monitor its 



ensure effective, 


August and 


implementation 

implementation 



economical and 


monitor its 






compliant 

municipal 

business 

operations in 

line with 

approved plans 


implementation. 

Approved 

credible annual 

budget by 

council and 

ensure its 

implementation 
and monitoring. 

Approved 

Approved 



by 2015/16 and 
beyond 

Preparation of a 

realistic and 

credible budget 

for sound 

financial 

administration. 


credible annual 

budget by 

credible annual 

budget by 




Approved credible 
annual budget by 

council and 

ensure its 

implementation 

council and 

ensure its 

implementation 

and 

monitoring. 

council and 

ensure its 

implementation 

and 

monitoring. 




DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 

and Three outer Years) 

15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 




Monthly 

preparation and 

submissions of 

budget returns 
and monthly 
required 
reports, 
quarterly and 
half year in line 

with the MFMA. 

and monitoring. 

Proof of prepared 

reviewed and 

submitted 

monthly, 

quarterly and half 
year reports in 

line with the 

MFMA. 

Proof of 

prepared 

reviewed and 

submitted 

monthly, 
quarterly and 
half year 
reports in line 

with the MFMA. 

Proof of 

prepared 

reviewed and 

submitted 

monthly, 
quarterly and 
half year 
reports in line 

with the MFMA. 

Proof of 

prepared 

reviewed and 

submitted 

monthly, 
quarterly and 
half year 
reports in line 

with the MFMA. 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 

and Three outer Years) 

15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 

















Financial 

Management 

Services to 

achieve clean 

administration. 

ALL 

DEPARTME 

NTS 

Monitor & 

ensure the 

implementation 

of Audit and Risk 

Action Plans by 

2015/16 and 
beyond. 

Development 

and 

implementation 

of audit and risk 
action plans. 

Developed risk 
plan and audit 
action plan 

Reduction for best 

control 

environment in 

order to achieve 

clean 

administration. 

Annually 
development 
and monthly 
implementation 
and monitoring 

of audit and risk 

action plans. 

Annually 
development 
and monthly 
implementation 
and monitoring 

of audit and 

risk action 

plans. 

Annually 
development 
and monthly 
implementation 
and monitoring 

of audit and 

risk action 

plans. 


ALL 

DEPARTME 

NTS 

To develop 

sound financial 

management 

within the 

institution for 

financial viability 

to achieve clean 

administration 

Preparation and 

submission of 

credible 

financial 

statements 

through daily, 
weekly and 

month end 

Developed and 
reviewed monthly 
and quarterly 
credible reports 
and financial 

statements 

through weekly 
and monthly 

Developed and 

reviewed 

monthly and 
quarterly 
credible reports 

and financial 

statements 

through weekly 

Developed and 

reviewed 

monthly and 
quarterly 
credible reports 

and financial 

statements 

through weekly 

Developed and 

reviewed 

monthly and 
quarterly 
credible reports 

and financial 

statements 

through weekly 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

Strategic/ Mea 


Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 



nt 

surable 

Objective 


and Three outer Years) 





15/ 16 

Key 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





Performance 








1 ndicator 






by 2015/16 and 

accurate 

updates and 

and monthly 

and monthly 

and monthly 



beyond. 

processes and 

monitoring of G.L. 

updates and 

updates and 

updates and 




high level of 


monitoring of 

monitoring of 

monitoring of 




accountability. 


G.L. 

G.L. 

G.L. 







Unqualified 

Unqualified 




Ensure 



Audit opinion. 

Audit opinion. 




compliance with 

GRAP 17 

standards 

through review 

and 

implementation 

of 

Unqualified Audit 

Unqualified 






upirMun. 

Audit opinion. 

Credible and 

Credible and 






compliant Fixed 

compliant Fixed 




Credible and 
compliant Fixed 
Asset Register 
and adopted as 

well as 

implementation of 

Asset 

Management 
policy and 
procedures for 
Control 


Asset Register 

Asset Register 




Credible and 

compliant Fixed 
Asset Register 

and adopted as 

well as 

implementation 

and adopted as 

well as 

implementation 




Asset 

and adopted as 

of Asset 

of Asset 




Management 

well as 

Management 

Management 




policy. 

implementation 

policy and 

policy and 





of Asset 

Management 

procedures for 

Control 

procedures for 

Control 





policy and 
procedures for 

Environment. 

Environment. 


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Focus Area 

Departme 

nt 

Strategic/ Mea 

surable 

Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 

and Three outer Years) 

15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

18/ 19 





Environment. 

Control 

Environment. 




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CORPORATE SERVI CES - 2014/ 15 Fl NANCI AL YEAR 


PROJ ECT NAME 

BUDGET 

Section: Human Resources 

Employee Study Assistance 

R127 200 

Employee Satisfaction Survey 

R247 000 

Health and Safety equipment 

R149 250 

TOTAL BUDGET 

R 523 450 


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Municipal Transformation and Institutional Development 
Strategic Goal: Improve organizational cohesion and effectiveness. 


Intended Outcome: Improved organizational stability and sustainability (in line with the term of council, 2014 - 2018) 


Focus Area 

Department 

Strategic/ measur 
able Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 



15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Recruitment 

and selection 

Corporate 

Services/AII 

Departments 

To ensure timeous 
and compliant filling 

of vacant and 

budgeted positions 
by 2017 and 
beyond 

Filling of all vacant 
and budgeted posts 
within 90 days 

• Turnaround 
time 

Filling of all vacant and 
budgeted post within 

90 days 

Filling of all vacant and 
budgeted post within 

90 days 

Employment 

Equity 

Corporate 

Services/AII 

Departments 

To ensure 

continuous 

compliance the 
Employment Equity 
Plan by 2017 and 
beyond 

• Enforce and 
monitor 

implementation of 
the EEP in line 
with the EE act 

• Establishment of 
a functional 
Remuneration 
committee 

• Number 
employees 
from 

designated 

groups 

• Number of 
barrier 
intervention 

s 

implemente 
d per EEP 

• Enforce and 
monitor 

implementation of 
the EEP in line with 
the EE act 

• Monitor 
functionality of the 
Salary 

remuneration 

committee 

• Enforce and 
monitor 

implementation of 
the EEP in line with 
the EE act 

• Monitor 
functionality of the 
Salary 

remuneration 

committee 






Focus Area 

Department 

Strategic/ measur 
able Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 



15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 








Training and 
Development 

Corporate 
Services/ all 
departments 

To continuously 
build capacity and 
improve 

performance at all 

levels of the 

municipality 

Enforce 

implementation and 

adherence to the 

WSP 

• Number of 
trainings 
implemente 
d per WSP 

• Number of 
councillors 
and 

employees 
trained per 
WSP 

Enforce 

implementation and 

adherence to the WSP 

Enforce 

implementation and 

adherence to the WSP 

Performance 

Management 

Corporate 

Services 

To continuously 
improve 

performance at all 

levels of the 

municipality 

1 mplementation of 

the PMS framework 

(cascading of PMS) 

Number of 

employees with 
signed Service 
Delivery 
Agreements 

1 mplementation of the 

PMS framework 

(cascading of PMS) 

1 mplementation of the 

PMS framework 

(cascading of PMS) 

Compliance 

to OHSA 

legislation 

Corporate 

Services/AII 

Departments 

To continuously 
creating a 

conducive and safe 

working safe 
environment by 

2017 

Enforce and monitor 

implementation of 
the OHS policy in line 

with the Act 

% compliance 

with the OHS 

policy 

Enforce and monitor 

implementation of the 
OHS policy in line with 

the Act 

Enforce and monitor 

implementation of the 
OHS policy in line with 

the Act 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 21 1 




Focus Area 

Department 

Strategic/ measur 
able Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 



15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Human 

Resource 

Strategy 

Corporate 

Services/AII 

Departments 

To ensure 

continuous 
implementation of 
Municipal vision and 
mission through 

Human Resources 

Management plan 

1 mplementation of 
the HR plan 

Number of 

interventions 

implemented 
per HR plan 

1 mplementation of the 
HR plan 

1 mplementation of the 
HR plan 

Labour 

Relations 

Management 

Corporate 

Services/AII 

Departments 

Continuously 
maintain a 

conducive working 
relationship 

between the 

employer and 
employees of NLM 

for the furtherance 

of service delivery 

Coordinate forum 
meetings in line with 
as per applicable 
legislations and 
agreements 

Number of 
meetings held 

Coordinate forum 
meetings in line with 
as per applicable 
legislations and 
agreements 

Coordinate forum 
meetings in line with 
as per applicable 
legislations and 
agreements 

Employee 

Wellness 

Corporate 

Services 

Effective 

implementation of 

wellness 

programmes 

Conduct employee 

wellness awareness 

workshops to 
management, 

councillors and staff 

No. of 

employee 

wellness 

awareness 

workshops 

conducted 

Conduct employee 

wellness awareness 

workshops to 
management, 

councillors and staff 

Conduct employee 

wellness awareness 

workshops to 
management, 

councillors and staff 


DRAFT 2015/2016 NGQUSHWA INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 212 



Focus Area 

Department 

Strategic/ measur 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 



able Objective 








15/ 16 

Key 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 





Performance 







1 ndicator 




Corporate 

To continuously 

Development of 

Report on 

Development of 

Development of 

Council 

Support 

Services 

ensure the 

1 nstitutional Calendar 

number of 

1 nstitutional Calendar 

1 nstitutional Calendar 


provision of 

by J une 2015 

council and 

by J une 2016 

by J une 2017 


effective and 


council 





efficient council 


structures 





support services to 

Distribution of council 

meetings held 

Distribution of council 




the council and its 

structures by 

ensuring the 

availability and 

adherence to the 

Municipal 

notices and agenda 

to council and council 

structures seven 

days before the 
meeting or as per the 
adopted Standing 

Number of 

council notices 

distributed to 

council and 

notices and agenda to 

council and council 

structures seven days 
before the meeting or 
as per the adopted 
Standing Rules for 

Distribution of council 

notices and agenda to 

council and council 

structures seven days 
before the meeting or 
as per the adopted 
Standing Rules for 
special meetings 



1 nstitutional 

Calendar aligned to 
all applicable 

Rules for special 
meetings 

council 

structures 

special meetings 



legislations 


Signed Council 

and Council 

Structures 

Minutes and 

resolutions 




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Focus Area 


Department 


Strategic/ measur 
able Objective 


Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 


15/ 16 


Key 

Performance 
I ndicator 


16/ 17 


17/ 18 


Registry and 

Document 

Management 


Corporate 

Services 


To continuously 

maintain a fully 
functional records 
management 
system by adhering 
to the principles of 
the National 

Archives Act 


Reviewal 

of Records 
Management Policy 
and Records 
Management 
Procedures by J une 
2015 


Capacity building on 
the utilisation of 
registry procedures 
by all staff 


Reports on of 

Records 

Management 

Policy & 

Records 

Management 

Procedures 


No of trained 
staff on the 
utilisation of 
registry 
procedures 


Reviewal of Records 
Management Policy 
and Records 
Management 
Procedures 


implementation of 
Records Management 
Policy and Records 
Management 
Procedures 


Reviewal of Records 
Management Policy 
and Records 
Management 
Procedures 


implementation of 
Records Management 
Policy and Records 
Management 
Procedures 


Facilities 


Corporate 


To create a 


Provision of adequate 


Number of park 


Facilitation of 


Maintenance of office 


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Focus Area 

Department 

Strategic/ measur 
able Objective 

Strategies/ Measurable Outputs (Plan for 2015/ 16 and Three outer Years) 



15/ 16 

Key 

Performance 

1 ndicator 

16/ 17 

17/ 18 

Management 

Services/Tec 

hnical 

Services 

conducive working 
environment by 

2017 and beyond 

office space 

homes- 

purchased/leas 

ed 

procurement of new 

offices 

buildings 


Resolution by Plenary 

The report from the commission was adopted by the plenary as adequate to address the strategic issues as per the SWOT report. 


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EXTERNAL FUNDED PROI ECTS FOR THE 2012-2017 Fl NANCI AL YEAR 


Project Name 

Ward 

Financial 

Year 

Actual Amount 

Source or Department 

Library Building 

10 

2009/ 10 

R500 000.00 

DoE and Dl SRAC 

1 nternational Museums Day 

Ward 10 

2012/ 13 

RIO 000 

DSRAC 

Womens day participation for 65 participants 

AII Wards 

2012/ 13 

R13 000 

DSRAC 

1 ndigenous Games 

AII 

2012/ 13 

R26 000 

DSRAC 

Horse Racing 

ALL 

2012/ 13 

R50 000 

DSRAC 

Fun Run 

AII 

2012/ 13 

R50 000 

DSRAC 

Girl Guider & Scouts 

ALL 

2012/ 13 

R50 000 

DSRAC 

Employment of EPWP Contract Worker 

Ward 10 

2012/ 13 

R33 600 

DSRAC 

Sanitation Project 

Ward 12 

2012/ 13 

R1 000 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Area Wide Sanitation Programme 

Various 

Wards 

2012/ 13 

R8 600 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Peddie Waste Water Treatment Works Upgrade 

Ward 10 

2012/ 13 

R8 000 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Hamburg Sewerage Treatment Plant 

Ward 11 

2012/ 13 

R1 000 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Ngqushwa Villages Water Reticulation 

Various 

2012/ 13 

R7 000 000 

Amatole District 


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Wards 



Municipality 

Prudhoe Housing (Bulk Water) 

Ward 12 

2012/ 13 

R500 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Cadastral Land Audit Capture and maintance for 
Nkonkobe, Ngqushwa and Amahlathi LM 

AII 

2012/ 13 

R900 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Development of the Zoning scheme/ Plan for 
Ngqushwa LM 

Ward 10 

2012/ 13 

R250 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Development of a Delegation Policy for 
Ngqushwa LM 

1 nternal 

2012/ 13 

RIOO 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

GRAP Compliant fixed assests register for 
Ngqushwa LM 

1 nternal 

2012/ 13 

R250 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Hamburg Satellite Fire Station 

Ward 11 

2012/ 13 

R1 000 000 

Amatole District 

Municipality 

Electrification Programme 

Peddie East 

(50 

household) 

2013/ 14 

R800 000 

ESKOM 

Peddie 

Town 

Extension 

(500 HH) 

2013/ 14 

R6 500 000 

ESKOM 

Peddie 

Central 

Phase 1 1 

2013/ 14 

R1 420 000 

ESKOM 

Peddie 

2014/ 15 

RIO 451 702 

ESKOM 


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Central 

Phase 1 1 




Repairs and Renovations 

Zimlindile 

SSS 

2012/ 13 

RO 

Department of Education 

Admin Block, Toilets, Security Fence and 

Renovate 5 Classrooms 

J uly SSS 

2012/ 13 

RO 

Department of Education 

Nutrition Programme 

All Schools 

2011- 

2017 

RO 

Department of Education 

Scholar Transport Programme 

12 Schools 

and 366 

learners 

2011/ 12 

RO 

Department of Education 

Scholar Transport Programme 

21 Schools 

and 885 

Learners 

2012/ 13 

RO 

Department of Education 

Moral Regeneration Programmes for youth 
Development 

All 

2009/ 10 

R320 000.00 

Seek Funding/ 

(GTZ) 

Eradication of Mud Schools 

All 

2009/ 10 

R20m 

Private Sector and DoE 

Revamp Packhouse for Citrus 

(Ripplemead/ Baltein) 

Ward 4 

2009/ 10 

R5m 

Source Funds 

Revitalise Bingqala Pineapple 

11 

2009/ 10 

R5m 

Source Fund 


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Establish Linkages with Tertiary 1 nstitutions on 
fish farming and crop potentiai iivestock 

All 

2009/ 10 

R2m 

Source funding 

Hamburg Arts Colony/ Residence 

11 

2009/ 12 

R22m 

DEAT/ AEDA/ 

ASPI RE 

Coastal Care Project 

11& 12 

2009/ 10 

R9m 

DEAT 

Peddie Multi-faceted Development 

10 

2009/ 10 


Togu Developers 

Assistance with Land Preparation ( tractors 
with Impiement 

All 

2009/ 10 

Rlm 

Source Funds 

Wesley Mining 

11 

2009/ 10 


Abasempuma Resources 
Company 

Hamburg Development 1 nitiatives 

11 




Town centre development 

2012/ 13 

R14 000 000 

Aspire / Nationai Treasury 

Artist Retreat 

2012/ 13 

R28m 

National Treasury, Dept of 

Tourism 

Hamburg Aquacuiture 

2012/ 13 

R9,5m 

DAFF 

Drivers License Testing Centre 

10 

2008/ 12 

R2 000 000 

Dept of Roads and 

Transport 


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Ward 12 Lime Mining Project 

12 

2009/ 10 

RO 

Dept of Minerais and 

Energy 

Feasibiiity study for Low Cost Housing Project: 
Ndiovini and German Viiiage 

10 

2013/ 14 


Amathoie District 

Municipaiity 

I.C.T. Centres in Ngqushwa Locai Municipaiity. 


