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IN I1IF l MFKDSl A! FS PATENT AM) 'I RVDEMARk Of FIVE 



In it* latent application of 
\.pphuuu\ Bednot/et <ii 
Seual \o 08M79.S10 



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fvimmei M kopec 



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\ppeal \o 2000-oOi ?2o 

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i&SUE CLASSIFY VHOS SLIP 




United States Patent u« 

Cook et al. 



tin 3,736,048 
t*fl May 29, 1973 



£S4 J OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OF VARIABLE 
EQUIVALENT FOCAL LENGTH 

{751 inventors: Cordon Hesry Ctwfe, Osdby, En- 
gland; Fa*r ArmU Merigtiltf, 
Prestatyn, Wales 

J 73 1 Assignee; The K«nk Orga&izstSoii Limited, 
London, England 

(22 J Hied; Jun* U, i»7J 

£2 1 J Appt. No.: 152,254 

Related VS. AppBcstfoi) Data 

[63 J Contifiuafjor.-in-psrt of Scr. Ho. 309,20$. Sept. 16. 
(963, alHtadoned. 

[52] UJS. 0 350/186, 3S0;iS7, 350/114 

[51] Irst.Cf G02b 7/10, G02b 15/18 

[SS] Field of. Search 350/1S4, IS6 

{56 ] Relwc-ttces Cited 

united STATUS PATUNTS 

3,027,805 *H962 Y«m# 3S0/fg4 

3,035,373 f:/!%2 Harris erst...- 3SH/1WX 

3 ,0 5 7 ,25V 10,". <X,2 Ktemt el al 350/ : 84 

Primary Exatntner—Sobn K, Cortun 
v<ifowy- H&komfee. Wetherii! & Brisebois 

( 571 ABSTRACT 

A zoom lens having an improved zooming ratijje and 



Bomprumg a convergent first member which tor s 
given object distance remains stationary during the 
rooming relative movements, en axiaily movrsbfe 
divergent second member behind the first member 
having «timaient. focal length /* lyinj numerically 
between 4 and 8 times the minimum value of the ratio 
of the oqiitvaient fees! length of the complete abjec- 
tive to tlie /-number of the objective m the range of 
variation, an axial!? movable divergent third member 
behind the second member having equivalent ffjcal 
length /„ lying numerically between 5 and !0 times the 
minimum value of such ratkj, a stationary convergent 
fourth member behind the third member, a loom con- 
trol element, and mean* thereby operaTion of the 

movement* to be effected, wherein the total axial 
movement of the second member in the range of 
variation lies niirrserfcriliy between .1.5/* ami 2.5/j and 
the total axia! movement of the (ted member in the 
range iies numericaHy between 0.25/i- and (3.5/ c , the 
minimum ajtial separation between the Second and 
tbitd memb-ers occurring when the equivalent foes! 
length of the object is greater than bajf its roanimum 
vafue in the range of variation, the movable divergent 
wcortd member consisting of a divergent simple 
meniscus comijonenl with its, surfaces convex !o the 
ftont and a divergent compound component behind 
such simple component, and the movable divergent 
third member consisting of a doublet component hav- 
ing its front surface concave to the front with radius of 
curvature lying nutnericaiiy between 0.J/ e and t ,0/ c . 

22 Cfaims, 7 Drawing Figures 




3.736.048 

SHEET 113 




PATENTS ASSISTS 3,736,048 
SHEET 2 Of 3 




PA!EN?»29!9T3 



3.736,048 




1 

OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OF VARIABLE 
SQl'IVALEST FOCAL LENGTH 

This application is a continuation-in-part of our prist 
application Ser. No. 309,208, filed Sept. io, !H3,now 
abandoned. 

This invention relates to an optica) objective of the 
"zoom" type, that is of the type having relatively mov- 
able member, whereby under the control of a zoom 
control element the equivalent focal length of the ob- 
jective can be continuously vaticd throughput a range, ) 
whilst maintaining constant position of the image 
plane, whereby the scate of the image can bo varied, 
the objective being corrected for spherical and chro- 
matic aberration, coma, astigmatism, field curvature 
Mid distortion. In this type of objective, accommoda- f 
lion for change of object position is usually achieved by 
imparting a movemem, independent of She zooming 
relative movements, to the front, member of the objee- 

Many difficulties* arise in the design of surb objee- J 
fives, and one of the problems facing designers of today- 
is to achieve an increased range of variation of equiva- 
lent foca! length mil, where possible, also an increased 
angular field of view. Attempts to achieve this have 
usually involved the use of relatively complicated mov- 2 
able members in the objective m order to make it possi- 
ble to stabilise the aberrations throughout the range of 
variation, such stabilized aberrations then being com- 
pensated in a stationary rear member of the objective 
which also serves to locate the resultant image plane in 3 
a convenient position. This <» turn involves the use of 
relatively large and heavy movable members and tint 
only in>: reaves the bulk and siio of the complete objec- 
tive, but also presents severe mechanics! problems in 
controlling the movements, especially bearing in mind 3 
that n! least one of the movable members roust neces- 

tionship to the movement of the 200m control element. 
Many attempts to extend the range of variation of the 
equivalent focal length have failed, because they have 4 
demanded departures from linearity uf movement 
which ire t » practicable mechanically, and often too 
because they have involved as increase in the bulk and 
size of tlie objective to unmanageable proportions or 
have introduced too severe optical difficulties in 
achieving aberration correction. 

One way of reducing the mechanical complexities is 
so to arrange the system that the front member does 
not participate in the zooming movements for varying 
the equivalent focal length, so thai this member is eon- ' 
cerned only with focussing movements and is relieved 
of the complication of superimposing focussing move- 
mcnts on looming movements. Such an arrangement is 
utilised in the present invention, wherein (he primary 
object is to provide an improved arrangeiriBHt of the 
movable rooming system of the objective, which csyt be 
employed with various different arrangements of the 
front " 



second and third are divergent and 
movable, and the fourth is convergent and stationary, 
the minimum separation between the second and third 
members occurring -when tlie equivalent focal length of 
tite objective is gieater than half its maximum value m 
me range of variation, whilst the equivalent focal 
lengths /„ and f c respectively of the movable second 
and third members lie numerically respectively be- 
tween 4 and 8 times the minimum value of the ratio of 
the equivalent foca! length of the objective to die /• 
number of the objective in the range of variation and 
between 5 and 10 times suoh minimum ratio, the diver- 
gent movable second member consisting oi a divergent 
simple meniscus component with its surfaces convex to 
tite front followed by a divergent Compound compo- 
nent and performing during the range of variation a 
total axial movement lying numerically between l.S/ f 
anil 2.5 / s . whilst the divergent movable third member 
consists of a doublet component having a front surface 
concave w the front with radius of curvature tying nu- 
merically between O.Sf,- and 1 0/ r and performs during 
the range of variation a total oxial movement lying nu- 
merical!}- between 0.35/ f; and 0.5/ c . 

Several specific examples of optical objective! an 
above described will be giver, later on in this specifica- 
tion, and a table will be found: after the first example, 
together with an accompanying explanation showing 
the effect of varying those parameters for which ranges 
of variation are given in the preceding paragraph within 
the ranges specified in that paragraph. 

it is to be understood that the terms "front" and 
"rear", as used herein, relate respectively to the sides 
of the objective nearer to and further from the longer 
conjugate in accordance with the usual convention. 

In addition, the term "total awal movement" is used 
to refer to the total distance moved b 
ing zooming from one end of the rangt 
dependency of (he direction of mo 
member may move forward and than 
range of variation, and m this case the 
merit is the numerical sum of the i 
moved plus the rearward distance mc 
It should also be made clear that (I- 



member dur- 



t. Thus, e 



il throughout a widely 



ahturafion stability to be achie\ 
extended range of variation ol the equivalent ii 
length of the objective. 

URIlif 1 ' SUMMARY OP THii INVENTION 
The optica! objective of the zoom I 
the present invention hits four rotwt 
first (counting from the front) for a given object dis- 
tance remains stationary during the eooming relative 



component, is intended to include, no! only a cemented 
conwet, but also what is commonly known as a "bro- 
ken contact", that is one in which the two contacting 
surfaces have slightly different rati!! of curvature, the 
effective radius of curvature of juch a broJcen contact 
being the arithmetic mean between the radii of curva- 
ture of the individual contacting surfaces, whilst the op- 
tica) power of the broken contact is the harmonic mean 
between the optical powers of the individual contacting 

The characteristics of the movable second and third 
members above specified contribute toward* keeping 
the overall dimensions of the objective as small as pos- 
sible and achieving the best compromise bcrweeti the 

members of the objective, and aisii permit the front 
rtoiSa! points of the second and third members lo be lo- 
cated as far forward as possible, thus mating it possi- 
ble, not only to accommodate the desired movements 
of the members without risk of fouling between (he 
members and with miriiflsum increase in the overall 
length of tho objective, but also to achieve a good com- 
promise between the diameters and relative apertures 



of the individual members, anil at it 
sist towards the desired stabilirauon 
especially of spherical aberration a 



! aberrations, 
tna. through- 
if the etiuiva- 



A movable system arranged in the i 
with rb 



:r above (fcc- 



>r chromatic 



lent fueat length of the objective. 
RJRTH158 HiATtJHI-S OP TJ 
The compound component in the divergent movable 
second member preferably includes at feast one con- 
vergent element and at least one divergent element ! 
made of materials whose Abbe V numbers differ from 
one another by more !h3» 15, thus permitting such sec- 
ond member to be individually corrected U 



1-or assisting towards stabilization <5f astigmatism and 
distortion, the radius of curvature of the front surface 
of the sirnfil* meniscus com ponent of the second mem- 
ber preferably lies numerically between ! -S/ fl and 3/„, 
and further assistance towards stabilization of astigma. 
tism can be obtained by arranging for the radius of our- 1 
vature of the rear surface of such component to He nu- 
merically between OMU and i .08. B. 

T he front, surface of the compound component of the 
second member is preferably concave to the front with 
radius of curvature lying numerically between ).$/„ ' 
and 3/„, the rear surface of sueit component being con- 
vex to the front with radius of curvature lying numeri- 
cally between 3/ y and 6/ 6 . thus assisting towards stabili- 
sation of spherical aberration and coins. 3{ 

Whiist such compound component may consist of a " 
doublet component, it wiii usually be preferable for it 
to be in the form of a triplet component having a con- 
vergent element between two divergent elements. This, 
in view of the formed availability of suitable material: 
for the various elements, facilitates correction uf chro- 
matic aberration and the desired stabiliiattot) of the 
other aberrations without excessive curvature of it« 
individual surface*. 



35 fc 



able for us>e with various different arrangements of the 
first member of the objective, but it is especially advan- 
tageous for such member to hove one or more of the 
following characteristics: 

A. The first member » preferably convergent and 
may comprise a front meniscus doublet component 
with its iront snd rear surfaces concave to the front fo|. 
lowed by two simple convergent components, the front 
surface tjf the doublet component having dispersive op- 
tical power iyingn«merivSfly between 0.5//, and i .1)1 fs. 
where f A is the equivalent focai length of the first mem- 
ber. The«e features permit the rear noilrtl point of the 
first member ro bo far w the rear and preferably behind 
tho tear surface of the member, for cooperation with 
the forwardly located front nodal point of the second 

fi. The interna! contact of tJie meniscus doublet com- 
ponent of the first member may be dispersive and con- 
vex to the front with radius of curvature between 1.5/* 
and 3/„ the difference between the mean refractive in- 
dices of the materials of the two elements of such dou- 
blet component being greater than 0.1 S. These features 
contribute towards Mobilization of spherical aberration 
and astigmatism over the desired focussing range to suit 
different object distances. 

C. The two simple components of the first member 
may together have 3 combined equivalent focal (ength 
between 0,75/,, and 1 ,25/j, their front surfaces each 
being convex to the front, the ri 
jrfaoe of the first, of si 



m ay in turn be greater than 0.7 if*- These features assist 
towards stabilizing the aberrations, especially Spherical 
— - — - «"essivc curvatures cm 40 sberrii u ori aai astigmatism, not oitlv throughout the 

also be assisted by employing .tor all the elements of the range of foMISiillg adjustments, but aho throughout the 
second member materials whose mean retractive mdi- rang( , ^ var ; s ,; 0(l equivalent fecal length, 
ces are greater than 1 .65 , whilst the mean retractive m- O. The rear surface of the rear component of the first 
dices of the materials of the elements of the compound member may be convex 10 the front with radius Of cur- 
component in such member do not differ from one an- 45 vatMfe b()(wj . en 2f , and 7f t . This feature contributes 
other by more than 0. ! 5. The arithmetic mean between towards stabilisation of primary astigmatism through- 
out the range of focussing adjustments, and also of pri- 
' ' * ' ' ' 'a throughout the 



>f the c 



. SO 



l"he doublet compoiteul constituting the divergent 
>vabis thiixJ member preferably has a collective in- 
nai cfiniact convex 10 the front wltft radius of curve- g gBm », «, 
•e lying pumericatly between 0.5/ e ond/ c , the differ- - 5 wards the 



range of vitiation of equivalent foci! length. 

E, The axial thickness of the meniscus titsubiet com- 
ponent of the fiist member may be less than 0.25/, and 
greater than the sum of the axial thicknesses of the two 
simple components thereof, such sum in turn being 
greater than 0.075/,. These features contribute to- 
' •*• ' ' rd location of the rear nodal 



a Is of the two elements of such component lying be- 
tween 0.05 and 0,1 5, whilst the difference between the 
Abbe V numbers of such materials exceeds 25. These 
features contribute towards the desired stabilization of 
the spherica! aberration and coma and aiso facilitate 
individual correction of the third member for chro-. 
malic aberration. 

As in the case of the second member, it is preferabie fi 
to employ materials for the elements of the. third mem- 
ber having mean refractive Indices greater thus 1 .65, in 
order to avoid excessive urlate unriaturca and thus 



pom: 



if the fi 



The arithmetic mean between the Abbe V num- 
bers of the material of the three convergent elements 
of the first member may exceed by at feast 20 the Abbe 
V number of the material of the divergent front ele- 
ment of the meniscus doublet component of such mem- 
ber, thus facilitating individual correction of the first 
member for chromatic Aberration. ., 

G. The equivalent focai length/, of (he first member 
may !te between ! -2 and 2.4 tltne* the maximum value 
of the ratio of .the equivalent focal length of the objec- 
tive 10 the /-number of the objective This feature as- 



sisis towards keeping the Overall dimensions of the ob- 
jective and also the rsiaiive aperture of the first mem- 
ber as small as possible. 

H tf desired, an achfiroafc doublet component may 
b« provided, which tan ba pl.ieed at »tj) behind the 
rem member of the objective to increase the vaiue of 
the euutvutent fucal length of tie objective bv a chmeu 
ratio throughout Ibc range .if variation 

in all the arrangement!, nctorrlmg to the present in- 
vention, it is preferable rortne. «u> dtar-hrjstm of the ob- 1 
jecttve to b« rtifcvBisty ami m be located behind trie 
movable third member of the objective- 

lihiCRIPI JON' OF feMBODiMFMS 

Some conven,ent practical examples oi warn objei.- I 
live ^cording w the invention are illustrated ttragrum 
WBticalH in (tie accompanying drawing! in vvluth 

TiOS I - 4 respectively illustrate four examples 
(FK5 * being on half (he scale of FiCS 1 - J) 

FIGS S -- 6 show the example of HG 3 sir* ikekto.i 2 
formi modified by the addition respectively of t*o al- 
ternative Csinstructiom of achromatic doublet compo- 
nent rfctnehably mounted behind the rear member .if 
the objective, and 

FiG 7 ifi ij awal tectioi thr-ugh a fens mount having : 
su-id'ile rof.m control eictnent for use in tprrymg out 
the invention. 

Num-ncu! data for in«se mk evaropjes 3re givei m 
th; foftnviing tables {numbered correspondingly to the 
figures of the dTawngsi, m which R„ R s designate H 
the radii of curvature of the Individual surfaces of the 
objective counting fro"i die front the positive sifn in- 
dicating that the suttee is convex tu toe front and the 
negative sign that it « concave thereto, D,, D, desig- 
nate the axial thicknesses of the individual element* of 
the objects, ,i.nd S„ S s designate the axial air sep.s 
ration* between the components of the objective Hie 
tables alvo give the mean refractive indices n* for the 
d-lme of tKe s-pectrutr and the Abbe V numbers of She 
itiitetiaKtrom wt-ich the vanotw, elements of the objec- 
tive ir* made and in addition the clear diameters ot 
the various surtax of the obiective 

The »econd section of es£h tabic Rives the vahjes of 
the three vambic a\iai air separations between rhn four 
mcrnhir* o f she objective for a number of reprrsenta- 
tive ^sitions t.<r «bich the aorreiiponding tiabes of 
the equusicr-t focal length F of the complete objective 
fri»m its minimum value F„ to its nuwimurn ialutf F„ are 
iK> given togethfif wnn the correspondine vaiutu ot 
log F. 

