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(19) 



J 



Europaisches Patentamt 
European Patent Office 
Office europeen des brevets 




(12) 



01) EP1 096 725 A2 

EUROPEAN PATENT APPLICATION 



(43) Date of publication: 

02.05.2001 Bulletin 2001/18 

(21) Application number: 00128439.7 

(22) Date of filing: 28.05.1999 



(51) intci* H04L 12/28, H04L 29/06 



(84) Designated Contracting States: 


• Lazaridis, Mihal 


AT BE CH CY DE DK ES Fl FR GB GR IE IT LI LU 


Waterloo, Ontario, N2J 3X5 (CA) 


MC NL PT SE 


(30) Priority: 29.05.1998 US 87623 


(74) Representative- 


Winter, Brandl, Furniss, Hubner, Ross, Kaiser, 


(62) Document number(s) of the earlier application(s) in 


Polte Partnerschaft 


Patent- und Rechtsanwattskanzlei 


accordance with Art. 76 EPC: 


Alois-Steinecker-Strasse 22 


99922026.2 / 1 082 839 


85354 Freising (DE) 


(71) Applicant: Research In Motion Limited 


Remarks: 


Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3W8 (CA) 


This application was filed on 22 - 12 - 2000 as a 


(72) Inventors: 


divisional application to the application mentioned 


under INID code 62. 


• Mousseau, Gary P. 




Waterloo, Ontario, N2T 1Z9 (CA) 





(54) System and method for pushing information from a host system to a mobile data 
communication device 



(57) A system and method for pushing information 
from a host system to a mobile data communication de- 
vice upon sensing a triggering event is disclosed. A re- 
director program operating at the host system enables 
a user to continuously redirect certain user-selected da- 
ta items from the host system to the users mobile data 
communication device upon detecting that one or more 



user-defined triggering events has occurred. The redi- 
rector program operates in connection with event gen- 
erating applications and repackaging systems at the 
host system to configure and detect a particular user- 
defined event, and then to repackage the user-selected 
data items in an electronic wrapper prior to pushing the 
data items to the mobile device. 



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EP 1 096 725 A2 



2 



Description 

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 

[0001] The present invention is directed toward the 
field of replicating information from a host system where 
the information is normally stored to a mobile data com- 
munication device. In particular, the system and method 
of the present invention provide an event-driven redirec- 
tion computer program ("redirector program") operating 
at the host system, which, upon sensing a particular us- 
er-defined event has occurred, redirects user-selected 
data items from the host system to the user's mobile da- 
ta communication device. The mobile data communica- 
tion device is preferably coupled to the host system via 
a wireless network and one or more landline networks. 
Due to the bandwidth limitations of wireless networks, 
only a portion of a user-selected data item is generally 
redirected to the user's mobile device, with the user giv- 
en the option of then retrieving the entire data item (or 
some other portion of the data item) from the host sys- 
tem. 

[0002] Instead of warehousing (or storing) the user's 
data items at the host system and then "synchronizing" 
the mobile data communication device to data items 
stored at the host system when the mobile device re- 
quests that such items of information be communicated 
to it, the present invention employs a "push" paradigm 
that continuously packages and retransmits the user- 
selected items oi information to the mobile data com- 
munication device in response to a triggering event de- 
tected at the host system. Wireless mobile data com- 
munications devices, especially those that can return a 
confirmation signal to the host that the pushed data has 
been received are especially well suited for this type of 
push paradigm. 

[0003] Present systems and methods for replicating 
information from a host system to a user's mobile data 
communication device are typically "synchronization" 
systems in which the users data items are warehoused 
(or stored) at the host system for an indefinite period of 
time and then transmitted in bulk only in response to a 
user request. In these types of systems and methods, 
when replication of the warehoused data items to the 
mobile device is desired, the user typically places the 
mobile device in an interface cradle that is electrically 
connected to the host system via some form of local, 
dedicated communication, such as a serial cable or an 
infrared or other type of wireless link. Software execut- 
ing on the mobile data communication device then 
transmits commands via the local communications link 
to the host system tc cause the host to begin transmit- 
ting the user's data items for storage in a memory bank 
of the mobile device. In these synchronization schemes, 
the mobile unit "pulls" the warehoused information from 
the host system in a batch each time the user desires 
to replicate information between the two devices. There- 
fore, the two systems (host and mobile) only maintain 



the same data items after a user-initiated command se- 
quence that causes the mobile device to download the 
data items from the host system. A general problem with 
these synchronization systems is that the only time that 
5 the user data items are replicated between the host sys- 
tem and the mobile data communication device is when 
the user commands the mobile device to download or 
pull the user data from the host system. Five minutes 
later a new message could be sent to the user, but the 
io user would not receive that message until the next time 
the user fetches the user data items. Thus, a user may 
fail to respond to an emergency update or message be- 
cause the user only periodically synchronizes the sys- 
tem, such as once per day. Other problems with these 
1 5 systems include: (1 ) the amount of data to be reconciled 
between the host and the mobile device can become 
large if the user does not "synchronize" on a daily or 
hourly basis, leading to bandwidth difficulties, particu- 
larly when the mobile device is communicating via a 
20 wireless packet-switched network; and (2) reconciling 
large amounts of data, as can accrue in these batch- 
mode synchronization systems, can require a great deal 
of communication between the host and the mobile de- 
vice, thus leading to a more complex, costly and energy- 
25 inefficient system. A more automated, continuous, effi- 
cient and reliable system of ensuring that user data 
items are replicated at the user's mobile device is there- 
fore needed. 

[0004] An additional feature of the present invention 
20 is that the pusn paradigm, in combinai^.. with a ieturn 
communications pathway, lends itself well to a system * 
that permits a user to control remotely, through the us- 
er's mobile device, a number of aspects of the host sys- 
tem. 

35 [0005] There remains a general need in this art for a 
system and method of continuously pushing user-se- 
lected data items (or certain portions of the selected da- 
ta items) stored at a host system to a user's mobile data 
communication device. 
40 [00061 There remains a more particular need for such 
a system and method where user-selected data items 
are continuously "pushed" from the host system to the 
mobile data communication device upon the occurrence 
of one or more user-defined triggering events. 
45 [0007] There remains an additional need for such a 
system and method that provides flexibility in the types 
and quantities of user data items that are pushed from 
the host system to the mobile data communication de- 
vice and that also provides flexibility in the configuration 
so and types of events that can serve to trigger the redirec- 
tion of the user data items. 

