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NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



THE FRONT COVER 



The cover to this issue is an innovation for this serv- 
ice but we hope that it will appeal to all interested in 
agricultural work, especially to tobacco growers and 
to all students. 

Reading from the top to the bottom, we first find a 
tobacco plant bed in Lenoir County. It will be noticed 
that the leaves have not yet appeared on trees. The 
second and third pictures show the tobacco being 
planted by machines and by hand. About 22 per cent 
of the state's tobacco crop is planted in April, 67 per 
cent in May and the remaining 11 per cent in June. 
The fourth shows a tobacco field in the midst of 
growth, while at the bottom are the leaves being hauled 
in on the small wagon and under the shed the leaves 
are being put on sticks for curing in barn. About 25 
per cent of the crop is harvested in July, 43 per cent 
in August, 27 per cent in September, and the re- 
mainder during October. The upper right picture 



shows the actual work of putting leaves on the stick. 
Under that is one of the tobacco barn's heating units. 
A stick of wood is being put in the furnace, while above 
that is the outlet flue through which the smoke escapes. 
The stringing of the tobacco is going on under the shed 
in the next picture. Next to the bottom is a farmer 
and his family sorting tobacco in the grading barn 
prior to the marketing. In this stage the leaves are 
sorted into different lengths and colors preparatory to 
selling. At the bottom right appears the tobacco auc- 
tion sales. This is an actual auction scene showing that 
after the sale is made each pile is left in a rather dis- 
rupted condition. The average sale takes only three or 
four seconds. In the center is the typical flue-cured or 
Bright Leaf tobacco plant. 

To complete the scene, we should show you the 
tobacco being hauled to the redrying plant, a scene in 
the tobacco factory and someone smoking it. 



The FARM FORECASTER presents the official farm statistical records for the State of North 
Carolina, as prepared by the North Carolina and United States Departments of Agriculture. This pub- 
lication is increasingly being used for reference purposes in the schools of the State. For this reason, 
the descriptive comments included in this issue are intended primarily to assist students in a better 
understanding of the graphic and tabular matter provided. 

Also, these comments provide the information in answer to constant requests received from 
farmers, agricultural leaders and others throughout the country for descriptive matter pertaining to 
farming activities. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Departmental Activities 3 

Agricultural Situation 4 

November 1, 1937, Crop Report 5 

Revised Estimates North Carolina 

Crops 1924-1936 _ 6- 7 

CORN Crop by Counties (three years) 8- 9 

COTTON Crop by Counties (three years) 10-11 

TOBACCO Crop by Counties (three years) 12-13 

WHEAT Crop by Counties (three years) 14-15 

OATS Crop by Counties (three years) 16 

RYE Crop by Counties (three years) 17 

IRISH POTATO Crop by Counties (three 

years) __ 18-19 

SWEET POTATO Crop by Counties (three 

years) _ 19-20 

SOY BEAN Crop by Counties (two years) 21-22 

COWPEA Crop by Counties (two years) 22-23 



Page 

HAY Crop by Counties (three years) 24 

PEANUTS Crop by Counties (three years) 25 

Carlot Shipments of FRUITS and 

VEGETABLES .._ 26 

Miscellaneous Farm Data, United States Census, 

by Counties 27 

Commercial Peach Tree Survey by Counties 28-29 

Farm Labor and Wages 30 

Index Numbers and Purchasing Power 

Farm Prices 31 

Prices Paid to Producers for Farm Products 32 

Supply and Distribution COTTON and 

TOBACCO 33 

Livestock Production and Income, 1930-1935. 34 

Revised Estimates of LIVESTOCK, 1925-1936.... 34 

Receipts from Sales of Farm Products. 35 

Poultry Estimates — Chickens and Eggs 35 

Value of North Carolina Crops 36 



FARM FORECASTER 



CROP AND LIVE STOCK REPORT FOR NORTH CAROLINA 



NORTH CAROLINA 


CROP REPORTING 


SERVICE— RALEIGH 


Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
U. S. Department of Agriculture 


— CO-OPERATING — 


Division of Statistics 
North Carolina Department of Agriculture 


W. F. CALLANDER, Chairman Crop Reporting Board 

FRANK PARKER, AGRICULTURAL STATISTICIAN 




W. KERR SCOTT, COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE 

W. H. RHODES, Chief, Division of Statistics 


November, 1937 


ANNUAL ISSUE 


Number 76 



THE ADMINISTRATION OF AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER W. KERR SCOTT 



Promptly after Mr. W. 
Kerr Scott won the election 
for North Carolina's Com- 
missioner of Agriculture last 
November, he planned for a 
harmonious and serviceable 
administration. He deter- 
mined on a real cooperative 
program with state and na- 
tional agencies. 

With an united, inter- 
ested and efficient person- 
nel, working harmoniously 
with the State College, 
farmers' organizations, and 
cooperating with the activi- 
ties of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, 
there was everything to be 
gained. Commissioner Scott 
now enjoys working agree- 
ments with the federal 
Bureaus, whereby this state 
gains the benefits of full 
services while contributing only a part of 
the cost. This, also, avoids matter of 
duplication, misunderstanding and hap- 
hazard methods. Illustration of this is 
the Crop Reporting Service which pre- 
pares the Farm Forecaster and about 150 
basic farm reports yearly — with the aid 
of thousands of voluntary crop reporters 
throughout the state. 

AGRICULTURAL 
DEPARTMENT'S ACTIVITIES 

An enlarged inspectional and regula- 
tory service for the protection of North 
Carolina farmers, as well as manufac- 




Commissioner Scott on his Melville Jersey Farm in Alamance County 



turers, is the goal of the State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

Equipped with the best seed laboratory 
in the South, Tar Heel growers are being 
given information as to the quality of the 
seeds they plant and in a large measure 
poor quality seed salesmen are being ex- 
posed. Once known as the dumping 
ground for poor quality seed, this state 
is moving toward the top in seed quality 
and germination test work — work for 
which the farmer is not charged. 

Important in his administrative pro- 
gram are modern livestock disease con- 



trol, seed, feed, creamery 
and fertilizer inspection. 
Protection of our white 
pines from the dreaded 
white pine blister rust, the 
stricter enforcement of bee 
regulations, the fight 
against the destructive 
Japanese beetle, and the 
protection of our rapidly 
growing bulb industry. 
Checking scales, protecting 
the seller as well as the 
buyer against inferior 
weighing devices and in- 
correct weight practices 
offer North Carolinians a 
service that saves them 
money. 

There was the all impor- 
tant matter of promotion 
of certain progressive pro- 
grams. Included in these were the seven 
sectional test farms; marketing activities; 
farm -wide statistical information; better 
seeds, feed and fertilizers; a broader news 
service and better departmental contacts 
throughout North Carolina. This year's 
State Fair was successfully promoted 
under his state management. It carried 
several improvements in ground arrange- 
ments and educational features. 

As a whole, the Department of Agri- 
culture serves as the "police agency" of 
the entire state — standing guard over the 
food and feed consumed, protecting the 
health of man and livestock. 





Pasture on Piedmont Test Farm in Iredell County 



4 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



AGRICULTURAL SITUATION 



The fall season of 1937 resulted in con- 
flicting trends of farm prices. For ex- 
ample, wheat and cotton prices went down 
while cattle and some other farm products 
went up. The cause for the cotton price 
decline was the world's record produc- 
tion of cotton this year. Naturally, in- 
terest is centered in farmers' plans for 
feeding more livestock this winter. De- 
spite these trends the farmer's income 
continues to exceed last year's figures. 
General crop production for the nation 
is the largest in nine years but the con- 
sumers' buying power is also up, with 
food costs 18% less than in 1924 to 1929. 
The purchasing power of non-agricultural 
income per capita for food is 6 per cent 
higher than in the base period just men- 
tioned. For the country at large the in- 
creased marketings of farm products, 
considering the prices received, are ex- 
pected to yield farmers the biggest cash 
farm income since 1929. 

DEMAND 

Most indications are for a continued 
good demand for farm products through 
1937. While general business activities 
have slackened through October, yet even 
if it should go lower, the buying power 
of consumers is unlikely to be greatly 
effected in the near future. Activity in 
woolen and cotton mills has slackened and 
the production of coal, shoes, automobiles, 
tires, and furniture have been reduced. 
However, back orders have been enough 
to keep some of the important industries 
going with about the usual activity. 

New orders to October have been dis- 
appointing and unless there is a material 
increase in new buying the present volume 
of industrial production cannot continue 
much longer. This, however, relates to 
the future rather than to the immediate 
demand for farm products. Exports of 
farm products were generally low last 
summer but there is an expected increase 
this winter as the results of the larger 
crops of cotton, wheat, and many other 
products. Obviously, the imports will 
probably be reduced. The unsettled situ- 
ation in the Far East and Europe has 
touched world trade but business activi- 
ties in most foreign countries are being 
maintained. 

FARM INCOME 

The farm income from marketings 
gained little during the fall season. The 
decline in the money received by farmers 



from the government has also affected 
farmers' income. Prices of many farm 
products have declined. Cotton and hogs 
contributed considerable to this. Increase 
in prices must be obtained in order to 
regain the mid-summer price level. 

PRICES 

Those familiar with farm economics 
will recall that farm products reached a 
parity level last January for the first time 
in many years. However, by September, 
the purchases of our farm products de- 
clined 91 per cent as compared to 101 
per cent in January. The index of prices 
received by farmers was 18 per cent above 
the pre-war level as compared with 130 
per cent for prices as paid by farmers. 
Fortunately for North Carolina farmers, 
the fine prices received from the tobacco 
and cotton crops produced are aiding 
greatly in maintaining the farmers' in- 
come of this state. Most other crops do 
not have nearly as good prices as usual. 

CROP PRODUCTION 

The 1937 crop production is the largest 
since 1928 and will be only 6 per cent 
less than the all-time peak reached in 
1920 following the World War stimula- 
tion. In spite of the increase in the world 
trade, the United States has produced a 
surplus of production which will require 
some exports for taking care of the sur- 
plus. The industrial activities have a 
steady increase since 1923 resulting in 
the 1937 activity being appreciably above 
the 1929 almost record activity. 

LABOR 

There has been a lag in the farm wages 
and in view of the 1937 prices received, 



farm wages are expected to be less an- 
other year. For the country at large, 
agriculture employs more than two mil- 
lion five hundred thousand persons as 
Hired farm labor. About one-third as 
many more persons are employed in farm 
work without compensation. These being 
made up largely of family labor. The 
majority of the farm labor does not have 
steady employment. The pay is usually 
small, often being as low as 50 cents a 
day. 

THE VEGETABLE INDUSTRY 

While the growing of vegetables is an 
industry, it is generally considered a minor 
agricultural enterprise. It is, however, 
becoming a major source of income to 
farmers. For example, during the years 
1933-1935 the yield had a gross farm 
average of well toward a billion dollars 
a year. This is about 23 per cent of the 
total gross income from all crops and 
more than 10 per cent of the total income 
from crops and livestock. North Caro- 
lina enjoys a fair sized vegetable indus- 
try in the eastern trucking counties, all 
the way from Norfolk to the South Caro- 
lina line. 

POULTRY 

Another valuable source of income is 
poultry, which, while not developed as a 
commercial enterprise in North Carolina, 
yet serves as an economic and cash income 
source for most farms. As with dairy- 
ing, this often provides cash for seasons 
when regular farm income is slacking. 




The fall season means harvest activity by farmers. Cotton ginning scene Sampson County October 1937 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



5 



NORTH CAROLINA CROP REPORT-NOVEMBER 1, 1937 



CROPS 


Unit 


NORTH CAROLINA CROPS 




UNITED STATES ( 


IROPS 


Acreage 


Yield Per Acre 


Production 


Acreage 
(In Thousands) 


Yield Per Acre 


Production 
(In Thousands) 


1936 


Preliminary 
1937 


1936 


Prelim. 
1937 


1936 


Indicated 
1937 


1936 


Prelim. 
1S37 


1936 


Prelim. 
1937 


1936 


Indicated 
1937 


Corn 


Bu. 


2,350,000 


2,326,000 


18.5 


19.5 


43,475,000 


45,357,000 


92,829 


96,146 


16.5 


27.6 


1,529,327 


2,651,393 


All Wheat 


Bu. 


530,000 


519,000 


9.8 


12.0 


5,194,000 


5,228,000 


48,820 


68,198 


12.8 


13.0 


626,461 


886,895 


Oats. . 


Bu. 


245,000 


233,000 


14.0 


20.0 


3,430,000 


4,660,000 


33,213 


35,933 


23.8 


32.1 


789,100 


1,152,433 


Barley . 


Bu. 


9,000 


7,000 


17.0 


19.0 


153,000 


133,000 


8,322 


11,166 


17.7 


20.9 


147,452 


232,878 


Buckwheat- _. . .. ... . 


Bu. 


4,000 


4,000 


15.0 


13.0 


60,000 


52,000 


370 


418 


16.8 


16.3 


6,218 


6,802 


Cotton 


Bales 


957,000 


1.074,000 


298.0 


320.0 


597,000 


720,000 


30,028 


33,736 


197.6 


258.8 


12,399 


18,243 


Tobacco* 




























Type 11 


Lbs. 


237,000 


261,000 


750.0 


790.0 


177,750,000 


206,190,000 






750.0 


768.0 


245,625 


277,900 


Type 12 


Lbs. 


293,000 


328,000 


760.0 


900.0 


222,680,000 


295,200,000 






760.0 


900.0 


222,680 


295,200 


Type 13 


Lbs. 


61,000 


72,000 


845.0 


950.0 


51,545,000 


68,400,000 






827.0 


950.0 


124,895 


174,800 


Type 31 


Lbs. 


6,000 


8,000 


900.0 


925.0 


5,400,000 


7,400,000 






Total 


Lbs. 


597,000 


669,000 


766.0 


863.0 


457,375,000 


577,190,000 


864 


958 


790.0 


872.0 


682,850 


835,713 


Total U. S 


Lbs. 














1 , 437 


1 , 690 


802.5 


878.9 




1 ,485, 148 


Potatoes (Irish) . _ 


Bu. 


82,000 


92,000 


73.0 


102.0 


5,986,000 


9,384,000 


3,058 


3,224 


107.9 


121.5 


329,997 


391 , 707 


Potatoes (Sweet). 

Peanuts* .. . . 


Bu. 


84,000 


85,000 


90.0 


96.0 


7,560,000 


8,160,000 


822 


826 


78.0 


89.3 


64,144 


73,774 


Lbs. 


228,000 


225,000 


1,070.0 


1,150.0 


243,960,000 


258,750,000 


1,736 


1,666 


749.2 


766.6 


1,300,540 


1,277,130 


Soybeans* 


Bu. 


118,000 


130,000 


12.5 


13.0 


1,475,000 


1,960,000 


2,113 


2,259 


14.0 


17.3 


29,616 


38,997 


Cowpeas* ... 


Bu. 


55,000 


65,000 


7.0 


7.5 


385,000 


488.000 


1,261 


1,334 


6.0 


6.4 


7,626 


8,569 


Sorghum Syrup __ __ . ... 


Gals. 


18,000 


18,000 


70.0 


70.0 


1,260,000 


1,260,000 


215 


198 


55.1 


61.8 


11,848 


12,239 


Hay (Tame) 


Tons 


890,000 


937,000 


.76 


.85 


680,000 


796,000 


57,055 


55,773 


1.11 


1.34 


63,309 


74,576 


Fruit Crops: 




























Apples ....... 


Bu. 










1,890,000 


4,505,000 










117,506 


211,100 


Peaches . . . . .. 


Bu. 
Bu. 

Tons 

Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 










1,558,000 
240,000 
7,900 

800,000 
300,000 
1,100,000 


1,984,000 
281,000 
8,100 

809,000 
300,000 
1,109,000 










47,650 
26,956 
1,916 

19,205 
20,930 
40,135 


59,626 
30,139 
2,732 

22,812 
53,796 
76,608 


Pears . 


















Grapes — 


















Pecans: 

Improved 


















Seedlings . 


















Total. 





































*NOTE: Tobacco totals for United States show total Flue Cured tobacco, and total for all types. Peanuts, Soybeans, and Cowpeas show acreage and production harvested for peas or beans only. 



CROP CONDITIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

November 1, 1937 



North Carolina, along with most other 
of the United States, has made extra 
good yields of crops for the 1937 harvest. 
This is generally due to the favorable 
weather conditions prevailing throughout 
the harvest season. Drought and flood 
conditions have been almost entirely lack- 
ing since the spring months. As a result, 
stands, growths, and fruiting have been 
surprisingly good. In spite of farm labor 
shortage, the harvest season has been 
sufficiently favorable and prolonged to 
permit of saving the crop with farm 
family labor. 

GRAIN CROPS 

We find this year's CORN crop pro- 
ducing as high yield per acre as has been 
made within the past fifteen years. Fav- 
orable weather and soil conditions are 
responsible. The WHEAT crop made a 
fine yield in spite of the very dry May. 
The 10 per cent increase over last year's 
yield was due to the very mild winter 
and to ample soil moisture, for filling out 
the grain in late May and June. A dry 
pollinating season is good for heavy 
heads, under conditions similar to those 
experienced in North Carolina this year. 
OATS, BARLEY, and RYE were gen- 
erally good for the same reasons favor- 
ing wheat yields. 

CASH CROPS 

By November, our farmers were gen- 
erally satisfied that the COTTON crop 
was one of the best for many years, in 
spite of severe boll weevil conditions be- 
ginning in late July. Conditions favor- 
ing good yields were abundant soil mois- 
ture, causing continued growth of the 
plants even through September, as well 
as fair weather through most of the 
season. Thus the plants were not only 
able to support the weevils, but to pro- 



duce maximum sized bolls and maximum 
fruitfulness. Good stands were also fav- 
orable. The unusually good harvest and 
ginning conditions, without damaging 
winds or rains, resulted in little loss in 
spite of farm labor shortage, and low 
price prospects. 

TOBACCO has shown quite contrasting 
conditions to cotton, in spite of the heavy 
production this year. Whereas the price 
of cotton was very low, due to over pro- 
duction, tobacco brought very satisfactory 
prices, largely due to the continued in- 
crease in consumption. Favorable weather 
conditions resulted in good quality and 
easier curing, as well as extra heavy 
yields in all belts. 

The PEANUT crop enjoyed good cul- 
tivation and growing conditions. Absence 
of drought or flood conditions meant a 
better yield per acre, through a more 
complete saving of nuts during digging. 
The same conditions meant brighter 
shells and better saleability. The yield 
was almost 8 per cent better than last 
year's good crop. 

IRISH POTATO yields were fairly 
good in spite of a dry early growing 
condition. The principal reason for this 
was that the low early price delayed the 
harvest, permitting a maximum develop- 
ment of the crop. The heavy increase in 
total production was due largely to the 
12 per cent expansion in acreage in the 
North Carolina crop. The commercial 
early crop was increased considerably 
more than that. 

SWEET POTATOES also show an ap- 
preciable increase in yield per acre, but 
only a small acreage increase. This year 
was unusual in that the extended favor- 
able growing season resulted in an extra 
good development of both plant and 
roots. 



FEED CROPS 

Here again, the year has been favor- 
able for plant growth which is desired in 
feed crops. Both plant growth and good 
prices have been conducive to heavy pro- 
ductions this year. SOYBEANS and 
especially COWPEAS, have shown a tre- 
mendous increase in acreage, with the 
yield per acre of all LEGUMES better 
than usual. The increased acreage and 
extra good yields resulted in a 17 per 
cent increase in production in HAY crops. 

FRUIT CROPS 

Last winter was very mild with no 
lossage to fruits, until the late spring 
freeze. This fortunately came at a time 
when practically no damage resulted to 
APPLES or GRAPES. PEACHES showed 
spotted damage, but the commercial, 
sandhill area had an excellent crop both 
in size and quality. Extra good prices 
were received for peaches while apples 
have been a distinct drag on the market, 
due to the heavy state and national pro- 
duction. This state's PECAN crop is 
somewhat better than usual with the 
total production slightly more than last 
year, and almost twice as much as last 
year for the country as a whole. 

UNITED STATES CROPS 

United States crop conditions have been 
much like those in North Carolina in that 
extra good yields show 14 per cent above 
the past 10-year average, and 24 per 
cent above the very low average of the 
last four years. This year is exceeding 
the record year of 1920 in the average 
yields per acre for all crops. 



6 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



REVISED ESTIMATES OF NORTH CAROLINA CROPS* 



CORN (All) 


OATS 


TOBACCO BY TYPES 
Type 11 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Pounds 


Production 
(000) 
Pounds 


1924 ... 


2,080 
2,153 
2,110 
2,088 
2,046 
1,985 
2,233 
2,345 
2,322 
2,392 
2,429 
2,478 
2,350 


16.0 
17.0 
18.0 
19.0 
17.0 
19.0 
18.0 
19.0 
15.0 
18.0 
17.5 
19.0 
18.5 


33,280 
36,601 
37,980 
39,672 
34.782 
37,715 
40,194 
44,555 
34,830 
43,056 
42,508 
47,082 
43,475 


1924 


210 

206 
190 
167 
147 
168 
186 
205 
219 
223 
228 
240 
245 


16.0 
15.5 
15.0 
15.5 
16.0 
19.0 
18.5 
23.0 
19.0 
16.5 
18.0 
21.5 
14.0 


3,360 
3,193 
2,850 
2,588 
2,352 
3,192 
3,441 
4,715 
4,161 
3,680 
4,108 
5,160 
3,430 


1925 


1925 


1924 


217,600 
227,000 
220,200 
263,600 
273,900 
276,000 
295,000 
264,000 
182,000 
249,000 
190,000 
244,000 
237,000 


569 
595 
655 
719 
626 
645 
740 
665 
600 
725 
765 
885 
750 


123,789 
135,130 
144,296 
189,492 
171,330 
178,020 
218,300 
175,560 
109,200 
180,525 
145,350 
215,940 
177,750 


1926 


1926. 


1927._. 


1927 


1925 


1928 


1928 


1926 


1929 


1929 _ 


1927 


1930 


1930 


1928 


1931 


1931 


1929.. 


1932 


1932.. 


1930 


1933.... 


1933 


1931.... 


1934 


1934 


1932 


1935 


1935 


1933 


1936 


1936 


1934 






1935 




CORN (for Grain) 


BARLEY 


1936 


Type 12 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Pounds 


Production 
(000) 
Pounds 


1924 


1,999 
2,044 
2,047 
2,014 
1,996 
1,892 
2,153 
2,266 
2,220 
2,320 
2,343 
2,417 
2,274 


16.0 
17.0 
18.0 
19.0 
17.0 
19.0 
18.0 
19.0 
15.0 
18.0 
17.5 
19.0 
18.5 


31,984 
34,748 
36,846 
38,266 
33,932 
35,948 
38,754 
43,054 
33,300 
41,760 
41,002 
45,923 
42,069 


1924 


5 
7 
9 
11 
16 
19 
23 
26 
17 
14 
11 
9 
9 


18.0 
18.0 
20.0 
18.5 
18.0 
18.0 
17.5 
20.0 
15.0 
17.5 
18.0 
19.0 
17.0 


90 
126 
180 
204 
288 
342 
402 
520 
255 
245 
198 
171 
153 


1925 


1925 


1924 


228,000 
279,700 
298,000 
338,000 
390,000 
402,000 
416,000 
368,000 
240,000 
352,000 
250,000 
310,000 
293,000 


610 
770 
712 
775 
730 
660 
760 
700 
630 
830 
905 
960 
760 


139,080 
215,360 
212,176 
261,950 
284,700 
265,320 
316,160 
257,600 
151,200 
292,160 
226,250 
297,600 
222,680 


1926 


1926 


1925 


1927 _ 


1927 


1926 


1928 __. 


1928... 


1927 


1929 


1929 


1928. 


1930 


1930 


1929 


1931 


1931 


1930 


1932 


1932. 


1931 


1933 


1933... 


1932 


1934 


1934 


1933 _. 


1935. _ 


1935 


1934.. _ 


1936 


1936 


1935 






1936 


CORN (for Silage) 


RYE 




Type 13 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
(000) 
Tons 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Pounds 


Production 
(000) 
Pounds 


1924 


9 
10 
10 
11 
11 
12 
13 
12 
12 
14 
17 
15 
16 


5.6 
4.7 
5.5 
6.2 
6.1 
6.0 
5.5 
5.5 
4.5 
6.0 
5.5 
6.0 
5.5 


50 
47 
55 
68 
67 
72 
72 
66 
54 
84 
94 
90 
88 


1924. 


55 
56 
73 
55 
51 
54 
51 
70 
72 
69 
76 
70 
60 


7.5 
7.0 
8.0 
8.0 
7.5 
8.0 
8.0 
9.0 
8.0 
7.0 
7.2 
7.5 
6.5 


412 

392 
584 
440 
382 
432 
408 
630 
576 
483 
547 
525 
390 


1925 __. 


1925.. 


1924 


27,900 
29,500 
28,500 
38,000 
48,500 
51,300 
57,000 
56,500 
40,500 
66,800 
46,500 
58,500 
61,000 


500 
775 
765 
830 
765 
805 
820 
765 
700 
860 
870 
1,010 
845 


13,950 
22,862 
21,802 
31,540 
37,102 
41,290 
46,740 
43,222 
28,350 
57,448 
40,455 
59,085 
51,545 


1926 _ 


1926 


1925... 


1927 


1927 


1926 


1928 


1928 


1927 


1929 


1929 


1928.. 


1930 


1930 


1929. 


1931 


1931 


1930 


1932 


1932 


1931 


1933 


1933 


1932 


1934 


1934 


1933 


1935 


1935 


1934.... 


1936 


1936 


1935. 






1936 


CORN (for Hogging, Grazing 
and Forage) 


BUCKWHEAT 




Type 31 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Pounds 


Production 
(000) 
Pounds 


Crop Years 


Acreage 






1924 


72 
99 
53 
63 
39 
81 
67 
67 
90 
58 
69 
46 
60 






1924. 


8 
7 
6 
6 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


13.5 
10.0 
15.5 
14.0 
13.5 
13.5 
12.0 
15.0 
11.0 
17.0 
16.0 
15.0 
15.0 


108 
70 
93 
84 
68 
68 
48 
60 
44 
68 
64 
60 
60 


1925.. 






1925 


1924 


3,500 
3,800 
3,300 
2,400 
3,600 
5,500 
7,200 
7,100 
6,500 
9,200 
5,500 
5,200 
6,000 


636 
650 
705 
720 
650 
730 
750 
710 
735 
785 
870 
925 
900 


2,226 
2,470 
2,326 
1,728 
2,340 
4,010 
5,400 
5,041 
4,778 
7,222 
4,785 
4,810 
5,400 


1926 






1926 


1925 


1927.... 






1927 _ 


1926 


1928.. 






1928 


1927 


1929 






1929 


1928 


1930 






1930 


1929 _ 


1931 






1931.. 


1930 


1932 






1932.... 


1931 


1633 






1933. 


1932 


1934 _. 






1934. 


1933 _. 


1935.. 






1935 


1934 


1936 






1936 


1935 










1936 


WINTER WHEAT 


SORGO SIRUP 




TOBACCO— ALL TYPES 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
1000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
for Sirup 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Gallons 


Production 
(000) 
Gallons 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Pounds 


Production 
(000) 
Pounds 


1924 


345 
324 
373 
380 
361 
353 
265 
358 
422 
443 
496 
520 
530 


11.0 
10.5 
11.5 
9.5 
10.5 
10.3 
10.8 
13.0 
9.5 
9.5 
9.9 
11.3 
9.8 


3 , 795 
3,402 
4,290 
3,610 
3,790 
3,636 
2,862 
4,654 
4,009 
4,208 
4,910 
5,876 
5,194 


1924. 


15 
14 

23 
18 
15 
15 
20 
26 
28 
25 
21 
20 
18 


63 
48 
81 
73 
65 
75 
60 
73 
60 
75 
75 
75 
75 


945 
672 
1,863 
1,314 
975 
1,125 
1,200 
1,898 
1,680 
1,875 
1,575 
1,500 
1,260 


1924 


477,000 
540,000 
550,000 
642,000 
716,000 
734,800 
775,200 
695,600 
469,000 
677,000 
492,000 
617,700 
597,000 


585 
696 
692 
755 
692 
665 
757 
692 
626 
794 
847 
935 
766 


279,045 
375,840 
380,600 
484,710 
495,472 
488,651 
586,600 
481,423 
293,528 
537,355 
416,840 
577,435 
457,375 


1925 


1925 


1925 


1926 


1926 


1926 


1927 


1927. 


1927.... 


1928 


1928 


1928 


1929 


1929. 


1929 


1930 


1930 


1930 


1931 


1931 _ 


1931 


1932 


1932 


1932 


1933.. 


1933. 


1933 


1934 


1934 


1934 


1935 .... 


1935.... 


1935.... 


1936 


1936 


1936 















* NOTE: Crop years 1924-1936. Revised in 1936. 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



7 



REVISED ESTIMATES OF NORTH CAROLINA CROPS* 



COTTON 


LESPEDEZA HAY 


ALL TAME HAY 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Picked 
(000) 


Yield of Lint 
Cotton 
Picked Per 
Acre 
Pounds 


Production 
Bales 
(000) 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
(000) 
Tons 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
Tons 
(000) 


1G24 








1924 


664 
564 
637 
738 
641 
618 
659 
801 
915 
805 
958 
922 
890 


.81 

.63 
.82 
.80 
.83 
.82 
.73 
.87 
.70 
.78 
.83 
.81 
.76 


535 
375 
523 
591 
530 
507 
480 
697 
641 
627 
798 
751 
680 


1924 _ 


1,732 
1,798 
1,802 
1,565 
1,628 
1,635 
1,448 
1,206 
1,251 
1,072 
970 
930 
957 


226 
291 
320 
262 
245 
217 
254 
298 
252 
305 
311 
294 
298 


821 
1,097 
1,208 
858 
832 
743 
771 
752 
660 
684 
631 
572 
597 


1925 








1925 


1925 


1926... 








1926 


1926.... 


1927.... 








1S27. 


1927 


1928 








1928 


1928 


1929 


21 
30 
60 
80 
100 
137 
160 
135 


1.00 
1.00 
.95 
.90 
.85 
.95 
.90 
.90 


21 
30 
57 
72 
85 
130 
144 
122 


1929 


1929_ 


1930.. 


1930... 


1930 _ 


1931... _ 


1931. __ 


1931 


1932... _ 


1932 


1932 


1933 


1933. 


1933 


1934 


1934 


1934 


1935 


1935 


1935 


1936... 


1936... 


1936 








GRAINS CUT GREEN FOR HAY 




POTATOES (Irish 






SOYBE. 


\NS 




n V 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
(000) 
Tons 


Orop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
for Beans 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


1924 


51 
48 
57 
68 
83 
62 
76 
79 
68 
77 
94 
85 
82 


110 
81 
96 
97 

111 
69 
95 

108 
97 
95 

115 

107 
73 


5,610 
3,888 
5,472 
6,596 
9,213 
6,138 
7,220 
8,532 
6,596 
7,315 
10,810 
9,095 
5,986 


1924... __ 


28 
30 
37 
48 
44 
53 
59 
65 
60 
65 
54 
50 
48 


.85 
.80 
.90 
.97 
.98 
1.16 
1.00 
1.10 
.90 
1.10 
.90 
.85 
.80 


24 
24 
33 
47 
43 
61 
59 
72 
54 
72 
49 
42 
38 


1924 


75 
80 
85 
80 
80 
84 
97 
110 
105 
95 
98 
95 


15.5 
14.5 
12.5 
15.0 
13.5 
12.5 
12.0 
13.5 
11.0 
11.0 
12.0 
13.5 


1,162 
l'l60 
1,062 
1,200 
1,080 
1,050 
1,164 
1,485 
1,155 
1,045 
1,176 
1,282 


1925 


1925 


1926 


1925 


1926. 




1926.. ._ 


1927 


1927 


1927 


1928 


1928. 


1928 


1929 _ _ 


1929 


1929.. _. 


1930 

1931 

1932 ... 


1930 _ 

1931 ._ 

1932.... 

1933 


1930 

1931 

1932. 


1933 

1934 

1935.... 

1936 


1934 

1935 

1936 


1933 

1934... 

1935. 

1936 














SWE 


ET POTATOES 


SWEET SORGHUMS FOR 
FORAGE AND HAY 




COWP1 


iAS 




Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
for Peas 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Bushels 


Production 
(000) 
Bushels 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
(000) 
Tons 


1924 


60 
65 
63 
69 
62 
60 
79 
88 
101 
95 
95 
93 
84 


90 
SO 
91 

114 
98 

112 
90 
82 
85 
£3 

104 

100 
90 


5,400 
5,850 
5,733 
7,866 
6,076 
6,720 
7,110 
7,216 
8,585 
8,835 
9,880 
9,300 
7,560 


1924 


38 
30 
42 
50 
30 
16 
30 
50 
56 
50 
46 
45 


8.5 
10.0 
8.0 
9.0 
7.5 
8.0 
8.0 
9.0 
7.0 
8.5 
7.0 
8.0 


323 
300 
336 
450 
225 
128 
240 
450 
392 
425 
322 
360 


1925 


1924.... 


8 
9 
9 
10 
9 
9 
16 
26 
27 
30 
28 
27 
24 


1.90 
1.60 
2.00 
2.20 
2.30 
1.80 
1.75 
1.50 
1.30 
1.40 
1.45 
1.40 
1.50 


15 
14 
18 

22 
21 
16 
28 
39 
35 
42 
41 
38 
36 


1926. 


1925 


1927 


1925 


1926 


1928 


1926 


1927 


1929 


1927 


1928 


1930 


1928 


1929 


1931 


1929 


1930 


1932 


1930. 


1931 


1933 


1931 


1932.. _ 


1934 


1932 


1933. 


1935 


1933. 


1934 


1936 


1934 


1935. 




1935... 


1936. _. 








1936... 










ALFALFA HAY 


PEANUTS FOR NUTS 


MISCELLANEOUS TAME HAY 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
(000) 
Tons 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
for Nuts 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Pounds 


Production 
(000) 
Pounds 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
(000) 
Tons 


1924 _ 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 
6 
7 
7 
7 
8 


1.65 
1.45 
2.00 
1.95 
2.10 
2.00 
1.60 
2.00 
1.75 
1.60 
2.00 
2.00 
1.60 


8 
7 
10 
10 
10 
12 
8 
10 
10 
11 
14 
14 
13 




1925 _.. 

1926 


1924 


113 
120 
121 
113 
115 

83 
115 
107 

97 
114 
126 
107 

96 


1.05 
.70 
.95 
.95 

1.05 

1.00 
.90 

1.10 
.90 
.80 
.90 
.90 
.85 


119 
84 
115 
107 
121 
83 
104 
118 
87 
91 
113 
96 
82 


1916 


205 
163 
145 
126 
126 
141 
145 
160 
190 
190 
195 
210 
200 
220 
205 
250 
255 
190 
238 
225 


910 
1,003 
1,000 
1,124 
1,011 
1,010 

900 
1,100 

950 
1,150 
1,030 
1,050 
1,050 
1,020 

870 
1,100 

800 

950 
1,100 
1,150 


186,550 
163,489 
145,000 
141,624 
127,386 
142,410 
130,500 
176,000 
180,500 
218,500 
200,850 
220,500 
210,000 
224,400 
178,350 
275,000 
229,500 
180,500 
261,800 
258,750 


1927 


1925 


1817 


1928. 


1826 


1918. 


1929 _.. 


1927 


1916... 


1930. 


1628 


1920. 


1931. _.. 


1829 


1921..... 


1932 


1930 


1922 


1933 


1931 


1923. 


1934 


1932 


1924- 


1935 


1933 _ 


1925. _. 


1936 


1934 _ 


1926 




1935 


1627. 


ALL CLOVER AND 
TIMOTHY HAY 


1936 


1928. 

1929 




WILD HAY 


1930 

1931 


1932 


1933. 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
(000; 
Tons 


Crop Years 


Acreage 
Harvested 
(000) 


Yield 
Per Acre 
Tons 


Production 
(000) 
Tons 


1934 

1935 


1636 










1924 


138 
134 

96 
94 
92 
90 
70 
76 
72 
54 
49 
56 
S3 


1.10 
.65 
.95 
1.00 
1.05 
1.05 
.70 
1.05 
.85 
.95 
.90 
.80 
.65 


152 
87 
91 
94 
97 
94 
49 
80 
61 
51 
44 
50 
34 


1924 


47 
42 
36 
29 
26 
23 
25 
24 
19 
20 
23 
23 
25 


.85 
.70 
1.00 
1.10 
1.00 
1.11 
.75 
1.00 
.80 
1.00 
1.00 
.90 
.85 


40 
29 
36 
32 
26 
26 
19 
24 
15 
20 
23 
21 
21 


These two pages afford an excellent study for 
yearly comparisons of the crops shown. For ex- 
ample, four different features of corn data are 
shown on the opposite page, as is an entire column 
(five tables) relating to tobacco. These tables carry 
the acreage, yield per acre and the production only. 
Values are not given since revised data on these 
have not been determined. 

In relation to the data on this page, may we 
call attention to the graphs in this publication show- 
ing particular farm product information since 1866. 
The information here only covers about 12 years, 
while the graphic illustration includes almost 75 
years coverage. Eight tables on hay are shown, 


1925... 


1925 


1926 


1926 


1927 


1927... 


1928 


1928 


1929 


1929 


1930 


1930 


1931... 


1931 


1932.. 


1932 


1933... 


1933 


1934 


1934 


1935 


1835 


1936.. 


1936 







not including soybeans, cowpeas and peanut hay. 

* NOTE— Crop years 1924-1936. Revised in 1936. 



NORTH CAROLINA CORN CROP 







Yield Per 


Acre 








Price Per 








Value Per Acre 






Acreage Planted 


(Bushe 


s) 


Production (Bushels) 


Bushel 


Total Value (Dollars) 


(Do 


Jars Value) 




Districts and Counties 



















— . — , ■ 





— ■ — ■ 


■ 


■ 














1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


— . 

1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


District 1 — 




















— ' — 




















Alleghany 


7,250 


7,760 


7,240 


18 


19 


23 


131,140 


151,230 


164,420 


1.00 


.96 


1.02 


S 131,036 


1 145,761 


% 167,313 


$18.07 


$18.78 


$23 


11 


Ashe.. - 


18,300 


17,640 


16,680 


18 


21 


23 


334,770 


372,800 


390,490 


1.04 


.97 


1.07 


347,666 


359,953 


418,733 


19.00 


20.41 


25 


10 


Avery - - . 


5,320 


5,920 


4,910 


21 


21 


21 


113,660 


124,190 


103,150 


.80 


.88 


1.07 


91,236 


108,801 


110,624 


17.15 


18.38 


22 


53 


Caldwell 


17,090 


15,030 


13,230 


15 


17 


17 


255,060 


248,810 


230,020 


.99 


.97 


1.03 


253,329 


242 , 100 


236,606 


14.82 


16.11 


17 


88 


Surry . 

Watauga.. 


31,020 


31,250 


31,140 


17 


19 


18 


526,770 


586,530 


567,470 


.83 


.87 


1.01 


439,741 


508,748 


571,259 


14.18 


16.28 


18 


34 


8,710 


9,880 


7,890 


18 


20 


24 


153,000 


200,980 


191,670 


1.01 


.98 


1.06 


154,702 


196,187 


203.432 


17.76 


19.85 


25 


78 


Wilkes 


36,760 


35,740 


32,360 


18 


19 


20 


675,460 


664,310 


646,520 


.89 


.91 


1.02 


603,535 


605,011 


657,930 


16.42 


16.93 


20 


33 


Yadkin 


20,250 


20,430 


20,160 


17 


19 


18 


351,450 


380,630 


367,760 


.88 


.90 


.98 


310,360 


340,946 


362,180 


15.33 


16.69 


17 


97 


Northern Mountain (NW.) 


144,700 


143,650 


133,610 


18 


19 


20 


2,541 ,310 


2,729,480 


2,661,500 


.92 


.92 


1.03 


2,331,605 


2,507,507 


2,728,077 


16.11 


17.46 


20 


42 


District 4— 








































Buncombe 


21,780 


24 , 720 


20,840 


20 


22 


26 


444,600 


532 , 660 


539,490 


.77 


.80 


.95 


343,374 


427,999 


513,602 


15.77 


17.31 


24 


65 


Burke - 


16,190 


15,870 


15,390 


19 


20 


20 


303 , 590 


318,580 


305 , 740 


.82 


.80 


1.04 


249,264 


255,051 


317,837 


15.40 


16.07 


20 


65 


Cherokee 


19,310 


19,960 


18,450 


15 


17 


21 


291,910 


348,780 


381,820 


.90 


.81 


.98 


262,592 


280,857 


376,002 


13.60 


14.07 


20 


38 


Clay 


10,070 


8,740 


8,220 


14 


17 


22 


144,890 


144,380 


177,380 


.95 


.91 


1.00 


138,135 


130,853 


176,643 


13.72 


14.97 


21 


49 


Graham... 


5,390 


5,490 


6,020 


18 


18 


20 


96,510 


98,540 


119,700 


.89 


.76 


.93 


85,912 


74,790 


111,338 


15.94 


13.62 


IS 


49 


Haywood... 


16,160 


17,520 


14,550 


20 


21 


24 


319,080 


372,360 


351,410 


.87 


.79 


.95 


277,552 


294,438 


334,513 


17.18 


16.81 


22 


99 


Henderson 


18,650 


18,370 


20,000 


20 


23 


24 


360,570 


428,620 


483,380 


.84 


.68 


.93 


302,186 


290,878 


449,595 


16. 20 


15.83 


22 


48 


Jackson 


11,670 


11,000 


10,550 


18 


20 


24 


208,670 


222,470 


255,420 


.84 


.82 


.92 


175,048 


182,196 


234,757 


15.06 


16.56 


22 


25 


McDowell- 


10,970 


1 1 , 720 


10,250 


19 


20 


21 


204 , 920 


238,980 


212,940 


.89 


.75 


1.00 


181,537 


178,365 


212,041 


16.55 


15.22 


20 


69 


Macon . 


14,010 


13,900 


13,160 


18 


21 


25 


257,870 


289,060 


329,410 


.91 


.81 


.96 


235,392 


233,422 


317,188 


16.80 


16.79 


24 


10 


Madison 


19,390 


19,600 


18,960 


20 


21 


25 


390,140 


420,130 


474,810 


.76 


.7b 


1.01 


296,436 


320,632 


477,754 


15.29 


16.36 


25 


20 


Mitchell . .. 


8,080 


8,490 


8,010 


18 


17 


24 


149,340 


147,750 


193,500 


.88 


.89 


1.07 


130,907 


131,665 


207,498 


16.20 


15.51 


25 


90 


Polk 


11,370 


11,050 


10,950 


15 


14 


15 


168,270 


157,520 


160,700 


.97 


.78 


1.03 


163,780 


122,457 


165,309 


14.40 


11.08 


15 


10 


Rutherford . 


36,100 


36,320 


32 , 570 


18 


18 


16 


645,470 


665 , 920 


506,930 


.79 


.70 


1.01 


509,253 


467,581 


510,306 


14.11 


12.87 


15 


67 


Swain_ 


10,370 


9,960 


10,290 


18 


17 


19 


190,890 


168,990 


195,270 


.97 


.74 


.97 


185,578 


125,165 


190,172 


17.9C 


12.57 


18 


48 


Transylvania 


9,070 


9,160 


5,430 


20 


23 


25 


181,420 


207,600 


136,070 


.93 


.74 


.88 


168,054 


152,906 


119,126 


18.53 


16.69 


21 


.94 


Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.) .. 


10,910 


12,780 


10,690 


19 


20 


26 


203,710 


250,670 


277,210 


.89 


.80 


1.01 


180,644 


199,839 


279,043 


16.56 


15.64 


26 


10 


249.490 


254,650 


234,330 


18 


20 


22 


4,561 ,850 


5,013,010 


5,101 ,180 


.85 


.77 


.98 


3,885,644 


3,869,094 


4,992,724 


15.57 


15.19 


21 


31 


District 2— 








































Alamance 


22,910 


23,440 


22,960 


18 


18 


21 


410,480 


428,890 


475,710 


.85 


.85 


.98 


348,880 


365,318 


467,071 


15.23 


15.59 


20 


34 


Caswell 


18,040 


18,140 


17,270 


14 


15 


18 


258,980 


268,750 


313,160 


.94 


.88 


.92 


242,319 


237,251 


289,560 


13.43 


13.08 


16 


77 


Durham..- . 


12,380 


12,360 


12,100 


16 


18 


20 


198,060 


218,180 


240,830 


.73 


.71 


1.10 


145,053 


153,891 


265,939 


11.72 


12.45 


21 


98 


Forsyth 


19,330 


18, 130 


18,660 


18 


22 


23 


347,600 


395,010 


435,210 


.87 


.81 


.98 


303,627 


321,914 


428,680 


15.71 


17.76 


22 


97 


Franklin 


31,050 


32,760 


28,080 


16 


15 


16 


491,280 


484,540 


460,730 


1.01 


.85 


.92 


494,820 


413,938 


421,971 


15.94 


12.64 


15 


03 


Granville 


25,350 


27,480 


25,500 


16 


17 


17 


408 , 720 


454 , 930 


440,480 


.95 


.85 


.89 


386,653 


385,675 


390,522 


15.25 


14.03 


15 


31 


Guilford 


28,940 


30,940 


27,870 


19 


20 


22 


540,170 


631,610 


600,770 


.90 


.86 


.99 


485,989 


541,038 


593,564 


16.74 


17.49 


21 


30 


Orange. . 


16,910 


17,210 


15,580 


15 


15 


19 


252 , 980 


252,920 


296,080 


.81 


.91 


.95 


216,460 


230,732 


280,382 


12. 8C 


13.41 


18 


00 


Person. ... 


21,150 


21,360 


20,540 


16 


16 


19 


332,990 


344,760 


390,140 


.97 


.88 


.92 


322,514 


303,367 


358,142 


15.25 


14. 2C 


17 


44 


Rockingham 


26,850 


26,530 


25,730 


15 


19 


17 


408,800 


497,260 


444,530 


.96 


.85 


.95 


391,090 


423,527 


423,322 


14.57 


15.96 


16 


.45 


Stokes. . 


21,810 


20,350 


19,060 


17 


20 


16 


368,620 


407,870 


313,170 


.89 


.81 


.95 


328,091 


331,462 


296,689 


15.04 


16.29 


15 


57 


Vance... . 


14,980 


15,010 


13 , 730 


14 


14 


16 


207,050 


215,400 


213,930 


1.02 


.92 


.90 


211,009 


198,557 


191,953 


14. 0£ 


13.23 


13 


1)8 


Warren . . . 


22,920 


23,460 


19,690 


15 


15 


15 


342,070 


359,070 


289,190 


1.02 


.83 


.87 


348,753 


299,161 


251,263 


15.22 


12.75 


12 


76 


Northern Piedmont (N.)„. 


282,620 


287,170 


266,770 


16 


17 


18 


4,567,800 


4,959,190 


4,913,930 


.93 


.85 


.95 


4,225,258 


4,205,831 


4,659,058 


14.95 


14.65 


17 


46 


District 5 — 








































Alexander.. ... 


14,800 


13,490 


12,990 


15 


16 


17 


219,300 


218,110 


218,270 


1.00 


.94 


.96 


219,616 


204,542 


210,164 


14.84 


15.16 


16 


18 


Catawba 


21,640 


22,860 


20,560 


18 


19 


18 


392,670 


428,160 


363,070 


.94 


.81 


1.01 


367,895 


345,831 


365,507 


17.0C 


15.13 


17 


.78 


Chatham. .. .. 


30,160 


29,360 


27,560 


15 


15 


18 


450,690 


447,610 


494,220 


.87 


.83 


.98 


390,424 


369,603 


486,692 


12.95 


12.59 


17 


.66 


Davidson . 


20,460 


23 , 890 


18,400 


18 


20 


20 


358,280 


473,700 


369,620 


.98 


.79 


1.01 


351,471 


373,614 


372,076 


17. IS 


15.64 


20 


.22 


Davie . 


14,730 


15,020 


15,090 


16 


19 


18 


232,600 


278,560 


277,650 


.95 


.86 


.95 


221,587 


240,942 


264,307 


15.04 


16.04 


17 


.52 


Iredell 


33,080 


31,790 


30,130 


18 


20 


17 


599,710 


647,340 


512,720 


.87 


.77 


1.00 


522,781 


497,372 


510,539 


15. 8C 


15.65 


16 


.94 


Lee . 


13,040 


13 , 900 


12,830 


15 


15 


16 


196,680 


204,620 


211,140 


.86 


.84 


.91 


168,915 


172,154 


191,771 


12.95 


12.39 


14 


.95 


Randolph 


30,950 


29,500 


28,720 


19 


20 


19 


595,040 


577,160 


536,580 


.90 


.84 


1.00 


538,046 


486,898 


534,307 


17.3! 


16.51 


18 


.60 


Rowan . ....... 


24,970 


25,510 


22,910 


19 


19 


19 


462,450 


483,960 


427,040 


.92 


.83 


.98 


424,354 


401,768 


420,566 


16.99 


15.75 


18 


36 


Wake. 1 


43,810 


49,180 


42 , 650 


16 


15 


16 


682,860 


735,420 


696,770 


.97 


.85 


.90 


659,351 


621,501 


625,195 


15. 0£ 


12.64 


14 


.66 




247,640 


254,500 


231 , 840 


17 


18 


18 


4,194,280 


4,494,640 


4,107,080 


.92 


.83 


.97 


3,864,440 


3,714,225 


3,981,124 


15.61 


14.59 


17 


.17 


District 8 — 








































Anson . 


37,300 


36,130 


33 , 530 


15 


14 


16 


577,800 


509,110 


526,310 


.91 


.72 


.95 


525,162 


364,876 


501,039 


14. Of 


10.10 


14 


.94 


Cabarrus .. . . . . 


24,820 


23 , 120 


21 , 030 


16 


18 


19 


390,510 


405,290 


401,630 


.89 


.87 


.93 


348,838 


351,245 


373,560 


14.05 


15.19 


17 


76 


Cleveland . 


45,100 


45,310 


38,590 


18 


18 


17 


805,830 


818,970 


671,020 


.92 


.72 


.96 


738,491 


591,979 


646,130 


16.37 


13.07 


16 


74 


Gaston 


24,470 


24,400 


21,640 


17 


16 


17 


408,700 


392,340 


376,360 


.96 


.77 


.94 


394,024 


303,784 


354,172 


16. 1C 


12.45 


Hi 


37 


Lincoln .. . .. 


21,900 


19,210 


18,800 


16 


20 


17 


359,810 


375,360 


327,550 


.88 


.77 


.94 


316,959 


287,909 


308,251 


14.47 


14.99 


16 


40 


Mecklenburg .. 


35,670 


34,490 


32,620 


17 


16 


15 


621,520 


539,520 


481,670 


.89 


.77 


.98 


554,925 


417,275 


474,369 


15.56 


12.10 


14 


54 


Montgomery. _ . . 


13,820 


13,740 


12,170 


15 


15 


16 


210,940 


205,620 


191,950 


.77 


.68 


1.01 


161,889 


140,221 


193,243 


11.71 


10.21 


15 


88 


Moore 


20,620 


20,070 


18,800 


15 


15 


16 


313,580 


294,280 


294,290 


.86 


.80 


.98 


270,175 


234,449 


289,819 


13.1C 


11.68 


15 


42 


Richmond. ._ . 


20,160 


21,680 


19,410 


14 


15 


13 


286,410 


321,780 


253,800 


.96 


.84 


.95 


274,124 


269,219 


241,622 


13. 6C 


12.42 


12 


45 


Stanly 


23,830 


25,420 


23,970 


16 


19 


19 


372,590 


486,710 


458,380 


.94 


.79 


.94 


351,189 


384,831 


431,315 


14.74 


15.14 


17 


99 


Union... 


51,400 


50,250 


45,920 


16 


17 


16 


808,840 


857,910 


757,470 


.95 


.86 


.97 


766,185 


735,138 


737,653 


14.91 


14.63 


Hi 


06 


Southern Piedmont (S.)_.. 


319,090 


313,820 


286,480 


16 


17 


17 


5,156,530 


5,206,890 


4,740,430 


.91 


.78 


.96 


4,701,961 


4,080,926 


4,551,173 


14.74 


13.00 


15 


89 


District 3— 








































Bertie 


26,680 


29,300 


26,630 


17 


21 


21 


465,730 


610,060 


551,190 


.78 


.68 


.77 


361,996 


414,778 


422,163 


13.57 


14.16 


15 


85 


Camden.. 


16,280 


16,180 


16,190 


19 


24 


21 


316,880 


386,040 


335,380 


.85 


.69 


.82 


269,368 


266,337 


275,220 


16.55 


16.46 


17 


uo 


Chowan. ... 


12,930 


13,250 


16,360 


18 


20 


22 


230,370 


270,190 


352,780 


.84 


.69 


.92 


193,981 


186,869 


324,237 


15.00 


14.10 


19 


82 


Currituck. _ 


13,960 


14,730 


13 , 790 


20 


23 


20 


279,780 


333 , 500 


273,160 


.87 


.71 


.81 


244,552 


236,576 


221,178 


17.52 


16.06 


Hi 


04 


Dare.. .. _ _ ._ 


210 


260 


260 


20 


16 


20 


4,200 


4,130 


5,080 


.78 


.64 


.84 


3,291 


2,663 


4,287 


15.67 


10.24 


16 


49 


Edgecombe.. . .. 


40,080 


40,420 


39,830 


19 


21 


18 


760,300 


854,270 


720,610 


.80 


.65 


.78 


610,414 


555,073 


559,856 


15.23 


13.73 


14 


06 


Gates . 


13,990 


15,060 


14,380 


15 


21 


21 


210,530 


311,760 


298,120 


.90 


.77 


.92 


189,435 


239,448 


274,033 


13.54 


15.90 


lit 


06 


Halifax 


45,570 


49,810 


44,980 


18 


19 


15 


824,470 


961,880 


696,590 


.85 


.71 


.86 


700,431 


680,384 


602,163 


15.37 


13.66 


13 


39 


Hertford 


18,320 


17,690 


16,680 


17 


19 


19 


306,800 


337,010 


316,920 


.86 


.75 


.90 


265,136 


253,336 


284,356 


14.47 


14.32 


17 


05 


Martin . . .. 


23,160 


25,360 


24,980 


20 


23 


22 


468,190 


574,110 


538,770 


.79 


.65 


.78 


368,579 


373,843 


418,552 


15.91 


14.74 


16 


76 


Nash 


42,200 


43,520 


38,660 


17 


20 


17 


718,350 


879,450 


666,280 


.87 


.72 


.88 


621,803 


632,975 


583,322 


14.73 


14.54 


15 


09 


Northampton 


29,460 


32,320 


28,340 


18 


21 


21 


518,500 


676,430 


586,530 


.80 


.71 


.82 


415,650 


478,373 


481,335 


14.11 


14.80 


16 


98 


Pasquotank. . _ 


22,590 


22,270 


21,360 


21 


24 


22 


478,350 


544 , 230 


460,160 


.81 


.65 


.84 


385,819 


355,464 


387,697 


17.08 


15.96 


18 


15 




17,310 


18,220 


21,010 


18 


21 


21 


304,970 


384,490 


435,530 


.86 


.68 


.92 


263,726 


261,272 


400,332 


15.24 


14.34 


19 


05 


Tyrrell.. .. 


9,430 


8,500 


9,300 


18 


18 


22 


166,130 


152,390 


200,570 


.89 


.72 


.82 


148,163 


108,968 


164,601 


15.71 


12.82 


17 


70 


Washington 


12,130 


12,600 


12,760 


18 


20 


22 


213,590 


255,350 


285,610 


.85 


.68 


.83 


182,017 


174,913 


237,537 


15.01 


13.88 


18 


62 


Northern Coastal (NE.).._ 


344,300 


359,490 


345,510 


18 


21 


19 


6,267,140 


7,535,290 


6,723,280 


.83 


.69 


.84 


5,224,361 


5,221,272 


5,640,869 


15.17 


14.52 


16 


33 


District 6 — 








































Beaufort . _ 


40,050 


42,410 


41,410 


22 


25 


24 


875,140 


1,045,200 


999,580 


.87 


.57 


.86 


759,540 


591,406 


864,044 


18.96 


13.94 


20 


87 


Carteret. -. 


4,860 


5,160 


5.050 


20 


18 


22 


96,460 


95,400 


108,830 


.87 


.59 


.95 


83,548 


55,861 


103,603 


17.19 


10.83 


20 


52 


Craven... 


22,060 


22,460 


22,720 


18 


22 


21 


400,900 


496,700 


469,840 


.75 


.60 


.85 


298,687 


299,241 


400,993 


13.54 


13.32 


17 


65 


Greene 


30,510 


26,910 


26,460 


17 


18 


19 


523,460 


496,160 


501,370 


.76 


.66 


.82 


397,334 


325,173 


411,444 


13.02 


12.08 


15 


55 


Hyde 


18,310 


17,340 


18,870 


19 


18 


22 


346,610 


314,680 


406,690 


.91 


.60 


.77 


314,473 


189,032 


311,518 


17.17 


10.90 


16 


51 


Johnston.. __ 


66,860 


76,200 


70,200 


17 


19 


20 


1,147,180 


1,467,840 


1,390,010 


.90 


.71 


.85 


1,030,899 


1,040,835 


1,186,400 


15.42 


13.66 


16 


90 


Jones _ 


19,380 


19,920 


20,090 


16 


19 




312,010 


382,120 




.90 


.59 




280,468 


223,985 




14.47 


11.24 






Lenoir 


37,810 


37,020 


35,790 


17 


18 




15 


624,450 


656,410 


554,680 


.78 


.62 




.78 


485,936 


404,643 


430,925 


12.85 


10.93 


12 


04 


Pamlico... . 


17,180 


19,010 


18,280 


18 


24 


25 


304,510 


457,730 


456,800 


.85 


.59 


.90 


257,631 


269,420 


409,895 


15.00 


14.17 


22 


42 


Pitt 


55,510 


55,880 


60,750 


20 


22 


19 


1,135,070 


1,227,980 


1,151,490 


.80 


.63 


.79 


906,731 


777,304 


907,201 


16.33 


13.91 


14 


93 


Wayne . ._ 


54,260 


57,390 


62,370 


19 


19 


17 


1,029,000 


1,090,780 


1,075,070 


.81 


.65 


.79 


836,661 


705,452 


847,014 


15.42 


12.29 


13 


58 


Wilson 


36,290 


37,300 


36,540 


19 


21 


20 


705,890 


768,430 


723,530 


.83 


.68 


.80 


587,641 


520,093 


577,943 


16.19 


13.94 


15 


82 


Central Coastal (E.) 


403,080 


417,000 


418,530 


19 


20 


19 


7,500,680 


8,499,430 


7,837,890 


.83 


.64 


.82 


6,239,549 


5,402,445 


6,450,980 


15.48 


12.96 


15 


41 


District 9 — 






































Bladen 


30,930 


34,100 


31,490 


16 


18 


16 


505,260 


603,970 


516,310 


.80 


.69 


.88 


402,773 


417,247 


451,977 


13.02, 


12.24 


14 


35 


Brunswick 


11,090 


11,420 


11,300 


14 


16 


18 


152,490 


187,870 


204,640 


.89 


.76 


.82 


135,008 


142,781 


167,950 


12. 17 


12.50 


14 


86 


Columbus. 


40,250 


39,530 


41,710 


19 


23 


18 


753 980 


903,310 


754,430 


76 


.68 


.83 


574,774 


611,125 


627,403 


14.28 


15.46 


15. 


04 


Cumberland . . 


36,670 


37,950 


34,470 


19 


18 


18 


681,240 


679,580 


624,060 


.82 


'.72 


]90 


558^467 


492,520 


559,922 


15.23 


12.98 


16. 


24 


Duplin.. 


52,370 


55,330 


56,660 


18 


20 


18 


939 , 820 


1,105,610 


1 , 025 , 690 


.71 


64 


.77 


662 932 


703,217 


785,648 


12.66 


12.71 


13. 


87 


Harnett 


35,430 


36,460 


33,020 


18 


19 


19 


622 , 130 


'687,780 


'626420 


]83 


]76 


.'91 


519,'l02 


519, '441 


568,644 


14.65 


14.25 


17. 


22 


Hoke 


20,620 


19,920 


18,400 


17 


18 


16 


344,590 


352,180 


300,940 


.84 


.74 


.80 


290,885 


262,202 


240,416 


14.11 


13.16 


13. 


07 


New Hanover 


2,870 


2,790 


2,820 


18 


22 


20 


53,070 


61,530 


56,620 


.77 


.77 


.81 


41,068 


47,418 


458,469 


14.31 


17.00 


16. 


26 


Onslow 


23,840 


22,770 


24,200 


16 


18 


17 


381,080 


416,000 


417,290 


.75 


.66 


.80 


286,078 


275,459 


333,343 


12.00 


12.10 


13. 


77 


Pender.. 


17,290 


16,630 


15,960 


16 


18 


17 


281,360 


296,260 


274,750 


.84 


.74 


.84 


237,709 


220,624 


231,497 


13.75 


13.27 


14. 


50 


Robeson. 


86,990 


85,850 


85,730 


18 


20 


16 


1,595,700 


1,741,320 


1,329,710 


.76 


.62 


.83 


1,211,300 


1,073,512 


1,105,744 


13.92 


12.50 


12. 


90 


Sampson 


57,890 


63,540 


57,100 


18 


19 


17 


1,042,880 


1,218,480 


982,710 


.81 


.64 


.80 
.88 


848,013 


781,527 


784,992 


14.65 


12.30 


13. 


75 


Scotland 


21,840 


21,430 


20,070 


17 


18 


14 


364,810 


390,180 


276,440 


.87 


.75 


316,073 


292,627 


241,990 


14.47 


13.66 


12. 


06 


Southern Coastal (SE.). — 


438,080 


.447,720 


432,930 


18 


19 


17 


7,718,410 


8,644,070 


7,389,710 


.79 


.68 


.89 


6,084,182 


5,839,700 


6,557,995 


13.89 


13.04 


15. 


