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.MPERlAL iNSTITlir^' 

OF 

A(5R!CULTIIRAL Releahch, Pusa. 



YEAR-BOOK 


OF THF 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 

FOR 1940 

[Vol. VII. 194!] 



CALCUTTA 

PBUraSD AT THB SAPTIST MISSION PABSS 
pgBtlSHBD BY TBB fiOYAI- ASIATIC StJOWY CB BBN&AI;, h PABK STWiW 

Ismied AprU, 19il 


Pdce Rs. 




OfiScers and Members of Council 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 

1941 


President 

Tlie Hon’ble Mr, Justice Lort-Williams, Kt., K.O, 

Vice-Presidents 

Sir B. N. Chopra, Ki, O.LJE., M.A., So.D., M.D., (Retd,), 
F.R.A.S.B,, F.HX 

C. S. Pox, Esq., I).Sc., MJ.Mm.E., P.G.S., P.R.A.S.B., P.H.I. 
Syamaprasad Mookerjee, Esq., M.A., B.L., D.Lit., Barrist©r-at-Law» 

Sir S. Badhakrishnan, Kt., M.A,, D.Lit., P,B.A, 


Secretaries and Treasurer 

Genera! Secretary: — B. S. Guha, Esq., M,A., Ph.D., F,R.A.S,B., P.NJ, 
Treasurer;—- Baini Prashad, Esq., D.Sc., F.Z.S., F.R.S.B., P.R.A.S.B., 
PXI. 


Philological Secretary: — S. K. Chatterji, Esq., M.A., D.Lit., P.R.A.S.B. 


Joint Philological Secretary;— M. Mahfuz-ul Haq, Esq., M.A, 


Natural History f 
Secretaries 


Biology i—Kahpada Biswas, Esq., M.A., D.Sc., P.R.S.E. 
Physical Science:— ‘Meghnad Saha, Esq., D.Sc., P.R.S., 
F.R.A.S.B., P.NJ. 


Anthropological Secretary;— 0. Chakladar, Esq., M.A. 

Philosophical Secretary Vanamali Vedantatirtha, Esq., M.A. 

Historical and Arohseological Secretary r—Kalidas Nag, Esq., M.A., 
DXit. 


Medical Secretary:— Major 0. L. Pasricha, M.A., M.B., B.Oh., M.R.O.S., 
F.N.I. 


Library Secretary:— J. N. Mukherjee, Esq., D.Sc., F.O.S., F.R.A,S.B., 
F.NJ. 


Other Members of Goundl 

S, 0. Law, Esq., M.A., BX., PhX., F.Z.S., M.B.OX., F.KX 
M. Z. Siddiqji, Bsq„ M.A., PkD. 

0, W. Gnrner, Esq., B.A., I.G.S. 

The Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley, M.A., Barrister-atXaw, J.P. 


EOYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 
PHmL»0i:S OF OEOINAIiy MBMBFE8 

(а) To be present and vote at all General Meetings, which are held on the first Monday 

in each month except in September and October, 

(fc) To propose and secoiwi candidates for Ordinary Membership, 

(c) To introduce visitors at the Ordinary General meetlags and to the grounds and pubic 

rooms of the Society during the hours they are open to members. 

(d) To have phonal access to the Library and other public rooms of the Sociely^ and 

to examine its coieqlaons* 

(б) To take out books, plates, and manuscripts firom the Library. 

{/) To receive gratis copies of the Jowrmlf fear-Pooh and Memoirs of the Society, 
if) To fill any office in the Society on being duly elected thereto. 



YEAR-BOOK 


OF THE 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 

VOLUME VII 
1941 



FRINTEII AT THE BAP TEST MISSION PRESS 
l^UBLISlTEn BY THE ROYAL AvSIA^TO SOCIETY 01^ BENGAL 

CALOXTTTA 

1942 



Date of IHibiieatioii ... 


April, 1941. 


Pp. l-‘200 
t Coiifiplele.) 




YEAR-BOOK 


OF THE 


lOVAl. AS[AT!0 S()01I]TY OF BENGAL 


FOR 1940 


VOLUME VI T 

1941 






Year-Book, Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1940 

CONTENTS 

Page 

I , Proceedings, Annual Meeting, 1941 . . . . . . 5 

Annitel Address, 1940-41 .. .. .. 9 

Officers and Members of Council, 1941 . , . - . . 14 

Exhibition, Annual Meeting ' . . . . . . 15 

Anmial Beport, 1940 . . . . « . . . 29 

Membership Statistics, 1911-1940 .. ..57 

List of Publications, 1940 .. .. .. ..58 

Abstract Statement of Beeeipts and Disbursements, 1940 . . 59 

Abstract Proceedings Council, 1940 . . . . . . 83 

2. List of Patrons, Officers, Council Members, etc., 1940 . . 119 

Patrons .. .. .. ..120 

Officers and Members of Council, 1940 .. .. ..121 

Officers and Members of Council, 1941 . . , . . . 122 

Ordinary Members, alphabetically . . . . . . 123 

Ordinary Members, chronologically . . ... . , 141 

Ijiffi Members, chronologically . . . . . . 146 

Special Anniversary Honorary Members . . . . 147 

Associate Members .. .. ..147 

Institutional Members .. .. .. ..148 

Ordinary Fellows .. .. ..148 

Hoiiorary Fellows .. ... .. ..149 

01mng€^s in Membership .. .. .. ..151 

Loss of Members, 1940 , . . . . . . , 151 

Elliott Gold Medal, recipients . . . , . . 153 

Barchiy Memorial .Modal, recipients . . . . . . 153 

Sir Willmin Jones Memorial M.edal, recipients ,. ..154 

Annandale Mxmiic)nal Medal, rc(‘ipient.s .. ..154 

J<,)y Gobind Law Memorial Modal, rtBcipionts - . . . 154 

Paul Johannes Priild Memorial Medal, recipients . . . ♦ 154 

I'ndian Scioneo Congress Modal, Caltmtta, recipients , . 154 

3. Proceedings, Ordinary Monthly Meetings, 1940 .. .. 155 

Obituary Notices . . . . . . . . . 190 

4. Proceedings, Medical Section Meetings, 1940 . . . . 194 

5. Instructions to Authors . , ■ . . . . . , 195 




PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, 1941 


FEBRUARY 


Tlie Animai Moetiiig ot the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 
was held on Monday, the 3rd February, 1941, at 5 p.m. 


Present 


The Hon’ble Mr. Justice John Lort- Williams, Kt., K.C., 
President, in the Chair. 

Members : 


Agharkar, Dr. S. P. 

Ajider&on, Mr. J, 

Asadullah, Khan Bahadur K. M. 
Vuden, Dr. J. B, 

Biswas, Br. K. P. 

Bose, Mr. S. M. 
lirahmaehari. Dr. P. N. 
l^rahmachari, Mr. S. C. 

Brown, Mr. Percy 
Bruco, Lieut. A. E. B. 

( Jhakladar, Prof. H. C. 

( ^hakravarti, Prof. C. 

Ohatterjeo, Mr. R. P. 

Chattorji, Dr. S. K. 

(Jhaudhuii, Dr. Roma 
Chopra, Dr. B. N. 

Chopra, Bt.-Col, Sir R. N. 
Clogliorn, Miss M. L. 

Oiilshaw, Rev. W. J. 

Datta, Mr. J. K. 

De, Mr. J. C. 

Do, Mx\ K. C. 

Diitt, Mr. M. K, 

Edgloy, Hon’bl© Mr. Justice N. O. 
Eisra, Sir David 
t^wcus, Mr. L. R. 

(]|hatak, Prof. 3. C. 

Chose, Dr. P. N. 


Chose, Dr, S. K. 

Chosh, Mr. J. 

Ghosh, Mr. P. K. 
Ghuznavi, Mr. I. S. K. 
Griffiths, Dr. W. G. 

Guha, Dr. B. S. 

Haq, Prof, M. M. 

Hobbs, Major H. 

Hora, Dr, S. L. 

Hosaiii, Dr. M. H. 

Huda, Mr. S. S. 

Isch-Wall, Lieut. C. 
Macfarlane, Dr. E. W. E. 
Majumdar, Mr. J. M. 
Mallya, Lt.-Col. B. G. 
Mazumdar, Mr. D. L, 
Meyer, Miss S. 

Mukherjoo, Dr. J. NT. 

Nag, Dr. K. 

Pasricha, Major 0. L, 
Prashad, Dr. Baini 
Rahman, Prof. S. K. 
Ramacliandran, Mr. T. N. 
A. Ray Chaxidhuri, Mr. H. 0, 
Saha, Dr. M. N. 

Singhi, Mr. Bahadur Singh 
Vedantatirtha, Mr. V. 
West, Mr. W. D. 


Visitors : 

Akbar, Mr. Syod K. 
Bauorji, Mr. G. N. 
Banorji, Mr. P. N. 
Bhattacharya, Mr. XJ. 0. 
Jihoso, Mr. S. 

Bingham, Mr, G. E. 
Bingham, Mrs. 

Biswas, Mr. P. C. 

Bose, Dr. S. B. 

Bose, Miss Indira 


Brown, Mrs. Percy 
Ohakravarti, Mr. P. K. 
Chatterjee, Dr. B. K. 
Chatterjee, Mr. B. N. 
Chatterjee, Mr. H. 0. 
Clark, Mr. T. W. 
Cleghorn, Miss 0. 

Datta, Mr, J. M. 
Das-Gupta, Mr. J. 

Das- Gupta, Miss Gayatri 

( 5 ) 



6 


Year-Book E.A>S,BJor 1940, 


[¥OIi. TO, 


David, Mrs. E. 

Devi. Miss Santa 
Devi, Miss Seeta 
Ezra, Lady 
Geiige, Mr. Q. R. 

(Riosh, Mr. D. N. 
fdiosh, Mr. R. C. 

('Ihosh, Mr. S. 0. 

(Tiiha, Mr. B,hn|)endra S. 
Giiha, Mrs. Unia 
Giiha, Mr. S. S. 

Criitbrie, Miss A. 

Guthrie, Mr, H. 

Hafiz, Mr. Q. x4, 

Hosain, Mr. J. W. 
Huang, Mr. C. G. 

Jacob, Dr. K. 

Jacob, Mrs. 

Krisknaii, Dr. K. S. 
Kuma/r, Mr. ('luruda.R 
Moitra, Miss 
Maitra, Mr. S. N. 
Majiimciar, Mr. G. I*. 


Mitra, Mr. A. K, 
Mitra, Mr. N. 

Mitra, Mr. P. 

Mitra, Mr. V. 0. 
Mittor, Mr. J5. C. 
jMukberjoe, Mr. vS. K, 
Mjiltani, Air. I*. 
Narayana-n, M,'r. lb G. 
Okazaki, Mr. K. 
Pandya, Dr. A. At. 
Pandya, Airs. 

Paul,' Air. G. G. 

Rao, Dr. H. S. 

Ray, Airs. I, R. 

Ray, Mr. S. N. 
Roonwal, Air. AI. L. 
Son, Air. A. 0. 

Sen, Air. H. 0. 

Sen, Aliss Usharani 
Sinha, Air. D. V. 
Sinha, Mr. R. K. 
Tiiaknr, Air. S. P. 
and many others. 


The President in declaring the Annual Mooting op«.m — 

' Ladies and Gentlemen, 

Voting papers for the election of the new Council will be 
distributed to all the Ordinary Members present. I request thi^ 
Ordinary Members present to deliver their votes in the colloe.tioii 
boxes which will be sent round to them.’ 

After the distribution of the voting papers the PiX'^sideiit^ 

said 

' Ladies and Gentlemen, 

Have all votes been delivered'!; If yes, I call upon 
M'.r. Hobbs and Dr. S. P. Agharkar to act as scrutinoers. 

I now call upon tlie General Bocrotary to prowini:- llio Annusd 
Report for 1940.’ 

Tlie Annual Repoi’t wa.s then iirc^senicai (viiio jia-ge 
After the presentation of tlie A,m".i'ua.l Report, Gn'i 'PrckHidmit;. 
delivered t!:ie Annual. Address (vide pige 9). 

After the reading of tlie Annujd .Address, i.'lie Gefwun,! 
Becretary transmitted to the Pr'osident tlie result of tln^ ('bfinitil 
election. The .President thensipon a»nnouncx,Hl thi:^ results of 
the Council election (vide page 14). 

The P,reBidont for 1941 tlien briefly thanked t,he ' f^emhiy 
for his re-election, as follows : — 

' Ladies and Gentlemen, 

I have to thank you most heartily for the honour you 
have do, lie me 'by re-electing ,me as your ^President for ' t-fie 
ensuing year, 

IB 



1941J 


Proceedings Annual Meeting. 


7 


I will add no words other than those necessary to say that 
it will be my streiiuoii,s endeavour, during the new year, to serve 
the Society so that its tisefulness, its renown and its influence 
may grow, and so that the cause of learning in this land and 
beyond its borders may be truly promoted/ 

Then the President made the following announcements: — 

' On the date prescribed by the regulations for the issue of 
nomination papers for the election of new Fellows for the year, 
there were no vacancies on the role, consequently no election of 
Fellows has taken place/ 

‘I have now to announce that no papers have been received 
in competition for the Elliott Prize for scientific research for the 
year 1940 which was for Mathematics/ 

‘ The prize for 194-1 will be for work in Chemistry regarding 
which a detailed announcement has been published in the 
Calcutta f Bihar, and Orissa Gazettes.^ 

‘My next announcement regards the Sir William Jones 
Memorial Medal. This medal is awarded triennially for con- 
spicuously important Asiatic Researches with reference alter- 
nately to (1) Science, including Medicine, and (2) Philosophy, 
Literature and History/ 

‘ This year the medal is for Science and is awarded to : — 

Sir Prafulla Chandra Ray, Kt., C.I.E., D.Sc., F.R.A.S.B., 
F.N.I.’ ' 

‘ In declaring the Annual Meeting dissolved, I now invite the 
members present to contimie in Ordinary Monthly Meeting of 
the^ Society for the election of Members and transaction of 
business, and visitors to inspect the exhibits shown at the 
other end of the hall/ 

(For the descriptive list of exhibits, see page 15.) 




AINUAL ADDRESS, 1940-41. 


For some time past it has "been, the (3'ustom for your President 
to address to you at the Annual General Meeting a learned 
discourse upon some scientific or literary subject. Periodicaly 
this custom has not teen observed, the reason being that a more 
urgent necessity of the time was the consideration of some 
fundamental question touching the well-being of the Society. 

Such urgency came to a head two years ago, when un- 
easiness which had been growing for some time, was tentatively 
reflected in a most interesting address by your then President, 
Sir David Ezra. I believe that those reflections were approved 
by Mi‘. Johan van Manen, then General Secretary, whose ex- 
perience of the Society was probably longer than that of most 
of us, and thoxigh I had never discussed the questions raised 
with either of them, I was surprised to find, how singularly they 
coincided with views which I had formed, independently. This 
coincidence confirmed me in my belief in the urgent necessity for 
a thorough enqiihy into the aims and orgamzation of the Society 
and, so to say, a general stock-taking. 

For a very good reason, the dangers then suggested were 
not fully appreciated, those fundamental questions were left 
unanswered, and. have not yet received the attention and 
consideration which they undoubtedly deserve, and which in my 
opinion they must have if this ancient Society is to retain its 
vitality and, survive. The reason was that they were over- 
shadowed by a more urgent problem, though incidentally one 
which was much easier to solve, namely, the apparent need for 
a thorough overhaul of what I may call the machinery of the 
Socdety, its administration and organization. It is unnecessary 
for me to recall the serious defects which were discovered after 
(tareful and thorough investigation, nor to repeat the story of 
the refoims wliicb were undertaken and which are rapidly 
approaching completion, as is shown in detail in the Annual 
Report. 

But organization, like patriotism, is not enough. The time 
has now com© to face the more difificnlt problem of the future 
of the Society from the intellectual standpoint, I have not 
much faith in optimists, and find a thoroughgoing pessimist 
much more stimulating for thought. And if it be considered 
pessimistic to face difficulties frankly, then I must plead guilty 
to being a thorough pessimist. , Spongier has described optimism' 
as a form of cowardice, and in a matter so important for the well- 
being of this Society of which I am proud to bo President, I am 
not in the least ashamed to repeat some of the remarks made 
two years ago by my predecessor, and in language upon which' 

(9 ) 



10 


Year-Book RAM.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VH, 


I cannot hope to iinproTe. My only regret is tliafc lie stoic^ my 
tliniidorj and a!iti(‘ipated some of my argumeiitH. Nevertlndess, 
lie has left to iiit‘ the more important tiisk of trying to siiggi\si 
reniedic^s wliidi lie frankly arhuitted, that he eoiihl not all.enrpt, 
within the limited seopt^ of his address. 1 \:) a-void iim 
necessary and iiscdoss task of transhiting his refiectioisH iiit.o 
my own language^ I wall sunmiarize them as follows. 

. The Society w'a<s born at a time when specialists and proi'i*H^ 
sioiial scholars worked with men of general cidtiire in forthc^riiig 
Hhe progress of science and literature’. The l)eneli<,:e.fit 
results of this co-operation wore^ a wider vSiipport for the Society 
both financial and social, work more readable, intelligible.' and 
acceptable to men and women of general cultiire, and the avo:icb 
ance of over-specializatio,n and technicality. WQrld.-tca'idei:icy, 
however, is increasingly towards segregation ami division, into 
specialist groups ami the cre^a-tion of a multitude- of soe,iet)ic'.s 
and institutions, wdiich. in India are sometiim^s m4tlu''.r affluent,, 
flourishing nor powerful, and (.tonsequentiy soon suilVa’ fi'om 
diminished support, am.! from Govcvrnment’s im^rt'asing diffieulty 
in providing help for so many. Gur Society has assiste<i in the 
birth of many such scholarly bodies and institutions, and this 
* has caused necessarily some decix^ase in tlie support availab,li^ 
for the mother Society. 

In these circumstances our Society ha.s to e.onsidt'r whetlu'r 
it has any longer any function to perforin. In the opinion of 
my predecessor and emphatically in mine also, a Society such 
as ours is more urgently needed than ever before. It cannot 
be denied that the world is suffeiing ironi over-specialization, 
In industry it has produced a crop of cwils, wlvidi arc^ shaking 
the very found ati(.)ns of our institutions and civilizat'iom .In 
science we .have a muliitiuie of experts, each pursuing with 
concentration his own particular path, B(,>i,neti.nu,‘s ,^<*ganll(;^ss 
of efforts made in otlier bramlies of sdeauHL a, ml often l.a,rgc*lyg 
if not wholly, ignorant of the rt'.sultis acrhkwcd. have many 
analytical experts, l>ut ap|;>m’entl.y no one (capable of t,re?iii,iig 
the prod.uci, of this amazing toil synt'h<I)i(^aJiy, n(.)m,^ able t,o 
gurv<',iy 'wliole fielil and co-ordinate the rt^sults of s|,KM,‘ializi‘(l 
effort. 

Nowg as every living tiling diqiemis for pi’ogi'csB, if not i’oi' 
existence itself, upon its ability to adapt itself to (’hanged 
environment, so with Socjieties. This is an age of hurry, 8|>oc;*4:.i 
and' complexity, but civilization depends upon kisuri,^ ' and 
contemplation. In every country wo observer th<'. c.)X|)rop:r’iai:.ioiri 
by taxation, or by more violent methcxls, of leisured 'dassew, 
but culture has always depended largely on members of tliosc,:» 
classes. It is an ago of specialization, but, as Clive Bell said in 
'(civilisation’, 'The specialist is never (^ompletc.^Iy civilised*. 
Even i,n our Society I observe a tendency towards ovcisr- 
specialization, and, this must be resisted if we am to survives 



1941] 


Annual Address, 


11 


It is essential for us to realize clearly what our function is, 
and what our aim should be and to follow it consistently. Our 
original name was 'The x\siatick Society’, and in my belief 
we should return to it with the addition of the prefix ' Royal 
It recalls the age of the Societ3^ and emphasizes the fact that 
our interests are not confined to Bengal or even India, but are 
general and unlimited so far at any rate as Asia is concerned. 
We must always lay stress on the universal scope of our activities 
and our study of all that is ' produced by nature or performed 
by man’. Every Asiatic subject is oar province. Further, 
and this to my mind is still more important, we must concen- 
trate upon our own interests to the exclusion of all else, and must 
not allow them to he in any way subservient to those of other 
bodies. We can no longer afford the blood-transfusion that we 
have suffered generously in the past. And above all we must 
seek greater support from the general cultured public. Our 
aim must he to provide something of which there is urgent 
need and which other Societies do not provide— a centre of 
general knowledge and culture. Ours should be a common 
platform upon which specialist and non-specialist can co- 
operate, #here East can meet West and where the expert and 
the man or woman of broad culture can exchange views without 
embarrassment . 

Our publications, again, should be such as will be readable 
by and intelligible to any man or woman of intellect and culture. 
Specialist scientific institutions and societies and the Universities 
and Departments of Government which publish the results of 
research, now absorb much of the material which used to be 
sent to our Society for publication. Science has developed a 
special terminology, almost what I may call a jargon of its own, 
which is unintelligible to anyone but an expert. It is probable 
therefore that the publication of the most important of such 
research work is not being and will not in future be offered to 
us, and, even if it were not so, the publication of such very 
tedmical and. specialized work is unsuitable for a Society such 
as ours. In these circumstances, we must consider whether 
it will be in the interest of the Society to continue publication 
of this kind of matcirial, or whether we should concentrate our 
energies more explicitly upon what may be caUed orientalist 
linos. 

As the years have passed since first T became a member, 
I have noticed a slowly creeping inertia and lack of interest in 
our Society among the general body of our members, and an 
increasing interest on the part of specialists a,nd professional 
scholars. The vivid general interest which created the Society 
and sustained it for so many years seems to have died away. 
Some members seem to regard membership merely as a badge 
of respectability, or social or intellectual superiority, or of learn- 
ing, to be worn only on special occasions such as this. . ' Some 



12 


Year^Booh R,A.B,B. for 1940. 


[VOL« VII, 


seem to allow themselves to be ovei’-persua.d.ed to fice.ept inorii- 
bershi,pj in. which they have no real or si.nc;ere interes't and 
they ha.ve no serious intention eithc^r of using oi.' retaining. 
Our monthly in,eetings are feebly siippori-ed, I think a.ve!‘a,g«^ 
attendances is about a dozen. 8o.m.e <sven of the general I,(a,l;.urc\s 
which have beam arranged hav<s hrck(sd siipportu 

1’ am qnites that to a la'rge <sxt(Uit thes exida-iiation Is 
that the ordinary members liavcs felt a laclv of inijcrc^st in tlic 
subject-matter of some of the papers I’ead and the lt‘c*tirres 
clolivered .3 and I will go so far as to admit .frankly t.liat. J, h.av<,t 
often sympathized with them, part,ly becanse, the papc;‘rs have 
been the result of specialized scientific r(^searc?h, a-iid, not ea.sily 
■understand, able even by i,ntelligent and. c;iiltin,*cd incm, oi' wonicm 
and, partly because the subject s(H'mied. to be* so fa^r !*einov(:’id 
from those vital matters wliich abso.rb our attemtion, to 
exclusion of all else in this inod,ern and rapidly chai,iging world. 
The objects of our Society are not I'imited to a Mus(,uim or a- 
Library or even to Publi(*ations of intornat.ic).!ial r«"pui-e 
above all include the provkion of a (centre for the pix)iiioiion 
of broad and general culture and civilization. India it>Belf is 
in rapid evolution, and there is pressing need, of a (:‘.ent.re for tin? 
discussion of such of its vital problems as are within our ptovinet^ 
as a learned Society. I am of (;ourso aware that siicli matters 
as party politics, sectarian religion, and all such questions a.s 
are liable to excite angry discuission, arc^ and always should be 
outside our province. But political, economic and soc^ial 
science, comparative religion, philosophy, tlie ancient and modern 
literature of East and West, Art in general, ewe-n the scienc('‘. 
of Government, and in fact all such subjects as are witliin the 
province of the cultured man, are ht matter's 'for stii(.Iy and, 
discussion by members of our Society. 

The q'uestion arises whether the (.sultiired man, tlie int.eilec- 
tual, the man of hroad geiuu'al cult'uro is noti gradually bt'c.oming 
extinct. Whether in this workl of t.ro'ubl{3 and. unre.^st, in tills 
tremendous and amazing jioriod «jf transiiiion his pla,ce lias not, 
been ,tahen by tli(,)se mudi less j)leasing ^:igur(^s, tlu'^ “’inl.t'llh 

gentsia’. One thing seems to im quite plain that* tlu'^ 

support of European imm of cultim^, to whitrh the Ho(i<4;;y owes 
its creation and to a great (extent its impt,irtafn(?(,i and HUcxH:x5ft in 
fr)rm.er years, is fast disappearing, owing iio virst»ly iiun'easiHl a-iid 
increasing facilities for transport and (',?ommunicat/ion. In tlie 
history of the world culture and civilization always have dc^pended 
upon a nucleus of men who have enjoyed a cwtain amount of 
leisure. Without some leisure there (iannot be either civilization, 
or culture. The leisure which the European used to spend in, 
India is now more often spent in EiU'ope and there is an intireasing 
tendency for him to devote his time and energy while in India,, 
to the development' of his business or the practice of his profession 
and the preservation of his health, and to postpone intellec4»i,iai 



1941] 


Annual Addmss, 


13 


endeavour and cultural activity until the day when he returns 
either temporarily or permanently to his native land. His 
eyes are always upon the western horizon. In these circum- 
stances it is clear that the future of the Society must depend, 
more and more as the years pass, on Indian men and women of 
cidture and intelligence. The torch is falling into their hands, 
and they are faced with a serious challenge. It would be a sad 
thing if the future produced only specialists and professional 
scholars, and men of broad culture disappeared from the Indian 
scene. Such a possibility is not improbable. For many years 
to come the vital energies of Indians who are not engaged in 
specialist research or professional work vill be absorbed largely 
in party political matters and industrial expansion. 

These then must be the aims and objects of all our efforts 
as members of this ancient cultural Society. To maintain a 
meeting place for cultured man, to preserve and encourage the 
grovl/h and. extension of Asiatic culture and to provide an active, 
vital centre for study and discussion, and the materials for 
that study of which w'-e already possess so great and so valuable 
a store. 

My object this evening has been to stimulate thought. The 
position is precarious. Time is short. We must act quickly. 
1 hope and trust that I am mistaken in my belief that the first 
signs of rot in our Society’s constitution are already perceptible. 
But lest my suspicions be justified, I beg of you all and especially 
the membei’S of your Council and your Officers to set your minds 
on the consideration and solution of this important problem 
with the same zeal, energy, concentration and sound judgment 
as has been devoted to our labours of reorganization. 


Calcutta, 

Zrd Fehrmry, 194L 


John Lobt-Wuxiams. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

■ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL^ 1941. 

Elected and annoimced in the Annual MeeUngy 
February, 1941. 

President, 

The Hori'bie Mr. Justice John Lort-Williams, Kt., KXl 
V ice- Presidents . 

Bt.-CoL Sir R. N. Chopra, Ivt., C.I.E., M..A., Sc.I)., M.i)., 
LM.S.,F.R.A,S.B,,F.N.L 

C. S. Fox, Esq., D.Sc., M.I.Miii.E., .F.G.S., F.R.A.S.B., F.NJ. 
Syamaprasad Mookerjee, Esq., M.A., B.L., I). Lit., Ikirrist-cn'-al » 
Law. 

Sir S. Kadhakrishrian, Kt., M.A., D.Lii., E.B.A. 

Secretaries a/nd Treasurer, 

General Secretary : — B. S. Guha, Esq., M.A., Ph.!)., 

E. N.I, 

Treasurer: — Baini Prashad, Esq., D.Sc., P.Z.S., F.R.S.E., 

F. R.A.S.B., P.N.I. 

Philological Secretary: — S. K. Chatterji, Esq., D.Lii., 

RR.A.S.B. 

Joint Philological Secretary: — *M. Mahfuz-ul Escf,, M.A. 

r Biology : — Kalipa-da Bis wa,s , Es(| . , M, . A . , 
Natural History J D.Sc. 

Secretaries ) Physical Science: — Meghnad Saha., Esq., 
I i,).Sc., F.R.S., F.R.A.S.B., F.N.J. 
Anthropological Secretnay: — ^H, C. Cluiklada'r, Es(|., M,.A. 
Philosophical Secu’ctary :~VanatnaU Vinhinitatirf'laq MA. 
Historical arid Artlneoiogical Seiuadiary :~Kulida'S Nsig, Esq., 
M.A.,D.Lit. 

Medical Secretary: — M'a/jor (j. L. Pa,srielui, M.A,, M.B., BdJi., 

_ M'.R.c.s,, im:.s., f.n’l 

Library Secretary :~J. N. Mukherya*, Esq., D.Se., h\i IS. . 

f.rIa.s.b., F.N'.L 

Other of GouuciL 

S, C. Law, Esq., M.A., B.L., Ph.l)., F.Z.S., MVB.O.U., E.N.L 
M. Z. Siddiqi, Esq., M.A,, Ph.D. 

C. W. Gixmer, Esq., B.A., I.C.S. 

The HonlJe Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgky, M'.A., lhuTiHt«a--af.« 
Law, J.P. ■' 


( 14 ) 



EXHIBITION ANNUAL MEETING. 


List oe Exhibits shown at the Annual Meeting of 
THE Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal on the 
Bed February, 1941. 

Archaeological Survey of India, 

/. Inscribed plaque from Maliasthan, Bogra District, Bengal, 

Inscription in Brahmi characters of the Mauryan period (3rd 
century B.C.) recording an order issued from Pudanagala (Pun^ra- 
nagara ™ Pundravardhana — Mahasthan) for/ helping people in 
distress with corn and coins. 


11. Inscribed hotel of grey schist from Dir State, N. W. India. 

Contains a small inscription in Kharoshthi characters mostly of the 
Kushana period, reading as ‘Jayatasa 4 sahirana ( ?)’. The language 
is the North-Western variety of Prakrit. 


2. Ganendra Nath Banerjee. 


1. Replica of Ganesh — Prom-Penh Museum (Cambodgienne). 

2. Lion — Brass Lion Pedestal. Bengal. 

3. Vishnu — Bangkok (Thailand), 

4. Portion of stupa™— Gandhara. 

5. Wooden mask of rnakara (Bali.) 


3. Ban GIYA Sahitya Parishad. 

Manuscripts of a little-knoum printed work : — 


/. Sringaramsapaddhati — -copied froui an edition printed in 
1840. 


II. Sringaratilakapaddhati — copied from an edition printed in 
1856. 


These manuscripts of one and the same work, published under 
different names, contain the Bengali translation of a Sanskrit work. 
For details cf C. Chakravarti — Sahitya Parisat Patriha^ 39, pp. 258-9. 

( 15 ) 



16 Year-^Book B.A.S.B, for 1940. [voL. vii, 

4. Percy Bro\to. 

(Lent by Rai Bahadur Rabha Krishna Jalan of 
Patna City.) 

Painted Cloth from Nepal. 

IHfo borders ol* cloth, each over 20 foot in leiigtli, and pa,i'n,tcfl witli 
a long series of figure -subjects evidently illustrating some mytho- 
logical or historical subject fully described by ins(?riptions. The 
technique is ^egg tempera’ and it was executed probably in the IStli 
century, if not earlier. It appears to be of Nepali origin. 

5» Calcutta University — Curator, Asutosh Museum of 
Indian Art. 

J Vish^M Fatta in black stone. Found in Bogra, BemjaL 
Date c. loth or llth century A.D. 

Both, the obverse and the reverse of the l^atta doc'jon'ited with 
beautiful carvings. The uppermost corners of the obverse are 
occupied by two flying Gana figures and in the i‘ecta.ngiilar compart - 
meat between them is seen the Seated LahaluuT with two oh^pinmte 
pouring water on her (Gaja-Lakshmi). The square in tin; middle is 
occupied by Vishnu seated on a lotus- throne. On two sides af Vishnu 
Ganga and Yamuna, are standing in Tribhanga. pose. Below Vishnu 
is seen Garuda, oii two sides of whom are two Gana figures in <Toi:iching 
pose. Almost the whole of the reverse is covered with, a ten-petalle(.l 
circular lotus ; each petal is slightly hollowed and in the cavity iihus 
formed the ten Avataras of Vishnu are shown in relief. 


6. SuNiTi Kumar Chatterji. 

A Selection of Ivory and Horn Work. 

L Indimi, including Nepali and Ceylonese. 

1. Mother and 0-hil<l, Old, folk-art of’ primitive stylo. , Ivory 
relief placjuette, 8out}» India, Tamil iauid. 

Pair t>f ,lvt»ry PlaquoH forming ’liilt of Dagger, l^lgiiren of 
Nude 'Woxnen in claiudng jmse. Old. Nori.fi Indian, profafiily 
R.ajput4:».na (daipur) work. 

4. Htanding ’Figu-rc <A' Man witli a long {'Fop of* Bow 

darnag(3d). Old. .B<mgal (Mtirshidabad) worli. 

5. Seated '.Figure oC Vaishuava 'Fea{,!|}er. M'od,(a*n. Beigpil 
(Murshidabad) 'w<")rk. 

6. fStanding Hanuman. ,]Vh,)d.ern. Andhra, or Telugu (Viwnga.^ 
pata,m) work. 

7. 8ea/ted Oanesa. Modern. Travancore (Trivandrum) work, 

8. Standing Krishna. Modewi. Travan,(if>TO*(TrivarM'l,ruTO) work. 

9. Standing Nayar 'Woman. Modern, •'.Frivandruin. 

10. Tamil Bride, Standing Figure, Modorrn Trivandrum. 

11. Palniyandavar, or Young Skaiida as Sivaite M:t;mdic;a.n1.. 
Modern , Tri vandrum . 

12. Buddha and Sujata, Modern, Nepal (,K,<xthmandw). 

13. Standing Buddha, with painted wooden Bfu.fkgrouml Old. 
Kandy. 



1941] 

I.L Burmese. 


Exhibits Annual Meeting. 


17 


14»15, Horseman and Elephant-rider. Chess Figures in Old yStyle. 
Modem. From Rangoon. 


III. Javanese. 

16-17. Two carvings in Deer Horn. Human Figures in Primitive 
style as Seal Handlers. Sundanese (West Javan) work. 

18. Seal Handle in Buffalo Horn. Bust of Figure in Wm/ang 
Purwa or Classical Theatre Dress. East Javanese work. 


I F. Chinese. 

_ 19-20. Two of the Pa Hsien or Eight Immortals. Old. Painted 
in Brown Patina. South China work. 


F. Japanese. 

21. Chinese Sage. Modern. 

22. Girl binding her sash. Modern. 


7. Geological Survey of India. 

The Sulphur Problem in India. 

Map showing occurrences of sulphur, pyrite and gypsum in India. 
Specimens : — 

Sulphur? Baluchistan 
Sulphur, Afghanistan 

Pyrite, Bihar 
Pyrite, Simla 

Ohaleopyrite, Singhbhum, Bihar 
Pyrrhotite, Bihar 
Gypsum, Salt Range, Punjab 
Gypsum, Bikanir State, Bajputana 
Gypsum, Nr. Rikhikesh, TJ.P. 

8. Bb. Mbs. Eileen W. E. Maofablanb. 

i. Photographs of some Aborigines connected with the Blood 
Grouping in India. 

1. Gardl. Taking and testing Munda bloods, Singhbhum Dist., 

Behar. (Photos by G. Oleghorn.) 

2. Card II. Malabar and Travancore — Western Ghats. 

Kanakars, Paniyans and Nayadi woman. Malayalam-speaking, 

wandering agriculturalists and hunters. Probably possess 
Negrito and Australoid strains. Show least of Blood Group B 
in India and most of Group A. 



18 


Year^Book B.A.8.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


3. Card III. Eastern Ghats, south Hyderabad State. 

ChencJms — ^nomadic food hunters without agriculture. Toliigu- 
speaking but related to tribes of Western Ghats. ■ Show Aus- 
traloid fea.tures. Belong mostly to Groups 0 and A with Group 
B coming in by racial crossing. Different physical types shown 
and two persons afflicted with Yaws. View of their junglc' 
shows BaiiMnia Vahlii W. & A, giant liana wliose seeds the}" 
eat. From it the Birhor (Card V) make string, rope and 
baskets. Note round thatched wattle huts. 

4. Card IV. Eastern Ghats — Bastar State. 

Gadba girls, Koraput District, wearing home-spun, dyed and 
woven cloths. 

Bison Head Maria Gonds — Gondi-speaking, primitive agricultural- 
ists and hunters. Fiery tempered tribe, several convicted 
murderers met in Jagdalpur Jail. Women shown in hostel of 
Government Yaws Clinic. Blood Groups O, A and B about 
equally distributed as in Mimdas. 

5. Card V. Chota Nagpur. 

Birhor (Forest Men) — complete nomads and food hunters, no 
agriculture and no shelters but tents of leafy branches as 
shown. Speak a Mundari dialect. Make storing, nets and 
baskets from liana bark to sell. Relish monkey flesh. Show 
Aiistraloid features. Small camp visited in Singhbhurn 
District, No bloods taken. 

6. Card VI. Chota Nagpur — of Singhbhurn Diet. Primitive 

agriculturalists and hunters. Blood groups show they are 
related to Maria Gonds. 

7. Card VII. Chota Nagpur — Oraans of Ranchi Dist. Primitive 

agriculturalists and hunters. Dancing scenes and pliysical 
types. Belong chiefly to Blood Groups O and B. 

8. Card VIII. Bengal — Immigrant Oraons, labourers in 24-Parganaa 

Dist. Note man with frizzy hair. Differ in blood gr<.)U|) 
distribution from neighbouring Mundas. 

Bagdi boy and child, 24-Parganas Dist. Agriculturalists witli 
aboriginal affinities. 

9. . Card IX. Aurangabad District, Deccan — Bhils, |)rimiti\'<^ iigrb 

culturalists and hunters. Young<;^r mon bIk.jwu are d('H{Hmdcd 
from converts and are now called Mohammedan Bliils. 
group showed over 50% in Group B, 

Banjaras — carriers hy trade, nomads now getiiliog down to bt:^ 
cultivators. Blood groux^s show a north Indian strain— not 
aborigines. Note women’s elaborate tjustomes. 

10. Card X. Darjeeling District, North Bengal. 

Nepalese women and a Lepcha girl at Kalimpong. M.ongoloid bill 
people. Differ from Bengalees in having rnon-'> of' Group A 
than Group B. Have less of B than Bongalees Imt thim, 
Tibetans. 

IL Card XI. Tibet, Sikkim and Bhulan-^BImtias, the Mongoloid 
Mountain folk. 

Like other isolated peoples they belong chiefly to Groups 0 and A, 
but Group B is coming in through racial crossing with Chinese 
and Nepalese, 



1941] 


Exhibits Annual Meeting. 


19 


12. Card XII. Khasi Hills, Assam. — Khasi young people and mega- 
liths, Cherrapunji. Blood Group distribution resembles that 
in Tibetans, Mongoloid Hill people. 

JL Prehistoric Cyst Grave, excavated. Near Hyderabad City, 
Demm. Photographed March, 1940 . 

9. Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta. 

1. Tung -oil yielding Plants Cultivated in India. 

Experiments on the cultivation of some of the Tung-oil yielding 
plants in the Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta during the last half 
a century and sufficient data collected from the experimental cultiva- 
tion in Assam, Behar, Bengal, Mysore and Burma indicate that 
cultivation of Tung-oil trees on a commercial scale will be successful 
in India. 

Sketches of the different species of Tung-oil yielding plants together 
with actual specimens are exhibited. Fruits and seeds of Aleurites 
Fordii and Aleurites montana are also displayed, 

A map showing the distribution of Tung-oil trees in their original 
habitat is also exhibited. 


II. Some. Bare Phnts of the Botanical Garden. 

1, SaccMabium gnttatmn — East Indies and Malaya. Hardy 

Ekyncostylis retusa garden epiphytic Orchid. In- 

Blume. troduced — 1932. 


2. Dracaena sp. (Showing 
bud mutation.) 


3. Lycopodium phlegmaria L. 


4. Primula obcorda Hance . . 


f). Begonia hydrocotyliJoUa 
Otto. 

6. Saxijraga purpurascens 

Hook. ' ' 

7. Ananas sativus Schult var. 

variegata. 


The gi*een plant has given out a 
variegated branch which can be 
taken out and propagated as a 
garden variety. 

India and Malaya. Introduced 
from Assam in 1939. The 
species can be propagated from 
cuttings and layering. 

This was introduced from China 
and are grown from seeds. 
These can be seen in the 
Eastern Himalaya. 

Mexico. This can b© grown from 
seeds as well as from cuttings. 
Introduced in 1900. 

Region Himalaya. This can be 
grown as an annual in Calcutta. 

America. This was introduced in 
1020. The fruit is insignificant. 
This can be propagated from 
the cuttings as well as from the 
buds that develop under the 
fruit. 


8. Mammillaria tenuis D.C. Mexico. This plant was intro- 
duced in this garden at about 
1840. The plant can be pro- 
duced both from seeds and 
cuttings. Flowers many, 
creamy during April to, July. 



20 


Year-Book M.A.8.B, for 1940. 


[VOL. VIII, 


9. 

EcJdnomotus titbifiorus 

Hort. 

Mexico. The seed was bnnigiif:. 
from Germany in 1,933 and iln'* 
plant %vas raised. 

10. 

Mehinmactus sp. 

Thi.s was raised trmn seetis o'f 
1933, Seeds o'btaiiw,^! 

Germany. 

IL 

Echinocacttis Le.Contci Eu- 
golm. 

Mexico. This is a gigantic S|,)Oci«'is, 
raised from seeds, friCr* 

Germany in 1932. 

12. 

N epenik&s Khasianu 

Hook.f. 

Assam. Insectivorous plant. In- 
troduced from Assam. Cati 
propagated from air layering. 

13. 

Gymnogramnie Calomela - 
nos chrysophylla Kaulf. 

West Indies. Gold Fern. 

14. 

Adiantum tenerimi var. 
Farleyense, 

Sterile fern received from W'csiv 
Indies. Tliis is propagated by 

division. 

16. 

Adimitwn Lathomi var. , . 

A sterile sport from A,. Lathomi 
separated in this garden. TIus 
can be propagated by division 

only. 

16. 

Nephrolepis Marshalli 

A garden variety (,>f coiupiU'i msd 
delicate hal)it. 


10 « School of Teopical Medicine, 

J. Serological Method of Blood Taking and Blood Grouping » 

1-2. Two diagrams of serological eonsfcitutioii. of blood gr(»ii|)S. 

3. A model of one of the diagrams, 

4. Potain’s Aspirator for taking blood in a closed system 
much discomfort to the donor, 

5. Cellophane bag for concentrating plasma. 


IL Trichophyton craterifomie Bodin^ 1902. 

I he fungus is recorded for* the first time iti India and ih rosponyibb' 
for causing ringwox'm hifoction of the scalp in a groui) of girls in 
board Sch,ool in Calcutta. 

In 1845 Malmsten first described the disease m I’ricjhopliyfcoif 
tonsurans. The, fungus belongs to the class— -Hyphotnyt^etr's. ' ("Sen « i 
Trichophyton 

Cultural charactem : — Early culture showB a rouini growtii \vit4i n, 
velvety surface; with age, the centre be(!o:nH,\s raiH(,H.! an<,i ibj'jit'-t a. 
central depression giving the appearance of a ci’at(,u' of nod 

hence the name crateriforme. 

.----Causes ringworm of the scalp, cUaicallv iodistio. 
guishabie from other form of Trichophytosis. 


III. Oriental Sore. 

(Photograph) showing lesicm on nose. 

2B. Ihe causal organism as seen in tissues' am,! in liultures. 



21 


1941] Exhibits Annual Meeting. 

IV. Acute Infective Jaundice. 

Leptospira icferokaemorrJiagiaef the spirochacte responsible for 
the disease in the tissues of experimentally infected animals. 

2. Leptospira as seen in culture under the dark ground illumination. 

F. Mat bite fever. 

1. Cases (coloured plates) showing lesions at the sit© of hit©. 

2. Spirillum Minus ^ the causative organism as seen in the blood 
and peritoneal fluid of the infected mice. 


il. Bahadur Sihgh Sihghi. 

Fanrnns of the Mogul Period. 

1. Harman granted by Jalalu-d-din Muhammad Akbar Shah 
Badshah Ghazi to Bhagwan Qanungo of the Subah of Bengal when 
he presented himself in the Imperial presence ; in recognition of Ms 
loyalty, faithfulness and best services, confirming his appointment 
of the office of Qanungo which he held and issuing the Imperial 
edict to all concerned to work in collaboration with him and also to take 
his decisions in all affairs concerning the land affairs of the Subah 
and granting the sum. of Rupees Two thousand seven hundred and 
fifty and Seven thousand Bighas of cultivable land in Mahal Monohar- 
shahi as reward besides the customs due and available to the Qammgo ; 
dated the 7th day of the month of Aban-e-Ilahi in the regnal year 
36 equivalent to 11 Zilhaj, Hijri year 999. 

Bearing the seal of the Emperor. 

Reverse 

Entry of the Prime Minister Saif-al-din Pateh Khan, 
Paymaster-General Shaikh Farid Khan and Raja Todarmall. 

Bearing seals of Farid Khan, Asaf Khan and Todarmall. 

2. Farman granted by Jalalu-d-din Mulia/inmad Akbar Badshah 
Ghazi, appointing Qazi Nizam to the offiic© of the Qanungo of Bijnor. 
His duties will be to collect the revenues, encourage the ryots to 
settle there and generally look after the welfare of the people. Dated 
29 Bahi II, 978 A.H, (September 1670 A.D.) 

Bears the Em,peror*8 seal. 

3. Farman gi‘ant©d by Nuru-d-din Muhammad Jahangir Badshah 
Ghazi to the principal officers of the State. They are not to introduce 
any imiovations in the established practice and procedure of th© 
administration and are to refrain from levying certain specified 
taxes. Dated 10 Amardad 19 Ilahi (1606 A.D.) 

Bears th© tughra and the seal of the Emperor. 

4. Farman granted by Abu-al-Zafar Muhi-ud-din Muhammad 
Aurangzeb Alamgir Badshah to Mu’taminu-d-Daulah. Desires him 
not to give any definite reply to Ghalib Khan who has offered to win 
over the Qflahdar of Sholapur to His Majesty’s side, for His Majesty 
has already commissioned Adil Khan for the task. Wants him to 
give an appointment to Bahlol’s son and assure him of th© royal 
favour. Eraj Khan is appointed governor of Berar in place of 
Shahbaz ' Khan, deceased. Leaves it to his discretion'' either to 
re-appoint Persu, Yusuf* and Karan to the cavalry or to dismiss them. 
2 



22 


Year-Book E.A.S.B, for 1940 . 


[¥OL« ¥11; 


TSie services of the 900 musketeers already with liim and 1^000 
that are being sent there under Mustafa Khan slia-Il be i*otaii'iC3d till 
the expedition comes to a successful close. Their pay will bo ^niot 
from the Imperial Treasury. Dated the 22nd .Tuniada II, 3 Jiilus 
(1661 A.D.). ' 

Bears the Emperor’s autograph and seal. 

5. Famiaii granted by Abu-ahZafar Molu-ud-dJii Miihamii'Mid 
Aurarigzeb Alamgir Badshah appointing Slmikli Iinac.i,ud Diu fch{'3 C^a,zi 
and Mulitasib of pargaiia Sandela in sarkar Lucknow. is grantijcl 
200 bighas of land out of the pargana for his services and is Ibrbiddx^ii 
to levy imauthorized cesses. Includes other iiistructions. Dated 
11 Rajab 23 Jiiliis (July 1681 A.D.) 

Bears the seal of the Emperor. 

0. Farman granted by Abul Fateh Nasir-al-din Muliarninad SImiIi 
Bahadur Badshah Ghazi, in regard to tho oflitje of Ivatiungoi of lu'ilf 
the province of Bengal, fallen vacant on the death of Darp Narain, 
to which his son Ishwar JNarain, like tlio deceased, on the acce|"»tanco 
of Poshkasli of Rupees Ten lakhs by the Imperial Court, was appoirite<!, 
with the same privileges as before an<i with the t'u’dcr that hci sliail 
carry on fully the duties assigned to that oihco; da,t(‘d 17tl» 8afar 
in the regnal yeax* 8, 

Bearii ig tlie seal of the Emp(>ror. 

Reverse 

Bears tho seals of Minister Emad-abdaulali Qumar»al-din Khan 
Chin Bahadur Nusrat Jung and Raja Amar SSingli, son of Raja 
Raghunath. 

7. Farniaii granted by Abu JSTasar Moin-al-din Muliaminad Ak,'bar 
Shah II, Emperor of Delhi, conferring honour on Syed Jafar All 
Khan Bahadur by bestowing upon him tho title of ZuIfokar«al» 
dowlah Muzaifar Jung and ordering the Imperial Priiices, W'azii’S a.nd 
all concerned to use this style in addressing the aforesaid Khan, 
Granted on 27th day of Zilhaj in the regnal year I. 

Bearing tho seal of the Empt^ujr. 

8. Farrnaii granted by Abu Nasar Moin-al-din M'lilimiuntid Alihiu’ 
8hah II, Einporor of Dellii, conferring on Muluinumul Ta,(ji Khan tlio 
title of Baluxdur Bahram Jang and on Wycd Muluunmad K,han ih<3 tli<lo 
of Iqui{lar“al-<Iowlah Bahaclur Ka.rini f)ang aiH,i on, tSyod MiitlUi'b 
Kl'ian thc'^ title of M/ukram-al-daulah, Bahadur Asful .h.ing and on 
Syed Muliamnmd Roza Khan the title o(‘ hViklrr-a.I-dovvIah Lahadur 
Shurnsiier Jang and on 8yed Mj,ihainri'ui.d ll'.udj Kluin the tlilc of 
lnitiaz-a!“dowIah, ikdiadur Baliadnr Jang a.nd on Hyod Anhkari 
Khai'i tho title'! of K nsrat-al-daidah Baliadnr Munir Ja'ug jind dirtH^iing 
tlie Royal Rrlnxaw and the M’lnistura and th.e grandees olhuninoiu'e and 
all coneerntMi with the Imperial Court as also tin,! adini'niHl<rat.orB 
of tho provinces to eordVirxn submissively to tlie Iiu{">erial order liorofiy 
given at a'n auspicious .moment imdou* the linpcvrial. Ht:?al on 8th 
of Safar-al-Muzaffar in tho regnal year 11. 

Bearing the seal of the Emperor. 

As by this one Farman titles have been conferrod on six diffenxnt 
personages of the Emperor’s Court, it is presrimed that this Farman 
is a. Court copy lor preservation iix the Imperial arcln.v<3s ami also 
to b© used for the purpose of proclai.nation fm'xn tho G'rand stairiiaso 
of th© Jumma Masjid on the day of the conferment of tln.i ti'tlc'.«. 

9. Farman granted by Ghazi-ai-din Haidar, Nawab of I..ucknow> 
graxiting on his accession to the throne an aii'uuity of Rupees Two 
thousand four hundred to th© divme Moulvio Syed'M'uhaixnuad Baker 


on 



1941] 


Exhibits Annual Meeting. 


n- 


and Maiiiavi Saiyad Muhammad Sadiq, sons of the great divine’ 
Maiilavi Saiyad Muhammad Saheb with effect from the 28th Rahi- 
ul-awal Hijri year 1248. 

Bearing the seal of the Emperor. 


12 . Zoological Survey of India. 

/. The Real Sacred Sinistral Chank and its Model. 

To the religiously -minded who seek to possess a Dakshinavarta 
Shankha or the sinistral chank at any cost, the model exhibited here 
should serve as a warning. The sinistral chank is an extreme rarity, 
one in about six million normal dextral shells of the sacred chank 
fishes being of the abnormal sinistral form. When it is remembered 
that during the last 300 years of chank -fishing on the Indian coasts 
only 120 sinistral shells have been obtained according to an autho- 
ritative estimate, the rarity of the Dakshinavarta Shankha is beyond 
question. 

The model prepared for exhibition in the Invertebrate Gallery 
of the Indian Museum and exhibited here with the original is a- good 
imitation of the latter, and no one with a sincerely religious mind 
would care to test the genuineness of his would-be treasure by di’opping 
it on a piece of granite or by using against it the hammer. 

The left-handed Chanks are luiown to the Tibetans as ya clwil 
to the Chinese as Ya hsuan pai-lei, and to the Tamils as 
V(ilmnjyuri Sangu. Tliey form an important part of the treasures 
of rich and ortliodox households, temples, and mutts to which they 
are often dedicated as offerings by the devotees. 

A good-sized sinistral shell of cpiality may fetdi a iDrice varying 
from Rs.500 to Rs.5,000 depending on the weight of the shell in 
tolas. 

II . Specimens of Bark Cloth from India and Oceania. 

Tlie use of bark of various trees, for purposes of eiotliing was very 
extensive in ancient times and references were made in the Ramayana 
(I. 1) and Ma]ial)liarata (I. 157. 1-2). At the present time its use 
is restri(d»ed to several a))oi*iginal tribes of India, the Andaman and 
tlie Nict.)bar Islands, Malaysia, Melanesia, x\frica, and Central and 
Soutli America. 

Spetdruons of bark elotli of the Garos (Assam), the Kadars (vSouth 
India), Nieoliarese, the Malays, the Javanese, Fijian and tliO' 
Polynesians (Ha;waii) arc exhibited hero. 

The bark of the trees used are: (i) Prap {FicAw Rmnphi)^ (ii) Cliram 
(Artomrptm ChaplasJia)^ (iii) Pakrani {Gretvia lilkm folia), (iv) Dunibri 
{Ficus Glommatu), (v) Anisep (Kydia (Jalycma) in the Garo hills; 
Arayiru (AMiaris Toxicaria) among the Radars; Ficus brevimspiB' 
among the Nicobarese; and paper Mxilberry (Morns papynifera^ 
Mroussonetda paqyyHfera) in Melanesia and Polynesia. 

They were used originally as clothing but now mostly as sleeping 
mats and blankets. 

The method used for preparing the bark is everywhere the same 
with minor variations. It may roughly foe described as fellows: — 
A young and a straight branch is cut off and subjected to a thorough 
pounding by a smooth stick after which a pointed stick is run along 
the whole length of the branch under the bark which is split open 
and pulled off. The outer layers of the green bark are carefully 
shaved off' until the reddish brown fibre is exposed* This is then 
laid on a smooth surface and well pounded from one end to the other,, 





Year-Book R.AB.B. for 1940. 


[VOL« VII, 


ruimiiig along, a.nd not across the fibre, with a serrated malle-t. When 
this is done it is doubled over lengthwise a.nd again beaten and. tiio 
process is repeated until the bark is I’ednced to a thictc. mass of fibre. 
The layers of the hbre are then unfolded and tlie inoisfuire wrung 
and dried in tlie sun. 

In cases of large ones, the pieces are eithivr struck tog«d;.lu.vr bj? 
gurn or sewn. In Malaysia harks are soaked in water f“or s<vvaral 
days before being beaten to obtain the necessary e.oloiirs. In 
Melanesia and Polynesia, the barks, after being prepared are orna- 
mented witli designs .made from natural dyes. 

The whole process of the inanufaeturo of bark cloth is carried out 
by both men and women except in Melanesia and Polynesia where 
the art is confined to women. 

III. Artificially Deformed Shull of a Chinook from the ColimMa 
River, Oregon, N, America. 

The practice of the artiftcial deformation of sindl W'as .r^^serted to 
ill ancient times and is still found among many tribc'S. 

There are several methods by wbicii skulls can lie artificially 
deformed atfecting diderent regions of the skull, fcg. oe.cipitak frontal, 
ocoipito-frontal, fronted -ayncipito -occipital, etc. 

Of the occipito -frontal deformations one is known as : (1) ‘ctoiKjhd * or 
flat, and (2) the other is ‘dressde* or ei’ect. J3oth are prevalent 
among the Chinooks of Oregon, who live in the Columbia liiver 
valley. 

The skull exhibited is of an adult Chinook, presumably male, and 
was acquired from the American Museum of Natural History of 1882. 
It shows occipito -frontal deformation of the ‘dress^o’ typo. The 
forehead and the back part of the skull are so flattened tliat the (Tania! 
vault has acquired a peculiar shape, rising steeply to the back. 

Thex'e is a broad depression on the anterior part of the parietal 
bones reaching to the squama of the temporal bone. Traces of other 
depressions are noticeable running backwards from, above the oar- 
holes. There are traces also of an injury on the top of tlio right 
parietal bone, partially healed. 

The accompanying sketches sliow how artificial d(’‘fbrmatio:ri of 
.skulls is brought about by swatliing the head of tlit^ new’-l:>oru bniby 
in bandages, or fixing it betweoii wooden boarders for sevfTal montlm. 
Tlwi ( 3 u,stom was p,revale,nt in Pro-Ct,)luinbian times nn,K„>ng the i-ribes 
of Pci’u, North Mexico, the old Cliff-dwcdlers anri ,M,«,>und-builcier.s 
in Florida and among tlu^ €ak.‘haciui in Arg<?n,tiii<\ It is still found 
among th,e Apat'ljos Nav'ahos, PiK.Vhlo-lndijms, j'n j^luropi* it, is 

practised in »S(-a:ithern .Fran(>e, Normandy, .Brittany, otic. 


13. Eoyal Asiatic Society op B.ek0al. 

J, Some interesting Mamiscripts with paintings, etc., frmn ifm 
Arabic and Persian Section. 

(1) QuYan Sharif’-^ A copy notable for- its superb calligraphy « 
The entire copy of the Q\ur*an is written in 32 foil. Each pSra 
is practically completed in two pages, and a very interesting feature 
of the MS. lies in^ the fact that each line starts with alif. 

(2) Shdhndma.^An. old copy of the great work of Ifirdmisi Tusl 
in 2 vols* containing 60 illustrations. It was written in A.H. 1017- 
A.I>. 1608. (Repaired in 1937.) 



1941 ] 


Exhibits Annual Meeting. 


25 - 


(3) Tafslr4~Qur''dn. — ^An early Persian commentary on the Qur’an 
by Muliammad b. Mahmud Mshapuri in 2 vols. The copy 5, an 
excellent specimen of the calligraphic art of Khorasaii, is writteii by 
an expert scribe, ’Alx b. Muhammad b. Ahmad al-adib al-Bukharl 
Sayyidiil-Khattat, in A.H. 686-A.D. 1286. (It was repaired in 
1940 .) 

(4) A.l-Ihhtimr waH-Tajr%d. — An autograph copy by Muhammad 
bin TJthman-al'Khahli. It is a work on tradition, compiled in 
A.H, 728— A.D. 1328. 

(6) AUJam'hayna's-SaMhayn, — ^A copy of the rare work on tradition 
by Muhammad bin Abi Nasr Futuh al-Andalusi, who died in A.H. 488™ 
A.D. 1095. This MS. is stated to have been collated with the- 
autograph copy in Damascus by the Khatib of the mosque in 
A.H. 711~A.D. 1311. (It was repaired in 1935.) 


II. Some old Sansicrit Manuscripts. 

(1) Kutfmiiniata. — It is about 750 years old. 

(2) Naisadhacarita {with conmwntary hy Narahari). — This copy 
was made about 400 years ago. (Repaired in June 1940.) 

(3 ) Bfhati or Prabhdkara/tnimdmsd. — ^The author is Prabhdkarami§ra^ 
This manuscript is also about 400 years old. This is probably the- 
only M’S. containing the first six chaixters of this work, now extant. 

(4) Bhdfiimti hy S'atdnanda with commentary by Balahhadra Dai- 
vajna. — The author of this astronomical work is older than 
Bhaskaracarya, The manuscript is about 250 years old. 

(6) Commentary on Astasdha»riJcdprajndpdramitd hy Maitreya . — ^It 
is a work on Bauddha pbilosophy. No other copy is probably extant. 


III, Old and rare printed books traced in the Library of the 
Society. 

1, Baldaeus: Description of Bast India^ Coasts of Malabar^, 

Coromandel and Ceylon, and of the Idolatry of the Pagans in SJm 
Bast Indies, Yoh UI, pp. 563-901. London, 1703. 

Tlw book contains description of the kingdoms of South India 
and Ceylon in the 17th century; their citiciS, chief harbours,. 
temf)les, jiroducts and living creatures, as well as manners and 
cuatomB 'of the inhabitants. The book contains maps and 
aketelies ^ drawn to the life and cut in coppei>piates 

2. Toz'/o: Bales ami Emmples of Perspective proper for Painters 

a/nd Architeclnre, etc. London, 1707. 

Tho book deals with the ‘Rules and examples of i^erspective proper 
for paintfvrs and architects, etc., in English and Latin L 
It cjontains ‘ a most easy and expeditiotxs method to delineate^ 
in perspective all designs relating to architecture, after a new 
manner, wholly free from the occult lines by that great Master*. 
Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Jos., engraved in 105 ample folio plates^, 
and adorned with 200 initial letters to the explanatory 
discourses 

The book is dedicated to ‘Her Most Sacred Majesty Queen Anne®' 
by tile translator, John Strut. 

S. short History of the Bast India Company and of their trade ta> 
India and China, Second Edition, London, 1793. 



^6 


Year-Booh E.A.8,B, for 1940 . 


[VOL. VII, 


The book gives ‘ a short history of the East India Company exhibiting 
a state of their affairs, abroad and at Home, political and 
commercial; the nature and magnitude of their commerce, 
and its relative connection with the Governinei'it a-ncl revoiiiies 
of India, and a discussion on the question of right to the 
conquered territories in India; also remarks <'>n the danger 
and impolicy of innovation, and the practical m<MS.ns of 
ensuring all the good effects of a free trade to the jmin;ufai<dnrers 
'fh Great Britain and Ireland, by matter of Regulation, without 
disturbing the established system 

The book is by F.R.. 

4. Wilks; Report on the Interior Administration^ Resources and 

Ex 2 ')enditurG of the Government of Mysore nnder the tSysteni 
prescribed, by the orders of the Governor ’■General in Council 
dated 4th September^ 1799. Fort William, 1805. 

The aiithor of the book is Major M. Wilks, ‘of the establislunent of 
Fort St. George, Acting Resident at Mysore It was ‘ ]:>rinted 
by the order of the Governor-General in Council, Fort William, 
4th May, 1805 

The book deals with the report on the state of affairs <jf Mysore 
immediately after the Mysore War and (*ontains statements of 
the gross revenues and disbursements from the year 1799 to 
1803: 

It is written on the title page that the book is a ‘present to the 
Asiatic Society by Lord Wellesley, 3rd .July, 1805 

5. Warren Hastings; h4 narrative of the InsiirrecMon which happened 

in the Zemeedary of Banaris in the month of Awjust^ 1781, 
and of the Transactions of the Governor -General in that District ; 
with an A^^pcndix of authentic papers and xi (jfidavit8\ Rioorkee, 
1853. 

The first edition of this book was published by order of the Governor- 
General in 1787, but the copy cf the Society is a re-printed 
edition of the same at the C.E. College Press, Roorkee, 1853. 

The author’s name does not appear on the title page, but the first 
letter that appears after the title page and the Iiitroducf.ion, 
both hear the signature of Warren Hastings. It was writt(‘U 
Ho guard the minds of my superiors against the suspidons to 
which all great political movemcaita are liable, esptMually bucIi 
as pass at a distam^e from observati<m, and arc^ attended, wif li 
violent eornrulsioi'is, or revolutions in any of the grea-t dt'*pend- 
enc-ies or x'dations of Governmejit, an<:l to wlucli Fr'otn tlieir 
conformity to that d<>S(.vri|)tion my late tra-nsaetions in jiajuw’in 
were particularly <^xpose<i’. 

ft Colebrooke : A. Oramnu.tr of the Bamkrit iM.nyu Vol. I ({U’lnted 
at the Honourable Company’s Press, Galtsutta, IH05), 

Colebrooke’s Sanskrit Grammar is the first of its kind tct bc^ printed 
and published. The a,\ithor was a gri^at Ha-imkrit «<‘l'iolar, 
who was the President of the'Asiatick 8o(u'(dy ’ of Bcaigal from 
1,806 to 1815 and, the founder of tlie Roya,^ABiati(^ Roci<4.y of* 
Great Britain and Ireland, and his grar,m:nati<.^al (?bBtjr\od*ionH 
are noteworthy. The work is exceedingly sf'aree and dillleidt 
to obtain. It appears that only Volume I was printed. 


IV, The Society's Publications in 1940 . 

(1) Journal; — 

(a) Letters, (b) Science, (c) Year-Book. 



1941] 


Exhibits Annual Meeting, 


27 


(2) Memoirs, 

(3) Bibliotheca Indica: — 

(а) Arabic and Persian. 

(б) Sanskrit. 

(c) Sanskrit and Tibetan. 

(d) English Translations. 

(e) Ltisliai-English, 

If) Maitliili. 

(4) Catalogue of Manuscripts : — 

Sanskrit. 




AINUAL REPORT FOR 1940. 


Tile Council of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal has the 
honour to submit the following report on the state of the 
Society's aifairs during the year ending the 31st December* 
1940. 

During the year the re-organization and overhauling of the 
work of the Society recommended by the Special Enquiry 
Committee was steadily pursued and though a great deal still 
remains to he done before the task can be completed, sufficient 
progress was made to ensure efficient administration and to 
recover in a great measure the ground lost during past years. 
With the introduction of system and order and co-ordination of 
work in the office it w^as' found possible to deal fully and 
expeditiously with all the business and correspondence of the 
Society. Similarly, notwithstanding heavy capital expenditure 
for steel furniture and a large outlay on printing, binding 
and repairing of MSS. and books, the finances of the Society 
were placed on a sounder footing by the reduction of the salary 
bill from 59% of the total income of the Society in 1937 to 44% 
in 1940, and elimination of all avoidable expense. The 
installation of steel shelving enabled the valuable printed 
collections and manuscripts belonging to the Society to be more 
safely housed. Additional facilities, in the shape of a furnished 
room set apart for study and the extension of library hours^, 
wore provided, for members and visitors. Eor an institution 
of the type of the R.A.S.B., however, these improvements 
are not enough; its position in the international world of learning 
being d.opendent on the prestige its publications command in the 
estimation of .kind.red bodies. The solicitude with which scholars 
and scientists are now regarding the pages of its Journal and 
Memoirs as proper media for their researchers, and the numerous 
requests received, for exchange, augur well for the future of 
the Society as the premier academic institution in this country* 

Mr. J, R. Seal, who worked as Assistant Secretary 

from August 1938, left the service of the Society in May, 1940, 
to fill the post of Secretary of the Karachi Chamber of Commerce, 
and Mx. J. C. Do, M.A. (Lond.), Lectiuer in History in th© 
University College, Colombo, was appointed in his place. The 
Council takes this opportunity of placiog on record its high 
appreciation of the services rendered by Mr. Seal during a 
period of heavy strain and stress consequent on the re- 
organization of the affairs of the Society. 

(29 ) 



30 


[VOX-., vn, 


Year^Book E.A.S.B, for 1940. 

Ordinary Members* 

Gains and Losses . — -These were as follows : — 


Gains. Losses. 

Elections carried forward .. 7 Lapses of elections «. 15 

New Elections . . , . 51 Elec'tious carried over . . 9 

Deaths . . - . 7 

Resignations . . .. 9 

Rule3S .. ..7 

Hide 40 .. .. 10 

Total . . 58 Total . . 57 


Initial total 386; net gain 1; final total 387. 

Rule 38. — ^^rhia Rule concerning inemTbers whose subscriptions 
are in arrears, was strictly applied and the names of 7 ineinbors 
were removed from the roll. 

Membership List. — ^The annual detailed ciKxikiiig of the 
membership list with the membership card index was made*. 

Life Members. — The number of our Life-m.embars at thc^ end 
of the year was 57. 

Deaths. — ^Amongst the distinguished and espociially valued 
members lost to us, whose memory will be cherished, and for 
whose departure the Society is the poorer, the following may be 
mentioned : — 

1. Rai Bahadur Kanak Lai Bariia (1931). 

2. Prof. A. C. Vidyabhusana (1905), 

3. Rai Bahadur Charnparam Misra (1912), 

4. J. W. L. Grieve (1900). 

Neto elections. — The election of O.rdinary Membt'^rs, 
amoixnting to 51, was the highest for the last five yc^ars. 

Associate Members* 

The following new Assoc.ia,tt^ Member was eleettuf 

Dr. "K W. E. :Macfar]au(\ 

The present number stands at 7, l.hc^ st.a.iutt>rv maximum 
is 15, 

Ordinary Fellows* 

At the Annual Meeting held on tlie 5tli b\d)ruary, 194X1, the 
following members were elected as Orditiary Fellows 

Dr. U. N. Ghoshal. 

Dr. B. C. Law. 

Dr. R. 0. Majurndar. 

Dr. H. S. Pnifchi. 

Wo lost through death the following:— 

Sir E. D, Ross (19X0). 



1941] A nnual Report. 31 

At the end of the year the number was 49, the statutory 
maximum is 50. 


Honorary Fellows, 

Wo lost through death the following : — ■ 

Sir Joseph John Thomson, Kt., O.M., F.R.S. (1915). 

The number at the end of the year was 21 ; the statutory 
maximum is 30. 

Condolences. 

The Council sent letters of condolence to the relatives of the 
following : — 

Rai Bahadur Kanak Lai Barua, 

J. W. L. Grieve. 


Council 

The Council met 13 times. The attendance averaged 11. 

The following resolutions of thanks were passed by the 
Council : — 

To the Editor-in-Cliief, Annals of Oriental Research of the Univer- 
sity of Madras for placing the Society on the free distribution 
list for the Annals of the University. 

To Sir David Ezra for a donation of Rs.500. 

To Dr. U. U. Ghoshal for his report on some old records in the 
collection of the Calcutta High Court. 

To H.E.H. the Nizam’s Government for presenting the Society’s 
library with a copy of ‘Ajanta’ by Ghulam Yazdani. 

To Sir Sarvappali Radhakrishnan for drafting a letter of congra- 
tulation from the Society to the poet Dr. Rabindra Nath Tagore 
on the occasion of his 80th birthday. 

To Dr. Hidayat Hosain for his acceptance of a reduced monthly 
honorarium of Rs.lOO from Rs.200, for the preparation of the 
Catalogue of Arabic and Persian MSS. from October 1940. 

To Dr. John B. Grant for his help in ctumection with the Society’s 
appeal to the Roekofollcr Foundation for financial help. 

To Mr. W. D. West for his letter (‘.oneerniiig the continuation of 
inorabership of tho Society of Dr. J - B. Audbn. 

To the Outgoing Moml)er8 of Oouneil for tho way in which they 
have sofvcmI the true interests of the Society during tho period 
of their Council Membership. 


Office Beaiers. 

Changes in the Council were as follows: — 

Sir S. Radliakiishnan was appointed an Additional Secretary for 
Philosophy from 4-3-40. 

Dr. Kalidas Nag was appointed an Additional Secretary for History 
and Archaeology from 4-3-40. 

Dr. B. S. Guha was absent during October and Dr. Prashad 
officiated for him. 

Dr. B. S. Guha, acting Honorary Treasurer from 12-2-40 to 22-2-40; 
16-9-40 to 17-10-40 and 23-11-40 to end of the year nee 
Dr. Baini Prashad, absent. 



32 


Tear^Booh B.AB.B. for 1940 . 


[¥OL. TO, 


Absences other than those mentioned above were 

Sir John Lort-Willianis, absent from 1-9-40 to 11-11 -JO® 
Malmrajadhiraja of Burdwan, absent in June and Jiily« 
Mr. Perey Brown, absent from April to June. 

Dr. K. P. Biswas, ab.sent from 30-9-40 to 2-11-40. 

Prof. M, Malifuz-iii Haq, absent fron\ 2-11-40 to 21-11 ••40, 


Committees of Council. 

The Standing Committees of Council, namely, the Finance, 
Publication, and Library Committees, met monthly, with tlia 
exception of the recess month of October, and the newly formed 
Bibliotheca Indica' Committee met once during the yea-r. 

The following sub- committees w^ere appointed:— 

(1) A sub -committee consisting of Dr. J. N. Muklierjec.% 
Dr. Kalidas Nag, Major C. L. Pasricha and the ex-officio mem- 
bers to review the lists of institutions with whiesh exeiawiges of 
publications are made and of institutions and individuals 
whom free copies of the Society’s Bibliothoc^a Iih'lica Scries 
are sent, and report. 

(2) A sub -committee consisting of Dr. S. P. Mookerjoe, 
Dr. J. N. Mukherjee, Major C. L, Pasricha, Dr. Meglmad Saha 
and the ex-officio members to select a candidate for the post of 
Assistant Secretary in place of Mr. J. R, Seal, resigned. 

(3) A sub-committee consisting of Dr. Kalidas Nag, Mi*. H. C, 
Chakladar and Dr. B. S. Guha to consider the publication of a 
special number of the Society’s Journal in commemoration of the 
centenary of James Prinsep. 

(4) A sub-committee consisting of Dr. K,alid.as Nag, Major 
C. L. Pasricha, Col. R. N, Chopra, Mr. Perc^y Brown, Dr. C. S. Fox 
and Dr. B. S. Guha to make arrangements and adv'i.s('^ as iio iilio 
most suitable method of expressing th(^ Scxact.y’s c(>ngratTila,tioriB 
on the 80th birthdays of Sir P. C. Ray and Sir Nil ]iai;JU) Si rc;iar. 

(5) A sub-committeo consisting of thc^ Li!)ra.ry S(M;rc4-ary' and 
the General Secretary to (ionsidd* tlu^ disposal of irux>m|doio 
books and waste-pa|)<^r found during tins pf'CH'-css of stock-taking 
and reorganiixation of the library, and also ihr^ !ri<4unplct,o 
printed forms, 21 to 67, of Maimsmrti, VoL I, 

(6) A siib-coinmittco (jonsisting of Dr. S. K, Chattcu'ji, 
Prof. M. Mahfu 2 :-ul Haq, Dr. S. P. Mookerjee, Prof. M‘. Z, Si«lclic|i 
and the ox-officio members to report on a Icttcu* dated J6il:i 
November, 1940, with cmclosure, received from Mr. W. IVariow, 
and addressed to the President. 

(7) A sub-committee consisting of Dr. S. K. Chattorji, 
Prof. M. Mahfuz-ul Haq, the General Secretary and the Trc 3 asurer 
to report on a letter from the Government of Bengal asking for 
the Society’s suggestions in connection with the reorganization 
of the Indian Historical Records Commission, 



1941] 


Annual Report. 

Finance Committee^. 


33 


The Finance Committee met on dates a few days earlier 
than those of the Council Meetings. 

Three special meetings were held in March, August and 
December, the last being for the budget for 1941. 


Office. 

The measures recommended by the Special Enquiry 
Committee for office reorganization were adopted and increments 
of salary given accordingly. With proper allocation of duties, 
and co-ordination and supervision of office work, the lack of 
system and discipline, which formerly existed, disappeared and a 
full and expeditious handling of all business was found possible 
in spite of a reduced staff. Unfortunately, the sudden departure 
of Mr. J. R. Seal about the middle of the year slowed down 
the work of reorganization to some extent. The preparation of 
an Office Manual, recommended by the Special Enquiry 
Committee, the need of which had been keenly felt for several 
years past, and an inventory of the assets of the Society made 
by Mr. Seal before he left, w^ere, however, of great assistance. 

One of the reasons for the difficulty experienced in the 
quick and efficient handling of correspondence was the confusion 
into which the files and records of the Society had fallen. It was 
not easy to trace any letter with its connected papers. It was 
therefore necessary to rearrange the files properly and put them 
in order. After careful consideration a suitable classification 
on lines followed in Government offices was adopted and applied 
to all current correspondence, in addition to about thirty of the 
more important older flies. It is expected that with the help of 
a temporary derk recently appointed the rest of this work will 
soon be completed. 

The regulations concerning leave and holidays are now 
enforced more strictly and records are kept. Office orders and 
notifications are ente:r*ed in a register, circulated to members of 
the Staff and signed by them. 

Another improvement is the rearrangement of the working 
rooms of the Society on more business-like lines. The old 
unwieldy wooden racks in the office room have been replaced 
with steel ahnirahs in which papers and registers in daily us© 
and Annual Reports and Abstracts of Statements wanted for 
reference have been neatly arranged. Old records and files not 
in daily use have been stored in the south-east room on the 
ground floor, part of which is being used also by the Society’s 
binders for binding works published by the Society. 



34 Year-Book R.A,S,B. for 194:0. [voL. 'Vi:!, 

After installing steel almirahs the main • south room liiis 
been divided into three parts. The eastern part has been rc^servc^Hl 
for Chinese and Tibetan MSS. and eostly rare 'works on 
Areh oology, Art and Science. The central pa^rtj has bemi 
furnished as an additionai B.eaders-Room and wx^sterii 
part, fornieiiy 'used by the File-cierk and Bc^spalrda*!:*, is now" 
occupied by the Assistant Secretary. In the (general ScMTcI'.ai-y's 
room also steel almirahs have been installed containing bound 
volumes of Council Circulars, and one set each of the Annual 
Reports and ptxblications of the Society, for ready rcdbrenco. 
The south-eastern end of the hall on the first floor ('ontaining thc^^ 
working table of Dr. M. Hida-yat Hosain has been converted 
into a regular study in w'hidi Prof. CiuTitaharan Chakra\'a.r‘ti arid 
Mr. Trill Chen have also been ac.cominodati'^d. Siiniltirly the 
rooms occupied by the Librarian and the Press Clerk hcAa,^ b(:M:M'i 
rearranged and fitted with steel almirahs. TI'U‘sr^ altcsutions 
liavo been made wdth the object of equipping <‘af(ii part as a* 
vself-eontained unit which will be more (■■onvenj'ent i‘or 'W'oi'k a.nd. 
easier to organize. 

The personnel of tlie Staff remained unchangtM'l (‘X(‘,c|)t t-liat 
Mr. J. R. Seal kflt at the end of IVIay, Mr. N. N<>rman o'ri tl:ie 
first of November, and Mr. J. Cl De w^as apj'iointed to suectecsl 
Mr. Seal on probation for one year at a salary of Rs.2CMl. No 
one w^as appointed in Mr. Norman’s place as Pilc-el(^.rk and 
Despat cher, the Council having decided to (*.onibiiie b,is duivles 
wdth those of the Typist. 

The perm,anent menial Staff remained the mme, though, 
certain alterations in their duties were made to (‘IIsuim^ gr«ia't:ri'* 
efficiency, and of the four temporary extra lui-nds emplni-d list 
year three ’were dischargcHl. 


Correspondence. 

In spite of the Wai* tlai 'numlavrs of l(^tt«u*H r(H*i;‘ived and 
issue<i during ilie year wer(^ 3,31 2 and 2,402 ri^Hp{'Hi.i:v<iy, Of tlio 
l(3tters r(3<*,(ived 818 wur(3 appii,(*aiions for the post, of AssiHt-a,iit» 
Secretiiry, 2(H) wawe book-orders and 100 were Ikink’s a-ckuow- 
lodg'ment :r(H3eipt;s. Of th(.sso only 42 necH'ltM'l attimi-ioii. 2I>0 
letters were issiu.al in addition to 2,136 n.Hicived wdiic'li nec3c,le«,l 
replies. 

Stock Rooms. 

The Stock Rooms were thoroughly reorganized and their 
contents repaired. After the replacement of the old w^ooden 
racks wdth steel shelves, the three rooms on the south-east of 
the ground floor wore white- washed throughout, the walls up f-o 
^ -lieight of five feet replastered, the floors repaired with cement, 



1941] 


Annual Report, 


35 


and damaged and worn-out wooden door-sills replaced with 
concrete. All saleable publications of the Society were arranged 
systematically on the steel shelves, and waste papers, surplus 
leaflets and ant -eaten materials sold by auction as waste-paper 
for whi(jh a sum of Its.561 was realized. 

