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WORLD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ORGANIZATION 
International Bureau 




PCT 

INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) 



(51) International Patent Classification 6 : 
H04M 3/42 



Al 



(11) International Publication Number: WO 97/33421 

(43) International Publication Date: 12 September 1997 (12.09.97) 



(21) International Application Number: 

(22) International Filing Date: 



PCI7US96/03064 
6 March 1996 (06.03.96) 



(71) Applicant: BELL COMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH. INC. 

fUS/US); 445 South Street, Morristown, NJ 07960 (US). 

(72) Inventors: PEPE, David, Matt hew; 51 Kings Highway, Mid- 

dletown. NJ 07748 (US). BLITZER, Lisa, B.; 10 Gramercy 
Lane. Manalapan. NJ 07726 (US). BROCKMAN. James. 
Joseph; 15 Running Brook Drive. Pemneville. NJ 08535 
(US). CRUZ, William; 9 Violante Court, Eatomown. NJ 
07724 (US). HAKIM. Dwight, Omar, 20 Tina Place. 
Matawan. NJ 07747 (US). KRAMER, Michael; 6136 Field- 
ston Road, Bronx, NY 10471 (US). PETR. Dawn. Di- 
ane; 331 English Place. Basking Ridge, NJ 07920 (US). 
RAMAROSON, Josefa; 23 Terrance Terrace. Freehold, NJ 
07728 (US). RAMIREZ, Gerardo; 3505 Sunny Slope Road, 
Bridgewater. NJ 08807 (US). WANG, Yang-Wei; 10 Cam- 
bridge Drive. Howell. NJ 07731 (US). WHITE, Robert, G.: 
20 Knollwood Drive, Morristown. NJ 07960 (US). 

(74) Agents: YEADON. Loria, B. ei al.; do International Coor- 
dinator, Room IG1I2R, 445 South Street, Morristown. NJ 
07960-6438 (US). 



(81) Designated States: AU. CN, KR. MX. SG. 



Published 

With international search report. 



(54) Title: PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS INTERNETWORKING 




DKIT* ASSIST*! 



(57) Abstract 

A personal communications internetworking (40) provides a network subscriber with the ability to remotely control the receipt and 
delivery of wireless and wireline voice and text messages. The network operates as an interface between various wireless (39) and wireline 
(29) networks, and also performs media translation, where necessary. The subscriber's message receipt and delivery options are maintained 
in a database which the subscriber may access by wireless or wireline communications to update the options programmed in the database. 
The subscriber may be provided with CallCommand service which provides real-time control of voice calls while using a wireless data 
terminal or PDA (30). 



BNSOOCJD: <WO 973M21At> 



FOR THE PURPOSES OF INFORMATION ONLY 



Codes used to identify States 
applications under the PCT. 



AM 


Armenia 


AT 


Austria 


AU 


Australia 


BB 


Barbados 


BE 


Belgium 


BF 


Burkina Faao 


BG 


Bulgaria 


BJ 


Benin 


BR 


Brazil 


BY 


Betarui 


CA 


Canada 


CF 


Central African Republic 


CC 


Congo 


CH 


Switzerland 


CI 


Cote d'lvohx 


CM 


Cameroon 


CN 


China 


cs 


Czechoslovakia 


cz 


Czech Republic 


DE 


Germany 


DK 


Desman 
Eatooia 


BE 
BS 


Spam 


n 


Finland 


FR 


France 


GA 


Gabon 



to the PCT on the front pages 



GB 


Untied Kingdom 


GE 


Georgia 


GN 


Guinea 


GR 


Greece 


HU 


Hungary 


IE 


Ireland 


n* 


Italy 


jp 


Japan 


KE 


Kenya 


KG 


Kyrgyttan 


KP 


Democratic People's B 




of Korea 


KR 


Republic of Korea 


KZ 


Kazakm tan 


U 


Uechttnetetn 


LK 


Sri Leak* 


LR 


Liberia 


LT 


Lithuania 


IX 


Luxembourg 


LV 


Lcvia 


MC 


Monaco 


MB 


Republic of Moldova 


MG 


Madagascar 


ML 


Mali 


MN 


Mongolia 


MR 


Mauritania 



pamphlets publishing international 



MW 


Malawi 


MX 


Mexico 


NE 


Niger 


NL 


Netherlands 


NO 


Norway 


NZ 


New Zealand 


PL 


Poland 


PT 


Portugal 


RO 


Romania 


RU 


Russian Federation 


SD 


Sudan 


SE 


Sweden 


SG 


Singapore 


SI 


Slovenia 


SK 


Slovakia 


SN 


Sanegal 


sz 


Swaziland 


TV 


Chad 


TG 


Togo 


TJ 


TajQcattac 


TT 


Trinidad and Tobago 


UA 


Ukraine 


UG 


Uganda 


US 


United States of Amc 


UZ 


Urbekiaan 


VN 


Viet Nam 



BNSO0a0:<WO 973342tAt> 



WO 97/33421 



PCT/DS96/03064 



gEBSQNAJL CHMMTrNTCATT ONS INTERNETWORKING 

5 FTFT.D OF THE INVENTION 

The present invention is directed to an internetwork for personal communications and. 
more particularly, to a network which allows a mobile communications subscriber to remotely 
control personal communications delivery options. 

10 HAPICnROUND OF THE INVENTION 

The use of mes sagin g as a means of day-to-day communications continues to grow and 
evolve, particularly in a business context. Messaging includes electronic mail (e-mail), facsimile 
transmissions (fax), paging, voice mail, and telephone communications. The introduction of the 
cellular phone and other wireless communications facilitated the advent of the "mobile office". The 

15 mobile office allows an employee, for example, to work away from the office on a portable 
computer and be in constant touch with the office via a cellular phone. 

The messaging options described above are available to businesses of all sizes, as well 
as individual users, from a variety of service providers. Many offices have some or all of the 
messaging options described above. The office may have certain messaging equipment (referred to 

20 as "consumer premises equipment" or "CPE") connected to one or more wireline networks. That 
is. the office may have telephones, fax servers, and voice mail systems connected to phone lines, 
and computers having modems for e-mail connected to packet networks which are connected via 
phone lines. The mobile employee may have certain wireless messaging equipment, such as a 
pager, a cellular telephone, or a personal digital assistant ("PDA"), which is typically a notebook 

25 computer connected to a wireless comrnunication network. 

One important goal of personal coinmunication services is to allow users to 
communicate from anywhere to anywhere at any time. Such personal communication services 
generally involve multiple servke providers including local and long distance telephone companies 
and cellular telephone companies. An example of a personal contmunication service is as follows: 

30 A personal comminication service provider (eg., a cellular telephone company) 

enables traveling users to rent a wireless portable phone from a rental phone company (e.g.. from 
an airline or car rental company). Using the rental phone, the user is provided with basic mobile 

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10 



WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/O3064 

phone service from the personal communication service provider. In addition, the user would like 
the following features: 

1) The user wants calls directed to his/her office or home to be automatically forwarded 
to the rental portable phone, without informing anyone that he/she is traveling. 

2) To avoid unimportant incoming calls (and corresponding incoming call charges), the 
user would like to restrict the number of people who can call the rented portable phone. 

3) It is important to the user that the rental phone features be activated instantly, so that 
calls can be made immediately upon the user's arrival at the visaing location. 

This kind of personal communication service involves a plurality of service providers. 
These providers are (a) the focal telephone company at the home location, (b) a long distance 
telephone company, (c) the local telephone company at the visiting location, and (d) the personal 
communication service provider (i.e.. the cellular telephone company) at the visiting location. All 
of these are referred to herein as "service providers". 

To enable this kind of personal communication service, involving muliiple service 
15 providers, interoperability problems among the different service providers must be resolved. The 
interoperability problems can be divided into two categories: (a) location tracking and (b) service 
management. 

The interoperability problem for location tracking has been addressed by adopting 
signaling protocols used by the mobile phone industry. Location tracking functions are 
implemented using two location registers. One of the registers, maintained by the focal telephone 
company of the user's home location, is called the Home Location Register (HLR). The other 
register, maintained by the focal telephone company of the visiting location, is called the Visiting 
Location Register (VLR). The HLR stores customer profile data and the location of the VLR of 
the user. The customer profile data contains important information such as the user's name, 
address, preferred long distance carrier, service features (e.g.. call forwarding and call restriction), 
billing, and other adrinistrative related information. When the user travels to a new visiting 
location, a new VLR is created in the new location. Apart of the profile data stored in the HLR is 
transmitted and loaded into the VLR such that the service provider at the visiting location can 
implement service features for the visiting user. When the user travels to a new visaing location 
the location of the VLR stored in the HLR is changed to the new VLR location, and the VLR in 
the previously visited location is deleted. The process of creating a new VLR. loading profile data 



20 



25 



30 



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WO 97/33421 ; PCT/US96/03064 

to the VLR, and updating the visiting location of a user in the HLR is called "automatic roarer 
registration". 

The interoperability problem for service management is much more complex than thai 
for location tracking. Service management refers to a collection of functions required to enable a 
5 personal communication service user to subscribe to, modify, and activate service features 
anywhere and at any time. Examples of service management functions include phone number 
administration, customer profile data management* service activation, and security administration. 
The phone number administration function is important for maintaining the uniqueness of phone 
numbers. The customer profile data management function provides customer profile databases and 

10 user interfaces for creating, modifying, or transferring such databases. The service activation 
function extracts pan of the data specifying service features from the profile data and loads this 
data into physical communication systems that process calls. The service activation function also 
controls the activation and deactivation of the service features. The security administration 
function prevents or detects unauthorized uses of services and service management functions. 

15 Service management functions of this type are needed to provide personal 

communication services involving multiple service providers. Such service management functions 
generally require interactions between application software and various databas e s owned and 
operated by the different service providers. Consider an application which enables a nomadic user 
to subscribe to a personal communication service from any service provider at any location. An 

20 example of such a service is call forwarding to a temporarily rented portable phone. The 
application may, for example, need to perform the following database access operations at 
databases maintained by various different service providers: 

x check credit databases owned by credit card cotipanies or phone companies to determine 
whether the user is able to pay for the service; 
25 x check the customer profile database in the user's HLR to determine whether the user is 
currently located in a place other than the visiting location currently stored in the HLR; 
x check the credit and network databases of long distance phone companies specified by the user 
to determine whether the user can use a particular long distance carrier in the visiting location; 
x load profile data into the VLR at the visiting location and update the HLR with the location of 
30 the VLR if necessary; and 

x load the profile data to the call processing systems and activate the service. 



BNSOOCTO: <WO 973342U1> 



PC17US96/0306* 

WO 97/3342! 

The user may «ed to send or receive messages from any or all of the messaging 
opuons described above at a visiting location. That is. the user may want to rece.ve or rece,ve 
notification of e-maiL faxes, phone calls, or mce mail at a visiting locanon or to send e-nuH or 
faxes from a wireless terminal The need to integrate these various types of messaging opuons and 
5 to interconnect the many service providers has, until now. been largely unaddressed. 

It is also desirable for the mobile employee to be able to limit the messages sent to the 
wireless messaging equipment, so that only urgent messages are received when away from the 
office and unwanted in-coming calls are avoided The mobile employee may also wish to route 
certain incoming wireless messages and phone calls to other destinations, such as an office fax 

1 0 machine or a colleague s telephone. 

Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide a mobile service subsenber 

the ability to control and integrate a plurality of messaging options. 

It is another object of the present invention to provide a mobile service subscriber wuh 
the ability to remotely control the addressability, routing, accessibility, and delivery of messaging 

15 ° PUOnS ' It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide an internetwork which 
uuerconnects nxssagmg semces both wueless and w«Une networks. 

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide a subscriber wuh real-tune 
control of voice calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA. 

20 It is yet a further object of the invention to provide a control over the messages routed 

to wiretess messaging options. 

Tbcse obj*u « obtained by a penonal communications inten^o* ptovutag a 
,5 ^^b^wiUt^ab^to^c^.^^.^^''^^ 

calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA. 



BMSOOOD: <WO 073)421 A1 



WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 

pfliyf ppg rpiPTION Of TffF DRAWINGS 

These and other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the 

following drawings, wherein: 

Fig. 1-3 are overviews of the PCI networks; 
5 Rg. 4 is an overview of one node of the PCI network according to the present 

invention: 

Rg. 5 is a block diagram of an exemplary PCI server according to the present 

invention; 

Rg. 6 is a block diagram of an exemplary embodiment of a PCI database according to 

10 the present invention; 

Rg. 7 is a block diagram of the logical connections between the PCI server and PCI 

database according to the present invention; 

Rgs. 8-11 illustrate exemplary message flows between a server and a database 

according to the present invention; 
, 5 Rg. 12 is a block diagram of a personal digital assistant according to the present 

invention; 

Rgs. 13-20 illustrate exemplary message flows between a PDA and PCI server; 
Rg. 2 1 is a block diagram of a text messaging portion of a PCI network; 
Rg. 22 is a block diagram of a voice messaging portion of a PCI network; 
20 Rg. 23 is a block diagram of a facsimile messaging portion of a PCI network; 

Rg. 24 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary OuTCommand service network; 
Rgs. 25-27 illustrate exemplary message flows in the PCI network; and Rgs. 28^5 
illustrate exemplary screens displayed to a PCI subscriber using a wireless PDA. 

25 nfTAlT im nraf PTPTIONS OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS 

For clarity of presentation, the detailed description is set out in the following 

subsections: 

I. PCI Overview 

The overall network is illustrated in Rgs. 1-4 The network is an interface between a 
30 plurality of wireless and wireline networks, providing a subscriber with a variety of wireless and 
wireline message and voice delivery and receipt options. 



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WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/O3064 

II. The PCI Server 

The PCI Server is illustrated in Fig. 5. The PCI server is a peripheral which performs 
messaging and call redirection functions and interfaces with the PCI database to update the 
subscriber profile. 
5 m. The PCI Database 

The PCI Database is illustrated in Fig. 6. The PCI database maintains the subscriber 
profile, controls CaUCommand functions, and handles DTMF-based subscriber profile updates. 

IV. The Server/Database Interface 

The Server/Database interface is illustrated in Figs. 7-11. The PCI server/PCI 
10 database interface provides for the transfer of information regarding the subscriber profile and the 
CaUCommand services. 

V. The PDA/PCI Interface 

The PDA/PQ interface is illustrated in Figs. 12 - 20. The PDA/PCI interface provides 
for the transfer of information between a remote wireless subscriber and the PCI. 

15 VI. Services 

A. E-Mail Messaging 

E-Mail messaging in the PCI is illustrated in Fig. 21. The PCI network provides the 
subscriber with a variety of e-mail delivery, receipt, and notification options, including screening 
and selective destination delivery of incoming e-maiL 
20 B. Voice Messaging 

Voice messaging in the PCI is illustrated in Fig. 22. The PCI provides the subscriber 
with a variety of voice mail delivery, receipt, and notification options, including screening and 
selective destination delivery of incoming voice maiL 

C. Facsimile Messaging 

25 Facsimile messaging in the PCI is illustrated in Fig. 23. The PCI provides the 

subscriber with a variety of facsimue delivery, receipt, and notification options, including screening 
and selective destination delivery of incoming faxes. 

D. CaUCommand 

The CaUCommand service is illustrated in Fig. 24. CaUCommand service provides 
30 real-tire control of voice calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA. 



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- WO 97/3342 1 PCT/US9«/03064 

VTt. Message Flows 

Certain message flows for wireless messaging in the PCI are illustrated in Figs. 25 - 27. 
The three message flows illustrated are sending a message from one subscriber to another, 
receiving a message regardless of whether the subscriber is using a wireless or wireline terminal. 
5 and sending a message to a non-subscriber. 
VOL The PDA Application 

The application residing in the PDA is described in Figs. 28 - 45. which illustrate 
exemplary screens displayed to a PCI subscriber using a wireless PDA 
DC. Billing 

! o Billing procedures for a PCI network use is briefly described. 

X. Conclusion 

A glossary of acronyms used in this specification is attached as Appendix A 
I. PCI Overview 

j 5 Fig. I is a simplified overview bf a personal communications internetworking ("PCI") 

according to the present invention. A consumer, an office for example, has various messaging 
equipment, such as a voice mail system 20, an e-mail terminal 22. fax machines 24. and telephones 
26. These arc all connected to wireline networks 29. For example, the fax 24. phone 26, and 
voicemail system 20 may be connected to a Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), pan of 

20 which belongs to a particular local phone service company, and part of which belongs to a 
particular long distance service provider. The e-mail terminal 22 may be connected to a data 
packet network, such as Internet, whose packets are carried over phone lines. 

A mobile communications subscriber (for example an employee who works at the 
office described above and travels frequently) has various portable messaging equipment, such as a 

25 PDA 30, a cellular phone 32. and a pager 34. These are connected to wireless networks 39. These 
wireless messaging options may be provided by different service providers. That is. the cellular 
phone may be connected to a wireless network of a cellular phone service provider, the pager may 
be connected to a different wireless network maintained by a pager service provider, and the PDA 
may be connected to a third wireless communications network maintained by yet another service 
30 provider. 