2013/ 14 

Unknown 

USAASA 

Construction of Sportsfieids: Sobantu High 

Schooi 

9 

2013/ 14 

Rlm 

DSR (Rlm) 

Construction of Sportsfields: Minenkulu High 

Schooi 

9 

2013/ 14 

Rlm 

DSR (Rlm) 

Construction of Sportsfieids: Cwaia Primary 

School 

12 

2013/ 14 

Rlm 

DSR (Rlm) 

Ngqushwa Water and Sanitation Provision 

Various 

Wards 

2014/ 15 

R36 648 000 

Amatoie District 

Municipaiity 

Bjorn Centre 

12 

2008/ 13 

R3,000000.00 

Keiskamma Trust 

Eva Centre 

6 

2008/ 13 

Rl,900000.00 

Keiskamma Trust 


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UNFUNDED PROJ ECTS 


Planned Projects 

Brief Description 

Amount 

Funding 

source 

1. Multipurpose 

Centre/Governnnent 

Offices 

Centralise government 
department/entities in 
order to provide a one 
stop government services 
to the community of 
Ngqushwa 

Unknown at 

this stage 

To source 

funding/PPP 

2. Agricultural Centre 

Centralise all the farming 
inputs in order to yield 
good returns on 
investment on 
interventions, Also provide 
a training facility, nursery, 
and processing machinery 
for mealies and other 
products 

R20m 

To source 

funding 

3. Middle income 
housing 

Development of middle 
income housing 

Unknown 

PPP 

4. Mall development 

Development of a 
shopping complex around 
Nobumba and Lewis 

Unknown 

PPP 

5. Ngqushwa Tourism 
Hub 

Reviving the Calvary 
Barracks and the Peddie 

Fort as the Tourism Hub 

R 21m 

To source 

funding 

6. Caravan Park 
upgrade 

Improve, and 
development the caravan 
park to be a Centre of 
tourism attraction 

Unknown 

To source 

funding 

7. Expansion of the 

Community Works 

Programme 

Expansion of the 
participants in the 
programme to cover all 
wards and most villages 

Unknown 

COGTA 

8. Lewis Game 

Reserve 

To exploit the potential 
and make use of the 
natural environment by 
developing a game 

Unknown 

PPP 


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reserve that will attract 
tourists and create job 
opportunities for the locals 



9. Hannburg Town 

Centre 

development 

To develop and beautify 
the Hamburg town Centre 
as a town for investment 

and tourism attraction 

R16m 

National 

Treasury 

lO.Farming ofTomato 

Project 

Enter into Private Public 
Partnership agreement 
with the Private sector to 

farm tomato for the 
benefit of employment 
creation and local 
economic development 

Unknown 

PPP 

ll.Expansion of the 

EPWP 

To increase the number of 
participants to all wards 

Unknown 

Public works 

12.1 CT incubator 

To provide the youth an 

ICT facility where they 
could be able utilize 
internet services for 
research, development 
and networking with local 
and international potential 
partners 

Rlm 

To source 

funding 

IB.Skills development 

Centre 

This is a facility to provide 
local communities an 
opportunity to develop 
their skills as Artisans, 
plumbers or builders 

R2m 

To source 

funding 

14.Poultry Park 

As the facility to grow the 
poultry sector in the 
Municipality 

R5m 

To source 

funding 

IS.Abattoir 

To have a facility to 
process livestock into a 
package for human 
consumption 

R6m 

To source 

funding 

le.Fresh Produce 

Market 

To provide a a market for 
local produce 

R4,5m 

To source 

funding 

17.Cooperatives Retail 

All Coop sector facility able 
to absorb all local 
production and services 

R4m 

To source 

funding 


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IS.Ward Training 

Centers 

The aim is build effective 
and efficient capacity 
building facilities to 
comprehensively deal with 
the issue of illiteracy in 
the Municipality by 
providing skills 
development interventions 
at each Ward centre 

R18m 

To source 

funding 

19.Revival of Irrigation 

schemes 

Revival of schemes for 

LED and employment 
creation 

R5m 

To source 

funding 

20.Livestock 

1 mprovement 

To change the quality of 
livestock for commercial 

purposes 

R3m 

To source 

funding 

21.Tarring of Hamburg 

Access Road 

To provide access a 
conducive environment for 

visitors and locals in order 
to attract development 
and tourism in the area. 

R30m 

To source 

funding 

22.Development of 

Beach front along 

the coast 

(Street lighting and 
amenities) 

R2m 

MIG, and 

source more 

funding 

23. Umqhwashu 

Heritage Site 

Construction buildings and 
Renovation on the site 

Unknown 

To source 

funding 

24. Resurfacing of 

Peddie Town 

Centre 

Tarring of Peddie town 
Streets 


To source 

funding 

25.0range Citrus Farm 

Municipal Property. The 
plan is to invite potential 
investor to lease the 
property. This will benefit 
our community through 
employment, mentoring 
while it generates income 
for the municipality. 



26.Mining 

Feasibility study was 
conducted and completed. 


To source 

funding 

27.Agricultural 

Mentors 

Seek funding to mentor 


To source 


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our emerging farmers. 


funding 

28.Agric Centre 

Concept document is 
available for the agric 
centre. 


To source 

funding 

29.Tourisnn 

Want to engage potential 
hospitality investors. 


To source 

funding 

BO.Hannburg 2030 

Vision 

Package Hamburg as a 
local economic 
development hub. 


To source 

funding 

31. 1 .C.T. 1 ntegrated 
Systems 

1 nstallation of 1 .C.T. 

Integrated systems 

Unknown 

To source 

funding 

32.Working for the 
Coast 

EC Street Cleaning and 
beautification (Peddie & 
Grahamstown) 

R7.6 Million 

DEA 

EC - WftC Fish River to 

Great Kei River 

R9.100 

Million 

DEA 

33.SMME Contractor 

Development 


Unknown 

To source 

funding 

34.Chicken Farm - 

Anchor project 


Unknown 

To source 

funding 

35.Wesley Truck 1 nn - 
Anchor project 


Unknown 

To source 

funding 

36.Brick Manufacturing 
- Hydrofoam 

Anchor Project 


Unknown 

To source 

funding 

37. Agricultural 

Proj ects 


R22 Million 

DRDAR 


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IDP 

Chapter Five 

Sector Plans, By-laws and 

Policies 


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225 




Chapter Five: Sector Plans, By-laws 
and Policies 

3.5.3 Human Resource (HR) Strategy 

The premise for Human Resource Management and Organizational Development in the 
Ngqushwa Local Municipality is based amongst other things, the prescripts of the existing 
legislative framework. The development of HR Strategy and its implementation plan is a 
requisite of the IDP. The Strategy will serve as a framework and guide to HR functions. The 
development and implementation of the HR Strategy will create an enabling environment 
that will assist towards improving service delivery. A Service Provider has been appointed 
by ADM for development of the HR Plan by 28 February 2014 for implementation. This will 
be reviewing the current HR Strategy. There will be future financial need for the 
implementation of HR Strategy imperatives. 

This legislative framework includes the Constitution, Municipal Systems Act, and the White 
Paper on Human Resource Management. This Human Resource Plan (HRP) is further 
contextualised by the strategic framework of the municipality, as well as the Service 
Delivery Budget I mplementation Plan (SDBIP) and within the municipal budgetary 
framework as per the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA). 

Municipal Strategic Objectives 

Ensure institutional plans, programmes and projects impact on youth, disabled, 
women, children, and other vulnerable groups. 

Ensure compliance with applicable legislation, policies and procedures on ongoing 
basis. 

Improve HR relations institutionally. 

Ensure compliance with the skills requirements of Ngqushwa municipality. 

Provide information technology governance. 

Ensure that all Ngqushwa assets, councillors and staff are adequately secured. 

3.5.4 District Human Resources Development (HRD) Strategy 

With the development of the HRD Strategy for South Africa 2010 -2030 as well as the 
Provincial HRD Strategy, ADM resolved that a District HRD Strategy be developed that 
would be aligned to the two HRD Strategies mentioned above. During the formulation of 
strategies for the 2010/2011 financial year, Amathole District Municipality (ADM) took a 
decision to develop and implement a District Human Resources Development Strategy 
(HRD strategy) and align it with the HRD Strategy for South Africa (2010-2030) as well as 
the Provincial HRD Strategy. This decision was informed by a number of challenges facing 
local government at large, which can be attributed to lack or shortage of skilled employees, 
among other factors. In developing this strategy, a number of applicable pieces of 


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legislation, policies, political announcements and relevant IDP programmes and initiatives 
were taken into cognisance. 

The Human Resource Development Strategy was developed and adopted by Council in 
2010-11 in line with the HRD Strategy for South Africa 2010 -2030 as well as the Provincial 
HRD Strategy. The Strategy was reviewed in 2012/13 in line with the IDP review process. 
As part of its implementation of the District HRD Strategy in 2012/13 conducting of the 
"New Venture Creation" Learnership continued into 2012/13, 1 unemployed "People With 
Disabilities"(PWD) from Ngqushwa was part of. An Award giving ceremony (Education 
Sunday) was also organized for 3 schools within Ngqushwa with top three learners. The 
gesture was to encourage schools to do better in future years to come. The school 
beneficiaries received laptops to the value of R8 242.26 each. I mplementation of the HRD 
Strategy is on-going and will continue with new programmes for 2013/14 and the years 
beyond. 

a) Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) 

According to the Government Gazette of June 2005, all employers are expected to submit 
their Workplace Skills Plans to their respective SETAs by the 30 J une of each financial year. 
The approved Workplace Skills Plan for the financial year 2013/2014 was signed off by 
management, Portfolio Councillor and the Union, and it also reflects all the training 
programmes that were identified by the departments for both Councillors and employees, 
and the document was submitted to the Local Government SETA within the stipulated 
period. Currently Corporate Services is implementing the training identified in the plan. 

b) Local Economic Development Learnership (N0F4) 

This programme was identified in line with the implementation the approved District HRD 
Strategy for 2013/2014. A Service Provider was appointed in September 2013 for 
implementation and coordination programme for ADM. Three candidates were selected 
from the unemployed youth who submitted their CVs in response to the circulated advert. 
Classes will commence in November 2013. 

c) Training of Officials and Councillors 

Training is currently being conducted in line with the Council approved Workplace Skills 
Plan as well as the Annual Training Programme. An allocated budget with a total amount of 
R1 050 000 was earmarked for training in 2013/14, and is currently being utilized for both 
Councillors and Officials. A sum of R450 000 was allocated for Councillor Training and R600 
000 was allocated for Officials for the 2013/14 financial year. 

d) Internship Programme 

Nine candidates are currently participating in the internship programme, 6 of the 
candidates are participating in the Municipal Finance Management Internship Programme 
which is funded by National Treasury and 4 candidates are funded internally. 

e) Experiential Training 


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Only 1 candidate was exposed to the world of work in the last financial year and 2 learners 
are currently participating in the experiential learning progrannnne. 

f) Bursary on Rare Skills 

Two students from disadvantaged backgrounds are currently receiving assistance through 
this programme which is coordinated by HR Unit, both are currently doing final year whilst 
the other two have completed their qualification 

g) Minimum Competency Level Training 

In order to meet the requirements of National Treasury as stipulated in the Gazette 29967, 
7 candidates are currently enrolled in the Municipal Finance Management Programme 
(MFMP) with University of Fort Hare. 1 Manager completed the programme with Wits 
University. 

j) Empioyee Study Assistance Scheme 

The department is currently co-ordinating a Study Assistance Programme. 


3.2.3 LED STRATEGY 

The Ngqushwa Municipality has adopted the reviewed LED strategy as an component of a 
Master Plan development process which was also approved in February 2013, The 
development of the municipality is based on the National Economic Development 
Framework; Growth and Development priorities as agreed upon by the social pact and 
compact; the Provincial Growth and Development pillars as well as the National Spatial 
Development Perspective principles. This is further entrenched in the activities of the 
clusters and all the IGR structures operating within the jurisdiction of Ngqushwa 
Municipality. 

Platform for Participation 

The following platforms are utilised for participation: 

I ntergovernmental Relations 

Community-based Planning; Representative Forum 
Area-based Planning; SMME/Co-operatives Forum 
Local Tourism Organisation 
Ngqushwa Agricultural Stakeholders Forum 
Small Towns Revitalisation Technical Committee 
Hamburg Steering Committee. 


According to the AREDS report, the historic lack of, or inappropriate, investment in 
Amathole District, considerable challenges to economic development are faced due to 

V low level of human capital development, 

^ under-developed infrastructure and 
^ I neffective governance. 

The following specific issues are considered barriers to economic growth in Amathole in 
general. These can be grouped into the following categories: 


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I nfrastructure - outdated, inadequate and poorly maintained infrastructure is an 
impedinnent to cost effective enterprise. This issue is a very high priority because of the 
distance of the district from markets and the lack of raw materials locally. As Ngqushwa 
Municipality we are in the process developing a Regenerating/Master plan and part of 
this process is the analysis of the existing infrastructure and its capacity to absorb 
investment opportunities and develop means and projects to increase these in order to 
deal with these barriers indicated. 


Land related issues - this includes the resolution of land ownership and use rights, 
land use planning and land use management to exploit (where applicable) and protect 
(where applicable) the environment. The land issue relates to both rural and urban 
localities. In the former, it relates to use for agriculture and settlements, while in the 
latter it relates to land for investment in production facilities, offices and housing. A 
Land Audit process has been long concluded by the Department of Public Works, and 
the Municipality together with its stakeholders is in the process of ensuring these are 
transferred to the Municipality for the benefit of attracting development opportunities 
and unlocking development potential that exist in these land parcels. 


Lack of competitiveness of the sectors and iocaiities. This resolves into two key 
aspects: 

o Support systems and services - there is inadequate technical and systemic (e.g.: for 
maintenance, provision of supply, production) support across all the sectors. However 
the Municipality has capacitated the LED section with human and financial resources 
(though not sufficient) able to create a conducive environment for the sectors to 
thrive. Therefore internal capacity has been built in order to drive the sectors and 
provide development support. 


o Skills -inadequate and inappropriate skills are a constraint to growth. There is 
constant engagement with relevant institutions to provide training interventions in 
order to address the issues of inadequate and inappropriate skills in the Municipality. 


^ Governance - across sectors and areas lack of governance systems and capacity are 
impediments to enterprise growth and development. The Municipality has provided 
platforms for engagements and to deliberate issues affecting the sectors, hence the 
establishment of sector forums, such as the agricultural stakeholder's forum, hawker's 
forum and others. 


The economic activity that exists in the Ngqushwa LM is mainly found in the Peddie 
town, similarly most tourism development and facilities are mainly found along the 
coast but with some in the inlands of the Municipality. Peddie is the economic hub in 
the municipality, with economic activities concentrated within the CBD. There is a need 
for the development of more by-laws in the town to try and regulate the trading sector. 
The town is characterised by the retail shop, various shops, and informal traders. 
Other economic activities include a number of agricultural enterprises such as but not 
limited to pineapples, cattle farming, honey production, and some citrus. Some 


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economic activities outside the CBD of the Municipality rely on available natural 
resources being used for various purposes such as:- 

Water 

Land 

Fuel woods; cooking, lighting and heating 
Timber for construction material and wood carving 
Fruit 

Bark; medicinal products, ropes and weaving 
Honey production 

Grass; thatching, grazing and weaving etc. 


