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PCT 

INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) 



(51) International Patent Classification 6 : 

G08B 5/22, H04Q 7/00, H04M 11/00 



(11) International Publication Number: WO 97/28518 

(43) International Publication Date: 7 August 1997 (07.08.97) 



(21) International Application Number: PCT/US97/00670 

(22) International Filing Date: 23 January 1997 (23.01.97) 



30 January 1996 (30.01.96) 



(71) Applicant: MOTOROLA INC. [US/US]; 1303 East Algonquin 

Road, Schaumburg, IL 60196 (US). 

(72) Inventors: TALTON, Gerald, Burton, Jr.; 10 Bay Tree Circle, 

Boynton Beach, FL 33462 (US). GEIL, Richard, Douglas; 
1056 S.W. 25th Way, Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (US). 
WEINER, Robert; 18805 Cox Avenue #210, Saratoga, CA 
95070 (US). 

(74) Agents: NICHOLS, Daniel, K. et at.; Motorola Inc., Intellec- 
tual Property Dept./GER, 1500 Gateway Boulevard-MS96, 
Boynton Beach, FL 33426-8292 (US). 



(81) Designated States: AL, AM, AT, AU, AZ, BB, BG, BR, BY, 
CA, CH, CN, CZ, DE, DK, EE, ES, FI, GB, GE, HU, IS, 
JP, KE, KG, KP, KR, KZ, LK, LR, LS, LT, LU, LV, MD, 
MG, MK, MN, MW, MX, NO, NZ, PL, PT, RO, RU, SD, 
SE, SG, SI, SK, TJ, TM, TR, TT, UA, UG, UZ, VN, ARIPO 
patent (KE, LS, MW, SD, SZ. UG), Eurasian patent (AM, 
AZ, BY, KG, KZ, MD, RU, TJ, TM), European patent (AT, 
BE, CH, DE, DK, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, IE, IT, LU, MC, 
NL, PT, SE), OAPI patent (BF, BJ, CF, CG, CI, CM, GA, 
GN, ML, MR, NE, SN, TD, TG). 



With international search report. 

Before the expiration of the time limit for amending the 
claims and to be republished in the event of the receipt of 
amendments. 



(54) Title: WIRELESS MESSAGE DELIVERY SYSTEM 





Local AIM WtotauNMWOMt (LAWN) 




\ — • 


lie-' 


















— i 71 LfL rSTl 




■& — 

ISO 







(57) Abstract 

A wireless message delivery system includes a wired messaging network (102) which delivers E-mail messages between wired 
network nodes, and which further inputs E-mail messages for delivery to a wireless messaging unit (116). A wireless messaging server 
(104) is coupled to the wired messaging network (102), and receives and processes the E-mail messages inputted from the wired messaging 
network (102) for delivery to the wireless messaging unit (106). A wireless messaging network (106) is coupled to the wireless messaging 
server (104) and delivers the E-mail messages to the wireless messaging unit. 



FOR THE PURPOSES OF INFORMATION ONLY 



Codes used to identify States party to the PCT on the front pages of pamphlets p 
applications under the PCT. 



Burkina Fa 
Bulgaria 



Czech Republic 

Germany 

Denmark 




Poland 
Portugal 



Trinidad and Tobago 
Ukraine 



WO 97/28518 



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PCI7US97/00670 



WIRELESS MESSAGE DELIVERY SYSTEM 

Field of the Invention 

5 The present invention relates generally to the field of 

message delivery systems, and more particularly to a wireless 
message delivery system which delivers messages originated 
from within a wired message delivery system to a wireless 
messaging unit. 

10 

Background of the Invention 

Wireless messaging systems, such as conventional radio 
paging systems have for many years provided message delivery 

15 to portable communication receivers, or pagers. In radio 
paging systems, tone only, voice, numeric, and alphanumeric 
messages were entered by a message originator using a message 
entry device such as a telephone for tone only, voice and 
numeric messages, and a page entry terminal, or personal 

20 computer, for alphanumeric messages. Messages inputted from a 
page entry terminal or a personal computer were routed through 
a PBX for on-site paging messages, or through the Public 
Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) for local or wide area 
paging messages for delivery to a paging terminal which 

25 processed the messages for delivery to the portable 

communication receiver designated by the message originator. 

Summary of the Invention 

3 0 In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a 

wireless message delivery system includes a wired messaging 
network which delivers E-mail messages between wired network 
nodes, and which further inputs E-mail messages for delivery 
to a wireless messaging unit. A wireless messaging server is 

35 coupled to the wired messaging network, and receives and 

processes the E-mail messages input from the wired messaging 
network for delivery to the wireless messaging unit. A 
wireless messaging network is coupled to the wireless 



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PCT7US97/00670 



messaging server and delivers the E-mail messages to the 
wireless messaging unit. 

Brief Description of the Drawings 

5 

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a wireless message delivery- 
system in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the 
present invention. 

FIG. 2 is an electrical block diagram showing the 
10 configuration of a wireless messaging server in accordance 
with the preferred embodiment of the present invention. 

FIG. 3 is an electrical block diagram showing memory 
partitioning within the wireless messaging server in 
accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present 
15 invention. 

FIG. 4 is a system software context diagram for the 
wireless message delivery system in accordance with the 
preferred embodiment of the present invention. 

FIG. 5 is a wireless messaging server software 
20 architecture diagram for the wireless message delivery system 
in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present 
invention. 

FIG. 6 is a message processor software architecture 
diagram for the wireless messaging server in accordance with 
25 the preferred embodiment of the present invention. 

FIG. 7 is a message parsing software architecture diagram 
for the wireless messaging server in accordance with the 
preferred embodiment of the present invention. 

FIG. 8 is a wireless message dispatch software 
30 architecture diagram for the wireless messaging server in 
accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present 
invention . 

FIG. 9 is a diagram of a typical E-mail message sent from 
the Wired messaging network 102 in the prior art SMTP E-mail 
35 message format. 

FIG. 10 is a diagram of an E-mail wireless message using 
E-mail aliases for addressing a wireless messaging unit in 
accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present 
invention . 



WO 97/28518 PCT/US97/00670 

3 

FIG. 11 is an E-mail context configuration diagram for 
addressing a wireless messaging unit using E-mail alias 
addressing in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the 
pr es en t invent i on . 
5 FIG. 12 is a diagram an E-mail wireless message using 

sub-domain paging for addressing a wireless messaging unit in 
accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present 
invention . 

FIG. 13 is an E-mail context configuration diagram or 
10 addressing a wireless messaging unit using sub-domain paging 
in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present 
invention. 

FIGS. 14 through 20 are flow charts illustrating the 
operation of the wireless messaging server in accordance with 
15 the preferred embodiment of the present invention. 

Description Of The Preferred Embodiments 

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a wireless message delivery 

20 system 100 in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the 
present invention. The wireless message delivery system 100 
comprises a wired messaging network 102, a wireless messaging 
server 104 (two of which are shown by way of example) and a 
Wireless messaging network 106. The wired messaging network 

25 102 can include a LAN 108 (local area network), a WAN 110 

(wide area network) , or a combination of LAN 108 and WAN 110 
networks as illustrated. It will be appreciated that while 
only a single LAN 108 network and a single WAN 110 network are 
shown, multiple LAN 108 networks and/or WAN 110 networks can 

30 be interconnected in a manner well known to one of ordinary 
skill in the art for the transfer of E-mail messages. The 
wireless messaging network 106 can include a LAWN 112 (local 
area wireless network) , a WAWN 114 (wide area wireless 
network), or a combination of LAWN 112 and WAWN 114 networks. 

3 5 It will be appreciated that while only a single LAWN 112 

network and a single WAWN 114 network are shown, multiple LAWN 
112 networks and/or WAWN 114 networks can be interconnected in 
a manner well known to one of ordinary skill in the art for 
the distribution of a wireless message, such as a paging 



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PCT/US97/00670 



message, to a wireless messaging unit 116, such as a pager or 
an information service receiver. 

The general function and operation of a LAN 108 (local 
area network) , shown in FIG. 1, is one of allowing spatially 
5 co-located computers which are typically located within a 
room, building or campus of buildings to share common 
resources on a computer network in a manner well known to one 
of ordinary skill in the art. The spatially co-located 
computers are represented pictorially in FIG. 1 as E-mail 

10 users, two of which are shown by example. Typical resources 
shared on a LAN 108 network are files on a File Server, 
printers on a Print Server, and E-mail message services on an 
E-mail server. The LAN 108 network uses a physical network 
such as ARCNET, Ethernet, Token-ring, Local Talk or other 

15 network media to connect the computers which represent wired 
network nodes into the network. The LAN 108 network can 
employ any one of a number of networking protocols, such as 
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/ Internet Protocol), 
AppleTalk™, IPX/SPX (Inter-Packet Exchange/ Sequential Packet 

20 Exchange) , Net BIOS (Network Basic Input Output System) or any 
other packet structures to enable the communication between E- 
mail users and the E-mail server. The LAN 108 can also use 
routers (not shown) to subnet the LAN 108 network 
organizationally or physically. In this context, the 

25 definition of a LAN 108 network as described herein refers to 
a geographic locality of computers and the type of wired media 
used to interconnect the computers for communication. 

The general function and operation of the WAN 110 (wide 
area network) is also one of allowing computers to share 

30 common resources. However, in this context the definition 

used herein is one where the computers are not spatially co- 
located. The typical resources shared are similar to, if not 
the same, as found in a LAN 108 network. However, the WAN 110 
network uses a different physical network media such as X.25, 

3 5 Frame Relay, ISDN, Modem dial-up or other media to connect 
other computers or other local area networks to the WAN 110 
network. FIG. 1 shows by way of example a number of well 
known public and private wide area networks such as 
Compuserve™, America Online™ (AOL) , the MIT computer network, 



WO 97/28518 PCT/US97/00670 

5 

the Motorola™ computer network and Prodigy™ which are shown 
by way of example. The WAN 110 network described above can 
operate independently, or can be interconnected through the 
well known world wide Internet computer network. Likewise, a 
5 LAN 108 network can also be interconnected to a WAN 110 

network through the world wide Internet computer network, as 
shown, in a manner well known to one of ordinary skill in the 
art. 

The general function of the LAWN 112 { Local Area 

10 Wireless Network) is one of offering local wireless messaging 
services, where the term "local" refers to a coverage area 
provided by a single transmitter on-site wireless messaging 
system, or a multiple transmitter wireless messaging system 
which can cover at most a single predetermined metropolitan 

15 area. Messages are input into the LAWN 112 network using a 
message entry device, such as a telephone, an alphanumeric 
entry messaging device or a computer terminal. The messages 
are typically interconnected from the message entry device 
through the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to a 

20 paging terminal. The paging terminal receives the messages 
and processes the message for transmission in a manner well 
known to one of ordinary skill in the art. Processing of the 
messages includes encoding the messages into one of a number 
of well known paging signaling protocols, such as the Post 

25 Office Communication Standard Advisory Group protocol 

(POCSAG) , the Golay Sequential Code protocol (GSC) , the FLEX 
signaling protocol or the ERMES signaling protocol, just to 
name a few. Once encoded, the wireless message is transmitted 
within the LAWN 112 to at least one wireless messaging unit 

30 116, such as to one or more pagers or data communication 
receivers . 