A Personal Communications Internetworking ("PCI") 40 according to the present 
invention is connected between the wireless 39 and wireline networks 29. The PCI 40 permits the 

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•WO 97/33421 FCiYUS96/03<*4 

mobile communications subscriber to send and receive messages between disparate networks and 
messaging systems and a variety of service providers. The mobile communications subscriber can 
receive e-mail. fax. pages, and voice messages under a single phone number while using either a 
wireless or wireline network. The subscriber may also select the media format and serving network 
5 used to receive messages. The subscriber may also select cross-media notification of incoming 
messages. (i.e.. the subscriber may receive notification from a pager message thai a voice mail 

message was received); 

The subscriber selects the wireline or wireless network and media format to be used for 
delivering messages or notification of message receipt. The PCI 40 will perform a media 
l0 conversion to allow, for instance, an e-mail message to be delivered to a fax server. The PCI 40 
may also include accessibility controls which allow the user to screen messages by selected criteria 
such as media type (e.g.. e-mail fax, etc.), message length (e.g.. voice mail messages less than three 
minutes), or sender (e.g.. only messages from the office and a certain client are to be forwarded*. 

For example, the subscriber may have notification of a voice mail or fax message 
15 receipt directed to a wireless PDA in the form of e-mail messages. If the subscribers wireless PDA 
is not turned on or otherwise not operating, the notification may be routed to an alternate wireless 
or wireline network. Notification to the subscriber that a voice mail message was received may be. 
for example, rerouted to the subscriber's pager, and notification that a fax has been received may be 

rerouted to the wireline e-maiL 
20 Fig. 2 is a simplified version of the interconnections between various messaging 

systems and a PCI. As shown in Fig. 2. a subscriber provides the network with message routing 
and delivery instructions. These instructions are received by a PCI database 44 and stored in a 
• subscriber profile" for that subscriber. This database controls the delivery of outgoing messages 
and the routing of incoming messages and message notification. (In Fig. 2. wireline 
25 cornmumcations are indicated with solid line connections and wireless communications are 
indicated with dashed line connections. The instructions to the PCI are shown with a solid line, but 
as wiD be explained in greater detail below, the instructions may be sent either by a wireline or 
wireless network.) 

The PQ database 44 supports access to information authenticating the subscriber s 
30 identity and validating the types of services subscribed to. the subscriber's message delivery 
(incoming messages) options and origination (outgoing messages) options and voice (telephone 
call and voice mail) options. For origination, the subscriber may select message distribution lists 



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WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 

with specific media delivery options. The database 44 also supports access to the portions of the 
subscriber profile that the subscriber may control. 

The subscriber may use a personal telephone number to register at alternate wireline 
and wireless terminals while maintaining use of the message screening and delivery options selected 
5 and stored in a subscriber's profile. This is called "personal mobility". Information about the 
location of a wireless or wireline network location to which the subscriber's terminal is connected 
automatically registers and deregisters a subscriber's terminal. This is called "terminal mobility." 

Fig. 3 shows the PCI 40. The CPE (voice mail 20. e-mail 22. fax 24, and phone 26) 
are connected to wireline networks 29. The mobile subscriber equipment (PDA 30. cellular phone 
10 32, and pager 34) are connected to wireless networks 39. Both the wireline and wireless networks 
29. 39 are connected to a PCI 40 at a service provider. The networks 29. 39 are connected to a 
local exchange carrier (LEO 42 for the personal communications internetworking. 

A PCI database 44 is a physical communication system which provides call processing 
functions for a collection of central office switches. The PCI database 44 includes the mobile 
15 subscriber's profile, including message sending, message receiving, and service control options. 
The PQ database 44 may be a service control point or a network adjunct. The PCI database may 
be connected via a service management system (SMS) interface to a service integrator 46. The 
service integrator 46 allows the service provider to update subscriber data and create and modify 
subscriber profiles. 

2 0 The PQ database 44 preferably stores and updates the subscriber profiles. The profiles 

contain service related information for mapping services to subscribers (e.g.. screening, routing, 
terminal selection by subscriber selected parameters, custom calling features, and the like); 
subscriber authentication data (e.g., password and user I.D.); user status (registered or not 
registered); generic service profile for non-call associated service, such as subscriber address or 

25 social security number, specific profile for a non-call service (based on subscriber selected 
parameters); wireless data providers identification (e.g., what cellular phone provider is used); and 
specific profile for call associated services (e.g.. call forwarding), based on user selected 
parameters. 

Fig. 4 is a more detailed depiction of the one node 43 of the PQ. The Pa has a 
30 plurality of nodes and is preferably built on the Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) architecture. 
Other network architectures may be used, but for illustrative purposes, the description is directed 
to an AlN-based network. 

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WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 

A PQ server 48 b a peripheral which performs messaging and call redirection 
functions and interfaces with the PG database 44 to update the subscriber profile. The PC server 
may be an AIN Intelligent Peripheral such as a Bellcore Intelligent Services Peripheral, or a 
network adjunct. The PCI server is connected to a switch 50. In the AIN architecture, this switch 

5 is a Service Switching Point Access Tandem (SSP AT), but may be any suitable switch, depending 
on the architecture. The SSP AT 50 connects wireline networks to the CPE. The SSP AT 50 also 
connects the PCI server 48 with a central office (CO) 52. The SSP AT 50 also connects to the 
SCP 44. The PQ database 44-and the PCI server 48 are directly connected. The LEC of Fig. 3 is 
part Of a large network and includes the Pa database 44. the PQ server 48. and the SSP AT 50. 

10 The Pa database may be connected to an SMS interface to a system integrator 46. as described 
above. 

The PO server 48 is also connected to various wireless and wireline networks 49 via 
signaling connections in these networks to transmit and receive information for all of The 
messaging options. Illustratively, the Pa server provides access to Public Packet Switched 
15 Networks (PPSN). Public Switched Telephone Network, (PSTN), Integrated Signaling Digital 
Networks (ISDN), X.25 networks and TCP/IP networks and may include access to asynchronous 
transfer mode (ATM). Switched Multimegabit Digital Service (SMDS). and Frame Relay 
networks. 

The mobile subscriber may access his or her subscriber profile to change message 
20 sending, message receiving, and service control options. These option changes are sent to the PC 
database 44 to be stored in the subscriber profile. Fig. 4 shows, for example, a PDA 30 connected 
to the Pa server 48 by a wnetess network, but the subscriber may also use wireline e-mail or 
wireless or wireline telephones (using DTMF signals) to access the subscriber profile. The 
messages from the PDA for example, are sent by a wireless network 54 to the PO server 48 
25 using, for example, an X.25 transport. 

Delivering PO service to a subscriber who may be present on a number of different 
systems requires storage, movement and caching of the service profile associated with that 
subscriber. A mobility controller 49. located in the PCI server 48. is a controller and data store, 
which dynamically maintains service control information for a Message Transfer Agent (MTA). 
30 described below, in J* K3 server 48. which connects the PO server 48 to wireless data networks. 

Data storage functions are handled by two tiered entities. The subscriber profile is 
preferably located in the Pa database 44 and is the top of the hierarchy where permanent records 

• 10- 



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WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 

such as service profile, authentication and validation information, and the like of the subscriber or 
device are maintained and performing status and location management and mapping are perfonred. 
A service profile cache 51 is preferably located in the PCI server 48 and is a local cache entity 
which stores on a "needs basis" information such as service profiles and validation status and . 
5 maintains a local repository for the service recipient. It also administers information necessary to 
serve the wireless data network entity, as well as sending updates to the permanent storage entity 
PCI database. The service profile cache 51 maintains the personal data associated with the 
processing of the mobility controller 49. The mobility controller 49 interacts with the PCI 
database-based subscriber profile (or third party data base) on behalf of the cache to obtain service 

1 0 profiles and location information related to wireless terminals. 

PCI may also provide directory services as a value-added component. The X.400 
MTA can query a local directory serving agent in the PCI server 48 for addressing and routing 
information. If the information is not local the PCI server 48 will need to get the addressing 
information from another PCI server 48 at another PCI node or an interconnected private directory 

1 5 serving agent which maintains a separate information base. By using the existing standard, the PCI 
network and mail PCI servers message handling can independently manage the networks without 
interfering with the PCI service. 

II. The PCI Server 

20 The PQ server is a peripheral which performs messaging and call redirection functions 

and interfaces with the PCI Database to update the subscriber profik. The PCI server performs a 
variety of functions. For example, an illustrative PQ server: 
x is an X.400 Gateway, 

x routes messages using the X.400 messaging protocol; 
25 x connects proprietary messaging protocols into X.400 protocol; 

x interfaces with wireless data networks; 
x interfaces with messaging systems; 

x interfaces with the PQ database to access subscriber profiles information; 
x processes messages as specified by the user in the service profile; 
30 x provides media conversion such as text to fax or fax to text; 

x provides access to an X.S00 directory to determine addressing schemes for packet 
data; 

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PCT/US96/03064 

WO 97/33421 

supports signaling between wireless data networks for management functions such as 

registration; and 

x maintains a service profile cache. 

5 Rg 5 is a detailed iUustration of a preferred embodiment of a PCI server 48 according to the 
present invention. The PCI server 48 includes three main elements: a call processor 1 10. a data 
messaging peripheral 1 12. and a shared disk memory 1 13. 

The call processor 110 comprises a plurality of interconnected computers. The 
messaging peripheral 1 12 maybe implemented by a computer such as a DEC XAP system 

The call processor 1 10 includes a PCI applications server 1 14. The application server 
is the central decision making point of the wireless messaging service described below in Section 
VL Thus, the server 114 controls message routing, screening, and notification for the w^eless 
rrrssaging service. 

The application server 1 14 is connected to a PDA protocol handler 115. The protocol 
hauler is the interface to the wirofcss network 54. for example the RAM wbeless network. Tors 
handles messages to be sent to and torn the subscribers PDA 30. A plurality of persona! digttal 
assistants (PDA) 30 are connected to the wireless network 54. 

The application server 1 14 also manages a PCI database protocol handler 126. The 
protocol handler 126 u u* interface berween the can processor 110 andthe PCI daubase44. The 
Ration server 114 also manages » Se^e Pro* C*b= 5.. The Service Pro* Cache 51 is 
^^mthet^ofrbeappfcauonse™ 114. ThecacheSlsrorosasubserofthedarain 
Ok subscriber psofile srored in the PCI database 44. This subset is subscriber profile inforrnatton 
which cunemly needs to be accessed frequently by the PCI server 4!. 

The Service Profit Cacte 51 srores and accesses data .elated to access systems such 
a as wholes dau providers and messaging services, and subscriber locaiion. The Service Profile 
Cache 5! ma, srora and updare dara relaed » the subscribe, focatio. such as muring addrass for 
subscribe* speci* «Me* tenranals; store arar updaes sesvtcea relaed dara for a paricolar 
tcmtal type (such as urn- or hi- deecdon); matnrain a list of the w *crib« wiraless dara proves 
and message services: track to subscribe* rermmal srarua (tegteerad or regisraradv. provade a 
30 gen^s^vte paofle for t»n«a« t^sagutg ser*e; and P^vtfe a ^ prou* »" — ■ 
associated sendee based on subscriber selected parameter*. 



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The application server 1 14 also manages the registration status of each application on 
each PDA 30 and controls, customer profile information via each PDA 30. 

The call processor 110 also includes an IP Functions Server 130. The IP Function 
Server 130 manages CallCommand applications. This server is also connected to the PCI database 
5 protocol handler 126 for communication with the PCI database 44 and the PDA protocol handler 
1 15 for communication with the wireless network 54. The PCI database protocol handler 126 
handles both interfaces between the PCI database and the PCI server, as described below. 

Thus, the two main application servers in the call processor 1 10 arc the IP Function 
server 130 for CallCommand applications and the PCI applications server 114 for wireless 

10 messaging services. 

The call processor 1 10 also includes a plurality of communication interfaces. The 
protocol handlers 115 and 126 have already been discussed. The alphanumeric paging server 
(APS) 132 gives the call processor 110 the ability to provide alphanumeric paging services. The 
APS 132 includes one or more moderns to communicate with terminal equipment of a network 
15 134 maintained by a paging service provider. The APS communicates with the paging service 
provider using, for example, the TAP protocol (Telocator Alphanumeric Protocol). 

The call processor 110 also includes a plurality of control processes which control 
peripheral equipirent external to the call processor 1 10. These controllers are as follows: 

A nrssage controller 136 controls the data messaging peripheral 1 12 and controls the 
20 sending of rressages between the call processor 1 10 and the data peripheral 112. 

The mobility controller 49 comprises the PCI database protocol handler 126, the BP 
function server 130, the service profile cache 51, and the PCI application server 1 14. The mobility 
manager provides control logk: for user authentication, service request validation, locaiion 
managenmt, user access to servfce profile, access registration, and communication management 
25 such as routing to user-specified destinations. The mobility controller 49 contains the service logic 
and handles servkx related processing for personal data and service access such as service feature 
analysis; access system mapping relationship information; identity management; subscriber 
variation and auttentication; billing information based on the subscriber; wireless data specific 
routing information for rmssage delivery and subscriber paging; subscriber service validation; and 
30 subscriber review and modification of the subscriber's profile. 

A transaction controller 150 controls a switch controller 152 and a voice peripheral 
controller 154. The switch controller 152 controls the digital switch 156 which connects to the 

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public switched telephone network 58. The voice peripheral controller 154 controls the voice 
peripherals 160. which are for example text-to-speech converters. 

the switch 1 56 and the voice peripheral 1 60 are also connected by a T 1 line 1 6 1 . The 
digital switch 156 is connected to the public switched telephone network by a plurality of 
5 transmissionmediasuchasTl lines 162, fax lines 163. and ADSI lines 164. 

The data messaging peripheral 112. which is optional, is now discussed in greater 
detail. The data messaging peripheral is the gateway to the wireline electronic mail network, which 
network is designated 170. The data messaging peripheral has a message transfer agent 158 for 
transferring messages between the call processor 1 10 and the data networks 170. 54 either directly 
10 or through the PDA protocol handler 1 15. The messaging peripheral 1 12 also includes a POP 
(post office protocol), server 190 and associated memory 192 for providing a message stonng 
capability. The message directory 194 is used for storing a subset of service profile cache 51 
relating to the routing of e-mail messages. 

The messaging peripheral 112 includes the message gateway 140. The message 

1 5 gateway 140 has the following capabilities: 

1) Notifying the PCI application server 1 14 in the call processor that e- 

mail has arrived from the wireline e-mail network 170 for a subscriber. 

2) Accept a request from the PCI application server 1 14 to send an e-mail 

message to a wireline add r ess. 

3) Accept a request from the application server 1 14 to provuie all unread 

nxssages stored in the server 190 which would have been sent to a primary destination if the 

subscriber had been registered. 

4) Accept a request from the application processor 1 14 to rewrite to the 

message store server 190 or back to the sender. 



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Using the call processor 1 10 and its associated peripherals, a wide variety of services 
may be performed. These have been discussed above briefly and are described in detail in Section 
VI below. However, to understand how the call processor 1 10 operates to provide these services, 
some exemplary descriptions for certain services is provided. 

For example, when a wireline e-mail message arrives at the PCI server's Data 
Messaging Peripheral 112. the messaging gateway 140 and messaging Controller 136 send 
notification to the PCI application server 1 14 of the e-mail arrival The PCI application server 1 14 



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will query the profit &che 51, or if necessary, the PCI database 44. Driven by data in the 
subscriber's profile, the PCI application server 114 executes service logic to determine where to 
forward the e-mail (Le.. forward to PDA 30 or to POP server 190 depending on screening 
outcome), and what nrdia, if any, to use to send notification of the e-mail arrival. 

5 For another example, when a CallCommand call arrives at the PCI server 48. the 

procedure is as follows, the switch controller 152 and transaction controller 150 forward the call 
to the IP Functions Server 130 based on the dialed number. The IP functions 130 sends a 
provide_instructions 1 129+ nvssagc to the PCI database 44 to determine how to handle the call. 
The PCI database 44 and IP functions applications servers 130 begin a conversation of messages 

10 which perform a sequence of functions which play an announcement to the caller, send notification 
to the PDA, etc. When a response arrives from the PDA 30, the IP functions server 130 forwards 
the response to the PCI database 44. The PCI database 44 will then direct IP functions server 130 
to forward the call to a routing number and/or play a synthesized message to the caller. 

If a subscriber wishes to update the subscriber profile by DTMF, the procedure is as 

15 follows. A call arrives at the PCI server 48. The switch controller 152 and transaction controller 
150 forward the call to the IP functions server 130 based on the dialed number. The IP functions 
server 130 sends a provide_instructions 1 129+ message to the PCI database 44 to determine how 
to handle the calL The PCI database 44 sends a request to play an announcement and collect digits 
("please enter PIN", collect PIN). The IP functions server 130 returns the result of this request to 

20 the PCI database 44. Again the PC database 44 sends a request to the IP functions server 130 to 
play an announcenrnt and collect digits ("voice menu", menu selection). The IP functions server 
130 returns the result of this request to the PCI database 44. 

This process repeats as users are guided through menus and change profile elements. 
The PCI database 44 interprets the collected DTMF tones and updates the subscriber's profile 

25 accordingly. 

When a PDA 30 sends an e-mail message addressed to a wireline address the 
procedure is as follows. The PDA 30 sends a UDP send.mail message to the PCI application 
server 1 14. The PCI application server 1 14 detects the message is not destined for another PCI 
subscriber and forwards the request to the messaging controller 136, which forwards it to the 
30 nrssaging gateway 140 which is in the Data and Messaging Peripheral 112. The messaging 
gateway \4& interfaces with the MTA 158 to send the e-mail to the wireline network 170, using, 
for example, the Simple Messaging Transfer Protocol (SMTP). 