This means that trees, tree products and woodlands play an important role for rural 
communities in this area both for survival and to generate a source of income. The 
municipality should devise means of providing support to these initiatives as part of the 
SMME development Strategies. The LED strategy identifies the following economic 
development initiatives for priority spending:- 

Tourism 

Livestock (beef, and small stock ) 

Aquaculture 

Subsistence Farming (community and household food gardens) 

Arts and Crafts 

Economic activities in the coastal zone 
Citrus 

Irrigation schemes 
Poultry (layers and broilers) 

Crop production (maize, wheat, etc.) 


7.2.1 REVISED PROJ ECT PROPOSALS 


These serve as planning documents for project implementation or for further 
feasibility studies. 


The IDP projects identified were screened by the officials, members of the 
community and politicians and are in line with the strategic guidelines, 
objectives and resource frames. 


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Project proposals were mutually agreed upon and reflect the people's priority 
needs. They were planned in a cost effective manner and can be implemented 
in a well co-ordinated manner. 


Detailed project proposals will be drafted in a bid towards implementation 
readiness. These project proposals shall be related to the Methodology 
selected, compliance factors (environmental, poverty alleviation, gender 
equity, and LED potential), feasibility and the alignment with other projects. 


A systematic, criteria-based and transparent process, which can be considered 
as fair by all parties involved for acceptance of the outcomes, will be adhered 
to. 

7.2.2 CONSOLI DATED SECTORAL PROGRAMMES/ SECTOR PLANS. 

7.2.3HOUSING SECTOR PLAN 

The municipality is has adopted the housing sector plan in August 2012. The 
purpose of this document is to analyze the housing situation of the 
municipality. The Housing Sector Plan therefore aims to outline the needs and 
demands for housing, respond to issues underlying provision of housing and 
make proposals for strategic housing interventions. 

The purpose of the Housing Sector Plan is as follows: 


■ To ensure the effective allocation f limited resources to a large pool of 
potential development interventions. 

■ To provide a formal and practical method of prioritising housing projects 
and obtaining political consensus for the sequencing of their 
implementation 


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■ To ensure the more integrated development through bringing together 
cross sectoral role players to coordinate their development 
interventions. 

■ To ensure that there is a definite housing focus for the I DP. 


This document sets the context of the existing situation in Ngqushwa 
Municipality area, the legal and policy setting and the various plans for 
the housing delivery. 


7.2.4 WATER SECTOR PLAN 

It should be noted that Ngqushwa LM is not water service authority, however it has 
developed a Water Sector Plan. The Sector plans provide a detailed description of the 
current situation experienced within the various areas of development. The sector plans 
also contain the priorities, objectives and sectoral programmes that are to be implemented 
by the municipality over a period in this case 2008 - 2012 . 

The Municipality is building capacity to develop and implement the various sector plans as 
well as review existing sector plans. 

The sector plans will assist in managing the implementation of projects as they provide a 
concise summary of all related measures, aspects and activities indicating how the sector 
issues of the analysis is being addressed. 

Ngqushwa has embarked on a process in order to determine whether all the sectoral 
activities are in line with available personnel and financial resources and has considered the 
time and location aspects for project implementation. 


7.2.5 LAND REFORM PLAN 

The policy addresses identified land reform and settlement planning objectives, it provides 
useful information pertaining to Ngqushwa's physical characteristics (soil, geology, 
topography, climate and vegetation), outlines the socio-economic climate of the area 
(poverty indicators, health, education levels of inhabitants), indicates the settlements. 


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current and previous land refornn and settlement projects, provides a process for land 
restitution and land reform as well as settlement models for future proposed settlement 
development nodes. 


7.2.6 ONE 5-YEAR FINANCIAL PLAN 

This serves as a mid-term financial framework for managing municipal revenue collection 
and for expenditure planning. 

Ngqushwa LM shall develop a 5 year financial plan to create the medium term strategic 
financial framework for allocating municipal resources through the municipal budgeting 
process in order to ensure the financial viability and sustainability of the Municipality's 
investments and operations. This is to ensure a close-"planning-budgeting link" 

Ngqushwa LM has developed a Revenue Enhancement Strategy. The Municipality will be a 
financially viable institution. This will be achieved through effective Revenue Management 
and Revenue Enhancement programmes. The Municipality will maximize revenue collection 
and will minimize unnecessary expenditure. I ntergovernmental grants will be used to 
achieve its strategic objectives. 

The Municipality will also initiate a sound investment policy and strategy to ensure that the 
returns on investments are maximized and fully compliant with legislation. 


Ngqushwa LM is committed to establishing a sound financial platform, aims for legislative 
compliance, accurate billing, providing an accurate and clean customer data base and 
billing system, an effective indigent subsidization and support programme and an effective 
credit control and revenue collection system through the provision of LED opportunity for 
people to work, demonstrating an improved local economy. 


Ngqushwa LM has developed a tariff policy, a credit control and a debt collection policy. 

A financial strategy has also been identified as a project to be undertaken by the local 
authority and shall include financial guidelines and procedures, capital and operating 
financing strategies, revenue raising strategies, asset management strategies and cost 
effective strategies. 

The financial plan indicating a revenue collection and expenditure forecast for 5 years with 
appropriate adjustments has been prioritized as a project for implementation. 


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7.2.7 AN INTEGRATED MONITORING & PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 
SYSTEM 

This includes development objectives as well as perfornnance indicators. The development 
of an integrated monitoring and performance management system is an imperative control 
tool to ensure accountability. Refer to Chapter 6 

Ngqushwa LM will develop a monitoring and performance management system as part of 
the implementation plan. This plan will depict the development indicators for the IDP, the 
objectives, output targets for all IDP projects, a time schedule, a list of performance 
indicators, an action plan including resource requirements and responsible actors. 

The Performance Management System is in place. It considers the five Key Performance 
Areas, namely: 

»:« I nfrastructure Development and Service Delivery; 

❖ Municipal Transformation and Organizational Development; 

❖ Local Economic Development 

❖ Municipal Financial Viability and Management 

❖ Good Governance and Public Participation 

Currently the Performance Management System focuses on the Managers of the 
departments through Departmental Service Delivery and Budget I mplementation Plan 
(SDBIP). Section 57 Managers are responsible for the implementation of their respective 
SDBIP and this in turn will give an indication of their performance. 

The institution is in the process of cascading down the PMS to the Middle Managers. This 
therefore means that the SDBIP's will be cascaded down to sections which will be 
monitored by the Section Heads and through the performance of Middle Managers will be 
individually measured. 

In order to ensure that the function receives the attention it deserves the Institution will 
have the services of a full time dedicated individual who will devote his/her time to the 
Integrated Development Plan and Performance Management System. 


7.2.8 WORKPLACE SKI LLS DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


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The municipality has a Workplace Skills Plan in place. The plan for 2010/11 was submitted 
to the Local Government Seta and the WSP for 2011/12 is being prepared for submission 
to the Local Government Seta on 30 June 2011. This plan seeks to identify training needs 
aligned to the scarce skills and IDP implementation processes. These processes are co- 
ordinated by the Skills Development Facilitator working together with the Training 
Committee as stipulated in the Skills Development Act 


EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMME 

The municipality as an employer is committed to look after the physical emotional, 
psychological and social well-being of its employees. To this end an Employee Assistance 
Programme (EAP) is in existence but not well established to provide to employees. Policies 
are also in place or being developed for adoption by the Council. 


7.2.9 INFORMATION AND COMMUNI CATI ON STRATEGY 

The Ngqushwa Local Municipality has a draft I.C.T. Strategy. The objective of the strategy 
is to provide a secure IT infrastructure which delivers appropriate levels of data 
Confidentiality, Integrity and availability and also incorporate effective governance and 
Project Management practices to promote a close alignment between ICT and Municipal 
Departments. The strategy also highlights the key strategic actions to be implemented in 
the next three years 


7 . 2.10 AN INTEGRATED SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 

The Ngqushwa Local Municipality has adopted the framework on the 31^‘ March 2011. On 
the review, the alignment with the Provincial Growth Development Strategy had been 
considered. The framework is currently being revised. 

The Ngqushwa SDF is informed by the Provincial Spatial Development Plan that seeks to 
identify key spatial development issues in the context of identified nodal points and zones. 
These are defined as areas where socio-economic development could be encouraged, as 
opposed to areas where natural environment and cultural heritage conditions require that 
development should be carefully and sensitively managed The Provincial Spatial 
Development Plan has been drafted to apply the DFA General Principles. The general 
principles for land development as continued in chapter 1 of the DFA are as follows:- 


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o Development in formal and informal, existing and new settlements 
o Discourage the illegal occupation of land 

o Encourage efficient and integrated land development by promoting 
integration of social, economic, institutional and physical aspects of land 
development 


Our SDF is also informed by the Land Use Management Guidelines. We are currently having 
a draft Zoning Scheme that is nearly completion.. The specific purpose of the Ngqushwa 
Municipality Land Use Management Guidelines is:- 


o Define the edge of the urban areas 
o Provide the preferred development density guidelines. 
o It should integrate sectoral strategies 
o I dentify special resource 

o Provide guidelines concerning land use and the change of land use as 
well as subdivisions 


I n terms of Sections 26(e) of the Municipal Systems Act of 2000 (Act No 32 of 2000), every 
Municipality is required to formulate a SDF as part of the contents of the IDP. The SDF 
highlights these spatial development challenges experienced by Ngqushwa, namely 
poverty; development integration and co-ordination; rural- urban interface; dispersal and 
fragmentation of settlements; development planning challenges (understaffing); 
underutilization of resources; environmental sustainability versus economic development 
and housing. 

Ngqushwa's Spatial Development Framework (SDF) was developed to create a strategic, 
indicative and flexible forward planning tool to guide planning and decisions on land 
development. The SDF provides for a spatial logic which guides private sector investment 
and at the same time ensures social, economic and environmental sustainability of the 
area. Spatial priorities were identified, and places where public-private partnerships are a 
possibility and where areas of greatest economic potential and need for poverty alleviation 
are highlighted and promoted. 


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The SDF depicts a settlement hierarchy indicating the regional centre, sub regional centre, 
ward centre and village centres. 

It also indicates the settlements development nodes distinguishing between rural 
settlements, urban settlements and coastal zones. A social services development 
framework, a local economic development framework, conservation areas, an 
infrastructural development framework, the distribution of social services (schools, clinics, 
hospitals, sports stadiums), road networks, rivers, villages and power lines are all indicated 
in the maps found in the SDF attached. 

Projects identified in the IDP will be considered against the backdrop of the SDF in order to 
spatially arrange the locations in a logical and practical manner. 

7.2.11 AN INTEGRATED POVERTY REDUCTI ON/ GENDER EQUITY 
PROGRAMME 

This serves as a basis for poverty and gender specific monitoring. This programme has 
been developed to reduce poverty in Ngqushwa and to contribute to gender equity in the 
municipality. Individual project proposals were developed taking poverty and gender 
related problems into account. This tool is seen as mainstreaming rather than side lining 
poverty and gender issues and shows the related efforts of all IDP projects in context. 


7.2.12 AN I NTEGRATED ENVI RONMENTAL PROGRAMME 


Which demonstrates compliance of the IDP with environmental policies, which helps to 
ensure a set of measures which is conclusive with regard to their environmental impact, 
and which serves as a basis for environmental impact monitoring. 

Ngqushwa LM has developed an Integrated Environmental Programme in order to 
contribute to a healthy environment by ensuring that urgent environmental issues are 
adequately addressed and envisaged projects have no negative impact on the natural 
environment. 


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Projects requiring EIA's were also identified and the Municipality will ensure that its 
projects comply with the NEMA principles and the national environmental norms and 
standards. 

Once again it is a tool for mainstreaming the environmental contributions from all IDP 
projects in context. 


7.2.13 AN INTEGRATED LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME 

Local Economic Development Strategy is in place and ready to be adopted by the Council 
on the 30^'^ J une 2010. Which provides an overview on all measures, which are meant to 
promote economic development and employment generation in the municipality. Thereby 
contributing to a consistent and coordinated promotion programme, which can help to 
achieve a significant impact. 

Ngqushwa's will develop an Integrated LED programme which aims to ensure a consistent 
and conducive set of measures to promote viable local economic activities and employment 
generation. 

Projects having economic development implications will be identified as well as projects 
that have economic development objectives as their sole outcome (independent LED 
projects). 

Major constraints for economic development and employment generation will be addressed. 

Major economic development potentials were adequately considered and focus was given to 
this aspect in all projects identified as an initiation drive. 

Economic viability for each LED project will be undertaken during feasibility studies to be 
conducted. 

Measures and approaches which tend to discourage or delay economic investment will be 
considered in depth and solutions and actions to minimize and overcome these obstacles 
will be proposed. Our LED Strategy is at draft stage. 


7.2.14 AN INTEGRATED HIV/ AIDS PROGRAMME; 

The HIV / AIDS Plan are in place. This strategy was adopted in September 2007 and is 
being reviewed in the 2009/2010 financial year. The Strategy captures Nutrition, 
Treatment, Care and support for people living with HIV and AIDS, Care and support. Within 
Ngqushwa Municipality HIV AIDS pandemic is prevalent at the rate approximately 27.1%. 


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7.2.15 


A DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN 


Amathole District Municipality embarked on a process of developing a district disaster 
management plan, with the assistance of suitably qualified service providers in the field, 
and as such all the plan were cascaded to local municipalities. 


7.2.16 REVENUE ENHANCEMENT STRATEGY 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality has made substantial efforts attempting to overcome some of 
their Revenue Enhancement challenges with limited success. This limited success can be 
attributed to a few critical success factors namely skills transfer to municipal practitioners, 
the accurate diagnosis of the real problems and hands on management support to 
implement programs that will have the desired positive impact on municipal sustainability. 
The municipality has developed the enhancement strategy in 2008 and it currently needs a 
reviewal. 

• The municipality currently bills for rates and refuse, water is provided by the district 
municipality and electricity is provided by Eskom. 

• The total debt of Ngqushwa Local Municipality as at the end of September 2008 is 
reflected within the data as R3, 535,919.00, with Hamburg and Peddie having the 
highest debt being 92.2% of the total Debt. 

• The municipality only has 2,573 accounts on the municipal financial system and only 
recovers 2% of billing. IDP suggests that there are 21,888 households in the 
municipality. 

• Municipal debt growing monthly by 98% of monthly billing. 

• Customer data inaccurate. 

• Needs review of municipal indigent register or indigent customers are flagged on the 
municipal financial system. 

• No records of FBS implementation as the catalyst for poverty relief. 

• Municipal data is not accurate making income generation and credit control very 
difficult. 

• Municipal Human Capital is not sufficiently skilled to fully utilize the municipal 
financial system. 

• Municipal Revenue policies have not been reviewed for a number of years. 

Equitable share is used to fund the municipal expenditure budget and is not used to 
provide FBS to the poorest of the poor 


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7.2.22 EDUCATION SECTOR PLAN 


The integrated intervention on education seeks to address systematically entrenched 
inequities that thwart the progression of transformation within the education sector, with 
basic education as the focal point. 

The strategy is being developed with aim of strategically positioning the municipality, as 
the local sphere of government, to play an effective coordinating role across all key sectors 
in addressing the disparities and barriers identified within the sector as they manifest 
themselves within our rural municipality. 

Barriers identified have a structural and socio-economic undercurrent. A strong correlation 
is thus drawn between the nature and extent of socio-economic patens (as demonstrated 
by the 2011 Census Population Statistics, which indicate a 12 000 decline in the total 
population) and the nature and extent of structural disparities within centres of basic 
education. The logical deduction is that the municipality has not provided the infrastructure 
and opportunities that our developing constituents require. 