Surrte of the tablet also have <s third section jrtvtBj; the 
equation defm ng an a\mi ■section through m a^phene 
stiffsce provtded ,u the stationary re<ir member ul the 
"■bjective theradiuioliuuaiuregnentorsuihiurfave 
in the first septfon of the table oemg the radius Of cur- 
vature at the vera* of the surface. 
1 he dimensions in each table <ire given tn terms of 1% 
(He msettioit of equate (=1 sijjns m tho radius eoi 
timns of the tablen. in company with p!u^ (+) jnd minui. 
(-) M K n'. v,fiN(i mdicoff « hcthcr tht surtaee is sonv« 
as toncave to the front, is for conformity with the usual 
Patent Office custom, snd it is to be tindcrsti"- d that 
these sigrs 3re not to be interpreted v,ho'!> tt! their 
mathematical significance Th^ sign Cynventtei agrees 
*.fh the mathemahc^l tign convention required for the 
computation tf some of the aberrations including (he 
pnmar) abcrrjuoni., hut different mathematieai stgri 



conventions are required for other purposes including 
computation of some of the secondary aberrations, ao 
that a radius indicated for exstnr* as positive in the ta- 
bles mav have to be treated S4 negative for some calcu- 
lations as » weli understood ,n the art 



3S KH-.nts? 



Equation for asphertc surface R„ 

J 1 07? >''t.(wl'M- yf -i>o:45^2iJi/ + 

0.088 Wi 72 v* 
- 0 244l>5«0 f ~ 0 074424S0 ^» 
The foa-jjoirtg Enample deserfbes a (.omplete tluek 
Jens design, vcith values eaicutated in many cises to the 
fourth dectiriji pU^e, and stvera! additional Examples 
, of thw tv/pe will be given tubstquentiy. 

It is, however, obviously impraunal to provide sucn 
ftillv caicuijted thick fens designs for valjes broadly 
d i -In Kited throughout lbs previously specified ranges 
fir aii the sigmfirant r>aramcters 

Howevsr, m order to jhovf the effect of ditering the 
pnncpsij parjitteters vvuhm the ranges specified for 
those p3ratnetBii, and demon stfn*e the practicality of 
dtHgning lenses haung parameter snfucs near 'he ei 



3,736, 

7 

:s or the specified ranges, an illustrative table t( 
below The parameters given are aii thin lens pa- 

i I£*fimp)c t is hased) and (he effects of (host pa- 



everaii abjective arid the relative aperture s (/- 
numbers) of the first three mcrnbeis. 
In (he following table: 

F M h the focal length of the wossl member; , 
Fr it the focal length of the third member; 
T* is the total tvxia! movement of the second member; 
T f: is the totsJ axial movement of the third member ; 
ft ib the in In I mum value of the ratio of the focal 

length of the ■complete objective to its /-number; . 
L is the overs!! !ength from the front of the ob jective 
to the focal plane; 

m diameter at the front of the objec- 



f>j is the relative aperture of the third member, 
The four critical thin lens parameters set forth m the 
fifth paragraph of this specification and in the main : 
claim are F », !■>, Tn, and T r , and their values for Exam- 
ple 1 are shown En line 1 of the tsbk. tn iine 1, Fj, is put 
e<tual tn the tower limit £4R) of the main ciaim, and ui 
line 3 equal to the upper limit 'BR). In tines 4 and 5 F t 
h treated similarly. T 4 and T r are dealt with in similar ; 
manner in lines 6 and 7 and lines B and 9. It i( not possi- 
ble to vary the four parameters completely indepen- 
dently of one another (this is referred to again later), 
<srid in fact when one parameter is set to an end limit, 
at least t*o of the others have been adjusted, in the ta- ; 
bte. so that the range of variation of foca! length re- 
mains appro>;irnatei,v unchanged. 



,048 

8 

Line 3 shows the effect of 
limit. Conversely, from the cl 

and F s! , it can be seen that such a mstmteu misi tens 
construction would be suitsoie for development of a 
fins! objective of relativety simple construction con- 
structed to cover relatively iatge image format riim B n. 
sions { at which scale high complexity -would not be per- 
missible) at a smaller relative aperture than Bnample J. 

Lines 4 and 5 show (dent tea! effects achievable by 
putting F t - at its lower and upper 1 ii» its, 

Line 6 shows the effect of outthtg the total axial 
movement of trw second member at its upper limit, in 
fact, in order to do this, it is necessary to put at least 
either F s or F r at or near its end limit. This is dictated 
by lite fundamental laws of optics, also hearing in mind 
the requirement to keep the foe*! range roughly the 
sams. However, the effect is now not o,tiite the same as 
in lines 2 to 5, because one axi&i movement now also 
ifes at its end limit. Thus, the change is I. and D from 
Exampts I is reduced, while the relative aperture of one 
member (the third member) is increased but the other 
wo are reduced, Lines ? to 9 show similar effects; in 
extent from Example (, as also at 
verting to line 6 in particular, thu 
to a moderately smalt but not extremely small dimen- 
sional scale of final objective having a medium relative 
aperture, wherein the smailef relative aperture of the 
third member either permits its complexity to be re- 
duced or, more useftiiiy, its existing complexity utilized 
to achieve art extremely high standard of aberration 
correction. Corresponding but slightly different effects 
cm be seen from the modifications of lines 7 to 9, 

in goners! therefore, it can readily be seen from the 
table hois- the parameters of the main claim can be 
taken to their end limits- to provide differing effects 



o diffe 



i«g rr 



Eixampte i is a loom lens intended for construction to 
dimensions. 

In Sine 2, the effect of putting F* to in lower limit is 
to reduce L and O. l r KI , V*i, and F M arc also reduced, 
meaning that each individual member has a wider rela- 
tive aperture. Because of their wider relative apertures, 
these members would have to be mere complex (con- 
tain more usable thick Sens parameters) than they are 
m Example 1, in order to achieve the same high stan- 
dard Of aberration correction. However, this greater 
complexity would be acceptable for a zoom objective 
built to a smui! dimensional scale covering small Image 
format dimension*. Such a no ail scale construe sion. 
wouid readily be possible In view of ihe reductions in 
t. and D Therefore, a zoom lens wSthin the scope of the • 
main claim, with F„ at or near its lower limit, would be 
preferred for a tons of wider relative aperture but con- 
structed to a smatler dimensional scale than Eaampft 



signer given the rnrtin claim and having a particular end 
requirement can work accordingly. 

The table also demonstrates the sense of the end lim- 
its. For example, to take F, below the value of 1 .0(4 Rj 
in iine 2 wouid bo further to decrease L and D and fur- 
ther widen the relative apertures of the seeond, third 
and fourth members. Obviously a question of opinion 
is involved at this point, but the opinion of ths inventor 
is that.the complexity of construction for the second to 
fourth members, in order to achieve good aberration 
correction at the further widened relative aperture, 
would render a practical construction a rion- 
ec-mmerctaJ proposition. Likewise to take F s beyond 
the value of 2,t)(SR) in line 1 would only permit con- 
duction of a practice! corrected objective to sucii a 
targe dimensional scale that it would find no useful ap- 
plication. The same factors aiso arise rn the modifies- 
ticins of lines 6 to 9, when coupied with the requirement 
to maintain a iarge range of variation of focai length, 
which iis an essential object of the invention. 



.v = H- 3 9463 - VlS..'?32'i~si -t- O.O0427U2O > 4 

-0.0077 ?09ti y« + 0.0072 y>» 
in a)5 these examples, the maximum value F„ of the 
equivalent foeai length F or the objective ts ten times 
the minimum value F„ thereof Example I is corrected 
for a relative aperture //4 0, whilst Examples. !i and !1! 
aie each cotrecte-d Hot a relative aperture /?2.8, and Ex. 
ample IV is corrected for a relative aperture of ,171 6. 
E:\amples If end fi! differ rrom one another solely m the 
stationary rear member L B , the front three members 
t, ix f.„ afld Lf being Iden'ical in the two examples. Such 
members L,,, L a and L.; are in fact simitar to the front 2( 
three members t,,, h K and L. c of Example t, the dimen- 
sion* being scaled up from those of Example I in the 
ratio of the /-numbers, that is in the ratio of 4.0/7.8, 
The rear m embers Vt> in lixaraplcs II and it! are, how- 
ever, not scated-up versions of the rear roentber L» of 2: 
Example I. The front three mem hers, L,, Lb, of 
Example IV, which includes yet another alternative 
construction al rear member Ln, are of the same 
general type as those of Examples l-fll, but their 
numerical dimensions differ somewhat from a vcr- J{ 
sion of those o{ Example 1 scaled up in the ratio 
4.0/1.6, 

Ail these example* cover a semi-angular field of view 
varying from 27 degrees at F B to 2,7 degrees 

The iris diaphragm in sli four examples i 
and is located between the movable third 
and the stationary rear member Lo- in Example I the 
diaphragm is 0 0fi2S F„ jo from of the surface R L! and 
has diameter 0 S5o8 Jv in Example il the diaphragm 
is 0.05* 20 F„ in front of the surface Ei „ and has diameter 40 
1.2240 F„; in Kxampie 111 the diaphragm is 0.1 37S F a 
in front of the surface R„ ami ha* diameter 1 .2240 F ( . 
arid in Example IV the diaphragm is 0.3407 F, m front 
of t*e surface R„ and has diameter 2.1446 P„ 

The back focal distance from the rear surface of the 45 

2.6761 Fj, in Example H, 2,3027 F t In Example IU and 

The equivalent focal length fa of the stationary first 
member L 4 is + 4. 455 ) F„ In Example I, + 6.3644 F, so 
in examples 11 and 111 and + ! 1.14 IS F»in Example IV; 
the equivalent foca! length fa of the movable second 
member L„ is - 1.4703 F a in Example I, ~ 2.1004 i-\ 
its Examples I! 3nd HI and - 3.6770 F 0 in Sxampie IV; 
the equivalent focal length fa at the mouable third 
member L 4 is ~ I 8176 F„ in Ersmpie I, - 2.5966 P, 
in Examples 1! end IH and - 4 5458 p' t in Example !V; 
snd the equivalent foeai length fa of the stationary 
fourth member L„ is + i 47S3 F, jft Example 1, + n 
2 1 2*6 F„ in Example Ii,+ 2.3232 F, in Example III and v 
+ 4.0419 F s In Example iV; the positive and negative 
sign* respectively indicating convergence and diver- 

in all four examples, the convergent stationary front $« 
member L t consists of i ' " " ' 
followed by two conve 

front surface Ri of the doublet component ii cc 
to the fr^ftt and has dfspetsive optical power m 



12 

catly equal to 0.I5S/F, or 0.692//, in Example I, to 
O.HHWFj „ <i.$92,'f A in Examples il and Hi, and to 
0.062/F. or 0,69Vh in Example IV. The internal con- 
tact 8 4 of the doublet component 19 dispersive and con- 
vex to the front and has radius of curvature equal to 
2.C37 f A in all four examples. The difference between 
the mean refractive indues of the materials of the two 
elements of such doublet component Is 0.27 in all four 
examples. 

The combined squivaient focal length of tbs two sim- 
ple components of (he first member L x is 4 001 3 F„ in 
Example I, 5.7 i« V, in Examples II and III, and 
10,0064 F„ In Irxample fVor0.S9fil f t in all four exam- 
ples Th* radius of confiture R< of the from surface of 
the FiMt of such simple components is J, 55 1 f A in alt 



four 1 



the second of suet 
is 0,880 f A in all four examples. T: 
(such second simple component is 
wirlj radius of " " 



The as 



ss (D, 4 



>,) of tt 



!) four 



ipanent of the first member l. A is 0,766 F, in 
Bxamplo 1, 1.094 F, In Examples il and ill, and !.*!i6 
F s in Example IV, or 0,i72 f A m all four examples. The 
sum of the axial thicknesses of the two simple compo- 
nents (D 3 4- D 4 ) of She first member is 0.5SS F„ iit Ex- 
ample 1, 0,790 in Examples it and 111, and 1.383 F„ 
in Estample IV, or 0.1 24 fa in sll four examples. 

The arithmetic mean between the Abbe V numbers 
of the materials of the tJsree convergent elements of the 
first meiJibsr L A In a!! four examples is SO. 72 and thus 
exceeds the Abbe V number of the material of the di- 
vergent front element by 24.62. 

The maximum vslue of the ratio of the equivalent 
focal length of the objective to the /-number of the ob- 
jective ta 2.5 F„ in Example I. 3.S7 F„ in Eiamples 11 
and £11, and 6.25 w Kxample IV, i.0 that in jif! four 
examples/, is 1.782 times such maximum value. 

In sll four examples, the minimum separation be- 
tween the movable second and third members L t and 
W occur* when the equivalent focal length of the ob- 
jective is 7.45 F'„ and the numerical values of the 
equivalent fOC3l lengths f s and f c of such members are 

the ratio of the equivalent fOC3l length of the objective 
to the /-number of the objective. 

The movable second member L, in alt four eiampfcs 
consists of a divergent simple meniscus component 
with its surfaces convex !o the front followed by a di- 
vergent triplet component having a convergent element 
between two divergent elements, and its total aiia! 
movement (h unidirectional rearward movement) in 
the range of variation is numerically equal to 1 .^94 /,,. 
Theftoniandrearsu rfacct R»BridR 9 csftheBlmp!emi:. 
niscus component of such membei lespectively have 
ladii of eurvaiure numerically equal tc? 1 .89/ s and 0.B3 
/{, in all four examples, whilst the front and rear sur- 
faces Rjunnd R,, of the triplet component respectively 
have radii of cutvature numerically equal to 1.8ft fa in 
examples 1 - til and 1 .87 /, In Example !v and to 3.93 
fi, in Examples t~»U and l.W fa in Example !V. 

The movable third member T-c to »H four examples 
consists-of a doublet component, whose fiont surface 
R„ i* concave to the front with radius of curvature nu- 
merical!^ equal to 0.72/ c . and the lotai axial movement 
(the numerical sum of an initial forward movement 



13 



14 



iu«ru rearward movement) of such mem- are given below of two alternative examples of achro- 

■sally equal to 0,363 / c . The inieinat con- matte doublet component suited to follow the rear 

Jul) double! component is collective and member L n of Example i above. F'iGS, S and 6 respec- 

;he front, with radius Cf curvature numeri- lively show these two examples of doublet component 
us 0.?2/ t , The ilLffcrenee between the mean 5 L* in position behind the main objective, which foraim- 

idiees of the materials of inch doublet cum- piicity is shown only in skeleton form, the front and 

.CBf in Examples f ■■ fli and 0,08? in Kxam- rear surface* only being shown for each of the four 

difference between their Abbe V numbers members L fl , L c and L s of the objective. 
) in Exam pies 1 - 111 and 30.2'f in Example ' 



ler is nams 
tact R„ of 

pohent is 
pie !V, ti 
being 30. 

!n aii four examples, the various aberrations arc *elt 
stabilized in The front three members (..,, L B , 
throughout the range of variation of equivalent focal 
length of the objective and a)*o throughout the focus- 
sing range., and the stationary rear member L 0 Serves to ' 
balance out such residual etabitiy.ed aberrations, and 
also to locate the resultant image plane in a convenient 
position. The construction of such rear member may 
thus vary widely. 

in Examples 1 and il, sttcfi rear member may be de- * 
scribed sis of modified Cooke triplet construction, 
wherein the strong convergent power heeded at the 
front to deal with the relatively widely divergent bC3m 
received from the third member ia achieved by the use 
of three simple convergent com pane ats, which ore foi- 2 - 
lowed by a simple divergent comjfOcient and either a 
t'onvergent doublet component as in Example 1 or a 
convergent doublet component followed a conver- 
gent simple component as in Example II. In these two 
e>;ampics an aspheric surface is used in order to assist 3< 
in balancing out th« residual si 



overall length of the Objective, such aspheric 
being the front surface R,j.of the simple diverge 
ponent, where it can he emptayect fo 
correction of spherical aberration and corns with mini- 
mum effect on oblique aberrations. 

In Bjiarnpte Hi, a somewhat different type of station- 
ary rear member ia used, which may be described as of 
modified Petitval construction. Jit this case, si* simple ' 
components are- used, the first three again being con- 
vergent in order to give the necessary strong conver- 
gent at the front, whilst the next Wo are si iter* 
gent and the sixth ia convergent. Although no aspheric 
surface is used in the actual example given, some fur- 
ther improvement in aberration correction conld be 
achieved by incorporating such a surface. 

Yet another alternative construction for the station- 
ary rear member L e is employed in Example IV, con- , 
listing of seven simple components, the first three and 
the last two being convergent, and the fourth and fifth 
divergent. An aspheric surface is again used, in this 
case the front surface R w of the rearmost component. 

it is often desired in practice to provide two different , 
ranges of variation of the equivalent focal length of the 
objective, and with the objective according to the pres- 
ent in vent (on this can be carried out in a simple way by 
the provision of an achromatic doublet competent, 
which can be placed at witf behind^ the stationary rear f 

when in position, acting to move the resultant image 
plane further from the rear surface of the member L 0 
and to increase the values of the equivalent focal length 
of the objective in the same proportion throughout the t 
range. Another effect of tie addition of this doublet 
component is to reduce the relative aperture of the ob- 
jective and the angtilat field covered, numerical d3ta 




The dimensions in these two examples of achromatic 

1 doublet component arc given in term* of the minimum 
value F a of the equivalent focal length for the objective 
of Example i. In each table S„ represents the air sepa- 
ration between the rear surface R M of the stationary 
rear member L e of Example i and the front surface ft s '„ 

: of the Rtfded doublet component. The doublet compo- 
nent in each case consists of a convergent element in 
front of a divergent wlement. 