The general operation of the WAWN 114 (Wide Area Wireless 
Network) is similar to the LAWN 112 network, except that the 
coverage area is larger than a single predetermined 
35 metropolitan area, and can include a plurality of local area 
wireless networks which have been interconnected to provide 
coverage to a number of separate metropolitan areas, or to 
provide regional, national or worldwide wireless messaging 
service. 



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PCTAJS97/00670 



As shown in FIG. 1, in the preferred embodiment of the 
present invention, the LAN 108 network and/or the WAN 110 
network can be advantageously interconnected to the LAWN 112 
network and/ or the WAWN 114 network through the use of a 
5 wireless messaging server 104 (WMS) , as will be described 

below. Messages, such as E-mail messages which are originated 
in the LAN 108 network and/or WAN 110 network are received by 
the wireless messaging server 104 which processes the E-mail 
messages received for delivery to a LAWN 112 network and/ or a 

10 WAWN 114 network. 

The interface between the wireless messaging server 104 
and the wireless messaging network 106 employs one or more 
well known physical interconnection media such as serial 
direct- connect, serial via modem/PSTN, Ethernet™, token-ring, 

15 LocalTalk™, ARCnet as well as others. The protocol used for 
message initiation into the LAWN /WAWN is by way of example 
either TAP (Telocator Alphanumeric Paging) , TFC/TAP (Telocator 
Format Conversion/Telocator Alphanumeric Paging) , TNPP 
(Telocator Network Paging Protocol), TDP (Telocator Data 

20 Paging) or TIS (Telocator Inter-Switch) protocols. 

FIG. 2 is an electrical block diagram of the wireless 
messaging server 104 in accordance with the preferred 
embodiment of the present invention. The wireless messaging 
server 104 includes a processor 200, such as a personal 

25 computer or high performance computer workstation; a mass 
storage media 212, such as a hard disk drive, a writable 
optical disk drive, a removable cartridge hard disk drive, or 
the like; a keyboard 208, and a video display 210, such as a 
CRT monitor or a dot matrix or other similar flat screen 

30 display. The mass storage media 212, is coupled to the 

processor 200 through an I/O port 214 (input/output port) as 
is well known in the art. The keyboard 208 and the video 
display 210 are also coupled to the processor 200 through an 
I/O port 214 as is also well known in the art. The keyboard 

35 208 is used to enter information into one or more databases 
which are described below, and which are required for 
operation of the wireless messaging server 104 . The keyboard 
208 and video display 210 allow the operator of the wireless 
messaging server 104 to, among other things, monitor the 



WO 97/28518 PCTAJS97/00670 

7 

delivery of messages, and to recover message processing data 
such as is used for billing purposes or to monitor the 
wireless messaging server 104 usage. It will be appreciated 
that additional uses for the keyboard 208 and video display 
5 210 can be provided as well, such as providing status messages 
to the message senders which are generated by the operator of 
the Wireless messaging server 104 . 

As shown in FIG. 2, the processor 200 includes, by way of 
example, a CPU 202 (central processing unit) which controls 

10 the operation of the wireless messaging server 104. Coupled 
to the CPU 202 is a read only memory (ROM) 218 which stores 
firmware controlling the basic operation of the processor 200. 
Also coupled to the CPU 202 is a random access memory (RAM) 
216 which is used to temporarily store E-mail messages as they 

15 are received, and further stores firmware utilized in the 
processing of the E-mail messages, as will be described in 
detail below. The random access memory 216 and read only 
memory 218 couple to the CPU 202 through an 
address/data/control bus 220 which provides access to the 

20 random access memory 216 and read only memory 218 in a manner 
well known to one of ordinary skill in the art. The CPU 202 
also couples to an I/O port 214 which provides communication 
with the mass storage media 212, the keyboard 208 and the 
video display 210, as described above. The CPU 202 also 

25 couples to an E-mail input interface 204 which enables 

receiving E-mail messages generated within the wired messaging 
network 102 . 

The CPU 202 also couples to an output interface 206 which 
enables delivering the wireless messages generated by the 
3 0 wireless messaging server 104 to the wireless messaging 

network 106 using any of a plurality of different network 
configurations and protocols, such as described in Table I 
that follows. 



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PCT/US97/00670 



Application 

Page Submission 
(Alpha /Numeric ) 



Protocol 
TAP 



Network 

Serial Connection 

Modem Dial-up Serial Connection 

Serial Connection 

Modem Serial Connection 

Serial Connection 

Modem Dial-up Serial Connection 

TCP/IP - Ethernet 

TCP/IP - Token Ring 

TCP/IP - SLIP 

TCP/IP - PPP 



TNPP 



5 



TDP 



TIS 



10 



Page Submission 
(Binary) 



TFC/TAP 



Serial Connection 

Modem Dial-up Serial Connection 

Serial Connection 

Modem Serial Connection 

Serial Connection 

Modem Dial-up Serial Connection 

TCP/IP - Ethernet 

TCP/IP - Token Ring 

TCP/IP - SLIP 

TCP/IP - PPP 



15 



TNPP 



TDP 



TIS 



20 



Table I 



25 



Returning to FIG. 2, as E-mail messages are received at 
the E-mail input interface 204 over one of the input network 
types identified in Table I, the E-mail messages are 
temporarily stored in the mass storage media 212 under the 

30 control of the central processing unit (CPU) 202. The mass 
storage media 212 also stores one or more databases, to be 
described below, which are used by the CPU 202 to direct the 
delivery of the wireless message generated by the wireless 
messaging server 104 to the wireless messaging unit 116. 

35 During E-mail message processing, the CPU 202 recovers the E- 
mail messages from the mass storage media 212, and using 
routines active in a random access memory (RAM) 216, processes 
the E-mail messages for delivery to the wireless messaging 
network 106 through the output interface 206 using one or more 

40 of the networks and protocols identified in Table II above. 

As will be appreciated from the description provided 
above, the wireless messaging server 104, in addition to 
processing E-mail messages generated in the wired messaging 
network 102 for delivery by the wireless messaging network 

45 106, is also capable of dynamically switching the E-mail input 
interface 204 between a number of networks and protocols, such 
as described in Table I, as well as switching the output 



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PCT/US97/00670 



interface 206 between a number of networks and protocols, such 
as described in Table II. 

By way of example, the processor 200 is a Sparc 5™ or 
Sparc 10™ workstation or the like which includes the keyboard 
5 208 and video display 210, and which is manufactured by Sun 
Microsystems of Sunneyvale, California. The processor 200 
preferably includes at least 16M Bytes of random access 
memory, and can include up to 64M Bytes of random access 
memory, depending upon the E-mail message volume anticipated 

10 within the system. Likewise the mass storage device can be 
the internal hard disk drive supplied with the workstation, 
which is typically 500 M Byte, but can be smaller or larger 
depending on the system requirements, and can be externally 
located as well. The processor 200 preferably includes the 

15 use of a Unix™ multitasking operating system or the like 
having a SMTP E-mail support. 

FIG. 3 is a block diagram showing memory partitioning 
within the wireless messaging server 104 in accordance with 
the preferred embodiment of the present invention. Memory 

20 partitioning occurs in both the mass storage media 212 and the 
random access memory 216 as shown by way of example in FIG. 3. 

In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the 
mass storage media 212 contains several files described below 
which are used in the processing of E-mail messages into 

25 wireless messages. The Operating System Software 315 is 

responsible for offering a preemptive-multitasking environment 
with E-mail, file input/output and networking services 
implemented preferably using a Unix™ based computer, such as 
described above. The Wireless Messaging Server Software 320 

30 is the actual executable controlling program that is loaded 
into random access memory (RAM) 216, and which controls 
processing of the E-mail messages into wireless messages. 

The Target Database 325, is shown by way of example in 
Table II below, and is responsible for providing target 

35 identifier look-up information. The target identifier look-up 
information includes such information as at least one 
predetermined wireless selective call user address 
corresponding with a wireless selective call user identifier 
and a wireless messaging unit address (WMU address) , all of 



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PCT/US97/00670 



which serve to uniquely identify the wireless messaging unit 
116 within a particular Wireless messaging network 106 to 
which an E-mail message is directed. The wireless messaging 
unit address is also often referred to as a pager cap code or 
5 a unit ID. The target identifier look-up information also 
includes a Wireless Messaging Unit Type (WMU TYPE) which 
designates the type of message information which can be 
received by the wireless messaging unit 116. As shown in 
Table II, the WMU TYPE can be a numeric message (NUMERIC) , an 

10 alphanumeric message (ALPHA) or an information service message 
(DATA) . It will be appreciated that other wireless message 
types can be utilized as well. The target identifier look-up 
information also includes a Service Name identifying the 
service network name to which the E-mail message is directed 

15 for transmission. In the preferred embodiment of the present 
invention, the Target identifier takes the form of the 
wireless message recipient's First Name and Last Name, as 
shown, although it will be appreciated that other forms of 
Target identifier identification can be used as well. In 

20 addition, as will be described below, the need for the Target 
Database can be, in certain instances, obviated when there is 
enough information within the Target identifier provided 
within the E-mail message to enable the wireless messaging 
server 104 to derive the WMU address, WMU Type and Service 

25 Name, as will be described below. 



TARGET DATABASE 


TARGET IDENTIFIER 








FIRST 


LAST NAME 


WMU 


WMU TYPE 


SERVICE 


NAME 




ADDRESS 




NAME 


GERALD 


TALTON 


011325 


NUMERIC 


P-NET 


GERALD 


TALTON 


011328 


ALPHA 


S-PAGE 


RICHARD 


GEIL 


223425 


ALPHA 


DEFAULT 


BOB 


WIENER 


123546 


DATA 


P-TEL 



TABLE II. 



30 The Service Name, shown in Table II, offers a cross 

reference (tag) into various databases to be described below 
that contain connection and protocol information necessary to 
communicate with a LAWN 112 network and/or a WAWN 114 network. 
The WMU address offers the actual address of the Wireless 



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11 

messaging unit 116 within the previously specified LAWN 112 
network and/or a WAWN 114 network. The WMU Type offers a 
certain level of validation and encoding insight for the 
wireless messaging unit 116, such as whether the wireless 
5 messaging unit 116 is a numeric pager; an alphanumeric pager; 
or a data, or information service, receiver. 

Returning to FIG. 3, the Error Log 328 is used by the 
Send Message to Wireless Service process 420 described below 
to log any and all wireless message dispatch errors . These 

10 errors are read as Status Information from the Send Message to 
Wireless Service process 420. 