While education falls outside of municipal functions and powers, as a developmental 
municipality, informed by the National Key Priorities, the Municipal Systems Act as well as 
the RSA Constitution, a diagnostic multi-stakeholder Education Indaba was undertaken in 
August 2013 in order to correctly classify, analyse and rectify the limiting factors within the 
education sector. As a continuation of the process, a multi-pronged approach premised on 
out-reach campaigns, Career Exhibitions and Anti-Drug Abuse campaigns continue to 
unfold. 

Immediate goals of the plan are: 

> Facilitation of access to well-resourced centres of basic and higher education 
{Everyone has a right to a basic education..and to further education which the 
state, through reasonable measures, must make progressively available and 
accessible-Bill of Rights} 

> Facilitation of access to quality infrastructure in both basic and higher centres of 
learning. 


> Facilitation of the mitigation of poverty, unemployment and other adverse social 
dynamics, as limiting factors to access to educational opportunities for NLM 
constituents. 


Policies and By-Laws 

CORPORATE SERVICES SECTOR PLANS 


Name 

Responsible Person 

Human Resources Strategy 

H.R. Manager 

Employment Equity Plan 

H.R. Manager 

File Plan 

Administration 


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Manager 

Infornnation Technology 
Strategy 

1 .T. Manager 


POLICIES 


Department 

POLICY TITLE 

DATE 

POLICY 

APPROVED 

APPROVED 

BUT 

REQUIRE 

REVIEW 

ADOPTION 


Community bursary policy 

30-11-2009 


Yes 


Rural community halls 





Policy on recruitment and selection 

29-08-2012 




Induction for new employees 

27-05-2013 




Retention Policy 

27-05-2013 




Employee Sport Policy 

27-05-2013 




Attendance & punctuality Policy 

27-02013 




Termination Policy 

New 




Relocation policy 

New 




Other allowances policy 

New 




Policy Student trainees on rare skills 

30-06-2012 


Yes 


Policy on Mayoral vehicle 

29-08-2012 


Yes 


Records management 

30-11-2011 


Yes 


Fleet management policy 





Policy on Career succession 

30-11- 2009 


Yes 

Corporates 

Policy on Confidential management 

30 -11- 2009 


Yes 

Services 

(35) 

Policy on Dress code 

29-08-2012 


Yes 


Policy on Employee study 

assistance 

30-06-2009 

Yes 

Yes 


Policy Promotion and transfer 

30-06-2012 

Yes 

Yes 


Policy Sexual and other harassment 

30-06-2012 


Yes 


Training policy 

30-06-2012 


Yes 


PolicyActing and acting allowance 

27-05-2013 


Yes 


Bereavement policy 

29-08-2012 


Yes 


Policy on Code of conduct 

30-11-2009 




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Overtime policy 

2011 



Subsistence and travel 

17-05-2009 


Yes 

Policy Employee assistance 

programme 

29-08-2012 



Leave policy 

29-08-2012 


Yes 

Policy on staff HIV/AIDS 

29-08-2012 


Yes 

Smoking control policy 

29-08-2012 


Yes 

Internship policy 

29-08-2012 


Yes 

Policy Substance abuse 

29-08-2012 


Yes 

Occupational Health & Safety 

30-11-2011 



Inclement weather policy 

29-08-2012 


Yes 

Hall Hiring And Parks Policy 

NEW 



BUDGET AND 
TREASURY OFFICE 
(13) 

Policy on Anti -corruption 




Policy on Bad debt write off 

27/05/2013 

Yes 

Adopted 

Banking policy 

27/05/2013 

No 

AdOpted 

Budget policy 

27/05/2013 



Indigent policy 

27/05/2013 

Yes 

Adopted 

Investment policy 




Credit control policy 

27/05/2013 

Yes 

Adopted 

Rates policy 

27/05/2013 

Yes 

Adopted 

Tarrif policy 

27/05/2013 



Asset management policy 




Supply chain management policy 




Reserves/lnvestment Policy 

NEW 



Property rates and tarrif by law 

NEW 



Community 

Services 

(2) 

Tractor Policy 

NEW 


YES 

EPWP Policy 

NEW 



OFFICE OF 
MUNICIPAL 
MANAGER 
(8) 

Risk management policy 

NEW 



Communication policy 




SPU Policy 




Fraud and prevention policy 

27-28 May 2013 



PMS Framework 

August 2012 


YES 

ICT Policy 

NEW 



Funding policy 

NEW 



Customer Care Policy 

NEW 




MIG Policy 

NEW 




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TECHNICAL 

SERVICES 

(3) 


Electricity maintenance Policy 


Building control policy 


NEW 


NEW 



IDP 

Chapter Six 


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Financial Pian 


Chapter Six: Financial Plan 


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Chapter Seven 

Performance Management 

System 


Chapter Seven: Performance 
Management System 


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1 . 


INTRODUCTION 


This document constitutes a framework for Ngqushwa Municipality's Performance 
Management System. 

It arises out of a revision of Ngqushwa's previous performance management framework 
completed in 2003. 

The Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations (2001) stipulate that "a 
municipality's performance management-system entails a framework that describes and 
represents how the municipality's cycle and processes of performance planning, 
monitoring, measurement, review, reporting and improvement will be conducted, organized 
and managed, including determining the roles of the different role-players". This document 
is in line with this requirement 

The framework acts as a municipal policy document that defines its performance 
management system. It constitutes council policy with regards to: 

• The requirements that a PMS for Ngqushwa will need to fulfil, 

• The principles that will inform its development and application, 

• A model that describes what areas of performance will be managed, in Ngqushwa 
Municipality 

• What processes will be followed in managing performance 

• What institutional arrangements are necessary for this 

• Who will take responsibility for parts of the system 

• How this links to S57 Performance agreements 

• How S57 Managers will have their performance managed 

• An action plan for the development and implementation of the system 

In other words the framework is a documented record of the municipality's performance 
management system to be implemented. This document was workshoped with municipal 
stakeholders on 7'^'^ August 2013 and amended accordingly. 

2. POLICY AND LEGAL CONTEXT FOR NGOUSHWA PMS 

1.1 The White Paper on Local Government (1998) 

The White Paper on Local Government (1998) suggested that local government should 
introduce the idea of performance management systems. 


The white paper acknowledges that, "involving communities in developing some municipal 
key performance indicators increases the accountability of the municipality. Some 
communities may prioritise the amount of time it takes a municipality to answer a query, 
others will prioritise the cleanliness of an area or the provision of water to a certain number 
of households. Whatever the priorities, by involving communities in setting key 
performance indicators and reporting back to communities on performance, accountability 
is increased, and public trust in the local government system enhanced" (The White Paper 
on Local Government, 1998). 


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1.2 Batho Pele (1998) 


The White Paper on Transfornning Public Service Delivery (Batho Pele) puts forward eight 
principles for good public service. Our municipality is duty bound to uphold these 
principles: 

Consultation: 

Communities should be consulted about the level and quality of public service they receive, 
and, where possible, should be given a choice about the services which are provided. 

Service standards: 

Communities should know what standard of service to expect. 

Access: 

All communities should have equal access to the services to which they are entitled. 
Courtesy: 

Communities should be treated with courtesy and consideration. 

I nformation: 

Communities should be given full and accurate information about the public services they 
are entitled to receive. 

Openness and transparency: 

Communities should know how departments are run, how resources are spent, and who is 
in charge of particular services. 

Redress: 

If the promised standard of service is not delivered, communities should be offered an 
apology, a full explanation and a speedy and effective remedy; and when complaints are 
made communities should receive a sympathetic, positive response. 

Value-for-money: 

Public services should be provided economically and efficiently in order to give communities 
the best possible value-for-money. 

Importantly, the Batho Pele White Paper notes that the development of a service-oriented 
culture requires the active participation of the wider community. Municipalities need 
constant feedback from service-users if they are to improve their operations. Local partners 
can be mobilized to assist in building a service culture. "For example, local businesses or 
non-governmental organisations may assist with funding a helpline, providing information 
about specific services, identifying service gaps or conducting a customer survey" - The 
White Paper on Local Government (1998). 

1.3 The Municipal Systems Act (2000) 

The Municipal Systems Act (2000) enforces the idea of local government PMS and requires 
all municipalities to: 


• Develop a performance management system 

• Set targets, monitor and review performance based on indicators linked to their IDP 

• Publish an annual report on performance for the councillors, staff, the public and other 
spheres of government 


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• Incorporate and report on a set of general indicators prescribed nationally by the 
minister responsible for local government 

• Conduct an internal audit on performance before tabling the report. 

• Have their annual performance report audited by the Auditor-General 

• Involve the community in setting indicators and targets and reviewing municipal 
performance 

The Department of Provincial and Local Government has published national guidelines on 
performance management systems. 

1.4 Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations (2001) 

The Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations set out in detail 
requirements for municipal PM systems. However the regulations do not sufficiently 
constitute a framework that fully proposes how the system will work. Each component of 
the proposed framework in this document is strongly informed by the regulations. The 
regulations have been attached as Appendix VI. 

1.5 Municipal Finance Management Act (2003) 

The Municipal Finance Management Act states requirements for a municipality to include its 
annual municipal performance report with its financial statements and other requirements 
in constituting its annual report. This must be dealt with by the municipal council within 9 
months of the end of the municipal financial year. 

1.6 Municipal Performance Management Regulations (2006) 

The Local Government Municipal Performance Regulations for municipal managers and 
managers directly accountable to municipal managers (Government Gazette No. 29089, 1 
August 2006), sets out how the performance of Section 57 staff will be uniformly directed, 
monitored and improved. The regulations address both the employment contract and 
performance agreement of municipal managers and managers directly accountable to 
municipal managers. It further provides a methodology for the performance management 
system as well as criteria for performance bonus payments. The regulations also provide an 
approach for addressing under-performance, should this occur. The regulations will be 
discussed in greater detail in a later section of this framework document. 

3. OBJECTIVES OF PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 

Beyond the fulfilling of legislative requirements, Ngqushwa Municipality requires a 
performance management system that will be constituted as the primary mechanism to 
plan for performance management, monitor, review and improve the implementation of the 
municipality's I DP. This will have to be fulfilled by ensuring that we: 

3 . 1 . Facilitate increased accountability 

The performance management system should provide a mechanism for ensuring increased 
accountability between 

■ The communities of Ngqushwa and the municipal council, 

■ The political and administrative components of the municipality, 

■ Each department and the office of the municipal manager. 


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3 . 2 . Facilitate learning and improvennent 

While ensuring that accountability is maxinnised, the performance management system 
must also provide a mechanism for learning and improvement. It should allow for the 
municipality to know which approaches are having the desired impact, and enable the 
municipality to improve delivery. It should form the basis for monitoring, evaluation and 
improving IDP implementation. 

3 . 3 . Provide early warning signals 

The performance management system should provide managers, the Municipal Manager, 
Portfolio Committees and the Executive Committee with diagnostic signal of the potential 
risks that are likely to affect the realisation of full IDP implementation. It is important that 
the system ensure decision-makers are timeously informed of risks, so that they can 
facilitate intervention, where it is necessary and possible to do so. 

3 . 4 . Facilitate decision-making 

The performance management system should provide appropriate management 
information that will allow efficient, effective and informed decision-making, particularly in 
so far as indicating where the allocation of limited resources should be prioritised. 

The functions listed above are not exhaustive, but summarise the intended benefits of the 
performance management system to be developed and implemented. These intended 
functions should be used to evaluate the performance management system, periodically. 

4. PRINCIPLES GOVERNING PM 

The following principles are proposed to inform and guide the development and 
implementation of the Ngqushwa performance management system: 

4.1 Simplicity 

The system must be a simple user-friendly system that enables the municipality to operate 
it within its existing capacity of its financial, human resources and information management 
system. 

4.2 Politically driven 

Legislation clearly tasks the municipal council and mayor as the owner of the performance 
management system. The Executive MUST drive both the implementation and 
improvement of the system. 

Legislation allows for the delegation of this responsibility or aspects of it to the municipal 
manager or other appropriate structure as the Executive may deem fit. 

4.3 Incremental implementation 

It is important that while a holistic performance management system is being developed, 
the municipality should adopt a phased approach to implementation, dependent on the 
existing capacity and resources within the municipality. 

It is also important to note that municipal performance management is a new approach to 
local government functioning and therefore requires adequate time to be given to the 
organization's process of change. The performance management system will not be perfect 
from the start it should be constantly improved based on its workability. 


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4.4 Transparency and accountability 

Members of the organisation whose performance will be monitored and measured must 
ensure that the process of managing performance is inclusive open and transparent. This 
can only be achieved by taking effective participation in the design and implementation of 
the system within the municipality. 

Again, the process must involve and empower communities so that they are able to 
understand how the municipality and its departments are run, how resources are spent, 
and who is in charge of particular services. Similarly, all information on the performance of 
departments should be available for other managers, employees, the public and specific 
interest groups. 

4.5 Integration 

The performance management system should be integrated into other management 
processes in the municipality, such that it becomes a tool for more efficient and effective 
management rather than an additional reporting burden. It should be seen as a central tool 
to the ongoing management functions. 

4.6 Objectivity 

Performance management must be founded on objectivity and credibility. Both the 
processes of managing performance and the information on which it relies need to be 
objective and credible. Sources of data for measuring indicators should be scrutinized to 
enhance credibility of information and therefore objective decision-making. 


5. WHAT DO WE MONITOR AND REVIEW? 

I nternational experience in both the private and public sectors has shown that traditional 
approaches to measuring performance that have been heavily reliant on only financial 
measures are severely lacking. 

It has become well accepted that in order to assess an organisation's performance, a 
balanced view is required, incorporating a multi-perspective assessment of how the 
organisation is performing as seen by differing categories of stakeholders. To ensure this 
balanced multi-perspective examination of Ngqushwa's performance, a model could be 
adopted to guide performance management in the entire municipal organisation. 

5 . 1 . What is a model? 

A model for performance management is a conceptual framework that provides guidance 
as to what aspects of the municipality's performance should be measured and managed. 

5 . 2 . Why do we need a model? 

Models have proved useful in performance management for the following reasons. They 
provide: 

5 . 2 . 1 . BALANCE 

A good model will prompt the organisation to take a balanced view in terms of how it 
measures and manages its performance. It should prevent bias by ensuring that 
performance measurement does not rely heavily on one facet of performance (ie. financial 
viability), but rather encapsulates a multi-perspective holistic assessment of the 
municipality's performance. 


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5 . 2 . 2 . SIMPLICITY 

A good model should organise simply, what would otherwise be a long list of indicators 
attempting to comprehensively cover performance, into a set of categories sufficiently 
covering all key areas of performance. Models differ most significantly in what they assert 
are the key aspects of performance. 

5 . 2 . 3 . MAPPING OF I NTER-RELATI ONSHI PS 

A good model will map out the inter-relationships between different areas of performance. 
These inter-relationships relate to the extent to which poor performance in one category 
would lead to poor performance in other related areas and the converse. These inter- 
relationships help in both the planning stage and the review stage, particularly in the 
diagnosis of causes of poor performance. 

5 . 2 . 4 . ALIGNMENT TO THE INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLANNING (IDP) 
METHODOLOGY 

A good model for a municipality in South Africa will align the processes of performance 
management to the IDP processes of the municipality. It will ensure that IDP is translated 
into performance plans that will be monitored and reviewed. The categories of key 
performance areas provided by a model should relate directly to the identified priority 
areas of the I DP. 

5 . 3 . The Revised Municipal Scorecard Model 

It is recommended that the Ngqushwa municipal council make use of the Municipal 
Scorecard (Revised 2006) as their model for performance. This model is useful for the 
following reasons, it is 

■ Tightly aligned to the strategic planning and IDP processes of the municipality 

■ Directly relevant to the notion of developmental local government 

■ A balanced view of performance based on municipal inputs, outputs, outcomes and 
process 

■ A simple portrayal of municipal performance, where inter-relationships can be mapped 
(municipal-wide, sectoral/departmental and unit/programme levels) 

■ Compliant with the requirements of the Municipal Systems act (2002) and its 
subsequent Regulations (2001) 

■ It aligns to 5 Key Performance Areas for Local Government used in the 

■ Regulations 

■ Five Year Local Government Strategic Agenda 

■ Vuna Awards for Performance Excellence 


The 5 Key Performance Areas from the Five Year local Government Strategic Agenda are 

1. Municipal Transformation & Organisational Development 

2. I nfrastructure development and Service Delivery 

3. Local Economic Development 

4. Municipal Financial Viability & Management 

5. Good Governance & Public Participation 


The Municipal Scorecard Model is based on five key perspectives, outlined in figure-1 
below. 