The added doublet component L E of Example v'in- 
cresses the values of the equivalent focal length in the 

' ratio 3;2, so that the normal range front F, to 1(5 F s is 
altered by the doublet component into a lange from 1 .3 
F, to f;fv The doublet component of Jixampfe VI acts 
to double the values of the equivalent focal length of 
Example I, thus giving a range from 2 F t to 20 F ( when 
the doublet component is in position. 

The back focal distance from the rear surface R, 5 of 
the added doublet component t s to the new position 
of the resultant image plane is 3.704 F, in Example V 

. and 4. 028 F„ in Example Vi. The relative aperture of 
the objective is changed from /4,0 by the addition of 
the doublet component to//6 0 in ExampSc V and/'8.0 
in Example VI. The semi-angular fiefrf, which for Ex- 
ample I alone varies from 2? degrees at F„ to 2.7 de- 
grees at F„, varies (when the doubie! component of ftx- 
ample V is added) frsrr) I S degrees at 1 ,S F s to (.8 de- 
grees at 15 F 5 , and (when the doublet aimpoiisnt of 
EKumpic VI is added) from 1 3.5 degrees at 2 F, to 1 .35 

!t wilt be readied that the addition of only an achro- 
matic doublet component to an already well-corrected 
objective must neccstatily result in a lower standard of 
aberration correction when the doublet component is 
in place. Bur the increased equivalent focal length and 
reduced relative aperture and angular field do not cat! 
for so high a standard of correction as is needed when 
the objective is used alone, and for many practical pur- 
poses the standard of correction obtained with the dou- 



15 U 

biet component added is adequate, which the compound component of the second ntein- 

The necessary axial movement of the second and bercons;st*of a triolet comment having a convergent 

third members may be brought about in various ways, element between two divergent elements, 

for example by means of two appropriately sloped S. Aft optica! objective as claimed in ctaim 4, in 

cams, which may be in the form of cam grooves B and < wfcieh the doublet oumponent constituting the third 

£ on the inner surface of a tabular member C rotated member has a collective interna) contact convex to tha 

by the zoom control clement G and stirroafidjag the front. 

second and third members M and H, which ate held *• An optical objective as claimed in claim I, in 

against rotation relatively to the fined casing F of the which the front surface of the compound component of 

objective. The focussing movement of the front mem- !0 the second member is concave to the front and the rear 

bar P may he effected under the control of a focussing surface of such component is convex to the front, 

control element O by mounting the front member itl An optical objective as claimed in ciaim I, in 

screw threaded engagement with the fixed casing F of which the doublet componenr comtituting the third 

the objective. member has a collective internal contact convex to ins 

!t wt!i be appreciated trjBt the foregoing examples !S front, and the materials of the two elements of such 

have been given by way of esftfitjsle tmfy and that the component having differing Abbe V numbers and dif- 

inveniion can be carried into practice in other ways. feting mean refractive indices. 

We ci3iro 8. An optical objective as claimed m ciaim I, in 

1, An optical objective of the loom type ( that is of which the front surface of the compound component of 
the type having relatively movable members wKerebv 26 tJ *° ***<">4 member is concave to the front and the rear 
the et;»i«tent focal length of the objective can be con- surface of sucit component in convex to the front, 
tirtuouaiy varied throughout a range, whilst maintaining An epfo* 1 objective as claimed in ciaim in 
constant position of the image plane), corrected for * hicfl the compound component of the second mem- 
sphcrica! and chromatic aberrations, coma, sstigma- ,, berconiis.il of a triplet component having a convergent 
tism, field curvature and distortion, said objective hav- element between two divergent elements, the materials 
ing a maximum equivalent focal length at least 6 times of ai> t}u! *tem«>w of ** second member having mean 
its minimum focal length, and comprising a convergent «ftactive m<««* greater than J .69 an< j being suc j, that 
first member *hich for a given Object distance remains the ariliwietl(: »>««> between the Abbe V numbers Of 
stationary during the looming relative movements, art ^ e ™ te "« ls °f *« divergent elements exceeds that of 
axiaiiy movable divergent sesofld member behind the * th * "^vetgent element. 

first member having «,„i™!eiit foes! length /, tying ntt- , J '.' An <*J<"«'™ f» e^roed in ciaim 9, in- 

mericaiiy betaken 4 and S times the minimum value of C! "f , ,n * , art 3c!ironlst - lc doublet which can he placed at 

the ratio of the equivalent focal length of the complete *' ! " beh,nd . ihe f ^«»»ry rear member of the objective 

objective to the /-number of the objective in the range t j ™? "» operative position to increase the 

Of variation, an axiaiiy movable divergent third mem- "' " ala<! " of t3,t « ( » ulV!d ' I ' t '«n8'» of objective by 

ber behind the second member having equivalent focal 8 'J]" 5 ™ "*» lt « «**» *> f T'f 0 "' , 

length/, Sying numerically beWeefi 5 and 10 timet the A " °P" ca! ob f cure 04 t!a ' ms f « >• ™ 

minimum value of such ratio, a stationary convergent *^ ^ejompoend componerit of the aecond mem- 

total axiai movement of the third member in the range * J" f " materials »' ™ „ s " cn i ofn * 

H« nnmeticaliy between ^ 0 ,/ the mi*. S^^^^S^^R^r 

mttm «x»I lepuuon between the second and tted than M ab(jul 

mernoer « currwg *her, the eqn.valent focal Iwgth of l3 . An iC8 j obje - ctive a$ ci3j[Jierf in ^ t 

the objecuve )s greater than half its masiraum value in 5 » whjcft ^ (1^.^ (omptlnet!t con3 tit u rin K the divet 

the range of variation the movabl* divergent second , movabte At|d mefnbsf hi9 a coii8Clivfi in(ema! 

memoer eonstsOflg of a divergent simple rnemscos renvoi to the front tvith ridius of curvature 

component with its surfaces convex to the front and a subsmntialfv equaf to C.7i/ C , the difference between 

divergent compound component behind such simple & e mem refrac ti ve ifldiws of lhe mawtiai( of i h(5 two 

component and the movable divergent third member ' eiements of such component being about 0.09, while 

consisting of a doublet component; having its front sur- { j, e ciffarence between the Abbe V numbers of such 

face coneaife to the front. materials is about 30. 

2, An optjeai objective as claimed in claim 1, in ,4. An opiicsS objective as ciaimcd in cSawn 13, in- 
which the compound component in the divergent tnov- tiuUir , g 3B aehromatio doublet which can be placed at 
abfe second member meludes at least one convergent wi u behind the stationary rear member of the objective 
eiement and at least one divergent element made of an d acts when in its operative position to increase the 
materials of differing Abbe V numbers. v3| ues of liw Bivalent focai length of the Objective by 

3. An optical abjective is claimed in ciaim 3, m a chosen ratio throughout the range of variation, 
which the front surface of the compound component of ^ ' IS. An optical objective of the 100m type \thaf is of 
the second member is concave to the front and the rear the type having relatively movable members whereby 
surface of such component is convex to the front. the equivalent focal length of the objective can be con- 

4. Art optica! objective as claimed in claim 3, in (inuously varied throughout a range, whilst maintaining 



]7 



18 



it. An optica) objective as claimed in claim IS, is 
which the compound component in the divergent mov- 
ubie second member in dudes at least one convergent 
voiwergeni fim member which for s givers object element and at feast one divergent element, and the 

tance reroums stationary during the looming relative i doublet component constituting the third member has 
movements, an axialiy movable divergent second mem- a collective internal contact convex to die front, 
bar behind the fust member having equivalent focal 18, An optical objective as claimed in claim i5, in 
length /„ lying numerically between 4 and 8 tiroes the which the two simple* components of the first member 
minimum value of the ratio of the equivalent focnl together have their front ittrfaces convex to the front, 
length of the complete objective to the /-number uf the 10 the radius of curvature of the front surface of the first 
object! re in the range of variation, an axtally movable of such simple components being greater than twice the 
divergent third member behind the second member ta dius „f E t, r voture of the front surface of the second 
uvtfeirt focal length/,, lying numerically be. ^ guS:{ , 5i „, plf . e „ m p„ wn4s , ttjc fBar , nte of tf)c 5S0 , 



m. value of such 
a stationary convergent fourth member behind the 15 
fhifd member, a loom control element, and means 
whereby operation of tits aoont control causes the 
zooming, relative movements to be effected, wherein 
she total axial movement of the second member tn the 
rang!; uf variation ties numerically between I ,S/ 5 and 20 

and the total axial movement of the third member 
in the range lies numerically between 0.2.5/ t - and 0.5/ c , 
the minimum axis! sepaiation between the second and 
third members occurring when the equivalent focal 
length of the objective is greater tbiia half its maximum 25 
value in the range of variation, the movable divergent 
second member consating of a divergent simple menis- 
cus ccmpoiwut wilh its surfaces convex to the front and 
a divergent compound component behind such simple 
component, the movable divergent third member con- 30 
slating of a doublet component having its front sutfaoe 
concave to the front, and the first member of the objec- 
tive comprises a meniscus doublet component having 
a front surface which is concave trj the front and 1*0 
simple convergent components behind stjch meniscus 35 
doublet component, 

lt>. An optical objective as claimed in claim IS, in 
which the internal contact of the meniscus doublet 
component of the first member is dispersive and con- 
vex to the front. 4 



ponent if the 
the axial 



so the 

objective as claimed in claim IS, in 
icknesa of the meniscus doublet eom- 
: member is is greater than the sum of 
of the two simple components of 



30. An optica! objective as claimed in ciairn 19, in- 
cluding an achromatic doublet which can be placed at 
wiB behind the stationary re3r member of the objective 
and acts when in its operative position to increase the 
values of the equivalent focal length of the objective by 
a Chosen ratio throughout the tange of variation. 

21. An optical objective as claimed in claim IS, in- 
cluding an achromatic doublet which can be placed at 
will behind the stationary rear member of the objective 
and acts when in its operative position to increase the 
values of the tquivaicrttfocsi length of the objective by 
« chosen ratio throughout the range of variation. 

23. An Optical Objective as claimed in claim 21. in 
which the internal contact of the meniscus doublet 
component of the first member is dispersive and con- 
vex to the fiont fciib radius of curvature substantially 
equal to 2.04/,, the difference between the mean te- 
fractive indices of the materials of the two elements of 
the doublet being substantially 0.27. 



65 



UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 

CERTIFICATE OF. CORRECTION 

Patent Ho. 3.736^8 Bated 29. 



It is certified that error appears in the above -identified patent 
and that said Letters Patent »*« hereby corrected as shown below; 



C?33 Assignee: The Rank Organisation Limited 
London, England 



[30] Foreign Application Priority Data 

Sect. I f f, 1963 Great Britain...,,. 35088 



Signed and sealed this 27th day of November 1973, 



EDWARD M. FLETCHER, JR. 
Attesting Officer' 



RME D. TEGTMEYER 

Acting Cosmissiener of Patents 




152254 



TO ALL WHOM IT MAY OON03EF; 

Marigold, Subjects of the ftueen of Bnglana , and resxfi 
of Oadby, Co'-inty of i.csster, E::gl.jn3 , &;;cl Frest.(sty 
County of Flintshire, Wales, LnHecl Kingdom ^et pscti 
have Invented certain new and useful improvements ii" 
Optical &b,lectives of Varnable S'jti 1 v-ulsnt Pcc&i -^e^j 
of sssieh the following is a y pec if ian. ion: ~ 



jsr.a-oosiiii'ising a convergent fitr-t atexasr which for- a 
itivz'ji ob.jee-, distance renins et&tionsry during the 
soossing relative movements, an axially movable diver-** 
second member behind the first member having eou.i valet 
focal length £ 2 lying numerically batman it and 8 tin* 



-s-^ivalenl focal 



length ol the soviet* objective to the £-jr,urber- or the 
in r.hs? ran^e of variation, nr. &xicliy movable 



eouivalent focal length lying numerically between [ 
ana 10 Uses the tninimun-" value of &\ich eat io, 



relative •■vjverce.nt.s to be sf *>ct -.vherftin t.iie totssl 
20 axial movement of the second member in the range of 

variation lie? euneric«lly between 1.51- &a£ 2.5r s snd 
the total axial movement of the third sneabei? in the 
rang- ii es numerically bet-een j.&t^, *r,a 0.5*,, t:;e 

25 members occurring when the «~uiv»lent focal length of 

r than half its nwxittua value in 

aesber consisting of s divergent s isiols aeni< cua 



\ 



frort -.sixh radius or curvature lying; numerically 
wee* 0.51, ^ i-'fy 

ftpiJlication is a continuation-in-part 
of our prior application ^^J^Jj^' ' r ~°'~ ' 



This invention relates to an optical objective 
of tne "noon" type, th-t is of the type saving relatively- 

conrrol element the s tuivale&t fo?ol length of the 
objective csn be c:ont Lnuo-Jsiy VjtrieJ throu>.*\oiit £= r^n^, 



v hereby tl.f scale of Cm isaga o&n be variea, th* 

distortion. In this type of objective, accomodation 

movements, to the front member of the objective. 

Raay difficulties arise in the design of such 



today is to achieve an increases ran^J of varLu.lon of 
e^-tiv&Ifcnt focsl length 3 no, vh*re posssible, al:ro ?n 

1;hi:> have usually involved the us,e of relatively 



will cooperate therewith to enable aberration stability 
to l~e nchisveci throa^out a widely extended range of 
variation of the equivalent focal length of the objective. 
I aF si M AH Y 0? ,T;HB ; _XMggf ION 

The optical ob^eo tive of the scorn type according 
to the .present invention has four 1 members of* which the 
first (counting froa the front } for a piven object 
distance resna in* stationary (hiring the 8 ©owing relative 
movements, the see and and third are divergent and 
Movable, and the fourth is; eenvergeist and stationary, 
the faitiiicu-:: seror^tio:; oetvseen the second an;; third 
me sabers occurring v?h«n the emiiv&lent focal length of 
the objective is greater than half its s^sxiaum value in 
the range of variation, whilst the equivalent focal 
lengths f 3 and f c respectively of the ii>ov&ble second 
and third saerabers lis r.usGsrlcally respectively between 
if arsd S tijsee the nunitsum valus of the ratio of the 
equivalent focal length of the? objective to the f~ number 
of the objective is the ran^e of variation tmd between 
5 and 10 tiasa such minltsu.m ratio, the divergent movable 
second Seisber consisting of a divergent simple meniscus 
component with surfaces convex to the front followed 
by a divergent compound oompooent and performing So. ring 
the ranye of variation a total axial movement lying 
numerically between l>5f^ 2-5f-»* whilst the 
divergent .movable third mettber consists of a doublet 
component having a front ;:.urf aoe concave to tr,c front 
with radius of curvature lying numerically between 0.5£„ 




Several specific examples of optical objectives 
as sbovs i'ies'cri'.bed will be giv:-:n later on in this 
specification, and a table •A-iil fee found after- the 
first example, together with an ac soups eying 
explanation showing the effect of varying those 
parameters for which ranges of variation ere given in 
tne preceding jar® graph within tne rangsa specified in 

and "rear", as used herein, relate respectively to the 
sides of the objective nearer to and further from the 
longer conjugate in accordance with the asusi convention. 

In addition^ the term "total axial movesssnt" 
is iised to refer to the total distance csovsd by a raesbsr 
daring goosing frosi one end of the range to the other, 
Independently of the direction of movement. Thus, a 
©eaibcr may move forward said then back <iur ing the rangs 
of variation, arid in this; esse the total axial raoveoent 
is the numerical sum of tuts forward ciatanee sieved plus 
the rearward distance moved. 

It should slso b« made clear thsst the t,«rnt 
"internal contact", when used in connection *i£h a 
co-npound e opponent, is intended 'to include, not only a 
cemented contact, hot oiao what is commonly known as a 
" broken contact", that is one in which the two contacting 
surfaces have slightly different radii of curvature, the 
effective radius of curvature of ooch a broken contact 
being the arithmetic raesn between the radii of curvature 
of the individual contacting surfaces, whilst tne optical 



the optical powers of the individual contacting surfaces. 

The character is. fries ot trxs -■ovable eeoo.id. and 
third members above specified contribute towards keeping 
5 the overall dimensions of the objective as small as 

possible and achieving the best compromise between the 
disasters and the relative apsrtares of the individual 
^sabers of the objective, and also permit the front 
nodal points of the second and %n±v$ jaessbers to be 

possible, not only to accommodate the deeired tsovemems 
of the members without risk of fouling between the 
members ssn3 with mini sua increase in. the overall length 
of the objective, but also to achieve a good corappoaiiee 
15 between the c! is meters and relative apertures of the 

individual members , and at the Kaisie time to assist 
■ fy 1; wards the Scssired stabilisation of tns aberrations, 

r 

1 especially of spherical ac^rretiofi and corns, thrc-ii.du.ii.it 

a widely extended range of variation of the equivalent 
2Q focal length of the objective. 

/) „•> The compound co»i>on»»t in the divergent 

r/ ., 

movable second stecsbeP preferably 2 nexuses at least one 
convergent element ana st least one divergent slensent 

2g, sssade of materials whose Abbe V numbers differ from one 

another by more than 25, thus permitting such second 
member to be individually corrected for -chromatic 
aberration. 

