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STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
The Resources Agency 



PHYSICAL SCI. LIB. 



PHYSICAL 



P.r >.!:!■: 



I£NCES 



LIBRARY 

partment of Wa ter Resources x^ 



BULLETIN No. 69-71 



CALIFORNIA HIGH WATER 

1970-1971 



SEPTEMBER 1972 



UNIVERbllY OF CALIFORNIA 
DAVIS 

NOV 10 1972 

GOVT. DOCS. - LIBRARY 



NORMAN B. LIVERMORE, JR. 
Secretary for Resources 
The Resources Agency 



RONALD REAGAN 

Governor 
Sfofe of California 



WILLIAM R. GIANELLI 

Director 
Department of Water Resources 



l..m 



MODOC 



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Figure I 
COUNTIES PROCLAIMED DISASTER AREAS 
DURING 1970-71 WATER YEAR 

-LEGEND- 
I I DECLARED MAJOR DISASTER AREA 



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state of CaJifornia 

The Resources Agency 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 

RONALD REAGAM, Governor 

NORMAN B. LIVERMORE, JR. 

Secretary for Resources, The Resources Agency 

WILLIAM R, GIANELLI 

Director, Department of Water Resources 

JOHN R. TEERINK 

Deputy Director 



DIVISION OF RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT 

Herbert W. Greydanus Di\/lsion Engineer 

William L. Horn Chief, Flood Forecasting 

and Operations Branch 



This report was prepared under 
the immediate supervision of 

Donald H. Neudeck Chief, Flood Operations and 

Flood Control Maintenance Section 



FOREWORD 



Bulletin No. 69-71, the ninth of an an- 
nual series, describes the general weather pat- 
terns preceding and during the storm periods of 
the 1970-71 water year, precipitation character- 
istics, and the resulting runoff; and presents 
information on flooded areas. It also includes 
tabulations of precipitation comparisons and peak 
streamflows and stages; hydrographs of streamflo\j 
and reservoir operations; and weir overflow graphs. 

Data for this bulletin were supplied by 
the National Weather Service, the U. S. Geological 
Survey, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, the 
U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, and many other agen- 
cies, both public and private. Their cooperation 
is gratefully acknowledged. 



Dale E. Martfeld . 
William A. Arvola 



by 



. Associate Engineer, Water Resources 
Senior Meteorologist, Water Resources 



William R, Glanelll, Director 
Department of Water Resources 
The Resources Agency 
State of California 
August 17, 1972 



assisted by 

William B. Chan .... Assistant Engineer, Water Resources 

Jess C. Bringham Water Resources Technician I 

George W. Patrick Water Resources Technician I 

William McKane Senior Delineator 

Liz Flaherty Stenographer II 



ABSTRACT 

The weather pattern for water year 1970-71 was marked by extremes that set several weather records. 
The year held the wettest November for San Francisco and Stockton, the longest winter drought at Red Bluff, 
the heaviest 2'4-hour rainfall in southern California, and the deepest snowpack at Norden in December and January. 

The Flood Operations Center was activated on a 2U-hour basis from November 28 through December 29, 1970, 
and again from January 15 to 20, 1971. No major emergencies arose and the Center had to take no special action. 

The completion of two new dams this year is expected to ease future flood control operations. Bullards 
Bar Dam on the North Fork of the Yuba River and New Don Pedro Dam on the Tuolumne River will reduce floods. 

A series of storms hit the North Coastal Hydrographic Area from October through December, causing flood 
stages on some rivers. A winter drought occurred from mid-January to early March. A new series of storms moved 
in during March. No major high water damage was experienced in the area. 

The San Francisco Bay Hydrographic Area was drenched by November storms that dropped almost three inches 
of rain on San Francisco and more than four inches of rain on Marin County in one two-day period. Heavy local 
runoff resulted in both areas, with the Napa River near St. Helena rising nine feet in nine hours. No streams 
exceeded flood stage. The rest of the water year was marked by a midwinter drought, a wet spring, and Intense 
summer temperatures. 

The Central Valley tfydrographic Area had light precipitation early in the water year. November and 
December were very wet months, and large amounts of snow were deposited in the Sierra Nevada in December. The 
Central Valley had little rain from January to March, when a new series of storms brought heavy rain to the 
mountains. Both Shasta and Oroville Reservoirs prevented downstream flooding. Low releases kept river stages 
low. 

The water year in the South Coastal Hydrographic Area was preceded by brush and grass fires that 
denuded vast acreages and created a mudslide hazard. Torrential rains in November and December I97O did cause 
mud slides and flooding throughout the area and heavy snows closed a major highway. January was a dry month. 
In February a severe earthquake centered in San Fernando Valley extensively damaged the Upper and Lower San 
Fernando Dams; 80,000 valley residents were evacuated until the lower reservoir was drained. 



Ill 



CONTENTS 

Page 

FOREWORD iii 

ORGANIZATION, DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES iii 

ABSTRACT iii 

INTRODUCTION 1 

WEATHER PATTERNS OF THE 1970-71 SEASON 2 

RAINFALL RUNOFF 9 

North Coastal Hydrographic Area 9 

Smith River Basin 9 

Klamath River Basin 12 

Eel River Basin 12 

Russian River Basin 13 

San Francisco Bay Hydrographic Area l6 

Napa River Basin 17 

Central Valley Hydrographic Area 17 

Sacramento River Basin 21 

Feather River Basin 25 

South Coastal Hydrographic Area 25 

STATE-FEDERAL FLOOD OPERATIONS CENTER 29 

TABLES 

No. Page 

1 Precipitation Amounts at Selected Stations h 

2 Maximum One-Day Precipitation Amounts at Selected Stations, 

November 21-December 9, 1970 k 

3 Peak Flows and Stages hO 

North Coastta Area UO 

San Francisco Bay Area ^2 

CentraJ. Coastal Area ^3 

South Coastal Area kh 

Central Valley Area ^6 

Southern Lahontan Area 51 

Northern Lahontan Area 51 



iv 



FIGURES 

Page 

1 Counties Proclaimed Disaster Areas During 

1970-71 Water Year ii 

2 Major Drainage Areas in California vi 

3 500-mb Chart for I6OO PST - January 15, 1971 6 

k Time Plot During the Period January 1^1-175 1971 7 

5 North Coastal Area: Precipitation Station Location 

and Percent of Normal Rainfall Map 8 

6 North Coastal Area: Precipitation Station Location 

and Isohyetal Map 10 

7 Hydrographs of Smith and Klamath Rivers 11 

8 Hydrographs of Van Duzen and Eel Rivers Ik 

9 Hydrographs of Russian River 15 

10 Hydrographs of Napa River I8 

11 Sacramento Valley Area: Precipitation Station 

Location and Percent of Normal Rainfall Map I9 

12 Hydrographs of Sacramento River - 1 22 

13 Hydrographs of Sacramento River -2 23 

ih Hydrographs of Feather River 26 

15 Federal State Cooperative 28 

16 Sacramento River, HistoriceuL Crest Profile 33 

17 Period of Record of Overflow of the Moulton Weir 3^ 

18 Period of Record of Overflow of the Colusa Weir 35 

19 Period of Record of Overflow of the Tisdale Weir 36 

20 Period of Record of Overflow of the Fremont Weir 37 

21 Period of Record of Overflow of the Sacramento Weir .... 38 

22 Period of Record of Inundation of the Yolo Bypass 39 



NORTH 
COASTAL 



Figure 2 

MAJOR DRAINAGE AREAS 

N 

CALIFORNIA 




CENTRAL 
COASTAL 



SOUTH 
COA ST A L 



COLORADO 
DES ERT 



VI 



INTRODUCTION 



Flooding in California during the water 
year October 1, 1970, to October 1, 
1971, was minor, although extreme 
weather patterns prevailed throughout 
the State. A number of weather records 
were set, including the wettest Novem- 
ber on record in San Francisco and 
Stockton, and the heaviest rainfall 
for a 2U-hour period in Southern Cali- 
fornia, Storm durations also set 
records; Sacramento recorded 15 consec- 
utive days of meas\irable rain. Early 
season snow in the movintains was ex- 
tremely heavy. The snowpack at Norden 
was the deepest of record for December 
and January. Conversely, the entire 
State was subjected to a midwinter 
drought in February. It was the long- 
est drought of record in Red Bluff. 

In mid-October rain fell in the North 
Coastal regions and the Sacramento 
Valley. These rains were light and 
the streams and rivers responded only 
slightly. Storms d\iring the first of 
November also had very little effect 
on the rivers, but on the weekend 
before Thanksgiving a storm entered 
California from the northwest through 
the Smith River Basin, causing minor 
rises on the North Coastal area rivers. 
When the storm moved into the Sacramento 
Valley, rivers rose slightly. 

A new storm a few days after Thauiks- 
giving dropped heavy amounts of rain 
on both the San Francisco and Sacra- 
mento areas. High gusty winds knocked 
down powerlines and trees, A substan- 
tial runoff in San Francisco and Daly 
City flooded streets. Rivers rose rap- 
idly to warning stages in the upper 
Sacramento Valley, and to floodstages 
at Bend Bridge, at the town of Tehama, 
and at Vina Bridge. Further downstream 



rivers did not exceed flood stage, 
although flow did occur in the bypass 
system. 

Storms continued to move into the State 
throughout December, keeping rivers at 
moderately high levels. January brought 
new storms, but no major flooding. Feb- 
ruary was very dry, but in March another 
series of storms arrived. These dropped 
only light rain on the valleys but large 
amounts fell in the mountains, causing 
heavy r\inoff at high elevations. The 
reservoirs restrained this runoff, fore- 
stalling floods in the Central Valley. 
Precipitation during the rest of the 
water year dwindled so that, despite 
the auspicious beginning, precipitation 
for the year was only normal to below 
normal. 

From November 28 to December 29 and a^ain 
from January 15 to January 20, the Flood 
Operations Center in Sacramento operated 
continuously. However, no major emer- 
gencies arose and the Flood Center staff 
was not required to take any si)ecial 
action. 

Before the water year began, the Los 
Angeles-San Diego area was subjected to 
some of the worst brush and forest fires 
the State has ever known. Because the 
denuded slopes gave promise of massive 
mud slides and debris flows, the region 
was declared a disaster area, making 
emergency flood control funds available 
to the counties. Money was also allo- 
cated to reseed the burned slopes so 
that new plant life could be started on 
the slopes before the major rain season. 
Although late November storms set rain- 
fall records throughout the area, later 
storms were not as intense or lengthy 
as had been feared. The denuded slopes 



caused no major disaster, although some 
large mudslides and debris flows did 
occur. 

The increase in flood storage capacity 
provided by two new dams completed early 
in the water year is expected to signi- 
ficantly influence flood flows in the 
Central Valley. Bullards Bar Dajn on 
the North Fork of the Yuba River and 



New Don Pedro Dam on the Tuolumne River 
will greatly reduce flooding on these 
rivers. 

Hydrologic data presented in this bul- 
letin are supplied by several agencies, 
both public and private, and are con- 
sidered reliable and accurate. How- 
ever, these data may be revised on the 
basis of subsequent information. 



WEATHER PATTERNS OF THE 1970-71 SEASON 



The first storms entered California in 
October but, because the soil was unu- 
sually dry, very little runoff occurred. 
November precipitation was above normal 
over the entire State — as much as 
four times the normail value in many 
areas. 

Two major periods of precipitation 
occurred in November and December: 
November 4-12, and November 22- 
December 9. During both, troughs of 
low pressure developed in the upper 
levels near the West Coast with a 
southwesterly flow over California. 
With this circulation pattern, a ser- 
ies of weather fronts brought precipi- 
tation to most of the State. 

The pattern over California was asso- 
ciated with meteorological events in 
Canada. A blocking high-pressure 
center located over eastern Canada in 
October moved to northwest Canada in 
the first half of November and to the 
Aleutians later in the month. The 
effect was to force the Jet stream at 
mid-latitudes to move south, shunting 
the storm track south as well. 

The first weather front moved into the 
State on November h. At the same time 
a large high-pressure area bringing 
cold air from Canada moved south into 
the Rocky Mountains. This was the 
first major outbreak of cold air of the 
season. Two other Pacific cold fronts 
moved into California during this 



period. Precipitation during the nine- 
days storm totalled 10 to 12 inches on 
the north coast and in the upper Sacra- 
mento Valley, while the northern Sierra 
Nevadas received eight to nine inches. 

A ridge of high pressure in the eastern 
Pacific during an intervening period, 
November 13 to 21, brought a brief rain- 
free period, except for some light pre- 
cipitation along the north coast on 
November 15 and l6. 

Between November 22 and December 9, an 
active trough of low pressure was rees- 
tablished over the eastern Pacific and 
storm systems moving over California 
were renewed. The blocking high was 
very well developed in the Aleutians 
during the last week in November, and 
the weather fronts moved out of the 
Giilf of Alaska into the upper level 
trough entrenched along the 130° W 
meridian. 

The weather front of November 2k had a 
west-east orientation along the Oregon- 
California border and, on the following 
day, when this front had moved into 
central California, it was replaced by 
a second front similarly oriented at 
the Oregon border. Heavy precipitation 
occiirred on November 2^-25. Another 
front — a cold front with waves — 
moved into the North Coast area on No- 
vember 2'7 and brought another two days 
of heavy precipitation. Five days later, 
on December h, another front with a 



-2- 



strong surge of moisture brought a con- 
centration of precipitation, which cul- 
minated in major rises on North Coastal 
area streams and the upper Sacramento 
River. 

From November 22 through December 9, 
precipitation varied from 25 to 35 
inches at North Coast stations to 25 
inches at upper Sacramento stations. 
Amounts at specific stations are pre- 
sented in Table 1. 

The November 27 front brought cold air 
in its wake over the entire State, and 
snov fell in the mountains from Novem- 
ber 28 through December k. The snow 
level in northern California dropped 
to 2,000 feet elevation and in the 
central Sierra Nevada to about 3>500 
feet elevation. The December U front 
became stationary near Sacramento, and 
the advection of a warmer air mass 
from the Pacific brought a warming trend 
in northern and central California. 
December was wet and cool. Above- 
normal amounts of rainfall occurred 
over most of the State, except in the 
desert areas and southern San Joaquin 
Valley, and heavy amounts of snow fell 
in the mountains. Heavy precipitation 
which fell December 2 to U was accom- 
panied by a lower snow level. Two 
additional wet periods occurred from 
December 13 to 21 emd December 26 to 
31. 



By mid-December several fronts had 
moved through the State, The strongest 
of these were the occlusions of Decem- 
ber 15 to l6 and December 20 to 21, 
when many stations recorded 2U-hour pre- 
cipitation of 1 to 2 inches. Overall 
accumiilations for the nine-day period 
were not heavy, but continued precipi- 
tation maintained streamflows at moder- 
ate levels. 

By December 17, a deep, upper level 
trough was established near the coast. 
This trough brought very cold air. 
During the following days a large quan- 
tity of snow fell. The National Weather 
Service office at Mt. Shasta (elevation 
3,5^+^) had 2 inches on the gro\ind at 
midmonth, 10 inches by the morning of 
the l8th and 22 inches by the 21st; 
Blue Canyon (elevation 5,280) had 30 
inches of snow on the ground on December 
15; 51 inches on December 17, 68 inches 
on December 22, and 82 inches at the 
end of the month. The totsQ. recorded 
snowfall at Blue Canyon during December 
was 121 inches, the second greatest 
amount of record for that month. Signi- 
ficantly heavy amounts of snow fell on 
December 19 in the Tehachapi Mountains, 
where drifts up to 8 feet high stopped 
traffic on Interstate Highway 5. At 
the National Weather Service Office at 
Sandberg in Los Angeles County, snowfall 
in the four-day period, December l8 to 
21, totalled 2k. k inches. 



The broad- scale hemispheric flow pat- 
tern on the mean upper level chairt for 
December was marked by relaxation of 
the blocking in Aleutian area and the 
establishment of a new blocking regime 
in the Atlantic. The flow over the 
Pacific Ocean on the mean chart for 
December was more zonal, with a band 
of strong winds near Japan and another 
over the eastern Pacific at ^5" N 
latitude. The southern branch of the 
second jet dipped south over San Diego 
and southern Arizona. The mean zonal, 
pattern varied during the third week 
of the month, when a low-pressure trough 
of moderate amplitude lay along the 
West Coast. 



The final December storm series began 
on December 26 and ended January 2, 1971. 
These were cold storms that deposited 
snow at low elevations. On December 29, 
many stations on the north coast and in 
the Sacramento drainage basin recorded 
moi*e than 2 inches of rain in 2k hours. 

Figures 5 and 11 illustrate how precipi- 
tation for November and December varied 
from normal on the north coast and in 
the Sacramento Valley. 

The important storm of the season occur- 
red in January. On January 10, a prom- 
inent ridge of high pressure formed at 
longitude l60° W and a closed low-pressure 



-3- 



Table 1: Precipitation Amounts at Selected Stations 



Station 


County 


Elev. 


Nov. 21- 
Dec. 9 


Jan. 9- 
Jan. 20 


I-^r. 22- 
tor. 27 




Hoopa 


Humboldt 


345 


19.97 


10.46 


5.87 


Laytonville 


I-iendocino 


1,640 


18.94 


10.59+ 


7.65 


Redding 

Fire Station ;y2 


Shasta 


580 


11.16 


3.95 


3.26 


Sacramento '.VSO 


Sacramento 


17 


7.00 


0.65 


1.24 


Plue Canyon WSO 


Placer 


5,280 


19.49 


7.33 


6.79 


Calaveras U.S. 


Calaveras 


3,343 


12.65 


MSG 


2.51 


r.dlo 5NE 


Tulare 


3,400 


7.58 


1.58 


0.12 


Bakersfield WSO 


Kern 


475 


1.68 


0.19 





Huasna 


San Luis Obispo 


715 


5.51 


2.02 


0.20 


Cachuma Dam 


Santa Barbara 


781 


5.72 


0.39 





Pit, '.Vilson 


Los Angeles 


5,709 


11.79 


1.14 






Table 2: Maximum One-Day Precipitation Amounts at Selected Stations 

November 21 - December 9, 1970. 



Station 


Amount 


Date 


Station 


Aiiiount 


Date 


Klamath 


5.9 


t'ovember 


24 


1970 


Calaveras 


1.43 


December 


2, 


1970 


Hoopa 


3.69 


December 


3, 


1970 


ililo 


2.96 


I'iovember 


25, 


1970 


Laytonville 


5.28 


December 


3, 


1970 


l;akersfield 


0.99 


November 


25, 


1970 


Yorkville 


4.8 


December 


3, 


1970 


Huasna 


1,96 


November 


25, 


1970 


Reddine 


2.87 


November 


28 


1970 


Cachuma 


2.81 


November 


29, 


1970 


Sacramento '.VSO 


2.42 


November 


28 


1970 


Mt. VJilson 


6.20 


November 


29, 


1970 


Blue Canyon 


2.60 


November 


28 


1970 


Los Angeles 


2.43 


November 


29, 


1970 


San Francisco 


1.7o 


November 


28 


1970 









center formed off the British Columbia 
coast. On succeeding days, the ridge 
began to build, with its line rotating 
clockwise over Alaska, The ridge gen- 
erated a strong northeast jet stream 
that extended southwest toward a low- 
pressure trough over the ocean south 
of Alaska and strengthened the southwest 
flow at latitude 30° N. This flow, 
also a powerful jet stream, headed 
toward northwest California. The fetch 
of the warm air mass in this flow ex- 
tended 3jC)00 miles to the region north 
and northwest of the Hawaiian Islands. 
The weather map for January 15, 1971 > 
is shown in Figure 3. 

