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"GW HATCHET 


District 

removes 

3 trailers 
at shelter 


by Deanna Reiter 

Hatchet Staff Writer 

Three trailers were removed from the 
Foggy Bottom Homeless Shelter after a 
government order on Nov. 23, accord- 
ing to a shelter spokesperson who 
wished to remain anonymous. 

Protestors in front of the shelter 
during the removal were arrested, the 
spokesperson said, refusing to comment 
on the number of protesters arrested. 

The remaining three trailers, which 
| house 54 beds, will be open to mentally 
ill people only. Women will be housed 
tin two of the trailers and men will be in 
the third trailer. 

Busses leave the shelter every hour 
on the hour to take the homeless that 
cannot be housed at the Foggy Bottom 
shelter to other shelters in the city, he 
said. 

The city also canceled Seed Mini- 
stries’ contract to run the shelter last 
weekbecause it failed to close it, said 
Camille Pearse, coordinator for the 
homeless for the Department of Human 
i Services. Catholic Charities is now 
(managing the shelter, she said. 


photo by Paul Connolly 

PROTESTORS COMFORT each other at a Foggy Bottom homeless shelter 
demonstration last week. 


President optimistic on future 


by Deborah Solomon 

Editor-in-Chief 

I n a year when diversity, money 
and academics are big 
buzzwords on campus, GW Pres- 
ident Stephen Joel Trachtenberg has 
managed to stay optimistic even 
though this year has already had 
several uneasy moments. 

In an interview with the president, 
he maintains his commitment to 
improving GW, both academically 
and aesthetically. The following arti- 
cle attempts to define where Trach- 
tenberg sees this University heading. 
Q: Where do you see GW at right 
now in terms of academics? Where 
do you see us heading? 

A: GW has never been stronger. 
We’re moving forward consistently 
from strength to strength. We’re 
getting more of our first (freshmen) 
picks, new faculty, and we’re seeing 
more distribution in both the student 
and faculty body on the basis of race 
and gender. Basically it is good news 
followed by good news. 

Q: Why isn’t GW the number one 
school in the country? 

A: There arc a couple of things hold- 
tng us back. The reputation of 
tmiversities are intimately tied to the 
age of the institution. There are 
hardly any old institutions that are 
thought badly of, and there are 
hardly any new ones that are thought 
highly of. 

One test is seniority, longevity. 
Have you demonstrated satisfactory 


performance for a century or two? 
GW is approaching its 175th 
anniversary and it in increasingly 
beginning to get recognition. 

The second reason is funding. It 
turns out that money is the mother’s 
milk of educational quality. Every- 
thing students and professors ask of 
me turns into a resource allocation 


Stephen Joel Trachtenberg 

decision. If I had unlimited funding I 
could always say ‘yes.’ Since cash is 
limited, I have to pick and choose 
and some people find the decisions 
disappointing. 

Q: What improvements have you 
seen in your four years as 
president? 

A: I think the quality and attitudes of 
people at GW has improved visibly 
over the last four years. I see more 
participation than earlier; the number 
of people and the enthusiasm at 
VIVA (Vital Issues Varied 
Approaches) is one example. 


Q: What are your future plans for 
the University? 

A: As the library is emptied out of 
non-library functions, there is the 
opportunity for using space to 
respond to many of the agenda items 
from students and faculty. We want 
to restore the Gelman Library to the 
purpose for which it was intended. 

We want to build campus 
community and pride of place that 
allows us to feel good about being at 
GW and allows both Foggy Bottom 
and Washington to be pleased that 
we’re both part of Washington. We 
keep chipping away at relations with 
Foggy Bottom, the city council and 
the mayor. Over time we have made 
progress. 

Q: There have been recent discus- 
sions about changing the curricu- 
lum at GW to include a formal 
African studies program. What 
are your feelings about this? 

A: There are currently about 20 to 25 
courses in the curriculum which are 
about African culture. The enroll- 
ment in those classes is modest. If 
enrollment was booming, no one 
would have to talk about adding 
more, it would come naturally. 

I think no one can call themselves 
educated in 1992 without some 
knowledge of Europe, the Pacific 
Rim, Larin America and Africa. We 
are obliged to have appreciation of 
others’ backgrounds. But the trick 
isn’t to put more courses in, it is to 

(See INTERVIEW, p. 12) 


UPD director quits 
for personal reasons 

by Elissa Leibowitz 

Asst. News Editor 

University Police Director Timothy Murrell will resign from UPD effective 
Dec. 12 because of what he said were personal reasons. 

Murrell, who has been with UPD for only five months, said he will return to his 
previous job as director of public safety at Butler University in Indianapolis, Ind. 
He declined further comment on the reasons for his resignation. 

UPD Senior Associate Director Dolores Stafford will serve as interim director 
until the University chooses a permanent successor. 

Murrell joined the University in July, succeeding Curtis Goode, who now serves 
as special assistant to Vice President for Student and Academic Services Robert 
Chemak. Murrell’s resignation breaks up a six-year working partnership between 
him and Stafford, who said she has no plans to return to Butler with Murrell. 

Stafford said she will meet with Murrell and other UPD administrators to make 
the transition smooth. Murrell said he “hasn’t been here long enough to implement 
all I wanted to do,” although during his term UPD started posting reports of all 
major crime incidents, expanded the campus escort program and unionized the 
department. Stafford said she will continue the same programs she and Murrell 
started. 

Chemak said the administration has been pleased with Murrell’s five-month 
performance. “He was a superior, qualified candidate when (the University) hired 
him ... he welcomed challenges,” Chemak said. 

Butler has been without a permanent police department director since July. Staf- 
ford took over as interim director from July until September before joining Murrell 
at GW. Since then, Butler has been openly searching for a replacement, Butler 
Human Resources administrative assistant Mindy Green said. She said four police 
supervisors have shared the director’s duties since Stafford’s departure. 

Chemak said the University would like to find a replacement by the beginning 
of next semester. Unlike the selection process used to hire Murrell, Chemak said 
the method to find his successor will be quicker and will be conducted by 
“personal connections” rather than by a national advertisement. 

“We have to expedite the hiring process as soon as possible. It will have to be as 
thorough, but we won’t have the luxury ... of time as in a normal search,” Cher- 
nak explained. “This is not an area of responsibility we want to have vacant for a 
long time.” 

He said Stafford is not a candidate for the job and will resume her associate 
directorship once the position is filled. “We feel comfortable with Dolores at least 
being interim supervisor of the department. She has been handling a lot of the day- 
to-day administrative functions,” Chemak said. 

Res. Life establishes 
new specialty floors 


by Rachel! Long 

Hatchet Reporter 

Plans to implement a special 
community service floor this year in 
Adams Hall have been abandoned 
because of a “lack of interest” Residen- 
tial Life Director Sheila Curtin said. 

Instead, a multicultural floor, entitled 
World Cultures, will be established in 
Munson Hall and a substance-free 
living floor will be set up in Everglades, 
she said. Residential Life staff decided 
to form these floors because students 
expressed interest in them in a Residen- 
tial Life-Residence Hall Association 
survey sent earlier this semester to 
students living on campus, Curtin said. 

RHA President Wayne McFadden 
said RHA and Residential Life had 
received a lot of “positive feedback” 
from the survey, especially for the 
multicultural floor. “It was the most 


popular,” he added. 

“World Cultures will include both 
international and domestic students. It’s 
for anyone interested in learning about 
other cultures,” Curtin explained. 

Curtin said she hopes to see the World 
Cultures floor become an entire resi- 
dence hall also housing the foreign 
language floor presently located in 
Madison hall. 

Curtin said a living / learning prog- 
ram, entitled the D.C. Experience, is 
being planned for the 1994-95 school 
year. She said the program is being 
researched, and a definitive program has 
not been put together yet. 

“It will be modeled after the ROOTS 
program (a special program in Crawford 
Hall which was canceled for this year) 
although we haven’t yet selected a 
specific hall,” she added. 


Editorials p.4-5 

Hate rearing its ugly head in Europe. 

Arts p.8-9 

Feast your ears on a smorgasbord of college music. 

Sports p.14-15 

Men's basketball opens its season with a win over Monmouth. 


Washington, D.C. 


Thursday, December 3, 1992 


•j Vol. 89, No 30 


Since 1904 


The George Washington University 








We are pleased to announce the formation of a new unit 
within the Career and Cooperative Education Center (CCEC) 
—Student Employment Services. 


In the first phase of our efforts to enhance services the 
College Work Study Program staff has joined the CCEC, 
relocating to the Academic Center, T509. Work study staff 
can still be reached by phone at 994-1581. For your work 
study, part-time employment, and other career needs, we 
invite you to visit the Center between the hours of 8:30am - 
7:00pm Monday thru Thursday, and until 5:00pm on 
Friday. 


Look for future announcements concerning the further 
development of Student Employment Services. 


5 



Shuttle bus task force planned 

l o ; i 


by Sari Marvel 

Senior Staff Writer 

Student Association President Jon Tamow announced the 
formation of a shuttle bus task force at an S A Senate meeting 
Tuesday night. 

The task force will analyze shuttle bus programs in use at 
other universities. The task force will then present a plan for a 
program at GW to Tamow by the end of February. 

In other senate business, the Community Relations Resol- 
ution of 1992 was passed. The resolution was referred back to 
the Student Life Committee at the Nov. 10 senate meeting. 

The resolution calls for the senate to create a five-member 
special committee on community relations to communicate 
with students, community residents and leaders as well as the 
Foggy Bottom Association, the West End Citizens Associa- 
tion and the Advisory Neighborhood Commissions. The 
committee will recommend appropriate measures and solu- 
tions to community problems. 

liliiott School of International Affairs Sen. Jason Schwartz 
sponsored the resolution and was appointed chairman of the 
committee by unanimous consent. The senate suspended 


consideration of the remaining four committee seats until the 
next senate meeting. 

FB A President Chris Lamb spoke on behalf of the resolu- 
tion. Lamb said it is a “good idea” to form this committee. He 
mentioned various projects the S A can get involved with such 
as crime prevention, the student code of conduct, landscaping 
and, beautification. 

Lamb said the FBA is “cautiously optimistic” in regard to 
their relationship with GW. He added that GW President 
Stephen Joel Trachtenberg has created a more open relation- 
ship with the FBA because he talks with the community and 
educates it on GW’s plans. 

Tamow introduced a resolution opposing the proposed 
construction of a polluting steam generator that Georgetown 
University is planning to build. Tamow said the generator 
will be built on Georgetown’s campus and it will “signific- 
antly increase pollution levels around the Northwest 
Washington metropolitan area.” 

Tamow’s resolution was referred back to the Student Life 
Committee for further consideration. 

The senate will resume its normal schedule with its next 
meeting scheduled Dec. 8. 


SA, MCGB name nominees to JEC 


by Tracy Sisser 

Hatchet Staff Writer 

The Student Association and the 
Program Board announced their 
appointments to the Joint Elections 
Committee in preparation for next 
semester’s election. 

SA President Jon Tamow nominated 
former Student Court Judge Chris 
Honorio, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual 
Alliance President Steve Raiche and 
Sigma Nu President Ramez Zahralddin. 
The S A Senate, after a closed executive 
section, approved the nominations. The 
Marvin Center Governing Board 
appointed Robin Fagan, who is MCGB 
vice chair. PB has not yet appointed 


anyone. 

The SA appoints three people to the 
committee, and MCGB and PB each 
appoint one person. 

The S A, MCGB and PB each have the 
power of nomination because they are 
the chartered student groups with 
elected officials, Tamow said. 

Tamow said he received a list from 
former SA President Mike Musante of 
the people he was considering for nomi- 
nation. He then added his own indivi- 
dual considerations. Tamow said he 
“consulted with his cabinet in order to 
choose the most qualified people.” 

The JEC is a five-member committee 
in charge of the SA elections in the 


spring. The duties of the committee 
range from setting election rules, orga- 
nizing a calender and setting the spend- 
ing budget for candidates. Out of the 
five committee members, one is 
appointed chairman. 

Former Residence Hall Association 
President Chris Ferguson was nomi- 
nated to the JEC by PB but declined the 
nomination because he said he would 
have felt too tied to the campaign. “It 
was an honor to be asked and I felt that I 
could be objective ... but for integrity 
of the process I decided not to do it,” 
Ferguson said. 


-Sari Marvel contributed to this report. 


