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FARM FORECASTER 

CROP AND LIVE STOCK REPORT FOR NORTH CAROLINA 




CROP REPORTING SERVICE 



NORTH CAROLINA 
DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE 
DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




JUNE 1932 



ANNUAL ISSUE (1931 Crops) 



NUMBER 61 



With the great numbers of trained agri- 
cultural specialists available, the average 
farmer wonders why these "experts" do 
not stem the tide of downward trend in 
farm prices. Even the Farm Board has 
failed with their many millions. It all goes 
to prove that the great economic law of 
Supply and Demand just will have its way. 
But surely farm products have reached the 
real bottom in the Spring of 1932. 

Truly no one is in a position to say de- 
finitely what the outlook is for the 1932 
products. We do know, however, that al- 
ready the purchasing power of the farmer's 
dollar is absurdly low in relation to non- 
farm products. See Page 29 for index num- 
bers. Most agricultural economists are pre- 
dicting that many of the products which 
the farmers have to buy will continue to de- 
cline during 1932, while most farm products 
will either stand still or in some cases, show 
a slight rise. At any rate, they predict that 
farm prices will be the first to show re- 
covery. 



OUTLOOK FOR 1932 

In view of the many doubtful predictions 
during the past few years regarding this 
matter, the Crop Reporting Service sug- 
gests that the only safe way is for the 
average farmer to produce practically all 
of the foods and feeds which he will require. 
He should let the acreage of cash crops be 
grown as a surplus, for whatever money re- 
turn it may bring. The return of agricul- 
tural prosperity is not "just around the 
corner," but more probably, is around a long 
hidden curve. 

The wise farmer will study the relation- 
ship of prices obtained during the past sea- 
son with those of previous years, as shown 
on page 28. This may enable him to see 
which products to avoid, even if it does not 
indicate the best ones to plant. Even with 
the heavy cut in the tobacco acreage, there 
may be no appreciable improvement in the 
price of this crop. The consumption is de- 
clining—see page 11. Other cash crops like 
cotton and peanuts have a discouraging 



outlook for prices. All of these have sold 
at record low prices, since prior to the World 
War. The best policy will be to revise all 
of our farm plans, on the basis of present 
conditions. If prices improve, we will then 
have a surplus. 

The big problem is how to pay the heavy 
tax burden, and how to meet the farm 
requiremnets for purchasing essentials at 
relatively high retail prices. The shortage 
of commercial fertilizers may mean smaller 
yields per acre, but the cost of production 
will also be less. It will be difficult to 
maintain the upkeep of farm implements, 
etc. Purchase of new equipment is almost 
out of the question. We wish that we might 
offer more encouraging prospects. The best 
thing to do is to read reports and informa- 
tion, such as contained in this publication, 
and be guided accordingly. It is time for 
each farmer to th^nk for himself, but first 
he must seek the causes and effects. 




North Carolina needs more livestock to consume our surplus farm feeds, so as to bring in the cash to buy other essentials. 



• 



2 



REVISION OF CROP AND LIVESTOCK ESTIMATES 

1919 — 1931 



Prior to the Census year of 1930, 
the Crop and Livestock estimates of 
the United States Department of 
Agriculture were somewhat at vari- 
ance with figures shown by the 
United States Census. This was 
considered by the Department of 
Agriculture as being due to the in- 
completeness of the listing by the 
Census and they have held to the 



results of the estimates in their pub- 
lications. The Department has 
agreed, however, to accept the 
Federal Census figures as a basis for 
revising their estimates since 1919. 
The State data presented in this pub- 
lication are, therefore, the Crop Re- 
porting Board's revised estimates 
in so far as they are available. 
We have likewise revised our 



State and county data — mostly 
downward. Preceding issues show- 
ing acreages, yields, productions 
and values of crops and livestock 
are therefore out of date. 

Improvement in the State's an- 
nual Farm Census surveys will help 
the situation as rapidly as more 
complete and reliable county sur- 
veys are made. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Looking at 1931 3 

North Carolina Crop Estimates 1929-1930 (revised) and 

1931 (preliminary) 4-5 

Farm Problems — Relating to the Distress Situation 6 

Farm Labor — Supply and Demand 7 

Compensation to Reporters 7 

Annual Fertilizer Tag Sales in North Carolina 8 

Cotton Supply and Ccnsu.-iption 8 

Cotton (Reduction in Crop from Stated Causes) 8 

Cotton (Production Statistics by Counties) 9 

Cotton (County Ginnings) 10 

Tobacco — Supply and Distribution 11 

Tobacco (Production Statistics by Counties) 12 

Tobacco — Annual Producers' Sales 13 

General Crop Comments 14 

Corn (Production Statistics by Counties) 15 

Wheat (Production Statistics by Counties) 16 

Oats (Production Statistics by Counties) 17 

General Crop Comments 18 

Rye (Production Statistics by Counties) 19 

Irish Potaoes (Production Statistics by Counties) 20 

Sweet Potatoes (Production Statistics by Counties) 21 

Soy Beans (Production Statistics by Counties) 22 

Cowpeas (Production Statistics by Counties) 23 

Hay Crop (Acreage and production Statistics by Counties) .24-25-26 

Peanuts (Production Statistics by Counties) 27 

Prices Paid to North Carolina Producers for Farm Products 28 



Index Numbers — Price Relationships of Farm Products 29 

Cost of Producing Crops in North Carolina 30 

Index of Farm Real Estate Values 30 

Carlot Shipments of Fruits and Vegetables 31 

Miscellaneous Items from the North Carolina 

Farm Census 32-33-34 

North Carolina "County Farm Census" Surveys 35 

Livestock — Numbers by Counties — Reported 

by Tax Assessors 36-37 

Acreage and Value of United States Crops 38 

Livestock— Summary for the United States 38 

United States Crops 39 

Crop Conditions — June 1, 1932 40 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

Page 

Livestock — A Source of Cash Income l 

A Fine Dairy Farm in Durham County 3 

A Typical Barnyard Scene on a Small North Carolina Farm 7 

Oxford Tobacco Experiment Station Annual Picnic 

Inspection Day n 

Wheat Combine Harvesting Wheat in North Carolina 14 

The Oxford Orphanage Farm (Alfalfa Field) 26 

Commercial Truck Crops — New Hanover County — 

(Lettuce Field) 30 

Farm Field Hands for Depression Conditions 35 

Combination of Alfalfa and Sweet Clover for Good Hay... 39 

Hyde County's Great Lake Mattamuskeet Area 

(Drainage Ditch) 40 



FARM FORECASTER 

CROP AND LIVE STOCK REPORT FOR NORTH CAROLINA 

W. A. GRAHAM, Commissioner of Agriculture (N. C.) W F. CALLANDER, Chairman Crop Reporting Board (U. S.) 

WILLIAM H. RHODES, Jr., Associate Agricultural Statistician FRANK PARKER, Agricultural Statistician 



LOOKING BACK AT THE 1931 CROP YEAR 

WILLIAM A. GRAHAM, Commissioner 



Intelligent retrospection is a virtue which, 
if properly exercised, may have a far reach- 
ing effect in the correction of past mistakes. 
As we look back at the year 1931 there is 
very little to command admiration or in- 
spire courage, if our glance is but a casual 
one. However, if we are in an analytical 
frame of mind, we may see silver linings 
behind some of its clouds. 

The past year was one of the most dis- 
couraging in the history of this Nation. It 
was heralded with hope, as all New Years 
are, but it was ushered out on the night of 
December 31st with a sigh of relief, as 
humanity turned its thoughts to the year in 
which we are now living and which is char- 
acterized by many of the drawbacks which 
confronted us in 1931. 

Last year saw prices continue to tumble; 
it witnessed very little that could be con- 
strued as being constructive; it was char- 
acterized by crumbling hopes and fortunes, 
as once prosperous persons clung to straws 
in the vortex of its various disappoint- 
ments. 

Agriculture experienced little that was 
helpful. Old promises were broken and 
new ones made, only to die aborning. But 
out of it all came the realization that the 
path to agricultural independence for the 
individual farmer lay in the direction of 
new and untried fields. 

Now Producing Essentials 

Thus, we find that during the past year, 
blessed by a bountiful crop of fruits and 
vegetables as we were, the housewives of 
North Carolina canned and otherwise pre- 
served millions of containers of food for 
winter use. We find, further, that many 
farmers who were formerly slaves to the 



one-crop and the two-crop system broaden- 
ed the scope of their production and pro- 
vided more food and feedstuffs than ever 
before in the history of the State. While it 
is true that values were down to a distress- 
ing minimum, and that while money was 
very scarce, at no time were we threatened 
with starvation or with actual want. We 
had food and to spare; and, after all, food 
is the all-important factor in human sub- 
sistence. 

Our people were faced with a sense of 
dire necessity and they measured up to the 
emergency. They did not retreat under 
their responsibilities. They kept up the 
fight, as North Carolinians are accustomed 
to do. We find that, through it all, our 
people, although they were confronted with 
many disappointments, held an abiding 
faith in themselves and in their ability to 
perform. We were blessed by a kind Provi- 
dence, and our people, if they are anything, 
are a religious people. 

During the fall months, there was a per- 
vading fear that the winter might bring 
added hardships, but these did not mater- 
ialize. Fall passed, with the weather still 
mild and pleasant; winter came on, and it 
was one of the most remarkable winters in 
the memory of this generation. There were 
no seasons of "hard" weather. The mild 
climate of the ordinary fall marked the 
"zero" hour of the season, and the only 
severe weather that we experienced occur- 
red in March. This was of short duration 
and brought no real suffering. 

Thus, we passed from a year of unfortu- 
nate conditions into a year which many 
believe will turn the tide back to prosperity. 
Whether this be the case or not, we are all 
the better prepared to practice those 
economies which are so necessary in times 
of stress. 



Looking Ahead Hopefully 

We now turn our faces toward another 
anticipated harvest, and it is my sincere 
hope that we will take advantage of every 
opportunity during the present growing 
season; that we will not only raise all the 
food and feedstuff possible, but that we 
will conserve all we possibly can. While 
even the United States Weather Bureau 
will not venture long distance forecasts, it 
stands to reason that it will be many a year 
before we experience a winter as mild as 
the one recently passed. We must, there- 
fore, be prepared for whatever emergency 
arises. We can do this by making use of 
every spare acre for the production of 
those things which are necessary to our 
existence. We are a people who have never 
been coerced. We have reduced cotton and 
tobacco acreage of our own accord. This 
policy was brought about through the pro- 
cesses of education and through the reali- 
zation that was necessary for us to abandon 
harmful policies. 

My message to the farmers of North 
Carolina through this publication, which I 
hope each will read with pleasure and profit, 
is that they do not give up hope, but dis- 
play that indomitable spirit which has al- 
ways characterized them in the past. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my thanks 
to those who have contributed their time 
and efforts to this issue of The Forecaster. 
This publication ranks among the best of 
its kind in any American State and I con- 
gratulate those who have brought it to its 
present state of usefulness. 



The State Department of Agriculture 
serves the farming interests of North 
Carolina through checks and analyses of 
fertilizers, foods and seed. Its Veterinary, 
Entomology, Marketing, Weights and 
Measures, Botany, Test Farms, Publica- 
tions and Warehousing Divisions offer 
extensive services that are needed for 
emergencies and upon call. 

The Statistical Division is largely an 
Information office. In order to compile 
reliable statistics, thousands of intelligent 
farmers must provide us with their judg- 
ment reports. We have the full coopera- 
tion of the United States Department of 
Agriculture. Our Field of statistics is 
farm wide as evidenced by this publica- 
tion. 

v J 




NORTH CAROLINA CROPS 
Seasons 1929, 1930, Revised and Preliminary 1931 Estimates 



Yield Per Acre 
I 



FIELD CROP 



UNIT 



PRINCIPAL CROPS 

Corn, for grain Bushels 

Corn, for silage Tons 

Corn, for forage Tons 

Corn, all (except sweet and pop) Bushels 

Corn, leaf fodder Tons 

Corn, tops Tons 

Winter Wheat, planted 

Winter Wheat, harvested Bushels 

Oats, for grain Bushels 

Barley, for grain Bushels 

Rye, for grain Bushels 

Buckwheat Bushels 

Sorghum, for sirup Gallons 

Sorghum, for forage Tons 

Cotton, planted 

Cotton, harvested (lint) Pounds 

Cottonseed Tons 

Tobacco Pounds 

Potatoes, Irish (all) Bushels 

Potatoes, Irish (Commercial early) Bushels 

Potatoes, Sweet Bushels 

HAY CROPS 

Clover, Japan, Lespedeza Tons 

Clover, red, alsike Tons 

Clover and Timothy mixed Tons 

Alfalfa Tons 

Cowpeas, for hay Tons 

Soybeans, for bay Tons 

Peanut, hay Tons' 

Annual Legumes (Total) Tons 

Grain, cut green for hay Tons 

Miscellaneous, tame hay Tons 

All tame hay (total) Tons 

Wild hay (total) Tons 

SOYBEANS 

Total (equivalent solid) Bushels 

Beans gathered - Bushels 



Revised 



Acreage 
Resived 



I Preliminary 



1929 



1930 



1931 



1929 j 1930 | 193T 



COWPEAS" 

Total (equivalent solid) Bushels 36,000 

Peas gathered Bushels 12,000 



.892,000 
12,000 
81,000 
,985,000 
,065,000 
325,000 
'360,000 
353,000 
168,000 
19,000 
54,000 
5,000 
15,000 
9,000 
.916,000 
,878,000 
,878,000 
736,000 
62,000 
27,500 
60,000 



21,000 
36,000 
54,000 
6,000 
30,000 
96,000 
92,000 
18,000 
53,000 
83.000 
71,000 
23,000 



185,000 
78.000 



PEANUTS 

Total, (all purposes) Pounds 

Nuts gathered Pounds 

COMMERCIAL TRUCK FOR MARKET 

Lima beans Bushels 

Snap beans, early Bushels 

Snap beans, late Bushels 

Cabbage, (including Kraut) Tons 

Cantaloupes Crates 

Carrots Bushels 

Cucumbers Bushels 

Lettuce Crates 

Green Peas Bushels 

Peppers Bushels 

Spinach Bushels 

Strawberries Crates 

Tomatoes Bushels 

Watermelons Melons 

TOTAL TRUCK CROPS* 

For Canning and Manufacture 

For Consumption, fresh 



243.000 
230,000 



FRUIT 

Apples, agricultural Bushels 

Apples, commercial Barrels 

Peaches, agricultural Bushels 

Peaches, commercial Bushels 

Pears, total Bushels 

Grapes Tons! 

Pecans Poundsl 



2,135.000 
13,000 
85,000 
2,233,000 
1,217,000 
600,000 
277,000 
265,000 
186,000 
21,000 
49,000 
4.000 
22,000 
16,000 
1,656,000 
1,643,000 
1,643,000 
766,000 
76,000 
31,500 
75,000 



27,000 
40,000 
50,000 
5,000 
28,000 
124,000 
192,000 
344,000 
59,000 
98,000 
623,000 
25,000 



237,000 
97,000 



45.000 
17,000 



231.000 
218.000 



2,244,000 
12,000 
89,000 
2,345,000 
1,300,000 
660,000 
344,000 
339,000 
197,000 
24,000 
64.000 
4,000 
29.000 
19,000 
1,358,000 
1,348,000 
1,348,000 
689,000 
79,000 
33,500 
80,000 



35,000 
34,000 
46,000 
5,000 
59,000 
136,000 
234,000 
429,000 
68,000 
98.000 
715,000 
24,000 



253,000 
107,000 



82,000 
34,000 



281,000 
266,000 



300 


1,200 


1,000 


6,000 


6.500 


6,000 


600 


500 


500 


850 


800 


700 


1,000 


620 


1,100 


400 


350 


300 


4.200 


7,300 


5.S00 


1,160 


1,400 


1,500 


3,100 


4.740 


3.650 


630 


750 


700 


110 


80 


80 


7,000 


5,400 


5,300 


50 


1,450 


1,800 


5,500 


7,600 


10,500 


31,250 


39,190 


40,160 


150 


200 


780 


31,100 


38,990 


39,380 



Production 
Revised 



1929 



| Preliminary 



1931 



19 00 


18 00 


20.50 


q ^ oio a aa 


90 _1QA AAA 


Ad AAO AAA 


ft QA 

o.ov 


5 50 


5 30 


76,000 


TO AAA 


64,000 


19 00 


18 00 


20.50 


07 71 c aa a 


A A 1QA AAA 


AQ A7*> AAA 
*0,U 1 - ,uuu 


^25 


!23 


^24 


266,250 


279,910 


312,000 


.33 


.31 


.34 


107,250 


186,000 


224,200 


10 30 


10 80 


13.00 


Q ftQ ft ("mil 


O QftO AAA 


A 4A7 AAA 
4.4U i ,UUU 


19 00 


19 00 


23.00 




Q ^34 AAA 


A 1 AAA 


18 00 


17 50 


20.00 


qio AHA 


Qftfl AAA 


J £ A AAA 


8 00 


8.00 


9.00 


aaa 


oqo AAA 


KTR AAA 


lo.ou 


12 00 


15 00 


oo.uuu 


48,000 


ftA AAA 


70 00 


60 00 


73.00 


1 A^A AAA 
J., VOU.UUU 


1 9 9(1 AAA 


O 1 1 7 AAA 
_ , I 1 i ,uuu 


1 80 


1 75 


1 50 


16 000 


•"> Q AAA 


O Q AAA 


1 QA aa 


225 00 


275 00 


TAT AAA 


TTK AAA 


#77K AAA 


352.50 


417 53 


510 39 


001 AAA 


040 AAA 


QAA AAA 


CftO fid 


765 00 


680 00 


J.J37 Qfift AAA 


^ft^ QQA AAA 


ARQ ~.->H AAA 
1 DO, O — V , UUU 


99.00 


95.00 


108.00 


6,138,000 


7,220,000 


8,532,000 


125.00 


140.00 


155.00 


3.438.000 


4,410,000 


5,192,000 


112.00 


on aa 


82 00 


ft TOA AAA 


ft 7KA AAA 


Ct K C A AAA 

o.odU.UUU 








24 600 


3 1,600 


A A AAA 

4y,uuo 


1.17 


1.17 


1.40 








1.10 


OA 

.ou 


1 00 


O Q ft AA 

y ,ouu 


O O AAA 


34,000 


1 00 


1 00 


1.00 




t^A AAA 


46,000 


2100 


1^60 


2^00 


12[000 


8,000 


10,000 


.85 


.75 


.95 


25,500 


21,000 


56,100 


1.20 


1.00 


1.05 


1 15,200 


1 4 AAA 


1 A A O A A 

14 J.oOO 


55 


.55 


.65 


1 A t ft A A 


KK, ft A A 


152,100 


.'77 


.73 


.82 


246,300 


250,600 


351.000 


1.16 


1.00 


1.10 


61,000 


59.000 


75.000 


1.00 


.90 


1.10 


Qt AAA 


Q Q O A A 

00, JOU 


1 A 7 O A A 

107,800 


Q 1 

• •7X 


.85 


.95 


cflO AAA 


R90 AAA 


C77 AAA 

I i ,000 


1.11 


.75 


1.10 




19,000 


AAA 

JO, 000 








*> JOQ AAA 


A Q 1 AAA 

o.Ool.OOO 


O ~ . .1 AAA 
0,04^,000 


13 50 


13.00 


14.00 








13 50 


13.00 


14.00 


1 A K Q AAA 


*f OR1 AAA 


1 iQ Q A A A 








Aft AAA 


ifle AAA 


O Q A AAA 

y o4,ouo 


1 1 00 


11.00 


12.00 










11.00 


12.00 


HO AAA 


10 7 AAA 


IAD AAA 








017 flfi A AAA 


OA7 QAA AAA 


Qoo Ic^AAAA 


,020.00 


900.00 1,150.00 








,020.00 


900.00 1,150.00 


234,600,000 


196,200,000 


305,900,000 








15,000 


79,000 


70,000 


50.00 


66.00 


70.00 








75.00 


120.00 


100.00 


450,000 


780,000 


600,000 


60.00 


55.00 


70.00 


39,000 


28,000 


35,000 


7.00 


6.00 


5.00 


6,000 


4,800 


3,500 


70.00 


85.00 


90.00 


70,000 


53,000 


99,000 


175.00 


200.00 


300.00 


70,000 


70,000 


90.000 


125.00 


150.00 


50.00 


525,000 


1,095,000 


290,000 


117.00 


93.00 


134.00 


136,000 


130,000 


201,000 


70.00 


83.00 


100.00 


217,000 


393,000 


365,000 


250.00 


140.00 


200.00 


158,000 


105,000 


140,000 


250.00 


240.00 


200.00 


28,000 


19,000 


16,000 


97.00 


81.00 


120.00 


679.000 


437,000 


636,000 


150.00 


40.00 


50.00 


8.000 


58,000 


90,000 


180.00 


270.00 


280.00 


990,000 


2,052,000 


2,940,000 
























2,628,000 


2.555,000 


5,475,000 








150,000 


100,000 


274,000 








1,400,000 


1,800.000 


3,128,000 








950,000 


1,245,000 


1,257,000 








205,000 


115,000 


323,000 








3,718 


3,880 


4,620 








664.000 


640,000 


1,050,000 



The figures on these two pages present a 
digest of the complete crop information for 
North Carolina for the past three years. 
The small table opposite on the other page 
gives the basic crop acreages and numbers 
of livestock for the past thirteen years. 

Thus, we have available here a study of 
the trends in numbers of livestock and acre- 
ages of crops from the World War inflation 
to the 1932 extreme depression. Due to the 
disparity of figures shown by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and the Census Bureau, 
an attempt has been made to revise the 
Agricultural Department's reports so as to 
be more in conformity with those of the 
Census Bureau. Thus, the data on these 
pages are different from any previously pub- 
lished. Previous issues of the Farm Pore- 
caster should, therefore, be used with 



caution when quoting figures authoritative- 
ly. For inter-county or inter-state com- 
parative purposes, they will serve practically 
as well as this issue. They are, therefore, 
satisfactory for class room and ordinary 
reference usage. 



Crop Diversification 

The acreage distribution of our North 
Carolina crops is clearly shown to be fairly 
well diversified, not only for certain Pied- 
mont counties, but for the State as a whole. 
For instance, corn ranks as the lead- 
ing crop, with about 2,250,000 acres* 
cotton comes second, with approximately 1,- 
360,000 acres. Then come hays with prob- 
ably more than 725,000 acres. Tobacco is 



fourth, with the 1932 acreage at probably 
less than 500,000 acres, but with 690,000 
shown above for 1931. Peanuts have an 
acreage of approximately 300,000 acres. Soy 
beans will probably reach near 300,000 acres 
in 1932. Wheat will be considerably more 
than that. Even commercial truck crops 
probably total nearly 100,000 acres when 
considering the local market sources. That 
for shipment out of the State is approxi- 
mately 40,000 acres. 

The trends in prices for the past year are 
shown to be distinctly downward. This is 
also reflected in the value per acre of most 
crops. The production rank of North Caro- 
lina for the different crops is shown in the 
column at the right on Page 5, as well as 
the State leading in the production of parti- 
cular crops. 



NORTH CAROLINA CROPS 
Seasons 1929, 1930, Revised, and Preliminary 1931 Estimates 



Price Per Unit 
( December 1 ) 



Total Value 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



1931 

$ 



1.00 
6.30 



.93 .43 | 
.50 5.75 



1.00 .93 .43 
25.00 23.00 20.00 
15.00 13.00 11.50 



1.41 

.75 
1.28 
1.40 
1.07 

.85 
16.90 

".167 
29.00 
.185 
1.05 
1.00 
.90 



1.09 
.68 
1.06 
1.23 
.98 
.80 
17.00 

^099 
22.00 
.129 
1.20 
1.30 
.90 



.72 
.38 
.70 
.71 
.58 
.53 
12.00 

~060 
12.00 
.094 
.60 
.52 
.55 



35.948,000 
478,800 



35.739.900 
540,000 



37.715,000 
6,656,250 
1,608,750 

5,127,000 
2,394.000 
438,000 
605,000 
73,000 
892,000 
270,000 



37,380,000 
6,437,930 
2,418,000 

3,120,000 
2,403,000 
390,000 
482,000 
47,000 
1,056,000 
476,000 



62,374.000 
9,599,000 

90,274,000 
6,445,000 
3,438,000 
6,048,000 



38,362,000 
7,546,000 

75,593,000 
8,664,000 
5.733,000 
6,075,000 



19,780,860 
368,000 

20,671,000 
6,240,000 
2,578,300 

3,173,000 
1,722,000 
336,000 
409,000 
35,000 
1,122,000 
336,000 

23,250,000 
4,128,000 

44,041,000 
5,119,000 
2,700,000 
3,608,000 



Value Per Acre 



[ Produc- 
| tion 
I Rank of 
State 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



$ 



19. 15 


17.39 


15.00 


ATI AQ {i 




735 000 


22.41 


20. o 5 


2100 


19.75 


19.00 


14.84 


TOO 1 AA 


anil Ann 

DUO ,UUU 


^04 560 


21.73 


15.20 


14.84 


19.09 


21.00 


15.70 


1,030,860 


1,050,000 


722,200 


19.09 


21.00 


15.70 


21.50 


23.50 


20.00 


JOB,UUU 


1 Q C AAA 


on AAA 


43.00 


37.60 


40.00 


20.58 


20.00 


15.35 


524,790 


420,000 


861,140 


17.49 


15.00 


14.58 


20.96 


20.50 


15.25 


O A t A K A A 

4 14,oy0 




2 177 700 


25.15 


20.50 


16.01 


15.70 


14.00 


9.50 


l,o5 ( ,9z0 


1 A T ■ A A fl 




8.64 


7.70 


6.18 


18.67 


17.72 


12.77 


4,597,300 


i iii. a A A 
4, 4 4 U, 4 U U 


A AOO TO A 


14.38 


12.94 


10.47 


16.36 


14.95 


13.48 


A A T < > i ' , > 

997 ,yo0 


Q Q O ft^il 
006,UOU 


1 All AAA 
1,111 i,yuu 


18.98 


14.95 


14.83 


18.71 


19.50 


11.50 


1,552,930 


1 " 1 A AAA 

l, t ly.yoo 


i oak non 


18.71 


17.55 


12.65 


1 7. 8*0 


19.30 


13.00 


9,292 ,000 


1 A O C O AAA 

1U, Joo.UUU 


c cm nnn 


16 20 


16.4 1 


12.35 


13.80 


14.00 


9 50 


359,000 


266,000 


247,000 


15.32 


10.50 


10.45 


1.70 


1.55 


.70 


4,247,000 


4,776,000 


2,479,000 


22.95 


20.15 


9.80 


1.70 


1.55 


.70 


1,790,100 


1,954,550 


1,048,600 


22.95 


20.15 


9.80 


2.30 


2.10 


.80 


911,000 


1,040,000 


787,000 


25.30 


23.10 


9.60 


2.30 


2.10 


.80 


303,600 


392,700 


326,400 


25.30 


23.10 


9.60 


.040 


.033 


.021 


9,914.000 


6,861,000 


6,786,000 


40.80 


29.70 


24.15 


.040 


.033 


.021 


9,384,000 


6,474,600 


6,423,900 


40.80 


29.70 


24.15 


2.00 


1.00 


1.35 


30,000 


79,000 


94,000 


100 00 


60.00 


94.50 


1.32 


.57 


.50 


594,000 


333,000 


225,000 


99.00 


68.40 


50.00 


1.20 


.60 


.75 


47,000 


17,000 


26,000 


72.00 


33.00 


52.50 


20.00 


44.00 


14.00 


120,000 


211,000 


49,000 


140.00 


264.00 


70.00 


1.20 


1.15 


.70 


84.000 


61,000 


69,000 


84.00 


97.75 


63.00 


.60 


.50 


.15 


42.000 


13,000 


4,000 


105.00 


100.00 


45.00 


1.76 


.35 


.60 


924,000 


169,000 


174,000 


220.00 


52.50 


30.00 


1.65 


.98 


.60 


224,000 


127,000 


121,000 


193.05 


91.14 


80.40 


1.61 


.44 


1.10 


349,000 


173.000 


402,000 


112.70 


36.52 


110.00 


.75 


.75 


.40 


118,000 


79.000 


56,000 


187.50 


105.00 


80.00 


.75 


.90 


.55 


21,000 


17,000 


9,000 


187.50 


216.00 


110.00 


3.10 


2.90 


2.65 


2,105,000 


1,267,000 


1,685,000 


300.70 


234.90 


318.00 


2.00 


2.00 


.75 


16,000 


116,000 


68,000 


300.00 


80.00 


37.50 


.175 


.115 


.080 


173.000 


236,000 


235,000 


31.50 


31.05 


22.40 








4,889,000 


2,951,000 


3,347,000 














16,000 


23.000 


58,000 














4,873,000 


2,928,000 


3,289,000 








1.25 


1.05 


.55 


3,283.000 


2,683.000 


3,011.000 








3.75 


3.15 


1.60 


562,000 


315,000 


438,000 








1.40 


1.35 


.65 


1,960,000 


2.430,000 


2,033,000 








1.06 


2.05 


.60 


1,007,000 


2,552.250 


754,200 








1.20 


1.30 


.70 


246,000 


150.000 


226,000 








65.00 


80.00 


80.00 


242,000 


310.000 


370,000 








.286 


.277 


.182 


190,000 


166,000 


191,000 









19 00 


16.74 


8.82 


39.69 


41.25 


30.48 




19.00 


---- 
16.74 


8 82 


6.25 


5.29 


4^80 


4.95 


4.03 


3.91 


14.52 


11.77 


9.36 


14.25 


12,92 


8.74 


23.04 


18.55 


14.00 


11.20 


9.84 


6.39 


14.45 


11.76 


8.70 


59.50 


48.00 


38.69 


30.42 


29.75 


18.00 


31.73 


2Y28 


16.50 


5.11 


9.19 


6.12 


122.66 


98.69 


63.92 


103.95 


114.00 


64.80 


125.00 


182.00 


80.60 


100.80 


81.00 


45.10 



'301 '31 



Iowa 

Wisconsin 

South Dakota. 



23 
25 
25 
16 
15 
2 
14 



Iowa 

Minnesota 

North Dakota. 
Pennsylvania- _ 

Alabama 

Texas 



1 
14 
4 
1 



30 
41 



4 

14 
25 
27 
26 



10 
40 
18 
16 

2 
15 

6 

5 
21 

9 
29 



I 14 

I 28 
I 5 



Texas 

Texas 

KejvBudky 

Maine 

Virginia 

North Carolina- 



New York- 
California- 



17 
i 11 

I 10 



Leading State 
In Production 



Illinois 

California- 
Tennessee. 
Vew York- 
S'ebraska_ _ 



Xorth Carolina- 



Florida 

Colorado. _ 
New York- 
California-. 
California- 
Florida 

California- 
California- 

Florida 

Texas 

Louisiana.. 

Texas 

Georeia 



Washington. 
Washington. 
California- _ 



Califomia. 
California- 
Texas 



FIELD CROPS' 



PRINCIPAL CROPS 

Com, for grain 

Corn, for silage 

Corn, for forage 

._ Corn, all (except sweet and pop) 

Corn, leaf fodder 

Com, tops 

Winter Wheat, planted 

Winter Wheat, harvested 

Oats, for grain 

Barley, for grain 

Rye, for grain 

Buckwheat 

Sorghum, for sirup 

Sorghum, for forage 

Cotton, planted 

Cotton, harvested (bint) 

Cottonseed 

Tobacco 

Potatoes, Irish (all) 

Potatoes, Irish (commercial early) 
Potatoes, sweet 



HAY CROPS 

Clover, sweet, Lespedeza 

Clover, red, alsike 

Clover and Timothy mixed 

Alfalfa 

Cowpeas, for hay 

Soybeans, for hay 

Peanuts, hay 

Annual Legumes (total) 

Grain, cut green for hay 

Miscellaneous, tame hay 

All tame hay (total) 

Wild hay (total) 



SOYBEANS 

Total (equivalent solid) 

Beans gathered 



COWPEAS 

Total (equivalent solid) 

Peas gathered 



PEANUTS 

Total (all purposes) 

Nuts gathered 



COMMERCIAL TRUCK FOR MARKET 

Lima beans 

Snap beans, early 

Snap Beans, late 

Cabbage, (including Kraut) 

Cantaloupes 

Carrots 

Cucumbers 

Lettuce 

Green Peas 

Peppers 

Spinach 

Strawberries 

Tomatoes 

Watermelons 

TOTAL TRUCK CROPS 

For canning and manufacture 

For consumption, fresh 



FRUIT 

Apples, agricultural 

Apples, commercial 

Peaches, agricultural 

Peaches, commercial 

Pears, total 

Grapes 

Pecans 



NOTE 
for harvest spring 



1931 Cotton estimate, preliminary. Filial ginnings report shows 747,208 — -(500 
1932 were 387,000 acres. The acreage seed in Rye for 1932 is the same as 



lb.) — bales ginned from the 1931 crop, 
that for 1931. 



Winter Wheat plantings in fall 



LIVESTOCK ON FARMS— JANUARY 1. N. C. REVISED 1919-1931 





| 1919 


1920 | 


1921 


1922 


1923 | 


1924 


1925 


1926 | 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


Horses _ 




1711 


163 


155 


147| 


1381 


1361 


1251 


114 


106 


98 


89 


83 




:::--! =, 


257| 


260 


264 


268| 


273[ 


285[ 


285 


285 


284 


282 


282 


276 


Milk Cows 




3001 


306 


312 


309| 


306| 


312| 


303| 


296 


294 


285 


285 


299 


All Cattle 




680| 


670 


600 


580| 


562 1 


545| 


529] 


490 


496 


496 


507 


532 


Sheep _ _ 




911 


95 


86 


801 


701 


671 


73 


80 


85 


94 


88 


90 


Swine 




1.271 


1,246 


1,186 


1.100| 


1 020[ 


894| 


832 1 


867 


1,050 


945 


830 


838 



CROP ACREAGE— N. C. REVISED 1919-1931 



Com 


2,531 


2,382 


2,403 


2,282 


2,189 


2.080 


2.153 


2,110 


2,088 


2,046 


1,985 


2,233 


2,345 


Wheat 


621 


517 


454 


428 


396 


345 


324 


373 


380 


361 


353 


265 


339 


Oats - _ _ 


170 


142 


190 


192 


205 


210 


206 


190 


167 


147 


168 


186 


197 


Rye __ 1 


68 


65 


54 


75 


70 


55 


56 


73 


55 


51 


54 


49 


64 


Barley 












5 




I 


11 


16 


19 


21 


24 


Ruckwheat _ 


6 


~6 


5 


~~6 


~~8 


8 


7 




6 


5 


5 


4 


4 


Irish Potatoes 


37 


37 


38 


41 


40 


51 


48 


57 


68 


83 


62 


76 


79 


Sweet Potatoes 


75 


65 


69 


72 


66 


60 


65 


63 


69 


62 


60 


75 


80 


Hay-Tame - 


591 


565 


597 


690 


678 


627 


598 


629 


629 


595 


571 


623 


715 


Tobacco 


524 


62 5 


417 


447 


548 


477 


54 


5 50 


04 2 


716 


736 


766 


689 



6 



ARE WE BLINDFOLDED? 

The other fellow's job is always easier 
than our own. He makes money easier than 
we do. He is just lucky. We never get a 
break. We farmers buy at retail and sell 
at wholesale prices. We even admit that 
we do not know just why this is so. We 
admit that we are blindfolded, so far as we 
are able to "see" ahead. Thus, we admit 
that we do not know the cause for it all. 
We do not have the facts or information 
which will enable us to "see" the pitfalls 
and to take advantage of profitable oppor- 
tunities. 

Does Study Help? 

Few of us like to study. Some have to do 
so in order to exist. Study is simply trying 
to store up new information. It leads to 
analyzing and anticipating causes and ef- 
fects. This year's conditions are different 
from those of last year. We must study or 
we get behind. Then the "blindfold" con-* 
dition is experienced. This applies to farm- 
ing just as essential as to any other 
business. 

Theory And Experience 

The critic says of the student: "Oh, he is 
a theorist — impractical." Theory is the 
ability — analyze — digest and to understand 
something. Our bulletins and reports are 
usually based on or are the results of the 
experiences of many successful farmers. A 
theory is usually a statement which has 
been proven true frequently enough to 
justify dependability of results. 

Reasonable Judgment 

Snap judgement may be a guess. Reas- 
onable judgment should be a decision, based 
on careful — studied analysis of any matter. 
Our experiences cause us to know that cer- 
tain results may be expected if we follow 
definite practices. Crop estimates are reas- 
oned judgment — or should be. The existing 
weather conditions, the stage of growth of 
the plants, the cultivation, etc., should ordi- 
narily result in a certain percent of a "full 
crop" production at harvest time — if good 
conditions follow. 

'nventories And Records Basic 

To find out where a farmer is "at," he 
must make a record of his supplies, machin- 
ery, livestock, and money. These records or 
inventories are comparable from year to 
year. Thus, he may know whether his 
affairs are improving or going backward. 
Best of all, he knows where to look for 
weaknesses. If he keeps cost or expense 
records, he knows where the weak places 
are. Bookkeeping is indispensable to all 
business men. Farming is the most uncer- 
tain and most complicated of all businesses, 
yet we regard "records" as mere theory and 
"tommy-rot". Just talk to the farmer who 
does keep "books" and hear what he says 



and why. It is the only way toward a 
steady success. 



Farming Independence 

Is farming an independent vocation? 
May the farmer stop and sell and buy when 
he pleases? Yes, but at what price? Can 
he judge wisely without much study and 
many inquiries and tests? Yes, but at what 
cost? Independence indicates a lack of de- 
pendence on others. How many of us can 
laugh at the others and say "I need none 
of your help — I am independent"? 

Can Farmers Organize 
Successfully? 

Yes, farmers can develop a powerful and 
profitable organization. However, this will 
never occur until the majority of the mem- 
bers know enough of the fundamentals to 
support their leaders. This comes only 
through study, more study, and much effort 
at analyzing the causes and effects of price 
movements. All this has long been avail- 
able to them. These are not theories but 
are based on experiences and facts. 



Trade Reports 

All successful organizations put great de- 
pendence in their trade reports. If not ap- 
propriate studies of supplies, consumption, 
competition and influential factors are 
available, they collect such as are needed. 
They must have such information in order 
to exist. Individual farmers should adopt 
this idea and learn to think and plan wisely 
and safely for themselves. 



System — Planning Ahead 

With reliable crop and livestock informa- 
tion at hand for study; with a knowledge 
of existing conditions at home and else- 
where; with good judgment to systematize 
these facts so as to draw conclusions, the 
individual farmer may so plan his work 
ahead that he plays on the safe side of the 
fence and in the long run, comes out far 
ahead of the other fellow who guesses and 
considers "Ignorance is bliss, so it is folly 
to be wise." 



Diversification of Interests 

The safe way to avoid losses is to diversify 
one's interests. Grow the feed crops and 
livestock that are known to be needed on 
the farm. Certain ones of these are usually 
safe, even saleable. These often offer no 
appreciable profit, however. Then select 
such other "cash" crops as crop reports 
and reliable leaders recommend. Self gath- 
ered facts are the best start. Government 
reports on supply and demand factors are 
basic. 



Farm and Non-Agricultural Prices 

Some farmers do not know that far better 
price information is available on manu- 
factured products than concerning farm 
products. Such reports appear more fre- 
quently and may be had by farmers. While 
farmers object to crop reporting, the "trade" 
reports are made and received with real 
interest, and are used regularly. Thus, the 
wise farmer may study relationships of all 
commodity prices — monthly. 



Economy 

Economy is relative. Stinginess or constant 
saving may prove to be extravagance. Los- 
ing sight of opportunity and failing to take 
advantage of price opportunities may mean 
anything but economy. Economical pro- 
duction and living often, require expend- 
ing — wisely, but certainly utilizing one's 
time and thought to good advantage. 



Luxury 

Luxuries embrace those things which are 
not really advantageous to our well being. 
Thus, they are expensive and unnecessary. 
They are unessentials. 



The Trade and "Speculators" 

It is easiest to find fault with some one or 
something of which we know very little. 
The "speculator" is such. Who is he? Is 
he a myth, a friend, or just some one of 
whom we have heard. Congress investigat- 
ed the "Bear" wave of short selling on the 
Stock Market last April. Are these the only 
group or kind of speculators? Isn't any 
person who buys and sells for profit* to a 
certain extent, a speculator? Then, most 
all buyers of farm products are such. The 
merchant, the cotton mills, the tobacco buy- 
ers, neighbors, millers, butchers, etc., should 
be our friends and cultivated as such, if we 
are to be treated favorably by them. We 
are dependent on them and the "trade" for 
the sale of our farm products. 

You and I want to buy as cheaply as we 
can, and sell at as high a price as we may. 
This is human nature. The "trade' must 
keep informed through trade reports, con- 
cerning the supply, demand and price 
trends, in order that they may know what 
prices they can afford to pay for the raw 
products. Why isn't it better for us farm- 
ers to also keep informed and tell our buy- 
ers why they can well afford to pay certain 
prices for our products. This would bring 
their respect, admiration and patronage. 
These friends are interested in our welfare, 
but they don't like to be called speculators, 
any more than we like to be called "coun- 
try-hicks" or "hay seeds" or "clod hoppers." 

We may win their aid and good will 
through complimentary and intelligent ap- 
proaches rather than through criticism and 
knocking. We must be fair, square and 
business like toward others in order to win 
the same consideration from them. 



7 



FARM LABOR — Supply and Demand 
March 1, 1931—1932 



STATE 
and 
DIVISION 



Supply 



Per Cent of 
Normal 



Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts _ . 
Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



Per Cent of 
Normal 



Supply 
Expressed 
As Per Cent 
of Demand 



North Atlantic 



Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin I 118 



East North Central _ 



Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 
South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



West North Central 



Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia _ 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



South Atlantic 



Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama _ 
Mississippi 
Arkansas _ 
l.ouisiana _ 
Oklahoma 
Texas 



South C&ntral 



Montana __ 

Idaho 

Wyoming _ 
Colorado 
Xew Mexico 

Arizona 

C'tah 

Nevada 

Washington 

Oregon 

California _ 



Western 



UNITED STATES 



1931 


| 1932 


1931 


1932 


| 1931 


1932 


111 


1 

125 


74 


59 


150 


212 


121 


124 


77 


76 


157 


163 


116 


123 


76 


72 


153 


171 


123 


126 


79 


72 


156 


175 


114 


116 


80 


77 


142 


151 


116 


127 


78 


79 


149 


161 


106 


119 


78 


68 


136 


175 


120 


121 


80 


77 


150 


157 


108 


121 


79 


70 


137 


173 


1 1 0.9 


121.4 


78.2 


70.2 


141.9 


1 73.0 


117 


122 


64 


64 


183 


191 


122 


I 128 


68 


61 


179 


210 


115 


I 123 


74 


67 


155 


184 


122 


135 


63 


55 


194 


245 


118 


1 129 


77 


66 


153 


195 


118.3 


126.7 


69.8 


63.3 


169.5 


200.0 


109 


120 


1 74 
74 


57 


157 


211 


111 


122 


81 


69 


135 


177 


112 


116 


65 


58 


172 


200 


107 


117 


66 


51 


162 


229 


109 


122 


73 


50 


149 


244 


1 12 


123 


75 


62 


149 


198 


116 


129 


65 


55 


178 


235 


111.1 


120.8 


71.7 


58.9 


154.9 


204.9 


107 


109 


80 


72 


134 


151 


110 


109 


72 


70 


153 


156 


115 


116 


69 


70 


167 


166 


105 


112 


63 


60 


167 


187 


109 


113 


65 


62 


168 


182 


98 


107 


71 


68 


138 


157 


106 


110 


71 


64 


149 


172 


104 


113 


80 


70 


130 


161 


1 06.8 


1 1 1 .3 


69.7 


65.9 


153.2 


168.9 


I 

103 


110 


64 


54 


161 


204 


105 


115 


70 


70 


150 


164 


114 


121 


65 


62 


175 


195 


103 


108 


65 


61 


158 


177 


112 


113 


47 


56 


238 | 


202 


111 


112 


68 


61 


163 | 


184 


115 


117 


58 


54 


198 | 


217 


113 


122 


56 


53 


202 


230 


109.8 


114.7 


61.0 


58.3 


180.0 j 


198.7 


I 

115 


132 


62 


46 


185 | 


287 


123 


139 


65 


54 


189 | 


257 


112 


132 | 


77 


72 


145 | 


183 


119 


130 


71 


57 


168 


228 


116 


121 | 


69 


56 


168 | 


216 


119 


117 


75 


62 


159 1 


189 


122 


133 


67 


45 


182 


296 


120 


137 


81 


48 


148 


285 


129 


141 


61 


56 


211 


252 


127 


137 


66 


60 


192 


228 


118 

1 


124 


79 


69 


149 | 


180 


120.1 | 

I 


129.1 


71.7 


60.5 


167.4 | 


"2T373 
"19272 


111.8 | 


119.1 


68.3 [ 


62.0 | 


163.6 | 




Just a typical barnyard scene on a small farm. 



FARM LABOR SUPPLY AND DEMAND 

The table on this page clearly indicates that the available 
farm labor is not only plentiful, but that there is a surplus. 
On the other hand, the demand is not equal to the usual. The 
lack of finances and the prospects of no revenue later prohibits 
farmers from hiring labor. 

Both farm owners and tenants were puzzled as to what to do 
last year. The problem was even greater this year. It was certain 
that the usual "assistance", "help to run them", "furnishings" 
and other forms of credit and "carrying" expenses would be 
reduced drastically this year. Many owners have either lost 
their farms or have allowed tenants to work the land without 
charge. Tenants are living in nice houses formerly occupied 
by highly respected owners. 

The prices of farm products appearing on Page 28 clearly 
3how that in comparison with the costs on Page 30 there is a 
margin of loss rather than profit. How, then, may a farmer 
pay for producing money-losing products? 

NORTH CAROLINA CROPS 

On Pages 4 and 5 are shown the array of crops grown in this 
State. These are revised to better agree with the Federal 
Census of 1929. We still think that the North Carolina farm in- 
formation would be improved with the more complete reporting 
jf the Farm Census surveys. The reasons for this are indicated 
on Page 35. 

Those who think that we are not a diversified State need but 
study our acreages of crops and livestock in this publication. 
For instance, CORN leads in acreage. Hay crops equal to half 
the cotton acreage. Even the soy bean acreage is much more than 
wheat, rye and barley combined. Did you know that the tobacco 
acreage is less than that for hay? 

Teachers might fish out many interesting comparisons, includ- 
ing the leading State in the various crops shown in the right 
hand column, (Page 5). 

COMPENSATION TO REPORTERS 

The question often arises concerning the compensation which 
our v61untary crop reporters should receive for the frequent 
services rendered. This is a brief attempt to explain this matter. 

Contrary to the ideas of many private individuals, the Govern- 
ment services are in many instances conducted on a more 
economical plane than is possible with many private organiza- 
tions. This is particularly true of the Crop Reporting Service. 
For instance, the mailing-list of the North Carolina office is 
more than 15,000. The regular voluntary aides who have proven 
to be dependable number several thousands. The number of 
pieces of mail sent out annually runs into the hundreds of thou- 
sands. Yet the total cost of both the State and Federal agencies 
is probably less than $25,000 for the entire year, including the 
development of the annual Farm Census, which represents well 
over 200,000 farms. 

No one offers a continued voluntary service (even to the Gov- 
ernment; unless they feel that they are compensated in some 
way. In as much as no funds are available for financial com- 
pensation for the fine services rendered by the regular crop 
reporter, there must be some other reward available. This is 
true. Some reporters do not realize these advantages, while 
others may gain additional benefits by some of the features 
pointed out herewith. Frequently educational and information 
returns are far more valuable than the money returns for a 
given task. 

INFORMATION OFFERED 

When the voluntary reporter receives his schedule or inquiry 
blank, certain features of crop development are called to his 
attention. If he concientiously attempts to review and to pass 
judgment on these, he increasingly takes more notice of acreage 
shifts, crop developments, yield prospects, weather conditions, 
etc., as affecting the prospective production. 
Thus, after a few months or seasons, a re- 
porter is unconsciously enabled to size up 
the situation rapidly and reliably. Thus, 
he becomes a local authority on crop con- 
ditions. 

In addition to the self-education, reliable 
and practical bulletins, crop report publica- 
tions and special inquiries, as well as reports, 
are sent to him in recognition of his serv- 
ices. His experiences in the crop report 
work causes him to take more interest in the 
bulletins and reports which he receives. 
Thus, he is gradually led to the unconscious 
benefits of economic information which 
otherwise would perhaps not be used or ap- 
preciated by him. These, in turn, enable 
him to better plan his crop acreage and to 
probably market more intelligently. Thus, 
his advantages as a crop reporter are de- 
finite and represent more than if he were 
paid in cash for the few minutes required 
each month. 

It is, therefore, a privilege to be a mem- 
ber of the Crop Reporting Service of North 
Carolina. 



8 



FERTILIZER SALES 

The table above, showing a summary of 
the fertilizer tag sales for the past twenty 
year period, presents an interesting com- 
parison in the increasing usage of fertilizer 
from 1910 to 1927. The decline in fertilizer 
usage since that date has been heavy. Sales 
for the year '31 and '32 will probably drop 
back to the pre-war figures. The heaviest 
usage for any year on record was 1927. 
There seems to be a closer relationship be- 
tween the usage of fertilizer and the finan- 
cial standing of the community than be- 
tween fertilizer usage and the acreage in 
crops fertilized. Evidently many farmers 
increase the acreage of certain crops to off- 
set the decrease in the use of fertilizer and 
the consequent reduction in yield. 



ANNUAL FERTILIZER (Tag) SALES IN NORTH CAROLINA 
(Fiscal Year July 1, to June 30) 



Year 


July 1 to December 31 


Year 


January 1 


to 


June 30 


Total for Year 


Ending 


Total tor 
















June 30 


Year 




Tons 






Tons 




Tons 




July 1-June 30 




Fertilizer I Cottonseed 




Fertilizer j 


Cottonseed 


Fertilizer | Cottonseed 


Tons 




1 


Ileal 












Meal 




1910 


61.282 


34.957 


1911 


643.154 




72,358 


704,436 


107,315 


8 1 1 , 7 o 1 


1911 j 


65,343 


30.833 


19 12 


631,868 




93,355 


697,211 


124,188 


Q O 1 Q Q O 


1912 


68,461 


46,544 


1913 


763,808 




70,696 


832,269 


117,240 


if lit ,ouy 


1913 


84.930 


44,773 


1914 


794,689 




71.049 


879,619 


115,822 


995,441 


1914 


59,035 


44,944 


1915 


587,628 




73,927 


646,663 


118.871 


765,534 


1915 


67,351 


48,690 


1916 


534,996 




78,759 


602,347 


127,449 


729,796 


1916 


106,745 


20,231 


1917 


731,777 




34.098 


838,522 


54,329 


892,851 


1917 


199,201 


43,215 


1918 


728.755 




82,940 


927.956 


126,155 


1.054,111 


1918 


129,283 


57,539 


1919 


831,942 




83,234 


961,225 


140,773 


1,101.998 


1919 


155,426 


53.559 


1920 


1,102,518 




61,781 


1,257,944 


115,340 


1,373,284 


1920 


67,922 


33,051 


1921 


629,314 




101,399 


697.236 


134,450 


831,686 


1921 


61,230 


57.860 


1922 


863,306 




53.039 


924,536 


110,899 


1,035,435 


1922 


87,870 


61,394 


1923 


993,943 




47,380 


1,081,813 


108,774 


1,190,587 


1923 


72,611 


65,630 


1924 


1,116.705 




51,996 


1,189,316 


117,626 


1,306,942 


1924 


66,349 


56,490 


1925 


1,151,119 




52,539 


1.217.468 


109,029 


1,326,497 


1925 


66,705 


79,808 


1926 


1,146,473 




69,569 


1,213,178 


149,377 


1,362.555 


1926 


71,703 


93,159 


1927 


1,072,316 




83.319 


1,144.019 


176.476 


1,320,495 


1927 


99,181 


75,566 


1928 


1,279,167 




36,601 


1,378,348 


112,167 


1,490,515 


1928 


70,196 


57,839 


1929 


1,234,838 




41,515 


1,305,034 


99,354 


1,404,388 


1929 


58,644 


45.614 


1930 


1,196,762 




37.286 


1,255.406 


82,900 


1,338,305 


1930 


45,274 


64,289 


1931 


9«7,203 




40,340 


1,012.577 


104,629 


1,117.206 


1931 


3C.238 


60.318 


1932 















REDUCTION IN COTTON YIELD 

North Carolina ginned 756,294 (500 pounds) bales of cotton from 
the 1931 crop. Farmers estimated that 21 percent of the crop 
produced was destroyed by climatic conditions, diseases and insects. 
In other words, had the State secured a full or normal crop, it 
should have made about 960,000 bales. This table enables one to 
reckon the extent to which damaging factors affect the yield. 



COTTON 

Reduction From Full Yield Per Acre 
From Stated Causes 







N'ortl 


l Carolina 






United States 








% 


Reduction 






% 


Reduction 






1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


Deficient Moisture _ 


5 


1 


1 


13 


5 


6.4 


4.4 


10.8 


27.7 


8.3 


Excessive Moisture _ 


3 


9 


15 


1 


1 


4.9 


7.3 


7.2 


2.8 


2.6 


Other Climatic _ 


1 


4 


4 


3 


2 


2.8 


4.9 


6.0 


6.3 


3.5 


Plant Disease 


2 


1 






2 


1.5 


1.9 


2.3 


1.7 


2.0 


Boll Weevil 


16 


12 


21 


17 


8 


18.5 


14.1 


13.3 


5.0 


8.3 


Other Insects 




o 


1 


1 


3 


4.4 


3.4 


2.5 


1.9 


1,8 


Total 


32 


29 


44 


37 


21 


38.5 


36.0 


42.1 


45.4 


26.5 



Cotton Production and Consumption 

The cotton data at the bottom of this 
page offers the most comprehensive study 
of the cotton situation that we have ever 
presented. This was collected from many 
different sources. If one cannot understand 
the situation from these figures, he at least 
need not complain of lack of information. 
It will be noticed that the following infor- 
mation is shown for twelve years: Average 
price, exports, yearly production, carry-over, 
total available supply and consumption for 
both the American and foreign crops. 

Let's take a little illustrative study. The 
low price of cotton reached just after the 
World War was in 1920. The average of 
this crop was 16.7c per pound of lint. The 
high point was 30.1c average for the 1923 



crop. A rather steady decline has occurred 
since this time, until the 1931 crop harvest- 
ed about 6c. Moving over six columns to 
the total supply of American cotton, we 
have an increasing supply from 1928 to the 
present time. It will be noticed that the 
supply declined from 1920 to 1924, which 
was the period which showed increases in 
prices. There is a close correlation between 
the total supply and prices. 

Supply and Demand Rule 
The supply of cotton simply means the 
production added to the carry-over. The 
consumption relates to the disappearance or 
usage by the manufacturers. The figures 
on consumption for the 1931 crop will not be 
available until after July 1st and are 
therefore, omitted from the cotton table. 



Of course, the same applies to exports. 

The World War figures are omitted for 
the simple reason that they are misleading 
in relation to normal conditions. As a 
matter of fact, we are only now getting 
back to normal. The sooner the American 
farmer and business man realizes this fact 
and adapts himself accordingly, the better 
off he will be. Two essential features to 
farming are (1) economical production and 
(2) efficient marketing. The production 
costs must be less than the marketing re- 
turn, in order for any production to be pro- 
fitable. If the trend of market prices are 
distinctly downward and appear to be fair- 
ly well justified, the only recourse is to either 
cut out the crop or to reduce the cost drasti- 
cally. 



COTTON, American and "All Kinds": Production, Carryover, Supply and Consumption. 

Also Price and Exports of American, 1920-21 to 1931-32 
Information Secured from Department of Commerce (U. S. Census Bureau) Washnigton, D. C. 



1 






AMERICAN 


COTTON 






ALL KINDS 




















World 


Carryover, 




United 






Av. Price 




United 


Carryover. 


Total 


United 




Production 


beginning of season 


Total 


States 






10 spot 


Exports 


States 


beginning of season 


ifupply 


States 


World 


including 








Consump- 


World 


Season 


Mkts. 


from 


Produc- 






m. bales 


Consump- 


Consump- 


China 


In U. S. 


World 


Supply 


tion 


Consump- 






U. S. 


tion 


In U. S. 


World 




tion 


tion 




m. bales 


Mixed Bales 






tion 




Cents 










1 






500 lb bales 




3 


4 


m. bales 




1920-21 


16.66 


5,745 


13,440 


3,278.9 


5 6.337.9 


19.777.9 


4.677 


10,030 


21,100 


3.563.2 


6 11,184.9 


32,284.9 


4,893 


17.595 


1921-22 


18.09 


6,184 


7,954 


6,360.7 


9,178.7 


17,132.7 


5,613 


12.757 


15.450 


6,534.4 


7 14,546.7 


29,996.7 


5,910 


21,167 


1922-23 


25.83 


4,823 


9,755 


2,664.9 


5.129.9 


14.884.9 


6.322 


12.666 


19,300 


2,831.5 


9,542.9 


28,842.9 


6,666 


22.143 


1923-24 


30.14 


5,656 


10,140 


2,123.0 


3,284.0 


13,424.0 


5,353 


11,107 


19,700 


2.319.0 


6,560.0 


26,260.0 


5,681 


20,430 


1924-25 


24.22 


8.005 


13.628 


1,439.4 


2,664.4 


16,292.4 


5,917 


13.256 


24,800 


1.555.5 


5,212.4 


30,012.4 


6,193 


23.294 


1925-26 


19.68 j 


8,051 


16,104 


1,503.8 


3.305.8 


19.409.8 


6.17(5 


13,730 


27,900 


1,609.8 


6.113.8 


34,013.8 


6.456 


24,681 


1926-27 


14.40 


10,927 


17,977 


3,413.6 


5,356.6 


23,333.6 


6,880 


15.780 


28,400 


3.542.6 


8,531.6 


36,931.6 


7.190 


26,141 


1927-28 


19.72 | 


7,540 


12.995 


3.663.01 8 7.818.0 


20,773.0 


6,535 


15,407 


24,000 


3,762.4 


10,562.0 


34,562.0 


6,834 


25,540 


1928-29 


18.67 


8,044 


14,478 


2,425.6 


5,078.6 


19,556.6 


6.778 


15.076 


26,900 


2.536.6 


9.390.6 


36,290.6 


7,091 


25,882 


1929-30 


15.79 


6,690 


14,828 


2.129.8 


4.459.8 


19,287.8 


5,803 


10,907 


25,600 


4,530.4 


11,316.7 


36,916.7 


5.271 


22,483 


1930-31 


9.61 


6.760 


13.932 


4,321.7 


6,242.7 


20,174.7 


5,091 


13.023 


26,500 


2,312.0 


9,252.8 


35,752.8 


6,106 


25.209 


1931-32 


6.00 




16.918 


6.262.5 


8,838.0 


25,756.0 






27,300 


6,369.4 


13.930.0 


41,230.0 








NOTE: 


Bales sh 


iwn in thousand (000) omitted 


All are in running biles excepting those otherwise market 


1 "mixed"' or 


500 lbs. bs 


les. 





Consumption, exports, and carryover compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census except as otherwise noted. 
World consumption data from the International Federation. 



U. S. production in 500 lb., gross bales, carryover in running bales (as they come from the gin.) 
American carryover in running bales, foreign carryover in the U. S. in 500 11). ba'es 
American carryover in running bales, foreign carryover in 478 lb. bales (linl.) 
In 478 lb. bales, except American carryover which are in running bales. 
Garside's Estimate. 

Estimate of the Merhants National Bank of Boston. 
Running bales. 

Estimate of the Bureau of Agriultural Eonomics. 
Preliminary figures are shown for 1931-32. 



NORTH CAROLINA COTTON 



9 



District and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW) 

District 4 — Buncombe 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.) 

District 2 — Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham . 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) 

District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie '_ 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph .. 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery ■_ 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 

District 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston . 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 



Acreage Planted 



1929 | 1930 



1931 



Yield 
Pounds 
Per Acre 
" 8 29T^3"0"r'3T 



308 
819 
1,580 

f,900 



8,243 
35,648 



45,791 

3,151 
422 
1,745 
945 
33,589 
3,925 
1,776 
3,021 
6 
11 

9,042 
28,945 
86,578 

5,294 
21,549 
12,409 

4,828 

8,095 
35,731 
11,455 

3,453 
26,377 
48,453 
177,644 
53,247 
26,360 
83,038 
25,606 
27,927 
51,113 
10,000 

8,885 
32,296 
17,813 
73,709 
409,994 
17,438 

5,426 
12,098 

3,609 
12 

49,919 
9,103 
65,179 
13,160 
10,598 
46,515 
43,495 
8,489 
12,134 
1,795 
3,807 
302,777 
14,660 
1,092 
4,972 
19,310 
5,171 
78,573 
6,322 
19,594 
5,637 
24,088 
41,572 
34,314 
255,305 
13,813 
794 
6,506 
40,588 
15,000 
45,366 
33,338 
90 
5.306 
4,341 
99,037 
58,200 
46,100 
368,479 



482 



383 
607 
1,472 

1,967 



8,098 
33,490 



43,555 

2,519 
176 
1,683 

I, 021 
27,647 

3,159 
2,129 
2,010 
27 
96 
9 

7,646 
27,887 
76,009 

4,940 
24,197 
8,885 
6,670 
9,230 
37,525 
9,717 
2,887 
29,039 
34,226 
167,316 
47,200 
27,291 
86,443 
25,712 
29,184 
50,632 
10,487 
6,005 
24,487 
17,663 
67.736 
392,840 
14.362 
4,368 
7,383 
2,453 
6 

44,248 
7,757 
59,659 

II, 991 
9,707 

36,766 
40.387 

4,655 

8,101 
562 

2,475 
254,880 

8,439 
741 

2,162 
13,719 

3,669 
65,297 

4,034 
13,945 

2,706 
20.391 
32,426 
27,066 
194,595 

9,712 

1,015 

5,231 
35,143 

9,881 
35,324 
28,825 
11 

3,984 

3,198 
86,367 
50,068 
42,471 
311,230 



6,966 
33.003 



307 


324 


226 


295 


~193 


314 


210 


279 


485 


230 


226 


300 


985 


273 


222 


295 


1~547 


255 


236 


305 











Production (Bales) 



1929 | 1930 | 19131 



255 305 311 
287 303 309 



41,516 

1,563 
121 
661 
491 
21,907 
1,649 
677 
1,471 
12 

~~28 
5,651 
22,969 
57,200 
4,291 
19,590 
5,524 
3,493 
7,403 
31,076 
8,227 
1,224 
23,059 
22,932 
126,819 
47,308 
21,851 
74,362 
19,439 
24,102 
38,010 
4,758 
2,348 
21,085 
13,605 
59,841 
326,709 
8,445 
1,997 
3,406 
1,116 
27 
32,392 
5,371 
47,874 
5,559 
5,035 
25,879 
26,503 
1,084 
3,311 
373 
1,722 
170,094 
4,841 
206 
1,068 
9,821 
2,806 
54,883 
2,771 
10,071 
1.688 
13,205 
26,323 
21,924 
149,607 
5,887 
255 
2,377 
27,678 
6,787 
26,208 
21,569 
4 

2,474 
1,168 
75,180 
47,285 
32,797 
249,669 



307 



280 300 309 

204 236 338 
193 236 290 
204 231 302 
249 232 362 
184 175 285 

220 233 3 
227 242 356 

195 242 314 
204 262 350 
18i 231 

190 330 

231 182 386 

235 187 350 
211 190 328 
287 253 276 
282 255 353 
174 226 341 

257 262 308 

258 276 341 
274 257 306 
183 276 326 

201 222 282 

281 294 365 
177 221 286 
234 256 324 
152 222 274 

236 253 285 
339 326 377 
291 285 365 
295 253 320 
263 237 300 
187 232 283 
168 234 294 
139 231 271 
217 278 300 
223 223 300 
243 259 315 
191 232 375 

221 207 336 

196 218 336 
217 230 336 
223 239 324 

202 260 293 
211 218 336 
221 222 324 

210 272 391 
191 233 375 
206 240 320 
249 254 403 
201 203 336 
194 207 324 

211 264 347 
199 261 336 
213 239 338 
141 243 333 
157 223 283 
139 221 218 
138 225 277 
208 274 333 
194 255 313 
201 243 293 
135 243 244 
159 233 273 
126 222 308 

161 258 306 

157 219 283 
164 243 327 
183 259 308 

162 279 297 
237 283 313 
213 278 333 
205 286 308 
252 286 377 

158 257 336 

185 290 411 
216 258 344 
162 296 263 

186 280 304 
224 287 365 
169 255 292 
203 276 328 



4,403 
21,431 



26,849 

1,346 
171 
746 
493 
12.946 
1,809 
844 

I, 234 
3 
4 

4,375 
14,248 
38,219 
3,183 
12,729 
4,523 
2,599 
4,375 
20,508 
4,391 

I, 454 
15,526 
17,964 
87,252 
16,953 
13,031 
58,965 
15,608 
17,257 
28,158 

3,917 
3,127 
9,403 
8,097 
34,430 
208,946 
6,977 
2,512 
4,967 
1,640 
6 

21,122 
4,023 
30,173 
5,789 
4,240 
20.071 
22,686 
3,574 
4,931 
793 
1,587 
135,091 
4,330 
359 
1,448 
5,582 
2.253 
31,930 
2,662 
5.541 
1.877 
6,358 
14,020 

II, 285 
87,645 

5,295 
269 
3,230 
18,109 
6,441 
23,947 

II, 034 
35 

2,401 
1,473 
38,586 
27,308 
16,319 
153,909 



190 



203 


168 


113 


16.8 


9.5 


6.5 


395 


287 


305 


16.0 


9.5 


6.0 


905 


683 


608 


16.5 


9.6 


6.1 


1,015 


972 


988 


16.8 


9T5 


6\0 



5.174 
21,256 



27,402 

1,245 
87 
814 
496 
10,135 
1,542 
1,079 
1,019 
15 
46 
4 

2,915 
10,923 
30,320 
2,618 
12,925 
4,206 
3,661 
5,336 
20,201 
5,618 
1,343 
17,883 
15,844 
89,635 
21,968 
14,463 
59,029 
15,350 
15,466 
25,136 
5,096 
2,943 
11.849 
10,286 
31,640 
213,226 
6,979 
1,894 
3,371 
1,182 
3 

24,096 
3,541 
27,743 
6.832 
4,738 
18.483 
21.488 
1,979 
3.513 
311 
1,353 
127,506 
4,296 
346 
1,001 
6,466 
2.106 
34,878 
2,053 
7,098 
1,321 
9,482 
17,524 
12,416 
98,987 
5,269 
593 
3,101 
20,465 
5,919 
21,162 
15,517 
7 

2,153 
1,993 
50,655 
30,100 
22,686 
179,620 



Price 
(Per lb.) 