Precipitation began in the North Coast 
area on January 9> but the strong flow 
of moist air did not become well devel- 
oped until January 15. This flow pat- 
tern continued through January l8; on 
January 19, the flow had weakened 
markedly and the fetch shortened. 

Figure h presents a time plot of the 
pressure gradient between Ssm Francisco 
and Areata (related to the onshore low- 
level wind flow) , dewpoint temperature 
at Areata (moisture parameter) , the 
mean relative humidity between the 
surface and 500 millibars (mb) at Med- 
ford (moisture in depth) , the speed 
of the 700 and 500 mb wind at Medford, 
and the hourly precipitation Eunount at 
the recording rain gage at Klamath. 
An isohyetal map of the precipitation 
totals in the 12-day period, January 9 
to 10, is shown on Figure 6. The heav- 
iest precipitation occurred January 15 
to 17, with many stream gaging stations 
peaking either late on the l6th or 
early on the 17th. The area affected 
by this storm covered the North Coast 
drainage area through the Russian River 
Basin, the upper Sacreunento River Basin, 
and the northern Sierra Nevada through 
the Feather River Basin. 

The final significant storm system of 
the season occurred on March 25-26, 
1971. This storm had the character- 
istics of the classical Norwegian wave 



cyclone. A wave formed near the lUO" 
W meridian at 35" W latitude (about 
1,200 nautical miles WSW of Eureka), 
moved towards the Northern California 
coast, occluded as it approached the 
coast, and curved northeastwards paral- 
lel to the Oregon- Washington coast. 
Some warm frontal precipitation began 
falling in the Sacramento Valley on 
March 25, but the heaviest precipita- 
tion came with passage inland of the 
occluded front. The precipitation 
amounted to two-day totals of 3 to 5 
inches in the north coast and central 
valley basins; heaviest amounts fell 
in the Trinity, Eel, and Russian River 
areas. 




Sacramento Bee photo 

California Highway Patrol Unit checks 
progress of a rotary snowplow clearing 
a slide on U. S. 50 east of Echo Summit. 



-5- 




SOLID LINES ARE THE CONTOURS OF THE 500-mb PRESSURE SURFACE LABELLED IN METERS 
CONTOUR INTERVAL IS 60 METERS WINDS BLOW PARALLEL TO THE CONTOURS WITH LOWER 
HEIGHTS TO THE LEFT OF THE WIND VECTOR H AND L. RESPECTIVELY REPRESENT AREAS 
WHERE THE HEIGHTS OF THE 500-mb ARE HIGH AND LOW SUPERIMPOSED ARE THE FRONTAL 
SYSTEMS FROM THE SURFACE WEATHER MAP THE SCALLOPED AREAS REPRESENT THE EXTENT 
OF THE CLOUD COVER AS VIEWED FROM THE NOAA SATELLITE ITOS-I 

NOTE THE EXTENDED FETCH OF THE SOUTHWEST FLOW FROM THE REGION NORTH OF 
HAWAII (LATITUDE BAND ZS'-JO'N) FLOWING TOWARDS NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AND OREGON 



Figure 3 
500-mb CHART FOR 1600 PST JANUARY 15. 1971 



14 



14 



E 
z 



O 

z 

S 60 
o 

UJ 

u 
tn 40 

o 

z 

S 20 60 

t- 

2 

O 
li-a 40 
° S 

iij 

Q 
S? 100 20 



X 

a: 90 



80 



15 



Pressure difference -San Francisco minus Areata 



17 




Mean relative tiumidity - surface to 500mb at Medford 




1.0 



X 

o 

z 



o 

0. 



t 



Hourly precipitation at Klamath 



u 4 

LlJ 

q: 
a. 

i 2 
a: 

3 
O 
I 



■ ■ ■ 111 



Tr 



T 



■ T"n" 



14 



15 



17 



DAYS 



ITEMS SHOWN ARE THE PRESSURE DIFFERENCE (Sea Level) BETWEEN ARCATA 
AND SAN FRANCISCO, THE 700 AND 500 m.b WIND SPEEDS AT THE MEDFORD, OREGON 
RAWINSONDE STATION, THE DEWPOINT TEMPERATURE AT ARCATA, THE MEAN RELATIVE 
HUMIDITY BETWEEN THE SURFACE AND 500 m.b AT THE MEDFORD RAWINSONDE 
STATION, AND THE HOURLY PRECIPITATION AT KLAMATH. SEE THE TEXT FOR DISCUSSION. 



Figure 4:TIME PLOT DURING THE PERIOD JANUARY 14-17,1971 









il' 



f^ 



/#S*v. 




■/ 



/ 



-v/* 










HOURLY PRECIPITATION STATIONS 

I CRESCENT CITY MAINTENANCE STATION 
2, HAPPY CAMP RANGER STATION 

3 KLAMATH 

4 ETNA 

5 HOOPA 

6 COFFEE CREEK RANGER STATION 

7 EUREKA W8 CITY 

8 KNEELAND 10 SSE 

9 HYAMPOM 

10 MIRANDA SPENGLER RANCH 

11 LAKE MOUNTAIN 

12 COVELO EEL RIVER RANGER STATION 
13. LAYTONVILLE 
W FORT BRAGG 
15 WILLITS HOWARD FOREST RANGER STATION 

REDWOOD VALLEY 

17 NAVARRO I NW 

18 POINT ARENA 

19. THE GEYSERS 

20. VENA DO 



LEGEND 

HOURLY PRECIPITATION STATION 

DRAINAGE BASIN BOUNDARY 

LINES OF PERCENT OF NORMAL RAINFALL 

TOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER - DECEMBER r970 



Figure 5 

NORTH COASTAL AREA 

PRECIPITATION STATION LOCATION 

AND 

PERCENT OF NORMAL RAINFALL MAP 



8 



RAINFALL RUNOFF 



North Coastal 
Hydrographic Area 

The North Coastal J^drographic Area is 
about 270 miles long and varies in 
width from about I80 miles in the north 
to about 30 miles in the south. It is 
sparsely populated; its prime indus- 
tries are timber, agriculture, and 
recreation. 

Storms that move into California usu- 
ally hit this area first before moving 
into the rest of the State. Storms 
are also more frequent and intense 
than in other areas. 

AnnueuL rainfall averages are among the 
highest in the State and range from 
almost 30 inches in the Russian River 
Basin to more than 100 inches at some 
locations in the Smith River Basin. 
These amounts produce approximately kO 
percent of the average annual runoff 
for the State. Because most of the 
area is below 8,000 feet elevation, it 
receives very little snow. 

SeveraJL major streams ajid their tribu- 
taries drain this area: the Smith, 
Klamath, Mad, Eel, and the Russian 
Rivers and Redwood Creek. Smaller 
streams such as the Ten-mile River, 
Jug Handle Creek, and Hollow Tree 
Creek complete the natioral drainage. 

Throughout the water year, high water 
caused no major damage. Mud slides 
which are common to the loosely- 
compacted soil found in this area 
brought only nominal damage. Some low- 
lying agricultural lands received 
debris and silt deposits. The first 
storm series in October caused minor 
rises on the rivers. A new series of 



storms in mid-November continued into 
December, causing rivers to rise rapidly. 
The Smith and Eel Rivers reached flood 
stages for a short time. Rivers rose 
a^ain in January and flood stages were 
reached again on the Smith sind Eel Rivers, 

A winter drought began mid- January and 
ended the first week in March, when rain 
caused some river rises. Flood stages 
were recorded at a few locations and 
some minor flooding was reported. 

Smith River Basin 

Smith River, the northernmost stream in 
the North CoasteLl Hydrographic Area, 
drains approximately 720 square miles. 
About 90 square miles lie in Oregon. 
The Smith River begins in Oregon, winds 
through the northwest corner of CaJ.ifor- 
nia, and discharges into the Pacific 
Ocean a few miles south of the Oregon 
border. 

The basin contains rugged mountains and 
foothills, most of which are below the 
3, 000- foot elevation; some mountains 
along the eastern edge rise to 5>000 
feet. This basin is usually the first 
part of the State to be hit by storms. 
Rainfall averages nearly 80 inches per 
year. Some stations receive more than 
110 inches per year. Rainfall in excess 
of one inch per day occurs in this basin 
about twenty days of every year. Most 
of this precipitation occurs between 
October and April, causing high river 
stages severaJ. times a year, and flood 
stages occasionally. 



When the Smith River exceeds flood stage, 
a phenomenon occurs. Flood water near 
the mouth of the river flows into Lakes 



-9- 




--X 



-i 

I CL£tlR LiKE 
l>ES 



7 



/ 



\A»; 



r 



I, 



^sT 



I 

) 



HOURLY PRECIPITATION STATIONS 

CRESCENT CITY MAINTENANCE STATION 

HAPPY CAMP RANGER STATION 

KLAMATH 

ETNA 

HOOPA 

COFFEE CREEK RANGER STATION 

EUREKA we CITY 

KNEELANO 10 SSE 

HYAMPOM 

MIRANDA SPENGLER RANCH 

LAKE MOUNTAIN 

COVELO EEL RIVER RANGER STATION 

LAYTONVILLE 

FORT BRAGG 

WILUTS HOWARD FOREST RANGER STATION 

REDWOOD VALLEY 

NAVARRO I NW 

POINT ARENA 

THE GEYSERS 

VENA DO 



SAN FRANCISCO 
BAY AREA 



LEGEND 

HOURLY PREaPITATION STATION 

DRAINAGE BASIN BOUNDARY 

tSOHYETS OF RAINFALL IN INCHES 
FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 9- 20.1971 



Figure 6 
NORTH COASTAL AREA 

PRECIPITATION STATION LOCATION 

AND 

ISOHYETAL MAP 



10 



>- I 






^¥Pf| 



^ 



T 




-Missing Oota 



- Missing 



SMITH RIVER 
NEAR CRESCENT CITY 



PEAK 36 6 FEET 
'(128,000 CFS) 



FLOOD STAGE 35.0 FEET* 




Missing Doto ^ 



iiiil'ii'^""lii"'"i'l"'i 



10 20 to 20 

NOVEMBER I DECEMBER 
I9?0 



JANUARY 



10 20 
FEBRUARY MARCH 
1971 



20 



APRIL 




NOVEMBER 



-1970 



Figure 7: HYDROGRAPHS OF SMITH AND KLAMATH RIVERS 



* Flood stage - Nomavccd Sireamt-Siogc ot which tigmdeani overbanhmg occurs 

- Leveed Streams - Stage oi which design copociiy of 'evee is reoched 

»» WiftRNlNG STAGE ' Nonieteed Sircoms - Stage at which tmlial ociion muii t>c token 

- Leweed Streoms - Siogc ot which potrol of projeci ic*ces becomes mondoiory 



NOTE I Curves ore derived from opcrolionol dolo 

2 Dischorge figures ore m- channel flow only 
and do not include overlond flow. 



11 



Earl and Talawa, which lie several miles 
to the south. These lakes drain into 
the ocean through a small outlet that 
must be opened occasionally when a 
sand bar develops at that point. If 
this outlet is not opened, lake levels 
will rise abnormally high and low- lying 
lands flood. When the lake levels are 
low, flood water flowing into the lakes 
from Smith River is confined to several 
small channels and culverts, and the 
system acts as a release valve to 
reduce lowland flooding. 

During October, a short series of 
storms brought light rain to the area. 
River rises were slight. In November, 
new storms had much more effect. The 
Smith River rose to flood stage on 
November 2^ but quickly receded without 
major damage. During this storm, sev- 
ered, rainfall records were exceeded, 
including that for the 24-hour period 
at the Gasquet Ranger Station where 
6.U3 inches fell on November 2k. 

Heavy rainfall occ\irred throughout 
November and much of December. Each 
burst caused the river to respond but 
river stages remained below flood 
levels. Some low- lying roads were 
closed but damage was minor. 

Heavy rain lasting several days began 
again on January 8, 1971, and caused 
the Smith River to go slightly over 
flood stage. Mud and rock slides 
closed several highways and caused 
minor damage. During this storm a 
double peak occurred. The river ex- 
ceeded flood stage on January 17, 
then receded. During this rise Lakes 
Earl and Talawa were low and very 
minor lowland flooding occurred. The 
river peaked again 24 hours later at 
an identical stage but with very dif- 
ferent results. Because the lakes 
were full, the second peak caused 
extensive lowland flooding, closing 
highway 199 for several hours. 

The remainder of the winter and spring 
was exceptionally dry. Storms moved 
through the area, causing some minor 



river rises, but all peaks were well 
below warning stage. 

Klamath River Basin 

Lying south and east of the Smith River 
Basin is the 15, 700- square-mile Klamath 
River Basin, of which nearly a third 
lies in Oregon. Major tributaries to 
the Klamath River included in this basin 
are the Salmon, Scott, Shasta, and Tri- 
nity Rivers. It is a rugged mountain 
area, with elevations ranging from sea 
level to over 8,000 feet. The basin is 
sparsely populated by residents employed 
mostly in logging. It is a prime rec- 
reational area. 

The Klamath River Basin receives heavy 
rainfall. Some areas receive as much 
as 80 inches per year. 

During October, storms caused minor 
rises on the Klamath River and no damage 
was reported. Another stormy period 
began in November and caused rapid 
rises along the river. However, high 
water was well below warning stage and 
no damage was reported in November and 
December. Some low- lying roads were 
flooded . 

Storms with heavy rain and gale winds 
entered again in January, and this time 
mud slides closed several roads. One 
county employee was killed by a slide 
while working to clear a previous slide. 
Some lowlands along the river were 
flooded, but the only damage was deposi- 
tion of debris and silt. The highest 
peak of the entire season, which occurred 
on January 17, was well below warning 
stage. 

Very little additional rain fell in this 
basin until mid-March when heavy rains 
hit the basin again, but these only 
brought minor peaks. No flooding was 
reported anywhere. 

Eel River Basin 

The 3, 700- square-mile Eel River Basin 
is an area famous for its tall redwoods. 



-12- 



Its major tributary is the Van Duzen 
River. The Basin is made up of rugged 
mountains having heavily wooded hill- 
sides and elevations ranging from sea 
level to nearly 7,000 feet. Average 
annual rainfall ranges from about kO 
inches near the coast to more than 80 
inches near the headwaters of the Eel 
and Van Duzen Rivers. Runoff amounts 
to nearly nine percent of the avereige 
runoff for the entire State. 

The river carries a quantity of sus- 
pended sediment to the ocean that 
equals 33 million tons of soil per 
year, the highest average suspended 
sediment yield per square mile of any 
river in the United States as large 
as or larger than the Eel River. 

Some light rain fell in the Eel Basin 
in October, resulting in minor river 
rises. November storms moved in rap- 
idly, accompanied by gale winds. Run- 
off caused the Eel and Van Duzen Rivers 
to rise rapidly, but the peaks did not 
reach flood stages. These storms con- 
tinued into December with new rises on 
the rivers. The upper Eel River failed 
to reach dangerous stages, but the Van 
Duzen River flooded its banks at Bridge- 
ville and inundated lowlands for a short 
time early in December. The lower Eel 
River flooded its banks near its mouth 
at Fernbridge at about the same time. 
Lowlands in the delta were flooded and 
silt and debris were deposited on low- 
lying lands. 

Numerous mud slides closed several 
roads but little damage was reported. 
The railroad was closed for several 
hours near the town of Pepperwood. 
The continuing downpour in early Decem- 
ber also caused flooding from local 
runoff in Ferndale and Eureka. Rain 
showers continued through the rest of 
December, but no flooding occurred. 

After a brief dry spell, rain began 
again after January 1. The rivers 
responded quickly and the Van Duzen 
River peaked slightly above warning 
stage in the first week of January. 



These rises also caused the Eel River 
to go over flood stage again near Fern- 
bridge, Delta lowlands were flooded 
and silt and debris deposited. Mud 
slides closed several highways and local 
roads. Highway 101, the main north- 
south route, was closed near Leggett 
for a short time. 

The weather then became unusually dry 
and remained so into March. In mid- 
March, storms caused the rivers to rise 
and flooding was reported along the Eel 
and Van Duzen Rivers. Flood peaks 
occurred at seversQ. points, flooding 
lowlands and depositing silt and debris. 
Flooding along the Eel River during 
March is iinusual. The most recent floods 
recorded during this month occurred in 
I9U0 and I9U9. 

Russian River Basin 

The 1,800- square-mile Russian River 
Basin, lying at the southern end of the 
North Coastal Hydrographic Area, con- 
tains mountains that rise to nearly 
4,700 feet. The Russian River begins 
in the mountains north of Ukiah and flows 
south through Healdsburg and turns west 
and flows toward the ocean at Jenner, 
covering a distance of nearly 112 miles. 
The basin is a prime recreational area 
for people from the San Francisco Bay 
Area. Niunerous summer homes line the 
river near Guemeville. 

October storms produced only minor rain- 
fall in the basin. In November, major 
storms brought large amounts of rain. 
Rain early in November had very little 
effect on the river, but an intense reiin 
squall late in the month caused the 
Russian River to rise sharply. Contin- 
ued bursts of heavy rain caused the 
river to rise to about four feet 
over flood stage near Guemeville on 
December 3. Some homes and lowlands 
were flooded near the river. Two addi- 
tional wet periods occurred in December 
and more minor rises took place, but 
these peaiks stayed well below flood 
stages. 