As a result of the reorganization of the Stock Rooms, the 
ba(;k numbers of the Proceedings of the Indian Science Congress 
and all Miscellaneous publications of the Society have been 
placed in the east room, the Journals and Memoirs in the south 
room and the Bibliotheca Indica Series in the large central hall. 
The Journals, Memoirs, and Volumes of the Bibliotheca Indica 
were all dusted and cleaned, made into small packets covered 
with brown paper and serially arranged on the shelves. 
Ai'raiigements have been made to clean and dust them regularly 
thi'oughout the year. 

During the past twenty years no stock was taken of the 
saleable printed material of the Society, and. no stock registers 
were kept. These have now been introduced and the stocks 
are being entered after being thoroughly checked. But the 
contents of the stock rooms, as they exist at present, are not 
secure. The windows, when open, are unprotected and require 
flexible S(,\reens and the oast room is without doors. Provision 
will have to be made for th(‘,se improvements. 

General, 

Routine work in resjDcct of the local distribution of the 
Society’s publications, circulars, forms, etc., and the keeping 
up to date of the addresses and card-registers of Members was 
carried out as usual, but the posting of Journals, etc., to belli- 
gerent and many neutral countries affectcMl by the War was 
either stopped altogether or was severely handier apped by delays 
in shipment and the increased rates of postage, etc. 


Rules and Regulations, 

No cha,ngcs were made in tlie Rules a,nd Rftgiila.tions of 
the Society except certain modifici''i.tionB ' in the Fellowship 
Regulaitions, Nos. 1, 2, 6, B, 10, 13, 14 and 17. 

Representations. 

Indian Museum. — The Society’s representative on the 
Board of Trustees of the Indian Museum, under the Indian 
Museum Act X of 1910, continued to be .Rai Sir Upendra Nath 
Brahmachari Bahadur. 

Kamala Lectureship. — ^The, Society’s nominee to serve on 
the Election Committee of the Kamala Lectureship, administered^' 
by the Calcutta 'University, was Dr. Bain! Prashad, 



36 


Y ear -Booh R,A.S.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. TR, 


Mational Institiite of Sciences of Iniia.” The Society's 
representatives to serve on the Council of the National Institute 
of Sciences of India were Dr. Baini Prasliad as Vice-President 
and Mr. W. D. West as member of Council during the year ; 
and Mr. W. D. West as Vice-President and Major C. L. Pasrielia 
as member of Council for 1941. 

Sarojini Basil Gold Medal. — ^The Society's nominee to serve 
on the Special Committee for the award of the Sarojini Basil 
Gold .Medal, administered by the Calcutta University, was 
Dr. Suniti Kumar Chatter ji. 

Deputations, 

The Society received invitations to send I’epreseiitatives to 
the various functions of the undermentioned bodies 

Tenth Session of the All-India Oriental Conferoiico 
Tirupatti. 

Indian History Congress, Fourth Session, 1940, at Lahore. 

Congratulations. 

The Society sent its cordial congratulations to the following: 

To its President, The Hon’ble Mr. Justice Lort-Williams, Kt,, 
K.C., on his appointment as Acting Chief Justice of Bengal. 


Visits. 

Among a large number of visitors from various parts of the 
world mention may be made of the following: — 

Dr, F. Vreede, Directeur Hoiioraire du Centre d’Etudes N^csrlandakes 
et du College Heerlandais de FUniversite do Paris. 

P. Wheeler, New York. 

Prof. Albert W, C. T. Herr6, Stanford University, U.S.A. 

I)r. H. I. Polemau, Director of Indie Studies, I'jibrary of Ooogross, 
Washington. 

Lady F. Ginwala, Bombay. 

A. N. Cohayre, Esq., Oxford, 

Miss Q. J. Jafor, Aligarh. 

Thob Than Uyentsen, Monk, Til)et. 

Professor Hsu Pah Hung, Natiking University, Ohi:r:ia. 

Prof. Mustapha Fazii Beg, ex-Govomor of Alexandria and 
Professor of Sociology, Istanbul University. 

Mrs. D, N, Glenn, Calcutta. 

Dr. Miss Spencer of Yale University, 

Shri Vijaya Dharma Suri, Jama Scholar, Bhavnagar. 


Awards. 

Elliott Prize for Scientific Research. — ^The aannal prize 
offered for the year 1939 was for research in Geology and Biology 
(including Pathology and Physiology). Four candidates sub- 



1941] 


Annual Bej^ort^ 


37 


niitted papers. The prize was awarded to Mi'. P. K. Chatterjee 
'of the Geological Survey of India. 

The prize offered for the year 1940 was for Mathematics. 
All aiiiioimcemeiit regarding the prize will be made at the Annual 
Meeting of 1941. 

The prize for the next year, 1941, will be for research in 
'Glieiiiistry. 

Barclay Memorial Medal. — ^The (biennial) award of the 
Barclay Memorial Medal for conspicuous contributions to Medical 
and Biological Science with reference to India, was announced at 
the Annual Meeting of 1940. The medal was awarded to Major- 
General Sir Eobert McCarrisoii, Kt., C.I.E., I.M.S. (retd.). 

The next award will be announced at the Annual Meeting of 
1942, 

Sir William Jones Memorial Medal.— The announcement for 
the (triennial) award of tlie Sir William Jones Memorial Medal 
for Asiatic Researches in Science, including Medicine, will be 
made at the Annual Meeting of 1941. 

Annandale Memorial Medal. — ^The (triennial) award, for 
, important contributions to the study of Anthropology in Asia, 
was announced ait the Annual Meeting for 1940. Tlie medal was 
awarded to Prof. Prank Weidenreich of Peiping. 

The next award will be announced at the Annual Meeting 
of 1943. 

Joy Gobind Law Memorial Medal. — ^The next .(triennial) 
award of the Joy Gobind Law Memorial Medal for conspicuously 
important work on Zoology in Asia, will be announced at the 
Annual Meeting of 1942. 

Paul JohLannes BriiM Memorial Medal. — The next (triennial) 
award of the Paul Johannes Briilil Memorial Medal for important 
contributions to the study of Asiatic Botany will be announced 
■at the Ajinual Meeting of 1942. 

Indian Science Congress, Calcutta, Prize. — ^Tho next award 
will be ma-de in connection with the. next session of the Congress 
to be lield in Calcutta, 

Pramatha latli Bose Memorial Medal. — ^Tho Council has 
not yet decided upon th,e year in which the initial award shall be 
made of this medal for conspicuously important contributions 
to practical or theoretical Geology with special reference to 
Asia. 

Donations. 

The Society received a donation of Rs.500 to the General 
. Pund from- Sir David Ezra and of Bs.20 to the Permanent Library 
Endowment Fund from.' Dr. Chr. von Haimendrof, late of the 
Vienna University. 

3 



38 Tear^Booh E.AM.B, for 1940. [voL. to,. 

Society Premises anfl Properties. 

Ill accordance with the recommendations of the^ Specisil 
Enquiry Committee the Building Fund and the Building Re|>air 
Fund were amalgamated and a sum of Rs.2,00() was credited to 
it. Out of the two amalgamated funds Rs.l 0,000 were. s|)eiit on 
steel shelving. 

The main work of the installation of steel, shelving lia.s Ixxm 
completed. The Stock Rooms, Library, Sanskrit and A'rabi<*- 
Persian MSS. Rooms, Reading Rooms and the oftico are .now 
equipped with modern steel racks and cupboards. The gi’eater 
part of the old wooden furniture has been sold by auction and 
a sum of Rs.2, 007-7-3 realized. Some of the larger alminihs 
in the Arabic-Persian room were broken up and six new teak- 
wood almirahs with locks were constructed from the old materials... 
These have been placed on the ground floor ibr stor’i,iig tln-^ 
Society’s old records, etc. 

Three mosquito-proof cisterns fitted with mosquito -proof 
covers and M.P. vent connections, etc., and a new o,iie for tlH'-s 
urinal in the Members’ room were purchased to noplace the old. 
unserviceable flush cisterns which were giving trouble. T,l:io total 
cost was Rs.l65, but a small part of the ex'penso was recovcvred 
from the sale of the old cisterns. 

The entire ground floor of the building, including the gi’and 
stamcase, pillars, Library, Stock and Members’ Rooms, wa,s 
white-washed. Worn-out plaster was stripped off tlio walls t.ip 
to a height of five feet and they were replastered witli, Piidlo 
cement mixed with creosote as a protection against wiiitc^-a,nts, 
which were found to have attacked corners and door-sills in 
several places. Altogether 4,033 sq. ft. of cemont pIastor*ing wa..s 
done, and 63 rxmning feet of old worn-out door-silI>s rcvplaciH.l l,jy 
new ones made of reinforced concrete. 

The sm-all room adjoining the back staircfiso on tlio .north- 
east of the building which was used forrrwu'ly for dumping 
refuse, etc., was cleaned, repaired a>,nd ro|)Iast.o:red wii-li, l^idlo 
cement. It can bo used either as a.n adjunct to the Jdlnruy or 
for installin,g machinery for air-conditioning if dt^sir<ML 

The tarred floor tiiroughoxit the Stoe.kRo(,>ins i,ind Lil)ra.ry 
had not been repaired ibr many years and wa.s full of holies and 
patches wliich h,aive been filled up and repaired. 

The total cost of the renovation of the .rooms on the groiinil 
floor came to Rs.711-4-0, and furniture renewals and :ropa.ir-s cost 
about Rs.90. 

The lea Famul,us Camera for making photostatic rcvproduc- 
tions ^of books and MSS. presented to the Society by' Count 
Kozui Ohtani of Japan has been lying unused sinco its pi*©- 
sentation. The camera was found to be intact except the Ica 
Famulus prism which needed resilvermg ; birt several hundred 
sheets of photographic paper sent along with it had become 

3B' 



1941] Anniml Report, 39^ 

useless and 600 feet of Ilford document paper was procured 
from England and the camera, after being reconditioned, was 
transferred to the photographic room of the Zoological Survey 
of India on loan for safe keeping on the initiative of Dr. Baini 
Prashad. Up to the end of the year, 237 pages of MSS. and. 
books have been pliotostated for scholars and members of the- 
Society at a nominal cost of 3 annas per page. 


Artistic and Historical Possessions. 

A stone inscription lying in the Stock Boom was cleaned 
and placed on the landing near the famous Asokan inscrip- 
tion from Bairat. The inscription is in the Nagri character 
and is probably of the 14- 15th century. Impressions have been 
taken by the Archseological Survey and are being studied by 
experts. 

The Society’s collection of oil paintings are not well displayed,, 
some are placed too high, and others are not seen to the best 
advantage. Steps are being taken to display them properly. 
Some of these paintings were also found to be cracked and the 
frames damaged. They were carefully examined by well-known 
artists and an estimate was obtained for their restoration 
amounting to Bs.2,300, but for financial reasons this work 
cannot be undertaken at present. 

The plaster plaque of Sir William Jones, translating 
Sakuntala, ought to be executed in either marble or bronze, but 
no member or well-wisher of the Society has so far offered to bear 
the cost. 


Library. 

The Special Enquiry Comm.ittee found that the Library,, 
though one of the best reference libraries in India, was in a very 
unsatisfactory condition. Among measures recommended for its 
reorganization were the replacement of the wooden racks with 
modern steel furniture, the taking of stock, and the repair and 
rebinding of books and manuscripts damaged by insects. 

The instaliation of steel shelving, commenced in 1939, was 
completed by the end of the year. The progress of the work was- 
delayed to some extent owing to heavy demands on the services 
of our Contractors, the Bangiya Steel Pratisthan, for war work. 
With the exception of the Arabio-Persian Room, the books and 
MSS. in the three other Sections, namely, the European, the 
Sanskrit and the Tibeto-Chinese, have now been transferred to- 
the steel shelves and arranged serially, after being carefully 
dusted and cleaned. In the main Reading Room and along the 
landings on the first floor also, the old open wooden racks have 



40 


Year-Booh R.A,S,B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VIIs 


'been replaced witli glass-fronted steel almirahs, where reforeiico 
vorks, lexicons 5 and encyclopaedias, are kept. Two of tliisse 
almirahs in the eastern part of the main Reading Room are 
reserved for new accessions, for the information, and iiispe(jti,o:i:i 
of readers. 

Another innovation has been to place all avail,a!)le hc,4:4S of 
the Society’s publications, including the rare Asiatic Rc'sc^ariilics, 
the Journals, Memoirs and the Bibliotheca Indica Scries in stcoi 
almirahs on the landing on the western side of the staircase, on 
the first floor. On the landing outside the Arabic-Persian Room, 
the printed catalogues and reference books in Arabic and Persian 
have been placed for the convenience of readers. 

Stoch4ak%ng ,—hi the Annual Reports of 1905 and R)18 
there are references to the ‘weeding out’ of books, but there, is 
no indication that this was done as a result of sto(i,k,-tak!ng. 
At the beginning of 1940, wdren the task of taking stock o,f tho 
collections in the Library was undertaken, a serious i'lifficndty 
was encountered owing to the absence of any accession r(,^g,i,ster, 
or any properly kept catalogue, either in card or in book form. 
The existing catalogues are very defective and have not b(H.iii 
kept up to date. Even with the index slips and the car<ls kept 
by the late Librarian, they fail to account for the wholi^^ of the 
books in the Library. Help therefore was sought from Mr. S. S. 
Saith, M.A. (Edin.), Superintendent of the Imperial Library, 
who advised that it was necessary to prepare first of all a 
register of all the books in the Library, shelf by shelf, accord- 
ing to their book marks or numbers and, after this v^'as acjcom- 
plished, to check it with the records kept in the form of ea,taIogues, 
index-cards, etc. This advice was followed, a complete ix'gister 
of the books on our shelves was prepared; and by tlio (uid of 
November, the general section of the Library, containing J]3,182 
books, was cheeked. The results of tho stock-taking so l:ar 
completed show that : — 

(i) 2,400 books had not been registered o,r cxrta-logueiL 
A complete list of these xvas prepared and included in tlie ,ric,>w 
register. 

(ii) Over 200 books mentioned in tlxe catalogues (iould not 
be traced. It is possible that some of those may be fburid 
■among the bound volumes of periodicals not yet examined. 

(iii) Books numbering nearly 6,000 were found to b© 
dainaged. No adequate preventive measures had been taken 
■against the attack of insects and no regular' or system, atic 
dusting or cleaning of the books had been done. 

(iv) A large mass of stray papers, book-covers, directories, 
catalogues of firms, civil lists and many odd volumes of books 



1941] 


Anmial BeporL 


41 


and pamphlets were found, and with the help of G. Bhattaeharya,. 
B.A .5 the son of the First Pandit, who is working as an apprentice 
in the Library of the Society, these were carefully examined and 
sorted. Those likely to be of use were kept, and the most 
important removed to the Library and entered in the register., 
A list of the others was prepared, and a Committee was appointed, 
by the Council to examine and report as to which should 
be preserved. The rest were sold by auction along with those 
found in the Stock Rooms. 

A list of the books most severely damaged was made, and it 
was found that over 6,500 hooks require to he repaired and 
rehound, out of which 114 volumes w^hich needed immediate 
attention were repahed at a cost of Rs.76L Estimates for the 
cost of repairing the others were obtained, but as the sum 
required was considerable it was decided to use the amount 
sanctioned in repairing and rebinding the old valuable books. 
This work is in addition to the repairing and binding of costly 
and rare works on Art, Architecture and Science which was 
completed wdthin this year at a total cost of about Rs. 6,000 . 
These w-orks have been placed in specdally made steel almirahs 
ill the south room. 

Sa7iskrit Section . — ^All the manuscripts in this section,, 
comprising works in Sanskrit, Prakrit, Bengali and other Indian, 
languages belonging to the Society, or on permanent loan from 
the Government of India, were placed in steel cupboards in the 
north-w^est room on the first floor, after being properly cleaned 
and classified. The manusciipts were thoroughly checked and 
a list of the missing ones was prepared and enquiries made for 
their recovery. It was found that 7,234 MSS. were damaged 
by insects and mildew, of which 144 were in very bad condition... 
Tiiose wei'o taken in hand first and altogether 261 wure repaired 
during the year. 

Arahic-Persian Section . — Similaily in tliis section all the 
MSS., munboring over 6,000, were carefuriy checked. A list 
was prej)ared and it was found th.at 2,039 were damaged, 56 of 
wl)ich, wore in a very bad state of j>reserva.tio.n. Tiieso were 
repaired and rebound. The old w^ooden racks and almirahs 
were dismantled and steel shelves erected. The collection wavS 
moved temporarily into the north room on the ground floor,, 
but will be shifted to the Arabic-Persian room on the first floor,, 
properly classified, and placed in steel cupboards when additional 
doors have been fixed. 

Sino-Tibetan Section . — ^The manuscripts and printed works 
comprised in this section were carefully checked and, after being 
properly labelled, were arranged in steel shelves, according to 
the Tibetan alphabetical order. A compiete register of the 



42 


Year-Book BA.S.B, for 1940, 


[VOL» Trij. 


•collection was made by Mr. Trin Chen and a descriptive catalogue 
•of the Buddhist Kangyur and Tangynr maiiirscripts is in 
preparation. 

It was found that 398 volumes in this Section were badly 
••eaten by insects. 

Repair of Manuscripts. — ^The repair of the most va»iua.ble 
■and severely damaged MSS. in the Sanskrit and Arabic-P(n*sia.n 
Sections was done at a cost of Rs. 1,202-6-9. The technique 
*of repair was determined on the advice of experts in India and 
abroad, and the work was done by emplo^dng special duftries 
to whom the necessary materials were supplied. The total 
•cost of repair of the rest of the damaged MSS. in tlie Sanskrit, 
Islamic and Sino-Tibetan Sections will be very large a,nd (^a»niK)t 
be undertaken at once. It is proposed therefore to divider the 
work into two or three stages according to the condition of the 
MSS. and the fimds available, Tlie estimated cost of re|)air‘ing 
the 414 MSS. which need urgent attention (of which 195 belong 
to the Sanskrit, 80 to the Islamic and 39 to the Sino-Tib(d.a.ri 
Sections) is Rs.2,524, and this expense cannot be postponed 
much longer without incurring serious damage to the MSS. 
Besides cleaning and dusting, measures wnre taken to prevent 
any further damage by insects. On the advice of Mr. A. R. 
Foster of the Imperial Chemical Industries Co., who very 
kindly examined onr damaged MSS. and books, a preparation 
•of paradichlor-benzene is being used as a disinfectant. 

Enforcement of Regulations. — ^Measures were taken to en- 
force the Library Regulations more strictly so as to guard aigalnst 
any further loss of books ; and the hours wnre extended fr-o:oi 
5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Library is now kept o|')en on all days 
•excepting those mentioned in the Regulations. Tliese reyforms 
were initiated with a view to increa.se the 'utilit:.y ol* tlie 
Library, 

Permanent Library Enxlowrmnt Fund, — total of this fund 
is now Rs. 14,020 in 3|% Covernment Papei*. 

Accessions and presentaUons. — The a(!<‘.essions, ex(^lusivc% 
•of 209 periodicals received either by way of exchange, presi'Siita.** 
tion or purchase, numbered 393 volumes, of whkh 136 werti 
purchased, 117 wete presented and the remaining 136 volumes 
were added to the Library from unregistered stock. 

Owing to the war, publications from European (ouiitiies 
were received with difficulty. There are 66 institutions in 
Europe alone, excepting the British Isles, which exchange 
publications with the Society, most of which have either stopped 
sending or are, able to send only'' a few publications at long 



1941] 


Annual Report, 


43 


intervals. Five new Indian periodicals were added to the 
Library. They are : (1) 'Annals of the Oriental Research 
Department of the Madras University^ presented by the 
University^ (2) ' New Asia presented by Dr. Kalidas Nag, (3) 
Transactions of the Bose Research Institute presented by the 
Institute, (4) The ' Bharatiya Vidya and (5) the 'Journal of 
Indian Entomology the last two by exchange for the Society’s 
Journal. 

Among books presented to the Society, mention may be 
made of 'Ajanta’, Vols. 1 to 4, from H.E.H. the Nizam of 
Hyderabad, and ' Monuments of Sanchi’, Vols. I to III, and 
' Excavations at Harappa’, Vols. I and II, from the Govern- 
ment of India. 

Besides the presentation of books the Society has 
received during the year a Photo Record Micro-film Copying 
Camera, complete with reostat weston exposure meter, extra 
foot pedal and lens, K-1 and K-2 yellow filters, a fihn winder 
and one hundred feet of micro-film from Dr. Horace I. Poleman, 
Director of Indie Studies, Library of Congress, Washington, 
U.S.A., on permanent loan for copying MSS. and other valuable 
records. Arrangements have been made with the consent and 
co-operation of the Director of the Zoological Survey of India 
to keep it in safe custody for the Society in the photographic 
room of the Zoological Survey of India. The Society is greatly 
indebted to Dr. Poleman and the Photo Record Micro-film Co. 
of America for the loan of this valuable and costly apparatus 
which will undoubtedly be of great service to the Society and 
scholars who want exact copies of MSS. to be made at a very 
moderate cost. 

Orders were sent for 38 books recommended for purchase 
by the Library Committee, but on account of difficulties of 
communication they have not yet arrived from England and 
America. 

Booh Review , — ^As a result of the publication of Book 
Reviews in the Society’s Journal, requests are being received 
regularly from authors for review of their works, and 13 books 
were presented to the Library. 


Finance. 

Appendix III contains the usual Statements showing our 
accounts for 1940. Certain changes have been made in the 
form of their presentation according to the recommendations 
of the Special Enquiry Committee. 



44 


Year^Booh E.AB.B, for 1940. 


[VOL, VII, 


Tile Building Fund and tlie Building Bepair Fund liave l>eeii 
amalgamated as shown in Statement No. 15. The Stateiiioiit 
showing the account of the International Cataiogiio of, 

Literature 5 London, has been closed and tlie balaivx) of 
Rs.4, 374-7-8 is being held teinporarity in the General to 

be transferred to the Temporary Reserve lahu*. Tlie <)th<u“ 
Statements are presented as hi the previous yeaii*. 

The Fund Accounts show their invested a>ssets written do'W'ii 
to their market value as^at the end of the year and Invest' men 1} 
Account No. 22 shows the allocation of invested paper to ea-u!i 
fund speoifically, wdtii both market and face values of the 
investments. 

Statement No. 24 shows the Balance Sheet and tlu^ differont 
funds administered by and through, it. 

The funds belonging to, or administered l)y, il'H> Society 
are classified as follows - 
{a) General Fund: — 

(i) Permanent Reserve. 

(ii) Working Balance. 

{h) Specific Funds belonging to the Society. 

(c) Funds administered by the Society. 

At the end of the year, the position of these fluids was a-s 
follows : — 



Face 

%?alue, 

aisti 

December 

1 1)40. 

Market! 

value, 

Deciunhor 

1940. 

"S ^ c? 

General Fund 

2,98,200 

2,8:1,000 

(а) Por.rnanc.nt Riesorv© 

(б) Working Balance 

2,04,200 

4-:kOOO 

L\:o>,ooo 

4-1 ,000 

Specific Funds belonging to the Society , . 
Funds administered by .the Society 

2.9.000 

69. 000 

24',000 
OH, 200 



0,79,800 


During the year 1940 Rs.1,040 were received as a-dinissiori 
fees and Rs.680 as compounding fees. This total amount of 
Rs. 1,720 will be transferred to the Permanent Reserve by 
conversion of Government Paper (3i%) bolonging to ilio 
Temporary Reserve. 

The Government of Bengal maintained'"the 20% cut in all 
grants made by them to the Society during the year. 



1941 ] Annual Report. 45 

Tlie Society r(3ceived the following grants from the above 
Government : — • 

For Rs. Statement. 

Journals .. .. .. 1,600 No. 1. 

O.P, Fund No. 1 . . . . 7,200 No. 2. 

Sanskrit MSS. . . . . . . 8,000 No. 4. 

The Government of Bengal grant of Rs.2,400 for the pnblica- 
tioii of works of historical interest for the year 1940-41 has 
not yet been received. 

Owing to increasing activity and the clearing up of arrears 
in the publications of the Society, a large number of works 
was publislied. The resultant heavy outlay on printing, binding, 
and editing fees increased the debit balance of the Oriental 
Publication Fund No. 2 (Statement No. 3) from Bs.3, 144-15-1 
in 1939 to Rs. 11,084-15-10 at the end of the year. Special 
efforts will be made to reduce this debit. 

The Government of India maintained the 50% cut in the 
grant for Arabic and Persian MSS. (Statement No. 5) and as a 
result the Fund closed with a debit balance, of Rs. 3, 141-3-3. 

The income derived from Advertising amounted to Rs. 10,200. 

The temporary investments of funds in Fixed Deposit and 
Savings Bank are shomr in Statements Nos. 21 and 20. 

Statement No. 18 gives an account of the amounts due to 
and by the Society for membership subscriptions, sales of 
publications and contingent charges. 

The Government Securities shown in Statement No. 22 
are held in safe custody by the Imperial Bank of India, Park 
Street Branch. During the year there was a - considerable 
appreciation in the value of the securities, amounting to 
Rs,17, 749-15-0 and increasing to that extent the book assets 
of the Society. 

The Buxiget estimates for 1940 and the actuals of the year 


were as follows : — 

E.‘3tiinates. 

Receipts. 

Expenditure, 


Rs. 

Rs. 

Ordinary 

52,030 

44,500 

Extraordinary 

650 

650 

Total . . 

52,680 

46,150 

Actuals. 

Ordinary 

82, .50 8 

64,884 

1,624 

Extraord-inary 

1,624 

Total . . 

84,132 

66,608 


The ordinary receipts were about Rs.30,478 more than the 
estimate. 



46 Year-Book M,A.8.B, for 194:0. [vol. to, 

The ordinary expenditure was about Rs.20,384 more than 
the estimate. 

The Budget estimates of probable oxi>enditii.r© have, as 
usual 3 been framed to meet demands under various heads based 
on a vigorous activity in all departments of the Society’s work. 

The receipts have been conservatively estimated. 


Budget Estimate for 1941. 
Ordinary Receipts. 


Original Budget 

Budget Actuals for Estimate 
Estimate 1940. for 1941. 
for 1940. 


Interest on Investments and 
Deposits 
Advertising 
Rent 

Annual Grant 
Miscellaneous 
Members’ Subscriptions 
Publication, Sales and Subscrip. 

tions . . 

Donation 

Proportionate Share of Fmrds : — 

1. O. P. FundNo. 1 

2. Sanskrit MSS. Fund 

3. Sanskrit MSS, Fund 

4. Building Fund 

5. Publication Fund 

6. International Cat. of Scien- 

tific Literature Fund . . 


Rs. 

Rs. 

Rs. 

10,000 

9,959 

9,800 

750 

750 

750 

10,200 

10,200 

10,200 

10,680 

10,680 

10,680 

1,600 

1,600 

1,600 

300 

2,700 

300 

9,000 

8,800 

9,000 

5,000 

5,200 

5,500 


500 


2,500 

2,500 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 


8,000* 



10,000* 



5,245* 



4,374-7-8* 



Total .. 52,030 ‘ 82,508-7-8 51,830 


* Special sanction by Cooncil 


Extraordinary Receipts. 


By Fees 

by Admission Fees 
by Compounding Fee 
by Institutional Membership 
Registration Fee 

, Total ' 


Ks. 

Rs. 

Rs. 

650 

944 

680 

800 

650 

1,624 

800 



1941] 


47 


Annual Report, 

Ordinary Expenditure. 




Original 
Budget 
Estimate 
for 1940. 

Actuals for 
1940. 

Budget 
Estimate 
for 1941. 



Rs. 

Rs. 

Rs. 

Salaries 


22,500 

22,625 

21,800 

'CommissioTi 


300 

• 280 

300 

Stationery 


550 

1,050* 

600 

Fan, Light and Telephone 


700 

672 

600 

Taxes 


2,400 

2,388 

2,400 

Postage 


1,200 

2,693* 

1,600 

Contingencies 


750 

1,098* 

700 

Petty Repairs 


150 

179 

200 

Insurance 


500 

500 

500 

Menials’ Clothing . . 


200 

270 

120 

Office Furniture 


500 

488 

200 

Building Repairs 


2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

Provident Fund Share 


800 

642 

700 

Audit Fee 


250 

250 

250 

Books, Library 


3,000 

1,334 

2,000 

Binding, Library 


1,000 

761 

2,000 

J oiirnal and Memoirs 


7,000 

9,055* 

7,000 

Printing Circulars, etc. 


700 

891* 

500 

Gratuities 

Contribution 

Cataloguing Bengali MSS. 



1,000 

*500 

8teel Si'K3lving 



12,473* 

6,560 

Total 


44,500 

64,884 

50,630 

* Special sanction by Council. 


Extraordinary Expenditure. 




Rs. 

Rs. 

Rs. 

To Permanent Reserve 





by Admission Fees 

• . 

650 

944 

800 

by Compounding Fees 


, . 

680 


by Institutional M'emborship 




R.cgistration Fees 

•• 




Total 

. . 

650 

1,624 

800 


Publications. 

Tho Special Enquiry Committee appointed in 1939 prepared 
a list of papers and works undertaken by the Society but not 
published. The names of these papers and works are given in 
Annewures A and B and printed in the Annual Report of the 
Society for 1939. In the course of that year the Jourrml of the 
Society was brought xip to 1938, and Vol. IV was completed 
with its Title-pages, Indexes, etc. Similaidy the Year-Book of 
the Society up to 1938 was published. During the’ current year 



48 


Year^Booh M.AB.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. rn, 


(1940) the complete Volume of the Journal for 1939 (VoL V)^ 
consisting of 754 pages and 3- jdates was piiblislied, as well m 
two iiiiiiibei’s for 1940 (Vol. VI) — one Science and oite Letiters— 
consisting of 110 pages and 6 plates. 

TiKr''year..Boofc"for 1930 '(Vol. VI, 1940-~pages 208) wis 
issued ill the early part of 1040. It is to be iioteci that this is 
the first time in the recent history of the Society tliat the Ih’o- 
eeedings of the Society were published and distributed to 
Members along with the Journal for the year just ended. 

Of the papers mentioned in Annexures A and B and lying 
in the press for many years, tw'o were published in Vol. \'' 
of the Journal, the remainder in Vol. IV except Nos. 3 and 4 
of A7inexure A, which were rejected on furthei* reference, and 
No. 1 in Annexure B which could not be sent to the Press till 
recently, no response having been received from the autlior. 

Of the liernoirs, No. 1 of Annexiire B , viz., the late Br. P. O. 
Bedding’s work on ‘How the Santais Live’ was piiblishoii, 
thus completing Vol. X of the Memoirs. 

The Society has publisluKl also an importiirnt new work 
on ‘The Pugnacity of the Swordfish, etc.,’ by I)r. E. W. Gudgiu' 
and consisting of 100 pages and 0 xilates as Vol. XII of tlu? 
Memoirs. 

Considerable progress has been made in the revised edition 
of the Mahdvyutpatti by Alexander Csoma do Koros whicli is t o 
form Vol. IV of the Memoirs (No. 2 of Annexure B) but has been 
lying uncompleted since 1910. Most of the materials loft by 
Csoma de Koros have been re-copied and revised by Mr. Trio, 
Chen and Prof. Biirga Charan Chatterjoe. 

Bibliotheca Indica Series. — Of the eighteivn incom|)lot(^ 
works mentioned by the Special Enquiry Committee in the luist 
Annual Report nine wx^re published in 1939. Biir'ing the \'Oii.r 
1940 the following works were x)ublished: 

(1) Varna-ratndJeara.—Tho oldest work in tljo Ma,ii.liili 

langiiagcj , written by Iva.vitek ha-raca. rya 4 ye > 1 1 i ris va.ri i. 
Thakkura (c. 1 325 A.I).), a.nd odit.iid !>y Prof. Suniti 
K. Cliatterji and Pandit Ikibua* MJsrfr. TIui work 

consists of Introductions, ].)p. l-Lxiv+l 8, n, I'^laite of 

the MS,, and Text and Index:, p}). 1-160. 

(2) Dharma-hmdu. — ^A work on Jaina Flrilosophy l)y 'llii,i‘i« 

biiadra, edited with tlie CK')niirient-iu\y of 
by Br. L. Suali, Ph.I)., and |:)i.U’tly :r(vvisod aaid 
seen tlirougb the press by Pj“of. Gliintaba.ran 
Chakravarti, M.A. Fascicle I was |)'ublislicd in 
1912. The printing of Fasciclo II, tlie major 
portion of which was seen by I)r. Suali in 1921, was 
entrusted to Prof, Chaki'avarti last year in the 
absence of Dr. Suali. This final fascicle coinsists 
of pp. 81-271 of the Text and Preliniinary,, and 
Glossary, pp. i-xi. 



IMl] Annual Report, 49 

(3) Avaddm-Icalpalatd. — reprinted edition of VoL ly 
Fascicle II, pages 59-154, original^ pii, Wished under 
the joint editorship of Sarat Ch. Das and Pandit 
Hari Mohan Vidyabhushana. The task of seeing 
tlie proofs through the press was done by Prof. 
Durga Charan Chatter] ee. The Fascicle consists 
of pp. 59-154 of the Text and Preliminary pp. i-iv 
and Appendixes I and II of 1-10 pages. 

In addition, progress made in the following works men- 
tioned in Amiexures A and B is shown below : 

(1) TMha-kalpa^ edited by Pandit Kedarnath of Jaipur.— 

Pages 97-288 have been printed and pp. 289-336 
are in page-form. Fifty pages remain to be made 
press-ready. With the completion of these, 
including the Index, the work can be issued next 
year. 

(2) Vailchdnasa’Srauta’Sutram. — Prof. Raghu Vira of 

Lahore, who was entrusted with the preparation of 
the Index has seen the galley proofs through the 
press. With the printing of the Index, which 
will occupy nearly 100 pages, the complete work 
can be published early in 1941. 

(3) KuUanl^matam, — ^During the middle of the year 

permission was obtained from the Kashmii* 
Government for Pandit Madhusudan Kaul Sastri, 
M.A,, Superintendent, Archaeology and Research 
Department of that Government, to edit and 
complete this work, which, it is expected, will also 
be published in 1941. 

(4) Kesar Saga. — ^Dr. S. K. Chatterji is now working on 

the final fascicle. He has included a number of 
connected Sagas and other matters from the Indian 
Aniiqm,ry and other sources, originally compiled 
and translated by the Rev. A. H. Francke, as 
a useful appendix. These have been set up in 
type, and the work will be published next year. 

(5) Dowazangmo.—K number of mistakes were found 

in the first 32 pages that were printed in 1932. 
The Council decided to stop the work for the 
present, distribute the type, and undertake the 
work at a later date when reliable MS. material 
becomes available. 

(6) Vajjalaggam. — ^Mr. Johan van Manen undertook to 

complete the English translation but has not done 
so as yet. 

In the Islamic Section the following works were published: — 
(1) The Index to Tabaqdt4-Akbari, Vol. III . — ^The Index 
to the Third Volume of the English Tra;nslation' 



50 


Tear-^Booh B.AB.B. for 1940. 


[voL. m, 


of the Tabaqat-i-Akbari of Khwajah Nizamnddin 

Ahmad by Dr. Baini Prashad, D.Sc., F.R.A.S.B* 
It consists of pages 817-921 set up in small t}^}© 
and double column. 

(2) Qdnmi4-Htimdyum {Persian Text). — ^Also known as^ 

Humdywn-Ndma of Kh wandamir, a work on the 
Rules and Ordinances established by the Emperor 
Humayun, and on some buildings erected by his 
order, was edited with notes and a Preface in 
English by Shamsu-l-^Ulama Dr. M. Hidayat 
Hosain, Ph.D., F.R.A.S.E. The work consists^ 
of pp. i-xxxvi in English and pp. 1-141 in Persian, 

(3) Qdnund-Hwmdyunl. — ^The English translation of the 

above work with Explanatory Notes, Preface and 
Index by Dr. Baini Prashad, D.Sc., E.R. A.S.B,, 
E.N.I. , P.R.S.E. The work consists of Preliminary 
pp. i-xii and pp. 1-92 Translation and Index. 


Progress as indicated below was made in the uncompleted 
Islamic works mentioned in Annexures A and B . : — 

(1) ^ Amal-i-Sdlilp or Shdh-Jahmi-Ndma. — ^The Persian 

text was completed in 1939 by Prof. G. Yazdani. 
The Index of the three Volumes is in course of 
preparation by the editor and the entke work is 
expected to be published in 1941. 

(2) Tari^A-Humdyuni of Bdyazld : Persian : is in course 

of completion and w^’iH be published in 1941. 

(3) Haft Iqlim. — ^The preparation of materials for VoL II 

in Persian by Prof. M. Mahfuz-iil Haq is w^ell 
advanced and is expected to be pross»rcady in 


Among new works published were 

(1) Doctrine of Nimhdrka. — ^Translation of ‘Vt^daiita- 

parijata-Saurabha* of Nmibarka and ‘"Vi^-dania- 
kaiistubha’ of Srinivasa (commeniiaries on tiic 
Brahma-Sutras), VoL I, by Dr. Roma Boso, M.A., 
D.Pliil. (Oxon), was published earlier in the year. 
It consists of Preliminary, pp. i-viii and Transla- 
tion, pp. 1-474. 

(2) Lus’hai-English Dictionary. — ^The Dictionary of the 

Lusha! Language — ^the first dictionary of i:»ho 
language of a tribal group inhabiting parts of the 
wild forest-covered mountainous region between 
India and Upper Burma, and prepared by the Revd. 
James Herbert Lorrain of the Baptist Missionary 
Society, London, and one of the pioneer Missionaries. 



1941] 


Annual Beport. 


51 


in tile Lnshai Hills. It consists of Preliminary 
pp, i~xvi and Vocabulary, pp. 1-576. 

Of new works undertaken by tbe Society in the Bibliotbeca 
Indica Series, progress was made as follows: — 

(1) Doctrine of Nimhdrha, Vols. II and III, by Dr. Roma 

Bose. — Since tbe publication of Vol. I, 200 pages 
of VoL II have been printed and tbe rest are in 
various stages of proof. It is expected to publish 
Vols. II and III in 1941. 

(2) Bhagawad-Gltd {in Persian Verse). — ^The materials are 

in course of preparation by Dr. Baini Prashad. 

(3) MadfJiiru4-Umard {English Translation). — ^Materials 

left by the late H. Beveridge, I.C.S. (Retd.), are 
being edited and revised by Dr. Baini Prashad. 

Sanshrit Catalogue . — 

(1) Volume VIII, Part II, Descriptive Catalogue of the 

Government Collection of Sanslo’it MSS. on loan to 
the Society, dealing with the subject of T antra ^ 
prepared by the late MM. Haraprasad Shastri, C.I.E., 
D.Litt., P.A.S.B., and revised and edited by Prof. 
Chintaharaii Chakravarti, M.A., consisting of pp. 609- 
892 (including Index) and pp. i-xxx of Prefatory 
matter, was published during the year. 

(2) Volume IX of the Descriptive Catalogue of Sanskrit MSS., 

prepared by the late MM, Haraprasad Shastri, and 
dealing with Philosophy, is being revised and checked 
and is expected to be published in 1941. 

Arabic Catalogue . — 

(3) Volum,e II of the Descriptive Catalogue of the Arabic 

MSS., dealing with the subjects of Asceticism and 
Ethics, History, Biography, Cosm>ography and Geo- 
graphy, Logic, Philosophy, 3Iathematics, Astronomy, 
Alchemy, Cabalistic works (works on spirits, incanta- 
tions, secret virtues of letters, names of God and 
construcjtions of magical squares) and Interpretations 
of Dreams is in preparation by Dr. M. Hidayat Hosain. 

The Bibliotheca Indica Committee, appointed last year, 
held its first meeting on July 22nd under the presidency of 
Sir Jadunath Sarkar. In view of heavy demands made on the 
resources of the Society for publishing a large number of works 
lying in the press in various stages of proof for many years 
past, it was resolved to proceed with uncompleted works already 
undertaken before accepting any new work. Accordingly, a list 
was prepared of 43 works in Sanskrit, and 8 works in Arabic 
and Persian, showing how much was already printed, what 



52 


Ymr-Bo'oh E.A,S.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. TO, 


remained to be done, and whether any have been published 
elsewhere in the meantime either completely or partially. 

Economies . — In view of the increased cost of printing as a, 
result of the war attempts were made to effect economy without 
impairing the excellence of the printing. Savings were made to 
the extent of 33^%, and 30-50% respective^, hy arra-nging fo,r 
binding to be done on the Society’s premises, and blocks to bo 
prepared direct^ by firms selected for the purpose, and notices 
of meetings, lectures, etc., were printed at approximately 40% 
less cost. 

Instrnctions to Authors . — ^In order to avoid delay and un- 
necessary trouble and expense, caused by the receipt of papers not 
properly press-ready, instructions were prepa,red by I)rs. Baiiii 
Prashad and S, K. Chatterji, suitable for both scientific and 
literary productions, giving full directions for .submission of papers 
for the Society’s Journal and Memoirs. These instructions have 
been printed and are being issued with each iiambor of the 
Journal and Memoirs. 

With regard to literary and scientific publications no efforts 
were spared to maintain the general standard. The Socfietiy 
published a large number of papers by distinguished, scholars 
and scientists including two from Sir Aurel Stein and Dr. E. W. 
Gudger ; communications also were received at the monthly 
meetings on matters of considerable importance by such authori- 
ties as Prof. Herre of the Stanford University. The satisfac- 
tion expressed by Sir Aurel Stein and Dr. Gudger for the prompti- 
tude and care with which their papers were published, will no 
doubt encourage all who worked so strenuously during the past 
year for the restoration of the Society’s reputation. 

The Baptist Mission Press. 

Under the capable superintendence of Mr. P. Koiglib tlu^ 
Baptist Mission Press continued to act as our cliief printi^rs 
and gave, as usxxal, their invaluable assistance. 

Agencies. 

Oux European, American and Indian Agents romtiin tlie 
same. An extension of the list for Asiatic countries could noii 
be made as deskecl owing to unsettled conditions in most of 
countries. 


Exchanges of Publications. 

The following applications for exchanges with the Society^ 
publications were considered by the Council, and its decisions 
are noted below : — 



1941] 


Annual Report, 


53 


PublicaMons of : 


To be exchanged with * 


Bha,ratiya Vidyaj Bombay 
Beccan. C’ollege Research Institutes 
Pooim (Bulletin) 

Research Dept., D.A.V. College, Lahore 

Visva-Bliarati, Saiitiniketan (including 
Tagore’s works in Bengali) 

Bangiya Sahitya Parisat . . 


'Saiislo.*it Sahitya Parisat . . 



Journal. 

JoumaL 

Bibliotheca In.diea works of 
equal value. 

Memoirs. 

Sanskrit, Hindi, other Indian 
vernaculars and Tibetan 
' works in the Bibliotheca 
Indica Series. 

Sanskrit Texts in the Bihliotheca 
Indica Series. 


T1i 6 list of institutions with which esclaanges of publications 
a»a|iacle has been placed before a sub-committee for revision. 


Meetings. 

The Ordinary Monthly Meetings of the Society were held 
regularly with the exception of January and the recess months 
of September and October. The average attendance was 14 
members and 4 visitors. The maximum attendance was in 
.December with 17 members and 9 visitors. 

There were no meetings of the Medical Section. ■ 


Exhibits. 

At the Ordinary Monthly Meetings exhibits were shown 
and commented upon by the exhibitors. The following may be 
mentioned : — 

Percy Brown: A note ou (a) Two old Japanese * How -to -Draw® 

books, and 

(6) An old Japanese book on repeating 
patterns for textiles such as 
brocades, etc. 

Dr. li S. Guha : Three Tibetan Manuscripts. 

Ohiiitaliaran Ohakravarti: Manuscripts in. the Society’s colIectio 2 ^ 
of Sanskrit Works of Maharaja Visvanath Singh of Eewah. 


Communications. 

Apart from papers, commumcations on matters of consider- 
able scholarly and scientific interests were made from time 
to time at the Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 

Among such communications the following may be men- 
tioned: — • 

Mrs. B, W, E. Macfarlaiie: Mother and Child Combinations of 
Blood Groups and Blood Types in Calcutta. 

J. N. Muklierjee: A note on solubility and dissociation constant of 
stearic acid by P, Dutta. 



54 


Year-Booh R.A.S.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. TO, 


Cliiiita-,ha.raii Cl’ialo'avarti : Study of Manuscripts. 

M. Hidayat Hosain: European Physicians and, ►Siirg(3oiis in fclie 
Moghul Court; a. note on the ruins of Masjklkur and Aniadi; and 
a 'note on a very rare and rielily <.')ri, lamented MS. called CliiiigiK 
Noma. 

J. 0. Do: P6)arls and the East India Company (KiOO t(.) J6C1). 
Albert W. C. T. Herr6: Fisheries Development in the East, 


General Lectures. 


The following General Lectures were delivered, before 
fairly large audiences of members and visitors : — • 


February 
March 18th . . 

March 29 th . , 

ikpril. 2nd 

July 31st 


Dr. Meghnad Saha : Physics in. Medic in©. ' 
Dr. C. S. Fox ; The Progress of Search for Mine , ' 
in India. 

Bt.-Col. R. N. Chopra: Use of Hemp 
in India. 4 

P. ICoda'iida Bao : Eastern, and Western C,iLV'iju 
tion — a Denial of Contrast, 

Dr. H. I. Poleman: America and. Indie Studies. 


Philology. 

Two papers read in the previous year wore published. 

Two papers were read and published, during the year. 

History. 

Two papers read in the previous year were published. 

Five papers were read and published during the year. 

Anthropology. 

Three papers read in the previous year wore publislicHl 
Eight papers were read and published during the year. 

Archaeology. 

Two papers were read and published d,uriiig tl:ie ymv. 

Two papers wore read during the year and. will bc,^ publlshcsil 
later. 

Natural History : Zoology, 

Two papers read in the previous year were published. 

Four papers were read and publishe(,l during the year. 

Natural History ; Botany, 

One paper read in the previous year was published. 

One paper was read and published during the year, 

4B 



1 , 941 ] 


Annual Report. 


55 


MathematieSo 

One paper wbjS read during the year to be published later* 

Cultural Actmties* 

Apart from, general lectures, activity was shown in several 
directions ahiied at increasing the usefulness of the Society as 
a great cultural institution. In the month of August permission 
was given to the Modern Society of Art to hold its exhibition of 
Paintings and Sculptures in a room on the ground floor. 

Advice and help were given to investigators from many 
pUces in India, and abroad, of whom the following may be 
? mentioned 

(1) Major M. P. C. Martin, P.E., (an old Member) was 
su’** bed with a note on the Chaleolithic Period in Baluchistan 
f ..o. .he Near East, and a bibliography of work done. 

(2) Mille. R. B. Cachio with a translation of a letter received 
from Helsinki. 

(3) Mr. R. Genge, a member, on behalf of Messrs. D. J. 
Keymer & Co., with a detailed note on the u.se of sandal-oil. and 
sandalwood in ancient India. 

(4) Miss Wheelwright from U.S.A. with information on 
alleged* similarities in folk-tales between the Tibetan and the 
Red Indian tribes of America. 

(5) Principal A. C. Dutt of the Bareilly College, Bareilly, 
with iiiformation on the^Hamsadatakayar’, regarding its author 
and its place in Sanskrit literature. 

(6) Request was made by the Registrar of the Calcutta 
High Court for help in assessing the value of the many historical 
documents in the possession of the Court. Dr. U. N. Ghosal 
examined them on behalf of the Society and his report was sent 
to the Registrar. 

(7) Mr, Harmux Kans of Hyderabad, asked for information 
on the use of 'Ameer-ul-Hind’ relating to Nawab Azam Jah 
Bahadur on old China. Prof. M. Haq supplied the necessary 
detail, s. 

(8) The Chief Secretary of Suket State was supplied with 
information on the Sena Kings of Bengal. 

(9) His Majesty’s Trade Commissioner at Calcutta with 
information regard, ing the interpretation of certain symbols 
used as trade marks. 

In addition, Mr. Sarojbhusan Barua, M.A., a research 
scholar of the Government of Bengal, has been carrying on 
researches in Buddhistic literature under the supervision of the 
Society’s experts for over a year. 

Solicitors. 

The Society is under obligation toits Sohoitors, Messrs. B. 
Basu & Co., for prompt and valuable service rendered during the 



56 Year-Book MA.S.B. for 194:0, [vol. to, 

yeai\ To tlie head of the firm, Mr. J. h[. Basil, it is specially 
indebted for Ms courtesy a.nd ungrudging help on all cx'scasioiiS' 
iFlieii, tliei“e wa,.s a^iiy need to consult him. 

Desiderata, 

From the foregoing review of woxic it will be seen that n. 
considerable part of the reorganization of the Society lias been 
effeeted. What remains to be done includes routine matters 
on which work has aii‘eady commenced and other improvements 
\Fliich require large capital outlay and cannot be carried out 
vdtliout addition to our already much reduced resources. 

Our successful efforts to vdpe off the large arrears of 
piibli( 3 ation have resulted in the quick depletion of our Funds 
available for publication, one of which, namely, the O.P. Fund 
No. 2 has closed with a debit balance of Rs. 11,000 in 1940. 
Unless the Government grants are restored in full, no furtlica* 
work in Arabic and Persian ca,n bo undertaken in the near 
future. Similarly, the repair and rebinding of damaged MSS. 
and books during 1939-40, has cost the Society large sums, 
and all future work in this direction will be very severely 
restricted unless our i^esources are considerably imple- 
mented. The restoration of some of our paintings, adequate^ 
insurance of all our properties, and .the provision of a modern 
fire-proof building cannot be shelved much longer. With the 
advice and help of Dr. John B. Grant, the Director of the All- 
India Institute of Hygiene, the Bockefelier Foundation of New 
York was asked for a donation of four lacis of rupees but 
under the present War conditions the Foundation d,id not find it 
possible to accede to our request. 

In Europe and America, institutions like ours benefit l>y 
generous help from big firms and philanthropists. The R 03 U 1 I 
Asiatic Society, which has, since the time of Sir William Jones, 
helped and encouraged research in all depai'tmeiits of Art and 
Science, has not been equally fortunate. Is ii; too muc‘h for tlu,> 
Council to hope that philanthropists and. rich well-wishers, among 
whom there must bo many who enjoy tlie privilcjiges of lt;s 
membership, will, by generous financial assistanc.e, liclp tlu:^ 
Society to maintain and increase its a<stiviticB in tlio caus«"^ 
of learning and research ? 



Anmal Bepoti. 


67 


1941 1 


[APPENDIX I.] 

Membership Statistics. 

(As calculated for December 31st, for 30 years.) 



ORDINARY. 

EXTRA- 

ORDL 

NARY. 

Grand Total Membership. 

FEL- 

LOWS. 

PAYma. 

Non- 

PAYHsra. 

Total Ordinary Members. 

YEAR. 

Resident. 

Non-Resident. 

Foreign. 

Total. 

Absent. 

Life. 

Total, 

Centenary Honoraiy. 

Associate. 

Institutional, 

Anniversary Honorary. 

Total. 

Honorary. 

Ordinary. j 

191J .. 

200 

225 

19 

444 

53 

22 

75 

519 

3 

14 



17 

536 

28 

19 

1912 .. 

203 

220 

19 

451 

43 

23 

66 

517 

3 

13 



16 

533 

27 

24 

1913 .. 

200 

211 

19 

430 

46 

23 

69 

199 

3 

U 



17 

516 

27 

28 

1914 .. 

191 

187 

19 

397 

50 

26 

76 

473 

3 

14 



17 

490 

24 

27 

1915 

171 

188 

21 

380 

40 

25 

65 

445 

3 

15 



18 

463 

29 

31 

1916 . . 

145 

159 

18 

322 

60 

25 

85 

407 

3 

15 



18 

425 

26 

33 

1917 

150 

144 

15 

309 

45 

24 

69 

378 

2 

12 



14 

392 

22 

35 

1918 .. 

153 

145 

17 

315 

43 

24 

67 

382 

2 

10 



12 

394 

22 

39 

1919 .. 

141 

128 

35 

284 

64 

25 

89 

373 

2 

11 



13 

386 

18 

36 

1920 . . 

161 

134 

15 

310 

32 

26 

58 

368 

2 

11 



13 

381 

28 

38 

1021 .. : 

160 

132 

16 

308 

26 

26 

51 

359 

2 

12 



14 

373 

28 

40 

1922 . . 

160 

141 

16 

317 

26 

26 

52 

369 

2 

13 



15 

384 

30 

39 

1923 . . 

147 

120 

13 

280 

30 

27 

57 

337 

2 

11 



13 

350 

28 

37 

1924 . . 

209 

134 

12 

355 

29 

28 

57 

412 

‘) 

12 



14 

426 

27 

37 

1925 .. 

263 

137 

12 

412 

23 

27 

50 

462 

2 

12 



14 

476 

26 

34 

1926 . . 

31 9 

162 

20 

501 

23 

2b 

51 

552 

0 

12 



14 

566 

25 

34 

1927 . . 

328 

107 

18 

513 

28 

33 

61 

571 

2 

13 



15 

589 

28 

38 

1928 . . 

344 

167 

23 

534 

42 

16 

88 

622 

i 

12 



13 

635 

28 

40 

1929 . . 

331 

181 

21 

533 

36 

49 

85 

018 

J 

10 

2 


13 

631 

27 

43 

1930 . . 

291 

194 

37 

522 

22 

52 

74 

596 

1 

8 

2 


!1 

607 

29 

47 

1931 .. 

228 

184 

29 

441 

26 

52 

78 

519 

1 

8 

5 


14 

533 

29 

46 

1932 . . 

222 

126 

23 

371 

27 

54 

81 

452 

1 

7 

5 


13 

405 

28 

45 

1933 . . 

194 

I2G 

27 

347 

33 

56 

89 

436 


7 

6 


13 

449 

26 

49 

1934 . . 

217 

112 

30 

359 

26 

57 

83 

442 


6 

7 

12 

25 

467 

26 

47 

1935 . . 

206 

107 

28 

341 

28 

56 

84 

425 


5 

7 

11 

23 

448 

24 

44 

1936 . . 

214 

106 

24 

344 

16 

55 

71 

115 


5 

10 

11 

26 

441 

21 

46 

1937 . . 

205 

99 

29 

333 

20 

55 

75 

408 


5 

12 

10 

27 

435 

19 

49 

1938 . . 

193 

98 

21 

312 

24 

54 

78 

390 


4 

12 

10 

26 

416 

19 

45 

1939 . . 

187 

103 

21 

311 

21 

54 

75 

386 


6 

12 

10 

28 

4U 

22 

46 

1940 . . 

190 

108 

18 

316 

1 

57 

71 

387 


7 

12 

10 

29 

416 

21 

49 





58 


Year-Book B.A.S.B. for im. [vol. yji, 1941] 


[APPENDIX II.] 

List of PuWications issued fey the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 

during 1940. 


(a) Bibliotheca Indiea : 

i. JnrHan- W^rrl's: 

1. Dnctririe oC Niiribairka, Englisli Trauslatiion, 

Vol. I . . . . ' . . 

2. Liisl:ia,i-Eoglisl'ii Dictionary, complete work . . 
.‘k Va.rna-ratnakara, complete worlc 

4. Dharma-bindii., Vol, 1, Fascicle 2, concluding 

fascicle 

5. Avadana-kalpalata, VoL I, Fascicle 2 (Reprint) 
,/7. Islamic ; 

0. Qaiiunu’-HiiniayrniT, complete work 

7. Qaafiri-i-Hrimayfini, English Translation, 

com])lete work 

8. Tabaciat-i-Akbarl, English Ti'anslation, Vol. 

.I ll, Fart III, Index, concluding part 


Rs. As. It. 

6 4 0 

18 0 0 
5 0 n 

3 4 0 

0 h 


;} 0 0 

4: 0 0 

2 8 0 




Journal and Proceedings (Third Series) : 

Vol. V (Lotters) No. 1 . . 

2 . . 

r, !! r, 7, 8 . 

,, ,, (Science) No. 1 . . 

2 . . 

,, V.l (Letters) No. 1 . . 

,, (Science) No. 1 . . 

,, ,, Year-Book 


Title-pages and Indexes to Volumes IV and 
and subscribers). 


7 8 0 

8 8 0 
2 8 0 
2 4 (I 
18 (\ 
8 8 0 
8 8 0 
4 14 b 

V (Free to Members 


(e) Memoirs : 

Vol. X, No. 8: How the Santa la Live . . 7 0 o 

Vol. XII, No. 2; The Alleged Pugnacity of‘ the 
Swordfish and the SjK’arfisbes as shown by tlieir 
attacks on Vessels . . . . . , 7 14 o 

(d) Miscellaneous : 

I)es<Tif)tiv<5 Oatalogue of Sanskrit Manuwmipts in 
Golk'ction of tlus R.oyal Asiatic Socitsiy of 
Bengal, Vol. VI i I, Tantru*, Part II 


7 8 0 



[APPENDIX III] 


Abstract Statement 

of 

Receipts and Disbursements 

of the 

Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 

for 

the Year 1940 


{ 59 ) 



60 


Year-Booh B.A.S.B.for 1940. 


[VOL. ¥11; 


STATEMENT No» 1. 

1940. ■ General 

Tncoiii© and Expeiiditiir© Aocouat 
Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Bstablishmknt : 


Salaries and Allowances , . 

, . 22,632 

4 

9 




Commission . . 

277 

2 

0 

22,90!) 

6 

9 







G-enebab Expenditukb ; 







Stationery 

1,046 

9 

3 




Fans and Light . . 

356 

15 

0 




Telephone 

324 

13 

0 




Taxes 

. . 2,387 

5 

0 




Postage 

. . 2,243 

1.1 

9 




Contingencies . . 

1,118 

5 

6 




Printing Circulars, etc. 

.. 1.304 

6 

6 




Audit Fee 

250 

0 

0 




Petty Repairs . , 

225 

5 

6 




Insurance 

500 

0 

0 




Menials’ Clothing 

100 

0 

0 




Furniture and Repairs 

513 

10 

0 




Interest on Security Deposit 

5 

0 

0 

10,376 

1,000 

1 

1'^ 

Gratuities 

. . 



0 

0 

Library and Collections : 







Books 

1,266 

i 

9 




Binding 

3,213 

2 

0 

4,479 

15,967 

3 

9 

C) 

Steel Shelving . . 

. . 



0 

Publications ; 







Journal and Proceedings . . 

.. 



7,738 , 

3 

6 

Contribution : 







Provident Fund for 1940 . . 

.. 



642 

0 

0 

Tbansebr to— 




63,111 

15 

6 

Building Repair Fund Account 

.. 



2,000 

0 

0 

Sundry Adjtustments ; 







I5ad Debts written-off 

.. 



1,175 

0 


Balance as i^eb Balance Sheet 



2,83,041 

8 

10 


i5,49,S28 8 4 



1941] Receipts and Disbursements. 61 

STATEMENT No. 1. 

Fund. 1940. 

for the year to 31st December, IHO. 

Rs. As, P, Rs. As. P, 
By Balance from last Aoootjnt , . .... 2,50,988 0 S 


Cash Receipts : 

Interest on Investments 
Interest on Fisred Deposits 
Government Grant 
Advertising 
Rent . . 

Donation 
Miscellaneous . . 


9,958 14 11 
750 0 0 
1,600 0 0 
10,200 0 0 
10,305 0 0 
500 0 0 
2,844 4 0 


36,168 


2 11 


Personal Account : 

9,839 0 0 
1,040 0 0 
680 0 0 
460 4 0 
5,185 12 3 

17,205 0 3 

Transfer from Funds : 


Members’ Subscriptions 
Admission Fees 
Compounding Fees 
Sundry Adjustments 
Publications 


Sanskrit MSS. Fund . . . . 8,000 0 0 

Building Repair Fund . . . . 10,000 0 0 

International Catalogue of Scientific 

Literature . . . . . . 4,374 7 8 

Proportionate Share in General Expen- 
diture — 

Oriental Publication Fund (1) .. 2,500 0 0 

Sanskrit MSS, Fund .. 2,000 0 0 

26,874 7 S 

Appreciation on Investments — 

' Revalued on 3142-1940 . . 17,749 15 0 

Appreciation on Transfer to 
Provident B’lmd . . . . 352 8 0 

18,102 7 0 


3,49,328 8 4 



62 


Year-Book R.A,S.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VIIj 


STATEMENT No. 2. 

1940, Oriental Publication 

i’rom a monthly grant made by the Government of Bengal for the pnbli- 
(Rs. 600), and for the publication of Sanskrit 
{Less 20% from the 


Rs. As. P. 


To Printing .. .. .. .. 8,592 11 6 

Editing • . . . . . • . 310 0 0 

Binding . . . . . . . . 417 8 0 

Proportionate Share in General Expenditure . . 2,500 0 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . . . 12,148 3 8 


23,968 7 2 


STATEMENT No. 3. 

1940^ Oriental Publication 

From an annual grant made by the Government of Bengal of 

H'istorica>l 
{Less 20% from, the 


To Balance from last Account 
Printing 
Editing 
Binding 


Rs. As. P. 
3,144 16 ] 

6,347 12 3 
1,013 12 6 
578 8 0 


1.B084 16 10 


STATEMENT No. 4. 

1940. Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund 

From an aumial grant of Rs. 3,200 made by the Govornment of Bengal 

by the Society i and Rs, 3,6<Mf from tli© 
{Less 20% from, the 


Bh. Aa. V, 
1,200 0 
200 0 0 
2,020 16 I] 
20 12 0 
1,202 6 9 
8,000 0 0 

2,000 0 0 
18,179 16 0 


To Cataloguijig 
Binding 
Printing 

Purchase of books 
Repairs to Mss. . , 

Transfer to Genera! Fund B,A,S.B. 
Proportionate Share in General Expen- 
diture . . . . ' . . 

Balance as per Balance Sheet 


32,824 1 3 



1941] Receipts and JDisMirsements. 63 

STATEMENT No. 2, 

Fund No. 1 9 in Accmmt with M.A.S.B. 1940^ 

cation of Oriental Wox’ks and Works of Instruction in Eastern Languages 
Works liitlierto unpublished (Rs. 250). 

Isi; of Aprils 1932.) 

Rs. As. P 

13y Balance from last Account .. 1637687 2 

Annuo, 1 Gro,nt . . . . . . . . 7,200 0 0 


23,968 7 2 

STATEMENT No. 3. 

Fund No^ 2, in Accotmt with E.A.8.B. 1940^ 

Rs. 3,000 for the publication of Arabic and Persian Works of 
Interest. 

1 , 9 ^ of AprUf 1932 .) 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance as 'per Balau(ie Sheet .. .. , 11,084 15 10 


11,084 15 10 

STATEMENT No. 4. 

Account, in Accotmt toith E.A.S.B, 1940. 

for the publication of the Catalogue of Sanskrit^ Man'uscripts acquired 
same Government for Research Work. 

15 / of April, 1932 .) 

Rs. As. P. 

J-Sy Balax'ico from last Account . . . . 24,824 1 3 

Annual Grant , . . . . . . . 8,000 0 0 


32,824 1 3 



64 


Tmr^Booh E.A.S^B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


STATEMENT No. 5, 

1940. Arabic and Persian Manuscripts 

B'rom an ammal grant of Rs. 5,000 mad© by tb© Government of for 
by th© Society ; for the purchase of further Manuscripts, 

Manuscrif:>ts foiiiKl in 


To Balance from last Account 
Purchase of Manuscripts 
Reference Works 
Catalogtiliig 
Binding 
Printing 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

1,417 1 

70 0 0 

254 8 0 

2,100 0 0 

419 4 0- 

1,380 0 0 


5,041 3 3 


STATEMENT No, 6. 

1940. Barclay Memorial 

From a sum of Rs. .500 odd given in 1890 by tlK^ tSurgoon 

©neouragemeiit of MlaJical 


To Cost of a Medal 

Balance as per Balance Sheet— 

Rs. 700;3|%a:P. Notes, 1854-55 
Surplus at date 


Rs. As. P. Rb. As. P. 

19 2 0 

058 7 0 
77 6 8 

735 13 K 


754 15 S 


STATEMENT No. 7. 

1940. Servants' Pension Fund 

Founded in 1870 as the Piddlngtori PooHinu. Fund 


■Rs. As. 1>. Rh, Ah P. 

To Pension ,, .. .. 132 0 o 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs, 3,000, 3|% G.P. Notes, 1854-55 2,821 14 0 
Surplus at dafe . . . . 838 2 8 

3,660 0 8 


3,792 0 8 



1941] Meceipts and Disbursements. 65 

STATEMENT No„ 5. 

Fund Account 9 in Accoimt with R.A.S.B. 1940, 

the cataloguing and binding of Arabic and Persian Manuscripts, acquired 
and for the preparation of notices of Arabic and Persian 
various Libraries in India. 



Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

By Annual Grant , . 

2,600 0 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet 

3,141 3 3 


5,641 3 3 

STATEMENT No. 6. 


Fund Account^ in Account with R.AM.B, 1940» 

General, for the foundation of a medal for the 

and Biological Science. 

Rs. As. P. Bs. As. P, 

By Balance from last Account . • .... 685 10 8 

Interest realized during the year . , .... 24 4 0 

Appreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-1940 .. 45 1 0 


764 16 8 

STATEMENT No. 7. 


Account^ in Account with 1940. 

■with Rs, SOO odd from the Piddington Fund. 

Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 
By Balance from last Account . . .... 3,494 2 8 

Interest realized during the year , . .... 104 12 o 

Appreciation on Investments revalued 

on 31-12-1940 .. .. .... 193 2 0 


3,792 0 8 



66 


Tear-Booh for 1940. 


[VOL. TOj 


STATEMENT No. 8. 

1940* Annandale Memorial Fund 

From donations by subscription, 


Rs. As, P, 

To Cost of a Medal . . . . . . . • 

Balance as per Balance Sheet— 

Rs. 4,000, Vs% G.P, Notes, 1854-65 3,762 8 0 

Surplus at date . . . . 624 4 9 


Rs. As. P. 
221 8 0 

4,386 12 9 


4,008 4 9 


STATEMENT No. 

1940. Permanent Library Endowment 

From gifts received, 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs, 14,000, 3|% G.P, Notes, 1854-55 13,168 12 0 
Surplus at date . . . . 2,737 7 8 

16,906 3 8 


16,900 3 8 


STATEMENT No. 10. 

1940> Sir William Jones Memorial 

From a sum gifted for the purpose in 
Rs. As, P. Rs, As. P. 

To Baiarie© as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs.3,000,3|%G.P. Notes, 1854-55 2,821 14 0 

Surplus at date • . . . 263 15 0 

3,076 13 0 

3,076 13 0 



67 


1941] Receipts and Disbursements. 

STATEMENT No. S. 

Account^ in Account with R.A.S.B . 

started i,u 1926. 


Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account .... 

Interest realized during the year .... 

Appreciation on Investments revalued 

011 31 - 12-1940 .. .. 


STATEMENT No. 9 . 

Fund Account^ in Account with E.A.8.E. 

started in 1926. 


Rs. As. F. 

By Balance from last Account . . . . .... 

Interest realized during the year . . .... 

Donation . . . . . . .... 

Appreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12.1940 


STATEMENT No. 10. 

Fund Account^ in Account with E.A.8.B. 

1926, by Dr. D. N. Brahmaehari, 


Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . . . . .... 

Interest realized during the year . . .... 

Appreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-1940 


1940 . 


Ks. As. P. 

4,212 4 9 

138 8 0 

257 8 0 


4,608 4 9 


1940 . 


♦Rs. As. P. 

14,496 16 8 
489 0 <J 
20 0 0 

901 4 0 

16,906 3 8 


1940. 


Rs, As. P. 
2,777 15 0 
104 12 0 

193 2 0 

3,076 13 0 



€8 


Year -Booh for 194-0. 


[VOL. vu:. 


STATEMENT No, 11, 

194G, Pramathanath Bose Memorial 

From a eiini 


Bs. Ab. '.P. Rs. As, P, 

To Balance as per Balance Slieet — 

Bs. 800, 3|%aP. Notes, 1842-43] j ^^3 2 ^ 

„ 1,000, „ „ 1865 3 ^ 

Surplus at date . . . . 313 6 0 

2,006 7 0 


2,006 7 0 


STATEMENT No, 12, 

1940. Joy Gobind Law Memorial 

From a donation for the ptirpoB«^ 


Rs. As, P. Rs. As, P. 

To Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs. 3,000, 3 J% G.R Notes, 1864-66 2,821 14 0 

Surplus at date . . . . 209 0 0 

3,030 14 0 


3,030 14 0 


STATEMENT No. 13. 

1940^ Calcutta Science Congress Prize 


Bs, As, P. Rs. As, P. 

To Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs. 3,000, 3|% G.F. Notes, 1864-66 2,821 14 0 

Surplus at date . . , . 1,187 10 7 

4,009 8 7 


4,000 8 7 



m 


1941] Receipts and Disbursements. 

STATEMENT No» 11. 

Fund Account^ m Account with R.A,8.B. 1940. 

fcho purpose in 1935, 


By Balance from last Account . , 

Interest realized during the year 
Appreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-124940 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

1,838 7 0 

52 2 0 

115 14 0 


2,006 7 0 


STATEMENT No. 12. 

Fund Account, in Account with R.A.S.B. 1940 

ill 1929, by Dr. Satya Churn Law. 


Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . . . . .... 

Interest realized during the year . . .... 

Appreciation on Investments revalued 
01131-12-1940 


Rs. As. P. 

2,733 0 0 
104 12 0 

193 2 0 


3,030 14 0 


STATEMENT No. 13. 


Fund Account^ in Accoimt with R.A.S.B. 1940. 


Rs. As. P. Rs, As, P. 

By Balance from last Account , . .... 3,711 10 7 

Interest realized during the year . . .... 104 12 0 

Appreciation on Investments revalued 

01131-124940 .. .. 193 2 0 


4,009 8 7 


5 



70 


Year-Book BA.S.B.for 1940. 


[yoi.. tii. 


STATEMENT No. 14. 

1940 . Dr. Brahl Memorial 

From a sum gifted for the purpose in 


Rs. As. P. Bs. As. P. 

To Balance as por Balance Sheet— 

Rs, 1,000, 3i% G.P. Notes 1854-55 940 10 0 

Surplus at date . , . , 1517 0 

— 1,092 1 D 


1,092 1 0 


STATEMENT No. 15. 

1940. Building Repair 

Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Transfer to General Fund , . , . . . 10,000 0 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet .. 4,317 3 0 

14,317 3 O' 


STATEMENT No* U. 

1940. Provident Fund 

From eontriliutioim by the 


To Payments during the year 
Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs. 5,000, 3% G.P Notes, 1941 
Rs. 6,000, 3i% a.P. Notes, 1900-01 
Savings Bank and Advances 


Bs. As. P. ,Rs. As. lb 
.... 150 0 0 * 

5,065 10 0 
6,64.3 12 0 
5,130 15 0 

16,840 5 0* 


16,990 6 0 ' 


5B 



71 


1941] Receipts and Disbursements. 

STATEMENT m. 14. 

Fund Account^ in Account with 1940^ 

1929^ by the Brdhl Farewell Committee. 



Rs. As, P. 

Es, As, P„ 

By Balance from last Account 

Interest realized during the year 
•Appreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-1940 

.... 

992 15 0* 
34 12 0 

64 6 O' 



1,092 1 0- 

STATEMENT No. 15. 



Fund Account^ in Account with M.AM.B. 

1940 .. 


Rs. Aa. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account 

Balance from Building Fund Account 
Transfer from R.A.S.B. General Fund 

.... 

5,995 9 6' 
6,321 9 6- 
2,000 0 O' 



14,317 3 0 

STATEMENT No, 16. 

Account^ in Account with E,A.8,B. 

Society and its Staff. 


1940 . 


Rs. As. P. 

Rs. Aa, P,^ 

By Balance from last Account 

Interest realized during the year 

Staff Contribution for the year 

Society’s Contribution for the year 

33*2 0 
642 0 0 
642 0 0 

14,330 6 11 

1,297 2 0 
310 4 1 

52 S O' 

Interest realized from Savings Bank 
Appreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-124940 .. 

.... 


15,990 5 0 



72 


Year-Book R.A.S.B.for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


STATEMENT No. 17. 

1940. Advances Account, 


Ks. As. I>. Rs. As. V. 

To Balance from last Account .. .... ** ** 

Payments during the year ., .... 0 0 

4,110 0 0 


STATEMENT No. 18. 


1940. 



Personal 


Rs. 

As. P. 

Rs. As. 1\ 

To Balance from last Account 

* * » 

0 « « 

3,852 13 9 

Advances 

« o » 

« » * 

2,019 0 3 

R.A.S.B.’s Subscriptions, etc. 

.. 12,019 

4 0 


Book sales, etc 

5,185 

12 3 

17,205 0 3 


2:i,r.7(i 14 :t 


STATEMENT No. 19. 

1940. 


To Books returned, etc. . . 
Special Binding (Plate books) 
Printing, Jotirixal and Memoirs 
Balance as per Balance Sheet 


Publication Fund Account, 


Es. As. P. Rs, As. .Ik 

26 3 0 

" 1,710 0 0 
3,196 12 3 
4,403 16 0 


8,336 14 3 



1941] Meceipts and Disbursements, 73 

STATEMENT No. 17. 

in Account with 1940. 


Bs. As. P, Rs. As, P. 

By RefunclR during the year .. .... 1,635 0 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 2,475 0 0 

4,110 0 0 


STATEMENT No. 18. 

Account. 1940. 

Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

By Cash Receipts during the year . . .... 18,208 4 0 

Books returned . , . . .... 26 B 0 

Bad Debts written off, R.A.S.B. , • .... 1,175 0 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 4,267 7 3 


Outstandings. 

Amount duo 
to the Society. 

Amount duo 
by the Society. 


Ks. 

As. 

P. 

Ks. 

As. 

p. 

Members 

3,263 

11 

0 

468 

14 

6 

Subscribers, etc. 
Bill Collector’s 

72 

0 

0 

24 

0 

0 

Deposit 




100 

0 

0 

Miscellaneous ... 

1,537 

i2 

3 

13 

1 

6 


4,878 

"*7 

1 

606 

0 

0 


23,676 14 3 

STATEMENT No. 19. 

in Account with R,A.S,B. 1940^ 

Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . . , , .... 7,824 8 6 

Cash Sale of Publications .. .. .... 51259 


8,330 34 3 




74 Year-Book B. A for IQiQ. [vol. to, 

:STATEME]SfT No. 20. 

1940. (/) Deposit Account (Savings Bank 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. 

'To Balance from last Account . . .... R380 10 II 

Deposit of Interest realized from 

loans during the year . . 13 2 0 

Deposit of Contributions during the 

year . . ... . . 1,291 14 0 

Deposit of Advances returned . . 1,635 0 0 

Transfer from Current Account . . 390 0 0 

0 0 

Interest for the year , . .... 310 4 1 

5,020 15 0 


STATEMENT No« 21. 

1940. ( 2 ) Deposit Account (Fixed Deposit 

Bs. As. B ' Ks. As. P. 

50.000 0 0 

10.000 0 0 


To Balance from last Account 
Deposit during the year 


60,000 0 0 



1941] Memifts and, Disbursements » 

STATEMENT No« 20. 

Deposit with Imperial Bank of India). 


By Withdrawal for Staff Advances, etc. 
Balance as per Balance Sheet 


Bs. As. F, 


STATEMENT No. 21. 
with Imperial Bank of India). 


Bs. As. P, 


75 


1940. 


Bs. As. P. 
2,365 0 0 
2,665 15 0 


5,020 15 0 


1940. 


Rs. As. F. 

20,000 0 0 

40.000 0 0 

60.000 0 0 


By Withdrawal during the year 
Balance as per Balance Sheet 



76 


Tear-Booh R.A.8.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. ■VIl, 


STATEMENT No. 22. 

1940. ( 5 ) Investments 

Ite. As. i:’. 

To Balance from la.st Acconnt . . . . 2„91,062 4 0 

Appreciation on In\-e.sfcrnent8 revalued 
011 3.1-12-1940 .. .. .. 19,1159 0 0 

Appreciation on Transfer to Provident 
Ftmd . . . . . . . . 352 8 fi 


3,11,373 12 C) 


Face 

Value 

Us. 

FUNDS. 

Kate (* 
Rs. % 


]40\'AL ASIA TIP HOOT FT 'Y OF 
UFN(3 A I... 


16,700 

1,53,7(10 

44,300 

0,000 

33,00(1 

1 * ICI{, M A N’ IfiST I l.KSKlt V 10. 

3|% U. l\ Notes, 1842-13 \ 

31% 0. P. Notes, 1.854-55 

U. P. Not(\s 1805 ]■ 

nh% U. I*. Notes, 1879 
:ii% U. P. Note.s, ],9i,iO-Ol ' 


2,53,700 

500 

3% G. P ,Noto.s”l89i?-97 

946/- 

80;i4/- 

12,000 

11,400 

TrOAU'OIfAUy liES.KllVK. 

3J% CL P. Notes, 1900-01 

4|% Loan, 1955-60 

94/1/- 

112/8/- 

700 

BAnorAr ATiomokiaij Fund. 

3|% Cl. .P. Notes, 18,54-55 

94/1/. 

8.000 

SKUVArf-rs’ Pen.sion Fund. 

34% CL P. Notes, 1854-55 

94'1,'- 

4,000 

Annandaoe AluMourAri Fund. 

3 4 % (1 . P, :N 0 tes , 1 854-55 

94-/1/- 

14,000 

PEItMA'NlSN'l' IjlIJUAlty ENDOWMENT 
Fund. 

34% (1. ,P. Notes, 18.54-.55 

94/1/- 

3,000 

Sm WinuuM Jones Memoriae 
Fund. 

34% U-, P. :Note.s, 1854-55 

m/i/- 

800 

1,000 

pRAMATllANA'i’Jl BoSE MEMORIAL 

Fund. 

34% CL .P. Notes, 1842-43 1 

34% (:L IL Notes, 1865 .f 

94/1/- 

3,000 

Jof Do hind Law Memorial Fund. 

1 84% CL P. Note.s, 1854-55 

94/1/- 

3,000 

Calcutta Science OoNf4RESs .Prize 
Fund. 

34% CL P, Notes, 1854-55 

94/1/- 

1,000 

Dr. BiiiiHL Memorial Fund. 

34% G. P. Notes, 1854-55 

94/1/-" 

5.000 

6.000 

Provident Fund. 

3% i:joaii,1941 ... 

34% G, P. Notes, 1900-01 ... 

101/5/- 

9.4/1/- 

3,22,100 




oltit" j *^1 St 

Pocenihor, DocMMiilxdr 
19-.li), Valnu- i!9r,!!), Va.lim-j 
lion. itioii i.u’cost 


Ai'^proc.i’a- 

t-ion 


Us. Us. Sn p.l n,!;. hv. !■ 


101 


11,287 

12,825 


058 

2,821 

3,762 

13,168 

2,821 

1,093 

2,821 

2,821 

940 


5,065 

5,643 

T, 05^73 


A.j 


9 

0: 

0 

0 

8 

1 

0 

0: 

0 

7 

! 6 

14 

0 

8 

0 

12 

(1 

14 

0 

2 

0 

14 

0 

14 

0 

10 

0 

10 

0 

12 

0 

li 

(p 


2,22,3(14 ,10 0 
378:12 0 


10,515 

12,205 


• 013 
2,028 
3 505 

12,267 

2,028 


2.028 

2,C>2S 

870 


5,040 

5,610 


(,) 0 

2 i.) 