15 


State 


2,429,000 1 


2,478,000 


2,350,000 


17.5 


19.0 


18.6 


42,508,000 I 


47,082,000 


43,475,000 


.86 


.74 


.91 


36,557,000 


34,841,000 


39,562,000 


15.05 


14.06 


16. 


83 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



9 



MILLION 

Bushels 



CORN - PRODUCTION IN NORTH CAROLINA 



MILLION 




50 
40 
30 
20 

10 




m\ ii ■ n 1 1 I 

LLLLLLlLLLLL 

liiiigigiiii 



CHART COMPARES PRODUCTION 



CORN 



North Carolina's corn crop is perhaps 
the most important in the state. This is 
due to the fact that almost every farm re- 
lies on corn as a feed, although very little 
of it is sold from the average farm. Then, 
too, it covers many purposes. It provides 
the table with several important foods, 
but practically all livestock use it. It is 
important in every county as may be seen 
from the table on page 8. 

The method of growing corn is gener- 
ally recognized as having about half the 
State's acreage grown alone and about 
one-fourth each grown with soybeans and 
with cowpeas. The acreage having pea- 
nuts or velvet beans planted in the corn 
is less than 2 per cent. There has been a 
distinct shift or increase in the corn acre- 
age having cowpeas interplanted. This is 
particularly true in the western half of 
the State. Farmers have definitely ex- 
pressed a preference for cowpeas for 1937, 
with the prospect of continued interest 
next year. In certain truck regions 
around Mt. Olive, Carteret County, Wash- 
ington, and Elizabeth City corn will be 
planted between rows of truck crops to 
be followed later with soy beans between 
the corn rows. Then, again, corn may be 
cut and topped; cut green for silage; the 
fodder or top or both may be taken off; 
it may be fed whole or shredded; or again, 
just the ears alone may be taken off, 
leaving the stalks standing. Again, many 
farms graze the field with their livestock, 
without harvesting the corn. Others will 
snap off the ears and let the stock feed 
on the remaining stalks. 

This shows clearly that the crop may 
not only be planted in various ways, but 
may also be utilized in many ways for 
various purposes. 

While an occasional farm may grow a 
surplus of corn, yet very little of it goes 
outside of the neighborhood where pro- 
duced. Exceptions to this may be found 
in certain coastal counties where this crop 
follows early truck. In these regions, 
yields may be quite good for the corn 
really is utilized in taking up the truck 
crop fertilizers from the soil that might 
otherwise be lost through leachage. 

The student will find considerable inter- 
est and information on the opposite page, 



by studying comparisons for any particu- 
lar feature interesting to him. The in- 
formation, acreage, yield, production and 
value, is offered for three years for each 
county in the state. The counties are 
grouped in geographic distribution so that 
neighboring counties may be more readily 
compared. Geographic districts are 
grouped together for the same purpose. 
Attention is especially called to the graph 
which shows the growth of this crop since 
1866. One important feature of corn which 
is not yet recognized by government of- 
ficials is the value of the "tops and 
fodder" crop. While North Carolina 
farmers give considerable attention and 
value to this form of feed, we are not 
given credit for it, even though it does 
lower the yield per acre of grain. Many 
wise farmers contend that the cost of 
pulling fodder and of saving tops does 
not justify itself through the value of the 
fodder gain in recognition of or relation 
to the loss in yield per acre. 

Credit for the information on acreage 
of corn and other crops is due largely to 
the county tax listing officials who se- 
cured this from farmers during the spring 
months. This information is considered 
quite reliable in view of its source and 
the care taken in interpreting the county 
totals. Each farmer should realize that 
this is basic information and should co- 
operate fully in giving complete informa- 



tion to his tax lister. The farm survey 
information is treated entirely as confi- 
dential, and in no wise affects one's taxes. 
The results are completed too late for it 
to affect prices paid to farmers. 

While the average yield of corn in 
North Carolina appears to be rather low 
at 15 to 18 bushels, yet this state has 
produced the highest yield of corn per 
acre yet on record. In 1911 Charlie Parker 
in Hertford County, produced more than 
200 bushels per acre of crib-dry corn, 
measured and weighed. Many reports of 
more than 100 bushels per acre have been 
reported by corn club members. The re- 
cent activity in soil conservation methods 
or programs is meaning much toward the 
increase in the yield of corn. 

Along with the seasonal decline in hog 
prices, we have also a seasonal slump in 
the price of corn. Meat prices have been 
good and the hog-corn price ratio above 
the average. It appears that the number 
of pigs raised in 1938 will be considerably 
larger than in 1937. With a much larger 
national supply of feed grains this year 
than last, and with the hog-corn price 
ratio above the average, the average 
weights of hogs slaughtered in 1937-38 
are expected to be heavier than those of 
1936-37, and the seasonal decline in hog 
prices, which is now under way, is ex- 
pected to continue throughout the fall 
months as marketing of spring pigs in- 
crease. 




Corn with interplanted crops Duplin County, 



NORTH CAROLINA COTTON CROP 











Yield Per Acre 




Production 




Price (Per 


Total Value of Lint 


Value Per Acre 




Acreage Harvested 


(Pounds 


) 


500 Pound Gross Weight Bales 


Pound) Cents 




(Dollars) 






(Dollars) 










































Districts and Counties 








































1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1 not 

1935 


iyoo 


1934 


1935 


> 

1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


District 1 — 
























































































































































Caldwell - 


406 


290 


272 


276 


249 


298 


235 


151 


170 


12.2 


11.3 


12.7 


14,335 


8,532 


10,294 


35.31 


29.42 


37.85 








































Wilkes 


152 


137 


202 


213 


261 


298 


68 


75 


126 


12.3 


11 .4 


12.7 


4,182 


4,275 


7,645 


27.51 


31.20 


37.85 


Yadkin 


521 


404 


513 


266 


253 


298 


289 


214 


320 


12.2 


11.3 


12.7 


17,629 


12,091 


19,415 


33.84 


29.93 


37.85 


Northern Mountain (NW.) 


1 , 079 


831 


987 


262 


253 


298 


592 


440 


616 


10 o 

I Z . Z 


11.3 


12.7 


36,146 


24,898 


37,354 


33.50 


29.96 


37.85 


District 4 — 














































































1,464 


1,236 


1,335 


275 


259 


261 


842 


671 


731 


12.3 


11.4 


12.7 


51,783 


38,247 


44,322 


35.37 


30.94 


33.15 








































Clay 






























































































































































































McDowell 


29 





ZZ 


1 bz 


239 


298 


1 n 
1U 


6 


137 


1 9 n 
1Z .u 


ii 1 
i i . i 


10 7 
1Z . / 


600 


1 fifi 

100 


fiOO 
OOO 


90 AQ 

zu. oy 


97 A7 
Z/ . 0/ 


07 01 
/ . 00 




















































































































Polk - - 


6, 203 


5,548 


5 , 759 


274 


268 


251 


3 , 560 


3,111 


3 ,024 


lz.o 


11.5 


12 . 7 


91 Q QAfi 


1 70 QQ9 
1 / O , OOZ 


100 44ft 
100 , 440 


1 OO 
OO .OU 


09 94 
OZ ,Z4 


01 QO 
61 .80 


Rutherford 


26, 842 


24,531 


28 ,071 


308 


312 


ZOl 


17,322 


16,005 


1 6 , 543 


12 .4 


11 .5 


12 . 7 


1 0,70 QRA 

i , u/o , yo** 


090 OQQ 
yzu , ZOO 


1 OOO 411 
1 , UUO ,411 


40 01 
4U .Ul 


07 19 
/ .OZ 


35.69 








































»■» » IU_,. u/ 'i 

Western Mountain (W.) __ 


34,538 


31 , 321 


35,187 


301 


302 


Z/D 


21 , 734 


19,790 


20,435 


12.4 


11.5 


12.7 


1 0.dn 9fl7 


1 137 RR*i 


1 909 019 
1 , ZOZ , U 1 z 


OR Q1 
00.90 


Oft 09 
OD. OZ 


OR 01 
00 . U I 


District 2 — 








































1,553 


1 ,212 


1,256 


281 


241 


238 


914 


612 


627 


12.2 


11.4 


12.7 


55 , 754 


34,884 


38,022 


35.90 


28.78 


30.23 


Caswell 


164 


125 


149 


209 


252 


241 


70 
/ Z 


66 


75 


12 . 1 


11.3 


12.7 


4,356 


3,729 


4,563 


26.56 


29.83 


30.61 


Durham - 


1 ,014 


620 


943 


222 


253 


254 


472 


090 

oZO 


501 


12.2 


11.4 


12.7 


28 792 


1 Q AQA 

io , oyo 


30 417 


9fi 0Q 

zo .oy 


30 15 


32 26 


Forsyth 


674 


560 


471 


242 


255 


254 


341 


299 


251 


12.2 


11.4 


12.7 


9fi oni 
ZU , OUl 


1 7 O40 
1 / , U40 


15 209 


OO Oft 
OU . OO 


00 40 
OU .40 


09 9A 
OZ .ZD 


Franklin 


19, 966 


17,051 


17,838 


306 


271 


97Q 

z/y 


12, 808 


9, 685 


10, 431 


12.2 


11.4 


13.0 


7B1 90(2 
tOi , Zoo 


K 19 041 
OOZ , U40 


A47 A9A 
04/ , OZO 


OQ 1 

oy . io 


09 Oft 
OZ .00 


OA 97 
00. Z/ 


fy _..;?[„ 


2,046 


1 , 713 


1 ,903 


261 


244 


941 

Z40 


1 1 1 Q 
1,110 


074 
0/4 


978 


12.2 


11 1 
11.0 


10 7 
1Z. ( 


AQ 1 0Q 

oo , iyo 


in 9ii 

OU,ZOD 


1Q 014 

oy ,014 


00 00 
OO .00 


90 04 

zy .04 


01 11 
01 . 11 


/~i ,.:i f i 

Ouiltord 


865 


791 


579 


279 


240 


269 


506 


OOQ 

oat* 


326 


12.2 


11 .4 


12. 7 


OO Cfifi 
OO, ODD 


99 AQA 
— , OOO 


19 771 


35 68 


28 68 


04 1 fi 
04 . 10 


Orange - 


1 ,353 


1 ,424 


1 ,293 


269 


256 


241 


762 


762 


652 


12.2 


11 .3 


12. 7 


AR AHO 


40 nio 

40 , UOO 


OQ 140 

oy , 040 


04 01 
04 .00 


30 23 


00 A1 
OU. 01 


Person 


13 


8 


7 


257 


239 




7 


4 


- 


12. 1 


11.2 


12.7 


*1Z3 


224 




32 62 


23 00 








65 


1 ft4 






25 


12.7 


1 191 
1 ,0-1 


90 OA 
ZO .00 




























Vance 


5, 690 


4 ,593 


5 , 12b 


307 


2ol 


262 


o , bob 


9 11 
z , 01Z 


2,808 


12.2 


11.4 


12.7 


990 01 fi 
iiiiO , U1D 


143 184 


170 337 


00 1 Q 

oy . iy 


31 17 


00 97 
00 . Z/ 


Warren 


17,501 


17,324 


15, 971 


326 


275 


251 


11 , 931 


9, 974 


8,400 


12.2 


11.4 


12. 7 


797 701 

/z/ , /yi 


1AQ 11 Q 
OOO, OlO 


IOO 4Q1 

ouy ,4yi 


41 1Q 

4i . oy 


32 82 


01 ftft 
01 . 00 


Northern Piedmont (N.) 


50, 839 


45 , 421 


45, 601 


306 


268 


9ft0 
ZOO 


32, 587 


OR tit A 

z □ , o 1 4 


25 , 074 


12.2 


11.4 


12.8 


1 , 30/ , / OO 


1 A*>A 017 
1 , 404, O 1 / 


1 Ci01 R1d 
1 , OOO ,014 


00 10 
OV. IU 


32 02 


00 ftft 
00 .00 


District 5 — 






































Alexander . 


4,450 


6 , 576 


o,9z0 


255 


239 


994 
Z04 


2,o7o 


1 700 


1 , 92 J 


19 O 
LZ .0 


11.5 


13 .0 


1 AR 9,17 
140 , Z3 / 


mo noo 
lUo , uyo 


11Q 014 

i iy , 004 


09 OA 
OZ . OO 


9ft RO 
ZO . 00 


OO 49 
0U.4Z 


Catawba 


16,532 


15,385 


12 , 682 


307 


280 


228 


10, 623 


9,006 


6,042 


12.3 


11.5 


13 .0 


ft^O OIA 
wo ,Ol* 


117 841 
01 / , 040 


375 113 


0Q fi.9 

oy . oz 


33 66 


29 64 


Chatham 


6,213 


5 , 487 


4 , 712 


242 


230 


273 


3 , 149 


2, 647 


2,691 


12.0 


11.2 


13 .0 


1 CO QAf\ 

ioo, yiu 


140 909 
140, ZOZ 


1A7 OQA 

10/ ,uyo 


00 41 
OU .41 


27 02 


35 49 


Davidson 


3 ,807 


3 ,503 


2, 844 


256 


250 


231 


2,043 


1 , 832 


1 ,373 


12. 1 


11.3 


12.5 


1 90 ftft9 
IZo , DUZ 


1 0O lOfl 
1 UO , OUO 


01 074 

oi , y <4 


09 47 
OZ . 4/ 


29 55 


9fl ft7 
ZO .0/ 




5, 896 


5, 184 


6,360 


257 


262 


227 


3 , 166 


2, 849 


3 ,021 


12.2 


11 .4 


12 . 7 


1 QO 1 0fi 
1 JO , 1ZO 


1A9 OOO 

ioz ,oyo 


100 990 

iyo , zzo 


09 7ft 
OZ . /O 


31 33 


9ft ftO 
ZO. 00 




25,943 


25, 176 


24 ,436 


276 


282 


910 
ZOy 


14, 967 


14 ,878 


12,248 


12 .3 


11 .5 


13 .C 


OOn A7f\ 

yzu , 4/u 


855 , 485 


7AO 417 
/OU, 40 / 


01 40 
00 .40 


00 Oft 

oo . yo 


01 07 

01 .u/ 


Lee 


5,841 


5,393 


5,839 


300 


277 


OQO 


3 , 670 


3, 128 


3 ,515 


12.3 


11 .5 


12. S 


OOfi 70 K 
ZZO , tUO 


1 70 QAn 

li \i , obu 


91 A 1AQ 

zio, ooy 


38 . 64 


00 01 
00 .00 


07 11 
/ . 10 


Randolph 


1 , 709 


1 ,269 


1 ,223 


254 


245 


Z14 


909 


651 


549 


12.1 


11.3 


12.5 


KA QQA 

oi , yy* 


OA 709 
OO, /OZ 


09 7Q0 

oz, /yu 


09 1)2 
OZ . 10 


28 99 


26 75 


Rowan 


19, 899 


19,965 


18,896 


276 


257 


9Qft 

ZyO 


11 ,507 


10, 724 


11 , 699 


12.3 


11.5 


12. J 


7fi7 fiflO 

, oou 


A1A Aon 

010, OOU 


711 1Q1 
/ 10 , 101 


01 1ft 
00 . 00 


30 89 


37 89 


Wake - 


20,466 


18, 894 


on ion 
ZU , OZU 


284 


263 


070 
Z/tf 


12, 182 


10,423 


11 ,864 


12.3 


11.5 


12. J 


7^0 100 

/ iy , iyo 


IOO 099 

oyy , ozz 


791 914 
/ ZO , Z04 


Oft A1 
00.01 


31 72 


35 71 


Central Piedmont (C.) 


110, 756 


■mo ooo 
J Uo . ooZ 


101 ooo 
I U I , zoz 


279 


266 




64, 594 


57,931 


54,924 


12.3 


11.5 


12. £ 


O QCO 971 
O , yDO , Li I 


O 090 1RK 


077 01 ft 
, oil , U ID 


01 70 
00. / 


32 01 


00 Oft 
00. OD 


District 8 — 






































Anson 


31 , 731 


OO OO 

66 , Zoo 


35,015 


305 


25b 


278 


20,244 


_ . 
17, 810 


20,417 


lz.5 


11.7 


12. £ 




1 041 001 
1 , U41 , OOO 


1 917 094 
1 , ZO/ , yz4 


OQ R.7 

oy .0/ 


31 35 


35 86 


Cabarrus 


16,586 


15,877 


15,743 


243 


240 


9ftQ 


8,438 


7, 977 


9 ,537 


12.3 


11.5 


12. £ 


<;1Q 007 
OlO, t)o i 


41Q A7fl 
400 ,0/0 


100 090 
OOO , UZO 


01 9Q 

oi . zy 


28 89 


36 99 


Cleveland 


50 , 775 


52, 829 


49,211 


380 


384 


9 KG 

zoy 


40,334 


42,519 


27, 671 


12 .5 


11.7 


12. £ 


2,520,875 


2,487,362 


1 704 01 Q 
1 , /U4 ,010 


40 A1 

iy . oo 


47 08 


34 70 


Gaston 


14, 715 


15,865 


15, 720 


259 


265 


9ft0 

zoy 


7,982 


8, 793 


8,865 


12 .4 


11.6 


13 .C 


AQA QQA 
lyl , Ool 


IOO OQ4 

ouy , yyi 


HO 40 
OOU , 400 


00 fiO 
00 . 00 


32 15 


34 97 


Lincoln — 


on ono 

20, 39© 


19,641 


19,250 


340 


329 


94 fi 

Z4U 


14,515 


13 ,521 


9, 671 


12.4 


11 .€ 


12. £ 


QOQ oon 

oyy ,you 


7Q4 910 
/04 ,Z10 


lOI OIQ 

oyo , ooy 


44 19 
44 . 1Z 


39 93 


30 96 


Mecklenburg. - 


29,588 


Zo , oaU 


28,453 


237 


246 


OOQ 


14 , 673 


14, 764 


13 , 298 


12.4 


11.6 


13 . 1 


OOO 79R 

yUy , /ZD 


OIA 019 
OOO, OlZ 


COO OOO 

oOZ ,uuo 


on 7i 

OU. / 


29 85 


29 21 


Montgomery. 


4,445 


4,850 


5,210 


258 


250 


90ft 

zyo 


2,397 


2,537 


3,224 


12.3 


11.5 


13.0 


147 AIR 
11/ ,110 


141 070 
140 , 0/0 


900 1 1Q 

zuu , ioy 


33 16 


30.08 


38 48 


Moore 


2,709 


2,950 


3,466 


245 


248 


259 


1,389 


1,530 


1,881 


12.3 


11.5 


13.0 


85,424 


87,975 


116,760 


3L53 


29 '.82 


33^67 


Richmond 


14, 797 


15,531 


14 , 626 


281 


250 


250 


8,696 


1 0O 


7, 657 


12.3 


11.5 


12. 7 


534,804 


467,992 


464,408 


36.14 


30.13 


31.75 


Stanly ._ 


12,282 


10,797 


10, 655 


280 


283 


301 


7,200 


6,390 


6,716 


12.4 


11.6 


13 . 1 


AAR AC\(\ 
440 , 4UU 


07O A90 
O /U , OZU 


411 762 


36 35 


34.33 


39 .43 


Union 


OO , 9oU 


on ooo 
oy ,ZZo 


41 ,333 


283 


268 


9Q0 
Zyo 


23 , 075 


oo noo 
zz ,Uoz 


25 ,388 


12.8 


12. C 


13 .2 


1 A 7fi ono 
1,4/0, OUU 


1 91 Q90 

i ,ozi ,yzu 


i Ann 104 

1 , OUU , 0U4 


07 OQ 

o / . oy 


33 70 


38 68 


Southern Piedmont (S.) 


lie , UUb 


900 AQG 

civ , 490 


OIQ COO 

Zoo, boz 


300 


001 


269 


148,943 


1 ac mo 
1 4b , (J I Z 


1 34 , 325 


12. 6 


11.7 


12. S 


q onn a/ir 


o COO OO/l 
O , OOZ , ooh 


017 RfiA 
0,01/, ODO 


39 24 


35 63 


34 85 


District 3 — 
































Bertie. 


9,585 


9,288 


9,984 


325 


280 


308 


6,516 


5,449 


6,431 


12. 1 


11 .2 


12. 7 


004 910 

oy4 , zj.0 


OOI 144 
OUO, 144 


OOO 100 

oyu , iuo 


41 13 


33 .07 


39. 12 


Camden 


2,576 


2,319 


3 , 183 


383 


338 


OOQ 

ooy 


2,066 


1 , 642 


2,257 


12 X 


11.2 


12. t 


1 90 ORO 

izo , you 


91 , 952 


ioi ono 

100 , OUU 


48 12 


39 65 


42 ] 71 


Chowan _ 


4,257 


4,043 


4,978 


381 


345 


325 


3,396 


2,923 


3,385 


12. 1 


11.2 


12.4 


9H^ A1Q 
ZUO, 400 


1AO AQQ 
100 , OOO 


900 4A7 
ZUU ,40/ 


48 26 


40.49 


40.30 


Currituck 


1 ,260 


1 ,363 


1 ,570 


410 


344 


040 
o40 


1 ,082 


983 


1 , 128 


12. C 


11.2 


12.7 


64 , 920 


55 , 048 


AO 400 

oo , 4oy 


51 52 


40 39 


43 .56 


Edgecombe 


ne nic 

Jo, 976 


25 , 588 


OA 0*7(1 

zb, o/y 


312 


291 


305 


17,595 


15, 607 


17, 151 


12 u 


11.0 


12.7 


1 070 90 K 


OQ1 7QA 

ooi , /yo 


1 040 974 
1 ,U4U , Z/4 


39 79 


34.46 


38.74 


Gates 


5,066 


5,073 


5,356 


365 


272 


ono 
ouz 


3,872 


2,894 


3,385 


12.1 


11 .3 


12.7 


904 9(%A 
Zo4 , ZOO 


1 63 , 5 1 1 


OftA 004 

ooo , yo4 


46 24 


32 .23 


38.35 


xlalilax 


38,605 


o/,79o 


40, 716 


331 


292 


01 A 


26, 747 


OO n*70 

16 ,U/o 


26 , 74 1 


12.3 


11.4 


12.7 


1,644,940 


1,315,161 


1,622,006 


49 A1 
4Z . 01 


34 80 


39 88 




5,484 


5, 847 


6,680 


363 


285 


047 
04 I 


4, 168 


3 ,493 


4 ,852 


12. 1 


11.3 


12.." 


252, 164 


197,354 


OOQ ft14 

zoy , oo4 


45 98 


33 75 


43.37 




7,275 


6, 196 


7,445 


330 


290 


318 


5,029 


3, 756 


4,965 


12. 1 


11 .3 


12.4 


004 914 
OU4 , Z04 


019 914 
Z1Z , Z14 


001 109 
OU1 , 10- 


41 . 82 


34.25 


40.39 


JNasn 


no Tnn 

jo,7uy 


16 ,09/ 


25, 116 


345 


295 


294 


19 ,274 


14 ,441 


15 ,458 


12. 2 


11.3 


12.7 


1 , 1 /O , / 14 


815 , 916 


007 ftl 1 

yo / , oio 


44 02 


34.87 


37.34 


Northampton - 


16 , 790 


25,493 


24 , 006 


395 


338 


on 

OOO 


19,656 


18 ,055 


1 7 , 828 


12.3 


11.4 


12.6 


1 9O0 044 
1 ,ZUo,o44 


1 O90 101 

i ,uzy , ioo 


1 079 090 
1 ,U/Z , OZO 


51 01 


40.37 


44*73 


2,278 


1 ,941 


2, 799 


305 


294 


107 
OZ 1 


1 ,454 


1 , 195 


1 ,918 


12. C 


11 .2 


12. £ 


87,240 


aa oon 
bb,yzu 


114 114 
114 ,014 


38 30 


34 .48 


40.87 




6,294 


5,464 


6, 727 


359 


299 


090 
OZO 


4,728 


3,420 


4,626 


12. C 


11,2 


12 .1 


900 AQO 
ZOO , OOU 


191 ,520 


97ft 1 01 
Z/0 , 101 


45 07 


35.05 


41.00 


Tyrrell 


462 


628 


923 


230 


265 


IO 
OOU 


222 


348 


677 


12. C 


11.2 


12. ( 


13 , 320 


19,488 


QOO 
OO, OUU 


28 83 


31 03 


42.00 


Washington 


2,336 


2,148 


2,965 


340 


290 


007 
OZ/ 


1,663 


1 ,306 


2,031 


12.1 


11.2 


12.3 


1 on a 1 o 
1UU, ulZ 


73 , 136 


11Q om 


43 07 


34.05 


40.22 


Northern Coastal (NE.) 


ICO QCO 

1bz,95o 


1 56 , 584 


icq Q07 


344 


301 


01 Q 
ID 


117,468 


98 , 585 


no ooo 
III, 833 


12.2 


11.3 


12. £ 


7 1 CC Q7K 

/ , 1 bb , o/o 


1 KQ1 QOO 


C 07 A mo 
b,a/4, I uz 


A.% QO 
40 .90 


35 65 


41 .19 


District 6 — 
























Beaufort 


5,004 


5,026 


6,435 


328 


289 


047 
04/ 


3,437 


3,041 


4,671 


12 .C 


11 .z 


12.3 


OOA 990 

zuo , zzu 


1 70 9QA 

i /u, zyo 


974 OQ0 

z/4 , oyo 


41 21 


33.88 


42.68 


Carteret 


587 


534 


596 


278 


267 


019 


341 


298 


389 


12. C 


11.2 


12.7 


20,460 


16, 688 


90 A10 
ZO , OIU 


34 86 


31 .25 


39.62 


Craven. 


2,450 


2,117 


2,087 


279 


272 


312 


1,430 


1,207 


1,362 


12.2 


11.3 


12.7 


ot oon 
O i , ZoU 


68, 196 


82 , 634 


01 AO 
00 . OU 


32 21 


39.62 


Greene 


9,548 


8,505 


9,130 


297 


263 


311 


5,935 


4,676 


5,936 


12.2 


11.3 


12. £ 


362,035 


264,194 


362,883 


37.92 


01 OA 

01 .uo 


39 81 


Hyde _. 


2,690 


3,051 


3,415 


338 


286 


313 


1 ,903 


1,828 


2,238 


12. C 


11.2 


12.7 


114, 180 


102,000 


135, 756 


42.45 


00 11 
00 .00 


39 75 


Johnston 


52,019 


44,574 


48,366 


282 


295 


308 


30, 702 


27,526 


31,237 


12.4 


11.5 


12. £ 


1 rino cox 

1 , 9Uo , oz4 


1 COO TA 1 

1 ,ooz, /4o 


1 no^ 11/1 
1 , yZ4,0l4 


Oft 1Q 

oo. oy 


35 51 


39.73 


Jones 


3,376 


2,842 


2,951 


276 


267 


362 


1,953 


1 ,591 


2,238 


12.1 


11.2 


12.7 


118, 156 


on nnc 

oy , U9b 


135, 756 


01 oo 
00 .uu 


31 35 


45.97 


Lenoir . 


9,856 


8,537 


8,710 


279 


294 


304 


5,752 


5,248 


5,547 


12.2 


11.3 


12. £ 


OKn Q70 
OOU, O/Z 


OOA 110 

zyb, oiz 


O0Q 007 

ooy ,uo/ 


35 60 


34.73 


38.91 




1 ,947 


2,292 


3 ,519 


365 


279 


343 


1 ,488 


1 ,341 


2,530 


12. C 


11.1 


12.7 


OO OOO 

o9,ZoU 


74,426 


153 ,463 


45 86 


32.47 


43.56 


p;++ 


15,126 


13,710 


14,943 


289 


253 


308 


9, 136 


7,255 


9,634 


12.2 


11.3 


12.7 


KC7 one 
00/ ,29b 


Ann noo 

4U9 , yuo 


104 OOO 

004 , ooy 


OA ftl 
00. 04 


29 89 


39.12 




28,219 


24 , 270 


29,221 


308 


282 


334 


18,204 


14,330 


20,435 


12.4 


11.5 


12. £ 


1 100 rie 
1 , lZo, b40 


OOO 071 

OoZ ,9/0 


1 OIQ OOQ 

i , zoy , uzo 


40 on 

4U . UU 


33 .95 


43.09 




19,343 


17,040 


17,383 


297 


256 


305 


12,025 


9,116 


11,094 


12.3 


11.4 


12.6 


■70 n too 
/o9,ooo 


519, 612 


ftA7 177 
00/ ,0/ / 


OS 90 
00 .ZO 


30 49 


38.43 


Pnntrol Pah til r? . 


1 50 , 1 65 


4 OO iinn 

132,498 


146,756 


294 


279 


317 


92,306 


77,457 


97,311 


12.3 


11.4 


12. £ 


K C77 40Q 

o , b// , 4oy 


A 41 q nic 
4,41o,Ulb 


3 , M40 , U4U 


07 ft1 
0/ . 01 


33 34 


40.50 


District 9 — 






















7,853 


7,096 


7,199 


284 


246 


313 


4,663 


3,648 


4,719 


12.1 


11.2 


12. S 


OOO 1 1 o 

ZOZ , 1 12 


OflA OOO 

ZU4 , Zoo 


90Q mo 
ZOO, OUO 


01 Q9 

oo . yz 


28.79 


40.06 




399 


571 


454 


225 


249 


320 


188 


298 


304 


12.0 


11.1 


12.7 


11 ,280 


16,539 


18,468 


90 97 
ZO . z/ 


28 96 


40.64 




3, 194 


2,971 


2,907 


313 


263 


325 


2,091 


1,639 


1 ,979 


12.2 


11 .3 


12.7 


127,551 


92 , 604 


1 on n4n 
1ZU.U4U 


00 QO 

oy . yo 


31 17 


41*27 




23,554 


24,508 


24,396 


292 


304 


319 


14,373 


15,601 


16,289 


12.3 


11.5 


12.7 


OOO (\At\ 

ooo , 940 


on7 nco 
09/ ,U0O 


oqq noi 
yoo.uzi 


7 10 
/ . 00 


36 60 


40 51 




10,139 


9,146 


10,481 


305 


270 


340 


6,475 


5,179 


7,460 


12.3 


11.5 


12.7 


398,212 


297,792 


808,725 


39.28 


32! 56 


43! 18 


TTjiuiljlI 1 


25,665 


25,681 


23,876 


320 


347 


305 


17,212 


18,669 


15,224 


12.3 


11.5 


12.7 


1,058,538 


1,073,468 


923,384 


41.24 


41.80 


38.73 


Hoke- 


18,603 


20,111 


18,032 


318 


361 


359 


12,369 
9 


15,218 


13! 549 


12^3 


11.5 


12.6 


760,694 


875,035 


815,341 


40.89 


43.51 


45.23 


New Hanover 


16 


28 


20 


283 


256 


364 


15 


152 


12.0 


11.2 


12.7 


540 


840 


9,234 


33.75 


30.00 


46.23 


Onslow 


3,050 


2,450 


2,611 


279 


252 


306 


1,780 


1,292 
899 


1,675 


12.1 


11.3 


12.4 


107,690 


72,998 


99,173 


35.31 


29.80 


37.94 


Pender 


1,525 


1,728 


1,524 


245 


248 


334 


782 


1,066 


12.0 


11.2 


12.5 


46,920 


50,344 


63,619 


30.77 


29.13 


41.75 


Robeson _ 


60,277 


58,505 


57,006 


355 


314 


344 


44,745 


38,441 


41,103 


12.3 


11.5 


12.8 


2,751,818 


2,210,358 


2,512,769 


45.65 


37.78 


44.03 


Sampson 


43,503 


40,993 


44 , 669 


322 


323 


335 


29,267 


27,737 


31,360 


12.3 


11.5 


12.7 


1,799,920 


1,594,878 


1,902,172 


41.37 


38.91 


42.54 


Scotland 


24,886 


26,229 


26,053 


361 


321 


318 


18,822 


17,635 


17,355 


12.3 


11.5 


12.5 


1,157,553 


1,014,012 


1,036,081 


46.51 


38.66 


39.75 


Southern Coastal (SE.) ... 


222,664 


220,017 


219,228 


328 


318 


332 


152,776 


146,271 


152,235 


12.3 


11.5 


13-1 


9,386,768 


8,400,214 


9,585,530 


42.16 


38.18 


43.72 


State 


970,000 


930,000 


957,000 


311 


294 


298 


631,000 


572,000 


597,753 


12.3 


*11.5 


12.9 


38,864,000 


32,873,000 


37,002,536 


40.07 


35.35 


38.66 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



11 




COTTON 



North Carolina's cotton crop is grown 
primarily in the southern Piedmont and 
eastern counties. The obvious reason for 
this is that it requires a warm and early 
planting condition. Its successful culture 
depends upon an early start, a long 
growth, and early fruiting; so as to avoid 
the heavy ravages of boll weevils. Prior 
to 1923 the main object was to get it well 
fruited before the frost got it. Now the 
weevil is the primary objective to avoid. 
The national 1937 crop promises to be 
about the largest on record in spite of 
serious boll weevil ravages. The cause of 
this was the fact that the crop was 
planted early, came up to a fairly good 
stand and the seasons afterwards were 
almost ideal. In other words, the crop 
fruited well putting on a heavy bottom 
crop prior to the serious ravages of 
weevils in August. Of course, this pest 
destroyed thousands of squares and young 
bolls but these would probably have shed 
anyway, since the plants were well loaded 
with early bolls. 

TREND GRAPH 

The graph above should be interesting 
to the student of historic data. It shows 
clearly what the expansion of this crop 
has been since 1866. In view of the pres- 
ent methods of planting and harvesting 
in Oklahoma and Texas, it is possible that 
North Carolina and the Atlantic cotton 
growing states, may gradually be run out 
of the production of this crop, due to the 



high production cost here in relation to 
their cost in the west. 

California, New Mexico, Arizona and 
parts of Texas and Oklahoma are pro- 
ducing cotton without appreciable damage 
from boll weevil. While the pan-handle 
section of Texas produces fairly low 
yields, yet the cost is quite low in com- 
parison with that of North Carolina. They 
handle the crop almost entirely by ma- 
chinery. It may be expected that the pro- 
duction in North Carolina may soon show 
a steady decline, which, in fact, has al- 
ready occurred. The table herewith shows 
production for each of the principal pro- 
ducing states. North Carolina at one time 
stood fourth in the production of cotton 
but it ranked 8th in 1936. Of course, many 
farmers are reducing their cotton acre- 
age and shifting to tobacco, but there is 
a limit to this shift. 

The cotton crop fits in admirably with 
the soil conservation program in that it 
does not deplete the soil. The reason for 
this is that the lint is about all that is 
lost and it does not carry appreciable 
plant food. All of the stalks and leaves 
go back to the soil, while most of the seed 
may go back in the form of fertilizer. 
This crop stands con- 
siderable abuse, which 
means that it will pro- 
duce fair yields under 
adverse conditions. Of 
course, like any other 



crop, it responds to good treatment, good 
fertilization and considerable cultivation. 

The cotton production chart, showing 
the years 1866 to 1936, showed a growth 
from about 100,000 bales in 1866 to a 
peak of 1,200,000 bales in 1926. North 
Carolina's 1937 production is near the 
700,000 bale mark, which is the most pro- 
duced since 1928. There was a steady 
growth in the production until 1926; since 
which time there has been a steady decline 
in the cotton production. 

Prior to 1924 cotton was an important 
crop in most of the coastal counties. The 
resulting damage from boll weevils caused 
farmers in many such counties to stop 
growing cotton in the favor of truck, to- 
bacco, and hog production. The apparent 
freedom from boll weevil damage in the 
western piedmont section caused an ex- 
pansion in the cotton acreage in that area. 
These western counties have found it ad- 
vantageous to grow small plants fairly 
thick in the row so as to produce and ma- 
ture a few bolls per plant as early as pos- 
sible. Contrary to this, the eastern coun- 
ties practice the habit of producing large 
plants, with many late bolls. This usually 
results in heavy lossage from boll weevils. 



REVISED ESTIMATES OF THE COTTON CROP 
BY STATES 




State 



Virginia 

North Carolina 
South Carolina. 

Georgia 

Florida 

Missouri 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Oklahoma 

Arkansas 

New Mexico... 

Arizona 

California 

All Other 

U. S. Total. ... 



Weighing the day's cotton pickings, Franklin County, 1937 



Area Picked 
Thousand Acres 



1935 



52 
930 
1,362 
2,155 

89 

319 
750 
2,243 
2,740 
1,268 
10,657 

2,318 
2,268 
90 
160 
218 
21 



27,640 



1936 



53 
957 
1,399 
2,276 



410 

829 
2,321 
2,998 
1,401 
11,597 

2,251 
2,731 
116 
208 
368 
25 



30,028 



Yield of Lint Cotton 
Picked per Acre 
Pounds 



1935 



273 
294 
261 
235 
165 

265 
202 
226 
220 
210 
133 

117 
180 
398 
405 
524 
193 



184.2 



1936 



298 
298 
279 
228 
170 

360 
250 
236 
305 
260 
122 

62 
227 
457 
438 
574 
313 



197.9 



Production 
5001b. Gross Wt. Bales 
Thousands 



1935 



30 
572 
744 
1,059 
31 

177 
317 
1,059 
1,259 
556 
2,956 

567 
853 
75 
135 

239 



10,638 



1936 



33 
597 
816 
1,086 
31 

308 
433 
1,145 
1,911 
761 
2,933 

290 
1,295 
111 
191 
442 
16 



12,399 



NORTH CAROLINA TOBACCO CROP 











Yield Per Acre 








Price 


Per Pound 








Value Per Acre 






Acreage 




(Pounds) 


Production (Pounds) 


(Cents) 




Total Value (Dollars) 


(Dollars) 


Districts and Counties 












































































1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


District 1 — 






































Alleghany ... 


30 


42 


73 


1,009 


1,086 


942 


30,263 


45,638 


68,796 


16.0 


19.0 


38.3 


$ 4 , 842 


£ 8,671 


$ 26,350 


5161 


S206 


$ 361 


Ashe --- - 


180 


175 


215 


969 


915 


892 


174,490 


160,189 


191,862 


18.0 


19.0 


38.3 


3 1 , 408 


30,436 


73 , 480 


174 


174 


342 


Avery — - 


28 


27 


29 


936 


929 


817 


26,203 


25,088 


23,706 


17.0 


20.0 


38.3 


4,455 


5,018 


9,080 


159 


186 


313 


Caldwell.. 


350 


524 


551 


772 


907 


752 


270,167 


475,179 


414,302 


23.0 


19.5 


22. 1 


62,138 


92,660 


91,561 


178 


177 


166 


Surry - 


10,788 


13,693 


14,417 


782 


912 


712 


8,441,071 


12,487,507 


10,261,003 


27.0 


19.5 


18.9 


2,279,089 


2,435,064 


1,943, 149 


211 


178 


135 


Watauga- - 


150 


129 


134 


975 


1 ,037 


942 


146,290 


133 , 764 


126,252 


17.0 


19.0 


38.3 


24,869 


25,415 


48,360 


166 


197 


361 


Wilkes -- 


825 


1,201 


1 ,371 


762 


850 


762 


629,024 


1,021,264 


1,044,575 


25.0 


19.0 


22.1 


157,256 


194,040 


230,851 


191 


162 


168 


Yadkin.. 


7,686 


9,282 


9,851 


809 


879 


765 


6,218,203 


8, 170,977 


7 , 534 , 603 


26.0 


19.0 


20.4 


1,616,733 


1 ,552,486 


1 ,539,490 


210 


167 


156 


Northern Mountain (NW.) 


20 , 037 


25 , 073 


26 , 641 


795 


898 


738 


15,935,711 


22,519,606 


19,665,099 


26.2 


19.3 


20.1 


4,180,790 


4,343,790 


3,962,321 


209 


173 


148 


District 4 — 




































Buncombe - 


840 


820 


1,034 


941 


917 


892 


790,416 


751,966 


922,806 


17.0 


21.1 


38.3 


134,371 


158,665 


353,430 


160 


172 


342 


Burke 


63 


67 


15 


755 


891 


792 


47,588 


59,671 


1 1 , 880 


17.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


8,090 


12,710 


4,550 


128 


190 


303 


Cherokee .— - 


56 


84 


21 


853 


987 


818 


47,763 


82 , 876 


17, 172 


15.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


7, 164 


17,653 


6,580 


128 


210 


313 


Clay 


45 


50 


20 


848 


1 ,055 


853 


38,138 


52 , 738 


17,064 


15.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


5,721 


1 1 , 233 


6,540 


127 


225 


327 


Graham 


50 


30 


23 


850 


961 


803 


42,513 


28,838 


18,468 


15.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


6,377 


6, 142 


7,070 


128 


205 


308 


Haywood 


625 


595 


760 


926 


964 


942 


578,910 


573,380 


715,932 


16.0 


20.5 


38.3 


92,626 


117,543 


ftTA onn 
274, 2UU 


148 


198 


361 


Henderson- 


35 


50 


80 


865 


912 


892 


30,264 


45 , 588 


71 ,388 


18.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


5,448 


9,710 


27,340 


156 


194 


342 




16 


29 


20 


925 


961 


918 


14,800 


27,858 


18,360 


15.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


2,220 


5,934 


7,030 


139 


144 


352 


McDowell -. 


9 


12 


15 


955 


925 


842 


8,595 


11 , 100 


12,636 


18.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


1,547 


2,364 


4, 840 


172 


197 


322 


Macon-- 


75 


74 


22 


874 


942 


884 


65,513 


69 , 738 


19,440 


15.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


9,827 


14, 854 


7,450 


131 


201 


339 


Madison - 


2,600 


2,340 


2,506 


829 


907 


892 


2,154,348 


2,123,388 


2,236,518 


19.0 


21 .5 


38.3 


409,326 


456,528 


OEC EQA 


157 


195 


342 


Mitchell. _- 


88 


85 


151 


786 


893 


883 


69,164 


75 , 938 


133,272 


18.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


12,450 


1 6 , 1 73 


51 ,040 


141 


190 


338 


Polk-_ 


26 


17 


31 


827 


925 


892 


21,513 


15 , 725 


27, 648 


17.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


3,657 


3 ,349 


10,590 


141 


197 


342 


Rutherford.- . 


75 


59 


123 


834 


915 


893 


62,514 


54,013 


109 , 782 


18.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


1 1 , 253 


11 ,505 


42 ,050 


150 


195 


342 


Swain 


11 


15 


4 


875 


1 ,000 


945 


9,625 


15,000 


3,780 


16.0 


21 .3 


38.4 


1 ,540 


3 , 195 


1 ,450 


140 


213 


363 


Transylvania — 


8 


25 


11 


875 


928 


893 


7,000 


23,188 


9,828 


17.0 


21 .3 


38.3 


1 , 190 


4,939 


3 , 760 


149 


198 


342 


Yancey 


490 


475 


713 


855 


914 


902 


419,090 


434,316 


643,410 


19.0 


21 .0 


38.3 


79,627 


91 ,206 


ftAC A OA 

24b, 43U 


163 


192 


345 


Western Mountain (W.) _. 


5,112 


4.827 


5,549 


862 


921 


899 


4,407,754 


4,445,321 


4 , 989 , 384 


18.0 


21 .2 


38.3 


792,434 


OAO TrtO 

943 , 703 


1 q i a oon 


155 


196 


344 


District 2 — ■ 






































Alamance 


4,532 


5,796 


6,066 


724 


802 


742 


3,283,108 


4 , 648 , 682 


4,499,991 


27.0 


17.8 


21 .4 


00£ 11A 

886,439 


00*7 dCK 

82/ ,4bo 


ncl QA1 

yt>4,dui 


196 


143 


159 


Caswell - - - 


10,429 


12,907 


1 1 , 743 


738 


821 


750 


7,695,608 


10,596,757 


8,805,315 


29.0 


18.6 


19.9 


O OH 1 IOC 

2, 231 , 72b 


1 n 7n nm 

1 ,y/u,yy / 


1 7KK ftAO 

1 , i 00, 243 


214 


153 


149 


Durham..- -- - 


4,267 


5,726 


5,770 


729 


832 


762 


3,109,505 


4 , 763 , 955 


4,395,836 


30.0 


19.6 


24.9 


932,852 


noo toe 

933 , 735 


1 flflK OQQ 


219 


163 


190 


Forsyth 


6,250 


7,487 


7,884 


722 


867 


752 


4,510,729 


6,490,577 


5,927,325 


27.0 


18.7 


19.9 


1 on on 7 

I , 21/,oy/ 


1 01*3 TOO 

1 ,213 , /3o 


1 , 181 ,546 


195 


162 


150 


Franklin 


11 ,525 


14,639 


14,059 


784 


912 


742 


9,033,015 


13,345,784 


10,429,101 


28.0 


20.0 


24.2 


2,529,244 


n cen 1 et 

2,669, 157 


O EOE onT 

2,020 ,»y/ 


219 


182 


180 


Granville 


15,108 


19, 645 


16,837 


710 


860 


717 


10,728,918 


16,900,007 


12,067,999 


29.0 


20.8 


22.9 


O 111 ooc 

3,111,386 


o E 1 c om 
6 ,010, ZU1 


o Taa AG.Q 

2, /bb, 4bo 


206 


179 


164 


Guilford 


9,022 


11 ,924 


12,111 


818 


897 


792 


7,377,147 


10,696,760 


9,591,088 


26.0 


18.2 


21 .4 


1,918,058 


■i f\A a oin 

l,94b,»10 


O ACE OTA 

2 ,U00 ,2/U 


213 


163 


169 


Orange 


3,325 


4,327 


4,023 


735 


822 


727 


2,444,892 


3 ,558,442 


2 , 923 , 680 


28.0 


18.4 


22.9 


no A E 7A 

o84,o/u 


654 , 753 


CTf\ ftftA 

b/U, 2Z4 


206 


151 


166 


Person 


10,285 


12,924 


13,428 


753 


862 


744 


7,746,307 


11 , 146,686 


9,988,298 


29.0 


20.4 


22.0 


O ) , , ■ A OA 

2,24b,42y 


ft ft TO ft ft A 

1,1(6, 924 


ft OAA 1 on 

2,2UU, 12U 


218 


176 


164 


Rockingham 


14,800 


18,640 


19,065 


833 


947 


737 


12,323,348 


17,657,757 


14,047,455 


27.0 


18.3 


18.9 


O OOT OA, 

3 ,327,304 


O OO 1 O TA 
6 , 16 1 , 3 /0 


o cca inc. 

2, bbU, iyo 


225 


173 


134 


Stokes. 


12,699 


15,076 


14,756 


778 


935 


745 


9,882,148 


14 , 103,374 


10,991 ,289 


27.0 


19.0 


20.9 


o cao 1 0A 

2 , boa, loU 


ft Cffl C A 1 

2,0/9 , b41 


2 , 3UU , 040 


210 


178 


156 


Vance. 


9,412 


11 ,845 


11 ,813 


710 


938 


757 


7,342,364 


11 , 106, 150 


8,940,596 


30.0 


20.5 


24.4 


n OAO TAA 

2 , 202 , 709 


O 07C Till 

2, 2/D, /ol 


O 1 Oo OAQ 
2 , 1 06 , 2Uo 


234 


192 


185 


Warren 


4,331 


5,800 


5,610 


760 


904 


758 


3,291,080 


5,244,033 


4,251,884 


28.0 


20.5 


22.5 


noi eno 

921 , 502 


1 flTE AOT 

1 ,U/o,UZ/ 


957, 751 


213 


185 


171 


Northern Piedmont (N.) _. 


115,985 


1 46 , 736 


1 43 , 1 65 


765 


888 


746 


88,768,169 


130,258,964 


106,859,857 


28.0 


19.4 


21 .8 


n, n7o one 

24,878,296 


2o , Zoo , 9/9 


OO QIC AQC 


214 


172 


163 


District 5 — 






































Alexander 


1 ,062 


1 ,378 


1 ,487 


782 


914 


727 


830,600 


1,258,890 


1,080,018 


26.0 


18.8 


22.1 


215,956 


noi; C71 

236,671 


OO O CO A 

23o, bo4 


203 


172 


161 


Catawba 


86 


180 


173 


854 


904 


752 


73,440 


162,718 


130,087 


26.0 


18.5 


22. 1 


19,094 


30, 103 


28, 749 


222 


167 


166 


Chatham 


2,462 


3,345 


3,716 


730 


780 


717 


1,796,190 


2 , 609 , 989 


2,663,457 


27.0 


18.2 


22.0 


484,971 


475,018 


toe CTO 

o»o, b/y 


197 


142 


158 


Davidson 


3,988 


4,513 


4,326 


808 


912 


822 


3,223,147 


4,114,595 


3,556,005 


26.0 


18.5 


22.0 


838,018 


761 , 2UU 


TOO OOA 

783 ,ZoU 


210 


169 


181 


Davie. _ .. 


1,159 


1 ,867 


1,709 


733 


905 


852 


849,091 


1 ,689,418 


1,455,395 


26.0 


18.6 


22.1 


220, 7b4 


1 A ftOft 


321 , 642 


191 


168 


188 


Iredell .. ... 


1,067 


1 ,385 


1,288 


837 


872 


752 


893,447 


1,208,011 


968,410 


26.0 


18.4 


22.1 


232,296 


222,274 


214,019 


218 


160 


166 


Lee -- .. 


3,628 


4,947 


4,835 


779 


910 


702 


2,824,545 


4,501 , 141 


3,392,946 


27.0 


18.4 


24.2 


762 , 627 


ooo oin 

828, Z1U 


821 , 761 


210 


167 


170 


Randolph. .- — . 


2,847 


3,896 


3 , 834 


757 


881 


784 


2,156,096 


3,433.618 


3,005,532 


27.0 


18.3 


22.0 


582, 146 


coo oeo 

628,352 


ceo noo 
bb2 ,U2o 


204 


161 


172 


Rowan 


153 


129 


100 


817 


911 


752 


125,041 


117,583 


75,210 


26.0 


18.5 


22.1 


32,511 


21 , 753 


16,621 


212 


169 


166 


Wake — 


19,848 


26,241 


23,212 


739 


88f 


752 


14,676,714 


23,247,542 


17,452,338 


29.0 


20.1 


24.4 


a nee n at 

4,256,247 


A CTO TEC 

4 , 672,75b 


a ofil cac 

4,2bl , bao 


214 


178 


183 




36,300 


47,881 


44 , 680 


756 


884 


756 


27,448,311 


42 . 343 , 505 


33 , 779 , 398 


27.9 


19.3 


23.5 


T OAA con 

7,644,630 


O 1A1 CCO 

8,1 91 ,569 


7 QQC 1 CO 


211 


171 


178 


District 8 — 






































Anson .- _ 


88 


124 


114 


715 


861 


752 


62,958 


106,710 


85,714 


26.0 


19.5 


22.1 


16,369 


on ono 

20 , 808 


18, 943 


„ 
186 


168 


166 


Cabarrus.. - 


44 


211 


5 


715 


90S 


753 


31,479 


191,862 


3,763 


26.0 


19.5 


22.1 


8,185 


37,413 


832 


186 


177 


166 


Cleveland ._ _ 


51 


59 


117 


718 


91£ 


752 


36,631 


54,219 


87,961 


26.0 


19.5 


22.1 


9,524 


10,573 


19,439 


187 


179 


166 


Gaston 


93 


32 




717 


885 




66,639 


28,320 




26.0 


19.5 




17,326 


5, 522 




186 


173 




Lincoln 


32 


138 


41 


708 


910 


752 


22,647 


125,548 


30,837 


26.0 


19.5 


20.0 


5,888 


24,482 


6,167 


184 


177 


150 


Mecklenburg 


18 


70 


52 


736 


909 


752 


13,248 


63 , 659 


39,094 


26.0 


19.5 


22.1 


3,444 


12,414 


8, 640 


191 


177 


166 


Montgomery ... 


580 


782 


785 


705 


802 


747 


408,808 


627,340 


586,361 


27.0 


17.8 


22.0 


110,378 


111,667 


129,158 


190 


143 


164 


Moore 


3,376 


4,752 


4,338 


693 


811 


817 


2,340,387 


3,851,867 


3,544,164 


27.0 


18.0 


23.9 


631,904 


693,336 


847,788 


187 


146 


195 


Richmond .. ... 


1,110 


1 ,500 


1,532 


763 


892 


852 


846,993 


1,337,679 


1,305,427 


26.0 


18.0 


22.0 


220,218 


ftAf\ TOO 

24U, /sZ 


Zoi ,040 


198 


161 


187 


Stanly .. ........ 


55 


68 


119 


72C 


91( 


752 


39,575 


61,889 


89,477 


26.0 


19.5 


22.1 


10,290 


12,068 


19, 774 


187 


177 


166 


Union .. 


24 


164 


149 


736 


906 


752 


17,664 


148,558 


112,057 


26.0 


19.5 


22.1 


4,593 


28,969 


24 , 765 


191 


177 


166 


Southern Piedmont (S.) 


5,471 


7,900 


7,252 


71C 


83 £ 


811 


3,887,029 


6,597,651 


5 , 884 , 855 


26.7 


18.2 


23.2 


1 noo i to 
1 , 038 ,119 


1 1QO no A 

1 , 19b\U34 


1 oco n.R.0 
1 , 363 , UDi 


i on 


■ 02 


188 


District 3 — ■ 






































Bertie... .. ... 


5,617 


7,235 


6,763 


940 


1 ,005 


819 


5,280,327 


7,272,560 


5,536,561 


29.0 


20.0 


22.8 


1 toi one 

1 ,531 ,295 


1 ,454, 512 


1 0(11 0Q7 

1 ,2bl ,2o7 


273 


201 


187 








































Chowan 


278 


440 


497 


945 


1,033 


844 


262,696 


454,412 


419,236 


28.0 


17.6 


22.8 


73,555 


79,977 


95,516 


265 


182 


192 














































































Edgecombe- . 


14,419 


17,823 


15,544 


901 


1 ,058 


64* 


12,997,309 


18,851,901 


10,025,196 


28.0 


21 .0 


22.5 


O CO f\ ft AT 

3,639,247 


o fico onn 

o ,yoo, oyy 


O Q/Y3 QAft 

Z,6\)6 , y4z 


252 


222 


145 


Gates 


145 


205 


182 


90b 


1,008 


81£ 


131,417 


206 , 706 


149,006 


28.0 


20.0 


22.8 


36,797 


41 ,341 


33 , 952 


254 


202 


187 


Halifax 


4,827 


6,261 


6,745 


861 


1,012 


774 


4,156,229 


6,335,805 


5,220,661 


28.0 


20.8 


22.8 


1 ,163,744 


1 ,317,847 


1 1 on a An 
1 , 189, 4UU 


241 


210 


176 


it „_.r„_ j 


2,738 


3 ,387 


3,989 


98C 


1 ,12( 


794 


2,683,766 


3,792,785 


3,166,726 


29.0 


20.5 


22.9 


778,292 


TTT E01 

777,521 


724 ,575 


284 


230 


182 


Martin 


10,367 


12,501 


12,563 


97C 


97( 


814 


10,054,829 


12,125,463 


10,284,521 


29.0 


21.6 


21.4 


2,915,900 


n cm 1 nn 

2, 619, 100 


o 1 nn noo 

2, iyy , y2o 


281 


210 


173 


Nash 


22,825 


28,672 


25, 119 


882 


982 


70S 


20,141,697 


28,158,201 


17,820,338 


29.0 


21.1 


22.9 


5,841 ,092 


E O A 1 o on 

5, 941 ,380 


A CvTI fid 1 

4 ,U/ / , b41 


256 


207 


162 




202 


231 


276 


844 


1 ,007 


754 


170,597 


232 , 706 


208,191 


28.0 


20.7 


22.8 


47,767 


48, 170 


47,432 


236 


208 


172 








































Perquimans. 


8 




42 
4 


920 




843 


7,360 




35,396 


29.0 




22.8 


2,134 




8,053 


267 





192 


Tyrrell .. — ._ 








76C 






3,040 






23.6 






717 


■■■ 




1 7n 
1 it) 


Washington 


688 


880 


1,231 


804 


88J 


852 


552,922 


779,091 


1,048,733 


29.0 


17.7 


24.9 


160,347 


1 o t ono 

137,899 


OCA QQO 

2bU,o32 


233 


10/ 


212 


Northern Coastal (NE.) 


62,114 


77,635 


72,955 


909 


1 ,007 


739 


56,439,149 


78,209,630 


53,917,605 


28.7 


20.9 


22.6 


16,190,170 


1C O Ti7 CitC 

16,376,646 


I 2. ZUo . 2/0 


261 


91 1 
L\ I 


1 C7 


District 6 — 






































Beaufort . . 


9,392 


1 1 , 992 


11 ,577 


91J 


914 


784 


8,592,120 


10,958,840 


9,075,751 


29.0 


19.0 


24.9 


2,491 ,715 


ft noo i on 

2 ,U82, 180 


O OS7 OK1 

2,-20/ ,301 


zoo 


1 7 A 
1/4 


1 OE 

1 ;IO 


Carteret 


1 ,059 


1,374 


1 ,556 


855 


907 


883 


905,194 


1,245,982 


1,374,268 


25.0 


17.7 


22.9 


226,299 


220,539 


314 ,472 


214 


161 


202 


Craven 


8,738 


11,422 


10,268 


905 


897 


868 


7,905,817 


10,242,985 


8,915,471 


27.0 


18.6 


22.8 


2,134,571 


1,905,195 


2,031,192 


244 


167 


198 




16,021 


18,822 


17,126 


905 


1,001 


774 


14,492,961 


18,846,819 


13,255,297 


29.0 


20.0 


22.8 


4,202,959 


3,769,364 


3,019,905 


262 


200 


176 








6 






783 






4,698 






25.0 






1,173 


--- - 




196 


Johnston . 


23,915 


30,759 


30,355 


854 


971 


71 £ 


20,432,307 


29,862,353 


21,838,370 


27.0 


19.4 


24.9 


5,516,723 


5 , 793 , 296 


E A O 1 CC1 

0,431 , obi 


231 


188 


179 


Jones 


6,200 


7,537 


7,241 


917 


991 


888 


5,684,667 


7,472,703 


6,430,845 


26.0 


18.7 


22.8 


1 ,478,013 


1 ,397,395 


1 A C E 1 A A 

1 ,4bo , 144 


238 


185 


202 


Lenoir 


17,823 


20,943 


19,316 


1,005 


955 


843 


17,914,487 


19,957,932 


16,291,792 


28.0 


19.2 


22.5 


5,016,056 


3,831 ,923 


O CCO AilA 

3 , 6b3 , 040 


281 


183 


190 


Pamlico 


508 


720 


927 


819 


857 


843 


416,297 


616,691 


781,782 


28.0 


17.5 


23.9 


116,563 


107,921 


1 OC CCO 

lob,6o2 


229 


150 


201 


Pitt 


32,739 


39,478 


34,061 


925 


914 


695 


30,271,900 


36,099,775 


23,658,150 


30.0 


20.4 


22.9 


9,081,570 


7,364,354 


E A 1 KTO 

0,413 ,0/2 


278 


186 


159 


Wayne 


15,971 


19,578 


21,574 


895 


958 


754 


14,299,866 


18,756,429 


16,269,687 


28.0 


19.0 


22.9 


4 , 003 , 962 


3 , 563 , 722 


o too OTn 

3 , 722 , 879 


251 


182 


173 


Wilson _. 


21 ,652 


26,541 


22,381 


875 


95; 


635 


18,933,084 


25,286,051 


14,213,156 


29.0 


21.0 


23.1 


5,490,594 


5,310,071 


O OOn LLTG 

3 , 28U, b/b 


254 


200 


1A7 
14 / 


District 9 — 
Bladen 


154,018 


189,166 


176,388 


908 


948 


749 


139,848,700 


179,346,560 


132,109,267 


28.4 


19.7 


23.3 


39 , 759 , 025 


35 , 345 , 960 


on TOT TOT 

30, 78/ , let 


258 


I Of 


1 7K 

I to 


4,919 


6,447 


7,189 


842 


968 


829 


4,141,686 


6,238,362 


5,959,477 


24.0 


18.4 


20.8 


994 , 005 


1 , 147,859 


1 Oiin a on 
1 ,242,4»U 


ono 

202 


1 70. 
1 /o 


1 70 
ill 


Brunswick.- — 


1,548 


2,182 


2,503 


864 


1,008 


829 


1,338,394 


2,198,381 


2,074,735 


23.0 


20.5 


21.3 


307,831 


450,668 


A A ft OOO 

442 ,822 


199 


207 


1 77 
lit 


Columbus 


13,393 


16,443 


17,764 


1,192 


1,071 


883 


11,911,497 


17,603,810 


15,684,213 


23.0 


20.4 


21.3 


2 , 739 , 644 


3,591,177 


o o <i t Ten 

3,347,769 


274 


218 


188 


Cumberland 


2,979 


4,115 


4,796 


788 


917 


844 


2,347,365 


3 , 774 , 708 


4,046,434 


26.0 


19.7 


21.8 


610,315 


743,617 


883,755 


205 


181 


184 


DupUn 


14,158 


17,787 


17,315 


928 


936 


863 


13,133,411 


16,640,550 


14,948,245 


26.0 


19.0 


21.7 


3,414,687 


3,161,705 


3,242,014 


241 


178 


187 


Harnett.- 


12,595 


16,783 


15,713 


769 


869 


762 




14 ^84 


11 P.71 407 


29.0 


21 .0 


23.9 


2,809,528 


3 062,840 


2,863,643 


223 


182 


182 


Hoke 


2,198 


2,879 


3,271 


779 


923 


785 


1,712,023 


2,658,332 


2,567,163 


27^0 


19^0 


22.8 


'462,246 


505,083 


586,152 


210 


175 


179 


New Hanover 


22 


34 


31 


750 


992 


816 


16,500 


33,728 


25,291 


24.0 


19.0 


21.5 


3,960 


6,408 


5,442 


180 


188 


175 


Onslow 


6,481 


8,014 


8,308 


891 


905 


883 


5,776,965 


7,254,483 


7,337,223 


25.0 


18.8 


21.9 


1,444,241 


1,363,843 


1,605,962 


223 


170 


193 


Pender. 