-13- 



5 20 



o 15 



lU UJ 

o UJ 

< u. 

ui eg 5 











PEAK 179 FEET 
f^(26,600 CFS) 


1 ' 1 ^\7 Z FEET 
1 FLOOD STAGE 17 FEET* / 




1 




-'IS 1 FEET 


15 7 FEET-^ WARNING STAGE 15 FEET** \ 












fl 




i^ 




K 










1 








r^ 


v. 


f 


A V 


^A^U^ 


\. / 


j^ 


V 








y^ 


1 \ 


fv 




-^^ 


-s 




































VAN DUZEN RIVER NEAR BRIDGEVILLE 






1 














1 



HUSB 



T 



TTT 



T 



F LOOP STAGE 5 1 0. FEET » 



WARNING STAGE 45 FEET** 



^41 3 FEET 



PEAK 41 8 FEET 
(240,000 CFS) 



f 




O 15 



*— Missing Dota- 



EEL RIVER 
AT SCOTIA 



ik 



■ "■'■III 



ik 



'■■■Ml" 



■■■■III" 



■■■■IIIM 



■■■■lll^ll 



iliinliM^I 



I ■■^■■■l ■■■ il "11 



10 20 

NOVEMBER DECEMBER 
-1970 



10 20 

JANUARY 



10 20 

FEBRUARY 



10 20 

MARCH 



APRIL 



■1971- 



^21 6 FEET 



PEAK 22 FEET 
(234,000 CFS) 



FLOOD STAGE 20 FEET* 



T — r- 

STAGE 17 



1 T 



UJ o 



FEET** 



^'' 



Below Floor 
of Wellhouse 



■■"III" 



Below Goge 



aelow Goge 



I|||^"^||I"^^"|^^I 



Below Goge 



L Below 
Goge 



Below Goge 



EEL RIVER AT FERNBRIDGE 



I ' II I " I " I 



1 1 1' 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 



NOVEMBER DECEMBER 
1970 



10 20 

JANUARY 



10 20 

FEBRUARY 



■0 20 

MARCH 



10 2( 

AP.RIL 



1971 



Figure 8 ■■ HYDROGRAPHS OF VAN DUZEN AND EEL RIVERS 



• F lood stage - Nomeweed Slreomi - Slog* ol -hich s.gn.licant ovKbonhmg occofs 

- Levied Si'eomi - Siogr oi which df sign copaoiy of i«v«e is reoched 

»» WARNING STAGE - Nonle.eeiJ Streomt- Sloge ol wftich miliol oclion moil be tohen 

- Lew«fd Sifeoin* - S'ogc ol which pot'ol o' p'oiect levr«s Becomes mondoiofy 



NO't I Curvti O'e defived liom opefOi'Onol Oo'o 

2 D'schofge t>giires ore m- chonoel Mo* only 
ond do noi include o»e'lond flow 



Ik 



I 



wr^^ 



It T -' 

U. Z S£ 

o - oc 




r 



RUSSIAN RIVER 
NEAR HOPLAND 



PEAK 187 FEET 
(20.000 CFS) 



FLOOD STAGE 21.0 FEET* 

=1= 




It'* 15 



"III" 



" "lull I III il II II I" "I n 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



10 20 

JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



10 20 

MARCH 



APRIL 



-1970- 



-1971- 



PEAK 39 3 FEET 
^(59,800 CFS) 



RUSSIAN RIVER 

NEAR GUERNEVILLE 

(SUMMER HOME) 




i'i""lii"i I"" 



10 20 

NOVEMBER I DECEMBER 
1970 



JANUARY 



10 20 

FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



1971 - 



Figure 9 ■ HYDROGRAPHS OF RUSSIAN RIVER 



* Flood stage - Nomeveed Sirfoms - Sioge ot which sigmdconl owerbonhing occurs 

- Leveed Sireams - Stoge ol which design copociiy of levee <s reoched 

»» WflRWlNG STAGE - Nonieveed Sireoms - Sloge at which imhol ociion mull be lohen 

- Leveed Si'eom* - Sioge ol which ponoi of project ie*ees becomes mondoiory 



NOTE I Curves are denved from operoiional dolo 

2 Oitchorge figures ore in-chonnel flow only 
ond do no) include overlond flow 



15 



New river rises resulted from January 
storms. The highest peak approached 
warning stage near Guerneville and 
quickly receded. No damage was reported. 

This basin was relatively dry from mid- 
January until the first week of March, 
when new storms arrived. Dry soil 
absorbed the runoff and the river only 
peaked at moderate levels and quickly 
receded. 



San Francisco Bay 
Hydrographic Area 

The San Francisco Bay Hydrographic Area 
extends along the Pacific Ocean from 
north of Petaluma to near Gilroy in the 
south and inland to Pittsburg. The 
area includes land around Suisun, San 
Pablo, and San Francisco Bays, and sev- 
ersil small streams that drain either 
into the bays or the ocean. Residents 
of this area must be alert during the 
winter because these small streams 



react quickly to rainstorms. Major 
streams in the area are the Napa River 
in the Napa Valley, and Petaluma River, 
ninning from near Cotati to San Pablo 
Bay. 

Flooding is chiefly loceil; flash floods 
occur on the smaller streams and some 
floods on the two major streams. Run- 
off is generated almost entirely by 
rain since mountain elevations are low 
and very little snow falls. 

Rain showers during October dropped 
little rain; moderate to heavy amounts 
were reported in only one short period. 
Rain began falling again in early Nov- 
ember. In the third week of November, 
a storm front entered the area, stalled 
over the San Francisco Bay area, and, 
on November 27 and 28 dropped 2.8? 
inches of rain at San Francisco. Areas 
of Marin County received more than h 
inches of rain from this storm. Over- 
loaded storm sewers caused streets to 
be flooded; the roof of one building 




San Francisco Examiner photo 



Heavy dovmpour on a San Francisco street. 



■ 16- 



collapsed when its drains could not 
handle the dovmpour. Minor flooding 
was also reported in Alameda, Contra 
Costa, Marin, and San Mateo Counties. 
Heavy winds blew trees and powerlines 
down throughout the area. Water six 
feet deep was reported at some locations 
in Daly City and Burlingame south of 
San Francisco. 

Rain continued through December but no 
further problems occurred. Rainfall 
was relatively light for the rest of 
the water year. 

Napa River Basin 

The largest stream in the San Francisco 
Bay Hydrographic Area is the Napa River. 
It drains the Napa River Valley, a basin 
about 230 square miles in area upstream 
of Napa. The river begins on the slopes 
of Mount St. Helena, flows through the 
Napa Valley, and discharges into San 
Pablo Bay near Vallejo. 

Storms that passed through the Bay Area 
in October and early November had little 
effect on this basin. In late November, 
a major storm series entered and dropped 
heavy amounts of rain. Amounts exceed- 
ing four inches were reported at several 
stations in a 24- hour period, with most 
of the rain occurring in 12 hours. At 
the St. Helena gaging station, the Napa 
River rose about one foot per hour for 
nine hours. However, this peak was 
slightly below flood stage. On December 3, 
heavy amounts of rain fell again and the 
Napa River exceeded flood stage near St. 
Helena gage. High flow in the Napa River 
washed out a bridge on Rutherford Road, 
the only major damage reported. 

During the rest of December and early 
January only light intermittent rain 
fell, causing some minor fluctuations 
on the river. All stages remained 
below danger levels. Storms after mid- 
January also had little effect on the 
river. February and the first week of 
March were extremely dry. In mid-March 
large amounts of rain fell on the basin, 
but peaJcs were well below the danger stage. 



High vfater dajnage in the basin was light, 
but other types of weather caused damage. 
In the early spring, a severe frost 
threatened crops. Actual losses were 
nominal and crops responded quickly to 
warmer weather. During August and early 
September 1971, the basin was subjected 
to an intense heat wave, with tempera- 
tures ranging near 100° for several days. 
Vineyards sustained about 30 percent 
damage . 



Central Valley 
Hydrographic Area 

One of the world's largest and most 
important agricultural regions, the 
Central Valley Hydrographic Area consists 
of all river basins that drain into the 
Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers upstreeim 
of the point at which the Sacramento 
River empties into Suisun Bay at Collins- 
ville. The area is about 5OO miles long 
and 120 miles wide, stretching from Goose 
Lake near the Oregon border to the 
Tehachapi Mountains, and from the Coast 
Range to the Sierra Nevada. Annual rain- 
fall is moderate to light, ranging from 
about 70 inches in the north to less 
than 10 inches in the Bakersfield area. 

Principal streams of the Sacramento River 
Basin are the McCloud, Pit, Feather, Yuba, 
Bear, and American Rivers, which flow 
from the Sierra Nevada, and the Cotton- 
wood, Stony, Cache, and Putah Creeks, 
flowing from the Coast Range. The Sacra- 
mento River runs the length of the Valley 
from Mount Shasta in the north to the 
Delta. In the San Joaquin Basin, the 
San Joaquin River flows north from its 
origin in the Sierra Nevada above Fresno 
to the Delta where it joins the Sacramento 
River near Collinsville. Principal trib- 
utaries of the San Joaquin River are the 
Cosumnes, Mokelumne , Calaveras, Stanis- 
laus, Tuolumne, Merced, Fresno, and Chow- 
chilla RiverSj draining the Sierra Nevada 
on the east side of the San Joaquin 
Valley. No major streams flow out of 
the Coast Range on the west. 



•17- 



q: 2 

Q. UJ 

to -I 

li. UI UJ 

O ^ X 

^ 2 



FP 




nrr 



m 






ig Data 



S I- 

I- < 3 



NAPA RIVER 
NEAR ST HELENA 



_PEAK 14.0 FEET 
(9,700 CFS) 



STAGE no FEET * 



(WARNING STAGE NOT ESTABLISHED) 






O I*' 
? u- 





KJ 



ILLlIiliujjlLLU-kuiilUi. 



lllLLl 



III'' II II 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



10 20 

FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



-1970- 



FLOOD STAGE 250 FEET » 



G STAGE 22,0 FEET *» 



^' 



PEAK 20.1 FEET 
(12,200 CFS) 



N 



NAPA RIVER 
NEAR NAPA 



Z 10 





liiiilii'il'iiiliiiiliiii 



iiiiliiiiliiiiiiiiiliiiiliiiii 



"i'liiiil""lii"l'i iilii' 



liiiilii..li.iil,,i,l 



'iliii il I'i'M ml 



liii'l""! 'I'll 



NOVEMBER 



10 20 

DECEMBER 



10 20 



10 20 

FEBRUARY 



10 20 

MARCH 



10 20 

APRIL 



-1970 



1971 



Figure 10 ; HYDROGRAPHS OF NAPA RIVER 



< FLOOD STAGE - Nonleveed Streofnt - Stage oi which sigmliconr oweibanhing occurs 

' Leveed Si'eamt - Sioge oi wtiich design copociiy of levee is reached 

»» WflRNlNG , ST AGE - Nonleveed S'reoms- Sioge 01 which iniliol ociion musi be token 

- Leweed Sweoms - Sioge ot wfiich powol of proieci levees becomes moidotory 



NOTE I Curves ore derived trom operotionoi dole 

Z Discharge figures ore in- channel flow only 
and do r^ot include overland ftOw 



18 



HOURLY PRECIPITATION STATIONS 

1 MOUNT SHASTA WB CITY 

2 ALTURAS RANGER STATION 

3 VOLLMERS 
A BEIBER 

5. ROUND MOUNTAIN INNE 

6 REDOING 5SSE 

7 VOLTA POWERHOUSE 

8 MINERAL 

9 RED BLUFF WB AP 

10 HAMILTON BRANCH POWERHOUSE 

11 OE SABLA 

12 BUCKS LAKE 

13 PORTOLA 
\A STONY GORGE RESERVOIR 

15 CHICO EXPERIMENT STATION 

16 BRUSH CREEK RANGER STATION 

17 SIERRAVILLE RANGER STATION 

18 OROVILLE RANGER STATION 

19 CAMPTONVILLE RANGER STATION 

20 WILLIAMS 

21 CLEAR LAKE HIGHLANDS 

22 GRASS VALLEY NO 2 

23 BLUE CANYON WB A P " 

24 SODA SPRINGS IE 
Zb BROOKS FARNHAM RANCH 

26 GEORGETOWN RANGER STATION 

27 MOUNT DANAHER 

28 KYBURZ STRAWBERRY 

29 LAKE SOLANO 

30 SACRAMENTO WB CITY 

31 FIOOLETOWN LYNCH RANCH 

32 TIGER CREEK POWERHOUSE 

33 CAMP PARDEE 



— -^-_« e 



t^oosr lip 3 

LAKf • " 




LEGEND 

HOURLY PRECIPrTftTION STATION 

DRAINAGE BASIN BOUNDARY 

LINES OF PERCENT OF NORMAL RAINFALL 

FOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 1970 



i'^^'^tll. 



^'^^^'T.'ik 



Figure 1 1 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY AREA 

PRECIPITATION STATION LOCATION 

AND 
PERCENT OF NORMAL RAINFALL MAP 



19 




Sacramento Bee photo 

Heavy snowfall in the Sierra Nevadas closed schools, blocked roads, 
and stranded vehicles. 



20 



South of the city of Fresno, the Tule, 
Kings, Kaweah, and Kern Rivers flow 
from the Sierra Nevada into the Tulare 
Lake Basin. During high flows on these 
streams, some flood flows drain from 
the Kings River into the San Joaquin 
River by way of the Fresno Slough. 

October storms were light and dropped 
only small amounts of rain in the 
northern Sacramento Valley. Light 
rains fell in early November and later 
that month intense rain began. Heavy 
rains fell at lower elevations, making 
rivers rise rapidly, and snow fell at 
higher levels. Reservoir inflow in- 
creased but releases were kept low. 
The storms continued into December and 
each new storm caused another rise in 
river stages. High stages on the Sac- 
ramento River caused flows in the 
bypasses. 

These heavy rains ceased in mid-December, 
ending a record 15 consecutive days of 
rainfall in Sacramento. Shortly after- 
ward , new storms dumped heavy snows in 
the upper mountain regions; record snow- 
packs were noted throughout the Sierra 
Nevada. By the end of December, a snow- 
pack that represented about 90 percent 
of an average year's water supply had 
collected, giving the water year a 
favorable outlook. 

January rainstorms caused new rises on 
the rivers and the bypasses were flooded 
again. 

After January, the Central Valley 
experienced a drought until March. A 
record 50-day dry spell was registered 
in Red Bluff where only O.lU inches of 
rain fell between January I9 and March 10. 

Storms in the middle of March deposited 
heavy rain at higher elevations, while 
slight rain fell in the valley. Shasta 
and Oroville Reservoirs protected down- 
stream areas from flooding. Both res- 
ervoirs received high inflows, but low 
releases and light rain kept river 
stages low. 



At the end of September a minor storm 
front moved into the area, bringing 
rain to the valley and snow to the 
mountains. A record 13 inches of snow 
was reported at Donner Summit from this 
storm. 

Sacramento River Basin 

Beginning at the base of Mount Shasta 
north of Redding, the Sacramento River 
flows south through the Sacramento Val- 
ley and ends in the Delta below Sacra- 
mento. Shasta Lake, above Redding, 
with a capacity of more than U, 500,000 
acre- feet, is the only flood, control 
reservoir on this river. Inflows to 
the lake from the upper Sacramento, 
McCloud, and Pit Rivers are released 
downstream to the Sacramento River. 
The Sacramento River and its tributaries 
drain about 26,300 square miles in which 
annual rainfall varies from about 70 
inches in the north to about 15 inches 
in the Delta. 

October and early November storms caused 
only small rises on the Sacramento River. 
However, about mid-November a major storm 
series entered the Valley. On the 27th, 
a front stalled for the two days along 
a line extending roughly throxigh Sacra- 
mento and San Francisco. The front was 
accompanied by strong winds, with gusts 
nearing U5 miles per hour in Sacramento. 
Extremely heavy precipitation fell 
throughout the area, causing rapid rises 
on the Sacramento River and overflow 
into the Sutter Bypass. The storm also 
brought record snowpacks to the Sierra 
Nevada. Rivers rose sharply again when 
a new storm series arrived on December h. 
Flood stages were exceeded at several 
points in the northern end of the valley, 
and the town of Tehama was flooded. Con- 
tinuing rain caused excessive runoff 
and, because of high inflows into Shasta 
Lake, releases were increased to 36,000 
cubic feet per second to vacate the flood 
storage reservation. This was the larg- 
est release recorded at Shasta Dam for 
the entire water year. 



■21- 



ui < 

I,. X jS 

o " M 3h 

«-§ 

-^ Z OT 

< — 

o < 4 




PEAK STORAGE 
4,544,700 ACRE -FEET- 
MAY 13, 1971 




SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT BEND BRIDGE 



Mllllli 



' I I II . II 



"I Ml I itlMlimllllll I: I I i I 



liiii^ I lllllll 



10 20 I )0 20 

NOVEMBER DECEMBER 
1970 >l<- 



FE8RUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 1 



Figure 12 : HYDROGRAPHS OF SACRAMENTO RIVER -I 



* Flood stage - Non'r*efd Stffomi- S'age of wfiich sigmficani ovcConiiinq occu'S 

- Leveed S'feomj - Sioge oi wh>ch design copocity of levee 'S feoched 

*» WAflN iNG STAGE - Nonlrveed Slieoms - Sioge 01 which imhol oclion must tie lolien 

- Lfyged Sneomt • S'oge ot ^^^"lC^ po'^oi of pfOjeci ie*ees Oecomet mondotcy 



NOTE I Curves ore derived I'om op«'Oi>onol doto 

2 Discharge figures ofe m- chonnel flow only 
and do not include overland flow 



22 



s 120 



.-? 

UJ o 

Hi z 110 

U. Ui 

2 u. 
- O 

^^ 105 
tn o 



S 65 



o to 
in o 





PEAK I86 FEE 
-^^(109,000 CFS) 


T 


A 


-185 3 FEET 






SACRAMENTO RIVER AT VINA 
(WOODSON BRIDGE) 


183 2 FEET-N^ 


"M "^ 











FLOOD STAGE 183 
WARNING STAGE 18 


D FEET* 1 










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10 20 

NOVEMBER 


10 20 

DECEMBER 


10 20 

JANUARY 


10 20 
FEBRUARY 


10 20 

MARCH 


10 20 

APRIL 




















! 1 

FLOOD STAGE 216 FEET* 




















































/ 






















X" 


4 4 FEET 


PEAK II 
'(97, IOC 


4 6 FEET 
) CFS) 




SACRAMENTO RIVER AT ORD FERRY 














112 9 


FEET^ 

1 


1 A 










i 




1 
WARNING STAGE 110.5 FEET*1* 
















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10 20 

NOVEMBER 


10 20 

DECEMBER 


10 20 

JANUARY 


10 20 

FEBRUARY 


10 20 

MARCH 


10 20 

APRIL 








! ' 
1 














FLOOD STAGE 70 FEET* 














647 


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""{41,80 


55 3 FEET 
CFS) 




















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FEET** 
















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SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT COLUSA 




rinliMf 


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10 20 

NOVEMBER 
< IS 


10 20 

i DECEMBER 
»70 > 


< 


20 

JANUARY 


10 20 

FEBRUARY 

1 


10 20 

MARCH 
971 


10 20 

APRIL 

> 



Figure 13 ^ HYDROGRAPHS OF SACRAMENTO RIVER -2 



* Flood stage - Nomeveed Sireoms - Stoqe at which nQntficont overbonkmg occurs 

- Leveed Streams - Stoge oi whicn design capooiy ol levee is reocried 

i»» WflRNlWG STAGE - Nonieveed Streams - Slage a( which mitial action mud Dc taken 

- Leveed Sireams - Stage ol which patrol o< proiect levees becomes mondoiory 



NOTE I Curves are derived from operational data 

2 Oischorge figures are in-chonnei flow only 
ar>d do no' include overland flow. 



23 



More mountain snowstorms set new records 
for early season snowpacks. At Norden 
near Donner Summit on Interstate 80, a 
100- inch snowpack was recorded on 
December 3, and several mountain roads 
were closed. The storm series ended 
December 8, having brought the total 
snowpack for the period to a level two 
to three times the normal. 

