Skip to main content

Full text of "Henry VIII"

See other formats


JFoi 



FOUNDED BY 



GOLDWlN SMITH 
HARRIET SA\ITH 



1901 



J 



HANDHOUND 
AT THE 



HENMCVS DEJ C*A KE-X ANCUE 




HENRY Vlll 

FROM A LINE ENGRAVING BY CORNELIS MATSYS . 



( 

THE LIVES OF THE KINGS 

EDITED BY CHARLES WHIBLEY 



THE TRIUMPHANT REIGNE OF 

KYNG HENRY THE VIII 

VOL. I 



Limited to 500 numbered copies for 
sale in the United Kingdom 



THE LIVES OF THE KINGS 



HENRY VIII 

BY EDWARD HALL 

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY 

CHARLES WHIBLEY 



VOLUME I 




i 

^- 

'$/"' 



I 



LONDON: T. C. fif E. C. JACK 

34 HENRIETTA STREET, W.C., AND EDINBURGH 

1904 



1904, 
v, ( 



Edinburgh: T. and A. CONSTABLE, Printers to His Majesty 



INTRODUCTION 



EDWARD HALL, the eloquent panegyrist of Henry 
VIII., was born in London towards the end of the 
fifteenth century. His parents, 1 of gentle birth 
and affluent circumstances, gave their son the best educa- 
tion that the time afforded, and from Eton he proceeded, 
in 1514, to King's College, Cambridge, where he took 
his degree in due course. In the spurious edition of 
Wood's Athena it is claimed that he also studied at Oxford, 
but there is no evidence that he visited the other 
University, and the credit of his nurture is due to Cam- 
bridge alone. After leaving Cambridge, he entered Gray's 
Inn, where he speedily became eminent in the practice of the 
law. John Bale praises his eloquence and erudition, as well 
he might, since they were of the same side both in politics 
and theology. ' Edvuardus Hallus,' says the historian of 
English writers, ' politioribus a tenera aetate literis adornatus, 
' ex longo Brytannicarum legum studio, peritissimus evasit.' 
Nor did his industry and learning go without their reward. 
In 1532 he was appointed Common Serjeant of the City of 
London, and presently became a judge in the Sheriff's Court. 
Though, like many a greater man than himself, he has 
baffled the biographer, his name occurs now and again in the 

1 His father was John Hall, of Northall, in Shropshire, while his mother was 
Catherine, the daughter and heiress of Thomas Gedding. Herbert, quoted in 
Ames's Typographical Antiquities, gives him an august ancestry. ' These Halles,' 
says he, 'were of Kinnersley and Northall, in the county of Salop, and descended 
from Sir Francis Halle, a natural son of Albert, Archduke of Austria, King of the 
Romans, so called from being born at the city of Halle, in Tyrol.' The statement 
is improbable and unsupported. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



VI 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



records of the time, and it is safe to conclude that his career 
was successful, as well as prudent. He was, as Fuller says, 
' well-affected to the Reformation ' ; he adhered, in pro- 
sperity as in disaster, to the King's party; and he was 
not allowed to suffer for his faithful allegiance. That the 
King can do no wrong was the maxim of his life, as of his 
book ; and he followed Henry VIII. through the twists 
and turns of his tortuous policy with a patient submissive- 
ness which was safe, if not always creditable. Not merely 
did he approve the 'abolishing' of the papal power and the 
declaration of the King's supremacy ; he made a speech in 
the Commons in favour of the Six Articles, that whip with 
six strings, as the people called it, which relentlessly undid 
the work of reform. His argument was characteristic : ' To 
' be short,' said he, ' in chronicles it may be found that the 
' most part of ceremonies now used in the Church of 
' England were by princes either first invented, or at the 
' least established ; and, as we see, the same do till this 
' day continue.' Thus he would permit neither the Clergy 
to propound and defend its doctrines, nor his fellow-citizens 
to exercise their private judgment. Moreover, he closed 
his harangue with a text wherewith he was ready to justify 
the last cruelties of his sovereign. ' For it is written,' 
exclaimed he, ' obey your King.' And he obeyed his King 
with a zeal, which he esteemed more highly than the truth, 
and which ensured his employment on many delicate occa- 
sions. He was one of the London Commissioners appointed 
in 1540 for the suppression of heresy; he visited Anne 
Askew in her cell, in the hope of hearing her recanta- 
tion ; and by way of recompense for his many services 
he received a grant of Abbey lands, which doubtless was a 
solace to his later years. We last hear of him as Member 
of Parliament for Bridgnorth, and in 1547 he died, thus 
escaping from the vengeance of Mary, which, had he 

survived, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



Vll 



survived, would surely have fallen upon him. But the 
punishment which he avoided fell upon his family and his 
book. In 1555 his father and mother were in Newgate, 
receiving letters from John Bradford ' for the testimony of 
' the gospel,' while in the same year his book was burned 
by the Queen's command, and thus rendered a rarity for 
all time. 

And perhaps it was fitting that the book should be punished 
rather than the man, for the book is by far the more im- 
portant. The deeds that were done by Edward Hall are 
uncertain and fall short of fame. His Chronicle of England 
is a possession for all time. The title justly indicates the 
scope and purpose of the book. ' The Union of the two 
' noble and illustrate famelies of Lancastre and Yorke,' thus 
it runs in the high-sounding terms of Tudor prose, f beeyng 
' long in continual discension for the croune of this noble 
' realme, with all the actes done in bothe the tymes of the 
' Princes, both of the one linage, and of the other, beginnyng 
' at the tyme of Kyng Henry the Fowerth, the first aucthor 
' of this devision, and so successively proceadyng to the reigne 
' of the high and prudent prince, King Henry the Eight, 
' the indubitate flower, and very heire of both the sayd 
' linages.' The last words give you a clue to Hall's aim and 
ambition. ' The indubitate flower, and very heire of both 
' the sayd linages ' : such is the true and only hero of his 
book King Henry VIII. The lives of this sovereign's 
predecessors do but lead on to his nobler renown. The 
deeds, which they accomplished, are only memorable because 
they prepared the way for the mighty achievements of the 
most splendid monarch that ever sat upon a throne. In 
brief, the Chronicle, so far as the death of Henry VII., is 
but a preface. And the author has marked the distinction 
with perfect clarity both in style and measure. He did not 
handle the facts which he learned from others with the same 

fulness 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



Vlll 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



fulness and circumstance wherewith he described the events 
of his own time, and the 'Triumphant Reign of Henry Fill., 
as Hall proudly styles it, is in all respects a separate and 
coherent biography. 

The twofold nature of the work is illustrated also by the 
diverse opinions which the critics have held concerning its 
style. It is Roger Ascham, in his Scholemaster, who put 
the case against Hall with the greatest ingenuity. He 
points out in a well-known passage that some kind of 
Epitome may be profitably used by men of skilful judg- 
ment : ' as if a wise man,' says he, ' would take Halle's 
' Chronicle, where moch good matter is quite marde with 
' Indenture Englishe, and first change strange and ink- 
' home tearmes into commonlie used wordes : next, specially 
c to wede out that, that is superfluous and idle, not 
' onlie where words be vainlie heaped one upon an other, 
' but also where many sentences, of one meaning, be 
' so clowted up together as though M. Hall had bene, not 
' writing the storie of England, but varying a sentence in. 
' Hitching schole.' Thus Ascham ; and then on the other 
hand we find Hearne, the Antiquary, and many another critic 
praising the ' masculine style ' and direct utterance of the 
Chronicle. At first sight it would seem impossible to 
reconcile the opposing judgments, but a little thought 
will show that both are fair. Until he came to the reign 
of Henry VIII., Hall ' compiled and conjoyned ' his work 
out of widely-gathered materials. He overlooked none of 
the familiar authorities. The French and Latin chronicles, 
Hector Boetius, Johannes Major, Jean Bouchet, Polydore 
Vergil, who presently equalised the debt by borrowing from 
Hall, Trevisa, Sir Thomas More he knew and quoted 
them all ; but, in order to make their matter his own, he 
marred it with what Ascham rightly calls ' Indenture 
' Englishe.' Restless to contribute something of himself, he 

tricked 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



IX 



tricked out the facts of others in strange terms and bom- 
bastic periods. If you compare his Life of Richard III. 
with Sir Thomas More's, you will easily discern the process. 
The history is the same ; the very phrases are echoed ; but 
Hall gives you the impression, in Ascham's excellent words, 
that he is ' varying a sentence in Hitching schole.' He 
could, when he chose, compose in pedantic English as well as 
any of his contemporaries. He could clowt up his sentences 
with unsurpassed elaboration, and the early part of his 
Chronicle assuredly smells too much of the schools. He had 
not yet freed his style from the Latin which was spoken 
and written in Gray's Inn. The opening passage of his 
book is as good an example as another of the faults which 
spoiled his narrative. ' What mischief hath insurged,' thus 
the passage runs, ' in realmes by intestine devision, what 
' depopulacion hath ensued in countries by civil discencion, 
' what detestable murder hath been committed in cities by 
' seperate factions, and what calamitee hath ensued in famous 
' regions by domesticall discord and unnatural controversy : 
' Rome hath felt, Italy can testifie, Fraunce can bear witnes, 
' Beame can tell, Scotlande may write, Denmarke can shewe, 
' and especially thys noble realme of Englande can apparauntly 
' declare and make demonstracion.' Here, indeed, is work 
for the writer of Ascham's epitome, who, by cutting away 
words and sentences, might have left the matter half as much 
in quantity, and twice as good as it was, ' for pleasure and 
' commodity.' 

But Ascham's censure touches but one side of the 
Chronicler's talent. No sooner did Hall write of what he 
saw and knew, than his style justifies Hearne's epithet, and 
becomes ' masculine.' He says good-bye at once to the stale 
artifices of repetition and decoration. He describes the shift- 
ing scenes of life, not in ' inkhorne tearmes,' but in vivid 
words, which were then, if not now, commonly used. Yet 

his 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



VOL. I. 



X 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



his style is never dry nor timid. He can enrich his prose 
with precisely the true colour, the proper dignity ; and he 
has made the language of pageantry his own. No more do 
you smell the oft-trimmed lamp ; you are in the open air, 
mingling with the loyal crowd in Chepe, or watching the 
King's procession, as it passes majestically through Gracious 
Street. In truth, when once he touches upon his own time, 
Hall writes like an inspired reporter ; not like the reporter 
of to-day, who shuts his eye, and sees in phrases ; but like a 
man of letters, unperplexed by the tricks of journalism, who 
goes out into the street to see, and writes down the result 
with sincere simplicity. Thus he gives you an impression 
of life and movement, for which you may ransack the most 
of historians in vain. And his sense of picturesqueness 
never deserts him. Turn his pages where you will, and 
you will find a living scene perfectly realised. Thus, in a 
few lines is described Anne Boleyn's appearance at her 
coronation : ' Then came the quene in a litter of white 
' cloth of golde not covered nor bayled whiche was led by ii. 
' palferies clad in white damaske doune to the ground head 
1 and all, led by her foetemen. She had on a circot of white 
' clothe of Tyssue and a mantle of the same furred with 
' Ermyne, her heere hanged doune, but on her head she had 
' a coyffe with a circlet about it ful of riche stones. Over 
' her was borne a Canopie of clothe of golde with iiii. gilte 
' staves and iiii. silver belles. For bearyng of whiche 
' Canapye were appointed xvi. knightes, iiii. to bear it one 
' space on foote and other iiii. another space accordyng to 
' their owne appointment.' But Hall has the rare tact of 
finding the right word, even in the simplest phrases, and 
of giving an air of distinction to plain facts. In deploring 
the impertinences of the King's minions, they 'were so 
' familiar and homely with hym,' says he, ' and plaied such 
' light touches with hym that they forgat themselves.' And 

when 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



XI 



when the English fleet sets sail against the French, the King, 
as Hall tells us, ' caused Sir Edwarde Hawarde his Admirall 
' with all diligence to take the sea, whiche, with all spede 
' possible made ready diverse goodly and tal shippes.' The 
effect is produced not by Latinisms nor fantastic terms, but 
by the right use of a simple, yet dignified, English, the 
secret of which was long since lost. Hall, in brief, was 
the master of two distinct styles, and Ascham's criticism 
leaves unscathed 'The Triumphant Reign of Henry VIII. 

The date of the book's appearance is still a matter of 
controversy. Tanner declares, in his Bibliotheca Britannica, 
that the first edition was printed by Berthelet, and published 
in 1 542 ; but, if that were so, the burning of the book, in 
1555, was so effectively performed that no perfect specimen 
of the first edition survived. A supposed fragment of it, 
however, has been found in a composite copy belonging to 
the University of Cambridge, and pieced together from three 
separate editions. 1 But, with the scanty evidence before us, 
it is impossible to arrive at a dogmatic conclusion whether 
Berthelet's edition ever saw the light or not. On the other 
hand, concerning Richard Grafton's two editions there is 
neither doubt nor difficulty. They appeared in 1548 and 
1 550, being printed in part, not from the finished manuscript, 
for Hall left his work incomplete, but from the author's 
notes. Now Hall, as Grafton tells us, was a man ' in the 
' later time of his life not so painful and studious as 
' before he had been.' But, in spite of Hall's imperfections, 
the editor did not presume to do more than arrange the 



1 Another fragment of this mysterious first edition (1542) has been detected in 
a copy bequeathed by Grenville to the British Museum. The colophon bears the 
date of 1548, but the main body of the book varies both in text and decoration 
from the familiar edition of that year, and it has been suggested that Grafton 
used up some of Berthelet's unfinished sheets. It is possible, indeed, that Berthelet 
did not complete his edition, and that Grafton acquired, along with Hall's notes, 
whatever sheets had been struck from Berthelet's press. However, here is a 
puzzle for the bibliographers, hitherto unsolved, and perhaps insoluble. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



Xll 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



Chronicler's own material. ' For as much as a dead man 
' is the author thereof,' says he, with laudable candour, ' I 
' thought it my duty to suffer his work to be his own, and 
' therefore have altered nothing therein.' And so well has 
Grafton performed his humble office, that we may detect 
Hall's hand as easily in the last years of Henry's reign as 
in the first. There is still the same love of pageants, the 
same obedience to the royal will, the same ardent protestant- 
ism in the pages finished by Grafton, as in those which came 
fresh from the hand of Hall, and we may acknowledge that 
for once the editor has not betrayed his trust. 

The life of Henry VIII. is a sincere picture of Hall's 
mind and fancy. The Chronicler reveals himself to his 
readers as well by his expressed opinions, as by the relative 
importance which he gives to passing events. Above all he 
is a hero-worshipper ; and, when the necessity of worship 
is satisfied, he proves himself a student of society rather 
than of politics. The wars, which were the peculiar glory of 
the reign, interest him chiefly as they throw a lustre upon the 
courage and martial ardour of Henry. It is true that, as in 
duty bound, he describes the taking of Terouenne, and the 
siege of Tournay ; he does not forget ' the old pranks of the 
' Scots, which is ever to invade England when the King is 
{ out, or within age' ; he relates with some circumstance the 
intrigues of the Emperor and the French King. But his 
heart is not in battles nor in foreign policy. The trumpet 
does not stir his blood ; the signing of a treaty does not, in 
his eyes, decide the destiny of nations. A rabble of citizens, 
on the other hand, arouses his sympathy at once ; and it is 
characteristic of him that the military exploit in which he 
takes the profoundest interest is the raid of the Adventurers 
in the marches of Calais. Now these Adventurers, or 
Krekers, as Hall calls them, were a body of wild persons, 
men out of service and fugitive apprentices, who offered 
their 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



Xlll 



their arms and their lives to the Lord Admiral. ' My 
' lord,' said a tall yeoman, their spokesman, ' here be many 
' good felowes that with your favour would jeopard to 
' get or lose, for their mynde is to be revenged on the 
' Frenchemen, enemies to the Kyng and his realme.' And 
the Admiral gave them a pennon of St. George, assuring 
them that if they got any booty and brought it to the 
army they should be paid to the uttermost. Therewith 
he supplied them also with money and weapons, and for 
many a long day they harried the French. ' These men,' 
says Hall, 'were light, hardy, and politike, and by 
' their manhood and hardines had robbed many tounes, 
' and taken many prisoners, with great boties.' Again and 
again their exploits are commemorated in the Chronicle, and 
their death, for they died together, was yet more glorious 
than their life. Surrounded at last and outnumbered by 
the French, they resolved to die, and each promised his 
fellow to slay him if he took to flight. ' Then every man 
' cryed God mercie,' thus writes Hall, ' and kneled doune 
' and kissed the earth, and strake handes eche wyth other, 
' in token not to depart, and then made themselfs prest to 
' the defence.' And so stout was their defence that not 
one escaped with his life, and they deserved, these citizen- 
soldiers, the immortality magnanimously bestowed upon 
them. 

But they were citizens first, and soldiers after, and there- 
fore claimed Hall's ungrudged sympathy. For in his eyes 
London was dearer even than England, and whenever the 
rights of her citizens were threatened, he was their loyal cham- 
pion. To cite one instance of many : he relates indignantly 
how in 1513 the fields about Islington, Hoxton, and Shore- 
ditch were enclosed by hedges and ditches, so that neither 
the young men of the City might shoot, nor the ancient 
persons might walk for their pleasure in the fields. Where- 
^ upon 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



XIV 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



upon a great number of the City, led by a turner in a fool's 
coat, went forth with shovels and spades, ' and within a short 
' space all the hedges about the townes were cast doune, 
' and the diches filled, and every thyng made plain, the 
' workemen were so diligent.' Neither King nor Mayor 
could withstand such enthusiasm as this ; and Hall, lawyer 
though he was, not merely applauds the licence of the 
people, but notes with satisfaction that the access of young 
or old to the fields was never afterwards hindered by hedge 
or ditch. 

However, it is in describing the fierce warfare, which 
raged for many years between the City and Wolsey, that 
Hall most clearly shows his sympathy. Now the Cardinal's 
vast enterprises could not be carried to a successful issue, 
nor the King's lavish expenses be defrayed without money. 
And where should money be obtained if not in the City ? 
So taxes were levied unrelentingly, now as tithes, now under 
the more amiable title of benevolences. In 1522 the King 
demanded ^20,000, which sore chafed the citizens, but 
the money was found : ' howbeit the craftes solde muche of 
' ther plate.' Two months later the Cardinal demanded 
that every man should swear of what value he was in mov- 
ables, and render a tenth unto the King. The Aldermen 
protested, as well they might. ' For Goddes sake,' they 
said to Wolsey, ' remembre this, that riche merchauntes 
' in ware be bare of money.' But bare or not, they paid, 
and some even declared themselves of more worth than 
they were from pride. The King and his Cardinal, how- 
ever, were still unsatisfied, and in the next year they 
proposed that a fifth part of the substance of the realm 
should be paid as a war-tax. The murmurings grew louder 
on every side. If all the coin were in the King's hands, 
how, it was asked, should men live ? Hall, of course, 
makes no attempt to hide his opinion. He is on the side 

of 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



xv 



of the people. 'The Merchaunt that is ryche,' says he, 
of Sylke, Wolle, Tynne, Clothe, and such Merchaundise, 
' hath not the fifth parte in money ; the husbande man is 
ryche in corne and cattel, yet he lacketh of that some.' 
But the Cardinal was deaf to argument ; he detected on 
every hand the signs of great abundance rich apparel, 
servants, fat feasts, and delicate dishes. And thus the dis- 
pute increased in rancour and bitterness. On the one hand 
the Cardinal renewed his exaction ; on the other, the people 
cursed the Cardinal, saying that, if men should give their 
goods by a commission, ' then wer it worse than the taxes of 
' Fraunce, and so England should be bond and not free.' 

At last, in 1525, the quarrel culminated. Lord Cobham, 
the commissioner of the tax in Kent, handled the men 
roughly, ' and by reason one Jhon Skudder answered hym 
' clubbishly, he sent hym to the Towre of London.' From 
Kent the disaffection spread throughout the realm. Women 
wept, young folks cried, and men that had no work began 
to rage, and assembled themselves in companies. The Duke 
of Norfolk sent to the rebellious commons of his shire to 
know their intent, asking them who was their Captain. 
Then a well-aged man begged licence to speak, which was 
granted. ' My Lorde,' said he, ' sythe you aske who is 
' our capitain, for soth hys name is Povertie, for he and his 
' cosyn Necessitie hath brought us to this doyng.' But 
the whole of this popular movement is sketched with a 
fulness and insight which we should seek elsewhere in 
vain, and it clearly marks the difference between Hall 
and those historians whose chief interest lies in the move- 
ments of opposing armies. That, in truth, is Hall's 
chief merit : he records the simple episodes of every day, 
which are too often overshadowed by the intrigues of 
ministers or parliament. Thus he takes delight in a ' goodly 
' disguisyng ' played at Gray's Inn, and set forth with rich 

and 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



XVI 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



and costly apparel, and strange devices of masks and 
morrises ; nor was his pleasure decreased by the fact that the 
play was an allegory of the quarrel between the people and 
the Cardinal, and that all men laughed thereat save only 
Wolsey himself. Thus he notes that the proclamation made 
in 1526 against unlawful games had an unexpected effect. 
When the young men were forbidden bowls and such other 
games, ' some fell to drinkyng, and some to ferretyng of 
' other mennes Conies, and stealyng Dere in Parkes, and 
' other unthriftines.' In the same spirit he records the 
variation of the price of wheat, deplores the rains of 1527 
which destroyed both crops and beasts, and, in brief, gives 
us such a picture of life in town and country as could only 
have been drawn by an eager contemporary. 

Being ever a staunch champion of the citizens, Hall 
harboured a bitter dislike of all foreigners. He hated a 
Frenchman as bitterly as did the Duke of Buckingham 
himself, and he looked with a wise suspicion upon any inter- 
loper, who threatened the trade of London. In those days 
the popular policy was not protection but exclusion, and the 
free entry of foreign goods more than once roused the City 
to rebellion. In 1517, as Hall tells us, the multitude of 
strangers was so great in London, that the English arti- 
ficers could scarce get a living. Worse still, the strangers, 
not content with ousting the citizens from their crafts, 
mocked and oppressed them, trusting always in the protec- 
tion of the Cardinal. At last an accident set the whole of 
London ablaze. A carpenter, named Williamson, bought 
two stock-doves in Chepe, and was about to pay for them, 
when a Frenchman snatched them from his hands, and said 
they were no meat for a carpenter. The French ambassador 
defended the effrontery of his countryman, and the car- 
penter was sent to prison. But the triumph was short- 
lived. Within a few days John Lincoln, a broker, 

had 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



xvn 



had persuaded Dr. Beale to preach the Easter sermon 
at St. Mary's, Spittle, against the aliens, and the Doctor, 
with Pugna fro patria for his text, had no difficulty in 
inflaming the citizens. Foreigners were buffeted in the 
streets, or thrown into the canal. A general rebellion 
was prophesied for May Day, and the Cardinal bade the 
Mayor set a watch upon all suspected persons. But the 
watch was set in vain : a trivial incident led to so fierce 
a riot, that the day was known as Evil May Day ever 
after. Now, two young men were playing at buckerels 
in Chepe, when by the command of an alderman one was 
arrested. Instantly the cry was raised of 'prentices and 
clubs, and out at every door came clubs and weapons. 
The rioters marched through the streets, sacking the foreign 
quarters, and putting the lives of all the aliens in jeopardy. 
However, at three o'clock the Lieutenant of the Tower 
turned his ordnance upon the City, and the rioters, who 
escaped capture, dispersed with what speed they might. 
Of those arrested, Lincoln alone suffered death, and some 
others, ' younglinges and olde false knaves,' as Hall calls 
them, were brought to trial at Westminster Hall, in their 
shirts and with halters about their necks. There the King 
pardoned them all, and when the general pardon was pro- 
nounced, ' the prisoners shouted at once, and al together 
' cast up their halters into the hal roffe, so that the King 
' might perceave thei were none of the discretest sorte.' 
But while Hall rejoices that the ringleaders remained un- 
discovered, he praises both their courage and discretion. 
The citizens might, had they chosen, have taken a fierce 
revenge upon the soldiers. ' But lyke true subjectes they 
' sufered paciently.' 

The French, however, did not profit by the lesson of May 
Day, and but a year later the public indignation broke out 
again. An Embassy, sent to London by the French King, 

brought 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



VOL. I. 



xviii KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



brought in its train a vast mob of pedlars and jewellers with 
' diverse merchaundise uncustomed, under the coloure of the 
' trussery of the Ambassadors.' A riot seemed imminent, 
but once more the people's anger was appeased, although 
calm was not wholly restored to the city, until, in 1526, 
an Act was passed which so bridled the strangers that they 
came to ' a reasonable point and conclusion.' Nor was it 
only in commerce that Hall resented the competition of the 
aliens. He had an equally sturdy contempt for the manners 
which certain young Englishmen brought back from the 
Court of Francis I. When they returned to England, says 
he, ' they were all Frenche, in eatyng, drynkyng and 
' apparel, yea, and in Frenche vices and bragges, so that all 
' the estates of Englande were by them laughed at.' Indeed 
for exclusive patriotism, it would be hard to find Hall's 
match, and no historian has ever uttered the cry of ' England 
' for the English ' with more eloquence and justice. 

And he would no more willingly permit the Church to 
be trammelled by foreign influence than the trade of 
London. In other words he was, as I have said, an 
ardent protestant. His dislike of the Pope is profound 
and unconcealed, nor does he ever lose a chance of 
avowing his antipathy to Rome, an antipathy which colours 
his history and intensifies his alert distrust of Cardinal 
Wolsey. He notes with satisfaction the growing disputes 
between the ' Catholics ' and ' Evangelicals,' which he knew 
must end in the forsaking of the Pope ; he welcomes 
the proclamation against bulls ; he proudly hails the King 
supreme head of the Church, whereafter, says he, with 
undisguised enthusiasm, 'the Pope with all his College of 
' Cardinalles with all their Pardons and Indulgences was 
' utterly abolished out of this realme. God be everlast- 
' 7 n g'y praysed therefore.' Where his religion is touched, 
he does not scruple to interrupt his history with tedious 
^ digressions, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



xix 



digressions, as when he relates the case of Richard Hun, who, 
being imprisoned in the Lollards' Tower for heresy, was 
found hanging by the neck in a girdle of silk. The Bishop 
of London declared that the man had hanged himself, but 
it was proved that William Horsey, the Bishop's Chancellor, 
had murdered him, and Hall, to justify an unfortunate 
heretic, forgets the King and his pageants, and wearies 
the reader with long-drawn depositions. His protestantism, 
indeed, knew only one check : when the King, in his 
arrogance, brought forward the Bill of the Six Articles, 
Hall, as I have said, supported them against his conscience. 
Much as he loved the reformed religion, he loved his King 
more. But he had his revenge in his Chronicle ; for before 
it was published the Bill was repealed, and the historian 
could describe it in the words of the common people as 
' the bloody statute,' without incurring the charge of dis- 
loyalty. 

Yet protestant as he was, Hall had no love of a dismal 
life. His delight in the pageantry of the Court, and in the 
masks and mummeries, which Henry VIII. 's ingenuity 
designed, is most eloquently expressed. His style was 
perfectly adapted for the description of splendid proces- 
sions and imposing spectacles. For once historian and 
monarch were well met : as Hall had at the tip of his pen 
all the words of magnificence, so Henry nourished a never- 
failing joy in dressing-up, and in devising brilliant festivals. 
Nor would he exclude the people from his pompous revelries, 
and time was when at Richmond the mob rent and spoiled the 
pageant, stripping even their sovereign and his companions 
to their doublet and hose. But the King's good humour 
was undisturbed. He turned the incident to mirth and 
laughter, and let the plunderers go off with their booty. 
Thus in war as in peace the jousts and merry-makings 
continued. Once upon a time the Scots Ambassadors were 

amazed 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



XX 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



amazed that King Henry should disport himself, when he 
was at war with France, and were shortly told by a gentleman 
of the Court that they did not set by the French King one 
bean. And if the spirit of revelry was unchanging, the 
devices were as various as cunning and extravagance could 
make them. Now the pageant was shaped like a mountain, 
with a tree of gold set upon the top ; now it was a castle, 
garnished after the most warlike fashion, with la forteresse 
dangereuse written upon its front. Or the garden of 
Esperance, with roses and pomegranates of silk and 
gold, was presented ; or wild men apparelled in green 
moss rushed suddenly from an artificial wood ; or a fair 
lady sat upon a rock with a dolphin on her lap ; or an 
allegory of ships passed before the King and Queen. 
The gay and joyous Court always found an excuse 
for a pageant. Christmas and Twelfth Night each had 
their gorgeous festivals, while on May Day, his Grace, 
' beyng yonge, and wyllyng not to be idell,' would rise in 
the morning very early to fetch may or green boughs. 
Or he would take the Queen into the greenwood to see 
how Robin Hood and the outlaws lived, and to breakfast 
on venison. Then there were jousts and tournaments, at 
which the King, the bravest knight of his time, always bore 
away the prize, happy to receive it at the gracious hands 
of Katherine. For it was an age of chivalry, in which the 
customs and titles of knighthood were still preserved ; and 
even when the King went to war, it was but a joust fought 
to the death ; challenges were given and received ; and 
great captains donned their armour as much for display as 
for policy. 

But the culmination of glory and splendour was the 

Field of the Cloth of Gold, whereon Henry and Francis 

took the sound advice of Comines, whose maxim it 

was that princes should not meet, except to share their 

pleasures. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



xxi 



pleasures. Never was so noble a spectacle seen before. 
The palace of gold, which sparkled in the plain of Guisnes, 
rose as by enchantment. Before the gate stood the old 
god of Wine, fashioned in gold, ' birlyng the wine,' and 
over his head was the motto, which Rabelais adapted 
to his own purpose : faictes bonne chere quy vouldra. To 
those who crossed the large court ' fayre and beautifull ' 
there was presented a scene of dazzling beauty. The roofs 
were covered with cloth of silk, which shewed like fine 
burned gold. Gold was the arras, ' compassed of many 
' auncient stones ' ; gold the chairs, gold the cushions. The 
chapel was a still greater marvel. Over the altar stood 
twelve golden images. The crucifix in the King's closet was 
gold, gold were the candlesticks ; even the roof was gilt 
' with fine golde and Senapar and Bice.' And the trees which 
shone in this wondrous plain the Hawthorn for Henry, 
the Raspberry for Francis they, too, were wrought of 
silver and Venice gold, until nature was eclipsed by artifice, 
and the very flowers and fruits were golden symbols of 
friendship and alliance. Thus in reciting the glories of this 
peaceful encounter, Hall sings a pasan to the precious metal, 
and the burden of his song is always the same gold, gold, 
gold ! Nor did the knights fall below the splendour of the 
landscape. ' To-day the French,' as Shakespeare wrote, 

' All clinquant, all in gold, like heathen gods, 
' Shone down the English ; and to-morrow they 
' Made Britain India : every man that stood 
' Show'd like a mine.' 

And the bravest sight of all was the King himself ' the 
' moste goodliest Prince that ever reigned over the realme 
' of Englande ' apparelled in a garment of ' Clothe of 
' Silver, of Damaske, ribbed with Clothe of Golde, so thicke 
' as might bee,' and bravely did he bear himself against the 
rufHers and gallants of the French Court. There, in the 
golden 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



XX11 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



golden field, the Kings ran course after course, breaking 
their spears like valiant princes, and presently went each his 
own way, eager to efface this memory of joyance in envy 
and hatred. Such was the pageant which Hall, doubtless 
a spectator, described with all his curious knowledge of 
trappings, and which was the noblest spectacle of an age 
renowned above all others for its noble pageantry. 

But not even the splendour of his life could endear 
Wolsey to the Chronicler, and it is evident from his first 
appearance in Hall's pages that the great Cardinal is to play 
a sinister part. He was a good philosopher, very eloquent 
and full of wit so much Hall admits ; but ' for pride, 
' covetous, and ambition he excelled all other.' No sooner, 
indeed, is Wolsey advanced to the Archbishopric of York, 
than Hall declares that henceforth he studied day and 
night to be a Cardinal ; and in the least of his actions 
the historian detects a limitless, insensate ambition. The 
brilliant services which he rendered to the King, the respect 
for England which he imposed upon all Europe, were as 
nothing in Hall's eyes. The King's loyal worshipper could 
only see in the Cardinal's masks and banquets a stumbling- 
block of offence, for he thought that the King should 
engross the dignity and magnificence of his age ; and he 
looked with a kind of jealousy upon the lavish grandeur of 
York Place. Moreover, while he delighted in all the golden 
triumphs of peace and war, which his eager eye witnessed, 
he flouted the Cardinal as a thief, when he asked the people 
to pay the bill. In brief, he intensified in his book the 
fierce hatred, which the people expressed as loudly as they 
dared against the omnipotent Chancellor. Was it not a 
disgrace that this butcher's dog should lie in the Manor 
of Richmond ? l And when Wolsey fell into disgrace, Hall 

1 Shakespeare echoed this taunt: 'this butcher's cur is venom-mouthed,' says 
Buckingham in the play. Shakespeare, indeed, found not a little inspiration in 
Hall. The episodes of his Henry PIII. follow the Chronicle with curious fidelity. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. xxiii 



was not content to repeat the articles in the Cardinal's 
indictment. He must needs turn and shift them to his 
victim's prejudice. From Hall, through Shakespeare, it has 
gone to the ends of the earth that Wolsey, in documents 
addressed to the Pope and foreign princes, was wont to 
write ' Ego et Meus Rex.' With this arrogance he was 
never charged, the worst hinted against him being that he 
added his own name to his master's ' my King and I.' 
Nor does the Cardinal's tragic death persuade Hall to relent. 
He cannot find the same excuses for his enemy, as Shake- 
speare in his magnanimity puts in the mouth of honest 
Griffith. He only remembers that Wolsey was of a great 
stomach, that he counted himself equal with princes, and 
that by crafty suggestion got into his hands innumerable 
treasure. He did all this and more, and yet deserves our 
pardon and respect. Masterful as he was, he would let 
none master England but himself, and Henry's decay in 
honour and happiness began only with his minister's death. 

The drama gives you the same sense of pageantry and magnificence which is 
always present in Hall's pages, while in many a passage there is a verbal similarity 
which cannot be gainsaid. The clamours of the people against the Cardinal's 
exaction is translated directly from the prose of Hall into the verse of Shakespeare, 
and even the King's angry speech to the faithful Wolsey is but an accurate para- 
phrase. Nor does the contempt which Hall hurls at the gallicised minions of the 
English Court lose its force in the phrase of Shakespeare. Buckingham's sad protest 
after his condemnation is another echo of Hall. The barge is ready and 'fitted 
' with furniture as suits the greatness of his person.' Then says Buckingham : 

' Nay, Sir Nicholas, 

' Let it alone ; my state now will but mock me. 
' When I came hither, I was lord high constable 
'And Duke of Buckingham ; now, poor Edward Bohun. ' 

Thus Shakespeare, and, if you turn to Hall, you will find the same thought set 
in prose. ' Sir Thomas Lovell ' thus runs the passage ' desired him to sytte on 
' the cusshyns and carpet ordeined for him, he sayd nay, for when I went to 
' Westminster I was Duke of Buckyngham, now I am but Edwarde Bowhen the 
' mooste caitiffe of the worlde.' The famous speech of Katherine too is borrowed 
from the Chronicle, even in its metaphor. ' It is you,' says the Queen to 
Wolsey, 'have blown this coal betwixt my lord and me.' Or as Hall puts it: 
' therefore of malice you have kindled thys fyre, and set this matter a broche.' 
These are but a few parallels of many which add not a little to the value and 
interest of the book. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



xxiv KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



But Hall was so jealous a champion of the King, that he 
could bear no rival near the throne. Henry was his only 
hero, and at the outset of his reign no finer hero could 
be found for epic or history. He was young, he was fair 
to look upon, he was accomplished. ' The features of 
' his body,' says Hall with the true accent of adulation, 
' his goodly personage, his amiable vysage, princely coun- 
' tenaunce, and the noble qualities of his royall estate, to 
' every man knowen, nedeth no rehersall, consideryng that 
' for lacke of cunnyng I cannot express the gifts of grace, 
' and of nature, that God hath endowed hym with all.' 
Katherine in the days of her unclouded state assured 
Wolsey that ' with his health and life nothing could come 
' amiss to him.' In the eyes of Giustiniani, the Venetian 
envoy, he was far handsomer than any sovereign in 
Christendom. ' It was the prettiest thing in the world,' said 
this enthusiast, ' to see him play tennis, his fair skin ' glow- 
ing through a shirt of the finest texture.' And like all the 
princes of his house, Henry was infinitely vain of his appear- 
ance. When Pasquilijo was in England the King called 
him to a summer-house, and questioned him narrowly 
about the French King. ' Is he as tall as I am ? ' he asked 
first. Pasquilijo assured him there was little difference. 
' Is he as stout ? ' demanded Henry, and, hearing that he 
was not, gravely enquired, ' What sort of a leg has he ? ' 
' Spare,' replied the envoy. Then said the King, open- 
ing the front of his doublet, and placing his hand upon 
his thigh, ' Look here ; I also have a fine calf to my 
' leg.' 1 But not merely was Henry handsome, he excelled 
all the chivalry of his time in manly exercises. In the 
tournament there was no knight who could withstand his 
onset, and the many prizes which he won were not awarded 

1 In precisely the same fashion did Henry's daughter Elizabeth question Sir 
James Melville concerning Mary, the Queen of the Scots, and in his answers Sir 
James proved himself a more cunning diplomatist than the Venetian. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



XXV 



lim out of mere courtesy. As in war he knew no fear, 
so in sport he knew no fatigue. He never went a-hunting 
without tiring eight or ten horses ; he loved hawking and 
shooting as he loved the joust ; and if he lost vast sums 
n the tennis-court, it was when an encroaching corpul- 
ence hindered his activity. Moreover, as has been said, 
ie had a rare genius for parade. He surpassed all his 
contemporaries in the lavish accoutrement of his court 
and person. Nor did this taste for grandeur leave him 
with the joyousness of youth. Even when he went to 
meet Anne of Cleves, he was still magnificent. His 
courser was stately as ever ; his trappings of gold and 
pearl had lost none of their splendour. And, if we may 
believe Hall, in comparison of his person, his rich apparel 
was on that day little esteemed. 

Yet he was no mere sportsman, proud of his golden 
beard and sturdy arm. By temperament a scholar, he had 
become by training learned in all the learning of his time. 
Erasmus not merely applauded his erudition, but hailed him 
as a true and generous patron of poets, who had brought 
back the golden age, and had illustrated in his own life 
the splendid gifts of ancient heroes. His speeches and 
letters prove him the master of a style, vigorous and 
his own ; and he possessed a power of argument which, 
if in age it declined to sophistry, was the terror of all 
antagonists. In the midst of his sedulous amusements, 
he still had time to play the statesman, and even after 
he was deprived of Wolsey's counsel, he was a match for 
the best of his contemporaries in policy. Nor did the 
smallest detail escape him that might benefit his kingdom. 
He suppressed vagabondage, and vastly improved the breed 
of horses. Above all, his zest of life was unquenchable. 
There was no pursuit, either gay or serious, which could 
not arouse his enthusiasm. He danced, he wrestled, he 

cast 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



VOL. I. 



XXVI 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



cast the bar, he leapt with a pole a sport at which he 
once jeopardised his life, he made ballads, he set songs, he 
composed two goodly masses in five parts, ' whiche were song 
' often times in hys chapel, and afterwards in diverse other 
' places.' He spoke, besides English, French, Spanish, and 
Latin, and he collected books. Now it amused him to 
devise a new harness, such as no armourer had ever seen. 
Now medicine engrossed him, and you hear that he invented 
a plaster, a sovereign remedy for sores. In brief, he was 
the most highly gifted, most handsome, and most affable 
monarch that ever graced the throne of England, and, until 
ruin overtook his character, he deserved the most eloquent 
panegyric that even Hall himself could indite. 

And when he tired of tournaments and books, he fell to 
gambling, and hazarded his wealth with reckless prodigality. 
His private accounts show how much he lost to his minions 
at dice and imperial, while the French hostages are said to 
have taken from him six or eight thousand ducats a day, a 
profit which doubtless lightened their enforced sojourn in a 
foreign country. His fame as a gambler even spread abroad, 
and certain Frenchmen and Lombards were brought to 
London to make wagers with him, and a rich harvest they 
reaped until their craft was discovered. And then, that 
he might leave nothing untried, he was constant in piety ; 
he heard five masses a day, besides vespers and compline in 
the Queen's chamber ; or he would indulge that love of 
theological disquisition which never left him. 

Such was Hall's hero in his youth, and such in Hall's 
fancy he remained unto the end. The faithful chronicler 
could discern no spot nor blemish in his King, and if the 
people justly cried out against him, he was still eloquent in 
excuse. In all simplicity of heart he believed that ' a certain 
' scrupulosity pricked his master's conscience,' when Henry 
was minded to put Katherine away ; and though it was 

murmured 



KING HENRY THE VIII. xxvii 



murmured that the King's conscience had ' crept too near 
' another lady,' Hall stoutly maintained that the murmur 
was slanderous and contrary to truth. But alas for Hall's 
loyalty ! Long before the Universities had supported the 
King's cause, Henry was already buying purple velvet for 
Mistress Anne, who was so vastly increased in dignity that 
the Mayor of London deemed it prudent to send her a gift 
of cherries ; he was already writing impassioned love-letters 
to his sweetheart, promising that ' shortly you and I shall 
have ' our desired End, which should be more to my 
' Hearts Ease and more Quietnesse to my Minde, than any 
' other Thing in this World.' The truth is, that in spite of 
Hall's championship, a dark shadow had fallen across the 
brain of Henry VIII. The death of Wolsey had removed 
the last hindrance from his path of wilfulness, and after the 
divorce of Katherine, he set no restraint upon his actions. 
The very virtues which hitherto had distinguished him, 
changed, by a kind of excess, into vices. His learning 
turned to casuistry, his accomplishment became cunning, his 
bravery fell away into an implacable cruelty. He who had 
been open with all men, grew into a monster of suspicion. 
While his eyes, sunk deeper into his head, overlooked 
nothing, his tongue refused to speak what his eyes saw. 
' If I thought that my cap knew my counsel,' said he to 
Cavendish, ' I would throw it in the fire and burn it.' 
But in nothing would he be thwarted. He ruled the 
Church, and overrode the law. It is said that he was better 
skilled in the law of divorce than any wiseacre in Christendom, 
and his profound knowledge of theology, which he might 
wisely have left to others, converted him into that worst of 
men a pedant, who was also bloodthirsty and omnipotent. 
Grimly determined upon matrimony, yet always unfortunate 
in his dealings with women, he murdered the wives, whom 
once he had loved, and decreed his children bastards. He 

saw 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



xxviii KING HENRY THE VIII. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



saw the closest of his friends, such as Francis Weston, 
go to the scaffold without a whisper of regret. He received 
Anne Boleyn's eloquent letter ' from her doleful prison in 
' the Tower,' begging him not to ' touch the innocent souls 
' of these poor gentlemen,' and in a few days openly showed 
Jane Seymour as Queen. With flattery and obeisance his 
ferocity of temper increased, and neither man nor woman 
was safe who thwarted his will. It was a cruel century, 
which did not shrink from boiling a man alive, nor from 
burning a child of fifteen at the stake ; l yet Henry outdid 
the worst of his contemporaries in cruelty. Whoever refused 
to acknowledge him supreme head of the Church, died upon 
the block : thus fell Fisher and Thomas More, the wisest 
spirits of the time. And if his enemies did not flout his 
theological supremacy, a frivolous pretext was always found 
for their destruction. So Surrey, the most accomplished 
poet of an accomplished age, perished, a victim to the 
royal displeasure, which neither genius nor grace sufficed 
to conciliate. In truth, history records nothing more 
pathetic than this ruin of a noble mind ; and through 
it all Hall's loyalty never wavered. In his faithful eyes 
the King could do no wrong, and he was able to in- 
spire others with his own splendid fidelity. Many of 
the later historians were persuaded by Hall's eloquence 
to reject the legend that Henry VIII. was an English 
Bluebeard, and to regard him as an amiable and 
kindly monarch. ' Of persone he was tall and mightye, 
' and in his later yeres somewhat grosse, in witte and 
' memory excellent. Of such majestic tempered with 
' humanitie and gentlenesse, as was comely in so great 
' and noble a Prince. In knowledge of good letters, he 

1 In the twenty-second year of Henry's reign, one Richard Roose was boiled 
alive for poisoning divers persons; and ten years later a child named Richard 
Mekins perished at Smithfield for repeating what he had heard some other folks 
speak against the Sacrament of the Altar. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. xxix 



' farre passed all the Kings of this realme that had bene 
' before him, and for his magnificence and liberalitie he 
' was renowned throughout all the world.' Thus writes 
Grafton after Hall, in recording the death of Henry VIII., 
and you wonder whether any king, who had not dipped 
his hands in innocent blood, was ever graced with a nobler 

epitaph. 

CHARLES WHIBLEY. 



INTRO- 
DUCTION 



This text is reprinted from the 

folio edition of 1550, printed at 

London by Richard Grafton. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



THE FIRST YEAR (1509-10) i 

THE SECOND YEAR (1510-11) 18 
THE THIRD YEAR (1511-12) .... 30 

THE FOURTH YEAR (1512-13) . . . .42 
THE FIFTH YEAR (1513-14) .... 59 

THE SIXTH YEAR (1514-15) . . . .120 

THE SEVENTH YEAR (1515-16) . . . .146 

THE EIGHTH YEAR (1516-17) . . . .150 

THE NINTH YEAR (1517-18) . . . . 157 

THE TENTH YEAR (1518-19) . . . .165 

THE ELEVENTH YEAR (1519-20) . . . 177 

THE TWELFTH YEAR (1520-21) . . .187 

THE THIRTEENTH YEAR (1521-22) . . .223 

THE FOURTEENTH YEAR (1522-23) . . .242 

THE FIFTEENTH YEAR (1523-24) . . .284 



THE TRIUMPHANT REIGNE OF 

KYNG HENRY THE VIII. 



HENRY the VIII. sonne to Kyng Henry the VII. 
beganne his reigne the xxii. daie of Aprill, in the 
yere of our Lorde 1 509, and in the xviii. yere of 
his bodily age : Maximilian then beeyng Emperoure, and 
Lewes the XII. reignyng in Fraunce. And Fernando 
beeyng the Kyng of Arragon and Castell, and Kyng James 
the fourthe then rulyng over the Scottes : Whose stile was 
Proclaimed by the blast of a Trumpet, in the citie of 
London, the xxiii. daye of the saied monethe, with muche 
gladnes and rejoysyng of the people. 

And the same day, he departed from his manour of 
Richemond to the tower of London, where he remayned, 
closly and secrete, with his counsayll, till the funeralles of 
his father, were finished and ended. The same daie 
also, sir Richard Empson knight, and Edmonde Dudley 
Esquier, greate counsaylers to the late kyng, were attached 
and brought to the Tower, not to the litle rejoysyng of 
many persones, whiche by them wer greved, whiche, 
attachement was thought to bee procured by malice of 
theim, that with their aucthoritie, in the late kynges daies 
wer offended, or els to shifte the noyse, of the straight 
execucion of penall statutes in the late kynges daies, by 
punishement of those persones, and other promoters, for to 
satisfie and appeace the people. The same daie also was 
attached, the lorde Henry Stafford, brother to the duke of 
Buckyngham and sent to the Tower, the cause was not 
thought to be great, because he was so sone delivered, and 
the same yere was created erle of Wilshire. And the same 
daie also Doctor Ruthal was named Bushoppe of Duresme. 

Sone after were apprehended diverse, called promoters, 
belongyng to Empson and Dudley, as Camby, Page, Smith, 
and diverse other, as Derbie, Wright, Sympson, and Stocton, 

of 

VOL. I. 



THE I. 

YERE 
[1509-10] 



Empson and 

Dudley 

attached. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



A generall 
Pardon. 



of the whiche, the moste part ware papers, and stoode on 
the Pillorie. How bee it, the moste craftiest knave of all, 
called Jhon Baptist Brimald, escaped and came to West- 
minster, and there toke Sanctuarie. 

The xxv. daie of Aprill was Proclaimed, that the kynges 
grace, ratefied all the Pardones, graunted by his father, and 
also pardoned all suche persones, as was then in suite, for 
any offence, whatsoever it was, Treason, Murder and 
Felonie onely excepte. 

After that all thynges necessary, for the enterment and 
funeral pompe of the late kyng, were sumpteously pre- 
pared and done : the corps of the said defunct was brought 
out of his privie chambre, into the great chamber, where 
he rested thre daies, and every daie had there Dirige and 
Masse song by a Prelate mitered : and from thence he 
was conveighed into the halle, where he was also thre 
daies, and had a like service there, and so thre daies in the 
Chapel, and in every of these thre places, was a hearce of 
waxe, garnished with banners, and ix. mourners gevyng 
there attendance, all the service tyme : and every daye they 
offered, and every place hanged with blacke clothe. Upon 
Wedinsdaie, the ix. daie of Maye, the corps was putte into a 
Chariot, covered with blacke clothe of golde drawen with 
v. greate Corsers, covered with blacke Velvet, garnished 
with cusshions of fine gold : and over the corps, was an 
Image or a representacion of the late kyng, laied on 
Cusshions of golde, and the saied image was appareled, in 
the kynges riche robes of estate with a croune on the hed, 
and ball and scepter in the handes : and the chariot was 
garnished with banners, and Pencelles of tharmes of his 
dominions, titles and genealogies. When the chariot was 
thus ordered, the kinges chapell, and a gret nombre of 
Prelates, set forward praiyng : then folowed all the kynges 
servauntes, in blacke, then folowed the Chariot : and after 
the Chariot ix. mourners, and on every side wer caried 
long torches and shorte, to the nombre of vi. C. and in this 
ordre they came to saincte Georges felde, from Riche- 
mond. There met with theim all the Priestes and 
Clearkes, and religious men, within the citee, and without 
(whiche went formoste, before the kynges Chapell) the 
Maior and his brethren, with many commoners, all clothed 
in blacke, met with the corps at London Bridge, and so 

gave 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



gave their attendaunce on the same, through the citee : and 
in good ordre, the compaignie passed thorough the citie, 
wherof the stretes on every side, wer set with long 
Torches, and on the stalles stode young children, holdyng 
tapers, and so with greate reverence, the Chariot was 
brought to the Cathedral Churche of sainct Paule, where 
the body was taken out, and caried into the Quire, and set 
under a goodly Herce of waxe, garnished with Banners, 
Pencelles, and Cusshions, where was soung a solempne 
Dirige, and a Masse, with a Sermon, made by the 
Busshoppe of Rochester : duryng whiche tyme, the kynges 
houshold and the mourners, reposed theim in the Bus- 
shoppes Paleis. The nexte daie, the corps in like ordre 
was removed, toward Westminster, sir Edward Haward, 
bearyng the kynges banner, on a courser trapped, in the 
armes of the defunct. In Westminster was a curious herse, 
made of ix. principalles, full of lightes, whiche, were lighted 
at the comming of the corps, whiche, was taken out of the 
Chariot, by sixe Lordes, and set under the Herse, the Image 
or the representacion, liyng upon the Cusshyn on a large 
palle of golde. The herse was double railed : within the 
firste railes, satte the mourners, and within the seconde 
raile, stoode knightes bearyng banners of sainctes, and 
without the same, stoode officers of armes. When the 
mourners were set, Gartier king at Armes, cried, for the 
soule of the noble prince kyng Henry the VII. late kyng 
of this realme : then the quire beganne Placebo, and so 
song Dirige, whiche beyng finished, the mourners departed 
into the Palaice, where they had a voyde, and so reposed 
for that night. 

The next daie, wer three Masses solemply song, by 
Busshoppes, and at the last Masse was offered, the kynges 
banner and courser, his coate of armes, his sworde, his 
target, and his helme, and at thende of Masse the mourners 
offered up, riche Paulles of cloth of gold and Baudekin, 
and when the quire sang, Libera me, the body was put into 
the yearthe, and then the lorde Treasorer, lorde Stewarde, 
lorde Chamberlein, the Treasorer, and Comptroller of the 
kynges houshold, brake their staves and caste theim into 
the grave. Then Gartier cried with a loude voyce, Vive le 
Roy Henry le hutiesme, Roy Dangliter, et de Fraunce, sire 
Dirland. Then all the mourners, and all other that had 

geven 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



The Kynges 
mariage 
doubtefull at 
the beginnyng 



geven their attendance, on this funerall Obsequie, departed 
to the Palaice, where they had a greate and a sumptuous 
feast. 

Wonder it were to write, of the lamentacion that was 
made, for this Prince emongest his servauntes, and other of 
the wisest sort, and the joy that was made for his death, by 
suche as were troubled, by rigor of his lawe : yet the towarde 
hope whiche, in all poyntes appered in the young kyng did 
bothe repaire and comforte, the hevie hartes of theim, whiche, 
had lost so wise and sage a prince : and also did put out of 
the myndes of suche, as were releved by the sayed kynges 
deathe, all their olde grudge and rancor, and confirmed 
their newe joye, by the newe graunte of his pardon. 

When the funeralles of this late kyng, wer thus honorably 
finished, greate preparacion was made, for the coronacion of 
this newe kyng, whiche was appoynted on Midsomer daye 
nexte ensuyng : duryng whiche preparacion, the kyng was 
moved, by some of his counsail, that it should be honorable, 
and profitable to his realme, to take to wyfe the lady Katherin, 
late wyfe to Prince Arthur his brother disseased, least she 
having so greate a dowrie, might mary out of the realme, 
whiche, should be unprofitable to hym : by reason of whiche 
mocion, the kyng beyng young, and not understandyng 
the lawe of God, espoused the sayed lady Katherine, the 
third daye of June, the whiche mariage, was dispensed with 
by Pope July, at the request of her father, kyng Farnando, 
contrary to the opinion of all the Cardinals of Rome, beyng 
divines. This mariage of the brothers wyfe, was muche 
murmured agaynst, in the beginnyng, and ever more and 
more, searched out by learning and scripture, so that at 
the laste, by the determinacion, of the best universities of 
Christendom it was adjudged detestable, and plain contrary 
to Goddes lawe, as you shall here, after xx. yeres. 

If I should declare, what payn, labour, and diligence, the 
Taylers, Embrouderers, and Golde Smithes tooke, bothe 
to make and devise garmentes, for Lordes, Ladies, knightes, 
and Esquiers, and also for deckyng, trappyng, and adornyng 
of Coursers, Jenetes, and Palffries, it wer to long to reherse, 
but for a suretie, more riche, nor more straunge nor more 
curious workes, hath not ben seen, then wer prepared 
agyanst this coronacion. 

On the xxi. daie of this moneth of June the kyng came 

from 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



from Grenewiche to the Tower, over London Bridge, and 
so by Grace Churche, with whome, came many a wel ap- 
pareled gentclman, but in especial the Duke of Buckyngham, 
whiche had a goune all of goldsmithes worke, very costly, 
and there the kyng rested, till Saterdaie next ensuyng. 

Fridaie the twentie and twoo daie of June, every thyng 
beeyng in a readines, for his Coronacion : his grace with the 
Quene, beeyng in the Tower of London, made there Knightes 
of the Bathe, to the nombre of twentie and foure, with all 
the observaunces and Ceremonies, to the same belongyng. 

And the morowe folowyng beyng Saterdaie, the xxiii. day 
of the said monethe, his grace, with the Quene, departed from 
the Tower, through the citie of London, agaynst whose 
comming, the streates where his grace should passe, were 
hanged with Tapistrie, and clothe of Arras. And the greate 
parte, of the Southe side of Chepe, with clothe of gold, and 
some parte of Cornehill also. And the streates railed and 
barred, on the one side, from over agaynst Grace Churche, 
unto Bredstreate, in Chepeside, where every occupacion stode, 
in their liveries in ordre, beginnyng with base and meane 
occupacions, and so assendyng to the worshipfull craftes : 
highest and lastly stode the Maior, with the Aldermen. 
The Goldsmithes stalles, unto the ende of the Olde Chaunge, 
beeing replenished with Virgins in white, with braunches of 
white Waxe : the priestes and clerkes, in riche Copes with 
Crosses and censers of silver, with censyng his grace, and the 
Quene also as they passed. The features of his body, his 
goodly personage, his amiable vysage, princely countenaunce, 
with the noble qualities of his royall estate, to every man 
knowen, nedeth no rehersall, consideryng, that for lacke of 
cunnyng, I cannot expresse the giftes of grace and of nature, 
that God hath endowed hym with all : yet partly, to discrive 
his apparell, it is to bee noted, his grace ware in his upperst 
apparell, a robe of Crimosyn Velvet, furred with Armyns, 
his jacket or cote of raised gold, the placard embrowdered 
with Diamondes Rubies, Emeraudes, greate Pearles, and 
other riche Stones, a greate Bauderike aboute his necke, of 
greate Balasses. The Trapper of his Horse, Damaske gold, 
with a depe purfell of Armyns, his knightes and Esquires 
for his body, in Crimosyn Velvet, and all the gentelmen, 
with other of his chappell, and all his officers, and houshold 
servauntes, wer appareled in Skarlet. The Barons of the 

five 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



five Fortes, bare the Canaby, or clothe of estate : For to 
resite unto you, the greate estates by name, the ordre of 
their goyng, the nombre of the lordes Spirituall and temporall, 
Knightes, Esquires, and gentelmen, and of their costly and 
rich apparell, of several! devises and fashions, who tooke up 
his horse best, or who was richest besene, it would aske long 
tyme, and yet I should omitte many thynges, and faile of 
the nombre, for they were verie many : wherefore I passe 
over, but this I dare well saie, there was no lacke or scarsitie 
of clothe of Tissue, clothe of Golde, clothe of Silver, 
Broderie, or of Golde smithes workes : but in more plentie 
and abundaunce, then hath been seen, or redde of at any 
tyme before, and thereto many and a greate nombre of 
chaines of Golde, and Bauderikes, bothe massy and greate. 
Also before the kynges highnes, rode twoo gentle menne, 
richely appareled, and aboute their bodies travers, they did 
beare twoo Robes the one of the Duchie of Guyon, and the 
other for the Duchie of Normandie, with Hattes on their 
heddes, poudered with Armyns, for the estate of the same. 
Nexte folowed twoo persones of good estate, the one bearyng 
his cloke, the other his hatte, appareled bothe in Golde 
Smithes woorke, and Broudery, their horses Trapped, in 
burned Silver, drawen over with Cordes of Grene silke and 
Gold, the edges and borders of their apparell, beyng fretted 
with Gold of Damaske. After them came sir Thomas 
Brandon, Master of the kynges Horse, clothed in tissue, 
Broudered with Roses of fine Gold, and traverse his body, 
a greate Bauderike of Gold, greate and massy, his Horse 
trapped in Golde, leadyng by a rayne of Silke, the kynges 
spare Horse trapped barde wise, with harneis Broudered 
with Bullion Golde, curiously wroughte by Gold Smithes. 
Then nexte folowed, the nyne chyldren of honor, upon greate 
coursers, appareled on their bodies, in Blewe Velvet, poudered 
with Floure Delices of Gold, and chaines of Golde Smithes 
woorke, every one of their horses, trapped with a trapper 
of the kynges title, as of Englande, and Fraunce, Gascoyne, 
Guyan, Normandy, Angeow, Cornewall, Wales, Irelande, 
etc. wrought upon Velvettes, with Embrouderie, and Gold 
Smithes worke. 

Then next folowyng in ordre, came the Quenes retinew, 
as Lordes, Knightes, Esquires, and gentle menne in their 
degrees, well mounted, and richely appareled in Tissues, 

clothe 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



clothe of Golde, of Silver, Tynsels, and Velvettes Em- 
)roudered, freshe and goodly to behold. The Quene then 
:>y name Katheryne, sittyng in her Litter, borne by twoo 
White Palferies, the Litter covered, and richely appareled, 
and the Palferies Trapped in White clothe of gold, her 
3ersone appareled in white Satyn Embroudered, her heeire 
langing doune to her backe, of a very great length, bewtefull 
and goodly to behold, and on her hedde a Coronall, set with 
many riche orient stones. Next after, sixe honorable per- 
sonages on White Palfreis, all appareled in Clothe of Golde, 
and then a Chariot covered, and the Ladies therein, all ap- 
pareled in Clothe of Golde. And another sort of Ladies, 
and then another Chariot, then the Ladies next the Chariot, 
and so in ordre, every one after their degrees, in clothe of 
Gold, Clothe of Silver, Tynselles, and Velvet, with Embrou- 
deries, every couplement of the saied Chariotes,and the draught 
harnesses, wer poudered with Armins, mixt with clothe of 
Gold : and with muche joye and honor, came to West- 
minster, where was high preparacion made, as well for the 
saied Coronacion, as also for the solempne feast and justes, 
therupon to be had and doen. 

The morowe folowyng beyng sondaie, and also Midsomer 
daie, this noble prince with his Quene, at time convenient, 
under their Canabies borne by the Barons of the five Portes, 
went from the saied Palaice, to Westminster Abbey upon 
clothe, called vulgarly cloth of Ray, the whiche clothe was 
cut and spoyled, by the rude and common people, immediatly 
after their repaire into the Abbey, where, accordyng to the 
sacred observaunce, and auncient custome his grace with the 
Quene, were annoynted and crouned, by the Archebusshop of 
Canterbury, with other prelates of the realme there present, 
and the nobilitie, with a greate multitude of Commons of 
the same. It was demaunded of the people, whether they 
would receive, obey, and take the same moste noble Prince, 
for their kyng, who with greate reverence, love, and desire, 
saied and cried, ye ye. After the whiche solempnitie, and 
Coronacion finished, the lordes spirituall and temporall, did 
to hym homage, and returned to Westminster hall, with the 
Quenes grace every one under their canabies, where by the 
lorde Marshall, and his tipped staves, was made rome, and 
every lord, and other noble men, accordyng to their tenures, 
before claimed and vewed, seen, and allowed by the lordes, 

and 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



and other of his graces counsayll, entred into suche rome 
and office that daie, to execute their services accordyngly. 
The kynges estate on the right hand, and the Quenes on 
the left hand, the cobard of ix. stages, their noble personages 
beyng set : first, at the bryngyng of the first course, the 
trumpettes blew up. And in came the Duke of Buckyngham, 
mounted upon a greate courser, richely trapped, and en- 
broudered, and the lorde Stewarde, in likewise on an horse, 
trapped in clothe of Golde, ridyng before the service, whiche 
was sumpteous, with many subtleties, straunge devyses, with 
severall poses, and many deintie dishes. At the kynges 
fete, under the table, wer certain gentelmen. And in like- 
wise with the quene, who there continued, during that long 
and royal feast. What should I speake or write, of the 
sumpteous fine, and delicate meates, prepared for this high 
and honorable coronacion, provided for as wel in the parties 
beyond the sea, as in many and sundery places, within this 
realme, where God so abundantly hath sent suche plentie 
and foyson ? Or of the honorable ordre of the services, the 
cleane handelyng and breaking of meates, the ordryng of 
the dishes, with the plentifull abundaunce. So that none 
of any estate beeyng there, did lacke, nor no honorable or 
worshipfull persone, went unfeasted. The seconde course 
beyng served : in at the haule doore entered a knight, 
armed at al poyntes, his bases rich tissue embroudered, 
a great plume and a sumpteous of Oistriche fethers on his 
helmet, sittyng on a great courser, trapped in tissue, and 
embroudered with Liarmes of England, and of Fraunce, and 
an herauld of armes before hym. And passyng through the 
halle, presented hymself with humble reverence, before the 
kynges majestic, to whom, Garter kyng of herauldes, cried 
and said with a loude voyce, sir knight from whence come 
you, and what is your pretence ? This knightes name was 
sir Robert Dimmocke, Champion to the kyng, by tenure of 
his enheritaunce, who answered the saied kyng of Armes, in 
effecte after this.maner : Sir, the place that I come from, 
is not materiall, nor the cause of my repaire hether, is not 
concernyng any matter, of any place or countrey, but onely 
this. And there with all, commaunded his Heraulde to 
make an Oyes : then saied the knight, to the kyng of armes, 
now shal ye here, the cause of my commyng and pretence. 
Then he commaunded his awne Herauld, by Proclamacion 

to 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



to sale : if there be any persone, of what estate or degree 
soever he be, that wil saie or prove, that king Henry the 
eight, is not the rightfull enheritor, and kyng of this realme, 
I sir Robert Dimmoke here his Champion, offre my glove, 
to fight in his querell, with any persone to thutteraunce, 
whiche Proclamacion was made in sundery places of the 
halle : And at every tyme, his gauntlette caste doune, in 
the maintenaunce therof. After whiche severall proclama- 
cions doen, and offers made, the said knight or champion, 
eftsones repaired to the kynges presence, demaundyng 
drinke, to whom the kynges grace sent a cup of gold, with 
wine, wherof after this knight had dronke, he demaunded 
the cover of the saied cuppe, whiche to hym was also 
delivered : that doen, he departed out of the halle, with 
the said cup and cover, as his awne. 

The maner of his tenure is this, that at the Coronacion of 
the kyng, he shall go to the armarie, and there take the 
kynges best herneis, save one, the best and rich bases savyng 
one, then of the plumes, or other thynges for the garnishyng 
of his creast or helme, and so to the stable, there taking the 
next courser or horse, to the best, with like trapper, and so 
furnished, to enter ut supra, and his office dooen, to have 
all these thynges, with the Cuppe of Gold and cover to his 
awne use. 

After the departure of the said Champion, the Kyng of 
Armes, with all the Herauldes, and other officers of Armes, 
made Proclamacions in severall places of the halle, criyng 
largesse. Briefly to passe over, this high and long solemp- 
nitie, of this honorable Coronacion and feast, more honorable 
then of the great Cesar, whom, many Historiographers, so 
high set out and magnified, if the Latins of Englande, were 
not promoted or avaunsed, to dignities and promocions, one- 
lesse they firste should (as other poore clerkes, in the parties 
beyond the sea, exalte and set furthe the jestes and Chronicles, 
of their native countreys, with high laude and prayse and in 
some parte more then truth, for small mede or reward doo) 
put in writyng, either in Englishe or Latin tongue, the noble 
triumphes, chivalrous feates, valiant actes, victorious battailes, 
and other noble Jestes of this realme, and in especiall, of 
our tyme and knowlege, of this moste valiant and goodly 
prince, it should appere muche more honorable, then any 
other stories : But promocion and benefices, putte awaie 

laboure 

VOL. I. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



10 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



laboure and payne, albeit the grate parte of theim will saie, 
that the high Cure and charge is to edifie the people, with 
the word of God, taking cure of the soules : ther against 
I will not replie, but no displeasure, I perceive that thei take 
as great cure, for the profite of their pursses, wyth pleasure 
of huntyng and haukyng, besides other their pastymes, after 
they com to the best of their promocion, with smal kepyng 
of hospitalitie, as other whiche were their predecessors, and 
muche worse, so that parte of their pastymes spent in writyng, 
and settyng furth the jestes, actes and deedes, of the nobilitie 
of Englande, with the manyfold commodities of the same, 
should muche ennoble the princes thereof, seeyng by dayly 
experience, Busshoppes, Archebusshoppes, Abbottes, and 
other clarkes, in the parties beyonde the sea, as well learned, 
as of high knowlege, and better linage, and as verteous as 
they, daily enforce theimselfes, to avaunce their Princes, 
their Realmes, and natyve Countreis, as well in Latin, as in 
their vulgare toungue. But to returne to thende of this 
honorable feast, the tables avoyded, the wafers were brought. 
Then Syr Stephen Jenyns, that tyme Maior of London, whom, 
the kyng before he satte doune to dynner, had dubbed knight, 
which, beganne the Erles Table that daie, arose from the 
place where he satte, to serve the Kyng with Ipocras, in a 
Cuppe of Golde, whiche Cuppe, after his grace had dronken 
therof, was with the cover, geven unto the said sir Stephen, 
like as other his predecessors, Maiors of the saied citie, wer 
wont to have at the Coronacion of the kyng. Then after 
the Surnap laied, and that the kynges grace, and the Quene 
had wasshed, every of them under their Clothes of estate, 
the tables beyng avoyded, went unto their chambers. 

For the more honor, and ennobling of this triumphaunt 
Coronacion, there wer prepared, bothe Justes and Turnies, 
to be dooen in the Palaice of Westminster, where, for the 
kynges grace, and the Quene, was framed a faire house, 
covered with Tapisstrie, and hanged wyth riche clothes of 
Arras, and in the saied Palaice, was made a curious Fountain, 
and over it a Castle : on the toppe thereof, a greate Croune 
Emperiall, all the imbatellyng with Roses, and Pomegranetes 
gilded : and under and aboute the saied Castle, a curious 
Vine, the leaves and grapes thereof, gilded with fine Golde, 
the walles of the same Castle coloured, White and Grene 
losengis. And in every losenge, either a Rose or a Pome- 

granet, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



1 1 



granet, or a Sheffe of Arrowes, or els H. and K. gilded 
with fine Gold, with certain Arches or Turrettes gilded, to 
support the same Castle. And the targettes of the armes, 
of the defendauntes, appoynted for the saied Justes there 
upon sumpteously set. And out at several! places, of 
the same Castle, as well the daie of the coronacion as at 
the said daies of the Justes and Turney, out of the mouthes 
of certain beastes, or gargels did runne red, white, and 
claret wine. Thenterprisers of these Justes, was Thomas 
lorde Haward, heire apparaunt to the erle of Surrey, sir 
Edward Haward Admirall, his brother, the lorde Richarde, 
brother to the Marques Dorset, sir Edmond Haward, sir 
Thomas Knevet, and Charles Brandon esquire. The trom- 
pettes blew to the feld, the fresh yong galantes and noble 
menne gorgeously appareled, with curious devises, of cuttes 
and of embrouderies, as well in their coates, as in trappers 
for their horses, some of gold, some in silver, some in 
Tynsels, and diverse other in goldesmithes worke, goodly 
to behold, first entered the feld in takyng up and turnyng 
their horses, netly and freshly. Then folowed a devise, 
(caried by strength of menne, and other provision) framed 
like a Castle, or a Turret, wrought with fine clothe of Gold : 
the toppe wherof was spred with Roses and Pomegranates, 
hangyng doune on every side, of the saied devise, wherein 
was a Lady, bearyng a shilde of Christall named Pallas. 
After whom, the saied Lorde Haward, with his com- 
paignions folowed, armed at al poyntes, their Basses, and 
Bardes, or Trappers, were of Grene Velvet, beaten with 
Roses, and Pomegranates of Golde, brodered with fringes 
of Damaske Golde. The saied devise or Turret, beyng 
brought before the kyng, the Lady Pallas, presented 
the saied persones, whom, she named her scholers, to the 
kynges highnes, besechyng the same, to accept them as her 
scholers, who wer desirous to serve hym to the encrease of 
their honors, whiche saied scholers, had about them on 
foote, to the nombre of an hundred persones, freshely 
appareled, in Velvettes of sunderey coloures, with Hose and 
Bonettes, accordyng to the same. And further, the saied 
Ladye desired the kyng, that it might please his grace, that 
her saied scholers, might be defendauntes to al commers 
whiche request was graunted. 

Then came in an other bende of horse men, freshly and 

well 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



well appareled in clothe of gold, in silver, in Goldsmithes 
worke, and brouderie, to the nombre of three score, 
with trappers accordingly to their garmentes, with greate 
Bauderikes, Collers, and Cheines of Golde, aboute their 
neckes, and traverse their bodies, every man with a coyfe 
of golde on his hedde, and a greate plume of fethers there- 
upon, some of one coloure, and some of an other, enteryng 
before into the felde, with Drommes and Fifes a greate 
nombre, every man takyng up his horse, in his best maner, 
as well for their Ladies, as also for laude or prayse to 
bee geven theim. After whom, folowed a good nombre 
of footemen, in Velvettes, and other silkes, cutte and 
embroudered, with hose to the same accordingly, and 
bonettes and other furniture, after a freshe and lustie 
fashion. Nexte to theim came on horse backe, eight per- 
sones, whose names were, sir Jhon Pechy, Sir Edwarde 
Nevell, Sir Edwarde Guildeforde, Sir Jhon Carre, Sir 
Wyllyam Parre, Sir Gyles Capell, Sir Griffith Dun, and 
Sir Roulande, Armed also at all poyntes, with shyldes of 
their awne armes, with riche Plumes, and other devises on 
their hedde peces their Bases and Trappers of Tissew, clothe 
of Golde, Silver and velvet, and nexte before theim, a 
gentle manne on horsebacke, in a coate of Blewe Velvet, 
embroudered with golde, and his horse Trapped in the 
same suite, with a spere of Golde on his thigh, and the same 
presented to the Quene : saiyng, that it was enformed those 
knightes of his compaignie, how that Dame Pallas, had 
presented sixe of her scholers to the kyng, but whether 
they came to learne, or to teache feactes of Armes, they 
knewe not. And further declared, that his knightes were 
come, to doo feactes of armes, for the love of Ladies, where- 
fore he besought her grace, to license those Knightes to 
prove theim selfes, agaynst Dame Pallas Schollers : and that 
in case her Schollers brake more speres, on the sayed 
knightes, by the viewe of the Judges, and the report of 
the Herauldes, then the same knightes should dooe on 
theim, then the saied Scholers of Pallas knightes, to have 
the spere of Gold for their prise. And if the knightes 
brake more speres, then Dame Pallas Schollers, the saied 
knightes to have the Christall Shilde. The whiche request 
to theim graunted, the Justes beganne, where every manne 
dyd acquite hym self, well and valiauntly, but who had the 

pryce 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



pryce of other, I knowe not, the night commyng on, the 
Justes ended. 

The next dale approched, the foresaied defenders, Schollers 
to Pallas on Horsebacke, armed Cape a pie, the one side of 
their Bases, and Bardes of their Horses white Velvet, 
embroudered with Roses of gold and other embrouderies, 
the other side Grene Velvet, embroudered with Pome- 
granetes of Golde, every one of theim on his hedde pece, 
had an heare of flatte Golde of Damaske, presented them- 
selfes, before the kyng ready to Tourney. 

Then immediatly on the other parte came in, the fore- 
named eighte knightes ready armed, their Basses and Bardes 
of their Horse, Grene Sattyn, embroudered with freshe 
devises, of Bramble branches, of fine Golde curiously 
wroughte, poudered over all. And after theim a greate 
nombre of homes blowen, by menne apparelled in Grene 
Clothe, with Cappes and Hosen of lyke suite, as Forsters or 
kepers, and a Pagente made lyke a Parke, paled with pales 
of White and Grene, wherein wer certain Fallowe Dere, 
and in the same Parke curious Trees made by crafte, with 
Busshes, Femes, and other thinges in lykewyse wroughte, 
goodly to beholde. The whiche Parke or divyse, beyng 
brought before the Quene, had certayn gates thereof opened, 
the Dere ranne out thereof into the Palaice, the greye 
houndes were lette slippe and killed the Dere : the whiche 
Dere so killed, were presented to the Quene and the Ladies, 
by the foresayed knightes. Crocheman, whiche the daye 
before broughte in the spere of Golde, there declared, that 
the same knightes were servauntes to Diana, and beeyng 
in their pastyme of huntyng, newes were brought unto 
theim, that Dame Pallas knightes, were come into these 
partes, to doo deedes of armes : wherefore, they had lefte 
their huntyng and chase, and repaired also thether, to 
encounter with the knightes of Pallas, and so to fight with 
them, for the love of ladyes to thutterance : saiyng that yf 
Pallas knightes vanquyshed the other, or made them to leve 
the feld, then thei to have the dere killed, and the greye 
houndes that slewe them. And in case Dianas knightes, 
overcame the other, they to have their swordes, and none 
other thyng more. Wherupon the Quene and Ladies, 
sent to the kyng to have his advyse and pleasure in this 
behalfe, his grace conceyvyng, that there was some grudge, 

and 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



Dianas 
knightes. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



and displeasure betwene theim, thynkyng if suche request 
wer to theim graunted, some inconvenience might ensue, 
would not there unto agree, so, that for the appeasyng thereof, 
it was awarded that bothe parties, should tourney togethers, 
gevyng but a certayn strokes, whiche dooen thei departed : 
And so these Justes brake up, and the prices geven to every 
man after his disertes. 

This yere the kyng pardoned the lorde Henry, brother to 
the Duke of Buckyngham, beeyng committed to the Tower 
upon suspicion of treason laied unto hym, but not proved, 
and sone after at the Parliament, created hym Erie of 
Wylshire. 

Also this yere, the kyng ordeined fiftie Gentle menne to 
bee speres, every of theim to have an Archer, a Dimilaunce, 
and a Custrell, and every Spere to have three greate Horses, 
to bee attendaunt on his persone, of the whiche bende, the 
Erie of Exssex was Lieuetenaunt, and sir Jhon Pechie Capi- 
tain, who endured but a while, the apparell and charges were 
so greate, for there were none of theim, but they and their 
Horses, were appareled and trapped in Clothe of Golde, 
Silver, and Golde Smithes woorke, and their servauntes 
richely appareled also. 

This yere also, was a greate Pestilence in the toune of 
Caleys, and muche people died, in so muche that the kyng, 
at the request of his counsaill of Caleis, considering the 
weakenes of the toune, sent thether Sir Jhon Pechie, with 
three hundred menne to tary there, who continued there 
unto suche time, that the plague was ceassed, and newe 
souldiours admitted, to suche roumes as then were vacant, 
and then returned into Englande. Furthermore, this yere 
the kyng somoned his Parliament, in the monethe of 
Novembre, whiche began in the moneth of Januarii en- 
suyng, whereof sir Thomas Inglefelde was chosen Speaker, 
in the whiche session emonges other thynges there enacted, 
it was ordeined by aucthoritie of Parliament, that sir 
Thomas Empson knighte, and Edmund Dudeley Esquire, 
late Counsailers to Kyng Henry the seventh, should and wer 
attainted of hault treason. 

The same yere the plague was greate, and reigned in 
diverse partes of the realme, the kyng kept his Christemas 
atRichemond. And the xii. daie of Januarie, diverse gentel- 
men freshely appareled, prepared theim selfes to Juste, un- 

knowen 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



knowen to the kinges grace, whereof, he being secretely 
informed, caused hymself, and one of his privie chambre, 
called William Compton to bee secretly armed, in the litle 
Parke of Richemond : and so came into the Justes, unknowen 
to all persones, and unloked for : The kyng ranne never 
openly before, and there wer broken many staves, and 
greate praise geven to the twoo straungers, but specially to 
one, whiche was the kyng : howebeit, at a course by mis- 
fortune, sir Edward Nevell Esquire, brother to the Lorde 
of Burgayne, did runne against Master Cumpton, and hurte 
hym sore, and was likely to dye. One persone there was, 
that knew the kyng, and cried, God save the kyng, with 
that, all the people wer astonied, and then the kyng 
discovered himself to the greate comforte of all the 
people. 

The kyng sone after, came to Westminster with the 
Quene, and all their train : And on a tyme beyng there, his 
grace, therles of Essex, Wilshire, and other noble menne, to 
the numbre of twelve, came sodainly in a mornyng, into the 
Quenes Chambre, all appareled in shorte cotes, of Kentishe 
Kendal, with hodes on their heddes, and hosen of the same, 
every one of theim, his bowe and arrowes, and a sworde and 
a bucklar, like out lawes, or Robyn Hodes men, wherof 
the Quene, the Ladies, and al other there, were abashed, 
as well for the straunge sight, as also for their sodain com- 
myng, and after certayn daunces, and pastime made, thei 
departed. On Shrove Sunday the same yere, the kyng pre- 
pared a goodly banket, in the Parliament Chambre at West- 
minster, for all the Ambassadours, whiche, then wer here, 
out of diverse realmes and countreis. The banket beyng 
ready, the Kyng leadyng the Quene, entred into the 
Chambre, then the Ladies, Ambassadours, and other noble 
menne, folowed in ordre. The Kyng caused the Quene, to 
kepe the estate, and then satte the Ambassadours and Ladyes 
as they were Marshalled by the kyng, who would not sit, 
but walked from place to place, makyng chere to the Quene, 
and the straungers : Sodaynly the kyng was gone. And 
shortly after, his grace with the Erie of Essex, came in 
appareled after Turkey fashion, in long robes of Bawdkin, 
powdered with gold, hattes on their heddes of Crimosyn 
Velvet, with greate rolles of Gold, girded with two swordes, 
called Cimiteries, hanging by greate bawderikes of gold. 

Next, 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



A banket. 



i6 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



Next, came the lorde Henry, Erie of Wilshire, and the lorde 
Fitzwater, in twoo long gounes of yelowe satin, travarsed 
with white satin, and in every bend of white, was a bend of 
crimosen satin after the fashion of Russia or Ruslande, with 
furred hattes of grey on their hedes, either of them havyng 
an hatchet in their handes, and bootes with pykes turned up. 
And after them, came, syr Edward Haward, than Admyral, 
and with him sir Thomas Parre, in doblettes of Crimosin 
velvet, voyded lowe on the backe, and before to the cannell 
bone, lased on the breastes with chaynes of silver, and over 
that shorte clokes of Crimosyn satyne, and on their heades 
hattes after dauncers fashion, with feasauntes fethers in 
theim : They were appareyled after the fashion of Prusia or 
Spruce. The torchebearers were appareyled in Crymosyn 
satyne and grene, lyke Moreskoes, their faces blacke : And 
the kyng brought in a mommerye. After that the Quene, 
the lordes, and ladyes, such as would had played, the sayd 
mommers departed, and put of the same apparel, and sone 
after entred into the Chamber, in their usuell apparell. And 
so the kyng made great chere to the Quene, ladyes and 
Ambassadours : The Supper or Banket ended, and the tables 
avoyded, the kyng beeyng in communicacion with the 
Ambassadors, the Quene with the ladyes toke their places 
in their degrees. Then began the daunsyng, and every man 
toke muche hede to them that daunsed. The kyng perceyv- 
ing that, withdrewe hym selfe sodenly out of the place, with 
certayn other persons appoynted for that purpose. And 
within a litle whyle after there came in a drumme and a fife 
appareiled in white Damaske and grene bonettes, and hosen of 
the same sute.than certayn gentelmenfolowed with torches, ap- 
parayled in blew Damaske purseled with Ames grey, facioned 
lyke an Awbe, and on their heddes hodes with robbes and 
longe typpettes too the same of blewe Damaske visarde. Then 
after them came a certayne number of gentelmen, wherof 
the kyng was one, apparayled all in one sewte of shorte 
garmentes, litle beneth the poyntes, of blew Velvet and 
Crymosine with long slyves, all cut and lined with clothe 
of golde. And the utter parte of the garmentes were 
powdered with castels, and shefes of arrowes of fyne doket 
golde. The upper partes of their hoses of lyke sewte and 
facion, the nether partes were of Scarlet, poudered with 
timbrelles of fyne golde, on their heades bonets of Damaske, 

Sylver 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



Sylver flatte woven in the stole, and thereupon wrought 
with gold, and ryche fethers in them, all with visers. After 
them entred vi. ladyes, wherof twoo were apparaylcd in 
Crymosyn satyne and purpull, embrowdered with golde 
and by vynyettes, ran floure delices of gold, with marvei- 
lous ryche and straunge tiers on their heades. Other two 
ladies in Crimosine and purpull, made lyke long slops 
enbroudered and fret with gold after antyke fashion : and 
over that garment was a short garment of clothe of golde 
scant to the kne facioned like a tabard all over, with small 
double rolles, al of flatte golde of Damaske fret with frysed 
gold, and on their heades skayns and wrappers of Damaske 
gold with flatte pypes, that straunge it was to beholde. 
The other two ladies were in kirtels of Crymosyne and 
purpull satyn, enbroudered with a vynet of Pomegraneltes 
of golde, all the garmentes cut compasse wyse, havyng but 
demy sieves, and naked doune from the elbowes, and over 
their garmentes were vochettes of pleasauntes, rouled with 
Crymosyne velvet, and set with letters of gold lyke Carettes, 
their heades rouled in pleasauntes and typpers lyke the 
Egipcians, enbroudered with gold. Their faces, neckes, 
armes and handes, covered with fyne plesaunce blacke : 
Some call it Lumberdynes, whiche is marveilous thinne, so 
that the same ladies semed to be nigrost or blacke Mores. 
Of these foresayed vi. ladies, the lady Mary, syster unto 
the kyng was one, the other I name not. After that the 
kinges grace and the ladies had daunsed a certayne tyme 
they departed every one to his lodgyng. 

In this yere kyng Henry the VII. his executours made 
restitucion of great summes of money, to many persons 
taken against good conscience to the sayde kynges use, by 
the forenamed Empson and Dudley. 

This yere also came Ambassadours from the kyng of 
Arragon and Castell into this Realme, who were hyghly 
entertayned and royally receyved, and repayred muche to 
the Courte. It happened on a daye, that there were certayne 
noble men made a wager to runne at the rynge, and parties 
were taken, and whiche partye atteyned or toke awaye the 
rynge oftnest with a certayne courses, should Wynne the 
wager. Whereof, the kynges grace hearyng, offered to be on 
the one partie with vi. companions : The Ambassadours 
hearyng therof, were muche desirous to see thys wager 

tried, 

VOL. I. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



i8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE I. 
YERE 

[1509-10] 



tried, and specially the Ambassadours of Spaigne, who had 
never sene the kyng in harneis. At the day appointed, the 
kyng was mounted on a goodly Courser, trapped in purpul 
velvet cutte, the inner syde whereof was wrought with flatte 
golde of Damaske in the stoole, and the velvet on the other 
syde cut in letters : So that the gold appered as though 
it had bene enbroudered with certayne reasons or poyses. 
And on the Velvet betwene the letters were fastened, castels 
and shefes of arrowes of doket golde, with a garment, the 
sieves compased over hys harneys, and his bases of the same 
worke, with a greate plume of fethers on his head pece, 
that came doune to the arson of his sadell, and a great 
company of fresh gentlemen, came in with his grace rychely 
armed and decked, with many other right gorgeously 
apparelled, the trompettes before them, goodly to beholde, 
wherof many straungers, but specially the Spaigniardes much 
rejoysing, for they had never sene the king before that tyme 
armed. 

On the other syde came in an other bende of gentlemen, 
freshely appareyled, and pleasaunt to beholde, all appareyled 
in clothe of gold, chekered with flatte golde of Damaske, 
and poudered with Roses : and so every man ranne, but to 
conclude, the pryce was geven unto the kyng. Every man 
did runne twelve courses, the kyng did beare away the ring v. 
tymes, and atteyned it thre : and these courses thus fynished, 
the Spanish Ambassadours desyred to have some of the 
badges or devises, whiche were on the kynges trapper : his 
grace therof knowing, commaunded every of them to take 
therof what it pleased them, who in effect toke all or the 
more parte : for in the beginning they thought they had 
bene counterfait, and not of golde. 

In this yere from divers Realmes and Countreys came 
many Ambassadours, of Fraunce, Denmarke, Scotlande, 
and other Realmes, whiche were highly enterteyned. 



THE SECOND YERE. 

ON May daye, then next folowyng in the ii. yere of 
his reygne, hys grace beyng yonge, and wyllyng 
not to be idell, rose in the mornynge very early to 
fetche May or grene bows, hym selfe freche and rychely 

appareyled, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



appareyled, and clothed all his Knyghtes, Squiers and 
Gentelmen in whyte Satyn, and all hys Garde and Yomen of 
the Croune in white sarcenet : and so went every man with 
his bo we and arrowes shotyng to the wood, and so repaired 
againe too the Courte, every man with a grene bough in his 
cappe, and at hys returnyng, many hearynge of his goynge a 
Maiyng, were desyrous to see hym shote, for at that tyme hys 
grace shotte as stronge and as greate a length as any of his 
garde. There came to his grace a certain man with bowe 
and arrowes, and desyred his grace to take the muster of 
hym, and to se hym shote : and at that tyme hys grace was 
contented, the man put his one fote in his bosome, and so 
did shote, and shot a very good shote, and well towardes 
his marke, wherof not onely his grace but all other greatly 
merveyled. So the kyng gave hym a rewarde for his so 
doyng, whiche persone afterwardes of the people and of 
them in the courte was called fote in bosome. 

The same yere in the feaste of Pentecoste, holden at Grene- 
wyche, that is to saye the Thursday in the same weke, hys 
grace with two other with hym chalenged all commers, to 
fyghte with theim at the barriers with target and casting the 
spere of viii. fote long, and that done his grace with the 
sayed two aides to fight every of them xii. strokes with 
two handed swordes, with and against all commers, none 
except being a gentelman, where the kyng behaved hym 
selfe so wel, and delivered hym selfe so valiauntly by his 
hardy prowes and greate strengthe that the prayse and laude 
was geven to his grace, and his aides : Notwithstanding that 
divers valiaunt and strong persons had assailed hym and his 
aides. 

From thence the whole Courte removed to Wyndesore, 
then begynning his progresse, exercisyng hym selfe daily in 
shotyng, singing daunsyng, wrastelyng, casting of the barre, 
plaiyng at the recorders, flute, virginals, and in settyng of 
songes, makyng of ballettes, and did set ii. goodly masses, 
every of them fyve partes, whiche were song oftentimes in 
hys chapel, and afterwardes in diverse other places. And 
whan he came to Okyng, there were kept bothe Justes and 
Turneys : the rest of thys progresse was spent in huntyng, 
hawkyng, and shotyng. 

The kyng beyng thus in hys progresse harde every daye 
more and more complaintes of Empson and Dudley, wher- 

fore 



THE II. 
YERE 

[I5IO-II] 



Empson and 

Dudley 

behedded. 



20 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE II. 
YERE 

[I5IO-II] 



fore he sent wrytes to the Shyryfes of London, to put them 
in execucion, and so the xviii. day of August, they were both 
behedded at the Towre hyll, and their bodies buried and 
their heades. 

The saied progresse finished, his grace, the Queue, with 
all their whole trayne, in the moneth of October folowyng, 
removed to Grenewyche. The kyng not mynded to se 
young Gentelmen, unexpert in marcial feates, caused a place 
to be prepared within the parke of Grenewych for the 
Quene and the ladies to stande and se the fyght with battaill 
axes that should be done there, where the kyng hym selfe 
armed, fought with one Gyot a Gentelman of Almayne, a 
talle man, and a good man of armes. And than after they 
had done, they marched alwaye two and twoo togethers, and 
so dyd their feates and enterpryces every man very well : 
Albeit, it happened the sayed Gyot to fyght with Sir Edward 
Haward, whiche Gyot was by hym stryken to the grounde. 

The morow after this enterprise done, the Kyng with the 
Quene came to the Towre of London. And to thentent 
that there shoulde no displeasure nor malice be borne by 
any of those Gentelmen, whiche fought with the axe agaynst 
other. The kyng gave unto them a certain summe in 
golde, valewed at cc. marke, to make a banket amongest 
them selfes with all : The whiche banket was made at the 
Fishemongers Halle in Teames strete, where they all met to 
the number of foure and twenty, al apareiled in one sute 
or livery, after Almain fashion, that is to say, their utter 
garmentes all of yealow Satyne, yealow hosen, yealow shoes 
girdels scaberdes, and bonettes with yealow fethers, their 
garmentes and hosen al cutte and lyned with white Satyn, 
and their scaberdes wound abought with Satyne : After 
their banket ended, they went by torche light to the towre, 
presenting them selfes before the kyng, who toke pleasure 
to beholde them. 

From thence, the viii. day of November, his grace 
removed to Rychemond, and willed to be declared to al 
noble men and gentelmen, that his grace with two aides, 
that is to wit master Charles Brandon, and master 
Compton, duryng two dayes would aunswere all commers 
with spere at the Tilt one daye, and at turney with 
swordes, the other. 

And to accomplyshe this enterprice the xiii. daye of 

November, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



21 



November, hys grace armed at all peces with his twoo 
aydes entred the fielde, their bases and trappers were of 
clothe of golde, set with redde Roses, ingreyled with golde 
of broudery : The counter parte came in freshly, appareyled 
every man after his devise. At these Justes the kyng brake 
more staves then any other, and therfore had the pryce : 
At the Turney in lykewyse, the honour was his. The second 
night were divers straungers of Maximilian the Emperours 
court, and Ambassadours of Spaygne with the kyng at 
supper : when they had supped, the kyng willed them 
to go into the Quenes chamber, who so dyd. And in the 
meane season, the kynge with xv. other, appareled in 
Almayne Jackettes of Crymosyn, and purple Satyn, with 
long quartered sieves, with hosen of the same sute, their 
bonettes of whyte Velvet, wrapped in flat golde of Damaske, 
with vysers and whyte plumes, came in with a momery, 
and after a certayne tyme that they had played with the 
Queue and the straungers, they departed. Then sodenly 
entred syx mynstrels, rychely appareled, plaiyng on their 
instrumentes, and then folowed xiiii. persones Gentelmen, 
all appareyled in yealowe Satyne, cut lyke Almaynes, bearyng 
torches. After them came vi. disguised in whyte Satyne 
and grene, enbroudered and set with letters and castels of 
fyne golde in bullion, the garmentes were of straunge 
facion, with also straunge cuttes, every cutte knytte with 
poyntes of fyne golde, and tassels of the same, their hosen 
cutt and tyed in lykewyse, their bonettes of clothe of sylver, 
wounde wyth golde. Fyrst of these vi. was the kyng, the 
erle of Essex, Charles Brandon, Sir Edward Hawarde, syr 
Thomas Knevet, and syr Henry Guylforde. Then part 
of the Gentlemen bearyng torches departed, and shortly 
returned, after whome came in vi. ladies, appareled in 
garmentes of Crymosyne Satyn enbroudered and travessed 
with clothe of gold, cut in Pomegranettes and yokes, 
strynged after the facion of Spaygne. Then the sayed 
vi. men daunced with these vi. ladies : and after that they 
had daunced a season the ladies toke of the mens visars, 
whereby they were knowen : Whereof the Quene and the 
straungers muche praysed the kynge, and ended the pastyme. 
It is to be noted that at this tyme the Quene was great 
with chylde, and shortly after this pastyme, she toke her 
chamber at Rychemond, for the whiche cause the kynge 

kept 



THE H. 

YERE 

[I5IO-II] 



22 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE II. 
YERE 

[1510-11] 



kept his Christmas there. And on Newyeres day, the fyrst 
day of January, the Quene was delivered of a Prince to the 
great gladnes of the Realme, for the honour of whom, fyers 
were made, and diverse vessels with wyne, set for suche 
as woulde take therof in certaine streates in London, and 
generall processions thereupon too laude God. As touchyng 
the preparacion of the Princes Christenyng, I overpasse, 
which was honourably done, whose godfathers at the font 
were the Archebishop of Caunterbury, and the erle of 
Surrey, Godmother the lady Katherine Countesse of Devon- 
shyre, Daughter to kynge Edward the fourth. 

Agaynst the xii. daye or the daie of the Epiphanie at 
nyghte, before the banket in the Hall at Rychemond, was a 
pageaunt devised lyke a mountayne, glisteryng by nyght, as 
though it had bene all of golde and set with stones, on the 
top of the whiche mountayne was a tree of golde, the 
braunches and bowes frysed with gold, spreding on every 
side over the mountayne, with roses and Pomegranettes, 
the whiche mountayn was with vices brought up towardes 
the kyng, and out of the same came a ladye, appareiled in 
clothe of golde, and the children of honour called the Henche- 
men, whiche were freshly disguysed, and daunced a Morice 
before the kyng. And that done, reentred the mountayne, 
and then it was drawen backe, and then was the wassaill or 
banket brought in, and so brake up Christmas. 

Shortly after, and before the Quenes churchynge, the 
kyng rode too Walsingham. The Quene being churched 
or purified, the kyng and she removed from Rychemond to 
Westminster, where was preparacion for a solempne Justes 
in the honour of the Quene, the kyng being one, and with 
hym thre aydes : his grace being called Cure total, the lorde 
William erle of Devonshire, called Bon voloire, Sir Thomas 
Knevet named Boncspoir, Sir Edwarde Nevile, called Val- 
iaunt desire, whose names were set upon a goodly table, and 
the table hanged in a tree, curiously wrought, and they 
were called Les quater Chivalers de la forrest salvigne, these 
foure to runne at the tilte against all commers, with other 
certayn Articles comprised in the said table. 

A place in the Pallayce was prepared for the kynge, and 
also the Quene, rychely hanged, the inner parte with cloth 
of golde, and the utter with ryche clothe of Arras. These 
Justes beganne the xiii. daye of February. After that, that 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



the Quene with her trayne of ladyes had taken their places, 
nto the Palays was conveyed a pageaunt of a greate quantitie, 
made like a forest with rockes, hylles and dales, with divers 
sundrie trees, floures, hathornes, feme and grasse, with six 
: orsters, standynge within the same forrest, garnished in 
cotes and hodes of grene Velvet, by whome lay a greate 
number of speres, all the trees, herbes, and floures, of 
the same forrest were made of grene Velvet, grene 
Damaske, and Silke of divers colours, Satyn and Ser- 
cenet. In the middes of this forrest was a castell stand- 
ing, made of golde, and before the Castell gate sat a 
;entelman freshly appareiled, makyng a garlande of Roses 
for the pryce. This forrest was drawen, as it were, by 
strength of twoo great beastes, a Lyon and an Antelop, 
the Lyon florished all over with Damaske golde. The 
Antelop was wrought all over with sylver of Damaske, his 
beames and homes and tuskes of golde : these beastes were 
led with certayne men appareiled like wilde men, or wood- 
houses, their bodies, heddes, faces, handes, and legges, 
covered with grene Silke flosshed : On either of the saied 
Antelop and Lyon, sate a ladye rychely appareiled, the 
beastes were tied to the pageaunt with great chaynes of 
golde, as horses be in the carte. When the pageaunt rested 
before the Quene the forenamed forsters blew their homes, 
then the devise or pageant opened on all sydes, and out 
issued the foresaied foure knyghtes, armed at all peces, 
every of them a spere in his hande on horsebacke with 
great plumes on their heddes, their basses and trappers 
of clothe of golde, every of them his name enbroudered 
on his basse and trapper : on the other parte with great 
noyse, aswell of Trompettes as of Drommes entred into 
the fielde. The erle of Essex, the lord Thomas Hawarde 
with many other cleane armed, their trappers and basses all 
of Crymosyn Satyn enbroudered with braunches of Pome- 
garnettes of golde, and posies with many a freshe Gentel- 
man, rydyng before them, their fotemen also well appareiled : 
And so the Justes beganne, and endured all that daye. 