1,832 


2,379 


2^570 


844 


956 


814 


1,546,332 


2,369,463 


2,091,061 


24.0 


18.6 


22.4 


371,120 


440,720 


468,095 


203 


178 


182 


Robeson 


21,057 


25,860 


24,822 


887 


1,009 


834 


18,685,816 


26,092,040 


20,698,932 


25.0 


20.6 


21.8 


4,671,454 


5,374,960 


4,520,792 


222 


208 


182 


Sampson 


11,375 


14,985 


15,433 


834 


917 


794 


9,488,943 


13,745,586 


12,251,308 


25.0 


18.7 


21.9 


2,372,236 


2,570,425 


2,681,485 


209 


171 


174 


Scotland 


406 


574 


655 


784 


905 


785 


318,219 


519,367 


514,046 


26.0 


18.5 


21.4 


82,737 


96,083 


110,230 


204 


167 


168 


Southern Coastal (SE.)- 


92,963 


118,482 


120,370 


862 


960 


832 


80,105,177 


113,713,763 


100,169,535 


25.3 


19.8 


22.0 


20,284,004 


22,515,388 


22,000,641 


218 


190 


183 


State 


492,000 


617,700 


597,000 


847 


935 


766 


416,840,000 


577,435,000 


457,375,000 


27.4 


19.8 


22.6 


113,767,468 


114.183,669 


103,479,200 


231 


185 


173 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



13 




Tobacco offers the most startling trend 
in production of all the crops grown in 
North Carolina. In 1866 the total pro- 
duction was less than 10,000,000 pounds 
while the 1937 production is estimated at 
573,000,000 pounds. Only the years 1930 
and 1935 exceeded this figure. Before the 
final estimates are made, 1937 may show 
a record production. 

The table on the opposite page affords 
a considerable study of tobacco for the 
past three years, covering acreage, yield, 
production, price and value. It will be 
noticed that practically every county 
grows some tobacco. This is quite a con- 
trast with the period prior to 1900. 

The flue-cured tobacco was grown first 
in Virginia and expanded over into North 
Carolina in the upper Piedmont section, 
probably out from Danville. It gradually 
spread through the upper portion of North 
Carolina and finally into the eastern or 
New Bright Leaf Belt. Later it jumped 
down to the North and South Carolina 
border area which gives rise to the Border 
Belt. As previously mentioned the ex- 
pansion of this crop has been nothing 
short of amazing. Many years ago the 
price of cotton and tobacco usually went 
along about the same, however, as a result 
of the considerable expansion and con- 
sumption of the crop, brought about to a 
large extent by women smoking, the price 
of the weed crop has gone up consid- 
erably while cotton has stayed too low. 

It is well known that the increased con- 
sumption of tobacco has caused a big de- 
mand throughout the world and has 
resulted in a large expansion in acreage. 
On the other hand, cotton has met com- 
petition through fibers like rayon and 
from cotton grown in other countries. 

While tobacco is, of course, a luxury 
crop, yet it has become so commonplace, 
especially in America, it is no longer 
looked on as such. Again, looking on the 
data on the page opposite, we find that 
the largest producing area is in the east- 



TOBACCO 

ern central counties of the Type 12 belt. 
Pitt, Johnston and Robeson counties are 
the largest producers in the order named; 
while Nash, Wake, Lenoir and Wayne 
counties follow rather closely behind. 

Most of the older tobacco growers 
well remember when their crop was sold 
at the farm. Many more remember when 
it was sold without tying and when little 
care was given to the cleanliness of the 
warehouse floors. The present methods 
are therefore, quite in contrast to the "old 
days" for now the offerings are placed in 
attractive baskets which are neatly ar- 
ranged, uniformly graded and the sales 
floors are well taken care of each day. 

The fees charged for sales are provided 
for in a state law passed by the General 
Assembly in 1895, which is still in force. 
These are as follows: For auction fees, 




Typical piles of farmers tobacco on the 
warehouse floors. Wilson County 



fifteen cents on all piles of one hundred 
pounds or less, and twenty-five cents on 
all piles over one hundred pounds; for 
weighing and handling, ten cents per pile 
for all piles less than one hundred pounds, 
for all piles over one hundred pounds at 
the rate of ten cents per hundred pounds; 
for commissions on the gross sales of leaf 
tobacco in said warehouses not to exceed 
two and one-half per cent. 

The marketing season has definitely ad- 
vanced in recent years. A decade ago quite 
a large percentage of the tobacco crop was 
sold after December 1st. The favorable 
prices received in 1937 especially encour- 
aged farmers to rush their crop to the 
market. 

No crop in the State demands and re- 
ceives the wide-spread interest such as is 
shown in tobacco. It is very difficult to 
sell farm land unless it has a government 
tobacco allotment base available. Whereas 
cotton formerly ruled, tobacco is king now. 
The growers are steadily improving in 
their ability to grow more poundage of 
better quality, to grade better and to 
market their crop more intelligently. 

The monthly sales reports from tobacco 
warehousemen, collected by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, provide a reliable 
and definite check basis for tobacco sta- 
tistics reports. Thus, as with the ginnings 
for cotton, the tobacco sales enable the 
Crop Reporting Service to keep the North 
Carolina growers informed as to the price 
and sale trends of the crop, as well as the 
final production. 

The Burley acreage has definitely ex- 
panded during the last few years. While 
this crop is truly grown in "patches," 
these patches are more numerous now 
than they were even three years ago. The 
Burley is a distinctly different type from 
the flue-cured tobacco in respect to the 
growth, color and methods of curing. This 
crop is confined to Districts 1 and 4 in 
North Carolina, but expands into Ten- 
nessee and Kentucky. 



NORTH CAROLINA WHEAT CROP 











Yield Per Acre 








Price Per Bushel 








Value Per Acre 




Acreage Harvested 


(Bushels) 


Production (Bushels) 




(Dollars) 


Total Value (Dollars) 


(Dollars) 










































.DISTRICTS AND COUNTIES 










































1 Q34 

iyo4 


1 G31 

iyoo 


1 03 ft 

iyoo 


1 G34 

iyo4 


1 031 
I . OO 


1 Q3R 

iyoo 


1 034 

iyo4 


iyoo 


1Q3R 

iyoo 


1934 


1 03 H 

Iyoo 


1 GO ft 

iyoo 


1Q3J, 

iyo4 


1Q31 

iyoo 


1 03 ft 

lyob 


1 Q04 

lyo4 


1935 


1936 


JJISTRICT 1 — 










































1 IRA 

1 , oou 


1 OAA 

1 , yuu 


1 77A 
1 , / /U 


ft fi 

0. 


Q 7 

y . 1 


ft 1 

0.0 


13 41A 
lo , 40U 


1 Q 3CA 
10 , OOU 


11 1 9A 

1 O , 1 zu 


1 


04 


OR 

.yo 


1 10 

1 . lo 


13 QAQ 

10 , y4y 


17 fi/10 
1 / , 04U 


1 7 (\A 1 
1/ ,U41 




0.94 


9.28 


9.63 




4 870 


4 470 


4 280 


8 6 


10 8 


9 


41 920 


48 230 


38 700 


1 


02 


OA 

. yo 


1 19 
1 . 1Z 


42 681 


46 285 


43 91R 
40 , ZOO 


Q 7fi 
O. /O 


10.35 


10. 11 




620 


530 


450 


7 6 


9 5 


6 7 


4 730 


5 040 


3 010 


1 


02 


OO 

. yy 


1 10 

1 . lo 


4 841 


A QQA 

4 , yyu 


3 303 
O ,o Jo 


7 Q1 
/ . Ol 


9 .42 


7.54 




7 1 GA 

/ , iyu 


6 310 


5 920 


8 6 


10 


8 1 


fil ftQA 
01 , OOU 


R3 ARA 
00 , UOU 


A1 QiA 

3 / , y^u 


1 


12 


QO 

.yy 


1 OA 


RO 4ft7 

oy , 40/ 


62 429 


57 , 566 


9 . 66 


9.89 


9.72 




11 140 


10 060 


8 170 


8 7 


10.6 


7.1 


OR Q10 

yo , you 


10R 17A 
1UO , O/U 


r. qoa 
OO , OoU 


1 


05 


1 01 


1 11 
1 . 14 


101 654 


107 651 


66 272 


Q 13 

y . 10 


1A 7A 
IU. /U 


8.11 


1 290 


1 ' 480 


1 370 


9 4 


10 4 


10 5 


12 170 


15 400 


14 330 


1 


06 


Oft 

.yo 


1 13 
1 . lo 


12 856 


15 090 


16 151 


O 07 

y . y / 


1A OA 

IU . zu 


11.79 




9 470 


11 260 


10 530 


9 2 


9 6 


8 1 


87 160 


1Aft AGO 

iuo, uyu 


85 180 


1 


05 


1 00 


1 1 R 
1.10 


91 400 


1AR AQ4. 

iuo , uy4 


99 142 


Ri 
y . do 


9 .60 


9 .42 


VoHlrin 


11 320 


11 120 


10 330 


9 8 


10 6 


9 5 


11 A CIO 

1 iu , you 


117 810 


no OOA 

yo , ozu 


1 


05 


1 A1 
1 . Ul 


1 11 
1 . 11 


1 1 r 339 

110 , OOa 


119 007 


1AQ QS1 

iuo , yoo 


in QQ 
IU . zo 


10. 70 


10.55 


Northern Mounts in (N W.) 


47 460 


47 130 


42 820 


9 


10 2 


8 4 


AOQ 01 n 
4Z;J , £ 1 U 


AGO con 
HOC , OOU 


3RA Q3A 

ou , you 


1 


06 


1 nn 

1 . UU 


1 tA 


d13 9AO 
400 , £UU 


481 1 86 


411 ftHfi 
411, OUO 


Q RR 


in 91 


9.62 


District 4 — 










































7 410 


8 290 


6 490 


7.4 


11 .5 


8.6 


54 820 


Ql 39A 

yo , ozu 


11 IRA 
OO , oou 


1 


06 


98 


1 OJ. 
1 .U4 


1R 03R 
OO , UOO 


Q3 3QR 

yo , oyo 


1R 090 
OO ,UZU 


7 ft3 
/ . OO 


1 1 97 
11 . Z/ 


8.94 
9.89 




7 650 


7 890 


8 740 


9 6 


9.6 


8 6 


73 460 


75 700 


74 850 


1 


03 


1 01 


1 11 
1 . 10 


75 577 


76 467 


86 434 


Q ftft 

y .00 


9 . 69 




940 


1 280 


1 100 


7 6 


9 4 


7 6 


7 160 


12 000 


8 360 


1 


07 


QO 

.yy 


1 11 
1 . 10 


7 651 


11 882 


9 651 


ft 14 
. 14 


9 .28 


8.77 




1 930 


1 720 


2 520 


8 5 


9 8 


7 6 


16 420 


1 R ft7A 
10, o/U 


19 220 


1 


.06 


QQ 

. yo 


1 19 


17 3S1 

1 / ,000 


16 530 


91 4ftfi 
Zl , 400 


Q A1 

y .ui 


9 .61 


8.53 




50 


10 


10 


7 8 


8 


5 


3 GO 

oyu 


ftA 
OU 


1A 
OU 


1 


.07 


1 AA 
1 .UU 


1 1 Q 
I . 10 


416 


SA 
OU 


10 


Q 39 
.OZ 


8.00 


5.90 




3 330 


4 180 


4 540 


10 5 


11.6 


8 6 


35 010 


48 430 


3R QAA 

00, yuu 


1 


.05 


Q1 

. yi 


1 1A 
1 . 14 


36 799 


46 967 


44 200 


11 05 


11 OA 
11 . Z4 


9.74 




1 650 


1 890 


3 150 


11 4 


11.9 


7 2 


18 880 


22 460 


22 540 


1 


.04 


07 

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1 11 
1 . 11 


19 623 


21 780 


24 985 


11 ftQ 

11 .oy 


11 10 
11 . OZ 


7.93 




2 510 


2 530 


2 750 


10 5 


11 3 


9 5 


OR 390 
ZO ,OZU 


9ft IRA 

£,Q , OOU 


26 130 


1 


03 


.yo 


1 1 ft 
1 . 10 


27 1 066 


27 116 


30 181 


in 70 
l\J. to 


10 . 72 


10.97 




2 950 


3 260 


3 250 


8.6 


11.6 


8.1 


25 340 


37 770 


OR 33A 
- ; , OOU 


1 


04 


07 

.y / 


1 IS 
1 . 10 


26 337 


OR fiOQ 
OO , O^O 


31 ' 132 


8 93 


11 04 
11 .Z4 


9.58 




2 660 


2 790 


3 560 


10 5 


10 6 


10 5 


07 ORA 

z / ,you 


90 IRA 

zy , oou 


37 OAA 
O / , Z^tU 


1 


03 


.96 


1 1 R 

1 . lo 


OQ 7QJ 
ZO , /04 


9ft 3RG 

£•0 ,ooy 


43 AA3 
40 , UUO 


1A Q9 
IU. OZ 


10. 17 


12.08 




7' 720 


6 800 


7 640 


7.6 


9.3 


8 1 


1ft RQA 

00 , oyu 


63 190 


61 810 


1 


02 


OR 

.yo 


1 11 
1 . 10 


1Q ROI 

oy , ouo 


60 637 


71 375 


7 71 

/ . /o 


Q QO 

. yz 


9.34 




1 ' 780 


1 910 


2 060 


7 6 


9.9 


7 5 


13 520 


18 920 


15 480 


' 1 


05 


OQ 

.yy 


1 1A 
1 . 14 


14 158 


18 728 


17 588 


7 95 


Q Q1 

y .01 


8 .54 


P^IL- 


1 760 


2 220 


2 030 


9.6 


10.9 


6.2 


16 930 


24* 140 


12 570 


1 


06 


98 


1 OQ 

1 . uy 


17 905 


93 R13 
£iO , OOO 


13 ' 702 


10 17 


1A RI 
IU. 00 


6. 75 




10 130 


11 230 


11 360 


10 2 


10.5 


7.1 


1A3 3fiO 
1UO , oou 


117 870 


81 080 


1 


04 


97 


1 17 

1.1/ 


107 327 


114 298 


95* 127 


10 59 


10 1ft 
IU . 10 


8.37 


Swain — - _ _ _ 


560 


580 


1 730 


7.6 


g'g 


5 


4 250 


5 090 


8 670 


1 


05 


01 

.yo 


1 1 A 
1 . 14 


4 476 


4 832 


9 851 


7 99 


ft 33 
.00 


5. 69 


i ransyl vama _ . 


130 


130 


110 


10 6 


12. 1 


10 4 


1 380 


1 570 


1 140 


1 


06 


01 

. yo 


1 ~\A 
1 . 14 


1 457 


1 492 


1 296 


11 21 


11 4ft 
11 .40 


11 .78 




3 110 


3 390 


3 350 


7.6 


9.4 


7.6 


00 COA 
1 . oou 


31 830 


91 1AA 
£•0 , OUU 


1 


04 


98 


1 14 


24 516 


31 187 


28 977 


7.88 


9 20 


8.65 


W/estern Mountsin (W.) 


56 ' 270 


SO 100 


64 390 


9.0 


10.5 


8 


Kn7 son 

OU/ , UZU 


coq ' 3fin 


E-jK arc 


1 


04 


OR 
. 90 


1 u 

1 . 14 


527 31 8 


R14 049 

OI4, U 4 L 


r 07 ' Afi.7 
oo/ , uo/ 


9 37 


I U . LL 


Q 19 


District 2 — 








































11 550 


11 890 


12 080 


10 7 


11.2 


11 


1 93 14A 
1 ZO , 04U 


133 1QA 

100 , iyu 


139 9QA 

1 ■>_ , zyu 


1 


06 


1 A1 
1 .Ul 


1 14 
1 . 14 


13A 71A 

iou, / ou 


134 543 


11A 391 
IOU , OZ1 


11 32 


1139 
1 1 .OZ 


19 A A 
1Z .44 




8*220 


7 940 


7*520 


7.5 


10.6 


9.5 


61 690 


84 180 


71 570 


1 


04 


98 


1 13 
1 . 10 


64 074 


82 481 


RO Rfi9 
OU , OUZ 


7 79 


1A 3Q 

iu .oy 


1 A 70 
IU. id 




4 620 


3 610 


3 160 


7.7 


9.4 


10 


31 1GO 

00 , oyu 


33 QfiA 

00 , you 


31 630 


1 


06 


98 


1 "\A 
1 . 14 


37 684 


33 277 


35 937 


8 16 


9 22 


1 1 07 




10 680 


11 080 


11 350 


11.8 


12.0 


12 8 


125,990 


139 Q9A 


145] 800 


1 


05 


1 A1 
1 .Ul 


1 13 

1 . lo 


132! 103 


134*269 


164 327 


12 37 


12 12 


14.48 




2*870 


2 260 


1*730 


8.5 


9.2 


9 1 


24 440 


20 750 


15 690 


1 


10 


1 04 


1 1 R 
1.10 


9fi R1R 
£.0 , OOO 


21 591 


18 263 


9 36 


9 55 


1 A 1ft 
1U.OO 




7 700 


5 800 


4 170 


7.5 


9.5 


8 6 


57 800 


55 130 


31 fiftn 
OO , oou 


1 


07 


1 00 


1 15 


61 783 


55* 131 


40 872 


8 02 


9 51 


9 . 80 




13 740 


15 300 


13 610 


11 .0 


11.6 


11 4 


151 170 


177 460 


1 R1 dAA 

100 , ^uu 


1 


07 


OQ 

.yy 


1 11 


161 511 


175 667 


172 263 


11 75 


1 1 4fi 
11 .40 


12.66 




8 960 


8 270 


7 140 


9 


9.6 


9 5 


on eon 
OU , OOU 


79 400 


R7 QdA 

1 , y^u 


1 


05 


Qfi 

. yo 


1 10 
1 . lo 


QA 1Q1 
04 , Ool 


77 7Qft 


76 569 


9 44 


Q 41 

y .41 


10. 72 




8 670 


7 290 


6 050 


7.6 


10.5 


9.5 


RR. Q3A 

00 , you 


76 580 


57 600 


1 


04 


99 


1 14 


68 498 


75 804 


65 445 


7 90 


10 40 


in qo 
iv. oz 




9 160 


9 770 


9 510 


8.6 


10.6 


10 9 


78 840 


1 A3 14A 
IUO , O'iXJ 


1A4 AQA 

iu* , uyu 


1 


06 


96 


1 11 
1 . 10 


83 436 


99 357 


11Q 930 
1 1 y , zou 


9 11 


10 17 


10 14 
1Z .04 




11 270 


9 590 


8 780 


9 6 


10.8 


11 4 


1Aft 1 Ml 
1UO 1 IOU 


1 A3 ISA 
lUo , OOU 


1AA 3AA 
1UU ,OUU 


1 


08 


1 01 


1 10 
1 . u 


1 1 R RQR 

110 , oyo 


1A4 fi30 
1U4 . OOU 


112 113 


10 35 


10 91 


1 O 77 

iz. / / 


Vance . . - 


3 060 


2 150 


1 950 


8 8 


9.2 


8 1 


OR OQA 

^0 , you 


1 Q ftAA 
iy , oUU 


1 1 7QA 

10, /yu 


1 


OS 


1 A1 
1 .Ul 


1 IK 
1 . 10 


OQ (\AA 
£V6 ,U44 


1 Q QQft 

iy , yyo 


18 231 


9 49 


Q 3A 

y .ou 


9.35 




4 930 


3 790 


3 380 


8.4 


10.3 


9 5 


41 430 


39 010 


32 150 


1 


09 


1 03 


1 1 fi 
1.10 


45 075 


40 196 


37 422 


9 14 


10 61 


1 1 07 
11. VI 




105 430 


98 740 


90 430 


9 3 


10.7 


10 7 


982 210 


1 arq nnn 

1 , U03 , OUU 


OCR qon 

yo j , sou 


1 


06 


1 nn 

1 . UU 


1 13 


1 049 nQ3 

1 , U4£ , U30 


1 flid 7 AO 
1 | U J4, IHC 


1 0Q1 fill 
1 , uy 1 , ooo 


9 88 


10 68 


19 n7 
I z. u/ 


District 5 — 


































8 830 


8 710 


9 300 


9.9 


10.8 


y . u 


87,410 


94,060 


84,040 


1 


08 


1 AA 
1 . UU 


1 11 
1 . 10 


94,263 


94,060 


97,034 


10 68 


1A ftA 
IU . OU 


1A AQ 
1U.40 




16* 110 


18 280 


19 350 


11.8 


11.8 


10 


1QA AQA 

iyu ,uyu 


OIK RQA 

£i\.tj , oyu 


103 39A 


1 


06 


1 03 


1 1 R 
1 . 10 


9A1 991 


999 937 
£i£i£i , £iO / 


991 034 
ZZO , U04 


12 .49 


12 16 


11 fi3 
11 . 00 




16 630 


16 160 


15 600 


8.6 


11 .2 


9 


1 A9 QQA 

11Z , yyu 


1 RA Q3A 

iou, you 


141 070 


1 


09 


1 02 


1 11 
1 . 10 


1 11 R3A 
100, OOU 


1 R4 ISO 
104 , OOU 


162 897 


9 36 


11 42 


10 44 
IU .44 




17 1 80 


24 870 


15 940 


10 9 


12.0 


13 2 


1 Q7 O JA 
lo/ , Z4U 


9Qft 43 A 

zyo ,^tou 


210 120 


1 


05 


QQ 

. yo 


1 1A 
1 . 14 


1QR 330 


292 419 


93S 717 
zoo , to 1 


11 43 


11 7fi 

11 . /o 


14 QQ 
14. yo 




8 880 


8 640 


9 440 


9 7 


10 9 


114 


Qfi 1 K.A 
oO, IOU 


OJ OAA 

y$ , zuu 


1A7 ft3A 
1\J i , OoU 


1 


06 


OQ 

. yo 


1 AO 


91 , 192 


Q9 3AQ 

yz , ouo 


109 57/ 


10 2/ 


1A Rft 
IU . OS 


11 R1 
11 . 01 


TrpHplt 


24 460 


24 980 


29 110 


10 7 


11 5 


Q 1 

y .0 


OR1 RCA 
ZOl , OoU 


0fl7 07A 
ZO* , L iv 


077 1AA 
^ / / , 1UU 


1 


04 


1 A1 
1 . Ul 


1.18 


071 7£0 
61 1 , / OO 


9QA 1 Q1 
£i\)\j, 100 


307 fififi 
OZ/ , OOO 


11 11 


11 62 


1 1 OR 
11 . ZO 




2 660 


2 G20 


2 940 


8 8 


11 .3 


9 


ZO , £1U 


32 970 


OR 1QA 

zo, oyu 


1 


10 


1 05 


1 1 A 
1 . 14 


91 71 3 
ZD , / 10 


34 636 


30 217 


9 67 


11 86 


10 28 




22 970 


21 i £40 


22 040 


11 .4 


11.5 


11.4 


9fil 810 
ZOl , OIU 


947 fiftA 
^ t f , OoU 


911 71A 
_ ■ 1 1 , i OU 


1 


06 


1 01 


1 12 


277 114 


910 1SR 
6o\j , loO 


281 404 


12.06 


11 .62 


19 77 
iz. / / 




21 750 


22 460 


25 450 


11 .6 


12.4 


11 9 


oco OAA 


97R 4RA 


309 ft10 
OUZ , OIU 


1 


05 


00 

.yy 


1 ia\ 
1 . 14 


9RJ 17A 
j504 , O/U 


9')1 fill 
£<iO , OOO 


344 0R4 
044 , Uo4 


12. 16 


12.27 


13 52 


Wake 


5*710 


5 100 


5 310 


8.5 


9 7 


9 


4ft HUA 


49 420 


48 050 


1 


06 


1 03 


1 11 
1 . 10 


11 373 
01,0/0 


50 917 


55 491 


9 00 


9 98 


10 45 


Ppnfral PipHrnnnl (C. ) 


145 180 


1 J J , OOU 


iRA dsn 

1 34 , 4QU 


10 6 


11.6 


10 6 


1 R41 K1A 

I , 04 1 , ! U 


1 77Q 11A 


1 C40 con 
1 , 04i , OOU 


1 


06 


1 nn 

I .UU 


1 tA 
1 . 14 


1 R9Q IRK 

1 . ozy , 100 


1 7B7 1ft1 
1 , t OI , too 


1 872*161 


11 22 


11 63 


19 19 
IZ IZ 


T^icTUTrr R — 

U J M 1,1 1 1 O 






























8 370 


9 850 


12 410 


7 9 


9 9 


Q 1 

y . 


RR 1 0A 
00 1 J -' ' 


07 K.3A 

y / , oou 


lift 1 1 A 
1 1 , J J U 


1 


06 


1 AA 
1 .UU 


1 1 A 
1 . 14 


7A AA7 
/U,UU/ 


Q7 139 


134 90Q 

104 , zuy 


8 36 


9 90 


1A ft1 
IU. Ol 




12 130 


13 010 


14 150 


9 9 


11 5 


Q A 

y .u 


120,070 


149,590 


127,980 


1 


04 


1 AA 
1 .UU 


1. 16 


124,816 


149,597 


148,966 


10 29 


11 50 


1 A 13 
I U . 00 




13 250 


16 120 


16 830 


11 Q 

11 . y 


12 3 


Q A 

y . u 


1 C7 fiti A 

10/ , OoU 


10ft OOA 


152 , 180 


1 


03 


.99 


1 .16 


1 fiO 10R 

1 , lob 


10R A3 9 
I»0, UOi 


177 130 

lit, ioy 


12 24 


12 16 


1 A 10 
IU. OO 




8 690 


10 470 


11 240 


11 8 


12 .2 


9 


1AO S.QA 

iuz , oyu 


107 R7A 
1Z/ , O/U 


1A1 R1A 

1U1 , oou 


1 


04 


QQ 

. yo 


1 . 15 


1 OR 1 A R 
1U0.040 


191 1A1 
1 _•> , IUO 


117 373 


12 26 


11 95 


10 44 




12 910 


14 300 


16 000 


12 6 


12 9 


ft fi 
0.0 


1 KO 7AA 
lOZ , /UU 


1 Qd d4A 
104 , 44U 


137 AOA 
lot , UaU 


1 


04 


1 A1 
1 .Ul 


1 . 16 


1 Rft Old 

1 00 , yo4 


1 BR 31 Q 

100 ,oiy 


1 10 4Qfi 

ioy , 4yo 


13 09 


13 03 


O 07 

y . y / 




7 600 


9 530 


11 260 


10 1 


11 1 


ft 1 

a . 1 


76 , 750 


1 05 , 7 70 


91 ,050 


1 


03 


.97 


1 .09 


78, 960 


1A9 1RR 
1UZ , OOO 


99 246 


10 39 


10 76 


ft fti 
0. 01 




8*420 


si 100 


7*940 


7.8 


10*4 


9.0 


65,670 


84,270 


71,830 


1 


09 


1.03 


1.11 


71,465 


86,835 


79*. 619 


8*49 


10! 72 


10.03 




8,140 


9,050 


8,990 


7.8 


9.5 


8.6 


63,530 


85,950 


76,980 


1 


10 


1.04 


1.14 


69,799 


89,433 


87,473 


8.57 


9.88 


9.73 




3 710 


4 380 


4 130 


8 8 


10 1 


7 fi 
/ . 


QO ROA 


A A OOA 
*± i t , £i£A) 


31 AQ(\ 
01 , 40U 


1 


10 


1 A1 
1 .Ul 


1 . 15 


qc 01 n 
OO , OIU 


A A RRA 
44 , OOU 


3R 310 
o\3,oo\j 


9 65 


10 20 


8 80 


Stanly 


91 ' ftAO 
ZO , ouu 


24 920 


OK enn 
Z O , OUU 


6 9 


11 6 


10 5 


OQK. R1A 


OQO AdA 
Loy , U"1U 


ORB A1A 
jSOo ,U1U 


1 


06 


1 .02 


1 . 13 


OACi AOA 

J4y , 4^4 


9Qi CA3 

zy4 , bUO 


3A9 A1Q 

ouz , uoy 


10 48 


11 83 


11 80 


Union . 


15 810 


20 240 


9 s ; A30 

- ■ ' , uou 


8 8 


12 .0 


9 5 


100 un 
ioy , A3U 


9J9 ftOA 
, OrU 


03 ft 3AA 
£.00 , OUU 


1 


06 


. 99 


1 TA 
1 . 14 


1;17 0A9 
14/ , 0\)£i 


9JA 410 
Z4U , 40U 


270 773 


9 .32 


11 .88 


10 82 


^nitharn PipHmnnt fS i 
ouutiiciii ■ icuiiiuiii -j. 


122*830 




IKO KOA 
1 30 , J OU 


10 


11 5 


9 2 


1 009 /IRA 


1 RAQ RQA 

i , ouy , 0-jj 


1 At A PGA 
1 ,414, 09U 


1 


05 


1 nn 


1 1A 
1 . 1 4 


1 9fl1 910 


1 CI O JOO 

1 ,010, Ho£ 


1 R19 703 
1 • c 1 C . i UO 


10 46 


11 .53 


10 50 


District 3 






























60 


50 


10 


10.5 


16.0 


16 


R3A 
OOU 


800 


1 60 


1 


24 


1 1 A 

1 . iu 


1 1 Q 

i . iy 


781 
/Ol 


833 


190 


13.02 


i.6.66 


19.00 




20 


50 


50 


13 .0 


17.2 


11 4 


260 


ftRA 
OOU 


17A 
O/U 


1 


20 


1 f\A 
1 .U3 


1 10 

I . la 


312 


895 


679 


15. 60 


17. 90 


13 .58 




30 


30 


80 


11 3 


17.7 


110 


34A 
OtU 


R3A 
OOU 


QQA 
OoU 


1 


22 


1 (\A 
1 .U$ 


1 10 

1 . iy 


A 1 R 
410 


552 


1 049 


13 .87 


18.40 


13 11 


Currituck 


20 


50 


50 


11.0 


17.6 


10 4 


220 


880 


520 


1 


18 


1 04 


1 10 

i . iy 


9fi0 
^OU 


915 


620 


13.00 


18.30 


12.40 


PlHoppnmr.P 


410 


570 


320 


11.7 


16.4 


12 5 


A ft1A 
4 , olU 


Q 34A 

y ,oiu 


.1 AAA 
% , UUU 


1 


18 


1 A3 
1 .Uo 


1 OA 
1 . - 1 > 


1 R73 
0,0/0 


9 626 


4 804 


13.84 


16.89 


15.01 




50 


20 


10 


112 


14 5 


IRA 

1 . u 


560 


290 


160 


1 


39 


1 . 04 


1 .20 


781 


'302 


1Q9 

iyz 


15 62 


15 10 


19 20 


Halifax 


1 590 


1 350 


1 170 


13 5 


19 3 


11 1 

11.0 


21 ,510 


26, 110 


13 ,400 


1 


18 


1 .01 


1 . 19 


25,348 


9ft OQA 


1 1 Q7A 

10, y /u 


15 94 


19 54 


13 65 


HprtfnrH 


90 


50 


30 


11 2 


16 


12 


1 AOA 


QAA 
OUU 


360 


1 


17 


1 .02 


1 . j.9 


1 1 07 

1,1a/ 


S1 R 
010 


428 


13 30 


16.32 


14.27 




20 


10 


20 


13.0 


16.0 


13.0 


260 


160 


260 


1 


20 


1.04 


1.19 


312 


167 


310 


15.60 


16.70 


15.50 


Nash — 


2 110 


1 960 


1 790 


13 3 


15.3 


12 4 


Oft AdA 
Zo , U3U 


OQ QfiA 

Ztf , you 


OO 1QA 
Lit , IOU 


1 


18 


1 .04 


1 . 17 


00 1 1R 
OO , 100 


31 17Q 

01 , 1 / y 


25 966 


15.71 


15.91 


14.51 




360 


*330 


380 


12 2 


16 3 


112 


.4 /1AA 
4 , 4UU 


5 ,390 


4,260 


1 


23 


1 .03 


1 .20 


5,413 


1 111 
O , OOO 


5 117 


15 04 


16.83 


13 .47 


Pasquotank . 


110 


150 


180 


114 


17 1 


1 A Q 

iu . y 


1 ,250 


2, 560 


1 ,£70 


1 


17 


1 .03 


1 . 19 


1 ,458 


9 R3S 
6 , UOO 


2 348 


13 .25 


17.59 


13 04 




50 


30 


50 


1 A fi 
IU. 


ifi 7 
10. / 


11 4 
11.4 


530 


500 


570 


1 


18 


1 .03 


1 . 19 


625 


11 1 
OlO 


R7Q 

o/y 


12 50 


17. 17 


13 58 


Tyrrell 


10 


30 


20 


16.0 


14.0 


13.0 


160 


420 


260 


1 


30 


1.04 


1.19 


208 


438 


310 


20.80 


14.60 


15.50 




20 


40 


3C 


10 5 


14 


12 


01 A 
Z1U 


560 


360 


1 


.24 


1 .02 


1 . 19 


260 


572 


42°- 


13 00 


14.30 


14.30 


Nnrthprn P.nactfll fNF 1 


4 950 


4 720 


4 190 


13 n 


10.0 


11 Q 


CA OAA 
04 , ZU U 


/a , Iou 


49 , 860 


1 


19 


1 .03 


1 .19 


76 , 200 


fll 3Q3 
OI , OOO 


59 091 


15 39 


17! 24 


14.10 


District 6 — 
































180 


230 


130 


11 8 


17 


12 8 


O 1 0A 


3 AAA 

, yuu 


1 can 

1 , boO 


1 


25 


1 .Uo 


1 10 
1 . 10 


fiii 

«, OOO 


A A1 1 
4 , UIO 


1 964 


14.75 


17.46 


15.11 


(lo ptprpt 


10 


1 A 
1U 




3 A 


1 O A 
IZ .U 




30 


120 


1 


40 


1 . 02 




42 


1 90 




4 20 


12 20 






OA 
ZU 


50 


90 


11 .5 


16.8 


■■■ ~~~ 
1<J .0 


230 


840 


1,200 


1 


36 


1.04 


1.18 


312 


873 


1,419 


1 1 fiA 
10 . OU 


17 4R 
1 / .40 


1 1 77 
10 . / / 


(jj reene 


110 


70 


50 


13.0 


17.4 


13 .6 


1.430 


1.220 


680 


1 


25 


1 .04 


1.18 


1 ,785 


1,268 


804 


16.23 


1 Q 11 

io. 11 


16.08 


Hyde 


OA 

zu 


on 
oU 


20 


10.5 


16.7 


13 .0 


210 


500 


260 


1 


.24 


1.03 


1. 18 


260 


515 


OAQ 
0U5 


1 3 AA 
10 .UU 


17 17 
1 / . 1 / 


15 40 


Johnston . _ _ 


770 
1 /U 


790 


790 


13 . 1 


15.3 


12.3 


10, 100 


12,060 


9,710 


1 


21 


1 .06 


1 .18 


12, 232 


12, 781 


11 AQA 
1 I , 404 


1 1 QQ 

10 . oy 


16 18 


14 54 


Jones 


1U 


10 




2.0 


18.0 




20 


180 


1 


30 


1 .04 




26 


187 




O fiA 
Z . OU 


1ft 7A 
±0. /U 






J A 

4U 


7A 
IV 


inn 

100 


11.2 


16.0 


~~ 
13 .0 


450 


1 , 120 




1 ,300 


1 


27 


1.03 


1 .18 


573 


1 1 10 
1 , 100 


1 137 
1 , Do 1 


14 33 
14 .00 


16 47 


15 37 




f;a 

UV 


70 


70 


11 .0 


16.0 


11.1 


550 


1 , 120 


780 


1 


.25 


1 .03 


1.18 


687 


1 , 153 


099 

yzz 


13 74 
10 . /4 


16 47 


13 17 


Pitt 


1 OA 


90 


130 


10.4 


16.6 


12.0 


1,980 


1 ,490 


1 ,560 


1 


.26 


1 .04 


1.18 


2,498 


1 , 549 


1 Q41 
1 , 040 


13 15 


17 21 


14 19 


"Wayne 


220 


210 


330 


12 .5 


16.0 


12.3 


2, 750 


3 ,360 


4,050 


1 


.25 


1 .04 


1.20 


3 ,435 


3 ,493 


4, 864 


15 61 


1 R R3 
10 . OO 


14 74 




4GA 

4yu 


320 


310 


12 .9 


16.2 


12.5 


6,310 


5, 180 


3,890 


1 


20 


1 .04 


1.19 


7,558 


5 ,385 


4, 636 


1 1 40 
10. 4Z 


1 fi S3 
ID. OO 


14 95 


Central Coastal (E ) 


9 11A 
Z, I IU 


1 QRft 

1 , you 


2,020 


12.4 


15.9 


12.4 


26,180 


31 ,090 


25,090 


1 


22 


1 .05 


1.19 


00 acq 


32 , 494 


OQ 703 
CO, / OO 


ir cn 


16 66 


14 74 
14 . / 4 


District 9 — 






















Bladen 


110 


130 


1 OA 
IUU 


11 1 
11.0 


ICQ 

10. 


9.o 


4 nan 

1 ,260 


2,050 


1 , 770 


1 


24 


1 .05 


1 .20 


1 RR9 


O 1 13 

- , 100 


2 126 


14 20 


16.56 


11 19 


Brunswick 


10 


30 


4A 
4U 


14,0 


17.7 


11 . 8 


140 


530 


470 


1 


11 


1 .03 


1. 19 


156 


14 ft 

040 


557 


15 60 


18.20 


13 .93 


Columbus 


130 


220 


290 


11.6 


18.0 


11.3 


1 , 510 


3 , 960 


3 , 270 


1 


21 


1 .03 


1 .20 


1, 822 


A AQ1 
4 , UOl 


3 Q9ft 

, yzo 


14 02 


18 55 


13 .54 


Cumberland 


770 


1,460 


2,490 


11.7 


15.3 


12.4 


9,020 


22,290 


30,850 


1 


20 


1.05 


1.17 


10,826 


23,417 


36,192 


u! 06 


16!04 


14*53 


Duplin 


190 


100 


230 


11.5 


16.8 


11.3 


2,180 


1,680 


2,600 


1 


24 


1.03 


1.18 


2,707 


1,732 


3,075 


14.25 


17.32 


13.37 


Harnett 


3,450 


3,770 


3,460 


10.5 


12.3 


11.9 


36,180 


46,330 


41,190 


1 


IS 


1.04 


1.16 


42,629 


48,203 


47,942 


12.36 


12.79 


13.86 


Hoke 


2,120 


2,210 


2,590 


11.9 


15.3 


11.4 


25,180 


33,840 


29,610 


1 


15 


1.01 


1.18 


28,940 


34,182 


35,011 


13.65 


15.47 


13.52 


New Hanover 


10 


10 


10 


2.0 


3.0 


2.0 


20 


30 


20 


1 


30 


1.00 


1.30 


26 


30 


26 


2.60 


3.00 


2.60 


Onslow 


20 


40 


20 


9.5 


15.2 


10.0 


190 


610 


200 


1 


23 


1.04 


1.18 


234 


635 


236 


11.70 


15.88 


11.80 


Pender 


30 


70 


80 


11.7 


15.9 


10.4 


350 


1,110 


830 


1 


19 


1.03 


1.18 


416 


1,144 


981 


13.87 


16.34 


12.26 


Robeson _ 


2,200 


2,490 


4,240 


12.4 


17.4 


13.3 


27,250 


43,290 


56,360 


1 


16 


1.02 


1.16 


31,594 


44,167 


65,596 


14.36 


17.74 


15.47 


Sampson 

Scotland _ 


460 


950 


1,470 


11.4 


16.3 


12.4 


5,240 


15,500 


18,230 


1 


25 


1.02 


1.19 


6,558 


15,814 


21,725 


14.26 


16.65 


14.78 


2,270 


2,250 


2,980 


12.4 


15.3 


11.4 


28,100 


34,390 


34,070 


1 


15 


1.03 


1.15 


32,271 


35,432 


39,339 


14.22 


15.75 


13.20 


Southern Coastal (SE.) ... 


11,770 


13,730 


18,090 


11.6 


15.0 


12.1 


136,620 


205,610 


219,470 


1 


17 


1.03 


1.17 


159,741 


211,536 


256,734 


13.57 


15.41 


14.19 


State 


496,000 


520.000 


530,000 


9.9 


11 .3 


9.8 


4,910,000 


5,876.000 


5,194,000 


1.06 


1.00 


1.14 


5,205.000 


5,876,000 


5,921,000 


10.49 


11.30 


11.17 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



15 



MILLION 



WHEAT PRODUCTION IN NORTH CAROLINA 



PUSHEL3 

6 
5 
* 

3 - 
Z - 

I - 





MILLION 
BljJSHELS 



. 1 



PPPPPIPPPPPPPP 




CHART COMPARES PRODUCTION 



M ILLION 



SMALL GRAIN 

The graps or illustrations on this page 
are intended to show the growth in the 
production of small grain from 1866 to 

1936. ! i_j :_| 

WHEAT 

The wheat crop is largely confined to 
the central or Piedmont counties. It is 
especially important in counties between 
the cotton and tobacco belts, (District 5). 
While it may not be classed strictly as a 
cash crop, because of its low yield per 
acre, yet many farmers do produce excess 
quantities for sale. The crop is advantag- 
eously grown in connection with livestock 
farming. In recent years it has been 
grown as a mother crop for lespedeza, 
thereby getting the benefit of the land 
usage after the grain is harvested. In this 
way soils are improved to advantage and 
a good hay or feed crop is harvested in 
the fall. North Carolina farmers are us- 
ing small grains to a great advantage in 
this way, in building up their land. 



The principal wheat producing counties 
are Davidson, Rowan, Iredell, Randolph, 
Stanly and Union counties. There are 22 
counties that usually produce over 100,000 
bushels yearly. As a rule, wheat farmers 
practice safe farming. They usually have 
a well diversified farming program, live 
well and have some money in the bank. 

North Carolina's wheat production was 
less than 2,000,000 bushels in 1866. A 
steady increase in the crop occurred un- 
til about 1900, after which a definite drop 
occurred. Again the production increased 
from 1921 until the present time. The 
1937 production is the largest since 1901, 
except in 1935 only. 

OATS 

The oat crop deserves considerably 
more attention and thought than is usually 
given it by farmers. It provides an excel- 
lent feed crop both as to grain and for- 
age. It may be sown in the fall or early 
spring. This state could expand its oat 
acreage to a considerable advantage. A 
study of the data on the opposite page 



should provide interesting, educational 
facts for students. Data for a three-year 
period is offered covering the basic facts 
of the crop, including acreage, yield, pro- 
duction and value. It is frequently used 
as a mother crop for spring legumes like 
lespedeza, clover, vetch, etc., although, 
wheat is more frequently used for this 
purpose. During recent years the plant- 
ing time has shifted from the fall seeding 
to the early spring, even in the Piedmont 
counties. On the other hand, the eastern 
counties have shifted somewhat to the fall 
season. In this latter area oats are cut 
off almost entirely for feed purposes 
either in the late "dough" stage, or after 
being fairly mature. They are rarely 
threshed in the eastern counties. 

RYE 

Rye had a rather steady trend until 
about 1915, since which time the pro- 
duction has increased fairly steadily. 
1936 and 1937, however, show a definite 
decline. There is a loss of interest in this 
crop. 



MILLION 



OATS - PRODUCTION IN NORTH CAROLINA 



MILLION 



BUSHELS 



CHART SHOWS PRO 




IL 



mJBn 



ODD ~ I 'dJO 



^5! 

6 

5 
4 

|3 
2 
.J 

10- 



HELS 



MILLION 
BUSHELS 



MILLION 
BUSHELS 



RYE PRODUCTION IN NORTH CAROLINA 



El* 



iHif 



CHART COMPARES PRODUCTION IN MILLION BUSHELS 



' I L L L 



NORTH CAROLINA OATS CROP 



Districts and Counties 


Acreage 


Yield Per Acre 
(Bushels) 


-Production (Bushels) 


Price Per Bushel 


Total Value (Dol 




Value Per Acre 
(Dollars) 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1 01 £ 


1936 


1 Q'iA 




1 Gift 




laoo 


1 Qlfi 




iyoo 


1 Qlfi 




1935 


1936 


District 1 — 






































Alleghany - 


1,083 


1,271 


1,458 


16 


18 


16 


17,328 


22,878 


23,328 


$ .58 


$ .59 


$ .66 


$ 10,050 


% 13,498 


$ 15,396 


% 9.28 


% 10.62 


$ 10.56 




3,270 


2 691 


3,956 


20 


17 


20 


65,400 


45,747 


79,120 


.53 


.58 


.68 


34,662 


26,533 


53,802 


10.60 


9.86 


13.60 


Avery. 


1,517 


1,203 


1,748 


14 


17 


18 


21,238 


20,451 


31,464 


.66 


.61 


.71 


14,017 


12,475 


22 339 


9.24 


10.37 


12.78 


Caldwell 


1,366 


1,242 


1,186 


17 


19 


15 


23,222 


23,598 


17,790 


.63 


.57 


.66 


14,630 


13,451 


11 741 


10.71 


10.83 


9.60 




1,883 


1,457 


1,948 


17 


18 


16 


32,011 


26,226 


31,168 


.63 


.59 


.65 


20,167 


15,473 


20 259 


10.71 


10.62 


10.40 


Watauga 


2,484 


2,659 


2,797 


21 


20 


29 


52,164 


53,180 


81,113 


.57 


.60 


.68 


29,733 


31,608 


55 157 


11.97 


12.00 


19.72 


Wilkes 


1,155 


799 


899 


20 


18 


16 


23 , 100 


14.382 


14,384 


.66 


.53 


.67 


15,246 


7,622 


9 637 


13.20 


9.54 


10.72 




3,155 


2,370 


2,637 


17 


19 


17 


53 , 635 


45,030 


44,829 


.65 


.62 


.66 


34,863 


27,819 


29 587 


11.05 


11.78 


11.22 


Northern Mountain (NW.) 

District 4 — 


15,913 


13 692 


.6,629 


18 


18 


19 


288,098 


251,492 


323,196 


.60 


.59 


.63 


173,368 


148,879 


217 918 


10.89 


10.87 


13.10 


2,625 


3.261 


2,208 


15 


16 


11 


39,375 


52,176 


24,288 


.58 


.54 


.63 


22,838 


28,175 


15 301 


8.70 


8.64 


6.93 




1,159 


1,079 


1,191 


18 


17 


12 


20,862 


18,343 


14,292 


.64 


.55 


.65 


13,352 


10,089 


9 290 


11.52 


9.35 


7.80 


Cherokee 


465 


574 


162 


16 


18 


24 


7,440 


10,332 


3,888 


.60 


.59 


.72 


4,464 


6,096 


2 79° 


9.60 


10.62 


17.28 


Clay 


77 
80 


134 


115 


17 


16 


23 


1,309 


2,144 


2,645 


.64 


.60 


.71 


838 


1,286 


1 878 


10.88 


9,60 


16.33 




36 


66 


15 


13 


14 


1,200 


468 


924 


.62 


.62 


.73 


744 


290 


' 675 


9.30 


8.06 


10.23 


Haywood 


2,723 


2,584 


2,371 


16 


16 


13 


43,568 


41,344 


30,823 


.66 


.57 


.66 


28,755 


23,566 


20 343 


10.56 


9.12 


8.58 




781 


595 


500 


15 


17 


13 


11,715 


10,115 


6,500 


.61 


.56 


.64 


7,146 


5,664 


4 160 


9.15 


9.52 


8.32 




531 


440 


492 


16 


16 


19 


8,496 


7,040 


9,348 


.65 


.60 


.69 


5,522 


4,224 


6 450 


10.40 


9.60 


13.11 


McDowell 


328 


310 


33i 


17 


17 


20 


5,576 


5,270 


6,620 


.64 


.52 


.68 


3,569 


2,740 


4 502 


10.88 


8.84 


13.60 




548 


663 


856 


21 


18 


24 


11,508 


11,934 


20,544 


.62 


.57 


.69 


7,135 


6,802 


14,175 


13.02 


10.26 


16.56 




2,303 


1,753 


2,345 


14 


15 


12 


32,242 


26,295 


28,140 


.57 


.53 


.67 


18,378 


13,936 


18, 854 


7.98 


7.95 


8.04 




2,430 


1,519 


1,945 


15 


15 


14 


36,450 


22,785 


27,230 


.67 


.58 


.72 


24,422 


13,215 


19 606 


10.05 


8.70 


10.08 




928 


827 


788 


17 


16 


10 


15,776 


13,232 


7,880 


.73 


.58 


.70 


11,516 


7,675 


5 516 


12.41 


9.28 


7.00 


Rutherford 


4,612 


4,429 


4,107 


18 


21 


11 


83,016 


93,009 


45,177 


.72 


.59 


.67 


59,772 


54,875 




12.96 


12.39 


7.37 




279 


338 


270 


15 


14 


14 


4,185 


4,732 


3,780 


.63 


.60 


.71 


2,637 


2,839 


2 684 


9.45 


8.40 


9.94 


Transylvania 


165 


115 


108 


15 


16 


14 


2,475 


1,840 


1,512 


.60 


.57 


.68 


1,485 


1,049 


1 ,028 


9.00 


9.12 


9.52 




2,401 


1,929 


2,107 


15 


14 


12 


36,015 


27,006 


25,284 


.62 


.56 


.67 


22,329 


15,123 


16 940 


9.30 


7.84 


8.04 


Western Mountain (W.) 


22,435 


20,586 


19,962 


16 


17 


13 


361 , 208 


348,065 


258,875 


.65 


.57 


.67 


234,902 


197,644 


1 74 ' 470 


10.48 


9.60 


8.74 


District 2 — 








































3,791 


3,178 


4,064 


20 


21 


19 


75,820 


66,738 


77,216 


.66 


.58 


.64 


50,041 


38,708 


62,218 


13.20 


12.18 


15.31 




746 


842 


1,058 


15 


19 


16 


11,190 


15,998 


16,928 


.69 


.60 


.66 


7,721 


9,599 


11* 172 


10.35 


11.40 


10.56 




770 


1,039 


1,608 


16 


19 


27 


12,320 


19,741 


43,416 


.72 


.65 


.68 


8,870 


12,832 


29,523 


11.52 


12.35 


18.36 


Franklin 


6,865 


6,519 


6,322 


20 


22 


18 


137,300 


143,418 


113,796 


.63 


.60 


.71 


86,499 


86,051 


80,795 


12.60 


13.20 


12.78 


1,434 


2,025 


2,104 


18 


17 


19 


25,812 


34,425 


39,976 


.73 


.62 


.65 


18,843 


21,344 


25 i 984 


13.14 


10.54 


12.35 




1,051 


1,709 


1,747 


17 


17 


14 


17,867 


29,053 


24,458 


.71 


.64 


.66 


12,686 


18,594 


16^ 142 


12.07 


10.88 


9.24 


vjuillora 


5,683 


5,928 


6,149 


21 


22 


19 


119,343 


130,416 


116,831 


.64 


.59 


.61 


76,380 


76,945 


71,267 


13.44 


12.88 


11.59 




1,147 


1,278 


1,980 


20 


21 


21 


22,940 


26,838 


41,580 


.70 


.61 


.67 


16,058 


16,371 


27,859 


14.00 


12.81 


14.07 




1,545 


1,622 


1,596 


15 


18 


13 


23,175 


29,166 


20,748 


.71 


.62 


.67 


16,454 


18,102 


13 ' 901 


10.65 


11.16 


8.71 


Rockingham 


2,163 


2,621 


2,833 


17 


21 


16 


36,771 


55,041 


45,328 


.68 


.59 


.65 


25,004 


32,474 


29,463 


11.56 


12.38 


10.40 




1,376 


1,239 


1,569 


18 


22 


19 


24,768 


27,258 


29,811 


.65 


.61 


.66 


16,099 


16,627 


19 675 


11.70 


13.42 


12.54 




661 


1,063 


978 


19 


18 


16 


12,559 


19,134 


15,648 


.72 


.62 


.67 


9,042 


11,863 


10 484 


13.68 


11.16 


10.72 


Warren 


1,459 


1,499 


1,338 


18 


21 


14 


26,262 


31,479 


18,732 


.72 


.63 


.68 


18,908 


19,832 


12 738 


12.96 


13.23 


9.52 


Northern Piedmont (N.) 


28.691 


30,562 


33,346 


19 


21 


18 


546,127 


628,735 


604,468 


.66 


.60 


.68 


362,606 


379,342 


41 1 221 


12.62 


12.41 


12.33 


District 5 — 








































1,162 


966 


1,164 


17 


19 


16 


19,754 


18,354 


18,624 


.75 


.52 


.60 


14,816 


9,544 


11 , 174 


12.75 


8.88 


9.60 




5,232 


5,898 


5,401 


17 


20 


16 


88,944 


117,960 


86,416 


.68 


.54 


.62 


60,482 


63,698 


53 , 578 


11.56 


10.80 


9.92 




2,601 


3,297 


4,563 


16 


21 


19 


41,616 


69,237 


86,697 


.72 


.60 


.63 


29,964 


41,542 


54 i 619 


11.52 


12.60 


11.97 




7,128 


7,149 


7,757 


17 


22 


20 


121,176 


157,278 


155,140 


.61 


.56 


.62 


73,917 


88,076 


96,187 


10.37 


12.32 


12.40 




4,495 


4,446 


4,908 


18 


21 


18 


80,910 


93,366 


88,344 


.60 


.54 


.72 


48,546 


50,418 




10.80 


11.34 


12.96 




9,692 


8,292 


8,447 


18 


21 


15 


174,456 


174,132 


126,705 


.58 


.51 


.60 


101,184 


88,807 


76,023 


10.44 


10.71 


9.00 




1,738 


2,365 


2,420 


15 


19 


20 


26,070 


44,935 


48,400 


.73 


.64 


.65 


19,031 


28,758 


31 ' 460 


10.95 


12.16 


13.00 


Randolph 


6,088 


5,479 


6,420 


16 


20 


19 


97,408 


109,580 


121,980 


.67 


.57 


.65 


65,263 


62,461 


79 287 


10.72 


11.40 


12.35 




11,587 


12,777 


12,318 


19 


23 


17 


220,153 


293,871 


209,406 


.59 


.58 


.67 


129,890 


170,445 


140302 


11.21 


13.34 


11.39 




4,921 


6,296 


6,997 


18 


17 


17 


88,578 


107,032 


118,949 


.75 


.68 


.64 


66,434 


72,782 


75* 127 


13.50 


11.56 


10.88 


Central Piedmont (C.) 


54,644 


56,965 


60,395 


18 


21 


18 


959,065 


1,185,745 


1,060,661 


.64 


.57 


.64 


609,527 


676,531 


682 365 


11.20 


11.88 


11.30 


District 8 — 






































Anson 


12,668 


14,494 


14,157 


15 


19 


18 


190,020 


275,386 


254,826 


.75 


.59 


.68 


142,515 


162,478 


1 OQO 

1 I - l , ___0__j 


11.25 


11.21 


12.24 


Cabarrus 


8,156 


8,122 


9,347 


17 


21 


17 


138,652 


170,562 


158,899 


.65 


.57 


.63 


90,124 


97,220 


100, 106 


11.05 


11.97 


10.71 




11,073 


10,719 


10,063 


20 


21 


17 


221,460 


225,099 


171,071 


.75 


.57 


.64 


166,095 


128,306 


109 485 


15.00 


11.97 


10.88 




5,537 


5,496 


5,865 


19 


22 


15 


105,203 


120,912 


87,975 


.74 


.58 


.66 


77,850 


70,129 


58 [ 064 


14.06 


12.76 


9.90 




4,605 


4,499 


5,345 


19 


21 


17 


87,495 


94,479 


90,865 


.73 


.56 


.65 


63,871 


52,908 


59 ^ 062 


13.87 


11.74 


11.05 


Mecklenburg 


6 975 


7,810 


8,466 


18 


20 


17 


125,550 


156,200 


143,922 


.74 


.58 


.65 


92,607 


90,596 


°3 549 


13.32 


11.60 


11.05 


Montgomery 


2*895 


3,049 


3,146 


13 


19 


20 


37,635 


57,931 


62,920 


.70 


.59 


.64 


26,345 


34,179 


40 269 


9.10 


11.21 


12.80 




2,475 


2,978 


3,423 


15 


18 


18 


37,125 


53,604 


61,614 


.71 


.63 


.67 


26,359 


33,771 


41 .281 


10.65 


11.34 


12.06 


Richmond 


3,433 


4,100 


3,276 


15 


20 


20 


51,495 


82,000 


65,520 


.69 


.61 


.65 


35,532 


50,020 


42^588 


10.35 


12.20 


13.00 


Stanly 


7,396 


8,776 


8,473 


16 


22 


19 


118,336 


193,072 


160,987 


.64 


.55 


.61 


75,735 


106,190 


98,202 


10.24 


12.10 


11.59 


Union 


13,474 


14,840 


14,938 


16 


21 


18 


215,584 


311,640 


268,884 


.74 


.58 


.67 


159,532 


180,751 


i on i 

loU , X Oil 


11.84 


12.18 


12.06 


Southern Piedmont (S.) — 


78,687 


84.883 


86,499 


17 


21 


18 


1,328,555 


1,740,885 


1,527,483 


.72 


.58 


.65 


956,865 


1,006,548 


qqr run 


12.17 


11.86 


11.52 


District 3 — 


































16.10 




566 


685 


569 


16 


21 


23 


6,056 


14,385 


13,087 


.75 


.60 


.70 


6,792 


8,631 


9 161 


12.00 


12.60 


Camden _ _ 


177 


166 


363 


17 


26 


24 


3,009 


4,316 


8,712 


.75 


.60 


.66 


2,257 


2,580 


5 750 


12.75 


15.60 


15.84 


Chowan 


149 


104 


100 


16 


26 


21 


2,384 


2,704 


2,100 


.75 


.60 


.68 


1,788 


1,622 


1 428 


12.00 


15.60 


14.28 




203 


272 


297 


16 


26 


22 


3,248 


7,072 


6,534 


.75 


.60 


.67 


2,436 


4,243 


4*378 


12.00 


15.60 


14.74 


Edgecombe 


3,896 


4,347 


3,485 


21 


26 


24 


81,816 


113,002 


83,640 


.75 


.60 


.71 


61,362 


67,801 


59 384 


15.75 


15.60 


17.04 




321 


181 


262 


15 


26 


22 


4,815 


4,706 


5,764 


.75 


.60 


.67 


3,611 


2,824 


3 862 


11.25 


15.60 


14.74 


Ha lifax 


2,135 


3,014 


1,879 


18 


26 


29 


38,430 


78,364 


54,491 


.75 


.60 


.69 


28,823 


47,018 


37 599 


13.50 


15.60 


20.01 




686 


338 


614 


18 


19 


24 


12,348 


6,422 


14,736 


.75 


.60 


.68 


9,261 


3,853 


10 ] 020 


13.50 


11.40 


16.32 


Martin - 


1,946 


1,883 


1,546 


17 


29 


29 


33,082 


54,607 


44,834 


.75 


.60 


.70 


24,812 


32,764 


31 ' 384 


12.75 


17.40 


20.30 




5,462 


6,014 


5,761 


21 


27 


23 


114,702 


162,378 


132,503 


.75 


.60 


.69 


86,027 


87,427 


91 427 


15.75 


16.20 


15.87 


Northampton 


2,083 


2,287 


2,338 


17 


16 


27 


35,411 


36,592 


63,126 


.75 


.60 


.70 


26,558 


21,955 


44 ' 188 


12.75 


9.60 


18.90 


Pasquotank... . .. 


329 


565 


612 


17 


26 


23 


5,593 


14,690 


14,076 


.75 


.60 


.64 


4,195 


8,814 


9 009 


12.75 


15.60 


14.72 


Perquimans.. . . . - 


515 


388 


459 


16 


26 


21 


8,240 


10,088 


9,639 


.75 


.60 


.65 


6,180 


6,053 


6 265 


12.00 


15.60 


13.65 


Tyrrell. . .. 


266 


247 


280 


18 


24 


27 


4,788 


5,928 


7,560 


.75 


.60 


.70 


3,591 


3,557 


5 .292 


13.50 


14.40 


18.90 


Washington - 


539 


424 


241 


19 


26 


28 


10,241 


11,024 


6,748 


.75 


.60 


.66 


7,681 


6,614 


4 656 


14.25 


15.60 


19.32 


Northern Coastal (NE.) 


19,273 


20,915 


18,806 


19 


25 


25 


367,163 


526,278 


467,550 


.75 


.60 


.69 


275,374 


315,766 


' fin? 


14.28 


15.10 


17.22 


District 6 — 


































16.90 


13.86 


Beaufort . _ . 


2,130 


3,539 


3,241 


22 


26 


21 


46,860 


92,014 


68,061 


.75 


.65 


.66 


35,145 


59,809 


44 920 


16.50 


Carteret. . 