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Power hungry 


Rarely is the use of force so easily justified as it is in Somalia. One 
thousand Somalians die every day while bags of grain sit wasting under 
the control of that country’s power-hungry warlords. The time has come 
for the world to do something about it and forceful intervention is the 
last and best solution to the problem. We encourage the United Nations 
to launch the U.S.-led coalition and begin to stop the starving. 

The continued chaos and suffering occurring in Somalia despite huma- 
nitarian contributions of food and grain mandate the use of force. Send- 
ing food is futile if we are then content to sit by and let it rot along 
with the bodies of dead Somalis. The political situation, or in this case 
the lack thereof, makes it possible for the U.N. to intervene without 
treading on the toes of established government. The scattered clan 
warfare enslaving Somalia is based on survival, not politics, and should 
be easy prey for an organized, sophisticated U.N. effort. 

While the decision to use force to ensure the safe transport of food to 
the people is clear, the specifics of their methods and mission must be 
carefully ironed out. The most important of these details is the length of 
the troops’ stay in Somalia. President Bush has proposed Jan. 20 as a 
goal for withdrawal in an effort to finish the business during his term. 
While his commitment to a short, efficient operation is appropriate, any 
ending date to the campaign must be secondary to the establishment of 
an effective, safe food distribution system. 

The U.N. and the United States must also be mindful of African 
apprehension of the return of colonialism. The days of white imperialism 
are a recent memory the presence of Western troops are bound to recall. 
With this in mind, the U.N. should route food distribution through the 
legitimate elders of the Somalian society, serving as transport and police 
force for these activities. In addition to minimalizing the specter of 
renewed colonialism, this work with the local establishment will pave the 
way for the maintenance of safe humanitarian assistance after the troops 
return home. 


Abortion affirmed P T - Bab y 


Sometimes, doing nothing can say much more than words or action 
ever could. The U.S. Supreme Court proved this by declining to hear a 
case which would have given it the opportunity to overturn Roe v. Wade 
this week, effectively ensuring that abortion will remain legal in this 
country. While the legal battle over states’ rights to restrict that right 
will rage on, the foundation Roe v. Wade established has finally and 
thankfully been ossified. 

The court declined to rule on a federal court’s repeal of a Guam law 
which banned abortion and threatened to even outlaw speech on the 
topic, falling one justice short of the four needed to hear a case. By not 
even considering the case, the court states its commitment to maintaining 
the precedent of national legal abortion established in Roe v. Wade. 

This decision is particularly heartening because of the current justices 
sitting on the court. Abortion has withstood a Supreme Court stacked by 
the conservative-minded Presidents Reagan and Bush with the purpose of 
overturning the Roe precedent. President-elect Bill Clinton has stated his 
commitment to maintaining abortion’s legality and will likely have the 
opportunity to appoint Supreme Court justices who will fulfill that goal 
long after he leaves office. 

The ramifications of this security are huge. Not only docs it prohibit 
government from determining what a woman can do with her body, it 
should greatly minimize the impact of abortion as an issue in national 
politics. While the politics of abortion will certainly become paramount in 
short-term state politics, there is an end in sight. 

A base commitment to the basic legality of abortion and a court which 
has demonstrated its willingness to uphold it gives little use for platforms 
and campaigns founded on the issue of abortion. We can only hope the 
void this creates will be filled with discussion of issues government can , 
and should address to make the country run more smoothly. That’s its 
job after all. 



Deborah 
Lisa L 

Paul Connolly, senior news editor 
Maren felt/., news editor 
Scott Jared, editorial page editor 
Vince Tuss, sports editor 
Collin Hill, arts & features editor 
Danielle Noll, arts &. features editor 
Sloan Ginn, photo editor 
Jennifer Balog, asst, news editor 
Elissa Leibowitz, asst, news editor 
Becky Henith, asst, sports editor 


Solomon, editor-in-chief 
.citer, managing editor 

Steven Morse, general manager 
Sarah Dalton, advertising manager 
Todd Peters, accounts manager 
Maura Mitchell, classified sales manager 


Scan Rubacky, circulation manager 


Felix Alvarez, senior marketing assistant 
Elissa Leibowitz, senior marketing assistant 
Sona Vaish, senior advertising representative 
Rachel Privler, collections assistant 


Zama Cook, production manager 
John P. Miller, senior production assistant 
Danielle Noll, senior production assistant 
Gina Romo, senior production assistant 
Angie Krecgcr, senior production assistant 


The GW women’s basketball prog- 
ram has enjoyed the most success of any 
GW athletic team for the past two years. 
GW women have broken records left 
and right for the past two seasons, 
winning more games last season than in 
two previous seasons (’89 and ’90) 
combined. GW pulled a major coup 
d’etat in recruiting and signing Debbie 
Hemery and Darlene Saar. To whom 
does most of this credit go to for these 
recent successes? Why of course to the 
head coach of the Colonial Women, Joe 
McKeown. Joe McKeown took a back- 
wards, unknown, unsuccessful team, 
gave them some fancy offensive plays 
named after a couple of states, a suicide 
defensive play named after some freak 
winter weather condition and the cour- 
age and drive to want to win. This 
combination turned them into a basket- 
ball powerhouse unlike any that has 
ever been seen at GW. What more could 
you ask of the man? 

Well, I’ll tell you what, how about 
maybe playing some of those juniors. 
There arc three bright, aggressive, 
talented juniors on the team who never 
get played. Well, let’s be fair, they do 
get a minute here and there if the team is 
up by 20 or 30 or down by 40 or 50 and 
Joe feels that it won’t do Jen Shasky’s 
career everlasting harm to pull her and 
some other starters out for a couple of 
seconds. Aside from those few rare and 
precious seconds, Mark Dutille and 
Katrina Wullenwcber, the trainer and 
the manager, see more time off the 
bench than do these three talented indi- 
viduals. What would make a coach so 
confident in the playing ability of some 
green freshmen and sophomores that he 
would overlook the more seasoned 
veteran juniors? 

An interview with Joe McKeown, as I 
envision it if he would spare me the time 
for one, would transpire something to 
this effect: I would ask very nearly the 
same question, “Joe,” I would say, 
“Why don’t you play your juniors?” 
Coach McKeown would just give me a 
puzzled, glazed-eye look and reply, 
“Juniors? There are juniors on my 
team?” I would say, “Why yes, three of 
them to be precise.” “Really?” Joe 
would ask with a surprised sound to his 


voice. “You know,” I would say, 
“Melissa Phillips, Stephanie Seifert, 
and Anna Lee.” “Melissa who? Stepha- 
nie . . .?” he would query. “Those three 
girls on the far end of your bench that 
you never play,” I would respond, 
getting rather irritated at him. “Oh, 
those girls,” he would say, “Y ou know, I 
wondered what their names were and 
why they have been coming dressed to 
practices and games.” “You mean you 
didn ’ t even know what their names were 
and why they have been on full scholar- 
ship to this University?” I would reply. 
At this point he would get rather flus- 
tered and angry and reply, “Hey, I am 
only human, I have obligations to the 
other members of the team, like Jen 
Shasky, Debbie Hemery and Darlene 
Saar, it wouldn’t look gook if I sat those 
girls on the bench, they were from some 
of the best high schools in the United 
States!” I would then ask if he thinks it 
looks good not having any of his juniors 
starting or even playing at all even 
though they have earned a shot at it. I’m 
sure he would then ask me to leave. 

In my opinion, Joe McKeown’s goal 
isn’t to have a good team and work 
toward a goal with the use of a whole 
team effort, but to cultivate the skills of 
a select few on the team in his quest to be 
the best and let the rest sit on the bench. 
Even if his methods work for more than 
two years, isn’t it just a shame to see the 
talents of the other players on the team 
wasted because all they do is sit on the 
bench? I think it is just a crying shame. 

What I also think is a shame is that 
The GW Hatchet seems to support 
Coach McKeown in this. Recently, 
when the Hatchet requested interviews 
with the players, they requested inter- 
views with the seniors, the sophomores, 
and the freshmen, pointedly leaving out 
the juniors. This insult did not go with- 
out notice of this fan, and I think, no I 
KNOW, that really REEKS!!!! What 
will be the next slap-in-the-face insult 
these juniors have to endure, not being 
allowed on road trips, becoming like La 
Tonya Nixon, a PMIA (Player Missing 
In Action), or worse yet, not even 
having their own pictures included in 
the media guide of their senior year? A 
year or so ago. Coach McKeown 
remarked to me that he once thought I 
was coming down from the bleachers to 
give him coaching tips during one of the 
games. At the time I said that I wasn’„t_ 


but if he needed any I would. He obvi- 
ously needs some now so here goes: for 
God’s sake, before it is too late, PLAY 
YOUR JUNIORS!!! 


-William M. Kinnik II 


Nice resume 


GW has more to offer to MBA 
students than they ever dreamed. Have 
you heard about INTERFACE? 
INTERFACE is comprised of MBA 
students who are developing paid 
summer internships abroad. The 
mission of INTERFACE is to unite the 
needs of internationally-oriented orga- 
nizations with the talents of GW’s 
graduate business students in a mutually 
beneficial, sustainable relationship. 
What an opportunity to make yourself 
stand our from a pack of MBAs. 

Students will gain international work 
experience in marketing, finance, 
accounting and management. The prog- 
ram will help organizations operating 
overseas compete in the dynamic, 
competitive marketplace. The students 
will benefit as well. An increase in the 
knowledge and skills available to 
INTERFACE members will develop as 
students enter a different culture. In 
order to prepare members for these 
different cultures, cross-cultural and 
informational speakers will be 
scheduled. 

INTERFACE was started in Septem- 
ber 1992 after the founder, Sheree 
Storm, returned from studying in 
Central and Eastern Europe for the 
summer. While trying to obtain an 
internship, she realized the importance 
of being involved with an organization 
that could establish credibility and 
prepare internships ahead of time. She 
also realized the vast opportunities that 
exist for MBA students in doing short- 
term, pro bono consulting projects. 

INTERFACE is now a part of the GW 
community seeking to send MBAs to 
work abroad. If you arc interested in 
working this summer in Central and 
Eastern Europe, come join us at our next 
meeting Dec. 8 at 7:15 p.m. or drop by 
until 8:30 p.m. to speak with the officers 
personally in Government Hall 108. 


-Christine Myers 

-INTERFACE vice president of market- 
-tog 





The GW Hatchet-Thursday, December 3, 1992-5 




Resurgence of hate crimes bodes 
ill for Germany, minority groups 


The resurgence of racism accom- 
panying our entrance into a new 
century is a clear indication that we 
have not yet learned from our unfor- 
tunate experience. 

The firebombing on Nov. 23 of a 
Turkish household in Moelln, 
Germany, which resulted in the 
deaths of an elderly grandmother and 
her two grandchildren seems to be 
serving as a catalyst in combatting 
the tide of fascism sweeping across 
Europe and Germany in particular. 
In a matter of days, spontaneous 
protests against the deplorable crime 
were organized with famous 
academicians and high-level govern- 
ment officials attending marches and 
the subsequent funeral service. The 
Bonn government is now deliberat- 
ing on the enactment of legislation 
authorizing the government to ban 
the assembly and expression of plat- 
forms of extremist groups. Perhaps 
this particular attack marks a turning 
point not only because of its excep- 
tionally violent nature, but also 
because the victims were Turks who, 
unlike most victims of recent racist 
attacks, had been living in Germany 
for more than 20 years. 

What seems to be lost in the flurry 
of the aftermath, however, is the fact 
that these actions on the part of the 
government, despite the good inten- 
tion, have come late. Furthermore, 
they remain all too cosmetic in 
nature. The behavior of Mr. Kohl’s 
government in dealing with this 


crisis suggests that a confirmation 
such as this incident was needed to 
affirm the fact that neo-Nazi attacks 
pose a serious problem and threaten 
everyone (including Jews and 
Turks). What may not be known, 
however, is the fact that Turks have 
been the victims of German racism 
for several decades, dating back to 
when they were “imported proleta- 
rians” brought in because of a labor 
vacuum to rebuild Germany after 
two devastating world wars. After 
having contributed in large part to 


Ozan Akcin 


the affluence of that country, they 
have been unable to gain German 
citizenship and have been harassed 
periodically to leave. These are the 
conditions that the Turkish commun- 
ity in Germany has been living in, 
with a brief abatement of attacks just 
before reunification. 