The morow beyng the xiii. daye of February after dynner, 
at tyme convenient, the Quene with the ladyes repaired to 
see the Justes, the trompettes blew up, and in came many 
a Noble man and Gentelman, rychely appareiled, takynge up 
their horses, after whome folowed certayne lordes appareiled, 

thei 



THE II. 
YERE 

[1510-11] 



2-4 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE II. 
YERE 

[1510-11] 



thei and their horses in clothe of golde and russet tynsell : 
Knyghtes in clothe of golde and russet Velvet. And a 
greate number of Gentelmen on fote, in russet satyn and 
yealow, and yomen in russet Damaske and yealow, all the 
nether parte of every mans hosen Skarlet, and yealow 
cappes. Then came the kyng under a Pavilion of clothe 
of golde, and purpull Velvet enbroudered, and poudered 
with H. and K. of fyne golde, the compas of the Pavilion 
above, enbroudered rychely, and valenced with flat golde, 
beten in wyre, with an Imperiall croune in the top of fyne 
golde, his bases and trapper of clothe of gold, fretted with 
Damaske gold, the trapper pendant to the tail. A crane 
and chafron of stele, in the frount of the chafron was a 
goodly plume set full of musers or trimblyng spangles of 
golde. After folowed his three aydes, every of them under 
a Pavilion of Crymosyn damaske, and purple poudred with 
H. and K. of fyne golde, valenced and frynged with golde 
of damaske : on the top of every Pavilion a greate K. of 
golde smythes worke, the number of the Gentelmen and 
yomen attendant a fote, appareiled in russet and yealow was 
C. Ixviii. Then next these Pavilions came twelve children 
of honor, sitting every of them on a greate courser, rychely 
trapped and enbroudered in severall devises and facions, 
where lacked neither brouderie nor goldsmythes worke, so 
that every child and horse in device and facion was contrary 
to other, whiche was goodly to beholde. 

Then on the counter part, entred Sir Charles Brandon, 
firste on horsebacke in a long robe of russet Satyn, lyke a 
recluse or a religious person and his horse trapped in the 
same sewte, without dromme or noyse of mynstrelsye, 
puttynge a byl of peticion to the Quene, the effect wherof 
was, that if it would please her to licence hym to runne in 
her presence, he woulde do it gladly, and if not, then he 
woulde departe as he came. After that his request was 
graunted, then he put of hys sayed habyte, and was armed 
at all peces with ryche bases and horse, also rychely trapped, 
and so did runne his horse to the tylte end, where divers 
men on fote appareiled in russet satyn awaited on hym : 
next after came in alone young Henry Guylford Esquier, 
hym selfe and his horse in russet clothe of golde and clothe 
of sylver, closed in a device, or a pageant made lyke a Castell 
or a Turret, wrought of Russet cercenet florence, wrought, 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



and set out in golde with hys worde or posye, and all his 
men in Russet satyn and white, with hosen to the same, and 
their bonettes of lyke colours, demaunding also licence of 
the Quene to runne, whiche to hym graunted toke place 
at thende of the tylte. Then came next the Marques 
Dorset and syr Thomas Bulleyn, lyke two pilgrems from 
saint James, in taberdes of blacke Velvet, with palmers 
hattes on their helmettes, wyth long Jacobs staves in their 
handes, their horse trappers of blacke Velvet, their taberdes, 
hattes, and trappers set with scaloppe schelles of fine golde, 
and strippes of blacke Velvet, every strip set with a scalop 
shell, their servauntes al in blacke Satyn, with scalop shelles 
of gold in their breastes. Sone after came in the lorde 
Henry of Buckyngham Erie of Wylshire, hym selfe and 
his horse appareiled in clothe of sylver, enbroudered with a 
posye, or his worde, and arrowes of golde in a posye, called 
La maison du refuge, made of Crymosyn damaske, broudered 
with Roses and arrowes of golde, on the tope a greyhonde 
of sylver, bearynge a tree of Pomegarnettes of golde, the 
braunches therof were so large that it over sprede the 
pagent in all partes. Then entred Syr Gyles Capel, Syr 
Rouland with many other knightes, rychely armed and 
appareiled. And thus beganne the Justes, whiche was 
valiauntly acheved by the kyng and his aides, emonges 
whome his grace atteyned the pryce. The Justes fynyshed, 
every man with drew, the kynge was disarmed, and at time 
convenient he and the Quene heard evensong, and that night 
all the Ambassadours supped with the kyng, and had a great 
banket. After supper, his grace with the Quene, Lordes 
and Ladies came into the white Hall, within the sayed 
Pallays, whiche was hanged rychely, the Hall was scafolded 
and rayled on al partes. There was an interlude of the 
Gentelmen of his Chapell before his grace, and divers 
fresh songes : That done, his grace called to hym a greate 
man, or a lorde of Ireland called Odonell, whome in the 
presence of the Ambassadours, he made knyght : Then 
mynstrels beganne to playe, the Lordes and Ladies beganne 
to daunce. 

And in the mooste of this pastime, when all persones were 
moste attentyve to behold the daunsyng, the kyng was 
sodenly gone unknowen to the moste parte of the people 
there, oneles it were of the Quene and of certayne other. 

Within 

VOL. I. 



THE II. 
YERE 

[I5IO-II] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE II. 
YERE 

[I5IO-II] 



Within a littell whyle after his departing, the trompettes at 
thende of the Hall began to blowe. Then was there a device 
or a pageaunt upon wheles brought in, out of the whiche 
pageaunt issued out a gentelman rychely apparelled, that 
shewed, how in a garden of pleasure there was an arber of 
golde, wherein were lordes and ladies, muche desirous to 
shew pleasure and pastime to the Quene and ladies, if they 
might be licenced so to do, who was answered by the 
Quene, how she and all other there were very desirous to se 
theim and their pastime : then a greate clothe of Arras that 
did hange before the same pageaunt was taken awaye, and 
the pageaunt brought more nere, it was curiously made and 
plesaunt to beholde, it was solempne and ryche, for every 
post or piller therof, was covered with fryse golde, therein 
were trees of Hathorne, Eglantines, Hosiers, Vines and 
other plesaunt floures of divers colours, with Gillofers and 
other herbes all made of Satyn, damaske, silke sylver and 
gold, accordingly as the natural trees, herbes, or floures 
ought to be. In whiche arber were vi. ladies, all apparailed 
in white satyn and grene, set and enbroudered full of H. 
and K. of golde, knitte together with laces of golde, of 
damaske, and al their garmentes were replenished with 
glitteryng spangles gylt over, on their heddes were 
bonettes al opened at the iiii. quarters, overfrysed with 
flat gold of damaske, the orrellettes were of rolles, wrethed 
on lampas douck holow, so that the golde shewed thorow the 
lampas douck, the fassis of their head set full of new devised 
facions : in this garden, also was the kyng and v. with him 
appareyled in garmentes of purpul satyn, al of cuttes with 
H. and K. every edge garnished with frysed golde, and every 
garment ful of poysees, made of letters of fine golde in bullion 
as thicke as they might be, and every persone had his name 
in like letters of massy gold. The fyrst Cuer loyall. The 
second Bone voloyre, in the iii. Bone espoier, The iiii. Val- 
yaunt desyre, The fyft Bone foy, The vi. Amoure loyall, their 
hosen, cappes, and cotes, were ful of poises and H. and K. 
of fine gold in bullion, so that the ground could scace apere 
and yet was in every voyde place spangels of gold. When 
time was come, the said pageaunt was brought forth into 
presence, and then discended a lorde and a lady by copies, and 
then the my nstrels, which were disguised, also daunced, and the 
lorde and ladies daunced, that it was a pleasure to beholde. 

In 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



In the meane season the pagiaunt was conveyed to the 
ende of the place, there to tary tyll the daunces were fynyshed, 
and so to have receyved the Lordes and Ladies againe, but 
sodainly the rude people ranne to the pagent, and rent, tare, 
and spoyled the pagent, so that the Lorde Stuard nor the head 
officers could not cause them to abstaine, excepte they 
shoulde have foughten and drawen bloud, and so was this 
pagent broken. 

After the kyng and his compaignions had daunced, he 
apointed the ladies, gentelwomen and the Ambassadours to 
take the letters of their garmentes, in token of liberalitie, 
whiche thing the common people perceyvyng, ranne to the 
kyng, and striped hym into his hosen and doublet, and all 
his compaignions in likewyse. Sir Thomas Knevet stode on 
a stage, and for all his defence he lost his apparell. The 
ladies likewyse were spoyled, wherfore the kynges garde 
came sodenly, and put the people backe, or els as it was 
supposed more inconvenience had ensued. So the kyng 
with the Quene and the ladyes returned into his chamber, 
where they had a great banket, and all these hurtes were 
turned to laughyng and game, and thought that, all that 
was taken away was but for honoure, and larges : and so this 
triumphe ended with myrth and gladnes. At this banket, 
a shypman of London caught certayne letters which he sould 
to a goldsmyth for iii.t. xiiii.s. viii.d. by reason wherof, it 
appeared that the garmentes were of a great value. 

After this great joye came sorowfull chaunce, for the 
young Prynce, whiche was borne upon newyeres daye last 
past, upon the two and twenty daye of February, beyng then 
the even of Saint Mathy, departed this worlde at Rychemond, 
and from thense was caried to Westmynster, and buryed. 

The kyng lyke a wyse Prynce, toke this dolorous chaunce 
wonderous wysely, and the more to comfort the Quene, he 
dissimuled the matter, and made no great mourning out- 
wardely : but the Quene lyke a naturall woman, made muche 
lamentacion, how be it, by the kynges good persuasion and 
behaviour, her sorow was mytigated, but not shortlye. This 
yere also in the moneth of Februarie, came from kyng 
Ferdinando, the kynges father in lawe, and kynge of Arragon 
and Castell certayne Ambassadours, whiche made request to 
the kyng, on the behalfe of the kyng their master, to have 
ayde of the kyng of fyften hundred Archers, with valiaunt 

Capitaynes 



THE II. 
YERE 

[I5IO-II] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE II. 
YERE 

[I5IO-II] 



Capitaynes to governe and conduyte them : For his entent 
was to make warre on the Moores, beyng Infideles and 
enemies to Gods law. The kyng and his counsayll hearyng 
this request, thoughte it muche honourable to ayde a Chris- 
tian Prynce, and in especiall his frende and father in lawe, 
agaynst the infideles enemies to Christes lawe, wherfore 
the kyng gentely graunted them their request. When 
tydinges were spread in the courte of this journey against the 
infideles, the lorde Thomas Darcye, knyght of the order of 
the gartier, made humble suyte to the kynge, to be capitayne 
generall of that Crewe or armye. The kyng and hys coun- 
saill for his greate valiauntnes and approved wysedome 
graunted his request : many lordes and knyghtes made 
suite to be in the same jorney, but the kyng aunswered 
them, that he retained them still for other greater considera- 
cions and purposes. There were appointed to go with the 
saied lorde Darcie, lorde Antony Grey, brother to the Mar- 
ques Dorset, Henry Guyldeford, Weston, Broune, Willyam 
Sydney, Esquiers of the kynges house, syr Robert Constable, 
syr Roger Haystynges, and syr Raufe Elderkare, and divers 
other gentelmen to be capitaines. The lorde Darcie and all 
the other Capitaynes toke their leve of the kyng, and went 
into their countreis to provide for all thynges mete and. 
necessary for the voiage. 

The kyng this tyme was muche entysed to playe at 
tennys and at dice, which appetite, certain craftie persons 
about him perceiuing, brought in Frenchemen and Lom- 
bardes, to make wagers with hym, and so he lost much 
money, but when he perceived their craft, he excheuyd their 
compaigny, and let them go. The kyng beyng lusty, young, 
and couragious, greatly delited in feates of chyvalrie, in so 
much that he made a chalenge of Justes, againste all commers 
to be proclaimed at his mannoure of Grenewyche, to be 
holden there the iii. first daies of May then next ensuyng, 
whiche noble courage, all younge persones highly praysed, 
but the auncient fathers muche doubted, considering the 
tender youth of the kyng, and divers chaunces of horses and 
armure: in so much that it was openly spoken, that stele 
was not so strong, but it might be broken, nor no horse 
coulde be so sure of fote, but he may fall : Yet for all these 
doubtes, the lusty prince preceded in his chalenge. 

The first daye of Maye the Kynge accompaignied with 

many 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



29 



many lusty Batchelers, on greate and well doyng horses 
rode to the woode to fetche May, where a man might have 
sene many a horse raysed on highe, with galope, turne and 
stoppe, marveylous to behold : where he and thre other as 
syr Edward Haward, Charles Brandon, and Edward Nevel, 
which were chalengers with the kyng, shyfted themselfes 
into cotes of grene Satyn, garded with Crymosyn Velvet. 
On the other parte the Earles of Essex, of Devenshyre, the 
Marques Dorset, the lorde Haward, were all in Crymosyn 
Satyn, garded with a pounced garde of grene Velvet : and 
as they were returning on the Hyll, met with them a shippe 
under-sayle : The master hayled the kyng and that noble 
compaignie, and saied that he was a Maryner, and was come 
from many a straunge porte, and came hither to se if any 
dedes of armes were to be done in the countrey, of the 
whiche he might make report therof in other countreis. 
An Heraulde demaunded the name of his shyppe, he 
aunswered she is called Fame, and is laden with good 
Renoune : Then sayed the Heraulde, if you wil bring 
your shippe into the bay of Hardines, you must double 
the poynt of Gentilnes, and there you shall se a com- 
paignie that wyll medle with your marchaundise. Then 
sayed the kyng, sythen Renowne is their marchaundyse, 
let us bye it and we can : Then the shippe shotte a pele 
of Gunys, and sayled forth before the kynges compaignie, 
ful of flagges and banners, till it came to the tilte yearde. 
At after none, the kyng and his thre felowes entred into 
the fielde, their bardes and bases of Crymosyn and blew 
velvet, cut in quadrant cuttes, enbroudered full of Pom- 
granettes, and all the wayters, in sylke of the same coloure. 
The other partie were in Crymosyn Satyn and grene velvet. 
Then began the trompettes to sounde, and the horses to 
runne that many a spere was brast, and many a great stripe 
geven : and for truthe the kyng exceded in number of 
staves all other, every day of the iii. daies. Wherfore on 
the iii. day, the quene made a great banket to the kyng, 
and all them that had Justed : And after the banket done, 
she gave the chefe price to the kyng, the ii. to the erle 
of Essex, the iii. to the erle of Devonshyre, and the iiii. to 
the Lorde Marques Dorset. Then the Herauldcs cried, 
my lordes, for your noble feates in armes, God sende you 
the love of your ladies that you moste desire. 

THE 



THE II. 
YERE 

[I5IO-II] 



3 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE III. 
VERB 

[I5II-I2] 



THE THYRD YERE. 

THE kyng ever desirous to serve Mars, began an 
other Justes the xv. day of the saied moneth : the 
kyng and his bend were all in grene sylke, and the 
erle of Essex and his bende in blew, garded with gold, and 
all the speres were paynted of the same colours. There 
was good running and many a spere brast, but for al the 
sport every man feared, lest some yll chaunce might happen 
to the kyng, and fayne would have had him a loker on, 
rather then a doer, and spake therof as much as thei durst : 
but his courage was so noble that he would ever be at the 
one ende. 

In this passe tyme, the lord Darcy and other appoynted 
to the vyage agaynst the Moores of Barbaria (at the in- 
staunce of Donpefernando father to the Quene) made 
suche diligence, that they and all their people were ready 
at Plymmouth by the myddes of May, and there mustered 
their souldiers before the lorde Broke, and other the 
kynges commissioners. The sayed lorde Darcie, as Capi- 
tayne generall ordeined for hys Provost Marshall, Henry 
Guylford Esquier, a lusty youngman, and well beloved 
of the kyng. Then, when the winde served to their 
purpose, and all the armie were set aborde in their shippes, 
whiche were vytailed and prest at all pointes, the Capitayn 
and other departed out of Plymmouth haven, the monday 
in the Rogacion weke with iiii. shippes Royall and the 
wind was so favourable to them, that the first day of 
June, beynge the even of the feaste of Pentecost, he arrived 
at the porte of Caleys in Southspayne, and immediatly by 
the advice of his counsayll, dispatched to the kyng of 
Arragon two Gentelmen, called Jhon Barthelmew, and 
Willyam Symonde, with letters to certefie the kyng and 
his counsaill of their arrivall, and what payne they had 
taken to come to his countrey, in fulfyllyng the kyng 
their masters commaundement. The messengers did so 
muche that they came to the kyng, beside the citie of Cy vill, 
where he then laye, and declared to hym how the lorde Darcie 
by the kyng their masters appointement, was come thither 
with xvi. C. archers mo, accordyng to the saied kyng of 

Arragons 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



3 1 



Arragons request, and laye still at Caleys to know his plea- 
sure. The kyng of Arragon aunswered them gentelly, 
that the lord Darcie and all other that were come from hys 
moste best beloved sonne were welcome, and hartely thanked 
theim of theyr paynes, and prayed the messengers to returne 
to their capitayne shewyng hym that the kyng in all haste 
would sende his counsail to him, and so they departed from 
the kyng, and made reporte to the lorde Darcie, whiche kept 
his shippe in great estate, and would not lande, but only 
suffered suche as were sicke and feble, and few other to go a 
lande. 

The Englyshmen whiche went a lande, fell to drinking of 
note wines and were scace masters of theim selfes, some 
ranne to the stewes, some brake hedges, and spoyled 
orchardes and vyneyardes, and orynges before they were 
rype, and did many other outragious dedes : wherfore the 
chefe of the toune of Caleys, came to complaine to the lorde 
Darcie in hys shippe, whiche sent forth his Provost Marshall, 
which scacelie with peyne refrayned the yomen archers, they 
were so hote and wyllfull, yet by commaundement and 
policie, they were al brought on borde on their shippes. 

Saterdaye the eight daye of June, the Byshop of and 

other of the kynges counsaill, arryved at Caleys, and there 
abode tyll wednysdaye, beyng the even of Corpus Christy, at 
whiche daye the lord Capitayne toke lande, and was honour- 
ably received of the kynge of Arragons counsayll, and on 
the morow highly fested at dynner and supper. And after 
supper, the Byshop declared the kyng of Arragons pleasure 
saiyng : my lorde Capitayne, the kyng my master in mooste 
humble wyse geveth you thankes for your greate paynes 
and travell, as muche as though he preceded in this pre- 
tensed enterpryce, but he with the advice of his counsayll 
circumspectly, consideryng the suertie of his awne realities 
and dominions hathe perfectie knowlege, that his adversarye 
of Fraunce, prepareth to invade hys countreis in hys absence: 
wherfore he entendyng not to leve his Realmes, voyde of 
men and shyppes (whiche myght be a great comfort to his 
enemies to invade) and therfore he hathe taken an abstin- 
ence of warre with the Moores tyll another tyme. Well 
sayed the lorde Darcie, sythe it is fully concluded that we 
shall do no service to your Master, we maye not saye 
agaynst his determinacion, consyderyng we were sent to 

hym, 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II-I2] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE III. 
YERE 

[ISII-I2] 



hym, but surely it is agaynste my hart, whiche ever hath 
desired to fyght agaynst Goddes enemies, but with your 
conclusion, I and all myne muste be content. You do as 
you should do, saied the Byshop, and the kynge my master 
geveth lyke thankes to the kynge his sonne, and to you all, 
as though he had preceded in his journey. And you shall 
have wages for all your souldiers : And if it shall please you 
to come to the court, you shall receyve hygh thankes of the 
kyng, and suche chere as there can be made you. That is 
not my desyre sayed the Lorde Darcie, for my men shall not 
saye that I brought them out of their countrey, and nowe to 
do my selfe pleasure, leave theim without an hedde, as men 
of men forsaken : Nay nay my lorde, the kynges banket is 
not my desyre. So the lordes departed for the night, and 
the next dai in the morning was sent wages, to conduict 
tharmie into England, with diverse giftes geven to the lord 
Darcie, and other gentle men : Yet that notwithstanding, 
he was highly displeased, how beit like a wise man he 
dissimuled the matter. 

The same dale, beyng the xiiii. daie of June and Fridaie, 
an Englishe man desired of a maide, that had been at the 
Bakers to bye bread for her maistres store and not to sell, 
to have a lofe for his money, she aunswered, that she had 
none to sell, he said he would have one, and folowed her, 
and when she perceived that, she cried, a force a force, the 
tounes men of Caleis, or Caleis males, sodainly rong their 
common bell, and al the toune went to harneis, and the 
fewe Englishemen that wer on land went to their bowes. 
The Spaniardes cast dartes, and sore anoyed and hurt the 
Englishmen : and thei likewise hurt and slew diverse 
Spanyardes. Then the Capitaines of Englande for their 
part, and the lordes of the Counsaill for their parte, toke 
suche pain, that the fraie was seased, and but one Englishe- 
man slain, and of the Spanyardes diverse slain. 

Then all Englishe men were commaunded to go aborde 
wyth theyr shippes. The lordes of Spayne came to the lorde 
Darcie, saiyng : Sir, we praie you, sithe you knowe the 
kynges pleasure and have your wages, that you with all 
your people will go with your shippes awaie, for we perceive 
you owe us some displeasure. Then he boldly answered 
saiyng, that he woulde al the worlde knew, that he was as 
able to conduit his menne homewarde, as he was to bryng 

theim 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



33 



theim out of their countrey, without the kyng of Arragons 
wages, (savyng his honor) and as for the fraie, it was 
agaynst his will and without his knowlege : and so that 
night he and all his men, went aborde with theyr shippes. 

When this jorney was come to this poynt, Henry Guil- 
forde, Weston, Browen, and Willyam Sidney, young and 
lustie Esquires, desired license to see the Courte of Spayne, 
whiche was to theim graunted : and then thei departed 
from Caleis, and came to the Courte of the kyng of Arragon, 
wher thei wer highly entertained, and he dubbed Henry 
Guildford, Weston, and Browne, knightes, and gave to sir 
Henry Guilford a Canton of Granado, and to sir Weston, 
and Browne, an Egle of Scicile on a cheffe to the augmen- 
tacion of their armes : William Sidney, so excused himself, 
that he was not made knight, and when thei had sojornied 
ther a while, they tooke their leave of the kyng and quene, 
and so returned through Fraunce into England, wher they 
demained themselfes so, that thei had the kynges favoure, 
notwithstanding it was thought contrary. 

Duryng whiche season the lorde Darcie, the xvii. daie of 
June made saile towarde England, and arived at Plim- 
mouthe, and came to the kyng at Wyndsore, and in August 
thus ended this voyage. 

Duryng the time that the Lorde Darcie was in Spayne, 
the Ladie Margaret Duches of Savoy, and daughter to 
Maximilian themperor, and governor of the countreis of 
Flaunders, Brabant, Holland, Zelande and other the lowe 
countres apperteinyng to Charles the yong prince of 
Castell, then beyng of tendre age, sent in thend of Maii 
to the kynge of England to have xv. c. archers, to aide her 
against the duke of Geldres which sore trobled the countreis 
aforsaid. The kyng tenderly regarding the request of so 
noble a lady, and also because there was a communication 
hangyng at their time of mariage, to be had betwene the 
young Prince Charles, and the lady Marie his sister, moste 
jently graunted her request and appoynted sir Edward 
Powninges knight of the garter, and comptroller of his 
house, a valiant capitain and a noble warrior, to be the 
lieuetenaunt and conductor of the saied xv. c. archers, whiche 
accompanied with the lord Clinton his sonne in lawe, sir 
Mathew Browne, sir Jhon Dighby, Jhon Werton, Richard 
Whethrill, Sherley Esquires and diverse tall gentelmen and 

yomen, 

VOL. i. 



THE in. 
YERE 

[1511-12] 



34 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II-I2] 



yomen, wel knowen men and tried, to the said nombre of 
xv. c. toke their shipping a mile beside Sandwiche, the 
xviii. daie of July, and landed at Arinew the xix. daie, not 
without some treble by reason of a litle storme, and sent 
Lancaster Herauld to advertise the lady of their arrivall, 
which sent to them lord Bresley knight of the Toyson, and 
diverse other to welcome them, and so conduited them to 
Barow, where the lorde of the toune made theim great chere. 
And the same daie at after none, came the lady Margaret 
to Barow, where the capitain with al his under capitaines 
received her at the gate, she welcomed them hartely, and 
so she did all the souldiers whiche stode along reinged in 
the strete. And on saterdaie beyng the xxvi. daie of July, 
she sawe al the company shote, and the same night the 
capitayn and other toke his leave of her, and the morowe 
beeyng sondaie departed to Rossindale, and so on thursday 
the last day of July came to Buldike, and that daie the 
ladie Margaret came thether. And the next daie, the whole 
army of Almaines, Fleminges, and other aperteignyng to 
the saied lady, met with thenglishmen without Buldike, 
where thei set furth in ordre, the lady Margaret being 
present : which toke her leve of all the capitaines and 
departed to Buldike, whome sir Edwarde Pownynges con- 
duited to the toune gate, and after returned to tharmy. 
Tharmie to the nombre of x. M. of the ladies parte and 
xv. c. Englishmen passed through Brabant, and came the 
x. dai of August beyng s. Laurence daie, before a litle 
castle standyng on the higher side of the river of Mase 
called Brimuoyst strongly Bulwarked, in the whiche wer 
c. men belongyng to the bastard of Gelders, with a 
capitaine called Lankessell van Gelder, whiche robbed and 
spoyled all the parties of Brabant. Thei within shot 
fiersly at tharmy as it passed by, and did them litle hurte. 
The same night Thomas Hert chief gonner of thenglish 
part, made his approch of his ordenaunce, and in the morning 
bet doune as much as might be beaten doune for the bul- 
warkes, and the next daie beyng the xi. of August the castle 
was assaulted valiantly, and taken by force, and the capitain 
and Ixxx. and od men were slain and xix. taken, of the whiche 
xi. wer hanged, Jhon Morton capitain of c. Englishmen, and 
one Guiot an esquire of Burgoyn crieng Burgoyn S. George : 
there was one Englishman slain and no more. 

On 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



35 



On thursdaie the xiiii daie, tharmie feried over the river 
of Mase into the land of Geldres, and there sojornied at a 
litle churche, of our ladye daie the Assumpcion that night, 
and the nexte daie thei came to a toune called Aiske, be- 
longyng to the Bastarde Geldres : where all the people wer 
fled, and there was undermined and caste doune, a litle 
castle standyng of the sayd river newly edified. 

The xx. of August thei brent the toune of Aiske, and 
brent al the countrey about, and came at last to a toune 
called Straulle, a strong toune double diked and walled, and 
within it iii. C. Ix. good men of warre beside the inhabit- 
auntes, whiche at the firste commyng shot Gonnes fiercely 
and hurte many, and there they planted their siege. 

Sir Edward Pounynges, whiche ever was in the forward 
with his archers, caused fagottes to be made, and trenches 
to be digged and cast and his men wer so diligent, that 
his trenche in the mornyng approched so nye the toune 
gate, that thei within wer halfe dismaied : and desired to 
speake with the Lordes, and so thei did. And on S. Bar- 
thelmewes even, were sixe men sent out of the toune to 
treate, and sixe hostages delivered for theim, and then it 
was agreed that all men of warre should departe with a 
white sticke in their handes, and to forfet all other thynges, 
and al the toune dwellers to bee prisoners at the will of the 
Prince of Castle. The next daie, after the men of warre 
were departed, erly in the morning sir Jhon Dighby knight, 
and Jhon Norton Esquire, toke possession of the toune with 
CC. English menne : and at after None the Admiral of 
Flaunders, sir Edward Pounynges, and the lorde Discilstain, 
chief capitaines of tharmie, with all other noble men, with 
Trumpettes, and Arthois and Lancaster, and Ostriche, 
officers at armes in their coates of armes before theim 
gorgeously apareled, entered the toune, and in the toune 
hall, toke thothe of thinhabitantes, and that night returned 
to their armie. 

The xxvi. daie of the same moneth, sir Jhon Dighby, and 
Jhon Norton, came out of the toune with al their English- 
men, and for them entered a capitain called Yonker Otes, 
with CC.l. Almaines, to kepe there a garrison, the whiche 
daie the armie went before Venlow and sent Artois with a 
trumpet to somon the toune : but thei would not here them 
speke, but shot gunnes at theim. The xxviii. daie, the 

armye 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II-I2] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II-I2] 



armye removed unto the Northside of Venlow, and part 
went over the water and made trenches to the water. The 
capitain of the Englishemen made trenches even to the 
toune diche, and the artilerie bet doune the towers of 
the walles, and every daie was some skirmishe. And the 
xxix. daie as certain Englishemen went a foragyng, it hap- 
pened x. of sir Jhon Dighbes men to go v. mile from the 
armie, and to mete with xxiiii. horsmen of Geldres which 
set on them, but they withdrew themselfes into a litle 
garden, and shot at their enemies, and slewe two horsmen 
and v. horses, gauled and hurte many of them, discomfited 
the remnant, and brought two great horses to tharmie, and 
every man was sore hurte, but in no perel of death thanked 
be God. The siege thus continuyng, not without skir- 
mishes xxix. daies sir Edward Pounynges, and sir Jhon 
Dighby dined with monsire de Rony and all other Englishe 
capitaines, and petie Capitaines, dined with an Almain called 
Clene Anderline, except sir Mathew Broune, and Jhon 
Fogge, whiche kepte the felde, and Richard Wethill, whiche 
kepte the trenche and was sore besette : and in the dinner 
tyme, thei of the toune issued out on thenglishemen, and 
hurte and toke one Sheldwiche of Canterbury prisoner, and 
one Miles : and thenglishemen hurt and slew many of theim, 
and compelled theim to returne by force of Arrowes, and so 
thei reculed with one prisoner. For Miles, which was led 
betwene two of the Geldres, perceiving rescue comming, 
after as he came to an hyll thrust the two Gelders doune the 
hill before him, and so ranne backe to his compaignie, whiche 
thyng the two Geldres that led him perceiving ranne to 
Sheldwiche and slew him. The Burgonions perceiving, 
that sir Edwarde Powninges was displeased with this 
chaunce, exhorted him with his menne to assault the toune, 
whiche, by thadvise of bastard Emery answered that the 
cause was theirs, and not his Maysters : and if he gatte 
the toune by assaulte, the king his Master should not have 
it, but if they would geve the assault, he woulde joyne with 
theim, whiche thing thei would not do, because thei had 
kinsemen and frendes within the toune : savyng one daie a 
few Almaines assaulted a Bulwerke, and wer slain and taken. 
The Englishe capitaines perceiving that thei laie there in 
vaine, consideryng the strength of the toune, and also how 
their armye was not in numbre to environ the toune, for 

ever 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



37 



ever thei had one Gate open, wrote to the kyng, which 
willed them with all spede to returne, and so thei did. 

Sir Edward Powninges went to the Court of Burgoyn, 
where he was highly entertayned of the young prince, and 
the Lady Margaret his aunte, and received great thankes 
and giftes for hys pain. And other capitaines, as syr Jhon 
Norton, sir Jhon Fogge, sir Jhon Scot, and syr Thomas 
Lind, were made knightes of the Prince. And the lady 
Margaret, perceiving the coates of the souldiers to be foule 
with liyng on the ground (for every man lai not in a tent) 
gave to every yoman a cote of wolen clothe of yalowe, red, 
white and grene coloures, not to her litle laude and praise 
emong thenglishemen. After that sir Edward Ponynges 
had ben highly feasted, and more praised of all men for his 
valiantnes, and good ordre of his people, he returned with 
his compaignie into England, and had lost by warre and 
sickenes, not fully an C. persones. 

When the Englishemen were departed, Geldres issued 
out daily, and made skirmishes and fraies with the Bur- 
gonions, and asked for theyr Archers, and Winter beganne 
sharpelye to approche, and by aboundaunce of raine, the 
river of the Masse roase so high, that the Trenches were 
drouned, and of force men were compelled to remove. 
And when the Capitaines considered the strengthe of the 
Towne, how it was fortified, victailed and manned, and 
how by the risyng of the River it was made stronger : thei 
determined to raise the Siege, and to burne and destroye 
all the Villages and Tounes aboute, of the which toune of 
Venlow, would have succor in winter, and to mete again, 
at the Prime time of the yere. Thus was the siege raised, 
and the countrey wasted and spoyled, and then every capi- 
tain returned home. 

In June the kyng beyng at Leicester, tidynges wer 
brought to him, that Andrew Barton a Scottishe manne, 
and a pirate of the sea, saiyng that the kyng of Scottes, 
had warre with the Portingales, did rob every nacion, and 
so stopped the kynges stremes, that no merchauntes almost 
could passe, and when he toke thenglishmenes goodes, he 
said they wer Portyngales goodes, and thus he haunted and 
robbed at every havens mouthe. The kyng moved greately 
with this craftie pirate, sent sir Edmond Haward lord Ad- 
miral of England, and lord Thomas Haward sonne and 

heire 



THE ill. 
YERE 

[1511-12] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II-I2] 



heire to therle of Surrey, in all the hast to the sea, whiche 
hastely made redy two shippes, and without any more 
abode, toke the sea, and by chaunce of wether were 
severed. The lorde Haward Hyng in the Dounes, per- 
ceived where Andrew was making toward Scotlande, and so 
fast the saied lorde chased him, that he overtooke hym, and 
there was a sore battaill : thenglishmen wer fierce, and the 
Scottes defended them manfully, and ever Andrew blewe 
his whistell to encorage his men, yet for al that, the lord 
Haward and his men, by cleane strength entred the mayne 
decke : then the Englishemen entred on all sides, and the 
Scottes foughte sore on the hatches, but in conclusion, 
Andrewe was taken, whiche was so sore wounded, that he 
died there : then all the remnaunte of the Scottes wer 
taken, with their shippe called the Lion. 

Al this while, was the lorde Admirall in chace of the Barke 
of Scotlande, called Jenny Pirwyn, whiche was wont to 
saile with the Lion in compaignie, and so muche did he 
with other, that he laied him on borde, and fiercely assailed 
him, and the Scottes as hardy and well stomaked men 
them defended, but the lorde Admirall so encoraged his 
men, that they entered the Barke and slewe many, and toke 
all the other. 

Thus wer these two shippes taken, and brought to Blacke 
Wai, the seconde daie of August, and al the Scottes were 
sent to the Bishoppes place of Yorke, and there remained 
at the kynges charge, til other direccion was taken for 
theim. 

After this, the kyng sent the bishop of Winchester, and 
certain of his counsaill, to tharchebishop of Yorkes place, 
wher the Scottes wer prisoners : and ther the bishop 
rehersed to them, wher as peace was yet between England 
and Scotland, that thei contrary to that, as theves and 
pirates, had robbed the kynges subjectes within his stremes : 
wherfore, thei had deserved to die by the law, and to be 
hanged at the low water marke. Then said the Scottes, we 
knowlege our offence, and aske mercie and not the lawe. 
Then a priest, which was also prisoner said, my lordes we 
appele from the kinges justice to his mercy. Then the 
bishop asked him if he wer aucthorised by them to sai so, 
and thei cried al yea yea, then said he, you shal find the 
kinges merci above his justice. For wher you wer ded bi 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



39 



the law, yet by his merci he wil revive you, wherfor, you 
shal depart out of this realme wythin xx. daies, upon pain 
of death, if you be founde after the xx. daie, and praie for 
the kyng, and so they passed into the Countrey. 

The kyng of Scottes, hearyng of the death of Andrewe 
of Barton, and takyng of his two shippes, was wonderfull 
wrothe, and sent letters to the kyng, requiryng restitucion, 
accordyng to the league and amide. The kyng wrote with 
brotherly salutacions to the kyng of Scottes, of the robberies 
and evill doynges of Andrewe Barton, and that it became not 
one Prince to laie a breache of a league to another Prince 
in doyng Justice upon a pirate or thiefe, and that al the 
other Scottes that were taken, had deserved to dye by Justice, 
if he had not extended his mercie : and with this answere, 
the Scottishe Herauld departed home. 

Duryng this season, there began greate warre, betwene 
Pope July and the Frenche kyng, Loys the XII. : the 
occasion beganne by one Jhon Bentivoyle, a greate lorde of 
Italic, whiche kepte the citee of Boloigne le Grace from the 
Pope, whiche, by the aide of the Frenche kyng, gatte the 
saied citee from the forenamed Jhon Bentivoyle : but 
afterward, because the saied Pope July tooke peace with the 
Venecians, the French kyng turned from the Pope, and 
made warre on hym, in the behalfe of Jhon Bentivoyle, and 
toke from hym again the said citee of Boloigne. 

The kyng of Englande wrote often to kyng Loys of 
Fraunce to desist from the persecutyng of the Pope, which 
was his frende and confederate : to which writyng he gave 
litle regard, wherefore, the kyng sent him woorde, to deliver 
hym his lawfull enheritaunce, bothe of the Duchie of Nor- 
mandie and Guyan, and the countreis of Anjow and Mayne, 
and also of his Croune of Fraunce, els he would come with 
suche a power, that by fine force he would obtein his pur- 
pose. For al these writinges, the Frenche kyng still made 
warre in Italic, and the kyng could of him have no certain 
nor determinate answere. Wherefore, after greate deliber- 
acion had, by the advise of his counsaill, he determined to 
make warre on the Frenche kyng, and his countreis, and 
called to him Maximilian the Emperor, and Ferdinand kyng 
of Arragon, and diverse other princes, and made preparacion, 
bothe by sea and by lande, and fortified his frontiers against 
Fraunce, and set furth shippes to the sea for defence of 

his 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II.I2] 



4 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II-I2] 



his merchauntes, whiche wer daily in jeoperdy, under a pre- 
tensed peace of the Frenche kyng, Lewes the XII. 

The kyng this yere kept the feast of Christmas at Grene- 
wiche, wher was such abundaunce of viandes served, to all 
comers of any honest behavior, as hath been fewe times 
seen. And against Newieres night, was made in the halle 
a castle, gates, towers, and dungion, garnished wyth artilerie 
and weapon after the most warlike fashion : and on the 
frount of the castle was written le Fortresse dangerus, and 
within the castle were vi. ladies, clothed in Russet Satin, 
laide all over with leves of Golde, and every owde, knit with 
laces of blewe silke and golde. On their heddes, coyfes, 
and cappes all of golde. 

After this castle had been caried about the hal, and the 
quene had behelde it, in came the kyng with five other, 
appareled in coates, the one halfe of russet satyn, spangled 
with spangles of fine gold, the other halfe riche clothe of 
gold, on their heddes cappes of russet satin, embroudered 
with workes of fine gold bullion. These vi. assaulted the 
castle, the ladies seyng them so lustie and coragious, were 
content to solace with them, and upon farther communi- 
cacion, to yeld the castle, and so thei came doune and 
daunced a long space. And after the ladies led the knightes 
into the castle, and then the castle sodainly vanished out of 
their sightes. 

On the daie of the Epiphanie at night, the kyng with 
xi. other wer disguised, after the maner of Italic, called 
a maske, a thyng not seen afore in Englande, thei were 
appareled in garmentes long and brode, wrought all with 
gold, with visers and cappes of gold, and after the banket 
doen, these Maskers came in, with sixe gentlemen dis- 
guised in silke bearyng staffe torches, and desired the 
ladies to daunce, some were content, and some that knewe 
the fashion of it refused, because it was not a thyng com- 
monly seen. And after thei daunced and commoned 
together, as the fashion of the Maskes is, thei toke their 
leave and departed, and so did the Quene, and all the 
ladies. 

The xv. daie of January began the Parliament, where 
the Bisshop of Cantorburie began his oracion with this 
verse, Justicia et pax osculate suni, upon whiche, he 
declared how Justice should be ministered, and peace 

should 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



4 1 



should bee nourished, and by what meanes, Justice was 
put by, and peace turned into warre. And there upon he 
shewed, how the French kyng would do no Justice, in 
restoryng the kyng his right enheritaunce, wherfore, for 
lacke of Justice, peace of necessitie must turne to warre. 

In this Parliament was graunted, twoo fiftenes of the 
temporaltie, and of the clergie two dismes : Duryng 
which Parliament, one Newbolt yoman of the kynges 
Garde, whom the kyng highly favored, slewe wilfully a 
servaunt of my lorde Willoughbies, in the palaice at West- 
minster, wherfore, the kyng abhorryng that deede, and 
settyng a side al affeccion, caused him to be hanged in 
the Palaice of Westminster, wher he hong twoo daies, in 
example of other. 

In this season, one Jherome Bonvise, whiche was borne in 
Luke, and was a factor in London for Merchauntes of that 
nacion, and had plaied Bankroute, and was conveighed out 
of the realme for debt, was nowe in suche favor with Pope 
July, that he made hym his Collector, and Proctor in 
England : and so he kept a greate porte, and resorted to 
the kyng and his counsaill, for the Popes affaires, (which 
then was sore troubled by the Frenche kyng) so that he 
knewe, bothe the Popes counsaill, and the kynges, and 
falsly and untruly, resorted by nighte, to the Frenche 
Ambassadors, liyng in London, and to theim discovered, 
what the kyng and the Pope entended, which was not so 
closly doen, but the king knewe it : and so he was laied 
for, and was taken commonyng, with one of the said Am- 
bassadors, upon London wall at midnight, and brought to 
the Tower, where he remained, till by the suite of his 
frendes, he was delivered, and shortly for shame, voyded 
the realme. 

After that it was concluded, by the body of the Realme, 
in the high Courte of Parliament assembled, that warre 
should bee made on the Frenche kyng and his dominions, 
the kyng with all diligence caused newe shippes to be made 
and repaired, and rigged the old, caused Gonnes, Bowes, 
Arrowes, and al other artilery, and instrumentes of warre 
to be made, in suche nombre and quantitee, that it was 
wonderfull to se what thynges wer doen, bothe for sea and 
lande in so shorte space. 

The kyng of Arragon, whiche also had warre with the 

French 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II-I2] 



VOL. I. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE III. 
YERE 

[I5II-I2] 



French kyng, and hearyng that his sonne the kyng of 
England would make warre in Fraunce, did write to hym 
that the duchie of Guyan was his true enheritaunce, whiche 
adjoyned to his countrey of Biskey : wherfore, if the kyng 
of Englande would entende to recover his Duchy first, and 
send an armie of men to Biskaye, and so to begin at Bayon, 
whiche is the keye of Guyan, he would aide them with 
ordinaunce, horsemen, and beastes for cariages, with other 
necessaries apperteignyng to the same. 

The kyng and his counsaill, puttyng their affiaunce in 
the promise of the kyng of Arragon, prepared a noble 
armie al of fotemen, and smal ordinaunce, trustyng to the 
kyng of Arragon for aide of horsemen and greate ordi- 
naunce, and of the same made capitain, the noble lorde 
Thomas Grey Marques of Dorset, to whom, he assigned 
many other gentlemen, as you shall here after in the next 
yere. 

THE HII. YERE. 

THE kyng greatly studiyng, to furnishe furthe his 
warre, whiche he had begonne against the Frenche 
kyng, caused sir Edwarde Hawarde his Admirall, 
with all diligence to take the sea, whiche, with all spede 
possible made ready diverse goodly and tal shippes, as the 
sovereigne and other to the nombre of xviii. beside litle 
shippes : and in his compaignie were Capitaines, syr Weston 
Browne, Griffith Doune, Edwarde Cobham, Thomas Wyn- 
dam, Thomas Lucie, Willyam Pirton, Henry Shirborne, 
Stephen Bull, George Witwange, Jhon Hopton, Willyam 
Gimstone, Thomas Draper, Edmond Coke, Jhon Bordet, 
with diverse other. When all these were shipped, they 
sailed to Dover, and skowred the seas, and so came before 
Portesmouthe, about the middes of Maye. 

The third daie of Maie, a gentleman of Flaunders, called 
Guyot of Guy, came to the kynge, wyth v. C. Almaines al 
in white, whyche was cutte so small, that it could scace hold 
together. After they had mustered at Blacke Hethe, the 
kyng made hym knight, and gave hym a greate chayne, and 
a yerely pencion, and sent hym with his band to South- 
ampton. About midde Maie, the lorde Marques and other 
noble men, appoynted by the kyng for the jorney of Biskay, 



as 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



43 



as the Lorde Hawarde, sonne and heire to the erle of 
Surrey, the Lorde Broke, the Lorde Willoughby, the Lorde 
Ferrers, the lorde Jhon, the lorde Anthony, and the lorde 
Leonard Grey, all three brethren to the Marques, sir Griffith 
App Riche, sir Mooreis Barkeley, sir Wylliam Sandes, the 
Baron of Burffbrd, sir Richard Cornwal his brother, 
William Huse, Jhon Melton, Willyam Kyngston Esquires, 
sir Henry Willoughby, and diverse other with souldiours, 
to the nomber of x. M. men, came to Southamton and 
there mustered. To se the lordes and gentelmen, so well 
armed and so richely appareled in clothes of gold, and of 
silver, and Velvettes of sundery coloures, pounsed and en- 
broudered, and all petie capitaines in Satin and damakse, of 
white and grene, and yomen in clothe of the same coloures. 
The Baners, Penons, Standerdes, and Gittons, fresh and 
newly painted, with sundry beastes and devises, it was a 
pleasure to behold. And when sir Willyam Sandes knight, 
appoynted Threasorer for the warres had paied all the wages, 
then every man was commaunded to his shippe. Then you 
should have sene byndyng of males, and fardelles, trussyng 
of coffers and trussers, that no manne was idle : and so on 
the xvi. daie, al the armie were shipped in Spanishe shippes, 
vitailed for that jorney, and passed the Nedles of Wight all 
the same daie, and so did the Lorde Admirall, whiche laie 
abidyng the wynde at Portesmouth, and toke his course to 
Britain, of whom I will speke after. 

The wynde served the Marques and his compaigne so 
well, that he with his whole armie arrived in Biskay, at 
a porte called Passagh, Southe West of Fountrabie. The 
thirde daie of June, the lorde Marques and all his faire 
compaignie landed, and tooke the fielde, and him wisely 
embattailed for his savegard. The Biskaynes that brought 
vitaile to the armie, saied to the souldiours : Sirs you bee 
arrived her, in trust that the kyng of Arragon will helpe 
you with ordinaunce and cariages, we here no preparacion 
that he maketh, nor never sent us worde to prepare for 
your comming, of the whiche wee marvell muche. These 
wordes ranne daily through the hoste, whiche made many 
men sad and to muse : and the Biskanes sore feared, least 
thenglishmen would destroye their countrey, because their 
kyng kepte not promise with theim, but the Marques made 
suche streight Proclamacion, that no souldiour durste do 

any 



THE mi. 

YERE 
[1512-13] 



44 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



any injurie to them. Within three dales after that the 
armie had lien in the feld, there came to him an erle, and 
another noble man, to welcome hym and his compaignie. 
Then the Lorde capitayn removed his field, and toke another 
place nerer Fountraby, more plenteous of water and woode, 
and there pitched his fielde, every daie lookyng for aide of 
the kyng of Arragon, but he harde of none. Then he 
called a Counsail, and devised how thei might have beastes 
to draw ordinaunce and cariages : then one sir Jhon Stile 
an Englishman, caused to be bought twoo C. Mulettes and 
Asses, of suche price as the Spanyardes gayned greatly, and 
when they were put to cary, they would neither bere nor 
drawe, for they were beastes which were not exercised 
afore. Then the lorde Marques muche lamented that 
chaunce, for if he had had redy two hundred drawyng 
beastes, he might have runne a great waie in Guian with 
his power, whiche then was not fortified, neither of men of 
warre, nor municions, nor artilarie. 

The Frenchemen of Bayon, hearyng of the Englishe- 
mennes campe, made a greate askry betwene the river of 
sainct Maria and Bayon : the Englishmen perceivyng the 
same, passed the river in good ordre of battail, al being on 
foote for lacke of the horsmen that the kyng of Arragon 
promised, and so with arrowes chased the Frenchemen on 
horsebackes that thei fled, and many horses foundered, and 
many a man was brosed or thei came to Bayon : at the 
whiche thenglishmen laughed and lamented. Firste, to se 
their cowardnes, second, to remembre what thei might have 
doen, if thei had had horses mete for their purpose : yet all 
thys notwithstandyng, thei retired to their campe in suche 
ordre, that the Spanyardes wondered muche, bothe at their 
fierce cor age and sobre ordre. 

The kyng of Navar, hearyng of the puissaunt armie of 
the English men liyng in Biskey so nere to his countrey, 
was sore troubled, and wondered much what the matter 
should meane : wherfore, he sent to the lord Marques, a 
bisshop and diverse other, to shewe to hym and all his 
counsaill, that if it pleased them, his countrey should sende 
them victaill, and al thynges necessarie for their money, 
and to do any other pleasure that thei could do, whiche might 
be to the pleasure of hym and all his armie, so that his realme 
should be sure of any invacions to be made by his people. 

The 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



45 



The Marques beyng capitain generall, with the advise of 
the other Lordes and counsaill, muche highly thanked the 
kyng of Navar of his good wil, aide, and comfort, which 
thinges onely they required : and if it pleased him, that his 
people will and male victaill us, we shall not onely paie 
theim for it, but also warraunt the passyng and repassing 
for us and oures in savetie, and that by us no prejudice 
shalbee dooen to hys realme, nor by our consent. With 
whiche answere the kyng of Navar was joyous, and suffered 
his people to victaill, and resort to the hooste, with al 
thinges necessarie and belongyng to the same, in greate 
windes and stormes, for that tyme happened muche wind 
and raine, whiche sore encombered the souldiours, that laye 
nightly on the bare grounde, for every man had not a tent 
or pavilion, whereof some wer lame, and some deffe, with 
other diseases. 

When the armie had lien there xxx. daies, in the seconde 
moneth ther came from the kyng of Arragon, a bisshop 
and other nobles of his counsail : but when it was knowen 
that it was the same bisshop that made the answere to the 
lorde Darcie at Cales Males, as you have hard the last yere, 
then many said, he came for no good but for delates : but 
he required the lorde Marques to take pacience, for shortly 
suche preparacion should be made, that he should se and 
prove, that it should be to the honor of his Master, and to 
his great renoune : to whom the Marques answered, that 
upon confidence of the king of Arragons promise that thei 
should lacke no beastes mete for drawyng, and horsemen, 
the kyng of England had sent him and his compaignions 
thether, whereof we have trusted sithe our firste hether 
commyng, whiche thynges if we had had, we had doen 
other enterprises then we have doen : for now we have 
lien here in campe, to the great charge of our Master, the 
kyng of England, and to no profile, and to our losse and 
great hurt. For at our arrival! the countrey of Guyan for 
the which we came, was unprovided of men of warr, muni- 
cions, and ordinaunce, by reason whereof (if all thynges 
had been accomplished of the part of your Master as we 
trusted) we might have had that whiche we came for, 
and if our commission had not been to folowe the kyng 
your Masters wil, as to whom we bee sent, I assure you we 
would have dooen other wise or this : but now the French- 



men 



THE mi. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



4 6 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



men have fortefied, victailed, and manned their tounes, and 
wee have spent tyme and dooen nothyng at all, lyngeryng 
for the kyng your Master, to the losse of us and great 
blemishyng of our honours. 

The bisshop perceivyng that the Englishe capitaines wer 
couragious and discontent with their idle abode, flatteryngly 
desired theim to tarry a while for the best, for a backe 
enemie saied he, is to bee regarded. Then saide the lorde 
Marques capitain general, if we knewe the Kynges entent, 
it would suffice us. Then saied the bisshop, you shal 
knowe it shortly : and so he departed frome the armie. 

Tharmie this lyngering, ever desirous to be at the busines 
that thei came for, their victaile was muche part Garlike, and 
the Englieshmen did eate of the Garlike with all meates, and 
dranke hote wynes in the hote wether, and did eate all 
the hote frutes that thei could gette, which caused their 
bloudde so to boyle in their belies, that there fell sicke 
three thousande of the flixe, and thereof died xviii. hundred 
men. 

The lorde Marques and other capitaines perceivyng this 
mischief, sent to the kyng of Arragon certain Lordes of 
the hooste to know his pleasure. The whiche answered 
them with gentle fashion, that the counsaill of Englande 
and his counsaill, had taken an ordre in all thyng of late, 
and how the duke Dalva a greate prince of Spain, should 
shortly with an armie royall joyne with theim, and so to 
precede in their enterprise. With whiche answere and 
small chere, the lordes of Englande departed, and made 
report to their capitain accordyng, whiche thought it verie 
sleight, but ever he regarded his Masters commaundement, 
and counsailed all the lordes to be content with the same. 

The armie liyng thus still and the sickenes not slaked, 
the people beyng idle, some evill disposed persones saied, 
that every capitain was alowed viii.d. for a common 
souldier, whiche was untrue, for thei had alowed onely vi.d. 
and so began together compaignies, the lordes perceivyng 
this, toke with them their trustie servauntes, and toke the 
beginners of the mischief, whiche wer of the retinue of my 
lorde Willoughby, and put them in warde. Whan thei wer 
arrested, other of like evil disposicion began to crake and 
face, whiche thyng beyng perceived, the lorde Marques by 
the advice of other capitanes caused serche to bee made, 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



47 



and so founde out the beginner of the mischief, whiche 
was delivered to Willyam Kyngston Esquire then Provost 
Marshall, and so was put to death to the terror of all other. 
Duryng the tyme that the armie laie thus lyngering, the 
Frenchmen diverse times came to behold the Englishemen, 
and when thei sawe any part of the armie remove toward 
theim, incontenent thei fled, and so the English archers 
every daie went a forragyng on the borders of Guian 
almoste to Bayon, and brent many pretie vilages, but ever 
they desired to have tidynges of the king of Arragon, and 
to know what thei should do, for they wer commaunded to 
be ruled by them. 

The Englishemen thus liyng idlely abidyng the aide of 
the kyng of Arragon, tidynges came daily into the host, 
how the Duke Dalva was commyng with a great puissaunce 
to joyne with the English army, and so to invade Guyan : 
thenglishe capitaines wer joyful of these tidynges, not 
so muche for the aide of the Spanyardes which they litle 
regarded, but for the beastes for cariage of greate artilerie, 
whyche they brought not with theim, in hope of the kyng 
of Arragons promes : for if thei had beastes for their 
cariage, and greate ordinaunce accordyng to the appoynte- 
ment, they would have doen otherwise, whiche thyng sore 
greved their hartes. 

Now thei thus lokyng for the Duke Dalva, hard every 
daie how he marched towarde theim, and was within a daies 
jorney or litle more of them, of the which the English- 
men wer merveilous joyful, but the Duke which pretended 
another thyng, sodainly removed his armie in a night with 
such diligence that he entred the realme of Naver, and 
was before the citie of Pampilona the chief citie of Naver 
before the kyng wist of it, whiche nothyng suspected of 
that pollicye. 

Thus the kyng was sodainly trapped, supposyng tharmie 
of Spain to have been reised to invade Guyan, and havyng 
nothyng defensable for the warre, in the night fled out at a 
posterne into Fraunce where he after died. The citie of 
Pampilona and all the countrey of Naver, being unpro- 
vided of artilarie and other defences, yelded themselfes to 
the Spanyardes, and thus was the realme of Naver wonne, 
which thyng made the lorde Marques and his compainie 
not a litle to marvell. So shortely after came to the lorde 

capitain 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



4 8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



capitain and the Englishemen, diverse Lordes sent from the 
Kyng of Arragon, whiche saied : The kyng our soveraigne 
lord, sendeth to you great gramercies, and highly thanketh 
you for your pain, and so it is that by Goddes grace and 
your good abode, he with his power hath taken and con- 
quered the realme of Naver, and if that countrey had not 
bee taken, thei might have intercepted all suche ordinaunce 
and victail, as the king of Arragon our master might have 
sent to you, but now you bee in suche a suretie and his 
puyssaunce with you and yours with his, that ye maie 
savely joyne, whiche you shall see shortly, ye and he hymself 
in proper person to joyne with you. Well said the lorde 
Marques capitain generall, we have sojeourned long here 
abidyng his commyng, and if the commission and expresse 
commaundement of the king my sovereigne lord wer not, 
that I should do nothing without the assent of the king your 
master, I assure you that the French menne should have 
knowen that Englishmen had been heere, and not to have 
lien so long in idelnes as we have done : but if thee kyng 
your master doo as you reporte, it shalbe muche to his 
honor and to our greate comforte, and so the lordes of 
Spayne departed. 

As the armie of Englishmen thus laie in campe, there was 
a village called Sancta Maria, in whiche diverse of the Eng- 
lishemen, and especially suche as have ben sicke, resorted and 
reposed theimself, not to the litle advantage of the toune, so it 
fortuned that a Spanyarde gave evil language to an Englishe- 
man, whiche gave him a buffet on the face, the toune rose and 
sett on the Englisheman, and gathered in suche a multitude, 
that the Englisheman whiche was the first beginner was slain, 
because onely thre Englishemen came to his rescue, whiche 
wer all hurte. The Almaynes that laie at the tounes ende, 
strake Alarum whiche hearyng the campe, cried to harnes 
every man. The tidinges were brought to the campe, that 
thei of the toune had slain an Englishman, and would bid 
battaill : the souldiers hearyng this, in a rage ranne to the 
toune in suche maner, that the capitaines could not staie 
them, and slew and robbed the people without mercy. The 
people fled over the water into Guian. The capitaines seeyng 
this with their privie servauntes kepte thee straightes, by 
the which the souldiers returned with pillage and naperie, 
brasse, pewter, beddes, plate, and other houshold stuffe, and 

apparell 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



49 



apparell which was commaunded to be layd doune by the 
lordes on a hepe. And after the lordes went to the toune 
to se what harme the Englishmen had doen, there thei found 
many Biskaynes slain, and the toune robbed, and the people 
fled. Then thei by sobre meanes and gentle exhortacion, 
brought al the souldiers to the campe : then Proclamacion 
was made that every man upon payn of death should bring 
in his pillage. Now ther wer xxi. men of whom one was 
a gentelman whiche had taken awaie x. thousand Duckates, 
who fled toward Gascoyne and were taken, and brought 
before the lord capitayn, and other, and adjudged to die : 
of the whiche vii. wer put in execucion, and the other xiiii. 
should have died the morow after, if the lordes of Spaine 
had not ben there at their judgement which with greate 
diligence and labor gat their pardon : and so all the pillage 
almost was restored, and the countrey pacified. 

Then one daie the Frenchemen whiche hard of this riot 
and trouble in the hoste, issued out of Baion toward the 
Englishemennes armie, the Englishmen hearing thereof, 
marched toward them, and when the French men perceived 
that thei were askried, thei sodainly returned. Thenglish- 
menne perceiving that the Frenchemen would not tarie, 
went to a good toune called sainct Jhon de Luce, and brent, 
robbed, and killed the inhabitauntes, and so from thence 
spoiled diverse other villages aboute the borders of Guyan. 
Thus the armie laie til the moneth of October, and winter 
began sore to encrease, and the lord Marques capitain 
generall fell sore sicke, and then the lord Haward had under 
hym the whole governaunce of tharmy, to whom wer sent 
divers lordes of the privy counsail of Spain saiyng : the 
kyng our master sendeth you word, that he would gladly 
come to you but the ceason is spent, the ground is so moyst 
that cariage cannot be conveighed, the feldes so barrain that 
beastes cannot fede, and the wether so troubleous that people 
cannot wel lye abrode in campe : therfore he would desire 
you, al these thinges considred, to breke up your feld, and 
sever your self to the tounes and villages of his countrey, 
tyll the spring of the yere, at whiche tyme there shall resorte 
to you freshe succors out of Englande, and he hymself will 
be with you with al ordenaunce necessary as becommeth to 
suche an armye, and then shall precede the first pretensed 
enterprice, to the honor of the kyng your master and 



THE mi. 

YERE 

[1512-13] 



ours, 



VOL. I. 



5 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



ours, and not to your small fame and renoune. When 
this message was hard by the whole counsaill, no manne 
was contented, but the lorde Haward which had the whole 
governaunce under the Marques saied : what report of 
honor can wee make of the kyng of Arragon your master, 
for at his desier we be come hether, and here have lien in 
campe a long space, ever tarieng for performaunce of his 
promise, and yet nothing hath he performed, our people 
be dedde of the flixe in greate numbre : we gentelmen 
everychone doth muche lament this long idelnes, by reason 
where of many a tall man having nothyng to do but abiding 
your masters pleasure hath fallen to some mischief, or by 
sicknes, or els for misdoyng executed by Justice. What 
shall the kyng our master report of our slothfulnes, whiche 
hath spent hym innumerable treasure and nothinge gained ? 
And yet we would make Winter warre, and the king of 
Arragon your master us denieth of suche thinges as hee 
promised, and willeth us like cowardes to our dishonor, 
to reise our Campe without any notable act doen to the 
frenchemen, for which cause we came. 

The Spaniardes perceiving the grudge of the Englishe- 
men, sayed that tyme passed could not be revoked, and 
that they had not lien idely, for the frontiers of Guian had 
susteined such dammage, as in many yeres thei shall not 
recover again, and all this while the Frenchmen durst not 
medle with you, so that you have lost no honor, and if you 
tary here this Winter by your daily Skirmishyng, thei shall 
receive greate damage : duryng whiche time, the kyng our 
master hath commaunded, the thinges mete and necessary 
for you to be at your commaundement, and in the spring 
of the yere he shall joyne with you, soo that your enemies 
and his shall well knowe your puissaunce, for he taketh all 
enemies too you to be his, so with faire wordes the counsaill 
of Spayn departed. 

Then the lorde Haward beyng chief, because the Marques 
was sick, counsailed with all the other lordes and capitaines, 
and so in the end of October thei agreed to breake up their 
campe, and so thei did, and thee lorde Marques and his 
people went to sainct Sebastian, thee lord Haward and his 
retinew to Rendre, and the lord Willoughby to Garschang, sir 
Wiliam Sandes and many other capitaines to Fountrabie,and so 
every capitain with his retinew wer severed in diverse villages. 

The 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



5 1 



The Englishe souldiers, what for sickenes, and what for 
miserie of the countrey, ever desired to returne into Eng- 
land. The kyng of England advertised by the kyng of 
Arragon of his entent, and how he would set forward the 
first spryng, sent Wynsore his Herauld of Armes to hys 
armie willy ng them there to tary, and that he would lende 
them new aide, under the conduite of the lorde Harbert his 
Chamberlain : which letter when it was redde, the souldiers 
began to murmure and grudge after such a sort, saiyng : 
that thei would not abide and dye of the flixe in such a 
wretched countrey, to be defrauded and mocked of the kyng 
of Arragon the next yere, as thei wer this yere, and spake 
such outragious wordes, that the capitain could not staie 
them, in so much that thei in a fury had slain the lord 
Haward and diverse other, if thei had not folowed their 
myndes, and so thei hired shippes and putte the lorde 
Marques in one, whiche was so weake that he asked where he 
was : and then every man shipped, whiche was in Novembre, 
and in the beginnyng of decembre thei landed in Englande. 
The kyng of Arragon was sore discontent with their de- 
partyng, for thei spent much money and substaunce in his 
countrey, and saied openly, that if thei had taried he would 
have invaded Guyan, and the Englishemen wer glad that 
thei were departed out of such a countrey, wher thei had 
litle health, lesse pleasure and much losse of tyme : but by 
their liyng there, the Kyng of Arragon stale the realme of 
Nauer, and the Englishemen left as muche money there, as 
he sent into England with his daughter. 

When the Marques sailed into Spayne in the moneth of 
May, the same tymc sir Edward Haward Lorde Admirall of 
Englande, as you have hard before, sailed toward Britain, and 
on Trinitie Sundaie arrived at Bertram Bay in Britain, with 
xx. great shippes, and sodainly set his men on lande : then 
the Britaynes made an askrie, and sette their beacons on 
fire, and shot out of a bulwarke that they had fortified at the 
poynt of the Baye, but the Englishemen whiche wer in the 
ship of Willyam Gonstone Grocer of London, toke first 
land maugre them all, and al other after, and so manfully 
thei set on the bulwarke that thei wan it, and the Britans 
fled and many slain. Then the Admirall set his men in 
an ordre, and passed in the countrey seven myles, burnyng 
and wastyng tounes and villages : and in his returne he 

skirmished 



THE mi. 

YERE 
[1512-13] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



skirmished with diverse men of armes and slewe diverse of 
theim, and notwithstandyng the Britons fought valiauntly 
for defence of their countrey, yet thei lost and nothing 
wan : and so the lorde Admirall returned to his shippe. 

Upon mondaie the xxiii. day of May he landed in the 
mornyng, and commaunded to burne the lorde Piers Meguns 
place, and the toune of Conket and diverse other places, 
and chased the Britones to the Castle of Brest, and for all 
assembles and showes that the Britons made, yet thei suffered 
the Englishmen peaceably to returne with their praies and 
gaines. The Britons seyng the hurte that the navie of Eng- 
land did to them, saide : alas the king of Englande hath 
ever before this time succoured us, and now he entendeth to 
destroy us, shame come to him that is the cause thereof. 

The first daie of June the Englishemen toke lande in 
Croiton Bay : then the Lordes of Britain sent worde to the 
Lord Admirall, that if he would abide, thei would fight with 
him in plain felde. The Admirall rewarded the messenger, 
and said, go say to them that sent the, that al this daie thei 
shall finde me here, tarieng their comming. Then he to 
encourage diverse gentelmen dubbed theim knightes, as sir 
Edward Broke brother to the lorde Cobham, sir Grirfithe 
Doune, sir Thomas Windam, sir Thomas Lucie, sir William 
Pirton, sir Henry Shirborne, sir Stephen Bull, sir Jhon 
Burdett : Then the lorde Admirall highly incouraged his 
men, when he saw the Britons come, which was x. thousand 
at the least, the Englishemen but onely xxv. C. or fewe 
above, bidding them remembre the honor and renoune that 
should come to them, if thei gained the jorney, and yet if 
thei wer slain, their valiauntnes was to be praised, and 
their true diligence to do their master service much to be 
allowed. 

When the Britons sawe the ordre of the Englishmen 
and their banners displaied, thei wer sodainly ustonied, then 
a gentelman of Britain of muche experience, advised the 
other capitaines not to fight, but to returne a litle and to 
take a strong grounde, and to watche the Englishemen, when 
thei returned to ther shippes, and then to take thavauntage. 
And so the captaines began to returne : and when the 
commons saw them returne, al thei raune awaie as faste as 
thei might, supposyng that their capitaines had seen or 
knowen some great perell toward them, because thei were 

not 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



53 



not privy of their Capitaines counsail. And when thci came 
home to their houses, some saied the battaill was greate, 
and some saied that the Englishemen wer xl. thousande. 
The lord Admirall seing this chaunce, when nighte came 
departed to his shippes : but yet they knewe not why thei 
fled, till after he hard the truthe. The gentelmen of Britain 
called a greate counsaill, saiyng that the Englishemen daily 
wasted the countrey on the sea cost, and that there was 
no trust in the commonalty, and that the gentelmen alone 
could not defende the countrey, wherfore thei concluded 
to send a messenger to the lorde Admirall, desiring hym of 
a safe conduite for diverse persones to speake with hym, the 
which he gently graunted. Then certain lordes of Britain 
toke a bote, and came to the ship of the lorde Admirall, 
where he was set with all the counsaill of the captaines about 
him. Then thei desired him humbly to surcest of his 
rigorous and cruel warre, and especially of burning of tounes 
whiche is to you no profite, and if you will have thee castle 
of Brest, it shall be at your commaundement, so that you 
be able to defend it, and we desire nothing so muche as 
peace. Nay, saied the Lorde Admirall, wee are sent hether 
to make warre and not peace. Then thei humblye required 
hym for Goddes sake to graunt theim peace for sixe daies, 
so that they might sende to the kyng their lorde, to adver- 
tise him of their trouble and calamitie. Then the lorde 
Admirall answered, that gentelmen ought to defend their 
countrey by force, rather then to sue for peace : with the 
whiche saiyng the Britons wer ashamed : yet thei hartely 
thanked him, and so he made them a banket and thei 
departed : and thei sent a land for freshe water and other 
fresh victailes, and then hearing that there wer men of 
warre upon the sea, he coasted from them alongest al the 
coastes of Normandy, stil skowring the seas, so that no 
enemie appered : and at the last came and laie by the Isle 
of Wight, to see if any enemies would appere on thenglishe 
cost : duryng whiche time diverse shippes kept the North 
seas under the conduite of sir Edward Ichingam, Jhon 
Lewes, and Jhon Lovedaie, which dilygently skowred the 
seas. 

This yere the King had a solempne Justes at Grenewich 
in June : firste came in ladies all in White and Red silke, 
set upon coursers trapped in the same sute, freated over with 

gold, 



THE mi. 

YERE 
[1512-13] 



54 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



gold, after whom folowed a fountain curiously made of 
Russet Satin, with eight Gargilles spoutyng Water, within 
the Fountain sat a knight armed at al peces. After thys 
Fountain folowed a lady all in blacke silk dropped with fine 
silver, on a courser trapped in the same. After folowed a 
knight in a horslitter, the Coursers and litter appareled, 
blacke with Silver droppes. When the Fountain came to the 
tilt, the Ladies rode rounde about and so did the Fountain 
and the knight within the litter. And after them wer 
brought twoo goodly coursers appareled for the Justes : 
and when they came to the Tiltes ende, the twoo knightes 
mounted on the twoo Coursers abidyng all commers. The 
king was in the fountain, and sir Charles Brandon was in 
the litter. Then sodainly with greate noyse of Trompettes, 
entered sir Thomas Knevet in a Castle of Cole blacke, and 
over the castell was written, The dolorous Castle, and so he 
and therle of Essex, the lorde Haward and other ran their 
courses with the King and sir Charles Brandon, and ever 
the king brake moste speres. 

The Kyng ever remembring his warres, caused all his 
shippes and Galies to be rigged and prepared, with all 
manner of ordinaunce and artillery mete for shippes of 
ware. And emongest all other, he decked thee Regent a 
ship royal as chief ship of that name, and then caused 
souldiers mete for the same shippes, to muster on Blacke- 
heth, and he appointed capitaines for that time, sir Anthony 
Oughtred, sir Edward Ichingham, William Sidney, and 
diverse other Gentelmen, whiche shortlye shipped and came 
before the Isle of Wight, but in their passage a Galeye was 
lost by the negligence of the Master. 

The king ever desiryng to see his navie together, roade 
to Portesmouthe, and there he appoynted capitaines for the 
Regent, sir Thomas Knevet master of his horse, and sir 
Jhon Carew of Devonshire. And to another ship royal 
called the sovereigne, he apponcted sir Charles Brandon, 
and sir Henry Guildforde, and with theim in the Sovereigne 
were put ix. of the tallest yomen of the kinges Card, and 
many other gentelmen wer made Capitaines. The king 
made a greate banquet to all the capitaines, and every one 
sware to another ever to defend, aide, and comfort one an 
other without failyng, and this they promised before the 
Kyng, whiche committed theim to God, and so with great 

noyse 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



55 



noyse of minstrelsie thei toke their shippes, whiche wer in 
nombre 25 of greate burden, and well furnished of all 
thinges. 

The Frenche kyng hearyng what dammage thenglishmen 
had don in Britaine, strongly furnished his Navie in the 
haven of Brest, to the nombre of xxxix. saile, and for chief 
ordeigned a Carick of Brest, apperteigning to the Queue 
his wife, which was Duches and heire of Brittayne called 
Cordelier, whiche was a strong ship furnished in all poyntes, 
and so thei set forward out of Brest the x. daie of August, 
and came to Britaine Bay, in which place the self same 
day, being the day of s. Laurence, the Englishe Navie was 
arrived. 

When the Englishe menne perceived the French Navie 
to be out of Brest haven, then the lorde Admirall was very 
joyous, then every man prepared accordyng to his duetie, 
the Archers to shote, the Gonners to lose, the men of Armes 
to fight, the Pages went to the toppe Castle with dartes : 
thus all thinges beyng provided and set in ordre, the Eng- 
lishe men approched toward the Frenchemen, whiche came 
fiersly forwarde, some leaving his Ancre, some with his 
foresaile onely to take the moost avauntage : and when thei 
wer in sight, thei shot ordenaunce so terribly together, that 
all the sea coast sounded of it. The Lorde Admirall made 
with the great ship of Depe, and chased her stil : sir Henry 
Guilford and sir Charles Brandon, made with the greate 
Caricke of Brest, beyng in the Sovereigne, and laied stemme 
to stemme to thee Caricke, but by negligence of the Master, 
or els by smoke of the ordinaunce or other wise, the Sove- 
reigne was cast at the sterne of thee Carick, with which 
avauntage the Frenchemenne showted for joy : but when 
sir Thomas Knevet whiche was ready to have borded the 
greate ship of Depe, saw that the Sovereigne had missed 
the Caricke, which sir Anthony Oughtred chased hard at 
the starne, and bouged her in diverse places, and set a fire 
her powder as some say, but sodainly the Regent crappeled 
with her a long boord, and when thei af the Carick perceived 
that thei could not depart, thei let slip an Ancre, and so 
with the streme the shippes turned, and the Caricke was on 
the wetherside, and the Regent on the lye side, the fight 
was very cruell, for the archers of the Englishe parte, and 
the Crossebowes of the Frenche part did their uttermost : 

but 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



but for al that the English men entered the Caricke, whiche 
seing a varlet Conner being desperate put fire in the Gonne 
powder as other saie, and set the whole ship of fire, the flame 
whereof set fire in the Regent, and so these twoo noble 
shippes which wer so crappeled together that thei could not 
part wer consumed by fire. The French navie perceiving 
this fled in all hast, some to Brest, and some to the Isles 
adjoynyng. The Englishmen in maner dismaied, sent out 
boates to help them in the Regent, but the fire was so 
greate that in maner no mon durst approche, saving that 
by the James of Hul wer certein Frenchmen that could 
swimme saved. This burning of the Caricke was happy 
for the frenche navie, or els thei had been better assailed 
of thenglishemen, whiche wer so amased with this chaunce, 
that thei folowed them not. The capitain of this Carick 
was sir Piers Morgan, and with him ix. C. men slain and 
ded : and with sir Thomas Knevet and sir Jhon Carow wer 
vii. C. men drouned and brent, and that nighte all the 
Englishemen laie in Bartrain Baye, for the frenche flete was 
sparcled as you have hard. 

The lorde admirall called al the capitaines together, 
desiryng theim not to be abasshed with this chaunce of 
warre, for he thought now that this was the worste fortune 
that could happen to theim, therfore to studie how to be 
revenged, and so thei concluded all to go to the sea, whiche 
thei did, and on the coast of Britain toke many shippes, 
and such as thei could not cary away they set on fire, small 
and great to a greate nombre on al the coast of Britain, 
Normandy and Picardy, and thus thei kept the sea. 

The King of England heryng of the losse of the Regent, 
caused a great shippe to be made, such another as was never 
seen before in England, and called it, Henry grace de Dieu. 

The French kyng heryng that his flete was thus devided, 
and of the losse of his greate Caricke, he sent to a knight 
of the Rhodes called Prior Jhon, whiche had three Galies 
of force, with diverse Foystes and Rowgalies so well ordi- 
naunced and with suche peces as was not seen in shippes 
before his comming : for he laie on the coast of Barbary, 
to defende certein of the Religion of the Rhodes comming 
to Tripoly, and at thee Frenche kinges request came into 
Britain and there taried. 

In Novembre the kyng called his high Courte of Parlia- 
ment, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



57 



ment, and there was concluded that the kyng himself in 
person, with an army roiall would invade his realme of 
Fraunce, with fire and Sworde, which thing beeyng knowen 
to his subjectes, and especiall to such as shoulde go with 
him, no man can doubt, but that preparacion was made 
of harneis, weapon, artillery, banners and al other thinges 
necessary for such an enterprice. 

The kyng after this Parliament ended, kept a solempne 
Christmas at Grenewiche to chere his nobles, and on the 
twelfe daie at night came into the hall a Mount, called the 
riche Mount. The Mount was set full of riche flowers of 
silke, and especially ful of Brome slippes full of coddes, the 
Braunches wer grene Satin, and the flowers flat Gold of 
Damaske, whiche signified Plantagenet. On the top stode 
a goodly Bekon geving light, round aboute the Bekon sat 
the king and five other, al in cotes and cappes of right 
Crimosin velvet, enbroudered with flatt gold of Dammaske, 
their coates set ful of spangelles of gold, and foure wood- 
houses drewe the Mount till it came before the quene, and 
then the king and his compaignie discended and daunced : 
then sodainly the Mounte opened, and out came sixe ladies 
all in Crimosin satin and plunket, embroudered with Golde 
and perle, with French hoodes on their heddes, and thei 
daunced alone. Then the lordes of the Mount toke the 
ladies and daunced together : and the ladies reentred, and 
the Mounte closed, and so was conveighed out of the hall. 
Then the kyng shifted him and came to the Quene, and sat 
at the banquet which was very sumpteous. And after the 
Purificacion of our Lady, the Kyng created sir Charles 
Brandon Viscount Lisle. In Marche folowing, was the 
kinges navie of shippes royall, and other mete for the war 
set furth to the numbre of xlii. Beside other Belengers, the 
lorde Admiral was chief, and with him sir Water Devereux 
Lord Ferreis, sir Wolstan Browne, sir Edwarde Ichingham, 
sir Antony Poyntz, sir Jhon Wallop, sir Thomas Wyndam, 
sir Stephen Bull, Wilyam FitzWilyam, Arthur Plantagenet, 
Wiliam Sidnay Esquires, and diverse other noble and valiaunt 
Capitaines : thei sailed to Portesmouth, and there laie abiding 
Wynde, duryng whiche tyme, the kyng sent into Flaunders 
for such thinges as he neded, and caused them to be brought 
to Caleis against his comming. 

When the wynde served, the Navy royall of England 

waied 

VOL. I. 



THE mi. 

YERE 

[1512-13] 



H 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IIII. 
YERE 

[1512-13] 



waied anker and made saile into Britain, and came into 
Bertram Bay, and ther lay at Anker in sight of the Frenche 
Navie. Now you muste understande, that all the greate 
Navie whiche the Frenche kyng had prepared laie in the 
haven of Brest, so well furnished in al thinges, that no doubt 
it was a wonder to se : but when thei wer ready to sette 
furthe, and sawe the English flete on the coast, thei deter- 
mined clerely to save themselfes in Brest haven. Then the 
Englishemen determined clerely to sett on them in the 
haven, and so in good ordre of battail sailed forward, but 
at the first entry one ship, whereof Arthur Plantagenet was 
capitain, fell on a blind rocke, and brast a sondre, by reason 
whereof, al the other staled to the gret displeasure of al the 
remnaunt, and not to the litle joy of the Frenchmen whiche 
shott at them without any doing harme. So the Englishe 
capitaines perceiving that thee haven was dangerous to. enter 
without an expert lodesman, cast about and returned to their 
harboroughe at Bertram Baye again. 

The Frenchemen perceiving that the Englishmen in- 
tended to assaile theim, moored their shippes as nye to the 
Castle of Brest as thei could, and set bulwarkes on the land 
on every side to shote at thenglishemen. Also thei frapped 
together xxiiii. greate Hulkes, that came to the Baye for 
salt, and set them on a rowe, to the intent that if the Eng- 
lishe menne would have assaulted them, thei would have 
set them on a fire, and lett theim drive with the streme 
emongest the Englishe Navie. Prior Jhon also laie still in 
Blacke Sable or Whitesande Baye, and plucked hys Galies 
to the shore, and sett his Basiliskes and other ordenaunce in 
the mouthe of the Baye, which Bay was Bulwarked on every 
side, that by water it was not possible to be wonne. 

The lorde Admirall perceiving the Navie of Fraunce to 
lye thus in feare, and not willing nor daring to come abrode, 
but to ly as prisoners in a dongeon, wrote to the Kyng to 
come thether in person, and to have the honor of so high 
an entreprice : whiche writing the Kynges counsail nothing 
allowed, for putting the kyng in jeoperdy upon the chaunce 
of the sea. Wherefore the king wrote sharpely to hym, to 
accomplishe that whiche apperteined to his duete : whiche 
caused hym too take courage and put thinges in adventure 
as after you shall here. 

THE 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



59 



THE V. YERE. 

AS you have hard before the lorde Admiral of England 
lay stil on the coast of Britain in the Bay, called 
Bartrames Bay, so that for feare of hym and the 
Englishe Navie, neither the great shippes in Brest haven 
durst once move to the lea ward, nor yet Prior Jhon for al 
his strong Galeis would once set out a saile : saving now 
and then send furth his smal Foystes, to make a shew before 
thenglish navy whiche chased them to their Bay, but because 
thenglish shippes were so greate thei could not enter the 
Bay, and so manned out boates and toke one of the best 
Foystes, and that, with greate daunger, for the Galies and 
the bulwarkes shot all at one time, that it was a wonder how 
the Englishemen escaped. 

The Admyrall of Englande perceving the Frenche 
mennes pollecy, called a counsaill, and there determined 
first to assaile Prior Jhon and his Galies, liyng in Whitsand 
Bay, and after to set on the remnaunt in the haven of Brest. 
Then first was appointed that Water lord Ferreis, sir Stephen 
Bui and other capitaines, should go a land with a convenient 
compaignie, to assault the Bulwarkes of Whitsand Bay, 
while the Lorde Admyrall entered with rowe Barges and 
litle Galies into the Bay, so that the Frenchmen should be 
assailed bothe by water and land. 

Thus was it fully agreed by the whole counsail : but 
alas, this noble capitain counsailed by a spanishe knighte 
called sir Alphous Charant, whiche saied that he might entre 
the Bay with litle jeopardy, called to hym William Fitz 
William, Willyam Cooke, Jhon Colley, and syr Wolstan 
Browne as the chief and his moste trusty frendes, and 
declared to theim that the matter was litle, and the honor 
greate, if they only tooke on them that enterprice, and let 
none other know of it. Thei like men of haute courage 
and desiryng honour gladly assented : so on saint Markes 
day, the xvi. daie of Aprill, the said Admirall put him self in 
a small rowe barge, with three other small rowing shippes, 
and his awne ship boate, and so rowed sodainly into the 
Baye, where Prior Jhon had moored his Galies just to the 
ground, whiche Galies with the bulwarkes on the lande, shot 



so 



THE V. 
YERE 



6o 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
VERB 



so terribly that thei that folowed wer afraid : but assone as 
he came to the Galies, he entered and drave out thee Frenche- 
men, William Fitz William within his shippe was sore hurte 
with a quarrel. The Bay was very shalow, and the other 
shippes could not entre, for the tide was spent, whiche thyng 
the Frenchemen perceiving, and that there could come no 
succoure to the Admirall, wyth Morris pikes entered again 
the Galies, and fought with the Englishmen in the Galies. 
And the Admirall perceivyng their approchyng, thought to 
have entered again into his rowe Barge, whiche by violence 
of the tide was driven (Joune the streme, and so with a pike 
was throwen over the borde and so drouned, and there the 
forenamed Alphous was slain, and al the other boates and 
vesselles scaped hardely, for if thei had taried, the tide had 
failed them and then all had been lost. The lord Ferreis 
and other capitaines muche were dolent of this chaunce, and 
some saied he dyd it without counsaill, and so he hath sped. 
And therfore although that they would have sette on the 
Navie in Brest haven, yet havyng no Admiral nor commis- 
sion, thei determined to do nothing farther till thei knew 
the knyges pleasur, and so sailed into Englande. The 
Frenche Navie perceivyng that the Englishmen made toward 
England, came out of their havens, and Prior Jhon set furthe 
his Galies and Foystes, and costed Briaitn and Normandy, 
and coasted over to the coast of Sussex and al his com- 
paignie, and landed on the sea coast, and set fire on the 
poore cottages. The gentlemen that dwelte nere, shortely 
reised the countrei, and came to the coast and drove Prior 
Jhon to his Galeis. This was al the hurt that this stout 
capitain of so great fame did to England, savyng he robbed 
certein poore Fisshermen of Whitynges. The kynge hear- 
ing the death of his Admiral was not a litle sory, consideryng 
both the nobilitie of his birthe, and the valiauntnes of his 
persone, but all sorowe availeth not when the chaunce is 
past. Therfore the kyng hering that the Frenche Navie 
was abrode, called to hym the lorde Thomas Haward, elder 
brother to sir Edward Haward late Admirall, and sonne 
and heire apparant to the Erie of Surrey, and made him 
Admirall, willyng him to revenge his brothers death, which 
with great reverence, thanked the kyng of the high truste 
that he had put him in. And then immediatly went to the 
sea, and so nobly and valiauntly did skower the sea, that 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



61 



the French men had no lust to kepe the coast of England, 
for he fought with theim at their awen portes. 

The kyng whiche had all thynges necessary and mete 
for the warre, entendyng to passe the sea in propre person, 
appoynted the valiaunt lord George Talbot Erie of Shrewes- 
bury, and his Steward of his houshold to be capitain generall 
of his forward, and in his compaignie wer lorde Thomas 
Stanley Erie of Derby, lorde Decowrey Prior of S. Jhons, 
sir Rober Radcliffe Lord Fitzwater, the Lorde Hastynges, 
the Lorde Cobham, sir Rice Ap Thomas, sir Thomas Blount, 
sir Richard Sachiverell, sir Jhon Dighby, sir Jhon Askewe, 
syr Lewes Bagot, sir Thomas Cornewall, and many Knightes 
and Esquiers and souldiers, to the nombre of viii. M. menne, 
whiche all passed the sea, and to Caleis in the middle of 
May. 

The lorde Herbert called sir Charles Somerset, chief 
Chamberlayn to the kyng, the ende of the same moneth with 
vi. M. men passed the sea in whose compaignie were these 
Erles, of Northumberlande Percie, of Kent Graye, of Wil- 
shire Stafford, the lorde Fitzwater, the lorde Dudley, the 
lorde Delawar, sir Thomas West his sonne, sir Edward 
Husey, sir Robert Dimmocke, sir Davie Owen, with many 
other gentelmenne, some with speres on horsbacke, some 
with pikes on foote, some with dimilaunces, and this was 
the rereward. Such good diligence was made that these two 
capitaines with all their compaignie, furnished with artilerie, 
pouder, tentes, cariages, and all thinges necessary for the 
warres were landed at Caleis the last daie of Maii. 

After thei had sojorned certain daies in Caleis, and that 
all thynges requisite wer ready, thei caused a trumpet to 
blowe and made Proclamacion that every man should de- 
parte out of the toune, and so to begin the campe. The 
erle of Shrewesbury with his compaignie first toke the felde, 
after him folowed the lorde Harbert with his compaignie, 
in maner of a rereward. And after him folowed the valiaunt 
sir Rice ap Thomas with v. C. light horse and Archers on 
horsebacke, and joyned hym to the forward. Then was ther 
ordre taken what persones should conduite the victailers that 
came from Caleis, and who should conduite the victailers 
that came out of Flaunders, for without sufficient conduite 
no creature durste bryng any victaile to the armie. These 
two lordes thus embattailed removed the xvii. daie of June 

to 



THE V. 
YERE 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



to Sandisfelde, and on the xviii. dale thei came to Margison, 
on the farre side of the water, as though thei would have 
passed streightly to Bulleyne, but thei thoughte otherwise, 
for the next daie thei tooke another waie, and coasted the 
countrey with suche diligence, that the xxii. daie of June 
thei with al their people, ordinaunce, and habilimentes of 
warre, wer come before the strong citie of Tirwin, and pight 
their Tentes a myle from the toune, and for that night 
embattailed them self: and as certain captaines wer in coun- 
saill in the lorde Herbertes tent, sodainly out of the toune 
was shot a gonne, the pellet wherof slewe a noble capitain 
called the Baron of Carew, sitting there in counsaill, whiche 
sodain adventure dismaied muche thee assemble. But the 
lorde Herbert valiauntly comforted them, saiyng : this is 
the chaunce of warre, if it had hit me you muste have been 
content, a noble harte in warre is never a feard of death. 
All the countrey of Arthoys and Picardy, fortified their 
holdes, and made shewes as the English army passed, but 
thei durst not once assaile them. 

The citie of Tirwin was strongly fortified with walles, 
rampaires, bulwarkes, with diverse fortresses in the diches, 
which were so brode and so plum stepe that was wondre to 
beholde. The lorde Pountremy was capitain generall, and 
with him wer within the citie vi. C. horsmen furnished, and 
twoo M. v. C. Almaines beside the inhabitauntes of the 
city, the walles and towers wer ful of ordenaunce, which did 
oftentymes great displeasure to the Englishemen. The 
Erie of Shrewesbury laied siege to the toune, on the North 
West side, and the lorde Herbert on the East side or end 
ward, the Frenchmen issued out of the toune and skirmished 
with the Englishemen, but the Archers shot so fast that 
they drave the Frenchemen into the citie, and slewe and 
toke diverse of them. The lord Herbert which laie in the 
open sight of the toune, having no hil or other thyng to 
succour or defende him, caused great trenches to be made, 
and so mawgre his enemies he approched very nere the 
cite : likewise therle of Shrewesbury with thee forward, gat 
into an holowe ground or valey nere to the citie. Daily 
the Frenchmen shot at thenglishmen, and diverse tymes 
issued out and skirmished, and ever thei lost by skirmishyng, 
but by shotyng of ordinaunce thei hurte diverse Englishmen. 
Wherfore the lordes commaunded the pioners to raise a 

great 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



6 3 



reat trenche in whiche they laied the great ordinaunce, and 
daily as thei might they approched : syr Rise ap Thomas 
with the horsmen daily skowered the countrey, and many 
tymes encountered with the Frenchmen, and slewe and toke 
diverse prisoners, so that the Frenchmen drewe not toward 
the siege, but turned another waie. Upon the Mundaie 
)eeyng the xxvii. daie of June xxiiii. Cartes charged with 
victaill, wer by the Garrison of Caleis conduited to Guisnes, 
and ther the Crewe of the castle and toune of Guisnes with 
three C. foote men, under the conduite of sir Edward 
Belknappe, al beyng in nombre iiii. C. Ix. men, set furthe to 
conduite the saied victailes to tharmie liyng before Tirwyn, 
and so thei passed to Arde. And while the Carters passed 
the toune, the horsemen fel a drinkyng in the waie, and the 
foote men wer al out of ordre. The duke of Vandosme 
capitain generall of Picardie, which laie in a bushement in 
the forest side of Guysnes with viii. C. light horsemen, 
toke his advauntage and set on the victailers, the Carters 
perceivyng that losed their horses and fledd to the toune, 
whiche was but a myle of and left their Cartes. Sir Nicholas 
Vaux capitain of Guysnes did al he could, to bryng the 
foote men in an ordre : but the Frenchmen set on so quickly 
that thei could not set theim in ordre, the horsmen of 
Guysnes whiche wer but onely xxiiii. toke their speres and 
joyned with the Frenchemen : the Archers of Englande 
whyche passed not Ix. shot manfully, and a noble capitain 
called Baltier Delien and diverse other, but the Frenchemen 
wer so many in nombre and in good ordre, that thei slew 
viii. gentlemen of the Garrison of Guysnes, and xxx. Archers 
slain and many hurte, and so thei distrussed the victailes, 
and caused sir Nicholas Vaux, and sir Edward Belknappe 
to flie toward Guisnes. This misaventure fell by tariyng 
of the horsmen and breaking of array, for if tharchers had 
taried together it had happened otherwise, for the fewe 
Archers that held together, slewe and hurt diverse Frenche- 
For on the felde laie Ixxxvii. great horse which never 



men 



went thence, by the which it appered that the Frenchemenne 
went not quite a waie without losse. When tidynges of 
this misaventure came to the lordes at the siege, thei wer 
not a litle displeased : and sir Rise ap Thomas caused his 
Trompet to blowe to the stirroppe, and he with his hors- 
men sought the Duke of Vandosme all the contrey, whiche 

hearyng 



THE V. 
YERE 



6 4 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



hearyng of the commyng of sir Rise, with great hast re- 
treted backe to Bangey Abbey, where the French kynges 
greate army laie. Sir Rise heryng that he was returned 
came the next day agayn to the sege. The rumour of this 
skyrmish sprong all the English pale toward Flaunders, 
wherfore the tounes fiered ther bekons and range alarme, 
divers honorable men that had passed the see with com- 
panies of souldiours and were in Caleis, marched forward in 
order of battaile, but heryng of the departing of Mounsir 
de vandosme, they rested. Then was new provision made 
for vitaile and sent daily from Caleis to Turwyn by such 
conduite, that the Frenchmen would no more meddill, 
and the army also was \vel vitaled out of Flaunders and 
Henawde. 

The army of England thus lay before the strong toune of 
Turwin : the noble kinge of England not forgettyng his 
entreprice prepared al thing redy to passe the see in proper 
persone, and caused sir Jhon Wilshire to purvey for iii. C. 
hoyes to carry over his artillery and habilimentes of warre, 
and all his shippes of warre were on the see skowering 
every coste of his realme. And when all thinges were 
prest, he accompanied wyth many noble men and vi. C. 
archers of his garde, al in white gabberdines and cappes, 
departed from his manour royall of grenewich the xv. daye 
of June and so he and the quene with small jorneys came 
to Dover castell and there rested, and made the quene 
governer of the realme, and commaunded William Warram 
then bishop of Canterbury and sir Thomas Lovell a sage 
knyght and divers other, to gyve there attendaunce on 
the quene. And commaunded therle of Surrey to drawe 
toward the north partes lest the Scottes woulde make any 
entreprice in his absence. Then the kyng toke leve of the 
quene and of the ladies which made such sorow for the 
departyng of their lordes and husbandes, that it was greate 
dolor to beholde, and so he with al his army toke his shippe 
the last day of June beyng the daye of sainct Paule. 

In the mornyng when the kyng was shipped and made 
saile, al the army folowed, to the nomber of iiii. C. shippes, 
and the winde was so, that they were brought even on the 
coste of picardy open upon S. Jhons Roade, and with the 
flud they haled along the coste of Whitsand with trumpettes 
blowynge and gonnes shotynge, to the great feare of them 

of 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



of Bolleyn which plainly might beholde this passage, and so 
came to Caleys haven. 

The kyng was received into a bote covered with arras, 
and so was set on londe. He was appareilled in almaine 
ryvet crested and his vanbrace of the same, and on his hedde 
a chapeau montabyn with a rich coronal, the folde of the 
chapeau was lined with crimsyn saten, and on that a riche 
brooch with the image of sainct George, over his rivet he 
had a garment of white cloth of gold with a redde crosse, 
and so he was received with procession and with his deputie 
of Caleys called sir Gylbert Talbot, and all other nobles and 
gentlemen of the towne and countrey, and so entred in at 
the lanternegate and passed the stretes tyll he came to 
Saincte Nycholas churche, and ther he alighted and offered, 
and from thens he went to the stapleinne wher he supped. 

When the kyng entred Caleys, al the banished men 
entred with him and were restored to the liberty of the 
toune. To tell of the gonne shott of the toune and of the 
shippes at the kynges landing it was a great wonder, for 
men of good estimacion reported that they harde it at 
Dover. The kyng lyenge thus in Caleys, all his armye 
except a few of his counsayll and other that gave their 
attendaunce on hym laye encamped at Newnam bridge, in 
which campe about a xi. of the clock at night there rose an 
eskrye, so that the towne of Caleys began alarme, with that 
the kyng waked and came to the walles, and demaunded 
what the matter ment, the yoman of the tentes, called 
Richard Gybson, shewed him howe that certayne horsmen 
and footmen of Fraunce, profered to come over the haven, 
and the archers that laie next the see side entred into the 
water and defended the passage, with which defence the 
Frenchmen returned, and so the kyng was satisfied. But 
after this a Frenchman of Whitsand bay and one of Bullain 
were taken, the one called Charles de bone, the other 
Peter vernowne, which confessed that from the toune of 
Whitsand came Ix. horsmen and ii. C. footmen of the 
garrison of Bullein and the countrey adjoynyng entendyng 
to passe by Rice banke at the low water marke, over that 
haven of Caleis at a certayn foord, shewed to them by a spy 
which served the yoman of the tentes of vitailes, and shewed 
them that the tentes were piched under Caleis walles be- 
twcne the toune and the campe, so that thei might burne 

them 



THE v. 

YERE 



VOL. I. 