138 


173 


142 


16 


26 


20 


2,208 


4,498 


2,840 


.75 


.65 


.71 


1,656 


2,924 


2 016 


12.00 


16.90 


14.20 


Craven 


1,331 


1,522 


1,059 


18 


26 


19 


23,958 


39,572 


20,121 


.75 


.65 


.72 


17,669 


25,722 


14 487 


13.50 


16.90 


13.68 




2,531 


2,127 


1,566 


20 


31 


25 


50,620 


65,937 


39,150 


.75 


.65 


.71 


37,965 


42,859 


27 797 


15.00 


20.15 


17.75 


Hyde _____ 


792 


1,342 


1,637 


23 


26 


29 


18,216 


34,892 


47,473 


.75 


.65 


.64 


13 , 662 


22,680 


30^383 


17.25 


16.90 


18.56 


Johnston _____ 


6,721 


7,789 


6,618 


21 


28 


19 


141,141 


218,092 


125,742 


.77 


.69 


.66 


108,676 


150,483 


82 990 


16.17 


19.32 


12.54 


Jones — 


445 


798 


470 


17 


26 


22 


7,565 


20,748 


10,340 


.75 


.65 


.73 


5,674 


13,486 


7 548 


12.75 


16.90 


16.06 




3,893 


2,553 


2,420 


20 


26 


20 


77,860 


66,378 


48,400 


.75 


.65 


.72 


58,395 


43,146 


34*848 


15.00 


16.90 


14.40 


Pamlico — 


830 


857 


490 


18 


26 


21 


14,940 


22,282 


10,290 


.75 


.65 


.70 


11,205 


14,483 


7 ! 203 


13.50 


16.60 


14.70 




7,485 


6,762 


6,652 


24 


23 


28 


179,640 


155,526 


186,256 


.75 


.68 


.73 


134,730 


105,758 


11K Qfi7 


18.00 


15.64 


20.44 


Wayne __ 

Wilson 


2,754 


3,711 


3,059 


18 


29 


22 


49,572 


107,619 


67,268 


.75 


.69 


.70 


37,179 


74,257 


47 109 


13.50 


20.01 


15.40 


4,868 


5,106 


4,775 


19 


27 


28 


92,492 


137,862 


133,700 


.75 


.65 


.70 


69,369 


89,610 


93* 590 


14.25 


17.55 


19.60 




33,918 


36,279 


32,129 


21 


27 


24 


705,072 


965,420 


759,671 


.75 


.67 


.70 


531,628 


645,217 


52ft' R^R 


15.71 


17.78 


16.46 


District 9 — 


































16.25 


15.62 


Bladen. _ 


1,115 


800 


809 


19 


25 


22 


21,185 


20,000 


17,798 


.75 


.65 


.71 


15,889 


13,000 


12 637 


14.25 


Brunswick.- .. _. . 


339 


522 


434 


17 


26 


25 


5,763 


13,572 


10,850 


.75 


.64 


.72 


4,322 


8,686 


7812 


12.75 


16.64 


18.00 


Columbus 


2,019 


1,983 


2,236 


18 


27 


28 


36,342 


53 , 54 1 


OJ , OUo 


.75 


.63 


7 A 


07 9H7 
_ 1 , -■) - 


33 731 


46*330 


13.50 


17.01 


20.72 


Cumberland 


2,575 


2,311 


2,597 


22 


28 


29 


56,650 


64,708 


75,313 


.75 


.63 


.67 


42,488 


40 ,'766 


50 \ 460 


16]50 


17.64 


19.43 


Duplin 


1 ,227 


1,299 


1,504 


20 


21 


25 


24,540 


27,279 


37, 600 


.75 


.65 


.70 


1 8 , 405 


17, 731 


26 320 


15 00 


13 65 


17.50 


Harnett. _. 


4,222 


4,622 


3,790 


17 


23 


22 


71,774 


106,306 


83,380 


.74 


.67 


.66 


53,113 


71,225 


55i031 


12 [58 


15141 


14!52 


Hoke 


2,792 


2,952 


2,856 


21 


26 


21 


58,632 


76,752 


56,976 


.73 


.62 


.68 


42,801 


47,586 


40,784 


15.33 


16.12 


14.28 


New Hanover 


38 


84 


47 


17 


26 


26 


646 


2,184 


1,222 


.75 


.64 


.74 


485 


1,398 


904 


12.75 


16.64 


19.23 


Onslow... . . . . . 


498 


441 


542 


17 


26 


24 


8,466 


11,466 


13,008 


.75 


.64 


.72 


6,350 


7,338 


9,366 


12.75 


16.64 


17.28 


Pender . ... . 


504 


621 


604 


17 


26 


20 


8,568 


16,146 


12,080 


.75 


.64 


.69 


6,426 


10,333 


8,335 


12.75 


16.64 


13.80 


Robeson . . 


10,561 


9,795 


10,133 


22 


28 


31 


232,342 


274,260 


314,123 


.74 


.64 


.76 


171,933 


175,526 


248,157 


16.28 


17.92 


24.49 


Sampson . . 


3,230 


2,856 


1,975 


20 


25 


30 


46,600 


71,400 


59,250 


.75 


.63 


.69 


34,950 


44,982 


40,883 


15.00 


15.75 


20.70 


Scotland __ ..- 


5,345 


5,484 


5,302 


19 


27 


27 


101,555 


148,068 


143,154 


.72 


.63 


.69 


73,120 


93,283 


98,776 


13.68 


17.01 


18.63 


Southern Coastal (SE.)___. 


34,465 


33,770 


32,829 


20 


26 


27 


673,063 


885,682 


890,362. 


.74 


.64 


.73 


497,539 


565,579 


645,795 


14.82 


16.75 


19.67 


State 


288,026 


297,652 


300,595 


18 


22 


20 


5,228,351 


6,532,302 


5,892,266 


.70 


.60 


.68 


3,641,809 


3,935,506 


3,980,470 


12.74 


13.22 


13.24 



NORTH CAROLINA RYE CROP 











Yield Per Acre 




























Acreage Planted 


(Bushels) 


Production (Bushels) 


Price Per Bushel 




lotal value 




Value Per Acre 


Districts and Counties 














































































1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


19oo 


1934 


1935 


1936 


District 1 — 






































in i 

Alleghany _. 


3 , 222 


2,730 


1,877 


7.0 


7.8 


6 


22 , 554 


21,294 


11 , 262 


t .93 


$ .91 


$1 . 15 


• Of! H7E 

i ZU , 9 / O 


$ iy,tJ/o 


$12, 951 


$ 6. 51 


$ 7. 10 


$ 6.90 


Ashe 


5, 880 


5,302 


3,985 


7.5 


8.5 


9 


44, 100 


45, 067 


35 , 865 


.91 


.90 


1.12 


40, 131 


40 , 560 


40, 169 


6.83 


7. 65 


10.08 


Avery. 


2 ,069 


1 , 890 


1 , 189 


7.0 


7.8 


8 


14,483 


14,742 


9,512 


.94 


.94 


1.10 


13 , 614 


13 , 857 


10, 463 


6.58 


7.33 


8.80 


Caldwell . . 


1 ,970 


1 ,387 


1,115 


7.0 


6.3 


5 


9 , 709 


8,738 


5,575 


.96 


.98 


1 .21 


9 ,321 


8,563 


6, 746 


6. 72 


6. 17 


6.05 


Surry 


4, 172 


3 ,050 


2,253 


7.0 


6.7 


7 


29,204 


20,435 


15,771 


1 .01 


.98 


1 . 20 


29,496 


20, 026 


18, 925 


7 .07 


6.57 


8.40 


Watauga 


2, 640 


1 , 984 


1 , 578 


9.0 


9.0 


9 


L6 , /bU 


17,856 


14,202 


. 92 


.93 


1 .09 


21 , 859 


16, 606 


15, 480 


8.28 


8.37 


9.81 


Wilkes — — 


7 , 931 


6,988 


5,094 


6.5 


6.4 


6 


51,551 


44,723 


30,564 


.95 


.96 


1 . 16 


48, 973 


42 , 934 


35,454 


6. 18 


6. 14 


6.96 


Yadkin - 


3 , 587 


3 , 369 


2,365 


7.5 


7.4 


7 


Lb , 903 


24,931 


1 6 , 555 


1 .03 


.99 


1 .24 


27, 710 


24 , 682 


20, 528 


7. 73 


7.33 


8.68 


Northern Mountain (NW.) 


31 , 471 


26 , 700 


19,456 


7.2 


7.4 


7 


999 OCA 

LLL, 2b4 


197,786 


1 9Q one 

139,306 


.96 


.94 


1 . 15 


91 9 fl7Q 


i or pne 

1 OO , DUD 


160, 716 


6. 85 


6 .99 


8.26 


District 4 — 






































Buncombe- _ 


2 , 524 


2 ,565 


1 ,574 


8.0 


9.0 


8 


20, 192 


23 , 085 


12 , 592 


1 .04 


.98 


1 . 14 


21 ,000 


22 , 623 


14 ,355 


8 .32 


8. 82 


9 . 12 


Burke __ 


2, 631 


2 , 732 


2, 138 


6.5 


6.6 


6 


17, 102 


18,031 


12,828 


.95 


.98 


1 .24 


16, 247 


17, 678 


15, 907 


6.18 


6.47 


7.44 


Cherokee 


9. ft7ft 


3 , 922 


3 , 798 


7.5 


7.0 


8 


26, 813 


27,454 


30,384 


.94 


.92 


1 . 15 


25 , 204 


25, 258 


34, 942 


7 .05 


6.44 


9 .20 


Clay 


2, 286 


1 ,527 


1 ,246 


7.5 


7.6 


7 


17, 145 


11,605 


8,722 


.93 


.90 


1 . 18 


15 , 945 


10, 445 


10, 292 


6 . 98 


6. 84 


8.26 


Graham. _ 


1 ,044 


649 


483 


7.0 


6.6 


5 


7,308 


4,283 


2,415 


.97 


.95 


1 . 20 


7,089 


4 , 069 


2, 898 


6. 79 


6.27 


6.00 


Haywood.. - 


1 97ft 
1 , 6 to 


1 ,213 


634 


7.5 


8.7 


8 


10,313 


10 , 553 


5,072 


1 .00 


.96 


1 . 15 


10, 313 


10, 131 


5, 833 


7 .50 


8 .35 


9 .20 


Henderson - _ _ — 


4, 894 


3 , 797 


4,466 
980 


8.0 


8.6 


7 


39, 152 


32, 654 


31 , 262 


1 .01 


.95 


1.13 


39 ,544 


31 , 021 


35,326 


8.08 


8. 17 


7.91 


Jackson — 


1 ,525 


1 , 182 


8.0 


8.6 


8 


12,200 


10,165 


7,840 


.96 


.93 


1.11 


11 ,712 


9,453 


8, 702 


7. 68 


8.00 


8.88 


McDowell 


1 , 811 


1 ,472 


1 , 174 


6.5 


6.7 


7 


11,772 


9,862 


8,218 


1.01 


.94 


1 .20 


1 1 , 890 


9, 270 


9 , 862 


6.57 


6.30 


8.40 


Macon 


2,191 


1 , 433 


1 , 214 


9.0 


7.4 


7 


19,719 


10,604 


8,498 


.94 


.90 


1 . 13 


18, 536 


9, 544 


9, 603 


8.46 


6. 66 


7.91 


Madison 


1 , 669 


1 ,300 


1,119 


7.6 


8.5 


8 


12,684 


11,050 


8,952 


.97 


.94 


1 . 15 


1 2 , 303 


10,387 


10, 295 


7.37 


7. 99 


9 .20 


Mitchell 


Q1Q 

yiy 


868 


555 


7.5 


7.7 


7 


6,893 


6,684 


3,885 


.96 


.95 


1 . 12 


6, 617 


6, 350 


4,351 


7.20 


7.32 


7 .84 


rolK 


71 A 


802 


736 


8.0 


7.6 


5 


5,712 


6,095 


3,680 


1 .05 


.97 


1 . 25 


5, 998 


5 ,912 


4, 600 


8.40 


7.37 


6.25 


Kutheriord- - - 


2 , 242 


1 , 919 


1,560 


9.5 


7.4 


6 


21,299 


14,201 


9,360 


1.12 


.98 


1.25 


23 , 855 


13 , 917 


1 1 , 700 


10. 64 


7.25 


7. 50 


Swain 


R7fi 
0/0 


737 


788 


7.0 


7.0 


7 


4, 732 


5, 159 


5,516 


1 .06 


.94 


1 . 14 


5,016 


4, 849 


6, 288 


7.42 


6.58 


7.98 


Transy 1 vama 


9 1 0K 


1 , 639 


944 


7.5 


8.0 


7 


15,938 


13, 112 


6,608 


1 .02 


.94 


1 . 18 


16, 257 


12,325 


7, 797 


7. 65 


7.52 


8.26 


Yancey 


1 Q7(\ 

l , y /u 


1 ,435 


1 ,060 


7.5 


8.3 


7 


14,775 


11,911 


7,420 


.94 


.96 


1 . 15 


13 , 889 


11 , 435 


8 , 533 


7.05 


7.97 


8.05 


Western Mountain (W.) __ 


1A 171 


29, 192 


24 , 469 


7.7 


7.8 


7 


90 7.9 

263 , 749 


991? c/tO 

LLb , 508 


173, 252 


.99 


.95 


1 .16 


261 , 415 


214, 667 


9m OQA 


7. 63 


7.35 


8. 23 


District 2 — 


































Alamance 


2 455 


2,306 


1 , 640 


8.0 


8.0 


7 


19,640 


18,448 


1 1 , 480 


1 . 17 


1 .02 


1 .30 


99 070 

il , y /y 


18, 817 


14 , 924 


9 .36 


Q 1 ft 


9 . 10 


Caswell 


oyu 


773 


1 ,097 


7.0 


8.3 


8 


4,830 


6,416 


8,776 


1 .20 


1 .00 


1 .30 


5, 796 


6,416 


11 , 409 


8. 40 


8.30 


10.40 




970. 

o / y 


429 


528 


8.0 


8.4 


9 


3,032 


3,604 


4,752 


1.20 


1.06 


1 .30 


3 , 638 


3 , 820 


6, 178 


9 . 60 


8. 90 


11 . 70 


Forsyth 


1 249 


1 , 153 


1 ,055 


9.0 


8.7 


11 


11,241 


10,031 


11,605 


1 . 15 


1 .01 


1 .28 


12 , 927 


10, 131 


14, 854 


10.35 


8. 79 


14.08 


Franklin 


oni 
yui 


878 


1 , 177 


8.0 


9.2 


10 


7,208 


8,078 
9,089 


1 1 , 770 


1 .30 


1 . 12 


1 .40 


9,370 


9 ,047 


16, 478 


10.40 


10.30 


14 .00 


Granville 


607 


1 ,095 


867 


8.0 


8.3 


9 


4,856 


7,803 


1 .28 


1 .05 


1 .40 


6,216 


9 , 543 


10, 924 


10 . 24 


8.72 


12 .59 


LrUllIOrO 


9 ft7n 
o , o/u 


4 ,020 


2,977 


9.0 


8.3 


10 


32, 130 


33,366 


on 779 

29,770 


1 . 16 


1 .00 


1.24 


37, 271 


33 ,366 


36,915 


10.44 


8 .30 


12 .40 


Orange 


ft7J 
Oil 


508 


468 


7.0 


8.0 


9 


4,018 


4,064 


4,212 


1 . 16 


1 .05 


1 .30 


4, 661 


4, 267 


5 ,476 


8. 12 


8.40 


11 . 70 


Person 


268 


316 


186 


8.0 


7.8 


7 


2, 144 


2,465 


1,302 


1 . 25 


1 .02 


1 .30 


2, 680 


2 , 514 


1 , 693 


10.00 


7.96 


S . 10 


Rockingham - 


2 527 


2, 621 


2, 186 


6.5 


7.6 


9 


16,426 


19,920 


19, 674 


1 . 15 


.99 


1 . 25 


18, 890 


19, 721 


24, 593 


7.48 


7.52 


11 .25 


otoKes 


& , iyu 


1 , 801 


1 , 592 


7.0 


8.2 


9 


17,430 
994 


14,768 


14,328 


1 .05 


1 .00 


1 .23 


18,302 


14 , 768 


1 7 , 623 


7 .35 


8. 20 


1 1 .07 




142 


230 


213 


7.0 


8.9 


9 


2,047 


1,917 


1 .33 


1 .07 


1 .40 


1 ,322 


2, 190 


2, 684 


9.31 


9 .52 


12. 60 


Warren 


390 


609 


583 


8.0 


9 . 1 


9 


3,120 


5,542 


5,247 


1 .35 


1 .09 


1 .40 


4 ,212 


6, 041 


7,346 


in on 
1U . oU 


Q Q9 

y . yz 


12. 60 


Northern Piedmont (N.) __ 


16 242 


1C 710. 


14,569 


7.8 


8.2 


Q 
9 


1 97 ncn 

l £7,069 


197 Mn 

137,838 


1 99 cie 

132,636 


1.17 


1 .02 


1 .29 


1 48 , 264 


140, 641 


171 , 097 


q no 


q An 


1 1 .74 


District 5 — 


































2 851 


2 033 


1 9^7 
1 . -4 t 


7 n 


r n 
D . u 


c 
O 


19 , 957 


12, 198 


6,235 


1 .01 


.97 


1 .23 


20, 157 


11 Q99 


7, o69 


7 07 


5 82 


6 15 






1 , 863 


1 , 255 


9.5 


7.2 


7 


23,712 


13,414 


8,785 


.96 


.99 


1.22 


22 , 764 


13 , 280 


10, 718 


9. 12 


7. 13 


8.54 


Chatham 


815 


834 


482 


10. 


8.6 


7 


8, 150 


7, 172 


3,374 


1 .20 


1 .01 


1 .30 


9,780 


7 , 244 


4 ,386 


12 .00 


8. 69 


9 . 10 




1 09A 


1 , 704 


1 , 944 


8.5 


8.0 


8 


16,371 


13,632 


15,552 


1 .05 


.97 


1 . 18 


171 on 

1 / , IbU 


13 223 


18 351 


8. 93 


7. 76 


9.44 


Davie 


2 151 


1 , 809 


1 , 203 


8.4 


7.5 


6 


18,068 


13,568 


7,218 


1 .04 


1 .00 


1.25 


18,791 


13 ,568 


9 ,023 


8. 74 


7 ftn 

/ . OU 


7.50 




5 486 


3 ,523 


2,305 


7.5 


7.6 


6 


41 , 145 


26,775 


13,830 


.98 


.96 


1.20 


40,322 


25 , 704 


16,596 


7.35 


7 .30 


7. 20 




211 


391 


345 


11.0 


8. 7 


7 


2,321 


3,402 


2,415 


1 .30 


1 .06 


1 .30 


3 ,017 


3 , 606 


3 , 140 


14 .30 


9 . 22 


9. 10 


Randolph 




2, 654 


1,860 


9.0 


8.3 


7 


22,212 


21,763 


13 , 020 


1 .05 


.99 


1.25 


99 999 
16,616 


21 , 545 


16,275 


9 .45 


8. 22 


8. 75 




1 292 


1 , 621 


937 


8.0 


9.2 


7 


10,336 


14,913 


6,559 


1 .08 


.98 


1 .21 


11 , 163 


14, 615 


7, 936 


8. 64 


9 .02 


8.47 


TJCTa 1_~ 


1 063 


1 ,447 


1 , 288 


9.0 


8.2 


9 


9,567 


1 1 , 895 


11 ,592 


1 .30 


1 . 10 


1 .40 


12,437 


13 ,085 


16, 229 


11 . 70 


9 .02 


12 . 60 


f*nnli»il Dinilmnnt C \ 


On 7KQ 


1 7 , 879 


12,866 


8.3 


7.8 


7 


171 ,839 


138,732 


88 , 580 


1 .05 


.99 


1 .25 


178,344 


137, 702 


1 1 n 999 

1 1 U . 6 IS 


8.69 


9.93 


8. 57 


District 8 — 








































ft1 7 


1 , 149 


1 , 101 


8.0 


7.8 


8 


4,136 


8,962 


8,808 


1.16 


1 .05 


1 .28 


4,798 


9 ,410 


11 , 274 


9 .28 


o. 19 


10.24 






511 


441 


7.5 


8.4 


8 


3,173 


4,292 


3,528 


1.06 


.96 


1.19 


3,363 


4 , 120 


4, 198 


7.95 


8.06 


9.52 




761 


824 


592 


10.5 


8.4 


9 


7,991 


6,922 


5,328 


1.15 


1 .00 


1.27 


9 , 190 


6, 922 


6, 767 


12.08 


8 .40 


11 .43 


Gaston 




880 


701 


13.0 


8.4 


7 


13,598 


7,392 


4,907 


1.11 


1.03 


1.25 


15,094 


7,614 


6, 134 


14 .43 


8.65 


8.75 


Lincoln 


930 


755 


491 


10.5 


8.6 


7 


9,765 


6,493 


3,437 


1.12 


1 .02 


1 . 20 


10, 937 


6, 623 


4, 124 


11 . 76 


8. 77 


8.40 


Mecklenburg 


ouu 


663 


567 


10.0 


8.7 


8 


5,000 


5,768 


4,536 


1.13 


1.03 


1 .26 


5,650 


5 ,941 


5, 715 


11 .30 


8 .96 


10.08 


Montgomery 


286 


386 


297 


7.5 


7.8 


8 


2,145 


3,011 


2,376 


1.20 


1.00 


1.23 


2,574 


3,011 


2, 922 


9.00 


7.80 


9.84 




1 ,103 


840 


777 


8.0 


8.7 


9 


8,824 


7,308 


6,993 


1.25 


1.07 


1.27 


1 1 , 030 


7, 820 


8, 881 


10.00 


9.31 


11.43 




Q99 

yzo 


1 , 128 


700 


9.0 


7.7 


6 


8,307 


8,686 


4,200 


1.20 


1.05 


1 .30 


9,968 


9, 120 


5,460 


10. 80 


8.09 


7 . 80 


Stanly 


97ft 
Z/O 


446 


319 


8.0 


9.0 


8 


2,200 


4,014 


2,552 


1.10 


.97 


1.21 


2,420 


3,894 


3,088 


8.80 


8. 73 


9. 68 


Union 


Q9A 


210 


465 


9.0 


9.3 


9 


3,024 


1,953 


4, 185 


1.15 


1 .04 


1.25 


3,478 


2,031 


5,231 


10.35 


9 .67 


11 .25 


Southern Piedmont (S.) — 


7 inn 
/ , IUU 


7 709 


6,451 


9.6 


8.3 


8 


68,163 


64 , 801 


50,850 


1 .15 


1 .03 


1 .25 


78 , 502 


66 , 506 


63 , 794 


1 1 .05 


8. 54 


9 . 58 


District 3 — 


































162 


225 


112 


11.0 


10.0 


12 


1,782 


2,250 


1,344 


1.40 


1.12 


1.60 


2,495 


2,520 


2, 150 


15 .40 


11 .20 


19 . 20 




9A 


2 


12 


11 .0 


10.0 


12 


200 


20 


144 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


280 


23 


230 


15 .40 


11 .50 


19 . 17 




7 


128 


18 


11.0 


10.0 


12 


77 


1,280 


216 


1.40 


1 . 15 


1.60 


108 


1 ,472 


346 


15 .40 


11 .50 


19 .22 




123 


156 


124 


11 .0 


10.0 


12 


1,353 


1,560 


1,488 


1 .40 


1.15 


1.60 


1 ,894 


1 , 794 


2,381 


15.40 


11 .50 


19 .20 




416 


875 


3C8 


11.0 


9.5 


12 


4,576 


8,313 


3,696 


1.40 


1.12 


1 .60 


6,406 


9 ,305 


1 ,914 


15.40 


10. 64 


19 .20 




CO. 


55 


93 


11.0 


10.0 


12 


979 


550 


1,116 


1.40 


1.15 


1 .60 


1 ,371 


633 


1 ,786 


15.40 


11 .50 


19 . 20 


Wn lifo v 


445 


897 


821 


11.0 


13.0 


8 


4,895 


11,661 


6,568 


1.40 


1.11 


1.50 


6, 853 


12,944 


9, 852 


15.40 


14.43 


12.00 


uertiora 


161 


201 


282 


11.0 


10.0 


12 


1,771 


2,010 


3,384 


1.40 


1.12 


1.60 


2,479 


2,251 


5,414 


15.40 


11 . 20 


19 . 20 






131 


175 


11 .0 


10.0 


12 


1,012 


1,310 


2, 100 


1.40 


1.12 


1.60 


1,417 


1 ,467 


3,360 


15.40 


11 .20 


19 .20 


Nash — 


622 


942 


1,257 


12.0 


9.7 


12 


7,464 


9,137 


15,084 


1.38 


1.11 


1.50 


10,300 


10,142 


22,626 


16.56 


10. 77 


18.00 


Northampton 


392 


437 


850 


11.0 


10.0 


12 


4,312 


4,370 


10,200 


1 .35 


1.11 


1.50 


5,821 


4, 851 


15,300 


14 .85 


11.10 


18.00 


Pasquotank 


16 


9 


13 


U.O 


10.0 


12 


1,760 


90 


156 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


2,464 


104 


250 


15.40 


11 . 50 


19.23 




ftd 

0* 


78 


182 


11.0 


10.0 


12 


594 


780 


2,184 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


831 


897 


3 ,494 


15.40 


1 1 . 50 


19.20 




A 

■± 


40 


93 


11.0 


10.0 


12 


44 


400 


1,116 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


62 


460 


1 , 786 


15.40 


11 . 50 


19.20 


Washington 


ift 


80 


113 


U.O 


10.0 


12 


495 


800 


1,356 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


693 


920 


2, 170 


15.40 


11 .50 


19 .20 


norinern isuasiai ixc. ■ 


9 RdR 


A 9KC 


4, 453 


11.5 


10.5 


11 


31 ,314 


44,531 


50,152 


1 .32 


1.12 


1 .54 


43,474 


49,783 


77 , 059 


15. 28 


11 .70 


17. 30 


District 6 — 






























141 


172 


192 


11 .0 


9.0 


11 


1,551 


1,548 


2,112 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


2, 171 


1,780 


3 ,379 


15.40 


10.35 


17.60 




39 


25 


16 


11.0 


9.0 


11 


429 


225 


176 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


601 


259 


282 


15.40 


10.35 


17.63 




49 


62 


151 


11.0 


9.0 


11 


539 


558 


1,661 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


755 


642 


2, 658 


15.40 


10.35 


17.60 




93 
i 
i 


98 


74 


11.0 


8.2 


11 


1,023 


804 


814 


1.40 


1.11 


1.60 


1 ,432 


892 


1,302 


15.40 


9. 10 


17.59 


Hyde 


8 


6 


11.0 


9.0 


11 


11 


72 


66 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


15 


83 


106 


15.40 


10.35 


17.67 


Johnston - . 


313 


620 


419 


12.0 


10.0 


11 


3,756 


6,200 
909 


4,609 


1.40 


1.12 


1.50 


5,258 


6,944 


6,914 


16.80 


11 . 20 


16 50 


Jones 


105 


101 


39 


11.0 


9.0 


11 


1,155 


429 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


1,617 


1,045 


686 


15.40 


10.35 


17.59 


9 ft 

60 


119 


97 


U.O 


9.0 


11 


385 


1,071 


1,067 


1.40 


1.12 


1.60 


539 


1 ,200 


1 ,707 


15.40 


10.08 


17.60 




1 « 

10 


104 


42 


U.O 


9.0 


11 


176 


936 


462 


1 .40 


1.15 


1.60 


246 


1,076 


739 


15.40 


10.35 


17.59 


Pitt — 


991 


363 


225 


U.O 


9.0 


11 


3,531 


3,267 


2,475 


1 .40 


1.12 


1.60 


4,943 


3,659 


3,960 


15.40 


10.08 


17.60 




362 


768 


753 


12.0 


9.0 


11 


4,344 


6,912 


8,283 


1.38 


1.11 


1.50 


5,995 


7,672 


12,425 


16.56 


9.99 


16.50 




237 


756 


634 


U.O 


9.0 


11 


2,607 


6,804 


6,974 


1.35 


1.10 


1.50 


3,519 


7,484 


10,461 


14.85 


9.90 


16.50 


Uenirdl l/OaSIal 


1 71 9 


3, 196 


2,648 


11.4 


9.2 


11 


19,507 


29,306 


29,128 


1.39 


1.12 


1 .53 


27,091 


32,736 


44,61 9 


15.82 


10.24 


16.85 


District 9 — 
























Q1 n 

OlU 


271 


225 


11 .0 


9.0 


9 


3,410 


2,439 


2,025 


1.40 


1.11 


1.50 


4,774 


2, 707 


3,038 


15.40 


9.99 


13.50 




09 


134 


237 


11 .0 


9.0 


9 


1,023 


1,206 


2,133 


1.40 


1.12 


1.50 


1,432 


1 ,351 


3,199 


15.40 


10.08 


13.50 




132 


155 


212 


12.0 


9.0 


9 


1,584 


1,395 


1,908 


1.45 


1.10 


1.50 


2,297 


1,535 


2,862 


17.40 


9.90 


13 .50 




920 


900 


1,120 


12.0 


9.0 


9 


11,040 


8,100 


10,080 


1.33 


1.08 


1.40 


14 , 683 


8, 748 


14, 112 


15.96 


9.72 


12.60 


Duplin 


421 


569 


708 


U.O 


9.0 


9 


4,631 


5,121 


6,372 


1.40 


1.12 


1.50 


6,483 


5,736 


9,558 


15.40 


10.08 


13.50 


n&rzL6uv__ 


525 


705 


713 


11 


8 6 


11 


5,775 


6 063 


7,843 


1.36 


1 10 


1.40 


7,854 


6,669 


10,980 


14.96 


9 46 


15 40 


Hoke 


769 


986 


760 


U.O 


8.0 


10 


8! 459 


7^888 


7^600 


l'.2b 


1.06 


1*28 


10,658 


8,361 


9,728 


13.86 


8.48 


12.80 


New Hanover __ 


86 


79 


30 


U.O 


9.0 


9 


946 


711 


270 


1.40 


1.15 


1.50 


1,324 


818 


405 


15.40 


10.35 


13.50 


Onslow 


148 


184 


217 


U.O 


9.0 


9 


1,628 


1,656 


1,953 


1.40 


1.15 


1.60 


2,279 


1,904 


3,125 


15.40 


10.35 


14.40 


Pender 


172 


212 


510 


U.O 


9.0 


9 


1,892 


1,908 


4,590 


1.40 


1.12 


1.50 


2^649 


2,137 


6,885 


15.40 


10.08 


13.50 


Robeson 


1,333 


1,044 


1,067 


U.O 


8.9 


10 


14,663 


9,292 


10,670 


1.38 


1.07 


1.30 


20,235 


9,942 


13,871 


15.18 


9.52 


13.00 


Sampson 


281 


277 


660 


12.0 


9.0 


9 


3,372 


2,493 


5,940 


1.42 


1.10 


1.50 


4,788 


2,742 
9,898 


8,910 


17.04 


9.90 


13.50 


Scotland. _ _ __ . 


1,421 


1,269 


863 


12.0 


7.8 


7 


17,052 


9,898 


6,041 


1.25 


1.00 


1.32 


21,315 


7,974 


15.00 


7.80 


9.24 


Southern Coastal (SE.) ... 


6,611 


6,785 


7,322 


11.4 


8.6 


9 


75,475 


58,170 


67,425 


1.33 


1.08 


1.40 


100,771 


62,548 


94,647 


15.22 


9.22 


12.93 


State 


120,714 


112,539 


92, 234 


8.2 


8.0 


7.4 


979,380 


897,672 


731,329 


1.08 


.99 


1.26 


1,050,540 


891,189 


923,539 


8.79 


7.92 


9.43 



NORTH CAROLINA IRISH POTATO CROP 



Districts and Counties 


Acreage Planted 


Yield Per Acre 
(Bushels) 


Production (Bushels) 


Price Per 
Bushel (Dollars) 


Total Value (Dollars) 


Value Per A 
(Dollars) 


ere 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


District I — 






















































Alleghany 


602 


484 


420 


105 


99 


48 


63 


457 


47 


763 


20 


108 


$ .54 


$ .52 


SI 


43 


$ 34 


510 


$ 24 


603 


$ 28 


852 


$ 57 


33 


% 50.83 


% 68.70 


Ashe... 


1,471 


1,493 


1,032 


115 


110 


60 


169 


077 


163 


878 


62 


243 


.49 


.51 


1 


39 


82 


085 


82 


802 


86 


259 


55 


80 


55.46 


83.58 


Avery 


1,887 


1,948 


1,542 


85 


102 


72 


160 


284 


198 


055 


110 


794 


.49 


.55 


1 


52 


77 


841 


109 


087 


168 


302 


41 


25 


56.00 


109.15 


Caldwell 


1,201 


786 


665 


80 


83 


39 


95 


768 


65 


169 


25 


918 


.55 


.63 


1 


51 


53 


033 


41 


198 


39 


135 


44 


16 


52.41 


58.85 


Surry 


762 


710 


746 


68 


73 


45 


52 


122 


51 


583 


33 


749 


.57 


.62 


1 


49 


29 


879 


32 


088 


50 


231 


39 


21 


45.16 


67.33 


Watauga.. 


3,538 


3,643 


2,379 


110 


108 


73 


388 


475 


393 


032 


173 


037 


.53 


.52 


1 


44 


204 


524 


205 


816 


248 


642 


£7 


81 


56.50 


104 . 52 


Wilkes 


1,434 


1,386 


1,206 


66 


75 


46 


95 


026 


103 


485 


55 


624 


.51 


.56 


1 


44 


48 


898 


57 


667 


79 


897 


34 


10 


41.82 


66.25 


Yadkin 


479 


481 


505 


73 


80 


47 


35 


171 


38 


422 


23 


745 


.58 


.69 


1 


62 


20 


508 


26 


662 


38 


469 


42 


81 


55.49 


76.18 


Northern Mountain (NW.i 


11 ,374 


10,931 


8,495 


93 


97 


59 


1 ,059 


380 


1,061 


387 


505 


218 


.52 


.55 


1 


46 


551 


278 


580 


253 


739 


787 


48 


47 


53.08 


87.08 


District 4— 






















































Buncombe 


1,575 


1,636 


1,348 


84 


87 


43 


132 


230 


142 


682 


57 


366 


.62 


.60 


1 


44 


82 


149 


86 


246 


82 


410 


52 


16 


52.72 


61.14 


Burke 


583 


540 


596 


83 


75 


42 


48 


308 


40 


301 


24 


856 


.74 


.67 


1 


.52 


35 


675 


26 


934 


37 


780 


61 


19 


49.88 


63.38 


Cherokee 


924 


1,105 


1,029 


63 


82 


43 


58 


290 


90 


513 


43 


815 


.68 


.56 


1 


44 


39 


697 


50 


629 


62 


966 


42 


96 


45.82 


61.19 


Clay 


253 


290 


240 


88 


71 


53 


22 


305 


20 


476 


12 


779 


.68 


.65 


1 


39 


15 


194 


13 


320 


17 


731 


60 


05 


45.93 


73 .88 




305 


354 


344 


77 


80 


45 


23 


414 


28 


302 


15 


588 


.73 


.65 


1 


49 


17 


055 


18 


397 


23 


171 


55 


92 


51.97 


67.36 


Haywood 


1,511 


1,738 


1,060 


87 


85 


49 


131 


490 


147 


768 


51 


679 


.54 


.54 


1 


39 


71 


499 


80 


065 


71 


630 


47 


32 


46.07 


67.58 


Henderson 


2,178 


2,291 


2,222 


76 


84 


40 


164 


764 


192 


503 


88 


683 


.63 


.57 


1 


49 


104 


046 


109 


427 


131 


976 


47 


77 


47.76 


59.40 


Jackson 


1,211 


1,035 


991 


83 


89 


61 


100 


436 


92 


469 


50 


134 


.56 


.56 


1 


33 


56 


529 


51 


733 


66 


895 


46 


68 


49.98 


67.50 


McDowell 


468 


484 


434 


84 


76 


50 


39 


312 


37 


040 


21 


556 


.73 


.59 


1 


54 


28 


599 


21 


709 


33 


145 


61 


11 


44.85 


76.37 


Macon.. 


1,076 


990 


971 


87 


78 


46 


93 


658 


77 


080 


44 


798 


.58 


.56 


1 


.39 


54 


592 


43 


123 


62 


059 


50 


74 


43.56 


63.91 




933 


954 


777 


75 


68 


42 


69 


627 


65 


342 


32 


369 


.58 


.59 


1 


34 


40 


591 


38 


628 


43 


220 


43 


51 


40.81 


55.62 




1,337 


1,311 


1,095 


82 


83 


65 


109 


432 


108 


772 


70 


918 


.52 


.51 


1 


38 


57 


422 


55 


928 


98 


227 


42 


95 


42.66 


89.71 


Polk 


196 


282 


226 


56 


66 


56 


10 


968 


18 


520 


12 


639 


.71 


.60 


1 


59 


7 


820 


11 


185 


20 


149 


39 


90 


36.66 


89.15 


Rutherford 


595 


738 


541 


54 


77 


60 


32 


164 


49 


039 


32 


650 


.74 


.60 


1 


64 


23 


684 


29 


215 


53 


597 


39 


80 


39.59 


99.07 




544 


634 


521 


77 


78 


45 


41 


776 


49 


430 


23 


593 


.58 


.53 


1 


44 


24 


280 


26 


271 


33 


951 


44 


63 


41.44 


65. 17 




566 


505 


340 


81 


87 


51 


45 


720 


43 


952 


17 


484 


.61 


.51 


1 


43 


28 


004 


22 


224 


25 


086 


49 


48 


44.01 


73.78 


Yancey - 


1,292 


1,339 


1,730 


84 


75 


59 


108 


446 


100 


034 


101 


251 


.53 


.51 


1 


42 


57 


944 


50 


555 


143 


4£1 


44 


85 


37.76 


82.93 


Western Mountain (W.) .. 


15,547 


16,226 


14,465 


79 


80 


49 


1,232 


340 


1,304 


223 


702 


158 


.60 


.56 


1 


43 


744 


780 


735 


889 


1,007 


454 


47 


91 


45.35 


69.65 


District 2 — 


















































52.79 


97.63 




330 


336 


339 


75 


70 


62 


24 


671 


23 


623 


21 


065 


.81 


.75 


1 


57 


19 


935 


17 


736 


33 


098 


60 


41 


Caswell -- 


682 


581 


491 


54 


51 


57 


36 


791 


29 


473 


27 


880 


.83 


.71 


1 


49 


30 


391 


21 


043 


41 


480 


44 


56 


36.22 


84.48 


Durham 


112 


198 


208 


66 


80 


68 


7 


437 


15 


764 


14 


215 


.68 


.72 


1 


59 


5 


045 


11 


413 


22 


621 


45 


04 


57.64 


108 . 75 


Forsyth 


613 


583 


578 


89 


86 


53 


54 


655 


50 


194 


30 


771 


.81 


.75 


1 


69 


44 


119 


37 


645 


52 


119 


71 


97 


64.57 


90. 17 




286 


390 


431 


85 


80 


61 


24 


317 


31 


081 


26 


400 


.58 


.69 


1 


54 


14 


187 


21 


368 


40 


674 


49 


60 


54.79 


OA Q7 
1*4.0/ 


Granville 


222 


639 


496 


64 


60 


58 


14 


244 


38 


405 


28 


637 


.87 


.71 


1 


50 


12 


474 


27 


431 


42 


824 


56 


19 


42.93 


86.34 


Guilford 


697 


824 


665 


85 


80 


67 


59 


219 


65 


779 


44 


849 


.83 


.78 


1 


64 


48 


919 


51 


133 


73 


665 


70 


18 


62.05 


110 77 


Orange 


244 


242 


162 


71 


76 


63 


17 


235 


18 


309 


10 


222 


.78 


.69 


1 


54 


13 


422 


12 


548 


15 


743 


55 


01 


51.85 


97.18 


Person 


453 


493 


381 


55 


55 


64 


24 


868 


27 


062 


24 


369 


.88 


.70 


1 


44 


21 


769 


19 


066 


35 


033 


48 


05 


38.67 




Rockingham 


673 


1,029 


712 


62 


56 


55 


41 


867 


57 


562 


39 


169 


.80 


.72 


1 


54 


33 


357 


41 


665 


60 


340 


49 


56 


40.49 


84.75 




676 


595 


586 


71 


75 


58 


48 


399 


44 


388 


33 


800 


.71 


.69 


1 


59 


34 


335 


30 


511 


53 


785 


50 


79 


51.28 


Q1 7fl 


Vance 


272 


384 


313 


55 


56 


59 


14 


952 


21 


480 


18 


346 


.73 


.73 


1 


54 


10 


885 


15 


726 


28 


262 


40 


02 


40.95 


on 90 
yu . 


Warren 


399 


404 


394 


62 


58 


62 


24 


829 


23 


445 


24 


472 


.68 


.72 


1 


54 


16 


908 


16 


958 


37 


665 


42 


37 


41.68 


sfO ■ OU 


Northern Piedmont (N.)._ 


5,659 


6,698 


5,756 


70 


67 


60 


393 


484 


446 


565 


344 


195 


.78 


.73 


1 


56 


305 


746 


324 


243 


537 


309 


54 


03 


48.41 


SJO. OO 


District 5 — 


















































40.07 


64.58 


Alexander 


363 


330 


247 


58 


66 


43 


21 


074 


21 


863 


10 


730 


.74 


.60 


1 


49 


15 


550 


13 


222 


15 


952 


42 


84 




579 


570 


384 


77 


77 


38 


44 


418 


43 


761 


14 


656 


.75 


.67 


1 


59 


33 


239 


29 


229 


23 


284 


57 


41 


51.28 


60 64 




330 


324 


319 


75 


72 


70 


24 


933 


23 


225 


22 


366 


.71 


.69 


1 


54 


17 


689 


15 


937 


34 


410 


53 


60 


49.19 


107 87 




786 


617 


653 


106 


80 


71 


83 


161 


49 


244 


46 


335 


.76 


.65 


1 


64 


63 


035 


32 


014 


76 


003 


80 


20 


51.88 


116 39 




224 


346 


250 


69 


79 


51 


15 


588 


27 


311 


12 


867 


.78 


.68 


1 


59 


12 


135 


18 


487 


20 


447 


64 


17 


53.43 


81 '.79 




590 


657 


398 


76 


73 


60 


44 


608 


47 


742 


24 


015 


.76 


.66 


1 


64 


33 


794 


31 


475 


39 


420 


57 


28 


47.91 


99 04 


Lee 


162 


201 


192 


77 


81 


74 


12 


410 


16 


310 


14 


145 


.68 


.72 


1 


49 


8 


469 


11 


771 


21 


036 


52 


28 


58.56 


109 56 


Randolph 


502 


514 


524 


93 


85 


68 


46 


840 


43 


691 


35 


791 


.78 


.70 


1 


56 


36 


432 


30 


750 


55 


778 


72 


57 


59.82 


106.45 




484 


558 


454 


108 


77 


55 


52 


212 


42 


853 


24 


968 


.73 


.67 


1 


64 


38 


043 


28 


620 


40 


967 


78 


60 


51.29 


60 24 


Wake 


389 


439 


425 


85 


76 


62 


33 


106 


33 


248 


26 


384 


.58 


.68 


1 


56 


19 


299 


22 


513 


41 


115 


49 


61 


51.28 


96.74 


Central Piedmont (C.) 


4,409 


4,556 


3,846 


86 


77 


60 


378 


350 


349 


248 


232 


257 


.73 


.67 


1 


59 


277 


685 


234 


018 


368 


412 


62 


98 


51.36 


95.79 


District 8 — 


















































57.62 


89.92 


Anson - 


543 


529 


568 


83 


82 


60 


44 


948 


43 


324 


34 


295 


.73 


.70 


1 


49 


32 


771 


30 


482 


51 


073 


60 


35 


Cabarrus 


286 


337 


280 


102 


79 


52 


29 


250 


26 


822 


14 


424 


.73 


.67 


1 


59 


21 


342 


17 


924 


22 


946 


74 


62 


53.19 


81 .95 


Cleveland 


470 


473 


452 


62 


82 


40 


29 


182 


38 


738 


18 


063 


.77 


.66 


1 


69 


22 


411 


25 


467 


30 


595 


47 


68 


53.90 


67.69 


Gaston.. 


359 


333 


289 


69 


80 


42 


24 


926 


26 


544 


12 


057 


.76 


.70 


1 


59 


18 


907 


18 


660 


19 


191 


52 


67 


56.04 


66.40 


Lincoln 


399 


373 


312 


68 


73 


43 


27 


275 


27 


412 


13 


285 


.78 


.65 


1 


54 


21 


218 


17 


805 


20 


478 


53 


18 


47.73 


65.63 


Mecklenburg 


414 


497 


410 


74 


70 


45 


30 


817 


35 


021 


18 


577 


.74 


.66 


1 


64 


22 


783 


23 


052 


30 


525 


55 


03 


46.38 


74^45 


Montgomery 


210 


262 


175 


99 


71 


68 


20 


839 


18 


726 


11 


968 


.73 


.76 


1 


49 


15 


206 


14 


173 


17 


835 


72 


41 


54.10 


101.91 


Moore 


292 


280 


304 


90 


80 


76 


26 


322 


22 


340 


23 


221 


.68 


.76 


1 


52 


17 


914 


16 


927 


35 


289 


61 


35 


60.45 


116.08 




320 


378 


337 


71 


78 


71 


22 


849 


29 


427 


23 


935 


.66 


.68 


1 


56 


15 


106 


19 


894 


37 


375 


47 


21 


52.63 


110.91 


Stanly 


274 


323 


283 


106 


76 


69 


29 


625 


24 


424 


19 


537 


.71 


.68 


1 


54 


21 


044 


16 


523 


30 


108 


75 


70 


51.15 


106.39 


Union 


650 


643 


616 


84 


85 


55 


54 


482 


54 


651 


33 


916 


.73 


.67 


1 


54 


39 


753 


36 


465 


52 


255 


61 


16 


56.71 


84.83 


Southern Piedmont (S.)... 


4,221 


4,428 


4,026 


81 


78 


55 


340 


515 


347 


429 


223 


278 


.73 


.68 


1 


56 


248 


455 


237 


402 


347 


670 


58 


86 


53.61 


86.36 


District 3— 


















































51.38 


124.03 


Bertie 


273 


424 


352 


96 


80 


75 


26 


337 


33 


932 


26 


506 


.53 


.64 


1 


65 


14 


056 


21 


784 


43 


658 


51 


49 


Camden 


4,454 


2,841 


2,409 


122 


161 


109 


545 


104 


456 


879 


262 


879 


.50 


.60 


1 


77 


275 


198 


276 


376 


464 


338 


61 


79 


97.28 


192,75 


Chowan 


247 


207 


279 


117 


88 


87 


28 


998 


18 


170 


24 


322 


.53 


.63 


1 


61 


If 


369 


11 


463 


39 


115 


62 


22 


55.52 


140 ! 20 


Currituck 


2,709 


2,103 


1,902 


128 


165 


106 


348 


239 


346 


983 


202 


439 


.51 


.60 


1 


75 


179 


175 


209 


822 


353 


300 


66 


14 


99.77 


185 75 


Dare - 


13 


13 


12 


61 


118 


85 




798 


1 


532 


1 


019 


.49 


.52 


1 


49 




394 




802 


1 


514 


30 


31 


61.69 


126.17 


Edgecombe. 


800 


714 


641 


122 


108 


75 


97 


634 


77 


059 


48 


352 


.47 


.68 


1 


64 


45 


582 


52 


121 


79 


493 


56 


98 
20 


73.00 


124.01 


Gates 


318 


219 


243 


91 


84 


102 


28 


998 


18 


389 


24 


759 


.48 


.61 


1 


60 


14 


055 


11 


226 


39 


620 


44 


51.26 


163.05 


Halifax 


669 


738 


775 


92 


76 


62 


61 


720 


55 


824 


48 


207 


.53 


.70 


1 


60 


32 


971 


38 


890 


77 


221 


49 


28 


52.70 


£9.64 


Hertford 


400 


408 


263 


94 


75 


81 


37 


£11 


30 


648 


21 


263 


.53 


.58 


1 


59 


19 


967 


17 


909 


33 


816 


49 


92 


43.86 


128!58 


Martin _ 


810 


844 


680 


157 


142 


80 


126 


898 


119 


966 


54 


324 


.49 


.65 


1 


75 


61 


608 


77 


915 


94 
70 


886 


76 


06 


92.32 


139 54 


Nash 


630 


664 


663 


109 


89 


66 


68 


637 


59 


107 


44 


129 


.53 


.71 


1 


£9 


36 


649 


42 


231 


156 


58 


17 


63.60 


105.82 


Northampton 


554 


645 


626 


95 


79 


70 


52 


409 


50 


789 


43 


837 


.54 


.67 


1 


59 


28 


505 


33 


946 


69 


651 


51 


45 


52.63 


111.26 


Pasquotank 


4,964 


3,138 


3,763 


126 


157 


105 


627 


840 


4f 1 


468 


393 


655 


.49 


59 


1 


78 


304 


754 


288 


404 


666 


535 


61 


39 


91.91 


185.90 
145 [ 00 


Perquimans 


155 


112 


181 


115 


78 


89 


17 


824 


g 


757 


16 


020 


.54 


.61 


1 


64 


9 


589 


5 


346 


26 


245 


61 


86 
36 


47.73 


156 ] 67 


Tyrrell. 


3,513 


2,214 


2,268 


132 


157 


89 


462 


367 


346 


764 


201 


274 


.47 


.59 


1 


77 


215 


561 


203 


407 


355 


316 


61 


91.87 


174^84 


Washington 


989 


484 


433 


130 


151 


100 


129 


027 


72 


899 


43 


109 


.47 


.61 


1 


76 


60 


163 


44 


771 


75 


707 


60 


83 
10 


92.50 


162!92 


Northern Coastal (NE.; 


21,498 


15,768 


15,490 


124 


139 


94 


2,660 


341 


2,189 


166 


1,456 


394 


.49 


.61 


1 


73 


1,313 


596 


1,336 


443 


2,523 


574 


61 


84.76 




District 6— 














































98 


64 


96.16 


139.32 


Beaufort 


7,814 


5,279 


6,806 


203 


157 


80 


1,587 


463 


826 


698 


543 


446 


.49 


.61 


1 


74 


770 


787 


507 


622 


648 


225 


Carteret 


1,143 


1,158 


875 


168 


159 


111 


191 


828 


183 


711 


96 


988 


.56 


.63 


1 


70 


108 


113 


116 


155 


165 


275 


94 


59 


100.31 


188 . 88 


Craven 


554 


428 


459 


147 


131 


89 


81 


556 


56 


120 


40 


817 


.48 


.58 


1 


72 


39 


488 


32 


371 


70 


351 


71 


28 


75 63 


153.27 


Greene 


627 


528 


539 


108 


87 


84 


67 


772 


46 


054 


45 


481 


.53 


.66 


1 


59 


36 


229 


30 


308 


72 


371 


57 


78 


57^40 


134.27 


Hyde 


278 


313 


304 


120 


96 


80 


33 


311 


29 


947 


24 


296 


.49 


.61 


1 


69 


16 


294 


18 


407 


41 


066 


58 


61 


58.81 


135.09 


Johnston 


1,060 


1,096 


908 


94 


92 


69 


99 


934 


101 


167 


62 


780 


.55 


.71 


1 


64 


55 


207 


72 


200 


103 


002 


52 


08 


65.88 


113.44 


Jones 


215 


246 


203 


109 


91 


84 


23 


356 


22 


398 


17 


104 


.48 


.67 


1 


71 


11 


310 


15 


075 


29 


285 


52 


00 
59 


61.28 


144.26 


Lenoir 


636 


675 


583 


123 


90 


75 


78 


492 


60 


901 


43 


927 


.52 


.68 


1 


04 


40 


447 


41 


257 


72 


034 


63 


61.12 


123.56 


Pamlico 


3,935 


3,815 


5,503 


211 


160 


115 


832 


020 


609 


517 


634 


603 


.51 


.61 


1 


74 


420 


185 


374 


171 


1,107 


104 


106 


78 


98.08 


194.62 
129^18 


Pitt 


1,864 


1,441 


1,725 


160 


125 


76 


297 


889 


180 


942 


131 


585 


.48 


.68 


1 


69 


141 


659 


122 


502 


222 


835 


76 


00 


85.01 




Wayne 


3,561 


2,778 


3,486 


127 


123 


73 


454 


108 


343 


011 


253 


647 


.51 


63 


1 


80 


233 


671 


216 


759 


455 


768 


65 


62 


78.03 


130.74 


Wilson 


722 


629 


700 


112 


89 


70 


81 


173 


56 


120 


48 


980 


.54 


.71 


1 


61 


43 


514 


39 


988 


78 


766 


60 
85 


27 


63.57 


112.52 


Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — 
Bladen 


22,409 


18,386 


22,091 


171 


137 


88 


3,828 


902 


2,516 


586 


1 ,943 


654 


.50 


.63 


1 


73 


1,916 


904 


1,586 


815 


3,366 


082 


54 


86.31 


165.72 


139 


157 


147 


74 


91 


83 


10 


267 


14 


350 


12 


155 


.52 


.70 


1 


66 


5 


363 


10 


086 


20 


228 


33 


58 


64.24 


137.61 


Brunswick... 


167 


116 


114 


95 


93 


84 


15 


950 


10 


741 


9 


609 
988 


.58 


.69 


1 


67 


9 


264 


7 


368 


16 


083 


55 




63.52 


141.08 


Columbus 


688 


733 


474 


98 


107 


78 


67 


835 


78 


355 


36 


.54 


.69 


1 


72 


36 


859 


54 


475 


63 


742 


53 


57 


74.32 


134.48 


Cumberland 


686 


486 


454 


104 


89 


81 


60 


868 


43 


404 


36 


641 


.56 


.69 


1 


59 


34 


275 


30 


136 


58 


315 


58 


49 
83 


62 01 
89! 13 


128.45 


Duplin. 


3,073 


2,537 


3,078 


122 


132 


73 


376 


209 


334 


286 


223 


956 


.50 


.68 


1 


79 


190 


001 


226 


114 


400 


112 


61 




129.99 


Harnett 


329 


228 


197 


102 


87 


71 


33 


459 


19 


897 


13 


950 


.58 


.67 


1 


57 


19 


453 


13 


287 


21 


905 


59 


13 


58.28 


111.19 


Hoke 


215 


215 


251 


79 


90 


72 


16 
8 


959 


19 


369 


18 
8 


060 


.54 


.72 


1 


56 


9 


215 


14 


011 


28 


220 


42 


86 
52 


05.17 


112.43 


New Hanover.. . . . 


86 


128 


82 


101 


114 


102 


708 


14 


615 


393 


.59 


.69 


1 


74 


5 


119 


10 


146 


14 


603 


59 


79.27 


178.08 


Onslow 


147 


272 


184 


91 


92 


85 


13 


384 


25 


003 


15 

9 


687 
898 


.53 


.71 
.68 


1 


64 


7 


167 


17 


816 


25 


753 


48 


76 


65.50 


139.96 


Pender _ 


485 


268 


127 


81 


102 


78 


39 


234 


27 


292 


.53 
.56 


1 


64 


20 


965 


18 


481 


16 


281 


43 


23 


68.96 


128.20 


Robeson 


1,286 


1,512 


1,536 


83 


S9 


71 


106 


611 


150 


548 


108 


997 


.71 


1 


64 


60 


067 


107 


320 


179 


088 
003 


46 


71 


70.98 


116.59 


Sampson 


1,544 


1,099 


1,048 


102 


108 


71 


156 


937 


118 


589 


74 


382 


.53 


.66 


1 


69 


83 


811 


78 


089 


126 


54 


28 


71.05 


120.23 


Scotland 


138 


256 


139 


74 


94 


73 


10 


267 


23 


947 


10 


130 


.58 


.69 


1 


62 


5 


997 


16 


608 


16 


379 


43 


46 


64.88 


117.83 


Southern Coastal (SE.) 


8,883 


8,007 


7,831 


103 


110 


74 


916 


688 


880 


396 


578 


846 


.53 


.69 


1 


70 


487 


556 


603 


937 


986 


712 


54 


89 


75.43 


126.00 


State. __ 


94.000 


85,000 


82,000 


115 


107 


73 


10,810,000 


9,095,000 


5,986,000 


.54 


.62 


1 


65 


5,846,000 


5,639,000 


9,877,000 


62.19 


66.34 


120.45 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



19 



IRISH POTATOES 



The Irish potato acreage has expanded 
extensively in the last half century, as is 
illustrated by the graph herewith. The 
county data on page 18 provides an 
interesting study of county comparisons 
for students interested in this subject. 
The commercial producing area of the 
early crop is in the coastal counties, center- 
ing around the Albemarle and Pamlico 
Sounds, as well as around Mount Olive. 
The late crop is confined largely to the 
mountain districts. District 1 grows a 
considerable amount of commercial pota- 
toes which are harvested in the late 
summer or the early fall. Study the 
dotted map herewith for this and other 
areas. 

It will be noted that the 1936 crop 
brought a very nice price following two 
years of unreasonably low prices. As 
might be expected, 1937 resulted in a big 
crop and unsatisfactory prices. 

The movement of commercial early 
potatoes amounted to 9,551 cars shipped 
to September 4th of this year, and com- 



pares with 5,358 during 1936. Last 
year's shipments were the lowest for many 
years, while 1934 showed the highest num- 
ber of cars (10,753) moved. Thus, the 
current year's crop is almost equal to the 
record. In much the same way, the early 
potato crop for the United States was 
increased almost 50 percent in the number 
of cars moved this year, as compared with 
1936. It is impossible to estimate the 
year's carlot movement for the United 
States since the late crop is barely har- 
vested in many of the Northern and 
Western States. 

During years of heavy production, the 
shipments of commercial potatoes are 
somewhat reduced or controlled by with- 
holding No. 2 or small potatoes from the 
market. The proportion of No. 2 pota- 
toes varies according to seasonal growing 
conditions. Since they always bring much 
lower prices than do the larger potatoes, 
their elimination materially affects the price 
of the crop shipped. The carlot shipments 
do not, therefore, always indicate the 



crop produced but more nearly the crop 
of No. 1 commercial potatoes grown. 
Potatoes are a highly speculative crop 
which means that new growers should 
plant this crop only after considerable 
study of conditions. The coastal counties 
have a distinct advantage by being able 
to ship several days earlier than else- 
where and this advantage alone often 
means the difference between profit and 
loss, since Virginia and the states south 
of us offer highly competitive agencies. 

Coming back to North Carolina, we find 
on the map herewith the concentrated 
areas of production. The outlying or 
thinner dotted counties represent average 
non-commercial farm production, which 
occurs in patches of from to 2 acres 
in size. As a rule, this farm crop yields 
much lower than do the commercial-pro- 
ducing farm. For example the average 
farm production for 1936 was 73 bushels 
as compared with about 150 bushels per 
acre for the average commercial-produc- 
ing farm. 



MILLION 
BUSHELS 



POTATOES - PRODUCTION IN NORTH CAROLINA 



MILLION 
BUSHaS 



10 
9 
8 
7 
6 
5 
4 
3 
2 



ACREAGE DISTRIBUTION 1934 
laracs 




Iff!* 

cd S 2 



■ i 



10 
9 

8 
7 

6 

5 
4 
3 
2 
I 

n 



CHART COMPARES PRODUCTION IN MILLION BUSHELS 1866 -1936 



SWEET POTATOES 

While North Carolina is not the home of that generally grown in North Carolina, other counties grow sizable quantities also. 



the sweet potato, the sweet potato is cer- 
tainly at home in North Carolina since 
practically all farm families grow some 
for home use. The Northern markets like 
or demand a different type of potato than 



They have not yet come to like the "juicy" 
southern sweet potato in the way that we 
do. 

The principal producing commercial 
areas are in the eastern counties, although 



The largest producing counties are : Johns- 
ton, Columbus, Currituck, Robeson, Samp- 
son, Brunswick, and Wayne. 

The peak of production was made in 
1934. 



WILLI ON 
BUSHELS 



SWEET POTATO. PRODUCTION IN NORTH CAROLINA 



MILLION 
BUSHELS 



77T 

8 
7 
6 
S 
4- 
3 
Z 
I 

o 



i i i i i i i i h i i i i I i i "-r i . i t 
■ ■■■ -i ■•• r n i i - i bi i i i : • Mil ill i i i i • i i i I. 

ni -i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i .i i i i i ri i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i I i , i i i i 



CHART COMPARES PRODUCTION IN MILLION BUSHELS 



1868 - 1936 



NORTH CAROLINA SWEET POTATO CROP 



Districts and Counties 


Acreage Plan 


ted 


Yiel 

C 


1 Per Acre 
3ushels) 


Proc 


uction (Bushels) 


Price Per Bi 
(Dollars 


ishel 


Tota 


Value (Dol 


ars) 


Value Per Acre 
(Dollars) 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


, . 

District 1 — 







































Alleghany.. 


3 


6 


19 


90 


69 


82 


270 


414 


1,558 


% .72 


% .66 


% .76 


$ 194 


% 273 


$ 1,504 


$ 64.80 


% 45.54 


$ 62 . 32 


Ashe. 


42 


21 


57 


85 


72 


81 


3,570 


1,512 


4^617 


.74 


.71 


.80 


2,642 


1,075 


4,657 


62! 90 


5l!l2 


64.80 


Avery 


49 


16 


28 


92 


67 


71 


4,508 


1,072 


1,988 


.75 


.72 


.83 


3,381 


768 


2,084 


69.00 


48.24 


58.93 


Caldwell 


632 


591 


448 


105 


97 


90 


66,360 


57,327 


40,320 


.71 


.74 


.83 


47,116 


42,464 


42,259 


74.55 


71.78 


74.70 


Surry 

Watauga 


608 


559 


620 


107 


96 


74 


65,056 


53 , 664 


45,880 


.72 


.71 


.78 


46,840 


38,043 


45,177 


77.04 


68.16 


57.72 


11 


14 


72 


94 


98 


77 


1,034 


1,372 


5,544 


.70 


.72 


.82 


724 


990 


5,744 


65.80 


70.56 


63.14 


Wilkes - 


845 


756 


652 


98 


86 


83 


82,810 


65,016 


54,116 


.70 


.74 


.79 


57,967 


48,147 


53,965 


68.60 


63! 64 


65.57 


Yadkin 


402 


676 


364 


107 


80 


73 


43,014 


54,080 


26,572 


.73 


.72 


.77 


31,400 


38,914 


25,823 


78! 11 


57! 60 


56.21 


Northern Mountain (NW.) 


2,592 


2,639 


2,260 


103 


89 


80 


266,622 


234,457 


180,595 


.71 


.73 


.79 


190,264 


170,674 


181 ,213 


73.40 


64.67 


80.18 


District 4 — 






































Buncombe 


269 


255 


281 


99 


84 


93 


26,631 


21 , 420 


26,133 


.73 


.75 


.81 


19,441 


16,093 


26,771 


72.27 


63.00 


75.33 


Burke. 


517 


543 


494 


100 


95 


79 


51,700 


51,585 


39,026 


.69 


.75 


.70 


35,673 


38,710 


34,519 


69.00 


71.25 


55.30 


Cherokee . 