BNSOOOO:<WO 9733421A1* 



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WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 

The F»a server 48 may be based, for example, on either an X.400 MTA or an SMTP 
router and can convert between both protocols. The PCI server 48 may receive text messages 
from a variety of different text messaging systems such as Internet maiL third party messaging 
systems, or proprietary messaging systems. In the example where PCI routes messages using an 
X.400 MTA. these messages must be converted to conform with X.400 protocol before they can 
be routed. Thus, an exemplary messaging gateway is an X.400 gateway, which can be designed 
and built by a person of ordinary skill in the art. 

0. Tii ? pfT Database 

A PQ Database 44 maintains the subscriber profile, controls the Call Command 

functions, and handles DTMF-bascd subscriber profile updates. 

The PCI database architecture shown in Fig. 6 comprises several application and 
support components. The application components include Multiple Services Application Platform 
(MSAP) 202; Service Provisioning and Creation Environment (SPACE) 204; and Data and Report 

15 Subsystem (DRS) 206. 

The service components include the Maintenance and Operation Console (MOC) 208. 
the Intelligence Peripheral Interface (IPI) 210; the Generic Data Interface (GDI) 212; the Service 
Network Interface (SNI) 214; and the Data and Report database (D&R) 218. 

The service network interface (SNI) 214 provides a communication interface to 
^0 external systems such as switch 50 and PCI server 48. These interfaces include the IPI 210 and 
GDI 212 which connect the Pa database to the Pa server via the TCP/IP network 213. The 
GDI 2 12 is used for uploading and downloading a subscriber profile to the Pa server 48. The DPI 
ZlOisusedfortransnaningDT^ For redundancy, 

each intelligent peripheral interface (IPI) and generic data interface (GDI) processor preferably 
25 requires two logical connections to the PCI server. 

The Mubipfc Services Application Platform (MSAP) 202 includes a call processor 220. 
a first call process request (CPR) database 222. an MSAP common 224. a shared memory 226. 
an* a call contact database (CCDB) 228. The call processor 220 receives messages from and 
sends messages to a message distributor 219 in the SNI 214. The message distributor determines 
30 whether the message received from the caU processor 220 is to be sent to the IPI 210 or the GDI 
211 The call processor receives messages from the message distributor and sends them to the fust 
CPR database, the CCDB 228. and/or the shared memory 226. The first CPR database 222 stores 



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the subscriber profiles. The MS AP 224 connects the fist CPR database 222 with the second CPR 
230. which resides in SPACE 204. MSAP common 224 updates one of the CPR databases 222. 
230 when changes have been made to the other CPR database. The CCDB 228 is a temporary, 
dynamic storage for storing subscriber profiles, and related data during profile update procedures. 
5 The shared memory 226 allows different processors to use the same data. 

SPACE 204 is a service provider-operated module through which new PCI database 
applications are created, and new subscriber profiles are initiated. SPACE 206 includes the second 
CPR database 230 which contains the identical information as the first CPR database 222 in MSAP 
202. When a new subscriber profile is to be created, a service provider uses a display terminal 232 
10 in SPACE to provision a new service profile including certain subscriber information. The 
subscriber profile is activated through MSAP when the user initially registers. Service provider 
changes made to the second CPR database 230 are transmitted to the first CPR database 222 in 
MSAP via the MSAP common 224. Changes made to the second CPR database 230 by a service 
provider are not transmitted to the service profile cache 51 in the PCI server 48 until a later time. 
1 5 That is, the PCI database 44 does not send data to the PCI server 48 unless requested by the server 
48. The server profile cache 51 will be updated with this new information the next time the PCI 
server 48 requests a profile download, for instance when the subscriber next registers. SPACE 204 
provides a function paralfel to the Service Management System described above. 

The Data and Report Subsystem (DRS) 206 collects data about the PCI database 44 
20 usage which may be helpful to tte service provider. For example, errors made by the subscriber 
when updating the user profile are noted. The types of alterations made, times such alterations are 
made, and the like arc also stored for future use by the service provider. 

MOC 1 10 is a network maintenance support system which monitors the status of the 
network and checks for system failures and the like. 
25 Wten a subscriber wishes to update the subscriber profile using a PDA 30, the 

procedure is as follows. The PDA 40 communicates with the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 
sends a GetData message having a "Service Key", which is a preferably a ten digit PCI subscriber 
number (e.g., a telephone number), to the PCIdarabase 44 over the GDI 212. The GDI 212 
translates the GetData nrssage into a formal understandable by the PCI database 44. The message 
30 is sent through the nrssage distributor 219 and call processor 220 to the first CPR database 222 
where the subscriber profile resides. The Service Key is used to obtain the correct subscriber 
profile and the profile is sent through the call processor 220 to the message distributor 219. The 

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w6 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 

message distributor determines that this message is to be sent to the PCI server 48 va the GDI 
212. (The reason for this is discussed below.) The GDI 212 translates the data into a format 
suitable for the TCP/IP network and is transmitted to the PCI server 48. The requested changes 
are performed in the PCI server 48 and the updated profile is sent back to the PCI database 44 
through the TCP/IP network, the GDI 212. message distributor 219. call processor 220 and to the 
first CPR database 222. The call processor 220 also sends a message through the GDI 2 12 to the 
PC server 48 which will be sent a wireless transmission to the PDA 30 acknowledging the 
subscriber profile update. The changes are also sent to the MSAP common 222 where they are 
sent to the second CPR database 230 in SPACE 204. 

During this process, information may be temporarily stored in the Call Contact 
Database (CCDB) 228. The CCDB database 228 provides temporary storage for subscriber 
profile updates that are suspended because they are waiting for action by a subscriber or waiting for 
data from an external system, such as the PCI server 48. During the time intervals between acuon 
by the user or delays in receiving data from an external system the call processor 220 stores the 
15 information in the CCDB database 228 and processes other calls. 

When a subscriber desires to update his or her subscriber profile using a touch tone 
phone, the procedure is as follows. The subscriber calls, for example, a service number provided 
by the service provider. The call is routed to the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 sends a 
message to the PCI database 44 via the IPI 210 that me DTMF commands are present. The 
message is sent through the message distributor 219 to the call processor 220. The appropriate 
subscriber profile is retrieved from the first CPR database 222 in the MSAP 202. 

The call processor 220 instructs the PCI server 48 to play a voice announcement 
instructing the caller to enter the subscriber ID and password, by pressing the appropriate digits on 
the touch-tone phone. The information is entered by the caller, and W clatabase 44 validates 
this mfonnatioa If the validation determines that the cater is an authorized subscriber, the PCI 
database 44 instructs the PCI server 48 to ask the subscriber to select which subscriber profile 
informatfonistobenxxlified Only two fields are modifiabte using DT^ message changing a 
wireline registration or recording a personalized greeting. The subscriber selects either registering 
at a wireline phone or recording a personalized greeting. If wireline registration is selected, the 
PCI database 44 instructs the PQ server 48 to prompt a ten digit telephone number to which all 
incoming calls will be routed If the subscriber selects to record a personalized greeting, the PCI 
database 44 instructs the PCI server 48 to prompt the subscriber for a new greeting . 



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If invalid infonnation is entered at any time, the PCI server 48 plays an error message 
to the subscriber and the subscriber retnes the modification. If the retry fails, the call is terminated. 
Otherwise, the subscriber's profile is updated according to the modification, data synchronizing the 
messages are sent to the PC server 48 and the call processor 220 instructs the PCI server 48 to 
5 inform the subscriber that the PCI service profile was updated. 

The call processor 220 also sends a message through the message distributor 219 to 
the GDI 212 and to the PQ server 48 which updates the service profile cache 51 in the PCI server 
48. the changes stored back in the first CPR database 220 are sent to the MSAP common 224 
where they are sent to the second CPR database 230. Note that DTMF function signals, which use 
10 the 1 129+ protocol are routed through the IPI 210 and the subscriber profile data which uses the 
GDI protocol, are routed through the GDI 212. 

IV. The PCI Server/Database Interface 

The interface between the PCI server 48 and the PCI database 44 is based on two 
15 protocols. The first protocol is H29+. This protocol will be used to support the PCI Call 
Command feature and for subscriber initiated profile manipulation using DTMF. The second 
protocol is Generic Data Interface. The GDI is used for subscriber profile management, 
specifically downloading a subscriber profile from the PCI database 44 to the PCI server 48 and for 
applying updates to the profile stored in the PCI database 44. 
20 . Fig. 7 shows the logical links from the PCI database 44 to the PCI ser/er 48. The PCI 

database 44 consists of a mated pair of PCI databases 44a 44b. each containing three call 
processors 220 which each share the load. The links 250 are TCP/IP links between Intelligent 
Peripheral Interface (IPI) 210 and the Generic Data Interface (GDI) 212 processors on the PCI 
database 44 to the PCI server call processor. Two logical connections are made from each IPI 2 10 
25 and GDI 212 processors to the PCI server for redundancy. Thus, a foil SCP configuration 
supporting PCI would preferably require 24 logical links, as shown in Fig. 7. The PCI database 
initiates the opening of the logical links. 

In this illustrative embodiment the CaHCommand feature employs the 1 129+ protocol. 
For the wireless messaging feature, PCI uses the GDI protocol. The GDI tag IDs assigned for the 
30 PCI subscriber profile elements are provided in Appendix B. 

Appendix B also shows the PQ profile data, including the profile elements, their data 
types, maximum lengths, and GDI tag IDs. An * indicates elements which were shortened to 32 

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bytes because of GDI byte limitations. The description of the types and lengths of these elements is 
as follows: 

dN BCD-encoded digits. The number N represents the maximum number of BCD digits, 
not octets. 

5 cN Up to N ASCII characters. 

cN Binary integer N bytes in length, in network byte order (highest order bit transmitted 

first). 

Because the portion of the PCI subscriber profile downloaded to the PCI server is large 
(preferably approximately i.000 bytes), and a maximum Transaction Capable Application Program 
0 (TCAP) message size is 256 bytes, the profile must be managed in segments. The service profile is 
divided into six segments as shown in Table i. Each segment is assigned a unique numeric 
identifier. 



PCI Profile Segment 


Segment ID (decimal) 1 


Personal data 


1 I 


J CC service profit 


2 


E-mail routing 


3 


E-mail subject screening 


4 


E-mail from screening 


5 


Voice mail profile 


6 



Certain data in a subscriber profile provides a subscriber's preferred media for messages 
delivery and notification. The encoding for these types are given in Table 2. 



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Media Type 


Code I 


Alphanumeric Pager 


A I 


E-mail message store 


S 


Fax 


F 


— 

PDA 


P 


Voice mail 


V 


Wireline e-mail 


E 


Null 


Z 



For example, if the subscriber prefers to receive e-mail which passes screening via the PDA 30. 
then the "primary destination one" profile element will contain a TP". 

Fig. 8 illustrates a message flow for profile retrieval using the GDI protocol. A 
subscriber attempts to register with the PCI server either explicitly or implicitly (registration is 

5 discussed in detail below). The PCI server 48 send a GDI GetData query to the PCI database 44 
over one of the GDI links (line 260). The PCI server 48 may send one GetData data query for 
each PCI profile segnxnt. Each query will be processed by the PCI database 44 as an independent 
transaction with a unique TCAP transaction ID. Each GetData query sent by the PCI server 48 
will include a "Service Key" parameter which is a ten-digit PCI subscriber number (e.g., a 

10 telephone number). This key should be used by the PCI database 44 to identify the subscriber. In 
each GetData is a list of tag IDs listed in the profile elements to be retrieved. The PCI database 44 
responds to the GetData data query with a GetData response (line 262). The response contains a 
return code and data for each element requested in the GetData data query. 

Fig. 9 provides a message flow between tte PCI server 48 and the PCI database 44 for 

15 a profile update originating from a wireless PDA 30. This wireless profile update uses the GDI 
protocol. A subscriber performs a profile manipulation *riviry, and the PDA 30 sends a profile 
data iressage to the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 sends a GDI SendData query to the PCI 
database 44 over one of the GDI links (line 264). The PCI server 48 may send one SendData 
query for each PCI profile segtmnt for which a profile element was updated Each query will be 

20 processed by the PCI database 44 as an independent transaction with a unique TCAP transaction 
ID. 

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Each Send Daia query sent by the PCI server 48 will include a "Service Key" 
parameter which is- the ten digit PCI subscriber number. This key should be used by the PCI 
database 44 to identify the subscriber. Each SendData query contains a list of tag IDs provided in 
Appendix B and data for the profile elements to be updated. Not all tags in this segment may be 
5 included in the SendData query; only those profile elements which are actually updated by the 
subscriber will be sent. The PCI database 44 should not update data for which no tag was included 

in the SendData query. 

The PQ database 44 responds to the SendData query with a Send Data response ( line 
266). The response contains a return code for each element requested in the SendData query. 
10 Flg . io is an illustrative example of one possible CallCommand message flow between 

the PO server 48 and the Pa database 44. (CallCommand is discussed in more detail in section 
VI D.) The exact call flow for CaUCommand depends upon the implementation of the service 
logic by the service designer, and upon options selected by the CallCommand subscriber. The 
CaUCommand functions illustratively use the 1 129+ protocol and the EPI 210 (see Figs. 6 and 7). 
l5 As illustrated in Fig. 10. a CallCommand call arrives in the PO server 48. The PCI 

server 48 sends a provkkjnstructions query to the PO database over one of the 1 129+ links (line 
268): A TCAP transaction ID is generated for the query. The dialed number digits parameter 
contains the personal numbers of the Pa subscriber (Le.. Service Key). The ANT digits contain the 
automatic number identification, if any, of the caller (ANI is a telephone network capability). The 
'20 Pa database sends a 1129+ sendjo.resource command to the Pa server 48 to play an 
announcement and collect digits (line 270). The PO server 48 plays the announcement, collects 
the digits, and sends a response containing a return code and the digits collected (line 272). 

PQ database 44 sends a 1129+ play.application comrnand to the PO server 48 to 
notify the PDA 40 of the incoming call (line 274). The PO server 48 responds with a return code 
25 and a destination number (entered by the subscriber at the PDA 30) to which the call is routed (Une 
276). The PO database 44 sends a 1129+ switch_to.resource command to the PO server 48 
instructing the PO server 48 to route the call to a destination number (line 278). The Pa server 
responds with the return code executing that request (line 280). 

Flg . 11 is an illustrative example of one possible message flow between the PCI server 
30 48 and the PO database 44 for a DTMF profile manipulation message. The DTMF profile 
manipulator uses the 1 129+ protocol through the IPI 210. The exact call flow for DTMF profile 



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manipulation depends upon the implementation of service logic by the service designer, and upon 
options selected by the PCI subscriber. 

As shown in this illustrative example, when a call arrives at the PCI server, the PCI 
server sends an 1129+ provide.instnictions query to the PCI database (line 282). The called 

5 number contains a dialed number (Le.. the service number for a DTMF updates), while the ANl 
field contains the ANI. if . The PCI DTMF profile manipulations Call Process Request CPR is 
triggered by the dialed service number. The CPR 222 instructs the PCI server to play 
announcements and collect digits, guiding the subscriber through voice menus and prompts (lines 
284. 288). The PCI server responds to each request with digits collected (lines 286. 290. 294). 

10 The CPR updates subscriber's profile with data collected via DTMF. 

V. PDA/PCI Interface 

Communication between the PDA and PC use, for example, an X.25 transport using 
the UDP IP protocol. A brief discussion of the PDA structure is provided. The PDA 30 is 
15 preferably a notebook or palm top computer having a wireless network interface. The PDA may 
be. for example a Hewlett Packard Omnibook 300 notebook computer running a PCI application. 
Fig. 12 illustrates an exemplary PDA. The PDA 30 has a central processing unit 295 connected to 
a bus B. The central processing unit ("CPU") 295 performs most of the computing and logic 
functions of the PDA 30. A memory 295 is connected to the bus B, which stores information to be 
20 provided to the CPU 295 or otherwise used by the PDA 30. An input/output device 297. such as a 
keyboard, is also connected to the bus B which allows a user to input data for storage in memory 
296 or for use by CPU 295. A display 298 is connected to the bus B. The PDA 30 also has a 
wireless communication interface 299 for ccrnnainicaiion with a wireless cornmiinication network. 

The PDA/PCI interface involves six types of message flow. These messages are: (1) 
25 rcgistratfon/deregistratiDn; (2) wireless messaging; (3) retrieving E-Mail; (4) cross-media 
notification; (5) CaDCommand; and (6) profile management. 

There are two types of registration and deregistrauon: explicit and implicit. Explicit 
registration occurs when a PCI subscriber starts the PCI application software on the PDA 30 (this 
is called start-up registration) or when the subscriber clicks a status check button or one of the 
30 service registration request buttons on the PDA 30 either for the CalKZomrnand or wireless 
messagin g service. Once successfully registered, if the subscriber's profile is not already present in 
the service profile cache 51 maintained by the PCI server 48, the PCI server 48 will request a 

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download of the subscriber's profile from the PCI database 44 to the service profile cache 5 1 . The 
pa server 48 sets the subscriber's registration status in the cache 5 1 to match those requested by 
the subscriber for the wireless messaging service for the call command service. 