The Message Log Switch 330 is used to control whether or 
not message logging is enabled by the WMS (Wireless messaging 
server) System Administrator 402 described below, and is one 

15 of the WMS System Administrator 402 system configuration 
commands . 

The Message Log 335 is a memory storage area used to log 
parsed message information such as the Target identifier, 
sender information including the E-mail address, and in 
20 certain instance the sender's full name, and other 

information, such as a time/date stamp, a Message Spool File 
reference number, an acknowledge flag and an evaluated success 
indication, as will be described below. 

The Spool Directory 337 is a directory containing 
25 multiple Message Spool Files where the E-mail messages, shown 
for example as E-mail message 1 through E-mail message N in 
FIG. 3, are copied for later analysis as Status Information. 

The Service Database 340 is responsible for storing 
service level parameters such as shown by way of example in 
30 Table III that follows. 



Service 
Name 


Service 
Password 


Message 
Size 
Limit 


Last 
Date 


Message 
Running 
Total 


Service 
Constants 


Connection 

Constants 

Record 


default 




240 


2/16/95 


13456 


1 


2 


S-Page 


hello 


400 


4/12/94 


1201 


2 


1 


M-Comm 




0 


4/10/94 


802 


1 


3 



Table III 



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The Service Database 340 includes a Service Name and 
parameters such as service passwords, message size 
limitations, last usage date, message running total and 
references to records in a Service Constants Database 345, 
5 such as shown in Table V that follows, and a Connection 
Constants Database 3 50, such as shown in Table IV that 
follows. The Service Name identifies within the wireless 
messaging network 106, the LAWN 112 network and/or WAWN 114 
network to which the wireless message is sent, and unless 

10 otherwise specified, includes at least a default network 
identifier whose Service Name is "default" and which 
identifies a default local area or wide area wireless 
messaging network. Additional wireless messaging networks can 
also be listed and are identified by unique Service Names, 

15 such as shown. The Service Password allows the wireless 

messaging server 104 dispatch access to the wireless messaging 
network 106, and more particularly to the LAWN 112 network 
and/ or WAWN 114 network to which the wireless message is to be 
sent. The Message size limit indicates the maximum number of 

20 characters of the E-mail message which can be sent within the 
wireless message. Any additional number of characters within 
the E-mail message will be truncated by the wireless messaging 
server 104. The Last Usage Date and Message Running Total are 
statistics maintained by the wireless messaging server 104 

25 that offers service level utilization information. The 
Service Constants Record number and Connection Constants 
Record number reference records within the Service Constants 
Database and the Connection Constants Database. 



Record 
No. 


Connection 
> ^ 


Port 


Number 


Network 
Address 


Backup 
Connection 


1 


M 


/dev/cua 


9,4567890 






2 


D 


/dev/cub 






1 


3 


M 


/dev/cua 


9,234565 






4 


N 






145 . 67 . 34 . 1 





30 

Table IV 

The Connection Constants Database 350 shown by way of 
example in Table IV, and is responsible for specifying the 



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13 

method of connection to the named service, i.e. LAWN 112 
network and/or WAWN 114 network. This Connection Type can 
vary over several types of records specifying network 
connection type, such as leased line or dial-up connections to 
5 the service, modem (M) , direct (D) or Network (N) connections. 
The record can also offer up a backup reference to another 
network connection type in case the first network connection 
type is not capable of being connected to, such as shown in 
Table IV record 2, where when the regular connection is not 

10 made, the backup connection is referenced to as the alternate 
method of connection. 

The Service Constants Database 345 shown in Table V is 
responsible for offering up wireless message dispatch protocol 
soft-coded constants that include the protocol type, and 

15 string and timer values used in the protocol with the Wireless 
messaging network 106. 



Record * 


Protocol 


Init 


Init 


TNPP 


TNPP Packet 




Ty^e 


Delay 


String 


Address 


Size 


1 


TAP 


2 


ID= 








TNPP 






3 


<ESC>PG1 



Table V 



As shown in Table V above, there is a controlling filed 
of the Table that decides whether certain fields corresponding 
to columns in the Table contain information or not. In the 
example above, record 1 is a TAP protocol type, hence only TAP 
protocol type contains the fields "Init Delay" and "Init 
String". In the case of protocol 2, the protocol type is 
TNPP, hence only TNPP protocol parameters are specified, as 
shown . 

Returning to FIG. 3, the random access memory 216 
contains several process images used in the processing of E- 
mail messages into wireless messages. The Send Mail process 
365, shown for by way of example as Send Mail_l through Send 
Mail_N, are temporarily allocated blocks of memory that 
contain the Send Mail process 365 which is invoked when a LAN 
108 network or WAN 110 network connection is completed, and 
which is responsible for accepting a network submittal of an 



25 



30 



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PCT/US97/00670 



E-mail message. The WMU message process 370, shown as WMU 
message_l through WMU message_N, are temporarily allocated 
blocks of memory associated with E-mail messages being 
processed into a wireless message or page. It will be 
5 appreciated that a single E-mail message can in fact be 

processed into a multiple number of wireless messages or pages 
as will be described below. The code section associated with 
the Send Mail process 365 is shared in the code image named 
Wireless Messaging Server Software 320. This is the actual 

10 code that is executed with varied data to result in E-mail 
messages being converted to wireless messages (WMU messages) 
and being dispatched to the wireless messaging network 106. 
The Operating System Software 315 image is responsible for 
offering task switching, file services and other basic 

15 operating system services. 

The Send Mail process 365 is responsible for receiving 
the E-mail message on the wireless messaging server 104 and 
for activating the Wireless Messaging Server Software 320 by 
loading the software from the mass storage media 212 into 

20 random access memory 216 and executing the code. The Wireless 
messaging server Software 320 image processes the message in 
the random access memory space associated with the WMU message 
370, identified as WMU message_l through WMU message_N. 
During message processing, the unprocessed E-mail message is 

25 copied to the Spool Directory 337. The unprocessed E-mail 
message is used during processing of the Wireless Messaging 
Server Software 320. During this processing, the Wireless 
Messaging Server Software 320 will log pertinent processing 
variables to the Message Log 335, as described below, when the 

30 Message Log Switch 330 is active. The processing will also 
use the Target Database 325 and Target identifiers found in 
the E-mail message to resolve the message into a wireless 
messaging unit 116 address (not shown in FIG. 3) and LAWN 112 
network or a WAWN 114 network service name for each target 

35 identifier. After the resolution is complete, the Out Of 

Service Switch 355 is checked. When the Out Of Service Switch 
355 is set, then the Out Of Service message 3 60 is sent back 
to the message originator in an E-mail message which includes 
the message originator's E-mail address, and processing is 



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stopped. Otherwise, the wireless message is dispatched to the 
wireless messaging network 106. This is done by the software 
cross-referencing the LAWN 112 network or WAWN 114 network 
service name in the Service Database 340. The Service 
5 Database 340 includes records of various LAWN 112 network 

and/or a WAWN 114 network services and statistical information 
and record references to the Service Constants Database 345 
and the Connection Constants Database 350. The Service 
Constants Database 345 details various protocol constants used 

10 in the protocol between the wireless messaging server 104 and 
the wireless messaging network 106. The Connection Constants 
Database 350 details various protocol constants used in the 
protocol responsible for acquiring a connection to the 
Wireless messaging network 106. When there are any 

15 difficulties in sending the message successfully to the 

wireless messaging network 106, then the errors associated 
with the problem are logged to the Error Log 328 and an error 
report is sent back to the originator of the E-mail message. 
FIG. 4 is a system software context diagram 400 for the 

20 wireless message delivery system 100 in accordance with the 
preferred embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 4 shows 
the overall software context in which the Wireless Messaging 
Server Software 320 operates. The Wireless messaging server 
Software 320 accepts an E-mail message, referred to in FIG. 4 

25 as the "Message", from the Wired messaging network 102. The 

Message may or may not result in the Wireless Messaging Server 
Software 320 generating a Wireless Message Submission, to be 
described below, to the wireless messaging network 106. Upon 
generation of the Wireless Messaging Submission to the 

3 0 wireless messaging network 106, the wireless messaging network 
106 will reply with a Message Submission Status, to be 
described below, back to the Wireless Messaging Server 
Software 320. When there are any problems incurred in sending 
the Message to the wireless messaging network 10 6, then a 

35 Message Problem, to be described below, will be sent back to 
the Wired messaging network 102. Optionally, a Message 
Verification, to be described below, would be sent back to the 
wired messaging network 102 when the Message is successfully 
sent to the wireless messaging network 106. The WMS System 



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Administrator 402, shown and described in FIG. 4, is a person 
responsible for inputting various System Configuration 
Commands, to be described below, to be used by the Wireless 
messaging server Software 320. The System Configuration 
5 Commands may or may not result in the generation of System 

Configuration Status, to be described below, which is sent to 
the WMS System Administrator 402. Also, in certain situations 
the Wireless Messaging Server Software 320 will supply the WMS 
System Administrator 402 with Status Information, to be 

10 described below, regarding the present state of the wireless 
messaging server 104. 

FIG. 5 is an overall software architecture diagram 500 
for the wireless message delivery system 100 in accordance 
with the preferred embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 

15 5 shows a decomposition of the Wireless Messaging Server 

Software 320 into its component parts, which in the preferred 
embodiment of the present invention is shown as the Process 
Message process 410, the Send Message to Wireless Service 
process 420 and the Configure WMS System process 430, in 

20 conjunction with the Target Database 325, the Service Database 
340, the Service Constants Database 345 and the Connection 
Constants Database 350. Upon activation of the Process 
Message process 410 by the receipt of an E-mail message, 
herein after referred to as "Message" in FIG. 5, from the 

25 wired messaging network 102, the Process Message process 410 
is responsible for resolving the Message into one or more 
Wireless Message Requests, as will be described below. During 
the Process Message process 410, the Target Database 325 is 
referenced, as described in FIG. 3. When the Message can not 

30 be resolved into one or more Wireless Message Requests, or 

there are problems encountered by the Process Message process 
410, then a Message Problem will be sent back to the wired 
messaging network 102. Again, optionally a Message 
Verification which is requested by the E-mail message 

35 originator can be sent back to the wired messaging network 102 
upon a Message Success Indication being received by the 
Process Message process 410 from the Send Message to Wireless 
Service process 420. The Process Message process 410 will 



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also send Status Information to the WMS System Administrator 
402 in certain conditions, to be described below. 