29 I 30 I 31 



17.0 9.7 6.0 



4,538 
21,361 



26,887 

1,107 
74 
418 
372 
13,078 
1,333 
505 
968 
9 

19 
4.569 
16,839 
39,291 
2.481| 
14.485 
3,946 
2,254 
5,288 
19,919 
5,618 
723 
17,630 
13,738 
86,082 
27,152 
13,045 
58,723 
14,862 
16,156 
23,856 
2,821 
1,446 
11,969 
8,549 
36,850 
215,429 
6,63 
1,406 
2,397 
785 
18 

19,880 
3,780 
32,490 
4,553 
3,955 
17,347 
22,373 
763 
2,247 
471 
1,212 
120,311 
3,377 
122 
488 
5,698 
1,957 
35,983 
1,701 
5,147 
965 
8,519 
16.872 
12,996 
93,825 
3.798 
159 
1,558 
19,306 
4,379 
20,696 
15,181 
3 

1.783 
643 
47,873 
36,152 
20.060 
171,591 



16.8 
16.9 



9.7 
9.6 



16.7 9.6 

18.0 10.0 
17.3 10.0 



17.0 
18.0 
17.2 
17.1 
17.0 
17.2 
17.1 
17.0 

17.0 



10.0 

9.9 
9.9 
10.0 
10.0 
9.9 
10.0 
10.0 
10.0 
10.1 

17.0 10.0 

17.1 10.0 



17.0 
17.0 
16.3 
17.0 
17.0 
16.7 
16.6 
16.8 
17.1 
17.0 
16.9 
17.0 
16.8 
17.0 
17.0 
16.5 
17.0 



9.7 
9.9 
9.8 
9.8 
10.0 
9.5 
9.9 
9.8 
9.8 
10.1 
9.8 
10.0 
9.6 
9.9 
9.4 
9.5 
9.9 

16.8 10!o 
17.1 9.9 



9.6 
10.1 
10.6 
9.9 
9.4 
10.0 
9.7 
9.8 
9.6 



9.5 
9.6 
9.8 
9.8 
9.4 
9.6 

10.0 
9.8 
9.5 
9.6 
9.6 
9.6 

10.0 
9.8 
9.0 



16.2 
17.0 
18.0 
17.1 
16.6 
16.8 
17.0 
16.8 
16.8 
16.7 
16.7 
17.0 
16.1 
16.2 
16.8 
17.0 
17.7 
17.0 
17.0 
16.8 
16.8 
16.4 
16.0 
16.4 
16.5 
16.4 
16.9 10.1 
17.3 10.0 



16.5 
16.0 
16.4 
17.0 



9.5 
9.8 
9.5 
9.9 



16.9 10.1 
16.S 9.9 



16.8 
16.8 
16.3 
17.0 
17.3 



9.4 
10.0 
9.4 
9.9 
9.4 



17.0 10.0 
16.5 9.6 



16.8 
16.0 
16.8 
16.5 
17.2 
17.0 
16.5 



9.9 
9.7 
9.5 
9.5 
9.8 
10.0 
9.7 



Total Value of Crop 



Value 
(Per Acre) 



1929 1930 



I 



1931 



$ 



16,248 
30.139 
71,338 



81,396 



10,566 



7,641 
13,032 
31,239 

4Tl00 



STATE '1,648,148 1,441,897 1,122,5991 215 254 324739,354 767,379 754,024| 16.9 9.8 



6.0 
6.0 



6.0 

6.2 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

6.3 

5.6 

6.0 

6.4 

5.9 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

6.3 

6.2 

6.3 

6.1 

6.5 

6.3 

6.3 

6.0 

6.2 

6.0 

6.2 

6.2 

6.2 

6.5 

6.4 

6.3 

6.3 

6.2 

6.1 

6.3 

6.3 

6.2 

6.5 

6.5 

6.4 

6.0 

6.0 

6.3 

6.0 

6.0 

6.1 

6.0 

6.3 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

6 

6.0 

5.9 

5.9 

6.1 

5.9 

6.0 

6.0 

6.5 

5.8 

6.1 

5.8 

5.9 

6.0 

6.0 

6.2 

6.3 

5.6 

5.9 

6.0 

5.5 

6.1 

6.1 

6.5 

6.3 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

6.3 

6.1 

6.3 

6.2 

6.1 



353,130 
1,729,035 



239,579 
974,157 



2,143,561 

115,705 
14.090 
60.517 
42,355 
1,063,025 
147,659 
68,536 
101,324 
209 
338 

355.079 
1,156,353 
3,125,190 
258,294 
1,033,059 
351,944 
210.935 
355,047 
1,634,979 
347,980 
116,601 
1,267,441 
1,457,951 
7,034,231 
1,375,877 
1,045,121 
4,785,480 
1,266,729 
1,359,347 
2,285,262 
314,160 
255.248 
727,241 
657,122 
2,958,679 
17,030,266 
552,889 
201,457 
403.105 
131,570 
450 
1,681,463 
320,762 
2,448,775 
444,940 
327,923 
1,609,791 
1,841,143 
302,013 
400,179 
64.387 
127,276 
10,858,123 
338,998 
27,431 
113.342 
439,689 
176.393 
2,576.094 
219,835 
436,456 
143,405 
497.754 
1,137.826 
910,453 
7,017,676 
424,667 
21,610 
251,333 
1,469,691 
531,975 
1,943,479 
869,122 
2,797 
183,375 
118,145 
3,039,446 
2,242,330 
1,324,453 
12,422,423 



1,257,836 

59,448 
4,154 
38,877 
23,450 
478,984 
73,605 
51,522 
48,156 
716 
2,218 
191 
140.549 
521,487 
1,443,357 
121,233 
610,853 
196,785 
171,259 
254,748 
916,173 
265,507 
62,810 
836,672 
763,959 
4,199,999 
1,047,840 
662,844 
2,789,861 
688,824 
701.437 
1,187,979 
243,298 
139,112 
543,024 
495,942 
1.601,144 
10,101,305 
313.206 
90.418 
156,121 
55,291 
138 
1,127,439 
165,656 
1,258,208 
313,109 
217,126 
864,736 
964,280 
90,717 
167,691 
14.540 
61,368 
5,860,044 
196,865 
15,863 
47,780 
302,504 
90,478 
1.681,724 
98,026 
321,920 
61,789 
430,046 
828,225 
598,673 
4,673,893 
236,448 
28,319 
139,155 
967,206 
265,641 
1,010,266 
711,170 
316 
99,704 
89,928 
2,297,362 
1,408.213 
1,083,011 
8,336,739 



5,434 



3,500 
8,730 
17,664 

28,310 



1929 I 1930 I 1931 



$ 



129.986 
611,876 



770,172 

32,754 
2,105 
11,977 
10,665 
393,340 
35,645 
14,461 
29,561 
248 

554 
130,877 
506,466 
1,168,653 
74,612 
421,831 
122,439 
67,778 
159,039 
570,555 
166,284 
20,710 
521,825 
406,630 
2,531,703 
842,555 
398,562 
1,766,172 
447,000 
478,184 
695,583 
84,830 
43,490 
354,270 
265,298 
1,166,900 
6,542,844 
190,013 
40,260 
72,098 
22,499 
525 
578,942 
108,279 
977.204 
130,414 
113,2 
496,877 
640,843 
21,853 
64,366 
7,636|' 
34,137 
3,499,234 
95,111 
3,498 
13,969 
176,827 
54,195 
1,047,881 
47,090 
144,982 
27,649 
244,028 
499,400 
390,883 
2,745,513 
106,979 
4,544 
40,920 
562,223 
127,514 
642,227 
456.573 
99 
51.063 
18,431 
1,439,847 
1,052,801 
603,334 
5,106,555 



55.08 21.92 17.70 



52.75 
36.80 
45.16 



19.95 
21.47 
21.22 



59,702,808 35,904.412 22,382,338| 



42.84 
48.50 



46.81 

36.72 
33.39 
34.68 
44.82 
31.65 
37.62 
38.59 
33.54 
34.88 
30.77 

39T27 
39.95 
36.10 
48.79 
47.94 
28.36 
43.69 
43.86 
45.76 
30.38 
33.77 
48.05 
30.09 
39.60 
25.84 
39.65 
57.63 
49.47 
48.68 
44.71 
31.42 
28.73 
22.52 
36.89 
40.14 
41.54 
31.71 
37,13 
33.32 
36.46 
37.46 
33.73 
35.24 
37.57 
33.81 
30.94 
34.61 
42.33 
35.58 
32.98 
35.87 
33.43 
35.86 
23.12 
25.12 
22.80 
22.77 
34.11 
32.79 
34.77 
22.28 
25.44 
22.66 
27.37 
26.53 
27.49 
30.74 
27.22 
38.63 
36.04 
35.47 
42.84 
26.07 
31.08 
34.56 
27.22 
30.69 
38.53 
28.73 
33.71 
36.22 



29.59 
29.09 



28.88 

23.60 
23.60 
23.10 
22.97 
17.33 
23.30 
24.20 
23.96 
26.20 
23.10 
19.00 
18.38 
18.70 
18.99 
24.54 
25.25 
22.15 
25.68 
27.60 
24.42 
27.32 
21.76 
28.81 
22.32 
25.10 
22.20 
24.29 
32.27 
26.79 
24.04 
23.46 
23.20 
23.17 
22.18 
28.08 
23.64 
25.71 
21.81 
20.70 
21.15 
22.54 

2~5\48 
21.36 
21.09 
26.11 
22.83 
23.52 
23.88 
19.49 
20.70 
25.87 
24.80 
22.99 
23.33 
21.41 
22.10 
22.05 
24.66 
25.76 
24.30 
23.09 
22.83 
21.09 
25.54 
22.12 
24.00 
24.35 
27.90 
26.60 
27.52 
26.88 
28.60 
24.67 
28.71 
25.03 
28.12 
26.60 
28.12 
25.50 
26.79 
24.90 



18.14 
18.00 
17.93 



42.84 22.42 18.30 



18.66 
18.54 



18.55 

20.96 
17.40 
18.12 
21.72 
17.96 
21.62 
21.36 
20.10 
20.65 

19~ 80 
23.16 
22.05 
20.43 
17.39 
21.53 
22.17 
19.40 
21.48 
18.36 
20.21 
16.92 
22.63 
17.73 
19.96 
17.81 
18.24 
23.75 
23.00 
19.84 
18.30 
17.83 
18.52 
16.80 
19.50 
19.50 
20.03 
22.50 
14.16 
21.17 
20.16 
19.44 
17.87 
20.18 
20.41 
23.46 
22.50 
19.20 
24.18 
20.16 
19.44 
20.47 
19.82 
20.57 
19.65 
16.98 
13.08 
18.01 
19.31 
19.09 
16.99 
14.40 
16.38 
18.48 
18.97 
17.83 
18.35 
18.17 
17.82 
17.22 
20.31 
18.79 
24.51 
21.17 
24.66 
20.64 
15.78 
19.15 
22.27 
18.40 
20.45 



19.94 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA COTTON GINNINGS 





NUMBER 


GINNERIES 








TOTAL GINNINGS FOR SEASON 






COUNTIES 


19 


25 


1930 






( 


Running Bales) 








(Active 


Idle 


Active 


Idle 


1925 


| 1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 




14 


4 


i 9 


I 7 


2,033 


2,726 


1,763 


2,196 


1,887 


1,33 1 


1,204 




47 


5 


43 


7 


2 3 , 3 5 C 




27,987 


22 92? 


17 461 


25,262 


27,368 




16 


7 


12 


5 


8 500 


11553 


7,288 


9,020 


4,804 


5,641 


3,829 




49 


8 


14 


20 


15,618 


15 078 


9.959 


11,116 


7,496 


7,744 


6,150 


Bladen - 


11 


6 


8 


2 


8,208 


1 1,234 


6,367 


5^825 


5,450 


5,545 


4,089 




32 


8 


21 


g 


13 449 


19 07G 


12,432 


11 963 


14 866 


15,001 


15,672 




8 




6 


2 


4 565 




2,404 


2 7 88 


2,215 


2,198 


1,344 




21 


~2 


20 


| 


11 561 


15 566 


10,375 


13^297 


16,100 


16,640 


16,523 




33 


7 


22 


10 


11,049 


10,190 


7,741 


6,782 


4,675 


4,476 


4,305 




S 


8 


6 


1 


6,288 


7,810 


5,068 


5,289 


3,005 


3,421 


1.990 




38 


1 


49 




37 221 


47 550 


48,699 


53,921 


64,340 


62,785 


64,578 




4 


5 


4 


4 


1 047 


2 150 


1,719 


826 


1,880 


1,390 


670 


Craven 


7 


6 


3 


3 


3 042 


3 531 


1.486 


2,376 


1,980 


1,635 


875 




30 


4 


29 


1 


29 415 


31 327 


17,085 


16,848 


16,990 


20,136 


19,424 




4 




5 




1 494 






1,143 


1,390 


1,388 


758 




13 




7 


4 


2 330 


2 943 


1,845 


2,041 


2,285 


2,596 


2,441 


Davie 


10 


1 


9 


2 


5 142 


5 835 


4,391 


4[929 


6,160 


6,698 


5,252 


Duplin 


20 


1 


12 


2 


13 341 


15 776 


9,560 


7,327 


7,424 


6,753 


6,124 


Durham _ 


8 


_ 






2 759 


2 408 


1,242 


1^064 


530 








79 


34 


50 


22 


4 1 692 


40 384 


26,358 


25,418 


18,736 


------ 

19,837 


18,637 


Franklin _ _ 


38 


5 


28 


2 


32,398 


2 8 884 


19,363 


20,010 


12,964 


13,259 


14,883 




16 


7 


16 


2 


8 856 


13 612 


12,459 


13,273 


1*3.705 


13,873 


12,205 




12 


3 / 


11 


1 


7 259 


6 468 


4,858 


5,131 


4,892 


4,183 


3,457 




8 





5 




4 576 


3 057 


931 


1,052 


1^102 


711 


313 




15 


1 


8 


~3 


12 370 


14 003 


8,275 


7,044 


3,132 


4,166 


4,03 1 




78 


9 


52 


11 


58,120 


55 098 


39,413 


44,092 


33,328 




O O TOO 

o2,7oo 


Harnett 


28 


1 


28 


2 


47,998 


380 


35,811 


33,425 


31,018 


31,436 


29,601 




15 





11 


3 


9 322 


9,062 


5,864 


6,139 


3,916 


3,450 


2,719 




17 


2 


13 


2 


18 712 


17 566 


13,527 


14.188 


9,969 


14,003 


12,561 




20 


2 


19 




16 766 


23 673 


16,955 


18,741 


20^959 


21,582 


22,591 




68 


5 


56 


13 


74 136 


73 143 


51,274 




39,265 


39,691 


37,160 


Jones 


9 


7 


4 




2 203 


2 865' 


1,937 


1,605 




1,293 


1,051 




14 


5 




2 


12 180 


12 147 


8,752 




5 ,704 


6,176 


5,059 


Lenoir _ _ 


24 


8 


18 


7 


14,193 


16,315 


9,787 


lo!200 


5,792 


8,079 


5.298 


Lincoln 


24 


3 


26 


1 


12,053 


16,555 


12,707 


15,586 


19,539 


19,361 


21,538 




16 


13 


6 


6 


8,681 


7,898 


5,023 


5,213 


3,029 


3,436 


3,019 


Mecklenburg 


28 


10 


23 


7 


2 1 984 


a £ , j, do 


22,745 


21,299 


25,234 


25,754 


23,452 




18 


8 


14 


10 




9,307 


5,825 


6,371 


5,497 


5,854 


4,482 


Moore _ _ 


20 


6 


14 


2 


8 318 




5,768 


5,100 


3,369 


2,996 


1,748 




43 


8 


40 


11 


59 871 


57 391 


40,794 


39,103 


23^388 


25,159 


24,036 




42 


— 


28 


8 


37 245 


39 234 


29,603 


34,134 


30,039 




22,413 


Onslow _ 


10 


8 


7 


5 


2 209 J 




1,262 


1,571 


1 ,63 2 


1,425 


881 


Orange 


10 





9 




2 114 


2 272 


1,648 


1,776 


1,301 


1,060 


1,086 


Pamlico 


11 


6 






2 142 


1 964 


1,078 


1,824 


1,253 








4 


5 


3 




3 329 




2,222 


2,344 


1,097 






Pender _ _ 


3 


4 






1 409 


2 070 


892 










9 


3 


7 


1 


8 129 




5,556 


6.386 


3,273 


3,093 


— — — 
2,431 




25 


5 


19 


5 


26 817 


30 707 


19,641 


17,579 


6,961 




8,843 


Polk 


3 


1 


4 




3 596 


2 561 


3,013 


3,965 


5,524 


5,107 


5,529 




10 


1 


10 




2 269 


2,279 


1.540 


1,724 


1,444 


1,285 


1,055 




51 


2 


38 


7 




no no j 


14,886 


13,560 


8,724 


10,429 


9,091 




66 


8 


60 






??* „9 


40,210 


38,672 


40,281 


52,221 


47,047 


Rowan _ 


28 


7 


28 


~6 




18,2 64 


13,279 


15[l55 


15]968 


17,870 


18,224 




21 


— 


19 


3 


13,147 


12,873 


13,762 


17,821 


23,273 


21,189 


21,895 


S'ampson _ 


50 


4 


38 


8 






29,213 


23,478 


25,992 


no f> o O 


32,508 


Scotland 


26 


7 


23 


3 


30,852 


36,344 


25,450 


22,252 


16,186 


24,219 


19,151 


Stanly _ _ 


16 


3 


12 


3 


9,578 


15,072 


10,716 


11,489 


10,539 


10,532 


9,536 


Union _ _ 


38 


4 


35 


3 


29,447 


37,310 


34,909 


31,451 


30,239 


28,732 


31,189 


Vance 


9 


3 


4 




9,677 


7,813 


5,252 


6,097 


5.447 


4,338 


5,671 


Wake _ _ _ __ 


84 


9 


54 


25 


51,271 


| 45,504 


| 30,152 


27,954 


1 18,16: 


15,459 


I 12,354 




26 


6 


20 


6 


21,435 


18,151 


14,519 


17,657 


18.727 


13.447 


16,963 


"Washington _ 


16 


7 


8 


4 


1,746 


1,263 


1,144 


1,796 


864 


1,251 


1.215 


Wayne _ 


58 


5 


34 


19 


39,019 


39,590 


25,970 


21,554 


15,251 


19,399 


21,808 


Wilson 


29 


1 


27 




31,477 


31,660 


23,741 


19,964 


12,001 


12,650 


12,938 


All Others 


24 


10 


21 


17 


5,418 


6,416 


4,242 


4,793 


6,203 


7,290 


5,474 


North Carolina Total 


1,632 


319 


1,240 


315 


1,147,340 


1,246,754 


879,677 


869,248 


767,043 


800,582 


771,127 



UNITED STATES— COTTON GINNINGS 



TOTAL GINNINGS 
( { Running 



FOR SEASON 
Bales) 



STATES 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Florida 

Georgia 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

New Mexico 

Oklahoma 

South Carolina- _ 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Virginia 

All other States. 



NUMBER GINNERIES! 



1925 



1930 



Active | Idle | Active | Idle 



1922 | 1923 



1924 



1,360 
55 
1,337 
68 
67 
1,672 
779 
1,481 
167 
39 
9851 
1,727 
476 
3,459 
151 



220 

5 

105 
6 
47 
651) 
129 
177 
2 
3 
281 
552 
44 
475 
16 



1,328 
57 

1,226 
73 
54 

1,626 
732 

1,457 
130 
44 



150 
18 
152 
17 
26 
281 
120 
156, 
16 
5 



9281 163| 



1,373 
453 

3,651 
122 



United States , 15,461 2,779 13,254 

World Production | | | 



339 
55 
308 
18 



819,870 
44,132 
,010,520 
28,473 
27,428 
735,874 
345,407 
985,787 
139,881 
12,383 
637,003 
517,464 
385,860 
;, 125, 758 
27,011 
7,161 



1,824 9, 

— I". 



729,306 
926,000 



599,140 
77,704 
643,643 
55,313 
13,628 
612,812 
373,812 
622,617 
124,676 
28,333 
665,904 
793,817 
235,344 
,212,248 
51,982 
6,319 



170,694 
036,000 



985,653 
109,950 
1,086,814 
79,938 
19,756 
1,030,202 
498,386 
1,116,350 
192,981 
55,858 
1,506,077 
837,815 
355.919 
4,850,956 
40.180 
12,417 



13,639,399 
23,836,000 



192; 



1,356 
115 
1,594, 
122 
40 
1,192 
912 
1,985 
292 
64 
1,680 
929 
513 
4,098 
54 
23 



1926 1927 



4021 1 
,359 
389 
260 
,208 
,952 
246 
524 
,950 
,706 
304 
040 
,130 
249 
016 
441 



16,122,516 17, 
26,678,000 27, 



,470,404 
120,089 
513,3821 
128,835 

33,231 
,498,473 
826,179 
857,525| 
215,769 

70,206 
760,644 
,025,991 
442,052 
477,788 

51,8*1 

15,857 



1,173 
90 
979, 
89 
17 
1,111, 
543, 
1,346, 
116 
64, 
1,009, 
738, 
355, 
4,229, 
30, 
6, 



,430 
,281 
4811' 
.998 
361 
399 
,1531 
4891 
024 
920 
626 
550 
975 
367 
705 
676 



755,0701 
819,000 



12,783 
23,426, 



112 

000 



1,096 
145 
1,216, 
171 
20 
1,053 
685 
1,462, 
146 
82 
1.187, 
744 
423 
4,941 
44 
6 



1929 



,624 
,731 
241 
042 
053 
205 
868 
0211 1 
.921 
177 
042 
390 
471 
545 
764 
206 



14,296 
25,628 



549 14 
000 26 



307,664 
149,467 
395,869 
254,126 

29,849 
339,835 
797,727 
875,979 
220,907 

86,296 
125,614 
833,054 
504,282 
803.211 

47,991 
8,877 



547,791 
653,000 



1930 



1,444.886 
150.545 
863.443 
256,337 
51,118 
1,597.475 
704,750 
.1.458,488 
153.337 
95,841 
856,748 
1,015,273, 
371.433 
3,886,126 
42.713 
6,423 



13,755,518 
25,500,000 



1931 



1,384,865 
110,191 
1,822.118 
170,660 
43,405 
1,394,400 
875,969 
1,703.472 
279,583 
93,765 
1,235,489 
1.010,325 
577,935 
5,068,320 
42,490 
11,666 



16,595,780 



The table of counties above includes only 
those producing appreciable amounts of cot- 
ton for the years of 1925 to 1931. The total 
ginnings include running bales, which aver- 
age about 480 to 485 pounds each. The num- 
ber of ginneries shown for 1925 to 1930 in- 
clude both the active and the idle plants. 
The table below shows the information for 



the United States covering practically the 
same information. These figures should be 
of value to anyone interested in county or 
state distribution of cotton production, or 
on the ginneries to be found in these local- 
ities. Refer to other cotton information on 
Pages 8 and 9. It should be remembered 



that the running bales show more than the 
equivalent 500 pound bales in North Caro- 
lina, while for the entire belt the gin run 
bales total less. The reason is that the 
national average bale weighs more than 500 
pounds and in our state it is 15 to 20 pounds 
less than the standard average. 



11 



TOBACCO— FLUE-CURED 
Production, Stocks, Disappearance and Prices, 1913-1931 



PRODUCTION 


Stocks 


Total 


Disappaer- | 


Price 


Year 


Type 11 


Type 12 


Type 13 


Type 14 


Total 


July 1 


Supply j 


ance 


per Lb. 


Yearis 


Million Lbs. | Million Lbs. 


Million Lbs. [Million Lbs. 


Million Lbs 


Million Lbs. 


Million Lbs. 


Million Lbs. 


Cents 


— 1913 - 


165.6 


11 


7.2 




282.8 


211.0 


493.8 


262.3 


18.3 


1914 


144.0 


13 


1.4 




275.4 


231.5 


506^9 


238.3 


11.3 


1915 


163.2 


14 


8.8 




312.0 


268.6 


580.6 


301.2 


10.5 


1916 


136.8 


12 


6.5 




263.3 


279.4 


542.7 


289.3 


19.0 


1917 


141.0 


21 


7.8 




358.8 


253.4 


612.2 


319.8 


30.5 


1918 


227.2 


25 


7.6 


2.3 


487.1 


292.4 


779.5 


452.2 


34.3 


1919 


180.3 


183.8 


101.2 


11.6 


476.9 


327.3 


804.2 


500.0 


44.4 


1920 


297.3 


220.0 


87.0 


11.7 


616.0 


304.2 


920.2 


437.1 


21.5 


1921 


168.2 


127.9 


56.2 


6.5 


358.8 


483.1 


841.9 


401.2 


21.9 


1922 


231.1 


126.3 


54.0 


4.0 


415.4 


440.7 


856.1 


417.4 


27.2 


1923 


268.8 


205.3 


97.4 


9.2 


580.7 


438.7 


1,019.4 


542.8 


20.8 


1924 


205.2 


139.1 


61.5 


31.5 


437.3 


476.6 


913.9 


451.6 


21.6 


1925 


213.0 


215.4 


95.6 


51.1 


575.1 


642.3 


1,037.4 


582.0 


20.0 


1926 


226.6 


212.2 


79.7 


41.6 


560.1 


455.4 


1,015.5 


549.0 


24.9 


1927 


284.2 


262.0 


110.6 


62.0 


718.8 


466.5 


1,185.3 


620.3 


20.5 


1928 


245.6 


284.7 


121.5 


87.3 


739.1 


565.0 


1,304.1 


741.1 


17.3 


1929 


262.9 


265.3 


128.4 


93.1 


749.7 


590.0 


1,339.7 


740.4 


18.0 


1930 


294.1 


315.9 


145.3 


109.0 


864.3 


599.3 


1,463.6 


786.8 


12.0 


1931 


*230.7 


*254.7 


•109.2 


* 63.1 


*657.7 


676.8 


1,334.5 





*8.9 



Production and prices compiled from records of the Division of 
for 1919 to 1929 revised in accordance with estimates of May 16, 
of the Bureau of the Census prior to April 1, 1929; since April 
Stocks Report of the Tobacco Section. 

'Estimated December, 1931. 



Crop and Livestock Estimates. Data 
1932. Stocks compiled from reports 
1, 1929, compiled from the Tobacco 



TOBACCO, BURLEY (Type No. 31) 
Production, Stocks, Disappearance, and 
Prices 1912-1931 





Production 


Stocks 


Total 


Disappear- 


Price 






on 


S'upply 


ance Year 


Per 


Year 




Hand 
October 1 




Beginning 
October 1 


Pound 


Million lbs. 


Million lbs. 


Million lbs. 


Million~lbs~ 


Cents 


1912 


196.1 


215.3 


411.4 


186.2 


11.0 


1913 


176.8 


225.2 


402.0 


198.3 


12.3 


1914 


224.7 


203.7 


428.4 


178.6 


8.1 


1915 


217.3 


249.8 


467.1 


267.8 


9.5 


1916 


257.0 


199.3 


456.3 


248.7 


15.5 


1917 


251.5 


207.6 


459.1 


269.0 


26.5 


1918 


312.0 


190.1 


502.1 


272.2 


32.6 


1919 


300.3 


229.9 


530.2 


262.4 


33.2 


1920 


287.7 


267.8 


555.5 


231.1 


13.5 


1921 


175.7 


324.4 


500.1 


219.2 


21.5 


1922 


276.4 


280.9 


557.3 


214.4 


26.8 


1923 


340.4 


342.9 


683.3 


255.0 


20.0 


1924 


295 8 


428.3 


724.1 


265.0 


20.1 


1925 


277.8 


459.1 


736.9 


270.9 


18.0 


1926 


2S8.8 


466.0 


754.8 


303.5 


13.1 


1927 


176.2 


451.3 


627.5 


279.7 


25.9 


1928 


269.1 


347.8 


616.9 


284.5 


30.5 


1929 


342.2 


332.4 


674.6 


301.6 


21.8 


1930 


347.3 


373.0 


720.3 


283.5 


15.4 


1931 


•463.0 


436.8 


901.8 




*10.9 



Production and prices compiled from records of the Division 
of Crop and Livestock Estimates. Data for 1919 to 1929 
revised in accordance with estimates of May 16, 1932. Stocks 
compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census prior to 
April 1, 1929; since April 1, 1929 compiled from the To- 
bacco Stocks Report of the Tobacoo Section. 

•Estimated December. 1931. 



TOBACCO COMMENTS 

There are still some farmers who 
think that the government should 
not collect crop report informa- 
tion for as they express it "It's 
none of their business." Too many 
farmers think that by keeping crop 
information to themselves that the 
public will not learn of crop deve- 
lopment. Some others explain 
that manufacturing industries do 
not make such reports and there- 
by reveal their production infor- 
mation. In this they are mistaken. 
Tobacco manufacturers /or in- 
stance, have to report the stocks 
on hand at given dates, the 
amount sold, and the amount 
bought, thus there is available to 
the farmer and others quarterly 
information on the production, 
stocks, disappearance and prices 
of different types of tobacco. 

Analysis of Tables 

The tables herewith present 




Oxford Tobacco Experiment Station. Annual picnic inspection day. 



some of these data — figures which the farm- 
ers may analyze for themselves. In order 
to aid in a better understanding of these 
figures a partial analysis is offered below 
for the bright leaf or flue-cured types. The 
burley tobacco is also offered, inasmuch 
as it is the chief competitor of the bright 
leaf, and also since this type is grown 
in the extreme western part of North Caro- 
lina. 

The table at the left shows the produc- 
tion of the different types grown in North 
Carolina for the years 1913 to 1931. The 
production data is for each of the old belt 
(type 11) ; new belt (type 12) ; the South 
Carolina (type 13) belt, as well as (type 14) 
which is grown in Georgia. The figures are 
in millions of pounds. For instance, the 
total production for 1913 (5th column) reads 
282.8 which means 282,800,000 pounds. The 
decimals should be recognized accordingly, 
except in the price column in the same 
year, which is 18.3 cents per pound. 

In the year 1931, the old belt (type 12) 
production was estimated in December at 
54,700,000 pounds with the total production 
of bright leaf tobacco of 657,700,000. The 
actual sales of the (type 12) belt for the 
past season, from the 1931 crop, showed 
252,000,000 pounds (Page 13). Types 11 
and 13 include areas of cross border states. 

For the year 1931, the production added 
to the stocks on hand, or the carry-over, 
show a total of available supply for manu- 
facturer of 1,334,500,000 pounds. This figure 
is given in the seventh column in the table 
above. The rate of manufacturer is shown 
under the next to the last column headed 
"disappearance." We did not have the 
complete data for 1931 at the time this in- 
formation was published. 

Consumption Must Equal Production 

The preceding years all show a gradual 
increased rate of manufacture. However 
1931, probably showed a downward trend 
indicating that 1930 was the peak of dis- 
appearance. In order for prices to be main- 
tained or certainly improved ,the production 
must be considerably under the rate of 
consumption, so as to let the surplus now 
on hand be used up. Any reasonable 
grower might take this table and study it 
to his advantage and determine for him- 
self the factors which might influence the 
future trend of the price of tobacco. 

On Page 12 is given the tobacco acreage 
yield production and value of the past two 
years for North Carolina. The important 
feature of this information is that county 
figures are available. Thus individual farm- 
ers or students may not only study the 
relationship of their home county with 
other areas but may study the price and 
value per acre relationship. 

A study of the various crop information 
shown in this publication enables one to 
realize that while a good crop may not be 
of importance in their own county it is 
highly important elsewhere. For instance, 
one in the central part of the state regards 
peanuts as an unimportant crop, whereas in 
the peanut counties they regard wheat as of 
small importance. After all North Caro- 
lina is a well diversified state when taken 
as a whole. Individual counties are increas- 
ingly realizing the advantages of diversifica- 
tion in their own communities. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA TOBACCO 



Districts and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

As lie 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes '. 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW) 
District 4 — Buncombe- 
Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.) — 

District 2 — Alamanee 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Kockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

northern Piedmont (N.) _ 

District 6 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S-)-- 

Dlstrlct 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.)_. 

Dlstrict 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Crfrven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE) 



Acreage 



Yield per 
Acre 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 |1929|1930|1931 



28 
4 

419 
16,827 

6 

1,022 
9.192 
27,498 

867 
12 
12 
8 
14 

458 
30 
15 

16 
3,226 

84 
6 
4 
7 
1 

683 
5,450 

6,910 
17.003 

7,550 

8,783 
15,310 
20,948 
10,554 
5,042 
16,948 
21,016 
18,878 
14,441 

6,373 
169,756 

1,210 

2,965 
4.042 
1,421 
780 
3.341 
2,875 
25 
29.050 
45,709 
36 
11 
7 
18 



90 
80 

617 
16.286 
58 
1,324 
9,745 
28,200 
1,238 
18 
49 
17 
25 
868 
103 
41 
19 
44 
3,873 
139 
1 

160 
26 
18 
1,094 
7,673 
6,211 
15,558 
6,024 
8,713 
15.670 
21.732 
10.345 
4,299 
17.321 
18,088 
18,686 
14,856 
7,350 
164,853 
1.474 
10 
3.138 
5.934 
1,359 
996 
3,774 
3,176 
34 
28,538 
48,433 
32 



777 


256 


4.999 


4.979 


318 


579 


3 


8 


15 


97 


6,184 


5,958 


6.827 


8,327 


9~7T 


955 



68 
117 
6 

590 
12,653 
118 
769 
7,688 
22,009 
1.340 
38 
32 
34 
12 
800 
49 
36 
48 
34 
3,873 
180 
50 
69 
13 
23 
908 
7,539 
6,564 
10,723 
5,215 
7,048 
14,328 
16,190 
10.228 
3,816 
16.483 
17.339 
14,469 
13,184 
5,952 
141,539 
1,174 
157 
3.444 
4,858 
1.228 
887 
4.773 
3,420 
52 
28,346 
48,339 
59 
107 

45 
55 
22 
829 
3,743 
1,157 
107 
90 
6,214 
6,373 

375 



22,550 
194 
7,541 
3.358 
16.517 
31.398 
152 
26 
28 

1,559 
91,124 

13.674 

I. 979 
12,294 
25,499 

16 

25,465 
8,158 

25,818 
870 

53,108 

23,883 

30.430 
221,194 
5.137 
1,508 

16,116 
2,787 

19,500 

II, 603 
3,730 

3 

8.867 
2,383 
23.425 
12,164 
512 
107,735 



22,335 
243 
7,609 
3,596 
15,348 
31,356 
169 

~~22 

1,217 
91,177 

14,445 
1,376 
11,966 
25,043 
13 

30,502 
8,301 
25.331 
499 
46,648 
22,826 
31,830 
218,780 
5,486 
1,851 
18,793 
3.415 
20,550 
18,324 
4,239 
11 
7,818 
2,659 
27,837 
14,482 
517 
125,982 



21,182 
240 
6,729 
3,607 
13,271 
31,034 
118 
28 



808 
83,765 

13.205 
1,284 
10.160 
22,066 
4 

33.361 
7,804 
20,764 
594 
40,029 
17,454 
29,948 
196,673 
5,440 
1,279 
14.739 
3,817 
18,407 
21,250 
2,724 

8,534 
1,981 
27,083 
12,961 
563 
118,778 



STATE - 1674^650 691,056 

NOTE: All tobaccos grown in North Carol 



795 825 

842 1013 

716 1075 

697 863 

842 1000 

711 938 

724 800 

707 850 

815 740 

690 840 

770 650 

780 750 

800 675 

780 725 

800 760 

830 691 

660 850 

750 650 

735 700 

710 633 
700 690 
690 717 
780 700 
800 710 
841 760 
765 718 
737 813 
668 800 

711 819 

721 865 
711 819 
700 898 
716 844 
674 800 
679 800 
719 850 
695 825 
710 850 
658 825 
699 836 
705 875 

906 

667 813 

753 906 

737 844 

747 875 

663 900 

693 841 

705 913 

732 875 

722 874 
663 900 

684 

695 

684 924 



684 856 

699 950 

688 931 

683 844 

688 875 

696 942 

750 855 



744 844 

778 856 

688 778 

727 889 

653 844 

759 883 

693 833 

795 

739 833 

682 

727 873 

728 856 
585 873 
793 889 
693 883 
661 783 
739 867 
790 811 
705 887 
634 878 
750 883 
628 800 
770 806 
716 789 
684 821 

834 821 
884 884 
907 914 
788 821 
758 854 

835 844 
866 811 
813 842 
750 871 
761 856 
886 838 
778 848 
860 842 
828 854 



950 
900 
740 
735 
784 
900 
686 
710 
755 
900 
750 
530 
550 
560 
750 
800 
650 
754 
600 
700 
680 
775 
790 
595 
754 
800 
770 
821 
650 
797 
710 
650 
797 
854 
710 
649 
854 
797 
735 
784 
753 
613 
735 
808 
772 
797 
674 
857 
727 
759 
797 
789 
772 
797 

778 
784 
759 
772 
766 
766 
784 
750 
754 
81 



Production (Pounds) 



1929 



T 



1931 



778 889 714 
727 



796 
719 
684 
816 
730 
638 
765 
714 



765 
719 

714 
638 
725 
776 
714 
745 
622 
673 
714 
735 
643 
816 
732 
880 
833 
750 
640 
825 
711 
660 

638 
763 
800 
789 
779 
764 



22.260 
3,368 

300~,004 
11.728,419 
5,052 
726.642 
6,655.008 
19,440,753 
706,605 
8,280 
9,240 
6,240 
11,200 
357,240 
24.000 
12,450 
4.620 
12,000 
2,371,110 
59,640 
4.200 
2,760 
5,460 
800 
574,403 
4,170,248 
5.092.670 
11.358,004 
5,164,200 
6,332,543 
10.885.410 
14,663.600 
7,556,664 
3,398.308 
11,507,692 
15.110.504 
13,120,210 
10,253,110 
4,193.434 
118,636,349 
853.050 



1.977.655 
3,043,626 
1,047,277 
582.600 
2,215.083 
1.992,375 
17.625 
21,264,600 
32,993,951 
23,868 
7,524 
4,865 
12,312 



74,250 
81.040 

663.275 
14,054,818 
58,000 
1,241,912 
7,796,000 
23,969,295 
916,120 
15,120 
31,850 
12,750 
16,875 
629,300 
78,280 
28,331 
16,150 
28,600 
2,711,100 
87,987 
690 
71,700 
18,200 
12,780 
831,440 
5,507,273 
5,049,543 
12,446.400 
4,933,656 
7,536,745 
12,833,730 
19,515,336 
8,731,180 
3,439,200 
13,856,800 
15,374.800 
15,415,950 
12,627,600 
6,063.750 
137,824,690 
1,289.750 
9,060 
2,551.194 
5,376.204 
1,146,996 
871.500 
3.396,600 
2,671,016 
31.042 
24.970.750 
42,314,112 
28,800 



Price per 
Pound 



1929|1930|1931 



Total Value 



64,600 
105,300 
4,440 
433,650 
9,919,952 
106,200 
527,534 
5,458.480 
16,620,156 
1.206.000 
28,500 
16,960 
18.700 
134,400 
600,000 
39.200 
23.400 
36,192 
20,400 
2,711,100 
122,400 
38,750 
54,510 
7,735 
17,342 
726.400 
5,801,989 
5,389,044 
6.969,950 
4,156,355 
5,004,080 
9,313, 200| 
12,903,430 
8,734,712 
2,709,360 
10,697,467 
14,807,506 
11,531,793 
9,690.240 
4,666,368 
106,573,5051 
719,662| 
115,395| 
2,782,752[ 
3,750,376| 
978,716 
597,838 
4,090,461 
2,486,340 
39,468 
22,591,762 
38,152,770 
45,548| 
1 



.18 .110 
.18 .160 



531.468 
3.494,301 
218,784 
2.049 
10 320 
4,305,491 
5,120,250 



1 
66 

7, 
1, 
8 
16 

20 
5 
16 

33 
18 
21 
151 
4 
1 
14 
2 
1 4 
9 
3 

6 
1, 
20 
9 

89 



755.438 
727 

,777,200 
150.932 
,188,208 
,441,266 
,784.948 
,831,082 
105,336 
20,670 
20,692 
1,364 
133,393 
331,506 
999,290 
569,347 
519,742 
854.839 
11,824 
117,350 
751.390 
368.612 
652,500 
351,824 
389,910 
787.880 
374,508 
284,258 
333,072 
617,212 
196,156 
781,000 
,688,505 
230,180 
2,439 
650,250 
813.463 
754,550 
463,592 
440.320 
254,997 



6,468 


35.010 




43,120 




16.696 


219,136 


639,988 


4,730.050 


2,867,138 


539,049 


886,262 


6.752 


83,888 


84.875 


67.500 


5,615,130 


4,685,150 


7,119,585 


5,200,368 


848,995 


267,750 



18,850, 
207 
5,919, 
3,196, 
12,953 
27,687. 
140, 



740 
150 
802 
844 
712 
348 
777 



16.860,872 
172,560 
4,602,636 
2,943,312 
9.687,830 
19,799,692 
90.270 
19,992 



.18 .110 
.16 .066 
.20 .160 
.18 .110 
.17 .090 
.16 .078 
.24 .158 
.23 .160 
.25 .165 
.24 .165 
.23 .165 
.23 .162 
.22 .160 
.22 .165 
.23 .162 
.25 .165 
.25 .165 
.23 .160 
.23 .159 
.23 .160 
.20 .165 
.22 .164 
.25 .160 
.25 .162 
.22 .135 
.18 .117 
.20 .155 
.17 .100 
.18 .130 
.19 .143 
.19 .120 
.21 .150 
.19 .137 
.18 .110 
.17 .075 
.18 .133 
.17 .120 
.18 .122 
.18 .110 
.110 
.17 .133 
.17 .135 
.17 .100 
.16 .120 
.18 .148 
.17 .130 
.17 .120 
.18 .138 
.18 .135 
.19 .135 

.19 

.19 

.19 .135 



.17 .135 

.18 .148 

.17 .135 

.19 .136 

.19 .136 

.18 .146 

.17 .115 



.120 
.120 
.105 
.085 
051 
.095 
.065 
.056 
.055 
.092 
.095 
.120 
.100 
.100 
.092 
.100 
.092 
.100 
.100 
.110 
.105 
.100 
.098 
.095 
.096 
.110 
.1 03 
.083 
.070 
.088 
.067 
.082 
.087 
.075 
.084 
.070 
.071 
.060 
.082 
.072 
.075 
.060 
.089 
.085 
.075 
.058 
.068 
.091 
.073 
.060 
.086 
.083 
.100 



083 
.083 
.083 
.085 
.081 
.075 
.080 

080 
.081 
.080 



.17 .115 .085 
.18 



18 
1,062 
78,005, 

12.610, 
1.223, 
10,565 
19,608 
11 

24,737 
7,362 
22.240 
440 
37,318 
18.397 
25,113 
179,631 
4,504 
1,636 
17,176, 
2,803 
17,549, 
15,465 
3,437 
9 

6,809 
2,276, 
23,327 
12,193 
435 
107,625 



326 
441 
722 

485 
264 
,978 
669 
271 
122 
987 
618 
617 
400 
756 
870 



618,120 
60,263,402 

9,428,370 
819,192 
7,366.000 
17,123.216 
2,856 
24,853,945 
4.854,088 
13,974,172 
424,116 
29,421.315 
11.222.922 
24,437,568 



037 143,927,760 



006 
284 
802 
715 
700 
456 
829 
262 
478 
104 
406 
844 
314 
200 



4,787,200 

1,095,407 
11.054.250 

2,477,233 
15.185.775 
15,108,750 

1,797.840 



5,444,692 
1,511,503 
21,666,400 
10,226,229 
438,577 
90,793,856 



624,856} 692 840 747 

ina east of the mountains are of the bright leaf 



486,507.803 580,492,459 466,818,587 



.19 
.17 
.17 
.18 
.17 
.19 
.19 
.18 
.1 
.17 
.18 
.18 
.18 
.18 
.17 
.18 
.18 
.20 
.18 
.17 
.17 
.18 
.18 
.20 
.18 
.18 
.19 
.18 
.18 
.17 
.20 
.17 
.18 
.17 
.18 
.19 
.17 
.18 
.18 



.125 
.127 
.115 
.135 
.120 
.132 
.120 

8 .110 



,079 
.085 
.075 
.090 
.078 
.089 
.090 
.085 



.19 



.115 
.125 
.125 
.120 
.109 
.120 
.120 
.125 
.125 
.116 
.118 
.130 
.115 
.131 
.123 
.103 
.100 
.115 
.115 
.130 
.160 
.130 
.110 
.120 
.120 
.133 
.125 
.130 
.129 
.124 
TTurle" 



.075 
.068 
.097 
.068 
.073 
.075 
.083 
.082 
.083 
.088 
.070 
.094 
.079 
.091 
.086 
.092 
.115 
.114 
.075 
.075 
.085 
.080 

!oio 

.093 
.116 
.069 
.075 
.092 

ross 



1029 | 1930 



Value per 
Acre 



1931 



S 



4.007 
606 



8.168 
12,966 



54,001 
1,876,547 
1,010 
130.796 
1,131,351 
3,198,318 
169.585 
1,904 
2,310 
1,498 
2,576 
82,165 
5,280 
2,739 
1,063 
3.000 
592,778 
13,717 
966 
635 
1,092 
176 
143,601 
1,025,085 
1.120.387 
2,044,441 
1,032,840 
1,076,532 
1,959,374 
2,786,084 
1,435.766 
713,645 
2,186,461 
2,719,891 
2,230,436 
1,845 560 
712,884 
21,864,301 
153,549 



336,201 
517,416 
178,037 
93,226 
393,715 
338,704 
2,996 
3.827.628 
5,841 ,472 
2,148 
1,430 
923 
2,339 



72.960 
927,619 
9.280 
136,610 
701,640 
1,869,243 
144,747 
2,419 
5,255 
2,104 
2,784 
101,947 
12,525 
4.675 
2.616 
4,719 
447,332 
14,078 
110 
11,472 
3,003 
2,096 
133,030 
894,912 
681,683 
1,456,229 
764,717 
753,675 
1,668,385 
2,790,693 
1,047.742 
515,880 
1,898,382 
1,691,228 
1.156,196 
1,679.471 
727,650 
16,831,931 
141.873 
997 
339.309 
725,788 
114,700 
104,580 
502,697 
347,232 
3,725 
3,445,964 
5,726,865 
3.078 



7.752 
12,636 
466 
36,860 
505,918 
10,089 
34,290 
305,675 
913,686 
110,952 
2,708 
2,035 
1.870 
13,440 
55,200 
3,920 
2.153 
3,619 
2.040 
298,221 
12.852 
3,875 
5,342 
735 
1,647 
79,904 
600,513 
447,291 
487,897 
365,759 
335,273 
763,682 
1.122,598 
655,103 
227,586 
748,823 
1,051,333 
691,848 
794.600 
335,978 
8,027,771 
43,180 
10,270 
236,534 
281,578 
56,766 
40,653 
372,232 
181,503 
2 3 
1,942*892 
3,167,976 
4,555 



873 



90,350 
628,974 
37,193 
389 
1,961 
765,707 
870,443 

128,424 
131 

.187,668 
25,658 
881,995 
439,428 
.833.441 
,527,906 
20,013 
3.720 
3,725 
232 
203.993 
,126,777 
439.872 
282,482 
448,356 
033,871 
2,128 
023,470 
035,250 
782,664 
110,925 
003.328 
310,184 
357,576 
,830,106 
771,166 
253,284 
,631,098 
395,308 
,512,770 
,937,701 
549,131 
439 
,130,543 
326,423 
,943,365 
,608,810 
79,258 
,139,296 



29,583 
700,047 

72,772 
918 

11.543 
818,814 
818,752 

97.634 



2,906 
3,579 
1,386 
54,399 
232,238 
66,470 
6.711 
5,400 
377,644 
416,029 



22,759 



2,356,343 


1,332,009 


141 


106 


63 


26,308 


14,668 


132 


108 


61 


680,777 


345,198 


117 


89 


51 


431,574 


264,898 


131 


120 


73 


1,554,445 


755,651 


111 


101 


57 


3,654,730 


1,762,173 


144 


117 


57 


16,893 


8,124 


132 


100 


69 




1.699 


143 




61 



122,181 
9,759,637 
1,576,311 
146,792 
1,151,692 
2,353,040 
1,353 
3,092,140 
920,373 
2,579,912 
51,993 
4,851,392 
2,115,742 
3,289,917 
22,130,657 
463,913 
163,628 
1,975,332 
322,427 
2,281.461 
2,474,473 
446,918 
1,019 
817,137 
273,132 
3,102,545 
1,524,231 
56.591 
18,902,807 



46,359 
4,969,567 
914,552 
55,705 
537,718 
1,284,241 
237 
2,038.023 
402,889 
1,229,727 
29,688 
2,765.604 
886,611 
2,223,819 
12,368,814 
440.422 
125,972 
1,260,185 
185,792 
1,138,933 
1,284.244 
143,827 



435,575 
140,570 

2,513,302 
705.610 
32,893 

8,407,325 



791.062 71,934,866 38,833,296 

y type predominates in the mountain count! 



'29 | '30 | '31 



flue-cured types. The 



TOBACCO— ANNUAL PRODUCERS SALES 



13 



Markets — Types 

Type 11 — Old Bright Belt 

Alamance : 

Burlington 

Mebane 

Durham : 

Durham 

Forsyth : 

Winston-Salem 

Franklin : 

Louisburg 

Granville : 

Oxford 

Lee: 

Sanford 

Moore : 

Aberdeen 

Carthage 

Person 

Roxboro 

Rockingham : 

Madison 

Reidsville 

Stoneville 

Surry : 

Elkin 

Mt. Airy 

Vance: 

Henderson 

Wake: 

Fuquay Springs 

Wendell 

Zebulon 

Warren : 

Warrenton 

Total — Old Bright 

Type 12 — New Bright Belt 
Beaufort: 

Washington 

Bertie: 

Windsor 

Craven : 

New Bern 

Duplin : 

Wallace 

Warsaw 

Edgecombe : 

Tarboro 

Halifax : 

Enfield 

Hertford : 

Ahoskie 

Johnston : 

Smithfield 

Lenoir : 

Kinston 

Martin : 

Robersonville 

Williamston 

Nash : 

Rocky Mt 

Onslow : 

Richlands 

Pitt: 

Fannville 

Greenville 

Wayne: 

Goldsboro 

Wilson : 

Wilson 

Total — New Bright 

Type 13 — S. C. Belt 

Bladen : 

Clarkton 

Columbus : 

Chadboum 

Fair Bluff 

Tabor 

Whiteville 

Robeson : 

Fairmont 

Lumberton 

Tout — S. C. Belt 

Typo 31 — Burley Belt 

Buncombe: 

Asheville 



STATE TOTALS- 



Season 1926-'27 


Season 1927-'28 


Season 192 


8-'2!) 


Season 1929-'30 


Season 1930-'31 


Season 1931-'32 


Pounds 


| Average 
Price 


Pounds 


| Average 
Price 


Pounds 


Average 
Price 


Pounds 


Average 
Price 


Pounds 


Average I Pounds 
Price | 


Average 
Price 


2,618.382 
. 3.769.256 


22.49 
28.05 


3,172,381 
4,450,754 


r~ 

i 

| 21.52 
1 27.94 


2,11 7.186 
3,922,276 


16.58 
22.08 


2,206,159 
4,139,326 


I 

| 16.45 
| 21.65 


3,253,096 
3,905,790 


I 

11.16 
15.35 


2,347,659 
2,527.238 


7.08 
9.45 


16,041,316 


26.56 


22,822,519 


23.81 


22,279,428 


20.06 


21,375,178 


19.65 


24,319,345 


15.58 


22,286,881 


9.19 


43,355.814 


23.36 


55,798,489 


I 

j 20.18 


48,349,119 


16.93 


53,934,876 


17.10 


56,098,842 


8.73 


38,408,588 


6.65 


3.124,205 


24.26 


4,194,606 


21.09 


2,786,611 


17.31 


2,206,669 


15.18 


5,044,573 


13.02 


3,950,256 


8.10 


13,545,896 


23.40 


20,298.370 


22.58 


16,989,629 


18.17 


20,821.103 


19.74 


25,513,692 


14.27 


21,555.278 


8.71 


1.224,396 


25.99 


2,140,138 


21.84 


1,716,282 


16.72 


2,535,430 


17.55 


4,573,344 


14.79 


3,913,868 


9.05 


1,926,486 
1,726,346 


26.47 
24.42 


3,370,145 
2,260,390 


21.75 
23.50 


3,995,019 
2,182,712 


18.91 
20.06 


3,363,542 
2,273,846 


16.30 
17.69 


4,862,532 
3,994,726 


13.28 
15.60 


2,961,696 
3,262.898 


7.17 
9.01 


5,321,973 


24.72 


6,248,874 


25.45 


4,621,484 


18.55 


6.136,284 


20.94 


5,426,582 


12.10 


3,840,550 


6.78 


2,006,506 
4,525,221 
1,347,894 


18.83 
23.59 
19.84 


1,813,548 
5,715,942 
2]341,'748 


18.93 
19.58 
18^89 


1,281,409 
7,110,965 
2,135,842 


14.62 
17.28 
15.29 


2,267,896 
9.577,683 
2,766!764 


14.20 
15.81 
15.60 


2,735,658 
13.787,756 
l!819!656 


5.34 
11.13 
4.65 


2,648,539 
10,318,963 
2,293,063 


6.50 
7.52 
6.24 


1,909,740 


I 21.95 


1,163,430 
5,281,252 


19.00 


760,202 
4,453 684 


15.21 






810,148 
3,985,711 


7.31 






4,212,890 


22.48 


17.33 


14.02 


5,064,675 


lT 88 


4.69 


1.988.516 


~5~11 


11,940,513 


24.77 


19,603,568 


23.52 


20,232,962 


19.56 


21,922,696 


19.40 


26,020,354 


13.33 


20,002,176 


8.20 


5,304,346 
3,530,158 
2,926,544 


28.87 
23.60 
22.74 


6,720,480 

4,o (o,»4J 

3,061,276 


23.33 
20.04 
19.49 


6,008,401 
3,080,830 
2,903,656 


21.23 
17.27 
17.07 


5,517,389 

A A K d A A Q 

4.40D.44O 
2.092,146 


20.27 
17.97 
15 29 


6,806,830 

o,ioy,7y4 

1,953,306 


16.19 
13.46 
12.57 


5,351,170 
7,407,006 
2,523,352 


9.08 

fi Oft 

8.17 


3,441,124 
133,799,006 


22.86 
24.21 


4,234,430 
179,069,282 


19.70 
21.72 


2,849,880 
159,777,577 


17.58 
18.15 


3,066,486 
175,724,596 


16.06 
18.10 


3,927,506 
204,029,241 


10.40 
11.97 


4,088,688 
161,676,386 


7.19 
7.88 


3,702,482 


26.84 


4,774,254 


23.98 


5,862,690 


19.32 


3,222.893 


16.70 


3,429,260 


12.47 


3,757,980 


9.66 


326,564 
2,709,486 


24.88 
24.27 


1,410,514 
2,881,186 


21.88 
21.75 


1,588,048 
3,207,762 


21.17 
17.15 


1,341,972 
1,950,869 


14.91 
15.07 


321,506 
991,224 


4.89 
10.93 


2,003,052 




7.04 


2,206,138 
257,598 

4,137,812 


22.82 
20.37 


1,582,673 


18.03 


1,753,505 


17.99 


2.141.478 


18.95 


4,029,782 


12.81 


2.590,964 



7.53 


25.91 




6,187,942 




23.18 


6,010,097 


18.44 


5,280.782 


16.90 


5,992,100 




11.22 


5,476,550 


7.87 


2.182,788 


25.82 


3,001,422 


20.35 


2,664,151 


16.99 


2,022,092 


14.45 


1,155,012 


11.47 


1,364,912 


7.50 


2.733,888 


26.20 


2,866.162 


20.00 


3,219,576 


19.63 


2,463,627 


17.16 


2,507,348 


13.79 


3,041,744 


8.97 


3,088,716 


24.31 


3,648,761 


20.02 


4,913,467 


16.54 


5.538,332 


16.99 


8,683,862 


12.42 


6.514,351 


8.19 


29,041,565 


25.23 


34,046,620 


21.35 


35,789,693 




33,354,135 




38,245,189 






8.83 


3,360,610 
6!080]999 


26.91 
27.09 


5,773,220 
7',437,442 


22.33 
2L52 


7,253,116 
7,051,898 


18.53 
19.21 


5,243,232 
4!627i986 


16.85 
15^60 


9,619,704 
oi233!354 


10.99 
10.95 


5,719,264 
4,278,519 


8.20 
7.17 


26.143,572 


25.43 


34.861,983 


22.08 


35,865,638 


19.65 


39,601.092 


19.78 


45,102,564 


1.4.57 


39,122,856 


8.88 


758,574 


22.23 


292,898 

18,002,160 
55,830,664 


14.25 


















13,742,958 
44,636,306 


28.08 
28.24 


22.49 
23.31 


19,134,012 
64,238,186 


20.17 
21.06 


17,552,046 
46,415,155 


19.19 
18.51 


21,504,420 
62,365,180 


12.95 
13.78 


20,444,710 
58,671,186 


9.55 
9.40 


5,841,672 


23.08 


5,230,677 


20.48 


6,663,162 


16.94 


8,859,760 


16.36 


11,036,036 


10 80 


ft 19ft no 


7.91 


61,825,130 
212^7761858 


26.86 
26.57 


67,874,902 
255.703.480 


22.96 
22.42 


75,561,417 
280,776,418 


20.45 
20.03 


74,753,642 
254,369^093 | 


20.10 
18.94 


77,788,672 
299,005,213 


13.88 
13.41 


59,432,880 
262i063,796 


9.05 
8.95 


1,267,223 


23.16 


2,422,589 


18.43 


1,738,491 


14.25 


1.518,265 


15.07 


960,330 


8.95 


1,221,285 


9.22 


1,800,238 
2,142,822 
1.095,260 
5.260,585 


22.71 
24.12 
22.41 
24.10 


2,488,205 
3,151,178 
1,193,554 
7,695,303 


19.26 
20.72 
20.52 
19.56 


2,695,771 
3,653,921 
1,115,703 
9,014,655 


13.02 
13.66 
12.74 
14.27 


2,751,287 
3,546,252 
1,755,006 
10,021,604 


17.61 
16.61 
16.34 
17.53 


2,768,629 
2,575,490 
1,051.652 
9,267.146 


10.62 
11.63 
11.07 
12.94 


1,683.005 
2,194,232 
978,342 
9,120,324 


11.27 
10.72 
11.19 
11.67 


9,461,431 
3,975,335 
25,002,894 


25.47 
21.99 
24.11 


15,167,340 
5,517,407 
37,635,576 


21.41 
20.04 
20.41 


16.935,809 
8,394,264 
43,548,614 | 


15.05 
13.13 
14.18 | 


22,823,007 
8,947,540 
61,362,961 | 


17.58 
16.32 
17.17 


29,534,527 
11.175,343 
67,333,117 


13.91 
12.98 
13.17 


25,686,206 
9,688.163 
50,571,567 


11.47 
11.89 
11.49 



















2,959,434 


15.83 


2,444,375 


9.16 


371,678,758 


25.53 


472,408,338 


22.00 


484,102,609 


18.78 


481,456,660 


18.40 


563,327,005 | 


12.84 


466,756,112 | 


8.88 



The table above showing the amount and 
average price of producers tobacco sold on 
North Carolina tobacco markets during the 
past six seasons illustrates fairly well the 
futility of disorganized efforts of farmers 
to adjust their crop production schedule in 
such a way that the income can be made 
to pay the cost. On Page 30 of this pub- 
lication will be found a study of the cost 
of producing certain crops in North Caro- 
lina. The decline in profits on tobacco has 
kept pace with the increasing acreage and 
adjustments are usually made after heavy 
losses compel the growers to curtail their 
supplies. On Page 11a table showing stocks, 
carry over and consumption offer interesting 
comparisons and reasons for the slump in 
prices of tobacco. 



It will be noted that smaller fluctuations 
are shown in the prices paid in type 13 
(South Carolina Belt). This area starts 
the season off and usually gives some indi- 
cation of what the forthcoming prices for 
the year are likely to be. The higher prices 
paid in this Belt during 1931 are, no doubt, 
due to the good quality of the crop produced 
and the very favorable season experienced 
during the past two years. 

There is a considerable quantity of North 
Carolina tobacco that is sold on outside 
markets in excess of that brought in from 
Virginia and South Carolina. This is esti- 
mated to be approximately 20,000,000 pounds 
annually. A large proportion of the Burley, 
produced in the mountain counties, is 
marketed in Tennessee. The past few 



seasons have shown a substantial increase 
in this type, and a market has been operat- 
ing in Asheville during the past two years. 

On March 1, the farmers of the State 
expressed their intention of decreasing their 
tobacco acreage 24%. This will mean 
a reduction of 165,000 acres below the 689,- 
000 harvested in 1931, and a reduction of 32 
percent below the 1930 acreage. The inten- 
tions to plant for the entire Flue-cured Belt 
show 27% below the 1931 acreage, and sub- 
stantial reductions are reported for all other 
types. It is probable that with the large 
carry over of stocks and the decreasing con- 
sumption further reductions in acreage 
would be desirable. In fact the effects of 
freezes, "blue mold" and fleas have brought 
it down to 60 or 65% of last year's acreage. 



