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FOREIGN AGRICULTURE CIRCULAR 



UA|-(TED STATES '6flF^/^TlVl|cNT 0^-7VG^^p^iii|^ii|g|^^^^^^ 
(FOREIGN A(|RlCgy|LTURAL SE I^V iililj^^^^^^ 

washi>jgt6n, D. c' iiiiiiite 

|M^^»T OF fiGRlCtHrmt [ 

*■ ■y'^'^-^ July 20, 1954 

EXPORT' PeSSIEUJTIES FOR Ul'TITED STATES ■ ' ' - : 
• JW: OWLJB IIJ TVi^STERIf -EUROPE l/ 

There iff an excellent market for United States offal products in 
The Netherlands |B a more lindted market e:?:ists in Syjitzerlandif and sales 

' Eel gi^^ could he increased, accordd.ng to a preliirinsry survey of foreign 
markets conducted by the Foreign Agricultural Service* Potentially Sweden 
and the United Kingdom are markets for our products but controls on dollar 
exchange preclude sales in those countries» France is experiencing a meat 
s.urplus, is aggressively seeking export outlets for surplus meat, thus it 
'" is difficult to sell oui poroducts in that country© 

There are a number of factors -fhich liinit sales of United States 
offal products abroad* Hot only do American products compete rith otheir 
exporting countries on a p3rf.ce basis, but they iroist conform Tdth specific 
veterinary and sanitary requirements T:liich differ materially oj countries* 
Some products are excluded from certain -European markets by the inspection 
Isxis of the individual countries* There may be substantial tariffs on 
imported supplies e As mentioned above, exchange regulations,- ostensibly 
to conserve dollars,; preclude the entry of United States products in 
isuch markets as the United Kingdom and Sr:edencv. 

United States meat offal products have a hi.gh consumer acceptability 
in TTesterh Europe<> In a number of countries prices are at such levels that. 
sl moderate amount of our.- products could be moved overseas* 

The preliminary study 'revealed some factors iihich need to be considered 
if our products are to find a market abroad^. The products should be so 
graded ^nd .packed that they trill meet the preferences of customers in 
foreign lands Some importers say they have not been able to line up 
sufficient quantities of suitable products at all times of the year frogi 
the United States and have looked to other countries as more constant 
sources of supply* This situation may be of a temporary nature* TTith^- 
in the past year prices of many of these products in the United States 
have •reached levels Trhich are more- competitive in iTorld iTiaj^ikats than 
those prevailing since the end of Tforld Y7ar IIo 



1/ Prepared by Grover J<i. Sims, largely on the basis of reports of U»S* 
Foreign Service Officers 0. 




FBI 



TI^ UETI-IEHLAIIDS 



There appears to be an excellent inarket for the sale of American 
beef tongues and iThole livers in the Netherlands «. The market for kidneys 
is good^. but prosiDects for the sale of tripe and brains in that country 
are less favorable «. The market for United States products could be fin*ther 
developed if more attention were paid to suppl^dng products: T/ell suited to 
the foreign customers and if regular year—roujid shipments from the United 
States could be depended upon«i. 

There has been some reluctance on the part of Dutch i:uporters to 
bring in frozen beef tongues from the United States because the tongues 
have not been closely trimmed and contain too much fat and other unde- 
sirable material.. 

Livers are m.ost desirable in vrhole uncut f orm«. It is desirable that 
the livers originate from young cattle to assure freedok from stbjje^.* .. 
Erices of cut livers are much lo^'Ier than uncut ones* ' Cut livers are 
usually used to make sausages and other- prepared products vliile the "crhole 
ones may b,e sold fresh* ' 

The Dutch trade has indicated that sliipments of kidneys from, middle- 
sized United States firms often vary greatly in quality^ In addition the 
quantities available are too small for leading Dutch buyers for year- 
round trade© This suggests that increased sales abroad could be made by 
the pooling of quantities by small producers in the United States and if 
some means were available vhereb^^ supplies for escport could be assembled 
for shipm.ent on a regular basis*. 

Tmolesale prices at The Hague in mid-iiay for various meat by— products 
are listed belov* Noarma.lly prices vary considerable during the year in 
response to changes in demand and supply conditions o- There "is a tendency 
for prices to decline during periods of Trarm treather* 



R?ices in dollars per 
ICQ pounds » 



Cattle 



Hog. 