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Figure 2: Structure of the Municipal Scorecard 


Using the Municipal Scorecard for 

Strategic Planning 



pdgs^ai 


Source : Paimer Development Group (2006^ 


2 


5.3.1. THE MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE 

In this perspective, the municipality will need to assess whether the desired development 
impact in the municipal area is being achieved. It incorporates social, environmental and 
economic development aspects. This perspective will constitute the development priorities 
for the municipal area and indicators that tell us whether the desired development 
outcomes are being achieved. It will be difficult to isolate development outcomes for which 
the municipality is solely accountable. It is expected that the development priorities and 
indicators, will often lie within the shared accountability of the municipality, other spheres 
of government and civil society. The measurement of developmental outcomes in the 
municipal area will be useful in telling us whether our policies and strategies are having the 
desired development impact. 


5.3.2. THE SERVICE DELIVERY PERSPECTIVE 

This perspective should tell us how a municipality is performing with respect to the delivery 
of services and products. This relates to the output of the municipality as a whole. 

5.3.3. THE INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE 

This perspective should tell us how a municipality is performing with respect to the 
management of its resources: 

• Human Resources 

• I nformation 


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• Organizational I nfrastructure 

• Asset managennent 

This relates to the inputs of the municipality as a whole. 

5.4. THE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVE 

This perspective tells us how a municipality is performing with respect to its financial 
management 

• Operating income 

• Operating expenditure 

• Financing infrastructure investment 

• Capital expenditure 

5.4.1. GOVERNANCE PROCESS PERSPECTIVE: 

This perspective should tell us how a municipality is performing with respect to its 
engagement and relationship with its stakeholders in the process of governance. This 
perspective should include, amongst others: 

• Public participation, including the functionality and impact of ward committees 

• Functionality and impact of municipal governance structures (council structures 
including the offices of the speaker, and portfolio committees and executive) 

• Access to information 

• I ntergovernmental relations 

This relates to the governance processes of the municipality as a whole. 

5.5. Organisational Scorecards at different levels 

It is proposed that there be two levels of scorecards for Ngqushwa as depicted in figure-2 
that follows. 

Figure 3: Two levels of scorecards 


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Finance 



nstitutiona 

Transform 



Service 

Delivery 



Development 


Stakeholder Relations 


^Audience: 
Management 
Team and the 
Executive 


5 . 5 . 1 . THE STRATEGIC SCORECARD 

The strategic scorecard will provide an overall picture of performance for the municipality 
as a whole, reflecting performance on the strategic priorities set in the IDP. 

The development perspective of this scorecard will therefore necessitate that information 
be collected from other development role players in the municipal area for reporting 
purposes. These include other spheres of government, business formations and civil society 
organisations. 

The Municipal Manager and HODs will use it, after review, as a basis for reporting to the 
Executive Committee, Council and the public. It is proposed that it be reported to the 
Executive Committee quarterly, to Council bi-annually and the Public annually for review. 

It must be noted that the Municipal Manager is primarily responsible for performance on 
the Strategic Scorecard. As such, the strategic scorecard is closely linked and forms the 
largest component of how the municipal managers performance will be appraised. This is 
dealt with in more detail in the section on employee performance. 

5 . 5 . 2 . SDBIP SCORECARDS 

The SDBIP scorecards will capture the performance of each municipal department. Unlike 
the strategic scorecard, which reflects on the strategic priorities of the municipality, a 
service scorecard will provide a comprehensive picture of the performance of that 
department. It will consist of objectives, indicators and targets derived from the service 
plan and service strategies. 


It is crucial to ensure that the SDBIP scorecards do not duplicate current reporting, but 
rather be integrated as a core component of the municipality's vertical reporting system. It 
should simplify all regular reporting from departments to the municipal manager and 
portfolio committees. 


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SDBI P Scorecards will be comprised of the following components: 

• A development perspective for departmental outcomes, which set out the 
developmental outcomes that the service is to impact on - the development 
perspective of this scorecard will seek to assess the extent to which the strategies 
that are driven by the department are contributing towards the intended 
developments in the municipal area 

• Service Deliverables, which set out the products and services that the department 
will deliver. This perspective will include service delivery targets and performance 
indicators for each quarter. 

• I nstitutional Transformation perspective, which sets out how the department will 
manage and develop its Human resources, Information and Organisational 
I nfrastructure 

• Financial Management Perspective will include 

o projections of revenue to be collected by source 

o projections of operational and capital expenditure by vote 

Performance reporting on this section of the scorecard will be in terms of actual 
against projections 

• Stakeholder Relations, which sets out how the department will improve its 
relationship with its key stakeholders 


Therefore in addition to the requirements of the MFMA and the National Treasury 
Guidelines for SDBIPs, the SDBIP scorecard approach thus provides an additional 
opportunity to set objectives, indicators, and targets for, as well as report against: 

• Service Outcomes 

• I nstitutional Transformation Issues 

• Stakeholder Relations 


Performance in the form of a SDBIP scorecard will be reported to the Municipal Manager 
and relevant portfolio committee for review. It is suggested that this happen quarterly. 


It must be noted that the relevant S57 Manager is primarily responsible for performance on 
the SDBIP Scorecard. As such, the SDBIP scorecard is closely linked and forms the largest 
component of how the S57 manager's performance will be appraised. This is dealt with in 
more detail in the section on employee performance. 

5.6 Scorecard concepts 

The strategic and SDBIP scorecards should be presented in a consistent format so that they 
are easy to use and understand. Proposed formats are attached as appendix I and II. 
Several concepts that are commonly used in the scorecard concept are defined below: 


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Objectives: are statements (often drawn from the IDP) about what a service wants to 
achieve. 


I ndicators: are variables (qualitative or quantitative) that tell us whether we are making 
progress towards achieving our objectives. 


A baseline measure: is the value (or status quo) of the indicator before the start of the 
programme or prior to the period over which performance is to be monitored and reviewed. 
For the purpose of standardising the setting of baselines and for the sake of clarity, the 
following descriptions will be used: 

If the indicator is measurable on an annual basis, the baseline will be its measure 
in the last financial year. 

- The baseline for annual targets that are incrementally measurable per quarter or 
per month will be the measure at the end of the last financial year but the targets 
can be set incrementally 

- The baseline for quarterly targets that are not incrementally contributing to an 
annual target will be the indicator's measure in the last quarter it was measured 
unless by its nature it is seasonally variable in which case it will be an average of 
the last four quarterly measures 

- The baseline for monthly targets, that are not incrementally contributing to a 
quarterly or annual target, will be its measure in the last month it was measured 
unless by its nature it varies monthly in which case it will be an average of the 
last three monthly measurements 


A target: is the value (or desired state of progress) of the indicator that is intended to be 
achieved by a specified time period. 


The measurement source and frequency. should indicate where the data for measuring 
will emanate from, and how frequently the indicator will be measured and reported. 
This information is crucial for the auditing process. 

i ndicator custodian: refers to the person that takes responsibility for the monitoring of 
change in the indicator and report on it. 


The performance management plan for Ngqushwa has suggested various indicators for the 
goals that are set in the IDP. These indicators including those that will be further developed 
for SDBIP scorecards should be assessed against the following criteria. 


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5 . 6 . Criteria for Setting Good Indicators 

5 . 6 . 1 . FOCUSED AND SPECIFIC 

Indicators should be clearly focused and stated unambiguously. 

5 . 6 . 2 . MEASURABLE 

An indicator should by definition contain a unit of measurement. 

5 . 6 . 3 . VALID AND RELEVANT 

Validity is the degree to which an indicator measures what is intended to be measured. 
This correlates strongly to the relevance of the indicator to the objective being measured. 
It is also important that the whole set of indicators chosen should be contextually relevant 
to the Ngqushwa municipal and South African contexts. 

5 . 6 . 4 . RELIABLE 

Reliability is the degree to which repeated measures, under exactly the same set of 
conditions will produce the same result. This is particularly relevant to those indicators that 
use ratios (formulas) and figures. 

5 . 6 . 5 . SIMPLE 

Good indicators will be simple, easy to communicate such that their relevance is apparent. 

5 . 6 . 6 . MINIMISE PERVERSE CONSEQUENCES 

Poorly chosen indicators, while nobly intended can have perverse consequences in the 
behaviours it incentivises. Chosen indicators should ensure that the performance 
behaviours likely to emerge from its pursuance are those that are intended to contribute to 
the objectives. 

5 . 6 . 7 . DATA AVAILABILITY 

Good indicators will also rely on data that is, or intended to be, available on a regular basis. 

5 . 7 . Core Local Government Indicators 
5 . 7 . 1 . NATIONAL INDICATORS 

While there is no legal requirement to incorporate a national set of indicators other than 
that prescribed by the Minister, it is recommendable that Ngqushwa municipality 
incorporate a core set of local government indicators into its performance management 
system. The indicators for the Vuna Awards for Municipal Performance Excellence are 
suggested in this regard for the following reasons: 

• It will ensure that the municipality is tracking its performance in line with national 
priorities, at least the indicators that are valued nationally 

• It will ensure that the municipality has the performance information on hand to enter 
the Vuna Awards 

It will allow benchmarking and comparison with other municipalities who are also using the 
same set of indicators. 


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A core set of Local Government indicators 



Figure 4: Local Government I ndicators 


The schematic above suggest an approach to incorporating a core set of LG indicators such 
as those used in the Vuna Awards into a municipal set of indicators. It notes that they need 
to be complemented for local use with IDP indicators and SDBIP indicators. Other sets of 
indicators deemed to be important, in each sector, such as the water sector benchmarking 
indicators can be included. 


There is also a national initiative at dplg on establishing a local government M&E system, 
that intends to include a core set of local government indicators. If these differ from the 
Vuna indicators, and are available in time, they may be included as part of the 
municipality's scorecard. 


5.7.2. DISTRICT INDICATORS 

In order to align with a district PMS system, the municipality may also be required to 
include a core set of indicators required by the district PMS. 

6. THE PROCESS OF MANAGI NG PERFORMANCE 

The process of performance management is central to modern notions of management i.e. 
it is inseparable from the things that a manager must do. It is important that performance 
management is mainstreamed in municipalities as an approach to daily management. 


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Figure 5: Performance Management as an Approach to Management 

The annual process of managing the performance of the Ngqushwa Municipality will involve 
the following components: 

• Co-ordination 

• Performance Planning 

• Performance Measurement, Analysis 

• Performance Reviews & Reporting 

• Performance Auditing 

For each of these components, this chapter sets out the role stakeholders in the 
performance management system will play and how these components are to happen. 

6.1. Co-ordination 

Oversight over co-ordination of the implementation of the planning, measurement, 
reporting and review process is delegated to a Performance Management Team made up 
of: 

• Municipal Manager 

• I DP/PMS Manager 

• All Heads of Departments 

• The Mayor and two other councillors who are members of the Executive Committee 
appointed by the Executive Committee 

The responsibility for performance management and the IDP are to be located together, in 
an IDP/PM Office. Furthermore, these functions are to be located in the office of the 
Municipal Manager and not in any specific line department. 


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6 . 2 . Performance Planning 

The IDP and the Municipal Service Delivery and Budget I mplementation Plans constitute 
the planning components for performance management. Through the IDP review process 
the strategic objectives, strategies and the strategic scorecard will be finalised. The next 
step is to develop Departmental scorecards that should support the realisation of the 
objectives and targets set in the strategic scorecard. These Departmental Scorecards are 
also known as Service Delivery and Budget I mplementation Plans. With these in place, the 
Municipality is now on track to implement and monitor the implementation of the I DP. 

The following diagram shows the link between the IDP objectives and strategies and the 
SDBI P scorecard 

Figure 6: Municipal planning 



pd qsjB a 


6 . 3 . Measurement and Analysis 

Measurement is the act of collecting data on identified performance indicators while 
analysis is the act of interpreting the meaning of such data in terms of performance. 

For each Municipal Scorecard indicator, a relevant custodian has to be designated. The 
custodian will not necessarily be accountable for performance he/she will be responsible for 
conducting measurements of the applicable indicators, analysing and reporting these for 
reviews. 

Analysis requires that current performance be compared with targets, past performance 
and possibly the performance of other municipalities, where data is available, to determine 
whether or not performance is poor. It should provide reasons for performance levels and 
suggest corrective action where necessary. 

There may be indicators that would require data gathering on municipal-wide outcome 
indicators and satisfaction surveys. This may need to be co-ordinated centrally instead of 
each department doing its own. The Office of the Municipal Manager will be responsible for 
this. 

The Office of the Municipal Manager may also undertake the following annual surveys to 
provide data for indicators organisationally: 

• An annual citizen satisfaction survey conducted for households and business in the 
Ngqushwa Municipality area. 


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• An employee satisfaction survey that is conducted internally. 

Reviews will be undertaken by the Municipal Manager, a committee of Councillors delegated 
a responsibility for performance management, and Council. Prior to reviews taking place, 
performance reporting will need to be tracked and co-ordinated. The Municipal Manager's 
Office will be responsible for this process. 

The Municipal Manager's Office will provide an overall analysis of municipal performance, 
for quarterly and annual reviews. Such an analysis will aim to pick up trends in 
performance over time and over all departments. 

6.4. Performance Reporting & Reviews 

The figure below aims to provide a picture of the annual process of reporting and reviews. 

Figure 7: The annual process of reporting and review 




Evaluation by 
Management 
Team 

and Portfolk> 
Committees 
Quarterly 


Departmental 

Evaluatibn 

(Moidhly) 


Once the system is embedded, a web-based reporting system can significantly enhance the 
reporting process and simplify it. The system can exist outside a software solution. 
However such a solution needs to be led by the system and not constrain it. A software 
solution for this methodology has recently been developed and is available. It must 
however be noted that a software system will only enhance the reporting processes within 
the municipality and potentially improve review processes. Most aspects of performance 
management still need human beings. 


6.4.1. DEPARTMENTAL REVIEWS 

It is intended that departments review their performance at least monthly, using their 
SDBIP scorecards. Decision-makers should be immediately warned of any emerging failures 
to service delivery such that they can intervene if necessary. 

Departments should use these reviews as an opportunity for reflection on their goals and 
programmes and whether these are being achieved. Minutes of these reviews should be 
forwarded to the performance management team. Changes in indicators and targets may 


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be proposed at this meeting but can only be approved by the relevant portfolio committee, 
in consultation with the IDP/PM Manager. 

6 . 4 . 2 . MANAGEMENTTEAM REVIEWS 

Departments will then need to report on their performance in the service scorecard format 
to the municipal manager and the heads of departments. Additional indicators that occur in 
the strategic scorecard will also be reviewed. The formulation of the strategic scorecard and 
the process of review will be co-ordinated by the performance management team. 

The management team will need to reflect on whether targets are being achieved, what are 
the reasons for targets not being achieved where applicable and corrective action that may 
be necessary. Where targets need to be changed, the management team can endorse 
these, for approval by the portfolio committee. The management team can delegate tasks 
to the performance management team in developing an analysis of performance prior to 
management team reviews. These reviews should at least take place quarterly. 

6 . 4 . 3 . PORTFOLI O COMMITTEE REVI EWS 

Each portfolio committee will be required to review the performance of their respective 
departments against their service scorecard, at least quarterly. The portfolio committee 
should appraise the performance of the service against committed targets. Where targets 
are not being met, portfolio committees should ensure that the reasons for poor 
performance are satisfactory and sufficient, and the corrective strategies proposed are 
sufficient to address the reasons for poor performance. Changes in indicators and targets 
that do not appear in the strategic scorecard may be proposed to and can only be approved 
by the relevant portfolio committee, in consultation with the IDP/PMS Manager. Changes in 
indicators and targets that fall within the strategic scorecard will need to be approved by 
the Executive Committee. 