Storms began again on December 13, and 
on December 16 heavy rains and winds 
caused severe damage throughout the 
Valley. Powerlines and trees were 
knocked down and buildings were damaged. 
Heavy snows reached as low as 1,500 
feet and closed roads and schools. New 
records for snowfall were set again at 
Norden. By January 1, 1971, the snow- 
pack in the Sierra Nevada had a water 
content 220 percent of normal for the 
date. This represented 90 percent of 
a normal year's total water supply. 

Light continuing storms caused minor 
fluctuations on the already moderately 
high river. Runoff into reservoirs 
was low, and smaller releases kept 
river stages down. 

On January 12 a fierce cold storm 
brought snow near the 2, 000- foot level 
and closed mountain highways. Inter- 
state Highway 80 over Donner Summit 
was blocked for Uo hours, the longest 
such closure since I96U. On the heels 
of this storm, a warm front moved into 
the Sacramento Valley on January 15, 
and rain pushed the upper Sacramento 
River to flood stage again. High in- 
flows entered Shasta Lake on January I6. 
After peaks had passed downstream, the 
lake was lowered to its required flood 
storage reserve. River stages equalled 
those of the November-December storms 
and flooded the Sutter and Yolo By- 
passes again. Mountain roads were 
closed by mud slides. High winds 
caused damage throughout the valley. 

The snowpack began melting at lower 
elevations, and the runoff held stages 
in the Sacramento River at moderately 
high levels for a short time, causing 



some bank sloughing and endangering 
homes near the town of Tehama. 

During the 50-day period from January I9 
to March 10, only O.38 inches of rain 
fell in Sacramento — the driest com- 
parable period since I877, and only O.II+ 
inches of rain fell in Red Bluff -- the 
driest period for this time of year since 
records began in l872. 

In March, new rains ended this rare 
winter drought. The storms hit at high 
elevations; only light rain fell in the 
valley. Rivers rose slightly while 
resei^oirs controlling the Sacramento 
River and its tributaries had high in- 
flows. Shasta Lake had the peak inflow 
of the season, more than 62,000 cfs. 
Because the rain fell late in the sea- 
son, however, the leike was allowed to 
retain this water. After the storms 
were over, the laice was filled from 
snowmelt runoff and only 16,000 cfs were 
released in April. By mid-May the lake 
was filled to capacity. 

A cool spring slowed snowmelt. Some 
minor local flooding was caused by spring 
showers and snowmelt. In early June, 
a late spring snowstorm followed by a 
brief period of warm temperatures caused 
an unusual snowmelt flood near Alturas 
in the upper Pit River Basin. River 
channel work in Alturas helped pass 
flood flows through town without damage. 
High water threatened the sewage treat- 
ment ponds, which were protected by a 
temporary levee. Flooding on the South 
Fork Pit River near Likely closed High- 
way 395, disrupting traffic between 
Alturas and Susanville for several days. 
Flood waters also backed up on the low- 
lying farmlands south of Alturas, deposit- 
ing silt and debris on crops. 

Throughout the summer the mountains were 
subjected to thunderstorms. One such 
storm caused flash flooding on Willow 
Creek north of Portola in Plumas County. 
High water in the creek polluted the 
city's water supply with mud. Later in 
the summer, another intense thunderstorm 
caused flooding in Susanville. 



-2U- 



Feather River Basin 

A major tributary of the Sacramento 
River, the Feather River was at one 
time a major threat during the high 
water season. It is now controlled by 
OroviULe Dam. This structure is the 
highest earthfill dam in the United 
States and impounds Lake Oroville, 
which has a designated capacity of 
3,538,000 acre-feet. This dam con- 
trols the runoff from a 3>600-square- 
mile basin. 

Rainstorms in the Sacramento Valley 
during the water year had little effect 
on this basin. The small storms of 
October and early November only damp- 
ened it. In late November, cold storms 
deposited snow on the upper regions of 
the basin, slowing runoff into the 
lake. The storm series continued into 
December but raised the lake level 
slowly. The lake was still below flood 
control reservations when the storms 
ended, and releases were small. 

Storms in late November caused several 
mud and rock slides. State Highway 70, 
the major route through the basin, was 
closed by a large rock slide and by 
snow at higher elevations. 

Mid-January storms caused a little 
increased runoff into Lake Oroville. 
At this time, however, the reservoir 
was close to flood reservation, and 
releases from the dam were increased 
to nearly 15,000 cfs for a few days to 
maintain it at the required level. 
Mud and rock slides closed Highway 70 
again for a time. Releases from Lake 
Oroville were reduced to 2,000 cfs 
when the storms passed. 

In March, a major storm brought heavy 
rain to all but the highest elevations 
where some snow fell. Resulting run- 
off was high, and Lake Oroville releases 
were raised to nearly lU,000 cfs to 
maintain the flood reservation. Rain 
continued through the rest of the month 
and inflow to the lake reached more 
than 56,000 cfs at one time. Releases 



were increased again to nearly 25 ,000 
cfs, the highest release of the season. 

Because this storm arrived near the end 
of the winter season, the reservoir was 
allowed to fill from continuing snowmelt 
runoff. It filled for the first time, 
in its history, with a storage of 
3j5535300 acre-feet recorded on June 2, 
1971. 



South Coastal 
Hydrographic Area 

The South Coastal Hydrographic Area 
extends along the Pacific Coast from 
the Tehachapi Mountains to the Mexican 
border a distance of about 200 miles, 
and inland about 75 miles. It is 
comprised of severaJ. river basins that 
drain directly into the ocean. The 
principal river is the Santa Ana River, 
which drains about one-fourth of the 
area. Other major streams are the 
Santa Clara, Los Angeles, San Gabriel, 
Santa Margarita, San Luis Rey, San 
Dieguito, San Diego, and Tia Juana 
Rivers. Smaller streams are the Ventura, 
Sweetwater, and Otay Rivers. 

This area is the most densely populated 
region in California. Its terrain is 
highly vulnerable to land slippage and 
rain- induced mud slides that damage 
homes and other structures in many loca- 
tions. 

Before the water year began, the area 
was subjected to some of the worst brush 
and grass fires in its history. Natural 
vegetation on more than 500,00j acres 
was destroyed, inviting massive mud 
slides when the winter rains hit. Los 
Angeles County was declared a disaster 
area and special legislation enabled 
the Department of Water Resources to 
take remedial measures to prevent flood 
and debris flows from the burned areas. 
The Department of Conservation and the 
Department of Fish and Game were empow- 
ered to take measures to alleviate the 
danger of flooding. The Division of 
Forestry replanted burned areas in the 



•25- 



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**- UJ _j 

1/1 E 

O S 2 



1- 32 



20 



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PEAK STORAGE 1 
3,553,300 ACRE-FEET-^ 
JUNE 2. 1971 1 ^* 






1 
























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y 





































^ 


































LAKE OROVILLE 
(CAPACITY 3,538,000 AF) 






































































^PEAK 56,850 CFS 
1 






























1 






























MEA 


^ DAILY 


jl 
INFLOW-vl 1 

1 1 / 


1 

-PEAK 24,500 CFS 

1 






























//^ 


MEAN DAIL 
^RELEASE TO 


I. 
RIVER 








^ 

II 
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10 20 

NOVEMBER 


10 20 

DECEMBER 


10 20 

JANUARY 


10 20 

FEBRUARY 


10 20 

MARCH 


10 20 

APRIL 




*~ 






















































FLO 


56 STA6E 103.8 FEEH 






































• 




























WAR 


NIN6 SI 


AGE 9J 


FEE 


T*» 
















































































FEATHER RIVER 
NEAR GRIDLEY 




















s. 










,<— T- 


S 


















J^ — - 




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1,1,1, ,11 







1 










10 20 

NOVEMBER 

< IS 


10 20 

DECEMBER 
70 »■ 


10 20 

JANUARY 
< — - -- 


10 20 

FEBRUARY 

1 


10 20 

MARCH 
971 


10 20 

APRIL 

> 



« o 85 



Figure 14 ■■ HYDROGRAPHS OF FEATHER RIVER 



« Flood STaot - NonHveed Slreoms - Sloge 01 «r>.ch signidconl ovefbonKing occo<s 

- Ltveed Sireoms - Stoge ol which design copocity of le««e is reocneO 

*j» WARNING STAGE - Nonleveed Si'tomt - Stoge ot which in>lial odion must be toKen 

- ttvetd Strfomt - Stoge ol which poiroi o( p*oieci ie*eei Decomei monOoicy 



NOTE I Curves ore de'ived I'om opcroT>ona> doio 

2 Discharge figures are m-chonnel flow only 
and do not include overland (low 



26 



hope that new growth would start before 
rains began. 

Storms began about November 25, 1970. 
By November 28 the rain became a tor- 
rential downpour accompanied by winds 
with gusts up to 50 miles per hour. 
Rainfall records were set throughout 
the area. In a 2U-hour period, ^.03 
inches of rain fell at the Los Angeles 
Civic Center, and 7 to 10 inches were 
recorded at higher elevations in Los 
Angeles County. 

Mud slides, particularly in the burned 
areas, closed highways and damaged 
homes. Flooding closed n\iraerous high- 
ways. The storm knocked down power- 
lines, suspending service to about 
130,000 subscribers. Three deaths were 
directly attributable to the storm. 

Storms were light until mid-December. 
On December I9, 1970, rain fell at the 
lower elevations and snow fell in the 
surrounding mountains. Heavy snow 
closed the Golden State Freeway, the 
only major highway between Los Angeles 
and Bakersfield, stranding 1,000 people 
on a 20-mile stretch of road. Two days 
passed before the road was reopened. 

More storms in late December brought rain 
and snow to the northern end of the area. 
Mud slides again occurred and roads were 



closed, but damage was minor. 

January was relatively dry. Los Angeles 
recorded less than 0,5 inch of rain. 

On February 9, 1971, the South Coastal 
Area experienced a devastating earth- 
quaJce centered near the San Fernando 
Valley. Extensive damage occurred as 
far away as southern Los Angeles. Sev- 
eral major structures, including hos- 
pitails, were damaged or destroyed, 
roads were closed, and 65 lives lost. 
The earthquake also severed communica- 
tions and power transmission and inter- 
rupted water service and other public 
facilities. 

Three dams in the San Fernando Valley 
were impaired by the tremors. Pacoima 
Dam, on the Pacoima River in eastern 
San Fernando Valley, was damaged slightly, 
and the two dams in the northern end con- 
taining the Van Norman Lakes — the 
Upper San Fernando Dam and the Lower San 
Fernando Dam — were damaged severely. 
Damage to the Lower San Fernando Dam 
was so extensive that 80,000 valley 
residents were evacuated until the res- 
ervoir had been drained. 

Storms in the South Coastal Area were 
light for the remainder of the water 
year and no flooding occurred. Precipi- 
tation and runoff were below normal. 



■27- 



Figure 15 

FEDERAL STATE COOPERATIVE 



DWR 





FEDERAL-STATE 

RIVER FORECAST CENTER 

JOINT-RIVER FORECAST 

BULLETINS 




28 



STATE-FEDERAL FLOOD OPERATIONS CENTER 



Floods in California were uncontrolled 
until, shortly after the first gold 
miners arrived in l849> when levees 
were built to protect property. As the 
levees went higher, the river stages 
also went higher because the flows were 
constricted to smaller areas; inevitably, 
the owner with the lowest levee was 
flooded. In the early 1900s, a coordi- 
nated effort was started to solve this 
common problem. With federal help, 
levees were built, bypasses constructed, 
and large dams erected to hold back the 
flood waters. The work started then 
has continued to the present and floods 
have been controlled with increasing 
success. 

However, the disastrous floods of Christ- 
mas, 1955 J demonstrated the need for a 
central organization to assemble in one 
location all pertinent flood information, 
such as rainfall, river stages, and res- 
ervoir operation. The organization 
would coordinate forecasts of river 
stages ajid provide information to all 
agencies associated with a flood emer- 
gency. By the end of 1956, the Federal 
Government and the State of California 
had come to agreement and the coopera- 
tive Flood Operations Center was estab- 
lished in Sacramento. 

Storms during the first half of I958 
tested the Center's capability with six 
weeks of flooding and flood fighting. 
The Center functioned extremely well 
during that first test and has become 
more efficient through additional exper- 
ience since that time. The large floods 
of I96U, 1969 and 1970 have been fought 
successfully, with the Center providing 
the nucleus for information, data, and 
assistance. 



The Flood Operations Center consists of 
the National Weather Service and River 
Forecast Center as the federal agencies, 
and the Flood Forecasting and Operations 
Branch of the Department of Water Re- 
sources as the state agency. Its fxinc- 
tion is to provide all necessary liai- 
son in a developing flood situation. 



m^^-' 




^;'^ I 




iiiii 



^.m A 




DWR Photo No. 4o85- 
River stage and rain gages throughout 
the State are interrogated by radio to 
obtain current storm data. Map shows 
gage locations. 



-29- 



The Sacramento Weather Office of the 
National Weather Service, adjoining 
the Center, is equipped to receive 
weather data by teletype messages, fac- 
simile weather forecast maps, and sat- 
ellite pictures. Radar having a l80- 
mile range is operated continuously 
during storm periods. This facility 
plus other radar facilities gives fore- 
casters an up-to-the-minute view of 
storm location and intensity. 

The Flood Operations Center contains 
a data collection facility that uses 
several radio and telephone systems 
to collect real-time data on river 
stages and rainfall. One radio system 
monitors the American and Cosumnes 
River Basins, obtaining data on rain- 
faUL, temperature, and water content 
of the snow; a second system collects 
rainfall and river stage data in the 



Central Valley from Redding to Fresno; 
and a third system automatically moni- 
tors the North Coastal Area from Oregon 
to Napa, collecting river stage and 
rainfall data. This North Coast system 
is also equipped with a readout facility 
in the Eureka office of the National 
Weather Service that provides the latest 
data for local operations and acts as 
a back-up in case the Flood Center's 
facility malfunctions. Data is also 
collected on river stages ajid rainfall 
by telephone throughout the State. 

Information is obtained from all prin- 
cipal reservoirs in the State on amount 
of inflow, amount of storage, stage of 
the reservoir, and present and planned 
downstresun releases. All these data 
are compiled daily; during periods of 
flooding or potential flooding, they 
are collected hourly around the clock. 




"S •'- 






•Iv 






«5».» 








/'. 



I 




DWR Photo No. ^085-3 



Weather and river forecasters review radar overlays depicting a storm 
situation to check the extent of rainfall. 



-30- 



Reservoir releases are under the juris- 
diction of reservoir owners and the 
Center cannot direct changes. However, 
the Center is a source of information 
on river conditions that assist res- 
ervoir operators in regulating reser- 
voir operation. 



The Flood Operations Center is on alert 
status from the middle of October to 
the middle of May. Men from the Center 
are assigned on a rotating basis to 
keep continuous watch on the weather 
and rivers. 




DWR Photo No. U085-2 



River forecasters assemble storm and river data to forecast expected 
river stages. 



•31- 



All data collected by the National 
Weather Service and the Flood Opera- 
tions Center are used to make a joint 
forecast of the expected river stages 
at several points along a river. Fore- 
casts are updated as conditions change 
until the danger has passed. After 
the forecast is prepared, it is issued 
to the responsible agencies and to the 
public. Forecasts are disseminated by 
teletype, radio, telephone, television, 
and newspaper. 

As a flood situation develops, the 
Center is manned 24 hours a day. Mem- 
bers of the Department's levee main- 
tenance inspection team maintain 
liaison with the recleunation and levee 
districts. Additional help is provided 
by specially trained personnel who are 



assigned from other offices of the 
Department of Water Resources. Liaison 
personnel from the Corps of Engineers 
and the Bureau of Reclamation move into 
the Center to keep their offices fully 
informed. Other Department personnel 
are dispatched to the flooded areas. 

In a flood emergency, all operations 
are coordinated through the Flood Opera- 
tions Center. The Center is equipped 
to communicate by radio with mobile 
units at the flood sites. All calls 
for men, material, and equipment are 
ordered through the Center. When more 
men are needed on the levees, the Center 
calls for specially trained inmates of 
the Division of Forestry Conservation 
Camps. After the floods have i)assed, 
the Center returns to normal routine. 




When forecasts 
are complete, 
Flood Operations 
personnel inform 
other agencies 
that will be 
affected by high 
water. 



DWR Photo No. I+085-I 



-32- 





r-50 










-45 \^ 








FS - 


-40 

35 \v 














LEGEND 




\^ 


-195 


pf-^<-.. Iff/1 M .^in 


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JANUARY 24, 19 
DECEMBER 22, 


in 






964 






30 


>S. 


-190-^^^ 




•125 












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DECEMBER 21. 1961 _ 






- 
















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-25 




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=go 


■75 


crooMABv la ta'.a 














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FS- 




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FS ! Flood Sioge 
WS = Worning Sloge 








-30 


WS- 


-leo 


^**^ 


■"^ ^^=!:~^'''^' 


-70 


















^~*^— -.^^^^ 






-15 




-175 


WS- 


-110 ""^^^ 


ssi^ >«\ 


r55 




BEND BRIDGE 










^"^N^ ^-^^ 






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WS- 


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p45 


-45 




u -. ;es 0' 




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Cof C 




■170 "^^ - 




-105 


-60 ^^1 "^^ -^^ ^^' 












VINA BRIDGE 






ws- 


;>v._^~^=== 


^o^'^: 


FS- 
-40 __ 


:40 






O.K 




- 
















Co«t 




Lloo ■ — - - -^ 


-55 


-« ^^ 














ORD FERRY 







'"-■ — ...,,____^ 












DATUM 


■ . , _ 




-35 


-35 


"A 


■^ 


-35 






= 0" 


^ V 


WS- 




\ \ 


A\ 








C o< E 


L50 


L40^ 








\ ^^ 








COLUSA WILXINS SLOUGM 








FS- 








DATUM DATUM 


-30 


-30 


-30 




-30 






0=0' = 
















C atE c e« e 


















-25 


-25 


-25 


WS - 


-25 






KNIGHTS LANDING^ 














OitUM 


\ 












0=0 


^. 












c 61 e 


L20 


-20 




-20 






FREMONT WEIR 












DATUM 












0-0* 












c o( e 


^15 




-15 






VERONA 










DATuy 










Figure 16 cVe 




-10 






SACRAMENTO RIVER 










HISTORICAL CREST PROFILE 


SAC RAM 


-5 

ENTO 








1 



33 



Figure 17 
PERIOD OF RECORD OF OVERFLOW OF THE MOULTON WEIR 



Se^iSON OF 


"- 











, „■::■,. „ 




REMARKS 


1934-35 






,'^ 


' ■ • 






1935-36 








1936-37 




■1 






■ II 

i^^ ■ ■■■■ 








1937-36 


■ 




1938-39* 


; 


' ! 1 , . 1 




1939-40 


I 


_«_■ ■ 


■' ^ ^ 






1940-41 


^K 


■n 1 1 ^^ ■■■■ 






1941-42 




Record S'age '- 83 9' 2/7/42 


1942-43 


! - -+ 


■ 1 






■ 


1943-44* 




l944-45-« 














1945-46 




1_ - ««■ 


■• 










1946-47 i. 