The Send Message to Wireless Service process 420 is 
responsible for connecting to, and sending, the Wireless 
5 Message Submission to the Wireless messaging network 106 upon 
receiving a Wireless Message Request. The Send Message to 
wireless Service process 420 functions by first referencing 
the Service Database 340, the Service Constants Database 345 
and the Connection Constants Database 350, as described in 

10 FIG. 3, to connect to, and to send, the Wireless Message 
Submission to the Wireless messaging network 106 . The 
Wireless Message Submission results in a Message Submission 
Status being generated by the wireless messaging network 106 
that is interpreted by the Send Message to Wireless Service 

15 process 420, and sent back to the Process Message process 410 
as a Message Success Indication, to be defined below. Upon 
any successful Message Submission Status being returned from 
the wireless messaging network 106. The last usage date will 
be updated to the present date, and the message running total 

20 will be incremented by the number of successful dispatches. 
This updated record is subsequently written back to the 
Service Database 340. 

The Configure WMS System process 430 is responsible for 
allowing the WMS System Administrator 402 to monitor 

25 information stored in the Target Database 325, the Service 
Database 340, the Service Constants Database 345 and the 
Connection Constants Database 350, as will be described below. 
The Configure WMS System process 430 is responsible for 
allowing the WMS System Administrator 402 to configure the 

30 wireless message delivery system 100 by allowing the WMS 
System Administrator 402 to add, change, and delete 
information stored in the Target Database 325, the Service 
Database 340, the Service Constants Database 345 and the 
Connection Constants Database 350, as will also be described 

35 below. Status information written into the Service Database 
340 by the Send Message to Wireless Service process 420 is 
read from the Service Database 340 by the Configure WMS System 
process 430 and relayed to the WMS System Administrator 402, 
as will be described further below. 



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FIG. 6 is a message processor software architecture 
diagram for the Process Message process 410 in accordance with 
the preferred embodiment of the present invention. The 
Process Message process 410 includes a Parse Message process 
5 610, a Log Message Processing process 650 and a Dispatch 

Wireless Message process 660. The Parse Message process 610 
is responsible for first copying the entire E-mail message, 
herein after referred to as the "Message" in FIG. 6, to the 
Spool Directory 337 and then to separating the various parts 

10 of the Message into various fields of information, including 
but not limited to: Sender information field including the E- 
mail address of the sender and optionally the Full Name of the 
sender, Recipient (s) field of the Message which may be zero 
or more, the actual wireless message to send and a Verify flag 

15 which is set by the E-mail message originator and that 

indicates whether a Message Verification should be sent to the 
E-mail message originator upon a Message Success Indication, 
to be described below. 

The Log Message Processing process 650 is primarily an 

20 information switch. When the Logging Switch 630 has been set 
by a System Configuration Command as described above, then all 
information input will be passed on to the Message Parse Log 
640. The Message Parse Log 640 provides one of the pieces of 
Status Information to the WMS System Administrator 402. The 

2 5 Log Message Processing process 650 also labels the various 

fields obtained from the Parse Message process 610. The 
labeling allows easier inspection of the Message Parse Log 
640. 

The Dispatch Wireless Message process 660 is responsible 

3 0 for resolving the various Recipient (s) into a wireless 

messaging service name and wireless messaging unit address. 
This is done by applying a set of rule that are described in 
detail with FIG. 17 below. Further examples of the input 
format are given in FIGs. 10 and 12 below. The Target 
35 Database 325 is optionally referenced for a matching Target 
Entry. Next a Wireless Message Request will be sent out for 
each successfully resolved Recipient. For each Wireless 
Message Request, a Message Success Indication, as described 
above, will be received back. Upon receiving a Message 



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Success Indication for every successfully resolved Recipient, 
an Evaluated Success Indication is formulated indicating three 
different levels of success: Successful, Partially Successful 
or Failure. When any of the Recipients can not be resolved, 
5 or the Evaluated Success Indication isn't Successful, then a 
Message Problem is sent back to the wired messaging network 
102. Also, when the verify Flag is set, as described above, 
indicating that the message originator has requested an E-mail 
Message Verification, and the Evaluated Success Indication is 

10 Successful, as described above, then a Message Verification 
will be sent to the wired messaging network 102. 

FIG. 7 is a message parsing software architecture diagram 
describing the Parse Message process 610 for the wireless 
messaging server 104 in accordance with the preferred 

15 embodiment of the present invention. The Parse Message 
process 610 includes a Distribute Message process 710, a 
Evaluate /Verify Flag process 750, a Find Recipient (s) process 
740, an Extract Wireless Message process 730, and a Find 
Sender process 720. The Distribute Message process 710 acts 

20 as a Message distribution point for the E-mail message herein 
after referred to as the "Message" in FIG. 7, to the Message 
Spooler 620 and to the processes to be described below. The 
Evaluate /Verify Flag process 750 is responsible for extracting 
from the "Subject:" field of the Message, as described in FIG. 

25 9 below, the case insensitive keyword "verify" which is 

entered by the message originator as a request for an E-mail 
message verification on a successful message dispatch from the 
Wireless messaging server 104 to the wireless messaging 
network 106. When the keyword "verify" is found, then the 

30 Verify Flag is set, otherwise the Verify Flag is not set. The 
Find Recipient (s) process 740 is responsible for looking at 
the v To:" field of the Message in order to find the applicable 
recipient. The Extract Wireless Message process 730 is 
responsible for examining the format of the Message, as 

35 described below, and the Sender Information, and for 

generating the actual wireless message to be sent to the 
wireless messaging network 106. The Find Sender process 720 
is responsible for extracting Sender Information from the 
"From:" field of the Message. 



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FIG. 8 is a wireless message dispatch architecture 
diagram describing the Dispatch Wireless Message process 660 
for the wireless messaging server 104 in accordance with the 
preferred embodiment of the present invention. The Dispatch 
5 Wireless Message process 660 includes a Send OOS Message 

process 810 (Out-of-Service message) , a Find WMU Address and 
Service process 820, a Dispatch Wireless Message process 840, 
and an Out of Service Flag 830. The Out of Service Flag 830 
acts as a simple switch. When the Out of Service Flag 830 is 

10 set, then the Send OOS Message process 810 is activated and 
sends a preset Message Problem indicating "Out Of Service" 
back to the wired messaging network 102 to the E-mail message 
originator. Otherwise when the Out of Service Flag 830 is not 
set, then the Dispatch Wireless Message process 840 is 

15 activated instead. The Dispatch Wireless Message process 840 
accepts the Sender Information, the wireless message and the 
Verify Flag from the Parse Message process 610, and waits for 
all of the Recipient/WMU Lookup pairs, to be described below. 
Upon receiving the Sender Information, the wireless message 

20 and the Verify Flag from the Parse Message process 610, the 

Dispatch Wireless Message process 840 will then scrutinize the 
Recipient/WMU Lookup pairs. When any of the Recipient (s) do 
not have exactly one WMU Lookup then a Message Problem will be 
sent back to the wired messaging network 102. Otherwise, when 

25 there is one WMU Lookup for any Recipient, then a Wireless 
Message Request will be sent for all of those Recipients 
identified by one Recipient/WMU Lookup pair, and the Message 
Success Indication received by the Dispatch Wireless Message 
process 840 for each Wireless Message Request. In the 

30 Recipient/WMU Lookup pair, the term Recipient refers to the 

target identifiers. The Dispatch Wireless Message process 840 
generates an Evaluated Success Indication which takes on three 
values: Successful which occurs when all the Message Success 
Indications are true, Partial Success occurs when at least one 

3 5 Message Success Indication is true, and Failure occurs when no 
Message Success Indications are true. The Evaluated Success 
Indication generated summarizes whether all the Wireless 
Message Requests were successful or not as described above. 
Finally, when the Verify Flag input is set, and all of the 



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Message Success Indications are true, then a Message 
Verification will be sent back to the wired messaging network 
102. 

FIG. 9 is a diagram of a typical E-mail message sent from 
5 the wired messaging network 102 in the prior art SMTP E-mail 
message submission protocol. It will be appreciated that 
other E-mail message submission protocols can also be sent 
from the wired messaging network 102, such as, but not limited 
to: X.400 messages, MHS (Mail Handling System™ messages by 

10 Novell™, and Microsoft Mail™ messages just to name a few. 

As shown in FIG. 9, an SMTP E-mail message is formatted 
such that the message includes an SMTP E-mail Header 910, a 
first blank line 920 functioning as an SMTP Header/Body 
Separator and SMTP E-mail Body 930. The SMTP E-mail Header 

15 910 includes one or more lines representing different SMTP- 
standard mail fields such as a "Date:" field, a "From:" field, 
a "To:" field and optionally a "Subject" field, such as 
described in Internet RFC 822, "Standard for the Format of 
ARPA Internet Text Messages"; RFC 821, "Standard for Simple 

20 Mail Transfer Protocol"; and RFC 1123, "An extension to RFC 

821 and RFC 822". Each SMTP-standard mail field, as described 
above, will generally have a structure of the field name 
followed by a colon, and then the data associated with the 
field. The SMTP Header /Body Separator is always the first 

25 blank line found when scanning the E-mail message from top to 
bottom. The SMTP E-mail Body 930 is shown as the section of 
the E-mail message that the message originator has input for 
sending the E-mail message to the message recipient. The SMTP 
E-mail Body 930 has no particular format, and can include by 

30 way of example as shown, a Salutation, a message and a 
Complementary Close. 

In the context of the description provided above, and as 
shown in FIG. 9, the SMTP E-mail Header 910 includes a DATE 
field identifying the date of the E-mail message transmission, 

3 5 a FROM field indicating the name of the E-mail message 

originator, a TO field indicating the name of the E-mail 
recipient, and a SUBJECT field indicating the subject of the 
E-mail message. As described above, the SMTP E-mail Header 
910 is separated from the SMTP E-mail Body 930 by a first 



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blank line 920 functioning as an SMTP Header/Body Separator. 
The SMTP E-mail Body 930 presents the actual E-mail message 
being sent, which by way of example includes the name of the 
message recipient, the message and the name of the message 
5 originator. it should be noted that there is no special 

significance give to the use of blank lines within the SMTP E- 
mail Body 930 when used in accordance with the prior art 
described above. 

FIG. 10 is a diagram of one example of an E-mail Paging 

10 Addressing Scheme using an E-mail Alias for addressing a 

wireless messaging unit 116 in accordance with the preferred 
embodiment of the present invention. The E-mail Paging 
Addressing Scheme using an E-mail Alias utilizes the basic 
structure of an SMTP E-mail message, such as described above, 

15 and in addition includes a unique structure which provides 

activation of the wireless messaging server 104 through an E- 
mail alias pipe. The E-mail Body 930 then employs a unique 
structure including target identifiers and a wireless message. 
The SMTP E-mail Header 910 has the same structure as the 

20 typical SMTP E-mail message shown in FIG. 9. However, unlike 
the SMTP E-mail message of FIG. 9, the "To:" field is not 
addressed directly to a message recipient residing in the 
wired messaging network 102, but rather is advantageously 
addressed to a fixed E-mail address which is responsible for 

25 offering E-mail/paging services, i.e., the wireless messaging 
server 104 in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the 
present invention. As shown by way of example in FIG. 10, the 
fixed E-mail address which is shown as the contents of the 
"To" field is "pager@pts.mot.com", where the first SMTP 

30 address portion shown as "pager@" defines the alias for 

activation of the wireless messaging server 104 through the 
use of an alias pipe, to be described below, and the second 
address portion, shown as "pts.mot.com" directs the E-mail 
message to be delivered to the particular wireless messaging 

35 server 106 identified. 