It is high time that the world come 
to realize what is taking place in 
Germany, home to the strongest 
fascist movement in Europe. 
Respected leaders of the Jewish 
community are helping in calling 
attention to the severity of the crisis 


at a time when democracy is being 
put to the test. As has been the case 
before in that dark period of German 
history, however, action and even 
words are coming much too late. 
More than 2,500 neo-Nazi attacks 
have occurred in the past 14 months 
in Germany with far-right parties 
gaining support everyday. The reluc- 
tance of the government to act may 
also be a reflection of a more 
profound symptom of the elusive, 
non-brown shirt Nazi sympathizers 
scattered throughout German soci- 
ety; some of whom hold government 
office (both federal and local). As 
long as the denial and minimaliza- 
tion of the problem persists and as 
long as the true sources of racism 
denied, this disease will never go 
away. 

I call upon everyone with the 
slightest sense of humanity to 
denounce this resurgence of racism 
and to realize that turning our heads 
away today will only force us to 
confront the problem tomorrow — 
when it may be too late. As the situa- 
tion in Germany and Europe in 
general now stands, it seems we have 
forgotten our vows all too quickly. It 
is unacceptable to stand by and 
observe and frown. There are at least 
six million reasons why it must be 
actively combatted. 

Ozan Akcin is junior majoring in 
international business and president 
of the Turkish Student Association. 


Holiday fever escapes in wacky, 
wild Thanksgiving Day observance 


The holidays are upon us — those joyous occasions when 
we spend hours driving to malls for the privilege of paying 
retail for gifts that will probably be returned and when we log 
even more miles to see friends and loved ones at gatherings 
that often make us thankful we only have to do this once a 
year. The beauty of it all can be overwhelming. But, before 
you decide you’d rather spend this season in a cave, don’t 
forget sometimes the familiar old drudgeries (i.e., rituals) can 
be safer than untried new departures. 


Rob Gam III 


Every November for the past 15 years the Smiths had gone 
over to the Joneses for Thanksgiving. Out of the closets came 
•he gussy-up clothes — the itchy ones that choked and 
pinched in places they’d forgotten were quite so large. Into 
•he Buick piled the kids, with clipped nails and an extra scrub 
behind the ears, for the short trip across the boulevard. 

“Now you’re all to be on your best behavior,” began Mrs. 
Smith. “Billy, I want you to be nice to that Jones boy — I 


don’t care what his politics are. And no one is to say a thing 
about Mrs. Jones’ new implants. If she has no compunction 
about paying some plastic surgeon a fortune to try to look like 
Madonna, that’s quite up to her.” 

But this year Thanksgiving was doomed from the start. 
The Joneses felt no more enthusiasm about preparing a meal 
than the Smiths did about sitting through it. And Mrs. Jones 
was running late. All that was needed was for Mrs. Smith’s 
ego to reach escape velocity. “It’s okay, Edna, I never actu- 
'ally liked that pie anyway,” she heard herself say. “Oh, 
really? Well I never much enjoyed cooking it, either,” Mrs. 
Jones shot back. Feeling oddly liberated at having spoken 
their minds, they eagerly agreed to forsake Thanksgiving 
dinner altogether. Why bother? 

So they all went out for ice cream and had the time of their 
lives — until, in between double scoops with extra jimmies, 
they started to unburden their true feelings about their friend- 
ships and their marriages; and someone got a stomach ache 
and started to cry. And they decided to go home. 

So say what you will about slaving hours over a stove, 
about forced smiles and disingenuous greetings. Tradition 
has its benefits — not the least of which being the prevention 
of civil war. 

Rob Ganz III is a sophomore majoring in biology. 


The GW Hatchet, located at 800 21st Street, NW, Washington DC 20052, is the student newspaper of the 
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holidays and exam periods. Opinions expressed in signed columns are those of the authors and do not 
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columns, call the editorial office at 994-7550. All material becomes the property of the GW Hatchet and may 
oe reproduced only with written consent of the editor-in-chief and the originator of the material. 


SA president ponders 
present plan, potential 


It has now been just over one month 
since I became Student Association 
president. Since the initial chaos has 
settled and the transition is now 
complete, I’ve had some time to reflect 
back on the events of this period, and to 
focus on what our student government is 
(or should) be doing. In the days imme- 
diately following the succession to my 
new office, many friends and other 
students approached me, and with a 
slight tone of uneasiness, said “congra- 
tulations.” My response would usually 
be, “Thanks, but I think ‘Good luck’ 
would be more appropriate.” After all, 
the SA was in turmoil, thoughts of 
campus unity had been shattered, and 
the administration was obviously 
concerned with the University’s image. 
For the first few days, I felt like the 
world was looking to me and only me 
for solutions: my telephone, both at 
home and in the SA, was incessantly 
ringing; I was constantly called over to 
Rice Hall and many people who had 
volunteered to help the SA this year 
were noticeably depressed. No course 
on crisis management or staff motiva- 
tion could have prepared me for this 
environment. 


Jon Tar now 


My experiences during that period 
reshaped my view of the SA, the 
University and myself. The best and 
worst of each were exposed in one 
single week. Within the SA, its worst 
aspects were clear to the entire campus 
and need not be mentioned again. 
However, far fewer people saw the 
constructive process that followed. As 
designed in the SA Constitution, the 
student senate discussed its role and the 
various actions available to it, including 
impeachment. In the end, the senate 
voiced the concerns of and stood up for 
the general student body and by doing so 
in an orderly manner protected our right 
to self-government. If nothing else, this 
situation proved our ability as students 
to be responsible, mature leaders in the 
face of crisis. I say this not about myself, 
but of the senators to whom the process 
is endowed. 

Having now gone beyond those 
tumultuous days, I still see potential for 
the Student Association. This potential, 
however, is not unlimited. The pros- 
pects for success in any student govern- 
ment rests with the student body itself. 
As Columbian College and Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences Sen. Bruce 
Benshoof said in a recent letter to the 
GW community, “the SA will never 
actually work until all (students) realize 
we are all members ... By running for 
office and being elected, we in the 
senate and executive have become your 
servants and spokespersons. Do not 
forget this.” I have known Bruce since 
he arrived at GW my sophomore year, 
and one characteristic we share is that 
desire to serve. On at least three occa- 
sions since my term in the senate, I have 
considered leaving the S A because there 
was too much “politics.” But each time, 
the desire to represent my peers has 
overwhelmed all of the negatives. 

The S A has been viewed for too long 
as a student “group.” While it may be 
just semantics — the S A is not a student 


group, it is your government. And while 
we may not actually “govern” (i.e. set 
laws or policies), we have a strong voice 
with those in Rice Hall who do affect 
our lives day in and day out. During the 
rest of my administration and beyond, 
the SA will need the help of every 
student, from freshmen in Thurston to 
the graduate students in every D.C. 
suburb, to ensure that our collective 
voice’ is loud and clear. 

It’s easy to dismiss the SA as ineffec- 
tive because it doesn’t “do anything.” 
But the real problem isn’t with the SA, 
but with a University that is inherently 
slow to change. A short (very short) 
sample of recent accomplishments 
shows the SA’s success. In 1989-90, it 
was the SA that revived homecoming, 
now one of the largest and most success- 
ful events on campus. In 1990-91, it was 
the SA that proposed a campus credit 
union, making student banking easier 
and short-term loans more convenient. 
The credit union will become a reality 
next year. In 1991-92, the S A undertook 
an unprecedented study of the financial 
aid office. And while it is far from 
perfect, I think most seniors will agree 
with me that it has greatly improved 
since we arrived four years ago. 

While the Student Association of 
1992-93 is most likely to be remem- 
bered for the events of late October, it is 
my sincere hope that other achieve- 
ments will stand out as well. The S A has 
made campus safety a priority issue and, 
with UPD’s help, improvements are 
forthcoming. Having been promised the 
arrival of new security phones next 
semester, it is now our job to sec that the 
promise is kept. Both the escort services 
now serve a greater area or Foggy 
Bottom that ever before. In other areas, 
the progress in securing student 
representation on dean search and 
faculty search committees has been 
substantial. Most recently, the SA has 
successfully sponsored an Africana 
studies resolution in the Joint Commit- 
tee of Faculty and Students. Not all of 
SA’s endeavors are immediately appa- 
rent, but the long-term gains should not 
be denied. 


“Having now gone beyond 
those tumultuous days, I 
still see potential for the 
Student Association.” 


Five months from now, I will be turn- 
ing over the SA to another new presi- 
dent. Like myself, he or she will have a 
set of goals for the year, some of which 
might be accomplished in the short 
term. Undoubtedly, my successor will 
also undertake ideas that take a much 
longer time to fully realize. In both 
cases, we the students will benefit. As 
part of that effort to improve our univer- 
sity, let us always look forward. Dwell- 
ing in past mistakes and past politics 
will truly achieve nothing. Working 
toward a better tomorrow can only be a 
positive experience, for the elected offi- 
cials of the S A and its 18,000 members. 

Jon Tamow is president of the Student 
Association. 




6-The GW Hatchet-Thursday, December 3, 1992 


Police catch burglar 
red-handed at GW 


GW ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK 
to the Guatemalan Refugee Camps 
along the Mexican/Guatemalan border 


A man who allegedly attempted to break into a campus building and an embassy 
within campus boundaries was arrested by Metropolitan Police Saturday, Univer- 
sity Police said. 

Police arrested Kevin Grey; 27, of no fixed address, for attempted burglaries at 
Building D, 2129 G. St., and later the Uruguayan Embassy, 1916 F St., next to 
Thurston Hall, UPD Senior Associate Director Dolores Stafford said. 

A UPD officer said he heard glass breaking at 2; 1 5 p.m. as he patrolled the area 
around Building D. After responding, the officer reported seeing a man trying to 
break into the basement door. MPD later identified the man as Grey. 

Grey fled the scene heading east on G Street after the officer confronted him, 
according to the University police report. 

MPD and the U.S. Secret Service Uniformed Division responded to another 
attempted burglary a few minutes later at the embassy. The UPD officer who 
observed the subject on campus also responded and identified him as the same 
person, the report said. Grey attempted to enter through a window he broke on a 
door in the rear of the building, MPD Public Information Officer Kenny Bryson 
said. 

Grey was taken to MPD 2nd District where he was charged with at least one 
count of attempted burglary, Bryson said. 

Nothing was reported missing from either building. Stafford said UPD would 
not normally respond to an incident at the off-campus embassy, but because the 
description of the subject attempting the burglary at the embassy matched the one 
from Building D, UPD responded. 

-Elissa Leiboivitz 


With 
are gre 
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We will live with families in the camps, 
participating in their everyday lives and 
possibly working the harvest. 

Participants should be comfortable with a spiritual 
faith based approach to life and be open to the 
customs, religions, experiences of another culture 


We have room for 15 people. 
Please call for an application 
which is due December 15. 


COST: $1200 Tm Y~r J ^ 

Financial assistance is J I 

available in helping participants 
raise money. 

Sponsored by: GW Ecumenical Christian Ministry 

For more information contact: Rev. Laureen Smith at (202) 676-6434 


GMU sued over rape investigation 

A Fairfax County, Va. woman has filed a suit against George Mason Univer- 
sity claiming campus police bungled an investigation of her alleged rape in a 
university dormitory last year. 

The woman, a 17-year-old freshman at the time of the Sept. 2, 1991 rape, is 
seeking $2. 1 million from GMU, claiming GMU University Police were negli- 
gent in collecting and preserving evidence. The woman also alleged campus 
police “took the wrong bedding to the forensic laboratory.” 

In addition, the woman said university officials intimidated her and tried to 
coerce her to withdraw from the university. 

GMU officials have refused comment since the case is under litigation. 

There have been nine rapes at the 1 1,000-student GMU campus since 1 987. 

Woman injured in 24th Street fire 

A fire at an apartment building just off campus left an elderly woman criti- 
cally burned Monday. 

According to Deputy Fire Chief James Gallagher, a fire at the nine-story' St. 
Mary’s Court building — 700 block of 24lh St. — started about 4 p.m. in 
75-year-old Claddie Montgomery’s apartment. Montgomery was found by 
firefighters unconscious on the floor of her apartment and taken to safely, 
Gallagher said. She was admitted to the GW Medical Center for treatment of 
severe bums and smoke inhalation. Another building resident, 76-ycar-old 
Margaret Allen, was treated at GWUMC for smoke inhalation and released. 