66 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



them quykly or the toune could issue, or the campe remove. 
But the Englishmen kept so good watch as you have heard 
that their entreprice came to none effect. The morow after 
being the first day of July, the noble lord Haward admirall 
of England landed at Whitsand Bay, and entred, spoyled 
and brent the toune, and returned to his ships for all the 
Bullonois, and so recompensed the imaginacion that the 
bayly of Whitsand and the Bullonoys had entreprised for 
the burning of the kynges tentes. 

On fryday at night blew such a storme that severed all 
the navy, and some were drowned. Upon the viii. day of 
July, the lord Marques Dorset, therle of Essex, the lord 
Lisle rode into Flaunders and ther toke the mousters of the 
lord Lynny, the lord Walon, sonne to the lord of Barow, 
and bastard Emery which with ther retinue were then 
admitted into the kynges wages and the lord Linny with a 
C. and 1. speres was appoincted to go to the lorde Herbert : 
and the lord Walon and bastard Emery with ther bondes 
were appointed to go to therle of Shrewsbury lieng before 
Tirwin : These strangers were warlycke persons on light 
horses. While the siege laye thus before Tyrwyn as you 
have harde, the Frenchmen diverse times issued out on 
horseback and many a staffe was broken and manye a 
proper feat of armes done. Likewise the Almaynes on 
foot woulde diverse tymes issue out with handgonnes and 
morish pycks and assaile the Englishmen, but by force of 
the archers thei were ever driven home agayn, and every 
day the Englishmen shott at the towne and dyd them 
muche displeasure. 

The xxi. day of July (when al thinges by counsaill had 
ben ordered concernyng the order of battayle) the kyng 
passed out of the toune of Caleis in goodly array of battaile 
and toke the felde : And notwithstandyng that the forward 
and the rerewarde of the kyngs great army were before 
Tirwyn as you have harde : Yet the kynge of his awne 
battayle made iii. battailles after the fasshion of the warre, 
the lord Lisle marshall of the hoste was capitaine of the 
forward, and under him iii. M. men. Sir Richard Carew 
with iii. C. men was the right hand wyng to the forward, 
and the lord Darcy with iii. C. men, wyng on the left hand, 
the skourers and forriders of this battaile were the North- 
umberland men on light geldynges. Therle of Essex was 

Lieutenant 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



6 7 



Lieutenant generall of the speres, and sir Jhon Pechy was 
vicegovernour of the horsmen : before the kyng went viii. 
C. Almaynes all in a plumpe by them selfs : after them 
came the standard with the redde Dragon, next the banner 
of our lady, and next after the banner of the trinitie, under 
the same were all the kings houshold servauntes, then went 
the banner of the armes of England borne by sir Henry 
Guildford, under which banner was the kyng him self, with 
divers noble men and other to the nomber of iii. M. men. 
The duke of Buckyngham with vi. C. men was on the 
kyngs left hand egal with the Almaynes, in likewise on the 
right hand was sir Edward Pounynges with other vi. C. 
men egall with the Almaynes. The lord of Burgainie with 
viii. C. men, was wyng on the right hand, sir William 
Compton with the retinue of the bishop of Winchester, and 
master Wolsey the kings Almoner to the nomber of viii. C. 
was in maner of a rereward, sir Anthony Oughtred and sir 
Jhon Nevell with the kinges speres that folowed, were iiii. 
C. and so the hole army were xi. M. and iii. C. men. The 
master of the ordinaunce set foorth the kynges artilary, as 
fawcons, slynges, bombardes, cartes with powder, stones, 
bowes, arowes and such other thinges necessary for the 
felde, the hole nomber of the cariages were xiii. C. the 
leders and drivers of the same were xix. C. men and all 
these were rekened in the battaile, but of good fightynge 
men there were not full ix. M. 

Thus in order of battaile the kyng rode to Seutreyca 
and ther lodged the first night, on friday the garrison of 
Bulleyn mustered nye to Fines Mill and were askryed by 
the Northumberland men, which marched toward them, 
but the Frenchemen returned. On saterdaie the hoste 
removed to Hambwell and ther rested. On sonday, and on 
mondaie he entered into the Frenche grounde nye to Arde, 
and ther every gentleman had on his coate of armes, and 
these tydynges were brought to the kyng that the French 
army approched which tidinges pleased him well, for he 
desyred nothyng but battaile. Tewsday the xxvi. daye of 
July the kynge passed forward in order of battayle and 
ever the Frenchmen costed a farre of to take the Englysh- 
men at some avantage, but thei kept them so close in 
order, that they could not fynd them out of array. 
Howbeit, by negligence of the carters that mystooke the 

waye 



THE v. 
YERE 



68 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



The courage 
of the kyng. 



waye a greate Curtail called the Jhon evangelist, was over- 
throwen in a depe ponde of water, and coulde not quicklye 
be recovered. 

The kyng heryng that his enemies approched, levyng 
the gonne (because the master carpenter sayde that he 
would shortely way it out of the water) set forward his 
hoste, and in good order came to Dornahan where is a 
fayre castell standyng in a wodde countrey, the Frenchmen 
were ever lurkyng in the woddes viewing the kyngs con- 
duite and order as he passed, and so he lefte the towne 
of Dornahan on his right hande, and came to a village on a 
litle river where the ordinaunce pitched. And when the 
kyng came to the ryver he perceyved that many gentlemen 
made daunger to entre into the river : Wherfore he a lighted 
downe of his horse and without any more abode entred the 
river, then all other entred and came over. Then was 
tydynges brought to hym, that the Frenchmen were nere at 
hande and would fight that nyght : the kyng styll abode in 
order of battaile, ever lokynge for the commynge of the 
Frenchmen, and at night woorde was brought that they 
were reculed, and then he entred into hys tente. 

Wednesday the xxvi. daye of July the releffe of the 
speres brought in askry, wherfore the kynge commaunded 
to blow to the standarde, and avaunced his banner and 
toke a faire feld or banke abidyng the comming of the 
Frenchmen. The capitaines generall of the army of the 
Frenche kyng were the lord dela Palice and the lorde 
of Piens, accompaignyed with the duke of Longuyle, 
therle of sainct Polle, the lorde of Floringes, the lorde 
Cleremounde, and Richard dela Pole traytour of England 
sonne to the duke Jhon of Suffolke : with these capitaines 
were comming xi. M. footmen and iiii. M. horsmen, all 
prest in battayle and came with in ii. miles of the kyng 
of Englande, and there the footmen staled and came no 
farther : certaine horsmen to the nomber of iii. M. and 
above marched forward and at the ende of a wodde shewed 
themselfes open in the sight of the Englishe army. The 
kyng perceivyng there demeanure, commaunded al his 
footmen not to remove, but to stand still. The French- 
men removed and came sumwhat nerer to a place of 
execucion : then the master Conner losed a pece of artilery 
or two. As the kyng lay thus styll abydyng his enemies, 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



6 9 



and that the horsemen stode still in sight, the greate 
armye of Fraunce approched, whiche the Englishmen 
could not descrye by cause of an hyll that was betwexte 
them. The Northerne men ran to the Frenchmen, which 
manly encontered with them and strake some of them 
downe and maugre all there powre brought certaine 
prisoners to the kyng of England. Therle of Essex 
capitaine of the kynges speres with ii. C. speres lay in a 
stale, if the Frenchmen had come nerer. Then sodainly 
apered in sight a great company of horsmen and the 
kyng knewe not what thei were: but at the last it was 
perceyved that it was the valiant knight sir Rice ap Thomas 
with his retinue whiche came to the kyng aboute none : 
which gentilly receyved him and sent hym to therle of 
Essex, which incontinentely departed and compassed the 
hill and came to therle, and when they were joyned, they 
drewe them about the hyll accompaignied with sir Thomas 
Gylforde capitayne of ii. C. archers on horseback, to thentent 
to have set on the Frenchmen, which perceivyng that, and 
dowghting more nomber to come after, sodainly drewe back 
and joyned them with there great battaile. Then therle of 
Essex and thenglishe horsmen folowed them tyll they came 
nere the great army of Fraunce and then staled, and sent 
light horsemen to knowe the conduite of the French army. 
When the Frenchmen of armes were retorned to ther 
battaile, both the footmen and horsmen reculed in order 
of battell and went back a pace, the Englyshe styrrers per- 
ceyvyng this, folowed iii. leages and returned to therle, 
makynge reporte of that they had sene, and then he brake 
up his stale and came to the kyng, declaryng to him how 
the Frenshemen were reculed. Thys daye was called the 
drye Wednesday, for the day was wonderfull hoat and the 
kyng and his army were in order of battaile from vi. of the 
clock in the mornyng tyll iii. of the clock at after noone, and 
some died for lack of moysture and allmost in general every 
man was burned nbout the mouth with hete of the stomack, 
for drynke lacked and water was not nere. After this, the 
kyng removed towarde Tyrwyn havyng his horsmen behind 
hym, lest the Frenshmen shoulde sodainly sett on hym be- 
hynde, and as the kyng was settyng forward, the lorde 
Walowne of Flaunders came to the kyng with his horsmen 
which were in the kynges . wages, and the kyng declared 

to 



THE V. 
YERE 



The dry 
Wednesday. 



7 o 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



to him what had chaunced. As the army passed by negli- 
gence the same day in a lane, was overthrowen one of the 
kinges great bombardes of Iron, called the redde gonne, 
and there left : When the night began to approche the 
kyng rested and toke his campe ii. myles from sainct Omers 
on the north syde. 

On the thursdaye beyng the xxviii. day of July the 
master carpenter with an hundred carpenters and laborers 
without knowledge of the marshal went to waye up the 
great gonne that was in the ponde as you have harde, and 
by force of engynes drewe it up and laied it on a carte 
redy to cary : But sodainly out of a wodde issued viii. C. 
Frenchmen with speres, crosbowes and handgonnes, and 
assayled the poore labourers which valiantly defended 
themselfes : but oppressed with multitude, the most parte 
was slayne and the remnant taken, and they and the pece 
of ordinaunce caried to bulleyne. This misaventure fel, 
for the master carpenter would woorke all of his awne 
hedde without counsayll, with which chaunce the kyng was 
sore displeased. The Frenchmen joyous of this chaunce, 
assembled a great nomber, to take the other gonne that 
lay still in the high way. Wherfore the lorde barnes 
beyng capiteyne of the pioners and laborers heryng of 
the misaventure, and consideryng that the other gonne 
was lyeng behynd prepared al maner of engines to recover 
the same. The morow after, the kyng entended to reyse 
his camp, but when he harde of the great pece of ordin- 
aunce that was left behynde, and that the Frenshmen 
assembled together, he was in a greate musynge and so 
taryed and commaunded the Almaynes to retrate backe 
and to succour them that went for the pece of ordin- 
aunce. The Almaynes went foorth and staled within two 
mile, where the pece of ordinaunce lay, and farther thei 
woulde not go. The earle of Essex with his company of 
speres, sir Rice ap Thomas, with his compaignie, sir Jhon 
Nevell with the Northumberland men set forward to helpe 
the lord Barnes for recovery of the gonne. And sodainly 
the northren horsmen espied where al the great army of 
the Frenshmen were commyng forward, and so reported 
to therle of Essex, that to sir Jhon pechy Lieutenant of 
the horsemen and speres and other capitaines, whiche were 
in the place where the said gonne was left with a hundred 

horsmen, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



horsmen, which hering therof sent worde to sir Rice, 
which hering therof desired the erle of Essex to come 
and to take grounde in that place where he was, which 
removed in greate haste : In the meane season by the 
diligent labor of the Lord Barnes, the pece of ordinaunce 
was raysed and carted, and furthe was it caried, by this 
tyme the French army apered in sight. 

When therle of Essex saw the great nomber of the 
Frenchmen, in all hast he sent to the lord Walon, willyng 
him with his company to come to there ayde, the lord 
Waloun sayd to the messenger, go tel your capitayne that 
I come hither to serve the kyng of England more then 
one daye, and therfore I would all thenglishmen would 
returne, for with the great power of Fraunce thei be not 
able to fight, for I esteme them ix. or x. M. men at the 
lest : with this aunswer the messenger departed and made 
relacion to the erle of Essex and other capitaynes which 
there with were sore discontent : by this time the scowrers 
of the French parte were come harde to the handes of the 
Englishmen : then began the light horsmen to skyrmyshe, 
ther was folowyng and reskuinge on both parties, and in 
open sight some of both parties slayne. Then marched 
forward the hole battaile of the Frenchmen with standardes, 
penons and banners waveryng, and sumptuous bardes, and 
riche harnys glyteryng, the men of armes in great nomber 
were in ranges a long redy to chace and charge. Sir Rice 
ap Thomas beyng a man of great experience, sagely per- 
ceyved in what case the matter stode, sayd to therle of 
Essex, sir we be not vii. C. horsmen, let us not be to 
folysh hardy, our commission was to fette the gonne and 
none other, let us folowe the same, therle agreed therto 
and so softely and not in flyeng maner retreted and folowed 
the gonne. The Frenchmen perceivyn that, cried al is ours 
let us folowe, then pricked forward ii. M. men of armes 
and came juste to the backes of the Englishmen, then 
thenglishemen cried sainct George and cast them selfe 
about and made retorne to the Frenchmen, sir William 
Tyler and sir Jhon sharpe were the first charged, and 
after all the other Englishmen, there was a dreadfull chase, 
for the men of armes of Fraunce flede so fast, that glad 
was he that might be formost, the hole hoost seynge ther 
horsmen returnyng in flight, sodainly in great hast returned 

without 



THE v. 

YERE 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



Tirwyn 
beseged. 



without any more doyng. Then the erle of Essex staled 
to an hyll, and ther caused his trompet to blowe to the 
standard for feare of subtyll dealynge : and when they 
were gathered together unto array, he returned. 

The xxix. daye of July the kyng with his army came 
to Arkus, and there embattailed him selfe in a strong 
grounde, and to hym came the erle of Essex and the 
other capitaines with the gonne, and made reporte of ther 
adventure, which thanked them hartely, and ther he lay till 
Monday in whiche time came many noble men of Flaunders 
to visite him, and many of the common people came to se 
hym. 

Mondaye the fyrste daye of Auguste, the kynge re- 
moved his campe to a village myddell way betwene Saynct 
Omers and Tyrwyn, and ther fell suche a rayne that the 
ordynaunce coulde scace be removed, the arable grounde 
was so softe. 

Thursday the iiii. day of August, the kyng in good 
order of battaile came before the citie of Tyrwyn and 
planted his sege in most warlikewise, his campe was en- 
vironed with artilerie, as Fawcones, serpentynes, caste hag- 
bushes, and tryde harowes, spien trestyls, and other warlike 
defence for the savegarde of the campe. The kynge for 
hym selfe had a howse of tymber with a chymney of yron, 
and for his other lodgynges he had great and goodly tentes 
of blewe water worke garnyshed with yelowe, and white, 
diverse romes within the same for all offices necessary, on 
the toppe of the pavilions stode the kynges bestes hold- 
ynge fanes, as the Lion, the Dragon, the Greyhounde, the 
Antelope, the Donne kowe : within all the lodgynge was 
poyncted ful of the sunnes risynge, the lodgynge was C. xxv. 
foot in length. 

The kyng lyeng before Tirwyn, his great ordinaunce 
sore bet the toune walles, and thei within likewise shot out 
of the towne ordinaunce, and slewe divers Englyshmen in 
the trenches, among which shottes thei had one gonne that 
every day and night was ordinarely shotte at certayne 
howres without fayle : this gonne was of Thenglishmen 
called the whystelyng gonne, but it never did harme in the 
kynges feld. The siege thus lyeng before the citie of 
Tyrwyn, Sir Alexander Baynam a capitaine of the myners, 
caused a myne to be enterprised to enter into the towne, 

but 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



73 



but the Frenchmen perceyvyng that, made a countermyne 
and so destroyed the other myne, and divers myners slayne 
within the same. The Frenche army hoved ever a farre to 
take the Englishmen at avantage as thei went a forragyng, 
and many a skirmish was done, and many good feates of 
armes acheved on bothe sydes, and divers prisoners taken. 
Among the Frenchmen were certaine light horsmen called 
Stradiotes with shorte styroppes, bever hatts, smal speres, 
and swerdes like Semiteries of Turkay : dyvers tymes the 
Northren light horsmen under the conduite of sir Jhon 
Nevell skirmished with these stradiottes and toke diverse 
of them prisoners, and brought them to the kyng. 

While the kynge lay thus before Tyrwyn, the capitayne 
of Bullen knowynge by hys espialles that many of the 
garryson of Caleys were with the kyng at the siege, and 
also that daylye vitailles were brought out of Englande to 
Caleys to succour the campe, imagened a great entreprice 
and sent for all the men of warre under his dominion 
and rule, and declared to them what honour they shoulde 
obteyne yf they hurted or spoyled the out partes of Caleis, 
the kyng of England beyng on that syde the see. The 
men of warre perceivyng the good courage of the capitaine, 
assented to his purpose, and so wyth all diligence they to 
the nomber of a M. men in the evenyng set forward, and 
came to Newnam bridge by iii. of the clock in the morning, 
and founde the watchmen that kepe the bridge a slepe, and 
so entred the bulwerke and slewe the watchmen, and toke 
the ordinaunce of the bridge and then let the bridge fall, so 
that all entred that would. The capitayn of Bulleyn kept 
vi. C. men for a stale at the bridge, and sent the other into 
the marrishes and medowes where the Cattell fedde, and some 
of the Frenshmen came to Caleys gate, and were askryed of 
the watch and so range alarme, the Englishe souldiours ran 
to the walles, and sawe the Frenshemen without the toune 
walles : then they knew that Newnam brydge was lost, and 
would have issued out, but Sir Gylbert Talbott deputie ther, 
would not suffer any gate to be opened. Now it happened 
that without Caleys gates were Richard Hunnyng and 
Richard Brickes of the Caterie, and iii. or iiii. of the kyngs 
servauntes whych lay there to sende provisions to the hoost : 
whiche heryng of this alarme, called to them the kynges 
bakers, and cowpers, and a fewe shippemen, which lay 



in 



THE V. 
YERE 



VOL. I. 



74 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



The foly of a 
Cowper. 



in the haven, and coragiously folowed the Frenchmen. 
Thenglishemen were not past vi. skore persones, and set 
on the Frenchemen as thei were a forragyng or they 
might assemble together, and slew them doune right and 
toke no prisoners in maner, and so thei came to Newnam 
brydge and toke it and put the Frenchmen backe : But or 
Thenglishmen had thus gathered them selfes together, the 
Frenchmen had forraged all with in the river up to sainct 
Peters, and had driven away the cattell and the ordinaunce 
of Newnam brydge and so passed till they came where the 
stale laye, and ther they taried lokyng for ther company 
that were gone a forragyng to Caleys walles. About v. 
of the clock in the morenynge, the gate of Caleys called 
Bulleyn gate, was opened, and then issuyd out one Culpiper 
the under marshall with ii. C. archers with the banner of 
Saincte George, and with great hast came to Newnam 
bridge, where thei found the kynges servauntes and the 
other that had wonne the brydge, and then they all together 
marched toward the Frenchemen, whiche kepte the stale. 
The Frenchmen thought it had ben there awne company 
that had returned, till they saw the banner of S. George, 
then they knewe that their company were overthrowen, 
and that they must nedes fight or dy. Then thenglish- 
men though thei were the smaller nomber, valiantly set 
on the Frenchmen, which with great force them defended, 
but at the last thei were all discomfited and xxiiii. slayne 
and xii. skore taken prisoners and ther ordinaunce and 
hole booty recovered. These prisoners were brought to 
Caleys, and there sold in open market : Amonge all other 
a Cowper of the towne of Caleys bought a prisoner of 
this booty that dwelt in Bulleyn, and had of the prisoner 
C. crownes for his raunsome, and when the mony was 
paied, the Frenchman praied the Cowper to se him save 
delivered and to conduite hym out of danger, the Cowper 
gently graunted and without any knowlege of hys frendes, 
all alone went with the Frenchman till he came beyonde 
the Cawsey and ther would have departed : but the French- 
man perceived, that the Cowper was aged and that no 
reskewes was ny, by force toke the Cowper prisoner and 
caried him to Bulleyn, and made him paye ii. C. crownes 
for his raunsome, thus thorowe foly was the poore Cowper 
deceaved. 

The 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



75 



The xi. day of August beyng thursday, the kyng lyeng 
at the siege of Tyrwyn, had knowlege that Maximilian 
themperour was in the toune of Ayre. The kyng pre- 
pared all thinges necessarie to mete with themperour in 
triumphe. The noble men of the kynges campe were 
gorgeously apparelled, ther coursers barded of cloth of 
gold, of damaske and broderie, theire apparelle all tissue 
cloth of gold and sylver, and gold smithes woorke, great 
cheynes of balderickes of gold, and belles of bullion, but 
in especial the duke of Buckingham, he was in purple 
satten, his apparel and his barde full of Antelopes and 
swannes of fyne gold bullion and full of spangyls and 
littell belles of gold mervelous costly and pleasaunt to be- 
hold. The kyng was in a garment of greate riches in 
juels as perles and stone, he was armed in a light armure, 
the mayster of hys horse folowed him with a spare horse, 
the henxmen folowed beryng the kyngs peces of harnys, 
every one mounted on a greate courser, the one bare the 
helme, the seconde his graungarde, the thirde his spere, 
the fourth his axe, and so every one had some thyng be- 
longyng to a man of armes : the apparell of the ix. henx- 
men were white clothe of gold and crymsyn cloth of 
gold, richely embrawdered with goldesmythes worke, the 
trappers of the corsers were mantell harneys coulpened, and 
in every vent a long bel of fyne gold, and on every 
pendant a depe tassel of fyne gold in bullion, whiche 
trappers were very ryche. The kyng and themperour 
mett betwene ayre and the campe, in the fowlest wether 
that lightly hath bene sene. Themperour gentely enter- 
teined the kyng, and the kyng likewyse hym, and after a 
littell communicacion had betwen them, by cause the wether 
was foule, departed for that tyme. The Emperour and all 
hys men were at that daie al in black cloth for the Emprice 
his wife was lately disseased. After that the kyng was 
thus retorned to his campe, within a daye or twayne ther 
arryved in the army a kynge of armes of Scotland called 
Lyon with his cote of armes on his back, and desyred to 
speke with the kynge, who with in shorte tyme was by 
Garter cheffe kyng of armes brought to the kynges presence, 
where he beyng almost dismayed seynge the kyng so 
nobly accompanied, with fewe woordes, and metely good 
reverence, delivered a letter to the king, which received 

the 



THE V. 
YERE 



7 6 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



the letter and redde it him selfe, and when he had redde 
it, without anye more delay he him selfe aunswered after 
this sorte. Nowe we perceyve the kyng of Scottes our 
brother in law and your master to be the same person 
whome we ever toke hym to be, for we never estemed 
hym to be of any truthe and so now we have founde 
it, for notwithstandynge his othe, his promise in the woord 
of kyng, and his awne hand and scale, yet nowe he hath 
broken his faith and promise to his great dishonour and 
infamie for ever, and entendeth to invade our realme in 
our absence which he dirst not ones attempte, our person 
beynge presente, but he sheweth him self not to be de- 
generate from the condicions of his forefathers, whose 
faythes for the most parte hath ever ben violated and 
ther promises never observed, farther then they liste. 
Therfore tell thy master, first that he shall never be com- 
prised in any league where in I am a confederate, and 
also that I suspecting his treuth (as now the dede proveth) 
have left an erle in my realme at home which shalbe able 
to defende him and all his powre, for we have provided 
so, that he shall not fynde our land destitute of people 
as he thynketh to do : but thus saye to thy master, that 
I am the very owner of Scotland, and that he holdeth it of 
me by homage, and in so much as now contrary to his 
bounden duety he, beinge my vassall, doth rebel against 
me, with Gods help I shal at my returne expulse him his 
realme, and so tell him : sir sayd the kyng of Armes, I 
am his naturall subjecte, and he my naturall lord, and that 
he commaundeth me to say, I may boldely saye with favor, 
but the commaundementes of other I may not, nor dare 
not saye to my sovereigne lorde, but your letters maye 
with your honour sent, declare your pleasure, for I may 
not say suche woordes of reproche to him whome I owe 
only my allegeaunce and fayth. Then sayd the kynge, 
wherfore came you hyther, will you receyve no aunswere ? 
yes sayde Lion, your answere requireth doyng and no 
writyng, that is, that immediatly you should returne 
home : well said the kynge, I wyll returne to your domage 
at my pleasure, and not at thy masters somonyng. Then 
the kyng commaunded garter to take hym to his tente 
and make him good chere, which so dyd, and cherished 
him wel for he was sore appalled: after he was departed, 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



77 



the kyng sent for all the chefe capitaynes, and before 
them and all hys counsaill caused the letter to be redde, 
the trewe tenor whereof foloweth woorde, by woorde. 



THE LETTER OF THE KYNGE 
OF SCOTTES. 

RIGHT excellent, right high, and myghty Prince, our 
' deerest brother and Cousyng, we commaund us 
' unto you in our mayst harty maner, and re- 
ceyved Fra Raff heraulde your letters quharuntill, ye 
approve and allow the doynges of your commissioners 
lately beyng with ours, at the borders of bathe the 
realmes for makyng of redresse, quylke is thought to 
you and your counsell should be continnet and delaet to 
the xv. day of October. Als ye write, slaars by see 
aught not compere personally, but by their attorneis. 
And in your other letters with our heraulde Hay, ye 
ascertaine us ye wil nought entre in the treux taken 
betwext the maste Christian kyng and your father of 
Aragon because ye and other of the hale liege, nether 
should ne may take peace, treux nor abstinence of warr 
with your common enemy, without consent of all the 
confederates. And that the Emperour kyng of Aragon, 
ye and every of you be bounden to make actuall warre 
this instant somer agaynst youre common enemie. And 
that so to do is concluded and openly sworne in Paules 
kyrke at London upon sainct Markes daye last by past. 
And ferther have denyed saveconduyte upon oure re- 
questes that a servitor of ours might have resorted your 
presence, as our herauld Hay reportes : Right excellent 
right high and mightie Prince our derest brother and 
Cousyng, the sayed metyng of our and your commissioners 
at the borders was peremptorily appyncted betwyxt you 
and us eftir diverse dietes for reformacion before con- 
tynued to the Commissioners metyng, to effecte that due 
redresse suld have ben made at the sayde metynge, lyke 
as for our parte, our Commissioners offered to have 
made that time : And for your part na malefactour was 
then arrested to the saide diet. And to glose the same, 
ye nowe wright, that slaars by see nede not compere 

' personally, 



THE v. 
YERE 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



personally, but by their attourneys, quylk is agayne lawe 
of God and man. And gefe in crimenall accion, all slaars 
sulbe nought compere personally, na punicion sulde 
folowe for slaughter, and than vane it were to seke 
farther metynges or redresse. And hereby apperes as 
the dede shewes, that ye wyll nouther kepe gude weyes 
of justice and equitie nor kyndnes with us, the greate 
wronges and unkyndnes done before to us and our lyeges 
we ponderate quhilk we have suffered this long time in 
upberyng maynsweryng noundressynge of Attemptates, so 
as the byll of the taken of in haldyng of bastard Heron 
with his complices in your countre quha slewe our wardan 
under traist of dayes of metyng for justice, and therof 
was filat and ordaynt to be delyvered in slaynge of our 
liege noble men under colour by your folkes, in takynge 
of uthers oute of oure realme, prisonet and cheinet by 
the cragges in your centre, with halding of our wifes 
legacie promist in your diverse letters for dispite of us, 
slaughter of Andrew Barton by your awne commaund quha 
than had nought offended to you nor your lieges unre- 
dressed, and breakynge of the amitie in that behalfe by your 
dede, and with haldynge of our shippes and artilarie to 
your use, quharupon eft our diverse requisitions at your 
wardens, Commissioners, Ambassadors, and your selfe, 
ye wrate and als shewe by uthers unto us, that ful 
redresse suld be made at the sayde metynge of com- 
missioners, and sa were in hope of reformacion, or at the 
lest ye for our sake walde have desisted fra invasion of 
our frendes and Cousynges with in their awne countres 
that have nought offended at you as we firste required 
you in favoure of oure tendre Cousynge the duke of 
Geldre, quham to destroye and disinherite ye send your 
folkes and dudde that was in them. And right sawe 
latly desyred for our brother and Cousynge the mast 
Christen kynge of Fraunce, quham ye have caused to 
tyne his countre of Millaigne, and nowe invades his selfe 
quha is with us in secunde degree of blude, and hase ben 
unto you kynde witoute offense and more kyndar than 
to us : notwithstandyng in defense of his persone we 
mon take parte, and therto ye because of uthers have 
geven occasion to us and to oure lyeges in tyme by past, 
nouther doyng justly nor kyndely towardes us, procedynge 

' alwayes 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



79 



alwayes to the utter destruction of oure nereste frendes, 
quha mon doo for us quhan it shall be necessarie. In 
evyll example that ye wyll hereafter be better unto us 
quham ye lightlye favoure, manifestlye wranged your 
sister for our sake incontrary our writtes. And sayeng 
unto our herauld that we give you fayre wordes and 
thinkes the contrary, in dede suche it is, we gave you 
wordes as ye dudde us, trustynge that ye shoulde have 
emended to us or worthin kyndar to oure frendes for 
our sakes, and sulde nougtight have stopped oure servi- 
tors passage to laboure peax, that thei might as the papes 
halines exherted us by his brevites to do. And ther- 
apon we were contented to have oversene our harmes 
and to have remitted the same, though uther informacion 
was made to our haly father pape July by the Cardinall 
of Yorke youre Ambassadour. And sen ye have now 
put us fra all gude beleve through the premisses, and 
specially in denyenge of saveconduyte to our servauntes 
to resorte to your presence, as your ambassadour doctor 
west instantly desyred we sulde sende one of oure coun- 
sayll unto you apon greate matters, and appoynctyng of 
differentes debatable betwixt you and us, furtheryng of 
peax yf we might betwyxt the most Christen kyng and 
you, we never harde to this purpose saveconduite denied 
betwixte infideles. Herfore we write to you this tyme 
at length playnes of our mynde, that we require and 
desyre you to desiste fra farther invasion and utter de- 
struccion of our brother and Cousynge the mayst Christen 
kynge, to whome by all confederacion bloude and alye 
and also by newe bande, quhilk ye have compelled us 
lately to take through your injuries and harmes without 
remedy done daily unto us, our lieges and subdites, we 
are bounden and oblist for mutuall defence ilke of uthers, 
like as ye and your confederates be oblist for mutuall in- 
vasions and actuall warre : Certifienge you we will take 
parte in defence of our brother and Cousyng the maist 
Christen kyng. And wil do what thing we trayest may 
crast cause you to desist fra persuite of hym, and for 
denyt and pospoynct justice to oure lieges we mon gyve 
letters of Marque accordyng to the amitie betwixte you 
and us, quharto ye have had lyttell regarde in time by 
past, as we have ordaint our herauld the bearer herof to 

' saie, 



THE V. 
YERE 



8o 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



' saie, gife it like you to here him and gyfe him credence : 
' right excellent, right high and mighty Prince our derest 
' brother and Cousyng, the Trinitie have you in kepyng. 
' Geven under our signet at Edynborowe the xxvi. daye 
'of July. 

When the kynge rede this letter, he sente it in all 
haste to the Earle of Surrey into England, whyche then 
lay at Pomfrett, and caused an other letter to be devised 
to the kyng of Scottes, the copie whereof foloweth. 

4 Right excellent, right high, and mighty prince, etc. and 
' have received your writyng, Dated at Edenburgh the 
' xxvi. day of July by your heraulde Lyon this bearer, 
' wherin after rehersall and accumulacion of many sur- 
' mised injuries, grefes and damages doone by us and our 
4 subjectes to you and your lieges, the specialites wherof 
' were superfluous to reherse, remembryng that to theim 
' and every of theim in effect reasonable aunswere founded 
' upon law and conscience hath tofore ben made to you 
' and youre counsail, ye not only require us to desiste 
' from farther invasion and utter destruction of your 
' brother and Cousyng the Frenche kyng, but also certifie 
' us that you will take parte in defence of the sayd kyng, 
' and that thyng which ye trust may rather cause us to 
' desiste, from persuite of him, with many contrived occa- 
' sions and communications by you causeles sought and 
4 imagined, sowninge to the breache of the perpetual! peace, 
' passed, concluded and sworne, betwixt you and us, of 
' which your imagined querelles causeles devised to breake 
' to us contrarye to your othe promised, all honor and kind- 
4 nesse : We cannot marvayle, consydering the auncient 
' accustomable maners of youre progenitours, whyche never 
' kepte lenger fayth and promyse than pleased them. 
4 Howebeit, yf the love and dread of God, nighnes of 
' bloud, honor of the worlde, lawe and reason, had bound 
4 you, we suppose ye woulde never have so farre preceded, 
' specially in our absence. Wherin the Pope and all Princes 
' christened may wel note in you, dishonorable demeanour 
4 when ye liyng in awayte seke the wayes to do that in our 
' sayd absence, whych ye would have bene wel advised to 
' attempte, we beyng wythin our Realme and presente. 
' And for the evydent approbacion hereof, we nede none 
4 other proves ne witnesse but your owne writinges heretofore 

' to 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



81 



to us sent, we beynge wythin our Realme, wherin ye 
never made mencion of taking parte wyth our enemie the 
Frenche kynge, but passed the tyme wyth us tyll after our 
departure from our sayde Realme. And now percase ye 
supposinge us so farre from our said realme to be destitute 
of defence agaynste youre invasions, have uttered the olde 
rancor of youre minde, whiche in covert maner ye have 
long kepte secrete. Neverthelesse, we remembrynge the 
britilnes of your promise and suspectynge though not 
wholy belevyng so much unstedfastnes, thought it ryght- 
expedient and necessarie to put our said realme in a redines 
for resisting of your saide enterprises, havyng firme trust 
in our Lord God and the rightwisnes of our cause with 
thassistence of our confederates and Alies wee shalbee able 
to resist the malice of all Scismatyques and their adherentes 
beynge by the genarall counsayll expresselye excommuni- 
cate and interdicted, trustinge also in tyme conveniente 
to remember our frendes, and requite you and cure 
enemies, which by suche unnatural demeanour have geven 
sufficiente cause to the dysheryson of you and your pos- 
teritie for ever from the possibilitie that ye thinke to have 
to the realme, whiche ye now attempte to invade. And 
yf the example of the kyng of Navarre beinge excluded 
from his royalme for assistence geven to the Frenche king 
cannot restraine you from thys unnaturall dealinge, we 
suppose ye shall have like assistence of the sayde Frenche 
kinge as the kinge of Navarre hath now : Who is a kinge 
withoute a realme, and so the French kynge peaceably 
suffereth hym to contynue wherunto good regarde woulde 
: be taken. And lyke as we heretofore touched in this oure 
: writing, we nede not to make any further aunswer to 
; the manyfolde greves by you surmised in youre letter : 
; forasmuche as yf any lawe or reason coulde have removed 
: you from youre sensuall opinions, ye have bene manie and 
1 often tymes sufficiently aunswered to the same : Excepte 
' onelye to the pretended greves towchynge the deniynge of 
; of our saveconduyte to your Ambassadoure to bee last 
' sent unto us : Where unto we make this aunswere, that we 
' had graunted the sayde saufeconduite, and yf your herauld 
' would have taken the same with him lyke as he hathe bene 
' accustomed to sollicitie saufeconduytes for marchauntes 
' and others heretofore, ye might as sone have had that, as 

' any 

VOL. I. 



THE V. 
YERE 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



' any other, for we never denied saufeconduyte to any youre 
' lieges to come unto us and no further to passe, but we 
' se wel, lyke as your sayde herauld had heretofore made 
' sinister reporte contrary to trueth so hath he done nowe in 
' this case as it is manifest and open. Fynally, as towching 
' your requisition to desist from farther attemptyng againste 
' our enemy the French kyng, we knowe you for no com- 
' petent judge of so high authoritie to require us in that 
' behalfe : wherfore God willyng we purpose with the ayde 
' and assistence of our confederates and Alies to persecute 
' the same, and as ye do to us and our realme, so it shalbe 
' remembred and acquited herafter by the help of our lord 
' and our patrone S. George. Who righte excellent, ryghte 
' hyghe and mightie Prynce, etc. Yeven under our signet 
' in our campe before Tyrwyn the xii. daye of August.' 

When thys letter was written and sealed, the kynge sent 
for Lyon the Scottishe herauld, and declared to him that he 
had wel considered his maisters letter, and therto had made 
a reasonable answere, and gave to him in reward a hundred 
angels, for which reward he humbly thanked the kyng and 
so taried with gartier alnight, and ever he sayd that he was 
sorye to thinke what domage shoulde be done in Englande 
by his mayster or the kinge returned, and so the next day 
he departed into Flaunders wyth hys Letter to have taken 
shyppe to sayle into Scotlande, but or he coulde have shyppe 
and wynde hys mayster was slayne. 

After the defiaunce declared by the king of Scottes 
herauld, the king of England wrote to the quene and other 
which he had left behynd of his counsayl, to prepare in al 
haste for the defence of the sayde kynge of Scottes, which 
so did with great diligence as you shal heare shortly after. 
Whyle the king lay thus at siege before Tyrwyn, the French- 
men studied al the wayes possible how to vitayle the towne 
of Tyrwyn, and imagined in a nyght by some waye to convey 
vitayle to the towne : wherfore every day they sent stradiates 
to espie by whiche way they mighte take their most avan- 
tage, and many times the Englishe horsmen met with the 
stradiates and of them slewe parte. 

The French kynge woulde in any wyse that the kyng of 
Englande shoulde bee foughte wyth all, wherfore he sent 
the duke of Vandosme, the duke of Longuile with diverse 
other valiant captains of Blangoy. Then was there a con- 
clusion 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



elusion taken that the duke of Alanson should with v. M. 
men fyght with the erle of Shrewsbury, or els to kepe that 
nother he nother the lord Harbert should aide or come to 
the kynges battayle, and with the king should skyrmysh 
the duke of Vandosme and Longuyle, whyle in the meane 
season the cariages with vitayle myght entre the toune. 
For accomplishyng of this enterpryse, the Frenchmen made 
greate purveaunce and al on horsebacke, this was not so 
secretly concluded but the kyng of England had an ynke- 
lyng therof, and sent worde to the Emperour which lay at 
Ayre and knewe nothyng of this devyse and desyred hym 
to come to the campe to have his advyse : which gladly 
aunswered that he woulde come the morowe after. The 
kyng continually sent forth his light horses to seke the 
countrey and to se yf anye apparaunce wer, and they ever 
brought tidinges of such things as thei saw, so that alwayes 
it was forsene that the kyng nor hys people shuld be taken 
unpurveied, nor the Frenchmen shoulde not come on them 
sodainly unaskried. 

While these thinges were thus in commonynge and 
immagenyng, themperour Maximilian and all his servauntes, 
whyche were reteined with the king of England in wages 
by the day, every person accordinge to his degre, and 
Themperour as the kinges souldioure ware a Crosse of 
saynte George wyth a Rose, and so he and al his traine 
came to the kinges campe the xiii. day of August beyng 
Fridaye, and there was receyved wyth greate magnificence 
and broughte to a tente of cloth of golde all ready appareled 
accordynge to hys estate, for all the tente within was syled 
wyth clothe of golde and blewe velvet, and all the blewe 
velvet was embrowdered with H. K. of fyne golde, and hys 
cupboorde was rychely furnyshed and officers appoyncted to 
geve on hym attendaunce : and there he taried tyl Sonday, 
and from thence he went agayne to Ayre for his pleasure. 
The kyng and his counsayl were informed by their espialles, 
and also it was confessed by certayne prisoners, howe the 
French army which lay at Blangoy, entended to vitail the 
cytie of Tyrwyn. Wherefore on Fridaye at nighte, the 
xiii. daye of Auguste the Duke of Buckyngham, the Earle 
of Essex, the Marques Dorset the Lorde of Burgaynye, the 
Lorde Willoughby, and diverse other gentlemen wyth vi. 
thousand men on foote and the Lorde Walon and the Lorde 

Ligny 



THE V. 
YERE 



8 4 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 

[I5I3-H] 



Ligny with ther horsemen were layed at Gingate on the 
south syde of Tyrwyn, where they were all nyghte in order 
of battayle, awaytynge the reskewe of the citie, but the 
Englyshmen were askryed, and so the Frenchmen brake 
their purpose for that time : and so the duke of Buckyngham 
and hys compaygnions returned to the campe. Mondaye 
the xiii. daye of Auguste by infortune, wythoute anye cause 
knowen, there fell a greate debate betwene the Almaynes 
of the kynges felde and Thenglyshmen, in so muche that 
they fell to fightinge and many men slayne, the Almaynes 
sodaynely ranne to the kynges ordinaunce and toke it, and 
embattayled them selfes, and bent the ordinaunce agaynst 
the kinge and his campe. Thenglyshmen were greately 
fumed with this matter : in so muche the archers set forward 
to have joyned with the Almaynes, and they lykewyse pre- 
pared their pykes, but the capytaynes tooke suche payne 
that the fray was appesed and al things done for that time, 
but as this commocion was in troublen the Emperour came 
from Ayre and saw al the demener of both parties and was 
glad to se the discrete handelyng of the capitaynes. After 
Themperour was come to the kinges feld, the king called 
Themperour and all the lordes of his counsayll together 
asserteyninge them that he was credibly enformed that the 
Frenchmen entended to reskew the citie of Tyrwyn, where- 
fore it was agreed that the mayster of the ordynaunce 
shoulde in haste make fyve bridges over the water for the 
armye to passe over, to thentent to besiege the citie on that 
syde : the carpenters dyd so there dever that nyght, so that 
by daye al the brydges were made, so that all the horssemen 
passed over and askryed the countrey. On Tewsdaye the 
xvi. day of August the kynge reysed his campe, and wyth 
greate ordinaunce and all other artilerie and cariage he passed 
the Ryver, and to him came Sir Jhon Nevel with hys lyghte 
horssemen and tolde hym that behynde the tower of Gingate 
was a great plumpe of horsemen. In the meane season, as 
sir Jhon Nevel told the kinge these tidinges, by another 
waye was the Erie of Essex, Sir Jhon Peche and the kings 
speres passed and skirmished with the plump of speres that 
Sir Jhon spake of, and there were manye prefers made on 
both sides, but in conclusion the Frenchmen wer compelled 
to leave their stale, and one horseman taken and sente to 
the kynge whyche in hope of pardon of his raunsome shewed 

howe 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



howe that the Frenche armye with their full power and 
strength were comming from Blangoy the nomber of 
fyftene thousande horssemen of armes to ayde Tyrwyn on 
that side of the water. And to thentente that the armye 
of the Lorde Stuarde, and the Lorde Chamberlayne shoulde 
not ayde the kynge, there wer appoyncted fyve thousande 
of the fiftene thousande horssemen on the other side of the 
water. As these tidinges was tolde came one from Sir Ryce, 
and sayde that a prisoner that he had that day taken, con- 
fessed that the citie shoulde be reskowed the same day, and 
that he had askryed a nomber of horssemen to hys judge- 
mente uppon the poyncte of six thousande. Then sodaynely 
came the Northren menne, whyche affirmethe, that they had 
sene the Frenche armye in ordre of battayle commynge 
forwarde, but they judged them not paste twelfe thousande 
menne. Then the kynges felde was pytched and the ordy- 
naunce set, but some counsayled the kynge to take doune 
hys tentes but the kinge sayde I will this daye that my felde 
be made and sette in as royall wise as maye bee, and all my 
ryche tentes sette up, whyche was done. Then the kynge 
called the Lorde Darcy, and commaunded hym to kepe his 
felde, treasure ordynaunce and other stuffe, which was lothe 
to go from hys Mayster but by streyte commaundemente. 
Then everye man prepared hym selfe to battayle resortynge 
to the standarde, the horsemen marched before the footmen 
by the space of a myle, still came curroures berynge tydynges 
that the Frenche armye approched. The kynge bad sette 
forwarde and to avaunce hys banner in name of God and 
sainct George. The Almanies seyng this (to what purpose 
it was not knowen) sodaynelye embateled them selfes on the 
lefte hande of the kinge and lefte the breste or fronte of the 
kynges battayle bare. As the kynge was thus marchinge 
forwarde towarde the battayle, to hym came the Emperoure 
Maximilian wyth xxx. men of armes, he and al his company 
armed in on sute with redde crosses : then by the counsayll 
of the Emperour the kynge caused certayne peces of small 
ordinaunce to bee layed on the toppe of a longe hyll or 
banke for the oute skowerers : Thus the kynges horssemen 
and a fewe archers on horssebacke marched forwarde. The 
kynge woulde fayne have bene afore wyth the horssemen, 
but hys counsayll perswaded hym the contrarye, and so he 
taryed wyth the footmen accompanied wyth themperour. 

The 



THE V. 
YERE 



86 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



The Frenchmen came on in iii. ranges xxxvi. mens 
thickenes and wel they perceived the kinges battayle of 
footmen marching forward : the erle of Essex capitayne of 
the horsemen, and sir Jhon Peche with the kinges horsmen 
and the Burgonions to the nomber of a xi. C. stode with 
banner displaied in a valey. The Lorde Walonne and the 
lord Ligny with bastarde Emery and there bend to the 
nomber of iiii. C. horsmen severed them selfes and stode 
a syde from the Englishmen : so then thenglishmen were 
but vii. C. yet they with banner displayed removed up to 
the toppe of the hill, and there they met with sir Jhon 
Gilford a C. talle archers on horsebacke, which had askryed 
the Frenchmen. Now on the toppe of the hill was a fayre 
plaine of good grounde, on the lefte hand a lowe wodde, 
and on the right hand a falow felde. The lord Walonne 
and the burgonions kepte them a loofe, then appered in 
sight the Frenchmen with banners and standardes displaied. 
Then came to the capitaines of Thenglishmen of armes, an 
English officer of armes called Clarenseux and saide, in 
Gods name set forward, for the victory is youres for I se 
by them, they will not abyde, and I wyll go wyth you in 
my coate of armes. Then the horsemen set forward, and 
the archers alighted and were set in order by an hedge all 
a long a village side called Bomy : the Frenchmen came 
on wyth xxxiii. standardes displayed and the archers shot a 
pace and galled their horses, and the English speares set on 
freshly, crieng sainct George, and fought valyantly with the 
Frenchmen and threw done their standarde, the dust was 
greate and the crye more, but sodaynly the Frenchmen 
shocked to their standarde and fled and threw awaye their 
speres, swerdes and mases and cut of the bardes of their 
horses to ronne the lighter, when the hinder part saw the 
former flye, they fled also, but the soner for one cause which 
was this. As the Englysh horsemen mounted up the hil, 
the stradiates were commynge doune wardes on the one syde 
of the hill before the French host, which sodainly saw the 
banners of the Englysh horsemen, and the kinges battayl 
folowyng upwarde, wening to them that all had bene 
horsmen, then thei cast them self about and fledde, the 
Frenchmen wer so fast in array that the stradiates could 
have no entre, and so they ran stil by thendes of the ranges 
of the French army : and when they behinde saw the fall 

of 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



of their standardes and their stradiates in whome they had 
greate confidence retorne, they that were farthest of fledde 
firste, then up pranced the Burgonions and folowed the 
chace : thys battayle was of horsmen to horsemen but not in 
egal nomber, for the Frenchmen wer tenne to one, whyche 
had not bene sene before tyme, that the Englyshe horssemen 
gatt the vyctorye of the men of armes of Fraunce. The 
Frenchemen call this battaylle the journey of Spurres because 
they ranne awaye so faste on horssebacke. Thys battayll 
was the xvi. daye of Auguste, in the whyche battayle was 
taken the Duke of Longuile, Loys brother to the Earle of 
Dunoys whyche had maryed the Marques of Rutilons heyre, 
the Lorde Cleremounde and manye other noble men to the 
nomber of twelve skore and all broughte to the kynges 
presence, and lykewise al the standardes and banners were 
brought to the king. The Burgonions kept their prisoners 
and brought them not to sight. The fame wente that 
Mounsire de la palayce was by them taken and lett go. 
Thenglyshemen folowed the chace thre mile longe, from 
the felde to a water in a valeye, and there a Frencheman 
sayde to Sir Gyles Capell, that one daye they woulde have 
a daye, whyche aunswered hym agayne in Frenche that it 
was a bragge of Fraunce : and so the Englishmen returned 
to the kynge, whyche was commynge forwarde who gave 
them thankes wyth great praysynges for the valyantnes, and 
there he made Sir Jhon Pech Banneret and made Jhon Car 
knight whyche was sore hurte, and Sir Jhon Peche had hys 
guyd home taken and divers of his men hurt, they folowed 
so farre. Then the kynge retreted to Gingate, to whom 
came sir Rise and shewed him how hoat the Frenchmen 
had skirmished with hym all daye on the other syde of the 
ryver, and how therle of Shrewsbury with banner displayed 
was al day prest in ordre of battayle to have fought with 
the duke Alanson and therle of sainct Polle and the lord of 
Floringes which with v. M. men as you have heard were 
appoincted to reskewe the toune on that syde, where the 
Lord of Shrewsbury lay, and to let him to come to aid the 
king, but how soever that it happened, they stode stil and 
came not doune but onelye skirmished with sir Rice. The 
citie of Tyrwyn was this day in hope of ayde, and when 
they saw their helpers comming nere they the same day 
proudely issued out on the lord Harbert and skirmished 

with 



THE V. 
YERE 



The journey 
of Spurres. 



88 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 

[I5I3-H] 



with his people very valiantly, and thei within also shot 
out ordinaunce of al partes. The lorde Harbert and his 
captaines coragyouslye defended them, and so sore they set 
on the Frenchmen, that they drave them by force to their 
gates for al their succors, and many of them wer slaine : 
this night the kinge sent for the duke of Longeuile and the 
lorde Cleremound and diverse other noble men, and the 
duke supped at the kinges borde that night. 

Then the Frenchmen after this discomfiture assembled 
together and returned to Blangoy xii. myle from the coste, 
and there talked of their losses, and because they knewe not 
who were taken and who wer slain, therefore they sent an 
heraulde to the kynge to knowe the nomber of the prisoners, 
the kinges counsayll according to their desyre sente to them 
the names. The kyng beynge assertayned that the French 
kinges purpose was yet agayne to geve him battayll, com- 
maunded the best of the prysoners shoulde be conveyed 
to the toune of Ayre in Flaunders : but when thenglishe- 
men had brought them thyther, the capitayne denyed that 
thenglishmen shoulde entre the toune wyth prisoners of 
Fraunce with whome he and his countrey had peace : but 
yf the Frenche menne woulde desire lodginge for their ease, 
they shoulde be permitted to entre. But thenglishmen in a 
fury aunswered, that yf you wyll not suffer us to kepe our 
prysoners, we wil slay them : then the Frenchmen mekely 
prayed the capitayne to suffer the Englishemen to entre, 
and sware to their kepers to bee true prysoners, and so they 
entered and after were conveyed into England. The Lord 
Powntremy of the house of Cresquy capytayne generall of 
Tirwyn perceyved the dyscomfyture of the French partie, 
and perceyved how the Earle of Shrewsbury and the Lorde 
Harbert had brought thither great ordinaunce so nere the 
toune that nerer it coulde not be broughte, and that in the 
walles was suche batterie that it was not lyke to continue, 
yet he manfully defended the citie, and shote gonnes everye 
daye as he was accustomed and never was in despayre, tyll 
the xviii. daye of the sayde monethe he sawe the kynge 
remove his campe from Gyngate and layed hys campe on 
the southe syde of the toune betwene their reskewe and 
the toune : then when he sawe this and consydered that 
hys succoures were put backe and that the toune was sore 
febeled, and that the kinges greatest ordinaunce was bent 

againste 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



8 9 



againste the toune, he therfore by the advyse of other 
capitaynes sent to therle of Shrewsburye and the Lorde 
Harberte a trumpet, desieryng abstinence of warre for a 
daye, they incontynente sent to the kynge to knowe hys 
pleasure, the kinge aunswered that he woulde not graunte 
till he knewe the consideracion : then the captayne sent 
woorde that with saufeconduyte he woulde come and speake 
with the kinges counsayll, which to him was graunted, then 
he sent certayn commissioners whiche offered to delyver the 
toune wyth all the ordynaunce and municions withoute anye 
fraude, so that the townes men that woulde there dwell 
myght have lyfe and goodes safe, and that the men of warre 
might departe wyth horse and harneys, for goodes they 
sayde they had none, and there horse and harneys was of 
litle valure to so great a prince. After that the kyng and 
his counsayll had debated this matter, it was aunswered the 
commissioners that althoughe the kynge knewe their penury 
of vitayle and the dayly mortalitie amonge them and that 
the towne by reason of greate batteries was not able longe 
to resiste, yet because they asked mercye he woulde not 
extende rygor, and graunted there requeste, so that they 
delyvered the towne wyth all the ordynaunce as they had 
promysed, to the whyche all they wer sworne, and so re- 
turned. And the same nyght therle of Shresbury entred 
the toune and had the walles and towers and the banner of 
saint George was set in the highest place in signe of victory, 
and the lord Powtremy with al the garrison departed with 
horse and harnes according to the appoinctment. Then the 
Lord George Talbot erle of Shrewsbury, with iii. C. men 
serched the toune for feare of treason, or that any incon- 
venience might be unto the king and his people : and after 
that he saw al thing sure, he called al the tounes men 
together, and sware them, to be true to the king of Eng- 
land. When all this was done, the kynge on the xxiiii. day 
of August entered into the citie of Tyrwyn, at ix. of the 
clocke before none with great triumphe and honour, his 
persone was apparelled in armure gilt and graven, his garment 
and barde purple velvet full of borders, and in al places 
traversed with branches in ronnyng worke of fyne golde, 
the branches were of hawthorne wrought by goldsmithes 
craft wounde with a braunche of Roses, and every flower, 
lefe and bury were enbossed : After whome folowed his 

henxmen 



THE v. 

VERB 



VOL. I. 



9 o 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



Tyrwin 
burned. 



henxmen with the peces of armure accustomed : thus with 
great glory this goodly prince entered and toke possession 
of the towne of Tirwin and was received at the Cathedral 
church with procession, and they heard masse and dyned in 
the bishoppes palice, and at after none retorned to his campe, 
leving in the towne the Earle of Shrewsbury with his retinue. 
The xxvi. daye of August the kyng removed agayne to 
Gingate, and there it was agreed that the walles, gates, 
bulwarckes and towers of Tirwin should be defaced, rased 
and cast doune : of whiche conclusion the Emperour sainct 
worde to sainct Omers, and to Ayre, which beyng joyous 
of that tidinges (for Tyrwyn was for them a scorge) sent 
thither pioners with all maner of instrumentes, and so they 
and thenglish pyoners brake doune the walles, gates and 
towres of the foundacion and filled the dyche and fiered the 
towne, except the Cathedral church and the palaice, and al 
the ordinaunce was by the king sent to Ayre, to be kept 
to hys use. After this, it was concluded that the king in 
person should ley his siege to the citie or Towne of Turney, 
wherfore he set forward thre goodlye battailes, the first was 
conduited by therle of Shrewsbury, the second battayle led 
the kyng hymselfe with whome was Themperoure. The 
rereward was conduyted by the lorde Harbert : and so the 
first night thei laye in campe beside Ayre, which night vitayle 
was skant, diverse Englyshmen tarried in Tirwin when the 
kyng was past for pillage and fyered certayne houses, on 
whome came sodainly the French stradiates and some they 
slew and some they caste into the fier, thei that fledde, 
scaped narrowly. 

Wednesday the xiiii. day of September the king and his 
army came to Beatwyn, and there had plenty of all thinges, 
and on the morowe he with his army passed forward and 
came to a strayt where was a foord and al the carriages must 
nedes come doune a stepe hill to the foord and so to the 
streyt, where as one wagon scace alone might passe, and 
the wether was hoat and the beastes had not droncke all day, 
wherfore at the foorde the horses woulde drynke maugre 
ther leders, and so the cariages went not al hole together 
which was a doubtful case, but yet by wise ordre thei passed 
the streyt and so did the army and came to a place betwene 
Cavon and Cambline and there lodged that nighte in a 
plaine barren grounde, and the next day removed his campe 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



9 1 



and the fbrwarde passed a bridge called pount Avandien into 
Flaunders side and ther lay, the king lay at the other ende 
of the bridge on Arthoys syde, and the rereward lay in a 
fayre grounde behinde the king. 

Saterday the xvii. day of September tidings came to the 
king how the Frenchmen had assembled a great puissaunce 
and would fight with the king, wherefore the king caused 
his forward to remove farther and sent the Almaynes to 
kepe the passage the pount dassaus. Then the greate ordi- 
naunce passed the bridge of pount avandien and the king 
was removed from thence and his tentes were takinge up, 
an askrye was made that the enemies were in sight, which 
noise was sodainly seased, and sir William Sandes with vii. C. 
Englishmen and strangers was appoincted to kepe the bridge 
and certayne ordinaunce was to him appoincted. 

When the king and al the carriages were passed, then the 
lord Harbert removed over the bridge and encamped hym 
behinde the king by a fayre mille, when the kinge was 
encamped and all thinges in order, there came to him a 
noble man of Flaunders called the lord Ravensten which 
after his humble reverence done, shewed the king that 
the young prince of castel Charles and the lady Margaret 
governes of the sayde prince most hartely desired him for 
his pastime after hys long travayle to come and repose in 
his toune of Lisle and to see hys brother the prince and the 
ladies of the court of Burgoyne, saiynge that it became not 
ladies to visite him in his marciall campe whyche to them 
was terrible. The king gentelly graunted his request, and 
then he sent his officers thether to make provision and 
appoyncted the Duke of Buckyngham the Marques Dorset 
therle of Essex and the lord Lisle and dyverse other to 
geve ther attendaunce on him, and committed his campe to 
his counsayll. Then he mounted on a courser, his apparel 
and barde were cloth of sylver of smal quadrant cuttes tra- 
versed and edged wyth cutt cloth of golde, and the border 
set full of redde rooses, hys armore freshe and set ful of 
juels, the Maister of hys horse Sir Henry Guylforde and 
the Henshmen folowed as you have heard before, and the 
coursers richly appareled and so were many capitaynes that 
wayted on the kinge : by the way met the king the lord 
Ravensten wyth many noble men and a myle without the 
toune ther mette with him the Bourgesses of Lysle and 

presented 



THE V. 
YERE 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



presented to him the keies of the toune, sayeng, that 
Themperour their sovereygne lord had so commaunded them 
to do. The king praised their obediens to their sovereygne, 
and thanked themperour and them for so high a presente 
as the keyes of such a toune. Neverthelesse he had suche 
confidence in them, that he trusted them no lesse then hys 
owne subjectes, and so delyvered the keyes to the provost of 
the toune, which was wel accompanied : then mette the king 
a great nomber of nobles of Flaunders, Brabant, Hollande 
and Henawde, which nobly received him. After them came 
the Countye Palatine or Paulsgrave one of the electors 
of the empire with xxx. horsses al his men gorgiously 
appareilled after the fashion of his countrey, and humbly 
saluted the king. At the gate of Lisle the captayn of the 
toune stode with a garrison in armure wel appoincted, al 
the stretes were set on both sides with burning torches and 
diverse goodly pagiantes pleasant to beholde : thus he passed 
thorow the towne with his swerde and maces borne before 
hym, and alighted at the hal dore with his swerd borne, 
where met with him themperour the prince of castel and the 
lady Margaret and humbly saluted him : then for reverence 
of themperour, the kinge caused his swerde to be put 
up and his maces to be leyed doune, then was the kinge 
and all other nobles lodged and feasted according to their 
degrees. 

In the toune of Lisle was a noys, that thre gonners with 
handgonnes should have slayn the king : For which rumor 
many were attached, but nothinge proved, but when thys 
tidinges came to the campe, they were never mery til they 
saw the king agayne, great was the chere with bankettes, 
playes, commodies, maskes and other pastymes that was 
shewed to the king in the courte of Burgoyne, and so in 
solace he sojornied there Sondaye and Mondaye the xix. day 
of September : the xx. day he sent woorde that his army 
shoulde remove towarde Tournay, and so they removed to 
a place convenient betwene Tournay and Lisle and certain 
capitaynes were appoincted to kepe the passage at the bridge 
of Avandien. 

After that the king had taried at Lisle iii. dayes, and had 
wel reposed himselfe, he toke his leave and thanked the 
Emperour and the young prince and the lady Margaret and 
al the ladies of all his high chere and solace and about six of 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



93 



the clock at nyght he departed out of Lisle, and the noble 
men broughte the kinge forth and so returned, and then the 
captayne shutt the gates. 

When the kyng was a mile and more out of the toun, he 
asked wher his campe lay ? and no man there could tel the 
way, and guyde had they none, the night was darcke and 
mistie : thus the king taried a long while and wist not 
whither to go, at last they mett with a vitayler commyng 
from the campe which was their guyde and brought them 
thither. The mayster of the ordinaunce shotte diverse 
peces of ordynaunce but they were not harde, but in safetie 
the king with all hys company returned. 

The xxi. day of September the kyng removed his campe 
towarde Tournay and lodged within thre miles of the citie, 
on a corne grounde by the river. The which night came 
to the king Themperour and the Paulsgrave whiche were 
lodged in ryche tentes, and noblye served of all vyandes 
and thynges necessarye. The people aboute Tournay were 
with their goodes fledde to the citie, and yet the cytye 
hadde no men of warre to defende it, but wyth multitude 
of inhabitauntes the citie was wel replenished : the king 
commaunded sir Rice and hys horsemen to vewe one quarter, 
and therle of Essex and hys company another quarter, and 
the lorde Walowne and the lord Ligny the other quarters : 
so the xxii. day of September these iiii. capitaines at one time 
were sone openly with banners displaid before the toune, 
and there made a longe stale and retorned. The king sent 
Gartier king of armes and a pursivant of armes with a 
trompet to somon the citie, which declared that the kinge 
of England and of Fraunce commaunded them to yelde to 
him his citie and to receive him as their natural lord, or he 
would put them and their citie to swerde, fyer and blud. 
To whom they proudely answered, that thei toke no citie of 
him to kepe, nor none wold they render, with which answer 
he departed. Then they fortified their walles, and made 
provision for vitaile, corne, wine and artilerie, and for al 
fortifkacions that might be gotten. And the citie of it selfe 
was strong, well walled and turrited with good Bulwarkes 
and defences : But when they saw the kynge with such a 
puissance draw nere to the citie, they were sore abashed and 
called a generall counsayl : then the provost sayde, brethren 
you knowe how that the king of England sent an heraulde 

to 



THE V. 
YERE 



94 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 

[I5I3-M-] 



to somon us to rendre to hym this citie, or elles he woulde 
put it and us to the swerde, fyer and bloude, we answered 
we would be at defence : now he is come in our syght to 
fulfyll the message sent by hys herauld, and now is come 
the time of our defence, and in this matter standeth iii. 
mischiefes, one is our bounden deuty and allegeaunce that 
we owe to our soveraygne lord king Loys of Fraunce, the 
second the lifes of us, our wyfes, children and neyghbours, 
the third how to defend the final destruccion of this auncient 
cyty whych is likely to fall, whiche citie was never con- 
quired and now our citie is hole (your lyfes in savity, your 
goodes your own) determine whither you wil have warr or 
peace : then the common people cryed al war, war, war, then 
said the provost, take compassion of wyfes and children 
and of the olde folke, consyder yf you have no quick reskue 
you can not contynue againste yonder puisance, al tho your 
corages were as good as Hectors or Achylles, thys the wysest 
of the citie and I have considered. Then sodaynly was there 
in the counsayll, a vantparler, a botcher whych heryng this, 
called a great nomber of his affynite and went out of the 
counsayl, and so out of the gates and set fier of the suborbes 
on all sydes. When the counsayl sawe the myndes of the 
commons and that ther wayes might not be folowed, then 
they comforted the people and maynteyned them for ther 
defence. The kyng raysed his campe and came in Array 
of battayle before Tornay, the Earle of Shresbury with the 
forward was a littell space on the right hand brest with the 
kyngs battayle, and the lord Harbert with the rereward on 
the left hande in lyke manner, the day was faire and the 
harneis glistered and banners waved that they of the citie 
were sore afrayed : thus stode the kinges battayles in Array 
before Tournay. Then the kynge commaunded hys greate 
ordynaunce to bee caried in the waye passynge towarde the 
cytie and so every thing according to his commaundement 
was accomplished. Then the king him selfe with a fewe 
persones rode betwene hys ordynaunce and the towne, and 
rode in great adventure so nere the walles that he might 
vewe the walles and the toures very wel : they shote oute 
of their toures peces of ordinaunce and hurt such as came 
within their level. Then they rong the alarme bell, which 
was harde wel in the felde. Then the citezens issued out 
at the gate by the river and manfully profered skirmyshe, 

but 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



95 



but they with archers were sone driven backe to theyr gates. 
The Englishe cariers, that came wyth the harbeshers to take 
ground ranne to the gates of Tornay, and toke certaine 
wagons with beere and vitayle and yet the Turnoyes dirst 
not resiste, although thei wer in greater nomber then the 
men of cariage. In this skirmish the horsse of the lord 
Jhon Gray brother to the Marques Dorset which went to 
defende the Cariours was slayne with a gonne, and he not 
hurt. After that the king in person had thus in jeopardie 
aventured him self and vewed the toun, he caused imme- 
diatly xxi. peces of gret artilery to be brought in a plain feld 
before the toune, and when they were charged, they wer 
immediatly shotte, and the most part of the stones fell 
within the cytie, and so they shotte diverse shottes one 
after another. 

Then the king with al his battayle planted hys siege on 
the northe parte of the citie : Therle of Shrewsbury with 
his battayl warded toward the south syde of the ryver and 
there lay that nyght. The Lord Harbert with the rereward 
planted his battail on the west side of the citie, and with 
great ordynaunce dayly bet the walles and toures of the citie. 
On the morow beynge the xxiii. day : the Lorde Talbot 
Earle of Shrewsbury accompanied with the noble men of his 
battayll whose names you have heard at his first passyng the 
sea, passed over the river of Tornay and planted his siege 
on the south syde stretching to the Easte ende of the citie, 
and bent his artillery against the walles of the citie. Thus 
was the citie of Tornay besieged on all partes, and ever in 
hope of reskue valyantly defended her selfe. 

Now must I leve the kynge at the siege of Turnay, and 
diverte to thinges done in Englande in his absence, and 
declare how the kyng of Scottes invaded the realme of 
Englande, and how he was defended and fought with al, 
and in conclusion slayne the vii. day of this moneth of 
September. 

When the king of Englande was determined in his high 
courte of Parliament to passe the sea, in proper person, for 
the recovery of his realme of Fraunce, he and hys counsayll 
forgat not the olde Prankes of the Scottes which is ever to 
invade England when the kynge is oute, or within age : 
and also he had knowlege that at Camphere in zeland the 
Scottes dayly shipped long speres called colleyne clowistes, 



armure 



THE V. 
YERE 



9 6 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



armure and artilerie, whych dealyng made his grace and his 
counsail to dowt, notwythstanding that the king of Scottes 
was sworne on the sacrament to kepe the peace, yet for 
voydynge of al dowtes, the kyng appoynted the lord Thomas 
Haward erle of Surrey sonne to the lord Jhon Haward 
duke of Norffolke and high treasourer and marshall of 
Englande, to be hys lieutenaunt in the North parties 
agaynste the sayed kynge of Scottes, yf he fortuned to 
inuade (as he dyd in dede) accordynge to the old tray- 
torous accustome of hys progenitors, and that the sayed 
earle should reise the powers of the contrey of Chester, 
Lancaster, Duresme, Northumberlande, Westmerlande, and 
Comberlande, besyde other aydes to be poyncted by the 
quene. And when the kynge shoulde take shippe at 
Dover, he toke the Earle by the hande and sayde, my 
Lorde I truste not the Scottes, therfore I praye you be 
not negligent : then sayde the earle I shall so do my 
duety, that youre grace shall fynde me diligent, and to 
fulfyll your will shalbe my gladnes : The Earle coulde 
skantly speake when he toke hys leave, for the departinge 
from the noble prynce hys sovereigne Lorde and kynge, 
and from the floure of all the nobilitye of thys realme, 
beynge redy in suche an honorable jorney. And when he 
was somewhat settelled in hys mode, he sayde to some that 
were about hym : Sory may I se hym or I dye, that is 
cause of my abydinge behynde, and yf ever he and I 
mete, I shal do that in me lyeth to make hym as sory yf 
I can : meanynge the same by the kyng of Scottes. From 
Dover he attendid on the quene to London, comfortynge 
her the beste he myght, and shortely sent for hys gentel- 
men and tenauntes, whiche were v. C. able men, whiche 
mustered before syr Thomas lovell, knyght, the xxi. daye 
of July, and the xxii. daye he rode thorough London 
Northward, and came to Dancaster, and there com- 
maunded syr William bulmer knight, to make haste to 
the marches of Scotlande, and to lye in the castels and 
fortresses on the frontiers with ii. C. archers on horse- 
backe : for the Earle by open tokens dayly perceived that 
the Scottes entended warre. Then the sayde Sir William 
with all spede departed and came to the borders and the 
erle came to Pomfret, the firste daye of August, and there 
taried. After that Syr Wylliam bulmer was come to the 

borders, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



97 



borders, one daye in Auguste, the Lorde Chamberlayne 
and warden of Scotlande wyth vii. or viii. M. men wyth 
banner displayed entered into Englande, and brent and 
haryed a great praye in Northumberlande, that heringe 
syr William bulmer, called to hym the gentelmen of the 
borders wyth hys archers, and all they were not a thousande 
men. And when they were nere assembled, they brought 
them selfes in to a brome felde, called Mylfeld, where the 
Scottes shoulde passe. And as the Scottes proudely re- 
turned wyth their pray, the Englishemen brake oute, and 
the Scottes on fote lyke men them defended, but the 
archers shotte so holy together, that they made the Scottes 
geve place, and v. or vi. hundred of them were slayne, 
and iiii. hundred and more taken prisoners, and the pray 
reskued beside a great number of geldynges that were 
taken in the countrey, and the lord Hume, lord Chamber- 
layne fled, and his banner taken. This was the fyrst open 
token of warre, shewed by the Scottes, whiche call thys 
journey the yll Roade. 

The Earle of Surrey, beynge at Pompfret, called to hym 
the most parte of the Gentelmen of the Counties to hym 
apoynted as is before rehersed, declaringe to them the 
Kynges hygh commaundement, shewynge them, that he 
beynge there the Kynges Lieutenaunt muste nedes have 
ayde and counsayll : Wherefore he sware the mooste 
wysest and experte gentelmen in suche causes of the 
kynges counsayll and hys for that tyme, for the better 
compassynge hys charge and purpose, and for too brynge 
every thynge in dewe order : Fyrst they toke a determina- 
cion wyth Syr Philippe Tylney knight, Treasurer of the 
warres, howe the charges shoulde be payde, and secondarely 
wyth syr Nycholas applyarde, master of the ordinaunce, 
for the conveyaunce of the Kynges Royall ordinaunce, 
pouder and artillerie to Newcastell, and so forwarde as 
the case shoulde requyer, whyche Syr Nycholas by William 
Blacknall, clercke of the Kynges spyceri, sent the sayde 
ordinaunce and artyllerye to Durham before, so that all 
thynges, concerning that office were in a redynes. The 
Earle forgatt not to sende to all Lordes Spirituall and 
Temporall, Knyghtes, Gentelmenne, or other whiche had 
tenauntes, or were rulers of Tounes or liberties (able to 
make men) to certifye what number of able men horsed 

and 



THE v. 

YERE 



VOL. I. 



N 



9 8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



and harnesed, they were able to make within an houres 
warnynge and to geve there attendaunce on hym, and also 
he layed Postes every waye, whyche Postes stretched to 
the marches of Wales to the counsayll there, by reason 
whereof, he had knowlege what was done in everye 
coste. 

The earle was enformed by the Lorde Dacres, of the 
numbrynge and preparyng of men in Scotlande, and 
Proclamacions soundynge to the breche of peace, and yet 
though he considered that the Roade made by the lorde 
Chamberlayne of Scotlande into England, beynge dis- 
trussed by Syr William Bulmer, as is afore rehersed, was 
an open breche of the perpetuall pece : yet the sayde 
Lorde Dacres avysed the Earle for many and greate 
weyghty causes, not to reyse or styrre the powers of the 
countrey, to hym appoynted tyll he mighte perceyve and 
openly know the subtyle purpose and entent of the Scottes 
aforesaid, lest yf the Scottes had perceyved the Englishe- 
men redy to fight, they woulde have desisted of theyr 
purpose for that tyme, tyll the Englishemen were re- 
turned to their countreys, and then sodaynely to ryse 
agayne. 

Then the Erie knowynge that the towne of Barwyck 
was strong ynough, sent to the Capitayne of Norham, 
certefienge hym, that yf he thought the Castell in anye 
daungier or debylitie, he woulde put hym selfe in a 
readynes to reskew it, if it were beseged, the Capitayn 
wrote to the Earle, thankynge hym and prayed GOD 
that the Kynge of Scottes woulde come wyth hys puys- 
saunce, for he woulde kepe hym playe tyll the tyme that 
the Kynge of Englande came out of Fraunce to reskew 
it, whyche aunswer rejoysed the Earle muche. 

After the Kyng of Scottes had sent hys defyaunce to 
the kynge of Englande, lyenge before Tyrwyn, as you 
have harde, he dayly made hys musters, and assembled 
hys people over all hys Realme, whereof the brute was 
that they were twoo hundred thousand, but for a surety 
they were an hundred thousand good fightynge men at 
the lest, and with all hys hoste and power entered into 
Englande (and threw doune pyles) the xxii. daye of 
August, and planted hys siege before the Castell of Nor- 
ham, and sore abated the walles. The Earle hard tydynges 

thereof 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



99 



thereof the fyve and twenty day of August, beynge saynct 
Barthelmewesdaye. 

Then he wrote to all the Gentelmen of the shyres afore- 
sayde, to be wyth hym at Newcastell, the fyrste daye of 
September next wyth all there retynew accordynge to the 
certificat. On the morow, he wyth hys fyve hundred 
menne came to Yorke, and the xxvi. daye he went toward 
Newcastell, and not wythstandynge that he had the fowleste 
daye and nyght that coulde be, and the wayes so depe, in 
so muche that hys guyde was almoste drouned before 
hym, yet he never ceased, but kept on hys jorney to geve 
example to them that shoulde folowe. He beynge at 
Durham was advertised how the Kynge of Scottes wyth 
hys greate ordinaunce had rased the walles of the Castell 
of Norham, and had made thre great Assaultes thre dayes 
together, and the Capitaynes valiauntly defended hym, but 
he spent vaynely so muche of hys ordinaunce, bowes and 
arrowes and other municions that at the laste he lacked, 
and so was at the vi. daye compelled to yelde hym symplye 
to the Kynges mercye. Thys castell was thought im- 
pregenable, yf it had bene well furnished, but the Scottes 
by the undiscrete spendynge of the Capitayne, toke it in 
sixe dayes : thys chaunce was more sorowful to the Earle 
then to the Bishoppe owner of the same. All that nyghte 
the wynde blewe coragiously, wherfore the earle doubted 
least, the Lorde Hawarde hys sonne greate Admyrall of 
Englande shoulde perishe that nyght on the sea, who 
promised to lande at Newcastell with a thousand men, to 
accompaynie his father, whych promyse he accomplished. 

The Earle harde Masse, and appoynted wyth the Prior 
for saincte Cutberdes banner, and so that daye beynge the 
thyrty daye of August he came to Newcastell: thither 
came the Lorde Dacres, Syr William Bulmer, Syr Marma- 
ducke Constable, and many other substanciall Gentelmen, 
whome he reteyned wyth hym as counsayllers, and there 
determined that on Sundaye nexte ensuynge, he shoulde 
take the felde at Bolton in Glendale, and because many 
souldiours were repayrynge to hym, he lefte Newcastell 
to the entent that they that folowed, shoulde have there 
more rome, and came to Alnewyke the thyrde daye of 
September, and because hys souldiars were not come, by 
reason of the foule waye he was fayne to tarye there 

all 



THE v. 
YERE 



S. Cutberds 
banner. 



ioo KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 

[I5I3-H] 



all the fourthe daye beynge Sundaye, whiche daye came 
to hym the Lorde Admyrall his sonne, with a compaignye 
of valyaunt Capitaynes and able souldiars and maryners, 
whiche all came from the sea, the commynge of hym muche 
rejoyced his father, for he was very wyse, hardy, and of 
greate credence and experience. Then the Erie and his 
counsayll, wyth great deliberacion appoynted his battayles 
in order with wynges and with ryders necessarie. 

C Fyrste of the forwarde was capitayne the Lorde Ha- 
warde, Admyrall of Englande, with suche as came from the 
sea, and wyth hym syr Nycholas Applyarde, syr Stephan Bull, 
syr Henry Shyreburne, syr Wylliam Sydney, syr Edwarde 
Echyngham, the Lorde ClyfFord, the lorde Conyers, the 
lorde Latymer, the Lorde Scrope of Upsale, the lorde Egle, 
the lorde Lomley, syr William Bulmer with the power of 
the Bishoprycke of Durham, syr Wylliam Gascoyne, syr 
Christopher Warde, syr Jhon Everyngham, syr Thomas 
Metham, Syr Water Gryffith, and many other. 

C Of the wynge on the righte hande of the forwarde, was 
Capitayne syr Edmonde Hawarde knyght, Marshall of the 
hoste, and with hym Bryan Tunstall, Raufe Brearton, Jhon 
Laurence, Rycharde Bolde Esquyers, and syr Jhon Bothe, 
Syr Thomas Butler Knyghtes, Rycharde Donne, Jhon Bygod, 
Thomas Fitzwilliam, Jhon Claruys, Bryan Stapulton, 
Robert warcoppe, Rychard Cholmeley, wyth the men of 
Hull, and the Kynges tenauntes of Hatfelde and other. 

C Of the wyng of the left hande, was Capitayne syr 
Marmaduke Constable wyth hys sonnes and kynnesmen, syr 
William Percy, and of Lancashere, a thousand men. 

C Of the rerewarde was Capitayne the Earle of Surrey 
hym selfe, and wyth hym the Lorde Scrope of Bolton, Syr 
Philippe Tylney, syr George Darce, syr Thomas Barkebey, 
syr Jhon Rocliffe, syr Christopher Pykerynge, Rycharde 
Tempest, syr Jhon Stanley wyth the Bysshoppe of Elyes 
servauntes, Syr Bryan Stapulton, Lyonell Percy, wyth the 
Abbot of Whitbyes tenauntes, Christopher Clapham, syr 
William Gascoing the younger, syr Guy Dawney, Maister 
Magnus, Mayster Dalbyes servauntes, syr Jhon Normavyle, 
the citizens of Yorke, syr Nynyan Markanvyle, syr Jhon 
Wylloghby wyth other. 

C Of the wyng on the right hande was capitayne the 
lord Dacres with his power. 

On 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



101 



C On the lefte hande wynge was syr Edwarde Stanley 
knyght, with the residue of the power of the countye 
Palantyne and of Lancaster. 

And when all men were appoynted and knewe what too 
do, the earle and hys counsayll concluded and determined 
emonge other thynges to sende Rouge Crosse, pursivaunt of 
armes with a trompet to the kynge of Scottes, wyth certayne 
instruccions, signed by the sayd erle, conteynynge woorde 
by woorde as foloweth. 

Fyrste where there hath bene suyte made to the kynge of 
Scottes by Elyzabeth Heron, wyfe to Wylliam Heron of 
Forde, now prysoner in Scotlande, for castynge doune of 
the house or Castell of Forde, and as the sayde Elizabeth 
reporteth uppon communicacion had, the sayde kynge hath 
promysed and condiscended to the sayde Elizabeth, that yf 
she any tyme before none, the fift daye of September, 
woulde brynge and deliver unto hym the Lorde Johnstowne, 
and Alexander Hume, then prysonerrs that time in England, 
he then is contented an agreed that the sayde house or 
Castell shall stande wythout castynge doune, brennynge or 
spoylynge the same : Whereunto the sayde Earle is content 
with that, uppon this condicion, that yf the sayde kynge 
wyll promytte the assuraunce of the sayde Castell, in maner 
and forme aforesayde under hys scale, to deliver the sayde 
Lorde of Jhonstowne and Alexander Hume, immediately 
uppon the same assuraunce. And in case the sayde kynge 
can and wyll be content to delyver the sayd Heron out of 
Scotlande, then the sayde Earle shal cause to be delivered to 
the sayde kynge the two gentelmen and two other, syr 
George Hume and William Carre. 

Farther the sayde Earle woll that you Rouge Crosse, 
shewe the sayde kyng, that where he contrary to his othe 
and league, and unnaturally agaynste all reason and con- 
science, hathe entred and invaded this hys brothers realme 
of Englande, and done great hurte to the same, in castynge 
doune Castelles, Towres, and houses, brenninge, spoylynge 
and destroiynge of the same, and cruelly murderynge the 
Kynge of Englande hys brothers subjectes. Wherefore the 
sayde Earle wyll be readye to trye the rightfulnes of the 
matter wyth the Kynge in battaill by Frydaye next com- 
mynge at the farthest, yf he of hys noble courage wyll geve 
hym tarienge, and abode, within this the Kynges Realme so 

longe 



THE V. 
YERE 



102 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



longe tyme : And the same the sayde Earle promiseth, as 
he is true knyghte to God and the Kynge of England hys 
Mayster. And before Rouge Crosse shoulde departe wyth 
the sayde instruccions, the sayde Lorde Admyrall gave hym 
in credence too shewe the sayde Kynge of hys commynge, 
and parte of his compaignye on the sea wyth hym : and 
that he hadde foughte the Scottyshe Navye, then beynge on 
the sea, but he coulde not mete with theym, because they 
were fledde into Fraunce, by the coste of Irelande. 

And in asmuche as the sayde Kynge hadde diverse and 
many tymes caused the sayde Lorde, too be called at dayes 
of true, to make redresse for Andrew Barton, a Pirate of 
the sea, longe before that vanquyshed by the same Lorde 
Admyrall, he was nowe come in hys awne proper persone 
too be in the Vauntgarde of the felde to Justifye the deathe 
of the sayde Andrewe, agaynste hym and all hys people, and 
woulde se what coulde be layed to hys charge the sayde 
daye, and that he nor none of hys compaignye shoulde take 
no Scottshe noble man prysoner, nor any other, but they 
shoulde dye yf they came in hys daunger, oneles it were the 
kynges awne persone, for he sayde he trusted to none other 
curtesye at the handes of the Scottes. 

And in thys maner he shoulde fynde hym in the Vaunt- 
garde of the felde by the grace of GOD and sayncte George 
as he was a trew Knyghte. Yet before the departynge of 
Rouge Crosse wyth the sayd instruccions and credence, it 
was thoughte by the Earle and hys counsayll, that the sayde 
kynge woulde fayne and Imagen some other message, too 
sende an Heraulde of hys wyth the same, onely to View, 
and over se the maner and order of the Kynges royall 
armye, ordinaunce, and artillerie, then beynge wyth the 
Earle, wherby myghte have ensued greate daungier to 
the same, and for exchuynge thereof, he hadde in com- 
maundemente, that yf any such message were sente, not to 
bryng any person, commynge therewith, within three or 
two myle of the felde at the nyghest, where the sayde Earle 
woulde come, and heare what he would saye : And thus 
departed Rouge Crosse wyth hys trumpet apparayled in his 
Cote of armes. 

On Mondaye the fyfte daye of September, the Earle 
tooke hys felde at Bolton in Glendall as he had appoyncted, 
where all the noble men and Gentelmen met wyth their 

retynewes 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



103 



retynewes too the number of six and twenty thousande men, 
and aboute mydnighte nexte ensuyng, came the trompette, 
whyche went wyth Rouge Crosse, and declared howe the 
Kynge of Scottes, after the message done to hym by Rouge 
Crosse accordynge too hys instruccions, the sayde Kynge 
detayned hym, and sent one Hay a Harauld of hys wyth 
hym unto the Earle, to declare too hym the sayde Kynges 
pleasure, too whome the Earle sente Yorke Heraulde at 
armes, to accompaignye the sayde Hay, at a Village called 
Mylo, twoo myles from the felde, untyll the commyng 
thether of the sayde Earle the next morow. 

The sixte daye of September, early in the mornynge, the 
Earle accompaignied with the mooste parte of the Lordes, 
Knyghtes and Gentelmen of the felde, every man havynge 
with hym but one man to holde hys horsse, and so the 
sayde Heraulde met wyth the Earle, and with blunt re- 
verence declared to him that he was come from hys Master 
the Kyng of Scottes, whyche woulde knowe, whyther the 
Earle sente anye suche message by Rouge Crosse, the Earle 
justified the same, saiynge farther, that Rouge Crosse hadde 
the same message of hym in writynge signed wyth hys awne 
hande, whereunto the sayde Hay sayde, as touchynge the 
savynge from brennynge or destroiynge, and castynge 
doune of the Castell of Forde, for the deliveraunce of the 
sayd prisoners. The Kynge his Mayster woulde therto 
make no aunswer. But as too the abydynge for battayll 
betwene that and Frydaye, then nexte folowynge, the 
Kyng his Master badde hym shewe to the Earle, that he 
was as welcome as any noble manne of England unto the 
same kynge, and that yf he had bene at home in his Towne 
of Edenborough, there receyvyng suche a message from the 
sayd Erie, he woulde gladlye have come and fulfylled the 
sayde Earles desyre : and the Heraulde assured the Earle 
on the Kynge his Maisters behalfe, that the same kynge 
woulde abyde hym battayll at the daye prefixed, whereof 
the sayde Earle was righte joyous and muche praysed the 
honourable agrement of the sayde Royall Kynge and estemed 
the same to procede of an hygh and noble courage, pro- 
mysynge the Heraulde that he and good suerty wyth hym 
shoulde be bounde in ten thousande pounde sterlynge, too 
kepe the sayde daye appoynted, so that the kyng woulde 
fynde an earle of his, and thereto a good suerty with him 

to 



THE V 
YERE 



104 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



to be bounde in lyke summe, for the performans of the 
same : And farthermore the Earle bad the Heraulde for to 
saye to his maister, that yf he for his parte kept not hys 
appoyntmente, then he was content, that the Scottes shoulde 
Baffull hym, which is a great reproche amonge the Scottes, 
and is used when a man is openly perjured, and then they 
make of hym an Image paynted reversed, with hys heles 
upwarde, with hys name, wonderynge, cryenge and blowinge 
out of hym with homes, in the moost dispitefull maner they 
can. In token that he is worthy to be exiled the compaignie 
of all good Creatures. 

Then Hay delivered too the Earle a littell Cedule, wrytten 
with the kynges Secretaries hande unsigned, the tenor 
wherof foloweth. 

C ' As to the causes alleged of oure commynge into Eng- 
' lande agayne oure bande and promyse (as is alleged) there- 
' to we aunswere, ower brother was bounde also farre to us as 
' we to hym. And when we swarelaste before hys Ambassade, 
' in presence of oure counsayll, we expressed specially in oure 
' othe, that we woulde kepe to oure brother, yf oure brother 
' kepte to us, and nat elles, we sweare oure brother brake 
' fyrste to us, and sythe hys breke, we have requyred dyverse 
' tymes hym too amend, and lately we warned oure brother as 
' he dyd not us or he brake, and thys we take for oure quarell, 
' and with Goddes grace shall defende the same at youre 
' affixed tyme, whyche with Goddes grace we shall abyde." 

And for asmuche as the sayde Kynge kepte styll Rouge 
Crosse wyth hym, who was not yet returned, the same Earle 
caused the sayde Hay too be in the kepynge of Syr Humfrey 
Lysle and Yorke Heraulde, in the same Vyllage, untyll the 
tyme that a servaunte of the sayde Hay myghte ryde in all 
haste too the Royall Kynge of Scottes, for the deliveryng 
of the sayde Rouge Crosse. Then the erle Joyous of the 
kynges aunswer, returned to hys campe, and set forward 
fyve myle, too a place called Woller Hawgh, in suche order 
of battayll, as even then he should have fought, and there 
lodged for that nighte, three littell myles from the kynge 
of Scottes, and betwene the kynge and hym was a goodly 
and large corne felde, called Mylfelde whyche was a con- 
venient and fayre grounde for twoo hostes to fight on, there 
every hoste myghte perceyve other. 

The morowe beynge Wednesdaye, the vii. daye of that 

moneth, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



I0 5 



moneth, the Kynge of Scottes caused hys greate ordinaunce 
too be shotte at the Englishe armye, but it hurte neither 
man nor beaste. When the kynge of Scottes sawe that Hay 
was deteyned, he sent away Rouge Crosse to the Erie, by 
whome, and other of the borders he was advertised that the 
kynge laye uppon the syde of a hyghe mountayne, called 
Floddon on the edge of Chevyot, where was but one narowe 
felde for any manne to ascende up the sayde hyll to hym, 
and at the foote of the hyll laye all hys ordinaunce. On 
the one syde of hys armye was a greate Marrishe, and 
ompassed wyth the hylles of Chevyot, so that he laye to 
stronge too be approched of any syde : excepte the Englishe- 
men woulde have temerariouslye ronne on hys ordinaunce, 
whiche matter well considered by the Earle and hys sonne, 
and other of the counsayll there, they called too theim Rouge 
Crosse, and sent hym the nexte daye to the Kynge of 
Scottes, willinge hym too shewe the kynge, that the sayde 
Earle, with dyverse of the Kynges nobles and subjectes 
hadde avaunced them selfes too geve battayll to hys grace, 
trustynge that accordinge too his promise, he woulde avaunce 
hym selfe and hys armye to joyne the battayll, whyche as yet 
he hath not done. Wherefore he desyred the kynge that 
he myghte have knowlege by noone that daye, whether he 
of hys noble courage would discende the hyll, where he laye 
and too geve battayll or not : and yf he saye that I shal not 
knowe his entent, or wyll saye, that he will kepe the 
ground : then shewe hym that he perceyveth well that that 
place is no indifferent grounde for twoo armyes too fighte, 
and therefor I will looke for no mo of his delayes. The 
same daye beynge oure Ladye day the Nativite Rouge 
Crosse departed to the Kynge of Scottes, whyche woulde not 
heare hym speke, but sente one of hys servitours to heare 
his message : Whiche servitour after he hadde disclosed the 
same to the kynge, made aunswer, that it besemed not an 
Earle, after that maner to handle a kynge, and that he 
woulde use no forcery, nor had no truste of any grounde : 

You have harde before, howe Hay the Scottishe Heraulde 
was returned for Rouge Crosse, and as sone as Rouge Crosse 
was returned, he was discharged, but he taryed with Yorke 
an Englishe Heraulde makynge good chere, and was not 
returned that mornynge that Rouge Crosse came on hys 
message, wherefore Rouge Crosse and hys Trompet were 

detayned 



THE V. 
YERE 



VOL. I. 



io6 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



detayned by the servante of Hay, whyche the daye before 
went for Rouge Crosse, assurynge them that yf Ilaye came 
not home before none, that he was not livynge, and then 
they shoulde have their heddes stryken of, then Rouge 
Crosse offered that hys servaunte shoulde goe for Hay, but 
it woulde not be excepted, but as happe was, Hay came 
home before none, and shewed of hys gentell enterteynynge, 
and then Rouge Crosse was delivered, and came to the 
Englishe armye, and made reporte as you have hearde. 

Then the Englishemen removed their felde on the water 
of Tyll, and so forthe over many hylles and streytes, 
marchynge towarde the Scottes on another syde, and in 
their sight the Scottes burned certayne poore Vyllages on the 
other syde of the Marishe. 

The Englishemen, alwayes leavynge the Scottishe armye 
on the left hande, toke their felde under a wood syde, called 
Barmer wood, two myle from the Scottes, and betwene the 
two armyes was the Ryver of Tyll, and there was a littell 
hyll that saved the Englishemen from the gonne shotte, 
on which hyll the lorde Admyrall perfightly saw and dis- 
covered them all. 

In the evenynge of the same daye it was concluded 
betwene the Earle and hys counsayll, and moste parte of 
the armye thereto agreed, that the Vauntgarde with the 
ordinaunce shoulde passe over agayne the water of Tyll, at 
a bridge called Twysell bridge the. ix. daye of September, 
and the rerewarde to passe over at Mylforde, puttynge 
theymselfes as nye as they coulde betwene the Scottes and 
Scotlande, and so to geve battayll to the Scottes on the hyll, 
called Floddon hyll. Frydaye the sayde nynth daye, the 
Lorde Admyrall, lyke a valiaunte Knyghte, passed over 
Twysell brydge wyth the Vantgarde, marchynge towarde 
hys enemyes, lyke diligence was made by the Earle for 
passynge over at Mylfforde wyth the rerewarde, saiynge to 
hys Capytaines, now good fellowes, do lyke Englishemen 
this daye, take my parte lyke men, whyche parte is the 
Kynges parte, and I wyste you woulde not, I wyll in my 
awne person fighte with the Kynge of Scottes, rather to dye 
honourablye by his crueltye, then to lyve in shame, or that 
any reproche shoulde be layed to me hereafter. 

To whome they aunswered, that they woulde serve the 
Kynge and him truely that daye. The Englishe armye 

that 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



107 



that daye hadde no vitayle and were fastynge, and two dayes 
afore they had onely dronke water, and coulde scace get 
anye other sustenaunce for money, and yet they kept array 
on horsebacke from fyve of the clocke in the mornynge tyll 
foure of the clocke at after none, and were alwayes in the 
sighte of the Scottes. 

The Kynge of Scottes perceyvinge the Englishemen, 
marchinge towarde Scotlande, thought that they woulde 
have entered into Scotlande, and burne and forray the 
plentifull countray, called the Marche, for so was he made 
beleve by an Englisheman named Gyles Musgrave whyche 
was familiar wyth the Kyng of Scottes, and dyd it for a 
pollecie to cause hym to come doune from the hyll : Where- 
fore the sayde Kynge caused hys tentes to be removed to an 
other hyll in grate haste, least the Englishemen shoulde 
have taken the same hyll : And at theyr departynge they 
sette fyer on theyr litter and other fylthye ordure, accord- 
ynge to theyr custome, and of the fyer and smolder dyd 
ryse suche a smooke so thicke and so darke, that the one 
host coulde not perceyve the other, for the wynde dyd 
dryve the smoke betwene the twoo armyes, the Scottes ever 
kepynge the heyght of the hyll on the edge of the chevyot, 
and the Englishemen passed forward styll in the lowe 
grounde, and ever in the covert of the smoke, in so muche 
that bothe the hostes were very nere together, within the 
space of a quarter of a myle, before one of them coulde 
perceyve another for the smoke. Then, when the Englishe- 
men had passed a lyttell brooke, called Sandyfforde, whyche 
is but a mans step over, and that the smoke was passed, and 
the Ayre fayre and cleare, eche army myghte playnly see 
one an other at hande. Then the Lorde Admyrall per- 
ceyved foure great battayles of the Scottes all on foote wyth 
longe speres lyke moorishe pykes : whyche Scottes furnished 
them warlike, and bent theim to the forwarde, whyche was 
conducted by the Lorde Admirall, whyche perceyvynge that, 
sent to hys Father the Earle of Surrey hys Agnus dei that 
honge at hys breste that in all hast he would joyne battayll, 
even wyth the bront or breste of the vantgarde : for the 
forward alone was not able to encountre the whole battayll 
of the Scottes, the Earle perceyvynge well the saiynge of 
hys sonne, and seynge the Scottes ready to discende the hyll 
avaunsed hym selfe and hys people forwarde, and brought 

theym 



THE v. 
YERE 



io8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



theym egall in grounde wyth the forwarde on the left hande, 
even at the bront or breste of the same at the foote of the 
hyll called Bramston, the Englishe army stretched East and 
West, and their backes Northe, and the Scottes in the 
Southe before theim on the forsayde hyll called Bramston. 

Then oute brast the ordinaunce on bothe sydes wyth fyre 
flamme and hydeous noyse, and the Master gonner of the 
Englishe parte slew the Master gonner of Scotlande, and 
bet all hys men from their ordinaunce, so that the Scottishe 
ordynaunce dyd no harme too the Englishemen, but the 
Englishemens Artyllerie shotte into the myddes of the 
Kynges battayll, and slewe many persones, which seynge the 
kyng of Scottes and hys noble men, made the more haste 
too come too joynynge, and so all the foure battayles in 
maner discended the hyll at once. And after that the shotte 
was done, whiche they defended wyth Pavishes, thei came to 
handestrokes, and were encontred severally as you shall here. 

Fyrste on the Englyshe syde next the West, was Syr 
Edmonde Hawarde knyghte, Marshall of the hoste chief 
Capitayne of a wynge on the ryghte hande of oure vantgarde, 
and was encountryd wyth the Chamberlayne of Scotlande 
wyth hys battayle of sperys on foote, to the number of ten 
thousande at the leaste, whiche foughte valiauntly, so that 
they by force caused the litle wynge to flye, and the same 
Syr Edmonde thre tymes felled to the grounde, and left 
alone, savynge his standarde berar, and twoo of hys ser- 
vauntes, to whome came Jhon Heron bastarde sore hurte, 
saiynge there was never noble mans sone so lyke too be 
loste as you be thys daye, for all my hurtes I shall here lyve 
ande dye wyth you, and there the sayde Syr Edmonde 
Hawarde was in a great daunger and jeopardy of hys lyfe, 
and hardelye escaped, and yet as he was goynge to the bodye 
of the Vantgarde he met with Davy Home, and slew hym 
with hys awne hande, and so came to the Vantgard. 