14 



GENERAL CROP COMMENTS 



CORN 

This is the most essential and the most 
generally grown crop in North Carolina. It 
is used for both human food and livestock 
feed. It is consumed by livestock either in 
the green, ensilage or dry state, including 
the grain and plant matter. The acreage 
was greatly increased for the past several 
years, but the low prices received for the 
1931 crop was very disappointing to those 
who had a surplus for sale. Even that 
portion fed to livestock for sale did not 
bring satisfactory returns. Even so, this 
crop probably offers the best basis for our 
future farming prosperity. The farmer 
who utilizes his corn by feeding to livestock 
which, in turn ,will be sold as a finished 
product, ultimately has the best basis for 
permanent success. While this crop re- 
sponds well to commercial fertilizers, yet 
the cheapest and most lasting fertilizer is 
through the usage of livestock and green 
manure. North Carolina produces a low 
yield per acre of corn when we average 
only 22 bushels. Good farmers readily get 
from 40 to 50 bushels. 

WHEAT 

The 1931 crop of wheat in North Carolina 
was perhaps the best in yield for several 
decades. The yield of 15 to 20 bushels per 
acre was common. The quality was also ex- 
ceptionally good. While the crop did not 
bring a profit through sales, it did provide 
a very essential and valuable food. Many 
farmers fed substantial proportions of their 
wheat to livestock, especially poultry. The 
price in North Carolina was far better than 
in the Western wheat States. It is an ad- 
mirable catch crop, by virtue of being plant- 
ed in the late Fall and early Winter. It 
requires no cultivation and is harvested in 
time for hay crops to follow for harvest in 
the same year. Some of the best yields are 
made in eastern or Coastal counties, where 
a dearth of this crop is produced. Cash 
crop producing farmers could well afford to 
grow more small grains and hays, in order 
to permit the cash crops to be a surplus 
production. 

COTTON 

After receiving a price of about 6 cents 
for lint cotton from the 1931 crop, the out- 
look is, of course, discouraging for 1932. 
Added to this is the realization that the 
consumption or demand is also weak, as 
indicated on Page 8. Yet, in spite of these 
conditions, we find that the probable acre- 
age of cotton this year may not be reduced 
in North Carolina. In addition to the dis- 
couraging outlook, there is a probability 
that boll weevil ravages will be exceedingly 
heavy unless dry weather is experienced 
during July and August. A large part of 
the increase in acreage will be due to the 
unexpected shortage in the acreage of to- 
bacco. The easiest shift in the tobacco 
area seems to be to cotton, where cotton is 
not grown extensively. While cotton re- 
sponds well to commercial fertilizers, the 
lack of finances is going to result in many 
farmers not using any at all this year. This 
will hasten the maturity of the crop which 
will be an advantage under boll weevil con- 
ditions. The acreage of cotton has been 
almost eliminated in the true Coastal 
counties. Even Onslow, Sampson, Jones, 



Craven, Pitt, Beaufort, Perquimans, Pas- 
quotank and Gates counties have small 
acreage in comparison with previous years. 

TOBACCO 

1932 is experiencing one of the strangest 
years in the history of tobacco. Due to the 
low prices paid to farmers last year, the 
intended acreage for 1932 was greatly re- 
duced. The mild winter permitted of the 
early planting of tobacco seed beds, but 
what the farmers did not anticipate were 
the severe freeze early in March and the 
ravages of flea bugs and blue mold (Downy 
mildew), as well as thieves. Thus the com- 
bined effects of freezes and other agencies 
has doubtless reduced the acreage to prob- 
ably 35 per cent below that of last year. 
The transplanting from beds was still 
underway on the first of June, even in the 
eastern counties. 

It is feared that many farmers are labor- 
ing under the delusion that, with the pros- 
pective shortage in acreage of the flue- 
cured type, the price is going to be quite 
favorable. A study of the tobacco supply 
and distribution data on Page 11 does not 
adequately indicate the probable reduction 
in consumption which is now occurring. The 
distressed financial conditions will probably 
react to a still greater reduction in con- 
sumption. The belated planting of the 
crop is likely to result in a large proportion 
of inferior grades. Those farmers who give 
especial attention to the production of high 
quality tobacco will probably be the chief 
benefactors. 

The tobacco sales data on Page 13 should 
be of interest to every grower. The last 
column to the right shows the 1931-32 
season's sales and prices, in comparison 
with the five previous seasons shown on the 
same page. 

On Page 11 is shown important data, not 
only for the bright tobacco, but for its 
chief competitor, the Burley type, covering 
supply and consumption. To anticipate the 
probabilities of demand and prices for any 
commodity, one must not only know the 
probable or actual production, but the con- 
sumption as well. The law of supply and 
demand has proven itself too often to be 
ignored. 

CASH CROPS 

There was undoubtedly a period when 



the cash crop farmers had the decided ad- 
vantage over those in the areas specializing 
in small grains and all around farming. In 
spite of the low prices of small grains and 
livestock, however, the farmer who prac- 
tices diversification has a far better chance 
of not only avoiding heavy debts, but of 
coming out ahead in the long run. The 
cash crop farmer, and especially the com- 
mercial fruit and vegetable growers, has 
years of prosperity, but the years of ad- 
versity come even more frequently. 

There is a portion of North Carolina 
located in the Central Peidmont area where 
neither cotton, tobacco, peanuts .trucking 
or fruit growing stand out as major features 
of their farming program, yet the people in 
these counties are the most contented, and 
equally as prosperous as any in the State. 
The reason is that they grow a little of all 
of these crops, with small grains and hays 
as surplus crops. Livestock is the chief 
source of converting their surpluses into 
meat and milk products. They consider 
poultry an essential part of their plan for 
securing ready cash. 

There is a large undeveloped field in 
farm production in North Carolina. This 
State is still importing large quantities of 
dairy and poultry products. It still imports 
small grains and hays. It is reasonable that 
advantages are available to farmers who 
specialize in these products for sale in 
counties nearby which are deficient in them. 
Such surplus and deficient counties may be 
readily located in the crop tables shown in 
this publication. 

We do not recommend that farmers grow 
no cash crops, but we do suggest the wiser 
policy of not being dependent solely on the 
income from such sales. Every farmer 
must have some cash income, but he should 
make every effort to let such crops be sur- 
plus or by-products, rather than the sole 
dependence. The actual growing of crops 
is only one essential of profitable farming. 
One of the greatest weaknesses is that of 
not knowing what the crops are costing. 
Suggestive of such a study is the table on 
Page 30 showing the cost of production. If 
every other industry finds it essential to 
keep records of operation and costs, why 
should not the most complicated industry 
of all — that of farming — find it equally as 
essential? 




NORTH CAROLINA CORN 



15 



Districts and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW) 
District 4 — Buncombe- 
Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.)„ 

Dlstrict 2 — Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) 

District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (O.) 

District 8 — Alison 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Grates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal <NE.) 

Dlstlrct 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones , 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (8E.) 



STATE. 



Acres Planted 



Yield 
Bushels 
per Acre 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 | , 29\ T 30\ '31 



6,200 
15,859 

4,332 
12,877 
27,278 

8,126 
33,493 

I. 8,145 
126,310 

18,626 
15,800 
17.286 
7,969 
4,226 

II, 881 
12,981 

9.221 
9,980 
10,561 
14,500 
6,876 
8,581 
27,539 
7,104 
6,801 
9,013 
198,945 
20,437 
16,182 
9,617 
17,990 
23,945 
26,990 
27,537 
16,225 
20,832 
23,070 
18,755 
12,455 
18,269 
252,304 
12,127 
18,692 
25.904 
19,090 
12,222 
30,119 
10.701 
25,448 
21,921 
43,006 
219,230 
23.743 
20,076 
35,361 
20,038 
16.761 
32,561 
11.359 
16,094 
16,752 
19,160 
41,109 
253,014 
21,702 
12,362 
12,033 
13,441 
406 
29,566 
13,574 
35,011 
12,741 
17,238 
29,479 
23,464 
19.226 
14.380 
6,635 
10,970 
272,228 
30,039 
4,359 
17,587 
22,685 
15,122 
53,177 
14,986 
31,978 
11,655 
42,747 
43,081 
25,827 
313,243 
23,589 
9 057 
33,820 
28,028 
40,115 
29,468 
15,522 
1,791 
16,784 
14.302 
62,547 
47,164 
15,996 
338,183 



6,885 
15,415 

4,791 
14.147 
29,483 

9,175 
37,184 
21,514 
138,594 
19.321 
14,999 
17,781 

8,901 

2,916 
14,158 
15.605 
10,100 
10,686 
12,373 
15.082 

7,356 

9,609 
29,698 

7.868 

6.961 
10,036 
213,450 
22,111 
16,273 
11,718 
18,055 
26,618 
27,094 
27,036 
17,351 
21,424 
24.888 
20,811 
13,284 
18,135 
264,798 
12,882 
20,727 
29,647 
20,642 
14,097 
31,153 
12,817 
26,226 
22,848 
47,035 
238,074 
27,915 
22,173 
37,861 
22,277 
17,713 
33,293 
12,671 
19,843 
17,578 
21,914 
43,071 
276,309 
24,335 
13,554 
13,973 
12,438 
225 
35,616 
13,755 
38,877 
14,802 
19,432 
35,671 
25,337 
21,872 
15,542 

7,970 
12,537 
305,936 
40,029 

5,032 
21,167 
25,916 
16,792 
58,477 
18,873 
33,028 
14,564 
46,786 
48,990 
32,206 
361,860 
25,556 

8,188 
36,419 
30,066 
43.279 
31,815 
15,150 

1,458 
16.784 
15,159 
67,322 
50,296 
17,015 
358,507 



7.012 
17,875 

4,181 
14,611 
31,580 

8,590 
39,423 
18.813 
142,085 
18,638 
15,418 
19,521 

7,365 

4,118 
13,545 
14,264 
10,192 

9,930 
10,924 
15,082 

7,785 

8,362 
31,450 

7,466 

5.700 

9,971 
209,731 
24,351 
15,681 
10,491 
20,011 
28,747 
23,923 
25,909 
18,180 
24,582 
28.256 
21,518 
15,569 
21,178 
278,456 
12.572 
20,574 
28.227 
22,529 
15,385 
30,850 
12,531 
30,089 
22,154 
46,298 
241,209 
27,339 
20,365 
38,054 
21,028 
17.708 
30.497 
12,006 
18,676 
18.475 
21.713 
48,617 
274,478 
24,0511' 
14,708 
14,723 
14,044 
406 
39,590 
15,642 
41,400 
15,877 
19,788 
38,451 
28,028 
23.989 
15,839 

7,947 
12,120 
326,603 
40,175 

4,556 
19,539 
25,951 
15,956| 
65,789 
19,434 
34,557 
14,383 
50,394 
43,343 
37,741 
371,818 
27,563 

8,982 
35,254 
24,457 
44.388 
31,656 
14,628 

2,135 
23,1581 
13,932 
71,531 
52,238| 
16.900| 
366,8221 



27 
28 
23 
23 
22 
24 
24 
21 
24 
25 
25 
20 
21 
21 
25 
27 
23 
22 
21 
23 
25 
23 
23 
22 
30 
24 
24 
23 
22 
21 
26 
20 
23 
25 
22 
22 
25 
23 
22 
20 
23 
19 
20 
20 
22 
24 
22 
19 
23 
22 
21 
21 
21 
22 
21 
19 
20 
21 
18 
17 
18 
23 
22 
21 
20 
20 
18 
19 
20 
23 
18 
22 
19 
23 
21 
21 
21 
19 
18 
19 
21 
24 
22 
22 
20 
24 
23 
20 
20 
25 
20 
23 
21 
22 
19 
20 
22 
21 
22 
22 
21 
25 
18 
20 
20 
22 
22 
21 



14 30 

17 29 

20 27 

18 22 
10 22 
18 29 
13 22 

17 22 

15 24 
24 27 

18 22 

19 21 

21 20 

20 19 

22 26 
19 28 

23 26 

19 23 

20 24 
23 24 

23 27 

16 21 

15 20 

21 22 
23 

24 26 

20 22 

21 22 

16 21 
19 21 

21 26 

16 20 

17 22 

22 24 
19 22 
17 23 
13 22 
12 23 
16 22 

16 19 

17 22 

16 20 

19 21 

21 22 

23 24 

18 21 

17 21 

19 21 

24 24 

22 23 

18 20 

20 22 

18 20 
24 22 
17 21 

20 20 

16 20 
22 23 
22 20 

20 20 

17 19 

27 24 
24 22 

21 21 

21 22 

28 24 

24 22 
26 23 

25 24 

19 23 

20 21 

18 22 
20 22 

26 23 
20 21 
20 22 

32 25 

27 23 

28 28 

26 27 

22 23 

27 27 

22 23 

23 23 

24 21 

33 30 

20 21 
22 21 

22 21 

25 26 

24 22 

21 20 

20 20 

23 22 

19 22 

25 21 

22 24 

21 19 

22 20 

19 20 

20 20 
30 22 

24 22 
24 21 

20 20 

21 19 
19 20 
21 21 



Production 
Total Bushels 



1929 



1930 



1931 



167,400 
444.052 

99,636 
296,171 
600,116 
195,024 
803,832 
381,045 
,987,276 
465,650 
395.000 
345.720 
167.349 

88,746 
297,025 
350.487 
212.083 
219,560 
221,781 
333,500 
171,900 
197.363 
633,397 
156,288 
204,030 
216,312 
,676,191 
470,051 
356,004 
201,957 
467,740 
478,900 
620,770 
688.425 
356,950 
458,304 
576,750 
431.365 
274,010 
365,380 
,746,606 
230,413 
273,840 
518,080 
419,980 
293,328 
662,618 
203,319 
585,304 
482,262 
903.126 
,572,272 
498,603 
441,672 
742,581 
380.722 
335,220 
083,781 
204,462 
273,598 
301,536 
440,680 
904,398 
,207,253 
434,040 
247,240 
216,594 
255.379 
8.120 
680,018 
244,332 
770.242 
242,079 
396.474 
619,059 
492,744 
403,746 
273.220 
119,430 
208,430 
,611.147 
720,936 

95.898 
386.914 
453,700 
362,928 
,223.071 
299,720 
639,560 
291,375 
854.940 
990,863 
542,367 
,862,272 
448,191 
181,140 
744.040 
588,588 
882,530 
648,296 
325,962 

44,775 
302,112 
286,040 
,250,940 
,037,608 
351,912 
,092,134 



96,390 
262,055 
95,820 
254,646 
294,830 
165.150 
483,392 
365.738 

2,018,021 
463,704 
269,982 
337,839 
186.921 
58,320 
311,476 
296,495 
232,300 
203,034 
247,460 
346,886 
169,188 
153,744 
445,470 
165,228 
160,103 
240,864 

4,289,014 
508.553 
260.368 
222,642 
379.155 
425,888 
460,598 
594,792 
329,669 
364.208 
323,544 
249,732 
212,544 
290,160 

4,621,853 
206,112 
393,813 
622,587 
474,766 
253,746 
529,601 
243,523 
629,424 
502,656 
846,630 

4,702,858 
502,470 
532,152 
643,637 
423,263 
283,408 
732,446 
278,762 
396.860 
298,826 
591.678 

1,033,704 

5,717,206 
511,035 
379,512 
335,352 
323,388 
5.625 
676,704 
275,100 
745,200 
296,040 
505,232 
713,420 
506,740 
699,904 
295,298 
223,160 
325,962 

6,817,672 

1,080,783 
110,704 
486,841 
621,984 
554,136 

1,169,540 
415,206 
726,616 
364,100 

1,122,864 

1,028,790 
644,120 

8,325,684 
485,564 
204,700 
801,218 
631,386 
952,138 
604,485 
303,000 
43,740 
402,816 
363.816 

1.346,440 

1,056,216 
323.285 

7,518,804 



210 
518 
112 
321, 
694 
249 
867 
413 

3,388 
503 
339 
409 
147 
78 
352 
399 
264 
228 
262 
361 
210 
175 
629 
164 
159 
259 

4,582 
535 
329 
220 
520 
574 
526 
623 
399 
565 
621 
494 
342 
402 

6,156 
251 
432 
620 
540 
323 
647 
263 
722 
509 
925 

5,236 
546 
448 
799 
420 
354 
701 
240 
373 
351 
521 

1,069 

5,825, 
529, 
35 
323, 
323, 
9 

910 
328 
910 
349 
455 
807 
616 
599. 
364, 
222 
327. 

7,430 

1,084 
104 
449 
544 
478 

1,381 
408 
725 
373, 

1,108, 
866, 
754 

8,282 
606 
188, 
846 
464, 
887 
633, 
292 
46, 
509 
292 

1,430 
992 
338 

7,529 



360 
,375 
887 
442 
760 
110 
,306 
,886 
,126 
226 
196 
941 
300 
,242 
,170 
392 
992 
390 
176 
968 
,195 
602 
000 
252 
600 
,246 
920 
722 
,301 
.311 
286 
940 
306 
,256 
,960 
,386 
,632 
.914 



1.08 
1.05 
1.11 
1.05 
1.01 
1.05 
1.02 
1.05 
1.04 
1.00 
1.03 
1.10 
1.13 
1.18 
1.08 
1.03 
1.15 
1.03 
1.08 
1.05 
1.15 
1.08 
1.08 
1.10 
1.05 
1.09 
1.07 
1.01 
1.00 
1.01 
1.03 
1.09 
1.00 
1.00 
1.02 
1.02 
1.00 
1.02 
518 1.06 



382 
914 

440 

054 
,994 



696 1.00 .89 



085 
,850 
151 
136 
542 
960 
908 
780 
030 
134 
560 
160 
431 
120 
520 
025 
112 
574 
446 
122 
992 
906 
012 
744 
570 
482 
800 
294 
124 
471 
616 
725 
97 
516 
240 
911 
725 
788 
397 
971 
680 
569 
114 
697 
958 
668 
860 
820 
247 
386 
622 
096 
683 
760 
120 
560 
970 
476 
572 
620 
522 
000 
387 



1.973,457 2,157,528 2,211,202| 22 21 22|42,756,1 59 44,714,966 48,432,859 1 .01 .94 .44 43,377,814 41,406,112 21,330,086121.98 19.19 10.10 



Price 
Per 
Bushel 



'29| '30| '31 



1.08 
1.02 

1.03 
1.03 
1.01 



1.18 
1.22 
1.20 
1.06 
1.05 
1.16 
1.04 
.99 
1.08 
1.01 
1.03 
1.04 
.95 
1.08 
.99 
1.03 
1.04 
1.02 
.99 
.94 
1.14 
1.02 
1.06 
1.01 
.97 
1.02 
1.02 
.93 
.92 
.98 
.96 
1.00 
.98 
.98 
.95 
.96 
.91 
1.01 
1.06 
1.06 
.97 
.98 
.98 
.85 



98 
1.05 
1.01 
1.05 
1.03 
1.05 
1.03 
1.00 
1.00 
1.08 
1.07 
1.10 
1.03 
1.06 
1.08 
.98 
1.00 
1.08 
1.04 
.96 
1.00 
1.03 
1.00 
.99 
.98 
1.05 
1.00 
.95 
.95 
1.05 
.99 
.98 
1.00 
1.00 
.98 
.99 
.92 
1.00 
.92 
.96 
.90 
.98 
.98 
1.00 
.95 
1.00 
.95 
1.03 
.97 
1.00 
.98 
.99 
.98 
1.00 
1.00 
.95 
1.00 
.95 
.98 
1.03 
.96 
.98 
.99 



.90 
.94 
.96 
.92 
.89 
.95 
.94 
.94 
.90 
.99 
.93 
1.01 
.99 
.92 
.96 
.94 
.89 
.95 
.95 
.98 
.79 
.77 
.80 
.97 
.90 
.89 
.92 
.94 
.91 
1.00 
.94 
.77 
.76 
.83 
.89 
.88 
.80 
.98 
.88 
.95 
.78 
.92 
.88 
.93 
.81 
.93 
.93 
.97 
.90 
.91 
.97 
.89 
.96 
.94 
.98 
.92 
1.00 
.95 
.96 
.94 
.91 
.95 
.94 



.55 
.55 
.53 
55 
.45 
.50 
.50 
.43 
.50 
.50 
.55 

.43 

.47 
.50 
.45 
.13 
.48 
.50 
.52 
.48 
.50 
.47 
.45 
.47 
.50 
.50 
.52 
.43 
.45 
.45 
.40 
.59 
.52 
.40 

41 
.50 
.42 
.40 
.47 
.52 
.46 
.43 
.49 
.41 
.41 
.42 
.49 
.412 
.44 
.4 5 
.48 

45 
"47 
.55 
.55 
.53 
.48 
.52 
.49 
.47 
.40 
.40 
.48 
.49 
.38 
.3'.) 
.4 
.43 
.45 
.38 
.48 
,4 5 
.39 
.42 
.49 
.44 
.43 
.43 

.39 

.45 
.41 

.3 
.30 
.30 
.35 
.35 
.39 
. 3 - 
.3 5 
.33 
.40 
.37 
.40 
.37 
.43 
.33 
.38 
.41 
.37 
.50 
.41 
.35 
.35 
.42 
.40 
.39 
.35 
.40 



Total Value of Crop 



1929 | 1930 1931 



Value 
per Acre 



1929| 1930| 1931 



180,792 
466,255 
110,596 
310,980 
606.117 
204,775 
819,909 
400.097 

1,099,521 
465,650 
406,850 
380,292 
189,104 
104,720 
320,787 
361,002 
243,895 
226,147 
239,523 
350,175 
197,685 
213,152 
684,069 
171,917 
214,232 
235,780 

>, 004, 980 
474,752 
356,004 
203,977 
481,772 
522,001 
620,770 
688,425 
364,089 
467,470 
576,750 
439,992 
290,450 
394,610 

i, 881 ,062 
237,325 
282,055 
523,261 
419,980 
287,461 
695,749 
205,352 
614,569 
496,730 
948,282 

1,710,764 
498,603 
441,672 
801,987 
407,373 
368,742 
704,294 
216,730 
295,486 
295,505 
440,680 
976,750 

1,447,822 
416,678 
247,240 
223.092 
255,379 
8,038 
666,418 
256,549 
770,242 
229,975 
376,650 
650,012 
487,817 
395,671 
273,220 
119,430 
204,261 

1.580,672 
663,261 
95,898 
355,961 
426,478 
326,635 

,198,610 
293.726 
039.560 
276,806 
854,940 
941,320 
558,638 

,631,833 
448,191 
177,517 
736,600 
576,816 
882,530 
648,296 
309,664 
44,775 
287,006 
280,319 

,288,468 
996,104 
344,874 

,021,160 



113,740 
319,707 
114,984 
269,925 
309,572 
191,574 
502,728 
362,081 

2,184,311 
468.341 
278,081 
351,353 
177,575 
62,986 
308,361 
305,390 
241,592 
207,095 
244,985 
326,073 
192,874 
156,819 
472,198 
166,880 
155,300 
245,681 

4,361,584 
472,954 
239,539 
218,189 
363,989 
425,888 
451,386 
582,896 
313,186 
349,640 
294,425 
252.229 
235,297 
307,570 

4,507,188 
201,990 
385,937 
529,199 
422,542 
228,371 
497,825 
233,782 
579,070 
447,364 
879,662 

4,405,742 
472,322 
478,937 
637,201 
393,035 
286,242 
725,122 
256,461 
380,985 
280,896 
526,593 
982,019 

5,420,413 
500,814 
299,814 
258,221 
258,710 
5,456 
609,034 
244,839 
685.584 
278,278 
459,761 
713,420 
476,336 
538,926 
224.426 
185,223 
290,106 

6.028,948 
864,626 
108,490 
428,420 
590,885 
432,220 

1,075.977 
365,381 
675,753 
294,921 

1,044.264 
956,775 
624.796 

7,462,514 
441,863 
198,559 
713,0S4 
606,131 
895,010 
592,395 
278,760 
43,740 
382,675 
349,263 

1,265,654 
961,157 
307,121 

7,035,412 



115 
285 

59 
176 
312 
124 
433 
177 
1,686 
251 
186 
176 

69 

39 
158 
171 
127 
114 
136 
173 
105 

82 
283 

77 

79 
129 
2,361 
230 
148 

99 
208 
339 
273 
249 
163 
282 
261 
197 
160 
209 
2,823 
108 
211 
254 
221 
135 
317 
110 
317 
229 
444 
2,351 
256 
246 
439 
222 
169 
364 
117 
175 
140 
208 
513 
2,856 
201 
137 
129 
138, 
4 

346 
157 
409 
136 
191, 
395 
271 
257 
156 

86 
147, 
3.168 
423 

31 
161 
190 
167 
538, 
130 
253, 
123 
443, 
320, 
301 
3,087 
260, 

62, 
321, 
190, 
328, 
316, 
119, 

16, 
178, 
122, 
572, 
387, 
118, 
2,995, 



698 
106 



830 25.53 



7 93 
642 
555 
,653 
,971 
,248 
613 
,558 
,275 
231 
,121 
,477 
,739 
196 
195 
332 
,745 
098 
,533 
050 
198 
800 
,623 
784 
,360 
185 
140 
.114 
15 
,679 
,302 
,984 
,693 
085 
.965 
983 
239 
,944 
,119 
.706 
,607 
,685 
,696 
.447 
523 
740 
,294 
,461 
,278 
,987 



29.16 
29.40 



24.15 
22.22 
25.20 
24.48 
2.05 
24.54 
25.00 
25.75 
22.00 
23.75 
24.78 
27.00 
27.81 
26.45 
22.66 
22.68 
24.15 
28.75 
24.84 
24.84 
24.20 
31.50 
26.16 
25.16 
23.23 
22.00 
21.21 
26.78 
21.80 
23.00 
25.00 
22.44 
22.44 
25.00 
23.46 
23.32 
21.60 
23.31 
19.57 
20.60 
20.20 
22.00 
23.52 
23.10 
19.19 
24.15 
22.66 
22.05 
21.49 
21 00 



417|22.00 
524 " 

20.33 
22.00 
21.63 
19.08 
18.36 
17.64 
23.00 
23.76 
21.53 
19.20 
20.00 
18.54 
19.00 



897 
997 
,744 
,659 
,554 
410 
445 
396 
030 
066 
669 
562 
S9 5 



385 19.80 



,017 
,671 
860 
,225 
152 
661 
311 
882 
64S 
,781 
,258 
,043 
043 
,436 
,783 
740 
,53S 
812 
596 
994 
406 
467 
.738 
.928 
481 
746 
245 
517 
520 
471 
560 
950 
440 
317 
880 
248 
984 
300 



22.54 
18.90 
22.00 
18 05 
21,85 
22.05 
20.79 
20.58 
19.00 
18.00 
18.62 
20.50 
22.08 
22.00 
20.24 
19.20 
21.60 
22.54 
19.60 
20.00 
23.75 
20.00 
21.85 
21.63 
21.17 
19.00 
19.60 
21.78 
20.58 
22.00 
22.00 
19.95 
25.00 
17.10 
19.60 
20.60 
21.12 
21.56 



278 20.76 



16.52 

20.74 

24.00 

19.08 

10.50 

20.88 

13.52. 

16.83 

14.56 

24.24 

18.54 

19.76 

19.95 

21.60 

21.78 

19.57 

23.92 

19.38 

19.80 

21.62 

26.22 

16.32 

15.90 

21.21 

22.31 

24.48 

20.43 

19.53 

14.72 

18.62 

20.16 

16.00 

16.66 

21.56 

18.05 

16 32 

11.83 

12.12 

16.96 

16.96 

17.02 

15.68 

18.62 

17.85 

20.47 

16.20 

15.98 

18.24 

22.08 

19.58 

17.10 

18.51 

16.92 

21.60 

16.83 

18.60 

16.16 

21.78 

20.24 

19.20 

15.98 

24.03 

22.80 

19.63 

20.58 

22.12 

18.48 

20.80 

24.25 

17.10 

17.80 

16.56 

18.80 

23.66 

20.00 

18.80 

24.64 

45.16 

23.24 

23.14 

19.71 

21.60 

21.56 

20.24 

22.80 

25.74 

18.40 

19.36 

20.46 

20.25 

22.32 

19.53 

19.40 

20.62 

17.29 

24.25 

19.58 

20.16 

20.68 

18.62 

18.40 

30.00 

22.80 

23.04 

18.80 

19.11 

18.05 

19.62 



16.50 
15.95 
14.31 
12.10 
9.90 
14.50 
.11.00 
9.46 
11.87 
13.50 
12,10 
9.03 
9.40 
9.50 
11.70 
12.04 
12.48 
11.50 
12.48 
11.52 
13.50 
9.87 
9.00 
10.34 
14.00 
13.00 
11.06 
9.46 
9.45 
9.45 
10.40 
11.80 
11.44 
9.60 
9.02 
11.50 
9.24 
9.20 
10.34 
9.88 
10.14 
8.60 
10.29 
9.02 
9.84 
8.82 
10.29 
8.82 
10.56 
10.35 
9.60 
9.75 
9.40 
12.10 
11.55 
10.60 
9.60 
11.96 
9.80 
9.40 
7.60 
9.60 
10.56 
10.41 
8.36 
9.36 
8.80 
9.89 
10.80 
8.74 
10.08 
9.90 
8.58 
9.66 
10.29 
9,68 
10.75 
9.89 
10.92 
12.15 
9.70 
10.53 
6.90 
8.28 
7.35 
10.50 
8.19 
6.72 
7.35 
8.58 
8.80 
7.40 
8.00 
8.53 
9.46 
6.93 
9.12 
7.79 
7.40 
10.00 
8.20 
7 70 
7.70 
8.82 
8.00 
7.41 
7.00 
8.17 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA WHEAT 



Productio 



Total Bushels 



Districts and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW) 
District 4 — Buncombe. 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.) — 
District 2 — Alamanee — 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stoke3 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.)_ 

Dlstrict 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) — 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.)_. 

Dlstrlct 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (IME.)_. 

District 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson _. 

Scotland _. 

Southern Coastal (SE) 



Acreage Planted 



Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 



STATE- 



Price 
Per 
Bushel 



1929 


1930 


1931 


| '29 | '30 


| '31 


1,018 


844 


842 


111 


13 


13 


2.981 


2.645 


3,356 




14 


14 


259 


290 


240 


a 


12 


12 


5,836 


4,734 


5,655 




10 


12 


9,375 


7,895 


12,957 


s 


11 


13 


1.009 


726 


792 


ii 


12 


13 


12.599 


10,087 


11,5681 10 


12 


14 


13.182 


10,147 


9,546 


ii 


12 


13 


46,259 


37,368 


44,957 


11 


12 


13 


3,831 


2,956 


3,421 


12 


15 


15 


8.173 


6,744 


7,242 


12 


12 


13 


307 


110 


146 


10 


10 


13 


2,012 


724 


1,113 


9 


11 


12 





40 






11 


12 


3,506 


2,938 


2,057 


12 


13 


14 


915 


634 


709 


11 


14 


16 


1,321 


572 


588 


11 


12 


14 


2,692 


1,413 


1,795 


11 


13 


13 


2,070 


1,056 


1,276 


9 


14 


13 


3,575 


2,387 


2,387 


11 


12 


14 


977 


465 


614 


14 


13 


13 


776 


162 


735 


12 


13 


14 


5,522 


2,648 


5,471 


11 


12 


15 


297 


152 


140 


10 


12 


13 


45 


40 


23 


11 


14 


15 


1,560 


956 


954 


12 


13 


12 


37,579 


24,003 


28,671 


11 


13 


14 


12,209 


8,836 


10,242 


11 


12 


15 


6,493 


5,595 


6,523 


12 


12 


14 


2,278 


1,758 


2,406 


10 


10 


14 


12,611 


9,739 


9,649 


14 


14 


16 


629 


763 


1,777 


11 


11 


13 


4,801 


3,200 


4,760 


10 


11 


16 


14.391 


12,545 


12,748 


12 


14 


14 


9,352 


6,453 


8,021 


11 


10 


13 


6,174 


4,348 


6,495 


10 


11 


13 


11.046 


8,610 


10,516 


10 


11 


14 


10,442 


8,666 


10.910 


11 


11 


14 


662 


559 


997 


10 


11 


16 


1,268 


950 


2.336 


12 


12 


16 


92,356 


72,022 


87,380 


11 


12 


14 


8,138 


6,747 


7,697 


12 


12 


13 


15,417 


11,358 


13.381 


12 


14 


15 


14,220 


9,470 


13,533 


10 


11 


14 


20,213 


16,525 


19,350 


14 


13 


16 


9,550 


6,962 


7,727 


13 


13 


15 


20,846 


14,536 


15,769 


13 


13 


14 


2,100 


1.282 


1,532 


10 


11 


13 


23,019 


18,152 


18,990 


12 


12 


15 




16,327 


18,089 


15 


14 


17 


2,407 


2,829 


4,444 


11 


11 


12 


138,543 


104,188 


120,492 


13 


13 


15 


5,196 


3,771 


5,697 


10 


10 


11 


10,774 


5.641 


8,785 


12 


11 


16 


7,375 


2,269 


7,316 


12 


12 


16 


6.309 


296 


5,443 


13 


14 


16 


9,390 


6,584 


9,123 


13 


14 


17 


3.643 


1,322 


3,395 


14 


12 


18 


6,841 


3,756 


6,556 


10 


10 


12 


6,686 


5,799 


8,998 


9 


10 


12 


1,049 


1,280 


2,462 


10 


11 


12 


19,476 


14,108 


19,323 


11 


12 


13 


7,875 


4,896 


9,794 


11 


11 


18 


84,614 


49,722 


86,892 


11 


12 


15 


40 


14 


129 


12 


12 


17 


51 


30 


22 


15 


12 


17 


59 


19 


33 


13 


12 


17 


18 


42 


36 


12 


12 


17 


6 





6 


10 




17 


90 


84 


314 


13 


12 


17 


28 


13 


25 


12 


12 


17 


1,043 


290 


657 


12 


11 


15 


32 


17 


47 


12 


12 


17 


11 


28 


13 


13 


12 


18 


262 


414 


935 


12 


13 


18 


27 


35 


173 


11 


12 


15 


15 


5 


10 


15 


12 


17 


7 


55 


13 


13 


12 


17 


8 


62 


9 


13 


12 


17 





209 


10 




12 


17 


1,697 


1,317 


2,432 


12 


12 


17 


25 


68 


154 


13 


14 


20 


12 


18 


1 


11 


14 


20 


59| 


64 


56 


12 


14 


20 


28 


38 


53 


13 


14 


21 


101 


26 


5 7 


1 4 


14 


20 


543 


428 


607 


15 


15 


20 


14 


12 


4 


12 


14 


20 


154 


9 


102 


12 


14 


17 


17 


29 


14 


13 


14 


20 


118 


105 


160 


13 


14 


19 


307 


336 


600 


12 


15 


20 


146 


206 


531 


15 


15 


20 


1 ,524 


1,339 


2,339 


14 


15 


20 


138 


58 


57 


11 


14 


17 


21 


36 


5 


10 


14 


15 


94 


45 


47 


13 


14 


18 


365 


288 


457 


15 


14 


19 


74 


240 


73 


13 


14 


18 


1,438 


1,299 


2,275 


13 


11 


13 


613 


930 


1,240 


14 


14 


15 


3 


14 


6 


15 


14 


15 


36 


26 


5 


12 


14 


15 


13 


95 


22 


12 


14 


18 


493 


305 


364 


14 


16 


17 


208 


280 


221 


13 


15 


18 


347 


569 


481 


11 


15 


16 


3,843 


4,185 


5,253 


13 


14 


16 


406,416 


294,144 


378,436 


12 


12 


14 | 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 | '29 | '30|'31 



11,198 
35,772 
2,849 
64,196 
103,125 
11,099 
125,990 
143.002 
499,231 
45,972 
98,076 
3,070 
18,108 

42T072 
10,065 
14,531 
29,612 
18,630 
39,325 
13,678 
9,312 
60,742 
2,970 
495 
18.720 
425,378 
134,299 
77,916 
22,780 
176.554 
6,919 
48,010 
172,692 
102,872 
61,740 
110,460 
114,862 
6,620 
15.216 
1,050,940 
97,656 
185,004 
142,200 
282,982 
124,150 
270,998 
21..000 
276,228 
339,495, 
26,477 
1,766,190 
51.960 
129,288 
88,500 
82,017 
122,070 
51,002 
68,410 
60,174 
10,490 
214.236 
86.625 
964,772 
480 
765 
767 
216 
60 
1,170 
336 
12,516 
384 
143 
3,144 
297 
225 
91 
104 

20,698 

325 
132 
708 
364 
1.414 
8.145 
168 
1,848 
221 
1,534 
3,684 
2.190 
20,733 
1,518 
210 
1,222 
5,475 
962 
18.694 
8,582 
45 
432 
156 
6,902 
2,704 
3,817 
50.719 



10,972 
37,030 
3.480 
47,340 
86,845 
8.712 
121,044 
121,764 
437,187 
44,340 
80,928 
1,100 
7.964 
440 
38,194 
8,876 
6,864 
18,369 
14,784 
28.644 
6,045 
2,106 
31,776 
1.824 
644 
12.428 
306,326 
106,032 
67,140 
17,580 
136,346 
8.393 
35,200 
175,630 
64,530 
47.828 
94,710 
95.326 
6.149 
11,400 
866,264 
80,964 
159,012 
104,170 
214,825 
90,506 
188,968 
14,102 
217,824 
228,578 
31,119 
1,330,068 
37.710 
62.051 
27,228 
4,144 
92,176 
15,864 
37,560 
57,990 
14,080 
169,296 
53,856 
571,955 
168 
360 
228 
504 

1,008 
156 
3.190 
204 
336 
5,382 
420 
GO 
GOO 
744 
2,508 
15,928 
952 
252 
896 
532 
364 
6.420 
168 
126 
406 
1.470 
5.040 
2,090 
18,716 
812 
504 
630 
4,032 
3.360 
14,289 
13.020 
196 
364 
1,330 
4,880 
4,200 
8.535 
56,152 



10,946 

46,984 
2,880 

67,860 
168,441 

10,296 
161,966 
124,098 
593,471 

51,315 

94,146 
1,898 

13,356 



28 
11 

8 
23 
16 
33 

7 
10 
82 

1 

11 
396, 

153 
91 
33 
154, 
23 
76 
178, 
104, 
84, 
147, 
152, 
15, 
37, 
1,252, 
100, 
200 
189 
309, 
115, 
220, 
19, 
284. 
307, 
53, 
1,802 
62, 
140 
117, 
87, 
155, 
61 
78, 
107 
29 
251, 
176, 
1,267, 
2, 



798 
344 
232 
335 
.588 
418 
,982 
290 
065 
,820 
345 
448 
380 
630 
,322 
,684 
384 
101 
160 
472 
273 
435 
224 
740 
952 
376 
753 
061 
715 
462 
760 
905 
766 
916 
850 
513 
328 
276 
667(1 



$ $ 
.51 1.28 
1.25 
1.25 
1.05 
1.15 
1.25 
1.15 
1.15 
42 1.15 
35 1.20 
1.14 
1.30 
1.25 
1.25 
1.05 
1.25 
1.20 
1.15 
1.25 
1.05 
1.10 
1.12 
1.08 
1.20 
1.15 
1.15 



.51 

.55 
.48 

40 
.50 
.40 

39 



,36 
42 
43 



560 
056 
088 
091 
110 
672 
976 
544 
199 
292 
255 
193 
374 
561 
612 
102 
338 
425 
855 
799 
234 
830 
595 
170 
221 
153 
170 
632 
080 
20 
120 
113 
140 
140 
80 
734 
280 
040(1 



39 1.14 

42 1.08 
1.09 
1.12 
1.05 
1.16 
1.10 
1.12 
1.10 
1.08 
1.10 
1.08 
1.12 
1.15 
1.09 
1.05 
.98 
1.12 
1.00 
1.03 
1.00 
1.10 
1.10 
1.03 
1.15 
1.04 
1.05 
1.08 
1.00 
1.08 
1.05 
1.05 
1.08 
1.12 
1.06 
1.05 
1.04 



42 1.06 



000 
620 
367 

969 
75 
846 



1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

314 1 

575(1 



600 
90 
75 
396 
188 
978 
696 
485 



4,798,661 3,601,596 5,477,61 BJ? 



1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.16 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.1 7 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.15 
1.17 
1.12 
1.05 
1.17 
1.17 
1.17 
1.13 
1.17 
1.10 
1.11 
1.08 



Total Value of Crop 



Value 
Ter 
Acre 



1929 



$ 



1930 I 1931 I 1929 | 1930] 1931 



16.909 
54,016 
4,416 
95,010 
144,375 
16,649 
176,386 
200,163 
707,924 
62,062 
133,383 
4,359 
25,894 

58,901 
13,789 
22,232 
41,753 
26,455 
51,123 
20,517 
13,689 
88,076 
4,336 
688 
25,834 
593,091 
190,705 
105,187 
33,031 
241,879 
11,416 
72,015 
241,767 
142,992 
82,114 
144,703 
158,510 
9,268 
22,824 
,456,411 
136,718 
260,856 
201,924 
396,175 
171,327 
387,527 
29,400 
395,006 
475,293 
42,363 
,496,589 
72,744 
182,296 
122,130 
118,925 
173,339 
71,403 
97,826 
91,464 
14,371 
299,930 
127,339 
,371,767 
792 
1,262 
1,266 
356 
99 
1,931 
554 
19,525 
634 
236 
5,125 
490 
371 
150 
172 

32,963 

536 
218 
1,168 
601 
2,333 
11,810 
277 
3,049 
365 
2,531 
6,079 
3,285 
32,252 
2,505 
347 
1,894 
8,870 
1,587 
30,845 
13,731 
74 
713 
257 
11,388 
4,489 
5,726 
82,426 



14,044 

46.288 
4.350 
49,707 
99,872 
10,890 
139,201 
140,029 
504,381 
53,208 
92,258 
1,430 
9,955 
550 
40,104 
11,095 
8,237 
21,124 
18,480 
30,076 
6,650 
2,359 
34,318 
2,189 
741 
14.292 
347,066 
114,515 
73,183 
19,690 
143,163 
9,736 
38,720 
196,706 
70,983 
51,654 
104,181 
102.952 
6,887 
13,110 
945,480 
85,012 
155,832 
116,670 
214,825 
93,221 
188,968 
15,512 
239,606 
235,435 
35,787 
,380,868 
39,596 
67,015 
27,228 
4,476 
96,785 
16,657 
40,565 
64,949 
14,925 
177,761 
56,010 
605,967 
197 
421 
267 
590 

L179 
183 
3,732 
239 
393 
6,297 
491 
70 
772 
870 
2,934 
18,635 
1,114 
294 
1,048 
622 
426 
7,447 
197 
147 
475 
1,720 
5,897 
2,445 
21,832 
950 
590 
737 
4,637 
3,931 
16,004 
13,671 
229 
426 
1,556 
5,514 
4,914 
9,389 
62,548 



7,662 16.61 
35,238|l8.12 
2,160|17 05 
50,895116.28 
116,224|15.40 
7.413|16.50 
118,235114.00 
85,628[15.18 
423,455115.30 



33,355 
67,785 
1,424 
10,017 



18,719 
7,714 
5,927 
17,035 
12.109 
22,390 
5,987 
7,203 
59,087 
1,256 
259 
8,128 
278,395 
113,686 
59,359 
23,579 
104,981 
18,481 
51,789 
121,361 
70,906 
53,194 
100,112 
111,500 
11,485 
26,911 
867,344 
73,045 
150,536 
140,202 
216,832 
82,293 
163,367 
13,941 
205,092 
230.635 



16.20 
16.32 
14.20 
12.87 



16.80 
15.07 
16.83 
15.51 
12,78 
14.30 
21.00 
17.64 
15.95 
14.60 
15.29 
16.56 
15.78 
15.62 
16.20 
14.50 
19.18 
18.15 
15.00 
16.80 
15.29 
13.30 
13.10 
15.18 
14.00 
18.00 
15.77 
16.80 
16.92 
14.20 
19.60 
17.94 
18.59 
14.00 
17.16 
21.00 



$ $ 
16.64 
17.50 
15.00 
10.50 
12.65 
15.00 
13.80 
13.80 
13.50 
18.00 
13.68 
13.00 
13.75 
13.75 
13.65 
17.50 
14.40 
14.94 
17.50 
12.73 
14.30 
14.56 



18.02 

14.00 
16.92 
16.56 
18.85 



37,330117.60 
,313,273 ' 

45,747 
105.420 
81,939 
60,962 
113,216|18.46 
41,555 
59,004 
77,743 
21,272 
188,399 
128,693 
923,950 
1,667 
284 
426 
465 
78 
4,057 
323 
7,096 
607 
178 
13,464 
2,050 
129 
168 
116 
129 
31 ,237 
2,279 
15 
829 



19.60 
14.30 
13.68 
13.70 
15.40 
16.17 
16.21 
19.80 
24.74 
21.45 
19.78 
16.50 
21.46 
19.79 
18.72 
19.81 
21.45 
19.56 
18.15 
24.73 
21.43 
21.50 

19.42 

21.44 
18.17 
19.80 



844 
9,105 
59 
1.283 
207 
2.250 
8,400 
8,815 
34,954 
678 
53 
592 
5,470 
926 
20,407 
12,648 
63 
53 
277 
4,022 
2,904 
5,387 



868 21.46 



.70 
.70 
.70 
.65 
.73 
.70 

.68 

.72 6,773,423 3,886,777 3,926,082|1 6.67 13.21 10.37 



23.10 
21.75 
19.79 
19.80 
21.47 
21.45 
19.80 
22.50 
21.16 
18.15 
16.52 
20.14 
24.30 
21.45 
21.45 
22 40 
27.00 
19.81 
19.77 
23.10 
21.58 
16.50 



53,474 21.45 



NORTH CAROLINA OATS 



17 



District and Counties 



Acres Planted 



Yield 
Bushels 
per Acre 



1929 | 


1930 | 


1931 


■29| 


'30| 


31 


1,816 


1,695 


1,737 


26 


24 


25 


5,304 


4,594 


3,823 


23 


24 


21 


1,273 


537 


1,407 


21 


21 


22 


1,177 


1,139 


1,138 


22 


21 


28 


1,918 


2,450 


2,893 


23 


19 


24 


2,833 


2,930 


2,751 


24 


25 


25 


1,640 


1,764 


1,695 


21 


18 


29 


2,370 


2.528 


2,458 


23 


18 


25 


18,331 


17,637 


17,902 


23 


22 


24 


3,706 


3.731 


4,054 


22 


25 


23 


783 


1,066 


847 


22 


22 


20 


262 


277 


365 


20 


23 


28 


150 


298 


220 


20 


24 


24 


82 


98 


17 


21 


22 


24 


3,302 


3,450 


3,012 


20 


23 


25 


580 


805 


553 


20 


22 


27 


915 


727 


1,044 


23 


25 


25 


196 


308 


339 


18 


19 


21 


SOO 


1,037 


1,010 


21 


26 


25 


3,704 


4,476 


4,476 


22 


22 


26 


3,407 


3,317 


3.242 


23 


23 


24 


492 


415 


630 


20 


20 


23 


1,957 


1,808 


3,146 


21 


19 


26 


540 


531 


313 


22 


22 


24 


84 


79 


52 


22 


23 


28 


3,777 


3,198 


3,635 


23 


21 


20 


24,737 


25,621 


26,995 


22 


23 


24 


2,236 


2,597 


2,806 


21 


19 


26 


893 


799 


1,058 


20 


20 


24 


1,070 


762 


781 


20 


18 


23 


4,446 


5,088 


5,122 


25 


23 


30 


800 


1,487 


1,778 


20 


19 


20 


2,000 


1,345 


1,510 


22 


18 


25 


3,304 


3.455 


3,330 


26 


23 


33 


1,220 


1,382 


1,468 


21 


18 


27 


1,682 


2,130 


1,785 


23 


18 


23 


1,678 


2,047 


2,588 


21 


18 


23 


1,728 


1,648 


1,962 


22 


20 


28 


236 


500 


545 


20 


19 


24 


660 


1,065 


1,528 


21 


20 


25 


21,953 


24,305 


26,261 


23 


20 


27 


801 


697 


778 


23 


21 


28 


3,834 


4,133 


4,221 


23 


21 


23 


3,306 


4,182 


2,711 


20 


20 


25 


4,627 


5,078 


3,635 


23 


21 


26 


2,118 


2,710 


2,872 


25 


22 


28 


4,871 


5,475 


5,960 


24 


23 


25 


1,607 


1,760 


1,833 


22 


24 


26 


3,556 


4,341 


3,214 


22 


22 


27 


7,028 


7,282 


8,378 


25 


21 


25 


3,422 


4,898 


4,978 


21 


19 


22 


35,170 


40,556 


38,580 


23 


21 


25 


11,156 


8,961 


10,798 


28 


23 


24 


5,083 


5,486 


6,625 


24 


24 


22 


4,109 


5,599 


7,816 


24 


21 


30 


3,543 


3,813 


4,274 


24 


25 


28 


2,625 


3,740 


2,614 


26 


25 


25 


3.715 


4,232 


5,099 


26 


27 


32 


2,398 


3,095 


2,737 


22 


26 


20 


1,790 


2,734 


2,499 


22 


25 


22 


3,787 


4,040 


4,212 


25 


23 


23 


4.890 


6,652 


5,668 


24 


27 


25 


11,817 


9,367 


11,858 


25 


26 


27 


54,913 


57,719 


64,200 


25 


25 


26 


462 


650 


528 


24 


19 


20 


187 


227 


374 


29 


21 


21 


210 


100 


269 


24 


21 


21 


165 


196 


304 


28 


21 


21 


16 


5 


43 


25 


21 


21 


2,767 


3,074 


4.025 


25 


20 


20 


158 


224 


240 


23 


21 


21 


822 


1506 


1758 


22 


19 


22 


429 


513 


588 


23 


21 


20 


1,160 


1,387 


1,382| 


25 


23 


30 


2,481 


4,633 


3,744 


25 


21 


21 


1.553 


2,110 


2,412 


22 


20 


20 


472 


485 


675 


27 


21 


21 


116 


406 


189 


25 


21 


21 


197 


354 


304 


26 


21 


21 


210 


742 


417 


24 


24 


21 


11,405 


16,612 


17,252 


24 


21 


21 _ 


1.655 


2,159 


2,242 


25 


21 


21 


148 


158 


187 


26 


21 


27 


1,024 


999 


1,281 


25 


21 


25 


1,466 


1,961 


2,644 


24 


21 


26 


1,421 


1,323 


1,398 


30 


21 


27 


5,631 


6,216 


5,250 


30 


24 


30 


320 


505 


551 


23 


21 


20 


2.142 


3,105 


2,928 


22 


20 


25 


640 


645 


668 


26 


21 


27 


5,284 


6,450 


6,747 


26 


18 


30 


3.180 


3,352 


3,061 


25 


20 


24 


2,900 


3,422 


4,459 


26 


23 


26 


25,81 1 


30,295 


31,416 


26 


21 


27 


867 


707 


808 


24 


20 


26 


193 


341 


174 


27 


24 


28 


1,676 


1,334 


1.634 


29 


25 


28 


2,150 


1,772 


1.796 


25 


24 


28 


1.632 


1,944 


1,574 


24 


22 


25 


2,152 


2,979 


4,011 


24 


25 


25 


2.128 


2,565 


2,193 


27 


26 


28 


46 


42 


85 


28 


24 


28 


387 


448 


329 


23 


24 


28 


572 


616 


586 


25 


24 


28 


8,930 


10,116 


11,557 


26 


24 


32 


3,844 


3,167 


3,203 


28 


23 


25 


3.953 


4,111 


4,191 


29 


26 


25 


28,530 


30,142 


32,141 


26 


24 


28 


. 220,850 


242,887 


254,707| 24 


22 


2S 



Total Bushels 



per 
Bushel 



1929 | 1930 



1931 



'29| '30 | '31 



Total Value of Crop 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



Average 
Value 
per Acre 



1929| 1930| 1931 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW). 
District 4 — Buncombe-. 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W)_. 

District 2 — Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) 

District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

i.ee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 

District 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.)__ 



STATE, 



47,216 
121,992 
20,733 
25,894 
44,114 
67,992 
34,440 
54,5±0 
422,891 
81,532 
17,226 
5,240 
3,000 
1,722 
66,040 
11,600 
21,045 
3,528 
16,800 
77.784 
78,361 
9,840 
41,097 
11,880 
1.848 
86,871 
535,414 
46,956 
17.860 
21,400 
111,150 
16,000 
44,000 
85,904 
25,620 
38,686 
35,238 
38,016 
4,720 
13,860 
499,410 
18,423 
88,182 
66,120 
106,421 
52,950 
116,904 
35,354 
78,232 
175,700 
71,862 
810,148 
312,368 
121,992 
98,616 
85,032 
68,250 
96,590 
52,756 
39,380 
94,675 
117,360 
295,425 
,382,444 
11.088 
5,423 
5,040 
4,620 
400 
69,175 
3,634 
18,084 
9.867 
29.000 
62,025 
34,166 
12,744 
2,900 
5,122 
5,040 
278,328 
41,375 
3,848 
25,600 
35,184 
42,630 
168,930 
7,360 
47,124 
16,640 
137,384 
79,500 
75,400 
680,975 
20,808 
5,211 
48,604 
53,750 
39,168 
51.648 
57,456 
1,288 
8,901 
14,300 
232,180 
107,632 
114,057 
755,003 



40,680 

110,256 
11,277 
23,919 
46,550 
73,250 
31,752 
45,504 

383,188 
93,275 
23,452 
6,371 
7,152 
2,156 
79,350 
17,710 
18,175 
5,852 
26,962 
98,472 
76,291 
8,300 
34,352 
11,682 
1.817 
67,158 

578,527 
49,343 
15,980 
13,716 

117,024 
28,253 
24,210 
79,465 
24,876 
38,340 
36,846 
32,960 
9,500 
21,300 

491,813 
14,637 
86,793 
83,640 

106,638 
59,620 

125,925 
42,240 
95,502 

152,922 
93,062 

860,979 

206,103 

131,604 

117,579 
95,325 
93,500 

114,264 
80,470 
68,350 
92,920 

179,604 

243,542 
,423,321 
12,350 
4,767 
2,100 
4,116 
105 
61,480 
4,704 
28,614 
10,773 
31,901 
97,293 
42,200 
10,185 
8,526 
7,434 
17,808 

344,356 
45,339 
3,318 
20,979 
41,181 
27,783 

149,184 
10,605 
62,100 
13,545 

116.100 
67,040 
78,706 

635,880 
14,140 
8,184 
33,350 
42,528 
42,768 
74,475 
66,690 
1,008 
10,752 
14,784 

242.784 
72,841 

108,966 

733,270 



43,425| 
80,283 
30,954 
31,864 
69,432 
68,775 
49,155f 
61,450| 
435,338| 
93,242 
16,940 
10,220 
5,280 
408 
75,300 
14,931 
26,100 
7,119 
25,250 
116,376 
77,808 
14,490| 
81,796 
7,512 
1,456 
72,700 
646,928 
72,956 
25,392 
17,963 
153,600 
35,560 
37,750 
109,890 
39,636 
41,055 
59,524 
54,936 
13,080 
38,200 
699,602| 
21,784 
97,083 
67,775 
94,510 
80,416 
149,000 
47,658 
80,778 
209,450 
109,516 
963,970 
259,152 
145,750 
234,480 
119,672 
65,350 
163,168 
54,740 
54,978 
96,876 
141,700 
320,166 
,656,032 
10,560 
7,854 
5,649 
6,384 
903 
80,500 
5,040 
38,676 
11,760 
41,460 
78,624 
48,200 
14,175 
3,969 
6,384 
8,757 
368,895 
47,082 
5,049 
32,025 
68,744 
37,746 
157,500 
11,020 
73,200 
18,036 
202,410 
73,464 
115,934 
842,210 
21,00,8 
4,872 
45,752 
50,288 
39,350 
100,275 
61,404 
2,380 
9,212 
16,408 
369,824 
80,075 
104.775 
905.623 



.73 

71 
.84 

80 
.73 
.78 
.73 
.75 
.75 

70 
.75 
.75 
.77 
.80 
.73 

65 
.80 
.80 
.75 
.68 
.81 
.82 
.78 
.78 
.81 
.68 

73 
.88 
.74 
.80 
.81 
.80 

90 
.*74 
.83 
.87 
.65 
.76 
.85 
.82 
.80 
.76 
.82 

81 
.70 
.69 
.72 
.72 
.76 

74 
.75 
.74 
.81 
.75 

76 
.75 
.76 
.80 
.79 
.78 
.71 
.72 
.81 
.78 
.78 
.90 
.85 
.90 
.75 
.70 
.90 
.78 
.82 
.73 
.80 
.80 
.90 
.88 
.69 
.75 
.77 
.70 
.88 
.89 
.69 
.62 
.72 
.80 
.75 
.90 
.68 
.70 
.69 
.71 
.87 
.90 
.88 
.82 
.82 
.75 
.91 
.90 

90 

89 
.75 
.80 
.77 
.80 



1° 



.78 


.45 


34,468 


31,730 


.75 


.43 


86,614 


82,692 


.74 


.43 


22,456 


8,345 


.75 


.47 


20,715 


17,939 


.73 


.33 


32.203 


33,982 


.72 


.40 


53,034 


52,740 


.75 


.38 


25,141 


23,814 


.70 


.33 


40,883 


31,853 


.74 


.39 


315,514 


283,095 


.60 


.40 


57,072 


55,965 


.60 


.43 


12,920 


14,071 


.70 


.48 


3,930 


4,460 


.75 


.43 


2,310 


5,364 


.73 


.40 


1,378 


1,574 


.60 


.39 


48,209 


47.610 


.80 


.35 


7,540 


14,168 


.65 


.40 


16,836 


11,814 


.79 


.38 


2,822 


4,623 


.73 


.40 


12,600 


19,682 


.65 


.34 


52,893 


64,007 


.73 


.45 


63,472 


55,692 


.78 


.41 


8,069 


6,474 


.80 


.43 


32,056 


27,482 


.68 


.40 


9,266 


7,944 


.73 


.40 


1,497 


1,326 


.69 


.38 


59,072 


46,339 


.67 


.40 


391,942 


388,595 


.78 


.40 


41,321 


38,488 


.55 


.37 


13,216 


8,789 


80 


.45 


17,120 


10,973 


'.68 


.34 


90,032 


79,576 


.75 


.48 


12,800 


21,190 


.73 


.42 


39,600 


17,673 


.75 


.38 


63,690 


59,599 


.79 


.45 


21,205 


19,652 


65 


.43 


33.057 


24,921 


165 


.38 


22,905 


23,950 


.70 


.35 


28,892 


23,072 


.75 


.39 


4,012 


7,125 


.80 


.49 


11,365 


17,040 


.72 


.39 


399,875 


352,048 


.68 


.34 


14,001 


9,953 


.65 


.40 


72,309 


56,415 


.70 


.34 


53,557 


58,548 


.64 


.34 


74,495 


68,248 


.70 


.33 


36,536 


41,734 


65 


.39 


84,171 


81,851 


.75 


.37 


25,455 


31,680 


.70 


36 


59,456 


66,851 


.70 


.37 


130,018 


107,045 


.85 


.45 


53,897 


79,103 


.70 


.38 


603,895 


601,428 


.68 


.40 


253,018 


140,150 


.70 


.38 


91,494 


92,165 


.68 


.40 


74,948 


79,954 


.73 


.43 


63,774 


69,587 


.68 


.37 


51,870 


63,580 


.69 


40 


77,272 


78,842 


.68 


.40 


41,077 


54,720 


.75 


40 


30,716 


51,263 


.65 


.36 


67,219 


60,398 


.62 


36 


84,499 


111,354 


.72 


.41 


239,294 


175,350 


.69 


.40 


1,075,781 


977,363 


.78 


.40 


8,649 


9,633 


.77 


.30 


4,881 


3,671 


.80 


.38 


4,284 


1,680 


.75 


.30 


4,158 


3,119 


.75 


.38 


300 


79 


.75 


.40 


4S.423 


46,110 


.78 


.38 


3,271 


3,669 


.77 


.45 


14,106 


22,033 


.77 


40 


8,091 


8,295 


.76 


.43 


21.170 


24,245 


.77 


.43 


49,620 


74.916 


.75 


.43 


27,333 


31,650 


.75 


35 


11,470 


7,639 


.76 


.38 


2,552 


6,480 


.72 


.38 


3,534 


5,352 


.75 


.38 


3,780 


13,356 


.76 


.41 


215,622 


261,927 


.73 


.40 


28,963 


33,097 


.75 


.38 


3,386 


2,489 


.75 


.38 


22.784 


15,734 


.85 


.40 


24,277 


35,004 


.60 


38 


26.431 


16,670 


.80 


.45 


121,630 


119,347 


.76 


.35 


5,880 


8,060 


.80 


.35 


35,343 


49,680 


.73 


40 


14,976 


9,888 


.77 


.39 


93,421 


89,397 


83 


.40 


55.650 


55,643 


.80 


.40 


52,026 


62,965 


.78 


.40 


484,767 


497,974 


.75 


.35 


18,103 


10.605 


.78 


.38 


4,690 


6,384 


.80 


.43 


42,772 


26,680 


.76 


.35 


44.075 


32,321 


.78 


.38 


32,118 


33,359 


.78 


.40 


38,736 


58,091 


.78 


.42 


52,285 


52,018 


.80 


.38 


1,159 


806 


.77 


.35 


8,011 


8,279 


.76 


.35 


12,727 


11,236 


.70 


.45 


174,135 


169,949 


J4 


.40 


86,106 


53,902 


.68 


.35 


87,824 


74,097 


.73 


.41 


602,741 


537,727 



19,541 
34,522 
13,310 
14,976 
22,913 
27,510 
18,679 
20,279 
171,730 



18.98 
16,33 
17.64 
17.60 
16 79 
18^72 
15.33 
17.25 
17.21 



37,297 15.40 



7,284 
4,906 
2,270 
163 

29,367 
5,226 

10,440 
2,705 

10,100 

39,568 



16.50 
15.00 
15.40 
16 80 
14.60 
13.00 
18.40 
14.40 
15.75 
14 28 



35,014|18.63 



5,941 
35,172 
3,005 
582 
27,626 
256,666 
29,182 
9,395 



16.40 
16.38 
17.16 
17.82 
15 64 
1 5.84 
18.48 
14.80 



8,083|16.00 



52,244 
17,069 
15,855 
41.758 
17,836 
17,654 
22,619 
19.22S 
5.101 
18,718 
274,742 
7,407 
38,833 
23,044 
32,133 
26,537 
58,110 
17,633 
31,240 
77,497 
49,282 
361,716 
103,661 
55,385 
93,792 
51,459 
24,180 
65,267 
21,896 
21,991 
34,875 
51,012 
131,268 
654,786 
4,224 
2,356 
2,147 
1,915 
343 
82,200 
1,915 
17,404 
4,704 
17,828 
33,808 
20,726 
4,961 
1,508 
2,426 
3,328 
-151,793 



20.25 
16.00 
19.80 
19.28 
17.43 
20.01 
13.65 
16.72 
17.00 
17.22 
18.22 
17.48 
18.86 
16.20 
16.10 
17.25 
17.28 
15.84 
16.72 
18.50 
15.75 
17.17 
22.68 
18.00 
18.24 
18.00 
19.76 
20.80 
17.38 
17.16 
17.75 
17.28 
20.25 
19.59 
18.72 
26.10 
20.40 
25.20 
18.75 
17 50 
20.70 
17.16 
18.86 
18.25 
20.00 
17 60 
24.30 
22.00 
17.94 
18.00 
18.91 



18,833|17.50 
1,919122.88 



12,169 
27,510 
14,343 
70,875 

3,857 
25,620 

7,214 
78,940 
29,386 
46,374 
337,040 

7,353 

1,851 
19,673 
17,601 
14,953 
40,110 
25,790 



22.50 
16.56 
18.60 
21.60 
18.38 
16.50 
23.40 
17.68 
17.50 
17.94 
18,78 
20.88 
24.30 
25 52 
20.50 
19.68 
18 00 
24.57 



904|25.20 
3,224 ~' 
5.743 
166,421 
32.030122.40 
36,671 22.22 
372,324 21.13 



20.70 
22.25 
19.50 



18.72 
18.00 
15.54 
15.75 
13.87 
18.00 
13.50 

12 60 
16.05 
15.00 

13 20 
16.10 
18.00 
16.06 
13.80 
17.60 

16 25 

15. '01 
18.98 
14.30 
16.79 
15.60 
15 20 
14.96 
16.78 
14.49 
15.17 
14.82 
11.00 
14.40 
15.64 
14.25 

13 14 
17.25 
14.22 
11.70 
11.70 
14.00 

14 25 
16.00 

14 48 
14.28 
13.65 
14.00 

13 44 
15.40 
14.95 
18.00 

15 40 
14.'70 
16.15 
14.83 
15.64 
16.80 
14.28 
18.25 

17 00 
18.63 
17.68 
18.75 

14 95 
16.74 
18.72 
16.93 
14.82 

16 17 

16. - 80 
15.91 

15 80 
15.00 
16.38 
14.63 
16.17 
17.48 
16.17 
15.00 
15.75 
15.96 
15 12 
18*00 
15.77 
15.33 
15.75 
15.75 

17 85 
12."60 
19.20 
15.96 
16.00 
15.33 
13 86 
16.'60 
18.40 
16.44 
15.00 
18.72 
20.00 
18.24 
17.16 
19.50 
20.28 
19.19 

18 48 
18.24 
16.80 
17.02 
18.02 
17.84 



11.25 
9 03 
9.46 
13.16 
7.92 
10.00 
11.02 
8.25 
9.59 
9.20 
8.60 
13.44 
10.32 
9.59 
9.7b 
9.45 
10.00 
7.98 
10.00 
8.84 
10.80 
9.43 
11.18 
9.60 
11.19 
7.60 
9.51 
10.40 
8.88 
10.35 
10.20 
9.60 
10.50 
12.54 
12.15 
9.89 
8.74 
9.80 
9.36 
12.25 
10.46 
9.52 
9.20 
8.50 
8.84 
9.24 
9 75 
9.62 
9.72 
9.25 
9 90 
9.38 
9.60 
8.36 
12.00 
12.04 
9.25 
12.80 
8 00 
8.80 
8.28 
9.00 
11 07 
1 0.20 
8.00 
6.30 
7.98 
6.30 
7.98 
8.00 
7.98 
9.90 
8.00 
12.90 
9.03 
8.59 
7.35 
7.98 
7.98 
7.98 
8.80 
8.40 
10.26 
9.50 
10.40 
10.26 
13.50 
7.00 
8.75 
10.90 
11.70 
9.60 
10.40 
10.73 
9.10 
10.64 
12.04 
9.80 
9.50 
10.00 
11.76 
10.64 
9.80 
9.80 
14.40 
10.00 
8.75 
11.58 



5,364,613 5,451,334 6,518,598| .76 .72 .40 4,090,137 3,900,157 2,580,797 18.52 16|06 10.13 



NOTE: Acreage above includes Oats cut mature for feed in addition to that threshed for grain. 