For assisting towards stabilisation of 

30 astigmatism and distortion, the radius of curvature of 




7 



isay comprise a front meniscus doublet component *ith 
its front and pear surfaces scaicsve to the front followed 
bs r two simple convergent components, the front sisiface of 
the doublet component having dispersive optical power 
lying numerically between and 1.0/f ; , where f A 

is the equivalent focal length of tr 4 e first member." 
These features permit the rssr nc-;5al point of the first 
;:ie::;be r to be far to the re^r and preferably behind the 
rear surface of the member, for cooperation with the 
•for^srdly located front .nodal point of the second meiishar, 
£•) v The iaternal cor.ts.ct of the i&eniscue doublet 
component of the first, member my be dispersive ana 
convex to the front with rsSius of curvsfcure between, 
lnjif . a nd 3£ , , the difference between the Psan refractive 
indices of the as terials of ths two elements of such 
doublet component b^ing greater than 0.15« These 
features contribute towards stabilisation of spherical 
aberration and satigssatism over the desired focussing 
raoga to suit different object; rii stances. 
0)V ; Ths two s,i:si?le component:? of the f ir,st member 

may together nave a c cabined equivalent focal length 
between. G.J5£.^ sna 1. 25-f^, their front surDacee each. 

the front surface of the first of z-.ich ^iisple oomponatHs 

of curvature of "the front surface of the 'second of :?.uc'n 
simple components, which latter radius of curvature "ay 
in turn be greater than C...?5£.. . Tneee features asfcist 

y /:. ..." 

t ovva r d s ilnbiiif, i n g the ah err* t i ons, e s pec i a liy g ph e r ical 
aberration and astigssatieis, not only throughout the 



to the front with radius of 



Lie r&ngs cf fc-j<isaL":« aJ;.aott.'.fi:2s, unS also of pi-irr^v 
aaa. higher order astsigawtiss shj>cii snout the ranee of 
variation of equivalent focal length. 
B) ' ' _ TV sxial thickness of the seniseus dounlel 
<:ot.:.oiwrt- of tr.e fir.?r -f^cf na;/ he ls c -s i.h;ui :.. ?5f , 



g«st»!- thuf. 0.0?;.*^. Ti-.cae feutui>oo cor.-. ribu t o 
i:owar5s the desired resrv.-^vrJ locstio;j of the rear noral 
point of Use first ^eiAer. 

F)" ' t ,. ?he arithmetic :«ssu between th-s Abbe V numbers 
of the sBtsrials of the three convergent elements of the 
first aseaber my w, s & by a: xsast ZQ iha ;>htee V rubber- 
of the 3)ia- of if- l: ? Jlverj:&r.;. frosit silent of f.hi 



facilitating Individual correction, of the 
for ci-.rocis.tkc -;b'?rrci-,ivi:. 

G-.k^: ?h p e i v.i 1 e r.t f cc * 1. 1 s n ?; th f^ o 
setter my lie between 1.2 and 2«U times t. 
value of the ratio of the e«uivaleat faasl. length of 
the objective tc the f-nuaoer of the objective. This 
feature assists towMs keeping the overall dimensions 
of Uie ob ( l-?c iivs alijo ' h{- rei.'tive &;xv:uz* of t-he 

first ;n<-i~; ; .er a;j srisll as; pos;.;: ihl% . 



B)/<} If desired, an achromatic doublet component raay 

be provided, which can be placed at will behind the re«r 
Bi&mber of the objective to increase the value of the 
equivalent focal length of the objective by a chosen 
ratio throughout th« range of variation. 

2n all the arrangements aceoramg to the present 

objective to as stationary and to be located behind she 
soys hie third member of the objective. 

Sot&e ccv-ejuent practical examples of soon 

objective according to the invention are illustrated 
diagrams tics ily in the accompanying drawings, in which 

■ Fi^urel?: 1 j 4 :^::fcceot.t veiiy illustrate four 
examples (Figure 4 being ok half the seals of Figures 

. Pij.-.r:?* ? v i shoa uhe exar^le of ?i 6 ure 1 t in 
skeleton for»} modified by the addition respectively of 
!.wo altsrt:- ';ive ■:■ one tru<r; ions ;f nehx'Ov;- t; 0 acublet 
component dataehsely mounted behind the rear member of 
the objective, and 

7 Isj E:fi .ixlaJ section ■..'jrcii ; -h a leas 
mount having suitable zoom control element for use in 
carrying oat tlse invention. 

Numerical data for these six examples are given 
in the following tables (numbered correspondingly to the 
figures of Lhe drt-v.-ir^s) , in synich H, , >y w designate 
the radii of curvature of the individual surfaces of the 
objective counting from the front, the positive sign 
indicating that the surface is convex to the front and 



their mthematicsl significance. This sign eonroatloi 
agrees with tiie mathematical el en convention required 

the prisma*:/ aberrations, *>«t different satbemat 
c.sm^iu ! oriis ,sre rft-uired for- othsr i-j.r^o,?.';s 
computation or some of the t- ee otO s ry aberrations, so 
that a radius indicated for example a a positive in ths 
tafclss my h-v& to be touted »£, r»?g<}t.ive for io;iis 
calonlat xonz i» well urrfisrs; i;roa in the -^rt. 



three members* 

la the i-ollowing table: 

T„ is th> to r^tncKt ef Ice ---'"J.^ rwiri^r ; 

- Xj tr.r t-<-3l t 2 ',<?"<- .t or" -rt- t ^ \, « 

- K is t o tiKmu-u," ^jlv>ts i_- • k u*^ ot t:.^ ices 1 

cr -„\e c<-r.etf >J'^? i,o f->i -ra 1 ^ £*; 

- L .o r : ov„x\s"U la; f^cT tv< „t „: trie 

is Vv^ .--xi-ir ■*,(,(' . ■'(, f l~ 

U 

- ^ , i^c i 'or, i <, ,4 th^ J; id 'titer. 



"ST-aisjif- 1 tie £i.c*ri l^e^l t: th*- "■< 5 -I'*« 3) e 

is put &<3usi to the lows? limit itut > or toe mam claim 
and in Ame 3 eaual to ths u»»er liaut \»it). in lines 



I 1 . i_ r^t i villi" - t o v. \" 

^ccmilef-el,! ir. le: s-iceir li >no ^.nct^er \ T r.i- ij rrf'rre i 

so that the range of variation of 



; t 



-17- 



1<~C^ It 6 * If 



. f lis. .5 



^ - i \ 1a I " n s t<~n or 

i u* 1 * o <"" - t i L i t 

svsrage x or mat aitsensxons. 

In line the siTeot of ptittiRK 3?, to its 
lower limit is to reaugp I, %cA J, h\ n , and *\. sr* 
also rsducaa , insanity tast eocii iruUviaasI ssembo** ass a 
vvider relative aperture. Because of their wither relative 
sferrare:-. , t.^ei e i;;<H?ihsr;> would have ':o be nore conii.-i?? 
t contain snore unable trie* lens £mvtingt<e r±) t/ian *.hey are 



xitv rouil be ^ccervsble fo« .'con: objective 
built to a s lie II c?imens.lo:ii.i r-osle cover in,:; mH J"-,^:- 
format di^ensicns. Soeh * e;: : o11 sc* le ocas tract ion 
would readily be possible in view of the reductions in 
L snci D. Therefore, a goom lens -si thin the scope of 
the saics claim, vrlnh ? 3 ,n or wsr its lower ltais, 
would be preferred for a lens of wider relative aperture 



relative aperture of th& third mmbsr either pe: 
its complexity to he ?*d--w.<x> or, mere usefully, 



of sberrntion eorrectio 



modifications of lines ? to y. 

(fore, it can readily fee seen 



fposa the table how the parameters of the main claim can 
hi-, taken to their end limits to provide differing effseU 
suited to differing initial retirements, The leas 
designer given the mix*, claim and having a particular 



1.0U8) in line 2 i 



The table also a era 
limits. For example, to take F f . below the value of 
decrease L and X> 

and further widen the relative apertures of the second, 
thii'd and fourth members. Obviously a f.«nestion of 
opinion is involved at this point, hut the opinion of 
the investor is that, the con.plejcity of construction f«t> 



lue of ;>.,0( iVJ 
• a practical cc 



n lir.s 1 t jx 



R 11 

K 13 
r :.l 
R V 

*1S 

»*> 







■ .a i t) 
















» 


0 . 20Ii+ 




+ 


















C .5. -58 






i • 3 ! ; f >7 


-2 












0 1 


s 


0.001+5 






1 & . 233'; 














r '3 
























; v: 
























D :> 




c 






•,- 










+ 


?o^7 


i!. 




v-.r: 3 ~: 














_ 


















3 S , 


* 


0*5178 






















C .OVli; 












C.3C/6 


= 






< 
















^.07"".', 






2. 


"5 
















- .v 






i . ii.-:. : 


y 










3 .c 








+ 


„,..-. j ;v 


















varlabl 






10.00^3 














"II 




v>.i>7>7 








s ; 




U,00«.5 






2.68U1 














D i> 




























0.0^5 
































s 































1 .7-.. 7 

1.51 s : 07 



i.;-h:s 



J i3 



.- - c.2<:l i.-r*-.. 1 

S,, * 0.00i + 5 

R„ = - -.,^70 

26 D., = C.330U I.613U2 

R... : B - s.76?0 - [ " 





*1 
R .. 

*; 


W1^2 


i.7.*. : 


H u 
: *3 




li'i . y J 


"ft 

R.. 


mOoo? 




k g 


:>.I161 




"10 

"11 


5,iOJ£ 

.crv 

2.;<.v:5 








2 ; : . . " 


H, t . 
' ».-> 


I.17"l 

1.1. -:-7 


. -o 




:.. 


. .-0 




l..:110 


?" 


V. 


1 . r s6~, 2 








..?? 


B , 
;? 27 


; .. s :n 










,H, 5 





2.' 



ifi td 1c Tf ■ fS-- '•' 





3. A .^ >" 








1."'. 


»<. 










, . - H 




",x > /" 














r — 


- 








^nation tor 


ft spheric s-v 









Jt - + ^7.90553 ~ ST ~ 0.0X666805 / _ + 0.020108^3 / 

^ 0.00 17 63m 6 - 0,00533^20 £ iC 



6- ' 



1.5S156 



1,1076 



1.00000 
1.7782? 



5.62339 
10.00000 



0.00 
0,25 
0.50 
0.75 
1.00 



0.CSL26 


6 .36 327 


I,807'0ii 


1,0000c 


0.0 


2.79513 


3-S19S5 


3.. 935*56 


1.77327 


0.2?; 


kM5k 


1.50SU1 


1.8S86U 


3.15237 


0.5 


6.3S837 


C.ijOsSS 




5.6233S 


0.75 


7.UX77U 






10.00000 


1.0 



Station for ^^erle^ surface 
X = + 3^9463 - /l5. 57328 - ^ + 0.004?7020 ^ 
? - 0.00777096 + O.007216S3 % li 



I is 



corrected for a relative aperture f/U-O, 

J/ 2.8, and Sxaaple IV is corrected for s relative 
'aperture of f/l.£. Samples II and III differ from 
one anothsr solely in th» fsta tiosiary rear aseisber l^, the 
front th:>e« raeabers L,, L P end t- 0 bexr..; ii-s.vfcisal ia th* 



Example I in the ratio of the £-nujsbers, that is in the 
ratio of L.V?,i, T - ~'r ^ < * j 1^ N I 

I-'q of Example IV, which includes yet g 



alternative 



general type as tnose of Examples I r II J, but their 
numerical dimensions differ somewhat from .3 version of 
those of Sxample I scaled up in the ratio 4*0/ 1.6* 

All these s»: ancle.-? cover a ^enu-anpuli r fl«:Id 
of view trying frosn 2? degrees at P,_. to 2.? degrees at 
F ;1 ,. 

The iris diaphragm In all four examples is 
stationery is locateo between tns movable third 
member L„ and the stationary rear meraber L^. In. 
Example i t.se lUc-hr^f. O.C;f,?.5 I-' o :n iYo-it of the 

tne diaphragm is 0*G*?29 .? In front of the surf see 

0 -1,7 

end has aiasaetser 1.3240 F t in Sxaraple III the diaphragm 

is O.I175 ¥' )..■: fr ■■>::• t of i.he su rf:i<:t: 3-,^ fcnd h&3 diameter 

/. 0 1( 
l,22i4.0 ? : and in Sxarcple IV the 6iap>;r&,<-S! is 0.2407 3? 

< s 0 

in front of she surface R-^y and, has diasEteter 2 » 1446 F Q » 
the becSc focal distance irons the rear surface 

of the objective to she iiiujge plane is 2,8301 F Q in 

Sxample X, 2»6?61 F in Ssarxpl© 11, F in S^arrsole 

III and I.7878 P in Bxa:sple IV. 

The equivalent focal length f A of the stationary 

rirst saember is + 4.4551 S 5 in Sxajaole I, -;- 6.^644. P 
A / ■ o ■ 0 

in Examples II and III and + 11,1415 F 0 la S8x ample IV; 

the equivalent focal length t Ti of the movable second 

member L„ Is - 1,4703 F A in Sxsreple 1, - 2,1004 P in 

Examples II and III ana - 3.S770 P„ in Example XV; the 
e ^ 

equivalent focal length f~ of' the movable third eieaber -4c. 

is ~ 1*8176 P. in Sxsasple 1, - 2.51*66 F„ in Sxasipies 21 

f; 0 ' 2... ° 

end III and - 4»54i?8 F. in Example . IV } and the ©ouivalent 



doublet component of the first memos? Jj is 0.756 F ( 
in Sample I, l.G-h F" o in 5ynvrles IT and 111, and 
1.916 F in Sxample XV, or 0.172 f. in all four 
eissiples. The sum of the axial thicknesses of the 
ti»o simple components (E, + ts, ) of the rirgt member 



in, 3.^; %>.^?u tv. ,r r.i^ ^ m *u 

four examples. 

?ne ar - - tbr,-.s-tio tr^ar. bf-two^n the *hce V Asa n b ; «s 

of the materials of ;.he three ;r;/eat elements of 

r.h* firs;t member L ; in all four exa cries Is- "jO.y^ ;>n^ 
H / 

thus exceeds the Afcae V number of the materiel ' of the 

divergent front elensam; by 24.62* 

/■ . 

The maximum value of the re tic of the 

<? -^livslsnt foosl length of the objective' to t;ia f-- number 

cf the ^b;-2ct:ve i B ,2.5 ? c is ixr !..;,. U> 1, *.p7 F^ xr t 

":>"8:-.pi«s II snS. Ill, zr-ti 6p2o I'., in Sxus.rj-ie IV, so that 

in all four examples f-. is 1.782 tims such sssximeas -value 
" f ■ ■ 

la all four examples, tne mini muss separation 
b<;t.v.»en the ucvgbl? sec on. i t; ir-i r&:".:wsa ar.;: L p 

occurs whsn the equivalent foe si length of the objective 
is 7 ..-1+5 P , and the numerical values or the equivalent 
focal lengths £ B una i\, of such ^en:;:sr;; respective L.v 

5.88 and 7. 27 limes the minimum value of the ratio of 

*") if'" 

the eouivalent focal length of the objective to the 
£~ number of the objective* 

The movable second taesHber in all four 

component with its surfaces convex to the front followed 
by a i.lver-£ent triolet c Gnu-orient hi.vi.rij:; & conversant 



elements, «sad its total 



the range of variation is numerically equal to f. R . 
The front and rear surfaces Kg »nS :i y of tr.e & i R1 £e 
meniscus component of such member respectively na-e radii 
: ' ife I to i..?^ X\, aaci .-.S3 f'^ i.i 
the ::ror-.t av.il r&.-ir c.irf toes 
and R 13 of the triplet component respectively h&ve radii 
of curvature imraericsily eisal to 1.8S f Tj in Examples 
1 j- III sad 1.87 1 3 in Xxample IV and to 3-95 f ? in 

K n,l- | ul ( : _ - ~ n f f . 

consists of a aosfclet component, whose front surface 8^ 
is concave to the front with mains of curvature 
ly < 

[t 

is rvi-.Kri^ally e-u;,i to 0,;6; £ y 
H i5 of s,eh < 



-y equal to 0.72 f c , and the total 
the .numerical aura of ss initial t- 



;ive indices . 

C.OB? in Examples I i III iand 0.0 



raster iala of such doublet 

so::! -.one ah is 0.0 r i? in I 
L 

Example IV, the diffe: 
being 30.09 in SxaKples 1 £ III 8?i 30. 2U in Sxample IV. 

3!V »-ll i i = - - ' - N..* L , i.,, L (; 

throughout the rant/e of variation of c--; v&lont roc«l 
length of the objective and also ihroujiout the focussing 
sr :2K-::.b«r <erves t:; balance 



Thickness or Ssfraetive Abbs ¥ 
Air Separation Index Siumbiar 



3,- * O.U781 1.70055 3-0.28 tC 
a 5Q * - 2.0S20 *• 

« D, A « 0.0500 1.60^2 33.31 

H 0 - + 2.0920 A0 *„ 0 0.67U& 



of the equivalent focal length for the objective of 8.x s as pie 
X. In sseh table S v , re presents the air separation between 
the rear surface S. v ... of th* statioiwr? recr a^b^r of 
Sxanple I and the front surf see or the aaaed doublet 
component. The doublst eomsoneat in each case consists of 
a convergent element in front of a divergent element. 