390 


451 


406 


92 


90 


82 


35,880 


40,590 


33,292 


.69 


.74 


.75 


24,757 


30,055 


31,549 


63.48 


66! 60 


61.50 


Clay. - 


222 


185 


172 


SO 


89 


71 


19,980 


16,465 


12,212 


.72 


.74 


.70 


14,386 


12,178 


10,810 


64.80 


65.86 


49.70 


Graham. 


129 


125 


148 


91 


99 


67 


11,739 


12,375 


9,916 


.68 


.74 


.75 


7,983 


9,134 


9,418 


61.88 


73.26 


50.25 


Haywood 


81 


130 


124 


96 


82 


72 


7,776 


10,660 


8,928 


.74 


.72 


.80 


5,754 


7,655 


9,047 


71.04 


59.04 


57.60 


Henderson 


354 


330 


311 


97 


97 


82 


34,338 


32,010 


25,502 


.68 


.69 


.79 


23,350 


22,008 


25,471 


65.96 


66.93 


64.78 


Jackson 


243 


202 


182 


100 


87 


91 


24,300 


17,574 


16,562 


.70 


.72 


.83 


17,010 


12,613 


17,352 


70.00 


62.64 


V5.53 


McDowell 


408 


352 


394 


106 


105 


89 


43 , 248 


36,960 


35,066 


.70 


.73 


.75 


30,274 


26,966 


33,266 


74.20 


76.65 


66.75 


Macon 


260 


251 


291 


101 


99 


89 


26,260 


24 , 849 


25,899 


.71 


.75 


.80 


18,645 


18,659 


26,214 


71.71 


74.25 


71. 20 




128 


134 


202 


102 


82 


74 


13,056 


10,988 


14,948 


.70 


.74 


.82 


9,139 


8,133 


15,496 


71.40 


60.68 


60.68 


Mitchell- -- 


67 


105 


72 


fO 


77 


64 


6,030 


8,085 


4,608 


.75 


.77 


.83 


4,523 


6,220 


4,825 


65 .50 


59.29 


53.12 


Poik 


468 


685 


601 


92 


102 


81 


43,056 


69,870 


48,681 


.70 


.73 


.73 


30,139 


50.975 


44,911 


64.40 


74.46 


59.13 


Rutherford 


2,080 


1,985 


1,801 


105 


103 


88 


218,400 


204,455 


158,488 


.71 


.72 


.69 


155,064 


146,967 


138,259 


74.55 


74.16 


60.72 


Swain 


259 


261 


326 


95 


77 


74 


24,605 


20,097 


24,124 


.73 


.76 


.77 


17,962 


15,310 


23,476 


69.35 


58.52 


56.98 


Transylvania . 


54 


183 


70 


68 


79 


80 


5,292 


14,457 


5,600 


.71 


.74 


.80 


3,757 


10,700 


5,660 


69.58 


58.46 


64.00 


Yancey 


40 


42 


97 


103 


82 


67 


4, 120 


3,444 


6,499 


.72 


.75 


.84 


2,966 


2,566 


6,913 


74.16 


61.50 


56.28 


Western Mountain (W.) .. 


5,969 


6,219 


5,972 


100 


96 


83 


596,411 


595,884 


495,484 


.71 


.73 


.74 


420,823 


434,942 


463,957 


70.50 


69.94 


77.69 


District 2 — 




































74.62 


Alamance 


563 


432 


459 


107 


91 


91 


60,241 


39,312 


41,769 


.75 


.69 


.82 


45,181 


26,994 


43 , 299 


80.25 


62.79 


Caswell 


927 


697 


602 


100 


78 


79 


92,700 


54,366 


47,558 


.74 


.68 


.80 


68,598 


36,766 


48,069 


74.00 


53.04 


63.20 


Durham.. 


714 


705 


732 


99 


88 


101 


70 , 686 


62,040 


73,932 


.70 


.67 


.78 


49,480 


41,276 


72,898 


69.30 


58.96 


78.78 


Forsyth. -. 


631 


571 


655 


110 


113 


84 


69,410 


64,523 


55,020 


.75 


.70 


.80 


52,058 


45,035 


55,638 


82.50 


79.10 


67.20 


Franklin _ 


1,616 


1,376 


1,043 


110 


103 


90 


177,760 


141,728 


93,870 


.73 


.72 


.73 


129,765 


101,824 


86,599 


80.30 


74.16 


65.70 


Granville 


1,039 


1,307 


1,032 


95 


84 


87 


98 , 705 


109,788 


89,784 


.78 


.66 


.79 


76,990 


71 , 960 


89,702 


74.10 


55.44 


68.73 


Guilford 


1,133 


1,107 


1,045 


111 


110 


93 


125, 763 


121,770 


97,185 


.72 


.74 


.81 


90,549 


90,070 


99,543 


79.92 


81.40 


75.33 


Orange 


390 


311 


251 


103 


93 


96 


40,170 


28,923 


24,096 


.78 


.73 


.80 


31,333 


21,117 


24,375 


80.34 


67.89 


76.80 


Person 


659 


617 


483 


97 


82 


82 


63 , 923 


50,594 


39,606 


.75 


.71 


.81 


47,942 


35.809 


■ 40.574 


72.75 


58.22 


66.42 


Rockingham 


972 


1,179 


797 


103 


90 


81 


100,116 


106,110 


64,557 


.73 


.74 


.81 


73,085 


78,452 


66,085 


75.19 


66.60 


65.61 


Stokes 


671 


552 


533 


108 


107 


72 


72,468 


59,064 


38,376 


.75 


.71 


.76 


54,351 


41,823 


36,865 


81.00 


75.97 


54.72 


Vance 


665 


776 


606 


98 


79 


82 


65,170 


61,304 


49,692 


.70 


.71 


.77 


45,619 


43,395 


48,371 


68.60 


56.09 


63.14 


Warren . . 


975 


826 


616 


92 


80 


78 


89 , 700 


66,080 


48,048 


.75 


.74 


.74 


67,275 


48,862 


44,965 


69.00 


59.20 


57.72 


Northern Piedmont (N.) .. 


10,955 


10,456 


8,854 


103 


92 


86 


1 ,126,812 


965,602 


763,493 


.74 


.71 


.78 


832, 226 


683,383 


756,983 


75.97 


65.36 


85.50 


District 5— 






































Alexander 


388 


356 


231 


96 


84 


84 


37,248 


29,904 


19,404 


.63 


.74 


.76 


23,466 


22,147 


18,622 


60.48 


62.16 


63.84 


Catawba 


1,542 


1,653 


1,193 


124 


103 


88 


191,208 


170,259 


104,984 


.61 


.75 


.71 


116,637 


127,757 


94,244 


75.60 


77.25 


62.48 


Chatham 


936 


910 


805 


108 


101 


97 


101,088 


91,910 


78,085 


.60 


.75 


.78 


60,653 


68,960 


77,061 


64.80 


75.75 


75.66 


Davidson 


2,290 


2,488 


2,439 


125 


120 


86 


286,250 


298,560 


209,754 


.63 


.73 


.75 


180,338 


217,735 


198,935 


78.75 


87.60 


64.50 


Davie 


328 


415 


299 


115 


106 


63 


37,720 


43,990 


18,837 


.61 


.74 


.75 


23,009 


32,569 


17,865 


70.15 


78.44 


47.25 


Iredell 


628 


665 


397 


125 


102 


82 


78,500 


67,830 


32,554 


.73 


.74 


.78 


57,305 


50,200 


32,096 


91.25 


75.48 


63.96 


Lee.. 


502 


423 


425 


115 


109 


98 


57,730 


46,107 


41,650 


.72 


.73 


.75 


41,566 


33,611 


39,515 


82.80 


79.57 


73.50 


Randolph 


559 


520 


494 


111 


112 


77 


62,049 


58,240 


38,038 


.70 


.72 


.82 


43,434 


41,862 


39,439 


77.70 


80.64 


63.14 




609 


609 


538 


114 


123 


84 


69,426 


74,907 


45,192 


.69 


.74 


.75 


47,904 


55,411 


42,845 


78.66 


91.02 


63.00 


Wake 


2,663 


2,697 


2,209 


112 


111 


99 


298,256 


299,367 


218,691 


.72 


.73 


.71 


214,744 


218,256 


196,361 


80.64 


81.03 


70.29 


Central Piedmont (C.) 


10,445 


10,736 


9,030 


117 


110 


89 


1 ,219,475 


1,181,074 


807,189 


.66 


.74 


.74 


809,056 


868,508 


756,983 


77.46 


80.90 


83.83 


District 8 — 




































60.59 


Anson 


1,246 


972 


922 


102 


103 


73 


127,092 


100,116 


67,306 


.69 


.74 


.83 


87,693 


74,045 


70,655 


70.38 


76.22 


Cabarrus 


350 


370 


314 


104 


128 


68 


36,400 


47,360 


21,352 


.66 


.75 


.76 


24,024 


35,506 


20,486 


68.64 


96.00 


51.68 


Cleveland 


1,472 


1,785 


1,459 


117 


101 


94 


172,224 


180,285 


137,146 


.71 


.73 


.72 


122,279 


131,448 


124,820 


83.07 


73.73 


67.68 


Gaston 


1,139 


1,048 


784 


109 


102 


91 


124, 151 


106,896 


71,344 


.66 


.75 


.75 


81,940 


80,243 


67,674 


71.94 


76.50 


68.25 


Lincoln 


772 


622 


533 


116 


108 


90 


89 , 552 


67,176 


47,970 


.63 


.72 


.76 


56,418 


48,308 


46,110 


73.08 


77.76 


68.40 


Mecklenburg.. 


1,029 


848 


777 


102 


98 


61 


104,958 


83 , 104 


47,397 


.68 


.74 


.87 


71,371 


61,513 


52,135 


69.36 


72.52 


53.07 


Montgomery 


317 


308 


231 


106 


110 


86 


33 , 602 


33,880 


19,866 


.69 


.76 


.79 


23,185 


25,805 


19,852 


73.14 


83.60 


67.94 


Moore 


811 


646 


511 


109 


114 


106 


88.399 


73,644 


54,166 


.73 


.71 


.82 


64,531 


52,148 


56,131 


79.57 


80.94 


86.92 


Richmond 


750 


709 


500 


100 


109 


68 


75 , 000 


77,281 


34,000 


.66 


.74 


.81 


49,500 


57,201 


34,820 


66.00 


80.66 


55.08 


Stanly 


360 


331 


298 


105 


116 


74 


37,800 


38,396 


22,052 


.64 


.72 


.75 


24,192 


27,624 


20,930 


67.20 


83.52 


55.50 


Union . . 


1,032 


921 


1,701 


103 


119 


66 


106,296 


109,599 


112,266 


.69 


.73 


.85 


73,344 


79,907 


120,633 


71.07 


86.87 


56.10 


Southern Piedmont (S.)— 


9,278 


8,560 


8,030 


107 


107 


81 


995,474 


917,737 


634,865 


.68 


.73 


.79 


678,477 


673,748 


634,246 


73.13 


78.71 


78.98 


District 3 — 






































Bertie 


1,333 


1,421 


1,220 


101 


104 


87 


134,633 


147,784 


106,140 


.73 


.77 


.67 


98,282 


114,058 


89,876 


73.73 


80.08 


58.29 


Camden 


1,009 


694 


668 


90 


102 


87 


90,810 


70,788 


58,116 


.78 


.79 


.50 


70,832 


56,172 


36,767 


70.20 


80.58 


43.50 


Chowan. .. 


562 


607 


552 


91 


84 


90 


51,142 


50,988 


49,680 


.71 


.78 


.62 


36,311 


39,953 


38,918 


64.61 


65.52 


55.80 


Currituck 


2,860 


3,001 


2,519 


85 


100 


96 


243, 100 


300,100 


241,824 


.80 


.73 


.52 


194,480 


218,886 


159,003 


68.00 


73.00 


49.92 


Dare 


57 


56 


139 


90 


72 


102 


5,130 


4,032 


14,178 


.71 


.78 


.53 


3,642 


3,165 


9,568 


63.90 


56.16 


54.06 


Edgecombe 


1,139 


1,191 


985 


105 


103 


101 


119,595 


122,673 


99,485 


.75 


.76 


.73 


89,696 


93,356 


91,811 


78.75 


78.28 


73.73 


Gates 


874 


750 


737 


98 


100 


95 


85,652 


75,000 


70,015 


.78 


.78 


.62 


66,809 


58,677 


54,936 


76.44 


78.00 


58.90 


Halifax 


1,445 


1,568 


1,261 


106 


104 


89 


153,170 


163,072 


112,229 


.74 


.77 


.73 


113,346 


125,794 


103 , 529 


78.44 


80.08 


64.97 




757 


586 


580 


105 


112 


90 


79,485 


65 , 632 


52,200 


.73 


.75 


.64 


58,024 


49,315 


42,250 


76.65 


84.00 


57.60 


Martin 


1,417 


1,539 


1,370 


110 


101 


108 


155 , 870 


155,439 


147,960 


.73 


.74 


.70 


113,785 


114,981 


130,729 


80.30 


74.74 


75.60 


Nash '. 


1,798 


1,931 


1,819 


115 


118 


99 


206,770 


227,858 


180,081 


.75 


.75 


.74 


155,078 


171,021 


168,464 


86.25 


88.50 


73.26 


Northampton 


926 


1,759 


835 


118 


119 


92 


109,268 


209,321 


76,820 


.75 


.81 


.70 


81,951 


170,362 


67,944 


88.50 


96.39 


64.40 


Pasquotank . 


282 


225 


176 


89 


100 


84 


25,098 


22,500 


14,784 


.75 


.83 


.55 


18,824 


18,592 


10,321 


66.75 


83.00 


46.20 


Perquimans 


486 


515 


481 


90 


72 


82 


43 , 740 


37,080 


39,442 


.74 


.77 


.60 


32,368 


28,614 


29,887 


66.60 


55.44 


49.20 


Tyrrell 


400 


407 


289 


90 


94 


98 


36,000 


38,258 


28,322 


.71 


.76 


.51 


25,560 


29,141 


18,276 


63.90 


71.44 


49.98 


Washington _ 


434 


334 


380 


98 


99 


97 


42,532 


33,066 


36,860 


.74 


.80 


.49 


31,474 


26,504 


22,791 


72.52 


79.20 


47.53 


Northern Coastal NE. 


15,779 


16,584 


14,011 


100 


104 


95 


1 , 581 , 995 


1 ,723,591 


1,328,136 


.75 


.77 


.64 


1,190,462 


1,318,591 


1,075,070 


75.45 


79.51 


76.73 


District 6 — 


































68.73 


45.12 


Beaufort 


1,806 


1,443 


1,185 


97 


87 


94 


175,182 


125,541 


111,390 


.72 


.79 


.48 


126,131 


99,563 


67,625 


69.84 


Carteret 


1,510 


1 ,676 


1,293 


90 


79 


93 


135,900 


132,404 


120,249 


.74 


.74 


.47 


100,566 


97,989 


71,415 


66.60 


58.46 


43.71 


Craven 


1,254 


1,126 


1,192 


96 


90 


90 


120,384 


101,340 


107,280 


.76 


.74 


.61 


91,492 


74,975 


82,666 


72.96 


66.60 


54.90 


Greene 


922 


768 


809 


103 


103 


106 


94 , 966 


79,104 


85,750 


.75 


.75 


.69 


71,225 


59,350 


74,717 


77.25 


77.25 


73.14 


Hyde 


105 


121 


88 


91 


106 


88 


9,555 


12,826 


7,744 


.72 


.74 


.47 


6,880 


9,448 


4,647 


65.52 


78.44 


41.36 


Johnston . . . . . 


3,933 


4, 140 


3,742 


110 


109 


101 


432,630 


451,260 


399,942 


.74 


.75 


.69 


320,146 


338,782 


329,685 


81.40 


81.75 


69.69 


Jones 


387 


413 


376 


91 


88 


91 


35,217 


36,344 


34,216 


.77 


.73 


.59 


27,117 


26,526 


25,558 


70.07 


64.24 


53.69 


Lenoir 


1 ,323 


1 ,047 


1,078 


105 


96 


92 


138,915 


100,512 


99,176 


.75 


.74 


.62 


104,186 


74,370 


77,652 


78.75 


71.04 


57.04 


Pamlico 


1,271 


1,225 


1,619 


94 


96 


92 


119,474 


117,600 


148,948 


.71 


.75 


.50 


84,827 


88,299 


94,161 


66.74 


72.00 


46.00 


Pitt. 


2, 196 


1,789 


1,611 


105 


93 


96 


230,580 


166,377 


154,656 


.73 


.74 


.70 


168,323 


123,182 


136,839 


76.65 


68.82 


67.20 


Wayne.. . . 


1*915 


1,745 


1,923 


110 


93 


97 


210,650 


162,285 


186,531 


.72 


.74 


.67 


151,668 


120,154 


157,872 


79.20 


68.82 


64.99 


Wilson 


1 ,405 


1 , 133 


1,145 


118 


116 


96 


165,790 


131,428 


109 , 920 


.76 


.75 


.72 


126,000 


98,594 


100,031 


89.68 


87.00 


69.12 


Central Coastal (E.) 


1 8^ 027 


1 6 . 626 


16,061 


104 


97 


96 


1 , 869 , 243 


1 ,617,021 


1 ,543,802 


'74 


!75 


.63 


1,378,561 


1,211,232 


1,222,868 


76.47 


72.85 


76.14 


District 9 — 




































54.32 


Bladen 


1,293 


1 ,345 


1,132 


97 


98 


97 


125,421 


131,810 


109,804 


.71 


.75 


.56 


89,049 


99,012 


77,678 


68.87 


73.50 


Brunswick. 


2^ 445 


2, 181 


2,220 


95 


81 


91 


232,275 


176,661 


202,020 


68 


.69 


.50 


157,947 


121,370 


127,596 


64.60 


55.89 


45.50 


Columbus 


4! 029 


4^014 


3,946 


100 


92 


102 


402,900 


369! 288 


402,492 


!72 


!74 


.55 


290,088 


273,310 


279,749 


72.00 


68.08 


56.10 


Cumberland 


1,296 


1,249 


1,096 


101 


103 


84 


130,896 


128,647 


92,064 


.75 


.76 


.62 


98,172 


97,947 


72,206 


75.75 


78.28 


52.08 


Duplin.. 


2,482 


2,370 


2,043 


104 


95 


80 


258,128 


225,150 


163,440 


.73 


.74 


.60 


188,433 


166,693 


123,992 


75.92 


70.30 


48.00 


Harnett 


1,720 


1,625 


1,507 


104 


104 


85 


178,880 


169,000 


128,095 


.73 


.76 


.70 


130,582 


128,670 


113,314 


75.92 


79.04 


59.50 


Hoke 


606 


611 


499 


102 


106 


82 


61,812 


64,766 


40,918 


.74 


.76 


.65 


45 741 


49,278 


33,634 


75.48 


80.56 


53.30 


New Hanover.. 


203 


182 


176 


96 


88 


93 


19',488 


16,016 


16,368 


.70 


.76 


!53 


13! 642 


12il67 


lo] 944 


67.20 


66.88 


49.29 




916 


791 


771 


89 


90 


81 


81 524 


71,190 


62,451 


.75 


.75 


.58 


61 , 143 


O.J ,08? 


45 780 


66.75 


67.50 


46.98 


Pender 


1,199 


1,100 


948 


95 


91 


89 


113! 905 


100,100 


84,372 


.72 


.73 


.52 


82,012 


73,004 


55 ',523 


68.40 


66.43 


46.28 


Robeson 


2,600 


2,648 


2,617 


110 


112 


98 


286,000 


296,576 


256,466 


.74 


.72 


.60 


211,640 


213,233 


194,463 


81.40 


80.64 


58.80 


Sampson 


2,785 


2,487 


2,311 


103 


102 


92 


286,855 


253,674 


212,612 


.74 


.74 


.63 


212,273 


187,682 


169,237 


76.22 


75.48 


57.96 


Scotland 


470 


584 


516 


98 


106 


69 


46,060 


61,904 


35,604 


.73 


.73 


.68 


33,624 


45,172 


30,564 


71.54 


77.38 


46.92 


Southern Coastal (SE.) 


22,044 


21,187 


19,782 


101 


97 


96 


2,224,144 


2,064,782 


1,806,706 


.73 


.74 


.58 


1,614,346 


1,520,922 


1,334,680 


73.23 


71.79 


67.47 


State... 


95,089 


93,007 


84,000 


104 


100 


90 


9,880,176 


9.300,148 


7,560,270 


.72 


.74 




7,114,215 


'6,882,000 


6,426,000 


74.82 


73.99 


76.50 



NORTH CAROLINA SOY BEAN CROP 





Acreage for Beans 


Acreage for Beans 


Yield 




















Grown 


Grown 


Equivalent 


Grown 


Grown 


Equivalent 


Per Acre 


Production (Bushels) 


Price Per 


1 otal 


Value 


Value Per Acre 


Districts and bounties 


Alone 


with Corn 


Solid 


Alone 


with Corn 


Solid 


(Bushels) 






Bu 


shel 












1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


UlSTRICT 1 — 


































Alleghany 


379 


12 


385 


30 


48 


54 


12.0 


10.0 


4,620 


540 


$1 .05 


$1.20 


$ 4 851 


$ 648 


$ 12.60 


$ 12.00 




38 




38 
8 


2 


1 


2 


12.0 


10.0 


456 


20 


1 .05 


1.20 


479 


24 


12.60 


12.00 


Avery" " " 


5 


6 


17 


11 


22 


12.0 


10.0 


96 


220 


1.05 


1.17 


101 


257 


12.60 


11.68 




381 


266 


514 


382 


391 


577 


11.0 


10.0 


5,654 


5,770 


1 .05 


1.20 


5 937 


6,924 


11.55 


12.00 




278 


72 


314 


332 


158 


411 


13.0 


10.0 


4,082 


4,110 


1.05 


1.25 


4* 286 


5* 138 


13.65 


12.50 


Watauga 


9 


55 


36 


9 


61 


39 


12.0 


10.0 


432 


390 


1 .05 


1.15 


' 454 


'449 


12.60 


11.51 


W 11K6S- 


750 


546 


1,023 


511 


532 


777 


12.0 


10.0 


12,276 


7,770 


1.05 


1.15 


12,890 


8,936 


12.60 


11.50 




35 


28 


49 


69 


140 


139 


13.0 


10.0 


637 


1,390 


1 .05 


1.21 


669 


1,682 


13.65 


12.10 


n uririorn iviuuiiiai 11 \n 


1,875 


985 


2,367 


1,352 


1,342 


2,021 


12.0 


10.0 


28,253 


20,210 


1 .05 


1 .19 


29 667 


24 ', 058 


12.21 


11.90 


District 4 — ■ 


































Buncombe 


442 


76 


480 


429 


297 


577 


12.0 


10.0 


5,760 


5,770 


1.09 


1.21 


6 278 


6,982 


13.08 


12.10 




365 


122 


426 


255 


166 


338 


12.0 


10.0 


5,112 


3,380 


1.09 


1.18 


5* 572 


3 1 988 


13.08 


11.80 




205 


286 


348 


117 


267 


250 


12.0 


10.0 


4,176 


2,500 


1.09 


1.25 


4 552 


3' 125 


13.08 


12.50 


■oiay 


57 


58 


86 


40 


52 


66 


12.0 


10.0 


1,032 


660 


1.09 


1.25 


1 ', 125 


825 


13.08 


12.50 




35 


98 


84 


2 


47 


25 


12.0 


10.0 


1,008 


250 


1.09 


1.30 


1 099 


325 


13.08 


13.00 


Haywood 


38 


50 


63 


129 


147 


202 


12.0 


10.0 


756 


2,020 


1.09 


1.20 


824 


2,424 


13.08 


12.00 




225 


120 


285 


140 


316 


298 


12.0 


10.0 


3,420 


2,980 


1.09 


1.20 


3, 728 


3 [ 576 


13.08 


12.00 




11 


53 


37 


58 


30 


73 


12.0 


10.0 


444 


730 


1.09 


1.20 


484 


876 


13.08 


12.00 




791 


642 


1,112 


899 


330 


1,064 


13.0 


10.0 


14,456 


10,640 


1.09 


1.15 


15, 757 


12,236 


14.17 


11.50 




129 


198 


228 


175 


202 


276 


12.0 


10.0 


2,736 


2,760 


1.09 


1.25 


2] 982 


3*4o0 


13.08 


12.50 




46 


40 


66 


86 


82 


127 


12.0 


10.0 


792 


1,270 


1.09 


1.15 


863 


1 ' 461 


13.08 


11.50 




44 


20 


54 


56 


30 


71 


12.0 


10.0 


648 


710 


1.09 


1.25 


706 


888 


13.08 


12.51 


rolK 


48 


44 


70 


75 


40 


95 


12.0 


10.0 


840 


950 


K09 


1.20 


916 


1 140 


13.08 


12.00 


Rutherford 


465 


752 


841 


598 


677 


S36 


12.0 


10.0 


10,092 


9,360 


1.09 


1.25 


1 1 , 000 


ll! 700 


13.08 


12.50 


Swain. 


67 


51 


92 


34 


5 


36 


12.0 


10.0 


1,104 


360 


1.09 


1.30 


1 [203 


468 


13.08 


13.00 


Transylvania 


116 


59 


146 


123 


79 


162 


12.0 


10.0 


1,752 


1,620 


1.09 


1.25 


1 ' 910 


2,025 


13.08 


12.50 




21 


3 


22 


10 


13 


16 


12.0 


10.0 


264 


160 


1.09 


1.30 


288 


208 


13.08 


13.00 


Western Mountain (W.) 


3,105 


2,672 


4,440 


3,226 


2,780 


4,612 


12.0 


10.0 


54,392 


46,120 


1.09 


1.21 


59 287 


55,697 


13.35 


12.08 


District 2 — 


































Alamance 


130 


45 


152 


149 


89 


193 


12.0 


12.5 


1,824 


2,413 


1.07 


1.16 


1,952 


2, 799 


12.84 


14.50 


Caswell 


32 


62 


63 


101 


94 


148 


12.0 


10.0 


756 


1,480 


1.07 


1.20 


' 809 


1,776 


12.84 


12.00 




117 


51 


142 


59 


48 


83 


11.0 


12.5 


1,562 


1,038 


.95 


1.16 


1,484 


1 '204 


10.45 


14.51 


rorsytn 

Franklin 


208 


26 


221 


200 


75 


237 


13.0 


10.0 


2,873 


2,370 


1.07 


1.35 


3 074 


3! 200 


13.91 


13.50 


343 


452 


569 


481 


626 


794 


11.0 


9.0 


6,259 


7,146 


.90 


1.12 


5! 633 


8,004 


9.90 


10.08 




108 


22 


119 


208 


70 


243 


12.0 


9.0 


1,428 


2,187 


.98 


1.15 


1,3S9 


2*515 


11.76 


10.35 


flni If nrH 


355 


189 


450 


230 


347 


403 


13.0 


10.0 


5,850 


4,030 


1.07 


1.20 


6^260 


4*836 


13.91 


12.00 




96 


81 


136 


57 


42 


78 


12.0 


12.5 


1,632 


975 


1.00 


1.15 


1*632 


1,121 


12.00 


14.37 


Person 


39 


92 


85 


56 


55 


83 


12.0 


10.0 


1,020 


830 


1.00 


1.18 


1 !020 


979 


12.00 


11.80 




169 


75 


206 


201 


89 


245 


13.0 


10.0 


2,678 


2,450 


1.07 


1.25 


2 * 865 


3,063 


13.91 


12.50 




68 


29 


82 


119 


106 


172 


12.0 


10.0 


984 


1,720 


1.07 


1.24 


1 *053 


2433 


12.84 


12.40 




116 


133 


182 


176 


324 


338 


11.0 


9.0 


2,002 


3,042 


.95 


1.17 


1 ] 902 


3 '559 


10.45 


10.53 


Warren 


2 


1 


2 


205 


196 


303 


10.0 


9.0 


20 


2,727 


.90 


1.10 


18 


3! 000 


9.00 


9.90 


Northern Piedmont (N.)- 


1 ,783 


1 ,258 


2,409 


2,242 


2,161 


3,320 


12.0 


9.8 


28,888 


32,408 


1 .01 


1.18 


29 101 


38 1 89 


12.08 


11.50 


District 5 — 


















1,950 


















162 


66 


195 


100 


117 


158 


10.0 


10.0 


1,580 


1.10 


1.17 


2, 145 


1,849 


11.00 


11.70 


Catawba 


219 


170 


304 


209 


171 


294 


14.0 


10.0 


4,256 


2,940 


1.10 


1.16 


4, 682 


3 1 410 


15.40 


11.60 


Chatham 


207 


195 


304 


184 


138 


253 


10.0 


10.0 


3.040 


2,530 


.95 


1.15 


2 888 


2,910 


9.50 


11.50 


Davidson 


259 


67 


292 


133 


174 


220 


12.0 


10.0 


3,504 


2,200 


1 " 10 


1.14 


3, '854 


2*508 


13.20 


11.40 




16 


11 


21 


57 


92 


103 


12.0 


10.0 


252 


1,030 


1.10 


1.20 


277 


1,236 


13.20 


12.00 


ireaell 


253 


264 


385 


187 


267 


320 


11.0 


10.0 


4,235 


3,200 


1.10 


1.10 


4, 659 


3 [ 520 


12.10 


11.00 




199 


133 


265 


249 


246 


372 


12.0 


8.0 


3,180 


2,976 


.95 


1.13 


3 021 


3*363 


11.40 


9.04 


Randolph 


205 


71 


240 


196 


243 


317 


11.0 


10.0 


2,640 


3,170 


1.10 


1.16 


2,904 


3 [ 677 


12.10 


11.60 


Rowan . 


154 


132 


220 


156 


434 


373 


13.0 


10.0 


2,860 


3,730 


1.10 


1.11 


3 146 


4* 140 


14.30 


11.10 


Wake _ 


590 


512 


846 


769 


1,144 


1,341 


12.0 


8.0 


10,152 


10,728 


.88 


1.15 


8*934 


12 ! 337 


10.56 


9.20 


f^nntial Din>4mnnt C . 


2,264 


1 ,621 


3,072 


2,240 


3,026 


3,751 


12.0 


9.1 


36,069 


34,084 


1 '01 


1.14 


36. 510 


38^ 950 


11 .88 


10.38 


District 8 — 


















11,232 
















Anson 


250 


1,373 


936 


900 


4,135 


2,967 


12.0 


10.0 


29,670 


1.04 


1.11 


11 ,681 


32,934 


12.48 


11.10 


Cabarrus 


105 


456 


333 


132 


736 


500 


12.0 


9.0 


3,996 


4,500 


1.04 


1.11 


4' 156 


4,995 


12.48 


9.99 


Cleveland 


59 


95 


106 


87 


669 


421 


13.0 


10.0 


1,378 


4,210 


1.04 


1.15 


1 ' 433 


4,842 


13.52 


11.50 


Gaston _ 


68 


109 


122 


142 


225 


254 


12.0 


10.0 


1,464 


2,540 


1.04 


1.12 


1 523 


2 [ 845 


12.48 


11.20 




62 


44 


84 


265 


83 


306 


12.0 


10.0 


1,008 


3,060 


1 .04 


1.20 


1 ', 048 


3 ' 672 


12.48 


12.00 


Mecklenburg- . _ 


341 


247 


464 


372 


558 


651 


11.0 


9.0 


5,104 


5,859 


1.04 


1.15 


5' 308 


6* 738 


11.44 


10.35 


Montgomery _ 


123 


63 


154 


416 


296 


564 


10.0 


8.0 


1,540 


4,512 


1 .04 


1.14 


1 602 


5' 144 


10.40 


9. 12 


Moore 


191 


318 


350 


220 


142 


291 


9.0 


9.0 


3,150 


2^619 


.95 


1.12 


2 993 


2,933 


8!55 


10*08 


Richmond _ _ 


235 


695 


582 


410 


358 


589 


10.0 


10.0 


5,820 


5,890 


.95 


1.09 


5 ' 529 


6 420 


9.50 


10.90 


Stanly 


96 


153 


172 


73 


342 


244 


12.0 


10.0 


2,064 


2,440 


1.04 


1.12 


2, 147 


2* 733 


12.48 


11.20 


Union 


153 


1,516 


911 


441 


4,314 


2,598 


13.0 


10.0 


11,843 


25 , 980 


1*04 


1.10 


19 7 


28 578 


13.52 


11.00 


Southern Piedmont (S.j 


1 ,683 


5,069 


4,214 


3,458 


11,858 


9,385 


12.0 


9.7 


48,599 


91 , 280 


1 .02 


1.12 


49 737 


101 *834 


11 .80 


10.85 


District 3 — ■ 


































Bertie _ — 


1,595 


3,708 


3,449 


1,972 


7,682 


5,803 


15.0 


11.0 


51,735 


63 , 833 


.80 


1.04 


41 388 


66 386 
uu , oou 


12.00 


11.44 


Camden 


12,426 


40 


12,446 


13,393 


71 


13,428 


15.0 


13.0 


186,690 


174,564 


.75 


1.03 


140,018 


179,801 


11.25 


13.39 


Chowan 


1,820 


4,294 


3,967 


931 


4,771 


3,316 


15.0 


12.0 


59,505 


39,792 


.72 


1.00 


42 844 


39,792 


10.80 


12.00 


Currituck 


8,278 


405 


8,480 


8,384 


832 


8,800 


15.0 


13.0 


127,200 


114,400 


.74 


1.01 


94 128 


115*544 


11.10 


13.13 




84 


58 


113 


30 




30 


13.0 


10.0 


1,469 


300 


* go 


1.15 


1 ' 175 


345 


10.40 


11.50 




1,008 


9,235 


5,625 


2,885 


24,082 


14,e26 


13.0 


11.0 


73,125 


164,186 


.83 


1.05 


60 694 


172,395 


10.79 


11.55 


Gates 


2,105 


3,290 


3,750 


1,796 


3,834 


3,713 


14.0 


11.0 


52,500 


40,843 


.78 


1.03 


40 950 


42*068 


10.92 


11.33 


rLautax . . 


2,167 


5,150 


4,742 


2,443 


8,822 


6,854 


15.0 


10.0 


71,130 


68,540 


.83 


1.06 


utf , UOO 


72 ' 652 


12.45 


10.60 


TT.-.l.f 1 

ilerttora 


547 


4,982 


3,038 


838 


7,521 


4,598 


15.0 


11.0 


45.570 


50,578 


*80 


1.06 


36 456 


53! 613 


12.00 


11.66 




1,117 


7,750 


4,992 


2,669 


11,443 


8,390 


13.0 


13.0 


64,896 


109,070 


[75 


1.01 


43' 672 


110* 161 


9.75 


13.13 


Nash 


785 


2,916 


2,243 


1,383 


7,622 


5,194 


13.0 


9.0 


29,159 


46,746 


'g5 


1.10 


24 ' 785 


51 421 


11.05 


9.90 


Northampton 


802 


5,207 


3,405 


1,260 


10,382 


6,451 


15.0 


9.0 


51,075 


58,059 


.85 


1.05 


43 414 


60,962 


12.75 


9.45 


Pasquotank 


17,293 


310 


17,448 


16,721 


765 


17,103 


15.0 


13.0 


261,720 


222,339 


[75 


1.04 


1Qfi 9QO 


231 [233 


11.25 


13.52 


Perquimans - _ __ _ 


9,211 


4,102 


11,262 


9,489 


7,006 


12,992 


15.0 


12.0 


168,930 


155,904 


'77 


1.02 


1 Q A 07(1 


159 022 


11.55 


12.24 


Tyrrell. _ _ _ __ 


4,108 


3,053 


5,634 


4,468 


3,393 


6,164 


14.0 


13.0 


78,876 


80, 132 


.71 


1.00 


^fi 009 


80* 132 


9.94 


13.00 


Washington. . _ _ _ ... 


5,371 


597 


5,669 


4,692 


1,864 


5,624 


14.0 


13.0 


79,366 


73,112 


.70 


.97 




70 919 


9.80 


12.61 




68,717 


55,097 


96,263 


73,354 


100,070 


123,386 


15.0 


11.8 


1,402,946 


1 ,462,398 


.76 


1 .03 




1 506 446 


11.13 


12.21 


District 6 — • 


































Beaufort . . 


7,183 


2,054 


8,210 


8,431 


5,094 


10,978 


13.0 


14.0 


106,730 


153,692 


.69 


1.00 


73 644 


1 53 6Q9 


8.97 


14.00 


Carteret _ 


358 


347 


531 


508 


198 


607 


12.0 


11.0 


6,372 


6,677 


.70 


1.07 


4 460 


7 144 


8.40 


11.77 


Craven ... 


1,077 


2,246 


2,200 


1,667 


3,801 


3,567 


14.0 


11.0 


30,800 


39,237 


.73 


1.05 


22 484 


41 199 


10.22 


11.55 


Greene 


604 


5,987 


3,597 


500 


12,695 


6,847 


13.0 


9.0 


46,761 


61 , 623 


.75 


1.03 


35*071 


63 ' 472 


9.75 


9.27 


T_T , , J „ 

Hyde 


11,175 


2,250 


12,300 


8,317 


7,013 


11,823 


13.0 


12.0 


159,900 


141,876 


.72 


.98 


115 128 


1QQ flQB 

ion , uoo 


9.36 


11.76 




1,910 


23,944 


13,882 


1,980 


33,112 


18,536 


13.0 


11.0 


180,466 


203,896 


.78 


1.10 


140* 763 


224,286 


10.14 


12.10 




669 


4,852 


3,095 


654 


6,890 


4,099 


12.0 


10.0 


37,140 


40,990 


.68 


1.01 


25,255 


41,400 


8.16 


10.10 


Lenoir _ _ 


736 


7,488 


4,480 


1,099 


11,736 


6,967 


13.0 


10.0 


58,240 


69,670 


.74 


1.00 


43 098 


69 670 


9.62 


10.00 


I 'a Dili co _._ 


1,962 


1,669 


2,796 


2,898 


3,053 


4,424 


13.0 


12.0 


36,348 


53,088 


.70 


1.00 


25 444 


^3 nss 

OO , OOO 


9.10 


12.00 




2,241 


20,964 


12,723 


3,168 


24,885 


15,610 


13.0 


13.0 


165,399 


202,930 


.74 


1.03 


122395 




9.62 


10.72 




1,093 


23,639 


12,912 


1,056 


36,897 


19,504 


12.0 


9.0 


154,944 


175,536 


.80 


1.07 


1 UO . if Olf 


187 824 


9.60 


S.63 




956 


7,342 


4,627 


1,218 


12,494 


7,465 


13.0 


11.0 


60,151 


82,115 


.84 


1.10 


50 527 


90 327 


10.92 


12.10 


uflnirai uoasiai t. i _______ 


29,964 


102,782 


81,353 


31,496 


157,868 


110,427 


13.0 


11.2 


1,043,251 


1,231,330 


.75 


1 .04 


782 224 


1 980 ' 1 Sft 

1 , UHJ , 1 JO 


9.62 


11.59 


District 9 — ■ 


































Bladen 


640 


6,416 


3,848 


908 


8,303 


5,059 


12.0 


9.0 


46,176 


45,531 


.84 


1.02 


38 788 


46 442 


10.08 


9.18 




272 


590 


567 


554 


942 


1 025 


10.0 


9.0 


5,670 


9,225 


.82 


1.04 


4 649 


9 '594 


8.20 


9.36 




641 


4,204 


2,743 


1,545 


7,577 


5! 333 


14.0 


12.0 


38,402 


63,996 


.86 


1.06 


OO . v_(0 


67 836 


12.04 


12.72 




932 


8,468 


5,166 


1,136 


14,476 


8,374 


11 .0 


10.0 


56,826 


83 , 740 


.85 


1.10 


48 302 


92* 114 


9.35 


11.00 




671 


19,211 


10,276 


1,123 


23,466 


12,856 


11. '0 


10.0 


113,036 


128,560 


.77 


1.04 


87 ' 038 


133 *702 

luu , 1 ou 


8.47 


10.40 




462 


4,797 


2,860 


1,270 


11,694 


7,117 


12.0 


9.0 


34,320 


64,053 


.90 


1.10 


30* 888 

Q\J , OOO 


70 458 


10.80 


9.90 


Hoke. 


182 


1,290 


827 


848 


2,068 


1,882 


12.0 


10.0 


9,924 


18,820 


.90 


1.07 


8,932 


20! 137 


10.80 


10.70 


New Hanover- _ _ _ 


71 


469 


305 


42 


403 


243 


10.0 


11.0 


3,050 


2,673 


.80 


1.11 


2,440 


2,967 


8.00 


12.21 


Onslow. .. .. 


588 


837 


1,006 


488 


3,637 


2,306 


12.0 


11.0 


12,072 


25,366 


.73 


1.03 


8,813 


26,127 


8.76 


11.33 


Pender 


522 


3,369 


2,206 


741 


3,140 


2,311 


10.0 


10.0 


22,060 


23,110 


.80 


1.03 


17,648 


23,803 


8.00 


10.30 


Robeson. . 


724 


8,123 


4,785 


1,534 


12,401 


7,734 


12.0 


11.0 


57,420 


85,074 


.87 


1.05 


49,955 


89,328 


10.44 


11.55 


Sampson 


1,241 


17,788 


10,135 


1,541 


18,600 


10,841 


13.0 


10.0 


131,755 


108,410 


.80 


1.06 


105,404 


144,915 


10.40 


10.60 


Scotland 


190 


809 


594 


234 


545 


506 


9.0 


12.0 


5,346 


6,072 


.90 


1.08 


4,811 


6,558 


8.10 


12.96 


Southern Coastal (SE.) 


7,136 


76,371 


45,318 


11,964 


107,252 


65,587 


12.0 


10.1 


536,057 


664,630 


.82 


1.06 


440,694 


703,981 


9.72 


10.73 


State 


116,527 


245,855 


239,436 


129,332 


386,357 


322,489 


13.0 


11.1 


3,178,455 


3,582,460 


.79 


1.02 


2,498,706 


3,749,313 


10.44 


11.63 



22 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



SOY BEANS 




Soy Beans in Hyde County 



The soy bean data is not available for 
many years. In fact, 1924 was the first 
year that the United States Census se- 
cured this information. The growth of 
the soy bean industry in the middle west- 
ern states has definitely affected the acre- 
age in North Carolina since the western 
states are now growing their own seed. 
Due to the soil conservation program, the 
acreage of soy beans has definitely been 
increased in North Carolina since 1933. 
This state has not yet gained much in- 
terest in growing soy beans for oil. The 
western states are taking more interest in 
oil production than for any other purpose. 

The principal producing area of soy 
beans will be found in the coastal counties, 
particularly those north of the Albemarle 
Sound. However, that area between the 
Albemarle and the Pamlico Sounds also 
grows large quantities of soy beans. The 
chief producing counties, for a 3-year av- 
erage, are: Pasquotank, Camden, Perqui- 
mans, Johnston, Hyde, Pitt, Wayne and 



several others. For the counties growing 
this crop alone, that is other than with 
corn, we have Pasquotank distinctly rank- 
ing first with Camden a close second. 
Perquimans comes next and Hyde and 
Beaufort following. On the back cover it 
will be noticed that soy beans rank be- 
tween strawberries and oats in total value. 
Few people realize that the strawberry 
crop is almost as valuable as the total 
soy-bean crop. 




COWPEAS 



BUSHELS 

400,003 

30Q0O 
20000G 

00,000 




HAY 



COWPEAS 



The total value of the cowpea crop is 
only about $600,000. Oddly enough, this 
is less than the sorghum for syrup crop 
and but little more than the snapbean. 
However, it should be remembered that 
this is for the seed and not hay pur- 
poses. For the period 1928 to 1930 cow- 
peas reached a low ebb of interest. 1931 
showed a decided shift from soy beans to 
cowpeas. 1937 is showing somewhat a 
similar shift. The frequency of cowpeas 
being planted in corn is quite noticeable 
in the central counties of the state. The 
chief producing counties in 1936 were: 
Robeson, decidedly first; Columbus and 
Scotland counties next with many other 
counties having between 4,000 and 6,000 
acres. This crop is rarely picked com- 
pletely but instead it is casually picked, 
only a part of the crop being saved. Even 
after some of the seed are picked the crop 
may be harvested for hay. 



North Carolina has shown a very dis- 
tinct expansion in hay crops since 1885. 
See graph herewith. Of course, there were 
big and small production years, in the 
meantime. The 1934 crop is the largest 
on record, and the 1937 crop is also show- 
ing prospects, following quite favorable 
hay producing seasons this year. 

Hay production is similar to tobacco in 
its growth. In 1866 less than 50,000 tons 
of hay was produced, whereas in 1937 the 
estimate is practically 800,000 tons. 

Tame hays in North Carolina include 
many crops such as clover, grain hays cut 
green, alfalfa, millet, sorghum cane, cow- 
peas, soy beans, peanuts for hay, lespedeza, 
crabgrass, etc. In proportion to the cul- 
tivated land, the principal hay producing 
counties are found in the mountain coun- 
ties or Districts 1 and 4. However, Robe- 
son County shows the most acreage, with 
20,247 acres reported in 1936. Wayne, 
Anson, Rowan, Davie, Guilford, Avery, 
Ashe and some other counties report fig- 
ures above 10,000 acres. 

The tame hay crop table, giving the 
county data, shows the acreage, yield, pro- 
duction and value for the years 1934 to 
1936. The increase in hay production is 
quite noticeable and is recognized by mer- 
chants. Only a few years ago farmers 
might be seen at almost any time hauling 
hay from the town to the farm. This prac- 
tice has decreased in recent years. 

With an expansion in the hay produc- 
tion it is natural to expect an accompany- 
ing increase in feed livestock. This would 
be obviously relating to cattle and sheep. 



There has been some expansion but not 
nearly that justified under the conditions 
prevailing in this state. There are abun- 
dant opportunities available for produc- 
ing more and better hay, which are too 
often overlooked by farmers. For example, 
as soon as the crops are harvested, the 
soil may be prepared to advantage for 
small grain, like oats. In the late winter 
months clover, or lespedeza may be sown 
over this winter crop. In the late spring 
the oats may be cut green or mature for 
a valuable hay. By mowing this the weeds 
are cut off as an aid to the hay crop that 
is to follow. In August the lespedeza or 
in July the clover may be harvested with 
a good yield and if lespedeza is grown it 
may be cut in August, which will give 
time for the crop to grow and develop 
plenty of seed for either harvest or re- 
seeding the land for another year. Thus, 
an abundance of hay may be grown with 
a minimum of labor, and at the same time 
practicing the soil conservation program. 

Assuming that our agriculture is some- 
what unbalanced for lack of adequate 
livestock, the production of more hay and 
increased pasturage would invite the ex- 
pansion in livestock. Certainly hay crops 
hold the soil or prevent erosion much bet- 
ter than clean culture practices. North 
Carolina is peculiar in the fact that it is 
able to grow any one of several hay crops 
during every month of the year. The 
abundance of idle land to be found could 
advantageously be put into hay crops. 
From a farm economic standpoint, the 
distribution of labor afforded by the pro- 
duction of hay offers an attraction. 

Note — See page 26. 



NORTH CAROLINA COWPEA CROP ™ 







Acreage 




Acreage 




Yield 




















Grown 


Grown 


Equivalent 


Grown 


Grown 


Equivalent 


Per Acre 


Production (Bushels) 


Price Per 


Total Value 


Value Per Acre 


Districts and Counties 


Alone 


with Corn 


Solid 


Alone 


with Corn 


Solid 


(Bu 


shels) 






Bu 


shel 












1935 






1936 




1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


District 1 — 


































Alleghany 


17 




17 


13 


18 


22 


5.0 


6.3 


85 


139 


$1.34 


$1.55 


% 114 


% 215 


% 6.70 


$ 9.77 


Ashe 


2 


1 

8 


1 


1 


5.0 


7.0 


5 


7 


1.34 


1.53 


7 


11 


6.70 


11.00 


Avery 


g 


5 


1 


g 


4 


4.0 


6.3 


32 


25 


1.34 


1.55 


43 


39 


5.36 


9.75 


Caldwell 


461 


363 


642 


403 


173 


489 


5.0 


5.5 


3,210 


2,690 


1.45 


1.55 


4,655 


4,170 


7.25 


8.53 


Surry 


762 


255 


889 


668 


239 


787 


7.0 


5.5 


6,223 


4,329 


1.28 


1.60 


7,965 


6,926 


8.96 


8.80 


Watauga 


12 


13 


18 


19 


24 


31 


5.0 


6.6 


90 


205 


1.34 


1.52 


121 


312 


6.70 


10.06 


Wilkes 


1,914 


796 


2,312 


1,600 


752 


1,976 


7.0 


6.5 


16,184 


12,844 


1.30 


1.62 


21,039 


20,807 


9.10 


10.53 


Yadkin 


1 ' 184 


163 


1,265 


887 


124 


949 


7.0 


7.0 


8,855 


6,643 


1.33 


1.63 


11,777 


10,828 


9.31 


11.40 


Northern Mountain (NW.)_ 


4 356 


1 597 


5,152 


3,592 


1,336 


4,259 


6.7 


6.3 


34,684 


26,882 


1.32 


1.61 


45,721 


43,308 


8.87 


10.17 


District 4— 


































Buncombe . . - - . 


306 


159 


385 


265 


199 


364 


6.0 


6.8 


2,310 


2,475 


1.29 


1.60 


2,980 


3,960 


7.74 


10.88 


Burke — -- 


945 


505 


1,197 


600 


602 


901 


5.0 


7.0 


5,985 


6,307 


1.30 


1.50 


7,781 


9,461 


6.50 


10.50 


Cherokee 


280 


606 


583 


231 


507 


484 


8.0 


5.7 


4,664 


2,759 


1.30 


1.50 


6,063 


4,139 


10.40 


8.55 


Clay 


225 


406 


428 


219 


255 


346 


7.0 


5.5 


2,996 


1,903 


1.35 


1.55 


4,045 


2,950 


9.45 


8.53 


Graham ------- ._ 


32 


932 


498 


32 


277 


170 


5.0 


4.5 


2,490 


765 


1.25 


1.70 


3,113 


1,301 


6.25 


7.65 


Haywood 


93 


162 


174 


102 


54 


129 


7.0 


6.0 


1,218 


774 


1.29 


1.50 


1,571 


1,161 


9.03 


9.00 


Henderson 


300 


169 


384 


492 


181 


582 


7.0 


6.2 


2,688 


3,608 


1.37 


1.52 


3,683 


5,484 


9.59 


9.42 


Jackson _ 


70 


196 


168 


58 


107 


111 


7.0 


6.1 


1,176 


677 


1.25 


1.55 


1,470 


1,049 


8.75 


9.45 


McDowell 


190 


291 


335 


142 


182 


233 


6.0 


6.6 


2,010 


1,538 


1.25 


1.47 


2,513 


2,261 


7.50 


9.70 


Macon - 


241 


722 


602 


135 


386 


328 


8.0 


6.5 


4,816 


2,132 


1.20 


1.60 


5,779 


3,411 


9.60 


10.40 


Madison--. 


43 


99 


92 


47 


52 


73 


5.0 


6.2 


460 


453 


1.29 


1.53 


593 


693 


6.45 


9.49 


Mitchell 


45 


61 


76 


17 


13 


23 


5.0 


6.2 


380 


143 


1.29 


1.50 


490 


215 


6.45 


9.35 


Polk 


298 


204 


400 


475 


256 


603 


8.0 


6.0 


3,200 


3,618 


1.25 


1.40 


4,000 


5,065 


10.00 


8.40 


Rutherford . , . - . .... 


1,389 


1,843 


2,310 


1,538 


2,123 


2,599 


8.0 


6.5 


18,480 


16,894 


1.35 


1.45 


24,948 


24,496 


10.80 


9.43 


Swain .- . 


106 


295 


253 


79 


340 


249 


4.0 


4.4 


1,012 


1,096 


1.30 


1.65 


1,316 


1,808 


5.20 


7.26 


Transylvania 


26 


18 


35 


14 


8 


18 


6.0 


6.3 


210 


113 


1.29 


1.50 


271 


170 


7.74 


9.44 


Yancey. 


20 


25 


32 


g 




10 


5.0 


6.4 


160 


64 


1.29 


1.50 


206 


96 


6.45 


9.60 


Western Mountain (W.) 


4,609 


6,693 


7,952 


4,452 


5,550 


7,223 


6.8 


6.3 


54,255 


45,319 


1.31 


1.49 


70,822 


67,720 


8.91 


9.38 


District 2 — 


































Alamance 


246 


127 


309 


185 


73 


221 


7.0 


6.5 


2,163 


1,437 


1.35 


1.60 


2,920 


2,299 


9.45 


10.40 


Caswell . 


381 


730 


746 


416 


660 


746 


6.0 


6.0 


4,476 


4,476 


1.60 


1.58 


7,162 


7,072 


9.60 


9.48 


Durham 


359 


396 


557 


402 


337 


570 


7.0 


6.0 


3,899 


3,420 


1.35 


1.67 


5,264 


5,711 


9.45 


10.02 


Forsyth- 


266 


35 


283 


321 


59 


350 


8.0 


6.5 


2,264 


2,275 


1.45 


1.65 


3,283 


3,754 


11.60 


10.73 


Franklin 


1,953 


2,657 


3,281 


1,856 


3,767 


3,739 


6.0 


7.0 


19,686 


26,173 


1.40 


1.70 


27,560 


44,494 


8.40 


11.90 


Granville 


659 


401 


860 


951 


449 


1,175 


7.0 


6.0 


6,020 


7,050 


1.35 


1.60 


8,127 


11,280 


9.45 


9.60 


Guilford 


605 


229 


719 


502 


238 


621 


8.0 


7.0 


5,752 


4,347 


1.50 


1.63 


8,628 


7,086 


12.00 


11.41 


Orange 


127 


106 


180 


253 


148 


327 


7.0 


6.2 


1,260 


2,027 


1.30 


1.65 


1,638 


3,345 


9.10 


10.23 


Person 


542 


540 


812 


383 


790 


778 


6.0 


5.8 


4,872 


4,512 


1.40 


1.60 


6,821 


7,219 


8.40 


9.28 


Rockingham - . . 

Stokes - 


394 


436 


612 


931 


886 


1,374 


7.0 


5.5 


4,284 


7,557 


1.55 


1.60 


6,640 


12,091 


10.85 


8.80 


439 


52 


465 


391 


63 


422 


7.0 


6.0 


3,255 


2,532 


1.50 


1.62 


4,883 


4,102 


10.50 


9.72 


Vance - 


661 


885 


1,103 


790 


1,067 


1,323 


6.0 


6.3 


6,618 


8,335 


1.43 


1.63 


9,464 


13,586 


8.58 


10.27 


Warren 


222 


482 


463 


2,478 


1,763 


3,359 


7.0 


6.6 


3,241 


22,169 


1.40 


1.60 


4,537 


35,469 


9.80 


10.56 


Northern Piedmont (N.) 


6,854 


7,076 


10,390 


9,859 


10,300 


15,005 


6.5 


6.4 


67,790 


96,310 


1.43 


1.64 


96,927 


157,508 


9.33 


10.50 


District 5 — 


































Alexander 


625 


311 


780 


456 


364 


638 


6.0 


8.0 


4,680 


5,104 


1.30 


1.54 


6,084 


7,860 


7.80 


12.32 


Catawba 


1,168 


704 


1,520 


1,118 


512 


1,374 


7.0 


8.5 


10,640 


11,679 


1.42 


1.53 


15,109 


17,869 


9.94 


13.00 


Chatham 


750 


585 


1,042 


289 


280 


429 


6.0 


7.5 


6,252 


3,218 


1.52 


1.52 


9,503 


4,891 


9.12 


11.40 


Davidson . — . 


885 


174 


972 


511 


204 


613 


7.0 


8.5 


6,804 


5,211 


1.47 


1.58 


10,002 


8,233 


10.29 


13.43 


Davie - 


288 


120 


348 


384 


131 


449 


7.0 


8.5 


2,436 


3,817 


1.20 


1.51 


2,923 


5,764 


8.40 


12.84 


Iredell 


1,714 


1,473 


2,450 


1,493 


821 


1,903 


7.0 


9.0 


17,150 


17,127 


1.30 


1.55 


22,295 


26,547 


9.10 


13.95 


Lee.- -- 


772 


584 


1,064 


526 


705 


878 


7.0 


5.0 


7,448 


4,390 


1.45 


1.50 


10,800 


6,585 


10.15 


7.50 


Randolph... 


431 


326 


594 


322 


130 


387 


7.0 


7.0 


4,158 


2,709 


1.40 


1.60 


5,821 


4,334 


9.80 


11.20 


Rowan 


1,209 


690 


1,554 


1,013 


1,382 


1,704 


8.0 


9.0 


12,432 


15,336 


1.25 


1.52 


15,540 


23,311 


10.00 


13.68 


Wake 


1,738 


3,344 


3,410 


2,379 


4,813 


4,785 


6.0 


6.5 


20,460 


31,103 


1.40 


1.65 


28,644 


51,320 


8.40 


10.73 


Central Piedmont (C.) — 


9,580 


8*311 


13,734 


8, 491 


9,342 


13,160 


6.7 


7.6 


92,460 


99,694 


1.37 


1.57 


126,721 


156,714 


9.23 


11.91 


District 8 — 


































Anson 


1,1/4 


c ... 
0,91b 


4,632 


1,928 


10,017 


6,936 


7.0 


7.0 


32,424 


48,552 


1.45 


1.50 


47,015 


72,828 


10.15 


10.50 


Cabarrus 


800 


1,233 


1,416 


708 


1,396 


1,406 


7.0 


8.0 


9,912 


11,248 


1.42 


1.58 


14,075 


17,772 


9.94 


12.64 


Cleveland .._ 


858 


284 


1,000 


2,622 


1,992 


3,618 


7.0 


7.0 


7,000 


25,326 


1.45 


1.48 


10,150 


37,482 


10.15 


10.36 


Gaston . 


830 


971 


1,315 


1 ,946 


1*662 


2,777 


7.0 


7.5 


9,205 


20,828 


1.52 


1.55 


13,992 


32,283 


10.64 


11.63 


Lincoln.. _ 


722 


871 


1,157 


1 1 372 


768 


1,756 


7.0 


8.5 


8,099 


14,926 


1.50 


1.50 


12,149 


22,389 


10.50 


12.75 


Mecklenburg 


1,967 


3,093 


3,513 


2,069 


4,008 


4,263 


8.0 


7.0 


28,104 


29,841 


1.55 


1.60 


43,561 


47,746 


12.40 


11.20 


Montgomery _ 


659 


557 


837 


516 


456 


744 


7.0 


6.5 


6,559 


4,836 


1.43 


1.48 


9,379 


7,157 


10.01 


9.62 


Moore.- - 


967 


1 ,404 


1,669 


762 


1,662 


1,593 


7.0 


6.0 


11,683 


9,558 


1.52 


1.45 


17,758 


13,859 


10.64 


- 8.70 


Richmond 


1,831 


g' i5g 


4,910 


2, 154 


2,297 


3,302 


7.0 


6.0 


34,370 


19,812 


1.50 


1.45 


51,555 


28,727 


10.50 


8.70 


Stanly 


585 


886 


1,028 


499 


1,201 


1,099 


7.0 


7.0 


7,196 


7,693 


1.38 


1.52 


9,930 


11,693 


9.66 


10.64 


Union - 


953 


804 


1,355 


1,078 


1,428 


1,792 


8.0 


. 6.5 


10,840 


11,648 


1.40 


1.53 


15,176 


17,821 


11.20 


9.94 


Southern Piedmont (S.) 


1 1 , 346 


23,178 


22,932 


15! 654 


27,267 


29,286 


7.2 


7.0 


165,392 


204,268 


1.48 


1.52 


244,740 


309,757 


10.67 


10.58 


District 3 — 






























Bertie 


97 


147 


170 


78 


129 


142 


8.0 


5.7 


1,360 


809 


1.20 


1.68 


1,632 


1,359 


9.60 


9.57 


Camden 


41 




41 


4 


1 


4 


7.0 


7.7 


287 
868 


31 


1.27 


1.80 


364 


56 


8.89 


14.00 


Chowan 


40 


168 


124 


58 


61 


88 


7.0 


7.0 


616 


1.27 


1.75 


1,102 


1,078 


8.89 


12.25 


Currituck 


382 


154 


459 


61 


243 


182 


7.0 


7.3 


3,213 


1,329 


1.27 


1.75 


4,081 


2,326 


8.89 


12.78 


Dare 


44 


11 


49 


83 




83 


7.0 


6.0 


343 


498 


1.27 


1.80 


436 


896 


8.89 


10.80 


Edgecombe. 


351 


1 106 


904 


1,167 


2,308 


2,321 


7.0 


6.5 


6,328 


15,087 


1.30 


1.70 


8,226 


25,648 


9.10 


11.05 


Gates 


60 


' 30 


75 


163 


509 


417 


7.0 


6.4 


525 


2,669 


1.27 


1.73 


667 


4,617 


8.89 


11.07 


Halifax 


1,506 


2 168 


2,590 


1,755 


3,889 


3,699 


8.0 


7.3 


20,720 


27,003 


1.25 


1.60 


25,900 


43,205 


10.00 


11.68 


Hertford.... 


' 148 


518 


407 


' 136 


624 


448 


7.0 


6.5 


2,849 


2,912 


1.27 


1.70 


3,618 


4,950 


8.89 


11.05 


Martin 


188 


78 


227 


175 


265 


307 


8.0 


6.2 


1,816 


1,903 


1.25 


1.65 


2,270 


3,140 


10.00 


10.23 


Nash 


839 


1 486 


1,582 


1 257 


4, 169 


3,341 


7.0 


6.4 


11,074 


21,382 


1.35 


1.68 


14,950 


35,922 


9.45 


10.75 


Northampton 


863 


935 


1,330 


707 


1238 


1,326 


7.0 


7.2 


9,310 


9,547 


1.25 


1.66 


11,638 


15,848 


8.75 


11.95 


Pasquotank 


33 


24 


45 


68 


174 


155 


7.0 


7.5 


315 


1,163 


1.27 


1.80 


400 


2,093 


8.89 


13.50 


Perquimans 


100 


142 


171 


g 


60 


39 


7.0 


7.0 


1,197 


273 


1.27 


1.75 


1,520 


478 


8.89 


12.26 


Tyrrell 


85 


149 


159 


16 


84 


58 


8.0 


6.4 


1,272 


371 


1.27 


1.80 


1,615 


668 


10.16 


11.52 


Washington ... _ . .. 