A fire department investigation pinpointed the cause as a faulty electric 
blanket in Montgomery’s apartment, Gallagher said in Tuesday’s Washington 
Post. 

Student honor code swiped 

Decatur, Ga. — The honor system at Agnes Scott College hit a new low 
when someone stole an honor pledge that students are traditionally asked to 
sign. 

The “Class of 1994 Honor Pledge,” a promise to uphold the honor code, is 
signed by each student in that class and normally hung in a permanent frame on 
a wall in Alston Center. It had been temporarily removed by the staff and placed 
on a table to make it accessible for signing. 

“We are not putting the honor codes up for the other three classes until this 
one is returned,” Sarah Pilgcr, a spokeswoman for the all-female school, said 

Pilgcr said the code was stolen during Black Cat Week, a week of activities 
that feature school spirit, and added there is a possibility that the culprit is not 
from Agnes Scott College. 


Wearing Shorts 
Is Encouraged. 


A bathing suit and sun 
block wouldn't be a bad idea 
either. Just be prepared 
for a week of fun. 

It's a multiple choice spring 
break. Games, parties, contests, 
free party cruise, free food 
and entertainment. Tennis and 
golf, too. Or go sightseeing 
on a moped. And don’t forget 
our beautiful pink beaches 
and turquoise waters. All less 
than two hours away. 

So do whatcha like. Just don’t 
let it go to your head. 

For more information, call 
George Washington Travel/ 

Travel On • J 

800 21 st Street, N.W., J 
Washington, D.C. 20052 J| 
202-728-0900 M 


The University abolished the Office olher universities, is trying to control 
of Business and Procurement Affairs, costs from within, Cole said, “which 
effective Monday, in an effort to translates directly to you and your pock- 
increase the efficiency of the Univcr- etbook as tuition savings.” 
sity’s business operations Scott Cole, Mos( f ^ m onnel will 

assoc, ate vice prcs.dent for bus, ness ^ ^ ^ ^ un(jcr lhe 

attairs, sa, . auspices of different departments. Don 

. Runyon, former assistant treasurer for 

The office dealt with the function of business and procurement affairs, will 
auxiliary-contracted services such as assumc lhc position of assistan t vice 
food services the GW Bookstore and p rcs ;<j cn [ a tO]d Dominion University in 
mad service. It duplicated functions of Norfolk Va „ according to a University 
other offices ,n the business affairs and rclcasc . Most of lhc othcr e limi- 

procurcmcnt and supply departments, ^ posjlions were vacancies the 
Cole added. University decided to leave unfilled 

“This was a business decision,” Cole Cole said, 
said. “We are trying to streamline our 

operations and improve the delivery of } 

our services,” he added. GW, like many -John Rep 


1 nights 

air/land inclusive 


PicUjr* based on Travel Turf pricing from New York and hulailclphia Add-on* apply from other points of departure Prices based on round tnp pur 
through 4 40/93 Prices ibghtiy lower for weekday travel Pncr* are based on four per room, minimum property category Prices vary by wholesaler «nd 











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Counselor provides 
advice for good credit 

by Zachary Nienus 

Hatchet Staff Writer 

With the holiday season imminent, the chances to run up high credit card bills 
are greater than during any other time of the year. 

Students, especially during the holidays, need to budget their expenses and 
maintain a good credit rating, Betty Matthews, branch director of the Consumer 
Credit Counseling Service of Greater Washington, told students Nov. 19. At the 
event, sponsored by the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, Matthews also discussed 
situations in which people obtain poor credit records, and what can be done to help. 

According to Matthews, credit has its advantages. It is convenient during 
emergencies and offers a safe way to carry money, she said. However, Matthews 
j explained that many people fall into a “credit trap” — running up large credit 
bills, ruining one’s credit record, and more importantly, going into massive debt. 

“People today use their credit cards for everything,” Matthews said. “While 
credit cards are used ideally for major purchases, consumers today use them for 
' purchasing things on the spur-of-the-moment, or for many small purchases. This 
adds up and really eats people up.” 

Matthews said credit problems often spill over into other areas of life, adding 
that she has experienced many of these first-hand through her clients. “I have had 
clients come in and tell me that their credit problems have caused arguments or 
fights at home. I have heard stories where children have run away from home 
because of the arguments their parents get into over credit debt.” 

Matthews stressed the importance of handling credit debt responsibly, and 
advocated taking exceptional problems to a credit management service, such as 
the counseling service. The service takes on credit debtors as clients, acts on their 
behalf to renegotiate their debt with credit companies and educates clients on how 
to handle credit responsibly. Their work often results in a “freeze” on the interest, 
or a reduction on the size of the debt. 

However, Matthews said, coming to a credit management service should be a 
, last resort. She advocated taking responsibility ahead of time to prevent debt from 
occurring. She also described good habits in maintaining credit, and stressed the 
benefits of observing a budget. 

One of the most important habits to having good credit is stability — holding a 
steady source of income and maintaining residence in the same place for at least a 
year. “It is very important to pay bills or loans on time,” Matthews said. 


The GW Hatchet-Thursday, December 3, 1992-7 




^ You Are Invited 

Authors 

GW Alumna ALLYN ENDERLYN 

and 

GW Alumnus OLIVER C. DZIGGEL 


Will Be Autographing 

CRACKING THE PACIFIC RIM 

and 

CRACKING EASTERN EUROPE 
Monday, December 7, 1992 - Noon to 1 :00 pm 

Stop By to Greet our GW Authors 


Telephone: 202/994-6870 


Solutions from your Apple Campus Reseller 
The Apple Computer Loan. 


© 1992 Apple Computer. Inc. Apple, the Apple logo anti Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. PowerBook is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc. 

* Based on Kev in Campbell s Apple Computer Loan of $2,342.40. his monthly payment was $15 (interest only) as of 10/1 2/92. Principal payments may be deferred up to 4 years. 
The interest rate is variable, and is based on the average of the higher of the 30-day or 90-day commercial paper rates as reported in the Wa// Street Journal, plus a spread of 
5.3S% (not to exceed 5.6%). The term of the loan is 8 years with no pre-payment penalty. The total finance charge on every $1,000 borrowed will be $543.38. Each applicant 
pav> a $35 00 non-refundable application fee. Approved borrowers will lx- charged a 4% loan origination fee. The loan origination fee will be added to the requested loan 
amount and repaid over the life of the loan. For the month of October 1992. the interest rate was 7.6% with an APR of 8.85%. 


“Why should I wait in line at the 
computer lab when I can own a Macintosh 


Kevin Campbell 
Aerospace Engineering Major 


for f 15 a month?’ 


What allowed Kevin to own an Apple' Macintosh' PowerBook" 145 
computer for such a low monthly payment? The Apple Computer Loan! 
Kevin knew that owning the power and portability of a Macintosh 
PowerBook for his full course load and his work in the Civil Air Patrol 
was a smart thing to do. And the Apple Computer Loan was the smart 
way to do it: easy application, fast turnaround and low, flexible payment 
terms. So Kevin went to the only place that offers the Apple Computer 
Loan, his Apple Campus Reseller. 

Macintosh. It’s more than a present, it’s a future. 


For further information visit 
Colonial Computers • 994-9300 
Marvin Center, Ground Floor 


- *tCUU* 






music, 


Acts rap, 
don’t riot 


by Sarah Western 


W elcome to Ice-T’s Las 
Vegas Lounge Act. No, 
that’s not the real name of 
the show, but here at Richie Coli- 
seum things are so intimate . . . 
You’ll have to ignore the silly TV 
crews. They seem to think there’ll be 
a hot story on a riot tonight. What? 
Why are there cops here? They’re 
also convinced Mr. T will excite the 
crowd into riotous behavior with that 
ridiculous anti-cop talk. Now if 
you’ll just give your ticket to Pene- 
lope and put your arms up high so 
Otis can frisk you . . . 

Needless to say, there was quite a 
controversy surrounding the Ice-T / 
Public Enemy show at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland — College Park 
Nov. 24. Members of the Fraternal 
Order of Police — Lodge 23 in 
Maryland — continued to protest 
the song “Cop Killer” from Body 
Count, the self-titled debut from 
Ice-T’s metal band. But Icc-T wasn’t 
performing with Body Count for this 
concert and had agreed beforehand 
that “Cop Killer” wouldn’t be played 
or promoted. So the show went on. 

It was a circus of white college 
boys eating popcorn and buying 
those glow-in-the-dark necklaces. 
Like they could start a riot. 

The crowd jumped, got crazy and 
cheered Ice-T’s lecture on why there 
was a problem outside the doors of 
Richie Coliseum. It’s like this: Back 
in the day when Little Richard was 
around, white kids liked his music 
and the authoritarians freaked out. 
Now the white kids like rap and those 
same people are worried that whites 
and blacks will become allies. “They 
wanna divide and conquer,” Ice-T 
said. “We’re here to put it back 
together.” 

Public Enemy also performed and 
worked the crowd well despite tech- 
nical problems that put them a bit out 
of sync. Flavor Flav was a riot as 
usual, dressed in a rainbow-colored 
sweatsuit with white sunglasses and 
a top hat — reminiscent of the white 
rabbit from Alice in Wonderland. 
Chuck D was, as always, the one 
with his head on straight. 

They also paid homage to Ice-T by 
telling us white kids — the future of 
America — that blacks see cops as 
their ancestors saw slave owners. 
“The law can be more criminal than 
the criminal,” Chuck D explained. 
When Flavor Flav took off his hat 
and glasses to say a few words about 
Ice-T I wished he’d left them on 
because suddenly he wasn’t like a 
cute prancing puppy dog anymore 
and he said “fuck” way too much . . . 

But Icc-T is a bad-ass. Whether 
he’s weaving in and out of his seven 
on-stage bodyguards or standing 
behind the “wheels of steel” to give 
Evil E the spotlight for a song, Ice-T 
is certainly worth the controversy. 


8-The GW Hatchet- Thursday, December 3, 1992 


Cool crop of albums heats up college airwaves 


ShdUyan Orphan 

- 


Shelleyan Orphan 


by Jennifer Mayne 

A coustic folk-oriented rock 
seems to be enjoying a renais- 
sance these days. With its third 
release, Humroot (Columbia), Shel- 
leyan Orphan is securing its place in this 
genre. Although not a stellar album, 
Humroot shows the group’s potential. 

The strongest aspect of Shelleyan 
Orphan’s music is its rhythmic empha- 
sis; some songs rely more on percussion 
than guitars. Variations on the prover- 
bial 4/4 time save several songs — 
“Fishes,” in particular — from 
becoming monotonous. 

Another distinctive aspect of 
Humroot is the use of unconventional 
instruments, which contributes to the 
exotic sound on “Muddied Up,” prob- 
ably the best song on the album. “Little 
Death” features an Irish-sounding jig 
played on a hurdy-gurdy and comple- 
mented by syncopated drum rhythms. 

The hometown of co-singer / 
songwriters Caroline Crawley and 
Jemaur Taylc is also the birthplace of 
poet Percy Shelley, which explains the 
group’s unusual name. Despite this 
literary background, however, the 
majority of Crawley and Tayle’s lyrics 
are dull, simple or even nonsensical. 
“Burst,” for example, is excellent in 
most respects, but suffers from silly 
lyrics: “Just burst / Uncontrollably 
burst / Down through the inside / Out 
through the outside.” 

Likewise, the vocals arc often weak. 
Crawley frequently has intonation prob- 
lems and Taylc’s voice slides around 
without direction. 

Humroot has its low points, but is 
somewhat redeemed by the group’s 
interesting rhythmic and instrumental 
choices. Though Shelleyan Orphan 
lacks the depth and instinct of a band 
such as The Sundays, its members arc 
certainly capable of making good 


Julian Cope 


by Deborah Solomon 


The album encompasses Cope’s 
entire career, including his stint with 
Teardrop Explodes. Floored Genius has 
songs from 1979 to 1991 and Cope’s 
most popular tunes — “World Shut 
Your Mouth,” “Beautiful Love” and 
“Charlotte Anne” are all featured on the 
album. 

The music is good and fortunately 
Cope did not decide to re-record the 
songs with funky mixes or electronic 
noise. The album contains the same 
tunes as you have heard them before. 
Two songs, however, are new to U.S. 
listeners. “Droolian” and “Skellington” 
have never been released here, so they 
are a nice break from the other 18 
predictable tracks. 