The added doublet component l, g of Example V 
increases the valuer of the ©-aiv-V.l.- f nt foc*i ler^tn in ;.hs 
ratio ^:2, so that the norssal range from P Q to 10 i?' 0 is 
altered by the doublet cos»;ooneat into a rat$Ke froas 1.5 ? 0 
to 15 F 0 . The doublet component of Sxsmple VI acts to 



control element 0 end fcurcoa&ins the seccrA ana third 
ti.e^cei'S M feud H, 'xf-'ich are risld &£?tinst rotation 
rel&tively to the fixed casing ? of the objective. 

:-?fr?sctTd iinr. er the r:>r.'. rc-1 c.t s f oca i ,7 csr.tr si 
eletrieiit 0 f^y &o<intir. ft ' th? front rmj.-iNsr In screw threaded 
engagement with the fixed casing ? of the objective. 

examples have been given by way of example only arsd that 
Use inversion cars ha carried irito practice in other ways. 



of the type having relatively movable members whereby 
the equivalent focal length of ~he objective can he 
com U\u?Aisly vari.*- - i throughout r&r..f;'?, ■.-.'!. ilt.t jv.s - : p.tn ir. 
constant, position of the Asasge plane), corrected for 
spheric&l and chi'osatlc aberrations, cqss, astig^tis^, 



5V 



0/ 

fr~ 20 




In o t ; *, ->t t 



30 ty. 




L 



DECLARATION^ PETITION AND POW ER OF ATTORNEY 




of °f -foclj^t- and residents 




^ — ^^^-,,v^...,^.i.:,.^:..;.-„,..^ — ^ — ^ — f.»-ri.irj',,.v.; — ; — 

of. Fi itttshirt 1 , Jv^JLei? , united Kingdom, 
respectively; thav we' "nave read the foregoing specification 

and claims, that we verily believe ourselves to be the 
original, first and joint inventors of the improvement 
in "^^:A^ i| 0prFc\':7zS || C-r v^ta-cf, ^vivalfa't ?ocal 
described end claimed in the foregoing specif lest ion; that 
this application in part dieclOBea and claims subject rastter 
disclosed In our earlier filed pending application Serial 
No. 3 CO, 20 -8 i| 3 filed fVp tether 16, l a ;>l... , that as to 
to subject ttvattei* of this application which Is common to 
said earlier application we do not know and do not believe 
that the same was ever known or used before our invention 
thereof or patented or described in any printed publication 
in any country before our invention thereof or more than 
one year prior to said earlier application, or in public 
use or on sale in tne United States mora than one year 
prior to said earlier application; that said cojnmon subject 
matter has not been patented before the date of said 
earlier application in any country foreign to the United 
States on an application filed by us or our legal representa- 
tives or assigns more than twelve months prior to said 
application; and that the earliest application for patent 
on said invention filed by us or our legal representatives 




or assigns in any country foreign to the United States was; 
Ore at Britain - Ho. 35-083 filed Pent . 14 , lt>C? 

that as to the subject matter of this application which 
is not common to said earlier application, we do not 
know and do not believe that the same was ever known or 
used before our invention thereof or patented or described 
In any printed publication in any country before our 
invention thereof or more than one year prior to the date 
of this application or in public ubo or on sale in 
the United States more than one year prior to the date 
of this application, and that said subject matter 
has not been patented in any country foreign to the 
United States on an application filed by us Or our legal 
representatives or assigns more than twelve months prior 
to the date of this application; and that no application 
for patent on said invention has been filed by us or our 
legal representatives or assigns in any country foreign 
to the United States. 

And we declare further that all statements 
made herein of our own knowledge are true and that 
all statements made on information and .belief are 
believed to be true; and further that these statements . 
■were made with the knowledge that willful false 
statements and the like so made are punishable by 
fine or imprisonment, or both, under Section 1001 
of Tit la 18 of the United States Code and that such 
willful false statements may jeopardise the validity 
of the application or any, patent issuing thereon. 




And we hereby appoint HOLCOMBS, WSTKERXLL & 3RISEBQIS, 
a firm having offices at Suite '307, Crystal Plasa Building 
No, 1, 2001 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington., Virginia 
22202, Registration No. 17,3^8, our attorneys with full 
power of substitution and revocation, to prosecute this 
application ana to transact all buslnees in the Patent 
Office connected therewith. 

Wherefore «e pray that Letters Patent be granted 
to us for the invention or discovery described and claimed 
in the foregoing specification and claims, and we hereby 
subscribe our names to the foregoing specification and 
claims, declaration, power of attorney, and this petition, 

Ottiis fth day of -><x-* .„ t 1971* 

2} this __2nd day of June t 1971, 



?ost Office Address i 

fi^Stouahton Road , 0^- 
Leicestershire, Enp;lu 

,47, Me I j den. Road, 



tTen'ryij" 



Prestatyn, Flints., Wales, r.L Peter Artlold M erigold 



-3- 




15325* 

Case Doci^t No, 2252 . ■ 



mwi & B3ISE80IS 
i0|. CRYSTAL PLAZA SU1LDSKS £BQu « 
ISSOS DAVIS iflSM . juke u, 1971 

■S, VIRGINIA 22202 { 
(703) 521-1550 



THE COMMISSIONER OF PATENTS 
Washington, B.C. 20231 



■ Transmitted Iravwstfc lor filing is riw patent application »f 

inventor: ' fOKBON HENFK COOK & PETER ARNOLD MERXGOLD 
For; GH?ICAL OBJECTIVES OF VARIABLE EQUIVALENT FOCAL 

This application Is a continuation In part o£ SN 309*208 1 
Enclosed are: - 



SL 



_ sheers or drawing 2 sheets *i*Qvm6l & 1 sheet fomal 



S to ass^t of th* to %*HE RAKK ORGANISATION LIMITED 



□ A certified copy of a .„„„„„„.„■ 
Associate power of attorney. 







NUMHEN Ffi,£D 


NUMBES EXTRA ; RATS 










27 -to. 




34,00 


l»iOSP|N06NT 


£ .«» 


I 




10.00 ' 




129.00 


ylgnment 



i J Please charge my Deposit Account No ; in the amount of 

j ■ A duplicate copy of this sheet is enclosed. 

jftj The Commissioner is hereby authorized to charge any additional fee's which may 

be required, or credit any overpayment to Account No. Qff-g7i?Q ; , . 

A duplicate copy of this sheet is enclosed, 

GD A check in the amount of A.lgSit.fift to cover the filing fee is enclosed. 



fOs« f>0.)i|I ti.»« 



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6^1 CAL OBJECTIVES OF 
VARIABLE ES8UVALKMT 



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r this form, RE SURE TO AOOBtSS 



THE GROUP ART UNIT iHOWN AiJOVi. 



si 



1955 



Qt-f! Q 10 ?5 

ems! b 

In re implication of December ^ , 19 '71 

GT^ON -ttHiy '0?V ~t P 
Sfriil Mo l~ s ^ 
^3„M Jtne 11, i<,7i 

FOCAL LFA'QTH 



Hon, Commissioner of Patents 
Washington, t)X. 20234 

Sir: 

Responsive to the enclosed letter, please transfer 
from the file of the parent application, SM 309,203, filed 
September 16, 196?, ( new ? abandoned) , the too sheets of drawings 
in that case. These correspond to the two informal prints in- 
itially filed with the above -entitled application. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HOLCOMBE, WETHERXU, & BRISSBOIS 



5^ 



J. K. Corbin 



2001 JEFPERfuN C*vli> 

Smite 

AffLlM^TON* V;.. ;Z2C^ 



This application has bm etotedned. 



A SHORTENED STATUTORY PERIOD FOR RESPONSE TO THIS ACTION IS SET TO EXPIRE 
JCh.t£,,£«, MONTH(S) &A¥fr FROM THE DATE OF THIS LETTER. 



PART I 

Tho lollinvtng attacftnov &\ 3 part oi th is acton 
a [fe'Vfu.c ct Rcfcr-necs Ct'rd Form P-C 8^2 t ™ N-t!.; ■ f lnUa.a< Pa tut Draw POO ft 

c. Cli Nosx-e of Informal fttt*nt Aoplwatton. d O 

Form PO-152. 

PART II 

f Summary of Action 

1 j& Ch.tm / -prf,in"d£orcmmm«HMi 

2 CI Clmm _ (re ■)!<< *cj 

3. Q Claims would be nttowabte if amended as indicated. 

! j£3 Ck«m } ~- 2~~7 arer'iected 

9, O Claims — _ _ are obsected to. 

6. Claims are subtest to restriction or election requirement. 

1. C3 Claims _■ we withdrawn from consideration. 

* Miki wis W lt 1 » r 11 ">n-s f K n itmdi ir»» tr tl o*wcc -vp for iomM matters, proS't-jf if v to tin 
me-mis fus,\i in i< l jrditn. > « t 1 ) i.v pi vt iv urukr £\ j. rf- Q i-yft IfrrO II I UG _H 

v 1 S11 <.(. ( at ^1 i '! 4' a ie, u,m.oi » th npp'ic t t -cp 
irom the dare of this letter. 



> pape is tuicvr (,v_ W> u-hdi r 



- th f i tertifid cf^ ■>» t^ur" 1 I j ^ t Sr !iS lias n 



Serial Ho, 152, 25** 

Art Unit 359 



-2- 



& separate letter to the Draftsman for cor- 
recting the curvature of to show that It is slightly 
convex to the front, as submitted in the parent case, 
should be submitted in the present case. 

The Yamaji, Harris et al, and Klemt et al 
patents are cited to show the state of the art. 

Claims 1-2? are rejected under 35 UJS.C, 112, 
first paragraph, as based on a disclosure which fails to 
establish the validity of the numerical ranges for cer- 
tain of the lens parameters, The numerical embodiments 
in the specification clearly do not support the validity 
of the ranges. Further the explanation in the specifi- 
cation, pages 16-20 3 falls to explain most of the 
ranges set forth in the dependent claims * The explanation 
on pages 16-20, however, does appear to establish the 
truthfulness of the ranges in parent claim 1 except for 
the one in the last two lines. The reasoning set forth 
in In re Cook and Merigold 169 USK?. 298* m & especially 
as set forth on page 303 is applicable to the last 
range In claim 1 and those in the dependent claims. 

Allowable subject tnatter is consider present 
in the disclosure. 



J, K. Corbin:vgr >^' 7 ^ ^ * 

703/557/3107 / JOHN K. GORSiN 

5-16-72 v EXAM NEB 



GROUP ART UNiT 259 



5-S 



0 SEPARAT' HOLD TOP ABO BOTTOM EOfiES* SNAP- APART AH* -.'"^RO CARBO* 

ATTACHMENT TO WtTR NO. V" 



fiOTiCe Of REFERENCES CITES 



PATENT NO, 






CLASS 


cuts 




1 


13 


{5 




7 


r 




5 






35b 








3 


0 




5" 


3 








,5 (z C «/ {'j 


35<3 














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5 






i^.l.^.HrtC &f~ &■/{'/ i 




J euzL. 






































































































































































































3^ ^^/J^>4^i □ 



ri D- PATENTS 



BOLCOKBS, WgfHgRIU. & BRISSBOIS 
S0ITS 307 

cmst&L plaza mm. 

2001 JgFFSSSOfi CAVIS HtfY. 



CJPflCAL OSJgCTIVSS OS' 
VABiABLS SQJJIVALSST 
?OUt L&WTH — 



NOTICE OF INSUFFICIENT f'EE AND / OR 5 Sf FORMAL DRAWINGS 

CorectitM of the informality checked be'-ow is mad red. 

APPLICANT IS GJV£N TWO (2} MONTHS WITHIN WHICH TO SUB.Mil THE FORMAL DRAWINGS AND / OH. FEE 
to avnidabiinctrarcment of tiia application. 



A balance of s 



•issed in this appiicali 
>f eiiditinnal claims. 



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u!e 8<f together with I he c 



t> are f equi red, 
'the Psfent Office doe 



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UP 250 $ 



IH THE UNITED STATES PATEN? OFFICE 

In re application of b'ovet"Ser 6, 1972/ 

SORDO.KT HENRY COOK et al ^ 

Serial No. 152 ,55'! Or, Art Unit 259 

Filed June 11, 1971 ^ ^ 

For: OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OP V API ABLE ff^S~J^- 

EQUIVALENT FOCAL LENOTH Exr, J. K- Corbin 



. Commissioner of Patents 
Washington, D.C. 20231 

Sir: 

Responsive to Official Action mailed August *t , 1972, 
please amend ths above-entitled application as follows: 

Claim 1, next to last line, cancel "with radius" and 
substitute a perloa; 
cancel the last line. 
Claim 2, line 5> cancel "whose" and substitute —of 

differing—; cancel "differ by more • 
^than 25". 

Cancel Claim 3- 

Clalm $ r"line iTcancel "3" and substitute —2—; 

line 3s cancel "with radius of" and substitute 

— and — ; 
cancel line * ;""* ^ 
at the end of line 5 insert a period; 
cancel lines S^arid 7. 



Claim 5 > line >i, cancel "the materials of the elements 
of" and substitute a period; 
cancel lines nclusive. 
Claim 6, at the end of line 3 insert a period; 

cancel lines l*-8 inclusive. 
Claim 7, line 3 ? cancel "with radius of" and substitute 
— and— ; 
cancel line ^ ; *"""'" 

at the end of Una 5 insert a period; 
cancel lines 6 and ?. 
Claim 8-7~"at the end of line 3 insert a comma; 
cancel line 4 ; 
line 5, cancel "and 

line 6 /"after "having" insert — differing — ; 

cancel "which differ by more than"' 
line 7, "^cancel "25"; after "and" insert 

— differing — ; cancel "which are each 

greater" and substitute a period; 
cancel the last line. 
Claim 9, line 3, cancel "with radius of" and substitute 

— and-- ; 
cancel line it; 

>^ 

at the end of line 5 insert — front, — ; 

^- ^ 
cancel llnes6 and 7. 

Cancel Claim loC"" 

Claim 11, line « , cancel "the materials of the elements 

"V 

cancel line 5; 

line 6't^cancel "by less than 0.15 fvrm one 
another" ; 





Claim 11 5 line 6, cancel "l.S?" and substitute — 1.69—; 

last line, cancel "by at least 2*5". 
Cancel Claims 13 and \h, 
Rewrite Claims l&"~and 17 follows: 




— (Amended) An optical objective as claimed in 
Clain/'i?^ in which the doublet component constituting the third 
member has a collective internal contact convex to the front 
with radius of curvature [lying numerically between 0-5f c and f^J 
substantially equal to 0.72f c , the materials of the two elements 




of such component having Abbe V numbers which differ by [more 
than 25] about 30 and mean refractive indices which are each 
greater than [1.65] 1JS£ and differ by [between 0.05 and 0.15] 
about 0.09.7/ 

■flfaft. (Amended) An optical objective as claimed in 
claim I, in which the doublet component constituting the divergent 
movable third member has a collective internal contact convex to 
the front with radius of curvature [lying numerically between 
0.5f_ c and f\J substantially equal to 0.7?f ci the difference 
between the mean refractive indices of the materials of the two 
elements of such component [lying between C.05 and 0.15] being 
about 0.09 , [whilst] While the difference between the Abbe V 
numbers of such material? [exceeds 25] is about 30. 7^ 




Claim l$r"line 35 ,-~"cancel "with radius of" and sub- 
stitute a comma; 
cancel line 36 r" 

line 39/ciancel ; 'has dispersive optical 

power" ; 
cancel lines 40 and hi. 

-3- 





Claim 20, cancel line if, and, substitute —to the front. - 

cancel lines 5-12 Inclusive. 
Claim 21 ^ line **, cancel "made of materials" and sub- 
stitute — } and the—; 

cancel line 

line 7, cancel "with" and substitute a period; 
cancel lines 8-12 inclusive. 
Claim 22, cancel line 3 and substitute — together — ; 

line 4, cancel "between Q.75£ A and 1.25f^, 
and" ; 

line 7, 'cancel "less than Htj. and"; 
line 9 /"cancel "which latter radius" and 

substitute — the rear — j 
cancel line 10 ; 

line 12, cancel "with radius of- curvature" 

and substitute a period ; 
cancel the line. 
Cancel Claim 23 - 

Claim Saline 3, cancel "less than 0.25f A and"; 

line 5, cancel " , such sum in" and substitute 
a period ; / 

cancel lines 6-10 inclusive. 
Rewrite Claim 27^3 follows: 

—^fj^i Amended) An optical objective as claimed in 



claim In which the internal contact of the meniscus doublet 
component of the first member is dispersive and convex to the 
front with radius of curvature [between lof^ and 31^3 sjjhjtan- 
tlallj' equal to 2.0*lf A , the difference between the mean refractive 



Indices of the materials of the two elements of the doublet being 
[greater than Q. 151 substantially 0 . 27 *p » 



60 



RgMABKS 



The criticized range In the last two lines of Claim 1 



has been eliminated, sinee the approximate curvature of the 
front surface of the third member may be decucecl by a skilled 
lens designer to lie within this range, once he has been given 
the basic information contained earlier in the claim. 

The dependent claims have likewise been amended to 
eliminate unsubstantiated rangeB. 

The required letter to the Official Draftsman is 
attached hereto. 

Since none of the references were applied to the claims, 
the application is now presumed to be in condition for allowance. 