Fig. 13 illustrates one example of the message flow between the PDA 30 and PCI 
server 48 during explicit registration. This flow is also used by a subscriber to check registration of 
CallCommand or wireless messaging services. A subscriber starts the PCI application software on 
the PDA or clicks the service status check. CallCommand registration, or wireless messaging 
registration buttons on the PDA The PDA sends a registration request to the PCI server 48 with 
the subscriber's validation information (subscriber ID and password (line .300)). The PDA 30 aJso 
starts a timer during which the PDA 30 will wait for a response from the PCI server 48. The PCI 
server 48 server receives the registration request and checks if the subscriber is provisioned and if 
the subscriber ID and password are correct. The PCI server then sends a registrar 
acknowledgement (line 302). If the subscriber is not provisioned, no service profile exists and the 
acknowledgement includes an "unrecognized subscriber" response. If the subscriber ID and 
password are invalid, the acknowledgement includes an "incorrect password/PIN" response. 
Otherwise, the PCI server acknowledgement includes a "success" response. If the PDA 30 does 
not receive an acknowledgement from the PCI server within a predetermined time, it aborts the 
registration attempt and tells the subscriber to try again later. 

Implicit registration automatically registers a subscriber for the wireless messaging 
0 service when the subscriber is currently not registered and wishes to send or fetch E-Mail from or 
to a PDA 30. Implicit registration is done as follows. The PCI server receives a fetch or send 
request from a subscriber who is not registered for the wireless messaging service. The PCI server 
48 retrieves a copy of the subscribers service profile from the PCI database 44. if necessary, and 
.^dates the subscriber's ID and password. The PCI server 48 validates the profile contents to 
25 nuke sure that subscriber may use the wireless messaging servce. If wireless messaging . 
permitted, the PCI server 48 processes the request. Otherwise, it sends an acknowledgement 
indicating the reason why the subscriber is not permitted to use the wireless messaging serv*e. 
The message flow is the same as illustrated in Fig. 13. 

Once the subscriber is registered for either the CaDContrnand serv« or the wireless 
30 rressagmg serv.ce. the subscriber remains registered until the subscriber explicaly deregisters by 
eitherquittmgtheapplkuttfonorclictog The subscriber 

can also be implicitly deregistered for the wireless messaging service by the PCI server 48 provtded 



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tn £ PCI did hot detect any wireless messaging activities to or from that subscriber for a given 
duration of time. -Although the subscriber is deregistered, the subscriber's service profile will 
remain in the service profile cache 51. The profile remains in the cache as long as the PCI server 
has some activity for the subscriber, such as incoming e-mail messages within a predetermined 

5 time, such as four hours. 

No PDA-to-PCI server messages may be sent be the subscriber to implicitly register for 
CaflCommand. thus, a subscriber should not be implicitly deregistered from this service. Implicit 
registration and deregistration occurs only for the wireless messaging service, and not for 
CallCommand. A subscriber remains registered for CallCommand as long as he or she is running 
10 the CallCommand software application on the PDA 

Explicit deregistration occurs when a subscriber quits the PCI application software on 
the PDA (this is called exit deregistration) or when the subscriber clicks one of the service 
deregistration request buttons on the PDA for the CallCommand or wireless messaging services. 
Fig. 14 is an illustrative cnibodiment of a message flow between the PDA 30 and PCI server 48 for 
15 explicit deregistratioa A subscriber quits the PCI application software on the PDA or clicks a 
deregistration button on the PDA The PDA 30 sends a deregistration request to the PCI server 48 
with the subscriber's validation information (the subscriber ID and password) (line 304). The PDA 
30 also starts a timer during which the PDA will wait for a response from the PCI server 48. The 
PCI server 48 sends an acknowledgement (line 306). The PCI server 48 receives the deregistration 
20 request and checks if the subscriber ID and password are correct. If the subscriber ID and 
password are not correct, the acknowledgement includes an -incorrect password/PIN" response. 
Otherwise, the acknowledgement includes a "success" response. If the PDA 30 does not receive 
an acknowledgement from the PCI server 48 after a predetermined time, the PDA 30 assumes that 
h is out of radio coverage and informs the subscriber to retry later. 
25 Implicit deregistration occurs when the PCI does not detect any wireless messaging 

activity from or to the subscriber for a given duration of time, for example four hours. The PCI 
will also try to implicitly deregister a subscriber from the wireless messaging service in the middle 
of the night in the event that the subscriber inadvertently left the PDA 30 turned on. The PCI 
server 48 keeps a time-stamp of the most recent wireless messaging activity for each registered 
30 subscriber in the subscriber's service profile maintained in the service profile cache 51. Whenever 
the Pa server 48 detects any wireless messaging activities to or from a particular subscriber, the 
time-stamp is updated to the current time. The stored time-stamp of a registered subscriber is 

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periodically compared to the current time. When a predetermined time elapses, the PCI server 48 
assumes that the subscriber is out of radio coverage or has quit the PC application. 

For implicit (or automatic) deregistration. the message flow is the same as illustrated in 
Fig. 14- The PCI server 48 sends to the PDA 30 a deregistration request containing registration 
5 information about the subscriber. The PCI server 48 also sets a timer during which it will wait for 
a response from the PDA 30. When the PDA 30 receives the deregistration request, it responds 
with registration acknowledgement which contains the registration information currently known to 
PDA. When the PCI server 48 receives the registration acknowledgement, it updates the 
subscriber s registration status based on information in the acknowledgement. The PCI server 48 
10 also updates the wireless messaging time-stamp associated with the subscriber to the current time. 
If the PQ server 48 does not receive an acknowledgement within a predetermined time as 
described above, the PCI server 48 assumes that the subscriber is no longer registered and removes 
all references to the subscriber from the service profile cache 5 1 . 

Sending and receiving e-mail wireless messages involves two types of message flows: 
15 sending messages from the PDA 30 to the PCI server 48 and from the PCI server 48 to the PDA 
30. 

Fig. 15 is an illustrative example of a message flow sending an E-mail from a PDA 30 
to an PQ server 48. When a subscriber sends an E-Mail notification from the PDA 30. the PDA 
30 forwards the E-Mail notification to the PO server 48. The body of the E-mail contains, for 
20 example. "to;fro m subject;cc" information (toe 308). The PCI server acknowledges this 
notification (toe 3 10). If the E-mail is longer than can be transmitted in a single message, the PDA 
30 segments the E-mail into multiple, sequentially numbered messages and sends them to the PCI 
server (toes 312, 316, 320). Each message sent from the PDA is responded to with an 
acknowledgement containing the reception status of the message and the sequence number it is 
25 acknowledging (toes 314. 318, 322). The PDA 30 and Pa server 38 use the sequence number to 
rnamtain a sequential flow of packets. Out of seque«x messages are dscarded. Once all of the 
packets are received, the Pa server 48 puts them into their original order using the sequence 
oumber and forwards the now assembled E-mail to a message transfer agent, which then forwards 

the E-mail to its intended destination. 
30 ThePDASOstartsatinereachtinxitseiKisoutanE-rr^ If the PDA 30 does not 

receive an acknowledgement after a predetermined tine (for example ten seconds), the send 
operation is aborted and the E-mail is stored in a focal outbound queue for redelivery in the future. 

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When an E-mail is being delivered from an. PCI server 48 to a PDA 30. a similar 
message flow is used The only difference is that the PC server 48 initiates the flow and sends the 

initial messages instead of the PDA 30. 

Retrieving E-mail involves two types of message flows: retrieving undelivered E-mail 
5 . addressed to the PDA 30 and retrieving E-mail delivered a messaging system, such as a wireline e- 
mail system. When a -subscriber is out of radio coverage or is not registered with PCI. the PCI 
sends E-mails addressed to be delivered to the PDA (PDA-bound E-mail) to an external mail 
storage system. The PCI server will also send certain E-mail directly to an external mail storage 
system (MS-bound E-mail), such as the subscriber's wireline E-mail connected to his or her 
10 personal computer, according to the subscriber profile stored in the PCI database 44. 

A registered subscriber can retrieve PDA 30 bound E-mail at any time by starting 
"FETCH" operation,. The PCI will send the PDA bound mail from the external mail storage and 
will also summarize MS-bound E-maiL 

An illustrative example of the message flow between the PDA and the PCI server for 
15 retrieving undelivered PDA bound E-mail is shown in Figs. 16a and (b). If there are no MS-bound 
messages, an illustrative message flow is shown in Fig. 16(a). The PDA 30 sends a fetch request to 
the Pa server 48 (line 324) and starts a timer, which waits for an acknowledgement. If no 
acknowtedgement is received within a predetermined time, for example twelve seconds, the PDA 
30 assumes it is out of radio coverage and informs the subscriber to try again later. In response to 
20 the request, me PCI server 48 logs into an external mail storage system specified in the subscriber s 
profit. If any PDA- bound E-mail is stored m the external storage system, the PCI server 48 will 
(a) move the PDA bound E-mail from the external mail storage system into a pending area in the 
Pa server, (b) send an acknowledgement to the PDA indicating the number of PDA bound E-mail 
now residing in the pending area; and (c) initiate delivery of these PDA bound E-mail from the 
25 pending area to the PDA (line 326). 

If there arc MS-bound E-mail messages, an illustrative message flow is shown in Fig. 
16(b). The PDA sends a fetch request (line 328) and starts a timer. Whenever the PQ server sends 
a summary message, it starts a timer. If the PC server 48 does not receive an acknowledgement 
within a certain predetermined time, for example ten seconds, it will assume that the PDA 30 is out 
30 of radio coverage, abort the send operation and discard the summary infbnnatioa In response to 
the request, the PO server 48 will (a) send an acknowledgement to the PDA indicating the number 
of MS-bound E-mail present (line 300); (b) extract summary information from those messages; and 

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"(c) send the summary to the subscriber's PDA (line 332). When the PDA receives an 
acknowledgernent from the PCI server, it informs the subscriber based on the contents. 

Summary information for the MS-bound E-mail is formatted into one ASCII text per 
E-mail and sent to the PDA. If the summary information, or the number of summarized E-mail 
5 require more than one message, the PCI server 48 splits the summary information into multiple 
sequentially numbered segments and sends each segment in a separate message (lines 336. 340). 
Each message from the PCI server 48 is responded to by the PCI server with an acknowledgement 
containing the reception status of the message and the sequence number it is acknowledging (lines 
334. 338. 342). Out of sequence messages are discarded. Once all of the packets are received, the 
10 PDA 30 puts them into their original order using the Sequence number; 

Once the summary information describing the MS-bound E-mail messages is reviewed, 
the subscriber may start a FETCH operation to retrieve these MS-bound E-mail messages. Fig. 17 
is an illustrative example of a message flow between the PDA 30 and the PCI server 48 retrieving 
MS-bound E-mail. The subscriber selects an MS-bound E-mail message to be received. The PDA 
15 30 sends a retrieve request to the PCI server 48 containing the message selected by the subscriber 
(line 344). The PCI server 48 responds with an acknowledgement (line 346). The PCI server 48 
. logs into the external message storing system specified in the subscriber's service profile and moves 
the MS-bound E-mail specified in the request out of the storage system into a pending area in the 
PQ server 48. The PCI server 48 initiates a send operation which delivers the E-mail in the same 

20 manner as discussed above. 

Cross media notification (e.g., PDA notification of voice mail message receipt) is sent 
to the PDA 30 using the same delivery as a wireless E-mail message to the subscriber. The PCI 
server 48 originates the notification E-mail and the e-mail subject is •'message notification". The 
body of the notification E-mail contains the message sender's address (Le.. the phone number for a 

25 voice mail), the date and time the message arrived at the PQ; the type of nxdia. (Le., v 

FAX, E-mail or other); whether the message is marked urgent (if detectable); the length of the 
message (for example, in minutes for a voice mail message); and. if appropriate, the subject of the 
message, 

CallCommand allows a PCI subscriber to reroute or direct calls in real time. The 
30 subscriber may receive notification on the PDA 30 that a call is waiting. Using the PDA 30, the 
subscriber may instruct the PCI to route the call to specified destination number or have the PCI 
server play a message entered by the subscriber using synthesized speech. 



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WQ97/33421 FCT/US*/W064 

When a call is made to a CallCommand subscriber's number, it is routed to an PC 
server 48. The PCI server 48 queries the PCI database 44 to determine now the subscriber s profile 
has directed the call to be processed. If the subscriber is registered at a known telephone number, 
the PCI database 44 instructs the PCI server 48 to route the incoming call to the given telephone 
number (assuming that the call meets any screening requirements). If the subscriber is not 
registered at a known telephone number, the PCI database 44 will provide a default routing 
number and a timer value instructs the PCI to play an announcement customized by the subscriber 
to the calkr and start collecting DTMF digits within that time period. The PCI plays the 
announcement and starts the timer provided by the PCI database 44 and then begins collecting 
DTMF digits entered by the caller. If no digits are collected within a predetermined time period, 
the PQ routes the call to a default number indicated by the subscriber's profile in the PCI database 
44. If DTMF digits are collected, the PCI puts the caller on hold determines if the caller meets 
screening requirement, and handles the call accordingly. If the call is to be directed to the 
subscriber, the PCI attempts to contact the subscriber. 
15 pig. 18 is an illustrative example of the message flow between the PDA 30 and PCI 

server 48 for a GulCommand calL The PCI server 48 sends a notification message to the 
subscriber s PDA 30 to notify the subscriber that a call is waiting (line 348). The message contains 
the DTMF digits entered by the caller. The PCI server 48 starts two timers, which are the time 
interval the PQ server 48 expects to receive an acknowledgement from the PDA 30 and the time 
interval the PCI server 48 expects to receive a response from the PDA 30. respectively. The 
typical values for these timers arc ten and forty seconds, respectively. The time to receive an 
acknowledgement should be less than the time for the response. 

After receiving a notification message, the PDA sends an acknowledgement to the PCI 
(line 350). This informs the PCI server 48 that the PDA 30 is within radio coverage and that the 
25 subscriber has been notified about the incoming calL Onatheacknowledgementisreceived.it 
cancels the acknowtedgement timer, but leaves the response timer ticking, waiting for a response to 
come from the PDA 30. If the PCI server 48 does not receive an acknowledgement within the 
predetermined time, it assumes that the PDA is either out of radio range or is turned off and 
cancels the response timer and routes the call to a (kfauk nun±er programmed into the user profit 
30 in the PQ database 44. The subscriber is notified of the incoming call by the CallCommand 
interface on the PDA 30. The DTMF digits entered by the caller provide the subscriber with the 
name and/or telephone number of the incoming caller. 



20 



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The subscriber can decide to route the call to directory number or voicemail enter a 
text message to be played to the caller, or both. The PDA will send a response to the PCI server 
48. which carries the number to which the call should be routed, a short text message to be played 
to the caller through synthesized voice, or both (line 352). When the PCI server receives the 
5 response, it cancels the response timer and executes the subscriber's decision in the response and 
sends an acknowledgement which contains how the subscriber's decision is to be carried out ( line 
354). 

If the response timer expires before the PCI server 48 receives a response, the PCI 
server 48 routes the call to a default number obtained from the PCI database 44 and send a status 
10 message to the PDA 30 to inform the subscriber that the caller is no longer waiting (line 356). 
Also, if the caller decided not to wait any longer (that is hangs up or presses which allows the 
caller to go to the default number) the PCI sends a status message providing this information. The 
PDA acknowledges the status message (line 358). 

Profile management allows the subscriber to modify wireless messaging and Call 
15 Command services by updating certain elements in the subscriber's service profile stored in the PCI 
database 44 and the service profile cache 51 in the PCI server 48. Profile information is not stored 
locally on a PDA 30. Updating the subscriber's profile using a PDA 30 always requires the 
subscriber to have a profile download from the PCI. 

Profile management involves two types of message flows, profile download and profile 
20 upload. Fig. 19 is an illustrative example of the message flow between the PDA 30 and the PCI 
server 48 for a profile download. As indicated above, any profile change requires a profile 
download because the profile is never stored in the PDA 30. A subscriber starts a profile 
management application on a PDA 30 and requests a profile download. The PDA 30 sends a 
download request to the PCI server and requests a copy of the subscriber's modifiable profile 
25 elements to be downloaded to the PDA 30 (line 360). The PCI validates the identity of the 
subscriber through its subscriber ID and password. If the subscriber's identity is not validated, the 
PC sends an acknowledgement and an error code and terminates the profile update session. If the 
subscriber's identity is validated, the PCI downloads the subscriber's modifiable profile elements 
(lines 362, 366. 370). Attached as Appendix C is a list of tags for modifiabk profile elements. The 
30 PDA 30 acknowledges the received data (lines 36" 368, 372). The PDA starts a timer after 
sending the download request. If the PDA does not receive an acknowledgement or data from the 
PQ server within a predetermined amount of time, for example, ten seconds, it assumes that it is 

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out of radio coverage and informs the subscriber to try again later. The PCI server 48 starts a 
tiner each tin* it' sends out data to the PDA 30. If the PCI server 48 does not receive an 
acknowledgement from the PDA 30 within a predetermined time, for example ten seconds, it will 
abort the profile download operation. 

Once the subscriber finishes editing the profile on the PDA. a profile upload 
request is issued. An illustrative example of the message flow between the PDA 30 and the PCI 
server 48 for a profile upload is shown in Figs. 20(a) and (b). After the subscriber issues a profile 
upload request, the PDA 30 sends an upload request to the PCI server 48 requesting permission to 
send the updated profile eteirents (step 374). The PCI server 48 validates the identity of the 
subscriber, for example by checking the subscriber ID and password, and checks if there is an 
associated download request issued by the same subscriber. The check for an associated previous 
download request is necessary so that the PCI server 48 is sure that the profile the subscriber wants 
to change is the profile that the PCI server 48 has just sent. If the subscriber s identity is not 
validated, or there is no associated download request packet, the PCI server sends an error code to 
the PDA 30 and terminates the profile update session. If the subscriber's identity is validated and 
there is an associated download request, the PCI server 48 honors the request by sending an 
acknowledgement and a status code of "OK M to the PDA 30 (toe 376). When the PDA 30 
receives the OK, it formats the updated profile elements and sends them to the PCI server 48 in the 
same way the profile was sent to the PDA 30 during the download phase (lines 378-386). If no 
20 error is detected, the PCI server 48 sends the updated profile elements to the PCI database 44 to 
commit the change. After a confirmation is received from the PCI database 44, the PCI server 48 
sends an acknowfedgement with status code of "OK M to the PDA to confirm and conclude the 
profile update session (line 388), as shown in Fig. 20(a). 