Secondely, Eastwarde from the sayde battayle was the 
Lorde Admyrall wyth the Vantgarde, wyth whome encoun- 
tred the Earles of Craffbrde and Montroos, accompaygned, 
wyth many Lordes, Knyghtes, and Gentelmen, all wyth 
sperys on foote, but the Lorde Admyrall and hys compaignie 
acquyted themselfes so well, and that with pure fightyng, 
that thei brought to grounde a great number, and both the 
Earles slayne. 

Thirdely, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



109 



Thirdely, Eastwarde from the Lorde Admyrall was the 
Earle of Surrey, Capitayne generall, to whose standarde the 
kynge of Scottes in hys awne person marched, beynge 
accompaygned wyth many Bishoppes, Earles, Barons, 
Knyghtes and Gentelmen of the Realme with a great 
number of commons, all chosen men with speres on foote, 
whiche were the most assuredlyest harnesed that hath bene 
sene, and that the tallest and goodlyest personages with all, 
and they abode the most daungerous shot of arrowes, which 
sore them noyed, and yet except it hit them in some bare 
place it dyd them no hurt. After the shotte endyd, the 
battayll was cruell, none spared other, and the kynge hym 
self foughte valiauntly. O what a noble and triumphant 
courage was thys for a kynge to fyghte in a battayl as a 
meane souldier : But what avayled hys stronge harnes, the 
puyssaunce of hys myghtye champions wyth whome he 
descended the hyll, in whome he so muche trusted that 
wyth hys stronge people and great number of men, he was 
able as he thought to have vanquished that day the greatest 
Prynce of the world, if he had ben there as the erle of 
Surrey was, or els he thought to do such an hygh enterprice 
hym selfe in his person, that shoulde surmount the enter- 
prises of all other princes : but how soever it happened God 
gave the stroke, and he was no more regarded then a poore 
souldier, for al went one waye. So that of his owne battaill 
none escaped, but syr William Scot knight his chauncelour, 
and Syr Jhon forman knight, his serjaunt Porter, whiche 
were taken prisoners, and wyth great difficultie saved. This 
may be a great myrror to al prynces, how that they adventer 
them selfes in such a battaill. 

Forthly, Eastwarde was Syr Edwarde Stanley knight, 
capitayn of the left wynge wyth the sayde earle, whyche 
clame up to the toppe of the hyll called Bramston, or the 
Scottes wyste, and wyth hym encontred the carles of 
Huntley, Lennoux and Argile, with a great number of 
Scottes whyche were sore fought wyth all, whyche perceyving 
the earle of Huntley toke a horse and saved hym selfe, yf he 
had taryed he had bene lykely to have gone wyth hys com- 
paignie : suche as fled, the sayde Syr Edwarde and his 
people folowed them over the same grounde, where the 
Earles battell firste joyned, and founde ther the Scottes, 
whyche were by the Earles battaill slayne before, and sodainly 

left 



THE v. 
YERE 



in. 



no 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



left the chase and fell a spoyling, and spoyled the kynge of 
Scottes, and many that were slayne in his battaill, but they 
knew him not, and founde a Crosse and certayn thynges of 
hys, by reason wherof some saide that he was slayne by that 
wyng, whyche coulde not be true, for the prisoners of 
Scotland testified that the kynges battayll fought onely with 
the Earles battels, but for a truthe this wynge dyd very 
valiauntly : wherfore it was thought that the sayd syr 
Edwarde myght that daye not have bene missed. 

All these iiii. battels, in maner fought at one tyme, and 
were determined in effect, littell in distance of the beginnyng 
and endynge of any of them one before the other, savyng 
that syr Edward Stanley, which was the last that fought, for 
he came up to the toppe of the hyll, and there fought with 
the Scottes valiauntly, and chaced them doune the hyll over 
that place, where the kynges battaill joyned. Besyde these 
iiii. battayles of the Scottes were twoo other battayls, whyche 
never came to hande strokes. 

Thus through the power of God on Fridaye, beyng the 
ix. daye of September, in the yere of our Lorde M. D. xiii. 
was James the IIII. Kyng of Scottes slayn at Bramstone 
(chiefly by the power of the earle of Surrey, lieutenaunt for 
kynge Henry the VIII. kynge of Englande, whyche then lay 
at the sege before Tornay) and wyth the sayde kynge were 
slayne. 



The Archebishop of saynct 
Androwes, the Kynges 
bastard sonne. 

The bishop of the lies. 

The Abbot of Inchaffrey. 

The Abbot of Kylwenny. 



The erle 
The erle 
The erle 
The erle 
The erle 
The erle 
The erle 
The erle 



Erles. 

Mountroos. 
of Crafford. 
of Arguyle. 
of Lennoux. 
of Glencarre. 
of Katnes. 
of Castelles. 
of Bothwell. 



The erle Arrell Constable 

of Scotlande. 
The erle Addill. 
The erle Athell. 
The erle Morton. 

Lordes, 

The lord Lovet. 

The lord Forbos. 

The lord Lord Elveston. 

The lord Roos. 

The lord Inderby. 

The lord Sentclere. 

The lord Maxwell, 

and hys iiii. brethren. 
The lord Daunley. 

The 



KING HENRY THE VIII, 



in 



The lord Seympill. 
The lord Borthyck. 
The lord Bogony. 



The lord Arskyll. 
The lord Blakkater. 
The lord Cowyn. 



Knyghtes and gentlemen. 



Sir Jhon Dowglasse. 
Cutbert Home lord of Fast- 

castel. 

Sir Alexander Seton. 
Sir Davy Home. 
Mayster Jhon Graunt. 
Sir Dunkin Caufelde. 
Sir Saunder Lowder. 
Sir George Lowder. 



Mayster Marshall. 

Mayster Keye. 

Mayster Eliot. 

Mayster Cawel Clerck of 
the chauncery. 

The Deane of Elle- 
ster. 

Mack, Kene. 

Mack, Clene, and manye 

other gentlemen, whiche be unknowen, because no officer 
of armes of Scotlande woulde come to make serche for them, 
and yf the daye had bene lenger by thre houres (for it was 
foure of the clocke at after none, or the battayles joyned) 
or that the Englashemen had had vitayles, so that they 
myght have bydden styll together, they had not alonelye 
made the greatest dystresse of Scottes by death, and takynge, 
that the lyke hath not bene sene in one daye : but also 
wythin a litle while might have put the Realme of Scot- 
lande in suche a misery and trouble, that for ever they 
shoulde have bene ware how to enter the Realme of Eng- 
lande, and specially the kynge, beynge absente : for the 
Englyshemen wanted no good wyll, for of the Scottes they 
slewe twelfe thousande at the leaste of the beste Gentlemen 
and flower of Scotlande, and of the Englysh syde were 
slayne and taken not xv. C. men, as it appered by the boke 
of wages when the souldiours were payed. Thus the erle of 
Surrey accomplyshed the promyse at hys daye prefyxed wyth 
the kinge of Scottes to hys great fame and honour. 

After that the felde was foughte and the Scottes fled 
many Englyshemen folowed them into Scotlande, and were 
so farre that they wiste not whiche waye to returne and 
so were taken prysoners of the Scottes that were in the 
ii. battailes that fled first and never fought. Also dyverse 
were taken by the Lorde Chamberlayne of Scotlande, whiche 
fought with the wyng of Sir Edmond Haward, and were 
caried wyth hym to the nomber of syxtye. Of the Scottes 

that 



THE V. 
YERE 



112 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



that fledde, some passed over the water of Twede at Caude- 
streme Foorde, and other by the drye Marches, durynge the 
tyme of the fyghte, and the nyghte after manye menne loste 
their horsses and suche stoffe as they lefte in their tentes 
and pavilions by the robbars of Tindale and Tividale. 

The Lorde Dacre wyth hys company stode styl all daye 
unfoughten with all. When the felde was done and the 
skoute watche broughte woorde, that there was no more 
apperaunce of the Scottes, but all were returned, the 
Earle thanked God wyth humble harte, and called to hym 
certaine Lordes and other gentlemen and them made 
knightes, as Sir Edmonde Haward his sonne and the 
Lorde Scrope, Sir William Percy and manye other. Then 
the Earle and the Lorde Admirall departed to Barmer 
wodde and appoincted Sir Philippe Tylney knighte with 
the compaignye of the Lorde Admirall and the compaignie 
of the Lorde Scrope of bolton, the Lorde Latymer, olde 
Sir Marmaduke Constable, Sir William Percy, Sir Nicholas 
Applyard, and their compaignies, and a fewe other to kepe 
the place where the felde was for savynge of the Englyshe 
ordinaunce, and the ordynaunce that was taken from the 
Scottes, whiche was fyve great Curtalles, twoo great 
Culverynges, foure Sacres, and syxe Serpentynes as fayre 
ordinaunce as hathe bene beside other small peces. Wei 
knowen it was by them that fought, and also reported by the 
prysoners of Scotlande, that their kynge was taken or slayne, 
but hys bodye was not founde tyll the nexte daye, because 
al the meane people aswell Scottes as Englysh were strypped 
out of their apparell as they laye at the felde, yet at the laste 
he was founde by the Lorde Dacres, who knewe hym well 
by hys pryvye tookens in that same place, where the battayle 
of the Earle of Surrey and hys, fyrste joyned together. 

Thys kynge had diverse deadelye woundes, and in 
especyall one wyth an Arowe, and another wyth a byll as 
apered when he was naked. After that the bodye of the 
kinge of Scottes was fownde and broughte too Barwicke, 
the Earle shewed it too Sir William Scot hys Chaunceller, 
and Sir Jhon Forman hys serjante porter, whyche knewe 
hym at the fyrste syghte, and made greate lamentacyon. 
Then was the bodye bowelled, enbawmed, and cered, and 
secretelye amongest other stufFe conveyed to Newcastell, 
but the same daye the Lorde Admirall came to the felde 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



and there some Scottes apered on an hyll : but William 
Blackenall whyche was the chyeffe doar and ruler of all the 
ordynaunce shott suche a peale, that the Scottes fledde, or 
elles the Lorde Admirall had bene in greate jeopardye : and 
then all the ordinaunce was broughte in savetye to the 
Castell of Citel and there remayned for a tyme. After 
thys noble vyctorye the Earle wrote fyrste to the Quene 
whyche had raysed a great power to resiste the sayde kinge 
of Scottes, of the wynnynge of the battaylle, for then the 
bodie of the kynge of Scottes was not fownde, and she yet 
beynge at the towne of Buckingham had woorde the next 
daye after that the kynge of Scottes was slayne and a parte 
of hys coate armure to her sente, for whiche vyctorye she 
thanked GOD, and so the Earle after that the Northe parte 
was sett in a quyetnes, returned to the Quene wyth the 
deade bodye of the Scottyshe king and brought it to 
Richemonde. 

Nowe lette us returne too the kynge of Englande 
lyenge before Tournay, whyche the xxv. daye of September 
receyved the gauntelett and letters of the Earle of Surrey, 
and knewe all the dealynge of bothe parties. Then he 
thanked GOD and hyghlye praysed the Earle and the Lorde 
Admirall and his sonne, and al the gentlemenne and com- 
mons that were at that valiaunte enterprice : Howe beit, 
the kynge had a secrete letter that the Cheshire men fledde 
from Sir Edmond Hawarde, whyche letter caused greate 
harte burning and manye woordes, but the kyng thankefully 
accepted al thynge, and would no man to be dispraysed. 
So, on the Mondaye at nyght the xxvi. daye of September, 
the Lorde Harbart and the Earle of Shrewsbury made greate 
fyers in their armies in tooken of vyctory and triumphe : 
and on Teusdaye the xxvii. daye the tente of cloth of gold 
was set up : and the kynges Chapell sange masse, and after 
that Te Deum, and then the Byshoppe of Rochester made a 
Sermonde and shewed the deathe of the kynge of Scottes, 
and muche lamented the yll deathe and perjury of him. 

The kynge of Englande lyenge thus before Tournay, 
caused hys greate ordinaunce to be planted rounde aboute 
the Cytye, and diverse trenches were caste and rampiers 
made and the Lorde Lisle, and the Lorde Wyloughby were 
appoyncted to maynteyne the ordinaunce, wyth their bendes, 
and the Earle of Kente was lodged before the gate called 

port 

VOL. i. 



THE V. 
YERE 



ii4 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



port Valencien, so that the Cytezens coulde not yssue oute, 
nor no ayde coulde come in. The ordynaunce dayly bet 
the gates, towers and walles, whyche made a greate bat- 
terye : and a fewe Englyshemen assaulted the port Coquerell, 
but they were to fewe in nomber, and yf they had bene more 
in nomber, they had taken the toune as the Tournosyns 
confessed after. The Citezens of Tournay consyderynge 
their estate, came together to counsayll, and there the 
Provoste sayde, frendes and brethren of thys noble Citie, 
I cannot to muche prayse youre trueth and fidelitie to youre 
Sovereygne Lorde the Kyng of Fraunce, consyderynge 
how manfully you have defended this citie sythe the 
begynnynge of thys siege, but alas allthoughe it be wryten 
on the gates graven in stone lammes ton ne a perdeu ton 
pucellage, that is to saye, thou hast never loste thy mayden- 
hed : yet yf this citye hadde not bene well furnyshed, and 
ever at the daye appoyncted sure of reskewe, it coulde not 
have continued : nowe you se that reskewe fayleth, our gates 
be rased, our towres betyn downe, our chiefe tower lyke to 
fall, so that yf thys perilous siege continue, or elles yf our 
enemies assaute us, we be not able to defende us : wherefore 
nowe, all these thynges consydered, I woulde knowe whyther 
you wyll treate wyth the kynge of Englande or abide the 
chaunce. Then they which at the last counsayll cried war, 
warre, now cryed peace peace, yet al were not agreed : then one 
wyseman saide : Sirs yf the towne bee assawted once agayne 
with a greate nomber suerlye it will be taken : you sawe the 
experience at the laste assaute, and then consyder yf it bee 
taken by force, who is there that can saye, he is sure of his life : 
But by entretie, the kinge of Englande is so merciful, that 
we maye fortune to save bothe lyfe and goodes. Then finally 
al agreed to treate. Then the Provost sent to the kinge a 
trompet desirynge a saufeconduyte for hym, and certayne 
other to come and to speake with hym, whyche requeste was 
to hym graunted. Then the Provost of the citie accompanied 
with eleven wyth hym of the beste of the citie came to the 
armye and spake with the lordes of the counsayll and after 
were broughte to the kynges presence, the Provoste kneled 
doune and all hys compaginy and sayde : Ryght hyghe and 
myghtye Prynce, althoughe the Citie of Tournay is stronge, 
well walled, well replenished with people, vitayles, artilerye, 
yea and the people in feare and dreade of nothinge, yet we 

knowe 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



knowe that againste youre great puissaunce yt cannot con- 
tinue long, although it were ten times as stronge as it is, 
wherefore we knowynge by reporte, youre honoure, your 
wysedome, youre justice, and noble harte, are contente to 
become youre subjectes and vassalles, so that we maye have 
and enjoye oure olde lawes, customes, lyberties, and Fran- 
chesses, under you as we have before thys done under other 
Princes. Then the kynge aunswered, we have well hearde 
youre peticion, we will common wyth our counsayll and 
make you aunswere, and when he had communed wyth his 
counsayll, he aunswered sayenge : Syrs, he that asketh 
mercye of us, shall not be denied, seinge you come to 
treate, we remitte you to oure counsayll. Then they wente 
into the tente of counsayll, and ther the Tournasyns fell at 
a poyncte, and in conclusion, they yelded the Cytye and 
tenne thousande pounde Sterlynge for the redempcyon of 
theyr lyberties, and so departed to the citie, makynge re- 
lacyon of the Kynge, and hys noble corage. On Thursdaye 
the xxix. daye of September, the kynge was in hys ryche 
tente of clothe of golde under hys clothe of estate, to whome 
came the Citezens of the Citie and were sworne to him and 
became his subjectes. Then the kynge appoyncted the lord 
Lysle, the Lorde of Burgayny, and the Lord Willoughby 
to take possession, whiche wyth syxe thousande men entered 
the citie and toke the market place and the walles, and 
searched the howses for feare of treason, and then Mayster 
Thomas Wolsey the kynges Almoner called before hym all 
the Citizens younge and olde and sware them to the kynge 
of Englande, the nomber whereof was foure skore thousande. 
Thus the kynge of Englande by conquest came to the pos- 
session of the citie of Tour nay : on Sondaye the ii. daye of 
October the kinge entered the citie of Tournay at porte 
Fountayn, and iiii. of the chiefe of the citie over him bare a 
cannapye wyth all the armes of Englande, every person was 
in hys beste apparell, the Ladies and Gentlewomen laye in 
the wyndowes beholdinge the kinge and his nobilitie, everye 
Citezen had in his hande a staf torche, the kynge hym selfe 
was richelye appereillcd in ryche armure on a barded courser, 
his henxmen bearynge his peces of warre, as are, spere and 
other, their coursers were barded with the armes of Eng- 
lande, Fraunce, Irelande, and other the kinges dominions 
all of ryche embrawdery, thus the kinge with his nobilitie 

al 



THE V. 
YERE 



n6 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



al rychely apparelled with his swerde borne before him, 
his herauldes and serj antes of armes with trumpettes 
and mynstrelsy entered the citie and came to oure Ladye 
Churche, and there "Te Deum was songe. Then the kinge 
called to his presence, Edwarde Guldeforde, William 
Fitzwilliam, Jhon Dauncye, William Tiler, Jhon Sharpe, 
William Huse, Jhon Savage, Christopher Garnishe, and 
diverse other valiant esquiers, and gave to them the order 
of knighthode, and then went to his lodgynge, and at after 
none he came to the market place, where was prepared for 
him a place : then he caused a proclamacion to bee made 
in his name king of England and of Fraunce, that no man 
shoulde greve the citizens, during which proclamacion the 
Turnesins scace loked up nor shewed once to him any 
amiable contenaunce which was much marked, the Cry 
finished, the king departed to hys campe levynge the citie 
in safe kepynge. This weke the kinge rode to see the 
castel of Morton, and there his grace toke great pleasur. 
The king remembring the great chere that the prince of 
Castel and the lady Margarete had made him at Lisle which 
was but xii. myle English from Tornay, desired the said 
prince and lady wyth diverse other to come to him to his 
citie of Tornay, and made preparacion for the same, and 
appointed a justes wherof he him selfe would be one, and 
caused a Tilt to be made in the Market place. While 
these thinges were preparyng, the king and his counsayll 
ordered for the sure keping of the citie of Tornay, and 
there ordeyned Sir Edward Powninges knight of the order 
of the gartier to be his Lieutenaunt with iiii. C. archers, with 
capitaynes horsemen and artilerie convenient, and to have 
aide of Henawde and other the kynges frendes adjoyning, 
and of his garde he left there iiii. C. archers, and ordinaunce 
was appoincted for the defence of the same. Monday the 
xi. day of October the king wythout the toune received the 
prince of castel, the lady Margaret and diverse other nobles 
of their countreyes and them brought into Tornay with great 
triumphe. The noyse wente that the lord Lisle made re- 
quest of mariage to the lady Margarete duches of Savoy and 
doughter to Themperour Maximilian, which before that 
tyme was departed from the kyng wyth many rich gyftes 
and money borowed, but whether he profered mariage 
or not she favored him highly : there the prince and 

duches 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



117 



duches sojorned with great solace by the space of x. dayes. 
During whiche time, the xviii. daye of October, began the 
justes, the king and the lord Lisle aunswered all commers : 
uppon the king attended xxiiii. knightes on foote in cootes 
of purple velvet and cloth of golde. A tent of cloth of 
gold was set in the place for the armorie and releve, the 
king had a base and a trapper of purple velvet bothe set ful 
of S.S. of fyne bullion, and the lord Lisle in the same suyt, 
ther were manysperes broken and many a good buffet geven, 
the strangers as the lord Walon and the lord Emery and other 
dyd right well. When the justes were done, the king and 
al the other unhelmed them and rode about the Tilt and 
did great reverence to the ladies, and then the herauldes 
cried to lodginge. 

This nyght the kinge made a sumpteous banket of a 
C. dyshes to the prince of Castell and the lady Margarete 
and to all other lordes and ladies, and after the banket, the 
ladies daunsed, and then came in the king and a xi. in a 
maske, al richely appareled with bonettes of 'golde, and 
when they had passed the tyme at their pleasure, the gar- 
mentes of the maske were cast of amongest the ladies, take 
who coulde take. 

The xx. daye of October, the Prince of Castel and the 
ladye Margarete with many great giftes to them geven 
returned to Lile wyth al their trayne. After that the king 
was enformed that all direccyons wer taken and every thing 
put in an order for the sure keping of the citie of Tornay, 
he toke the same to sir Edward Powninges knight, which 
valiantly kept it in good order and justice. 

The king and his counsail before this had considered 
that the Frenchmen would geve them no battail, and that 
winter approched, which was no time to lie at siege of other 
townes, concluded to kepe Tournay savely, and to breake up 
their campe for that winter, and to begin again war in the 
spring of the yere : this was a full conclusion taken by the 
kynge and his counsayll, and so the kinge and al hys people 
(excepte suche as were appoincted to be with sir Edward 
Powninges) departed out of Tournay the xx. daye of 
September : and the king and the noble men made such 
spede, that shortly they came to Caleys, and thyther came 
the Lorde Admirall whome the king hartely thanked of hys 
paynes and there every man was paied of his wages and 

conduit 



THE V. 
YERE 



A Justes. 



n8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



The discrip- 
tion of 
Thomas 
Wolsy, which 
afterwarde 
was made 
Cardinal!. 



conduit money, and shippes prepared for the passage, and 
so the xxiiii. day of September the kyng with a privy com- 
pany toke shippe and the same day landed at Dover and 
shortly after all his people folowed, then he with a small 
companye rode to Richemond in post to the quene, where 
was such a lovinge metyng, that every creature rejoised. 
This season began a great mortalite in London and other 
places wher much people died : Al this winter the kynges 
navy kept the seas and robbed and spoyled the Frenchmen 
on their costes. 

When the kynge was thus returned, he forgat not the 
good service that many a gentleman dyd at the battayll at 
Bramston, wherefore he wrote to them hys lovinge letters 
wyth suche thankes and favorable wordes that everye man 
thought him selfe wel rewarded. And on the day of the 
purificacion of our Lady at Lambeth the kynge created the 
Earle of Surrey duke of Norffolke with an augmentacion 
of the armes of Scotlande, and Sir Charles Brandon Vicont 
Lisle, he created duke of Suffolke, and the Lord Haward 
high Admiral he created Earle of Surrey, and Sir Charles 
Somerset lord Harbert, his chief Chamberlayne he created 
Earle of Worcester : and after that at another daye he made 
Sir Edwarde Stanley for his good service, lorde Montaygle, 
and in a march folowynge was maister Thomas Wolsey the 
kinges almoner consecrate bishop of Lincolne, whiche therto 
was named on Newers daye before : This man was borne at 
Ypswhyche and was a good Philosopher, verye eloquente 
and full of wytte, but for pride, covetous, and ambicion, he 
excelled al other as you shall hear after. 

In the tyme of Kinge Henry the seventh father to kynge 
Henrye the eighte it was concluded betwene the sayde kinge, 
and kinge Phylyppe of Castel sonne to Maximilian the 
Emperour and kynge of Castell and hys wife, that Charles 
his eldest sonne shoulde marye the ladye Mary doughter to 
the kynge of Englande wyth a dowrye to her appoyncted, 
at whiche tyme they were bothe younge : Nowe at the kinges 
retourne from Tournay he made a preparacion too sende the 
sayde Ladye his sister to the Prince of Castel. But the 
counsayll of Flaunders aunswered that concerninge her selfe 
they would gladdly receyve to be espowsed to their Prynce, 
for she was then one of the fayrest Ladyes of the worlde : 
but as concerninge the artycles of her dowar,ithey coulde not 

fulfill 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



119 



fulfill wythout thassente of the kynge of Arragon and the 
realme of Castell (whyche was sayde, mynded to have hym 
maryed in Spayne.) The kynge lyke a lovynge brother 
woulde not sende his syster wyldely wythoute a dowar 
assured, toke the firste agremente betwene the kynge her 
father and kynge Philippe hys father to bee of none effecte, 
sythe the Spaniardes would not conferme the same, and the 
cause was, by reason that kinge Phylyppe was not naturallye 
borne to bee theyr kynge, but was kynge in the ryghte of 
hys wyfe, and so they were not bounde too hys agreementes 
made wythoute their consente. So thus the kynge of Eng- 
lande reteyned stil hys syster and all the preparacyon that 
he hadde done for her conveyaunce, whiche was very costlye. 

This season the lady Margaret quene of Scottes late wife 
to king James the IIII. slayne at Bramston, and sister to the 
kyng, wrote to the kynge to have compassion of her and his 
two Nephewes her sonnes, for she was in feare lest he woulde 
have invaded her realme. The king moved with brotherly 
compassion, sent her word, that yf the Scottes kept peace he 
would kepe peace, yf they woulde have war he wold like- 
wise have war, and so with that answere the messenger 
departed. In the spring tyme of the yere the kyng wrote 
hys letters to all noble men and gentlemen that he woulde 
shortly passe agayne into Fraunce in hys owne person, wher- 
fore every man prepared him self mete for that jornay : 
the Flemminges hearing therof, made purviaunce for wagons, 
vitayl and other thynges, whiche turned them to great losse 
for that viage brake of, as you shall heare. 

All this season Sir Richard Whethil and sir Jhon Tremayle 
kept so Thenglishe pale that the Frenchmen durst not 
medyll, and yet they spoyled to base Bollen. 

Before this tyme the tounes about London as Islyngton, 
Hoxston, Shordysh and other, had so enclosed the comon 
feldes with hedges and diches, that nother the young men 
of the citie myght shote, nor the auncient persons might 
walke for their pleasur in the feldes, except either the bowes 
and arrowes were broken or taken away, or the honest 
and substancial persons arrested or indited, saieng that no 
Londoner shuld go out of the citie but in the hygh wayes. 
Thys sayeng sore greved the Londeners, and sodainly this 
yere a great nomber of the citie assembled them selfes in 
a morninge, and a turnar in a fooles coote came cryenge 

through 



THE V. 
VERB 



120 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE V. 
YERE 



The 



vi. yere. 



through the cytye, shovels and spades, and so manye people 
folowed that it was wonder, and within a short space all the 
hedges about the townes were cast doune, and the diches 
filled, and every thyng made plain the workemen were so 
diligent. The kinges counsayll hearyng of this assembly 
came to the Gray Friers, and sent for the mayre and the 
counsail of the cytye to knowe the cause, whiche declared 
to them the noysance done to the Citezens, and their com- 
modities and liberties taken from them though they would 
not yet the commonaltie and younge persones, whyche were 
dampnefyed by the noisaunce would pluck up and remedy 
the same. And when the kinges counsayll had harde the 
aunswer, they dissi muled the matter, and commaunded the 
mayer to se that no other thynge were attempted, and to 
call home the citezens, which when they had done their 
enterprice, came home before the kynges counsayll and the 
Mayre departed without any harme more doing, and so after, 
the feldes were never hedged. 



THE VI. YERE. 

IN the moneth of Maye the kyng and the newe Duke of 
Suffolke wer defenders at the Tilt against al commers 
the kynge was in a scopelary mantel and hat of clothe 
of silver and like a whit hermite, and the duke appareled 
like a black hermite al of black velvet, both their berdes 
wer of Damaske silver, and when they had ridden about the 
Tilt and shewed them seles to the quene, then they threw 
of their apparel and sent it to the ladies for a larges, then 
was the king in black, and the Duke in whit with black 
staves, on the staves was wrytten with whit letters : who can 
hold that wyl away : thys poyse was judged to be made for 
the Duke of SufFolke and the Duches of Savoy, at these 
justes were the duke of Longevyle and the Lorde Cleremond, 
and there the kinge and the Duke dyd so valiantly that they 
obteyned the price, at these justes wer broken C. xiiii. speres 
in a short season. 

The kinge at this season sent agayne into Flaunders for 
the performaunce of the mariage of the younge Prince of 
Castell and the fayre Ladye Mary his sister, and shewed 
howe he had prepared al thynges necessarie and convenient 

for 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



121 



for suche an high estate. The counsail of Flaunders aun- 
swered that they woulde not receive her that yere, with 
many subtill argumentes, by reason wherof the perfite love 
betwene Englande, and the low countreys was much 
slaked. 

The xix. day of May was receyved into London a Capp 
of maintenaunce and a swerde sent from Pope July, with a 
great compaigny of nobles and gentlemen, which was pre- 
sented to the kyng on the Sondaye then nexte ensuynge 
wyth great solempnitie in the Cathedrall Churche of sainct 
Paule. About this time, the warres yet contynuing betwene 
Englande and Fraunce, prior Jhon (of whom you have 
hard before in the fourth yere) great capitayne of the 
Frenche navye, wyth his Galeyes and Foystes charged wyth 
greate basylyskes and other greate artillerie came on the 
border of Sussex, and came a lande in the night at a poore 
village in Sussex called Bright Helmston, and or the watche 
coulde him escrye he sett fier in the toune and tooke such 
poore goodes as he founde : then the watche fiered the 
bekins, and people began to gather, whiche seinge Prior Jhon 
Sowned his trompet to call his men aborde, and by that 
tyme it was day : then syx archers whiche kepte the watche 
folowed Prior Jhon to the sea and shott so faste, that they 
bet the galymen from the shore and Prior Jhon hym selfe 
waded to his Foyst, and the Englishe men went into the 
water after, but they were put backe wyth pickes or ells 
they had entered the foyst, but they shott so fast, that they 
wounded many in the foist, and Prior Jhon was shott in 
the face with an Arrow, and was likely to have died, and 
therfore he offered his image of wax before our Lady at 
Bolleyn with the English arrow in the face for a myracle. 

When the lorde Admirall of Englande had hearde these 
newes he was not content and sent sir Jhon Wallop to the 
sea incontinent wyth diverse English shippes, which sayled 
to the cost of Normandy and there landed and brent xxi. 
villages and tounes with great slaughter of people, and brent 
shippes and boates in the havens of Treaport, stapels and in 
every place. This sir Jhon Wallopp quit hym selfe so, that 
men marveled of his entreprises, consideryng he had at the 
most but viii. C. men, and toke lande there so often. 

In the moneth of June the lord Powntremy that was 
capitayn of Tyrwyn with banner displayed and greate ordi- 



naunce, 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



The Capp of 
maintenaunce. 



VOL. I. 



122 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 



naunce, with a greate army came into Picardy nere to Arde. 
Sir Nicholas Vaux captain of Guysnes considering that the 
Frenchmen had such ordinaunce, thought that they would 
have besieged Guisnes, and wrote therof to the king, which 
incontinent provided a great army for the reskewe. And 
when every thynge was ready and the army forward, the 
lord Pountremy reised his campe, and departed without anye 
more doing, but for all that the king sent over sir Thomas 
Lovell knight wyth vi. C. men to Caleys for the more 
strength of that towne and other townes and castelles beyng 
within the Englysh pale and the marches there. 

The French king this yere appoincted to Richard de la 
Pole traitor of England and banished the realme xii. M. 
lanceknightes to kepe Normandy, and also to entre into 
England and to conquere the same, where they made suche 
a Riot that many of them were slayn and he was faine to 
cary them to sainct Malos in Britaigne to take shippe : for 
the Frenchmen would fayne have bene rydde of them, they 
cared not how, their condicions were so vyle and shameful, 
but by the reason that the French kyng suyd for peace, this 
journey toke no effect. 

The French king by an herauld wrote to the king of 
England, that he marvelled greately why he made him so 
sore war, and brent and toke his townes, slewe and robbed 
hys people withoute anycause geven on his parte, wherfore 
he required the king to graunt saveconduit to his ambas- 
sadoures, whiche shoulde entreate the cause : wherupon in 
June the French king sent a commission with the president 
of Roan and the generall boyer and certayne other nobles of 
Fraunce to entreat peace and alliaunce betwene both the 
princes : and farther, because that they knew that the mariage 
was broken betwene the prince of Castel and the lady Mary 
(as you have heard) thei desiered the said lady to be espoused 
to the French king, affirming a great dower and suertes for 
the same with great treasures : so much was offered that the 
king moved by his counsail, and specially by the bishop of 
Lincolne Wolsey, consented upon condicion that yf the saide 
French king Loys died, then she should yf it pleased her 
retorne into England again with al her dowar and riches : 
after this entretie, the indentures were sealed and the peace 
proclaimed the vii. daye of August and the king in presence 
of the French ambassadours sworn to kepe the same, and 

likewyse 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



123 



.ikewyse ther was sent an Ambassade out of Englande to se 
the French kynge swere the same. 

The Dutchmen hering these newes were sory, and repented 
them that they received not the lady, and spake shamfully 
of this mariage, that a feble, old and pocky man should 
mary so fayr a lady, but the voys of people let not princes 
purposes. 

By the conclusion of this peace was the duke of Longvile 
and other prisoners delivered, payeng their raunsom, and the 
saied Duke affied the lady Mary in the name of kyng Lewes 
his maister. This Duke was highly interteined in England 
of many noble men and had great chere, but when they came 
into Fraunce with the quene he would scace know them. 
Then when al thinges were redy for the conveyaunce of 
this noble Ladye, the kyng her brother in the moneth of 
September with the quene his wife and his sayde sister and 
al the court came to Dover and there taried, for the wynde 
was troublous and the wether foule, in so muche that a 
shippe of the kings called the Libeck of xi. C. tonne was 
driven a shore before Sangate and there brast and of vi. C. 
men scantely escaped iii. C. and yet the most part of them 
were hurt with the wrecke. When the wether was fayre, 
then all her wardrope, stable and riches was shipped, and 
suche as were appoincted to geve their attendaunce on her, 
as the duke of Norffolke, the Marques Dorset, the Byshop 
of Durham, the earle of Surrey, the lorde Delawar, the 
lorde Barnes, the lord Montaigle, the Marques iiii. brother, 
sir Morice Barkeley, sir Jhon Peche, sir William Sandes, 
sir Thomas Bulleyn, sir Jhon Car and many other knightes, 
squiers, gentlemen and ladies, al these went to ship, and the 
sayde lady toke her leave of the quene in the castell of 
Dover, and the king brought her to the sea syde, and kissed 
her and betoke her to God and the fortune of the sea, and 
to the governaunce of the French king her husbande. Thus 
the ii. daye of October at the hower of foure of the clocke in 
the mornynge this fayre ladye toke her ship with al her 
noble compaignie : and when they had sayled a quarter of 
the sea, the wynde rose and severed some of the shippes to 
Caleys, and some into Flaunders and her shippe with greate 
difficultie was brought to Bulleyn, and with great jeopardie 
at the entring of the haven, for the mayster ran the ship hard 
on shore, but the botes were redy and received this noble 

lady, 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



124 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



lady, and at the landynge sir Christopher Garnyshe stode in 
the water and toke her in his armes, and so caried her to 
land, where the Duke of Vandosme and a Cardinall wyth 
many estates received her, and al her ladies, and welcommed 
all the noble men into that countrey and so the Quene and 
al her trayne came to Bulleyn, and there rested and from 
thence she removed by diverse lodgynges tyll she came 
all most within thre mile of Abvile besyde the forrest of 
Arders, and there kynge Loyes uppon a great courser met 
with her, and she would have alyghted but he woulde not 
suffre her, and welcommed her to his countrey, and when he 
had sene her beauty (which he so long desired) and talked 
with her a litle space, then he returned to Abvile by a secret 
way and she was with great triumph, procession and pagiantes 
received into the toune of Abvile, the viii. day of October 
by the Dolphin, which receyved her with gret honor, she 
was appareiled in cloth of silver, her horse was trapped in 
goldsmyths work very rychly. After her folowed xxxvi. 
ladies, al their palfreys trapped with crymsyn velvet, 
embraudered : after them folowed one chariot of clothe 
of tyssue, the seconde clothe of golde and the third 
Crimsyn velvet embrawdered with the kings armes and 
hers full of roses. After them folowed a great nomber 
of archers, and then wagons laden with their stuffe. Great 
was the ryches in plate, juels, money apparel, and hang- 
inges that this lady brought into Fraunce. The Monday 
beyng the daye of Sainct Denyse, the same kynge Lewes 
maried the lady Mary in the great church of Abvile, bothe 
appareled in goldsmithes woorke. After the masse was 
done, there was a great banket and fest, and the ladyes of 
England highly entretayned. 

The Tewesday beyng the tenth day of October al 
Thenglyshmen except a fewe that were officers with the 
sayd quene, were discharged which was a greate sorowe 
for theim, for some had served her longe in hope of pre- 
fermente, and some that had honest romes lefte them to 
serve her, and now thei were without service, which caused 
them to take thought in so much some died by the way 
returning, and some fel mad, but there was no remedy. 
After thenglishe Lordes hadde done their commission the 
French king wylled them to take no lenger payne, and so 
gave to them good rewardes, and thei tooke their leave of 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



the quene, and returned. Then the Dolphin of Fraunce 

called lord Frauncis duke of Valoys, and by his wife duke 

of Britaigne for the more honour of this manage, before 

Thenglishmen departed from Abvile, caused a solempne 

justes to be proclaymed, which shoulde be kept at Paris in 

the moneth of November next ensuyng, and that he with his 

ix. aydes shoulde aunswere, all commers beyng gentlemen of 

name and of armes. Firste, to ronne v. courses at the Tylt 

with peces of avauntage, and also fyve courses at Randon 

with sharpe speres, and twelfe strokes with sharpe swordes, 

and that done, he and his aides to fight at the barriers with 

al gentlemen of name and of armes. Fyrst, syx foynes 

with handspeares, and after that eyght strokes to the most 

auantage yf the spere so long held, and after that twelfe 

strokes wyth the swerde, and yf any man be unhorsed or 

be felled with fightinge on foote, then hys horse and armoure 

to bee rendered to the officers of armes, and every man of 

thys chalenge must set up his armes and name upon an arche 

triumphante, whiche shalbe made at the place where the 

justes shalbee, and farther shall wryte to what poinct he shal 

aunswere to one or to all. When this proclamacion was 

reported in Englande by the noble men that returned from 

the mariage : the Duke of Suffolke, the Marques Dorset, 

and hys foure brethren, the Lorde Clynton, Sir Edward 

Nevell, Sir Giles Capel, Thomas Cheney and other sued to 

the kyng to be at the chalenge, which request he graciously 

graunted. Then the Lordes and knyghtes prepared all 

thinge necessarye for their enterprice, and shypped their 

horses and harnesse, and dyd so muche by journeye, that 

they came to Parys, at the ende of the moneth of October, 

whiche were hartelye welcomed of the kyng and the Dolphin, 

but moste of all, of the French quene which then lay at 

saynct Denyse, and was not yet crouned nor entred into 

Paris. 

The Dolphin desired the duke of Suffolke and the lord 
Marques Dorset, whose activitie he knew well by reporte, 
to be two of his immediat aides, which therto assented : 
therfore was erected an Arch of widnes at the tournelles 
beside the strete on sainct Anthony, directly before the Bastel, 
on the which were set iiii. targettes or scutchions, the one silver 
and he that sett his name under that shylde, runne at the 
Tylt according to the articles : he that put his name under 

the 



THE VI. 
YERE 



126 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



the golden target should ronne with the sharpe speres and 
fight with sharpe swerdes : they that put ther names to the 
black shilde, should fight a foote with speres and swerdes 
for the one hand. And he that touched the tawney sheld 
shoulde cast a spere on foot with a targett on his arme, and 
after to fight with a ii. hand swerde : on this arche above 
stode the armes of the kyng and the quene, and benethe 
them stode the armes of the Dolphin and his aydes, and 
under nethe stode the iiii. scochions that you have harde of, 
and under theim all the armes and names of suche as set 
their names to any iof the sayde iiii. scochions. While 
all these thinges were preparynge, the lady Mary of Eng- 
land the v. daie of November then being Sondaie, was 
with great solempnytee crowned Quene of Fraunce in the 
monasterie of Sayncte Denyce, and the Dolphyn all the 
season held the croune over her hed, because it was of 
greate waight to her grevance, at whiche coronacion were 
the lordes of England, and accordynge to ther degrees well 
enterteyned. 

Mondaye the vi. daye of November the sayde Quene was 
receyved into the cytee of Parys after the order that 
foloweth. First the garde of the Cytee met with her with 
oute Sayncte Denyce all in coates of goldesmythes woorke 
with shippes gylt, and after them mett her all the priestes 
and religious which were estemed to be iii. M. The quene 
was in a chayre covered about (but not over her person) in 
white cloth of golde the horses that drewe it covered in cloth 
of golde, on her hed a coronall all of greate perles, her necke 
and brest full of Jueles, before her wente a garde of Almaynes 
after their fassion, and after them al noblemen, as the 
Dolphyn, the Duke of Alanson, the Duke of Burbon, the 
Duke of Vandosme, the Duke of Longevyle, and the Duke 
of SufFolke, the Marques Dorsett v. Cardynalles and a 
greate nomber of estates, aboute her person rode the kynges 
garde whiche were Scottes. Thus was this quene receyved 
into Paris and so conveyed to the cathedral churche and 
ther offered, and from thence to the pallayce where she 
offered at the holy Chapel, and from thence she went to the 
lodgyng for that nyght, for whome was provided a great 
supper and the herauldes cryed a larges and had to them 
geven a ship of silver and gylt, and other plate to the valewe 
of ii. C. marke, and after supper began daunsyng and 

pastyme. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



127 



pastyme. On the morowe began the justes, and the Dolphin 
with his aydes entered the feld, the apparell and bardes 
were cloth of golde, cloth of sylver and crymsyn velvet 
kanteled together all in one sute, they shewed them selfs 
before the kyng and quene who were in a goodly stage, and 
the quene stode so that all men might see her and wondered 
at her beautie, and the kyng was feble and lay on a couche 
for weakenes. Then entered the counter parte by a rayle 
for combryng the place. These justes contynued iii. dayes, 
in the whiche were aunswered iii. hundred and v. men of 
armes and every man ran v. courses, and with sharpe speres, 
dyverse were slayne and not spoken of : the English lordes 
and knightes dyd as well as the best of any the other. At 
the Randon and Tournay the Duke of Suffolke hurt 
a gentelman that he was like to die, the Marques strok 
Mounsire Crew an Albanoys with his spere and persed his 
hed pece and put hym in jeopardy : the duke of Suffolke 
in the tornay overthrewe a man of armes horse and man, so 
dyd the lorde Marques another, and yet the Frenchmen 
woulde in no wyse prayse theim. At this tornay the 
Dolphyn was hurt in the hande, so that he coulde not per- 
forme hys chalenge at the barriers and put one of his ayde 
in his rome, the nexte daye after began the fight at the 
barriers and because the Dolphin was not present, the duke 
of Suffolke and the lorde Marques Dorset that daye began 
the feld, and toke the barriers with speres in hand abyding 
all commers. The Dolphin brought a man secretly, which 
in al the court of Fraunce was the tallest and the strongest 
man, and he was an Almayne and put him in the place of 
an other person to have had the duke of Suffolke rebuked. 
The same great Almayne came to the barres fiersly with face 
hyd, because he would not be knowen, and bare his spere to 
the duke of Suffolke with all his strength, and the duke him 
received, and for all his strength put hym by strong strokes 
from the barriers, and with the but ende of the spere strake 
the Almaine that he staggared, but for al that the Almayne 
strake strongly and hardly at the duke, and the judges suffred 
many mo strokes to be foughten then were appoincted, but 
when they saw the Almayne rele and staggar, then they let 
fall the rayle betwene theim. The lorde Marques Dorsett 
at the same time, even at the same barre fought with a 
gentelman of Fraunce that he lost his spere, and in maner 

with 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



128 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 



with drewe : When the rayle was let fal, these two noble 
men put up their vysers and toke ayer, and then they tooke 
swerdes with poynct and edges abated, and came to the 
barriers, and the Almayne foughte sore with the duke, which 
imagened that he was a person set on for the nonce but the 
duke by pure strength tooke him about the necke, and 
pomeled so aboute the hed that the bloud yssued out of his 
nose, and then they were departed, and the Almayne was 
conveyed by the Dolphyn lest he should be knowen. These 
twoo noble men of Englande that daye fought valiantly 
diverse feates, and the Frenchmen likewise nobly them 
defended but it happened the lord Marques one time to put 
for his aide his youngest brother called the Lorde Edward 
Grey of the age of xix. yere, and to hym was put a gentel- 
man of Fraunce of greate stature and strength to thentente 
to plucke hym over the barres, but yet the younge Lorde 
was of suche strength, powre and pollecy, that he so stroke 
his adversarie that he disarmed hym, al the face bare. Thus 
was these enterpryces fynished to the laude of al parties, and 
Thenglyshmen receyved muche honoure and no spott of 
rebuke, yet they were prively sett at and in many jeopardies: 
for the declaracion of this triumphe, he ithat sawe it can tell 
howe goodly the courses trotted bounded and quickly 
turned : How valiantely the men of armes behaved them 
selfes and howe the Duke of Burbones bende was apparelled 
and bassed in tawny velvet, and clothe of sylver clowdy, the 
bende of therle of Sayncte Polle apparelled and barded in 
purple velvet all to cut on purple satten, the enfante of 
Arragon sonne to Frederycke last kynge of Napels, hys 
bende al in clothe of golde and sylver paled. This lord was 
but young but was very towarde. The Duke of Vandosme 
and his bende in clothe of golde, and pluncket velvet. The 
Dolphyn and hys aydes were every daye newe appareled at 
his coste, one daye in sylver and golde, a nother in 
Crymesyn velvet and yelowe velvet, and another daye in 
white velvet and grene, some daye myxted with satyn, some 
daye embraudered, some daye pounced with golde, and so 
every daie in chaunge as the woorkers fantasye coulde 
devyse, but the Englishemen had ever on their apparel red 
crosses to be knowen for love of their countre : at this 
triumphe the countie Galeas came into the place on a Jenett 
trapped in blewe satten and he hym selfe likewyse apparelled 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 129 



and ran a corse with a speere, which was at the hed v. 
ynches on every syde square, that is xx. ynches about, and 
at the but ix. ynches square, that is xxxvi. ynches, this spere 
was tymber and yet for al that he ran cleane with it a long 
course and slightely avoyded it to his great honour. 

Also ther was a nother gentelman called Anthony Bown- 
arme whiche came into the feld all armed, and on his body 
brought in sight x. speres that is to wyt iii. speres set in 
every styroppe forward, and under every thygh ii. speres 
upwarde, and under his lefte arme was on spere backeward, 
and the x. in his hand, and when he came before the Quene 
he let hys horse ronne and never stopped tyll he had taken 
every spere after other and broken it on the grounde, and 
he never stopped his horse tyll all were broken, thys Gentle- 
man was hyghely praysed and so he was worthy : when all 
this great triumphe was done, the lordes of England toke 
their leve and were highely thanked of the kynge, quene, 
Dolphin, and all the lordes, and so departed and came into 
England before Christmas. In November the quene was 
delivered of a prince which lived not longe after. 

This yere in December ther was one Richard Hun a 
marchaunt tailor of London in Lollers tower by the com- 
maundement of the Bishop of London, called Rychard 
Fytzjames and doctoure Horsey his chaunceler, whiche was 
a man more of witt to preferre the Byshoppes jurisdicion 
and the clergie, then the trueth of the Gospell : but so it was 
that the said Hun was found dead hanging by the neck in 
a girdle of silke, within the said towre. The beginning of 
this matter must be shewed for the folowing of the con- 
sequent : for this Hun had a child that died in his house 
being an infant, the curate clamed the bering shete for 
a mortuary. Hun answered that the infant had no propertie 
in the shet, wherupon the priest ascited him in the spiritual 
courte, he taking to him good counsail, sued the curat in a 
preminire, and when the priestes hard of this, thei did so much 
of malice that they accused him of heresy, and brought him 
to the lollers tower and ther was founde deed as you have hard. 

This man was counted of honest reputacion, no man to 
the sight of people more vertuous, wherfore upon this 
mater a greate matter folowed, for the Byshoppe and his 
Chaunceller doctour Horsey sayde that he hanged him selfe, 
and all the temporaltie sayde that he was murthered, and 

there 

VOL. i. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



Richard Hun 
committed to 
the lollers 
tower and 
murthered. 



130 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



The inquiry 
of the death 
of Richard 
Hun. 



there upon xii. men were charged before the Coronour 
whiche xii. were elected by greate dyscrecion, and many 
tymes they were wyth the kynges counsayll and hard their 
opinions, but in the meane season the Bysshop of London 
brent the dead Carcasse of the sayde Rycharde Hun in 
smythfeld, to the abhominacion of the people : but after 
that the matter had ben hard by the judges, and after by the 
kynges counsayll his grace beyng present and hering the 
cause openly debated and much borne by the spiritualtie, yet 
at the last he remitted it to the tryall of the lawe, and so upon 
good evidence doctour Horsey the Chaunceller and Bel- 
rynger with Charles Joseph the somner, were endyted of 
the murther : but afterward by the meanes of the spiritualty 
and money, Doctour Horsey caused the kynges attorney to 
confesse on his arraynement hym not to be gylty, and so he 
escaped and went to Exetre, and for very shame durst never 
come after to London. But yet for a further truthe to be 
declared in this abhominable and detestable murther, here 
shall folow the whole inquyry and verdicte of thenquest 
woorde for worde. 

The v. and the vi. daie of December in the vi. yere of 
the reigne of our sovereigne lorde kyng Henry the VIII. 
Wyllyam Barnewell crowner of London, the daye and yere 
above sayde within the warde of Castylbaynerd of London 
assembled a quest, whose names afterwarde doo appere, and 
hath sworne theim truely to enquire of the death of one 
Rychard Hun whiche lately was founde dead in the Lollers 
tower with in Pauls church of London, wherupon al we of 
the inquest together went up into the sayd tower, where we 
found the body of the said Hun hanging upon a staple 
of iron in a gyrdell of sylke, with faire countenaunce hys 
heed fayre kemmed, and his bonet right sittyng upon his 
heed, with his eyen and mouth fayre closed, withoute any 
staring, gapyng, or frownyng. Also without any drevelyng 
or spurgyng in any place of his body, wherupon by one 
assent all we agreed to take downe the body of the saide 
Hun, and as sone as we began to heve at the body it was 
loose, wherby by good advysement we perceyved that the 
gyrdell had no knot above the staple, but it was double cast 
and the linkes of an iron chayne which dyd hang on the same 
staple were laid upon the same gyrdle wherbi he did hang : 
Also the knot of the gyrdel that went about his neck stode 

under 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



under his left eare, whiche caused his head to leane toward 
his right shoulder. Not withstanding there came out of the 
nostrels ii. smal stremes of bloud to the quantite of iiii. 
dropes, save only these iiii. dropes of blode, the face lippes, 
chinne, doublet, coler, and shurt of the saide Hun was cleane 
from any bloud. Also we fynd that the skyn both of his 
neck and throte beneth the gyrdel of sylk, was fret and 
fased away, with that thing which the murtherers had broken 
his neck with all. Also the handes of the sayd Hun wer 
wrong in the wristes, wherby we perceyved that his handes 
had been bounde. 

Moreover we fynd that within the sayde prison was no 
meane wher by any man might hang him selfe, but onely 
a stole, which stole stode upon a bolster of a bed, so tyckle 
that any man or beast myght not touche it so lytle but it 
was redy to fall, wherby we perceyved that it was not 
possible that Hun might hange him selfe the stole so stand- 
inge. Also all the gyrdell from the staple to his necke, as 
well as the part which went about his neck was to litle for 
his hed to come out therat. Also it was not possible that 
the soft sylken gyrdell shoulde breake his neck or skyn 
beneth the gyrdle. Also we finde in a corner somewhat 
beyonde the place wher he dyd hang, a great persell of 
bloud. Also we fynde that upon the lyfte syde of Huns 
Jacket from the breast downeward ii. great stremes of bloud. 
Also within the flappe of the lyft syde of his Jacket, we 
fynde a greate cluster of bloude and the Jacket folden downe 
therupon, whiche thing the saide Hun coulde never folde 
nor do after he was hanged : Wherby it appeareth plainly to 
us all, that the necke of Hun was broken, and the greate 
plenty of bludde was shed before he was hanged. Where- 
fore all wee fynde by God and all our consciences that 
Rychard Hun was murthered : also we acquyte the said 
Richard Hun of his aune deathe. 

Also an ende of a wax candell whiche as Jhon Belrynger 
sayeth, he lefte in the pryson burnyng with Hun that same 
Sondaye at nyght that Hun was murthered, whiche waxe 
candell we founde styckynge upon the stockes fayre put 
oute, aboute seven or eyght fote from the place where Hun 
was hanged, whiche candell after cure opynion was never 
put oute by hym, for many lykelyhodes whiche we have 
perceyved. Also at the goynge up of Master Chaunceller 

into 



THE VI. 
YERE 



132, KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



into the Lollars tower we have good proofe that there laye 
on the stockes a gowne eyther of murrey or crimosyn in 
grayn furred with shankes, whose goune yt was wee coulde 
never prove, neyther who bare it awaye. All wee fynde 
that Master Wyllyam Horsey Chaunceller to my lorde of 
London hath had at his commaundement bothe the rule and 
guydynge of the sayde prysoner. Moreover, all we fynde 
that the sayde Master Horsey Chaunceller hath put Charles 
Joseph out of his office, as the sayde Charles hath confessed, 
because he would not dele and use the sayde prisoner so 
cruelly and do to him as the Chaunceller would have had 
him to do. Notwithstanding the deliveraunce of the keyes 
to the Chaunceller by Charles on the Saturdaye at nyght 
before Huns deathe and Charles ryding out of the towne on 
the Sondaye in the mornyng ensuyng was but a convencion 
made betwixte Charles and the Chaunceller, for to colour 
the murther, for the same Sondaye that Charles rode furth, 
he came agayne to towne the Sonday at nyght, and kylled 
Rychard Hun, as in the deposycions of Julian Littell, 
Thomas Chitcheley, Thomas Symondes, and Peter Turney 
doeth appere. 

After colouryng of the murther betwixte Charles and the 
Chaunceller conspired, the Chaunceller called to hym one 
Jhon Spaldyng Belrynger of Poules and delyvered to the 
same Belrynger the keyes of the Lollars towre, gevyng to 
the sayde Belrynger a great charge, sayeng : I charge the to 
kepe Hun more straytely than he hath been kepte, and let 
hym have but one meale a daye. Moreover I charge the, 
let no body come to hym wythoute my lycence, neyther to 
brynge hym shurt, cap, kercheffe, or any other thynge, but 
that I see it before yt come to hym. Also before Hun was 
caried to Fulham, the Chaunceller commaunded too bee put 
uppon Huns necke a greate coller of Iron with a greate 
chayne whiche is to hevy for any man or beast to were and 
longe to endure. 

Moreover it is well proved that before Huns death the 
sayd Chaunceller came up into the sayde Lollers tower, and 
kneled downe before Hun, holdyng up hys handes to hym, 
prayenge hym of forgevenesse of all that he had done to 
hym and muste do to hym. And on the Sondaye folowynge 
the Chaunceller commaunded the Penytensary of Poules, too 
goo up to hym and saye a Gospell, and make for hym holy 

water 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



water and holye breade, and geve yt to hym, whiche so dyd 
and also the Chaunceller commaunded that Hun should 
have his diner. And the same dyner tyme Charles boye was 
shute in pryson with Hun, whiche was never so before, and 
after dyner whan the Belrynger set oute the boye, the Bel- 
rynger sayde to the same boye, come no more hyther with 
mete for hym untyll to morowe at noone, for my mayster 
Chaunceller hathe commaunaed that he shall have but one 
meale a daye : and the same night folowynge Rychard Hun 
was murthered, whiche murder coulde not have been done 
wythoute consente and lycence of the Chaunceller, and also 
by the wittynge and knowelege of Jhon Spaldynge Bel- 
rynger, for there coulde no man come into the prysone but 
by the keyes beyng in Jhon Belryngers kepynge. Also 
as by my Lorde of Londons booke doeth appere, Jhon 
Belrynger is a poore innocente man, wherefore all wee doo 
perceyve that thys murther coulde not be done, but by the 
commaundement of the Chaunceller, and by the wittynge 
and knowyng of Jhon Belrynger. 

Charles Joseph wythin the tower of London of hys awne 
free wyll and unconstreyned sayde, that Master Chaunceller 
devysed and wrote with his awne hand, all suche heresyes 
as were layd to Huns charge, recorde Jhon God, Jhon 
Truy, Jhon Pasmar, Richard Gybson with many other. 

Also Charles Joseph sayeth, that whan Rychard Hun was 
slayne Jhon Belrynger bare upp the steyre into Lollars tower 
a waxe candell, havynge the keyes of the dores hangynge on 
hys arme, and I Charles went nexte to hym, and master 
Chaunceller came up last, and whan all wee came up, we 
founde Hun lyenge on hys bedde, and than Master Chaun- 
celler sayde, lay handes on the thefe and so all we murthered 
Hun, and than I Charles put the gyrdell about Huns 
necke, and than Jhon Belrynger and I Charles dyd heve up 
Hun and Master Chaunceller pulled the gyrdell over the 
staple, and so Hun was hanged. 

The deposition of Julian littell Late seruaunt to Charles Joseph 
by her fre will unconstrayned the vi. yere of our e sovereigne 
lord kyng Henry the VIII. within the Chap ell of our lady 
of Bethelem shewed to thynquest. 

Fyrst Julian sayeth, that the Wednesdaye at nyght after 

the 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[I5H-I5] 



134 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 



the death of Rychard Hun, that Charles Joseph her master 
came home to hys supper : than Julian sayde to hym, 
master it was tolde me that ye were in pryson, Charles 
aunswered, it is merye to turne the penye, and after supper 
Charles trussed persell of his goodes, and with helpe of 
Julyan bare them into Master Porters howse to kepe, and 
that done Charles sayde to Julian. Julian, yf thou wilt be 
sworne to kepe my counsayll I wyl shewe the my mynde. 
Julian aunswered ye, yf it be neyther felonie or treason : 
than Charles toke a boke oute of his purse, and Julian sware 
to hym therupon, than sayde Charles to Julian, I have dis- 
troyed Rycharde Hun. Alas Master sayde Julian, howe, he 
was called an honest man? Charles aunswered, I put a 
wyre in his nose, Alas sayde Julyan nowe be ye cast awaye 
and undone, than sayde Charles Julyan I truste in the that 
thou wylt kepe my counsayll, and Julyan aunswerd, ye but 
for Codes sake master shifte for your selfe, and than Charles 
sayde I had lever than a hundred pound yt were not done, 
but that is done can not be undone. Moreover Charles 
sayde than to Julyan, upon Sondaye whan I rode to my 
cousyn Baryngtons house, I taryed there and made good 
chere all daye tyll yt was nyght, and yet before it was myd- 
nyghte I was in London, and had kylled Hun, and upon 
the next day I rode thether agayn and was there at dyner, 
and sent for neyghbours and made good chere. Than 
Julian asked Charles, where set you your horse that nyght 
you came to towne, and wherfore came ye not home, 
Charles aunswered, I came not home for feare of bewraiynge, 
and than Julian asked Charles, who was wyth you at the 
kyllynge of Hun, Charles aunswered, I wyll not tell the : 
and Julyan saythe that upon the Thursdaye folowynge 
Charles taryed all daye in his house with great fere, and 
upon Frydaye folowyng erly in the mornynge before daye, 
Charles went foorth (as he sayde) he wente to Poules, and at 
his commyng in agayne he was in great fere sayenge Hastely, 
get me my horse and with great feare and hast made hym 
redye to ryde, and bad Mayster Porters lad lede his horse 
into the felde by the backsyde, and than Charles put into 
hys sieve hys mase or masor wyth other plate, and borowed 
of Masteres Porter bothe golde and sylver, but howe muche 
I am not sure, and Charles wente into the felde after hys 
horse, and Julyan brought hys booget after hym. Also 

upon 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



upon Fryday in Christmas weke folowyng, Charles came 
home late in the night and brought with him iii. bakers and 
a Smyth of Stratforde, and the same nyght they caried out 
of Charles house all his goodes by the feld syde to the Bell 
at Shordyche, and erly in the mornynge conveyed yt with 
cartes to Stratford. 

Moreover Julyan sayth that the Saturdaye at nyght 
before the death of Hun, Charles came home and broughte 
with him a Gurnard, sayenge, yt was for Hun, and Charles 
boye telled to Julian, that there was also ordeyned a pece 
of freshe Salmon, whiche Jhon Belrynger had. 

Also Charles sayde to the sayde Julyan, were not this 
ungratious trouble, I coulde brynge my Lorde of London 
to the dores of heretyques in London bothe of men and 
women that ben worthe a thowsand pound : But I am aferd 
that the ungracious myd wyfe shall bewraye us all. 

Also Charles sayde unto maistres Porter in lykewyse and 
more larger saieng of the best in London, where to maistres 
porter answered, the best in London is my lord Mayer, than 
Charles sayde, I wil not skuse him quyte for he taketh this 
matter whote. 

Where as Charles Joseph saieth he laye at necke hill with 
a harlott a mans wyfe in Baringtons house the same nyght, 
and there abode untyll the morowe at xi. of the clocke that 
Richarde Hun was murthered whereupon he brought before 
the kynges counsayll for his purgacion the forsayde baude 
Baryngtons wyfe, and also the foresayde harlott, whiche 
purgacion we have proved al untrewe as right largely may 
appere as well by the deposicion of Julian Littell, as of 
Thomas Chytcheley Taylor and of Jhon Symons Stacioner, 
with other, as of Robert Jhonson and Peter Turner. 

The deposydon of Thomas Chitcheley Taylor. 

The sayd Thomas saieth, the same Monday that Richard 
Hun was found dead, within a quartar of an hower after 
vii. a clock in the morning, he met with Charles Joseph 
comming out of Pouls at the nether north dore, goyng 
toward Pater noster row, sayeng good morow master 
Charles, and the sayd Charles answered, good morow and 
turned hys back whan he was withoute the churche dore, 
and loked upon the saide Chitchelay. 

The 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



136 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



The deposition of Thomas Symondes Stationer. 

He sayeth, the same mornyng that Hun was founde deed, 
that with in a quarter of an hower after vii. a clock in the 
mornynge, Charles Joseph came before him at his stal and 
sayd good morow goshyp Symons, and the same Symons 
sayd good morow to him agayne, and the wyfe of the same 
Symons was by him, and because of the dedly contenaunce 
and hasty goyng of Charles, the sayd Thomas bad his wife 
loke whither Charles gothe, and as she coulde perceyve, 
Charles went into an ale howse standing in Pater noster 
rowe by the Aley ledyng into the rode of Northerne, or 
into the Aley whither she could not well tell. 

The deposition of Roberte Jhonson and his wife dwellyng at the 
bell in Shorditche, where Charles Joseph sett his horse that 
nyghte that he came to toune to murther Richard Hun. 

The sayde Robert sayeth that Charles Joseph sent hys 
horse to hys house upon a holydaye at nyght about iii. 
wekes before Christmas by a boy, which horse was albe 
swet, and albe myred : and the said boye sayd let my fathers 
horse stand saddled, for I can not tel whether my father 
wyll ryde agayne to nyghte or not, and the sayde horse stode 
sadelled all nyght and in the mornynge folowynge Charles 
came boted and spurred aboute viii. of the clocke, and asked 
yf hys horse was sadelled and the servaunt aunswered : ye, 
and the sayde Charles lepte upon his horse and prayed the 
hoste to let hym out of his backe gate that he myght ryde 
out by the feld syde, whyche host so dyd. And because he 
was uncertayne of the daye, we asked hym yf he hard speke 
of the death of Hun at that tyme or not, and he aunswered 
nay : but shortly after he did. Neverthelesse Peter Turner 
Charles sonne in law which brought the horse by nyght into 
the Bell Robert Jhonsons house, confessed it was the same 
night before that Hun was founde dead in the morning. 
Moreover the Frydaye before Huns deth Peter Turner sayde 
to an honest woman a waxe chaundelers wyfe dwelling 
before sainct Maries spitel gate, that before this day seven 
night Hun should have a mischevouse death. And the same 
daye at after none this Hun was founde dead, the sayde 

Peter 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



Peter came to the same wyfe and tolde her that Hun was 
hanged, sayenge what told I you. 

Also James the Chauncellers cooke, the Fryday before 
Huns death, sayde to v. honest men, that Hun shoulde dye 
or Christmas, or els he woulde dye for hym, and on the 
Mondaye that Hun was founde dead the sayde James came 
to the same men : and sayde, what tolde I you, is he not 
now hanged. 

And we of thynquest asked both of Peter Turner and of 
James cooke wher they had knowlege that Hun should so 
shortely dye, and thei sayd in master Chauncellers place by 
every man. 

The deposition of Jhon Spaldyng Eelrynger. 

Fyrste the sayde deponent sayeth, that on Saturdaye the 
seconde daye of December Anno M. D. xiiii. he toke the 
charge of the pryson at foure of the clocke at after none, by 
the commaundemente of master Chaunceller, and so toke 
the keyes, wherupon he gave commaundement to the de- 
ponent, that he should let no maner of person speke with 
the prysoner excepte he had knowlege of them, and so at v. 
of the clocke the same daye the sayde deponent wente to the 
prysoner hym selfe alone, and sawe hym and cheryshed hym 
where he gave the sayde deponente a pece of fresh Salmon 
for his wyfe. And after that the sayde deponent sayeth that 
he went to master commissaries to supper with his felowe, 
where he remembred that he had left his knyfe with the sayde 
prysoner, wherupon by the counsayll of master Commissary 
he went to the prysoner and feched his knyfe, where he 
founde the prisoner sayeng of his beades, and so the sayde 
deponent requyred his knyfe of the sayde prisoner, and the 
saide prisoner delivered the knyfe to the sayd deponent 
gladly, and so departed for that nyght. 

And after that on the Sonday next folowyng the said 
deponent came to the prisoner at ix. of the clock, and asked 
him what mete he would have to his diner and he aunswered 
but a morsell, and so the saide deponent departed and went 
to the Chaunceller into the quere, and he commaunded, that 
he should take the penitensary up to the prisoner with him 
to make hym holy water and holy bred, and made the saide 
deponent to departe the prison house for a whyle, and after 
that he brought hym his dyner, and locked Charles boye 

with 

VOL. I. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



i 3 8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



with hym all dyner whyle, unto the hower of i. of the 
clocke, and so let the lad out agayne and asked hym what 
he would have to his supper, and he answered that he had 
meate ynough, and so departed untyll vi. of the clocke, and 
than the saide deponente broughte hym a quarte of ale, and 
at that tyme one Wylliam Sampson went with the sayde 
deponent to see the prysoner where he was, and sawe him 
and spake together, and so from the hower of vi. a foresayde 
unto twelfe a clocke on the morow the sayde deponent came 
not there, and whan he came there he met the Chaunceller 
with other doctoures goynge to se the prisoner where he 
hanged. 

The deposition of Peter Turner, sonne in law of Charles Joseph. 

Firste he sayeth that his father in lawe rode out of the 
toune upon Sonday the iiii. day of December. Anno xv. C. 
and xiiii. at vi. of the clock in the mornynge, weryng a cote 
of orenge tawny, on a horse cooler grysell, trottyng. 

He sayeth the Sondaye next before that one Buttons wyfe 
gave knowledge to the saide deponente that his father shoulde 
bee arested by dyverse sergeantcs assone as he coulde be 
taken, and thereupon the sayd deponente gave knowlege. 
to the sayde father in lawe at the blacke Friers at the water 
syde. Wherupon he avoyded, and the same nighte mayster 
chaunceller gave the keyes to Jhon Belringer, and gave him 
charge of the prisoner and on the sayde Sondaye the sayde 
deponente wyth Jhon Belrynger served the sayde prisoner of 
his diner at xii. of the clocke and than Jhon Belrynger sayde 
to the deponent, that he would not come to him unto the 
morowe for my lord had commaunded him that the prisoner 
should have but one meales mete of the daye. Notwith- 
standyng that the sayde Jhon Belrynger after that he had 
shut Poules church dores, went to the foresaide prisoner, 
with another with him at vii. of the clock at nyght the sayde 
Sondaye. 

And the sayde deponent sayeth, that he came on the 
Monday at the hower of eyghte of the clocke in the moren- 
ynge to seke Jhon Belrynger, and coulde not fynde hym, 
and taryed untyll the hye Masse of Poules was done, and 
yet he coulde not fynde Jhon Belrynger, and than Jhon 
Belryngers felowe, one Wyllyam, delyvered the keyes to 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



1 39 



the sayde deponent, and so the said deponent with two officers 
of my lordes beyng somners went to serve the sayd prisoner, 
and whan they came the prisoner (thei saide) was hanged, 
his face to the wal warde, and upon that the sayde deponent 
immediatly gave knowelege to the chaunceller, wherupon 
the chaunceller went up with the master of the rolles, and 
master Subdeane with other doctoures unknowen, to the 
nomber of a dosen and their servauntes. 

"The deposition of Jhon Enderby Barber. 

The sayde Jhon Enderby sayth, the Frydaye before the 
death of Richard Hun, betwixte viii. and ix. of the clock in 
the morning, he met with Jhon Belrynger in estchepe, and 
asked of hym how master Hun fared, the sayd Belrynger 
aunswered, sayenge : There is ordeyned for hym so 
grevouse penaunce that when men here of it, they shal have 
great marvel therof : wytnesses that hard Jhon Belrynger 
saye these woordes Jhon Rutter Skrevener, and William 
Segar armourer. 

Also the sayd Jhon Enderby sayth, the same Mondaye 
that Rychard Hun was founde ded, he met with the said 
Jhon Belrynger at the condith in gracious strete about ix. of 
the clock in the mornyng, askyng the sayd Belrynger, how 
master Hun fared, the sayde Belrynger aunswered, sayeng, 
he fared well this day in the mornyng betwixte v. and vi. of 
the clock. Howbeit, I am sory for hym for there can no 
body, come to hym untill I come, for I have the keyes of 
the dorees here by my Gyrdell, and shewed keyes to the sayd 
Enderby. 

The deposition of Alen Creswell wax Chaundeler. 

The sayde Alen sayth, that Jhon Grandger servaunte 
with my lorde of London, in my lord of Londons kechyn, at 
such tyme as the sayd Alen was seryng of Huns coffen, that 
Grandger tolde to him that he was present with Jhon Bel- 
rynger the same Sonday at night that Richard was founde 
ded of the morowe whan his kepers set hym in the stockes, 
in so muche the sayde Hun desyred to borow the kepers 
knyfe, and the keper asked him what he would do with 
his knyfe, and answered, I had lever kyll my self than 
to be thus entreted. This deposicion the sayde Alen will 

prove 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[I5H-I5] 



140 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 



prove as farforth as any christen man may, saieng that 
Grandger shewed to hym these wordes of his awne frewyl 
and mynde, without any question or enquiry to hym made 
by the said Alen. Moreover the sayd Alen sayth, that all 
that evenyng Grandger was in great feare. 

The deposition of Richard Horsnayle Bailyfe of the sanctuary 
towne called Good Esture in Essex. 

The sayd Richard saith, the Fryday before Christmas daie 
last past, the one Charles Joseph, somner to my lord of 
London, became a sanctuary man, and the aforesayde Fry- 
daye he regestred his name, the saide Charles sayenge yt 
was for the savegarde of his body, for there be certayne men 
in London so extreme agaynst hym for the deathe of 
Richard Hun, that he dare not abyde in London : Howbeit 
the sayde Charles saithe, he knowlegeth hym selfe gyltles of 
Huns death, for he delivered the keyes to the Chaunceller 
by Huns life, also the saide Bialife sayth, that Charles payd 
the deuty of the sayde regestryng, both to him and syr Jhon 
Studely Vicar. 

The copye of my lorde of Londons Letter sent to 
my lorde Cardinall. 

I beseche your good lordshipp to stande so good lord 
unto my poore chaunceller now in warde, and endited by an 
untrewe quest for the death of Richard Hun, upon the 
onely accusacion of Charles Joseph made by payne and 
duraunce, that by your intercession it may please the kynges 
grace to have the matter duly and sufficiently examined by 
indifferente persones of his discrete counsayll in the presence 
of the parties, or there be any more done in that cause, and 
that upon the innocency of my saide Chaunceller declared, 
it may further please the kynges grace to a ward a plackard 
unto his Atturnay to confesse the sayde enditement to be 
untrewe whan the tyme shall require it, for assured am I if 
my Chaunceller be tryed by any xii. men in London, they 
be so maliciously set. In favorem heretice pravitatis, that 
they wyl cast and condempne any clerke though he were as 
innocent as Abell. guare si poles beate pater adjuva infirmi- 
tates nostras et tibi imperpetuum devincti erimus. Over this in 
most humble wyse I beseche you that I maye have the 

kynges 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



141 



kynges gracious favour, whome I never offended willingly, 
and that by your good meanes I might speke with his grace 
and you, and I with al myne, shall pray for your prosper- 
ouse estate long to continue. 

Your most humble Orator. R. L. 

The Woordes that my lord of London spake before the lordes 
in the parliament chambre. 

Memorandum, that the Byshop of London sayde in the 
parliament chamber, that there was a byll brought to the 
parliamente to make the jury that was charged uppon the 
deathe of Hun true men, and sayde and tooke upon hys 
conscience that they were false perjuried caytyfes, and sayde 
further more too all the Lordes their than beynge : for the 
love of GOD, loke upon this matter, for yf ye do not I dare 
not kepe myne awne house for heretiques: and sayde that the 
saide Rychard Hun hanged hym selfe, and that yt was hys 
awne dede and no mans els. And further more sayde, that 
there came a man to hys howse (whose wyfe was appeched 
of heresye) to speke with hym, and he sayde that he had no 
mynde to speke with the same man, which man spake and 
reported to the servauntes of the same Byshoppe, that yf 
hys wyfe woulde not holde styll her opinion, he woulde 
cutte her throte with his awne handes, with other woordes. 

The sentence of the quest subscribed by the crouner. 

The inquisicion intendid and taken at the citie of London, 
in the Parishe of sainct Gregorie, in the warde of Baynard 
Castel in London the syx daye of December, in the yere and 
reigne of kyng Henry the eight the syx yere, afore Thomas 
Barnewell crouner of our soveraigne lorde the kynge, within 
the Citie of London aforesayed. Also afore James Yarford, 
and Jhon Mondey Sheriffes of the sayed Cytie, uppon the 
sight of the bodie of Rychard Hun late of London Taylour, 
whiche was founde hanged in the Lollars Towre, and by the 
othe and profe of lawfull men of the same warde, and of 
other thre wardes next adjoyning as it ought to bee after 
the custome in the Cytie aforesayed, to enquyre, how, and in 
what manerwise, the sayde Rycharde Hun came unto hys 
death, and upon the othe of Jhon Bernard, Thomas Sterte, 

Willyam 



THE VI. 

YERE 

[1514-15] 



142 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



Willyam Warren, Henry Abraham, Jhon Aborow, Jhon 
Turner, Rebert Alen, Wylliam Marler, Jhon Burton, James 
Page, Thomas Pickehyll, Willyam Burton, Robert Brige- 
water, Thomas Busted, Gilbert Howell, Rychard Gibson, 
Christopher Crofton, Jhon God, Rycharde Holte, Jhon 
Pasmere, Edmonde Hudson, Jhon Aunsell, Rycharde Couper, 
Jhon Tynie, the whiche saied upon their othes, that where 
the saied Rychard Hun, by the commaundement of Rychard, 
byshop of London, was enprisoned and brought to holde in 
a pryson of the sayed byshops, called Lollars Towre lyeng in 
the cathedrall churche of saincte Paule in London, in the 
parishe of saincte Gregorie, in the warde of Baynerde castell 
aforesaied, Willyam Horseley of London clerke, otherwyse 
called Willyam Heresie, Chauncellour to Rycharde byshop 
of London, and one Charles Joseph late of London somner, 
and Jhon Spaldyng of London, otherwyse called Jhon 
belrynger, feloniousely as felons to our lord the kyng, 
with force and armes against the peace of our sovereigne 
lorde the kyng, and dignitie of his croune, the fourthe day 
of December, the yere of the reigne of our sovereigne lorde 
the sixt a foresayed, of their great malice, at the parishe of 
saincte Gregorie aforesayed, uppon the sayed Recharde Hun 
made a fraye, and the same Rycharde Hun felonyously 
strangeled and smodered, and also the necke they did breake 
of the sayed Rycharde Hun, and there feloniously slew hym 
and murthered hym : and also the body of the sayed 
Rycharde Hun afterwarde the same iiii. daye, yere, place, 
paryshe and warde aforesayed, with the proper gyrdell of the 
same Rycharde Hun of sylke, blacke of coloure, of the value 
of xii. pence after his death upon a hoke dryven into a pece 
of tymber in the wall of the pryson aforesayed made faste, 
and so hanged hym againste the peace of oure sovereigne 
lorde the kynge, and the dignitie of hys croune, and so the 
sayed Jury hathe sworne upon the holy Evangelist, that the 
said William Horsey clerke, Charles Joseph, and Jhon 
Spalding of their set malice then, and ther, feloniously 
killed and murthered the sayed Rycharde Hun, in maner 
and forme abovesaied, agaynst the peace of our sovereigne 
lorde the kyng, his croune and dignitie. 
Subscribed in this maner. 

Thomas Barnewell, crouner of the 

citie of London. 

This 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



This Christmas on Newyeres night, the kyng, the duke of 
Suffolke and twoo other in mantels of clothe of sylver, and 
lyned with blew Velvet, the sylver was pounsed in letters, so 
that the Velvet might be sene through, the mantels had great 
capes like to the Portingall slopys, and all their hosen, 
doublettes and cotes were of the same fasshion cut and of 
the same stuffe, with them were foure ladies in gounes, after 
the fasshion of Savoy, of blew Velvet, lyned with clothe, the 
Velvet all to cutt, and mantels lyke tippettes knytte together 
all of sylver and on their heddes bonettes of burned golde, 
the foure torche bearers were in Satyn white and blew. 
This straunge apparell pleased muche every persone, and in 
especiall the Quene, and thus these foure lordes and foure 
ladies came into the Quenes chamber with greate lyght of 
torches, and daunsed a great season, and then put of their 
visers, and then they were wel knowen, and the Quene 
hartely thanked the kynges grace for her goodly pastyme, 
and kyssed hym. 

Lykewyse on the twelve night, the kyng and the Quene 
came into the hall of Grenewyche, and sodaynly entered a 
tent of clothe of golde and before the tent stode foure men 
of armes, armed at all poynctes and swerdes in their handes, 
and sodaynly with noys of trompettes entered foure other 
persons all armed, and ran to the other foure, and there was 
a great and a fearce fight, and sodainly came out of a place 
lyke a wood eight wyldemen, all appareiled in grene mosse, 
made with slyved sylke, with Uggly weapons and terrible 
vysages, and there foughte with the knyghtes eight to eight, 
and after long fyghtyng, the armed knyghtes drave the 
wylde men out of their places, and folowed the chace out of 
the hall, and when they were departed, the tent opened, and 
there came out syx lordes and syx ladyes rychely appareyled, 
and daunsed a greate tyme : when they had daunsed their 
pleasure, they entered the tent agayn and so was conveyed 
out of the hall, and then the kynge and the Quene were 
served with a right sumpteous banquet. 

The third day of Februarie, the kyng made a solempne 
Justes, and he and the Marques Dorset would aunswere all 
commers, their apparell and bardes were of blew Velvet, and 
clothe of sylver, all to cutte in suttell knotes, rychely en- 
broudered, all the servitours in white and blewe sylke. The 
counterparte, whiche were xiiii. in number, rychely appareyled 



in 



THE VI. 
VERB 

[1514-15] 



i 4 4 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[1514-15] 



Cardinal 
Benbrick 
poysoned at 
Rome. 



in Velvet, clothe of golde, and brouderie, every man after 
his awne device. The kyng was that daye hyghly to be 
praysed, for he brake xxiii. speres besyde attayntes, and 
bare doune to ground a man of armes and hys horse : the 
lorde Marques and all other dyd valiauntly, and hadde 
muche prayse, for every man did passyng well, whiche is 
seldome sene in suche a case, but the kyng for a suertie 
exceded all other. 

The iiii. day of October, the kyng removed to Lambeth, 
and on the morowe began the hygh courte of Parliament, 
fyr Thomas Nevel was then speaker, in this parliament was 
diverse actes made, but in especial two, whiche were muche 
spoken of, the one was the acte of apparail, and the other the 
acte of labourers, of these twoo actes was muche commoning 
and much busynes arose, for the labourers would in nowise 
labour by the daye, but all in taske and in greate, and there- 
fore muche trouble fell in the countrey, and in especiall in 
Harvest tyme, for then husbandmen coulde scace get worke- 
men to helpe in their Harvest. This Parliament contynued 
tyll Easter, in the whiche diverse subsidies were graunted to 
the kyng toward his great costes and charges, that he had 
bene at in his vyage Roy all in Fraunce, and after Easter the 
nyne and twenty daye of the moneth of April, the kyng 
deliting to set forth young gentelmen, called Nicholas 
Carew, and Fraunces Bryan, and caused diverse other young 
Gentelmen, to be on the counter parte, and lent to them 
horse and harneys to encourage all youthe to seke dedes of 
armes. This yere died at Rome by poyson as was reported 
the Archebyshop of Yorke and Cardinall, called doctor 
Benbricke, whiche was the kynges Ambassadour there : 
this was a wise man and of a joly courage. The kyng then 
gave the saied Archebishoprike to Thomas Wolsey, then 
bishop of Lyncoln, whiche at that tyme bare all the rule 
aboute the kyng, and what he saied was obeied in all places. 
And when he was once Archebishop he studied day and 
nyght how to be a Cardinall, and caused the kyng and the 
Frenche kyng to write to Rome for hym, and at their 
requestes he obteyned his purpose as you shall here after- 
warde. 

At this tyme was muche commoning, and verely as it 
appered it was entended, that the kyng in person would 
passe the sea to Caleys, and there on the marches of the 

same, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



J 45 



same, the Frenche king and Quene to come and se the kyng 
their brother, and for the same jorney many costly workes 
were wrought, and much ryche apparell provided for, and 
much preparacion made against the next spryng : but death, 
whiche is the last ende of all thynges let this jorney, for 
before the next spring the Frenche kyng dyed at the citie of 
Paris, the first daye of January, when he had bene maried 
Ixxxii. dayes. And when the kyng was advertised of the 
death of the Frenche kyng, he caused a solempne obsequie 
to be song for hym in the cathedral church of s. Paule with a 
costly herse, and many noble men being present. 

And after he sent a letter to comforte the Quene his 
sister, requyryng to knowe her pleasure whither she would 
continue styl in Fraunce or returne into Englande againe. 
And when he was advertysed of her purpose, which was to 
returne into England. He sent the duke of Suffolke, syr 
Richard Wyngfeld, and doctor West with a goodly bande of 
yomen all in blacke to Parys, whiche were well received of 
the newe Frenche kyng Fraunces the first of the name, and 
declared to hym, that according to the covenauntes made at 
the tyme of the mariage betwene kyng Loyes and the ladie 
Marie, sister to the kyng of England, thei demaunded 
to have the sayde queue delivered to them with her dower, 
and shewed their commission for the receite of her. Then 
the counsaill of Fraunce, accordinge to the apointmentes 
assigned her a dower, and the Duke of Suffolke put in 
officers, then she was by endenture delivered to the duke, 
whiche behaved hym selfe so to her, that he obteined her good 
will to be her husband, and therupon he wrote to the kyng 
her brother, mekely besechyng hym of pardon of his request 
and humbly requiring him of his wil and consent, at whiche 
thinge the kyng a while staied, and at the last by the meane 
of the Frenche quene her selfe, and other great frendes on 
the dukes parte : After long suite it was agreed that the 
duke of Suffolke should bring her into England unmaried, 
and at his retorne to mary her in England : but for doubte 
of chaunge he maried her secretely in Parys as was sayde. 



THE 



THE VI. 
YERE 

[I5H-I5] 



VOL, I, 



146 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VII. 
YERE 

[1515-16] 



A maiynge. 



THE SEVENTH YERE. 

AFTER that the duke of Suffolke had receaved the 
Frenche quene with her dower apointed, and all her 
apparell, juels and husholde stuffe delivered, he with 
the quene toke their leave of the Frenche kyng, leaving 
doctor West, nominate byshop of Ely, for the conclusion of 
the newe league to bee made betwene the kyng of England, 
and the newe Frenche kyng called Fraunces the first, and so 
passed thorough Fraunce to Caleis, where she was honourably 
enterteined. And after with greate honoure maried to lorde 
Charles Brandon, duke of Suffolke openly : howbeit, some 
saied he was maried prively before at Parys, in the house of 
Cluigny. Against this mariage many men grudged and saied 
that it was a great losse to the realme that she was not 
maried to the prince of Castell : But the wysest sorte was 
content, considering that if she had bene maried again out 
of the realme, she should have caried much riches with her, 
and now she brought every yere into the realme ix. or x. M. 
markes : but whatsoever the rude people said, the duke 
behaved hym selfe, so that he had bothe the favour of the 
kyng and of the people, his witte and demeanour was 
such. 

i'The kyng and the quene accompanied with many lordes 
and ladies roade to the high grounde of shoters hil to take 
the open ayre, and as they passed by the way, they espied a 
company of tall yomen, clothed all in grene with grene 
whodes and bowes and arrowes, to the number of ii. C. 
Then one of them, whiche called hym selfe Robyn hood, came 
to the kyng, desyryng hym to se his men shote, and the kyng 
was content.;^ Then he whisteled, and all the ii. C. archers 
shot and losed at once, and then he whisteled again, and they 
likewyse shot agayne, their arrowes whisteled by crafte of 
the head, so that the noyes was straunge and great, and 
muche pleased the kyng the quene and all the company. All 
these archers were of the kynges garde and haH thus 
appareled them selves to make solace to the kynge_ v i Then 
Robyn hood desyred the kyng and Quene to come into the 
grene wood, and to se how the outlawes lyve. The kyng 
demaunded of the quene and her ladyes, if they durst 

adventure 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



147 



adventure to go into the wood with so many outlawes. 
Then the quene said, that if it pleased hym, she was 
content, then the homes blewe tyll they came to the wood 
under shoters hill, and there was an Arber made of bowes 
with a hal, and a great chamber and an inner chamber very 
well made and covered with floures and swete herbes, whiche 
the kyng muche praised. Then said Robyn hood, Sir, out- 
lawes brekefastes is venyson, and therefore you must be 
content with such fare as we use.| Then the kyng and 
quene sate doune, and were served with venyson and vyne 
by Robyn hood and his men, to their great contentacion. 
Then the kyng departed and his company, and Robyn hood 
and his men them conduicted, and as they were returnyng, 
there met with them two ladyes in a ryche chariot drawen 
with v. horses and every horse had his name on his head, and 
on every horse sat a lady with her name written. On the 
first courser called Cawde, sate humidite, or humide. On the 
ii courser called Memeon, roade lady vert. On the iii. called 
pheton, sate lady vegetave. On the iiii. called Rimphon, sate 
lady pleasaunce. On the v. called lam-pace, sate swete odour, 
and in the Chayre sate the lady May, accompanied with lady 
Flora, richely appareled, and they saluted the kyng with 
diverse goodly songes, and so brought hym to Grenewyche. 
At this Maiyng was a greate number of people to beholde 
to their great solace and confort. 

The same after none, the kyng, the duke of Suffolke, the 
Marques dorset, and the erle of Essex, their bardes and 
bases of grene velvet and clothe of golde, came into the 
fielde on great coursers, on whom wayted diverse gentelmen 
in silke of the same colour. On the other side entred xvi. 
lordes and gentelmen, all appareiled richely after their 
devises, and so valiauntly they ranne their courses ap- 
pointed : and after that they ran volant one as fast as he 
might overtake another, whiche was a goodly sight to se : 
and when al was done they departed, and went to a goodly 
banquet. 

This Sommer the kyng toke his progresse Westward, and 
visited his tounes and castels there, and hard the com- 
plaintes of his pore comminaltie, and ever as he roade, he 
hunted and liberally departed with venyson : and in the 
middes of September he came to his maner of Oking, and 
thether came to hym the Archebyshop of Yorke, whom 

he 



THE VII. 
YERE 

[1515-16] 



148 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VII. 
YERE 

[1515-16] 



The 

Cardinals hat 
receaved. 



he hartely welcommed and shewed him great pleasures : And 
while he sojourned there, a letter was brought to the Arch- 
byshop from Rome, certefiyng him howe he was elected to 
be a Cardinal!, whiche incontinent shewed the same to the 
kyng, disabling him self in wordes, though his entent was 
otherwise, and so the king did encourage him, and willed 
him to take the order on him, and so called him my lorde 
Cardinall, but his hat, bul nor other ceremonies were not yet 
come. 

In the moneth of November, the kyng assembled his 
hygh courte of Parliament at Westmynster, and diverse 
actes made in the Parliament the vi. yere, amended and 
altered, and especially the acte of apparell, and the acte of 
labourers, as by the booke of statutes more playnly apereth. 
And at the ende of this Parliament, the Archebyshop of 
Cauntourbury perceaving that the Archebyshop of Yorke 
medled more in his office of Chauncelourship then it became 
hym to suffer, except he would aventure the kynges dis- 
pleasure, and seing also that the said byshop of Yorke 
coveted to beare all the rule, and to have all the whole 
aucthoritie, consideryng also his awne great age, gave up 
into the kynges handes his rowme of Chauncelour, and 
delivered to the kyng the great Seale, whiche delivered the 
same to the Archebyshop of Yorke, and made hym 
Chauncelour. And assone as he was Chauncelour, he 
directed commissions into all Shires, for to put the statute 
of apparell and the statute of labourers in execucion. And 
he hym selfe one daye called a gentelman named Symon fyz 
Richard, and toke from hym an olde Jacket of Crymosyn 
velvet and diverse broches, whiche extreme doinge caused 
hym greatly to be hated, and by his exsample many cruell 
officers for malice, evell intreated dyverse of the kynges 
subjectes, in so muche that one Shynnyng Mayre of 
Rochester, set a young man on the Pillory for weryng of 
a ryven shert. 

In the ende of this moneth was sent into Englande the 
Cardinalles hat, and receaved by gentelmen of Kent, and 
brought to London with suche triumphe as though the 
greatest prince of Christendome had bene come into the 
realme. And on a Sonday at s. Peters church at Westminster 
he receaved the habite, hat, and piller, and other vaynglorious 
tryfles, apperteignyng to the order of a Cardinal. And when 

he 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



149 



he was once a perfite Cardinal!, he loked then above all 
estates, so that all men almost hated hym, and disdayned 
hym. 

Then after the Parliament sir Edward pouninges laboured 
to be discharged of the keping of the citie of Torney, for 
there he was ever sickly, and so he was discharged, and sir 
William blunt lord Mountjoye was sent thether. And for 
Marshal there was apointed sir Sampson Norton. And 
when the lord Mountjoye was come thether, and sir Sampson 
Norton, there happened such a ryot that the citie was in 
great jeopardy, the very cause was unknowen, but all the 
souldioure, except such as were of the kynges garde rebelled, 
and put the lord Mountjoye in jeopardy of his lyfe. And in 
conclusion to appease the people, sir Sampson Norton was 
banisshed the toune for ever. And after the citie was 
appeased, and every thing thought to be forgotten, diverse 
were executed, and diverse banished the toune and some fled 
and were banyshed both England and the toune. 

After the Parliament was ended, the king kept a solempne 
Christmas at his maner of Eltham, and on the xii. night in 
the hall was made a goodly castel, wonderously set out, and 
in it certeyn ladies and knightes, and when the kyng and 
quene were set, in came other knightes, and assailed the 
castel where many a good strype was geven, and at the last 
the assaylantes were beaten awaye. And then issued out 
knightes and ladies out of the castel, whiche ladyes were 
ryche and straungely disguysed, for all their apparell was 
in braydes of Gold, fret with moving spangels, sylver and 
gilt, set on Crymosyn satyn lose and not fastened : the 
mens apparell of the same suyte made like Julis of 
Hungary, and the ladyes heddes and bodies were after 
the fassion of Amsterdam, and when the daunsyng was 
done, the banquet was served in of ii. C. dyshes, with 
great plenty to every body. 

This yere was the new league betwene the kyng and the 
Frenche kyng openly proclaymed thorough the citie of 
London with a trompet. This yere also, Margaret quene 
of the Scottes, wife to James the iiii. slayn at Bramston the 
v. yere of the kyng, and elder syster to the kyng, after the 
death of her late husbande maried Archiball Douglas erle of 
Angus, without the kyng her brothers assent, or the counsail 
of Scotland, for the whiche he was not well content. But 

after 



THE VII. 
YERE 

[1515-16] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VII. 
YERE 

[1515-16] 



after that, there fell such a strife betwene the lordes of 
Scotland, that she and her husband like banished persones 
came into England, and wrote to the kyng for mercy and 
comfort. The kyng ever enclyned to mercy, sent theim 
apparell, vessell and all thynges necessary, willyng them to 
lye still in Northumberland, till they knewe farther of his 
pleasure : And so they laye still at Harbotell, and the quene 
was there delivered of a faire lady called Margaret, and all the 
countrey were commaunded by the kyng to do them pleasure. 

This yere the xviii. of February, at Grenewiche was 
borne a faire princes and christened with great solempnitie, 
and named Mary. 

This yere died the kyng of Arragon father to the quene, 
for whome was kept a solempne obsequy in the Cathedrall 
churche of Paules. 



THE EIGHT YERE. 

E have harde the last yere how the quene of Scottes 
with her husband was come for succour into 



Y 

England, and laye at Harbottell in Northumber- 
land, tyl the kynges pleasure was to send for them. So 
he, lyke a natural brother sent for her and her husband 
to come to hys courte for their solace. For the whiche 
kyndnes the erle Humbly thanked the kyng, and promised 
to geve his attendaunce on the quene his wife to the court : 
wherupon the kyng sent William blacknal esquier, clerke 
of his Spycery with sylver vessell, plate and other thynges 
necessary for the conveyaunce of her, and sent to her all 
maner of officers for her estate convenient. And when she 
was ready to departe, she asked for her husbande, but he 
was departed into Scotland, and left her alone, nothing 
remembring his promes, which sodeyn departyng muche 
made her to muse : Howbeit, the lordes of Englande 
greatly encouraged her to kepe her promyse with the 
kynge her brother : and so after she was somewhat 
appeased, she set forward, and in every toune she was well 
receaved, and so on the iii. day of May she made her entry 
into London, riding on a white palfrey (which the quene of 
England had sent to her) behind sir Thomas par richely 
besene, and with great company of lordes and ladies, she 

roade 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



roade thorough the citie to Baynardes castel, and from 
thence she was conveighed to Grenewiche, and there 
received joyously of the kyng, the quene, the Frenche 
quene her syster, and highly was she feasted. And when 
the kyng hearde that the Erie of Angus her husbande was 
departed, he saied, it was done like a Scot. This Quene 
sometyme was at the courte, and sometyme at Baynardes 
castell, and so she continued in Englande all this yere. 

The kyng for the honoure of hys syster, the xix. and xx. 
day of Maye prepared ii. solempne dates of Justes, and the 
kyng him selfe, and the duke of Suffolke, the erle of Essex, 
and Nicholas Carew esquyer, toke on them to aunswere al 
commers. The apparel of them and their horses was blacke 
velvet, covered al over with braunches of hony suckels of 
fine flat gold of dammaske, of lose worke, every lefe of the 
braunche moving, the embroudery was very connyng and 
sumpteous. On the kyng was attending in one suyte on 
horsebacke, the lorde Marques dorset, the erle of Surrey, 
the lord Burgainy, the lord Hastinges, sir Jhon pechy, the 
lord Ferreys, sir William Fitzwilliam, and xii. other knightes, 
all these were in frockes of blewe velvet, garded with ryche 
clothe of golde, and their horse trappers of blew velvet, 
frynged with golde : And on foote were xl. persons all in blew 
satyn, garded with clothe of golde. And so they entered the 
fielde with trompettes, dronslades and other mynstrelsey. 

Then in came the counterpart, richely appareled, to the 
number of xii. and on that daye every man did well, but the 
kyng did best, and so was adjudged, and so at night they 
ceassed, and came to supper. 

The kyng, the next day and his company were appareiled 
horse and al in purple velvet, set ful of leaves of clothe of 
gold, engrailed with fyne flat golde of dammaske, em- 
broudered like to Rose leves, and every lefe fastened to 
other with pointes of dammaske golde, and on al their 
borders were letters of gold, bullion. And on the kyng 
wayted v. lordes xiiii. knightes in frockes of yelow velvet, 
garded and bound with riche clothe of gold, and xxx. gentel- 
men were in like apparell on fote, and xl. officers in yelow 
satyn edged with clothe of gold : thus with great triumphe 
thei entred the fielde. Then the cuntrepartie entred, al 
clothed and barded in white satyn, traversed with clothe of 
golde richely. This day was many a great stripe geven. 