Following the first blank line 920 of the SMTP E-mail 
message is located the SMTP E-mail Body 930. In this 
instance, the SMTP E-mail Body 930 includes three uniquely 
discernible parts: a Target identifier List 1010 comprising 



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23 

one or more Target identifiers as described above, a delimiter 
1020, and the wireless message 1030 to be sent. The Target 
identifier List 1010 section is identified as the first 
sequence of non-blank lines in the SMTP E-mail Body 930. The 
5 Target identifier List 1010 includes at least one wireless 

messaging unit address, as described above, and upon further 
inspection of the Target identifier List 1010 section of the 
SMTP E-mail Body 930 reveals, by way of example, several 
target identifier types can be simultaneously identified. The 

10 first Target identifier is listed by name in the format of 

"f irstname_lastname" , i.e. "richard_geil " . This first Target 
identifier assumes that the wireless messaging server 104 can 
search the Target Database 325 to find a single corresponding 
WMU address and Wireless Messaging Service. The second Target 

15 identifier shown explicitly supplies a WMU address in the 
format of "address", i.e., "9834", but omits the Wireless 
Messaging Service Name. When a single address is encountered 
as shown, a "default" Service Name is assumed. The next two 
Target identifiers listed by name in the format of 

20 "address . servicename " explicitly specify a WMU address and 
Service Name, which by way of example is "345612 . s-page" and 
"882363 .m-comm" which direct the E-mail messages to the S-Page 
and M-comm Wireless Messaging Services. In the latter example 
of "address . servicename" , no assumptions or lookups are 

25 required as to the service provider name. 

The delimiter 1020 is defined as the first occurrence of 
one or more consecutive blank lines which follow the Target 
identifier list 1010, and which separates the Target 
identifier list 1010 from the message, The delimiter 1020 is 

30 represented as a predetermined keystroke sequence which 

comprises by way of example in the preferred embodiment of the 
present invention, the occurrence of two or more carriage 
return/new line characters which are typically input with a 
"Return/Enter" key on a conventional keyboard. The actual 

35 wireless message is then located within the SMTP E-mail Body 
930, following the delimiter 1020. 

FIG. 11 is a context configuration diagram for addressing 
a wireless messaging unit 116 in accordance with the preferred 
embodiment of the present invention by using E-mail alias 



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addressing for addressing mail relay computers which are mail 
routing and relaying processors, the purpose of which is to 
accept E-mail from an SMTP Mail Super Domain, embodied as a 
mail relay computer and associated Local Mail Domains and Sub- 
5 Domains, also embodied as a mail relay computers which route 
the E-mail messages appropriately. FIG. 11 shows that an SMTP 
Mail Super Domain 1110, shown for example as "mot.com", then 
connects to a modified Local Mail-Domain 1120, shown for 
example as "pts.mot.com". The modification to the 

10 conventional SMTP E-mail Local Mail Domain 1120 is 

advantageously a unique addition to the aliases file, which is 
shown for example as "/etc/aliases" file, and which is 
achieved by adding the term "pager", which is defined as by 
way of example "pager@wms". Under the Local Mail-Domain 1120 

15 there are also shown other Local Mail Sub-Domains 1130, and 
the wireless messaging server 104 in accordance with the 
preferred embodiment of the present invention, which is also 
shown under the Local Mail-Domain 1120. The host name 
assigned to the Wireless messaging server 104 is for example 

20 "wms" as listed in the host table which resides in the Local 
Mail-Domain 1120. The Wireless messaging server 104 also 
advantageously has an addition to the alias file, where 
"pager" is defined as a Send Mail program pipe to the 
Wireless Messaging Server Software 320. 

25 FIG. 12 is a diagram of an E-mail paging addressing 

scheme using the E-mail sub-domain method for addressing a 
wireless messaging unit 116 in accordance with the preferred 
embodiment of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 12, an 
SMTP E-mail message using E-mail sub-domain addressing is 

30 formatted such that the message includes an SMTP E-mail Header 
1210, a first blank line 1220 representing an SMTP 
Header/Body Separator and the SMTP E-mail Body 1230. The SMTP 
E-mail Header 1210 is of the same general structure as that of 
the SMTP E-mail Header 910 shown in FIG. 10, however, a 

35 critical difference is present in the SMTP E-mail Header 1210 
as compared to the SMTP E-mail Header 910. The inf ormation 
that was previously contained in the Target identifier List 
1010 of the SMTP E-mail Header 910, shown in FIG. 10, has been 
relocated and reformatted into a legitimate SMTP E-mail 



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25 

address with the SMTP sub-domain, shown for example as 
v @pager. pts.mot.com" . As in the SMTP E-mail Header 910 shown 
in FIG. 9, the SMTP E-mail Header 1210 includes one or more 
lines representing different SMTP-standard mail fields such as 
5 a "Date:" field, a "From:" field, a "To:" field and optionally 
a "Subject" field. Unlike that shown in FIG. 9, the Target 
identifiers are positioned in the "To:" field of the SMTP E- 
mail Header 1210. Each of the Target identifiers is resolved 
as described above in FIG 10, however, the Target identifiers 

10 now represent actual E-mail addresses. The concept of E- 

mail /paging is, as a consequence, integrated with E-mail more 
seamlessly, and hence is easier for an E-mail message 
originator to learn to use. The SMTP Header/Body Separator 
1220 is the same as the SMTP Header/Body Separator 920 in a 

15 standard SMTP E-mail message. The SMTP E-mail Body 1230 is 

used as the message to send to the Wireless messaging unit 116 
identified by the Target identifiers as described above. 

FIG. 13 is a context configuration diagram for addressing 
a wireless messaging unit 116 using sub-domain paging in 

20 accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present 

invention. FIG. 13 shows essentially the same configuration 
of Mail-Domains as shown in Figure 11. However, unlike that 
of FIG. 11, the configuration of the linkage between the Local 
Mail-Domain 1110 and the wireless messaging server 104 is 

25 advantageously different as will be described below. In the 
alternate embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 
13, the host file, shown with a filename "/etc/hosts" in the 
Local Mail Domain 1120, utilizes an alias for the host name, 
"wins" which is set to "pager" in this example. The addition 

30 of the alias effectively creates a new Sub-domain called, by 
way of example, "pager.pts.mot.com" which for the Local Mail 
Domain 1120, is shown by way of example as "pts.mot.com". 
Also, the host name of the Wireless messaging server 104 is 
also set to reflect the host alias . Finally, a custom 

35 sendmail configuration file, shown by way of example as 
" /etc/sendmail . cf " is installed on the local wireless 
messaging server 104 such that any E-mail directed to an SMTP 
sub domain "@pager" is directed to the Wireless Messaging 
Server Software 320. 



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FIGS. 14 through 20 are flow charts illustrating the 
operation of the wireless messaging server 104 in accordance 
with the preferred and alternate embodiments of the present 
invention . 

5 Referring to FIG. 14, the Wireless Messaging Server 

Software 320 is invoked in response to the E-mail message 
being directed to the wireless messaging server 104. Upon 
execution of the Wireless Messaging Server Software 320, the 
E-mail message is delivered via a file handle into the 

10 executable. The Wireless Messaging Server Software 320 
initiates the parsing of the E-mail message which was 
delivered. The first step in the parsing process is the 
extraction of the Recipient (s) and the wireless message to be 
sent from the E-mail message. The Recipient (s) are first 

15 extracted, at step 1404, from the "To:" field of the SMTP E- 
mail Header 910, 1210. This is accomplished by first 
selecting the contents of the "To" field, and when the "To" 
field does not exist, at step 1406, the contents of the 
"Apparently-To : " field is selected as the contents of the "To" 

20 field in a manner well known by one of ordinary skill in the 
art, at step 1408. Otherwise when the "To" field is present 
in the SMTP E-mail Header 910, 1210, the "To" field contents 
is selected, at step 1406. 

The SMTP E-mail Body 930 of the E-mail message is then 

25 extracted at step 1410 by searching the E-mail message from 
the beginning of the message for the occurrence of a first 
blank line 920 denoted by a sequence of two end of line 
characters, as described above. Next, the E-mail address 
contained within the "To:" or "Apparently-To:" field is 

3 0 identified at step 1412. When the E-mail address is 

identified as "pagerS", at step 1412, then the E-mail-alias 
form of E-mail paging is selected. In this instance, the Body 
of the E-mail message is scanned forward to the first 
occurrence of one or more blank lines 1020, after which the 

35 wireless message 1030 is extracted, at step 1414, from 

between the blank line 1020 and the end of the E-mail Body 
930. The Target identifiers 1010 for the wireless message are 
next extracted, at step 1416, by scanning from the top of the 
E-mail Body 930 to the first occurrence of the one or more 



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blank lines 1020. The Target identifiers, are then set to the 
Target identifier sequence 1010 as described above. 

When the E-mail address of the "To:" or "Apparent ly- To : " 
field does not specify the Recipient (s) as "pager@", then the 
5 SMTP Sub-domain format for E-mail /paging is selected, at step 
1412. In this instance the wireless message is set to the 
SMTP E-mail Body 930, at step 1418, as extracted as previously 
described above. Next, each E-mail address in the "To:", 
"CC: " and "BCC:" fields are then searched for the "©pager" sub 

10 domain identifier. The E-mail addresses found will then be 

extracted and stripped of the "©pager" E-mail domains, and set 
to be equal to the Target identifiers, at step 1420. 