If you are a true Cope lover, then 
Floored Genius will definitely curb your 
appetite. Those who are not big fans of 
Cope will most likely enjoy this album 
as well since Cope’s music is eccentric 
and daring. His lyrics are often surpris- 
ing and so arc his live acts. The drugs 
Cope has taken have definitely affected 
him, but his art doesn’t suffer because of 
it. 

This “best of’ album is sure to keep 
Cope fans happy for awhile, but if it’s 
not enough and you can’t cope without 
another album, Jehovah Kill is sche- 
duled to be released on Dec. 8. 


M ost people who buy “best of’ 
albums tend to already like the 
artist whose work they are 
purchasing. It is rare for people to 
dislike greatest hits albums, so it will 
come as no surprise when Julian Cope 
fans begin to rave about his latest 
release, Floored Genius (Island). 


Julian Cope 


The 27 Various 


by Jennifer Batog 


/ /'W'WT here have I heard this 
•• %/%/ before?” is a question that 
T Y comes to mind when you 
first pop in the new release from the 
Minneapolis-based band The 27 Vari- 
ous. The new album. Fine (Twin / 
Tone) is just that. Fine. Not 
outstanding, not incredible, not awful, 
not the worst, just fine. 

The songs for the most part arc slow, 
melodic and pretty, but they sound like 
the best of the current popular alterna- 
tive bands such as James, Del Amitri, 
The Lemonheads and some mellow 
Pearl Jam. But there is a nostalgic qual- 
ity to the tunes that is hard to place at 
first. Then, during “Song for Julianna,” 
the album’s best song, it hits you. These 
guys sound kind of like ... the Beatles. 
Yes, the Beatles. Sort of. 

“Song for Julianna” opens with 
folksy mellow guitar and Ackcrson’s 
soft voice and then explodes into a 
Matthew Swcet-ish guitar riff that 


The 27 Various (1. to r.) Ed Ackerson, Bart Bakker and Mike Reiter 


carries along through the rest of the 
song. It’s a great song about love and 
life. The 27 Various uses this method of 
switching from slow to fast guitar riffs 
in just about all the songs on the album. 
Though it works well in this particular 
song, it can get boring and repetitive 
after the first five or so times. 

All in all Fine isn’t a bad effort. The 
27 Various’s next release could be an 
incredible one if it would step away 
from its influences and let its own style 
take over. It’s there somewhere, they 
just have to find it. Until then, if you like 
The Lemonheads, Del Amitri or any of 
those other alternative bands, this one’s 
for you. 

Cause and Effect 

by Steve Seibert 

C ause and Effect’s latest release. 
Another Minute (BMG) is well 
worth the cost. Although this 
Sacramento, Calif.-based band sounds 
distinctly like another derivative of 
Depeche Mode, its voice is crisp and 
clean. 

This 10-song, 50-minute collection 
contains some of the best pop music I 
have heard in the past few years. Not 
since bands such as Depeche Mode, 
New Order and Camouflage have I 
heard such clear synthesized pop. 
Kudos to Sean Rowley for bringing 
audible pleasure to eardrums 
everywhere. 

The two most notable songs on this 
album are “New World” and “Some- 
thing New.” “New World” begins with a 
wonderfully slow, surreal beginning, as 
if somebody is taking the listener 
through a journey in a dream machine. 
When the piano, drums and lyrics come 
in simultaneously, the effect is purely 
amazing. Both Rowe and Rowley 
deserve praise for the lyrics they co- 
wrote in this song and throughout the 
album. The other song, “Something 
New,” embodies the duo’s style 
throughout the entire album. The 
synthesizer is quite good and the lyrics 
are poetic and surrealistic. 

However, “You Think You Know 
Her,” “Farewell to Arms” and “Another 
Minute” all have problems establishing 
a tempo for the album and sticking with 


it. These songs detract slightly from the 
album. 

Another Minute is an album that you 
should go out and buy. I heartily recom- 
mend this to anyone who remotely likes 
Depeche Mode and wants something 
they can kick back and relax with and 
even party to. 

On Nov. 12, keyboardist / vocalist 
Sean Rowley, 23, died of cardiac arrest 
induced from an asthma attack. The 
attack occurred during the band’s sound 
check prior to its scheduled appearance 
at Glam Slam in Minneapolis, Minn. 
The group has canceled the remainder of 
its tour and will return to its hometown 
of Sacramento, Calif. Rowley was 
buried in Minneapolis Nov. 14 and is 
survived by his parents, Hugh and 
Verna Rowley and his brother Kevin. 

Blind Melon 

by Collin Hill 

T he show biz adage goes some- 
thing like, “It’s not what you 
know, it’s who you know,” and 
Blind Melon knows Axl and everyone 
knows Axl — Rose, that is. In the land 
of the L.A. hard-rock scene, there are a 
million bands that are all pretty good. 
Blind Melon is a good, likable band. It 
just doesn’t seem to be good enough to 
warrant the hype it’s received. 

Blind Melon’s music has an endear- 
ing charm that is surprising to find. The 
problem is its music lacks any real spark 
of originality. The band’s eponymous 
debut on Capitol Records sounds good, 
but the sounds have all been heard 
before. One minute they sound too 
much like Liquid Jesus, the next they 
don’t sound enough like Jane’s 
Addiction. 

Of course, I do like the album. The 
instrumentation is solid and in the 
catchy guitar vein. Songs such as 
“Change” and “No Rain” are perfect 
examples of this. They have a familiar 
feel to them. Each is a quality toc- 
tappin’ guitar ditty. The biggest draw- 
back to the album is Shannon Hoon’s 
reedy voice. It is reminiscent of Perry 
Farrell’s primal wail without the manic 
qualities. If you’re looking for a good 
guitar album lacking surprises, pick up 
Blind Melon. 









The GW Hatchet- Thursday, December 3, 1992-9 





Capital 


E ntefJlAi*’** 


nrnerrt 


suppl®^ 1 ®^ 


The genie introduces himself to Aladdin, his pet monkey Abu and 
their magic carpet. 

Disney magic won’t 
endure with Aladdin 


by Holger Stolzenberg 


O ver the years, Disney has produced 31 full-length animated features, 
including the newest film in its collection, Aladdin. It is only the sixth fairy 
tale which Disney has ever adapted to film and it Comes up short in 
comparison. 

The first animated fairy tale appeared in 1 937, when Disney released the classic 
film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and followed with treasures such as 
Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, The Little Mermaid and finally Beauty and the Beast, 

I which became the most successful animated feature in motion picture history. 
Aladdin is based on the myth of the genie and the lamp. Both the genie’s voice 
and personality are matched with actor / comedian Robin Williams, well known 
for his zany, off-the-wall comedic impressions. 

Despite giving one of the best performances of his life, Williams’ presence in 
the film will turn out to be a poor casting move by Disney in the grand scheme of 
things. Williams’ contemporary references take away from the historic Disney 
“classic” talcs. 

It is still possible to watch Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs 55 years later and 
get the exact same feeling that people did when it was released. The same holds 
true to the other four “classic” fairy tales, but not for this one. 

In 10, 20 or, God forbid, even 1 00 years from now, no one will be able to under- 
stand Williams’ references to William F. Buckley Jr. or Ed Sullivan. Williams has 
wasted the animators’ efforts and destroyed the perfect “classic” film. 

This is one of Disney’s few action / adventure animation films, however, which 
brings an Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark flavor to the movie. The 
sword fights, carpet rides and adventures give the songs more feeling than some of 
Disney’s others. Composer Alan Menken and the late lyricist Howard Ashman 
collaborated once again — as they did in The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the 
Beast — to do their third Disney film together. 

The tale begins as the evil vizier Jafar (Jonathan Freeman) is trying to retrieve 
the legendary lamp of the genie. However, it is held in “The Cave of Wonders” that 
| will only allow one trustworthy sole or a “diamond in the rough” to go in and 
tetrievc it. 

This youth turns out to be a street beggar, Aladdin (Scott Wcingcr) who is trying 
to escape from street life and become a more respectable citizen. Aladdin falls in 
love with the princess Jasmine (Linda Larkin), but knows that their love could 
never be. He successfully retrieves the lamp, but accidentally finds the genie 
(Williams). The genie offers Aladdin three wishes which change the rest of his life. 

Another voice that steals the show belongs to Jafar’s sidekick lago (Gilbert 
Gottfried). Iago, a parrot, steals some of the best one-liners and, with Williams, 
brings along the laughs. 

Jafar also is by far the most intriguing villain that Disney has put on the silver 
screen since Sleeping Beauty in the 1950s. 

The one thing that seems peculiar is that both Aladdin and the Princess Jasmine 
look similar to their counterparts in The Little Mermaid. One has to question why 
’bey couldn’t have made them look a bit different. 

Criticism and Williams’ contemporary references aside, I would recommend 
seeing the movie — within the next 20 years, of course — because it is funny and 
18 the best animated film among the latest three Disney films. 




ROBERT BEDFORD PRESENTS A FILM BY MICHAEL APTED 


i 

W 


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DECEMbER ?Rd 8/10:50 

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Meet the man Europa, Europa was based 
on! Solomon Perel is a German Jew who 
survived the horrors of World War II by 
concealing his Jewish identity. Living by 
his wits, he escaped Germany after 
Kristalnacht. He had adventures in Poland, 
Russia, and as a translater for a German 
officer, who was so impressed by this fine 
"Aryan " youth that he assigned him to an 
elite Hitler youth academy. 

His talk is free and open to the entire 
campus community. The program is 
co-sponsored by Hillel, the Program 
Board, and the Board of CImplains. 

Mr. Perel will also be joining us for 
Shabbat dinner before speaking; please 
come by Hillel by Thursday if you would 
like to sign up and pre-pay for this dinner. 


Friday, December 4 th 
8:30 PM at the Hillel Building 

Gewirz Center 2 300 H St. NW (202) 296-8873 





Program Board 


Board of 
Chaplains 





10-The GW Hatchet-Thursday, December 3, 1992 





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The GW Hatchet-Thursday, December 3, 1992-11 


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UPD replaces 5 cars 


with newer models 


The University Police Department has recently leased five new cars to replace 
older models now in operation on campus. 

The new cruisers, Chevrolet Luminas, will replace the Ford Crown Victoria 
models currently in service, UPD Senior Associate Director Dolores Stafford said. 
GW decided to switch to the Luminas after the three-year lease on the Crown 
Victorias ran out. 

UPD chose the Luminas because they offer some advantages over the old 
Crown Victorias, Stafford said. Among them, the Luminas’ smaller size will better 
enable it to maneuver in the tight city streets and the parking garage, UPD Director 
Timothy Murrell said. Additionally, the Luminas are easier to get in and out of in a 
hurry, Stafford added. 

Murrell also said the new cars’ smaller, V-6 engines are more fuel -efficient. 

The Luminas will bepainted with aspecial reflective paint, which will allow the 
cruiser to be seen at farther distances at night. 

Murrell said other than these differences the new cars arc basically the same as 
the older ones, and will still function as part of the campus escort service. 

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COME MEET AMERICA’S FUTURE 


12-The GW Hatchet-Thursday, 


Interview 


continued from p. 1 


put more students into the classroom. 
Merely offering more courses, without 
students taking these courses, would 
achieve a political purpose, but not an 
academic purpose. 

We are part of a consortium with 
Howard University. Howard has the 


December 3, 1992 

most splendid menu of offerings on 
African-related subjects and languages 
available in this country. The cross 
registration between Howard and GW is 
statistically insignificant. 

Universities need to be able to trade 
off strengths; everybody can’t duplicate 
what everybody else has. 

Q: Should an African studies class be 
required of all students in order to 
foster more interest? 

A: If you ask about African studies, it is 
reasonable to ask about all other minor- 
ity studies, maybe even gender and 


sexual orientation studies. It turns the 
curriculum into political football. 

Students need to know something 
beyond our own culture. All courses 
need to be appropriately inclusive so 
somebody who takes a course in Ameri- 
can history who doesn’t understand the 
role of immigrants, slavery or the Civil 
War can learn. 

What we did to the Native Americans 
in the West needs to be talked about, but 
not so that we can whip ourselves for our 
sins, rather because we don’t want to 
repeat history. 


President Stephen Joel Trachtenberg 
and 

The GW Inaugural Ball Committee 


request the pleasure of your company at 
The George Washington University 
Inaugural Ball in honor of 


President William Jefferson Clinton 
and 

Vice President Albert Gore, Jr. 