6 . 4 . 4 . EXECUTI VE COMMITTEE REVI EWS 

On a quarterly basis, the Executive Committee should engage in an intensive review of 
municipal performance against both the SDBIP scorecards and the strategic scorecard, as 
reported by the municipal manager. 

Many of the indicators in the strategic scorecard will only be measurable on an annual 
basis. The quarterly reviews should thus culminate in a comprehensive annual review of 
performance in terms of both scorecards. 

The review should reflect on the performance of services and the strategic scorecard. The 
Executive Committee will need to ensure that targets committed to in the strategic 
scorecard are being met, where they are not, that satisfactory and sufficient reasons are 
provided and that the corrective action being proposed is sufficient to address the reasons 
for poor performance. 

The review should also focus on reviewing the systematic compliance to the performance 
management system, by departments, portfolio committees and the Municipal Manager. 


6 . 4 . 5 . PERFORMANCE AUDIT COMMITTEE REVIEWS 

On a quarterly basis, the Performance Audit Committee will review the departmental and 
municipal performance using both the SDBIP and Organisational Scorecards respectively. 
Other function that is linked to the Performance Audit committee is the auditing and 
assurance guarantee on the assessment and processes of the framework and the system. 
This is further detailed in section dealing with Auditing and Ouality Control. 

The quarterly report will be submitted to the Executive Committee and biannually to 
council. 

The Performance Audit Committee will need to reflect on whether targets are being 
achieved, what are the reasons for targets not being achieved where applicable and 


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corrective action that may be necessary. Furthermore, they will verify and give assurance 
to the process of reviews undertaken by the panels and recommendation. 

Where targets need to be changed, a recommendation will be submitted to the Executive 
Committee for approval. 

6.4.6. COUNCI L REVI EWS 

At least twice annually, the council will be required to review municipal performance. It is 
proposed that this reporting take place using the strategic scorecard in an annual report. 
The Municipal Systems Act requires that the annual report should at least constitute a 
performance report (the strategic scorecard), financial statements and an audit report. 

6.4.7. PUBLIC REVIEWS 

The Municipal Systems Act requires the public to be given the opportunity to review 
municipal performance. 

It is proposed that in addition to the annual report mentioned above, a user-friendly 
community's report should be produced for public consumption. The communities' report 
should be a simple, easily readable and attractive document that translates the strategic 
scorecard for public consumption. 

It is also proposed that a public campaign be annually embarked on to involve communities 
in the review of municipal performance. Such a campaign could involve the following 
methodologies: 

• Ward committees be reported to and submit their review of the municipality to council. 
The performance management team should be used to summarise this input. 

• Various forms of media including radio, newspapers and billboards can be used to 
convey the communities' report. The public should be invited to submit comment via 
telephone, fax, email and public hearings to be held in a variety of locations. 

• The public reviews should be concluded by a review by the IDP Representative Forum. 

6.4.8. REPORTING TO OTHER SPHERES AND AGENCIES OF GOVERNMENT 
Auditor General and MEC 

The Systems Act requires the municipal manager to give written notice of meetings, in 
which the municipality's the annual report, is tabled or discussed by the Council, to the 
Auditor-General and the MEC for local government. The Municipal Manager must also 
submit copies of the minutes of these meetings to the Auditor-General and the MEC for 
local government in the province. Representatives of the Auditor-General and the MEC for 
local government in the province are entitled to attend and to speak at such meetings. A 
copy of the report must be submitted to the MEC for local government in the province and 
the Auditor-General. 


Table 1: Reporting and Reviews 


Reporting 

Structure 

Reviewing 

structure 

Report 

When 

Departments 

Management 

Team 

SDBI P Scorecard 

Quarterly 

Departments 

Portfolio 

SDBI P Scorecard 

Quarterly 


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Committee 



Portfolio Committee 

Executive 

Committee 

High Level 

Summary 

Quarterly 

Management Team 

Executive 

Committee 

Strategic 

Scorecard 

Quarterly 

Executive 

Committee 

Council 

Strategic 

Scorecard 

Twice-yearly 

Council 

Public (IDP 

Forum) 

Citizen's report 

Annually 

Council 

Province 

Annual Report 

Annually 


6 . 5 . Critical dates and tinnelines 

The municipality commits to influencing its partners and other spheres of government to 
work towards an annual cycle of municipal performance management with agreed critical 
dates and timelines. In such a cycle the following dates will be dates by which to complete 
key activities. 


Activity 

Compietion date 

1. Development of District Strategic 
Scorecard (as part District IDP process) 

31 March 

2. Development of Ngqushwa municipal 
scorecard (as part of the IDP process) 

30 April 

3. Finalisation of SDBPIs 

30 J une 

4. Completion of the first quarter review 

15 October 

5. Completion of the midyear/ second 
quarter review 

15 J anuary 

6. Completion of the third quarter review 

15 April 

7. Completion of the annual review 

15 July 

8. Submission of inputs to the ADM District 
Strategic scorecard 

30 July 

9. Participation in the District Strategic 
scorecard review as part of the IDP 
process 

1 September 


6 . 6 . Auditing and Quality Control 

All auditing should comply with Section 14 of the Municipal Planning and Performance 
Management Regulations (2001). Auditing of performance reports must be conducted by 
the internal audit structure prior to submission to the municipality's external audit 
committee and auditor-general. 

6 . 6 . 1 . QUALITY CONTROL AND CO-ORDI NATI ON 

The Office of the Municipal Manager, overseen by and reporting regularly to the PMS 
Management Team, will be required on an ongoing basis to co-ordinate and ensure good 
quality of reporting and reviews. It will be its role to ensure conformity to reporting formats 
and check the reliability of reported information, where possible. 


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PERFORMANCE I NVESTI GATI ONS 


6 . 6 . 2 . 

The Executive Committee or Audit Committee should be able to commission in-depth 
performance investigations where there is either continued poor performance, a lack of 
reliability in the information being provided or on a random ad-hoc basis. Performance 
investigations should assess 

• The reliability of reported information 

• The extent of performance gaps from targets 

• The reasons for performance gaps 

• Corrective action and improvement strategies 

While the internal audit function may be used to conduct these investigations, it is 
preferable that external service providers, preferably academic institutions, who are 
experts in the area to be audited, should be used. Clear terms of reference will need to be 
adopted by the respective committee. 

6 . 6 . 3 . INTERNAL AUDIT 

The municipality's internal audit function will need to be continuously involved in auditing 
the performance reports of SDBIPs and the strategic scorecard. As required by the 
regulations, they will be required to produce an audit report on a quarterly basis, to be 
submitted to the Municipal Manager and Audit Committee. The capacity of the internal 
audit unit will need to be improved beyond the auditing of financial information. 

Auditing is necessary to prevent: 

• I nconsistencies in performance management definition or methodology of data 
collection; 

• Incorrect processing and poor documentation of performance management; 

• Biased information collection and reporting by those whose image is at stake in the 
performance management process. 

The Regulations specify that any auditing must include assessment of: 

• The functionality of the municipality's performance management system; 

• The compliance of the system with the legislation; and 

• The extent to which performance measurements are reliable in measuring performance 
of the municipality 

6 . 6 . 4 . AUDIT COMMITTEE 

The regulations require that the municipal council establish an audit committee, where the 
majority of members are not councillors or employees of the municipality. It is important 
for the council to ensure that the chairperson of the committee is neither a councillor nor 
an employee of the municipality. 

The operation of this audit committee is governed by section 14 (2-3) of the regulations. 
The municipality may choose to use an existing audit committee for this purpose. 

According to the regulations, the performance audit committee must 


• review the quarterly reports submitted to it by the internal audit unit 

• review the municipality's performance management system and make recommendations 
in this regard to the council of that municipality 

• assess whether the performance indicators are sufficient 

• at least twice during a financial year submit an audit report to the municipal council 


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It is further proposed that the audit committee be tasked with assessing the reliability of 
information reported. 

In order to fulfil their function a performance audit committee may, according to the 
regulations, 

• communicate directly with the council, municipal manager or the internal; and external 
auditors of the municipality concerned; 

• access any municipal records containing information that is needed to perform its duties 
or exercise its powers; 

• request any relevant person to attend any of its meetings, and, if necessary, to provide 
information requested by the committee; and 

• investigate any matter it deems necessary for the performance of its duties and the 
exercise of its powers. 

The composition of the audit committee should ensure that the following competencies are 
sufficiently catered for within the group: 

• An understanding of performance management 

• An understanding of municipal finances 

• An understanding of development, including rural development 

• Have insight into the municipality's IDP objectives 

• Credibility within all Ngqushwa's communities and organs of civil society 

6 . 7 . Role of Stakeholders 


Stakeholders Performance 

Measurement Performance 

Planning 

and Analysis Reporting & 


Reviews 


Community 

Structures 

and IDP 

Forum 

• Be consulted on 
needs 

• Develop the 

long term vision 
for the area 

• Influence the 

identification of 

priorities 

• Influence the 

choice of indicators 
and setting of 
targets 


• Be given the 
opportunity to 
review municipal 
performance and 
suggest new 

indicators and 
targets 

Council 

• Facilitate the 
development of a 
long-term vision. 

• Develop 

strategies to 

achieve vision 

• Identify 
priorities 

• Adopt 

indicators and set 
targets 


• Review 
municipal 
performance bi- 
annually 


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Stakeholders Performance 

Measurement Performance 

Planning 

and Analysis Reporting & 


Reviews 


Portfolio 

(S79) 

Committees 

• Influence the 

preparation of 

SDBI P scorecards 

• Adopt SDBIP 

scorecards 

• Ensure 

involvement of 

connnnunities in the 
setting of 

municipal targets 
(IDP) 

• Monitor 
performance of 
relevant services 

• Receive 

reports from 

service 
managers 

• Review 
monthly SDBIP 
scorecards 

• Report to 

Mayco 

• Adopt 

corrective 
actions where 

necessary and 
recommend to 
Mayco 

Executive 

Committee 

• Play the leading 

role in giving 

strategic direction 
and developing 

strategies and 

policies for the 
organisation 

• Manage the 

development of an 
IDP 

• Approve and 

adopt indicators 

and set targets 

• Communicate 
the plan to other 
stakeholders 


• Conduct the 
major reviews of 
municipal 
performance, 
determining 
where goals had 
or had not been 
met, what the 
causal reasons 
were and to 
adopt response 
strategies 


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Stakeholders Performance 

Measurement Performance 

Planning 

and Analysis Reporting & 


Reviews 


Management 

Team 

Assist the 

Executive 

Connnnittee in 

• providing 

strategic direction 
and developing 

strategies and 

policies for the 
organisation 

• Manage the 

developnnent of 

the IDP 

• Ensure that the 
plan is integrated 

• Identify and 

propose indicators 
and targets 

• Comnnunicate 
the plan to other 
stakeholders 

• Develop SDBI Ps 
& Budget 

• Regularly 

monitor the 

implementation 
of the IDP, 

identifying risks 
early 

• Ensure that 

regular 
monitoring 
(measurement, 
analysis and 

reporting) is 

happening in the 
organisation 

• Intervene in 
performance 
problems on a 
daily operational 
basis 

• Conduct 

quarterly 
reviews of 

performance 

• Ensure that 
performance 
reviews at the 
political level are 
organised 

• Ensure the 

availability of 

information 

• Propose 
response 
strategies to the 
Executive 
Committee 

• Report to 

Exco 

HODs or 

Departmenta 
/ Managers 

• Develop service 
plans for 

integration with 

other sectors 

within the strategy 
of the organisation 

• Measure 

performance 
according to 

agreed 
indicators, 
analyse and 

report regularly 

• Manage 

implementation 
and intervene 

where necessary 

• 1 nform 

decision-makers 
of risks to 

service delivery 
timeously 

• Conduct 
reviews of 

service 
performance 
against plan 

before other 

reviews 

/ nternal 

Audit 



• Produce 
quarterly audit 
reports for MM 
and Audit 

committee 


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Stakeholders Performance 

Measurement Performance 

Planning 

and Analysis Reporting & 


Reviews 


Audit 



• Review 


Committee 



internal 

audit 




reports 
• Assess 





system 

indicators 

and 




• Provide 

audit 




report 

twice 




annually 

council 

to 


6 . 8 . Responding to Organisational Perfornnance 

This outlines how the municipality may reward good organisational performance and 
address poor organisational performance. 

6 . 8 . 1 . GOOD OR EXCEPTIONAL ORGANI SATI ONAL PERFORMANCE 

There will be a Mayoral Award for excellent performance that can take the form of rotating 
trophies or plaques for the best four departments / units annually. These can be 
designated: 

• Platinum 

• Gold 

• Silver 

• Bronze 

An annual entertainment fund can be used to provide funds for at least the Platinum 
winners to entertain themselves as determined by the Executive on an annual basis. 

6 . 8 . 2 . POOR PERFORMANCE 

Poorly performing departments should be asked to provide an explanation and analysis of 
poor performance. If this is insufficient, an investigation should be conducted to deepen the 
understanding of the underlying problems, whether they be policy-related, systemic, 
structural or attributed to the poor performance of individuals. 

This section does not deal with employee performance and rewarding good performance 
and addressing poor employee performance. These are dealt with at the end of the next 
section. 

7. EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE 

This section focuses on the performance management arrangements which need to be in 
place for employees of municipalities. The following framework can be used for all 
employees. However the legal framework that underpins it requires that it be enforced for 
all Section 57 Managers. The municipality may choose to roll-out this system for all 
employees. 

The legislation upon which this is based includes: 

o The Local Government Municipal Systems Act, No. 32 of 2000. 

o The Local Government Municipal Systems Amendment Act, No. 44 of 2003. 


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o Local Government Municipal Performance Regulations for Municipal Managers and 
Managers directly accountable to Municipal Managers, 2006. Regulation Gazette No. 
29089. 

o Draft competency guidelines for Municipal Managers and Managers directly 
accountable to Municipal Managers, 2006. 

7 . 1 . Issues related to the implennentation of regulations 

The perfornnance regulations, as published in Government Gazette No 29089 on 1 August 
2006, seek to set out how the performance of section 57 managers will be uniformly 
directed, monitored and improved. 

In the implementation of the regulations, a number of issues may arise that may have an 
effect on whether an employment contract or a performance agreement has been validly 
entered into. 

This section deals with who bears the responsibility to implement the performance 
management system, the ipso facto (automatic) applicability of national legislation on an 
employment contract, the effect of a non-existing performance agreement on an 
employment contract, the legality of a "retrospective" performance agreement, and the 
legal effect of missing the 90 day deadline. 

7 . 1 . 1 . RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IMPLEMENTING SYSTEM 

The Municipal Manager, as head of the administration (see section 55 Municipal Systems 
Act or MSA) or as accounting officer (see section 60 Municipal Finance Management Act or 
MFMA) is responsible and accountable for the formation and development of an 
accountable administration operating in accordance with the municipality's performance 
management system. She or he is also responsible for the management of the 
administration in accordance with legislation. 

The final responsibility for ensuring that employments contracts for all staff are in place 
rests with the municipal manager. The final responsibility for ensuring that performance 
agreements with the relevant managers, including his or her own, are in place, rests with 
the municipal manager. 

7 . 1 . 2 . EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT 

The Systems Act (see section 57) provides that there must be a written employment 
contract between the municipality and the municipal manager. 

Applicable legislation 

The regulations (see sub-regulation 4(1)) provide that the employment contract must be 
subject to the terms and conditions of the Systems Act, the MFMA, and other applicable 
legislation. In the event that the employment contract does not refer to the applicability of 
other legislation, that omission will not affect the legal validity of the employment contract. 
The employment contract will, in any event, be subordinate to any legislation even in the 
case where the parties themselves are unaware of such legislation. 