[0008] There remains yet an additional need for such 
a system and method that can operate locally on a users 
desktop PC or at a distance via a network server. 
55 [0009] There remains still another need for such a 
system and method that provides for secure, transpar- 
ent delivery of the user-selected data items from the 
host system to the mobile device. 



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EP 1 096 725 A2 



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The document wo 97/41654 describes a system and 
method for disseminating information from one or more 
information sources, or databases, to mobile subscrib- 
ers through a message distribution center. The mes- 
sage distribution center processes the data from the one 5 
or more information sources and generates individual 
messages for subscribers based upon a subscriber-de- 
fined profile. The information messages can be trans- 
mitted at predetermined times, such as every morning 
at 9:00 am, or upon the occurrence of a predetermine 10 
event, such as when a stock price exceeds a particular 
value. In addition, the information messages can be 
transmitted based on the subscriber's location, or based 
on a request message from the individual subscriber. 
The document wo 97/32251 describes a method of rep- *5 
Heating information between two systems in which soft- 
ware programs are executed at a provider computer 
system and a consumer computer system in order to 
maintain a communications control structure for trans- 
ferring information between the two systems. This con- 20 
trol structure originates at the provider computer and is 
transferred to the consumer computer. Changes to the 
structure on the provider computer result in an updated 
version being transferred to the consumer computer 
The communications control structure contains a com- 25 
bination of data, metadata, and instructions which are 
used by the respective programs to control the origina- 
tion of outgoing communications and the processing of 
incoming communications between the provider and 
consumer. 30 

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION 

[0010] The present invention overcomes the prob- 
lems noted above and satisfies the needs in this field for 35 
a system and method of pushing user-selected data 
items from a host system to a user's mobile data com- 
munication device upon detecting the occurrence of one 
or more user-defined event triggers. As used in this ap- 
plication, the term host system refers to the computer 40 
where the redirector software is operating. In the pre- 
ferred embodiment of the present invention, the host 
system is a users desktop PC, although, alternatively, 
the host system could be a network server connected 
to the users PC via a local-area network ("LAN)", or 45 
could be any other system that is in communication with 
the users desktop PC. 

[001 1] A redirector program operating at the host sys- 
tem enables the user to redirect or mirror certain user- 
selected data items (or parts of data items) from the host so 
system to the users mobile data communication device 
upon detecting that one or more user-defined triggering 
events has occurred. Also operating at the host system 
are various sub-systems that can be configured to cre- 
ate triggering events, such as a screen saver sub-sys- 55 
tern or a keyboard sub-system, as well as sub-systems 
for repackaging the users data items for transparent de- 
livery to the mobile data device, such as a TCP/IP sub- 



system or one or more E-Mail sub-systems. Other sub- 
systems for creating triggering events and repackaging 
the users data items could also be present at the host 
system. The host system also includes a primary mem- 
ory store where the users data items are normally 
stored. 

[0012] Using the redirector program, the user can se- 
lect certain data items for redirection, such as E-mail 
messages, calendar events, meeting notifications, ad- 
dress entries, journal entries, personal reminders etc. 
Having selected the data items for redirection, the user 
can then configure one or more event triggers to be 
sensed by the redirector program to initiate redirection 
of the user data items. These user-defined trigger points 
(or event triggers) include external events, internal 
events and networked events. Examples of external 
events include: receiving a message from the users mo- 
bile data communication device to begin redirection; re- 
ceiving a similar message from some external compu- 
ter; sensing that the user is no longer in the vicinity of 
the host system; or any other event that is external to 
the host system. Internal events could be a calendar 
alarm, screen saver activation, keyboard timeout, pro- 
grammable timer, or any other user-defined event that 
is internal to the host system. Networked events are us- 
er-defined messages that are transmitted to the host 
system from another computer coupled to the host sys- 
tem via a network to initiate redirection. These are just 
some of the examples of the types of user-defined 
events that can trigger the redirector program to push 
data items from the host to the mobile device. Although 
in the preferred embodiment it is anticipated that the 
configuration that specifies which data items will be re- 
directed and in what form will be set at the host system, 
it is within the scope of this invention that such configu- 
ration may be set or modified through data sent from the 
mobile communications device. 
[0013] In addition to the functionality noted above, the 
redirector program provides a set of software-imple- 
mented control functions for determining the type of mo- 
bile data communication device and its address, for pro- 
gramming a preferred list of message types that are to 
be redirected, and for determining whether the mobile 
device can receive and process certain types of mes- 
sage attachments, such as word processor or voice at- 
tachments. The determination of whether a particular 
mobile device can receive and process attachments is 
initially configured by the user of that mobile device at 
the host system. This configuration can be altered on a 
global or per message basis by transmitting a command 
message from the mobile device to the host system. If 
the redirector is configured so that the mobile data de- 
vice cannot receive and process word processor or 
voice attachments, then the redirector routes these at- 
tachments to an external machine that is compatible 
with the particular attachment, such as an attached 
printer or networked fax machine or telephone. Other 
types of attachments could be redirected to other types 



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EP 1 096 725 A2 



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of external machines in a similar fashion, depending up- 
on the capabilities of the mobile device. For example, if 
a user is traveling and receives a message with an at- 
tachment that the user's mobile device can not process 
or display, the user may from a mobile communications 
device send a command message to the host system 
indicating that that attachment is to be sent to a fax ma- 
chine at a hotel where the user will be spending the 
evening. This enables the user to receive important E- 
mail attachments as long as the host system is provided 
with sufficient information about the destination where 
the attachment is to be forwarded. 
[001 4J Once an event has triggered redirection of the 
user data items, the host system then repackages these 
items in a manner that is transparent to the mobile data 
communication device, so that information on the mo- 
bile device appears similar to information on the user's 
host system. The preferred repackaging method in- 
cludes wrapping the user data items in an E-mail enve- 
lope that corresponds to the address of the mobile data 
communication device, although, alternatively, other 
repackaging methods could be used with the present 
invention, such as special-purpose TCP/IP wrapping 
techniques, or other methods of wrapping the user se- 
lected data items. The repackaging preferably results in 
E-mail messages generated by the user from the mobile 
device to be transmitted from the host system, thus en- 
abling the user to appear to have a single E-mail ad- 
dress, such that the recipient? of messages sent from 
the mobile communications device do not know where 
the user was physically located when the message was 
first sent. The repackaging also permits both messages 
to the mobile device and sent from the mobile device to 
be encrypted and decrypted as well as compressed and 
decompressed. 