Wednesday, the twentieth of January 
Nineteen hundred and ninety-three at 
8 o'clock in the evening 


Cloyd Heck Marvin Center 
800 Twenty-first Street, N. W. 
in the City of Washington 


Black Tie Preferred 

Music by King James & the Serfs of Swing 


Tickets are twenty dollars per person and 
can be purchased at the GW hiaugural 
Ball Headquarters, Marvin Center 204. 
Advanced reservations are strongly 
suggested by January 13, 1993- 
For further information, please call 
(202) 994-7470. 


^Ihe 

^feiSmiton 

University 

^WASHINGTON DC* 


Q; How do you feel about the debate 
over research versus class time for 
professors? 

A: We have a generous arrangement for 
research at GW. It’s not a burning issue 
at GW. There is a strong commitment to 
teaching at the graduate and undergra- 
duate level. We recognize that our tap 
root as an institution is firmly embedded 
in our role as a transmitter of knowledge 
and skills as well as a source of new 
wisdom. 

Q: A lot of students have complaints 
about the “bureaucracy” at GW, such 
as running from department to 
department to get one thing accom- 
plished. How and when can you fix 
that? 

A: We ’ ve made some real progress; four 
years ago registration was still in the 
dark ages with students lining up to get 
classes. BANNER — when it is in 
place and working — will make life 
immensely easier. We are now going 
through the gestation period that comes 
with developing any kind of new 
system. It’s painful, but we have no 
choice except to plow on until we get it 
right. 


Q: A few years ago you were criticized 
for saying GW was a corporation. Do 
you think students view you as some- 
one who is more interested in them 
and improving their school, or some, 
one who is more interested in making 
money and a name for GW? 

A: The comment that I view GW as a 
corporation was taken out of context 
The point I was trying to make, and am 
trying to make now, is that not-for-profu 
organizations, whether it is a museum, 
library, or hospital, have got to run 
themselves in a businesslike way. They 
can’t afford to be casual with their 
resources or sloppy in their 
management. 

Q: Will tuition keep rising? 

A: We are trying to come up with a 
budget next year that will permit us to 
keep raises in tuition to absolute mini- 
mum. In order to do that, we need to 
keep our eye on every nickel and dime. 
However, the price of things is almost 
irrelevant if people cannot afford to pay. 
If the price of education gets way ahead 
of people’s ability to pay, then you have 
a problem. 


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Nov. 30 

• An employee reported the theft of two computer systems, a television, 
VCR and other property — valued at a total $8,640 — from the second and 
third floors of Building E. 

Nov. 25 

• A Milton Hall resident reported the theft of several clothing items from the 
hall’s basement laundry room. The theft occurred at approximately 10:40 a.m. 

Nov. 24 

• An employee reported the theft of a computer — valued at 
$1,909 — from a second floor office of Building AB, 2136 Pennsylvania Ave. 
N.W. There were no signs of forced entry. 

• A Riverside Towers Hall office assistant reported receiving approximately 
15 harassing telephone calls between 5:25 and 5:35 p.m. 

• An employee reported the theft of her purse — containing credit cards 
and identification — from a fourth floor office in Stuart Hall. The theft 
occurred between 11:15 a.m. and 1:10 p.m. 

• An employee reported the theft of her wallet — containing $ 1 0 and credit 
cards — from the first floor of Stuart Hall. The theft occurred at noon. 

Nov. 22 

§ A student reported the theft of her bookbag — containing her wallet, 
credit cards and other property — from the third floor of Gelman Library. The 
theft occurred at approximately 9 p.m. 

Nov. 21 

§ An employee reported the theft of a cellular telephone — valued at 
$500 — from iter car parked on the second level of the University Parking 
Garage. The theft occurred between 6:45 a.m. and 7:25 p.m. There were no 
signs of forced entry. 

• A student reported the theft of her bookbag from the music department on 
B-l level of the Academic Center. When the bookbag was later recovered from 
a men’s restroom in the Marvin Center, $30, a Maryland driver’s license, a 
checkbook, credit cards and an automated teller machine card were missing. 

Nov. 18 

• A student was assaulted on the 2100 block of Eye St. Four female students 
passed her on the street, two of whom turned around and followed her. The 
victim said one of the women pushed her and shouted racial slurs. The victim 
was not injured and was unable to describe the assailants. 

Nov. 17 

• A Thurston Hall resident reported the theft of $51 from a card sent to him 
by his mother. The student said he received the card Nov. 17 and discovered the 
envelope had been opened. The envelope was postmarked Nov. 16. 

Nov. 7 

• A visitor reported parking his car in a University parking lot at 7:30 p.m. 
and when he returned at 11:50 p.m. the car had been moved, with the front 
passenger window broken and rear view mirror damaged. The victim filed an 
attempted auto theft report with Metropolitan Police. 

-compiled by Elissa Lcibowitz 


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The GW 

Hatchet- Thursday, 

December 3, 1992-1: 

Crime 

Nov. 1 992 

’92 to Date 

’91 to Date 

Assault 

3 

14 

16 

Burglary 

2 

31 

6 

Destruction of Property 

1 

11 

14 

Drug Violation 

0 

0 

1 

Harassment 

7 

62 

63 

Indecent Exposure 

0 

1 

1 

Kidnapping 

0 

1 

0 

Murder 

0 

0 

0 

Rape 

0 

1 

1 

Robbery 

1 

6 

4 

Theft 

46 

356 

400 

Threats 

0 

11 

7 


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HOLLAND 23 

BRIGHAM 20 

SURLES 21 


3RIGHAM 26 

DARE 26 

5URLES 25 

>EARSALL 29 

dOSES 17 

IONES 17 

HOLLAND 15 

EVANS 9 

HART 8 

: ORD 4 

/VISE 3 

COLLETTE 2 


OTALS 


ERICH REPS MIN 


VRIGHT 38 

4BONU 40 

JERTHOL 19 

UNSTALL 36 

)OLES 5 

ALSTON 34 

'HOMAS 12 

: IELDS 9 


14-ihe CiW Hatchet-Thursday, December 3, 1992 


The Hot Corner 


Colonials outmatch 
Monmouth, Verich 


by Vince Tuss 

Sports Editor 

An inauguration long awaited in 
Washington finally took place Tuesday. 
Bill Clinton still has to wait until next 
month, but the GW men’s basketball 
team opened its season with a 76-54 
victory over Monmouth College in 
West Long Branch, N.J. The Colonials 
also wrapped up their exhibition games 
before Thanksgiving break with a 84-75 
win over the Verich Reps A.A.U. All- 
Stars Nov. 23 at the Smith Center. 

GW 76, Monmouth 54 

The offensive weapons carried GW 
(1-0) through the defensive lapses and 
opening-night jitters the team exper- 
ienced Tuesday. The Eagles were defi- 
nitely overmatched as they fielded six 
newcomers, three of which started 
against the Colonials. 

Still, Monmouth posed a challenge 
with its ball rotation and the three-man 
offensive weave. The home team’s pati- 
ence took advantage of GW defense to 
score in the half-court offense. Twin 

rMEN^SKT8AU^^6^0NMOUT>n71 


PEARSALL 27 
DARE 21 

MOSES 20 
JONES 14 

HART 11 

EVANS 10 

FORD 5 

WISE 5 

WITHERS. E. 2 
CALLOWAY 1 
WITHERS. M. 1 


BARNES 27 

FLYNN 19 

WRIEDT 32 

ZIEMIAN 19 

GIRALDO 36 

RYAN 23 

PETERS 20 

GORDON 8 

MARTIN 7 

BLUNDO ' 4 
MCCLELLAND 3 
HICKMAN 2 


2-3 1-1 2-5 2 

7-14 3-4 2-3 2 

0-1 0-0 0-2 1 

5-7 1-3 5-11 2 

2- 4 0-0 1-3 0 

1-6 2-3 1-2 2 

1-5 2-2 0-1 1 

3- 8 1-2 1-1 2 

0-1 0-0 0-0 0 

0-1 0-0 1-2 0 

0-1 0-0 0-1 0 

1-1 0-0 0-0 0 

0-0 0-0 0-0 0 


6-11 5-7 
1-6 0-0 
5-13 2-3 
0-5 0-0 


towers 7-0 center Steve Wriedt and 7-1 
forward Josh Peters also posed prob- 
lems underneath. Wriedt led the Eagles 
with 17 points and nine rebounds while 
point guard John Giraldo added 14, 
mostly from the outside. 

Nerves dominated the early going for 
GW. The team turned over the ball at the 
start with Dirkk Surles’ charging foul. 


On his first play of the game, Yinka 
Dare let the ball bounce off his hands out 
of bounds. Vaughn Jones left his 
uniform sitting in his locker at the Smith 
Center, which radio play-by-play man 
Larry Michael brought to the game. 

Eventually, the Colonials settled 
down, ripping off a 17-2 run midway 
through the second half to put the game 
definitely out of reach. Monmouth had 
cut the score to 48-41 with 1 1:58 left to 
play in the game off Peters’ baseline 
jumper. However, Jones scored seven 
points in the next five minutes while the 
Eagles turned over the ball three times to 
swing momentum. With 6:57 left, 
Monmouth found itself behind 65-43 
and out of the game. 

Surles led all scorers in the game with 
18 points, 12 of which came on fast- 
breaks in the first half. Sonni Holland 
and Yinka Dare added 1 1 , with Dare 
also pulling down 11 rebounds and 
blocking ’one shot. 

The first half revealed much for how 
the Colonials will run its season. GW 
head coach Mike Jarvis started a veteran 
line-up with Surles, Holland, Brigham, 
Alvin Pearsall and Robert “Nimbo’ 1 
Hammons. Yet by the seven-minute 
mark, Jarvis had all four of his newcom- 
ers in the game. GW used its depth to 
run a full-court pressure defense and 
forced 30 turnovers. No Colonial played 
more than 27 minutes as all 15 of the 
road squad entered the contest. 

Monmouth held a lead only once 
when it won the tip and scored the first 
basket of the game. From there, the visi- 
tors ran out on a 24-10 run in the next 
nine minutes. Monmouth kept it even 
from there, trailing 37-26 at halftime. 

GW 84, Verich Reps 75 

A game that started to resemble a 
blowout took a quick suspenseful turn, 
but GW clinched the 84-75 win with a 
one- handed dunk from Surles that gave 
the Colonials the emotional advantage. 

Verich cut GW’s lead to one point 
when guard Herman Alston drained two 
free-throws — two of his 31 points on 
the night — with 3 :25 left to play in the 
game. 

The Colonials brought the ball down- 
court and gave the ball to Surles, who 
attempted a three-point shot that fell 
way short and went out of bounds. 


Dirkk Surles (4) used his dunking ability to lead GW. P hotob y Djve J ackso " 


Verich Forward Dozze Mbonu took the 
ensuing inbound but traveled under- 
neath to turn over the ball. 

With 2:34 left, Surles took the ball on 
the baseline, went around Mbonu on the 
right and slammed the ball to give the 

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home team a 75-72 lead. From there, 
Verich scored only three more points 
while the home team posted nine to 
ensure a nine-point victory. 

Brigham led the team with 25 
points — mostly off putbacks from the 
double-teamed Dare’s misses — and 
16 rebounds. Surles scored 16 in the 


effort while Holland contributed 13 as 
well. 

The home team opened the game on a 
tear, roaring off 25 points in the first 
seven minutes of the game. It took the 
visitors 2:05 to score its first basket, off 
of guard Sean Tunstall’s jumper. Verich 
did not score again until Alston drove 
the lane for a lay-up with eight minutes 
gone in the first half. 

“It was a different kind of test,” Jarvis 
said. “It was a matter of who with how 
many points would take control to win 
the game. We learned many valuable 
lessons. It did more good this way than 
going from 22-2 to 44-4 in the first 
half.” 

From there Verich found its scoring 
touch and ran off a 14-4 stretch and 
stayed even with the Colonials with the 
rest of the half to trail 46-33 at halftime. 
The visitors shot a dismal 11-33 in the 
first half, partly because it was coming 
off a last-minute loss to the U.S. Naval 
Academy the night before. 

Dunks — GW heads for the sunny 
environs of Florida to take part in the 
Hatter Classic at Stetson University in 
DeLand, Fla. The Colonials face 
Central Michigan University Friday at!) 
p.m. while Stetson plays Bethune- 
Cookman College at 7 p.m. the same 
day. The consolation game between the 
two losers occurs Saturday at 7 p.m. 
with the championship match at 9 p.m. 