Validity of employment contract 

The regulations Uee sub-regulation 4(4)(a)) further provide that employment in terms of 
an employment contract must be subject to the signing of a separate performance 
agreement within 90 calendar days after assumption of duty and annually within one 
month after the commencement of the financial year. The question arises whether the 
validity of the employment contract will be affected in the absence of a performance 
agreement as per the dictates of the regulation. It is important to bear in mind that both 
the employment contract and the performance agreement are entered into separately by 
the parties. In the event that the performance agreement has not been entered into after 
the expiration of the time limit, it amounts to a breach of the employment conditions and 
the party responsible for such breach must be put on terms. It is important to emphasise 


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that the failure to enter into a perfornnance agreement does not automatically render the 
employment contract invalid. The party responsible for this breach must be given an 
opportunity to remedy the breach. Failure by the party responsible for the breach to 
remedy the breach may result in the other party initiating a contract termination process if 
it so feels. 

7 . 1 . 3 . PERFORMANCE AGREEMENT 

The performance agreement (see sub regulation 8(2) read with sub-regulation 23) provides 
the basis upon which the municipality will reward good performance on the part of the 
employee. Performance Agreements form the basis upon which the performance of Section 
57 staff are measured and monitored against targets. The performance agreement is put in 
place to comply with the provisions of Section 57 (l)(b), (4A),(4B0 and (5) of the Municipal 
Systems Act as well as the employment contract entered into between the parties. This 
agreement must be entered into for each financial year and be reviewed annually in J une. 
According to the Performance Regulations for Municipal Managers and Managers directly 
accountable to Municipal Managers (2006), the performance agreements fulfil the following 
key purposes: 

o specify objectives and targets defined and agreed with the employee and to 
communicate to the employee the employer's expectations of the employee's 
performance and accountabilities in alignment with the Integrated Development 
Plan, Service Delivery and Budget I mplementation Plan (SDBIP) and the Budget of 
the municipality; 

o specify accountabilities as set out in a performance plan, which forms an annexure 
to the performance agreement; 

o monitor and measure performance against set targeted outputs; 

o use the performance agreement as the basis for assessing whether the employee 
has met the performance expectations applicable to his or her job; 

o and in the event of outstanding performance, to appropriately reward the employee; 

o give effect to the employer's commitment to a performance-orientated relationship 
with its employee in attaining equitable and improved service delivery. 

Retrospectivity 

The question arises whether it would be possible to enter into a performance agreement 
retrospectively, even after the end of the financial year for that financial year. The 
language of the MSA (see section 57(2)) is peremptory in this regard. It provides that a 
"performance agreement must be concluded with a reasonable time after a person has 
been appointed" (own emphasis). The regulation provides that the performance 
agreement must be signed within 90 calendar days after assumption of duty. The 
municipal council does not have the authority to change these prescripts. The absence of a 
performance agreement at the end of a financial year will fatally affect the ability of the 
municipality to pay a performance bonus to the affected employee. 

Legai vaiidity after 90 days 

A further issue which may arise is the legal validity of a performance agreement that is 
concluded after the period of 90 days has lapsed. In this regard, it is instructive to 
consider that the regulation provides that employment is subject to the compliance with 
sub-regulation 4(4)(a). It would appear that one would still be able to enter into a valid 
performance agreement after the 90 day period provided that there is consensus between 
the parties that the employment contract is still in force. Thus, where the performance 
agreement is entered into after the expiry of the 90 day limit, the agreement can still be 
entered into for part of that financial year (see sub-regulation 24(1)). 


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It is understood that a perfornnance agreement comprises a performance plan and a 
personal development plan. 

7.1.4. PERFORMANCE PLAN 
The performance plan establishes: 

o a detailed set of objectives and targets to be met by the Section 57 employee as 
well as; 

o the time frames within which these should be met. 

The specifics of the performance plan will be determined by the Executive Committee, in 
consultation with the employee, and will be based on the IDP, SDBIP and the Budget. It 
shall include the following elements: 
o Key Objectives 

o Key Performance I ndicators 

o Targets 

o Weightings 

In addition, the employee will be measured in terms of their contribution to the goals and 
strategic planning as set out in the Municipality's IDP. 

Section 57 staff will be assessed against two components, weighted as follows: 

Key Performance Area (KPA) which is weighted at 80% 

The employees assessment will in part be based on his/her performance in terms of 
outcomes/outputs (performance indicators) identified in the performance plan which are 
linked to the KPAs. This contributes to 80% of the overall assessment result. The 
weightings per KPA will be agreed upon between the Executive Committee and the 
employee. For Managers directly responsible to the Municipal Manager, the KPAs are those 
related to their key functional areas. 

For the municipal manager this will be the organizational scorecard, not dealing with 
outcomes, representing the IDP. For managers reporting to the municipal manager, this 
component will be their SDBIP scorecards, without outcomes. 

For all other staff that this system will be rolled out to, this component will need to be 
drawn up for them and align with their job description. 

Core Competency Requirement (CCR) which is weighted at 20% 

The CCRs which are deemed most critical to the employee's specific function are selected 
from a list and agreed upon with the employer, with consideration for proficiency levels as 
agreed between the two parties. Weights are further assigned to the CCRs selected. 

This refers to a separate component dealing with competency and expected behaviour. 

Table 2: Core Competency Requirements from Regulations (2006) 

CORE COMPETENCY REQUI REMENTS FOR EMPLOYEES (CCR) 


Core Managerial and Occupational 
Competencies 

□ 

(1 ndicate 

choice) 

Weight 

Core Managerial Competencies 

Strategic Capability and Leadership 



Programme and Project Management 



Financial Management 

compulsory 



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Change Management 



Knowledge Management 



Service Delivery Innovation 



Problem Solving and Analysis 



People Management and Empowerment 

compulsory 


Client Orientation and Customer Focus 

compulsory 


Communication 



Honesty and Integrity 



Core Occupational Competencies 



Competence in Self Management 



1 nterpretation of and implementation within the 
legislative and national policy frameworks 



Knowledge of developmental local government 



Knowledge of Performance Management and 
Reporting 



Knowledge of global and South African specific 
political, social and economic contexts 



Competence in policy conceptualisation, 
analysis and implementation 



Knowledge of more than one functional 
municipal field discipline 



Skills in Mediation 



Skills in Governance 



Competence as required by other national line 
sector departments 



Exceptional and dynamic creativity to improve 
the functioning of the municipality 



Total percentage 

- 

100% 


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7 . 1 . 5 . PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

As part of the performance agreement, a personal development plan should be included. 
This section should state the activities, including training, that the employee wishes to 
undertake to improve themselves or is required to take to better fulfil the needs of the job. 

7 . 2 . Evaluating performance 

The Performance Regulations for Municipal Managers and Managers directly accountable to 
Municipal Managers (2006), stipulates in detail how the evaluation process should be 
undertaken. 

7 . 2 . 1 . EVALUATORS 

For purposes of evaluating the annual performance of the municipal manager, an 
evaluation panel constituted of the following persons must be established - 

• Executive Mayor or Mayor; 

• Chairperson of the performance audit committee or the audit committee in the 
absence of a performance audit committee; 

• Member of the executive committee 

• Mayor and/or municipal manager from another municipality; and 

• Member of a ward committee as nominated by the Mayor. 

For purposes of evaluating the annual performance of managers directly accountable to the 
municipal managers, an evaluation panel constituted of the following persons must be 
established 

• Municipal Manager; 

• Chairperson of the performance audit committee or the audit committee in the 
absence of a performance audit committee; 

• Member of the executive committee 

• Municipal manager from another municipality. 

7 . 2 . 2 . PROCESS & SCORING 

Performance must be reviewed on a quarterly basis. The employer must keep a record of 
the mid-year review and annual assessment meetings. The performance plan must include 
a Personal Development Plan, in order to address any weaknesses or skills gaps which may 
have been identified. 

In summary, the annual performance appraisal must involve an assessment of results as 
outlined in the performance plan, discussed below: 

KPA assessment 

1. Each KPA should be assessed according to whether performance indicators have 
been met 

2. An indicative rating on a 5-point scale should be provided for each KPA 

3. The applicable assessment rating calculator must be used to add to the scores and 
calculate the final KPA score based on a weighted average score. 

CCR assessment 

1. Each CCR should be assessed according to performance indicators have been met 

2. An indicative rating on a 5-point scale should be provided for each CCR 

3. The rating is multiplied by the weighting given to each CCR, to provide a score 


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4. The applicable assessment rating calculator must be used to add to the scores and 
calculate the final CCR score, based on a weighted average score. 

Table 3: Scoring suggested by the Regulations (2006) 


Level 

Terminology 

% 

Range 

Deschption 

5 

Outstanding 

performance 

Greater 

than 

130% 

Performance far exceeds the standard expected 
of an employee at this level. The appraisal 
indicates that the Employee has achieved above 
fully effective results against all performance 
criteria and indicators as specified in the PA and 
Performance plan and maintained this in all areas 
of responsibility throughout the year. 

4 

Performance 

significantly above 
expectations 

100- 

129% 

Performance is significantly higher than the 
standard expected in the job. The appraisal 
indicates that the Employee has achieved above 
fully effective results against more than half of 
the performance criteria and indicators and fully 
achieved all others throughout the year. 

3 

Fully effective 

90- 

100% 

Performance fully meets the standards expected 
in all areas of the job. The appraisal indicates that 
the Employee has fully achieved effective results 
against all significant performance criteria and 
indicators as specified in the PA and Performance 

Plan. 

2 

Performance not 

fully effective 

60- 

89% 

Performance is below the standard required for 
the job in key areas. Performance meets some of 
the standards expected for the job. The 
review/assessment indicates that the employee 
has achieved below fully effective results against 
more than half the key performance criteria and 
indicators as specified in the PA and Performance 

Plan. 


Unacceptable 

performance 

Below 

60% 

Performance does not meet the standard 

expected for the job. The review/assessment 
indicates that the employee has achieved below 
fully effective results against almost all of the 
performance criteria and indicators as specified in 


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the PA and Perfornnance Plan. The employee has 
failed to demonstrate the commitment or ability 
to bring performance up to the level expected in 
the job despite management efforts to encourage 
improvement. 


The combined KPA and CCR assessment scores, weighted 80% and 20% respectively, will 
make up the overall assessment score. While the regulations do not specify, it is assumed 
that the total percentage score is arrived at by dividing the combined weighted average 
score by three and reflecting as a percentage. 

7 . 3 . Responding to Good Employee Performance 

7 . 3 . 1 . BONUSES 

A performance bonus, based on affordability may be paid to the employees, after: 

1. the annual report for the financial year under review has been tabled and adopted by 
the municipal council 

2. an evaluation of performance in accordance with the provisions of the Regulation 

3. approval of such evaluation by the municipal council as a reward for outstanding 
performance 

4. that the council had clean audit opinion from Auditor's General 

In addition to the annual cost-of-living increase, the employee shall be eligible to be 
considered for a performance related increase (pay progression) on an annual basis. 

Performance Bonus criteria 

The regulations provide that a performance bonus between 5% and 14% of the inclusive 
annual remuneration package may be paid to the employee after the end of the financial 
year and only after an evaluation of performance and approval of such evaluation by the 
Municipal Council, as a reward for excellent performance. In determining the bonus 
payment, the regulations specify that the relevant percentage depends on the overall 
rating, calculated by using the applicable assessment rating calculator: 

1. A score of 130% - 149% is awarded a performance bonus ranging between 5%-9%. 

2. A score of 150% and above is awarded a performance bonus ranging 10% - 15%. 

3. In addition to what is suggested in the regulations in Ngqushwa a score of 100%- 
130% should result in a bonus of between 0% to 5%. 

7 . 3 . 2 . DISPUTE RESOLUTION 

Any disputes about the nature of the employee's performance agreement, whether it 
relates to key responsibilities, priorities, methods of assessment and/ or salary increment 
in the agreement, must be mediated by - 


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(a) ln the case of the Municipal Manager, the MEC for local governnnent in the province 
within thirty (30) days of receipt of a fornnal dispute from the employee, or any other 
person designated by the MEC; and 

(b) ln the case of managers directly accountable to the Municipal Manager, the executive 
mayor within thirty (30) days of receipt of a formal dispute from the employee; whose 
decision shall be final and binding on both parties. 

8. EVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 
SYSTEM 

8.1. THE MUNICIPAL SYSTEMS ACT REQUI RES THE MUNICIPALITY TO 
ANNUALLY EVALUATE I TS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM. IT IS 
PROPOSED THAT AFTER THE FULL CYCLE OF THE ANNUAL REVI EW IS 
COMPLETE, THE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT TEAM Wl LL INITIATE AN 
EVALUATION REPORT ANNUALLY, TAKI NG I NTO ACCOUNT THE INPUT 
PROVIDED BY DEPARTMENTS. THIS REPORT Wl LL THEN BE Dl SCUSSED BY 
THE MANAGEMENT TEAM AND Fl NALLY SUBMITTED TO THE EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE FOR DISCUSSION AND APPROVAL. THE EVALUATI ON SHOULD 
ASSESS: 

• The adherence of the performance management system to the Municipal Systems Act. 

• The fulfilment of the objectives for a performance management system captured in 
section 3 of this document. 

• The adherence of the performance management system to the objectives and principles 
captured in section 4 of this document. 

• Opportunities for improvement and a proposed action plan. 

8.2. IT MUST ONCE AGAI N BE EMPHASISED THAT THERE ARE NO 
DEFINITIVE SOLUTIONS TO MANAGI NG MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE. THE 
PROCESS OF IMPLEMENTING A PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM MUST 
BE SEEN AS A LEARNING PROCESS, WHERE THERE IS A CONSCIOUS BUY-IN 
TO INCREMENTAL I MPROVEMENT OF THE WAY THE SYSTEM WORKS IN 
ORDER TO FULFIL THE OBJECTIVES OF THE SYSTEM AND ADDRESS THE 
EMERGI NG CHALLENGES FROM A CONSTANTLY CHANGI NG ENVI RONMENT. 

9. PERFORMANCE BELOW SECTION 56 MANAGERS LINKED TO OPMS 

I 

9.1. INDIVIDUAL OR STAFF PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT DEALS WITH 
PERFORMANCE ON THE LEVEL OF THE INDIVIDUAL EMPLOYEES. 
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE TARGETS ARE ALSO FORMULATED DURI NG THE 
BUSINESS PLANNING PROCESS REFERRED TO IN PAR 6.2. MEASURI NG 
STAFF PERFORMANCE PROVI DES COUNCIL AND MANAGEMENT WITH 
APPROPRI ATE I NFORMATI ON ON THE BEHAVI OUR OF STAFF AND OUTCOMES 
IN THE WORKPLACE. REVI EWI NG STAFF PERFORMANCE AT REGULAR 
INTERVALS ALSO PROVI DES INFORMATION ON PERFORMANCE GAPS 
AND/OR EXCELLENCE. AT SECTION 56 LEVEL THE 2006 MUNICIPAL 
PERFORMANCE REGULATIONS FOR MUNICIPAL MANAGERS AND MANAGERS 
REPORTING DIRECTLY TO MUNICIPAL MANAGERS PRESCRI BE A 
LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK FOR LINKING THE INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE 
OF SECTION 56 MANAGERS TO THE STRATEGY AND OPERATIONS OF A 
MUNICI PALITY. 


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The cascading of PMS deals with delegation of perfornnance measures from strategic to 
operational level, i.e. from IDP to the SDBIP, and forms the link between institutional and 
individual performance management .This ensures that performance management at 
various levels relates to one another in line with the MFMA and MSA. 

The MFMA specifically requires that the annual performance agreements of managers must 
be linked to the SDBIP of a municipality and the measurable performance objectives 
approved with the budget (circular 13 of the MFMA). The SDBIP in essence becomes the 
nucleus mechanism to translate and manage the performance objectives enshrined in the 
IDP to individual performance. 