The 



THE VIII. 
YERE 

[1516-17] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VIII. 
YERE 

[1516-17] 



The kyng and sir William kyngston ranne together, whiche 
sir William was a strong and a tall knight, and yet the kyng 
by strength overthrew hym to the ground. And after that 
the kyng and his aides had perfourmed their courses, they 
ranne volant at al commers, whiche was a plesaunt sight to 
se. And when night approched, they al disarmed them, and 
went to the quenes chamber, where was a great banket for 
the welcome of the quene of Scottes. 

This moneth of May were sent out of England xii. C. 
masons and Carpenters, and iii. hundred labourers to the 
citie of Torney : for the kyng and his counsaill, consideryng 
that the garrison that was kept there, was chargeable, and 
therfore it was determined that there should be builded a 
Castell to chastice the citie if they rebelled, and to minishe 
the garrison. And therfore these worckemen were sent 
thether, whiche this yere began a strong Castell, and wrought 
still on it. 

This yere, by the Cardinall, were all men called to accompt 
that had the occupiyng of the kynges money in the warres or 
els where, not to every mans contentacion, for some were 
found in arterages, and some saved them selfes by policy 
and brybory, and waxed ryche, and some Innocentes were 
punished. And for a truthe he so punished perjury with 
open punyshment and open papers weryng, that in his tyme 
it was lesse used. He punyshed also lordes, knyghtes, and 
men of all sortes for ryottes, beryng and maintenaunce in 
their countreis, that the pore men lyved quietly, so that no 
man durst beare for feare of imprisonement : but he him self 
and his servauntes, whiche were well punished therfore. The 
pore people perceaved that he punished the ryche, then they 
complayned without number, and brought many an honest 
man to trouble and vexacion. And when the Cardinall at 
the last had perceaved their untrue surmises and fayned 
complaintes for the moste parte, he then wexed wery of 
hearyng their causes, and ordeined by the kynges com- 
mission, diverse under courtes to herei complaintes by bill of 
poore people. The one was kept in the white hall, the other 
before the kynges Almoner doctor Stokesley, a man that had 
more learnyng then descrecion to be a judge. The third 
was kept in the lord treasourers chamber beside the starre 
chamber, and the iiii. at the rolles at after none. These 
courtes were greatly haunted for a tyme, but at the last the 

people 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



people perceaved that much delay was used in these courtes, 
and few matters ended, and when they were ended, they 
bound no man by the law, then every man was wery of 
them and resorted to the common law. 

In the moneth of October came into Englande Mathew 
Byshop of Sedonon and Cardinall, called commonly the 
Cardinal of Swyshes, from the Emperour Maximilian. This 
Cardinal was a wise man and of great boldenes, and was wel 
entreteined in the court and of the kyng. And at his con- 
templacion and for old love, the kyng lent to the Emperour 
Maximilian a great summe of money : wherof the company 
of Friscobalde, and Antony Caveler Genevoy undertoke 
thexchange, but they paied not the Emperour at his day, 
not withstanding thei had receaved the money of the kyng. 
This Friscobald and Antony Caveler by meanes of rewardes, 
geven to great lordes of the counsail borowed of the king 
xxx. M.i. and had long daies for the paiment : but Fris- 
cobald was shortely consumed, and Anthony Caveler could 
not be sene, and so the kyng was not payd at his daies, and 
many English merchauntes were by these men undone, for 
they spent liberally of every mans goodes. 

This yere the kyng kept his Christmas at his maner of 
Grenewiche, and on the xii. night, according to the old 
custome, he and the quene came into the hal, and when 
they were set, and the quene of Scottes also, there entred in 
to the hall a Gardeyn artificiall, called the Gardeyn of 
Esperance. This Gardeyn was towred at every corner, and 
railed with railes gilt, all the bankes were set with floures 
artificial of silke and gold, the leves cut of grene sattyn, so 
that they semed very floures. In the middest of this 
Gardeyn was a piller of antique worke, al gold set with 
perle and stone, and on the toppe of the piller, which was 
vi. square, was a lover or an arche embowed, crouned with 
gold : within whiche stode a bushe of Roses red and white, al 
of sylke and golde, and a bushe of Pomegranates of like 
stuf. In this gardeyn walked vi. knightes and vi. ladyes 
rychely appareyled, and then they discended and daunsed 
many goodly daunses, and so ascended the gardeyn agayne, 
and were conveighed out of the hal, and then the kyng was 
served of a great banket. After this Christmas, the kyng 
exercysed hym selfe muche in hawkyng. 

In this ceason, the Genowayes, Frenchemen and other 

straungers 

VOL. I. 



THE VIII. 
YERE 

[1516-17] 



U 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VIII. 
YERE 

[1516-17] 



The pryde of 
Frenchemen. 



straungers sayde and boasted them selfes to be in suche 
favoure with the kyng and hys counsaill, that they set 
naughte by the rulers of the citie : And the multitude of 
straungers was so great about London, that the pore 
Englishe artificers coulde skace get any living : And most 
of all the straungers were so proude, that they disdained, 
mocked and oppressed the Englishemen, whiche was the 
beginning of the grudge. For amonge all other thynges, 
there was a Carpenter in London called Willyamson, whiche 
bought two stockedoves in Chepe, and as he was about to 
paye for them, a Frencheman toke them oute of his hande, 
and said they were no meate for a Carpenter : well said the 
Englysheman I have bought them and now payed for them, 
and therfore I will have them, naye saied the Frencheman 
I wil have them for my lorde the Ambassadour, and so 
for better or worse, the Frencheman called the Englishe- 
man knave, and went a waye with the stockdoves. The 
straungers came to the Frenche Ambassadour, and surmysed 
a complainte againste the poore carpenter, and the Ambas- 
sadour came to my lorde Maire, and said so muche, that the 
carpenter was sent to prison : and yet not contented with 
this, so complayned to the kynges counsail, that the kynges 
commaundement was layde on hym. And when syr Jhon 
Baker knyght and other worshipful persones sued to the 
Ambassadour for him, he aunswered, by the body of God 
that the Englyshe knave shoulde lose his lyfe, for he saied 
no Englysheman shoulde deny that the Frenchemen required, 
and other aunswere had they none. 

Also a Frencheman that had slayne a man, should abjure 
the realme and had a crosse in his hande, and then sodeynly 
came a greate sorte of Frenchemen about hym, and one of 
them said to the Constable that led him, syr is this crosse the 
price to kyll an Englisheman. The Constable was somwhat 
astonied and aunswered not. Then said another Frenche- 
man, on that pryce we would be banyshed all by the masse, 
thys saiyng was noted to be spoken spitefully. Howebeit, 
the Frenchemen were not all onely oppressors of the 
Englyshemen, for a Lombarde called Fraunces de bard, 
entised a mannes wyfe in Lombarde strete to come to his 
chambre with her husbandes plate, whyche thynge she dyd. 
After when her husbande knewe it, he demaunded his wyfe, 
but aunswere was made he shoulde not have her, then he 

demaunded 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



demaunded his plate, and in lyke maner aunswere was made 
that he shoulde neither have plate nor wyfe. And when he 
had sewed an accion against the straunger in the Guylde 
hall, the straunger so faced the Englisheman, that he faynted 
in his sute. And then the Lombarde arrested the poore 
man for his wyfes boorde, while he kept her from her 
husbande in his chamber. This mocke was muche noted, 
and for these and many other oppressions done by them, 
there encreased suche a malice in the English mennes hartes, 
that at the last it brast oute. For amongest other that sore 
grudged at these matters, there was a broker in London 
called Jhon Lyncoln, whiche wrote a byll before Easter, 
desyryng doctor Standiche at hys Sermon at saint Marye 
Spyttell the Mondaye in Easter weke, too move the Mayre 
and Aldermen, to take parte with the comminaltie agaynste 
the straungers : The Doctor aunswered that it became not 
hym too move anye suche thinge in a Sermon. From hym 
he departed, and came to a Chanon in sainct Mary Spittell, 
a doctor in Devinitie, called doctor Bele, and lamentably 
declared to hym, howe miserably the common artificers 
lyved, and skase coulde get any woorke to fynde them, their 
wyfes and chyldren, for there were such a number of arti- 
ficers straungers, that tooke awaye all the lyvynge in maner. 
And also howe the Englyshe marchauntes could have no 
utteraunce, for the marchaunt straungers brynge in all 
Silkes, clothes of Golde, Wyne, Oyle, Iron, and suche other 
marchaundyse, that no man almoste byethof an Englyshman. 
And also outwarde, they carye so muche Englyshe Wolle, 
Tynne, and Leade, that Englyshmen that aventure outwarde 
can have no lyvyng : Whiche thynges saied Lyncoln hathe 
bene shewed to the counsaill, and cannot be heard. And 
farther sayed he, the straungers compasse the cytie rounde 
aboute, in Southwarke, in Westminster, Temple barre, 
Holborne, Sayncte Martynes, Sayncte Jhons strete, Algate, 
Towre hyll, and Sainct Katherines, and forstall the market, 
so that no good thynge for them commeth to the market : 
Whiche is the cause that Englyshe men want and sterve, and 
they lyve habundauntly in great pleasure. Wherefore sayed 
Lyncolne master Doctor, syth you were borne in London, 
and se the oppression of the straungers, and the great 
misery of your awne natyve countrey, exhorte all the 
cytezens to joyne in one against these straungers, raveners 

and 



THE VIII. 
YERE 

[1516-17] 



'56 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE VIII. 
YERE 

[1516-17] 



and destroyers of your countrey. Master doctor hearynge 
this, saied he muche lamented the case if it were as 
Lyncolne hadde declared, yes sayde Lyncolne, that it is 
and muche more, for the Duchemen bryng over Iron, 
Tymber, lether and Weynskot ready wrought, as Nayles, 
Lockes, Baskettes, Cubbordes, Stooles, Tables, Chestes, 
girdels, with pointes, saddles and painted clothes so that if 
it were wrought here, Englishemen might have some worke 
and lyvynge by it. And besyde this, they growe into suche 
a multitude that it is to be looked upon, for I sawe on a 
Sondaye this Lent vi. C. straungers shotyng at the Popyngaye 
with Crosbowes, and they kepe suche assemblies and frater- 
nities together, and make suche a gathering to their common 
bore, that every botcher wil holde plee with the citie of 
London : wel sayd the doctor, I will do for a reformacion 
of this matter asmuche as a priest may do, and so receaved 
Lincolnes byll and studied for his purpose. Then Lyncoln 
very joyous of hys enterpryce went from man to man, saiyng 
that shortly they shoulde heare newes, and dayly excited 
younge people and artificers to beare malice to the 
straungers. When Easter came and doctor Bele shoulde 
preache the Tuesdaye in Easter weke, he came into the 
pulpit, and there declared that to hym was brought a 
pitifull byll, and red in this wyse. To all you the worshyp- 
full lordes and masters of the cytie that will take compassion 
over the pore people your neighbours, and also of the greate 
importable hurtes, losses, and hynderaunces, whereof pro- 
ceadeth the extreme povertie too all the kynges subjectes 
that inhabite within this cytie and suburbes of the same, for 
so it is that the alyens and straungers eate the bread from the 
poore fatherles chyldren, and take the livynge from all the 
artificers, and the entercourse from all merchauntes, wherby 
povertie is so muche encreased that every man bewaileth the 
misery of other, for craftes men be brought to beggery and 
merchauntes to nedynes : Wherefore the premisses con- 
sidered, the redresse muste be of the commons, knyt and 
unite to one parte, and as the hurt and dammage greveth all 
men, so muste all men set to their willyng power for remedy, 
and not to suffre the sayed alyens so highly in their wealth, 
and the naturall borne men of his region too come to 
confusion. Of this letter was more, but the doctor red no 
farther, and then he began Ccelum cosli domino, terram autem 

dedit 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



deditfiliis hominum, and upon this text he intreated, that this 
ande was geven too Englishemen, and as byrdes woulde 
defende their nest, so oughte Englishemen to cheryshe and 
defende them selfes, and to hurte and greve aliens for the 
common weale. And upon this text pugna pro f atria, he 
brought in, howe by Goddes lawe it was lawfull to fyght for 
their countrey, and ever he subtellie moved the people to 
rebelle against the straungers, and breake the kynges peace, 
nothynge regardynge the league betwene prynces and the 
kynges honoure. Of thys Sermon many a light person 
tooke courage, and openly spake agaynste straungers. 
And as the devell woulde, the Sunday after at Grenewyche 
in the kynges gallery was Fraunces de Bard, whiche as you 
hearde kept an Englishe mans wife and his goodes, and yet 
he could have no remedy, and with hym were Domyngo, 
Anthony Caveler, and many mo straungers, and there they 
talkynge with syr Thomas Palmer knyght, Jested and 
laughed howe that Fraunces kepte the Englishemans wyfe, 
saiyng that if they had the Mayres wyfe of London, they 
would kepe her : syr Thomas sayed, Sirs you have to muche 
favour in England. There were diverse Englishe merchauntes 
by, and hearde them laugh and were not content, in so muche 
one William bolt a Mercer sayed, wel you whoreson 



as 



Lombardes, you rejoyse and laugh, by the masse we will 
one daye have a daye at you, come when it wyll, and that 
saiynge the other merchauntes affirmed. This tale was 
reported aboute London, and the younge and evell disposed 
people sayed, they woulde be revenged on the merchaunte 
straungers, aswell as on the artificers straungers. On 
Monday the morow after, the kyng removed to hys maner 
of Rychemonde. 

THE IX. YERE. 

UPON this rumour the xxviii. daye of Aprill, diverse 
younge men of the citie assauted the Alyens as they 
passed by the stretes, and some were striken, and 
some buffeted, and some throwen in the canel. Wherfore 
the Mayre sent diverse persons to ward, as Stephyn Studley 
skynner, and Bettes and Stephenson and diverse other, some 
to one counter, and some to another, and some to Newgate. 
Then sodeynly was a commen secret rumour, and no man 

could 



THE VIII. 
YERE 

[1516-17] 



"58 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IX. 
YERE 

[1517-18] 



could tell how it began, that on May daye next, the citie 
would" rebell and slaye all Aliens, in so muche as diverse 
straungers fled oute of the citie. This brute ranne so 
farre that it came to the kinges counsail, insomuch as the 
Cardinall beyng lord Chauncelour, sent for Jhon Rest Mayre 
of the citie, and other of the counsayl of the citie, and 
demaunded of the Mayre in what case the citie stode, to 
whome he aunswered that it was wel and in good quyet : 
Nay sayd the Cardinall, it is informed us that your young 
and ryotous people wyll ryse and distresse the straungiers, 
heare ye of no such thing ? No surely sayd the Mayre, and 
I trust so to governe them that the kynges peace shalbe 
observed, and that I dare undertake yf I and my brethren 
the Aldermen may be suffered. Wel said the Cardinal, go 
home and wisely forsee this matter, for and yf any suche 
thing be, you may shortly prevent it. The Mayre came 
from the Cardinals at iiii. of the clocke at after none on 
May even, and demaunded of the officers what they harde, 
diverse of them aunswered that the voyce of the people was 
so, and had ben so ii. or iii. dayes before. This heryng the 
Mayre sent for al his brethren to the Guylde hall in great 
hast, and almost vii. of the clocke or the assemble was set. 
Then was declared to them by Master broke the recorder 
how that the kynges counsail had reported to them that the 
comminaltie that night would ryse, and distresse al the Aliens 
and straungers that inhabited in the citie of London : the 
Aldermen aunswered they harde say so, but they mistrusted 
not the matter, but yet they sayd that it was wel done to 
forsee it. Then sayd the recorder, it were best that a sub- 
stancial watche were set of honest persons, housholders, 
whiche might withstand the evell doers. An Alderman 
sayde, that it was evell to rayse men in harneys, for if suche 
a thinge were entended, they coulde not tel who woulde 
take their parte. Another Alderman sayd, that it were best 
to kepe the younge men asonder, and every man to shut in 
hys doores, and to kepe hys servauntes within. Then with 
these opinions was the Recorder sent to the Cardinal before 
viii. of the clocke, and then he with suche as were of the 
kynges counsayll at his place, commaunded that in no 
wyse watche shoulde be kept, but that every man shoulde 
repayre to his awne house, and there to kepe hym and 
hys servauntes tyl vii. of the clocke of the mornynge : 

with 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



with whiche commaundement, the sayde Rycharde brooke 
sergeaunt at the lawe and recorder, and syr Thomas Moore, 
late undershrife of London, and then of the kynges coun- 
saill, came to the Guylde hall halfe houre and before ix. of 
the clocke, and there shewed the commaundement, of the 
kynges counsayl. Then in all hast, every Aldermen sent to 
his warde that no man should styrre after ix. of the clocke 
out of his house, but to kepe his doores shut, and hys 
servauntes within tyll vii. of the clocke in the mornynge. 
After this commaundement, syr Jhon Mondy Alderman 
came from his warde, and founde two young men in Chepe 
plaiynge at Buckerels, and a great company of young men 
lokynge on them for the commaundement was then skace 
knowen, for then it was but ix. of the clocke. Master 
Mondy seyng that, bade them leave, and the one younge 
man asked hym why ? and then he sayd thou shalt know, 
and toke hym by the arme to have had him to the counter. 
Then all the young men resisted the Alderman, and toke 
him from master Mondy, and cryed prentyses and clubbes. 
Then out at every doore came clubbes and weapons and the 
Alderman fled, and was in great daungier. Then more 
people arose out of every quarter, and oute came servynge 
men, and water men and Courtiers, and by a xi. of the 
clocke there were in Chepe vi. or vii. hundreth. And oute 
of Paules churcheyarde came iii. hundreth, whiche wist not 
of the other, and so out of all places they gathered, and 
brake up the counteryes, and tooke out the prisoners, that 
the Mayre had thether committed for hurtynge of the 
straungers, and came to Newgate and tooke out Studley and 
Petyt, committed thether for that cause. The Mayre and 
Shrifes were there present, and made Proclamacion in the 
kynges name, but nothynge was obeyed. Thus they ranne 
a plump thorow sainct Nycholas Shambels, and at saynct 
Martyns gate, there met with them syr Thomas Moore and 
other, desyrynge theym to go to their lodgynges : And as 
they were intreatyng, and had almost brought them to a 
staye : The people of saynct Martynes threwe oute stones 
and battes, and hurte dyverse honest persones, that were 
perswadynge the ryotous people to ceasse, and they bade 
theim holde their handes, but still they threwe oute bryckes 
and hoate water. Then a sergeaunt of Armes called 
Nycholas dounes, whiche was there with master Moore, 

entreatynge 



THE IX. 
YERE 

[1517-18] 



Evel may- 
day. 



i6o 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IX. 
YERE 

[1517-18] 



entreatynge them, beynge sore hurt, in a fury cryed doune 
with them. Then all the misruled persons ranne to the 
doores and wyndowes of saynct Martyn, and spoyled all 
that they founde, and caste it into the strete, and lefte fewe 
houses unspoyled. And after that they ranne hedlynge into 
Cornehill by Leaden hal, to the house of one Mutuas a 
Frencheman or Pycardy borne, whiche was a greate bearer 
of Frenchemen, were they pyckpursses, or howe evell dis- 
position soever they were of, and within hys gate, called 
Grenegate, dwelled dyverse Frenchmen that kalendred 
Worsted, contrary to the kynges lawes : and al thei were 
so borne out by the same Mutuas, that no man durst medle 
with them, wherfore he was sore hatet, and yf the people 
had found hym in their fury, they would have striken of his 
head : but when they found hym not, the water men, and 
certeyn young priestes that were there fell to riflynge : 
some ranne to Blanchechapelton, and brake the straungers 
houses, and threwe shooes and bootes into the strete : This 
from x. or xi. of the clocke, continued these ryotous people, 
durynge whiche tyme a knight called syr Thomas parr, in 
great hast went to the Cardinall and tolde him of thys ryot, 
which incontinent strengthened his house with men and 
ordinaunce. And after, this knight roade to the king to 
Richemond, and made the report much more then it was : 
Wherfore the king hastely sent to London, and was truly 
advertised of the matter, and how that the ryot was ceassed, 
and many of the doers apprehended. But while this ruffling 
continued, syr Richard Cholmeley knight, Lieutenaunt of 
the Towre, no great frende to the citie, in a frantyke 
fury losed certayn peces of ordinaunce, and shot into the 
citie, whiche did litle harme, howbeit his good wyl apered. 
About iii. of the clocke, these ryotous persons severed and 
went to their places of resorte, and by the waye they were 
taken by the Mayre and the heddes of the citie, and some 
sent to the Towre, and some to Newgate, and some to the 
Counters, to the number of iii. C. some fled, and specially 
the watermen and priestes, and servyng men, but the poore 
prentises were taken. About fyve of the clocke, the erles 
of Shrewesbury and Surrey, whiche had harde of this ryot, 
came to London with suche strength as they had, so dyd the 
Innes of court, and diverse noble men : but or they came, 
all the ryot was ceased, and many taken as you have heard. 

Then 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



161 



Then were the prisoners examined, and the sermon of 
docter Bele called to remembraunce, and he taken and sent 
to the Towre, and so was Jhon Lyncoln : but with this ryot 
the Cardinall was sore displeased. Then the iiii. day of 
May was an Oyer and determiner at London before the 
Mayre, the duke of Norffolke, the erle of Surrey and other. 
The citie thought that the duke bare them grudge for a 
lewde priest of his, which the yere before was slayn in Chepe, 
in so much the duke then in his fury sayd, I pray God 
I may once have the citezens in my daungier : and the duke 
also thought that they bare him no good wil, wherfore he 
came into the citie with xiii. C. men in harneys to kepe the 
Oyer and determiner. And upon examinacion it could 
never be proved of any metyng, gathering, talking or con- 
venticle at any daye or tyme before that day, but that the 
chaunce so happened without any matter prepensed of any 
creature saving Lyncoln and never an honest person in 
maner was taken but onely he. Then Proclamacions were 
made that no women shoulde come together to bable and 
talke, but all men should kepe their wyves in their houses. 
All the stretes that were notable stode ful of harnessed men, 
which spake many opprobrious wordes to the citezens, whiche 
greved theim sore : and yf they woulde have bene revenged, 
the other had had the worsse, for the citezens were ii. C. 
to one : but lyke true subjectes they suffered paciently. 

When the lordes were set, the prisoners were brought in 
thorough the stretes tyed in ropes, some men, some laddes, 
some chyldren of xiii. yere. There was a great mournyng 
of fathers and frendes for their chyldren and kynsfolke. 
Emong the prisoners many were not of the citie, some were 
priestes, and some husbandmen and laborers, the whole 
some of the prisoners were ii. C. Ixxviii. persons. The cause 
of the treason was, because the kyng had amitie with all 
Christen princes, that they had broken the truce and league, 
contrary to the statute of kyng Henry the V. Of this 
treason diverse were endited, and so for that tyme the lordes 
departed. And the next day the duke came agayn, and the 
erle of Surrey with ii. M. armed men, which kept the stretes. 
When the Mayre, the duke, and the erle of Shrewsbury 
and Surrey were set, the prisoners were arreigned, and xiii. 
founde giltye of high treason, and adjuged to be hanged, 
drawen and quartered, and for execucion wherof, were set 

up 



THE IX. 
YERE 

[1517-18] 



VOL. t. 



162 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IX. 
YERE 

[1517-18] 



up xi. payre of galowes in diverse places where the offences 
were done, as at Algate, at Blanchechapelton, Gracious 
strete, Leaden hal, and before every counter one, and at 
Newgate, at s. Martens, at Aldrisgate, at Bishops gate. 
This sight sore greved the people to se galowes set in the 
kynges chamber. Then were the prysoners that were 
judged, brought to the places of execucion, and executed 
in most rigorous maner, for the lord Edmond haward sonne 
to the duke of Northfolke, and knight Mershal shewed no 
mercy, but extreme cruelty to the poore yongelinges in their 
execucion, and likewise the dukes servauntes spake many 
opprobrious wordes, some bad hange, some bad drawe, some 
bad set the citie on fyer, but all was suffred. 

On Thursday the vii. day of May was Lyncoln, Shyrwyn, 
and two brethren called Bets, and diverse other adjudged to 
dye. Then Lyncoln said, my lordes, I meant well, for and 
you knew the mischief that is ensued in this realme by 
straungers, you would remedy it, and many tymes I have 
complained, and then I was called a busy felow : now our 
lord have mercy on me. Then all the sayd persons were 
layd on the hardels, and drawen to the standarde in Chepe, 
and first was Jhon Lyncoln executed, and as the other had 
the rope about their neckes, there came a commaundement 
from the kyng to respite execucion. Then the people cried, 
God save the king. Then was the Oyer and determiner 
deferred tyll another daye, and the prisoners sent agayn to 
warde, and the harnessed men departed oute of London, and 
all thynges quyet. 

The xi. daye of Maye the kynge came to his maner of 
Grenewiche, where the recorder of London and diverse Alder- 
men came to speake with his grace, and al ware gounes of 
black coloure. And when they perceaved the king comming 
out of his privie chambre into his chambre of presence, they 
kneled doune, and the recorder sayd : Our most natural, 
beninge and sovereigne lorde, we knowe well that your 
grace is displeased with us of your citie of London for the 
great ryot late done : we assertein your grace that none 
of us, nor no honest person were condiscendynge to that 
enormitie, and yet we, oure wyfes and chyldren every houre 
lament that your favour shoulde be taken from us, and for- 
asmuche as light and ydle persones were the doers of the 
same, we moost humbly beseche your grace to have mercy 

of 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



163 



of us for our negligence, and compassion of the offendours 
for their offence and trespasse. 

Truly sayd the kyng, you have highly displeased and 
offended us, and ye oughte to wayle and be sory for the 
same, and where ye saye that you the substanciall persons 
were not consentyng to the same, it appereth to the con- 
trary, for you never moved to let theim, nor sturred once 
to fyght with theim, whiche you saye were so small a nombre 
of light persones, wherefore we must thynke, and you can- 
not deny, but you dyd wyncke at the matter, but at this 
tyme we wyll graunt to you neither our favor nor good will, 
nor to thoffenders mercy, but resort to the Cardinall our 
lord Chauncelour, and he shal make you an answer and 
declare our pleasure, and with this answer the londoners 
departed and made relacion to the Maior. 

The xviii. day of this moneth the quene of Scottes, which 
had bene at the Courte and at Baynardes Castell, a whole 
yere at the kynges charge, and was richely apoynted of all 
thinges mete to her estate, both of Jewells, plate, tapissry, 
Arras, Coyne, Horsses, and all other thinges of the kynges 
gift and liberalitie, departed out of London toward Scotland 
with great ryches, albeit she came into Englande with muche 
povertie, and she entred into Scotland the xiii. daye of Juyn, 
whome her husband receaved at Berwick : but the Englishe- 
men smally hym regarded. All her charges within the 
realme, comminge to the courte and returnynge, were of 
the kynges pursse. 

Thursdaye the xxii. day of May the kynge came into 
Westmynster hall, for whome at the upper ende was set a 
clothe of estate, and the place hanged with Arras, with him 
was the Cardinall, the dukes of Northfolke and Suffblke, 
the erles of Shrewsbury, of Essex and Wilshyre, of Surrey, 
with many lordes and other of the kynges counsaill. The 
Mayre and Aldermen, and al the chief of the citie were 
there in their best livery (according as the Cardinall had 
them apoynted) by ix. of the clock. Then the kynge com- 
maunded that al the prisoners should be brought foorth. 
Then came in the poore younglinges and olde false knaves 
bounde in ropes all along, one after another in their shertes, 
and every one a halter about his neck, to the number of iiii. 
C. men and xi. women. And when all were come before 
the kinges presence, the Cardinal sore layed to the Mayre 

and 



THE IX. 
YERE 

[1517-18] 



164 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE IX. 
YERE 

[1517-18] 



and comminaltie their negligence, and to the prisoners he 
declared that thei had deserved death for their offence : 
Then al the prisoners together cryed mercy gracious lord, 
mercy. Then the lordes altogether besought his grace of 
mercy, at whose request the kyng pardoned them al. And 
then the Cardinal gave unto them a good exhortacion to the 
great gladnes of the herers. And when the generall pardon 
was pronounced, all the prisoners shouted at once, and al- 
together cast up their halters into the hal roffe, so that the 
king might perceave thei were none of the discretest sorte. 
Here is to be noted that diverse offenders which were not 
taken, hering that the king was inclined to mercy came wel 
appareled to Westmynster, and sodeynly stryped them into 
their shertes with halters, and came in emong the prisoners 
willingly, to be partakers of the kynges pardon, by the 
whiche doyng, it was well knowen that one Jhon Gelson 
yoman of the Croune, was the first that began to spoyle, 
and exhorted other to dooe the same, and because he fled 
and was not taken, he came in the rope with the other 
prisoners, and so had his pardon. This compaignie was 
after called the blacke Wagon. Then were all the galowes 
within the citee taken doune, and many a good praier sayed 
for the kyng, and the citezens toke more hede to their 
servauntes. 

In June the kyng had with hym diverse Ambassadors, for 
solace of whom he prepared a costly Justes, he hymself and 
xii. agaynst the duke of Suffolk and other xii. his base and 
bard was the one halfe clothe of silver, and the other halfe 
blacke Tinsell. On the silver was a curious lose worke of 
white velvet embraudered with Golde, cut on the Silver and 
every cut engrayled with golde, so that that side was golde, 
Silver and velvet. On the blacke tynsell syde was blacke 
velvet enbroudered with golde and cut, and every cut was 
engrayled wtth flat gold of Damaske. The base and barde 
wer broudered with greate letters of massy golde Bullion, 
full of pearles and stones, merveylous riche : al his com- 
paignie wer in like suite, saving that they had no juelles. 
The kyng had on his hed a ladies sieve full of Diamondes. 
On the kyng attended gentlemen, Armourers, and other 
officiers to the nomber of Cxxv. persones all in white Velvet 
and white Sattyn, horse and harneis for horsemen. Cappes 
and Hosen for footemen, all white at the kinges cost. This 

royally 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



royally the kyng and his compaignie with his waiters came 
to the tiltes ende. 

Then entered the Duke of Suffblke with the Marques 
Dorcet, the Erles of Essex and Surrey, and viii. other of his 
bande, in bardes and bases of white Velvet and crimosin 
sattin losenged, set full of letters of C. M. of gold, for 
Charles and Mary, and thei toke the other ende of the tilt. 
Then the Trompettes blewe, and the Kyng and the Duke 
ranne fiercely together, and brake many speres, and so did 
all the other, that it was harde to saie who did best : but 
when the courses were ronne, they ranne volant one at an- 
other, so that bothe by the reporte of sir Edwarde Gylforde 
Master of the Armury, and also of the Judges and Heraldes, 
at these Justes wer broken five hundred and sixe speres : 
and then the kyng the same night made to the Ambas- 
sadors a sumpteous banket, with many ridelles and muche 
pastyme. 

After this greate triumphe, the king appointed his gestes 
for his pastyme this Sommer, but sodeinly there came a 
plague of sickenes, called the Swetyng sickenes, that turned 
all his purpose. This malady was so cruell that it killed 
some within three houres, some within twoo houres, some 
mery at diner and dedde at supper. Many died in the 
kynges Courte, the Lorde Clinton, the Lorde Grey of 
Wilton, and many knightes, Gentlemen and officiers. For 
this plague Mighelmas terme was adjourned, and because 
that this malady continued from July to the middes of 
December, the kyng kept hymself ever with a small com- 
paignie, and kept no solempne Christmas, willyng to have 
resort for feare of infeccion : but muche lamented the 



no 



nombre of his people, for in some one toune halfe the people 
died, and in some other toune the thirde part, the Sweate 
was so fervent and infeccious. 



THE X. YERE. 

IN the beginning of this yere, Trinite terme was begon 
at Oxenford, where it continued but one day, and was 
again adjourned to Westminster. This yere came to 
Calice from Pope Leo, a legate de latere, called Laurence 
Campeius, commonly called the Cardianall Campeius, for to 

exhorte 



THE IX. 
YERE 

[1517-18] 



The x. yere. 



i66 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE X. 
YERE 

[1518-19] 



exhorte the kyng to make warre on the Turke. And like- 
wyse the sayed Leo sent iii. other legates furth, at that tyme 
for the said purpose, one into Fraunce, another into Spain, 
and the third into Germany. 

When the Cardinall of Yorke knewe, that there was com- 
myng a legate into Englande, whiche should have a greater 
preheminence then a Cardinall, he whose ambicion was never 
satisfied, caused a Bishoppe and certain Docters to passe the 
Sea to Calice to welcome hym, and to shewe hym that yf 
he would have the Popes purpose to take any effecte in 
Englande, he should in any wyse sende in poste to Rome, 
to have the saied Cardinall of Yorke to be legate also, and 
to be joyned in commission with hym, whiche thing was 
doen, (not without good rewardes) so that in thirtie and 
five daies, the bull was broughte to Calice, Duryng whiche 
tyme the Cardinall of Yorke sent to the Legate to Calice, 
redde cloth to clothe his servauntes, whiche at their com- 
myng to Calice, were but meanely appareled. And when 
all thinges were ready, he passed the sea and landed at 
Dover, and so kept furthe his jorney toward London. At 
every toune as thei passed, he was received with Procession, 
and accompaignied with all the Lordes and gentlemen of 
Kent. And when he came to Black heth, ther met hym the 
Duke of Norffblke, with a great nomber of prelates, knightes 
and gentlemen, all richely appareled. And in the waie he 
was brought into a riche tente of clothe of golde, where 
he shifted himself into a robe of a Cardinall, edged with 
Ermyns, and so toke his Moyle ridyng toward London. 

The night before he came to London, the Cardinall of 
Yorke, to furnishe the carriages of the Cardinall Campeius, 
sent to him twelve mulettes with emptie Cofers covered with 
redde, whiche twelve Mulettes wer led through London, 
emongest the Mulettes of Campeius, which were but eight 
and so these xx. Mulettes passed through the stretes, as 
though thei had been full of treasures, apparel], and other 
necessaries. And when they came into Chepe, one of the 
Mulettes brake from her keper, and overthrewe the Chestes, 
and overturned twoo or three other Mulettes cariages, whiche 
fell with suche a violence, that diverse of theim unlocked, 
and out of some fell olde Hosen, broken Shoen, and roasted 
Fleshe, peces of Breade, Egges and muche vyle baggage : at 
whiche sighte the Boyes cryed, see, see my Lorde Legates 

treasure, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



167 



treasure, and so the Muleters wer asshamed, and tooke up 
all their stuffe and passed furth. And about thre of the 
clock at after none on the xxix. day of July the said legate 
entred the citie, and in Sothwarke met him all the clergie of 
London, with crosses, sensers and copes and sensed him 
with great reverence. The Maior and Aldermen, and all 
the occupacions of the citee in their best liveries stode in 
the stretes, and hym hyghly honored : to whom sir Thomas 
More made a brief oracion in the name of the citee. And 
when he cam to Paules, ther he was received by bishops 
mitred, and under a canapy entred the churche : whiche 
canapy his servauntes toke for their fees. And when he had 
offred, he gave his benediccion to al the people, and toke 
again his mule, and so was with al his train aforsaid, con- 
veighed to Bathe place, and there rested : where he was 
welcomed of the Cardinall of Yorke. And on Sondaie next 
ensuyng these twoo Cardinalles as legates, toke their barges 
and came to Grenewiche, eche of them had beside their 
crosses two pillers of silver, two litle axes gilte, and two 
cloke bagges embroudered, and the cardinalles hattes borne 
before them. And when they came to the kynges hall, the 
Cardinall of Yorke went on the right hande : and there the 
king royally appareled and accompaignied, met them even 
as though bothe had come from Rome, and so brought them 
bothe up into his chamber of presence, and there was a 
solempne oracion made by an Italian, declaryng the cause 
of the legacy to be in twoo articles, one for aide agaynst 
Gods enemies, and the second for reformacion of the 
Clergie. And when Masse was doen, they were had to a 
chamber, and served with lordes and knightes, with muche 
solempnitie : and after dinner they toke their leave of the 
kyng and came to London, and rode through the citee 
together, in greate pompe and glory to their lodgynges. 

When the Cardinall of Yorke was thus a legate, he set up 
a court, and called it the court of the legate, and proved 
testamentes, and hard causes to the great hinderaunce of all 
the bishops of the realme. He visited bisshopes and all 
the Clergie, exempt and not exempt, and under colour 
of reformacion he gat muche treasure, and nothyng was 
reformed, but came to more mischief : for by example of 
his pride, priestes and al spiritual persones wexed so proude, 
that thei ware velvet, and silke, bothe in gounes, jackettes, 

doblettes, 



THE x. 

YERE 
[1518-19] 



i68 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE X. 

YERE 

[1518-19] 



doblettes, and shoes, kept open lechery, and so highly bare 
themselfes by reason of his aucthorities and faculties, that no 
man durst once reprove any thing in them, for feare to bee 
called heretike, and then thei would make hym smoke or 
beare a faggot. And the Cardinall hym self was so elated 
that he thought hymself egall with the kyng : and when he 
had said Masse he made dukes and erles to serve him of wyne 
with a say taken, and to holde the bason at the lavatories. 
Thus the pride and ambicion of the Cardinal and clergie 
was so high, that in maner al good persons abhorred and 
disdained it. 

This yere the French kyng wrote to the kyng of England, 
that if it were his pleasure, he would send an ambassade 
into England, to common with the kyng and his counsaill 
for the redemyng of the citee of Turney and other thynges : 
whiche answered the messenger, that the ambassade of the 
Frenche kynge should be right hartely welcome to him. 
And so the French kyng sent into England the lorde 
Bonevet, hygh Admyrall of Fraunce, and the bishop of 
Parys as chiefe Ambassadors, accompanyed with many noble 
men, and young freshe galantes of the courte of Fraunce, to 
the numbre of Ixxx. and more, and with them came a great 
numbre of rascal and pedlers, and Juellers, and brought over 
hattes and cappes, and diverse merchaundise uncustomed, all 
under the coloure of the trussery of the Ambassadours. 

After that these noble men were landed at Dover, thei 
were receaved by the nobles and gentelmen of the countrey, 
and so conveyghed from lodgyng to lodgynge tyll they came 
to Blackheth, and before them went their cariages and people 
in great numbre, to the summe of xii. C. one and other, 
whiche was thought to be to many for an Ambassade. These, 
gentlemen of Fraunce were very freshe. 

Monday the xxvii. day of September, the erle of Surrey 
hygh Admyrall of Englande, in coate of riche tyssue cut on 
cloth of silver, on a great courser richely trapped, and a 
great whistell of gold, set with stones and perle, hangyng at 
a great and massy chayne baudryck wise, accompanyed with 
an C. xl. gentlemen, rychely appareled, on goodly horsses 
came to blackheth, and there amiably receaved the Ambas- 
sadors of Fraunce. The young galantes of Fraunce had 
coates garded with one colour, cut in x. or xii. partes very 
richely to beholde : and so al the Englishmen accoupled 

them 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



169 



them selves with the Frenchmen, lovingly together, and so 
roade to London. After the ii. Admyrals folowed xxiiii. 
of the Frenche kynges garde whome accompanyed xxiiii. of 
the kynges garde. And after them a great numbre of 
arches, to the numbre of iiii. C. And in this order they 
passed thorough the citie to Taylers hal, and there the chiefe 
Ambassadors were lodged, and the remnaunt in marchauntes 
houses about. When these lordes were in their lodgynges, 
then the French harder men opened their wares, and made 
the Taylers hal lyke to the paunde of a marte. At this 
doynge many an Englishman grudged, but it availed not. 
The last day of September, the French Ambassadors toke 
their barge, and came to Grenewiche. The Admyrall was 
in a goune of cloth of silver raysed, furred with ryche 
Sables, and al his company almost were in a new fassion 
garment, called a Shemew, which was in effect a goune cut 
in the middle. The gentlemen of Fraunce were brought to 
the kynges presence, wher the bishop of Parys made a 
solempne oracion : which beyng ended, and aunswer made 
therto, the kyng highly entreteyned the Admirall and his 
company, and so dyd all the English lordes and gentelmen. 
The Ambassadours beyng dayly in counsayl at Grenewiche, 
the other gentlemen daunced and passed the tyme in the 
quenes chambre with ladies and gentlewomen. After long 
counsailing and muche desyring of the French kyng and his 
counsayll, it was agreed that the citie of Tourney should be 
delivered to the Frenche kynge, he payenge vi. hundred 
thousande crounes for the citie, and iiii. hundred thousand 
crounes for the Castel, the which the kyng had buylded, but 
it was not fully performed : and also he should pay xxii. 
M. 1. Tournies, the whiche summe the citezens of the citie 
of Turney ought to the kyng of England for their liberties 
and fraunchises. 

Upon these agrementes to be performed, it was concluded 
that the citie of Tourney should be delivered to the French 
kyng. The Frenchemen the soner to come to their pur- 
pose, made a pretence of mariage to be had betwene the 
Dolphyn, sonne and heyre to the Frenche kyng and the 
lady Mary the kynges daughter, which was agreed upon 
this condicion, that if they both consented at lawful age, 
then to be ferme and stable, or els not : for then they were 
both very young. And so all matters were concluded, and 

the 

VOL. I. 



THE X. 
YERE 

[1518-19] 



170 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE X. 
YERE 

[1518-19] 



the erle of Worcester and the bishop of Ely apoynted to go 
into Fraunce for the delivery of the citie of Tourney, and 
performyng of the other agrementes. And for the sure 
payment of the summes of money to be payde to the kyng 
of England upon the sayd agrementes, there were iiii. gentel- 
men of the realme of Fraunce left in Englande for hostages : 
whose names were Mounsire Memorancy, Mounsire Mon- 
pesart, Mounsire Moy, Mounsire Morret. Of the whiche 
the ii. fyrst named were of noble blood, but the ii. 



1111. 



last were but of meane houses. And because they were 
young, there was auncient gentelmen, apoynted governours 
to them. 

When all thinges were concluded and sealed, the kyng and 
all the Ambassadours richely appareled and the ii. legates, 
roade solemply to the church of sainct Paul from the bishop 
of Durhams place : and there was made from the West 
doore to the quere doore of the churche egall with the 
highest step, a hautepace of tymber of xii. fote broade, that 
the kyng and the Ambassadors might be sene. And there 
the Cardinall of Yorke sange hygh masse, and had hys 
cloth of estate of Tyssue : hys Cupboord set with basons all 
gilt covered : his place was v. steppes high. At the first 
lavatory, iii. Erles served him, and at the second ii. dukes 
and a Marques, and with the saye taken, they gave hym 
wyne, and after water. And when masse was done, the 
Cardinal Campeius and he gave to the people (as they sayd) 
cleane remission. And after that done, doctor Pace the 
kynges secretory, a man very eloquent, made a goodly 
Oracion in prayse of peace : and that done, the kyng and 
all his nobles and Ambassadors went to the Bishops palace 
to dynner, where they were highly feasted. And after 
dynner the kynge roade agayne to the bishop of Durhams 
place. 

That night the Cardinall of Yorke made to the Ambas- 
sadors a solempne banket, and them accompanied many 
lordes and ladyes of Englande. And when the banket was 
done, in came vi. mynstrels, richely disguysed, and after 
them folowed iii. gentelmen in wyde and long gounes of 
Crymosyn sattyn, every one havyng a cup of golde in their 
handes, the first cup was ful of Angels and royals, the 
second had diverse bales of dyce, and the iii. had certayn 
payres of Cardes. These gentelmen offered to playe at 

monchaunce, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



171 



monchaunce, and when they had played the length of the 
first boorde, then the mynstrels blew up, and then entred 
into the chambre xii. ladyes disguysed, the fyrst was the 
kyng him selfe and the French quene, the second the 
duke of Suffolke, the lady Dawbeny, the lord Admirall 
and the lady Guyldford syr Edward Nevel, and the lady 
Sentliger, syr Henry Guyldford, and mastres Walden, Capi- 
tayn Emery, and mastres Anne Carew, syr Giles Capel, and 
lady Elizabeth Carew, Nycholas Carew, and Anne broune, 
Fraunces Brian and Elizabeth Blont, Henry Norrys and 
Anne wotton, Fraunces poyntz and Mary fyenes, Arthure 
poole and Margaret Bruges. On this company attended xii. 
knightes disguysed, bearing torches all these xxxvi. persons 
disguysed were in one suyte of fyne grene satyn all over- 
covered with clothe of golde, under tyed together with laces 
of gold, and maskyng whoodes on their heddes : the ladyes 
had tyers made of braydes of dammaske gold, with long 
heres of white gold. Al these maskers daunced at one 
tyme, and after they had daunced, they put of their vizers, 
and then they were all knowen. The Admyral and lordes 
of Fraunce hartely thanked the kyng, that it pleased hym 
to viset them with such disport and then the kyng and his 
company were banketed, and had high chere, and then they 
departed every man to hys lodgynge. 

The viii. day of October at Grenewiche was song a 
solempne masse by the bishop of Durham, and after masse 
doctor Tunstal master of the Rolles, which after was bishop 
of London, made an eloquent preposicion in praise of the 
matrimony to be had betwene the Dolphyn and the lady 
Mary : and all that day were the straungers feasted, and at 
night they were brought into the hall, where was a rock ful 
of al manet of stones, very artificially made, and on the top 
stood v. trees, the first an Olive tree, on which hanged a shild 
of the armes of the church of Rome : the ii. a Pyneaple tree, 
with the armes of the Emperour : the iii. a Roysyer with 
the armes of England : the iiii. a braunche of Lylies, bearing 
the armes of Fraunce : and the v. a Pomegranet tree, bearing 
the armes of Spayn : in token that al these v. potentates 
were joined together in one league against the enemies of 
Christes fayth, In : and upon the middes of the Rock sate a 
fayre lady, richely appareled with a Dolphin in her lap. In 
this Rock were ladies and gentelmen, appareled in Crimo- 

syn 



THE x. 

YERE 
[1518-19] 



A pageaunt. 



172 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE X. 
YERE 

[1518-19] 



A banquet. 



syn sattyn, covered over with floures of purple satyn, 
embroudered on with wrethes of gold knyt together with 
golden laces, and on every floure a hart of gold moving. 
The ladies tyer was after the fassion of Inde, with kerchiefes 
of pleasaunce, hached with fyne gold, and set with letters of 
Greke in golde of bullion : and the edges of their kerchiefes 
were garnished with hanging perle. These gentlemen and 
ladyes sate on the neyther parte of the Rocke, and out of a 
cave in the said Rock came x. knightes, armed at all poyntes, 
and faughte together a fayre tournay. And when they were 
severed and departed, the disguysers dissended from the 
rock, and daunced a great space : and sodeynly the rocke 
moved and receaved the disguysers, and ymediatly closed 
agayn. Then entred a person called Reaport, appareled in 
Crymosyn satyn full of tonges, sitting on a flyeng horse with 
wynges and fete of gold called, Pegasus. Thys person in 
Frenche declared the meaning of the rocke and the trees, 
and the Tournay. 

After this pastyme ended, the kyng and the Ambassadours 
were served at a bancket with ii. C. and Ix. dyshes : and after 
that a voydee of spyces with Ix. spice plates of silver and 
gilt, as great as men with ease might beare. This nyght 
the Cupboord in the hall was of xii. stages all of plate of 
golde and no gilt plate. When that every man had ben 
plenteously served, the tables were taken up, and the kynge 
and the quene and all the straungiers departed to their 
lodginges. After diverse Justes and feastes made, the sayd 
Ambassadors by the kynge and lordes : Syr Thomas Exmew 
Mayre of London, made to them a costly dynner at the 
Goldsmythes hall, which dynner they highly praysed, it was 
so well ordred. 

And when tyme came, they toke their leave of the kyng, 
the quene and the kynges counsaill, and delivered into the 
kynges possession their iiii. hostages as you have harde 
before : at whiche departing the kyng gave to the Admyral 
of Fraunce a garnishe of gilt vessel, a payre of covered 
basons gilt xii. great gilt bolles, iiii. payre of great gilt 
pottes, a standing cup of gold, garnished with great perle : 
and to some other also, he gave plate, to some Cheynes of 
gold, to some riche apparel, and to some greate horses with 
ryche bardes, so that every gentelman was well rewarded : 
which liberalitie the straungers much praised : and after that 

al 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



'73 



al their trusses were ready they departed toward the sea, and 
toke ship and landed at Boleyn. 

Sone after their departing, the erle of Worcester, beyng 
the kynges chamberlayn. The bishop of Ely, the lord of 
s. Jhons, syr Nicholas vaux, syr Jhon pechy, syr Thomas 
bulleyn as Ambassadours from the kyng of Englande, accom- 
panyed with Ixx. knightes and Gentelmen and yomen, to 
the number of iiii. C. and above passed the sea with some 
stormes, and came to Calys, and passed thorough Picardy 
with great and kynde entreteynment in all places, till they 
came to Parys, where they were nobly receaved, every man 
matched with a lyke pere : and after they were brought 
to the Frenche kynges presence, where the bishop of Ely 
made a solempne oracion, as concerning the mariage and the 
peace : he did it with suche a bolde spirite that the Frenche- 
men muche praysed his audacitie. 

The conclusion of this peace was this, that Henry king of 
England, Fraunces kyng of Frenchemen, and Charles kynge 
of Castel had sworne a perpetuall peace, duryng their lyves. 
And yf it shoulde happen any of the iii. to vyolate the 
league in any poynt and to move warre : then the other ii. 
should joyne together, and make warre agaynst the violater 
or breaker of the peace. 

After al thinges concluded, the French king made a 
banket house in the bastill of Parys betwene iiii. olde walles : 
this house was covered with coardes strayned by craft, and 
every coarde was wound aboute with boxe, and so layd 
crosse wise one over a nother in fret, and at the metynges 
a great knop gilt with gold foyle : Over their coardes was 
streyned wollen clothes of light blew : this roofe was Ixxx. 
fote high, and on every side iii. stages high : al the pillers 
of the stages were covered with antique workes, and the 
brestes of the stages curiously wrought with armes, fynettes 
and braunches : the roofe was set full of starres gilt furnished 
with glasses betwene the fretes : and in this house was ii. C. 
xii. braunches gilt hanged, and on every braunche a great 
numbere of lightes of white waxe : and divers sortes of 
maskes were shewed that night : and also there was shewed 
at every side of the palace a great Cupboord of massive plate 
of muche greatnesse, and ever the French kyng welcommed 
the lordes and Ambassadours with good countenaunce. 
After diverse feastes, justes and bankettes made to the 

Englishe 



THE x. 

YERE 
[1518-19] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE X. 

YERE 

[1518-19] 



The maner of 
the delyvery 
of Tournay. 



Englishe Ambassadours the byshop of Ely with syr Thomas 
Bulleyn and sir Rychard Weston were sent by the Frenche 
kyng to Konyack to see the dolphyn, where they were well 
receaved, and to theim was shewed a fayre young chylde : 
and when they had sene hym, they departed. The fame 
went that the Frenche kyng at that tyme had no sonne, but 
that this was but a colour of the Frenche kyng, howbeit it 
was proved otherwise after. 

In this ceason the Earle of Worcettre, and with hym 
sir Nicholas Vaux, sir Jhon Pechy, syr Edward Belknap 
with many other knightes toke their leave of the Frenche 
kyng, and roade to Tourney, where they were well received. 
Then began the Capitaynes and the souldiours to mourne, 
knowyng that the toune should be yelded to the Frenche 
kyng, and many a young gentelman, and many a tall yoman 
wished that they had not spent their tyme there. And the 
next day after, the sayd earle discharged sir Richarde Jer- 
nyngham of his office of capitayne and commaunded every 
man to be obedient to the kynges pleasure and to prepare to 
returne into England. The eight day of February the lord 
Chatilion came nere to the citie of Tournay with xxi. hun- 
dreth men in harneys. The erle of Worcettre sent sir 
Edward Belknap to knowe his commission, and there he 
sheued hym his commission, whiche was to receive the citie 
of Tourney. Then sir Edward Belknap desired hym too 
sende his commission to the earle of Worcettre, whiche he 
refused to do, saiyng it was sufficient to shewe it : well sayd 
sir Edwarde Belknap you must understande that we have a 
commission from the kyng our master to deliver you the 
citie at a day appointed : wherfore we must shewe the kyng 
of Englande both your commission that you had aucthoritie 
to receive it from the Frenche kyng, and also that you by 
your indenture sealed with your scale of armes shall confesse 
that you receive the citie as a gift, and not rendred as a right 
to the kyng your master, or els be you sure that the citie 
shall not be delivered. Then the lorde Chastileon was 
wonderous wroth that he was no better beleved : And so 
dayly were great messages sent to the citie from him to the 
erle of Worcetter, and aunswers were sent of the Englishe 
part. But when the day approched he had full aunswere that 
he must deliver his commission and also scale the indenture, 
or els the Englishmen would not put him in possession of 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



'75 



the toune, for their commission was otherwise. The Frenche 
capitaines perceaving that yf they disagreed at the daye, that 
doubtes might folowe, wherfore they sent their commission 
and sealed their indenture and sent it likewyse in the mor- 
nyng, and came forward with their banners displayed : 
whereof hering the earle, he sent woord that the cytie 
was neither yelded nor gotten, but delivered for confedera- 
cion of mariage, and therfore thei should not entre with 
banners displaied. Then were the Frenchmen angry, but 
there was no remedy but to rolle up their standerdes and 
banners. And when thei came to the gates, there their 
commission and Indenture were solemply red openly : and 
then the Frenchemen entred with drumslades and minstrelsy 
without any banner : and then to Monsire Castileon was 
delivered the Casteil, and there he ordeined watche and 
warde in every part. Thus was the cytie of Turnay de- 
livered the eight daie of February in the x. yere of the 
reigne of the kyng, and many a tall yoman that lacked 
livyng fel to robbyng, which would not labor after their 
returne. 

Duryng this tyme remayned in the Frenche court Nicholas 
Carew Fraunces Brian and diverse other of the young gen- 
telmen of England and they with the Frenche kyng roade 
daily disguysed through Parys, throwyng Egges, stones and 
other foolishe trifles at the people, whiche light demeanoure 
of a kyng was muche discommended and gested at. And 
when these young gentelmen came again into England, they 
were all Frenche, in eatyng, drynkyng and apparell, yea, and 
in Frenche vices and bragges, so that all the estates of Eng- 
lande were by them laughed at : the ladies and gentelwomen 
were dispraised, so that nothing by them was praised, but if 
it were after the Frenche turne, whiche after turned them to 
displeasure as you shall here. 

After the kynges Ambassadors were returned, and Tour- 
nay delivered to the Frenchemen upon the condicions afore- 
said, the hostages that were here lefte for the paiment of 
the great somes and performaunce of the condicions com- 
prised in the league (of the whiche one was that if the 
mariage toke none effect, then the citie of Turnay should 
be redelivered upon repaiment of the same some) the saied 
hostages knewe not in what case they stode, but when they 
knewe it, they were very hevy and sorowful : howbeit, they 

dissimuled 



THE X. 

YERE 

[1518-19] 



176 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE X. 
YERE 

[1518-19] 



A justes. 



dissimuled the matter in the best wise thei could. The 
kyng used familiarly these foure hostages, and on the vii. 
daie of Marche prepared a disguilyng, and caused his great 
chamber at Grenewyche to be staged and great lightes to be 
set on pillers that were gilt, with basons gilt, and the rofe 
was covered with blewe satyn set full of presses of fyne gold 
and flowers : and under was written, lammes, the meanyng 
wherof was, that the flower of youth could not be oppressed. 
Into this chamber came the kyng and the quene with the 
hostages, and there was a goodly commedy of Plautus plaied, 
and that done, there entred into the chamber eight ladies in 
blacke velvet bordred about with gold, with hoopes from the 
wast dounward, and sieves ruffed and plited at the elbowe 
and plain in the middes, full of cuttes, plucked out at every 
cutte with fyne Camericke, and tired like to the Egipcians 
very richely. And when these ladyes had passed aboute the 
place, in came eight Noble personages in long gounes of 
tafFeta set with flowers of golde bullion, and under that 
apparell cotes of blacke velvet enbroudered with golde all 
to cut, and plucked out with cuttes of white sarcenet, and 
every man had buskyns of blacke velvet full of agglettes of 
golde. Then the eight men daunced with the eight ladies 
all beyng viserd, and sodainly the men cast of their large 
gounes, and then their under apparell was sene. And when 
al was done, every lorde and lady put of their visers, and 
then it was knowen that the kyng and the duke of Suffolk 
and the French quene were there whiche were present at the 
plaie tyme. 

The viii. daie of Marche was a solempne Justes, the kyng 
hymself and eight young gentelmen based and barded in 
blacke Velvet embroudered with gold, against the duke of 
Suffolk and eight of his bande al in white satyn with droppes 
of golde. And that daie they all ranne exceadyng well, 
whiche the straungers highly commended. 

In the ende of Marche the kyng sent for all the yomen 
of garde that were come from Tourney, and after many 
good wordes geven to them, he graunted to them iiii. d. 
the day without attendaunce, except thei were specially com- 
maunded, and yet for all this the comminaltie said that the 
kyng was evil counsailed to geve away the citie of Tour- 
ney, because the mainteinyng of a garrison there should 
have norished and brought up men and yonger brethren 



in 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



177 



in feates of warre to the great strength and defence of the 
realme. 

This yere the xii. daie of February died the Emperour 
Maximilian, for whome the kyng caused a solempne Obsequy 
to be done at Paules churche, all the nobles of the realme 
and knightes of the Gartier beyng present, of whiche ordre 
the saied Emperour was one. 



THE XL YERE. 

IN the beginnyng of this yere, the kyng with all the 
knightes of his ordre beyng in Englande, roade on 
double horsses, with the henxmen folowing the kyng, 
from Colbroke to Winsore in gorgious apparel, and there he 
kept with greate solempnitie the feast of S. George, and 
dined in the hall. And the byshop of Wynchester prelate 
of the ordre sat at the boordes ende alone. The kyng was 
solemply served and the surnap cast like the feast of a coro- 
nacion. All thynges were plenteous to straungers that 
resorted thether. At the masse of Requiem was offered 
the banner and other hachementes of honor belonging to 
Maximilian the Emperor late deceased. After this feast 
ended, the kyng came to Richemond, and so to Grene- 
wyche, and laie all Maie. 

In whiche moneth the kynges counsaill secretly communed 
together of the kynges gentlenes and liberalitie to all per- 
sones : by the whiche they perceived that certain young men 
in his privie chamber, not regardyng his estate nor degree, 
were so familier and homely with hym, and plaied suche 
light touches with hym that they forgat themselfes : Whiche 
thynges although the king of his gentle nature suffred and 
not rebuked nor reproved it : yet the kynges counsail 
thought it not mete to be suffred for the kynges honor, 
and therfore thei altogether came to the king, beseching 
him al these enormities and lightnes to redresse. To whom 
the kyng answered, that he had chosen them of his counsaill, 
both for the maintenaunce of his honor, and for the defence 
of all thyng that might blemishe the same : wherfore if they 
sawe any about hym misuse theimselfes, he committed it to 
their reformacion. Then the kynges counsaill caused the 
lorde chamberlein to cal before them Carew (and another 

who 

VOL. r. 



THE x. 

YERE 

[1518-19] 



i 7 8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



who yet liveth, and therfore shall not at this time be named) 
with diverse other also of the privy chamber, whiche had 
bene in the Frenche court, and banyshed them the courte 
for diverse consideracions, laiyng nothing particulerly to 
their charges. And they that had offices were commaunded 
to go to their offices : whiche discharge out of the courte 
greved sore the hartes of these young menne whiche were 
called the kynges minions. Then was there foure sad and 
auncient knightes, put into the kynges privie chamber, 
whose names wer sir Richard Wingfeld, sir Richard Jer- 
nyngham, sir Richard Weston and sir Willyam Kyngston : 
and diverse officers were chaunged in al places. 

Then sir Jhon Pechy was made deputie of Caleis, and sir 
Rychard Wingfeld therof discharged, and Nicholas Carew 
made capitain of Ricebanke and commaunded to go thether, 
whiche was sore to hym displeasant. These young minions 
which was thus severed from the kyng, had bene in Fraunce, 
and so highly praised the Frenche kyng and his courte, that 
in a maner they thought litle of the kyng and his court, in 
comparison of the other, they were so high in love with the 
Frenche court, wherefore their fall was litle moned emong 
wise men. 

This yere in the moneth of June was elected to be 
Emperor Charles kyng of Castel, and nephew to the quene, 
by the whole assent of the electors of thempire : Although 
the Frenche kyng sent his great Master to cause hym to be 
elected to the high majestic of the Empire : yet his ambas- 
sador and great Master of his houshold called Gonffier lord 
of Boisy, and brother to Willyam Conner lorde Bonevet 
Admirall of Fraunce, whiche was Ambassadour of England 
the last yere as you have hard, did not so his message that 
it toke any effect. The kyng which had sent doctor Pace 
his secretory for the avauncement of his nephewe the kyng 
of Castell to the dignitie imperiall, because he had the duchie 
of Ostrik and many other seigniories in Almain, was very 
joyous of this eleccion, and caused a solempne Masse to be 
song at Paules the viii. daie of July : at whiche Masse, was 
present the Cardinall Campeius, the Cardinall of Yorke, the 
Duke of Buckyngham, of Norffolk and Suffolk, with the 
Ambassadors of Spain, Fraunce, Venice and Scotlande. 
And after Masse was done, the quier sang Te deum, and 
then all the lordes departed to Baynardes Castle to dinner, 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



179 



and that night were solempne fiers made through London, 
and great plenty of wine geven by Italiens, duchemen and 
Spaniardes for these newes. 

This sommer the quene desired the kyng to bryng to her 
manour of Havering in the Bower in Essex, the gentelmen 
of Fraunce being hostages. And for their welcommyng she 
purveyed all thynges in the moste liberallest maner : and 
especially she made to the kyng suche a sumpteous banket 
that the kyng thanked her hartely, and the straungers gave 
it great prayse. The king liyng there did shote, hunte, and 
ronne dayly with the hostages to their greate joye. 

This yere in September the kyng laie at his manour of 
Newhall in Essex, otherwyse called JBeautieu, where the 
kynge had newly buylded a costly mancion, and there to 
welcome the quene and the Lordes, and the Frenche gentel- 
men, he made to them a sumpteous banket, and all a long 
the chamber sat a ladie and a lorde, or a knight, which were 
plenteously served. And after the banket ended, with noise 
of minstrelles entered into the chamber eight Maskers with 
white berdes, and long and large garmentes of blewe satyn 
pauned with Sipres, poudered with spangles of Bullion golde, 
and they daunsed with ladies sadly, and communed not with 
the ladies after the fassion of Maskers, but behaved theim- 
selfes sadly. Wherfore the quene plucked of their visors, 
and then appered the duke of Suffolk, the Erie of Essex, the 
Marques Dorset, the lord Burgainy, sir Rychard Wyngfeld, 
sir Robert Wyngfelde, sir Rychard Weston, sir Willyam 
Kyngston : all these were somwhat aged, the youngest man 
was fiftie at the least. The ladies had good sporte to se 
these auncient persones Maskers. When they were de- 
parted, the kyng and the foure hostages of fraunce, and 
the erle of Devonshire with sixe other young Gentelmen 
entered the chamber, the whiche sixe were all in yelowe 
Sattyn, hosen, shoen, and cappes, and sixe other were in like 
maner in Grene : the yelowe satyn was freted with silver of 
damaske, and so was the grene very rychely to behold : and 
then every Masker toke a ladie and daunsed : and when 
they had daunsed and commoned a great while, their visers 
were taken of, and the ladies knewe them, and there the 
kyng gave many broches and proper giftes to the ladies. 
And after this done, the quene made a banket to the kyng 
and his lordes and the other straungers. 

In 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



i8o 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



In the moneth of November, the kyng came from Lam- 
beth to Westminster hal, and so to the starre chamber, and 
there were before him the Lorde Ogle, the Lorde Haward, 
sir Mathewe Broune, sir Willyam Bulmer, and Jhon Skot 
of Camerwell, for diverse riottes, misdemeanours and 
offences, and especially the kyng rebuked sir Willyam 
Bulmer knight, because he beyng the kynges servaunt 
sworne, refused the kynges service, and became servaunt 
to the duke of Buckingham, saiyng : that he would none 
of his servauntes should hang on another mannes sieve, and 
that he was aswel able to maintein him as the duke of 
Buckyngham, and that what might be thought by his de- 
partyng, and what myght bee supposed by the dukes 
retaining, he would not then declare. The knight kneled 
still on his knees criyng the kyng mercie, and never a 
noble man there durst entreate for him, the king was so 
highly displeased with him. Yet at the last when other 
matters were hard, the kyng moved with pitie forgave the 
saied sir Willyam his offence, saiyng, that we will that none 
of our servauntes shalbe long to any other person, but to 
us, nor we wil not that our subjectes repine or grudge at 
suche as we favoure, for our pleasure we will have in that 
cace as us liketh, for one we wil favor now and another at 
suche tyme as us shall like : and therefore sir Willyam if 
you serve us hartely, you shall not be forgotten, and for 
this tyme we pardon you. Likewise he pardoned the lorde 
Edmond Haward, and sir Mathew Browne their offences, 
which were indicted of riottes, and mainteinaunce of bear- 
ynges of diverse misdoers within the countie of Surrey : 
but the lorde Ogle humbly beseched the kyng of his 
mercie, to whom he aunswered. Sir your matter con- 
cerneth murder of our subjecte, whiche greate offence is 
not onely to us but to God, and therfore we remit you to 
the common lawe. And then he rose and went to his barge, 
and by the waie he made James Yarfford Maior of the Cytie 
of London knyght, and so he with all his counsaill came to 
Lambeth. 

The iiii, gentelmen hostages of Fraunce, daily resorted to 
the courte and had great chere, and were well enterteined, 
and every tyme they moved, stirred and required the kyng 
to passe the Sea, and to mete with the Frenche kyng their 
Master, whom they preised hyghly, affirming that if the 

kyng 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



181 



kyng and he might once familiarly common together, that 
there should suche a constant love rise and encrease betwene 
theim, whiche afterward should never faile. This request 
was often tymes hard and litle regarded, but yet by the 
meanes of the Cardinal! at the last, in the ende of February 
it was agreed that the kyng in person, should passe the sea 
to his castell and lordshyp of Guisnes, and there in Maie 
next comming betwene Guisnes and Arde, the kyng and the 
Frenche kyng should mete. When this was fully con- 
cluded, the kyng wrote letters to all suche lordes, ladies, 
gentelmen and Gentelwomen as should geve their attend- 
aunce on hym and the quene : which incontinent put theim- 
selfes in a redines after the mostc costliest fashion, for the 
furniture of the same metyng. 

Then were sent to Guysnes under the rule of sir Edwarde 
Belknap three M. artificers, which buylded out of the yearth 
on the* playn before the castle of Guysnes, the most goodliest 
palaice of timber that ever was wrought in the same place, 
and so curiously garnished without and within. Beside this, 
provisions were made within the realme of England and in 
Flaunders for vitaill, wine and all other thynges necessary 
for the same. And yet beside all this Orleaunce kyng of 
armes of Fraunce came into the court of England and made 
proclamacion, that the kyng of England and the French 
kyng, in a campe betwene Arde and Guysnes with xviii. 
aydes in June next ensuyng, should abyde all commers 
beyng gentelmen, at the tylt, and torney, and at bariers, and 
lyke proclamacion was made by Clarenseaux kyng of Armes 
of Englande, in the Courte of Fraunce, and in the courte 
of Bourgoyne, and in diverse other Courtes and places in 
Almain, and Italy. For furnyshyng of Justes, there was 
devised a tilte and all thynges necessary for that enterprice, 
in a goodly playn betwene Guysnes and Arde. 

Duryng the tyme of these preparacions, newes were 
brought to the king that Charles his nephew elected 
Emperor of Almain would shortely depart out of Spain 
by sea, and come by Englande to go into Germany to 
receive his firste Croune at Aeon. Wherefore the kyng 
caused great provisions to be made at every haven, for the 
receivyng of his welbeloved nephew and frend, and daily 
provisions were made on al sides, for these noble metynges 
of so hygh princes : and especially the quene of Englande 

and 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



and the Lady dowager of Fraunce, made greate coste on the 
apparell of their ladies and gentlewomen. 

The first daie of February being Candelmas even, as the 
kyng and queue were come from evensong at their manour 
of Grenewiche, before the quenes chamber there blewe a 
trompet sodainly, and then entred into the Quenes chamber 
foure Gentelmen appareled in long and large garmentes of 
blewe damaske bordered with gold, and brought with them 
a tricke waggon, in the which sat a lady richely apareled 
with a canapy over her hed, and on the iiii. corners of the 
waggon were iiii. hed peces called Armites, every pece beyng 
of a sundery device : the saied lady put up a bill to the kyng, 
the effecte wherof was that the iiii. gentelmen present would 
for the love of their ladies answer al commers at the tilt at 
a day by the kyng to be apointed : whiche daie was apointed 
at shrofetide next ensuing. At whiche daie the foresaid 
gentelmen valiantly accomplished their enterprice, with 
greate laudes of the kyng the quene and ladies. 

In this yere the kyng beyng infourmed, that his realme 
of Irelande was out of ordre, discharged the Erie of Kildare 
of his office of deputie, and therunto (by the meanes of the 
Cardinall as men thought) was appoynted therle of Surrey 
lorde Admiral, to whom the Cardinal did not owe the best 
favour. Wherfore the said erle of Surrey in the beginning 
of Aprill, tooke leave of the kyng, and the duke of Nor- 
ffolke his father, and passed into Irelande, and had with him 
diverse gentlemen, that had bene in the garrison of Tourney, 
and one hundred yomen of the kynges garde, and other to 
the nomber of a thousande menne. Where he by hys 
manhod and wisedome, brought the erle of Desmonde and 
diverse other rebelles, to good conformitie and ordre : and 
there he continued in greate hardnes two yere and more, in 
whiche space he had many battailes and skirmishes with the 
wild Iryshe. 

When it was concluded that the kynges of Englande and 
Fraunce should mete, as you have hard, then bothe the 
kynges committed the ordre and maner of their metyng, 
and howe many daies they should mete, and what prehemi- 
nence eche should geve to other, to the Cardinall of Yorke, 
whiche to set all thynges in a certaintie, made an instrument, 
the very true tenour whereof ensueth. 

Thomas Archebyshop of Yorke and Cardinal. &c. Albeit 

that 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



that by the treatie and metyng of the right high and right 
puyssaunt princes, Henry by the grace of God, kyng of 
Englande, and of Fraunce, lorde of Irelande my sovereigne 
lorde : And Fraunces by the same grace kyng of Fraunce 
ryght Christened, made and concluded at London the eight 
daie of October, the yere of our lorde a thousand five 
hundred and xviii. be emongest other thynges concluded 
and accorded, that the same metyng shalbe in place in- 
different, and not subject to any of the saied prynces. 
Nevertheles, wee consideryng the honoure, profyte, and 
utilitie, that shall redound by the entervieu of the said two 
princes, and not onely to the saied twoo prynces, their 
realmes and subjectes, but also to all Christendom : after 
declaracion thereupon had with the saied princes. Also 
considering that the saied illustre kyng of Englande my 
sovereigne lorde, in passing the sea with his retinue, shall 
sustaine great costes and expences, and dispose hymselfe to 
great labours and daungers, leving his realme and puis- 
saunce for certain tyme, we have thought and estemed that 
he should not be wholy satisfied to thonor and dignitie of 
the same, right illustre kyng of England my sovereigne 
lorde, and should not have in regarde condigne of his 
labours and dangiers, if the said entervew or meting after 
the first treatie, should be in place indifferent, wherfore it 
is that we desiring to weye egally thonour and dignitie of 
the said twoo kynges by vertue and power of the commis- 
sions to us geven, of whom the tenours shalbe hereafter 
declared : we have made, declared, and ordeined certaine 
articles accepted and approved, by the same princes re- 
spectively, which thei will observe, and by this presentes 
we make, declare and ordein as foloweth. 

And first we declare and ordeine, that before thende of 
the moneth of Maie next comming, the saied illustre kyng of 
Englande shall come personally to the castell of Guisnes, 
with his bedfelowe the Quene, and his sister the dowares 
of Fraunce : and semblaby the right Christened kyng of 
Fraunce, shall come in persone to his Castle of Arde, with 
the Quene and his mother : and some daie, houre, and 
tyme, within iiii. daies at the moste, after the ende of Maie, 
that shalbe assigned by the commissioners of the one and 
the other partie. The said kyng of England shal issue out 
of his castle of Guisnes halfe a mile long, without that he 

shall 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



i8 4 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



shall issue out of the limites of his demain of Guisnes, and 
shal come towardes the said castle of Arde : and there within 
the territorie of the saied castle of Guisnes, he shall rest in 
some place not fortified nor walled, and nere the limites of 
Fraunce, that the saied commissioners shall assigne (as above 
said) and the saied right christened kyng, partyng from his 
castle of Arde shal come towardes the saied kyng of England 
the same daie, place tyme and houre, that shall tary hym 
within the demain of Guisnes as is saied. In the whiche 
shall not be set nor dressed any pavilions or tentes, and 
there the saied two kynges beyng on horsebacke, with their 
retinue shall se the one the other, and salute eche other, and 
speake together familiarly, and common in that sorte and 
maner, and so long as shall seme to theim good. And after 
the said salutacion and communicacion finished for that time, 
the saied illustre kyng of England shal returne to his castle 
of Guisnes, and the saied right christened kyng to his castle 
of Arde. 

Item, for asmuche that wee thynke to bee satisfied touchyng 
the laboures daungiers and honoure of the saied kyng of Eng- 
land my sovereigne Lorde of so muche, that the saied right 
Christened Kynge at the firste speakyng, he shall come for- 
warde unto and within his territorie of Guisnes, we will kepe 
the honour of the said kynges, and therfore declare and 
ordeine, that on the morowe after the firste entervew, 
the same kynges shall mete together in some place in- 
different betwene Arde and Guysnes that shalbe assigned 
by the saied Commissioners, and after the salutacion made 
on the one and the other partie, the saied right illustre kyng 
of Englande shall go to the Castle of Arde, to se, salute, and 
visite the quene of Fraunce, and also the sister of the said 
christened kyng, with whom he shall dine prively. And 
likewise the saied right christened kyng shall go to the Castle 
of Guysnes, to visite and salute the Quene of Englande, 
and the dowares of Fraunce, with whome he shall dyne. 
In the whiche place the saied princes shalbe received famyliarly 
and amiably, unto mutual! love, and also to the honoure of 
the saied princes. 

Item, as the saied serene prynces of Englande and Fraunce, 
be lyke in force corporall, beautie, and gyfte of nature ryght 
experte and havyng knowlege in the arte militant, right 
chevalrous in armes, and in the flower and vygor of youth, 

whereby 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



whereby semed to us a ryght assembly, that for to decore 
and illustre the same assembly, and to shewe their forces in 
armes, they shall take counsail and dispose themselfes to do 
some fayre feate of armes, aswel on fote as on horsebacke, 
against all commers. We declare and ordein, that the place 
where shalbee the saied fyght and feate of armes, shalbee 
chosen betwene Guysnes and Arde, and assygned by the 
commissioners, of the one and the other partie. And for a 
suertie of the persones of the saied kynges and their com- 
paignie, the saied place shalbe apparreled, diched, fortified 
and kepte of the one and the other partie, by equall nomber 
of men of armes, respectively committed and deputed that 
to do. And duryng the tyme of the saied justes and feates 
of warre, the same kynges and quenes with their retinue, shal 
se eche other familiarly, and converse and speake together : 
And every daie towardes the evenyng, after the Justes, 
triumphes, bankettes, and familiar communycacions dooen, 
the saied kynges with their retinue shall returne into their 
Castles, that is to saie, the kyng of England into his castle 
of Guysnes, the said right christened kyng into his Castle of 
Arde, and thus they shal do dayly, duryng the saied fight 
and feate of armes. 

Item, wee declare and ordeine, that when the same kyng 
of Englande and the Quene his bedfelowe, and the Dowares 
of Fraunce his sister, with their retinue, shall go to the terri- 
torie and entrie of the saied ryght christened kyng, the 
superioritie and preheminence shalbe geven to the saied 
kyng of Englande, to the quene his bedfelowe, and to 
their retinue respectively, duryng the tyme that they shall 
tary and be there : and semblaby when the saied right Chris- 
tened kyng, and the quene his bedfelow and his right 
illustre Ladie and mother, with their retinue shall come to 
the territorie and entrie of the saied illustre kyng of Eng- 
lande, the superioritie and preheminence shalbe geven to 
the said right christened kyng, to the quene his bedfelowe, 
and to his mother, and to their retinue duryng the tyme 
that they shall continue and abide there. 

Item, for so muche as the Castle and places where the saied 
entervewe shalbe, be so litle and narowe that if entrie and 
license to come thether be geven to all them that would go 
thether, diverse anoyances, troubles and impechementes should 
folowe, wherfore it is so that we Cardinall abovesaied, by these 

presentes 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



VOL. I. 



2 A 



i86 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



presentes declare and ordeine, that none of the retinue of the 
saied Kynges, Quenes, or other lordes and nobles, of what 
estate qualitie or condicion that he or they be, shal not come 
to the said assemble with more greater nomber of persones 
or horse, then shalbee wrytten by letters, subscribed by 
the saied kynges, the whiche shall conteigne the estates and 
condicions of the persones, aswell men as women, and 
nombre of servauntes and horse, except by the common 
consent and license of the saied kynges. 

Item, forasmuche as peradventure it shall come that the 
said Princes, lordes, gentelmen, and houshold servauntes, 
shall se and converse together familiarly, to the ende that 
it may engender betwene them an amitie more fyrme and 
stable, for that cause and that more suerly and agreably they 
may bee together, aswel by daie as by night, without any 
daunger or feare, whiche we desire to provide : we declare 
and ordein that two gentelmen with sufficient compaignie of 
equall and lyke nomber, be committed and depute, respec- 
tively by the saied kynges for the kepyng and suretie of the 
waies and watches, that shalbe made continually duryng the 
assembly of the saied kynges. 

The whiche gentelmen with their compaignies shall ordein 
and depute explorators and spies in the valeis, forestes, 
woodes, townes, borowes, villages, castels, passages and 
waies, and other places daungerous and suspect : from 
tyme to tyme, and houre to houre, aswell towardes 
Flaunders, as Picardie, Artoys and Englande, to cxployte 
and watche there. And if any be founde suspect, theim to 
repulse and take away, to thende that not onely the saied 
prynces, their gentlemen and houshold servauntes, maie 
surely and without feare visite the one the other as saied 
is, but also those that shall bryng vitailes necessary to the 
saied assembly, maie without daunger, trouble, impeche- 
ment or noysaunce go and come : The whiche explorators 
shalbe bounden every daie in the mornyng and evenyng, to 
make reporte to the saied prynces or to their saied counsail- 
ours respectively, of that which they have found, and in what 
estate the waies be. We declare further and ordein, that all 
men of armes and of warre, of the one and the other partie, 
shall not approche nerer then twoo journeyes, to the place 
where the saied entervewe shalbe, except the retinew and men 
of warre that bee committed and deputed to kepe Bullein and 

Caleis, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



i8 7 



Caleis, and that the same men of warre nor none other duryng 
the assembly of the saied princes, shal not presume to come 
nerer, onlesse by the consent, accorde, and license of the saied 
princes. 

Item, we Cardinall above saied, by expresse aucthoritie 
and power to us geven, by these presentes, bynde the saied 
princes to do, fulfill, and accomplyshe, all and every the 
thynges above saied here in conteined. 

Item, we declare and ordeine that eche of the saied kynges 
on his partie, shall ratifie, confirme, and approve all and 
every the Chapiters and Articles above saied, by their 
Letters Patentes signed with their handes. And by the 
same lettres of ratificacion they shalbe bounden to accomplish 
with good faith and in worde of a kyng, all and every the 
thynges abovesaied : the whiche letters made, subscribed and 
sealed, as is saied, they shal geve the one the other, and shall 
chaunge in the citie of London, within one moneth next 
after the daie of these presentes. Made the twelve of 
Marche, the yere of our lorde a M.CCCCC.xix. 



THE XII. YERE. 

THE most noble and puisant kyng, kyng Henry the 
VIII. king of England and of Fraunce, the yere of 
our Lord, a M. five hundred and xx. and of his 
bodely age xxix. yere, and the xxii. daie of April began the 
xii. yere of his reigne over the realme of Englande, and 
halowed the daie of sainct George at the maner royal of 
Grenewych with the noble knightes of the Garter in robes 
of the order. 

The kyng intending and persevering in purpose to mete 
with Frances the Frenche kyng greate and ryche provisions 
were made, wherfore the noble Kyng and the Quene with 
all the noble courte, removed the twentie and one daie of 
May beyng on Mondaie, from their maner of Grenewyche, 
towardes the Sea side, and so on the Fryday beyng the 
twentie and five daie of May, arrived at the cytie of Can- 
terbury, intendyng there to kepe his Pentecoste. 

Sone after whiche comming to Canterbury, tidynges were 
brought that Charles Emperor electe, was on the sea, in sight 
of the coast of England, wherfore officers of the kyng were 

sent 



THE XI. 
YERE 

[1519-20] 



i88 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



sent with great diligence to the Castle and toune of Dover, 
to be there in a redines against the arrivall of the Emperor. 

The reverent father in God my lorde Cardinall, came to 
the toune of Dover in hast with a nobell repayre, abidyng 
the commyng of the Emperour, whiche Emperour, the 
Saterdaye beyng the xxvi. daie of Maii arrived with all his 
navie of shippes royall on the coast of Kent, directe to the 
toune or porte of Hieth the saied daie by noone, where he 
was hayled by the noble knight sir William Fitzwilliam, 
vice admirall of Englande, with syxe of the kynges shippes 
well furnished, whiche laye for the safegarde of passage 
betwene Dover and Caleis, at the costes and charges of the 
kyng of Englande. Calmenes of the wether and lacke of 
wynde, caused that the Emperour might not so sone take 
lande at the porte of Dover, as he would have dooen. Not- 
withstandyng towardes the even he departed from his shyppes, 
and entered into his boate commyng towardes the lande, 
where in his comming to the lande : on the sea the reverent 
father lorde Wolsay Cardinall and Legate, mete and re- 
ceived hym with suche reverence, as to so noble a Prince 
apperteigned. Thus landed the Emperour Charles, under 
the clothe of his estate of the blacke Egle all splaied on 
riche clothe of golde. In his retinue with hym, were many 
noble menne, and many fayre Ladyes of his bloud as princes 
and princesses, and one ladie as chiefe to be noted, was the 
princes Avinion with many other nobles whiche landed with 
hym in high and sumptuous maner and greate riches in their 
apparell : greate joye made the people of Englande to see 
the Emperour, and more to see the benyng maner and 
mekenes of so high a prince. 

Then when the Emperour thus had taken lande, the 
reverente father lorde Cardynall was as conduite to the same 
noble Emperour from the shore of Dover unto the castell 
ther : then were all persons chered the best that there in the 
towne might be. 

After the departyng of Themperour to the lande from 
hys navy, the apparell of every ship then shewed, as flagges, 
banners, stremers and targetes, then the mighty ordinaunce 
of every of them brake oute by force of fyer as though the 
see had brente, marvelous was the noyse of the gonnes. 

The Emperour beyng thus in the castell of Dover, wyth 
hast tidynges came to the kyng where as he was at Cantor- 
bury 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



189 



bury, who hasted hym towards the noble Emperour. And 
so came ridyng early in the morning to the castell of Dover, 
within which castell the kyng alighted : the Emperour hering 
the king to be come, came out of his chamber to mete with 
the kyng, and so mete with him on the stayres or he could 
come up, wher eche embraced other right lovyngly : then 
the kyng brought the Emperour to his chamber, where as 
ther communyng was of gladnes. 

Sone after, these twoo noble princes on the Whitsonday 
early in the morening toke their horse and rode to the Cytee 
of Canterbury, the more to solempne the feast of Pente- 
cost but specially to see the quene of England his aunte was 
the intent of the Emperour. 

The noble personages of the realme of Englande and the 
quene wyth her beautiful trayne of ladies received and wel- 
commed the same Charles elect Emperour, whose person 
was by the kyng conveighed to a faire and pleasant chamber 
where the sayde Emperour apparelled hym right richely. 
Then the noble retynue of the sayde Emperour aswell of 
lordes as ladyes were lodged, aswell as there myght be wyth 
joye and muche gladnes, and there in Canterbury sojorned 
the Emperour and all hys trayne wyth the kyng, untill the 
Thursdaye in the same weke. 

The last daye of May beyng Thursday, the Emperour 
toke leave of the kyng and of all the ladyes, and gave great 
thankes, and so rode to Sandewiche, and there toke his 
shippes, the wynd to hym was likynge, whereby he say led 
into Flaunders. 

Then the same daye, the kyng of Englande made saile 
from the porte of Dover and with noblf -ipparaile landed at 
Calys at the hower of xi. of the clock, and wyth hym the 
quene and ladyes and many nobles of the realme. And so 
was the kyng received into the Checker and there rested : 
great repayre of noble men came to the towne of Caleys 
from the Frenche court, to se the kyng and to salute hym, 
which were of his grace, princely entretayned. 

Mondaye the iiii. daye of June the kynges grace with all 
the nobles aswell the quene with her trayne of ladyes as 
other, with al the whole nomber of nobles removed from 
Calls to his lordship royall of Guisnes into the most noble 
and royal lodgynge before sene, for it was a palays, the palays 
was quadrant, and every quadrant of the same palays was 



m. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



190 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



iii. C. xxviii. foote longe of a syse, whiche was in compasse 
xiii. C. and xii. foote aboute. This palayce was sette on 
stages by great connynge and sumpteous woorke. At the 
enterynge into the palays before the gate, on the playne 
grene was buylded a fountayne of enbowed worke, gylte 
with fine golde, and bice, ingrayled with anticke workes, 
the olde God of wyne called Baccus birlyng the wyne, 
whiche by the conduyctes in therth ranne to al people 
plenteously with red, white, and claret wyne, over whose 
hedde was writen in letters of Romayn in gold, faicte bonne 
chere quy vouldra. 

On the other hand or syde of the gate, was set a pyller 
which was of auncient Romayne woorke borne with 
iiii. Lyons of golde, the pyllers wrapped in a wrethe of 
golde curiously wroughte and intrayled, and on the sommet 
of the sayde pyller stode an image of the blynde God Cupide 
wyth his bowe and arrowes of love redy by his semynge, 
to Stryke the younge people to love. 

The forgate of the same palays or place with great and 
mighty masonry by sight was arched, with a tower on every 
syde of the same port rered by great crafte, and inbattayled 
was the gate and tower, and in the fenestres and wyndowes 
were images resemblynge men of warre redy to caste greate 
stones : Also the same gate or tower was set with compassed 
images of auncient Prynces, as Hercules, Alexander and 
other by entrayled woorke, rychely lymned wyth golde and 
Albyn colours, and well and warly was made over the gate 
loups, and enforced wyth battaylementes and in the same 
gate a lodge for the porter : whyche there appered and 
other, sumpteously apparayled like unto kynges officers. 

By the same gate, all people passed into a large courte. 
fayre and beautifull, for in this court appered much of the 
outward beutie of this place for from the firste water table 
to the raysyng or resun pieces, was bay wyndowes on every 
syde myxed with clere Stories, curiously glased, the postes 
or monyelles of every wyndow was gylte. Thus the out- 
ward parte of the place lumyned the eyes of the beholders, 
by reason of the sumptuous woorke. Also the tower of the 
gate as semed, was buylded by greate masonry, and by great 
engyne of mans wit, for the sundry countenaunces of every 
image that their appered, some shotyng, sum castyng, sume 
ready to strike, and firynge of gonnes whiche shewed very 

honorably. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



191 



honorably. Also all the sayd quadrantes, bayes and edifices, 
were royally entrayled, as farre as unto the same court appar- 
tayned. And dyrecte against the gate was devised a hallpas, 
and at thentry of the staier was images of sore and terrible 
countenaunces, all armed in curious woorke of argentyne. 
The bay of the same halpas pendant by crafte of trimmer 
and under the trimmer, anticke images of gold envyroned 
with verdour of Oliffes cast in compas, mounsteryng their 
countenaunces towardes the enteryng of the palaice. The 
staier of the saied halpas was caste of passage by the wentes 
of brode steppes, so that from the firste foote or lowest steppe, 
a persone might without payn goo unto the highest place of 
the same halpas. 

On every hande was there chamber doores and enterynges 
into the chambers of the same palais, which were long and 
large, and well proporcioned, to receive light and aire at 
pleasure : the roofes of them from place to place, and 
chamber to chamber wer syled and covered wyth cloth 
of Silke, of the most faire and quicke invencion that before 
that tyme was seen, for the grounde was white ingrailed, 
Inbowed and batoned with riche clothes of silkes knitte, and 
fret with cuttes and braides and sundery newe castes, that 
the same clothes of silke shewed like bullions of fine burned 
golde and the roses in lossenges : that in the same rofe, were 
in kyndly course, furnished so to mannes sight that no livyng 
creature might but joye, in the beholdyng therof, for from 
the jawe pece of the saied selyng : whiche pece was guilte 
with fine Golde, were woorkes in pann paled, all the walles 
to the crest encounteryng the clere stories, the same creste 
which was of large depenes, the worke was antique knottes 
with bosses cast and wrought with more cunnyng then I can 
write, all which workes and overages were gilte : and to set 
it the more to the glory, the florishyng Bise was comparable 
to the riche Ammell. 

Also at the foote of the same palaice was another crest all 
of fine sette gold whereon hanged riche and marveilous 
clothes of Arras wroughte of golde and silke, compassed of 
many auncient stories, with whiche clothes of Arras, every 
wall and chamber were hanged, and all wyndowes so richely 
covered, that it passed all other sightes before seen. In 
every chamber in place convenient were clothes of estate, 
greate and large of clothe of golde, of Tissue, and riche 

embroudery, 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



192, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



embroudery, with Chaiers covered with like cloth, with 
pomelles of fine gold : and great Cushyns of riche woorke 
of the Turkey makynge, nothynge lacked of honourable 
furnishement. 

Also to the same palais was rered a Chapell with two 
closettes, the quire of the saied Chapell filed with clothe of 
golde, and thereon frete ingrailed bent clothes of Silke, all 
was then silke and golde. The aultars of this Chapell were 
hanged with riche revesture of cloth of gold of Tissue, 
embroudered with pearles. Over the high aultare was 
hanged a riche Canaby of merveilous greatnes, the aultare 
was appareled with five paire of Candelstickes of golde, and 
on the aultare an halpas and thereon stode a Corpus domini, 
all fine golde, and on the same halpas stoode twelfe Images 
of the bignes of a childe of foure yeres of age all gold : 
And all the Coopes and Vestementes so riche as might be 
prepared or bought in the citie of Florens, for all the copes 
and Vestementes wer but of one pece,'so woven for the pur- 
pose, cloth of Tissue and poudered with redde Roses purled 
with fine golde : the Orfrys sette with pearles and precious 
stones. And all the walles and deskes of his Chapell was 
hanged with right Clothe of golde, and three ryche greate 
Crosses were there ready to be borne at festival times, and 
basyns and Sensers, Gospellers, Paxes, Crewetes, holy Water 
vessels, and other ornamentes all of gold. 

Also in the fyrst Closet was a traverse for the kynges 
person of cloth of golde : And within that the kynges place 
and Chaire, with Cusshins of clothe of golde : before the 
traverse was an altare of presence, whiche Aultare was 
adourned with clothe of brouderie, and riche Pearles and 
precious stones, set in goldesmithes woorke of fine golde. 
On the aultare was a deske or halpace, whereon stoode a 
patible of the Crucifix of fine golde, with an Image of 
the Trinitee, an Image of cure Lady, and twelve other 
Images all fine golde and precious stones, twoo paire of 
Candelstickes of fine golde, with Basens, Crewettes, Paxes, 
and other Ornamentes, the saied Closet was hanged with 
Tappettes embraudered with riche worke fret with pearles 
and stones, the roffe of the same Closet was siled with 
woorke of Inmouled, gylte with fine Golde and Senapar 
and Bice. 

The seconde Closette was for the quenes persone, in 

whiche 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



whiche was a traverse of riche clothe of golde, the aultare 
so richely appareled, that there lacked neither Pearles nor 
Stones of riches : on the aultar were twelve greate Images 
of golde, the Closet hanged with clothe of gold all other 
jewelles Missall, I suppose never suche like were seen, and 
the rooffe of the same closet was filed with like worke that 
the kynges closet was as is before rehersed. 

And from this palaice or place into the mightie and 
stronge fortresse and Castle royall of Guisnes, was a 
galery for the secrete passage of the kynges persone into 
a secret lodgyng within the same Castle the more for the 
kynges ease. 

Also to this palaice was all houses of offices, that to suche 
an honourable Courte should apperteigne, that is to wete, 
the lord Chaumberlaine, lorde Steward, lorde Thresourer 
of the houshold, for the Comptroller and office of grene 
Clothe, Wardroppes, Juell house, and office of houshold 
service, as Ewery, Pantrie, Seller, Buttery, Spicery, pitcher 
house, Larder and Poultrie, and all other offices large and 
faire that the officers might and did marveiles, as in the 
craft of viandes, by Ovens, harthes, reredorses, Chimnayes, 
Ranges, and such instrumentes that there was ordained. 
In this Palaice as ye have hearde, was the kynges grace 
lodged and all the nobles after their degrees. And for 
that the toune of Guysnes was litle, and that all the noble 
menne might not there be lodged, thei sette up tentes in 
the felde, to the nomber of twentie and eight hundred 
sundery lodgynges, whiche was a goodly sighte. Thus 
was the kyng in hys Palais royall at Guysnes. 

FRAUNCES the Frenche kyng was with all his nobles of 
the realme of Fraunce, come to the toune of Arde, whiche 
was prepared for his commynge, many tentes, hales and 
pavilions, were set and pight in the felde. On the French 
partie also, there was at the same toune of Arde buylded 
the Frenche kynges lodgyng full well, but not finished, 
muche was the provisions in Picardy on every part through 
all. The French kyng commaunded his lodgyng to be 
made, a litle out of the toune of Arde in the territorie 
of an old castle, whiche by the war of old time had been 
beaten. On the same place was edified a house of solas and 
sporte, of large and mightie compas, which was chiefly sus- 
tained by a great mightie maste, wherby the greate ropes 

and 

VOL. I. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



2 B 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



and takell strained, the same maste was staled. All the 
roffe of the same house hong on the same Maste, and with 
takell was strained and borne, by the supporters of the same 
Maste or tree, the colours of the same was all blewe, set 
with starres of gold foyle, and the Orbes of the heavens 
by the crafte of colours in the roffe, were curiosly wrought 
in maner like the sky, or firmamen, and a cresant strained 
sumdell towardes the toune of Arde, this cresant was covered 
with frettes and knottes made of Ive busshes, and boxe 
braunches, and other thynges that longest would be grene 
for pleasure. 

In this tyme the reverent father lorde Thomas Wolsay 
Cardinall and legate a Latere as the kynges high ambas- 
sador rode with noble repaire of lordes, gentlemen and 
prelates to the toune of Arde, to the French courte where 
of the Frenche kyng, the same lord Cardinall was highly 
enterteined. Of the noblenes of this Cardinall, the Frenche- 
men made bokes, shewyng the triumphant doynges of the 
Cardinalles royaltie. The nomber of the gentlemen, knightes 
and lordes al in crimosyn velvet, with the marvellous nomber 
of chaines of golde, the great Horse, Mules, Coursers, and 
cariages, that there were, which went before the Cardinalles 
commyng into Arde with sumters and cofers. Of his great 
Crosses and Fillers borne, the pillowe bere or cace broudered, 
the two mantelles, with other the Ceremoniall Offices, with 
greate and honourable nomber of bishoppes gevyng their 
attendaunce, the mightie and great nomber of servauntes, as 
yomen, gromes, all clothed in Scarlet who so redeth of the 
Frenche boke, shall finde wonderfully set furthe. 

The kyng of England beeyng at the Castle of Guysnes in 
the newe palais, many noble men of the Frenche court resorted 
to his grace, to se the kyng of England and the quene, and 
to salute them : who of the kyng of Englande were well 
entertained. 

When the lord Cardinall had sojourned at Arde in the 
Frence court by the space of twoo daies, and the high and 
urgent princely causes in counsaill declared, the lord Cardinal 
toke his leave of the French kyng and of all the Frenche 
courte, and repaired unto the Castle of Guysnes, where he 
founde the kyng of England his sovereigne Lorde. And 
the same kyng by his letters patentes, had geven full power 
and aucthoritie to the same lord Cardinall, concernyng all 

matters 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



matters to bee debated, touchyng the kyng and the realme, 
and also gave unto the same Cardinal!, full strenght, power, 
and aucthoritie, to affirme and confirme, bynde, and unbynde, 
what soever shoulde be in question, betwene hym and the 
French kyng, as though the kyng in proper person had been 
there presently. 

When the lordes of the Frenche counsaill, sawe the high 
and greate aucthoritie that the Cardinall had, thei shewed it 
unto the French kyng, who incontinent commaunded his 
commission to be made, of like power and aucthoritie, that 
the kyng of Englande had geven unto the said lord Cardinall : 
the same power and aucthoritie had the same reverent father, 
geven to hym by Fraunces the French kyng, and affirmed 
by the counsaill royall of Fraunce : Then hastely was sent 
to the kyng of Englande the Frenche kynges patent, for the 
lorde Cardinall saied humbly to the Frenche kyng, that he 
would no suche power receive, without the consent of the 
kynge of England his sovereigne Lord : but when the kyng of 
Englande and his counsaill, had seen and vewed the French 
kynges Patent, and well considered, then he sent the same 
Patent of power to the lorde Cardinall with full assent : then 
the lord Cardinall the power received with much gladnes. 
It was highly estemed and taken for great love that the 
Frenche kyng had geven so greate power to the kynge of 
Englandes subject. 