0 0 

,12 0 

0 

8 0 | 


2,85.U4 


16,331 45)0 
25 400 


12 0 
12] 0 

I 

41 0 


0: 0 


772 

019 

45 

193 

901 

193 

115 

11>3 

193 

04 


120 
12 1) 


19,959 ; 0 0 


H'O 

140 


Ip 

i 

I 

2o 

i 

8,0 

j 

■111 


M!4 


1941] 


Meceipts and Disbursements. 


77 


STATEMENT No. 22. 
Account. 


By Transfer of Fixed Deposit to Imperial 
Bank Current Account . . 

Balance as per Balance Sheet 


1940. 

Rs. As. P. 

6,000 0 0 

3 . 05.373 12 0 

3 . 11.373 12 0 



78 


Year-Book B.A.S.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. vn. 


STATEMENT No. 23. 

1940. Cash 

For th© year oiwiod 3 1st 


To 


Rs. As. P. -Rs. As. 


Balance from last Account 
General Fund Account 
Oriental Publication Fund No. 1 Account . . 
Sanskrit Man.nscri|.>ts Fund Account 
Arabic and Persian Manuscripts Fund 
Account 

Barclay Memorial Fund Account 
Servants’ Pension Fund Account 
Annandale Memorial Fund Account 
Permanent Library Endowment Fund 
Account 

Sir William Jones Memorial Fund Account 
Joy Gobind Law Memorial Fund Account 
Calcutta Science Congress Prize Fund 
Account 

Dr. Briihl Memorial Fund Account 
Pramathanath Bose Memorial Fund 
Account 

Provident Fund Account 
Advances Account . . 

Personal Account . . 

Publication Fund Account 
Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 
Bank of India, Calcutta 
Fixed Deposit Account, Imperial Bank 
of India, Calcutta 
Investments Account 


13,616 13 4 
36,158 2 11 
7,200 0 0 
8,000 0 0 

2,500 0 0 
24 4 0 
104 12 0 
138 8 0 

500 0 0 
104 12 0 
104 12 0 

104 12 0 
34 12 0 

52 2 0 
1,297 2 0 
1,635 0 0 
18,208 4 0 
512 5 9 

2,365 0 0 

20,000 0 0 
6,000 0 0 


1,18,670 6 0 



79 


1941] Meceipts and Disbursements. 

STATEMENT No, 23. 

Accotmt. 

December^ 1940. 


By Bs. As, P 

Genoral Fund Account . . . . .... 

Oriontal Publication Fund No. 1 Account . . .... 

Oriental Publication Fund No, 2 Account . , .... 

Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund Account . . .... 

Arabic and Persian Manuscripts Fund 
Account . . , . . . .... 

Barclay Memorial Fund Account . . .... 

Servants’ Pension Fund Account . . .... 

Annandale Memorial Fund Account . . .... 

Provident Fund Account . . . . .... 

Advances Account , . . . . . .... 

Personal Account . . . . . . .... 

Publication Fund Account , . . . .... 

Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 
Bank of India . . . . . . .... 

Fixed Deposit Account, Imperial Bank of 
India . . . . , . . , .... 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

In hand . . . . . . .... 

With the Imperial Bank of India, on 

Current Account . . . . .... 


1940 . 


Rs. As, P, 
63,111 15 6 
9,320 3 6 
7,940 0 9 
4,644 2 3 

4,224 2 0 
19 2 0 
132 0 0 
221 8 0 
150 0 0 
2,215 0 0 
2,619 0 3 
3,906 12 3 

3,330 0 0 

10,000 0 0 

14 8 6 

6,821 15 0 


1,18,670 6 0 



80 


Tear-Booh E.AB.B, for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


STATEMENT No. 24. 

1940. 


LIABILITIES. 


General Fund Account) 

Oriental Pu blication Fund No. 1 Account 
Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund Account 
Barclay Memorial Fund Account 
Servants’ Pension Fund Account 
Annandale Memorial Fund Account 
Permanent Library Endowment Fund 
Account 

Sir William Jones Memorial Fund Account 
■prama,tlianat,h ]3os(,) Memorial Fund 
Account 

Joy Gobind Law Memorial Fund Aocodnt 
Calcutta Science Congress Prize Fund 
Account 

Dr. Briihl Memorial Fund Account 
Building Repair Fund Account 
Provident F’und Account 
Publication Fund Account 
Personal Account — Sundry Liabilities 


Rs. As. 


Wo liavG exann'noA the above .Balance Shoot 
and the appendod detailed accounts with the 
IBooks and vouchers jjresentod to us and certiiy 
that they are in accordanco tlierowith, and, in 
our opinion, set forth, correctly the position of 
the Society as at 31st December, 1940. 

Priciq, WATORuousn, Peat & Co., 


Calcutta, 

27th January, 1941* 


Auditors, 

Chartered Accountants, 
Registered Accountants* 


Balance 

As Mt 31.st 


Rs.Ab. IL 

2,83,041 8 10 

12,148 3 8 
18,179 15 0 
735 13 8 
3, OCR) 0 8 
4,386 12 9 

15,906 3 8 

3,075 13 0 

2,000 7 0 
3,030 14 0 

4,009 8 7 
1,092 1 0 
4,317 3 0 
15,840 5 0 
4,403 15 0 
006 0 0 


3,76,440 12 10 



81 


1941] Meceipts and Disbursements. 

STATEMENT No„ 24» . 

Sheet. 

Decernberj 1940. 


ASSETS. 


Rs. As. P. 

Oiiental Publieation Fund No. 2 Account 11,084 15 10 
Arabic and Persian Manuscripts Fund 
Aceomit . . . . • . . 3,141 3 3 


Advances Account . , 

2,475 

0 0 

Personal Account — Sundry Outstandings . . 

4,873 

7 3 

Deposits ’ 

Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 
Bank of India 

2,655 

15 0 

Fixed Deposit Account, Imperial Bank 
of India 

40,000 

0 0 

Invostinents Account 



Cash Accomit : — 

In hand 

14 

8 e 

With the Imperial Bank of India, on 
Current Accomit 

6,821 

15 ( 


1940 . 

Rs. As. P, 

14,226 3 1 

7,348 7 3 

42,655 15 0 
3,05,373 12 0 

) 

- 6,836 7 6 

3,76,440 12 10 


Batni Pbashao, 
Honorary Treasurer, 




[APPENDIX IV.] 

Abstract Proceedings Council, 1940« 

(Rule 48 f.) 

Accommodation — 

Letter of thanks from the Honorary Secretary, Mining, Geological 
and Metallurgical Institute of India, for the use of the Society’s rooms 
on the occasion of the last Annual General Meeting of the Institute. 
Record. 

No. 7. 29-1-40. 

A letter from the Modem Society to hold an Art Exhibition in one 
of the Society’s rooms (downstairs) in which pictures of historical interest 
will be on view. Offer a room to them on the ground floor provided that 
the Society incurs no liability or expenses as a result of the exhibition. 

No. 2. 29-7-40. 

Letter dated 24-10-40 from the Honorary Secretary, Mining, Geolo- 
gical and Metallurgical Institute of India requesting the use of the 
Society’s Hall for their Animal Meeting on Friday, the 10th January, 
1941. Record. 

No. 20. 27-11-40. 

Annual Meeting — 

Consideration of the Annual Report for 1939. Proposed by Mr. Percy 
Brown, seconded by Dr. J. N. Mukherjee that the Annual Report, 
as amended, be adopted. Carried imanimously. 

Special. 17-1-40. 

Annual Meeting. Record. 

No. 13. 29-1-40. 

Provision for loud-speaker for the Annual Meeting. Resolved that 
the General Secretary arrange for the loan of the loud-speaker from 
the Calcutta University and that incidental expenses incurred thereby 
shall be borne by the Society. 

No. 15. 29-1-40. 

Letter B.O, No. 4134G dated 12-12-40 from the Private Secretary to 
His Excellency the Governor of Bengal expressing the inability of 
His Excellency to be present and preside over the Annual Meeting 
of the Society. President to personally approach His Excellency on 
the subject after the holidays. 

No. 22 . 20-12-40. 

Abtistic Possessions — 

Letter dated 23-8-40 from Mr. K* C. Roy, sculptor, offering to under- 
take the execution either in marble or in bronze plate of the plaster of 
Paris plaque of Sir WiUiam Jones translating Sakuntala at a cost of 
Rs.400 or Rs.l50 respectively. Request Maharaja Sir Pradyot Coomar 
Tagore for a donation to execute a marble statue. 

No. 25. ■ 


( 83 ) 


27 - 8 - 40 . 



84 


Yem^Booh B.A.S.B. for 1940 . 


[VOL. VII, 


Letter from Maharaja Sir Pradyot Goomar Tagoro da, ted 27t],i Sep™ 
temher 1940 in reply to the Greneral Secretary’s request to ])ear the cost 
of the Paris plaster plaque of Sir William Jones translating the Abhi- 
Tiianasakiin-talaiB, executed in marble. Record. 

' No. 9. 27-11-40. 


Bibliotii koa In j u'ca — 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 2 of 211-1-40. Letter 
fiHiin Prof. Chintaharan Ghakravarti otfering to eoniplete Bibli(,>thcca 
Indica work on ‘ Dliarmabiiidu Accept the offer at the customary 
lower rate of remuneration. Accepted by Council. 

No. 11. 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 3 of 23-1-40. Letter 
from Trill Chen offering to complete the Bibliotheca Indica, work on 
‘Bowuizangmo ’ by Mr. Karma Paul, Accept at tlie customary lower 
rate of remuneration. A specimen of Mr. Triii Clien’s work sliould 
be reviewed by a Tibetan scholar. Accepted by Couiieil. 

No. 11, 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 5 of 23:1-40. Standard- 
ization of the size of our Bibliotheca Indica publi(aitions. Staudar<lizc 
to 4to. and 8vo. only. Accepted by Council. 

No. 11. 29-1-40. 

Rec()'nm.iendation Publication Committee No. 6 of 23-1-40. Ijctter 
from Prof. Ragliu Vira regarding remuneration Ibr prepai’ing Mantra 
Index to the Vaikliaiiasasravitasutra. Rs.l20 to bo paid as a special 
ease. No mention of the International Academy of Indian Ciilturo 
to be made in tlio prefatory note. Accepted by Council. 

No. 11. 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 2 of 23-2-40. Letttsr 
from Mr. K. S. Paul regarding revision of the Tibetan work on 'Dowa- 
zangmok Inform Mr. Paul that Mr. Trin Chen has been asked to do 
tlio w'ork and trust that there will be no objection to this arrangement. 
Acceptcid bv Council. 

No. 13. 27-2-40. 

RtH.H>nirnendati(>n Publication Committee No. 3 of 23-2-40, New 
Work for Bibliotiieca Indica Series by I)r. Koma CIia,u,(Uiuri on ‘l)oc» 
trine of Nimliarkak Accepted by Council. 

No. 13. 27-2-40. 

Iloeoiiimondation Publicati^ni Committee No. 2 of 22-1-40. 
from tlie B. M. Press regarding the l>inding of BibIiotb(M'*a Indicia, works 
a,nd tlio aeti(,)n taken thereon. Confirm Gon(n.'ai Secretary’s fuOJon. 
Arrangements to bo made for storage of tlia fornu^s on the Socioty’H 
])romises. If required the works to bo soiiarately insured. Aocopted 
by Council. 

' No. 10. 29-4-40. 

Recommendation Publication Goimnitteo No. 3 of 22-4-40. Report 
on the Tibetan wairk ‘Dowazangmo’ in the Bibliotheca Indica Series. 
Work to be stopped and the type distributed. The MS. to be returned 
to the editor. The work may be undertaken at a later date when a 
comjietent editor and a reliable MS. are available. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 10. 


29-4-40. 



1941] 


Ahsiract Fi'oceedings Council, 1940 . 


85 


Recommendation PublicationJCommittoe No, 5 of 22-4-40. Request 
of Mr, A. G. Sliirreff for permission to complete tlie translation of 
Malik Muliainmad Jaisi’s 'Padmavati’j the text ofwliieli was published 
iri the Bibiiotlieca Indicsa Series under the editorship of Sir George 
A. G-rierso,i;i. Permission to be gi’anted to Mr. Shirreff to complete 
tiio translation. The Benares edition of the work to bo used for this 
purpose. A copy of this edition to be purchased by the Society. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. 29-4-40. 

Extract from a letter from Rev. W. J. L. Wenger, Record. The 
General Secretary to approach the Govermnent of Assam for a grant 
to meet the cost of publishing the Lushai-English Dictionary. 

No. 14, 29-4-40. 

Recommendation Bibliotheca Indica Committee No. 2 of 22-7-40. 
Application from Mr. Nareiidra Chandra Vedantatktha with a letter 
of recommendation from the Philological Secretary, Dr. S. K. Chatterji, 
suggesting the undertaking of the publication in the Bibliotheca Indica 
Series of the English translation of Tattvacintamani and Sabdasakti- 
prakasika. Dr. S. K. Chatterji withdrew Ms recommendation in view 
of the Society’s financial commitments. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Bibliotheca Indica Committee No. 3 of 22-7-40. 
A letter from the Philological Secretary, Dr. S. K. Chatterji, suggesting 
the publication of the remaining portion of the Tatparyaparisuddiii — 
the first part of which has already been published by the Society under 
the editorship of the late Lakslimana Sastri Dravida. Postpone con- 
sideration till a complete list of the Society’s publications that are still 
incomplete be prepared. Accepted by Council. 

No, 12. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Bibliotheca Indica Committee No. 4 of 22-7-40. 
Application from Dr. Mahdi Hosain of the A.gra University with a 
letter of recommendation from Prof. M. Malifuz-ul Haq, the Joint 
PMlological Secretary, suggesting the importance of the publication of 
the English translation of Ibn Batuta’s works. Postpone consideration 
till funds are available. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Bibliotheca Indica Committee No. 5(a) of 22-7-40. 
A letter from the Joint Philological Secretary, Prof. M. Mahfuz-ul Haq 
recommending the publication in the Bibliotheca Indica Series of 
Ta’rikh-i-NusratJaiigi or a History of Dacca by Nawab Nasrat Jang, 
the Nawab of the City, 1817. Translated by Dr. M, I. Borah. The 
publication of the translation cannot foe undertaken because of paucity 
of fimds in Oriental Publication Fund No. 1, Accepted by GouiiciL 

No. 12. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Bibliotheca Indica Committee No. 5(5) of 22-7-40. 
A letter from the Joint Philological Secretary, Prof. M. Mahfuz-ul 
Haq, recommending the publication in the Bibliotheca Indica Series of 
the Futuhat-i-Firuz Shahi (the Victories of Sultan Firuz Shah), by N. B. 
Roy. Publish in the Journal of the Society. Accepted by CounciL 

No. 12, 27-8-40. 

Recommendation BxbHotheca Indica Committee of 22-7-40. On 
the recommendation of Sir Jadunath Sarkar it was agreed that: 

6 



86 


Tear-^Boofc E.A.S.B, for 1940 . 


[VOL. VII, 


(«) A full list be prepared of works piiblisbed f»r undertaken, to bo piil:)- 
lisliod by tlie Society, but which are iaeompiete, (h) Tlio Coininittt'e 
oxa^iniiie the list and determine the priority of their piil;>lie.a.tion, (c) 
111 future, not fasciculi but complete volumes be publisheci, (d) Oare 
be taken to publish only those portions of liistorical wcn'Ics wliic.li am 
of real value t<.> tlio students interested in 'hist<")rical research, (6) ;rr(,>'r. 
Sarkar bo re€jiiesti>d to send a .note on tlio list wlson it is i.ireparcM'L 
Accepted by OouiiciL 

No. 12. 27-8-40. 

liecommendatioii Publication Committee No. 5 ol 21-8-40. .T.^otter 
from Dr. S. K. Ghatterji regarding Dr. A. H, Fraiieke’s work in tla^ 
Bibliotheca Iiidiea on ‘Kesar Saga’. Ac^eept Dr. Chatterji’s sug- 
gestions. Accepted by Council. 

No. 17. 27-8-40. 

Letter from Mr. J. P. Mills, regretting tlie inability of the Assam 
Coveminejit to provide .funds for tlie Imsiial-Phiglish Diction, aiy uiiieh 
is being ’published by the Society. Keco,rd. 

No, 24. ' 27-8-40. 

Keeommendationa of the Bibliotheca Indica Co:nuniti)ee of 22-7-4:(k 
Accept. 

No. 12. 27-8-40. 

A letter from the Honorary Secretary, Iloyal Asiatii* Soc.it.d/y, 
Bombay Branch, appreciating the presentation of 18 volumes of the> 
Bibliotheca Indica Series. Becord. 

No. 8. 24-1L40. 

The General Secretary informed the Council tliat Dr. M. Hidaj'^ai. 
Hosain, who is preparing the Catalogue of the Arabic tnul Jkirsian MSS., 
and receiving as honorarium Bs.200 per month for this work, iias, in 
view of the poor financial position of the fiuid, agrec^d to aceepfi otdy 
Rs.lOO from Octobex* 1940 onwards. Rosedved, that the thaiiks of the 
Society be convoyed to him for his action. 

No. 15. 24-9-40. 

ConsidBration regarding incorn}>lete printed fortncK of Manusnirl.i. 
R(^port tt.) the (Joinmittee a|)pointod for eonsidcjration of diKpewnl 
(,>f incomj),lete books, waste 'papers, 

No. 10. 27- f I -40. 

Letter dated 27-11-40 from Rev. W, 4'. ,L. Wmigor .re«’jues'l.ing the 
S(.,>ciety ti.) roducic the price of the Ltiahai-Engiish Dietimu.iry fnnn 
Rs.iS to Rb,8 so that abo'ut 200 <,'(.»pies 'irn.iy bo sold. Reduet,? price 
to Ra.iO |>t5r copy if fur ordtu's of !00 (jopins or the!'< mahout. 

No. 2. ' ' 20d.2-4b. 


Letter from the Secretary to the GovGrnmo,nt of India, Despartmont 
of Education, Health and Lands, regretting the inability of Govorii’inrvnt. 
to restore the grarit for Arabic and Persian MSS. to its origin,al figure 
of Rs.5,000 during 1940-41, The position will, howev(,?r, bo rovlow'<‘d 
in connection with the budget estinmtes for 1941-42. Record. 

No, 20, ' 27-2-40. 

6b 



1941] 


Ahstmd Proceedings Council^ 1940. 


87 


Recommendation Special Finance Committee ^ No, 1 of 20-3-4:0« 
Revised estiiiiatesj with notes thereon, for the year 1940. (o) That the 

amount to be paid for steel shelving in 1940 be met as under: 

(!) Sanskrit MSS. Fund— Rs, 8,000. 

(2) Building Fimd—Rs. 10,000. 

(3) Balance from the General Fund. 

(5) That the additional amoimts required for the Journal and Memoirs, 
and Special Binding be met from the Publication Fund, (c) That the 
International Catalogue of Scientific Literature Account be closed and 
that the balance of Rs.4,374-7-S be transferred to the Temporary 
Reserve. In the event of any future claim being made by the Royal 
Society it will be dealt with on its merits, (d) That the work on publica- 
tions financed from. Oriental Publication Fund No. 1 be slowed up so 
that works published may be paid for as funds are available. This 
Fund should not be allowed to run into debt, (e) That the work on 
publications financed from Oiiental Publication Fund No. 2 be consider- 
ably retarded so that the Fund may again become solvent at as early 
a date as possible, (/) That a further representation be made to the 
Government of India after the commencement of the next financial 
year (1st April 1940) reiterating the need for restoration of the grant 
.for Arabic and Persian MSS. to the original sum of Rs.5,000 per annum, 
{g) That the Treasurer shall eiideavoui* to simplify the form in which 
the accounts are now presented, by putting Medal and Memorial Funds, 
and by separating the Society’s Frmds from the Special Funds, {h) That 
no commitments of any kind shall be inciuTed without very careful 
consideration and without the definite report of the Treasurer that 
funds are available, (i) That the bulk of the annual issues of the Journal 
be reduced from 1940 from 1,200 pages to 800, (j) That a revised state- 
ment be prepared, as early as possible by the Treasurer taking all these 
recommendations into consideration and that this revised statement 
be submitted to a special meeting of the Finance Committee for con- 
sideration, (k) That a general appeal be issued to Governments, to learned 
l.:)odies, and to wealthy individual members and well-wishers for si)eciai 
donations for the Library to cover the cost of replacement of books, 
re-binding and repair of Manuscripts and books. Council order: 
Accept. The final recommendations of the Special Finance Committee 
to be circulated to members of Council, 

No. 15. 27-3-40. 

Reconunendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 21-5-40. Regulariza- 
tion of amounts expended in excess of budget sanction and provision 
of fund for the remainder of the year 1940. Regularize the over 
expenditure of Rs.2 14-2-6 iu the postage account and allot a further 
sum of Rs. 1,350 to meet expenditm’e under postage for the remainder 
of the year. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-5-40. 

Recommendation Finairce Committee No. 8 of 20-6-40. Regulariza- 
tion of amounts expended in excess of budget sanction and provision 
of fimds for the remainder of the year, 1940. (1) Regularize the over 

expenditure of Rs. 127- 1-6 in the “Stationery” aeeomit and allot a 
fmther sum of Rs. 322- 14-6 to meet expenditure under this head for the 
rest of the year. (2) Allot Rs.350 to “Contingencies” account and 
Rs.200 to “Printing Cii*cuiars, Forms, etc.” account to meet increased 
expenditui'e under these heads for the remainder of the year. Accepted 
by Council. 

No. 9. 28-6-40* 

Recommendation Special Finance Committee No. 1 of 16-12-40, 
Budget estimates for 1941, Unanimously recommend to Council 



88 Year-Booh B.A.8.B. for 1940. [voL. v.ii, 

tliafc tlie estimates a,.s placed bo fore tlie Committee be adojitecL Accjijpted 
by Coiuicii 

Wo, 8. 20-12-4(1 

Beeoiiiniendatioii Idimnce ilommittoe No. o{d) of” 20"r2-40., liiulgtd-, 
ostii'oates for 1941. Accepted by Coi'incil. 

No. f). ' 20-12-10. 


IlgiLDING — 

Provision, of doors and nets of exjiauded metal f-or ilie stexifv rooms 
and 3 doors for tlio North-West Library do^v'llstai!^s along vvldi esfciiriab's. 
'Postpone eonsiiloratioii till January. 

No. 23. 20-12-40. 


Committees — 

Oufcstandnig items of tlu;’! iSpei-iai Encjiiiry Commifcietfs (1939) ro- 
coiiiinendatioiiH. 'I4osolved (1) l-bat the Bilihotlicea Indica Corimrittc^e 
.for 1940-41 be coinposed of 
Dr, S. K. Chatterji, 

Prof. M. Mabfnz-iil Ha,q, 

Dr. lb 0. Law, 

8ir Radhakrishiian, 

Sir Jadunath Sarkar, 

Dr. M. Z. Sid(ii.qi and the 
Ex- Officio members, 

(2) that Sir S. Radhakrisiinaii be appointed Additional Secretary for 
Philosophy, (‘i) that Dr. Kalidas Nag be appointed Additional Sec- 
retary for History and Archajology, (4) that tlie i'enuiiriii:i.g' items l)e 
considered after the deliberations of the special meeting of tlie .FinaiuX'^ 
Committee referred to in Miimte II. 

No. 14, 27-2-40, 

Constitution of Standuig Committees of t],ie Society for I941)-4I,, 
(a) Finance, (I*) Library and (<?) Publication. That the following shall 
«’.oiistitnt 0 tiio Standing Conrmil/teos of tlie Socicq^y .for 10h,>-41 


{a) FinaMB (Jmmnittm : 

president "1 

Treasurer > Idx-OJhio. 

Con(3tul Secretary } 

Dr. C. S. Fox. 

'Dr. S. 0. Law. 

Dr. Syaniapi'asad Mookerjee, 

Dr, J, N. Mukherjee and 
Major 0. L. Pasricha. 


[6) Library Committee : 

President 
Treasurer 
General Seoretai'y 





1941] 


Abstract Frooeedmgs Co'mcU, 1940 . 


89 


Philological 
•Tt. Philological 
Biological 
Physical Seienco 
A nthropological 
Medical 
Library 
Philosophical 
Historical and 

Archseological 

(c) Pnhlication Committee : 

President 

Treasurer 

General Secretary . 

Philological 
Jt. Philological 
Biological 
Physical Science 
Anthropological 
Medical 
Library 
Philosophical 
Historical and 

ArcliSBological 

Further resolved that the Library and Publication Goinmittees shall 
have power to co-opt. 

No.' 15. 27-.2-40. 

Letter dated 24-5-40 from Hr. S. Elrishnaswami Aiyangar suggesting 
that the centenary of the deciphering of the Asoha* inscriptions by 
James Prinsep should 1 :)g suitably celebrated by the Society. Resolved 
that Dr. Kalidas Nag, Mr. H. C. Ohakladar and Dr. B. S. Guba should 
form a sub-committee to consider publication of a special number of 
the Society’s Journal in commemoration of the centenary of James 
Prinsep. 

No. L 28-6-40. 

On the motion of Dr, Kalidas Nag it was resolved that a sub-com- 
mittee consisting of tbe following: Dr. Kalidas Nag, Major C. L. Pasricha., 
Col. R. N. Chopra, Mr. Percy Brown, Dr. C. S. Fox and Dr. B. S. Guha 
be requested to make the necessary arrangements and advise as to the 
most suitable method of expressing tbe Society’s felicitations on the 
80th birthday of Sir P. C. Ray, one of the most distinguished and oldest 
fellows of the Society, and Sir Nilratan Sircar, a welIJmown physician 
of Calcutta. 

No, 12. . 24-9-40. 

Letter No. 596(5)-B;.R. of 12-12-40 from the Government of Bengal 
together with enclosures asking the Society’s suggestion, in connection 
with the reorganization of the Indian Historical Records Commission. 
Appoint a special committee consisting of Dr. S. K. Chatterji, Mr. 
M. Mabfuz-ul Haq and the General Secretary to consider the matter. 

No. 25. . 20-12-40. 

ComsroiL — 

Vote of thanks to the outgoing members of Council* Resolved that 
the Counoil’s thanks be conveyed to tb© outgoing members of Council. 

No. 14. 29-1-40. 


j 8ecreiaHc,s\ 


^ Ex-OjfjficAo. 


^ Secretaries. 



0 


Tear^Boo'k ILA.8.B, for 1940. 


[V(),L. VIl,, 


Acc?opte,iiee seat on Council by the Council Mct'nl.)erw, Riecorcl. 
Tlie Clin.i.riiiaii oxtojided a, hearty welecnno to the now inci.nb(vr.s. 

No. 1. a7»2-40. 

Note on the ^*]a:Ssi^ication, ot Cortiici'l Circulars. Acc{f)t and bli^'ord. 

No. :h 274b.40. 

Let-ter from M'r. Percy .'Bro\v.n, notifying hia absences from CalcuttH/ 
for the montlis of Ai,)i'ib May and Jioio llfi-O. K,e!>cord. 

No. 15. ' ' 20-4-40, 

("biiiieil nict4iin.gs during recess n,iont.l,is. No nieefcings to c(Kn\^eiio(i 
unless for special reasons. 

No. 26, ■ 27-8-40. 

Letter from the Troasnror, lt.A.S.'!:L, dated i4th 8eptoiiil)er 11)40, 
intinuiting his absence, from Calcutta for threes wee'fvs from lOtb 8ei">- 
teniber 1 940. Itecord. 

No. 0. 24-9-40. 

Resolved that no meetings ’i)o he](.l in C^d-olxa-. 

No. ll. 24:-9.40. 

Intimation from tine Ceruvral Sec.rota.ry tlia.t h(3 wii! go out of CaJentia. 
in. October. Rec.ord and recpiost Or. Baini Prasluid, to s'lc.t a,s General 
Seca’otary in ad<iitio.ti to his owm, d;utios during the abstmee of Dr. B. S. 
Guha. 

No. 13. 24-9-40. 


Informal consideration mgarding composition, of Council for 1941-42, 
After discussion the follo’wdng list of candidates h)r nomination to 
next year’s Council was placed before the meeting for (;onsi.d oration : — - 

P, resident . . . . The Hon’bie Mr. Justice Jobn 

Lort-Williams, Kt.j K.O. 
Bt.-Col. B. N. Chopra. 


Vice-President 

S9 9? • • • • 

99 99 

99 99 

General Socrotary 
Treasurer 

Phih>logical Secretary 
dt. Philological Secretary 
Nat. Hist. ’Secretary (Biology) 
„ „ ,, (Phys. Science) 

Philosophic^al. 8ocretary 
A'nthropologi,cal Se<-,u*c4.a;,ry 
Historical a,nd Archseologicai 
SocK’stary . . ^ . 

Medical Secretary 
Library Secretary 
Member of Council 

99 99 

99 99 

99 99 • • 


Dr. C. S. Fox. 

Dr. S. P. Mookerjee. 

Sir S. Radhakrishnan. 

Dr. B. S. Guha. 

Dr. Baini Prashad,. 

Dr. S. K. Cliattorji, 

Mr. M. Mabfuz-ul Ibup 
l>r. K'. Biswas. 

Dr. M;. N. Salia,. 

Prof. Varnamali Vods';U'itaf.-i lilxiu 
Mr. H. Ch Cliakladar. 

Dr. I'^^alidas Nag. 

Major G. Ij. Pasricha,. 

Dr.' J. N. Mukhorjecu 
Dr. S. C. Law. 

Br. M. Z, Siddiqi. 

Mr. C. W. Gurner. 

The Hon’blo Mr. Justkic^ N. G. A. 
Edgley. 


Unammotisly resolved that the General Secretary do pri:ii,t and (a'rcudato 
to the members of the Council the list of the Council as at prescTit 
constituted, together with the new list ]:)laced before tlio meeting, and 
provided with a blank column for additional names, and that” thc‘sci 
lists b© returned to the General Secretary within a weedt of the date 



1941 ] 


Abstract Proceedings Council, 1940 . 


91 


of issue, and that a list be compiled of the candidates finally proposed 
and be placed before the next Council meeting to be voted upon. 

No, 2 : 274140. 

Fixing date of the Council and Committee meetings for December 
194-C), Idle Council and the Committee meetings to meet on Friday, 
the 20th December 1940, 

No, 7. 274140. 

Letter from the Treasurer of the Society dated 204140 intimating 
his absence from Calcutta from 234140 to 54240. Record. The 
General Secretary to continue to act for him till 54240, 

No. 8. 274140. 

Council Nominations, 1041 -42. Accept. 

No. 4. 204240. 


Donation — 

Letter dated the 29th January, 1040, from Sir David Ezra, Kt., 
enclosing a cheque for Rs.500 as donation towards the renovation of 
the members’ room of the Society. Accept with, thanks. 0.n the 
motion of the President it was resolved that this donation be utilized 
in any manner decided upon by the Council. 

No. 20. 29-140. 


ExchanG'B of Publications — 

Letter dated the 28th November, 1939, from Cambridge Philosophical 
Society regretting their inability to exchange their Journals with ours 
as requested by us in our letter No. 1492, dated the 2nd August, 1939. 
Record. 

No. 3. 29-140. 


Recommendation Library Committee No. 1 of 23-2-40. Requests for 
exchange of publications from the Editors, Bharatiya Vidya, Bombay, 
and Bulletin of the Deccan College, Research Institute, Poona. 
Exchange Journal only. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 2 of 23-2-40. Request for 
exchange of publications from the Director, Research Dept., D.A.'V. 
College, Lahore. Exchange Bibliotheca Indica works of equal value. 
Dr. S, K. Chatter] i to select the volumes from their list which the Society 
needs. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-240. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 11 of 23-2-40. Letter 
from the Librarian, Visva-Bharati, asking for (i) free replacement of a 
few missing parts of the Society’s Journal and (ii) exchange of the 
Society’s with those of the Visva-Bharati, including Rabindranath 
Tagore’s works in Bengali, (i) That parts of the Journal that are 
available be issued free to complete their sets, (ii) that Memoirs only 
be exchanged for their publication. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-2-40. 

Exchange of publications with the University of Calcutta. A letter 
to be sent to the Registrar of the University. 

No. 20. 


29-440. 



92 


Tear-Booh M.AB.B. for 1940 . 


[VOIk VIlj 


Complete list- of ijistitiitions wifch wliicli, oxeliangos ol’ iiiiblioationsH fl/t’o 
made and al^o a complete list of iiistitntions and individuals t<') wliom 
free (X)pies fvf the 8ociety’s Bibliot1ie(^a Iticlicn, Series am seni^. A. 
cf'wnmittce eonsistijig of Dr. J. N, Miikliorjee, Dr. Kalidas Nag.. 

CL L» "Pasrielia and tlie ex-officio nicmboi’s was appointed to rrnn’ew 
and to report to tbe Council. 

No. 4 . ■ 29 - 4 » 40 . 

E.ecommenda.tion Libra-ry Committee No. I of 21-5-4'0. Application 
for an. exebange of publications from tlie Bangiya Saiii't'yti .Farisbat, 
Calcutta. E.xelmngo Sanskrit, Hindi and other Indian, V<:i.riuic.nlar 
and. Tibetan works in the Bibliotlieea Inclica Series. A.ceo]>ted, by 
Council. 

No. 13. ■ 27-ri.40. 

Becoinnneiidatioii Li!>ra.ry Comioittee No. 2 of 21“i‘b40. Application 
;fbr an exchange of Sanskrit publications from the Sa/rtskrif'' Sahitya 
Parisha,t, Calcutta. Excliango Sansk'rit fexts in the .■i-'»i!)]io'M;seca 
Iiidfca Series. Accepted by Couneil. 

No. 13. ‘ 27-5.-40. 

B,eeomin,enclation Library Committee No. 2 of 20-r>-4(>. Applir‘atiori 
fro.m the Stanford lTnivers,ity Libraries requesting excha.ngf' of puldica,.- 
tio.ris. Refer to the Committee appoir,itecl for revising th,e existing list 
of exchanges. Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. ■ 28-6-40. 

Correspondence with tbc Research Office, ScieniifK*. and ]'ndust.riai 
R.©seareh, Alipore, Calcutta, offering to present the publications tJie 
department in. exchange for the privilege of borrowing books from the 
Society’s Library. Agree. 

No. 1. ‘ 27-8-40. 

Recommendations of the Exchange a,i.Kl Frcc-disiribution Sul> 
Committee of 21-8-40. Accept and Record. 

No. 14. 27-8-40. 


IflNAISrCE — 

Rocorrmie.n,dation FinaiHic Cominitice No. 2(o) of* 23- 1 -.<10. O’Ik' 
Atiditors’ (Messrs. Frico, Waterhouse, Ik^at A. C'Vi.) R(‘|K,>rt on ibe 
Statement of Aecounts for tlie year end<?d. 31st Ifb'Pk 'riia.t 

the following action be taken.: 

Item, 1. — Explain that the a.mounts actually 're<,‘,eiv<'!«'l fluririfr lb,(^ 
year on account of Advertising, R(u:i.t aufl are r(X'''or(,le<l 

in the General Fund. Accrued items under these la^ads tiiat 
have not actamlly been received are not shown. 

Item 2. — Oriental 'PnhUcalion Fund No, 1 
Explain as in Item 1. 

Sanslcrit Manuscripts Fund Account. 

Explain that the grant from the GovornTnc,n,t of Ik^^rigal t<',> this 
Fund is an annual one, and that the 'nn,ancia,l yca.i’ of* that< 
Government is from, the 1st April to the 31st March, wheyreas 
the Society’s financial year is from the 1st La-nuary to tlio 3,l«t 
December, In some years payment of the grant is roccivix,! 
within our financial year and sometimes with,in the s'i:t!)sc(|iieiit 



1941 ] 


Ahstrad, ProceediTigs Council, 1940 . 


93 


yoa,r. The practice is to record it in the year’s accounts in which 
it is actually received. 

Jlan 5.-— Action lias been taken to have these amounts regularized. 

Ilcm i. — Effect to be given to the suggestion. 

llG?n 5. — Action has already been taken under the Buies in respect 

of Members’ outstanding aceoimts. 

The outstanding amounts on aecoimt of sales of books, etc., 
should be written off. 

The suggestion regarding the total debits and credits shown in 
the Personal Account being recorded in the Balance Sheet as 
Sundry Assets and Liabilities should be adopted. 

The investment of surpluses of capital funds should be made to 
the extent practicable. 

A reply in the above sense to be sent to the auditors. 

Accepted by Council. 

No. 9. 294-40. 


Becommendation Finance Committee No. 2(c) of 23-1-40. Be- 
iuvestment of Fixed Deposit (Beceipt No. A92r)8S, dated • 27-1-39) 
for Bs. 10,000 which matures on 27-1-40. Be-invest. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 9. 29-1-40. 


Becommendation Finance Committee No. 5 of 23-1-40. Begiilariza- 
tion by the Council of the amounts spent under O.P. Fund No. 2 and 
Arabic and Persian MSS. Fund for 1939 resulting in those Funds 
closing with debit balances. Begularize extra expenditure sanctioned. 
Accepted by CoimclL 

No. 9. 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No, 2 of 27-2-40. 15 bills 

were submitted. Pay. The Plonorary Treasurer drew attention to 
the low state of tlie current account after these paymentvS have been 
made. Council order: Accept. A Special Meeting of the Finance 
Committee should b© convened as early as possible to decide on items 
5(6); 6, 9 and 10 of the minutes in question. 

No. IL 27-2-40, 

Recommendation Finance Committee No, 3 of 27-2-40. Reinvest- 
ment of Fixed Deposit of Bs.6,000 (Fixed Deposit Beceipt No. 04948) 
belonging to the Provident Fund which matures on 23-2-40. That the 
amount available be reinvested in other securities bearing a higher 
rate of interest on the advice of the Agent, Imperial Bank of India, 
Further recommended that, if for any reason the market value of such 
securities falls below the amount paid for them, the securities shall foe 
taken over by the Society, and an amount equivalent to the original 
purchase price shall foe reinvested by the Society for the benefit 
of the members of the Provident Fimd. Council order: Accept. A 
Special Meeting of the Finance Committee should be convened as early 
as possible to decide on items 5(6) ; 6, 9 and 10 of the minutes in question. 

No. 11. 27-2-40. 



04 


Year-Book E,A.S.B. for 1040. 


[VOL. VII, 


Reeoiiiiiieiidafcioii Finance Committee No. 9 of 27-2-40. .Letter from 
Dr. M- N. Saha regarding the provision of a modern opidiascopt'3 for 
lectures, etc. As for item 5(6). Council ord. 0 r: Accept. A Special 
Aleetiiig of the Finance Conunittee should be convened as ea.rly as 
possible to decide on items 5(6), 6, 9 and 10 of the minutes in question. 

No. 11. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 10 of 27-2-40. Review of' 
items, involving expenditure, on which decisions have already been 
issued, or which require urgent consideration. As for item 5(6). C'ouiiei I 
order: Accept. A Special Meeting of the Finance Committeo shouIxJ 
be convened as early as possible to decide on items 5(6), 6, 9 and 10 of* 
the minutes in question. 

No. 11. 27-2-40. 

Letter to the Agent, Imperial Bank of India, Park Street Bra,nch, 
re virtual sale of securities held in the Temporary Reserve. Approve', 
transfer of securities valued at Rs.6,000 from the Temporary Reserve 
to the Provident Fund and adjust the accomits in the terms of the 
letter. 

No. 7. 27-3-40. 

Recommendations of the Special Finance Committee of 20-3-40. 
Accept. The final recommendations of the Special Finaiu;e Conirnittoo 
to b© circulated to members of the Council. 

No. 15. 27-3-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3 (a) of 27-3-40. Re-’ 
investment of a Fixed Deposit (Receipt No. 04959) of Rs. 10,000 with 
the Imperial Bank of India which will mature on 1st April 1940. 
Reinvest for 12 months. Accepted by Council. 

No. 16. 27-3-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 27-3-40. Advance 
given to Mr. J.'R. Seal, Assistant Secretary, of Rs.350, vide his applica- 
tion dated 19-3-40. Sanction, but no further advan®© to bo given until 
all outstandings have been repaid. Accepted by Council, 

No. 16. 27-3-40. 

Recosnmendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 22-4-40. Bill No. 633, 
dated the 19th April 1940, from Messrs. Bimgo Steel FurnitjiiN} TA-d. 
for supply of steel furniture . . . Rs.845. Pay Rs.434 in full. An 

advance proportionate payment may be made against the sum of 
Rs.2,792 as the goods have been supplied but the work of oroefing is not 
yet completed. Accepted by Council. 

No. 7. 29-4-40, 

Report by the General Secretary on notices appearing in tlie 3 on real 
of the North China Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. Record. 
The President to approach Imperial Chemical Industries (India) Ltd, 
for a donation to the Society. 

No. 19. 29-4-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 5 of 21-5-40. Report by 
the Treasurer on the available bank balance. Record. Payment of' 
the bills of the Baptist Mission Press listed in minute 2(e), (/) and (g) 
to be deferred until June 1940, Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 


27-5-40. 



1941 ] 


Abstract Proceedings Council^ 1940 . 


95 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 20-6-40. Considera- 
tion of renewal of a Fixed Deposit (Receipt No. 05041) of Rs. 10,000 
witli the Imperial Bank of India, which will nmture on 24tli June 1940. 
Realize the Fixed Deposit when it matures, and transfei* the sum to 
the Society’s current account together with the interest accrued thereon. 
Accepted by Council. 

No'. 9. 28-6-40. 


Rceornmeiidation Finance Committee No. 6 of 20-6-40. Application 

dated 5-6-40 from Duftry Abdul Razzak for a loan of Rs. 30 from the 
Society. Lend without interest. Accepted by Council. 

No. 9. 28-6-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 7 of 20-6-40. Application 

dated 14-6-40 from, Pandit Aghore Nath Bhattacharyya for a loan of 
Rs.60 from the Society. Lend without interest. Accepted by Council. 

No. 9. 28-6-40. 

Letter from Rockefeller Foundation in reply to the request of the 
R.A.S.B. for donation. Record. 

No. 3. 29-7-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(5) of 22-7-40. Re- 
investment of a Fixed Deposit (Receipt No. 05108) of Rs.10,000 with 
the Imperial Banl? of India, Park Street Branch, which will mature on 
21st August, 1940. Transfer the amoimt together with the accrued 
interest to the current account of the Society. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 29-7-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 22-7-40. Payment 
made of a bill of Rs.5 received from the Accounts Officer, Telephone 
Revenue, Delhi, for a trunk telephone call put through from our tele- 
phone on 22nd May, 1940. Enquire from Mr. J. R. Seal if he can throw 
any light on the matter. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 29-7-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2 of 21-8-40. Seven bills 
were submitted. Pay. Approach the Corporation of Calcutta for 
exemption of the Society’s premises from payment of rates and taxes. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 15. 27-8-40. 

Letter from Dr. D. R. Stevens in reply to the Society’s request for 
the financial support from the Rockefeller Foundation. Record and 
convey thanks to Dr. Grant. 

No. 23. 27-8-40. 

Fixing date of the Special Finance Committee Meeting for considera- 
tion of the Budget for 1941. (1) Hold it on Thursday, the 12th Decem- 

ber, (2) Circulate to the members the draft Budget estimates 2 or 3 
days before the meeting. 

No. 6. 27-11-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2 of 22-11-40, Report 
renewal of a Fixed Deposit (Receipt No. 05157, dated 30-10-39) for 
Rs.10,000 for a further period of one year, which matured on 30-10*40. 
Approve. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 


27-11-40. 



il6 


Yexir-Booh for 1940 . 


[voL. ru, 


Recommeiidafcioii Finance Committee 4 of 22-11-40. Report, 
that in accordance witli tlic Coiincii resolntion dated the 27tli August 
1940, tlie pa 5 ?' bills for the office staff of the Society _for the iiiorifcli of 
October 1940 were paid as a special ea.se without being put up before 
the Finance Committee for their formal approval. Confirm. Accepted 
by OounciL 

No. 12.- 2741-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6 of 22-11.-40. Report sale 
proceeds of waste papers, etc., amounting to E.s.e516. Action approved. 
Accepted by Gomicil. 

No. 12. 2741-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 12 of 22-11-40. Bad debts 
to be written off owing to deaths, resignations, operation of Bnle 38, 
Rule 40, etc. Write offi Accepted by Council. 

No. 12, 27-11-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 13 of 22-11-40. Amoiinii 
not claimed in spite of repeated reminders, to be written off from personal 
account . . . Rs.460-4-0. Adjust. Accepted by GoimciL 

No. 12. 27-11-40. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2 of 20-12-40. 9 bills 

were submitted for pa 3 nraL 0 nt. (i) Pay bills (a) to (/?.■), (2) As regards 
(i) make part payment of bill No. 769, dated 18-12-40, to the extent 
of B,s.3,494. The balance of the bill to be paid after the work is com- 
pleted. Accepted by Council. 

No. 9. 20-12-40. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 20-12-40. Authority 
for payment of bills by the General Secretary and Treasurer till next 
Finance Committee Meeting. Grant. Accepted by Cooncil. 

No. 9. • 20-12-40. 


iNStJBAJiTCE 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(6) of 27-3-40. Renewal 
of Fire Policy No. 15467332 for Rs.2, 50,000 covering Building and 
Contents of No. 1, Park Street, with the Commercial IJnion Assurance 
Go., Ltd., at an, annual premium of Rs. 312-8-0, which falls due on 
1 9-4-1 940. Renew, but the question of insurance should be ro-oxaniinod 
before the premium again falls due. Accepted by Council. 

No. 16, ‘ 27-3-40. 

Becomnaendation Finance Committee No. 5 of 20-6-40. Renewal of 
Fire Policy No. 20149423 with the Royal Insurance Co., Ltd., for 
Rs.25,000 covering MSS., etc., on the premises of the Society at a.ii 
amiual premium of Rs. 31-4-0. It will expire on 6tli July 1940. The 
Policy is to be forwarded to Sir John Lort-Williams for oxaniination 
and to be renewed if approved. Accepted by Council. 

No. 9. ’ 2S-0-40. 

Renewal of Fire Insurance Policies. Resolved that the policies be 
sent to the President for examination and advice. 

No. 20. 28-6-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(a) of 22-7-40, Renewal 
of Fire Insurance Policy No. 15467733 with the Commercial Union 
Assurance Co., Ltd., for Rs.1,26,000, covering Society’s books and 



1941] 


Abstract Proceedings Council, 1940. 


97 


pictures, at an annual premium of Rs. 150-4-0, wliicli will fall due on lOfch 
August, 1940. All the assets to be insured with one company and 
full particulars to be obtained from the Commercial Union and other 
(joinpaiiies. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 29-7-40. 

Letter from the Gonimercial Union Assurance Co., Ltd., stating tlieir 
inability to quote a rate more favourable than 1/8% and pointing out 
that compensation could be paid to the Society in case of accident only 
on a pro mta basis owing to the under-valuation of the Society’s assets. 
(a) Accept Dr, Prashad’s recommendations that (1) only special assets 
{.>f the Society be iiismed and (2) that a policy covering all our property 
be taken out when funds become ' available. (6) State that the valua- 
tion of the Society’s assets at sixteen lakhs is not approximate, 
(c) Discuss the whole matter with an insurance expert. 

No. 2. 27-8-40. 

Statement regarding the purchase of some more fire extinguishers 
(Rocoinmendatioiis No. 3 of the Special Finance Committee of 9-8-40). 
Purchase from Messrs. The Bengal Chemical and Pharmaceutical 
Works provided they are certified to by the Test Ht)use at Alipore. 

No. 11. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Special Finance Committee of 9-8-40. The question 
of taking up of a, comprehensive tire policy according to the suggestion 
of Finance Committee’s meeting held on 22-7-40 and the renewal of an 
insurance with the Commercial Uniuii (jovering the Society’s books 
and pictures valued at Rs. 1,25,000, wliich expires on the 10th August 
1940. (1) The existing insurance policy No. 1546773S which was to 
expire on the 10th August 1940 (for Rs, 1,25,000) be renewed; (2) A 
proper valuation of the Society’s properties be made so that the Com- 
mittee may be in a position to recommend further action; (3) Some more 
fire extinguishers be purchased; (4) Valuable books and MSS. be listed 
and housed seirarately as soon as practicable; (6) The G•o^^ermxLent of 
India be approached for an amxual grant of Rs.2,000 to cover the 
Insurance of Government properties on permanent loan with the 
Society which in its depleted financial position the Society finds it 
impossible to midertake. Accepted by Council. 

No. 13. 27-8-40. 

Letter dated 23-9-40 from the Assistant Secretary to the Government 
of* Bengal, regretting the inability of the Government to saTiction a> 
special grant to the Society to cover the cost of insuring MSS. Record. 
Write anotker letter to the Kducation Secretary asking for grant of 
Rs.5,000 for preservation of MSS. 

No. 18. 27-11-40. 


Invitations — 

Letter dated 28-3-40 from the Vice-President, Working Committee, 
Fourth All-India Library Conference, inviting the Society to attend the 
4th Session of the Conference. Record. 

No. 12. 29-4-40. 


Lease — 

Correspondence resting with letter No. J /2027 of 15-2-40 from Mr. J. N. 
Basu dealing with the execution of the renewal of lease and advertising' 
agreement with the Standard Vacuum Oil Company. Resolved that 
the drafts be approved and that the General Secretary be, and hereby is, 



98 


Year-Book E,A,8.B, for 1940 . 


[VOL. VII, 


authorized to sign both the lease and agreement on behalf of the Kioyal 
Asiatic Society of Bengal. , ^ 

Ko. 6. ^7^2-40. 

Letter from Messrs. Standard Vacuum Oil Oompaiiy dated 28-1040 
requesting permission to build an enclosure for two hydraulic lifts at 
the Bark Street Service Station, together with the opinion of onr 
Solicitors, Messrs. B. N, Basil & Co. (l)^Find out from Solicitors 
whether we have the right to build on tliis place, and whether the 
proposal will affect our rights, (2) Ask Messrs. S.V.O. Company to 
furnish a picture of the structure and site as it will appear when finislioti. 

No. 5. 27-11-40. 

Letter dated 7-12-40 from Messrs. B. N. Basil & Go. re Society’s 
right to rebuild on the site let out to Messrs. Standard Vacuum Oil 
Company. Write again according to President’s suggestions. 

No. 20. 20-12-40. 

Lectubes — 

Letter received from Sir Aurel Stein with regard to a Geiiei'al Lecturcu 
Record. 

No. 1. 27..1.40. 

Report by the General Secretary on the arrangement made for a 
General Lecture in the Society’s Rooms on Wednesday, the 31st July 
1940, by Dr. Horace I. Poleman on ‘America and Indie Studies’. 
Record. 

No. 17. 29-7-40. 

Arrangements for General Lectures. Arrange the following lectures ; 
1. Mr. Percy Brown — ^Art of Nepal, 2. Dr. J. B. Grant — Social 
Reconstruction in China, 3. Dr. S. L. Hora — Edible Pishes in Bengal, 
and lectures by 4. Sir Sarvapalli Radliakrishnan and 5. Sir N. N. 
Sircar. 

No. 16. 20-12-40. 


Ltbbaby — 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 7 of 23-1-40. Letter 
from Dr. U. N. Giiosal regarding the Society’s copper-plates and coin 
collection. Facilities for inspection to be granted. As arrangements 
have already been made in respect of this work the cjuestion of puj3lishing 
the results does not arise at present, but if any important diBctiVory 
is made by Dr. Ghosal and his son this may be reconsidered later on. 
Accepted by Coiineii. 

Ho. IL 29-1-40. 

Letter dated the 25th January, 1940, from Mr. C. A. Oarstairs asking 
that the Rules be amended so that the Society’s rooms may bo kept 
open until 7 p.m. daily to enable members to make fuller use of tfit? 
Society. 

Resolved that as an experimental measure for one month the General 
Secretary shall arrange, without additional expenditure, for the Society’s 
rooms to remain open daily until 7 p.m. (Sundays and gazetted holidays 
excepted) ; that half the library staff be allotted duties in alternate weeks 
to attend (a) from 10 a,m. to 5 p.m. and (6) from 12-30 to 7 p.m., and 
that a circular letter be issued to all Resident Members informing them 
of these arrangements. The General Secretary will report to the Council 
the result of this measure after the expiry of the experimental period. 

No. IS. 29-1-40. 



1941 ] 


Ahstract Proceedings Ooimcil, 1940 . 


99 


Letter dated the 27th January, 1940, from the Editor-iii-charge, Annals 
of Oriental Research of the University of Madras stating that the 
Society lias been placed on the free distribution list for the Annals of 
Oriental Research of the University of Madras. Accept with thanks. 

No. 1,9. 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 3 of 23-2-40. Suggestion 
for the purchase of reference works for use of the Cataloguers of the 
Society’s Arabic and Persian, Sanskrit and Bengali MSS. Request 
the Finance Committee to provide Rs.965 immediately and to arrange 
fo% a fm'ther sum of Rs.535 to be allotted for the purpose during the 
year to make a total of Rs. 1,500. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 4 of 23-2-40. List of books 
missing from the Society’s library and the question of their replacement 
by purchase. The list be scrutinized by the Additional (Sectional) 
Secretaries, that they select the hooks needed, and that their recom- 
mendations together with a report as to availability and price be 
submitted to the Council for sanction to purchase. Accepted. by Council. 

No. 12. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 5 of 23-2-40. List of parts 
of sets of periodicals missing from the Society’s library and the question 
of their replacement by pux’chase. That the publishers be asked to 
state whether these parts are now available, whether they may be 
obtained free, or in exchange, or by purchase, and if so, at what price. 
Further re|)ort to be submitted for consideration. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 9 of 23-2-40. Bin.ding 
and repairing work needed in the library. That tlie Finance Committee 
be requested to provide funds and that this matter be given priority. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 10 of 23-2-40. Report on 
the urgent requirements in the library and a review of the measures 
aheady adopted to meet some of these. That the Finance Committee 
be requested to provide funds and that the order of priority for these 
items sliould be: {a) Binding and repairing work. (6) Capital works — 
electrical installation and furniture, (c) Reference books for cataloguers, 
(d) Preparation of catalogues, (e) Replacement of missing periodicals. 
(/) Replacement of missing books. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6(a) of 27-2-40. Recom- 
mendations of the Library Committee, minutes 23rd February 1940. 
Item 3 — Purchase of reference works for the use of cataloguers of the 
Society’s Arabic and Persian, Sanskrit and Bengali MSS. That a sum 
of Rs.965 only be provided for this purpose for 1940. Council order: 
Accept. A Special Meeting of the Finance Committee should be 
convened as early as possible to decide on items 5(b); 6, 9 and 10 of the 
minutes in question. 

No. 11. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 5(5) of 27-2-40. Recom- 
mendations of the Library Committee, minutes 23rd February 1940. 
Items 9 and 10 — Binding and repairing work and urgent requirements 
in the library. That the General Secretary and Treasurer draw up a 



100 


Year -Booh R.AB,B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VIIj 


detailed statement showing the actual amouiit.s required under each head, 
and the sources from and the extent to which funds can be made avaih 
able. This report to be considered by the Fmaiic© Committee at a special 
meeting. Council order: Accept. A Special Meeting of the 'Finanoe 
Committee should be convened as early as possible to decide on items 
6(6) ; 6, 9 and 10 of the minutes in question. 

No. 11. 27-2-40. 

Report by the General Secretary on the results of keeping the library 
opened until 7 p.m. on working days during the experimental period 
of February 1940. Record. The library to continue to remain open 
until 7 p.m. on working days for the month of Mareli and a fmtlier 
report submitted at the end of that period. 

No. 17, 27-2-40, 

Further report by the General Secretary on the results of keeping 
the library open until 7 p.ni. on working days during the month of 
March 1940. The arrangement to continue for another niontli, a 
more detailed record to be kept, and a further report submitted to the 
Council at its next meeting. 

No. 13. 27-3-40. 

Recommendation. Library Committee No. 1 of 20-3-40. Letter from 
the Deputy Secretary to Government, Punjab, Revenue Department, 
notifying the discontimiance to the Society of free issues of Pmijal) 
District and State Gazetteers. That the Punjab Government be 
requested to make an exception in the case of the Society in view of the* 
free issue of the Society’s publications to that Government. Accepted 
by Council. 

No. 17. 27-3-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 2 of 20-3-40. The question 
of replacement of books missing from the Society’s library. Include 
Prof. Mahfuz-ui Haq’s recommendation imder item 3 infra. No 
further commitment can be entertained in respect of this list at 
present. Accepted by Council. 

^7. 27-3-40. 

Further report by the General Secretary on the results of .keeping 
the library open until 7 p.m. on working days during the month of 
April- Record- The library to remain open until 6 p.m. ou working 
days during May and June and until 7 p.m. during July and August. A 
■turther report to be submitted to tiie Council after that period hm 
elapsed. 

29-4-4(h 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 3(a) of 22-4-40. .Purelmso 
of the Notices of Arohaeoiogia Orientalis, Series A, 'Vols. V and VI 
Tung-ching-ch’eng and Hung-shan-Hon, Ch’ik-Feng. Write and 
suggest exchange with our publications of equivalent value. Accenttsd 
by Council. ^ 

29-4-40, 

Letter from ^ Prof. Ghulam Yazdani regarding the presentation to 
the Society’s library by H.B.H. the Nizam’s Government of Ajanta 
by Ghulam Yazdani. A letter of thanks to be sent to H.B.H. the 
Nizam’s Goveriunent. A letter also to be sent to Sir Akbar Hydari 
asking him for a donation to the Society. 

No. 10. 


29..4-40, 



1941 ] 


Abstract Proceedings Council^ 1940 . 


101 


Recommeiidatioii Library Committee No. 7 of 21-5-40. Letter 
from Prof. Baghu Vira requesting the Society to subscribe to the 
critical edition of Bamayana by Valmiki. Siibscribe. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 14. 27-5-40, 

Reconamendatioii Library Committee No. 2 of 22-7-40. Recommend- 
ation for the purchase of complete works of Banldm Chandra Chatter] i 
(B,oyal Edition — ^Rs.50). Purchase. Accepted by Couneil, 

No. 10. 29-7-40. 


Recommendation Libi*ary Committee No. S of 22-7-40. Report by 
General Secretary of part receipt of books and manuscript from Sir 
Ziauddin Alimad, Record. Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. 29-7-40, 

A report on the result of keeping the library open after office hours 
during the last seven months since February. Continue existing 
arrangements till the end of the current year. 

No. 3. 27-8-40. 

List of books, etc., outstanding from members of the Society for 
the period from 1932 to 1-1-1940. Accept the President’s suggestions 
that (a) solicitor’s letters be sent to Kumar Harit Krishna Deb, Mr. O. C. 
Gangoiy, Mr. D. 0. Chattorjee and Sir U. N. Bralimachari. (6) No 
further action be taken against Mrs. O. J. Koplanko and Babu Biswanath 
Basil, (c) Dr, N. C. Sen Gui^ta be requested to pay the price of a copy 
of Sukraniti. {d) Letters signed by the President be sent to Mr. M. A. P. 
Hirtzel, Dr. Stella Kramrisch, Mr. S. C. Seal and Pt. A. 0. Vidya- 
bliusana. 

No. 4. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 1 of 21-8-40, Purchase 
x'ecommendatioiis for the month. Purchase Nos. i, 3, 7, 8, 10, 19 and 
23. (1) Appoint a small Committee to lay down principles which 

should underlie the purchase of new hooks. (2) The remaining books 
of the present list are to be scrutinized further before they can be 
recommended for purchase. Accepted by Council. 

No. 16. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 1 of 24-9-40. Letter from 
Dr. G-. Bose of 19-9-40 concerning the recommendation made by him 
for the purchase of certain books on Psychology in August 1940. In 
view of the reasons given by Dr. Bose it was decided to purchase all 
tlie books recommended by him. Accepted by Council, 

No. 3. 24-9-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 2 of 24-9-40 
recommendations of books for the month of September 1940 
that the books stated be purchased. Accepted. 

No. 3. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 3 of 24-9-40. Report on 
the find of certain old and rare books which are not mentioned in the 
Society’s Library Catalogue, Record. Resolved that the present 
Librarian, Mr. P. O. Matthai, be congratulated on his extremely valu- 
able finds during his stock-taking of the collections of the librnry. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 3. ' 24-9-40. 


Purchase 

Resolved 

24-9-40. 


7 



102 


Year^Booh E.AB,B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


Presentation to the Society’s library of 21 volumes of ^ Tlie Times ’ 
History of the Wax by our member j, Mr. Chhote Lai Jain, and 57 works 
in English, Hindi and Gujarati by Sadliu Vujaya Dliarma Sto’i, editor 
of the Yogasastra. (1) Accept with thanks. (2) Bequest Dr. S. K. 
Cliatterji to scrutinize the 57 woi'ks in English, Hindi and Gujarati 
and retain only the suitable ones in the library. 

Ko. 6. " 244)*-4CL 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 1 of 22-1 1-1940. Pure, base 
recommendations for the month. Resolved that in future in, embers 
be asked to state reasons when recommending books for piireliase. 
Accepted by Council, 

No. 13. 27-11-40. 

Recommeiidation Library Committee No. 2 of 22-11-40. Tlie 
question of the disposal of incomplete books, such as Encyclopaedia, 
Reports, etc. Resolved that the Library Secretary and the General 
Secretary be asked to examine and scrutinize all papers, pamplilets, 
stray copies of Journals and incomplete works that are being found 
during the process of stock-taking and reorganization of tlio liljraxy, 
and make their recommendations to the Council regarding thoir dis|;)osaJ,. 
On the motion of Major C. L. Pasricha it was resolved that the Library 
Committee takes full responsibility for the disposal of papers, pa:inplilets, 
etc., made by the Honorary Treasurer, acting as the General Secretary 
during the month of October 1940. Accepted by Council. 

No. 13. 27-11-40. 

Letter from 'Mr. 0. C. Gangoli requesting the loan of 3 volumes of 
Marshall’s Monograph on Sanchi. 1 . Decline, as these are valuable work s 
of art containing costly plates. 2. Give him every facility to consult 
these, if he so desires, in the Society’s rooms. 

No. 24. 20-12-40. 

Loan of MSS. — 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 5(e) of 23-1-40. Applica- 
tion for loan of MS. from Bhandarkar Oriental Research Iristitx,ite, 
Poona, for ‘Devabadhas’ commentary on the Mahabharata, Adi- 
parva. Lend against an indemnity bond for Rs.lSO for 3 ro,ontl.is. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 5(d) of 23-1-40, Applica- 
tion for loan from the Vice-Chancellor, Dacca Dnivex’sity, of 2 MSS, 

‘ Satapanea-Saddesvatibhaga ’ and ‘Desavalivivrti’. Lend agai,ust 
indemnity bonds for Rs.lO and Rs.l50 respectively for 3 i,nonthK, 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Library Oonmiittee No. 5(c) of 23-1-40. Applica- 
tion for loan from Prof. M. M. Haq of 2 MSS. of ‘Riyaz-usli-Shiia,ra’ 
and one of ‘Rawdat-ul-Jannat’. Lend as the work for which these 
are required is being carried out on behalf of the Society. Accepted 
by Council. 

Ho. 10. 29-1-40. 

^ Recommendation Library Gonamittee No. 5(5) of 23-1-40. Applica- 
tion for loan of MS. from the Principal, A. M. College, Mymensingh, 
for ‘Anisit Jalibin wa wadatus Salikin’. Decline, but a rotogra}::>.l». 
copy of the MS. may b© supplied later on. Accepted by CotmeiL 

No. 10. 29-1-40. 

7B 



1941] 


Ahstract Proceed.ings Council^ 1940. 


103: 


Becomnieiidation Library Committee No. 5(a) of 23-1-40. Applica- 
tion for loan of MS. from Librarian, Lytton Library, Aligarh, for 
‘Ghaclmama’. Lend against an indemnity bond for Rs®500. Accepted 
by Council. 

‘No. 10. 29-1-40, 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 4(6) of 23-1-40. Applica- 
tion for extension of the period of loan of the MS. of ‘Malatimadha,va’ 
from Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, Poona, for a further period 
of six months. (This MS. was issued to them on 30-3-39 and an 
extension was granted till 31-10-39.) Grant an extension of the period 
of the loan for six months. Accepted hv Council. 

No. 10. " 29-1-40. 


Recoimneiidation Library Committee No. 4(a) of 23-1-40. Applica- 
tion for extension of the period of loan of the MS. ‘Surjanacarita’ from 
Dr. H. 0. Ray. (This MS. was issued on loan to Dr. H. G. Ray on 
9-8-1932. He now desires to keep it till his work on it is linished.) 
Dr. H. 0. Ray should be requested to return the MS. and, if he again 
requires it, a fresh application for the loan should be submitted. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 10, 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 3 of 23-1-40. Application 
for exchange of publications from the Manager, Shibli Academy, Azam- 
garh. Decline. Accepted bv Council. 

No. 10. ‘ 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 5(/) of 23-1-40. Applica- 
tion for loan of MS. from Rao Bahadur K. V. Rangaswami Aiyangar 
for MS. ‘ Krityakalpataru ’ (3 MSS.). Lend against indemnity bonds 
for Rs.50, Rs.50 and B-s.lOO respectively for 3. months. Accepted 
by Council. 

No. 10. 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. b(g) of 23-1-40. Applica- 
tion for loan of MS. from the Registrar, University of Madras, for 
‘Tarikli-i-Ferishta’ (No. 136 of Ivanow’s catalogue of Persian MSS). 
Lend against an indemnity bond for Rs. 1,000 for 3 months. Accepted 
by Council. 

No. 10. 29-1-40. 

Recommendations of the Publication Committee. Accept, Also 
resolved that the General Secretary be empowered to lend one MS, 
at a time to Prof. Mahfuz-ul Haq for his work in connection with the 
publication of the Haft-Iqlim on behalf of the Society. 

No. 11. 29-1-40. 

Application for loan of MSS. : (a) The Principal, Vidya-Bhavana, 
Visva-Bharati, for the loan of ‘ Sapinat-ui-Awiiya Lend against 
an indemnity bond for Rs.500 for a period of three months. (6) The 
Registrar, University of Dacca, for the loan of 3 MSS, of ‘Agnipuranab 
Postpone until next meeting. General Secretary to submit a detailed 
list of MSS. at present on loan, (c) Bhandarkar Oriental Research 
Institute, Poona, for a ‘commentary on the Malati Madhava® by 
Harihara. Decline. A photostat copy may foe supplied to them, 
(d) The Librarian, University of Dacca, for the loan of ‘Munis’ul-Arwah, ® 
No. 74, Ourzon Collection. Decline, 

No. 7. 


27-2-40, 



104 Year-Book for 1940 . [vol. vif, 

Application for the extension of the period of loan of ‘Malati Madhava 
till 31-8-40 (This was issued to them on. 4-4-39.) Extend. 

No, 8. 27-2-40. 

Letter from Yale University enquiring whether they should, keep thf:'! 
MSS. of Sabbaparvaa ’ (Mahabharat) for some time more on aee<.)iiiit 
of the difficulty of transport owing to the war. The MS. to b(> rotairiei.1 
by them until safer conditions of transmission obtain. 

No. 9. 27-2-40. 

Report on MSS, lent out during the month. Record. Also resolved 
that in future a tabular statement showing all MSS. on loan and tf) 
whom lent, with dates and full particulars shall be submitted to the 
Council monthly. 

No, 10. 27-2-40. 

Report by the General Secretary of the outstanding loan to Prof. €1 . 
Tueci of a MS. in 1930. The matter to be followed iij') tliroug,li the 
Consulate -General for Italy, and the Department of Education, .Romo. 
Major Pasricha has agreed to furnish Prof. Tucci’s present addre.ss. 

No. 19. 27-2-40. 

Application for loan of 3 MSS. of ‘Agnipurana’ by the Registrar, 
University of Dacca (postponed since the last meeting of the Council), 
together with a detailed list of MSS. at present on loan. Lend for a 
period of three months against indemnity bonds of Rs.200, Rs.lOO and 
Rs.250 respectively, after repair. Further resolved that all Univer- 
sities and Institutions to which the Society issues its publications 
free should be requested to present all tlieir publications to tho 
Society in exchange. Fm-ther resolved that the General Secretary 
be asked to prepare (i) a complete list of institutions with which ex- 
changes of publications are made and (ii) a complete list of institutions 
and individuals to whom, under the orders of the Government, free 
issues of the Society’s Bibliotheca Indica Series are sent. These lists 
to be submitted to the Council at its next meeting. 

No. IL 27-3-40, 

Report on MSS. lent out during the month. Record. Pvosolved 
that Dr. S. K. Chatterji and Dr. M. Z. Siddiqi approach Dr. Horn 
Chandra Ray to return the MS. on loan with him. Failing any resulf; 
the General Secretary to report the matter to the Vico-Chanccvilor, 
Calcutta University. It was also resolved that the General, Secretary- 
follow up, through Mr. J. N. Basu, the efforts made to peraiu'ifhi' I>,r. Zio’ - 
uddin Ahmed to return the MS. and books lent to him. 

Mo. 12. 27-3-4:0. 

Renewal of request of Mr. S . K. Rahman for the loan of MSS . OI:)ta! 1 1 
complete details and bring up again at the next meet.ing of tlio Council. 

Mo. 20. '■ 27-3-40. 

Application from the Registrar, University of Madi’as, lor oxtonaiori. 
of loan of 2 MSS. for a further period of three months from 3-4-40. 
Grant. 

Mo. 21. 27-3-40. 

Correspondence with Mr. S. K. Rahman regarding the loan to him 
of 4 MSS. of ‘ Kalimat-ush Shuara h Lend two MSS. at a time under 
the usual conditions. 

Mo. 2. 


29-4-40. 



19411 


Abstract Proceedings Council, 1940 , 


105 


Report on MSS, lent out during the month. Record. The General 
Secretary to issue a final demand to Dr. Hem Chandra Ray for the return 
of the MS. on loan with him, and to inform him that unless he complies^ 
the matter -will be referred to the Society’s legal advisers. 

Mo. 5. 29-4-40. 

Letter from Mr. T. R. Ghintamani requesting that the period of loan 
of 2 MSS. may be extended by three months to enable him to complete 
the work. Extend. 

Mo. 17. 29-4-40. 

Request from the Registrar, University of Madras, for extension of 
the period of loan of MS, ‘ Tarikh-i-Ferishta ’ for three months from the 
10th May 1940. Extend for a further three months from the lOtli May 
1940. 

Mo. 5. . 27-5-40. 

Application for loan of MSS. of Srstidhara's Commentary on the 
Mahabharata by Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, Poona. 
Lend against an indemnity bond for Rs.300 for a period of three months. 

Mo. 6. 27-5-40. 

Request from the Curator, Bhandarkai‘ Oriental Research Institute, 
Poona, for extension of the period of loan of MS. ‘ Mahabharata-tat- 
paryatika J nandipika ’ by Devabodha from 1 1 -5-40 to 3 1 -7-40. Extend. 

Mo. 7. 27-5-40. 

Correspondeiieo with Dr. Hem Chandra Ray concluding with his 
letter, dated 28-5-40 in respect of the return of the MS. ‘ Suijana- 
carita’ lent to him in 1932. Resolved that (1) the President be 
requested to write on behalf of the Society to Dr. H. C. Ray stating 
that he may enter into a new bond on terms suggested by the President 
on condition that he returns all books belonging to the Society that are 
still with him and are long overdue, (2) all bonds executed by various 
scholars and institutions for borrowing the Society’s MSS. should be 
brought up to date. 

No'. 2. 28-6-40. 

Applieation dated 4-6-40 from the Madras University Library for 
extension of period of loan of the MS. Tarikh-i-Ferishta ’ by another 
3 months. Extend. 

Mo. 5. 28-6-40. 

A]:>plication from Rao Bahadur K. V. Rangaswami Aiyangar, dated 
28-5-40, re extension of the period of loan of the MSvS. ^ Krtya-kalpatara * 
and a woric on Sraddha by another 3 months. Extend. 

Mo. 6. 28-6-40. 

Applieation from Dr. R. G. Majumdar, dated 14-6-40, for extension 
of the period of loan of 2 MSS. by another two months. Extend. 

No. 7. 28-6-40. 

Letter No. J-7325 of 14-6-40 from our Solicitors, Messrs. B. N. Basu 
& Co., enclosing copy of letter No. J-7323 of the same date sent by them 
to Sir Ziauddin Ahmed. Record. 

No. 14. 28-6-40. 

A letter from the India Office regarding the loan of MS. No. 4666D. 
Record. 

No. 17. 


28-6-40. 



106 


Ymr^Booh E,A,8.B. for 1940 . 


[VOL. VII, 


Application for extension of loan of MS. * Amarakoshavyakha ’ {(Jovt. 
MS. No. 846) for another three mouths by Mr. T. R. Cixintaiiiaiii. 


Extend. 
No. 4. 


20-7-4<i. 


Application from Dr. B. R. Chatterjee tor the loan one MS. 
® Naradiya Puranak O-raiit permission mider usual conditions. 

No. 8. 29-7.40. 

Request from the Registrar of the University of Madras for an oxteii- 
sioii of the period of loan of MS. ‘ Tarild.i-i-Ferislita ’ by another six 
months from 10-8-40. Extend. Resolved that future extensions^ of 
loans of MSS, might be granted by the General Secretary in consultation 
■witii the Philoiogical Secretary unless the MS. became damaged or for 
anything for which consultation with the Oomicil would seem desirable 
in the opinion of the General Secretary. 

No. 6. 27-8-40. 


Request from the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute for a 
further extension of the period of loan of MS. Maha'bliarata-tatparya- 
tika Jnandipika ’ up to 1st January 1941. Extend. 

No. 7. 27-8-40. 


Renewal of loan of MSS. to Dr, H. 0. Ray. Record. 

No, 22, 27-8-40. 

A letter from Messrs. B. N. Basu & Co., Solicitors, dated 9th September 

1940, regarding the period for which our bonds covering MSS. are 

enforceable. Record, 

No. 7. 24-9-40. 

Application from the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, 
Poona, asking for an extension of the period of loan up to 31st March 
1941 of MS. * Malati Hadhava k Extend. 

No. 10. 24-9-40. 

Request from the Librarian, Punjab University Library, of 9th 
November, 1940, for the loan of the following two MSS,: (a) Porsiaii 
versified translation of the Bhagavat Gita by Faizi, (b) Persian trxiusla- 
tion of the Gita by Dara SMkuli (Abi Zindagi). The MSS. are not to !)t'> 
issued, but give the Librarian of the Punjab University all hieilities 
for copying the MSS. if required. 

No. 11. 27-11-40. 

Manusobipts — 

Letter dated the 2nd January, 1940, from Mr. Jogoudranatii Gupta 
asking that he may be permitted to prepare a descriptive Cfatalogua 
of the Society’s Bengali MSS. Resolved that the preparation of th<i> 
catalogue foe entrusted to^Mr. Jogendranath Gupta at the usual remuner- 
ation under the supervision of the Philological Secretary, and that not 
more than Rs.500 be expended during 1940 for this work. 

No. 6, 29-1-40. 

Letter dated the 26th January, 1940, from the Assistant Secretary, 
Government of Bengal, requesting the Society to take charge of sundry 
MSS. belonging to the India Office, London. Resolved that the Genera! 
Secretary ascertain fuller details more particularly in regard to the 



1941] Abstract Proceedings Council, 1940, 107 

Society’s responsibilities and the extent to which these can be covered by 
insurance. 

No. 17. 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No, 6 of 23-2-40, Letter from 
Maharaj Kumar Ragliiibir Sinh of Sitamau, suggesting the feasibility 
of iiitrodiieing micro -film copying of MSS. by the Society. That Sii* 
Jadmiath Sarkar be asked to furnish a list of those micro -film copies 
of MSS. in the Maharaj Kumar’s library which should find a place in 
the Society’s library. Accepted by Council. 

No, 12. 27-2-40. 

Report by the General Secretary on the receipt of MSS. belonging 
to the India Office from the Secretary, Education Department^ 
Government of Bengal, for safe custody for the period of war. 

No. 22. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 1 of 22-4-40. Application 

from Mr. G. Bux, supported by Sir Jadunath Sarkar, to be allowed to 
take extracts from 4 Arabic MSS. belonging to the Society, Grant, 
under supervision. Accepted by Council. 

No. 9. . 29-4-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 3(6) of 22-4-40. Letter 

from Mr. J. C. Gupta concerning the availability of sundry Sanskrit 
and Bengali MSS, for purchase by the Society. Prof. Chintaharan 
Chalo'avarti to be requested to inspect and report on the Sanskrit MSS. 
only with a view to purchasing those of which the Society possesses no 
copy and those which are in better condition than those of the Society. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 9. 29-4-40. 

Report on the misplacement or theft of two Sanskrit MSS. Record. 
After installation of steel fuimiture is completed a complete and careful 
stock should be taken and a further report submitted to the Council. 

No. 6. 27-3-40. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 4 of 21-5-40. Estimate 
for repairing, pasting and binding MSS. and books. Proceed with the 
woi’k as far as funds permit, MSS. in the Tibetan and Sanskrit sections 
being given priority. Accepted by Council. 

No. 13. 27-5-40. 

Application from Mr. Prabhas Chandra Majumdar, M.A., Post- 
Graduate Jubilee Scholar of the Calcutta University, for permission to 
consult manuscripts of the Society. Grant, under proper supervision. 

No. 14. 27-3-40. 

Report by the General Secretary on reports appearing in the local 
press on the state of the MSS. of the Society, General Secretary to 
prepare a note explaining the exact position in brief for submission to 
the press. The not© to be approved by the Council in circulation. 

No. 23. 27-3-40. 

Letter from the Librarian, India Office, requesting the Society to 
take charge of 5 India Office MSS. on loan to the Society for the period 
of the war. Record. 

No. 24. 


27-3-40. 



108 


Year-Booh B.AB.B. for 1940 , 


[VOL. VII, 


Draft note on the state of the MSS. of the Society, prepared by the 
General Secretary for submission to the press. Record. 

No, 1. , 29-4^40. 

Press notices, in respect of the Society’s MSS. which hawe appoarf^ci 
ill the ‘Amrita Bazar Patrika’ and the ‘ Hiiidustliaii Standard’. 
Record. 

No, 13, 29-4-40. 

Letter from Dr. H. I. Poleman, Director of Iridic Studies, Library of 
Congress, Washington, 

(а) asking for permission to photograph by the iiiicro-filiii process 

certain MSS. in the Society’s collections and 

(б) putting forward a plan for the development and operation of a 

micro -filming service, {a) Permit. (5) Accept with thanks. 

The General Secretary and Treasurer to settle deta,i],s. 

No. 18. 29-4-40. 

Request from Dr. Raghiibir Sinh for permission to copy Vol. 2 of MS. 
^ Miinsha’at-Mahru Grant. 

No. 4. 27-5-40. 

All extract from the ‘Indian Pen’ of June 1940 regarding MSS. 
from Tipu Sultan’s Library. Record. 

No. 15. 28-6-40. 

Letter dated the 26th June, 1940, from Mr. Jagadish Narayan 
Sarkar, Lecturer, Patna College, requesting permission to consult 
some Persian MSS. bearing on the life of Mir Jumla and to take extracts 
or translations from relevant passages. Grant pei’mission under usual 
conditions. 

No. 6. 29-7-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 21-8-40. The cost of 
repairing, pasting and binding MSS. recommended by the Library 
Committee of 21-5-40, is being met out of Sanskrit MSS. Fund. Approi'o 
the action taken. Accepted by Council. 

No. 15. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 4 of 2(}-3-4(K Appli<‘}t« 
tion of Mr. Syed Jamil Ahmad Naqvi for preparation ol' a, catiaLfgiH? 
of Urdu MSS. in the library. Decline. AceeptexI by Council. 