■ 
















i947-4e» 


1 . 






1949-49 


■! 1 1 1 


- - ■ - 






1949-50 






1950-51 


i > . > < 


j . 








1951-52 


1 


...^ . ^ 


■• 1 ■ 






1952-53 




^^^H 


, , . . , 








1353-54 




■ 


■ * » 








l954-551f 




■ J - i- 






1955-56 






1956-57 




• : ■ 1 






1957-58 


; 








1956-59 


' ; 1 






1959-60 


1- 




■ 






1960-61 


1 


■ - ■ . 1 






1961-62 


' ' 






1962-63 


i ' 


i 1 ' 






1963-64* 


' 


- 


196 4-65 


j '1 ^ 






1965-66 


I 




: 




1966-67 


i ■ ■ 


1 




1967-66 


I : 


- .^ 


^ 




1966-69 




' 


^IH B 




1969-70 




-._ 






1970-71 




■ 




1971 -72 


, . 1 . . . - 




1972-73 






1973 -74 




. L— 


■ 




1974-75 




' 




1975-76 






1976-77 






1977-76 


' ! ' 





1 


ss 


1978-79 


' : 1 




< < 


19 79-80 


' j ' i ' 


n n 


1960-81 






1981 -82 


, ' I 


1 




^N 


982-93 


i 


. 





i i 


<< 1 


1983-84 




- 


1984-85 


1 




1- fcO 


1985-86 


1 







(S X 


1986-87 


1 










i "E 


1987-88 


1 




i>. 


1988-89 










1989-90 










1990-91 


' i 


i \ 








^7 


1991 -92 








z a: 


1992-93 




. 1 














1993-94 




4— t- 




' OfOtf" " 


'—■•••'" 




' :.:::. " 


• .'...:.:; '• 


_..t» 


...„ 


— 


t» 



Oolo compiled from reco'ds of O.W.R. si 
Storton "Sacram«nlo River oi Moulton Weii 

Ootum" O^O'U.S.E.O. 

P«fto4 of racord' 1935 lo present 

Crest elevation = 76 75 teet 



LEGEND 

Dtsignotei periods at tlow a»«' wci' 

Designates season ot no fiov 



STATE. Of CALifORNifl 

7ME RESOURCES AGENCY ■ 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 



3U 







Figure 18 
PERIOD OF RECORD OF OVERFLOW OF THE COLUSA WEIR 






SEASON OF 


, ■, •:•■: „ 


,-■„-•;;., 








..„. 


.... 


... 


REMARKS 




1934-35 




---— r 


-'!■:;. 


■ ■ 




". . + "■•■»-- . 






1935-36 


; i 


HIB 


^i^ 


■ ^ ■ 








1936-37 


— --■ 


IM 






■ • 




m 







.937-38 










1936-39 









— . 


!■■ 








1959-40 
1940-41 


^^^■B .■ 


Recof3 Stoqe = 70 6' 3/1/40 


- 


1941-42 
1942-45 


■ 


1 


1 


--Pi^ 


■ tmmt 






- 


1945-44 






1944-43 




' 


^^^ 


■'.. . . 










1945-46 




1946-47 






I 


. • 


■ 


m 1 1 


^. . 




1947-48 




1949-49 


. i . 
1 




1 ■ ■ 









1949-50 


■ 






1950-51 




■ ■^ 1 . 


^^^B 


1 M 








1951-52 


m ^ ■■MHHB 








1952-53 






■ ■ ■ ■ 




■ 


"■' ' 






1353-54 


1 




1954-55 


: - 1 . 


1 -^ ■ 


- ■ 


•----■ 




1955-56 




1956-57 


: ! 






■ 




1957-58 




1958-59 






■I • a^m\ 

:• - ' • ! ' 






1959-60 




1960-61 


■ 


1^ 




■ ■ 1 1 






1961-62 


IMl 1 ■ 


. 






1962-65 


■ 




■ 




■ 


.PP— - 




1963-64 






;9t 4-65 


^ 




; _ 1 


■--■- 




1965-66 




a ■ 




1966-67 


1 












■ 


■ m 


1967-68 


■ ^^ 








1968-69 




. ^ 






1 - - - 






1969-70 












1970-71 




" 


^gi^^g^ 


^' 


. 1 . . , 




1971-72 






1972-73 


: 1 ' ' 1 
i ' ' ■ i i 








973-74 




1974-75 


I : ! : ■ ! 






1975-76 




1976-77 




1 i 

i 1 ! 1 






1977-78 


j 1 


1 ,. .-. 




O O 


19 78-79 




: 1 








< < 


1979-80 




S-if 


1980-61 


j - ' ! ■ 1 1 




o o 


1981-82 




982-83 




f'_ 


■ ! 






1 ^ 


1963-94 


u < 


1964-85 


i 

! ■ 










1965-86 




<D I 


1986-87 


i ; 


I 






1 a 


1987-88 




^ > 


1988-89 


i :- 

i 




1 1 




1989-90 


1 






1990-91 


! . 

i 












^^ 


1991 -92 


> < 

z ir 


1992-93 
















Hi 


1993-94 


' ^ 


1 


... l_l 




' .:=.:.'.:" 


' ^;.,1,", " 




' ,'.-'.1° " 


' ," «'.i,t " 


' \ii v " 


' '"..^ ^'° '* 


, .=_.,.., 


ii 






NOTE 




LEGEND 






slotion "Socf 
Oofumi = 0' 
Period of roc 
Crett •{•votio 


monlo River at 
J.S.E.O. 
Drd^ 1935 to pr 
n= 61 80 teet 


Colusa Wcir " 












» Designaiei saoJO" ot no flow 
STfiTt CP CALfFORNlfl 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY 
DEPARTMENT CF WATER RESOURCE 


s 



35 



Figure 19 
PERIOD OF RECORD OF OVERFLOW OF THE TISDALE WEIR 



SEASON OF 


..o... 










..„. 


, .,'"•„ „ 


..,-,■•,.,. 


REMARKS 


1934-35 






■^ 1^ 




■ 




1935-36 




■ 






1936-37 




- . j . 4 ■ 


■ ■ 


^■^H 


■■■i ^BB 






.937-38 










1938-39 




1 . . : ■ : i 




1939-40 


Record sioqe - 53 3' 3/1/40 


1940-41 


■ - 








^^B^_ 




1941-42 


1 


■ 














1942-43 




■ I 

i 






■ 




1943-44 


. ' " 




- 


1 ■ 


1944-45 


■ ■ ■ 


■■■ 


1 








1945-46 




1946-47 




1 - 


■ 


■ 








1947-46 


■ 






^^^^H 


1948-49 


1 i - ' ■ ■"" 








1949-50 




1950-51 












195; -52 




1952-53 

1353-54 




^ 




■ - 


1954-55 




■ ' ■■ 1 i 








1955-56 


1 






1956-57 


1 


] 


^^B^ 




■ 




1957-56 


tu 


■ ^ ■■ 






1958-59 












1959-60 








1960-61 




■ 


^^^ ^ 








1961-62 




1962-63 


■ 


i 


■ 






1963-64 




1964-65 












■ ttm ; 




1965-66 




^ ■ 








1966-67 




■ 1^"^ 


iB^H^ 






■ ■ 




1967-68 




.i-i-i-= 




1968-69 




I ^mt 








1969-70 










1970-71 




■ 




■ 






1971 -72 


! 






1972-73 




' 


1 
i 




973-74 


1 


- 






1974- 75 








1 




1975-76 






1976-77 




1 1 ■ < 






1977-78 


oS 


1978-79 




j 




1 

1 ■ - ■ ■ 


< < 


19 79-80 


UJ U 


1980-81 




1 1 : ' 








1991-82 


' 




- - 


9B2-83 


i . ! 


! ! ■ ■ 






s s 


1983-84 


UJ < 


984-85 


1 ■ : 


i 1 ■ ■ ■ 






K tn 


1985-86 


at X 


1986-87 






' 1 ■ ■ ■ 






T °^ 


1987-89 


^; 


1988-89 




' 








1969-90 






UJ , 


1990-91 




1 










'~' ^ 


1991 -92 






>- < 

Z EC 


1992-93 










- 






f < 


1993-94 


. 4-4- 




— •■• 


•-'.:;." 


• :,. ;•-.'.'.■• 


• ■;.-;.'.': " 


"•■■■"••■'" 


..... 


...„ 


... 


♦ ♦ 



NOTE- 

Oala compiled from records of D.W.R. sireom gogii 

station "Sacrotnenlo River at Tisdole Weir" 

Darum< = 0'u.S.E.D 

Period of record' 1935 to present 

Crest elevolion= 4545 feel 



le:gend 

Oeiignoiej periods of flow over weir 
Oeslgoates season of no Cow 



STATE OF CflLtroHNIA 

THE RESOURCES aOENCY 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 



36 



Figure 20 

PERIOD OF RECORD OF OVERFLOW OF THE FREMONT WEIR 






SEASON OF 


....... 






r^ 





, .:"■„.. 




REMARKS 


- 


1934-35 








.■, . . 


■- 




■ 




1935-36 














1936-37 





-■- ■ -^ 


. ^_^-. ^1 


■ ■ MH^ 


.■■ 


r^•J** ..— • '!» -, 




1937-38 










1936-39 « 






_. i . . 






1939-40 




"■i •■■■ 




1940-41 




- ■ - --^-'—7! 


■ ^BMn 


^iHH 


■■■■ 






1941-42 


^■■la 




^■■■B 




1942-43 




-^ -.-I- ■ . .^^ 


.^^-•_, 








} 


1943-44 » 




t944-45 








■■ . . . 


- - - 


- ■ ■ ■ 






1945-46 


■■^^^ 




(946-47 « 










■■-- -- 








I947-4B 




■■■ 




1948-49 




.... ^ .... 1 . .■■.., 


--■f--^ 


; 




1949-50 


1 




1950-51 




■■ 




■^ "^^^ 


■ Hi 1 








1951 -52 


■ 






iBHHP 




1952-53 


.1 




L — 


■ .■ - ■ 


--.•-- 






1953-54 


■ 




1954-55 « 




1 ■ ^' " " 






Reccro Sioqe : 397 ' i2/23/55 


' 


'956-57 


1 . - ■ ; ■ 

( ; 


W^^M 




■ 




1957-58 








1958-59 


i - ' - 

1 : 


! ^ ^ 


• 








1959-60 




1960-61 • 


i 


^^ 








1961-62 




1962-63 


........... 1 


^^^m 


-■^ 






1965-64 * 








i9t 4-65 
1965-66 « 


i 


" 


' 




' 


1966-67 




■^^^ 


^ 






1967-68 
1968-69 







1 ._j_ ^ 




z z 



< % 

a. a. 


z z 


1969-70 
• 970-71 




.___-_S 








1971-72 


i ■ ] ; I 1 ■ ■ " 




1972-73 










1973-74 




1974-75 


i j . 1 








1975-76 




1976-77 


j 1 1 j j 








1977-78 






1978-79 


■ 1 r " • 


i •• ■ 




19 79-80 




1980-81 


1 ' I 








1981-82 


j ' 


i 




1992-83 


j . . : 












:! ta I 

1 St „ 

~ CD = 

; i 

c > < 
- z a 

I— i—i 


1983-84 


1 




(984-85 


1 : 


' 










1985-86 










1986-87 


■ i - ■ - ; 


■ I 










1987-89 


■ i 




1988-89 


r 




1 






1989-90 








1990-91 


! 




! 


- ■ - ■ ■ 






1991 -92 






1 






1992-93 


' 












^-: -■ 






1993-94 












* ^;u'.°." 


' ^t-it-M-" 


' :„:.::." 


• ■;.,•.:'■; " 


' ," ,'." " 


' ■'.::" " 


' '°*-»i" " 


' " J'.'° " 


♦ tt 






NOTE ■■ 


LEGEND 












slotion "Socr 
00tum> = 0' 
Period of r«C 
Crest elevatio 


imento Rivar 01 

J.S.E.O. 

Ofd- i934 to pr 

n= 33.50 feet 


Fremont Weir, W 
Bsenl 


(St End" 










*. Designates seosoo o' no fio« 

STiTE or CALIFORNIA 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCE 


s 



37 



Figure 21 
PERIOD OF RECORD OF OVERFLOW OF THE SACRAMENTO WEIR 



SEASON OF 


. r:: „ 


, t::".: ., 


, r.' .v,?„ 






..... 




... 


REMARK? 


1934-35 * 


. .... 














i 


fnifg Ju^t lOt^ 




1935-36 


■■ 


— . 


1936-37 • 






1 
- -^»^-' t- ■ ■ ^ - 












1937-38 


i^a^m 


^ 




■ 


1938-39 • 




1 ; 

■ ■ ■ - 1 ■ - -- ; 


■ 


1 






1939-40 


^^m 


^^ 




1940-41 


i ■ ' 


I 














l94r-42 


■ 


^IMH 








1942-43 


. .... 








- --■ 








1943-44 , 






' ■ 


1944-45 


1 
1 


■ 












1945-46 . 






1946-47 * 


1 . 




- 












1947-48 t' 


! 


1 


1 






1949-49 * 






1 










r949-50 • 












1950-51 






.- . 








J95I -52 • 






t952-53 . 


■ ■ 1 ! 












13 53-54 * 






1954-55 • 


;- -L i 


: 












1955-56 




mi 


- 1 


1 1 




' II 


1956-57 . 




1 














t 


1957-58 . 


' 


I 




1958-59 • 












1959-60 . 


-■" : 






1960-61 * 
















1961-62 , 


; i 




1962-63 




\ . 

1 ■ ■ 








1963-64 . 


i 




f 




1964-65 


1 1 Ji 










1965-66 . 




; 


' 


1966-67 . 




1 








1967-68 . 






.968-69 


mid 






1969-70 






■ 










1970-71 - 




1 




i 


■ - 






1971 -72 


- 1 1 




1972-73 


' 


1 








1973-74 












1974- 75 












1975-76 




' 




1976-77 


! 1 










1977-78 













z o 


19 78-79 












^ir« 


19 79-90 




i 


iiU;; 


1960-61 


1 








i O u, O 
O 0- 


1981-92 


1 . 1 . . . 


' ^' 


i98?-83 


• 


1 ' ■ ■ 




,5:1 


(983-84 


s"<; 


1984-85 


■ !' 








^►^ s„ 


1985-86 








1986-87 










O u O — 

{r -a "■ (r 


1987-88 


t^^'i 


1988-89 


1 


1 - 








tzt' 


1989-90 




1990-91 


: \ 










(t o <i ^ 


1991 -92 












ii-i 


1992-93 












— 




: 




?I^SS 


1993-94 






' 1 1 . 1 




:,.;.;:" 


* -!!..-■"• " 




^ .-'.t^ '* 




.1^ " 


.^•C" 


' ■°.;:„" " 


, ...,_..„ 


♦ ♦♦t 



Oola compiled from records o' D.W.R, ttreom qoglng 
station "SocromenTo Weir Spin to Yolo Bypass, near Socfomento 

Doium> = 0'U.S.E,D. 
Period of record' 1926 to present 
Crest elevclion= 24 75 leet 
Etevotion o' 'op of gales = 31 feet 



Detignotes pefiods of flow over we 
ond 'oioi riumbe' Of gales opened 
Designates season of no float 



STATE OP CALIFORNIA 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY 

DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES 



38 





Figure 22 
PERIOD OF RECORD OF INUNDATION OF THE YOLO BYPASS 






SEASON OF 


; ___ : ^_^ ' 1 


Max-STAGE AT LISBON GAGE 
0UBIN6 PERIOD Of INUNDATION 




1914-15 


i 




_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


— , 




_- 


_ 


— 






^+|i : 




_ 


1 


_ 


-_ 





14 r 


1916-17 


- 




- 


- 


- 


— 




- 


- 




- 




- 


- 








— 


J 


* 




- 




= 








!• 


- 


F 




- 


- 




— 




1 






- 


- 


- 


— 


14,8' 


1917-18 • 














































[ 


































i 






1918-19 






















































"^ 


























1 




1 


I5.7' 


1919-20 • 






















































M 


























1 








1920-21 






















m 


1 












■ 








■ 










444 






■ 




















! 1 






15 0', 130', IS.l' 


1921-22 






















































iM 










1 


















1 ' 


12.5' 


1922-23 
































■ 
































; 1 


















1 1 


12.1' 


1923-24 • 








































j 


















■■'1 ! 1 1 




















1924-25 


















































^H 




■ ! ! : ' 






1 
i 






] ■ 1 ■ 


17.0' 


1925-26 • 


















































1 1 ! 1 


1 1 ! 1 


1 : ! 




1 ; : 1 ! 




1926-27 


























■ 


■ 




















'^MMM 


^ 




i 


44b ' 


1 1 I 1 




14.3'. 20.0', 14.8' 


l927-2e 








































1 










! 




1 






1 


' ; M 




13.6'. 21.4' 






^ 


■ 


HWW 


1928-29 « 






































j 












1 ! i 










1 i 






t929-30 






























m 


■ 




1 1 




1 




' 1 i 


' ■■■ ! 




i ; 


15.2; 13 5' 


1930-31 • 






























1 


; 


] ! 






i I 1 ; 




: ! 1 ; 


■ ! i ; ! 


; 1 i 




1931-32 


































■ 


^ 1 




1 


! i ! ! 




! ■ ■ ■ ; 


13 8' 


1932-33 • 




































■ ' ! i i 


I i L 


-- 


M ' ; 


i ; ■ ; 






l933-34» 










































'■ ' '■ i 






1934-35 




































; : : i : 


I ' " .' 








175 
















IM-' 


BMMII^H 


1935-36 






































^■H 


mm 






16.6', 19 3' 


1936-57 


4 


-J 


_ 


_J 


_ 


_ 






_ 




_ 


_, 


_ 


h- 






^-i — 


^-i^M-^ 


_^^^_. 


. -. . ^^ . . _ ^__^ 


,..,....,,., ^ 


12 5', 15 1' 


'938-39 • 


~i — 


— 


- 


- 


— 




— 


- 




- 




- 


— 


- 


1 1 




iH' ■ 


■ 












^^ 






' - - 




1939-40 


























'.:','. 


: 1 


HI 


■ 




■ 


■■■IB 




15 3', ISO', 13 7', 22 5', 20 6 


1940-41 


! 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 




- 




_ 


; 1 1 ^ 
i ! 1 ^ 






"•^mm^ 




20 2', 18 6' 


1942-43 


- 


H 


- 


- 


- 


— 




- 


- 




- 




- 






J 




— 




^ 


— — , 


^""" 





20 1', 17.6' 


I943-44* 






































- 
















z 


1944-45 










































! 


*f^' 


; ■ ! 