Respectfully submitted, 
GORDON KE>3RY COOK et al 



521-1550 
JPBrgw 




J os,e»h V . ' 3rl 3 eb oi s S a £ . 1 5 , 9^5 
T50LC0MBE, WBTHEP.TLL 5 BRTSEBOIS 



-5- 



CI 



*mm p. & 

now m 

IN THE 'JUTTED STATES PATENT OFFICE 

re application of November 6, 1972 
OORtiON HEN?Y COOK et al 

Serial No. 1=52,25*1 Gr.Art 'Jnit ? e i9 
Filed June 11, 1971 

Tor: OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OP VARIABLE 

"QUI V A LEST FOCAL I^NGTH Fxr, f. K . Corhlti 

LETTER r -0 OFFICIA L DRAFTSMAN 

Ron. Commissioner of Patents 
Washington, D.C. 20231 

Sirr 

Please correct the surface ?t„ In each of Figures 1-6 
to show it as slightly convex to thy front, as Indicated in re-d 
on the attached prints s and charge the cost of this work to our 
Miscellaneous Account No. 08-3720, Order So. 5~<. 

Resoectfully submitted, 
00JO0>! HEKBY COOK et al 



521-1550 *y <V V Z. '_/"*t' 

JThgw J?feeph P. Briseboia Heg.15 ,?6f 

KOL^OMRE, WrT!)?^ILL & BP.IS2BCIJ 



CORRECT 





63 





in S<?p!y Pk 


aw defer To Th» Foilowmg; 








J. K, Corfcin 








June 11, 1973. 




152, 25 t 










Gordon Henry Cook et 


al 












OpriCAL OBJECTIVES OF 
ESUIVALSM i^OOAL LSNC 


VARIABLE 
TH 



AUnr-ekS. GnV CCHVM SSIONkR OF "STENTS 
Washington, D,C. 80231 



fHoleomfce, Wether ill, & Brisebois ] 
2001 Jefferson Davis Hwy,, Sulfee 30? 
^Arlington, Va, 2220=; | 



i=- 1972 



Plaase find faniow a communication from the EXAMINER in charge of fhis appficati 



CHANGES AND/OR ADDITIONS TO THE APPLICATION RECORD MADf BY THE 
EXAMINER UPON ALLOWANCE 



This application is in condition for alio wanes and the following changes have been meda therein by ?hs 
Examiner. Should the change* be unacceptable to applicant, sn appropriate amendment may be pro - 
posed after the Notice of Attantanee has hem received, as provided under Rule 312. To ensure 
consideration of sucfi an amandrreflt, it most be submitted on or before remittance of itte Sssse Issue Fse. 



PROSECUTION ON THE MERITS IskfcpSED. & NOTICE OF ALLOWANCE WfLL BE MAItED M 
DUE COURSE. 



i patentable thereover. 



In line 8 of 5 
sertad after "1963" ♦ 



; abandoned— < been In- 



J. K, Corblntaas 

703/557/3107 
11-17-72 



^ JOHN K, C088IH 
GROUP ART UNIT 259 



mm msv. wot 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Patent Office 



NOTICE OF ALLOWANCE 
AND BASE ISSUE FEE DUE 



Trie a ip'if nf'on identified fcefow rws been e>urnned tsna k und oi oA'tiblf fat :suci>xe ot Letters Pctt&it 
Jki-lL'.Il LjZIS* L_22 Lcr^ia _ 



I * i local length j 

Tie cdmaiete Issus* f c i ji a hirt<rB3 Jj <jr t$ O -1 ! pk * dolto s {$,!' <✓ e'j«i theft jf <ti iw <■ 
ail'ors 'S'C, <ar cots ft pi* ) page f s^scif ».ut ot ( iJja i(j c unci' 1 ct nf o i t L *retf 

tSSl'E TEE cm .t.ng t l ia fef for 01 ninq fi a'ft s' prqs <jt ^, ec * IC --iHt n ($10 (, M if fs« if t%1l f " so' 

r a rjj\Je-J o th* fee t V V) pj j its pc <i w * i i'i *»jwi^t lorn j v f* of • JUU'l cr th " c 

sS-.utl b» reaorded qs ABANDONED. 

bsing cuthorijtfd. POL-B5C sfcouid *!*o be torworded. ^ 



A Net e ->f Salon'p ot 's-iie F'e Du-e wiH bff mi- r ;c ^etSsr a«h t oqciteifse copy jl rhe patent f <>i 0 .J f i 
> rite Sftywn nitit dc i-odf. m h « ti ae , v r il i (tie oof* st^vsi" i <i c Notice <u » F*' U»t "O FM 
TH « BOUNCE AiTH M I -\l TiViE SPiONfcO A L J£b It lit vVSE OF THE WENT 



Eolcombe, ttatheT.il 1, fit at 
2001 Jefferor. Davis Hwy. , 

Suite 307 

Arlington, Va. 22202 _J 



IMPORTANT 

ATTENTION 5S DIRECTED TO RULE 334 
REVISED NOVEMBER 4, ) 969, 

THE PATENT Wilt ISSUE TO APPLICANT 
UNIKS AN ASSIGNEE )S SHOWN IN 
IT5M 3 ON FORM POL-^Sb, ATTACHED 



PATENT OFFICE COPY 



BEST COPY 




IRTO.UTi ^OfiJMSYPS P."1kChKj 



C6/U/7I 153254 [ 



j Corb ta 



i MUST b* .ho-S^ 



.■..xx.:- •- s . 



mxixa 2m* to, mi alb 



<4x^ - 



r 



THS RAKK ORGANISATION LTKRESS , 7 J 
Ciii.ii.Zi. 

) AODfcESS: iCityJ. 5«ate of Country! 03/1 5 fj 3 

London 3 England 



,15,2 751 



uq.oc'tk"" 

50 00 C< 
6 ,30 Cr<. 





IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 

In re application of March 9, 1973 

GORDON HENRY COOK et al AX Id, Jan. 10 ,1973 

serial No. 152, 25 ^ Final Fee Pd. Mar. 9 ,1973 

Piled June 11, 1971 Gr. Art Unit 259 

For: OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OF VARIABLES 

EQUIVALENT FOCAL LEKOTH Exmr. Corbin 



CLAIM OF PRIORITY 

Honorable Commissioner of Patents 
Washington, D.C. 20231 

Sir: 

Applicants hereby claim the priority of their corres- 
ponding British application Ho. 35088 filed in Sreat Britain, 
September 14, 1962 by applicants' assignee HANK PRECISION 
INDUSTRIES LIMITED trading as THE HANK ORGANISATION RANK TAYLOR 
HORSQN D1V1S10M as is permitted oy British law } applicants oeing 
the true and first inventora. 

A certified copy of said British application is 

attached. 

Please note that this application is a continuation- 
in-part of application Serial No. 309,208, filed 
September 16, 1963. 

Respectfully submitted, 
GORDON HENRY CpOK et al 



521-1550 
dkf 




The Patent Office, 

25 Southampton Buildings, 




\ 



3 w v O O 

)i> 6 2 



rms £,r<\ck roi< on ice vsl onl y 

ACT, IMS 
appt rc v. ion t ox i'a i r;vr 

(To be a 



t oi !n .I'll* o. ice ^ 1 f 
ml, ' ft <! f -!fF 



dfs/ rs in j>os-. ;s=n »r of an ;r en <>b„'i ^ duenbui i.i the xc<*!ii~ 
& r ^ tr iV^ *r<* ^ 1 ™,d" .f <- tit e {««) ' . - 

a- T ' ' 

{h) (W&. 

■tUitm - be 'K: "t\ e »id I -i> a- Her -r>" ih<* ihvc 1 ion 
to w the trues «W i vtscv or of t* e jpvi Won 



)lN , ..«> uv 4w v f) 



ob^chOT t ^ iK. Runt o < j ututv w'juiuSv mpiicitk n -"iJ i 
ptvv ft il a p kti* n *r !v u i tied 'u t i'ui fo, t k ltd jp",^ Hto t 



{the prcmi to- be- yat t;rd t«5 rr^jpf c i+iorrNo 



6, And. 4, We request Ml nviue , leeuifcitum*. and cororram <"t- 
tion 1 ; rdatma to thii <ippV tioi ei <iy k. ^ent to ' „\ " > " 

r wt ff , s Ci) "vhc ^/'rc hcrei-\ . po >urd t ■> 'or <rte't » 
(WW PttEGlKON WDUKTitSE* U». 

„ ;<i - u * - N« 

Declaration u. be ^gn^d b> <. nyone iu nod a i \erif >r vs p.ul 2 is, mt Jn ppjft,:art 
i,W< a^ent k ths making if rhtc (tppheatiop. 



jAo Conipfnwfr r. 

T'ts jVfr '* O^re - /(juip'c B ii 'Ji if 



■NOflCE TO INVENTORS 



In such cases, 8ft« an application for a patent has been fifed as tlw Patent Office, fiic Coasptrelte 
'will cottier whether pub! Semi on or costs maniestbn of the invention ;.aoaici be prohibited or Kmktc? 
under Ssciion IS of the Act and wiff inform the xp|»!fe>nt tfsach prohibition is necessary. Applicant: 
<ii„ f<f m"i£.J t ii l " ■i v i ^ mi i , I s u v »% i„ i<\ ! i .i ' 

written permit or unless a;-; application iias been filed not less si.x v,«k"s previoisiy m the Unite 
Kingdom for s js&ient for ihe fasns iBvemion anc! no direction piohifcising pubitc«tion a. : " 
fion. has been givcB. 



70 



14 SEPT 1963 

3 5088 
1962 



te, LA>v i.-CJZl ,r X! lib*** » -L- tx-uU! «>f 

ae^l ^ tts i)fv«aticii if bf te -^i^ed a, > t'.c ioll^W 
statements ~ 




1. 



Shis invention relates to «m optical objective of tHo 
"zoom" type, that is of the t;Tt; hfw;.;';. rfcln^-iv^H' novnhto 
members whereby under the control of a 20 cm control elesiont 
tht* eqtiivslont foor.l Icnrth 0;.' -be abjective c.n b$ ocnt::)'u'-9u 
!y varied throughout 9 rsAf>e, whilst maintaini^s; constant 
position of the insets plans, uhersby th<» f3i?,e of the iisix&e 
oan. »« varied, Aceo^fiod&tiori for chop.f;<? of oivleot posit.! on 
ia usually achieved by lap art ^.f art ptftfitional movement to tfc 
front member of the- objective. 

?1any difficulties ariae in th^ of nvah objectives 

and one of the probl&wa feeing designers of tod^.y is to 
achieve an increased range of variation of equivalent food, 
length and> where possible, also an ixiorosiSfid « fibular ff.old 
of viev, Attonpts to ,-iohievs this mindly Involve tho was 
of relatively cosr 1 pIi?at.jd : ; iOv::.bIo senborrs in t[:c. object ?: v-(? is 
ordor to naki? .it poc.jifcXe it: oi^h EOVGhle u?JBb«'-rsi tcfat&M Vi.ee 1 
the aberrations thro-.^hout the ran#ft of variation, syoh 
stabilised aberration::; V;cn boii:;'; cc^roiujatsct in stationary 
roar member of the objective which also «srve« to locate tho 
resultant ie-age plane in a convenient position, fhla in 
tarn involves ths use of relatively large and hsji,vy movable 
Bombers and not only increases the bull'. tind si:;? of the com- 
plete objective, but also pref-oivfcs severe raechiaiioal problems 
in controlling the movements, ©specially 'bearing in mind 
that at least one of the movable members Kuat necessarily 
perform a movement bearing ? non-linear relationship ta the 
ssoveoent of the boots ooatrol elsasnt. ksny att&npts to oxten 
ths ran^a of variation of the tr^uivaic^l focal length hevs 
failed, bootiueo thuy ho,v<? desijTid&d departures- from linoas/iiy 



of &ovei»c-nt which arc impracticable soc^-jrilcaJJ.^ , j-iid c :.'trra 
too because thsy have involvcy an incre^o in rive toCLI: W'd 
size oi' the objective- to unmanageable proportions or have' 
introduced too novorc optical Oiffio.OLti ua in f.o'hi«Yitt£ 
aberration, c or re o t :'t on » 

Ono way o3? reducing the sscehanical complexities is oo to 
ayroago the oyoten thst the front ncr.bor do?r< not participate 
in tile aooiaing eoy3i>csit3 for varying tins equivalent focal 
loneth, so that this raerabcr Id concerned only with focussing 
moversojits and is relieved of t?.o ccmpli cation of anpei'i ^posing 
focussing raoYeaaxito on zaanznc -novencnts. Such on arrnn»";cnent 
la utilised in. tho present invention } v.'hcrein th=s pritaory 
object io to provide an iaprov&d &rr&nc©nent of the noynblo 
system of the objective, vhieh can b-> oiaployed vith various 
different arreiigeiacnts of the front cenbor an<.i v.ill coopcrcte 
therewith to osable aberration stability to be achieved 
throughout a widely extended range of variation of the equiva- 
lent focal length of the objective. 

The optical ob;scotiro of tho soon type according to the 
pX93cnt invention has four ue^bers of which the Cirat (count- 
ing -Croa tha front) for a yiven object di stance remains 
stationary during th& aooiuin,^ relative etovottenta, tho accent!, 
and third are divei-£;eafc and '.iOVablc, and the :Courth jta con- 
vergent and statior:&ry, the position of mininua aopar&tion 
between the second arid third KssibsrB occurring v;hen tho 
equivalent focal lencth of the objective is greater than half 
its E&xisnus value in ths r*s&e of variation, viiil&t the 
equivalent focal lengths f £ and f^ respectively of the Tri- 
able second and third Eciubers lie respectively between 4 and a 




-times tho jslnircua value of the- ratio of tho $ univalent focal 
length of the objective to thu i/uusber 01 tius -.-/ujcjetive in 
the range of variation and bevr/san ^ ana 10 tissoa iracn rcimurins 
ratio, tho cliverc«i*« movable- ?;cccnd luei^fcox ccnui sting of a 
divergent duple meniscus: consonant vitii its surfaces convex 
to the front- followed by a divergent cunpeuad component and 
perfornin£ during tLe r-.sr.4T: variation a tbtul axial £iC»yc— 
aeat lying bstveen l.Sfg and ;.:.pf^, vialst the tSivurecnt Mov- 
able third atcaber consists of a. doublet aoaponer-it having a 
front surfaco concave to tl.e front v;i1:L radius of curvature 
between O.Sjfg and 1*^£q * erf am a during the range of 
variation a total axial aovei.cn t lying between 0.25£,, 0.5f r 

It ia to be understood 't&afe the tevsta ".frost" and "rear" , 
as U£3t3d heroin, rolate respectively to the oicos of tho ob- 
jective nearer to mill further froiu the longer conjugate in 
aceord&aco with the usual convention. ■ • 

It should also be taade clear that the terti "internal 
"contact", when used in connection with « aoupoung component, 
is intended to include, net only a cemented contact, but also 
vhat is coaEionly hncfwn ao a "'broken contact's that is one in 
which the two contacting; surfaces have slightly different 
radii o£ curvature, the effective radiua of curvature of 
such a broken contact being tae arithmetic scan bo fcweca the 
radii of curvature or tha individual contacting Siurxaoea, 
whilst the optical power of the broken contact is the harmonic 
saeua between the optical powers of the individual contacting 
surface a. 

She characteristics of too isovable second n;ul third 
members above specified contribute towards keeping overall 



; as saaXX as poseiUe aobi arias: 
the host ooapro :io^ between Si* <1JL: -.v.-tors j^.; U>& x-al^iva 

al?o permit the frost nodjil ^olato cr the qcootA a:ai fcisu 
aessltors to bo IccntT-a a.? ir.x -?c;r-.v:s:\! pox.j.i.V'ic, i.Y.:;.: ..:J:ir 
it possible, not only to ncso'-^iUiio -ike fi^yir&u isoYCsr'caAo c£ 
tho sis/obors without rich at fouli i;: botvstm U;o poaborb una 
with aslalfflUB Increase 1a tHo overall lesgtii oi' the ofcjootlT*, , 




»* lo;ist on a oosvcv^snt elo.caot 
:..ooond x:u>; 'k:v to ho inaivi-Sually correlated 



5. 

75 



spherical aberration and corja* 

Whilot such compound eo&ponor.t nay rionrji.vst of « doublet 
component, It -anally be /.ro^orable £«!.' it to 'bo in the 

for?a of a triplet (jos^joneat having n convcr^ort element be- 
tv.'c-fjrt Iv:p diverge?! t oler-eato* £hir-» in viov/ oi* the limited 
availability of ou3 fcafclo sateriala for tho varloss elo.;eata f 
facilitates correction of cfcrostatlc aherrntiou and tho deeirod 
stabilisation of tho other ftbtrratS without gxcc^dAvo 
curvature of the individual suri'a'.'ft.^. 

l-ho avoidance of cscoirriva BUrfnoe curvatures ecu hIzo 
be assisted by employing £or ail the eler.ontc of the r.eoond 
■nember materials whose mean refractive incliceo ara greater 
thai* 1.65* whilst the tacan refractive indicc: of the material £; 
of the elements of the compound eerrror^nt in rnioh nctsbor So 
3io t differ fro» oo>t> si"; other by ssorc than 0.15* She arith- 
metic i:esa between tho Abbe V nunbore of tho- material o of 
tho divergent clercentp in the eeconfi rfe<nber r^eferefclY c.?ooede 
that of the eottY errant clement or ol e. .eats by at lonct 2J>» 
in order to ngaiefc iri oorroetin^; cuci ncssbor for chromatic 
aberration. 