The wireless message processing continues with FIG. 15 
which illustrates a flow chart which concentrates on the 

15 extraction of message originator information, and optionally 
the full name of the message originator for identification 
purposes to the wireless messaging unit 116. First, the E- 
mail address of the message originator is extracted from the 
SMTP Header "From:" field, at step 1424. Next, the SMTP 

20 Header "Subject:" field is scanned, at step 1426, for the case 
insensitive keyword "from", and when found, the format of the 
SMTP Header "From:" field is examined to locate the full name 
of the sender which identifies the request from the message 
originator to have sender identification appended to the E- 

25 mail message. When the format of the E-mail address is one 
with text containing sections of text contained within 
parenthesis, at step 1428, as for example "E-mail address 
(full name)", then the full name of the message originator is 
extracted from within the parenthesis, at step 1430, and 

30 stored in the username variable. When the format of the E- 

mail address is one with text containing text enclosed within 
greater- than and less- than signs, at step 1432, as for example 
"full name <E-mail address>", then the full name is extracted 
from the text outside of these signs, and stored in the 

35 username variable. Otherwise, when neither format of the 
"From:" field applies, then the actual raw contents of the 
"From:" field is extracted as the full name of the message 
originator, at step 1434, and stored in the username variable. 
When the SMTP Header does not include the case insensitive 



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keyword "from", at step 1426, no information is stored in the 
username variable. The final wireless message is then 
created, at step 1436, by appending the username variable to 
the wireless message. 
5 The wireless message processing continues with FIG. 16 

which illustrates a flow chart which describes house keeping 
features, such as message parse logging, at step 1438. The 
Wireless messaging server 104 checks to see if message parse 
logging is turned on, at step 1440, as indicated by the 

10 Message Log Switch 330 being set. When the Message Log Switch 
330 is set, then the wireless message and presently processed 
information associated with the wireless message is logged to 
the message parse log, at step 1442. The information that is 
logged in the preferred embodiment of the present invention 

15 includes the message originator information in the form of an 
E-mail address and optionally a fullname, the Target 
identifiers, the wireless message, an indication of the verify 
flag being set, a time/date stamp for the entry, and a message 
Spooler message file name. It will be appreciated that more 

2 0 or less information can be logged depending upon the needs of 

the Wireless Messaging Server System Administrator 402. 

The wireless messaging server 104 then checks whether the 
"Out of Service" flag is set, at step 1444. When the "Out of 
Service" flag is set, then an Out Of Service message 360 is 
25 sent back to the message originator as an E-mail message 

explaining that the Wireless messaging server 104 is not in 
service, at step 1446 and execution is stopped at step 1448. 
The Out Of Service message 360 can also include an indication 
of why the Wireless messaging server 104 is out of service. 

3 0 When the "Out of Service" flag is not set, at step 1444, then 

the wireless messaging server 104 continues processing at step 
1612 shown in FIG. 17. 

The wireless message processing continues with FIG. 17 
which illustrates Target identifier resolution to wireless 
35 messaging unit 116 addresses and Service Names. As shown in 
FIG. 17, Target identifier resolution begins by locating a 
first Target identifier, at step 1450, which may be one of a 
list of Target identifiers. When a number is explicitly given 
as the first character of the Target identifier, at step 1452, 



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such as when the first and last names are omitted, then the 
number is assumed to be an explicit wireless messaging unit 
address as shown in Table II above. When only the number is 
specified, the "default" Service Name is also assumed, 
5 however, a Service Name can be explicitly specified by 

following the Wireless messaging unit 116 address by a period 
character and then Service Name, i.e., as for example 
"14576. s-page", such as shown in FIGs. 10 and 12. The target 
identifier will be further searched for the period character. 

10 When a period character is found, then the rest of the target 
identifier is assumed to be a Service Name for the wireless 
messaging unit 116 address. When the period character is not 
found, then the "default" Service Name is assumed. In either 
case, the Target Identifier resolution will result in a single 

15 (One) Wireless messaging unit 116 code and corresponding 

Service Name being found for this type of Target identifier. 
In another case, where the first character of the Target 
identifier is not a number, then the Target Database 325 is 
searched for a matching Target identifier. When no matching 

20 target name (None) is found, then an E-mail response is 

created /appended indicating a "Target identifier not found" 
error to the message originator, at step 1454. When a single 
wireless messaging unit and Service Name is found for the 
Target identifier, then the wireless messaging unit address 

25 and Service Name are added to the list of wireless messaging 

unit 116 addresses, at step 1456. When more than one wireless 
messaging unit 116 address and Service Name is found (>One) 
then a "Multiple Wireless messaging unit found for <Target 
identifier;-" message response will be created/appended, at 

30 step 1460, where <Target identifier> is the actual Target 
identifier searched for. When processing of the list of 
Target identifiers is not completed, at step 1460, then the 
next Target identifier is located at step 1462, and step 1452 
through step 1454, 1456 and 1458 are repeated. When 

35 processing of the list of Target identifiers is completed, at 
step 1460, program flow continues to step 1464, shown in FIG. 
18. 

FIG. 18 is a flow chart which illustrates the decision 
making process to determine what type of E-mail message to 



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send back or prepare for sending back to the message 
originator when there are problems resolving a Target 
identifier into a wireless messaging unit 116 address and 
Service Name. As will be described below, the E-mail message 
5 sent back to the message originator is also sent to the WMS 
System Administrator 402. FIG. 18 also illustrates deciding 
whether or not to actually send a wireless message or stop 
execution based on the fact that there were no resolved Target 
identifiers and Service Names found. The first action that is 

10 taken is one of checking to see when in the previous address 
resolution step an E-mail response message was created, at 
step 1464. When an E-mail response message doesn't exist, at 
step 1464, then the wireless messaging server 104 will send 
the wireless message out, at step 1474. When a wireless 

15 message has been created, at step 1464, then there is at least 
one resolution problem reported in the message . The next 
question in this case is whether any resolutions were 
successful in generating a Target identifier or Service Name, 
at step 1466. When no resolutions were successful, at step 

20 1466, and there is no Target identifier or Service Name to 

send a wireless message, then a "Page Failure" E-mail response 
message is sent to the message originator indicating possible 
resolutions, at step 1470 and the execution stopped, at step 
1472. When one or more resolutions were successful then a 

25 "Wireless Message Resolution Failure" E-mail response message 
is prepared, at step 1468, and the wireless messaging server 
104 will send the wireless message, at step 1474. In the 
process of sending the wireless message, all events during the 
process will be logged to a log file, at step 1476. This log 

30 file is used to decide whether or not all the wireless 
messages were successfully sent. 

FIG. 19 is a flow chart describing the evaluation of the 
results of transmitting the wireless messages described in 
FIG. 18, and of sending a response back to the message 

35 originator in an E-mail message which includes the message 
originator E-mail address. When all the wireless message 
submissions were successful, at step 1478, then a check is 
made as to whether or not the Acknowledgment E-mail feature is 
enabled, at step 1480, and when not enabled, execution stops, 



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at step 1502 . When the Acknowledgment E-mail feature is 
enabled, at step 1480, then an Acknowledgment response message 
is generated, and the successfully delivered wireless message 
and Target identifiers activated are listed in the response 
5 message, at step 1482, and sent to the message originator in 
an E-mail message which includes the message originator E-mail 
address. Debug logging is next checked, and when debug 
logging is enabled, at step 1486, than a success indication is 
logged to the log file, at step 1486, and then execution stops 

10 at step 1502. When debug logging is not enabled, at step 
1484, then execution stops at step 1502. 

When an indication is received that the wireless message 
submission was not successful, at step 1478, then the wireless 
messaging server 104 checks whether any of the wireless 

15 message submissions were successful, at step 1488, and 

classifies the message submission as Partially Successful. 
When any of the wireless message submissions were successful, 
then the wireless messaging server 104 will send a Partial 
Message Failure message indicating which wireless messaging 

20 units 116 were and were not activated, and the wireless 

messaging server 104 also appends system usage instructions to 
the Partial Message Failure message and send the Partial 
Message Failure message back to the message originator in an 
E-mail message which includes the message originator E-mail 

25 address, and also sends the E-mail message to the System 

Administrator 402, at step 1490. Whenever an E-mail message 
is sent to the message originator and the Wireless Message 
System Administrator 402, system usage instructions are 
appended to the message. Debug logging is next checked, and 

30 when debug logging is enabled, at step 1492, than a partial 
failure indication is logged to the log file, at step 1494, 
and then execution stops at step 1502 . When debug logging is 
not enabled, at step 1492, then execution stops at step 1502. 
When none of the wireless message submissions were 

3 5 successful, at step 1488, then the wireless messaging server 
104 sends a Message Failure message indicating all wireless 
messaging units which were not activated, and the Wireless 
messaging server 104 also appends system usage instructions to 
the message Failure message and sends the Message Failure 



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message back to the message originator in an E-mail message 
which includes the message originator E-mail address, and also 
sends the E-mail message to the system administrator, at step 
1496. Debug logging is next checked, and when debug logging 
5 is enabled, at step 1498, than a failure indication is logged 
to the log file, at step 1500, and then execution stops at 
step 1502. When debug logging is not enabled, at step 1498, 
then execution stops at step 1502. 

The interpretation of a Success indication is one where 

10 all Target identifiers were fully resolved and all wireless 
messages successfully submitted, which is why there is a 
Target identifier resolution failure check. The 
interpretation of a Failure is that absolutely no wireless 
messages were successfully generated. This leaves the 

15 classification of Partially Successful with all other cases. 
This classification will be logged to the log file when the 
debug logging feature is enabled. 

FIG. 20 is a E-mail (SENDMAIL) Parsing Rule Structure 
diagram showing the various major rules sets used in the 

20 parsing of E-mail using the UNIX email relay and routing 

program SENDMAIL. The SENDMAIL program uses rules that are 
stored in the configuration file " /etc/sendmail . cf " to make 
decisions of how mail will be routed and reformatted. The 
configuration file " /etc/sendmail . cf " is contains sets of 

25 rules that are used to match the format of the email address 
in the To: field of the email. When a rule is found to match 
the present format of the email address a corresponding action 
is taken for that matching condition. The rules are arranged 
in sets that are numbered. The processing of the SENDMAIL 

30 program first starts with the evaluation of what mailer 

program will be used to route the mail. This is done by first 
applying the email address parsing rule set 3 2001. The rule 
set 3 2001 is used universally to clean the email address and 
put it in a standard format. Next the rule set 0 2002 is used 

35 to find resolve what mailer program will be used to route the 
email message. This is where the WMS system modifies the 
email system to capture all email addressed to the arbitrary 
SMTP E-mail sub-domain "@pager" . An additional rule is added 
to the top of rule set 0 2002 that looks for a matching email 



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address with an "@pager" in the address. All email of this 
type will be routed to a newly defined mailer program. The 
mailer program is defined using standard mailer definition 
rule and will activate the WMS Software. Therefore, there are 
5 fundamentally two changes that must be made to a configuration 
file " /etc/sendmail . cf " to support sub-domain paging: 1) add a 
rule to the top of rule set 0 2002 as described above, and 2) 
add the definition of a new mailer program that activates the 
WMS software. The other purpose of the SENDMAIL program is to 

10 rewrite email addresses as appropriate. This is done first 

for the sender by applying rule set 3 2001, then 1 2004, then 
the rule set associated with the resolved mailer 2005, then 
the cleanup rule set 4 2007 to the contents of the From: 
field. Next, the rewriting is done for each of the recipients 

15 by applying rule set 3 2001, then 2 2003, then the rule set 
associated with the resolved mailer 2006, then the cleanup 
rule set 4 2007 to the contents of the From: field. 