18 



NORTH CAROLINA FIELD CROPS 



OATS 



Oats are more generally grown through- 
out the State than any other of the small 
grains. While certain counties, of the Pied- 
mont area, such as Union, Anson, Rowan, 
etc., produce large acreages, this is some- 
what true of the Mountain and Coastal 
Belts. In the East, the crop is grown large- 
ly for feeding in an unthreshed state, 
whereas the Piedmont Belt thrashes most 
of the crop. During the present economic 
distress, oats are essential for providing 
feed for all kinds of livestock, both for hay 
and roughage. Oats are somewhat like corn 
in that there is no great inter-farm sale. 
Each farmer attempts to grow what is need- 
ed for his own farm. The planting is done at 
any time from October until April. The win- 
ter planted crop usually yields the best, 
unless damaged by winter freezes. The late 
winter and early spring seeding is usually 
practiced in the eastern counties. 



RYE 



In the eastern half of the State, prac- 
tically all of the rye is grown for grazing 
or plowing into the soil for improvement 
purposes. Occasionally some is cut for hay, 
but is rarely thrashed. The principal grain 
producing area is in the Mountain counties 
and the Central Piedmont. The Mountain 
counties alone make up almost 50 per cent 
of the rye acreage of the State. The ave- 
rage yield in this territory is from 9 to 11 
bushels. In revising the crop data for 
North Carolina, it is found that the Federal 
Census yields per acre are much less than 
those heretofore reported by the farmers 
aiding with the crop reports. There has been 
quite an improvement in the yield of rye 
during the past fifteen years, through the 
introduction of the Abruzzi types. These 
have almost doubled the yield per acre, 
both of grain and straw. 



IRISH POTATOES 



Irish potatoes are grown throughout the 
State, but the purposes of production vary. 
For instance, in centers about Elizabeth 
City, Columbia, Bethel, Pantego, Aurora, 
Bayboro, Beaufort and Mt. Olive, heavy 
acreages of early commercial potatoes are 
produced. These are disposed of almost 
entirely by carlot movements to northern 
markets. Then there is the second-early 
to late crops for home consumption. In the 
mountain counties they have a commercial 
production of the late crop, some of which 
are produced in competition with the 
Northern grown seed. 



The 1931 crop of potatoes made excellent 
yields for the commercial early production. 
However, in many counties of the State the 
farm yield was no better than the usual. 
Dry conditions of the soil were responsible. 
Good yields for the commercial crop are 
expected for 1932, together with fairly sat- 
isfactory prices. This is due to a heavy acre- 
age reduction. Ordinarily, the price this year 
might be quite advantageous, but the de- 
pression conditions may curtail the demand 
for the crop except at reasonable prices. 
It is the general practice of farmers to 
grow the potatoes needed on the farm, and 
in many instances, a little surplus for local 
sale. The inability to finance this crop is 
largely responsible for the curtailment in 
acreage in the eastern counties. 



SWEET POTATOES 

North Carolinians are fond of sweet po- 
tatoes and many farmers look upon this 
crop as being equally essential to corn, 
wheat, etc. The eastern part of the State 
produces most of the acreage, due to the 
sandy loam nature of the soil. However, 
several of the Piedmont counties produce 
fairly large acreages. The drier types pre- 
dominate as one goes westward. Catawba 
County, for instance, ships considerable 
quantities of these latter types, which are 
in demand in the Northern States. There 
is usually an over production of sweet po- 
tatoes in many eastern counties. This is 
largely offset by the heavy losses in stor- 
age (mostly hilled) during the winter 
months. Improved methods provide means 
for overcoming much of these losses. The 
introduction of improved methods of cook- 
ing the soft potatoes and introducing them 
into the Northern homes would help great- 
ly in the expansion of Northern market de- 
mands. 

Currituck County leads in the acreage of 
this crop, with Johnston, Columbus and 
Wayne Counties next in order. The yield 
is highest in the Coastal Plains area, where 
average yields of more than 100 bushels per 
acre are frequent. As might be expected, 
the average prices are lowest in the heav- 
iest producing counties. The past winter 
resulted in relatively low losses from rotting 
in storage. Consequently, large quantities 
of potatoes were available for consumption 
in the Spring of 1932. 



SOY BEANS 

Many farmers in the western half of 
North Carolina knew little of the soy bean 
crop prior to 1920. The expansion of the 
acreage of this crop has been noticeable 
since then. This expansion occurred large- 



ly in the hay production. The real com- 
mercial acreage is to be found between the 
Pamlico Sound and the Virginia line es- 
pecially above the Albemarle Sound, in- 
cluding eight counties. All of the eastern 
or Coastal Belt part of the State is parti- 
cularly suitable for the production of this 
crop. The counties centering around Wayne 
are now planting heavy acreages. 

This crop is difficult to estimate, due to 
the multiple methods of its cultivation. 
These include grown alone for seed and for 
hay or for soil improvement by turning 
under. They may be planted broadcast or 
drilled between the rows of other crops, es- 
pecially corn. The seed are saved in whole or 
part, hogged off, picked by hand or machine, 
thrashed in the form of hay, or thrashed 
directly from the standing plants. This 
acreage frequently follows some other early 
harvested crop, thus further complicating 
the chances of getting reliable information. 
Almost all livestock are particularly fond 
of soy bean plants and seed. 

The average yield per acre ranges from 
5 to 20 bushels, depending on the location 
and methods of culture. The price dropped 
heavily during the past two years. The 
1930-31 season average was $1.25 to $1.75 
per bushel. The prices for the past season 
have averaged .40 to .80 per bushel. 



COWPEAS 

This crop has spurts up and down in 
acreage, but, in general, it has been large- 
ly replaced by soy beans in the eastern 
portion of the State. For the first time in 
many years, the price of cowpeas is below 
$1.00. This is less than half the price 
tweive months earlier. As with soy beans, 
the methods of culture are quite varied 
and complicated. The chances of getting 
reliable information on the crop are poor, 
resulting in doubtful data. The fact that a 
portion of its yield is used for human con- 
sumption, both in a green and dry state, 
adds to the difficulty of determining the 
yield. 

The drawbacks of this crop are that they 
are difficult to harvest with machinery, 
either for hay or seed. They are compara- 
tively difficult to cure, as well as to stack 

or house. 

This crop has no definite commercial 
centers of production, and is gradually be- 
ing replaced apparently by other hay crops 
that are probably more economical in both 
culture and harvest. The acreage of cow- 
peas harvested in 1931, while practically 
double that of the previous two years, 
marked a return to about the usual acre- 
age in the State. High priced seed during 
the past few years have been largely re- 
sponsible for the reduction in this crop. 



NORTH CAROLINA RYE 



19 



Districts and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW) 
District 4 — Buncombe- 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.) 

District 2 — Aiamanee 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.)_ 

Dlstrict 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.)_ 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (ME.)-- 

District 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE)_ 



Acreage Planted 



11)29 | 1930 | 1931 



STATE f83J597 



2,822 


2,363 


3,817 


3,986 


518 


817 


1,601 


1,461 


3,342 


2,652 


1,509 


1,299 


7,378 


5,261 


3,275 


2,244 


24,262 


20,083 


1,413 


1,674 


1,851 


1,533 


2,367 


1,807 


1,173 


1,347 


180 


446 


1,246 


1,170 


2,000 


2,213 


595 


577 


1,055 


897 


838 


1,150 


890 


859 


76 


155 


749 


584 


1,384 


764 


574 


411 


589 


797 


348 


495 


17,328 


16,879 


1,749 


1,873 


672 


773 


248 


155 


1,159 


1.352 


354 


467 


649 


764 


2,980 


2,759 


521 


441 


117 


131 


2,026 


2,313 


2,450 


2,062 


58 


88 


214 


105 


13,197 


13,283 


2,566 


2,410 


2,300 


1.671 


872 


886 


1,894 


1,956 


1,269 


1,404 


3,598 


2,699 


161 


134 


2,281 


1,625 


1,427 


1,264 


459 


709 


16,827 


14,758 


276 


374 


1,206 


682 


460 


364 


066 


432 


740 


509 


706 


456 


376 


307 


652 


1,040 


213 


615 


623 


797 


133 


371 


6,051 


5,947 


66 


51 


15 


25 


76 


55 


49 


35 


i8~i 


348 


62 


57 


137 


360 


18 


212 


69 


49 


367 


817 


122 


288 


42 


6 


10 


76 


31 


21 


15 


62 


1,267 


2,462 


36 


277 


50 


113 


52 


51 


30 


51 




281 




232 


30 


35 


50 


55 


9 


1 


185 


159 


444 


335 


135 


251 


1,302 


1,560 


384 


149 


76 


79 


112 


115 


544 


473 


146 


346 


233 


137 


427 


1,107 


2 


71 


114 


140 


33 


211 


513 


590 


186 


445 


593 


912 


3,363 


4,775 



4,098 
6,995 
966 
1.S49 
4,985 
2,396f 
8,017 
2,856 
32,162 
2,204 
1,908 
2,402 
1,496 
948 
1,392 
2,843 
887 
1,249 
1,789 
859 
246 
627 
1,467 
384 
1,268 
725 
22,694 
2,209 
917 
212 
1,621 
1,330 
849 
3,043 
642 
253 
3,304 
3.467 
317 
418 
18,582 
2,497 
2,067 
685 
1,585 
1,376 
2,841 
145 
1,746 
911 
966 
14,819 
526 
439 
640 
574 
653 
364 
381 
834 
784 
325 
384 
6,904 
85 
14 
45 



203 
25 

408 
79 
17 
1,015 

226 
26 
26 
49 
26 
2,333 
69 
48 
78 
77 

291 
9 

~18 
192 
793 
871 
2,446 
142 
13 
119 
761 
339 
443 
1,125 
15 
36 
80 
940 
347 
1,204 
5,564 



Bushels 








Yield 






Production 


Per Acre 




Total Bushe 


'29 1 


'30| 


'31 


1929 


1930 | 


12 


14 


12 


33,864 


33,082 


13 


14 


13 


49,621 


55,804 


12 


14 


12 


6,216 


11,438 


10 


11 


10 


16,010 


16,071 


12 


10 


13 


40.104 


26,520 


12 


12 


14 


18,108 


15,588 


11 


11 


12 


81,158 


57,871 


12 


9 


11 


39,300 


20,196 


12 


12 


12 


284,381 


236,570 


12 


15 


14 


16,956 


25,110 


11 


10 


11 


20,361 


15,330 


12 


12 


14 


28,404 


21,684 


11 


11 


11 


12,903 


14.817 


11 


14 


13 


1,980 


6,244 


13 


15 


15 


16,198 


17,550 


12 


14 


If! 


24,000 


30,982 


11 


15 


15 


6,545 


8,655 


11 


12 


12 


11,605 


10,764 


12 


14 


12 


10.056 


16,100 


11 


12 


12 


9,790 


10,308 


13 


14 


13 


988 


2,170 


12 


11 


15 


8,988 


6,424 


12 


10 


13 


16,608 


7,640 


12 


15 


13 


6,888 


6,165 


12 


12 


16 


7,068 


9,564 


12 


15 


12 


4,176 


7,425 


12 


13 


13 


203,514 


216,932 


10 


9 


14 


17,490 


16,857 


12 


10 


16 


8,064 


7,730 


11 


9 


14 


2.728 


1,395 


14 


11 


13 


16.226 


14.872 


10 


10 


14 


3,540 


4,670 


11 


10 


14 


7,139 


7,640 


12 


10 


15 


35,760 


27,590 


11 


9 


12 


5,731 


3,969 


11 


9 


12 


1,287 


1,179 


13 


8 


13 


26,338 


18.504 


13 


9 


14 


31,850 


18,558 


10 


10 


14 


580 


880 


10 


11 


15 


2,140 


1,155 


12 


9 


14 


158,873 


124,999 


10 


9 


11 


25,660 


21,690 


11 


10 


12 


25.300 


16,710 


11 


11 


12 


9,592 


9,746 


12 


10 


14 


22,728 


19,560 


12 


10 


12 


15,228 


14,040 


11 


10 


10 


39.578 


26.990 


10 


10 


13 


1,610 


1,340 


11 


11 


13 


25,091 


17,875 


12 


11 


16 


17.124 


13.904 


10 


10 


13 


4,590 


7,090 


11 


10 


12 


186,501 


148,945 


11 


9 


8 


3,036 


3,366 


11 


10 


14 


13,266 


6,820 


11 


8 


12 


5.060 


2,912 


11 


10 


14 


7.326 


4,320 


11 


9 


12 


8,140 


4,581 


12 


9 


15 


8,472 


4,104 


9 


11 


11 


3,384 


3,377 


9 


9 


10 


5,868 


9,360 


10 


10 


9 


2,130 


6,150 


11 


12 


12 


6,853 


9,564 


11 


9 


11 


1,463 


3,339 


11 


10 


11 


64,998 


57,893 


13 


10 


10 


858 


510 


13 


10 


14 


195 


250 


13 


10 


14 


988 


550 


13 


10 


14 


637 


350 


13 


10 


10 


2,444 




3,480 


13 


10 


1 4 


806 


570 


13 


12 


15 


1,781 


4,320 


13 


10 


14 


234 


2.120 


13 


10 


14 


897 


490 


13 


9 


15 


4,771 


7.353 


13 


11 


14 


1,586 


3,168 


13 


10 


14 


546 


60 


13 


10 


14 


130 


760 


13 


10 


14 


403 


210 


13 


10 


14 


195 


620 


13 


10 


14 


16,471 


24,81 1 


10 


10 


14 


468 


2,770 


13 


10 


14 


650 


1,130 


13 


10 


14 


676 


510 


13 


10 


14 


390 


510 


13 


__ 

9 




15 




3,653 




2,088 


13 


10 


14 


390 


350 


13 


10 





650 


550 


13 


10 


14 


117 


10 


13 


10 


14 


2.405 


1,590 


13 


11 


13 


5,772 


3,685 


13 


9 


15 


1,755 


2,259 


13 


10 


14 


16,926 


15,452 


12 


10 


12 


4,608 


1,490 


13 


10 


12 


988 


790 


13 


10 


12 


1,456 


1,150 


11 


10 


14 


5,984 


4,730 


13 


10 


12 


1,898 


3,460 


10 


10 


n 


2,330 


1,370 


10 


9 


10 


4,270 


9,963 


13 


10 


12 


26 


710 


13 


10 


12 


1,482 


1.400 


13 


10 


12 


429 


2.110 


12 


11 


15 


6,156 


6.490 


13 


10 


15 


2,418 


4.450 


11 


12 


10 


6,523 


10,944 


11 


10 


12 


38,568 


49,057 



1931 



49,176 
90,935 
11,592 
18,490 
64,805 
33.544 
96,204 
31,416 
396,162 
30,856 
20,988 
33,628 
16,456 
12,324 
20,880 
45,488 
13,305 
14,988 
21,468 
10,308 

3,198 

9,405 
19,071 

4,992 
20,288 

8,700 
306,343 
30,926|1 
14,67211 

2,968|1 
21,073|1 



Price 
Per Bushel 



'29| '301 



18,620 
11,886 
45,645 
7,704 
3,036 
42,952 
48,538 
4,438 
3.270 
258,728 
27,467 
24,804 
8,220 
22,190 
16,512 
28,410 
1,885 
22,698 
14,576, 
12,558 



179,320[1. 



4,208 
6,146 
7,680 
8,036 
7,836 
5,460 
4,191 
8.340 
7,056 
3,900 
4,224 
67,077 
850 
196 
630 
1.246 



2.030 
350 
6,120 
1.106 
238 
15,225 
3,164 
364 
364 
686 
364 
32,933 
966 
672 
1,092 
1,078 

4,3~65| 
126 

~252 
2,688 
10,309 
13.065 
34,613 
1.704 
156 
1.428 
10,654 
4,068 
4.873 
11.250 
180 
432 
960 
14,100 
5.205 
12,040 
67,050 



30 
24 
37 
32 
32 
.40 
27 
32 
30 
.44 
,30 
36 
38 
43 
42 
49 
48 
32 
33 
40 
36 
45 
36 
42 
50 
39 
40 
50 
45 
59 
47 
00 
52 
48 
58 
45 
44 
49 
58 
65 
49 
41 
48 
45 
35 
36 
41 
65 
36 
37 
75 
41 
62 
38 
49 
51 
4 9 
50 
62 
7 
70 
41 
52 



1.22 
1.20 
1.30 
1.18 
1.16 
1.23 
1.15 
1.20 
1.19 
1.30 
1.25 
1.28 
1.20 
1.30 
1.15 
1.20 
1.27 
1.24 
1.25 
1.20 
1.24 
1.26 
1.28 
1.20 
1.23 
1.15 
1.24 
1.25 
1.17 
1.27 
1.25 
1.50 
1.30 
1.20 
1.22 
1.20 
1.20 
1.20 
1.35 
1.40 
1.23 
1.12 
1.18 
1.10 
1.15 
1.12 
1.20 
1.40 
1.10 
1.25 
1.45 
1.11 
1.35 
1.25 
1.32 
1.33 
1.20 
1.28 
1.30 
1.50 
1.38 
1.20 
1.40 
50 1.32 
75 1.50 
75 1.50 
75 1.50 
75 1.50 



1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 

1.1 E 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.70 
1.71 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.78 
1.78 
1.71 
1.74 



79,477 104,504 12 11 13 970,232 874,659 1,342.226 



1.42 



1.50 
1.50 
1.52 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 

1.5~6" 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.45 
1.40 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.48 
1.23 



'31 

$ 

.63 
.65 
.73 
.78 
.60 
.70 
.65 
.68 
.66 
.73 
.78 
.63 
.65 
.69 
.70 
.68 
.73 
.70 
.69 
.75 
.68 
.67 
.66 
.70 
.70 
.70 
.69 
.75 
.75 
.70 
.70 
.85 
.70 
.72 
.75 
.70 
.60 
.68 
.73 
.80 
.71 
.70 
.71 
.70 
.68 
.74 
.74 
.78 
.70 
.80 
.78 
.72 
.8!) 
.70 
.83 
.93 
.90 
.80 
.80 
.711 
.89 
.70 
.78 
.83 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 



Total Value of Crop 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.80 
.80 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.80 
.83 
.85 

.SO 

.83 

~so 

.75 
.89 
.75 
.81 
.88 
.85 
.89 
.80 
.85 
.85 
.78 
.85 
.85 
.87 
.90 
.85 
.76 
^83 
.71 



44,023 
61,530 

8,516 
21,133 
52,937 
25,351 
103,071 
51,876 
368,437 
24,417 
26,469 
38,629 
17,806 

2,831 
23,001 
35,760 

9,687 
15,319 
13,374 
13,706 

1,344 
13,032 
22,587 

9,781 
10,602 

5,805 
284,150 
26,235 
11,093 

4,338 
23.852 

5,664 
10,851 
52,925 

9,055 

1,866 
37.927 
47,457 
916 

3,531 
236,310 
36,181 
37,444 
13,908 
30,683 
20,710 
55,805 

2,657 
34,124 
23,460 

8,033 
263,005 
4,918 
18,307 

7,539 
11,063 
12,129 
12,708 

5.482 

9,976 

3,621 

9,663 
2,224 
97,630 

1,502 
341 

1,729 

1,115 

4,277 
1,411 
3,117 
410 
1,570 
8,349 
2,776 
956 
228 
705 
341 
28,827 
819 
1,138 
1,183 
683 

6.393 
683 
1,138 
205 
4,209 

10,101 
3,071 

29,623 
8,064 
1,729 
2,548 

10,472 
3,322 
3.961 
7,302 
46 
2,594 
751 

10,958 
4,304 

11,154 

67,205 



40,360 
66,965 
14,869 
18,964 
30,763 
19,173 
66,552 
24,235 
281,881 
32,643 
19.163 
27,756 
17,780 
8,117 
20,183 
37,178 
10,992 
13,347 
20,125 
12,370 
2,691 
8,094 
9,779 
7,398 
11,764 
8,539 
267,919 
21,071 
9,044 
1,772 
18,590 
7.005 
9,932 
33,108 
4,842 
1,415 
22,205 
22,270 
1,188 
1,617 
154,059 
24,293 
19,718 
1,072 
22,494 
15,725 
32,388 
1,876 
19,663 
17,380 
10,281 
164,890 
4,545 
8,525 
3,844 
5.746 
5,497 
5,253 
4,390 
14,040 
8,487 
11.477 
4,675 
76,479 
765 
375 
825 
525 

5,220 
855 

6,566 

3.180 
735 
11,030 

4,752 
90 

1,140 
315 
930 
37,303 

4,155 

1,695 
765 
765 

3,132 
525 
825 
15 
2,385 
5,528 
3.389 

23,179 
2,235 
1,185 
1,725 
7,095 
5,190 
1,987 

13,948 
1,065 
2,100 
3,165 
9,735 
6,675 

16,416 

72,521 



30,981 
59,108 
8,462 
14,422 
38,883 
23,480 
62,533 
21,363 
259,232 
22,525 
16,371 
21,186 
10,696 
8.504 
14,616 
30,932 
9,713 
10.492 
14,813 
7,731 
2,175 
6,301 
12,587 
3,494 
14,202 
6,090 
212,428 
23,195 
11,004 
2,078 
14,751 
15,827 
8,320 
32,864 
5,778 
2,126 
25,771 
33,006 
3,240 
5,016 
182,976 
19,227 
17,611 
5.754 
15.089 
12,219 
21,023 
1,470 
15,889 
11,661 
9,795 
129,738 
3.745 
4,302 
6,374 
7,473 
7,052 
4,368 
3,353 
6,589 
6,280 
2,730 
3,295 
55,561 
638 
147 
473 
935 



Average 
Value 
Per Acre 
1929| 1930| 1931 



1,523 
263 

4,590 
830 
179 
12,180 

2,531 
273 
273 
515 
273 
25,623 
725 
538 
906 
916 



3,492 
105 

~202 
2,016 
9,175 
9,799 
27,874 
1.500 
133 
1,271 
8,523 
3.458 
4,142 
8,775 
153 
367 
835 
12,690 
4,424 
9,150 
55,421 



±5.60 
16.12 
16.44 
13.20 
15.84 
16.80 
13.97 
15.84 
15.19 
17.28 
14.30 
16.32 
15.18 
15.73 
18.46 
17.88 
16.28 
14.52 
15.96 
15.40 
17.68 
17.40 
16.32 
17.04 
18.00 
16.68 
16.40 
15.00 
17.40 
17.49 
20.58 
16.00 
16.72 
17.76 
17.38 
15.95 
18.72 
19.37 
15.81 
16.50 
17.91 
14.10 
16.28 
15.95 
16.20 
16.32 
15.51 
16.50 
14.96 
16.44 
17.50 
15.63 
17.82 
15.18 
16.39 
16.61 
16.39 
18.00 
14.58 
15.30 
17.00 
15.51 
16.72 
16.13 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 



$ 

17.08 
16.80 
18.20 
12.98 
11.60 
14.76 
12.65 
10.80 
14.04 
19.50 
12.50 
15.36 
13.20 
18.20 
17.25 
16.80 
19.05 
14.88 
17.50 
14.40 
17.36 
13.86 
12.80 
18.00 
14.76 
17.25 
15.87 
11.25 
11.70 
11.43 
13,75 
15.00 
13.00 
12.00 
10.98 
10.80 
9.60 
10.80 
13.50 
15.40 
11.60 
10.08 
11.80 
12.10 
11.50 
11.20 
12.00 
14.00 
12.10 
13.75 
14.50 
11.17 
12.15 
12.50 
10.51 
13.30 
10.80 
11.52 
14.30 
13.50 
13.80 
14.40 
12.60 
12.86 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 



$ 

7.56 
8.45 
8.76 
7.80 
7.80 
9.80 
7.80 
7.48 
8.06 
10.22 
8.58 
8.82 
7.15 
8.97 
10.50 
10.88 
10.95 
8.40 
8.28 
9.00 
8.84 
10.05 
8.58 
9.10 
11.20 
8.40 
9.36 
10.50 
12.00 
9.80 
9.10 
11.90 
9.80 
10.80 
9.00 
8.40 
9.10 
9.52 
10.22 
12.08 
9.85 
7.70 
8.52 
8.40 
9.52 
8.88 
7.40 
10.14 
9.10 
12.80 
10.14 
8.75 
7.92 
9.80 
9.96 
13.02 
10.80 
12.00 
8.80 
7.00 
8.01 
8.40 
8.58 
9.41 
7.50 
10.50 
10.50 
10.50 



22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 



15.00 
15.00 
18.24 
15.00 
15.00 
13.50 
16.50 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.15 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 



7.50 
10.50 
11.25 
10.50 
10.50 
12.00 
11.20 
10.50 
10.50 
10.50 
10.50 
10.98 
10.50 
11.20 
11.62 
11.90 



22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
22.75 
21.00 
22.75 
22.75 
19.25 
22.75 
17.00 
17.00 
23.00 
22.75 
22.75 
21.36 
23.14 
18.81 
19.98 



1,375,187 1,078,231 948, 853|1 6.45 



13.50 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
16.50 
13.50 
14.86 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.50 
12.60 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
16.50 
15.00 
18.00 
15.19 
13T57 



12.00 
11.62 

iTio 

10.50 
11.57 
11.25 
11.40 

10.56 
10.20 
10.68 
11.20 
10.20 
9.35 
7.80 
10.20 
10.20 
10.44 
13.50 
12.75 
7.60 
9.96 
9.08 



20 



NORTH CAROLINA IRISH POTATOES 



District and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW 
District 4 — Buncombe. 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.)_ 
District 2 — Alamance- 
Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.)_ 
District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 
District 6 — Beaufort_ 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.)_ 



Acreage Planted 



Yield 
Bushels 
per Acre 



Production — Total Bushels 



STATE _ 



192 9 


1930 


1931 | 


'29 1 


'30| 


'31 


1929 | 


1930 


288 


388 


697 


108 


89 


95 


31,104 


34,532 


661 


807 


964 


125 


103 


95 


82,625 


83,121 


916 


1,387 


1,105 


109 


97 


110 


99,844 


134,539 


729 


892 


993 


95 


78 


70 


69,255 


69,576 


591 


670 


1,012 


90 


50 


60 


53.190 


33,500 


1,959 


2.510 


2.993 


110 


102 


105 


215,490 


256,020 


1,392 


1,533 


1,662 


80 


59 


80 


111,360 


90,447 


359 


456 


427 


79 


52 


75 


28,361 


23,712 


6,895 


8,643 


9,853 


100 


84 


90 


691,229 


725,447 


963 


1,572 


1,631 


93 


87 


65 


89,559 


136.764 


414 


472 


698 


86 


80 


75 


35.604 


37,760 


665 


863 


977 


94 


85 


55 


62,510 


73,355 


200 


221 


205 


85 


86 


50 


17,000 


19,006 


242 


293 


206 


95 


69 


45 


22,990 


20,217 


999 


1,752 


1,716 


98 


75 


70 


97,902 


131,400 


1,477 


1,939 


2,242 


102 


69 


54 


150,654 


133,791 


770 


1,128 


1,016 


105 


80 


80 


80,850 


90.240 


372 


563 


551 


95 


85 


80 


35,340 


47,855 


620 


729 


675 


95 


83 


87 


58,900 


60,507 


566 


699 


699 


89 


85 


80 


50,374 


59,415 


676 


1,095 


1,001 


85 


105 


105 


57,460 


114,975 


621 


286 


271 


96 


65 


58 


59,616 


18,590 


361 


523 


668 


110 


60 


65 


39,710 


31,380 


446 


442 


408 


105 


78 


90 


46,830 


34,476 


301 


547 


595 


100 


84 


85 


30,100 


45,948 


625 


812 


972 


86 


113 


85 


53,750 


91,756 


10,318 


13,936 


14,531 


96 


82 


72 


989,149 


1,147,435 


275 


405 


342 


108 


68 


65 


29,700 


27,540 


461 


524 


429 


95 


62 


SO 


43,795 


32,488 


208 


269 


152 


99 


58 


80 


20,592 


15,602 


443 


740 


807 


125 


70 


60 


55,375 


51,800 


189 


393 


493 


108 


85 


90 


20,412 


33.405 


340 


500 


476 


100 


74 


88 


34,000 


37,000 


535 


784 


734 


112 


73 


78 


59,920 


57,232 


173 


288 


245 


102 


72 


75 


17,646 


20,736 


494 


466 


572 


90 


64 


75 


44.460 


29,824 


578 


761 


689 


109 


70 


65 


63,002 


53,270 


683 


737 


896 


108 


50 


75 


73,764 


36,850 


186 


379 


360 


103 


71 


100 


19,158 


26,909 


245 


310 


428 


94 


46 


95 


23,030 


14,260 


4,810 


6,556 


6,623 


105 


67 


75 


504,854 


436,916 


248 


374 


366 


89 


92 


80 


22.072 


34,408 


350 


509 


582 


100 


74 


80 


35,000 


37,666 


181 


310 


249 


110 


75 


98 


19,910 


23,250 


419 


898 


891 


115 


77 


80 


48,185 


69,146 


220 


405 


285 


100 


74 


90 


22,000 


29,970 


442 


543 


788 


95 


79 


100 


41,990 


42,897 


122 


209 


145 


113 


88 


60 


13,786 


18,392 


461 


477 


870 


119 


85 


95 


54,859 


40,545 


364 


517 


452 


112 


69 


75 


40,768 


35,673 


315 


663 


465 


98 


85 


95 


30.870 


56,355 


3,122 


4,905 


5,093 


106 


79 


89 


329,440 


388,302 


389 


330 


329 


98 


85 


80 


38,122 


2S.050 


250 


223 


270 


105 


63 


78 


26,250 


14,049 


237 


382 


392 


90 


70 


88 


21,330 


26,740 


209 


334 


352 


99 


70 


80 


20,691 


23,380 


221 


364 


357 


80 


68 


85 


17,680 


24,752 


300 


344 


310 


102 


67 


70 


30,600 


23,048 


135 


191 


184 


110 


75 


95 


14.850 


14,325 


194 


286 


327 


104 


86 


95 


20,176 


24,596 


154 


360 


353 


100 


81 


90 


15.400 


29,160 


277 


343 


268 


100 


78 


83 


27,700 


26,754 


555 


794 


849 


104 


81 


88 


57.720 


64,314 


2,921 


3,951 


3,991 


99 


76 


85 


290,519 


299,168 


178 


279 


229 


100 


69 


95 


17,800 


19,251 


2,205 


2.4 63 


3,651 


125 


129 


135 


275,625 


317,727 


153 


257 


312 


110 


75 


110 


16,830 


19,275 


2,064 


2,613 


2,589 


130 


127 


120 


268,320 


331,851 


20 


16 


20 


110 


75 


100 


2,200 


1,200 


441 


781 


660 


109 


88 


95 


48,069 


68,728 


282 


318 


335 


115 


87 


115 


32,430 


27,666 


333 


634 


635 


105 


80 


115 


34,965 


50,720 


201 


245 


321 


108 


92 


125 


21,708 


22,540 


332 


672 


453 


120 


98 


100 


39,840 


65,856 


375 


667 


609 


103 


90 


105 


38,625 


60,030 


230 


350 


394 


110 


108 


120 


25,300 


37,800 


3,758 


4,138 


4.749 


127 


121 


125 


477,206 


500,698 


87 


186 


85 


110 


85 


115 


9,570 


15,810 


2,220 


2,242 


3.227 


122 


131 


115 


270,840 


293,702 


539 


308 


580 


120 


115 


110 


64,680 


35.420 


13,418 


16,169 


18,849 


123 


116 


120 


1,644,068 


1,868,274 


4,491 


5,925 


5,277 


120 


120 


115 


538,920 


711,000 


1,007 


1,164 


1,758 


120 


105 


120 


120,840 


122,220 


193 


540 


366 


116 


100 


95 


22,388 


54,000 


490 


694 


572 


84 


92 


90 


41,160 


63.848 


123 


107 


140 


103 


100 


120 


12,669 


10,700 


996 


1,185 


1.074 


105 


87 


95 


104.580 


103,095 


104 


225 


215 


110 


96 


85 


11.440 


21,600 


430 


539 


626 


98 


88 


110 


42,140 


47.432 


3,979 


4.250 


3,574 


135 


117 


115 


537,165 


497,250 


934 


1,784 


1,361 


110 


110 


110 


102.740 


■ 196,240 


1,960 


4,360 


3,510 


123 


86 


100 


241,080 


374.960 


487 


609 


767 


96 


102 


100 


46.752 


62,118 


15,194 


21,382 


19,240 


120 


106 


109 


1,821,874 


2,264,463 


•") 




1 70 


108 


94 




7,020 


10,058 


134 


193 


110 


104 


95 


120 


13.936 


18,335 


320 


461 


591 


109 


100 


118 


34,880 


46,100 


348 


635 


607 


104 


88 


108 


36,192 


55,880 


1,445 


1,786 


1,802 


124 


105 


98 


179,180 


187,530 


172 


686 


204 


100 


90 


105 


17,200 


61,740 


168 


187 


185 


106 


91 


85 


17,808 


17,017 


69 


170 


114 


125 


100 


125 


8,625 


17,000 


46 


169 


149 


108 


120 


90 


4,968 


20,280 


136 


234 


283 


1 112 


98 


88 


15,232 


22,932 


594 


1,021 


1,194 


110 


83 


105 


65.340 


84,743 


882 


1,346 


998 


| 112 


97 


90 


98,784 


130,562 


129 


164 


406 


110 


77 


110 


14,190 


12,628 


4.508 


7,159 


6,813 


114 


96 


102 


513,355 


684,805 


61,186 


82,701 


84,993 


| 111 


94 


97 


6,784,488 


7,814,810 



Price 
per 
Bushel 



1931 ;1029|1930|1931 



66.215| 1.10 1.03 



Total Value of Crop 



Average 
Value 
per Acre 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 | '29| '30| '31 



91,580 
121,550 
69,510 
60,720 
314,265 
132,960 
32,025 
888,825 
106.015 
52,350 
53,735 
10.250 
9,270 
120,120 
121,068 
81,280 
44,080 
58,725 
55,920 
105,105 
15.718 
43,420 
36,720 
50,575 
82,620 
1,046,971 
22,230 
21,450 
12,160 
48,420 
44,370 
41, 
57,252 
18,375 
42,900 
44,785 
67,200 
36,000 
40,660 
497,690 
29,280 
46,560 
24,402 
71,280 
25,650 
78,800 
8,700 
82,650 
33,900 
44,175 
445,397 
26.320 
21,060 
34,496 
28,160 
30,345 
21,700 
17,480 
31,065 
31,770 



1.12 1.00 

1.21 1.02 

1 18 1.00 

1.20 1.08 



1.11 
1.15 
1.25 
1.15 
1.26 
1.21 
1.15 
1.13 
1 32 
1.25 
1.35 
1.12 
1.20 
1.10 
1 15 
1.13 



1.00 
98 
1.06 
1.01 

1.10 
1 06 
1.03 
1.00 
1.00 

.90 
1.00 
95 
1.02 

.98 
1.05 
1.00 



1.36 1.02 
1.38 1 05 



1.25 
1.22 
1.15 
1.23 
1.40 
1.30 
1.60 
1.37 



1.00 
.95 
.98 
1.00 
1.15 
1 16 
1.20 
1.20 



1 63 1.20 
1.53 1.22 



1.37 
1.37 
1.50 
1.45 
1 38 
1.80 
1.30 
1.43 
1.21 
1.24 
1.33 
1.28 
1.30 
1.22 
1.27 
1.24 
1 44 
1.43 



1.21 
1 15 
1.20 
1.13 
1.05 
1.27 
1.26 
1.18 
1.05 
1.10 
1.08 
1.06 
1.08 
1 10 
1.10 
1.04 
1.12 
1.25 



1.29 1.10 

1.31 1 15 



1.10 

1.12 
1.15 
1 10 
1.20 



1.26 
1.38 
1.42 
1,36 
1.44 

1.18 1.15 
1.30 1.20 
1.18 1.18 
2,244 1.25 1.14 
1.35 1.05 
1 32 1.13 
1.20 1 25 
1.12 
1.25 
1.12 
1.50 
1.25 
1.35 
1.15 
1.10 
1.37 
1.13 
1.26 
1.12 
1.20 



1.44 
1.23 
1.48 
1.40 
1 48 
1 22 
1.35 
1.20 
1.52 
1.27 
1.26 
1 46 
1.30 



74,712| 
339,352 
21,755 
492,885 
34,320 
310,680 
2,000 
62,700 
38,525 
73,025 
40,125 
45.300 
03,945 
47,280 
593,625 
9,775 

371,105 1.15 1.50 

63,800 1.20 1.47 

2,270,845 1.15-1.44 

606,855 1.25 1.60 

210,960 1.33 1 

34.770 1.27 1.50 

51,480 1.49 1.30 

16,800 1 20 1.25 

102,030 1.33 1.30 

18,275 1.75 1.50 

68.860 1.56 1 35 

411,010 1.28 1.55 

149,710 1 30 1.50 

351,000 1.32 1.56 

76,700 1.12 1.35 

2,098,450 1.29 1.54 

19,040 1.37 1 33 

13.200 1.32 1.33 

69,738 1.36 1.37 

65,556 1 21 1.35 

176,596| 1.30 1.56 



21.420 
15,725 
14,250 
13,410 
24,904 

125.370 
89.820 
44,660 

693,689 



1.19 1.27 
1.25 1 33 
1.25 1.35 



1.35 
1 30 
1.49 
1.26 
1.28 
1.31 



1.38 
1.30 
1.38 
1.48 
1 28 
1.43 



.65 

.53 

.55 

.65 

.60 

.51 

.60 

.76 

.57 

.67 

.67 

.65 

.61 

.70 

.52 

.69 

.55 

.63 

.60 

.66 

.55 

.74 

.60 

.65 

.58 

.59 

.61 

.75 

.65 

.75 

.78 

.70 

.75 

.73 

.77 

.68 

.70 

.62 

.70 

.65 

.70 

.63 

.66 

.58 

.68 

.77 

.66 

.70 

.78 

.74 

.60 

.69 

.64 

.69 

.69 

.72 

.75 

.75 

.74 

.78 

.70 

.78 

.62 

.70 

.50 

.50 

.50 

.50 

.50 

.50 

.53 

.63 

.53 

.55 

.65 

.60 

.55 

.50 

.50 

.50 

.53 

.60 

.50 

.55 

.50 

.50 

.58 

.60 

.57 

.55 

.65 

.55 

.56 

.57 

.63 

.53 

.50 

.57 

.53 

.58 

.62 

.02 

.60 

.56 

.63 

.59 

.57 

.57 



8,281,219 1.25 1.32 



.58 



34,214 
92,540 
120,811 
81,721 
63,828 
239,194 

128,064 
35,451 
795,823 

112,844 
43,081 
71,887 
19,210 
30,347 

122,378 

203,383 
90,552 
42,408 
64,790 
57,930 
64,930 
81,078 
54,800 
58,538 
36,722 
61,813 
1,216,691 
41,580 
56,934 
32.947 
75,864 
33,272 
52,020 
82,090 
24,175 
66,690 
91.353 

101,794 
34,484 
29,939 

723,142 
26,707 
43,400 
26,480 
61,677 
28,600 
51,228 
17,508 
68,025 
58,706 
44,144 

426,475 
49,940 
33.075 
29,435 
29,381 
24,045 
44,064 
17,523 
26,229 
18,172 
34,625 
77,922 

384,411 
21,360 

308,700 
21,038 

300,518 
3,300 
60.086 
43,781 
40,210 
23,879 
54,581 
43,646 
31,878 

534,538 
11,484 

311,466 
77,616 
1,888,081 

673.650 

160,717 
28,433 
61,328 
15,203 

139,091 
20.020 
65,738 

687,571 

133,562 

318.226 
52.362 
2,355,901 
9.617 
18,396 
47,437 
43,792 

232,934 
20,468 
22,260 
10,781 
6,707 
19,802 
97,357 

124,468 
18,163 

672,182 



35,568 
83,121 
137,230 
69,576 
36,180 
256,020 
88,638 
25,135 
731,468 
150,440 
40.026 
75,556 
19,006 
20,217 
118,260 

133,791 
85,728 
48,812 
59,297 
62,386 

114.975 
18,962 
32,949 
34,476 
43,651 
89,921 
1,148,453 
31,671 
37,686 
18,722 
62,160 
40,086 
45,140 
69,251 
23,846 
35,789 
60.195 
38,693 
34,174 
17.968 

515,381 
36,128 
41,433 
25,110 
73,295 
32,368 
47,187 
20,231 
42,167 
39,954 
70,444 

428,317 
32,258 
15,454 
29,949 
26.887 
27,227 
27,658 
16,474 
29,515 
34,409 
30,500 
67,530 

337,861 
24.064 

457,527 
23.708 

491,139 
1,680 

101,717 
33,753 
68,472 
27.048 

100.101 
76,238 
47,628 

731,019 
20,553 

440,553 
52,067 
2,697,267 
1,137,600 

205,330 
81,000 
83,002 
13,375 

134,024 
32.400 
64,033 

770,738 

294,360 

584,938 
83.859 
3,484,659 
13,377 
24,386 
63,157 
75,438 

292,547 
78,410 
22,633 
22,950 
27,986 
29,812 

116.945 

193,232 
16.184 

977,037 



43,040 

48.537 
66,853 

45.182 

36,432 
160,275 
79,776 
24,339 
504,434 
71,030 
35,075 
34,928 
6,253 
6,489 
62,462 
83,537 
44,704 
27.770 
35,235 
36,907 
57.808 
11,631 
26,052 
23,868 
29,334 
48,746 

641,829 
16.673 
13,943 
9,120 
37,768 
31,059 
31,416 
41,794 
14.149 
29,172 
31,350j 
41,664 
25,200 
26,429 

349,737 
18,446 
30,730 
14,153 
48.470 
19,751 
52,008 
6,090 
64,467 
25,086 
26,505 

305,706 
16,845 
14,531 
23,802 
20,275 
22,759 
16,275 
12,935 
24,231 
22,239 
17,350 
46,321 

237,563 
10,878 

246,443 
17,160 

155,340 
1,000 
31,350 
20,418 
46,006 
21,266 
24,915 
41,564 
28,368 

326.494 
4,888 

185,553 
31,900 
1,1 93,543 

364,113 

105,480 
19,124 
25.740( 
8,400 
59,177 
10,965 
39,250 

226,056 
97,312 

193,050 
42,952 
1,191,619 
11.995 
6,996 
34,869 
37,367 
93,596 
12,424 
9,750 
8,835 
8,046 
13,946 
78,983 
52.994 
25,456 

395,257 



8,462,706 10,320,443 4,819,688 



119 
140 
132 
112 
108 
122 

92 

99 
115 
117 
104 
108 

96 
125 
123 
138 
118 
114 
105 
102 

96 
131 
152 
131 
122 

99 
119 
151 
124 
158 
171 
176 
153 
154 
140 
135 
158 
149 
185 
122 
150 
108 
124 
146 
147 
130 
116 
144 
148 
161 
140 
137 
128 

95 

87 
141 
109 
147 
130 
135 
118 
125 
140 
132 
120 
140 
138 
146 
165 
136 
155 
121 
119 
164 
116 
139 
142 
132 
140 
144 
141 
150 
160 
147 
125 
124 
140 
193 
153 
173 
143 
162 
108 
155 
148 
137 
148 
126 
161 
119 
133 
156 
146 
146 
164 
141 
141 
J149 
138 



92 
103 
99 
78 
54 
102 
58 
55 
86 
96 
85 



69 

68 

69 

76 

87 

81 

89 
105 

66 

63 

78 

80 
111 

82 

78 

72 

70 

84 
102 

90 

88 

83 

77 

79 

53 

90 

58 

79 

97 

81 

81 

82 

80 

87 

97 

88 

77 
106 

87 

98 

69 

78 

81 

75 

80 

86 
103 

96 

89 

85 

86 

86 
186 

92 
188 
105 
130 
106 
108 
110 
149 
114 
136 
177 
111 
197 
169 
167 
192 
176 
150 
120 
125 
113 
144 
119 
181 
165 
134 
138 
163 62 
125 71 



50 
61 
46 
36 
54 
48 
57 
51 
44 
50 
36 
31 
32 
36 
37 
44 
50 
52 
53 
58 
43 
39 
59 
49 
50 
44 
49 
33 
60 
47 
63 
66 
57 
58 
51 
46 
47 
70 
62 
S3 
50 
53 
57 
54 
69 
66 
42 
74 
56 
57 
60 
51 
54 
61 
58 
64 
53 
70 
74 
63 
65 
55 
60 
48 
68 
55 
60 
50 
48 
61 
72 
66 
55 
68 
72 
69 
58 
58 
55 
63 
69 
60 
52 
45 
60 
55 
51 
63 
63 
72 
55 
56 



126 
137 
119 
164 
114 
121 
135 
166 
127 
115 
144 
99 
136 
126 



64 
59 
62 
52 
61 
53 
78 
54 
49 
66 
53 
63 
58 
57 



NORTH CAROLINA SWEET POTATOES 



21 



District and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW) 

District 4 — Buncombe 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.) 

District 2 — Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont ( N.) 

District 5— Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 

District 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bfaden 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 



Acres Planted 



1929 | 1930 I 1931 



11 

24 
3 

462 
444 
65 
754 
259 

2,022 
172 
422 
306 
133 
96 
75 
249 
247 
278 
167 
142 
59 
501 

1.426 
172 
47 
135 

4,687 
300 
504 
398 
391 
654 
500 
805 
213 
483 
716 
614 
329 
505 

6,412 
256 

1,083 
438 

1,148 
237 
415 
310 
436 
416 

1,802 

6,541 
834 
188 
854 
781 
324 
550 
155 
389 
365 
321 
650 

5,411 
803 
684 
563 

2,510 
70 
499 
660 

1,098 
404 
629 

1,162 
422 
143 
418 
268 
121 



6 
13 
47 
556 
460 
58 
767 
356 

2,263 
411 
494 
474 
186 
127 
90 
253 
326 
359 
227 
188 
46 
596 

1,465 
163 
105 
391 

5,901 
432 
518 
641 
604 
996 
746 

1,043 
323 
456 
872 
668 
538 
482 

8,319 
339 

1,444 
631 

1,668 
408 
512 
440 
450 
543 

2,480 



14 
12 
12 
494 
634 
19 
806 
303 
2,294 
212 
410 
293 
136 
108 
57 
156 
171 
284 
161 
188 
37( 
737| 98 
2,0781 97 
185 94 
42|100 
29| 91 



Yield 
Bushels 
per Acre 



'29[ '30| '31 



94 
101 
89 
119 
92 
98 
89 
98 
98 
97 
98 
101 
92 
80 
101 
106 
96 
109 
87 
92 
88 



5,234 

479 
570 
682 
615 

1,500 
710 
954 
324 
600 
960 
717 
661 
662 

9,434 
353 

1,455 
707 

2,024 
358 



706 113 



403 



503 
2,960 



8,915 10,244 



97 

107 
106 
101 
108 
117 
108 
99 
96 
103 
114 
97 
104 
114 
106 
104 
112 
119 
124 
117 



758 669 

218 274 94 

1.170 1,180 102 

1,016 1,132 99 

657 539 107 

710 850 

207 24ljl04 

496 493 109 

703 515 104 

388 301 111 

1,079 1,164 103 

7,402 7,358 102 

1,120 1,022 103 

567 1,108 130 

677 542 140 

3,561 2,898 111 

69 212 103 

781 1,096 109 

863 743 109 

1,443 1,505 111 

550 552 106 

887 1,180 119 

1,461 1,589 

559 630 

203 472|115 

466 599|120 

311 5281124 

238 3091102 

10,454 13,756 14,985 116 

1,037 2,090 2,319|121 
1,311 1,456 
824 1,022 
526 747 
146 26 
3.350 3,425 
193 342 
754 1,158 
1,002 1,221 
933 1,567 

1,591 2,475 1,915 

852 976 1,330 



102 
112 
121 
122 
117 100 
102 87 



81 
80 
78 
83 
61 
79 
60 
70 
68 
64 
73 
89 
90 
80 
75 
80 
80 
90 
70 
80 
S8 
79 
77 
79 
79 
90 
79 
93 
62 
90 
95 
101 
90 
85 
89 
71 
80 
56 
59 
60 
81 
88 
98 
95 
117 
90 
85 
89 
103 
104 
98 



98 
89 
90 
80 
84 
98 
99 
100 
111 
86 
91 
60 
92 
65 
90 
125 
92 
58 
76 
69 
91 

121 100 
140 80 

85 



75 
80 
82 
115 

1.879(138 128 
110 
108 
125 
92 
101 

1,371(138 103 
1,607 136 124 
2,0S3|121 105 



1,192 
796 
94 

3,940 
485 



124 
122 
109 
138 
109 



12,519 16,505 19.011 



667 
2,032 
3,625 

864 
1.636 
1,219 
56 

153 

679 
1,037 
1.286 
2,016 

244 



950 
2.030 
3.910 
1,003 
2,193 
1,591 
292 
154 
884 
1,134 
1.930 
2,067 
527 



125 
134 
131 

144 



1,138 
2,1241127 
4,323(148 
1,247 121 
2,343 131 
1,511 120 
457 105 



158 
917 
1,237 
2,333 
2,505 
898 



144 



102 
99 
106 

105 
95 

125 
95 

109 
90 

108 

121 



116 118 
118 120 
137 110 
123 100 
133 125 



Production — Total Bushels 



Price 
Per 
Bushel 



1929 1 1930 



1931 | '29| '30| "'31 1929 



Total Value of Crop 



Average 
Value 
Per Acre 



1930 



1931 



$ 



15.514 18,665 21,1911132 109 



STATE, 



63,560 81,726 89,751 11 19 95 



69 
70 
69 
83 
69 
65 
75 
83 
76 
80 
70 
83 
69 
85 
77 
89 

oo 

79 
85 
78 
88 
85 
75 
93 
80 
90 
79 
80 
65 
73 
83 
78 
75 
90 
80 
65 
88 
80 
75 
78 
78 
73 
98 
92 
98 
85 
100 
80 
95 
97 
83 
91 
45 
85 
98 
69 
100 
78 
65 
60 
55 
75 
65 
73 
83 
90 
100 
90 
90 
85 
75 
105 
110 
90 
95 
115 
95 
9 
100 
110 
94 
80 
110 
110 
88 
80 
94 
90 
80 
115 
100 
80 
90 
94 
90 
69 
80 
78 
70 
80 
68 
70 
88 
65 
89 
73 
65 

85 7 



1,034 
2,424 
267 
54,978 
40,848 
6,370 
67,106 
25,382 
198,409 
16,684 
41,356 
36.966 
12.236 
7,680 
7,575 
26,394 
23,712 
30,302 
14.529 
13,064 
5,192 
49,098 
138,322 
16,168 
4,700 
12,285 
456,263 
32,100 
53,424 
40,198 
42,228 
76,518 
54,000 
79.695 
20,448 
49.749 
81,624 
59,558 
34,216 
57,570 
681,328 
26,624 
121.296 
52,122 
142.352 
27.729 
46.895 
31,620 
48,832 
50,336 
219,844 
767,650 
85,068 
17,672 
87,108 
77,319 
34,668 
52.800 
16.120 
42,401 
37,960 
35,631 
66,950 
553,697 
82,709 
88.920 
78,820 
278.610 
7,210 
54,391 
71,940 
121,878 
42,824 
74,851 
140,602 
59,080 
16,445 
50,160 
33,232 
12,342 
214,014 
125.477 
180,918 
102,176 
64.172 
15,914 
462,300 
21,037 
104,052 
136,272 
112,893 
198,875 
114,168 
638,254 ' 

96,048 
258,064 
536,500 
104,544 
214.316 
146,280 
5,880 
22,032 
78,764 
122,366 
176,182 
247,968 
32,452 
041,396 ; 



486 
1,040 
3,666 
46,148 
28.060 
4,582 
46,020 
24,920 
154,922 
26.304 
36,062 
42,186 
16,740 
10,160 
6,750 
20,240 
26,080 
32,310 
15,890 
15,040 
4,048 
47,084 
112,805 
12,877 
8,295 
35,190 
468,061 
40,176 
32,116 
57,690 
57,380 
100,596 
67,140 
88,655 
28,747 
32,376 
69,760 
37,408 
31,742 
28.920 
672,706 
29,832 
141,512 
59,945 
195,156 
36,720 
43,520 
39,160 
46.350 
56,472 
243.040 
891,707 
65,946 
21,364 
104,130 
91,440 
52,560 
59,640 
20,286 
49,104 
70,300 
43,068 
92,794 
670,632 
67,200 
52,164 
44,005 
320,490 
8,625 
71,852 
50,054 
109,668 
37,950 
80,717 
146,180 
44,720 
17,255 
39,610 
23,325 
19,040 
,132,775 
240,350 
186,368 
112,420 
80,676 
3,250 
315,100 
34,542 
119,274 
151,404 
164,535 
252,450 
96,624 
,756,993 • 

99,750 
192,850 
488,750 
95,285 
239,037 
143,190 
31,536 
18,634 
104,312 
136,080 
212,300 
206,700 
65,875 
,034,299 ■ 



966 
840 



41,002 
43,746 
1,235 
60.450 
25,149 
174,216 
16,960 
28,700 
24,319 
9,384 
9,180 
4,389 
13,884 
15,390 
22,436 
13,685 
14,664 
3,256 
62,645 
155,850 
12,555 
3,360 
2,610 
413,267 
38,320 
37.050( 
49,786 
51,045 
117.000 
53,250 
85,860 
25,920 
39,000 
84,480 
57,360 .95 
" .95 



1.02 
1.14 
1.08 
.87 
.99 
1.00 
.91 
1.00 
.93 
.95 
.90 
1.20 
1.10 
1.16 



1.00 
1.04 
1.08 
.9fr 
.96 
1.03 
.98 
.95 
.95 
1.03 
1.00 
1.05 
1.00 
1.10 



1.08 1 00 
1.00 1.00 



1.10 
.87 
.95 
1.10 
1.00 
.92 
.92 
1.25 
1.17 
1.07 
.99 
1.00 
.90 
.95 
.96 
.87 
.80 
.98 
1.03 
.92 
1.00 



.98 
.95 
.95 
1.05 
1.00 
.95 
.90 
1.05 
1.05 
1.00 
98 
.95 
1.00 
.88 
90 
.95 
1.00 
1.00 
.95 
.95 
1.00 
.95 
98 



49,575| 
51,636|1.00 1.00 
740,282 .94 .96 

25,769|1.05 
142.590 1.05 
65,044|l.00 
198,352| .88 
30,430| .75 
70,60011.03 
32,240| .83 
73,625| .96 1.00 



.98 
85 
!88 
.90 
.95 
.95 
.85 



48,791 
245,680 
933,121 

30,105j 

23,290 
115,640 

78,108 

53,900 

66,300 

15,665 

29,580 

28,325 

22,575 

75,660 
639,148 

84,826 

99,720 

54,200 
260,820 

19,080 

93.160 

55,725 
158,025(1.01 

60,720| .85 1.00 
106,200| .87 .95 
150,955|1.00 

72,450 



.97 
!>4 
95 

83 
90 

1 00 
.92 

1.00 
.96 
.93 
.96 
.88 
.92 
.95 
.93 
.96 



.96 
.80 
1.00 
1 00 



90 
.85 
.89 

.89 
1.00 
.95 
.95 
1.03 
98 
.95 
1.00 
.80 
.88 
.90 
.93 
.90 
.90 
80 
.'90 
1.00 



.95 
.98 



44,840 

56,905 

52,800 

33,990 
,404,416 
185,520 
206,690 
131,120 

70,048 
7,520 
370,360 

43,650 
109,680 
184,805 
208,300 
153.200 
119,700 
.790,593 
102,420 
146,556 
345,840 

97,266 
164,010 
120,880 

31,076 

11,060 

80,696[ 

S0,405| .82 
207,637| .90 



.72 
.84 
.80 

86 
.88 
.76 
.68 
.85 
1.00 
.90 
.82 
.85 
.86 
.64 

91 
.85 
.98 
.82 
.90 
.80 

77 
.80 
.85 
.80 
.85 
.70 

80 



182,865 
58,370 
,629,081 



.90 



.83 



1.01 
1.00 
80 
.85 
1.00 
1.00 
.94 
.78 
.70 
.75 
.85 
.75 
.78 
78 
.75 
.70 
.80 
.88 
.88 
.79 
.85 
.70 
.75 
.85 
.80 
.90 
.88 
.70 
.83 
.70 
.78 
.90 
.75 
.79 



.65 
60 
69 
.'60 
.59 
.58 
.58 
.75 
61 
.75 
65 
.70 
J5 
.78 
.75 
.70 
75 
.58 
.68 
.65 
.70 
.70 
.60 
.75 
.68 
.70 
.66 
.83 
.73 
.60 
.75 
.60 
65 
.'65 
.65 
.70 
65 
.'60 
.65 
.63 
.66 
.60 
.60 
.50 
.60 
.67 
.68 
.63 
.75 
.66 
.55 
.60 
.68 
.73 
.65 
.70 
.63 
.68 
.66 
.68 
.67 
.75 
.65 
.67 
.46 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.55 
.45 
.50 
.53 
.50 
.45 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.45 
.48 
.49 
.43 
.40 
.50 
.50 
.45 
.46 
.43 
.45 
.40 
.45 
.45 
.50 
.45 
.50 
.45 
.47 
.54 
.49 
.56 
.50 
.48 
.50 
.50 
.49 
.55 
.40 
.50 



1,055 
2,763 
288 
47,831 
40,440 
6,370 
61,066 
25,382 
185,195 
15,850 
37,220 
44,359 
13,460 
8,909 
8,181 
26,394 
26,083 
26,363 
13,803 
14,370 
5.192 
45,170 
127,256 
20,210 
5,499 
13,145 
451,464 
32,100 
48,082 
38,188 
40,539 
66,570 
43.200 
78.101 
21,061 
45,769 
81,624 
56,580 
32,505 
57,570 
641,889 
27,955 
127<361 
52,122 
125,270 
20,797 
48,302 
26,245 
46,879 
48.826 
206,653 
730,410 
70.606 
15.905 
87,108 
71,133 
34,668 
50,688 
14,992 
40.705 
33.405 
32,781 
63,603 
515,594 
79,401 
66.690 
75.667 
222,888 
7,210 
54,391 
63,307 
123.097 
36.400 
65,120 
140,602 
48,446 
11.840 
42.134 
26 586 
10 614 
074,393 
95.363 
123,024 
86,850 
64.172 
14.323 
379.086 
17, SSI 
89,485 
87.214 
102,733 
169,044 
111,885 
1,341,060 
86,443 
206,451 
413.105 
83,635 
182.169 
117,024 
4.998 
15,422 
63.011 
100.340 
158,564 
223,171 
31,154 
1.685,487 



486 
1,082 
3,959 
41,533 
26,938 
4,719 
45.100 
23.674 
147,491 
27.093 
36.062 
44,295 
16,740 
11,176 
6,750 
20,240 
25,558 
30,695 
15,096 
15,792 
4,048 
44,730 
101.525 
13,521 
8,710 
35.190 
457,221 
38,167 
32,116 
50,767 
51,642 
95.566 
67,140 
88,655 
27.310 
30,757 
69,760 
35,538 
31,107 
28,920 
647,445 
29.235 
120,285 
52,752 
175.640 
34,884 
41,344 
33,286 
46.350 
50.825 
206,584 
791,185 
58,692 
21,364 
98,924 
86.868 
54,137 
58,447 
19,272 
49.104 
56.240 
37,900 
83,515 
624,463 
60.480 
46.948 
35.204 
288,441 
8,625 
68.259 
47,551 
107,474 
37.950 
76,681 
147.561 
44.720 
13,804 
33,669 
23.325 
19,040 
1,059,732 
1S7.473 
130.458 
84.315 
68.575 
2,438 
245.778 
26.943 
89,456 
105,983 
131,628 
222,156 
85.029 
,380,232 
84,788 
134,995 
366,563 
80,992 
191,230 
128,871 
27,752 
13,044 
86.579 
95.256 
165,594 
186,030 
49,406 
,611,100 



628 
504 
571 
24,601 
25,810 
716 
35,001 
18,862 



106,752 91.14 



12,720 
18,655 
17,023 
7,038 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



95.88 
115.14 
96.12 
103.53 
91.08 
98.00 
80.99 
98.00 



92.15 
88.20 
121.20 
101.20 



7,160| 92.80 

3,292 " 

9,719 
11,543 
13,013 

9,306 



109.08 
106.00 
105.60 
94.83 
82.65 



9,5321101.20 



2.279 
43,852 
93,510 
9,416 
2,285 
1,827 

272,170 
31,806 
27,047 
29,872 
38,284 
70,200 
34,613 
55,809 
16,848 
27,300 
54,912 
34.416 
32,224 
32.531 

485,862 
15,461 
85,554 
32,522 

119,011 
20,388 
48,008 



88.00 
90.16 
89.24 
117 50 
117.00 
97.37 
96.03 
107.00 
95.40 
95 95 
103.68 
101.79 
86.40 
97,02 
98.88 
94.76 
114.00 
92.15 
98.80 
114 00 
99.64 
109.20 
117 60 
119.00 
109.12 
87 75 
116.39 



20.311| 84.66 
55,219|107 52 
32,202|117.37 
135,124|114.68 



563.800 

20,471 
17,002 
75.166 
54,676 
33,957 
45,084 
10,339 
20,114 
18.978 
16,931 
49,179 
361,897 



111.15 

84.66 
84 60 

102.00 
91.08 

107 00 
92.16 
96 72 

104.64 
91 52 

102.12 
97.85 
94.86 



134.40 
88 80 

103.00 

109.00 
95 92 

112.11 
90.10 

103.53 



39,020| 98.88 
49,860| 97.50 
27,100 
130.410 
10,494 
41,922 
27,863 
83,753 
30,360 
47,790 
75,478|121.00 
36,225|114.80 
22,4201 82.80 
28,453|100.80 
23,7601 99.20 
16,315| 87.72 
691 .223 102.08 
79,774| 91.96 
82,076| 93.84 
65,560|105.40 
35,024|122.00 
3,158| 98.10 
170,366|113.16 
18,770| 92.65 
49,356|118.G8 
73,922| 87.04 
93,735|110.11 
08,940(106.25 
59,8501131.32 
801,1 31 11 07.42 
51,210|129.60 