Fig. 20(b) is an illustrative message flow when the PCI server 48 detects errors in 
25 an uploaded profile. The upload proceeds as above (lines 390-398). If the PCI server 48 detects 
errors in the updated profile elenmts it responds with an error message to notify the subscriber 
about the invalid profile elemnt (line 400). The PDA acknowledges receipt of the error message 
(line 402). The PCI server 48 sends the invalid profile elements in a similar way as the profile was 
sent to the PDA 30 during the download phase (lines 404, 406). 
30 The PDA 30 starts a timer when its sends out an upload request or sends out data. 

If the PDA 30 does not receive an acknowledgement from the PCI server 48 within a certain 



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predetermined time, it will abort the profile upload operation and inform the subscriber to retry at a 
later time. 

VI. Services 
; a. Wirclgis, E-mail Messaging 

PQ includes several wireless text message sending, receiving, and service control 
features. PCTs wireless text messaging services are based on three network-based capabilities: 

x message integration combining voice message notification, voice mail. 

telephone calls. e-maiL and fax; 

x message routing and delivery, ie.. the PCI is a wireless and wireline 



10 x 
network gateway, 

x database access. i.e.. subscriber profile, authentication, and validation. 
The PCI uses personal communications service-integration capabilities to integrate the wireless 
service capabilities available to the subscriber. This is accomplished by providing the subscriber 
15 with control over the message routing and delivery by the subscriber accessible "subscriber profile- 
stored in the PQ. The subscriber profile contains subscriber programmed instructions on message 
receipt, origination, and notification. Thus. PO operates as a messaging gateway for providing 
access to multiple wireline and wireless networks, while using subscriber profile information to 
control sending and receiving options. PCI allows wirekss service providers to integrate the vok* 
20 messaging, e-mail and fax message services for one subscriber through a single telephone number. 
Thus, one phone number may provide a single link between the service provider and the 
subscriber's voice and data communications lines. 

The message sending features include coinmunications across disparate networks 
and broadcast comminicarions. A subscriber may send voice mail e-mail and fax messages 
25 between different service providers and networks. A subscriber may also send broadcast e-mail 
and fax messages, which broadcasts may mix e-mail and fax messages within a single distribution 
list. For example, the subscriber may type a message on a PDA and send it to a distribution list 
over a wireless network. The distribution list may direct the FCI to deliver the message to the 
office as an e-mail and to a client as a fax. 
30 The message receiving features include personal number addressing, selection of 

message receipt media format, selection of cross-media message notification, and selection of 
message screening and delivery options. A subscriber may receive voice (e.g.. phone), voice mail 

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notification, e-maiL and fax communications under a single personal telephone number. A 
subscriber may direct e-mail and fax delivery based on selected parameters, such as time-of-day. 
day-of-week. etc. A subscriber's media message notification, voice mail notification of e-mail or 
fax messages, e-mail notification of voice mail or fax messages, and fax notification of e-mail or 
5 voice mail messages may be delivered to the subscriber based on selected options and parameters. 

Alternatively, if the subscriber's wireless terminal is not activated, e-mail messages 
may be automatically routed to alternate destinations as defined by the subscriber's profile. For 
example, the subscriber may not want to receive all telephone calls at a visiting location to avoid 
unnecessary interruptions and unwanted incoming call charges. The subscriber directs the PCI to 

10 send notification of phone calls to the pager and to route the call to voice maiL Once notified, the 
user can determine from the phone number included in the pager notification whether to call the 
person directly, check voice maiL or ignore the call until a later time. The subscriber may also 
direct which nessages are to be routed to the subscriber's current serving network, which are to be 
sent to another network, and what media is to be used to receive certain messages. The subscriber 

1 5 may also designate, for example, that if the wireless terminal is off, all text messages to be sent to e- 
mail and all voice messages are to be sent to voice maiL 

The PQ service control features include supporting subscriber profile management, 
supporting personal mobility across wireless and wireline networks, and supporting wireless 
terminal mobility. A subscriber's profile may be updated by sending text messages from a PDA 

20 over a wireless network or DTMF (touch-tone) messages from either a wireline or wireless 
terminaL The subscriber may program the profile to select media for receiving and sending 
information; select cross media for message notification; select message screening and delivery 
options; select single voice mailbox storage (for subscriber's with more than one voice mailbox); 
and seta a PCI service password All of these options may be maintained over wireless or 

25 wireline terminals. The subscriber may automatically register and deregister a wireless terminal 
thus updating tte subscriber's profile to receive or reroute messages as preprogrammed in the 
profile. 

The wireless data network provides data transport between the PQ server 48 and 
the subscriber using a wirefess data terminaL such as a PDA 48. The wireless data network may 
30 connect to the PQ server in a variety of ways, using a variety of protocols. For example, the 
wireless data network may connect to the PCI using a leased line and run a proprietary protocol to 
connect the PCI server via standardized protocols such as TCP/IP. 

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Text messaging systems may be connected to the PC server through for example, 
Frame Relay. SMDS. ISDN, leased line interface, or other transport mechanism effective for 
supporting data communications may be used. An inter-message handling system protocol, such as 
X.400 (in which case X.400 gateway conversion is needed), or Internet SMTP or other protocols 
5 supported by an interworking unit terminating the data transport interface, may be used to forward 
messages between the PCI server 48 and the system accessing the PCI. 

The PCI server will preferably support sending and receiving faxes in the T.434 
format. The PCI server may also preferably suppon sending and receiving faxes using the simple 
mail transfer protocol (SMTP) supported by the TCP/IP transport protocol 
l0 . Fig. 21 shows an illustrative embodiment of a PCI service supporting text 

messaging systems. In this example, a subscriber has a personal computer 402 at the office 
connected to a local area network (LAN) 414 and an enterprise text messaging system (for 
example, a local network e-mail) 413. a personal computer at home 416. and a wireless terminal, 
such as PDA 30 that may send and receive messages. All of these devices are connected to the 
15 PQ. For example, the subscriber's home personal computer 416 may be connected to the PCI 40 
via a modem and a wireline data network 4 1 8 over either a PSTN or ISDN. 

Persons connected to the LAN may send text messages to the subscriber by using 
the local text messaging system without using the PCI. That is. the user of computer 420 can send 
an e-mail to the subscriber's office computer 412 without entering the PCI node 40. Because the 
20 enterprise text messaging system 413 is connected to PCI, all enterprise messaging users may send 
messages to and receive messages from all PQ subscribers (including those not connected to the 
local text messaging system 413) by using an appropriate PCI address. 

A person connected to a different enterprise messaging system, such as text 
message handling system 2 422. can send messages to the subscriber on message handling system 1 
25 413 by routing the message through the PCI Server 48. 

PCI subscribers are assigned a single personal telephone for both voice and data 
communication. For example, an E.164 address (Le.. a telephone number) may be assigned to a 
PCI subscriber to use as the single PCI address. These phone numbers may be geographically 
based according to current PSTN architecture, but it is also possible to use portable universal 
30 numbers. Fifteen digit number formats may be desirable to permit sub-addressing. For example, a 
message destined for a PCI subscriber may be addressed to the subscriber's telephone number, e.g.. 
201-555-5555. If an originating mail system such as a LAN mail system or third party message 

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handling system requires a domain identifier, the originator may have to specify 201-555-5555 @ 
PQ, or on the Internet 201-555-5555 @ peine;. When the PQ server 48 receives the ressage. it 
will took at the subscribers profile stored in call process request database 222 stored in an PCI 
database 44 to determine how to handle the incoming message. An example of a few of the 
5 options that PCI may provide for the subscriber are to: 

x send the message to the subscriber's wireless PDA; 
x send the message to the subscribers wireline computer at home; 
x send the message to the destination text messaging system at the office; 
x send a notification of an incoming message to the wireless data terminal 
10 and the actual message to the text messaging system 

x send the message to any or all of the above; 

The subscriber may send text messages over the wireless data network or wireline 
data network to the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 consults with the subscriber's profile at the 
PQ database 44 and forwards the message to the appropriate destination, depending on the 

15 routing destination found in the profile. Text messaging systems not connected to the PCI 40 may 
send text messages to PCI subscribers by using another network connected between the senders 
text messaging system and the PQ subscriber's text messaging system, for example, the non- 
connected text message may be connected to a PQ over the Internet 
The flow for wireless messaging is now described 

20 The flow for a PQ subscriber receiving an e-mail message to a wireless PDA 30, 

for example, is as follows. An e-mail message is sent from a wireline or wireless sender to a PQ 
subscriber and arrives at the PQ server 48. The incoming e-mail contains a recipient address in the 
format of "201-555-5555 @ pci.net" where 201-555-5555 is the subscriber's ten-digit personal 
numberandpci.net is the PQ server's domain name in the Internet. 

25 The PQ server 48 checks the subscriber's service profile, either from the profile 

service cache SI in the PQ server or by downloading the subscriber profile from the PQ database 
44 into the cache 51 to determine how to process the e-mail message. The profile contains 
screening and routing information and cross media notification information. The PQ server 48 
uses this information to send incoming e-mail to an actual destination address that can be a 

30 wireless, wireline, or paging address using, for instance, the UDP/IP protocol over a wireless data 
network; the Internet SMTP protocol over the Internet wireline network; or the Telocater Alpha 
Numeric Protocol (TAP), respectively. In this case, the subscriber has programmed into the 



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subscriber profile to have the e-mail sent to a PDA 30, The PQ server 48 receives the e-mail 
message and forwards it to the wireless data network programmed into the profile. The e-mail is 
transmitted over a wireless data network 39 for receipt by the PDA 30. 

If the e-mail cannot be delivered, the PCI server returns the e-mail to the original 
5 sender with a short description of why the delivery was unsuccessful using the SMTP protocol. 

If an e-mail message is to be delivered to an alphanumeric paging address, the PCI 
server translates the e-mail message into a paging message and sends the paging message to the 
paging network specified in the subscriber profile. The protocol between the PCI server and the 
paging network is the Telocater Alpha Numeric Protocol (TAP). The PCI server formats the 
10 paging message into a maximum page limit with a maximum number of characters per page. For 
example, the page limit may be two pages and a maximum of 256 characters per page. The PCI 
server does not verify whether a paging message is actually delivered by the paging service 
provider. It will however, verify that the message was successfully sent to the paging service 
provider. Because the PCI server does not provide this verification, it is under the assumption that 
1 5 messages sent to a pager arrive successfully at the pager. 

If the subscriber profile contains an option for voice message notification of e-mail 
messages, the PCI server generates and sends a digitized prerecorded voice announcement to the 
address specified in the subscriber service profile. The protocol used to deliver the voice message 
notification is the AMIS- Analog Protocol. 
20 in this illustrative embodiment, a preferred PCI server node functions as an X.400 

message transport agent or SMTP router and routes messages destined for PQ subscribers and to 
those destined for users connected on other systems. In the case of an X.400 message transfer 
agent (MTA). X.400 addresses are used to internally represent subscriber addresses. The 
translation from the "user friendly" subscriber addresses such as E.164 numbering to the X.400 
25 address would be done via a look-up table (ROM or other memory device) at the PQ access 
module or the X.400 gateway. Destination or source addresses from users on other networks are 
not converted to X.400 addresses, but are left in the native address format of the sending or 
receiving system An X.400 gateway address may be added to the message header, however, to 
allow PQ to route the message to ah appropriate gateway. 
30 The PQ server 48 is responsible for delivering a message to the subscriber listed in 

the destination field of the message. In a simple case, the subscriber has an X.400 or Internet 
mailbox accessible to the PO via one of its access connections. Alternatively, the subscriber 

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profile may contain forwarding addresses which route the message for delivery to unusual 
destinations. For example, the subscriber's mailbox may reside on another message handling 
system, a wireless data network, wireline data network, or PSTN destination associated with a fax 
machine. The delivery of such a message to a final destination is handled by an interworking unit 
which is responsible for doing address translation and. if necessary, format translation as defined by 

the subscriber profile entry. 

For subject e-mail screening, the subject field is analyzed to determine if a match 
exists before comparing the address field. If the subject field matches an entry on the screening list, 
the treatment for a matched entry will occur. That means, in this illustrative embodiment, that 
subject screening takes precedence over address sender screening. . That is. if e-mail originated 
from ah address that is excluded from the e-mail screening address list, the e-mail will still be 
delivered according to the screening criteria. 

If the PDA 30 is not registered for the wireless messaging service or if the PDA 30 
is out of radio coverage at the time the message arrives at the PCI server 48. the message will be 
sent to the subscriber's external message storage system, such as the text message system 413. 



Fig. 22 shows an illustrative embodiment of a PCI service for voice mail system 
The voice mail systems 430 may use the public telephone network 432 and Audio Messaging 
20 Interface Specification (AMIS) - Analog Protocol to connect analog voice messages to the PCI. 
Alternatively, the voice mail system may use a modem 434. a private line 436. or an ISDN BPJ 
AMIS - Digital Protocol 438 to connect digital voice mail signals to the PCI. 

Voice messaging systems on the PCI must be able to send a message to the PCI 
server 48 providing notification that the subscriber has received a voice message. The voce mail 
25 system may send this text message using, for example, by asynchronous interfaces with a modem; 
X.25; ISDN BRI. or TCP/IP interfaces. Preferably, the PCI server 48 supports the AMIS Analog 

. and Digital interfaces. 

The PQ voice messaging call flow is as follows. Using the AMIS-Analog 
Protocol the system originating the voice message sends message information to the PQ server 48 
30 specifying the type of message to be delivered, the message length (in minutes), the originator's 
mailbox number, and the recipient's mailbox number. When the message arrives at the PCI server 
48. the originator's mailbox is extracted from AMIS-Analog Protocol and is compared to the 

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subscriber's voice mailbox number stored in the subscriber profile. If the two values match, the 
voice message is already in the mailbox designated by the subscriber. In this case, the PCI server 
48 sends a bogus error code to the originating voice messaging system using the AMIS- Analog 
protocol so that the voice message is rejected and is not forwarded to the PCI server 48. The PCI 
5 server 48. however, has header information needed to send a notification message to the 
subscriber, if such notification is required by the subscriber profile. 

If the originator's mailbox does not match the subscriber's voice mailbox number, 
the PQ server 48 analyzes the message length parameter. If this parameter exceeds a certain 
predetermined length, for example three minutes, the PCI server 48 sends a response message to 
10 the originating voice messaging system with an error code specifying that the message is too lone. 
No further processing of the voice message occurs. If the message length is not longer than the 
predetermined time, the PCI server 48 sends a response message to the originating voice 
messaging system accepting the message. The originating voice messaging system will then 
forward the voice message to the PCI server, 
j 5 when the voice message arrives at the PCI server 48. the PCI server 48 attempts 

to route the voice message according to the screening, registration, and routing options contained 
in the subscriber profile. Using AMIS-Analog Protocol the PCI server 48 sends message 
information to the subscriber's destination voice messaging system, specifying the type of message 
to be delivered, length of the message in minutes, the originator s mailbox number, and the 

20 recipient's mailbox number. 

For voice messages that cannot be delivered to the destination, for example if the 
mailbox is full the destination system sends a non-delivery notification message to the PCI server 
48 specifying the reason why the message is undeliverable. The PCI server 48 retries delivering for 
up to a system defined time period. If all of the retries fail the PCI server 48 uses the AMIS- 

25 Analog Protocol to return the voice message to the originating voice messaging system with an 
appropriate non-delivery notification. A pre-recorded non-delivery announcement is sent to notify 
the message originator that the message was undeliverable. No further processing occurs. If the 
destination system accepts the message, the PCI server 48 forwards the voice message to the 
destination system, 

30 if the subscriber chooses e-mail notification of incoming voice messages, the 

notification is sent via wireless or wireline network to the subscriber as specified in the subscriber 
profile. If the subscriber selected page notification, the notification will be sent through the paging 

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network according to the profile. Either notification contains the mailbox number that originated 
the voice message, the date and time the message was received, and the length of the voice 
message in minutes. 

In another example, a user having a digital voice mail system creates a voice mail 
5 message and addresses it to a user of analog voice mail system. The destination telephone number 
indicates that the message must be routed to the PCI server 48. The PCI server 48 checks the 
recipient's user profile and deterrhines that the destination recipient hais an analog voice mail 
system. The passage is then passed into the analog voice mail system via the AMIS • Analog 
Protocol. 

10 The subscriber will receive all of the voice mail messages at the voice mail system, 

if that is what is selected in the subscriber's profile. The subscriber may also set up the profile to 
receive at a wireless data terminal a text message that provides a notification of a voice mail 
rressage and envelope information of the message. Alternatively, a recipient voice mail system 
may send a text nressage containing a notification and envelope information of the message. 

15 One feature of the AMIS-Digital Protocol is that if the original voice message is 

marked urgent by the sender, the AMIS-Digital Protocol includes as priority status information in 
the rrrssage sent from the voice messaging system to the PCI server. Using this information, the 
PC can screen priority messages. 