[001 5] In an alternative system and method, the redi- 
rector program executes on a network server, and the 
server is programmed to detect numerous redirection 
event triggers over the network from multiple user desk- 
top computers coupled to the server via a LAN. The 
server can receive internal event triggers from each of 
the user desktops via the network, and can also receive 
external event triggers, such as messages from the us- 
ers' mobile data communication devices. In response to 
receiving one of these triggers, the server redirects the 
user's data items to the proper mobile data communica- 
tion device The user data items and addressing infor- 
mation for a particular mobile device can be stored at 
the server or at the user's PC. Using this alternative con- 
figuration, one redirector program can serve a plurality 
of users. This alternative configuration could also in- 
clude an internet- or intranet-based redirector program 
that could be accessible through a secure webpage or 
other user interface. The redirector program could be 
located on an Internet Service Provider's system and 
accessible only through the Internet. 
[0016] In another alternative configuration of the 
present invention, a redirector program operates at both 



the host system and at the user's mobile data commu- 
nication device. In this configuration, the user's mobile 
device operates similarly to the host system described 
below, and is configured in a similarfashion to push cer- 
5 tain user-selected data items from the mobile device to 
the user's host system (or some other computer) upon 
detecting an event trigger at the mobile device. This con- 
figuration provides two-way pushing of information from 
the host to the mobile device and from the mobile device 
10 to the host. 

[0017] The primary advantage of the present inven- 
tion is that it provides a system and method for triggering 
the continuous and real-time redirection of user-select- 
ed data items from a host system to a mobile data com- 
15 munication device. Other advantages of the present in- 
vention include: (1 ) flexibility in defining the types of user 
data to redirect, and in defining a preferred list of mes- 
sage types that are to be redirected or preferred senders 
whose messages are to be redirected; (2) flexibility in 
20 configuring the system to respond to numerous internal, 
external and networked triggering events; (3) transpar- 
ent repackaging of the user data items in a variety of 
ways such that the mobile data communication device 
appears as though it were the host system; (4) integra- 
ls tion with other host system components such as E-mail, 
TCP/IP, keyboard, screen saver, webpages and certain 
programs that can either create user data items or be 
configured to provide trigger points; and (5) the ability 
to operate locally on a user's desktop system or at a 
30 distance via a network server. 

[0018] These are just a few of the many advantages 
of the present invention, as described in more detail be- 
low. As will be appreciated, the invention is capable of 
other and different embodiments, and its several details 
35 are capable of modifications in various respects. Ac- 
cordingly, the drawings and description of the preferred 
embodiments set forth below are to be regarded as il- 
lustrative in nature and not restrictive. 

40 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS 

[0019] The present invention satisfies the needs not- 
ed above as will become apparent from the following 
description when read in conjunction with the accompa- 

^5 nying drawings wherein: 

[0020] FIG. 1 is a system diagram showing the redi- 
rection of user data items from a user's desktop PC (host 
system) to the users mobile data communication de- 
vice, where the redirector software is operating at the 

50 user's desktop PC. 

[0021] FIG. 2 is a system diagram showing the ion of 
user data items from a network server (host system) to 
the user's mobile data communication device, where the 
redirector software is operating at the server. 

55 [0022] FIG. 3 is a block diagram showing the interac- 
tion of the redirector software with other components of 
the host system in FIG. 1 (the user's desktop PC) to en- 
able the pushing of information from the host system to 



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the user's mobile data communication device. 
[0023] FIG. 4 is a flowchart showing the steps carried 
out by the redirector software operating at the host sys- 
tem. 

[0024J FIG. 5 is a flow chart showing the steps carried 5 
out by the mobile data communication device to inter- 
face with the redirector software operating at the host 
system. 



DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS 



[0025] Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 is an ex- 
ample system diagram showing the redirection of user 
data items (such as message A or C) from a user's office 
PC (host system) 10 to the users mobile data commu- 15 
nication device 24, where the redirector software 12 is 
operating at the users PC. Message A in FIG. 1 repre- 
sents an internal message sent from desktop 26 to the 
users host system 10 via LAN 14. Message C in FIG. 1 
represents an external message from a sender that is 20 
not directly connected to LAN 14, such as the users mo- 
bile data communication device 24, some other users 
mobile device (not shown), or any user connected to the 
Internet 18. Message C also represents a command 
message from the users mobile data communication 25 
device 24 to the host system 10. As described in more 
detail in FIG. 3, the host system 10 preferably includes, 
along with the typical hardware and software associated 
with a workstation or desktop computer, the redirector 
program 12, a TCP/IP subsystem 42, a primary rnes- 30 
.sage store 40, an E-mail subsystem 44, a screen saver 
subsystem 48, and a keyboard subsystem 46. 
[0026] In FIG. 1 , the host system 1 0 is the users desk- 
top system, typically located in the users office. The 
host system 10 is connected to a LAN 14, which also 35 
connects to other computers 26, 28 that may be in the 
users office or elsewhere. The LAN 14, in turn, is con- 
nected to a wide area network ("WAN") 18. preferably 
the Internet, which is defined by the use of the Trans- 
mission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP") to 40 
exchange information, but which, alternatively could be 
any other type of WAN. The connection of the LAN 14 
to the WAN 18 is via high bandwidth link 16, typically a 
T1 or T3 connection. The WAN 18 in turn is connected 
to a variety of gateways 20, via connections 32. A gate- 45 
way forms a connection or bridge between the WAN 18 
and some other type of network, such as an RF wireless 
network, cellular network, satellite network, orothersyn- 
chronous or asynchronous land-line connection. 
[0027] In the example of FIG. 1 , a wireless gateway so 
20 is connected to the Internet for communicating via 
wireless link 22 to a plurality of wireless mobile data 
communication devices 24. Also shown in FIG. 1 is ma- 
chine 30, which could be a FAX machine, a printer, a 
system for displaying images (such as video) or a ma- 55 
chine capable of processing and playing audio files, 
such as a voice mail system. The present invention in- 
cludes the ability to redirect certain message attach- 



ments to such an external machine 30 if the redirector 
program configuration data reflects that the mobile de- 
vice 24 cannot receive and process the attachments, or 
if the user has specified that certain attachments are not 
to be forwarded to mobile device 24, even if such device 
can process those attachments. By way of example, 
consider an E-mail sent to a user that includes three at- 
tachments - a word processing document, a video clip 
and an audio clip. The redirection program could be con- 
figured to send the text of the E-mail to the remote de- 
vice, to send the word processing document to a net- 
worked printer located near the user, to send the video 
clip to a store accessible through a secure connection 
through the internet and to send the audio clip to the 
users voice mail system. This example is not intended 
to limit the breadth and scope of the invention, but rather 
to illustrate the variety of possibilities embodied in the 
redirection concept. 