Rosters grow with addition of seven recruits 


by Vince Tuss 

Sports Editor 

The end of November brings the end of early recruiting period and seven 
athletes have signed with GW for the 1993-94 season. Women’s basketball head 
coach Joe McKeown came away with the jackpot with four recruits, while baseball 
has found two and men’s basketball grabbed one. 

Leading the class for the Colonial Women is Colleen McCrca, a 5-8 guard from 
South Hunterdon High School in Lambcrtville, N.J. where she averaged 20.3 
points, 7.4 rebounds, 7.2 assists and 5.4 steals per game last season. She was an 
All-State selection of the Newark Star-Ledger last year and led her team to the 
Group I State Title in 199 1. Street and Smith ’spul her as a fourth-team high school 
All-American. 

McCrca is also first in her class with a 4.9 grade point average. Stanford Univer- 
sity, which won the NCAA women’s basketball tournament last season, also 
pursued her. 

GW also signed Tajama Abraham, a 6-2 power forward from Kecoughtan High 
School in Hampton, Va. For the Warriors last season, she averaged 23 points, 1 1 
rebounds and4.5 blocks a game. Street and Smith’* listed her as a sixth-team high 
school All-American this year and an eastern honorable mention in 1990-91. The 
University of Virginia was also recruiting her. 

McKeown reemited 5-1 1 guard / forward Lisa Ccrmignano front Gloucester 
Catholic High School in Mount Royal, N.J. and 6-1 power forward Carrie Goheen 
from North Allegany High School in Wexford, Pa. Ccrmignano scored 22 points 
and 8.5 rebounds a game last season while Goheen averaged 15.1 points and 8.7 


rebounds. 

Mike Gargiulo and Lance Migita push the roster of the baseball team to 36, tte 
largest number since head coach Jay Murphy joined the team as an assistant six 
years ago. “We have an excellent nucleus and ultimately hope to develop into a 
regional power,” Murphy said. “These guys can help us get there.” 

Migita, who bats and throws righthanded, transfers from the College of the 
Canyons in Canyon County, Calif., but attended the University of Southern Cali- 
fornia as a freshman and sophomore. This summer, he played under Murphy on the 
Little Falls (N.Y.) Diamonds in the Northeast Collegiate Baseball League. While 
there, he hit .356 with 17 stolen bases leading off and playing center field. Migil* 
w'as named to the league’s all-star team. 

Gargiulo, another righty, comes from Bishop McDevitt High School in Harris- 
burg, Pa. where he hit .430 as the starting catcher and team captain. He was 
selected to the Capital City Regional Team and a Mid-10 Conference All-Star, as 
well as a first-team choice of the Patriot News. i 

Men’s basketball rounds out the signccs w'ith 6-11, 240-pound center Rene i 
Harry, who was bom in Trinidad and Tobago, but graduated front Cordozo High 
School in Washington, D.C. last year. He is currently attending Worcester (Mass) 
Academy. 

“He’s a young, promising player that we classify as a project,” head coach Mite 
Jarvis said. “He’s very intelligent and a honor student, but he’s probably achieved 
more in the band than on the basketball court.” Harry has played for only a couple 
years and Jarvis said he chose him more for his size and athletic ability rather than 
numbers, which he would not give. 


Blood 


Feud 


Sports is such an ugly arena for 
discrimination. The Negro Leagues, 
Title IX, A1 Campanis, Jimmy the 
Greek, they all still leave a lingering 
feeling of guilt after they are 
supposedly resolved. This whole 
issue with Marge Schott’s remarks to 
a former employee of hers smacks of 
the same, but another issue of discri- 
mination exists that hits closer to 
home and receives none of the atten- 
tion that Schott’s words have. 

The NCAA men’s and women’s 
basketball rules committees have 
instituted a rule that a bleeding 
player must leave a game and have 
the wound treated before returning. 
The NBA has a similar rule, which 
originated last season when Magic 
Johnson announced he was HIV 
positive. It’s not protecting against 
AIDS, but it’s standardizing the 
rules. Plus, it’s good common sense. 
All wounds should be treated for the 
player’s sake. If the NCAA stopped 
there, I wouldn’t have a worry. 

But it didn’t. The NCAA extended 
the rule to also say that if a player has 
blood on the uniform, the player 
can’t re-enter the game until the 
uniform has been washed in a disin- 
fectant or change to a clean one. 

What’s wrong with this picture? 
How docs regulating blood on the 
uniform deal with AIDS prevention? 
Sports Illustrated estimated that a 
player has the same chance of catch- 
ing HIV from blood on a player’s 
uniform as a soccer player docs of 
getting struck by lightning while 
standing on a field on a sunny day. 

If the NCAA wants to protect its 
athletes and all college students from 
AIDS — as it should — it should 
sponsor education programs for its 
players and others on how it is truly 
transmitted and ways to protect 
against it. Efforts such as this rings of 
discrimination versus people who 
are HIV positive. 

Without truly knowing how AIDS 
is transmitted — by unprotected 
sex, the use of dirty hypodermic 
needles or contaminated blood not 
exposed to oxygen — this measure 
alienates against HIV positive 
people. If someone is told they need 
to be protected from clothing, there 
is no way they will want to come near 
someone who has HIV or AIDS. 
That’s just wrong. College is here to 
educate and the NCAA is failing in 
that mission. 

These rules only contribute more 
to the AIDS hysteria this entire coun- 
try faces because of the uninformed. 
There has not been a proven case that 
athletic injuries could transmit 
AIDS. There isn’t even a realistic 
hypothetical example. To truly end 
this epidemic, we must all work 
together, help and comfort those 
infected with viable solutions. Fear 
of infection by unrealistic means 
only pushes us backwards. 

We say on the basketball court if 
there’s no blood, there’s no foul. 
With the NCAA, this is a case in 
which the aim of no blood causes a 
foul of tremendous order. 


-Vince Tuss 




The GYV Hatchet-Thursday, December 3, 1992-15 



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Volleyball gets invite 
to national tourney 


by James Dinan 

Hatchet Sports Writer 

The GW volleyball team will 
compete in the 1992 National Invita- 
tional Volleyball Championship this 
week. The Colonial Women were 
accepted to compete in this 20-tcam 
tournament, which will be held at the 
Municipal Auditorium in Kansas City, 
Mo. This is GW’s first appearance in a 
post-season competition since 1981, 
when they finished second in the East- 
ern Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics for Women (EAIAW) 
tournament. 

GW head coach Susie Homan, who 
was named Atlantic 10 “Coach- of-thc- 
Ycar” this week by the conference’s 
head coaches, said she cannot wait Tor 
this competition to begin. “It reels great. 
It’s been one of our goals since the 
beginning of the season, so really as a 
team we cannot think of a better way to 
end our season. We want to go out and 
be as successful as we can,” she said. 

The Colonial Women will compete 
with four other teams in their bracket in 
thcNIVC tournament. On Friday, GW 
will take on Murray State University at 2 
p.m. and then face Northern Illinois 
University at 7 p.m. On Saturday, the 
Colonial Women battle Southwest 
Missouri State University at 1 1 :30 a.m., 
followed at 3:30 p.m. by Loyola Mary- 
mount University. The winners of the 
four brackets will face off Tor the N1VC 
championship on Sunday, with the 
semifinals at 10 a.m. and the champion- 
ship match at 1 p.m. All times arc 
Central Standard. 

Homan said she expects four tough 
matches for GW and offered a short 
preview on each team. “Murray Stale 
seems to be an aggressive team. They go 
primarily to their outside hitters and 
they have a couple of good athletes,” she 
said. “Overall, though, we are a better 
leant. As long as we do the things that 
we do well, I think we should be able to 
beat them. 

“Northern Illinois is a good team that 
is very well-balanced,” she said. “They 
have strength in both the middle and 
outside. They arc currently ranked ninth 
in the NCAA Mideast Region. This will 


AP WOMEN'S TOP 25 


I RNK 

SCHOOL 

RECORD 

POINTS 

|T7 

STANFORD (69) 

30-3 

1,797 

2. 

TENNESSEE (3) 

28-3 

1,719 

3. 

VANDERBILT 

22-9 

1,512 

4. 

MARYLAND 

25-6 

1,507 

5. 

WESTERN KENTUCKY 

27-8 

1,459 

6. 

VIRGINIA 

32-2 

1,436 

7. 

IOWA 

25*4 

1,416 

8. 

S.F. AUSTIN 

28-3 

1,216 

9. 

SOUTHERN CAL 

23-8 

1,043 

10. 

TEXAS 

21-10 

1,018 

11. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON 

25-7 

780 

12. 

MISSISSIPPI 

29-3 

775 

13. 

SW MISSOURI STATE 

30-3 

758 

14. 

ALABAMA 

23-7 

675 

15. 

TEXAS TECH 

27-5 

669 

16. 

KANSAS 

25-6 

639 

17. 

PURDUE 

23-7 

619 

18. 

GEORGIA 

19-11 

552 

19. 

LOUISIANA TECH 

20-10 

466 

20. 

MIAMI 

30-2 

444 

|21. 

CONNECTICUT 

23-11 

437 

1 22. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

21-9 

286 

23. 

PENN STATE 

24-7 

262 

124. 

AUBURN 

17-12 

239 

25. 

COLRADO 

22-9 

233 


OTHER RECEIVING MORE THAN 10 VOTES: CLEMSON 172; 
s. uinois 136; Arizona st. 123; Georgia tech 105; 
0**0 ST. 102; NORTHWESTERN 91 ; WASHINGTON 69; 

Creighton 65; depaul 53; Wisconsin 45; ucla 43; 

CAL 42; NEBRASKA 4 1 ; VERMONT 40; GEORGETOWN 29; 

27; N. CAROLINA ST. 25; N. ILLINOIS 23; S. MISS 21 ; 
0YU 16; BOWLING GREEN 1 5; XAVIER 1 5; LONG BEACH 
ST - 13; Toledo 12; Houston 10 
THIS IS THE AP PHESEASON POLL 

records are from last season 


definitely be our toughest match on 
Friday and probably for the entire pool 
play.” 

“Southwest Missouri State is a very 
experienced team. We know that they 
have a strong middle and a very good 
setter. They have been in the NCAA 
tournament many times and their coach 
has over 700 career wins, so I expect this 
to be a tough match all-around,” Homan 
said. 

“1 think Loyola Marymount will be a 
very' experienced, ball-controlled type 
team. They don’t have a Svetlana 
Vtyurina-typc player on their team, but 
they arc very controlled players and arc 
very experienced overall,” Homan said. 
“Basically, their play is similar to BYU- 
Hawaii, where they just attempt to force 
you to make the errors.” 

All in all, Homan said she was 
impressed with her team’s performance 
this year, which went from 10-24 in 
1991-92 to a 27-7 record and a No. 14 
ranking in the latest NCAA Midcast 
Region volleyball poll. “I’m very 
happy. We started last January to work 
on this season. Our athletes have been 
very dedicated to our goals. This is 
really the end to our 12-month goal, so 
we expected to do better,” she said. 

“In terms of numbers concerning 
wins and losses,” Homan added, “I 
don’t think we set an exact number of 
victories to achieve, but certainly we 
had matches and targeted wins through- 
out the season. All of our athletes, have 
contributed greatly into making this a 
successful season.” 

In other GW volleyball news, outside 
hitter Svetlana Vtyurina was named the 
A-lO’s “Playcr-of-thc-Ycar” by the 
conference’s head coaches. Vtyurina 
currently leads the nation with a 5.99 
kills per game average. She also leads 
the A-10 with a .371 attack percentage 
and 67 aces. 

Joining Vtyurina on the All- 
Conference first team arc setter Tracy 
Webster and hitter Kelly McCarty. 
Hitter Liz Martin made the All- 
Conference second team. Also, Webster 
and outside hitter Jennifer Gray made 
the A-10 Academic All -Conference 
first team. 


AP MEN'S TOP 25 


RNK 

SCHOOL 

RECORD 

POINTS 

1. 

MICHIGAN (19) 

0-0 

1,526 

2. 

INDIANA (14) 

4-0 

1,524 

3. 

KANSAS (19) 

0-0 

1,523 

4. 

DUKE (13) 

0-0 

1,504 

5. 

KENTUCKY 

0-0 

1,365 

6. 

SETON HALL 

3-1 

1,233 

7. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

0-0 

1,216 

8. 