Tongues 
Livers 
Kidneys 
Hearts 
Tripe 



Brains (per ICO sets^) 



21*60 
32*90 

U*50 
5«30 
2«90 



33 

14 .,50 



SUTHZSBLAM) 



There Is^ a good outlet for the e^rport of a Idjnited amount of United 
States meat offal products to Srdtzerland* ExiX)rt possibilities axjpear 
best for frozen ox tongues and frozen cooked tripe* 

Srriss imports of all meats and meat animals reached a very high 
level in 1950 and 1951 but receded to comparatively low levels in 1953 o 
Production "of meat, in Sv/itzerland has been on the increase for several 
years but consumption has also increased* 'It now appears that' consump- 
tion in 1954- will continue to rise but demand for meat fdll continue 
strong as a record tourist season is e:5qDected« Becai^se of the good 
tourist business there is no dollar shortage in the country© 

, The United States has supplied only a small share of the imported . 
products© American participation has been confined largely to frozen 
and preserved meats, averaging around 3 percent of the total Swiss imports 
of meat,, , excluding live animals for slaughter 

Total imports of meat and livestock for , . 

slaughter in Svdtzerland, 19-49—53 



Item 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



19^ 



l^OCO 

rxDunds 



1,000 

pounds 



liEAT HvIPORTS 



Fresh meat i 

Veal 1 

Pork ! 

.. Other I 

Earn, salted, smoked ; 

cooked, cured, Bto» ; 
Other salted, cured, meats i 

Frozen beef and mutton : 

Preserved meat ; 



322 
' 18 
l,704i 

355 

322 

7,057 



412 
24 
1,900 

176 
4.6 
5,941 



1,000 

pounds 



291 
11 
3,108 

132 
31 
5,917 



1,000 

ppunds 



258 
11 
5,306 

93. 
40 
5,697 



1,000 

l yunds 



123 
IS 
2,478 

46 
44 
240 



Cincludinc offals) : 2,566 i 


2,813 ! 


t 2.751 1 


: .3.-402 $ 1,803 


Total t 12,34/- J 


11,?14 


, 12,022 ! 


13,666 : 4,758 


IvSAT EQUWALEl 
II.IPORTSD FOI 

klli meat anirinls, : j 
carcass weight basis t '23,076 : 


]T OF Mm 

I SLAUGHTEr 

I 29,319 i 


LLS 

I 

' 27,769 : 


• 
• 

' 7.8n ; 2,458 


Total : . 35.420 j 


. 40,633 : 


, 39,791 ; 


. 21,477 : 7.216. 



Imports of offal products hj SiFriLtzerland have not declined as much as 
tmports of other meats in recent years » Lnports from all countries of the 
4 t-yjpes of edible offals most likely to be supplied by United States 
sources totaled 1,58^,000 pounds in 1953 compared tdth 2,066,000 a year 
earlier and 2,008,000 in 1951* 



Lnports of selected meat offal- 
products by 3v;itzerland, 1951-53 



Item i 


JLy^JL i 




• 
# 


1 Q'l'^ 
XyDp 




' 1 000 i 

■!■« www 4 


' 1«000 




1,000 




Toounds J 


]oounds 


• 


pounds- • 


Cb: tongues s 


1,305 ! 


1,226 


« 


1,250 


Tripe j 


514 i 


653 


* 
» 


ISI 


Caiined lunch tongues (pork), j 


. 143 1 


99 


a 


33 ■ 


Siveetbreads. j 


I 46 1 


■ SS 


• 
• 


119 


Total J 


, 2, 008 . 


t 2,066 


m 
• 


l,r5,^„ 



Source; Cooperative for the Supply of Livestocl: and Heat, • 

The Svd-ss prefer to import frozen tongu.es and to salt and smoke 
them in that country<j. S\Tiss consumers are very particular about salted 
and cured ineats as thej- are accustomed to meats processed frith a minimum 
amovjit of salt* Only ox tongues find a ready market and importers pre- 
fer the so-called "Giger Cut" or short tongue rreighing about 3"^? pounds* 
Tongues may be imported as fresh,, salted, cured, frozen or canned. Tost 
of the imports are frozen but a feiT salted ones enter the country* 

According to S\-d.ss veterinarjr regulations, only cooked tripe my 
be imported* Frozen cooked or canned tripe my be sliipped from the 
United States* Imports of fror^en kidneys are permitted* Iiaports of 
fresh liver,- kidneys and brains, separated from the carcass, are not 
allowed due to , sanitary/ regulations* Liver separated from the carcass 
Kay be iiuported only in canned form* 

riholesale prices of meat offals in Srdtzerland are relatively high* 
Recent vrholesale prices for frozen ox tongues have been reported at the 
equivalent of 74 United States cents per pound* Cooked tnfrozen uncut 
tripe T7as recently reported to be 'vorth 37 to 44 cents per pound at T^hole— 
sale. The import duty- of 50 Sv'dss franlcs per 100 kilograms is the equiva-. 
lent of 5 #29 cents per pound*. In addition to the duty, a-' snail statistical 
fee is collected on imports. and there is a, fee for veterinary inspection ' 
at the border^ Tlie statistical fee of 10 centinies pfer 100 kilograms is 
equal to about' 1 pent per 100 pounds and the veterinary inspection fee for 
offals is slightly Idgher at 13 centiires per 100 kilograms* - . .. 