No. 18. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 7 of 20-12-40. Material 
for a catalogue of Bengali MSS. in the possession of tlie R.A.S.IL 
prepared by Mr. d'ogendranath Gupta. Reeirculatc3 to PuWication 
Committee for opinion. Accepted by Council. 

No. 11. 20-12-40. 

Medals — 

Letter of thanks from Dr. Leo Berg for the award to him of the J'oy 
Gobind Law Memorial Medal. Record. 

27-2-40. 

Report by the General Secretary on the issue of the Barclay Memorial 
Medal to Major-General Sir Robert McCarrison. Bt.-CoL R. N. Chopra 



1941] 


Ahstract Proceedmgs Council^ 1940 . 


109 


to be requested to ask Dr. L. A. Napier, who is shortly proceeding to 
England, to take the medal with liim. 

No. 22. 27-3-40. 

Letter No. 8884 of 10-5-40 from the TJniversity of Calcutta asking 
the Society to nominate a representative to serve on the Special Com- 
mittee for the award of the Sarojiiii Basu Gold Medal. That Dr. S. K, 
Chatterji be the Society’s representative. If Dr. Chatterji has already 
been nominated by other bodies then Dr. Kalidas Nag to be the Society’s 
nominee. 

No. 2. 27-5-40. 

Letter from Prof. Franz Weidenreich thanking the vSociety for the 
award to him of the Anandale Memorial Medal. Record. 

No. 19. 28-6-40. 


A letter from Major-General Sir Robert McCarrison, Kt., C.I.E., 
M.D., acknowledging receipt of the Barclay Memorial Medal. Record. 
No. 15. ” 29-7-40. 


Appointment of Advisory Board for the award of Sir William Jones 
Memorial Medal for 1940. The Board to consist of: 

Dr. S. S. Bhatiiagar, 

Dr. K. P. Biswas, 

Mr. H. G. Ghakladar, 

Dr. J. N. Mukherjee, 

Major C. L, Pasrieha, 

Dr. M. N. Saha, 

Sir John Lort-Williams, 

Dr. Baini Prashad, 

Dr. B. S. Giiha. 

No. 4. 


Ex-Officio. 


27-11-40. 


Question of nominating Dr. S. S, Bhatnagar, a non -member of the 
Society, as a member of the Sir William Jones Memorial Medal Board. 
The selection of Sir XT. N. Bralimachari be approved in place of 
Dr. S. S. Bhatnagar, 

No. 1, 20-12-40. 


Report of the Committee appointed to consider the question of a 
design for the die of the Indian Science Congress (Calcutta) Medal. 
1. Postpone consideration till Januaiy 2. Request Mr. O. C, Gangoli to 
explain in detail the sigriiheance of the designs sketched by him. 

No. 17. 20-12-40. 

Letter No, 7127P of 29-11-40 from Govermnenfc of Bengal intimating 
that the Government of India are miabie to forward the Annandale 
Medal to Prof, F. Weidenreich of Peiping as he is a German. Record. 

No. 25. 20-12-40. 


Meetings — 

The question of holding ordinary monthly meetings during the 
recess months, September and October 1940. Do not hold any ordinary 
monthly meeting at that time. 

No. 16. 


29-7-40. 



110 


Year-^Booh for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


Membership — 

Correspondence regarding the application of Mr. Bangalore Venlmta- 
ramaii alias B. TsT. Venkataramaiya to be elected as an Ordinary Member 
of the Society. Regret- that his application cannot be entertained. 

No. 1. " ^ 29d..40. 

Letter No. 598 of 9-2-40 from Mr. B. V. Raman asking to be informed 
why the Council cannot entertain his application for membership. 
Beeline, with regret. 

No. 5. 27-2-40. 

Application for admission to Institutional Membership of the Society 
from the Keeper of the Nepal Museum, Kathmandu. Accept. 

No. 3. 27-5-40. 

Extract from a letter dated the 12th May 1940, from Dr. J. H, 
Hutton, Cambridge, requesting the Society to put Ms name on the list 
of absentee members. Treat him as an absentee member. The 
Secretary to write to him whether it will be possible for him to compound 
his subscription for Hfe membership after the war. 

No. 1. 29-7-40. 

Letter dated 18th July 1940, from Dr. A. L. Coulson tendering 
resignation from the Society with effect from the end of the current 
quarter. Accept with regret. 

No, 7. 29-7-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee Ho. 6(u) of 22-7-40. List of 
members who are in arrears with their subscription for four or more 
quarters to whom Circular Letter No. 1 will have to be sent. Apply 
the rules. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 29-7-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6(b) of 22-7-40. List of 
members who are in arrears with their subscriptions for eight or more 
quarters to whom Circular Letter No. 2 will have to be sent. Apply 
the rules. Accepted by Council, 

No. 12. 29-7-40. 

Letter dated the 25th June 1940, from Dr. A. A. Bake, resigning 
membership of the Society. Record. 

No. 14. ‘ 29-7-40. 

The question of re-electing Prof. Kshitish Chandra Chattorji Shastri, 
Lecturer, Calcutta University, who was removed under Rule 98 with 
an outstanding of subscription of Rs.90 in 1930. Request him to join 
as a new member. 

No. 10. 27-8-40. 

Reconsideration of application for membershii> from Prof. Kshitish 
Chandra Cliatterji Shastri in the terms of Rule 5. Resolved to readmit 
him as an Ordinary member on his explaining the circumstances which 
made him sever his connection with the Society. 

No. 14. 24-9-40. 

Removal of Members’ names under Rule 40. Announce in next 
ordinary monthly meeting. 

No. 3. 


27.11-40, 



1941 ] 


Abstract Proceedings Council^ 1940 , 


111 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 7 of 22-1 l-iO. List of 
members who are in arrears with their subscriptions for four or more 
quarters to whom Circular Letter No. 1 will have to be sent. Apply 
rules. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-11-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. S of 22-11-40, List of 
members who are in arrears with their subscriptions for four or more 
quarters to whom Circular Letter No. 2 will have to be sent. Apply 
rales. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-11-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 9 of 22-11-40. List of 
members who are in arrears with their subscriptions for eight or more 
quarters to whom Circular Letter No. 3 will have to be sent. Apply 
rules. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-11-40. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 10 of 22-11-40. List of 
members for removal under Rule 38 to whom Circular Letter No. 3 
was sent more than six months ago. Apply rules in case of all with 
the exception of Dr. S. K. Mulcherjee whom Dr. J. N. Muliherjee under- 
took to approach personally. Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 27-11-40. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. II of 22-11-40. List of 
members for removal under Rule 40. Apply rules. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 12. 27-11-40. 

Letter dated 13-12-40 from Mr. W. D. West, informing the continua- 
tion of Membership to the Society of Dr. J. B. Auden. Record. Convey 
the thanks of the Council to IVIr. W. D. West for his help. 

No. 18. 20-12-40. 


MiSCELLANEOtrS — 

Letter of thanks from the General Secretary, Indian Science Congress 
Association, for the help rendered to that Association by the Society 
for a portion of the year 1939-40* Record. 

No.'S. 29-1-40. 

Letter dated 15-1-40, from Col. R. B. Se 3 ntnour Sewell requesting the 
Society to forward to him for transmission to the Secretary of State, 
its views regarding the value of the series of Fauna of British India, 
publication of which has been stopped. Resolved that the President 
be requested to invite the Patron, His Excellency Sir John Herbert, 
to be so good as to place the matter before Lord Zetland, Secretary 
of State for India, pointing out all the facts and stressing the necessity 
for the continuation of the work. 

No. 4. 27-2-40. 

Report of Dr. D. N. Ghosal on some old records in the collection 
of the Calcutta High Court. Record. A vote of thanks to be conveyed 
to Dr. Ghosal. 

No. 18. 27-2-40. 

Power of Library and Publication Committees to co-opt members. 
The rules must be adhered to and co -option is not permissible. The 



112 


Tear-Book E.A.S.B, for 1940 . 


[VOL. VII, 


resolutions, item 15(6) and (c) of Council, dated the 27tii February, 1940, 
to be modified accordingly. 

No. 2. 27-3-40. 

Letter of tlia,nks from Mr. Hurmuz Kaus for information siipplitMi 
to him. Record. 

No. 5. 27-3-40. 

Letter No. Circ. 40-41 of 16-3-40, from the General Secretary ' 
Science Congress Association, inviting scientific and technical officers 
of the Society to become members of the next Session of the Congress 
to be held at Benares in 1941. Record. 

No. 10. 27-3-40. 

Letter from Lady Ginwala thanking the Society for the help afforded 
her during her stay in Calcutta. Record. 

No. 25. 27-3-40. 

Recopiition of the 79tii birthday of the Poet Rabindra Nath Tagore. 
That Sir S. Radliakrishnaii be requested to draft a suitable message 
and that a special social meeting .be arranged by the Society at the 
poet’s convenience. 

No. 1. 27-5-40. 

Installation of a telephone extension. Enquire the cost of plug 
connections and report to Council. 

No. 8. 27-5-40. 

Letter dated 11-2-40 and enclosures from the Chairman, Kokusai 
Bunka Siiinkokai, furnishing details of a world -wide prize essay contest 
to commemorate the 2600th anniversary of the founding of the Empire 
of Japan. Record. 

No, 17. 27-5-40. 

Letters from Messrs. J. B. Auden and J. A. Dmm, dated fche 22nd and 
24th Jim© 1940. Resolved that (1) the President be requested to 
discuss the matter with Dr. Fox and (2) that Major Pasriclia and tlie 
General Secretary should discuss the best method, of preserving all 
valuable possessions of the Society. 

No. 3. ■ 28-6-40. 

A letter from Dr. H. C. Ray to the President suggesting changes ,iu 
the work of the Society. After discussion the President withdrew the 
letter addressed to him by Dr. Ray as he considered it a private 
munication. It was resolved that in view of the withdrawa,! of the 
letter of Dr. Ray, by the President, it could not be formally considered. 
The Comicil, however, requested the President to infonn Dr. Ray that, 
it deprecated the language and tone of his references to the Honorary 
General Secretary. Resolved further that the suggestions eontained 
in Dr. Ray’s letter to the President when formally submitted will be 
considered by the Library Committee with Mr. Percy Brown as e. 
co-opted Member. 

No. 5. 29-7-39. 

Suggestions for contribution towards War Defence Savings Bonds 
and Certificates by the Staff of the Society, ilceept. 

27-8-40. 

Copy of the letter (Rafted by Sir S. Badhakrisiman and signed by 
the President, containing the Society’s felicitations on the occasion of 



1941] 


Abstract Proceedings Council^ 1940. 


113 


the 80th birthday of the poet. Convey the Society’s thanks to Sir 
Sarvapalli Badhakrishnaii. 

No. 20. 27-8-40. 

Dr. Rahindra Nath Tagore’s reply to the letter of felicitations on 
the occasion of liis 80th birthday. Record. 

No. 22. 27-8-40. 

Circular Letter No. 2, dated 11-10-40, from the Indian History Con- 
gress, Fourth Session (Lahore), 1940. Put it up on notice board. 

No. 1. , 27-11-40. 


Letter dated 31-10-40 from the Government of India, Department of 
Education, Health and Lands, New Delhi, in reply to Society’s letter 
No. 1803 of 30-8-40. Record. 

No. 19. 27-11-40. 

Letter dated 15-11-40 together with enclosure from W. Ivanow, Esq., 
to the President of the Society regarding Catalogue of Arabic MSS. 
published by the Society. (1) A Committee consisting of the following 
to report on the matter : 

1. Dr. S. K. Chatter ji, 

2. Prof, M. Mahfuz-ul Haq, 

3. Dr. S. P. Mookerjee, 

4. Prof. M. Z. Siddiqi and 
the ex-officio Members. 

(2) It was resolved further that all MSS. and galleys of the papers and 
works published by the Society are to be preserved in the archives 
of the Society for a certain period after the publication of the works. 
No. 21. 27-11-40. 


Letters dated 4-12-40 and 12-12-40 from the Senior Censor, Calcutta, 
requesting the use of our Micro-film Camera for secret and confidential 
work in connection with the war. Record. If any help is required in 
future the General Secretary is to render all possible assistance. 

No. 6. 20-12-40. 

Report of the Committee appointed to consider Mr. Ivanow’s letter 
to the President. Postpone consideration till January. 

No. 13. 20-12-40. 

Obdinaky Fellows — 

Recommendations of the Resident Fellows of the Society, dated the 
5th January 1940. Accept. Put up for election as FeHows in the 
Annual Meeting, 1940, Dr. U. N. Ghosal, Dr. B. C. Law, Dr. R. C. 
Majumdar and Mr. H. S. Pruthi. 

' No. 4. ■ 29-1-40, 

Letters of thanks from Drs. U. N. Ghosal, B. 0. Law, R, C. Majumdar 
and H. S. Pruthi for their election as Ordinary Fellows of the Society. 
Record. 

No, 3. 27-2-40. 

Pbovidbnt Finsrn — 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6 of 23-1-40* Application 
of daftry Shaik Nawab Jan for a loan of Rs.50 to meet his personal 
marriage expenses. Grant a loan of Rs.l5 from the Provident Fund 



114 


Year-Book E,A.8.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. vn, 


bearing interesst at 3% per annum repayable in monthly instalments 
of Rs.2 each. Council order: Accept. Further resolved that dattry 
Nawab Jan be granted a loan of R.s.35 from General Funds under the 
personal guarantee of the Librarian. The loan to be repayable at 
Rs.3 p.m. and to bear interest at 3% per annum. 

Ko.9. 204-40. 


Recommendation Finance Committee jSTo. 8 of 27-2-40. Application 
from Pt. B. B. Mukherjee, 2iid Pandit, for a loan of Bs.lOO from tlie 
Provident Fund. Grant. The loan to bear interest at 3% per aimiiin 
and to be repaid by instalments of Bs.lO monthly. Council order: 


Accept. 
hTo. 11. 


27-2-40. 


Reeomiiieiidation Finance Committee No. 11 of 20-6-40. Applica- 
tion from Mr. B. K. Das, Press Clerk, dated 19-6-40 for a loan of Ils.480 
from Provident Fund. Grant loan on 3% interest and ask liim to 
avail himself of free medical treatment in the Tropical School. Accepted 
by Council. 

No. 9. 28-6-40, 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3 of 24-9-40. Application 
dated 18-9-40 from Mr. S. K. Bay, General Assistant, for a loan of 
Ks.400 from Provident Fund. Lend and credit interest at 1% to his 
Provident Fimd Account. Accepted by Council, 

No. 2. 24-9-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 24-9-40. Application 
dated 20th September 1940, from Shah M. Ahmad, First Maulvi, 
for a loan of Rs.2, 000 from Provident Fund. (1) Lend him the 
maximum amount for which he is eligible under the Buies from his 
Provident Fund and credit the interest at 1% which is to be charged 
on the loan to his own account. (2) Lend him the remainder of the 
sum of Rs. 2,000 applied for from the General Fund and charge him 
2% interest on it. Accepted by Coimcil. 

No. 2. 24-9-40. 

Application from Mr, A. Michael, Steno-typist of the Society, for 
joining the Provident Fund of the Society. Admit. 

No. 21. 20-12-40. 


Publications — 

Recommendation Publication Ooimnittee No. 4 of 23-1-40. Fixation 
of the number of reprints of articles published in the J'oumal anil 
Memoirs. Ten copies only of reprints in addition to the numbers 
required by the author should be printed. Accepted by Coimeil. 

No. II. ^ " 29-1-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6 of 27-2-40. Rocorn- 
mendation of the Publication Committee of 23rd February 1940, 
item 4. Review of the commitments of the >Society in respect of 
publications. As for item 5(6). Council order: Accept. A 'Special 
Meeting of the Finance Committee should be convened as early as 
possible to decide on items 5(6), 6, 9 and 10 of the minutes in question. 

No, 11. 27-2-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 5 of 23-2-40, Request 
from Prof. M. Mahfoz-ul Haq for extension of the period of service of 



1941] 


Ahstract Proceedings Council^ 1940. 


115 


the Maulvi appointed as his assistant for collating the 'Haft Iqlim' 
by 1 month and 15 days. Extend. Accepted by Council. 

No. 13. ‘ 27-2-40. 

Reconimondation Publication Committee No. 4 of 23-2-40. Review 
of the financial coininitments of the Society in respect of Publication. 
That the Finance Committee he requested to arrange for funds to be 
provided for the publication of the Journal, for those works in the 
Bibliotheca Indica Series that have already been undertaken, and for 
new works in the Bibliotheca Indica Series which have been recom- 
mended for publication. Further recommended that this should be a 
first charge on the Society’s finances and that the Journal should not 
be curtailed for financial reasons. Accepted by Coimcil. 

No. 13. 27-2-40. 

Editorial Review of the Journal of the Society, Vol. IV (1938), 
Letters, Part 3, appearing in Nature, VoL 145, No. 3662 of 6-1-40, 
Record. 

No. 21. 27-2-40. 


Reconsideration of the re-issue of Advance Proceedings. Accept 
the General Secretary’s and Treasurer’s recommendations. 

No. 4. 27-3-40. 


Reconnnendation Publication Committee No. 5 of 20-3-40. Circula- 
tion of papers to members of the Committee. In future only the paper 
itself, the opinion of the referee, and the Press estimate of costs to be 
circulated. Bulky illustrations, charts, diagrams, etc., should not be 
circulated. Accepted by Council. 

No. 18. 27-3-40. 

Regularization by ex post facto sanction to the work of preparation 
of Descriptive Catalogue of Sanslmt MSS. from Voi. 8 onwards by 
Prof. Chintaharan Chakravarti. Accord ex post facto sanction. 

No. 3. 29-4-40. 


Recommendation Publication Committee No. 4 of 22-4-40, Report 
on the procedure followed in the submission cf a paper for publication 
on the ‘Cult of Magdeswari’ by S. Das-Gupta. {a) Confirm the action 
of the General Secretary. (6) Inform Mr. K. P. Ohattopadhyaya about 
the procedure for the receiving and publication of papers recommended 
by the Special Enquiry Committee and adopted by the Council, aiid 
state that these were designed to produce order, discipline and regularity. 
Point out the highly objectionable nature of the language used in his 
letter dated the 16th April 1940 , and call for an apology which must 
be made before any further action in regard to the paper can be taken, 
(c) Correspondence between Secretaries or Members of Council and 
Committees must be treated as confidential and not passed on to other 
members of the Society. Accepted by Council* 

No. 10. 29-4-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 6 of 21-5-40. Letter 
from the Superintendent, Baptist Mission Press, giving details of the 
amounts charged on account of authors’ corrections in works recently 
published. Author’s corrections in excess of 26% of the cost of type- 
setting, etc., to be paid by the author. Accepted by Council. 

No. 14. 27-5-40. 



116 Year-Booh for 1940. [vol, yii, 

Letter from I)r. Baiiii Prashad forwarding a copy of a review of liis 
paper on tlie ‘Life and Work of Khwajah Nizaiiiuddin Ahmed Bakhslii 
Record. 

16. 27-5-40. 


Reeomiiiendatioii of the Publication Committee No. o of: .IP-6-40. 
Resolved on the recommendation of Major C. L. Pasrielia that ^instruc- 
tions regarding the submission of Papers in proper :form be printed on 
the inside cover of the Journal and Memoirs ot the Society for the 
guidance of the contributors. Accepted by Council. 

No. 11. 28-6-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 5 of 22-7-40.^ Request 
from Dr. J. B. Chaudhuri for permission to publish Society’s MS. 
‘Vag-Mandana-Junaduta-Kavya ’ in the Indian Historical Quarterly 
and the B. & O. Research Society. Permit him to publish subject to 
suitable references to the Society being made in this connection. 
Accepted bj?' Council. 

No. 11. 20.7-4f). 

Recommendation Publication Coihmittee No. 6 of 21-8-40. Di’aft 
instructions to authors regarding submission of paper.s for fjublication 
in the Journal and Memoirs. Accept after i*evisiou and condoiisatio:n 
by Dr. Baini Prashad. Accepted by Coxmcil. 

‘'No. 17, 27-8-40. 

Extract from a letter from Br. Giidger received by Dr. Baini Praslun ! 
regarding the former’s paj^er on ‘The alleged pugnacity of the sword- 
fish and the spearfishes as shown by their attacks on vessels’ published 
in the Memoirs of the Society, together with a letter of 1-7-40 from 
Dr. Giidger addressed to the Society. Record. 

No. 19. 27-8-40. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 3 of 22-11-40. Resolved 
that in future separate estimates for printing 500 copies and 1000 copies 
respectively of the Joiunal and Memoirs be obtained from the Press to 
©liable the Oomieil to determine the total number of each that should 
be printed. Accepted by Council. 

No. 14. 27-11-40. 

Representation" — 

Letter dated the 14tli December, 1939, from the Secretary, National 
Institute of Sciences of India, asking :For the Society’s ;nomine0S 
servo as additional Vice-President and additional Mombor of Counx?il 
of the Institute for the year 1940. Resolved that Dr. Baini Prasliad 
and Mr. W. D, West be the Society’s nominees as Vice-I’rosideni) and 
Member of Council respectively. 

No. 2. 29-1-40. 

Nomination of the Society’s delegates to the Tentli Session of the 
All-India Oriental Conference at Tirupati. Record. 

No. 9. 27-3-40. 

Letter from the Honorary Secretary, National Institute of Sciences of 
India, requesting the Society to appoint its representatives to serve as 
Additional Vice-President and Additional Member on tlie Council, 
of the Institute. 1. Mr, W. D. West be appointed as Additional 
Vice-President, 2. Major G. L. Pasricha be appointed as Additional 
Member on th© Council. 

No. 2. 


20-12-40. 



1941 ] 


Abstract Proceedings Council ^ 1940 . 


117 


Staff — 

Recommendations of the Finance Committee. Accept. Further 
resolved that daftry Nawab Jan be granted a loan of Rs.35 from 
General Funds, under the personal guarantee of the Librarian. The 
loan to be repayable at Rs.3 p.m. and to bear interest at 3% per anniim. 

No. 9. ■ 29-1-40. 

Grant of emergency commission in H.M.’s Land Forces to the 
Assistant Secretary, R.A.S.B. Resolved that the maximum period 
for Joining, viz. 30 to 60 days, be accepted. 

No. 16. 29-1-40. 

Application from Pandit Aghornath Bhattacharya for permission 
for his son to be trained in the general and Sanskrit sections. Grant 
without any obligation on the part of the Society. 

No. 8. 27-3-40. 

Recommendations of the Special Committee of the Gomicil re 
appointment of Assistant Secretary. AeeejDt. 

No. 10. 27-5-40. 

Grant of gratuity to the retiring Assistant Secretary (Item 1, 
Special Council, 19th April 1940). 

(1) A bonus of Rs. 1,000 to be paid and deduct therefrom the 

balance due from him to the Society on the 31st May 1940. 

(2) The amomit due to him under the rules of the Provident Fund 

also to be paid. 

(3) The Council records its appreciation of the services rendered 

by him at a very critical period and wishes him prosperity 

and success in his new appointment. 

No. 11. 27-5-40. 

Application dated 17-6-40 from the members of the office staff of 
the R.A.S.B. re revision of rules regarding holidays. Resolved that 
the General Secretary be asked to report to the Council the number of 
holidays which are given by the Government and the Bengal Chamber 
of Commerce respectively to enable it to fix the number of holidays 
for the R,A.S.B. 

No. 4. 28-6-40. 

Letter dated 1-6-40 from Mr. J. C. De, accepting the post of Assistant 
Secretary to the Society. Record. 

No. 13. 28-6-40. 

Action against Mr. J. R. Seal by Sir David Ezra in which the Society 
is made a garnishee. Resolved that the matter be placed before our 
solicitors. 

No. 18. 28-6-40. 

Report by the General Secretary re (i) the number of holidays 
given by the G overmnent of Bengal, (ii) those which are granted by the 
Bengal Chamber of Commerce, (iii) those given to members of the 
staff by the Society. Resolved that the practice now followed be 
continued. 

No. 9, 27-8-40* 

Report of the resignation by Mr. N. Norman, File-Clerk and 
Despatcher of the Society. Accept. The post not to be filled up, but a 

8 



118 


Year-Book R.A.8.B. pr [vol. vn, 1941] 


temporary clerk be appointed to help the Assistant Secretary in classi- 

fying and putting the files in order. 

m, 17, 27«;ii-4o. 

Letter dated 24tli November 1940 from Mr. N. Norman ^fco tlii' 
President for a gratuity. Inform Mr. Norman that no gratuity ('an. 
be given. 

No. 22. 27 -LI. -40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. Z{c) of 20-12-40, A.un,iial 
increment of salaries to Staff. Grant as recom.mended by the Spc^vial 
Enquiry Committee. Accepted by ComiciL 

No. 9. 20-12-40. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(e) of 20-12-40. Wiritor 
clothing for Menials, (a) Sanction the over-expenditure up to a limit 
of PwS.70; (b) in future menials be supplied with winter clothing every 
three years. Accepted by Ooimcil. 

No. 9. 20-12-40. 

Confirmation of the services of Mr. Trin Chen, Sino-Tibetan clerk, 
on the grade 50 — 3 — 80. Confirm. 

No. 15. 20-12-40. 

Application from Pt. B. B. Miikherjee, Society’s 2nd Pandit, dated 
12-12-40 for leave for four days on full pay. Grant. 

No. 19. 20-12-40. 

Visit — 

Letter dated the 9th January 1940 from the Secretary, Indian 
Historical Records Commission, thanking the Society on behalf of the 
Commission and the Government of India for the courtesy shown to the 
members on the occasion of their visit to the Society’s rooms, Recjord. 

No. 5. 29-1-40. 


8b 



List of 
Patrons, 

Officers, Council Members, Members,, 
Fellows, and Medallists 
of the 

Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 

On tlie 3ist December, 1940* 


( 119 ) 



PATRONS OF THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF 

BENGAL» 

.. .. H-E. the Most Honourable Lord 

Victor Alexander John Hope^ 

P,C., G.M J.E., G.C J.E«, 

D.L., T.D., the Marquess of 

■ Linlithgow, Viceroy and Governor- 
General of India. 

. . . . H.E. Sir John Arthur Herbert, 

G.G.LE., Governor of Bengal. 


1910-1916 

. . Lord Hardinge of Penshursfc, K.G., 
P.C., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., G.C.S.I., 

G.C.LE., G.C.V.O., I.S.O. 

1917-1922 

. . The Most Hon. the Marquess of Zetland, 
P.C., G.C.S.I., G.O.I.E. 

1922-1927 

. . The Eight Hon. the Earl of Lytton, P.C., 
G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E. 

1926-1931 

. . The Eight Hon. the Viscount Halifax, 
K.G., P.C., G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E. 

1927-1932 

. . Colonel Sir Francis Stanley Jackson, 
P.C., G.C.I.E. 

1931-1936 

. . The Right Hon. the Earl of Willingdon, 
G.M.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.M.I.E., 6.B.E. 

1932-1938 

. . The Right Honourable Sir John 
Anderson, P.C., G.C.B., G.C.I.E. 


( 120 ) 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF COUNCIL OF THE 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 
DURING THE YEAR 1940. 


Elections Annual Meeting. 
President. 

The Hon’bl© Mr. Justice John Lor t -Williams, Kt., K.C. 


V ice-Presidents . 

Bt,-Col. R. N. Chopra. M.A., M.B., LM.S.. F.R.A.S.B., F.NX 

Sir Bijay Chand Mahtab, G.C.I.E., K.C.S.I., Maharajadhiraja 

Bahadur of Biirdwaii, 

0. S. Fox, Esq., D.Sc., M.I.Min.E., F.G.S., F.R.A.S.B., P.N.I. 
Syamaprasad Mookerjee, Esq., M.A., B.L., D.Litt., Barrister-at-Law. 


Secretaries and Treasurer. 


General Secretary :~B. S. Guha, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.A.S.B., F.N.I. 
Treasurer: — Baini Prashad, Esq., D.Sc., F.Z.S., F.R.S.E., F.K.A.S.B.^ 
F.N.I. 

Philological Secretary: — S. K. Chatterji, Esq., M.A., D.Lit., F.R.A.S.B. 
Joint Philological Secretary: — Mahfuz-ul Haq, Esq., M.A. 

Natural History 
Secretaries 

Anthropological Secretary; — H. C. Ohakladar, Esq., M.A. 

Medical Secretary; — Major C. L. Pasricha, M.A., M.B., B.Ch., M.R.C.S.^ 
I.M.S,, F.N.I. 

Library Secretary: — J. N. Mukherjee, Esq., D.Sc., F.C.S., F.R.A.S.B.^ 
F.N.I. 



F.R.S.^ 


Other Members of Council. 

Percy Brown, Esq., A.R.C.A., F.R.A.S.B. 

S. C. Law, Esq., M.A., B.L., Ph.D., F.Z.S., M.B.O.IL, F.N.I. 
Kalidas Nag, Esq., M.A., D.Litt. 

Sir S. Radhakrishnan, Kt., M.A., D.Litt., F.B.A. 

M. Z. Siddiqi, Esq., M.A., Ph.D. 

W. D. West, Esq,, M.A., F.N.I. 


APPOINTMBJS-TS, TRANSFEKS, AKP OTHER CHANGES DURING THE YEAR.. 

Sir S. Radhakrishnan, appointed an Additional Secretary of Philosophy' 
from 4-3-40. 

Dr. Kalidas Nag, appointed an Additional Secretary of History andi 
Archaeology from 4-3-40. 


( 121 ) 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF COUNCIL OF THE 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 
ELECTED FOR THE YEAR 1941. 


President. 

The Hon^ble Mr. Justice Lort-Williams, Kt., K.C, 
Vice-Presidents, 

Bt.^Col. Sir R. N. Chopra, Kt., CJ.E., M.A., Sc.D., M.D., 
I.M.S., F.R.A.S.B.3 KKX 

C. S. Fox, Esq., D.So., M.I.Min.E., F.G.S., F.R.A.S.B., F.N.I, 

Syamaprasad Mookerjee, Esq., M.A., B.L., D.Lit., Earrister-at- 
Law. 

Sir S. Radhakrisimaii, Kt., M.A., D.Lit., F.B.A. 

Secretaries and Treasurer, 

General Secretary: — B. S. Guha, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.A.S.B., 
F.N.I. 

Treasurer: — Baini Prashad, Esq., D.Sc., F.Z.S., F.R.S.E,, 
F.R.A.S.B,, F.N.I. . 

Philological Secretary: — S. K. Chatter ji. Esq., M.A., D.Lit., 
F.R.A.S.B. 

Joint Philological Secretary: — Mahfuz-ui Haq, Esq., M.A. 

r Biology: — Kalipada Biswas, Esq., M.A., 

Natural History \ D.Sc. 

Secretaries 1 Physical Science: — ^Meghnad Saha, Esq,, 
C D.Sc., F.R.S., F.R.A.S.B., F.N.I. 

Anthropological Secretary: — H. C. Chakladar, Esq., M.A. 

Philosophical Secretary : — ^Vanamali Vedantatirtlia, Esq., M.A. 

Historical and Archaeological Secretary :—KaIidas Nag, .Esq., 
M.A,, D.Lit. 

Medical Secretary: — Major C. L. Pasricha, M^.A., M.B., B.Ch., 
^M.R.C.S,, LM,S., F.N j. 

Library Secretary: — J. N. Mukherjee, Esq., I).S(a, F.C.S,, 
F.R.A.S.B., F.N.I. 

Other Members of CounciL 

S. 0. Law, Esq., M.A., B.L., Ph.D., F.Z.S., F.N.I. 

M. Z. Siddiqi, Esq., M.A., Ph.D. 

C. W. Gurner, Esq., B.A., I.C.S. 

The Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley, M.A,, Barrister-at- 
Law, J.P. 


( 122 ) 



ORDINARY MEMBERS. 


R~ Resident. 
An Asterisk 

Bate of 
Election. 

5- 4-22 R 
7-3-27 Kf 

2- 11-25 

2- 3-21 R 

3- 2-36 ]sr 

1-1-34 N 

6- 6-17 H 

6-12-26 H 

1-12-20 isr 

5- 6-39 R 

4- 4-38 R 

3-7-12 F 

6- 5-40 R 

3-3-30 L 

3- 9-34 R 

3- 11-30 R 

4- 4-17 N 

1-5-39 A 


N= Non-Resident. F= Foreign. A— Absent. L—Life. 
is prefixed to names of Ordinary Fellows of the Society. 


Abdul Ali, Abxjl Faiz Mithamihad, m.a., m.r.a.s., i.k.s.l., 
F.Kr.G.s., F.R.H.s. 3, Nawab Abdiir Rahman Street, 
Calcutta. 

Abdul Kadir, A. F. M., m.a. (Ablahabad), maxtlvie fazib 
(Punjab ), madbassah final (Calcutta), Professor , 
Eajshahi College. Rajsliabi. 

Acharya, Paramananda, b.sc., State ArchcBologist, 
Mayurbhanj State, Baripada. 

Agharkar, Shanear Purushottam, m.a., ph.d., f.l.s., 
Sir Rash Behari Ghosc Professor of Bo tang, Calcutta 
Vniversity. 35, Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta. 

Ahmad, Alfazuddin, Khan Bahadur, Late Offg. 
Assistant Director of Public Instruction for M uhammedan 
Education, Bengal. Dhalhora, Tamluk, Midnapur. 

Ahmad, Mian Jamal-ud-Din, b.a.,b.t., Member, Bureau of 
Ed iication, Afghanistan. 2, Andrabi , Kabul, Afghanistan. 

Aiyan^ar, K. V. Rangaswami, Rao Bahadur, m.a,, 
Late Dk'ector of Public Instruction, Travancore, Vasumali 
Vilas, Rangaswami Road, Mylapore, Madras. 

***Aiyaiigar, vS. Krishnaswami, m.a., ph.d., m.r.a.s., 
F.R.HiST.s., F.R.A.S.B., Rajasevasakta, Professor, University 
of Madras. ‘Sripadam’, 143, Brodies Road, Mylapore, 
Madras, S. 

Akbar Khan, The Hon’ble Major Nawab Sm 
Mohammed, k.b.e., c.i.e., Khan ofHoti. Ploti, N.-W.P.P. 

Ali, S. Shamsbr, Insurance Underwriter, 3, Bright Street, 
Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

Anderson, ,T. 15, Park Street, Calcutta. 

Andrews, IGgbert Arthur, b.a. c/o The Royal Empire 
Society, Northumberland Avenue, London, W.C. 

Asaduilali, Khalifa Mohammad, Khan Bahadur, 
General Central Service Class 1, Librarian, Imperial 
Library, 6, Esplanade East, Calcutta. 

Ashton, Hubert Shorrock, Merchant. Trueloves, 
Ingatestone, Essex, England. 

Auden, John Bicknell, m.a. (Cantab.), f.g.s., f.n.i.. 
Assistant Superintendent, Geological Survey of India. 
27, Chowrxnghee, Calcutta. 

Austin, George John, Sanitary Engineer, Messrs. J, B. 
Norton ds Sons, Ltd. Norton Building, Lalbazar, Calcutta. 

Awati, P. R., B.A. (Cantab.), d.i.o., f.n.i., i.e.s., Professor 
of Zoology, Royal Institute of Science. Mayo Road, 
Fort, Bombay. 

Ayrton, Shavun Munohershaw, Assistant, Messrs. Shaw 
Wallace <h Co., Madon Mansions, 276-C, Bow Bazar 
Street, Calcutta. 

{ 123 ) 



124 


Year-Book R.A.8.B, for 1940. 


[voL. m, 


Date of 
Election. 

3~14 

L 

*Bacot 5 J., F.TI.A.S.B. Boulevard Saint -Antoine , 61, 

7-9-36 

E, 

Versailles Seine -et-Oiso, France. 

BagcMj K. X., K.AI Bahadur, b.so., m.b. (Cal.), f.i.o. 
(Lond.), d.t.m. (Cal. & L‘pool), Chemical Mxafniner 
to the Government of Bengal, Medical College, 
Calcutta. 

BagcM,PROBODH Chandra, m.a., dr. -es -letters (Paris), 

Ml-20 

1-1 

1-3-26 

E 

Member of the A.S. of Paris ; Lecturer, Calcutta University, 
9, Eustomjee Street, Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

Bagnall, John Frederick, b.so., a.m.i.mech.e.. 

2-4-24 

N 

a«m.i.b.e., A.M.INST.C.E., Consulting Engineer, Messrs, 
Macneill S Co. 2, Fairlie Place, Calcutta. 

’^BaM, K. X., D.sc., d.rhil., f.n.i., f.r.a.s.b., Professor of 

1-8-38 

E 

Zoology, Liichnow University. Badsliabagb, Lucknow. 
Banerjee, J. N., m.a.. Lecturer, Calcutta University. 28, 

6-2-18 

E 

Manoharpukur Eoad, Calcutta. 

Banerjee, Xarendra Nath, o.e., A.M.r.E., Chief 

Engineer, Posts Telegraphs, Simla (38/1, Gariabat Road, 
Ballygunge, Calcutta). 

Banerjee, P. N., m.a. (Cantab.), a.m.i.e., f.c.u.. Civil 

5-3-24 

E 

7-12-36 

E 

Engineer, 12, Mission Row, Calcutta. 

Banerjee, S., i.e.s. Collector’s House, Hooghly. 

3-12-23 

E 

Harwell, N. F., m.o., m.a., lt.-col. (retd.), Barrister-aL 
Law. 6, Middleton Street, Calcutta {and) Aylmerton 
House, Aylmerton, Norfolk, England. 

Bastin, RbginaiiD Waiter, i.o.s., Settlement Offtcer^ 

2-10-39 

N 

7-12-36 

E ' 

Mymensingh, E.B.Rly. 

Basil, Indubhtjsan, m.d. (Cal.), Medical Practitioner, 
Associate Professor of Medicine and Visiting Physician, 
Carmichael Medical College. 19, Vivekananda Road, 
Calcutta. 

Basil, Jnanendra Xath, Vidyalankar, Member, 

6-2-39 

E 

3-12-24 

E 

Benares Hind>u University Court, Fellow, Theosophical 
Society, Landholder, Director, Messrs. Thacker Spink 
Co. 9, Park Lane, Calcutta. 

Basil, Jatindba Xath, m.a., m.l.c., Solicitor. 14, Baloram 

5-2-40 

E 

Gbose Street, Calcutta. 

Basil, Mriganka Mault, Member of the Indian Civil 

1-3-26 

H 

Service, Special Magistrate, Howrah. 

Basil, Xarendra Kumar, m.l.c.. Advocate, High Cotirt. 

2-10-39 

X 

12, Asbu Biswas Road, Bbawauiporo, Calcutta. 

Basil Mazoomder, Wooshaour, b.l., m.r.a.s., f.e.s.a. 

7-7-09 

X 

(Lond.), Bengal Civil Service {Judicial), Munsif. 
Barisal, Dist. Bakbarganj (Bengal). 

Bazaz, Rangnath Khemraj, Proprietor , Shri Venkatesli- 

4-3-40 

X 

war P7'ess. 7tb Khetwadi, Bombay No. 4. 

Bell, Frank Owen, Indian Civil Se^'vice, S.O., Dinajpiir. 

7-5-34 

E 

Bent, William Antony, Assistant, Messrs. George 

4-3-25 

B 

Hende7*son <h Co., Ld. 101/1, Clive Street, Calcutta. 
Benthall, Sm Edward C,, kt., Merchant. 37, Ballygunge 

7-4-09 

L 

Park. Calcutta. 

=^Bentley, Charles A,, c.i.e., m.b., d.f.ti., d.t.m. & 

6-1-3G 

X 

F.A.S.B., Professor of Hygiene. University of Egypt, 
Cairn 

Berkeley-Hill, Owen, a.r., m.a., m.d., b.ch. (Oxon), 



M.R.c.s. -(England), d.t.m. (Lond.), lt.-col., i.m.s. 
(retd.). Station View, Ranchi. 



1941] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members. 


125 


Bate of 
Election. 



4-6-28 

N 

Bhadraj Satyendra Nath, Rai Bahadur, m.a.. 
Principal, Jagannath Intermediate College. Nayabazar. 
Dacca, 

1-8-17 

Ji 

'^'Bliaiidarkar, Devadatta Ramkrishna, m.a., ph.d.? 
p.e.a.s.b. 2/1, Lovelock Street, Ballyguiige, Calcutta. 

6-5-40 

N 

Bliaruclia, Farrohh B., Merchant, Canada Buildings 
Hornby Road, Bombay. 

5-4-20 

N 

Bliatia, M. L., m.sc.. Lecturer in Zoology, lAfchnmv 
University. Lucknow. 

7-7-24 

L ; 

Bliattacharyya, Binoytosh, m.a., ph.d., Eajaratna^ 
General Editor. Gaekwad\s Oriental Series, and Librarian, 
Oriental Collections, Baroda State. Baroda. 

6-9-37 

N 

Bbattacharya, N. C., Vice-Chairman, Birnagar Muni- 
cipality. Bimagar, Nadia. 

4-6-28 

N 

Bhattasali, Nalini Kanta, m.a., ph.d., Curator, Dacca 
Museum: Ramna, Dacca. 

6-4-31 

R 

Bhose, JoTiSH Chandeb, m.a., b.d.. Advocate, Calcutta 
High Court. 24A, Ray Bagan Street, Calcutta. 

5-2-34 

A 

Bhuyan, Subyya TCumab, Rai Bahadur, m.a., b.l., a.e.s.. 
Honorary Provincial Director of Historical and Anti- 
quarian Studies, Assam; Professor, Cotton College. 
Gauhati, Assam. 

5-3-28 

R 

Biswas, The Hon’ble Mr. Justice Charu Chandra, 
C.I.E., M.A., B.L., Jud,ge, High Court. 58, Puddopukiir 
Road. P.O. Elgin Road, Calcutta. 

1-8-23 

L 

Biswas, Kalipada, m.a.,d.sc. (Edin.), f.r.s.e., Superin- 
tendent, Royal Botanic Garden. Botanic Garden P.0,, 
Calcutta. 

3-1-27 

N 

Bivar, Hugh Godfrey Stuart, i.c.s., District and 
Sessions Judge. Faridpur. 

4-11-35 

N 

Bor, N. L., M.A., D.sc., i.f.s.. Forest Botanist, Forest 
Research Institute. New Forest, Debra Dun. 

6-7-25 

R 

Bose, Manmatha Mohan, m.a., Professor Emeritus^ 
Scottish Church College. 1 9, Gokul Mitra Lane, Hatkhola, 
Calcutta. 

7-12-36 

N 

1 

Bose, Ambuj Nath, m.b.e., m.d. (Lausanne), f.r.c.p. 
(Edin. & Lond.), et.-col., t.m.s. Medical College, Patna. 

4-12-39 

R 

Bose, Debendra Mohan, m.a., ph.d., p.n.i., Director, Bose 
Research Institute, 93, Upper Circular Road, Calcutta. 

7-8-39 

R 

Bose, Gibindbashekhab, m.b., d.sc., f.n.i., Professor 
of Psychology and Head of Department of Psychology, 
Calcuka University. 14, Parsi Bagan Lane, P.O. Amherst 
Street, Calcutta. 

2-3-3.] 

N 

Bose, SuDHANSU Kumab, b.sc. (Cal.), a.b.s.m., b.sc. 
(mining) (London), Professor of Mining and Surveying. 
Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad. 

2-1-39 

R 

Bose, SuDHANSU Mohan, m.a., ll.b. (Cantab.), Barrister- 
at-Law, Me?nber, Public Service Commission, Bengal. 
3, Federation Road, P.O. Amherst Street, Calcutta. 

2-11-36 

N 

Bothra, Stjbhhaban Singh, Landholder and Student. 
Kundigar Bhairon, Jaipur City. 

4-5-31 

R 

Bottomley, John Mellob, b.a. (Oxon). t.e.s.. Director of 
Public Instruction, Bengal. 1, Sunny Park, Ballygunge, 
Calcutta. 

5-12-32 

A 

Boyle, Cecil Alexandeb, major, d.s.o,. Adviser in 
Languages and Secretary to the Board of Examiners. 
Army Headquarters, Simla. 



126 


Year-Book R.A.SM. for 1940. 


[VOL. vri. 


Bate of 
Election. 



3-12.S4 

R 

Bralimachari, Phantitdba Nath, m.sc., m.b. 19, 
London Street, Calcutta. 

i-l-OS 

L 

■•‘'Bralimachari, Sib Upendba Nath, kt., R.ai I^AirAiiij'.Ti, 

M.A., PH.D., M.D., F.S.M.F., E.K.I., B.E.A.S.B. 19, LOiKloli 
Street, Calcutta. 

7-11-27 

N 

Brahmachary, Sabat Chahdba, Rai Eajjaditr,,^ m.a.,. 
B.T. Kasba Road., Ballygunge, P.O. JOhakiiria., 24-.P<‘,rg's« 

6-1-36 

R 

Brocke, A. G., d.so. (Doctob PHiLOflo.pHT/E .ISTatu'ealis) 
(Jena), Branch Manager, PharniarjyiUieril DeparfmcMt , 
^Bayer\ 52/4/1, Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcut.ta. 

3-7-07 

L 

'"Brown, John Coggin, o.b.e., d.sc., f.g.s., m.i.m.e., 
M.iNST.M.M., M.T.E., F.B-A.s.B. c/o Messrs. GriiicUay & 
Co., 54, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, 
S.W.L 

6-10-09 

R 

■'"Brown, Pebcy, a.b.c.a., p.b.a.s.b., Curator, Victoria 
Memorial, Calcutta. 

4-3-40 

R 

Bruce, Alex.andeb Edwin Bobebt, b.a., a.c.p., 

M.B.s.T., M.B.A.S., F.B.G.S., A.B.i.F.H.H., Principal, 

RafMifi Hall School, Darjeeling. 

S-I-96 

F 

'"Burn, Sir RtoiiARi.), kt., c.s.t., f.b.a.s.b. 9, Staverton 
Road. OKford, i^liiglaml. 

3-12-34 

F 

Burt, Sib Bryce CrfODLEiGH, kt., c.i.e., m.b.e., b.sc., 
I.A.S., F.N.i. Bryn Dene, Allanson Road, Rhos-on-Sea, 
Colwyn Bay, N. Wales. 

2-4-13 

A 

• Gaider, Charles Gumming, b.sc., f.n.i., f.l.s., Superin- 
tendent. Royal Bota>nic Garden, Sibpiir, Howrah. 

4-12-30 

R 

Cameron, Rev. Allan, m.a., ph.d., Principal, Scottish 
Church College, 3 and 4, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

4-11-29 

F 

Campbell, Sib Gboboe R., kt., Westcroft, Pyrford,’ 
Siirre3% England. 

. 4-7-38 

R 

Garstairs, Andrew McLaren, m.a., Bengal Ghaniher of 
Coinmme, Royal Exchange Buildings, 2, Clivo Street, 
Calcutta. 

3-2-36 

F 

Catto, OF Oairncatto, The Right Hon’ble Lord, 
Bart. ‘Woodlands’, Clamp Hill, Stanmoro, Middlesex, 
England. 

1-9-20 

R 

Ghaldadar, Haban Chandra, m.a. 2S/‘t/2, vSrimoliau 
Lane. Kalighat, Calcutta. 

7-3-32 

R, 

Gbuckerbutty, Khirode Behari, md Afu.w////nc- 

turer, 7, Hindusthan Park, P.O. Bajl,ygungG, Calcutta,. 

4-7-27 

n 

Chakravarti, Ciiintahaban, m.a.*, ’ K'avyatIetha, 
Lecturer, Bethune College, 28/3, Sahanaga;r Road, 
Kalighat, Calcutta. 

3-2-30 

N 

Chakravarti, M. N., m.scj., A,T,S, ‘ Gitanjali 37, 
Mayo Garden, Lahore. 

3-1-27 

, N 

Chakravarti, Nirantanprasad, m.a., ph.d. (Cantab.), 
Government Epigraphist, Office of the Government Epi- 
; graphist, Ootacamund, Nilgiris, S. India. 

7-2-38 

1 R 

! Chakravarti, P. K., m.a., b.l., Advocate, High Court, 
6, Basanta Bose Road, Bhowanipore, Calcutta. 

6-2-39 

N 

Chakravarti, Prof. Rash Mohan, ph.b., Puranbatna, 
ViDYAViNODE, Superintendent, Mammala Ghhatravas, 
Comilla, Bengal. 

5-6-33 

' N 

Chakravarti, Susil Kumar, m.a.. Zemindar. Coo eh 
Behar (Cooch Behar State). 



1941] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Memhers. 


127 


Date of 
Election. 

1-9-20 

R 

3-1-06 

L 

7-5-28 

R 

7-2-27 

N 

1-7-40 

R 

27-10-16 

F 

2-3-36 

R 

1-10-20 

R, 

4-7-27 

R 

,3-12-34 

X 

2-9-40 

R 

4-6-34 

X 

5-1-31 

R 

7-6-11 

R 

7-5-28 

1 R 

6-8-24 

1 R 

2-3-36 

1 

R 

5-11-24 

R. 

2-11-25 

X 

4-4-38 

R 

4-11-35 

R 

5-12-23 

L 


•''Gtianda, Ramapbasad, Rai Bahadur, b.a., f.b.a.s.b. 
H7/1, Manoharpukur Road, Kaligkat, Calcutta. 
Chapman, Johit Alexander. 32, Lavington Road, 
West Ealing, London, W.3. 

Ghatterjea, Sm Nalini Ranjan, kt., m.a., b.l., Retired 
Judge and sometime acting Chief Justice, Calcutta. 91 A, 
Harish Miikherjee Road, JBhawanipore, Calcutta. 
Ghatterjee, Ashore, b.a. (Oal.), b.a. (Cantab.), Labour 
Welfare Office. Burnpur, Via AsansoL 
Ghatterjee, A. B., m.a., General Manager, Metropolitan 
Printing <&} Publishing House Ltd., 4-B, Couneil House 
Street, Calcutta. 

Ghatterjee, Sir Atul Chandra, k.c.i.e., k.g.s.i., Late High 
Commi$sio7ier for India. Witlidean, Cavendish Road, 
Weybridge, Surrey, England. 

Ghatterjee, Manomohan, b.sc. (Cal.), ph.d. (Bond.), 
A.R.C.S., D.I.C., Professor of Geology, Presidency College. 
170/2, Lower Circular Road, Calcutta. 

Ghatterjee, Nirmal Chandra, Barrister uit-Low. 47/1, 
Theatre Road, Calcutta. 

Ghatterjee, Patitpabon. m.a., b.l., Vahil, High Court. 
S4, Harrison Road, Calcutta. 

Ghatterjee, Sisir Chandra, m.d. (Edin.), m.r.c.p. (Edin.), 
D.p.H. (Edin.), Chief Medical db Health Officer. Head- 
riLiartor.s Offices, N.W. By., Lahore. 

Ghatterji, Banrim Chandra, m.sc., (Gold Medallist), 
Member of the Calcutta Mathematical Society, Research 
Scholar, Calcutta University. 15, Vidyasagar Street, 
Calcutta. 

Ghatterji, Brian Ra,t, ph.d. (London), d.lttt. (Punjab)j 
Professor of History, Meerut College. Meerut. 

Ghatterji, Durgacharan, m.a., Lecturer in Sanskrit, 
Bethune College. 39, Jatin Das Road, Kalighat, 
Calcutta. 

Ghatterji, Karuna Kuiviar, lt.-col., i.t.p., m.c., v.h.a.s, 
15, Oamac Street, Calcutta. 

Ghatterji, Kedar Hath, b.so. (London), a.e.c.s. 

(London), 43, Wellesley vSfcreet, Calcutta. 

’^‘Ghatterji, Stjniti Kumar, m.a. (Cal,), d.litt. (London), 
P.R.A..S.B, Khaira Professor of Linguistics, Calcutta 
Unwersity. ‘Sudharina’, 16, Hindusthan Park, (off 
Rashbiliari Avenue East End), Ballygunge, Calcutta. 
Ghatterji, Mrs. Tuhinika, m.a., ILa^watirtha, Research 
Scholar, Examiner, Calcutta University. 5, Wood Street, 
Calcutta. 

Ghattopadhyay, K. P., m.sc., Professor, Calcutta Univer- 
sity. 2, Palm Place, Ballygunge, Calcutta. 
Ghattopadhyaya, Kshetresa Chandra, m.a., Lecturer 
in Sanskrit. Allahabad University, Allahabad. 
Ghandhnri, Mbs. Roma, m.a,, d.phil. (Oxon). 3, Fede- 
ration Road, Calcutta. 

Ghaudhuri, S. N. 62, Ballygunge Circular Road, 
Calcutta. 

Chopra, B. H., d.sc., r.n.i., f.l.s., Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Zoological Survey of India. Indian Museum, 
Calcutta. 


128 


Year^Book B.A.S.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


Date^of 

Election. 



1-2-22 

R 

*Cliopra, R. IST., o.i.e., m.a., sc.d., m.d. (Cantab.), f.e.c.p., 

F.N.I., F.B.A.S.B., BREV33T-COL,, ProfesSOT of PhUf'- 

macology. School of Tropical Medicino and Hygiene, 
ChifctaranjarL Avenue, Caleixtta. 

5-12-27 

L 

Chowdliiiry, Sir Ghhajuram, kt., c.i.e,, m.l.c. 21, 
Belvedere Road. Calcutta. 

2-4-28 

K 

Gliowdiiiiry, Rai Jatindranath, Zemindar. 36, Riissa 
Road, Tollygunge, Calcutta. 

3-7-07 

L 

^Ghristie^ Wilbiam Alexander, Kvnoch, b.so., ph.d., 
M.iNST.M.M., r.R.A.s.B. Secretariat, Principal Supply 
Officers’ Committee (India), Defence Department, Simla. 

2-2-31 

E, 

Clough, John, Barrister -at-Law. 17, Store Road, Bally- 
gimge. Calcutta. 

5-5-30 

F 

Cooper, G. A. P. 29, Eccleston Street, Eaton Square, 
liondon, S.W. 1. 

4-11-29 

L 

‘^'Cotter, Gerald de Pxjrcell, b.a., sc.d. (Dublin), 
M.INST.M.M., P.G.S., E.R.A.s.B. ‘ Fallowfield Mauof 
Road, Penn., Bucks., England. 

4-3-40 

R 

Crawford, C. E. J., b.a., b.so., Technical Staff, Imperial 
Chemical Industries {India) Ltd., 18, Strand Road, 
Calcutta. 

2-11-25 

R 

Grookshank, Henry, b.a., b.a.i. (Dublin), e.n.i., 
Assistant Superintendent, Geological Survey of India. 27, 
Chowringhee, Calcutta. 

6-3-39 

N 

Giilshaw, Rev. Wesley James, Methodist Minister, 
P.O. Serenga, Dist. Bankura. 

7-3-32 

R 

Oarbari, M, D., Incorporated Accountant, S* B. Billimoria 
Co., Ld. 100, Clive Street, Calcutta. 

4-3-26 

R 

Das, Ajit Hath, Rai Bahadur, m.b.a.s,, e.z.s., Zemindar. 
24, South Road, Entally, Calcutta. 

5-12-39 

N 

Das-Gupta, C. C., m.a., Arclioeological Survey of India. 
Western Circle, Poona. 

1-3-26 

R 

Datta, Hirendra Hath, m.a., b.l., Solicitor, High Court. 
139, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

6-8-24 

L 

Davies, L. M., lt.-col., m.a.. e.b.s.e., f.r.a.i., f.g.s. 
8, Garscube Terrace, Murrayfield, Edinburgh, 12, 
Scotland. 

4-3-29 

R 

De, J. C., M.B., LT.-COL., T.Bi.s. 11, Rowland Roa<'i, 
Calcutta. 

3-6-40 


De, Jatis Chandra, m.a., b.l. (Cal.), m.a. (Lond,), 
Colonial Educational Service, 11, Ray Street, Elgin Bond 
P.O., Calcutta. 

19-9-95 

L 

De, Kiran Chandra, c.i.e., b.a., t.c.s. (retd.), Manmjer. 
Nawab Bahadur of Murshidahad Estate. Lalbagh, 
Mujshidabad. 

4-3-25 

K 

Deb, Kshitindra, Rai Mahasai. 21/E, Rani Sankari 
Lane, Kalighat, Calcutta. 

5-12-27 

L 

Decbhen, H.H. Maharani Kunzang, Maharani ofSikIcim. 
Gangtok, Sikkim. 

5-5-30 

N 

Deo, Sir Pratar Chandra Bhanj, k.o.i.e., Maharajah, 
Biller of Mayurbhanj State. P.O . Baripada, Mayu rbh'ani , 
B.H.R. 

5-11-34 

R 

Dey, Mukul, a.b.c.a. (Lond.), m.c.s.e. (D.S.A.), e.r.s.a., 
etc.. Principal, Govt. School of Art; Officer in charge. An 
Section Keeper of Govt. Art Gallery; Trustee, Indian 
Museum. 28, Chowringhee, Calcutta. 


1941] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members. 


129 


Date of 
Election. 

4-5-10 

L 

4-8-20 

N 

5-1-98 

R 

2-7-02 

L 

7-11-32 

R 

6-6-38 

N 

6-9-37 

A 

2-1-33 

R 

3-7-33 

R 

30-9-35 

R 

5-12-32 

R 

1-7-40 

R 

2-12-40 

R 

1-11-38 

N 

5-1-31 

L 

6-2-28 

L 

2-5-38 

R 

2-12-29 

R 

3-8-04 

L 

5-2-40 

F 

4-3-40 

R 

5-11-13 

L 

5-11-28 

R 


Dhavle, The Hon’ble Me. Justice Shaistkae Balaji, 
B.A., I.C.S., Judge, Patna High Court. Patna. 

=*=Diksliit, Kashihath Naeayan, m.a., e.e.a.s.b. c/o The 
Office of the Director-General of Archaaology, New Delhi. 
Dods, William Kane, Agent Hongkong and Shanghai 
Bankmg Corporation, 6, Minto Park, Alipur, Calcutta. 
Doxey, Fbedeeice:. ‘Baliygunge’, Cooden Drive, 
Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex, England. 

Driver, Daeab Ctjesetji, m.a. (Cantab.), Barrister-at- 
Latu, Constituted Attorney to Messrs. Tata Sons, Ld., 
Managing Agents for The Tata Iron <b Steel Go., Ld. 
87/G, Park Street, Calcutta. 

Diidhoria, Naba Kumae Sing, Zemindar and Banker. 
Azimganj Dt. Murshidabad, 

Duruiz-Podewils, Count, Consul-General for Germany. 
34, Park Street, Calcutta. 

Dutch, Robeet Austen, b.a. (Cantab.), i.o.s., District 
Judge. Alipore, Calcutta. 

Dutt, Gueu Saday, Barrister -at-Laiv, i.o.s. 12, Loudon 
Street, Calcutta. 

Dutt, Mohendea Nath, l.e., Consulting Engineer. 12, 
Kailas Bose Lane, Howrah. 

Dutt, Nalinaksha, m.a., ph.d,, d.litt. (Lond.), Lecturer, 
Calcutta University. 39, Badur Bagan Row, P.O. 
Amherst Street, Calcutta. 

Dutt, SuDHiB Chundee, Capt., M.B., A.I.B.O., Ophthalmic 
Surgeon, Mayo Hospital, 214, Lower Circular Road, 
Calcutta, 

iBdgley, Hon’ble Me. Justice Nqeman Gboege 
Aemsteong, Puisne Judge, Calcutta High Gourt, 9/1, 
Middleton Street, Calcutta. 

Eekhout, Jhe. p.j., Vice-Gorisul for Netherlands, Clarke’s 
Hotel, Simla. 

Evans, Percy, b.a. (Cantab.), p.g.s., Geologist, o/o The 
Burma Oil Co., Digboi, Assam. 

Ezra, SiE David, kt., f.z.s., m.b.o.u. 3, Kyd Street, 
Calcutta. 

Paroqui, Nawab Sir K. G. M., kt., of Batanpur, 20/1, 
Store Road, Calcutta. 

Fawcus, Louis Reginald, c.i.b., b.a. (Cantab.), Indian 
Civil Service, United Service Club, Calcutta. 

*Fermor, Sir Lewis Leigh, kt., o.b.e., m.inst.m.m., d.so., 
A.R.S.M., p.G.s., F.R.s., F.N.I., F.R.A.s.B,, Late Director, 
Geological Survey of India, c/o Messrs. Lloyds Bank, 
Ld., 6, Pall Mall, London. 

Fleming, Andrew, Band Club, Johannesburg. 

Foster, Albert Ridgbley, b.so., a.i.o., Agricultural 
Chemist and Agricultural Expert, c/o Imperial Chemical 
Industries (Indio) Ltd., 18, Strand Road, Calcutta. 

=^Fox, Cyril S., d.sc. (Biem.), m.i.m.e., f.g.s., f.n.i., 
F.R.A.S.B. Geological Survey of India, 27, Ghowringhee, 
Calcutta. 

Galstaun, John Caeapiet, o.b.e., Merchant and Land- 
holder, 234/4, Lower Circular Road, Calcutta. 


130 Year-Book B.A.8.B. for IMO. [vol. vti, 


Date^of 

Election. 



1-11-26 

R 

Galstaun, Shanazan", G„ m.a., d.m.b.e., m.r.o.s., l.:r.c\p.. 
Medical Practitioner^ Radiologist^ Medical College HospiiaL 
34, Gliowriiighee Road, Calcutta. 

6-10-09 

R 

* Gangoly, Ordhendra Goomar, b.a., .f.r.a.s.b, 2, 

Asutosh Mukherjee Road, Calcutta. 

5-11-34 

R 

Gee, Edward Rowlakd, m.a. (Cantab.), f.n.i., f.g.s., 
Assistant Superintendent, Geological Survey of India. 27, 
Chowriiigiiee, Calcutta. 

2-1-33 

N 

George, James, b.a. (Cantab.), i.c.s.. Joint Magistrate and 
Dy. Collector. Dacca. 

5-2-40 ; 

N 

Gliatak, Indu Bhushan, b.a. (Cal.), c.t.e. (Dao.), med. 
(Amb.), Dip. Lbr. (B.L.A.), Examiner^ Patna University, 
Lecturer, St. John Ambulance Association, Ex-member, 
Subordinate Educational. Service, C.P., Associate, Red 
Gross Society, Headmaster, Raj High School, Garh Baiiaili 
P.O., (Purnea). 

6-2-33 

L 

Ghatak, Jyotish Chandra, m.a. (Triple), Sahitya 
Saraswati, Jyotish-Sagaea, Professor. 4, Boloraiu 
Bose Ghat Road, Bhawauipore, Calcutta. 

7-5-28 1 

R 

^Ghosal, Upendra Nath, m.a., ph.d., e.r.a.s.b., Professor 
of History, Presidency College. 35, Badur Bagaii Row, 
Calcutta. 

5-4-26 

R 

Gkose, Bimal Chandra, Barrister -at-Law. 27/1, liarish 
Mukherjee Road, Calcutta. 

7-1-29 

R 

Gkose, The Hon’ble Mr. Justice Mohim Chandra, b.a- 
(Cal.), M.A. (Cantab.), i.c.s., Barrister -at-Law {Inner 
Temple), Judge, High Court. 4A, Little Russell Street, 
Calcutta. 

3-12-24 

R 

Gkose, Sushil Chandra, b.a., Deputy Alagistrate. 1, 
Sikdarbagau Street, Calcutta. 

7-9-36 

R 

Ghosk, J., m.a. (Cal.), ph.d. (Edin.), f.n.i., Professor of 
Mathematics, Presidency College. 9, Satyon Dutta Road'., 
Calcutta. 

4-9-39 

N 

Gbosh, J. C., D.sc., E.N.I., Director, The Indian Instituio 
of Science. Bangalore. 

2-4-24 

R 

Gliosli, K., D.T.M., D.P.H. (Cantab.), l.m.s., Medical 
Practitioner. 45, Creek Row, Calcutta. 

7-3-27 ^ 

R 

Ghosk, Phanindra Nat.h, m.a., ph.d., sc.d. (.Padua), 
E.iNST.p., Sir Rashbehary Ghosh Professor of Applied 
Physics, University of Calcutta. 92, Upper Gircuiai’ Road, 
Calcutta. 

2.9-40 

R 

Gkosk , Prashanta Kumar, Visiting Physici an. Carm ichael 
Medical College Hospital, Belgaehia, Calcutta, P.7/i, 
Ghittaranjaii Avenue, P.O. Boadon Street, Calirutta. 

4-9-12 

R 

Gkosk, Tabapada, Zemindar. 14, Paddapukur Street, 
Kidderpore, Calcutta. 

1-2-26 

R 

Gkuznavi, Sir Abdul Halim, kt., m.l.a., Zcmdndat. 
18, Canal Street, Entally, Calcutta. 

6-8-28 

R 

Gkuznavi, Iskander S. K., Ze?nmdar. 21, Syod Aineor 
AH Avenue, Circus P.O., Calcutta (and) Dilduar. 
Mymensingh. 

7-12-36 

R 

Gillespie, Andrew Dollar, Chemist and Senior Partner, 
Messrs. Bathgate <Ss Go. 17, Old Court House Street, 

1 Calcutta. 

5-3-28 

R 

Gooptu, Dwijbndra Nath, Medical Practitioner and 
Landholder. 5, Middleton Street, Calcutta. 

7-9-10 

N 

^Gravely, Erederio Henry, d.so., e.n.i., e.r.a.s.b. 
Museum House, Egmore, Madras. 



1941] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary M embers > 




Date of 
Election. 

6-5-40 R Griffitlis, Walter Geraldsojs-, b.sc. (Calif,), b,d, 
(Drew), m.a. (New York), ph.d. (Drew), Missionary, 
13, Wollington Sqr., Calcutta. 

4-3-35 Ri Grotli, Edward, M., American Consul. American 
Consulate General, 9, Esplanade Mansions, Esplanade, 
Calcutta. 

4- 2-25 L *Gulia, B. S., m.a., ph.d. (Harvard), p.n.i., p.r.a.s.b. 

Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

5- 3-19 N Gupta, SivAPRASAD. Seva TJpavana, Benares City. 

5-8-15 Pv Gurner, Cyril Walter, b.a. (Oxon), i.c.s., Chairman, 

Iniprove7nent Trust, 4, Theatre Road, Calcutta. 


5- 2-34 P Haidar, Bharati Vikas, m.a., b.l., Advocate, High Court, 

47, Haldarpara Road, Kalighat, Calcutta. 

6- 1-30 N Haidar, Sudhindra Kumar, m.a., i.c.s., Dishdct and 

8essio7is Judge, Khulna. 

6- 9-37 N Halim, Abdul, Dr., m.a., Lecturer in History, Muslwi 

University, Aligarh. 

2-4-24 R Haq, M. Mahfuz-ul, m.a.. Professor, Presidency College, 
8/B, Dargah Road, Park Circus, Calcutta. 

1 -5- 1 2 A Harley, Alexander Hamilton, m.a., i.e.s.. Late Principal, 
Islamia College. 19, Wellesley Sqtiare, Calcutta. 

1- 2-26 E Harris, PT.G. Gurinespory Avenue, Ealing, London. 

2- 4-28 R Harris, Lawrence Ernest, Engineer, Manager for India, 

Messrs. Stdzer Brothers. 4, Lyons Range, Calcutta. 
4-3-40 X Harshe, Ramkrishna Ganbsh, b.a. (Tilak), d.lit. 

(P^itRis), Registrar, Deccan College Post-Graduate and 
Research Institute, Poona. 

4- 3-40 X Haryana, Ram Adhar, b.a., Dy. Jailor (U.P. Jails), 

District Jail, Utah, (U.P.). 

7- 8-39 X Helland, Bernhard Alvin, m.a. (Minnesota), b.d. 

(Augsburg Seminary, U.S.A.), Missionary, Principal, 
Kaerabani Boys^ Middle English and Guru Training 
School, Kaerabani, via Dumka, Santal Parganas. 

6- 8-28 X *Heron, A. M., d.sc. (Edin,), f.g.s., f.r.g.s., f.n.i., 

F.B.S.E., Late Director, Geological Sm'vey of India. Mines 
and Geology Office, Hyderabad, Deccan. 

7- 6-11 L *Hidayat Hosain, Muhammad, ^ams ’ul-‘Ulama, Khan 

Bahadur, ph.d., f.r.a.s.b. 172/26, Lower Circular Road, 
Calcutta. 

4-11-35 R Hirtzel, Michael Arthur Frederick, b.a. (Trinity 
College, Oxford), MercanUle Assistant, Macneill (h Co, 
2, Fairlie Place, Calcutta. 

1-4-25 R Hobbs, Henry, major, v.d.. Merchant. 9, Old Court 
House Street, Calcutta. 

7-3-27 A Hopkinson, Arthur John, i.c.s., Secretary to the 
Govertinient, N.-W.F, Province. Peshawar, X.-W.F.P. 
2-11-21 ' L *Hora, Sunder Lal, Rai Bahadur, d.sc., f.z.s., f.b.s.e., 
E.N.I., E.R.A.S.B. Zoological Survey of India, Indian 
Museum, Calcutta. 

6-6-23 L ’^Howard, Sm Albert, kt., c.i.e., m.a., f.r.a.s.b., Late 
Director, Institute of Plant Industry, Indore, and Late 
Agricultural Adviser to States in Central India, 14, 
Liskeard Gardens, Blackheath, London, S.E. 3. 

5- 2-40 B Huda, Syed Skamsul, Research Scholar {Anjuman 

Taraqqee Urdu, Delhi), SB, Taltolla, Entally, Calcutta. 





132 


Year-Book R.A.S.B, for 1940 « 


[VOL. VII, 


I)Si t6 oi' 
Election. 

^7-3-32 

N" 

Hughes, Abthuk, b.a. (Manchesteb), Indian Civil 

6-8-34 

N 

Service, District Magistraie. Faridpiiro. 

Husain^ Syed Ata, m.a. (Cae.), c.e. (Roobkeic)’ -HCired 
Superifhtciuliwj Engineer, Hyderabad State, 
Liiisfumpally, Hydorabad, Deccan. 

•'‘■'Hutton, jV H., c'.i.e., i.c.s., m.a., i>.so., e.b.a.s.b. 

6-6-23 

A 

1-2-11 

L 

University Museum of Arcliaeoiogy and Etlitudogy, 
Downing Street, Cambridge, England. 

Insch, James. 18, Beecliwood Avenue, Bosconibe, Hants, 
England. 

Isch-Waii, Claude, licencie-es-scienoe (mathbma- 
TiQUES EO? PHYSIQUES) Lieutenant British Army, Grand 
Hotel, Calcutta. 

Jacob, J. R., Director, Messrs, B. N. Elias tO Co,, Merchant 

2-12-40 

R 

2-5-38 

R 

1-7-40 

R 

and Landholder, Norton Buildings, Old Court House 
Corner, Calcutta. 

Jagannath, Sei, Officer, Indian State Rlys., Suite No. I2Aj, 

6-6-27 

L 

53, Ghowringhee Road, Calcutta. 

Jain, Baldeodas, Merchant and Banker, 21, Armonian 

2-2-21 

R 

Street, Calcutta. 

Jain, Chhote Lal, m.e.a.s. 174, Central Avenue, 

6-1-30 

N 

Calcutta. 

Jain, Nibmal Kumar. Devashrama, Arrah. 

6-8-28 

N 

Jaitly, P. L., Electrical Engineer, Merchant, 16, Canning 

2-12-40 1 

R 

Road, Allahabad. 

Jaian, Mohanlal, Landlord, 61, Harrison Road Calcutta, 

1-11-26 i 

N 

Jameson, Thomas Blandfoed, major, m.c., m.a. (Can- 
tab.), i.c.s., District and Sessions Judge, Dinajpur. 
Jatia, KAnai Lall. 21, Roopcband Boy Street, 

l-U-38 

R 

4-2-29 

R 

Calcutta. 

Jenkins, Walter Allen, d.sc. (Sheffield), l.e.s. 

1-11-11 

L 

United Service Club, Calcutta. 

IKamaluddin, Ahmad, Shams’ ul-‘Ulama, i.e.s., 

4-5-10 

L 

3, Nawab Abdur Rahman Street, Calcutta, 

'‘Kemp, Stanley W., b.a., d.sc., ir.E.s., F.A.w.xn 'Marine 

6-3-01 

N 

Biological Association of U,K, The Laborsitory, Ciiu.dcl 
Hill, Plymouth, England. 

'“Khan, The PIon’ble Nawab Sadr Yak, Junu, Mioifu. 

3-12-24 

li 

Habib -UL -Rahman, f.r.a.s.b., Bais, iMkanpur, 

Habibganj, District Aligarh, 

Khan, Rezaue Rahman, b.l., Depuiy IBrshhnC 

2-8-26 

H 

Bengal Legislative Council, 46, Old Ballygungo Ist j auan 
Calcutta. 

Khettry, Benimadho, Proprietor, Messrs, Qoari Hhunkrr 

2-11-25 

F 

Khettry, Landholders, Bankers and. M.m;JumLH, 1C, 
I^aggiyapatti, Barabazar, Calcutta. 

Kimnra, R. (Ko-Shi), Principal, College Department of 

5-2-34 

N 

lUssho University. Osald Machi, Tokyo, Japan. 

Kirby, Walter, b.sc., Inspector of Mines in India, 

4-11-35 

R 

Dhanbad, E.I.R. 

Klebe, Anina, nee Brandt, i>h.d. (GitEi'FBWALD. 


1 

Gbumany), Psychologist. 26, Royal Court, 5/1, RushoI! 
Street, Calcutta, 



B41] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members. 


133 


Bata of 
Election. 

B 

7-3-23 

A 

4-2-35 

B 

5»2-40 

R 

5-2-34 

R 

5-8-14 

L 


R 

4-2-35 

R 

1-7-14 

B 

7-6-26 

R 

1-641 

L 

2-8-05 

L 

11-1-93 

L 

3-3-20 

R 

2-6-38 

R 

14-11 

R 

3-2-30 

N 

6-2-24 

R 

3-7-39 

B 

2-2-16 

R 

4-6-13 

N 

4-11-29 

B 

7-9-36 

K 

6-2-18 

L 


Kramrisch, Stella (Mbs.), bh.d., Lecturer in Ancient 
Indian History {Fine Arts)^ Calcutta University. 7, 
Raja Saiitosh Road, Alipur, Calcutta. 

Labey, George Thomas, m.c., Bengal Pilot Service. 
United Service Club, Calcutta. 

Lai, Ram Bihari, m.b.b.s., d.p.h., d.t.m. & h., d.b,, i.nx,. 
Professor of Vital Statistics and Epidemiology, AlLIndia 
Institute of Hygiene and Public Health. 21, GMttaraiijaB 
Avenue, Calcutta. 

Law, Akajstta Churn, Attorney -at Law, 23, Badur Bagan 
Road, Calcutta. 

Law, Bhabani Churn, Merchant, Zemindar and Artist. 
223, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

*Law, Bimala Gharan, m,a., b.l., ph.d., p.b.hist.s., 

E. R.A.s.B. 43, Kailas Bose Street, Calcutta. 

“^Law, Narendra JSTath, m.a., b.l., ph.d., p.r,a.s^. 

96, Amlierst Street, Calcutta. 

Law , P arbutty Churn. 223, CoruwaEis Street, Calcutta, 
Law, Satya Churn, m.a., b.l., ph.d., p.n.i., p.z.s., m.b.o.u, 
50, Kailas Bose Street, Calcutta. 

Lemmon, Richard Dennis, Merchant, cjo Messrs. 

Martin & Harris, Ld., 17, Prinsep Street, Calcutta. 

Lort- Williams, The Hon’blb Mr. Justice John, kt., 
K.c., Barrister -at-Law, Judge, High Court, 221 jl. Lower 
Circular Road, Calcutta. 

*2VlcGay, David, lt.-col., i.m.s., m.d., b.ch., b.a.o., 
M.R.O.P., F.R.A.s.B. c/o The Standard Bank of S. Africa, 
Hanover, Cape Province, S, Afriba. 

'•^Maclagan, Sir Edward Douglas, k.o.s.!., k.o.i.b,, 

F. R.A.s.B. 39, Egerton Terrace, London, S.W. 3. 
Mahalanobis, P. 0., m.a., b.sc., f.n.i., i.e.s.. Professor, 

Presidency College. 210, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 
Mahtab, Maharaj Kumar A. 0., Bijay Manzil, 2, 
Judge’s Court Road, Alipur, Calcutta. 

Mabtab, Sir Bijay Chand, k.c.s.i., i.o.m., Maharaja- 
DHiRAJA Bahadur op Burdwan. 2, Judge’s Court 
Road, Alipur, Calcutta. 

Mahtab, XJday Chand, b.a., Maharaj Kumar of Burdwan. 
The Palace, Burdwan. 

MaMndra, K. C., b.a. (Cantab.). Messrs. Martin & Co., 
12, Mission Row, Calcutta. 

Majumdar, Jatindba Mohan, m.a., Deputy Dock 
Superintendent, Qalcvlta Port Commissioners. 29, School 
Row, Bhawanipore, Calcutta. 

Majumdar, Nabendea Kumar, m.a., Professor, Calcutta 
University. 3, Government Place, West, Calcutta. 
’•‘Majumdar, Ramesh Chandra, m.a., ph.d., p.b.a,s.b., 
Vice-Chancellor, Dacca University. Ramna, Dacca. 
Mallya, Bantwal Ganapathy, lt.-col., p.r.o.s.b., 

Superintendent, Campbell Medical School. Calcutta. 
Mandhata, H. C., m.a. (Allahabad), Member, Pelrmn 
Institute, formerly History Lecturer, Agra Collie. 
Ghaziabad, Meerut. 

^Mauen, Johan van, o.i.e., Officer de V Instruction 
Puhligue, f.r.a.s.b. 6, Temple Chambers, 6, Old Post 
Office Street, Calcutta. 


9 



134 Tear-Book R,A.S,B, for 1940. [¥0L, tii,,. 


Date of 
Election. 



5-6-.0i 

F 

Mann, Habold Hart, d.sc., m.sc., r.i.c., f.l.s, Woburn 
Experimental Station, Aspley G-uise, Bedfordshire, 
England. 

6-1-30 

N 

Martiiig M. F. G., Capt,, r.e. c/o The Garrison Engineer,, 
Lovalai, Baluchistan. 

4-3-40 

n 

Mazumdar, Dwijendra Bal, Indian Civil Service^ 
11 A, Mayfair, Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

2-1-28 

N 

Mello, Froilaisto de. Colonel, Director -General of Medical 
Services in Portuguese India, Professor of Parasitology^ 
Nova Goa. 

6-3-39 

R 

Meyer, Miss Sally, m.a., Professor of Botany, Victorm 
InsfAtution. 11, Sudder Street, Calcutta. 

5-11-84 

L 

^‘Middlemiss, C harles Stewart, c.i.e., f.r.s., b.a., p.a.s., 
F.B.A.s.R. Aviemore, Crowboroiigh, Sussex, England. 

1-2-26 

N 

*Mi!is, James Philip, i.c.s., m.a. (Oxon), j.p., e.n.i., 
p.R.A.s.B. Shillong, Assam. 

0-3-24 

3sr 

Mitter, The Hon’ble Sir B. L., k.c.s.i., m.a,, b.l.. 
Barrister -at-Law, Advocate-General, Federal Court, New 
Delhi. 

5-4-26 

R 

Mitter, Khagendra Nath, Rai Bahadur, m.a., Professor^ 
Presidency College (Retired), 0, Ballygunge Place, 
Calcutta. 

30-0-35 

R 

Mitter, Sudhir Chunder, Barrister -at- Law, 19, Camac 
Street, Calcutta. 

7-12-36 

R 

Mittra, S. G. 34, Shampukiir Street, Calcutta. 

1-11-26 

R 

Modi, Jal R. K., b.a. 4, Camac Street, Calcutta. 