65,950 
162,545 
52.524 
80,305 
67,693 
15,538 
5,309 
40.348 
40,203 
101,742 
100,576 
23,348 
807,351 



101.60 
113.96 
96.80 
111.35 
96.00 
89.25 
100.80 
92.80 
90.76 
123.30 
110.70 
127.68 
109.56 



81.00 44.85 
83.20 42 00 

84.24 47.61 
74 70 49.80 
58.'56 40.71 
81.37 37 70 
58.80 43.50 
85.50 02,25 
64.60 46.36 
65.92 60.00 
73.00 45.50 
93.45 58.10 
90.00 51.75 
88.00 66 30 
75.00 57.75 
80.00 62.30 
78.40 67.50 
85.50 45 82 
66.50 57.80 
84.00 50 70 
88.00 61.60 
75.05 59.50 
69.30 45.00 
82.95 69.75 
82.95 54.40 
90.00 63.00 

77.42 52.14 
88.35 66.40 
62.00 47.45 
79.20 43.80 
85.50 62.25 
95.95 46.80 
90 00 48.75 
85.00 58.50 
84.55 52.00 
67 45 45.50 
80.00 57.20 
53.20 48.00 
57.82 48.75 
60.00 49.14 
77.76 51.48 
86.24_43.80 
83.30 58.80 
83.60 46.00 

105.30 58.80 
85.50 56.95 
80.75 68.00 
75.65 50.40 

103.00 71.25 
93.60 64.02 
83.30 45.65 
89.00 54.60 

77.43 30.60 
98.00 62.05 
84.55 63.70 
85.50 48.30 
82.40 63.00 
82.32 53.04 
93.10 42.90 
99.00 40.80 
80.00 36.85 
97.08 56.25 
77.40 42.25 
84.63 48.91 
54.00 38.18 
82 80 45.00 
52.00 50.00 
81.00 45.00 

125.00 49.50 
87.40 38.25 

55.10 37.50 
74.48 55.65 
69.00 55.00 
86.45 40 50 
101.00 47 50 
80.00 57.50 
68.00 47.50 

72.25 47.50 
75.00 45.00 
80.00 52.80 
77.08 46.06 
89.70 34.40 
89.60 44.00 
82.50 55.00 
91.80 44.00 

93.75 33.60 

71.76 43 24 
78.78 38.70 
77.25 36 00 
86.80 46.00 
84.00 45 00 
89.70 36.00 
87.12 45 00 

83.74 42.30 
89.25 45.00 
66.50 31.05 
93 75 37.60 

80.75 42.12 
87.20 34 30 
81.00 44.80 
95.04 34.00 
84.70 33.60 
97.94 44.00 
84.00 32.50 
85.80 43.61 
90.00 40.15 
93.75 26.00 

86.11 38.50 



551,011 7,782,095 7,624,1241 .88 .86 .54 6,625,492 6,718.869 4,090,1861104.72 81.70 45.90 



22 



NORTH CAROLINA SOYBEANS (For Beans) 



District and Counties 



S s 
4o< 



e 

o 



Cow 

Ed mO 



Yield 
Bushels 
Per acre 



Production 
Total Bushels 



1930 


1931 


1930 


193 1 


1930 


871 


198 


970 


44 


63 


76 


13 


1 

10 


12,610 


5 


3 


7 


145 


168 


229 


13 


10 


91 


52 


5 


55 


2 





2 


1 1 


10 


605 


384 


243 


506 


672 


317 


831 


1 1 


1 1 


5,566 


322 


41 


343 


339 


77 


378 


10 


12 


3,430 


7 





7 


12 


3 


14 


12 


10 


84 


900 


381 


1,091 


1,229 


550 


1,504 


1 1 


1 1 


12,001 


557 


61 


588 


369 


75 


407 






5,880 


3,098 


932 


3,567 


2,812 


1,253 


3,441 


1 1 


1 1 


40 267 


225 


73 


262 


336 


138 


405 


14 


1 1 


3 668 


383 


111 


439 


561 


156 


639 


XI 


10 


4 829 


61 


296 


209 


112 


332 


278 


13 


10 


2 717 


52 


15 


60 


103 


60 


133 


1 2 


10 


720 





9 


5 











1 x 




55 


336 


214 


443 


196 


129 


261 


13 


10 


5 759 


138 


114 


195 


86 


49 


111 


11 


10 


2,145 


86 


85 


129 


48 


36 


66 


14 


10 


1,806 


1,084 





1,084 


859 


319 


1,019 


12 


11 


13,008 


357 


177 


446 


239 


261 


370 


14 


10 


6,244 


50 


25 


63 


50 


25 


63 


12 


10 


756 


20 


81 


61 


14 


19 


24 


12 


10 


732 


94 


83 


136 


141 


69 


176 


12 


10 


1,632 


430 


596 


728 


601 


1,090 


1,146 


13 


10 


9,464 


4 


44 


26 


53 


20 


63 


12 


10 


312 


75 


9 


80 


35 


7 


39 


12 


10 


960 


13 


16 


21 


49 





49 


12 


10 


252 


3,408 


1,948 


4,387 


3.483 


2,710 


4,842 


1 3 


1 


55 059 


46 


20 


56 


203 


62 


234 


11 


12 


616 


149 


8 


153 


96 


13 


103 


11 


11 


1 683 


103 


128 


167 


79 


47 


103 


12 


11 


2.004 


345 


48 


369 


276 


24 


288 


11 


13 


4 059 


258 


629 


573 


663 


698 


1,012 


9 


11 


5,157 


107 


52 


133 


140 


67 


174 


10 


11 


1,330 


254 


52 


280 


132 


28 


146 


11 


11 


3!o80 


181 


138 


250 


380 


76 


418 


10 


11 


2,500 


110 


77 


149 


88 


174 


175 


10 


11 


1^490 


154 


39 


174 


897 


77 


935 


11 


11 


1,914 


79 


13 


86 


111 


15 


119 


10 


11 


860 


131 


122 


192 


149 


319 


304 


9 


12 


1,728 


232 


118 


291 


165 


99 


215 


8 


11 


2,328 


2,149 


1,444 


2,873 


3,379 


1,699 


4,226 


10 


1 1 


28,749 


688 


146 


761 


555 


58 


584 


10 


10 


7,610 


419 


75 


457 


475 


218 


584 


11 


12 


5,027 


239 


146 


312 


457 


65 


490 


14 


12 


4,368 


329 


73 


366 


981 


286 


1,124 


15 


10 


5,490 


403 


85 


446 


432 


130 


497 


13 


12 


5,798 


986 


247 


1,110 


1,094 


273 


1,23 1 


11 


11 


12,210 


111 


136 


179 


398 


118 


457 


12 


13 


2,148 


322 


114 


379 


216 


90 


261 


12 


11 


4,548 


787 


408 


991 


980 


529 


1,245 


14 


1 1 


13 874 


614 


1,179 


1,204 


1,344 


1,273 


1,981 


13 


11 


15,652 


4,898 


2,609 


6,205 


6,932 


3,040 


8,454 


12 


1 1 


76 725 


183 


3,757 


2,062 


179 


3,385 


1,872 


13 


10 


26 806 


334 


1,268 


968 


587 


1,138 


1,156 


13 


10 


12 584 


69 


87 


113 


116 


115 


174 


13 


1 1 


1 469 


221 


217 


330 


277 


171 


363 


12 


1 1 


3 960 


230 


100 


280 


311 


43 


333 


13 


X 1 


3 640 


377 


552 


653 


596 


418 


805 




1 1 


9 142 


112 


210 


217 


377 


242 


498 


1 1 




2 387 


167 


231 


283 


425 


221 


536 




10 


3,679 


464 


1,398 


1,163 


268 


597 


567 


i i 


10 




346 


473 


583 


196 


370 


381 


14 


10 


8 162 


71 


467 


305 


215 


2,335 


1,383 


13 


10 


3 965 


2,574 


8,760 


6,957 


3,547 


9,035 


8,068 


1 3 


1 


92 076 


761 


1,566 


1,544 


1,045 


1,905 


1,998 


14 


13 


21 616 


10,973 


21 


10,984 


10,643 


420 


10,853 


13 


13 


142 792 


1,833 


3,690 


3,678 


2,037 


4,066 


4,070 


12 


13 


44 136 


6,255 


167 


6,339 


7,117 


778 


7,506 




14 


88 746 


28 





28 


417 





417 


14 


1 1 


392 


812 


6,342 


3,983 


1,185 


8,075 


5,223 


13 


13 


5 1 779 


1,542 


3,057 


3,071 


1,463 


2,762 


2,844 


12 


13 


O v> , O t> i- 


690 


1,661 


1,521 


1,211 


3,761 


3,092 


1 1 


13 


16 73 1 


329 


4,271 


2,4641 531 


4,894 


2,978 




Id 


27 104 


574 


3,261 


2,205 


667 


3,862 


2,598 


15 


14 


O O ,\J 1 o 


316 


2,911 


1,767 


663 


4,260 


2 793 


13 


12 


22,971 


312 


2,153 


1,339 


478 


3 542 


2 249 


13 


12 


17,407 


16,999 


131 


17.064 


17,284 


774 


17 671 


13 


13 


221,832 


8,289 


2,831 


9,705 


9,392 


3 190 


10 987 


13 


14 


126,165 


3,698 


3,446 


5,421 


3,778 


4 596 


6 07C 


19 


15 


102,999 


4,038 


1,329 


4,703 


4,004 


2,000 


5 004 


18 


14 


84,654 


57,449 


36,837 


75,816 


61,915 


48,885 


86,359 


14 


13 


1,039,251 


6,829 


5,450 


9,554 


10,005 


7,246 


13,628 


17 


14 


162,418 


1,130 


389 


1,325 


1,100 


1,135 


1,668 


13 


13 


17,225 


1,198 


1,542 


1,969 


1,366 


3,069 


2,901 


13 


13 


25,597 


255 


7,090 


3,800 


570 


8,967 


5,054 


14 


13 


53,200 


9,275 


8,747 


13,649 


9,656 


8,595 


13,954 


19 


16 


259,33 1 


915 


18,673 


10,252 


1,506 


24,093 


13,553 


14 


12 


143,528 


811 


3,991 


2,807 


1,237 


4,798 


3,636 


14 


12 


39^298 


473 


8 117 


4,527 


634 


11 990 


6,629 


13 


12 


58,851 


2,624 


2^144 


3,646 


2,692 


4^004 


4^694 


13 


13 


47,398 


1,961 


14,075 


8,999 


2,429 


17,069 


10,964 


15 


13 


134,985 


577 


23,375 


12,265 


926 


19,487 


10,670 


16 


12 


196,240 


193 


5,155 


2,771 


873 


7,331 


4,539 


11 


13 


30,481 


26,241 


98,748 


75,564 


32,994 


117,784 


91 ,890 


15 


13 


1,168,552 


929 


4,432 


3,145 


914 


5,091 


3,460 


11 


11 


34,595 


401 


560 


681 


226 


772 


612 


13 


11 


8,853 


998 


5,478 


3,737 


819 


6,364 


4,001 


16 


12 


59,792 


702 


5,975 


3,690 


891 


10,024 


5,703 


13 


11 


47,970 


950 


15,081 


8,491 


797 


17,259 


9,427 


14 


13 


118,874 


228 


3,498 


1,977 


205 


2,021 


1,216 


14 


12 


27,678 


254 


1,668 


1,088 


198 


1,572 


984 


12 


11 


13,056 


235 


1,578 


1,024 


407 


615 


715 


14 


12 


14.336 


398 


4,783 


2,790 


790 


5,842 


3,711 


15 


12 


41,850 


387 


2,838 


1,806 


502 


2,695 


1,850 


15 


11 


27,090 


595 


13.622 


7,406 


1,189 


16,323 


9,351 


13 


12 


96,278 


735 


13,948 


7,709 


1,362 


18,455 


10,590 


13 


12 


100,217 


382 


3,426 


2,095 


355 


4,052 


2,381 


13 


11 


27,235 


7,194 


76,887 


45,639 


8,455 


91,085 


64,001 


14 


12 


617,824 


107,011 


228,165 


221,O08|123.517 


275,491 


261 ,281 


14 


13 


| 3,118,503 



Price 
Per 
Bushel 



1931 1930|1931 



Total Value 
o£ Crop 



Value 
Per Acre 



1930 | 1931 | 1930 | 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW)_ 
District 4 — Buncombe_. 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W) 

District 2 — Alamance__ 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

FrankJin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) 

District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.)__ 

District 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamiieo 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal ( E) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Kobeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 



STATE, 



760|2.10 
2,290|2.10 
20|2.10 



9,141 
4,536 
140 

16,544 
4,477 

37,908 
4,455 
6,390 
2,780 
1,330 

2,610 
1,110 
660 
11,209 
3,700 
630 
240 
1,760 
11,460 
630 
390 
490 
49,844 
2,808 
1,133 



1.85 
2.00 
2.15 
1.95 
1.90 
1.98 
2.10 
1.80 
2.10 
2 15 
2.10 
2.15 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.15 
2.10 
1.80 
1.80 
2.20 
2.10 
2.15 
1.98 
2.00 
2.00 
1,133 1 90 



3,744 
11,132 
1,914 
1,606 
4,598 
1,925 
10,285 
1,309 
3,648 



2.00 
1.90 
2.00 
2.10 
2.00 
2.10 
2.15 
2.10 
1.90 



2,365|1.85 



47,600 

5,840 
7,008 
5,880 
11,240 
5,964 
13,541 
5,941 
2,871 
13.695 
21,791 
93,771 
18,720 
11,560 
1,914 
3,993 
3,663 
8,855 
4,482 
5,360 
5,670 
3,810 
13,830 
81 ,857 
25,974 
141,089 
52,910 
105,084 
4,587 
67,899 
36,972 
40,196 



1.93 

1.85 
1.75 
1.80 
1.75 
2.00 
1.85 
1 90 
1.90 
1.90 
1.85 
1.86 
1.80 
1.90 
1 75 
1.80 
1.75 
1.80 
1.85 
1.80 
1 75 
1.90 
1.67 
1.81 
1.60 
1.45 
1 47 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.60 



38,714|1.60 



36,372 
33,516 
26,988 
229,723 
153,818 
91,140 
70,056 
1,155,038 
190,792 
21,684 
37,713 
65,702 
223,264 
162,636 
43,632 
79,548 
61,022 
142,532 
128,040 
59,007 
,215,572 
38,060 
6,732 
48,012 
62,733 
122,551 



1.50 
1 70 
1.65 
1.45 
1.50 
1.45 
1.50 
1.49 
1.45 
1 40 
1.50 
1.50 
1 40 
L50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.40 
1.50 
1.52 
1.46 
1.65 
1.70 
1.75 
1.70 
1.65 
14,592(1.80 



10,824 
8,580 

44,532 

20,350 
112,212 
127,080 

26.191 



1.75 
1.80 
1.60 
1.75 
1.80 
1.70 
1 85 



642,449 1.72 



1.00 
.95 
.95 

1.00 
.90 

1.00 
.95 
.80 
.94 
.95 
.94 
.95 
.92 

1.15 
.85 
1.00 
.95 
1.00 
.90 
.90 
1 00 
l.'OO 
1.13 
.90 
.90 
.97 
1.00 
.90 
1.10 
1.10 
.90 
1.15 
1.00 
1.00 
.85 
95 
l.'OO 
.95 
.95 
.97 
.80 
80 
1.00 
90 
1.00 
.85 
.83 
1.10 
1.00 
.95 
92 
.85 
1.00 
.80 
.90 
.85 
1.00 
1.00 
.80 
.85 
1.00 
.90 
.91 
.66 
.44 
.50 
.43 
.60 
.60 
.57 
.70 
.75 
.51 
.83 
.72 
.45 
.46 
.50 
.47 
.51 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.56 
.45 
.61 
.52 
.55 
.53 
.53 
.56 
.68 
.53 
.78 
.60 
.75 
.80 
.63 
.85 
.75 
.60 
55 
.65 
.88 
.62 
.80 
.80 



26,481 
191 
1,271 
10,297 
0,860 
181 
23,402 
11,172 
79,855 
7,703 
8,692 
5,706 
1,548 
116 
12,382 
4,290 
3,612 
26,016 
12,488 
1.625 
1,537 
2,938 
17,035 
686 
2,016 
542 
108,932 
1,232 
3,366 
2,188 
8,118 
9,798 
2,660 
6,468 
5,000 
3,129 
4,115 
1,806 
3.283 
4,307 
55,470 
14,079 
8,797 
7,862 
9,608 
11,596 
22,589 
4,081 
8,641 
26,361 
29,113 
142,727 
48,251 
23,910 
2,571 
7.128 
6,370 
16,456 
4,416 
6,622 
28,494 
15,508 
6,622 
166,348 
34,586 
207,048 
64,880 
133,119 
588 
77,669 
55,278 
26,770 
43,366 
49.613 
39,051 
28,722 
321,656 
189,248 
149,349 
126,981 
,547,924 
235,506 
24,115 
38,396 
79,800 
363.063 
215,292 
58,947 
88,277 
71,097 
188.979 
294,360 
46,331 
,704,163 
57,082 
15,050 
104,636 
81,549 
196,142 
49.820 
22,848 
25,805 
66,960 
47,408 
173,300 
170,369 
50,385 
1,061,354 



760 
2,176 
19 
9,141 
4,082 
140 
15,717 
3,582 
35,617 
4,232 
6,007 
2,641 



|$ 

27.30 
27.30 
23.10 
20.35 
20.00 
25.80 
21.45 
19.00 
22.39 
29.40 
19.80 
27.30 



1,224|25.80 
23.10 



3,002 
944 
660 



27.95 
22.00 
28 00 



10,649j24.00 
3,700 28 00 
567 25 - 80 



216 
1,760 

11,460 
712 
351 
441 

48,566 
2,808 
1,020 
1,246 
4,118 

10,019 
2,201 
1,606 
4,598 
1,636 
9,771 
1,309 
3,466 
2,247 

46,045 
4,672 
5,606 
5,880 

10,116 



11,510 



25.20 
21.60 
23.40 
6 40 
25.20 
25.80 
24.83 
22 00 
22.00 
22.80 
22.00 
17 10 
20.00 
23.10 
20.00 
21 00 
23.'65 
21.00 
17.10 
14 80 
19.31 
18.50 
19.25 
25.20 
26.25 



5,964 26.00 



20.35 



4,931|22.80 



3,158 
13,695 
20,701 
86,233 
15,912 
11,560 
1,531 
3,594 
3,114 
8,855 



22.80 
26.60 
24.05 
23.00 
23 40 
24*70 
22.75 
21.60 
22.75 
25.20 



4.482|20.35 
4.288 23.40 



4,820 
3,810 
12,447 
74,413 

17,143 
62,079 
26,455 
45.186 
2.752 
40,739 
21,074 
28,137 
29.036 
18.550 
27,818 
19,431 

103.375 
70,756 
45,570 
32,926 

591,027 
95,396 
10,842 
18,857 
36,793 



24.50 
26 60 
21.71 
23.91 
22.40 
18.85 
17.64 
21.00 
21.00 
19.50 
18.00 
17.60 
17 60 
22.50 
22.10 
21.45 
18.85 
19.50 
27.55 
27,00 
20.42 
24.65 
18.20 
19.50 
21.00 



21 00 
21.00 
19.50 
19.50 
21.00 
24.00 
16 72 
22.55 
18.15 
22.10 
28.00 
22.10 
23.10 
25.20 
21.00 
25 20 
24.00 
26.25 
23.40 
22.10 
24.05 
23.26 

3,324,039(1.56 SiZ 4,866,773 2,045,867|22.02 



100,469|26.60 
99,208 ~ ' 
22,689 
43,751 
32,342 
75,542 
71,702 
40,125 
647,716 
29,687 
4,039 
36,009 
50,186 
77,207 
12.403 
81,180 
5.148 
24,493 
13.228 
98,747 
62.135 
21.788 
516,250 



NORTH CAROLINA COWPEAS 



23 



Districts and Counties 



u ° - 
<lC5-ti 



IS I 

W 02 <l 



M O o 



e 

t- o - 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry: 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW). 

District 4 — Buncombe 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tancey 

Western Mountain (W.) 

District 2 — Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) 

District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 

Distirct 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven . 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 



STATE. 





1930 






1931 




27 


59 


56 


115 


12 


121 











7 


2 


8 


3 


3 


4 


10 


1 


11 


365 


99 


415 


532 


264 


664 


392 


50 


417 


990 


1 77 


778 




1,634 




245 




1,756 


4 

2,1*8 




414 


4 

2,315 


1,023 


132 


1,089 


1,527 


134 


1,594 


3,444 


588 


3,737 


5,293 


1,004 


5,496 


22 


• 20 


32 


75 


15 


82 


652 


177 


740 


1,027 


116 


1,085 


82 


357 


261 


274 


438 


493 


195 


58 


224 


380 


215 


488 


9 


68 


43 


14 


25 


27 


345 


216 


453 


48 


27 


61 


56 


24 


68 


92 


68 


126 


42 


5 


45 


36 


20 


46 


67 





67 


65 


27 


78 


168 


69 


202 


1,251 


255 


1,379 


16 


16 


24 


16 


16 


24 


10 


19 


19 


1 


3 


2 


162 


157 


240 


166 


117 


225 


408 


254 


535 


768 


512 


1,024 


7 


54 


M 


2 


142 


73 


15 





15 


18 


33 


34 


24 


4 


26 


20 





20 


2,280 


1,498 


3,028 


4,253 


2,029 


6,267 


120 


34 


137 


212 


43 


233 


240 


52 


266 


383 


161 


463 


257 


93 


304 


318 


137 


386 


234 


55 


262 


444 


56 


472 


105 


114 


162 


944 


693 


1,290 


103 


38 


122 


123 


42 


144 


245 


104 


297 


442 


225 


555 


101 


50 


126 


293 


49 


317 


301 


339 


470 


270 


201 


371 


156 


72 


292 


1,043 


202 


1,144 


67 


25 


80 


369 


58 


398 


83 


42 


104 


125 


113 


181 


755 


275 


893 


1,111 


208 


1,215 


2,767 


1,293 


3,515 


6,077 


2.188 


7,169 


606 


175 


694 


807 


131 


873 


819 


228 


933 


1,690 


612 


1,996 


144 


67 


177 


518 


225 


631 


324 


113 


380 


1,211 


252 


1,337 


168 


37 


286 


556 


284 


698 


1,658 


500 


1,908 


2,692 


1,165 


3,245 


343 


153 


419 


529 


347 


702 


143 


114 


200 


460 


299 


609 


833 


366 


1,016 


1,651 


848 


2,075 


555 


679 


894 


1,293 


1,607 


2,096 


5,593 


2,432 


6,907 


11,407 


6,710 


14,262 


201 


695 


549 


296 


742 


667 


319 


412 


525 


843 


773 


1,230 


300 


60 


330 


278 


317 


436 


595 


882 


1,036 


1,248 


1,082 


1,789 


454 


92 


500 


584 


295 


732 


759 


454 


986 


1,415 


1,614 


2,222 


73 


73 


109 


554 


368 


738 


420 


289 


564 


699 


569 


983 


423 


1,503 


1,175 


650 


2,912 


2,106 


528 


432 


744 


576 


603 


877 


231 


182 


322 


784 


682 


1,135 


4,303 


5,074 


6,840 


2,927 


9,957 


12,915 


87 


62 


118 


202 


497 


450 


23 


22 


34 


29 


3 


30 


358 


98 


407 


506 


186 


599 


220 


63 


251 


220 


197 


318 


81 





81 


47 





47 


336 


268 


470 


805 


1,329 


1,469 


96 


41 


116 


52 


21 


62 


252 


329 


416 


447 


605 


749 


429 


113 


485 


625 


223 


736 


82 


215 


189 


234 


184 


326 


172 


300 


322 


894 


1,467 


1,627), 


149 


38 


168 


385 


573 


671 


26 


335 


193 


108 


242 


229 


462 


211 


567 


1,183 


254 


1,310 


27 


69 


61 


27 


299 


176 


198 


88 


242 


611 


109 


665 


2,998 


2,252 


4,120 


6,375 


6,189 


9,464 


345 


369 


529 


233 


181 


323 


62 


177 


150 


43 


223 


154 


109 


346 


282 


308 


501 


558 


79 


1,071 


614 


262 


2,238 


1,381 


115 


174 


202 


26 


77 


64 


345 


1,684 


1,187 


670 


5,105 


3,222 


50 


139 


119 


45 


321 


205 


16 


138 


85 


146 





146 


55 


25 


67 


79 


26 


92 


341 


733 


707 


470 


1 560 


1,250 


373 


2,662 


1,704 


416 


4,'794 


2,813 


213 


934 


675 


934 


3,837 


2,852 


2,103 


8,452 


6,321 


3,632 


18,863 


13,060 


263 


1,993 


1.254 


937 


4,360 


3,117 


187 


1,440 


907 


135 


2,566 


1,418 


250 


4,689 


2,594 


602 


8,971 


5,087 


448 


754 


825 


718 


2,862 


2,149 


301 


1,261 


931 


382 


2,743 


1,753 


165 


558 


444 


238 


717 


596 


215 


640 


535 


550 


2,742 


1.921 


32 


36 


50 


65 


45 


87 


114 


788 


508 


182 


1,610 


987 


187 


1,264 


819 


210 


646 


533 


694 


6,883 


4,135 


935 


18,352 


10,111 


354 


1,855 


1,281 


543 


4,937 


3,011 


346 


2,792 


1,742 


399 


4,302 


2,550 


3,556 


24,953 


16,025 


5,896 


64,853 


33,320 


17 044 


46,542 


60,493| 


50,860 


100,793 


1 00,952 1 



Yield 
Bushels 
Per 
Acre 



Production 
Total Bushels 



1930 | 1931 | 1930 



Price 
Per 
Bushel 



1930J1931 



12 
12 
10 

9 
7 

10 
8, 
9 
13 
11 
12 
12 
10 
12 
11 
12 
10 
13 
12 
11 
12 
10 
11 
12 
12 
11 
10 
11 
10 
10 
9 
10 
9 
9 
10 
9 
6 
9 
9 
9 
10 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
9 
11 
10 
10 
12 
9 
12 
12 
12 
12 
10 
10 
12 
12 
12 
12 
11 
9 
10 
10 
13 
10 
8 
10 
10 

11 
11 
11 

10 
9 
13 
12 
10 
10 

11 

9 
11 
14 
10 
10 
11 

8 

9 
13 
12 
11 

9 
12 
12 



10 
9 
10 
11 
11 
9 
11 
9 
10 



13 
12 
12 
12 
10 

13 
13 
12 
13 
10 
11 

9 
10 
12 
12 
11 
14 
10 
12 
12 
11 
13 
11 
12 
13 
11 

9 
12 
10 
11 

9 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

11 

10 

12 
12 
10 
11 
12 
11 
12 

" f 

12 

10 

11 

10 

10 

12 

13 

12 

13 

11 

10 

12 

11 

11 

12 

12 

10 

10 

10 

13 

10 

11 

11 

11 

10 

11 

10 

11 
11 

12 
12 
11 

11 
10 

9 
12 
13 
10 
10 
11 

9 
11 
10 
11 
11 
10 



10 

11 

10 
10 

11 
11 

10 
8 
9 

10 



672 

"~40 
3.735 
2.919 

17.560 
8,712 

33,638 
416 
8,140 
3,132 
2,688 
430 
5,436 
748 
540 
670 
2,626 
288 
209 
2.880 
5,350 
374 
180 
312 

34.419 
1,370 
2,926 
3,040 
2,620 
1,458 
1.220 
2,673 
1,134 
4,700 
2,628 
480 
936 
8,037 

33,222 
6,940 

11.196 
1,770 
3.800 
2,860 

19,080 
4,190 
1,800 

11,175 
8,940 

71,751 
6,588 
4,725 
. 3,960 

12,432 
6.000 

11,832 
1,090 
5,640 

14,100 
8,928 
3,864 

79,159 
1,298 
306 
4.070 
2,510 
1,053 
4,700 
928 
4,160 
4,850 
2,079 
3,542 
1,848 
1,930 
5,103 
793 
2.904 

42,074 
5,290 
1,650 
2,538 
6,754 
2,828 

11,870 
1,190 
935 
536 
6,363 

22,152 
8,100 

70,206 

11,286 

10,884 

31,128 
6,600 
8,379 
4,440 
4,815 
500 
5,522 
9,009 

37,215 

14,091 

15,678 
159,547 



1,573| 
96 
132I 
7,968 
7,780 

30~095 
20,722 
68,366 
1,066 
10,850 
5,423 
4,392 
270 
732 
1,512 
506 
1,092 
13.790 
288 
24 
2,475 
13,312 
803 
408 
260 
57,203 
2,097 
5,556 
3.860 
5,192 
11.610 
1,728 
5,550 
3,170 
3,710 
11,440 
3,980 
1,810 
13,365 
73,068 
10,476 
23.952 
6,310 
14.707 
8,376 
35,695 
8,424 
6,699 
24,900 
20,960 
160,499 
6,670 
12,300 
5,232 
23,257 
8,784 
28,886 
8,118 
9,830 
25,272 
9,647 
12,485 
150,481 
5,400 
300 
5,990 
3,180 
611 
14,690 
682 
8,239 
8,096 
3,260 
17,897 
6.710 
2.519 
14,410 
2.112 
7.980 
102,076 
3,553 
1,540 
5,022 
16,584 
832 
32,220 
2,050 
1,606 
828 
13,750 
28,130 
31,372 
137,487 
31,170 
12,762 
61,044 
19,341 
17,530 
6,556 
19,210 
870 
10.S57 
5,863 
101,110 
24,088 
22,950 
333,351 



10 11 | 524,016 1,082,5311 



2.40 
2.30 
2.00 
1.90 
2.30 
2.20 
1.95 
2.15 
2.04 
2.10 
2.00 
2 00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.10 
2.20 
2 10 
2.15 
2.10 
2.00 
2 00 
2.00 
2.00 
2 00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.03 
2.50 
2.50 
2 40 
2.50 
2.40 
2.20 
2.50 
2.40 
2.30 
2.50 
2 40 
2.10 
2 10 
2.33 
2.00 
2.00 
2,50 
2.00 
1.95 
2.00 
2 50 
2.05 
2.10 
2.50 
2,12 
2.25 
2.00 
1.90 
2 20 
2.40 
2.25 
2.00 
2 25 
2.20 
2.00 
2.10 
2,18 
2.10 
2.20 
2.25 
2 20 
2.25 
2.50 
2.20 
2 25 
2.20 
2.50 
2.65 
2 00 
2.20 
2.20 
2.50 
2.50 
2.28 
2 60 
2.50 
2.50 
2.80 
2.60 
2.00 
2.50 
2 60 
2.60 
2.75 
2.50 
2.00 
2.43 
2.38 
2.40 
2.25 
2.50 
2,75 
2.40 
2 30 
2.40 
2.40 
2 25 
2.40 
2.65 
2 40 
2.41 



1.25 
1.10 
1.00 
.88 
.75 

~Io 

.75 
.80 
.95 
.85 
.75 
.80 
.75 
1.00 
1.00 
1.05 
.95 
1.00 
.97 
.95 
.90 
.95 
1.00 
1.05 
.95 
.91 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.30 
1.42 
1.25 
1.25 
1.38 
1.35 
1.15 
1.00 
1.15 
1.32 
1.31 
.80 
.78 
.92 
1.22 
1.00 
.85 
.84 
.92 
.95 
1.10 
.93 
.78 
1.00 
.85 
.90 
1.00 
.85 
.83 
.85 
.75 
1.00 
.90 
.87 
.75 
.70 
.80 
.75 
.95 
1.00 
.85 
.95 
1.00 
.75 
1.19 
1.00 
.65 
.75 
1.00 
.85 
.93 
1.00 
.85 
1.00 
.85 
1.00 
.75 
.95 
.90 
.90 
.78 
.90 
.85 
.84 
.75 
.75 
.65 
.60 
.75 
.65 
.80 
.80 
.75 
.83 
.70 
.71 
.70 
.70 
.88 



Total Value 



1930 | 1931 



1,613 

~~80 
7,097 
6,714 

34,242 
18,731 
68,477 
874 
16,280 
6,264 
5,376 
860 
11,416 
1,646 
1,134 
1,441 
5,515 
576 
418 
5,760 
10,700 
748 
360 
624 
69,992 
3.425 
7,315 
7,296 
6,550 
3,499 
2,684 
6,683 
2 722 
10,810 
6,570 
1,152 
1,966 
16,878 
77,550 
13,880 
22,392 
4,425 
7,600 
5,577 
38,160 
10,475 
3,690 
23,468 
22,350 
152,017 
14,823 
9,450 
7.524 
27.350 
14,400 
26,622 
2,180 
12,690 
31,020 
17,856 
8,114 
172,029 
2,726 
673 
9,158 
5,522 
2,369 
11,750 
2,042 
9,360 
10,670 
5,198 
9,386 
3,696 
4,246 
11,227 
1,983 
7,260 
97,266 
13,754 
4,125 
6,345 
18,911 
7,353 
23,740 
2,975 
2,431 
1,394 
17,498 
55,380 
16,200 
170,106 
26,861 
26,122 
70,038 
16,500 
23,042 
10 656 
11,075 
1,200 
13,253 
20,270 
89,316 
37,341 
37,627 
383,301 



1,966 
106 
132 
7,012 
5.835 

24,076 
15,542 
64,669 
1,013 
9,223 
4,067 
3,514 
203 
732 
1,512 
531 
1.037 
13,790 
279 
23 
2,228 
12,040 
803 
428 
247 
52,276 
3,146 
8,334 
5,790 
6,750 
16,486 
2,160 
6,940 
4,375 



Value 
per Acre 



1930| 193F 



28.80 

20.00 
17.10 
16.10 

19.50 
17.20 
18.32 

27.30 
22.00 
24.00 
24.00 
20.00 
25.20 
24.20 
25.20 
21 50 
27.30 
24.00 
22.00 
24.00 
20.00 
22.00 
24.00 
24.00 
23.12 
25.00 
27.50 
24.00 
25.00 
21.60 
22.00 
22.50 
21.60 



5,009|23.00 
13,156122.50 



3,980 
2,082 
17,642 
95,850 



14.40 
18.90 
18.90 
22.06 



8,381|20.00 
18,683124.00 



5,805 

17.943 
8,376 

30,341 
7.076 
6,163 

23,655 

23,056 
149,479 
5,203 

12,300 
4,447 

20,931 
8,784 

24.553 
6,738 
8,356 

18,954 
9,647 

11,237 
131,150 
4,050 
210 
4.792 
2.385 
580 

14,690 
580 
7,827 
8,096 
2,445 

21,297 
6,710 
1,637 

10,808 
2,112 
6.783 

96,002 
3,553 
1,309 
5,022 

14.096 
832 

24.165 
1,948 
1,445 
745 



25.00 
20.00 
19.50 
20.00 
25.00 
18.45 
23.10 
25.00 
22.01 
27 00 
18.00 
22 80 
26.40 
28.80 

27 00 
20.00 
22.50 
26.40 
24.00 
25 20 
25.15 
23.10 
19.80 
22.50 
22.00 

29 25 
25.00 
17.60 
22.50 
22.00 
27.50 
29.15 
22.00 
22 00 
19!80 
32.50 
30.00 
23.61 
26.00 
27.50 
22.50 

30 80 
36.40 
20.00 
25.00 

28 60 
20.80 



10,725124.75 



25,317 
26,666 
115,823 

23,378 
9,572 
39.679 
11,605 



32.50 
24.00 
26.91 

21.42 
28 80 
27.00 
20.00 



13.148|24.75 



4,261 
15,368 
696 
8.143 
4,866 
70,777 
17,102 
16,065 
234,660 



24.00 
20.70 
24.00 
26.40 
24 75 
21.60 
29.15 
21.60 
23.92 



1,190,738 928,909123.58 9.20 



24 



NORTH CAROLINA HAY CROPS 



SOYBEANS 



COWPEAS 



Districts and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW) 
District 4 — Buncombe. 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.)__ 
District 2 — A)amance__ 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Yance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.)_ 

District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson . 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.)_ 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 
District 6 — Beaufort.. 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE)_ 



Acreage 



Yield lbs. 



1029 | 1930 | 1931 | 1929 | 1930 | 1931 



53 
13 
53 
1.025 
925 
3 

1,162 
1,526 
4,760 

1,085 
970 
311 
73 

619 
1,171 
488 
1,132 
558 
264 
100 
203 
341 
157 
119 
74 
7,665 
4.326 
528 
1,285 
2,870 
189 
324 
5,317 
2,485 
205 
1,210 
313 
251 
316 
19,619 
818 
1,484 
2,335 
2,934 
1,2 69 
453 
244 
4,754 
2,749 
1.322 
18,362 

1,616 
183 
705 
701 

1,385 
301 
637 
369 
131 
176 

6,931 
888 

1,006 
24 

1,103 

617 
291 
327 
1,000 
403 
443 
664 
2,066 
786 
825 
1,605 
12,048 
4,301 
747 
2,603 
340 
394 
2,249 
1,746 
1.312 
1,156 
2,292 
2,073 
332 
19,545 
763 
467 
1.280 
2,010 
2,600 
489 
274 
497 
1.118 
707 
1,102 
1,432 
599 
13,248 



30 
11 
76 
1,224 
1,332 
6 

1,554 
1,362 
5.595 

1,842 
1,570 
391 
161 

821 
1,317 
517 
1.343 
711 
313 
123 
183 
427 
128 
54 
87 
9,988 
5,125 
741 
1,791 
3,214 
684 
818 
6,831 
3,023 
311 
1,535 
506 
788 
395 
25,762 
953 
2,032 
4,039 
3,491 
2,157 
1,275 
3S1 
5,568 
3,572 
2,584 
26,052 
928 
2,192 
233 
1,129 
843 
1,488 
378 
1,065 
1,438 
138 
48 
9,880 
950 
1,025 
233 
1,361 

650 
259 
321 
376 
475 
1,073 
957 
2,514 
1,014 
901 
1,312 
13,421 
5,513 
696 
3,684 
1,124 
108 
2,549 
2,482 
2,846 
1,214 
4,420 
4,844 
958 
30,49*8 
658 
287 
1,489 
2,726 
1,620 
756 
418 
890 
1,381 
840 
3,739 
1,804 
2,486 
19,094 



30 
1,006 
1,899 
10 
1,701 
1,698 
6,402 
847 
812 
349 
41 
2 

587 
890 
437 
1,599 
512 
313 
109 
194 
812 
51 
23 
98 
7,676 
5,018 
967 
1.174 
3,610 
585 
1.206 
5.849 
2,736 
262 
989 
784 
985 
514 
24,679 
1,197 
2,291 
2,658 
2,735 
1,598 
984 
504 
6,452 
2.342 
2,630 
23,391 
2.080 
2,261 
126 
981 
1,154 
1,438 
245 
1,273 
595 
171 
154 
10,478 
642 
1,769 
283 
1,700 

819 
107 
675 
220 
393 
1,047 
1,339 
2,446 
996 
962 
1,553 
14,951 
6,054 
1,035 
2,839 
2,397 
581 
2,576 
2,685 
5,007 
1,211 
4,316 
4,723 
828 
34,252 
950 
383 
1,719 
2,699 
2,055 
648 
476 
255 
1,439 
1,099 
2,764 
1,770 
2,064 
18,321 



2,400 
2,400 
2,200 
2,150 
2,100 
2,350 
2,267 
2,200 
2,187 
2,750 
2.350 
2,400 
2,700 

2~500 
2,400 
2,600 
2.400 
2,750 
2,400 
2,250 
2,350 
2,300 
2,500 
2,500 
2,300 
2,486 
2,300 
2,100 
2,350 
2,275 
2,250 
2,400 
2,250 
2,250 
2,200 
2,150 
2.250 
2,350 
2.300 
2,267 
2,200 
2,400 
2,400 
2.300 
2,250 
2,300 
2,550 
2,350 
2,275 
2,250 
2,323 
2,400 
2,250 
2,800 
2,700 
2,500 ■ 
2,600 
2,200 
2,400 
2,250 
2,150 
2,500 
2,452 
2,300 
2.550 
2,350 
2,600 

2,450 
2,300 
2,400 
2,350 
2,150 
2,500 
2,300 
2,500 
2,400 
2,350 
2,300 
2,413 
2,267 
2,300 
2,250 
2,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,300 
2,000 
2,400 
2,150 
1,950 
2,600 
2,150 
2,200 
2,300 
2,400 
2,100 
2,000 
2,300 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,250 
2,667 
2,000 
2,300 
2,232 



1,900 
2,000 
1,800 
2,200 
1,600 
2,000 
1,933 
1,650 
1,852 
1,800 
2,200 
2,000 
2,000 

2~000 
1,850 
2,100 
2,000 
2,200 
1,750 
1,600 
2,100 
2,300 
2,000 
2,000 
1,800 
2,001 
2,000 
1,800 
2,000 
2,500 
1,850 
1,700 
2,200 
2,000 
1,800 
1,800 
1,700 
1,400 
1,400 
2,061 
1,900 
2,100 
1,850 
2,200 
2,050 
2,200 
2,200 
2,000 
2,000 
2,050 
2,015 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,100 
■ 1,850 
1,900 
2,000 
2,100 
2.000 
1,900 
1,900 
1,993 
1,700 
2,000 
1,850 
1,900 

1,900 
1,760 
1,600 
1,800 
1.S00 
2,100 
1,750 
2,100 
1,900 
2,000 
2.000 
1,931 
2,100 
1,800 
1.800 
1,800 
2,700 
2,000 
2,000 
1,850 
2,000 
1,850 
1,900 
2,000 
1,929 
1,900 
2,100 
2,100 
2,000 
2,000 
2,100 
1,800 
2,600 
2,200 
2,300 
1,700 
2,300 
2,100 
2,041 



Price Per Ton 



Acreage 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 | 1929 | 1930 | 1931 



00 
25.00 

25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
24.7 

24. 7 

24.7 
24.7 

24.75 
24.75 
24.75 
24.75 
24.75 

4.75 
24.75 
24.75 
24.75 
24.75 
24.75 

4.75 



2,300 
2,400 
2,350 
2,100 
2,000 
2,400 
1,900 
1,925 
1,975 
2,250 
2,000 
2,200 
2,250 
2,200 
2,100 
2,100 
2,200 
2,000 
2,300 
2,100 
2,200 
2,000 
1,950 
2,200 
2,200 
2,250 
2,095 24.75 
2,000,20.40 
1,90020.40 
1.950j20.40 
2,00020.40 
2.00020.40 
1,87020.40 
2,10020.40 
2,10020.40 
2,00020.40 
2,25020.40 
2,000,20.40 
1,80020.40 
1,700|20.40 
2,018 20.40 
2,00020.40 
2,07520.40 
1,90020.40 
2,00020.40 
1,870 20.40 
1,850 20.40 
2,000 20.40 
1,95020.40 
2,200 20.40 
2,075 20.40 
1,995 20.40 
1,950:20.00 
2,200 20.00 
1.90020.00 
2,000 20.00 
2,20020.00 
2,10020.00 
1,95020.00 
2,00020.00 
1,90020.00 
2,20020.00 
2, 100120.00 
2,06620.00 
2,250|l8.60 
2,200 18.60 
2,000 18.60 
2,100 18.60 

2,05018.60 
2,200 18.60 
2,100 18.60 
2,300 18.60 
2,100 18.60 
2,100 18.60 
2,333 18.60 
2,40018.60 
2,100 18.60 
2,200118.60 
2,10018.60 
2,19318.60 
2,250 18. GO 
2,100!l8.60 
2,000 18.60 
2,00023.05 
2,500,23.05 
1,85023.05 
1.950 23.05 
23.05 
23.05 
23.05 
23.05 
23.05 
21.25 



STATE 102,178 140,290 140,150 2,295 1,994 



2,000 
2.200 
2,100 
2,000 
2,000 
2,060 

2,00020.00 
2,000 20.00 
2,100 20.00 
2,150,20.00 
1,90020.00 
1,95020.00 
2,05020.00 
2,300 20.00 
1,850 20.00 
2,20020.00 
2,150120.00 
2,00020.00 
2,100j20.00 
2,720 20.00 
~27140! 20.85" 



18.50 


16.00 18 


166 


18.00 


16.0C 


41 


19 


18.00 


16. OC 


12 


21 


20.00 


16. OC 


471 


286 


20.62 


16. OC 


203 


71 


18.50 


16. OC 


85 


3 


21.00 


16. OC 


538 


290 


21.00 


16.0C 


368 


448 


20.58 


16. OC 


1,736 


1,304 


21.00 


16.00 


203 


377 


21.00 


16.00 


535 


282 


19.00 


16.00 


100 


76 


20.00 


16.00 


30 


32 





16.00 


12 


2 


20.00 


16.00 


147 


225 


20.00 


16.00 


323 


140 


19.00 


16.00 


51 


59 


21.00 


16.00 


25 


23 


19.50 


16.00 


101 


50 


20.50 


16.00 


41 


68 


19.00 


16.00 


18 


48 


21.00 


16.00 


266 


89 


22.50 


16.00 


607 


142 


20.00 


16.00 


16 


22 


20.00 


16.00 




1 


19.00 


16.00 


42 


45 


20.58 


16.00 


2,517 


1,681 


22.50 


16.50 


244 


271 


20.00 


16.00 


392 


636 


22.00 


16.50 


556 


626 


23.00 


16.00 


225 


211 


22.50 


16.50 


131 


149 


22.00 


16.50 


179 


338 


23.00 


16.00 


598 


223 


22.00 


16.50 


183 


172 


21.50 


16.00 


317 


537 


22.00 


16.00 


692 


624 


21.00 


16.00 


87 


48 


22.50 


16.50 


85 


164 


23.00 


16.50 


398 


365 


22.50 


16.25 


4,087 


4,364 


21.00 


16.50 


396 


459 


21.50 


16.50 


872 


1,004 


21.75 


16.50 


166 


73 


21.20 


16.50 


695 


245 


21.00 


16.50 


66 


167 


22.00 


16.50 


435 


689 


22.00 


16.00 


599 


523 


22.50 


16.50 


188 


180 


21.50 


16.50 


729 


522 


22.50 


16.501 531 


554 


21.79 


16.50 


4,677 


4,416 


23.20 


16.00 


593 


212 


21.70 


16.50 


254 


206 


23.00 


16.50 


400 


445 


23.00 


16.50 


547 


348 


22.00 


16.50 


398 


363 


23.00 


16.50 


365 


572 


24.25 


16.00 


117 


174 


24.00 


16.00 


351 


412 


23.00 


16.50 


366 


898 


22.00 


16.50 


82 


75 


22.60 


16.50 


150 


74 


22.70 


16.50 


3,623 


3,779 

8 


19.50 


15.50 


1 


18.00 


15.00 




_ 


20.00 


15.50 


16 


5 


19.00 


15.00 


50 


25 




21.50 


15.50 


122 




182 


20.00 


15.50 


20 


55 


22.00 


15.50 


67 


37 


20.50 


15.50 


100 


19 


19.00 


15.50 


54 


31 


22.00 


15.50 


128 


300 


21.50 


15.50 


28 


49 


18.50 


15.00| 


13 


39 


19.50 


15.00 




13 


19.00 


15.00 


~8 


16 


19.50 


15.00 




46 


19.55 


15.30 


607 


825 


19.00 


15.00 


146 


108 


19.50 


15.00 


65 


69 


20.00 


15.00 


348 


398 


21.00 


15.50| 


887 


383 


20.00 


15.00 


11 


10 


20.00 


15.50 


496 


605 


21.00 


15.50 


199 


169 


22.00 


15.50 


1,870 


1,623 


19.00 


15.00 


47 


31 


19.50 


15.50 


940 


851 


21.50 


15.50 


1,020 


1,224 


22.00 


15.50 


236 


438 


20.28 


15.40 


6,265 


5,909 


23.00 


15.50 


278 


370 


23.00 


15.50 


140 


253 


22.50 


15.50 


1,118 


813 


22.25 


15.50 


1,088 


498 


21.50 


15.50 


1,200 


398 


22.00 


16.00 


383 


203 


23.00 


16.00 


977 


1,465 


23.00 


15.50 


57 


109 


23.00 


15.50 


113 


84 


22.50 


15.50 


367 


278 


23.00 


15.50 


3,450 


5,619 


22.00 


15.50 


300 


438 


22.50 


16.00 


1,338 


1,428 


22.47 


15.60 


10,809 11,956 


21.47 


16.94 


34,321 


34,234 



360 
376 

692 
1,074 
2,509 
88 
913 
119 
J* 



140 
111 

34 
56 
68 
46 
143 
593 
20 
27 
5 

2,450 

619 
1,437 
587 
882 
649 
677 
1,358 
420 
807 
1,395 
217 
385 
1,034 
10,467 
640 
2,778 
412 
1,012 
689 
1,427 
78E 
823 
1,842 
1,640 
12,048 
1,953 
630 
627 
1.186 
985 
1,904 
391 
867 
2,169 
252 
374 
11,338 
23 
20 
17 



Yield (lbs.) 



Price Per Ton 



1929 1930 1931 1929 1930 1931 



1,900 

2,000 
1,900 
1,833 
1,950 
2,050 
1,900 
1,850 
1,883 
1,850 
1,850 
2,000 
1.800 
1.886 
1,800 
1,900 
1,850 
1,800 
1.900 
000 
000 
1,850 

l.noo 

1,900 

1,900 
1,877 

1,900 
1,900 
1,800 
,000 
1,800 
2,000 
2,050 
1,800 
1,950 
2,000 
1,900 
1.950 
1,900 
1,924 
1,600 
1,850 
1,800 
1,800 
1.900 
1,900 
1,800 
1,750 
1.850 
1,750 
1,806 
1,800 
1,850 
1,900 
1,800 
1,800 
1,825 
00 
1.750 
1,900 
1,950 
1,750 
1,819 
1,650 



1.800 
1192,100 

402 ,850 
301,750 
5101,700 
461,700 
73 1,600 
835 1,900 
157 1,750 
2,000 



99 
24 
20 
1 

2,376 

107 
48 
491 
827 



1,800 



1,337 

301 
2,040 
48 
1,014 
2,099 

822 
9,142 

599 

13 



948 



11,304 1 
1,2131 
3,322 1 
24,3241 



: 1,823 

1,800 
1,650 
1.600 
1,600 
i 1,800 
1,800 
1,600 
1,550 
1.650 
1,550 
1,650 
1,950 
! 1,586 
,800 
1,800 
1,6522,000 



1,750 
1,800 



552 1,900 
2,429 1,800 
151 1,800 
163 1,700 
1651,650 
,800 
900 
,850 
817 



1,500 

1,500 
1,500 
1,600 
1,500 
1,500 
1,600 
1,600 
1,580 
1,500 
1,400 
1,750 
1,800 
1.500 
1,550 
1,400 
1,600 
1,500 
1,700 
1,400 
1,500 
1,500 
1,400 
1.600 
1,500 
1,500 
1,497 
1,600 
1,575 
1,500 
1,700 
1.500 
1,500 
1,700 
1,500 
1,500 
1,550 
1,600 
1,400 
1,400 
1,534 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,600 
1,400 
1,375 
1,500 
1,667 
1,500 
1,400 
1,474 
1,500 
1,700 
1.500 
1,600 
1,400 
1,750 
1,600 
1.400 
1,700 
1,800 
1,700 
1,608 
1,650 

l"700 
1,700 

1,600 
1,600 
1,500 
1,650 
1,700 
1,500 
1,600 
1,700 
1,700 
1,700 
1,700 
1,585 
1,800 
1,700 
1,700 
1,600 
1,700 
1,500 
1,600 
1,700 
1,800 
1,650 
1,625 
1,600 
1,643 
1,275 
1,400 
1,600 
1,350 
1,625 
1,333 
1,500 
1,600 
1,500 
1.600 
1,400 
1,400 
1,800 
1,478 



2,000 



2,000 
2,000 

1~800 
1,900 
1,902 

2,200 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2.000 
2,000 
2,100 
2,200 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,100 
2,000 
1,900 
1,900 
2,000 
2,150 
2,000 
2,050 
1,900 
2,000 
2,000 
1,900 
1,800 
1,900 
2,000 
2,050 
2.100 
2.000 
1,800 
1,900 
1,957 
2,000 
2,050 
1,855 
2,000 
1,875 
1,900 
2,050 
1,800 
2,100 
1,950 
1,986 
1,700 
1.750 
1,800 
1,850 
1,900 
1,900 
1,800 
2,000 
1,850 
2,025 
2,000 
1,847 
1,900 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

2,100 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,950 
1,800 
2,050 
2,000 
2,000 
1,800 
1,850 
1,946 
1,800 
1,800 
1,700 
1,800 
1,800 
1,950 
1,850 
1,750 
1,700 
1,850 
2,000 
2,050 
1,880 
1,800 
1,600 
1,775 
1.750 
1,800 
2.000 
1,800 
1,900 
1,940 
1,900 
1,950 
1,750 
1,800 
1,868 



22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 
21.25 

2T25 
21.25 

22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
22.70 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
29.50 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
22.60 

2~2T60 
22.60 

22.60 
22.60 
22.60 
22.60 
22.60 
22.60 
22.60 
22.60 

22~60 

22.60 

21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
21.90 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 
20.45 



19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
20.00 
21.00 
19.00 
20.50 
22.00 
20.72 
21.50 
20.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
20.00 
19.00 
20.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
21.00 
21.50 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
20.09 
20.50 
20.50 
21.00 
23.00 
21.50 
21.50 
22.00 
21.00 
21.00 
21.00 
21.50 
22.00 
21.50 
21.19 
21.00 
21.00 
20.00 
20.50 
21.50 
20.00 
20.00 
21.00 
21.00 
21.50 
20.75 
20.50 
21.00 
22.50 
21.00 
21.50 
21.50 
22.00 
21.50 
21.00 
20.00 
21.00 
21.30 
22.50 

2~2T50 
22.50 

22.50 
22.50 
22.00 
22.50 
22.50 
22.00 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.32 
23.00 
23.00 
22.00 
22.00 
23.50 
22.00 
21.50 
22.00 
22.00 
23.00 
22.00 
23.00 
22.23 
20.00 
20.60 
20.90 
21.00 
22.00 
21.50 
21.00 
22.00 
22.50 
22.00 
20.50 
21.00 
20.00 
20.72 



16.00 
16.00 

16.00 
16.00 
16.00 

16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.09 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
15.00 
15.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.00 
15.00 
14.50 
14.00 
15.00 
14.00 
15.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.50 
14.00 
14.50 
14.30 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 

14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.00 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.47 
14.50 
14.00 
14.50 
14.00 
14.50 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.50 
14.50 
14.00 
14.00 
14.20 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.00 
14.00 
14.50 
14.50 
14.00 
14.50 
14.50 
14.00 
14.50 
14.34 



74,6541,858 1,536 1,906 22.45 21.14 14.91 



NORTH CAROLINA HAY CROPS 



25 



Districts and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain INWI 
District 4 — Buncombe__ 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.)__ 

District 2 — Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) 

District 6 — Alexander.. 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 

Distlrct 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones _. 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen__. 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Hamett 

Hoke ! 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 



ALL CLOVERS 



SMALL GRAINS CUT GREEN 



Acreage 



Yield (lbs.) 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 [ 1929 | 1930 | 193 



1,555 
126 
619 
202 
1,031 
33 
1,091 
2,115 
6,772 
814 
621 
25 
55 
35 
748 
793 
537 
108 
214 
1,104 
265 
119 
117 
256 
202 
774 
6,787 
1,399 
581 
689 
5,553 
168 
425 
2,979 
1,060 
1,612 
1,530 
1.510 
397 
1,274 
19,177 
1,001 
4,119 
1.052 
4,256 
2,003 
4,563 
22 
3,691 
6.935 
168 
27,810 
987 
1,838 
61 
1.058 
1,659 
521 
448 
126 
35 
5,200 
4,737 
16,670 
5 

28 



585 
6 

503 
16 
15 

428 
74 
29 



1,699 

125 
9 
5 



111 
17 
8 
1 
33 
25 
26 
366 
6 
74 
31 
51 
26 
9 
24 

5 
12 
34 

2 



319 
699 
87 
390 
1,402 
24 
1,401 
2,724 
7,046 
1,128 
1,059 
69 
84 
23 
743 
584 
383 
199 
246 
1,443 
504 
21 
58 
63 
185 
741 
7,533 
1.982 
1,167 
960 
6,264 
544 
838 
3,950 
1,770 
3.116 
1,751 
2,287 
762 
1.265 
26,656 
1,192 
3,617 
1,767 
3,997 
2,805 
6,801 
125 
4,381 
9.291 
353 
34,329 
3.161 
2,707 
191 
1,041 
1,698 
1,114 
690 
297 
109 
6,138 
6.333 
23,479 
6 
1 
13 



991 
9 

562 
44 
23 

679 
79 
13 

~5 
29 
2,454 

90 
34 
30 
4 

66 
5 

20 
6 

107 
29 
61 

452 

25 
1 
15 
16 

28 

7 

100 



65 
148 

61 
481 



395 
409 
265 
182 
1,126 
112 
1,104 
1,499 
5,092 
1,789 
487 
108 
88 
63 
1,229 
390 
683 
125 
360 
1,443 
810 
51 
90 
100 
184 
992 
8,992 
1,537 
870 
810 
4,042 
534 
736 
2,437 
1,122 
1,782 
665 
731 
1,030 
814 
17,110 
836 
2,424 
1,016 
2,851 
2,346 
6,109 
45 
2,691 
6,931 
456 
25,705 
3,304 
2,993 
160 
707 
731 
1.264 
540 
147 
130 
7,721 
5,487 
23,184 
1 
11 



725 

741 
10 
35 

589 
54 
3 
20 

200 
2,389 

116 
7 
9 
17 

159 
22 
65 

87 
54 
39 
575 
56 

2 
61 
89 
62 

4 

138 

17 
21 

58 
69 



2.167 
2,400 
1,950 
2,000 
2,400 
2,250 
2,250 
2,333 
2,248 
2,467 
1,950 
2,100 
2.200 
2,148 
2,500 
2.000 
2.100 
1,900 
2.125 
2,250 
2,150 
2,100 
2,150 
2,000 
2,150 
2,233 
2,189 
2,000 
1.250 
1.950 
2,450 
1,950 
1.900 
2.300 
2,000 
2,000 
2,100 
2,200 
2,000 
1,900 
2,160 
2,236 
2,150 
2,200 
2,400 
2,300 
2,230 
2,100 
2,100 
2,625 
2,000 
2,338 
2.250 
2,450 
2,300 
2,100 
2,268 
2,500 
2.100 
2.000 
2,050 
2,420 
2,300 
2,330 
2,000 

1,900 



2,000 
1,875 
1,800 
1.950 
2.050 
2,100 
2,000 
2,100 
2,000 
1,900 

1,963 

1,875 
2.000 
2,000 

2,100 
2,300 
1,850 
1,900 
1,950 
2,100 
2,050 
2,200 
2,065 
1.900 
1.850 
2,100 
2,050 
2,000 
2.050 
2,100 

l.ioo 

2,000 
2,000 
1,950 



577 1,983 



STATE 1 79,655 102,430 83,624 2,262 



1.875 
2,500 
1,750 
1,500 
1,700 
1,800 
1,600 
1,625 
1,717 
1,600 
1,500 
2,000 
1,900 
1,900 
1,700 
1,500 
1,700 
1.700 
1,900 
1,600 
1,800 
1,650 
1.700 
1.800 
1,600 
1,700 
1,636 
1,900 
1,900 
2,000 
1,800 
2,000 
2,000 
1,800 
1,950 
2,000 
1,600 
1,600 
1,900 
1,833 
1,841 
1,550 
1,500 
1,900 
2,000 
1,700 
1.600 
1,800 
1,950 
1,817 
2.000 
1,766 
2,100 
2,000 
1,900 
1,950 
1,700 
1,900 
1,900 
1,800 
2,000 
2,060 
2,000 
1,992 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



1,900 
2,000 
1,900 
2,000 
2,000 
2,100 
2.000 
2,000 

2,000 
2,000 
1,967 

2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

2~l65 
2,000 
2.000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,014 
2.000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,900 
2,000 
1,900 
1,900 

2~000 
2,000 
1.900 
2,000 
2,000 
2,140 
1,828 



2,000 
2,100 
1.900 
1,900 
1,800 
2,000 
1,800 
1,900 
1,882 
1,900 
1,800 
2,000 
2,100 
2,000 
1,800 
1,800 
1,900 
1,700 
2,100 
1,700 
1,900 
1,700 
1,800 
2,000 
1,800 
1,800 
1,839 
2,000 
1,900 
2,000 
2,200 
1,800 
1,800 
2,100 
1,900 
1,900 
2,000 
1,900 
1,700 
1,600 
1,983 
1,900 
2,000 
2,000 
2,100 
2,100 
1,900 
2,000 
2,000 
2,200 
2,000 
2,047 
2,100 
2,100 
1,900 
2,000 
2,000 
2,100 
1,800 
1,900 
1.900 
2.200 
2,200 
2,140 
2,000 
2,000 



Price 
T92<T 
$ 

17.90 
17.90 
17.90 
17.90 
17.90 
17.90 
22.60 
17.90 
18.65 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
17.65 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.40 
19.20 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
20.75 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
20.10 
22.50 



Per Ton 
l"930~r"193T 



22.50 



2,200 

1,800 
2,000 
2,200 
2,100 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

2,000 
2,026 

2.200 
2,000 
2,000 
2,200 

2,100 
2,000 
2,200 

2~,200 
2.200 
2,300 
2,159 
2,000 
2,000 
2,200 
2,100 
2,200 
2,100 
2,000 

2~000 
2,100 
2,000 
2,200 

2^086 
2,027" 



22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 

22.50 

22.80 
22.80 
22.80 

22^80 
22.80 
22.80 
22.80 
22.80 
22.80 
22.80 
22.80 
22.80 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 

2~3~65 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 

23.00 
19781 - 



19.00 
20.00 
18.00 
21.00 
20.00 
19.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
21.00 
19.00 
19.00 
18.00 
18.00 
20.00 
19.00 
20.00 
19.33 
19.00 
18.00 
21.00 
21.50 
18.00 
18.67 
19.00 
19.41 
20.50 
21.00 
23.00 
23.00 
22.00 
21.00 
23.50 
21.00 
20.00 
20.00 
21.50 
22.00 
23.00 
21.95 
21.00 
22.33 
21.00 
23.00 
23.00 
21.50 
23.00 
22.00 
22.80 
24.00 
22.45 
23.17 
22.00 
22.00 
24.00 
23 00 
24.00 
22.00 
23.50 
24.00 
22.50 
23.00 
22.85 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 



23.50 
24.00 
23.50 
24.00 
24.00 
23.00 
25.00 
24.00 

2T00 
24.00 
23.66 

24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 

23T00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
23.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
23.50 
24.50 

24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.00 
24.50 
24^16 
22.08" 



15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.50 
15.50 
15.00 
15.50 
15.50 
15.28 
15.00 
15.50 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
16.00 
16.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
16.21 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
16.50 
16.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
16.50 
16.50 
15.81 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
16.00 
15.00 
15.50 
16.50 
15.60 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
15.50 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
17.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.05 
17.00 
17.00 



17.00 

17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.50 
17.50 

17750 
17.14 

17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 

17.00 
17.00 
17.00 

17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 

1Y00 

17.00 
17.00 
17.00 

17~00 
16:13 



Acreage 



| Yield (lbs.) | Price Per Ton 
1929 I 1930 I 1931 | 1929 | 1930 | 1931 ] 1929 | 1930"|~l"931 



24 
85 
278 
125 
3 

118 
155 
788 

432 
328 
57 
21 
14 
262 
161 
127 

92 
153 
54 
53 
195 
51 
10 
20 
2,102 
567 
399 
426 
408 
384 
400 
809 
133 
114 
455 
116 
344 
217 
4,772 
86 
1,128 
139 
376 
198 
782 
7 

376 
1,774 

693 
5,559 

587 

964 
1,100 
1,733 

900 
1,979 

249 

412 
26 

434 
2.236 
11,144 

484 
59 



394 
138 
211 
112 
102 
662 
113 
25 
390 
161 

2,865 

1,717 
211 
12 
3 
10 
688 
82 
166 
27 
628 
1,050 
418 
5,012 
89 
26 
32 
590 
255 
587 
48 
18 

232 
209 
280 
38 
2,404 



7 
71 
182 
218 
238 
10 
190 
184 
1,100 
414 
148 
80 
20 

396 
123 
143 
41 
136 
162 
80 
42 
177 
31 
31 
24 
2,048 
415 
467 
294 
467 
317 
325 
673 
331 
288 
252 
73 
302 
143 
4,347 
81 
823 
175 
367 
215 
568 
145 
402 
1,816 
609 
5,201 
244 
493 
382 
911 
394 
693 
209 
352 
165 
168 
708 
4,719 
545 
30 
48 
36 
3 

630 
90 

347 

133 
21 

245 
90 
29 
51 
2 
42 
2,342 
1,455 

125 
35 



105 
122 
732 
46 
836 
1,828 
885 
6,171 
98 
6 

225 
793 
106 
198 
248 
7 
55 
68 
261 
359 
96 
2,520 



37 
27 
17 
129 
309 
7 

135 
198 
859 
985 
216 
33 



103 
49 
172 
43 
106 
162 
131 
59 
114 
53 
9 
61 

2,296 
562 
531 
304 
599 

1,163 
446 
621 
196 
526 
703 
137 
468 
314 

6,570 
180 
970 
111 
409 
307 
815 
82 
348 

2,153 
454 

5,829 
126 
446 
436 
750 
296 

1,495 
344 
175 
43 
269 

1.119 

5,499 
352 
91 
113 
1 

246 
146 
165 
65 
28 
853 
20 
(t 

208 
21 
330 
2,645 
1.467 
9 
IS 
12 
18 
1,081 
42 
738 
41 
976 
1,000 
621 
6,023 
89 
21 
421 
655 
138 
62 
251 
51 
283 
30 
537 
270 
176 
2,984 



34,646 28,448 32,705 



- 


~~~ 


1 


900 


1 


900 




000 


1 


850 


1 


800 


1 


950 


1 


567 


1 


800 


X 


400 




000 


2 


000 




000 


} 


250 




000 


X 


650 


1 


934 


1 


553 




167 


X 


300 


* 


000 


1 


500 


1 


800 


1 


800 


1 


790 


1 


800 


1 


750 


" 


~~~ 


1 


875 


1 


4 <>0 


1 


850 


} 


00 


1 


850 


1 




1 


800 




000 


1 


900 




000 


J 


000 


X 


875 


1 


900 


1 


900 


1 


850 


I 


800 


1 


800 


1 


950 


1 


800 


1 


800 


1 


900 


X 


300 


2 


000 




000 


1 


948 


1 


605 


X 


900 






1 


900 


1 


300 


1 


900 


1 






100 


1 


900 




000 


1 


700 


X 


800 


~ 


800 


^ 


OoO 


1 


750 


l 


880 




800 


1 


850 


1 




X 


950 


1 


100 


~ 




j 


000 


1 


900 


1 


800 


X 


980 




800 


1 


81 6 


1 




~! 