16.8' 


1945-46 


































1 


■ 




" 


1 




i : 1 ■ 


■ " ■ ; 




, 


18 5' 


1946-47 • 








































T 




-- ., -. . ._ 
i ■ ■ 




' 




_ 


' 


- 








1947-48 
1948-49 


- 




- 


- 


- 


— 


h 


- 


- 




- 




- 










- 


-1- 


1 I I 
1 i 










12.9' 


(949-50 

1950-51 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 




i 






-1 






4" 


-1- 

4j 




— ] — , — 


■ . Magia^ 


i ■ — 


i : \ 


1 . 
: . : M 

'•■ — i — : — 


15.6' 

20 2', 18 0', 16,0', 144' 




1952-53 
1953-54 


- 




- 


- 


~ 


- 




- 


- 


~ 


I 




- 


J 






H 


- 


^ 






'■*' ^ 




^1 : i 


12 3', 18.4' 
15.4', 13 2' 





I954-55* 








































! i M 


M j ; ! 






! 


1 




1955-56 




































■ 




-^ 




■^< '^'F 


■■■ 






'ill 


1 •; 


234', 176' 


.1956-57 


, 










_ 













- 


, 




_ 


, , 













J^ 


■ — 1— i— 




■ 1 i— j— u 


s 










I ' ■ : 


15 2' 


1958-59 


- 




- 


- 


- 


_ 




- 


- 




- 


r 


_ 










- 


- 


-i 


- 


- 








^ 


■i i 




-V 


^ 


! ' 


1 






16 8' 


1959-60 


















































^ 


■i 


' 1 




1 




1 






178' 


1960-61 • 
























































I 
















i 1 




! 


,..! . 




1961-62 
























































m 


















j 1 


1 


1 


13 5' 


1962-63 




. 


■ 


■ 






































■ 


mm 


4 














■ 


■ 


i^ 


^B 


4J 1 


205'. 22 6', 18 0' , 


1963-64 • 


1 










































n 
























M 


1 


;'! 






T? 


1964-65 
































^ 


■ 










■ 1 
























1 m 












247", 12 5' 12, 


I965-66* 


i 




















































































■ "f J| 


3 


1966-67 




























■ 




■ 
















■ ■ 


^ 












■ 




1 




^ 




■ 


■ 


■ 






- 




i5.5',206', I4 0; II 9^ 128' 


-5« J 


(967-68 


















































• 






I 


■ 




■ 




























I2,0; 14,5" 


„3' ■ 


(968-69 


_. 




_ 


_: 


— 







_. 


^ 


, 


_ 




_ 


^- 








_ 




— 


- 


■ 


■ 




.- 


■ 




■ 


■ 








1^ 


__ 


_ 


„ 










_ 


,„. 




._ 





._l_ 


.•• 7' 


.970-71 


- 




- 


- 


- 


— 




- 


- 




^ 






B 








— 


■ 


- 




H 




■ 




- 




- 


H 








" 




- 


1 




- 




- 


- 






- 


- 


- 


- 


15.6'. 15 i', il-S' a 


J r ? £ J 

I X ^, " 


1971 - 72 
































































































1972-73 






























































































4 


1973-74 










































































































'■'.::,■:" "°.;:,r" ••°::."" 


illl 




NOTE 




LEGEND 






stotion "VDio 1 
Dotum O^US 
Period of Hec 
Assumed wtt 
ihe Lisbon go 


iyp 
E 

>rd 
10 

g« 


OS 




s r 


91 


wo 
oil 
4 

By 


r 
m 



pa 


.is 

Pre 
ss 


)0 

se 

01 


nt 

s 


lo 


}' 


Ob 


OV 


c 


1 t 


' 


n 










































• 




D 


D 
EP 


esi 


inotes seoson Byposs not inu 

THE RESOUtCES AGENCr 
TMENT or WATER RES 


ndo 
OUR 


ed 
CE 





39 



PE4K FLOWS AND STAGES 
IPRELIMINARY DATA-SUBJECT TO REVISION! 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



DATE 



STAGE 
irj FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



i J70-1971 
HATER YEAR 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



SMITH RIVER BASIN 



SMITH RIVER 
NEAR CRESCENT CITY 



SHASTA RIVER 
NEAR YREKA 



NORTH CUASTAL AREA 



609 1931- USGS 
KLAMATH RIVER BASIN 



1933-Al 
793 19','.- USGS 



12-22-6A ".a. 5 



12-22-6'i 
12-22-6'! 



228.000 



12.9 21.500 
13.9(A) - - 



1-16-71 36.58 



128.000 



UASO 



SCOTT RIVER 
NEAR FORT JONES 



KLAMATH RIVER 
NEAR SEIAD VALLEY 



SALMON RIVER 
AT SOMESBAR 



KLAMATH RIVER 
AT ORLEANS 



653 I9'.l- 



751 



8'.75 1927- 



1912-25 






1951- 


USGS 


12-23-6', 


1911-15 






1927- 


USGS 


12-22-6', 



TRINITY RIVER ABOVE COFFEE 
CREEK NEAR TRINITY CENTER 1'.9 



1957- USGS 



12-22-64 
12-22-6'. 



TRINTIY RIVER 
AT LEWISTON 



NORTH FORK TRINITY 
RIVER AT HELENA 



TRINITY RIVER 
NEAR BURNT RANCH 



HAYFORK CREEK 
NEAR HYAMPOH 



WILLOW CREEK 
NEAR WILLOW CREEK 



TRINITY RIVER 
AT HOOPA 



KLAMATH RIVER 
NEAR KLAMATH 



728 1911- USGS 



1911-13 
1957- 



1931-'.0 
1956- 



USGS-OWR 12-22-6'. 



41 



1953- USGS 



1959- 



1911-14 
2865 1916-18 
1931- 

1910-26 
12100 1950- 



REDWOCO CREEK BASIN 



REDWOOD CREEK 
AT ORICK 



LITTLE RIVER 
AT CRANNEL 



278 
LITTLE RIVER BASIN 



1911-13 
1953- 



'.4 



MAD RIVER BASIN 



1955- 



MAD RIVER 
NEAR FOREST GLEN 



143 1953- 



MAD RIVER 
NEAR ARCATA 



485 
EEL RIVER BASIN 



1910-13 
195D- 



EEL RIVER BELOW SCOTT DAM 
NEAR POTTER VALLEY 



EEL RIVER AT VAN ARSDALE 
DAM NEAR POTTER VALLEY 



290 1922- 



349 1909- 



OUTLET CREEK 
NEAR LONGVALE 



BLACK BUTT6 RIVER 
NEAR COVELO 



162 1951- 



Legend to Table 5 appearo on pe^e 51, 



USGS 



USGS 1- 4-66 
1-17-53 



2 5. 3 (AC) 54,600 

33.8(A) 165,000 

46.6(A) 133,000 

76.5(AC) 307,000 



12.3 20.800 
13.4(A) - - 



12-22-55 27.3(AC) 71.600 



1966- USGS 



27.9(A) 35,800 

43.2(A) 172,000 

19.1 26.800 

20.6(A) 17,000 

40.3(AC) 231.000 



1-10-71 17.63 



1-18-71 18.50 



1-18-71 23.23 



1-17-71 



1-16-71 15. aO 



1-18-71 37.42 



12-23-64 55.3(A) 557,000 1-18-71 36.4 



12-22-64 24.Q(A) 50,500 11-24-70 18.70 



11.1 6,300 
15.7(A) - - 



11-24-70 11.46 



USGS 12-22-55 24.5(A) 39.200 
USGS 12-22-55 29.8 77,800 



12-22-64 
12-22-64 
12-22-54 



12-22-64 
12-11-37 



24.2(A) 56,300 



33.9(A) 64,100 



30.6(A) 77,900 



26.4(A) 29,000 
3o.2(AC) - - 



1-16-71 11.52 



1-16-71 17.15 



1-16-71 16.49 



1-16-71 21.12 



12 -3-70 19.79 



46,700 



190.000 



11.500 
25.000 
18,200 
2,410 
79,000 



30,500 



8,830 • 



10.600 



17.400 

22.400 

16.400 

7,530 



40 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SQ MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



DATE 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1970-1971 
WATER YEAR 



DATE 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



NORTH COASTAL AREA (CONTINUED) 



EEL RIVER BASIN 
(CONTINUED) 



NORTH FORK EEL RIVER 
NEAR MINA 



EEL RIVER 
AT FORT SEWARD 



SOUTH FORK EEL RIVER 
NEAR BRANSCOMB 



TENMILE CREEK NEAR 
LAYTONVILLE 



SOUTH FORK EEL RIVER 
NEAR MIRANDA 



1953- USGS 



BULL CREEK 
NEAR HEOTT 



EEL RIVER 
AT SCOTIA 



VAN OUZEN RIVER 
NEAR BRIDGEVILLE 



2107 


1955- 


USGS 


<>4 


19'.6- 


USGS 


50 


1957- 


USGS 


537 


1939- 


USGS 


28 


1960- 


USGS 


3113 


1910- 


USGS 



222 1950- 
MATTOLE RIVER BASIN 



MATTOLE RIVER 
NEAR PETROLIA 



NOVO RIVER 
NEAR FORT BRAGG 



NAVARRO RIVER 
NEAR NAVARRO 



2*0 
NOYO RIVER BASIN 



1911-13 
1915- 



106 1951- 
NAVARRO RIVER BASIN 

303 1950- 
GUALALA RIVER BASIN 



SOUTH FORK GUALALA RIVER 
NEAR ANNAPOLIS 



RUSSIAN RIVER 
NEAR UKIAH 



EAST FORK RUSSIAN RIVER 
NEAR CALPELLA 



RUSSIAN RIVER 
NEAR HOPLAND 



RUSSIAN RIVER 
NEAR CLOVEROALE 



BIG SULPHUR CREEK 
NEAR CLOVEROALE 



RUSSIAN RIVER 
NEAR HEALDSaURG 



DRY CREEK 
NEAR CLOVEROALE 



DRY CREEK 
NEAR GEYSERVILLE 



SANTA ROSA CREEK 
NEAR SANTA ROSA 



RUSSIAN RIVER NEAR 
6UERNEVILLE (SUMMERHOME) 



362 1939- 



503 1951- 



82 1957- 



793 1939- 



162 1959- 



USGS 



USGS 





161 


1950- 


USGS 


RUSSIAN 


RIVER 


BASIN 

1911-13 






100 


1952- 


USGS 


RIVER 










92 


19^.1- 


USGS 



USGS 

USGS 
USGS 
USGS 

USGS 
USGS 



1959- USGS 



IS'.O 1939- USGS 



12-22-6^- 
12-22-6* 
12-22-55 
12-22-55 
12-22-6* 
12-22-6* 
12-23-6* 
12-22-6* 



12-22-55 



12-21-55 
12-22-6* 



12-22-55 
12- -37 



12-22-55 



12-23-6* 
12- -37 



1-31-63 



12-23-6* 
12-23-55 



33.6(A) 133.000 

87.2(AC) 561,000 

16.2 20,100 

22.9(A) 16,300 

*6.0(A) 199,000 

20.6(Aj;) 6,520 

72.0(A) 752,000 

2*. 0(A) *8,700 



12 -3-70 20.23 29,900 
1-16-71 *2.5* 162,000 
STATION DISCONTINUED 



12 -3-70 1*.20 



12-22-55 29.6(C) 90,*00 12 -3-70 20.70 



USGS 12-22-6* 26.3 



2*, 000 



12 -*-70 19.98 



12-22-55 *0.6(C) 6*, 500 1-16-71 2*. 00 



2*. 6(C) 55,000 12 -3-70 18.20 



12 -3-70 11.96 



21 





13 


900 


20 


2 


IB 


700 


27 





*5 


000 


30 


0(A) 




- - 


31 


6(C) 


55 


200 


16 


8(A) 


2U 


000 


27 





71 


300 


30 


8(A) 




- - 



32,*00 



*9.6(A) 93,*00 
*9.7(A) - - 



6, 100 



12 -3-70 29.16 92,*00 

12 -3-70 11.01 2,610 

1-17-71 *1.77 2*0,000 

12 -3-70 17.86 26,600 



1-16-71 18. *K 



1-16-71 18.76 



12 -*-70 18.92 



12 -3-70 11.26 



12 -*-70 13.8* 



12 -3-70 11.15 



12 -3-70 12.68 



STATION DISCONTINUED 



12 -*-70 39.33 



*6,900 

9,080 

20,000 

28,600 

9,360 

8,980 

20,000 

25,000 

9, 160 

*0,200 

7,*50 



59,800 



kl 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED! 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1970-1971 

WATER YEAR 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA 



WALKER CREEK BASIN 



WALKER CREEK 
NEAR TOMALES 



37 1959- 

CORTE MADERA CREEK BASIN 



I- 5-66 



5,420 



12 -'.-70 18.65 



3.290 



CORTE MADERA CREEK 
AT ROSS 



18 1951- 
NOVATO CREEK BASIN 



12-22-55 



17.5 



3.620 



12 -3-70 15.11 



2,640 



NOVATO CREEK 
NEAR NOVATO 



IB 1946- 
SONOMA CREEK BASIN 



USGS 1-14-70 11.0 2,000 11-27-70 6.82 



SONOMA CREEK 
AT AGUA CALIENTE 



NAPA RIVER 
NEAR ST. HELENA 



NAPA RIVER 
NEAR NAPA 



58 1955- 
NAPA RIVER BASIN 



U 



1929-32 
1939- 



1929-32 
218 1959- 



REDWOOD CREEK 
NEAR NAPA 



10 1958- 
PACHECO CREEK BASIN 



USGS 12-22-55 17.1(CI 8,880 12 -3-70 15.26 



USGS 12-22-55 16.2 12,600 
USGS 1-31-63 27.6 16,900 
USGS 1- 5-65 10.4 1,450 



12 -3-70 14.00 

12 -4-70 20.13 

11-27-70 8.52 



9,700 



1,400 



SAN RAMON CREEK 
AT SAN RAMON 



6 1952- 

SAN LCREN20 CREEK BASIN 



USGS 10-13-62 



1,600 12 -4-70 3.64 



220 



SAN LORENZO CREEK 
AT HAYMARD 



38 



1939-40 
1946- 



USGS 10-13-62 19.7(AI 7,460 
12-22-55 2C.8IAI - - 



12 -4-70 10.01 



1,260 



ALAMEDA CREEK BASIN 



ARROYO MOCHO 
NEAR PLEASANTON 



ARROYO VALLE 
NEAR LIVERMORE 



ARROYO VALLE 
AT PLEASANTON 



ALAMEDA CREEK 
NEAR NILES 



PATTERSON CREEK 
AT UNION CITY 



141 1962- 



1912-30 
1957- 



171 



USGS 



1957- USGS 



1891- USGS 



2- 1-63 



12-23-55 



1958- 



8.60(CI 1,760 

13.9(AI 18,200 

25.4 11,300 

14.9 29,000 

20.4(AI 10,500 



11-29-70 12.50 



11-13-70 



12 -2-70 



11-29-70 13.90 



620 

80 

80 

2,230 

5,300 



ALAMEDA CREEK 
AT UNION CITY 



653 1958- 
COYOTE CREEK BASIN 



2- 1-63 



19.3(A) 1,770 11-29-70 11.39 



50 



COYOTE CREEK 
NEAR MADRONE 



UPPER PENITENCIA CREEK 
AT SAN JOSE 



1902-12 
196 1916- 



22 1961- 
GUADALUPE RIVER BASIN 



USGS 3- 7-11 - - 25,000 
USGS 1-21-67 6.2 15,000 



9-28-71 2.48 



12 -2-70 4.94 



ALAMITOS CREEK 
NEAR NEM ALMADEN 



LOS GATOS CREEK 
AT LOS GATOS 



GUADALUPE RIVER 
AT SAN JOSE 



32 



SARATOGA CREEK 
AT SARATOGA 



1958- 



1929-44 
1953- 



144 1929- USGS 



9 1933- 
MATADERO CREEK BASIN 



4- 2-58 


9. 7 


4 


300 


12 -2-70 


2-27-40 


14.7(C) 


7 


110 


8-24-71 


4- 2-58 


16.6 


9 


150 


11-29-70 


12-22-55 


6.4(C) 


2 


730 


11-28-70 



1, 120 



3,260 



MATADERO CREEK 
AT PALO ALTO 



1952- USGS 12-22-55 



12-20-70 3.20 



1+2 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED! 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PfcRlOU 

OF 
RECGRU 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



197U-1971 
WATER YEAR 



DATE 



StAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA ICUNTINUEDl 



SAN FRANCISOUITO 
CREEK BASIN 



SAN FRANCISOUITO CREEK 
AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY 



38 



1930-<.I 
1950- 



REDWOOD CREEK 
AT REDWOOD CITY 



PESCADERO CREEK 
NEAR PESCADERO 



SAN LORENZO RIVER 
AT BIG TREES 



SOOUEL CREEK 
AT SOOUEL 



BUDFISH CREEK 
NEAR GILROY 



TRES PINOS CREEK 
NEAR TRES PINOS 



SAN BENITO RIVER 
NEAR HOLLISTER 



PAJARO RIVER 
AT CHITTENDEN 



CORRALITOS CREEK 
NEAR CORRALITOS 



CORRALITOS CREEK 
AT FREEDOM 



SALINAS RIVER 
NEAR POZO 



REDWOOD CREEK BASIN 

2 1959- 

PESCADERO CREEK BASIN 

46 1951- 
SAN LORENZO RIVER BASIN 

111 1936- 
SOOUEL CREEK BASIN 

"lO 1951- 
PAJARO RIVER BASIN 



206 1939- 



586 19*9- 



1186 1939- 



11 



1957- 



28 1956- 
SALINAS RIVER BASIN 



70 



SALINAS RIVER ABOVE PILITAS 
CREEK NEAR SANTA MARGARITA 114 



JACK CREEK 
NEAR TEMPLETON 



USGS 12-22-55 13.6 
CENTRAL COASTAL AREA 



1-31-63 



5.560 



1959- USGS 



USGS 



1942- USGS 



1942- USGS 



ESTRELLA RIVER 
NEAR ESTRELLA 



NACIMIENTO RIVER 

NEAR BRYSON 



SALINAS RIVER 
NEAR BRADLEY 



ARROYO SECO 
NEAR SOLEDAO 



SALINAS RIVER 
NEAR SPRECKELS 



CARMEL RIVER 
AT ROBLES DEL RIO 



BIG SUR RIVER 
NEAR BIG SUR 



12-23-55 



1-25-69 

1-25-69 



25 


1949- 


USGS 


2-24-69 


922 


1954- 


USGS 


2-24-69 


140 


1955- 


USGS 


1-25-69 


2535 


1948- 


USGS 


2-24-69 


244 


1901- 
1900-01 


USGS 


4- 3-58 


4156 


1929- 


USGS 


2-26-69 
1-16-52 


CARMEL RIVER BAS 


IN 






193 


1957- 


USGS 


4- 2-58 
12-23-55 


BIG SUR RIVER BASIN 






47 


1950- 


USGS 


4- 2-58 



22.3 



12-20-70 5.82 



12-29-70 6.25 



11-29-70 7.12 



15,800 11-29-70 7.06 



1-31-63 


8.3 


1 


240 


11-29-70 


4- 4-41 


7.8 


8 


060 


12-21-70 


4- 3-68 


16.3 


11 


600 


11-29-70 


12-24-55 


32.5 


24 


000 


12-21-70 


4- 3-58 


33.1 








4- 2-58 


7.6 


1 


970 


11-29-70 



6.51 



12-22-55 15.6IA) 3.620 11-29-70 5.07 



13.9 18.600 
15.5(AI 



14.9 16,600 

11.3 8.160 
10.4(A) 32.500 
24.6 39.100 
20.3(A) 117.000 

16.4 28,300 



26.5(C) 83,100 
26.9(AC) - - 



10.5 
ll.7(Al 



11.6 



7,100 
6,930 



12-21-70 11.86 

12-21-70 1.42 

12-21-70 6.10 

12-23-70 2.55 

U-28-70 15.28 

3 -5-71 7.20 

11-29-70 8.45 

11-30-70 8.00 

12 -2-70 6.53 



2,530 



1,300 



520 
970 

250 
430 



5,680 11-29-70 6.80 



1,210 
55 
14,400 
2,380 
4, 300 
2,080 

1,170 

1,600 



43 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SQ MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