5-3-34 

R 

Modi, Jehangir Jeevanji Jamshedji, Merchant, 5, 
Dburrumtoliah Street, Calcutta. 

5-11-24 

R 

Mookerjee, B. N., b.a. (Cantab.), Engineer, 12, Mission 
Row, Calcutta. 

2-7-24 

R 

Mookerjee, Syaiviaprasad, m.a., b.l., d.litt., Barrister - 
at-Law. 77, Asutosh Mookerjee Road, Calcutta. 

5-4-37 

N 

Mooney, H. F., i.f.s., Forest Adviser, Sambalpur, 
B.N. Pvy., Orissa. 

5-7-37 

N 

Mozumdar, Suprabhat, Master, Eajhumar College. 
Staff Chib, Raipur, G.P. 

4-12-39 

R 

Mukerjea, Jyotish Chandra, Chief Executive Officen: 
Calcutta Corporation, 28, Camac Street, Calcutta. 

6-3-39 

R 

Mnkerjee, S. G., Retired Memher of the Indian Civil 
Service, 25/1, Rowland Road, Calcutta. 

2-2-21 

N 

Mnkerjee, Subodh Chandra, Shastri, m.a., docteur- 
ES-LETTRES (Pabis), Secretary, Mayurhhanj State, 
Baripada. 

6-2-28 

R 

Mukerji, Sir Manmatha Nath, kt., m.a., b.l., Late 
Jtidge, High Court. 8/1, Harsi Street, Calcutta. 

5-7-37 

R 

Mukerji, Pannalal, Rai Bahadur, Eemindar and 
Honorary Magistrate, 7, Rajmohan Road, XJttarpara, 
Hooghly. 

6-12-27 

R 

Mukherjee, Susil Kumar, f.b.c.s. (Edin.), d.o. (Oxon), 
D.o.M.s. (Bond.), Ophthalmic Surgeon, Carmichael Medical 
College Hospitals. 1/1, Wood Street, Calcutta. 

7-11-27 

N 

Mukherjee, Devapbosanna, m.a., b.l., Zemindar. 
Biirdwan. 

2-8-26 

R 

’^Mukherjee, Jnanendra Nath, d.so. (London), f.c.s. 
(London), f.n.i,, f,r.a,s,b.. Chose Professor of Chemistry, 
University of Calcutta, 92, Upper Circular Road,, 
Calcutta. 


9B 







136 


Year-^Booh B.A£.B,for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


Date of 
Election. 

s'Xis 

L 

3-8-25 

N 

3-12-24 

R, 

4-12-39 

R 

3-11-30 

R 

7-9-36 

N 

2-1-39 

R 

2-10-39 

N 

0-8-34 

B 

1-2-26 

N 

2-7-24 

N 

7-9-21 

R 

5-1-21 ^ 

N 

5-3-90 

B 

4-12-39 

B 

5-11-28 

L 

2-4-24 

F 

5-2-34 

B 

3-12-24 

L 

2-7-28 

L 

5-6-33 

B 

6-12-26 

B 


^Prasliad, Baini, d.sc,, f.z.s., f.b.s.e., j-.k-.i., f.b.a.s.b., 
Director y Zoological Survey of India. Indian Museum, 
Calcutta. 

^PrutMj Hem Singh, m.sc. (Punjab), :ph.d. (London), 
F.N.i., F.B.A,s.B,, 1 77ipcrial Entomologist^ Imperial InstMute 
of Agricultural Mesearch, Pusa, Darbhaixga. 

Pustiongj E. S., M.D,, li.s.A., Medical PractUiomr^ L 
Ciiapel Road, Hastings, Calcutta. 

Radhakrishiianj Sib Sarvapadli, kt., m.a., p.b.a., d.mt. 
George F Professor of Philosophy ^ Calcutta University 
P„ 378, Southern Avenue, P.O. Kalighat, Caleutta. 
Raiimaii, Shah Kauimub, m.a., Lecturer in Arabic and 
Persian, Calcutta University, Carmichael Hostel, 51, 
Baitakkhana Road, Calcutta. 

Ram, Boulat, Accountant, Military Secretary's Office, 
c/o Messrs. Biru Mai Chira-iiji Lai, Chhatla Magiii Ram, 
Patiala. 

Ramachandran, T. N., m.a., Offg. Supermtmdent, 
Archaeological Sectio7i, lyidian M^iseiitn. 27, Chowringhee, 
Calcutta. 

Rangarajam, Kbishnaswami, Emploijee, l.C.I, {India) 
Ltd,, Madt'as. Rukmani Building, Mauibalam West, 
Madi'as. 

Rao, U. Shankbb, Bengal Pilot Service. 83, Chowringhee, 
Calcutta. 

Rao, y. Ramachandba, Rao Sahib, m.a., 

Locust Research Entomologist, 5, Scixidia House, New 
Delhi. 

Ray, Abinash Chandba, b.a. R.M.H.E. School, P,0. 
Baidyabati. 

Ray, Hem Chandra, m.a., ph.d. (London), d.mt. 

(London). 135B, Vivekananda Road, Calcutta. 

Ray, Jagadisnath, Maharaja, Maharaja of Dinajpore, 
Dina j pore. 

’^Ray, Sir Profuuda Chandra, ht., o.i.e., d.sc,, p.n.i., 
p.E.A.s.B. University College of Science, 92, Upper 
Circular Road, Calcutta. 

Ray-Chowdhiiry, H. C., Carmichael Professor of Ancient 
Indian History aotd Culture, Calcutta University, 
Mysore Road, Kalighat, Calcutta. 

Reinhart, Werner, Alerchant. o/o Messrs. Volkart Bros., 
Bychenberg, Winterthur, Switzerland. 

Richards, P. J., i.o.s. 1-A, Collingham Road, London., 
S.W. 5. 

Richter, Herbert, Db. Jttr., Vice-Go?%sul for Germany, 
26, Lee Road, Calcutta. 

Roerich, Geobgb Nicholas, m.a„ m.r.a.s., Orienialisk 
310, Riverside Drive, New York, XJ.S.A. (‘Urusvati^ 
Naggar, Kulu, Punjab). 

Roerich, Nicholas, Professor, Honorary President, Master 
Institute of United Arts, New York, U,S,A., Artist- 
Painter, 310, Riverside Drive, New York, U.S.A. 
Rossetti, Felix FjEtANcis Leo, b.so., b,h.. Secretary, 
Y.M,C,A, 42, Corporation Street, Calcutta. 

Roy, Sib A. R., kt,. Barrister -at-Law, AdvocateHmeral, 
Bengal, 3, Upper Wood Street, P.O. Theatre Road, 
Calcutta. 


1941] 


li 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members^ 


Date of 
El Gction 

5^40 

1 

i 

R 

5>4-37 

N 

1-12-30 

N 

6-8-24 

N 

7-5-28 

R 

5-4-37 

R 

5-2-34 

L 

3-12-24 

R 

4-2-35 

R. 

5-4-37 

R 

3-6-40 

N 

6-3-33 

R 

1 -4-25 

R 

9-12-36 

R 

1-6-36 

N 

6-12.23 

L 

5-4-37 

N 

, 5-2-40 

N 

1-4-29 

R 

5-7-11 

L 

5-4-37 

N 

2-11-25 

N 

6-5-29 

N 

5-8-35 

N 

2-5-23 

F 

6-1-09 

N 


Roy, B. 0., B.A., M.D., F.R.O.S. (EnG.)j M.B.G.P. (LON’D.)j. 

3r.s.M.F. (Bejngai.), 36, Wellington Street, Calcutta. 
Roy, David, Assam Civil Service. Siiilloiig, Assam. 

Roy, Kumab Kamalaraujan, b.a,. Zemindar, Kasliim- 
bazar Post, Dt. MursKidabad. 

Roy-Chowdhury, Bbajendea Kishore, Ze 7 nindar, (63, 
Snkea Street, Calcutta.) Gauripur, Mymensingh. 


^Saha, Meghnad, d.sc., f.b.s., f.n.i., f.r.a.s.b., Falit 
Professor of Physics, Qalciiita TJnivefsity. 92, Upper 
Circular Road, Calcutta. 

Salini, M. R., m.a. (Cantab.), d.sc. (Lond.), 
Geologist, Geological Survey of lyidia, 27, Gbowringhee,, 
Calcutta. 

Sale, Harodd Montague, m.a., f.g.s., Mancetter College, 
Athersbone, Warwickshire, England. 

Sarkar, C. K., c.e.. Engineer and Architect. 10, Hastings 
Street, Calcutta. 

Sarkar, The Hon’ble Mr. Nalini Ranjan, Hindusthan 
Buildings, Corporation Street, Calcutta. 

S attar, The H.on’ble Mb. A. R. H. A., Member, Council 
of State. 32, Ezra Street, Calcutta. 

Seal, JohnRobebt, m.b.e., c/o. Grand Hotel, Simla, H.O. 

Seal, Satis Chandra, m.a., b.i.,, Honorary Secretary, 
Indiani Research InsiUutc. 170, Maiiiktola Street,. 
Calcutta. 

Sen, Benov Chandra, m.a. ‘ Pt,upeswar’, Diamond 
Harbour Road, Behala. 

Sen, D. N. 7, Puawdon Street, Calcutta. 

Sen, J, M., M.ED. (Leeds), b.sg. (Cal.), t.d. (Lond.), 
dip.ed, (Oxford), p.b.g.s., p.n.t. Principal, Krishnagar 
College,. Krishriaffar, Nadin. 

Sen, Laxshman, H.H. Raja of Suket. Suket State ^ 
Punjab. 

Sen, .Kshitish Mohan. Principal, Visvabbarati, Santi- 
niketan, Dist. Birbhum. 

Sen, S. C., B.sc. (Caj..), b.a. (Cantab.), a.m.i.ohem.e . 
(London,), Supdt,, Cinchona OuUimtion in Bengal, 
Mungpoo, Riyand, D.H.Ry. 

Sen-Gupta, Nabes Chandra, m.a., d.l.. Advocate, Sigh 
Court. 23A, Manoharpukur Road, Calcutta. 

^Sewell, Robert Berespord Seymour, c.i.e., bc.d. 
(Cantab.), m.r.c.s., l.r.c.p., f.z.s., f.r.s., 

F.R.A.S.B., LT.-coL,, Late Director, Zoological Survey 

of India, IS, Barrow Road. Cambridge, England. 

Sharaf-Bd-Din, S-, m.a., b.l., Professor, Ghittagmig 
College. Chittagong. 

SSiarif, Mohammad, d.sc., f.b.m.s., f.l.s.. Lecturer in 
Zoology. Muslim University, Aligarh. 

Sharma, Sri Bam, m.a., m.r.a.s., m.a.o.s., Professor of 
History. D.A.V. College, Lahore. 

Shatto'ck, John Swithin Harvey, b.a. (Oxon), i.c.s. 
Political Department, New Dellii. 

Shebbeare, E. O., Chief Game Warden, Post Box No. 376, 
Kuala Lumpur, F.M.S. 

SMrre:^, Alexander Grierson, b.a,, i.c.s., Commis^ 
sioner. Gorakhpur, U.P. 


138 


Year-Book E.A.S,B. for 1940. 


[VOL» VII, 


Date of 


'Election 


4~26 

I 

1 N 

6-2-28 

L 

1 

4-11-29 

R 

■6-2-39 

i 

1 

1 N 

•5-3-13 

L 

6-3-39 

F 

1 

6-2-18 

N 

4-11-29 

A 

.5-3-34 

L 

■2-1-33 

N 

4-2-35 

A 

5-9-12 

R 

7-8-33 

N 

1-8-38 

R 

'6-6-27 

N 

4-1.26 

N 

5-7-16 

L 

5-3-24 

R 

5-8-29 

R 

3-9-34 

R 

7-3-23 

F 

28-9-04 

L 

5-4-37 

R 

2-6-20 

R 

3-3-20 

N 


! Shortts H. E., LT.'COL., Director, King's 

1 Institute, Guindy, Madras. 

1 Shumser, Jung Bahadur Bana, Sir Kaiser, k.b.e., 

I SURPRADIPTA MANT'AVARA, LIEUT. -GENERAL, NepalcSG 
\ Army, Kaiser Mahal, Kathmandu, Nepal. 

I Siddiqi, MohajMtviad Zubayr, it. a,, ph.d., Sfr Asutosh 
I Professor of Islamic Culture, Calcutta University , 6, 

1 Siihrawardy Avemie, Calcutta. 

i Simeons, Albert Theodore WTlliam, m.d. (Hbidel- 
I BERG), Physician, Kliatau Mansion, Cooperage, Bombay. 

I *Simoiiseti, John Lionel, d.sc., f.i.c., f.b.s., f.b.a.s.b. 

• University College of Noi*th Wales, Bangor, North Wales. 

! Sinclair, Gregg M., Director, Oriental histitute, Univer- 
I sity of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A. 

I Sin^li, ]\Ianyabara Badakaji Marichi Man, Panditji, 
i c.i.E. 38, Khichapokhari, Kathmandu, Nepal. 

I Sin^li, Jaipal, m.a. {Modern Greats), St. John's College, 
Oxford University, Achimota College, Accra, West 
Africa. 

Singh, His Highness The Hon’ble Maharajadhiraja 
Sir Kameswar, k.c.i.e. Darbhanga. 

Singh, Rudra Pertab, Rao Bahadur, Proprietor, 
Sonharsa Raj, Sonbarsa P.O., District Bhagalpore. ^ 
Singh, Sarabjit, m.a., b.l. P.O. Impbal, Manipur 
State. 

Singh!, Bahadur Singh. (Azimganj, Mursbidabad), 
48, Gariabat Road, Calcutta. 

Sinh, Raghubir, Rajkumar, m.a., ll.b., Heir -Apparent of 
Sitamau State. Raghubir Niwas, Sitamau, C.I. 

Sinha, B. 4, Hastings Park Street, Calcutta. 

Sinha, Sheonandan Prasad, m.d., Assistant Surgeon, 
Government Hospital, Jamshedpur. 

Sinton, J. A., o.b.e., lt.-col., i.m.s., v.o., Officer-in-Charge, 
Malaria Bureau. Central Research Institute, Kasauli. 
Sircar, Ganapati, Vidyabatna. 69, Beliaghatta Main 
Road, Calcutta. 

Sircar, Sm Nil Ratan, kt., m.d., Physician, 7,. 
Short Street, Calcutta. 

Sommerfeld, Alfred, Merchant, c/o Mouseii & Co,, 
Mercantile Buildings, Lall Bazar, Calcutta. 

Sondhi, Ved Pall, m.sc., f.g.s.. Assistant Superintendent, 
Geological Survey of India. 27, Chowringhee, Calcutta. 
Stamp, L. Dudley, b.a., d.sc. University of London, 
London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London, 
W.C. 2. 

^Stapleton, Henry Ernest, m.a., b.sc.,d.litt., f.b.a.s.b., 
Late Director of Public Instruction, Bengal. St. Brelade, 
Jersey, C.I., England. 

Sufi, M. E., B.A., D.F.H., L.R.G.P.E,, L.B.O.S.E-, L.F.P.S.G., 
Assistant Director of Public H ealth, Bengal {retd.) . 8 /A/ 1 , 

Elliott Lane, Calcutta. 

Suhrawardy, Sir Hassan, o.b.e., lt.-col., kt., m.d., 
F.R.C.S.I., D.p.H., Chief Medical Officer, E,B, By., Late Vice- 
Chancellor, Calcutta University. 3, Suhrawardy Avenue, 
Park Circus, Calcutta, 

Simdararaj, Bunguru, m.a., f.n.i., ph.d., Director of 
Fisheries. Chepauk, Madras. 



1941] 


Alphabetical- List of Ordinary Members. 


139 


Date of 1 
Election. 

7-11-32 

L 

6-4-98 

R 

7-11-27 

R 

•31-8-93 

L 

1-6-04 

L 

6-6-38 

N 

7-5-28 

F 

•5-7-26 

A 

4-1-37 

R 

7-8-33 

R 

6-3-01 

L 

■27-9-94 

L 

6-5-25 

N 

5-3-28 

N 

6-2-33 

N 

6-2-33 

! R 

1-11-26 

R 

19-9-06 

L 

6-5-29 

A 

7-9-36 

R 

>6-2-28 

F 

1-4-08 

R 


Suvama, Shumser. Jung Bahadur Rana, Major-General 
in the Nepalese Army. Singlia Darbar, Katlimandu, 
Nepal. 

Tagore, Sib Pbadyot Coomar, kt., Maharaja Bahadub. 
‘Tagore Castle’, 12, Prasanna Coomar Tagore Street, 
Calcutta. 

Tarkatirtha, Bimalananda, Kaviraj, Punditbhusan, 
Byakaranatirtha. 90/3, Grey Street, Calcutta, 

Tate, Geobge Passman. 56, Cantonment, Bareilly, XJ.P, 
^Tipper, Geobge Howeett, m.a., f.g.s., m.inst.m.m», 

E. B.A.s.B. ‘The Laurels’, Glebe Road, Cambridge, 
England. 

Tressler, G. W., m.a., Senior Professor of History and 
Political Science^ Murray College, Siallmt, Punjab. 
Tuccl, Guiseppe, ph.d.. Late Professor of Religions and 
Philosophy of India and the Far East, University of Rome ; 
Professor of Chinese, University of Naples. Naples, Italy. 
Tyson, John Dawson, c.b.e., m.a, (Oxon), i.c.s., j.f. 
c/o U.S. Club, Calcutta. 

Vedantatirtha, Nabendba Chandra, m.a. (Bagchi, 
Bhattacharja, Sankhyatirtha, Mimamsatirtha., 
Tattvaratna, Sastbi), Author and Editor of Books, 
49, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

Vedantatirttia, Vanamali, m.a., Formerly Professor, 
Cotton College, Qauhati, 8/4-E, Nepal Bhattacharya 
Lane, Kalighat, Calcutta. 

*Vogel, Jean Phelippe, mtt.d., f.b.a.s.b. Noordeind- 
splein. 4a, Lieden, Holland. 

Vost, William, lt.-col., i.m.s, ‘Woodhurst*, Manor 
Way, South Croydon, Surrey, England. 

^'Wadia^ D. N„ m.a., b.sc., f.r.g.s., f.n.i., f.r.a.s.b., 
Government Mineralogist. Torrington Square, Colombo, 
Ceylon. 

Waight, Harry George, b.a. (Oxon and Lond.), 

F. R.G.S., I.c.s. , District and Sessions Judge, Burdwan. 
Wellsted, Thomas Arthur, a.r.s.m., b.so., assoc- inst. 

M.M., Alining Engineer, Mansar, P.O. Kandri, Ramtek, 
C.P. 

West, William Dixon, m.a. (Cantab.), f.n.i., Assistant 
Superintendent, Geological Survey of India. 27, Chow- 
ringhee, Calcutta. 

Westcott, Foss, Most Reverend, d.d. (Cantab.), 
honorary D.D. (Oxon), Lord Bishop of Calcutta and 
Metropolitan of India, Burma and Ceylon, Bishop’s 
House, 51, Chowringhee, Calcutta. 

’’‘Whitehead, Richard Bertram, f.b.a,s.b., i.o.s. (bbtd.). 

30, Millington Road, Cambridge, England. 

Williams, Henry French Ftoford, m.a., Clare Col- 
lege (Cams.), Chaplain of Barrachpore, Barrackpore. 
Williams, N. T., Orr Dignam & Co. 32, Dalhousie Sqr., 
Calcutta. 

Williams, T. Taliesin, m.a., b.sc. Penrallt Fact, New- 
port, Pembrokeshire. 

Wordsworth, William Christopher, m.a., i.e.s. (betd.). 
c/o The ‘Statesman’, Chowringhee Square, Calcutta. 



140 


Tear-Book B.A.S.B. for 1940. [tol. rn, 1941| 


Date of 
Election. 

s'liTis N 


2-10-39 ! N j afar Hasan, Maitlvi, K]BLi.N Bahadub, 

I . AreJiasological Survey. Northern Circle, Agra. 


■^Yazdanis Gh'ctla^i, m.a., f.b.a.s.b., Epigmpkist to im 
Government of India for Persian and Amhic Inscriptions,^ 
Hyderabad. Archseoiogieal Survey, H^nlerabad^ Deccan.. 



ORDINARY MEMBERS. 

{GhronologicaL) 


1884, 

Nov. 

1888. 

June 

1890. 

Mar. 

5, 

6, 

5. 

Middlemiss, C. S. 

Pennell, A. P. 

Ray, Sir Prafalla 0. 

1892. 



Jan. 

11. 

Maclagan Sir Ed- ' 
ward D, 

1893. 

5 Attg. 

31. 

Tate, G. Passman 

1894. 


- 

Sept. 

27, 

Vost, W. 

1896. 

Sept. 

19, 

De, K. C. 

1896. 

Jan, 

8. 

Bum, Sir Richard 

1898. 

Jan. 

5. 

Dods, W. K. 

10 April 

6. 

Tagore, Sir Pradyot 


1901, 

Mar. 

6. Shirwani, H. 


„ Vogel, J. P. 

June 

6. Manu,H.H, 

1902, 

July 

2. Doxey, P. 

1904. 

16 June 

1, Tipper, U, H, 

Aug. 

3. Fermor, Sir L, L, 

SJ> 

„ Stapleton, H. E, 

1906. 

Aug. 

2. McCay, D, 

1906. 

Jan, 

3, Chapman, J. A. 

20 Sept. 

19. Whitehead, R. B. 


1907. 


July 

3. 

Brown, J. C. 




Christie, W. A. K. 


1908. 




Jan. 

1. 

Brahmaehari, Sir IJ. 




N. 


April 

1. 

"Wordsworth, W. C. 


1909. 




Jan. 

6. 

Shirreff, A. G. 

26 

April 

7. 

Bentley, C. A. 


July 

7. 

Bazaz, R. K. 


Oct. 

6. 

Brown, P. 


}> 


Gangoli, 0. C. 


1910. 




May 

4. 

Dhavle, S. B. 

30 

„ 


Kemp, S. W. 


Sept. 

7. 

Gravely, F. H. 


1911. 




Feb. 

1. 

Insch, J. 


99 

9i 

Law. N. N. 


Mar. 

1. 

Mahtab, Sir Bijay 




Chand 

35 

June 

7. 

Chatterjee, K. K. 


„ 

» J 

Hosain, M. H. 


July 

5. 

Sewell, R. B. S- 


Nov. 

I. 

Ahmed, K. 






May 

1. 

Harley, A. H. 

40' 

July 

3. 

Andrews, E, A. 


Sept. 

4. 

Ghosh, T. 


♦» 

- 

Singhi, B. S. 


1913. 




Mar. 

6. 

Simonsen, J. L. 

46 

April 

2. 

Calder, C. C. 


June 

4. 

Majumdar, R, C. 


Nov. 

6. 

Fox, C. S. 


1914, 




Mar. 

4. 

Bacot, J, 


July 

1. 

Law, S. 0. 


Aug. 

6. 

Law, B. 0. 

50’ 


( 141 ) 



142 


Year-Book R.AB.B. for 1940 . [voL. Tii, 


1915. 


April 

Aug, 

Oet, 

7. 

4. 

27. 

Ohtani, Count K. 
Gurner, C. W. 
Chatterjee, Sir A. C. 

1916. 

Feb. 

2. 

Majmiidar, N. K. 

55 July 

5. 

Sarkar, G. 

1917. 

April 

4, 

Awati, P. R. 


Aiyangar, K. V. R. 

Aug. 

I. 

Bhandarkar, D. R. 

ISIS. 

Feb. 

6, 

Banerji, N. N.’ 

60 „ 

j. 

Manen, Johan van 


,, 

Singh, B. M. 

April 

3. 

Prashad, B. 

1919. 

Feb. 

5. 

Yazdani, G. 

Mar. 

5. 

Gupta, S. P. 

1920. 

■m Mar. 

3. 

Mahalanobis, P. C. 

June 

99 

Sundara Raj, B, 

2. 

Suhrawardy, Sir H. 

Aug. 

4. 

Dikshit, K. N. 

Sept. 

1. 

Chakladar, H. C. 

'70 „ 

»* 

Chanda, R. P. 

Bee. 


Chatter] ee, N. C. 

»» 

Akbar Khan, Sir M. 

1921. 



Jan. 

5. 

Ray, J. N. 

Feb. 

2. 

Jain, Chhote Lall 

75 „ 


Mukherjee, R. P. 

Mar. 


Mookherjee, S. C. 

2. 

Agharkar, S. P. 

Sept. 

7. 

Ray, H. C. 

Nov. 

2. 

Hora, S. L. 

1922. 

SO Feb. 

1. 

Chopra, R, N. 

April 

6. 

Abdul Ali, A, F. M. 

1923. 

Mar. 

7. 

Labey, G. T. 

99 

5J 

Stamp, L. D. 


May 

2. 

Shebheare, E. 0. 


June 

e”. 

Howard, Sir A. 

85 

Aug. 

jj 

Hutton, J. H. 


1. 

Biswas, K. P. 


Dec. 

5. 

Chopra, B. N. 


99 


Barwell, N. F. 


99 


Sen, H. H. Lakshman SO 


1924. 


Feb. 

6. 

Mahindra, K. C. 

Mar. 

0. 

Banerjee, P. N. 

j,. 

99 

Mitter, Sir B. L. 

s> 


Sircar, Sir N. R. 

April 

99 

2. 

Bahl, K. N. 95 

99 

Ghose, K. 



Richards, F. J. 

99 


Haq, M. M. 

May 

7. 

Bhattacharya, B. 

July 

2. 

Ray, A. C. 100 

»» 

,, 

Mookerjee, S. P. 

Aug. 

6. 

Ciiatterji, S. K. 

,, 

•f 

Roy Chowdhury, B. K. 

Nov. 

,, 

Davies, L. M. 

5. 

Chattopadhyay, 

K. P. 105 

Dec. 

„ 

Mookerji, B. N. 

3. 

Newman, Ohas. F. 

,, 


Pushong, B. S. 

»> 


Basu, J. N. 

»» 


Ghose, S. C. 110 

>> 


Roerich, G. N. 


>> 

Khan, R. R, 

„ 

jj 

Sarkar, C. K. 


1925. 


Feb. 

4. 

Cuba, B. S. 


Mar. 

4. 

Benthall, Sir E. C. 

116 

99 

79 

Das, A. N, 


99 

99 

Deb, K. 


April 

L 

Perior, F. 


»5 

Hobbs, H. 


99 


Sen, B. C. 

120 

May 

6. 

Wadia, D. N. 


July 

6. 

Bose, M. M. 


Aug. 

3. 

Pruthi, H. S. 


Nov. 

2. 

Acharya, P, 



s> 

Chattopadliyaya, 

K. C, 

125 

>> 


Crookshank, H. 


,, 

J, 

Kimura, R. 




Sharif, M. 



1926. 

Jan. 4. Shortt, H. E. 

„ „ Sinton, J, A. 130 



1941] 


Chronological List of Ordinary Memhers, 


143 


Feb. 

1. 

Rao, Y. R. 



Ghuznavi, Sir A. H. 


?? 

Harris, H. G. 

Mar. 

1. 

Datta, H. N. 



Basu, N. K. 

5, 


Krarnrisch, Stella 

JJ 

J, 

Bagnall, J. F, 

April 


Ghose, B. 0. 


■ >> 

Bhatia. M. L. 

5 ? 

5 ) 

Mitter, K. N. 

June 

6, 

Lemmon, R. D. 

July 

5. 

Mukhopadhyaya, 

P. K. 


,, 

Tyson, J. D. 

Aug, 

2. 

Mukherjee, J. N. 

» J 

J J 

Khettry, B. 

Nov. 

1 . 

Jameson, T. B. 

»» 


Modi, J. R. K. 

J, 

jj 

Westcott, F. 


73 

Mills, J. P. 


53 

Galstaun, S. 



Bagchi, P. C. 

Dec. 

6 . 

Aiyangar, S. K- 

>» 

»> 

Roy, k.. K. 


1927. 




Jan. 

3, 

Chakra varty, N. 

155 


33 

Bivar, H. G. S. 


Feb. 

7. 

Chatterjee, A. 


Mar. 

7. 

Hopkinson, A. J. 




Ghosh, P. N. 


?? 

33 

Abdul Kadir, 

A, M. F. 

160 

June 

6. 

Nandi, Maharaja 

s.c. 




Jain, B. 




Sinha, S. P. 


July 

I 

Chatterjee, P. P. 




Chakravarti, 0. 

165 

Nov, 

7. 

Tarkatirtha, B. 



,, 

Mukherji, D. 


„ 


Brahmachary, S. C. 


Dec. 

5, 

Namgyal, H.H. Sir 
Tashi 




Bechhen, H.H. 

Kunzang 

170 

J? 

ft 

Chowdhury, Sir 

C. 


>y 

ft 

Mukerjee, S. K. 


1928. 

Jan. 2. Mello, F. d© 

Feb. 6. Ezra, Sir B. 

,, „ Mukerji, Sir M. N. 

175 „ ,, Williams, T. T. 

,, ,, Shumsher, Sir Kaiser 

Mar. 5. WaigM, H. G. ■ 

,, „ Gooptu, D. K. 


Mar. 

5. 

Neogi, P. 

>> 

33 

Biswas, C, C. 180 

April 

2. 

Mullick, K. C. 


33 

Chowdhury, Rai J. N. 

,, 

33 

Harris, L. E. 

May 

7. 

Chatterji, K, N. 

ti 

,, 

Chatter] ea, Sir N. R. 186 

ti 


Tiieci, G. 

tt 

„ 

Murray, E. F. 0. 

ft 

ft 

Ghosal, U. N. 

ft 


Saha, M. N. 

June 

1 

Bhadra, S. N. 190 


tf 

Bhattasali, N. K. 

July 

2. 

Roerich, N. 

Aug. 

6. 

Jaitly, P. L. 

tt 

»» 

Ghuznavi, I. S. K. 


ft 

Heron, A. M. 195 

Nov. 

5. 

Reinliart, W. 

- 

tt 

Galstaun, J. C. 

1929. 



Jan. 

7. 

Ghose, M. C. 

Feb. 

4. 

Narain, Hird© 


,, 

Jenkins, W. A. 200 

Mar. 

4, 

Be, J. C. 

tt 

»» 

Mullick, P. N. 

April 

1. 

Sen-Gupta, N. C. 

May 

6. 

Sharma, S. R. 

tt 


Williams, H. F. F. 205 

Aug. 

5. 

Sommerfeld, A. 

Nov. 

4. 

Singh, J. 

,, 

,, 

Cotter, G. de P. 

tt 

>> 

Campbell, G. R. 

tt 

,, 

Siddiqi, M. Z. 210 

„ 

,, 

Mallya, B. G. 

Bee. 

2. 

Fawcus, L. R. 


1930. 


Jan. 

6. Jain, N. K. 


„ Haidar, S. K. 

tt 

„ Martin, M. F. C- 215 

Feb. 

3. Mahtab, U. C. 


„ Chakravarti, M. N. 

Mar. 

3. Ashton, H. S. 

May 

5. Beo, Sir P, C. Bhanj 


„ Cooper, G, A. P. 220 

Nov. 

3. Austin, G. J. 

ff 

„ Rahman, S. K. 


„ Newman, C. B. 

Bee. 

L Roy, K. K. 


1931. 

Jan. 5. Chatterji, B. 225 

„ „ Evans, P. 

Feb. 2. Clough, J, 

Mar. 2. Bose, S. K. 

April 6. Bhose, J. C. 



144 


Year«>Book R.AB3. for 1940. 


[VOL. m, 


230 May 4, Bottomley, J. M. 
Jime 1. Lort-Williams, J. 


1932. 

Mar. 

235 Nov. 

Dec. 

55 

7. Hughes, A. 

5 , Chakraborty, K. B. 

Darbari, M. D. 

5 , Suvarna Shumsor 
Driver, D. 0. 

5. Butt, N. 

„ Boyle, C. A. 

1933. 

Jan. 

2. George, J, 

240 „ 

,, Diitch, R. A. 

jrj 

„ Singh, B. P. 

F©b. 

6. Wellsted, T. A. 

3i» 

,, Ghatak, J. C. 

9S 

„ West, W. D. 

245 Mar. 

6. Seal, S. C. 

June 

5. Chakravarti, S. K. 

99 

,, Rossetti, F. F. L. 

July 

3. Butt. G. S. 


7. Singh, Raghubir 

260 

„ Vedantatirtha, V. 

1934, 


Jan. 

L Alimad, M. J, 

Feb. 

5. Bhuyan, S. K. 

99 

„ Haidar, B. V. 

99 

„ Kirby, W. 

255 „ 

„ Law, B. C. 

s» 

„ Nariman, R. K. 

t% 

,, Pasrieha, C. L, 

99 

,, Percival, F. G. 

99 

,s Richter, H. 

260 „ 

„ Sale, H. M. 

Mar. 

5. Modi.J. J. J. 

99 

„ Singh. H.H. Sir K. 

May 

7. Bent, W. A. 

June 

4, Chatterji, B, R. 

265 Aug. 

6. Husain, S. A. 

99 

,, Muilick, M, L. 


,, Rao, U. S. 

Sep. 

3. Auden, J. B. 

J9 

„ Sondhi, V. P. 

270 Nov. 

5. Gee, E. R. 

99 

„ Bey, M. 

Dec. 

2. Burt, B. C. 


, , Brahmaehaii, P, N. 

99 

,, Chatterjee, S. C. 

1935. 

275 Feb, 

4. Singh, S. 

99 

„ Sarkar, N, R, 


Feb. 

4. 

Law, P. C. 

J 

99 

Lai, R. B. 

Mar. 

4, 

Grotli, E. M. 

Aug. 

5. 

Shattock, J. S. H* 

Sep. 

30. 

Butt, M. N. 

99 

99 

Mitter, S, K. 

Nov. 

4. 

Bor, N. L. 

99 


Ciiaudhiiri, S. N. 



Aniiia Klebe. 

99 

,, 

Hirtzei, M. A. F. 


1936. 



Jan. 

6. 

Brocke, A. G. 


y? 

Berkely-Hill, 0. 

Feb. 

3. 

Catto, Lord 



Ahmad, A. 

Mar, 

2. 

Chatterji, Mrs. T. 

99 

99 

Chatterjee, M. 

June 

1. 

Sen, J. M. 

Sep. 

7. 

Williams, N. T. 


99 

Ghosh, J. 



Ram, D. 



Mandhata, H. C. 



BagcM, K, N. 

Nov. 

2. 

Botlira, S. 

Deo. 

9. 

Sen, B. N. 



Mittra, S. C- 

99 


Gillespie, A. B, 

,, 


Bose, A. N. 

99 


Basu, I. B. 

- 

99 

Banerjee, S. M. 

1937. 



Jan. 

4. 

Vedantatirtha, N. 0. 

April 

5. 

Sufi, M. E. 

99 


Sharaf-ud-Bin, S. 

99 

99 

Sattar, A. H. 

99 


Sahni. M. R. 

39 

99 

Boy, D. 

it 

99 

Mooney, H. F. 

99 

99 

Sen, K, M. 

July 

6, 

Mozumdar, S. 


99 

Mukherjee, P. 

Sep. 

6. 

Halim, A. 

99 

J? 

Burniz-Podewils , 



Count 

99 

>> 

Bhattacharya, N. C« 

1938. 



Feb. 

7. 

Chaki’avarti, P. K. 

April 

4. 

Chaudhuri, Mrs. R, 


39 

Anderson, J. 

May 

2. 

Faroqui, K. G. M. 

»> 

»> 

Mahtab, Maharaj 



Kumar, A. C, 

99 

99 

Jacob, J. R, 


280 


285 




295 


300 


305 


m 


315 


320 



1941] 


Chronological List of Ordinary Members. 

145 

325 

Jtme 

6. 

Tressler, Q. W. 

Dec. 

4. 

Cameron, A. 

355 


®ss 

July 


Dudhoria, N. K. S. 

99 

99 

Badhakrislman^ S. 



4. 

Carstaii's, A, M. 

99 

$9 

Milker jea, J. 0. 



Aug. 

L 

Sinha, B. 

99 

99 

Bose, D. M, 




S'? 

Baiieijee, J, N, 





330 

Mov, 

1. 

Jatia, K. L, 






j,® 

s? 

Eeklioiit, Jhr», P. J. 

1940. 





Bee. 

5. 

Das Gupta, C. G. 

Feb. 

2. 

Sen, S. a 






99 

99 

Roy, B. C. 

360 





99 

99 

Pask, J. D. 






99 

99 

Law, A. C. 


1939 




» 

99 

Huda, S. S. 



Jan. 

2. 

Bose, S. M. 

>9 

99 

Ghatak, I. B. 




if 

Ramachandran, 

99 

99 

Fleming, A. 

365 




T. N. 

99 

99 

Basu, M. M. 


335 

Feb. 

6. 

Basu, J. N. 

1 Mar. 

4. 

Mazumdar, D, L. 



,, 

J.J 

Simeons, A. T. W. 

1 

99 


Harshe, R. G. 



99 


Chakravarti, B. M. 

99 


Haryana, R. A. 



Mare 

6. 

Culshaw, W. J, 

99 


Crawford, 0. E. J, 

370 


»» 

99 

Sinclair, G. M. 

99 

yp 

Bruce, A. E. R. 


340 

!•; 


Mukerjee, S, C, 

99 

yy 

Bell, F. 0. 



}} 

May 


Meyer, Miss S* 

99 

pp 

Foster, A. R. 



1. 

Parker, E. 

May. 

6. 

Grifaths, W. G. 



99 

n 

Ayrton, S. M. 

9» 

J? 

Bharucha, F, E. 

375 


June 

5. 

AJi, S. S. 

99 

9» 

Asadullah, K. M. 


345 

»$ 

9> 

Nag, K. 

June 

3. 

Seal, J. R. 



July 

3. 

Majumdar, J. M. 

99 

99 

Poleman, H. I. 



Aug. 

7. 

Bose, G. 

99 

99 

Be, J. 0. 



99 

99 

Heiland, B. A. 

July 

1. 

Jagannath. 

380 


Sep. 

4, 

Ghosh, J. 0. 

99 

99 

Dutt, S. 0. 


350 

Oct. 

2. 

Hasan, Z. 

99 

99 

Chatterjee, A. B. 





BasuMazoomder,W. 

Sep. 

2. 

Ghosh, P. K. 




7? 

Rangarajam, K. 

99 

99 

Ghatterji, B. G. 



£>9 

S>9 

Bastin, R. W. 

Dec. 

2. 

Edgley, N. G, A. 

385 


Deo. 

4. 

Ray Chowdbury, 

>> 

99 

Isch-Wall, a 





H. C. 

99 

99 

Jalan, M, 




LIFE MEMBERS 

{Chronological,) 


5 


10 


15 


20 


25 


5-11-84 C. S. Middleiniss 
(30 N.). 

6-6-88 - A. F. Peiinell (88 F.). 
11-1-93 Sir Edward D, 
Maclagan (94 R.). 
31-7-93 G. P. Tate (23 N.). 

27- 9-94 W. Vest (94 F.). 
19-9-95 K. C. Be (26 R.). 

6- 2-01 J.Ph. Voeel (25 ¥,). 

2- 7-03 E. Doxef (2S R.). 

1- 6-04 G. H. Tipper (27 N.)- 

3- 8-04 Sir Lewis L. Fermor 

(36 N.). 

28- 9-04 n, E. Stapleton 

(26 R.). 

2- 8-05 B. McCay (29 F.). 

3- 1-06 J. A. Chapman 

(28 N.). 

19-7-06 R. B. Whitehead 
(26 N.). 

3-7-07 J. Coggin Brown 
(28 N.h 

3- 7-07 W. A. K. Christie 

(29 N.). 

1-1-08 Sir U. N. Brahma- 
chari (27 R,). 

7- 4-09 C, A. Bentley (30 N.). 

4- 5-10 S. B. Bhavle(10N.). 

4- 5-10 S, W Kemp (29 F.). 

1 - 2-11 James Insch (28 R.)* 
7-6-11 M. Hi day at Hosain 

(27 NO- 

5- 7-11 B. B. S. Sewell 

(28 K.). 

1-11-11 Karaaliiddin Ahmad 
(24 N.). 

5-3-13 J. L. Simonsen 
(19 N".). 

5-11-13 C. S. Fox (40 N.). 

4- 3-14 J. Bacot (14 F.). 

5- 8-14 B. C. Law (33 R.). 
7-4-15 Count K. Ohtani 

(39 F.). 


5- 7-16 G. Sircar (29 N.)« 30' 

6- 2-18 Johan van Maneii 

(25 R.). 

3- 4-18 B. Prashad (29 R.). 

2- 11-21 S. L. Hora (30 N.). 

6- 6-23 Sir A. Howard 

(SON.). 

1- 8-23 Kalipada Biswas 

(36 R.). 35 

5-12-23 B. N. Chopra (40 N.). 
5-12-23 H.H.LakshmanSen 
(24 N.). 

7- 5-24 B. Bhattacharya 

(24 N.). 

6-8-24 L. M. Bavies (24 N.). 

3- 12-24 G. Roerich (28 F.), 40’ 

4- 2-25 B. S. Guha (40 N.). 

6-6-27 B. B. Jain (28 R.). 

5-12-27 SirChhajuramChow- 
dhury (27 R.). 

5-12-27 H.H. Sir Tashi 
Namgyal (27 N.). 

5- 12-27 H.H. Kunzang 

Bechhen (27 N.). 45 

6-2-28 Sir B. Ezra (28 R.). 
6-2-28 Sir Kaiser Shumsher 
Jung Bahadur 
Rana (28 N.). 

2- 7-28 N. Roerich (28 F.). 
5-11-28 W. Reinhart (28 F.). 

4- 11-29 G. do P. Cotter 

(32 N.). 50 

3- 3-30 H.S. Ashton (30 N.). 

5- 1-31 P. Evans (31 N.). 

1-6-31 J. Lort-Williams 

(40 N.). 

7-11-32 Suvarna Shiimser 
Jung Bahadur 
Rana (32 N.). 

6- 2-33 J. C. Ghatak (33 R,). 55 

6- 2-34 H. M. Sale (34 N.). 

6-3-34 H.H. Sir K. Singh 

(34 N.). 


( 146 ) 



SPECIAL ANNIVERSARY HONORARY MEMBERS. 


Date of 
Election. 

15~34 

15 - 1-34 

164-34 

15 - 1-34 


(Science.) 

Prop. Albert Einstein, c/o Princeton University^ New^ 
Jersey, U.S.A. 

M. A. Lacroix, Secretaire Perpetual, Academie des Sciences,. 
Paris, 

Sir Sydney Burrard, K.c.s.r,, f.r.s., Foxhill, Salisbury Road,. 

Farnborough, Hants, England. 

Dr. Sir Sven Hedin, Stockholm, Sweden. 


{Letters.) 


15-1-34 

15-1-34 

15-1-34 

15-1-34 

15-1-34 

15-1-34 


Sir John Marshall, kt., c/o Messrs. Grindlay & Co., Ltd.,. 
54, Parliament Street, London, 

Dr. Rabindra Nath Tagore, Santiniketan, Bolpur, Birbhiim. 
Prop. Taha Hosain, Cairo. 

Prop, Arthur Christensen, 62, Baadhusvej, Charlottenlund,. 
Denmark. 

Dr. J. Van Kan, President, Royal Society of Arts and Letters,. 
Batavia, Java. 

H.R.H. Prince Damrong Rajanubhab of Siam, Siam. 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS« 


Date of 
Election. 


1 - 2-22 


1 - 2-22 


2-12-29 

1-1-34 

6-3-39 

4-12-39 

4-3-40 


*PiEREE Johanns, Rev,, sa., b.litt. (Oxon), Professor of 
Philosophy. St. Xavier’s College, 30, Park Street, Calcutta. 

*Anantakrishna Sastri, Mahamahopadhyaya, Vbdanta- 
VISARADa, Lecturer in Samkrit, Calcutta University, 32, 
College Square, Calcutta. 

f Sarat Chandra Roy, Rai Bahadur, m.a., b,l., Editor , 

^ Man in India\ Church Road, Ranchi. 

L. Dugin, Consulate-General for Prance, 15, Stephen Court, 
18, Park Street, Calcutta. 

Rev. William Pettigrew, 54, Giinsdyke Road, Hatch End, 
Middlesex, England. 

Miss Maude Lina West Cleghorn, p.b.s. 43, 

Moulahat Road, Calcutta. 

Mbs. B. W. E. Macfablenb, c/o Burma Shell, Budge' 

Budge. 


^ Re-elected for a further period of five years on 5-4-1937 under 
Rule 2c. 

f Re-elected for a further period of five years on 6-3-1939 under 
Rule 2c. 


( 147 ) 



148 


Year-Book E.A.S.B. for 1940. 
INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS. 


[VOl. YII; 


10 


Date 01 ; 
Election, j 

28 - 1 ^ 2 ^ ; 

242-29 

4 - 5-31 

1 - 6-31 

7 - 12-31 

30 - 10-33 

30 - 4-34 

6 - 1-36 
4 - 5-36 

7 - 12-36 

4 - 1-37 

7 - 6-37 


Legatuiii Warnerianiim (Oriental Department), UniveMity of 
Leyden, Leyden, Holland. 

Adyar Library, Adyar, Madras S. 

Benares Hindu University Library, Benares. 

OMani University Library, Kyoto, Japan. 

Aimamalai University Library, Annamalainagar, Chidam- 
baram, S. India. 

Aiiahabad University Library, Ailababad. 

Bombay University Library, Bombay. 

Islamia College, Peshawar. 

Patna College, Patna. 

Forest Kesearch Jnstitnte, Dehra Dun, 

Dacca University, Dacca. 

Agra Unix^ersity, Agra. 


ORDINARY FELLOWS, 


5 


10 


15 


■20 


■25 


■30 


Date of 
Election. 

£2-10 

7 - 2-12 

5 - 2-13 

5 - 2-13 

3 - 2-15 
2 - 2-16 
2 - 2-16 

7 - 2-17 

6 - 2-18 
6 - 2-18 
5 - 2-19 
5 - 2-19 
5 - 2-19 

5 - 2-19 

2 - 2-21 

1 - 2-22 

4 - 2-25 
7 - 2-27 

6 - 2-28 
6 - 2-28 
4 - 2-28 
4 - 2-29 
4 - 2-29 
4 - 2-29 
3 - 2-30 
3 - 2-30 
3 - 2-30 
3 - 2-30 
2 - 2-31 
2 - 2-31 


Sir Prafulla Chandra Ray, kt., o.i.e., m.a., d.sc., f.n.i. 

C. S. Middlemiss, c.i.e., b.a., f.g.s., e.r.s. 

J. Ph. Uogel, PH.D., LTTT.D. 

S. W. Kemp, b.a., d.sc., p.r.s. 

G. H. Tipper, m.a., f.g.s., m.inst.m.m. 

Sir Richard Burn, kt., O.S.I., i.c.s. {retired)* 

Sir L. L. Fermor, kt,, o.b.b., a.b.s.m., d.sc., F.a.s., m.inst.m.m., 

F.B.S,, F.K.I. 

P. H. Gravely, d.sc., f.n.i. 

J, L. Simonsen, d.sc., f.i.c., f.b.s, 

D. McCay, m.d., m.b.c.p., i.m.s. 

J. Ooggin Brown, o.b.e., m.i.m.b., f.g.s. 

W. A. K. Christie, B.sc., ph.d,, m.ikst.m,m. 

D, R. Bhandarkar, m.a , ph.d, 

R. B. Seymour Sewell, m.a., so.d., m:.b.C.s., l.b.c.p., 

F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.R.S., F.N.I., I.M.S. 

Sir U. N. Brahmachari, kt., m.a., ph.d,, m.d., f.s.m.f., f.n.i. 
Ramaprasad Chanda, b.a. 

M. Hidayat Hosain, ph.d. 

Johan van Manen, c.i.b. ■’ 

H. E. Stapleton, m.a., d.litt., b.sc., i.e.s, {reiifed)* 

B. Praahad, d.so-, f.z.s., f.r.s.b., f.n.i. 

0. A. Bentley, O.I.E., m.b,, d.p.h., d.t.m. & h. 

Sir Albert Howard, kt., c.i.e., m.a. 

J. H. Hutton, O.I.B., M.A,, D.sc., i.o.s. 

Sir Edward D. Maelagan, K.O.3.I., K.a.i.E. 

G. de P. Cotter, b.a., so.d., m.inst.m.m,, f.g.s, 

S. L. Hora, d.so., f.z.s., f.b,s.e,, 

J, P, Mills, I.C.S., M.A., J.P., F.N.I. 

Meghnad Saha, d.so., f.b.s., f.n.i, 

S. Krishnaswami Aiyangar, m.a,, f.b.hist.s. 

R. H. Chopra, m.a., m.d., so.d., f.n.i., i.m.s. 



1941] 


Honorary Fellows, 


149 


Date of 
Election. 

2X31 

1-2-32 

6-2-33 

6-2-33 

6-2-33 

5- 2-34 
3-2-36 
3-2-36 
3-2-36 

15-2-37 

15-2-37 

15-2-37 

15-2-37 

6- 2-39 
6-2-39 
5-2-40 
5-2-40 
5-2-40 
5-2-40 


R. B. Whitehead, i.c.s. {retired). 

J. Bacot. 

Percy Brown, a.r.c.a. 

Ordhendra Coomar Gangoly, b.a. 

Ghnlam Yazdani, m.a. 

D. N. Wadia, m.a., b.sc., f.r.g.s., s-.n.!. 

Suniti Kumar Chatterji, m.a., d.litt- (Bond.). 

Ao M. Heron, d.sc. (Edin.), f.g.s., F,R.a.s., f.r.s.e., f.n.i. 
Habib -ur-Rahman Shirwani. 

K. N. Bahl, D.sc., d.phil., f.n.i. 

K. N. Dikshit, m.a. 

N. N. Law, M.A., B.L., FH.D. 

J. N. Muldierjee, d.sc. (Bond.), f.c.s. (Bond.)., f.N'.t. 

C. S. Fox, d.sc. (BiRM.), F.G.S. , F.N.I, 

B. s'. Guha, M.A., PH.D. (Harvard), f.m.i. 

U. N. Ghoshal, m.a., ph.d. 

B. 0. Law, M.A., B.Ii., PH.D., F.R,HIST.S. 

R. G. Majumdar, M.A., ph.d. 

H. S. Pruthi, m.sc., ph.d., f.n.i. 


35 


40 


45 


HONORARY FELLOWS. 


Date of 
Election. 

5^96 


2-3-04 


4-2-20 

4-2-20 

4-2-20 

4-2-20 

4-2-20 


4-2-20 

4-2-20 

4-2-20 

2-3-21 

7-6-22 

7-6-22 

7-1-25 

7-3-27 


Charles Rockwell Lanman. 9, Farrar Street, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, XJ.S.A. 

Sir George Abraham Grierson, k.c.i.e., o.m., ph.d., d.litt., 
LL.D., F.B.A., i.o.s. (retired), Rathfarnham, Camberley, 
Surrey, England. 

Sir Aurel Stein, k.c.i.e., ph.d., d.litt., d.sc., d.o.l., f.b.a. 
c/o Indian Institute, Oxford, England. 

A. Fotjcher, D.LITT. Boulevard Raspail 286, Paris, XVI®. 

Sir Arthur Keith, m.d., f.r.o.s., ll.d., f.r.s.a. Royal College 
of Surgeons of England. Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London, W.C. 2 . 

R. D. Oldham, f.r.s., f.g.s., f.r.g.s. 1, Broomfield Road, 
Kew, Surrey, England. 

Sir David Prain, kt., c.m.g., c.i.e., m.a., m.b„ ll.d., f.r.s.e., 
F.R.S., F.L,s., F.Z.S., LT.-COD., I.M.8., Late Superinten- 

dent, Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta, and Director, Botanical 
Survey of India, and late Director, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Surrey, England, 

Sir Joseph Larmor, kt., m.p., m.a., d.sc., ll.d., d.c.l., f.r.s., 
F.R.A.S. St. John’s College, Cambridge, England. 

Sir James Frazer, kt., d.c.l,, ll.d., litt.d. Trinity College, 
Cambridge. 

J. Takakusu, Imperial University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, 

F. W. Thomas, c.i.e., m.a., ph.d., Boden Professor of Sanskrit, 
University of Oxford. 161, Woodstock Road, Oxford, 
England. 

Sir Thomas Holland, k.c.s.i., k.c.i.e., d.so., f.r.s. Principal, 
University of Edinburgh, Blackford Brae, Edinburgh. 

Sir Leonard Rogers, kt., o.i.e,, m.d., b.s., f.r.o.p., f.r.s., 
I.M.S. 24, Cavendish Square, London, 4. 

Sten Konow, Ethnographisk Museum, Oslo, Norway. 

Rt. Hon’blb The Earl of Lytton, p.c., g.c.s,i., g.o.i.e. 
Knebworth, Herts, England. 


5 


19 


15 


10 



150 


Tear-Booh B.A.S.B for 194:0. [voL. vir, 1941] 


Date of 
Eiectioji. 

54-30 Dk. R. Robinson", d.sc., f.r.s. The Dyson Perrins Laboratory,, 
South Parks Road, Oxford, England. 

7-2-38 Rt. Hon’ble Sm John Anderson, p.c., ,o.c.b., G'.c.i.e.,, 
Lord Privy Seal* 11, Clieapstow Vilas, London, S.W. 

4-9-39 Sir S. Radhakrishnan, kt., m.a., d.litt., George V Professor 
of Philosophy, Calcutta University. P378, Southern AvormOj, 
P.O. Kalighat, Calcutta. 

4-9-39 Prof. Db. Heinrich Lttedebs, Grermany. 

20 4-9-39 The Most Hon. the Marquess of Zetland, p.c., g.c.s.i.,, 

G.C.I.E., Secretary of State for India. India Office, White 
Hail, London, S.W. 1. 

4-9-39 Sib Jadunath Sarkar, kt., c.i.e., m.l.o., m.a., d.litt. 169, 
Southern Avenue, Kalffihat, Calcutta. 


I OB 



CHANGES IN MEMBERSHIP, 


List of Members who have been absent from 
India three years and upwards.* 

*Rule 40. — After the lapse of three years from the date of a member 
leaving India, if no intimation of his wishes shall in the interval have 
been received by the Society, his name shall be removed from the List of 
Members. 

The following members will be removed from the nest Member List 
of the Society under the operation of the above rule : — 

Rai Bahadur S. K„ Bhuyan. 

P. N. Banerjee. 

G. C. Gaidar. 

H. Grookshank. 

A. H. Harlejr. 

L. E. Harris. 

Major M. F. C. Martin. 

Dr. H, Richter. 

Jaipal Singh. 

Prof. Gr. Tucci. 

T. Williams. 


Loss OF Members during 1940* 


By Retirement, 


Ordinary Members, 

1. J. C. Mitra. (1924.) 

2. E. H. Rankin. (1936.) 

3. E. S. Olpadvala. (1928.) 

4. A, L. Coxilson. (1933.) 

5. A. A. Bake. (1927.) 

6. E. C. Fhiry. (1930.) 

7. Hemra j Raj guru. (1919.) 

8. J. C. White. (1936.) 

9. J. A. Dunn. (1929.) 


By Death. 


Ordinary Members, 

1. Rai Bahadur K. L, Barua. (1931.) 

2. S. N. Wolfenden. (1937.) 

3. A. C. Vidyabhusana. (1905.) 

4. Rai Bahadur C. Misra. (1912.) 

5. SirE. D. Ross. (1901.) 

6. J. R. Asari. (1937.) 

7. J. W. A. Grieve. (1900.) 

( 151 ) 



t-H CO lO CO t- 


152 


Year-Booh R.A.S.B.for\%M). [voL. vii, 1941 ] 


Honorary Fellow. 

L Sir Joseph John Thomson. (1915.) 


Ukdee Rule 38. 

L N.M. Basu. (1928.) 

2. P. L. Gaiigoly. (1936.) 

3. B. P. Chose. (1929.) , 

4. R. P. Singhania. (1935.) 

5. Kumar S. G. Sinlia. (1928.) 

6. S. P. Mahajan. (1916.) 

7. H. K. Sen. (1924.) 


Under Rule 40. 

. G.W. Douglas, (1931.) 

. OttoEberi. (1928.) 

. R, S. Finlowa (1906.) 

. D.E.G. Kenny. (1930.) 

. H.W. Lyiie. (1926.) 

. E.L. Vance. (1927.) 

I. R. M, Statham. (1928.) 

8. G. L. Mallam. (1930.) 

9. O. G. Matthias. (1930.) 

10. S. C. Ohakravarty. (1930.) 



MEDALLISTS 


ELLIOTT GOLD MEDAL AND CASH. 

Recipients. 


1893 

1895 

1896 

1897 
1901 

1904 1 
1911 1 


1913 


1918 

1919 

1922 

1923 

1926 

1927 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 
1937 
1939 


Ohandra Kanta Basn. 

Yati Bhusana Bhaduri. 
Jnan Saran Chakravarti. 
Sarasi Lai Sarkar. 

Sarasi Lai Sarkar. 

Sarasi Lai Sarkar. 

Surendra Nath Maitra. 
Aksboy Kumar Mazumdar. 
Jitendra Nath Bakshit. 

J atindra Mohan Datta. 
Kasik Lai Datta. 
Saradakanta Ganguly. 
Nagendra Chandra Nag. 
Nilratan Dhar. 
Bibbutibbushan Dutta. 
Jnanendra Chandra Ghosh. 
Abani Bhusan Datta. 
Bhailal M. Amin. 

Bidliu Bhusan Ray. 
Kalipada Biswas. 

T. C. N. Singh, 

P, N. Das-Gupta. 

Nirmal Kumar Sen. 

D. P. Roy Ghowdhury. 
Kalipada Biswas. 

Pulin Behari Sarkar. 

P. K. Ghatterjee. 


BARCLAY MEMORIAL MEDAL. 

Recipients. 


1901 E. Ernest Gi'een. 

1903 Sir Ronald Ross, xt., k.c.b., c.i.e., k.c.m.g., m.u.c.s., f.b.c.s. 

D.F.H,, LL.D., D.80., M.D., F.R.S. 

1905 D. D. Cunningham, c.i.e., f.b.s, 

1907 A. W. Alcoek, g.i.b., m.b., IiB.d., f.r,s. 

1909 Sir David Praia, xt., g.i.e., c.m.g., m.a., m.b., ll.d., f.r.s.e. 

F.L.S., F.Z.S., M.R.I.A., F.E..S- 

1911 Carl Diener. 

1913 William Glen Liston, c.i.e., m.d., d.p.h. 

1915 J. S. Gamble, g.i.e., m.a., f.r.s. 

1917 H. H. Godwin- Austen, F.it.s., f.z.s., f.b.g.s. 

1919 N. Annandale, g.i.e., d.sc., g.m.z.s., f.l.s., f.r.s., f.a.s.b. 

1921 Sir Leonard Rogers, XT., C.I.B., m.d., b.s., f.r.c.p., f.r.g.s. 

F.R.S. 

1923 Sir Samuel Christophers, XT., g.i.e., o.b.e., f.r.s., f.a.s.b., m.b. 
LT.-COL., r.M.s. 


( 153 ) 



154 


Jear^Booh R.A.8.B. for 1940. [vol. vii, 1941 ] 


1925 Stephensoa, c,i.e., b,sc., m.b., ch,b., f.k.s., f.r.c.s., f.b.s.e., 

LT.-OOL., I.M.S. 

1927 S. W. Kemp, b.a., b.sc., f.a.s.b. 

1929 Sir Albert Howard, kt., c.i.e., m.a., f.a.s.b. 

1931 R» B. Seymour Sewell, c.i.e., m.a., sc.d. (Cantab.), m.b.c.r., 

L.R.C.P., F.Z.S., F.L.S., F.B.A.S.B., F.R.S., LT.-COB., I.M.S, 

1933 R. Row, O.B.E., D.sc. 

1935 B. Sahni, m.a., sc.d. (Cantab.), d.sc,, f.g.s., f.b.a.s.b. 

1937 R. ISr. Chopra,, c.i.e., m.a., m.d. (Cantab.), f.b.a.s.b., bt.-coe., 

I.M.S. 

1939 Major-General R. MeCarrison, kt., c.i.e., m.d., d.sc., f.b.o.p,, 
tii.D., K.H.p,, I.M.S. (Retd.). 

SIR WILLIAM JONES MEMORIAL MEDAL. 

Recipients. 

1927 Sir Malcolm Watson, kt., ll.d. (hon.), m.d., c.m., d..p.h. 

1928 Sir George A. Grierson, k.c.i.e., o.m., ph.d., d.litt., ll.d., f.b.a. 

(hon.), F.R.A.S.B., T.c.s. {retired), 

1930 Dr. Felix H, B’Herelle. 

1932 Dr, C. Snouck Hurgronje. 

1934 Rai Sir Upendra Nath Brahmachari, Bahadur, kt., m.a., m.d., 

PH.D., F.S.M.F., F.R.A.S.B, 

1937 Prof. Dr. A. J. Wensinck. 

ANNANDALE MEMORIAL MEDAL. 

Recipients. 

1927 Fritz Sarasin. 

1930 Dr. Charles Gabriel Seligman, m.d., f.r.c.p., f.e.s. 

1933 Dr. Bugdne Dubois. 

1936 Dr. John Henry Hutton, c.i.e., i.c.s. {retired)^ m.a., d.sc., f.b.a.s.b. 
1939 Prof. Frank Weidenreich. 

JOY GOBIND LAW MEMORIAL MEDAL, 

Recipients. 

1929 Max Weber. 

1932 Dr. Ernst J. O. Hartert, ph.d. 

1935 Prof. Leo Semeno witch Berg. 

1938 Dr. Baini Prashad, d.sc., f.z.s., f.r.s.e., f.r,a,s.b. 

PAUL JOHAIWES BRUHL MEMORIAL MEDAL. 

Rbcotents. 

1931 Rev. Ethelbert Blatter, s.j. 

1934 Isaac Henry Burkill, m.a. 

1938 Sir David Prain, KT., F.R.S. 


INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS MEDAL, CALCUTTA. 

Recipients. 

1935 Meghnad Saha, d.sc,, f.r.s., f.r.a.s.e. 

1938 Sir James H. Jeans, d.sc., sc.d,, ll.d., f.i.c., f.r.s. 



PROOEEBINGS OP THE ORDINARY MONTHLY 
MEETINGS, 1940 


JANUARY 

(No Meeting) 


FEBRUARY 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 5th February, 1940, 
immediately after the termination of the Annual Meeting, for 
the election of Ordinary Members and the transaction of business. 


Present 


Bt.-Col. R. N. Chopra, C.I.E., M.A., Sc.D., M.D., F.R.G.S., 
F.RA.S.B., Vice-President, in the Chair. 

Members : 


Biswas, Br. K. P. 
Bralimachari, Sir U, N. 
Brown, Mr. Percy 
Ohakravarti, Prof. C. 
Chatterji, Br. S. K. 
Chaudliiiri, Br. Roma 
Fox, Dr. 0. S. 

Ghose, Mr. S. K. 
Ohosal, Br. U. N. 
Gnha, Br. B. S. 

Haq, Prof. M. M. 
Hobbs, Major H. 


Kramrisch, Br. Stella 
Law, Br. S. C. 

Meyer, Miss S. 

Mukherjee, Br. J. N. 

Parker, Capt. E. 

Pasricha, Major G. L. 
Prashad, Dr. Baini 
Rahman, Prof. S. K. 

Ray Ghandhnry, Prof. H. C. 
Saha, Br. M. N. 

Sarkar, Sir Jadunatli 
Siddiqi, Br. M. Z. 


The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The General Secretary announced that no meeting was 
held in January, 1940, for want of a quorum. 

The General Secretary announced that the presentations of 
books, etc., received since the previous meeting, would be 
exhibited at the next Ordinary Monthly Meeting. 

The following candidates were ballotted for for election as 
Ordinary Members : — 

(1) Roy, B. a., B.A., M.B., F.R.C.S. (Eng.), M.R.C.P. (Loud.), 
F.S.M.F. (Bengal), 36, Welhngton Street, Calcutta, 

Proposer: R. N. Chopra. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 


( 155 ) 



156 Year-Book B.A.S.B. for 1940. [ vol . vii , 

(2) Basu, Mriganha MauU, Memlier of the Indian Civil Service, 

Cliinsiiraii,, Dist. Hooghly. 

Proposer: J. N, Mtjlvliorjee. 

Secoiider; Baini Prashad. 

(3) Binglh Ganda, Professor, Khalsa College, Amritsar. 

Proposer: Sri Ram Sliarma. 

Seconder: R. Sinh. 

(4) MuJcerji, Jogesh Chandra, Medical Practitioner, 22, Park Street, 
Calcutta. 

Proposer: J. N. MuMierjee. 

Seconder; Baini Prasliad. 

(5) Ghatalc, Tndii Bhushan, B.A. (Cal.), O.T.E. (Dae.), Med. (Amb.), 
Dip. Lbr. (B.L.A.), Examiner, Patna University, Lecturer, St. John 
Ambulance Association, Ex-member, Subordinate Educational Service, 
G.P., Associate, Red Cross Society, Headmaster, Raj High School, G-arh 
Banaili P.O., (Purnea). 

Proposer; B. S. Guha. 

Seconder : Sir David Ezra. 

(6) Huda, Syed Shamsul, Research Scholar (Anjuman Taraqqeo 
Urdu, Delhi), 3B, Taltolla, Entally, Calcutta. 

Proposer; M, Hidayat BCosain. 

Seconder ; M. Mahfuz-ul Haq. 

(7) Fleming, Andrew, Rand Club, Johannesburg, 

Proposer; Baini Prashad. 

Seconder; B. S. Guha. 

(8) Sen, S. O., B.Sc. (Gal.), B.A. (Cantab.), A.M.I.Chem.E. (Lond.), 
Siipdt., Cinchona Cultivation in Bengal, Mungpoo, Riyand, D.H.Ry. 

Proposer: K. Biswas. 

Seconder: J. N. Miikherjee. 

(9) Pash, John David, B.Sc., Ph.D. (Leeds), Chief Chemist, Howrah 
Mills Co., Ltd., Ramkristopur, Howrah. 

Proposer: J. N. Muldierjee. 

Seconder: Baini Prashad. 

(10) Bhatnagar, Onicar P.» B.A., Visharad, Ajmer Road, Jaipur. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder; Percy Brown. 

(11) Law, Ananta Chum, Attomey-at-Law, 23, Badur Bagan Road, 
Calcutta. 

Proposer: S. 0. Law. 

Seconder: S. P. Mookerjee. 

The General Secretary reported the following loss of 
memlbership, since the previous meeting, by death : — 

(6) Sir D. Hamilton (An Ordinary Member, 1930). 

(1) Rai Bahadur Kanak I^al Barua (An Ordinary Member, 1931). 



1941] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


157 


The General Secretary reported the following loss of 
inemhership, since the previous meeting, by resignation: — 

(14) Madan Gopal Daga (An Ordinary Member, 1936). 

(15) L. Brooke Edwards (An Ordinary Member, 1929). 

(1) J. G. Mitra (An Ordinary Member, 1924). 

The General Secretary reported that there had been no 
lapses of election, since the previous meeting, under Rule 9. 

“'""The General Secretary reported that there had been no 

withdrawals of application, since the previous meeting. 

In accordance with Rule 38, the General Secretary announced 
that the names of the follovdng Ordinary Members would be 
suspended as defaulters within the Society’s building for the 
period of one month to be removed from the Society’s registers 
for non-payment unless the amount due be paid before the 
next Ordinary Monthly Meeting : — 


N. M. Basil 

.. Rs.117 

P. L. Gangoly 

. , „ 99 

D. P. Ghosh 

. - „ 99 

B. P. Singhania 

„ 108 

Kumar S. C. Siiilia 

. . „ 93 

S. P. Mahajan 

„ 78 

H. K. Sen 

„ 108 


In accordance with Rule 2(c), the General Secretary 
announced that the Council had recommended for election the 
following lady as an Associate Member for a period of five 
3-^ears : — 

Dr. E. W. E. Macfarlaiie (Mrs.). 

The Chakman announced the result of the ballot for the 
election of the Ordinary Members and declared that all the candi- 
dates had been duly elected. 

The Chairman announced that no meeting of the Medical 
Section had yet been arranged to be held during the month. 

MARCH 

An Ordinar^^ Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 4th March, 1940, at 5-30 p.m. 

Present 

Sir Buoy Chand Mahtab, G.C.I.E., K.C.S.I., T.O.M.,* 
Maharajadhibaja Bahadur op Bubdwan, Vice-President, in- 
the Chair up to' 6 p.m. 

Sib David Ezra, Kt., F.Z.S., M.B.O.IJ., in the Chair, 
after 6 p.m. 



158 


Year^Booh R.AB.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


3ie7nhers : 

Bose, Prof, M. M. 

Brown, Mr. Percy 
Chatterjee, Mr. M. M. 
Chattopadhyay, Mr. Iv. P. 
Ciiakravarti, Prcf. C, 
Chopra, Dr. B. IST. 
Clegiiorn, Miss M, L. 
Dugin, Mr. L. S. 


Ghosal, Dr. U. N. 
Guha, Dr. B. S. 

Haq, Prof. M. M. 
Hobbs, Maj or H. 
Hosain, Dr. M. H. 
Majumdar, Mr. J. M. 
Mullick, Mr. M. L. 
Mliite, Mr. J. G. 


Visitor's : 

Brown, Mrs. Percy 
Datta, Mr. J. M. 

Datta, Mr. N'arayuna Pada 
Ezra, Lady 


Ghosh, Mrs. Leela 
Bay, Mr. N. N. 
Boonwal, Mr. M. L. 
Sen, Mr. M. 


The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The General Secretarj^ announced receipt of the following 
fort\^-two presentations of books, etc., which had been kept on 
the table for inspection: — 

(1) From IVIr. J. N. Gupta — ‘Bikrampurer Itihasa, Pt. 1’. 

(2) „ Messrs. Percy Lund Humphries & Co. — ‘Native Races of 
Asia and Eui'ope’. 

(3-9) From Archaeological Dept., Travancore — ‘Administration 
Reports from 1 107-1 113’. 

(10-13) From Maharajktmiar Raghubir Sinh — ‘Indian States and 
New Regime’, ‘Sapta Dwip’, ‘Malwa me Yugantar’, ‘Sesh Smritiyan’. 

(14) From Abdul Majid — ‘Tarikli-i-Golkoiida’. 

(15) ,, Government of Travancore — ‘Travancore Tribes and 
Castes, Vol. II’. 

(16) From Kimiar S. Deo — ‘Nandapur, Part I 

(17-20) Royal Asiat. Soe. of Bengal — ‘Manusmriti, Vol. 3’, ‘ Ain-i- 
Akbari, Eng, trans., Vol. I’, ‘Haft-Iqlim, Fasc. S’, and ‘Tabaqat-i-Akbari, 
Eng. ti*ans., Vol. 3, Pt. 2 

(21-23) From Government of Bengal — ‘ Fauna of British India, 
Nematoda, Vol. II’, ‘Ooleoptera Staphylindae, Vol. IV, Pts. I and II’, 

(24) From A. L. Srivastava, Esq. — ‘Sliuja«ud-Dowla, Vol. I’. 

(25) „ H. R. Gupta, Esq. — ‘History of the Sikhs, 1739-68’. 

(26) ,, the Calcutta University — ‘Alivardi and his Times’. 

(27) „ the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahai’s of India,, 
etc. — ‘ The Bahai World, etc.’. 

(28-29) From Royal Asiatic Society — ‘Bibliography of Moslem 
Numismatic’, ‘Marriage in early Islam’, 

(30) From Sir Aurei Stein — ‘In Memoriam: Filippo de Filippi’. 

(31-32) From Government of India — ‘Monuments of Sanchi, Vols. 

I-III 

(33) From K. A. Ramanathan, Esq., and S. M. Mukherjee, Esq.— ‘A 
Seismological Study of the Baluchistan (Quetta) Earthquake of 19:^5 

(34) From the Calcutta University — ‘Studies in the Taiitras, Pt, I 

(35) „ the Imperial Library — ‘Catalogue, Part 2’. 

(36) ,, Pt. N. G. Vedantatirtha — ‘Brahman Parichaya’. 

(37) ,, Bangiya Shitya Parisad — ‘Parisat- Parichaya’. 

(38) ,, Royal Asiat. Soe. of Bengal — ‘Descriptive Cat. of Sans. 
MSS., Vol. 8, Tantra, Pt. 1 

(39-40) From the Calcutta University — ‘Karpuraznanjari ’ and 
‘Hetutavaupadesa 

(41) From Syed Ata Husain, Esq. — ‘ Tarjiima-i-Adabii’l muridin’. 

(42) ,, Oxford University Press — ‘Song of Lovers’. 



1941] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


159 


The following candidates were ballotted for for election as 
Ordinary Members : — 

(12) Haryana, Bam Adhar, B.A., Dy. Jailor (U.IP. Jails), District 
Jail, Etah, (U.P.). 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder; M. Hidayat Hosain. 

(13) Bruce, Alexander Edwin Robert, B.A., A.G.P., M.R.S.T., M.R.A.S., 
P.R.G.S., A.R.I.P.H.H., Principal, Rathlin Hall Scliool, Darjeeling. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder: M. Hidayat Hosain. 

(14) Mazumdar, Dwijendra Lai, Indian Civil Service, 11 A, Mayfair, 
Bailygmige, Calcutta. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder: M. Hidayat Hosain, 

(15) Harshe, Bamhrishna Ganesh, B.A. (Tilak), D.Litt. (Paris), 
Registrar, Deccan College Post-Graduate and Research Institute, Poona. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder: M. Hidayat Hosain. 

(16) Bell, Frank Owen, Indian Civil Service, S.O., Dinajpur, 

Proposer; B. S. Guha. 

Seconder; M. Hidayat Hosain, 

(17) Cratvford, 0. E. J., B.A., B.Sc., Technical Staff, Imperial 
Chemical Industries (India) Ltd., 18, Strand Road, Calcutta. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder ; M. Hidayat Hosain. 

The General Secretary announced the following loss of 
menjbership, since the previous meeting, by death: — 

(2) S. N. Wolfenden (An Ordinary Member, 1937). 

The General Secretary announced the followdng loss of 
membership, since the previous meeting, by resignation : — 

(2) E. H. Rankin (An Ordinary Member, 1936). 

The General Secretary reported that there had been no 
lapses of election, since the previous meeting, under Eule 9. 

The General Secretary reported that there had been no 
withdrawals of application since the previous meeting. 

In accordance wdth Rule 38, the General Secretary aimounced 
that the names of the following Ordinary Members whose names 
had, since the last Monthly Meeting, been suspended as 
defaulters within the Society’s building had now been removed 
as defaulters from the Society’s registers for non-payment 
of dues : — 


1. N. M. Basu. 

6 . 

Kumar S. C. Siiiha. 

2. P. L. Gangoly. 

6. 

S. P. Mahajan. 

3. D. P. Ghosh. 

7. 

H. K. Sen. 

4. R. P. Singhania. 





160 Year-Book R.A,S,B. for 1940. [vol. vii. 

In accorclaiice iidtli Rules 2 and 3, the Chairnaan called for 
ballot for the election of — 

Dr. E. W. E. Maefarlane (Mrs.) 

who had been proposed for election in the last Ordinary Monthly 
Meeting as an Associate Member for a period of five years. 

In accordance with Rule 4, the General Secretary announced 
that in eonforiiiit}.^ vdth recommendations of the Special Enquiry 
Committee of 1939 the Council recommends for confirination 
the following appointments, made since the last Ordinary 
Monthly Meeting : — 

1. Additional Secretary for Philosophy — -Sir S. Radhakrishoan. 

2. Additional Secretary for History and Archaeology — Dr. Kalidas 

Nag. 

Order: Confirm. 

The General Secret amiounced the composition of various 
Standing Committees of thb Society for 1940-41 to be as 
follows : — 


Finame Committee : 

President 

General Secretary > Ex-officio. 
Treasurer J 

Dr. C. S. Fox. 

Dr. S, C. Laxv. 

Dr. S. P. Mookerjee. 

Dr. J. N. Mukherjee. 

Major C. L. Pasricha. 

Library Comrnittee : 

President 

General Secretary V Ex-officio, 
Treasurer j 

Philological 
Jt. Philological 
Physical Science 
Biological Science 
A nthrop olo gi cal 
Medical 
Philosophical 

Historical and Archaeological 
Library 


SeGrefaricN. 


Piihlication Gomniittee : 


President 1 

General Secretary > Er-offcio. 
Treasurer J 

Philological \ 

Jt. Philological 
Physical Science 
Biological 

Anthropological / 

Medical 

Philosophical 

Historical and Archaeological 
Library J 


Secretaries^ 



1941] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


161 


Bibliotheca Indica Cominittee : 

President 

General Secretary > Ex-officio. 

Treasurer j 

Dr. S. K. Ghatterji. 

Mr. M. Mahfuz-ul Haq. 

Dr. B, G. Law. 

Sir S. Radhakrishiran. 

Sir Jadunath Sarkar. 

Dr. M. Z. Siddiqi. 

The following exhibit was shown and commented upon: — 

1. Percy Brown. — A note on {a) Two old Japanese 
^How-to-Draw^ boohs, and (b) A7z old Japanese booh on repeating 
patterns for textiles such as brocades, etc. 

The two drawing books give illustrations, supplemented 
by certain written instructions, of the methods to be employed 
by the student in depicting objects from life, such as birds, 
fishes, insects, plants and trees, by means of a black outline 
applied by the brush. 

In one book all the artist’s materials and the method of 
using them are shown, as well as a number of technical details 
relating to the process of workmanship. 

The other book, which may be a little older than the former, 
probably dating from the end of the 18th century, contains a 
number of diagrams illustrating the artist’s theory that most 
subjects can be drawn by means of a geometrical formula. The 
manner in which he endeavours to prove this is depicted in a 
most graphic and convincing manner. 

The third book, of a period rather later than the others, is a 
large collection of designs reproduced in black outline evidently 
intended for the use of textile workers. 

The following communications were made : — 

1. Eileen W. E. Maceablane. — Mother and Child 
Combinations of Blood Groups and Blood Types in Calcutta. 

Bloods from 252 matching pairs of mothers and babies 
were grouped: among these 127 were homospecific and 125 
were heterospecific. There is no significant difference in 
frequency of premature births nor in weight at birth between 
these two groups. Agglutination time of agglutinin B in cord 
blood is similar to that in adults but for A it is almost twice as 
long. Only about one-third of the infants have demonstrable 
agglutinins at birth. Sub-group A 2 is found in between 2% 
and 3% only of Indians in Calcutta. One hundred matching 
pairs of mothers and babies were typed for M, MN and N. 
Among them 56 were homotypic and 44 heterotypic. No 
exceptions to the expected possible combinations of mother- 
child blood types or blood groups were found. The proportions 



162 


Jear^Book B.A.S.BJor 1940. 


[¥OL. VII, 


of the blood types were found to be of the same order as reported 
for Calcutta by previous workers, with somewhat more of MN 
and less of type M, The Calcutta Muslims examined resemble in 
their blood group proportions the up-country Khatris and not 
the riiraJ Bengali Muslims. 

2. N. P. Dittta . — A note on Solubility cmd Dissocintton 
Constant of Stearic Acid. 

Widely divergent values are found in the literature for the 
solubility of stearic acid, for example, the value obtained by 
Moore ^ is 3-5 X N at 37°, by Siedeli 3 is 1-2 x 10-^ N at 25°, 
and by McBaiii ^ is 4*1 X at 25°. It was therefore thought 

desirable to determine the solubility of the acid. The method 
emj)loyed is as follows : Large quantities of stearic acid hydrosol 
and also conductivity water saturated with stearic acid by 
shaking or by keeping at 60-65° for several hours then cooling 
to the desired temperature were uitrafiltered through X-eilad 
(finest) membranes. The filtrate was evaporated in small 
iiistahnents from a platinum bowl and weighed after drying 
in a vacuum desiccator. The values obtained varied from 
1*16 X 10 “^ N to 1*19 xlO”^ N and the mean of four separate 
determinations is 1*18 xlO'^ N at 35°±*05 C. 