In summary, a wireless messaging system is presented 
comprising a wired messaging network for delivering E-mail 

20 messages between wired network nodes, and further for 
inputting E-mail messages for delivery to at least one 
wireless messaging unit. The wireless messaging system 
communicates with a wireless messaging server that receives 
and processes the E-mail messages inputted from the wired 

25 messaging network for delivery to the at least one wireless 
messaging unit. The E-mail messages comprise a simple mail 
transfer protocol (SMTP) address, a portion of which 
represents a wireless selective call user identifier. 
Further, a wireless messaging network is coupled to the 

30 wireless messaging server for delivering at least one wireless 
selective call message to the wireless messaging unit in 
response to correlating the wireless selective call user 
identifier with at least one predetermined wireless selective 
call user address. 

35 The wireless messaging system communicates using at least 

one of a wired messaging network such as a local area (LAN) 
messaging network, a wide area (WAN) messaging network, a 
local area wireless (LAWN) messaging network, a wide area 
wireless (WAWN) messaging network. Moreover, in the preferred 



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embodiment, the wired messaging network delivers the E-mail 
messages to the wireless messaging server using an E-mail 
system compliant with RFC-822 SMTP E-mail. Preferably, the 
wireless messaging system utilizes TCP/IP protocol to 
5 transport the E-mail messages within the wired messaging 

network. Alternatively, message communication may be effected 
using protocols such as X.400 or the like, with minor 
modifications such as taught in the instant disclosure. 

Referring to the wireless messaging server, it includes 

10 an E-mail input interface coupled to the wired messaging 

network for receiving the E-mail messages inputted from the 
wired messaging network for delivery to the wireless messaging 
unit. A processor is coupled to the E-mail input interface 
for processing the E-mail messages inputted from the wired 

15 messaging network to determine (1) the wireless selective call 
user identifier including a wireless messaging unit address 
designating the wireless messaging unit, (2) a network 
identifier identifying a wireless messaging network from at 
least a portion of the SMTP address, and (3) add at least a 

20 portion of an information content of the E-mail messages 

associated with the SMTP address to the at least one wireless 
selective call message targeted for delivery to at least one 
wireless selective call messaging unit. After these step are 
performed, an output interface couples the at least one 

25 wireless selective call message to the wireless messaging 

network identified by the network identifier for delivering 
the E-mail messages to the wireless messaging unit designated 
by the wireless messaging unit address. 

Lastly, the wireless messaging server includes a memory 

30 for storing a plurality of wireless selective call user 

identifiers and associated wireless messaging unit addresses 
and wireless network identifiers . 

The E-mail messages, including the wireless messaging 
unit address, may be processed using a default network 

35 identifier stored in the memory. This is possible since a 
default wireless messaging network associated with the 
wireless messaging unit address stored in the memory is 
associated with the received E-mail messages by the processor. 
The processor determines the wireless messaging unit address, 



WO 97/28518 PCT/US97/00670 
35 

and in response thereto, recovers from the memory the default 
network identifier identifying the wireless messaging network. 
Subsequently, the output interface delivers coupled to the 
processor delivers the at least one wireless selective call 
5 message to the wireless messaging unit designated by the 

associated wireless messaging unit address within the wireless 
messaging network identified by the network identifier. Note 
that the at least one wireless selective call user identifier 
identifies an intended recipient of the at least one wireless 

10 selective call message. 

Additionally, the memory further stores a wireless 
messaging unit type associated with each of the plurality of 
wireless selective call user identifiers. This parameter may 
be used to identify any unique characteristics of the target 

15 unit, e.g., display capability, presentation means (audio, 
video, hardcopy) . 

In the preferred embodiment, the processor determines the 
at least one wireless selective call user identifier from the 
E-mail messages, and in response thereto, recovers from the 

20 memory, an associated wireless messaging unit address and 

network identifier identifying a wireless messaging network. 
As above, the output interface delivers the at least one 
wireless selective call message to the wireless messaging unit 
designated by the associated wireless messaging unit address 

25 within the wireless messaging network identified by the 
network identifier. 

An additional feature allows the wireless messaging unit 
further to accept a request to have originator identification 
automatically appended to the at least one wireless selective 

30 call message. This allows the recipient of a wireless message 
to identify the sender or source of the message . 

Another feature of the wireless messaging system is 
message receipt, delivery, and transmission verification. In 
this case, the E-mail messages comprise a message originator 

35 E-mail address that is used by the wireless messaging server 
to generate a reply status message to an originator of the E- 
mail messages. This reply status message indicates a success 
or failure in delivering the at least one wireless selective 
call message to the wireless messaging unit. Additionally, 



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the reply status message may further indicate a success or 
failure transmitting the at least one wireless selective call 
message to the wireless messaging network. These features 
allow positive verification of message delivery. 
5 In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the 

E-mail messages comprise an E-mail address of a form 
user@pager. entity. ext ( with parameters user, pager, and 
entity. ext. Examples of this addressing and message delivery 
method were earlier discussed with reference to FIGs. 9-20. 

10 More particularly, the E-mail messages may include information 
content comprising at least one of a text message, an audio 
message, and a video message. 

When using the user@pager . entity .ext form of addressing, 
the entity. ext parameter represents a destination node in the 

15 wireless messaging network to which the at least one wireless 
selective call message is directed. Similarly, the pager 
parameter represents a wireless messaging domain of a SMTP E- 
mail address. 

Upon detection of the pager parameter in the 

20 user@pager .entity. ext format, the processor processes the SMTP 
E-mail address to determine the wireless messaging unit 
address associated with the user parameter and network 
identifier associated with the entity. ext parameter. Further, 
the processor extracts, in response to detecting the pager 

25 parameter, an information content of the E-mail messages 

associated with the SMTP address, to generate an information 
portion of the at least one wireless selective call message. 

Following identification and extraction, the processor 
assembles, for either immediate local transmission of deferred 

30 remote transmission, the at least one wireless selective call 
message comprising the wireless messaging unit address and at 
least a portion of the information content of the E-mail 
messages. In the first case, the at least one wireless 
selective call message may be transmitted by a local wireless 

35 messaging system in real time. In the second case, the at 
least one wireless selective call message is preferably 
transferred (sent) to a remote paging system for either 
immediate or deferred transmission. 



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Regarding the user parameter, it represents a unique user 
and is selected from one of a full user name, a user name 
alias, the wireless messaging unit address, and the wireless 
selective call messaging unit identifier. Additionally, the 
5 unique user may comprise a predetermined list of wireless 
messaging users comprising a user group. 

Referring to the alternate addressing form, the E-maii 
messages comprise an E-mail address of a form paging- 
identifier@entity.ext, with parameters paging- identifier and 

10 entity. ext. As with the preferred embodiment, the E-mail 
messages may include information content comprising a text 
message, an audio message; and a video message. 

As before, the entity. ext parameter represents a 
destination node in the wireless messaging network to which 

15 the at least one wireless selective call message is directed. 
However, in the alternate addressing form, the paging- 
identifier parameter represents a wireless selective call 
messaging unit identifier compatible with an RFC-822 compliant 
SMTP E-mail system and recognizable by the wireless messaging 

20 server. Once the wireless messaging server recognizes the 

paging-identif ier parameter as having a corresponding wireless 
selective call messaging unit identifier, the processor 
processes an SMTP E-mail address to determine the wireless 
messaging unit address associated with the paging-identif ier 

25 parameter and network identifier associated with the 

entity. ext parameter. Additionally, the processor extracts an 
information content of the E-mail messages associated with the 
SMTP address to generate an information portion of the at 
least one wireless selective call message. Local and remote 

30 transmission or delivery are accomplished in the same manner 
regardless of the addressing form used. 

Similarly, as with the user parameter in the preferred 
embodiment, the paging-identif ier represents a unique user and 
is selected from one of a full user name, a user name alias, 

35 the wireless messaging unit address, and the wireless 

selective call messaging unit identifier. Additionally, the 
unique user may comprise a predetermined list of wireless 
messaging users comprising a user group. 
\le claim: 



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CLAIMS 



1. A wireless messaging system, comprising: 

a wired messaging network for delivering E-mail messages 
5 between wired network nodes, and further for inputting E-mail 
messages for delivery to at least one wireless messaging unit; 

a wireless messaging server, coupled to the wired 
messaging network, for receiving and processing the E-mail 
messages inputted from the wired messaging network for 
10 delivery to the at least one wireless messaging unit, the E- 
mail messages comprising a simple mail transfer protocol 
(SMTP) address, a portion of which represents a wireless 
selective call user identifier; and 

a wireless messaging network, coupled to the wireless 
15 messaging server for delivering at least one wireless 

selective call message to the wireless messaging unit in 
response to correlating the wireless selective call user 
identifier with at least one predetermined wireless selective 
call user address. 

20 

2. The wireless messaging system according to claim 1, 
wherein the wired messaging network is a local area { LAN) 
messaging network. 



25 3. The wireless messaging system according to claim 1, 

wherein the wired messaging network is a wide area (WAN) 
messaging network. 

4. The wireless messaging system according to claim 1, 
30 wherein the wireless messaging network is a local area 
wireless (LAWN) messaging network. 



35 



5. The wireless messaging system according to claim 1, 
wherein the wireless messaging network is a wide area wireless 
(WAWN) messaging network. 



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6. The wireless messaging system of claim 1 wherein the 
wired messaging network delivers the E-mail messages to the 
wireless messaging server using an E-mail system compliant 
with RFC-822 SMTP E-mail. 

7. The wireless messaging system of claim 6, wherein the 
E-mail system utilizes TCP/IP to transport the E-mail messages 
within the wired messaging network. 



10 8. The wireless messaging system of claim 1, wherein the 

wireless messaging server comprises : 

an E-mail input interface, coupled to the wired messaging 
network for receiving the E-mail messages inputted from the 
wired messaging network for delivery to the wireless messaging 

15 unit; 

a processor, coupled to the E-mail input interface, for 
processing the E-mail messages inputted from the wired 
messaging network to determine the wireless selective call 
user identifier including a wireless messaging unit address 

20 designating the wireless messaging unit and a network 

identifier identifying a wireless messaging network from at 
least a portion of the SMTP address, and add at least a 
portion of an information content of the E-mail messages 
associated with the SMTP address to the at least one wireless 

25 selective call message targeted for delivery to at least one 
wireless selective call messaging unit; and 

an output interface, for coupling the at least one 
wireless selective call message to the wireless messaging 
network identified by the network identifier for delivering 

30 the E-mail messages to the wireless messaging unit designated 
by the wireless messaging unit address . 



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9. The wireless messaging system of claim 8, wherein the 
E-mail messages further include at least one wireless 
selective call user identifier, and wherein the wireless 
messaging server further comprises: 

5 a memory for storing a plurality of wireless selective 

call user identifiers and associated wireless messaging unit 
addresses and wireless network identifiers. 