DATE 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1970-1971 
WATER YEAR 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



CENTRAL COASTAL AREA (CONTINUED) 



ARROYO DE LA CRUZ 
NEAR SAN SIMEON 



SANTA ROSA CREEK 
NEAR CAMBRIA 



SISQUOC RIVER 
NEAR GAREY 



SANTA MARIA RIVER 
AT GUADALUPE 



ARROYO DE LA CRUZ BASIN 

'tl 1950- 
SANTA ROSA CREEK BASIN 



19'.0- 

IT'il 19A0- 
SANTA YNE2 RIVER BASIN 



SANTA YNEZ RIVER 
BELOW GIBRALTAR DAM 
NEAR SANTA BARBARA 



216 1920- 



SANTA CRUZ CREEK 
NEAR SANTA YNEZ 



SAN JOSE CREEK 
NEAR GOLETA 



ATASCADERO CREEK 
NEAR GOLETA 



CARPINTERIA CREEK 
NEAR CARPINTERIA 



T, 1941- 

SAN JOSE CREEK BASIN 

6 1941- 

ATASCADERO CREEK BASIN 

19 1941- 
CARPINTERIA CREEK BASIN 

13 1941- 
VENTURA CREEK BASIN 



MATILIJA CREEK 
AT MATILIJA HUT SPRINGS 



VENTURA RIVER 
NEAR MEINERS OAKS 



CUYOTE CREEK 
NEAR OAK VIEW 



VENTURA RIVER 
NEAR VENTURA 



55 



13 



1911-14 
1929- 



SANTA CLARA RIVER BASIN 



SAN CLARA RIVER AT LOS 
ANGELES-VENTURA CO. LINE 644 



372 1955- 



1911-13 
1927- 



PIKU CREEK 
ABOVE LAKE PIRU 



SESPE CREEK 
NEAR FILLMORE 



SANTA PAULA CREEK 
NEAR SANTA PAULA 



MALIBU CREEK BASIN 

HALIBU CREEK AT CRATER CAMP 
NEAR CALABASAS 105 1931- 

BALLONA CREEK BASIN 



USGS 



13 1957- USGS 
SANTA MARIA RIVER BASIN 
471 



USGS 



USGS 



1927- USGS 



1958- USGS 



1-25-69 
12- -55 



15.3 



12.0 
15.2(A) 



35,200 11-28-70 7.61 



3,350 11-29-70 6.13 



USGS 1-25-69 13.0 24,500 11-29-70 
1-16-52 8.2(C) 32,800 



1-25-69 25.8 



54,200 5 -6-71 



2-24-69 14.5(A) 7,050 11-29-70 



USGS 1-25-69 IC.I 
1-21-43 12.7 



1-25-69 13.0 



1-25-69 18.9(A) 4,560 11-29-70 

1-25-69 16.5 20,000 12 -1-70 

1-25-69 - - 28, 000(E) 11-29-70 

1-25-69 12.0 8,000 11-29-70 

1-25-69 24.3(A) 58,000 12-21-70 



USGS 1-25-69 19.0 68,800 
USGS 2-25-69 18.6(A) 31,200 



USGS 1-25-69 20.8 60,000 
2-25-69 25.0(A) - - 



USGS 2-25-69 15.2(A) 21,000 
SUUTH COASTAL AREA 



1-25-69 21.4 



7.63 



2,000 11-29-70 



5,230 11-29-70 11.30 



4.20 



11-29-70 



11-29-70 11.03 



11-29-70 20.42 



BALLONA CREEK 
NEAR CULVER CITY 



90 



1928- USGS 11-21-67 



33,800 12-19-70 11.45 



32,500 11-29-70 9.50 



4.000 



640 



2,000 
NO PEAK 



1,340 



1, 100 



2,500 

220 

520 
1,560 
1,430 
3, 120 

9,080 

9,860 

22,800 

2,530 



14,600 



hk 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



DATE 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1970-1971 
HATER YEAR 



DATE 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



LOS ANGELES RIVER 
AT SEPULVEOA DAM 

LOS ANGELES RIVER 
AT LOS ANGELES 

KIO HONDO 
NEAR DOWNEY 



LOS ANGELES RIVER BASIN 
158 19^9- 
514 1929- 



143 

SANTA ANA RIVE 



209 
236 

532 



SANTA ANA RIVER 
NEAR MENTONE 

SAN GABRIEL RIVER 
BELOW SANTA FE 0AM 
NEAR BALDWIN PARK 

SANTA ANA RIVER AT 'E' ST 
NEAR SAN BERNARDINO 

HILL CREEK 
NEAR YUCAIPA 

LYTLE CREEK 
NEAR FONTANA 

CAJON CREEK 
NEAR KEENBROOK 



SANTA ANA RIVER AT RIVERSIDE 
NARROWS NEAR ARLINGTON 855 



1928- 

R BASIN 

1896- 
19'.2- 



1939-54 
1966- 



1919-38 
1947- 



SAN JACINTO RIVER 
NEAR SAN JACINTO 

SANTIAGO CREEK 
AT MODJESKA 

SANTIAGO CREEK 
AT SANTA ANA 



141 

13 

95 



1961- 
1928- 



SUUTH COASTAL AREA (CONTINUED) 



USGS 1-25-69 11.4 13,800 
USGS 3- 2-38 - - 67,000 



USGS 



1918- USGS 



USGS 



1920- USGS 



1-25-69 15.2 



46,900 



USGS 3- 2-38 14.3(C) 52,300 
USGS 1-26-69 22.2 30,900 

USGS 



11-29-70 10.57 
11-29-70 12.18 
U-29-70 6.18 



11-29-70 
12-17-70 



8.2 

10.68 



12,300 

41,500 

9,350 

6,600 



2-25-69 


16.5 


28,000 


11-29-70 


8.37 


3,440 


1-25-69 


16.8(A) 


35,400 


11-29-70 


8.60 


1,200 


1-25-69 


15.0(A) 


35,900 


11-29-70 


7.50 


1,100 


3- 2-38 


26.0(C) 


14,500 


11-29-70 


7.50 


1,300 


3- 2-38 




100,000 


11-29-70 


9.77 


5,300 


2-16-27 




45,000 


11-29-70 


8.92 


45 


2-25-69 


6.2 


6,520 


12-21-70 


2.93 


50 


2-25-69 


9.1IC) 


6,600 


12-19-70 


4.90 


330 


1-16-52 


9.8 


- - 









SAN JUAN CREEK BASIN 



SAN JUAN CREEK 
NEAR SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO 106 



SANTA MARGARITA 
RIVER BASIN 



SANTA MARGARITA RIVER 
NEAR TEHECULA 



588 1923- 



SANTA MARGARITA RIVER 
AT YSIDORA 



USGS 



739 1923- 
SAN LUIS REY RIVER BASIN 



SAN LUIS REY RIVER AT 1935-41 

MDNSERATE NARROWS NR PALA 373 1946- 



SAN LUIS REY RIVER 
NEAR 80NSALL 



512 



1916-18 
1929- 



SANTA YSABEL CREEK 
NEAR RAHONA 



SAN DIEGUITO RIVER BASIN 
112 



1912-23 
1943- 



SANTA YSABEL CREEK 
NEAR SAN PAS(3UAL 



SAN DIEGO RIVER 
NEAR SANTEE 



SWEETWATER RIVER 
NEAR OESCANSO 



1905-12 
128 1947- 

SAN DIEGO RIVER BASIN 

377 1912- 
SWEETWATER RIVER BASIN 



46 



1905-27 
195fr- 



TIJUANA RIVER 
NEAR DUL2URA 



TIJUANA RIVER BASIN 

481 1936- 



USGS 



USGS 



2-25-69 5.6IAC) 22,400 12-19-70 3.85 



USGS 2-16-27 14.6(C) 25,000 
USGS 2-16-27 18.0(C) 33,600 



USGS 2- 7-37 8.7(C) 

USGS 3- 3-38 16.0 18,100 



USGS 1-27-16 14.0(C) 28,400 
USGS 3-24-06 5.3(C) 8,000 



12-21-70 



12-21-70 



I -3-71 
1 -3-71 



USGS 1-27-15 25.1(C) 70,200 12-21-70 



3.32 



1.69 



5.65 



2-15-27 13.2(AC) 11,200 11-30-70 3.96 



135 



NO PEAK 



NO PEAK 
210 



20 
20 



2- 7-37 



4,700 12-21-70 2.85 



50 



^5 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



197U-1971 
WATER YEAR 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



CENTRAL VALLEV AREA 





SACRAMENTO RIVER 


BASIN 


SACRAMENTO RIVER 






AT DELTA 


a;!5 


19'!'.- 


PIT RIVER 




1904-31 


NEAR BIEBER 


2^.75 


1951- 


PIT RIVER BELOW 






PIT NO.'t DAM 


'.6<.7 


1922- 



HCCLQUD RIVER 
ABOVE SHASTA LAKE 

SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT KESWICK 

CLEAR CREEK 
AT FRENCH GULCH 

CLEAR CREEK 
NEAR IGG 

COW CREEK 
NEAR MILLVILLE 

COTTONWOOD CREEK 
NEAR COTTONWOOD 

BATTLE CREEK BELOW 
COLEMAN FISH HATCHERY 
NEAR COTTONWOOD 

SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT BEND BRIDGE 

PAYNES CREEK 
NEAR RED BLUFF 

RED BANK CREEK 
NEAR RED BLUFF 

ANTELOPE CREEK 
NEAR RED BLUFF 

ELDER CREEK 
NEAR PASKENTA 

MILL CREEK 
NEAR LOS MOLINOS 

THOMES CREEK 
AT PASKENTA 

DEER CREEK 
NEAR VINA 

SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT VINA BRIDGE 



SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT HAMILTON CITY 
(BEFORE SHASTA DAM) 

SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT HAMILTON CITY 
(AFTER SHASTA DAM) 

BIG CHICO CREEK 
NEAR CHICO 

STONY CREEK 
NEAR FRUTO 

STONY CREEK 
NEAR HAMILTON CITY 

SACRAMENTO RIVEP 
AT QRD FERRY 
(BEFORE SHASTA DAM) 

SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT ORD FERRY 
(AFTER SHASTA DAM) 

SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT BUTTE CITY 
(BEFORE SHASTA DAM) 



60<. 1945- 



6468 1938- 



115 1950- 



228 1940- 



425 1949- 



922 1940- 



358 1961- 



USGS 12-22-64 

USGS 3-19-07 

uses 1-25-70 

USGS 12-22-55 
USGS-DWR 2-23-40 

USGS 12-22-64 

USGS 12-21-55 

USGS 12-27-51 

USGS 12-22-64 

USGS 12-11-37 



1960- 


OWR 


1-24-70 


1949- 


USGS 


12- 1-61 


1948- 


DWR 


1- 5-65 


1940- 


USGS 


1-23-70 


1946- 


USGS 


2-24-58 


1909-13 






1928- 


USGS 


12-11-37 



131 



194 1920- 



1911-15 
1920- 



USGS-DWR 12-22-64 
USGS-DWR 12-10-37 



DWR 1-24-70 
1-24-70 



1927-43 DWR 



1944- DWR 



1930- USGS 



1901-12 
598 1960- 



777 1940- USGS 
1921-43 DWR 



1944- 



OWR 



20.1 38.800 3-26-71 11.26 

16.7 33,800 3-28-71 10.59 

18.1 32, 500(E) 3-27-71 13.85 

28.2 45,200 3-26-71 16.56 
47.2(C) 186,000 12 -9-70 24.52 



7,600 



1-16-71 10.07 



13.8 



24,500 12-28-70 
45,200 12 -4-70 



21.6 

19.6 60,000 1-16-71 
15.8(AC) 35,000 11-28-70 



8.06 



11,000 
11,000 
13,000 

7,300 
37,600 

3,800 

2,610 
30,000 
31,300 

6,490 



48.3 158,000 12 -4-70 39.50 104,000 
11.3 10,600 STATION DISCONTINUED 

1,600 



10.1 



7.04 



9,730 1-16-71 

18.0 17,200 11-28-70 12.82 

13.9(C) 11,700 3-26-71 8.23 

23.4(A) 36,400 12 -4-70 9.41 

15.3 37,800 3-26-71 9.62 

19.2(A) 23,800 3-26-71 8.04 



91.5 171,000 12 -4-70 86.03 
- - 228,000(L) 



5,090 



5 


870 


9 


360 


4 


540 


09 


000 



12-11-37 150.7(C) 350,000(EL) 



1-24-70 50.8 156,000 12 -4-70 45.26 



1- 5-65 15.4 

12-23-64 15.9 

2-25-58 18.3 

2-28-40 121.7 



9,580 12 -4-70 

40,200 1-16-71 

39,900 1-19-71 

370,000(EL) 



1-24-70 119.79 265,000(ELl 1-17-71 114.59 



101,000 

3,840 

14,400 

5,570 

97, 100(E) 



1921-43 USGS-DWR 2- 7-42 96.9 170,000 



k6 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1970-1971 
HATER YEAR 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



CENTRAL VALLEY AREA (CONTINUED! 



SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN 
(CONTINUED) 



SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT BUTTE CITY 
(AFTER SHASTA DAM) 

MUULTON MEIR SPILL 
TO BUTTE BASIN 



COLUSA WEIR SPILL 
TO BUTTE BASIN 



SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT COLUSA 



COLUSA BASIN DRAIN 
AT HIGHWAY 20 



BUTTE CREEK 
NEAR CHICO 



BUTTE SLOUGH 
NEAR MERIDIAN 



SUTTER BYPASS 
AT LONG BRIDGE 



TISOALE WEIR SPILL 
TO SUTTER BYPASS 



SACRAMENTO RIVER 
BELOW WILKINS SLOUGH 



SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT KNIGHTS LANDING 



MIDDLE FORK FEATHER 
RIVER NEAR CLIO 

MIDDLE FORK FEATHER 
RIVER NEAR HERRIMAC 

NURTH FORK FEATHER 
RIVER NEAR PRATTVILLE 

BUTT CREEK BELOW 
ALMADOR-BUTT CREEK 
TUNNEL NEAR PRATTVILLE 

INDIAN CREEK 
NEAR CRESCENT MILLS 

SPANISH CREEK ABOVE 
BLACKHAWK CREEK AT KEDOIE 

NORTH FORK FEATHER RIVER 
AT PULGA 

WEST BRANCH FEATHER RIVER 
NEAR PARADISE 

FEATHER RIVER 
AT OROVILLE 
(BEFORE OROVILLE DAM) 

FEATHER RIVER 
AT OROVILLE 
(AFTER OROVILLE DAM) 

THERMALITO AFTERBAV 
RELEASE TO FEATHER 
RIVER NEAR OROVILLE 

FEATHER RIVER 
NEAR GRIDLEY 
(BEFORE OROVILLE DAM) 

FEATHER RIVER 
NEAR GRIDLEY 
(AFTER OROVILLE DAM) 

SOUTH HONCUT CREEK 
NEAR BANGOR 



1935- 

1935- 

12110 19'.0- 

192<.- 

1'.7 1930- 



USGS-DWR 


2-20-58 


96.7 




l-2<.-70 


- - 


OWR 


1-25-70 


83.6 




2-20-58 


83.7 



USGS-DWR 2- 8-42 



12-22-6* 



DWR 



666 1925- 
1062 1951- 

493 1905- 

1936-59 
69 1964- 



1906-18 
739 1930- 



IB* 1933- 

1953 1910- 

110 1957- 

362<. 189<.-67 



USGS 



USGS 



12-22-6<. 