Thursday the seventh day of June, in the vale of Andren, 
within the lordeship royall of Guysnes, before daie was set 
and pight a royall rich tent, all of clothe of gold, and riche 
embroudery of the kyng of Englandes, and diverse other 
hales and pavilions : the same riche tente of gold was 
within hanged of the richest Arras, newly contrived and 
made, that ever before was seen, and a presence of the 
kynges estate, with two chayers and riche cusshyns therein : 
the ground was spred with Carpettes, of newe Turkey makyn, 
all of beautie. 

But here is to be noted, that in this meane season in all 
the feldes about, bothe nigh and far, wer many of the 
French gard, ridyng and beholdyng the maner of the 
Englishe parte, some of the kynges gard, and some of the 
duke of Burbons gard, and some of the Admirall of 
Fraunces Gard, whiche slily marked the conveighaunce 
of the people of Englande. At the houre of metyng 

appoynted 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[I520-2I] 



196 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[I520-2I] 



appoynted, the Lordes of England set their people and 
servauntes in good arraie of battaill, in a plain felde 
directly before the castle of Guysnes. The kyng of 
England commaunded that his Garde should bee set in 
the breste of the battaill, or bend of footemen, and so it 
was doen. This battaill of footemen conducted them- 
selfes so in ordre, that from the firste to the laste, never 
a person of the footemen brake his place or arraie, but 
kept theimselfes so well, that never servyng men theim- 
selfes better demeaned. The servynge men thus set in 
ordre in the felde, on the left hande of the kyng of 
Englande, somewhat towarde the Marres, longe while 
thus abidyng, in whych tyme the Castle of Guysnes shot 
a warnyng pece to the toune of Arde, and in lykewyse 
the Toune of Arde gave warnynge to the Castle of 
Guysnes. 

Now was gathered the Frenche Kynges repaire, and by 
the Lord Marshall and Constable of Fraunce, the Lordes, 
and gentlemen were set in ordre : thus bothe these two 
high and mightie princes, intendyng to mete and assemble, 
many woordes and tales, and suspect demeaninges arose 
in the Englishe partie, for the great love that we the 
English men had to our Prince, caused the ignoraunt 
people that wer not worthy to know the pretence of 
princes, to suspecte the Frenche partie, and the more 
because that Monsire Chatelion a Lord of Fraunce, in 
rigorous and cruell maner, threwe doune foure pennons 
of white and grene which were set up by Richarde Gibson, 
by commaundement from the kynge for the suer marke 
or metyng place of the twoo kynges, in what grounde 
they shoulde encounter, wordes rose betwene Monsire 
Chatelion and Richarde Gibson, as farre as became for 
that deede, but at the commaundement of the Earle 
Marshall for that tyme, which was the noble Earle of 
Essex, the Kynge of Englandes cosyn, that wronge by 
us Englishemenne was paciently suffered, thus from tyme 
to tyme, and watche to watche, and vewe to vewe, the 
houre drewe nere, that was by bothe the Princes appoynted, 
of metyng or encountre. 

Wherefore the kyng of Englande oure sovereigne Lorde, 
with all the Court of nobles of England mounted on horse- 
backe, and marched towardes the valey of Andern in honour- 
able 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



197 



able ordre, all Gentle menne, Squiers, Knightes, and Barons, 
roade before the Kynge and bishoppes also, the Dukes, 
Marques and Earles, gave attendaunce next the Kynge. He 
were muche wyse that coulde have tolde or shewed of the 
riches of apparell that was emongest the Lordes and Gentle- 
menne of Englande, Clothe of Golde, Clothe of Silver, 
Velvettes, Tinsins, Sattins embroudered, and Crymosyn 
Sattens : The marveilous threasor of Golde that was worne 
in Chaynes and Bauderickes, so greate, so weightie, some 
so manifolde, some in Colers of S. greate, that the Golde 
was innumerable to my demynge to be summed, of all noble 
menne, Gentlemenne, Squiers, Knightes, and every honeste 
Officer of the Kynge was richely appareled, and had Chaynes 
of Golde, greate and mervelous waightie : what shoulde bee 
sayed ? surely emong the Englishemen lacked no riches, nor 
beautifull apparell or aray, and alwayes as the Kynge of 
Englande and hys horsemenne marched, so pace for pace 
marched the moste goodly battayll or bend of foote men 
(out of defensable apparell) that ever I trowe before was 



seen. 



The Frenche kyng on his partie marched towardes the 
encountre with all the ruffelers and gallantes of the Frenche 
Courte. In which tyme came to the Frenche kyng some 
reporte, that caused him to tarry, and a light from hys Horse, 
then the Frenchemen were very doubtfull and in a staye so 
still rested, untill aLorde of Fraunce called Monsire Morret, 
the saied Morret came to the Frenche Kyng, and shewed 
him the very fidelitie of the kyng of England, whereby 
the Frenche kynge mounted on horsebacke, and the better 
couraged, marched towardes the place appoynted of encountre. 

Thus in marchyng thone kyng to the other, to the kyng 
of England came lord George Nevell lorde Aburgheny, and 
openly saied, sir ye be my kyng and sovereigne, wherefore 
above all I am bounden to shewe you truthe, and not to let 
for none, I have been in the Frenche partie, and they be mo 
in nomber, double so many, as ye bee : with that was the 
Erie of Shrewesbery Lorde Stewarde ready and saied, sir, 
whatsoever my Lorde of Burgheny saieth, I my selfe have 
been there, and the Frenchemenne bee more in feare of you 
and youre subjectes, then your subjectes bee of them, where- 
fore saied the Earle, yf I were worthie to geve counsaill, 
your grace shoulde marche forwarde, so we intende my Lord 

sayed 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



198 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



sayed the Kyng : then the Officers of Armes cried on afore, 
then in shorte while was the kyng on the banke of Andern : 
then every gentleman as they roade toke his place, and 
stoode still side by side, their regard or face towardes the 
vale of Andern. 

Then the kyng of England shewed hymselfe somedele 
forwarde in beautie and personage, the moste goodliest 
Prince that ever reigned over the Realme of Englande : his 
grace was apparelled in a garment of Clothe of Silver, of 
Damaske, ribbed wyth Clothe of Golde, so thicke as might 
bee, the garment was large, and plited verie thicke, and 
canteled of very good intaile, of suche shape and makynge, 
that it was marveilous to beholde. The Courser whiche 
hys grace roade on, was Trapped in a marveilous vesture of 
a newe devised fashion, the Trapper was of fine Golde in 
Bullion, curiously wroughte, pounced and sette with anticke 
worke of Romayne Figures. Attendyng on the kynges 
grace of Englande, was the Master of his horse, by name 
Sir Henry Guylford, leadyng the kynges spare horse, the 
which horse was Trapped in a Mantellet bront and backe 
place, al of fine golde in Scifers, of device with Tasselles on 
Cordelles pendaunt, the Sadell was of the same sute and 
woorke, so was the hedde stall and raynes. After folowed 
nyne henxce menne, ridyng on Coursers of Naples, the same 
young Gentlemen were appareled in riche Clothe of Tissue, 
the Coursers in Harneis of marveilous fashion, scaled in fine 
Golde in Bullion, and workes subtile more then my sighte 
coulde contrive, and all the same horse Harneis were sette 
full of tremblyng spanges that were large and faire. The 
Lorde Marques Dorset bare the kynges sweard of estate 
before the kynges grace, the reverent father Lorde Cardinall 
did hys attendaunce. 

Thus in litle tyme, abidyng the commyng of the Frenche 
kynge and his, the which in shorte tyme came with greate 
nomber of horsemenne, freshely apparelled, the Frenche 
Kyng and his retayne, put themselfes in place appoynted, 
direct against the Englishe partie, beholdyng every other 
of bothe nacions, the Frenchemenne mused muche of the 
battaill of the foote menne, and every of the Frenchemen to 
other spake of the multitude of the englishe men whiche 
semed greate, yet were not they so many as the Frenche 
partie. 

When 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



199 



When the Frenche kyng had a litle beholden the Englishe 
men, he put hymself some what before his people, that were 
there on him attendaunt, the Duke of Burbon bearynge a 
naked Swearde upright, the Lorde Amirall of Fraunce, and 
the Countie Cosmen Galias, Master of the Frenche Kynges 
horse, and no mo persones gave their attendance in passyng 
with the Frenche kyng : when it was perceived that the 
French kynges swearde was borne naked, then the kynge of 
Englande commaunded the lord Marques Dorset to drawe 
out the sweard of estate, and beare it up naked in presence, 
whiche was so doen. 

Then up blewe the Trumpettes, Sagbuttes, Clarions, and 
all other Minstrelles on bothe sides, and the kynges descended 
doune towarde the bottome of the valey of Andern, in sight 
of bothe the nacions and on horsebacke met and embrassed 
the twoo kynges cache other : then the two kynges alighted, 
and after embrased with benyng and curteous maner eche to 
other, with swete and goodly woordes of gretyng : and after 
fewe wordes, these two noble kynges went together into the 
riche tente of clothe of golde, that there was set on the 
grounde for such purpose, thus arme in arme went the 
Frenche kyng Fraunces the firste of Fraunce, and Henry the 
eight kyng of Englande and of Fraunce, together passyng 
with communicacion. 

When the two princes were in the tente, before rehersed, 
the French kyng saied, my dere brother and Cosyn, thus 
farre to my paine have I travailed to se you personally, I 
thinke verely that you esteme me as I am. And that I 
maye to you be your aide, the realmes and seigniories shewe 
the might of my persone : Sir said the kyng of England, 
neyther your realmes nor other the places of your power, 
is the matter of my regarde, but the stedfastnes and loyall 
kepynge of promesse, comprised in Charters betwene you 
and me : that observed and kepte, I never sawe Prince with 
my iyen, that might of my harte bee more loved. And for 
your love I have passed the seas, into the fardest frontier 
of my realme to se you presently, the whiche dooyng now 
gladdeth me. And then wer the twoo kynges served 
with a banket, and after mirthe, had communicacion in 
the Banket tyme, and there shewed the one the other 
their pleasure. 

The Englishe officers went and ranne with greate pottes 

of 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



200 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



of Wyne, and Bolles to the Frenche menne, and them 
chered the best that might bee, all this season stoode still 
the noble men of the Englishe partie, and all other, and 
from their places moved nothyng that thei were appointed 
unto. And the servyng men in lykewise, not once moved 
from their ground or standyng, but the Frenchemen sodainly 
brake, and many of them came into the Englishe partie, 
speakyng faire, but for all that, the court of Englande and 
the lordes, kept still their arraie. 

After the two kynges had ended the banket, and spice 
and wyne geven to the Frenchemen, Ipocras was chief 
drinke of plentie, to all that would drinke. In open sight 
then came the two kynges, that is to wete : the Frenche 
kyng, and the kyng of England, out of their tent, by whiche 
I then well perceived thabiliment royall of the Frenche kyng, 
his garment was a chemew, of clothe of silver, culpond with 
clothe of golde, of damaske cantell wise, and garded on the 
bordours with the Burgon bendes, and over that a cloke of 
broched satten, with gold of purple coloure, wrapped about 
his body traverse, beded from the shulder to the waste, 
fastened in the lope of the first fold : this said cloke was 
richely set with pearles and precious stones : this Frenche 
kyng had on his hed a koyfe of damaske gold set with 
diamondes, and his courser that he rode on was covered 
with a trapper of Tissue, broudered with devise, cut in 
fashion mantel wise, the skirtes were embowed and fret with 
frised worke, and knit with Cordelles, and buttons tasseled 
of Turkey makyng, Raines and hedstall, answeryng of like 
woorke : and verely of his persone the same Fraunces the 
Frenche kyng, a goodly Prince, stately of countenaunce, 
mery of chere, broune coloured, great iyes, high nosed,, 
bigge lipped, faire brested and shoulders, small legges, and 
long fete. 

All the nobles of the Frenche courte, were in garmentes of 
many colours, so that thei were not knowen from the brag- 
gery: thus as the two kynges were in communicacion, diverse 
noble men of England were called to presence. And then 
the two kynges departed with their compaignie, the kyng of 
Englande to Guysnes, the Frenche kyng to Arde. 

Saterdaie the ix. daie of June in a place within the Eng- 
lishe pale were set and pight in a felde, called the campe, 
two trees of much honor the one called the Aubespine, and 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 201 



the other called the Framboister, whyche is in English the 
Hathorne, whiche was Henry, and the Raspis berry for 
Fraunces, after the significacion of the Frenche, these twoo 
trees were mixed one with the other together on a high 
mountaigne, covered with grene Damaske, the same Trees 
were artificially wrought resemblyng the nature of the same 
as nigh as could be, the leaves were grene Damaske, the 
braunches, bowes, and withered leaves of clothe of gold 
and all the bodies and armes of the same clothe of golde, 
laied on tymber, thei were in heigth from the foote to 
the toppe xxxiiii. foote of assise, in compasse aboute an 
hundred twentie and nyne foote, and from bough to bough 
fourtie and three foote : on these trees were flowers and 
fruites, wrought in kyndly wise with silver and Venice 
gold, their beautie shewed farre : on the mountaigne was 
a place harber wise, where the Herrauldes were, the moun- 
taigne was rayled about, and the railes covered with grene 
Damaske. 

The same day the two noble kynges came to the same 
trees of honor with great triumphe, accompaignied with 
diverse nobles and yonge valiauntes, before whom were 
their shildes caried, and after borne aboute the listes, and 
set on the highest place, shewyng into the feldes, the kynge 
of Englandes armes within a Gartier, and the French kynges 
within a Coller of his ordre of sainct Michael, with a close 
Croune, with a Flower delice in the toppe. The Campe 
was in length nyne hundred foote and in bredth three 
hundred and twentie foote, ditched rounde about, savyng 
at the entrees with broade and depe diches, diverse skaffoldes 
were rered aboute thys Campe, for the ease of the nobles : 
on the right side of the felde stood the quene of England, 
and the quene of Fraunce with many ladies. The same 
Campe was railed and bard on every ende strongly, there 
was twoo lodgynges in the entery of the same felde, for the 
twoo kynges richely adourned, which were unto them very 
necessarie, for therein thei armed theimselfes and toke their 
ease : also in the same compasse was two greate Sellers 
couched full of wyne, whyche was to all men as largesse as 
the fountain. 

The cause of the settyng up of the twoo greate shildes 
with armes Royall, was for joye of the honourable metyng, 
there to passe the tyme from idlenes, with the exercise of 

noble 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[I520-2I] 



VOL. I. 



2 C 



2O2 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



noble feactesof Armesin honour, articles of Justes, Turnayes, 
battailes on foote at the Barres and suche victorious feactes 
were farre in Realmes Proclaimed, whyche caused muche 
people of noble courage thether to resorte : the twoo kynges 
as brethren in armes, undertoke to deliver all personages of 
the same feactes, and to the same twoo kynges by the ordre 
of armes were sociate, the Duke of Vendosme, the duke 
of Suffolke, the countie saint Paule, the Marques Dorset, 
Monsir de Roche, sir William Kyngston, Monsire Brian, 
sir Richard Garnyngham, Monsire Cavaan, sir Giles Capell, 
Monsire Bukkal, Master Nicholas Carewe, Monsire Mounta- 
filion, and Master Anthony Knevet, the shieldes of all these 
nobles were hanged on the trees, with thre tables of the 
Chalenges, to the which al noble menne that would answere, 
brought in their shieldes to the same trees, and them pre- 
sented to the kynges of Armes, and to the Articles wrote 
with their handes. 

Mondaye the xi. daye of June, the twoo Quenes of Eng- 
lande and of Fraunce came to the campe, wher either saluted 
other right honorably and went into a stage for them pre- 
pared, right curiously hanged, and specially there was for 
the quene of England, a Tapet all of pearle called Huges 
Dike, which was much loked at for the costlynes of the 
same. 

At the houre assigned, the two kynges armed at all peces 
mounted on horsebacke, on them attendyng the noble per- 
sones, parteners of the chalenge : the French kyng sette 
hymself on a Courser barded, covered with Purple sattin, 
broched with golde, and embraudered with Corbyns fethers 
round and buckeled, the fether was blacke and hached wyth 
gold. Corbyn is a Raven, and the firste silable of Corbyn 
is Cor, whiche is a harte, a penne in English, is a fether in 
Frenche, and signifieth pain, and so it stode, this fether 
round was endles, the buckels wherewith the fethers wer 
fastened, betokeneth sothfastnes, thus was the devise, harte 
fastened in pain endles, or fain in harte fastened endles : on 
hys hed pece he bare a sieve, all the partenars of the Frenche 
Kynges chalenge were in lyke apparell, every thyng cor- 
respondent in clothe of silke embroudered, on his persone 
were attendant on horsebacke noble persones, and on foote 
foure persones all appareled in purple sattin. 

The kynge of Englande mounted on a freshe courser, the 

trapper 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



203 



trapper of clothe of golde, of Tissue, the Arson mantell 
wise : And the brunt of the trapper bard fashion, cutte in 
waves of water woorke, and every wave rawe wrought and 
frised with Damaske golde, this woorke was laied lose on 
russet velvet, and knitte together with poyntes of golde, 
which waves signified the Lordeshippe of the narowe sea. 
All the parteners of the kynges chalenge wer in the same 
sute, their horses aswel as their persones, attendyng on the 
kyng on horsebacke wer sir Henry Guilford Master of the 
kynges horse, sir Jhon Pechie deputie of Caleis, sir Edward 
Guilford Master of the kynges armye, and Monsire Moret 
of the Frenche courte appareled al foure in the kynges 
livery, which was white on the right side, and the left side 
gold and russet bothe hose and garment. And on him wer 
attendant on foote sixe honorable knightes, xx. esquiers and 
officers to the nombre of an C. and xii. persons, of the whiche 
nomber all the knightes and gentlemen had coates, the one 
halfe silver, and thother clothe of gold and russet velvet, 
and the other officers cotes wer of right Sattin of the same 
coloure, and all their hosen were of the same suite very 
costly. Thus with honour and noble courage these twoo 
noble kynges with their compaignies entered into the feld, 
and them presented unto the Quenes, and after reverence 
dooen to theim, thei roade rounde aboute the tilte, and so 
toke their places appoynted, abidynge the answerers, which 
was for the first the duke Dallencon and tenne men of 
armes on his bend, on coursers barded, the bardes covered 
with white and blacke Velvet, fastened the one within the 
other, garded with Burgon bendes of Tynsell sattin, as well 
their garmentes as their bardes. Then entered on coursers 
barded twelfe gentlemen of the bende of the lord Admirall 
of Fraunce, their garmentes and bardes were russet sattin, 
broched with gold and white and purple Sattin, after the 
devise of their pleasure with great plumes. When these 
bendes were entered the feld, thei shewed themselfes about 
the tilte, and dyd reverence to the quenes, the bend of the 
Duke Dallencon toke firste place, they made theim prest on 
bothe sides, the Frenche kyng was the firste that ranne, he 
did valiauntly and brake speres mightely. 

Then ranne the kynge of Englande to Monsire Graundrvile 
wyth great vigor, so that the speres brake in the kynges 
hande to the vantplate all to shevers. And at the second 

course 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



204 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



course he gave the sayed Monsire Graundevile such a stroke 
that the charnell of his hedde pece, although the same was 
very stronge, was broken in suchewise that he might runne 
no more whereby the kynge wanted three courses. 

Then ranne the Duke de Vandon and mette his counter 
parte righte nobely, and brake speres right valiauntly. 

The noble duke of Suffblke charged his course and met 
right valiantly his counter parte and furnished the v. courses 
right nobly together like good men of armes. 

And when all parties of the chalenge had right valiauntly 
furnished theyr courses, then ranne agayne the ii. noble 
kynges, who dyd so valiantly that the beholders had great 
joy, after which courses the herauldes cried the disarmy and 
the trompettes sounded to lodgyng. 

Tewsday the xii. day of June at hower convenient the 
ii. quenes toke their stages and the bende of chalenge in the 
feld prest to answere and delyver allcommers, to whom came 
x. gentlemen armed on barded horses of the bend of Mounsire 
de Suuyes ther bardes and apparell clothe of velvet full of 
friers knottes sylver, after that they had presented unto the 
queue, then they toke thende of the tilte, and then course 
after course they ranne to the chalengers right egerly, and 
the chalengers of the partie of the twoo kynges delivered to 
the ende of their articles of Justes. 

Then entered a xi. men of armes of the bende of Mounsure 
de Tremoyell, on horses barded with yelowe velvet, losenged 
with Friers knottes of blacke velvet, and after they had 
saluted the quenes, they likewyse toke thende of the tilt, and 
course after course, ranne till they wer delivered of their 
chalenges of Justes : valiauntly this daye was finished. 

Wednesdaie the xiiii. daie of June, the two hardie kynges 
armed at al peces, entered into the felde right nobly appareled, 
the French kyng and all hys parteners of chalenge were 
arraied in purple sattin, broched with gold and purple velvet, 
embrodered with litle rolles of white satin, wherein was 
written, quando, all bardes and garmentes wer set full of the 
same, and all the residue where was no rolles, were pondered 
and sette with the letter ell as thus. L. which in Frenche is 
she, which was interpreted to be quando elle, when she, and 
ensuyng the devise of the first daye it signifieth together, 
harte fastened in pain endles, when she. 

The kyng of England with all the bende parteners of his 

chalenge 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



205 



chalenge wer likewise on horsebacke, appareled in trappers 
of losenges russet velvet and clothe of silver of damaske, 
enbroudered and set in every losenge a bravinche of 
Eglantine of golde, the apparel of the persones wer of the 
same correspondent to the trapper, this Eglantine tree is 
swete, plesant and grene, and yf it be kyndely and frendly 
handeled, and yf it be rudely delt with, it wyll pricke, and 
he that wyll pull up the whole tree by the top his handes 
wyll bee hurte : The twoo kynges with their compaignies thus 
appareled, presented themselfes to the quenes, and so toke 
the ende of the tilte, then entered into the feld Monsire 
Leskeuu called lorde Liskyn, with hym came a xi. men of 
armes, hymselfe the xii. on horses barded and richely 
appareled, and so rode aboute the tilte and saluted the 
quenes, and toke the ende of the tilte. 

Monsire de Leskeuu and his xi. compaignions had their 
bases and bardes, all blacke clothe of gold of damaske all 
to cut on blacke sattin, their garmentes had mantell sieves 
on the left arme, to the wast behynd just to the shulder, 
whyche was praised for the strangenes. 

The Frenche kynge ranne to Mounsire Bewsy Damboyes, 
one of the bend of Mounsire Liskew, and the kyng of 
England charged his course and ranne to Mounsire Liskew, 
and so furnished their courses (as they laie) right nobly and 
valiauntly in breakyng speres that were strong thus course 
after course eche with other, his counter partie did right 
valiantly, but the two Kynges surmounted all the rest in 
prowesse and valiantnes. This bend thus furnished entred 
the Marques de Salons, and his bend xii. persones all ridyng 
on coursers barded and apparelled in white Sattin and blacke, 
broched wyth golde and silver, with cuttes and culpynes 
muche after tawny and blacke Sattin billottes : and after 
reverence done to the quenes, toke thend of the tilte. To 
the Marques de Salons ranne the kyng of england, and the 
kyng of Fraunce to another of the same bend, stil course 
after course ranne all the noble men til the Marques de Salons 
and his bend were delivered, who bare theim right valiantly : 
then blew the trumpettes the retraict and the two kinges 
them unarmed and after departed, the French kyng to 
Arde and the kyng of England to his castle of Guysnes. 

Thursday the xiii. day of June by the noonetyde the two 
Quenes mette in the camp and toke their places, the people 

wer 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



wer come to behold the honor and to see the two kynges, 
who al ready armed entred the feld to receive and deliver all 
men of answere of Justes. Then entred the erle of Devon- 
shyre nere cosyn to the kyng of England, on his bend the 
lorde Mountague also cosyn to the kyng, lord Harbert, 
lord Leonard Gray, Master Arthur Poole, Master Fraunces 
Brian, Master Henry Norres, and iiii. other all richly 
appareilled, the one side blewe Velvet embrodered with a 
mans hartburning in a ladies hand holding a garden pot 
stillyng wyth water on the hart, the other syde was white 
sattin embrodered with letters of golde. Thys compaignie 
rode about the tilte and did reverence to the Quenes and 
so abode to thend of the same. The erle of Devonshire 
charged his spere, and the French kynge likewise charged 
his course to met the same erle and ranne so hard together, 
that both their speres brake, and so mainteined their courses 
nobly. 

Then ranne the king of England to Mounsire Memorancie, 
and hym encountered and bare bothe together and gave 
great strokes, the kynges moste noble grace never disvisered 
nor brethed tyll he ranne the fyve courses and delivered his 
counter partie. 

Dukes, Marqueses, Knightes, Esquiers and other ranne as 
faste as ever thei might, there was none abode when the 
coursers came, tyl the Earle of Devonshire and his bend 
were delivered of demaundes. 

Then entered the lorde Hawarde sonne to the duke of 
Northfolke and xi. compaignions apparelled and barded in 
crimosin Sattin full of flames of golde, the borders ribbed 
with crimosin Velvet, and wyth much honor and due 
reverence done to the quenes were brought with Herakles 
of armes aboute the tiltes, and so toke the place to theim 
appointed, right ryche was their apparell. Then ranne the 
French kyng and encountered the same lord Edmond, they 
brake bothe their staves valiantly course after course, the 
encounter ceased not til they had furnished their five 
courses, so was the lorde Edmonde delyvered by the French 
kynge. 

Then ranne the kinge of Englande to a strong gentle- 
man named RafFe Broke and brake his spere, and ranne 
course after course tyll he had finished his courses right 
nobly and lyke a prince of most valiaunce. The resydue 

ceassed 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



207 



ceassed not tyll they had eche delivered other of their 
chalenge. 

Friday the xv. day of June the king of England mounted 
on a courser royall, his person armed at all peces, his apparell 
and trapper was the one syde riche cloth of gold, of tissue, 
the other side of cloth of Tissue of silver, and cloth of 
golde of Tissue entered ounde the one with the other the 
ounde is warke wavynge up and doune, and all the borders 
aswell trapper as other was garded with letters of fine golde, 
and on the other side that was ounde was set with sygnes 
called cyfers of fine gold, the which were set with great and 
oriental perles, the cifers signified letters knit together in a 
knot, which was to wete, God my frend, my realme and I 
may. This was the devyse and reason thereof, al the 
kinges bende were apparelled in lyke apparell. 

The French king likewise armed at all pointes mounted 
on a courser royal, al his apparel as wel bardes as garmentes 
were purple velvet entred the one with the other, em- 
brodered ful of litle bokes of whit sattin, and in the bokes 
were written a me, about the borders of the bardes and the 
borders of the garmentes, a chayne of blew like Iron resem- 
bling the chaine of a wel or prison chayne, which was 
enterpreted to be Liber, a booke, wythin this boke was 
wrytten as is sayde a me, put these two together and it 
maketh Kb era me, the chayne betokeneth prison or bondes 
and so maketh together in Englysh, delyver me of bondes, 
put to the reason, the first day, second day, and third day, of 
chaunge, for he chaunged but the second day, and it is, hart 
fastened in faine endles, when she delivereth me not of bondes, 
thus was thinterpretacion made, but whether it wer so in all 
thynges or not I may not say. Now is ready the two 
kinges and princes and all their retayne abidynge the 
aunsweres, and after salutacions made to the Quenes being 
by their stages, they toke thende of the title. 

Ready was Mounsire Florengis and with him xii. men of 
armes with coursers barded : the bardes and appaarel was 
crymosyn velvet, tawny velvet, and Plunket velvet, em- 
brodered borderwyse with sheperdes hokes of cloth of silver. 
When they wyth honour had passed about the title, the 
reverence to the Quenes and ladies done, the two kynges 
had their speres ready, then began the rushyng of speres, 
the kynge of England this day ranne so freshly and so many 

courses, 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



208 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



courses, that one of his best coursers was dead that nyght, 
this band was delyvered man after man of their pretence 
of Justes. 

Then entered bendes of Moumire de Rambeurs and Moun- 
sire de Pyns, eche havyng xi. persones in nomber, the one 
band all whit Satten enbrodered with blacke, and the other 
all blacke, dropped with silver droppes and after reverence 
done to the quenes, at the end of the tilte toke their places. 
Then began a new encounter hard and sore, many of them 
bare great strokes of the kinges, to their honor : when these 
bendes wer delivered, the Heraldes cryed a lostel and the 
princes them disarmed and went to lodgynge. 

Saterday the xviii. day of June the French kyng with a 
small nombre came to the castle of Guisnes about the hour 
of viii. in the mornynge the king being in his privy chambre, 
had therof knowledge, who with glad hast went to receyve 
the same French king, and him met and welcomed in frendly 
and honorable maner, and after communicacion betwene 
them had, the king of England departed, leaving the French 
king ther in the sumpteous place before named. Then was 
busy the lord chamberlaine, the lord Stewarde and al other 
officers to make ready feast and chere, it were to longe to 
reherce al, for suche a feaste and banquet was then made, 
that of long tyme before the lyke had not bene sene. 

The king of England thus departed, he toke his horse 
and wyth compaignie of noble men rode to Arde, where the 
French quene and other noblemen him received with muche 
honour. After which receyving he was by the sayd quene 
and lordes brought into a chamber hanged with blew velvet 
embrodered with flowers delice of cloth of gold, wherein 
was a great bedde of like worke, from whence he was 
conveighed into another chamber, in the which was a kinges 
state : hys chamber was hanged and siled with cloth of gold, 
embrodered wyth great cordelles or fryers knottes of cloth 
of silver. In the same chambre wer two cupbordes on 
either syde one, furnyshed with great and goodly plate 
gilt. Noble feasting and chere was there made. After 
diner the ladies dressed them to daunce, the king the more 
to glad the quene and the sayde ladies, departed secretly and 
put hym self with xxix. persons more in maskers apparel, 
fyrst x. young honorable lordes apparelled after the maner 
of Ry and Reuel in Kuselande or farre Estland. Fyrst 

theyr 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



209 



theyr hosen of rych gold satten called Aureate satten, over- 
rouled to the kne with skarlet, and on theyr fete, shoen 
with litle pykes of white nayles after the Estlande guise, 
theyr doublettes of ryche crimosin velvet and cloth of gold 
with wide sieves lyned with cloth of gold, over thys they 
had clokes of crymosyn velvet short, lyned with cloth of 
gold, on every syde of the clokes ringes of silver with laces 
of Venice gold, and on their heades thei had hattes made in 
the toune of Danske and Purses of Scales skynnes, and 
gyrdles of the same : all these yong lordes had visers, on 
their faces and their hattes were drawen lyke hatbondes full 
of Damaske gold. 

Other x. lordes were apparelled in long gounes of blewe 
Satten of the auncient fashion embrodered wyth reasons of 
golde that sayde adieu. Junesse fare well youthe : they had 
typpettes of blacke velvet and hattes hangynge therby, and 
on their heades, high violette standynge cappes and girdelles 
of silke, and Purses of cloth of golde after the auncyent 
maner, with visers, their faces of lyke auncyentie. 

Then was ther another compaignie of x. lordes in which 
maskery the king was hym selfe, apparelled all in longe 
garmentes of estate all pale riche clothe of golde, all these 
had rych gounes which were lyned with grene Taffata, and 
knit with poinctes of Venice silver wherwith the rych clothe 
together was fastened on their faces visers, and al the berdes 
were fyne wyer of Duket golde, the Drunslad plaiers and 
other minstrels arayed in whit, yelow and russet Damaske, 
these mynstrels blew and played, and so passed throughe the 
citie of Arde. All these noble revelers came into the French 
court and put them in presence of the French Quene and 
ladies : and when the Queue had them beholden, these 
revelers toke ladies and daunsed, in passynge the tyme right 
honorably. Then at thinstaunce of the French quene and 
her ladies these maskers and revellers them disvisered, 
shewinge them what persons thei wer. Then spices, fruites, 
jelies and banket viandes wer brought, that done and ended, 
the king toke his leave of the French quene and ladies and 
in secret places every one visered him selfe, so that they 
were unknowen, and so passed through the French court, 
to whome were brought xxx. horses trapped in Damaske, 
whyte and yelowe, and so in maskeler passed the toune of 
Arde, into the felde or campe. 

But 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



VOL. I. 



i D 



210 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



But now to tell of the feast and riches royall that was in 
the presence of the French kyng in the newe palaice roiall. 
This daye the Quene of England received the French king 
with all honor that was accordynge. In presence lacked 
neither clothes of estat nor other riches, for to shew the 
multitude of silver and golde in plate and vessel there that 
daye, it were impossible : for all noble men were served 
in gilte vessel, and all other in silver vessel. When the 
Frenche kinge had wasshed and in hys estate was set, he 
was ryght honorably served in all thinges nedefull, for 
Forestes, Parkes, felde, sake seas, Ryvers, Moates and 
Pondes, wer serched and sought through countreies for the 
delicacie of viandes, wel was that man rewarded that could 
bring any thinge of likinge or pleasure : Ryght honorably 
was the French kynge entertayned, and al other after their 
degre and state. When the French kyng had wasshed, 
then the ladies came and profered them selves to daunce, 
and so dyd in the French kinges presence, which done, the 
French kynge tooke leave of the Quene and ladies of the 
court. The reverend father lord Cardinall accompaignied 
with the Duke of Buckyngham, and other great lordes 
conducted forward the French Kyng, and in their waye 
they encountred and met the King of England and his 
company right in the valy of Anderne apparelled in their 
Maskinge apparell, whyche gladded the French King. 
After reverence done, the sayd two Kinges departed for 
that nyght. 

Monday the xviii. daye of June, there blewe such stormes 
of wind and wether that marvaill was to hear, for whiche 
hideous tempest som said it was a very pronosticacion of 
trouble and hatred to come betwene princes. 

Tewsday the xix. day of June, the two valiant chalengers 
kynges at houre convenient entered into the feld armed at 
al pieces, abiding the comers. Then entered Mounsire 
Bonival and his bend xiiii. persons in nomber wel armed 
riding on barded horses, their apparell was black velvet and 
cloth of golde bilet wyse and fayre plumes on their heades, 
and after reverence done to the quenes, al ready beyng on 
their stages they toke their places at the ende of the tilte. 

Ready were the speres, the French king charged and 
ranne course after course and dyd nobly. Also the King 
of England ranne surely and lost no course til Mounsire 

Bonivall 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



211 



Bonivall and his bende was delivered, the kinges and their 
retayne did not cease. 

Then entered xvii. persones roially armed, the bend of the 
duke of Burbon ridyng on barded coursers, their apparell 
was white velvet, tawny and blacke velvet, entred together 
and all bordered with clothe of golde garnished with plumes 
of the same colours on their heades, they saluted the quenes 
and ladies and toke thende of the tilte as they that came to 
furnyshe thende of the chalenge of Justes. 

The kyng of England was ready and strake his horse 
with the spurres and so fiersly ran to the countre partie that 
his graund grave gard was lose with the great stroke that 
the king gave him : course after course the King lost none, 
but evermore he brake his spere, and so nobly ended his 
Justes royal, for this daye ended the kyngs great chalenge, 
and of the king oure sovereygne lordes doynges, all men 
there that him behelde reported his doynges (so valiante 
were his factes) evermore in honor to be renoumed. The 
French King on hys part ran valiantly breaking speares 
egrely and so wel ended his chalenge of Justes, that he 
ought ever too bee spoken of. When the bende of the 
duke of Burbon was of their pretence of chalenge dely vered, 
they toke leave and departed. 

Wednisday, the xx. day of June, the two Kinges began 
to hold turneyes with al the parteners of their chalenge, 
armed at al pieces. The French kinge and his bend were 
apparelled, their bard covered with purple sattyn, broched 
wyth golde and purple velvet, over al brodered wyth gar- 
londes of friers knottes of whyt satten, and in every 
garlonde liii. paunse flowers, whiche signified, thinke on 
Fraunces, to whom he spake was not knowen, goodly and 
rych was their apparel. 

The King of England mounted on a courser of Napels 
barded and after hym al the fayre bend of his retayne on 
coursers barded, the bardes and apparell was the one side 
rych clothe of Tyssue enbrodered, and lined with rich cloth 
of silver, al the outward part was cutte, the other syde was 
russet velvet poudered with gold or purpled with gold, 
enbrodered with a great rocke or mountayne, and a picture 
of an armed knyght on a courser barded, vauncynge himself 
upon that hil : then was on the same in ryche enbrodery 
a picture of a ladie comming out of a cloude strikinge the 

knight 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



212 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



knight into the body with an arowe a deadly wounde, and 
beneth on the borders were written in letters enbrodered 
that sayde, in love whoso mounteth, passeth in peril!, this was 
the devise, so was the kynge of Englande apparelled and 
al hys parteners of chalenge. 

The quene of Fraunce and the quene of Englande were 
in the places appointed for their honors. The Judges were 
on stages to marke with the king of Heraldes that was for 
Fraunce named Roy mon Joy, and for England kyng of 
armes Garter, to marke and wryte the dedes of noblemen : 
every person toke a naked sworde in his hande, the trum- 
pettes blewe al waitinge to ride and runne, the French 
kynge and the king of England together entred, and their 
bendes, and reverenced the queues, and rode about the place, 
and then toke the ende of the felde in their abode. 

Now again souned the trumpettes, the Heraldes broughte 
into the bendes of divers noble and wel armed men on 
horses barded, that is to wete : First the duke of Alanson 
and x. men of armes on his bend, the lord Admyrals bend 
xii. menne of armes, and Mounsire Gywer and ix. in nomber 
of men of armes all gentlemen, Mounsire Trenoyll wyth xi. 
men of armes, mounsire Liskew and with him xi. men of 
armes on his bende, the Marques de Salons and xii. men of 
armes on hys bend, al on horses barded, and naked swordes 
in their handes. 

Then the two kinges put doune their visers and rode 
to the encountre valiantly, and for trouth strake and recevied 
great strokes, but verely the two kinges bet their countre 
parties to disarming, and then were they departed and that 
battail ceased : then went other, evermore two for two, till 
it came to the kynges agayne, at whiche it neded not to put. 
them in remembraunce : for coragiously the two kynges 
newely foughte with great randon and force, they shewed 
their vigors and strengthes and did so nobly that their 
countre parties had none advauntage. When they had thus 
eche of them fought iiii. battailes, then came Mounsire 
Liskew with whom the king of England had fought one 
battayll, and presented the kynge wyth hys horse, which 
the kyng gentely receyved and for love, incontinent mounted 
on hym, and ther fought the v. battayle ryght valyantly. 
Thus was the turney delivered honorably for that day. 

Thursday the xx. day of June, the quene of England and 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 213 



the French quene were come to the campe in roialtie like 
unto their estates, the ii. kynges were in the felde armed 
and apparelled, the Frenche kyng and his bend on coursers 
barded, their bardes covered with purple broched satten and 
purple velvet right royally, without any more enbrodering. 
The kynge of Englande was mounted on a horse of force 
and courage royally and nobly apparelled he and his retain 
in sute lyke. The apparel was of cloth of silver of damaske 
bordered wyth letters of cloth of golde of damaske all the 
borders, on the bardes and apparell were litle mountaynes 
and springing braunches of Basyle, wrought all of fyne gold, 
and every braunche, lefe and stalke, was lose and waverynge, 
all thycke and full of leaves and braunches, that vneth was 
the clothe of sylver sene, the reasons written on the borders 
was thus : Breake not these swete herbes of the riche mounte, 
doute for dammage. Thys apparel was mervailous freshe and 
fayre : thus the two kinges and theyr retayne tooke the 
felde. Then entered the Earle of Devonshyre cosyn to the 
kyng of England and xvi. honorable persones in hys bende 
well armed. 

Then came Mounsire Florenges and xii. persones on hys 
bende, then came Mounsire de Rambeurs Mounsyre de 
Pyns and ix. men of armes on his bend, then came the bend 
of Mounsire de Bonyval hym self, and xiii. men of armes 
on his bende, then came the bend of Mounsire de Burbon 
and xviii. men of armes, al wel and warlyke horsed and 
armed and everye of these bendes after their devises ap- 
pareilled ryghte rychely. 

The two noble kinges were ready and either of theim 
encountred one man of armes, the French kyng to the erle 
of Devonshire, the king of England to Mounsire Florenges. 
The kyng of England bare back Mounsire Florenges and 
brake his Poldron and him disarmed, when the strokes were 
striken, this battaill was departed, it was much praised. 
Then on went swordes and doune went visers, ther was litle 
abidinge. Sir Jhon Nevell, Mayster Fraunces Bryan, sir 
Rouland, and mayster Robart Garnyngham were this day 
as aides for the hurt persons that before wer of the enter tayn, 
and fought fervently battail after battaill and none ceased 
till they all that woulde entre were delivered of their pre- 
tence in chalenge royall pretenced. This daye was the 
chalenge of Turnays after the articles ended, and all noble 



men 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



214 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



men delivered and so departed the felde : then the kinges 
rode about the feld as honor of armes required, and the 
Herauldes cryed la fine des Turnayes, by the sayde ii. noble 
princes, the xxi. day of June. 

Fryday the xxii. daye of June in the campe was set a 
barrier for to fyght on foote, also an Hale of the kynges of 
Englande was sette in the same place, enbrodered with 
cloudes of blewe, and oute of the cloudes the Sunne risinge, 
the valence of the same was wrytten in letters of blewe 
enbrodered, dieu et mon droit, in whyche Hale the Lordes 
and other of the entertayne of the chalenge armed theim 
selfes. 

Nowe was the noble kynges ready to do battaylle on foote 
at the Barriers, the Queues on their stages : then entered 
bende after bend on foote and preased to the Barriers, 
everye one in hys hande a Punchion spere, wherwith wyth- 
out any abode foyned and lashed alwayes one at another, 
two for twoo as the lotte fell. When the speares were 
spent, then swordes to them were geven. Then preased to 
the Barriers the two valyaunte kynges, and other, then was 
no tariynge but fought with suche force that the fier sprang 
out of their armure. Thus bende after bende they were 
all delivered by the two noble kinges and their aydes of 
retayne. 

Then in came a bend with two hande swordes and cast- 
inge dartes to answere to that chalenge xii. menne wel armed, 
which presed to the barriers and mightely threw theyr 
speares the one to the other, ready or not ready, none 
favored other more then two enemies or at utterance, and 
ever still two for twoo, til al were delivered concernynge 
the chalenge, so this same two kinges safe in body and 
limmes ended the battaill for that daye at the barriers wyth 
great honor. 

Al men of armes passed and departed for that time, much 
preparacion was made there, as setting up tentes, hales, and 
other places for furnishyng of houses of offices, and chambers 
of estates for the kynges and quenes, and also the same 
night was in the campe rered a large frame of tymber worke 
for a chapell place, whyche was siled with ryche clothes 
embrodered, wherin was made a stage of two degrees, with 
the chaire and cloth of state for the lorde Cardinall, the 
alter apparelled wyth all Juelles missal of greate riches, the 

same 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



same chapel thus finished the xxiii. day of June beyng 
Satterday, at houre convenient, the said lord Cardinal sang 
an highe and solempne masse by note before the two kynges 
and quenes : the same done, Indulgence was geven to all 
hearers, the two kynges together associate tooke their 
chamber. Of thys masse in Flaunders arose muche com- 
municacion, in so muche that the common voyce went, how 
the ii. kinges wer sworne together on the sacrament whyche 
was contrary, for the masse was for none other entent then 
to geve Indulgence to the kynges. 

When tyme was, the two kynges washed and satte to 
meat under their clothes of estate, where they were rychly 
served, the royaltie of the fare and the ryches of vessel, 
plate and Juelles surmounteth the witte of man to expresse : 
the quenes in another Chamber wer served with no lesse 
honor, the dyner ended, the sayd straungers royally appar- 
elled, presented them selfes in places of estate. 

To tel you the apparel of the ladies, their rych attyres, 
their sumptuous Juelles, their diversities of beauties, and 
the goodly behavyor from day to day syth the first meting, 
I assure you ten mennes wyttes can scace declare it. 

The two noble kinges put them selfes in armes with their 
bend and entered the felde on foote, before the barriers, 
then entered the bendes of men of armes in armur ryght 
rychly, then al was ready and the two kynges at the barriers 
ready to fyght ryght noblye. Thys daye was delivered at 
barriers by battail, a C. and vi. persones, the ii. last battails 
did the kynges. The kyng of England with few strokes 
disarmed his counter partie. The French kyng likewyse 
bare him self right valiantly. Thus the sayd satterday was 
fully ended, and all men delivered of articles of Justes and 
all Turneys and battailes on foote by the sayde two noble 
kynges. 

After this chalenge honorably performed, the kynges 
prepared divers maskers, and especially of the king of 
England, had iiii. companies, and in every company x. 
persones apparelled as you shall heare. 

The firste persone of the firste x. was appareilled like 
Hercules in a shirt of silver of damaske written in letters of 
purple about the border, en femes et infauntes cy petit assur- 
ance, whyche in Englyshe is as muche to saye : In women 
and children is litle assuraunce : he had on his head a whode 

with 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



2l6 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



with a garlonde of grene damaske cutte into leaves like 
Vyne leaves and Hawthorne leaves, in hys hande a club 
covered wyth grene damaske full of prickes : the Lyons 
skyn aboute his backe was of cloth of gold of damaske, 
wrought and frysed wyth flatte gold of Damaske for the 
heeres, and buskins of gold on his legges. Other thre were 
apparelled for Hector, Alexandre and Julius Caesar, in 
Turkay Jubbes of grene cloth of gold wrought lyke chamblet 
very richly, and on their hedes bonettes of Turkay fashyon, 
of cloth of gold of Tyssue, and clothe of sylver rolled in 
Cypres kercheffes after the Panyns fashyon, and girdles of 
cloth of gold wyth pendantes of the same cutt in greate 
flages, and every one buskins of grene damaske, and thre 
other lyke Princes of Jury for David, Josue, and Judas 
Machabeus : these thre were in longe gounes of russet 
Tinsel satten with great wide sieves lined with cloth of gold 
pendant and great tippettes of the same cloth of gold 
baudericke wise and whodes of the same, buskyns of grene 
damaske, their vysers had berdes of fyne golde : the other 
thre were for Christen prynces, as Charlemaine, Arthur and 
Godfry de Bulloigny. These thre were apparelled in long 
vestures of calendred cloth of golde and purple clothe of 
gold broched together, with whoddes and cappes of the 
same, visers and buskyns of grene Damaske. 

Other x. wer apparelled in cotes of crimosyn Sattin al 
over covered with quaterfoyks of cloth of gold, of tissue, 
and clothe of sylver raysed, the gold was frynged with 
sylver, and the silver wyth gold and layde lose on the 
Crimosyn Satten, and every quaterfoyle was knyt to other 
with laces of gold. Over that the said x. persones had 
every one a large mantle or Robe of crimosyn satten en- 
brodered full of fygures of golde and on their heades 
bonettes of stoole worke of gold of damaske, and every one 
had on hys vyser a berde of golde wyer with whoddes and 
buskyns of crimosyn Satten. 

Ten of the ladies were appareled after the Genowayes 
fashyon, the ground of their gounes was whit Satten, over 
diapred with right crimosyn satten and gold of Damaske, 
and on their heades square bonettes of damaske golde, 
rolled wyth lose gold that did hange doune at their backes, 
with kerchiefes or cleres of fyne Cypres. 

The other x. ladies were attyred after the fashyon of 

Millayne, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



217 



Millayne, in ryche Tyssue and clothe of sylver raysed, 
parted, travers, and ruffed sieves with foresleves pendant, 
knit with poyntes of gold and caules or coyfes of gold 
piped, and Myllayne bonettes of crimosyn satten drawcn 
throughe wyth clothe of golde. Thus the kynge of Eng- 
land, and xix. noblemen with him and his sister Quene 
Marye dowager of Fraunce and xix. ladies with her like 
maskers apparelled as you have heard, all mounted on horses 
trapped in velvet white and yelow, and evermore a lord and 
a lady rydyng together, with mynstrelsie departed out of 
Guysnes on sonday the xxiiii. day of June and toke their 
way toward Arde, and in the way on the banke of Anderne 
these maskers met with the Frenche kyng, beyng in a 
chariot with xxxviii. persones richely apparelled in Maskyng 
apparellj and eche compaigny passed by other without any 
countenaunce makyng or disviseryng. 

The Frenche kyng and his compaignie went to Guysnes, 
the king of England to Arde, where his majestic was received 
into the French court, and brought into the chamber of 
riche apparell, where at the instance of the French Quene 
the kinge and al hys, them disvisered and shewed theyr 
faces, and al the ladies of England likewyse, then began 
feast and chere to aryse, the king of England was set, and 
after all the ladies and Maskers of England, and were nobly 
served of many straung meates : After diner began the 
daunces in passing the tyme joyouslye. 

The French Maskers apparel was not all of one suite, but 
of several fashions, of divers silkes, some cut, some broched, 
some had plumes that were very fayre, but very beautifull 
was the syght. 

The Frenche kinge and his company was then at Guisnes, 
where the quene of England met and welcomed them. 
Then the French king and his Maskers shewed themselfes 
bare faced, and when the Queue them saw she did then the 
more reverence. Create was the chere that then was there. 
After dyner and daunces done, the French king drew him 
self into a secret chamber and put from hym his apparel of 
maskery and toke to him hys apparell of usaunce, in the 
whyche were many fair Emeraudes, this done, he toke his 
leave of the quene, and on the court he loked with a high 
countenaunce and so departed, the lord Cardinal and the 
duke of Buckingham him conductinge, the king of Englande, 

this 

VOL. I. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



2 E 



218 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[I52O-2I] 



this tyme durynge, was at Arde, where he passed the time 
with much solas. At tyme convenient he toke leave of the 
Frenchmen and all other of the French court, and after 
they had visered them selfes they rode nobly thus appar- 
elled through the towne of Arde, and so passed till they 
came to the campe, where as all the chalenges were finished, 
and there the French kyng perceiving the commyng of the 
English maskers, stode still beholding them. Then the 
kyng of Englande put of his viser and preased unto the 
French king: then the two kinges embrased and amiably 
together communed, after which communicacion eyther of 
other by kyngelye salutynge tooke leave, and for remem- 
braunce eyther to other gave gyftes. The kynge of Eng- 
land gave to the Frenche kynge a colloure of Jewels of 
precyouse stoones called Balastes the Sanker furnyshed wyth 
greate Dyamantes and Perles. The Frenche kynge gave 
to the Kynge of Englande a Bracelet of precyouse stones, 
riche Jewels and fayre, and so departed the sayde two noble 
Kynges, the sayd xxiiii. day of June, which was sonday and 
Midsomerday. 

During this triumph so much people of Picardie and 
West Flaunders drew to Guysnes to se the kyng of England 
and his honor, to whom vitailes of the court were in plentie, 
the conduicte of the gate ranne wyne alwayes, there wer 
vacaboundes, plowmen, laborers and of the bragery wagoners 
and beggers that for drunkennes lay in routes and heapes, 
so great resort thether came, that both knightes and ladies 
that were come to se the noblenes, were fayne to lye in hay 
and strawe, and helde theim therof hyghly pleased. From 
the court of the Emperor, nor of the lady Margarete court, 
nor of Flaunders, Brabant nor Burgoin came never a persone 
to aunswere to the chalenge : By that it semed that ther 
was smal love betwene the Emperor and the Frenche kynge : 
Moreover Mounsire Fayot captayne of Boleyn wyth Moun- 
syre Chattelon did theyr devoyer to have taken the toune 
of sa,inct Omer, of which doyng was thought no goodes to 
the Emperor. 

Monday the xxv. day of June, the kyng of England and 
the Quene and al the court removed from Guysnes to the 
toune of Caleys and ther made the king his abode, where 
was concluded the metinge of the Emperor with the kyng, 
wherfore was made newe and great provisions. 

In 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



219 



In the tyme of the triumph there was a muttering that 
the toune of Caleys should be rendred into the French 
kynges handes, and for trueth the Frenchmen so spake and 
sayd, wherwith many Englishmen wer greved. 

While the king lay thus in Caleys, he considered the 
charge of hys nobles, and thought that lesse nombre of 
servauntes would now serve them for the tyme of his 
abode, and so caused the Cardinal to cal al the gentlemen 
before him, whiche in the kinges name gave to theim 
thankes with much commendacions, and for eschewing of 
coste, because the king taried but the Emperors comminge, 
he licensed them to send home the halfe nombre of their 
servauntes and bad them after their long charges to live 
warely, this terme warely was amongest the most part taken 
for barely, at which saying the gentlemen sore disdayned. 

Thus in Caleys rested the king and the quene until the x. 
day of July. Then the kinges grace with goodly repayr 
rode to the toune of Graveling in Flaunders ther that night 
to rest and se the Emperor, on the kynge wer wayting the 
lorde Cardinall, Dukes, Marquises, Erles, bishops, Barons, 
knightes, and gentlemen. The noble Emperor passed the 
water of Graveling, and at a place called Wael, there he 
mete and receyved the kinge of Englande, the Emperor 
made such semblant of love to all the court of Englande 
that he wan the love of thenglishmen, and so passed the 
Emperor and the king of England to Graveling, where the 
kynge lodged the best that might be, all lordes, gentlemen, 
yomen, and all sortes of Englishmen from the highest to 
the lowest were so chered and feasted, with so loving maner 
that much they praysed Themperors court. In Gravelyng 
was the Emperors Aunte Margarete, she welcomed the 
kinge and other noble men of the realme. 

When the French king and his lordes had knowlege of 
the metynge of the Emperor and the kyng of England in 
the towne of Gravelinge, they were therwith greately greved, 
as by many thinges appered for after the Englishmen were 
in Fraunce disdained, and in their suites ther greatly deferred 
and had litle right and muche lesse favor, so from day to 
day still more and more began hartbrenning, and in con- 
clusion open warre did arryse betwene the two realmes. 

Wednisday the xi. day of July, the Emperor and the lady 
Margaret came with the king of England to the toune of 

Caleys, 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



22O 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[l520-2l] 



Caleys, the Emperor and the lady Margaret were lodged in 
Staple hal, and al gentlemen and other lodged in other places 
right well prepared of all necessaries for their comming : 
and for solas was buylded a banqueting house 800 foote 
round, after a goodly devyse, builded upon Mastes of 
shyppes in suche maner as I thinke was never sene, for 
in it was the whole speare portrated, which by reason of 
the great winde that blewe, coulde not be acheved, the same 
day at night, the king and xv. persones wer apparelled all in 
black Velvet covered with cloth of golde, cut on the velvet, 
fastened with knottes of gold, on the whiche knottes honge 
spangels of golde lyke tuftes and bonettes of the same and 
clokes of crimosyn Satten and cloth of gold wrapped travers, 
and their buskyns of the same clothe of gold. Al these lusty 
maskers went to the Emperors lodging and were received 
and in the chambre of presens daunced and revelled, the 
which at the Emperors request, the kinge and other theim- 
selves disvisered, whereby the king was knowen : then the 
kynge toke his leave and departed for that nyght. 

Tewsday the xii. day of July, because the banquet house 
could not be finished, the Emperor and the lady margaret 
supped with the king and the quene at the checker, where 
the same night after supper revelled Ixxxxvi. Maskers: after 
the revelles was a banquet : After whych banket the kyng 
brought the Emperor and the lady Margaret to the Staple, 
and after withdrew hym. 

This night was viii. compaignyes of maskers, and in every 
compaignie xii. persones all in gold, silver and velvet rychely 
appareilled, but because the rome was small, the shew was 
the lesse. 

In these revelles were put in maskers apparel divers gentle- 
men of the French court unweting to the kyng or any other 
that bare rule, for divers yong gentlemen of the French 
court favored more the Frenche partie, then the Emperors 
partie, through which meanes thei saw and much more heard 
then they should have done. 

Friday, the xiii. day of July, the Emperor did entend to 
have departed from Caleys, but the counsail was suche that 
he departed not that night. The charters before tyme con- 
cluded, there were redde, and to the Emperor declared al 
the whole articles of high peace and league tripertite, to 
which the French kynge had assented and fully contented, 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



221 



and for the more exemplificacion of the same, he sent the 
lorde de Roche wyth letters of credence to signifie to the 
Emperors Majestic that to the same articles he the Frenche 
kyng promised in the worde of a king as prince faythfull, 
to observe and kepe for him and his realme and subjectes. 
Thus by the lord de Roche in the Emperors presence and 
before the king of England in the name of his master there 
shewed the Frenche kynges will in the toune of Caleys 
with many high and urgent causes concernyng the princes, 
whereby the Emperor went not out of Calays that night, by 
whiche abode the emperors servauntes were muche in doubt 
of the Emperors persone. 

Saterday the xiiii. day of July, about none the Emperor 
toke leave of the quene of England his aunte and of her traine 
of ladies, the kyng with all his nobles conducted the Emperor 
on his way to a village towardes Flaunders called Wael, 
wher the Emperor enbrased the kyng, and him betoke to 
almightie God, and the kyng gave to him a courser of 
Naples richely apparelled. 

The kyng toke leave of the Duches of Savoye great aunte 
to the Emperor and of all nobles of the Emperors court, and 
so departed, smal tyme in Calayce the kyng made abode, but 
in goodly hast shipped and with the quene and all other 
nobles in safetie tooke lande. And after passed the tyme 
of Sommer with huntyng and other sportes honorably and 
made no great jestes this yere. 

This yere the kynge kept his Christmas at his Maner of 
Grenewiche with muche noblenes and open court. And the 
x. day of February in his owne person Justed to all comers, 
and the xii. day his grace and therle of Devonshyre with iiii. 
aydes answered at the Turnay all comers which were xvi. 
persones, noble and riche was their apparel, but in feates of 
armes the kyng excelled the rest. 

In this tyme was Edwarde Duke of Buckyngham accused 
to the kyng of high treason, wherfore the kynges grace by 
the advise of hys counsail, sent and directed his letters to 
the sayd duke, beyng at his maner of Thornbury in the 
countie of Glocester, that incontinent he shoulde come to his 
presence all excuses layde aside. Also the kynge gave com- 
maundement to sir Willyam Cumpton, sir Richard Weston, 
and Sir Willyam Kyngston knightes for the kynges bodye, 
to take with them secret power and also serjauntes at armes, 

and 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



The duke of 
Buckingham 
accused. 



222 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



and that thei shoulde wisely take hede that when the duke 
had received the kynges letters, he should not convey hym- 
selfe, whiche they wisely accomplished. 

The sayd Duke upon the sight of the kynges letters 
removed, and so jornied tyll he came to Wyndsore, and 
there offered at S. George, and alwayes not farre from him 
awaitynge his demeanor, were the same knightes liyng. The 
Duke lodged in Wyndsore for that night, and as it was well 
proved, he mervailously feared, inso muche that he called 
unto him a servaunt of the Kynges named Thomas Ward, 
the same Thomas Ward was gentleman Herbenger for the 
kyng, and demaunded of him what he made there, who 
answered, saiyng that ther lay his office, there the duke 
perceived that he could not escape. And so muche was he 
in spirit troubled that as he was at breakefast his meat would 
not doune, yet he made good countenaunce, and shortly 
toke his horse, and so rode till he came to Tothill besides 
Westminster where he toke his barge : before this tyme was 
the dukes chauncellour taken and as a prisoner kept in the 
tower, whiche had confessed matter of high treason concern- 
yng the kynges persone. 

When the Duke was in his barge, he commaunded to 
lande at my lorde Cardinals bridge, where he landed wyth 
foure or five of his servauntes, desiryng to see the same 
lorde Cardinal!, but to hym was answered how the same 
lorde was diseased, well sayd the duke yet wyll I drynke of 
my lordes wyne or I passe, then a Gentleman of my Lordes 
brought the Duke with muche reverence into the Seller, 
where the duke dranke. 

When he sawe and perceived no chere to him was made, 
he chaunged colour and so departed to hys barge, saiynge to 
his servauntes, I mervaill where my chauncellor is, that he 
commeth not to me, not knowynge that he was in prison. 

The duke thus in his barge commyng towardes London, 
sir Henry Marney capitaine of the Kynges Garde, on him 
attendyng C. yomen of the Kynges garde in a barge on the 
ryver of Thames met the same duke, and without abode 
borded the dukes barge and hym in the kynges name 
attached. And then from him were put his servauntes, 
and the duke was brought to the Haie wharfe and there 
landed, the dukes servauntes were commaunded to go to 
the Maner of the Rose in saincte Larence Pountnay, and 

there 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



there to abide till the Kynges pleasure were further 
knowen. 

Sir Henry Marnay brought the duke through the Thames 
strete to the Tower of London, the people muche mused 
what the cause might be, and for trouth tyll it was knowen, 
among theim was muche speakyng. There was also attached 
a Monke of a Charterhouse besides Bristow called Henton, 
also Mayster Jhon Delaker the Dukes Confessor, and the 
dukes Chauncellor before mencioned, al were in the Tower 
prisoners. The xvi. day of April was the same Duke brought 
to the Tower. Alas the whyle that ever ambicion shoulde 
be the losse of so noble a man, and so muche in the Kynges 
favor, by hym all Lordes and other may beware how they 
geve credence to false prophesies, or false hypocrites. For 
a Monke of the Charter house shewed the Duke that he 
shoulde be Kynge of Englande, whych to the Kynges per- 
sone coulde be no higher treason. Alas that ever he gave 
credence to suche a false traitor. 



THE XIII. YERE. 

IN this tyme inquiries were made in divers shyres of 
Edwarde Duke of Buckyngham beynge prisoner in 
the tower of London, where, by the knightes and 
gentlemen, there he was endited of high treason for certaine 
wordes spoken by the same Duke in Blechyngly to the 
Lorde Aburgenye, the same Lorde was attached for con- 
sailement, and the Lord Mountague the kynges Cosyn and 
both ledde to the Tower. And sir Edward Nevell knight, 
brother to the sayd lorde Aburgeney forbidden the kynges 
presence. 

The Duke of Northfolke was made by the kynges letters 
patentes high Steward of Englande, to accomplishe the high 
cause of appele of the Piere or Pieres of the realme, and to 
decerne and judge the causes of the pieres, &c. 

Wherfore shortly after was made in Westmynster hall a 
scaffolde for the Lordes and a presence for a Judge, railed 
and counter railed about, and barred with degrees. The 
Duke of Northfolke was chiefe Judge, and many Pieres of 
the realme, as the Duke of Suffblke, the Marques Dorcet, 
the Erles of Worcester, Devonshyre, Essex, Shrewisbury, 

Kent, 



THE XII. 
YERE 

[1520-21] 



224 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



Kent, Oxford, and Darby, the lorde of S. Jhons, Lorde 
Delaware, lorde Fitz Warren, Lorde Wylloughby, Lorde 
Broke, Lorde Cobham, lorde Harbert, and the lorde Mor- 
ley, satte as Peres and judges upon the same duke of 
Buckyngham. 

When the lordes had taken their places, sir Thomas 
Lovell and sir Richard Chomley knightes, brought the duke 
to the barre with thaxe of the Tower before him, who 
humbly bareheaded reverenced the duke of Northfolke, 
and after all the lordes and the kinges lerned counsaill. 
Then the Clarke of the counsail sayd, sir Edward duke 
of Buckyngham hold up thy hande, thou art endited of 
high treason, for that thou traitorously hast conspired and 
ymagined as farre as in thee lay to shorten the life of our 
soveraigne lorde the kyng : of this treason how wilt thou 
acquite thee, the Duke answered by my Peres. 

And when thenditement was openly redde, the duke sayd, 
it is false and untrue and conspired and forged to bryng me 
to my death, and that wil I prove, allegyng many reasons 
to falsefy the inditement, and against his reasons the kynges 
Atturnay alleged the examinacions, confessions and proves 
of witnesses. 

The Duke desired the witnesses to be brought furth, 
then was brought before hym Syr Gylbert Perke prieste his 
Chauncellor, fyrst accuser of the same Duke, Maister Jhon 
Delacourt priest, the Dukes Confessor and his owne hand 
writyng layde before hym to the accusement of the duke. 
Charles Knevet Esquyer Cosyn to the Duke, and a Monke, 
Prior of the Charterhouse besides Bathe, whiche like a false 
ypocrite had enduced the Duke to the treason, and had 
divers tymes sayd to the duke that he should be kyng of 
England, but the duke sayd that in himselfe he never con- 
sented to it. Divers presumpcions and accusementes wer 
layde to him by Charles Knevet, which he would fain have 
covered. The deposicions were redde, and the deponentes 
were delivered as prisoners to the officers of the Tower. 

Then spake the Duke of Northfolke, and sayd my lorde, 
the kynge oure soveraigne Lorde hath commaunded, that 
you shall have hys lawes ministred with favor and right to 
you. Wherefore yf you have any other thinge to say for 
your selfe you shalbe hard. Then he was commaunded to 
withdrawe him, and so was led into Paradise a house so 

named. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



225 



named. The Lordes went to counsaill a great while and 
after tooke their places. Then sayd the Duke of North- 
folke to the Duke of Suffblke, what say you of sir Edward 
duke of Buckyngham touching the high tresons ? The Duke 
of Suffolke answered, he is giltie, and so sayd the Marques 
and all the other Earles and lordes : Thus was this prince 
duke of Buckyngham founde giltie of high treason by a 
Duke, a Marques, vii. Erles, and xii. Barons. 

The Duke was brought to the barre sore chafyng and 
swette mervailously, after he had made his reverence, he 
paused a while. The duke of Northfolke as a Judge sayd, 
sir Edward, you have heard how you be indited of high 
treason, you pleaded thereto not gyltie, puttyng your selfe 
to the peres of the realme, the whiche have found you 
giltie : then the Duke of Northfolke wept and sayd, you 
shalbe ledde to the kynges prison and there layde on a 
Herdill and so drawen to the place of execucion, and there 
to be hanged, cutte doune alive, your membres to be cutte 
of and cast into the fyer, your bowels brent before you, 
your head smytten of, and your body quartered and devyded 
at the kynges wyll, and God have mercy on your soule. 
Amen. 

The Duke of Buckingham sayd, my lorde of Northfolke, 
you have sayd as a traytor should be sayed unto, but I was 
never none, but my lordes I nothyng maligne for that you 
have done to me, but the eternall God forgeve you my 
death and I do : I shall never sue to the kyng for life, how- 
beit he is a gracious prince, and more grace may come from 
hym then I desire. I desire you my lordes and all my 
felowes to pray for me. 

Then was the edge of the axe turned towardes him, and 
so led into a barge, Sir Thomas Lovell desired him to sytte 
on the cusshyns and carpet ordeined for him, he sayd nay, 
for when I went to Westminster I was duke of Buckyng- 
ham, nowe I am but Edwarde Bowhen the mooste caitiffe 
of the worlde. Thus they landed at the Temple, where 
received him sir Nicholas Vawse and sir Willyam Sandes 
Baronetes and led him through the Citie, who desired ever 
the people to pray for him, of whom some wept and lamented, 
and sayd, this is thende of evill life. God forgeve him, he 
was a proude prince, It is pitie that he behaved him so 
against his kynge and liege lorde, whom God preserve. Thus 

aboute 

VOL. I. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



The duke of 
Buckinghams 
judgement. 



2 F 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



aboute iiii. of the clocke he was brought as a cast man to 
the Tower. 

Frydaie the xvii. day of Maie, about xi. of the clocke. 
This duke with a great power was delivered to Jhon Kyeme 
and Jhon Skevyngton shyriffes, who led him to the skaffblde 
on Tower hill, where he sayd he had offended the kynges 
grace through negligence and lacke of grace, and desired all 
noblemen to beware by him, and al men to pray for him, 
and that he trusted to dye the kynges true man. Thus 
mekely with an axe he toke his death, on whose soule Jesu 
have mercy. Then the Augustine friers toke the body and 
head and buried them. Alas that ever the grace of truth 
was withdrawen from so noble a man, that he was not to 
his kyng in alegeaunce as he ought to have been, suche is 
thende of ambicion, thende of false prophesies, thende of 
evill lyfe and evill counsaill. 

About this tyme Fraunces the Frenche kynge made open 
warre against the Emperor Charles both by lande and sea. 
The Provinces of Aragon, Castle, and all Spayne, Germany, 
Brabant, Flaunders and the steades mainteined the partie 
of the Emperor. The Kynges highnes consideryng the 
murder and effusion of Christen bloud, and the trouble that 
might ensue to al the princes of Christendome, by invasion 
of the great Turke sent the Cardinall of Yorke his Chaun- 
cellor by name lord Thomas Wolsey to his toune of Calayce 
to intreate an amitie and peace betwene those two mightie 
princes. For this voiage great preparacion was made, not 
onely for him but also for the Earle of Worcestre then lorde 
Chamberlayn, the lorde of S. Johns, the lord Ferrys, the 
lorde Harbert, the bishop of Duresme, the bishop of Ely, 
the Primate of Armicane, sir Thomas Boleyn, sir John 
Peche, sir Jhon Hussey, Sir Richarde Wyngfelde, sir Henry 
Gildforde, and many other Knightes, Esquiers, gentlemen, 
Doctors, and learned menne. And thus honorably accom- 
panied he rode through London the xxv. daye of July, and 
at Thomas Beckettes house the Maier and Aldermen toke 
leave of hym, praiyng God to send him good spede. Thus 
passed he to Canterbury where tharchebishop, and the bishop 
of Canterbury and other prelates received him in ponti- 
ficalibus and brought him to his lodgyng under Canape 
to the bishoppes palayce : the viii. day of Julye he came 
to Dover : the xx. daye he and thother lordes with their 

retinues 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



227 



retinues toke passage, and arived at Calayce in safetie, where 
the lorde Deputie and counsaill received theim wyth muche 
honor, and lodged the Cardinall in the Staple hall. 

Shortly after whose arivall, came thether the Chauncelor 
of Fraunce and the Countie de Palays with iiii. C. horse, as 
ambassadors from the Frenche kynge. And likewise from 
the Emperor came great Ambassadors, and when thei satte 
in counsail, the Emperors Ambassade shewed their Com- 
mission and power. And even so did the Frenche kynges 
Ambassade, which was more larger then the Emperors 
commission. Thus when the grudges were declared on 
bothe sides, when the Emperors Ambassadors consented 
to peace, the French kynges would not. And when the 
Frenche Ambassadors consented to peace, the Emperors 
would not. The Cardinall then would have knitted the 
Emperor, the kyng our soveraigne lorde, the Frenche kynge, 
and the bishop of Rome in a league and amitie together : 
the other Ambassadors had no suche Commission, especially 
the bishop of Romes, where upon letters were sent to Rome 
in all hast and the Frenchmen taried in Calayce till he 
returned, and beheld the toune, with whiche the counsail of 
Calaice wer not contented. Hereupon the Cardinal rode to 
the Emperor accompanied with his Ambassadors (and left 
the Frenche ambassadors in Calaice to abide his returne) 
and passed by Gravelyng, Dunkirke, Newport, Owden- 
borow, and sundry tymes in the waye he was encountred 
and received with noble men. And without Bruges he was 
received with many noble men, and many lordes and other 
of the Emperors court, and a myle without Bruges the 
Emperor his owne persone met him, and shewed to him 
and to the other lordes and gentlemen of england gracious 
countenaunce, and so accompanied the cardinall into the 
toune, where great multitude of people beheld them, and so 
rode to the Emperors palayce where he lighted, and fyrst 
embrased the Cardinall and after all the lordes, knyghtes, 
and gentlemen of Englande. It is to suppose the Emperor 
knewe of the Commission geven to the sayd Cardinall, 
whiche had the kynges power as if his grace had been 
present, and also had the great scale wyth hym, whiche had 
not been seen before, or els the Emperor woulde not have 
done hym so high honor and reverence. 

The Englishe lordes, knightes, esquiers, yomen of the 

kynges 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



228 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



kynges gard and other beyng to the nomber of iiii. C. Ix. 
horse, were wel lodged every man after his degree, and every 
lodgyng furnished with fewell, bread, bere, wyne, Beves, 
Muttons, Veles, Lambes, Venison, and all maner deintie 
viand aswell in fishe as fleshe, with no lacke of spices and 
bankettyng dishes. 

The next day after the great chere made to the lord 
Cardinall and to all his lordes, knightes, gentlemen, and all 
other lordes and knightes of England (in whose presence) 
the Cardinall made his proposicion concernyng peace to 
be had betwene the sayd Emperor and the French kyng 
declaryn the calamities, misery, and wretchednes that came 
by warre : and the commodities, benefite, and welth that 
came by peace, Concorde and tranquilitie, whiche proposi- 
cion continued a great while : and when the Cardinall had 
made an ende, the Emperor himselfe answered and said : 
The lawe of God byndeth every man to claime and aske his 
right, and that the same lawe byndeth no man to holde, 
kepe, and withstande another mans right. Our cosyn of 
Fraunce doeth wythholde our rightes and patrimonies whiche 
we have princely desired, and eftsones wil, and if he wil 
rendre to us our said rightes and patrimonies, we are con- 
tented to have peace with hym and his subjectes, yf not we 
trust in God and oure ryght that the troubles by your 
fatherhed rehersed, shal come upon hym and his adherentes. 
And for the titles of our regalitie, to putte that to the 
bishop of Rome, we do consider that kynge Edwarde of 
Englande the third of that name of noble memory, warred 
by just title to recover the realme of Fraunce from Philip 
de Valois, whiche title by intercession was put to the bishop 
of Rome and his court, to discusse and expended there by 
the space of xxiii. yeres undetermined, notwithstanding great 
pursuite and labor was made to have it ended : Suche lyke 
tyme shoulde be to us tedious, wherfore we entende by the 
ayde of God to folowe our title. 

The Cardinall replied and declared the league that was 
betwene the thre mightyest princes of the worlde, that 
is to saye, the Emperor, the kynge our soveraigne lorde 
Henry the VIII. and the Frenche kyng, and how that to the 
prince that fyrst moved warre, the other two should be 
enemies unto hym, and sayd, beholde the mightie power and 
puissaunt realme, riches, shippes, vitailes, and ordinaunce, 

lordes, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



229 



lordes, chivalry, horsemen, archers and comminaltie, this is 
in the high and mightie kynge of England my soveraigne 
lord, and he that fyrst warre beginneth, by the sayd league 
my sayed soveraigne lorde to his honor may lefully spred 
his baner and make warre in defence of his frende. For 
this and other thynges my soveraigne lorde desires of your 
highnes and majestic the consent of peace. 

My lorde Cardinall sayd the Emperor, I esteme moste the 
honor of my dere uncle the kynge of Englande and trust in 
his assuraunce, that neither his royall person, his realme, his 
power, Navye, nor ordinaunce shalbe but to our ayde in 
assistynge our tried title, nor will consent to any thyng 
in dishonoryng us or our Empire : God defende but we 
shoulde humble our selfe to his request, our high honor 
reserved. Lorde God who may esteme more higher injuries 
and wronges then we in our person, our predecessours, and 
our lovyng subjectes have endured by the house of Fraunce. 
My lorde Cardinall sayd the Emperor, their pride with our 
honor we may and must apprehende and overthrow by the 
help of God : With these wordes the counsaill brake up. 

All the lordes and menne of honor of England that day 
dyned in the Emperors court. 

When they were set and served, it came so to passe that 
an honorable man of the Emperors as he sat at dyner sayd 
thus. It is thought that the kynges Majestic of Englande 
entendeth to make a peace. Alas that ever he shoulde 
ymagyn a thyng so muche to the dishonor of the Emperor. 
The kynge is his uncle, is it not come to his hearynge that 
all the worlde heareth ? It was so that by assent of the 
Byshoppe of Rome and other princes to make peace wyth 
us, the Frenche partie after the battayll of Gyngate obtained 
by Maximilian then archeduke of Osteriche, where everye 
noble manne of us foughte wyth the Frenchmen quarter 
naked, and slewe of theim a mervailous nomber. They 
desired the doughter of Maximilian named Margarete to 
wife, whiche lady is Duches of Savoy and yet livyng, and 
she beynge like an Emperors childe was delivered into their 
handes as queue of the realme, with divers tounes in Picardie 
rendred with her and parte of high Burgonie, and treasure 
mervaylous. Nowe sithen the same Maximilian had spoused 
Jane doughter and heire of Fraunces Duke of Britaigne, 
whiche lande the Frenchemen over ranne and spoiled, and 

she 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



she constrained to sue unto Charles Kynge of Fraunce for 
a safe conduict to passe through his realme to Maximilian 
her spouse, and upon the same safeconduict graunted, the 
sayd ladie Jane passynge through Fraunce with a small 
company, was by the same Charles taken at Ambois and 
there maried her against her wyll, wherupon he forsoke the 
lady Margarete and sent her againe to her father themperor 
without rediliver or rendryng againe the tounes that wer 
delivered with her. And where as the duke of Geldre is 
subject to the Emperor, is he not yet at this day by the 
procurement of the Frenche Kynge, rebell ? And where 
also by just title the realme of Naples ought to be united to 
the croune of Castle, dyd not the Frenche kynge fayne a 
jorney into the holy lande pretendyng title by Jeniamy brother 
to the great Turke beynge then captive in Rome, and by a 
craftie treatie obtained the sayd Jeniamy, and so passed 
into Naples wythout perill, and seazed all the lande into hys 
handes, and then prisoned he the same Jeniamy ? Thus to 
the great dammage of Castle, he made claime to Naples by 
Margaret quene of England late wyfe to Henry the VI. 

The kyng of Naverne is evermore vassal to the house of 
Aragon and Castell, yet the Frenche kyng caused him to 
rebell, hopyng thereby to subdue the sayd countreys. 

Of late daies the Frenche kyng by false treason caused 
Sir Robert de la Marche to submitte himselfe to the 
Emperors Majestic, who received him upon his othe and 
fidelitie, pardonyng all offences past. Is not this false 
traitor returned, and is of the Frenche partie ? How may 
that court, that counsaill, that kyng, that realme that con- 
senteth to treason and perjury by maintenaunce of traitors 
be called honorable ? Hath not the French kyng sworne, 
and is bounden never to retaine the Switchers in wages to 
make warre against the Emperor ? and yet doth at this day. 
And albeit that his Majestic speaketh not of these thynges, 
yet he well considereth them. I trust verely sayd this noble 
man that God sayeth, Vive Burgoigne, every manne that 
heard this rehersall, knewe that it was true, howbeit he was 
not answered, but some Englishe knightes sayd, Sir you 
have sayd well, and as God will all muste be. Thus was 
this narracion ended. 

In this season the Emperor gatte the toune of Mewzon : 
Also of the Emperors partie a great army arrived in the 

Duchy 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



Duchy of Mylan and also the Emperors power besieged the 
noble citie of Messiers, but the capitaine called Franciscus 
was suspected of treason, for he removed wyth the hoste 
from the seage without knowlege of the Emperor. 

The Emperor made a seage volant about the Citie of 
Turnay, for the reskue wherof and also of Messiers, the 
French kyng made a great army and him selfe in person. 

Durynge this seage the Frenchemen toke a Spaniardes 
ship laden with Englishemens goodes at Margate within the 
kynges streames, not without great slaughter on both parties, 
yet the Frenchmen were C. Ix. men, and of Spaniardes and 
Englishemen only xxv. 

The kynge of Denmarke Cristianus came to se themperor 
his brother in law beyng a stately prince, yet meanes was 
made that the lorde Cardinall and he spake together without 
great signe of amitie. 

The lorde Cardinall after he had sojorned in Bruges by 
the space of xiii. daies and concluded divers matters with 
the Emperor and accomplished his commission : he tooke 
leave of his Majestic, and likewise dyd all the noblemen of 
England, and after convenient jornies arrived with al his 
company at Calyce, where thembassadors of Fraunce taried 
him, and immediatly after his arivyng he treated with them 
of peace, yet not so ernestly as he did before and that 
perceived well the sayd Ambassadors and wrote therof to 
the Frenche kynge, yet the welth and prosperitie of both 
the realmes and their subjectes were highly reasoned betwen 
the Cardinall and the sayd Ambassadours, especially for 
fishyng, where upon was concluded that the subjectes of 
both the princes might freely fishe on the sea, and repaire 
to any porte of thone or thother prince without robbyng, 
spoylyng, or takyng unto the second day of February next. 

The French kyng with a mightie army and himselfe in 
person repaired to the countrey of Cambray, mindyng to 
passe the streites, but they wer withstanded by the Emperors 
power, yet he continued there from October unto Novembre 
without any thing doyng, to the great displeasure of the 
Frenche kynge. The duke Daleson hearyng that, made 
preparacions wyth the Almaynes to passe the marryes by 
the point Dassans, and there the Almaynes had made bridges 
of Pypes and vessels, and brought thither their great ordi- 
naunce. The Emperor beyng in the toune of Valencian and 

therof 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



232 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



therof advertised, caused strong watche to be made, and 
as they would have passed, the bastarde Emery, and the 
capitaine of Gaunt with xii. C. men mette with them, where 
was a great conflicte and many men slaine, and at the last 
the Almaines were put to flight and their bridges and other 
provisions broken : Of the Frenche partie wer slaine in this 
conflicte xiiii. C. men, and of the Burgonians were slaiine 
the bastarde Emery, the capitaine of Gaunte and iiii. C. 
men. 

The lord Cardinal after he had long treated with the 
Ambassadors of Fraunce and could not bryng theim to no 
conformitie of peace, he sent to the Emperor the lord of 
sainct Jhons and sir Thomas Boleyn knight to advertise his 
Majestic therof. 

Likewise the sayd lord Cardinall sent to the Frenche kyng 
the Erie of Worcester and the bishoppe of Ely to exhorte 
hys grace to peace, he hard theim, but he gave theim but 
fewe woordes to answere, and after they had been xix. or xx. 
dales in his hoost, they tooke leave and returned to Calyce. 

Duryng the continuaunce of the Cardinall in Calayce all 
writtes and patentes wer there by hym sealed and no shyriffes 
chosen for lacke of his presence. 

The kyng of Hungary sent an Ambassador to the Kynges 
highnes for ayde against the Turke, whom the Cardinall 
honorably entertayned duryng hys abode in Calayce. His 
commyng was for ayde as men sayd against the Frenche 
kyng. 

The lorde Cardinal after the returne of the Englishe 
Ambassadors from the Emperour and from the Frenche 
kynge, tooke shippyng and landed at the porte of Dover, 
the xxvii. day of November, and there toke his jorney to 
Blechyngly, where the kinges grace welcomed hym gevyng 
him also thankes for his great paines and travaill. 

This tyme the Frenche kynge layde seage to the toune 
and Castle of Hedyng, the Burgonions perceivynge they 
were not furnished for the defence thereof, forsoke the sayed 
toune and castle and fledde into Flaunders to no litle rejoys- 
ing of the sayd Frenchemen. 

The Admyrall of Fraunce named Mounsire Bonyfet with 
a puissaunt armye made signe as though he woulde passe 
into Naverne, howbeit sodainly he reculed with his hooste 
and beseaged the toune of Fontraby in Biskay, and brake 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



the fyrste, second, and thirde walle thereof with his ordi- 
naunce mervailously : And after gave a freshe assault to 
the same. The Spaniardes (notwithstandynge that the 
ordinaunce was caryed into Naverne for defence thereof) 
defended theimselfes manfully and slewe of the Frenche- 
men vi. hundreth and moo, and of the Spaniardes Ix. slaine. 
Then the Capitaine of Fontraby made serche what vitailes 
was in the toune, and founde that there was but for twoo 
meles, he called the inhabitauntes and menne of warre to- 
gether declaryng their great necessitie, and sayed the battery 
of the walles discorageth us not, but the great necessitie of 
victalles, wherfore we muste do like the Wolfe that runneth 
from the wood for hunger to hys death, and considerynge the 
great scarcitie of vitailes in Byskay, by meanes whereof we 
cannot be vitayled we muste nedes rendre the toune. Never- 
thelesse they kept the toune seven daies after that they had 
neither bread, fleshe fruite nor oyles in the same, but onely 
herbes and water, yet at last herbes failed also, by meanes 
wherof they rendred the toune by composicion, and or the 
Frenchmen entered, they delivered the Englishemen all their 
goodes out of the toune. 

The Frenche kynge Hyng enbattailed in the countrey of 
Cambray sodainly brake his campe, not muche to hys honor. 
Great warres was this tyme in Italye, in so muche that the 
Emperours hoost wanne the citie and countrey of Mylan 
to the high displeasure of the Frenche kynge, for he lost 
there many of his nobles and other capitaines and men of 
warre. 

Thus the Frenche kyng returned into his countrey with- 
out reskuyng the citie of Turnay, neverthelesse he sent them 
a letter which was taken by the people of the Countye of 
Nasson, the tenour whereof foloweth. 

' Trustie and welbeloved we grete you well, lettyng you to 
' wete that dayly before us appeareth your true faythfull 
' services, by that you abode within oure citie of Turnay 
' with great jeopardie, to the muche honor of us and our 
' realme, and to your praise and manly fame for ever and us 
c to be your good lord for the demerites of your so high 
' services. And where as we entended the relief and reskue 
{ of you and our sayde subjectes and citie of Turnay, we 
' consideryng the weale of our person and realme, have 
' removed us from that purpose. Wherefore we maye no 

' more 

VOL. I. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



2 G 



234 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



' more saye unto you but God and Mounsire sainct Denys 
' be youre succours.' 

When the Countie of Nasson knewe that no reskew 
shoulde come, he then sent for more people and ordinaunce 
and planted siege on all parties of the citie. Then the capi- 
taine of the Castell and Provost of the citie after thei knewe 
of the French kynges retreite, and after long consultacion 
amongest them had, rendred the Citie and Castle by appoint- 
ment, that is to say, that the Burgeises should have xv. daies 
to depart with bagge and baggage, levyng behynd them 
all the ordinaunces aswell of the Castle as of the Citie. 
Thus was the Castle and Citie of Turnay rendred into the 
Emperors handes the last day of November the yere of our 
Lorde God M. D. xxi. 

This yere many goodly and gorgious Mommeries were 
made in the court to the great rejoysing of the Quene and 
ladies and other nobles beyng there. 

The last day of december the Cardinall accompaignied 
the Emperors Ambassadours to the court where they were 
honorably received and highly feasted durynge their abode 
there, and many sumptuous and gorgious disguisynges, 
enterludes and bankettes made in the same season. 

Pope Leo dyed and Adryan chosen. 

This yere was a great pestilence and death in London and 
other places of the realme, and many noble capitaines died, 
as the lorde Broke, sir Weston Browne, sir Jhon Heron, sir 
Edward, sir Jhon Peche and muche other people. 

The bishop of London Doctor Fitz James likewise 
deceased thys yere, and Doctor Tunstall was preferred to 
the same benefice. 

The lorde Thomas Haward earle of Surrey, came out of 
Ireland to the court the xxv. day of January, when he had 
been there the space of xx. monethes in great travaill and 
payn, and often tymes sore troubled by the wylde Irishe, 
howbeit by his noblenes and manhod he brought the lordes 
of Ireland to the Kynges due obeysaunce, and had of them 
many victories to his perpetuall laude and praise. 

The Frenchemen this tyme spoyled and shamefully robbed 
the kynges subjectes on every coast of the sea, so that 
wheresoever the kyng roade his poore subjectes came with 

lamentacions 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



2-35 



lamentacions and cryes shewynge hys grace of the crueltie of 
the Frenchemen and of their inhumaine dealynge with them, 
but ever the Frenche Ambassadours promised restitucion of 
every thyng, but none was restored. 

In this moneth of January, the kyng commaunded all his 
shippes of warre to be made in a readynes, which was done 
with all diligence. 

About this tyme the duke of Albany arrived in Scotland, 
notwithstandynge that the Frenche kynge sware unto the 
Cardinall that he should never come into Scotlande, without 
the kynge our sovereigne lordes consent, but for all that 
he had commission from the Frenche kyng although the 
Frenche Kynge wrote to the Kynge that he was entred 
Scotlande without his assent. 

The second day of February, the kynge beyng at Grene- 
wiche, came thether the Cardinall with a Legacion from Leo 
bishop of Rome, and also his ambassadour, on whom waited 
many a nobleman, the kynge met them at his chamber 
doore welcommyng them as though they had both come 
from Rome. Then sayd the Cardinall, high and victorious 
kyng it hath pleased our Lorde God to indue your grace 
with a great multitude of manifolde graces as a kynge electe 
in favor of the high heaven, and so appeareth presently by 
your noble persone, so formed and figured in shappe and 
stature with force and pulchritude, whiche signifieth the 
present pleasure of our lorde God wrought in youre noble 
grace. And further he praised his wisedome, prudence, and 
learnynge, with many other goodly wordes in the praise of 
hys most noble grace. And finally the Cardinall declared 
how the sayd bishop of Rome had sent his highnes an 
Acte in Bull under leade, declaryng therein his grace to be 
the defender of the Christian fayth, and his successors for 
evermore. 

And when his grace had received the sayd Bull and caused 
it to be redde and published, he went to his chapell to heare 
Masse accompanied with many nobles of his realme and also 
with Ambassadors of sundrye princes, the Cardinall beyng 
revested to syng Masse, the Erie of Essex brought the 
Bason with water, the duke of Suffolke gave thassay, the 
duke of Northfolke helde the towell, and so preceded to 
Masse. And that done gave unto all them that heard the 
Masse cleane remission and blessed the Kyng and the Quene 

and 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



Defender of 
the fayth. 



236 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



and all the people : then was the Bull eftsones declared, 
and trumpettes blew, the shalmes and saggebuttes plaied in 
honor of the kynges newe style. Thus hys hyghnes went 
to dinner. In the middes whereof, the kyng of Heraldes 
and his compaignie began the larges, criyng Henricus dei 
gratia rex Anglic, et Francis, defensor fidei, et dominus 
Hiberni*, thus ended the dinner, with muche habundance 
of vitaill and wyne, to all maner of people. 

The x. daie of february, the Lord Hodie chief Baron of 
the kynges Eschequer gave over his office, and for him was 
admitted by the Cardinal, master Jhon Fitz James, a right 
honorable man and wel learned. 

In this time was much busines betwene the Emperor and 
the French kyng, wherfore the king sent to the sea sixe 
good shippes, well manned and vitayled for the warre : the 
Admiral was called Christopher Coo, a man expert on the 
sea, for saffegarde of the Merchauntes, and other the kinges 
subjectes, that were grevously spoyled and robbed on the 
sea, by Frenchmen, Scottes and other rovers. 

This tyme was the viii. day of February, the lord Dacres 
Wardein of the Marches of Scotlande, entered into Scotland 
with v. C. men, by the Kynges commaundemente, and there 
Proclamed that the Scottes should come into the kynges 
peace, by the fyrst daye of Marche folowynge, or els to 
stande at their perilles, the Duke of Albany beynge then 
within fyve myles, with a mightie power of Scottes. 

The xi. day of February, sir George Nevell lorde 
Burgayny, beeing then prisoner in the Tower was brought 
to Westminster, and ther in the kinges Benche confessed 
his enditement of misprision, in the cause of Edwarde late 
Duke of Buckingham to bee true, and after the open 
confession thereof, led againe to the Tower. 

The lord Montacute the kinges cosyn, was about this 
tyme reconciled to his graces favor, which had bene prisoner 
in the Tower, wyth sir Edward Nevel knight, this sir 
Edward Nevel was forbidden the kynges presence, for 
bearinge favor to the Duke of Buckingham. 

This yere the second of Marche, certain noble men of the 
Empire arrived in England to passe into Spain, who wer 
honorably receyved and in honor of them great Justes 
and triumphes wer made, and that finished and done, thei 
toke their leave and departed on their jorney. 

Also 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



Also this time commission was geven throughoute the 
realme, for general musters to be had, to knowe what 
power might be made with in the same, and also men 
sworne of what substaunce and landes thei wer of. And 
the Cardinal advertised of the same : not wythout grudging 
of the people, and marveiling why thei shuld be sworne for 
their own goodes. 

The citie of London was thys moneth advertised of the 
comming of the Emperor, wherefore was greate pre- 
paracion : and the citezens sent the kynges grace one 
hundred tall men wel harnissed, to furnyshe hys navie, 
appoynted to kepe the narowe seas. 

The French kyng certified the kynges hyghnes, by his 
leters dated in Marche, how the Graund capitain of Fraunce, 
the Countie de Palais, Monsire de Lescue, and other noble 
men of Fraunce, had won the toune of Milain, which was 
not true, for within five or syxe dayes after, it was evidently 
knowen that the Frenchmen were beaten backe, and had 
wonne nothing, to their great shame and reproche. 

Moreover the same season the Frenche kynge wrote his 
letters to the Seignory and commonaltie of Gean, to send 
him thre Carectes and sixe Galeis furnished for the warres, 
unto his porte of Breste, to maintein his warres agaynst the 
forsayd Emperor, who made him by their letters suche a 
reasonable excuse, that he was contented to spare them for 
that tyme. 

The kynges hyghnes kepte thys yere his Easter at his 
manour of Richemont, and caused hys amner to make 
enquiry, eyght miles round about the said manour, what 
poore people was in every parish. And for the eschuyng 
of murther, that moste commonly fortuned every good- 
friday, by reason of the great resort of poor people, his 
grace caused them to be refreshed with his almose at home 
at their houses. 

About this tyme a rover or thiefe of Scotland, called 
Duncan Camell, was after long fight taken on the sea, by 
a Squyer of Cornewall called maister Jhon Arondell, and 
presented to the kinges highnes, who committed him to the 
Tower of London, where he remaygned prisoner a long 
season after. 

In the moneth of Marche, as you had hard before, came 
certain noble men from the Emperor to the king, which the 

more 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



more to solace theim enterprised a Justes, he him self was 
chief on the one syde, hys courser was barded in cloth of 
silver, of Denmarke, embrodered wyth L. L. L. of Golde, 
and under the letters a harte of manne wounded, and great 
rolles of Golde with blacke letters, in whyche was wrytten, 
mon nauera, put together, it is, ell man ceur nauera, she hath 
wounded my harte, and the same suit was his base. 

Then folowed sir Nicholas Carewe, his base and bard was 
white Damaske, on whiche was embraudered with Clothe of 
gold : a prison and a man loking out at a grate, and over the 
prison came from the prisoner a rolle, in which was written in 
Frenche, in prison I am at lybertie, and at libertie I am in 
pryson, and all his apparel was garded with shakelles of sylver. 

Then folowed therle of Devonshire, the lord Roos in one 
suit, their appareil was whit velvet, embraudered wyth cloth 
of gold, wroughte in device an harte, traversed crosse wise 
wyth a chayne, the which devided the bard in foure quarters, 
in twoo quarters was a hand of golde holding a spere of the 
worlde, on the other twoo quarters was twoo handes holding 
two plumes of fethers, and on the borders were written, my 
harte is betwene joye and peyne. 

Then folowed Anthony Kyngston, and Anthony Knevet, 
their appareil was a hart bounde in a blew lace, em- 
broudered on Crimsin sattin, and written about wyth letters 
of gold, my harte is bounde. 

Nicholas Darrell had a bard and base of black sattin, 
embraudered full of hartes, turned or broken of gold, and 
written in letters of silver, my harte is broken. 

Last of that bend was Anthony Broune, which had a bard 
of silver full of speres of the world broken, set on hartes 
broken al of golde written abo.ute in letters of blacke 
Sance remedy, wythout remedy. 

Then entered the Duke of Suffolke and his bend al in 
bardes and bases of russet velvet and cloth of silver, 
embraudered with braunches of paunces of golde, at these 
Justes were many speres broken, whych the straungiers 
hyghly commended. 

The third day of Marche, the Cardinall made to the kyng 
and the Ambassadors a great and a costly banket, and after 
that a playe and a Maske, their garmentes were russet sattin 
and yelowe, all the one side was yelowe face and legge, and 
al the other syde was russet. 

On 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



On shrovetewesday at nyght, the said Cardinall to the 
kinge and ambassadors made another supper, and after 
supper thei came into a great chamber hanged with Arras, 
and there was a cloth of estate, and manye braunches, and 
on every braunche xxxii. torchettes of waxe, and in the 
nether ende of the same chamber was a castle, in which was 
a principal Tower, in which was a Cresset burning : and 
two other lesse Towers stode on every side, warded and 
embattayled, and on .every Tower was a banner, one 
banner was of thre rent hartes, the other was a ladyes 
hand gripinge a mans harte, the third banner was a ladies 
hand turning a mannes hert : thys castle was kept with 
ladies of straung names, the first Beautie, the second Honor, 
the third Perseveraunce, the fourthe Kyndnes, the fyfth 
Constance, the sixte Bountie, the seventh Mercie, and the 
eyghte Pitie, these eyght ladies had Millian gounes of 
white sattyn, everye Ladye had her name embraudered 
wyth golde, on their heades calles, and Millein bonettes of 
golde, with Jwelles. Undernethe the basse fortresse of the 
castle were other eyght ladyes, whose names were Dangier, 
Disdain, Gelousie, Unkyndenes, Scorne, Malebouche, Straungenes, 
these ladyes were tired lyke to women of Inde. Then 
enterd eyght Lordes in clothe of golde cappes and all, and 
great mantell clokes of blewe Sattin, these lordes were 
named, Amarus, Nobknes, Youth, Attendaunce, Loyaltie, 
Pleasure, Gentlenes, and Libertie, the kyng was chyefe of 
thys compaignie, thys compaygnye was led by one all in 
Crymosyn Sattin wyth burninge flames of golde, called 
Ardent Desire, whyche so moved the ladies to geve over 
the Castle, but Scorne and Disdain sayed that they woulde 
holde the place, then Desire sayd the ladies shoulde be wonne, 
and came and encoraged the knyghtes, then the lordes ranne 
to the castle (at whych tyme wythoute was shot a greate 
peale of gunnes) and the ladies defended the Castle wyth 
Rose water and Comfyttes, and the lordes threwe in Dates 
and Orenges, and other fruites made for pleasure, but at the 
last the place was wonne, but Ladye Scorne and her com- 
paygnye stubbernely defended theim wyth bowes and balles, 
tyl they were driven out of the place and fled. Then the 
lordes toke the ladies of honor as prysoners by the handes, 
and brought them doune, and daunced together verye 
pleasauntlye, whiche much pleased the straungers, and 

when 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



24 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



when thei had daunced their fyll, then all these dysvisered 
themselfes and were knowen : and then was there a costly 
banket, and when al was done, the straungiers toke their 
leave of the king and the Cardinall, and so departed into 
Flaunders, geving to the king muche commendacion. 