She doublet coKro-Jient constituting the divrr;-ent ??!OV,-:ble 
third !H$.ber preferably iisa a collective intornr.l eontnot 
convex to the front wifcii rcuiiua of evrvnturu b<:tv»eon 

of the niaterials of the two el orients c?' such ccts-ponent 
lying between 0.05 end 0*15 » whiloi; tho difference between 
the Abbt5 V stobora of such materials exceeds 2% 
Thece features contribute tov/ardes tho desired 



ec ii t< J rrao J ^i ( 'r\<, M u i i t *. 1 , , u> or ^ t t ■> c 
p <.< a^c iti*<-<.v. <, v I.- a Li. Jik t. lm '.I t- 

V n."V£t t .< ,«u Ji 1M ( !, t,i £l >t, vv-wX ti 

* xll ix „i„,n, ^ii. i i oi t .a;.! i u c~ < 

t5C<J ^IjCtlt' > ! it li ii fce.U i. b tOUv iCi 8UO i. 

ij lif v. a >t Jt> ■>(. ^ w lx«+ ' tv, i t i U i1 j.* -i J u 

l./iyL.L lx t tlJ-Vl s , j.t,U s( Jt"li 1 C C C 1 X HI Iv 1 1 „ - 

k,t of t ' , gt ^ a, t, < i a , n ' ^ 1 

jloUsj. r i.nt i»i ILe liz^t me i v t, \<s l. c""il 

•tiers VvXtn uf ~ ixl„ L' r>a + t t r u + n ( 1 p >i» 1 oi 
eeoona weisser* 

in' liift u>abcr « >o <3\_„ tz\.iye £.* i ctrvej« -to Xion - * 
Vx. h s * u x /v. iv- i i. x. ^ i >J^, * ^ dl..j.~ - 

crujR b tv/e r * o "-e^n reliiot ■< e uli <■ * fcx^ -u ilaXe 



7? 



1j. s»^.i c i<-r w e tj a<, di.. * . i- ^t<,^ 

C) two 3j. ^lt com* o nis o . .. 
tr^et' >, rt v c c •> *>u.k 1 to Iwi - '"-1 V- 
Ow5f, ai i » t'tir if ^ t i-a- m .ac i 

the front, ihe sil^s of ct vuive o t* * i> ^ 

fi^st o " * .DJ. C ?l > i .£3 R,i j li. 

Jv?d<>.5 Ct' 3 *'Va +, tl J .i i *IUj Ir mi V f~ 'if t 
SjjJri-il^i-i. r".t, 

.} i t'j* 1 u ui ace i ' rc^i >, o' ciii of tl < ! ej 
tit In int , i., <,> k\ ^> 1^ it ,; u it 1 t t >uii>, c c trv ' 

ialx-u ca juiui; «.i>-U v .&ati.ii. t^tjuj- i . t % < r ' _3 r J '^i-- 

r^ticm tUioit^sut tue rune? vuii .i^oi o~ t^uj vil^n- " v 1 
lengtu, 

c" iuo £i*~t j;^aLtJ i,^ ts U^i -s. <■ i jj';. cvi 

tiia cue* or tLs ii: i.il ■tMc;Ln-r f.^ • i iu t , h c*> s. u -^tf; 
■Uiereci, such £>ujn xii. luxn K^v iK^u' ^1 ^i,^* - 

^..turs-t ui il-.! t <k s. -^t^^t ^ i It^i if 

tn.w r»L^ uodri roiat ti -tut: liot i t \'r. 



a. 

7f 



, 101 ' 

te'T o ' - to 
v.. no* o L 



i«,jbi*r i iv e-zcpevx ty -% 3 (.<>.. . Lj.o V oi i . 

tut^ri'J o: -sat ^jYOivionr ^ ri cjc.uit of .^ict.^ i r j.ill.* 

ooisponsn^ of auch r-o^ber, t^h x'sciia^^tiJiis lad. vi d^til -oi Men- 
tion of first r.t-i i'ej c. f u-OJ_a *c 'tVesrs 1.10a . 

G) ilit, equtva 1 >"nc food ioi^th of t^K- ilr^t Kiar 
fc-iy lie 'i.1vcva .1, : <V Uium the n ciran vaVir of t" - ratio 
of the i,^.Y,M r Kl fi,.vl h'." cf v '.Ijoctav to tLc l', A iu.,bj 
of the objective, ^iilo ti-t^wsv r^a: ytu toi'orrir .'recginj, ihe> 
overaU ult£.?u.?i -n': ci IK- ;,\tj <'Aro relatri",< '.per 

t^ro cf tue firs, -at ,injt?r r.s, t \Jl ^ -jiviM!:, 

Vt.i*ic«(< coj^x-oavieme t C Ue f on ;;oing f e-: Ua*«s ff<v i^o 
ij.oorforci.od in t,:c ,rrar~ v,; r oi 1 30 Crot reiser, si'M ii, 
Is esroeit , ll; r fw'ti - " " eou'} 1' .-rra?vp m^h sri'-or in "ce.jr.3- 
anco i iih Ijs nation IWifaf fcjo rub t oct of the presort 
applica + c' dr:. T ,h '-te.l ^ pit jat-tnn io.W^s of lyc siiied 
eoiisuizei iy r.eic. 1 .0 os\itf>ctii« i/> .'icaor tjiice ill 

tiie invvj-Jdcii ol oono irrt-at pvu-i fc , t pp33 c*i. l j oa lro Tour 

rO'jbeiT 0 Ua<~h ! ' N *'trr~ ior r. gj-v^r. oojfct d'abanct rc oius 
stationary during tuo too'^n^ 3oI«itivfc ; .o-v <•» r-nl y , tl-c >'< foni 
and thiru noubtrr c"b nov, ^K 1 , £,vd ihc fourth sfeatSoiiary, 
at lea?t one of tao ncvt^Of s^Cviid t; t '3 J ,hird lumbers !«nf! 
divert on i, widlot tl.e iirsJ -.bei 12 c-cinreicunt and cor,- 
jrioci front li.ripcuo ^c^iH c::.. ^r.fit I'olle^eu b;' tvo 

a front surface Cvr.cave to the ironi. viih. is^p^iv** li^il 

or Ivif , Vl-<--n 0.!v' ^ . a? snC 

Intr -ral ccn-t^o- \ h:ch ( > . -oro: vc . "0 topvizt to 1he Jront 
\,iih rj,Ji'r of cvv.ture Kt-,';oi3 1. _ ^ ( 1 Ke cij^<rrrc>f 



7f 



0' Ufc r n the t ran n rx~<,t1 " < ^ + 't « x J f 3 s - 1» 
c ci i 1 i'» c t xti / Icr c 1 j< ,t (.t O.^i,,^ d 

to : s i- f c^v^/ir- J i. 1 * u ^u -1 " < <""" < - v-i<> tcc nd 

l~ -ft. it * a i'i J t«i »i '' r -, * 

i j til t«w p wvt ti ^ , t " i ■ k prcsp i 1 '^n- 

tc K .tj-iirr^yj «d u> 1 - f Ktj: it u-va 1 lc tun 

me fiber o£ the cLgeo'sive. 

w t \ <u - ~ 1- ox cat 1, +.a e-ti< t ii t ''a-> 

in tLt. ^.r Id •'Vj Uile", ^ >i-j-ii * , vC-lIj U vhc 

2 .ttia c a^xttxiae oJ u< a 4 f _ ^uu.^- cO t 5 ^ pig re 

tna-t -Uc t. ~£s,ce io oonu lo 1.< Ji&rt <. neg"t*vc bi^n 
tl at il it cojioa/e Uieaec f -^t ut- n.„te t p I 

-Lbj-ck^es-tsj oi U,c ii^i-viuu 1 u ta d t c objective, aid 

^ . (j. .it, to 5 j sef a-*s 1>iJv Ci '«« 

reir«,cJ\e lnuaa ^ -oi tU ^ l"ie of t c -re^trum a d 
tho ^"bfce V nu»l>eis» of 1± o a.attj.1 s iroflj noti irts varicub 



10. 

?5 



% 
















3.4435 






h 


0,1410 


1,7*4? 


26.10 _ 




*2 


+ 




0.6230 






^2 


3.4750 








h 


1 ,51507 


50 , 35 




fi 3 




4,0937 


0.0051 








3.4U70 


R 4 


+ 




0,?fC5 


1,1X1 


47.90 




3.3715 


H 5 




15.7510 




0.0051 








3.3610 


K 6 
















3.1035 










0.2969 


1.717 


47. 90 












8 5 


v.'iricvble 








3.0707 


% 


+ 


2.7753 








% 


1.7000 






]? 3 

S 4 


0.0063 


1 > 69734 


50 . r. 




V 




1,215* 










.1.4012 


n.o 












K 10 


1.4712 






h 


0 . 0500 


1,59734 






Hx 


+ 3.1121 








B 11 1.4092 










0,2125 


1.7047 


' 26,3 0 






5-U21 


o . 0500 


X.C r< 734 


56,10 




1.3947 




+ 


5.7-301. 


% 
9 








B 13 


1. 3412 






1.5021 


0.0375 


1.69734 






0,7007 


J-? 


+ 


1.3021 


C . 10*3 


1,?h4? 




K 15 


0.4*205 


H 16 


+ 


s.&m 


"6 - 
r> li 
5 ? 

»12 
K 8 








K 16 


0.0300 


B l? 


+ 




0.1250 


1. 


53.57 


J V/ 


o.ecss 


fi 18 




1.B116 


0.0031 






R ia 


0.9017 


*19 


+ 


1.8116 


0.1250 


1.524 


5-3.27 


ho 


i).;J157 


. M zo 




6. 3333 


0.0031 






*?o 


0.2102 


S 21 




1.0417 










h.i 












0\I;?f0 


1,6.2'-: 










3-1250 


0.2373 








G.0602 


K„ 




4.0770 


% 




1.733 


20.06 


'•23 


0.7560 


*24 


+ 


l.oeee 




C . 5175 






*24 


0.6907 


*2 5 


-t- 


5.1589 


B lfi 


0.0625 


1,7?£3 


2.0.66 


V, 


0.7197 


V> 


+ 




0.1563 


1.61452 


56.22 


fe ,c 


0.7200 


*27 




1.5001 










B 2? 


0,7225 





% 








0.0 JOE 3 








o.; o 








1. 1, 








L.7-' ..1 


'7 


o.% 










c.7. 




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1.00 




13. 

f3 



xi(iC. 










iJc-jfrrictiv 




CI o;it 








Air 


^ration 


VvUx ^ 




vox- 


h 


™ 


7 .£11'; 


h 


0. 2014 


1.70'~;-7 












B 2 


0.8928 


1.51507 


56, 3'.- 


.,.96.<~;? 






>>.G9t7 










'3 






3 1 


0 . 0043 








*' '! 




I6.2V;£ 
















D 5 


0, 3661 


1,71/0 


4/.y0 




~ 


22.2*12 


S ? 


0.0045 






it- 


% 












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% 


0 * 4241 


1.?1'0 


4 ( \^0 


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24. 515 't- 


vftricblo 










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"8 






% 


0 . OiJOt 


1.&S75* 


SC. 19 




Jl 9 


•r 




0, 5178 






TS(. 2.1.161 
















2/Joiy 








0.0? 14 


1,69734 


56.19 


K U 


+ 


4.4453 








S n J. 0132 








0,3036 


1.7847 


26.10 


£ 12 




4 , 4458 








H x , ? 1.9925 






S 3 
S 5 


0,0714 


1,69754 


56.19 


*13 




6,^572 


vai*lable 






R 1? 1.9161 


S 14 




i.aaci 








K iif , 1.1155 






S 9 


0.0536 


1.69754 


36.19 


"15 


+ 


1.8601 








7i v ^ 1.1721 








B 10 
a S 


0,1518 


1.7*47 


26.10 


£ 16 


+ 


14.1574 








Ii ic 3.1357 


K 17 


- 


10. C 03 5 








E i7 1.2592 






*11 

3 ? 

hz 

S 3 


0,1375 


1.5168 


64. SO 




Il 18 




1 . 919 £ 










H 19 




2,60*1 


0. 1"75 


X. 51&ft 


64.20 


P., 1.5UC 


*20 




10.8725 


0. j045 










■:- 


1 ~ " '' " 








H.^ 1.2C-72 








*13 

u 




j.. ^16 a 


&4. 20 




Hi 

K 23 




2. a OS* 

--i . 2 


0.4375 






IV,, 1.222C 
E.,, 1.05CK, 








ho 


U , j ! ( 1 


1. { 2fJ,J 


•2&,66 


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-t 


1.9174 


0.4714 






H., 4 0.968C 


*25 






0.C929 




23.6(5 


l.OOlc 


*26 


+ 










ho 








ho 

hi 


0,2204 


1.0134* 


59 . 27 


*27 








K, ;7 1.030* 


*28 




5.7S70 
















hi 


0. 2304 


1.61542 


59.27 


B 29 




5.7570 








£ 29 0.9/7.. 



0 . 0^318 






1.0 00 00 


G.CO 


1.59155 


2.CX0J:'.- 


1.06^00 


1. 77; 07 


' 0.25 


2. 7 6 '-529 


0.8621S 




■^.It:?27 














4.23I9G 


0.257';-o 




ICf.COOOO 


1..00 




Eedtus Sfcicloieoa -or \?e tractive Al<l;6 V Soar 



X 




7*2114 


h 


0.2014 


1.704? 


26.10 


h. 


4. 3.132 


- l 2 




12,3661 


h 


0.0328 


1,51507 


56. -js 


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4.3o42 


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5.85C7 


h 


0.004? 








4 .001 4 






3.5. 23% 




0.3601 


1.7170 


47.90 


Yi> 
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A „ 2164 






22. 5012 










a 5 




17. 




5 . 50 54 




0.*f!41 


1.7170 


47.90 




4 * 4 335 






24. 3154 




variable 






n , 




:t 8 




2, 3> > 47 


% 


0.0004 


1.63734 


56.19 






K 3 




1»73&2 


S 4 


0.517s 










P 10 






% 


0.0714 


1.02734 


56.10 


s -io 




%1 






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O.3O30 


1.704? 


' 26.3.0 


hi 




S 12 






% 


0,0714 


1.63754 


56.19 


H 2.2 




,%3 






% 


variatolo 






%3 




n u 




1 . 0601 




0.0535 


3 .63734 




%4 


1*17-3 


H$ 






ho 


0.1218 


1.7847 


26.10 


I5 15 




K 16 




14.1274 


h 


variable 






v . 
**16 


1 . ,1057 


"17 






hi 


0,1911 


1.524 


5U .07 


hi 


1. 2330 


?? 






h 


0.0045 






F» . 
A "li> 


1 . 30 5 8 








hz 


0,1910 


1.524' 


5G.U7 


A '19 


1. 3233 


u 20 






% 


0.0045 








1 . 52S3 


K 21 






: »X3 


0.2670 


LSI 34 2 


39.27 


"21 


1. 3273 


K 22 




2,7012 


s 9 


0,0100 








1.30o3 


*23 




2,5142 


^4 


0.0G9? 


1,72330 


-23.56 


a w 


1« ;<0<9 


E 24 






ho 


1.092S 






K 24 


1.2033 


E 25 






h5 


O.OS93 


1.72830 


28. 6 S 


% 


0. 9600 


% 




1,4255 


hi 


0.0253 








0, 0000 


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1.6477 






1.55734 


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O.i'^-O) 



< t f \ --t * -t - x 1 i !■> t o i xn.ua 

, til ' 1 * o * j T t ' f> *f ^ 

k t t>it jl/ ,v , > 1 \ v. i r i t III jti c t (1 

*<-r x-l Hi ta „c •>» LnuhI Til m Hi dt ]«. 

l h " creuct- 3 Vx xu* i _ n "t 1; s Cx«i„T,les. Sua 

£io,at ti *.o x ax^e r t * v. j. > fco * -> fiort -^tvC 

imiur o x L _ i " t * u ? I * 

Cjl r 3^1 ^~ - v- -- t f f/a^tv. f t 1 ! 1 -!<-•* t 

\ f r«tlo <~ <. 2. c ! t ^ S t x 1- TI >i. U 

t t, ii. u i» i t ki 1 w i l ui»e jf 

! . ^1 * tu t ' r r * -iiir fl-^i, of 

iT 3 V ti i.C .. rc^rtt. < * t v-j. f «t / 

4 a j 4 ► * «. ^ t 

iiit; ( on <•> 3 v U t > i ,ir>if < 

O.b^B ) c , jll fir II tK c ifcja* * 0.0^ j ~* 0 

in iiu.t o. l uj* u 11 ii <- 1 1 « ~ r , -ttfi 

t.^ buty « I 1 2U i ^ ir i ij. t t e urf l j7 
ana .aas axaecter 



£7 



Hhs back focal cl:* stance fi-ca the roar surface- ox' th-? ob- 
jective to the iirage plane is 2.8501 i\ in rsenvl* I, Z-t'thl Y 

a o 

in i'x&tsple- XX and 2.5027 '£ : 0 in l&aisplo Jill. 