37 


125 


99 


39 


167 


122 


8.0 


7.0 


792 


854 


1.27 


1.75 


1,006 


1,495 


10.16 


12.25 


Northern Coastal (NE.)_ 


4 814 


7 241 


8,432 


5 776 


13 921 


12,732 


7.4 


6.8 


62,269 


86,447 


1.28 


1.66 


79,425 


143,7)9 


9.42 


11.29 


District 6 — 


































Beaufort 


458 


181 


548 


200 


145 


272 


8.0 


6.2 


4,384 


1,686 


1.33 


1.75 


5,831 


2,951 


10.64 


10.85 


Carteret 


92 


322 


253 


90 


451 


315 


5.0 


4.4 


1,265 


1,386 


1.33 


1.70 


1,682 


2,356 


6.65 


7.48 


Craven 


242 


1 104 


794 


313 


1 657 


1,141 


5.0 


4.7 


3,970 


5,363 


1.35 


1.70 


5,360 


9,117 


6.75 


8.00 


Greene 


179 


1 485 


921 


290 


3 005 


1,792 


6.0 


6.5 


5,526 


11,648 


1.25 


1.75 


6,908 


20,384 


7.50 


11.38 


Hyde 


306 


' 150 


381 


74 


'l27 


137 


6.0 


7.0 


2,286 


959 


1.33 


1.80 


3,040 


1,726 


7.98 


12.60 


Johnston 


1 316 


7 062 


4,847 


1 213 


11 100 


6,763 


7.0 


5.8 


33,929 


39,225 


1.35 


1.65 


45,804 


64,721 


9.45 


9.57 


Jones 


107 


628 


421 


' 73 


*910 


528 


5.0 


4.8 


2,105 


2,534 


1.40 


1.65 


2,947 


4,181 


7.00 


7.92 


Lenoir 


241 


909 


695 


338 


2 242 


1,459 


6.0 


5.0 


4,170 


■ 7,295 


1.25 


1.70 


5,213 


12,402 


7.50 


8.50 


Pamlico 


142 


200 


242 


111 


557 


389 


6.0 


5.0 


1,452 


1,945 


1.33 


1.75 


1,931 


3,404 


7.98 


8.75 


Pitt 


188 


982 


679 


186 


824 


598 


6.0 


6.0 


4,074 


3,588 


1.30 


1.80 


5,296 


6,458 


7.80 


10.80 


Wayne 


1 183 


9 245 


5,805 


601 


9 949 


5,575 


6.0 


4.8 


34,830 


26,760 


1.30 


1.72 


45,279 


46,027 


7.80 


8.26 


Wilson 


1 024 


6 837 


4,442 


1 148 


8 567 


5,432 


6.0 


6.6 


26,652 


35,851 


1.40 


1.75 


37,313 


62,738 


8.40 


11.55 


Central Coastal (E.).. 


5 478 


29 105 


20,028 


4! 638 


39*534 


24,401 


6.2 


5.7 


124,643 


138,240 


1.34 


1.71 


166,604 


236,466 


8.32 


9.69 


District 9 — 






























Blaaen 


817 


8,036 


4,835 


861 


7 955 


4,838 


6.0 


6.4 


29,010 


30,963 


1.43 


1.57 


41,484 


48,612 


8.58 


10.05 


Brunswick 


379 


4,049 


2,403 


449 


4*584 


2,741 


5.0 


6.5 


12,015 


17,817 


1.40 


1.50 


16,821 


26,726 


7.00 


9.75 


Columbus 


1,036 


15,633 


8,852 


1 394 


21 '374 


12,081 


7.0 


7.0 


61,964 


84,567 


1.42 


1.50 


87,989 


126,851 


9.94 


10.50 


Cumberland 


673 


3,065 


2,205 


1 547 


3 871 


3,482 


7 


5.4 


15,435 


18,803 


1.50 


1.50 


23,153 


28,205 


10.50 


8. 10 


Duplin 


734 


4,549 


3,008 


'628 


6 [564 


3,910 


6.0 


5.3 


18,048 


20*723 


1*40 


1*70 


25*267 


35 | 229 


8*40 


9*01 


Harnett 


471 


5,527 


3,234 


800 


4,056 


2,828 


/ .U 


o.v 


&£t, UOO 


14, 140 


1 .50 


1 .55 


33 , 957 


21,917 


10.50 


7.75 


Hoke 


954 


7,804 


4,856 


676 


6,863 


4,107 


7.0 


5.0 


33,992 


20,535 


1.45 


1.45 


49,288 


29,776 


10.15 


7.25 




50 


259 


178 


70 


156 


148 


7.0 


7.0 


1,253 


1,036 


1.45 


1.60 


1,817 


1,658 


10.15 


11.20 


Onslow 


101 


357 


279 


217 


3,360 


1,897 


5.0 


5.0 


1,395 


9,485 


1.56 


1.58 


2,176 


14,986 


7.80 


7.90 


Pender 


230 


1,917 


1,188 


250 


2,161 


1,330 


5.0 


6.0 


5,940 


7,980 


1.45 


1.60 


8,613 


12,768 


7.25 


9.60 


Robeson.. 


2,820 


45,518 


25,579 


3,651 


47,440 


27,371 


7.0 


6.2 


179,053 


169,700 


1.38 


1.50 


247,093 


254,550 


9.45 


9.30 


Sampson 


1,166 


5,387 


3,859 


1,033 


6,487 


4,276 


6.0 


5.0 


23 , 154 


21,380 


1.53 


1.60 


35,426 


34,208 


9.18 


8.00 


Scotland.: 


2,453 


13,133 


8,969 


2,664 


14,698 


10,013 


7.0 


5.2 


62,783 


52,068 


1.45 


1.47 


91,035 


76,540 


10.15 


7.64 


Southern Coastal (SE.) 


11,884 


115,234 


69,446 


14,240 


129,569 


79,022 


6.7 


5.9 


466,680 


469,197 


1.42 


1.52 


664,119 


712,026 


9.49 


9.01 


State... 


58,921 


198,435 


158,066 


66,702 


236,819 


185,088 


6.8 


6.3 


1,068,173 


1,166,357 


1.40 


1.57 


1,495,079 


1.827,278 


9.42 


9.87 



24 



NORTH CAROLINA TAME HAY CROP (*See Note) 









Yield Per Acre 








Price Per Ton 








Value Per Acre 


A 


reage PI a 


nted 




(Pounds 




Pre 


auction ( 


^ons) 




(Dollars 


) 


Tot 


1 TT_1 /TV_ 

u Value (Dc 


liars) 




(.uollars 


I 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


18, 834 


9, 175 


9,718 


1,950 


1,825 


1,550 


18 ,363 


8,372 


7,532 


S18.00 


$11.00 


$17.00 


$ 330, 534 


$ 92,092 


1 

% 128,044 


517.54 


$10.04 


$ 13.17 


12,120 


14,878 


14,591 


2,000 


1 , 850 


1 ,590 


12,120 


13,762 


11,600 


19.00 


11 .50 


17.50 


230,280 


158,263 


203,000 


19 .00 


10. 64 


13.91 


11,985 


11,362 


12,258 


2,000 


1 , 900 


1 , 600 


11,985 


10,794 


9,806 


17.50 


12 .00 


17.00 


209,738 


129,528 


166,702 


17.50 


11 .40 


13 .60 


6,743 


3,496 


2,976 


2, 000 


2, 150 


1 ,470 


6, 743 


3, 758 


2, 187 


19 .00 


15.00 


16.50 


128, 117 


56,370 


36,085 


19.00 


16.12 


19 19 
IZ . IZ 


5, 778 


3 , 277 


3 , 244 


1 , 950 


1 ,925 


1 , 610 


5, 634 


3 , 154 


2, 612 


18.50 


15.00 


16.60 


1U4, zz9 


47,310 


43 ,359 


18.04 


14 .44 


13 .36 


9, 888 


8 , 796 


7,036 


2, 100 


2,050 


1 ,510 


10, 382 


9 , 016 


5,312 


18 .00 


13.00 


16.50 


186,876 


117, 208 


87,648 


18 .90 


13 .33 


19 Ad 

iz.4b 


6, 168 


4 ,094 


2 , 902 


2 , 100 


1 , 975 


1 , 590 


6,476 


4 ,043 


2 ,307 


19 .00 


14.00 


15.80 


123,044 


56, 602 


36,451 


19. 95 


13 .83 


12.56 


6, 281 


4 , 787 


2, 978 


2 , 000 


2 , 000 


1 i9n 
1 , ozu 


6, 281 


4, 787 


2, 263 


19 .00 


15.00 


16.30 


119, oo9 


71 ,805 


36,887 


19 .00 


15.00 


1 1Q 

iz .oy 


) 77 , 797 


59 , 865 


55 , 703 


9 ftftA 
Z , UU4 


9 f\QA 
£,U54 


1 RAP 
I , Out 


77 , 984 


57, 686 


43 , 619 


18. 36 


1 2. 64 


16.92 


1 ,432, 157 


729 , 1 78 


738, 176 


18. 41 


19 10 

iz lo 


1Q OC 
1 . Co 


12, 467 


_ 

1 1 , 879 


o,o77 


- 

2 , 050 


2, 150 


1 , 550 


12, 779 


12, 770 


4, 942 


18.50 


16.00 


18.50 


OO C 111) 

zoo, 412 


2U4 , ozO 


91 ,427 


18. 96 


1 

1 7 . 20 


1 A Id 
13 . 04 


6, 410 


3 , 839 


3 ,010 


1 01/1 
1 , you 


9 1 1A 
c, IOU 


1 1JA 
1 , 04U 


6, 250 


4, 126 


2,318 


18.00 


14 .00 


17.00 


112 ,500 


57,764 


39,406 


17 11 
1 / .00 


1 1 fti 
10. uo 


13 09 


2, 405 


3 ,034 


2, 400 


9 1 AA 
Z , 1UU 


9 1 1A 
Z , IOU 


1 ftJA 
1 , 04U 


2 ,525 


3 , 262 


1 ,966 


17.50 


15.00 


18.00 


44 , 188 


48,930 


35,388 


18.37 


1 £ 11 
10 . 10 


14 74 


1 , 632 


1,131 


1 , 009 


2 , 000 


9 1 AA 
Z , 1UU 


1 , 600 


1 , 632 


1 , 188 


807 


17.00 


14.00 


17.50 


27, 744 


16, 632 


14, 122 


17.00 


Id 71 
11 . 1 1 


14 00 


985 


1,411 


1 ,395 


1 , 900 


2 , 000 


1 , 600 


936 


1 ,411 


1,116 


18.00 


14 .00 


18.50 


16, 848 


19, 754 


20,646 


17. 10 


14 .00 


11 vn 
Iri . SU 


6, 885 


6, 286 


4, 092 


2 , 050 


2 , 050 


1 , 630 


7,057 


6,443 


3 ,335 


18.50 


15.00 


17.50 


130,555 


96, 645 


58,363 


18. 96 


15.37 


14 26 


2 ,901 


2, 689 


4 , 629 


9 1 AO 
z , 1UU 


9 1 AA 
Z , 1UU 


1 A1A 

1 , oou 


3 ,046 


2, 824 


3 , 819 


17.50 


15.00 


18.00 


53 , 305 


42 , 360 


68 , 742 


18.37 


1 1 71 
10 . 10 


14 85 


2 , 977 


3 , 163 


3 , 233 


9 1 AA 
z , 1UU 


9 1 AA 
di , 1UU 


1 RAA 

1 , ouu 


3 , 126 


3 ,321 


2,587 


19 .00 


15.00 


18.00 


59 ,394 


49,815 


46,566 


19 .95 


1 1 71 

10. 10 


14 40 


2 , 002 


1 AO. A 
1 , 484 


1 ,476 


1,900 


2,100 


1,600 


1 , 902 


1 , 558 


1,181 


19.00 


15.00 


17.50 


36, 138 


90 O 7A 

lo ,o/U 


20 , 668 


18.05 


15.75 


14 .'00 


3 , 127 


3 , 035 


2,478 


2,100 


2,050 


1,640 


3 ,283 


3,111 


2,032 


17.50 


14.00 


18.00 


57, 453 


43 , 554 


36,576 


18.37 


14.35 


14.76 


9,056 


7,424 


9,365 


1 OAA 

1 , yuu 


1 QAA 
1 , SUU 


1 inn 
1 ,ouu 


8,603 


6,682 


7,024 


18 .00 


15.00 


18.00 


154,854 


100,230 


126,432 


17 in 
1 / . 1U 


11 1A 
10 . OU 


13 50 


6,163 


7,548 


6,932 


1 QAA 

1 , yuu 


1 71A 
1 , I OU 


1 fi91 

1 , ozo 


5,855 


6,605 


5,632 


18.50 


13 .00 


17.50 


108,318 


85,865 


98,560 


17 10 
1 / .OS 


11 Id 
11 .OS 


14 22 


920 


1 , 022 


1 , 237 


1 7AA 
1 , /UU 


9 AAA 
Z , UUU 


1 AQ(\ 
1 , 4SU 


782 


1 , 022 


915 


18.00 


15.00 


16.50 


14 ,076 


15,330 


15,098 


15.30 


1 1 AA 
10. UU 


12 20 


5,493 


5 ,037 


5, 147 


1 , 900 


9 A1A 
Z , UOU 


1 , 640 


5,218 


5, 163 


4 , 221 


18.00 


15.00 


17.10 


93 , 924 


77, 445 


72, 179 


17. 10 


IK QO 

10 .OS 


14 02 


967 


1 ,097 


691 


1 950 


2 000 


1 570 


943 


1 ,097 


543 


18.50 


14 .00 


17.00 


17,446 


15,358 


9,231 


1Q ftA 
IS .U4 


11 AA 
It .UU 


13 36 


1 , 105 


2, 172 


1 ,016 


9 9AA 

z , zuu 


9 AAA 
- , UUU 


1 7AA 
1 , /UU 


1,216 


2, 172 


864 


18.00 


15.00 


17.50 


21 , 888 


32,580 


15, 120 


19 . 81 


1 1 AA 
10 . UU 


14 88 


1 OOA 
0, ZZ4 


6 , 853 


5 , 738 


1 CIA 
1 , SOU 


1 791 
1 , / Lo 


1 £71 
1,0/0 


4 ,832 


5,911 


4 , 806 


19.00 


14 .00 


17.50 


91 , 808 


82 , 754 


84, 105 


17.57 


1 9 AO. 
IZ . US 


14 66 


So , / I 6 


oy , i u 4 


fift 99K 
DU , C CD 


1 Q7Q 


1 QR7 
1 , 001 


1 , 03 


69 , 985 


fift fifiC 
Oo , OOO 


48, 108 


18.24 


14. 75 


17.72 


1 07C oci 
1 , CIO 1 


1 m 9 7nc 
I . U I c. tub 


oco con 

852,629 


18.06 


1d fiR 
1 4 . OO 


14 16 


1 1 , Izo 


10, 171 


8,ol8 


1 850 


1 895 


1 680 


10,289 


9, 6o7 


0,987 


19.50 


14 .00 


17.75 


2UU, bob 


134, 918 


124,019 


1°. ftA 
IS .U4 


13 26 


14 .91 


1 9£1 
, Z01 


1 917 
, ZO 1 


4 , 994 


1 7AA 
1 , / UU 


1 fiAA 

1 , ouu 


1 R9A 

1 , ozu 


4 , 472 


4 , 190 


4 ,045 


18.00 


15.50 


17.50 


80,496 


64,945 


"7A "TOT 

70, 787 


1 1 QA 
10 .01) 


1 9 Aft 
1Z ,4U 


14. 17 


< Oil 

4 , oil 


4 , 523 


1 1 1 Q 

, 1 lo 


1 750 


1 900 


1 660 


4 , 210 


4, 297 


4 , 244 


19 .00 


15.00 


17.00 


70 (ion 

/y ,yyu 


64 ,455 


72, 148 


10. 00 


14 25 


14. 11 


1 1 ftTA 
10, U/4 


9 , 535 


7, 735 


2 050 


2 100 


1 610 


15, 451 


10,012 


6 , 227 


20.00 


15.50 


17.50 


onn n9A 
oUy , U2U 


155 , 186 


108,973 


20 50 


16 28 


14 09 


£ 1 Aft 

0, 14U 


4 711 


5 , 272 


l!750 


l!800 


M20 


c 070 
0,0/0 


4 , 240 


A 97A 

1 , z/u 


18.50 


15.50 


16.50 


99, 401 


65, 720 


70, 455 


ie!i9 


13^95 


13 .'36 


5 , 870 


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5 , 778 


1,800 


1,700 


1,590 


5 , 283 


4 , 551 


4 , 594 


18.50 


16.00 


17.00 


07 70 R 

y/ , 100 


72, 816 


7s,09s 


16.65 


13.60 


13.52 


16,389 


16,240 


11,008 


1 900 


2 050 


1 630 


15.570 


16,646 


8,972 


19.50 


15 .00 


17.50 


303,615 


249,690 


157,010 


18 11 
lo . OO 


15 38 


14.26 


7,542 


5,870 


5,683 


1 800 


1 900 


1 640 


6,788 


5,577 


4,660 


18.50 


14 .50 


18.00 


125,578 


80,867 


83,880 


16 . 65 


1 1 7ft 
i-O. lo 


14. 76 


3 , 984 


2 , 991 


3 , 422 


1 750 


1 700 


1 , oou 


3 ,486 


9 1,49 
Z , ->) _ 


2, 789 


18.00 


14.50 


17.25 


62, 748 


36,859 


48, 1 10 


1171 

10. /o 


19 19 
IZ . oz 


14 06 


8, 895 


8 , 030 


7 ,079 


1 750 


1 850 


1 600 


7, 783 


7,428 


5, 663 


19.00 


15.00 


16.75 


1^7 Q77 

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111, 420 


94 , 855 


16 62 


11 ftft 
10 . ss 


13.40 


4 , 288 


3 , 455 


2 , 307 


1 700 


1 900 


1 650 


3 , 645 


3 , 282 


1 , 903 


19.00 


14 .50 


16.50 


69 , 255 


45 , 948 


31 ,399 


16 15 


1 1 in 
10 . ou 


13 . 61 


3 252 


3 657 


4 141 


1 850 


1 750 


1 600 


3 , 008 


3 , 200 


3,313 


18.00 


15.00 


16.75 


54 , 144 


48 , 000 


55,493 


1 6. 65 


13 13 


13 .40 


6 , 172 


6 , 838 


4 , 494 


1 800 


1 650 


1 500 


5, 555 


5 , 641 


3 ,370 


17.50 


15.00 


16.50 


97, 213 


84, 615 


55, 605 


1 1 71 
10 . lo 


12 37 


12.37 


98, 801 


ftfi C 1 9 


7P. tAA 
i , 044 


1 840 


1 876 


1 620 


90, 913 


81 , 243 


61 , 037 


19.00 


14.96 


17.22 


1 797 7no 
i./c/ /uy 


1 91 B A1Q 
I . c\D 409 


1 ncn 000 
1 , 050 , col 


17 dQ 
1 / . 4o 


ij no 
1 H . UO 


13.95 


1 fifiB 
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9 1 79 


1 £10 
1 , bOS 


1 850 


1 750 


1 530 


1 OA Q 
O , -44 


1 , 901 


1 

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19.00 


15 .00 


16.00 


99 , 617 


28,515 


20,048 


17 58 


13 13 


12.24 


1 i n£n 
10 , uou 


9 , 983 


5 , 979 


2^000 


2^050 


1,'500 


15,060 


10, 233 


4, 484 


18.50 


15.00 


16.50 


278, 610 


153 , 495 


TO no£ 

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18^50 


15^37 


12^37 


7 "397 
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5 387 


3 325 


1,800 


2,050 


1,640 


6, 594 


1 199 
O, OZZ 


2 , 727 


18.00 


14.00 


16.00 


11C £09 

11s, oyz 


77 QAO 

/ / , oUS 


43 , 632 


16.20 


14.35 


13.12 


14,453 


10^782 


lo! 115 


1 900 


2 100 


1 590 


13,730 


11,321 


8,042 


19.00 


15 .00 


17.00 


260,870 


169,815 


136,714 


1 fi A1 
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1 1 71 
10 . 10 


13 52 


11,989 


5,765 


3,618 


2 050 


2 050 


1 570 


12,289 


5,909 


2,840 


19.00 


14 .00 


16.75 


233,491 


82,726 


47,570 


19 48 


14 35 


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23 , 33 1 


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6,439 


1 950 


2 000 


1 610 


22 , 748 


1 2 , 009 


5, 183 


19.00 


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16.20 


^19 919 

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180, 135 


83 , 965 


1 Q 11 
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1 1 aa 
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13 04 


2 , 988 


1 550 


1 fifil 
1 , 800 


1 700 


1 725 


1 500 


2 , 540 


1 ,337 


1 ,397 


18.50 


14 .50 


15.75 


Aii oon 

4b , yyu 


19,387 


00 nno 
11 , UUo 


15 73 


12 50 


11 .81 


13 , 646 


1 9 A79 


6, 258 


1 950 


2 100 


1 550 


13 ,305 


12, 676 


4, 850 


18.50 


14 .00 


16.10 


246, 143 


177,464 


78 , 085 


18 04 


14 70 


12.48 


30 401 


19 003 


12 263 


2 000 


2 050 


1 550 


30 , 401 


19 , 478 


9 , 504 


18.50 


14.00 


16.60 


1£9 A in 

ooz , 4iy 


979 K09 

z/z , oyz 


157, 766 


18 50 


14 35 


1 9 ft£ 

IZ . 00 


1 1 1 AO 
10 , 14Z 


12 023 


1 1 A£d 
1 1 , U04 


1 800 


1 850 


1 630 


13 , 628 


11,121 


9,017 


19.50 


15.50 


16.00 


265, 746 


179 Q7fi 
liL,OI\) 


144 , 272 


17 55 


14 34 


13 04 


1 Aft nnR 

I 4U , UUD 


oU , / HO 


fi9 RC9 


1 936 


2 016 


1 576 


135, 538 


91 , 507 


49, 297 


18.78 


14. 58 


16.39 


9 RAA 7Qn 

t, 044, /yu 


1 Q1Q 

1 , 60 . y lo 


0U0, U41 


18 18 


14 70 


19 Q1 


1 A 017 
13 , SO/ 


11 267 


12 226 


1 850 


1 650 


1 560 


lo , 74o 


9 , 295 


9,5o6 


19.00 


1 A nn 
14 .00 


15.50 


9(11 117 
Zbl , 11 / 


1QA 

IOU , IOU 


1<7 ono 

14/ , SUo 


17 58 


11 55 


12 09 


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7 Adi 

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£ 97/1 
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2 000 


2 050 


1 630 


18,095 


7, 221 


5, 110 


18.00 


15 .00 


16.50 


191 7tn 
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108,315 


84,315 


18 00 


15 37 


11 di 

10 . 40 


8 861 


8 226 


6 855 


1^950 


2^200 


1^600 


8, 639 


9,049 


5 , 484 


18 50 


14.50 


17.60 


1 10 Q99 

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131 , 21 1 


96,518 


18^04 


15195 


14.08 


7 171 
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1 0.71 


5 002 


1,850 


2,050 


1,580 


7,007 


6,020 


3 , 952 


18.75 


15.00 


17.50 


131 ,381 


on Qnn 
yu,ouu 


69 , 1 60 


17.34 


15.38 


13.83 


9,151 


8,561 


2! 448 


1 900 


2 000 


1 600 


8,693 


8,561 


1,958 


19.00 


14.00 


16.70 


165,167 


119,854 


32,699 


18 05 


14 00 


1 1 1£ 
10 .00 


19,166 


9,479 


9,201 


1 950 


2 100 


1 600 


18,687 


9,953 


7,361 


18.50 


15.00 


16.70 


345,710 


149,295 


122,929 


18 04 


15 75 


11 Ifi 
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5 822 


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1 £7A 
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5, 240 


2, 706 


1 ,361 


18.50 


15.00 


17.00 


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yb, y4U 


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4u, oyu 


23, 137 


16 65 


13 50 


11 Q1 
lo.So 


1 Mfi 
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j cia 
4 , sou 


4, /00 


1 750 


1 650 


1 600 


4, 846 


4,001 


3 , 760 


19.75 


15.00 


17.25 


95 , 709 


60,015 


64 , 860 


17 28 


12 37 


11 on 
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6 , 085 


£ a 1 o 

0,418 


5 , 947 


1 700 


1 500 


1 530 


5, 172 


4, 814 


4 , 550 


20.00 


15.00 


16.00 


103 ,443 


72, 210 


79 onn 
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17 00 


11 25 


IZ . Z4 


11 245 


3 591 


9 QOI 

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1 900 


2 200 


1 fifiA 
1 , OoU 


10, 683 


3 , 950 


2,516 


18.00 


15.50 


16.50 


1 09 OClA 

lyz, zy4 


61 , 225 


41 , 514 


17 10 


17 05 


11 Qfl 
10. SO 


iy , yz4 


10 211 


7 dAI 
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2 050 


2 050 


1 620 


20, 422 


10, 466 


5, 996 


18.00 


15.50 


16.25 


Q£7 lOft 

ob/ , Oao 


1 co 999 

1 bz , Zzo 


97,435 


18 45 


15 89 


13 16 


19G 11Q 
Ito Jib 


7ft R9fl 


fid 71 7 


1 919 


1 936 


1 594 


1 21 , 227 


76, 036 


51 ,584 


18.52 


14.80 


16.54 


9 O^yl QQC 
C , Z44 , OOO 


1 19K OCO 
1 , Mo, OOO 


853, 175 


17 77 


14 33 


11 1ft 


1 631 


1 195 


1 97ft 
1 , Z/U 


1 850 


1 100 


1 , OIU 


1 ,509 


657 


851 


15.25 


13.50 


15.50 


no f\m 

lo ,012 


s,s70 


lo , 190 


14 11 


7 42 


1ft 10. 

iu . oy 


1 890 

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9 170 

z , o / y 


9 111 
Z , 101 


2 025 


2 150 


1 71A 
1 , / OU 


1 , 852 


2, 557 


1 , 882 


18.00 


15.00 


16.25 


Q1 QQC 
00,000 


38,355 


30,582 


18 23 


16 12 


1 A OO 
14 . ZZ 


499 


111 
001 


377 


1 900 


1 030 


1 350 


474 


180 


254 


16.00 


13 .00 


16.25 


7,584 


2,340 


4 , 128 


15 20 


6 67 


10 95 


2 , 268 


2 ,519 


2 , 885 


2 000 


2 250 


1 7AA 
1 , i UU 


2, 268 


2,834 


2,452 


18.50 


15 .00 


16.00 


41 , 958 


42,510 


on 90 o 
Oa , ZoZ 


18 50 


16 88 


11 fift 

10 . OU 


A1 


41 




1 800 


1 850 


1 lAn 

1 , OUU 


37 


38 


38 


20.00 


15.00 


15.75 


740 


570 


598 


18 05 


13 90 


1 1 Qfi 

1 1 . yo 


A 117 


4 , 266 


A BftO 
4 , SOZ 


1 900 


1 425 


1 91A 
1 , ZOU 


4 ,329 


3,040 


2 , 990 


15.75 


13 .00 


16.00 


68, 182 


39 ,520 


47, 840 


14 96 


9.26 


9 84 


595 


111 
OOl 


710 


1 850 


1 075 


1 90A 

1 , zyu 


550 


297 


458 


15.00 


13.00 


16.00 


8, 250 


3 , 861 


7,328 


13 87 


7 01 


10 32 


3 113 


1 ftGft 


3 055 


1^875 


M00 


1,320 


2 ,918 


1 ,329 


2,016 


15.50 


13.00 


15.75 


45, 229 


17, 277 


3 1 , 752 


14^53 


9J0 


10!39 


1 , 600 


i , O /U 


678 


1,800 


1,075 


1,220 


1 , 440 


736 


414 


14.75 


13.00 


15.50 


21 ,240 


9, 568 


6,417 


13.28 


6.98 


9.46 


1,221 


1,298 


£57 


1 01 A 

1 , you 


1 K91 
1 , OZO 


1,3/0 


1,190 


1,055 


656 


15.50 


13 .50 


15.50 


18,445 


14,243 


10,168 


15 11 


10 97 


1ft fi9 
1U . OZ 


5,690 


5,141 


10,264 


1 850 


1 900 


1 520 


5,263 


4,884 


7,801 


18.50 


15.00 


16.00 


97,366 


73,260 


124,816 


17 11 


14.25 


12 16 


3,986 


4 ,331 


4 , 679 


1 900 


1 150 


1 Q7A 

1 , /u 


3, 787 


2,490 


3 , 205 


15.00 


13 . 50 


15.50 


56, 805 


33 , 615 


49, 677 


14 25 


7 76 


10 62 


2 , 452 


1 A1 d 
O , U14 




2 000 


2 150 


1 7BA 
1 , / oU 


2,452 


3 , 240 


2,332 


18.00 


15.00 


16.75 


44, 136 


48 , 600 


39,061 


18 00 


16 12 


14 91 


1 , 905 


1 , 407 


1 , 7U9 


1 875 


1 250 


1 , 370 


1 , 786 


879 


1 , 170 


17.00 


14.00 


16.75 


OA QflO 

oU.obz 


12,306 


19,598 


15 94 


8 75 


11 47 


1 , 222 


1 , 858 


1 1 405 


1 905 


2 100 


1 1AA 
1 , OUU 


1 , 164 


1,950 


1 ,054 


16.50 


15.00 


16.00 


19, 206 


29 , 250 


16, 864 


15 72 


15. 74 


12 00 


2 ,544 


2 , 586 


3 , 145 


1 900 


1 700 


1 QQ1 
1 , OOO 


2,417 


2, 198 


2,099 


16.00 


14.00 


15.50 


38,672 


OH T70 

o0,77z 


32 , 534 


15 20 


11 90 


10 34 


1(\ 1 11 

OO, I DO 


OA one 
04 , ZUj 


Aft Q1 7 
4U, Ol / 


1 902 


1 fi£>ft 


1 ,404 


33 , 436 


28, 364 


29,672 


16.58 


14.28 


15.97 


554 , 523 


ACiA Q1 7 

4U4 , l / 


473 , 785 


15 77 


11 84 


11 61 


y 1 1 7 7 


o,9oO 


9 , 4oo 


2 000 


2 050 


1 650 


9 , 177 


9, 153 


7, 783 


17.50 


13.00 


16.00 


160, 598 


lis, ysy 


124, 528 


17.50 


13.32 


13 20 


1 ,040 


1 , 421 


1 , 655 


1 850 


1 650 


1 f\AA 

1 , ouu 


962 


1 , 172 


1 ,324 


16.50 


15.00 


16.25 


15,873 


17, 580 


21 ,515 


15 26 


12.37 


13 .00 


d OQA 
4 , ZS4 


1 fiftfi 
, S8b 


6,933 


1 CIA 

1 , sou 


1 , 650 


1 ,500 


3 , 963 


4,852 


5, 200 


19.50 


15.00 


16.00 


77 97n 

/ / ,z/y 


79 70A 

(I, /SU 


00 9nn 
So , zuu 


IS . U4 


12 36 


19 ftft 
IZ .UU 




5 , 808 


7 ,391 


1,900 


1,850 


1,500 


5, 425 


5,372 


5,543 


19.00 


15.00 


15.50 


1 AO A7C 

lOo ,U/o 


80 , 580 


85, 917 


18.05 


13] 87 


11.62 


192 


515 


527 


1,950 


2,000 


1,690 


187 


515 


445 


17.00 


14.00 


15.50 


3, 179 


7,210 


6, 898 


16.56 


14.00 


13.09 


9,157 


12,180 


11,994 


1 QAA 

1 , yuu 


1 , 900 


1 , 640 


8,699 


11,571 


9,835 


19.00 


15.00 


16.00 


165,281 


173,565 


157,360 


18 05 


14 25 


13 12 


3,895 


4,609 


5,348 


1 071 
1 , 8/0 


1 , 550 


1 , 620 


3,652 


3,572 


4,332 


19.00 


15.50 


16.50 


69,388 


55,366 


71,478 


17 81 


12 01 


13 36 


8, 449 


9,011 


9 , 752 


1 CAA 
1 , SUU 


1 7 in 
1 , / ou 


1 Q1A 

1 , oou 


7, 604 


7,885 


6,583 


19.00 


13.50 


16.00 


144,476 


1 I\£i A AO 

lub,44S 


1A1 09Q 

lUo,ozS 


17 10 


11 .81 


10. 80 


1 , 958 


2, 484 


3 , 126 


1 , 975 


2,050 


1 , 550 


1 ,934 


2,546 


2,423 


18.00 


15.00 


16.00 


34,812 


38, 190 


38, 768 


17 70 
1 / . /S 


15 37 


12 40 


8,094 


9 , 149 


12 , 168 


1 , 950 


1 , 825 


1 , 640 


7,892 


8,348 


9,978 


18.00 


14.00 


15.50 


142, 056 


lie 079 
lib, oil 


1 1/1 £10 

104 , boy 


17 11 
1 / . OO 


12 77 


12 71 


1 1 , 259 


10, 869 


16, 697 


1 ,850 


1 ,925 


1 ,550 


10,415 


10,461 


12,940 


19.00 


13.50 


15.75 


197,885 


141 , 224 


ono one 
ZUo , 8U0 


1 7 IB 
1 / . OS 


1 9 oo 
iz . yy 


12 21 


5, 254 


5 , 844 


7, 615 


1 , 900 


1 , 950 


1 , 600 


4,991 


5,698 


6,092 


19.50 


15.00 


16.50 


97,325 


85,470 


100, 518 


18 52 


14 63 


13 20 


68, 469 


76 , 706 


92, 641 


1 , 837 


1 , 855 


1 , 565 


64,901 


71 ,145 


72,478 


18.66 


14.26 


15.92 


1 , 21 1 , 227 


\ ,014,274 


1 , 153 ,974 


17 69 


13 22 


1 2] 46 


o , 940 


A 

4 , 258 


4 ,440 


1 onn 

1 , 800 


1 , 400 


1 ,430 


3,546 


2,980 


3, 175 


18.50 


14.00 


15.80 


65,601 


41 , 720 


50, lo5 


1 £ £1 
10 . OO 


9 80 


11 .30 


1 , 127 


1 ,443 


1 ,983 


1 , 700 


1 ,500 


1 ,080 


958 


1,082 


1,071 


18.50 


16.00 


16.50 


17,723 


17,312 


17, 671 


15 73 


12 00 


8.91 


1 70£ 

o, /So 


6, 928 


8, 686 


1 , 900 


1 ,475 


1 ,310 


5,497 


5,109 


5,689 


18.00 


15.00 


16.00 


98,946 


76,635 


91 ,024 


17 1ft 
1 / . 1U 


11 06 


10.48 


9 ,051 


7,936 


8, 670 


1 , 750 


1 , 700 


1 ,580 


7,920 


6,746 


6,849 


19.50 


15.50 


16.25 


154,440 


104 , 563 


111 ,296 


1 7 ft£ 

1 / .uo 


13 18 


12.84 


7, 839 


8,418 


9,093 


1,750 


1,800 


1,560 


6,859 


7,576 


7,092 


18.50 


15.50 


16.50 


126,892 


117,428 


117,018 


16.19 


13^95 


12^87 


4 , 688 


4 , 204 


3, 996 


1,750 


1,800 


1,600 


4, 102 


3,784 


3, 197 


19.00 


15.00 


16.50 


77 , 938 


56,760 


52, 750 


16.63 


13.50 


13.20 


5,367 


6,392 


4,167 


1,700 


1,650 


1,500 


4,562 


5,273 


3,125 


20 00 


15.50 


15 50 


91,240 


81,732 


48,437 


17.00 


12.79 


11.62 


1,263 


1,823 


1,929 


2,000 


1^550 


l]700 


1,263 


1,413 


1,640 


2o!oo 


15^00 


niso 


25,260 


21,195 


28,700 


20.00 


11.63 


14.88 


3,191 


3,525 


4,975 


1,800 


1,500 


1,600 


2,872 


2 644 


3 980 


17.00 


15.50 


16.75 


48 824 


40,982 


66,665 


15.30 


11.63 


13.40 


3,106 


2,385 


3,901 


1,850 


1,650 


1,690 


2^873 


l]968 


3^296 


19.00 


15.00 


17.00 


54^587 


29! 520 


56,032 


17.57 


12.38 


14.36 


15,708 


17,615 


20,247 


1,850 


1,525 


1,560 


14,530 


13,431 


15,793 


19.00 


15.00 


15.75 


276,070 


201,465 


248,740 


17.58 


11.44 


12.29 


7,415 


9,038 


7,968 


1,850 


1,850 


1,600 


6,859 


8,360 


6,374 


19.00 


15.50 


16.75 


130,321 


129,580 


106,764 


17.58 


14.34 


13.39 


7,648 


10,904 


12,692 


1,750 


1,500 


1,540 


6,692 


8,178 


9,773 


20.0C 


15.50 


16.75 


133,840 


126,759 


163,698 


17.50 


11.63 


12.90 


76,129 


84,869 


92,747 


1,800 


1,615 


1,532 


68,533 


68,544 


71,054 


18.99 


15.26 


16.31 


1,301,682 


1,045,651 


1,158,960 


17.10 


12.32 


12.49 


693,392 


380,635 


)44,756 


1,911 


1,887 


1,567 


362,517 


543,191 


126,849 


18.56 


14.50 


16.61 


12,293,825 


7,881,446 


7, ,089, 572 


17.73 


13.57 


13.01 



Districts and Counties 



District 1 — 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery___ 

Caldwell.. 

Surry. __ 

Watauga. 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Northern Mountain (NW 
District 4 — 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cherokee _ 

Clay 

Graham 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Jackson 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison. _ 

Mitchell 

Polk 

Rutherford.. 

Swain _. __ 

Transylvania 

Yancey 

Western Mountain (W.) 
District 2 — 

Alamance 

Caswell 

Durham 

Forsyth __ 

Franklin 

Granville _ 

Guilford 

Orange 

Person 

Rockingham 

Stokes 

Vance 

Warren 

Northern Piedmont (N.) _. 
District 5 — 

Alexander 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Davidson 

Davie 

Iredell 

Lee. __ 

Randolph 

Rowan 

Wake 

Central Piedmont (C.) 

District 8 — 

Anson 

Cabarrus 

Cleveland 

Gaston. _ 

, Lincoln 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Richmond 

Stanly 

Union 

Southern Piedmont (S.).__ 
District 3 — 

Bertie 

Camden _ 

Chowan 

Currituck 

Dare 

Edgecombe 

Gates 

Halifax 

Hertford 

Martin.. 

Nash 

Northampton 

Pasquotank- _ 

Perquimans 

Tyrrell- 

Washington 

Northern Coastal (NE.).__ 
District 6 — 

Beaufort 

Carteret-. 

Craven 

Greene 

Hyde. 

Johnston. 

Jones 

Lenoir 

Pamlico 

Pitt 

Wayne 

Wilson 

Central Coastal (E.) 

District 9 — 

Bladen.. 

Brunswick.. _ 

Columbus 

Cumberland 

Duplin. 

Harnett. 

Hoke.__ 

New Hanover 

Onslow. 

Pender- _ 

Robeson. 

Sampson 

Scotland _ 

Southern Coastal (SE.) 



State 693,392 



*NOTE: Hay Acreages Shown Above in Table Exclude Lespedeza and Peanut Vine Hay. 



NORTH CAROLINA PEANUT CROP 











Yield Per Acre 








Price Per Pound 








Value Per Acre 




Acreage Harvested 


(Pounds) 


Production (Pounds) 


(Cents) 


Total Value (Dollars) 




(Dollars) 


Districts and Counties 






































1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1934 


1935 


1936 


District 1 — 






































Alleghany 


5 


5 


31 


800 


807 


700 


4,000 


4,037 


21,700 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


$ 160 


$ 129 


$ 977 


$32.00 


$25.80 


$ 31.52 


Ashe 


15 


12 


9 


800 


809 


700 


12,000 


9,708 


6,300 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


480 


310 


284 


32.00 


25.83 


31.56 


Avery ... --- 


14 


16 


6 


800 


859 


700 


11,200 


13,745 


4,200 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


448 


439 


189 


32.00 


27.44 


31.50 


Caldwell 


46 


68 


54 


800 


832 


700 


36,800 


56,594 


37,800 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


1,472 


1,811 


1,701 


32.00 


26.63 


31.50 


Surry 


52 


8 


17 


800 


911 


750 


41,600 


7,286 


12,750 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


1,664 


233 


574 


32.00 


29.13 


33.76 


Watauga 


24 


12 


31 


800 


809 


700 


19,200 


9,708 


21,700 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


768 


310 


977 


32.00 


25.83 


31.52 


Wilkes 


65 


89 


78 


800 


845 


700 


52,000 


75,203 


54,600 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


2,080 


2,406 


2,457 


32.00 


27.03 


31.50 


Yadkin 


97 


37 


48 


800 


830 


800 


77,600 


30,719 


38,400 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


2,716 


983 


1,728 


28.00 


26.57 


36.00 


Northern Mountain (NW). 


318 


247 


274 


800 


838 


721 


254,400 


207,000 


197,450 


3.8 


3.2 


4.5 


9,788 


6,621 


8,887 


30.78 


26.81 


32.43 


District 4 — 
































Buncombe . . ... . 


51 


45 


61 


800 


789 


700 


40,800 


35,521 


42,700 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


1,632 


1,136 


1,922 


32.00 


25.24 


31.51 


Burke 


120 


88 


86 


800 


799 


750 


96,000 


70,303 


64,500 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


3,840 


2,249 


2,903 


32.00 


25.56 


33.76 


Cherokee 


39 


50 


7 


800 


804 


700 


31,200 


40,189 


4,900 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


1,248 


1,286 


221 


32.00 


25.72 


31.57 


Clay 


28 


18 


32 


800 


772 


700 


22,400 


13,890 


22,400 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


896 


444 


1,008 


32.00 


24.67 


31.50 


Graham - 




48 


4 




789 


700 




37,855 


2,800 




3.2 


4.5 




1,211 


126 




25.23 


31.50 


Haywood 


14 


37 


34 


800 


794 


700 


11,200 


29,373 


23,800 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


448 


939 


1,071 


32.00 


25.38 


31.50 


Henderson 


96 


25 


41 


800 


804 


700 


76,800 


20,095 


28,700 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


3,072 


643 


1,292 


32.00 


25.72 


31.51 


Jackson . . _. . 


23 


11 


9 


800 


771 


700 


18,400 


8,481 


6,300 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


736 


271 


284 


32.00 


24.64 


31.56 


McDowell 


19 


21 


40 


800 


773 


700 


15,200 


16,224 


28,000 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


608 


519 


1,260 


32.00 


24.71 


31.50 


Macon.. 


51 


20 


15 


800 


771 


700 


40,800 


15,427 


10,500 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


1,632 


493 


473 


32.00 


24.65 


31.53 


Madison - 


10 


13 


16 


800 


771 


700 


8,000 


10,019 


11,200 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


320 


320 


504 


32.00 


24.62 


31.50 


Mitchell 


9 


16 


2 


800 


772 


700 


7,200 


12,353 


1,400 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


288 


395 


63 


32.00 


24.69 


31.50 


Polk 


4 


30 


17 


700 


799 


800 


2,800 


23,965 


13 , 600 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


112 


766 


612 


28.00 


25.53 


36.00 


Rutherford.. .. . . 


243 


271 


226 


740 
800 


792 


800 


179,820 


214,721 


180,800 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


7,193 


6,871 


8,136 


29.60 


25.35 


36.00 


Swain 


43 


19 


24 


773 


700 


34,400 


14 , 687 


16,800 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


1,376 


469 


756 


32.00 


24.68 


31.50 


Transylvania 


95 


3 


34 


800 


759 


700 


76,000 


2,277 


23,800 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


3,040 


72 


1,071 


32.00 


24.00 


31.50 


Yancey. 


2 


5 


13 


800 


774 


700 


1,600 


3,870 


9,100 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


64 


123 


410 


32.00 


24.60 


31.54 


Western Mountain (W.) .. 


847 


720 


661 


782 


791 


743 


682,620 


569 , 250 


491,300 


4.0 


3.2 


4.5 


26,505 


18,207 


22,112 


31 .29 


25.29 


33.45 


District 2 — 




































Alamance 


76 


66 


67 


850 


911 


900 


64,600 


60,108 


60,300 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


2,261 


1,923 


2,714 


29.75 


29.14 


40.51 


Caswell 


46 


45 


27 


700 


910 


900 


32,200 


40,945 


24,300 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,127 


1,310 


1,094 


24.50 


29.11 


40.52 


Durham -. 


34 


21 


40 


780 


913 


900 


26,520 


19,163 


36,000 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


928 


613 


1,620 


27.29 


29.19 


40.50 


Forsyth 


26 


13 


6 


700 


938 


800 


18,200 


12,200 


4,800 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


637 


390 


216 


24.50 


30.00 


36.00 


Franklin.. . .. 


73 


60 


33 


710 


916 


770 


51,830 


54,930 


25,410 


3.0 


3.2 


3.8 


1,555 


1,757 


966 


21.30 


29.28 


29.27 


Granville 


34 


12 


12 


840 


873 


750 


28,560 


10,474 


9,000 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,000 


335 


405 


29.41 


27.92 


33.75 


Guilford 


53 


32 


149 


830 


898 


900 


43 , 990 


28,745 


134,100 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,540 


919 


6,035 


29.06 


28.72 


40.50 


Orange 


10 


10 


12 


800 


958 


900 


8,000 


9,582 


10,800 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


280 


306 


486 


28.00 


30.60 


40.50 


Person 


2 


11 


3 


700 


952 


900 


1,400 


10,474 


2,700 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


49 


335 


122 


24.50 


30.45 


40.67 


Rockingham _. 


56 


55 


44 


700 


904 


800 


39,200 


49 , 693 


35,200 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,372 


1,590 


1,584 


24.50 


28.91 


36.00 


Stokes — 


5 


12 


30 


700 


942 


800 


3,500 


11,307 


24,000 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


123 


361 


1,080 


24.60 


30.08 


36.00 


Vance -- 


13 


2 


12 


900 


863 


800 


11,700 


1,725 


9,600 


3.0 


3.2 


4.5 


351 


55 


432 


27.00 


27.50 


36.00 


Warren _ 


499 


313 


659 


1,010 


913 


790 


503 , 990 


285,779 


520,610 


2.5 


3.2 


3.1 


12,600 


9,144 


16,139 


25.25 


29.21 


24.49 


Northern Piedmont (N.) ._ 


927 


652 


1,094 


899 


913 


820 


833,690 


595,125 


896,820 


2.9 


3.2 


3.7 


23,823 


19,038 


32,893 


25.70 


29.20 


30.07 


District 5 — ■ 
































Alexander 


126 


134 


81 


600 


859 


800 


75,600 


115,167 


64,800 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


2,646 


3,685 


2,916 


21.00 


27.50 


36.00 


Catawba. . 


385 


486 


350 


775 


858 


800 


298,375 


416,766 


280,000 


3.5 


3.2 


4.6 


10,443 


13,336 


12,880 


27.13 


27.44 


36.80 


Chatham.. 


62 


44 


26 


740 


865 


900 


45,880 


38,065 


23,400 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,606 


1,218 


1,053 


25.90 


27.68 


40.50 


Davidson 


151 


72 


83 


700 


851 


900 


105,700 


61,293 


74,700 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


3,700 


1,961 


3,362 


24.50 


27.24 


40.51 


Davie. . 


56 


55 


178 


700 


858 


800 


39,200 


47,185 


142,400 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,372 


1,509 


6,408 


24.50 


27.44 


36.00 


Iredell 


253 


165 


158 


780 


859 


800 


197,340 


141,679 


126,400 


3.5 


3.2 


4.7 


6,907 


4,533 


5,941 


27.30 


27.47 


37.60 


Lee — 


22 


29 


7 


750 


855 


900 


16,500 


24 , 808 


6,300 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


578 


793 


284 


26.27 


27.34 


40.57 


Randolph ... 


70 


54 


37 


750 


860 


900 


52,500 


46,456 


33,300 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,838 


1,486 


1,499 


26.26 


27.52 


40.51 


Rowan 


194 


184 


203 


710 


855 


900 


137,740 


157,367 


182,700 


3.5 


3.2 


4.6 


4,821 


5,035 


8,404 


24.85 


27.36 


41.40 


Wake 


218 


195 


176 


760 


858 


700 


165,680 


167,339 


123,200 


3.3 


3.2 


4.0 


5,467 


5,354 


4,928 


25.08 


27.46 


28.00 


Central Piedmont (C.) 


1,537 


1,418 


1,299 


738 


858 


814 


1,134,515 


1,216,125 


1,057,200 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


39 , 378 


38,910 


47,675 


25.62 


27.44 


36.70 


District 8— 
































Anson 


56 


53 


44 


760 


852 


1,075 


42,560 


45,173 


47,300 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,490 


1,445 


2,129 


26.61 


27.26 


48.39 


Cabarrus 


193 


189 


120 


750 
800 


839 


900 


144,750 


158,660 


108,000 


3.5 


3.2 


4.7 


5,066 


5,077 


5,076 


26.25 


26.86 


42.30 


Cleveland 


143 


156 


149 


837 


800 


114,400 


130,622 


119,200 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


4,004 


4,179 


5,364 


28.00 


26.79 


36.00 


Gaston. 


175 


152 


87 


760 


838 


800 


133,000 


127,396 


69,600 


3.6 


3.2 


4.8 


4,788 


4,076 


3,341 


27.36 


26.82 


38.40 


Lincoln - 


231 


246 


156 


800 


839 


800 


184,800 


206,281 


124,800 


3.5 


3.2 


4.6 


6,468 


6,600 


5,741 


28.00 


26.83 


36.80 


Mecklenburg 


182 


118 


102 


800 


835 


900 


145,600 


98,579 


91,800 


3.5 


3.2 


4.7 


5,096 


3,154 


4,315 


28.00 


26.73 


42.30 


Montgomery 


65 


23 


37 


770 


856 


900 


50,050 


19,693 


33,300 


3.3 


3.2 


4.5 


1,652 


630 


1,499 


25.42 


27.39 


40.51 


Moore - 


44 


38 


47 


900 


843 


1,060 


39,600 


32,043 


49,820 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


1,386 


1,025 


2,242 


31.50 


26.97 


47.70 


Richmond ... 


169 


221 


167 


800 


837 


1,065 


135,200 


184,918 


177,855 


3.5 


3.2 


4.2 


4,732 


5,917 


7,470 


28.00 


26.77 


44.73 


Stanly 


133 


69 


82 


840 


834 


900 


111,720 


57,523 


73,800 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


3,910 


1,840 


3,321 


29.40 


26.67 


40.50 


Union. .. 


107 


62 


58 


810 


834 


900 


86,670 


51,737 


52,200 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


3,033 


1,655 


2,349 


28.35 


26.69 


40.50 


Southern Piedmont (S.).._ 


1,498 


1 ,327 


1,049 


793 


838 


903 


1,188,350 


1,112,625 


947,675 


3.5 


3.2 


4.5 


41,625 


35,598 


42,847 


27.79 


26.83 


40.85 


District 3 — 






























Bertie 


31,380 


30,391 


29,172 


1,173 


1,174 


1,155 


36,818,941 


35,688,560 


33,685,171 


3.4 


3.1 


3.8 


1,254,290 


1,119,839 


1,273,216 


39.97 


36.85 


43.65 


Camden 


39 


19 


36 


1,153 


1,159 


1,109 


44,955 


22,029 


39,935 


3.5 


3.2 


3.9 


1,572 


704 


1,545 


40.31 


37.05 


42.92 


Chowan .. . .. 


9,679 


9,524 


5,983 


1,194 


1,286 


1,061 


11,553,450 


12,248,666 


6,349,665 


3.5 


3.1 


4.1 


407,094 


384,307 


260,360 


42.06 


40.35 


43.52 


Currituck 


20 


18 


18 


1,087 


1,224 


1,111 


21,731 


22,030 


20,000 


3.6 


3.2 


3.9 


786 


704 


773 


39.30 


39.11 


42.94 


Edgecombe 


19,690 


17,729 


18,693 


1,118 


1,212 


1,024 


22,005,502 


21,479,226 


19,148,831 


3.5 


3.1 


3.8 


775,679 


674,297 


723,910 


39.39 


38.03 


38.73 


Gates 


11,006 


9,858 


9,827 


1,138 


1,198 


1,116 


12,519,984 


11,808,067 


10,962,157 


3.4 


3.2 


3.9 


426,742 


382,899 


425,693 


38.77 


38.84 


43.32 


Halifax 


30,853 


31,504 


30,478 


1,154 


1,118 


1,070 


35,604,408 


35,225,930 


32,606,926 


3.5 


3.2 


3.8 


1,255,862 


1,142,363 


1,232,270 


40.70 


36.26 


40.43 


Hertford . 


23,008 


20,050 


19,581 


1,138 


1,202 


1,020 


26,186,322 


24,100,793 


19,967,499 


3.5 


3.1 


4.0 


923,428 


756,648 


796,533 


40.14 


37.74 


40.68 


Martin . 


20,003 


18,156 


18,910 


1,163 


1,253 


1,139 


23,264,244 


22,756,964 


21,544,931 


3.6 


3.1 


3.9 


847,196 


714,416 


836,707 


42.35 


39.35 


44.25 


Nash . . 


2,674 


2,896 


2,629 


1,101 


981 


1,200 


2,944,556 


2,841,867 


3,154,831 


3.5 


3.2 


4.0 


103,738 


92,205 


125,931 


38.80 


31.84 


47.90 


Northampton _ 


33,234 


32 , 767 


31,620 


1,157 


1,175 


1,145 


38,459,054 


38,486,366 


36,201,076 


3.4 


3.3 


3.9 


1,310,875 


1,288,765 


1,406,101 


39.44 


39.33 


44.47 


Pasquotank 


175 


186 


199 


1,028 


1,184 


1,104 


179,820 


220,300 


219,642 


3.9 


2.9 


4.6 


7,073 


6,335 


10,044 


40.42 


34.06 


50.47 


Perquimans 


6,772 


6,182 


7,270 


1,168 


1,269 


1,200 


7,912,091 


7,842,671 


8,725,797 


3.6 


3.0 


4.2 


288,424 


237,904 


366,204 


42.59 


38.48 


50.37 


Tyrrell ... 


507 


557 


617 


1,108 


1,305 


1,003 


561,938 


726,989 


618,992 


3.5 


3.1 


3.7 


19,647 


22,523 


23,177 


38.75 


40.44 


37.56 


Washington 


6,108 


5,811 


6,273 


1,097 


1,175 


1,025 


6,698,304 


6,829,292 


6,429,535 


3.5 


3.1 


3.8 


236,555 


214,677 


243,364 


38.73 


36.94 


38.80 


Northern Coastal (NE.) 


195,148 


185,648 


181,306 


1,152 


1,187 


1,101 


224,775,300 


220,299,750 


199,674,988 


3.5 


3.2 


3.9 


7,858,961 


7,038,586 


7,725,828 


40.27 


37.91 


42.61 


District 6 — 






















Beaufort 


1,106 


1,161 


986 


1,095 


1,127 


990 


1,211,100 


1,308,266 


976,141 


3.8 


3.5 


3.6 


45,685 


45,186 


35,141 


41.31 


38.92 


35.64 


Carteret 


1,604 


1,516 


1,668 


746 


930 


859 


1,197,000 


1,409,551 


1,433,353 


3.5 


2.8 


3.2 


42,336 


39,801 


45,867 


26.39 


26.25 


27.50 


Craven 


704 


600 


687 


797 


838 


889 


560,800 


502,808 


610,875 


3.7 


3.1 


3.5 


20,498 


15,775 


21,381 


29.12 


26.29 


31.12 


Greene 


147 


149 


162 


963 


931 


1,057 


141,620 


138,664 


171,297 


3.5 


3.4 


3.2 


5,002 


4,660 


5,482 


34.03 


31.28 


33.84 


Hyde... 


5 


2 


19 


950 


1,000 


928 


4,750 


2,000 


17,634 


3.8 


3.2 


3.5 


179 


64 


617 


35.80 


32.00 


32.47 


Johnston ._ 


294 


234 


220 


827 


840 


1,019 


243,190 


196,541 


224,197 


3.8 


3.5 


3.5 


9,155 


6,799 


7,847 


31.14 


29.06 


35.67 


Jones -. 


1,920 


1,692 


1,702 


826 


847 


979 


1,585,300 


1,432,461 


1,666,367 


3.8 


2.9 


3.5 


59,798 


41,978 


58,323 


31.14 


24.81 


34.27 


Lenoir 


1,031 


562 


654 


955 


803 


1,009 


984,960 


451,371 


659,997 


3.5 


3.6 


3.2 


34,833 


16,055 


21,120 


33.79 


28.57 


32.29 


Pamlico.. 


173 


54 


108 


875 


916 


898 


151,375 


49,437 


96,984 


3.5 


3.6 


3.8 


5,359 


1,795 


3,686 


30.98 


33.24 


34.13 


Pitt . 


5,647 


5,074 


5,894 


1,005 


1,117 


1,004 


5,675,190 


5,665,937 


5,918,562 


3.4 


3.1 


3.5 


193,951 


177,843 


207,150 


34.35 


35.05 


34.15 


Wayne 


296 


404 


419 


993 


913 


1,001 


294,000 


368,967 


419,426 


3.7 


3.6 


3.4 


10,763 


13,101 


14,260 


36.36 


32.43 


34.03 


Wilson . ._ 


509 


477 


363 


1,024 


1,115 


1,103 


521,180 


531,747 


400,533 


3.7 


3.6 


3.8 


19,024 


18,907 


15,220 


37.38 


39.64 


41.93 


Central Coastal (E.) 


13,436 


11,925 


12,882 


936 


1,011 


978 


12,570,465 


12,057,750 


12,595,366 


3.6 


3.2 


3.5 


446,583 


381,964 


436,094 


33.24 


32.03 


33.85 


District 9 — 


















Bladen 


3,213 


3,434 


4,848 


946 


1,123 


1,100 


3,038,100 


3,855,435 


5,333,228 


3.4 


3.5 


3.5 


103,797 


133,023 


186,663 


32.31 


38.74 


38.50 


Brunswick. 


4,433 


4,140 


5,036 


836 


931 


920 


3,706,920 


3,855,435 


4,633,558 


3.4 


2.9 


3.2 


126,649 


112,866 


148,274 


28.57 


27.26 


29.44 


Columbus 


1,426 


1,255 


1,460 


1,026 


1,114 


1,064 


1,462,600 


1,397,850 


1,553,886 


3.4 


3.5 


3.4 


49,929 


48,244 


52,832 


35.01 


38.44 


36.19 


Cumberland 


321 


265 


592 


817 


933 


1,068 


262 , 400 


247,347 


632,232 


3.5 


3 4 


3 9 


9,241 


8 522 


24 , 657 


28.79 


32.16 


41.65 


Duplin 


4,049 


3,102 


4,059 


647 


969 


'915 


2,619i500 


3,006,740 


3,714,714 


3.5 


3.5 


3.3 


92! 551 


103! 751 


122 | 586 


22.86 


33 ]45 


30! 20 


Harnett 


56 


58 


47 


firm 






44 800 


54 462 


47 769 


o . 5 


3 5 


3 8 


1 719 


1 Q97 
1 ,\>- 1 

889 


1 Q1 ^ 
1 .MO 


30.70 


33 22 


38. 62 


Hoke 


85 


30 


124 


840 


832 


1,042 


71 ! 400 


24 ',962 


129|256 


3.5 


3!6 


4.3 


2^507 


5,558 


29 49 


29 .'63 


44.82 


New Hanover 


792 


978 


910 


846 


933 


1,000 


669,800 


912,233 


910,414 


3.5 


3.3 


4.5 


23,639 


30,532 


40,969 


29^85 


31.22 


45.02 


Onslow 


5,023 


5,424 


7,353 


916 


1,035 


900 


4,600,600 


5,611,824 


6,617,362 


3.7 


3.1 


3.4 


167,981 


176,006 


224,990 


33.44 


32.45 


30.60 


Pender 


4,260 


3,796 


4,386 


796 


843 


891 


3,392,000 


3,201,894 


3,905,789 


3.5 


3.3 


3.1 


119,843 


107,160 


121,079 


28.13 


28.23 


27.61 


Robeson 


255 


261 


235 


996 


922 


1,040 


254,000 


240,539 


244,463 


3.6 


3.4 


4.1 


9,241 


8,078 


10,023 


36.24 


30.95 


42.65 


Sampson 


284 


263 


341 


638 


897 


964 


181,120 


236,001 


328,761 


3.5 


3.5 


3.7 


6,375 


8,374 


12,164 


22.45 


31.84 


35.67 


Scotland 


92 


57 


44 


848 


836 


1,086 


78,020 


47,653 


47,769 


3.7 


3.6 


4.3 


2,865 


1,704 


2,054 


31.14 


29.89 


46.68 


Southern Coastal (SE.) ... 


24,289 


23,063 


29,435 


839 


984 


955 


20,380,660 


22,692,375 


28,099,201 


3.5 


3.3 


3.4 


716,337 


741,076 


953,664 


29.49 


32.13 


32.40 


State 


238,000 


225,000 


228,000 


1,100 


1,150 


1,070 


261,800,000 


258,750,000 


243,960,000 


3.5 


3.2 


3.8 


9,163,000 


8,280,000 


9,270,000 


38.50 


36.80 


40.66 



26 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



PEANUTS 



HAYS 



Peanuts showed a decline in North Caro- 
lina production toward the close of the 
war (1918). However, an increase in pro- 
duction occurred following 1922 until the 
peak was reached in 1931. In 1937 it is 
still on a relatively high base. The pres- 
ent indicated crop is 243,000,000 pounds. 
The current pre-marketing price of pea- 
nuts is not quite as good as a year ago. 