[0028] The preferred mobile data communication de- 
vice 24 is a hand-held two-way wireless paging compu- 
ter, a wirelessly enabled palm-top computer, a mobile 
telephone with data messaging capabilities, or a wire- 
lessly enabled laptop computer, but could, alternatively 
be other types of mobile data communication devices 
capable of sending and receiving messages via a net- 
work connection 22. Although it is preferable for the sys- 
tem to operate in a two-way communications mode, cer- 
tain aspects of the invention could be beneficially used 
in a "one and one-hair or acknowledgment paging en- 
vironment, or even with a one-way paging system. The 
mobile data communication device 24 includes software 
program instructions that work in conjunction with the 
redirector program 12 to enable the seamless, transpar- 
ent redirection of user-selected data items. FIG. 4 de- 
scribes the basic method steps of the redirector program 
12, and FIG. 5 describes the steps of the corresponding 
program operating at the mobile device 24. 
[0029] In an alternative embodiment of the present in- 
vention, not explicitly shown in the drawings, the mobile 
device 24 also includes a redirectorprogram. In this em- 
bodiment, user selected data items can be replicated 
from the host to the mobile device and vice versa. The 
configuration and operation of the mobile device 24 hav- 
ing a redirectorprogram is similar to that described here- 
in with respect to FlGs. 1-4. 

[0030] A user of the present invention can configure 
the redirectorprogram 12 to push certain user-selected 
data items to the users mobile data communication de- 
vice 24 when the redirector 12 detects that a particular 
user-defined event trigger (or trigger point) has taken 
place. User-selected data items preferably include E- 
rnail messages, calendar events, meeting notifications, 
address entries, journal entries, personal alerts, alarms, 
warnings, stock quotes, news bulletins, etc., but could, 
alternatively, include any other type of message that is 
transmitted to the host system 10. or that the host sys- 
tem 10 acquires through the use of intelligent agents, 
such as data that is received after the host system 10 



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initiates a search of a database or a website or a bulletin 
board. In some instances, only a portion of the data item 
is transmitted to the mobile device 24 in order to mini- 
mize the amount of data transmitted via the wireless net- 
work 22. In these instances, the mobile device 24 can 
optionally send a command message to the host system 
to receive more or all of the data item if the user desires 
to receive it. 

[0031] Among the user-defined event triggers that 
can be detected by the redirector program 12 are in the 
preferred embodiment external events, internal events 
and networked events. External events preferably in- 
clude: (1) receiving a command message (such as mes- 
sage C) from the user's mobile data communication de- 
vice to begin redirection, or to execute some other com- 
mand at the host, such as a command to enable the pre- 
ferred list mode, or to add or subtract a particular sender 
from the preferred list; (2) receiving a similar message 
from some external computer, and (3) sensing that the 
user is no longer in the vicinity of the host system; al- 
though, alternatively, an external event can be any other 
detectable occurrence that is external to the host sys- 
tem. Internal events could be a calendar alarm, screen 
saver activation, keyboard timeout, programmable tim- 
er, or any other user-defined event that is internal to the 
host system. Networked events are user-defined mes- 
sages that are transmitted to the host system from an- 
other computer coupled to the host system via a network 
to initiate redirection These are just some of the event? 
that could be used with the present invention to initiate 
replication of the user-selected data items from the host 
system 10 to the mobile device 24. 
[0032] FIG. 1 shows an E-mail message A being com- 
municated over LAN 14 from computer 26 to the user's 
desktop system 10 (also shown in FIG. 1 is an external 
message C, which could be an E-mail message from an 
Internet user, orcould be a command message from the 
user's mobile device 24). Once the message A (or C) 
reaches the primary message store of the host system 
1 0, it can be detected and acted upon by the redirection 
software 12. The redirection software 12 can use many 
methods of detecting new messages. The preferred 
method of detecting new messages is using Microsoft's 
® Messaging API (MAPI), in which programs, such as 
the redirector program 1 2, register for notifications or 
'advise syncs' when changes to a mailbox take place. 
Other methods of detecting new messages could also 
be used with the present invention. 
[0033] Assuming that the redirector program 1 2 is ac- 
tivated, and has been configured by the user (either 
through the sensing of an internal, network or external 
event) to replicate certain user data items (inciuding 
messages of type A or C) to the mobile device 24, when 
the message A is received at the host system 10, the 
redirector program 12 detects its presence and pre- 
pares the message for redirection to the mobile device 
24. In preparing the message for redirection, the redi- 
rector program 12 could compress the original message 



A, could compress the message header, or could en- 
crypt the entire message A to create a secure link to the 
mobile device 24. 

[0034] Also programmed into the redirector 12 is the 
5 address of the user's mobile data communication device 
24, the type of device, and whether the device 24 can 
accept certain types of attachments, such as word 
processing or voice attachments. If the user's type of 
mobile device cannot accept these types of attach- 
10 ments, then the redirector 12 can be programmed to 
route the attachments to a fax or voice number where 
the user is located using an attached fax or voice ma- 
chine 30. 

[0035] The redirector may also be programmed with 

15 a preferred list mode that is configured by the user either 
at the host system 1 0, or remotely from the users mobile 
data communication device by transmitting a command 
message C. The preferred list contains a list of senders 
(other users) whose messages are to be redirected or 

20 a list of message characteristics that determine whether 
a message is to be redirected. If activated, the preferred 
list mode causes the redirector program 12 to operate 
like a filter, only redirecting certain user data items 
based on whether the data item was sent from a sender 

25 on the preferred list or has certain message character- 
istics that if present will trigger or suppress redirection 
of the message. In the example of FIG. 1 , if desktop sys- 
tem 26 was operated by a user on the preferred list of 
host system 10, and the preferred list ontion was acti- 

30 vated, tnen message A would be redirected. If, however, 
desktop 26 was operated by a user not on the host sys- 
tem's preferred list, then message A would not be redi- 
rected, even if the user of the host system had config- 
ured the redirector to push messages of type A. The us- 

35 er of the host system 1 0 can configure the preferred list 
directly from the desktop system, or, alternatively, the 
user can then send a command message (such as C) 
from th« mobile device 24 to the desktop system 10 to 
activate the preferred list mode, or to add or delete cer- 

40 tain senders or message characteristics from the pre- 
ferred list that was previously configured. It should be 
appreciated that a redirection program could combine 
message characteristics and preferred sender lists to 
result in a more finely-tuned filter. Messages marked as 