Regarding the dissociation constant of stearic acid very 
little is knowm. A value of 0*8 X 10"^ has been taken by McBain 
(loc. cit.) for the same. The titration curves of colloidal stearic 
acid with NaOH resemble in some respects those of a iveak acid 
but also differ as regards others. The Henderson equation 
cannot be applied to obtain the dissociation constant of the 
acid from the titration curves. If we take colloidal stearic 
acid to behave as a weak acid obeying the law of mass action 
and assume the activity coefficient to be unity at these low 
concentrations then the following equation should hold : 
[H+] [stearate' ] = /u [H— stearate] =^. 811=8 wliere Sii is the 
concentration of the undissociated acid in equilibrium with 
the solid phase. For the pure sol [H+] = [stearate'] and [H*'-] 
can be obtained from (a) pH of the sol, (h) sp. conductivity of 
the sol to which [H+] is related by the equation (u+v) [H'l"] x 10^ 

(sp. eond. in rec. ohms). Further, in the case of the 
titration of the sol with HaOH the above equation reduces to : 
[H+] [stea^ate“■]=[H+]{[]S^a+]+[H+]^[OH']}=^^Su=:S, since 
[stearate']=:[Na+]+[H+]— [OH“] and therefore /c.Sii can be 
evaluated from definite points in the titration curves, [Na+] 
being known from the amount of alkali added to the sol and 


1 Moore f Hutchinson and Wilson : Biochem. Jour., 1909, 12, 347. 

2 Siedeli : Bull. No. 67, Hygienic Laboratory. U.S. Public Healtli 
Service. 

3 McBain : Proc. Boy. Soc., A, Vol. 125, 1929. 



1941] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetnigs. 


163 


[H+] and [0H“] from the pH of the sol at that point. The 
results obtained by different methods are given below : 


fc.SiiX 10-12 


i 

Sol. 

(«) pH 
of sol. 

{b) Sp, j 
cond. 

(o) Points in the titration curves . 

4 

h ' 

s 

j: 

Final 

inflexion. 

A, 

17-30 

21-00 

19-00 

20-20 

! 

26-10 

25-70 

B 

19-05 

25-90 

26-00 

24-70 



C 

29-89 

24-90 



19-60 

i 18-40 

i 


It is interesting to note that the values obtained by different 
methods are of the same order and do not differ much from one 
another considering the experimental difficulties. Now the 
values from the pH of the sol are expected to be in larger error. 
The values obtained from | and final neutralization points of 
NaOH titration curves are liable to some error because the 
slopes of the curves at these points are considerable. The 
values obtained from sp. conductivity data and from half 
neutralization point are less liable to error. The mean of the 
above values is 21 x Now if we divide the mean value 

of /iJ.Sii by the mean value of solubiiit 3 ^ of stearic acid the 
dissociation constant of stearic acid becomes 1-77 X 

3. Chintaharan Chakra varti. — Study of manuscripts. 

Owing to the lateness of the hour the communication bj^ 
Prof. Chakravarti was held over until the next meeting. 

The Chairman announced the result of the baUot for the 
election of Ordinar 3 ^ Members and an Associate Member and 
declared that all the candidates had been duly elected . 

The Chahinaii announced that the following General 
Lectures, illustrated with lantern shdes, would be delivered in 
the rooms of the Societj^ : — 

1. Dr. C. S. Fox. — Progress of Mineral Development in 

India, on 18th March, 1940, at 6-30 p.m, 

2. Bt.-Col. R. N. Chopra. — The Use of Hemp Drugs m 

India, on 29th March, 1940, at 6-30 p.m. 



164 


Year-Book E.A.S,B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


APRIL 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 1st April, 1940, at 5-30 p.m. 


Present 

Bahsti Pbashad, Esq., D.Sc., E.Z.S., F.R.S.E., 
F.R.A.S.B., Hony, Treasurer, in the Chaii'. 

Members : 

Chaki'avarti, Prof. C. 

Chatterjee, Mr. P. P. 

Clegliora, Miss M. L. C 
Dugin, Mr. L. S. 

Guiia, Dr. B. S. 

Haq, Prof. M. M. 

Visitors : 

Datta, Mr, J. M. Eiiversaid, Mine. 

Enversaid, Dr. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 
The General Secretary announced receipt of the following 
nine presentations of books, etc., which had been placed on 
the table for inspection 

( 1 ) From Government of India — ‘ Specimens of Arabic and Persian 
Palaeography 

(2-4) From Madras University — ‘Diwan-i-Azfari ‘Tuzak-i-walajahi, 
Pt. 1 % and ‘Diwar-i-Bider’. 

(5) From Government of Bengal — ‘Press List of Ancient Docu- 
ments, etc.’. 

(6) From Madi’as University — ‘Sources of History of the Nawabs of 
Carnatic II ®. 

(7) From Sir Arthur Du Cros — ^‘Wheels of Fortmie’. 

(8) „ Archaelogical Survey of India — ‘Memoirs, NTo. 59’. 

(9) ,, Royal Society of London — ‘Year Book, 1940’. 

The General Secretary announced the receipt of 172 foreign 
coins presented by the Master of His Majesty’s Mint, Calcutta. 

The General Secretary announced that no application for 
Ordinary Membership had been received since the previous 
meeting. 

The General Secretary announced that there had been no 
loss of membership, since the previous meeting, by death. 

The Chairman called upon Dr. B. S. Guha to read an obituary 
notice of Rai Bahadur Kanak Lai Barua (see p. 190), 

The General Secretary announced that there had been no 
loss of membership, since the previous meeting, by resignation. 

The General Secretary reported that there had been no 
lapses of election, since the previous meeting, under Rule 9. 


Hobbs, Major H. 
Hora, Dr. S. L. 
Hosain, Dr. M. H. 
Macfarlane, Dr. M. H. 
Mukherjee, Mr. S. C. 
and others. 



1941] 


Ordifiary Monthly Meetings. 


165 


Til© General Secretary reported that there had been no 
withdrawals of application since the previous meeting. 

The following papers were read: — 

1. Jatikbba Mohan Datta. — Bagh-Ohal at Kamahhya. 

Ill March 1939 the author visited Kamakhya, 5 miles to 
the west of Gauhati in Assam. There are two stone-flagged 
slopes to the Temple on the top of the hills — the ©astern one 
much broader, and the western one steep. Down the western 
descent there is a stone -wall and a few yards outside this wall, 
on the stone-flagging he found the diagram of the above game 
chiselled. Two local Nepali boys were playing the game of Bagh- 
Chal, with two tigers and twenty pieces for goats. The usual rule 
of capture by jumping over the piece to the next vacant point 
in a straight line is followed. Sedentary games were popular 
in the time of Emperor Akbar. 

2. Jatindra Mohan Datta. — Ghallis-Ghuttia and its 
degenerate variants. 

In this paper, the author observed the following game 
described as Challis-Ghuttia (the gam© of forty pieces) being 
played by men in the streets of Calcutta near Ultadanga, 
They all hailed from Jaunpur in the United Provinces ; and they 
told him that this game is also played in their home district. 
The description of the game is given. A similar game Ratti- 
chitti-Bakri (Red- White Goats) was described by the late 
Prof. Hem Chandra Das Gupta in ' Sedentary Games prevalent 
in the Punjab’. 

3. Data Shankar Sarbahi. — The Alimentary Canal of 
Labeo rohita (Hamilton). 

The author gives a detailed account of the morphology and 
histology of the alimentary canal of Rohu, Laheo rohita (Hamil- 
ton), under the following headings : the mouth, the buccal cavity, 
the pharynx, the oesophagus, the intestinal bulb, the intestine 
and the rectum. The glands of the alimentary canal, the liver 
and the pancreas, are also similarly treated. The morphology 
and histology of the ductless glands, such as the spleen, the 
thyroid and the thymus, are given. At the end there is a 
comprehensive list of literature dealing with the subject. 

The following exhibit was shown and commented upon : — 

1, B. S. Ghha . — Three Tibetan Manuscripts. 

(1) This is the biography of the Great Tibetan Yoga Mila- 
raspa who was born in 1038 A.D. He was the Guru of the 
Kargyudpa Sect of Lamaism. He was a black magician and 
had the power to fly in the air. He had shown many miraculous 



166 


Year-Book B.A.S.B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


powers and works to the people of Upper Tibet. His birth- 
place was Kyaiigatsa near Kirong. He practised Yoga medita- 
tions amid the snowy fastnesses of the Himalaya mountains near 
ISiepal. He has eight higher disciples. The picture on the first 
page is the first disciple named Haschiingpa. On the second page 
there are two pictures : one is Shiwa Wod Repa, the other Ngan 
Bzongrepa. Milaiaspa was a practical mastei of higher Tantras 
of the Mahayaiia Buddhism. 

There are seven branches of Kai^gyudpa monasteries in 
Tibet. 

This is a very famous and favourite book of Tibet. It is 
a,clmired the literary and learned classes as well as the common 
people* 

This manuscript was written eight hundred years ago. In 
Tibet ail the Lamas of different Sects and ail Tibetan scholars 
hold it in high esteem. 

(2) This is a Lamas’ religious prayer book. When the 
Lamas perform this ceremony they must read the book together 
and at the same time they have to make the mystic signs with 
their hands and fingers. When making votive offerings or 
casting speUs the mystical language of this book must be used. 
It was WTitten by Lama Gedungyatso palzangpo in the horse 
year at the north of Lohita river side. 

(3) This is the explanation for the three Great Lamas of the 
yellow sect Gelugpa : (i) Tsongkhapa who founded the great 
monastery Garden and his follower (ii) Jamyang gyatso who 
founded the great monastery hBras Spung, and (iii) Eyams ohen 
choje who founded the Sera monastery Tsoughpa, established 
big prayer meetings celebrated at Lhasa every year and founded 
many monasteries in Tibet. In many Buddhist books prophesies 
about them were TOitten; how they would be an incarnation of 
Buddha, wLen and at what places they W'^oiild be bom, and by 
what names they would be called. All these have been proved 
true and all the three Great Lamas’ life-stories are written in a 
brief manner by Lama Lab zang ye She at Kali dam pho brang. 

The following communication was made : — 

1. CniNTAHAEAijf Chakbavabti. — Study of manuscripts » 

Many-sided importance , of a careful study of old manu- 
scripts. ^ History of the collection, preservation and study of 
manuscripts in Sanskrit and different vernaculars of India. 
Reference to the large stocks of manuscripts still lying uncared 
for and unoatalogued in many parts of the country exposed 
to the mercy of the white ants and the ravages of the climate 
not at aU favourable for the preservation of manuscripts. Im- 
perative necessity of the preparation and publication of scientific 
catalogues and systematic and scholarly analysis of the contents 
of manuscripts which being more fragile than monuments of 

IIB 



1941] 


Ordhuiry Monthly Meetings. 


167 


stone and other materials are fast disappearing with the vast 
store of much useful information contained in them. Difficulties 
in the way — ^paucity of funds, lack of requisite encouragement 
and proper appreciation, dearth of persevering and painstaking 
workers. Hence the defects commonly met with especially in 
Indian catalogues : superficial descriptions, wrong or incomplete 
titles, imperfect indication of subject-matters, reproduction in 
a stereotyped fashion of portions from the beginning and the 
endj etc. Ideals of a good catalogue: proper indication of the 
subject-matter, identification of the correct titles, reference to 
the peculiarities, if any, in the case of works already published 
or described in manuscript catalogues. Suggestion for the 
addition of a new wing of the Archseological Department called 
the Manuscript Department for giving impetus to and directions 
for a systematic study of manuscripts and for the introduction 
of a Manuscfi'ptia Indica of the type of the EpigmpMa Indica 
for the publication of thorough analysis of important manu- 
scripts pointing to their importance and usefulness. 

The Chairman announced that the following General 
Lecture would be delivered on Tuesday, the 2nd April, 1940, 
at 6-30 P.M. : — 

Pv. Kodanda Rao. — Eastern and Western Civilization — A 
Denial of Contrast. 




MAY 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 6th May, 1940, at 5-30 p.m. 


Preseist 


Prop. M. Mahfuz-ijl Haq, M. A. , Joint Philological Secretary, 
in the Chaii\ 


Members : 

Anderson, Mr. J. 
Ayrton* Mr. S. M. 
Ohakravarti, Prof. C. 
Cliatterjee, Mr. P. P. 
Cleghorn, Miss M. L. 


Guha, Dr. B. S. 
Hosain, Dr. M. H, 
Majumdar, Mr. J. M. 
Pasricha, Major G. L. 
Rahman, Prof. S. K. 


Visitors : 

Cleghorn, Miss O. 0. 
Datta, Mr. J. M. 
Dhar, Mr. G. 


Khosla, Mr. R. N. 

Roy Ghowdhtiry, Prof. M. L. 
Singh, Mr. B. H. 

Singh, Mr. B. P. 


The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 



168 


Year-Book M^A.S.BJor 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


Tie General Secretary reported receipt of the foUowing 
fifteen presentations of books, etc., which had been kept on the 
table for mspection 

(1) From Syed Moiid. Badruddin Ailavi, Esq. — ' Arabian Poetry and 
Poets 

(2) From the Punjab Government — ‘Sirmur State Gazetteer ^ 

(3) s, Tata, Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Bombay — ^Perin Memorial 
Lectures 

(4) From KungL Bibiioteket, Stockholm — ^‘Accessions Katalog No. 53 
of 1938 h 

(5-6) From Madras Government — ‘Guide to the Archaeological 
Galleries ’ and ‘Illustrations of Indian Sculptures 

(7-8) From Kungl. Svenska Vetenskapsacademien, Stockholm— 
‘ Johan Carl Wileke, experimental-fysiker ’ and ‘ Pehr Wilhelm Wangentim 

(9) From H.E.H. The Nizam’s Government — ‘Ajanta, Texts, Pts. 
I-II and Plates, Pts. I-II*. 

(10-11) From Visva-Bharati — ^‘Monograph of Modem Calligraphy’ and 
‘ Grammar of the Braj-Bhakha’. 

(12-14:) From Visva-Bharati — ^‘Gatuhsataka of Axya deva’, ‘Trisva- 
bhavanirdesa’ and ‘Brahman sutras’. 

(15) From Government Oriental MSS. Library® Madras — ‘Descriptive 
Catalogue of Government MSS., Vol. 28 Supplement 

The following candidates were ballotted for for ©lection as 
Ordinary Members: — 

(20) Srinivasan, K, i?., M.A., Curator, State Museum, Pudukkottai, 
South India. 

Proposer: R. C. Majiimdar. 

Seconder; B. S. Gulia. 

(21) Venhataraman, K. R., B.A., L.T., Lecturer, Maharaja’s College — 
now Editor, State Manual and History, Maharaja’s College, Pudukkottai, 
South India. 

Proposer; R. C. Majiimdar. 

Seconder: B. S. Gulia. 

(22) Bharucha, Farrokh E,, Merchant, Canada Building, Hornby 
Road, Bombay. 

Proposer : Baini Prashad. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 

(23) Chabrabarli, Biswesivar, Teacher of History, Dogachi, Dacca, 

Proposer: N. K. Bhattasali. 

Seconder: B. S. Gulia. 

(24) Griffiths^ Walter Geraldson, B.Se. (Calif,), B.D, (Drew), 

(New York), Ph.D. (Drew), Missionary, 13 , Wellington Sqr„ Calcutta. 

Proposer: B. S. Gulia. 

Seconder: Baini Prashad. 

(25) Ahhar, Mohammad Gholam, M.A., Lecturer in Persian, P.G. 
Dept., Calcutta University, Carmichael Hostel, 51, Baitakkhana Boad!i 
Calcutta. 

Proposer: M. Z. Siddiqi. 

Seconder: S. K. Rahman. 



1941 ] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


169 ' 


(26) Osman, Mohd., M.A., Lecturer in Arabic and Persian, Calcutta 
University, 7, Rajmohan Street, Calcutta. 

Proposer: M. Z. Siddiqi. 

Seconder: S. K. Rahman, 

(27) Asadullah, Khalifa Mohammad, Khan Bahadur, General Central 
Service Class I, Librarian, Imperial Library, 6, Esplanade East, Calcutta. 

Proposer: M. Z, Siddiqi, 

Seconder; B. S. Guha. 

The General Secretary announced the following loss of 
membership, since the previous meeting, by death: — 

1. Prof. Amulya Gharan Vidvabhusana (An Ordinary Member, 
1905). 

2. Rai Bahadur Champa Ram Misra (An Ordinary Member, 1912). 

3. Prof. A. J. Wensinck (Recipient of Sir William Jones Medal, 1937) . 

The General Secretary amiounced the following loss of 
membership, since the previous meeting, by resignation: — 

1. E. S. Olpadvala (An Ordinary Member, 1928). 

The General Secretary announced that there had been no 
lapses of election, since the previous meeting, under Rule 9. 

The General Secretary announced that there had been no 
^withdrawals of application since the previous meeting. 

The following paper was read: — 

1. B. C. SmoAR. — Digvijaya of King Chandra of the 
Meharauli Pillar Inscription. 

An attempt has been made in this paper to prove that 
the digvijaya of King Chandra referred to in the Meharauli 
Pillar Inscription was performed by Chandra Gupta Maurya. 
Bescriptions of digvijayins. 

Conclusion: King Chandra has been identified as Chandra- 
gupta II of the Imperial Gupta dynasty. 

The following exhibit was shown and commented upon: — 

1 . Chintaharan Chakravabti. — Manuscripts in the 
Society's Collections of Sanskrit Works of Maharaj Tismrmth 
Simha of Rewa. 

Visvanath Simha (19th Century) is well known as a great 
patron of learning. But little is known about books written 
by him. The Society is in possession of manuscripts of three 
Sanskrit works (all on the cult of Rama) attributed to him : — 

(ft) Ramacandrahnika — a Kavya work dealing with the 
story of Rama. 

{h) Mantrarthanirnaya — a Tantric work which seeks to 
demonstrate the supremacy of the worship and mantra of Rama 
and gives an esoteric meaning of the latter. 



170 


Tear-Booh E.A.S.B.for 1940 . 


[VOIi. VII, 


(c) RacUiavallablin'amataprakasabhasya — a coiiimeiita'.ry 
on the Veddnta-sfdra that elucidatcKS the views of the Radiia- 
vallabhiya S chool . 

The following coimnuni cation was made:-™ 

1. M. Hidayat Hosain. — Ettropemi PJiyskmm and 
Surgeons in the Ilogfitil Court. 

When European physicians and surgeons visited India 
during the Moghul Rule, thej" were consulted in urgent cases 
and they were often offered State-appointments. The first 
European phj^sician at the Court of Delhi was a Frenchman, 
M. Bernard by name. He became a great favourite of the 
Emperor Jahangir (1605-1627 a.d.) and was appointed to the 
post of Coux't Physician and enjoyed the honour of being invited 
to the Royal Table. Other Court Physicians duiing the Moghul 
Rule were: — ^Manonchi; Francis Bernier; Pitre de Lan; Gabriel 
Boiighton; William Hamilton; and so on. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for the 
election of Ordinary Members and declared that all the 
candidates had been duly elected. 


JUNE 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 3rd June, 1940, at 5-30 p.m. 


PkESE]S"T 

The Hon'ble Me. Justice Jom-^ Lokt-Williams, Kt., 
K.C., President, in the Chair. 


Members : 


Anderson, Mr. J. 
Bose, Prof. M. M. 
Ghakravarti, Prof. C, 
Ohatterji, Prof. B. R. 
Cliatterji, Br. S. K. 


Bugin, Mr. L. S. 
Guha, Br. B. S. 

Haq, Prof. M. M. 
Majumdar, Mr. J. AI. 
Prashad, Br. B. 


The minutes of the last meeting wnre read and confirmed. 

In accordance with Rule 48(d), the General Secretary 
reported for confirmation by the meeting the following terins 
adopted by the Council, since the last Ordinary Monthly 
Meeting: — 

(i) A bonus of Rs. 1,000 was paid to the retiring Assistant 
Secretary IVlr. J. R, Seal, in recognition of his 
valuable services to the Society; 



1941] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 



(ii) Mr. Jatis Chandra Be, M.A., B.L. (Cal), M.A. (Lond.), 
was appointed as Assistant Secretary to the 
Society with effect from 1st June, 1940, on proba- 
tion for one year, on a -salary of Rs.200 per month 
to be confiimed subsequently on a grade of Rs.200“— 
20—500. 

Order: Confirm. 

The General Secretary announced the receipt of the following 
eighteen presentations of books, etc., which were placed on the 
table for inspection : — 

(1) From the Parsee Paiichayet — ‘Yasra’. 

(2) ,, the Director of Public Instruction, Poona — ‘Nirukta of 
Yaska Vol. I 

(3) From Mr. B. G. Singh — ‘Karikavali 

(4 ) , , the P arsee Paiichayet — ‘ Nondha Ane Y ukteyini ’ . 

(5) ,, the Madras University — ‘Osadhikasam’, 

(6) ,, Mr. B. Wilson Haigh — ‘Coal carbonization, etc, 

(7) ,, B. and O. Research Society — ‘Bhagalpur Report’. 

(8) „ Mr. O. G. Gangoly — ‘Relation between India and Indo- 
nesian Culture’. 

(9) From the Travancore University — ‘Proc. and Transac. of the 9th 
All-India Oriental Conference ’, Trivandrum. 

(10-15) From the Parsee Panchayet — ‘Writings of G. K. Nariman’, 
* Identification and description of some old sites in Sind ‘Settlements in 
the lower Indus Basin’, ‘ Rubaiyat-i-Baha Tahir, etc.’, ‘Religion of the 
Zarathushtra,’ and ‘Studies in Indo-Muslim History’. 

(16) From Prince of Wales’ Museum, Bombay — ‘Report for 1938-39’. 

(17) „ Mr. M. W. Chiplonkar — ‘Distribution of temperature in 
the lower stratosphere ’. 

(18) From the Director, Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine — 
‘The Library Catalogue, Calcutta Section of Tropical Medicines’. 

The following candidates were ballotted for for election as 
Ordinary Members : — 

(28) Poleman, Horace Irvin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Indie 
Studies, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., U.S.A, 

Proposer: B. S. Gulia. 

Seconder: M. Hidayat Hosain. 

(29) Seal, John Eobert, Accountant, Asst. Secretary, R. A.S.B. , 

1, Park Street, Calcutta. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder; M. Hidayat Hosain. 

(30) De, Jatis Chandra, M.A., B.L. (CaL), (Lond.), Colonial 

Educational Service, 11, Ray Street, Elgin Road P.O., Calcutta. 

Proposer: B. S. Gulia. 

Seconder: M. Hidayat Hosain. 

The General Secretary reported that an application for 
Institutional membership had been received from — 

The Nepal Museum, Kathmandu, Nepal 

which had been accepted by Council. 



.172 


Year^Book B.AB.B, for 1940. 


[VOL. VII, 


The General Secretarj^ announced that there had been no 
loss of mejnbershipj since the previous meetings by death. 

The Chairman called upon Prof. Chintaharan Chaki*avarti 
to read an obituary notice on the late Prof, Amiilya Cliaraii 
Vidyabhusaiia (see page 191). 

The Chairman called upon Prof. Chintaharan Chakravarti 
to read an obituary notice on the late Mi*. N. N. Vasii (see 
page 192). 

Til© General Secretary announced that (a) there had been 
no loss of membership since the previous meeting by resignation ; 
(5) there had been no lapses of election since the previous meeting 
under Rule 9; and (c) there had been no withdrawals of applica- 
tion since the previous meeting. 

The following papers were read : — 

1. Jatiitdba Mohan Datta, — Sedentary Games — Proposed 
Nomenclature^ of its Points. 

The author finds fault with the usual method adopted in the 
description of various sedentary games by diagrams with indica- 
tions on them. He suggests a new^ method which is fully 
described. 

2. W. J. Ctjlshaw. — Some Notes on Bongaism. 

Among the Santals there is no evidence to show that they 
either now or in the past have held beliefs which would justify 
us in maintaining that the word ‘ bonga ’ can mean an impersonal 
and all-pervading power. Pantheistic notions among present- 
day Santals are a late accretion due to Hindu influence, and are 
in no waj^ reflected in their customary practices and beliefs. 
It w'ould seem that we must look elsewhere than in their 
‘Bongaism’ for traces of a conception analogous to ‘Mana’. 

The following communications were made: — 

1. M. Hidavat Hosain. — A note on the Ruins of Ma.spdhur 
and Amadi. 

The material for this note was collected by the author (luring 
a short visit paid by him to this part of the province some) 
time ago. It gives an account of twelve Moslem Saints who, 
500 years back, lived in Khulna and Jessore, and built, beautiful 
mosques at several places. The chief of this saintly ojxler was 
Ulugh ^an Jahan; a staunch wazTior-saint who flourished during 
the reign of ISTasir-ud-Dm Mahmud Shah, an independent king 
of Bengal (1442-1459 A.D. ). The famous mosque of Satligumbaz 
at Bagerhat had been built by him. According to the epitaph 
on his tomb, he died at Bagerhat on the 26th Uhi’l Hijja, 
863 A.H., the 23rd October, 1459 A.D. 



1941] 


Ordhmry Monthly Meetings. 


173 


2, Jatis Chandea De. — Pearls and the East India 
Company {1600 to 1661). 

Ever since the date of 'Grevii’s’ report — a document 
connected with the genesis of the Company — ^the East India 
Traders had become interested in pearls. Later on^ it was felt 
that without the bestowal of presents it was impossible to 
develop commercial relationship with the East. 'Presents 
must be given, else there would be noe livinge among these 
people/ because if the men in power 'were pleased, the crie of a 
million of subjects would not be heard’. Therefore among 
various presents of the period which included 'spitting potts’, 
dusty mastives’ and 'young lions from Turkey.’ good pearls came 
to occupy a prominent place. Pearls were of various kinds 
ranging from the 'seed’ ones to those which were of extra- 
ordinary size. 'Pearles (were) esteemed rather by their greatness 
than then bewty.’ Pearls were however not only important 
as presents, hut were also considered to be px'ofitable merchandise. 
Bickley’s fleet brought a pearl which was sold for 5,000 rupees, 
the transaction apparently resulting in a profit of 33% on the 
original outlay. 'Those not overbought (would) yeald proffitt 
and readye monye to the valew of 10,000 L. Sterling for one 
yeare, provided they (were) perfect and oriental!.’ 

Again their utility as securities to borrow money on is also 
emphasized by the documents, though sometimes the Company 
was cheated in 'pawnes of pearles’. They came from Indo- 
Ceylonese and Persian waters as well from elsewhere, and were 
obtained chiefly by purchase, privateering and smuggling. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for election 
of the Ordinary Members and declared that all the candidates 
had been duty elected. 


JULY 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 1st July, 1940, at 6-30 p.m. 


Peeseet 

Majob Hexey Hobbs, V.D., Ordinary Member, in the 
Chair. 


Members : 

Anderson, Mr. J. 
Bose, Prof. M. M. 
Cleghom, Miss M. L. 
Be, Mr. J. C. 


Ghatak, Prof. J. C. 
Griffiths, Dr. W. G. 
Guha, Br. B. S, 
Raliman, Prof. S. K. 



174 


Year-Book R.A.S,B.for 1940. 


[VOL. ¥11, 


Visitors : 

Bose, Mi\ Sxidhir Kumar. Guiia, Mrs. Uma. 

Majumdar, Mr. D. N. 

Tlie iiiiniites of tlie last meeting were read and coiifiriEod. 

Tlie General Secretary reported receipt of the following: 
eighteen presentations of books, etc., which had been placed, 
on the table for inspection: — 

(1) From the C.'onsul- General for France — ‘Documents Diplornatiqiies 
Francais, Ser. 1, Tom 9’. 

(2-9) From Archaeological Survey, Frontier Circle, Lahore — -‘Annual 
Progress Beports for years 1905 to 1910, 1913 and 1920 7 

(10-11) From Prof. N. Boerich — ‘Beprints of articles contributed 
by Roerich to several periodicals’, ‘ Nicholas Roerich’. 

(12) From Mysore Geological Department — ‘Areliaeoii Complex of 
Mysore 

(13) From Dr. B. R. Ohatterji — ‘Recent advances in Kambuja 
Studies’. 

(14-17) From Govermnent of India — ‘Proc. Indian Historical 
Records Commission, Vols. 4, 5, 6’ and‘Vol. 10’. 

(18) From Pandit Bisweswarnath Ran — ‘Marwar ka Itihas, Vol. 17 

The following candidates were ballotted for for election as 
Ordinary Members: — 

(31) fSH Jagannath, Officer, Indian State Rlys., Suite No. 12A, 53, 
Chowringhee Road, Calcutta. 

Proposer : J. C. De. 

Seconder ; B. S. Guha. 

(32) Dutt, Sudhir Ghunder^ Capt., M.B., A.I.R.O,, Ophthalmic 
Surgeon, Mayo Hospital, 214, Lower Circular Road, Calcutta. 

Proposer ; J, C. De. 

Seconder : B. S. Guha, 

(33) ChatterjeGf A. R., M.A., General Manager, Metropolitan Print- 
ing & Publishing House Ld., 4-B, Council House Street, Calcutta.. 

Proposer; J. C. De. 

Seconder : M. Hidayat Hosain. 

(34) Ghosh, Eatneswar, Merchant and Manufacturer, 12/2, Circuhir 
Garden Reach Road, Kidderpore, Calcutta. 

Proposer; J. C. De. 

Seconder ; B. S. Gulia. 

(35) Bag, SuJmmar, Professor of History, H. G. College, Munsliigaiij, 
Dacca. 

Proposer ; J. C. De, 

Seconder; M. Hidayat Hosain. 

The General Secretary announced that {a) there had Ijeeii 
no loss of membership since the previous meeting either hy 
death or by resignation; (b) there had been no lapses of elect ion 



1941] , Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 175 

since tlie previous meeting under Eule 9 ; and (c) tliere had been 
no vtithdrawals of application since the previous meeting. 

In accordance with Eule 48(a), the General Secretaiy 
announced that the Council, since the last Ordinary Meeting, 
had passed the following emendation of certain Eegiilations 
regarding the Election of Fellows: — 

The following Eegulations, after amendment, would read 
as: — ■ 

1. The General Secretary of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 
for the time being shall be ex-officio Secretary and Convener to the body 
of Fellows and serve as the channel of communication between that 
body and the Council of the Society. In his capacity as General Secretary 
he shall attend, and act as Secretary to, the meetings of Fellows prescribed 
in the Regulations, but shall not participate in discussions or vote unless 
he he a Fellow. 

At any meeting of the Fellows the Senior Fellow present shall take 
the Chair. 

2. There shall be a meeting of Fellows in Jiuie, before the issue of 
blank nomination papers, one week’s notice of which shall be given to 
the Resident Fellows. At this meeting such recommendations or matters 
of concern to the Fellows, of which previous notice has been received by 
the General Secretary, shall generally be considered. 

6. Each candidate shall be nominated by at least two Fellows, one 
at least of whom shall certify that he is personally acquainted with the 
scientific or literary work, as the case may be, of the candidate he proposes 
and is in a position from his personal knowledge to express an opinion 
on its value, and shall set out in detail the qualifications of the candidate, 
including detailed references to his most important published original 
papers, stating date and place of publications, and in ease of publication 
in a serial, the name and the volume number of the latter. 

The tenure of any Office on the Council of the Society shall not be 
considered a qualification. 

Each candidate shall also be supported by at least two other Fellows. 

8. There shall be a meeting of Fellows within the fortnight preceding 
the 7th of October, one week’s notice of which shall be given to the Resident 
Fellows. At this meeting matters of concern to the Fellows of which 
pre^uous notice has been received by the General Secretary, shall generally 
be considered and the nomination papers so returned shall be scrutinized, 
and the General Secretary shall be requested to issue the voting papers 
as provided in Regulation 10. 

10. A list of the persons duly nominated, and supported, with their 
qualifications, shall be compiled from the nomination papers by the 
General Secretary, printed as a voting paper, and sent out to each Fellow 
not later than the 1st of l^ovember. The number of vacancies shall be 
stated on the voting paper. 

13. There shall be a meeting of Fellows in the second week in 
January, one week’s notice of which shall be given to the Resident Fellows. 
At this meeting the sealed envelopes mentioned in Regulation 12 shall be 
opened, and the voting papers counted as the Chairman directs, and the 
names of such candidates as receive at least three -fourths of the votes 
of the Fellows voting shall be placed before the meeting. The meeting 
shall also be competent generally to consider matters of concern to the 
Fellows of which previous notice had been given. 

14. In the event of a tie for any of the vacancies, the Fellows present 
at the meeting shall decide by ballot which of the candidates receiving 
the same number of votes shall be selected for recommendation to the 
Goimeil for election. 



176 


Year-Book R,A.8,B. for 1940. 


[VOL. VII,, 


The following papers 'were read; — 

L B. N. I^Iajumdar. — Same Aspects of the Culhiral Life 
of ike Mhasas of cis-Himalayan Region. 

The EJiasas of Jaiinsar Baww are a polyandroiis people. 
Jaiiiisar Ba^var is included in the Chakrata sub -division 'Of 
the Behra Bun district in the United Provinces. To the north 
and east of Jaiinsar Bawar lie the state of Tehri, to the east 
Jiibal and 8irmur states, and to the south the Dun valle}^. The 
whole of this area is rugged and full of precipitous mountains^ 
with little level gi^ouiid. There is ample evidence of the phjT-sical 
similarity of the Khasas vdth the Kasmiris, and the Khasa family 
law resembles the Punjab customary law particularly that of 
the Kangra hills. The Khasas have occupied these hills perhaps 
long before the Christian era and references to them are found 
in the Brhat Samhita, the Vi§nu and Vayu Pm*anas, Hari 
Vamsa and the Mahabharata. The3^ represent most probably 
the easternmost outpost of Indo-Aryan penetration in the ois- 
Himalayan region,. The social organization in Jaunsar Bawar 
is characterized by a dual organization of economic classes, 
viz. the zemindars and the artisans. The latter are mostly 
recruited from the aboriginal substratum perhaps of 'AustricJ 
speaking stock. At the lowest scale of the economic ladder 
lies the domestic drudge, called Kolta, who is the hereditary 
hewer of wood and drawer of water. Then come the other 
artisan classes, such as bajgirs (musicians), oads (carpenters), 
lohars, ehamars, barbers and others. The Kajputs and 
Brahmins form as it were, a top dressing on the aboriginal base. 
Eeligious life of the Khasas is a curious blend of Hindu and tribal 
beliefs and practices and though they own allegiance to Hindu 
divinities their partiality to ancestral spirits, queer and fantastic 
demons and gods, stones, weapons and various s^mibols, is rather 
phenomenal. The Khasas are a patriarchal people living in a 
Joint family under the aiithoritj^ of the eldest brother. The 
potyanclrj’’ of the Khasas is also of the fraternal type as several 
brothers share one wife with a conventional code of rights and 
obligations, Pln^siological fatherhood may not be recognized 
by the Khasas but the}^ appear to have developed a functional 
fatherhood in which the kinship term for father is qualified by 
the role or function of the group of fathers in domestic economy. 
There is a disparitj^ in the distribution of the sexes and the 
fexi-ility of women has considerably fallen in recent years; the 
proportion of the male childi‘en is greatly in excess "of females 
and the attitude of the Elhasas towards this problem has been 
carefully analyzed. The functional analysis of the group morals 
and customs connected mth polyandry leads to the irresistible 
conclusion that the cis-Himalayan region is characterized by an 
impact of tw^o distinct matrices, one matriarchal represented 
by the Boin as or the aboriginal substratum and the other patri- 



1941] 


Ordhmry Monthly Meetings. 


177 


archai represented by the Khasas. It is true that the peculiar 
economic conditions of the hill people and the biological factor of 
sex disparity where it exists, have no doubt largely determined 
the form and functions of the traits-complex, but had it not 
been for the matriarchal matrix, the polyandry of the Himalayan 
region w’ould not have assumed the importance it possesses. 

2. J. C, De. — The Indian Theatre of Anglo^Dutck Competi- 
tion (1600-1652). 

India was only one of the many regions in which Anglo- 
Diiteh rivalry became manifest. At Surat efforts of the 
Dutch to establish a factory were stoutly opposed, and Roe 
referred to their ‘ iiisuffrable insolencies h Communications of 
other Englishmen also throw light on this point. Then came 
the Amboyna tragedy and English factors in India became 
deeply agitated. 'No energetic retaliatory measui-es were, how- 
ever, adopted and on one occasion the then king of England 
released three Dutch vessels which he had impulsively seized 
(probably) on pa3nnent of £30,000. The Portuguese menace, 
however, in spite of all heartburnings drew the two European 
nations together, and Anglo-Dutch navies fought the common 
foe on several occasions. No permanent co-ordination of 
interests, how^ever, follo'wed, and over a scheme of fortifying 
Bomba^:^, for example, the allies fell out. English trade at 
Masulipatam ‘ lieth there also on bleeding ’ . Spices and specie 
of which they had abundant supplies enabled the Dutch to take 
the lead. But the Dutch progress terrified the Portuguese who 
were gradually thrown into the arms of the English. The Dutch, 
however, 'went on pursuing theii* policy of commercial monopoly 
vigorous^, and not even the Royal Flag of England could 
protect a vessel against Dutch privateering. To all the various 
causes of conflict in the East were added those in the West and 
war was formaUj^ declared in 1652. 

3, Nanimabhab CHAinDHTJBi. — 'Cult of the Old Lady\ 

An investigation into folk cults prevalent in Bengal and for 
the matter of that in different parts of India I'eveals how the 
Hindu and the tribal religions have behaved towards each other. 
It has been a policy of give and take. Hindu deities have been 
tri'balized and there are many instances of orthodox members 
of the Hindu pantheon losing their position and even caste 
gradually as their worship spread among the tribes ; while many 
tribal deities have been Hinduized and sometimes Brahminized 
and accepted as forms of some or other of the great deities. 
The paper deals with the cult of such a tribal deity prevailing 
in parts of North Bengal. This cult of the Burl or the Old Lady 
combines with the worship proper a Jai or festival which contains 
two important features, namely, dancing with dressed up 



178 


Year-Book B.AB.B, for 1940. 


[VOL. VII^ 


bamboo poles, and dancing with lighted torches tied to the ends 
of h'oii rods passed through the tongues, arms, ];>aliiis, etc,, of the 
votaries. An analysis of the cult shows how a tribal clan 
deit}^ who continues to be offered worship in the original form 
has come to be Brahminized as Vrddhesvarl, affiliated to the 
Bevi and worshipped in the Erahminical form and to incorporate 
into it in course of time rites borrowed from the old Ciiaitra 
festivals and important elements of an old fertility cult. 

4. A. iliYAPPAN. — Siva-Seal of IIohenjo-Daro. 

The figure in yogic pose on a low stool, with its arms 
outstretched and hands placed on the knees and with the head 
adorned by a pair of horns, which is found engraved on several 
seals excavated from Mohenjo-Daro, has been tentatively 
identified by Sh John Marshall with that of Siva-Pa^upati, taking 
into consideration the attributes of Siva, such as, the trident-like 
head-dress, the yogm pose, the erect memhrum virile and the 
numerous animals associated with him. Dr. Saletore has 
objected to this identification on the grounds that : (1) the Siva- 
iinga cult is of post-Mahabharata date, (2) the Mohenjo-Baro 
figui’C is two-eyed or possibly three-eyed, while ^iva is three- 
eyed, (3} Siva’s trident is in his hands and not on the head, and 
(4) the horns of the tiideiit-like head-dress are not the speciality 
of a pre- Aryan deity, because the Vedic God, Agni, also has 
horns. He has therefore identified it with Agni. 

In this article, the author has made an attempt to prove 
that the figure on the seals is ffiearer Siva than Agni or even 
Rudrab His view is supported by a study of Proto “iieolithic 
cultures and by ethnological, archaeological and sculptural 
evidences. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for the 
election of the Ordinary Members and declared that all the 
candidates had been duly elected. 


AUGUST 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 5th August, 1940, at 5-30 p.M'. 

Present 

Br. S. K. Chatterji, M.A., B.Lit., F.R.A.S.B., Philological 
Secretary, in the Chair. 



1941] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetmgs. 


179 


Members : 

Anderson, Mr, J. 
BageM, Mr, K. N. 
Biswas, Dr. K. 
Gliakravarti, Prof. G. 
Gleghom, Miss M. L. G. 
Be, Mr. J. G. 

Gliatak, Prof. J. C. 
Glioslial, Dr. U. N. 
Ghiizuavi, Mr. I. S. K. 


Griffiths, Dr. W. G. 
Gidia, Dr. B. S. 

Haq, Prof. M. 
HoblDs, Major H. 
Hosain, Dr. M. H. 
Majumdar, Mr. J. 
Prashad, Dr. Baini 
Rahman, Prof. S. K. 
Rossetti, Mr, P. F. 


Visitors : 

Ahmed, Mr. S. Judd, Rev. H. P. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and conjfirined. 

The General Secretary announced receipt of the following 
twelve presentations of books, etc., which had been placed on 
the table for inspection: — 

(i) From the Trustees of the Gibb Memorial — ‘Kew Series publication 
No, XIV k 

(2-3) From Mr. F. Wolf — ‘Glossar zu Firdosis Shahnama’ and 
' Supplement to the Glossar zu firdosis Shahnama ’. 

(4) From Dept, of History and Antiquarian, Assam — ‘Account of 
Assam k 

(5) From University of Pennsylvania — ‘Sanskrit Iiidecliuables, etc.k 

(6) ,, Govt. Oriental Library, Mysore — ‘Advaita siddlii, etc., 

Vol. 3 k 

(7) From University of Madras — ‘ Slokavartika- Vyakhya-Tatparya k 
(S-12) From Madras Government — ‘Descriptive Catalogue of Kaiia- 

rese MSS. k ‘Descriptive Catal. of Tamil MSS.k Vol. 5 k ‘Descriptive 
Catal. of Telegu MSS., Vol. 7k ‘Triennial Gatal. of MSS., Vol. 11’, and 
‘Descriptive Catal. of Kauada MSS.k 


The following candidates were ballotted for for election 
as Ordinary Membeirs : — 

(36) Hiischin, Br. Mahdi, Lecturer in History and Politics, Agra 
College, Agra. 

Proposer : J. G. De. 

Seconder : M. Hidayat Hosain. 

(37) KammgOf Nityanand, Ex-Minister, Orissa, Bakrabad, Cuttack. 

Proposer: J. C. De. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 

(38) Chatter jee Sastri^ Kshitish Chandm, M.A., Lecturer, Calcutta 
University; 81, Shambazar Street, Calcutta. 

Proposer: J. C. De. 

Seconder; B. S. Guha. 

The General Secretary announced the following loss of 
membership since the previous meeting by resignation: — 

(4) A. L. Coulson (An Ordinary Member, 1933). 

(5) A. A. Bake (An Ordinary Member, 1927). 



ISO Yeaf~Booh R,A,8.B. for 1940, [vol. yii, 

The General Secretary announced the following lapses of 
election since the previous meeting under Rule 9:~~ 

(1) Jogesh Ch. Mukerji (Elected on 5-2-40), 

(2) Syamakaiita Diitt (Elected on 4-3-40). 

The General Secretary announced that there had been no 
withdrawals of application since the previous meeting. 

The follow'ing papers were read : — 

1 . R. Rakshpal. — Post-Embryonic Development of the 
Respiratory System of Bialeurodes eugeniae MasheU (Honiptera, 
Aleurodidae) together with prelimdnary Observaiions regarding 
the Mechanism of Respiration in the different Instars. 

Introduction. Development of the respiratory system of 
Dialeiirodes eugeniae Maskell: — Spiracles; the tracheae ami 
tracheoles; general conclusions regarding the tracheal system; 
development of the breathing-folds ; functions of the breathing- 
folds ; mechanism of respiration. Development of the resphatory 
system of Alenrodes Bp. Material and technique. Acknowledge- 
ments. References. 

2. N. K. Bhattasali.- — An Inquiry into the Origin of the 
City of Dacca. 

This paper reveals the strange fact that the city of Dacca 
had no ceremonial foundation but grew up of itself. *No one 
cam© here with the intention of founding a city^ and none set 
about busity to do so. This sounds somewhat mystifying’. 
The author attempts Ho clear up the mystery’. 

3. E. 0. Mxjkeay. — Ancient Workers of Western Dhalhhum, 

In this paper the author, Mr. E. 0. Murray, a Mining 
Engineer, gives an interesting account of the Copper Mine 
worMiig of the ancient people of the western Dlialbhiim per- 
ganah, in the district of Singhhhum, in Bihar. Remains of the 
ancient copper workers are numerous in the shape of (countless 
working dumps and slag heaps testifying to their industry^ Slag 
heaps and the remains of old clay furnaces lie all around and 
testify to a considerable output of copper at these points. Thi,^ 
process of smelting was more or less the same as at present day, 
air being supplied by foot -worked leather bellows to clay furnaces 
about three feet high. 

Plenty of Palaeolithic and Neolithic implements in the shape 
of bouchers, celts, flat stone axes, ringed hammer-stones, cores 
and flakes have been found round about the places of Banabassa, 
Bonidi and Kundrukocha. Monolithic monuments and burial 
urns of clay and in some cases with bones and skulls have also 
been found from some of the places. 



1941] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


1,81 


Amongst tlie other interesting finds the following haA’e been 
foimcl : — 

( 1 ) Broken pieces of pottery of c^dindrical shape. 

(2) A considerable quantity of beads of devitrified glass 

of various shapes and sizes, of polished stone, of 
blue, green and yellow glass, of agate, jasper, topaz 
and carnelian resembling curiously enough to 
Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa and to some of the 
cnmmon forms of Neolithic beads in both Europe 
and Asia found from an area which extended to 
more than 3 miles. 

(3) Terra-cotta beads of brick -red colour of various 

shapes and sizes. All the beads either of stone, 
glass and terra-cotta have holes which have been 
drilled for threading. 

(4) One bead of white glass overlaid with beaten gold 

stuck to it b}" lac. 

(5) Some shrine-like structures with panel decorations 

and carvings in the interior of the buildings. 

(6) Some punch-marked coins bearing resemblance to 

those of the Kiishan period. 

The following communications were made : — 

1. M. Hid AY AT Hosain. — A note on a very rare and 
richly ornamented Manuscript called Chingiz Nama. 

After the description of the MS. which contains altogether 
112 paintings of delicate and highly finished style, Dr. Hosain 
described some of the most interesting photos which have 
been taken from the original MSS. preserved in the Bankipore 
Library. Among these photos there is one which shows the 
birth of the Emperor Akbar in the castle of Amarkot — ^the 
mother (Hamida Banu Begam) dressed in green robe is lying 
exhausted on a couch and the baby Akbar is seen in the arms 
of a nurse vdth a high Tartar cap. There is a general rejoicing 
in the harem and the women are seen in exultation over the 
bhth. In the lower part of the illustration there is a picture 
of Tardi Beg Khan bringing the news to Emperor Humayun 
who was encamped about 15 kos from Amarkot. It is a, very 
striking picture of the birth of Akbar. 

Baini Pbashad . — Buildings of Humayun, 

It was resolved on a motion from tbe Chair that both the 
communications be published in extenso in the Journal. 

The Chauman announced the result of the balot for the 
election of the Ordinary Members and declared that aU the 
candidates had been duly elected. 



182 


Year-Book E.A.8.B. for 1940. 

NOVEMBER 


[yol, mi . 


An Ordinary Moiithh' Meeting ot the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 4th November, 1940, at 
5-30 p.M. 

Peesekt 


Br, Mscihnad Saha, D.Sg., F.K.8., P.N.I., E.R.A.S.B., 
Natural History (Physical Science) Secretary, in the Chair. 


Members : 

Anderson, Mr. J. 

Bose, Mr. M. M. 

Brown, Mr. Percy 
Bruce, Mr, A. E. K. 
Gleghorii, ]\liss M,. L, C. 


De, Mr. J. C. 
Gliose, Mr. P. K. 
Hobbs, Major H. 
Hora, Dr. iS. L. 
Prasliad, Dr. J iaiisi 


Visitors : 

Giegl'iorn, Afiss O, Ewing, Mr. G. 

IsdiAVali, Mr. C. 


The minutes of the last meeting were read and, confirmed. 

The General Secretary reported receipt of the following 
seventy-two presentations of books, etc., which had been 
placed on the table for inspection : — 

(1-2) From Dr. B. C. Law — ‘Buddhist Conception, of Spirits', and 
‘Mal'iaivira, His Life and Teachings'. 

(3) Prom Govt, of Bengal — ‘Diptera, Vol. \1\ 

(4) ,, Dr. B. C. Law- — ‘D. R. Bhaudarkar Voiuined 

(5) ,, University of Southern California — ‘Morphology id’ the 
Tibetan Langimge 

(6) From University Press, Boiiiljay — 'Shah Alidul Latif (tf BiiiU. 

(7-27) From Ohhotelal Jain, Esq. — ‘ Times’ Histoiy of tlio lYar .ir* 

21 Vols. ’ 

(28-33) From Dr. B. C. Law — ‘Minor Antliologiis of Ihxli (.';viiojr, 
‘Ancient Indian Tribes, Vol, 2’, ‘Geographical Essays, A’ol. 1 ‘HistoricaJ 
Gleanings’, ‘Some Ivshatriya Tribes of Ancient India’, ‘Lil'e arul Work of 
Buddhagliosa’. 

(34-38) From 'Vijaya Dharma Siiri — ‘Wliat the Historians s;qv about 
the Sarahs’, ‘Dis(?o'ui‘ses’, ‘Heritage of the last Arhat’, ‘Kalokio scope <if 
Indian Wisdom’, ‘Interpretation of Jain Ethics’. 

(39) From Sir J, G. Frazer — ‘Lectures <tti, the Early History 
Kingship 

(40) From Indian Science Congress Association — ‘Proceedings, 
Session’, Lahore. 

(41) From Galciitta University — ‘Some Makers cl’ English Law’. 

(42) ,, Seth Jugal Kishore Birla — ‘Hindu America’. 

(43-44) From Govt, of India — ‘Hakluyt Society, 2nd series, Ixxxiii, 
Vols, 1 and 2’. 

(45-46) From Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal — ‘Doctrine o!‘ 
Nimbax'ka’, Vol. 1 and ‘Dictionary of the Liishai Language 

(47) From Elizabeth Sharpe — ‘Thakore Sahib Shri Sir Daiilat Siiieli 
of Limbdi’. 

(48) From the Archaeological Survey of India^ — ‘C’atalogue of pre- 
historic Antiquities in the Indian Museum 

I2B 



1941] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings'. 


183 


(49) From P. Baldaeus — 'A true and exact description of tli© most 
celebrated East India coasts of Malabar and Coromandel’. 

(50) From Archaeological Survey of India — ' Bombay -Ivamatak 
I ascription/ , 

(51 -5d) From the Trustees, British Museum — ‘Fossil Orthoptera, etc,’ 

(53) From Govt. Central Press, Bombay — ‘Selections from CJ. W, 
Malet’s Letter-Book, 1780-84’. 

(54) From Madras Government — ‘A triennial Catalogue MSS. of Ctovt, 
Oriental MSS. Library, Vrd. 7, part 2’. 

(55) From Dr. B. C. Law — ‘Gautam Buddha/ 

(56) ,, Bhandai'kar Oriental Research Institute — ‘ Maiiabiiarata 
fasc, 10 

(57-58) From Dr. B. C. Law — ^‘Buddlia Ramajii’, ‘Lichliabi Jati’. 

(59) From Madras Govt. — ‘Author Index of Sanskrit ]\ISS. in Govt. 
Oriental MSS. Library/ 

(60-72) From Vijaya Dharma Suri — ‘Subhasita Padma ratiiakara, 
vols. 2-5’, ‘Arbud Prachiu Jaina Lekhamandoha’, Maina Sapta-padarthi’, 
"Balabodliini-parikamita’, ‘'Himensu Vijaya-Jina-Lekha’, SSuriswar Aiiey 
Samrat “Praeliiii Bharatavarsa Num Siiiliabloehana’, hSaiiskrit-Praclim- 
stabaii-Sandoiiae, Hemehandra vacananuba’ and ‘Abu’. 

Tlie following candidates were elected Ordinary Members 
by the Conneil. during the recess months, under Rule 7 : — 

(39) Ghosh. Pmshcma Kumar, Visiting Physician, Camiiehad Medical 
College Hospital, Belgachki, Calcutta, P.7/1, Ohittaraiijan A^^eime, 
P.0, Beadon Street, Calcutta. 

Proposer: J. C. De. 

Seconder: B. S. Giiha. 

(40) Judd, The RfAd. Fleur j/ Pomeroy, Olerk-in-Holy Orders, (St. Janies’ 

Cliiirch), 165, Lower Circular Road, Calcutta. G 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder: J. C. De. 

(41) Chafierji, Bankim Chandra, M.Sc., (Gold Medalist), Member of 
the Calcutta i\'Iathematical Society, Research Scholar, Calcutta University, 
P. 23B, Nepal Bhattacharya 1st Lane, Kalighat, Calcutta. 

Pro})oser: J. G. De. 

Seconder: B. 8. Guha. 

(42) Ma.yley, Thomas Theodore Steiger, I.C.S., F.R.A.I., B.A. (Cantab, 
and Oxom), Assistant Commissioner, Shillong, Assam. 

Proposer: J. P, Mills. 

Seconder: B. S. Giilia. 

(43) Mukerji, Nirod Prosad, M.Sc. (Gal.), Pli.D. (Loud.), Research 
Fellow, Teachers’ Training Dept., Calcutta University, 1/6, Fern Road, 
Bally gimge , Galcut ta^ . 

Proposer: J'. C. De. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 

(44) HaUhvUah, A. B. M., M.A. (Gal.), Ph.B. (Bond.), Dip. Lib. 
(Lond.), Lectiu-er Islamic History & Culture, Calcutta University, 4, 
Hyat Khan Lane, Calcutta. 

Proposer : M. Hidayat Khan. 

Seconder: J. C. De. 



I S4 Yechf^Booh M,A B.B. for 1940. [voL. vii, 

The General Secretary reported the folloTidng loss of 
memberships since the previous meeting by death. 

L Sir E. Deriison Ross (Ordinary Member, 1901 ; Oi'diiiary Fellow, 
1910). 

2. J. R. Asari (Ordinary Member, 1937). 

Members staiicling passed resolution of eondoienee. 

The General Secretary announced that since the previous 
meeting : {a) there had been no loss of membership by resignation 
(6) there had been no lapses of election under Rule 9; and 
({5) there had been no mthdrawals of application. 

The following papers were read : — 

1. B. S. CtOGATE. — On Trematodes Collected in Pilihhit 
{North India), 

This paper is a description of a number of species of 
Trematodes Parasites collected in the Pilibhit district of the 
United ProTiiices. 


2. M. E. Gordon and D. H. Gordon. — Survivals of the 
Indus Valley. 

The authors indicate several suiwivals of the Harappa and 
Jhiikar Cultures of the Indus VaUe^-" over to the early Historic 
Period from the beginning of the Gupta’s, i.e., 322 B.O. to C. 
500 A.D. At the same time they put forward their views, based 
on objects discovered from the area, in reference to the apparent 
cultural hiatus of approximately two thousand years. 

3. S. L. Hoka and J. K. Rddba. — -On Catfish 'Spines 
embedded in the Mesentery of Ophicephalus punctatus Bloch. 

The presence of pectoral spines of Mystm gtiUo (Hamilton) 
in the mesentery of Ophicephalus punctatus Bloch is recorded, 
and attention is dii’octed to the earlier records of foreign bodies 
embedded in the tissues of fishes. An explanation as to how the 
spines became lodged in the mesentery is given, and referenct) 
is made to certain relevant features in the ecology and bionomics 
of the two species concerned. 

4. Sir Aurbl Stein. — Notes on the Life and Labours of 
Captain Anthony Troyer. 

Captain Anthony Troyer after several years’ distinguished 
service in the Indian Army and as Secretary to the Government 
Sanskrit College, Calcutta, retired to Paris in 1835. In 1840 
he published a i¥ench translation and the Sanslait text of the 
first six cantos of the Chronicle of Kalhana’s Majatarangim* 



1941] 


Ordi-Tiary Ilonthly Meeting's, 


185 


Twelve years later lie completed the work by translating the 
remaining two cantos. In this communication, the author 
gives an account of the life and labours of this interesting 
personality who continued to pursue his scholarly labours till 
1865 when he died at the age of 90 years. He was described by 
the distinguished French orientologist Mohl as a man wholly 
indifferent to fame and content to satisfy his interest in study for 
its own sake. Troyer also completed an English translation of 
Dahistan or School of Manners from an incomplete manuscript 
left by David Shea : this was published on behalf of the Oriental 
Translation Committee in 1845. The account of the life and 
work of Captain Troyer communicated to the Society is based 
on an obituary notice by Mohl and on enquiries carried out by 
Col. Phillimore. 

5. C. P. S. Menon. — The Magic Cahras a.nrl Rectilinmr 
Orbits in Ancient Astronomy. 

From his detailed studies the author concludes that the 
ancient astronomers who were engaged in observing the Sun 
and the stars and measuring the shadows learnt to assign 
rectilinear orbits to the celestial bodies. This plan fitted in 
with their syvstem of measurements based on square scales, and 
with their general scheme of things including their conceptions 
like the Universe based on the square form and their appliances 
like the gnomon and the Sundial. From an evolutionary stand- 
point the square appears to have given place to the circle, the 
intermediate stages being marked by the pentagon, hexagon, 
octagon, etc. Wliile the solar orbit and the zodiac were conceived 
as squares in the beginning these earlier astronomers soon learnt 
to differentiate between the forms of the oi'bits of the variouvS 
planets. These realities of the Universe were, however, treasured 
as secrets and gave rise to various s\mibols of mysticism, occultism 
and art, and survived in astrology, alchemy, the Kabbala, and 
in rites of religion and magic. 


-<>- 


DECEMBER 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was "held on Monday, the 2nd .I>eeeinber, 1940, at 
5-30 P.M. 


Present 

Dr. S. L. Hora, D.Sc., F.Z.S., F.N.I., F.R.S.E., F.R.A.S.B,, 
Ordinary Member, in the Chair. 



186 

Taw-Book B.A.S.B./of ItMti. 

..Meadlc/w ; 

A.g'iiarkar, Dr. S. ]l 

(Irirdtbs, lOr. \\ - L . 

T>r. Iv. T''^. 

Didui, Dr. ,B. S. 

i;?ose, Al-r. S. I\L 

'Kot'ibs, Map'u' I'l. 

J?riice, Mr. A. lb R, 

Lloxsdn, Dr. M. 11. 

Dhalcravarti. I'rof. ( 

Jain, Mr. <b !.. 

( laR.terit'e, M'r. B. ( 

MactarljOH', Mi-s. K. W 

Do, (b 

Meyor, Miss S, 

edios'lu Mr. lb K,. 

Pasi'fidia. Majjtc (J. L. 


R(<sst'{ti, Mr. F. I'b 

r-evde/'-s' .• 


tlraig, Mir, D. 

Muokerjea, Mr. S. K. 

l"Ce.rre, Ib'nf. Albert. 

\\b (1 db Roonwak Air. M. L. 

Job,, ;Mr. db J. '■ 

{ Dr. TL S. 

.lartt', Mr. X. (\ 

'f’inlier'bi, Mr. B. lb 


W’iUL*;, Mr. < ^ 

ininutos ol’ {'.lie lanl. iiHiotyi, 11,11; w'orf* rr.arl juid eiMitirmiMj. 

The ("reiieral SiMirotary aiiruaineiMl rtM‘(h,pl:. el'llif*. Followiiiy^ 
imi oi',' hooks, wliieh had been r'ai 

the t'.ah'k^ for ins]'KMit.,ion : 

(1) From Kjiiifurylal Mat'hnr M\ii\ il}i S;Ui,jjralm in HiiHlif 
(‘i) ,, Dr. P». (’, IjUW ‘Holy <»t' indiiif 

(.‘{) ,, thi" ArcluuMaojLiiral S»irv<*y 'a{s»|H|i;uc rt'iilral 

Ari'iia<'H>!ngi(*4il Librjiry 

(4) ,, tlu' Miiwlt’a.s Fni\ (‘psity yA<!jnliustriil ion hsh! Snoial hitn 

tinder Vijayimagar 

(a) From ( f (VfM'ivrnont IVnt.ral I’nsss, Brnnlaiy “Pnnna K<‘Hi<ien<'y 
i'V>rrespond,e:iH-‘o, \'ol. 7 b 

({>) From the (‘aieiitta rnivia'sitv ‘Santal I nsurreot.ioii, iHah to 

38a7b 

(7) Fi'niri Kalikitikar 'Diitia, Ks<j. 'Santul {itHurreeiiiai, IHaa tn 
I8r>7b 

(8) Fniin 'Dr. lb N. ({hosbal '■'rrn\'(*ls ol* 'rihetan PiigriniH in. Mir 
8an,ti Vallcyvb 

({)) From thi' Madras Doverninent- -''J)nseri}>th‘<* Calahfgno of Is'hmde 
MSS. ill (jovonniuait Oriental MSS. Library. \(A. tb 

(l(t) From Alaulavi Tl. S. Aia Tiosaiii "fia'/.airnl (puds, O (<. b 

Hio following; oa.n<i,id,a4es we.nt ’halloffiMi foi’ ekadabni as 
<)d I i I airy Miiiril h a"s :• 

(•la) jfiinifjWfH, Liitnf! LanutriU S^'orotary and Treaiynrer, Brifjwli anal 
Foreign Bible Sn<‘iety (i.laieut (a- Aux.), Bildo Ttenso, :!;b Ohowringbee 
JioiwL Oaleutt-a. 

I:"!'* >p< >sr‘r : I'Jaini ,lb,uslia<'l. 

Seta aider; i\l. B'idayai lIoBaiu. 

(4f>) Jdliin, Mahdtddl., Lam. {.lord, (»l , Itarrisen limid, ( ’akutta. 

I'^ro'poKer ; .i4aini 'Frashatk 
Seeonder: J, (,b I)e. 

(47) Id(thityah}uiMhiinu, Fan(lU Kf'derHuUt, bkiitnr (d’ J\il\'yaoiftl«, 
Cknirt Raj Fa;ndit, .Raj tlyotislii, .Inebargt* 'Mabarajak AHtrologfeal 
Observatory, Sanghi ji ka Ka.sta, daipnr City, HajpntaiiH. 

Proposer: Iku'ni .Frashad. 

Seconder: J. C'b 1)e. 



]94ri 


Oriinmij MoniMy MeMings, 


187 


(48) Genne, Gfortie JRfuloliffe, 8penef>’« Hotel, Calcutta. 

Pro'i'H »sor : l-iaiui Prasha.cl . 

►Seeoi.idor: A. E. E.. 'Bfuoo. 

(4P) !seh-]Valh (-/((/ulc, Li('(;*iie,ia.ei§-8cieiico {Matlieni^tiqiies efc 
Ilry.^iqiios) Lieutcnaot l-’>ritish Army, Enrt William, Oalcnttfr. 

J^nip(>srr: A. IP 11. 

Seooi i,(l< ‘ 1 ’ : I >n in i Prasiiinl. 

(00) Edfilf'i/, lioidhlr ,]h\ Ja.sim: Norman Gexmje A rmMrong^ Puisne 
JUid|Li:<y < 'alfutta. High Court, i)/j, 'Middlotoji. Street, Caleutta. 

Proy)os(:'r : L, K. Faweus. 

SfH*( Older: M. Hidixyat Hosaiu. 

(01) Mahmao, .4. F. M. K/ialilt{i\ B.A. Hons. (Loud.), Ph.D. (Lond.), 
Professor of Plisti.uy (B.E.S.), Presidency College, College Street, Calcutta. 

Fro]H)s«‘r: i\L Xlahfiiz-ul Haq. 

Seconder: V. N. (riiosbal. 

llie Gon(q.*al iS(M*r('itar\' a,iinoiinc‘.tMi the following loss of 
membership, sincio tlK-,-* previous meeting, by death: — 

1. Sir doseph .folm Thomson (Honorary Fellow, lOio). 

The Ge.ntirai iSe(T(‘.tary I'eported th(i Ibllowiiig loss of member- 
ship, sincifi thtf itrevious nw.^eting, by resignation: — 

1. E. C. Fluiy (Ordinary Member, lOdB). 

2. Hem raj HaJ ( hiiui (Ordinary Meinlior, HHl)). 

:h J. (f VVliite ((.)rdinary Member, IDiJO). 

4, 4 . A. Dmm (Ordinary M'cimbcr, 1029). 

TTm-^ General Secreta!*y annoniicixl tlurt siiKM:^ the pravions 
•j'Vieethig: (a) there had l)etm, no lapses of electi<,>n under Rule 9, 
tind (b) tihere had been no withdrawals of a,])plieation. 

The GtdK'rnl 8 ee 3 ‘etary repoi‘t(xl that in acx*or(Ian<.ic with 
Rules 37 and 38, th,e na.mcvs of the following six ordinary members 
would be suspend,(‘d as dcdaultors within the Soeioty's building 
for the 'period o'i’ a month, to be removed from thei Soiuety’s 
reglstctrs for non-paA^rnent unless th(^ amount (iue 1)0 paid before 
the :n(^xt Grdiiu'sry Monthly Meeting: — 


I. M. b. idialia. due .. Its. 70 

P. 1.. 4uitly „ „ B8 

H. C. Miiudliata ,, . . ,, 78 

4. Abinash Ch, Hay „ - * 

5. Baja Ivshhindra Deb iiai Mahasai ,, . . „ 108 

0. Muled Dry „ . . „ 135 


III a>eeordanee with Rule 40, the General Secjreta-ry reported, 
the na-mes of the follo^ving ttm Ordinary Members had now been 
remov(:xl from the memb(,w-list of the Society 


1. 

G. W. Douglas. 

6. 

Major 34. h. Vance. 

2. 

Otto PlberL 

7 . 

R. M. Statliam. 

3. 

R. S, Finlow. 

8. 

Capt. G. L. Mallam. 

4. 

Major I>. E. 0. Kenny. 

9. 

0. G. Matthias. 

5. 

H. IT. Lyne. 

10 . 

B. 0. Ohakravarti. 



188 


Ym,f~Booh M.AM.B, for lUiK 


\H}h. ¥il,, 


111 accor<ia>iicX',^ with Rule 4(1, GoiK^rat 8(‘cr(4„a.ry' ri^|ior!:fbi 
tfliatp tlie iiamias of tlu-^ following oioviai ('>rdiiia-r\' M„e.iol)ors woiiiai, 
be removed from l-lie mext) mem! xa’- list ot tlie 


1 . K,ai j-laiiadiu* S. K 

1 Uiuyau. 

7. 

Haji.r ,.\L lA 

2. F. N. iJa.iicrjtxa 

S. 

Hf’trbert' l-Ur 

:L 0. (A CiikUo'. 


C. 

Ja,,i|)a! Siiia'! 

4. H, Cronkshiutk. 


10. 


f>. A, H. Ha. r ley. 

(). E. Harris. 


i 1. 

T, William-. 


The following u'ere rea<!: — 

L V. Nailayakaswam ;!. — A mdr on Ciissiii .bivariira. 
L. and Ckssia nodosa Ham. with a keff to the enltlTctkd tree ( ’;iss:ia.>, 

The oorreet. idtmt-ifi cation of t-lie two niost^ IxMotiful of 
Cassias, namely tlii^ Java. Ciissia, C’h.ssiji ja-vanica .‘iiui, tlo'^ 
Busuk-Busiik, C. nodosa. Ham., thai. aii^ ctnnmoidy with 
in eAiltivation in sevei’al ].>a;rts of Tinlia. has for long l,)ix3ii 
iiiisatisfa(‘.tory. Of these, the Java (Vissia is tlm oldest; s|)(sdes, 
establislie-d by Lirina<xis in 1.75J. Probably on a.cconnt of I, (mg 
cultivation ruider artificial ('‘onditions, it has iKM'ome vory 
variable and it may not be unlikely that C. nodosa, ffa.m., is 
one of variafions that has now be(‘o,nie hrinl\' i^.slni dished 
•with '(dear cut characdicrs of a true spoc/k^s. ("Vtogen(d.'ic tests 
may perhaps solve this prol)ability. A|)art- from tJris suf);|)ositnoii 
regarding the origin of (1 nodosa Ham., tln;^s(‘ two speeit^s rliflbr 
from each othei* snarkedly as to (‘onsideral)ly minimized tin- 
chances of their being mistaken one foT‘ the other. 

C. javanica is easily distinguished, from (f nodosa. I\y (I) 
the sem.iliiiiate stipulc-^s, prod, need at the two ends int<> sidmlate 
tails, (2) by the small oblong oval leaflets, (x^naJ ami roirmlod. 
at the base and rounded, obtuse or slightly a.t. 

tips, and (3) i)y the oblong obtuse ]>et;a]s, roundrxl at> both, imd,s. 
In €. nodosa, on the othm’ hand, the l(Adlel.s are (d)l<}iig ova,t«% 
acute apicaiiy and a<xite oi* sonnn\.’'hat rouiH'lrxl a.!' liase; 
stipules are semilunatc.^ whih tln-^ uj, >per ludf broade!’ with ii 
distiiKdi median norvt^ (ending iti a nnie.ro jou! tlm arr; 

long narrow oblong, acAifi^ a/t- bol.li taids. 

2. Eileuk W. E. (Imivping in fh* 

Deccan and EaMern (Mads. 

Blood group data •from 75 persons from tlu'^. Deprt^sstxl 
(lasses in the Nkands Dominions showed fnapumems ol‘ tlie thnxA 
agglutinogen genes smiilar to that found in tlie ],)fV|)reHsed Classes 
of Bengal A small sample of Bhil bloods showe«l fwer 5(1’;.;^ 
Group B and very little Group A. Banjaras possess less of I'l 
and a north Indian type of blood group ^listrilmtion. Tho 
primitive Clienchua^ belong preponderantly to groups 0 and A,. 
B seems to be filtering in by mis(^egenation on the edge^ of thifii' 



1941] 


Ordimmj Monthly Meetings. 


1.89 


roservatioii. They thus differ from ail other Indian groups 
tested e'X(*.ept Paiiyars of the Western Ghats and Maiayali lower 
castes. Aiiio'iig ]_23 Bison Hoad Maria Gonds in Bastar State 
the three groups were fairly equally represented with a regular 
prepoiideraiiec^ of about 10% of Group B over A, a. similar 
distribution to that found, among t.he Santals by Sarka.r. 

Tile folio wdiig (X>minuni(*ations were made; — 

1. Albe,et W. C. T. Herke. (Stanford University, U.S,A.)^ 
--Fisheries Development in the East. 

The present condition of fisheries and the objectives of the 
Fisheries ^ ^Departments in the Philippines and Malaya will be 
(lis(vussed and a comparison made with conditions elsewhere in 
tile Orient. The problems of local versus alien .development 
aaid domination will be considered at the same time. Marine 
and fresh- water fisheries, and the im]X)rtaiice of pond culture 
will be treated. 

2, Chi'ktaharan Ghakravartt. — SamskrU Mimtiscrvpts in 
the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal. 

The .Royal, Asiatic,*. Society of Bcmgal is tin* custodial^ of one 
of the biggest, (.‘ollections of Sanskrit Manus{,i,ipts. Histoj.-y of 
the different coiiecddons — Sockd.y’s own (^olkH'dions, Govermiient 
(‘ollections, Indian Museum, (collections. Catalogues and, notices 
of the Miinuscripts. Manuscripts of a general interest: old 
Manuscripts of the 7th“-12th centuries; illustrated Manuscripts 
of artisticc interest, Manuscripts of works on the game of chess, 
on warfa-re, on the Persian language, on stealing, on veterinary 
science am,!, on haw-king. Sanskrit texts published irom rare or 
uniqii(‘ mamisccripts belonging to the So(,*iety. Works published 
witli the help ol: manuscripts in tlie possession of tht> Society. 

Comm, unication No. 2 by Prof. Chintaliaran Cliakravarti 
'veas not read but postponed for the next miMdang witli his 
(HMsent, 

The Chaii'juan amiounecMi the .rcNsult <,>1 tiio bal,iot for tlic^ 
ebetion of Ordinary Menu, bars and d(ui,a!’('*d thal' all, tin* 
candidates had becu,i duly 



OBITUARY NOTICES 


Kai Bahai>iir Kanak \jA\. Maimia, 

(iS;72»-:P.Ma) 

licii Baliiidur Ivaiiak Ba-i'ua-, isoit oi' l,.aJvs[i!!ii Ijat 

Eariui, 'horn at (la.u'hati in fix*. y(‘jir 1S72. Afi(a’ nbiaiiiiriu; 
tlie B.A. and. 'B.L. dcvunns ni; ^,h(' (\a.lrulia. IdiivarsilyA !ir’ 
praat'ihi(‘(l at IIk* (btuhati Ba.r idr a- ibvr yaa.rs. lb* iiaxi joined 
the AssaiiM Bivi,i Serviee as an exl..ra: Assl. ( Vaanii.ssiorirr in HHlIK 
Ho was appoinlAM,! i.rjnpnrarily in b(^ fingistra.r <»!' Bn-.n|Ha‘?d'iAa,* 
Soc.kt'ie.s and D'naad.or nf Indust'rit's in S(^])txinb(‘r lltbS a-nd in 
1922 wa,s appnitiical, ,sid,)s(.aj'U.iv<dy a,s a. boiler of a ' listed post ' 
in the IrKiian ('ivi! Sorviecn Brom (.)et'nber 192‘5 Ise wa.s head 
nf the (‘oinbirKal tbparlinents of A.!Li;rienlim‘<‘, Irxbist ries^ and 
On -operative So<iet'i(ss. M(‘ nttred in ih27 but. soon aft(a'\va,,n!s 
lie Avas appoirit(‘d ib.e .Ah^nilna* f.nr (dm.n,iere(^ niial Indusla’y in 
the AssajB Government. In 1929 lx*, wars {ipjaainted a.s a. Miniatii’ 
for SelBGovermixmt in t.lx^ Sa.ad,ullMh MlniMta^y. He Ixdd this 
position up to April 1,997 aaxl, in la'U'ognition of ids s<a*vie-eH, lx,» 
Avas .mafl(‘ a. G(>mT)ai.'ii(,)n ot tlx^ Ord,er of tlx^ !"nd.ia.n if^-mpire in 
1937. 

In ad(liti(m tf> his admim.st,.r*ativ<-,-f work, he was a. ktHU'i 
stnde.nt of .Assa 2 nt‘se hisliory a-n<i. antiquity i.wk'I piiblishial a 
large niimbra* of pa'j>nrs in many .Historical J’omTurls. He was 
a .memiHM’ of tlxA Hoyai A,siaii<,i Soeied.y nf Bengal sitx*e 1931 a-nd 
took a giaaiit <,.,l(‘.a,.l of int'.'eresii in its >vor,k. He. was a.lso a,, meinlavr 
of tlx,^ fd'wxdi o.r th(^ newly ronixb-'.d India.n A,ntIn’opn,!ogi«%*iI 
Tiisidt'nti.e '.Bor many y(‘.a.rs lic^ wa'is the Frcskbait- of tlie K,anmnipa. 
Anusaiiillian Sa.mity ami. Hu^ nuiiimtay a-n<l <,‘ditor of* its oipos 
7^he Journal of the AMSum. iSocieh/^ ns well a.s Serr<t.a.fy 

for tlx^ '.ProvitKvial Coin (.'khinid., H.is most. iinj>(,M*taut» work is 
‘ThcAEatiy H'istAa,y (d,‘ Ka;iutu*upa’ Avhieh was ptjfdislied in .1933, 
dealing with the hist<ory of A.ssa.in from t:-ix^ (^a-rliest, fiitx?s of the 
advent of Ahoms. 

He Avas a man of very libenil vieAvs and pta-senad t*liarm aixi 
had a A^'ide (irele- of triends. His d(U'd..h AV'i,ll be irmnnii'd by 
stndmits of India not only in his nafa'vc^ prov'irxfr^ <d,‘ Assam bid 
throughout the (:*-ountry. 

B. H. Gijjia. 

{Bend in ike Ordmnry Monthly Meetmg of 1st A/pHf 1940.) 


( 190 ) 



[tol* tit, 1941] 


Ohitmiry Notices. 


191 


Pan:dit Am'cjlya Chakak Vidyabhusauta 

(1877-1940) 

Faiiiliti Aiimlya. Clia,.ran Vidyabhusana, was aai Orientalist 
■who (Icvvoted liis eni^rgies mostly in making a popular expositio'ii 
of tii,c‘ stori^^s of tlic'- 'i.avst glory of Bengal as Avell as of Iiidia., 
among tli(‘. of l:>engak Hc^ Professoi* of Pali and the 

JiicliaTi \'(‘j‘na-enhirH in tlie Vklyasagai ('ollege for a good inaay 
yeai‘s. He had a working kno'wledge of a nimibe.r of modern 
la.nguages — Indian and, European. Towards the end of th('^ 
Ijist c{‘ntiii;y he nnide his debut into his literary career by starting 
a Translating Bureau whieh undertook to translate correspon- 
dence in diffei'ent languages of the world. In 1901 he founded 
t he EdwaT'd, Institution for teaching languages. 

He was intimately connc‘eted with various literary and 
eviltural institutions of Bengal. He was an Ordinary Member 
of the Boyal Asiatic Society of Bengal sincc‘- July 11)05 t'ill the 
lime of his death. He was a'n aO'.ive member of the Bangiya, 
Sahitya Parishat for many a year. He served the Parisliat in 
various capacities: Librarian (1310-1313 E.S.), Assistant Secre- 
tary (1326-1329 B.S.), SeciTtarv (1330-1334 B.S.; 1343- 
1344 B.S.), Vice-President (134M342 B.S.). He presided over 
the annual sessions of a uumbevr of literary conferences in and 
outside Bengal. He wa,s at. o'r.ie time^' or other the editor of a 
nuinbir’ of well-km >\\^,n journals of B<mgal. He 'wii-s the first editor 
of oiK^ of the best Bengali jovu■^nals— (1320 B,S.). 
He was also the editor of Hawi (1312-8), iMarnuwd'^l (1322 B.S.), 
(kmrdngasevaka (1 325-1 335 B.8.), KrlydsthafatriM (1326, 

1334-1335 B.8.), (1336-1 339TL8 SnBhdratl (1340- 

1346 B.S.). Pandit Amidyacharan vroto mostly in Bengali. 
He (.contributed .numerous papers in different |)opular Bengali 
jourruils and sov^eral in a numbe.r of pei'iodictals in English. 
()f his puhliccations in b(,>ok-foi*m, mention may be made of the 
following 

L Edition of tht^ ^rikrsymnldsa (a nuMlieval Bengali work) 
of Kf^nadasa (Bangiya Bahitya Parishat Biries, 1326 B.S.). 

2. ’'D(,cs(criptive 'Catalogue of Bengali MSS. in the Bangiya 
Sahitya Parishat (VoL III, pt. 1, 1330 B.S.; Vol. II, pt. II, 
1333 B.S.). 

3. ’Edition of BanMrtmidmfta (a medkwai Bengali work) 
of l)Inaba.ndhu Dasa (Bangiya Sahitya Parishat Series, 1.336 B.S.). 