The kynge like a prince which forseeth all thinges, saw 
that warre was likely to ensue, caused the earle of Surrey, 
his hygh Admiral!, to put in readines his navie, both for the 
conduictynge of the Emperoure into England, and also for 
the defence of his subjectes, which were daily robbed and 
spoiled on the sea, which lorde Admiral toke such diligence 
with the helpe of sir William Fitz William his Vice 
Admyrall, that all the shyppes by the beginnyng of April, 
were rigged and trimmed, and in especial the Henry grace 
of due, the kynges great ship, was brought out of the ryver 
of Thamis into the Dounes, readye to sayle whether God 
and the kynge woulde. 

In thys yere at the Assise, kept at the castle of Cambridge 
in Lent, the Justices, and al the gentlemen, Bailiefes and 
other, resorting thether, toke such an infeccion, whether it 
wer of the savor of the prisoners or of the fylth of the 
house, that manye gentlemen, as syr Jhon Cut, syr Giles 
Alington knightes, and many other honest yomen therof 
dyed, and al most all which were there present, were sore 
sicke and narrowly escaped with their lives. And this 
yere also dyed Sir Edward Powninges, knight of the 
Gartier, sir Jhon Pechy, and sir Edwarde Belknap valiaunt 
capitaynes, whiche were suspected to be poysoned, at a 
banket made at Arde, when the two kinges met last. 

This yere also, was not wythout Pestilence nor Derth of 
Corne, for Whete was sold this yere in the citie of London, 
for xx.s. a quarter, and in other places, for xxvi.s. viii.d. 
And in the same yere in December, died Leo bishop of 
Rome, for whom was chosen, one Adrian born at Utrike, 
the Emperors schole maister, and in the same moneth 
Gawan Doglas bishop of Dunkel in Scotland, fled out of 
Scotland into England because the Duke of Albany was 
arrived into Scotland, and had taken upon him to be 
governor of the kyng and the realme, to whom the kyng 
assygned an honest pencyon to lyve on. But when the 
kyng was advertised that the Duke of Albany was arryved 
into Scotland, and had taken the rule of the young king, his 

realme, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



241 



realme, and he much doubted the sequele of the matter, 
consideryng the Duke to be heire apparant to the croune of 
Scotland : wherfore he sent Clarenseaux kinge of Armes 
into Scotland, and wyth commaundement, that he should 
declare to the Duke of Albany, that his pleasure was, that 
he should depart the realm of Scotland for two causes, the 
one, because it was promised by the French king, at the 
last meting, that he should not come into Scotland, the 
second was, that the kyng of England was uncle to the 
kyng of Scottes, and by the very bond of nature, ought to 
defende his nephew. Wherefore hys nephew beyng young, 
and in the custody of him to whom, if he should dye, the 
realme of Scotlande should discende, he doubted lest he 
might be brought out of the way, as other dukes of Albany 
before had served the heires of Scotlande : and if he would 
not avoyde Scotlande, then Clarenseaux was commaunded to 
defie hym, which accordyngly did defie hym, at holy Rode 
house in Edenbrough, to whome he answered, that neyther 
the French king, nor the kyng of Englande, should let 
hym to come into his naturall countrey, by theyr agrement : 
also as towching the young king, he sayd, that he loved him 
as his sovereigne lord, and him would kepe and protect, 
against al other. 

When Clarenseaux had reported his answere to the king, 
then he knewe wel that al this was the French kinges 
doynge, wherefore he provyded in all thinges accordingly. 
The Earle of Anguishe of Scotland that had maryed lady 
Margaret, the king our sovereigne lordes sister, late wyfe 
unto kyng James of Scotland, that was slain at Floddon 
felde, was by the Duke of Albany, sente by a coloured 
Ambassade into Fraunce, where shortly after his arryvyng, 
he was by the French king committed to prison, and his 
brother like wyse, which escaped after as you shall heare. 

Also the vi. day of Marche, the French kyng commaunded 
all Englyshmennes goodes beyng in Burdeaux, to be attached 
and put under a reste : and likewyse deteyned the kynges 
trybute, whyche he shoulde have out of Fraunce, and also 
the French quenes dowry, and when the kyng sent to him 
for it, he ever gave faire woordes, and made delaies, 
but none was payed, and ever the Ambassador promised 
fayre. 



THE 



THE XIII. 
YERE 

[1521-22] 



VOL. I, 



2 H 



242, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 

the xiiii. 
yere. 



THE XIIII. YERE. 

THE king this yere kept the daye of saynt George 
with great solempnitie, at his manour of Riche- 
mond, where wer elect to the ordre of the Gartier 
Done Ferdinando brother to the Emperor, and Archduke 
of Oystrycke, and sir Richard Wingfeld, knight by the 
Emperors meanes, to the which the Emperor had geven 
two hundred pound pencion out of the house of Burgoin, 
which sir Edward Pouninges before had of the Emperors 
gyft. Duryng this war betwene the Emperor and the 
French King, and the Kyng of Englande liyng still an 
entreator betwene them, the Englishmen wer robbed on 
both sydes, and when their wines were laden at Burdeaux, 
and redy to depart, it was attached, and the Merchauntes 
put in prison : the poore fishermen on the coast of England 
sometyme met wyth the Frenchmen and them spoyled, but 
to no recompence of that they had taken. The Merchauntes 
of England, that had factors at Burdeaux, complayned to the 
King of England, and shewed hym how the French king, 
contrary to his league and his safeconduyte under hys seal, 
by hys people, had taken their goodes, and emprisoned their 
factors and frendes, and can have no remedy. Likewise 
complained all the Merchauntes, how their shippes were 
restrayned, in every porte of Fraunce, and their goodes 
rifeled, and could have no redresse. The king and his 
counsail, were sory to here the complaintes of the mer- 
chauntes, and so concluded to sende for the Frenche 
Ambassadours, to whom the Cardinal sayd : sir how is 
this chaunce happened ? you have promised ever in the 
name of the kyng your Maister, that all leagues, promises 
and covenauntes should be kept, and that full restitucion 
should bee made of every e hurt and dammage, and that 
ferme peace and amitie shoulde be kept : but contrary to 
your saiyng, our Merchauntes be robbed and spoyled, yea, 
although he hath graunted his safeconduyte, yet they be 
robbed, and stayed at Burdeaux, is this the peace that you 
and your Maister hath promised to be kept ? is this the 
amitie that he was sworne to kepe ? Is this the word of 
a king ? Is thys the strength of a prince, to breake hys 

safeconduyt ? 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



safeconduyt ? And wher you advised our merchantes to 
sue in Fraunce for restitucion, and dyd warrant them to be 
restored, you have put them to coste and losse, for thei 
have sued there longe and spent their goodes wythout any 
redresse, and now you have emprisoned them, and kept 
both them and their goods, is this justice ? is this resti- 
tucion ? And all this was youre procurement, and now se 
what is come of your promyse, surely thys may not be 
suffered, and besyde this the kyng is enformed, that the 
kyng your Maister had spoken by hym, foule and oppro- 
brious wordes, yea, in the hearynge of the Englishmen 
whyche were sore greved to hear such wordes, and were not 
so able to be revenged. 

The Ambassadour of Fraunce sayd, that it was not so as 
it was reported : wel sayed the Cardinall, yf you note the 
counsayll of Englande so lyght, as to tel fables, you be 
misavised, but I pray you how often times hath the kyng 
written to your Maister, for the restitucion of such roberies 
as hath be done, and yet can have no redresse ? Wherefore 
he graunted letters of marcke, which may stand wyth the 
league, but Monsire Chastilion hath taken Merchauntes of 
Englande prysoners, and hath sent certain hether for their 
raunsome, this is open war and no peace. Maister President 
Polliot or Pulteyne the Frenche Ambassador, answered, 
that surely the matters which wer alleged against his 
maister the French king, were but forged matters and not 
true : but he sayed that for a truthe, daily in the Court of 
Fraunce, were complaintes made againste the Englishemen, 
for greate robberies done by them, aswell on land as on sea, 
affirmyng it to be done in the Emperors querel, and yet the 
French kynge for the love he beareth to England letteth his 
subjectes to be unhard, although he dayly lament the great 
injury, done to hym and his subjectes by Englyshmen : 
and therfore my lord I pray you, beleve not such tales, 
tyl I have tolde you the truthe. 

Then the Cardinal called the foure hostages, that lay here 
for the payment of money for Turney, and they four were 
delivered, to my lord of sainct Jhones, to sir Thomas Lovel, 
to sir Andrewe Windsore, and to sir Thomas Nevell, every 
knight one to kepe safe, and none of their countrey to 
speake with them prively, and the Ambassador was com- 
maunded to kepe his house in silence, and not to come in 

presence, 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



244 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



presence, till he was sent for, whiche ordre sore abashed the 
French hostages, and thambassador, but ther was no remedy, 
and commaundement was geven to the Maior at London, to 
attache al the Frenchmen body and goodes, and them to 
kepe in prison, til he hard farther of the kynges pleasure : 
then were all the Frenchmen in London and aboute, arrested 
and brought to prison, so that al the prisons in and aboute 
London, wer full of them, some of them escaped by speakyng 
Dutch, and sayd they wer Fleminges borne, whiche was not 
tryed. 

The king for safegard of his Merchauntes, sent xxviii. 
goodly shippes to the sea, wel manned and trimmed for the 
warres, and seven other shippes he sent towarde Scotland, 
whych entered the Frith, and preferred to enter into the 
Scottysh shippes that lay in the haven, but the Scottes ran 
their shippes on land, and the Englishmen folowed wyth 
boates and landed, and set the shippes on fire, and at Lith 
toke certain prisoners, whych they brought into Englande, 
and stil the kynges great navie kept the narrowe seas, for 
then was neither peace betwene Englande and Fraunce, nor 
open warre as you have hearde. 

The king had perfect knowledge, that Charles the 
Emperour would be at the kinges toune at Calice the xxiii. 
day of May, to passe thorow Englande into Spain, wherfore 
the kyng sent the Marques Dorcet, accompaignied with 
diverse knightes and gentlemen, to receyve hym at Calice, 
which in al hast sped them thether. Lykewyse the Cardinal! 
toke his jorney toward Dover the xx. day of Maye, and 
rode throughe London, accompaignied wyth two Erles 
xxxvi. Knightes, and an hundred Gentlemen, eyght 
Bishoppes, ten Abbottes, thirty Chapelleines all in velvet 
and Sattin, and yomen seven C. and so by jorneing he 
came to Dover the xxvi. day beyng Monday. In the 
meane season tidinges wer brought to the kyng, that the 
French kyng had sent a great army toward Calice, and the 
men of war lay at Abvile, Munstrell, Bulleyn, and about, 
nere the Englysh pale. Wherefore the kynge lyke a Prynce 
that forsawe all, and entending not to be disceived, wrote to 
his nobles and cities and tounes, to prepare certayne menne 
of war in a readines which was shortly done, and so they 
were sent to the navie, so that thei might shortly be at 
Calice yf nede required. 

On 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



On Sundaye the xxv. daye of Maye, the lorde Marques 
Dorset, the bishop of Chichester, and the lorde de Lawar, 
with other noble men, at the water of Graveling, received 
the Emperor in the name of the kynge of England, and so 
the Emperor embraced theim, and he having in his com- 
paignie many noble men, came toward Calice, wher at the 
Turnepike in the lordeship of Marke, he was received of sir 
Edward Guylford Marshall of Calice, wyth fyftie menne of 
armes richly besene, and also a hundred archers on horse- 
backe, then in passing forward toward Calice, the ordinaunce 
shot terribly, and into Calice he was receyved wyth pro- 
cession, and then by the lord Barne deputie there, and the 
counsayll of the toune : then was he received by the Maior 
and Aldermen of the toune, and then of the Maior and 
Merchauntes of the Staple, and so conveighed to the 
Checker, and there lodged. 

On the Monday, he and al the nobles of Spain, Flaunders, 
and Germany, toke ship at Calice and landed at Dover, at 
foure of the Clocke at after none, and with him the Duke 
Dalvoy, the Prince of Orenge, the Countie Nassaw, the 
Countie Vascord, the lord Ogmond, and the Marques of 
Brandenbrough, all in one ship bote. The Cardinal received 
hym on the Sandes, accompaygnyed with thre hundred 
Lordes, Knightes and Gentlemen of England : Theemperor 
embrased the Cardinall, and tooke hym by the arme, and so 
passed forward, and toke horses and rode together to Dover 
Castle, wher thei wer lodged. Thenglish Harbingers dili- 
gently lodged the Emperors train, every man according to 
hys degree. The kyng of England was come to Cantor- 
bury, the xxvii. day of May, and received by the Archbishop : 
and hearynge of the Emperors arrival, wyth a smal com- 
paignie on the Wednesday, beyng the Assension even, he 
rode to Dover, and with muche joye and gladnes the 
Emperour and he met, and there taried the Assension day, 
and on Friday, the kinge brought the Emperoure aborde on 
hys newe shyp, called the Henry grace a dieu, a shyppe of 
xv. C. and rowed about to all hys greate shippes, whych 
then lay in Dover rode, the Emperor and his lordes, muche 
praised the makyng of the shyppes, and especially the 
artilerie, they sayed, they never sawe shippes so armed. 

The same day at after none, the two noble princes marched 
forward to Canterbury, where the Maior and Aldermen 

received 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



246 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



received them without the toune, with a solempne oracyon, 
to whom the Emperors secretary answered ornatly. Then 
the Princes with their swerdes borne najced before theim, and 
the Emperour on the ryght hand, entered the citie of Cantor- 
bury, and so with procession were brought to Christes Church 
where the Archebishop and twelve prelates mitered, receyved 
them under a Canapy, and so they offered to the Sacrament, 
and the Emperour was brought to the Bishoppes palace, 
where he lay for that night, and the kyng lodged at S. 
Augustynes. The morowe after, these princes removed to 
Sytyngborne, and the next day to Rochester, wher the 
Bishop receyved them with the whole Covent, and on 
Mondaye thei came to Gravesende by one of the Clocke, 
where they toke their Barges, and ther were thirty Barges 
appoynted, for the straungiers, and so by vi. of the clocke 
they landed at Grenewiche, the same Monday, the ii. day 
of June, where the Emperour was of the kyng newly 
welcommed, and al his nobilitie, and at the hal doore the 
Queue and the Prynces, and all the Ladies receyved and 
welcommed hym : and he asked the Quene blessing (for 
that is the fashyon of Spain, betwene the Aunte and the 
Nephew) the Emperor had great joye to se the Quene hys 
Aunte, and in especyall his young cosyn Germain the lady 
Mary. The Emperor was lodged in the kinges lodging, 
whiche was so richely hanged, that the Spanyardes wondered 
at it, and specially at the rych cloth of estate : nothyng 
lacked that might be gotten, to chere the Emperor and 
his Lordes, and al that came in his compaignie, were highly 
feasted. 

The Wednesday, the more to do the Emperor pleasure, 
was prepared a Justes royall : on the one part was the 
kinge, the erle of Devonshire and x. more compaignions, 
al mounted on horsbacke, their apparell and bardes, were of 
rich Cloth of golde, embroudered wyth sylver letters, very 
ryche, with great plumes on their heades. This compaignie 
tooke the felde, and rode aboute the tilt : then entered the 
Duke of Suffolke, and the Marques Dorset, and x. with 
them barded, and their apparell was russet velvet, em- 
broudered wyth sundery knottes, and culpyns of golde. 
The Emperor and the Quene, with al the nobles stode in 
the galery, to behold the doyng. The king ran at the 
Duke of Suffolke viii. courses, and at every course brake 

his 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



247 



his spere. Then every man ran his courses and that done, 
all ranne together volant, as faste as they could discharge, 
and when the speres appointed were broken, then they 
disarmed and went to supper. After supper, the Emperor 
beheld the ladies daunces, and sodainly came to the chamber, 
sixe noble men, appareled in Crimosin velvet and cloth of 
golde, and a mantell of Taffeta, rolled about their bodies, 
and hoddes and bonettes of cloth of gold, on their heddes, 
and velvet buskyns on their legges : these Maskers entred 
and daunced a great while wyth the ladies, and sodainly 
entred syx other Maskers with drumslades, appareled in 
long gounes, and hoddes of cloth of gold, of whych nomber 
was the kyng, the duke of Suffolke, the prince of Orenge, 
the countie of Nassow, the countie of Naveray, and Monsire 
Egremond. When these maskers wer entred, the other 
avoyded, and then thei toke ladies and daunsed, so that the 
straungiers much praised them : and when the time came, 
every person departed to their lodgyng. 

Thursday, they that Justed the other daye, appoynted 
themselfs to Tornay, and as the kyng was armyng him, 
there came to him one George Luffkin and shewed him, 
that there was one come from his Ambassador in Fraunce, 
the king called for the messenger, and delivered his letters, 
which the king red, and said to syr William Compton, tel 
the Emperor that I have newes, if it pleaseth hym to come 
hether : Sir William Compton went and told this to the 
Emperoure, which without delay came to the kyng, whych 
shewed him the letters from sir Thomas Cheiney his 
Ambassador, wherin was conteyned the definitive answer 
made aswel to sir Thomas Cheyney, as to Clarenseaux 
king of armes of Englande, by the French kynge, to the 
kinges requestes : for you shall understand, that the kyng 
of Englande by hys Ambassador, had often times demaunded, 
both his trybute and hys lawful debte, and also restitucyon 
to be made to his subjectes greved, and farther also the 
league was broken, by makyng warre on themperor, so 
that now by the league the kyng of Englande should be 
enemy, to him that first brake, and did take part wyth the 
other, yet he had so much compassion, on sheding of 
Christen bloud, that he would not enter warre, but shew 
him self a mediator and an entreator betwene them. And 
upon thys sir Thomas Cheney had often moved the French 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



248 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



kyng, and also moved him to take peace with the Emperor 
for two yeres, so that some mediacion of peace might be 
entreated, in the meane season : to all this the French 
king answered we have wel considered your Maisters 
desire, to the which we nothinge agree, nor hold us content 
wyth his request. Sir said thambassador, the kyng my 
Maister shalbe advertysed of your answere by me, wherfore 
I besech your grace of safeconduit, to returne into England : 
then sayd the kyng, there is an officer of armes come hether 
out of Englande, let him come and he shalbe hard, and have 
an answere, to which thing Sir Thomas Cheney answered not, 
but wyth reverence departed, and so on the xxi. daie of Maie, 
the said officer called Clarenseaux king of armes, came to the 
French kinges chamber at Lions, which was accompaignied 
with many noble men and gentlemen, and then Clarenseaux 
put on his cote of armes, and desired license to speake, and 
libertie according to the law of armes, which was to him 
graunted : then he declared that where the French kinge was 
bound by league tripertite, to kepe peace with the Emperor, 
and with the king of England, and whosoever first brake, the 
other two to be enemies to hym, to the which league the 
French king was sworne, whiche league he apparantly had 
broken, by making warre on Themperor, by syr Robert 
de la Marche, and by hym selfe in persone. Wherfore the 
kinge by that league muste bee hys enemie, and take parte 
agaynst hym. 

Also he declared, that the French king kept away the kinges 
rentes, and debtes, dew to him. Also that he deteyned the 
dower of the French quene. Also that contrary to his 
promyse, he had sent the Duke of Albany into Scotland: 
Also that contrarye to Justice he had emprisoned Mer- 
chantes, having his safeconduite, where they should have 
gone in safty seyng there was no warre proclaimed, betwene 
him and the kyng his maister : al these articles with many 
mo, the kyng my maister is ready to prove. Nay said 
the French kyng, I began not the war, nor sent Robert 
Lamarche to make warre, but commaunded him to the 
contrary, and or I made warre in proper person, his warre 



was open, and he had oure toune of Tournay strongly 
besieged, and as touching the Duke of Albany, it hath 
cost me xl. M. Frankes, to kepe him out of Scotland, but 
I could not let hym to go into his owne countrey. Thys 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



249 



the French kynge excused his untruth. Sir I am farther 
charged to tell you, said Clarenseaux that the king my 
sovereigne lord, holdeth you for his mortal enemie this day 
furth, and al your adherentes : wel sayd the French king, I 
loked for this a great while agone, for sith the Cardinall 
was at Bridges, I loked for no nother, but you have done 
your message : then the French king rose and departed, 
and Clarenseaux was conveighed to his lodgyng, and shortly 
after, sir Thomas Cheyney and he, by safeconduyt, departed 
and came to Bulleyn, and there Monsire Fayet capitain 
there, theim both staied til the Ambassador of Fraunce, 
whiche had lien in England, wer clerely delyvered out of 
Calice. The whole circumstaunce of the demaundes and 
defiaunce, and the French kinges aunswere, was conteined 
in the letter, which was brought to the king, which shewed 
it to the Emperor (as you have hard) but while the king 
and the Emperor loked on the letter, a sodein noise rose 
emongest both their subjectes, that it was a letter of 
defiance, sent to them bothe by the French king, whych 
was nothing so. Thus now was the warre open of al 
parties, betwene Englande and Fraunce, and Spain. When 
the two princes had of this matter commoned their fill, 
themperor called for a horse, and the king himself was 
armed, and bothe the bendes that should Tournay, mounted 
on horsebacke, and themperor in rich apparell of tissew and 
richly trapped brought the king into the felde, and toke up 
hys horse, that all men had great pleasure to beholde him. 
The men of armes fel to Turnay, and brake swerdes and 
wer severed, and after came together agayn, and fought 
very valiauntly, and when tyme was, the Herauldes cryed 
the disarme, and assone as the king was unarmed the 
Emperor and he went to supper, and after supper, the 
kyng brought the Emperor into the hal where was a 
Cupperd of xii. stages, al set wyth great mightie plate al 
of golde, at the upper end honge thre clothes of estate, and 
the hall was ful of great lyghtes, set on gylt braunches. 

When the two Princes were set, and the Quene also, then 
entered in eight noble menne, in Maskers apparell with 
visers, their garmentes blacke Velvet, garded and em- 
broudered wyth golde in cut workes and over that double 
Lumberdy Mantelles of Sattin, folded up on every shulder, 
curiously embroudered, these Maskers were halfe English 

Lordes, 

VOL. i. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



2 I 



250 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



Lordes, and the other straungiers. They toke Ladies and 
daunsed, and sodainly entered eight other Maskers, ap- 
parelled in rych tinsel, matched wyth clothe of golde, and 
on that Turkey Clokes, rebanded wyth Nettes of Silver, and 
betwene the knittinges Flowers of Golde, and the Mantelles 
were Crimosin Sattin, both the Maskers had hoddes of 
Crymosyn Sattyn, these lustie Maskers entered, and reveled 
lustely, and when they had done, then were the spices brought 
and wyne, and then al persones began to draw to reste. 

On Friday, the sixt day of June, the king and the 
Emperour, wyth all their compaignies marched toward 
London, where in the waye a Myle from Sainct Georges 
Barre, was set a ryche Tent of Cloth of golde, in whyche 
tente were two lodgynges, one for the Emperoure, and 
another for the kyng, where these two Princes shifted 
theim. And when the Herauldes had appointed every man 
their roume, then every man set forwarde in ordre, rychlye 
apparelled in Clothe of Golde, Tyssew, Silver, Tinsell, and 
Velvettes of all coloures. There lacked no massye Cheynes, 
nor curyous Collers : an Englyshe manne and a straungier 
roade ever together, matched accordinge to their degrees, 
before the Emperoure and the kinge, were borne two 
swordes naked, then the two Princes folowed in Coates of 
cloth of golde, embraudered with sylver, bothe of one suite : 
after theim folowed the Kynges Henxmenne, in Coates of 
Purple Velvet, pieled and paned wyth rych Cloth of silver, 
and with them were matched the Emperours Henxemenne, 
in equall nomber, in Coates of Crimosyn Velvet, with two 
gardes, the one golde, and the other silver : then folowed the 
Capitaynes of the Gardes, then the Emperours Gard on the 
right hande, and the Englishe Garde on the left hande, and 
so in this ordre they wente forwarde, and in the waye the 
Maior Jhon Milborne and hys brethren, in fyne Skarlet and 
well horssed, met wyth the Emperour and the king where one 
sir Thomas More knight, and well learned, made to theim an 
eloquent Oracion, in the praise of the two princes, and of the 
peace and love betwene them, and what comfort it was to 
their subjectes, to se theim in such amitie, and how that the 
Maior and Citezens, offered any pleasure of service that in 
them laye, next their sovereigne lorde. 

When this was done, they came into Southwarke, wher 
the Clergie received theim, in Copes, with Crosses, and 

Sensers, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



Sensers, and so kepte the one syde of the strete, al the 
citie throughe. When they came by the Marshalsie at the 
kinges Benche, the Emperoure desired pardon of the kyng, 
for the prisoners, and he at the Emperours requeste, 
pardoned a great nomber of theim. When they were 
almoste at the Brydge foote there was a staye, the kyng 
demaunded the cause, and it was told hym that the 
Herauldes had appoynted two gentlemen to ryde together, 
one was the Ambassadour from the Marques of Mantua, to 
the Emperour, and the other from the Citie of Seines, to the 
Emperour also and the Citie and the Marques were not 
frendes, the Emperour incontinent, sent his Lord Chamber- 
layne to theim, saiynge : that yf they woulde that daye do 
him honour, he would thanke theim, and yf they woulde not 
ryde as they were appointed, he prayed them to departe. 
When the lorde Chamberlayne had told this message, they 
rode furth and made no more curtesye. 

When they wer come to the Drawe Bridge, ther were set 
Targettes, of the Armes of the Emperour and his Dominions, 
rychly paincted, and on the other syde, stode one great 
Giaunt, representynge Hercules, wyth a myghty Clubbe in 
hys hand, and on the other syde stode another Giaunte, 
representyng Sampson, wyth the Jawe bone of an Asse in 
his hande. These twoo Gyauntes helde a greate Table, in 
the whyche was wrytten in Golden letters, all the Emperours 
Style. From the Drawe Bridge these two Princes passed, 
to the myddes of the Bridge, where was raised a faire 
edifice, wyth Towers embattailed and gates, al lyke 
Masonrye, of Whyte and Blacke, lyke Touche and Whyt 
Merbell : above this buildinge was a faire pagiaunt, in the 
whych stoode Jason all in harneys, havyng before hym a 
golden Piece, and on the one syde of hym stode a fiery 
Dragon, and on the other side stode two Bulles whiche 
beastes cast out fyer continually, and in a tower on the one 
side stode a fayre mayde representyng the lady Medea 
whiche was very straungely and rychely appareled, and 
above this Pagiant were written these verses. 

Leticiie quantum mimiis preiebat, lason 

Aurea Pbrixee vellera nactus avis 
Leticite quantum tulerat Pomptius et urbi 

Hoste triumphato Scipio Romulidum 
Tantum tie nobis Ccesar mitissime Princeps 

Intrans Henrici Trincipis hosptcium 

When 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



252 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



When they had beholden this Pagiant they came to the 
Conduite at Gracious strete where was made a Bastyle with 
two great gates, one on the one syde of the way and the 
other on the other side, and over these gates and betwene 
these gates were made iii. great towers embattailed and 
vauted with lopes Lucanes lyke Masonry, curiously wrought, 
and in the middle tower was a clothe of estate, under whiche 
sat one representyng the Emperor, and in the third tower 
representyng the kyng. And Charlemayne havyng ii. swordes 
gave to the Emperor the sworde of Justice, and to the kyng 
the sworde of triumphant victory, and before hym sat the 
Pope to whom he gave the croune of thorne and thre nayles. 
About this pagiant were sette all the armes of the electors 
of thempyre and these verses in a table. 

Carole Christigenum deem et quern scripta loquntur 

A magno ductum Carolo babere genus 
Tuque Henrice pia virtutis laude refulgent 

Doctrina ingenio religione fde 
Cos pretor consul sanctus cum plebe senatus 

feet os hue fausto sydere gestit ovans 

This Pagiant was made by the Esterlynges. 

From Gracious strete where the Esterlinges stode in good 
order, the two princes came to Leden halle wher overthwart 
the great strete that leadeth to Bishoppes gate was erected a 
goodly Pagiant wonderfull curiously wrought, it was xxxviii. 
fote broade and Ixxx. of length, at the fote of the pagiant 
sat Jhon duke of Lancastre called Jhon of Gaunte sonne to 
kyng Edward the third. This duke sat in a rote and out 
of the rote sprang many braunches curiously wrought with 
leaves whiche by pollicie dropped swete water, and on every 
braunche satte a kyng and a quene or some other noble 
parsonage descended of the sayd duke to the nomber of 
Iv. images, and on the toppe stode the Emperor, the kyng 
of England and the Quene, as thre in the vi. degree from 
the sayd Duke. This pagiant was made at the cost of the 
Italyans and was much praised. From thence they passed 
to the Conduite in Cornehill where the strete was enclosed 
from side to side with ii. gates to open and shitte, and over 
the gates wer arches with towers embattailed set with vanes 
and scutchions of the armes of the Emperor and the kyng, and 
over the arches were two towers, the one full of Trompettes 
and the other full of Shalmes and shagbuttes whiche played 

continually : 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



continually : Betwene these two towers was a place, under a 
riche clothe of estate sat kyng Arthur at a rounde table and 
was served with x. kynges, Dukes and erles all bearyng 
Targettes of their armes, and when the Emperor and the 
kyng were commyng thether a Poet sayd. 

Laudant magnanimos urbs inclita Roma Cattnes 

Cantant Hannibalem punica regna mum 
Gentis erat Soli me rex ingens gloria David. 

Gentii Alexander gloria prima sue 
lllustrat fortes Arthuri fama Britannos 

Illustras gentem Caesar & ipse tuam 
Cui deus imperium victo precor baste secundet 

Regnet ut in terris pads arnica quies 

When this was sayd, they came to the Stockes where was 
a quadrant stage where on was an Herber full of Roses, 
Lyllies and all other flowers curiously wrought, and byrdes, 
beastes and all other thynges of pleasure. And aboute the 
Herber was made the water full of Fyshe, and about it was 
the Elementes, the Pianettes and Starres in their places and 
every thyng moved, and in a type in the toppe was made the 
Trinitie with the Angels singyng, and the Trinitie blessed 
the kyng and the Emperor, and under his feete, was written, 
behold the lover of peace and concorde. And so they passed 
through the Poultry to the great Conduite in Chepe, where 
was made on the right hand of the sayd Conduite (as they 
passed) in maner quadrant with fower towers, at every 
corner one with goodly types, betwene every tower was a 
gallery, whiche galeries were hanged with clothes of golde 
and silver within, and so covered over. The forefrontes of 
every gallery were hanged with white and grene Sarcenet 
wrethed and with great knottes of golde, let doune in maner 
of a valence before the gallery, and under the sayd galleries 
were Targettes and schutchions of the Emperors and kynges 
armes and devyses. In the fower towers were fower fayre 
ladyes for the cardinall vertues so richely besene that it was 
great pleasure to behold, every vertue havyng a signe and 
token of her propertie. In the galleries sat chyldren mixed 
with men and women singyng and plaiyng on instrumentes 
melodiously, of the whiche sort one child sayd these verses 
folowyng. 



Quanta amplexetur populus te Ceesar amore 
Testantur variis gaudia mixta sonis 



Aera, 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



2*54 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



Aera, tube, Litui, cantus cithare calamisque 

Consona te resonant organa disparities 
Unum te celebrant, te unum sic cuncta salutant 

O decus, O rerum gloria Ccesar ave. 

When they came to the standard there was made a mightie 
buildyng of tymber with towers set in carbles forced with 
arches buttand and al abilimentes embossed, and the lyn- 
terelles inhaunsed with pillers quadrant and the vautes in 
orbes with crobbes dependyng and monsters bearyng up the 
pillers and in the roffe was a lower swelling, in the top 
wherof was a banner of the armes of Spayne and Engeland 
and all the pagiant full of scutchions of armes of the 
ii. princes. At the fote of this pagiant sat Alphons kyng 
of Spayne richely apparelled, and out of his brest a braunche 
of whiche sprang many kynges, quenes and princes whiche 
satte and were lively persones richely apparelled every one 
with a scutchion of armes shewyng their mariages, and in 
the highest braunce satte the Emperor, the kyng and just 
v. and vii. degrees from the sayd kyng of Spayne, to whom 
the sayd kyng Alphons sayd these verses. 

Carole quifulges sceptro ff diademate sacro 
Tuque Henrice simul stemmata juncta gerens 

Alter germanis, lux alter clara britannis 
Miscens Hispano sanguine uterque genus 

Vivite felices quot vixit secula Nestor 
Civile cumane tempora fatidice 

After this pagiant seen and the verses sayd, they came to 
the litle Conduite in Chepe where was buylded a place lyke 
heaven curiously painted with cloudes, erbes, starres and the 
lerarchies of angels, in the top of this pagiant was a great 
type and out of this type sodainly issued out of a cloude 
a fayre Lady richely apparelled, and then all the minstrels 
whiche wer in the pagiant played and the angels sang, and 
sodainly agayne she was assumpted into the cloud whiche 
was very curiously done, and aboute this pagiant stode the 
Apostles wherof one sayd these verses. 

Ob quorum advent urn tocies gens ipsa br it anna 

Supplex diis superis vota preterque dedit 
)uos tetas omnis, pueri,juvenesque, senesque 

Optarunt oculis sepe videre suis 
Venistis tandem auspicio Cbristi Marieque 

Pads conjuncti fcedere perpetuo. 
Heroes sahete fii, salvete beati 

Exhilarant nostros minima vestra lares 

Yet 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



2-55 



Yet you must not forget for all the pagiantes how the 
Citezens well apparelled stode with in railes sette on the left 
side of the stretes and the clergie on the right side in riche 
copes, which sensed the princes as they passed and all the 
stretes were richely hanged with clothes of golde, silver, 
velvet and Arras, and in every house almooste Mynstrelsy, 
and in every strete were these two verses written in letters 
of gold. 

Carolus, Henricus, vivant defenior uterque 
Henricus fidei, Carolus Ecclesie 

Whiche verses wer also written in other tables in golden 
letters as ensueth. 

Long prosperitie 

To Charles and Henry Princes moste puissant. 
The one of fayth 

The other of the Churche Chosen defendant. 

When they were past the lytle Conduite they came to the 
West ende of Poules churche and there they alighted, and 
there was a Canapie redy under whiche they two stoode and 
were received by the Archebyshop of Cauntorbury and xxi. 
prelates in pontificalles and so they offered at the high aulter 
and returned to horsebacke and came to the Blacke Friers 
where the Emperor was lodged in great royaltie : All his 
nobles were lodged in his newe palace of Brydewell, out 
of the whiche was made a Gallery to the Emperors lodgyng, 
whiche gallery was very long, and that gallery and all 
other galleries there wer hanged with Arras. The kynges 
palayce was so richely adorned of all thynges that my witte 
is to dull to descrive theim or the riches of the hangynges 
or the sumptuous buildyng and giltyng of chambers. 

On saterday the kyng and the Emperor playd at tennice 
at the Bayne agaynst the princes of Orenge and the Marques 
of Brandenborow, and on the Princes syde stopped the Erie 
of Devonshyre and the lorde Edmond on the other syde, 
and they departed even handes on bo the sydes after xi. games 
fully played. 

On Whitsonday the viii. day of June themperor and the 
kyng with great honor both apparelled in cloth of silver 
reysed, gounes and cotes and all their apparell white eccept 
their bonettes, roade to the Churche of saint Paule and 
there heard high Masse whiche was song by the Cardinall 

which 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



256 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



which had his travers and cupborde, and before Masse 
ii. Barons gave him water and after the Gospell ii. Erles, and 
at the last lavatory ii. Dukes whiche pride the Spanyardes 
sore disdayned. When Masse was done they returned to 
Brydewell where the Emperor was highly feasted. The 
same sonday at afternoone the two princes went by water 
to Westminster and roade to the churche, and in ridyng all 
the sanctuary menne cryed mercye and pardon, they were so 
hastye and presed so nere that the sergeauntes at armes 
could scace kepe theim from touchyng the Emperor and 
the kyng : The Cardinall gave them a gentle answere 
whiche contented theim for a tyme. They wer receyved 
with Procession into the Abbey and heard evensong and 
beheld kyng Henry the seventhes chapel and then went 
into Westminster halle, at the largenesse wherof the Em- 
peror muche mervayled, then they turned to Brydewell and 
there supped. 

On Monday they dyned in Southwarke with the duke of 
SufFolke and hunted there in the Parke, and roade to the 
Manor of Richemond to their lodgyng and the next day to 
Hampton court, where they had great chere and from thence 
on thursday to Wyndsore wher he hunted Fryday and Sater- 
day and on Sonday at night in the great halle was a dis- 
guisyng or play, theffect of it was that there was a proud 
horse which would not be tamed nor brideled, but amitie 
sent prudence and pollicie which tamed him, and force and 
puyssaunce brideled him. This horse was ment by the 
Frenche kyng, and amitie by the king of England and 
themperor, and the other prisoners were their counsail 
and power, after this play ended was a sumptuous Maske 
of xii. men and xii. women, the men had on garmentes of 
clothes of golde and silver lose layde on crimosyn Satten, 
knit with pointes of golde, bonettes, whoddes, buskins, all 
of golde. The ladies were in the same suite whiche was 
very riche to behold, and when thei had daunced, then came 
in a costly banket and a voidy of spices, and so departed to 
their lodgyng. 

Monday, tewsday, and Wednesday the princes and their 
counsail sat moste parte in counsail, and on Corpus Christi 
day, they with great triumph rode to the collage of Wynd- 
sore where the Emperor ware his Mantle of the Garter 
and satte in his owne stall, and gave to the Herauldes 

CC. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 257 



CC. crounes : that day bothe the princes received the 
Sacrament, and after Masse bothe sware to kepe the pro- 
myses and league eche to other, for the which amitie great 
joy was made on both parties, and after that Masse was 
ended thei went to dyner, where was great feasting. 

On fryday they departed out of Wyndsore, and by easy 
jorneys came to Wynchester the xxii. day of June, and in 
the way thether, the Emperor hunted the Hart. Before 
the Emperor was come to Wynchester, therle of Surray 
Admyrall of England with all the kynges Navy was come 
to Hampton, and with him the lorde Fitz Water, the Baron 
Curson, syr Gyles Capell, sir Nicholas Carew, sir Richard 
Wyngfeld, sir Richard Jernyngham, Fraunces Bryan, 
Anthony Browne, Jhon Russell, of whiche many were of 
the kynges prevy chamber : These with many more de- 
parted from Hampton with xxx. shippes well manned 
and ordinaunced in the ende of June, noisyng that they 
should onely skoure the seas for savegard of the Emperor 
and his Navye : But they had privy instruccions to go to 
another place as you shall heare after. 

All this while was the warre on the parties of Picardy 
hotte, and the capitaine of Bullain called Fayet wrote ever 
mockyng letters to the garison of Calice, and sayd : yf the 
garison of Calayce would issue out, he would mete with 
theim halfe way with iiii. M. men. Wherupon sir Edward 
Guildforde Marshall of Calayce, whom the capitaine of 
Bullain called the fyrebrand, because it was his badge, sette 
furth out of Calayce the xi. day of June with xii. C. men 
and went out of Calayce and sent a pursivant to the capitayn 
of Bullain certifiyng hym that he was commyng with his 
fyerbrand,and bad hym kepe promise. This officer declared 
the message to hym, but he came not : Furth marched sir 
Edward til he came to Marguison and taryed to see whether 
the capitayn of Bullayne would come or no, and when he 
sawe he came not, he set fyer in the toune, and the light 
horsemen forrayed the beastes and pillage, and brent vyllages 
all about, whiche was wel perceived in the countrey a farre 
of, and towarde night all the crew came home with good 
pillage, and on the morow sir Edwarde Gyldford delivered 
a prisoner franke and free, on condicion he should tell the 
capitaine of Bullain that he had bene at Marguison with his 
fyerbrand, whiche truely did his message, for the whiche the 

capitaine 

VOL. I. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



2 K. 



258 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 

YERE 
[1522-23] 



capitaine brake hys head : all the castels and fortresses in 
the Englishe pale were well manned and vitailed and lacked 
no artillerie, so that the Frenchemen could do theym no 
harme. 

When the Emperor and the kyng laye at Byshops 
Walthan they joyntly sent letters of defiaunce to the Duke 
of Loraine, as alye and confederate with the Frenche kyng. 
The fyrst day of July the Emperors navy sailed before 
Hampton, which wer C.lxxx. goodly shippes. When the 
Emperors shippes were come, he tooke leave of the kyng 
and had great gyftes geven him and muche money lent to 
him, and so the vi. day of July he toke his shippe, so with 
all his Navy he made sayle towarde Spayne where he arived 
in savetie the x. day after. 

The kyng about this very tyme sent to the citie of London 
to borow xx. M. poundes, whiche sore chafed the citizens, 
but the somme was promised, and for the payment the 
Mayer sent for none but for men of substaunce. Howbeit 
the craftes solde muche of their plate. This summe was 
payed, and the kyng sent his letter promisyng payment of 
the same and so did the Cardinall. The poore men were 
contented with this payment and sayd, let the riche churles 
pay, for they may well. Lyke loane was practised through 
al the realme, and privy scales delivered for the repayment 
of the same. 

This season the xxi. day of Maye was the citie of Geane 
gotten by the Emperors capitain called Octaviano de Co/umna, 
whiche had with hym iiii. M. and iiii. C. Spaniardes, v. M. 
Italyans, and iiii. M. Lanceknightes : and in the citie was 
taken Porter de Navarro the Frenche kynges familiar 
capitaine and all the lordes of Geane whiche favored 
the Frenche kyng were taken prisoners or slayne, and 
especially one Octaviano Faragoso, whiche ruled there for 
the Frenche kyng, was evil punished : The spoyle of the 
citie that the souldiers had, was iiii. M. dukates beside the 
pillage, whiche was a great thyng. 

Now let us returne to the lorde Admyrall of Englande 
whiche departed from Hampton as you have heard, and so 
with his Navy sayled and skoured the seas, and at last came 
on the costes of Brytaigne, and commaunded the wysest 
Masters and Marriners to boy the heaven of Morles, whiche 
was done, and so the next night all the flete came to the 

haven 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



haven of Morles in safetie and moored their shippes 
together. Then all men were commaunded to harnes 
and to avaunce their standardes, and all souldiers to geve 
their attendance on their capitaines, and then the lorde 
Admyrall appointed and caused xiiii. pieces of ordinaunce 
called Faucons to be brought to land and drawen furth 
with strength of men. Then when all menne that should 
go forwarde were landed, the lorde Admyral with banner 
displayed tooke lande on the Estside of the haven the fyrst 
day of Julye, and with hym a fayre band of souldiers, as 
the lorde Fitz Water, the Baron Curson, sir Richard 
Wyngfelde, sir Richard Jernyngham, sir Wyllyam Batantine, 
sir Adrian Foskew, sir Edwarde Donne, sir Edwarde 
Chamberlayne, Fraunces Bryan, Richard Cornewall, sir 
Anthony poynes, sir Henry Sherborne, and the vice 
Admyrall, sir Willyam Fitzwillyam, sir Edmond Bray, sir 
Gyles Capel, sir Willyam Pyrton, sir Jhon Cornewalles, sir 
Jhon Wallop, sir Edward Echyngham, sir Willyam Sidnay, 
Anthony Broune, Gyles Huse, Thomas More, Jhon Russell, 
Edward Bray, Henry Owen, George Cobham, Thomas 
Owdayle, Thomas Lovell, Robert Jernyngham, Anthony 
Knevit, sir Jhon Tremaile, and the Master of the kynges 
ordinaunce, sir Willyam Skevyngton, and Jhon Fabian 
serjeant at armes, by whom this enterprise was chefly 
moved as was reported, with many other gentlemen and 
souldiers, to the nombre of vii. M. The lorde Admyrall 
and sir Richard Wyngfeld brought these men in good order 
of battaill, and caused Christopher Morres the master 
gunner to see all thinges redy prepared, and then about 
viii. of the clocke the sayd fyrst day they marched towarde 
Morles in good ordre of battail with banners displayed. 
The alarme rose in the countrey and came to the toune of 
Morles wherby the gentlemen of the countrey shewed 
theimselfes prickyng, but when they heard the Gunes they 
fledde as though they never used warre. They of Morles 
armed theimselfes and went to the walles and shut the gates 
and laide ordinaunce where was moste jeopardie. The Eng- 
lishemen had gone five long myle and were now come to 
the subberbes of the toune : then the Englishemen archers 
shot, and the Brytons them defended : then the Admyrall 
commaunded the toune to be assauted, then the lord Fitz 
Water and the Baron Curson quartered the toune on all 

sides : 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



260 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



sides : The Englishemen shot with long bowes, and the 
Brytons with crosse bowes, whiche defended themselfes man- 
fully. Before the port Morvet where is a Meason de dieu, 
at this gate gave the assaut sir Richard Wyngfelde, Nycholas 
Carew, Fraunces Bryan, sir Jhon Wallop and all their bendes 
havyng with theim thre pieces of ordinaunce called Faucons, 
whiche the master Gunner of tymes shot, but the Britons 
had set the gate full of hacbushes, then the gunner sayd, 
have at the wicket, and in the smoke of the gunnes let 
us entre the gate, the gentlemen assented, then the sayd 
sir Christopher Gunner strake the locke of the wicket, so 
that it flew open, then in the smoke ranne to the gate the 
sayd Christopher and the other forenamed gentlemen, and 
when Christopher came to the gate he found the wicket open 
and entred, and the gentlemen folowed, the Brytons defended 
them selfes, but thei were put backe or slaine, then was the 
great gate opened and then entered the souldiers that were 
on the other side of the toune. When the Brytons on 
the walles sawe the towne gotten, some fled at the posterne 
and some by another way, the best way that they could. 
Therle of Surray with banner displayed toke the market 
place. Then the souldiers fell to pillage and rifled the 
chestes and ware houses of marchauntes, for the toune of 
Morles was very riche, and specially of lynnen clothe, the 
gentlemen suffered the souldiers to do what they would. 
When the souldiers had taken their pleasure of the toune 
as muche for a trueth or more then they could beare away, 
the lorde Admirall commaunded the trumpettes to blow, 
and commaunded all men to set fyer in al places of the 
toune (the holy places onely except) the fayre market place 
was set on fyer, and the subburbes brent ardantly. Wher- 
fore all men were commaunded to their standardes, and 
aboute vi. of the clocke the army retreted, and as they 
passed they brent the villages and places. And when night 
approched they drewe together and all that night lay on 
land abiding their enemies. And the next day with honor 
they tooke their shippes, and when all menne were shipped 
and fewe or none missed, the lorde admyrall commaunded 
xvi. or xvii. shippes small and great liyng in the haven to be 
brent. Then they sayled furth and came to ancker before 
saint Polle de Lyon, then he commaunded that the foyst 
and other small shippes and great botes should be manned 

to 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



261 



to enter into an harborow for shippes called pympoll or 
pympole, which was sone done, the boates entred the place 
and some landed, but then the Brytons were to strong, and 
so they tooke their boates and bet the Bryttons on the shore, 
and the Brytons shotte great ordinaunce at the Englishmen, 
but it did them no harme, and yet the Englishmen Brent a 
shippe of CC. and many small vessels. When tyme came 
the whole flete sayled into the haven of Brest and with 
barkes and rowe barges entred the haven and toke land, and 
some Englishmen did so muche that they set fyer in houses 
the castle. And even as thenglishemen sayled by the 



nere 



cost, the Brytons them askryed and fortefied the landyng 
places, yet dayly the Englishemen skyrmished with the 
Brytons and came safely to their shippes againe : with this 
warre was all the duchy of Brytaigne sore troubled. 

When the lorde Admirall had wonne the toune of Morles 
as you have heard : He called to him certaine squyers whom 
for their hardines and noble courage he made knightes, fyrst 
sir Fraunces Bryan, sir Anthony Broune, sir Richard Corn- 
wall, sir Thomas More, sir Gyles Huse, sir Jhon Russell, 
sir Jhon Raynsford, sir George Cobham, sir Jhon Cornwalles, 
sir Edward Rigley and divers other. And after he wrote 
letters to the kyng of his good spede : In the whiche he 
muche praised all the gentlemen and souldiers for their 
hardynes. When he had sayled a while on the seas, he had 
letters sent from the kyng that he should retreyte, and so he 
came withall his fleete under the Isle of Wyght to a place 
called the Kow, and then he departed from his shippe and 
came to Estamstede the xxi. daye of Julye to the kyng, of 
whom he was well welcomed you may be sure. And so on 
Mounday the xxiii. day of July the kyng and he came to 
London to the Cardynals place and there sat in counsayle to 
determine what should be done. After this the kyng dyned 
with the Cardinall the xxiii. day of Julye, where he rehersed 
that he had knowlege that the Admyrall of Britaine was in 
Morles with a C. horsemen and a C. crosbowes, and yet he 
fedde, and the kyng muche commended the lorde Admyral 
for his payne and hardynes, and praysed theim of hys garde, 
and specially fiftie, whiche left pylferyng and never went 
from the lorde capitaine. 

On the third day of July while this enterprise was done 
at Morles, certaine Frenchemen to the nomber of CCC. 

horsemen 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



262 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



horsemen came nere to the castle of Guysnes and kept theim 
selfe in a close covert and so appered viii. or x. horsemen 
and came nere Guysnes : out of the Castle came viii. Eng- 
lishe archers and issued out of the gate and fell with the 
Frenche horsemen in skyrmishe : to the Frenchemennes 
reskue came iii. men of armes and skyrmished with the 
archers whiche were a fote. Then out of Guysnes issued 
xii. dimilances all Welshemen and ranne boldely to the 
Frenchemen in reskue of the fotemen. Then the whole 
bend of Frenchemen issued out and set on the Whelshemen, 
the fotemen shotte while arrowes lasted and were faine to 
fight with swordes, the Welchmen kept themselfes together 
and entred into the bend of Frenchemen and brake their 
speres and then fought so with swordes that they made 
away, so that they escaped from the bend of CCC. horse- 
men, and of the Frenche men were slayne iii. men and 
v. horse, the fotemen were overpressed and solde their 
lives dere, for the Frenchemen slew them al and would 
take none prisoner, they were so angry with the kyllyng 
of their horse. 

Also the xxv. day of July sir Wyllyam Sandes treasorer 
of Caleys and sir Edward Guildforde Marshal, with banners 
spred, issued out of Caleys with xiiii. C. menne and went 
into the Frenche pale lokyng for Mounsire Foyat whiche 
was a great mocker and a coward : But when he appeared 
not they went to Whitsand baye and set it on fyer, and the 
people fled to the churche whiche was fortified and stode at 
defence, the body of the churche was wonne and then they 
toke the steple and some yelded themselfes, but the rem- 
nant by counsail of a priest mainteined so long that the 
Steple was fyred and then the priest cried succour, but it 
was to late and so the Frenche people was fayne to lepe the 
Steple and divers perished, and they that were saved wer led 
to Caleys as prisoners. Farther the xxiii. daye of the same 
moneth Thwaites a capitaine of an Englishe shippe tooke 
land beside Bulleyn, and went up thre myle into the 
countrey to a toune called Newe Castle and forrayed all 
the countrey and in his returne set fyer on the toune and 
brent a great part therof maugre the Bullenoys, and with 
his bowes and men whiche only was vi. score, he put 
backe Ixxx. Haugbushes and CCC. men of warre of the 
countrey and so came to their shippe with al the botie 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



263 



and lost no man, notwithstandyng they were sore folowed 
to their shippe. 

On the vi. day of July the Cardynall satte in the starre 
chamber at Westminster where he sayd, my Lordes it is 
reason that you should know the honorable enterprise done 
by the lorde Admiral and his compaigny in Brytaigne whiche 
hath dispoyled and destroyed the great toune of Morles in 
Brytaigne with all the villages and countrey adjoynyng to 
the same, whiche is in the Frenche dominion, whiche mis- 
chiefe had never risen yf Fraunces the Frenche kyng had 
kept his othe and promise. For he is bound that he should 
never retayne the Swyches from the Emperor, nor that he 
shall not invade any of the Emperors landes or dominions, 
whiche he hath done, for he hath invaded the countrey of 
Henaude and Cambrises and taken Heding and Fountraby 
with many other injuryes. For when the kyng sent me and 
other to his great costes the last yere to Caleys to treate 
a unitie and peace betwene theim, all our saiynges were by 
the Frenche kyng turned into a mocquery. Also contrary 
to hys promyse he hath suffered Duke Jhon of Albany to 
entre the realme of Scotland to the great perill of the yong 
kyng, Nephieu to our soveraigne lorde, and also entendeth 
to mary the Quene of Scottes contrary to the kynges honor. 
The sayd Frenche king also witholdeth the kinges dueties 
and his sisters dower : wherfore of necessitie the kyng is 
entered into warre, for no prince wyll suffre the wrong that 
the French kyng offereth hym as an untrue and forsworne 
prince, wherfore for your owne welth you must now ayde 
your prince, trustyng to punyshe and chastice hym to your 
great honor and fame. 

Then by commaundement wer all Frenchemen and Scottes 
imprisoned and the goodes seazed, and all suche as were 
denizens were commaunded to shewe their letters patentes, 
and suche as were allowed had all their goodes and the other 
not, and all Frenchemen and Scottes that had maryed Eng- 
lishe women, the wifes and children had halfe the goodes 
delivered unto them, and every denizen to fynde suertie for 
hys good abearyng, and all the other yf they would be bayled 
to fynde suerties for their trueth and allegeaunce or els to 
be kept in pryson, for the portes were so kept that they 
could not flye. 

The kyng nowe beyng entered into the warres thought 

not 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



264 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



not to slepe and let the Frenche kyng alone, wherfore by his 
letters he commaunded certain persones with their powers to 
come to London in August. They that wer appointed came 
accordyngly, every man with suche a nomber as to him was 
appointed, and when they had mustered at London before 
the kynges Commissioners they were nere xii. M. menne 
with the Poyners, and they were sent to the lorde Admyral 
whiche lay at Dover with iiii. M. men, but because harvest 
was not done, the vitayle at Caleys was to litle for so great 
an armye, wherfore they lay in Kent at tounes there a good 
space, whiche made vytaile dere there. 

In this sommer the lorde Rosse and the lorde Dacres of 
the North whiche were appointed to kepe the borders agaynst 
Scotland did so valiantly that they burned the good toune of 
Kelsy and Ixxx. villages and overthrew xviii. towers of stone 
with all their Barnkyns or Bulwerkes. 

The kyng also in this moneth was credibly enformed that 
the duke of Albany prepared an army royall of Scottes and 
Frenchemen to invade England. Wherfore the kyng ap- 
pointed the Erie of Shrewsbury his lorde Steward to be his 
Lyeutenaunt generall against the sayd Duke and his inva- 
sions, whiche directed his letters to the shyres of Yorke, 
Darby, Stafford, Shropshyre and al other beyond Trent that 
all menne should be in readynes. 

The xx. daye of August the Cardynall sent for the Maior, 
Aldermen and the moste substanciallest commoners of the 
Citie of London, where he declared to theim that the kyng 
had appoynted commissioners through the whole realme of 
England for to swere every manne of what value he is in 
movables, the more to be in readynes for the defence of 
this realme. And the kyng for the love he beareth you 
would have syt with you hymselfe, but for certayne other 
affayres in hys warres to be doone he is letted, and so hath 
appoynted me your Commissioner. Wherfore in convenient 
tyme certifye me the nomber of all suche as be worth one 
hundreth poundes and upwarde, to the intent I may sweare 
theim of their values : for fyrst the kyng asketh of you your 
lovyng heartes and due obeysaunce, the whiche shall appeare 
by your conformitie to his requestes, and when the value is 
taken he desyreth onely the tenth part of goodes and landes 
whiche is the least reasonable thyng that you can ayde your 
prince with. I thynke every one of you wyll offer no lesse, 



as 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



as for the spiritualtie every marine is in the shyres sworne 
and shall and wyll gladly pay the fbwerth part to the kyng 
and lyve on the iii. partes. Nowe to your part I am sure 
you wyll not grudge, therfore name me the menne of sub- 
staunce and for the meaner sorte, meaner Commissioners 
shall be appoynted. Syr sayd a marchaunt yf it may please 
you, how shal this tenth part to the king be dely vered ? In 
money plate or Juels sayd the Cardinal! at a value. O my 
lorde sayd the Aldermen it is not two monethes sithe the 
kyng had of the Citie xx. thousand pound in ready money 
in loane, whereby the Citie is very bare of money, for 
Goddes sake remembre this, that riche marchauntes in ware 
be bare of money : Well sayd the Cardynall, this must 
be done and therefore go about it. So the Aldermen 
resorted to their Wardes and named suche as they judged 
to be of that value, whiche came before the Cardinall and 
moste humbly besought hym that they myght not be sworne 
for the true value of their substaunce, for the true valuacion 
to theim was unknowen and many honest mennes credence 
was better than his substaunce, and therfore they doubted 
the peril of perjury. Well sayde the Cardinall sythe you 
dread the cryme of perjurye, it is a sygne of grace, and 
therefore I will for you borowe of the kyng a lytle. Make 
you your bylles of your owne value likely to report your 
fame, and then more busynes nedeth not, for you see what 
two costly armyes the kyng hath ready against bothe 
Fraunce and Scotland, therfore nowe shewe your selfes lyke 
lovyng subjectes, for you be able enough. And I dare 
sweare the substance of London is no lesse worth then two 
Myllions of golde. Then sayd the citezens we woulde to 
God that it were so, and the citie is sore appaired by the 
great occupiyng of straungers. Well sayd the Cardinall it 
shalbe redressed if I lyve : But on Saterday next I shall 
appoynt one to receyve your bylles, and he that is of 
credence more then of substance let hym resorte to me and 
I will be secrete and good to hym. Thus the Citezens 
departed in great agony saiyng, that at the last loane some 
lent the fifth part and nowe to have the tenth part was to 
muche. And here note well that the x. thousand poundes 
that was lent was not taken as the xx. of every mannes 
substaunce, but it should be allowed as part of the x. part, 
and this valuacion shoulde performe up the whole x. part. 

Great 

VOL. I. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



2 L 



266 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



Great was the mournyng of the common people as it 
is ever in suche cases of paymentes. But in the ende 
one doctor Tonnys a secretary to the Cardinal came to 
the Chapiter house of Paules, and to him the citezens 
brought in their bylles and on their honestie they were 
received, whiche values afterwarde turned them to dis- 
pleasure. 

The spiritualtie made suite to the lorde Cardinall that 
no temporall men should sit to examyne them, to be made 
privy to their possessions and goodes : wherfore bishoppes 
and Abbottes were appoynted commissioners to take the 
value of their substaunce. 

In this season was great plentie of vitaile sent to 
Caleys, and to the lorde Admyral were sent Tentes and 
Pavilions some of Ixx. lodgynges for hym and other 
noble men. 

The Friday beyng the xxii. day of August certain 
Welshemen were lodged at a poore village named Cause, 
because in Caleys was verye narow lodgyng, and the same 
night CCCC. Frenchmen passed by Caleys haven for lacke 
of good watche and came into the same village and set fyer 
in the house where the Welshemen lay whiche ranne awaye 
naked into the Marishe and saved themselfes, but their 
horses wer taken. This chaunce happened for lacke of 
good watche. 

When the lorde Admyrall had brought all his menne out 
of the shippes and that all the souldiors were come out 
of Englande and the ordinaunce set on land, then came 
into Caleys haven xxiiii. shippes out of Spayne from the 
Emperor whiche set on land CCC. Spanyardes whiche were 
sent to serve the lorde Admyrall and under hym they were 
put. When all thinges were ready, the lorde Admyrall set 
in order his battels and for the forwarde he appoynted sir 
Robert Ratcleffe, lorde Fitzwater for Capitayne, and with 
hym divers knightes and gentlemen whiche capitaine kept 
his men in very good order. 

After that battail folowed the ordinaunce, artilerie and 
other trusses with vitail and necessaries, and for the capi- 
taine of the horsemen was appointed syr Edward Gylford, 
by whom the currers and vewers of the countrey were 
appointed. The myddle warde ledde the lorde Admyrall 
himselfe, and in his compaignie the lord Edmond Haward 

his 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



267 



his brother, with many worshipfull knightes squiers and 
tall yomen : The last battail was ledde by twoo valiaunt 
knightes of the Garter syr Wyllyam Sandes and syr Richard 
Wyngfelde, and with theim was sir Richard Jernyngham 
with many other. In good order of battaill they passed 
over Newnam bridge the xxx. dai of August to a place 
called Calkewel and their lodged betwene the Wyndmyl 
and the marrishe. 

The same day came to the lorde Admyrall a certain 
nombre of wilde persones, as menne out of service and 
apprentises that rann from theyr Masters and other ydle 
persons, and him desired that they might be retained in the 
kynges wages, to whom he answered, that the kyng had 
appointed the nombre of suche as should have wages, which 
was fully complete, and advised theim to returne into Eng- 
lande and not to loyter there. Then sayd a tall yoman, 
my lord here be many good felowes that with your favor 
would jeopard to get or lose, for their mynde is to be 
revenged on the Frenchemen enemies to the kyng and his 
realme. Good felowe sayd the lorde Admirall, theyr myndes 
be good, but if for lacke of conduite they should be cast 
awaye, it were a losse to the kynge and a great corage 
to the Frenchemen. Then al the compaignie cried, let us 
go in the name of God and sainct George : Then after 
counsaill taken he gave them a Penon of sainct George 
and bad them adventure (of whiche they were called ad- 
venturers) and farther bad theim that yf they got any botie 
they should ever bryng it to tharmy, and they should be 
payde to the uttermost, and then he gave them money and 
commaunded them weapons and so the sayd xxxi. daye 
the sayd adventurers iiii. C. in nombre and mo, sette for- 
ward before the host, but how thei did, you shall heare 
after warde. 

Monday the fyrst day of September the armye removed 
towarde Guisnes, which day was very hote and drinke 
lacked, and water was not nere, so that some died for faint- 
nes, and this night they laye at Guysnes. 

Tewsday the second day of September the armye passed 
towarde Arde : And in the golden Valay where the kyng of 
Englande and the Frenche kyng met two yeres before, there 
met with tharmy of England two capitaines of the Bur- 
gonions, the one called therle of Egremond the Seneschal 

of 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



of Henaude, and the lorde of Bavers Admyral of Flaunders 
with v. C. horsemen, like men of warre. The lord Admiral 
in gentle maner received these two capitaines and their com- 
paignie and so they joyned theimselfes to the Englishe armye, 
and the same day they tooke lodgyng at Arde south from 
the toune, where they were wel vitailed, and there lay wed- 
nisday all day, and the Burgonyons lay under the castle of 
Mountorrey. The next day they removed to the vale of 
Lyekes, and there encamped themselfes. Sir George Cob- 
ham the same day with ii. M. men, by the Admiralles com- 
maundement came to thee toune of Selloys and set fyer in 
the toune, and when the toune was on fyer he assauted the 
castle. They within made resistence, but it availed not, for 
the walles were entred and the souldiers taken, and the castle 
set on fyre, and with gunpouder overthrew the walles : then 
with hast he removed to a town called Brune bridge and set 
it on fyer and also brente a toune called Senkerke, and also 
the tounes of Botyngham and Manstier and so returned to 
the lord Admirall whiche gave him greate thankes. The 
Frenchemen appered in plumpes, but yet they durst not 
reskewe theyr tounes. 

On saterday the lord Admirall removed with the whole 
army too a ground beside saynt Nerbyns and there lay all 
Sonday beyng the vii. day of Septembre, wher he sent 
divers compaignies out, which forranged the countreyes and 
brent many villages as farre as thei might travail the lord 
Admirall caused the toune of Narbyn to be brent, and tooke 
thee castle and rased it and utterly destroyed it. 

On Monday the viii. day, he removed to Daverne and 
brente al the tounes as he passed, and liyng there he brente 
the toune of Daverne and cast doune the castle of Colum- 
berge and the Castle Rew, but the churches of Daverne and 
a house of Nonnes, wer saved by his commaundement. 
The same day was brente sainte Marie de Boys and all the 
countreye twelve myle about was of light fyer, the people 
fledde and lefte tounes and Castelles full of wyne, corne, 
and all other necessaries, so that in Daverne the Englishe- 
men found greate plenty, whiche or they went away they set 
a fyer. 

The ix. day of Septembre the whole armye came before 
the toune of Boyardes in which was a Churche more liker a 
Castle then a Church, for it was depe ditched with drawe 

bridges 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



269 



bridges and with Bulwarkes, fortefied and lopes very war- 
like. The Admirall beholdyng it sayd, thys is like no 
house of praier. Then he commaunded his people to enter 
the dyches and plucke doune the drawe bridges, and set fyer 
in the churche and with gunpouder overthrewe it, and brent 
the toune and all the villages adjacent to the same, the people 
cried and fledde, well was he that might save him selfe. 

The x. day thei came to the toune of Vaus, which was 
ny the toune called Fauconberge and there a company of 
Frenchemen were askried, for out of a wood they shewed 
them selves, but thei taried not long, but without prefer of 
encounter thei departed. Wherfore thee whole armye toke 
their campe and there lay till the xiii. day whiche was sater- 
dai, every daye sendyng plumpes out to set fyer in the 
countrey, and on that daye they toke the way to Frynge 
or Frynges, and ther brent the towne and destroyed the 
castle which was very strong. 

The Sonday beyng the xiiii. day, the lorde Admirall with 
his compaigny in great raine and yll wether passed by hilles 
and valeys verye painefully, and with greate labor came to a 
toune called Blaniow, and there taried monday all day and 
there al day counsailed the capitaines bothe of England and 
Flaunders or Burgon what was best to be done. 

On tewsday in the mornyng came a trumpet from the 
Castle of Hedyng and desired to speake wyth the capitaine, 
whiche incontinent sent for hym : my lorde capitaine sayd 
the trumpet, the capitaine of Hedyng desireth you to come 
thither and see the place, and on the walles he wyll bring 
you good lucke, and he prayeth you not to hurt the dere in 
hys parke, and for any other hurt you can do hym he careth 
not : well sayde the lorde Admyrall, I wyll send hym answere 
by my trumpet. Incontinent he called a trumpet and bad 
hym go to Hedyng to Mounsire de Bees and to say to him 
that he would come to the castle of Hedyng, and if he slay 
any of my menne with his artillerie, let him trust me, that if 
I gette the castle I shall save neither man, woman, nor 
childe. So wyth that message the trumpet departed and 
declared it to Mounsire de Bees, whiche sayd that it was 
spoken of noble corage, and so the trumpet returned, and 
the same day the campe was removed and the whole armye 
came about the castle of Hedyng, at whiche tyme the 
toune of Hedynge was sore infecte with pestilence, where- 
fore 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



Message from 
Hedyng. 



The answere. 



Hedyng 
beseged. 



2.7 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



The cause 
why the 
castle was 
not assauted. 



The siege 
raised. 



fore a generall commaundement was geven that no man 
should once come into the toune, howbeit some of the 
Burgonyans did and set fyre in the houses. 

When the siege was planted, the ordinaunce was very light 
for the wayes were so depe and the grounde so wet that the 
greate ordinaunce could not be caried. Thys thing was well 
debated by the lord Admirall and the capitaines. After they 
had been there xi. dayes, fyrst they considered that the castle 
could not be obtained wyth out great ordinaunce, which in 
no wyse could then be caried, and also if they wyth the light 
ordinaunce shotyng should spend all their pouder and not 
get the castle then in theim might be reckened great foly, 
and al so they should bee in great jeopardie to passe wyth- 
out ordinaunce, and further the plage began sore in the 
armye, wherefore they determined to leave the siege and 
returne. But whyle they lay at the toune they bet doune 
roffes, galleries, chymnies, and suche other thynges as the 
light ordinaunce would bete doune, whyche sore defaced the 
beautie of the castle. They also destroied all the dere in 
the Parke, whyche were falowe dere and left none for the 
capitaine. The Englishemen were clerely determined to 
have assauted the castle if the Burgonions would have done 
the same : But they refused, whyche seyng the Englishmen 
left the assaut alone : For though the Englishemen had 
gotten it, it should have been delivered to the Emperours 
use by the treatie, for he claymed it as his inheritaunce, 
whyche caused the Englishemen to leave the assaut. 

And so the xxii. daye of September they rered the siege 
and set theim selfes in good order of battaill and passed 
styl onwarde til they came to Dorians and brent the toune, 
and rased the castle, and from thence came to the good 
toune of Barrier and brent and spoyled the same. Thus he 
brent all the way as he passed : and ever the wether was 
worse, and men fell sicke wherfore the Burgonions and 
the Spaniardes returned into Flaunders above Betwyn. 

Then the lord Admyral sawe that it was no time to kepe 
the felde, turned bacward in good order of battaill and 
came to Calaice the xvi. daye of October. And while he lay 
at Calayce he sent out syr Willyam Sandes, syr Morice 
Barkeley, syr Willam Fitzwillam wyth iii. M. men, whiche 
brent Marguyson whyche was newly edified and fortefied, 
they brent also the toune of sainct Johnes Rhode and 

Temple 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



271 



Temple toune, and many villages. At this voiage wer 
taken many prisoners xiii. M. shepe, xiiii. C. great cattel 
as Oxen and Kyen, and xiii. C. hogges, and xi. C. Mares and 
Horses, wyth this great botie this crew returned to Calayce 
in safetie. 

Then the lord Admyral sent syr Jhon Walop wyth ix. C. 
men to saint Omers to lye there and at Guysnes, Hammes, 
and at Marke, and at Oy he left another nombre and left 
capitaines to overse them and all the soudiers had a monethes 
wages payed them and so returned into Englande. The 
adventurers taried still and gat many good prayes, and 
brought to the garrisons, and lacked nothyng : they were 
muche drad of all the common people, for of them they 
had great prayes, and dayly learned feates of warre whiche 
made them the bolder. 

When the lorde Admirall had set all thynges in an order 
on that syde the sea, he toke shippe and with the Navy came 
into the river of Thames and so to the kynge, of whom he 
was wellcommed and not unworthy. 

In this season were banished out of Southwarke xii. Scottes 
whiche had dwelt there a long season and wer conveied from 
parisheto parishe by the constable like men that had abjured 
the realme, and on their uttermost garment a white crosse 
before and another behynd them. Thus were they conveyed 
through London Northwarde till they came to Scotlande. 

While the lorde Admiral was this in Fraunce destroiyng 
the countrey, the noble Erie of Shrewsbury lorde George 
Talbot and Stewarde of the kynges houshold prepared by 
the kynges commaundment a great army toward Scotland : 
for the kynge was enformed that Duke Jhon of Albany 
(whiche in the Parliament of Scotland was made lord gover- 
nor of the realme and of the yong kyng duryng hys nonage) 
had raised a mightie and puissaunt host of Scottes to the 
nomber of Ixxx. M. men as after was well knowen, whiche 
were warlike appointed, and that he wyth v. C. Frenchemen 
with handgunnes and other great artillerie was commyng 
forward to invade the west Marches of England adjoynyng 
toward Scotlande. Wherefore the kyng sent worde to therle 
of Shrewsbury, which with all diligence lyke a noble capitaine 
set forward towarde Yorke, and wrote to therles of North- 
umberland, Westmerland and Darby, to the lorde Dacres, 
Lumley, Clyfford, Scrope, Latemer, Ogle, Darcy, Conyers, 

and 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



272 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



The saiyng of 
a Scottishc 
Erie. 



The answere 
of the duke of 
Albany. 



and to al other gentlemen to be ready within viii. houres 
warnyng with all their powers : and so in jorniyng, he wyth 
his power whiche was great, came to the citie of Yorke 
abidyng the ordinaunce, and the lordes and all other thynges 
necessary in suche a case. 

In the meane season the Scottes were come nigh to the 
citie of Carleyle and lodged them nigh the water of Eske 
not farre from Sulway sandes, and there made their abode. 
Therle of Westmerland, the lord Dacres, the lorde Roos, 
the lord Mountaigle, with the knightes of Lancashere, West- 
merland and Cumberland were ready with xxviii. M. men to 
have geven them battaill. 

When the Scottes sawe that they could not come into 
England with out battaill, the lordes of Scotland drew to 
counsail, and amongest all one wyseman said, my lordes, 
hether be we come by the commaundement of my lorde 
Governor the duke of Albany, but for what cause the warre 
is we should know : you al remember that the last warre 
was to the realme of Scotland muche prejudiciall : For kyng 
James the IIII. brought the realme of Scotland to the best 
that ever it was : and by his warre it was brought to the 
worst almost that may be, for by that warre was he and his 
nobilitie slain, whiche Scotland sore lamenteth : Wherfore 
by myne advice let us go to the duke and know of him the 
cause. Then thei al came to the dukes court, and therle 
of Arrayn an auncient man spake for them al and saied, my 
lord Governor, by your will and commaundement here is 
assembled almost all the nobilitie of Scotland with their 
power upon a pretence to entre into England, my lordes 
here would know the cause and quarel why this war is 
begon, if it might please your goodnes, it should wel 
satisfie their mindes. 

The duke studied a good while and sayd : this question 
would have bene demaunded or now : For wel you know 
that I for the very love that I bere to the realme of Scot- 
land of the which I have my name, honor and lynage. I 
have passed the seas out of the noble realme of Fraunce 
into this realme of Scotland. One great cause to bryng 
you to a unitie when you were in devision : By reason of 
which devision your realme was likely to be conquered 
and destroied. Also the Frenche kyng by my suites and 
intercession wyl joyne with you in aide against thenglish 

nacion : 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



273 



nacion : and when this warre was determined in the parlia- 
ment, you made me capitain, authorisyng me to invade 
England with banner displaied : then was no question de- 
maunded of the right or quarell, and that I have is by your 
assent and agrement, and that I will justifie : But to answer 
your demaunde, me thinke you have just cause to invade 
England with fyer, sworde, and bloud, if you be not to for- 
getfull, and without you wil beare dishonor and reproche for 
ever : for you know that this realme of Scotland is our 
inheritaunce as a porcion of the world allotted to our nacion 
and auncetors whom we succede : Then where may be 
better warre then to mainteine this our naturall inherit- 
aunce, is not daily sene the great invasion that thenglishmen 
on us make, the greate manslaughters and murders with 
robberies and spoiles that they do dayly ? Is not this cause 
of warre ? To defend the countrey is the office of a king 
the honor of noble men and the very service of chivalry, 
and the duty natural of the cominaltie. For I thinke it a 
just quarel if we might conquere the realme of England and 
annex it to our realme and make a Monarchic : For sith the 
beginning of our habitacion in this Isle of Britaigne, that 
nacion and we have bene enemies, and us they have ever 
hated, and yet we have ever withstode them til at the last 
battail of Branxston where we by chaunce lost our sove- 
reigne lord and many noble men, but that was by treason 
of his lord chamberlain, and yet I thinke we wan the fielde : 
which murther I thinke all we noble men ought tb revenge. 
Therfore I would that you should coragiously avaunce your 
self in this quarel to get honor and to be revenged. 

Then a sad man called the president of the counsaill said, 
my lord : Fortune of warre is led by him that all ledeth, 
and he striketh the stroke, we can worke no miracles, and 
here are the lordes of England redy to encountre us, and 
surely they will fight, for their power shall encreace daily 
and ours is at the hyest. And God geve us the victory as I 
trust he will, yet have we not won the field. For redy 
comming is the lord talbot erle of Shrewsbury so muche 
drad in Fraunce as you know wel, with a great puissaunt 
army, and there is no doubt but the kyng of England wil 
send or bring another army, if we should chaunce to get 
the first battail : if we get the ii. fields, that wil not be 
without losse of many nobles, by reason wherof the realme 

shalbe 

VOL. I. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



2 M 



274 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



shalbe weaker. And if we be overcome, how many shalbe 
slayne God knoweth : they that fle be worthy to be reputed 
as traitors to the king and so by wilfulnes and folishe har- 
dines the realme shalbe in jeopardy to be undone, and I say, 
while the king is within age, we ought to move no warre, 
sith by warre we may bring him to distruccion. Alas said 
the duke here is al the puissaunce of Scotland : if we re- 
turne we shal encorage our enemies, and the realme of 
Scotland shall ever be rebuked and defamed. All this com- 
municacion in counsaill was written by one sir Lother priest 
and Scot and secretary to the queue of Scottes, whiche was 
a secretary there in the host at that tyme, to a Scottishe 
priest that dwelt in London : and farther he wrote that the 
Scottishe kyng did muche for the Frenche kynges pleasure 
to draw the lordes of England with their powers toward that 
partie and to put the kyng of England to charges, so that 
he should not invade Fraunce. 

After this communicacion the quene of Scottes which 
doubted the sequele of this matter, sent worde to the duke 
and him required to comon of a peace with the warden of 
thenglish Marches, which sent an Herauld to the lord 
Daker then warden of the west Marches, the lord Daker 
agreed, and upon hostages went to the duke of Albany into 
his campe, where the quene of Scottes by that tyme was 
come, and so ther was an abstinence of warre taken for 
a season : and in the meane tyme the duke and the quene 
promised to send Ambassadours to the kyng of England 
to conclude a peace : And thus the Scottes returned into 
their houses. This truce was taken the xi. day of September 
betwene England and Scotland this xiiii. yere of the kyng. 
Therle of Shrewsbury hearyng of the truce by the lorde 
Dacres letters returned with al his company, sory that he 
had not gone forward on the Scottes. In this season the 
commissioners sat for the loane of the x. part of every mans 
substaunce in every shyre, the people were sworne and some 
avaunsed themselfes more then they were worth of pride, 
not remembryng what was comyng, and the commissioners 
did what they could to set the people to the uttermoste, 
whiche afterwarde turned the people to muche heavines, 
and by reason of this, great summes of money were levied, 
but the moste part were not content, because the loane 
was so sodainly paied. But under the value of v. pound 



no 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



no man lent a peny. The vii. day of October was iiii. M. 
pound paide to the citie of London whiche was lent for a 
private cause about the loane of the x. part. 

In this yere the bakers of London came and tolde the 
Mayre that corne would be dere, wherupon he and the 
Aldermen made provision for xv. C. quarters, and when it 
was come they would by none, and made the common 
people beleve that it was musty, because they would utter 
their owne, so that the lorde Cardinall was fayne to prove 
it, and found the bakers false and commaunded them to 
bye it. 

The xv. day of October the kyng lay at Hichyn in Hart- 
ford shyre to see his Haukes flye, and by chaunce, there 
the kynges lodgyng was on fyer and he in greate feare, but 
in no jeopardie, and so the kyng came shortly to London 
and sent for the Mayre and dyvers Comoners and to them 
gave thankes for many kyndnes whiche they thought they 
had well deserved. 

The warre thus continuing betwene the Frenche kyng and 
the kyng of Englande, there was a valiaunt Capitayn Con- 
stable of the castle of Hammes under the lorde Mountjoy 
called sir Richard Whethyll, the Frenchemen hym so muche 
hated that they devised a policie to take him, and so on 
Christmas day at night there issued out of Bullain CC. hors- 
men and CCC. fotemen, and somuche they travayled that all 
together were come to a place where Hoppes grewe, nere 
Hammes castell called Catte Hall. When they were come 
thither, they kept theimselfes covert, and in the morning 
they brake up the Turne pyke by saint Gertrudes : Then 
sent they into Hammes Marshe ix. or x. footemen to take 
cattell. In the castle the alarme rang, but the embushement 
kept theim stil close : The constable perceived what the 
alarme ment, and armed hym, and so did his archers, and 
toke his horse, and thre gentelmen went on foote by him. 
The Frenchemen of purpose drived the cattell here and there 
as though it would not be driven, sir Rychard Whethyll pur- 
sued them. When the drivers sawe hym, they drove the 
cattell into a greate fielde : then were the bushment of horse- 
men and fotemen betwene hym and sainct Gertrudes, and 
they sodainly brake out on hym, and the thre gentelmen 
on foote fought valiauntly but thei were slaine, the knight 
alighted and fought on foote manfully, but he was borne 

doune 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



The duke of 

Albany 

returned. 



doune with pykes, and sore wounded and so was compelled 
to yelde hym selfe prisoner : by that tyme were xxx. archers 
come out of the castle, and when they sawe the greate nomber 
of the Frenchemen, then they knewe that their capitain was 
betrayed and so returned. 

In this Christmas whiche was kept at Eltham, the 
Cardinall made dyvers reformacions for the kynges hous- 
holde, and al they that had no masters were commaunded 
to avoyde. 

The xxvii. day of February syr Jhon Walop knyght sent 
Ix. aventurers from Guysnes to seke aventures, and they 
mette with a Gentelmanne called Thomas Palmer whiche 
went with them. And out of a Castell betwene Bullaine 
and Marguyson called Hadyngham came out Ixxx. Frenche- 
men with Pykes and Crosbowes, and sette on the same 
Palmer whiche hym defended. 

Al his company savyng xxiii. persons were gone about to 
seke their pray. These xxiii. persons him manfully succoured 
and after the Frenchmen had slain his horse and wounded 
hym, his company slew iii. Frenchemen and toke xxv. on 
live whiche were all hurt and so were thenglishemen, for the 
Frenchemen fought sore. All these prisoners were brought 
to Guisnes, and the remnant of thadventurers returned with 
muche cattell. 

The last day of February Ix. Englishmen archers and 
bilmen came to a place called saint Anthonies nere to Mar- 
guison and entred the houses and fell a spoilyng : The 
Frenchemen were therof advertised by a spy, and came on 
and set on a few Englishmen which were together: then 
with noise other of thenglishemen approched, so they were 
xl. persones. Then came out a freshe embushment of 
Frenchemen and set on thenglishemen and so slewe xi. 
and toke xx. prisoners and the other scaped. About this 
tyme the duke of Albany sailed out of Scotland into Fraunce, 
and the French kyng somuch favored him, that as it was 
shewed to the kyng of England for truthe, that when the 
French kyng rode through Paris he rode on the one hand 
and Richard de la Pole a traitor to England and by parlia- 
ment attainted on the other hand, and that the duke had 
asked of the French kyng v. M. horsemen and x. M. 
Almaines, and that he had promised the French kyng if 
he had those xv. M. men, he would do one of these iii. 

thynges, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



277 



thynges, either sley the kyng of England in battaill, or els 
take hym prysoner, or els drive hym out of his realme. 
These were shamefull bragges of a noble man and very 
folishe. 

Ye have hard before how truce was taken by the duke of 
Albany and the lord Dacres for a season betwene England 
and Scotland and that Ambassadors should be sent to the 
king of England, so it was that in October accordyng to 
their accustomed doublenes they sent iii. personages of smal 
behavor as it semed, as Ambassadours from Scotland : thei 
were smally regarded and shortly departed. Their commis- 
sion was to know whether the same tyme or abstinence of 
warre was by the kyng assented to or not, and other com- 
mission had they none. Thus they ment craftely as you 
may perceyve, for in suche troubelous tyme they may steale 
unpunished, whiche they may not do in tyme of peace. 
Wherfore the kyng to be sure of them sent for Henry 
the v. erle of Northumberland and him made warden of 
the whole Marches which thankefully accepted the same, 
and so departed lord Warden. But howsoever it happened 
he made suite to the kyng and his counsaill and never left, 
til he was discharged of the same, and then therle of Surray 
lord Admirall of England was made generall warden, and the 
lord Marques Dorset was made Warden of thest Marches 
and Myddill, and the lorde Dacres of the west Marches : 
whiche iii. lordes sped them thether the vi. day of March 
for the defence of the borders. For refusyng of this office 
therle of Northumberland was not regarded of his owne 
tenauntes whiche disdained hym and his bloud, and muche 
lamented his foly, and al men estemed hym without hart or 
love of honour and chivalry. 

The kyng out of hand sent commission to gather the 
loane, this was called the practisyng of the loane, which sore 
emptied mens purses. In the same moneth were musters 
taken through the realme and every man commaunded to be 
ready within a dayes warnyng to do the kyng service in 
harnes, whiche caused every man of honesty to bye harnes 
and weapon. 

The lorde Marques Dorset warden of the East Marches 
betwene Englande and Scotland accompanied with sir Willyam 
Bulmer and sir Arthur Darcy and many other noble men, 
the second day of April then beyng shere thursday entred 

into 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



Ambassade 

from 

Scotland. 



The loane 
gathered. 



278 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



The oration 
of doctor 
Tunstall 
Bishoppc of 
London. 



into Tyvedale and so x. myle into Galoway and brent on 
every side townes and villages, and the Scottes in great 
nomber shewed themselfes on the hylles and did not 
approche, and so he all that night taried in the Scotishe 
ground, and on good Friday returned wyth their botie 
whyche was iiii. M. head of nete into Englande, when 
they had brent Grymslay, Mowhouse, Duffbrde mylles, 
Ackeforthe, Crowlyng, Nowes maner, Midder Crowlyng, 
Marbottel, Low Bog, Sefforth Maner, Myddyl rigge, 
Primsed, Broket, Shawes Harvel, wide open Haught and 
other tounes and villages, and yet lost not many men. 

The xv. daye of Aprill beganne a Parlyament at the blacke 
Fryers in London, and that day the Masse of the holy ghost 
was song, all the lordes beyng present in their Parliament 
robes. And when Masse was finished the kynge came into 
the Parliament chamber and there satte doune in the seate 
royall or throne, and at his fete on the right side satte the 
Cardynal of Yorke and the Archebishop of Canterbury, and 
at the raile behind stode doctor Tunstal bishop of London, 
which made to the whole Parliament an eloquent Oracion, 
declaryng to the people the office of a kynge. Fyrst he 
muste be a man of judgement accordyng to the saiyng of 
the Prophet David De u s judicium tuum regi da &c. Also he 
muste be a man of great learnyng accordyng to the saiyng 
of the Prophete Erudimini qui judicatis terram. Accordyng 
to whiche saiynges he sayde that God had sent us a prince 
of great judgment, of great learnyng, and great experience, 
whiche accordyng to hys princely dutie forgat not to studye 
to sette forwarde all thynges whyche might be profitable to 
his people and realme, least ther might be layde to hys charge 
the saiyng of Seneca Es rex et non habes tempus esse rex ? 
Art thou a kyng and hast no tyme to be a kyng ? whiche is 
asmuch to say, as art thou a kyng and doest nothyng profit- 
able to thy people ? Art thou a kyng and seest the people 
have an insufficient lawe ? Art thou a kyng and wilt not 
provide remedy for the mischiefe of thy people ? These 
thynges have moved the kynges highnes to call this hys 
high court of Parliament both for the remedy of mischiefes 
whiche be in the common law, as recoveries, forain vouchers 
and corrupt trials. And for makyng and orderyng of new 
estatutes which may be to the high avauncement of the 
common wealth, wherfore he wylleth the commons to re- 

payre 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



279 



payre to the common house and there to elect theim a 
speaker, or theyr common mouth, and to certifie the lorde 
Chauncellour of the same, whyche should thereof make 
report to the kynges moste noble grace, whyche should 
declare hys pleasure when he would have hym presented 
before hys personne. Thys was the cause of the Parlya- 
ment he sayd, but surely of these thynges no worde was 
spoken in the whole Parlyament, and in effect no good acte 
made except the graunt of a greate subsidie were one, but 
accordyng to thys instruccion the commons departed to the 
common house and chose for their speaker sir Thomas 
Moore knight and presented hym the saterday after in the 
Parlyament chamber, where he accordyng to the old usage 
disabled hymselfe both in wit, learnyng, and discrecion, to 
speake befor the kyng, and brought in for his purpose how 
one Phormio desired Hanniball to come to his readyng, 
whyche thereto assented, and when Hannyball was come, he 
began to reade, de re militare, that is of Chivalrie, when 
Hannyball perceived hym, he called hym arrogant foole, 
because he would presume to teache hym whych was master 
of Chivalrie, in the feates of warre. So the speaker sayde, 
if he should speake before the kyng of learnyng and order- 
yng of a common welth and such other like the kyng beyng 
so well learned and of suche prudence and experience might 
say to hym as Hannyball sayd to Phormio. Wherfore he 
desired hys grace that the commons might chose another 
speaker : The Cardinall answered, that the kyng knewe his 
witte, learnyng and discrecion by long experience in his ser- 
vice, wherefore he thought that the commons had chosen 
him as the moste metest of al, and so he did admit hym. 
Then sir Thomas Moore gave to the kyng hys moste humble 
thankes, and desired of hym two peticions : The one, if he 
should be sent from the commons to the kyng on message 
and mistake their entent, that he might with the kinges 
pleasure resort againe to the commons for the knowledge of 
their true meanyng : The other was, if in communicacion and 
reasonyng any man in the common house should speake more 
largely then of dutie he ought to do, that all such offences 
should be pardoned, and that to be entred of recorde, whiche 
two peticions were graunted, and so thus began the Parlya- 
ment and continued as you shall heare. 

Because an evil chaunce happened to the great rebuke of 

al 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



The Oration 
of Sir 
Thomas 
More. 



280 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 

The Rhodes 
besieged. 



Why the turk 
coveted the 
Rhodes. 



al christen princes, I entend briefly to declare the same 
miserable chaunce. In the beginnyng of this yere Sulton 
Solyman Pac called the great Turke which was but the 
viii. of the ligne of Ottoman, the first that toke upon hym 
to be a great capitain or ruler. And to whom Sultan Selyme 
his father had lost thempyres of Constantinople, Trapesonde, 
Alexandry, and Babylon, with many divers kyngdomes and 
realmes : whiche Sultan Solymon the yere before had gotten 
thee towne of Belgrade beyng the key of Hungary. Because 
he sawe all the greate princes in Christendome now at dis- 
cord, thought it moste for his honor and profile to make 
warre on the Isle of the Rodes and to take the same, which 
Isle had been kept by the space of CC.xiiii. yeres by the 
brethren or knightes of the order of sainct Johnes of 
Jerusalem. Dyvers thynges moved him to take this enter- 
price. One was because this Isle stode so that the religious 
of the same oftentymes toke and destroyed his shippes as 
they came with golde and other riches from Egypt Sirie and 
other Est parties to Constantinople, so that by theim of 
that Isle he sustayned more hurt then by all Christendome, 
because the sayd Isle stode in the entry toward Constanti- 
nople. Another mocion was because his father when he 
died charged hym to assay to take the Rhodes for to be re- 
venged of the shame that they had done to hys graundfather 
Mahomet the great Turke which was with dishonor beten 
from the siege of the Rhodes. But the greatest occasion 
of all was the exhortacion of a great counsailer of the religion 
called Andrewe Admiral borne in Portyngale, whiche knew 
the whole estate and in what case the toune stode in : The 
cause why this Andrew Amyral bare malice to his religion, 
was because after the death of Frier Fabrica de Laretto lord 
master of their religion, he was not elected to that honor, 
but one Philip de Vylliers de Lisle Adam of Fraunce was 
named to be lord Master, wherfore the said Andrew pro- 
voked the Turke to come to the Rhodes. 

The great Turke seyng so great an occasion offered and 
desiryng honor, and also knowing the fortresse of the Rhodes 
to lacke municions (for surely the brethren of the sayd order 
wer both of suche wealth and pride and also lived after suche 
an ungracious and ungodly fashion, that they toke neither hede 
of their vow and solempne profession, nor also did forese 
the thynge to come, so that the greate welth of them and 

their 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



281 



their evil livyng blinded them, so that they thought the 
Turke durst not ones attempt to set on their garrison, and 
so they beyng elevate in this point of pride, left their toune 
unfurnished and so wer sodainly surprised as you shall 
heare) wherfore the sayd Turke covertly provided for Hi. 
C. saile, in the whiche he caried all his artilery and al other 
thinges necessary : in the which armye wer Ix. M. myners 
and pyoners prepared for the only intent to digge and myne. 
All the rest of the army of the Turke came by land to a 
place called Fysco, which standeth so directly against the 
Rhodes that a fyer may be seen from the one side to the 
other, from whiche place the Turke sent letters to the 
abovenamed Philip de Vylliers lorde Master of the sayd 
religion signifiyng to him that he would have the sayd Isle 
for great damage that they had done to him and his people, 
and if they would yeld to hym the sayd Isle, he promised on 
his faith and by Mahomet his fyrst prophet, thei should have 
no damage nor hurt by hym, and that thei that would depart 
should go in safetie, and they that would tary and serve him 
should have good wages and if they refused thys to do, he 
sware that he would subvert the walles of their fortresse and 
destroy them all and make them slaves, which letter was 
dated at Constantinople the first dai of June. The said 
Lord Master and his compaignie were greatly abashed at 
this letter, but yet lyke hardy gentlemen they intended to 
defende them, and made all the preparacions that they could 
do in so short a space, and wrote to al princes christen of 
their nede and distres. But the Turke like a wyly serpent 
knowyng the great devision amongest the christen princes, 
so that he knewe that they could sende no succours to the 
Rhodes, sent CC. M. Turkes whiche arrived in the Isle of 
the Rhodes on Mydsomer dai, which was the feastfull daye 
of the Rhodians in honor of Saint Jhon baptiste whiche 
sodain commyng sore abashed the Rhodyans beyng but vi. 
C. knightes and v. M. other mete to beare armes : yet of 
noble courage and trusting in God, they determined to 
defende the enemies of God, and the xxviii. day of July 
the Turke arrived there in his awne persone, whiche muche 
encouraged his people. 

When the Turke was arrived, he bent his ordinaunce 
towarde the toune and did no great harme, when he sawe 
that the walles were of that defence that ordinaunce did 

litle 

VOL. I. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



2 N 



282 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 

The 
mountes. 



The Mynes. 



The assautes. 



Treson 
espied. 



litle harme, he caused all his Pyoners to cast yearth, 
one banke over an other still tyl they came within a bow- 
shot of the wall, and although that many of the pyoners 
were slain with ordinaunce of the toune, they never ceased 
tyll they had made a banke of yearth hygher by x. foote 
then the wall of the toune, and there they layde their 
ordinaunce, so that no persone durst styrre on the walles 
or Bulworkes, and thus with mountaines of yearth was 
the toune environed and behynd the mountaynes lay the 
Basheaux and chief capitaines of the Turke whichc were 
ever ready to take their advauntage, and dayly they shot 
into the toune and bet doune houses and slewe the people 
in the streates, for they upon this mount myght easely see 
into the toune. Besyde this, the Turke caused so many 
mynes to bee made in divers places, that they within were 
not able to make countermynes for lacke of people, inso- 
muche as wemen were set a worke to dygge and cary, 
by reason wherof a greate part of the walles were over- 
throwen, and if they within had not made countermynes 
the toune had bene gotten within a short space. 

Also the Turkes in September gave to the Rhodyans 
foure greate assautes lyke valiaunt warriers, but the Christen 
men within, so valiantly defended them, that at every assaute 
they lost at the lest ii. M. men, and at the fourth assaute 
they lost x. M. Turkes and more. 

The greate Turke seyng the losse of his men at the 
assautes, sent for Monstaffa Basshaw, through whose coun- 
sail he toke on him this enterprice and much blamed hym 
that he had made hym beleve that he might have the toune 
within xii. dayes or in a moneth at the most, wherefore in 
that furie he would have put hym to death, if the other 
Basshawes had not entreated for him : but in conclusion 
the Turke determined clerely to rayse his siege and to 
departe, and so had done if that same night syr Andrew 
Amyrall that you heard of before and a Jewe beyng within 
the Rhodes had not written letters and shot them out on 
quarelles into the Turkes army. By whiche letters the 
Turke knewe the necessitie of the toune and feblenes of 
the people, whyche caused hym to chaunge his purpose. 
But this treason was espyed, and the traytors taken and 
put to terrible execucion. And the Turke caused so many 
Mynes to bee made, that although some tooke none effecte, 

yet 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



283 



yet by some he overthrewe bothe Bulwarkes, walles and 
towers, so that he myght entre into the toune : and so on 
sainct Andrewes even he caused a greate assaute to bee 
geven, whiche was very fierce, but yet the Christen men so 
valiauntly defended them, that they slewe thre thousande 
Turkes and mo, and kept them from enteryng that daie, 
but the Citezens of the Rhodes after this assaulte, came to 
the lorde Master, and praied hym to have compassion of 
them, their wives and children, and shewed him that if the 
toune were taken by assault, (as it was like to be) that thei 
al should be cruelly murdered, the lorde Master muche 
regarded his honour, and comforted the people with faire 
wordes, but by chaunce about the same tyme, the great 
Turke sent a letter into the Rhodes, willyng theim to deliver 
the toune, and they all should have their lyves and goodes, 
and they that would tary, should tary in quiet, and thei that 
would depart should savely depart. 