45 low priority or that are simple return receipts or message 
read receipts, for example, could always be suppressed 
from redirection while messages from a particular send- 
er would always be redirected. 
[0036] After the redirector has determined that a par- 

50 ticular message should be redirected, and it has pre- 
pared the message for redirection, the software 12 then 
sends the message A to a secondary memory store lo- 
cated in the mobile device 24, using whatever means 
are necessary. In the preferred embodiment this method 

55 is to send the message Aback over the LAN 14, WAN 
18, and through the wireless gateway 20 to the mobile 
data communication device 24. In doing so, the redirec- 
tor preferably repackages message A as an E-mail with 



11 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



12 



an outer envelope B that contains the addressing infor- 
mation of the mobile device 24, although alternative 
repackaging techniques and protocols could be used, 
such as a TCP/IP repackaging and delivery method 
(most commonly used in the alternative server configu- 
ration shown in FIG.2). The wireless gateway 20 re- 
quires this outer envelope information B in order to know 
where to send the redirected message A. Once the mes- 
sage (A in B) is received by the mobile device 24, the 
outer envelope B is removed and the original message 
A is placed in the secondary memory store within the 
mobile device 24. By repackaging and removing the out- 
er envelope in this manner, the present invention causes 
the mobile computer 24 to appear to be at the same 
physical location as the host system 10, thus creating a 
transparent system. 

[0037] in the case where message C is representative 
of an external message from a computer on the Internet 
1 8 to the host system 1 o, and the host 1 0 has been con- 
figured to redirect messages of type C, then in a similar 
manner to message A, message C would be" repack- 
aged with an outer envelope B and transmitted to the 
user's mobile device 24. In the case where message C 
is representative of a command message from the us- 
er's mobile device 24 to the host system 10, the com- 
mand message C is not redirected, but is acted upon by 
the host system 10. 

[0038] If the redirected user data item is an E-mail 
message, as described above, the user at the mobile 
device 24 sees tne original subject, senders address, 
destination address, carbon copy and blind carbon 
copy. When the user replies to this message, or when 
the user authors a new message, the software operating 
at the mobile device 24 adds a similar outer envelope 
to the reply message (or the new message) to cause the 
message to be routed first to the user's host system 1 0, 
which then removes the outer envelope and redirects 
the message to the final destination, such as back to 
computer 26. In the preferred embodiment, this results 
in the outgoing redirected message from the user's host 
system 10 being sent using the E-mail address of the 
host mailbox, rather than the address of the mobile de- 
vice, so that it appears to the recipient of the message 
that the message originated from the users desktop 
system 10 rather than the mobile data communication 
device. Any replies to the redirected message will then 
be sent to the desktop system 10, which if it is still in 
redirector mode, will repackage the reply and resend it 
to the users mobile data device, as described above. 
[0039] FIG. 2 is an alternative system diagram show- 
ing the redirection of user data items from a network 
server 11 to the user's mobile data communication de- 
vice 24, where the redirector software 12 is operating at 
the server 1 1 . This configuration is particularly advanta- 
geous for use with message servers such as Microsoft's 
® Exchange Server, which is normally operated so that 
all user messages are kept in one central location or 
mailbox store on the server instead of in a store within 



each users desktop PC. This configuration has the ad- 
ditional advantage of allowing a single system adminis- 
trator to configure and keep track of all users having 
messages redirected. If the system includes encryption 
5 keys, these too can be kept at one place for manage- 
ment and update purposes. 

[0040] In this alternative configuration, server 1 1 pref- 
erably maintains a user profile for each users desktop 
system 10. 26, 28. including information such as wheth- 
™ er a particular user can have data items redirected, 
which types of message and information to redirect, 
what events will trigger redirection, the address of the 
users' mobile data communication device 24, the type 
of mobile device, and the users preferred list, if any. The 
is event triggers are preferably detected at the users 
desktop system 10, 26. 28 and can be any of the exter- 
nal, internal or network events listed above. The desktop 
systems 10, 26, 28 preferably detect these events and 
then transmit a message to the server computer 11 via 
20 LAN 14 to initiate redirection. Although the user data 
items are preferably stored at the server computer 1 1 in 
this embodiment, they could, alternatively, be stored at 
each users desktop system 10, 26. 28, which would 
then transmit them to the server computer 11 after an 
2 $ event has triggered redirection. 

[0041] As shown in FIG. 2, desktop system 26 gener- 
ates a message A that is transmitted to and stored at 
the host system 11 , which is the network server operat- 
ing the redirector program 12. The message A is for 
30 desktop system 10, but in this embodiment, user mes- 
sages are stored at the network server 11. When an 
event occurs at desktop system 10. an event trigger is 
generated and transmitted to the network server 11, 
which then determines who the trigger is from, whether 
35 that desktop has redirection capabilities, and if so, the 
server (operating the redirector program) uses the 
stored configuration information to redirect message A 
to the mobile computer 24 associated with the user of 
desktop system 10. 
40 [0042] As described above with reference to FIG. 1 , 
message C could be either a command message from 
a users mobile data communication device 24, or it 
could be a message from an external computer, such 
as a computer connected to the Internet 1 8. If the mes- 
4! > sage C is from an Internet computer to the users desk- 
top system 10, and the user has redirection capabilities, 
then the server 11 detects the message C, repackages 
it using electronic envelope B, and redirects the repack- 
aged message (C in B) to the users mobile device 24. 
50 if the message C is a command message from the users 
mobile device 24, then the server 11 simply acts upon 
the command message. 

[0043] Turning now to FIG. 3, a block diagram show- 
ing the interaction of the redirector software 12 with ad- 
55 ditional components of the host system 1 0 of FIG. 1 (the 
desktop PC) to enable more fully the pushing of infor- 
mation from the host system 1 0 to the users mobile data 
communication device 24 is set forth. These additional 



13 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



14 



components are illustrative of the type of event-gener- 
ating systems that can be configured and used with the 
redirector software 12, and of the type of repackaging 
systems that can be used to interface with the mobile 
communication device 24 to make it appear transparent 
to the user. 

[0044] The desktop system 10 is connected to LAN 
14, and can send and receive data, messages, signals, 
event triggers, etc., to and from other systems connect- 
ed to the LAN 14 and to external networks 18, 22, such 
as the Internet or a wireless data network, which are also 
coupled to the LAN 14. In addition to the standard hard- 
ware, operating system, and application programs as- 
sociated with a typical microcomputer or workstation, 
the desktop system 10 includes the redirector program 
12, a TCP/IP sub-system 42, an E-mail sub-system 44, 
a primary data storage device 40, a screen saver sub- 
system 48, and a keyboard sub-system 46. The TCP/IP 
and E-mail subsystems 42, 44 are examples of repack- 
aging systems that can be used to achieve the transpar- 
ency of the present invention, and the screen saver and 
keyboard sub-systems 46, 48 are examples of event 
generating systems that can be configured to generate 
event messages or signals that trigger redirection of the 
user selected data items. 