4. Bamsvatd (Vol. I) (Doyatattva-granthamala No. I). 
A detailed a(.'ceoiint in Bengali of the Goddess of Learning. 

5. Bangiya Mahdko§a (Encyclopaedia Bengalonsis)— e>idited 
by Pandit Amulya(3haran (chief editor) with the help of a band 
of scholars. One volume (846 pages) and twelve parts (384 
pages) of the second volume have so far becui published. 

Chintahaban Chakbavaeti. 

(Read in the Ordinary Monthly Meeting of Zrd June, 1940.) 



192 


Year-Book R.A.8,B, for i940« j;vo:r.i, vi.l 

Eai Saheb Nagej^bba Nath Vas¥ 

(ism-ins) 

'Natgc;Mi<i!-a Na 4 :.li Vasu was a well-kiiowu s(‘l.u>L‘ir 'wiio iia> 
cloiio a gri^ati sta'vico to IiKloIogy l>y li.is voiioiiiiioiis 
ill diftbrcnt bnvo<‘lies of the sul'>j<Mit, c.ojiipiliitioii «,rf the 

Vi^imkam (Eiii'yciiopaedia .BerigaJen,sis) \rill give liiiii a phier 
of lionoiir in the Iiistory of the va-vrru-nailai* literatiiros .India. 
It was on. this work that he de. voted the best paii- oi,;' liis lilb and 
energy. He liac.l. a great fas(;d.iiatioii for l(^xic^(,>gra.plu(*a.l w'oiii 
with which, he came to bo associa.tcui (411 ite ea-rly in. Iiis life. 
Before he took upon himself tlie ta.sk of (ximpiling the V-e^rakos^i 
he is statc^d. to liavo ivorked for soni(‘- tune Ibi.* Saldendu- 
prakdki-mahdkma and for the suppUvnumt of Hehihihdpii- 
drmna. 

He was associated, with the .Asiatic S<.,)(d.(^ty oT I'hmga.i as an 
Ord,ma.ry Mioiibor from September IKitl- to .'Shiy 1927 and a.s 
an Associate Member sini.^e May 1,927. H.e lia.-d. tunitribiitod 
about half a dozen are.haeologica!. papers in tl,i(^ Joiiriia.l oi‘ t!n.‘ 
Society (Old Series, Vols. (>5, bO, 07, (>9) during tiho yeiirs ISOfo™ 
1900. 

He was intimately cmme<4/ed with Banglya Saliityii 
Parishat for many years and in many ('.apat‘ities. Ho was 
editor of the Journal for nine years (1311-1318 „B.S.). ..lie was 
elected Vic.^o-PreKsidont of the Parishat 0.11 several ot.Hi^asioiis 
(1330, 1331, 1.336, 1340 B.S.), He edited a large .number, as 
many as a dozen, perhaps the largest number so far jmbliHhed 
in the Series under the editorship of scholar, of works, 
mostly texts in old and medieval Bengali, in th(,‘. Seric^s cd' the 
Parishat. It was Mr. Vasu who in a sense iotrodm'cd (.hc^ Soric^s 
and edited the hrst tiv<.) woi-ks publislied l>y the .Pai'isiiaf’. Idic 
Parishat in rec, cognition of his vast scho1arH,hi|.> as reffc^ct.cd in Ids 
numerous wo,rks, especially his monumental (.•.ojjipihd.ion, 
Fite/coim, hoiionre(,l, him, at a. spc^cial meeting hold on C^aitrii 
17, 1318 B.S., 00 , the c.omp.letioti of l.ht^ gr‘«»a.-t work o.F Ids life. 
The Parishat also gave him the highc.^st honour at' it'S disposal 
by electing him one of its 15 disidnguishcHl. meml»ers hi 1319 
The Government of India ho'n(,)ur<Hj him with a. Ihri in 

the year 1918. 

It is not possible t(,> giv<^ here a (aanplc^tr^ bil)lk,)gra|,iiiy of 
the numerous pul)iications <,.)f Mr. Vasu. A list of the more 
important of these is given below: — 

1. Vi^vako^a or Encyclopaedia in 22 (.'fuartto vx>1h. of a lx. Hit' 
16,000 pages. He took up the work in 1295 B.S. from |)ag<‘ 
113 of Voi, II where it was left by the original edi,t:orH Kaiigalid 
Mukherji and Trailokyanath Mukherji and comph'tixl la^si' 
volume in 1318 B.S. ' ■ ' 



1941] 


Oh Ikiary N otices. 


193 


2. A liiglily improved edition of the. work in Hindi wa^.s 
also piiblislied by Mr. Vatsu in 2o quarto voliijm.es of 768 pages 
eaeli. But it is a pity that he wavS not spared to complete the 
sec-oiid and up-t.odafe edition of the Bengali version of which 
foiii* voiiinuvs ot 788 pages eacdi have so far been published. 

3. Ar(dia(M)iogi<‘al 8iirv(‘y of Mayivrbhanja, Yol. I, 1911. 

4 . Modern Buddhism and its .followers in Orissa, 19 ], 1 . 

r>. CVistes a.nd So(*ts of Eenga.l (in Bengali) in 11 vois. 
(1321 

6. Social History of Kaniarupa, Vol. 1, 1922 ; VoL II, 1926. 

7-™] 7. Editions of Rasamanjari of Pitanibara Dasa 
(1366 Mahabharata of Vijayapandita (1306 B.S.), Caitanya- 
nuingala. of Jayaiianda Dasa (1312 B.S.), Kasiparikrama of 
Jayanarayana (Thoshal (1313 B.S.), Siniyapiirana of Eamai 
I^iiidit (1314 E.S.), Navadvipaparikrania of Narahari Cakravarti 
(1316 B.S,), Kalkipurana of Ramaiocaiia Dasa.. (1320 B.S.), 
Saingitai-'agakaipadrunia of Krisnanand,a Vyasadeva Rasasagara 
(1321 B.S.), Tirthainangala of Vijayaraina Sen (1322 B.S.), 
and Tiidvliabhra,in.ana of Yadiinath Sarvadhikari (1322 B.S.). 

OhIN AKAl^ O.H AKKAV ARTI . 

(Read in the Ordinary Monihly Meeting of Zrd June^ 1940.) 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE MEDICAL SECTION 
MEETINGS, 1940. 


No nn'iil i iKj iij Ihi Jii‘(llctd Si'iii.i.ni loid tliiriiuj tiii- ytiir. 


( 194 ) 



INSTRUCTIONS TO AUTHORS FOR THE SUBMISSION 
OF PAPERS FOR PUBLICATION IN THE JOURNAL 

AND MEMOIRS OP THE SOCIETY^ 


PAPERS 

1. Ail communlcatious submitted to the Society for publicatiou 
should be addressed to the Geueral Secretary and not to any officer by 
name. They shcnild be type-written on one side cf the paper with siifliclent 
margin on the sides, and m all respects 7nust be absolutely m their final 
form, for prinling, 

2. Papers must be accompanied by a brief abstract net exceeding 
1,000 words, which shall indicate the subject of the paper and the nature 
of the advance in the existing kaiowledge on the subject. 

Tables of contents (for long papers), references to the plates and 
literatures, etc., should be given in their proper places. 

4, Quotations in Oriental languages should be in the original script, 
and wherever they are transliterated the System of Transliteration 
fulopted l)y tlie Society must bo followed (see instruction 15). The 
names of genera and species in th<^ case of biological conimiuiications 
should 'bo underlined to indicate that they are to be luiiited in italics. 

i;LLUSTRAlT.ONS 

5, All drawings and photograidiic prints should be as clear as 
possible. I’lioy should he in a form immediatoly suitable for reproduction, 
preferably of a si'ze to |)ermit reduction to alxiut two-thirds the linear 
jllmensions of tlie original, and should be capable of reproduction by 
I )botographic processes. 

6, Drawings and diagrams to be reproduced as line blocks should 
be iimdo with 'fixed Indian ink, preferably un fine white Bristo bboard, 
free from folds or creases; smooth clean lines or sharp dots, but no washes 
or colours should l)o employed for shading. The positions of the illustra- 
tions tl'iat are to ap|.iear hi the text must be clearly indicated in the margin 
of the paper; and explanations of the 'figures should bo typed at the end 
Ckf the raaii'i pafier witli the i'ndicatiorA : Kxpimi(itwri of iext-jigures» 

7, Tlie maximum space allowable for illustrations in the Journal 
and tlie Memoirs are as follows: — 

Journal, text, 3f X6f ; 4i^X7^ 

Memoirs, text, 6^X9""; Plates, 

These spatx-is include the usual figure numbering. Explanations of 
tlie plates to be printed on separate pages, facing the plates, must be 
typed on separate sheets. 

PBOOF8 

8, A proof of each paper will be sent to the author, on the address 
given on the MB, 

9, No alteration or addition necessitating any considerable change 
of typie may bo made in the proofs. Should sucli alterations or additions 
1)0 necessary, these must be added as footnotes duly dated and initialled. 
The cost of corrections made in the proofs should not exceed 20% of 
the printers’ charges for the setting of the paper; any excess will be 
c'harged to the authors. 

10, The proof must, if possible, be returned within one week of the 
date of receipt to the Society duly corrected. 

( 196 ) 



196 Ymr^Book M.A.8.B, for 1940 [vol. vi:i, 

MISCELLANEOUS 

1!. Authors ot papers publishwi in the Sooiotfy's Jonn^d and 
Memoirs are entitled to receive grafts 110 c*opies of ea(*.h papJir, and, eh 
many more as they require on payment of the <,K>Bt of i^rifiting, fiapeiv 
and make tip. Such requiremontB must bo stated at the time e,f rotursiing 
the proofs. 

' 12. Papers by ,aou-Me,mbors of tlie Studety must» bo c.omirmiiic'atrHi 
through a Me,mbor, who shall satis.fy f)tirn.soir that fch<^ |iaf>er ,ia siiitial,di> 
for presentation to the Sotdety, and is roa<ly for tlu^ press. 

KL No communications under consideratiim o,r acsteptod .for the 
Society’s publications may be published elsewlmre without thi> ex|>ress 
sanction of the Council, 

14. To facilitate the compilation of indexes, each autl:M:>,r i« !*er|iiesk;Hi 
to return to the Society together with the proof, a briel' iticlex t:d,’ tht.^- 
contents of the paper. These indexes will 1)0 edited a,tKl im‘.orf;)orati-Ml 
in the volume when completed. 

15. The following systems of transliteration are Iien(.!ef<.,>rth to Im 
followed (as far as practicable) in tlie publicatbr^s of thc^ Society, in 
quoting non -European words as such. In giving names of f, places, mifcliors 
or books, which would oticur in the course of the .'English text, a * broad’ 
transcription, following B,nglish values of the consonants and avoiding 
diacritical marks, is recoinmended. 


SANISIvlUT 

^ = a = a -^ = i t = i ^ s=s u =s u 

^r=s|! ^==:f w ss] ^as=e (OT e) $ ==: »i (OF aj) 

’^=3 0 (or 5) ^ ^ au (or ;ui) (Prakrit nx. = afj all) 

•^(Amismra) = m t (Visarga) = h x (Jilmmultga) = 
[Upadhmmmja) == if 

Sandhi Vowels m,ay be ii'u.licated as a i u e 6, Avmir(ilm^\ 
Accents in Vedic — Uddtta 4 a c^te. Svariki — a. 




IF 

3 

w 

tSS 

k 

kh 

g 

gh 

B (or g) 


¥ 

3? 



IS 

t! 

eh 

j 

jh 

fi (or ji) 

z 

3 

¥ 


¥ 

— 

t 

th 


dh 

n 

z 





— 

t 

til 

d 

dh 

It 







P 

ph 

b 

bh 

in 

n 

X 




— 

y 

r 

1 

V (or wj 

w 






A 

8 

H 

h 


m 

oS^f 





1 

!.h 





HINDI (and other North Indian Speec,hes) 

As for Sanskrit, only nasalised Vowels are to be indicstecl 
by a tilde mark {^) above the Vowel (e.g, ^ ^ ? 3 » a | g |||^ 



194 : 1 ] 


Instruct ions to Authors 


197 


etc.) 3 and f ^ are to be denoted optionally by either d dh or by 
f rli. Care slioiild be taken in distinguishing ^ and ^ (6 and 
t’)— the latter preferably may be written as w rather than v, 
specially in iiitervoeal and final positions. The final silent -a 
may bo optionally omitted : but in quoting Early Hindi, etc. the 
final a shoiihl be retained. ©3 as in Rajasthani, Panjabi, etc, 
are to be indicated as in Vcdic. 


BENGALI 

The system for Sanskrit, with the provision for nasal 
Vowels and for ^ 15 (= ^ ^) as in Hindi. For ^ ^ ), in all 

(aisama or pure Sanskrit words, y should be employed, in 
Prakritio and semi-tatsama words, j; subscribed ^ 

should bo indicated by y. The difference between ^ 6) 

and ^ (= ??, to) need not be indicated for Bengali — b may be 
written for both: only subscribed is to be written 

as w (e.g. Skt. VUvdsa == Bengali Biswdxs). Final -a may be 
omitted optionally, but it should be retained for Early Bengali. 

ARABIC 

In transcribing Arabic, according to the context cither 
(!) the native Arab pronunciation (as current in the Jazlraiu-U 
^Jrub) or (ii) the Perso- Indian pronunciation may be followed, 
(i) Arabic in native Arab Pronunciation — 

5 ^ (alif hamza) v = b, ^ = t, '^ = th(or0);^=:j 

(or ^ = h, ^ « kh (or x> or x) ; ^ = d, ^ = dh (or 8) ; j - r, 

3 z ; a" « 8, sh (or ^5) ; == 9, === d ; T- k: t (or t), = z 

(orz); t==‘> t=s}i (or y); ^ = f, 3 = q; -^=k; >3 = 1; 

f ssa m ; sss n ; j ~ W', 11 ; ^ — h ; » y, L 

respectively =» a, i, u (or 5 optionally in place 

of j, u), ^ = a, i, u ; V » = a ; cr i = i ; y tssu; ^ sa ay 

* * 

(or ai) ; y == aw (or au) ; tanwin =s above line ; = a. 

(Note: ^ =: 'AbduJ-Haqq, or ^Abd al-Haqq, not 'Abd-iil- 

Haqq.) 

« =5 1 (or h, or tb). 

13 




INDEX 


Year-Book Royat, Asiatic Society of BENiSAL 


VOETJME VII, 1941. 


A, 

'Abstract Statement of Receipts and 
Disbursements for tbe 
year 1940, 59. 

,, Proceedings Council, 1940, 
83. 

Accom modation , 83 . 

Agencies, 52. 

Aiyappan, A. Siva-seal of Mobenjo- 
' Daro, 178. 

Annual Address, 1940-41, 9. 

,, Meeting, 83. 

,, , ,, 1941, proceedings 

of, 6. ■ 

,, ,, Exliibition, 14. 

,, Report for 1940, 29. 
Anthropology, 54. 

Arohacological Survey of India. 
Inscribed plaque from Mahas- 
tliau, Bogra District, Bengal, 
15. 

— —-Inscribed bowel of grey schist 
from Dir State, N.-W. India, 
15. 

Archaeology, 54, 

Artistic and Historical Possessions, 
39. 

Artis tki PoHSOssions, 83. 

Awards, Annaiidale Memorial 

Medal, 37. 

,, Barclay Memorial Medal, 

37. 

,, Elliott Prize for Scientific 

Research, 36. 

,, Indian Science Congress, 

Calcutta, Prize, 87. 

,, Joy G"obind Law Memo- 

rial Medal, 37. 

,, Paul JohanneB Briihl 

Memorial Modal, 37. 

,, Pramatha Nath Bose 

Memorial Medal, 37. 

,, Sir ‘William Jones Memo- 

rial Medal, 37. 


B 

Banerjee, Ganendra Nath. Beplica 
of Ganesih — Prqm-Penh Mu- 
seum (Ganibodgienne), 15. 

^Lioii — ^Brass Lion Pedestal. 

Bengal, 15. 

Visbnu-~~Ban gkok (Tliailand ) , 

15. 

Portion of stupa— Gandhara, 

15. 

Wooden mask of makara 

(Bali), 15. 

Bangiya Sahitya Pari shad. Manus- 
cripts of a little, known 
[irinted work — Sringmaram- 
paddhati, 15. 

Sri ngaratUakapaddhati, 16 . 

Baptist Mission Press, 52. 

Bariia, Rai Bahadur Kanak Lai, 
Obituary of, 190. 

Bhattasali, N. K, An Inquiry into 
the Origin of the City of 
Dacca, 180. 

Bibliotheca Indica, 84. 

Brown, Percy. A note on (a) Two 
old Japanese ‘ How-to-Draw ’ 
hooks, and (6) Api old 
Japanese book on repeating 
patterns for textiles such as 
brocades, etc., 161. 

- — Painted cloth from Nepal, 16, 

Budget, 86. 

Building, 88. 

C 

Council, 31, 89. 

,, Committees of, 32. 

Calcutta U niversity — Asufcosh 

Museum of Indian Art. A 
Vishnu Patta in black stone. 
Found in Bogra, Bengal. 
Date c., 10th or' 11th century 
A.D., 16. 


( 201 



202 


Index 


Cliakravart.i, Chintabarsm. Study 
of Mamisci’ipts, 163, 166. 

— — Mairuscripts in the Society’s 
Goliections of Sanskrit Works 
i;>i‘ Maharaj ViBvanath Biniha 
f>f Rcwa, f.69. 

.• — — SaiiHicrit Manuscripts in the 
Boya! Asiatic Society of 
Bengal, 169. 

'Cliat'torji, Sriniti Kumar. A col- 
le<'tion of Ivory and Horn 
Work. Indian,, ■ including 
Nepali and Ceylonese, 16, 

ditto Biraiiese, 17. 

— — ,, Javanese, 17, 

Chinese, 17. 

,, Japanese, 17. 

Ghaudhury, Isfanimadhab. Cult of 
the' Old Xjady, 177. 

Chopra, R. N. The use of Hemp 
Brugs in India, 168. 

.CominitteeB, 88. 

Committee, Kinaiico, 83. 

Cjommuuicataon s , 58 . 

Condolences, 81. 

Congratulations, 36. 

C 111 aha w, W. J. Some notes on 
Bongaiam, 172. 

Cultural Activities, 65. 

D 

Batta, rT. M. Bagh^Chal at Kama- 
khya, 166. 

CJiaUis-Ghuttia and its dege- 
nerate variants, 165. 

Sedentary Games — ^Proposed 

nomenclature of its points, 
172. 

Be, J. C. Pearls and the East 
India Company (1600 to 
1661), 173. 

- — ITie Indian Theatre of Anglo- 
Dutch Competition (1600 to 
1652), 177. 

DeptitationB, 86. 

Besiderata, 5(>. 

Donations, 37, 91. 

Butta, N. P. A note on Solubility 
and Bissextiation Constant of 
Stearic Acid, 162. 

■ E 

Exhibits, 16, 68. 

Exchange of Publications, 62, 91. 

E 

Fellows, Ordinary, 80, 118, 148. 

,, Plonora'ry, 81, 149. 

Finance, 43, 92. 


Fox, C. B. I’rogress c>f Mjiieral 
Development; in India, 168, 

G 

( ,1 cniiral J jccI urcs , 64 . 

Geologie.al Burvc‘.y of India. The 
Bnlpluir Ilrohlem in liKlia, 

17. 

Gogato, B. S. On TreniatodoB col- 
lected in ITiibhit (North 
India), 184. 

Gordon, M. E. and I), Sur- 
vivals of the Indus 'Valiev, 
184. 

Guha, B. S. Three Tibetan ManuB- 
cripts, 166. 

H 

Herre,^ Albert W. C._ T. Fislmries 
Bcn'clopment) in the East, 
189. 

History, 54. 

Hora, S. B. and Budra, J. N. On 
Gatitish Spines embedded in 
the Mesen(;(‘ry of Ophieepha- 
luN pmialatm Blocli, 184. 

Hosain, M. Hidayat. Europeu.n 
Fhysicians and Burgeons in 
tihe Moghul Court, 170. 

note on the Euins of Masjid- 

kur and Amadi, 172. 

^A note on a very rare and richly 

ornamented manuscript callea 
Chingiz Narna, 131. 

I 

Tnstrnctions to Authors, 196. 

IriBuranee, 96. 

Invitations, 97. 

IjeaBC, 97, 

T/eidrUres, 98. 

Bibrary, 89, 98. 

lioans of Man user i pin, 102, 

M 

Macfarlaoe, Eileen W, .B, ilTioto 
graphs of some AborigincH 
connected with the llloocl 
Grouping in India, 17. 

-'■—Prehistoric Cyst Grave, exca- 
vated. Near Hyderabad City, 
Deccan. ' T^botographed 

March, 1,940, '19. , 



Index 


203 


Moe,fjvrIa:n,e, Eileen W. jB. 
Metlier and Child Gombma- 
tions of Blood Groups and 
Blood Types in Calcutta, 161, 

-Blood Grouping in the Deccan 

aud Ihislern Gbats, 188. 

l\fiijiinKlar, ,D. N. Some Aspects 
of ilie Ciiltiuml Life of the 
Klia.sas of cis-Himalayau 
Begion, 176. 

Maimscripts , 106 . 

Mathematics, 65. 

Medals, 108. 

Medallists, Becipients, Annadaie 
Memorial Medal, 154. 

,, ,, Barclay Memorial 

Medal, 164. 

,, ,, Elliott Gold Medal and 
Gash, 153. 

,, ,, Indian Science Congress 
Medal, Calcutta, 164. 

,, ,, Joy Gobind Law Memo- 

rial Medal, 154. 

,, Paul Johannes Brhhl 
Memorial Medal, 164. 

,, ,, Sir William Jones 

Memorial Medal , 154 . 

Medical Section Meetings, Pro- 
ceedings of, 104. 

Meetings, 63, 109. 

Members, Associate, 30, 147. 

,, rnstitutional, 148. 

,, Life (chronological), 146. 

„ List of, 119. 

,, Ordinary, 30, 123 (chro- 
nological), 141. 

,, Special Anniversary 
Honorary, 147. 

Membership, 110. 

,, changes in, 161. 

,, statistics, 57, 

Menon, G. P. S.' The Magic Cakras 
and Bectilinear Orbits in 
Ancient Astronomy, 185, 

Miscellaneous, 111. 

Mdirray, B. 0. Ancient Workers of 
Western Dhalbhnra, 180. 

N 

Natural History : ii^oology, 54. 

,, ,, Botany, 54. 

Narayanaswami, V. A note on 
Cama javaniea L, and Cassia 
nodosa Ham. with a key lo 
the cultivated tree Cassias, 
188. 

0 

Obituary Notices, 190. 

■Office, is. 


Office Bearers, 31. 

Officers and Members of Council 
(1940), 121. 

„ (1941), 14, 122. 

Ordinary Monthly Meetings, 1940, 
Proceedings of, 156. 


p 

Patrons, 120. 

Philology, 54. 

Prashad, Baini. Buildings of 
Plum ay un, 181. 

Premises and Properties, 38* 
Provident Bund, 113. 

Publications, 47, 58, 114. 


E 

Rakshpal, E. Post-Embryonic 
Development of the Bespira- 
tory System of Dialeurodes 
• eugeniae Maskell (Homptera, 
Alenrodidaie) together with 
preliminary observations re- 
garding tlie Mechanism of 
Respiration in the different 
Ins tars, 180. 

Bao, B. Kodanda. Eastern and 
Western Civilization — A 
Denial of Contrast, 167. 
Representations, 35, 116. 

,, Indian Museum,, 35, 

,, Kamala Lectureship, 35. 

,, National Institute of 
Sciences of India, 36. 
,, Sarojini Basu Gold 
Medal, so. 

Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal. 
Some interesting manuscripts 
with paintings, etc., from the 
Arabic and Persian Section, 

24. 

—Some old Sanskrit Manuscripts, 

25. 

Old and rare printed books 

traced in the Library of the 
Society, 26. 

-Society’s Publications in 1940, 

26. 

Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta. 
Tung-oil yielding plants cul- 
tivated in India, 19. 

— - — Some Rare Plants of the Bota- 
nical Garden, 19. 

Budra, J. N. See Hora, S, L. 
Rules and Regulations, 35, 



2(14 


Index 


Sarli^'.iii, ].». H. Tiu^’ Ali!tienta.,ry 
fa nil! (iC liUhen rohita fHst- 
inillrfU}, 

Ini'ira! Mt'.lluM'l of Blond, Tak- 
in:,, ami Idood U rouping, ‘20. 

I'rii'Jiopfiijlon ('raterifoTwe 

.Budiit, 20. 

Dritoifai am'*', 20. 

- inftadavo d',*!,.undico, 21. 

— ‘Rat hill' f'i'var, 21 . 

Biuglii, ,f'k!.liiw|}!r Singh. Fsmmny 
of the ,Mrsgul Roriod, 21. 
Birorrr, IX Digvijay'O' of Kitig 
Charuira of tho Meharauli 
Rslliir InHmdption. 100, 
Solioitors, 55, 

Stair, 1,17. 


Sioin, Sir Aund. Noii-H no i,hf3 Liit' 
a,iul Labours id' Captaiii 
Aniiiouy 'Iroyer, '181. 

V 

Viuo'i, Uu'i Sa.lioh Niigoiidrft N'ttt-li, 

nititiuiry of, 102. 

Vidyiiblmsana, Raudit ,A„miiiya 
(llianut, Ohiti'iary of, ,101. 

ViidfM, 0(X RIH. 

Z 

Koologioa.! Siu'vti}' of .India;. Tla? 
„!;Joa,l Saorod Sioisf'ra! Clnink 
and its ACodol, 23. 

Sp(H,*iu!e'ns d Ba<:rk G,lotli, frofo 

Lidia and f)cpania;, 23. 

-Arl'dic'iai'ily Pofonood Skul! ol 

a ('hiiionk froiri Cofuiubia. 
Kivcf’, <,’>n*u'nio N. Anierioa, 
21 ,. 



YEAR-BOOK 


OF THE 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 

FOR 1941 

IVol. VIII. 1942] 


ISIRWlLUAMJONESlf 




CALCUTTA 

PBINTBD AT THH BAPTIST MISSION FBBSS 
WBtlSBSl) TMK BOTAB ASIATIC SOteT OB BENGAl, I FAtf 

Imt 0 i Septmber, 194S 

Price Rs.7-04 





Officers and Members of Council 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 


1942 


Premdent 

0. S. Fox, Eeq., D,So,, MXMm.E., F.O.S., F.NX, F,R.A*S.B. 


' Vm^PredienM 

Sir John Lopfc-Williams, Kt., K.C* 

The Hon’bl© Br* Syamaprasad Mookorjoo, Bt.A., B.L., D.LitI}., Barrister* 
at“Law, 

S. K Ohatierji, Esq., M.A., BXit., F.R.A.S.B. 

Meghnad Saha, Esq., D.Sc.,FX.S., F.N.I, F.R.A.S.B. 


Becretarm and Treamrer 


General Seorotaiy:--*S. L. Horn, Esq., B.So., F.R.S.E., F.N.L. 

F.R.A.S.B. 

Treasurer W. Garner, Esq., O.B J., I.C.S, 


Philological Secretary :—Na!laaksha Dufet, Esq., M.A., Fh.D., B.Lifct, 
Joint Philological Secretary j—M. Mahfuss-nl Haq, Esq,, M.A* 

D.So.,F.K.S.K. 
Be., M.B., 


Natural History 
Secretaries 


* f Biology;— Kalipada Biswas, Esq., M.A„D.So,. 

^ ^ Physical Science:— E. N. Bagchi, Esq., Bi 

les !— ^ y J (J ^ D.T.M., F.N.I. 


Anthropological Secretary;— H. 0. Chakladar, Esq., M.A. 
Philosophical Secretary i—Vanamali Vedantatirtha, Esq., M.A. 
Historical and Arohseological Secretary Halidas Nag, Esq., 
B,Lik 


M.A., 


Medical Secretly:— J. B. Grant, Esq., M.B., F.A.P.H.A. 

Library Secretary:— S. L. Hora, Esq., B.So., F.NJ., 

F.B.A.S.B. 


Otimr af Owimil 

S. 0. Law, Esq., M.A., BX., Ph.D., F,2:.S., M.B.0.IJ., F.N.L 
M* Z. Siddiqi, Esq., M.A., Ph.B. 

The HorJble Mr. Jnsiiee N, G. A. Edgley, M.A., Barrlstor.at-Lftw, Ji\ 
L. B. Fawcus, Esq., OJ.E., IB.S. 


BOYAt ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BEHGAi 

FEIVB.BO»S OF OmtHAm MEMaWS 

(a) To be present and yote at all General Mootings, wMoh are hold on tl» irst Moadiiy 
in each month except in September and October. 

(h) To propose and second candidates for Ordinary Membership. 

(c) To introduce visitors at the Ordinary General Meotinga and to the groimdi ami public 
rooms of the Society during the hours they aro open to membors. 

(i) To have persona! access to the Library and other public rooms of the Soaieiy, mid 

to examine its collections. 

(e) To take out books, plates, and mannsoryts from the Library. 

(f| To receive gratis copies of the Jownak tmfdmh ^md Msmim of the Society, 

(g) To bll any office in the Society on being duly elected thereto. 



YEAR-BOOK 

OF THF 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 

FOR 1941 


VOLUME VIII 

1942 




Year-Book, Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1941 


C'ONTENl’S 

L Froc©odiiaf 2 :s, Aiiruial Meeting, 1942 
Annual Address, 1941-42 
Patron’s Address 

Ofltcors and Members of Council, 1942 . . 

Kxiiibition, Annual Meeting 
Annual Report, 1941 
Membership Statistics, 1912-1 941 
List of Publications, 1939-41 

Abstract Statornont of Receipts and Disbursements, 1041 
Abstract Proceedings Comndl, 1941 
2. List oi‘ Patrons, Otlicors, Council Members, etc., 1041 
Patrons 

Otticers and Members of Couneil, 1941 . . 

OOicers and Moudau’s of Couiudl, 1942 . . 

Ordinary Menibors, alphabetically 

Oi’dinary Members, chronologically 

Life Members, ehronok)gically 

Special Anniversary Honorary Members 

Associate Members 

Institutional Members 

Ordinary Fellows 

Houora ry Follows 

Change's in Membership 

Li>ss of Members, 1941 

Fliiott (lold Modal, reciplouis 

Barclay Memorial Medal, recipients 

Mir William Jones Memorial Medal, recipients 

Annandale Memorial Medal, recipients. 

Joy dobind Law Memorial Modal, recipients , . 

Paul tJohannoH Brtthl Memorial Medal, recipients . . 
Indian dcionco Oongmss Modal, Calcutta, recipients 
:L Procoodings, Ordinary Monthl^^ Mootings, 1941 
Obituary Notices 
4 . lustnictions to Authors 


Page 

5 

10 

26 

29 

30 
37 

59 

60 
63 
86 

121 

122 

123 

124 

125 
142 

147 

148 

148 

149 

149 

150 
152 
152 
154 

154 

155 
155 
155 
1 55 
155 
157 
195 
208 




PROCEEDINGS OP THE ANNUAL MEETING, 1942 

FEBRUARY 

The Annual Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 
was held on Monday, the 2nd February, 1942, at 5 p.m. 


Present 

His Excellency Sir John Arthur Herbert, G.C.I.B., 
Governor of Bengal, Patron. 

Sir John Lort- Williams, Kt., K.C., President, in the 
Chair. 


Agharkar, Dr. S, P. 

Anderson, Mr. »T, 

Aftadullah, Khan Bahadur K. M. 
Auden, Mr. B. 

Bagelu, Dr. K. N. 

Mr. J. N. 

Basil, Mr, »r. N. 

Biswas, f)r, K. P. 

Bose, !)i. D. M. 

Bose, Mr. S. M. 

Brahnuiehary, Bai Bahadur B. C. 
Brown, Mr. Percy 
Bruce, Capt. A. E, R. 

Cliatterjoe, Mr, Manmohan 
Cdiattorjee, Mr. Ih P. 

Chatter'll, !)r. B. K. 

Chatterjl, Mrs, T. 

(diaudhun, Mrs. Roma 
(Jhopra, Dr. B. N. 

Cliighonx, Mihh M. L. 

Das»Gu}>ta, Mr. C. ( J. 

Datfca, Mr. H. N. 

Do, Mr. d. C. 

Dufci, Mr, M'. N. 

Ouitj Mr. N. 

Eara, Bir David 

Fawciw, Mr. 'L. K. and 


V(sitor.<t : 

Allsup, Mr. M, 

Bhattacharya, Mr. V. N, 
Bhattaeharya, Mr. M. N. 

Biswas, Mr. N. 

Biswas, Mrs. K. F. 

Biswas, Mr, B. 

Bose, Mr. B. 

( 


Fox, Dr. t'. S. 

Gangoly, Mr. O. C, 

Ghosh, Dr. P. K. 

Ghosh, Mr. Bushil Ohandro 
Ghoshal, Ur. U. N. 

Griffiths, Dr. W. (h 
Guha, Dr. B. B. 

Gurncr, Mr. C. W. 

Haq, Prof. M. M. 

Hobbs, Major If. 

Hora, Dr. B. L. 

Jain, Mr. Chhotolal 
Maiik, Khan Bahadur A. R, 
Mayor, Mias B. 

Mazuindar, Mr, D. L. 

MukhGr|oe, Dr. J. N. 

Mukherjoo, Rai Bahadur Pannalal 
Nag, Dr. Kalidas 
Prashad, Dr. B. 

Hay Chaudhuri, Prof. H, C. 
Siddiqi, Dr. M. Z. 

Bircar, Mr. Ganapati 
Sondhi, Mr. V. P. 

Tagore, Maharaja Bir P. (\ 
Vodantatirtha, Mr. N. 

West, Mr, W, D. 
others. 


Bose, Mr. S. K. 

Brown, Mrs. X^erey 
Ohackravarti, Mr. P. K. 
Ohatterje©, Mr. S. R. 
Chaudhuri, Dr. J. B. 
Cohen, Mr. D. J. 
Cleghorn, Miss D. 

5 ) 



6 


Ymr^Booh E.AB.B.for 1941. 


['VOL. 


Datta, Mr. B. K. 

Dutta, Mr. J. M'. 

De, Mr, 1C, C. 

FreclonVik, Mr. A. 

CHioso, M"r. Sovcvii 
(I'bose, Mr. Svusil Ki'nnar 
Gooaka,, Kiai, Balaiclirr Bn-dr’ida^ 
Gxilia, Mrn. ITioa, 

Gn|)ta, Mr. S. K. 

.Hafia, Dr. H. A. 

Ma-jumdar, Mrs. D. L. 
Mookerjee, Mr. 1). 

Miiklierjee, Mr. R. R. • 


.Nfira-yanaswaini, Mr, V. 

N i t vas war 11 fiaru vn cl a , Hw ami 
Iknikts Mr. :B. id 
Rain nan, Air. B. 

B,a,o, Dr. H. 8. 

Rmi, Mr. A. 

R,ay. 'Mr. I. R. 

R,a,y (.Ihcavtjhiiry, .Mr. S, 
Roonwal, Air, M. R. 

Sniith, Air. H. K. 
Tliakiiriha, 'Air. A. 
Vorstraetan, Fr. A. 
and o theirs. 


Ill declaring tbe Animal Meeting o|,>eii the Pf‘(,\Hi(lenii r)!*de:r«‘d 
tile distribution of the voting jiapiM's for tlie (^kH'*tioii oi‘ OfficH'rs 
a.nd Mombers of Council of tlic S<,>ci<d'.y for 1942 t'.o <ill the Orditniry 
M, embers present and appointed Major 11. Molilis nud Ih'of. H. Cf 
R<ay Charidhnri to be seriitincers. 

Th(.^ President then (.talked upon the Gemu'al SiH-.rrdm’y t<o 
prese.iit the Annual Report for 1941, 

The Annual Report was then presented (vide fiagi^ B7), 

At 5-30 P.M. the President, accompanied l>y tlu^ (:,kn,n,‘raJ 
Secretary and the Treasure^', left the iiall t.o II is 

Excellency Sir John Herbert, Govc^rnor of Benga-l, Patron of tin, ^ 
Society, at tlie entrance of the building, and appointed Sir 
David Ezra to occupy the Chair during his abscncce l^he retiring 
Council Members then assembled at the liead of the staii’case to 
receive His Excellency. 

On the arrival of the Patron, the President introductal llit.*. 
retiri,ng Council Members to liim after which 
His Excellency to occupy the Chair. 

After his installation in the Chair, the I^n,trc)n cailcfl (,>n tJie 
retiring President, Sir Jolm Lort-Williams, to r(‘a.d Ins nddr«‘ss, 

The rotiring Ik'(\si(kvnt< th.en addressiH ttu^ ineeti’iig (vi«lc^ 
pa.ge ,!,()). 

llie retiring ,Pr(^Hide.nt tlnm upon, tin* scrjitimMirs to 

report and anm.mnciHl th(^ n^sult'S of tln,^ (kmncil 'ElcGioii (vide 
page 29). 

Tlie retiring ,l:k’esident Hum, gave plains t<,) tlie Po^sirhip, bir 
1942 w,ho thankcM.,! the Socicsty a-s follows:— 

fLAMBS AND GbNTR'KMDN, 

I have to thank you fVir the honour you havr^ doin^ rnc'i 
by electing me as your President for tlu^ cuisning yi^ar. .ft will 
'be my sincere endeavour, during my tc3:r,m of 'olic<,s to server 
the Royal Asiatic Society fully, so that its UBefulriess may 
increase and 'be appreciated. I hope that in tlie year that. li<*s 
before m we may often gather here in the evenings to (.liHciiBH 



1942 ] 


Proceedings Annual Meeting, 


7 


those arts and sciences which arc the work of Man and study 
those o!:>jeets which are produced by Nature, and in this way 
escape for an hour or so from, the atmosphere of war to enjoy 
a short j^eriod of peace.’ 

first duty as your President is to express our appreciation 
of tiie stn’vices of our outgoing President, Sir John Lort-Williams. 
louring his tenure of office as President he set an example in steer- 
ing our affairs with great wisdom and an astonishing patience, 
and by his whole-hearted devotion in promoting the work of 
the Society he has proved himself equal to any of his distin- 
guished predecessors. I am sure you will agree with me that 
what I have said is a very feeble way of expressing our 
appreciation of the work done for the Society by Sir John 
Lort-Williams.’ 

The President for 1942 then said — ‘It is now my privilege 
to invite our Patron, His Excellency the Governor of Bengal, 
to address us.’ 

The Patron then addressed the meeting (vide page 26). 

After the termination of the Patron’s address, the President 
for 1942 proposed a vote of thanks to the Patron on behalf 
of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, which has been adopted 
by acclamation. 

The Patron then called upon the President for 1942 for 
making such announcements as were called for. 

The President said — ‘My first announcement is regarding 
the Election of Ordinary Fellows. On the date prescribed 
by the Regulation for the issue of voting papers for the election 
of Ordinary Fellows, there was one vacancy on the roll of Fellows, 
and two candidates were proposed for election. On scrutiny 
of the voting papers, it was found that neither of the two 
candidates had received the required number of votes as laid 
down in tlie Regulations, and the Council decided that no 
candidate should be recommended for election to Fellowship in 
this Annual M'eeting.’ 

‘ I have next to announce that papers from two candidates 
have been received during last ymiT in competition for the 
“ Elliott Prize for Scientific Research ” which was for Chemistry, 
I regret to say that the Trustees of the Prize have not received 
tl:u3 report of the referee to whom the medal is to l;)e awarded. 
So this prize is held over for next year.’ 

‘A prize is offered for 1942, and the subject is for Physics. 
A detailed announcement concerning this has been published 
in the Calcutta Gazette last month.’ 

‘My next announcement is regarding the Barclay Memorial 
Medal, This medal is awarded every alternate year for con- 
Bpicuousiy important contributions to' Medical or Biological 



8 


Year-Booh for 1941. 


VOL. V111, 


Scie^iice witli »s]->eciai rc^vronoo to inrliai. iiLHlaJ foi*^ I!l4i 

is awarded to Sir David PraiiK Kt,, (J.LE,, for Itis 

important medical and biological (‘ontribiitvioos. I:li‘ w'iis for 
some time Superioteodent of the lio\'al Kotanic (firdcii at 
Hmvrali, I)ir(a*.tO]‘ of the Ibnad 'Botajiit^ C'i*u’d«iK Ivew, 
imcl a ''.rrastec^ of t\io British Miisfaiinf 

Idle President fjandtMl over tlH,‘ m(‘daJ to 'the it'i/l-roii, anil 
reciiicstfcd liiin P> luuid it ovi*r to ilie Sirperititetideiit of the 
Tfoya ! Bo ti 1 1 1 i < ^ (';} a.rd cai s . 

Idle Patron addressed tiH.mSn|:)ei4.!iteiident- a-s follows 

fDr. Kalipada Biswas, 1 have gix^at. pl,ea.si;ir'i‘ in Imnding ovti' 
to yon on. belndf of the Royal Asiatic^ Society of Bi»ngal the 
Baixeiay M'eiiioriiii Me-eh'd for tlie y^air 1941, and rca’piest yon 
ti'ansniit it to Sir David 'Prain ’wit.h tlu,‘ So(*ie-t-y*s mid iny hearty 
congn'didationsd 

Tlio Preskh'mt tlien said — ‘My ii,cxtni,!n'ifnnie(am‘nf. is rega.rcb 
iiig tl:ie doy Ool')ind ,Laav Menmrial MedaJ. This mcHlal is 
awarded every ycairs to that [H'a’som 'wiio, in iJie opinion 

of tl:i(,^. Conneil, has made imiiortant (‘ont-ribniions to (»ur know* 
ledgi'- of Zoology in Asia. ^riu> nnala! for 1941 is awarded to 
Prof, K, 'N. Bald, .D.Sw, D.Pln.1., l'h‘ofessor of Zoology, laiekntnv 
University, for his im]:)ori:.aivt (amtrihntions to onr knowlealgi* 
of the Fauna, of Asia.’ 

The Pi'csident hand(3d over t-he mexial to the ,f^ii,.r‘on and 
roquested him to hand it over to the Director of tlio Zoologieid 
Survey of India. 

The Patron addresscai thc^ Director as follows 

M')r. Baini Prashad., I have great ph^asnn^ in haiidriig ovor 
to you on ladialf of tlie Royal Asiatic? Hoc*H’‘t-y of BtngnI tlu^ 
Joy Gobind Law Memorial .Medal, for P.tll, and I yon 

to transmit it to Ih,*oh'?ssor K. N', Bald witii tln.^ SoeiG-y’s and iny 
hearty c?ongratulatioris/ 

Tlie Th’(‘sidc?nt tlam sahl — ‘My ncnx.t jumonic'esiient' regm’ds 
tiu? Paul Joliannx'H .Brtlhl Menunial M,eda,J, lids medal was 
instituted in 1991 to be hestfowed on a. person who, in iho 
opinion of the (k)iincil, has made eonspimumsly iinporta-id 
coiitribidvioim to tin? knowh?dge of Asinl,.ie Botu.ny, In view c.rl* 
the legal opinion given by tin- .President for 1941 regitrdiiig ila^ 
Trust, the iBrtlhl M,eraoria! Mi-?dal Advisory Bon-rc.! was iinalile* 
to make? an awanl, ami reeonn-nonchal t(» thtG,k)iniell t<) luivi‘ the 
Rules governing th,e award arnen(,le(l in ac.c'ordaimc^ wlt,h the 
terms of the Trust, which has l)i?on ac('?(?|>ted fiy tlie (.jouneil. 
The next award will tht?refore made? in attcjordfincc with the 
amended Rules in 1949.^ 

The Presi(,i(3nt for 1942 then said *My iiext aiin<)rin(^c?ment. 
is with regard to the Indian Bcic?nce Cougre^ss (('takaitta) 'M'eciaL 



1942] 


Proceedings Annual Meeting, 


9 


This medal is awarded whenever the Science Congress holds its 
annual session in Calcutta, and it has so far been awarded twice— 
in 1935 to Br. Meghnad Saha and in 1938 to Sir Janies Jeans/ 

The Patron handed over the medals to the General Secretary 
for transmission to the recipients. 

After these announcements the President declared the 
Annual Meeting to be dissolved with the following words : — 
'Ladies and Gentlemen, 

'In declaraing the Annual Meeting dissolved, I invite the 
non-menibers present to examine the collection of exhibits 
at the other end of the hall, and the members present to re- 
assemble around this table for an Ordinary Monthly Meeting 
for the election of an Ordinary Member and the transaction of 
business.’ 

After this final announcement the President for 1942 then, 
conducted His Excellency the Patron to inspect the exhibits 
(see page 30). 

At 7 p.M. the Patron left the hall, conducted by the Pre- 
sident, after which an ordinary monthly meeting was held, 
whilst the visitors inspected the exhibits. 



ANNUAL ADDEESS, 1M1«42« 


Arioihor year lias |kuss(h,.I ju"mI owin,^ io wiu* I iiitrl 

myself, iiTiex|H‘(*!, rally, but m'naa'i.iie.brss with pride ajul pleasure, 
still ymir Presirhait, cm whom nests whalr scune forniia’ IN’cssidcaiis 
have (lescTil'Hxi a.s ilie incubus of iPc Anmia-i Address, it- is 
curious there is su)t arul, so faj' a-s I can trave, uevea* has hciai 
any tu'ovision for suel'i an Addt‘css in, our ndcs. 

In t-lie first placc^ it is my duty i-o !'(hT*r t.o idic* dea,ths 
during 1!I41 of s(^vcral distinguishcHl iu.cj} who h,a;Vc^ l>c^cm a.sso- 
ciated witli tlic^ work of tlu^ Socied-y. Sir (■leorgc (trierson held 
a unique position in tlu^ donudn of the* study of Indian hin- 
giiages and dialcadrS. lie vvumS th,c Director e?f tlic liinguistac 
iSiirvoy of India. Prof. C. 'M. L;uiuia,n was a greaf Smiskrit 
scliolar and Oricnitaiist, and Prof<,‘ssor of Ha-nskrit- a-t Harvard 
University. Sir ibirnes .'Pra/aa* wa.s the auHior of tluit fjonous 
work ‘The Goldiai JP)ugh\ a-ia] ni.a.ny oilier staidi(‘s of primitive 
beliefs and institutions. Dr. Rabindra Nui-h 1jigor(‘ was ma^li* 
a Speda.1 Anniversm’y C(aitena,ry .Mmnlan* of tlio Society in IfiTI-, 
His lift',' and work is so well, known tliat it wonki be a. work 
of su|.>ererogaii(,>n to . attempt, a. suinmary. Sliaansail-iriarna 
Klian Baha.(,!:u'r 'Dr. ,IVL 'Hidayat Hosain was eoniicH'd.‘fC'Hl wit-h tlM:^ 
Society for over 40 years. .He 'was J'oini ',!:dfi]o,logi(,:aI. Scaaa'^i'aia' 
from i925 to 1.939, was the author and talitor of many liamiec'l 
papers and works in Ai’aliic an<,l Persian, and from 1935 was 
entrusted 'w.itlx tlie ■|;)u.l)Ucation of the Oatai,ognes c,>f Ai’jdiie and 
’Persian Manuscri'pts. Sir Gangatxath J'ha. wa.s .M,onora-r,\’ lAlit.or 
of VMaiiii in our Bihliolheca Indiea Sealers. Thc^ Maha- 

rajadJiiraja of Burdwan. wiis one of our Viha.^l'hnsidenl^H. He 
was distinguished for his br(*adt!i of miiK'b enimnmi senses 
and sound judgment, and possessed va-liud>l<‘ (pudities of u 
type too .rare in India to bt^ lost wiihout gn^at regret. 

We ar<'^ now in tiie midst of what may bt* said wiihouf, 
exaggeratiori to bi? a» world-waii* and the grea-tesi- wa-r in history. 
At such a niormaitons tinier aaal ami<ist smli a^ stnpcmdons i,i|e 
lieaval, wliieh is now' dose to our own d(.)or‘s, it. is <lifli<*u!i tc^ fine'! 
anything to say to you w’hidi will be. ap;propria.(.e aa'id fitting not. 
only to the thm^s but t.o the oeiatsion of Ha.'i Annua! Mf.^et.ing of 
tl 1 is I (:iar .r ued S o e i,o ty . 

Liko everytliing else the wrir ha.s aifeetcai our Sodd,y .in 
many ways. It has caused and will increasingly <V:itis<:> a, consi- 
derable diminution in our activities and somc^ 'loss of rrimnbers!n{o 
aiK.l we have incurri^d lieavy c^xtra expenditure owing t.o the 
urgent necessity of 'prot/ccting and preserving in pla<;^t‘s of safety 
the (3ountl0ss manuscripts, books, picitures and otlie,r iiossessioiis 
whicli are our priedeBs heritages 

( 10 ) 



[voL, VIII, 1942] 


Annual Address. 


11 


You m,ay remember that last year I departed from what was 
thought by most of us including myself to be the usual convention 
of an Address upon some special subject. I did so deliberately ^ 
not because I am not qualified as a specialist, except perhaps 
as a lawyer*, but because I thought it a bad convention which 
might have the effect of limiting the office of President to spe- 
cialists, in fact several past Presidents, including men so eminent 
as the late Sir Rajendra Nath Mookerjee have thought it neces- 
sary to apologize for their lack of special knowledge, and because 
many special subjects, though of the greatest interest to special- 
ists, are not of general interest nor suitable for the Annual 
General Meeting of this Society, intended as it is for the general 
entertainment and if possible edification of the large gatherings 
of our resident members and their friends which are to he expected 
nowadays on these mainly social occasions. 

But on searching the records of our Society I was, and you 
may be, surprised to find that this so-called convention is of 
comparatively recent origin and that during the Society's 
existence of 158 years there have been only 14 of such Addresses, 
the rest being concerned solely with the work of the Society 
and its various activities and in the earlier period with very 
lengthy reviews or synopses of scholarship and science not only 
over the whole of India, but including, so far as Oriental studies 
were concerned, the whole of the world. Of these earlier Ad- 
dresses each covered an average of over 100 printed pages, 
one l)eing 170 pages in length, yet described as brief and incom- 
plete, and were compilations of articles supplied by the sectional 
Secretaries and other collaborators. I trust that they were never 
in fact folly delivered to long suffering audiences, and I am 
not surprised that they came to be regarded as an incubus. 

Nevertheless these old Addresses are well worthy of study. 
It is useful occasionally to make comparison of our present 
condition with our past history and examine the gradual evolu- 
tion of our Society, You will remember how last year I drew 
attention to the existence of growing dissatisfection among 
many of our memb(u‘s with, our organization and our cultural 
acitivities and made a number of suggestions for future guidance 
with the object of stimulating thought. I found, from, letters 
whicli I received, tliat my remarks were appreciated by a consi- 
de,rable number of our members, though in converBation and 
otiierwise I became aware of a good deal of opposition from 
others. It wiis clear that there existed a distinct cleavage of 
opinion, and I think that we must find some way to meet the 
views of both. 

Therefore I made it my business to examine our records 
over many past years, and found to my surprise that many of 
our present difficulties and the criticisms made about our declin- 
ing usefulness and prestige have been paralleled again and again 
in the past. What is more important and more useful to us in 



12 Yenr’^Book R,A,S.B,for 1941. ['voL. viif, 

tiie present is tlsat sound rea/SOiis are given, for those (‘oiiditions 
wliic,!'! hotii tlien Uiiid n<,>\v liavc l)eeii and are the suhjert’ of 
anxiety and complaint, and wliile many useful 8ygg<‘stioiis Itjive 
been itiacie l)y way of rmne.(.iy, niuch .,1 desire i>ring to your 
notice, tlie impossil'ulit'y ara'I 'iin|,>raotieahilii'y of reviving nmiiy 
of our past aeilv'ities iia.s l,H‘en <,‘{ea;rly and fruHilily expresscMh 
Oil the othe/r ha/nd, I' !mv(^ eonu> to the eiaadusion tlial the 
foiKlaiiieiital reaison for tlu‘ d(M*l!ne^ in tiie presti’ge of our 
Society has never hetai fully gras|HM,i or <'learly a,p(uv('iated. 

Th(^ .most striking el'King(‘ in the condition of tlu* St;H„it*fy is 
111 the personnel of our o,{li(*<'‘rs and. members and <.*«rntrihut«,»rs. 
.1.11 tlie first 7i) yeai*s of the 8oei(,‘ty\s life only (.me .Indian n;mw 
appeal's a..mong tin.' Offh.Ha's a.nd in th<;‘ m^xt JId years only d morm 
Ail th,e work of Oie 8o<nety was dorK'‘ by Eiiropi‘a,ns, fiio.s!.,!\'' 
officials, and this stat(,^ of adalrs eontinned a,lni{,)st to ttir* 
beginni,ng of tin^ prescait <.?<mti,u'y. For example, of |>apt‘rs 
co,ritri1)nted to Pa,rt I" of the Jonmal betwcsai ,18‘hl a,n(l I89d, 
724 were by Enro|)(‘ans and 1.95 liy .Indians, a/m.! to Ihirt 11, 
I, ,021 and 18 ri^sficetively. 

Mr. Beveridge, who was our .President in ,1.801,, saJd : 

Mt is miicli to ho regretted that so few native, gentlmimn t^aki^ 
a promii.ient ];)art in our nnsetingB, and that so few, comparatlvi.ly 
speaking, are inerataa’s. Doubtless the chief reason vvliy wo luivt^ 
not more .native members is that the subseripti<,.m is rather highd 

In 1896 Mr. (afterwards 8ir Alexander) Pedler said: 

‘‘It is difficult to come to any conclusion .from the 'foregoing 
facts than the disheartening one, that native geJitlmnrii as a, 
whole have not yet shown any particular aptitiiidt^ for (.aigiiml 
resea'rch, and that this is true not only with .resea, rch o'fa, iit'era,i'y 
nature, but more particularly true of resear(,1i in Physi<‘al, 
and Natural Sciences,* 

In the Centenary volume Dr. Ita-jei'idra I'^al, Mitvra, wmio as 
follo'ws : 

‘Looking 'to the numeric^al wt‘a.k'ness of Ft.'irripean s«ai(,1'y in 
India, and to tiie a.rduo'us diaracter of the v}iri(:,ais oeeiipal.liajH 
in 'which its members are engaged, it wmdd Ih^ iinr(*fm(mable in 
expect that .many men 'woulcl be found (levot.e their tit'ue iif 
lit6,ra.ry and scientific pursuits. . , . , . Natives, on th,e other liafid, 
ha've, gcme'ral,ly speaki'ug, a directive (X'lu<"tation In (*m1y life, 
and cannot engage in researches, th<^ fruits of 'wliidi, hav(** te^ 
recorded i,n, a foreign language. The Asiatit? Soilety has i,hiis 
always la!)oured under a doul)le disadvantage Nc.h:witli“ 

standing the heavy duties they (Europeans 'in Pivil, Medkjal 
and Military service of the East India Co,m|')ar'iy) i",ia(,l to clisclmige 
in th,e.ir^re8p(M;jtive spheres, many of them 'cont'ributc,H.I, largely to 
the efficiency, the stalnlity, and the adva,ncernent of the Hoe'h^ty 
by their literary labours and scientific researclies/ 



1942] 


Annual Address, 


13 


Contrast all this with the statement made by Sir Rajendra 
Mookerjee in 1925: ^It was not an unjust criticism in 1896 that 
Indians as a general rule did not ‘‘show any particular aptitude 
for original research” especially in the domain of science. This 
feature is responsible for the almost complete absence of Indian 
iianies (with a few brilliant exceptions) from the illustrious bead- 
roll of the Society for one hundred years. The criticism is 
no longer true; since the late nineties Bengal has witnessed a 
wonderful educational revival and the number of Indians devot- 
ing their time and energies to original research has been steadily 
on the increase. We see the change in the composition of the 
Society’s officers, and in the contents of our Journal and 

Proceedings But at the same time I am constrained to 

remark that there has been a remarkable falling off of interest 

amongst the European members I am afraid I have to 

record the almost complete lack of interest, in so far as the 
Society’s literary and scientific work is concerned, amongst the 
officials to-day.’ 

Now let us turn again to these Addresses in order to seek 
for guidance about our future. I shall not attempt to para- 
phrase what our Presidents have said, but give you verbatim 
extracts from their speeches, upon the language of which I 
cannot hope to improve. 

Thus in 1880 Mr. Medlicott said: 

‘ In normal communities scientific societies are mostly res- 
tricted to special branches of study, and are sufficiently supported 
by men more or less devoted to that study, and who think it an 
honour, and an advantage to belong to the society. For larger 
societies that deal with all subjects there are also enough and to 
spare of scientific workers seeking the advantages or the honour 
of fellowship. If there were any need to illustrate how abnormal 
is the community to which we belong in India, the statistics of 
our Society would be much to the point. The relation of the 
body to the members seems to be almost the reverse of what I 
have indicated as normal. The very precarious hold the Society 
has upon its members has always been a complaint, but instead 
of mending with the advance of civilization, there are signs of 
its becoming a serious disease. This has been distressingly 
exhibited of late in connexion with a praiseworthy endeavour 
mad© by our administration to get the affairs of the Society 
into more regular working order. In some instances when 
notice was sent to members, calling attention to the rules of the 
Society and stating how long the subscription had been in 
arrears, while they had been in regular receipt of the Journal^ 
instead of apologizing for their neglect, as a proper sense of the 
situation would dictate, fhey have not been ashamed to take 
offence at the notice, and to request the removal of their name 
from the list of members. The fact, I say, is a caution against 



14 


Year-Book R,A.,8.B. for 1041. 


vffr. 


at-tem|:)tiiig to regulate our practixK^ too clo.sely j>ii thc^ iiMttrnii of 
societies in a .normal community 

Flowover English. men may conduct tlu'insclvcs in .liidjji, 
they cjin nevei* of themsf^lves form thr^ normal com in unity 
wliieli it is the function of (;*-ivili,zatiori to establish. Hii|:)eri'h‘i,*illy 
it did not S(‘ein a.n unnatsonal>h> hop(‘ thaf the stMals ol'kiiowlcclae 
would t.a-ke root in this <*ouniry, and in time yic^id an, a.biindant: 
crop of nativi^ scientific'. w'orkc.u’S, amongst- wlimii tliis Soci<‘ly 
won lei find it's naiiira.l, sujiport 

I hoA'o twice referred to the ag(^ of amatems; and, from tlm 
lips of a “'profess,io:nai’h it miglit Ik‘ thought tliat',- tla^ ic'rni 'wa.s 
.meant slightingly. .T used it as peculiarly desigiiatnig thi' bond 
of folio wsliip that >should unite a Socit.dy <'>!irs 

I lia've madc^ a f’lia'nclpal a;j,)|')eal to tlie 'inoraJ, consraousness of 
Englishmen in fndia, hut it hedvoves 'Us to do \vlia4/ we ea,n t'o 
conc*!,iliatc so ca|)ricious an au'xiliary. If it should (‘-onic. io be 
tliought that the Soe-i(d,.y is in the* !ia.-nds o'f, I'lnd siil!h:,‘iei'}tly 
provid(^d for by, drwotees in t.he sba;p(-‘ of {‘xp(u.’ts and pi‘ofr‘.s- 
siouals ’b 'we should risk losing the very sliglif. hokl we have,* upcm 
a large iiiimlior of our uKunhe^rsf 

111 1887 Mr. Atkinson said: 

^Tt luis bc^en sonuddmes urged that wes should make* our rma-d- 
ii'igs more interesting to the general public and tlK,KSC‘ jimongst our 
mei'ubers wlio do not occupy themselves with miltivating a,iiy 

pa'rticular branch of .knowledge Idle mi'aiis a,rr‘ jit 

hand and have received the sanction of your Oouncil. 0,n noti,c(,* 
given to our Secretaries, they will 'plac^e on tlie agem.la. paper for 
tlie even:ing any one of tlic iiumorous sulijetsts 'wltl'iin the scope, ^ 
of our Society that any membeu'* 'may 'wisli to hi'ing 'feru’ard i,Vir 
discuss:ion, and this sliall be th('- sifbject of <*.onvt‘rsation (or ilic* 
meeting, to lie e,ntere<l on aftcu* tb,c‘ formal business of 'the* I'venlng 
ha.s bc'cn concluded, and not 'to 'form a-ny po'rii(,m of tlif* !*e(*ords 

thcri'of .Looking biutk on tlu'^ lusfory of our SrK‘iety 

and analyzing tile's (‘xisi-ing listNif mmnbm’s, one,‘ fact, is (‘vidmit 
thr<"mgbout, that w<'‘ a,.re*. (‘ssmitially a. Siadciy of ania.l.mu's wifi'i 
a few ’|;)r(',)fcssio,naI men to weld our elforis togcl'lwr, and it is, 
in a grmt '[lart*, tlie labours <')f these amateurs tliai- fmvo Imill 
up tliis Scadety and made^ it what it. isf 

In 1889 Cloloncd Watewh<,ms<'^ said: 

' W('^ haves as yet no class of hdsured (h,wotee*H of HcnVrice\ as 

in otlu3r coirntri(,\s, l^Vir firogrt'SH in the' |">ra,f‘iie‘al 

app,lieatic)ns of science 'we 'have mairily to’ 'lo(„ik to tlir^ Sim:'‘nt, 4 fic 
I)epartni(3!:its of the (lovcrrunent ; for*few of us fiavc:*. (dt!,im’ 
fociiities or the leisure for carrying out ind,i.?pen(.lm"it ia.‘Hc«i,rcl'if^w 
of our own; and thus it has come aliout that c^xpr^rirnental Hcicnc!<„‘ 
occupies so sruall a place in orir Journal, a fact greatly tc„i he 
reg,retted, for 'the field of useful work is still large."" It rinist bt* 



Annual Address, 


15 


adinittedj liowever, that there is mueh in favour of the centraliza- 
tion of the results of the scientific work carried on under G-overn- 
ineiit ill various departments, so that enquirers in this or other 
countries may at once know where the information they are in 
search of is most likely to be found; the work is done more com- 
pletely, and thc^ continuity of the records of it thus secured is 
of the utmost importance.’ 

And in 1890 he said: 

'As usual, we have to look to the scientific departments of 
Government for the principal additions to our knowledge of 
Indian geography, geology and mineralogy, meteorology, botany 
(scientific and economic), chemistry, archaeology, biology, and 
to a very great extent, of zoology, which seems to he the one 
subject that appeals more than any other to the private worker. 

There are few countries where so much scientific 

work is done by Government as in India, as evidenced by the 
many valuable publications that are yearly brought out in the 
branches of science above enumerated. When we contrast the 
state of Indian scientific literature noiv with what it was when I 
joined the service some 30 years ago, the value and amount of 
the work of this kind done l>y the Government will be clearly 
seen. Tliere were then no Archaeological Surveys, no Meteorolo- 
gical Bepartmeiit, no scientific Annals of any kind except, I 
believe, the Records of the Geological Survey, and the Reports 
of the Gre«at Trigonometrical Survey. The principal Museum 
in the country was our own and most of the scientific work done 
was by members of our Society,’ 

In 1891 Mr. Beveridge said: 

'Provision might also be made then for a discussion of the 
annual report and the annual address, and I would suggest that 
the meeting in March might be set apart for the purpose. At 
present members have no opportunity of effectively discussing 
the annuail r 0 |)ort, for though it is the practice to invite remarks 
aft(U'* the r(.q)o:rt has been read, there is no time at the February 
mec'ting for a discussion, and moreover meml)ers are not tlien in 
a posit.ion discuss the report as they liave' not studied it. 

T am very anxious that our Society should not 

fall lahind tlie times, and I liave no wish to conceal from you 
tliaf vv(^ ]')assing through a pcu'iod of trial, and that there have 
been ominous mutterings about our delays and alleged somno- 
lence. I have been struck with '"the idea tb, at wliat we 

want is (concentration of effort, and limitation of scope. I think 
tliat our lines a, re too extended. It is true that we have 
autlioT'ity for wide views in the motto which stands on the 

covers of our Journal and Proceedings Sir William 

Jones was spccaking in the early days of oriental learning and 
when the wealth of each plot of the field of research was not 



16 


Year-Book E.A£.B,for 1941, 


[voL. 


known. Oii!\s was tlieii tlie only Society in IiKlia. . . , . . Drir 
vciierakle Society is like M'iltoivs banian tr-eo: 

'^Bra.nchi,ng so ht'oad and long tliati on the ground 
T!u> liended, twigs talce root, arul daughters grow 
Abrnit tlie :fnoth<>r treed^ 

We haiVe an cxcidlerst hall for i(M'tnrrs, [umI 

we do not inake .snffieirait use of it, or snOieienily tain* a«i vantage 
of the admirable site of onr bnilding. Ikadia.fjs we do not- nmke 

ourselves prominent enougli We might: aJsrj iurve 

coiiAan'sazioni, or even revival the old 'pra,etiee of an annual,, 
dinner. We are ,not a rig.idly 8c.ientifi(? Society. Wi* (in* and 
always have been, a Society composed mainly of aniittcsns, and 
there would be no harm, I think, i,n e(,air*tir„ig puhheity. Wf* mnsfr 
marc'li with the times and l)e on our guard agakisl. anaelii*!?- 

nisms It was by its antiqinrrian ittid |>hilo|ogiea,l 

researclies that the Asiatic Soiaidy origina,lly marie its r«‘|>iita,.“ 
tion, and I ajn inclined to think that it is by smdi that 

it will best jnainta-in its ground. We haaaa an imm<msr‘ arlva-n- 
tage over :for'eign. Societies in our l)eing able t.o get. {'(Hitribiit'ions 
.from Government o,ffic(,a,‘s and othfu's living in tbc^ interio?\ arnl in 
being able to get help from the native's of tlu,^ c^ormtry. In pun,' 
scholarship we cannot compete with li^aris or Bin‘li,n,, but wherevin* 
local knowledge (^omes in, we can pull tliem ovoi* the line. .... 

The resources of our Society are limited, and ,1. suppose that 
we are about tlie only Oriental Society tliat has two distinet- 
departments, and tries to carry- on pari passu aritiqiuiria!i and 
physical research/ 

In 1902 Sir John Woodburn said: 

‘'A proposal of cardinal importance was also !,)r<:,mght iH'for<^ 
you for altering the status of the Society by incbaling in its st*(»pe 
the development of Indian art, and (^sjKxdally l>y a.n enijirged 
attention to the a/ppllcation of scienc^e iri Basiern stud,l<\s. 
deciBion, of the Society has l.x^cm to leave its mmt,' an<l sfafus 
unclia,nged. I’f I nuiy say so, 1 tliink tiiat dec'ision wa.s right'. 
The Society lias an anckmt a.nd lionourtxl name. Its sfircbd 
and |)rope,r objects have l,)ee!i (x:>nH(,HU‘at‘.e(l by tbe lapjse of years. 
Tlie seicavtifie. students it was jiropoHed to allnrr^ t-o our rolls liavi,^ 
independent a:nd special i^icd orgn.ni5^iations, a 4 u,l I ihinli tbe 
:maJority of the Socic'ty w(a*e right in tbe belird’ tint tlu* origi- 
nators of tlie proposal woukl not succeed in mcrg:tng tlu'si' Ahsc,^ 
ciatlons in the wider an(,I ;more general bo<ly of tlu' Asiat.ic 
Soc;iety.’ 

In 1904 Mr. (afterwards Sir Henry) Risloy said: 

H now turn to tlie large queBtion of the posIti<,a:i a.ii,d proS'-- 
pects of this Society. We all know that it is not the powci' that 
it was in its earlier days. We all know that people say tliat our 
,raeetings are dreary, tliat our Journal appears at tong and urn 



Annual Address. 


17 


c('?rtaio intervals, that its pages are devoid of all human or other 

interest We shall all admit, when we have relieved our 

minds by a gibe at the Philistine in the street, that the authority 
and influence of the Soqicty are not what they were a century 
ago. We do not do so much, and what we do does not attract so 

nvuch general attention as it did 

The staiidaixl explanation, a stock excuse for many things 
in India, is want of leisure, Every one is said to be too busy. 
The deinands of official work, of business, of society are heavier 
than they were in the old days. People had time then to read 

and to tliink; they have no time now 

Tliere is another stock apology which, like the former, is 
used in a loose general way to account for anything in India 
that is thought for the moment to be out of joint. We are told 
that since the days of railways and steamers Englishmen in 
India have become mere birds of passage, that they go to Europe 
so often that they lose their interest in the East, and get out of 
toucli with the people and their ways. Consequently, so the 
arguinent runs, they no longer care to write papers for the Asiatic 
Society; its journal languishes and its meetings liave become 
dull. Tlie conclusion may 'or may not be true: the premise is, 
in my opinion, if not absolutely false, at any rate far too widely 
stat-ed. There has never been a time when interest in India 
and in tlie East generally has been so keen and so widely diffused, 
in Europe as it is at the present day. You see it in. every branch 
of the subject with w^hich this Society deals, and it has been and 
will continue to be enormously quickened by the great political 
movement which is now in progress — the scramble for posses- 
sions, trade interests and points d' appui in Asia. It is indeed 
hardly a iiaradox to say that if any one in this country is in want 
of a stimuhis in the partic\ilar branch of study in which, he is 
enga.ged, hf.‘. will best find it in a visit to Europe and in contact 
with fellow- workers there. Any one of a dozen societies will 
give him a cordial reception, and their ent.husiasm revive his 
flagging energies. He will realize that the study of Indian sub- 
jects holds a higher place than it has over do.ne, that it is no longer 
ti'(*jrted as a t,h;ing apart which can be ig,tiored with impunity, 
but tlU'it it enters into the solution of problems which a genera- 
tion a.go no one would have dreamed of approaching from the 
Ti'idiaii point of view. Nor do I admit that the Europeans at 
work in India at the present day know less about the country 
and tlie people than their predecessors of a century ago. Of the 
country as a whole they know infinitely more because they have 
seen moi‘e, because trains and steamers move faster than boats 
and palanquins. Of the people also they can know more if they 

choose to take the trouble, for they have a better start 

For the real causes of the diminished influence of the 
Society we must look back to the history of its own growth and 
development. Whe,n our first President, Sir 'William Jones, 



i8 


Year^Booh E.A MJl for 1041 . 


'VllT, 


gave to tlie workl, as Sir HeiUT i\laii,ie a.(Iiiiira.l)ly put:' it:, 
mocleiTi sciiaiae of 11uiol<,)gy a.nd the iiioderji tluaary of Raei*’\ 
the Asiaite Soriety of ’B<'‘ngaj tiad a, -praetical faoi'i,o|'«>Iy of the 
new leai’iiiog. 44a ■ C fa-ieiittia. seh<4a:rs ot: tha4:< i!a.y, clones, 
brooke, W'ilkios a:nd Wilson, a-1! of tiuan aol-ive members of this 
Boeiety, wca'e the pioneers of th<‘. Sanskrit. Ileimissama' as thi^ 
G!.TH?k\s(4i(>la.TS of tlu‘ Ibth eiad-ury w<a‘(M;)f reviva-l of learning 
in Eiirxj'pe. But (taieiitta. was not long t.o remain the eeiitir<“ of 
Sanskrit studies. Wlaai tlie (h"*rnian, UnivcTsitie.s ent^ere<l the 
tield guided by ]-i.innl>oldt and Wolff, u.ud controlltM'l liy a fionaa'in 
roeiit too wis(‘ to lea,vt,^ th(i great national Intercast o{* liiglH^r 
ed!ieati<')n to tli<^ (‘.ha!ie(.\s of private enterpriscg i.lie r*onibinjition 
of industry a,.nd organization wa,s bound to make its(*!f felt.. . . . 

In the region of s(*iene(', while the result luis laa'U} tin'* sa,me, 
it has (*ome a})out in ratlum a dillena^i way. When tlH‘ Founder 
of th('‘> Asiatic Soeic4'.y defined th<^ ranges of its inc|niries as {ex- 
tending to wiuitevc‘r is i'>y ma.n or |)rodutH‘d l>y^ mit'ur<% 

Ills words corresponded to tiie fa<d;s. W(^ tlum the soh,^ 

organ of I’csiairch in Asia. Wlvaievia* wa,s don«‘ in (biology, 
Metcorologjg Zoology, Botany wa«s done at i.he instanei^ of a.nd 
through, tlie agency f.)f this Soci<4:'y, and thc^ resnlt.s t.jf 
research, os w<a‘e pulilisliod in. this JouruaL Now all these 
b:ranchea of seientifie activity have grown a.nd d,i‘velo|a*d on 
lines of tluar own. 1''hey have blossonuai foi‘th into separate 
departments, a,nd they publish their own memoirs. Tliis is tlie 
natural course of evolution 

Wliat then is there left for us to do ? We c.amiot’-— I would 
:frankly admit t.h0 fact — aspire to rival tlie Gtnniians in tla,^ mattcjr 
of scholarship, at any rate not at piesmit. .ft may he tliat ray 
frie.nds Dr, .Ross and. Hara 'Prasad Sastri will sucec'ed in erei-iting 
traditions of (,*.ritical accuracy on th,<^ lines recognized as soumi ,in 
.Eui’opc^ and will train up a geueratio.n of Jomwes, Ck>l«4,>rookes 
and Wilsoj'is. But it will takt^ a long time, for mod(‘rn Hclmlm*- 
ship is a, Imrd mistri>ss to s(‘rv(% and domraHls jin tnielleet.ual 
eciinpment, a range; of know]e>dge, and a- stmulujil (h' ai‘eiirae‘y 
far biwoml the rea(*h of tlm typiea.1 IVhuilvi or Panditu Ihitil 
tlmt ideal has been r<^aliz(‘d W(* must (content c.Mirseives with tlif' 

useful if ine.(.,m8picu(.ms work fhat wo do now -‘C.ollecting manie 

scripts and publishing texts, furnishing tlie mat.iu'ia! \vlii<h 
.Euro'pean scholars will work up. In this matitiu* wc*. Imve tlie 
great advantage of bcii.ig o.n the B|)ot. ...... Ariothtu’ liuf* 

of possible activity is antiquarian research in which hho man 
on th,e spot lias an obvious advantage ovea* ilu^ most laborious 
sti-ident wo:rking at a distance. ....... I said al:)o\’e% and I' 

fancy that no one will disagree with us, that in maitei’s of scliolar- 
ship the centre of authority has now beem, shiftcs'l to Etiroiau 
But mere sc!iolarshi;p is not ovewything. It is only a im‘ai:is to 
the higher end of recoustr acting the life of tlK5 past. In working 
towards this end stiu.lents of tlic 'East have the griiiit ad, vantages 



Annual Address, 


19 


that the present is the past or at any .rate is so full of survivals of 
the past that it forms the only instructive commentary on the 
written record. Here it seems to me is the most promising field 
for tlie future researches of out Society,’ 

In 1910 Mr. Justice (afterwards Sir Asutosh) Mookerjee said: 

^Tlie most important point in connection with the interna! 
administration of the Society during the last year, is the decision 
about the creation of Fellowships, to be conferred solely in 
recognition of literary and scientific work. It cannot be denied 
that a membership of the Asiatic Society does not import any 
recognition of original work, and as such, has little or no attrac- 
tion to the modest scholar whose main object is the advance- 
ment of knowledge. To alter the constitution of the Society so 
as to restrict admission only to persons distinguished for re- 
search, would obviously narrow the field of supply, and might, 
indeed, in a brief space of time, prove suicidal. On the other 
hand, if the prestige and reputation of the Society are to be 
maintained undiminished, the object can be attained only by 
the enrolment, as members, of distinguished workers in the 
different branches of historical, philological, and scientific 
activity. With the formation, however, of important depart- 
ments of State, devoted to the furtherance of scientific research 
in special branches, with the simultaneous increase in the number 
of special societies for the promotion of different branches of 
knowledge, and with increased facilities for the publication of 
original researches of any degree of value and importance, it 
would be idle to expect that any considerable proportion of the 
research carried on in this country should, as it was a century 
ago, be communicated for the first time to the learned world 
through the medium of our publications. The practical mono- 
poly which we then enjoyed in this respect, has long since dis- 
appeared, and if w© desire still to attract to oxir ranks the best 
amongst the original workers in this country, we must be prepared 
to create a distinction which would be valued as a recognition 
of merit by people engaged in the task of widening the bounds 
of knowledge.’ 

In 1911 Mr* La Touche said: 

Hn addition to these publications and collections, which 
may be said to represent the fundamental and customary work 
of the Society, especially on its literary side, an attempt has been 
made to expand its sphere of usefulness by the admission of the 
general public to lectures, illustrated when possible by lantern 

slides, on various subjects of common interest Such 

is the success that has attended these lectures, and so much 
interest has been displayed in them by people who, though not 
members of the Society, are, attracted by such opportunities of 
acquiring some knowledge of subjects unconnected with their 



20 


Year^Booh R.A.S,B, for 1941. 


[voL, viri:, 


daily avocations, tliat every effort shoiilcl l)0 made to cairry 

theiii on For many years after tlie foimdatioii of 

the Society, its |mblicatio!is were almost tiic only nie{liii!ii 
til rough wirlc^h tlio i’c\scarchcs of those who gave tlnanselves l^o 
tlie study of tlie science and literature of tliis va-st country could 
ho given to tlie world; at least this is time of ilu^ gi’eate-r pori.iem 
of India. But, with th,e estahlishmeuit by an eulightiuiecl 
Government of separate departuKmts, concerning themselves 
witli the collection and co-ordination of fa:(d’.s pertaining to 
various branches of scientific encpiiiy, it was inevitaliie tliat the* 
publication of tliese facts shoiii.d becotne a function of each 
Department, and th,at the Society shorild, to that extent, bc^ 
deprived of some of its importance. First the (Teoiogi,stK, th.en 
the Meteorologi.sts, Zoologists, Botanists, find Areluw'ologists, 
who formerly contributed much. va.,liiablo matter to the pages 
of o'ur Journal, established tlieir own liecords a,nd Mimioirs, 
and for some years th.e Soc.uety Inis become mori^ and, more 
restricted to the domain of literature. Though I would not for 
a moment have it imagined that I think tliat tliis growing con- 
centration on one branch of .knowledge implies any degeneration 
in the activity or aims of tlie Society, for tlio publication of Gio 
results of enqiii,rics into the a.neien,t civili/aitiou and .hist(.)ry of 
India must be regarded as of tlie utmost importance; yet I do 
not see why tlie equally important result.s of scie.ntific researcdi 
should be comparatively neglected. The scientific departments 
publish the facts; but usually so wrapped up in technical lan- 
guage or in such minute detail that, to tlie uninitiated, they 
become either wearisome or perhaps hardly intelligible. And 
yet it is quite possible to present the essential facts Iironght to 
light l)y these iiivestigatio.ns in such a form, that eve,n those wiio 
are unacquainted with the methods (.ir with tlu^. peculiar dialect 
employed may be instructed and interested. Oui* k'‘.ctiires c(.)n~ 
stitute a useful stivp In, this direciimi; Imt 1 should likt^ to s<,m‘ an 
attempt madc^- to summarize in the Jowrnal the rf*sul{;s of siiicm- 
tific! work pei:I:(>r,med in this country, so that tlu? :i,niV)r’mation 
now often buried liencath masses of statistii^s and, otlu.u' di^y 
and iiniriterc^sting .mattei* might Ix^ madi^ mori^ a[>}Md}i/J ng iind 
availalile to its reade.rs 

In an(,)ther direction also the So(,ii(‘.ty may |>erfomi, if 
chooses, a most useful function, lliat is, in leading I'uihlic 
opinion on qiic^stions of pnictical sci(uitifi,c, lltei'ary, fuw.i evem 
social impOT’ta.n(ie 

A question of pressing importances, in which, the Society 
might exercise a valuable influence on, public (>|)inio.n, is that of 
the form, and method of Education that would be most suitable 
under the conditions prevailing in India. There is no doulit 
that ser,ious changes are necessary in the present system, one 
that has been establislied in the country by an alien raccy anxious 
to impress Western ideas of culture upon a people wliose point 



1942] 


Annual Address, 


21 


of view differs in many essential respects from their own; and 
every serious contribution to the discussion that has already 
arisen with regard to the direction that these changes should 
take cannot fail to he usefuld 

In 1922 8ir Asutosh Mookerjee said: 

^Biit I havc^ heard it urged that we are no longer able to 
repeat the brilliant record of our earliest years. In tills connec- 
tion I would like to invite the attention of our critics to two out- 
standing circumstances. In the first place, the pioneers in a 
new field have opportunities of exploration and discovery which 
can scarcely if ever recur to their successors, however able and 
devoted. In the second place, what is perhaps of even greater 
importance, the lamp which was lighted by our illustrious founder 
more than a century ago has enabled others to light similar 
lamps elsewhere, which must necessarily share with ours the 
glory of dispelling the darkness that envelopes the history of our 
past. During the last century societies and other institutions 
have sprung up in Europe and America, as also in Asiatic coun- 
tries beyond the limits of India, wdiere Ancient Indian History 
and Culture engage the attention of bands of enthusiastic stu- 
dents and investigators. Many of tliese institutions are main- 
tained by the State; many again are supported by liberal aid 
from the public funds, while others fiourish by reason of private 
munificence.’ 