The voice messaging gateway converts vendor proprietary voiccmail format to the 

20 X.400 format and vice versa, thus bridging different messaging formats. It is responsible for voice 
transcoding from proprietary to or from X.400 form. It also maps options to or from the X.400 
protocol as specified in AMIS. 

25 Fig. 23 illustrates a PCI service for fax messaging. The PCI server 48 is connected 

to public switch telephone networks 432 via analog lines 444 or a Tl trunk 445. Fax machines 440 
and fax servers 442 are connected to the PSTN 431 The PCI server 48 may also be connected to 
fax machines 440 and fax servers 442 by private lines 446 or an ISDN 438. For a subscriber to 
receive faxes, the fax machine telephone number must be supplied to the subscriber profile. The 

30 PCI will send a fox to the designated number and may send a text notification message or take 
other action as the user has selected in the profile. If the user has specified a wireless data terminal 



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to receive the fax. the PCI server 48 will perform the' necessary wireless adaptation and send a fax 

through a wireless data tenhinaL 

A fax may be sent to a PCI subscriber by routing the fax to the PCI node, the user 

must dial the telephone number of the PCI server 48 to send the fax to the subscriber. The PCI 
5 server 48 will send the fax to the subscriber's telephone number. The PCI server will check the 

subscriber's user profile to determine how the fax should be delivered. In this example, the fax 

message is sent to a fax machine at a designated telephone number. 

Fax users having existing fax machines 440 must place a call over the PSTN 

network in order to access the PQ. This is because existing fax machines 420. unlike fax servers 
10 422. are designed for point • to -point communication, not fax network communication. Users of 

the existing fax machine 420 can access the PCI in two ways. One way is by two stage dialing. 

The sender first dials the PCI 48 and then dials the recipient's number after receiving a prompt from 

the PCI. Alternatively, the user can dial •FX+destination address. The fax machine user can 

directly dial from the fax terminal the recipient telephone number proceeded by "FX. which signals 
1 5 the switch to automatically forward the fax call through the PCI server. 

Fax servers that support X.400 messaging will include the personal number in the 

X.400 address field and there is no reason for the PCI to prompt the user for the personal number. 



20 D. rallCommand 

PQ CallCommand (CQ service provides subscribers real-time control of voice 
calls while using a wireless data terminal or PDA. CC is designed to enhance personal number 
services (it., HLR), by providing real time call management capabilities to nomadic users. 
CC provides the subscriber with four call management options: 
25 x location independence (supplementing personal number/HLR 

applications); 

x real-time call screening (using AN1 and/or prompting the caller to enter a 

number); 

x real-time call redirection (routing calls to any telephone number based on 

30 the calling party); and 

x real-time short messaging (inputing or selecting a short message to be 

played to the caller). 

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When a caller dials, a PCI subscriber's telephone number, the callers telephone 
number, is entered for screening. After the caller's number is entered, the PDA 30 can map the 
calling number to a name and alert the subscriber of an incoming call. The PDA 30 visually 
displays the name and/or number of the caller. The subscriber can then use the PDA 30 to accept 
the call by entering the telephone number of a nearby telephone to which the call will be routed. 
The subscriber can alternatively have the call forwarded to another number, such as a colleague s 
phone or a vojce mailbox,, If the subscriber decides not to, respond to the caller, the caller is played 
an announcement and forwarded to a pre-determined default telephone number, such as a votce 

mail box or secretary. 

CC allows the subscriber to send a brief message to the caller. Upon being alerted 
to an incoming call the subscriber can select from a pre-defined list of messages, or type a new 
message, on the PDA 30. The message is transmitted to the PCI server 48 which convens the text 
message into speech and plays the message to the waiting caller. The caller receives the message 
and can leave voice mail for the subscriber, or be forwarded by the subscriber to an alternate 

15 telephone number. 

Call command enables nomadic subscribers to manage, in real time, incoming calls 
using screening, rerouting and messaging to the caller. Call command subscribers having a PDA 
30 are visually informed of the name and or number of the caller. The subscriber can elect to either 
accept the call routing it to a specified number, such as the number of a nearby telephone: route 

20 the call to an alternate number, such as a voice mailbox, colleague phone number or secretary 
phone number, or respond to the caller with a brief keyed in message, which is played back to the 
caller in synthesized speech. The service also provides a number of non-real time call management 
features including predetermined screening lists, day of week\time of day routing schedules; and 
location sequencing. Call command allows mobile subscribers to manage and receive telephone 

25 calls using a personal digital assistant. 

Call command users pre-subscribe to a wireless data service such as Ardis or RAM 
mobile data for E-mail call management, and other wireless data applications. The wireless data 
provider provides a radio interface to the subscriber's PDA 30. A focal exchange carrier interfaces 
with the wireless data provider over a PCI interface. When a caller enters his or her number the 

30 focal exchange carrier forwards a data message containing the caller party information. The 
wireless data provider locates the subscriber and forwards the calling parry information to the 



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subscriber's PDA 30 where the subscriber is alerted of the calL The subscriber then forwards the 
data packet containing a routing number to the PCI. The PCI reroutes the call accordingly. 

Fig. 24 is ah illustrative example of a CallCommand service network. A caller. Joe 
450. wishes to speak with Mary. Mary, who is away from the office, is a PCI subscriber having the 
5 CallCommand service. She has a PDA 30. which is turned on and registered at a visiting location. 
Joe dials Mary's office phone number. This phone number connects Joe's '-call to the PCI server 48. 
The PCI server 48 network instructs Joe to type in his telephone number: The PCI server 48 puts 
Joe on hold and plays back a message using synthesized speech informing Joe that the network is 
trying to locate Mary. The network recognizes that Mary is registered at a visiting location and 
10 sends a phone notification over a wireless data network 39. Mary is notified on a PDA 30 that a 
phone call is coming from a particular phone number. If Mary has already programmed a name 
corresponding to that phone number in a directory on her PDA 30. that name will also appear. 
Therefore, she is aware that she has a phone call from Joe Smith. Mary has several options. She 
may type or select a preselected message to be sent from the PDA 30 to the PCI network which 
15 converts the message into synthesized speech and play it back to Joe; she may forward the call to a 
nearby telephone, such as a cellular phone or a nearby pay phone 452 or forward the call to her 
secretary or colleagues* phone number, she may send a message and forward the call; or she may 
direct the call to her voice maiL In this illustration, Mary selects that the call be routed to a local 
public pay telephone 451 The call is routed over public switched telephone networks 432 to the 
20 selected telephone and Mary and Joe speak. 

CallCommand has several advantageous features. Call command includes real time 
call screening which allows the subscriber to direct calls in a predetermined fashion based on the 
caller, the time or date. etc. Call command also has real time call rerouting which allows the 
subscriber to reroute calls to any phone number on a per call basis. That is, when a call is received. 
25 the subscriber may enter a phone number to which she wishes the call to be routed For example, it 
may be a phone in an office she is visiting, a rented cellular phone, or a public telephone. In the 
event that a subscriber cannot respond to a caller because PDA is out of range, the subscriber is 
preoccupied, the PDA is turned off. etc.. the subscriber may select a default routing number. Such 
a default number could be a voice mailbox, secretary, colleague, or other phone number. 
30 call command also has a call messaging option. This allows the subscriber to send 

a brief message to a calling party. The message is typed on the PDA 30 and sent by wireless means 
to the PCI. The PCI converts the signal into synthesized speech and plays it to the caller. For 

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exinpk a subscribe!" may bis oh ah important customer call when his supervisor calls, expecting a 
respdo&'TB^ subscriber can send a message to the manager ('Talking to customer, 

call you back"), while still communicating with the customer. 

The call messaging feature has two aspects. The first is the wireless messaging 

5 from the PDA 30 to the PCI. The second is the text to speech translation. The subscriber may 
type in a message on the PDA 30. The msssage originates as a data message from the wireless 
data provider network and is forwarded to a local exchange carrier network over the PCI interface, 
The PQ server 48 translates the wireless text message into speech and plays it back to the caller. 

Call command also has a predetermined call management option. This feature 

10 allows a subscriber to have unanswered calls sent to predetermined default telephone numbers. For 
example, in the event a call cannot be answered, it is first routed to, for example, a service hotline; 
if the service hotline does not answer, it is forwarded to a secretary; and if the secretary does not 
answer, then it is forwarded to voice maiL Each time the call is forwarded to the next number a 
message is played back to the caller. The routing numbers and sequence order may be altered by 

15 updating the subscriber profile in the PCI database. 

This feature also allows the subscriber to predetermine the management of certain 
numbers! For an example, a subscriber may want to be notified in real time only if a calling party 
number matches that of an imrediaie family member, supervisor, or important client. In other 
cases, the subscriber may wish to have calls automatically rerouted to a default number, such as a 

20 voice mailbox or secretary. For a company which does business over a large geographic area, the 
subscriber may wish to have the phone call routed to different places based on the geographic 
origin of the call For example, calls originating from New York or New Jersey may be routed to a 
sales representative for that area and calls originating from California are routed to a sales 
representative for that geographic area. 

25 The call managenxnt feature allows the subscriber to predetermine call routing 

based on the tin* of day. For example, a subscriber may wish to have calls forwarded to a 
custonrr service staff during business hours and be personally notified of calls during non-business 
hours. 

Wireless technologies make subscribers constantly available, therefore it is 
30 important to give them the ability to accept or decline communication attempts at their discretion. 
While delivering the calling number to the PDA 30 allows a subscriber to locally screen each 
attempt as they occur, the subscriber may be in an environment where distractions are unacceptable 

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such as an important meeting. Therefore, the subscriber is able to create lists against %vhich callers 
are screened by the network delivering the service. These network resident lists reduce the number 
of call attempts to the subscribers remote wireless device. The CallCommand service allows 
subscribers to turn screening on and off and add or remove numbers and names from these lists. 
5 Like the wireless data services. CallCommand service profile management allows 

subscribers to modify or update their subscriber profiles which preferably reside in a PCI database 
44. Profiles are created and deleted by the service integrator controlled by the service provider. A 
subscriber may modify the profile by either wireless or wireline messaging using DTMF tones or 
data 

l0 subscriber profile can be updated by a wireless device such as a PDA 30. A 

subscriber profile may be modified by wireline cornmunications as well. A subscriber may use a 
telephone or wireline data terminal to contact an PCI database 44. The PCI server 48 acts as a 
mediation device between wireless terminals and an PCI database 44 for DTMF profile updates: It 
is preferable that the wireline network be supported by a service management operating system 
1 5 capable of prompting subscribers using a DTMF telephone for a profile update that is completed 
when the service management operating system makes the appropriate changes in the subscriber's 
profile in the PQ database 44. When a service management operations system is used to modify 
the profile in the PQ database 44, the changes should also be reported to PQ server 48 so that the 
service profile cache 51 may be modified accordingly. 
20 Call command has its locus of control in service logic in the PH database 44. The 

PQ database 44 service logic provides (1) service status maintenance, which maintains the status 
of the subscriber as registered or dercgistered; (2) call screening, which provides network based 
screening of incoming calls; (3) call routing, which provides routing destinations for each call: this 
information is based on information received from the subscriber in real time via the Pa server 48 
25 or by preprogrammed instructions in the subscriber profile in the PCI database 44; (4) profile 
management support, which is service logic in the Pa database which permits "downloading" of 
the subscriber's profile to the PO server 48 for presentation to an update by the subscriber through 
the PDA 30; (5) security, wherein subscriber authentication and validation must be supported to 
safeguard the subscriber's personal information and status such as location; and (6) accounting 
30 management, the PO database 44 collects accounting parameters to support service provider 
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The subscriber profile in the PCI database 44 must contain certain information. 
This type of information includes a subscriber identifier subscriber authentication information: 
wireless data provider parameters; registration status; service mode (default, override, or 
command); screening lists; and routing tables (including day of week and time of day parameters). 
5 The application supporting the CallCommarid server in the PCI server 48 includes 

a mobility management function. The mobility management function provides status location 
information to a database in the PCI database 44 and is responsible for delivering a Temporary 
Location Destination number on request from the PCI database 44. To do this, the PCI server 48 
is responsible for ( 1) location registration, the PCI server 48 updates the PCI database 44 with the 
10 subscriber's PDA 30 status (for example, registered on a wireless data network or registered on a 
wired telephone); (2) play announcements and digit collection for caller information and 
presentation to the subscriber. (3) remote alerting, such as formatting and sending call information 
through a wireless data network to the PDA 30 for presentation to the subscriber; (4) profile 
management support (the PCI server 48 must support the ••downloading" of the subscriber s profile 
15 and packaging for presentation to update by the subscriber through the PDA 30); (5) security (the 
subscriber authentication invalidation information must be supported to safeguard the subscriber s 
personal information and status such as location); and (6) account management, the PCI server 
should collect accounting parameters for presentation to the service provider for billing. 

20 VII. Message Flows 

PQ wireless messaging involves three types of message flow. The first is sending a 
message from one subscriber to another, the second is receiving a message regardless of whether 
the subscriber is using a wireless or wireline terminal and the third is sending a message to a non- 
. subscriber. 

25 fig. 25 is an illustrative example of the message flow of a PCI wireless subscriber 

sending a message. The PCI user submits a message 502. The message is received by a message 
transfer agent in the PCI server. The MTA copies and temporarily stores the originating and 
destination addresses 504. The MTA sends to the mobility manager function in the PCI server a 
request to validate the sending user as a PQ subscriber 506. The mobility manager sends this 

30 validation request to the PCI database and waits for a response 508. Upon receipt of an affirmative 
validation from the PCI database, the mobility manager sends the validation response to the MTA 
5 10. 512. The MTA then sends the mobility manager a request for the address of the user's home 

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MTA 5 14. The mobility manager routes this request to the PC dat a base 516. Upon receipt of a 
response from the PCI database, the mobility manager routes the home MTA address to the MTA 
518, 520. The MTA then routes the message to the home MTA 522. If a third party PCI database 
must be consulted, the home MTA request will be directed from the PCI database to a third party 

5 PCI database 524, 526, 

Fig. 26 illustrates an example of the message flow of a wireless PCI user receiving 
a message. When the PCI receives a message from a subscriber, the MTA in the PCI server copies 
and temporarily stores the destination address and the message 530. The MTA sends to the 
mobility manager function in the PCI server a request for the PCI subscriber's user profile 532. 
10 The mobility manager will retrieve this profile request from the PCI database 534 (If third party 
PCI database is involved, the local PCI database contacts the third party PCI database through a 
switch transfer point 536. 538.) Upon receipt of the subscriber's profile from the PCI database 
540, the mobility manager requests the message from the MTA using a "message forward request" 
message 542. When the mobility manager receives the message from the MTA 544. the mobility 
15 manager processes the message as indicated by the subscriber's profile, which may involve media 
conversion or screening 546. After processing the message, the mobility manager sends the 
message to the MTA for delivery 548. 550. Alternatively, the PCI server mobility manager 
function may directly deliver the message to the termination receiver 552. 

Fig. 27 illustrates an example of a message flow from a PCI wireless subscriber to a 
20 non-subscriber, When the MTA receives a message from a PCI subscriber 560. the MTA copies 
and temporarily stores the originating addresses and the message 562. The MTA sends the 
mobility manager a request to validate the originating address as a PCI subscriber 564. The 
mobility manager will send this validation request to the PCI database and wait for a response 566. 
When the mobility manager receives an affirmative validation response from the PCI database 568. 
25 the mobility manager sends the validation response to the MTA 570. Next, the mobility manager 
sends to the PCI database a request for the PCI subscriber's profile 572. Upon receipt of the 
subscriber's profile from the PCI database 574. the mobility manager requests the message from the 
Mi A using a "message forward request" 576. Upon receipt of the message from the MTA 578. 
the mobility manager processes the message as indicated by the user's profile, which may require 
30 media conversion or obtaining the addresses for the distributbn list for the message 580. After 
processing the message, the mobility manager sends the message to the MTA for delivery 582. 
584. Alternatively, the MTA may directly deliver the message 586. 

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Vm The PDA Application 

To better understand the capabilities of PCI and PDA/PC server interface, a 

discussion of the PDA user interface is helpfuL The user interface is application software residing 
5 in the PDA. This software is described by describing the screens displayed on a PCI subscriber's 

PDA screen. The following discussion is for an illustrative embodiment of the PDA user interface. 

A person skilled in the art recognized that the interface may be implemented in a myriad of ways. 

Fig. 28 is an illustrative example of a PDA user interface main menu. The menu 

allows the user to enter the CallCommand or wireless messaging services, update the user profile, 
10 or check the status of the system by clicking on buttons 610, 612, 614, 616. respectively. 

Fig. 29 shows a computer screen after "status request" 616 is selected. The status 

request screen shows that there are five local originating messages (waiting to be sent by the PDA) 

and three outgoing tressages (waiting to be retrieved) in boxes 618. 620, respectively. The various 

services' status is also displayed. As seen in Fig. 29, this subscriber's wireline registration is on. as 
15 seen in box 622. This registers the subscriber on a particular wireline telephone, seen in box 624. 

This registration will direct calls to this phone number. The status request also advises this 

subscriber about the status of the CallCommand and wireless messaging features, as seen in boxes 

626. 628. 