As will be noticed, on the peanut table, 
showing county data, the principal pro- 
ducing counties are: Northampton, Hali- 
fax, Bertie, Hertford, Edgecombe, Martin, 
all of which have more than 18,000 acres. 

There is considerable demand for pea- 
nuts for oil purposes. However North 
Carolina farmers do not seem interested 
in growing them for this purpose. The 
farm relief program is planning to di- 
vert a part of the crop for this purpose in 




order to aid the price. The crop in the 
northeastern counties is grown almost en- 
tirely alone. While in the southeastern 
counties a small per cent of the acreage is 
grown in corn and most of it is hogged off. 
The principal commercial belt in District 
3 grows the crop almost entirely for nuts. 

Those familiar with the peanut indus- 
try think of the few northeastern coun- 
ties of North Carolina as practically 
limiting the peanut production of this 
state. A few others know that peanuts 
are grown to a less commercial extent in 
the southern counties. However, the actual 
weighted geographic center of the peanut 
area of North Carolina is about the 
corner of Edgecombe, Bertie and Martin 
counties. The soil best suited for pea- 
nuts, centers perhaps in Wayne County. 
Thus, the opportunity for planting pea- 
nuts exists in a considerable area outside 
of the recognized peanut growing coun- 
ties. It will be noticed from the table 
herewith that the average yield of peanuts 
for the past three years has been well 
over a thousand pounds in the northern 
counties and below that figure elsewhere. 
It is the desire of the Department of Agri- 
culture to provide a test farm more 
nearly in the center of the peanut soil area 
so as to give opportunity to small growers 
for increasing their yield and quality. 



More detailed comments on hay will 
be found on page 22 where soy bean and 
cowpea data are given. These two crops 
provide a large portion of the hay in 
North Carolina. 

Lespedeza hay is coming into promi- 
nence due to the convenience of growing 
it in the fall with spring planted small 
grains, thus utilizing the land and labor 
of the grain crops. Hay can then be cut 
in the late summer or fall. The volunteer 
crabgrass hay is also of importance in 
many counties. Then there are the clovers, 
alfalfa, sorghum cane mixture, millet and 
other crops that provide good hays. A 
distinct advantage of hay crops is their 
soil preserving or erosion preventive 
quality. Considering the abundance of 
idle land available farmers could grow 
more hay crops to advantage. 




Peanut Stacks. When threshed or "picked" the 
remaining "vines" are baled for hay usage 



TONS 

eoo, ooo 
700, ooo 

600 OOO 
500, 000 
400, OOO 
300, 000 
200, 000 
I 00, 000 




HAY PRODUCTION IN NORTH CAROLINA 



TONS 



.III" 

. -i pt i i i ■i .j i in in 1 1 

i i 1 1 1 1 ri 1 1 1 1 i i i 1 1 1 

LLLLL i i i i I i i i i i i ii i i l i i I 



■III I i I I 



CHART COMPARES PRODUCTION 



TONS 1866-1936 



80QQOO 
700000 
60Q0CO 
500000 
400000 

aoopoo 

20Qp00 
100,000 




Car Lot Shipments of Fruits and Vegetables from North Carolina 





SEASONS 


1936 SEASON 




1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April 


May 


June 


July 


August 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total 


Apples 


127 
8 

710 


4 
1 

626 
67 
51 
58 

180 


16 
2 

474 
29 
8 
127 
178 


3 
1 

498 
23 
24 
114 
199 






























Apples, Dried 






























Beans, Snap and Lima 

Beets 


659 
9 
23 
122 
174 










73 


112 
2 
4 
1 


47 




10 


6 






248 
2 
4 

16 
134 
1 
78 
310 
11 
1 

142 
380 
937 
106 
24 
5,358 
3 
483 
357 
















Blackberries, Dewberries 


























Cabbage 


189 
110 










15 














Cantaloupes . . 










127 


7 










Carrots _ __ 












1 

26 
285 










Corn, Green _ _ 




139 
527 
4 


67 
235 
1 


90 
292 


114 

340 












52 
25 












Cucumbers.. . 


439 






















Greens, Except Spinach 


















5 


6 


Honev-dew Melons 




1 
44 

576 
1,161 
264 
32 
10,753 
1 

306 
495 


7 
190 
523 
1,494 
221 
45 
8,170 
















1 






Lettuce and Romaine 


498 
239 

2,564 
554 
61 

8,680 


110 

346 
1,833 

284 
24 
5,877 


195 
469 

1,280 
335 
45 

7,044 








1 

2 


141 

77 














Mixed Vegetables 








166 
4 
3 
1 

4,831 


116 
440 


18 

493 




1 






Peaches 














Peas, Green 










103 










Peppers 










20 
521 


3 
1 










Potatoes, Irish 










5 










Spinach. 








3 

44 

30 










Strawberries 


1,228 
798 


619 
561 


849 
441 


787 
493 
1 
79 
14 
1,340 








439 
19 
















Sweet Potatoes 


46 


39 


44 


9 


5 


35 


4 


7 


39 


80 


Onions 


Tomatoes 


158 


162 


83 


66 
7 

1,239 












8 
2 


60 
2 
631 












68 
4 

1,243 


Turnips and Rutabagas 






















Watermelons 


2,486 


1,628 


1,705 












612 










Total 






















18,849 


13,101 

931 


13,583 
1,288 


16,189 

1,036 


14,805 
1,611 


46 


39 


44 


80 

38 


872 

659 


5,455 


2,046 


1,170 


14 


14 


44 


86 


9,910 

697 


Truck Shipments 
(Incomplete) 
Strawberries 



























MISCELLANEOUS NORTH CAROLINA FARM DATA-United States Census 27 



UlSTRICTS AND BOUNTIES 


Total Number 


All Land in Farms (Acres) 


Vj 
Lan 


due of Fa 


rms 
dings 


Fai 


m Population Jan. 1, 1935 


Persons working on 
Farms Jan. 1 935 


TT. 

farm 
Lraraen 
Vegetables 


Milk 
Produced 

^LraUOnS.J 


— n 

iJutter 

Churned 
(Pounds) 


















Family 
Labor 


Hired 
Help 


19oo 


1930 


1935 


1930 


1935 


1930 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1 Q1A 

iyo4 


1 Q'iA 

iyo4 


19o4 


r\ 1 

UlSTRICT 1 — 
















































1 ftii 


1 9Q/1 

l ,oo4 


135 


375 


128 


988 


% 3,868 


516 


1 5 


911 


990 


7 


253 


6 


952 


301 


2 


138 


140 


c tin. at 7 
$ ou,yi/ 


1 H70 RKft 

1 ,u/y , oou 


1 on A 7R 
lOU, 4/0 




4 ,061 


3 , 660 


257 


445 


244 


419 


6,763 


079 


11 


008 


814 


20 


128 


19 


739 


389 


5 


735 


358 


19K nfiQ 

izo.UUo 


7H9 RCLG 

Z, /UZ, 0O0 


ono 001 

oao, 66 1 




1 ,990 


1 ,410 


94 


355 


87 


526 


2.6C2 


118 


3 


078 


441 


10 


602 


10 


432 


170 


4 


169 


526 


79 , 572 


1 ni9 noo 
1 ,uoz ,yyz 


979 1 00 
Z/Z, IZz 


V^alUWcll 


2 , 623 


2,062 


186 


874 


163 


327 


5,391 


302 


5 


923 


172 


15 


331 


14 


522 


809 


4 


196 


443 


on * 1 1 1 

ou , OUl 


1 710 111 

1 , / iy , 101 


007 77U 

0y / . / (0 




4, 699 


4,324 


283 


053 


263 


762 


9,056 


338 


12 


072 


272 


23 


088 


22 


080 


1 ,008 


9 


363 


327 


97ft nm 
z / , UUl 


O 70ft HA Q 

z , /yo , / 4o 


0/19 in7 
OUZ, oU/ 




2 , 614 


2 ,375 


166 


394 


163 


136 


5,569 


105 


8 


04 2 


418 


13 


431 


13 


360 


71 


4 


208 


406 


QK. 1 AQ 
OO , 140 


1 07ft A(\A 

1 , 0/0, 4y4 


OOO (ifil 

0O0, 001 




5, 630 


5, 125 


372 


849 


365 


7£0 


7,894 


801 


11 


205 


765 


30 


064 


28 


533 


1 ,531 


10 


341 


649 


1 16, 857 


1 O/ii ni 1 
, Z41 ,UOO 


RCR /inl 

090,490 


i tiUKin 


3 ,079 


2, 788 


192 


812 


179 


804 


6, 110 


753 


7 


413 


544 


15 


454 


14 


857 


597 


6 


153 


146 


83 132 


1 C07 17d 
1 , OZ / , /4 


537, 814 




Oft 1«17 


99 1 90 
CO , lit) 


1 ,689 


157 


1 ,596 


752 


47 , 346 


012 


65 


616 


416 


135 


351 


130 


475 


4, 876 


46 


303 


2, 995 


0Q7 171 

y ( , 101 


1R 07ft nn 

1 . Li C , 1 1 U 


O C71 QQA 
O, O/O, 304 


District 4 — 
















































o,oiy 


_ 

o ,895 


263 


817 


230 


761 


1 1 , 743 


892 


20 


321 


031 


27 


816 


27 


123 


693 


7 


751 


1 , 191 


1QK. 77R 
100 , / / O 


1 no n 1 9 
O.uoo, yiz 


/00,040 


Burke 


2, 668 


2, 136 


159 


655 


156 


488 


5, 145 


627 


6 


207 


769 


14 


632 


13 


534 


1 ,098 


4 


750 


540 


QH QQ7 

yu, yy / 


1 111 flno 

1 , OOO , OUO 


190 AOO 




40n 


1 OIQ 

i ,yoo 


168 


764 


154 


406 


2, 844 


059 


3 


2U2 


398 


12 


588 


12 


498 


90 


4 


285 


194 


to, 1^0 


1 9ift K7n 
1 , zoo , 0/U 


190 ion 
oZo.ooy 


flair 

L-iay 


1 , 008 


898 


64 


480 


60 


525 


981 


531 


1 


741 


340 


4 


754 


4 


703 


51 


1 


821 


57 


AQ IOA 
4y ,0Z4 


A CA 111 
4y4 ,010 


141 , 809 




861 


692 


51 


344 


48 


299 


647 


833 


1 


278 


320 


4 


683 


4 


540 


143 


1 


313 


24 


OC Q99 

zo , ozz 


ion 1^7 
OoU,o4/ 


96, 854 




1 1 Q7 


101 
z , 1 _■ > 


200 


028 


160 


305 


6,954 


158 


10 


207 


574 


17 


000 


16 


951 


49 


4 


700 


276 


119 RQ7 
1 1Z , 00/ 


9 nftn qji 
z , uou, y40 


11/1 H7n 

014 ,u/y 




2 , 690 


1 OBI 

i , yoo 


145 


428 


120 


226 


7, 184 


740 


8 


606 


704 


12 


548 


12 


010 


538 


3 


717 


261 


09 fYX\ 
yz , UO I 


9 mn iar 

Z,U1U, /40 


129 ini 
oOZ ,oU0 




7ft 1 

z , f Ul 


2,117 


146 


741 


132 


029 


3, 133 


122 


4 


585 


706 


12 


681 


11 


707 


974 


3 


984 


277 


79 Al 1 
/Z , 01 1 


1 llfi 19Q 

1 , ooo,ozo 


iiii 007 

oi4 , zy/ 




1 , 707 


1 ,268 


119 


892 


111 


683 


2,769 


439 


3 


447 


754 


9 


275 


8 


660 


615 


3 


030 


240 


41 144 


1 noi mi 
1 , uy 1 , uoo 


Oftl OOI 

zoo , zyo 




901 

Z , ZOO 


1 B47 
1 , 04 / 


148 


609 


130 


415 


2, 656 


303 


3 


859 


727 


11 


756 


11 


510 


246 


3 


663 


321 


81 958 


1 Aftl 79fi 
1 , 400 , / ZO 


101 OOft 

ozo, yoo 




4 1 01 

4 , iyo 


3 , 267 


221 


537 


203 


652 


5, 222 


999 


7 


038 


199 


20 


145 


20 


006 


139 


7 


177 


177 


1 9Q fiOS 

izo ,uyo 


9 AA1 m Q 
Z , 441 , U10 


110 7HR 
OOZ, /Ut> 




2 , 043 


1 ,887 


91 


979 


91 


266 


2,764 


032 


3 


93 3 


707 


11 


399 


11 


367 


32 


3 


220 


211 


K7 A1Q 
0/ , 400 


1 19Q OftO 

1 , izo , yoz 


Oftn 1/in 

zoy ,o4y 


Polk 


1 ifti 


1 000 

i , zzy 


103 


772 


89 


094 


2,334 


388 


3 


399 


616 


7 


677 


6 


832 


845 


2 


670 


165 


49 311 


789 GRO 

/oz , yoy 


9m 9fii 
zuo , zoo 




4 11Q 

^ ,oiy 


3 ,791 


971 


A7C 
4/o 


237 


093 


7, 863 


169 


10 


626 


369 


22 


Q7S 
O/O 


1 

iy 


f\Q 1 

uy i 


3 ,284 


6 


666 


585 


1 OQ HSO 

izy , ooz 


9 RQA \(\A 
Z , 054 , 1U4 


717 1/1 ft 
/0/,040 




1 711 
1 , too 


1 174 


106 


1 Q1 
lol 


93 


490 


1 ,999 


691 


3 


1 60 


126 


9 


369 


8 


223 


1 ~\AR 
1 , 140 


2 


370 


106 


50 722 


Q7A 1ft1 
0/4 , 001 


910 710 
ZOO, / 10 




1 ,U /0 


710 
/OU 


62 


880 


62 


858 


2, 604 


662 


2 


818 


577 


5 


635 


5 


515 


120 


1 


732 


158 


37 916 


Iftn lifi 
OOU , 040 


1 on i/ii 

1ZU, 140 




2 851 


2 039 


153 


762 


126 


158 


3,710 


929 


4 


903 


158 


14 


344 


14 


214 


1 QP. 
loU 


4 


951 


lie 
1 10 


107 634 


1 ftfiO TiA 

1 , ooy , /04 


441 , 251 


Wactarn lUlmintain , \AJ ^ 
VVt-olcril IVILUMIalll ' ¥W , 


42 908 




9 AQft 


on 7 

43 1 


2, 208 


748 


70, 560 


574 


99 


488 


075 


01 Q 


C77 
0/ / 


one; 


HQ 1 * 


in iQ3 

IU, ISO 


0/ 


on n 
oUU 


A RQQ 


1 397*774 


Oft 010 QOp 
ZD , Ol £, 9Z0 


ft niQ 7ftn 
0, u 10 , / ou 


District 2 — ■ 














































Al sm3iice 


9 B11 
Z , 001 


o fion 

z , OZU 


230 


425 


220 


290 


5, 474 


865 


7 


436 


51 1 


16 


09o 


11 


6o8 


4 , 405 


. 

4 


c9o 


olo 


inn (\qa 
luy , ob4 


011 RH7 
— , ZOO , OUl 


447 ftift 
44 / , 010 




3 007 


094 

z , yo4 


zoo 


0/U 


227 


588 


5,468 


859 


7 


287 


172 


17 


420 


9 


466 


7 QZ.A 

/ , yo4 





012 


352 


109 201 


1 011 0.00 
1 , zoo , ozz 


407 ft11 
4Z/ , Olo 




1 Gfi1 

i , yoi 


1 

1 , 001 


146 


182 


116 


567 


4, 877 


568 


5 


893 


162 


10 


125 


7 


181 


2 , 944 


Q 
O 


926 


337 


1 10 , OUO 


1 ill Q7Q 

1 , 400 , 0/ y 


171 04ft 
to , U40 




i a on 

, 4ZU 


Q lid 


217 


313 


204 


164 


11 , 183 


727 


20 


068 


137 


19 


017 


1 7 
1 / 


397 


1 , 620 


5 


296 


722 


100 , uyo 


9 ,109 ft1i 

z , 4yz , 014 


11B ftll 
OOO , DOl 




4 160 


/i oni 
* , zoo 


256 


519 


230 


366 


6, 602 


709 


8 


999 


492 


22 


648 


1 9 
1Z 


743 


9 , 905 


/ 


382 


OOO 


10 / , GOV 


1 lis nil 

1 , 040 , UIO 


181 1 71 




1 978 

, Z/O 


3 , 668 


287 


437 


275 


273 


6, 805 


538 


9 


327 


007 


18 


306 


9 


484 


(2 coo 


6 


427 


963 


119 342 


1 IdQ 109 

1 , 04y , ozz 


10B Oftft 

ozo, zoo 




i 1 At; 

, 140 


3 , 864 


341 


247 


300 


677 


15,534 


605 


20 


318 


709 


27 


289 


23 


082 


4 ,207 


7 


oul 


1 , 143 


Ofi"? 77n 
Z OO , / IV 


A AOd 19Q 

4 , 4zy , ozy 


Bflft ftOI 

0O0, oyo 




1 Qlft 

i , yoo 


1 (270 
1 , CM u 


lol 


07£ 

y /o 


189 


886 


3 ,474 


281 


4 


755 


517 


10 


542 


7 


220 


1 Q09 


6 


000 


408 


59 964 


1 491 soft 

1 , 4Z1 , obO 


111 101 
10 , ozo 




O ft79 
z , 0/z 


2, 996 


226 


109 


195 


082 


4,847 


684 


6 


297 


857 


14 


980 


8 


740 


6 , 240 


4 


780 


833 


127 040 


1 9fi1 ftfi4 
1 , ZOO , 004 


471 10ft 

4 zo , iyo 




A 499 
4 , 4Z0 


A 101 

'x , iyi 


309 


521 


303 


596 


8,0C6 


388 


11 


343 


692 


22 


412 


17 


276 


5, 136 


8 


841 


486 


09H iQC 

zzo, 4aO 


9 Ifift 10,8 

z , 000, oyo 


717 oni 
ill, zuo 




1 8ft7 
, 00/ 


q son 


261 


163 


240 


229 


6, 157 


719 


9 


833 


838 


19 


319 


17 


782 


1 ^37 
1 , Oo / 


7 


712 


249 


173 245 


9 nai m9 

Z , UOI , OUZ 


ftftQ Bftl 

ooy , 001 




2 561 


9 QCQ 


142 


033 


138 


013 


4 ,786 


265 


6 


174 


244 


13 


417 


6 


595 


6 , 822 


5 


441 


835 


84 743 


Q80 111 

yoz , 001 


OBQ Oil 

zoy , yoo 




9 1 (37 
, 10/ 


fifiO 


224 


548 


176 


912 


4,567 


518 


5 


589 


696 


18 


505 


5 


389 


1 1 1 1 a 
16 , 1 10 


{ 


195 


736 


110 156 


1 (VAA J18 
1 , U04 , 400 


0B7 "iAA 
ZO/ , 044 


Wnrthorn Pif-rimnnt N I 


49 ACQ 
HL , HOO 


A(\ A'iR 


o, Uoi 


1 AO 


2, 818 


643 


87, 877 


726 


1 23 


325 


034 




073 


1 




76, 030 


( C 


ZOO 


8, 533 


1 7Qd ddn 


OA 1 CE ICC 


c opn 109 
D , OCU, OZZ 


District 5 — 
















































Z , 100 


1 , 690 


140 


yob 


134 


043 


3 ,442 


127 


4 


508 


099 


10 


846 


10 


108 


TOO 

7oo 


A 

4 


_ 

7 60 


436 


77 936 


1 OOO ArtQ 
1 , OOO, 400 


001 mo 
zyo ,uoz 




3 481 


3 102 


213 


100 


204 


813 


8,068 


296 


10 


1 60 


812 


19 


335 


17 


531 


1 QC\A 
1 , 0U4 


6 


962 


oyu 


100 079 

IOO , O 1 z 


O AAA 8(iQ 

z , 444 , ooy 


AA'i 110 
440 , 1 1Z 




3 , 243 


3,191 


309 


555 


310 


377 


4,854 


180 


6 


480 


863 


15 


774 


10 


711 


5,063 


6 


929 


372 


90 761 


1 B4ft 11Q 

1 , 040 , ooy 


410 Iftl 

4oy ,000 




1 ft41 
, 041 


1 AQA 


272 


685 


266 


707 


9 , 654 


759 


11 


893 


231 


18 


915 


17 


787 


1 1 9Q 
1 , \ - s 


6 


502 


384 


120 844 


O AO A 1AA 
Z , 4Z4 | 141 


441 171 
441 ,0/1 




1 (170 
1 ,0/Z 


1 7A1 


146 


165 


138 


004 


4,024 


404 


5 


657 


709 


9 


617 


8 


190 


1 , 427 


Q 
O 


783 


211 


46 598 


1 417 899 
1 , 40/ , . 


04Q mo 
Z4y , ouz 




4 , 206 


3 , 966 


342 


493 


302 


220 


10,015 


887 


13 


260 


371 


22 


539 


1 Q 
10 


588 


3 , 951 


Q 
5 


236 


551 


1UO ,004 


Q niO A (17 

, uoy ,40/ 


717,416 




1 7fift 
1 , / 00 


1 fi91 
1,0/1 


123 


928 


107 


1£4 


3,499 


751 


4 


073 


763 


9 


355 


6 


724 


2 , 631 


O 
it 


824 


173 


80,9 

00 , oyz 


814 sno 

004 , OUO 


oni 7fti 
zuo , / 00 




A BOB 
4 , OOo 


3 , 977 


409 


441 


378 


334 


7,895 


349 


10 


787 


476 


22 


051 


20 


015 


2,036 


6 


620 


429 


134 783 


9 B7ft 114 
Z , O/O, 1 14 


ftift AA1 
000,441 




9 ftCO 
, Obb 


3 241 


272 


coy 


250 


325 


10, 412 


888 


14 


121 


421 


21 


615 


17 


695 


1 C9A 






370 


557 


11U , oou 


9 on fini 
z , y 10 , ou4 


582 , 150 


Wake 


1 071 

, a to 


k d7t; 

0,4/0 


408 


892 


383 


744 


13, 188 


294 


20 


140 


092 


34 


030 


21 


593 


19 AQ7 
1Z , 4o / 


13 


567 


1 , 676 


007 9nn 
ZU/ , zuu 


1 017 81ft 
O , Z4/ ,010 


ftB1 OftO 

001 , yoz 


Pontral Pi&Hmnnt H ^ 


0*4 , 30/ 




2, 647 


794 


2, 475 


761 


75,055 


929 


101 


083 


837 


184 


077 


148 


QAO 


fid 


00 


300 


5, 179 




90 R1fl 

ll , mo ,010 


A ftQQ 114 
H , OOO, 104 


District 8 
















































o , oUo 


O 1 -70 

o , 172 


zou 


OAO 


247 


200 


5, 196 


147 





63 1 


273 


20 


181 


9 


... 

028 


11 1 CO 

1 1 , 1 DO 


Q 




ASQ 
400 


1 1 P"7 

1 , 167 


131 262 


1 478 255 


411 7 on 
411 , / ZU 




9 1B1 
Z ,003 


9 Q7n 


211 


553 


189 


412 


6,453 


691 


8 


93 7 


326 


14 


966 


11 


725 


3 , 241 





811 


520 


64 328 


9 naa 1 no 
z , uoo , 1UZ 


iiq ion 
ooy , oyu 




1 Oftfi 
, ZOO 


, lOl 


264 


732 


242 


902 


12,878 


688 


18 


527 


732 


28 


066 


20 


332 


7 , 734 


1Z 


816 


670 




mi RH9 
O , OUO , OUZ 


filft 181 
OOO, OOI 




2 871 


2 555 


183 


553 


151 


029 


8,082 


877 


11 


758 


386 


17 


124 


12 


718 


A AC\R 
4 , 4U0 


4 


920 


584 


77 Q01 

/ / , yyo 


a 1 1 m 1 

Z , 41 1 , UIO 


4oa ,4oZ 




9 01 Q 
Z , too 


9 K07 
Z , 0U( 


175 


725 


152 


740 


6, 104 


086 


8 


199 


045 


15 


349 


13 


165 


2 , 184 


6 


460 


164 


ins fin7 

1UO , OUl 


O OftQ m7 

z , uoy , iu/ 


11ft ill 
010,013 




A 1 99 


3 , 773 


274 


591 


246 


031 


13 ,901 


714 


20 


955 


181 


23 


108 


15 


078 


8,030 


6 


277 


938 


127 184 


1 ftift ftdi 

. OOO , 040 


711 filft 

/ 40 , ooy 




1 1 476 


1 A7A 


153 


079 


145 


981 


2,708 


649 


3 


702 


103 


9 


140 


7 


369 


1 , 771 


2 


798 


254 


49 022 


87n sna 

0/ u , OUO 


044 7no 

Z44 , 1 UZ 




9 99B 
Z , 000 


2 , 062 


226 


893 


216 


784 


5,142 


182 


6 


803 


633 


13 


443 


10 


334 


3 , 109 


4 


400 


612 


76 976 


1 017 110 
1 , Zl / , 01Z 


Oftl 171 
ZOO , 1 to 




1 G10 

1 , yoz 


1 Q1 1 
1,011 


179 


458 


164 


319 


4,273 


372 


5 


761 


829 


12 


062 


6 


656 


5 , 406 


4 


639 


608 


Kft n^o 
OO , uoz 


Qdl 7nn 
y40 , / ou 


1 70 ftftA 

1 /y , you 




2 , 728 


2,404 


210 


597 


189 


076 


5,069 


039 


7 


213 


051 


14 


945 


13 


997 


948 


5 


241 


303 


yo , 000 


1 , 923 , 101 


IflO 007 

ooy , zy / 




1 H7d 
O, U/ 4 


, 44 it 


358 


685 


317 


795 


7,926 


341 


13 


116 


640 


27 


309 


21 


866 


C AA'i 
, 440 


10 


381 


764 


117 222 


O 71ft QQ1 

z , / 10 , yy 1 


ftftft 774 

oyo , / /4 


Cm it h nr n Piurimnnt Q 1 


id kip. 


Ot. CO I 


t, oia 


068 


2, 273 


269 


77 , 736 


786 


111 


606 


199 


195 


693 


142 


268 


AOZi 
OO p HCa 


79 


231 


6, 584 




90 flP.0 QQfi 
ZZ . OOZ , 090 


c 110 cni 
3, 1 10, OUO 


District 3 — 
















































9 09 7 
, Z0/ 


o ,474 


258 


644 


243 


545 


7,593 


617 


10 


078 


699 


17 


850 


7 


185 


10, oo5 


8 


171 


542 


112 987 


li.0 017 
04Z , ZO/ 


fi7 08fi 
0/ , ZoO 




070 

o/y 


791 


62 


953 


53 


679 


2,268 


129 


2 


990 


380 


4 


576 


2 


649 


1 , 927 


1 


468 


162 


19 476 


oiQ rift 
zoy , i>io 


14 n7ft 
04 , U/ 




1 no7 


1 1ft9 
1 , 1 < 


72 


901 


70 


693 


2,888 


295 


3 


966 


327 


6 


246 


3 


447 


2, 799 


1 


406 


314 


17 (11 A 
1 / , 014 


11ft Oftl 

IOO, zoo 


01 1 04 
Zl , 1Z4 




932 


763 


70 


736 


70 


235 


2,488 


899 


3 


342 


653 


4 


984 


3 


182 


1 , 802 


1 


156 


335 


1 a mi 
iy , iuo 


1 Q7 oon 
iy / , zzu 


19,011 




126 


53 


5 


249 


2 


963 


190 


185 




124 


151 




556 




500 


56 




129 


8 


4 810 


44 124 


1 494 




3 ,514 


4,000 


290 


034 


237 


413 


10,217 


037 


12 


998 


714 


23 


837 


8 


846 


14,991 





986 


1 ,870 


Q7 SJOft 

01 , ozo 


fti7 nno 
00 / , uuy 


70 1 in 
/y , iou 




1 ,395 


1 ,400 


98 


051 


109 


195 


2,912 


277 


3 


929 


737 


7 


298 


4 


042 


3,256 


2 


297 


285 


Q9 nn 
oz , uoo 


1 70 R71 

1 /y , /o 


10 nfio 
oy , uoz 


TTnlifov 


4,048 


4,559 


362 


141 


310 


693 


11,049 


277 


13 


030 


961 


29 


099 


6 


620 


22 ,479 


9 


159 


2, 287 


10( dOd 
IZti , 4Z4 


1 neo fti7 
1 ,uoy , 00/ 


011 1 74 

Zlo , 1/4 




2,038 


2,117 


118 


295 


148 


400 


4,505 


722 


6 


764 


995 


10 


977 


4 


301 


6, 676 


3 


876 


283 


60 , 296 


070 71 

z/z , / iy 


52 , 265 




2 , 683 


2, 651 


198 


109 


170 


077 


6,821 


109 


7 


761 


883 


15 


531 


8 


428 


7, 103 


5 


633 


559 


95 , 1 60 


353 , 802 


71 ,933 




5, 416 


5, 820 


302 


442 


237 


914 


12,761 


597 


15 


418 


634 


31 


296 


17 


606 


13 , 690 


14 


284 


1 ,594 


217 , 044 


1 11 Q OfM 

1 , 10 , yu4 


19H QCft 




3 ,386 


3 , 870 


268 


130 


201 


230 


7,798 


595 


10 


598 


259 


20 


423 


7 


033 


13 ,390 


8 


863 


1,084 


110 109 

110, oyz 


101 A(\n 
oyo, 4uu 


146 , 753 




1 1 11 
1 , 100 


1 , 170 


77 


585 


83 


003 


3,497 


380 


5 


657 


545 


6 


318 


3 


738 


2,580 


1 


590 


521 


10 , uoo 


101 BQ1 

ozi , oy 1 


56 , 323 




1 1 09 
1 , 1 ■ - 


1 ,222 


84 


963 


91 


083 


2,862 


305 


4 


434 


347 


6 


098 


3 


560 


2 , 538 


1 


992 


349 


19 , 697 


108 7dn 

iyo, /4U 


41 ,508 




713 


540 


37 


142 


37 


873 


1,173 


337 


1 


315 


138 


3 


127 


2 


267 


860 




858 


111 


10 , 053 


174, 499 


97 077 

z/ ,y / 1 




1 , 202 


1 ,091 


70 


477 


67 


557 


2,452 


536 


2 


884 


312 


6 


213 


3 


837 


2,376 


1 


792 


224 


24 659 


008 1 Oft 

zyo, izo 


10 1 B1 
00, IOO 


Nnrthorn Pnnetnl f'NP 1 


90 049 
OL , OHO 


34 , 553 


2,377 


852 


2,135 


553 


81 , 480 


297 


105 


297 


035 


194 


429 


87 


241 


107,188 


69 


660 


1 , 528 


0,09 ndi 


ft filyj OO.A 

0,014, 0U4 


1 Ofift 1 77 
1 , Z3U 


District 6 — 
















































, 000 


6 ,425 


237 


497 


189 


017 


8,460 


303 


9 


919 


289 


18 


341 


12 


778 


5 , 563 


5 


669 


1,011 


Oft RA7 

yo, 04/ 


IBS A 14 
/ 00 , 404 


... 

92,071 




885 


840 


62 


330 


53 


618 


1 ,652 


990 


2 


503 


936 


4 


606 


4 


112 


494 


1 


215 


161 


07 V>A 
Z/ , 0Z4 


1 ftO 14fi 
10Z ,040 


19,436 




2,339 


2,102 


149 


057 


127 


664 


4,531 


107 


5 


697 


795 


12 


197 


7 


360 


4,837 


4 


524 


601 


71 7Q7 
/ 1 , /O / 


raa cno 
044 , ouy 


68, 172 




2,832 


3 , 260 


139 


010 


130 


456 


7,310 


421 


9 


590 


015 


15 


189 


8 


497 


6,692 


6 


620 


760 


71 non 
4 , uzu 


147 ftftft 
04 / , OOO 


08 071 

00 , O/O 


nyae 


1 ,052 


1 ,023 


66 


143 


63 


970 


2,497 


643 


2 


854 


036 


6 


012 


3 


617 


2,395 


1 


862 


316 


18, 698 


250, 345 


47 ,971 




7 , 617 


7 ,512 


434 


804 


372 


251 


17,206 


262 


22 


925 


214 


42 


109 


35 


016 


7,093 


15 


919 


1,908 


9^9 Af\R 

Z4z , 4Uo 


1 nf\A QOI 

1 , 9U4 , fly 1 


572, 9oz 




1 ,599 


1 , 535 


135 


834 


113 


123 


2,977 


095 


3 


749 


160 


7 


867 


4 


588 


3,279 


2 


969 


156 


46, 287 


171 ixn 
l/o ,o4y 


35,235 




3 ,387 


3,765 


187 


698 


181 


403 


8,680 


347 


12 


531 


817 


17 


281 


10 


076 


7,205 


7 


141 


1 , 134 


131 , 719 


7ft7 7ft1 
/O/ , /Ol 


ion 011 

izy ,yio 




1 ,077 


887 


88 


664 


75 


691 


3,087 


743 


2 


852 


981 


5 


935 


4 


161 


1 , 774 


1 


801 


473 


11 C17 
OO , 30 / 


104 BIO 
0Z4 , OOZ 


39 , 710 


Pitt 


6,384 


6,766 


301 


758 


282 


353 


15,744 


379 


21 


961 


214 


31 


673 


17 


538 


14, 135 


13 


864 


1 ,266 


165, 937 


851 , 8o2 


147, 107 




5,075 


4,907 


282 


058 


256 


654 


13,942 


027 


18 


420 


206 


26 


582 


16 


679 


9, 903 


8 


685 


1, 191 


TAQ QH9 
140, OUZ 


1 , 178,424 


917 ft 10 

ZO / , OOO 




4,352 


4, 734 


206 


154 


181 


233 


12,340 


103 


15 


592 


879 


23 


802 


15 


490 


8,312 


1 1 


083 


1, 181 


11)3 ACiO 
100 , 4UZ 


700 740 

/zy , / 4z 


142 , 201 


Control Pnaclrtl F i 


40 , 1 52 


40, 756 


2,291 


007 


2,027 


433 


98,430 


420 


128 


598 


542 


211 


594 


139 


912 


71 , 682 


81 


352 


10, 158 


1 1QK 11ft 
I , 1 93 , I I O 


Q f\OA ATX 


1 ft '11 91 1 


District 9 
















































3,026 


2, 686 


234 


825 


208 


550 


4,233 


334 


5 


172 


352 


16 


583 


9 


741 


6,842 


7 


501 


549 


_ 

7z , 7oo 


777 11 1 
/ / / , Ol 1 


_ 

94,79o 




2 ,079 


1 ,519 


173 


239 


132 


036 


2,794 


893 


2 


421 


602 


11 


221 


7 


562 


3,659 


3 


294 


222 


59,527 


011 779 
Zll , / /Z 


12,569 




4 ,826 


4,297 


265 


473 


250 


758 


8,098 


922 


9 


096 


350 


26 


141 


19 


764 


6,377 


8 


474 


1,074 


131 ,460 


1 nm on 

1 ,uyi , 004 


127, 658 




3,255 


2,840 


222 


010 


174 


972 


5.628 


563 


7 


570 


009 


18 


401 


10 


821 


7,580 


8 


019 


951 


86 , 756 


1 nnd Q8i 
1 , UU0 , 000 


1 711 onn 
1 /U , OUU 




5,627 


4,970 


333 


774 


281 


683 


8,873 


945 


11 


406 


808 


27 


908 


18 


077 


9,831 


10 


600 


1,423 


1 A A KA A 

144 , 044 


cnn qak 
ouy , 040 


1 RCl 101 

109 ,666 


Wo rnoff 


4,220 


3 939 


228 


871 


204 


596 


9,289 


406 


12 


163 


537 


23 


896 


18 


119 


5 777 


7 


904 


744 


1 A 9 IflQ 

14Z .oao 


1 A 11 001 
1 , 401 , OZo 


OfiO 911 

ooz, ^00 


Hoke._ _ 


1,644 


\\m 


106 


948 


112 


118 


3,576 


680 


6 


588 


540 


10 


158 


3 


513 


6^645 


4 


002 


592 


46,558 


534,661 


102.839 


New Hanover. 


435 


282 


21 


267 


15 


259 


1,664 


210 


1 


973 


154 


2 


747 


2 


017 


730 




568 


366 


5,023 


565,097 


18,026 


Onslow 


2,734 


2,394 


206 


571 


178 


002 


4,111 


407 


5 


369 


669 


12 


447 


9 


491 


2,956 


4 


800 


489 


79,684 


219,218 


45,323 


Pender 


2,508 


1,984 


189 


973 


138 


594 


3,336 


338 


3 


993 


558 


12 


841 


7 


182 


5,659 


4 


682 


324 


49! 773 


511 ,'961 


79^973 


Robeson 


7,996 


7,666 


419 


045 


340 


S20 


17,214 


189 


20 


879 


151 


46 


720 


IS 


905 


27,815 


17 


643 


1,874 


197,222 


1,888,808 


353,981 


Sampson 


6,311 


6,102 


368 


012 


375 


493 


11,209 


927 


15 


574 


146 


32 


759 


22 


338 


10,421 


13 


632 


1,371 


160,212 


1,452,423 


362,347 


Scotland.. 


1,873 


1,896 


113 


677 


105 


963 


4,315 


425 


6, 


891 


795 


11 


765 ■ 


3 


600 


8,165 


3 


301 


467 


43,323 


379,999 


70,427 


Southern Coastal (SE.)-- 


46,534 


42,460 


2,883 


685 


2,518 


944 


84,347 


239 


109 


106 


671 


253 


587 


151 


130 


102,457 


94 


420 


10,446 


1,219,216 


10,901,855 


1,970,325 


State 


300,967 


279.708 


19,970,002 


18,055,103 


622,834,983 


844,121,809 


1,623,481 


1,162,495 


460,986 


578,578 


59,321 


9.631,010 


138,121,337 


30,716,616 



"Value of Farm Garden Vegetables Grown for Home Use. 



28 NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



NUMBER, AGE, AND VARIETY OF PEACH TREES 

Survey of Commercial Orchards 1936 


NUMBER, AGE, AND VARIETY OF PEACH TREES 

Survey of Commercial Orchards 1936 


Counties and Varieties 


Total 
N umber 




A< 


je of The 


es— Yeaf 


s 




Counties and Varieties 


Total 
Number 




A( 


IE OF TRE 


ES — Yeai 


s 




1-3 


4-5 


6-7 


8-9 


10-11 


12 and 
Over 


1-3 


4-5 


6-7 


8-9 


10-11 


12 and 
Over 


Anson: 
Elberta 


30,875 
11,025 
7,800 
5,800 
4,920 
4,700 
1,800 
1,400 
300 


13,900 
4,000 
4,900 
3,000 
4,800 
2,000 
1,400 
1,000 








550 


16,425 
7,025 
2,900 


Iredell: 
Ga. Belle 


325 
285 
250 
250 
240 
200 
200 




275 








50 
285 
250 
150 
240 
200 
200 


Ga. Belle 








Hiley 










Hiley 










Elberta . . . 












Early Rose - 


2,000 
120 






800 


Hale 




100 








Jubilee .... .... 








Assorted 










Hale 








2,700 
100 


English Cling 












Red Bird 


300 








Other Varieties.. 














400 
100 


















Mayflower... 

Other Varieties. .. . ... 






100 


100 


Total 


1,750 

4,000 
2,000 
1,500 




375 








1 ,375 

4,000 
2,000 


Total 








Lee: 

Ga. Belle. 










68,620 
100 


35,000 


2,420 


500 




1,450 

100 


29.250 


Cabarrus: 
Elberta 




Elberta 












Hale... 










1,500 


Total 












Total 












100 

5,750 
3,100 
2,400 
1,200 
550 
500 
500 
475 










100 

1,100 
800 
1,300 




7,500 

850 
690 
240 
240 
200 
230 










1,500 

300 


6,000 


Caldwell: 
Elberta 


2,350 
200 
300 




600 
600 




1,700 
1,500 
500 


Lincoln: 
Assorted.. 


100 






450 
450 


Ga. Belle 






Elberta 


240 
240 
240 
200 
80 






Hale 


300 




Carman.. . 










Assorted 


1,200 




Red Bird 












Carman 




50 






500 
500 


Chinese Cling . . . 












Greensboro 










Other Varieties. 






150 
















500 












Other Varieties 


225 


250 








Total ... 


2,450 

1,885 
850 
835 
570 


100 

475 


1 ,000 

100 

250 
200 




1,050 

710 
200 
75 
125 


300 

325 
250 
110 
60 




Total 










fyJECKLENBUTlQ: 

Elberta 


250 


25 
150 
250 
190 


14,475 

1,350 
600 
450 
350 
200 
350 


3,075 

150 
100 
50 
50 


600 


2,400 




3,700 

625 
500 
400 
300 


4,700 


Cleveland: 
Early Elberta 


575 




Ga. Belle. 


50 

95 


150 
100 










Other Varieties 


Ga. Belle 










Total 




Red Bird 










4,140 

188,920 
80,801 
39,773 
36,235 
13,340 
10,958 
9,535 
9,300 
8,625 
4,900 
4,000 
3,031 
2,980 
2,250 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 
2,775 


620 

67,051 
15,747 
12,640 
16,750 
4,140 
2,925 
2,277 
2,000 
7,802 
4,900 
4,000 
2,816 
1,680 
200 
1,000 
1 , 500 
1,000 
1,325 


550 

24,394 
11,011 
8,525 
9,610 
3,200 
1,888 
5,758 


500 

8,640 
3,000 
2,850 
1,250 
1,500 
740 
550 
50 


1 ,110 

700 
300 
7,900 


745 

1,250 
220 
875 
1,705 
1,100 
180 
100 
400 


615 

86,885 
50,523 
6,983 
6,920 
1,100 
5,225 
200 
6,650 


Assorted 




200 






m ontgomery: 
Elberta 


Other Varieties 


250 






100 




Total 












3,300 

7,000 
5,450 
3,850 
1,200 
1,200 
300 
300 


600 

1,500 




200 


575 


1,925 

1,000 




Ga. Belle 

Early Rose . 


Cumberland: 
Elberta 




4,500 
5,450 
2,850 
1,200 
1,200 
300 
300 


Hiley 


Red Bird --- 


2,300 




Ga. Belle 








Mayflower. 


650 
200 


Hiley 


1 ,000 










Hale 


Early Rose 










Jubilee 


823 


Hale 












Gage Elberta 










Carman 












Early Elberta 












Mayflower 














100 
1,300 


100 


15 






Total. .. 


















19,300 

300 
300 
210 


2, 500 








1,000 


1 5 , 800 


Augbert 


50 


2,000 






Davidson: 
Elberta 




300 
300 
210 








1,000 




Early Blush 










Late Elberta 












Pondorosa 












Other Varieties ... - 


500 


600 






350 


Other Varieties 


















Total 












421 ,923 

169,492 
55,650 
50,630 
26,270 
18,500 
18,250 
11,850 
9,290 
7,600 
5,485 
2,000 
2,000 
1,550 
1,000 
1,000 
2,125 


149,753 

36,115 
6,475 

14,545 
8,650 
2,900 
9,675 
3,050 
2,100 
6,000 
4,100 
2,000 


67,109 

2,345 
6,600 
6,270 
2,860 


19,330 

4,200 


14,065 

1,750 


6,830 

11,550 
3,880 
4,550 

600 
2,300 

500 


164,836 

113,532 
38,695 
23,315 
9,210 
10,000 
3 , 225 
4,000 
6,190 
100 
585 


810 

3,420 
2,480 
1,225 
1,040 
760 
610 
535 
360 
335 
925 






810 

180 

370 








Total -. 

MOORE: 


Forsyth: 
Elberta 


550 


750 


500 
2, 100 
200 




1,440 


Ga. Belle 


Hiley 


1,950 
500 




Pondorosa 


in" 

10 

250 
150 


Early Rose 


4,450 
3,300 
600 
4,700 


Hale 


150 
100 


250 
250 
100 


375 
210 
510 
10 


Hale 


Ga. Belle 


non~ 

280 
50 


Red Bird 


3,650 
100 


600 


Carman 




Augbert 




250 


350 




500 
500 
500 


500 


Jubilee 


535 






Jubilee 


1,000 
100 




Hiley 






300 


- 60 
225 
75 




Mayflower - - - - 




200 










110 
55 


Late Elberta 




Other Varieties 


100 


375 


170 


150 


Brackett 








2,000 




Total 




1,550 
1,000 










11,690 

8,472 
6,545 
2,920 
1,400 
550 
300 
250 
200 
1,520 


1 , 585 

2,200 
3 , 145 


1 79K 

2,100 
1 ,000 


1 , 050 


3,500 

200 
200 


1,120 


2,710 

3,972 
500 
2,735 
1,400 
350 


Slippers L. Red . .. 

Mixed. — -- 












Gaston: 
Elberta 


Early Red Blush 


1,000 
300 










Other Varieties... 


1,425 








400 


Total. 








Assorted 


900 


800 
185 


382,692 

2,175 
652 
250 
200 
400 


99,585 

425 
127 


24,225 

400 


8,750 

550 

275 


14,800 

600 


26,080 

150 

250 


209,252 

50 


Ga. Belle 


Polk: 

Assorted 


Carman .. . - 










Mayflower. _ 




200 
300 








Elberta 


Jubilee. ... 










Elberta Queen.. 






250 










250 




Stark Early Elberta 






200 






Slippers Red . 


200 
660 










Other Varieties . 


200 






175 


25 


Other Varieties.. .. 






100 


250 


510 


Total.. 








Total 






3,677 

850 
350 


752 


400 


1 ,025 


600 


575 


325 

850 
350 


22,157 

9,000 
4,210 
1,200 
1,150 


6 , 205 


3 1 600 


900 


500 


1 , 485 

1,500 
1,800 
1,150 


9,467 

7,500 
2~, 410 
1,200 


Randolph: 
Ga. Belle 


Harnett: 
Ga Belle 


Elberta 












Total 












Elberta 










1,200 

211,376 
92,148 
88,902 
44,390 
42,900 
9,120 
7,600 
6,200 
4,730 
4,428 
4,350 
7,048 












1,200 

121,618 
36,568 
75,944 
2,750 
26,800 
20 
2,000 


Hiley 










Richmond: 
Elberta 


41,708 
33,480 
858 
17,600 
6,900 
4,650 
4,000 
6,200 
2,400 
2,428 


32,500 
13,850 
3,000 
9,390 


5,000 


600 


9,950 
8,250 
9,100 
4,500 
9,200 
800 


Hale 










Total 

Hoke: 

Elberta 
















15,560 

12,433 
5,410 
2,033 
1,858 
1,000 
800 
200 










4,450 


11,110 

10,000 
4,410 
600 
1,425 


Hiley 

Ga. Belle 






2,433 
1,000 
1,433 
433 
1,000 








Red Bird- 


4,200 


5,950 


Hale-... 


Early Rose 


3,650 






Ga. Belle 










Augbert 


500 


1,100 


Hiley. 










Gage Elberta.. . . 






Early Rose. . 










Slappy 


930 
2,000 








1.40C 


Red Bird... 










Jubilee. _ 








Carman. 










800 
200 

17,435 


Carman 






1,700 
200 


2,650 
1,300 


Hale 












Other Varieties 


4,808 


740 






Total. 












Total 






23,734 


6,299 










523,192 


125,032 


66,060 


9,700 


7,650 


43,700 


271,050 



















NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



29 



NUMBER, AGE, AND VARIETY OF PEACH TREES 

Survey of Commercial Orchards 1936 



Coi'NTIES AND VARIETIES 



Robeson: 

Elberta 

Hiley 

Hale 

Ga. Belle 

Assorted 

Total 

Rowan: 

Elberta 

Ga. Belle 

Early Rose 

Seedlings 

Hale 

Jubilee 

Assorted 

Mayflower 

Other Varieties 

Total 

Rutherford: 

Elberta 

Hale 

Assorted 

Mamoth Iron Clad 

Ga. Belle 

Iron Clad 

Brackett 

English Cling 

Jubilee 

Other Varieties 

Total 

Stanlt: 

Seedlings 

Assorted 

Elberta 

Hale 

Red Bird 

Ga. Belle 

Total 

Surry: 

Elberta 

Ga. Belle 

Hale 

Mixed 

Cling Seedling 

Greensboro 

Light Eiberta 

Augbert 

Salway 

Other Varieties 

Total 

Wake: 

Elberta 

Jubilee 

Early Rose 

Assorted 

Mayflower 

Ga. Belle 

Hale 

Red Bird 

Early Elberta 

Uneeda 

Total 

Wayne: 

Assorted-.. 

Elberta 

Ga. Belle 

Total 

State 



Total 
Number 



750 
400 
400 
350 
225 



2.125 



3,400 
1,825 
1,000 
665 
600 
500 
440 
300 
325 



9,055 



9,775 
7,263 
4,695 
3,001 
2,050 
975 
500 
300 
275 
612 



29.446 



950 
700 
600 
500 
390 
200 



3,340 



18,300 
3,950 
1,800 
500 
500 
450 
300 
200 
200 
300 



26,500 



9,500 
7,400 
4,500 
4,200 
4,100 
3,900 
2,550 
2,100 
300 
300 



38,850 



515 

275 
250 



1,040 



1,638,626 



Age of Trees — Years 



1-3 



150 



150 



2,250 
1,000 
1,000 
350 
500 
500 



300 
300 



6,200 



6,150 
2,850 
1,470 



575 
450 
500 



275 
150 



12,420 



950 



500 
140 



1,590 



2,500 
100 
500 



300 



3,400 



600 
400 
500 
700 
100 
400 
300 



1, 



4,800 

430 



430 
460,096 



4-5 



200 
475 



790 



400 
400 
,150 
300 
325 
300 



2,875 



000 



250 
200 



1,050 



700 
300 



1,000 



7,000 
4,000 



3,000 



300 
300 



14,600 



188,379 



800 
350 



50 
150 



1,350 



1,025 
738 
1,700 



200 
200 



262 
4,125 



3,800 
200 



500 



,500 



650 



650 



55,790 



1.100 
2,400 



2,000 
250 



5,850 



700 



700 



675 
200 
250 



500 
400 



200 



2,225 

1,500 



1,000 
~1~,BM 



4,000 

85 



85 



56,710 



10-11 



150 



100 



250 



425 
100 
325 

26 
100 

25 



25 



1,026 



,250 
600 



200 
100 



,000 
750 



300 
,250 



275 
250 



525 



108,161 



12 and 
Over 



750 
400 
400 
350 
75 

1,975 



315 
150 



465 



675 
775 
50 
675 
600 



300 
"~75 



3,150 



6,375 
2,550 
1,050 



50 
"200 



10,225 

3,200 



2,850 
~2~500 



8,550 



769,490 



During 1936 the Divisions of Entomology of the State Department of Agri- 
culture and the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United 
States Department of Agriculture co-operated in a project to remove trees 
infected with phoney disease from the commercial peach orchards in North 
Carolina. 

All orchards having over 500 trees were inspected as well as all nursery 
environs were peach stocks were grown and the age and variety of all trees 
were recorded. The tabulation above presents a summary by counties of the 
results of this survey showing the totals of the commercial peach trees by 
ages and variety in commercial orchards only. In making up this summary 
minor varieties were grouped together under the classification of "Other 
Varieties" at the end of each county table. 

Mr. J. A. Harris of the State Department of Agriculture had charge of this 
work for the Division of Entomology in co-operation with Mr. C. H. Hearn 
of the United States Department of Agriculture. 




The peach crop in North Carolina has experienced favorable 
price conditions for the past three years. With the increase 
in planting of young trees the production is expected to expand 
in the near future. Peaches are an expensive crop, requiring 
attention throughout the year. For that reason, fair prices 
must be received in order for the growers to make ends meet. 
Close inspection by government experts are now required for 
good quality products. 

While the peach graph, herewith, shows considerable varia- 
tion from year to year, yet there is a definite trend or growth 
in production until the past three or four years. There is now 
a definite downward trend in production of this crop. Since it 
takes about four years for a peach tree to get into fairly good 
bearing, it is expected that upward trends will recur in about 
another year or two. 



NORTH CAROLINA FRUIT CROPS 

Total Production — Revised Estimates 





Apples 


Peaches 


Pears 


Grapes 




Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Tons 


Year 


(000) 


(000) 


(000) 




1919 


1 


938 




479 


112 


5,340 


1920.. _ 


5 


700 


1 


212 


248 


5,700 


1921 




962 




596 


130 


4,000 


1922 


5 


616 


1 


580 


235 


5,500 


1923 


2 


260 




529 


86 


5,300 


1924... . 


5 


750 


2 


304 


277 


5,700 


1925 


2 


793 


1 


393 


164 


4,200 


1926 


5 


427 


1 


995 


278 


5,900 


1927 


1 


688 


1 


032 


104 


4,200 


1928 


4 


692 


2 


100 


260 


4,800 


1929 


2 


465 


1 


326 


196 


3,720 


1930 


2 


380 


1 


512 


129 


4,400 


1931 


4 


884 


2 


944 


380 


6.000 


1932 


1 


575 


1 


504 


136 


4,600 


1933 


4 


189 


2 


080 


290 


7,000 


1934 


2 


598 


2 


116 


289 


7,320 


1935 


2 


915 


1 


962 


294 


6,600 



APPLE PRODUCTION IN N. C. 



MILLION 
BUSHE]^ 



WW 



immiib 

iipnippini 

n r 



I 



XL 



:'ei| 
<?»! 



REVISED ES 



co 



IMA' 



ES 1919-1936 



30 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



FARM LABOR IN NORTH CAROLINA 



Supply 
%of 
Normal 



Demand 
%of 
Normal 



Average Wages Being Paid 
to Hired Farm Labor 



By Month 
With 



By Month 
Without 
Board 



By Day 
With 
Board 



By Dav 
Without 
Board 



SuDply 
foot 
Normal 



Demand 
%of 
Normal 



Average Wages Being Paid 
to Hired Farm Labor 



By Month 
With 
Board 



By Month 
Without 
Board 



By Day 
With 
Board 



82 


97 


83 
83 


97 


85 


99 
90 


89 


94 


88 


94 


90 


95 


88 


93 


87 


88 


87 


92 


90 


91 


86 


92 



£4 



93 
90 



95 
94 

92 



102 
106 
104 



91 
111 
90 



90 
92 
85 



82 
78 
73 



27.00 
27.25 
30.00 
29.00 

29.00 
28.00 
28.00 
29.00 

27.00 
29.00 
29.00 
30.00 

29.00 
26.75 
26.75 
27.50 

28.25 
27.00 
27.50 
27.75 

27.00 
26.25 
26.75 
28.75 

25.00 
23.75 
23.25 
22.25 



37.00 
38.50 
41.00 
42.00 

39.00 
40.00 
40.00 
40.00 

39.00 
40.00 
41.00 
41.00 

39.00 
38.50 
38.25 
38.00 

40.50 
37.00 
39.00 
39.25 

40.00 
38.50 
38.25 
39.25 

35.00 
34.00 
33.25 
31.25 



1.25 
1.45 
1.65 
1.46 

1.90 
1.50 
1.54 
1.50 

1.53 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 

1.50 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 

1.50 
1.40 
1.45 
1.50 

1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 

1.35 
1.25 
1.25 
1.10 



1.80 
1.88 

2.00 
1.85 

2.25 
1.90 
2.20 
2.00 

1.95 
1.90 
1.90 
1.90 

1.90 
1.85 
1.80 
1.75 

1.90 
1.85 
1.85 
1.90 

1.85 
1.80 
1.80 
1.80 

1.75 
1.65 
1.55 
1.45 



1931 
January. 

April 

July.... 
October. 

1932 
January. 

April 

July.... 
October. 

1933 
January. 

April 

July.... 
October. 

1934 
January 
April . . . 
July.... 
October. 

1935 
January 
April. .. 
July... 
October. 

1936 
January 
April. .. 
July — 
October 

1937 
January 
April . _ . 
July... 
October 



112 
111 
105 
110 

117 
115 
115 
116 

118 
113 
107 
100 

100 

99 
95 
95 



94 
92 
91 

92 
90 



83 
77 



67 
70 
73 
59 

60 
62 
62 
60 

56 
59 
65 
76 

68 
70 
79 
81 

77 
82 
83 
85 

81 

86 



92 
94 
95 



20.50 
17.50 
17.25 
16.00 

14.00 
13.00 
11.50 
11.50 

9.75 
9.75 
11.25 
13.75 

14.25 
14.25 
14.25 
15.50 

15.50 
15.50 
16.00 
16.00 

15.75 
15.75 
15.75 
16.50 

17.00 
17.75 
18.25 
18.53 



29.50 
26.00 
25.50 
23.10 

21.00 
19.25 
17.25 
17.25 

14.75 
14.75 
17.25 
20.00 

21.00 
21.25 
21.25 
23.25 

23.00 
23.00 
24.25 
24.25 

23.75 
23.50 
23.25 
24.25 

25.75 
26.00 
26.25 
26.68 



1.05 
.90 
90 
85 

70 
65 
60 
60 

£0 
50 
60 
70 

75 
75 



FARM ECONOMIC STUDIES 



Following the distribution of thousands 
of Rural Carrier Acreage cards during 
September and October of this year, let- 
ters were received from postmasters and 
rural carriers explaining why such poor 
returns were obtained. Quoting from a 
Duplin County postmaster we have the 
following: 1. Fear that the information 
is used in connection with the Triple A 
program to the disadvantage of the 
farmer. 2 Fear of an increase in their 
taxes. 3. Fear that this information is 
given to the trade or speculators to in- 
fluence prices. 4. That they are already 
receiving too many of similar inquiries. 
5. The average farmer cannot under- 
stand how this information can be of help 
to him. 6. Farmers do not keep books and 
therefore, do not understand this and 
economic methods. 7. It is not the fault of 
the rural carriers but the 
farmers themselves, since 
the farmers definitely refuse 
to give the carrier the infor- 
mation sought. 

If farmers would seek 
nearly as diligently to obtain 
the constructive values of 
farm statistical information 
as they do destructive criti- 
cisms, they would be far bet- 
ter off than they have been. 
Of course, these reports do 
not affect one's taxes and 
the speculative trade effects 
are really negligible. 

Farm economists have, 
during many years, endea- 
vored to secure information 
that would be basic and con- 



structive to farm programs. This is true 
of the Crop Reporting Service of North 
Carolina. More or less of a fight was neces- 
sary each year in continuing the Farm 
Census and other farm survey programs. 
It was a welcome day when the Triple A 
program was inaugurated because North 
Carolina had the facts better than any 
other southern state, which would establish 
this program on a safe basis. Instead of the 
North Carolina farmers appreciating this 
advantage there was a general expression 
of opposition to many of the basic acre- 
ages and production figures used for given 
counties. While there has been a definite 
improvement in the attitude of the 
farmers regarding this information, there 
is still a long ways to go before a safe and 
sane farm program can be established 
with the full cooperation of growers. 




Statisticians making cotton boll counts at 5 mile stops in field travel 



The statistics in this publication were 
collected from growers, and are offered 
back to them as certain evidence or indi- 
cation of trends which affect the agri- 
cultural situation. Any farmer may take 
this information and readily determine 
where the principal production is made, 
where over-production occurs and where 
the demand for given products should be 
good. Even price trends are shown, not 
only for the present time but by months 
for the previous part of 1937 and for 
years back to 1909. 

This information represents the results 
from expenditures of great sums of 
money through past years. The peculiarity 
of statistics is that with the passage of 
years the statistical information becomes 
of increasing value. This is due to the 
comparative usages available. Statistics 
become standardized. For- 
tunately, the agricultural 
high schools of North Caro- 
lina are taking a great deal 
of interest in this publica- 
tion and are using the data 
in the class work. County 
agents are increasingly 
using it in their county 
programs. Individual farms 
should show like interest 
and obtain the benefits of 
the opportune results. 

When farmers read and 
study the highly construc- 
tive information that is 
available to them, then con- 
ditions will improve. 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



31 



INDEX NUMBERS OF NORTH CAROLINA FARM PRICES, 1910 to Sept. 1937 

Based on Five Year Period — August, 1909-July, 1914 equals 100 per cent. 