FURTHERMORE AND IN ORDER FOR THE PMS TO PERMEATE ACROSS THE 
ENTIRE ORGANISATION I NCLUDI NG LEVELS BELOW SECTION 56, THE PMS 
OUGHT TO BE CASCADED DOWN TO ALL STAFF THAT SUPPORT HEADS OF 
DEPARTMENTS. THE CASCADI NG OF PMS I NCULCATES A CULTURE OF 
ACCOUNTABI LITY AND ALIGNMENT OF THE DAY-TO-DAY INDIVIDUAL 
ACTIONS TO THE BROADER STRATEGI ES AND OBJECTIVES OF THE 
MUNICI PALITY. THE CASCADI NG OF PMS ALSO ENABLES THE RECOGNITION 
OF GOOD PERFORMANCE WHI LST CORRECTI NG UNDERPERFORMANCE. TO 
THIS END THE MUNICIPALITY MUST DEVELOP SYSTEMS AND PROCESSES 
THAT ENSURE THAT CASCADI NG OF PMS BECOMES A REALITY AND IS 
PRACTICAL. 


This cascading process is illustrated by the diagram below. 

INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE - CASCADI NG OF I NSTI TUTI ONAL PERFORMANCE 



PLANS 



The delegation Funnel 


Institutional Scorecard 


MM - NLM 



Delegation of 


1 






Delegation of 


Employee A, B, C, E, etc 


Operational Staff Performance Scorecards linked to Institutional Performance Plan 


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1. PHASE 

2. ACTIVITIES 

3. WHAT 
HAPPENS? 

4. TIMEF 
RAME 

5. RESPQ 
NSIBLE 

PARTY 

1. Planning & 

1 mplennent 
ation 

- Sign J ob description 

- Develop and sign 

SDAs linked to 

Supervisor KPIs and 
targets 

- Develop Personal 

Development Plans 
(PDP's) 

- Prepare weekly plans 

- Prepare weekly 

reports 

Documents required: 

- J ob description 

- SDA 

- PDP Forms and 

structured questions 

- Departmental 
scorecard/SDBI P 

- Weekly Plan 

- Both parties 

together 
discuss, reach 
an agreement, 
and sign SDAs. 

- PDP's detail 

required 
trainings/WSP / 
interventions/ 
resources 

needed to 

facilitate ability 
of staff 

member to 

reach required 
standard. 

Before 31 
July each 
year 

Hod, 

manager & 

subordinate 

2. Monitoring 
& Coaching 

- Preparation of 

monthly plans and 
reports 

- Preparation of 

weekly reports 

- Documentation of 

coaching session 

- Signing of action 
plans 

- Subsequent reviewal 
of progress 

Documents reauired: 

- SDAs 

- Action Plan 

- Follow up meeting 
notes 

- Portfolios of evidence 

- Training records, 

etcetera 

- Both parties 
discuss work 
to date 

against 
required 
targets on 

Weekly plans 
and SDA. 

Problems and 

causes are 

highlighted 

and 

appropriate 

action 

detailed on 

action plan 

with 

timeframes. 
Follow up 

meetings and 
manage 
progress. 

Weekly and 
monthly 

Hod, 

manager & 

subordinate 

3. Formal 
Reviewing 

• Formal performance 
report prepared with 
supporting POEs 

• Quarterly internal 

auditing of 

performance reports 

• Quarterly 

performance review 

• First Review is 

by the 

subordinate 
(self-score) 

• Manager and 

subordinate 
discuss and 

agree on 

Quarterly 
(Sept, Dec, 
Mar & J un) 

Evaluation 

Panel 

• Head of 
departm 
ent 

• Corporat 
e 


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(signed) 

• Annual performance 
review (signed) 

Documents required: 

- SDAs 

- Quarterly and annual 
performance reports 

- Attendance registers 

- Minutes of the review 

- Portfolios of evidence 

- Evaluation Panel 

score-sheet and 

Consolidated Score- 
sheet 

performance 
results, 
agreement 
sought (re- 

scores and 

sign-off of 

assessments 
sheets). 

• Final review 

requires 
consolidated 
panel score as 
per policy. 


Services 

represen 

tative 

(secretar 

iat) 

• Union 
represen 
tatives 

• M&E 
represen 
tative 
(observe 
raO 

4. Rewarding 

• Submission of results 

to Corporate Services 
Manager for 

processing 

• Award as per policy 
(refer to the table 
below) 

• Results audited 

by Audit 

Committee 

• Results read 

together with 
policy and 

reward applied 
as per policy 

J une 

(applicable 
for June 

but only 

conducted 
after Final 
Annual 
Report 
tabled and 
approved. 

Hod, 

manager & 

subordinate 


NOTE: Reporting for individual staff (below section 56) is facilitated by Corporate 
Services Manager 

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT IS A PROCESS (DAY TO DAY), NOT A ONE Tl ME 
EVENT! 


INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE PLANNING BELOW SECTION 56 

THE MOST EFFICIENT AND MOSTLY UTILISED APPROACH IS THAT 
WHICH DELEGATES THE SECTION 56 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 
AND TARGETS ENCAPSULATED IN THE MUNICIPAL SCORECARD AND 
OPERATIONAL PLANS TO LINE MANAGERS AND BELOW, AND THIS IS 
DONE WITHIN THE AMBITS OF THE EMPLOYEE'S J OB DESCRIPTION. 
THIS PRINCIPLE APPROACH I NTEGRATES AND INTERTWINES 
THE PERFORMANCE AT VARIOUS LEVELS OF THE 
ORGANISATION AND THAT EACH LEVEL IS AN I NTEGRAL PART 
OF THE ENTIRE VALUE CHAI N PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 
SYSTEM OF MUNICI PALITY. 

To this effect, managers below section 56 managers must sign Service 
Delivery Agreements (SDAs and Performance Deveiopment Pians 
(PDPs) iinked to the Work-piace Skiiis Pian of the department as 
demonstration of the will and confidence to deliver the KPIs and targets of 
the senior managers in the department. 

The SDAs and PDPs shall remain in force for a period of a year and reviewed 
annually or at anytime at the discretion of the supervisor after consultation 
with the employee. 


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I ndividual Performance Monitoring and feedback below section 56 

On the basis of the SDAs, each employee shall prepare Weekly Perfornnance Plans (WPPs) 
to systematically implement the KPIs and targets in the SDAs. Thereafter weekly reports 
shall be prepared for status quo review by supervisors, decision making and support of 
subordinates. Note: a portfolio of evidence and / or reasons and corrective action 
must form part of the weekly reports to supervisors, this is in line with the "early 
warning system" prescribed by the MSA. The advantage and benefit for this is that 
performance will begin to be an on-going process rather than an event and performance 
information will be maintained efficiently to inform high-level individual and institutional 
performance. 

I ndividual Performance Evaluation below section 56 

On a quarterly basis, the heads of departments and unit heads must formally assess the 
performance of staff based on prepared performance reports and portfolio of evidence. The 
assessment must be based on delegated KPIs and targets from the departmental 
scorecard. Once completed, this assessment shall inform assessments of managers above 
until the level of the municipal manager. 

MAYOR'S MERIT AWARD 

A Mayor's merit award will be introduced for all employees that perform excellently based 
on the following awards: 


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Score 

obtained on 

Performance 

Assessment 

Reward 

Scale 

The Employee may be eligible to choose 
ONE of the options listed below 

4.5 - 5 

Platinum 

(>100% 

129%) 

Medal plus: 

a) Employee is granted 6 "free" leave days. 

or 

b) The Employee is eligible for a 100% study 
bursary to a maximum of R20000 only for a 
degree/diploma directly relevant to his/her 
job function 

or 

c) The Employee may select a work tool that 
will enhance his/her ability to perform 
better in his/her job that costs a maximum 
of 6 leave days for that employee 

3.9 - 4.5 

Gold 

(100% 

120%) 

Medal plus: 

a) Employee is granted 4 "free" leave days 
or 

d) The Employee is eligible for a 70% study 
bursary to a maximum of R14000 only for a 
degree/diploma directly relevant to his/her 
job function 
or 

b) The Employee may select a work tool that 
will enhance his/her ability to perform 
better in his/her job that costs a maximum 
of 4 leave days for that employee 

3.1 - 3.9 

Silver 

(80% 

100%) 

Medal plus: 

a) Employee is granted 2 leave days 
or 

e) The Employee is eligible for a 50% study 
bursary or RIOOOO for a degree/diploma 
directly relevant to his/her job function 
or 

b) The Employee may select a work tool that 
will enhance his/her ability to perform 
better in his/her job that costs a maximum 
of 2 leave days for that employee 

3 - 3.5 

60 % 

79.9% 

No specific reward 

0 - 4 

< 60 

Compulsory performance counselling 


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9.1.1. SALARY ADJ USTMENT 

The respective employee's salary can be adjusted if it is understood that the high levels of 
performance can be sustained and are not once-off. This salary adjustment is over and 
above any inflationary adjustment. 

9.1.2. SHOULD AN EMPLOYEE WHO HAS RECEI VED A NON-FI NANCI AL REWARD IN 
THE FORM OF A WORK TOOL, LEAVE THE EMPLOYMENT OF NGQUSHWA 
MUNICIPALITY AND WISHES TO TAKE THE WORK TOOL, THE EMPLOYEE 
Wl LL BE REQUI RED TO PAY TAX ON THE VALUE OF THE TOOL. 

9.1.3. SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Special opportunities will be created such as special study opportunities and exchange 
programmes that could benefit high performing employees. 

9.1.4. PROMOTION 

Employees who consistently perform well will be given more responsibility and promoted 
where opportunities arise. 

10. Addressing Poor Employee Performance 

In the case of unacceptable performance, the municipality shall: 

o Provide systematic remedial and developmental support to assist the 
employee to improve his/her performance. 

o Provide appropriate performance counselling and support, offering reasonable 
time for improvements in performance. 

If performance does not improve, the municipality will consider steps to terminate the 
contract of the employee on the grounds of poor performance or operational incapacity. 

The Labour Relations Act, requires an employee to be given two written warnings, before 
termination of employment can be sought due to poor performance. 

APPENDICES 

10.1. Appendix III: Extracts of relevant policies and legislation 

10.1.1. THE WHITE PAPER ON LOCAL GOVERNMENT (1998) 

The White Paper on Local Government (1998) ' nationally introduced performance 
management systems to local government, as a tool to ensure Developmental Local 
Government. It concludes that 

" Integrated development planning, budgeting and performance management 
are powerful tools which can assist municipalities to develop an integrated 
perspective on development in their area. It will enable them to focus on 
priorities within an increasingly complex and diverse set of demands. It will 
enable them to direct resource allocations and institutional systems to a new 
set of development objectives". 


The White Paper adds that 


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"Involving communities in developing some municipal key performance 
indicators increases the accountability of the municipality. Some communities 
may prioritise the amount of time it takes a municipality to answer a query; 
others will prioritise the cleanliness of an area or the provision of water to a 
certain number of households. Whatever the priorities, by involving 
communities in setting key performance indicators and reporting back to 
communities on performance, accountability is increased, and public trust in 
the local government system enhanced". 

10 . 1 . 2 . BATHO PELE (1998) 

Similarly, the White Paper on Transforming Public Service Delivery (Batho Pele) puts 
forward eight principles for good public service: 

Consultation: 

Citizens should be consulted about the level and quality of public service they receive, and, 
where possible, should be given a choice about the services that are provided. 

Service standards: 

Citizens should know what standard of service to expect. 

Access: 

All citizens should have equal access to the services to which they are entitled. 

Courtesy: 

Citizens should be treated with courtesy and consideration. 

I nformation: 

Citizens should be given full and accurate information about the public services they are 
entitled to receive. 

Openness and transparency: 

Citizens should know how departments are run, how resources are spent, and who is in 
charge of particular services. 

Redress: 

If the promised standard of service is not delivered, citizens should be offered an apology, 
a full explanation and a speedy and effective remedy; and when complaints are made 
citizens should receive a sympathetic, positive response. 

Vaiue-for-money: 

Public services should be provided economically and efficiently in order to give citizens the 
best possible value-for-money. 


"I mportantly, the Batho Pele White Paper notes that the development of a service-oriented 
culture requires the active participation of the wider community. Municipalities need 
constant feedback from service-users ifthey are to improve their operations. Local partners 
can be mobilised to assist in building a service culture. For example, local businesses or 
non-governmental organisations may assist with funding a help line, providing information 
about specific services, identifying service gaps or conducting a customer survey" - The 
White Paper on Local Government (1998). 


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10.1.3. THE MUNI Cl PAL SYSTEMS ACT (2000) 

The Municipal Systems Act, enacted in November 2000, requires all municipalities to: 

• Develop a performance management system 

• Set targets, monitor and review performance based on indicators linked to their IDP 

• Publish an annual report on performance for the councillors, staff, the public and other 
spheres of government 

• Incorporate and report on a set of general indicators prescribed nationally by the 
minister responsible for local government 

• Conduct an internal audit on performance before tabling the report. 

• Have their annual performance report audited by the Auditor-General 

• Involve the community in setting indicators and targets and reviewing municipal 
performance 

10.1.4. MUNI Cl PAL PLANNI NG AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT REGULATI ONS (2001) 
The Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations set out in detail 
requirements for municipal PM systems. However, the regulations do not sufficiently 
constitute a framework that fully proposes how the system will work. Each component of 
the proposed framework in this document is strongly informed by the regulations. 

Municipal Finance Management Act (2003) 


Chapter 12: Financial Reporting and Auditing 


Preparation and adoption of annual reports 


1. Every municipality and every municipal entity must for each financial year prepare 
an annual report in accordance with this Chapter. The council of a municipality must 
within nine months after the end of a financial year deal with the annual report of 
the municipality and of any municipal entity under the municipality's sole or shared 
control in accordance with section 129. 

2. The purpose of an annual report is 

(a) to provide a record of the activities of the municipality or municipal entity 
during the financial year to which the report relates; 

(b) to provide a report on performance against the budget of the municipality or 

municipal entity for that financial year; and 

(c) to promote accountability to the local community for the decisions made 
throughout the year by the municipality or municipal entity. 

3. the annual report of a municipality must include 

(a) the annual financial statements of the municipality, and in addition, if section 
122(2) applies, consolidated annual financial statements, as submitted to the 
Auditor-General for audit in terms of section 126(1); 

(b) the Auditor-General's audit report in terms of section 126(3) on those 

financial statements; 


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{c) the annual perfornnance report of the municipality prepared by the 
municipality in terms of section 46 of the Municipal System Act; 

(d) the Auditor-General's audit report in terms of section 45(b) of the 

Municipal Systems Act; 

(e) an assessment by the municipality's accounting officer of any arrears on 

municipal taxes and service charges; 

(0 an assessment by the municipality's accounting officer of the municipality's 
performance against the measurable performance objectives referred to in 
section 12(3)fib^for revenue collection from each revenue source and for each 
vote in the municipality's approved budget for the relevant financial year; 

(g) particulars of any corrective action taken or to be taken in response to issues 
raised in the audit reports referred to in paragraphs (b) and (d); 

(h) any explanations that may be necessary to clarify issues in connection with the 

financial statements; 

(i) any information as determined by the municipality; 

(j) any recommendations of the municipality's audit committee; and 

(k) any other information as may be prescribed. 

4. The annual report of a municipal entity must include- 

(a) the annual financial statements of the entity, as submitted to the Auditor- 
General for audit in terms of section 126(2); 

(b) the Auditor-General's audit report in terms of section 126(3) on those 

financial statements; 

(c) an assessment by the entity's accounting officer of any arrears on municipal 

taxes and service charges; 

(d) an assessment by the entity's accounting officer of the entity's performance 
against any measurable performance objectives set in terms the service 
delivery agreement or other agreement between the entity and its parent 
municipality; 

(e) particulars of any corrective action taken or to be taken in response to issues 
raised in the audit report referred to in paragraph (b)-, 

(f) any information as determined by the entity or its parent municipality; 

(g) any recommendations of the audit committee of the entity or of its parent 

municipality; and 

(h) any other information as may be prescribed. 


IDP 

Chapter Eight 

Spatial Development 
Framework 


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Chapter Eight: Spatial Development 
Framework 


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