000 


1 


500 




250 


\ 






167 


1 


650 


jj 


120 


X 


380 




000 


1 


700 




200 


^ 


675 




200 


2 


000 




075 


X 


500 


~ 


300 


X 


600 




000 




000 


2 


a 9 ? 


J 




1 


900 








000 


1 


7 oO 




100 




050 




000 


1 


700 




100 


1 


750 


X 


950 


X 


680 


X 


900 


2 


000 


- 


000 


X 


900 


1 


875 




000 




100 


1 


600 




000 


X 


soo 


1 


997 


1 


795 


X 


900 


X 


600 




000 


X 


500 


J 


100 


X 


900 


X 


960 


X 


500 


■ 


~~ ~ 


X 


800 




300 


X 


950 




000 


1 


800 




150 


X 


900 




050 


X 


750 


2 


150 


2 


100 


1 


950 


1 


800 




000 


X 


600 




150 




800 




050 


1 


800 


2 


000 




000 


- 




2 


000 


2 


040 


1 


788 




150 


"? 


100 




000 


X 


500 


X 


960 


1 


900 




100 




000 




000 


- 






050 




000 


X 


930 




000 




000 




000 


* 


100 


X 


800 




200 


X 


800 


2 


250 


1 


800 




575 


1 


900 


2 


174 


1 


902 


X 


920 


1 


500 


X 


875 


X 


700 


X 


900 


1 


800 


2 


000 


X 


600 


X 


900 


X 


800 





000 


2 


100 


2 


050 


X 


450 


2 


400 


2 


000 






X 


600 


2 


000 


1 


800 


X 


950 


2 


500 


X 


950 


2 


000 


X 


900 


X 


700 


1 


976 


1 


787 


2 


028 


1 


754 



2,000 

2,100 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,200 
1,900 
2,000 
1,989 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,100 
2,000 
2,000 
1,900 
1,800 
2,000 
2,100 
1,900 
2,000 
2,000 
2.150 
2.000 
1,997 
1,850 
2,000 
2,000 
2,200 
1,900 
1,800 
2,100 
1,900 
1,850 
1,750 
1,700 
1,800 
1,850 
1,914 
2,150 
1,925 
2,050 
1,800 
2,000 
2,100 
2,000 
1.850 
2,300 
1,850 
2,083 
1,850 
2,000 
1,850 
1,800 
2,000 
1,900 
1,750 
1,900 
1,700 
1,975 
2,000 
1,908 
1,700 
2,100 
2,000 
2,000 

2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,750 
2,100 
1,950 
1,800 
2,300 
2.000 
2,100 
2,000 
1,942 
1,850 
1.800 
1,900 
1.900 
1,900 
1,990 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,900 
1,850 
1,800 
1,872 
1,900 
1,900 
2,100 
2,000 
1,850 
1,800 
1.850 
2,200 
1,700 
1,900 
2,000 
2,050 
1,600 
1,942 



1,948 



22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.60 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
18.25 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.20 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 

19T00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 

19.00 

19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
19.50 
20.15 
20.15 
20.15 
20.15 
20.15 
20.15 
20.15 
20.15 

2~0~15 
20.15 
20.15 
20.15 
20.15 
19.45 



19.00 
18.50 
17.50 
21.00 
22.00 
18.00 
21.50 
22.00 
20.61 
20.00 
22.00 
18.00 
18.00 

18.50 
20.00 
18.00 
21.00 
18.00 
19.00 
18.00 
20.50 
21.00 
17.50 
19.00 
18.50 
19.36 
22.00 
20.50 
23.00 
22.60 
22.00 
22.00 
21.25 
22.00 
21.00 
21.00 
22.00 
23.00 
22.00 
21.88 
22.00 
21.00 
21.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.50 
21.50 
22.50 
23.00 
22.05 
21.25 
22.00 
21.50 
22.00 
21.00 
23.00 
20.00 
21.00 
21.60 
21.00 
22.00 
21.76 
21.00 
22.00 
22.00 
21.00 
23.00 
23.00 
20.00 
23.00 
20.50 
21.50 
22.50 
21.50 
22.00 
21.00 
21.00 
22 00 
22.00 
22.50 
22.00 
22.50 
22.50 

2~2~50 
21.00 
22.00 
22.00 
22.00 
23.00 
24.00 
22.67 
22.50 
22.50 
22.00 
23.00 
23.00 
22.00 
22.00 
25.00 
21.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.50 
22.00 
22,83 
21.95 



13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
14.00 
13.56 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 



13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
14.00 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
13.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
13.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
13.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
13.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.45 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 

iHToo 

13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
12.50 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
13.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 

1 2 JL 00 
13.25 



26 



NORTH CAROLINA HAY CROPS 



Districts and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW). 
District 4 — Buncombe-. 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain <W.) — 

District 2 — Alamanee 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.)_ 

District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.)__ 

District 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE) 



OTHER GRASSES AND MIXED HAYS 



Acreage 



1029 | 1930 | 1931 



STATE. 



10,380 
14.867 
7,838 
1,664 
2,267 
8,933 
2,181 
1,242 
49,372 
5,276 
908 
3,109 
1,202 
1,059 
3,929 
1,942 
2,989 
319 
2,594 
8,404 
6,674 
211 
656 
986 
808 
6,853 
47,919 
2,047 
337 
742 
3,025 
216 
410 
3,742 
901 
362 
1,450 
1,827 
270 
506 
15,835 
209 
1,268 
715 
5,668 
2,337 
2,613 
59 
1,732 
4,179 
693 
19,473 
1,400 
3,784 
263 
1,427 
844 
2,586 
243 
330 
471 
1,180 
2,431 
14,959 
104 

191 
97 

176 
53 

414 
35 

137 

564 
53 
81 
41 
3 

1,949 

142 
160 
247 
29 
16 
906 
118 
48 
95 
265 
281 
208 
2,515 
131 
106 
141 
347 
261 
197 
21 
32 
73 
41 
256 
372 
26 
2,004 



8,553 
17,600 
7,581 
1,551 
1,945 
8,523 
1,920 
1,070 
48,743 
5,016 
760 
3,064 
1,172 
1,549 
3,219 
1,679 
2,925 
412 
2,236 
6,247 
7,228 
375 
586 
909 
1,206 
7,292 
45,875 
1.993 
562 
350 
2.367 
629 
562 
3,873 
848 
535 
1,535 
1,720 
431 
658 
16,063 
385 
1.073 
918 
6,103 
2,720 
3.532 
654 
1,438 
4,693 
979 
22,495 
1,220 
3,915 
773 
1,473 
846 
3.092 
514 
604 
862 
1,224 
3,459 
17,982 
92 
12 
63 
42 
9 

344 
132 
180 
123 
46 
634 
120 
435 
244 
3 

200 
2,679 

315 
288 
559 

75 

17 
764 
239 
435 
248 
616 
533 
274 
4,363 
850 
453 
579 
512 
778 
427 

74 
731 
372 
317 
785 
497 

13 
6,388 



8,906 
14,022 
5,607 
1,049 
1,651 
7,561 
1,727 
1,444 
41 ,967 
3.833 

829 
2,845 
1,076 
1,369 
3,285 

763 
2,585 

387 
1,417 
6,247 
6,148 

231 
1,160 

806 
1,021 
5,511 
39,513 
1,922 

506 
1,155 
2,321 

797 

674 
3,037 

712 

608 

729 
1,359 

523 

845 
15,188 

358 
1,269 

878 
6,429 
2,930 
3,482 

189 
2,242 
4,674 
1,016 
23,467 

400 
3,074 

988 
1,225 

715 
3,291 

318 

200 

222 
1,663 
8,889 
20,985 
53 
28 

124 
51 

511 
83 
277 
10 
70 
829 
166 
76 
15 
13 
149 
2,455 
222 
48 
383 
132 
48 
491 
364 
222 
56 
494 
637 
201 
3,298 
146 
1,656 
251 
332 
199 
211 
202 
89 
1,900 
441 
366 
431 
19 
6.243 



Yield (lbs.) 



7 



Price Per Ton 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 | 



2,000 
2,160 
2,000 
2,125 
2,100 
2.250 
2.040 
2,050 
2,015 
2,333 
1,900 
2,000 
1,900 
2,052 
2,100 
2,000 
2,200 
2,000 
1,950 
2,133 
2,350 
1.860 
1,900 
2.000 
2,100 
2,100 
2,112 
1,950 
1,850 
2,400 
2,000 
2,150 
1,900 
1,900 
1,850 
1,890 
1,920 
2,050 
1,930 
1,960 
1,987 
2,000 
2,000 
2,250 
2,000 
2,036 
2,100 
2,000 
1,920 
1,950 
2,100 
2,018 
2,130 
2.300 
2,100 
2,000 
2,100 
2,200 
2.000 
1,940 
1,880 
2,150 
2,300 
2,179 
1,920 

1~800 
2,450 

2~100 
2,100 
2,050 
2.000 
2,100 
2,200 
2,020 
2,300 
1.880 
1.900 

2,105 

2.160 
1,900 
2,060 
2,100 
2,200 
2.250 
2,000 
2,200 
2,000 
2,460 
1,980 
2.542 
2,205 
1,900 
1,900 
2,000 
1,850 
1,900 
1,890 
1,840 
2,400 
1,850 
1,870 
1,850 
2,000 
1,900 
1,920 



1,200 
1,275 
1,300 
1,500 
800 
1,400 
1,400 
1,600 
1,291 
2,000 
1,500 
1,750 
2,000 
1,000 
1,500 
1,750 
2,000 
1,633 
1,750 
1,467 
1,350 
1,556 
2,000 
1,850 
1,600 
1,400 
1,562 
1,650 
1,800 
1,900 
1,600 
1,800 
1,800 
1,500 
1,800 
1,750 
1,200 
1,000 
1,700 
1,750 
1,556 
1,700 
1,900 
1,800 
1,900 
1,800 
1,900 
1,800 
1,800 
1,986 
1.900 
1,892 
1.700 
2,000 
2,000 
1,800 
1,600 
1,900 
1,850 
1,900 
1.600 
2,000 
2,000 
1,903 
1,900 
1,700 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,700 
1,700 
1,800 
1,700 
1,800 
1,600 
1.800 
1,900 
1,800 
2,000 
1,900 
1,744 
2,100 
2,000 
1,900 
1,800 
2.400 
1,860 
1,953 
1.800 
2,000 
2,000 
1,750 
2,000 
1,857 
1,600 
1,600 
1.600 
1,500 
1,600 
1,900 
1,700 
2,000 
1,800 
1,700 
1.500 
1,500 
1,700 
1,689 



2,200 
2,100 
1,800 
1,700 
1,650 
1,800 
1,500 
1,550 
1,956 
1,750 
2,000 
2,300 
2,000 
2,000 
2,300 
2,100 
1,900 
1,800 
2,200 
2,100 
2,000 
1.800 
1,800 
1,900 
1,900 
2.000 
2,027 
1,600 
1,600 
1,800 
1.900 
2.200 
1,650 
2,000 
2,000 
2.100 
1.800 
2,000 
1,800 
2,000 
1,888 
1,700 
1,650 
1,500 
2,100 
1.800 
1,650 
2.000 
1,650 
2,000 
1,750 
1,864 
1,700 
1.800 
1,975 
1,500 
1,750 
1,600 
1,700 
2,000 
1,700 
2,000 
2,100 
1,898 
1,800 
2,000 
2.000 
2,000 

1,900 
2,000 
1,700 
1,850 
2,100 
2,000 
1,800 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,930 
2,000 
1.900 
1,700 
2.200 
2,100 
1,850 
1,700 
1,600 
1,800 
1,800 
1,600 
2,000 
1,780 
1,600 
1,800 
1,900 
1.750 
1.700 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 
1,750 
1,800 
1,625 
1.700 
1,778 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



154,026 164,588 153,116 | 2,078 1,612 1,931 



13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13.50 
13,50 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
15.40 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
16.55 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
15.50 
14.65 

14.65 
14.65 

f4~65 
14.65 
14.65 
14.65 
14.65 
14.65 
14.65 
14.65 
14.65 
14.65 

14.65 

14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
14.85 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
J 5.00 
16.10 



18.00 
19.00 
19.00 
20.00 
19.00 
20.00 
19.33 
19.00 
18.62 
20.00 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
18.00 
19.00 
21.00 
20.00 
19.33 
20.00 
19.00 
20.00 
21.00 
20.50 
19.00 
20.00 
20.00 
19.67 
20.00 
19.50 
21.00 
20.67 
20.00 
20.00 
21.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
19.00 
22.00 
20.00 
20.44 
19.00 
19.00 
19.00 
18.00 
19.50 
20.00 
20.00 
19.00 
20.00 
21.00 
19.31 
20.50 
19.00 
20.00 
20.00 
19.50 
20.50 
19.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.50 
19.82 
21.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
21.00 
20.00 
21.00 
21.00 
20.50 
21.00 
20.00 
21.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.76 
21.75 
22.50 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
21.00 
20.00 
21.00 
21.00 
21.00 
21.00 
22.00 
21.10 
20.00 
21.00 
20.00 
21.00 
20.00 
21.00 
20.00 
22.00 
21.00 
21.00 
21.00 
21.00 
21.00 
20JB 
19.66" 



16.00 
14.50 
13.00 
15.00 
18.00 
13.00 
13.50 
14.00 
14.63 
16.50 
10.00 
15.00 
17.00 
17.50 
15.00 
17.00 
16.50 
12.00 
17.50 
18.00 
14.00 
16.50 
15.00 
17.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.56 
17.50 
17.50 
15.00 
16.00 
12.00 
17.00 
13.00 
16.50 
18.00 
15.00 
13.00 
16.00 
16.00 
15.58 
15.50 
11.00 
12.50 
12.50 
14.00 
13.25 
12.00 
15.00 
13.00 
12.00 
13.08 
13.50 
11.50 
13.00 
12.50 
12.00 
12.00 
13.00 
15.00 
12.50 
13.00 
12.00 
12.73 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
13.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.47 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 

9.00 
10.00 
11.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 

9.50 
10.00 
10.30 
12.00 
10.00 
14.00 
10.00 
10.00 
13.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
13.50 
10.00 
13.00 

J 11 1 35 
12796 



HAY CROPS 

The Farm Census surveys for North Caro- 
lina, made through the tax listers, offer un- 
doubtedly the best agency for securing farm in- 
formation. On the other hand, the farmers 
reporting the information fall down badly when 
it comes to reporting hay crops. This particular- 
ly applies to those hay crops which are planted 
after June 1st, such as soy beans, cowpeas, 
millets, sorghum and voluntary hays like crab- 
grass, following truck crops, tobacco, small 
grains, ec. Thus, our hay data as shown on the 
preceding pages is not complete, but only shows 
the acreages which were reported to the list- 
takers. 

For instance, Pitt County only shows a very 
small acreage of "Other grasses and mixed hays" 
which includes many of those mentioned above, 
with the exception of the legumes. We know 
that it is quite customary for farmers to mow 
the hay crops following the early truck crops, 
oats and tobacco. We feel certain that most of 
this acreage is omitted. The usual excuse for 
not reporting it is "We never know whether we 
will mow these fields or not." It is true that 
during dry seasons, the yield is usually too light 
to justify. However, an average year provides 
very good yields of hay from such fields. 

North Carolina is exceedingly fortunate in the 
variety of hay crops from which the farmers 
have to choose. First are the different kinds of 
small grains, like oats, which may be cut either 
in a green or mature state; second are the dif- 
ferent types of clovers, like red, crimson, alsike, 
alfalfa, etc. Some of these provide for more 
than one cutting in the same year. Third are 
the annual legumes of the soy bean and cowpea 
type. Fourth is the peculiar type of hay secur- 
ed from peanuts. This is almost entirely a by- 
product from the threshing machines after the 
nuts are picked off of the plants. Fifth are the 
voluntary or meadow hays which are never 
planted. And last are the special grasses and 
mixed hays mentioned in the second paragraph 
above. 

It seems odd that our North Carolina farmers 
fight the very crop which is easiest to grow. 
Grasses grow abundantly in all parts of the 
State and yet millions of dollars are spent to 
kill the grass in order that the planted crop may 
develop advantageously. These same farms per- 
haps have no permanent pasture, with livestock 
grazing-harvesting their own food. With the 
God -given opportunities which are available, it 
seems reasonable that better advantage should 
be taken of the natural growing grasses in the 
form of hays and pastures. 

PEANUTS 

While peanuts are grown commercially pri- 
marily in fifteen counties of the Coastal Belt, 
they may be grown to advantage in any part of 
the State. As a matter of fact, ten counties, of 
which eight are located adjacent to Bertie Coun- 
ty, produce 90 percent of the crop. It is not 
uncommon to see 100 acre fields of peanuts in 
this northeastern area. 

As with other crops, peanuts sold at a remark- 
ably low price during the past season. Three 
cents was remarkably high, while one cent was 
not uncommon for the farmer's stocks of un- 
shelled and uncleaned pods. On the other hand, 
peanuts do not require excessive fertilizers and 
they provide a nutritious and palatable roughage 
in the form of the thrashed plant. This is often 
baled and stored for winter usage. It is the 
main hay dependence of the farms in this area. 

Peanuts have many usages. First is the sale 
of the nuts for commercial trade; second is the 
hay crop resulting therefrom; and, third is the 
"ground" crop which is left in digging and saved 
by "hogging." This is done by turning the hogs 
on the harvested fields where often times almost 
half of the nuts are left. The hogs may feed on 
these for several weeks to good advantage. The 
old style of hand picking peanuts has been sup- 
planted by efficient machinery for this purpose. 



NORTH CAROLINA PEANUTS 



27 



District and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Tadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW 
District 4 — Buncombe 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.)_ 
District 2 — Alamance- 
Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) 
District 5 — Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 
District 6 — Beaufort. 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.)_ 



Yield per Acre 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 | 1929 | 1 03 | 1031 



STATE. 



32 



5 

186 

1 
1 



22 
222 



29 
11 

6 
79 
44 

9 
34 
95 
307 
25 
96 

4 
26 

21 

32 
8 

15 
1 
7 
6 
7 

78 



15 
341 

46 
37 
30 

7 
10 
20 
50 

9 

3 
58 
30 

234 
534 

90 
315 
110 

55 
131 
170 

54 

62 
180 
136 
,303 

59 
110 

30 

79 
135 

Gl 

40 

52 

40 

35 

25 
666 
,600 
376 
,730 

66 
8 

,450 
,129 

274 
,507 
,330 
,723 

305 

530 

719 

712 

878 4 
,337 168 

,243 1 
,262 
350 
63 
137 
256 
293 
296 
70 
207 
412 
720 
309 
329 
646 
410 
172 
100 
26 
14 
966 
791 
500 
339 
1G9 
291 
763 



17 

1 

52 
33 

111 
88 

103 

405 
23 

156 
33 
31 

76 
25 
14 
25 
11 

~3 
23 
109 



42 
23 

66 
104 
237 

7 
91 

2 
28 



33 
130 
4 



17 
546 

52 
37 
21 
38 
12 
15 
56 
18 



10 



307 

99 
217 
33 
50 
69 
23 
32 
13 
5 
37 
23 
12 
829 
1,442 
98 
372 
38 
279 
80 
224 
43 
85 
261 
238 
1,718 
177 
161 
83 
201 
172 
119 
93 
58 
59 
71 
63 
1,257 
34,065 
130 
12,5 

37 
14 

22,811 
10,748 
37,839 
24.514 
21,578 
4,007 
36,065 
262 
4,301 
551 
6,112 
277 215,610 
421 1,390 



47 

11 
160 
87 
562 

108 
310 
20 
132 
44 
150 
44 
102 
261 
224 
,395 
179 
115 
50 
184 
117 
192 
18 
86 
250 
81 
57 
,329 
,318 
117 
389 
57 
4 

891 
582 
,894 
,573 
,531 
,789 
,227 
338 
,847 
518 
.202 



1,519 
384 
109 
8 

448 
1,412 
450 
60 
i.799 
664 
920 
1,197 
I.357 
!,407 
,891 
207 
1,044 
89 
23 
625 
142 
264 
645 
256 
412 
362 



1,299 
522 
323 
9 

304 
1.646 
614 
131 
10,052 
688 
1,876 
18,854 
5,178 
3,201 
2,438 
343 
2,451 
68 
36 
731 
6,415 
3,256 
1,744 
463 
422 
26,746 



650 209,073 266,171 



Lbs. 
920 
920 
920 
900 
920 
920 
920 
890 
905 
930 
975 
930 
930 

930 
930 
930 
930 
930 
930 
930 
950 
980 



Lbs. Lbs. 
600 800 



625 
6«0 
500 
610 
520 
540 
570 
650 
700 
800 
800 

700 
690 
740 
700 
770 

650 
680 
640 



800 
800 

800 
800 
800 

860 
860 
860 
860 

860 

860 

860 



860 
860 
860 



Price 



1929 



Lbs. 
26,680 
10.120 
5,520 
71,100 
40,480 
8,280 
31.280 
84,550 
278,010 
23,250 
93,600 
3,720 
24,180 



Lbs. 
10,200 



19,530 

29,760 
7,440 

13,950 
930 
6.510 
5,580 
6,650 

76,440 



930 
955 

900 
900 
900 
950 
965 
910 
910 
890 
910 
920 
900 

940 
923 
880 
1,000 
910 
920 
1,030 
1,040 
970 
870 
1,100 
890 
984 
1,000 
925 
920 
980 
1,000 
960 
880 
940 
1,000 
930 
980 
962 
1,017 
1,100 
970 
1,000 
1.010 
1,050 
1,015 
1,030 
1,023 
976 
1,010 
1,045 
985 
970 
960 
985 
1,016 
945 
960 
950 
920 
890 
985 
980 
930 
960 
915 
900 
1,000 
941 
1,022 
980 
1,010 
1,000 
1,015 
960 
1,010 
1,100 
1,025 
945 
970 
1,020 
1,025 
1^002_ 
I.Otl 



690 
698 

650 
600 
750 
620 
860 
700 
640 
700 
650 
600 
515 
690 
610 
653 
600 
700 
800 
700 
660 
640 
830 
750 
700 
850 
718 
840 
780 
710 
740 
720 
770 
810 
840 
860 
800 
825 
796 
970 
950 
1,000 
950 
899 
795 
800 
815 
865 
985 
990 
900 
990 
985 
945 
990 
899 
915 
1,000 
960 
900 
920 
930 
990 
950 
900 
915 
945 
900 
936 
994 
1,000 
1,010 
850 
940 
880 
870 
1,000 
1,015 
985 
890 
880 
900 
984 
907 



860 

900 
900 
900 
900 
830 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
860 
745 
807 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
880 
897 
1,010 
930 
1,005 
930 
930 
900 
840 
960 
985 
880 
990 
941 
1,195 
1,120 
1,180 
1,140 
1,165 
1.110 
1,145 
1,085 
1,210 
1,190 
1,095 
1,215 
1,150 
1,212 
1,165 
1,155 
1,165 
1,010 
945 
985 
990 
1,015 
980 
1,020 
995 
1,015 
1,030 
990 
1,015 
1,016 
1,192 
1,025 
1,085 
970 
1,065 
935 
995 
1,060 
1,080 
970 
1,040 
855 
1,015 
1,071 
1,140 



13,950 
325,490 

41,400 
33,300 
27,000 
6,650 
9,650 
18,200 
45,500 
8,010 
2,730 
53,360 
27,000 



189 

1, 



22 
224 



219,960 
492,760 

79,200 
315,000 
100,100 
50,600 
134,930 
176,800 
52,380 
53,940 
198,000 
121,040 
,281,990 
59,000 
101,750 
27,600 
77,420 
135,000 
58,560 
35,200 
48,880 
40,000 
32,550 
24,500 
640,460 
,154,200 
413,600 
,348,100 
66,000 
8,080 
272,500 
295,935 
092,220 
,024,661 
866,080 
,740,230 
,578,725 
522,050 
517,430 
683,520 
789,830 
373,161 
,174,635 
,211,520 
332,500 
57,960 
121,930 
252,160 
,267,140 
275,280 
67,200 
,849,405 
370,800 
720,000 
,700,530 
,380,238 
,573,080 
,434,100 
172.000 
,131,500 
24,960 
14,140 
062,600 
,935,775 
,307,500 
298,830 
172.380 
298,275 
805,378 



625 
34,320 
16,500 
67,710 
45,760 
55,620 

230,735 
14.950 

109,200 
26,400 
24,800 



33,600 
18,400 



53,200 
17,250 
10,360 
17,500 
8,470 

1~950 
15.640 
69.760 



11,730 
381,210 

33,800 
22.200 
15,750 
23.560 
10,320 
10.500 
35,840 
12,600 
5,200 
28,200 
5,665 
110,400 
53,070 
367,105 
64,800 
217,000 
16,000 
92,400 
29,040 
96,000 
36,520 
76,500 
182,700 
190,400 
1,001,360 
150,360 
89.700 
35,500 
136,160 
84,240 
147,840 
14,580 
72,240 
215,000 
64,800 
47.025 
1,057,445 
28,438,460 
111,150 
10,389,000 
54,150 
3,596 
13,428.345 
7,665,600 
22,733,610 
17,795,645 
17,268,035 
1,771,110 
21,804,300 
334,620 
4,774,295 
489,510 
4,159,980 
151,221,406 
1,300,215 
1,519,000 
368,640 
9$, 100 
7,360 
416,640 
1,397,880 
427,500 
54,000 
5,306,085 
627,480 
828,000 
12,350,900 
3,336,858 
3,407,000 
1.909,910 
175,950 
1,921,360 
78,320 
20.010 
625,000 
6,234,130 
3,215,040 
1,464,050 
225,280 
370,800 
22,983,708 



52,800 
83,200 
189,600 

6,020 
78,260 

1.720 
24,080 

~6~,020 

860 

3,440 



28,380 
111,800 
3,440 



264,020 

89.100 
195,300 
29,700 
45,000 
57,270 
20,700 
28,800 
11,700 
4,500 
33,300 
20,700 
10,320 
617,605 
1,163,995 
88,200 
334,800 
34,200 
251,100 
72,000 
201,600 
38,700 
76,500 
234,900 
209,440 
1,541,440 
178,770 
149,730 
83,415 
186,930 
159,960 
107,100 
78,120 
55,680 
58,115 
62,480 
62,370 
1,182,670 
40,707,675 
145,600 
14,839,680 
42,180 
16,310 
25,320,210 
12,306,460 
41,055,315 
29,661,940 
25,677,820 
4,387,665 
43,818,975 
301,300 
5,212,812 
641,915 
7.059,360 
251,195,217 
1,403,900 
1,227,555 
514,170 
319,770 
9,135 
297,920 
1,678,920 
610,930 
132,965 
10.353.560 
681,120 
1,904,140 
19,134,085 
6,172.176 
3,281,025 
2,645,230 
332,710 
2,610,315 
63,580 
35,820 
774,860 
6,928,200 
3,158,320 
1,813,760 
395,865 
428,330 
28,640,191 



1929|1930 1931 
|c |c 
9.0 7.0 4.5 
9.0 
9.0 
7.0 
8.0 
9.0 
8.0 
8.0 
7.9 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 



Value 



1929 | 1930 



n 



9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
9.0 
8.0 



9.0 
8.7 

6.0 
7.0 
5.2 
7.0 
4.3 
5.0 
7.0 
6.0 
6.0 
7.0 
8.0 

3~0 
4.9 

8.0 

8.0 

5.2 

7.0 

8.0 

8.0 

4.6 

6.0 

7.0 

5.0 

7.1 

5.0 

6.0 

7.0 

7.0 

7.0 

6.0 

6.0 

5.0 

4.5 

6.0 

5.3 

6.1 

3.7 

3.8 

3.7 

3.8 

3.7 

3.6 

3.9 

3.2 

3.8 

3.7 

3.8 

3.7 

3.7 

3.6 

3.8 

3.6 

3.6 

4.0 

3.5 

4.0 

4.0 

4.0 

5.0 

4.0 

4.2 

4.0 

3.5 

4.3 

4.0 

3.8 

4.6 

3.4 

4.0 

4.0 

3.5 

4.2 

4.0 

4.0 

3.3 

3.2 

4.2 

3.9 

4.0 

3.6 



7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 

7~0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 

7~0 
7.0 
7.0 



7.0 
7.0 

5.7 

5.9 

5.0 

6.8 

4.0 

4.4 

6.0 

5.0 

5.0 

6.0 

6.5 

4.4 

4.0 

5.1 

7.0 

7.0 

5.0 

6.0 

6.6 

6.8 

5.0 

5.5 

6.0 

4.5 

6.0 

4.5 

6.0 

7.0 

6.4 

6.9 

6.0 

5.8 

5.0 

4.4 

5.8 

5.0 

5.5 

3.6 

3.2 

3.5 

3.2 

3.5 

3.4 

3.2 

3.4 

3.3 

3.6 

3.5 

3.4 

3.5 

4.0 

3.4 

3.5 

3.5 

3.8 

4.0 

4.0 

4.2 

3.6 

4.4 

4.1 

4.4 

4.0 

3.9 

4.3 

3.7 

4.0 

3.7 

3.7 

3.6 

4.5 

4.3 

4.5 

4.5 

4.0 

4.2 

4.1 

4.3 

4.4 

4.5 

4.0 



4.5 
4.5 

4~5 
4.0 
4.3 

4.5 
4.5 
4.5 
4.5 

4~5 

4.5 



4.5 
4.5 
4.5 



897,779 189,593,869 303.311.218 3.7 3.6 



4.5 

4.5 

4.5 

4.5 

4.5 

2.5 

3.5 

4.5 

4.5 

3.8 

4.5 

4.5 

3.0 

1.8 

2.9 

4.5 

4.5 

4.0 

4.5 

4.0 

4.5 

3.0 

4.5 

4.0 

2.8 

3.7 

4.0 

4.8 

4.0 

4.3 

4.0 

4.8 

4.5 

3.0 

3.5 

4.5 

4.5 

4.2 

2.1 

2.0 

2.3 

2.0 

2.1 

2.0 

2.3 

2 

2 

2.0 
2.2 
2.0 
2.0 
2.3 
2.4 
2.0 
2.1 
2.0 
1 

2.1 
2.1 
2.1 
2.0 
2.0 
2.2 
2.1 
2.0 
2.6 
2.1 
2.0 
1.8 
1.8 
1.8 
1.3 
2.0 
2.S 
2.0 
1.8 
2.3 
1.8 
2.1 
1.8 
2.1 
2.0 
2.1 



2,401 
911 
497 
4,977 
3.238 
745 
2,502 
6,764 
22,035 
2.093 
8,424 
335 
2,176 

1~758 

2,678 
670 

1,256 
84 
586 
502 
599 

6,115 



1,256 
28,532 

2,484 
2,331 
1,404 
466 
415 
910 
3,185 
481 
164 
3,735 
2.160 

6.599 
24,334 

6.336 
25,200 
5,205 
3,542 
10.794 
14,144 
2,409 
3,236 
13,860 
6.052 
90,778 
2,950 
6,105 
1,932 
5,419 
9,450 
3,514 
2,112 
2,444 
1,800 
1,953 
1.299 
38,978 
,226,705 
15,717 
456,880 
2,508 
299 
621,810 
440,541 
898,951 
874,937 
098,045 
66,129 
,094,413 
19,316 
234,627 
25,974 
208,434 
,885,286 I 
46.985 
42,403 
13,300 
2,318 
4,877 
12,608 
50,686 
11,562 
2,688 
134,729 
15,944 
28,800 
366,900 
109,491 
121,485 
97,364 
6,880 
74,603 
1,048 
566 
42.504 
195.881 
105,840 
54,551 
0,723 
11,931 
828,867 



714 

44 
2,402 
1.155 
4.740 
3,203 
3,893 
16,151 
1,047 
7,644 
1,848 
1,736 

3~724 
1,208 

725 
1,225 

593 

137 
1,095 
4,883 



821 
26,686 

1,927 
1,310 
788 
1,602 
413 
462 
2,150 
630 
260 
1,692 
368 
4,858 
2,123 
18,583 
4,536 
15,190 
800 
5,544 
1,917 
6,528 
1,826 
4,208 
10,962 
8,568 
60,079 
6,766 
5,382 
2,485 
8,714 
5,813 
8,870 
846 
3,612 
9,460 
3,758 
2,351 
58,057 
,023,785 
3,557 
363,615 
1,733 
126 
456,564 
245,299 
772,943 
587,256 
621,649 
61,989 
741,346 
11,712 
190,972 
16,643 
145,599 
,244,788 ! 
49,408 
60,760 
14,746 
4,120 
265 
18,332 
57,313 
18,810 
2,160 
206,937 
26,982 
30,636 
490,469 
123,464 
126,059 
68,757 
7,918 
82,618 
3,524 
900 
25,000 
261,833 
131,817 • 
62,954 
9,912 
16,686 
921 ,442 



72 



1,512 
828 

2,376 
3,328 
8,116 
271 
3,522 
77 
1,084 



271 
39 
155 



1,277 
5,031 
155 



11,882 

4,010 
8,789 
1,337 
2,025 
1,432 
725 
1,296 
527 
171 
1,499 
932 
310 
11,117 
34,170 
3,969 
15,060 
1,368 
11,300 
2,880 
9,072 
1,161 
3,443 
9,396 
5,864 
63,519 
7,151 
7,187 
3,337 
8,038 
6,398 
5,141 
3,515 
1,670 
2.034 
2,812 
2,807 
50,090| 
854,861 
2,912 
341,313 
844 
343 
506,404 
283,049 
862,162 
622,901 
513,556 
96,529 
876,380 
6,026 
119,895 
15,406 
141,187 
,243,768 
28,078 
23,324 
10,798 
6,715 
192 
5,958 
33,578 
13,440 
2,792 
207,071 
17,709 
39,987 
389,642 
111,099 
59,058 
47,614 
4.325 
52,206 
1,780 
716 
13,947 
159,349 
56,850 
38,089 
7,1261 
8,995 
561,154 



Value Per Acre 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



82.79 
82.82 
82.83 
63.00 
73.59 
82.78 
73.59 
71.20 
71.78 
83.72 
87.75 
83.75 
83.69 



42.00 36.00 



44.00 
46.19 
35.00 
42.70 
36.40 
37.80 
39.88 
45.52 
49.00 
56.00 
56.00 



36.00 
36.00 

3~6~00 
32.00 
34.24 

38.71 
38.70 
38.50 
38.71 



83.72 49.00 38.71 

83.69 48.32 

83.75 51.79 39.00 

83.73 49.00 

84.00 53.91 38.75 

83.71 

83.67 45.67 

85.57 47.61 38.70 

78.40 44.80 38.70 

31.00 



83.73 48.29 

83.14 48.88 38.70 

54.00 37.06 40.51 
63.00 35.41 40.50 
46.80 37.52 40.52 
66.57 42.16 40.50 
41.50 34.42 20.75 
45.50 30.80 31.52 
63.70 38.39 40.50 

53.44 35.00 40.54 
54.67 32.50 34.20 
64.40 36.00 40.51 
72.00 33.45 40.52 

30.36 25.83 

28.20 24.40 13.41 

45.57 33.07 23.70 
70.40 42.00 40.50 
80.00 49.00 40.50 
47.31 40.00 36.00 
64.40 42.00 40.50 
82.40 43.57 36.00 
83.20 43.52 40.50 
44.61 41.50 27.00 
52.19 41.25 40.51 
77.00 42.00 36.00 
44.50 38.25 24.64 
69.67 43.07 36.97 
50.00 37.80 40.40 
55.50 46.80 44.64 
64.40 49.70 40.20 

68.59 47.36 39.99 
70.00 49.68 37.20 
57.61 46.20 43.20 
52.80 47.00 37.80 
47.00 42.00 28.79 
45.00 37.84 34.47 
55.80 46.40 39.61 
51.96 41.25 44.56 
58.53 43.68 39.85 
37,63 34.92 25.09 
41.80 30.40 22.40 
35.89 35.00 27.14 
38.00 30.40 22.81 
37.38 31.50 24.50 
37.80 27.03 22.20 

39.58 25.60 35.64 
32.96 27.71 22.79 
38.87 28.54 25.41 
36.11 35.46 23.80 
38.38 34.65 24.09 
38.67 30.60 24.30 

36.45 34.65 23.00 
34.92 39.40 27.88 
36.48 32.13 27.96 

35.46 34.65 23.10 
36.95 31.17 24.32 
37.80 34.77 20,20 

33.60 40.00 17.96 
38.00 38.40 20.69 
36.79 37.80 20.79 
35.60 33.13 21.33 
49.25 40.92 19.60 
39.20 40.59 20.40 
39.06 41.80 21.89 
38.40 36.00 21.31 
32.02 35.68 20.60 
38.70 40.64 25.74 

40.00 33.30 21.32 

35.59 37.17 20.67 

47.01 36.78 21.46 
33.32 37.00 18.45 
40.40 36.36 19.53 
40.00 38.25 12.61 
35.53 40.42 21.30 
40.31 39.60 26.18 
40.43 39.13 19.89 
44.00 40.00 19.08 
33.83 42.63 24.84 
30.24 40.39 17.46 
40.74 38.27 21.84 
39.78 38.72 15.39 
41.00 40.50 21.32 
36.43 39.44 20.98 



8,285,710 6,836,255 6,362,3411 37.23 32.70 23.90 



28 PRICES PAID TO NORTH CAROLINA PRODUCERS FOR FARM PRODUCTS 

This Table shows yearly, and monthly comparisons for price trends. These prices are those paid to farmers and NOT retail prices 



GENERAL FARM CROP PRICES 



Hay Crops 



Com 
bu. 



Wheat 
bu. 



Oats 
bu. 



Barley 
bu. 



Rye 
bu. 



Cotton 
lint 
lbs. 



Cotton- 
Seed 
tons 



To- 


Soy- 1 


Cow- 


Pea- 


bacco 


Beans 


peas 


nuts 


lbs. 


bu. | 


bu. 


lbs. 


c 


S 


* 


c 


21.4 


1.80 


2.15 


5.0 






2.28 


3.5 


21.6 




2.00 


6.0 


29.5 


1.85 


1.78 


3.0 



Irish 


Sweet 


All 


Pota- 


Pota- 


Tame 


toes 


toes 


loose 


bu. 


bu. 


tons 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1.35 


1.06 


19.70 


1.55 


1.12 


20.20 


1.24 


1.05 


19.60 


1.03 


.99 


18.20 


.99 


.74 ' 


19.95 


1.24 


.95 


20.15 


1.14 


1.00 


20.45 


1.30 


1.07 


20.20 


1.25 


1.00 


20.50 


1.30 


1.34 


21.00 


1.30 


1.40 


21.00 


.95 


1.17 


20 50 


1.04 


1.20 


21.00 


1.01 


1.59 


21.00 


1.38 


1.39 


19.50 


1.68 


1.63 


20.20 


2.58 


1.36 


20.00 


3.50 


1.55 


22.30 


1.70 


1.70 


20.50 


1.45 


1.00 


18.30 


1.70 


1.00 


18.50 


1.80 


1.15 


19.00 


1.75 


1.25 


19.00 


1.20 


.85 


18.50 


1.25 


.80 


17.50 


1.55 


1.05 


17.40 


.75 


1.00 


18.00 


.85 


1.10 


17.20 


.90 


.95 


18.10 


.90 


1.15 


18.30 


1.00 


1.20 


17.60 


1.10 


1.00 


17.50 


1.25 


.90 


17.00 


1.50 


1.05 


17.90 


1.10 


1.15 


17.90 


1.10 


.95 


18.90 


1.05 


.85 


17.10 


1.10 


.85 


17.90 


1 15 


90 


17 80 


1.16 


!92 


18i61 


1.35 


.99 


15.71 


.89 


1.00 


16.67 


.71 


.95 


16.31 


.61 


.95 


16.40 


.61 


.75 


13.70 


.65 


.58 


13.25 


.57 


.52 


14.62 


.59 


.52 


12.82 


.58 


.56 


12.50 


.60 


.55 


12.15 


.62 


.59 


12.49 


.75 


.56 


11.43 



Tim- 
othy 
loose 
tons 



Clover 
loose 
tons 



January 1922- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1923- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1924. 

April 

July 

October 

January 1925- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1926- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1927- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1928- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1929- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1930- 

April 

July 

October 

January 193 1- 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 1932. 

February 

March 

April 



.74 
.87 
.89 
.93 
.93 
1.06 
1.20 
1.20 
1.05 
1.11 
1.15 
1.35 
1.46 
1.42 
1.51 
1.25 
1.06 
1.08 
1.07 
.97 
.83 
.84 
.98 
1.01 
.89 
1.03 
1.22 
1.17 
1.09 
1.19 
1.24 
1.18 
.98 
1.05 
1.11 
1.06 
.75 
.75 
.76 
.77 
.77 
.75 
.70 
.72 
.62 
.51 
.45 
.41 
.38 
.37 
.38 
.38 



$ 

1.39 
1 52 
l."39 
1.24 
1.35 
1.46 
1.42 
1.26 
1.31 
1.30 
1.33 
1.45 
1.88 
1.72 
1.70 
1.67 
1.90 
1.81 
1.54 
1.37 
1.42 
1.39 
1.42 
1.43 
1.44 
1.65 
1.59 
1.45 
1.49 
1.52 
1.29 
1.42 
1.39 
1.34 
1.09 
1.10 
1.01 
1.01 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
.96 
.74 
.67 
.65 
.66 
.77 
.73 
.74 
.71 
.72 
.73 



.66 
.66 
.69 
.64 
.68 
.75 
.71 
.27 
.79 
.79 
.75 
.83 
.85 
.79 
.75 
.75 
.74 
.74 
.65 
.70 
.66 
.68 
.67 
.70 
.74 
.81 
.84 
.78 
.79 
.78 
.71 
.74 
.73 
.74 
.67 
.68 
.58 
.59 
.64 
.61 
.60 
.54 
.46 
.39 
.39 
.37 
.36 
.38 
.36 
.36 
.39 
.37 



1.20 
1.10 
1.19 
1.25 
1.22 
1.33 
1.42 
1.33 
1.34 
1.13 
1.25 
1.23 
1.27 
1.05 
1,16 
.98 
.96 
.98 
.93 
.93 
.87 
.66 
.55 
.63 
.58 
.70 
.62 
.\63 
.60 
.57 
.54 



$ 
1.14 
1.10 
1.22 
1.23 
1.18 
1.28 
1.27 
1.26 
1.19 
1.30 
1.25 
1.49 
1.56 
1.51 
1.43 
1.57 
1.44 
1.40 
1.30 
1.22 
1.20 
1.15 
1.10 
1.29 
1.32 
1.38 
1.44 
1.46 
1.47 
1.41 
1.29 
1.37 
1.34 
1.34 
1.14 
1.25 
1.14 
1.09 
1.14 
1.05 
1.06 
.98 
.85 
.70 
.65 
.68 
.69 
.68 
.68 
.65 
.65 
.61 



17.0 
16.5 
20.9 
20.3 
25,8 
28.8 
25.4 
27.4 
32.6 
30.0 
28.0 
23.0 
22.8 
23.0 
23.1 
20.2 
18.4 
17.6 
16.6 
12.3 
11.6 
13.2 
15.5 
20.5 
19.0 
19.1 
21.4 
18.3 
18.6 
19.0 
18.3 
17.8 
16.3 
15.2 
12.5 
9.4 
8.9 
9.7 
9.9 
9.7 
9.2 
8.1 
8.8 
7.1 
6.1 
5.6 
6.4 
5.9 
6.1 
6.3 
6.7 
6.1 



$ 

32.20 
36.30 
36.50 
34.03 
46.10 
54.00 
46.90 
40.60 
46.50 
40.00 
39.00 
35.00 
40.00 
42.00 
33.50 
33.70 
35.50 
38.40 
36.00 
24.10 
23.00 
21.70 
30.00 
37.80 
38.50 
43.00 
42.00 
35.00 
42.00 
40.00 
35.00 
30.00 
26.00 
28.00 
26.00 
21.00 
21.50 
23.00 
24.00 
24.98 
24.00 
20.69 
20.28 
18.00 
9.57 
8.07 
12.16 
13.07 
11.16 
10.90 
11.51 
10.43 



26.6 

22.5 
21.5 
19.8 



23.9 
21.1 



26.4 
18.6 



26.7 
20.9 



2.20 
2.50 
2.90 



6.5 
6.5 
6.2 



6.0 
4.0 





1.70 


1.70 


5.6 


22. i 


1.44 


1.03 


4.2 


19.1 


1.43 


1.63 


5.7 




1.74 


1.84 


5.4 




1.86 


2.13 


6.2 


2~o7E 


1.79 


1.88 


4.9 


16.3 


1.95 


2.30 


5.1 




2.16 


3.01 


4.9 


13~9 


2.40 


3.55 


4.6 


19.9 


1.73 


2.33 


4.3 


16.8 


1.78 


2.46 


3.4 




2.04 


3.13 


3.0 




2,11 


3.28 


3.1 


14.9 


1.60 


2.36 


4.7 


10.7 


1.53 


2.05 


3.0 


6.6 


1.60 


1.92 


3.4 


4.3 


1.59 


1.90 


3.4 




1.65 


1.93 


3.6 




1.69 


1.92 


4.3 




1.73 


2.03 


3.8 




1.43 


1.84 


3.5 


12.4 


1.24 


1.79 


3.5 


9.6 


1.22 


1.36 


2.7 


9.9 


.92 


1.00 


1.6 


8.8 . 


.74 


.89 


2.0 


6.7 


.65 


.78 


1.8 


6.1 


.69 


.78 


1.7 


5.0 


.66 


.74 




6.9 


.69 


.82 




7.5 


.68 


.73 


Ti 



23.50 
24.58 
23.06 
22.00 
24.50 
24.40 
22.70 
24.50 
21.50 
22.90 

Ls7(>0 

2~L30 



24.00 
28.00 
26.00 
24.50 
24.00 
25.00 
22.00 
20.00 
22.00 
19.70 
21.00 
19.70 
21.50 
20.30 
22.50 
20.50 
19.20 
20.50 
21.20 
21.00 
22.00 
21.00 
20.80 
24.40 
20.29 
24.07 
17.22 
18.00 
13.60 
15.29 
16.46 
17.28 
17.42 
17.82 
16.47 
13.30 



$ 

22.30 
21.41 
20.79 
19.10 
22.40 
21.40 
21.00 
18.00 
21.80 
22.00 
19.50 



17.50 
20.00 
20.00 
22.00 
23.70 
20.10 
22.80 
23.00 
22.00 
22.00 
20.00 
20.50 
19.00 
21.00 
19.00 
20.20 
20.60 
20.30 
18.80 
18.40 
19.50 
19.00 
22.50 
20.00 
20.20 
21.00 
22.27 
18.82 
19.00 
17.36 
18.00 
17.30 
16.78 
15.06 
14.71 
15.91 
16.35 
13.73 
13.00 



FRUIT 



LIVESTOCK (live weight) 



LIVESTOCK AND PRODUCTS 



DATES 



January 1922- 

April 

July 

October 

lanuary 1923- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1924_ 

April 

July 

October 

lanuary 1925_ 

April 

July 

October 

January 1926- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1927- 

April 

July 

October 

January 192 8- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1929- 

April 

July 

October 

January 1930. 

April 

July 

October 

January 1931- 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 1932_ 

February 

March 

April 









Beef 


Veal 






















Wool 


Apples 


Hogs 


Cattle 


Calves 


Sheep 


Lambs 


Milk 


Horses 


Mules 


Butter 


Milk 


Eggs 


Chick- 


Tur- 


(Un- 




1 


per 


per 


per 


per 


per 


Cows 


per 


per 








ens 


keys 


wash- 


bu. 


| bbl. 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


per 


head 


head 


lb. 


qt. 


doz. 


live 


live 


ed) 




1 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


head 












1 lb. 


lb. 


lb. 


$ 


$ 


* 


$ 


$ 


$ 


* 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


c 


$ 


$ 


2.90 


8.50 


9.65 


4.80 


6.00 


5.45 


6.80 


45.50 


108.30 




.37 




.43 


19.3 


.30 


.20 


3.86 


9.50 


9.80 


4.87 


6.44 


5.75 


7.95 


43.11 


110.00 




.33 




.20 


19.6 




.26 


.95 


2.67 


9.90 


4.90 


6.45 


5.85 


8.60 


43.66 


112.50 




.30 




.24 


24.0 




.26 


.74 


2.44 


10.10 


5.10 


6.80 


6.00 


8.36 


41.90 


110.90 




.35 




.31 


21.0 




.30 


1.45 


4.38 


10.20 


5.30 


6.80 


6.70 


8.10 


44.00 


112.00 




.36 




.42 


20.5 


~31 


.31 


1.79 


5.98 


9.40 


5.20 


6.40 


5.20 


8.20 


42.00 


114.00 




.37 




.22 


21.0 




.31 


1.54 


4.16 


9.20 


5.10 


6.50 


5.60 


8.90 


43.40 


110.00 




.37 




.27 


25.0 




.33 


1.14 


4.00 


10.10 


5.10 


6.50 


7.80 


8.80 


43.40 


105.00 




.35 




.33 


20.8 




.33 


1.64 


4.40 


9.20 


5.00 


6.80 


6.60 


8.20 


42.00 


102.00 




.40 


T11 


.34 


19.0 


"729 


.35 


1.87 


5.50 


9.20 


5.00 


7.00 


6.70 


8.50 


43.10 


100.00 




.36 


.15 


.20 


19.0 




.36 


1.00 


4.00 


9.50 


5.30 


6.90 


6.00 


9.50 


46.00 


104.00 




.36 


.12 


.26 


23.0 




.35 


.85 


3.00 


10.40 


5.20 


7.80 


6.50 


10.20 


45.00 


100.00 




.37 




.39 


22.0 




.36 


1.30 


4.00 


10.90 


5.60 


7.90 


6.50 


10.00 


43.00 


92.00 




.38 




.43 


20.0 


~30 


.34 


1.10 


5.90 


11.00 


5.70 


7.30 


7.40 


11.10 


42.70 


97.00 




.38 




.25 


21.0 




.38 


1.26 


4.00 


11.10 


5.50 


7.20 


6.00 


9.80 


45.80 


95.00 




.34 




.27 


24.0 




.37 


1.15 


4.00 


11.80 


5.70 


9.00 


7.00 


10.90 


50.20 


88.00 




.38 




.38 


22.0 




.38 


1.58 


5.30 


12.00 


4.90 


8.30 


6.20 


10.00 


45.10 


73.00 


10T00 


.40 


"".10 


.41 


20.0 


~30 


.40 






12.00 


5.30 


8.80 


8.00 


11.60 


49.00 


82.00 


116.00 


.38 


.12 


.27 


22.0 




.36 


L00 


5.00 


13.00 


6.30 


8.30 


7.60 


11.60 


50,00 


82.00 


114.00 


.37 


.11 


.29 


26.0 




.36 


.70 


2.70 


12.70 


5.90 


8.60 


7.50 


10.30 


50.00 


78.00 


105.00 


.37 


.11 


.37 


22.0 




.36 


1.00 


3.00 


12.50 


6.00 


8.60 


8.00 . 


11.50 


50.00 


77.00 


105.00 


.37 


.14 


.38 


21.0 


"30 


.35 






11.80 


6.30 


8.80 


7.70 


10. GO 


58.00 


90.00 


120.00 


.36 


.14 


.22 


22.0 




.35 


1.20 


3" 50 


11.80 


6.40 


9.40 


7.40 


10.70 


59.00 


88.00 


125.00 


.37 


.14 


.24 


24.0 




.35 


1.65 


3.90 


10.70 


6.80 


9.20 


6.70 


10.50 


64.00 


84.00 


120.00 


.39 


.14 


.37 


23.0 


"730 


.27 


1.90 


6.00 


10.60 


6.80 


9.80 


8.00 


10.70 


65.00 


88.00 


126.00 


.39 


.14 


.39 


21.0 


.30 


.35 






9.00 


7.60 


11.00 


8.70 


12 10 


72.00 


95.00 


145.00 


.38 


.14 


.22 


21.0 




.40 


.90 


2"90 


9.90 


7.60 


11.00 


8.30 


12.00 


72.00 


95.00 


140.00 


.37 


.14 


.27 


25.0 




.42 


.85 


2.55 


10.70 


8.10 


11.40 


8.30 


10.60 


74.00 


88.00 


135.00 


.39 


.14 


.38 


23.0 


"728 


.43 


1.10 


3.30 


9.40 


7.50 


10.60 


8.10 


11.40 


71.00 


87.00 


135.00 


.38 


.14 


.35 


21.0 


.29 


.41 


1.35 


4.00 


9.70 


7.90 


11.00 


8.20 


11.60 


72.00 


91.00 


137.00 


.37 


.14 


.23 


25.0 




.43 


1.05 


3.05 


10.10 


8.10 


11.40 


8.20 


11.50 


74.00 


92.00 


137.00 


.36 


.14 


.29 


25.0 




.38 


1.15 


3.45 


10.40 


7.90 


10.60 


7.80 


10.20 


75.00 


86.00 


137.00 


.40 


.14 


.40 


22.0 


"Tii 


.39 


1.45 


4.35 


10.10 


7.90 


11.00 


7.30 


10.80 


72.00 


87.00 


136.00 


.36 


.15 


.40 


21.0 


.24 


.37 


1.75 


5.25 


9.60 


7.80 


10.50 


8.10 


11.00 


69.00 


89.00 


140.00 


.36 


.14 


.23 


22.5 




.34 


1.35 


4.00 


9.80 


7.00 


9.80 


5.80 


9.40 


64.00 


90.00 


135.00 


.32 


.14 


.23 


20.6 




.23 


1.00 


3.46 


9.83 


6.09 


8.99 


5.28 


7.40 


56.90 


77.50 


139.64 


.34 


.14 


.31 


19.1 


"723 


.26 


1.12 


5.35 


8.71 


5.89 


8.55 


5.54 


6.87 


51.51 


78.46 


110.09 


.31 


.13 


.29 


16.9 


.20 


.23 


1.19 


4.50 


8.65 


5.55 


7.64 


5.17 


6.89 


51.22 


82.89 


126.23 


.28 


.13 


.17 


16.4 


.21 


.20 


1.33 


4.66 


7.97 


6.00 


7.76 


6.12 


7.67 


50.02 


77.93 


121.16 


.28 


.13 


.17 


16.6 




.23 


1.47 


4.41 


8.38 


5.53 


7.70 


5.42 


7.32 


51.63 


85.94 


135.76 


.29 


.13 


.19 


17.7 




.20 


1.32 


5.16 


8.21 


5.26 


7.42 


5.17 


7.69 


50.43 


89.10 


139.87 


.27 


.13 


.17 


19.0 




.17 


1.20 


3.10 


7.70 


5.32 


7.51 


4.81 


7.85 


48.55 


78.11 


119.04 


25 


.12 


.18 


18.4 




.17 


.74 


2.59 


7.98 


5.23 


7.66 


4.15 


5.82 


45.35 


73.10 


113.89 


!25 


.12 


.18 


18.0 




.16 


.58 


1.19 


7.32 


4.69 


6.48 


3.62 


5.34 


43.97 


75.40 


122.36 


.25 


.12 


.18 


17.5 




.15 


52 


2.00 


6.7C 


4.73 


6.26 


4.03 


5.70 


44.49 


59.59 


100.00 


.27 


.13 


.23 


16.5 




.16 


.51 


1.65 


6.22 


4.80 


6.40 


3.59 


4.95 


40.49 


04.81 


105.33 


.26 


.12 


.24 


16.7 




.17 


.54 


1.83 


6.49 


4.65 


6.54 


4.09 


5.54 


41.95 


67.29 


101.78 


.26 


.12 


.26 


16.4 


"7l9 


.18 


.55 


1.52 


5.59 


4.46 


6.41 


3.55 


5.14 


39.49 


68.88 


87.20 


.28 


.12 


.27 


15.5 


.20 


.16 


.59 


2,00 


5.36 


4.46 


6.07 


3.65 


4.85 


37.12 


62.88 


85.65 


.25 


.11 


.19 


14.1 


.19 


.16 


.58 


' 1.68 


4.85 


4.34 


6.37 


4.10 


5.81 


37.08 


69.29 


96.52 


.23 


.12 


.14 


13.2 




.15 


.70 


2.46 


5.14 


4.48 


6.02 


3.92 


5.79 


37.71 


66.96 


104.89 


.22 


.11 


.11 


13.2 




.16 


.82 


2.56 


4.77 


4.14 


5.98 


4.53 


5.99 


36.28 


62.27 


97.97 


.22 


.11 


.12 


13.4 




.14 



INDEX NUMBERS OF NORTH CAROLINA FARM PRICES FOR 1920-1931 
Based on Five- Year Period— August 1909-July,1914, Equals 100 Per Cent 



29 



TEARS 
MONTHS 



PERCENTAGE COMPARISON OF PRICES RECEIVED TO PER-WAR PRICES 







s 

o 


_^ o 


d 




V 




%3 

S o 







£ 


is, 


Ci 


o 


176 


210 


ISO 


214 


293 



?1 



22 O SO 



S3 S-E 
22 t, 



0Q 

° -a O, 



January - 

April 

July 

October- 



221 
233 
239 



210 
231 
277 



177 

209 



208 
205 



277 
346 



205 
223 



317 

296 



311 

295 
283 



156 
175 
183 



221 
216 
209 



277 
274 
260 



205 214 
199 203 
187 195 



230 
239 
202 



241 

250 
207 



104 
110 
104 



243 
246 



233 
233 
241 



213 
200 
204 



245 
258 
172 



227 
234 
231 



236 
254 
251 



96 
92 
92 



104 
109 
109 



93 
90 
90 



218 


224 


178 


207 


217 


214 


200 


151 


157 


210 


243 


197 


192 


237 


215 


93 


235 


236 


204 


120 


194 


139 


82 


122 


75 


127 


180 


131 


159 


169 


171 


99 


80 


148 


166 


181 


170 


153 


196 


187 


85 


2 1 5 


196 


20 S 


118 


134 


196 


68 


146 


69 


113 


163 


126 


159 


114 


143 


82 


72 


139 


135 


169 


144 


123 


121 


134 


84 


193 


140 


158 


109 


115 


171 


67 


149 


67 


104 


141 


121 


124 


100 


197 


71 


83 


120 


120 


140 


122 


119 


131 


140 


76 


188 


135 


152 


96 


106 


159 


67 


150 


70 


110 


131 


113 


125 


154 


177 


158 


145 


130 


123 


143 


132 


125 


130 


144 


77 


202 


168 


158 


91 


131 


159 


82 


121 


75 


88 


124 


106 


116 


159 


151 


137 


127 


124 


119 


137 


117 


129 


134 


141 


68 


180 


179 


154 


90 


119 


158 


75 


133 


72 


98 


132 


102 


110 


161 


127 


130 


144 


118 


110 


123 


119 


124 


130 


144 


71 


172 


133 


138 


124 


115 


156 


74 


136 


80 


94 


130 


110 


124 


139 


140 


161 


153 


117 


113 


127 


119 


1 •_•'.) 


i :i c. 