When this letter was knowen, then the people cried out 
on the lorde Master, to take the offre, wherfore he callyng 
all his counsaill together seyng that it was not possible to 
kepe the toune longer, both for lacke of artilary and vytayle, 
and also because his nomber was so minished, that scace he 
had souldiers to kepe the walles, wherefore he by greate 
advice determined to take the Turkes offer, and so sent to 
hym twoo of his religion, for the farther conclusion and 
assuraunce of the same, whiche well entertained them, and 
had wrytynges sealed of all thynges that they desired, to 
which two knightes, Aymeche Basshaw sware by his faith 
that there was slayn at the siege Ixiiii. thousande Turkes, and 
xl. thousande dedde of mortalitie and mo. 

And so on Christmas daie, the great Turke hymselfe 
entered into the Rhodes, and toke possession therof, and 
the lorde Master and all his religion, the first daie of 
January tooke shyp and sailed to Candy, and so in con- 
clusion came to Rome, and there declared his chaunce and 
adventure. Thus was the toune and the isle of the Rhodes, 
taken by the great Turke, whiche was a great succour to all 
Christian men, resortyng into the East partes of the world, 
whiche chaunce was muche lamented thorowe all Christen- 
dom, and much blame put in all Princes, because they sent 
no succoure nor aide to the Isle. 

And this yere the byshoppe of Duresme died, and the 

kyng 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



The yeldyng 
up of the 
Rhodes. 



284 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XIIII. 
YERE 

[1522-23] 



The xv. 

yere. 

The 
Cardinalles 



kyng gave the byshoprike to the Cardinal!, and he resigned 
the byshoprike of Bathe, to doctor Jhon Clerke master of the 
Rolles, and he made sir Henry Marney his vicechamberleyn 
lorde Privie Scale, and after created hym lord Marney. In 
the ende of this yere, doctor Blithe byshop of Chester, was 
attached for treason, but he acquite hymselfe. And about 
this season, the Cardinall of Yorke beyng Legate, proved 
testamentes, and dyd call before hym, all the executors and 
administrators, of every Dioces within the realme, so that 
the bishoppes and ordinaries, did prove no great willes in 
their dioces, except he were compounded with, not to their 
litle dysavauntage. Also by his power Legantine he gave 
by provencions, all benefices belongyng to spirituall per- 
sones, by the whiche doyng, he not onely had the hatred 
of the spiritualtie, but also he ran into the daunger of 
the Premunire, whiche he sore after repented, as it shall 
appere in the xxi. yere of this kyng. 



THE XV. YERE. 

THE Parliament beyng begon, as you have hard before 
rehersed, the Cardinall accompaignied with diverse 
lordes, aswell of the Spiritualtie, as of the tempor- 
altie, came the xxix. daie of Aprill into the Common house, 
where he eloquently declared to the commons, how the 
Frenche kyng Fraunces the first, called the moste Christ- 
ened kyng had so often tymes broken promise with the 
kyng of England, and his welbeloved nephew Charles the 
Emperor, that the kyng of his honor, could no longer suffre. 
For first he declared, that the metyng of the saied twoo 
prynces at Guisnes, the said Frenche kyng was sworne, to 
kepe all the articles conteined in the tripartite league, made 
betwene him, the Emperour, and the kyng of Englande, 
sithe the whiche tyme, he hath made warre on themperors 
dominions, by Robert de la Marche his capitain. He also 
hath with holden the tributes and other paimentes, whiche 
he should paie to the kyng of Englande, for redempcion of 
Torney and Tirwin, and not with this content, hathe not 
alonely robbed and spoyled the kynges subjectes, but also 
hath sent Jhon duke of Albany into Scotland, to make warre 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



285 



and to invade this realme, wherfore the king of necessitie 
was driven to warre and defence, whiche in no wise could be 
mainteined, without great somes of money, and he thought 
no lesse then viii. C. M. pounde to be reised of the fifth part 
of every mans goodes and landes, that is to saie iiii.s. of every 
pounde, for he saied that the yere folowing, the kyng and 
the Emperour should make suche warre in Fraunce, as hath 
not bene sene. 

After that he had declared his matter at length, exhortyng 
the Commons to aide their prince, in tyme of necessitie, he 
departed out of the common house. The morow after, sir 
Thomas More beyng speker, declared all the Cardinalles 
oracion again to the commons, and enforced his demaund 
strongly, saiyng : that of duetie men ought not to deny to 
paye iiii.s. of the pound. But for all that, it was denied and 
proved manifestly, that if the fifth part of substaunce of the 
realme, were but viii. C. M. pounde and if men should paie 
to the kyng, the fifth part of their goodes, in money or plate, 
it was proved, that there was not so much money out of the 
kynges handes, in al the realme, for the fifth part of every 
mans goodes, is not in money nor plate : For although 
five men were well monied, v. thousand were not so, the 
gentelman of landes, hath not the fifth part of the value of 
coyne : The Marchaunt that is ryche of Sylke, Wolle, Tynne, 
Clothe, and suche Marchaundise, hath not the fift parte in 
money, the husbande man is ryche in corne and cattel, yet 
he lacketh of that some. Lykewyse viteilers and all other 
artificers, be ryche in housholde stufFe, and not in money : 
And then consequently, if all the money were brought to the 
kynges handes then men must barter clothe for vitaile, and 
bread for chese, and so one thyng for another : then con- 
sider that after this valuacion, the kyng hath had by the waie 
of loane ii.s. of the pound whiche is foure hundred M. pound, 
and now to have iiii.s. of the pound which amounteth in the 
whole xii. C. M. 1. whiche first and last is vi.s. of the f. whiche 
is almost the third part of every mans good, whiche in coyne 
can not be had within this realme, for the profe whereof was 
alleged, that if there were in Englande, but xv. M. parishes, 
and every parishe should geve a C. marke, that were but 
xv. C. M. marke, whiche is but x. C. M. t. and how many 
parishes be in England one with another able to spare a C. 
markes, out of cities and tounes : and where it is written, 

that 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 

The 
demaunde. 



286 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



that in England there be xl. M. parishe churches, it was 
proved that there were not xiii. M. parishe churches at this 
daie. Then accompt the whole some can not amounte above 
x. C. M. 1. and the kyng demaundeth viii. C. M. and he 
according to this valuacion, hath had iiii. C. M. pounde, ther- 
fore it was thought, the some was impossible to be levied, and 
if all the coyne were in the kynges handes, how should men 
live : Also the kyng had of the spirituall men the last yere 
iiii.s. of the pounde. 

After long reasonyng, there were certain appoynted, to 
declare the impossibilitie of this demaunde to the Cardinall, 
whiche according to their commission, declared to hym sub- 
stancially the povertie and skarcenes of the Realme : All 
whiche reasons and demonstracions, he litle regarded, and 
then the saied persons, moste mekely beseched his grace, 
to move the kynges highnes, to bee content with a more 
easier some, to the whiche he currishly aunswered, that he 
would rather have his tongue, plucked out of his hedde with 
a paire of pinsons, then to move the kyng, to take any lesse 
some : with whiche aunswere they almoste dismaied, came 
and made reporte to the common house, where every daie 
was reasonyng, but nothyng concluded. 

Wherfore the Cardinall came again to the common house, 
and desyred to be reasoned withal, to whom it was aunswered, 
that the fashion of the nether house was, to heare and not 
to reason, but emong themselfes. Then he shewed the 
realme to be of great ryches, firste, because the kynges cus- 
tomes were greater now, then they were before tyme : also he 
alleged sumpteous buildynges, plate, riche aparel, of men, 
women, children, and servauntes, fatte feastes, and delicate 
dishes, whiche thynges were all tokens of greate aboundaunce : 
with whiche repetyng of mens substaunce, as though he 
had repined or disdained, that any man should fare well, or 
be well clothed, but hymself, the commons greatly grudged. 
And when he was departed out of the house, it was proved, 
that honest apparell of the commodities of this Realme, 
aboundaunce of plate, and honest viandes, were profitable to 
the realme, and not prodigall. 

After long debating, the Commons concluded to graunte 
ii.s. of the pound, of every mannes landes or goodes, that 
was worth xx. pounde, or might dispende xx. pound, to be 
taken for the kyng, and so upward e of every xx.s. twoo s. 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



and from xl.s. to xx. pounde, of every xx.s. xii.d. and 
under xl.s. of every hed xvi. yeres and upwarde iiii.d. to bee 
paied in twoo yeres. This graunt was reported to the Car- 
dinall, which therwith was sore discontent, and saied, that 
the lordes had graunted iiii.s. of the pound, whiche was 
proved untrue, for in dede they had graunted nothyng, but 
harkened all upon the commons. 

Then a knight called sir Jhon Huse of Lincolneshire, 
saied, to please the Cardinall somwhat, let us gentlemen of 
fiftie pound lande and upwardes, geve to the kyng of our 
landes xii.d. of the pounde, to be paied in thre yere : with 
whiche mocion diverse gentlemen were sore discontent. And 
when the question was asked, ten or xii. of the gentelmen 
sayed yea, and when the naie should be asked, the commons 
saied nothyng, for they would not condempne, nor let the 
gentelmen to charge themselfes, and so by x. or xii. persones 
the gentlemen were burdened, with xii.d. more then other, 
for the whiche graunt, sir Jhon Huse had muche evill will. 

After this graunt made the xxi. daie of Maie, because of 
Whitsontide, the parliament was proroged to the tenth daie 
of June : Duryng which prorogacion, the common people 
saied to the Burgesses, Sirs, we heare saie you will graunt 
iiii.s. of the pound, we advise you to do so that you maie 
go home, with many evill wordes and threatenynges. 

And in this season, the Cardinall by his power legantine, 
dissolved the Convocacion at Paules, called by the Arche- 
bishop of Canterbury, and called hym and all the clergie, to 
his convocacion to Westminster, whiche was never sene before 
in England, wherof master Skelton a mery Poet wrote. 

Gentle Paule laie doune thy swear de : 

For Peter of Westminster hatb shaven thy beard. 

When the parliament was begonne again, the landed menne 
of fiftie pounde and upward, seyng that they were charged, 
with xii.d. of every pounde of their landes, moved, that all 
suche as were worth fiftie pound in goodes and upward, 
should paie also xii.d. of the pounde, in the iiii. yere. At 
the whiche mocion was muche reasonyng, and at the last the 
xxvii. daie of June, the question was asked, and doubtfull it 
was, whether the yea or nay were moste, then was the house 
divided, and all the commons severed theimselfes, from the 
knightes of the sheres, so that one yea part remained onely 

the 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



The Kyng of 

Denmarkes 

commyng 

into 

Englande. 



the knightes of the shire, and the commons stifly affirmed 
that the mocioners of this demaunde, were enemies to the 
realme. At the last the Speaker called theim all together, 
and after long perswadyng, and privie laboryng of frendes, 
it was agreed that xii.d. of the pounde should be paied the 
fourth yere, of fiftie pounde in goodes. 

After this the parliament the xxxi. daie of July, was 
adjorned to Westminster, and there continued till the xiii. 
daie of August, and that daie at ix. of the clocke in the 
night dissolved. Duryng the tyme of this Parliament the 
xxvii. daie of Aprill, was Sir Arthur Plantagenet, bastarde 
sonne to kyng Edward the fourth, at Bridewell created 
viscount Lisle, in the right of his wife, whiche was wife to 
Edmond Dudley behedded. 

In this season was true worde brought, that on Christmas 
daie laste past, the strong toune of the Rhodes was de- 
livered, to the great Turke called Sultan Soliman, with the 
whole Islande, to the greate hurt of all Christian nacions : 
the causes of the losse, was the evill livyng of the brethren 
or knightes, and negligence of provision for the defence, and 
the envie and treason emong themselfes, as it is written 
and reported. 

This yere Cristierne kyng of Denmarke with his wife, 
which was sister to the Emperour Charles, and his thre 
children, with xviii. shyppes arrived in Flaunders, cleane 
banished out of his realmes and dominions, by his uncle 
Frederick Duke of Hoist, and his awne subjectes, for his 
crueltie as is written. Whiche Cristierne with his wife was 
well entertained of the Duches of Savoy, and a pencion 
assigned to hym to lyve on, in Brabant and Hollande. 
Duryng the tyme of his there sojornyng, he made muche 
suite to come into Englande, to see and speake with the 
kyng, whiche request was to hym graunted, and so he and 
his Quene, with foure gentlewomen, and a trayne of fourty 
persones, poore and evill appareled, landed at Dover the xv. 
daie of June, where he was nobely received, by the erle of 
Devonshire, and the byshoppes of Excester, and Rochester, 
and diverse Knightes and Esquiers, and so brought to Grene- 
wyche : where the kyng and the Quene, standyng under 
their clothes of estate, received in the greate hall of Grene- 
wyche, kyng Cristerne and Quene Isabell his wife. And he 
dined with the kyng, and she with the Quene, both set under 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



289 



the clothe of estate, and were sumpteously served, of all 
dilicate viandes. 

And when he had sojourned there a season, every dale 
feasted at the Court, he was conveighed to London, and 
lodged at Bathe place, where he hearyng of the watche in 
London, on sainct Peters even, desired to se it, and so was 
accompaignied with the duke of Suffolk, the erles of Oxford, 
Essex, and Kent, and diverse other lordes and ladies, and 
brought into the kynges hed in Chepe, where the cytie of 
London made to hym and his wife a costly banket. And 
when he had sene the watche, he saied, I would to God I 
had so many Archers, Pikes, and halberders, as I sawe this 
night, then I trust I would punishe suche, as have wrong- 
fully dispossessed me, of my realme and countrey. And 
after he had solaced hymself in London, he resorted to 
the kyng, of whom he had many great giftes, and likewise 
had his wife of the Queue her aunte, and so tooke their 
leave, and were conveighed to Dover. And when he had 
bene in Englande xxii. daies, he toke shippyng, and sailed 
again into Flaunders, praisyng muche the kyng of Englande 
and his court. 

Duryng all this season, and session of the parliament, the 
warre was fierce, bothe betwene Englande and Fraunce, and 
England and Scotlande, in so muche that eche parte, did 
asmuche as in theim laie, to hurte the other. For on the 
borders of Scotlande, laie the valiaunt Earle of Surrey, greate 
Admirall of Englande, and the Marques Dorset, and his 
thre brethren, sir Willyam Compton, and sir Willyam 
Kyngston, with diverse other Knightes and Esquiers, sent 
to theim by the kyng, whiche dayly invaded the realme of 
Scotlande, and threwe doune the Castle of Wedorberne, the 
castle of West Nesgate, the Castle of Blakkater, the tower 
of Mackewalles, the Tower of Est Nesgate, and many other, 
and brent to the nomber of xxxvii. villages, and haried the 
countrey from the Este Marches to the West, and never 
had skirmishe : but they often times shewed themselfes in 
plumpes, waiting their avantage howbeit in all this journey, 
were fewe Englishemen lost. Wherfore the Lordes per- 
ceiving, that the Scottes entended not to make any armie 
into Englande, fortified the frontiers on every parte, with 
men and all thynges necessary for defence, for stealyng 



or other small rodes. 



After all whiche thynges set in a 

perfectnes, 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



VOL. I. 



2 O 



29 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 

A ship 
sonken with 
stone in 
Calice haven. 



perfectnes, they returned toward the kyng, and came to the 
ende of the parliament. 

In this season, the Frenchemen havyng a greate desier, to 
have the kynges toune of Calice, devised first to destroy the 
haven, by the which thei supposed, that Calice might have 
been lightly gotten, for faulte of reskewe. Whereupon 
thei laded an old ship of iiii. C. tonne, with great Cane 
stone, in the port of Depe, whiche ship had no mast, but 
came with a foresaile, as though the mast had bene cut, and 
cast over the bord in the sea in a tempest. And when she 
came before Calice, every man that sawe her, thought she 
had bene wether driven, and lost her mast by tempest, and 
so aboute x. of the clocke at night the xxiiii. daie of May, 
the saied shippe came before Calice haven, as though she 
would entre for harborow, and so was enteryng and missed 
the chanell, and turned to the sandes, towarde Rise banke, 
and the Frenchemen supposing, that they had bene in the 
very chanell, launched out their boate, and sodainly set the 
shippe on fire, and lepte into their boate, and so skaped by 
the shore. When thei of Calice sawe the fire, they were 
sore troubled, and at the last when the water was gone, they 
perceived the ship consumed, and the goodly Cane stone 
liyng whole. 

Wherfore the lorde Barnes deputie of Calice, the lorde 
Barkley leuetenaunt of the castle, the lorde Sandes thresorer 
of Calice, and other commaunded all the labourers that might 
be gotten, to breake the remnaunt of the ship, and to cary 
away the stone, and so the saied stone was brought to 
Calice : wherupon the saied Capitaines sent a letter, to the 
capitayn of Bulleine, by Calice pursivant at armes, desiryng 
hym to geve thankes, to Monsire Lodowyke capitayn of 
Depe, for the sendyng of so fayre a ship, and goodly stone 
to Calice, whiche stone the saied lordes sent worde, they had 
received into the toune of Calice, and that it did them muche 
profite, for the fortificacion of the saied Toune, desyryng 
hym to sende more, and they would receive it on the same 
price. To the whiche letter, the capitain of Bulleine 
aunswered, I have nothyng lost, nor they have nothyng 
gotten of me, tell hym that hath lost, with whiche aunswer 
the pursivant departed. Wherupon thenglishemen beyng 
greved, there issued out of Calice an hundred light men of 
warre, called aventurers, and came nere Bulleine, and obteined 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 291 



a greate botie, wherof the garrison of Bullein being adver- 
tysed, issued out and folowed the Englishemen, and sharpely 
them encountered. The Englyshemen shot so, that the 
French men whiche were five hundred, lighted and fought 
sore, so that as it appered evidently, that there were dedde 
on the ground xlvi. Frenchemen, and xxii. Englishemen, 
and the Frenchemen toke xx. Englishemen prisoners, the 
residue of the Englishemen kept them together, and so 
came to Calice, the capitain of this enterprise was one 
Lathebery. 

The lorde Sandes thresorer of Calice, entendyng to be 
revenged on the Frenchemen, called the counsaill of Calice 
to hym, and declared to them how that the Frenchemen, 
and in especiall Monsire de Bees capitain of Bullein, daily 
imagened to destroye the Englishe pale, and that they on 
the Englishe part, had nothyng done yet against them : 
wherfore he advised them all to do some act, and he hym- 
self would be present, and formoste man, and their leder 
and capitain. Whereupon it was concluded and com- 
maunded, that every man should bee in a readines, at the 
soundyng of a trompet, upon whiche warnyng, the saied 
lorde Sandes the ix. daie of July early in the mornyng, sent 
furth twoo hundred lyght horses, through the Englishe pale, 
to stoppe the people from goyng, the one towarde the other, 
least his enterpryse should be askried, and so the people were 
kept in all that daie, and in the evenyng aboute seven of the 
clocke, he hymself with a capitain called Guiot, Thomas 
Palmer, Ripton, Raufe Broke and other, set forward with 
light ordinaunce and vitaile, and embattailed themselfes in 
good arraie, and marched towarde Sandifelde by a xi. of the 
clocke, and there refreshed themselfes, and in good ordre, 
thei came to the water of Sclaukes, not farre from Bullein, 
whiche was the tenth daie of July. 

When they were askried Alarme was rong all the countrey, 
and the capitain of Bullein sent furth Ixx. menne of Armes, 
and foure hundred footemen with morice pikes, crosebowes, 
and hande gunnes, wherefore capitain Guyot was sent with 
hys bend of horsemen, to aide thenglyshe footemen, whiche 
were farre behynde, and Capitain Ripton, was appoynted to 
fyght with the Frenchemen, and Sir Thomas Palmer, and 
Raufe Broke, with the remnaunt of the horsemen, stode for 
a stale. Then capitain Ripton profered forwarde with the 

Speres 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



Spares of Calice, and the Frenchmen came on valiauntly, 
then began a sore skirmishe, the Frenche men bothe horse- 
men and footemen, defended the passage at the water of 
Sclaukes, whiche is but a gut made by force of lande water, 
but after long fyght, the Englyshemen gat over the water by 
pure force, and toke the Frenchemens standerd, and a gentel- 
man, whiche was a man of Armes of Bullein, called Charles 
de Marviell, and ever sir Thomas Palmer and Raufe Broke, 
stode and aided where necessitie was moste. Thus this 
skirmishe continued, from foure of the Clocke in the mor- 
nyng, tyll ix. of the clocke, before None, and ever the 
Frenchemen encreased, but at the last they retreited them- 
selfes toward Bullein, in whiche returne diverse of them 
were slain. Or the skirmishe was ended, came the lord 
Sandes with the fotemen, with his spere on his thigh, and 
his helme on hys hed, and greatly encouraged his compaignie : 
duryng whiche conflict, diverse of Picardy had gathered 
them together, and had taken the church of Odirsaell, 
whiche was well fortefied, and a strong place : whereof the 
Lorde Sandes beyng advertised, he marched thetherward, 
and in the waie burned all that might be brent, and sent an 
officer of Armes, to them that kept the churche of Odirsaell, 
to yeld the churche to hym, which to hym aunswered, that 
they would stande at defence : then he commaunded an 
assault, which quickly was done, and the Frenchemen de- 
fended them selfes, with hand gonnes, crosebowes, and 
pikes, so that the Englishmen could not entre. Then the 
lorde Sandes commaunded a curtail, whiche he had with 
hym, to be shotte to the churche, and perced it through : 
Then they within sawe that their defence could not hold, 
yelded themselfes body and goodes. Out of the Churche 
came Ixxii. Frenchemen, whiche were taken as prisoners, 
and all the goodes whiche they had caried into the churche 
were taken for a botie. Thus by one of the clocke, the 
saied tenth daie of July, was the churche of Odirsaell taken. 
In this while also, had the Frenchemen manned the steple 
of Odyngham, whiche was a very strong tower, muche like 
a castle, to whome the lorde Sandes sent an officer of armes, 
to commaunde them to yelde the fortresse, to whom they 
aunswered, that they were Frenchemen, and to hym they 
would none yeld, and if he came thether, they would with- 
stand hym : wherupon he and his armie marched thether 

ward, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



ward, and about foure of the clocke at after none, he 
assaulted the steple, and the Frenchemen themselfes 
valiauntly defended, but sodainly by a chaunce unknowen, 
the steple was a fire, and the Frenchemen fled doune to 
the quire, then the Englishemen lightly entered the body of 
the churche, and assaulted the Frenchemen, which e cried 
mercie and yelded theimselfes, and at twelve of the clocke 
at midnight the assault ended, and there were yelded out of 
the churche fortie prisoners. 

After whiche tyme the Lorde Sandes encamped hymselfe, 
and made good watche for feare of enemies, and in the mor- 
nyng called to hym all the priestes, whiche were in bothe the 
churches, and stode at defence, and said to them that they 
ought not to be men of warre, and notwithstanding he had 
theim as prisoners, yet for Gods sake he released them, 
admonishyng them, that if ever after they wer taken at 
defence, they should be hanged on the next galowes: after 
whiche monicion done, he delivered them frely. 

About viii. of the clocke in the morning, he marched 
forward in good ordre of battaill, and came to the Castle of 
Hardyngham, the whiche he brent and spoyled, and so the 
xi. daie of July, he and his compaignie whiche passed not xii. 
C. men, of whiche he had lost but onely xii. returned to 
Calice with greate store of bestiall and pillage. 

This same season, the Frenche kyng sent an armie of xviii. 
M. men, towardes the parties of Flaunders, whiche secretly 
enterprysed to take a place called Newdike, whiche is a strong 
passage, betwene Fraunce and Flaunders, kept by the Flem- 
ynges, wherof they beyng advertised, arreised a greate power 
of xiii. M. and came to the passage, and slewe of the Frenche- 
men vi. C. then the Frenche men reculed, and severed theim- 
selfes : some went to Mount Orry, and some to sainct Omers 
and some brent the subbarbes, they within Mount Orry de- 
fended themselfes, and hurte the capitain of Bulleine, called 
Monsire de Bees, and slew his horse : wherfore the French- 
men went thence, and brent a village called Arkus : thus 
was all the frountiers full of Frenchemen, insomuche that in 
the monethe of Auguste, they bette into the toune of Guisnes, 
the scourers and the scoute watche, whereof began Alarme, 
and the Frenchemen whiche were many in nombre, a lighted 
as though they would geve assaut maintenant, and fiersly 
proffered toward the diche, but when the ordinaunce began 



once 



THE XV. 
YERE 

t 1 523-24] 



294 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



once to shote, it was no nede to bid theim go. Then the 
Englishemen coragiously folowed the chace, but sodainly 
out came an embushement of Frenchemen, and toke twoo 
Englishemen, and thus all the armie of Fraunce, removed 
to Gyngate beside Tyrwyn. 

The Frenche kyng seing the kyng of England, daily 
more and more encoraged to make warre on him and his 
dominions, and that the Scottes did nothyng to his pleasure, 
for lacke of the Duke Jhon of Albany, whom the Scottes 
called their governor. He therfore caused great preparacion 
to be made, on all parties for men, shippes, harnes, and 
artilery, for the sendyng of the duke Jhon of Albany into 
Scotlande, which duke of a greate presumpcion promised to 
the Frenche kyng, to drive the kyng of Englande out of 
his realme, whiche promise was not kept. 

The kyng of Englande, hearyng that the Duke of Albany, 
should passe into Englande, to make warre on his realme 
thought to have hym met on the seas, and therfore he pre- 
pared, a flete of tal and strong shippes mete to encounter with 
the saied Duke and his power, and made Admirall of that 
journey, sir Willyam Fitzwilliam, and with hym sir Fraunces 
Brian, sir Anthony Pounez, Serjant Rot, Jhon Hopton, Will- 
yam Gonstone, Anthony Knivet, Thomas West and other, 
whiche with greate diligence, laie in waite to mete with the 
said duke of Albany, and as they sailed on the Frenche 
coast, they determined to lande, to doo some harme to Trey 
Port, and as they hovered there, thei were espied : then the 
capitain of the toune fired the beakens, sent for aide of al the 
fortresses about and strengthed and manned the toune very 
warlike. This notwithstandyng, sir Willyam Fitzwillyam 
and other capitaines, left not their enterprice, and so the 
xxiii. daie of August beyng Sondaye, at seven of the clocke 
in the mornyng, they toke lande in the haven of Treyport, 
at whom the Frenchemen shot out ordinaunce, quarelles and 
stones, the Englysh men in the botes shot likewise, and 
encoraged by their capitaines, assauted the Frenchemen in 
their bulwerkes, the Frenchemen them valiauntly defended, 
and thenglishe capitaines as men without fere, theim assailed 
and yet the nomber was nothyng egall, for the Englishemen 
were but vii. C. men, and the Frenchemen vi. M. For the 
well fightyng of the Frenchmen, their bulwerkes were taken, 
and their ordinaunce sezed, and all that were about, fled to the 

toune 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



toune of Treiport, and ever thenglishmen folowed shotyng 
arowes at them, and sleyng them, in whiche skirmishe Serjant 
Rotte had his bowe in his hande striken with a Gonne. Then 
the capitaines cried sainct George, to the gates of Trey port, 
then every man avaunced forward, and as they were goyng, 
Cristopher Morres master Conner, espied a pece of a Maste, 
whiche he caused to bee taken up, and then Anthony Knevet, 
and Fraunces Neudigate with their men, ranne with the saied 
maste to the gate, but the gate was so strong, that it could 
not be broken : and also at every loupe laie a pece of ordi- 
naunce, whiche continually shot at the Englishemen, whiche 
caused theim to leave the gate, and then they sette fyre in the 
subbarbes, whiche was a fayre strete, and all was brent, and 
while the subbarbes brent, the Englishmen went to the 
haven, and would have had out the shippes, but water 
lacked, wherfore they set fyre on theim, and brent there 
seven faire shyppes beside other. All this while was there 
skirmishyng at the gates, and muche murder on bothe sides, 
for the Frenchemen in fliyng from their bulwerkes to the 
toune, lost Ixxx. persones, and many were hurte with arrowes. 
The men of the countrey came thether stil, in somuche 
as the nomber became very great, whiche sir Willyam Fitz 
Willyam perceiving, caused his trompet to blowe a retrete, 
and with suche prysoners, pillage, and ordinaunce as they had 
gotten, they returned to their boates, and the capitaines sent 
their souldiers before, the Frenchemen perceiving the Eng- 
lishemen returned, issued out and founde on lande, Fraunces 
Neudigate, Thomas Wagham, Serjant Rotte, and other Capi- 
taines to the nomber of twelve, and ran hastely toward theim 
in great nomber, which perceiving that, bended themselfes 
to sell their lives dere : sir Willyam Fitz William per- 
ceiving the great jeoperdy that they were in, turned hys 
boate toward the lande, and discharged his ordinaunce, and 
with muche paine saved these gentelmen, and them toke into 
boates, notwithstanding a great nomber of Frenchemen, 
which were in the water to let him : and thus the whole 
armie returned to their shippes, after they had bene v. 
houres on land, and brought with them xxvii. peces of faire 
ordinaunce, whiche were in the bulwarkes, and lost of their 
men not fully xx. persones, and then every capitaine toke his 
awne ship, and coasted the seas, ever lokyng for the duke of 
Albany, but hard no tidynges of hym. 

In 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



296 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 

Jorney of 
the duke of 
Suffolke. 



In the Parliament (as you have hard) it was concluded, 
that the kyng of necessitie, muste nedes make strong warre 
on the realme of Fraunce, wherfore the noble Charles duke 
of Suffolke, was appoynted as Capitain generall, to passe 
with an armie royall into Fraunce, in the ende of August, 
whiche with all diligence, prepared all thynges necessary, for 
suche a royal enterpryce, and for the furniture of this armie, 
there were appoynted to geve their attendaunce on hym, the 
Lorde Montacute, and syr Arthur Pole his brother, the lorde 
Herbert sonne to the erle of Worcester, the lorde Ferreis, 
the lorde Marney, the lorde Sandes, the lorde Barkeley, the 
lorde Powes, and Baron Curson, and of knightes, sir Richarde 
Wyngfelde, Chauncellor of the Duchie of Lancaster, Sir Jhon 
Veer, sir Edward Nevell, sir Willyam Kyngston, syr Richard 
Weston, sir Andrew Wynsore, sir Robert Wyngfeld, sir 
Anthony Wyngfeld, sir Edward Guyldford, sir Edward 
Gryvell, sir Edward Chamberlein, sir Thomas Luce, syr 
Everard Dighby, syr Adrian Foscew, syr Willyam Skeving- 
ton master of the ordinaunce, sir Thomas Cheiney, sir Richard 
Corn well, syr William Cortney, sir Willyam Sidney, sir Henry 
Owen al these lordes and knightes, with many other knightes 
and coragious Esquiers, and active gentlemen, came accord- 
ing to the kynges commaundement at last, with all their 
people and retinue to Dover, wher thei mustered at severall 
times, as thei passed to the sea, and so the nombre taken, 
that is to saie, of dimy Lances vi. C, of archers on horse- 
backe twoo C., of Archers on foote three M., of bill men five 
M., of pioners and laborers ii. M. vi. C., and when the viewe 
was taken on the other side of the sea, there were adjoyned 
to this nomber xvii. C. whiche might be spared out of the 
fortresses, and crewes of Hams, Guysnes, and Calice, so 
that al the army wer xiii. M. and an C. well harnesed, and 
appareled for the warre, the pioners onely excepte : but the 
duke himself arrived at Calice the xxiiii. of August, with his 
retinue and counsaill, abiding the armye, and caused all 
thynges, as vitaill and other, to be prepared for the same. 

Muche commonyng was in Englande, whether this army 
should go because that no man, except a fewe, knew the 
secretnes : some said to Bullein, some to Paris, and so every 
man judged, accordyng to his awne opinion, as the common 
use is. 

In this season, because the mortalitie was greate in Calice, 

the 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



297 



the duke of Suffolk caused his armie to be lodged in tentes 
and pavilions, upon the faire grene beside sainct Peters 
Churche, for their more healthe, and he accompaignied 
with diverse noble men, the viii. daye of September rode 
to Gravelyng, and thether came to hym Cristerne kyng of 
Denmark and the lorde Isilsten, capitain generall of Flaunders, 
whiche amiably enterteigned the saied duke, and after they 
had secretly commoned of diverse matters, concernyng 
diverse armies to invade Fraunce, in sondry places, the 
duke toke leave of the kyng and other, and came to 
Calice. 

While the armie laie without Calice, they daily came 
into the toune, and so it happened that a symple felow 
cut a purse, as he made to bie apples, whiche incontinent 
was taken, and brought to the Maiors house to ward whiche 
thyng divers Welshemen perceivyng and not knoweyng 
what apperteigned to Justice, ranne in greate compaignies to 
the Maiors house, and would have broken the house, the 
Officers of the toune entreated, and Welshemen more and 
more approched, the nombre of the Welshemen were so 
greate, that the watche of Calice strake Alarms. Then the 
Lorde deputie and the Lorde Sandes, did all that in theim 
laye, to bryng theim to conformitie, but thei wer so rude 
that thei nothyng them regarded, the priestes brought furthe 
the blessed Sacrament, whiche also was not regarded. Wher- 
fore the Lorde Ferreis was straightly commaunded to appese 
their rage, for with him thei came thether, whiche with greate 
pain and entreatie theim appesed : and then all the Welshe- 
men were commaunded to the felde, and to depart the toune 
and so wer all other capitaines, and after diverse of the hed 
rioters wer apprehended and sore punished for example. 
And when al thynges necessary were prepared, the duke 
issued out of Calice and toke the field, and ordeined his 
Marshall, and capitain of the vantgard the lord Sandes, 
capitain of his right wyng sir William Kyngston, and capi- 
tain of his lefte wing, sir Everard Dighby, sir Edward 
Guyldford Marshal of Calice, was capitain of all the hors- 
men, sir Richard Wingfeld, capitain of the rereward : then 
the duke with all his army, as capitain of the middle ward, 
with standerdes, baners and penons, displaied, marched for- 
ward in good ordre of battail and came to a place called 
Kalkewel, and there lodged the xix. day of September. In 

whiche 

VOL, I, 



THE xv. 

YERE 
[1523-24] 



A riot at 
Calyce. 



The Sacra- 
ment. 



2 P 



298 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



whiche place diverse souldiers, of Cariers and up lande men, 
whiche were unmete to the warre, (for every thyng to theim 
was pain) fell sycke and diseased, wherfore the duke gave 
them leave by pasport to returne. 

And on the xxii. day of September, he toke up his campe 
and came to Hamswell, and there pitched his fielde, he thus 
liyng in abode for the armie of Flaunders, which promised 
to joyne with hym, which as then were not come to S. 
Omers. He entending not to lye still idely, sent Claren- 
seux kyng of armes, to somon the castle called Bel castle, 
to yelde to him, or els he would destroie it with fire and 
sworde, the officer of armes dyd his message accordingly, to 
whom the capitain answered, that he would deliver no castle 
to the duke, and if the duke came thether, he should nothyng 
get, for he said he was sure of suche rescues, that should not 
be to the dukes avantage : whiche with this answer returned 
toward the duke and in the way he met the lorde Sandes, and 
the lord Ferreis in array of battaill, with v. C. horsmen, and 
i. M. fotemen, to whom he rehersed the answer, then said 
the lordes we must compell him, if otherwise he wil not. 
Then the master of thordinance was commaunded to pre- 
pare for a batrie, which was done, and thether came v. c. 
horsemen of Burgonions, and v. C. fotemen, then thordi- 
nance with great difficultie was brought nere the castle, and 
all though it wer night, the gonnes cesed not and bet the 
place sore, they within defended the best that they might, 
and when the day began to spring, the lordes caused to blow 
to thassault, which hearyng the capitain of the castle said to 
his companions, that they were not able to abide thassault, 
and that their succors failed them, wherfore of necessitie 
they muste delyver the castle, wherto they agreed, and so 
he yelded the castle, his lyfe onely saved, and all other at the 
mercie of the duke, whiche pardoned theim, and toke them 
as prisoners, and delivered the castle to sir Willyam Skevyng- 
ton, whiche was shortly rased doune to the ground, the xxvii. 
day of September. 

Mondaie beyng the xxviii. day of September, there was a 
proclamacion made in tharmy, how that Fraunces duke of 
Burbon, and Constable of Fraunce, was become frend to the 
kyng of Englande, and enemy to the Frenche kyng, and was 
sworne to the kyng of England, and had in his wages for 
the kyng of England x. M. Almaines to invade Fraunce, or 

to 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



299 



to let the Frenche kynges purposes, and for this intent to him 
was sent money in no litle some, but the common people 
said, that never was Frencheman true to England, howbeit 
he was true as long as he lived. 

To make this proclamacion more apparunt, you must 
understande that in this season the Frenche kyng was ruled 
by his mother the Countesse of Angulesme and the Admyrall 
of Fraunce called lorde Bonyuet whiche as was reported and 
sayd, loved the sayd lady as his paramor, of whiche all the 
court of Fraunce spake muche. These two persones so 
ruled the kyng, that what they sayd was done, and no judge- 
ment nor sentence passed in the Parliament at Parys with- 
out their assent, so that nothing was done without them, at 
whiche thing the nobles of Fraunce sore disdained and 
especially the lorde Fraunces duke of Burbon and Constable 
of Fraunce whiche having a suite for therledome of Mont- 
pelyer could not be heard speake nor his counsail neither. 
At the last he beyng sore displeased with this unkynd and 
unjust handlyng, came to the French kyng besechyng hym 
of justice and favor, whiche flateryng hym sayd, that al that 
was in his power to do he would gladly accomplish, and 
other answer had he none, and to encreace his grudge the 
more, the Frenche kynges mother made a title to the whole 
Duchy of Burbon and Averne, and the Admyrall and she 
so entised the kyng that he sayd openly that the Duke 
of Burbon shortly should be as poore as the meanest gentle- 
man in Fraunce, whiche wordes reported to hym caused hym 
to hate mortally the Frenche kyng and his mother, and so in 
displeasure departed into his owne countrey. The kyng 
of England beyng hereof advertised, sent to the Duke of 
Burbon a knight of his Chamber called sir Jhon Russell a 
man well languaged, whiche wisely and covertly so behaved 
hymself, that he came to the duke to Molyns and knew all 
his entent how he would forsake his kyng, and serve the 
kyng of England and the Emperor agaynst the Frenche 
kyng, and therupon tooke his othe. The Frenche kyng 
not mistrustyng the allegiance of the duke of Burbon sent 
to the Duke to prepare hym to go into Italye, for he had 
prepared a great army to passe the mountaines agaynst the 
duke of Myllaine, in which army he had vi. M. men of 
armes, and xxv. M. fotemen. The duke hearyng hereof 
fained himselfe sicke, and the Frenche kyng passyng by 

Molyns 



THE xv. 

YERE 
[1523-24] 



3 oo 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



Molyns visited and comforted him : to whom the duke 
promised to come shortly after to Lyons with all his power, 
and caused an horse-litter to be caried emptie, iii. dayes 
amongest a certayn of his souldiers as though he were 
there, but he hymselfe fled secretly into the Countye of 
Burgoyne pertainyng to the Emperor, where he retained 
x.M. Almaines to invade Fraunce assone as the Frenche 
kyng was passed the mountaines. 

When the Frenche kyng heard of this, he sent the 
Admyrall into Italy with his army, and sent his great 
Master to seaze al the dukes landes. Of all these doynges 
sir Jhon Russell brought true worde, for he was present 
with the Duke, and also sawe the Frenche armye, and 
returned unespied, wherfore he deserved and had of the 
kyng and his counsaill great thankes. Whereupon the 
kyng caused the proclamacion to be made in the army, 
that they might knowe that all the power of Fraunce should 
not trouble them. For what with the warres of Italy and 
for the duke of Burbons power thei might do what they 
lust and be unfougt withal which so proved after. Whiche 
tidynges muche encoraged thenglishe souldiers. 

After this proclacion, there wer tidynges brought to the 
army for a truethe, that one Hierome Vicount, a great 
familiar frende, with the duke of Myllayne entised by the 
French kyng, had almost slaine Fraunces duke of Myllain 
with a dagger behynd at his backe, with the whiche doyng 
the Frenche kyng above all persones fained himselfe to be 
moste displeased. The morowe beyng the xxix. daye of 
September the duke with his whole armi removed to Arde 
and there lodged, and the last dai of September he removed 
to a village called Alrke, and from thence the first day of 
October he came to a village betwen Tyrwin and saint 
Omers called Esqwerdes or Cordes, wher the duke lay and 
encamped himselfe abidyng his enemies. 

Nowe must I returne to tell you what was done bewene 
Englande and Scotland this same season. Whyle the Duke 
of Suffolke was thus invadyng the realme of Fraunce. The 
Scottes thinkyng the war turned into Fraunce, and that 
nothyng should be attempted against them, began to robbe 
and spoyle on the Marches of England, whereof the kyng 
hearyng sent againe thither the valiant erle of Surray 
treasorer and Admyrall of England, whiche in all hast 

sped 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 301 



sped hym to the west Marches and sent for an army of 
vi.M. men, and with banner displayed entred by the dry 
Marches betyng doune castles and fortresses on every side. 
And although the Scottes be men of high corage, yet they 
seyng the wise conduict of the noble erle of Surray and his 
chosen company, durst not ones encounter with him, and so 
he passed quietly through the dales, tyll he came to the 
strong toune of Jedworthe, in whiche lay a great garrison 
of Scottishmen whiche did al the hurt they could to the 
Englishmen, and hardely in great nomber skyrmished with 
thenglishemen, so that on both partes divers wer slaine, but 
in the ende the Abbay, Castle, and toune of Jedworth were 
brent and all rased a sonder in the open sight of the Scottes. 
And after this he would not returne but encamped hymself 
in the Scottishe ground abidyng battil, and lay there from 
the xxii. day of September to the xxv. day. Duryng whiche 
tyme he sent the lorde Daker of Gyldersland to a strong 
hold of Doncar called Fernhurst, the whiche castle stode 
very evill to come to, for the wayes wer hylly, stony, and 
full of marishes, and the Scottes had bent their ordinaunce 
that way : yet for all that the Englishemen so fiersly set on 
that they gat the castle, notwithstandyng that the Scottes 
fought valiauntly, and many of theim were taken, as Dan 
Car the lorde, the lorde of Gradon and divers other whiche 
was there taken, and so the lorde Daker returned with his 
prisoners, and then he was ordained to kepe the watche that 
night whiche set his watches and his wardes surely. In the 
night sodainly, C C C. good geldynges brake out of a pasture, 
whiche were in custodie of the sayd lord Dacres campe, and 
as beastes wodde and savage ranne enraged, and notwith- 
standyng that men dyd asmuche as they might to stoppe 
them, yet they ranne as thought they were in array of batayll, 
whereof the noyse in the night was so great, that the armye 
founed alarms, the horse styll in array ranne to the campe 
where the erle lay and bare doune many persones in their 
waye, and so sodainly ranne away whether it was unknowen : 
the lorde Dacres men sayd that the devil was sene amongest 
them : and after the third day the Erie returned into 
England. 

When the Erie of Surray departed from the borders in 
August as you have heard heretofore : The Scottes wrote 
to the duke of Albany of all their affaires, whiche was 

commyng 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



302 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



commyng into Scotland. But when he heard that the 
Navy of England lay in wayte to fight with him, he durst 
not aventure, but sate styll : And when he heard there was 
no capitaines of name on the borders of England toward 
Scotland, he devised by policie that all his shippes should 
be removed to the haven of Brest, and sayd himselfe and 
caused it to be noysed that he would not saile into Scotland 
that yere. So ranne the voyce al the coastes of Normandy 
and Britayne, and so passed tyll the ende of Septembre. 

The kyng of England was enformed by suche as knew 
none other, that the Duke of Albany had broken hisjorney, 
and would not passe that yere into Scotland. Wherfore the 
kyng of England in the middest of September caused his 
shippes to be layde up in his haven tyl the next spryng : 
The duke of Albany beyng therof advertised boldly then 
tooke his shippes and shipped his people, and with Ixxii. 
sayle in sight passed by the West partes of England and 
coasted Wales, and so with great labor landed at Kyrcowbre 
in the West parte of Scotland with all his people the 
xxi. day of September whiche were in nomber iii. M. or 
there about, and with him was the traytor Richard Delapole. 

When it was knowen in Scotland that the lorde Governor 
was landed, muche gladnes there was amongest the people. 
Then the duke was highly receyved and his people wel 
cherished, and then beganne a Parliament. The kyng of 
England hearyng that the duke of Albany was landed in 
Scotlande and was unfought withall, was not a litle dis- 
pleased, and suspected that suche as enformed hym that 
the Duke would not passe that yere, had deceyved him, 
but there was no remedye : Wherfore he made provisions 
and put all thynges in a readynes, yf he would attempt 
any thyng agaynst hym and his realme. 

The Duke of Albany Governor of Scotland beyng in the 
Parliament of the realme, with great eloquence declared 
to them the love and favor that Fraunces the Frenche 
kyng bare to the realme of Scotland, insomuch that he 
beyng advertised of the great murders, slaughters, and 
burnynges done by the Englishemen, thought that he suffred 
no lesse hurt and damage then they did, accomptyng him self 
one of their membres, and them likewise the membres of 
him and his realme, and for the revenging of the same, he 
to be partener as their member, and for the more credite 

he 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



33 



he shewed the Frenche kynges favorable letter, affirmyng 
his declaracion. When the letters wer red there start up a 
Baron of Scotland called the lorde Forbos, whiche sayd : 
the realme of Scotland for the love of Fraunce suffereth 
great paine as daily doth appere, for our nobles be slayn or 
taken, our cominalte murdered, our landes overrunne, our 
houses and fortresses brent and rased, the profiles of our owne 
landes we lese : which misschief we nede not to have had, 
but for the love of Fraunce, and what helpeth Fraunce ? A 
farre frend is not sone set. A mightie neighbor may be a 
cruel enemy. I affirme this, if we would kepe amitie with 
the realme of England we were out of all these daungers. 
God forbyd sayd the duke of Albany that Scotland ever 
should seke a new frende or profer their amitie, to the 
destroyers of their countrey and nacion, but you my lordes 
of Scotland are sufficient of your selfe to maintain your 
landes, libertie, and fredome against your comon enemyes 
thenglishemen. And therfore now let us together revenge 
the hurtes done to us and our countrey : And I on myne 
honor shal go with you, and therfore I have brought with 
me bothe treasure, men, and artillerie into this realme. I 
thinke not but we shall so do that all Christendome shall 
speake of our noble conquest. To the dukes request all the 
court of Parliament agreed and then wer commissions sent 
through Scotland and cryes made that at men shuld assemble 
at Doglas dale with vitaile for xxviii. daies. The Scotes in 
al hast prepared, so that the lordes wer come to the place 
appointed the xxviii. day of October, with vitaile, gunnes, 
and all other artillerie, and so came by easy jorneys to the 
ry ver of Twede on a ground beside Hume castle, and from 
thence came to Cawdestrene and there lodged. 

All this doyng the kyng of England knewe well, wherfore 
with all diligence he caused to be assembled the people of 
the North part beyond Trent wherof there were iii. M. 
beryng cotes of armes with their power and strength, whiche 
all wer commaunded to resort to the erle of Surray with 
spede. The noble Marques Dorset Thomas was appoynted 
to kepe Berwicke with vi. M. men, lest the Scottes therto 
would lay siege. 

The duke of Albany whiche lay on the frontiers hearing 
of the Erie of Surreyes preparyng, sent to him an Herauld 
promisyng him of hys honor to geve him battaill, and yf he 

tooke 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



304 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



tooke him in battail he would put him to curteous raunsome 
and his body to be safe : To whom the erle answered, that 
muche he thanked the duke of his offer, and that he would 
abide battail, promising him that he would geve him 
battail if he durst abide : and yf that the sayd duke were 
taken prisoner by hym or his menne he would strike 
of his head and send it to the kyng of England his 
Master, and bad that he should trust to none other, af 
whiche answere the duke of Albany and the Scottes toke 
great dispite. 

The erle of Surray beyng at Alnwyke, to him came 
therles of Northumberland and Westmerland, the lorde 
Clyfford, the lorde Dacres, the lorde Lumley, the lorde 
Ogle, the lorde Darcy, and many noble Knightes, Squiers 
and yomen, to the nomber of xl. M. And from the kynges 
court was sent to be at the batail sir Nicholas Carew Master 
of the horse, sir Fraunces Bryan, sir Edwarde Baynton and 
divers other. All this armye laye on the borders abidyng 
the Scottes commyng into Englande, whiche lay styll in 
Scotland and did nothyng till the last day of October beyng 
Saterday. The night before the Scottes had sent over the 
water into England iii. or iiii. M. men, to lay siege to a lytle 
castle called the Castle of Warke, whiche standeth nere the 
border : the great ordinaunce of Scotland sore bet the castle, 
and Dan Car and the Frenchemen whiche came out of Fraunce 
with the duke of Albany gave to the castle a strong assaut : 
within the castle was sir William Lyle with a C. persones, 
but the Scottes were so many in nomber, that they got the 
uttermoste warde called the Barnkyns where the beastes and 
barnes were, whiche seyng, the capitaine sent in all hast to 
the Erie of Surrey advertisyng him of their distres, whiche 
in all hast assembled his capitaines to reskue the castle, therby 
hopyng that Duke Jhon of Albany would enter into England. 
The Frenchmen and Scottes lay styll about the castle con- 
tinually shotyng ordinaunce Sonday and Monday the fyrst 
and second day of November, and then the Scottes thinkyng 
the place assautable, coragiously set on the castle and by 
strength entred the second warde. Sir Willyam Lyle per- 
ceivyng that the Scottes had gotten the false brayes and that 
nothing remained but only the inner warde or dongeon, sayd 
to his company, sirs for our honor and manhod let us issue 
and fight with the proude Scottes and stately Frenchmen, for 



more 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



35 



more shall our honor be to dye in fight, then to be murthered 
with gunnes, to the whiche his company that were left agreed : 
for of his C. men he had lost almost xl. at the other assautes. 
Then they issued out boldly and shot coragiously as men 
that shot for a vauntage, and with shotyng and fightyng they 
drave their enemies clene out of the place and slew of them 
and chiefly of the Frenchmen CCC. whiche lay there dead 
in sight when the Erie came thither, beside suche as dyed of 
woundes and were drouned. Then the Scottes removed 
their ordinaunce, in great hast over the water, and by that 
tyme was the Erie of Surrey come with v. M. men on hors- 
backe and all his great army folowed and was very sory that 
his enemies were gone, and muche praysed sir Willyam Lyle 
for his valiauntnes. 

When the Duke of albany and the lordes of Scotland knew 
that the erle of Surrey approched with his puissant army, 
they thought it not convenient to jeoparde all the nobilitie 
of Scotlande in one felde, consideryng their chaunce, x. yeres 
before, and therfore they concluded to returne, and so on 
the sayd second day of November in the night the duke 
with all his armye retreated more for his suertie then honor. 

The horsemen of Scotland kept the fordes that no man 
should passe to greve the fotemen as they returned, and when 
all the baggages wer gone they cast them selfes in a plumpe 
and returned. 

When the day appeared, then the Englishmen might 
plainly see the Scottes how they fled fiftie mennes thickenes, 
many a lusty Englishman would faine have folowed them on 
horsbacke, and so would therle of Surray with all his heart, 
but his commission was only to defend the realme and not 
to invade Scotland, whiche thing hym sore displeased. 
Thus brake up the great army of Scotland to the great 
rebuke of the duke of Albany and the nobles of Scotland 
whiche ii. yere together had made bragges and assembles 
and durst not abide battaile. The Scottes made much 
bragges that they had beaten doune the walles of Warke 
castle, but they spake nothyng of their men that they left 
there, nor how cowardly they returned and would not 
abide. After this returne quene Margaret of Scotland and 
mother to the yong kyng, sent to her brother the kyng of 
England for an abstinence of warre to be taken betwene the 
realme of England and Scotland, to thentent that some way 

might 

VOL. I, 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



2 Q 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 

A present 
sent by the 
Emperor to 
the kyng. 



might be taken, that an amitie might be had betwene them : 
whiche request to her was graunted, and so the great armye 
of England was dissolved and the Erie of Surrey returned 
to the coast. 

In this season the Emperor Charles sent to the kyng of 
England ii. Mules trapped in crimosyn velvet curiously 
enbrodered, al the buckles, stiroppes, and all suche other 
garnishynges were silver and gilt of mervailous connyng 
worke. He sent also xi. Genettes ful goodly to behold 
trapped with russet velvet richely wrought, and iiii. speres, 
and ii. Javelynes of straunge tymber and worke richely 
garnished, and v. brace of greyhoundes : and to the quene 
he sent two Mules with riche trappers and high chayers 
after the Spanishe fashion, all these presentes wer thankefully 
received both of the kyng and quene. 

Now let us returne to the Duke of Suffblke whiche lay 
at Cordes or Esquerdes the xx. day of September and 
thither came to him the army of Flaunders, wherof was 
capitaine the lorde of Isilsteyne whiche had with him of 
Spaniardes, Almaines, Cleves and other iii. M. fotemen and 
v. C. horsemen well appareled for the warres in all pointes. 

The duke of Suffolke beyng thus furnished passed forward 
in wete wether makyng bridges and wayes, ever lokyng for 
battel, and on the xvii. day of October he sent the lorde 
Sandes Marshall of his armye, and with him iii. M. men 
to a good toune called Anker whiche accompanied with 
divers knightes and gentlemen in good order of battail 
marched towarde the toune. The Frenchemen perceivyng 
the Englishmen commyng toward their toune, fled out as fast 
as they might, and left the toune desolate : then entred the 
Englishmen and had there a great botie and toke the castle 
called Bone gard and therin put a garrison of Englishemen, 
whereof was capitaine the lorde Leonard Gray brother to 
the Marques Dorset to conduict vitailers to the armye, 
whiche nowe was farre from any succours of the Englishe 
part. In this toune was an abby of Monkes whiche 
received humbly the lordes and nobles of England whiche 
to theim did no hurt nor dammage, and then they returned 
to the duke. 

After this, the xix. daye, the Duke with his armye passed 
to a village called Quede : and there, after long counsailyng 
it was determined that the whole army should passe to a 

strong 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



37 



strong toune and wel fortefied called Bray, whiche toune 
was well ordinaunced and had in it xvi. C. men of warre, 
the capitaine therof was called Adrian, and for succours to 
the toune were come Mounsire Pontdormy, the Vicount 
Larnerdam, the Vicount Turraine, Mounsire Applyngcort, 
and Mounsire Dampney, with v. C. horsemen, so that in 
the toune beside the inhabitauntes were ii. M. good men. 
This toune standeth on the river of Some xxiiii. Englishe 
myle from Arras, and xiiii. myles above Amyas : This toune 
was well diched and strengthned on every syde. 

The xx. day of this moneth the Duke commaunded al his 
great ordinaunce to be brought by iiii. of the clock in the 
morning before the toune of Bray, they that had the charge 
therof so manfully acquited them that notwithstanding al 
the damage that their enemies could do, brought the ordi- 
naunce before the toune at the houre appointed. Then eche 
part shot dredfully at other, but the Englishe gunners shot 
so well, that the walles of the toune were beaten doune and 
rased with the ordinaunce, insomuche that by ix. of the 
clocke the toune was made assautable. Then the duke 
caused to blow to thassaut. Then the Englishmen and 
Flemynges and Burgonions lept furth quickely, and not- 
withstandyng that the diches wer depe, yet they so coragiously 
entered by the good comfort of the lorde Sandes and other 
noble men that they gat the diches. The Frenchemen per- 
ceivyng that the toune should be gotten, hastely made traynes 
of gunpouder from strete to strete and house to house, 
saiyng that the Englishmen after their entry into the toune 
would fal to pillage, and then sodainly sodain fyer should 
destroy them. This was the provision of the Frenchmen : 
by this tyme the Englishmen wer enteryng on the walles, 
and the Frenchmen stode yet at defence with pikes, cros- 
bowes, handgunnes, and halbardes, but they were to weke, 
for on all partes entred thenglishmen and sodainly the 
Frenchmen fledde and the Englishemen folowed and killed 
and slew in every part. 

Nowe you must understand that this toune of Bray 
standeth on the river of Some whiche is there divided in 
divers braunches and betwene every braunche is a marishe 
ground, where on the farside of the toune was fortefied 
a Bulwarke ful of ordinaunce to kepe the passage over the 
water, and the Frenchmen had losed the plankes of the 

bridge 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



3 o8 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



bridge nere a myle above Bray, and the horsmen of Fraunce 
passed by a myll which was to the Frenchfotemen a great 
ayd, for thei stode and kept the passage til the fotemen wer 
come over the bridge, and then they plucked away the 
planckes of the bridge, so that noman shuld folow, but ever 
thenglishmen folowed and cast plankes on the bridge and 
passed over the bridge, in whiche passyng divers wer drouned, 
but with great travail al men passed, horsmen and fotemen, 
and fiersly assauted the Bulwarke and toke it with all the 
ordinaunce, and in it was taken capitaine Adrian and capitaine 
Ulterlew. The Englishe horsmen folowed the Frenche- 
men and divers of them wer slaine and taken, sir Robert 
Jernyngham brake a spere on the lorde Pountdormy. The 
lorde Leonard Gray did valiauntly that day. You must 
remember that when the Frenchemen issued out of the 
toune, they forgatte not to lay a matche to the traine of 
gunnepouder whiche they had made, whiche in short space 
set the toune al on fyer, so that when thenglishmen returned 
again, al was on fyer, so that there they had litle profite but 
wyne, whiche to them did great pleasure. This was the 
toune of Bray taken and destroyed the xx. day of October. 

The duke consideryng that little succours were for him 
and his souldiers in the toune of Bray because the sayd 
toune was consumed with fyer, he therfore commaunded 
the bridges to be wel repayred for to passe over the great 
river of Some into the realme of Fraunce : and when the 
passage was sure, the lord Sandes the xxi. day of October 
in the mornyng was prest to passe over with the vaward. 
Then some gentlemen sayd that they would passe no farther 
forward, and divers souldiers were on the same opinion. It 
was asked why they should feare, and they answered that if 
they were past over the river, they were past all succours 
and vitail, none could be brought to them. By reason of this 
noyse the souldiers stayed, which the lord Sandes perceiving, 
sayd to the Welshmen which wer evil willyng to passe the 
river : sirs sayd he, behold what I do, and with that he toke 
a banner of sainct George and sayd, as many as love the 
kyng of England and be true to hym and to the croune, 
folow me, and then he and sir Wylliam Kyngston set for- 
ward and passed the water, whiche there runneth in thre 
streames, then all other persones coragiously folowed, and 
the ordinaunce and vitailes. 

After 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



39 



After the foreward folowed the duke and al his battail : 
At this tyme the army was sore minished by reason many 
wer diseased and from the host departed, so the host 
was not of that strength that it was at the settyng out of 
Calayce. When thenglishemen were passed, then folowed the 
Burgonions in good order, and so that night this army 
came to a toune called Kappe and there encamped theim- 
selfes, all the inhabitauntes were fled bothe out of the toune 
and Castle : there thenglishemen found C. tonne of wyne, 
and other good pillage. The garrison that lay at Anker 
knowing that the duke was passed the river of Some, rased 
the toune and castle, and came and joyned with the dukes 
army at Kappe. 

There the duke caused proclamacions to be made in the 
armye that all the people of Fraunce that would vitaile 
the armye of Englande should be well entreated and have 
their vitailes well payed for, and safe goyng and commyng, 
by the whiche proclamacion the host was well vitailed, 
for the people of the countrey resorted with al thinges 
necessarie. 

The Duke thus liyng at Cap sent to the toune of Roy to 
yeld theim to the kyng of England. The toune perceivyng 
that their power was not able to withstand the great armye 
of the Duke, assented to deliver the toune to the Duke. 
This was a strong toune well walled, dyched and ordinaunced 
but not manned, the Duke sent thither sir Richard Cornwall 
and other with iiii. C. men to receive the toune, whiche 
went thither in good array and had the toune to theim 
delivered and then they sette the banner of sainct George 
in the highest part of the toune, and full well this garrison 
kept the toune of Roy til the duke came thither with his 
whole armye. 

The Duke and his armye the xxv. day of the sayd moneth 
removed to a vilage called Lyhome, and had there great 
pillage : for this toune was muche haunted of marchauntes 
and there kept great markettes. The next day he removed 
to Davenker, and the xxvii. day he removed and came before 
the strong toune of Mountdedier, where for defence of warre 
lacked neither diches, walles, nor bulwarkes : The horsemen 
of the Englishe army rode about the toune to vew it, at whom 
the capitaines caused divers pieces to be losed whiche shewed 
well their strength. The duke sent an officer of armes to 

somon 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



310 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



somon the capitain to deliver the toune : the officer departed, 
and with him a trumpet whiche blew before the gate, but no 
person would answere, because they would have no Sommons 
made to them : the officer of armes returned and made 
report. Then the Dukes skyrrers made prefer afore the 
toune, out of the whiche issued a great companignie of 
horsemen and skyrmished with the Dukes horsemen and 
fought valiantly, but at the last xl. of the horsemen were 
taken, with whiche the lorde Roche Baron capitaine of the 
toune was sore displeased, yet he thought him able to main- 
taine the toune agaynst the whole armye. Then the Duke 
of Suffblke pytched his felde and layd his siege rounde 
about the toune of Mountdedier and kept good watche and 
warde on every side : whiche thing the lorde Roche Baron 
perceivyng comforted his menne of warre and bad them not 
be afrayd but to be of good corage, and sayd that the Duke 
there should get nothyng. When the Duke had thus planted 
his siege, he considered that he was farre from reskew, and 
that liyng still and nothyng doyng was not profitable, he 
knewe also by report of the prisoners that in the toune 
of Moundedier were two thousand footemen, and one 
thousand horsemen, wherfore he sent for all the lordes 
and capitaines of his army and muche praised their hardy- 
nes and sayd that the noble corrage that he sawe in theim 
did muche avaunce hym to sette forwarde in all thynges, 
the prayse wherof should be to them and not to him, and 
therfore nowe he encoraged them againe to continue still in 
their valiaunt doyng, for with Goddes grace he entended 
to bend his ordinaunce the next mornyng before the toune, 
to the whiche all the lordes agreed and praysed muche the 
dukes corage and forwardnes. 

Then was sir Willyam Skevyngton knight, Maister of the 
ordinaunce commaunded to prepare for the battery, whiche 
with all diligence made trenches, and prepared all thinges 
mete for the purpose. In this season sir Jhon Wallop 
knight had with him almost a M. proper men and hardy, 
havyng litle wages or none whiche lived alonely on their 
aventure, wherfore of some they were called adventurers, of 
some they were called kreekars. These men wer light, hardy, 
and politike, and by their manhod and hardines had robbed 
many tounes, taken many prisoners, with great boties, and 
daily brought to the army Horses, Mares vitaile, cloth, corne, 

and 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



3 11 



and other necessaries whiche might not be missed. Of this 
company the Frenchemen and especially they of villages and 
passengers wer sore afrayde, for they were never ydle but 
doyng some thyng in one part or other. The lorde Pount- 
dormy, or Pountreny hearyng Mountdedyer was besieged, 
called to him divers great lordes and capitaines to the nomber 
of v. C. menne of armes and dunilaunces, and a great nomber 
of fotemen, entendyng to bryng gunnepouder and other 
necessaries to the toune of Mountdedier : and as they wer 
thither commyng by night, Thomas Palmer, capitain of the 
skout watche of thenglishe army them askried and skyrmished 
with them although they wer more in nomber : manfully 
fought the Frenchemen, but for all that they were compelled 
to flee backe, and then Englishmen theim folowed and slewe 
divers, and two speres were broken on the brother of the 
lorde Pountdorny, but by the swyftnes of his horse he saved 
himselfe, and in this chase were C. prisoners taken whiche 
muche rejoysed the Englishmen. 

When the Master of the ordinaunce had all thinges ready, 
at the houre of iiii. of the clocke in the mornyng he dis- 
charged the ordynaunce continually in suche fashion, that by 
viii. of the clocke the xxviii. day of October the walles were 
made lowe and the toune assautable. All whiche while, the 
great ordinaunce shot still out of the toune tyll the walles 
and toune were beaten doune. The capitaine of the toune 
perceivyng this, called to him al the capitaines, declaryng to 
them that their toune was in iiii. houres made assautable, 
and that surely the Englishmen would assaute the toune 
whiche should be to their confusion, wherfore he asked their 
advise what was best to be done, al they answered, do as you 
will : Then he went into a tower and caused a trompet to 
blowe and set furth a banner of truce. Then the duke 
commaunded the ordinaunce to cease. Then sir Willyam 
Skevyngton came to the walles and demaunded what they 
would, and the lord Roche Baron sayd, that if it pleased the 
duke for the love of the kyng of England and his honor, 
to graunt to him and thother gentlemen that wer there, 
lycence to depart with life, bagge and baggage, they would 
deliver the toune of Mountdedier. Then sir Willyam 
Skevyngton made report to the duke whiche therto con- 
sented, saiyng : they be men of warre, their riches is not 
great. Then the lorde Sandes and divers other wer 

appointed 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



appointed to receive the toune, and so they entred and 
set their standardes on the top of the gates, and toke the 
keyes of all the strong houses, towers, and Bulwarkes. 
The Frenchemen were readye to depart with trussages 
and cariages, with Crosbowes, Pykes, and Handgunnes, 
with whiche doyng the lorde Sandes and the Englishemen 
which wer within the toune wer not content, and sayd that 
the Frenchmen should passe without weapon : on this point 
was muche alteracion and the Frenchemen were stayed, but 
the lorde Roche Baron gave many fayre wordes and passed 
forwarde with a red standard, with a whitte crosse before 
him, that seyng sir Thomas Palmer, ranne to the standard 
and plucked it in pieces. Then sayd the Lord Roche 
Baron that it was ungently done : To whom he answered 
that he should beare no standard there lyke a conqueror. 
Then after longe disputacion the Frenchemen sayd, that it 
was promised theim that they should have their weapons 
and baggage, and so upon that they were suffered to depart. 
The fotemen likewyse had a standard before theim which 
was rent by sir Robert Jernyngham. The nomber whyche 
departed truely accompted, were twoo thousand footemen, 
five hundreth horsemen and odde well and warlike appointed, 
and they left muche baggage behynd them because they sawe 
the Englishemen so fast come into the toune, they wer in 
feare of losse of all. 

When the Frenchemen wer departed, the duke with his 
whole army entred the toune and there the Englishemen 
founde fine fetherbeddes, napery, coveringes, and muche 
houshold stuffe, and especially of wyne greate plentie, and 
there the armye rested till the laste day of October, and 
then were all the gates of the toune rased and throwen 
doune, and all the Bulwarkes likewyse. Then the duke 
caused all the ordinaunce to be taken and; so removed to 
the toune of Royc, where he and all hys armye rested for 
a while : wherof they were glad, for they had travailed 
sore, and the weather was wette and colde. On the feast of 
all sainctes called Alhallon Daye, thee Duke in thee chiefe 
Churche of Roy made knightes thee Lorde Harbart, the 
Lorde Powes, Oliver Manners, Arthur Poole, Richard 
Sandes, Robert Jerningham, Robert Salisbury, Edmonde 
Beningfelde, Richard, Corbet, Thomas Wenteworthe Wil- 
liam Storton, Water Mantel, George Warran, Edwarde 

Seymour 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



3*3 



Seymour after erle of Hartfoord, and now Duke of Somerset, 
and mooste worthy Governor of the kinges majesties persone 
and Protector of all his realmes, dominions and subjectes. 

The morow after, the army removed to a place called 
Neele, there the Burgonions beganne to waxe wery, and so 
dyd thee Englishemen, for every day was foule wether and 
raine bothe daie and night. Wherfore diverse compaignies 
fell to grudgyng sayng, now you may see that by our remov- 
ing we shall bee ledde from place to place all this wynter, 
whiche is to thee utter losse of our lives : for daylye wee see 
that our company dyeth no smal nombre, (and trueth it was 
that some dyed but not many) thei saied farther, the Bur- 
gonions have the greate gaine and do least for it, for they 
have wagons and cary their booties to theyr countrey : 
whiche is nere hand, and we go before and fight, and wee 
have no meanes to convey any thing into our countrey for 
lacke of carryage, and so we bete the bushe and they take 
the byrdes. This grudge was seassed by gentle woordes for 
a tyme. 

In these jorneys was commonly spoken that the duke of 
Burbon with his x. M. Almaines would have invaded Fraunce 
and soo joyned wyth this army, but the truth was contrary, 
for he turned his host another way and went into province 
and layde siege to Marcelles, wherof the duke beyng adver- 
tised, not a litle mused, and also seyng his menne daily fall 
sicke, was sory, and yet he so comforted theim that every 
man was glad to folowe his wyll and entent. 

On the vi. day of November the lorde Sandes beyng 
capitayne of the foreward, and the duke of the middle ward, 
and sir Richard Wyngfeld capitaine of the rereward came 
in order of battaill prest to fight, to a village called Veane 
and there rested for that night, and the morow after the 
whole army returned agayne over the water of Some, and 
came to a place called Beaufford : At this passage the 
duke made knightes Jhon Dudley, and Robert Utreyght 
esquiers. 

The viii. day the duke removed to a place called Mount 
sainct Martyne a very mete place for an armye, and then 
was the dukes instruccions loked upon by the capitaines, 
and they perceivyng that they hard nothyng of the duke of 
Burbons commyng, ayde nor counsail, all they thought and 
determined to send the lorde Sandes in post to the kyng, 

to 

VOL. J, 



THE XV. 
YERE 



2 R 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



A great frost. 



to declare all the case as it stode and their necessitie accord- 
yng as he hym selfe knew and saw in all pointes : whiche 
lorde Sandes tooke great paine and made good diligence 
toward the kyng, and while he was ridyng, the duke 
removed his armye to a place called Permount and there 
lodged for a tyme to rest, and the army was well vitailed, 
but ever the Welshemen muttered and grudged more and 
more. 

After the great raynes and wyndes that had fallen, came 
a fervent frost so sore that many a souldier dyed for coulde, 
some lost fyngers and some toes, but many lost their nayles 
of their handes, whiche was to them a great grefe. The 
duke all this notwithstandyng remembryng that he came 
not thither to lye styl, the xiii. day removed to a place two 
myle from the castle of Bowhen and still it frised, insomuche 
that the master of the Ordinaunce was compelled of neces- 
sitie to set the wheles of his ordinaunce on hardies for sink- 
yng. In the mornyng the Welshemen set out a shout and 
cryed, home, home, the Krekers hearyng that, cryed hang, 
hang. For whiche matter devysion was like to have fallen, 
but by policie it was ceased. Sir Edward Gyldford capitaine 
of the horsmen vewed the castle of Bowhen or Boghan, 
whiche ever was thought to be impregnable, but he 
judged it might be wonne, for the castle was invironed 
with Marryses, so that to no mans judgement it was 
possible to wynne it : But nowe he perceived that the frost 
was so great and strong that it might be beseaged, and 
all that night it fresed agayne : wherfore he desired the 
Duke to geve hym leave to assaute it whiche thereto agreed. 
Then he caused the ordinaunce to be set furth over the 
marrish. When they within the castle perceived that the 
marrishe fayled theim, they were sore dismayed. Then sir 
Edward Guildeford shot thre great pieces at the castle, and 
the castilian shot thre pieces agayne. Then as the Englishe 
gunners wer preparing to the battery, the capitain seyng his 
castle could not hold, by reason that the marishe failed, and 
that he coulde defende none assault, delivered the castle to 
him to the behofe of the Emperor and the kyng of Englande, 
and after a small communicacion had betwene the sayed sir 
Edwarde Guylforde and the capitaine, the capitaine with 
all his retinue departed levyng behynd the ordinaunce of 
bombardes, curtawes, and demycourtaux, slinges, cannons, 

volgers, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



volgers, and other ordinaunce, there were Ixxvi. pieces, 
plentie of pellettes and pouder. The duke of Suffolke per- 
ceivynge that this castle stode on the border of Henaude : 
Wherfore the more to please the Henawders he made capi- 
taine of the same castle of Boghan the Seneshall of Henaude, 
to the behofe of the Emperor and the kyng of England. In 
this place the army was evill vitailed, because the Frenche- 
men had stopped the water of Some, that no vitaile should 
passe over the river : wherfore the Duke sent to them of 
Henaude and specially to theim of Valencien to have ayde 
of vitaile, which of their litle sent to the army a litle, but yet 
it dyd them some service, and all this while the fervent frost 
with bitter windes continued, which caused many people 
to dye : yet still lay the army abidyng the answer of the 
lord Sandes, whiche as you have heard rode in post and 
somuche travailed that he came to the kyng of England 
to his castle of Wyndsore and there declared to the kynge 
his message, whiche was that his people whiche wer in the 
Frenche ground abode much misery, for the wether was 
wet, the wayes depe, long nightes and short dayes great 
jorneys and litle vitaile, which caused the souldiers daily to 
dye. Also they trusted when they passed the seas accord- 
yng to their instruccions to have had ayde of the Duke of 
Burbon (of whom sith their departyng they never heard 
worde) wherfore the Duke of Suffolke and other nobles of 
youre army have sent me to your highnes to declare their 
state and condicion, their good will to tary, and the evil 
chaunces which daily happeneth to them by God and not 
by their enemies. Well sayd the kyng, all this we knewe 
before your commyng : wherfore we have appointed the 
lorde Mountjoy with vi. M. men to passe the seas for 
the relefe of our army, whiche lorde Mountjoy is almost 
in a redynes : For we will in no wise that the army shall 
breake. 

Then the kyng came to Westminster to the Cardinals 
place and there received letters from the duke of Suffolke 
by sir Robert Jernyngham of the gettyng of the castle of 
Boghan or Bowen : wherfore incontinent it was by the kyng 
and his counsaill determined that the lord Mountjoy shoulde 
make spede, whiche did suche diligence that many of his 
souldiers were come to London well harnissed and weponed 
redy to passe the seas. Wherfore the kyng sent in all hast 



sir 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



316 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



sir Robert Jernyngham again to declare to the duke the 
kinges pleasure and what ayde was commyng towarde him. 
But or sir Robert Jernyngham could come to the duke the 
armye was removed from Boghan and brent the toune, and 
so came to the citie of Valencine in Henaude, and there 
layde up their ordinaunce and from thence came to the citie 
of Turnay (whiche then was under the Emperor and out 
of the Frenche kynges handes) and so toke their jornay 
homewarde thorow Flaunders and the army there broken 
and dispatched. But when the duke mette with sir Robert 
Jernyngham at Bridges in Flaunders and knewe the kynges 
mynde and entent, he did what he might to retreate the 
souldiers, whiche could not be, for many Englishemen shipped 
at Andwarpe, and many at Sluyes, and at Newport and other 
havens, and they that were at Calayce were steyed for a 
tyme, but when the Duke sawe that he coulde not bryng all 
his army together scacely the iiii. part, he then licensed the 
remnaunt to depart. Of this breakyng up of the armye 
were letters sent to the kyng, which incontinent stopped the 
lorde Mountjoy and sent his men into the countrey againe. 
The Duke and other capitaines hearyng of the kynges dis- 
pleasure, were sore abashed, and did write to their frendes 
that they had perfite knowlege that the Duke of Burbon 
had broken up his campe for the extremitie of the Wynter, 
and also shewed that their souldiers dyed, and vitaill failid, 
whiche caused them to breke the army, for of truth the 
souldiers would not abide : with which reasons the kyng 
was somwhat appeased and so on good hope the duke came 
to Calayce the xii. day of December, and there abode long, 
till their frendes had sued to the kyng for their returne. 
And when it was graunted and that they were returned, the 
Duke and the capitaines came not to the kynges presence 
in a long season, to their great heavynes and displeasure : 
But at the laste all thinges were taken in good part and they 
well received and in great love, favor, and familiaritie wyth 
the kyng. 

Whyle the Duke of Suffolke was in Fraunce and the 
Earle of Surrey on the Marches of Scotland, the Cardinall 
sent out commissions in the moneth of October through the 
realme, that every man that was worth xl.l. should pay the 
whole subsidie before graunted out of hand and before the 
dayes of payment. This payment was called an Anticipa- 

cion, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



317 



cion, which is to say, a thing taken or a thing commyng 
before his time or season : This terme was new to the 
cominaltie, but they payd wel for their learnyng, for their 
money was paied out of hand without delay. 

The kynge this yere kept his Christmas solempnely at 
his castle of Wyndsore and thither came to him the third 
day of Januarye the erle Pountiver of the royal bloud of 
Brytaigne and pretendyng to be duke of the same, whiche 
was nere cosyn to the duke of Burbon and bannished 
Fraunce. This erle came hastely from the duke of Burbon 
and was well entertained and feasted of the kyng, and after 
answere made to him by the kyng, he went to the Cardinal 
to Hampton court, and so with great spede returned to the 
sayd duke into the countrey of Province. 

In the same season was brought to the court a gentleman 
of Scotland called Andrew Stewart taken on the sea with 
divers letters by one Water Jago a yoman of the kynges, 
with divers letters from the duke of Albany to the Frenche 
kyng, by reason wherof the kyng knew muche of their 
counsaill. This Gentleman payed raunsome and was very 
sone redemed. 

The xix. day of January vi. fayre shippes of Fraunce well 
appointed, mette with a shippe of the kynges of England 
called the Kateryne Galley a shippe of xl. tonne, the capitain 
wherof was one Jhon Mariner, with a small company, for 
many of his company were a lande : But he so encoraged 
his menne that all feare was set aside, and ever as the 
Frenchemen approched, they bet them of with arrowes, 
pykes, and fightyng, and styll this continued from iiii. of 
the clocke in the mornyng tyll ix. of the clocke, and ever 
on the coste of England, and the Englishmen dyd the best 
they could to save themselfes : For by that tyme she had 
spent her pouder, arrowes with shotyng, and her bylles with 
hewyng, and her pykes with kepyng them of from com- 
myng aborde, and all the company almost sore hurte, and 
the capitaine wounded to the death, so that they had no 
other remedy but to fayle. This chace was perceived by one 
called capitain Markham, capitain of the barke of Sandwyche, 
which manfully called his men together out of Sandwyche 
haven and with good wynd came to reskue the Kateryne 
Galley. The vi. shippes perceivyng that, left their chace 
and made with the Barke of Sandwyche. The capitaine 

coragiously 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 

An Anticipa- 



tion. 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



An insurrec- 
cion moved 
at Coventry. 



coragiously comforted his men and made the quarters of his 
ship defensable. The Frenchmen sette on fiersly, and their 
toppes were higher then the toppe of the Englishe ship. 
Out went the ordinaunce, quarels and dartes of the Frenche 
shippes : the Englishmen shot fiersly agayne and when the 
Frenchemen profered to enter, the Englishmen bet them of 
with bylles. The Frenchemen at last with a great gunne 
bet doune the toppe of the barke and slewe the men in the 
same, and lastly thei strake doune his Mast. This conflict 
continued from x. of the clocke tyll two at after noone. 
Then he could make no shift, but to faile : and ever the 
Englishmen shot arrowes, and while thenglishmen had any 
arrowes the Frenchemen durst not enter : But when theyr 
arrowes were spent, the Frenchemen came aborde all at 
ones and entred the barke. In thys fight were slaine of 
Frenchmen out of hand xxvii. and Ixxx. sore hurt, and of 
the Englishe were slaine xxiii. What shoulde I saye, the 
Englishemen fought valiauntly, but they were to weake for 
vi. tall shippes. Wherfore they were taken and brought 
to Depe for a prise, but the Frenchemen sayd they never 
bought prise so dere. After this Jhon Maryner capitaine of 
the Kateryne galey dyed, and many Frenchemen that wer 
hurt dyed at Depe, so that neither part wanne greatly. 

In the last moneth called December were taken certain 
traytors in the citie of Coventry, one called Fraunces Philippe 
scholemaster to the kynges Henxmen, and one Christopher 
Pykeryng clerke of the Larder, and one Antony Maynvile 
gentleman, which by the persuasion of the sayd Fraunces 
Philip, entended to have taken the kynges treasure of his 
subsidie as the Collectors of the same came towarde London, 
and then to have araised men and taken the castle of Kyling- 
worth, and then to have made battaile against the kyng : 
wherfore the sayd Fraunces, Christopher and Anthony wer 
hanged, drawen, and quartered at Tyborne the xi. day of 
Februarye, the residue that were taken, were sent to the 
citie of Coventry and there wer executed. One of the 
kynges Henxmen called Dygby which was one of the con- 
spirators fled the realme, and after had his pardon. 

The xvii. day of January there was a Payer or market at the 
toune of Marguyson in the French kynges dominions beside 
Calayce, and for defence of the people and their marchaun- 
dise, there wer appointed CC. men in harnes wel weaponed : 

The 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



The souldiers of Guysnes hearyng of this, departed in the 
night and came nere to the toune of Marguyson and closly 
kept themselfes tyll the Market was fayre and at the best, 
then the Englishmen which wer Ixx. archers and bylles, 
set sodainly on the Market, that seyng the Frenchemen 
stode manfully at their defence with handgunnes and pykes, 
but the Englishmen shotte so wholy together that they drave 
the Frenchmen out of the toune, and would for succors have 
taken the Churche, but the Englishemen were betwene theim 
and the Churche, so that thei had none other remedye but 
to flee and many Frenchmen were slaine. Capitain Jhon de 
Pound, and capitain Jhon de Babage and divers other were 
taken prisoners, and divers marchauntes that were there to 
sell their goodes were also taken, and all their goodes brought 
in Frenchemennes wagons to Guysnes and on Englishman 
slaine but divers were sore hurt. 

The fyrst day of February the valiant knight sir Robert 
Jernyngham and with him fifty demylaunces of the garrison 
of Calayce skoured the countrey to Odirsael and there toke 
a C. hedde of beastes, by that doyng an askry rose through 
the countrey, wherby the Frenchmen gathered together to 
the nomber of xii. score, and or Sir Robert and his com- 
pany came to Houndyngbrige they were beset round about, 
so that of necessitie thei must fight, the Frenchmen set on 
with handgunnes, crosbowes and pykes, and for a while there 
was a strong encountre, but the Englishemen as menne 
desperate (because of the nomber) fought so fiersly that 
they caused the Frenchmen to geve backe and slewe many 
of them and toke xiii. prisoners, and in the chace they toke 
vii. more which made up xx. Then the sayd sir Robert 
returned with his botie and prisoners and lost noman, but 
almoste all were hurt. 

The x. day of Marche the kyng havyng a newe harnes 
made of his owne devise and fashion, suche as no armorer 
before that tyme had seen, thought to assaye the same at the 
tilte, and appointed a Justes to serve him. On fote were 
appointed the lorde Marques Dorset and the Earle of Surrey, 
the kyng came to the one ende of the tylt, and the Duke of 
Suffolke to the other : then a gentleman sayd to the Duke, 
sir the kyng is come to the tyltes ende. I see him not sayd 
the Duke on my fayth, for my head piece taketh from me 
my sight : with these wordes God knoweth by what chaunce, 

the 



THE XV. 
YERE 



320 KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 

The jeoperdy 
that the 
kynge was in 
at a Justes. 



the Kyng had his spere delivered him by the Lorde Marques, 
the viser of his headpece beyng up and not doune nor 
fastened, so that his face was clene naked. Then the gentle- 
man sayd to the duke, sir the kyng commeth, then the duke 
set forward and charged his spere, and the kyng likewise 
unadvisedly set toward the duke : the people perceivyng the 
kinges face bare, cryed hold, hold, the duke neither saw nor 
heard, and whether the kyng remembred that his viser was 
up or no few could tell : Alas what sorow was it to the people 
when they saw the spleters of the dukes spere strike on the 
kynges hedpiece : For of a suertie the duke strake the king 
on the brow right under the defence of the hedpece on the 
very coyffe scull or bassenetpece where unto the barbet for 
power and defence is charneld, to whiche coyffe or bassenet 
never armorer taketh hede, for it is evermore covered with 
the viser, barbet and volant pece, and so that pece is so 
defended that it forseth of no charge : But when the spere 
on that place lighted, it was great jeopardy of death inso- 
muche that the face was bare, for the Dukes spere broke all 
to shyvers, and bare the kynges viser or barbet so farre 
backe by the countre buffe that all the kynges headpece was 
full of spleters. The Armorers for this matter were muche 
blamed, and so was the lord Marques for the deliveryng of 
the spere when his face was open, but the kyng sayd that 
none was to blame but himself, for he entended to have 
sayed him selfe and his sight. The duke incontinently 
unarmed him, and came to the kyng, shewyng hym the 
closenes of his sight, and sware that he would never runne 
against the kyng more : But yf the kynge had been a lytle 
hurte, the kynges servauntes woulde have put the Duke in 
jeopardy. Then the kynge called his Armorers and put all 
his peces together and then toke a spere and ranne vi. 
courses very well, by the which all men might perceive that 
he had no hurt, whiche was great joy and comfort to all his 
subjectes there present. 

In the ende of Februarye foure Frenche shippes chased 
the Fysher botes of Rye to the verye shore, and when the 
fludde was gone, would have taken the botes and came a 
lond with pikes, but the fishers threw stones, and one archer 
shotte and slewe a Frencheman whiche helde up a basket 
and bad shote Englisheman shote, and the Englisheman shot 
through the basket and slewe him, and so they saved their 

botes, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



botes, and when the fludde came, the Frenchemen sette up 
their sailes, and as thei were passyng, the Englishemen of 
warre mette with theim and tooke two of the sayd shippes, 
and the other two fled. 

In this yere the kynge sent the Lorde Morlay sir Wyllyam 
Hosy knight and doctor Lee his Almoner to Done Ferdin- 
ando archduke of Austrice and brother to the Emperour 
Charles with the order of the Garter which in the toune 
of Norryngberge received the same, where then were all 
the princes of Germanye assembled at a counsell or Dyet, 
against the byshoppe of Rome, against whom the Germaynes 
put a C. greves. 

The xiii. day of Aprill one Capitain Breerton one of the 
capitaines of the aventurers at Guysnes with xvi. tall men 
came to a village called Waste and there toke a bootie of 
beastes, by whiche takynge an askry rose, and by chaunce 
certain of the garrison of Bulleyn were then abrode and by 
the cry of the people came where the Englishmen were, the 
Frenchmen wer CC. horsmen and with great cryes environed 
the Englishemen about, so that the Englishemen coulde make 
no defence. Then capitain Brearton called to the capitain 
of the Frfnchemen and sayd, sir I am a gentleman and this 
enterprict was myne, I have brought these good felowes to 
this jeopardy, wherfore we yelde us al prisoners to you, and 
so thei delivered their weapons, the capitain was a gentleman 
and gently them received, then to the men of warre drewe 
all the peisantz or chorles of the countrey nye hand to the 
nomber of vii. or viii. score, whiche desired to bye the 
Englishmen that wer taken, the Frenchmen were content 
and toke money, then the Englishmen were delivered to the 
uplandishe people, and the men of warre rode away. 

When the menne of warre wer departed the rybaudes 
with pykes, javelyne, and knyves, fell on the Englishemen 
whiche had no weapon and them slewe all xvii. and cutte 
them in pieces the moste shamefully that ever was sene. 

When knowlege thereof was brought to the capitain of 
Guisnes sir Jhon Gage, he sent for the aventurers willyng 
theim to revenge their capitaines death. So all the adventurers 
the xiiii. day gathered together to the nomber of xl. archers 
and pykes, and by good guide the next day in the mornyng 
they came to the same village of Wast and there toke xxxvii. 
prisoners and moste part were at the murder of Brearton 

and 

VOL. I. 



THE xv. 

YERE 

[1523-24] 



Capitaine 

Brcarton 

murdered. 



2 S 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 

The murder 
revenged. 



Bolton prior 
of sainct 
Bartholo- 
mewes. 



and his company, and of the xxxvii. they slew xxxvi. and so 
they left one and caried him with them, but or they departed 
they set the toune on fyer and spared nothyng, their ire was 
so great : the menne of warre of Fraunce costed the English- 
men, but they would not medle with them in that rage. 

When they came to Guysnes they sware the Frencheman 
that was left on live to declare their message to the capitaine 
of Bullein, whiche was that after that day they would save 
neither man, woman nor child that came to their handes for 
the great crueltie that the peysantz had done to capitaine 
Brearton and his company, with whiche message the French- 
men were discontent and sayd that the villaynes deserved to 
have vengeaunce for their crueltie. 

In this yere through bookes of Emphimerydes and Pro- 
nosticacions made and calculate by Astronomers, the people 
were sore affrayd for the sayd writers declared that this yere 
should be suche Eclipses in watery signes, and suche con- 
junction that by waters and fluddes many people shoulde 
perishe, Insomuche that many persones vitailed them selfes 
and went to high groundes for feare of drounyng, and 
specially one Bolton which was Prior of saint Bartholo- 
mewes in Smythfeld builded him an house upon Harow of 
the hill, only for feare of this flud, and thether he went and 
made provision for all thinges necessarye within him, for the 
space of two monethes : But the faythfull people put their 
trust and confidence onely in God. And this raine was by 
the wryters pronosticate to be in February, wherfore when 
it began to raine in February the people wer much afrayd, 
and some sayd now it beginneth, but many wisemen whiche 
thought that the worlde coulde not be drouned againe, con- 
trary to Goddes promise, put their truste in him onely, but 
because thei thought that some great raines might fall by 
enclinacions of the starres, and that water milles might 
stande styll and not grinde, they provided for meale, and 
yet God be thanked ther was not a fairer season in many 
yeres, and at the last the Astronomers for their excuse said 
that in their computacion they had mistaken and miscounted 
in their nomber an hundreth yeres. 

The Emperor Charles which also was enemy to the French 
kyng, seyng the great army that the kyng of England his 
confederate had in Fraunce, thought it was to him honorable 
to make warre also on that part of Fraunce that joyneth to 

Spain, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



Spain, and in especially he imagined how to recover the 
toune of Fountraby, whiche the Frenchmen before that tyme 
had gotten : wherfore he assembled a great puissaunce and 
made capitain the lorde Barnardine de Belasco Constable of 
Castyle, which with great diligence came before the toune of 
Fountraby whyche was strongly fortefied and the capitain 
therof was a Naveroys : but when the capitaine and his 
compaigny sawe the toune besieged with suche a puissaunce, 
and also that the sea was so narowly kept that they coulde 
not have vitail nor succour, they determined to geve up 
the toune : but yet the capitaine of a high stomacke shotte 
out his ordinaunce and sent his trompet to the capitain of the 
Spanyardes to knowe what prisoners he had of his, and for 
the communicacion thereof he desired abstinence of warre 
tyll he had communed with the counsail of the Spanish host, 
whiche to him was graunted. Then was communicacion for 
five dayes and nothyng ended, for the Spanyardes were haute 
on the one syde, and the Frenchmen proude on the other 
syde, but on the vi. daye it was concluded that the toune 
shoulde be delivered with ordinaunce and artillery and all 
the men of warre to depart wyth bagge and baggage, and so 
the xxvii. daye of February was the toune of Fountrabye 
brought againe to the handes of the Emperor, and he that 
was capitaine of Fountraby was afterwarde restored to his 
landes in Naver by the Emperor and became his man. 

The bishop of Rome called Pope Clement seyng the great 
warres that were this yere on all parties and in especial 
betwene the Emperor and the kyng of England on the one 
partie against Fraunces the Frenche kyng and his alyes, sent 
an archebishop of the realme of Naples fyrste to the French 
kynge, and after to the Emperor, whiche declared to the 
Frenche kyng the manyfolde mischiefes that ryse by warre, 
the great stroke of vengeaunce that God will strike for 
unjuste warre and specially for the death of innocentes and 
effusion of christen bloude, and shewed farther that the sayd 
Frenche kyng made daily warre on the Emperor and the 
kyng of England without cause, but onely because he him- 
selfe would do no right to them nor to their subjectes. 

The Frenche kyng after counsaill taken answered, my 
lord Legate we assure you that we make no warre, but 
warre is made on us, and we stande at the defence, notwith- 
standyng our right is kept from us both the duchy of 

Myllain 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



Myllain and realme of Naples by the Emperor and the 
usurped duke, to the whiche we have good title, and the 
kynge of England warreth on us without cause, notwith- 
standing that we have geven him and many lordes of his 
counsaill divers fayre pencions, not because we be afrayed of 
him, but because we woulde have his love and amitie, and 
when we perceived that he toke part with the Emperor our 
mortall enemy, we withdrewe our pencions as with right we 
might, and now with all his power he would conquere our 
good will, whiche is against reason, and we clayme nothing 
of him. Well sayed the ambassador, I wyll speake fyrst 
wyth the Emperor and after with the kyng of England, and 
then I will declare to you their rightes and demaundes, with 
whiche the Frenche kyng semed to be content. 

Then the sayd ambassadour tooke his leave and in poste 
came to the Emperor in Spaine, and there exhorted him to 
peace with many goodly reasons, affirmyng that the warre 
was unjust and without reasonable cause made on the Frenche 
kyng as the sayd kyng affirmed. Then the Emperor like 
a noble prince answered, that the warres were never of his 
beginnyng : For the Frenche kynge or he wyst had taken 
the toune of Fountraby, and also had sent an army to 
conquere the realme of Naverne, and not with this contented, 
reteyned the Swyches which be the Emperors subjectes and 
caused them to be enemies to thempyre, and he also with 
helde the duchy of haut Burgoyne, and the countie of 
Arthoys with divers other countrys and seignories belong- 
yng to hym : Wherfore his quarel was alway just, and 
because the college of Rome should perceive the whole 
cause of his warres, he delivered to the sayd ambassador 
a scedule, with whiche he departed, refusynge all gyftes which 
the Emperor offered him, and came againe to the Frenche 
kyng and rehersed to him all the Emperors saiyng, but the 
French kyng him selfe highly excused and sayd that he 
might not lese that his predecessors left him, and so the 
byshop of Romes ambassodor toke his leave and came into 
England. 

After this Legate was departed from the Emperors court, 
ther came thither an Ambassador from Portyngale, whiche 
highly behaved him selfe, and when he came to the Emperors 
speche, he proudly sayd : Sir you that are the greatest prince 
of Christendome ought above all men to do justice and 

right, 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



right, and to do wrong to no man, and where it is well 
knowen that by the labor, studye, and learnyng in Cosmo- 
graphy and Astronomy of us only Portingales, the trade to 
the parties of Inde or Indias were fyrst sought and found, 
and the fyrst labor in that behalfe was ours and the great 
innumerable riches whiche was spent for the searchyng and 
findyng of the same, was employed and spent by the kyng 
of Portyngale and his progenitors, by whych travaill we have 
wonne straung landes, wherby all Christendome is greatly 
enriched with Juels, stones, and perles and other straung 
commodities. How can it then be thought just or righteous 
that any other persone should take from us that commoditie 
that we have so derely bought ? Yet most puissant lorde 
and mightie Emperor, your subjectes daily travaill thither 
and wrong fully take away our gayne, whiche never labored 
nor toke pain for the findyng or serching of the same, wher- 
fore of justice you muste commaunde your subjectes not 
alonely to leve their trade thitherwarde, but also to make 
to us Portyngales a sufficient recompence for the harmes 
that we have susteined. 

When the Ambassador had sayed, after a lytle deliberacion 
the Emperor answered. The very povertie of your countrey 
of Portyngale is suche, that of your selfes you be not able 
to live, wherfore of necessitie you were driven to seke livyng, 
for landes of princes you were not able to purchase, and 
lande of lordes you were not able to conquere. Wherfore 
on the sea you were compelled to seke that whiche was not 
found : And wher you say that you have found landes, I say 
those landes found you by shipwrekes of the sea beyng cast 
thereon before you thought of any such ground, and so 
sought farther for succours in necessitie, yet they say not 
that you have them wonne, but they have wonne you. And 
where you would that our subjectes should not repare thither, 
we ascertaine you that no man shal prohibite our subjectes 
to saile where they lyst for their avauntage. For our 
subjectes may be warned no place by them with whom I 
have peace and amitie : for he is mine enemy and no frend 
that letteth my libertie : Well sayd the ambassador, and 
we wil let your subjectes to passe thither. Nay sayd the 
Emperor, we wil not trye so farre for I am able to disturbe 
your doynges nerer hande. But for a suertie you Portyn- 
gales be enemies to all Christendome, for to the Indyans you 

cary 



THE XV. 
YERE 



The proposi- 
tion of a 
Portingale. 



The 

Emperors 

answer. 



326 



KING HENRY THE VIII. 



THE XV. 
YERE 

[1523-24] 



cary nothyng but coyne, whiche is hurt to all countreys, 
wherefore at this time you may depart, till you be better 
advysed. After this answere geven to the Portyngales, they 
offered great summes of money to the Emperor to leave hys 
trade into the Indyans, but he therto in nowyse woulde 
agree. 



END OF THE XV. YEAR. 



Printed by T. and A. CONSTABLE, Printers to His Majesty 
at the Edinburgh University Press 



fVIm 14. 



DA Hall, Edward 
332 Henry VIII 
H35 
1904 

V.I 



PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE 
CARDS OR SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LIBRARY