All three examples Incorporate the invention. Of tso con- 
current- British X'atent Application ubovo mention^. 

xho equivalent focal loi^th f, of tho r/fcatiaK&ry fir ft 
nwnbdr is + 4. AS 51 1' in Exsaplo 1 w«5 •* 6.?64^ y in Staples 
II and 111; tl:e equivalent focal l«i£tc. f^ of mt/v&hl* 
eeooad taoniber is - 1.^703 is Sssrpl© 1 and - 2.1004 > ! is 
Examples II «v3 111; the equiv&ler.t focal l<=n£th ^ of the 
movable third nensber is - 1.0176 J? in Sxanpls I and - :?.:>9S6 i A f 
in Examples 21 and 111; %?A the equivalent focal length f- D 
of the stationary fourth jaeger is + 1.4753 in Example I, 

+ 2.128$ T> in SxaKlafcl and * S„ in Example III? the 

o - j o 

positive end negative signs respectively Indicating conver- 
gence sad divergence. 

la all three examples, the convergent stationary front 
me&ber consists oi" ix senfeeus doublet couponc^t followed by 
two convergent oiraple o opponent o, She front (surface &, of 
tha doublet coEiporsent 1b concave to tho front tuid Ivjs dis- 
por&ivs optical power numerically equal to 0.1J>$4/j? 0 or 
0.6924/f fi in feftnple I, 0.1Cc8/i? or 0.692*/£ A 1:1 Salaries 12 
and III. Ojhft i&temii contact It, oi tiio doublet component is 
d laps reive mid convex to the front and has radius; of o-ur^ature 
e^ual to 2*0^13 f K in all three Mtaiaples. 9?he difference 
between the mean refrae-tive indices of the materials of. the 
tv.'O element?'- of sucli doublet eosponsnt is .2? in all three 
exaraplee. 



12., 



£ " Qvil^t't <■> Jvi 1 ' f->r . Ui b f 'i r ^ >"..<. 
CO' cno a cu f iio i - 1 : ir ".C^l* J > cr ^.O" 1 ' ' ( I" 
" '3 1, t ).'i^ > \, . 1 ^ .1 - . 

flio reui ^ of ^ ^ u'rs "\ v-i -the X" „fc s o ' U JJ'r^- 1 

ci i~ f lo " o c ^ j"/ n j iwOt, ^ " If 
**iJ3ft tuB ■>* t^ur of c >v_ ii 1 D o +io 1 i 1- tu** ->cp f l/.c 
other eoifcrt^' it, G.tO<5 f ^ J * nil uroo cse 1 3. 

T»i "C"'* ixO^^_'! ' ,. > > of ^ <. *\.t 

^catfr ! *j c id i f f >ut >-a ' is^iv of c .rY^ae 

t ir- -^-rii 1 + V ^'a + 1 -U <» r n *~ f cur. ot 

cewvM^t ti» o-in<, )„ 1 0. Cv N e »* J,W<! j in 
£\Rrti>3 - I juj. l.^f 0 C.I',' C J 1 , j..! 'V j'o 11 11, 

ccm^r^nU ci the -r^-et n-nia i <j o. r "" J ' v ^ 0.124? * n 

! ^fj-nT-, x ^ or 1 j. ^ ^ j "II j la. 

aq ^ ifu ct <* hDa;, l*** 0^ n> 1 <'> / m^ers of il-o 

m nil n 0 r ~r~l £ i ^. / -v ) J 1, .0/ 1 v 

iivrabcr oi tho di er/e t £rt * olo t * f\K> far^t r^i v>e> - by 
24.62. 

"J a .j a »&<■ I f 0 y^vf 1 yaD. ^ o.' t*u> ' k 5o of* IK cyav,- 
let 1 - >■* 1 p •> of t -» c u c 3-v i } ^ „ 1 1 *"f « i 
at r-^Jve v, 2. > . iv. +' , j.s 1./"/" , <ji 01 " 
value, ■"frLlc" i * ^ i'i^ts II i?A 1X1 euc^ ~> ^run r tic ie 
5»?71 ^1 00 tla-* £ A is 1.7r>^ t lues s ci 1 ■ sciciu 1 

ratio. 

!!} 3 aoalixon of sduir < eap^r' 1 JUn fcct\ < 1 t) o 1 ilIq 



19, 



li tii c' t )h)oc"l < -> " n *r t * " 

IK O l 1 v i ^ 1. u*l L 

scf* t ^ i i! t 11) ' i rl J i7.;t- 

in ^ iv ci in/ 'al < n ' ">.i -» i 1 - 1 •H > fc rc«I 

1 't. of i s Pint" ' <» 0 t ^ „ ' n i '-r^ u 

all three examples. 

of a uivo H i j! r .1 i1 i + lit* 

t,ou/o to t .2 licit Ho . v f N 

having a cowrcent e-c.^Ai; !>r fcvc oiv-e^ent ii3 entnit y , 

and its total ar.ial reevs-.ient iv: i; le rai:- : ,{- ef vartatioi ia 
irusnariaally equal to 1.9942 

Tiie front an4 to:::- curl." cot; ^ ar;d J. Cj ex" tl:o niEjle 
acniricus co:.; , e;:cnt ;:f the ecd-:" '? ^.c^'hr.-.r ".'c:t root-ivsl/ hrve raclli 
of curvature nunoricallj! equal -so ,i:. s and O.S?C6 Xy. 

The £xoat raid rear surfaces J^.. :..ao c>i the triplet com- 
ponent of mieh nerabsr respectively have rac ! ii ci curvature 
niLTjerically e?aal tc w.t. 3.933. S: j\. 

Tag movable third ^ecber in all thn-y sraapiee- eonsiyfcs 
of a doublet ce^peaexit vihost front surfr'.eu is concave to 
the fremt vvAth radius oi ourvavure numor:; ca:iiy equal to 
0.716* f 0 » and the t;.-tui axial : .ov^i.ern oi" such !:.er;:;or is 
jiuiaericaily e<uial %o C>)30 f fl . 

Xi:o iii^i--raai coJii.-.ct il^ of tLe aoull.-.t covenant oi' t;.\: 

third member is collective and oeuvcx i:o the front and has 

ratline of curvature numerically equal to 0.7164 f..,. The j 

difference between the mean refrnative inaiccts of tl-e water! 'li' 

■ f 

of the tve e.1 treats ef such fioublet ooi^oiiout is ,CV>7* &nd ; 
the oiffersn^e betveLiitfcGir .Vu::;.- V r-unlots la 20.09. 



20. (fo 



\rr itioi ' x nit i f >«)< 
^ -vc ic "b - i o it - i 

XO£ t ^ CO k 2 v l 

V*dd . ' 1 ft. I 

*-i< "*« i M \ i lei t - 
"t> j i *itj s e 1 < o 

-}^{ c 1 tl c 

F * 1" or \ n v n c 
eonv< T i h O- D ^ c<, ) i " 

lit J Cl t C [f^t i i 

fro it r \a t oi t e ) i 
It c K i( rl <o J 

stt ^.o a* / 'c x "i^o" u_ 

cocfJfivl Pets 1 on *r o 101 

r < a"? , L t, „ _ 

Oleic. * a £±- ^ c t.--\ 



9/ 



(surface. 

o'Tlcy a ; n io^ jbot Oi ftrr 11 < 1,. ^ccwr^cje wi^ the t 

Won or coicv^ot <- j;-^- <i <-}y 

it J Ot 1 0 ;c ( r ' ! 11 I „1 1 1 o jo 

tutvcaitacaoucly wood j.„ c^o^ >, • . or; with Uie s-ov^.l-lc ?y" 
above described. 



U.S. Ow^ARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Patent Office 

AddrasB Ort, CJMMiS&ONEf? Of PATENTS 
Washington DC 30931 



•March 22, 1973 

Holoooibe, We the fill & Brisebois 
2001 Jefferseas Davis Hwy . 
Suite 307 

Arlington, Va, 22202 

Is re Gordon H. Cook, at &1 

Serial No. 1^2,25*4- 

Filed Jus© 11 3 19?1 

For: Optical Objectives of 

Variable Squiv&lej&t S'oeal Length 



Gent lemes : 

Receipt is acknowiwiged of papers filed on March 9, 1973 

purporting to comply with the r«<|ujremerus of Tide 35, U.S. Code, Sec, 119 (1952), and 




issue Control Officer 
Issue and Gazeste Division 




IS THE UXITED STATES PATEM? ?F'FTCE 




CORDON HEN'RY COOK et gl 

Serial Xo. 152, 2=^ 

Piled: June 11, 1971 

For; OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OF 
VARIABLE EQUIVALENT 
POCAL LENGTH 

Exmr* Corbin 

Group Art Unit 259 



June ?H, 197? 



U.S. Patent No. 3,7*6,0*8 



Granted: Mav 2<* , 1971 



Honorable Commissioner of Patents 
Washington, D.C. 20231 



Sir: 

It is respectfully requested that the Official Letters 
Patent, abov-8-identified , be corrected as oer attached sheet. 

Please correct the spelling of the assise 'a name 
to read I'RS SANK uR^A^ISATIOf; LIMITED . 

The necessary claim of oriority and certified copy 
were filed in the Patent Office on March 9, 1>73 however this 
information was omitted from the heading of the Letters Patent. 

Please note that these were clerical errors in the 
Drinking of the patent. 

Res oec t fully submitted, 
: OORDON FFN1Y O^OS at &1 




■ , ! ,<, r " ■ ' ■ ■■ y*^fc^-TL ~~ 

osep Brisebcis Ren. No. 15,%5 
H0LCCX3S, WSTHaHILL % B*U$EB0IS 



7955 



IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 



In re application of" 



r jUL 2 5 1973 



GORDON HENRY COOK et al 



Patent Mo. 3,736 ,0^8 



Request .for • Certi f 1 eate 
of Correction fQed 
June 28 , 1973 



Granted: May 29, 1973 



OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OF 
VARIABLE EQUIVALENT 
FOCAL LENGTH 



NOTICE OF CHANGE 0? ATTORNEY'S 
FIRM NAME.. AND ADDHKSS 



Hon, Commissioner of Patents 
Washington, D, C. 20231 

Sir: 

This will advise that as of August 1, 1973 * the 
firm name and address of the undersigned attorneys of 
record in the above case will be: 



brisebois & muam 

Suite 612 

23^1 Jefferson Davis Highway 
Arlington, Virginia 22202 



Respect full?f submitted , 



HOLCOKBS , WETHEBI'jL S BRISSBOIS 




Joseph P. Srisebois - Reg, 15,965 




7955 



IS THE UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 

In appllsatiOfl of November 5, 1972 
&OHDOS HENRY COGX st al 

Serial No. 152,25* Or. Art Unit 259 

WLl»d ^un© 11, 1971 

Fop: OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OP VARIABLE 

EQUIVALENT FOCAL L8HOTH Exr. J. K. CorbXn 



LSTTEB TO OFFICIAL DRAFTSMAN 



Hon, Commissionar of Patents 
Washington, D.C. 20231 



Pla&aa ©orreet the surface in each of Figures l»6 
to show it as slightly convex to tha front, as Indicated in rstS 
oil the attached prints, and charge the cost of this work to our 
Mia se Hansons Account Mo, 08-272Q, Or-l*r So. 5>3. 

Respectfully aubmlttsd, 
GORDON j££$RY COOK at al 

521-1550 By >?£2/£ /y^/Co 

JFBsgw Jp'sepn F. BrlBSDois Fag. 15. "565 

KOLCOMBTC, SfFTK^ILL * BHISSBQI3 



Line 


Code 


Serial Number 


Filing 2»te 


2 

Status 


Patent Muasber 


latent Date 


104 








. } 






105 


— ■ 












106 














107 














108 














109 














HQ 














in. 














112 














113 














114 














115 






j 






116 






! 






117 






I 








COKDITIOiS' hi 

COPE 
01 


D STATUS CODES 

CONDITION 

Now Patented 
Now Abandoned 


FOB COST 


INUISG DATA 




03 

71 
81 


A continuation 


:inuation 


uding streamline} 



72 A continuation-in-part of 

82 which is a continuation-in-part-, of 

75 and a continuation-in-part 

?3 A substitute for 

74 A division ci : 

84 which is a division of 

36 ; said 

90 and 

31 and a continuation of 

92 , each 

SSOTEj When tha codes 36 and 32 are used they nust be followed 
by a code in the series 80 (-31, 32, or S4} ; the 
conditions beginning with "which is..,.". 



MPI Family llepOlt (Family Bibliogiaphit- and Legal Status) 

in fhc MPI Fastuh leport <ill publication staues io. collapsed imo i ^itmic ivooui based on sdv,ntit,.ti .tpphuMUon 
±iu Uw bUifh>j>tjphk nifo>nu!ii>i){l)spia\<J milk o>IIaps<_J ruirI is iaU n itsmUiic latest public itum 

Kepurt Ckmrm! Date: _WM t 24 
Name of Report: 
Number of Families: 1 
Comments: 

Table of Contents 

L US373<aUSA 197.10529 RANK ORGANISATION LTD 

OPTICAL OBJECTIVES OF VARIABLE EQUIVALENT FOCAL LENGTH . 



1 lecords m the fanuh. 

I S3~3o048 V 1 <)"3<)5^ [ no drawing available] 

(t\GK)PH< Al OBJK irVfc^O* > ARUULE 
J Ql IV\ll<VI hOC\l H-MS1H 

\ss«>ik(' RNNkUFiG WKVTKA 1 ID 

Ifuentorfs) ( OOk G H Ml FiGOl D F ±. 

\p{)hi<tti(in No 1 i. ^"m>04 D v 

I tlint> Djtc: 

issue'Piiblication DaU>: i**"*n^2v 

Abstract: <1 ,\Gt -\ zoom lens na\ uy an unproved /oomuy rwae and oompiiMnu <) eomerjom Iiim member 

whteb iot .i en ob)c^( disLmu: rom.tms sJ<nion<m dining die /ooimiij: iel.nu<. mow mails .m<i\ijll\ 
movable dtxenxnr ^<xond mcmbci behind the fitst member lix\ ma c]m\;Acm fot-rd length fb h in* 
mmterKjlk between 4 ,md x tones the tnmmmnu.iliieo) i!k niuooi ilk. eqim ,ikni kK.ti iotisithoftlw, 
<.ompkk otu^eme to the f-mmibei ot the objeune m the t ttnie ot \ tnatum <ni i\! i5i\ mo\abk 
dnen'uit shmi ttkmlki bdimdlik ^void membet ruum* <.qt»"<iJcnl tocalkmyh R hut» munenealb 
between s rmd K> lime flu, minimum s<duc of mh rttio a station u\ comuiietit lotuth meinbet behind 
the thud membu ,i 'oom eontio] ckmeiit and meair uheiebs opeiauon of she zoom comtoi ek incut 
causes tin. Aiomm^ tUatp c mo\ omenis to bo Ufeaed w hetem the total asi ii mm ement of tlK sesond 
nkmlvt tit tlte name oi \ aii.itioitkcs numcncilh Ivtwcen 1 SfB.ind^ ^fB uni the total" jsi.i1 
itiosemuit oi the third meitibei m tiu, nutae hes tmmenctih between f> 2M( and o ^fC Hie nmtinmsn 
>w n* "kpinuonbuueui tin. second and third member oc^tuiin?, v> hen the oinnaient iocti length ot 
tin, obfC*.t is gieaki than hail «s niastttmni \aiue tit (be r<m>;e oi \atiatsott the mosabk dnetguit 
sveond member ^insist mg ot ■tdnusMii simpk sikiimdv eompoituit with i!^ suit kcs ^omc\ to the 
Itont md <i dtvuHOiU onniputind toiiiponem boiimd su<.h siinpk coiupwtont md tlte mo\:ibfo dnot^ont 
third member voiiMsiuiij oi ,i doublet eompoituit ha\ ing lis iamt suiTtee eonciw to (Ik liont with 
uidnisot >,tin tutu, hm^mitiKiteaiK between ft and i dfC 

Priurilj Daia: LS i^^^'l i^'lOoit \ i 

Related \|»pHcaii»B(s>: ofro<)2oS i«)on) 4 >lo 1^ \h \MK 1NE0 

1P( Otik'raatkin.il Class); un^noi^r 

L(. LA {European < lass): O02Bo[Si7 

IS Class: ^'iti^ 4V>(,8S, -t < ;«- , ()8 

Piihik'iJtkm I ,ut«H<jj;e: F\G 

Filing ! ,«)su.i«e: F\G 

\t>vm{s): HokomtK Wvthatll & Hns^bt««> 

Examiner Primat <\nbtn lohn K 

Assignments Repurted U> I SPIO: 

Keei'l-rame: 048o4ol!0 Daie Sijywd: ! 98" 1021 Date Reeorded: !98SO^o: 

A^i&nee: RWK 1 A.> LOR HOIJSOM SMUfcU 2 Nfc'W Si A.R ROAD 1. 1. K bS FtVR 5. 1. 4 "JO. {. \] 0:D 
klXGi'OM A CORP 0) bM 1FJ> KINGDOM 



tones. \titlr: LIPMR HWIH II 1 II NO* kti KPIAU f<)l / t VV5LMLif» m)U <:oi HI WIMl 

tt F Si \\ } FIF I D \t tt fF }AI \ 0~iwn 
Bik'f; ASSKAMl O Of V'AKAOPS AURSA1 



Le^al Status: 

Dale b- Code I>v$crtptton 

i^xst^O: o A<; \« ouitet name R \\K I ^ i OR HU^oX i IVil'J Hi 2 \H\ 

\P I'OVi) IH<[ \sMCA'\« \i OI VAitSNOKfc 
A tT PLST \SSKAOP RAM. ORCAMSAJKA Pi/