100 


73 


ISO 


141 


130 


124 


123 


177 


69 


144 


73 


104 


112 


102 


123 


127 


152 


166 


143 


118 


128 


127 


137 


1 2!> 


143 


1 09 


75 


176 


141 


146 


1 50 


130 


176 


74 


135 


73 


111 


121 


110 


117 


116 


106 


202 


176 


119 


132 


133 


133 


137 


164 


169 


74 


192 


175 


158 


141 


141 


150 


94 


106 


89 


119 


127 


115 


128 


129 


108 


227 


215 


121 


117 


120 


118 


119 


117 


148 


74 


184 


147 


154 


148 


145 


154 


94 


106 


89 


126 


133 


113 


127 


128 


133 


205 


197 


121 


118 


126 


119 


120 


130 


165 


72 


188 


159 


161 


158 


147 


155 


95 


105 


84 


135 


114 


102 


126 


161 


165 


225 


196 


130 


128 


131 


131 


129 


185 


178 


72 


175 


150 


146 


165 


150 


154 


97 


103 


87 


125 


117 


127 


1 2 1 


147 


143 


263 


177 


129 


124 


127 


133 


12 3 


162 


170 


67 


177 


142 


167 


159 


155 


154 


101 


99 


89 


125 


113 


122 


130 


135 


152 


236 


159 


122 


113 


123 


129 


117 


151 


153 


65 


168 


133 


150 


172 


144 


154 


94 


108 


82 


121 


124 


119 


127 


146 


187 


215 


164 


125 


122 


133 


127 


123 


140 


177 


68 


173 


153 


157 


167 


144 


154 


94 


107 


85 


152 


131 


132 


149 


117 


180 


189 


147 


133 


130 


136 


157 


133 


155 


207 


67 


185 


177 


154 


179 


146 


155 


94 


106 


89 


174 


168 






122 




184 


152 


132 


139 


130 


154 










183 


179 


158 


154 


151 


158 


96 


105 


92 


160 


150 


122 


151 


105 


181 


181 


167 




128 




135 


1 4ft 


1 67 


200 


63 


184 


167 


158 


J J™ 


\ A^A 


160 


95 


105 


92 


159 


159 


119 


146 




185 


178 


^1? 


lib 


127 


133 


132 


1 A C 

145 


140 




{to 


180 




iifl 
l* o 


177 


144 


1 60 


90 


111 


93 


140 


150 


119 


157 


207 


251 


1 "71 


141 


lax 


143 


152 


184 


1.) 1 


167 


222 


59 


185 


173 


158 


190 


145 


158 


92 


109 


91 


126 


170 


119 


147 


304 


194 


148 


135 


126 


122 


136 


162 


161 


152 


207 


48 


188 


171 


167 


182 


132 


157 


84 


119 


91 


121 


157 


114 


140 


365 


176 


139 


153 


130 


119 


140 


162 


152 


180 


210 


53 


197 


180 


158 


172 


130 


156 


83 


120 


90 


113 


144 


103 


133 


191 


227 


128 


151 


122 


145 


145 


153 


169 


177 


217 


53 


198 


171 


161 


172 


130 


157 


83 


121 


87 


109 


123 


111 


122 


179 


154 


101 


101 


118 


148 


151 


173 


163 


178 


209 


52 


188 


168 


154 


179 


118 


155 


76 


131 


84 


S)9 


127 


106 


122 


200 


143 


94 


88 


116 


149 


151 


168 


168 


196 


237 


51 


1 '.( <; 


158 


154 


159 


114 


154 


74 


135 


82 


98 


127 


111 


121 


190 


140 


101 


109 


114 


141 


161 


164 


169 


195 


205 


54 


199 


145 


158 


159 


116 


154 


75 


133 


82 


94 


127 


106 


121 


191 


151 


104 


126 


113 


145 


163 


169 


169 


171 


228 


59 


202 


129 


154 


172 


118 


154 


77 


131 


82 


94 


121 


105 


115 


188 


131 


104 


126 


111 


142 


166 


162 


150 


173 


190 


58 


196 


147 


150 


167 


116 


154 


75 


133 


81 


92 


123 


105 


115 


186 


132 


113 


113 


110 


140 


168 


182 


152 


177 


205 


61 


206 


147 


146 


159 


118 


154 


77 


131 


82 


98 


127 


105 


115 


215 


140 


118 


120 


111 


141 


159 


170 


151 


182 


205 


60 


243 


138 


152 


154 


121 


155 


78 


128 


84 


103 


133 


106 


112 


197 


167 


119 


126 


113 


147 


171 


173 


154 


172 


200 


57 


180 


141 


161 


167 


123 


155 


79 


126 


84 


107 


131 


111 


121 


173 


167 


138 


140 


113 


152 


176 


185 


159 


187 


203 


59 


186 


159 


164 


167 


130 


154 


84 


118 


86 


113 


131 


114 


126 


156 


158 


171 


154 


114 


169 


187 


177 


158 


176 


197 


56 


172 


175 


157 


179 


141 


154 


92 


109 


91 


113 


129 


111 


129 


148 


131 


168 


159 


120 


170 


194 


185 


137 


159 


213 


56 


182 


168 


158 


169 


140 


155 


90 


111 


91 


111 


127 


113 


133 


146 


136 


168 


162 


109 


182 


195 


198 


145 


172 


198 


56 


190 


171 


167 


175 


142 


154 


92 


108 


89 


108 


130 


118 


135 


151 


127 


153 


150 


107 


182 


201 


205 


145 


191 


224 


61 


195 


176 


163 


179 


139 


153 


91 


110 


90 


106 


129 


119 


134 


147 


114 


153 


147 


110 


169 


196 


191 


142 


196 


222 


58 


1 9 3 


162 


1 6 3 


l :> '.» 


135 


154 


88 


114 


89 


107 


132 


117 


130 


152 


127 


138 


156 


111 


164 


206 


187 


140 


174 


218 


60 


192 


155. 


163 


159 


132 


154 


86 


117 


87 


111 


137 


125 


139 


160 


132 


143 


162 


102 


175 


204 


200 


123 


203 


263 


61 


191 


124 


163 


172 


135 


137 


99 


101 


89 


116 


143 


125 


138 


161 


119 


150 


171 


101 


171 


206 


203 


114 


196 


218 


62 


186 


147 


158 


191 


137 


156 


88 


114 


90 


122 


163 


128 


144 


165 


121 


159 


173 


103 


167 


211 


196 


123 


201 


228 


63 


199 


153 


154 


182 


142 


156 


91 


110 


95 


123 


163 


136 


143 


134 


118 


154 


172 


105 


180 


205 


183 


129 


194 


232 


62 


230 


156 


161 


191 


143 


157 


91 


110 


92 


128 


149 


133 


147 


84 


133 


165 


176 


108 


175 


209 


202 


129 


193 


223 


62 


188 


159 


161 


201 


145 


156 


93 


108 


93 


128 


135 


129 


139 


86 


149 


153 


176 


109 


188 


215 


219 


135 


187 


209 


64 


199 


153 


168 


196 


145 


156 


93 


108 


89 


130 


132 


119 


142 


88 


151 


147 


159 


110 


191 


227 


208 


137 


199 


203 


60 


190 


165 


165 


224 


144 


156 


92 


108 


91 


131 


131 


124 


146 


105 


169 


150 


147 


111 


203 


224 


229 


137 


198 


215 


59 


192 


173 


163 


215 


147 


155 


95 


105 


88 


131 


136 


124 


146 


104 


161 


151 


167 


110 


203 


215 


224 


131 


205 


228 


58 


198 


175 


167 


215 


147 


155 


95 


105 


86 


12 8 


134 


123 


149 


102 


151 


152 


166 


108 


187 


216 


224 


133 


209 


215 


59 


197 


176 


167 


220 


145 


155 


94 


107 


86 


130 


133 


127 


150 


106 


136 


150 


160 


114 


187 


214 


207 


126 


199 


235 


58 


192 


146 


158 


l m; 


142 


155 


92 


109 


86 


132 


134 


125 


144 


92 


133 


147 


168 


115 


176 


212 


204 


126 


179 


219 


57 


203 


155 


158 


195 


141 


156 


90 


111 


88 


134 


132 


125 


140 


101 


138 


156 


174 


111 


185 


210 


206 


131 


188 


230 


61 


211 


171 


154 


210 


146 


156 


94 


107 


90 


134 


132 


120 


141 


94 


131 


150 


159 


107 


178 


206 


203 


123 


185 


210 


59 


218 


153 


154 


205 


142 


155 


92 


109 


89 


129 


125 


118 


141 


88 


137 


144 


156 


104 


182 


214 


219 


137 


193 


235 


60 


222 


173 


150 


172 


142 


155 


92 


109 


88 


128 


114 


114 


134 


102 


135 


142 


144 


105 


180 


208 


197 


133 


194 


223 


60 


253 


175 


161 


168 


140 


155 


90 


111 


87 


131 


121 


113 


131 


112 


160 


141 


147 


105 


187 


215 


210 


132 


191 


213 


60 


192 


171 


161 


182 


141 


156 


90 


111 


89 


132 


129 


118 


134 


123 


143 


147 


153 


108 


195 


224 


219 


143 


176 


212 


61 


191 


176 


168 


182 


145 


156 


93 


108 


91 


136 


130 


113 


143 


131 


145 


151 


139 


111 


191 


230 


213 


139 


183 


207 


57 


184 


180 


165 


190 


145 


154 


94 


106 


92 


133 


128 


117 


137 


136 


154 


146 


126 


113 


198 


227 


213 


133 


186 


207 


58 


188 


182 


167 


195 


144 


154 


94. 


107 


91 


126 


126 


121 


137 


152 


161 


138 


125 


108 


197 


221 


218 


136 


179 


219 


56 


195 


179 


163 


195 


141 


154 


92 


109 


88 


1 


12 6 


119 


138 


151 


143 


136 


114 


107 


182 


222 


226 


140 


188 


218 


59 


198 


184 


163 


190 


137 


154 


89 


112 


88 


117 


124 


118 


137 


147 


129 


137 


99 


107 


J 'J 7 


2 17 


215 


13.5 


179 


224 


58 


193 


167 


150 


168 


136 


153 


89 


113 


88 


119 


123 


117 


135 


152 


127 


122 


106 


111 


178 


215 


196 


134 


174 


219 


56 


194 


150 


150 


163 


130 


152 


86 


117 


86 


117 


120 


112 


136 


154 


125 


113 


105 


105 


187 


201 


193 


130 


191 


222 


58 


199 


129 


150 


177 


128 


151 


85 


118 


83 


118 


117 


114 


134 


156 


119 


120 


111 


104 


176 


197 


194 








58 




loo 


150 


162 


128 




OO 


117 


85 


116 


114 


108 


132 


160 


126 


118 


121 


109 


167 


194 


210 


132 


186 


198 


59 


192 


153 


146 


127 


127 


150 


85 


118 


83 


115 


113 


109 


133 


161 


129 


111 


109 


105 


170 


191 


188 


132 


148 


175 


00 


204 


144 


139 


100 


124 


149 


83 


120 


82 


117 


102 


106 


116 


124 


153 


96 


109 


107 


161 


186 


180 


128 


135 


175 


59 


155 


135 


139 


109 


118 


148 


80 


125 


75 


115 


103 


105 


116 


130 


155 


95 


104 


114 


155 


173 


169 


124 


139 


153 


54 


164 


129 


141 


109 


115 


147 


78 


128 


74 


122 


104 


104 


122 


131 


138 


83 


102 


118 


152 


172 


163 


131 


119 


133 


53 


157 


145 


143 


120 


113 


146 


77 


129 


76 


119 


99 


108 


125 


130 


146 


77 


88 


122 


150 


169 


175 


126 


124 


151 


52 


161 


141 


142 


125 


109 


144 


76 


132 


74 


117 


96 


104 


121 


128 


144 


83 


92 


122 


152 


162 


172 


125 


132 


163 


47 


160 


142 


142 


120 


110 


142 


77 


129 


73 


100 


95 


103 


118 


126 


135 


74 


87 


113 


142 


163 


165 


118 


143 


144 


49 


155 


140 


138 


120 


102 


139 


73 


136 


70 


89 


90 


94 


116 


124 


121 


72 


82 


107 


144 


154 


158 


117 


135 


141 


48 


158 


117 


129 


100 


98 


137 


72 


140 


69 


88 


89 


94 


110 


120 


113 


78 


89 


111 


129 


152 


143 


116 


133 


133 


52 


152 


85 


113 


91 


96 


136 


71 


142 


66 


87 


89 


100 


115 


122 


118 


79 


97 


106 


142 


146 


142 


107 


149 


167 


51 


152 


100 


117 


96 


98 


134 


73 


137 


68 


87 


87 


94 


109 


125 


108 


76 


99 


108 


124 


146 


140 


105 


122 


132 


53 


154 


127 


117 


91 


96 


132 


73 


138 


69 


84 


87 


92 


107 


124 


115 


72 


96 


103 


117 


145 


145 


111 


120 


149 


57 


154 


110 


104 


77 


93 


131 


71 


141 


66 


79 


85 


86 


99 


59 


112 


63 


84 


99 


120 


137 


137 


101 


111 


128 


53 


172 


111 


109 


73 


88 


129 


68 


147 


62 


80 


69 


73 


87 


62 


127 


68 


85 


97 


120 


131 


140 


103 


95 


108 


49 


135 


106 


109 


72 


92 


128 


72 


139 


61 


74 


62 


63 


71 


80 


113 


56 


81 


103 


112 


128 


139 


101 


82 


102 


50 


148 


107 


114 


72 


82 


127 


65 


155 


59 


68 


60 


62 


68 


81 


99 


50 


44 


98 


115 


132 


125 


90 


87 


105 


45 


135 


113 


113 


80 


77 


124 


62 


161 


58 


58 


59 


59 


68 


80 


92 


46 


34 


87 


118 


121 


129 


79 


83 


100 


43 


140 


108 


108 


80 


72 


123 


59 


171 


55 


52 


68 


56 


68 


73 


93 


53 


51 


94 


116 


121 


127 


82 


92 


111 


43 


143 


107 


108 


85 


74 


123 


60 


166 


58 


49 


66 


61 


69 


72 


87 


48 


51 


82 


111 


115 


134 


74 


88 


104 


46 


141 


110 


117 


80 


71 


123 


58 


173 


53 


45 


68 


58 


69 


71 


80 


49 


42 


79 


109 


112 


117 


71 


88 


104 


43 


132 


81 


100 


73 


67 


121 


55 


181 


51 


44 


63 


57 


66 


70 


73 


50 


43 


75 


101 


110 


119 


65 


92 


107 


45 


122 


68 


92 


68 


65 










44 


64 


59 


66 


74 


79 


53 


47 


66 


104 


108 


112 


69 


95 


119 


44 


121 


65 


92 


72 


66 










43 


63 


57 


61 


78 


64 


48 


41 


67 


93 


103 


110 


61 


102 


108 


40 


118 


80 


92 


67 


62 











January- 

April 

July 

October- 



January- 

April 

July 

October- 



-1922__ 



January. 

April 

July 

October- 



.1923. 



January_ 

April 

July 

October- 



January, 

April 

July 

October- 



-1925. 



January. 

April 

July 

October- 



-1926-. 



January 

February- _ 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September- 
October 

November- 
December-. 



-1927. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September- 
October 

November- 
December- 

January 

B'ebruary 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September- 
October 

November- 
December- 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September- 
October 

November- 
December- 

January 

February-- 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September- 
October 

' November- 
December- 

January 

February-. 

March 

April 



.1928- 



-1929. 



-1931_. 



.1932. 



30 



COST OF PRODUCING CROPS IN NORTH CAROLINA 



PER ACRE COSTS 
AND 

VALUE OF CROPS 



CORN 


WHEAT 


OATS 


IRISH POTATOES 


COTTON 


1929 [ 


1930 | 


1931 


1929 


1930 | 


193 1 


1929 | 


1930 | 


1931 


1929 | 


1930 | 


1931 


1928 


| 1929 


1930 


| 1931 


$ 

0-7 


$ 

4.48 


$ 

3.01 


$ 

3.15 


$ 

2.73 


$ 

2.27 


$ 

2.50 


$ 

2.31 


$ 

2.24 


$ 

16.59 


$ 

19.22 


$ 

16.08 


9.54 


9.00 


S 

7.57 


$ 

6.12 


1 . O 7 


^* . . 


1.42 


1.38 


1.25 


.9 1 


.77 


.54 


.59 


1.67 


1.99 


5.02 




1.36 


.87 


1.24 


.45 


.44 


.40 


2.00 


1.78 


1.35 


1.97 


2.08 


1.60 


13.76 


17.46 


13.88 


140 

* 


1.19 


1.12 


.80 


.06 


. 1 1 


.07 


.29 


.43 


.27 


.28 


.30 


.20 


5.20 


2.63 


4.38 


.69 


.30 


.39 


.22 











1.81 


1.98 


1.70 


1.81 


1.71 


1.74 













~ ~~ 






---- 


— ~" 