MEMPHIS STATE 

0-0 

1,193 

9. 

ARIZONA 

0-0 

1,074 

10. 

IOWA 

0-0 

861 

11. 

FLORIDA STATE 

2-2 

752 

12. 

LOUISVILLE 

0-0 

737 

13. 

GEORGIA TECH 

0-0 

703 

14. 

GEORGETOWN 

0-0 

693 

15. 

OKLAHOMA 

0-0 

656 

16. 

UCLA 

3-1 

600 

1?. 

SYRACUSE 

0-0 

458 

18. 

MICHIGAN STATE 

0-0 

417 

19. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

0-0 

331 

20. 

TULANE 

1-1 

299 

21. 

NEW MEXICO STATE 

3-0 

291 

22. 

CINCINNATI 

0-0 

276 

23. 

UNLV 

0-0 

264 

24. 

PURDUE 

1-0 

257 

25. 

CONNECTICUT 

0-1 

211 


OTHER RECEIVING MORE THAN 10 VOTES: NEBRASKA 
201 ; iowa st. 169; Texas 120; byu 84; Illinois 68; 
cal 63; Florida 57; utah 53; unc charlotte 4 1 ; 
GEORGIA 36; EVANSVILLE 34; AUBURN 32; BOSTON 
COLLEGE 31 ; OHIO ST. 29; WAKE FOREST 28; OREGON 
st. 23; ARKANSAS 17; GEORGE WASHINGTON 14; 
S. ILLINOIS 14; TENNESSE 14 

RECORDS AS OF NOV. 30 



The Colonial Women will come together again at the NIVC this weekend 


photo by Sloan Ginn 



Warm Wishes 

sj# •> 

V 


Cheers . 
to You! 


Since' 1952 

Greetings are Full Color • Envelopes Included 


Create your own cards this Season witli your favorite color 
photo and one of these colorful sentiments. Come in and 
see our complete holiday selection. 


Rife, 

Crisman 

earn 

honors 

GW women’s soccer players Beth 
Rife and Jenny Crisman earned posi- 
tions on the 1992 National Soccer Asso- 
ciation of America’s (NSCAA) Central 
Region All-America Team. Rife was 
named to a spot on the first team while 
Crisman was placed on the second team. 
Both helped to lead the Colonial 
Women to an 8-8-2 record this past 
season. 

Rife, a senior and co-captain along 
with Crisman and junior goalkeeper 
Kerry Dziczkaniec, totaled nine goals 
and seven assists for 25 points on the 
year for GW at forward. She led the 
team in scoring and was ranked 1 8th in 
the Central Region. She ends her career 
with the Colonial Women with 23 goals 
and 15 assists for 61 points in 79 games. 

Crisman, also a senior and captain, 
played 79 of GW’s 81 matches during 
her four-year career as a defender. In 
1992, she scored one goal and four 
assists, ending her years at GW with five 
goals and 12 assists for 22 points 
overall. 


-Vince Tuns 


University 
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16-The GW Hatchet-Thursday, December 3, 1992 



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Real Estate For Sale 


Why rent when you can own for less? Fully furnished 
one bedroom condominium in The President with 
hardwood floors, full kitchen with dishwasher and 
disposal, 550 sq. feet, block from metro, available 
immediately, $59,500. Prudential Preferred Properties, 


Learn WordPerfect. Lotus, DOS at your home, evenings, 
weekends. TMF- 703-764-8890 

SAME DAY TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING. 

2025 Penn Avenue., #226. Term papers, theses, forms, 
letters, etc. Student Discount. 202-857-8000. 

Termpapers, reports, thesis, laser printing/ floppy disk. 
$1/ page. 301-598-0339 


Vast academic, legal and business experience. Word- 
processing, editing, writing. Papers, dissertations, 
books, resumes, cover letters, proposals. Student 
discount. Joan: 703-527-2151. 

WORD PROCESSING. TAPE TRANSCRIPTION. 
PU&D. OPEN 24 HOURS. 301-434-2412/ 
202-965-0247 


For Sale - Misc. 


Computers for sale. One portable 20MB hard drive and 
floppy drive. $600 O.B.O. One stationary 2 hard disk 
drives and EGA monitor. $400 O.B.O. Call Deanna 
301-604-9660. 

For Sale: Ibanez Electric guitar w/hard case: $110 or 
best; Queen size Futon w/frame: $120 or best; call Jim 
703-527-3821. ~ 

For sale: Blk Couch, white dresser and desk etc. Call 
202-296-9104, good prices. 


Macintosh computer. Great for word processing. All 
software included. Exc. cond. $350 O.B.O. 
202-994-9743 

Top Brand Electronics direct to you at low wholesale 
prices call 301-572-8000. 



HEALTHY WOMEN WANTED AS EGG DONORS. 
Help infertile couples. Confidentiality insured. Ethnic 
diversity desirable. Ages 21-33. Excellent 
compensation. Contact the Genetics & IVF Institute, 
Fairfax, VA (703) 698-3909. 

Need help with statistical analysis for your thesis or 
dissertation? Call Chet Robie at 202-588-9720. $15/ hr. 
References available upon request. 


Help Wanted 


A part time office assistant needed immediately with 
good handwriting and communication skills. Please call 
Sherry 202-234-3531. 


Busy downtown athletic club seeks energetic front desk 
person. Hours available 10:30am- 3:30pm or 3:00- 
8:00pm. Free membership included. Ask for Laura, 
202-659-9573 

Busy downtown athletic club seeks energetic morning 
person for front desk position 6:15- 10:30 am. Free club 
membership. Ask for Laura 202-659-9573. 


CASHIER. $7/HR. Lively stationary store across from 
Federal Triangle Metro, Old Post Office Pavillion. Good 
personality, references required. Days, Evenings, and 
weekends part time. Hours flexible. 202-289-4160 


Card and gift shop, part time and temporary positions for 
Christmas break and Spring semester. 2 Metro stops 
from campus. Flexible hours, safe area. Call Balloons 
USA at High Browse 202-737-3311. 

EARN $300+ per week delivering roses for ROSEx- 
press. Experience necessary. Knowledge of VA. MD 
and DC a plus. Must have own car, insurance and good 
driving record. 202-842-1000 or 200 K St NW. 


$$$$, FREE TRAVEL AND RESUME EXPERIENCEIt 
Individuals and Student Organizations wanted to prom- 
ote SPRING BREAK, call the nation's leader. Inter- 
Campus Programs 1-800-327-6013 


GWU Police Department seeking photographer for 
B&W poster series. Fee negotiable. Send sample: 
Poster photos, GWUPD, Woodhull House. WDC 20052. 
Info contact: John Stafford 202-994-6110. Closes 

12-11-92. 

LOOKING FOR A FUN LEARNING EXPERIENCE? 
The Campus Activities Office is seeking outstanding 
work study students for the Spring semester. 

For more information contact Danita 

Campus Activities 

Marvin Center 427 994-6555 


Part time position for psychology/speech pathology 
major to work with three year old learning disabled boy. 
Flexible week day hours. McLean, VA location. Call 
703-893-4806. 

SEASONAL EMPLOYMENT! GREENPEACE is hiring 
students I Call M-F before noon to schedule an interview, 
202-667-7814, Ask fo / John. 

Shop Assistants Needed PT for retail florist, $6+ per 
hour, mornings 8-1 Monday- Friday, customer service, 
light typing skills necessary, call 202-842-1000 or apply 
at ROSExpress. 200 K St NW. 


Valet Parkers needed for summer/year round F/T & P/T 
positions. Men & Women please apply. Must have valid 
drivers license & able to drive manual transmission. 
$4.80/HR plus tips, flexible hours. E.E.O.E. call Mr. 
Wurz 202-466-4300. 

WERE EXPANDING OUR STUDENT NETWORK! 
EARN $50 TO $600+- WEEKLY IN YOUR SPARE 
TIME! BE AMBITIOUS, CALL LOGITEL 800-697-0288 


Hop^CullerWw^02^59-5900Mh^202-232-7jH4^^ 



■ IVWMI ■ IVU 




Professional Resume $18. Free delivery at G'W. 20 tree, 
laser copies. 703-764-8890 


RESUME TYPESETTING. Same day service OK. 
Located on campus. 202-857-8000. 


UNIVERSITY RESUMES 
SAVE $5 W/COUPON 

from Career Center or GW Student Handbook. 

Your resume produced on campus ($25.00 standard 
rate), includes 10 free copies at Kinko's Copies, and 
free storage for 1 year. Available for you as a service of: 
The GW Hatchet 

Marvin Center 436 / 800 - 21st Street, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20052 
(202) 994-7079 


Services 


Internships 


EDITORIAL ASSISTANCE. Term papers, theses, etc. 
Wordprocessing, laser printing. 301-652-1255 


For expert TUTORING in Physics. Inorganic Chemistry. 
The MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP PROGRAM at Pre-Calculus, Calculus- CALL 301-422-2222. 

American Youth Hostels has intern position openings for 

Spring '93. For more information, call 202-783-0717. Math Tutor. Calculus. Statistics. Economics. Satisfac- 

tion guaranteed. Call Joseph 703-841-9681. 

INTERNSHIPS in Jewish Communal organizations- 

wide variety of maiors. Call 301-468-3422 for free listina. »■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 


= Resumes 

WHY? 

Reason #7 

GW GRADS 
DESERVE THE BEST 

Mon. thru Fri. 

8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

GW HATCHET RESUME SERVICE 
MARVIN CENTER 436 
800 - 21 st Street, Northwest 
Washington, D.C. 20052 
(202) 994-7079 

NOW GET 10 FREE COPIES 
AT KINKO'S COPIES 


Non-Stop Air • (7) Nights Hotel • Taxes • Club 
Discounts • Transfers • Activities Program 

CANCUN. from $399 

BAHAMAS. from $409 

JAMAICA from $439 

SOUTH PADRE. from $469 

FLORIDA (hotel only) ZtO/T? $109 

® For free brochure call 

Breakaway Travel 
1-800-862-7325 

(Deposits due by December 15) 


FAX 

YOUR 

RESUME 

NOW, Fax your 
resume to 
The GW Hatchet 
Resume Service. 
•It's quicker! 
•It's easier! 

•It's a dollar 
more per page 

GW HATCHET RESUME SERVICE 
FAX 202-994-1309 
WE ACCEPT VISA & MASTERCARD 


Opportunities 


BARTENDING Good times, good pay. flexible hours. 
1,2-week classes. Placement assistance. On Metro. 
703-841-9700 

III SAVE $60 OFF BROCHURE RATESIII 
III SIGN UP BY 12/10/92 FOR THIS SAVINGSIII 
III HEATWAVE VACATIONS SPRING BREAK 1993111 
III CALL 1-800- 395-WAVEIII 


| Work Study | 
Housing Offered 


WORK STUDY STUDENT NEEDED: 10-20 hours a 
week. $7.50 hr. Typing and errands. Gelman 613. 
202-676-7106. 


1 M/F needed to have own BR in spacious 3 BR apt. in 
Crystal City. Balcony, pool, full kitchen. Block to metro. 
$400 utilities & parking included. 703-920-3835. 


APARTMENTS FOR RENT Furnished/ Unfurnished 
about 590. Utilities included, minimum lease 3 months. 
2400 Penn Ave NW 202-333-2400. 


The Nation's #1 Holiday Party! 
SYJP Presents... 

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Tickets for all cities available at 
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G.G. Flipps 

MONDAY - FRIDAY 

ALL YOU CAN EAT INDIAN BUFFET $5.95 

1 1:30 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. 

TUESDAY NIGHT - ALL YOU CARE TO DRINK DRAFTS 

$2 cover 

Half-price burgers 
9:00 - 11:00 p.m. 

THURSDAY NIGHT - ALL YOU CARE TO DRINK 

$7 cover 

Drafts, rail drinks & cordials 
8:00 - 1 1:00 p.m. 

FRIDAY NIGHT - PARTY NIGHT! 

50 1 drafts 

$1 Bud/Bud Light bottles 
Half-price burgers 
8:00 - 11:00 p.m. 

SATURDAY NIGHT - ALL YOU CARE TO DRINK DRAFTS 

$5 cover 

7:00 - 11:00 p.m. 

D.J . EVERY NIGHT 

G.G. Flipps • 915 21st St. • 466-5567 

All credit cards accepted • Age ID required • DRINK RESPONSIBLY