10. The wireless messaging system of claim 9, wherein: 
10 the E-mail messages include the wireless messaging unit 

address ; 

the memory stores a default network identifier 
identifying a default wireless messaging network associated 
with the wireless messaging unit address; 

15 the processor processes received E-mail messages to 

determine the wireless messaging unit address, and in response 
thereto, recovering from the memory the default network 
identifier identifying the wireless messaging network; and 

the output interface delivers the at least one wireless 

20 selective call message to the wireless messaging unit 

designated by the associated wireless messaging unit address 
within the wireless messaging network identified by the 
network identifier. 

25 11. The wireless messaging system of claim 9 wherein the 

at least one wireless selective call user identifier 
identifies an intended recipient of the at least one wireless 
selective call message. 

30 12. The wireless messaging system of claim 9 wherein the 

memory further stores a wireless messaging unit type 
associated with each of the plurality of wireless selective 
call user identifiers. 



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13. The wireless messaging system of claim 9, wherein the 
processor is further coupled to the memory , for processing 
received E-mail messages to determine the at least one 
wireless selective call user identifier, and in response 

5 thereto, recovering from the memory an associated wireless 

messaging unit address and the network identifier identifying 
a wireless messaging network; and 

the output interface delivers the at least one wireless 
selective call message to the wireless messaging unit 
10 designated by the associated wireless messaging unit address 
within the wireless messaging network identified by the 
network identifier. 

14. The wireless messaging system of claim 9, wherein the 
15 wireless messaging unit further comprises means for accepting 

a request to have originator identification automatically 
appended to the at least one wireless selective call message. 



15. The wireless messaging system of claim 9, wherein the 
20 E-mail messages comprise a message originator E-mail address 
used by the wireless messaging server to generate a reply 
status message to an originator of the E-mail messages 
indicating a success or failure in delivering the at least one 
wireless selective call message to the wireless messaging 
25 unit. 



16. The wireless messaging system of claim 15, wherein 
the reply status message may further comprise an indication of 
success or failure transmitting the at least one wireless 

3 0 selective call message to the wireless messaging network. 

17. The wireless messaging system of claim 8, wherein the 
E-mail messages comprise: 

an E-mail address of a form user@pager .entity . ext , with 
3 5 parameters user, pager, and entity. ext. 



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18. The wireless messaging system of claim 17, wherein 
the E-mail messages further comprise: 

the information content comprising at least one of; 
a text message; 
5 an audio message; and 

a video message. 

19. The wireless messaging system of claim 17, wherein 
the entity. ext parameter represents a destination node in the 
wireless messaging network to which the at least one wireless 
selective call message is directed. 

20. The wireless messaging system of claim 17, wherein 
the pager parameter represents a wireless messaging domain of 
a SMTP E-mail address. 

21. The wireless messaging system of claim 20, wherein 
the processor processes the SMTP E-mail address in response to 
detecting the pager parameter, to determine the wireless 
messaging unit address associated with the user parameter and 
network identifier associated with the entity. ext parameter. 

22. The wireless messaging system of claim 20, wherein 
the processor extracts, in response to detecting the pager 
parameter, an information content of the E-mail messages 
associated with the SMTP address to generate an information 
portion of the at least one wireless selective call message. 

23. The wireless messaging system of claim 20, wherein 
the processor assembles, for immediate transmission by the 
wireless messaging server, the at least one wireless selective 
call message comprising the wireless messaging unit address 
and at least a portion of the information content of the E- 
mail messages. 



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24. The wireless messaging system of claim 20, wherein 
the processor assembles, for transmission by a remote wireless 
messaging server, the at least one wireless selective call 
message comprising the wireless messaging unit address, the 

5 network identifier, and at least a portion of the information 
content of the E-mail messages. 

25. The wireless messaging system of claim 17, wherein 
the user parameter represents a unique user and is selected 

10 from one of: 



15 identifier. 

26. The wireless messaging system of claim 25, wherein 
the unique user comprises a predetermined list of wireless 
messaging users comprising a user group. 

20 

27. The wireless messaging system of claim 8, wherein the 
E-mail messages comprise: 

an E-mail address of a form paging- 
identif ier@entity . ext, with parameters paging-identif ier and 
25 entity. ext. 

28. The wireless messaging system of claim 27, wherein 
the E-mail messages further comprise: 

the information content comprising at least one of; 
30 a text message; 



29. The wireless messaging system of claim 27, wherein 
35 the entity. ext parameter represents a destination node in the 
wireless messaging network to which the at least one wireless 
selective call message is directed. 



a full user name; 
a user name alias; 
the wireless messaging 
the wireless selective 



unit address; and 
call messaging unit 



an audio message; and 
a video message. 



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30. The wireless messaging system of claim 27, wherein 
the paging-identif ier parameter represents a wireless 
selective call messaging unit identifier compatible with an 
RFC-822 compliant SMTP E-mail system and recognizable by the 

5 wireless messaging server. 

31. The wireless messaging system of claim 30, wherein 
the processor processes an SMTP E-mail address in response to 
detecting the wireless selective call messaging unit 

10 identifier, to determine the wireless messaging unit address 
associated with the paging-identif ier parameter and network 
identifier associated with the entity. ext parameter. 

32. The wireless messaging system of claim 30, wherein 
15 the processor extracts, in response to detecting the paging- 
identif ier parameter, an information content of the E-mail 
messages associated with the SMTP address to generate an 
information portion of the at least one wireless selective 
call message. 

20 

33. The wireless messaging system of claim 30, wherein 
the processor assembles, for immediate transmission by the 
wireless messaging server, the at least one wireless selective 
call message comprising the wireless messaging unit address 

25 and at least a portion of the information content of the E- 
mail messages. 

34. The wireless messaging system of claim 30, wherein 
the processor assembles, for transmission by a remote wireless 

30 messaging server, the at least one wireless selective call 
message comprising the wireless messaging unit address, the 
network identifier, and at least a portion of the information 
content of the E-mail messages. 



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45 

35. The wireless messaging system of claim 27, wherein 
the paging-identif ier represents a unique user and is selected 
from one of : 

a full user name; 

a user name alias; 

the wireless messaging unit address; and 
the wireless selective call messaging unit 

identifier . 



36. The wireless messaging system of claim 35, wherein 
the unique user comprises a predetermined list of wireless 
messaging users comprising a user group. 



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NO 



DOES EMAIL 
RESPONSE MESSAGE 
EXIST? 



YES 



WERE ANY PAGER 
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INCLUDE "PARTIAL 

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RESPONSE MESSAGE 



INCLUDE "MESSAGE 
FAILURE" IN EMAIL 
RESPONSE MESSAGE. 



V TRANSMIT PARTIAL MESSAGE 
MESSAGE 



1472 



^TOP EXECUTION^ 



1476 



LOG OUTPUT FROM PAGE 
SUBMISSIONS TO A PAGE 
SUBMISSION LOG FILE 



FIG. 18 



WO 97/28518 



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PCTYUS97/00670 



20/20 




INTERNATIONAL SEARCH REPORT 



A. CLASSIFICATION OF SUBJECT MATTER 

IPC(6) G08B 5/22; H04Q 7/00; H04M 11/00 
US CL ;340/825.44; 455/33.2; 379/57 
According to International Patent Classification (IPC) or to both nation 

B. FIELDS SEARCHED 

Minimum documentation searched (classification system followed by cl 



International application No. 
PCT/US97/00670 



U.S. : 340/825.44, 825.07, 825.33, 825.34, 825.5, 825.52; 455/33.2, 56.1, 54.1, 33.1, 38.2; 379/57, 59, 60 



Documentation searched other than ir 



n documentation to the extent that such documents are included in the fields searched 



Electronic data base consulted during the international search (name of data base and, where practicable, search terms used) 
APS- SEARCH TERMS: PAGER OR SELECT? CALL? OR PAGING RECEIVER, E-MAIL, WIRELESS MESSAGING, 
WIRELESS MESSAGING SYSTEM, WIRELESS MESSAGING NETWORK, WIRELESS MESSAGING SERVER 



C. DOCUMENTS CONSIDERED TO BE RELEVANT 



Category* 


Citation of document, with indication, where appropriate, of the relevant passages 


Relevant to claim No. 


Y 


US, A, 5,436,960 (CAMPANA, JR. ET AL) 25 JULY 1995, 
ABSTRACT, COL. 4, LINES 45-51, COL. 5 LINES 17-35, 
COL. 7 LINES 20-32, COL. 11, LINES 48-56, COL. 16 LINE 
66- COL. 17, LINE 14, COL. 19, LINES 11-19, COL. 24, 
LINES 49-57, COL. 25, LINES 4-16, 36-42, AND 64-68, 
COL. 26, LINES 1-14, 29-42, AND 64-68, COL. 27 LINE 24- 
COL. 28, LINE 62. 


1-36 


A, T 


US, A, 5,604,788 <TETT) 18 FEBRUARY 1997, ABSTRACT. 


1 


A, T 


US, A, 5,612,682 (DELUCA ET AL.) 18 MARCH 1997, 
ABSTRACT. 


1 


A, P 


US, A, 5,550,861 (CHAN ET AL.) 27 AUGUST 1996, COL. 
3, LINES 25-31. 


1 



_Xj Further documents are listed in the continuation of Box C. £j See patent family annex. 



Special oliguric of cited document "T later document published after the international filing date or priority 
•A- ,w,. m ™tri*f;„;„. ih. ..... f,h - k- t, • . , date ami ool in conflict with the application but ctled to understand the 

to^nfTartlc^J retelancT principle or Iheory underlying Ihe invention 

ear document published on or after Ihe international filing dale considered novel or cannot be considered to involve an inventive atep 
"L" document which may throw doubts on priority claiin(») or which is whca Ihe document is taken alone 
cited to establish the publication date of another citation or other 

special reason (as specified) "V" document of particular relevance: the claimed invention cannot be 

•O- document referring to an oral disclosure, use. exhibition or other combined wiUl ^o'nrnrc ^tter^uch d^uments. such^rnWn^'tion 

nwsais being obvious to a person skilled in the art 
" P " ^^^^^V^^^m^irmti^b^^ - & - document member of the same palen. famdy 


Date of the actual completion of the international search 
19 MAY 1997 


Du.. of mailing of the international search report 

1 1 JUH 1997 


Name and mailing address of the ISA/US 
Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks 
Box PCT 

Washington, DC. 20231 
Facsimile No. (703) 305-3603 


Au^nzed officer J^^^Uy^U, 
/lEDWARD MERZ v 
Telephone No. (703) 305-4869 



Form PCT/ISA/210 (second sheet)(July 1992)* 



INTERNATIONAL SEARCH REPORT 



International application No. 
PCT/US 97/00670 



C (Continuation). DOCUMENTS CONSIDERED TO BE RELEVANT 


Category* 


Citation of document, with indication, where appropriate, of the relevant passages 


Relevant to claim No. 


A, T 


US, A, 5,621,798 (AUCSMITH) 15 APRIL 1997 COL. 1, LINES 
13-26, COL. 2, LINES 26-51. 


1 



Form PCT/ISA/2I0 (continuation of second sheet)(July 1992)*