3-19-07 

12-23-64 



USGS 3-19-07 

USGS 12-22-64 

USGS 12-22-64 

USGS-OWR 12-22-64 



USGS-DWR 3-19-07 
USWB 12-22-64 



160,000 1-18-71 
225,000(L) 



12926 


1938- 


USGS 


1-26-70 


50.7 


29,300 








3- 1-40 


52.8 


- - 




1921-39 










14541 


1940- 


USGS-OWR 


1-26-70 


40.9 


30,800 








2- 8-42 


41.8(D) 


- - 



16.2 14,500 3-27-71 

26.5(A) 86,200 3-26-71 

16.2(C) 10,000 2-18-71 

5.9 3,830 3-26-71 

20.2(C) 25,000 3-27-71 

13.5 15,400 3-26-71 

35.8 73, 000(H) 3-26-71 

26.2(A) 26,300 3-20-71 



2 8.2 2 30,000(C,P) 
- - 252, 000(g) 



3624 1967- USGS-DWR 1-25-70 15.3 56,300(N) 3-26-71 



1967- 



USGS-DWR 1-28-70 23.3 21,600 3-27-71 



91. 10 



36, 400(B) 12 -5-70 79.60 

70.4 86,000(6) 12 -5-70 66.71 

69.2 49,000 1-18-71 65.31 

51.9 25, 400(E) 11-30-70 48.31 

14.1 21,200 3-26-71 7.20 

61.5(E) 152, 000(E) 12 -6-70 55.20 

57.7 210,000 12 -6-70 49.04 

53.4 25, 700(B) 12 -6-70 49.13 

1-18-71 48.47 



1-18-71 34.21 



10.23 



3676 1929-67 USGS-DWR 12-23-55 52.2 



3676 1967- USGS-DWR 1-27-70 42.8 72,900 3-30-71 83.61 



95,800 

7, 720(B) 

44,200(8) 
41,800 

2,530 

6,080 
35,300 

13, 500(B) 
27,600 

27,800 

7,620 

15,700 

520 

780 

8,930 

8,o70 

21,900 

6,990 

7,720(N) 
17,600 



31 1950- USGS 12-26-64 19.3 17,600 3-26-71 



S.90 



24,300 



3,300 



h7 



TABLE 3 (CONIINUEO) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1970-1971 
WATER YEAR 



STAGE 
IN FEtT 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



CENTRAL VALLEy AREA ICONTINUEDI 



FEATHER RIVER 
AT YUBA CITY 



SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN 
(CONTINUED) 



397<i 1943- 



USGS-DWR 12-23-64 
12-24-55 



76.4 172,000 3-25-71 
82.4 - - 



NORTH YUBA RIVER 
BELOW GOODYEARS BAR 



NURTH YUBA RIVER BELOW 
NEW BULLARDS BAR DAM 



250 1930- USGS 



490 1940- USGS 



2- 1-63 23.8(A) 40,000 3-26-71 



SOUTH YUBA RIVER 
NEAR CISCO 

SOUTH YUBA RIVER AT JONES 
BAR NEAR GRASS VALLEY 

YUBA RIVER 
ENGLEBRIGHT DAM 

DEER CREEK 
NEAR SMARTVILLE 

YUBA RIVER 
NEAR MARYSVILLE 

BEAR RIVER 
NEAR WHEATLAND 

FEATHER RIVER 
AT NICOLAUS 

FREMONT WEIR (WEST END) 
SPILL TO YOLO BYPASS 

SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT VERONA 

SACRAMENTO WEIR SPILL 
TO YOLO BYPASS 
NEAR SACRAMENTO 

NORTH FORK AMERICAN RIVER 
AT NORTH FORK DAM 

RUBICON RIVER 
NEAR FORESTHILL 

MIDDLE FORK AMERICAN RIVER 
NEAR FORESTHILL 

MIDDLE FORK AMERICAN RIVER 
NEAR AUBURN 

SOUTH FORK AMERICAN RIVER 
NEAR CAMINO 

SOUTH FORK AMERICAN RIVER 
NEAR LOTUS 

AMERICAN RIVER 
AT FAIR OAKS 
(BEFORE FOLSOM DAM) 

AMERICAN RIVER 
AT FAIR OAKS 
(AFTER FOLSOM DAM) 

SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT SACRAMENTO 



SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT WALNUT GROVE 



ADOBE CREEK 
NEAR KELSEYVILLE 



KELSEY CREEK 
NEAR KELSEYVILLE 



CACHE CREEK 
NEAR LOWER LAKE 



308 



1940-48 
1959- 



USGS 



1108 1941- 

85 1935- 

1339 1940- 

292 1928- 



USGS 



USGS 



1-22-70 
12-22-64 



1-31-63 
12-22-64 
12-22-64 
10-13-62 
12-22-64 
12-22-55 



5920 1943- USGS-DWR 12-23-55 

1934- DHR 12-23-55 

21257 1929- USGS-DWR 3- 1-40 



35.3 55,200 6-2E-71 
40.5(C) 91,600(M) 



20.6(A) 18,400 6-26-71 

25.0(A) 53,600 6-^6-71 

546.1 171,000(K) 3-26-71 

13.8 11,600 3-26-71 

90.2 180,000 3-26-71 

19.3(C) 33,000 12 -4-70 

51.6 357,000 3-27-71 

39.7 294,000(8) 12 -7-70 
41.2 79,200 12 -5-70 



342 1941- 



315 1958- USGS 



524 1958- 



12-23-64 



USGS-DWR 3-26-28 32.8 118,000(BE) 

USGS 12-23-64 11.9 65,400 3-25-71 

55.4(A_I ) - - 3-26-71 

59.0(A_I) 310,000(1) 3-26-71 

60.4(A,I) 253,000(1) 3-26-71 

32.6(A) 49,800 3-25-71 

21.4 71,800 3-26-71 

31.9(C) 180,000 



1911- 




USGS 


12-23-64 


1922- 




USGS 


12-23-55 


1951- 




USGS 


12-23-55 


1904- 


55 


USGS 


11-21-50 



1888 1955- USGS 



12-23-64 21.6 



115,000 1-15-71 




23530 1879- 

1929- 
6 1954- 
37 1946- 
528 1944- 



USGS-DWR 11-21-50 
USWB 



DWR 12-25-64 

USGS 12-22-64 

USGS 12-21-55 

USGS 2-24-58 



30.1(C) 104,000 12 -5-70 21.79 



12.8 



1,500 
8,800 
8,000 



12 -3-70 

12 -3-70 

1-15-71 



8.56 



10. 17 



7,360 
1,B20 



9.U8 


3,370 


13.08 


9,060 


515.30 


15,000(B^) 


9.20 


4,520 


59.69 


18,800 


15.35 


12,400 


33.87 


44,900 


35.42 


25, 100(b) 


34.00 


63,200 




NO FLOW 



14, 100 
5,450 

16,400 

16,500 
5, 100 

11, 100 

6,270 
73,700 



880 
3,840 
4,420 



h& 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1970-1971 
HATER YEAR 



DATE 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



CENTRAL VALLEY AREA (CONTINUED) 



SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN 
(CONTINUED) 



NORTH FORK CACHE CREEK 
NEAR LOWER LAKE 



CACHE CREEK 
ABOVE RUMSEY 



CACHE CREEK 
NEAR CAPAY 



CACHE CREEK 
AT YOLO 



YOLO BYPASS 
NEAR WOODLAND 



DRY CREEK 
NEAR MIDOLETOWN 



PUTAH CREEK 
NEAR WINTERS 



YOLO BYPASS 
NEAR LISBON 



SACRAMENTO RIVER 
AT RIO VISTA 



197 1930- 
955 1960- 
lO** 19'.2- 
1139 1903- 

1939- 
8 1959- 
57* 1930- 

1914- 

1906- 

SAN JOAQUIN RIVER BASIN 



USGS 12-11-37 

USGS-DWR I- 5-65 

USGS 2-2<.-58 

USGS 2-25-58 

US6S-UHR 2- 8-*2 

USGS 2- 8-60 

USGS-DWR 2-27-'.0 

OWR 12-25-64 

DWR 12-25-55 



NORTH FORK COSUMNES RIVER 
NEAR EL DORADO 205 



MIDDLE FORK COSUMNES RIVER 
NEAR SOMERSET 107 



SOUTH FORK COSUMNES RIVER 
NEAR RIVER PINES 64 



1911-41 
1948- 



1957- 



USGS 
USGS 



1957- USGS 



COSUMNES RIVER 
AT MICHIGAN BAR 



CUSUMNES RIVER 
AT MCCONNELL 



COLE CREEK 
NEAR SALT SPRINGS DAM 



SOUTH FORK MOKELUMNE RIVER 
NEAR WEST POINT 



MOKELUMNE RIVER 
NEAR MOKELUMNE HILL 



MOKELUMNE RIVER 
AT HOOUBRIDGE 



MUKELUMNE RIVER 
NR THORNTONIBENSON FERRY) 



BEAR CREEK 
NEAR LOCKEFORD 



SOUTH FORK CALAVERAS RIVER 
NEAR SAN ANDREAS 



536 1907- 



724 1941- 



1927-42 
1943- 



USGS 



12-23-55 



2- 1-63 
2- 1-63 



2- 1-63 



12-23-55 
3- -07 



12-23-64 



1933- USGS 



544 1901- 



DRY CREEK 
NEAR GALT 



MORMON SLOUGH 
AT BELLOTA 



CALAVERAS RIVER 
NEAR STOCKTON 



STOCKTON DIVERTING 
CANAL AT STOCKTON 



DUCK CREEK 
NEAR STOCKTON 



SOUTH FORK STANISLAUS 
KIVER NEAR LUNG BARN 



661 


1924- 


USGS 


11-22-50 


2045 


1911- 


OWR-USWB 


12-24-55 


48 


1930- 


USGS 


4- 3-58 


118 


1950- 
1926-33 


USGS 


12-23-55 


329 


1944- 


USGS-DWR 


4- 3-58 


— 


M48- 


DWR 


4- 2-58 


__ 


1958- 


DWR 


1- 6-65 



1950- DHR 



1937- USGS 



14.0(A) 20,300 12 -4-70 9.28 8.970 

21.4(A) 59,000 12 -4-70 14.46 17,900 

20.9 51,600 12 -4-70 13.96 16,800 

85.4 41,400 12 -4-70 72.27 18,200 
32.0 272,000 12 -5-70 25.64 33,300 

9.9 3,470 STATION DISCONTINUED 

30.5 81,000 3-28-71 9.10 1,110 

24.7 350,0O0(EI 12 -8-70 15.70 

10.2 - -(0) 11-30-70 8.32 - -( 



14.8 



16. 
18, 



2 
4(A) 



10.9 



14, 

16. 



6 
3(A) 



12-23-55 14.8(AC) 



12- 3-50 



15,800 3-26-71 8.71 4,210 

11,800 3-26-71 9.79 2,290 

5,540 3-26-71 4.70 1,400 

42,000 3-26-71 7.97 8,590 



54,000 3-27-71 41.85 

6,140 1-17-71 5.35 

6,920 3-25-71 6.38 

33,700 6-27-71 11.49 

27,000 12-13-70 12.14 



-(D) 12 -5-70 



9.16 



2,930 11-29-70 12.29 



17,600 12 -2-70 



5.91 



8,320 

1,170 

1,250 

12,600 

1,440 

- -( 

615 

2,210 

2,960 

1,430 

85 



15.3 24,000 3-26-71 13.26 

20.7 15, 400(E) 12-21-70 7.27 

12.6 760(E) 3-25-71 4.65 

17. HE) 11, 400(E) 11-29-70 9.40 2,140 

5.8 400 STATION DISCONTINUED 

9.3 4,900 6-27-71 6.00 1,460 



U9 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SU MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



DATE 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



UI SCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1S70-1971 
WATER YEAR 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



CENTRAL VALLEY AREA (CONTINUED) 



SAN JOAQUIN RIVER BASIN 
(CONTINUED) 



STANISLAUS RIVER AT 
ORANGE BLOSSOM BRIDGE 



STANISLAUS RIVER 
AT RIPQN 



SOUTH FORK TUOLUMNE 
RIVER NEAR OAKLAND 
RECREATION CAMP 

MIDDLE TUOLUMNE 
RIVER AT OAKLAND 
RECREATION CAMP 

TUOLUMNE RIVER 
AT MODESTO 

0KESTIM8A CREEK 
NEAR NEWMAN 

MERCED RIVER AT POHONO 
BRIDGE NEAR YOSEMITE 

SOUTH FORK MERCED RIVER 
NEAR EL PORTAL 

MERCED RIVER 
NEAR BRICEBURG 

MERCED RIVER 
NEAR STEVINSON 

CHOWCHILLA RIVER 
NEAR RAYMOND 

FRESNO RIVER 
NEAR KNOWLES 

FRESNO RIVER 
NEAR DAULTON 

WILLOW CREEK 
AT MOUTH NEAR AUBERRY 

SAN JOAQUIN RIVER BELOW 
KERCHOFF POWERHOUSE 
NEAR PRATHER 

SAN JOAQUIN RIVER 
BELOW FRIANT 



SAN JOAQUIN RIVER 
NEAR MENDOTA 



EASTSIDE BYPASS 
NEAR EL NIDO 

SAN JOAQUIN RIVER 
AT FREMONT FORD BRIDGE 

SAN JOAQUIN RIVER 
NEAR NEWMAI^ 

SAN JOAQUIN RIVER 
NEAR VERNALIS 



KINGS RIVER 
BELOW NORTH FORK 



KAWEAH RIVER 
AT THREE RIVERS 



TULE RIVER 
NEAR SPRINGVILLE 



TULE RIVER 
BELOW SUCCESS DAM 



KERN RIVER 
AT KERNVILLE 



1928-39 












1940- 


DWR 12-23-55 


31 


a 


62,000 


6-27-71 


1940- 


USGS-OWR 12-24-55 


63 


3 


62.500 


6-28-71 




2-12-38 


64 


4IA] 


- - 




19i3- 


USGS 12-23-55 


10 


9(A) 


11,900 


3-26-71 



48.97 



1916- USGS 12-23-55 11.8(A) 4,920 5-16-71 



4.36 



1884 1940- USGS-DWR 12- 9-50 59.2 



134 1932- 



321 1916- 



241 


1950- 


USGS 


691 


1965- 


USGS 


1273 


1940- 


USGS 


202 


1959- 
1911-13 


DWR 


133 


1915- 


USGS 



258 1941- USGS 



1952- USGS 



12-23-55 
12- 6-66 
12- 5-50 
2-24-69 
12-23-55 
12-23-55 
12-23-55 



1481 1942- USGS- 12-23-55 



1676 1907- USGS 



12-11-37 

6- 6-69 



4310 1939- 

1964- 
7615 1937- 
9520 1912- 
13540 1922- 



USBR-OWR 6- 1-52 
6-20-41 



DWR 2-25-69 
USGS-DWR 2-26-69 
USGS-DWR 2-26-69 



USGS-DWR 12- 9-50 
1-27-69 



1342 1951- USGS 



418 1958- 



247 1957- 
393 1953- 



1905-12 
1009 1953- 



12-23-55 
11-19-50 



57,000 
6.6(C) 10,200 
21.5(A) 23,400 



1-15-71 44.24 



18.7 



46,500 



17.8 21,500 

73.8 13,600 

586.4 13,760 

11.5 13,300 

12.6 17,500 
28.5(A) 15,700 
51.0(A) 92,200 



12-21-70 

5-16-71 

5-16-71 

5-16-71 

12-22-70 

12 -2-70 

12 -2-70 

12 -2-70 



5.58 
7.63 
8.80 
9.39 
61.04 
572.55 
2.72 
2.79 



6-16-71 16.79 



23.e(CM) 77,200(M) 6-22-71 
11.7 12,400 



- - B,840 8-17-71 
13.8 11,740(M) 



17.6 21,700 12-23-70 
68.1 9,180 12-23-70 



3.07 



58.83 



65.9(A) 34,700(L) 12-23-70 53.05 



32.8IC) 79,000 
34.6 52,600 



12-23-70 16.69 



12-23-55 


23.1 


85,200 


6-16-71 


7.94 


12- 5-66 
12- 5-66 


16.7 
19.0(A) 


73,000 


5-16-71 


6.31 



12- 6-66 19.7(Ap) 49,600 



21.7(C) 27,000 
26.0(Ap) 32,0C0(M) 



11-26-70 
12 -2-70 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



5,570 



3,070 
580 
3,420 
2,120 
5,880 
1,280 



460 
1,150 
4,840 

270 



220 



860 



2,030 
6,700 

6,500 
1,830 



12- 6-66 19.3(A) 74,000 6-17-71 



2,040 



50 



TABLE 3 (CONTINUED) 



STREAM AND STATION 



DRAINAGE 
AREA IN 
SO MILES 



PERIOD 

OF 
RECORD 



SOURCE 

OF 
RECORD 



PREVIOUS MAXIMUM 
OF RECORD 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



1970-1971 
WATER YEAR 



STAGE 
IN FEET 



DISCHARGE 
IN CFS 



HONEV LAKE BASIN 



NORTHERN LAHONTAN AREA 



WILLOW CREEK 
NEAR SUSANVILLE 



SUSAN RIVER 
AT SUSANVILLE 



90 



1950- 



1917-21 
1950- 



PYRAMID AND WINNEMUCCA 
LAKES BASIN 



LITTLE TRUCKEE RIVER ABOVE 
BOCA RESERVOIR NEAR BOCA l'i6 



1903-10 
1939- 



TRUCKEE RIVER 
AT FARAD 



932 1899- 

CARSON RIVER BASIN 



EAST FORK CARSON RIVER 
BELOW MARKLEEVILLE CREEK 



WEST FORK CARSON RIVER 
AT WODDFOROS 



276 



1900-07 
1938- 



USGS 



USGS 



1-63 



USGS 



11-21-50 



1-31-63 
2- 1-63 



14.5(A) 



820 
5,100 



13.300 
17,500 



15,100 
4,890 



1-18-71 
3-26-71 



9-11-71 
6-26-71 



6.10 



6-26-71 



510 

2,520 



620 

3, '.00 



2,560 
680 



WALKER LAKE BASIN 



WEST WALKER RIVER 
BELOW LITTLE WALKER 
RIVER NEAR COLEVILLE 



6,220 



2,080 



EAST WALKER RIVER 
NEAR BRIDGEPORT 



1911-14 
1921- 



5 6-19-63 4.6 
SOUTHERN LAHONTAN AREA 



1,390 



7-21-71 



3.17 



720 



MOJAVE RIVER BASIN 



MOJAVE RIVER AT LOWER 
NARROWS NEAR VICTORVILLE 



MOJAVE RIVER 
AT BARSTOW 



1899-06 
1930- 



70,600 



130 



MOJAVE RIVER 
AT AFTON 



1929-32 
1952- 



LEGEND 

USG 
USB 
USW 

use 

DWR 
PG 



- UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

- UNITED STATES BUREAU OF RECLAMATION. 

- UNITED STATES WEATHER BUREAU. 

- UNITED STATES CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

- DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES. 

- PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY. 

- FROM FLOOD MARKS. 

- DISCHARGE OVER WEIR OR SPILLWAY. 

- SITE OR DATUM THEN IN USE. 

- DISCHARGE NOT DETERMINED, AFFECTED BY BACKWATER OR TIDE. 

- ESTIMATED. 

- FROM DWR TELEMETERING LOG. 

- PRELIMINARY. 

- INCLUDES FLOW THROUGH POWER PLANT. 

- DUE TO FAILURE OF PARTIALLY COMPLETED DAM. 

- GAGE HEIGHT REVISED. 

- FLOW THRUUGH POWER PLANT NOT INCLUDED. 

- DISCHARGE AT LATITUDE OF GAGING STATION SITE. 

- PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF UPSTREAM DAM. 

- INCLUDES FLOW THROUGH FISH HACTHERY BUT NOT UPSTREAM DIVERSION TO THERMALITO AFTERbAY. 

- OBSERVED. 

- ESTIMATED PEAK INFLOW TO PARTIALLY COMPLETED OROVILLE RESERVOIR. 

- PEAK OF RECORD. 



note: 



THE ABOVE TABLE IS A COMPOSITE OF SELECTED STATIONS THROUGHOUT 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA AND THE DATA THEREIN IS TAKEN FROM USGS 

SURFACE WATER RECORDS, DWR BULLETIN NUMBER 130, AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT 

OF COMMERCE, WEATHER BUREAU, DAILY RIVER STAGE PUBLICATIONS. 



51 



,.^ 



s."^ 



THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE 
STAMPED BELOW 



BOOKS REQUESTED BY ANOTHER BORROWER 
ARE SUBJECT TO RECALL AFTER ONE WEEK. 
RENEWED BOOKS ARE SUBJECT TO 
IMMEDIATE RECALL 







. ,,il9T9 




^HYS SCI LIBRARY, 








'^sn 





JAN 6 1982 



LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS 

Book Slip-Series 458 



i"', 




California. 
Bulletin. 



TC 
QP.k 
C2 
A2 

PllVSICAL 
SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 



Dept. of Water Resources. 



^a 



it 



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, i