[0045] The method steps carried out by the redirector 
program 12 are described in more detail in FIG. 4. The 
basic functions of this program are: (1) configure and 
setup the user-defined event trigger points that will start 
redirection; (2) configure the types of user uata items foi 
redirection and optionally configure a preferred list of 
senders whose messages are to be redirected: (3) con- 
figure the type and capabilities of the user's mobile data 
communication device; (4) receive messages and sig- 
nals from the repackaging systems and the event gen- 
erating systems; and (5) command and control the re- 
direction of the user-selected data items to the mobile 
data communication device via the repackaging sys- 
tems. Other functions not specifically enumerated could 
also be integrated into this program. 
[0046] The E-Mail sub-system 44 is the preferred link 
to repackaging the user-selected data items for trans- 
mission to the mobile data communication device 24, 
and preferably uses industry standard mail protocols, 
such as SMTP, POP, IMAP, MIME and RFC-822, to 
name but a few. The E-Mail sub-system 44 can receive 
messages A from external computers on the LAN 14, or 
can receive messages C from some external network 
such as the Internet 18 or a wireless data communica- 
tion network 22, and stores these messages in the pri- 
mary data store 40. Assuming that the redirector 1 2 has 
been triggered to redirect messages of this type, the re- 
director detects the presence of any new messages and 
instructs the E-Mail system 44 to repackage the mes- 
sage by placing an outer wrapper B about the original 
message A (or C), and by providing the addressing in- 
formation of the mobile data communication device 24 
on the outer wrapper B. As noted above, this outer wrap- 



per B is removed by the mobile device 24, and the orig- 
inal message A (or C) is then recovered, thus making 
the mobile device 24 appear to be the desktop system 
10. 

s [0047] In addition, the E-Mail sub-system 44 receives 
messages back from the mobile device 24 having an 
outer wrapper with the addressing information of the 
desktop system 10, and strips this information away so 
that the message can be routed to the proper sender of 
10 the original message A (or C). The E-Mail sub-system 
also receives command messages C from the mobile 
device 24 that are directed to the desktop system 1 0 to 
trigger redirection or to carry out some other function. 
The functionality of the E-Mail sub-system 44 is control- 
led by the redirector program 12. 
[0048] The TCP/IP sub-system 42 is an alternative 
repackaging system. It includes all of the functionality of 
the E-Mail sub-system 44, but instead of repackaging 
the user-selected data items as standard E-mail mes- 
sages, this system repackages the data items using 
special-purpose TCP/IP packaging techniques. This 
type of special-purpose sub-system is useful in situa- 
tions where security and improved speed are important 
to the user. The provision of a special-purpose wrapper 
that can only be removed by special software on the mo- 
bile device 24 provides the added security, and the by- 
passing of E-mail store and forward systems can im- 
prove speed and real-time delivery. 
[0049] As described previously, the present invention 
can oe triggered to oegin redirection upon detecting nu- 
merous external, internal and networked events, or trig- 
ger points. Examples of external events include: receiv- 
ing a command message from the user's mobile data 
communication device 24 to begin redirection; receiving 
a similar message from some external computer; sens- 
ing that the user is no longer in the vicinity of the host 
system; or any other event that is external to the host 
system. Internal events could be a calendar alarm, 
screen saver activation, keyboard timeout, programma- 
ble timer, or any other user-defined event that is internal 
to the host system. Networked events are user-defined 
messages that are transmitted to the host system from 
another computer that is connected to the host system 
via a network to initiate redirection. 
[0050] The screen saver and keyboard sub-systems 
46, 48 are examples of systems that are capable of gen- 
erating iniornal events. Functionally, the redirector pro- 
gram 12 provides the user with the ability to configure 
the screen saver and keyboard systems so that under 
certain conditions an event trigger will be generated that 
can be detected by the redirector 12 to start the redirec- 
tion process. For example, the screen saver system can 
be configured so that when the screen saver is activat- 
ed, after, for example, 10 minutes of inactivity on the 
desktop system, an event trigger is transmitted to the 
redirector 1 2, which starts redirecting the previously se- 
lected user data items. In a similar manner the keyboard 
sub-system can be configured to generate event trig- 



20 



25 



3D 



35 



40 



45 



50 



15 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



16 



gers when no key has been depressed for a particular 
period of time, thus indicating that redirection should 
commence. These are just two examples of the numer- 
ous application programs and hardware systems inter- 
nal to the host system 10 that can be used to generate 
internal event triggers. 

[0051] FIGs. 4 and 5, set forth, respectively, flow 
charts showing the steps carried out by the redirector 
software 12 operating at the host system 10, and the 
steps carried out by the mobile data communication de- 
vice 24 in order to interface with the host system. Turn- 
ing first to FIG. 4, at step 50, the redirector program 12 
is started and initially configured. The initial configura- 
tion of the redirector 12 includes: (1 ) defining the event 
triggers that the user has determined will trigger redirec- 
tion; (2) selecting the user data items for redirection; (3) 
selecting the repackaging sub-system, either standard 
E-Mail, or special-purpose technique; (4) selecting the 
type of data communication device, indicating whether 
and what type of attachments the device is capable of 
receiving and processing, and inputting the address of 
the mobile device; and (5) configuring the preferred list 
of user selected senders whose messages are to be re- 
directed. 

[0052] FIG. 4 sets forth the basic steps of the redirec- 
tor program 1 2 assuming it is operating at a desktop sys- 
tem 10, such as shown in FIG. 1. If the redirector 12 is 
operating at a network server 11, as shown in FIG. 2, 
then additional configuration steps may be necessary to 
enabie redirection for a particular desktop system 10, 
26. 28 connected to the server, including: (1 ) setting up 
a profile for the desktop system indicating its address, 
events that will trigger redirection, and the data items 
that are to be redirected upon detecting an event; (2) 
maintaining a storage area at the server for the data 
items; and (3) storing the type of data communication 
device to which the desktop system's data items are to 
be redirected, whether and what type of attachments the 
device is capable of receiving and processing, and the 
address of the mobile device. 
[0053] Once the redirector program is configured 50, 
the trigger points (or event triggers) are enabled at step 
52. The program 12 then waits 56 for messages and 
signals 54 to begin the redirection process. A message 
could be an E-Mail message or some other user data 
item than may have been selected for redirection, and 
a signal could be a trigger signal, or could be some other 
type of signal that has not been configured as an event 
trigger. When a message or signal is detected, the pro- 
gram determines 58 whether it is one of the trigger 
events that has been configured by the user to signal 
redirection. If so, then at step 60 a trigger flag is set, 
indicating that subsequently received user data items 
(in the form of messages) that have been selected for 
redirection should be pushed to the user's mobile data 
communication device 24. 