Fig. 30 illustrates an exemplary screen if the subscriber clicks "Call Command" 610 
20 on the main nrnu (Fig. 28). If tte subscriber clicks on "YES" 630, a screen such as Fig. 31 
appcan. The screen includes a window 632 whkh shows the status of various received telephone 
calls. The status indicates whether an incoming call was answered, forwarded to another number, 
was hung up before being answered; unanswered; or forwarded to voice maiL The phone number 
and receipt time and date of each call are displayed The subscriber may save or delete any entry 
25 the subscriber by clicking box 634 or 636, respectively, The subscriber may also connect or 
disconnect the CallCommand service by clicking box 638, 640, respectively. 

Fig. 32 is an illustrative example of a screen if the subscriber selected "Wireless 
Messaging" 512 on the main menu (Fig 28). The subscriber win be connected to the wireless 
messaging service if H YES M 642 is clicked. 
30 Fig. 33 is an example of a screen which may appear if the subscriber selected 

"Profile" 6 14 from the main menu (Fig. 28). If the subscriber selects "Fax" 644 from this screen, a 
screen such as that shown in Figure 34 may appear, which allows the subscriber to enter a phone 

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number into box 646 to which faxes will be directed. Turning on e-mail screening activates both 
the subject and address screening. Subject screening takes priority over address screening 
parameters. 

If the subscriber selected "e?mail" 648 on the screen Fig. 33. a screen such seen in 
5 Fig. 35 appears. The subscriber can select where e-mail messages should be delivered (destination 
screening) 650. where notification of e-mail receipt should be delivered (notification screening) 
652. whether messages should be screened at all 654 and, if so. how they should be screened 656. 
658. 

The destination 650 allows the subscriber to select destinations for incoming e- 
10 mail. Messages that satisfy the screening requirement may be sent to two destinations (match A. 
match B). As shown in this illustrative example, e-mail received which match the subscriber s 
preprogrammed screening criteria are to be delivered only to a wireline e-mail, such as the 
subscriber's personal computer at the office, because match A 660 and match B 662 designate ihe 
same destination. All received e-mail messages which do not meet either criteria ("not matched") 
15 are sent to a selected fax machine 664. for example, the fax machine at the subscriber's office. 

The subscriber also indicates where notification of a received e-mail should be sent 
652. Notification for all e-mail messages meeting the screening requirement should be sent to a 
selected fax machine 666. The PCI network will select information about the e-mail origination 
such as the author, recipient, and subject matter and convert it to a facsimile format and send the 
20 message to a fax machine. Notification of all e-mail that does not meet the screening criteria are 
sent to a pager 668. The PCI network will take the originating message information and turn it 
into alphanumeric information according to the TAP protocol and send it to the subscriber s pager. 
If the screening option is turned off. notification of all incoming e-mail is sent to voicemail 670. 
The PQ network will convert the origination information from text to synthesized speech and send 

25 the information to a selected voice mailbox. 

The user may also select whether to screen incoming c-mail messages at all 654. If 
the screening is on. the user may screen e-mail based on the originating address 656 or subject 
matter 658. 

Fig. 36 is an illustrative screen which the subscriber may use to edit e-mail 
30 screening according to address by clicking box 656 (Fig. 35). The subscriber may input new e-mail 
addressees into box 672 and add them to a list by clicking a box 674 or select addresses already 
entered to be included in a screening criteria as seen in box 676. For example, the user may want 

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e-mail messages originating from the following addresses to be routed according to the screening 
criteria: cclstanp. cclrizzo, and cclrupin. E-mail messages originating from these addresses will be 
routed and notified according to the criteria selected on the screen illustrated in Fig. 35. 

If the user selected to edit the "subject" a screening criteria based on "subjects" by 

5 clicking box 658 (Fig. 35). a screen such as that illustrated in Fig. 37 is presented. The user may 
type in to boxes 678 particular subjects which should be routed according to a screening criteria. 
The subject will search the incoming e-mail origination information to determine the subject of the 
e-mail. Subjects may include "urgent", "personal", the name of a client or project, etc. 

If the subscriber viewing the "profile menu" (Fig. 33) clicked "voice mail" 680. a 

10 screen such as that illustrated in Fig. 38 is presented. The subscriber can type into a box 682 in the 
destination voice mail system phone number. The subscriber may also select notification based on 
certain screening criteria 684. If the incoming voice mail message matches the screening cnteria. 
the subscriber has selected to be notified by a message sent to the PDA 686. If the voice mail 
message does not match a screening parameter, the subscriber has selected to not be notified 688. 

15 If the screening option is turned off. the subscriber has decided to not be notified of any voice mail 
messages 690. 

The user has the option of turning the screening on or off 692. If the screening is 
on. the messages are screened by caller 694. If the user decides to screen by caller by clicking box 
694. a screen such as illustrated in Fig. 39 is displayed The user may type into boxes 696 certain 
20 incoming phone number which meet the screening parameters. 

If the subscriber viewing the "profile menu" (Fig. 33) clicked "Call Command". 698 
a screen such as illustrated in Fig. 40 is displayed. The subscriber may type in a box 700 a wireline 
registration telephone number, which is a number to which incoming calls may be forwarded. The 
subscriber has the option to edit screening criteria phone numbers or to edit reply messages to be 
25 sent to the caller. 

If the subscriber wishes to edit forwarding call numbers box 702 is clicked and a 
screen such as illustrated in Fig. 4 1 is displayed. The user may type into boxes 704 or select certain 
phone numbers which are to be forwarded to a preselected phone number if screening is on 

If the subscriber viewing the "Call Command" screen (Fig. 39) clicked "edit 
30 messages" 706. a screen such as illustrated in Fig. 42 is displayed. The user may compose a unique 
message in box 708 or edit one already on a list shown in box 7 10. 



-49- 



WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 

If the subscriber has connected the Gill Command and ah incoming call is received, 
a screen such as that uiustra&i in Fig. 43 is displayed. This screen displays in a box 712 the 
number from which the incoming call originates. The user has the option of sending a message and 
forwarding the call by clicking box 7 14. forwarding the call without a message by clicking box 716. 
5 sending a message and not forwarding the call by clicking box 7 18. or routing the call to voice mail 
by clicking box 126. 

If either the "message and forward" or "forward" 716 option is selected, a screen 
such as that illustrated in Fig:' 44 is displayed. This allows the subscriber to select one of several 
the preselected phone numbers 722-728 to forward, or select another phone number, such as a 
1 0 nearby telephone to which the call is to be forwarded. This phone number may be typed into a box 
730. 

If the user selected the "message and forward" 714 or "message only" 718 
selections, a screen such as that shown in Fig. 45 is displayed. This allows the subscriber to -type in 
a message into a box 732 or select a predetermined message shown in box 4134 to be sent to the 

15 incoming caller. This message is sent by wireless communications to the PCI network where the 
ISP converts the message into synthesized speech and plays it for the caller. For example, if the 
subscriber desires to call back the incoming caller as soon as possible, the message "will call back 
ASAP" is selected. This message is transmitted from the PDA by wireless communications to the 
PQ network. The ISP will receive the message and convert it to synthesize speech and send the 

20 synthesize speech message to the incoming caller. 

DC. Billing 

Biffing operations is supported by an Automatic Message Accounting Network 
Function. The automatic network accounting measures, collects, formats and outputs network 
25 usage information to upstream billing and other operation application and service purposes. 
Preferably, automatic message accounting data is collected at various stages of service flows across 
network equipment and services. 



-50- 



BNSDOCJD:<WO 973342 1 At > 



WO 97/33421 PCTAJS96/03064 

X. C Qnclusion 

A system has been described which enables a wireless PDA user to remotely 
control a large number of messaging and call handling options. 
5 While the invention has been described by the reference to specific embodiments, 

this was for purposes of illustration only and should not be construed to limit the spirit or the scope 
of the invention. 



-51- 



BNSOOaD: <WO 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/O3064 
Wc claim: 

I. A personal communication internetworking for sending and receiving wireless and wireline 

messages: 

(1) a server, including: 
5 (a) a message transfer agent interfaced with at least one wireline data network: 

(b) a wireless data network protocol handler connected to the message transfer 
agent and interfacing with ai least one wireless Jata network; 

(c) a mobility controller, including 

i. a subscriber profile cache; 
10 ii. a message router responsive to message routing parameters in the 

subscriber profile; 

iil an interface connected to exchange message routing parameters 
between the subscriber profile and the at least one wireless network; 

iv. an interface connected to exchange message routing parameters 
1 5 between the subscriber profile and a personal communication control point; and 

v. an interface with at least one of a telephone network, an 
alphanumeric pager network, and a voice peripheral; and 

(2) tte personal communication control point connected to the server, including: 

(a) a first interface connected to exchange DTMF message routing 

20 parameter signals with the server, 

(b) a second interface connected to exchange generic data message 

routing parameter signals with the server, 

(c) a subscriber profile connected to receive and maintain message 

routing parameters; and 

25 (d) a call processor connected between the subscriber profile and the 

first and second interfaces. 

2. The personal communication internetworking of claim 1, wherein the internetworking is 
built on an Advanced Intelligent Network architecture, the server is an Intelligent Peripheral and 
30 the control point is a Service Control Point. 



-52- 



BNSDOOD: <WO 0733421 AU 



, WO 97/33421 PCT/US*M)3064 

3. The personal communication internetworking of claim 1, further including a personal 
digital assistant riaving a wireless data network interface connected to exchange message routing 
parameters and an application designed to communicate with the interface to receive, update, and 
transmit the message routing parameters. 

5 

4. The personal communication internetworking of claim I. wherein the server further 
comprises: 

a message convener connected to receive from an interface a message in a first format and 
output to another interface the message in second format. 

10 

5. A method for personal communications internetworking, comprising the steps of: 

(a) storing a subscriber profile containing message routing commands for a subscriber. 

(b) receiving any of an electronic mail, a facsimile, and a voice mail message addressed 
to the subscriber from either of a wireless and a wireline network; 

! 5 (c) consulting the subscriber profile for instructions for routing the received message; 

and 

(d) routing the received message to any of a wireless or wireline network according to 
the instructions in the subscriber profile. 



20 



6. The method of claim 5. further comprising the step of converting the received message into 
a different format if the subscriber profile instructs routing the received message in the different 
format. 

7. The method of claim 5. further comprising the step of remotely updating the routing 
25 commands in the subscriber profile via one of a wireless and a wireline data network. 

g. The method of claim 5. wherein the received message is addressed to a single subscriber 
telephone number regardless of format 

30 9. The method of claim 5. further comprising the step of sending a message notifying the 
subscriber of the received message. 



.53- 



BNSOOCIO:«WO 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 

10. A rmthod for routing incoming telephone calls, comprising the steps of: 

(a) storing a subscriber profile containing telephone, routing, and screening parameters 
including at feast one of incoming telephone call origin, time of day, and day of week; 

(b) receiving a telephone call directed to the subscriber, 

5 (c) consulting the subscriber profile to determine where to route the received 

telephone call; and 

(d) routing the telephone call according to the subscriber profile. 

U. The method of claim 10, further comprising the step of remotely updating the subscriber 
10 profile via a wireless data network.. 

12. The rrethod of claim 10, further comprising the step of remotely updating the subscriber 
profile via either a wireless and a wireline telephone network. 

15 13. The rxrthod of claim 10, further comprising the steps of. 

(a) if the subscriber profile so instructs, notifying the subscriber of the received 
telephone call via a wireless data network message; and 

(b) the subscriber selecting one of. 

(i) forwarding the call to a subscriber selected telephone number, 

20 (a) selecting a text ressage to be transmitted over the wireless data network 

and converted into synthesized speech and played to the incoming telephone call and 

(iii) forwarding the call and selecting a text message. 
14. A communication apparatus, comprising: 

a personal communications internetworking: 
25 (i) having a number of subscribers, each subscriber having a single address 

to which all incoming communications are addxessed; 

(ii) being connected to receive and transmit communications from a 
plurality of wireless and wireline communications networks; 

(iii) having a profile configured to store communication forwarding options 

30 for each subscriber, and 

(iv) having a communication router connected to receive the received 
communications from the plurality of wireless and wireline networks and being responsive to 

-54- 



BNSOOC1D: <WO 9733421 Al> 



WO 97/33421 PCT/US%/03<*4 

the profile for transmitting the received communications according to the stored 
communication forwarding options. 

15. The communications apparatus of claim 14, wherein the communication information 
includes incoming communication delivery and outgoing communication origination 

5 information. 

16. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the profile is connected to receive 
and store revised communication forwarding options from a subscriber. 

17. The communication apparatus of claim 16, wherein the profile is connected to receive 
the revised communication forwarding options from one of a wireless and a wireline network. 

10 18. The communication apparatus of claim 17, wherein the profile is connected to receive 
revised communication forwarding options in the form of dual tone modulated frequency 
signals from a telephone. 

19. The communication apparatus of claim 17, wherein the profile is connected to receive 
revised communication forwarding options in the form of generic data messages from a 

15 generic data interface. 

20. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the single address is a telephone 

number. 

2 1 . The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the communications include at 
least one of telephone, pager, facsimile, voice mail, and electronic text communications. 

20 22. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the communication router further 
includes a media formal translation device configured to translate a received communication 
into a different communication medium for transmission. 

23. The communication apparatus of claim 14, wherein the profile further stores cross- 
media notification information and the personal communications internetworking further 

25 includes a cross-media notification device responsive to the received communication received 
on one of the plurality of wireless and wireline communications networks, and to the profile, 
and being configured to transmit in a first preselected medium a notification signal indicating 
receipt of the received communication. 

24. The communication apparatus of claim 23, wherein the cross-media notification 

30 information includes a second preselected medium and, when the first preselected medium is 
not available, the cross-media notification device transmits in the second predetermined 
medium the notification signal indicating receipt of the received communication. 

-55- 



BNSOOCJO:«WO 973M21A1> 



WO 97/33421 PCT7US96/03064 

25! The coinmuhicaubn apparatus of claim 14. wherein the profile further includes 
received communication screening information and the communication router is further 
responsive to the screening information. 

26. The communication apparatus of claim 25 , wherein the received communication 

5 screening information includes information to screen communications based on at least one of 
a received commuhication's media type, time of day received, day of week received, origin, 
and sender. 

27. The communication apparatus of claim 14. further including a server connected to the 
profile. 

10 28. The communication apparatus of claim 27. wherein the server includes a call 
processor. 

29. The communication apparatus of claim 28. wherein the call processor comprises a 
plurality of interconnected computers. 

30. The communication apparatus of claim 28. wherein the call processor includes an 
15 interface with at least one of the profile, a wireless data network, an alphanumeric paging 

network, a telephone network switch, and a voice peripheral. 

31. The communication apparatus of claim 30, wherein the voice peripheral includes a 
text-to-speech converter. 

32. The communication apparatus of claim 28. wherein the call processor further includes 
20 a service profile cache which contains a subset of information stored in the profile, which 

subset of information is cuirendy frequently needed. 

33. The communication network of claim 27. wherein the server further includes a data 
messaging peripheral. 

34. The communication device of claim 33. wherein the data messaging peripheral 
25 include* an interface with at least one electronic messaging network. 

35. The apparatus of claim 14. wherein the internetworking is built on an Advanced 
Intelligent Network architecture. 

36. The apparatus of claim 14, wherein the internetworking is a network adjunct. 

37. The communication device of claim 14. wherein the communication router further 
30 comprises an audio messaging interface specification analog protocol connected to a public 

telephone network. 



-56- 



BNSOOCIO: <WO 9733421 A1> 



1 



WO 97/33421 PCT/US<H/03064 

38. The communication device of claim 14. wherein the communication router further 
comprises an audio" messaging interface specification digital protocol connected to at least one 
of a modem, a private line, and an integrated signalling digital network basic rate interface. 

39. The communication device of claim 14. wherein the communication router further 

5 comprises at least one of an analog line connected to a public switched telephone network, a 
private line, and an integrated signalling digital network. 

40. The method of claim 7. wherein the step of updating is done via a wtreless network 
and further includes: 

a. transmitting a data request from a terminal over a wireless network to the profile; 
, 0 b transmitting the requested data from the profile over the wireless network to the 

terminal; 

c. updating the routing commands at the terminal; 

d. transmitting the updated routing commands over the wireless network to the 
profile; and 

l5 e . storing the updated routing commands in the profile. 

41. The method of claim 40. further including after the step of transmitting the 

updated routing commands: 

a. generating an update acknowledgement signal; and 

b. transmitting the update acknowledgement signal over the wireless network to the 
20 terminal. 

42. The method of claim 9. wherein the step of sending a message further includes 
notifying the subscriber of a received telephone call. 

43. The method of claim 42. further including after the step of notifying, the step of 

selecting any one of : 
25 a. forwarding the telephone call to a selected telephone number; 

b. selecting a text message to be transmitted over the wireless data network and 
convening the text message into synthesized speech and played to the incoming telephone 
caL 1 ' and 

c. forwarding the call and selecting a text message. 

30 44. The method of claim 42. further including the step of remotely updating the subscriber 
profile via either one of a wireless and a wireline telephone network. 



-57- 



SNSOOCtD: <WO 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 PCT7US96/03064 

45. The method of claim 44. wherein the step of updating includes using DTMF signals to 
update the subscriber profile and storing the updated profile. 

46. The method of claim 44. further including after the step of updating: 

a. generating an update acknowledgement signal: and 
5 b. transmitting the update acknowledgement signal over the telephone network. 

47. The method of claim 5. further including delivering a single message according to a 
distribution list stored in the subscriber profile, the distribution list instructing the message to 
be delivered to a plurality of addresses via one of an electronic mail and a facsimile format. 