TTholesale prices of beef tongues and tripe 
in Switzerland and SthIss import duties 





TJholesale j 


5 Import 


Item J 


prices : 


duty 1/ • 




Dollars pei* . 


i Dolls, rs per • 


0;: tongues : . ■ j 


: 100 -pound J 


t 100 pound 




Fresh • « 


! 69*06-74.00 i 


I 5.29 


Frozen j 


' , 74.C0 ! 


5*29 


Salted . ■ ■ ! 


I 69 ♦00-74 oOO J 


I 5.29 


Smoked < 


t ^,00^5 #00 ! 


' 5,29 • 


Tripe ; 




Cooked, unfrozen: 






Uncut 


: 37.00-^,4*C0 


! 5.29 


Cut 


: 31*00-38.00 


: 5.29 



1/ 50 SiTiss franks per 100 kilograms 



BELGIUM 



Prices of offal products in Belgium indicate that more United States 
meat products could be sold in that coujitry idth further promotion. Offal 
products have a high consumer acceptance in BeHgium* Apparently fresh 
meat offals may be imported only when adhering to the carcass » If sepa- 
rated from the carcass they laust be salted, iinports of offals aiie not 
limited, no import licences are required and meat enter the coujitry frea 
from import duties* ' - ,." 

According to official sources domestic production of offal products 
is sufficient for Belgiujn requiremfents* Eomvcr^ sm.all quantities of 
salted liver are imported from the Netherlands » 

Belgium im-ports small quantities of salted px tongues from various 
sources* I^ny of the tongues are processed and canned in the countrj'- 
and are th^n re-e::ported» 



TJholesale prices of selected fresH. 
offal products in Belgium 



Item J 


5 Cattle i 


! Hos 




I Dollars per i 


1 Dollars per 




I 100 pounds J 


! 100 ::ounds 


Liver : 


r 25 1 


t 32 


Kidneys ! 


20 J 


\ 29 


Brains j 




i 4-5 


Tongues . , : 


> 29 





SFJEDEN 



Potentially Srreden is a market for United States offal products, 
particularly liver, but the very tight dollar situation precludes any 
imports from dollar countries. At the present time dollars are allocated 
on a priority basis and are being used to buy items considered to be more 
iiuportant to the economy thaii m.eat« 

Offals have a high consumer acceptance by the consumers in S\7eden.. 
Beef liver has been in short supply for a n-umber of m.onths*. Recently 
fresh liver has been imported from Demnark and frozen liver from Uruguay* 
Smaller amounts of frozen rjroducts are shipped in from /irgentina» 

Import fees for meat into S\TOden are 70 ore per kilogram (6 U.S.. 
cents per pound) and in addition the tariff is 7 ore per kilograra (^6 
U.S. cents per pound). 



TJliolesale prices for fresh meat offals 
in Sireden, I'ay, 1954- 



Item 


: Cattle 


: Hos J 


• Sheep 




: Dollars 


s Dollars ; 


Dollars 




: per 100 


: per 100 j 


100 




: pounds 


: ■Dounds j 


{ pounds 


Liver 


: 47 


: 33 J 


t 18 


Kidneys 


; 11-15 


: 26-28 j 


• 10 


Tonficues 


: 61-63 


: 35-3S I 


. 18l 



6 



FRAI'ICS ■ 

Ibssibilities for e:rpc(rting United States neat offal products to . 
JVance appfear to be dvOJ.* Since last fall the French Governnent has been 
"nres tling v:ith a meat sv-rplus. It has engaged in pi'ice support activities 
hy purchasing meat and rdtholding it from the mai^ket in storage* The 
Government li£5 sponsored an aggressive exiX)rt program for meats and is 
seeking additional e:rport outlets* (See Foreign Crops and I!arkets. I'arch 
29, 1954, page 268*) 

■ ■ UIJITED. KmGDOLi 

United States supplies or offals are excluded i£rom the British market 
because no dollars are allocated for in;x)rts» The use of dollars for 
importing meat i^roducts, e::cept beef, is proliibited, A specific quantity 
of dollars vRj be set aside for imports of beef from dollar areas but the 
amounts thus allocated liave been extremely small * 

The United I^ingdom imports very large quantities of offals and, if 
it "vrere not for the exchajige controls, some United States products could 
be imported. The United- Ivingdom shipped in 57 percent of its requirements 
of bacon and ham last year and 40 percent of 'its total. utilization of 
other meats and offals* 

In prevrar the United Ilingdom T:as a fairly good market for offal 
products produced in the United States but Merican products had to conv- 
pete iTith those of the Dominions, the Colonies and South American coiu>» 
tries on a price basis for a share of. the British market*