[0054] If the message or signal 54 is not a trigger 
event, the program then determines at steps 62. 64 and 



66 whether the message is, respectively, a system 
alarm 62, an E-Mail message 64, or some other type of 
information that has been selected for redirection. If the 
message or signal is none of these three items, then 
5 control returns to step 56, where the redirector waits for 
additional messages 54 to act upon. If, however the 
message is one of these three types of information, then 
the program 12 determines, at step 68, whether the trig- 
ger flag has been set, indicating that the user wants 
10 these items redirected to the mobile device. If the trigger 
flag is set, then at step 70, the redirector 12 causes the 
repackaging system (E-Mail or TCP/IP) to add the outer 
envelope to the user data item, and at step 72 the 
repackaged data item is then redirected to the user's 
'5 mobile data communication device 24 via LAN 14, WAN 
18, wirdess gateway 20 and wireless network 22. Con- 
trol then returns to step 56 where the program waits for 
additional messages and signals to act upon. Although 
not shown explicitly in FIG. 4, after step 68, the program 
2 o could, if operating in the preferred list mode, determine 
whether the sender of a particular data item is on the 
preferred list, and if not, then the program would skip 
over steps 70 and 72 and proceed directly back to step 
56. If the sender was on the preferred list, then control 
25 would similarly pass to steps 70 and 72 for repackaging 
and transmission of the message from the preferred list 
sender. 

[0055] FIG. 5 sets forth the method steps carried out 
by the user's mobile data communication device 24 in 
so order to interface to the redirector program 12 of the 
present invention. At step 80 the mobile software is 
started and the mobile device 24 is configured to oper- 
ate with the system of the present invention, including, 
for example, storing the address of the user's desktop 
35 system 10. 

[0056] At step 82, the mobile device waits for mes- 
sages and signals 84 to be generated or received. As- 
suming that the redirector software 12 operating at the 
user's desktop system 10 is configured to redirect upon 
*o receiving a message from the user's mobile device 24, 
at step 86, the user can decide to generate a command 
message that will start redirection. If the user does so, 
then at step 88 the redirection message is composed 
and sent to the desktop system 1 o via the wireless net- 
45 work 22, through the wireless gateway 20, via the Inter- 
net 18 to the LAN 14, and is finally routed to the desktop 
machine 10. In this situation where the mobile device 
24 is sending a message directly to the desktop system 
1 0, no outer wrapper is added to the message (such as 
50 message C in FIGs. 1 and 2). In addition to the redirec- 
tion signal, the mobile device 24 could transmit any 
number of other commands to control the operation of 
the host system, and in particular the redirector program 
12. For example, the mobile 24 could transmit a com- 
55 mand to put the host system into the preferred list mode, 
and then could transmit additional commands to add or 
subtract certain senders from the preferred list. In this 
manner, the mobile device 24 can dynamically limit the 



17 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



18 



amount of information being redirected to it by minimiz- 
ing the number of senders on the preferred list. Other 
example commands include: (1 ) a message to change 
the configuration of the host system to enable the mobile 
device 24 to receive and process certain attachments; 
and (2) a message to instruct the host system to redirect 
an entire data item to the mobile device in the situation 
where only a portion of a particular data item has been 
redirected. 

[0057] Turning back to FIG. 5, if the user signal or 
message is not a direct message to the desktop system 
1 0 to begin redirection (or some other command), then 
control is passed to step 90, which determines if a mes- 
sage has been received. If a message is received by the 
mobile, and it is a message from the user's desktop 10, 
as determined at step 92, then at step 94 a desktop re- 
direction flag is set "on" for this message, and control 
passes to step 96 where the outer envelope is removed. 
Following step 96, or in the situation where the message 
is not from the user's desktop, as determined at step 92, 
control passes to step 98, which displays the message 
for the user on the mobile device's display. The mobile 
unit 24 then returns to step 82 and waits for additional 
messages or signals. 

[0058] If the mobile device 24 determines that a mes- 
sage has not been received at step 90, then control 
passes to step 100, where the mobile determines 
whether there is a message to send. If not, then the mo- 
bile unit returns to step 82 and waits for additional mes- 
sages or signals. If there is at leasi one message to 
send, then at step 1 02 the mobile determines whether 
it is a reply message to a message that was received by 
the mobile unit. If the message to send is a reply mes- 
sage, then at step 108, the mobile determines whether 
the desktop redirection flag is on for this message. If the 
redirection flag is not on, then at step 106 the reply mes- 
sage is simply transmitted from the mobile device to the 
destination address via the wireless network 22. If, how- 
ever, the redirection flag is on, then at step 11 0 the reply 
message is repackaged with the outer envelope having 
the addressing information of the user's desktop system 
10, and the repackaged message is then transmitted to 
the desktop system 1 0 at step 1 06. As described above, 
the redirector program 1 2 executing at the desktop sys- 
tem then strips the outer envelope and routes the reply 
message to the appropriate destination address using 
the address of the desktop system as the -from" field, 
so that to the recipient of the redirected message, it ap- 
pears as though it originated from the user's desktop 
system rather than the mobile data communication de- 
vice. 

[0059] If, at step 102, the mobile determines that the 
message is not a reply message, but an original mes- 
sage, then control passes to step 1 04, where the mobile 
determines if the user is using the redirector software 
12 at the desktop system 10, by checking the mobile 
unit's configuration. If the user is not using the redirector 
software 12. then the message is simply transmitted to 



the destination address at step 106. If, however, the mo- 
bile determines that the user is using the redirector soft- 
ware 12 at the desktop system 10. then control passes 
to step 110. where the outer envelope is added to the 

5 message. The repackaged original message is then 
transmitted to the desktop system 10 at step 106, which, 
as described previously, strips the outer envelope and 
routes the message to the correct destination. Following 
transmission of the message at step 106, control of the 

10 mobile returns to step 82 and waits for additional mes- 
sages or signals. 