48. The method of claim 5. wherein the step of receiving a voice mail message 
1 0 addressed to the subscriber further includes the steps of: 

a. receiving from an originating voice mail system voice mail information including 

identification information: 

b. extracting the identification information from the message to determine the origin 

of the voice mail message; 
! 5 c. the step of consulting further comprising determining if the identification of the 

originator indicates that the originator is also the subscriber. 

d. if the originator is the subscriber, the step of routing further comprises the steps 

of: 

i. not forwarding the voice mail message to the communication network; and 
20 ii. extracting header information from the identification information and 

transmitting a notification to the subscriber containing the header information; 

e. if the originator is not the subscriber, the step of routing further includes the steps 

of: 

i. if the message exceeds a predetermined length, rejecting the message; and 
25 u. if the message is less than or equal to the predetermined length, the 

communication router accepting the message; and 

f. the step of routing the received message further includes touting the voice mail 
message according to routing instructions in the profile. 

49. The method of claim 48, wherein before the step of routing, the step of translating the 
30 voice mail message from analog format into a digital format. 

50. The method of claim 48. wherein before the step of routing, the step of translating the 
voice mail message from a digital format into an analog format. 

-58- 



BNS0OCI0:<WO 973M21*t> 



WO 97/3342 1 PCI7USS6/03064 
5 1 The personal communication internetworking of claim I , wherein the internetworking 

is a network adjunct. 



-59- 



BNSOOC1D: <WO. 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 



1/26 



PCT/US^/03064 




BNSOOC1D:<WO 9733421AW 



y WO 97/33421 



2/26 



PCI7US96/03064 



FIG . 2 



SPECIALIZED 
MOBILE RADIO 
(SMR) \ 



CELLULAR 
MOBILE 
PHONE 



PAGING 



VALUE ADDED 
NETWORK 



(MESSAGE 
ROUTING AND 

DELIVERY 
INSTRUCTIONS] 



WIRELINE 
TELEPHONE 




WIRELINE DATA 
NETWORKS 



FAX 
SERVERS 



E-MAIL 
NETWORKS 



VOICE MAIL 
NETWORKS 



BNSDOC10:<WO 9733421 At > 



WO 97/33421 



PCT/US96/03O64 




BNS0OCiD:<WO B733421AW 



WO 97/33421 



4/26 



PCT/US96/03064 




BNSOOCID: <WO 9733421A1> 



WO 97/33421 



PCT/US96/03064 




BNSOOCID:<WO 9733421 A1> 




BNSDOOD: <WO 97334*1 Al> 



WO 97/33421 



PCT/US96/03064 



7/26 




BNSOOCJD: <WO 0733421 



WO 97/33421 



B/26 



PCT/US96/03064 



FIG. B 



SERVER 



DATABASE 



260 

j 

r 


GET.DATA 


262 


GET_DATA_RESP 


260 

/ 


GET.DATA 


262 

. 1 


GETJATAJESP 





\ MAY BE 
REPEATED 



DIFFERENT 
> TRANSACTION 

THAN FIRST 
J PAIR 



SERVER 



FIG. 9 



DATABASE 



264 
f 


SEND.DATA 


266 


SENO_DATA_RESP 


264 

/ 


SEND.DATA 


266 

/ 


SEND_DATA_RESP 





1 



HAY BE 
REPEATED 



DIFFERENT 
^TRANSACTION 
THAN FIRST 
PAIR 



BNSOOC1D: <WO 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 



PCT/US96/03064 



9/26 



FIG. 10 



SERVER 



DATABASE 



268 



PROVJNSTR (ON. AND 



270 



f SEND JOJSRC (PLAY ANNOUNCEMENT S COLLECT DIGITS) 



272 



/ SEND_TO.RES.RESP (RC, DIGITS) 



274 



/ PLAY.APP (NOTIFY PDA) 



276 



"f PLAY.APP.RESP KPN) 



276 



SWITCHJO.RSRCE (ROUTE TO DN) 



280 



"; SWITCH_TO_RSRCE_RESP (RC) 



FIG. 11 

DATABASE 



282 
t 


PROY INSTR (DN. AND ^ _ 


284 
, f 


SENDJO.RSRC (PLAY ANNOUNCEMENT S COLLECT DIGITS) 


286 
f 


SEND TOJESJESP (RC. DIGITS) 


288 
, f 


SENDJO.RSRC (PLAY ANNOUNCEMENT S COLLECT DIGITS) 


290 
) 


SEND TO RSRC.RESP (RC, DIGITS) 


292 
B f 


SENDJO.RSRC (PLAY ANNOUNCEMENT S COLLECT DIGITS) 


294 

) 


SEND TO RES RESP (RC. DIGITS) 





BNS0OC1D: <WO 9733421 A1> 



W0 97/3M21 



PCT/US9«/03064 



10/26 



30 



\ 



FIG. 12 



299 





s 




WIRELESS 
NETWORK 
INTERFACE 


CPU 




SYSTEM 
MEMORY 



II 




DISPLAY 



r 

29B 



FIG. 13 



SERVER 




FIG. 14 



SERVER 




BNSOOCID: <WO 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 



11/25 



PCT/US96/0y>64 



FIG. 15 

PDA SERVER 



c 308 


EM.NTFN (0) 


r 310 
„ J 


EM.ACK (0) 


r 312 


EM.OATA (1. MORE) 


^314 


EM_ACK (1) 


^316 


EMJ5ATA (2. MORE) 


^318 


EH.ACK (2) 


^320 


• 
• 
• 

EMJATA IN. FINAL) 


^322 


EM.ACK IN) 





FIG. 16A 



POA 



SERVER 



324 



EM FETCH |0) 



r 



326 



EM.ACK I0.NP.NM) 



BWSOOCIO: <WO 9733421 A1> 



• WO 97/33421 



PCT/US96/03064 



FIG. 16B 



PDA 



FIG. 17 



PDA 



12/26 



SERVER 



r 328 

1 


EM.FETCH (0) 


(330 


EMJCK 10. NP.NM) 


r33?; 


EM.SUHMARY , (1, MORE) 


r 334 
J 


EMJCK li) 


r 336 . 


EMJ3UMMARY (2. MORE) 




EMJCK (2) 


^340 


• 
• 
• 

EMJSUMMARY (N, FINAL) 


^342 


EMJCK IN) 



SERVER 



^344 


EM.RETRIEVE (O.MID) 


^346 


EMJCK 10) 





FIG. 18 



PDA 



SERVER 



j-348 


CC.NTFN 


^350 


CCJCK 


j-356 


CCJTATUS 


|-35B 


CCJCK 


f352 


CCJESP 


j-354 


CCJCK 





BNSOOCID: <WO 0733421 M> 



WO 97/33421 



13/26 



>CTAJS9€/03064 



FIG. 19 



PDA 



SERVER 





PFJXWNLOADJEQ (0) 




r 352 


PFJATA (i. MORE) 




^364 


PF_ACK (1) 




^366 


FJATA (2. MORE) 




^368 


PF.ACK (2) 




^370 


• 
* 
• 

PFJATA (N. FINAL) 




^372 


PF_ACK (N) 




PDA 

^374 


FIG. 20 A 

PFJJPLOADJEQ (0) 


SEflY 


^376 


PF.ACK 10) 






ni~ niTi 1 1 tinned 

PFJATA 11. MOHtJ 




r 380 


PFJCK (i) 




^382 


PFJATA (2. MORE) 




^384 


PFJCK (2) 




^386 


• 
• 
• 

PFJATA IN. FINAL) 




✓-388 


PFJCK (N) 





BNSOOOD: <WO 0733421 Al» 



14/26 



FIG. 20B 

PDA SERVER 





P^jjPLOAD.REQ (0) 




PFJCK (0) 




PF.DATA tl. MORE) 


,-396 


PFJCK (1) 


j-39B 


• 
• 

PF.DATA (N. FINAL) 


^-400 


PFJRROR (0.H0RE) 


402 


PFJCK (0) 


y-404 


t 
• 

PF JUROR 'in, FINAL) 


406 


PFJCK IN) 



BNSOOC1D- <WO 0733421 A1> 




BNSOOClD:<WO 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 



PCT/US96/03064 



16/26 



FIG. 22 




VM 
SYSTEM 



.430 



VH 
SYSTEM 



430 



436 






VM 




SYSTEM 



430 



VM 
SYSTEM 



430 



FIG. 23 



4B 



PSTN 



445, 



Tl 



"444 



SERVER 



BRI 



ISDN 





FAX 
MACHINE 












FAX 
SERVER 


^442 


.446 








FAX 
SERVER 


^42 





438' 



BRI 



FAX / 
MACHINE p 



440 



BNS0OCID:«WO 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 



PCTAJSW/03D64 




BNSOOC1D:<WO 8733421 At > 



m> 97/33421 PCT/US96/03064 



18/26 




BNS00C1D:<W0 9733421A1> 



WO 97/33421 



19/26 



PCTAJS96/03'Xh4 




BNSOOCID: <WO 9733421A1> 



W6'97/33421 



20/26 



PCT/US*$/03064 




BNSDOCID:<WO 9733421A1> 



WO 97/33421 



PCT/US96/03T64 



21/26 

FIG. 28 



r \ /-6io 

CALL COMMAND y 
{ WIRELESS MESSA6IM6 * ^ 512 



PROFILE • \^ 



614 



STATUS REQUEST 



616 



QUIT 



FIG. 29 



MESSAGES WAITING 



LOCAL OH OUTGOING |~TL STORAGE □ 
^ 618 ^ K3ft 



620 



SERVICE STATUS 

WIRELINE REGISTRATION \WL L C9081 758-5930 

■ i v. coo 
CALL COMMAND _ 

626 



WIRELESS MESSAGING 



628 



624 



QK ) 



FIG. 30 



DO YOU KANT TO CONNECT 
CALL COMMAND 
TO THE NETWORK? 



WO 97/33421 



PCT/US96/03064 



22/26 



FIG. 31 



STATUS ) 



PHONE- NUMBER 



DATE/TIME 



532 



A 1201)579^4729 SEP 

F {242)fe958-SEP. 

H (908) 357-4583 SEP 

U (908) 358-6802 SEP 

H (908)569-5738 SEP 

V (908)758-3480 SEP 

V (908)758-4682 SEP 
A (908)758-5489 SEP 

U (908) 758-5489 SEP 

F (908) 758-5683 SEP 



15 94 1205 

16 94 10:25 
16.94 11:15 
16 94 14: 45 
15 94 11:23 
15 94 11: 44 
15 94 11:44 
15 94 09: 34 
15 94 09:56 
15 94 09:45 



i^ry 634 

DELETE y 636 



O | CONNECT K 



® 



DISCONMEC 



A: ANSWERED F: FORWARDED H: HAN6 UP 
U: UNANSWERED V: VOICE MAIL 



CANCEL 



OK 



638 



640 



D 



FIG. 33 



L-MAIL 



64B 



VOICE MAIL 



FAX 



680 



644 



_ ggg 



QK ) 



CANCEL ) 



FIG. 32 



DO YOU WANT TO CONNECT 
WIRELESS MESSA6IN6 
TO THE NETWORK? 



YES 



642 



NO 



FIB. 34 




8NS0OCID:<W0 9733421 A1> 



WO 97/33421 



PCI7US96/03C64 



23/26 



FIG. 35 



DESTINATION SCREENING 
HATCHED A 



650 



662 



1 WIRELINE E-HAILV 



660 



, MATCHED B 
I • : . _ , 664. 



NOT HATCHED 



WIRELINE E-MAIL V I N FAX V 



NOTIFICATION SCREENING 

MATCHED HOT MATCHED 

666 



UK 



fPAGER 



652 

~~ 670 

OFF i 

^ 668 | VOICE HAIL V 




SCREEN ON ADDRESSES 



-656 

T 

. -658 



OK 



SCREEN ON SUBJECTS 



CANCEL 



J 
D 



FIG. 36 



INPUT E-HAIL AODRESS: 



672 



cc! CSD 
cciupfi 
cc! stanp 
cc! kogut 
cc! rizzo 
cc! rubin 
cc! buckner 
prefect! rrml 



SI 



3 



c 








OK 






4 



674 v ( ADD TO LISTj 



DELETE 



CANCEL 



FIG. 37 



SUBJECT 1 




SUBJECT 2 




SUBJECT 3 




SUBJECT 4 




SUBJECT 5 






BNSOOaD: <WO 97»42tA1> 



24/26 



PCT/US^/03064 



FIG. 38 



DESTINATION (908)758-2715 



682 



NOTIFICATION SCREENING 
MATCHED 



PDA 



686 



NOT HATCHED 



[NULL 



684 
^688 



OFF 



690 



POET 



SCREENING 

® rem jf 

O EE 



692 



SCREEN ON CALLER 



r 



OK 



J 



CANCEL ) 



FIG. 39 



FROM 1 




FROM 2 


(212)589-5093 


FROM 3 




FROM 4 




FROM 5 


(212)458-3849 




FIG. 40 



WIRELINE REGISTRATION NUMBER: 



(908)487-9083 



•700 



pnn NUMBERS 1 



OK 



WO 97/33421 



25/26 

FIG. 41 



PHONE 1 




PHONE 2 


(212)589-5093 ■ 


PHONE 3 


(212)589-5093- 


PHONE 4 


(212)589-5093 



■704 
•704 
-704 
-704 



PCTAJS96/0306.1 



OK ] 



[ CANCEL ) 



FIG. 42 





INPUT MESSAGE: J 




( « J 






■ — 708 






MESSAGE RECEIVED 
HILL CALL BACK ASAP 
CANNOT CONNECT NOW 
UNABLE TO FIND PHONE 
PLEASE TRY LATER 
CALL MY OFFICE ^ 
CALL BACK IN 1 HOUR 
MESSAGE RECEIVED 
HILL CALL BACK ASAP 


0 


-710 


[ado to list] 

( DELETE ) 
( CANCEL ) 



FIG. A3 





INCOMING CALL FROM: 








1908)758-5547 






^712 






FJORWARO TO ... 


™A WW ) 


{ VOICE MAIL 



BNSOOCIO: <WO 6733421A1> 



WQ 97/33421 



PCTOJSS^/03064 



26/26 



FIG. 44 



FORWARD CALL TO: 



■730 



PHONE 1 


(201)459-5902 


| PHONE 2 


(908)589-6739 


PHONE 3 


(212)758-9803 


PHONE 4 


(908)758-3901 



•722 
•724 
-726 
-728 



OK 



CANCEL ) 



FIG. 45 



INPUT MESSAGE TO SEND: 



SELECT MESSAGE TO SEND: 



MESSAGE RECEIVED 
HILL CALL BACK ASAP 
CANNOT CONNECT NOH 
UNABLE TO FIND PHONE 
PLEASE TRY LATER 
CALL MY OFFICE 
CALL BACK IN 1 HOUR 
MESSAGE RECEIVED 
HILL CALL BACK ASAP 



•732 



■734 



OK 



'ADD TO LIST) 



DELETE 



CANCEL ) 



INTERNATIONAL SEARCH REPORT 



Interoiiidnij appbcation No. 
PCTAJS96V03064 



A. CLASSIFICATION OF SUBJECT MATTER 
PC(6) :H04M 3/42 

USCL :379/58, 211,210, 212 . 

According to biternational Pmicnt CUssiiicauon (IPC) or to both inborn! classification and IPC 



B. FIELDS SEARCHED 



Minimum docurncnuiion searched (ckuiacauon system followed by cUssification symbols) 
U.S. : 379/58.210.211.212 



Docurncnuiion i earthed other than minimum docurncnuiion to the extent that such documenu arc included in the fields searched 



Electronic dau base consulted during the international search (name of dau base and, where practicable, search terms used) 



C. DOCUMENTS CONSIDERED TO BE RELEVANT 



Category - 



Citation of document, with indication, where appropriate, of the relevant passage* 



Relevant to claim No. 



US, A, 5,353,331, (EMERY ET AL) 04 OCTOBER 1994, 
ABSTRACT 

US, A, 5,327,486, {WOLFF ET AL) 05 JULY 1994, col. 3, 
lines 38-40, col. 5, lines 1-6. 

US, A, 5,479,472 (CAMPANA, Jr. ET AL) 26 DECEMBER 
1995, ABSTRACT 

US, A, 5,329,578 (BRENNAN ET AL) 1 2 JULY 1994, Col. 4, 
Line 19- col. 13, line 56, 



1, 2, 35, 36, 
38, 39 

3, 4, 6, 22, 31 
AND 34 

47 



5, 7-21, 23-30, 
33,37, 40-46, 
48-52 



| | Further documenu are listed in the continuation of Box C. Q See patent family annex. 



Soc— f¥iiiff»ini*r|-n-nil aichi 

to W part of f 



ilniMicl wbkk may tttro* oooba oo priority ckkfr) or «fck* m 
cooi to —Huh *m piAliriwe 4am of mama a*ooo or emu 



l be 
t » 



! IO OA OTftl 

tpuhliihwl prior to m* 



roffcoi 



Date of the actual completion of the international search 
17 MAY 1996 



Date of mailing of the international search report 



e of mailing of the eternal 

12JUN199T 




Name and mailing address of the ISA/US 
Cesnfflisstoeer of Psieou and Trmdcmsrt* 
fioxPCT 

WasUafton, DX. 20231 
Facsimile No. (703) 305-3230 



Auihoitfccvotl 

1am, coward 

Telephone No. (703) 30S4&47 



Form PCT/ISA/210 (second shect)(July 1992)* 



BNS0OCtD:<WO 9733421 A1>