PERCENTAGE COMPARISON OF PRICES RECEIVED TO PRE-WAR PRICES IN NORTH CAROLINA 













a 

o 


c 

o 


toes 


S 
_^ o 


2 

3 


>eans 


o 


(All) 


8 


S 
J3 


_,_ 
S Hi 


w 


as 


<g 
as 






olesale) 


S3 

a 






it 
o 

•~x 




Corn 


3 
M 
&- 
> 


Oats 


Rye 


Cott 


Cott 
Seed 


Pota 


Swec 
Pota 


Pear 


Soyl 


Tob: 


Hay 


Appl 


Peac 


O Q 

£z 

o — 


o 

h-t 


Beef 
Catt 


"3 

5) <3 

>-o 


Lam 


Butt 


So 


g > 


(30 


Woo 


LIVE 
IND 




1 


o 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


1910 


88 


yo 


98 


69 
98 


113 


127 


87 


92 


100 




82 


80 


82 


77 


98 


112 


97 


98 


101 


98 


99 


99 


86 
84 


128 


99 


1911 


103 


Q1 


100 


75 


78 
89 


111 


113 


93 
96 




89 


106 


87 


112 


85 


98 


62 


96 


95 


93 


99 
99 


94 


100 
94 


95 


1612 


95 


1U1 


101 


104 


93 


120 


105 




124 


105 


76 


84 


105 


87 


83 


92 


81 


102 


96 


81 


94 


1Q13 


100 


CA 


95 


67 


101 


108 


93 


101 


93 


99 


143 


104 


92 


109 


115 


100 


107 


104 


107 


106 


99 


103 


95 


90 


100 


1914 


102 


109 


103 


99 


62 


83 


107 


102 


93 


96 


89 


111 


54 


86 


79 


106 


121 


115 


109 


102 


101 


105 


101 


94 


105 




100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


1915 


68 


117 


101 


101 


89 


147 


60 


98 


96 


94 


87 


103 


TA 




92 


99 


115 


112 


118 


102 


99 


102 


90 


109 


100 


1916 


169 


146 


114 


119 


139 


226 


121 


114 


110 


106 


154 


106 


83 


125 


144 


108 


121 


118 


136 


106 


101 


114 


100 


133 


106 


1917 


208 


207 


155 


188 


220 


280 


236 


154 


166 


166 


243 


122 


97 


113 


223 


163 


162 


158 


188 


136 


125 


152 


151 


199 


145 


1918 


206 


208 


168 


201 


220 


275 


140 


188 


189 


145 


271 


135 


129 


145 


232 


230 


200 


166 


235 


166 


165 


200 


177 


288 


189 


1916 


2i7 


222 


176 


195 


284 


306 


181 


231 


249 


184 


411 


166 


175 


160 


315 


231 


216 


208 


238 


183 


175 


230 


199 


261 


201 


1620 


115 


202 


162 


192 


118 


106 


243 


200 


122 


111 


174 


150 


106 


167 


146 


198 


209 


194 


216 


208 


183 


235 


224 


217 


202 


1921 


95 


127 


109 


121 


136 


141 


131 


176 


127 


111 


205 


120 


214 


213 


161 


132 


131 


135 


144 


161 


153 


164 


146 


64 


149 


1922 _ 


116 


119 


108 


122 


192 


169 


139 


152 


144 


111 


230 


119 


113 


154 


192 


128 


117 


121 


155 


144 


135 


178 


139 


123 


136 


1923 


125 


115 


116 


129 


233 


182 


145 


160 


160 


122 


173 


125 


128 


186 


192 


127 


124 


123 


163 


157 


139 


183 


146 


157 


141 


1924 


156 


141 


129 


143 


181 


153 


112 


180 


156 


153 


189 


128 


97 


116 


175 


129 


124 


142 


175 


157 


141 


181 


145 


171 


142 


1925 


119 


157 


116 


147 


157 


141 


173 


188 


103 


113 


187 


128 


121 


145 


163 


149 


133 


152 


208 


157 


145 


182 


161 


180 


152 


1126 


100 


128 


106 


127 


101 


100 


190 


158 


103 


93 


213 


US 


84 


82 


145 


164 


136 


158 


204 


161 


147 


193 


164 


161 


158 


1927 


109 


130 


112 


128 


159 


156 


197 


140 


132 


95 


174 


109 


137 


154 


160 


155 


155 


177 


204 


157 


147 


190 


143 


165 


154 


1928 


127 


132 


125 


142 


148 


158 


64 


148 


124 


116 


159 


109 


96 


104 


146 


131 


181 


204 


221 


161 


145 


192 


146 


164 


152 


1929 


117 


123 


116 


136 


133 


117 


122 


135 


81 


111 


154 


107 


117 


127 


135 


133 


185 


210 


217 


161 


145 


196 


161 


185 


156 


1930 


89 


96 


103 


118 


77 


90 


139 


129 


81 


89 


108 


111 


107 


122 


64 


128 


166 


185 


179 


144 


135 


167 


137 


119 


141 


1931 


46 


64 


60 


69 


48 


43 


64 


92 


41 


40 


73 


81 


60 


60 


59 


99 


121 


138 


122 


115 


117 


140 


102 


75 


113 


1932 _•_ 


60 


62 


57 


61 


57 


49 


77 


67 


33 


33 


102 


70 


76 


86 


72 


63 


95 


106 


97 


89 


89 


103 


78 


57 


83 


1933 


81 


92 


89 


95 


86 


62 


99 


87 


69 


72 


134 


87 


68 


77 


101 


57 


82 


87 


99 


81 


83 


64 


79 


109 


78 


1934_._ 


96 


95 


103 


98 


98 


148 


62 


95 


84 


67 


238 


105 


91 


61 


147 


75 


60 


96 


111 


89 


97 


113 


99 


119 


93 


1935 


83 


89 


87 


92 


92 


131 


71 


97 


77 


55 


170 


89 


79 


86 


118 


116 


114 


119 


128 


98 


105 


132 


119 


109 


113 


1936 

1937 — 

January . . 


102 


102 


103 


117 


101 


147 


188 


112 


61 


56 


190 


100 


116 


136 


137 


125 


121 


134 


146 


106 


85 


140 


132 


133 


119 


100 


119 


106 


119 


104 


151 


142 


98 


110 


71 


167 


103 


137 




130 


123 


121 


140 


138 


106 


117 


128 


134 


142 


122 


Feb, 


104 


123 


109 


118 


105 


155 


142 


105 


105 


82 
88 


159 


100 


147 




128 


123 


119 


137 


140 


106 


117 


129 


109 

98 


142 


120 


March 


104 


124 


116 


118 


112 


155 


171 


105 


108 


101 


153 




118 


123 


131 


140 


144 


106 


117 


131 


142 


117 


April— _ 


115 


128 


116 


120 


116 


151 


160 


112 


115 


93 
96 




97 


174 




121 


120 


136 


146 


161 


102 


117 


135 


65 


146 


117 


May 


124 


126 


118 


121 


110 


159 


165 


118 


115 




101 


174 




119 


123 


133 


152 


146 


102 


117 


135 


99 


146 


118 


June 


126 


115 


108 


108 


104 


147 


74 
63 


118 


105 


93 




100 


158 


145 


109 


128 


136 


154 


165 


102 


117 


139 


102 


186 


121 


July 


125 


108 


97 


108 


102 


147 


105 


103 

88 


93 




97 


79 
68 


213 


105 


138 


138 


142 


165 


102 


115 


142 


109 


171 


123 


August... 


117 


105 


87 


108 


90 


139 


80 


118 


82 


205 


63 


109 


134 


136 


136 


158 


165 


106 


115 


139 


119 


165 


126 


Sept. 


109 


103 


87 


113 


75 


86 


80 


112 


89 


62 


184 


83 


68 


109 


117 


135 


147 


162 


163 


106 


117 


148 


140 


165 


131 



•Average of Base Period from August 1909 to July 1814. tlndex of All Crops Combined, Items 1-14 Inclusive. 
{Index of All Livestock and Livestock Products Combined, Items 16-24 Inclusive. 



INDEX NUMBERS 

When understood, index numbers offer 
an ideal means of comparative, study of 
prices for any given time in relation to 
some standard, or base period. For ex- 
ample, the data on page 31 covers the 
period from 1910 to 1937. The base period 
was from August, 1909, to July, 1914 (5 
years), since this was very near a normal 
period of exchange values as between agri- 
cultural and manufactured products. 

This five-year BASE period is therefore 
shown as an index of 100 per cent or 
standard for comparison. Any given year 
is therefore compared with this base. For 
example, the first year after the base, corn 
had an index of 98 per cent or 2 per cent 
less than the five-year period employed. 
The next two years (1916-1917) it jumped 
to 169 per cent and 208 per cent respec- 
tively. This simply meant that the 1917 
price of corn more than doubled the price 
in 1915. In 1936 the price was 102 per 
cent of the pre-war base. In 1931 the in- 
dex of ALL CROPS (Column 15) was 
only 59 per cent and corn 46 per cent or 
about half of the base period. 

Column 30 shows the ratio of prices 
farmers received to the prices they paid 
for (manufactured) products they bought 
— (prices paid). To illustrate, in 1915 
this ratio had declined to 93 per cent of 
the AVERAGE purchasing power that 
prevailed from 1910 to 1914. By 1917 it 
had risen to 117 per cent, due to World 
War inflation effects. This was the high- 
est point reached from 1910 to 1937. In 



1932 the farmers' products would buy 
only 61 per cent as much as they would 
in the base year. Thus, we realize the 
cause of the serious plight of farmers dur- 
ing the 1931-1933 depression. By 1936 
this ratio, or farmers' purchasing power 
had risen to 92 per cent, while in Jan- 
uary, 1937, it had recovered the pre-war 
value (102 per cent). This was short 
lived, for in September it had declined to 
92 per cent. 

If one is interested in forecasting price 
trends he may make a time series chart 
by showing across the bottom of a sheet 
of paper the years 1910 to 1936 (evenly 
divided distances). At the left a scale of 
indexes, say from to 250 per cent in 
10 unit divisions is shown. Then over each 
year a point is made to indicate the index 
for that year. When completed the cycle 
or trend in prices is shown for the 27 
years. By studying related products, and 
the known yearly price influences like over 
or under production, economic factors, 
etc., the student should be enabled to com- 
pare the present situation with some other 
similar period and influences. Thus, see- 
ing what happened then, he may fore- 
cast what may occur in the near future. 
This, of course, requires some work and 
study, but it certainly is worth while, to 
one who really needs such information. 

It is obvious that since agricultural 
products have consistently been below par, 
or the base year, that non-agricultural 
(manufactured) products were more pro- 
fitable or had a higher index and purchas- 
ing power than they showed before the 





Index Prices Received 

for N. C. 

All Commodities 


Index Prices Received 
All Commodities 
U.S. 


Index Prices 
Farmers Pay 
U. S. 


Ratio Prices Received 
(N. C.) To Prices 
Paid (U. S.) 


Ratio Prices Received 
(IT. S.) To Prices 
Paid (U. S.) 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


1910 


99 


102 


98 


101 


104 


1911 


87 


95 


101 


86 


94 


1912— - 


103 


100 


100 


103 


100 


1913 


113 


101 


101 


112 


100 


1914 


83 


101 


100 


83 


101 


Base* 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


1915.... 


93 


98 


105 


89 


93 


1916 


139 


118 


124 


112 


95 


1917... 


212 


175 


149 


142 


117 


1918 


226 


202 


176 


128 


115 


1919 


299 


213 


202 


148 


105 


1920... 


154 


211 


201 


77 


105 


1921 


100 


125 


152 


66 


82 


1922 


184 


132 


148 


123 


89 


1923-.- 


184 


142 


152 


121 


93 


1924... 


170 


143 


152 


112 


94 


1925.... _. 


161 


156 


157 


103 


99 


1926 


147 


145 


155 


95 


94 


1927 


159 


139 


153 


104 


91 


1928 


147 


149 


155 


95 


96 


1929.... 


138 


146 


153 


86 


95 


1930 


101 


126 


145 


70 


87 


1931 


67 


87 


124 


54 


70 


1932 


74 


65 


107 


69 


61 


1933 


97 


70 


109 


89 


64 


1934 


139 


60 


123 


113 


73 


1935.- 


118 


108 


125 


94 


86 


1936... 


134 


114 


124 


108 


92 


1937 












Jan 


129 


131 


128 


101 


102 


Feb 


127 


127 


129 


98 


98 


March.. .. 


118 


128 


130 


91 


98 


April . . 


120 


130 


134 


60 


87 


May 


119 


128 


134 


89 


96 


June. 


111 


124 


134 


83 


93 


July 


109 


125 


133 


82 


94 


August 


133 


123 


132 


101 


93 


Sept 


119 


118 


130 


91 


91 



•See Note Under Table Above. 

World War or normal base period. This 
index is shown in column 28. The pur- 
chasing power of non-farm products is 
obtained by dividing column 28 by columns 
26 or 27 depending on whether North 
Carolina or United States ratios or pur- 
chasing power is wanted for any year de- 
sired. 



32 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



PRICES PAID TO NORTH CAROLINA PRODUCERS FOR FARM PRODUCTS 

Table shows quarterly and monthly comparisons for farm prices 



DATES 



January 1929. 

April 

July -. 

October --. 

January 1930, 

April • 

July 

October 

January 1931. 

April 

July 

October 

January 1932. 

April 

July 

October 

January 1933. 

April 

July 

October 

January 1934. 

April -. 

July 

October 

January 1935. 

April 

July 

October 

January 1936. 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July - 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 1937 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 



GENERAL FARM CROP PRICES PER UNIT SHOWN 



Corn 


Wheat 


Oats 


Barley 


Rye 


Cotton 


Cotton 


3ushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Lint 


Seed 












Pounds 


Tons 


1.09 


% 1.49 


$ .79 


$ 1.33 


$ 1.47 


ff 18.6 


$ 42.00 


1.19 


1.52 


.78 


1.34 


1.41 


19.0 


40.00 


1.24 


1.29 


.71 


1.13 


1.29 


18.3 


35.00 


1.18 


1.42 


.74 


1.25 


1.37 


17.8 


30 00 


.98 


1.39 


.73 


1.23 


1.34 


16.3 


26.00 


1.05 


1.34 


.74 


1.27 


1.34 


15.2 


28.00 


1.11 


1.09 


.67 


1.05 


1.14 


12.5 


26.00 


1.06 


1.10 


.66 


1.16 


1.25 


9.4 


21.00 


.75 


1.01 


.58 


.98 


1.14 


8.9 


21.50 


.77 


1.00 


.61 


.93 


1.05 


9.7 


24.98 


.76 


.74 


.46 


.66 


.95 


8.8 


20.28 


.51 


.66 


.37 


.58 


.68 


5.6 


8.07 


.38 


.74 


.36 


.63 


.68 


6.1 


11.16 


.38 


.73 


.37 


.54 


.61 


6.1 


10.43 


.40 


.59 


.33 


.47 


.59 


5.4 


10.00 


.47 


.70 


.35 


.54 


.64 


6.7 


11.80 


.44 


.68 


.35 


.51 


.61 


6.1 


10.00 


.56 


.74 


.41 


.53 


.62 


6.6 


11.20 


.88 


1.05 


.52 


.79 


.91 


10.8 


18.00 


.76 


1.00 


.60 


.81 


1.01 


9.4 


13.75 


.64 


1.02 


.55 


.76 


.95 


10.6 


17.50 


.72 


1.04 


.61 


.76 


.97 


12.0 


24.50 


.79 


1.01 


.57 


.71 


.91 


12.6 


22.00 


.83 


1.11 


.70 


.85 


1.09 


12.7 


34.00 


.85 


1.10 


.68 


.86 


1.00 


12.6 


43.00 


.87 


1.09 


.70 


.73 


.95 


11.8 


40.00 


.89 


.90 


.54 


.75 


.89 


12.3 


33.00 


.84 


1 .06 


.58 


.82 


.94 


11.1 


32.00 


.63 


1 .08 


.55 


.75 


.92 


11.5 


33.00 


.64 


1.06 


.54 


.75 


.92 


11.6 


34.00 


.64 


1.06 


.58 


.80 


.92 


11.6 


32.00 


.66 


1.05 


.51 


.72 


.90 


11.6 


32.00 


.71 


1.05 


.53 


.71 


' .90 


11.7 


31.00 


.71 


1.02 


.55 


.75 


.90 


11.9 


31.00 


.74 


1.06 


.56 


.77 


.93 


13.0 


31.00 


.94 


1.14 


.61 


.89 


1.03 


12.6 


32.00 


.96 


1.16 


.63 


.92 


1.17 


12.6 


32.00 


.90 


1.18 


.68 


.99 


1.23 


12.8 


35.00 


.85 


1.21 


.65 


.97 


1.26 


12.7 


33.00 


.86 


1.23 


.63 


.95 


1.23 


12.9 


34.00 


.90 


1.33 


.67 


.98 


1.18 


13.0 


37.00 


.93 


1.37 


.69 


.97 


1.17 


13.1 


38.00 


.93 


1.39 


.73 


.95 


1.17 


14.0 


38.00 


1.03 


1.43 


.73 


.93 


1.19 


14.5 


37.00 


1.11 


1.41 


.74 


.93 


1.20 


13.8 


39.00 


1.13 


1.29 


.68 


.90 


1.07 


13.0 


36.00 


1.12 


1.21 


.61 


.88 


1.07 


12.8 


36.00 


1.05 


1.17 


.55 


.85 


1.07 


11.3 


34.00 



To- 
bacco 
Pounds 



f/ 16.3 



13.9 
19.9 
16.8 



14.9 
10.7 



9.9 
6.1 
7.5 
7.1 
11.5 
11.3 



12.3 
15.0 



31.1 

17.9 



23.1 
16.5 
10.0 



20.0 
23.0 
23.4 
23.1 
22.1 
23.5 
19.0 



24.6 



Soy- 
beans 
Bushels 



1.95 
2.16 
2.40 
1.73 
1.78 
2.04 
2.11 
1.60 
1.53 
1.65 
1.43 
.92 
.69 
.68 
.65 



.60 
.90 
.75 
1.05 
1.65 
1.40 
1.20 
1.20 
1.15 
1.10 
.95 



.85 
.90 
1.10 
1.20 
1.30 
1.20 
1.20 
1.10 
1.00 
1.15 
1.25 
1.45 
1.55 
1.65 
1.70 
1.65 
1.65 
1.45 



Cow- 
peas 
Bushels 



% 2.30 
3.01 
3.55 
2.33 
2.46 
3.13 
3.28 
2.36 
2.05 
1.93 
1.84 
1.00 
.78 
.73 
.70 
.76 
.60 
.65 
1.20 
.95 
1.00 
1.60 
1.60 
1.20 
1.40 
1.65 
1.90 
1.30 
1.25 
1.35 
1.35 
1.40 
1.65 
1.95 
2.15 
2.05 
1.70 
1.20 
1.25 
1.40 
1.45 
1.75 
1.90 
2.10 
2.15 
2.10 
2.00 
1.75 



Pea- 
nuts 
Pounds 



5.1 
4.9 
4.6 
4.3 
3.4 



3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1.8 
1.1 
1.1 
2.1 
2.4 
2.9 



3.0 
3.2 
3.5 
4.5 
4.1 
4.1 
4.1 
3.7 
3.9 
4.6 
4.4 
4.5 
4.8 
4.8 
4.4 
4.3 
4.1 



Irish 
Pota- 
toes 
Bushels 



.90 
1.00 
1.10 
1.25 
1.50 
1.10 
1.10 
1.05 
1.16 
.71 
.65 
.58 
.75 
.65 
.60 
.60 
.70 
.85 
1.00 
.95 
.80 
.45 
.75 
.70 
.60 
.60 
.65 
.75 
.75 
.85 
.85 
.95 
1.85 
1.50 
1.20 
1.15 
1.20 
1.15 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.50 
1.40 
1.45 
.65 
.55 
.70 



Sweet 
Pota- 
toes 

Bushels 



.95 
1.15 
1.20 
1.00 
.90 
1.05 
1.15 
.95 
.85 
.92 
.95 
.58 
.56 
.56 
.65 
.50 
.43 
.46 
.55 
.60 
.55 
.70 
.75 
.70 
.60 
.70 
.70 
.60 
.65 
.70 
.75 
.75 
.85 
.85 
.90 
1.05 
.90 
.80 
.70 
.70 
.75 



.85 
.90 
.90 
.80 
.90 



HAY CROPS 



All 

Tame 
Loose 
Tons 



18.10 
18.30 
17.60 
17.50 
17.00 
17.90 
17.90 
18.90 
17.10 
18.61 
16.31 
13.25 
12.50 
11.43 
11.80 
12.00 
10.70 
10.50 
13.30 
14.50 
13.90 
15.00 
16.70 
18.40 
17.10 
16.00 
14.60 
14.50 
13.10 
13.40 
15.30 
13.80 
14.90 
15.00 
14.30 
15.40 
14.90 
15.80 
16.10 
16.50 
16.80 
16.40 
16.50 
15.90 
16.50 
16.30 
15.90 
15.20 



Tim- 
othy 
Loose 
Tons 



? 21.50 
20.30 
22.50 
20.50 
19.20 
20.50 
21.20 
21.00 
22.00 
24.40 
17.22 
15.29 
17.42 
13.30 
15.00 
13.90 
13.30 
13.30 
15.00 
16.00 
15.80 
17.20 
18.80 
20.00 
22.00 
22.00 
17.70 
19.00 



DATES 



January , 1929 

April 

July 

October 

January 1930 

April 

July 

October 

January 1931 

April 

July - 

October 

January 1932 

April --- 

July 

October 

January 1933 

April 

July 

October --- 

January. _ ... 1934 

April 

July 

October 

January 1935 

April 

July 

October 

January 1936 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August-. 

September 

October 

November _ 

December 

January 1937 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July.. - 

August 



FRUIT 



Apples 



Bushel Barrel 



1.10 
1.35 
1.05 
1.15 
1.45 
1.75 
1.35 
1.00 
1.12 
1.47 
.74 
.51 
.59 
.82 
.74 
.74 
.90 
1.05 
.70 
.65 
.90 
1.25 
.80 
.85 
1.10 
1.40 
.75 
.75 
.95 
1.05 
1.05 
1.10 
1.20 
1.50 
1.00 
.90 
.90 
.95 
1.00 
1.15 
1.30 
1.40 
1.45 
1.65 
1.65 
1.50 
.75 
.65 





LIVESTC 


)CK (Liv 


! Weight) 






LIV 


ESTOCK 


AND PI 


„ODUCT£ 


i PER U> 


iit mo\ 




Beef 


Veal 










Milk 
















Chick- 


Hogs 


Cattle 


Calves 


per 100 


Lambs 


Cows 


Horses 


Mules 


Butter 


Milk 


Eggs 


ens 


per 100 


per 100 


per 100 


per 


100 


per 


per 


per 


lb. 


qt. 


doz. 


Live 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Head 


Head 


Head 








lb. 


I 9.40 


% 7 


50 


$10 


60 


$ 8 


10 


til 


40 


? 71 


00 


? 87 


00 


J135 


00 


$ .38 


$ .14 


$ .35 


21.0 


9.70 


7 


90 


11 


00 


8 


20 


11 


60 


72 


00 


91 


00 


137 


00 


.37 


.14 


.23 


25.0 


10.10 


8 


10 


11 


40 


8 


20 


11 


50 


74 


00 


92 


00 


137 


00 


.36 


.14 


.29 


25.0 


10.40 


7 


90 


10 


60 


7 


80 


10 


20 


75 


00 


86 


00 


137 


00 


.40 


.14 


.40 


22.0 


10.10 


7 


90 


11 


00 


7 


30 


10 


80 


72 


00 


87 


oo 


136 


00 


.36 


.15 


.40 


21.0 


9.60 


7 


80 


10 


50 


8 


10 


11 


00 


69 


00 


89 


oo 


140 


00 


.30 


.14 


.23 


22.5 


9.80 


7 


00 


9 


80 


5 


80 


9 


40 


64 


oo 


90 


00 


135 


00 


.32 


.14 


.23 


20.6 


S.83 


6 


09 


8 


99 


5 


28 


7 


40 


56 


90 


77 


50 


139 


64 


.34 


.14 


.31 


19.1 


8.71 


5 


89 


8 


55 


5 


54 


6 


87 


51 


51 


78 


46 


110 


09 


.31 


.13 


.29 


16.9 


8.38 


5 


53 


7 


70 


5 


42 


7 


32 


51 


63 


85 


94 


135 


76 


.29 


.13 


.19 


17.7 


7.98 


5 


23 


7 


66 


4 


15 


5 


82 


45 


35 


73 


10 


113 


89 


.25 


.12 


.18 


18.0 


6.22 


4 


80 


6 


40 


3 


59 


4 


E5 


40 


49 


64 


81 


105 


33 


.26 


.12 


.24 


16.7 


5.36 


4 


46 


6 


07 


3 


65 


4 


85 


37 


12 


62 


88 


85 


65 


.25 


.11 


.19 


14.1 


4.77 


4 


14 


5 


98 


4 


53 


5 


99 


36 


28 


62 


27 


97 


97 


.22 


.11 


.12 


13.4 


5.29 


4 


02 


5 


01 


3 


91 


5 


28 


34 


90 


65 


10 


104 


90 


.20 


.10 


.12 


12.0 


4.81 


3 


99 


5 


35 


3 


68 


4 


49 


34 


00 


67 


00 


105 


00 


.20 


.10 


.23 


11.2 


4.05 


3 


40 


4 


70 


3 


50 


4 


80 


30 


00 


68 


00 


95 


00 


.19 


.10 


.24 


9.2 


3.80 


3 


25 


4 


10 


3 


30 


4 


85 


28 


00 


72 


00 


104 


00 


.17 


.10 


.10 


9.8 


4.55 


3 


55 


4 


55 


3 


45 


5 


50 


31 


00 


82 


00 


115 


00 


.19 


.10 


.13 


12.4 


4.90 


3 


50 


4 


65 


3 


45 


5 


20 


30 


00 


87 


00 


112 


00 


.20 


.11 


.22 


11.5 


4.95 


3 


25 


4 


60 


3 


00 


4 


90 


29 


00 


85 


00 


124 


00 


.20 


.11 


.20 


11.1 


4.75 


3 


50 


5 


20 


3 


80 


5 


40 


31 


00 


99 


00 


135 


00 


.21 


.11 


.14 


11.9 


4.95 


3 


65 


4 


75 


3 


55 


6 


20 


32 


00 


100 


00 


142 


00 


.21 


.11 


.16 


15.0 


6.70 


4 


15 


5 


20 


3 


35 


5 


10 


33 


00 


99 


00 


150 


00 


.22 


.12 


.27 


13.8 


7.20 


3 


85 


5 


10 


3 


90 


5 


50 


31 


00 


100 


00 


140 


00 


.23 


.11 


.26 


12.8 


8.00 


4 


85 


6 


50 


4 


35 


7 


10 


36 


00 


115 


00 


153 


00 


.24 


11.5 


18.0 


15.2 


7.90 


4 


95 


5 


90 


4 


35 


6 


69 


37 


00 


111 


00 


150 


00 


.22 


11.7 


20.0 


15.7 


10.40 


4 


85 


6 


50 


4 


30 


6 


80 


37 


00 


105 


00 


160 


00 


.25 


11.1 


30.3 


15.7 


9.80 


5 


00 


7 


20 


4 


25 


6 


50 


36 


00 


117 


00 


160 


00 


.26 


11.4 


32.0 


15.3 


9.60 


5 


30 


6 


50 


3 


80 


6 


40 


37 


00 


117 


00 


160 


00 


.25 


11.6 


26.0 


16.5 


9.10 


4 


90 


6 


60 


4 


10 


6 


20 


37 


00 


122 


00 


175 


00 


.24 


11.7 


16.6 


16.5 


9.10 


4 


80 


6 


30 


4 


50 


7 


20 


39 


00 


126 


00 


170 


00 


.24 


11.7 


17.4 


17.1 


8.90 


•5 


20 


7 


10 


4 


00 


8 


10 


39 


00 


124 


00 


175 


00 


.24 


11.6 


18.4 


16.7 


8.70 


5 


10 


7 


10 


4 


00 


7 


90 


39 


00 


121 


00 


177 


00 


.23 


11.5 


20.7 


17.4 


9.10 


5 


20 


7 


00 


4 


30 


7 


60 


40 


00 


122 


00 


165 


00 


.23 


11.5 


21.6 


17.9 


9.60 


5 


20 


7 


30 


4 


30 


8 


40 


40 


00 


118 


00 


165 


00 


.25 


11.5 


23.7 


15.9 


10.00 


5 


10 


7 


30 


4 


35 


8 


40 


42 


00 


120 


00 


165 


00 


.26 


11.5 


28.6 


15.8 


10.00 


5 


30 


7 


80 


4 


40 


8 


30 


41 


00 


125 


00 


167 


00 


.26 


11.7 


30.6 


15.8 


9.70 


5 


10 


6 


40 


4 


40 


7 


40 


40 


00 


124 


00 


168 


00 


.26 


11.9 


33.3 


15.8 


9.70 


5 


00 


7 


20 


4 


25 


7 


40 


40 


00 


127 


00 


160 


00 


.26 


11.9 


36.7 


14.0 


9.80 


5 


10 


7 


30 


4 


25 


7 


10 


40 


00 


130 


00 


167 


00 


.25 


11.9 


25.8 


14.9 


9.30 


5 


00 


7 


10 


4 


35 


7 


20 


40 


00 


133 


00 


173 


00 


.25 


11.9 


21.1 


15.0 


9.30 


5 


50 


7 


30 


5 


50 


7 


40 


43 


00 


141 


00 


180 


00 


.25 


11.9 


19.0 


15.3 


9.10 


5 


70 


7 


60 


4 


70 


8 


30 


43 


00 


136 


00 


180 


00 


.24 


11.9 


18.3 


15.7 


9.30 


5 


60 


7 


90 


4 


45 


7 


50 


42 


00 


133 


00 


180 


00 


.24 


11.9 


19.1 


15.7 


9.70 


5 


70 


8 


00 


4 


45 


8 


50 


42 


00 


130 


00 


170 


00 


.24 


11.9 


19.8 


16.2 


10.40 


5 


80 


7 


80 


4 


45 


8 


50 


4! 


00 


130 


00 


171 


00 


.24 


12.0 


21.0 


16.5 


10.70 


5 


70 


8 


20 


4 


50 


8 


50 


43 


00 


122 


00 


169 


00 


.25 


12.1 


22.9 


16.2 



Tur- 
keys 
Live 
lb. 



.29 



.28 
.24 



.23 
.20 



.14 
.13 
.12 



.14 
.14 
.14 
.13 
.14 
.17 
.17 
.16 
.17 
.20 
.19 
.20 
.19 
.18 
.18 
.18 
.17 
.18 
.19 
.19 
.19 
.18 
.17 
.18 
.19 
.18 
.17 
.18 
.18 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



33 



TOBACCO-TOTAL FLUE -CURED 

Production, Stocks, Disappearance and Prices, 1920-1936 



Years 



1920... 
1921... 
1922... 
1923... 
1924... 
1925... 
1926... 
1927... 
1928... 
1929... 
1930... 
1931... 
1932... 

1933 

1934 

1935_ _ _ 
1936 





PRODUCTION 






















Stocks 


Total 


Disap- 


Price 












Type 11 


Type 12 


Type 13 


Type 14 


Total 


July 


Supply 


pearance 


per 


Million 


Million 


Million 


Million 


Million 


Million 


Million 


Million 


Lb. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Cents 


297.3 


220.0 


87.0 


11.7 


616.0 


304.2 


920.2 


437. 1 


21.5 


168.2 


127.9 


56.2 


6.5 


358.8 


483.1 


841.9 


401 '. 2 


20 


231.1 


126.3 


54.0 


4.0 


415.4 


440.7 


856.1 


417.4 


27.2 


268.8 


205.3 


97.4 


9.2 


580.7 


438.7 


1,019.4 


542.8 


20.8 


205.2 


139.1 


61.5 


31.5 


437.3 


476.6 


913.9 


451.6 


21.6 


213.0 


215.4 


95.6 


51.1 


575.1 


462.3 


1,037.4 


582.0 


20.0 


226.6 


212.2 


79.7 


41.6 


560.1 


455.4 


1,015.5 


549.0 


24.9 


284.2 


262.0 


110.6 


62.0 


718.8 


466.5 


1.185.3 


620.3 


20.5 


245.6 


284.7 


121.5 


87.3 


739.1 


565.0 


1.304.1 


741.1 


17.3 


262.9 


265.3 


128.4 


93.1 


749.8 


590.0 


1,339.7 


740.4 


18.0 


294.1 


315.9 


145.3 


109. 


864.3 


599.3 


1.463.6 


786.8 


12.0 


241.1 


251.8 


113.2 


63.0 


669.2 


676.8 


1,346.0 


600.8 


8.4 


143.1 


150.7 


69.6 


13.3 


376.8 


745.2 


1,122.0 


543.8 


11.5 


237.2 


291.6 


148.1 


61.7 


738.6 


578.2 


1,316.8 


664.7 


15.3 


198.5 


226.4 


97.2 


34.8 


556.9 


652.1 


1,209.0 


567.2 


28.4 


290.3 


297.6 


148.8 


74.4 


811.1 


641.8 


1,452.9 


705.8 


20.0 


245.6 


222.7 


124.9 


89.7 


682.9 


747.1 


1,430.0 




22.0 









Exports 



413,949 
429,942 
432,688 
285,486 
269,662 
330,330 
244.500 
322,792 
302,634 



COTTON AND TOBACCO SUPPLY and DISTRIBUTION 



To those interested in the cotton and 
tobacco crops perhaps no information is 
more valuable than that of supply and 
distribution data. The reason for this is 
that this information not only provides 
the production for any given year but 
also the consumption or disappearance and 
price trends. There is a definite relation- 
ship between the consumption and the 



price in relation to production. 

It is almost certain that after a sur- 
plus crop has been produced, that is, when 
more than the demand requirements are 
produced for a given year, that the price 
declines. The administration's program 
for control of the crop is to avoid just 
this situation. Their idea is that if the 
crop can be produced on a balance with 



the requirements, that the price should 
remain constant. The student will find in 
this data considerable information that 
will be of both interest and help in en- 
abling him to understand why the price 
goes up or down. 

Let's take the study of tobacco above. 
We find that the data begins with 1920 
and continues through 1936, covering the 
production by types of tobacco, then fol- 
lows the stocks, the total world's supply 
of Bright Leaf tobacco, the disappearance 
through the previous year and the year's 
average price. It is quite evident that there 
are strong relationships between these 
data. 

The stocks of tobacco on hand as of 
July 1, 1936, were 747,000,000 pounds in 
comparison with the 1936 American pro- 
duction of about 683,000,000 pounds. Thus, 
adding the stocks on hand prior to the 
marketing season to the production we 
have 1,430,000,000 pounds for the total 
visible world supply of flue-cured tobacco 
when 1937 came in. On July 1, 1937, the 
stocks on hand were 752,304,000 pounds 
or about 5,000,000 pounds higher than a 
year earlier. 

The farmer is only fooling himself by 
thinking that he is giving away secret 
information when he reports the informa- 
tion asked for to the state or federal of- 
fice. As a matter of fact, it is quite ob- 
vious that the manufacturers keep a very 
close touch with all such information and 
iudge or make their plans in accordance 
with facts available. The farmer is only 
fooling himself to think otherwise. 

The cotton supply similar to the study 
on tobacco, shows the world's commercial 
production of cotton to be 26,641,000 bales 
from the 1935 crop. The 1936 production 
is estimated at 30,800,000 bales, which is 
very close to the world consumption of 
30,900,000 bales. As of July 1, 1937, the 
world carry over was about 12,936,000 
bales of cotton which was appreciably less 
than any year since 1929 and 1930. On 
the other hand the 1937 production of cot- 
ton is the largest on record. Both the 
American and foreign production is 
greatly increased. A very heavy surplus 
of cotton is in sight. These influences 
naturally have depressed prices. Farmers 
should know this information and be 
guided accordingly. It will be folly for 
farmers to be kept in ignorance of these 
trends when the trade knows them so 
well. The farmers refusing to give infor- 
mation on the cotton crop would not help 
at all in improving the price. It might 
act otherwise. 

The accompanying distribution and 
price tables for cotton and tobacco pro- 
vide a most interesting and useful study 
if one only will seek it out. First it is 
necessary to study the heading of each 
column and get a definite idea of its mean- 
ing then following the cost for given years 
the complete story is provided. 



COTTON SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION 





SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION OF COTTON AND LINTERS 


WORLD SUPPLY AND DIS- 






IN THE UNITED STATES FOR YEARS END- 




TRIBUTION FOR YEARS 






ING JI 


ILY31, (RU 


VNING BAL 


ES) 




EN 


DING JULY 


31 




Average 




Consumed 


Net Exports 


Carryover 








World 


Season 


Price 


United 


in 


from 


on 


Aggregate 


Production 


World 


Carryover 




for 


States 


United 


United 


Hand 


Supply 


Commer- 


Consump- 


Mixed 




Season 


Production 


States 


States 


July 31 


(000) Bales 


cial Cotton 


tion 


Bales 




(Cents) 


(000) Bales 


(000) Bales 


(000) Bales 


(000) Bales 


(000) Bales 


(000) Bales 


(000) Bales 


1924-25 


29.9 


13,630 


6,193 


7,999 


1,610 


15,638 


23,836 


22,642 


6,936 


1925-26.... 


19.6 


16,105 


6,456 


8,045 


3,543 


17,933 


26,678 


23,930 


9,484 


1926-27 


12.5 


17,978 


7,190 


10,917 


3,762 


21,795 


27,819 


25,869 


11,657 


1927-28 


20.2 


12,956 


6,834 


7,529 


2,536 


16,793 


23,426 


25,285 


9,657 


1928-29.... 


18.0 


14,477 


7,091 


8,038 


2,312 


17,273 


25,628 


25,782 


9,250 


1929-30.... 


16.8 


14,825 


6,106 


6,675 


4,530 


17,219 


26,653 


24,878 


11,281 


1930-31 


9.5 


13,932 


5,263 


6,757 


6,370 


18,314 


25,304 


22,402 


13 , 634 


1931-32 


5.7 


17,095 


4,866 


8,707 


9.678 


23,169 


26,329 


22,896 


16,954 


1932-33 


6.5 


13,001 


6,137 


8,418 


8,165 


22,612 


23,634 


24,986 


16,035 


1933-34. ... 


10.3 


13,047 


5,700 


7,531 


7,744 


20,894 


26,106 


25,324 


16,071 


1934-35.... 


12.4 


9,636 


5,361 


4,767 


7,208 


17,317 


22,942 


25,283 


13,521 


1935-36.... 


11.1 


10,638 


6,351 


5,970 


5,409 


17,730 


26,641 


27,631 


11,983 


1936-37.... 


12.3 


12,387 
































The farm trailer hauls King Cotton to the gin anywhere in North Carolina 



34 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



REVISED ESTIMATES OF 
N. C. LIVESTOCK 

HORSES AND COLTS 







Farm Value 


Total Farm 


Year 


Number 


Per Head 


Value 




Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


1925 


136,000 


$ 99.00 


$ 13,464,000 


1926 


125,000 


86.00 


10,750,000 


1927 


114,000 


83.00 


9,462,000 


1928 


106,000 


87.00 


9,222,000 


1929_ 


98,000 


86.00 


8,428,000 


1930 


89,000 


85.00 


7,565,000 


1931 


83,000 


76.00 


6,308,000 


1932. __ 


77,000 


65.00 


5,005,000 


1933 


72,000 


67.00 


4,824,000 


1934 


69,000 


85.00 


5,862,000 


1935 


67,000 


103.00 


6,884,000 


1936 


68,000 


117.00 


7,960,000 



MULES AND MULE COLTS 







Farm Value 


Total Farm 


Year 


Number 


Per Head 


Value 




Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


1925.. _ 


285,000 


$ 119.00 


$ 33,915,000 


1926 


285,000 


117.00 


33,345,000 


1927 .... 


285,000 


107.00 


30,495,000 


1928 


284,000 


119.00 


33,796,000 


1929 


282,000 


124.00 


34,968,000 


1930.... 


282,000 


120.00 


33,840,000 


1931 


282,000 


114.00 


32,148,000 


1932. 


279,000 


89.00 


24,831,000 


1933 


285,000 


89.00 


25,365,000 


1934 


290,000 


116.00 


33,596,000 


1935 


295,000 


140.00 


41,242,000 


1936 


298,000 


172.00 


51,150,000 



ALL CATTLE AND CALVES 







Farm Value 


Total Farm 


Year 


Number 


Per Head 


Value 




Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


1925 


545,000 


$ 28.50 


$ 15,532,000 


1926. 


529,000 


30.00 


15,870,000 


1927... 


490,000 


34.80 


17,052,000 


1928 


496,000 


44.70 


22,171,000 


1929 _ 


496,000 


48.10 


23,858,000 


1930 


507,000 


47.80 


24,235,000 


1931.. 


558,000 


35.90 


20,032,000 


1932... ._ 


594,000 


27.20 


16,157,000 


1933. 


659,000 


20.60 


13,575,000 


1934 _. 


679,000 


19.70 


13,399,000 


1935 


685,000 


21.30 


14,624,000 


1936. 


671,000 


27.20 


18,225,000 



STOCK SHEEP AND LAMBS 







Farm Value 


Total Farm 


Year 


Number 


Per Head 


Value 




Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


1925 


67,000 


$ 6.20 


$ 415,000 


1926. 


73,000 


6.60 


482,000 


1927 


80,000 


7.40 


592,000 


1928 


85,000 


9.10 


774,000 


1929 _ 


94,000 


9.10 


855,000 


1930 


88,000 


8.70 


766,000 


1931 


90,000 


5.80 


522,000 


1932 _ 


86,000 


3.90 


335,000 


1933 


85,000 


3.10 


264,000 


1934 


81,000 


3.45 


278,000 


1935 


77,000 


3.75 


287,000 


1936 


73,000 


4.80 


351,000 



HOGS INCLUDING PIGS 







Farm Value 


Total Farm 


Year 


Number 


Per Head 


Value 




Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


Jan. 1 


1925.... 


894,000 


$ 13.00 


$ 11,622,000 


1926 


832,000 


13.00 


10,816,000 


1927 


867,000 


14.20 


12,311,000 


1928 


1,050,000 


12.90 


13,545,000 


1929 


945,000 


11.70 


11,056,000 


1930 


830,000 


11.60 


9,628,000 


1931 


913,000 


10.20 


9,313,000 


1932 


954,000 


7.70 


7,346,000 


1933 


1,096,000 


5.10 


5,590,000 


1934 


1,005,000 


5.80 


5,822,000 


1935 


947,000 


7.60 


7,241,000 


1936 


966,000 


10.60 


10,255,000 



LIVESTOCK IN NORTH CAROLINA— Production and Income 



CATTLE 



Number on Hand January 1 

Milk Cows 

Beef Cows 

Calves Born — Number 

Number Shipped Out of State 

Cattle.. 

Calves 

Local Slaughter 

Cattle 

Calves 

Farm Slaughter 

Cattle _ 

Calves 

Number Died 

Cattle 

Calves. 

Production and Income from Cattle and 
Calves 
Net Production 

Cattle — Amount (Pounds) 

Value (Dollars). 

Calves — Amount (Pounds) 

Value (Dollars). __ 

Total Cattle and Calves — Amount 

(Pounds) 

Value (Dollars) 

Shipments and Local Slaughter 

Cattle (Pounds) 

Calves (Pounds) 

Farm Slaughter 

Cattle (Pounds).. 

Calves (Pounds) 

Cash Income (Dollars).. 

Gross Income (Dollars) 



1930 



507,000 
285,000 
18,000 
190,000 



27,000 

37,000 
20,000 

10,000 
13,000 

11,000 
21,000 



60,000,000 
4,200,000 
7,500,000 
720,000 

67,500,000 
4,920,000 

25,900,000 
5,875,000 

6,000,000 
1,625,000 
2,863,000 
3.065,000 



1931 



558,000 
314,000 
21,000 
210,000 

27,000 
29,000 

35,000 
25,000 

9, COO 
16,000 

13,000 
20,000 



67,550,000 
3,445,000 
8,750,000 
630,000 

76,300,000 
4,075,000 

43,400,000 
6,750,000 

5,400,000 
2,000,000 
3,053,000 
3,200,000 



1932 



594,000 
334,000 
20,000 
222,000 

23,000 
7,000 

30,000 
35,000 

12,000 
17,000 

13,000 
20,000 



76,700,000 
3,068,000 
7,375,000 
406,000 

84,075,000 
3,474,000 

37,100,000 
5,250,000 

7,200,000 
2,125,000 
2,115,000 
2,257,000 



1933 



659,000 
368,000 
22,000 
252,000 

67,000 
35,000 

30,000 
35,000 

12,000 
18,000 

13,000 
22,000 



86,600,000 
2,988,000 
11,000,000 
500,000 

97,600,000 
3,488,000 

67,900,000 
8,750,000 

7,200,000 
2,250,000 
3,037,000 
3.159.000 



1934 



679,000 
378,000 
26,000 
265,000 

57,000 
51,000 

40,000 
35,000 

20,000 
20,000 

15,000 
22,000 



84,000,000 
3,192,000 
13,250,000 
662,000 

97,250,000 
3,854,000 

67,900,000 
10,750,000 

12,000,000 
2,500,000 
3,531,000 
3,734.000 



1935 



685,000 
381,000 
24,000 
267,000 

105,000 
17,000 

20,000 
60,000 

10,000 
30,000 

16,000 
24,000 



89,060,000 
4,275,000 
13,375,000 
829,000 

102,435,000 
5,104,000 

87,500,000 
9,625,000 

6,000,000 
3,750,000 
5,195,000 
5,377,000 



The purpose of of the Crop Reporting 
Service is to give usable information on 
crops and livestock. It is not their claim 
to give exact figures but estimates as 
nearly accurate as it is possible to make 
them. In this effort, judgments from a 
large number of farmers throughout the 
State are secured from which the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture can anticipate or 
forecast the approximate numbers or 
probable outcome of the crop considered. 
Obviously, errors creep into such infor- 
mation. This is, of course, anticipated 
and periodically the figures are corrected 
as soon as reliable information of a cer- 
tain nature is available. 

The usual time for such revision is fol- 
lowing the United States Census because 
that provides the best information thus 
far available. Tobacco and cotton are ad- 
justed annually because information of a 
reliable nature is secured from tobacco 
warehouse sales and cotton ginnings, so 
on this page is given the revised estimate 



LIVESTOCK REVISIONS 

of livestock numbers. This is made pos- 
sible by the 1935 Census. Instead of the 
Crop Reporting Service being ashamed of 
its estimates, it is nothing short of sur- 
prising or amazing how close the esti- 
mates are to the final check figures which 
become available. 

Under the subject of horses and colts it 
will be observed that the total values 
shown for 1925 have become almost di- 
vided in half by 1936. This is partially 
due to the decrease in numbers which was 
largely occasioned by the automobile. The 
1936 per head value of horses shown at 
$117.00 was almost twice the price in 1932. 

Mules have continued to show fairly 
much the same number throughout the 
twelve-year period. On the other hand, the 
price has gone up considerably. 

Cattle have shown some increase in 
numbers since 1925. However, the price 
has not fully recovered from the depres- 
sion years. The year 1934 showed the low 
point mark at about $20.00 per head. 




Champion Jersey Bull of State Fair, October 1937 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



35 



RECEIPTS FROM SALE of PRINCIPAL FARM PRODUCTS 



January 1935 — July 1937 

































Total Including 










Receipts From Sales 












(Jovernment Payments 


Year and 










Livestock and 




Total Crops 


Government 










% 


Month 




Crops 




Livestock Products 


and Livestock 


Payments 










N. C. 






























N 


C. 


TT S 


of 




N. C. 


U. S. 


N. C. 


u. s. 


N. 


C. 


U. S. 


N. C. 


U. S. 






tt a 


1935— 


$(000) 


$(000) 


$(000) 


$(000) 


$(000) 


$(000) 


$(000) 


$(000) 


$(000) 


$(000) 


1.29 


Jan 


4 


373 


178 


000 


1,606 


275 


000 


5 


979 


453 


000 


787 


70,000 


6 


766 


523 


000 


Feb 


3 


858 


150 


000 


1,582 


253 


000 


5 


440 


403 


000 


—316 


52,000 


5 


124 


455 


000 


1 . 13 


Mar 


4 


720 


155 


000 


1,755 


283 


000 


6 


475 


438 


000 


5,304 


50,000 


11 


779 


488 


000 


2.41 


Apr... 


3 


078 


173 


000 


1,995 


306 


000 


5 


073 


479 


000 


1,563 


49,000 


6 


636 


528 


000 


1 . 26 


May 


5 


870 


167 


000 


1,952 


338 


000 


7 


822 


505 


000 


388 


36,000 


8 


210 


541 


090 


1 .52 


June.-- 


5 


815 


137 


000 


1,778 


318 


000 


7 


593 


455 


000 


1,496 


30,000 


9 


089 


485 


000 


1 . 87 


July 


2 


615 


161 


000 


1,657 


315 


000 


4 


272 


476 


000 


410 


19,000 


4 


682 


495 


000 


.95 


Aug 


13 


939 


264 


000 


1,953 


302 


000 


15 


892 


566 


000 


386 


44,000 


16 


278 


610 


000 


2. 67 


Sept _. 


35 


349 


354 


000 


2,248 


294 


000 


37 


597 


648 


000 


1 ,536 


57,000 


39 


133 


705 


000 


5.55 


Oct 


52 


619 


474 


000 


2,487 


328 


000 


55 


106 


802 


000 


1,115 


62,000 


56 


221 


864 


000 


6.51 


Nov 


33 


453 


338 


000 


2,665 


331 


000 


36 


118 


669 


000 


1,534 


64,000 


37 


652 


733 


000 


5.14 


Dec 


9 


253 


262 


000 


2,578 


351 


000 


11 


831 


613 


000 


1,929 


50,000 


13 


760 


663 


000 


2.08 


Total 


174 


942 


2,813 


000 


24,256 


3,694 


000 


199 


198 


6,507 


000 


16.764 


583,000 


215 


330 


7,090 


000 


3 . 04 


1936— 








































g 


426 


201 


000 


1,852 


349 


000 


10 


278 


550 


000 


90 


1,000 


10 


368 


551 


000 


1 . 88 


Feb... 


3 


969 
686 


161 


000 


1,758 


288 


000 


5 


727 


449 


000 


—2 




5 


725 


449 


000 


1.28 




3 


179 


000 


1,825 


326 


000 


5 


511 


505 


000 


679 


15,000 


6 


190 


520 


000 


1 . 19 


Apr 


3 


000 


159 


000 


1,961 


334 


000 


4 


961 


493 


000 


—71 


37,000 


4 


890 


530 


000 


.92 


May 


3 


961 


191 


000 


1 , 963 


350 


000 


5 


924 


541 


000 


361 


59 ! 000 


6 


285 


600 


000 


1 .05 


June. . 


7 


815 


206 


000 


1,921 


381 


000 


9 


736 


587 


000 


1.187 


57,000 


10 


923 


644 


000 


1.70 


July 


3 


949 


327 


000 


1,808 


383 


000 


5 


757 


710 


000 


1,112 


24,000 


6 


869 


734 


000 


.94 


Aug _ 


6 


102 


284 


000 


2,026 


351 


000 


8 


128 


635 


000 


278 


11.000 


8 


406 


646 


000 


1 .30 


Sept 


33 


814 


406 


000 


2,160 


346 


000 


35 


974 


752 


000 


156 


6,000 


36 


130 


758 


000 


4] 77 


Oct 


54 


890 


510 


000 


2,587 


372 


000 


57 


477 


882 


000 


111 


22,000 


57 


588 


904 


000 


6.37 


Nov 


28 


048 


367 


000 


3,081 


382 


000 


31 


129 


749 


000 


152 


19,000 


31 


281 


768 


000 


4.07 


Dec 


13 


091 


321 


000 


2,965 


404 


000 


16 


056 


725 


000 


249 


36.000 


16 


305 


761 


000 


2.14 


Total 


170,751 


3,312,000 


25,907 


4.266,000 


196,658 


7,578,000 


4,448 


287,000 


200,960 


7,865 


000 


2.56 


1937 — 






































Jan 


6,068 


267,000 


1,796 


359,000 


7,864 


620,000 


382 


43,000 


8,246 


669 


000 


1.23 


Feb 


3 


231 


211,000 


1 , 689 


293,000 


4 


920 


504,000 


592 


52,000 


5 


512 


556 


000 


.99 


Mar 


3 


365 


237,000 


1,604 


359,000 


5,269 


596,000 


5.431 


112,000 


10,700 


708 


000 


1.51 


Apr 


3 


070 


222,000 


2,099 


361,000 


5 


169 


583,000 


4,066 


76,000 


9 


235 


659 


000 


1.40 


May _ . 


3 


951 


212,000 


2,068 


365,000 


6,019 


577 


000 


911 


33,000 


6,930 


610 


000 


1.14 


June 


5 


829 


220,000 


1,936 


384,000 


7 


765 


604 


000 


596 


27,000 


8 


361 


631 


000 


1.33 


July 


2 


578 


386,000 


1,830 


354,000 


4,408 


740,000 


287 


11,000 


4 


695 


751 


000 


.63 


Aug 


13 Ofifl 


421,000 


2,144 


345.000 


15.163 


766 nnn 


108 


5,000 


15.271 


771 


000 




Sept 






466,000 


349 


000 






816 


000 


5.000 






821 


000 





This tabular matter provides some rela- 
tively new information for agricultural 
economic students and those interested in 
agricultural affairs. As will be noticed, 
monthly figures since January, 1935, are 
provided showing the receipts from sales 
of crops and livestock. The government 
payments are also shown, which together 
with the receipts from farm products 
shows the total for North. Carolina and 
United States for months and years. The 
final right hand column shows the per 
cent of the total money received by 
farmers in relation to the United States' 
total. Of course, a very low percentage 
is the natural result. 

While we think of our agricultural in- 
dustry as being quite sizeable in relation 
to other states, yet we must realize that 
middle western states depend largely on 
the livestock products for their farm in- 
come while we can sell the crop as a raw 
product. They, in the west, depend on 



the manure from the livestock for retain- 
ing and improving the soil fertility. While 
here we buy commercial fertilizer. Thus, 
even though the cash income to North 
Carolina farmers might be seemingly 
large yet, in the long run, the net profits 
are rather weak in relation to any other 
state. Perhaps that largely explains why 
the average farm net income in North 
Carolina is so small in relation to the 
average farm income of the middle west. 

Farm Records 

This brings to mind the importance of 
farm records. Without such information 
it is simply impossible for the farmer to 
tell how much profit alone he is making 
through his farming efforts. By having 
adequate records he could profitably look 
through them and find where the weak 
links are and where the strong ones are 
and build up on the weak ones or entirely 
eliminate them and resort to the more 



profitable features of his work. He would 
be surprised at the results. 

Many a dollar might be made or saved 
as a result of more complete daily farm 
records. This applies to the family ex- 
penses and usages of farm products by the 
family. The greatest weakness of farm- 
ing as an industry is the slack methods, 
lack of basic facts for planning, and fail- 
ure to utilize the basic information avail- 
able for improving the quality and yields 
of products and income from their sales. 
No other industry could survive under 
such conditions. The low purchasing power 
of farm products in relation to the prod- 
ucts fai-mers must buy to make crops, 
necessitates every economy possible on 
farms. 



POULTRY 

Probably the most generally produced 
farm product in North Carolina is poultry 
and eggs. It is unfortunate that more de- 
tailed and constructive information is not 
available for presentation in this issue. 
However, the data available since 1925 are 
shown herewith. It will be noticed that 
the number of chickens on farms, their 
value, the number raised, the number sold, 
and the number of hens and pullets, are 
indicated. In the same way, the number 
of eggs produced and sold on farms, as 
well as the value, is included. 

The peak in value of eggs produced on 
the farms was in 1926 while the low point 
was in 1932. The information is not yet 
available for 1936 on eggs, but the last 
two years in the table show a definite 
climb in this respect, just as it does in 
the value of chickens on farms. The num- 
ber of farms did not vary much during 
these past two years. 

Unfortunately, the average farmer 
gives little thought to his poultry, as an 
income part of the farm work, as this is 
usually left to the womenfolk. However, 
just as with dairying, poultry may pro- 
vide a steady income if properly handled. 
It might provide good winter work for the 
farmer. Just as with other livestock and 
crops, this product must be taken care of 
with the idea of productiveness. Poor at- 
tention to any farm production means a 
poor return on the investment. 



POULTRY ESTIMATES 



Years 


CHICKENS 


EG 


GS 


Number 
Chickens 
on Farms 
January 1 


Value 
Chickens 
on Farms 
January 1 
(Dollars) 


Chicken 
on F 


i Raised 
arms 


Chickens Sold 
from Farms 


Hens and 

Pullets 
Number on 
Farms 

January 1 


Eggs Produc 


;d on Farm 


Eggs Sold f 


om Farm 


Number 


Value 
(Dollars) 


Number 


Value 
(Dollars) 


Number 


Value 
(Dollars) 


Number 


Value 
(Dollars) 


1925 

1926___ 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932___ 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 


8,900,000 
8,900,000 
9,345,000 
10,116,000 
8,960,000 
8,870,000 
8,670,000 
8,960,000 
9,560,000 
9,136,000 
8,829,000 
9,289,000 


6,942,000 
7,120,000 
7,569,000 
8,194,000 
7,347,000 
7,540,000 
6,069,000 
5,286,000 
3,728,000 
4,020,000 
4,944,000 
6,038,000 


16,000,000 
16,480,000 
17,470,000 
15,020,000 
14,727,000 
13,255,000 
13,650,000 
15,015,000 
14,114,000 
13,408,000 
14,212,000 


8,800,000 
9,558,000 
9,958,000 
8,712,000 
9,425,000 
7,555,000 
6,416,000 
5,255,000 
4,516,000 
5,095,000 
6,538,000 


4,932,000 
5,867,000 
5,278,000 
5,742,000 
4.994,000 
4,692,000 
4,390,000 
5,010,000 
4,811,000 
4,381,000 
4,209,000 


2,713,000 
3,403,000 
3,008,000 
3,380,000 
3,196,000 
2,674,000 
2,063,000 
1,754,000 
1,540,000 
1,665,000 
1,639,000 


7,743,000 
7,743,000 
8,130,000 
8,801,000 
7,795,000 
7,420,000 
7,150,000 
7,210,000 
7,760,000 
7,372,000 
7,206,000 


465,000,000 
480,000,000 
520,000,000 
528,000,000 
472,000,000 
430,000,000 
429,000,000 
425,000,000 
435,000,000 
442,000,000 
432,000,000 


12,090,000 
12,624,000 
12,012,000 
12,461,000 
12,272,000 
9,460,000 
7,036,000 
5,312,000 
5,546,000 
7,072,000 
8,280,000 


254,000,000 
267,000,000 
281,000,000 
300,000,000 
242,000,000 
198,000,000 
156,000,000 
139,000,000 
164,000,000 
177,000,000 
161,000,000 


6,604,000 
7,022,000 
6,491,000 
7,080,000 
6,292,000 
4,356,000 
2,558.000 
1,738,000 
2,091,000 
2,832,000 
3,086,000 























36 



NORTH CAROLINA FARM FORECASTER 



THE VALUE OF NORTH CAROLINA CROPS 



The chart below is offered to the readers 
of the Farm Forecaster for very careful 
study. The map shows the distribution 
of cultivated land throughout the state. 
Each dot represents one thousand acres 
of cultivated or crop land. While it is dif- 
ficult to show the exact part of a county 
in which the cultivated land occurs, yet 
the statisticians are often times suf- 
ficiently familiar in a county to approxi- 
mate such locations. 

The little map shows the crop report- 
ing districts. It will be noticed that Dis- 
tricts 1 and 4 are in the mountain, while 
2, 5, and 8 are in the Piedmont and 3, 6 
and 9 in the coastal belt. 

The bar chart, with the heavy black 
lines, illustrates comparative values of the 
various crops grown in North Carolina. 
From this, rye shows the lowest value 
which is $452,000 while tobacco shows the 
most at $106,731,000. It will be noticed 
that the tobacco bar line is broken so it 
will show on this chart while it appears 
very little more than cotton, yet, in fact, 
it is about two and a half times as much 
in value as the cotton lint and seed. Corn, 
the third most valuable, shows almost 
$40,000,000, somewhat less than cotton, 
however, if we were to include the tops 
and fodder value of corn it will probably 
be fully as much as cotton. Other crops 
range on down from tobacco to rye. The 
importance of these will prove to be in- 
teresting to those who wish to analyze 
them. 

While tobacco, cotton, and corn are dis- 
tinctly the leaders in the total production 



VALUE ALL CROPS- N.C. 



MILLION 
DOLLARS 

200 — 



IL 



100 —I 



and value of North Carolina farm crops, 
yet we find that there are several other 
little known farm products that rank high 
in their total values. For instance, the 
commercial truck crop which is shown 
with the value of more than $14,000,000. 
Strictly speaking, Irish and sweet potatoes 
would also come under the head of com- 
mercial truck. However, since these are 
used for farm purposes they are given 
under different grouping. Probably many 
interested in agriculture will be surprised 
that the value of all hay crops is not more 
than the $11,000,000 shown. 

Each section of the state is naturally 
prejudiced or biased by the farming ac- 
tivities in that locality. For example, in 
the Piedmont section growers are bound 
to think everybody should be familiar with 
that crop where, as in the central Pied- 
mont area, farmers look on wheat as the 



major farm product. In the coastal coun- 
ties soy beans rank high. Again in the 
Piedmont lespedeza has recently grown 
to great importance. The student should, 
therefore, study all parts of the state and 
nation in order to be truly familiar with 
the agricultural distribution. 

To the student interested in the distri- 
bution of the state of individual crops, 
the crop reporting service has a special 
graphic issue which shows nothing but 
graphs and maps illustrating the distri- 
bution and trend for various farm com- 
modities. In the aggregate North Caro- 
lina crops for 1936 were worth $235,- 
000,000, with the rank of fifth among all 
the states of the union. The value of the 
state's livestock added $94,000,000 to that. 
In comparison with most of our middle 
western states our livestock value is quite 
low. 

It will be noted on the map below that 
the most intensively cultivated areas in 
North Carolina follow very closely the dis- 
tribution of the cotton acreage through 
the eastern and southern Piedmont coun- 
ties of the state. A map showing the 
distribution of work stock in North Caro- 
lina also shows a correlation with the 
cotton acreage and the cultivated land 
area. It will be found that the counties 
in the central Piedmont areas are the 
most diversified farming section of this, 
state, as they lie between the intensive 
cotton and tobacco counties and produce 
very little of either of these two crops. 
Small grains, dairying and live-at-home 
practices prevail. 



1936 VALUE OF NORTH CAROLINA CROPS 



Millions or 
Dollars 5 



CROP 



-9- 



TOBACCO 

and Seed) 

CORN 

CCUIERCIAL TRUCK 

HAY (ALL) 

POTATOES 

PEA1IUTS 

SWEET POTATOES 

WHEAT 

APPLES 

PEACHES 

OATS 

SOY BEANS 

STRAWBERRIES 

CABBAGE 

T.FqP imi?7.A XV.V\* 

SORGHOt FOR SYRUP 
C0Y1PEA8 
SNAP BEANS 
SORGHOl FORAGE 
RYE 



^48,618,000 



$106,731,000 



$39,562,000 



$14, 271,000 
I 

$11,472,000 
19,877,000 
♦9,270,000 



$6,426,000 
$5,921,000 
$2,849,000 

$2,700,000 

I 

$2,230,000 

$1,534,000 

I 

$1,453,000 
I 

$1,146,000 

I 

$1,063,000 
I 

$882,000 
I 

$601,000 
$549,000 
$504,000 
$452,000 




DISTBIBUTI0H 
of 

CROP LAND HARVESTED 



SERVICE 

NORTH CAROLINA 

1 dot: 1,000 acres