[0060] Having described in detail the preferred em- 
bodiments of the present invention, including the pre- 
ferred methods of operation, it is to be understood that 
15 this operation could be carried out with different ele- 
ments and steps. This preferred embodiment is present- 
ed only by way of example and is not meant to limit the 
scope of the present invention which is defined by the 
following claims. 

20 

Claims 

1 . A system for redirecting information between a host 
25 system and a mobile device, comprising: 

a first redirector application operating at the 
host system, wherein the first redirector appli- 
cation is configured to sense a triggering event 
30 at the nost system and to continuously redirect 

information from the host system to the mobile 
device; and 

a second redirector application operating at the 
mobile device, wherein the second redirector 
35 application is configured to sense a triggering 

event at the mobile device and to continuously 
redirect information from the mobile device to 
the host system. 

40 2. A message redirection method operating at a host 
system, comprising the steps of: 

configuring one or more redirection events at 
the host system; 
45 detecting that a redirection event has occurred 

at the host system and generating a redirection 
trigger; 

receiving messages at the host system from a 
plurality of message senders; 

so in response to the redirection trigger, continu- 

ously redirecting the received messages from 
the host system to a mobile data communica- 
tion device associated with the host system; 
receiving reply messages from the mobile data 

55 communication device at the host system and 

configuring the reply messages using address 
information of the host system; and 
transmitting the configured reply messages 



•19 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



20 



from the host system to the plurality of message 
senders. 

3. A message redirection method, comprising the 
steps of: 

configuring one or more redirection events at a 
host system; 

detecting that a redirection event has occurred 
at the host system and generating a redirection 
trigger; 

receiving messages at the host system from a 
plurality of message senders; 
in response to the redirection trigger, continu- 
ously redirecting the received messages from 
the host system to a mobile data communica- 
tion device associated with the host system; 
receiving the redirected messages at the mo- 
bile data communicalion device; 
generating reply messages at the mobile data 
communication device; 

transmitting the reply messages from the mo- 
bile data communication device to the host sys- 
tem; 

receiving the reply messages at the host sys- 
tem and configuring the reply messages using 
address information of the host system; and 
transmitting the configured reply messages 
from the host system to the plurality of message 
senders. 

4. A method for redirecting messages between a host 
system and a mobile data communication device, 
comprising the steps of: 

configuring one or more redirection events at 
the host system; 

detecting that a redirection event has occurred 
at the host system and generating a redirection 
trigger; 

receiving incoming messages directed to a first 
address at the host system from a plurality of 
message senders; 

in response to the redirection trigger, continu- 
ously redirecting the incoming messages from 
the host system to the mobile data communi- 
cation device; 

receiving outgoing messages generated at the 
mobile communications device at the host sys- 
tem; 

configuring address information of the outgoing 
messages so that the first address is used as 
an originating address of the outgoing messag- 
es; and 

transmitting the outgoing messages from the 
host system to message recipients. 



10 



15 



20 



25 



30 



35 7. 



40 



45 



more wireless communication devices comprising: 
a. a redirector component that: 

i. upon receiving e-mail messages destined for 
a first e-mail address associated with the e-mail 
system, pushes the e-mail messages to a wire- 
less communication device associated with the 
first e-mail address; 

and, 

ii. upon receiving e-mail messages generated 
at the mobile device pushes the received e-mail 
messages to respective e-mail message recip- 
ients using the first e-mail address as an origi- 
nating e-mail address. 

An information system operable with one or more 
wireless communication devices comprising: 

a. an e-mail system operating at a server; and, 

b. a redirector component associated with the 
e-mail system comprising: 

i. means for redirecting e-mail to users of 
the e-mail system having a wireless com- 
munication device associated with their re- 
spective user accounts, wherein each user 
account is uniquely identified by an e-mail 
address; 

ii means for using the e-mail address of a 
user as an originaimg e-mail address when 
an e-mail message is composed and trans- 
mitted from a wireless communication de- 
vice. 

An information system as claimed in claim 5. where- 
in the e-mail system further comprises: 

a. an incoming information store; and 

b. an outgoing information store wherein one or 
more of the e-mail messages transmitted from 
the wireless communication device is stored in 
the outgoing information store. 



50 



55 



5. A server-based e-mail system operable with one or 



EP 1 096 725 A2 





LOCAL AREA NETWORK 
(LAN) 



16 




OESKTOP 
"COMPUTER 



IS 



10 



REDIRECTION SOFTWARE 



IS 



12 



/ 



30 



FAX OR VOICE 
MACHINE 



3 



INTERNET NETWORK 




Z 



-32 



20 



32 



WIRELESS 
GATEWAY 



1 



22 



z: 24 



MOBILE 
COMPUTER 



Fig. I 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



28- 



LOCAL AREA NETWORK 
(LAN) 



I0 



12 



SERVER 
COMPUTER 




REDIRECTION SERVER-''' 
SOTfoffE---" 




30 



FAX OR VOICE 

MACHINE 



20- 



, WIRELESS ^ 
C l GATEWAY \ ^TT 



MOBILE 
COMPUTER 



Fig. 2 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



14 



LOCAL AREA NETWORK (LAN) 



10 



42 



2^ 



40 



TCP/IP 
SUB-SYSTEM 



PRIMARY STORE 



44 



E-MAIL 
SUB-SYSTEM 



ALTERNATE LINK 



\ 



MAIN LINK 



/ 



RED I RECTOR 
PROGRAM 



12 



SETUP EVENTS 
TRI66ER 



SETUP EVENTS 
TRIGGER 



48 



2l 



SCREEN SAVER 
SUB-SYSTEM 



V 



46 



KEYBOARD 
SUB-SYSTEM 



DESKTOP COMPUTER 



Fig. 3 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



REDIRECTION 
SOFTWARE 
STARTED 



50 



INSTALL TRIGGER 
POINTS IN 
SYSTEM 



r 

MESSAGE AND 
SIGNALS 



FORWARD 
TO USER 



AOD OUTERIS 
ENVELOPE 




Fi S . A 



EP 1 096 725 A2 



80 



r B4 

MESSAGE AND 
SIGNALS 



MOBILE 
SOFTWARE 
STARTED 



88 



COMPOSE AND 
SEND TO OESKTOP 



VAIT FOR 
MESSAGES AND 
SIGNALS 



98 



1 



PRESENT 
TO USER 




REMOVE 
OUTER 
ENVELOPE 




94 ? < 


YES 


t 




SET OESKTOP 
REDIRECTION 

FLAG ON I 





SENO TO 
DESTINATION 
ADDRESS 




PUT OUTER ENVELOPE 

ON MESSAGE AND 
AOORESS TO OESKTOP 



Fig. 5