---- 


— r - 














---- 





~~ 





2.83 


2.30 


2.38 


2.00 


.02 


.02 


.01 


.02 


.02 


.01 


---- 




.01 




.08 


~ ~ 


.03 


.05 


. 14 


.06 


. 88 


.77 


.87 


.81 


.77 


.72 


. 66 


.79 


.63 


— 
.72 


1.03 


1.47 


.94 


1.25 


1.02 


1.13 


.53 


.38 


.33 


.26 


.22 


.14 


.22 


.22 


.16 


. 1 1 


.16 


.25 


.53 


.52 


.58 


.25 


3.74 


3.75 


3.15 


3.74 


3.76 


2.87 


3.19 


3.32 


2.55 


4.74 


4.10 


4.11 


4.73 


4.30 


3.97 


3.22 


1.05 


.87 


.87 


1.01 


.93 


.91 


.94 


.89 


.78 


3.35 


3.18 


3.20 


1.07 


1.43 


1.06 


.88 


.01 


~~~~~ 


.02 


---- 


---- 








— -- 


---- 


.72 


.91 


.89 


.30 


.16 


.87 


.38 


4.31 


4.20 


3.16 


. 14 


.08 


.08 


.12 


.01 


.06 


3. 64 


5.16 


3.21 


6.97 


6.80 


6.39 


4.70 


3 07 


2 68 


2 04 


2 25 


2 38 






2 02 


1 73 


9 00 


6 75 


5. 83 


10 80 


7.98 


6 51 


4 88 


2.00 


1.82 


1.48 


1.38 


1.44 


.95 


1.39 


1.28 


.84 


5.14 


4.98 


5.95 


1.28 


1.13 


!88 


!82 


1.29 


1.18 


1.11 


1.03 


.98 


1.09 


.90 


.71 


.90 


1.68 


1.31 


1.37 


1.48 


1.43 


1.21 


1.35 


.11 


.05 


.11 


.02 


.08 


.05 


.13 


.05 


.05 


.05 


.01 


.13 


.37 


.06 


.06 


.15 


7.35 


6.69 


5.10 


6,20 


6.06 


4.62 


6.29 


6.18 


4.75 


7.25 


9.57 


10.16 


9.59 


8.21 


7.59 


5.15 


30.86 


29.25 


23.15 


25.49 


24.89 


19.91 


23.46 


22.41 


18.83 


73.62 


78.54 


75.93 


53.51 


47.47 


42.61 


33.33 


.28 


.26 


.28 


.14 


.15 


.16 


27 


26 


30 


112 


124 


105 


298 


268 


305 


341 


1.10 


1.12 


.83 


1.82 


1.66 


1.24 


.87 


.86 


.63 


.66 


.63 


.72 


.18 


.18 


.14 


.98 


1.05 


.94 


.45 


1.41 


1.13 


.71 


.80 


.72 


.39 


1.20 


1.09 


.64 


.19 


.17 


.097 


.06 


29.56 


23.98 


12.72 


19.92 


16.86 


11.26 


22.05 


18.61 


11.90 


130.74 


138.22 


65.92 


55.62 


44.80 


29.80 


21.47 


3.23 


2.91 


2.11 


2.32 


2.35 


1.71 


2.34 


2.13 


1.77 


.28 




.73 


8.97 


6.61 


5.53 


3.48 


78.00 


49.00 


37.00 


77.00 


44.00 


38.00 


64.00 


49.00 


40.00 


75.00 


62T00 


58.00 


80.00 


68.00 


52.00 


31.00 


1.34 


1.30 


1.01 


1.13 


1.19 


.95 


1.28 


1.43 


.96 


1.42 


1.90 


1.37 


1.72 


1.45 


1.41 


1.04 


27.63 


26.34 


21.04 


23.17 


22.54 


18.20 


21.12 


20.28 


17.06 


73.34 


78.52 


75.20 


44.54 


40.86 


37.08 


29.85 


+ 1.93 


-2.36 


-8.32 


—3.25 


-5.68 


-6.94 


+ .93 


-1 .67 


-5.16 


+ 57.40 


+ 59.70 


-9.28 


+ 11.08 


+3.94 


—7.28 


-8.38 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 



Commercial Fertilizer 

Manure and Compost 

Seed and Plants 

Sheets, containers, etc.-. 

Threshing 

Ginningc, bags & ties 

Crop insurance 

Damage to implements.. 

Damage to buildings 

Preparing ground 

Planting or sowing 

Spraying, dusting, etc.-. 

Cultivation 

Harvesting 

Haul to market 

Overhead 

Other costs not shown. 

What land cash rents for 

Total cost per a»re 

Yield per acre 

Cost per unit 

Price received for product-. 

Value of product per acre 

Value of by-products 

Value of land 

Land Tax 

Net cost per acre 

Profit or loss 



The Table above was prepared in cooperation with the Division of Farm 
Management and Costs of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, D. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

The items listed showing the "Cost of Producing Crops" in North Carolina 
are similar to that appearing in previous annual issues of this publication. Figures 
for some preceding years are available upon request. Since these figures represent 
the average of replies from those farmers reporting voluntarily on this subject, it is 
evident that the results are representative of a more progressive class somewhat 
above the average farmer. 

The chief value of this table therefore is 
bution of cost items in relation to the total cost, 
sentative of the average. 

EXPLANATION OF ITEMS: 

4. This item includes twine, sacks, sheeting, barrels, crates and other 
materials used in harvesting these crops. 



to show the proportional distri- 
This relationship is fairly repre- 



9. Buildings, like implements, have to be replaced through depreciation and 
io enter into farm storage costs which are usually overlooked. 

1 1. This item includes preparing seed or plants for planting and re-planting, 

14. This includes cutting, shocking, stacking, shucking, picking, digging, 
tying, curing and fire wood. 

15. Includes work in preparing products for and hauling to market which is 
not included previously. 

16. Few farmers appreciate the meaning of "overhead" and consequently 
underestimate it. This includes repairing fences, road-ways, telephone, ditching and 
other general farm expense, including unallotted supervision. 

18. This item includes the value that the particular cultivated land in question 
would bring if rented oat.. It is included te represent the interest on the land in- 
vestment. 

24. By-products include such items as : Corn stover, fodder, tops, straw of 
grain, and cotton-seed. 



COST OF GROWING CROPS 

The table above shows the factors enter- 
ing into the cost of producing our crops. 
Five important crops are shown. We would 
suggest that the reader not only refer to 



this for information, but that it be 
used as an outline for determining the cost 
for producing one's own crops. This will 
prove to be interesting and helpful for 
anyone following the suggestion. For in- 



INDEX OF FARM REAL ESTATE VALUES 

Estimated Value per Acre in Terms of Pre- War Average Value for 
Southern States, March 1, 1932 — with Comparisons (State 
Average Value in 1912-1914 = 100%) 

The table below gives the estimated value per acre of. farm land for the years shown in relation to the pre- 
war values. Thus North Carolina land values in 1920 were more than double the price average for 1912-1914. 
In 1932 the value was 14% more than the pre-war rate. The averages for other states are shown but an 
interesting feature is that North Carolina has retained its farm value of real estate to a better extent than 
any of the other states shown, except Florida. This state is, after all, more for resort purposes than for agri- 
cultural production. We have the advantage over the country at large, which is 11 percent below the pre-war 
base. 



STATES 


1920 | 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 




% 189 


% 


% 


% 


1 % 


% 


% 


% 


% 


Virginia 




154 


148 


138 


137 


136 


134 


117 


99 


NORTH CAROLINA __ 


223 


187 


185 


178 


172 


165 


158 


135 


114 


South Carolina 


230 


138 


128 


113 


110 


110 


104 


90 


73 


Georgia _ 


217 


116 


112 


104 


102 


101 


100 


90 


70 


Florida _ 


178 


172 


223 


183 


176 


174 


172 


166 


141 


Kentucky _ 


200 


140 


1»39 


134 


130 


129 


127 


115 


97 


Tennessee 


200 


137 


134 


130 


127 


125 


123 


114 


96 


Alabama 


177 


154 


154 


145 


145 


143 


143 


129 


102 


Mississippi 


218 


136 


134 


1 2(1 


123 


122 


122 


112 


92 


United States 


170 


127 


124- 


119 


117 


116 


115 


106 


89 



NOTE : 
to correction. 



The above includes all farm lands with improvements. Figures for 1932 preliminary, subject 




stance, the farmer may show above item 
(1) the total acres in a given crop and 
for each of the following items the 
given amounts for each feature shown, 
concerning the acreage for the particular 
crop. Then by taking the amount noted for 
each item and dividing by the number of 
acres, the cost per acre may be approximated. 
Under item 19 the cost per acre would be 
shown, which divided by the average yield per 
acre, will show by item 21 the average cost 
per bushel or pound for the crop. Follow- 
ing this information should be shown the 
amount received, or the value placed on the 
crop, including any by product By deducting 
the cost of production from the total value 
one may see the profit or loss. However it 
should be remembered that taxes, rentals or 
values placed on the usage of the land should 
also be deducted from the value of the crop 
or added to the cost of production. 




Many combines are now harvesting wheat in North Carolina 



New Hanover County specializes in com- 
mercial truck crops (lettuce). 



CAR LOT SHIPMENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES BY COUNTIES FOR 31 

SEASON, 1931 



COUNTIES 



c-2 



B os 
IB £ 

a" 3 



So 



3 



Anson 

Avery 

Beaufort- _ 

Bladen 

Buncombe- 
Camden 



Carteret- 
Chowan- 



Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland- 
Currituck 

Duplin 

Edgecombe 

Forsyth 

Gaston 



Harnett-. 
Haywood- 



Hoke 

Johnston-. 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

McDowell- 



Mitchell 

Montgomery-- 

Moore 

New Hanover- 
Onslow 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Pitt 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Surry 

Transylvania-. 
Tyrrell 



1336 
2 



62 
1 



17 



1 

25 



20 
_ 7 



20 



2 

153 



3 __. 



61 



12 



630 
391 
28 
58 
45 
30 
486 
634 
18 



3 
74 



28 



— 228 
11 

1 



35 

~-Z 374 



20 _. 



1 

29 
28 
1 
i 



215 



_-_ _-_ 73 -— 4 
139 43 



670 
804 



2 465 145 



125 
2 7 



54 
123 



47 

2 



6 



73 



11 
11 
15 



6 

311 



1271 
1282 
28 
7 

209 



94 

22 

106 



2 
84 



892 
1 



1 
22 



22 4 

46 31 

2 



9 

524 
._ 200 
._ 502 



10 



Wake- 
Was bin gton- 



Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Pick-up Cars 

Boat Shipments- 



22 
54 



._ 920 



2 
36 



37 



._ 188 
797 



30 



107 



10 



30 



93 



40 



90 
12 
1362 
11 
19 
633 
814 
59 
707 
88 
110 
643 
2001 
18 
5 
1 
1 
32 
93 
7 
1 

215 
» 
1 

22 
8 
1 

59 
5 

670 
1006 
945 
17 
1429 
1682 
382 
17 
211 
905 
593 
327 
631 
93 
1 

942 
10 
376 
6 

1138 
15 
92 
317 



Total above- 



134 



8 710 



59 116 189 110 12 125 439 



19 498 239 



4 2564 554 61 8680 1228 435 158 



3 2486 18831 



Truck Shipments (Incomplete) — Records not available, but truck shipments increasing rapidly 



_753 



CAR LOT SHIPMENTS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM NORTH CAROLINA 



Apples 

Apples, Dried 

Beans, String 

Beans, Dry 

Cabbage 

Cantaloupes 

Carrots 

Celery 

Cucumbers 

Deciduous Fruits 

Egg Plant 

Grapes 

Lettuce 

Onions 

Peaches 

Peas, Green 

Peppers 

Potatoes, Sweet 

Potatoes, White 

Rutabagas and Turnips. 

Spinach 

Strawberries 

Tomatoes 

Vegetables, Mixed 

Watermelons 



SEASON'S 



1924 I 1925 



1927 



1928 1929 1930 



1931 SEASON 



Jan. Feb. I Mar. 



Apr. May June 



July Aug. 
I 



Sept Oct. 



| Total 
Nov. Dec. 1931 



220 


433 


344 


261 


559 


6 

459 


1 


1 


3 


364 


265 


371 


620 


401 


665 




3 


11 


175 


1,639 


1,562 



718 



10 
654 
3,475 
5 
25 
1,668 

758 
1,542 



1 

714 



215 1,657 



11 
720 
6.56G 
2 
21 
2,046 
8 

1,093 
664 



537 

2.024 
491 
18 
1.198 
4,052 
3 
11 
1.634 
8 

853 
991 



393 
2 

550 

347 
397 
28 

869 
4 

1 

540 
2 

2,155 
596 
11 
1,364 
6,713 

2 

1,253 
27 
673 
1,301 



80 


231 


1 


4 


50.4 


690 


293 


254 


606 


304 


11 


1 


1 




935 


812 



1 

447 

1~702 
570 
39 
1,692 
7,555 
4 
21 
2,202 
33 
761 
1,085 



177 
3 

736 

261 
88 
33 



63 
3 

998 

214 
19 
27 



89 543 
54 5 
182 7 



38 
2 



52 


51 


2 


3 


1 


38 



651 



2 

477 

3,242 
685 
107 
760 
9,736 
3 
2 

2,151 
3 

517 
1,252 



2 
5 

363 
2 

1,250 
368 
125 
597 
6,018 
7 
5 

1,483 

2 

402 
758 



4 

364 



204 294 



2,139 
482 
183 
842 

7,355 
1 



488 



27 
66 



841 1,696 



85 



98 120 107 



49 3 
71 8,325 
1 



221 



10 2 
183 37 25 
51 9 1 



47 
2 



756 
118 
540 
1,765 



8 1,220 



82 



1 151 6 
128 21 1 
1,448 1.038 



127 
8 

710 
61 
189 
110 
12 

439 



498 
4 

2,564 
554 
61 
798 
8,680 
3 

1,228 
158 
239 

2,486 



Total Cars. 



11,712 16,802 15,222 17,228 18,543 21,233 13,336 16,664 



86 98 120 326 2,530 9,501 2,934 2,993 103 120 64 65 18,929 



32 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS FROM THE NORTH CAROLINA FARM CENSUS 



District and Counties 



Field | 
Workers! 

and | 
Tenants I 
(No.) 



(No.) 



1929 I 1930 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain ( NW 
District 4 — Buncombe. 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.)- 
Dlstrict 2 — Alamance- 
Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.)_ 
District 5 — Alexander. 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.). 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan . 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 
District 6 — Beaufort. 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.)_ 



TOTAL LAND IN FARMS 

(Acres) 



I 



1929 1930 



1931 



CULTIVATED BY OWNERS 
(Acres) 



CULTIVATED BY TENANTS 
(Acres) 



IDLE LAND (Cleared 
(Acres) 



1929 



1930 



STATE- 



15,737 
24,294 
13,637 
20,854 
42,658 
24,124 
47,669 
41,358 
230,331 
26,185 
22,987 
15,283 
9,255 
4,967 
19,998 
19,124 
14,925 
9,990 
17,510 
22,108 
17,908 
12,229 
40,503 
8,928 
5.455 
17,582 
284,937 
41,863 
17,218 
12,054 
39,033 
24,550 
29,104 
62,411 
27,092 
19,502 
35,277 
32,598 
14,827 
29,935 
385,464 
26,671 
50,025 
46,139 
58,597 
20,140 
55,398 
17.522 
61,566 
65,999 
55,014 
457,071 
33,338 
32,094 
60,844 
42,225 
35,492 
38,883 
23,163 
32,303 
21,907 
41,376 
60,541 
422,166 
29,204 
10,826 
20,811 
13,317 
1,386 
16.476 
24,967 
44,543 
12,845 
20,295 
25,255 
27,336 
26,012 
22,442 
10,416 
11,874 
318,005 
34,495 
8.729 
22,594 
12,086 
15,760 
75,559 
12,933 
23,620 
13,951 
26,350 
34,830 
19,516 
300,423 
31,171 
15,733 
49.463 
32,824 
47,583 
50,936 
14,343 
4,512 
24,534 
23.965 
51,052 
75,920 
9.899 
431,935 

445,554 1 34,41 2| 22,937,341 23,290,030 20 494,33612,830,332 



1,250 
2.052 
1.430 
3,132 
6.466 
1,757 
8,138 
2,952 
27,177. 
2,871 
2,690 
2,760 
1,516 
1,129 
1,750 
630 
1,771 
1,395 
2,614 
3,201 
2,503 
2,414 
8,155 
1,909 
727 
2,180 
40,215 
4,437 
4,640 
1,747 
2,058 
6,033 
5,078 
5,785 
2,303 
4,601 
7,002 
4,838 
2,911 
4,602 
56,035 
3,514 
6,771 
4,858 
4,597 
1,977 
7,554 
1,666 
4,343 
4,756 
18,488 
58,524 
8,858 
3,432 
8,835 
3.308 
5,534 
6,556 
1,887 
2,922 
2,565 
5,791 
11,614 
61,302 
4,087 
1,099 
1,316 
1,835 
127 
8,826 
1,611 
9,076 
3,815 
3,719 
14.507 
7,340 
1,802 
510 
861 
1,341 
61,872 
3,485 
1.395 
2,627 
7,240 
649 
15,606 
2,116 
6,894 
910 
10,066 
6,353 
7,015 
64,356 
1,547 
1,326 
5,096 
7,048 
7,922 
8,619 
3,490 
185 
3,266 
3,151 
22,009 
9,566 
2,788 
76,073 



145 
492 
104 
638 
1,508 
102 
993 
856 
4,838 
1,034 
401 
687 
262 
146 
1.529 
320 
343 
560 
373 
987 
234 
563 
1,624 
141 
168 
425 
9,797 
765 
2,195 
678 
1,544 
2,160 
1,676 
932 
726 
1,794 
1,255 
1.393 
1,270 
1,405 
17,793 
554 
846 
1,035 
1,754 
778 
1,962 
657 
560 
1.796 
3,603 
13,645 
1,815 
1,399 
2,626 
689 
1,142 
2,453 
605 
597 
1,270 
1,387 
2,654 
16,637 
1,789 
473 
868 
1,380 
4 

3,755 
612 
3,370 
1,630 
1.718 
3,678 
2,416 
517 
628 
195 
572 
23,605 
1,560 
367 
1,014 
2,380 
657 
4,080 
1,017 
2,497 
261 
4,629 
3.144 
2,955 
24,561 
898 
283 
1,701 
1,536 
2,294 
2,674 
1,128 
227 
1,004 
628 
6,894 
2,512 
1,857 
23,636 



127,397 
321,508 
124,966 
216.407 
314,189 
181,075 
430,778 
192,045 
1,908,365 
284,280 
164,810 
292,799 
61,726 
83.838 
163,248 
161,714 
139,177 
135,305 
157,866 
234,461 
97,071 
85,022 
283,030 
89,365 
96,191 
135,287 
2,614,690 
211,075 
226,503 
140,698 
224,623 
241,985 
326,510 
284,448 
179,496 
245,045 
290.918 
238,936 
160,190 
220,277 
2,990,704 
157,300 
226,680 
347,636 
265,887 
161,774 
322,340 
132,373 
431,312 
234,069 
453,679 
2,733,050 
299,112 
189,643 
270,222 
186,064 
165,606 
252.970 
294,571 
372.834 
218,762 
222,345 
376,539 
2,848,668 
345,685 
138,154 
136,304 
120,413 
4,802 
287,245 
182,732 
412,966 
175,752 
250,575 
282,191 
259,075 
103,134 
108,753 
54.298 
71,308 
2,933,387 
323,141 
83,201 
351,605 
160,276 
95,877 
439,717 
237.252 
220,372 
74,583 
349,314 
249,662 
206.150 
2,791,150 
356.349 
351.040 
448,758 
285,620 
407,886 
364,610 
145,449 
112.149 
262,926 
211.092 
521,011 
460,361 
190,076 
4,117,327 



136,917 
287,774 
126,827 
246,871 
282,220 
223,909 
427,454 
181,272 
1,913,244 
278,919 
170,042 
294,797 
89,558 
55.179 
267,988 
159,782 
199,752 
165,838 
143,223 
217,515 
104,934 
113,835 
266,675 
113,015 
198,118 
137,359 
2,976,529 
220,718 
216,056 
121,679 
205,234 
240,435 
326,672 
283,274 
181,103 
236,086 
292,249 
244,823 
163,173 
198,543 
2,930,045 
133,937 
210,775 
353,148 
290,462 
152,887 
310.806 
129,287 
399,668 
250,930 
456,236 
2,688,136 
310,389 
187,279 
280,370 
187,684 
161,048 
260,140 
242,518 
343,169 
224,086 
224,351 
419,315 
2,840,349 
321,346 
149,529 
125,247 
99,204 
2,963 
323,209 
175,362 
422.736 
206,819 
258,580 
283,510 
275,149 
103,882 
125,181 
55,442 
107,108 
3,035,267 
392,376 
148,868 
336,953 
155,297 
143,369 
434,948 
259,146 
230,088 
67,676 
359,249 
280,736 
204,775 
3,013,481 
394.865 
160.300 
390,307 
294,903 
388.101 
295,489 
142,488 
125,767 
272,501 
265,563 
502.043 
463,380 
197,272 
3,892,979 



137,779 
251,042 
96,514 
172,296 
253,314 
191.908 
404,018 
163,495 
1,670,366 
207,459 
148,835 
224,078 
53,554 
28.798 
243,943 
118,736 
122,615 
126,913 
112,959 
217.515 
87,374 
87,203 
265,325 
77,946 
47,543 
117,055 
2,287,851 
225,933 
195,773 
132,933 
193,263 
230,286 
274,131 
258,996 
178,606 
235,563 
286,188 
221,035 
173,261 
222,232 
2,828,200 
126,977 
206,274 
317,352 
359,326 
147,148 
287,437 
126,601 
333,568 
236,556 
433,143 
2,574,382 
278.424 
167.971 
262,232 
148,304 
158,510 
226,054 
202,519 
223,935 
210,803 
201,715 
396,684 
2,477,151 
321,086 
104,585 
96,563 
94,048 
4,802 
301,981 
141,045 
345.084 
198,242 
231,659 
283,802 
242,367 
90,073 
109,596 
48,487 
62,540 
2,675,960 
405,289 
43,824 
210,716 
149,802 
74,082 
445,920 
215,052 
204,66 

77,800 
335,122 
227,605 
219,611 
2,609,488 
385,220 
112,974 
287,422 
250.667 
370.197 
317,565 
131,978 
36,020 
200,247 
162,109 
505,409 
443,348 
167,782 
3,370,938 



1931 | 1929 | 1930 



1931 



14,128 
29,605 
15,245 
20,857 
40,430 
22,759 
53,548 
35,556 
232,128 
26,808 
24,573 
15,576 
9,842 
5.521 
17,380 
17,900 
13,812 
11,961 
16,981 
21.444 
18,208 
9,667 
35.662 
10,095 
7.377 
18,140 
280,947 
42,137 
15.034 
12,095 
37,205 
26,425 
30,094 
61,729 
24,994 
17,176 
36,886 
31,384 
17.4 
29.454 
382,091 
25,667 
47,871 
44,682 
52,113 
23,707 
58,051 
16,592 
69,7381 
55,262 
55,238 
448,921 
34,504 
29,470j 
52,679 
36,68lj 
37,389 
41,404 
21.8231 
35,591 
20,000[ 
44,566 
60,273 
414,380 
29,350 
13,022i 
17,999 
13,426 
478 
37,807 
21,885 
46.820 
13,820 
20,471 
31,175 
25,471 
25,562 
23,295 
10,619 
11,853 
343,053 
45,044 
8,888 
28,398 
10,457 
12,911 
71,861 
12.038 
25,3441 
17.409 
28,565 
40,581 
22,220 
323,716, 
28.646 
15,627 
51.506, 
31.636| 
43,656 
49,569 
13,991 
5,149 
22,559 
20,205 
45,201 
73,826 
9,113 
410,684 
2^835,920 



16,785 
34,433 
12,974 
19,429 
43,674 
20,857 
56,016 
31,123 
235,291 
27,314 
25,553 
18,817 
7,881 
6,684 
17,827 
19,579 
14,156 
10,569 
15.270 
21,444 
18,138 
9,660 
43,104 
9,131 
9.200 
17,718 
292,045 
41,120 
17.042 
11.876 
35.821 
28,478 
25,221 
52,927 
26,518 
20,950 
33,572 
33,203 
19,603 
27,356 
373,687 
23,822 
46,07 
41,746 
59,815 
22,292 
65,083 
17,712 
61,053 
57,455 
54.084 
449,139 
32,482 
31,693 
46,661 
33,548 
43,225 
42,344 
19,971 
32,427 
23,591 
47,752 
63,462 
417,156 
27,521 
16,944 
21,100 
12.448 
1,386 
30,351 
20,434 
50,551 
15,162 
25,088 
41,932 
42,285 
21,760 
22,737 
11,531 
13,177 
374,407 
50,810 
11,245 
23,578 
13,678 
13,339 
81,724 
12,958 
27,076 
16,522 
35,951 
39,124 
30,641 
356,646 
31,094 
14,714 
51,098 
31,379 
44.0S2 
48,464 
12,971 
3,937 
24,401 
19,795 
52,405 
81,920 
12,573 
428,833 



8,182 
8,064 
1,513 
9,305 
20,152 
2,239 
18,707 
16,975 
85,137 
10,124 
11.086 
10,027 
3,688 
886 
6,163 
5,734 
3.355 
7,278 
3,940 
12,515 
3,074 
10,207 
36,055 
2,516 
4,068 
6,299 
137,015 
17,325 
30,252 
15,847 
24,920 
53,454 
31,328 
18,573 
13,780 
32,109 
33,019 
25,330 
24,841 
30,070 
350,848 
8,327 
25,733 
20,257 
23,413 
21.101 
50,763 
13,143 
20,894 
36,949 
80,011 
300,591 
63,004 
37,818 
73,843 
22,417 
26,906 
60,756 
11,153 
19,028 
38,554 
25,484 
74.824 
453,787 
55,524 
19,737 
21,354 
17,674 
129 
116,124 
13,735 
95,885 
41,866 
46,757 
90,994 
69,930 
21,166 
18,967 
5,013 
15,868 
650,723 
39,537 
4,761 
19,633 
58,132 
16.601 
99,733 
23,302 
63.138 
10,840 
109,233 
69.216 
77,529 
591,655 
19,035 
4,148 
27,498 
49,298 
42,266 
46,183 
43,940 
2,647 
17,398 
8,016 
152,142 
57.516 
62,025 
532,112 



3,758 
6,603 
1,448 
8,496 
24,250 
2.139 
14,518 
19.641 
80,853 
12,446 
9.266 
9,567 
4,257 
1,323 
10.882 
9,483 
3,490 
5.984 
3,980 
13,334 
2,640 
11,363 
46,843 
2,327 
3,250 
7.436 
157,871 
16.112 
29,057 
15,584 
24,796 
49,871 
31,613 
20,593 
14,567 
37,035 
26,764 
24,924 
23,463 
31.568 
345,947 
9,532 
27,076 
21,825 
29,917 
21,474 
50,802 
14,586 
18.250 
46,211 
74.716 
314,389 
57,475 
41,577 
79.171 
28,985 
28,390 
58,641 
12,763 
13,849 
35,883 
23,441 
66,930 
447,105 
51,291 
19.860 
19,304 
16,263 
94 

117,662 
14,606 
95,019 
41,675 
44,221 
84,008 
71,800 
25,997 
20,756 
4,737 
16,978 

644,271 
38,767 
5,622 
14,844 
58,825 
18,502 

100,241 
26,688 
59,647 
7,755 

107.946 
79,322 
75,171 

593,330 
21,048 
4,327 
23,665 
49,549 
46,335 
46,729 
39,936 
2,912 
20,268 
10,838 

158,654 
59,610 
60,939 

544,810 



1929 



1930 | 1931 



7,345 
11,347 
1,825 
10,392 
27,319 
5,509 
19,466 
20.160 
103,363 
14,216 
7,823 
9,433 
5,275 
242 
11,295 
5,091 
4,740 
6,750 
3,612 
13,334 
3,054 
9,979 
40,061 
1,261 
2,472 
7,132 
145,770 
20,270 
25.531 
13,770 
20,870 
48,180 
26,590 
24,518 
14.658 
33.707 
37,805 
28,848 
22,979 
34,775 
352,501 
10,784 
27,883 
21,201 
20.692 
24.942 
42.243 
15,234 
18,537 
39,280 
68,735 
289,531 
63,969 
37,472 
87,830 
26,189 
18,197 
48,218 
11,145 
11,840 
32,084 
24,058 
73,483 
434,485 
51,798 
16,869 
15,968 
17,476 
129 
101,571 
15,503 
91,400 
38,234 
38.159 
69,609 
56,773 
26,037 
13,717 
3,483 
16,360 
673,086 
29,652 
2.709 
16,833 
51,263 
16.973 
92.523 
27,199 
50,686 
8.117 
93,374 
65.752 
71.256 
526,337 
18.659 
3,814 
20,181 
35.295 
42.009 
42,587 
34,936 
2.067 
21,200 
8,248 
133.548 
46,724 
52,647 
461,915 



2,867 
21,209 
4,817 
13,171 
15,121 
9,827 
22,069 
21,873 
110,964 
16,848 
9,157 
8,117 
5,434 
4,583 
8,639 
16,207 
10.789 
6,190 
12,416 
18,450 
3,850 
6,321 
20,024 
5,804 
5,777 
7.989 
166,695 
30,243 
28,586 
9,938 
36,843 
15,721 
32,402 
26,032 
15,572 
28,595 
31,285 
26,526 
14,950 
8,935 
305,628 
11,118 
17,837 
34,363 
36,579 
13,228 
35,534 
7,505 
32,581 
13,553 
33,997 
236,295 
20,524 
13,598 
11,229 
9,421 
12,984 
21,882 
11,720 
19,023 
9,283 
15,589 
16,776 
162,029 
3,458 
2.301 
2,059 
5,241 
137 
5,986 
2,113 
13,941 
3,611 
2,964 
6,255 
4,146 
4,280 
367 
756 
1,479 
59,094 
6,653 
4,004 
8,533 
2,726 
2,565 
10,013 
12,161 
9.198 
1.627 
4,694 
13,427 
1,922 
77,523 
8,145 
8,261 
9,856 
16,206 
15,198 
8,928 
8.483 
3,524 
10.823 
7.317 
10,887 
15,551 
3,597 
126,776 



3,730 
20,577 
13,206 
13.312 
17,074 
3,421 
19,980 
14,864 
106,164 
14.735 
10,473 
9,685 
2,574 
4.627 
10.581 
16.075 
8,429 
4.753 
8,007 
17,199 
5,376 
4.811 
14,922 
6,066 
4,713 
8.402 
161,428 
29,961 
25.345 
10,952 
20.795 
17,616 
31,263 
28.630 
14,028 
24,573 
16.217 
20,299 
11,291 
16,255 
267,225 
12,899 
15,014 
29,811 
40,444 
12,604 
23,971 
5,540 
33,937 
17.882 
35,830 
227,932 
11,652 
16,028 
3,316 
8,168 
7,280 
21,880 
8,405 
15,337 
18,459 
14,217 
17,756 
142,498 
4,585 
2,175 
1,697 
3,918 
39 
19,323 
3.370 
14,471 
4,153 
3,662 
8,181 
10,210 
2,715 
2,840 
1,016 
840 
83,195 
4,985 
2,803 
7,531 
2,723 
1.554 
9,438 
9,411 
6,739 
1,239 
4,044 
14,510 
2,785 
67,762 
9,293 
4,091 
6,396 
14,867 
15,709 
6.769 
3.780 
3,613 
8,155 
7,401 
9,426 
13,274 
6,807 
109,581 



9,072 
29.200 
7.124 
16.192 
16,510 
6,349 
24.177 
10,313 
118,937 
18,385 
4,266 
8,957 
3,873 
1,719 
9,586 
20,323 
11,189 
6,034 
5,940 
17,199 
11,980 
7,063 
5,218 
5,519 

I, 573 
19,566 

158,390 
17,029 
17,152 
8,489 
29,755 
15,671 
26,316 
28,988 
10,951 
21,346 
10,817 
15,493 
11,843 
27,380 
241,230 
7,687 
17,356 
20,583 
31,697 
11,469 
33,548 
3,788 
26,776 
13,687 
27,399 
193,990 
8,433 
12,253 
16,717 
23,474 
5,860 
28,114 
5,428 
5,427 
30.772 
9.174 
26.412 
172,064 
4,236 
6,567 
1,893 
3,000 
137 
18,321 
8,392 
37,320 
3,704 
5,471 
12,861 
13,365 
1,250 
23.521 
477 
343 
140,868 
5,638 
1.053 
3,637 
3.553 
795 
12,956 
7.654 
3,005 
2,566 
3.756 
9.197 
1,988 
66,798 

II. 447 
2.216 

18,490 
9,736 

13,025 
3,754 
2.466 
2,659 
5.683 

16,723 

13,038 
8,310 
9,350 
116,897 



2,927,20413,101,868 3,128,576 2,886,088[1,244,894 1 ,1 55,785 1 ,198,164 



Other Than Potatoes. Total land in farms varies widely f jr weakly reported counties. 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS FROM THE NORTH CAROLINA FARM CENSUS 



33 



Districts and Counties 



Sows of Breeding Age 



Hogs Sold or Slaughtered 



District 1 — Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW) 
District 4 — Buncombe- - 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.)_. 

District 2 — Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) — 
District 5 — Alexander. 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (O- 

Dlstrict 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (HE.).. 

Dlstlrct 6 — Beaufort 

Oarteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones . 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (8E.)_ 

STATE 





(Number) 






( Number) 


] 929 


I 930 


1931 


192 9 


1930 [ 


600 


711 


443 


388 




787 


614 


825 


8,222 




291 


258 


192 


2.532 


2 1^8 


566 


399 


277 


4,647 




612 


240 


250 


6.675 




924 


159 


367 


3.355 


2.707 


62 6 


642 


452 


9.430 


8,569 




2 67 


1891 4,789 


4,382 


4,704 


3,290 


2,995 


40,038 


38,878 


475 


326 


151 


6,056 


5,573 


3 80 


259 


275 


3,000 


3,022 


241 


248 


253 


2,919 


2,575 


486 


397 


213 


3,073 


2,774 


338 


316 


202 


1,005 


1,202 


467 


4 89 


273 


3,048 


3,533 


306 


245 


137 


2.886 


2,668 


649 


533 


413 


3,933 


3,4 13 


234 


121 


121 


2,044 


1,614 


600 


493 


288 


4.326 


3,776 


385 


232 


232 


3,867 


3,514 


215 


173 


164 


3,000 


2,469 


84 


62 


13 


1,343 


946 


370 


600 


249 


5,714 


4,967 


187 


78 


67 


1,392 


1,351 


255 


185 


167 


1,510 


1,275 


258 


' 


226 


3.391 


3,109 


5,930 


5,035 


3,444 


52,507 


47,781 


64 6 


567 


556 


6,992 


6,803 


3 79 


208 


157 


4,572 


4,136 


235 


72 


169 


2,709 


2,762 


360 


488 


294 


5.690 


5,185 


613 


444 


605 


7.028 


6,727 


550 


380 


315 


8,458 


7,237 


933 


596 


495 


7,926 


7,395 


369 


218 


274 


4,249 


4,347 






275 


5,236 


5,412 


409 


oOo 


144 


3,771 


4,135 


1 84 


171 


147 


5,302 






a«? 


251 


2,678 


o,087 






408 


5,268 


4,796 




4 480 


4.090 


69,879 


67,006 




'^33 


200 


3,234 


o ,uyi 


±<k- 




451 


5.726 


3,880 




84 b 


689 


9,520 


10,149 


9 7 S 


1,189 


667 


8.539 


9,949 


374 




305 


3,955 


3,613 


888 


<?oo 

633 


468 


8.365 


8.184 


502 


225 


141 


2,875 


2 902 






819 


9,435 


7,824 


S3 Q 6 


:*° 


510 


7,771 


7,173 






870 


12,527 


11,798 




5 , , 


5,120 


71,947 


68,566 


n 8o 


o 24 


568 


5,809 


5,02 1 




413 


461 


5,720 




3 2 -> 




173 


6.327 


f 561 


3 2 3 


''93 


289 


3,724 


a a oa 


— o i 


J ™jj 


303 


3.947 


3,924 


- o 2 




378 


6.084 




itii 


OIK 


217 


3.134 


2 , ->o 2 




OAO 


230 


3,713 


3,057 


4 L o 


^•>- 


677 


3,004 


3,045 


691 


i. KQ 


433 


6,242 


5,247 




4 50 


682 


8,934 


8,162 


5 460 


3 465 


4.411 


56,638 


51 ,850 






2,669 


IK. 943 


18,982 


4 i U 


O ( o 


789I 7,614 


6,261 






1,580 


12,710 


12,654 


1 91 Q 


KA 
1,154 


1.273 


7,667 


6,883 


53 


33 


53 


423 


~ ~ ~ ~ 


2 ,09 1 




2.567 


11,802 


1 o ,68 o 




1 975 


1,957 


13,726 


13,956 


2,oo2 


2,223 


2,505 


15,589 


14,707 


1,819 


1,878 


1,904 


11.588 


12,623 






2,333 


18,151 


14,784 


1 49** 




1.462 


12.243 


1 1,593 




1 ,94 8 


2.170 


16,171 


14,207 




174^ 


1.723 


14,081 


13,507 


i all 




1.918 


17,780 


15,238 




747 


1,030 


10,691 


7,560 


i noi 




1.378 


7,301 


9,609 






27,312 


196,490 


1 ob /a'J 


2 , Oo4 


i Q«a 


2,277 


19.628 


17,757 


o o ^ 


o 5 6 


699 


5.451 


6,307 


1 ,o 84 


1,163 


1,102 


8,418 


6,895 


1,570 


1, 607 


1.968 


7,821 


6,696 






664 


4,806 


4 ,2 10 


4 515 




5.200 


31,298 


_ o.yoo 


1 586 




1.614 


11,873 


11,259 




2 408 


2,506 


10,888 


10,059 


683 


549 


515 


5.871 




2,936 


2,633 


3.452 


17,707 


i2]eoi 


3,037 


3,013 


2.471 


19,649 


18,863 


1,488 


1,082 


1.617 


10,448 


8,069 


23,127 


21,276 


24,085 


153,858 


137,433 


1,538 


1,490 


1,488 


12,995 


8,977 


1,793 


1,503 


1,330 


12,813 


10,450 


3,046 


2,483 


2,732 


20,094 


17,052 


1,506 


1,189 


1.299 


9.125 


9,270 


3,873 


3,856 


4,025 


28.499 


24,958 


1,372 


1.258 


1,164 


9.499 


10,484 


591 


489 


506 


3.552 


3,437 


143 


137 


189 


775 


853 


2,484 


2,200 


3,133 


16.166 


15,386 


1,824 


1.577 


1,776 


12.684 


11,029 


3,180 


3,183 


3,439 


16,020 


17,854 


3,735 


3.197 


3,669 


25.333 


22.950 


339 


500 


587 


1,739 


3,358 


25,424 


23,062 


25,337 


169,294 


156,058 


106,737 


92,710 


96,794 


| 810,651 


753,822 



1931 



Barley 



(Acres) 
T931~ 




26,071 



34 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS FROM THE NORTH CAROLINA FARM CENSUS 







1 Pure 


Thresh- 


Commercial | Radios 


'Torses and Mules 


[ Bred 


ing 


| Fertilizers 


on 


( Working 


Age) 


Bulls 


Ma- 


Used 


Farms 








1 chines 


(Tons) 




1929 


1930 


1930 


1931 


1931 


1929 


1.530 


1.516 


61 


3 


1,267 


15 


3.037 


2,672 


102 


31 


1,916 


22 


936 


879 


29 


3 


598 


38 


1.904 


1,629 


91 


21 


1.050 


40 


4.473 


4.292 


44 


26 


7,635 


32 


1,955 


1.768 


45 


26 


2,058 


11 


4,022 


3,761 


97 


36 


2,992 


6) 


3,311 


3,181 


53 


16 


4,171 


55 


21,168 


19,698 


522 


162 


21 ,677 


274 


3,000 


2.771 


159 


25 





107 


2.032 


1,884 


27 


19 


1,623 


31 


1.729 


1.876 


22 


1 


811 


13 


881 


793 


18 


2 


303 


8 


621 


573 


15 


1 


46 


2 


1.532 


1.671 


139 


11 


843 


20 


1,516 


1.521 


59 


10 


1.406 


138 


1.540 


1.367 


43 


10 


659 


21 


1.186 


1.109 


20 


11 


355 


15 


1,650 


1.510 


45 




536 


28 


2,740 


2.752 


71 


__ 





45 


1,346 


1.185 


34 


4 


721 


39 


1,124 


1.017 


10 


9 


2.145 


49 


4,413 


4.080 


60 


60 


9.359 


85 


902 


912 


24 


11 


175 


8 


507 


526 


16 


5 


625 


36 


1.593 


1,542 


34 


13 


817 


23 


28,312 


27,089 


796 


192 


20,424 


668 


3.813 


3.818 


96 


46 


5,234 


81 


3.258 


3,128 


15 


10 


6,199 


50 


2.081 


1.834 


23 


8 


3,455 


29 


3.560 


3,550 


112 


46 


4,918 


85 


5 050 


4,819 


15 


24 


12,612 


69 


5,818 


5.437 


28 


12 


10.614 


77 


4.868 


4,621 


108 


46 


3,091 


158 


2 848 


2,699 


49 


— 





60 


4,098 


4.027 


14 


16 


9.316 


42 


4 054 


3,957 


17 


9 


8.584 


130 


4.244 


4,118 


26 


8 


7.865 


38 


3.0U7 


3 054 


14 


6 


9.344 


77 


3.383 


3.257 


11 


9 


6.794 


41 


50,172 


48,319 


528 


240 


88,026 


937 


2,009 


1.843 


23 


18 


1.816 


18 


4.122 


3,677 


89 


28 


5.035 


168 


4.313 


4,292 


63 


23 


5.742 


76 


3,957 


4.247 


89 


60 


4,798 


96 


2,418 


2,451 


80 


29 


2.136 


31 


5,629 


5,413 


78 


30 


6,828 


93 


1,918 


1.797 


9 


1 


5,864 


4 


4,764 


4,404 


95 


44 


5.674 


75 


4,635 


5.009 


78 


52 


5,645 


118 


8,328 


7,426 


54 


67 


24.220 


176 


42,093 


40,559 


658 


352 


67,758- 


855 


4,666 


4,773 


18 


21 


14,723 


56 


4.097 


3.877 


74 


35 


3,566 


136 


7.840 


7.732 


27 


28 


36,239 


137 


3,527 


3,620 


84 


5 


4.571 


73 


3.062 


3.596 


45 


14 


4,982 


105 


5,780 


5,604 


118 


22 


6.595 


215 


2.037 


1.694 


25 


10 


3.324 


18 


2,465 


2.320 


19 


25 


5,368 


44 


2,411 


2,305 


7 


26 


6,519 


18 


3.882 


3,874 


71 


35 


4,288 


55 


8,431 


7,861 


61 


53 


13.648 


126 


48.798 


47.256 


549 


274 


103,823 


983 


5,247 


4,894 


10 


103 


9.311 


31 


1.618 


1,638 


11 


29 


3,815 


29 


2,145 


1,822 


15 


23 


2,462 


31 


1,542 


1,397 


13 


__ 


4.879 


48 


65 


69 











5 


7,206 


7.210 


20 


158 


21,101 


74 


2,408 


2.301 


3 


49 


4.429 


21 


7,510 


7,215 


18 


129 


17,469 


64 


3.418 


3,179 


13 


87 


7,166 


49 


4,121 


3,881 


25 


72 


14,293 


30 


7,750 


7.289 


25 


17 


26,525 


100 


5,778 


5,288 


124 


97 


9,669 


78 


2.492 


2,325 


36 


47 


6.007 


38 


2,171 


1.937 


12 


89 


2,391 


29 


940 


796 


2 


14 


3.706 


11 


1.385 


1.477 


4 


108 


3,253 


1 


55,796 


52,718 


331 


1,022 


136,476 


639 


4 335 


4.305 


54 


25 


14,867 


65 


820 


840 


10 





3,423 


17 


2 515 


2,438 


17 


288 


6.163 


20 


4 530 


4.240 


13 


8 


15.650 


71 


1,407 


1,293 





37 


1,921 


12 


10,487 


9.680 


61 


28 


37.769 


137 


1.842 


2.001 


10 





5,439 


8 


4.380 


4.530 


29 





15,396 


34 


1.173 


1.234 


21 


44 


4,531 


12 


8,546 


8,010 


25 


32 


30.397 


71 


6,535 


7,033 


38 


8 


186,836 


54 


6,097 


5.870 


5 


12 


24,154 


70 


52,667 


51,474 


283 


482 


340,546 


671 


2,355 


2,279 


21 


27 


5,678 


34 


1,398 


1,235 


14 


2 


2,134 


21 


4,506 


4,486 


19 


3 


12,385 


45 


3,232 


3,502 


23 


39 


13,296 


44 


5.210 


5,190 


20 




17.873 


77 


4,673 


5,164 


63 


11 


18.891 


84 


2,409 


2,265 


11 


4 


8,469 


24 


484 


536 


5 


3 


1,899 


24 


2,099 


2.138 


11 


15 


6,826 




1,989 


1,346 


23 


7 


3,243 


38 


8.498 


9,251 


23 


36 


41,543 


66 


6.924 


6.396 


43 


43 


28.248 


71 


2.520 


2.781 


9 


13 


10.874 


71 


46,297 


46,569 


286 


203 


171,359 


599 


345,303 333.682 


3,952 


2,927 


960,089 | 5,526 



District and Counties 



District 1 — Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW). 
District 4 — Buncombe.. 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W) 

District 2 — Alamance_- 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford, 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vanca 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N)__ 

District 5 Alexander. _ 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln : 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanley 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.)___ 

District 6 — Beaufort 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 



Hens of Laying Age 
(Number) 



Milk Cows 
(Milking Age) 



1929 | 1930 I 1931 | 1929 



1931 



Sheep 
Ewes 
(Breed 
ing Age) 
T930 



STATE, 



28.533 
62,728 
16,918 
36.393 
55,601 
36.775 
72.034 
49,291 
358.273 
76.791 
48.335 
31,901 
18.307 
9.228 
38.144 
43.574 
27.926 
19.596 
25.777 
56.757 
21,522 
21,580 
58,558 
15,470 
11.231 
24.815 
549,512 
61.140 
47.823 
26.141 
62.290 
51.201 
61,451 
89.554 
46,691 
46,453 
58.842 
59.669 
28.246 
32.926 
672,427 
30.823 
63,261 
57.130 
59.072 
37.038 
72,556 
23.145 
94,316 
63,191 
95,116 
595,648 
48,395 
46.699 
94,255 
76,908 
47.673 
73,996 
27.960 
36 601 
22,465 
59,602 
110,052 
644,606 
47,638 
25,394 
25.376 
21,005 
2,000 
61,442 
24,220 
58.359 
26,833 
43,709 
66,267 
50,855 
38,997 
35,244 
23,663 
21,282 
672,284 
70,557 
14,097 
27.487 
46.334 
28.584 
91.910 
22,320 
38,292 
20.638 
84,134 
70,062 
46,602 
661,017 
30,629 
26,619 
53,903 
40.424 
59.300 
62,360 
20,988 
7.192 
26.345 
31,857 
76.026 
66.970 
21.274 
_523,887 
4,477,654 



28.999 
70,516 
18.410 
37.944 
61.993 
45,370 
81,278 
52,442 
396,952 
71.254 
51,713 
42,994 
19,533 
11,374 
42,844 
47,015 
26,588 
21.996 
28,367 
59,705 
24.300 
15.612 
62.946 
16.019 
12,342 
28.274 
582,876 
73,213 
47,718 
29,228 
70,345 
54,914 
64,790 
94.823 
48,501 
50.730 
64,075 
65,905 
32.269 
30.218 
726,729 
33,351 
60,524 
68,452 
67,445 
39,735 
77,912 
33,743 
87,928 
69,131 
95,328 
633,549 
56,074 
48,183 
93.778 
50.873 
47,344 
60,664 
22,725 
39,624 
21,425 
64,237 
117,590 
622,517 
50,936 
34,182 
24,353 
22,304 
1,899 
54,870 
28,437 
59,486 
28.296 
34,885 
73,932 
47,323 
45,255 
33,010 
23,291 
25.942 
588,401 
77.071 
14,753 
29,866 
47,916 
27,417 
97,730 
26,021 
25,309 
24,881 
82,147 
87.309 
46,791 
587,211 
34,452 
28,367 
58,040 
48.551 
69,249 
60,265 
20.220 
10,800 
28,774 
28,148 
90,735 
74,944 
19,596 
672^141 
47710^376" 



29,511 
60,417 
16.430 
33.934 
59.987 
40,422 
72,865 
45.072 
358,638 
66.04 
49,875 
38,452 
18.199 
7,844 
43.920 
44.1 
26,210 
18,811 
23.971 
59,70 
22 442 
14.191 
65,034 
15,540 
14.327 
26.282 
565,001 
71,161 
43,167 
21,620 
69,068 
52,398 
57,981 
89,281 
47,198 
53,828 
68,826 
61,135 
34.021 
33,396 
703,080 
32,197 
58,251 
62,551 
66,856 
44,249 
72,008 
30,970 
95.024 
61,194 
84.340 
607,640 
48.869 
46,089 
76,949 
44,216 
41,444 
51,186 
26.750 
43,737 
21.766 
60,873 
128,409 
590,288 
45,744 
33.324 
18,868 
22,851 
3,418 
49,622 
26,194 
58,450 
26,307 
31,954 
76.551 
49,146 
41.947 
32,899 
26.663 
23,542 
567,480 
89,217 
18.286 
27,393 
46,227 
29.223 
115,128 
24,169 
48.090 
24,947 
87,650 
66,430 
70.099 
646,859 
37,609 
28,274 
56,642 
47,661 
63,829 
64,128 
19,667 
7,959 
37,286 
28,635 
100,053 
84,400 
21,001 
697,144 
4,626,130 



3.065 
6.662 
1.839 
2,908 
4.134 
3,938 
6.179 
2,920 
31,645 
8,383 
2,868 
2.190 
1,288 
807 
3,128 
2,879 
2,570 
1,438 
2.483 
3,637 
2,025 
1.088 
3,992 
1,299 
840 
2,288 
43,203 
3,867 
2,359 
2,008 
4,152 
2,528 
3.632 
6.469 
2,816 
2,700 
2.953 
3,182 
1,661 
2.134 
40,461 
2.050 
4,178 
3,185 
4,294 
2,939 
5,246 
1,118 
4.726 
4,920 
5.561 
38,217 
3,046 
3,638 
5,615 
4,229 
2,672 
7,271 
1,433 
1,835 
1,507 
2.959 
6.029 
40,234 
795 
549 
590 
916 
60 
1,221 
576 
2.356 
693 
515 
1.874 
1,530 
1,641 
783 
556 
438 
15,093 
1,252 
310 
828 
793 
924 
2,887 
457 
1,408 
444 
1,546 
1,733 
728 
13,310 
1,316 
607 
1,551 
1,727 
1,920 
1,929 
776 
504 
596 
1,014 
2,119 
2.653 
664 
17,376 
239,539 



3,625 
7,599 
1,730 
2,434 
4.393 
4,111 
7,061 
2,711 
33,664 
7,913| 
2,213| 
2,476| 
1,333| 
509| 
4,253| 
2.810| 
2,487| 
1.366| 
2.366| 

2,244| 
869 
4.350 
1,230 
883 
2,531 
39,833 
4,198 
2,213 
2,074 
4,359 
2,438 
3,079 
5,645 
2,775| 
2,7601 
3,810| 
3,1871 
1,910] 
2,042 
40,490 
2,025 
4,001 
3,136 
5,135 
3,329 
5,269 
1,112 
4,854 
4,931 
4,819 
38,611 
2,549| 
3,612 
5,331 
3.882 
2,651 
6,638 
1,401 
1,841 
1,422 
2,987 
7,750 
40,064 
812 
507 
399 
839 
84 
1,346 
692 
2,265 
774 
469 
2,169 
1,491 
1,716 
1,387 
497 
527 
15,974 
1,461 
381 
894 
665 
772 
3,145| 
487 
999 
482 
1,553 
1.542 
900 
13,281 
1.398 
466 
1,600 
1,254 
2,167 
2,070 
581 
552 
913 
1,088 
2.353 
2,777 
780 
17,999 
239,91 6| 



6,938 
12.952 
3,382 
170 
51 
7,653 
671 
83 

31,900 

1,380 
3 

319 
819 

1,075 

4,487 
332 

1,98? 
12E 

1,113 

2,695 

1,481 
76 
35 
200 
426 

1,729 
18,283 
554 
47 
56 
119 
361 
407 
251 
126 
48 
329 
227 
343 
216 

3,084 
69 
141 
614 
614 
728 
312 
23 
547 
399 
465 

3,912 
109 
347 
175 
98 
225 
242 
150 
636 
142 
153 
343 

2,620 
386 
819 
332 
987 
80 
520 
310 
456 
266 
49 
147 
308 

1,945 

1,211 
717 
264 

8,797 
314 
115 
91 
50 
765 
290 
245 
129 
429 
192 
96 
17 

2,733 
167 
343 
157 
198 
903 
222 
33 
173 
107 
512 
349 
436 
571 

4,171 
75,500 



NORTH CAROLINA'S COUNTY 
FARM CENSUS SURVEYS 

In the Spring of 1932, there were thirty- 
six conferences held in as many counties 
of North Carolina. The object was to dis- 
cuss the purposes and local uses of crop 
reports and the Farm Census inventory in- 
formation. Unannounced contacts were 
made with certain county officials in twen- 
ty-one other counties. 

Prom these it was learned that the real 
local objection to crop report information 
was that it reacts through "speculators" to 
the disadvantage of farmers by lowering 
prices of farm products. A knowledge of 
the true usages is convincing that the op- 
posite effects results. However, the aver- 
age person is skeptical of this statement 
until it is proven. 

With perhaps 240,000 farmers reporting 
their farm inventory surveys this yea;r, it is 
full time that some specific facts about the 
real purposes and usages of such crop re- 
ports be made known. Practical and posi- 
tive answers are available for all objections 
that might be raised to this kind of infor- 
mation. 

Isn't it true that a man might live twen- 
ty years doing good deeds in a community, 
but at his first slip, all his previous records 
are forgotten? We do not consider ordinary 
good deeds as news, but scandal, crime, etc., 
gain front page space. That crop reports 
have occasionally resulted in drops in prices 
of products is true, but what of the many 
instances when prices were raised thereby? 
What of the frequent (often unconscious) 
aid and mental relief that crop information 
affords our farmers who are interested in 
crop probabilities? Why talk of the specks 
of objections, when an abundance of ad- 
vantages await our usages. 

Individual Farmers are Benefitted 

The County Agent or Agricultural Teach- 
er is by crop report information better en- 
abled to advise the individual farmers of 
his community. The mere reporting of his 
crops causes the farmer to mentally "size 
up" or to make an inventory of his crops. 
After a few years he finds this easy and in- 
teresting. Thus, he is initiated into busi- 
ness methods. He should go further and 
make a written inventory each year, includ- 
ing all items and their values — for his own 
information. Many farmers are invited to 
a meeting or to join in a shipment of live- 
stock or to buy fertilizers, etc., in order to 
sell or to buy to advantage. Farmers who 
are not listed on the Farm Census surveys 
are often denied this privilege. Why there 
are many advantages and NO real disad- 
vantages to farmers who aid in these 
essential COUNTY surveys. 

Is The Farm Census Reliable 

Consider the following comparisons: 
The county farm surveys are made at 
planting time, while the United States 
enumerations were made at the planting 
time of the next year's crop. The county 
Farm Census items are limited to 34 simple 
acreages and numbers of mature livestock, 
while the Federal Farm Census included 



more than ten times that many, including 
many puzzling business and personal items. 
The surveys are made each year through 
your local tax supervisors by the land own- 
ers, while the National surveys asked the 
information of land operators, and these are 
mostly tenants and croppers in North Caro- 
lina. The township list-takers are experi- 
enced reporters of the yearly items called 
for, and are known to the farmers. In con- 
trast to this, consider the National enumer- 
ators who are usually strangers and who 
call only at ten-year intervals. 

Of these two farm surveys, which should 
provide the more reasonable results? Then, 
too, the county surveys reported in April 
and May are completed for the guidance 
of farmers' planting before the next Spring, 
while the Federal results are rarely avail- 
able within two years of the planting season 
of the crops to which they relate. 

Lets cite the case of small grains. Wheat, 
for instance, is planted with machinery 
whose drills cover the fields uniformly and 
measure it. The farmers report these known 
acreages just before the harvest season. 
The Federal survey called for the 1929 acre- 
age a year later. As a result, the local 
reports uniformly showed from 5 to 24 per- 
cent more acreage than the National report 
for the same crop. 

While neither of these surveys are ac- 
curate, don't you agree that the county sur- 
veys are reasonably the more reliable? To 
infer that they are not reliable is to infer 
that the farm owners themselves are not 
reliable. This is improbable, as evidences 
have proven. In fact, the farmer usually 
has a far greater familiarity of farm condi- 
tions than he realizes himself or is given 
credit for having. This also applies to 
public as well as to his private affairs. We 
err greatly in belittling these essential pro- 



35 



ducers. They really strive to give honest 
information. 

Do Farmers See The Farm Census 
Results? 

Yes and no. Yes, if they ask for them of 
local farm leaders or show sufficient in- 
terest, such as the voluntary crop report- 
ers do. No, for the cost of a general dis- 
tribution would be prohibitive. Then, too, 
it is the exceptional farmer who would 
study, much less understand how to use, 
the tables of county data thus mailed to 
them. 

How, then, do the North Carolina farm- 
ers who report their crop information bene- 
fit by these surveys? As the printing costs 
of this Farm Forecaster alone is about 10 
cents per copy, it is necessary to limit its 
distribution to the county leaders, such as 
Agricultural Teachers, county High School 
libraries, County Farm Agents, Superinten- 
dents of Schools, County Accountants, Tax 
Supervisors, Crop Reporters, banks, supply 
merchants and other interested farm lead- 
ers. Indirectly through these, the farmers 
get the benefits of the farm survey reports. 

You often admire the wisdom of a public 
man who in his talks shows a wonderful 
insight and knowledge of county conditions. 
He has to get his facts from somewhere, 
doesn't he? In the case of farm facts, 
these usually come from your yearly Farm 
Census surveys. The individual farmer may 
study and gain equal familiarity and even 
greater benefits from these reports than do 
others. The first handlers or producer has 
the first say as to the disposition of his 
products. If he is familiar with the sup- 
ply (production) and demand (markets) 
conditions and trends, the sales should be 
made advantageously. Otherwise the farm- 
er is at the mercy of the buyer. 




Farm field hands for depression conditions. Grass killers. 



36 



NORTH CAROLINA LIVESTOCK (Reported by Assessors) 



District and Counties 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW). 
District 4 — Buncombe- _ 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W) 

District 2 — Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford; 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N) 

District 5 Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Kowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C) 

District 8 — Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanley 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S) 

District 3 — Bertie 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.)___ 
District 6 — Beaufort_"__i 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — Bladen 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 



STATE. 



Acres of Land 



Horses 



1SMS9 



1930 



1931 



144.690 
271,897 
128.736 
268.134 
332.847 
203,120 
474.269 
206.935 

2,030,629 
338,248 
277.829 
284,185 
119,715 
183,972 
350.135 
199,586 
279,403 
223,706 
220,175 
285,651 
130,180 
138,116 
346,594 
194,789 
189,005 
174,021 

3,935,310 
254,417 
271,032 
159,395 
245,001 
303,840 
333,974 
390,094 
250,190 
249,043 
343.410 
283,695 
146,120 
270,843 

3,501,054 
158,779 
248,256 
431,060 
353.173 
163.485 
360,940 
141,156 
473,443 
318,051 
525,273 

3,173,616 
332,058 
222,192 
293,242 
217,106 
191,986 
302.782 
294,930 
434,693 
273,648 
232.488 
383.350 

3,178,475 
435,387 

1 45,545 
109.703 
143.088 

2 7 6.63.-, 
312,253 
192,258 
428,745 
234,287 
280,991 
333.580 
328,701 
135.153 
14 5.961 

87,574 
210,238 

3,800,099 
512,191 
274,571 
413,318 
163.708 
378,586 
514.008 
274.815 
240,414 
149.199 
402,714 
336,018 
219,686 

3,879,228 
515,770 
475,157 
576,499 
353,820 
471,957 
307.621 
168,541 
110,982 
443.337 
401,168 
560,140 
516,921 
194,332 

5,156,246 



145,324 
271.844 
130.837 
268.003 
339,158 
196,904 
479,275 
206,997 

2,038,342 
333,816 
277,000 
274,632 
136,568 
169,599 
312,889 
202,981 
283,624 
226,409 
216,046 
254.367 
127.394 
129.817 
349,929 
245,183 
189,005 
180,513 

3,909,772 
259,562 
268,853 
177,700 
220.077 
320,201 
332,324 
395,558 
241,781 
250,966 
342,892 
281,569 
163,497 
274,289 

3,529,269 
160,175 
252,941 
434,597 
346,447 
165,392 
383,657 
158,418 
491,461 
315,252 
526,258 

3,234,598 
329,649 
220,428 
315,689 
201,161 
189,278 
306,525 
324.788 
415,108 
282,083 
244,627 
383,602 

3,212,938 
358,618 
153,450 
112,036 
143.265 
278,391 
314,270 
190.000 
437,039 
207,078 
283,911 
336,391 
327,421 
127,165 
148,742 
87,481 
210,729 

3,715,987 
495.498 
270,528 
411,468 
164,522 
385,844 
528,530 
304,936 
234,825 
179,053 
393,228 
341,067 
218,509 

3,928,008 
526,391 
517,652 
570,726 
312,697 
464,951 
367,737 
172,627 
104,454 
422,786 
438.309 
557,529 
580.095 
193,855 

5,229,809 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



145,340 
271,375 
134,055 
225,697 
336.773 
200,825 
472,580 
206,506 

1,993,151 1 
333,437| 
269,8891 
276,875 
149,938 
194,371 
334,646 
215,688 
282,382 
224.716 
223,120 
257,658 
128,380 
131,487 
350,071 
364,606 
187,659 
181.840 

4,1 06,763 1 
288,078 
277,910 
167,260 
240,698| 
306,859 
333,052 
387,622 
243,176 
251,579 
351,542 
283,520 
165,122 
272.714 

3,569,132 
160.315 
248.937 
440,926 
342,660 
164,940 
364,488 
159,042 
495,000 
317,581 
524,011 

3,217,900 
329,069 
216.214 
297,497 
209,652 
188,084 
310,136 
306.307 
425,383 
272,195 
232,091 
391.110 

3,177,738 
367.595| 
154,148 
109.921 [ 
143.331 
291,897 
310,449 
192.258 
444,030 
211.726 
265,928 
335,374 
329,700 
137,171| 
144.980| 
112,4131 
217,947| 

3,768,868; 
527,77l| 
251,8851 
414,283| 
251,903| 
388,989| 
500,744| 
268,694| 
234,870 
156,079 
395,593 
343,280| 
218,664| 

3,952,755 
514,754 
422,845 
586,455 
316,162 
484,351 
371,102 
203,690 
104,454 
443,297 
436.833 
557,724 
564,418 
194,164 

5,200,249 



1,480 
2.695 
848 
954 
1,129 
1,577 
1,667 
945 
1 1 ,295 
1,991 
871 
516 
245 
401 
1,808 
1,062 
1,080 
406 
764 
1,532 
804 
234 
640 
480 
4 83 
1,240 
14,557 
2,172 
1,079 
1,227 
1,992 
1,193 
1,813 
3,462 
1,255 
1,352 
1,244 
931 
1,115 
1,536 
20,371 
581 
1,572 
1,427 
2,548 
1,104 
1,724 
296 
1,903 
2,546 
1,625 
16,326 
713 
1,523 
850 
723 
856 
1,176 
353 
642 
361 
1,033 
1.459 
9,689 
1,078 
704 
365 
715 
414 
873 
764 
1,528 
926 
530 
908 
1,228 
1,166 
795 
312 
480 
12,786 
1,635 
704 
777 
379 
1,215 
831 
364 
767 
594 
1,463 
1,107 
434 
10,270 
360 
310 
530 
421 
1.465 
567 
236 
284 
529 
430 
979 
964 
375 
7,450 



1.421 
2.526 
813 
954 
997 
1.552 
1,658 
942 
10,863 
1,632 
800 
492 
246 
451 
1,707 
1,084 
1,044 
409 
700 
1.470 
674 
212 
609 
411 
480 
1,011 
13,432 
2,096 
898 
903 
1,867 
1,044 
1,642 
3,362 
1,263 
1,207 
1,113 
933 
997 
1,340 
18,666 
591 
1,461 
1,248 
2,574 
1,043 
1,602 
266 
1,678 
2,291 
1,375 
14,129 
614 
1.384 
828 
652 
662 
974 
316 
521 
330 
931 
1,278 
8,490 
943 
613 
406 
660 
366 
742 
778 
1,195 
778 
427 
773 
1,012 
1,047 
647 
270 
398 
11,055 
1,253 
568 
645 
287 
1,116 
843 
297 
723 
562 
1,234 
999 
326 
8.853 
328 
284 
491 
394 
1.344 
517 
218 
275 
458 
368 
840 
892 
265 
6,674 



1,350 

2,417 
773 
86f 
964 

1,526 

1,638 
908 
10,441 

1,605 
790 
474 
264 
316 

1,662 
997 
991 
363 
682 

1,500 
6 

205 
525 
45 
480 
1,008 
12,991 
1,954 
824 
900 
1,574 
868 
1,453 
3,154 
1,171 
1,084 
1,016 
760 
821 
1,154 
16,733 
559 
1,291 
1,200 
2,523 
1,026 
1,566 
269 
1,600 
1,980 
1,314 
13,328 
518 
1,268 
573 
561 
604 
840 
286 
518 
306 
876 
1,191 
7,541 
785 
549 
331 
628 
32 
588 
617 
1,051 
687 
332 
601 
880 
937 
547 
254 
340 
9,452 
2,055 
500 
592 
264 
1,024 
644 
256 
616 
462 
950 
859 
298 
8,520 
294 
229 
313 
373 
1,247 
490 
201 
230 
425 
314 
776 
795 
233 
5,920 



Mules 



Milk Cattle 



1929 | 1930 



1931 



1929 



1930 | 1931 



237 
280 
209 
1,172 
3,608 
315 
2,525 
2,363 
10,709 
1,653 
1,546 
1.305 
685 
288 
721 
821 
718 
976 
1,150 
1,720 
611 
956 
3,906 
425 
302 
903 
18,686 
2,486 
2,645 
1,467 
2,328 
4,547 
3,461 
3,591 
1,900 
2,538 
3,087 
3,442 
1.804 
2,815 
36,771 
1,617 
2,890 
3,833 
2.290 
1,475 
4,356 
1,807 
3,841 
3,397 
6,363 
31,870 
4,685 
3,061 
5,415 
3,177 
2.985 
5,240 
2,041 
2.3G7 
2,539 
3,270 
6,077 
41,457 
4,209 
1,098 
1.60G 
933 
22 
6,805 
1,787 
6, 80S 
2,702 
4,214 
7.189 
4.944 
1.637 
1,803 
803 
1,353 
48,033 
3.788 
008 
2,114 
3,866 
831 
5,342 
1,620 
3.820 
1,037 
6,852 
6,067 
6,073 
42,078 
2,735 
1,080 
4.344 
3,303 
4.450 
4,559 
2,282 
531 
2,039 
1,688 
8,196 
6.390 
2.968 
44,565 



219 
283 
137 
1.115 
3,641 
269 
2,530 
2,458 
10,652 
1,528 
1,540 
1,283 
688 
261 
694 
877 
724 
1,018 
1,119 
1,655 
564 
987 
4,005 
393 
301 
967 
18,604 
2,495 
2,629 
1,500 
2,484 
4,327 
3,427 
3,502 
1,899 
2,690 
3,768 
3,602 
2,135 
2,784 
37,248 
1,569 
3.113 
3,765 
2.400 
1,535 
4,590 
1,728 
3,818 
3,652 
6,489 
32,659 
4,407 
3,149 
5,274 
3,332 
3,388 
5.152 
1,878 
2,097 
2,226 
3,306 
6,549 
40,753 
4,151 
989 
1,484 
769 
20 
6,459 
1,473 
6,438 
2,622 
3,982 
6.815 
4,722 
1,565 
1,700 
715 
1,296 
45,200 
3,624 
686 
2,108 
3,797 
954 
10.117 
1,569 
3,761 
809 
6,674 
5,641 
5,966 
45,706 
2,615 
1,307 
4,441 
3,272 
4,341 
4,589 
2,089 
479 
1,986 
1,684 
8,256 
6,343 
2,593 
43,995 



200 
256 
162| 
1,120 
3,295 
268 
2,497 
2,334 
10,132 
1,671 
1,500 
1,226 
615 
242 
680 
875 
713 
932 
1,057 
1,546 
559 
1,016 
3,851 
473 
380 
967 
18,303 
2,521 
2,509 
1,419 
2,487 
3,957 
3,251 
3,398 
1,980 
2,540 
3.614 
3,214 
2,030j 
2,737| 
35.657 
l,538j 
3,349 
3,604 
2,435 
1,531 
4,414 
1,717 
3,750 
3,556 
6,337 
32,231 
4,048 
3,053 
6,474 
3,163 
3,274 
5,175 
1,671 
2,140 
l,994j 
3,287 
6,282 
40,561 
3,782 
l,090j 
1,393 
987 

6,031| 
1,754 
5,992 
2,583 
3,729 
6,528 
4,614 
1,579 
1.678 
723 1 
1,251 
43,736| 
3,532 
676| 
2,066| 
3,357| 
935| 
8.531 
1,504 
3,430 
923 
6,178 
5, 6681 
5,732| 
42,5321 
2,627| 
1,377| 
4,319| 
3,035| 
4,215 
4.714 
1,851 
484 
2,067 
1,613 
7,876] 
6,310 
2,370 
42,858 



3,293 
7,161 
2.112 
3,571 
5,211 
3,940 
6,689 
3,205 
35,182 
10,373 
2,950 
2,461 
1,214 
953 
5,176 
3,675 
3,083 
2,112 
2,669 
4,834 
2,204 
1,334 
4,635 
1,770 
1,481 
2,903 
63,827 
4,794 
2,604 
2,819 
5,601 
2,825 
3,342 
8,897 
2,965 
2,439 
4,517 
3,493 
1,980 
2.700 
48,976 
2,350 
5,472 
4,023 
5,228 
2,976 
6,188 
1.429 
5 737 
6,450 
5,324 
45,177 
2,841 
4,087 
0,722 
5,991 
3,257 
8,218 
1,795 
2,366 
1,686 
3,513 
6,281 
45,757 
847 
604 
378 
543 
149 
1,298 
398 
2,494 
805 
537 
2,006 
1,636 
1,742 
777 
553 
509 
15,276 
1,330 
414 
985 
744 
1,079 

303 
1,483 
682 
1,548 
2,011 
1,233 
14,649 
1,649 
550 
1,639 
1,511 
1,440 
2,057 
772 
753 
342 
1,029 
2,021 
2,242 
813 
16,818 



3,668 
7,613 
1,954 
3,523 
5,174 
4,095 
7,021 
3,231 
36,279 
9,214 
2,900 
2,500 
1,528 
976 
5,385 
3,864 
3,143 
2,065 
2,983 
5,118 
2,256 
1,215 
4,807 
1,379 
1,478 
3,039 
53,850 
4,928 
2,547 
2,643 
5,307 
2,614 
3,223 
8,649 
3,333 
2,378 
4,624 
3,561 
2,025 
2,617 
48,449 
2,478 
4,963 
3,897 
5,496 
2,745 
6,152 
1,449 
5,741 
6,152 
5,616 
44,689 
2,748 
4,276 
5,573 
5,078 
3,649 
8,257 
1,764 
2,230 
1,708 
3,791 
6,237 
45,311 
919 
601 
385 
445 
146 
1,112 
557 
2,240 
801 
561 
1,873 
1,483 
1,656 
676 
509 
556 
14,520 
2,562 
417 
961 
691 
992 
2,883 
358 
1,505 
514 
1,494 
1,998 
1,201 
15,576 
1,584 
426 
1,681 
1,542 
1,438 
2,084 
759 
722 
261 
1,149 
2,045 
2,202 
732 
16,626 



3,012 
8,206 
2,272 
3,856 
5,393 
4.16P. 
6,593 
3,604 
37,102 
10,106 
3,100 
2,643 
1,472 
1,050 
6,157 
3,884 
3,421 
2,167 
3,330 
5,589 
2,498 
1,380 
4,856 
1,705 
1,808 
3,493 
58,659 
5,262 
2,621 
2,782 
5,726 
2,520 
3,165 
9,172 
3,676 
2,379 
4,883 
3,705 
2,024 
2,677 
50,592 
2,553 
5,376 
4,300 
5,854 
3,614 
6,691 
1,540 
5,800 
6,445 
5,880 
48,053 
2,792 
4,142 
6,013 
5,524 
4,231 
9,314 
1,839 
2,382 
1,672 
3,953 
6,153 
48,016 
788 
752 
381 
528 
134 
1,239 
598 
2,269 
840 
563 
1,851 
1,439 
1,723 
755 
521 
503 
14,884 
1,343 
410 
925 
674 
1,054 
2,707 
441 
1,370 
505 
1,352 
2,004 
1,008 
13,793 
1,644 
530 
1,604 
1,809 
1,650 
2,210 
710 
727 
542 
1,189 
2,150 
2,373 
797 
17,935 



28,654,656 25,279,923 28,986,556 101,744 92,161 84,926 274,169 274,817 266,0101 275,662 276,299 289,033 



Note: Numbers of Livestock shown on farms in Randolph and Burke Counties for 1931 are estimated, as actual figures were not available. 



NORTH CAROLINA LIVESTOCK 



(Reported by Assessors) 



37 



Cattle Other Than Milk 



1929 



1930 | 1931 



All Cattle 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



4,454 


9,075 


8,015 


7,747 


12,743 


11,027 


3,700 


9,281 


10,343 


10.446 


16,442 


17,956 


18,652 


5,981 


1,776 


2,376 


2,208 


3,888 


4,330 


4,480 


1,823 


2,029 


2,257 


2,408 


5,600 


5,780 


6,264 


4.268 


2,201 


2,661 


2,914 


7,412 


7,835 


8,307 


7,344 


4,892 


5,367 


5,274 


8,832 


9,462 


9,440 


3,620 


4,064 


4,125 


4.075 


10,753 


11,146 


10.668 


8,337 


1,471 


1,859 


2,029 


4,676 


5.090 


5,633 


4,682 


3 0.1 68 


38,063 


37,369 


65,350 


74,342 


74,471 


39,755 


6,418 


8,858 


8,0051 16.791 


18,072 


18,111 


5,126 


851 


875 


880 


3,801 


3,775 


3,980 


2.603 


2,201 


2 ,100 


2,834 


4.662 


4,600 


5,477 


2,592 


1,491 


1,592 


1,899 


2.705 


3,120 


3,371 


2,473 


1,083 


1,163 


1.467 


2,036 


2,139 


2,517 


2.167 


9,940 


10,331 


10,196 


15,116 


15,716 


16.353 


4,290 


1,871 


2,299 


2,502 


5,546 


6,163 


6,386 


2,463 


3,349- 


3,859 


4,596 


6,432 


7,002 


8,017 


4,486 


1,054 


1,220 


1,352 


3,166 


3,285 


3,519 


2,289 


3,017 


2,775 


3.351 


5,686 


5,758 


6,681 


4,452 


6,729 


7,249 


6,747 


11,563 


12,367 


12,336 


4,264 


1,688 


1,910 


1,853 


3,892 


4,166 


4,351 


2,292 


550 


593 


685 


1,884 


1,808 


2,065 


1,007 


1,956 


2,254 


2,232 


6,591 


7,061 


7,088 


4,836 


1,481 


1,508 


1,825 


3.251 


2,887 


3,530 


1,286 


1,323 


1 ,302 


1.743 


2.804 


2,780 


3,551 


2,054 


3,029 


3,103 


3,591 


5.932 


6,142 


7,084 


2,775 


48,031 


52,991 


55,758 


101,858 


106,841 


114,417 


51 ,455 


2,463 


2.887 


3,021 


7,257 


7.815 


8,283 


6,487 


783 


863 


992 


3,387 


3,410 


3,613 


5,141 


891 


1,03 7 


1,200 


3,710 


3,680 


3,982 


3,213 


2,119 


2 ,449 


2,797 


7,720 


7,756 


8,523 


7,787 


1,328 


1,453 


1,581 


4,153 


4,067 


4,101 


7,423 


1,198 


1,347 


1,445 


4,540 


4,570 


4,610 


6,224 


3,263 


3,068 


3,293 


12,160 


11,717 


12,465 


9.268 


1,568 


1,765 


1,964 


4,533 


5,098 


5,640 


4.906 


840 


1, 101 


1,226 


3,279 


3,479 


3,605 


4,924 


1,62 1 


2,066 


2,178 


6.138 


6,690 


7.061 


7,274 


1,440 


1,887 


1,842 


4,933 


5,448 


5.547 


5,445 


725 


683 


809 


2,705 


2,708 


2,833 


3,713 


1,835 


1,872 


1,913 


4,535 


4,489 


4,590 


6.417 


20,074 


22,478 


24,261 


69,050 


70,927 


74,853 


78,222 


1,439 


1,554 


1,956 


3.789 


4,032 


4,509 


3.006 


2,034 


2 ,939 


2,690 


7,506 


7,902 


8,066 


6.213 


2,726 


3,228 


3.275 


6,749 


7,125 


7,576 


8,084 


2,309 


2,896 


2,976 


7,537 


8,392 


8,830 


9,688 


1,879 


2,3 12 


2,231 


4,855 


5,057 


5,845 


4,050 


3,029 


3,566 


3,640 


9,217 


9.718 


10,331 


8,954 


670 


775 


869 


2.099 


2,224 


2,409 


2,918 


2,971 


3,314 


3,500 


8,708 


9,055 


9,300 


8,413 


2,396 


2,696 


2,951 


8,846 


8,848 


9,395 


8,425 


1,874 


2,353 


2,915 


7,198 


7,969 


8,795 


10,950 


21 ,327 


25,633 


27,003 


66,504 


70,322 


75,056 


70,701 


1,632 


1,624 


1,822 


4,473 


4.372 


4,614 


4.914 


2,100 


2,52 1 


2,704 


6,187 


6,797 


6,846 


4.950 


1,450 


1,4 12 


2,524 


7,172 


6,985 


8,537 


5,510 


2,307 


2,609 


2,513 


8,298 


7,687 


8,037 


4,943 


1,576 


1,827 


1,816 


4,833 


5,476 


6,047 


5,137 


3,147 


3 ,683 


3,675 


11,365 


11,940 


12,989 


6,378 


823 


920 


1,118 


2,618 


2,684 


2,957 


3,056 


1,036 


1,244 


1,393 


3,402 


3,474 


3,775 


4,252 


673 


794 


938 


2,359 


2,502 


2,610 


3.473 


2,130 


2,453 


2,673 


5,643 


6,244 


6,626 


5,674 


3,539 


4,143 


4,222 


9,820 


10.380 


10,375 


6,678 


20,41 3 


23,230 


25,398 


66,170 


68,541 


73,413 


54,965 


792 


680 


818 


1,639 


1.599 


1,606 


18.311 


952 


940 


1,033 


1,556 


1,541 


1,785 


5,958 


561 


642 


917 


939 


1,027 


1,298 


10,284 


1,820 


1,920 


2,300 


2,363 


2,365 


2,828 


8,407 


694 


74 1 


826 


843 


887 


960 


910 


1,148 


1,086 


1,297 


2,446 


2,198 


2,536 


12,760 


626 


654 


717 


1,024 


1,211 


1,315 


11,392 


1,504 


1,309 


1,543 


3,993 


3,549 


3,812 


15.140 


533 


558 


628 


1,338 


1,359 


1,468 


13,057 


839 


767 


837 


1,376 


1,328 


1,400 


17,546 


1,024 


1,093 


1,223 


3,030 


2.966 


3,074 


13.118 


847 


916 


1,032 


2,483 


2,399 


2,471 


13,482 


1,427 


1,511 


1,555 


3.169 


3,167 


3,278 


14.787 


607 


690 


721 


1.384 


1,366 


1,476 


14,050 


492 


543 


522 


1,045 


1,052 


1.043 


7.988 


543 


324 


686 


1,052 


880 


1,189 


8.899 


1 4,409 


14,374 


16,655 


29,685 


28,894 


31,539 


186,089 


1,386 


1,909 


1,490 


2,716 


4,471 


2,833 


20,987 


1,268 


864 


1,003 


1,682 


1,281 


1,413 


5,274 


1,024 


892 


1,206 


2,009 


1,853 


2.131 


10,218 


370 


358 


343 


1,114 


1,049 


1.017 


7.543 


1,367 


1,279 


1.422 


2,446 


2,271 


2,476 


6,870 


1,94 1 


2,392 


2,232 


4,718 


5,275 


4,939 


30,927 


706 


764 


976 


1,069 


1,122 


1,417 


10,861 


526 


428 


841 


2,009 


1,933 


2,211 


11.466 


539 


729 


728 


1,221 


1.243 


1.233 


4,078 


883 


986 


1,014 


2,431 


2,480 


2,366 


17,423 


1,059 


1,195 


1.341 


3,070 


3,193 


3,345 


18,168 


4 17 


392 


289 


1,650 


1,593 


1,297 


10,661 


11,486 


12,188 


12,885 


26,135 


27,764 


26,678 


154,476 


1,732 


1,927 


2,145 


3,381 


3,511 


3,789 


11,135 


932 


893 


917 


1,482 


1,319 


1.447 


8,900 


1,480 


1,665 


2,059 


3.119 


3,346 


3.663 


18,018 


926 


1,338 


1,352 


2,437 


2,880 


3.161 


9.429 


2,544 


2,828 


3,228 


3.984 


4,266 


4,878 


23,055 


1,093 


1,193 


1,284 


3,150 


3,277 


3.494 


11.412 


319 


286 


359 


1,091 


1.045 


1.069 


4.313 


252 


215 


318 


1,005 


937 


1.045 


1.164 


1,658 


1,503 


1,956 


2,000 


1.764 


2.498 


18,923 


1,170 


1.295 


1,342 


2,199 


2.444 


2.531 


10,886 


1,594 


1,600 


1,797 


3.615 


3,645 


3.947 


20,095 


2,238 


2.554 


2,853 


4.480 


4,756 


5.226 


23,539 


560 


505 


436 


1.373 


1,237 


1,233 


3,859 


16,498 


17,802 


20,046 


33,316 


34,427 


37,981 


1 64,728 


182,406 


206,769 


219,375 458,068 


482,058 


508,408 


800,391 



1929 | 1930 | 1931 



3,110 
4,860 
1,284 
3,464 
5,547 
2,790 
8,724 
3.874 
33,653 
3,631 
2,700 
2,600 
1,961 
2,021 
3,206 
1,937 
2,851 
1,663 
3,430 
3,306 
1,843 
909 
4,057 
784 
2,023 
2,204 
41,126 
5,078 
4,379 
2,394 
6,239 
5,449 
5,029 
9,405 
3,658 
4,138 
5.722 
4,882 
3,034 
5,093 
64,500 
2,309 
4,618 
6,078 
7,595 
3.102 
6,336 
2,353 
5,822 
5,963 
9,433 
53,609 
3,637 
4,020 
4,366 
4,072 
4,219 
4,494 
2,395 
3,231 
2,797 
4.251 
5,317 
42,799 
14,108 
5,150 
9,614 
6,335 
677 
11,880 
12,612 
11,987 
10.400 
14,393 
10,102 
13,000 
10,772 
10.558 
4,419 
5,524 
151,531 
14,573 
4,324 
7.811 
7,454 
5,633 
29,239 
8,154 
11,096 
3,670 
14,583 
15,876 
8,172 
130,585 
9,504 
7,114 
15.544 
7,848 
20.166 
9,656 
3,462 
1,693 
14,883 
10,013 
18,090 
19,781 
2,724 
140,478 



Sheep 



1929 | 1930 



1931 



2,000 
4,249 
1,128 
3,030| 
4,723 
2,494 
8,431 
3,598 
29,653 
3.293 
2,300j 
1.800 
1.655 
1,476 
3,085 
1,988 
3,102 
1,488 
3,078 
3,311 
1,876 
934 
3,941 
728 
1,684 
2,294 
38,033 
4,985 
5,262 
2,835 
6,119 
5,342 
5,028 
9,547 
3,834 
4,193 
5,619 
4,139 
3,160 
4,67 
64,735 
2,128 
4,767 
6,213 
7,063 
3,149 
5,912 
2,465 
5,900 
5,734 
10,403 
53,734 
3.695 
3,798 
5,841 
2,419 
3,920 
4,271 
2,568 
3,431 
2,835 
4,411 
5,036 
42,225 
13.840 
4,045 
10,842 
7.441 
649 
12.491 
13,345 
12,154 
11,531 
13,844 
11.165 
11,209 
10,621 
12.245 
4,606 
5,119 
155,147 
13.634 
4,001 
7,667 
8,551 
4,854 
27,262 
8,547 
11,055 
4,054 
15,974 
16.067 
8,917 
130,583 
9,731 
6,980 
16,204 
7,494 
22,998 
9,929 
2,916 
1,782 
16,789 
11,207 
17,507 
10,767 
2,472 
136,776 



15,596 
21,699 
5,246 
216 
158 
12.624 
666 
75 
56,280 
1.820 
115 
482 
953 
1,152 
8,251 
493 
3,882 
135 
1,765 
5,531 
2,351 
42 
26 
138 
725 
3.303 
31,164 
584 
95 
33 
327 
352 
633 
438 
277 
136 
165 
85 
232 
434 
3,791 
72 
221 
864 
884 
4 23 
375 
91 
723 
247 
77 
3,977 
172 
373 
30 
130 
121 
476 
162 
651 
53 

527 
2,695 
359 
981 
449 
1.794 
329 
604 
459 
725 
305 

54 

49 
529 
2,024 
1.157 
717 
336 
10,871 
553 
393 
245 

72 
1.740 
567 
345 

76 
219 
265 
124 

60 
4,659 

79 
618 
251 
221 
517 

75 
146 
3 
189 
224 
349 
230 

79 
2,981 



7,639 
21.068 
5,110 
210 
247 
13,361 
675 
69 
48,379 
1,828 
120 
475 
1,497 
1,172 
8,840 
555 
3,909 
116 
2,039 
5.069 
1,803 
39 
37 
133 
754 
2.960 
31,346 
582 
68 
30 
493 
359 
671 
469 
229 
141 
192 
61 
172 
457 
3,924 
63 
231 
958 
689 
765 
223 
138 
615 
372 
20 
4,074 
137 
320 
31 
245 
138 
563 
109 
561 
43 
311 
588 
3.046 
381 
951 
451 
1,877 
322 
625 
543 
618 
391 
52 
69 
396 
2,439 
1,335 
751 
327 
11,528 
632 
380 
161 
107 
1,626 
508 
208 
120 
110 
330 
84 
52 
4,318 
94 
512 
229 
2£8 
779 
64 
33 
3 

282 
192 
365 
231 
33 
3,085 



District and Counties 



658,281 650,886! 116,418 109,700 



5.000 
24,054 
5,284 
209 
216 
14,966 
64? 
131 
60,503 
1,592 
110 
54 
1,160 
1,460 
8,489 
483 
4,049 
119 
1,850 
4,938 
1,430 
42 
64 
319 
1,083 
4,311 
31,559 
702 
56 
35 
593 
347 
597 
436 
241 
80 
260 
76 
165 
394 
3,982 
59 
259 
920 
735 
885 
300 
140 
620 
305 
86 
4,309 
140| 
340 
18 
130 
115| 
484 
102 
488 
37 
214 
584 
2,652 
381 
1.027 
589 
2,087 
402 
555 
538 
622 
405 
40 
94 
542 
2,219 
1,269 
849 
314 
11,933 
682 
362 
126 
56 
1,680 
488 
256 
89 
143 
264 
248 
48 
4,442 
79 
424 
272 
296 
591 
117 
45 
10 
310 
186 
347 
225 
36 
2,938 
112.318 



District 1 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery 

Caldwell 

Surry 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

.Northern Mountain (NW.) 

Buncombe — District 4 

Burke 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.) 

Alamance — District 2 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Granville 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) 

Alexander — District 6 

Catawba 

. Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

Anson — District 8 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston 

Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.) 

Bertie — District 3 

Camden 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.) 

Beaufort— District 6 

Carteret 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

Bladen — District 9 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin 

Harnett 

Hoke 

New Hanover 

Onslow 

Pender 

Robeson 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 

STATE 



38 



ACRE VALUE OF CROPS 

Ordinarily the table opposite carries the 
value per acre for the different States. This 
makes an interesting study, for after all, 
that is the key to farming. Of course, the 
cost per acre is equally as important in 
determining the net value per acre. Un- 
fortunately, we do not have the cost of pro- 
duction information for the different States. 

By dividing the value of all crops by the 
acreages of each State, the value per acre 
may be obtained. It will be found that 
North Carolina ranks relatively high. How- 
ever, it should be remembered that the cost 
of commercial fertilizer alone in North 
Carolina is one of the highest of any of the 
States: Our more successful or more pro- 
fitable States depend on livestock for their 
cash income. Their per acre value of crops 
is relatively low, hut they have to consider 
the livestock return as an additional factor. 
In other words, as Dr. Clarence Poe says 
"Without livestock, we are only using one 
arm of our farming machinery. Lievstock 
makes up the other and perhaps the most 
improtant arm." 

It seems odd that the average North Caro- 
lina cash crop farmer spends considerable 
money or time fighting the grasses which 
Nature is attempting to produce without 
cultivation. He hires labor to harvest the 
crop, when livestock would delight in har- 
vesting it at a minimum cost. The table on 
Page 4 shows that North Carolina offers a 
wonderful choice of crops for feeding live- 
stock. 



ACREAGE AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES CROPS 



STATES 



Maiae 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas_ _J 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

NORTH CAROLINA _ 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arize na 

Utah 

Nevada 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



UNITED STATES- 



Acreage of All Crops 



Value of All Crops 



1929 


1930 


1931 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1929 


1930 


1931 


(000) 


(000) 


(000) 


(000) 


(000) 


(000) 








1.337 


1,320 


1.319 


$ 

79,077 


$ 

45,804 


* 

24,013 


34 


35 


37 


392 


383 


377 


9,447 


8,997 


6,667 


46 


46 


46 


1,078 


1.062 


1,067 


23,672 


22,207 


17,733 


44 


43 


41 


440 


425 


421 


28,862 


24,787 


19,382 


42 


42 


39 


51 


49 


48 


2,608 


2,320 


1,665 


48 


48 


48 


364 


357 


347 


27,130 


25,449 


17,261 


43 


41 


42 


6,727 


6,524 


6,496 


195,997 


179,748 


126,065 


17 


10 


11 


711 


707 


694 


51,024 


50,214 


34,068 


36 


34 


34 


6,299 


6,263 


6.219 


184,702 


162,557 


123,795 


21 


13 


12 


9,760 


9.708 


9,975 


228,323 


167,371 


145,100 


12 


12 


7 


10.088 


10.264 


10,572 


201,512 


153,970 


109,649 


16 


14 


14 


18.477 


18,529 


18,716 


386,840 


272,949 


195,585 


4 


4 


4 


7.307 


7.371 


7,444 


169,884 


145,755 


97,826 


24 


16 


20 


9,506 


9,572 


9,484 


225,548 


198,897 


121,778 


14 


9 


13 


18,274 


18,376 


18.703 


311,976 


231,340 


146,761 


6 


6 


6 




22,430 


22,168 


501,571 


372.138 


224,513 


3 


3 


3 


12,960 


13,197 


13,366 


226,008 


148,872 


126,958 


13 


15 


10 


21,724 


21,287 


15,624 


188,758 


121,507 


52,484 


10 


21 


29 


17,682 


18,220 


14,850 


186,572 


116,662 


41,728 


20 


24 


32 


21,345 


21,908 


21,880 


328,350 


244,589 


140,946 


5 


5 


8 


24,145 


24.600 


25,056 


307,222 


199,936 


163,073 


7 


8 


5 


383 


386 


385 


14,617 


11,012 


8.414 


46 


45 


45 


1,691 


1,673 


1,672 


62,590 


41,072 


39.480 


35 


36 


33 


3,752 


3,671 


3,834 


145,383 


84,620 


78,263 


26 


30 


25 


1,478 


1,373 


1,448 


43,138 


25,569 


27,043 


37 


40 


36 


6,241 


6,364 


6,378 


257,955 


213,647 


136,496 


8 


7 


9 


4.672 


4,771 


4,731 


141,068 


118,993 


71,438 


28 


23 


27 


9,461 


9.453 


9,558 


228,978 


179,422 


101,898 


11 


11 


18 


1,379 


1,419 


1.487 


111,590 


124,482 


86,485 


30 


20 


23 


5,204 


4.966 


5,340 


172,212 


97,616 


102,497 


23 


28 


17 


6.048 


5.985 


6,151 


179,222 


112,079 


89,691 


22 


25 


21 


7.568 


7,945 


8,143 


194,099 


139,392 


88,908 


18 


17 


22 


6.756 


6,787 


7,008 


252,167 


129,209 


97,913 


9 


18 


19 


6.866 


6,874 


6,927 


204,289 


84,681 


107,844 


15 


29 


16 


4,471 


4,428 


4,451 


154,678 


101,616 


81,883 


25 


27 


24 


15.552 


14,938 


15,622 


242,316 


126,613 


108,328 


10 


19 


15 


31,398 


31,765 


32,442 


595,690 


410,992 


304,659 


1 


1 


2 


7.755 


7,759 


4,944 


88,635 


57,858 


32,751 


33 


33 


35 


3.024 


3,012 


2.851 


99,610 


74,959 


49,076 


31 


31 


30 


1,993 


2.044 


1,784 


33,159 


26,951 


16,967 


41 


38 


43 


6.640 


7,046 


6,563 


130.670 


120,717 


61,081 


29 


22 


28 


1,460 


1,378 


1,531 


35,2431 19,955 


18,150 


39 


44 


40 


483 


516 


480 


39,990 


27,443 


16,516 


38 


37 


44 


1,122 


1,171 


1,115 


33,263 


26,873 


20,027 


40 


39 


38 


393 


393 


240 


9,991 


6,506 


3.152 


47 


47 


47 


3,442 


3,479 


3,575 


143,368 


102,141 


76.070 


27 


26 


26 


2,679 


2,644 


2,577 


89,278 


60,047 


44.694 


32 


32 


31 


5.029 


5,119 


4,596 


520,206 


398.315 


316,076 


2 


2 


1 


357,827 


359,927 


350,672 


8,088,494 


5,818,849 


4,122,850 







Rank in Value 
of All Crops 



LIVE STOCK ON FARMS— JANUARY 1 
Summary for United States 



Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

lowa_. 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebrasba 

Kansas 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

"West Virginia 

NORTH CAROLINA 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma „. 

Texas 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



United States. 



Horses 


ind Colts 


Mules and Mule 


Colts 


All Cattle and Calves | Milk Oowe and 


Heifers 


Sheep and Lambs 


Swine — including Pigs 


( 


000) 


(000) 




(000) 




(000) 




(000) 




(000) 




Number 


Number 




Number 


Number 




Number 




Number 




1)3 1 


1932 


1931 1932 


1931 [ 


I 932 


1931 | 1932 


1931 | 


1932 


1931 ] 


1932 


59 


57 






241 


243 


140 


143 


85 


81 


50 


55 


19 


18 






127 


131 


79 


81 


19 


18 


15 


15 


51 


50 






427 


436 


288 


299 


41 


39 


29 


32 


24 


24 






181 


179 


131 


131 


11 


10 


101 


101 


4 


4 






29 


29 


21 


21 




2 


5 


5 


21 


21 






153 


155 


108 


113 


11 


10 


26 


25 


312 


303 


6 


6 


1.956 


1,976 


1.370 


1,411 


489 


473 


195 


205 


37 


35 


3 


3 


160 


163 


119 


120 


8 


7 


72 


78 


309 


297 


50 


50 


1.357 


1,398 


860 


886 


481 


491 


642 


655 


484 


469 


32 


32 


1.562 


1,610 


910 


938 


2,000 


2,164 


1.974 


2.072 


438 


425 


86 


83 


1.360 


1,428 


722 


751 


809 


826 


2,637 


2,900 


805 


773 


132 


129 


2.265 


2,401 


1.057 


1,099 


719 


799 


4.445 


4,940 


381 


373 


6 


6 


1,376 


1.390 


825 


850 


1,213 


1.285 


542 


661 


544 


534 


7 


7 


3.150 


3,184 


2,096 


2,150 


529 


546 


1.536 


1.658 


791 


775 


15 


15 


3,151 


3,246 


1,643 


1,708 


1.027 


1,084 


3,665 


3,738 


1,037 


996 


83 


81 


4.063 


4,185 


1,414 


1,456 


1,313 


1,398 


10,509 


11,350 


592 


574 


297 


291 


2.551 


2,660 


989 


1,030 


1,204 


1,205 


3,488 


4,011 


604 


586 


8 


8 


1,398 


1.454 


567 


589 


940 


1,040 


766 


650 


605 


581 


18 


18 


1,946 


1,907 


589 


607 


1,332 


1,465 


3.000 


2,490 


719 


697 


95 


91 


3.167 


3,104 


680 


700 


960 


1,047 


4,820 


5,110 


699 


685 


155 


143 


3.141 


3,392 


811 


860 


669 


779 


2,487 


3,109 


17 


17 


10 


10 


49 


49 


33 


35 


4 


4 


23 


22 


93 


91 


29 


29 


277 


277 


184 


186 


111 


108 


168 


160 


195 


187 


94 


93 


754 


782 


383 


390 


495 


485 


508 


551 


112 


106 


13 


12 


500 


525 


214 


225 


625 


657 


168 


176 


83 


77 


276 


273 


532 


548 


299 


306 


90 


91 


838 


880 


28 


26 


176 


176 


261 


266 


140 


141 


14 


14 


504 


580 


3 6 


35 


340 


333 


773 


789 


329 


336 


38 


37 


1.299 


1.390 


20 


19 


42 


42 


432 


441 


86 


88 


44 


43 


498 


508 


231 


222 


246 


241 


940 


978 


498 


518 


875 


875 


782 


899 
1.075 


169 
62 


157 


321 


318 


992 


1.032 


487 


507 


382 


3931 933 


58 


322 


319 


771 


810 


371 


390 


50 


50 


870 


957 


98 


92 


358 


347 


929 


966 


447 


469 


91 


100 


764 


878 


133 


132 


342 m 


332 


773 


848 


383 


421 


56 


59 


574 


832 


112 


106 


197 


189 


705 


740 


247 


260 


133 


140 


605 


679 


482 


453 


302 


287 


2.010 


2,151 


682 


716 


174 


164 


927 


1.205 


741 


704 


990 


960 


6,127 


6,127 


1,238 


1,288 


6.834 


7,312 


1,606 


2.088 


430 


4001 9 


8 


1.263 


1,250 


193 


195 


4,244 


3,820 


280 


283 


198 


190 


7 


7 


636 


668 


187 


194 


2,394 


2,274 


270 


351 


171 


166 


4 


4 


830 


863 


72 


72 


3,894 


4,128 


137 


123 


331 


324 


28 


27 


1.541 


1,541 


260 


266 


3,351 


3.361 


520 


624 


135 


128 


23 


22 


1.100 


1,144 


69 


70 


2,780 


3.058 


62 


74 


77 


74 


12 


12 


795 


851 


40 


42 


1,112 


1,190 


21 


23 


90 


87 


3 


3 


475 


484 


111 


113 


2.900 


2,755 


77 


96 


39 


38 


3 


3 


320 


310 


21 


21 


1,175 


1,152 


18 


21 


171 


161 


21 


20 


591 


615 


288 


300 


750 


750 


183 


238 


169 


162 


14 


14 


772 


795 


240 


250 


2,679 


2,679 


205 


266 


207 


190 


40 


38 


2 006 


1.886 


637 


637 


3,588 


3.444 


560 


672 


13.165 


12,679 


6,215 


5.082 


o«,915 


62,407 


23,668 


24,379 


62,746 


53,912 


54,374 


69.611 



39 



In studying the crop information for 
marketing purposes, it is essential that the 
National data be available. It is also advis- 
able that the World production and con- 
sumption information be studied. 

These two pages offer information for the 
United States similar to that for North 
Carolina on Pages 4-5. Space does not per- 
mit of more than two years trend for these. 
Three years are shown for the aggregate 
acreages and values for crops of the differ- 
ent States, as well as the rank in value. 



able from this type of farming. It bears the 
same relationship that feed crops do in the 
cash crop producing areas. Many cash crop 
farmers claim that they can buy feed stuffs 
much cheaper than they can grow them. 
That it pays them to grow the cash crops 
and then buy the essential feeds and foods 
from the money obtained through the saJe 
of cash crops. 

We have come to depend on commercial 
fertilizers for maintaing the fertility of our 
soil. The average farmer thinks that there 



is no money in livestock. Much of the fer- 
tilizer expense can be saved and a far better 
soil developed through the growing of live- 
stock. Not only so, but the livestock offers a 
market for our surplus production of feeds 
and grains. A minimum of hand labor is 
required for livestock farming because ma- 
chinery can be used in mowing hays and in 
preparing pastures. By utilizing livestock as 
a by-product, the farm income is distribut- 
ed throughout the year without the re- 
quirement of emergency sale of perishables. 



Students are usually interested in the re- 
latively rank of North Carolina among the 
States of the Union in crop and livestock 
values. We are not showing the usual in- 
formation on livestock, but the crop rank is 
placed as ninth as compared with seventh 
in 1930. About the close of the World War, 
North Carolina obtained the high rank of 
fourth, which was induced by the high prices 
of cotton, tobacco and peanuts, all of which 
are relatively important in this State. 



LIVESTOCK FACTS 

Probably the greatest weakness in North 
Carolina farming is the lack of livestock. 
This is said in spite of the contention of 
most farmers that there is no money avail- 




Combination of alfalfa and sweet clover for good hay 



UNITED STATES CROPS 
(1930 Revised— 1931 Preliminary Estimates) 



CROPS 



ACREAGE 
Thousands 
Omitted 



1930 



1931 



Corn 

Winter Wheat 

Wheat, All 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

Buckwheat 

Hay, Tame -.- 

Hay, Wild 

Soy Beans 

Cowpeas 

Peanuts 

Potatoes 

Sweet Potatoes 

Tobaooo 

Cotton 

Cottonseed 

Pecans 

Apples — Total 

Apples — Commercial 

Peaches — -Total 

Pears — Total 

Grapes — Total 

Oranges — (7 States) 

Grapefruit (4 States) 

Lemons : 

Cranberries 

Cane Syrup 

Sorgo Syrup 

Commercial Truck Crops 

Asparagus 

Beans, (Snap) 

Cabbage 

Cantaloupes 

Carrots 

Cauliflower 

Celery 

Corn (S*weet) 

Cucumbers 

Egg Plants 

Lettuce 

Onions 

Peas ( Green ) 

'eppers 

Potatoes, (Early) 

Spinach 

Strawberries 

Tomatoes 

Watermelons 



Total Truck Crops for Market 
Manufacture 



100,743 
39,509 
61,138 
39,729 
12,662 
3,543 
573 
52.622 
13,793 
1,162 
674 
1,862 
3,038 
648 
2,101 
45,091 



28 
104 
165 

97 
189 
149 
129 
28 
28 
34 
376 
174 
4 

173 
83 
348 
17 
325 
56 
178 
560 
235 



104,970 
41,009 
54,949 
39,722 
11,471 
3,143 
502 
53,449 
11,977 
1,271 
1,016 
2,172 
3,382 
778 
2,019 
40,495 



28 
104 
259 

103 
168 
146 
138 
30 
28 
33 
351 
138 
4 

177 
77 
309 
19 
347 
57 
154 
448 
239 



YIELD 
PER ACRE 



1930 



1931 



20.4 
15.2 
14.0 
32.2 
24.1 
12.8 
12.2 
1.21 
.78 
13.3 
8.8 
632.0 
109.7 
82.8 
778.0 
147.7 



20.2 
161.9 
54.0 

108.0 
1.13 
6.70 
123.0 
381.0 
212.0 
307.0 
1.76 
80.0 
222.0 
113.0 
313.0 
1018.0 
213.0 
134.0 
2.72 
54.2 
3.96 
350.0 



24.4 
19.2 
16.2 
28.0 
17.3 
10.4 
17.7 
1.20 
.68 
14.9 
10.3 
716.0 
111.3 
80.9 
797.0 
200.1 



PRODUCTION 
Thousands 
Omitted 



1930 



1931 



23.5 
142.9 



91.0 
1.10 
6.80 
130.0 
390.0 
254.0 
292.0 
2.20 
78.0 
207.0 
105.0 
246.0 
802.0 
248.0 
134.0 
2.99 
73,1 
3.29 
316.0 



2,060 
601, 
858. 
1,277 
304 
45 
6 
63 
10 
15 
5 

1,176 

333 
53 
1,635 
13 
6 
46 
155 
33 
53 
25 
2 
54 
18 
7 

16 



185 
840 
160 
764 
601 
,379 
,962 
,463 
,751 
,416 
922 
,700 
210 
,663 
,210 
,932 
.185 
,469 
,982 
,668 
,864 
540 
439 
559 
690 
950 
560 
834 
,916 



10,494 
214 
999 
15,951 
10,662 
5,843 
10,419 
660 
13,842 
798 
19,591 
26,002 
354 
3,690 
43,551 
152 
9,637 
2,217 
82,401 



2,556,863 
787,465 
892,271 
1,112,142 
198,965 
32,746 
8,875 
64,233 
8,133 
18,885 
10,468 
1,554,410 
376,248 
62 904 
1,610,098 
16,918 
7,523 
74,985 
211,506 
34,732 
77,743 
23,009 
1,583 
50,814 
14,770 
8,000 
651 
14,859 
17,818 

9,307 
185 
993 
17,962 
11,833 
7,087 
9,750 
772 
10,757 
775 
18,569 
18,857 
248 
4,623 
46,381 
172 
11,286 
1,476 
75,459 



UNIT 



Bushels 



Tons 

Bushels 

Lbs. 
Bushels 

Lbs. 
Bales 

Tons 

Lbs. 
Bushels 
Barrels 
Bushels 

Tons 
Boxes 



Barrels 
Gallons 



Crates 
Tons 

Crates 
Bushels 
Crates 

Tons 
Bushels 

Crates 
Bushels 

Tons 
Bushels 

Tons 
Crates 

Tons 
Number 



PRICE 
PER UNIT 



TOTAL FARM 
VALUE 
Thousands Omitted 



1931 



1930 



1931 



.655 
.634 
.600 
.315 
.389 
.384 
.835 
12.62 
7.10 
1.56 
2.02 
.032 
.890 
.900 
.129 
.095 
21.61 
1.53 

.930 
2.69 
.887 
.749 
18.97 
1.64 
1.77 
2.50 
10.15 
.577 
.787 

1.53 
92.16 
18.62 
1.21 
.59 
.82 
1.46 
13.24 
.91 
.89 
1.71 
.51 
67.46 
1.06 
1.13 
43.90 
4.04 
24.26 
116.0 



.360 
.434 
.443 
.231 
.352 
.387 
.424 
9.06 
6.18 
.63 
.93 
.019 
.429 
.574 
.097 
.057 
10.45 
.078 
.577 
1.80 
.562 
.602 
22.94 
1.62 
1.28 
2.40 
5.99 
.493 
.430 

1.55 
87.42 
10.03 
1.00 
.53 
.74 
1.82 
11.32 
.68 
.75 
1.44 
.79 
67.96 
.74 
.63 
34.16 
3.31 
20.62 
101.0 



1,349,218 
381,491 
514,847 
402,713 
118,359 
17,419 
5,814 
800,694 
76,345 
23,996 
11,992 
38,226 
296,505 
48,328 
211,102 
659,455 
133,671 
7,123 
145,065 
90,557 
43,825 
18,158 
44,040 
89,658 
33,078 
19,875 
5,688 
9,709 
7,018 

16,086 
19,336 
18,588 
19,283 

6,284 

4,783 
15,263 

8,734 
11,173 
714 
33,582 
13,186 
23,887 

3,914 
49,021 

6,669 
38,976 
53,778 

8,936 



920,142 
341,458 
395,600 
256,483 
70,119 
12,673 
3.765 
581,833 
50,277 
11,919 
9,709 
29,189 
161,264 
36.132 
156.097 
485.611 
78.581 
5,834 
122,091 
62,612 
41,377 
13,567 
36,081 
82,517 
18,951 
19,200 
3,902 
7,331 
7,654 

14,388 
15,970 

9,758 
17,543 

5,326 

5,270 
17,789 

8.737 

7,188 
582 
26,664 
14,171 
16,843 

3,438 
29,346 

5,868 
37,376 
30.425 

7,344 



1,590 
1,330 



1,606 
1,072 



239,926 
69,219 



208,046 
41,514 



Note: Cotton price per pound of lint — Watermelons per 1,000 melons. 



40 



June 1932 Crop Conditions for North Carolina 



The crop year of 1932 is extremely un- 
usual. Here are some outstanding causes: 

1. The economic or credit status of 
farming is very low. 

2. The buying ability of the public is also 
low. 

3. The winter was warm, the Spring 
cold and summer insects bad. 

4. No one is able to safely anticipate 
"What money crops to plant." 

5. "Cash" crops still offer no definite net 
profits. 

6. With taxes and other cash obligations 
to meet and with no cash income in pros- 
pect to meet them, farmers are dishearten- 
ed. 

Small Grains Average 

The early June crop reports showed that 
most small grains had good stands, with 
fair to good heads, but with somewhat short 
stalks— low growth. The early March 
freezes really helped by inducing better 
"stooling" and killing out injurious insects. 

The WHEAT crop is not nearly up to 
1931, but still it is probably equal to the 
usual for yield per acre. The acreage was 
increased over recent years. There is no 
complaint of "fly" damages. The heads are 
somewhat short and rarely more than three 
grains to the "mesh" or spikelet, with two 
grains the rule. A condition of 73 percent 
of a full crop yield, or 10.5 bushels per acre 
is estimated. 

OATS are low in height but the heads 
are expected to be fairly well developed. 
The stands show little winter kill, especially 
spring oats. The grain crop condition is 
estimated at 74 percent of a full crop 
(normal) yield indicating 20 bushels per 
acre. The feed crop cut whole in a mature 
state for feeding will be helped due to the 
even stand. 

RYE is about normal as indicatd by the 
condition of 78 percent of a full or normal 



crop. BARLEY is also promising, at 76 per- 
cent of a crop, indicating 20 bushels per 
acre in North Carolina. These have aver- 
age stands and heads, although rye is not 
equal to the heavy crop last year. 

Fruit Variable 

North Carolina is extremely fortunate 
with a fair to average PEACH crop. The 
commercial "Sand Hills" and border sections 
of the Piedmont and Coastal Belts have 
the best prospects. This belt is finding it 
necessary to thin or pick off much fruit in 
order to get quality this year. The non- 
commercial or farm crop for the State is 
estimated at 45 percent of a full crop pro- 
duction, while the commercial orchards may 
average over 70 percent. In view of the 
very poor crops in competing States. North 
Carolina growers have a decided advantage 
and should be able to catch up with some 
"over-due" obligations from peach losses of 
recent years. Climatic conditions have been 
favorable for quality production. 

APPLES are still at an indefinite stage at 
this time. The "drop" is still in doubt. If 
no unexpected drop occurs, the reported 
condition of 28 percent in the Mountain 
counties offers evidence of a real short crop. 
The Piedmont area, growing most of the 
other State crop, averages 34 percent condi- 
tion, which is below the usual average there. 
The lack of spraying adds doubt to the 
probable results. 

Early Truck Crops (Commercial) 

IRISH POTATOES in the ten early truck 
counties have a normal growth and stand. 
While the crop is late, the yield will prob- 
ably be above the average, although not 
equal to the heavy production of 1931. Seas- 
ons have been favorable, with neither 
drought or excessive rainfall. The Virginia 
crop may begin to move in competition 
with much of the North Carolina shipments, 



due to the cool and belated growth condi- 
tions. The early farm crop over the State 
in general averages 77 percent, which is 9 
percent less than June of last year. 

STRAWBERRIES had an early crop evi- 
dent early in March, which was cut back to 
the blooms by the freezes. The crop since 
was irregular in every respect. Prices were 
fair to begin but quite low late in the har- 
vest season. The total production was low. 

CABBAGE sold well, but the yield was 
light, due to small sizes. They grew off too 
rapidly in February, then had a set back by 
the March freezes. 

Cash Crops 

No estimates of acreage or condition of 
cotton, tobacco or peanuts are made until 
July. However, it is generally known that the 
tobacco acreage will be much less even than 
the "intended" 20 percent reduction. The 
March freezes caused heavy losses in plant 
beds. Then followed flea bugs and "blue" 
mold (mildew) — even into the fields. Thus, 
the crop is late, irregular, and with doubt- 
ful chances of a quality crop. The acreage 
is reduced about 35 percent. 

COTTON is late and small, but the stand 
is above average. The roots are probably 
getting a deep hold in the soil, which is an 
advantage. The fertilizers used are con- 
siderably less than usual, but this may 
hasten the maturing of bolls, with less re- 
sulting damage by boll weevils. Plenty of 
weevils are expected this year. The acre- 
age will perhaps not be much different from 
last year's crop, in spite of the present 
price. 

PEANUTS will perhaps not be reduced 
much in acreage, for they require little fer- 
tilizers and provide a rich feed crop for all 
livestock. Then, too, there is no attractive 
substitute as a money crop, even at the very 
low level of 1 to 2 cents that Virginia pea- 
nuts sold for last season. 




Hyde County's Great Lake Mattamuskeet area (drainage ditch). It has large fields of small grains, soy beans, etc. 50,000 acres in 

Lake bottom