In 1924 Dr. Annandale said : 

‘ We are told that this is due to the strenuous life of the 
present age as compared with the leisure of the past. The life 
of the present day with its constant journeys and junketings is 
not coiidiKuve to study or application, but we must remember 
that if life was less strenuous a century ago it was also much 
more difficult, not merely in material things, but in all the appa- 
ratus of learning. . . . 

The ti.mes are difficult for Oriental scholarship in India, 
We are at the parting of the ways and only the confirmed optimist 
can be quite sure that we are even in a state of transition* 
The greatest Greek scholars were never natives of Athens, Latin 
scholars of Rom.o or Egyptian scholars of Cairo : scholarship in 
Calcutta must prove itself an exception to the rule. ' I am 
always expecting great things of Indian scholarship, but must 
confess myself disappointed with much of the indology of India. 
Good work is done, but there is little true imagination or 
originality and progress is delayed, not accelerated, by wild 
extravagance, by the readiness with which those in authority 
accept a low standard and by the good-natured but injudicious 
praise of scholars abroad to whom Indian scholarship comes as a 
surprise, as a new thing from which too much must not be 
expected. There can be only one ultimate standard for true 

2 



22 . Year-Book E.A ,S.B. for 1941 . [ vol . viih 

scliolarsliip ; is it sound or is it not? Praise hestowi'd on 
research for racial, political or official reasons is an insiilt t,o 
true learning, not a coinplimentd 

In 1925 Sii.‘ Jtajcndra. Natli. iMoGk(n‘jee said : 

“■'Wc^ are proial of this a.chievcaneni:. I>nli wo slionlci ii«^i 
igno'ix^’! that, tiun’o lia,s Ixm'ii a, pi*ogr(\ssiv<^ in ti'ie 

and omineiit position which our 8ocit4.y (ornnuindod a.t one lime. 
We recognize and applaud tlie brinia.rs,t work of tfa^ Enaicli 
German sa.va,iits. 1 am of opinion that we shmild make si:.rc‘nuoijs 
effbri'-s to reocjciipy the pre-erainemt place whicii our |:)red(H'n,^sso!‘s 
m,ad (3 for th,e Bociety. We cannot stand still. We l:ta\a^ eithca* 
to go forward o,r fall back and, give way t^o yoiiiigca* a,-nd inorc^ 
energetic institutions. Wo havi^ to ,face tlie fact:, ihai,; wc3 ?'W’<3 
no longer so widely known; we a.re not po|)uifir in tli,(3 .iiteral 
sense of the word. £ have mot many higlily i*diu‘a.ti*d p(30|)lc^ 
who have iicvei* heard of ov<‘U tln^ tvxisfc{a"ua3 of iiu‘ Asiatic 
Society of Bengal. Oui* monthly nundvings ar(3 'fioorly jittendfid. 
. , . . If I urge Tipf)n you tiu3 necessity of a pro^|;)aga,-nda, for 
popularization O'f t:'he Society’s work I do not a»sk you tcj court 
cheap ap];)lause. I want to gather within t<lK^ folds of tfie 
Society all people interested in the adva.m.u3inent of rfisi^arcti 
and knowlcMlge and you cannot get them unless you t(3ll tlioin 
that you exist and the purposes for which you exist. A feature 
of the Christmas week in London is a series of spc^-cial |X)pular 
lectures on scientific subjects addressed by eminent scientists 

in language easily understood by the layman I imagitie 

the abstruse nature of the researches conducted 'uiKlor the 
Society’s auspices attracts only a limited class of people. I' luiive. 
given considerable thought to the problem of broadening the 
basis of our work atid the practicability of ejecting sort of jilll- 
ancG between abstruse scientific research ami modewi popular” 
knowledge. .... There yet remains to us tlu) vast fi(4<! 
of economicj and political Bcience in which Indians arc^ now 
t.aking great interest btit in whicih from ignorama^ of fiu^ts and of 
tlu^ true history of the past tluy are in nee<l of lu‘l|) and guida.ncM>. 
India is at prcsetit amidst a wonderiul industrial r‘iM,uiisHjnic.e juiil 
the Asiatic Society of Bt^ngal can usefully <^o!d4lbut>c toward n, 
safe and prosperous evolution by eiirrying on Hcicsutific^ rc^HearcdiCH 
and taking the lead in clarifying thc^ laws of (,^conorni(%H and 
guiding future national poiic?i(3B. A study of tiie (3(a)nomic Iristory 
of India is urgently needed and I! wouid liki^ 'to hcx) tlu3 Asialic 
Society of Bengal taking up the work of invi^stigritio'u and 
research in this essentially vital and importa'ut field. . . . Miuiy 
of our members are in the same position as myself: tlic\y can 
lay no claim to any deep learning or to the aefive pros(3cutioii 
of researeli. They have joined the Society witli the 'focjlii'ig 'tliat 
they are assisting in maintaining a leading institution of learning 
and culture/ 

2B 



1942] 


Annual Address. 


23 


You will now be able to appreciate wky I have read to you 
so many extracts from these Addresses, which not only contain 
the whole history of the Society and its gradual evolution during' 
the passage of the years, but also an enumeration of all the 
questions and difficulties which have faced the Society in the 
past and reasonable explanations and answers to the criticisms 
which have been made from time to time and which are still 
being made and with increasing persistence and force. 

You will observe, nevertheless, that most of our Presidents 
have been pessimists. According to them we have been going 
downhill and becoming more unpopular and less influential for 
almost a hundred years. Yet somehow or other we have sur- 
vived and have regularly and periodically renewed our strength 
and activity. 

The history of every kind of association discloses a struggle 
between the conservative forces and the forces of change. During 
long periods the former are in the ascendent, in others, such as 
the present age of rapid transition, the demand and the necessity 
for change is strong and insistent, and survival depends upon 
the wisdom and capacity and rapidity with which difficulties 
are faced and readjustment to the new environment is effected. 

The first thing to realize is that it is useless to bemoan the 
loss of a past which cannot by any possibility be restored. This 
Society was once unique. It was a Society of British officials 
who, as amateurs, were pioneers in the study of the Orient. 
Eor many years they were in sole possession of a rich and 
virgin soil. From its loins sprang many learned bodies and its 
activities were a source of inspiration to many learned men and 
industrious workers in the realms of Oriental scholarship. 
To-day the work which it initiated is shared with hundreds and 
thousands of Societies, Government Departments, Universities 
and individual workers in Oriental study and research, all over 
the world. That unique position has gone for ever and cannot 
by any means be restored. We have to share the limelight 
and be satisfied at the very most with a position of primus 
inter pares. 

The next point to appreciate is that we have always, ap- 
parently, aimed at remaining a Society of amateurs digging 
in a wide and unrestricted field. The world, or at any rate not 
less than the whole of the Oriental world, has been our oyster. 
Our aim has always been broad culture and the encouragement 
of every kind of scholarship and research within the boundless 
scope laid down by our illustrious founder. But the present is 
not only an age of exact scholarship, but of narrow and con- 
centrated specialization. We cannot as amateurs hope to compete 
with experts or in subjects which have become severely special- 
ized, nor can we hope to attract for publication in our journals the 
work of specialists who are members of specialist bodies with 
high-class publications of their own. The specialist’s ahn is to 



24 


Yenr-^Book E.AM.B.Jhr li)4L 




I’laTe Ills w'ork circiilated a:ii.K)n.si; hLs iollow-s|:)e(i 5 ,il!.sis, uiio art* 
more likely to road tfa* piihlioa-iioiis issueci liy tliose liodios t-o 
wiiicli they all lioloiit!;. It socmiis io mo q'uitio of, >v ions i-hat. \v<* 
ought in some dirociions to 'limit the soofH* of our (uiquiries a.iitl 
(*-ooo<eiitrai.o upon those st.udicss whi('*h luivo. rioi.' yet- hooii iriado 
subjects of speoiali^aitb'ui, and (ipou thos(‘ which di^Huid upon 
looiil, that is io say oriimtah r<‘So.a,roh ami invc'siJgatioii in wliioli 
\vc l]a,ve a, clistiiud ami i!*remov<*ahle adva.utagr* over ih/lioi' 
investigators. In other direct.-ions, on, tla,* (contrary, ought. t:o 
extend our scHipt^ and include in our aet-ivities the. 8t'4id,y r>r new 
problems, social a,iid othei'wista aifcHiting the |,H‘o'p]e and the 
countries of tlie Oilent. We caj-uiot stand stil 1. As old (,|m\stion.s 
arcs resolved tlic^y must be !*e|)huaHl, hy new ones, oih(,a,‘\vis<,> we 
sliall sink, slowly or rapidly, until we to I.mc anything inoia* 
than carctaki'rs of prhiciless boo'ks and n.mnnsr*ri;[)ts. 

Tlie reasons sugg<isted fiy various PrcNsifliuits ,f:br the, tiis- 
appearance of th(wl’hitish ()iliida.^ amaUau* \vvvi\ in my opiniom 
wide of the mark. ,l:iis work and. his initu'est (‘ea.sed wlu.m. 
he realized that he could not compete witli expc.ai,s, 'Hiere is 
no longer any room for amateurs. 

Our amateur status is responsible, nlsri fi.u' the* fmni o.f (mr 
constitution and organization. M'ueh has l'H*en d<,me during the 
last three years to impi’ove our organ ization. But 1 a.m not 
yet satisfied that wai liave diseovewed tlie r("‘al iaiiit^ Hu* up- 
heaval and the <u,I,ticism wiiich. initiated tlio eacfuiry into tlu^ 
condition of tlie Society and t.he har*d 'work: wiiieli was 
result, have all been pai*alleled in past yc^ars. 1 'he idu^noniemt 
recur apparently in every goneratiou or evtm slioi 1 .(>r periods. 
I believe tliat thes (,3 periodic dilficultios also ar(‘ due, io {diang<,\H 
in personnel and env1r*oninen.t and a conservadvc* disiiuhnaf.ion 
to make any drastic changes, liowever .mucli ttic signs iudicati^ 
that something .more fimdanu.mtal than minor mijiiHl-ment,, is 
needed. I am beginning to wonder wiietlier in fVtei* of th,t,» 
gmdtial (hhap|XOTanc,;e of amakau* wor‘kf‘,r*s, the couf.rol a, ml 
direcition, of tlm Society by amatrairs is any longer suit, a, hie, 
and wiiehlua* the e'x,a,.minat/ion c.)f and decision upon iWM'a’y f«d 4 ,;V 
detail of oiii* work and (rrganization l>y a. Cbuneil i>f ,20*0101 be 
reganlecl a,H a hr.iHin,<.%sslik('^ method of conducing the nJTairs of 
tlu 3 Bociety. ddio scholarly ami scucmtific work of tfu^ Woeierty 
is no longer done I>y amat<a,irH arid di!(I,4'4mti, f.mt hy eK|)f‘rt,,.H iii 
Government Departments, Univm'sity Professors ant! HpecialistH 
in one or other subject of study, l^hHcnent orgamizaiJon nownda.yH 
is a matter of sp(?cial gifts, training and (3xpcaaen«3 and oi.iglit to 
be in the hands of a thoroughly <a:)mprd/ent and wclh|iaic'l 
Secretary subject only to general BuperviHiom 

Next come the questions of popularity and publicity. It, 
will be seen, from the extracts which I have read, that tlie 
comp,laint about unpopularity is almost as okl, as ttie ScKucsty 
itself. The attendance at monthly meetings has never been. 



1942] Annual Address. 25 

much larger than it is now and the attendance at our Annual 
Meetings and lectures is much larger than ever before. Our 
publications are in many ways better than they have ever been. 
What I may call our normal membership has been the same for 
many years, and must, for financial reasons if for no other, be 
sustaiiied, but it is doubtful whether it can be much increased. 
After all is said and done, this is a learned Society, and its 
membership must be restricted to persons of culture, whether 
general or special, and the number of such persons is limited. 
On the other hand, there are doubtless some who have not yet 
thought fit to join our ranks, and efforts should be made to bring 
them in. The cost of membership seems always to have been 
something of a stumbling block and some further attempt should 
be made to solve this difficulty. Our lectures have been a success 
and shoxxld be extended and there ought to be more opportunities 
for informal discussion among our members than there are at 
present. I think it is a mistake to read both scientific and other 
papers at the same ordinary meeting, and I am doubtful whether, 
in normal times, the earlier hour of the Society's meetings has been 
an advantage. Learned discussions in daylight and immediately 
after the day's drudgery are apt to be somewhat uncongenial. 
The Annual Dinner might be revived. 

All these matters require very careful consideration and I 
do not think that we can do better than adopt the plan which 
was successful regarding the question of re-organization, and 
appoint a special enquiry committee to deal with the wider and 
much more important problem of our cultural activities and the 
future of the Society. Personally, I have now reached definite 
conclusions, I think that we should relinquish the pretence 
that we are still a Society of amateurs and aim at creating a 
Society of experts, of men distinguished for exact scholarship, 
supported by a general membership of persons of general culture. 
I think that this object will best be attained by a development 
of our Fellowship Boll, but I would try to obtain the assistance 
and advice of a number of men outside our membership who are 
distinguished in scholarship, in order that our decisions will be 
such as to appeal to and attract such men to our membership 
in increasing numbers. Thus and thus only can we regain our 
reputation and prestige as the premier learned Society in the 
East. 

Your Excellency, Ladies and Gentlemen, I need hardly tell 
you how grateful I am for the honour which you have bestowed 
upon me by electing me as your President during the last 
two years, and I desire to express my personal thanks to Your 
Excellency for so graciously presiding at our Annual General 
Meeting. 

JoHK Loet-Williams. 



PATEON’S ADDRESS 


Speech: :!,rY' l:Iis 'PIxcje’leekcy' Sik .Icitn ,A:rmi'U}i 

(loVi'IKNClR. Oii^ jiEN<lAL, ,AT TOR A:N:NirAL 'MK:i'rrrN(i Cl’’ 

Tii'w lioYAL As;iATro S(kii::ety 0¥ Ee'nga'l, ihaivd ok 

2:nb FR:BRiJA,Ry, 'il)42. 

"'Me. 1'^e:rsi:d:rnt, La.i>i::k8 akd Ct:rktlemi<j:n, 

Ijet irie frmt eoiigi.*atElat.e tlio l^rosidirrit., Sir 

tiolm Loi‘t4¥ill,iaTHK, on 8iic‘peB8ful a.elriovi^intnit.s of i.lio 
yoa:r and ^(4001116 to of I.^i-osiciont, Dr. ¥ox, wlio iuhkIs no 
iiitrc)diictioii ifroin nE\ Ab a Fellow of the Soeirt)- and Dirc^rtor 
of (.jeolo^dca,.! Survey of India,, he is wx^ll known'i to u.s ill!. 'Hf' 
has alHO done niueli to helf) the war e.ffor*t tivronyds his rese.iirehes 
in the minrvrid resoinees of tlu‘ eonntry Inelndiny inieii. 

^ -During the past yoiir the Soei(‘tv aaid tin* wo!*Id liii\'e 
suffered a great Iosb through, tht^ f)asHi,ng of Dr. liiihindra Nittli 
Tagore, SpcH'^iiil Anniverna.ry H’oiK)n,iry Meinher cif the Soeiidy. 
11,10 d(^iith of ,l,Vof. Larnnan, Sir George Gri(vrHon iiod Sir Ja.nies 
,Prii8e,r, lionorio'y FdlowB of the. Society, ineiins th,(,^ Iohh of dis- 
tiuguished men wh,o luive given greatly to the^ Soei<'‘'t<y and tin? 
clause of learning. 

The losB^of Sir Ganganath dl\a, Honorary Editor of ** Miinn 
Sm,iiti’’,_ and Shains-iil-IJlarnii Dr. Hkh lyat -H'oHaiit, .Editor (»f 
the Catalogues of the Society’s Thirsian aiid Aral)ic Matiuscrii>ts, 
is a Joss also to oriental scholarship. We also luoiiru tlie 
death of otio who was loved by all who know him, tht' Maharaja- 
dhiraja of Burdwan. 

Since I liwt (wldressed you two yofirs ago tlu' wa.i’ luw lieootue 
appreciably nearer .Indiu- and in fiict appears rapidly to Im' 
approaching a creHeendc* of vdoletiee. 1’lie (h‘rma.ns on their 
.side are boasting to making totn-l wa.i'. ’'I’lu'y a.re proml of 
throwing cwerything into tin* sccaliw against, us,' a.nd tio aeliicw'e 
their purpose they have made Heicmeci ami lli<» a.rt,s scafs of thc! 
god of war. If wc' considcir the (condition of the a.i'ts in Nazithcd 
Germany we must rccalize iirmuidiatcly how' nuith is denied to 
those people whoso life has nndc'r Nazi ride heeome eoniph'tely 
circumscribed and regimentccd. 'rhe works of some of tlw great 
men who helped to make Gerimuiy famous for its seholarship 
and artistic achievement are in certain cases no longer available* 
to the inhabitants of the I’hird Reich. 

The expulsion of many scientists, doctors and men of letters 
whoso names are legion has been symptomatic^ of the roprccsHion 
y all freedom of thought and opinion in modern Germany, 
The proscioution of Neimoller is typical of the Gc'nnan attitude 

{ ) 



[VOL. VIII, 1942] 


Patron's Address, 


27 


towards religion and of the determination of Hitler and his 
satellites to keep the church in chains of political servitude. 
Even the great men of the past are not respected. The ban on 
the fi:uits of such great and noble intellects as Heine and Chopin, 
to name only two, must make even the fanatic Nazi aware of his 
intellectual captivity to Hitlerdom. 

Germany, which in the past centuries was known as a land 
of music and of learning, where the arts were given enthusiastic 
encouragement, has become under Nazi rule nothing but a 
Parade Ground on which Nazi hordes stamp and strut, whose 
temple is now an arsenal wherein are worshipped the arts of 
destruction. 

I dread to think of the result of this denial of truth to so 
many. I dread to think of a generation devoted to blood and 
war, spurning all creative art, ignoring both past and future 
and only looking to the present task of destruction. Por this 
very reason and even, more to prepare for the days after the war 
it is essential that all should play their part in preserving the 
beauties of ancient art and continuing its study. 

Democracy assures to men of arts and letters that inde- 
pendence of spirit which is the pre-requisite of true culture, yet 
war inevitably hampers their work. This Society has naturally 
been affected. Now^ that the war is closing in upon ns in India 
the Society, iookiiig to the future, has taken steps to safeguard 
its most valuable manuscripts and historical objects by sending 
them to Benares and elsewhere. 

Incidentally I have been happy to have the opportunity 
of housing some of your pictures in Darjeeling, and if I have the 
occasion tins year of going to Darjeeling they will be under my 
own eye, Yo\i may recall that I had the honour of bringing 
back to you from London the ffimous Bhowal Plate. The new 
phase of the war has placed more of your possessions in my 
custody. In fact, it seems that I am to have the honour of being 
the Society’s Honorary Curator. 

The cost of insurance, packing, freight, etc., has already 
amounted to R8.7,000 and the total sum involved will be con- 
siderably more. This Society has to depend on the good will 
of scholars ^iiid public-spirited men devoted to the advancement 
of civilization and has no large funds at its disposal. The 
heavy burden of the extraordinary expenditure forced upon 
the Society by the exigencies of war must be met by some 
special means. I ask yon, therefore, for further donations to 
tlxe Society to ensure the safe custody of its ancient treasures 
and for the continuation of its valuable work. So as to start 
a subscription list I myself am giving Rs.500 towards this end. 

The members of the Society are believers in the successful 
development of the true arts and it is our duty to maintain 
the treasures of the past for the benefit of future generations. 



28 


Yem^BookJLA.S.B.for 11141 . [vol. viri, 1942] 


It is for tin’s t.liat I a|)|)ea.l for cionations to the Hoc-ioty in 
siiicivro tliat my contribution will bo folloAVCHi, by otrliin'w. 

Tt is gf‘a4if'yin,t!: to kuow iliat in s|)it<‘ of this fina'iioiaj liaiidi- 
ojvp the Societyds \vo!*k ha.s I asm ]Mii*snod with vigour, am! that 
arrears of tin'? hist 25 yojirs '|]a;v'«‘' homi almost complrt-cl}/ wiped 
out a-rid t,ha.t tfn^ JoarHfd aaid the J^nic^’cdiiHj,^ of tho Sorirty 
aro now for tlio first tinn^ siiK’o 19.17 tip to (iattu 'flio Soeic^ty 
Will, I knowy continiH^ its wm’k nndtd'orrfs! by foa.rs of war, 
Tlio inateiml aa:;(.‘ 0 ]).i|)lishnien.ts of t,lH.^ ptist .vaair, the* .Liisliai 
rfiijtioiiary rind tlio l),ringi.ng up to d.a4'<‘ <.»f tln^ Hocad-^'V Javmfd^ 
are soiiH.lihiiig to l:)e proud of, and ,1 know tha^t I van roly upon 
yon, Mr. Prissidont, and tlio ,.m.omb(>rs (,»f tin* Soiioty t<,:i fullil 
tliat task. In so doing you will raisurt,^ thr^ niairitfaiaric'o of tla* 
f^oo'ioty intonuitiona-l r<v('mtatio! i . ’ 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF COUNCIL* 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, 1942. 

Jilected and announced in the Annual Meeting, 

27id February, 1942. 

Presidents 

C. S. Pox, Esq., D.Sc., MJ.Min.E., P.G.S., F.R.A.S.B., P.N.L 
Vice-Presidents s 

Sir John Lort- Williams, Kt., K.C. 

The Hon’ble Dr. Syamaprasad Mookerjee, M.A., B.L., D.Lit., 
Barrister-at-Law. 

S. K. Chatterji, Esq., M.A., D.Lit., F.R.A.S.B. 

Meghnad Saha, Esq., D.Sc., F.R.S., F.R.A.S.B., P.N.I. 

Secretaries and Treasurer, 

General Secretary: — B. S. Guha, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., F.R.A.S.B., 
F.N.I. 

Treasurer :~-C. W. Gurner, Esq., C.S.I., I.C.S. 

Philological Secretary: — Nalinakslia Dntt, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., 
D.Litt. 

Joint Philological Secretary : — M. Mahfuz-ul Haq, Esq., M.A. 

/^Biology: — Kalipada Biswas, Esq., M.A., 
Natural History ) D.Sc., F.R.S.E. 

Secretaries 1 Physical Science : — K. N. BagcM, Esq., B.Sc., 
C M.B., P.I.C., D.T.M,, F.N.I. 
Anthropological Secretary : — H. C. Chakladar, Esq,, M.A. 
Philosophical Secretary : — Vanamali Vedantatirtha, Esq., M.A, 
Historical and Archaeological Secretary :™Kalidas Nag, Esq., 
M.A., D.Lit, 

Medical Secretary : — J. B. Grant, Esq., M.D., MVP.H., 
P.A.P.H.A. 

Library Secretary :—Snnder Lai Hora, Esq., D.Sc., F.Z.S., 
P.R.S.E., F.N.I., F.R.A.8.B. 

Other Members of Council, 

S. 0, Law, Esq., M.A., B.L„ Ph.D., F.Z.S., M.B.O.U., F.N.I. 

M. Z. Siddiqi, Esq., M.A., Ph.D. 

The Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley, M.A,, Barrister-at- 
Law, J.P. 

L. R. Fawcns, Esq., C.I.E., I.C.S. 

( 29 ) 



EXHIBITION ANNUAL MBETIIO. 

■[^TST OF Exhibits shown at thb Annij.il MHi'rn,NC'; oi<' 
Royal As'WVic Society" oif Benoal cn i’iu*; 
2 'hp Eebithahy, 1942. 


The Banoiya Sahitya Paeishat. 

Mfznuscripk of a few interesting Bengali Works. 

(F'or details of the MSS. cf. C. Ciiakravarfci — Bengali MSiB, hi the. 
Ikmgiya Sahitya Parlshut, Sahitya Parishat Palrikat 48, fLit??.) 

(1) MS. of an ineomplofco dictionary' of tlio •n!,od<a’n typo by ntt 
unknown author (1(575), 

(2) MS. of a. small metrical work of loxieograpiiicuil chjM’acfcor 
giving the m(3a.nings of tliirby-six words oiKling in K'/ama. 

The natne of the work is OhairiJ KarkhdtuJ grantha (259(5). It is 
the work of tho joint authors YLiidya Kamal Sen and Suhlitankaro 
BIirguiTima. 

(3) MS. of a. (juasi-hiatorieal work called Madaner pilM (934 5 
whicli d(3a<5ribos how Madan Kay, a z(3mindar, incurred tlie dis- 
pleasure of Nawah Siyesta Khan and was saved througis the inter- 
volition of M>:ibarak Ga/.i, whom the zinnindar approiw^hed on tin* 
advice of a Muhainraedan officer. 

(4) MSS, of a number of Bengali Pnranas;- - 

(а) Mahdhhdgamtapurmia (299) of Kailris Yhisu of M'idriapur. 

It describes the marriage of (§iva, birth of Kailiiknya., 
killing of demon Taraka and Kavana. 

(б) Kdlihdpurmm (906) describing the story of ihrrvati up to idn* 

birth of Ganesa. 

(c) KfiUhlp'iirdna (1778) describing the exploits of th«' M<»fclier 

goddess as found in tlic Mdrhaydeya Pardya* 

(d) Dtifgapurnna (80(5) diwrribing the n,rriva.I of Ilurga on the 

Himalayas and receiving worship ilierc^ 

(c) ValmlM/ptifd'na (1781) of lla-re K|*tfna' Dasa, which nartamts 
the story of the ea.rly liib of Vrdiniki, when he is H(.iat.ed to 
have been known as Vrnda, tla' d(nnon. 

2, J)E. D. M. Bose, 

L A 'idoniatic .Recorder for PhotographmUg Eeeording ihe 
Diurnal variation of tihe PidsaRwy movrmimt of l)e8iii€H!ii,i!ii 
gyrans. 

This apparatus is used to investigato tlw nature of the pulHa.tory' 
movements in leafiots of Desmodium gyrans witli a view to finding 
o'lit the source of energy of these pulsationH. Tho invi^stigatiou atnl 
the apparatus used are based upon th(3 reaearelies of Sir (?. 
who found a considerable similarity botw'een thesf» pulsations and tlw 
heart beats of animals. 

The apparatus used consistB of an optical lever, of wliow:» 
ends is attaclied to the tip of tlie Desmodiiun Icaflcit witli a silk fibre, 

( :i0 ) 



[voL. viiij 1942] Exhibits Annual Meeting, 


31 


by means of wliich a magnified image of the pulsatory movement is 
recorded on a rotating drum round which a photographic paper is 
wrapped. Other automatic recorders are used to measure the 
intensity of the daylight incident on the leaflet and the temperature 
of the surrounding air. 

It is found that— 

(1) when the leaflet stem is kept dipped in tap water, the pulsatory 
activity of the detached leaflets continues for about 20 days, 
stopping only for a few hours at night and starting again at 
sunrise; 

(ii) if the leaflet is kept in the dark the movement completely 

stops after a few hours; 

(iii) if 1% glucose is added to the tap water, the leaflet will, when 

kept in the dark, resume its pulsatory activity and for a 
few days even continue nearly through the whole day and 
night ; 

(iv) the best results are obtained when the leaflet stem is kept in 

the glucose solution and is exposed to daylight— under such 
conditions the pulsatory activity continues during the 
entire twenty-four hours for several days. 

The conclusions drawn are that the exiergy of pulsatory activity 
in Desmodium leaflets is due to the combustion of the carbohydrate 
produced in the leaflet photo-synthetically under the action of sun- 
light. In the dark the introduction of glucose through the solution 
can replace the photo-synthetically produced carbohydrates in 
providing energy by combxistion by which the movement is main- 
tained. 

IJ. Photographs of Cosmic ray showers of different types taken 
with a continuously working Counter controlled Wilson 
cloud chamber. 

With the apparatus used, penetrating cosmic ray particles which 
pass through 10 cm. of lead placed on the top of the chamber and 
through the cloud chamber energises a number of Geiger Muller tubes, 
by moans of which relays are actuated enabling the tracks of cosmic 
ray particles to be photographed, A lead plate 2-2 cm, thick is 
placed across the cloud chamber. The behaviour of the ionizing 
particles incident on the upper side of this plate give an indication 
as to their nature. If the tracks are absorbed or give rise to a shower 
of fresh tracks starting from the lower side of the lead plate, then 
they are due to ordinary aloctrons. If however the particles penetrate 
through the plate without producing any secondaries, they are most 
probably due' to heavy electrons (mesotrons of mass 200 times that 
of the soft electron). The present investigation is concerned with 
the origin of these mesotron showers. 

Photographs are exhibited, showing the ionization tracks due to 
(i) extensive air showers, (ii) showers produced in the lead plate 
inside the chamber due to a primary soft electron, and (iii) of mesotron 
pairs and multiples. 

3, Mb. H. K. Bose. 

Standing Image of Vishnu. 

(11th century A.D, Later Pala Period.) 

Upper part of a standing image of Vishnu engaged in meditation. 
The right tipper hand is holding a club and the right lower hand 



32 


Year^Book R,A,S.B. for 1941 


[VOIi. VI 11, 


resting oil a. lotus is in the posture of ort'oring boon. TIjo loft rr|)|:)c'‘i* 
liaiid holds ttio wIh^oI and tho loft iinvor lifuid also rostiiig on a lot/iis 
holds tlu** coiio'h, shell, 'fho upper liands an<i the fon%‘MTO« a.rr^ 
artistlea.Ily ourved. Tho usual ' KirtiinukhiV at tlir^ tofi and ilte 
Hying pairs <if " VidlvadhAras' a.re oureo*! on tho top of thi^ blaek slab. 
It is rruwh^ of slal:i\ Tlio uiodolllng of tho rost of lla^ tigure is firy. 

It was hiiiiid roeeui.ly vvlii'lo ro-oKijavatiug a. ponri at a- dr^plli. of 
ft, ra^ai' 'N'agn.rgrtobi, said, t() hav(; la'M'ni tho trailitlonaJ oapita,! of 
'Na-ga.r Ibyjah alKuit whom no histori<‘al dalii a.ro foil'-heoiiung. 'Flic*- 
plae.e is close to tla's cremation ground of villag<^ .lapir, llama, jlaripa,! 
in tho 1-i<a>g'hly district, Bcnigal, Sonm oilier scmlpturr^s of a.houi- the 
sa.nio period lai-vo also boon fonml yoa.rs ago while excavating a-notlicr 
pond in its uca’ghiiourhood 'but tluw are iioo fragmentary’' tii lie exhi- 
bited,. 

blon tided by^ llai Balimlnr Ita-inapi-ashad Ciianda.. 

4. Mr. P,EEf’Y 'B-rowni 

Sm/iU copper gilt figure TlbeL 

‘ This fignrinct depic*,ts the ('.Iremi Taa'a, a. cammizc.Hi re(Mrescnta.tlon 
of Bliri-knti tim Nnindoso consort of Srin Tsan t hnnpo, one of tho 
greatest kings of Tibet, who reigncc’l in tlio KOV<mtk c<,nitury. It is a 
votiivi^ figun'^ mddontly int(5ndod to bo fixed on a lodge, or attaohiMf !(,> 
a shrine, as a. sa.crod contillaition to a. Nopalosi^ tranplo*. I’lio <la,'t,o 
of its prodnetion niight be the fifteenth or sixtemith (UHiitiry, ««iid in 
its fioHO a.‘n,d workinanslup it is one f>f tiie l>est. of ii.s kii'nl. Ah a. proof 
of its artistic eharacter tho grac‘,<,irnl. curves of tho body^ and «:>f tho 
figure UiS a wiiolo proclaim it as superior to most of tiie stift <n>tiven- 
tionalized images of this school. 

5. Me. a. K. 

Head of a figure of fJte Gupta Period. 

The fiead, probably of an attem.lant figure of an. ima.gfi of tlii' 
Gupta period (fith or 6th century, A.'D.). Tliongh sadly da.maged, 
it retains sonio of its original plastic, bea'uty. The fa(‘e seemH iiof- 
ca.rve<! 'by cbisel, but to hn,vo issued Hf>ontano«msly onl, of tla^ stone, 
Tboujgh wearing th,e exiirossion of <^ont(■nn|,)l^lllon, it is lit,, up by a 
smi,le i,f:K!i<M,i,ting t-ranquil. plenauro. 

'IVov€Miau(.f!e Village ni’Car Hla.rna.tln Bim uw’sh. 

Identified and doHcribod liy Hai Babaflur IbnnapraHhad f-himda, 

6. T'ITK llOY,Ab AhIATIB SrKIfKTY (')K B'RNOAb. 

h Book^ PiMiuhed by Mjmberu of the Royal Amalie Boemty 
of Bengal and ohtamed by the Library n/' the HoeUiy in 
1941 . 

N. B. "Ro^v: Tlic Hu(;cesst>rs of Sher Hhah. 

do Humayuh 'ISTatna, 

K'alidaa Nag: India and tho 'Ihmifie Work',!. 

O. Berkeley- H'ill r All too 'htiman, 

K. N.jr)iks!.iit: Annual Report, Archaeological Hurv(\y, IlKhidll. 

N. fh ‘Vedantatirtha: An Introduction to the Vaisosika. tSyBbu'U. 

tlo An Introfhietio,n to the Advaita Vetlanta 

Byatem, 

fie Nyayadarsaner Xtihaaa* 



1942] 


Exhibits Annual Meetimj. 


33 


Gangeya Narottama Sastri: Karuna-tarangini (Hindi). 
Borioytosh Bhattacharya : Sakti Samgama-taiitra, Vol. IL 


IL TJia Society's Puhlimtions in 1 , 941 . 

(1) Journal: — 

(a) Lettors, (b) Science, (c) Year-Book. 

(2) Bibliotheca .Indica: — 

(a) Arabic and Persian. 

{b) Sanskrit. 

(c) Tibetan and English. 

(d) English Translations. 

(3) Catalogue of Manuscripts : — 

Vamaeular, 

7. The Royal Botahio Gardens, Calcutta. 

Rhododendrons and other important plants. 

Exhibit /. 

Tho beauty of the Rhododendrons of tlie Sikkim Himalayas 
attract many naturalists to the neighboui'hood. of the everlastmg 
snows, where these plants flourish. Here are the coloured illustra- 
tions of eight commoner species: — Rhododendron harbatum Wall., 
10,000 ft., flowering in April; Rhododendro^i Edgeworthii Hook, lil., 
7,000-9,000 ft., flowering in May-Tune; Rhododendron ftdgens Hook, 
fil., 12, 000-14, GOO ft., flowering in Juno; Rhododendron Oamphelliae 
Hook, ill., 9,000-10,000 ft., flowering in Apiil-May; Rhododendron 
Thornsoni Hook. fiL, 11,000-13,000 ft., flowering in June; Rhodo- 
dendron Wightii Hook. liL, 12,000-14,000 ft., flowering in June; 
Rhododendron lancifoUum Hook, fil., 10,000 ft., flowering in April- 
May; Rhododendron Dalhoitsiae Hook, fll., 7,000-9,000 ft., flowering 
in April- July. 

Exhibit IL 

(1) Mammillaria conopsea Scheidw.^ — This plant was introduced 
from Mexico during the early period of the Gardens by the East 
India Company. This plant is actually growing in the original 
Chinese vase in which it was brought through the East India Company 
more than 100 years ago, 

(2) HaumrtMa attenuata Haw. — This plant was obtained front 
Eriedrich Adolph Haage, Germany, in 1926 and is kept growing in 
the Gardens successfully since then. 

(3) AdianPum tenerum Farleyense.— This is a sterile fern introduced 
from West Indies. This fern has been propagated by divisions after 
acelimatization in the Gardens for years, 

(4) Adiantum Lathomii Horb. — ^A variety of special sterile sports 
from Lathomi which was grown in the Gardens. This can also be 
propagated by divisions only. 

(5) Oymnogramma calomelanos chrysophylla, — This is a common 
West Indian gold fern. 

(6) Auraucaria Gunninghamii Sweet. — This is an Australian 
plant which has been propagated from layering. This plant has been 
kept growing in the pot for over 60 years. This curious prostrate 
variety is totally different from the usual giant trees of Auraucaria 
Oanninghamii, 



34 


Year-Book R,A.S.B.for 194L 


[VOL, VllI, 


(7) Narnia floridana A.DG. Ins. Baliam.--Tiiis rare plant belonging 
to tlie family of Cycadacea© is raised from seeds and is aeclimatizo<i 
in the Grardens. 

(8) Acorm Calamus Linn. — ^This species of important m(3diciiial 
plant has been gathered from the swampy region along tlio' l:)orclors 
of Nepal and Sikkim Himalayas at an altitude of about 4d)00 flu 
by Dr. K. Biswas during Ids exploration along the border of Nepal 
and Silddm last autumn. 

(9) Cinchona succirtihra and Cinchona ledgeriatfa. — Those two 
plants have been obtained from Mungpoo Plantation, Darjoeliiig, in 
order to make an attempt towards acclimatization of these two wxdl- 
known dninin© plants. 

(10) Derris eUiptica Benth. — This is the insecticidal plant of com- 
merce. The roots are also used as fish poison. The active principle 
of this plant is rotenon. 

(11) Some fibre plants.— Experiments have been carried on last 
year and are being continued this year as well on some fibre yielding 
plants, such as Broussonetia papyrifera Vent., Llixiim usitatissimimi 
Linn., Adansonia digitata Linn., Boehmeria nivea Gaud and Agave 
sisalana Perr. ex Engelm, The fibres of these plants altlioiigb 
extracted by crude method are still sufficient to show the high 
standard of the fibres of these plants which might be grown on a 
commercial scale with advantage in the suitable parts of Bengal. 

(12) Some Orchids and cut flowers. 

8, Turn Sanskeit Sahitya Paeishat. 

List of the Manuscripts, 

(1) Krtyahalpataru, by Lakshmidhara. 

(2) Bdraruca Vritti — Com. on Katantra. 

(3) lYi'V'igrahanddwiveka, 

(4) Ahhydtapradlpikd. 

(5) ■ Basendrahalpadruma. 

(6) Daitahatilaha, 

(7) Krtyatatwarriava, 

(8) Pravd, by Vaidyanath Bhatta. 

(9) Panchar ahshdf etc. 

(10) Sdrctsaraswatl. 

(11) Sdnrakarmmdnsdhhdsya, 

(12) Devlmdhdtmyamanjari, 

(13) Nirudapobsiibandha, 

(14) Mahahhdratam (Santiparvan). 

(15) KtckaJcamdha, by Nitivarman. 

9. Me. S. S. Saekab. 

Human Twins from a hereditary point of vieWu 

Human twins are usually of two kinds: (1) Identical or mono*- 
zygotie; they are always of the same sex and are similar to ono another 
in a large number of morphological and physiological cliaracters. 
They are believed to develop from the early fission of a single egg 
into two halves. (2) Non-identical or fraternal or dizygotic; they 
may be of same sex or of different sexes. They differ from one 
another like ordinary brothers and sisters. They develop from tho 
almost* simultaneous fertilization of two different eggs. 

As a rule dizygotic twins are bom more frequently than the mono- 
zygotic ones, the ratio being about 1: 4. Nothing is Imown of its 



Exhibits Annual Meeting. 


35 


frequeiiey in ^ India. Ceylon twins are bom once in 160 births. 
Ill Cermaiiy its ratio is 1 in 85, in United States 1 in 86. 

Tlie lioreditaiy nature of twin births will b© evident from the two 
pedigrees exhibited here. The mode of inheritance is still a problem, 
i't has been a. matter of export controversy, in which authorities 
di;ffer, wliether the two types of twiiming, namely, monozygotic and 
dizygotic, are expressions of the same hereditary factor or different 
expressions of two different hereditary factors." Present researches 
in this country and the two pedigrees exhibited here indicate that 
they are linked up with one another and are possibly expressions of 
the same hereditary factor. Further data on this line are being 
collected in Bose Institute, Calcutta. 

Exhibit's : 

(1) Pedigree I, collected from the district of 24-Pergana8, Bengal, 
belonging to the Pod caste. The family shows 9 pairs of twins the 
sex eombmations of which are: — 2 males — 2; 2 females — S; 1 male 
and 1 female — 4. 

(2) Pedigree II, collected from various villages of the district of 
24-Perganas, Bengal, belonging to the Kumhar caste. The pedigree 
shows the details of 4 clans bound up by intermarriage. There are 
a total number of 9 twin births the sex combinations of which are : — 
2 males — 2; 2 females— 5; 1 male and 1 female — 2. 

(3) Plate I showing 3 pairs of identical twins and 3 pairs of non- 
identical twins. 

(4) Plate II showing a trizygotic triplet, the right hand of one being 
first born. The sexes of the triplet are from the right, female, 
female, male. 

10. Mr. W. D. West. 

Lapis4azuU, Kokcha valley, Badakshan, Afghan-Turkestan. 

The best and most famous mines are situated in Badakshan, in 
the north-eastern comer of Afghanistan, in the upper reaches of the 
Oxus. They were visited and described as far back as 1271 by the 
celebrated Venetian traveller, Marco Polo. The stone used to be 
sent to Bokhara, and from thence to the fairs of Mzhniy Novgorod, 
where it was distributed by the merchants assembled there to all 
parts of the world* These mines are not at present being worked, 
but the stone can still be purchased in Kabul from the State author- 
ities, the best quality costing £20 per kilogramme. 

In addition to its use in mosaics and costly ornaments, it used to be 
powdered to produce the rich and durable paint called ‘ ultramarine 
but has now been replaced by the artificial product. 

Its colour is due to the presence of the miiieral lazurit© (derived 
from the Persian word ‘lajward’). It sometimes contains decks and 
streaks of golden iron-pyrites, a variety which was compared foy 
Pliny to the ‘star-bedecked firmament*. 


11. The Zoological Subvby oe India. 

Oasts of Tasmanian and Amtrcdian Skulls. 

Exhibits 1, 11, HI, and IV. 

Plaster casts of skulls of a Tasmanian male and a Tasmanian 
female in the collection of the Anthropological Laboratory, Z.S.I*, 



m 


Year^Book B,A,S.B. for 1941 . [vol. vni, 1942] 


obtained from the .Australian Museum on the 11th February, 1887 , 
the cranial indices being 73-4 and 75*4 respectively. The Tasmanians 
were medium-headed (C.I., 76-77), as compared to the A.iistraliai.is 
of which Exhibit III from New South Wales is an excellent example. 
Exhibit I, the Tasmanian male, has air ovoid shape looked at from, 
above, and Exhibit II, the Tasmanian female, is also ovoid, as con- 
trasted with the harmonious ellipsoid form of the pronouncedly 
dolicho -cranial Australian, Exhibit III, The two Tasmanian casts 
also show a more pronounced upward development of the frontal 
bone than is the case with the Australians with their remarkably 
retreating forehead. 

The Australian skull III, exhibits a small epipteric bone on tlie left 
side, and a frontal process of the temporal bone prevents the meeting 
of the pa-rietal bone and the great wing of the sphenoid, on its right 
side. The squama and the nuchal parts of the occipital bones meet 
ill a sharp angle in all the three specimens, which alike sliow an 
occipital torus in more or less pronounced form. The dental arch is 
ellipsoid in form in the three specimens. 

The Tasmanian face has also much in common with the Austral, imi. 
There are the same narrow forehead, the pronounced snpia- orbital 
arches, the prominent zygomatic arches, and the broad nasal skeleton. 
Only in some of the Australians the stouter and more pronouiiee<l. 
development of the lower part of the forehead, gives tlio race a 
Neanderthaloid appearance, though they are certainly to be connte<l 
among the varieties of Homo Sapiens recens. The men were lOB cm. 
high and the women 160 cm., slightly shorter than the Australians 
in average. 

In spite of these resemblances the Tasmanians differed fro, in tlie 
Australians in one very important feature, viz., their black hair was 
not wavy like that of the Australians, but woolly like that of the 
Malanesians. Another characteristic feature was the strong fold 
which descended laterally from the proximity of their iroso to the 
outer comer of their broad mouth. Bacially, as well as linguistic- 
ally, their affinities were with the Malanesians, though they must 
be regarded as a specially inbred type. 

Unfortunately, the Tasmanians are known to us to-day from 
their scanty skeletal remains, photographs and descriptionB. 
Tonkanini, the last Tasmanian woman, died in 1877, 74 yea,rs after 

the island was colonized by the European settlers. At that time, 
8,000 Tasmanian males were stated to be living. By 1864 their 
number was reduced to 16 males only, the last of them dying in 
1865. Our best accoimt of them is from the writings of tlio explorer 
Cook, in 1777. 

It is curious how these people had reached Itisrnania. from thc^ 
Malanesian archipelago without contacting witli tlie Austral iivriB. 
Unlike the latter they had no boomerangs, their artefacts lioing of 
the Paleolithic type. They went about naked, had no bows and 
arrows, no pottery nor agriculture. They lived as collecting iiomadK 
on their floats on the rivers, subsisting mainly upon flsh and mol hi bob. 

For purpose of comparison a cast of the Neandorthal (Neandor 
Valley) skull from Busseldorf, western' Germany, is' also exhibited 
(Exhibit IV). 



ANIUAL REPORT FOR IMh 


The Council of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal has the 
honour to submit the following report on the state of the Society's 
affairs during the year ending the 31st December, 1941. 

The development of the War and more particularly the 
deterioration in the international situation in the latter part of 
1941 seriously affected the activities of the Society and caused 
additional expenditure in safeguarding the rare and valuable 
collections and possessions of the Society which strained our 
slender resources to the utmost. It is satisfactory to note 
however that in spite of these handicaps, the work of reorganiza- 
tion and reconstruction recommended by the Special Enquiry 
Committee of 1939 was continued throughout the year and great 
headway was made. The deta^ of this work are given in the 
following pages and special mention need only be made of two 
matters of importance, namely,, that the arrears in the pub- 
lications of the Society of the last two decades have almost 
been wiped off and the Journal and Proceedings have been 
brought up-to-date for the first time since 1917. Also, the 
practice of levying a proportionate share from the funds adminis- 
tered by the Society towards its general expenditure has been 
discontinued and an attempt has been made to meet the normal 
expenses of the Society out of its own income by observing strict 
economy and carefully checking all expenditure. 

The Society shared in the great loss suffered by the nation 
in the passing of Dr. Rabindranath Tagore, Special Anniversary 
Honorary Member of the Society. The deaths of Prof, Charles 
Rockhill Lanman, Sir George Pierson and Sir James Frazer, 
Honorary Fellows of the Society, have removed from the world 
three of the most distinguished savants whose services in the 
cause of learning are irreparable. Similarly the deaths of Six 
Ganganath Jha, Honorary Editor of ‘"Mann Smpti*' in our 
Bib. Ind. Series, and Shams-ul-Ulama Dr. Hidayat Hosain, 
Editor of the Catalogues of the Society’s Persian and Arabic 
MSS. and sometime its Jt. Philological Secretary, have left a 
groat void in the world of Oriental Scholarship which it will be 
very difficult to fill. The Society also mourned the death of 
Maharajadhiraja Sir Bijoy Chand Mahtab of Burdwan who was 
for sometime one of our Vice-Presidents and whose breadth 
of mind and humane qualities endeared him to all who knew 
him. 


( 37 ) 

3 



38 


[VOL, VXH,, 


Ymr-Booh B.AB.B. for 194L 
Ordinary Members, 

Gains and Losses.-— These were as follows 


Gains . 


Losses. 


Elections carried forward . . 10 

New Elections . . . . 30 


Total . . 40 


Lapses of election 

. . 1 2 

Elections carried o^'cr 

5 

Deaths 


Resignations 

5 

Rule 38 

h 

Rule 40 

. . II 

Total 

. . 4d 


Initial total 387 ; net loss 5, final total 382. 

Mule 38 . — ^This Rule concerning inembers whose subscrip- 
tions are in arrears, was strictly applied and thc^ names of 6 
members were removed from the roll. 

Membership List . — ^The annual detailed cbecking of the 
membership list with the membership card index was made. 

Life Members . — ^The number of our Life-Members at the end 
of the year was 58. One was lost by death; two members 
compounded during the year. 

Deaths . — ^Among the distinguished and specially valued 
members lost to us, whose memory will be cherished, and for 
whose departure the Society is the poorer, the following may be 
mentioned: — 

1 . Maharaj adliiraj a Sir B . C. Mahtab (1911). 

2. Br. M. Hidayat Hosain (1911). 

3. T. P. G-hose (1912). 

4. Dr. M. E. Sufi (1937). 

15. Mr. a, S. Dutt (1933). 

6. Dr. S. K. Mukherjee (1927). 


Associate Members. 

We lost by resignation the following:— 

L. S. Dugin. 

The present number is 6, the statutory maximum is 15. 

Ordinary Fellows. 

On the date prescribed by the regulations for the isstie of 
nommation papers for the election of FeUows there were no 
Tacancies, consequently iro election of Ordinary Fellows has 
taken place. 

We lost through death the follow ing — 

Dr, M. Hidayafc Hosain. 

3B 



1942] Annual Report. 39 

At tlie end of the. year the number was 48, the statutory 
maximum is 50, 

Hoiioraxy Fellows, 

We lost through death the folio wing: — 

Charles Bockweli Laiimau (1896). 

Sir Georg© A. Grierson, K.C.I.E., O.M., Ph.D., D.Litt., LL.D,, 
F,B.A. (1904). 

Sir James Frazer, Kt., D.C.L., LL.D., Litt.D., (1920). 

The number at the end of the year was 18; the statutory 
maximum is 30. 

Special Anniversary Honorary Members, 

Owing to the death of Dr. Rabindranath Tagore there 
remain only 9 Special Anniversary Members elected on the 
occasion of the Society’s 150th Anniversary. 

Condolences. 

The Council sent letters of condolence to the relatives of 
the following : — 

Dr. Rabindfenath Tagore. 

Dr. Sushi! Kumar Muldierjee. 

Maharajadhiraja Sir B. C. Mahtab. 

Sir Ganganath Jha. 

Shams-u!-Ulama Dr. M. Hidayat Hosain. 

Council. 

The Council met 12 times. The attendance averaged 12. 

The following resolutions of thanks were passed by the 
Council: — 

To Dr, N. N. Law for presenting to the Library of the Society th© 
1940 issues of the Indian Historical Quarterly. 

To the Government of Bengal for the restoration of the 20% cut in a 
monthly grant of R8.250. 

To th© Benares Hindu University for the storage of th© Society's 
Manuscripts in th© library of the University. 

Office Bearers. 

Changes in the Council were as follows : — 

Sir S. Radhakrishnan, absent from 1st July and resigned on 4th 
August. 

Major 0. L. Pasricha, absent from 15tli March to end of th© year. 
Sir John Lort-Williams, absent from August to November and 
Col. Sir R. N. Chopra officiated for him. 

Dr. Baini Prashad, absent for 10 days in February, and Major 
C. L. Paaricha officiated for him, again for 10 days in May and 
2 weeks in November and Dr. B. S. Guha officiated for him. 

Dr* B. S. Guha, absent during October and Dr. Kalidas Nag offi- 
ciated for him. 

Col. Sir R. N, Chopra, absent from November till th© end of the 
year. 



40 7eaT'Booh-B.A,S3. for 194L [vol. vill, 

Committees of Council. 

The Standing Coinmittees of Council, namely, the Finance, 
Publication, and Xibraiy Committees, met monthly, witli the 
exception of the recess month of October. A special meeting of 
the Finance Committee was held in December to consider the 
Budget for 1942. 

The following Siib-Committees were appointed:-— 

(1) A Sub -Committee consisting of the Ex-Officio members, 
the Library Secretary and Mr. A. B. Foster to discuss methods 
of preservation of old records and MSS. 

(2) A Sub -Committee consisting of Dr. Kalidas Nag, Dr. 
M. N. Saha, Dr. J. N. Miikherjee and the Ex-Officio Members, to 
define the duties of the Assistant Secretary. 

Office. 

The measures undertaken in the previous year for ensuring 
greater efficiency and more expeditious handling of office matters 
were continued and stricter observance of punctuality by the 
staff and closer scrutiny of all expenditure were enforced. 
The confusion and lack of system found in fhe records and 
files of the Society could not however be fully cured, though 
good progress was made in sifting and classifying all past 
correspondence according to subject matter and date. Among 
other necessary reforms were the introduction of a proper system 
of purchase and supply of stamps and a stamp book which is 
checked periodically by the General Secretary and the Treasurer. 
It is to be hoped that with the purchase of a franking machine 
recently sanctioned, complaints of non-receipt of packages, etc., 
will disappear. Similarly a stationery book has been introdiiced 
with a record of all office stationery issued to the staff. 

In order to regularise the purchase and supply of office 
requisites a requisition book and an order book are now kept and 
each section is required to send in a list of its requirementB in 
proper form at the beginning of each montli, and supplies are 
then issued from, stock or obtained from outside on approved 
quotations. 

In conformity with the practice adopted by the Gove,rnment 
and other public institutions, Bengal time is now observed. The 
office hours of the Society are from 10 a.m,. to 4-30 p.m. on week 
days (Saturdays 10 a.m. to 1-30 p.m.) and the library hours are 
from 10 a.m. to 5-30 p.m, on week days (Saturdays 10 a.m. to 
4-30 p.m.). 

There has been little change in the personnel of the staff 
except that the first Pandit Aghornath Bhattacharya retired 
after serving the Society for 19 years. In his place his son Pandit 
Girija Nath Bhattacharya, B.A., who had been serving as an 



1942] 


Annual Eeport. 


41 


apprentice for over eigiit months was appointed on probation at 
Rs.50 per month in the junior scale as from 1-5-1941. 

The, services of Mr. J. C, De, Asst. Secretary, were trans- 
ferred to the Library with effect from the 1st of December, 1941 
after the expiration of the period of six months' extension of Ms 
services granted to him on 30 - 5 - 41 , and Mr. P. 0. Matthai, 
Librarian, was appointed as Superintendent of the office. These 
steps were taken as experimental measures for six months in the 
first instance without making any change in their existing salaries 
and emoluments. 

Correspondence. 

In spite of the War the numbers of letters received and 
issued during the year were 2,559 and 2,339 respectively. Of 
letters received 600 were book orders, bills and hank acknow- 
ledgment receipts; 375 letters were issued in addition to those 
which needed replies. 200 Council circulars also were issued 
during the year. 

Stock Rooms. 

The re-arrangement of the stock rooms on the ground floor 
was continued. 

The stock-taking of all saleable publications of the Society 
has been completed and they have now been tied up in small 
bundles, arranged and classified under three main heads, namely 
(a) Miscellaneous publications consisting of catalogues and 
notices of Sanskrit Manuscripts, Centenary Reviews, Proceedings 
of the Indian Science Congress for the first twenty-five years and 
other miscellaneous works, ( 5 ) the Society's own Periodicals includ- 
ing the valuable and rare Asiatic Researches; the Journal, old 
series, from Vol. 1 - 75 , 40 volumes of the Proceedings, of the 
Society from 1865 - 1904 , the Journal and Proceedings, new 
series from 1905 to 1931 , Memoirs and the third series of the 
current issues of the Journal and Proceedings, and (c) the 
publications of the Bibliotheca Indica Series consisting of 263 
separate works of about 1,800 different fascicles and divided into 
(i) Arabic works on Islamic culture, (ii) Persian works on Islamic 
culture, and (iii) works on Sanskritic and Tibetan and tribal 
languages such as Lushai and Kui. Separate registers have been 
prepared for each section and printed labels placed on every 
shelf giving the exact number of available copies. 

Rules and Regulations. 

No changes were made in the Rules and Regulations except 
the addition of new clauses in place of Regulation No. 17 of the 
Provident Fund Regulations of the Society with a view to 
bringing them in conformity with those of the Government 
and other public bodies. 



42 


Year^Book E.A.SM for 11)4L 


[VOXi, VIII, 


RepresentatioBS. 

Mian Museum.— The Society’s repreKseiitative on the Boivrcl 
of Trustees of the Indian Mnseiiin, under tlie "Mmenm 

Act X of 1910, was Sir U. N. BrahinaeliaTi till November who 
was replaced by Dr, J. N, Miiklierjee. 

Kamala Lectureship — ^The Society’s noniiiiee to sciwu'* on 
the Selection Conmiittee of the Kamala Lectu:rcsli;i|>, axlminis™ 
tered by the Calcutta University, continued to 1)0 .Di*. 'Baini 
Prashad, 

National Institute of Sciences of India.— The Society’s 
representatives to serve on the Council of the National Institute 
of Sciences of India were Mr. W. D. West as Vice-President and 
Major C, L. Pasricha as member of the Council for 1941. 

Sarojini Basu Gold Medal. — ^The Society’s nominee to sei’ve 
on the Special Committee for the award of the Sarojini Basu 
Gold Medal administered by the Calcutta University, was Prof. 
V. Vedantatirtha. 

Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. — ^The 
Society’s nominee for the corresponding fellowship of the Royal 
Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland was Dr, S. K. 
Chatterji. 

Indian Historical Records Commission. — The Society’s re- 
presentative to serve on the Indian Historical Records Com- 
mission was Mr. C. W. Gurner. 

Deputations. 

The Society received invitations to send representatives to 
the various functions of the under-mentioned bodies: — 

Silver Jubilee of the Benares Hindu University on 21-1-42. 

Fifth Session of the Indian History Congress at Hyderaba,.d 
on 2Lst to 23rd December 1941. 

Congratulations. 

The Council sent congratulatory addresscvs to Sir Profiilla 
Bay and Sir Nilratan Sircar on the oeoasion of their 80th birth- 
days. 

Birthday Honours 

Edian Bahadur M. Zafar Hasan — O.B.E, 

MM. Ganganath Jha — Knighthood. 

New Tear Honours 

Gol. B. N. Chopra— ‘Knighthood. 

Mr. 0. W. Gurner— O.S.I. 

Mr. J. F. Millsr-C.I.E. 

Mr. Percy Brown — ^M.B.E. 

Mr. David Boy— M.B.E. 

Mr. J. S. H. Shattock— M,B.E. 



1942] Annual Report. 43 

Yisits. 

Among a number of visitors from various parts of tiie 
world mention may be made of the following : — 

The Lady Mary Herbert. 

Prof. Thomas Whitemore, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass, 

Mr. and Mrs, D. M. Donaldson, Aligarh, U.P. 

Awards, 

Elliott Prize for Scientific Research. — The annual prize 
offered for the year 1940 was for research in Mathematics. No 
papers were submitted for competition. 

The prize offered for the year 1941 was for Chemistry. An 
announcement regarding the prize will be made at the Annual 
Meeting in 1942. 

The prize for next year will be for research in Physics. 

Barclay Memorial Medal. — ^The announcement of the 
(biennial) award of the medal will be made at the Annual Meeting, 
in 1942. 

Sir William Jones Memorial Medal. — The (triennial) award 
for conspicuously important Asiatic Researches in Science, in- 
cluding medicine, was announced at the Annual Meeting in 1941. 
The medal was awarded to Sir Profulia Chandra Ray, Kt., 
C.I.E., D.Sc., F.R.A.S.B., F.N.I. 

The next award will be announced at the Annual Meeting 
in 1944. 

Annandale Memorial Medal. — The next (triennial) award, 
for important contributions to the study of Anthropology in Asia 
will be made at the Annual Meeting in 1943. 

Joy Gohind Law Memorial Medal. — ^The announcement of 
the (triennial) award for conspicuously important work in 
Zoology in Asia, will be made at the Annual Meeting in 1942, 

Paul Johannes Bruhl Memorial Medal. — ^The announcement 
of the (triennial) award, for important contributions to the study 
of Asiatic Botany will be made at the Annual Meeting in 1942. 

Indian Science Congress, Calcutta, Prize. — ^^Che next award 
will be made in connection with the next session of the Congress 
to be held in Calcutta. 

Pramatha Nath Bose Memorial Medal. — ^The Council has not 
yet decided upon the year in which the initial award shall be 
made of this medal for conspicuously important contributions 
to practical or theoretical Geology with special reference to 
Asia. 

Society’s Premises and Possessions. 

For the purpose of protection screens of flexible material 
have been fixed on all windows and outer doors in the, stock 



44 


Year^Booh RA,S3, for 1941. 


[VOIi. VIII, 


and library rooms on the ground floor, and for greater facility 
of access a door has been ^provided in the eastern stock ^•oolrl 
leading to the central passage. The cost of these alterations 
was Rs.81.5-2”0. 

Considerable use was made of tlie Soci(3ty’s i.ca: Fan ni Ins 
Camera for photostating, and the camera fi)r mi(‘.ro:filiiii»g 
manuscripts and documents. Among otliers, piioiiostat co|>ies 
of the manuscript Malatimadhava with Harihara/s coininentai’y 
were made for the Bhandarkar Oriental Researcli Institute {mic! 
of the map of ancient Kashmir given in Sir Aiirel St^eiiFs 
* Chronicle of Kashmir ’ for the Survey of India. 

Eight Sanskrit Manuscripts were microfilmed for Dr. Ilorfice 
Poleman, Dkeetor of Indie Studies, who was instrumental in 
obtaining the loan of the microfilm camera> for the vSociety. 
Orders were also received from Harvard College Inl,)rary for 
microfilming documents and papers. The cost of pre^paring 
photostat and microfilm copies unfoi-tunately lias increased 
considerably owing to the heavy rise in the priccvs of |)lioto- 
graphic materials. 

Artistic and Historical Possessions. 

Ten of the most valuable paintings in the possession of the 
Society were cleaned and the frames repaired and re-guilded at 
a cost of Rs.l40, under the direction of Mr. Percy Brown. 

Library. 

The re-organisation of the Library, commenced in KKI!), 
was continued. The manuscripts and printed works in the 
Arabic, Persian and Urdu languages were transferred from tfn.^ 
ground floor where they were housed temporarily during the 
installation of steel almirahs to the Aral)ic-Persian Room on 
the first floor, and were classified and arranged in 'pt’ 0 |;>er ordm\ 

After completion of the stocktaking of tlu^ gc^neral seetlon 
of ' the Library mentioned in the Annual Report for 1940, thc 3 
periodicals and the Journals were taken in hand and the 
work was finished in April 1941. Prom the report submitted 
by Mr. P. 0. Matthai it appears that the total number of books 
in the possession of the Society on 1-5-1941 was 27,397 and 
the bound volumes of Periodicals numbered 27,029 making a 
grand total of 54,426. The report disclosed that 

(1) 481 books mentioned in the catalogue piiblisliod in 19:i4 
are not traceable and must now be considered lost. 

(2) Over 2,000 books were found which did not appear in 
the catalogue of 1934 although registered and added 'to the 
Library before its publication. 



1942] 


Annual Report, 


45 


(3) Over 3,000 books were found to be worm-eaten and 
needed attention and re-binding. 

(4) Of 904 Periodicals found there is a record of 462 in the 
only periodical register kept. The rest must be assumed to be 
either discontinued or extinct. 

(5) About 170 periodicals have been added to the Library 
since the publication of Kemp's Catalogue in 1914. 

(6) There are about 3,500 bound sets of Periodicals which 
require repair and re-binding. 

Among the innovations introduced during the year is a 
loose-leaf register in which leaves containing the names of books 
are arranged alphabetically according to the author and the sub- 
ject in two separate sections. This register contains all the 
necessary information from which complete author and subject 
catalogues can be prepared. Two separate registers for periodi- 
cals, showing which of them have been purchased or received by 
exchange, or by presentation were introduced and another 
containing detailed information about the distribution of the 
Society’s publications. 

Binding and Repair. — 1,238 old damaged and worm-eaten 
books were repaired and re-bound at a cost of Es. 1,776-6. 
A large sum has been provided for similar purposes in the budget 
for 1942. 

Accessions . — Exclusive of 167 periodicals, accessions were 
155 volumes, of which 40 were purchased and the rest presented. 
There has been a drop in the number of periodicals received owing 
to the international situation. The same cause is responsible 
for the smaller number of books purchased the total amount 
spent being only Rs.999-11-6 out of Rs.2,000 allotted for the 
purpose. 

Seven new Journals were added to the Library, namely 
(1) The Journal of the Osmania University, Faculties of Theology 
and Arts and Faculty of Science; (2) The Bulletin of the 
Deccan College Research Institute; (3) Pushtu Tolana, Kabul; 
(4) The Indian Messenger from the Sadharan Brahino Samaj, 
Calcutta; (5) Anthropological Papers from the Calcutta Uni- 
versity; (6) Agriculture and Live Stock in India from the 
Imperial Council of Agricultural Research, New Delhi ; and (7) 
Calcutta Medical Journal. 

The first two were received by exchange and the last five 
by presentation* 

Booh Reviews . — As a result of the publication of Book 
Reviews in the Journal of the Society books are being received 
regularly from authors for review five of whom presented a second 
copy to the Library. 



46 Tem^Booh R.A.8,B. for 1941. [voL. vm, 

Sanskrit Section.— The number of iiiamiscripte repaired 
was 108, and 5,062 have been dusted and rearranged. 

A revised iiLinierical list of the Bardic ^niamisoiifvts ^w'a.s 
made and the preparation of an alphabetical list of t-itlf^s ol: tlie 
Baaiinseiipts on loan from the Miiseiiin, ari’angCHl iiccoixling t»o 
subjects, was commenced. Also, lists of the rare and imporl'a-iirt 
niaiiiiscripts after careful scrutiny, with their a;p;|vix3'xiniatn, viduea, 
was prepared for purposes of evacuation and safe preserva,tif)n 
outside Calcutta. 

■ Arabic and Persian Section. — Sixty-one damaged luami- 
scripts were repaired and forty-eight were re-bound. The mini'lxw 
of worm-eaten manuscripts stiU unrepaired is 1,983. A list of 
the rare and valuable manuscripts with their approximate values 
was prepared for purposes of e vacuation. 

Sino-Tibetan Section . — ^The preparation of the catalogue of 
Tibetan Tangyur manuscripts was continued and progress was 
made up to volume 24. New labels in both Tibetan and English 
written alphabetically were put on each manuscripts. Also, 
a list of the rare and most important Tibetan manuscripts 
and xylographed works with their values was prepared for 
purposes of evacuation. The total amount spent during the 
year on repair of manuscripts in the three sections was 
Rs.1,287-5. 

Enforcement of Regulations . — Strict application of the terms 
of Library Regulation No. 12 had to be enforced as the practice 
grew of keeping books for more than three months. Cards 
giving the details, the dates of issue and return, placed inside a 
flap fixed at the back of each book, have made the periodical 
checking of borrowed books much easier. 

Permanent Library Endoioment Fund . — The Society has not 
received any donations during the year. The total ainount in 
the Fund is Rs, 16,176-8-8 in 3|-% Government Securities. 


Finance. 

Appendix III contains the usual Statements sh, owing our 
accounts for 1941. According to the recommemdationa of the 
Special Enquiry Committee all sale proceeds of our publications 
and subscriptions to the Journal and Memoirs have been cjroditeci 
to the Publication Fund. 

As usual the Fund Accounts show their invested assets 
written down to their market values as at the end of the year and 
Investment Account No. 22 shows the allocation of invested 
paper to each fund specifically, whilst both market and face 
values of the investments are shown in it. 

Statement No. 24 shows the Balance Sheet of the Society 
and the different funds administered by and through it. 



1942] Annual Eeport, 47 

The funds belonging to, or administered by, the Society are 
classified as follows: — 

{a) General Fund: — 

(i) Permanent Reserve. 

(ii) Working Balance. 

(6) Specific Funds belonging to the Society. 

(c) Funds administered by the Society. 


At the end of the year, the .position of these Funds was as 

follows : — 




Face 

Market 



value. 

value, 



3ist 

31st 



December 

December 


1 

1941. 

1941. 



Rs. 

Rs, 

L 

General Fund 

2,96,400 

2,77,200 


{a) Permanent Reserve 

2,54,200 

2,35,000 


(6) Working Balance 

42,200 

42,200 

2. 

Specific Funds belonging to the Society . . 

33,200 

32,600 

3. 

Funds administered by the Society 

73,600 

71,300 



4,03,200 

3,81,000 


During the year 1941, Rs.736 were received as admission 
fees and Rs.590 as compounding fees. This total amount of 
Rs. 1,326 will be transferred to the Permanent Reserve by 
conversion of Government Paper (3|%) belonging to the Tern* 
porary Reserve. 

The Government of Bengal lifted the 20% cut in regard to 
two grants, but maintained the cut in all other grants made by 
them to the Society during the year. 


The Society received the following grants from the above 
Government : — 

For 

Rs, 

Statement. 

Journals 

1,600 

7,600 

No. 19. 

O.P, Fund-No. 1 

No. 2. 

O.P. Fund No. 2 

4,800 

No. 3. 

Sanskrit MSS. 

6,080 

No. 4. 


The Government of Bengal annual grants of Rs.2,400 for 
the publication of works of historical interest (O.P. Fund No, 2) 
for both the years 1940-41 and 1941-42 were received during the 
year. 

The debit balance of the Oriental Publication Fund No, 2 
{Statement No. 3) is still remaining but it has been brought 



48. Tmr-Book B, A >8. B. for Idil. [vol. viii, 

down from Rs.l 1,084- 15- 10 to Rs. 8, 152- 14-7. Special attempts 
are being made to restore this Fund to working order. 

The Government of India maintained the 50% cut in the 
grant for Arabic and Persian MSS. (Statement No. 5). SpcH3iaJ 
effort to restore the cut was made by our Honorary Trmmnr 
during the year. The grant for the year 1941-42 lias not 
yet been received. The fund closed with a debit bsiiamic of 
Rs.4, 243-11-3. 

The income derived from Advertising ainouiited to Bs. 10,200. 

The temporary investments of funds in Fixed Deposit and 
Savings Bank are shown in Statements Nos. 21 and 20. 

Statement No. 18 gives an account of the ainoiints due to 
and by the Society- for membership subscriptions, sales of luiblica- 
tions and contingent charges. 

The Government Securities, shown in Statement No. 22, arc 
held in safe custody by the Imperial Bank of India, Park Street, 
Branch. During the year there was a considerable depreciation 
of the securities amounting to Bs.4, 997-8-0, decreasing to tha,t 
extent the hook assets of the Society. 


The Budget estimate for 1941 and the aetnals of the year 
were as follows : — 

Estimates. 

Ordinary 

Extraordinary 

.. 

Receipts. 

Rs. 

51,830 

800 

ExpeiviitufO. 

Rs. 

50,530 

800 


Total 

52,630 

51,330 

Actuals. 




Ordinary 

Extraordinary 


53,160 

1,326 

49,521 

1,326 


Totat. 

54,486 

50,847 


The ordinary receipts were about Rs.l,:i30 more than the 
estimate. 

' The ordinary expenditure was about Rs. 1,009 less than tlie 
estimate. 

The Budget estimates for probable expenditure have as usual 
been framed to meet demands under various heads based on a 
vigorous activity in all departments of the Society’s work. 
Special provision had to be made for A.R.P. measures taken by 
the Society to preserve its properties and evacuation of a large 
number of the most valuable and rare manuscripts and historical 
objects belonging to the Society. 

The receipts have been conservatively estimated. 



1942] 


Annual Re.'X}ort, 


49 


BttdG'BT Estimate fob 1942 * 


Ordinary 

Receipts. 




Budget 

ostiraate 

Actuals for 
194;i. 

Budget 

estimate 


for 1941. 

for 1942. 


Rs, 

Rs. 

Rs, 

int'HM'est im and 

C 9,800 

9,802 

9,800 

Deponitw 

1 750 

600 

750 

Advortiwiiig 

10,200 

10,200 

10,200 

I'icnt 

10,680 

10,680 

10,680 

Annual Clrant; 

1,600 

1,600 

1,600 

Mistiellanooiis 

300 

390 

300 

Meinbors’ Subseription 

Publications sales and Sub- 

9,000 

8,920 

8,000 

sciri:ptioiiB 

5,500 

6,968 

.5,000 

'Proportionate Sliare of Bounds--— 



O.P. B^ind No. 1 

2,000 

2,000 


Sanskrit MBS. Fund 

2,000 

2,000 


I'OTAL 

51,830 

53,160 

46,330 


Eitraordinary Eeeeipts. 


By 'Fooi ^ — 

Rs. 

K,s . 

Rs. 

l:)y Arlinission B'eos 

800 

736 

700 

'by (Joinpo'unding B'ees 


590 

. . 

by Institutional Membership 

R.egistration Fees 



Total 

800 

1,326 

700 

Ordinary Expenditure. 

Rs. 

Rs. 

Rs. 

Salaries 

21,800 

21,887 

22,260 

Commission 

300 

264 

300 

Stationery 

600 

1,506’«‘ 

1,000 

B'an, X-«ight and Telephone 

600 

486 

500 

Taxes . , 

2,400 

2,388 

2,400 

.Postage 

1,600 

1,369 

1,227* 

1,400 

■Contingencies ... 

700 

1,000 

Petty Repairs 

200 

160 

150 

Insurance 

500 

500 

500 

Menials’ Clotlnng . , 

120 

392'* 

60 

Office Ptimiture 

200 

525* 

1,000 

Building Repairs , , 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

Provident Fund Share . ♦ 

700 

668 

700 

Audit Fee 

250 

250 

260 

Books, Library 

2,000 

i,m 

1,000 

Binding 

2,000 

1,806 

4,500 

J oumal and Memoirs 

7,000 

6,445 

6,500 

Printing, Circulars, etc. 

500 

540 

700 

‘Gratuities 

, , 

690* 

» . 

Cataloguing Bengali MSS. 

500 



Steebshelving 

6,560 

6,296 

A 

Total 

50,630 

49,621 

46,200 


* Special sanction by ConnciL 



50 Year-Book R. A, S.B. for 1941. 

[VOL. VI1[, 

Exteaoiffiiiiary Expenditufe* 



ssx. 

for 1941. for 1942. 


R,s. BiS. 

:rs. 

To Perniaiient Reserve — 
by Admission Fees 
by Compoiio,diiig Fees 
by Institutional Membership 
Foes 

800 730 

_ 500 

71HI 

Total 

800 1,326 

700 

To removal and Insurance 
charges for MSS. to Benares. . 


5,600 


Publications. 

During the year two numbers of volume VI of tlie Journal 
for 1940, one Letters and one Science, consisting of 174 pages 
with 2 plates, title pages and indexes were published. Als(» 
the Gomplete volume VII of the Journal for 1941. Tins 
contained two numbers of Letters, one of Science and one 
Year-Book covering 478 pages with 19 plates. This is the first 
time since 1917 that the current volume of the Journal and 
Proceedings has been published and distribirtod within the year. 

Memoirs , — ^The manuscript of MaMvyutpatti by Alexander 
Csoma de Koros which has been lying incomplete sincie 1910 
has been revised and recopied by Prof. Durga Charan Chatter jee 
and Mr. Trin Chen and sent to the press. It is expected! that 
this MSS, and volume IV of the Memoirs will be published early 
in 1942. There is no other work outstanding in the Memoirs, 

Bibliotheca Indica Series . — ^The following works were pul)- 
lished during the year. 

(1) Kesar Saga . — -A lower Ladakhi version of tlic^ ,Kc\sar 
' Saga recovered by tiie late Dr. A. H. Frariekc^ 
from Khalatse in lower Lad,akhi, and prol^sibly 
the oldest and most important corpus of the K„esar 
legend. It consists of the Til)etan taxi-, .EngliBli 
Abstracts of Contents, Notes, Vocal)ulai‘i(\s "and 
Six Appendices. Prof. Suniti Kumar Chait(B:ji 
has furnished an exhaustive and illuminating 
introduction reviewing the whole Kesar Saga 
literature and its place in Central Asia. Pp. 1-494 
and i-xxxii. 

* (2) The Doctrine of Nimhdrka , — Vol II, pp, 475-884, by 
Dr. Roma Bose. This completes the English, 
translations and annotations of two commentaries 
on Brahma Sutras known as the/ Vedanta-Parijata- 



1942] 


Annual Report, 


51 


Saurabha® of Mmbarka and 'Vedtota Kaustabiia® 
of Srinivasa. The third and the last volume giving 
a full philosophical exposition of Nimbarka^s 
doctrine is in the press and is expected to- be 
published during 1942. 

(3) VaihMnasa-Srauta-Sutram. — ^Being the description of 

vedic rites as interpreted by the Vaikhanasa 
school of the Black Yajurveda. The text was 
critically prepared by the late Prof. WiUem 
Caland of Utrecht together with an Index by 
Prof. Raghu Vira of Lahore. The work consists 
of the Preface pp, i-xxxvi, text pp. 1-334 and an 
Index pp. 335-408. 

(4) MaaMr-ul-Umard. — ^VoL 1, fasc. VII, pp. 001-840. 

This is the final fascicle of the English translation 
of volume one containing the biographies of the 
Muhammedan and Hindu officers of the Timurid 
Sovereigns of India from 1500 to 1700 A.D. by 
Nawwab Samsam-ud-Daula Shah Nawaz Kliaii 
and ' Abdul- Hayy. The English translation was 
originally prepared by H. Beveridge and pp. 1-600 
of the first five fascicles and part of fascicle six 
were published between 1911-14. The rest of the 
fascicle six (pp. 601-840) was revised, annotated 
and completed by Dr. Baini Prashad and is now 
issued together with a prefatory note, pp. i-vii. 

(5) TadJikira4->Humdyun Wa Akhar of Bdyazld Biydt , — 

The Persian text of Bayazid Biyat now published 
contains the history of the Emperor Humayun 
and his son Emperor Akbar and is edited with notes 
and a Preface in English by the late Shams-ul- 
Ulama Dr. M. Hidayat Hosain, pp. i-vii and 
1-450. 

Descriptive Catalogue of Manuscripts in the possession of the 
Royal Asiatic Society, 

The Catalogue of Verwcular Manuscripts in Bengali, Hindi, 
Gujrati, Marwari and Uriya, prepared by the late MM. H. P. 
Shastri and revised and edited by Mr. Jogendra Nath Gupta 
together with an Introduction in English was published at the 
end of the year. This Catalogue forms VoL IX of the Descrip- 
tive Catalogue prepared by the late MM. Shastri and contains 
short descriptions of 445 manuscripts dealing with the epics of the 
Ramayaiga and Mahabharata, Vai^nava Literature, Astrolog}^, 
Mathematics, Travel, Romance, ^akta and Vaisnava sects and 
other miscellaneous subjects. The volume consists of an 
Introduction in English and 1-420 pages of text and index. 

Of the works mentioned in Annexures A and B of Appendix 
II of the Report of the Special Enquiry Committee of 1939 the 



. 52 Tear^Book M.AB,B. for 1941. ^ [voL. viii, 

following still remain to he published. ^4 fuM list of tJm works 
published during 1939-41 is given in Appendix II. 

Annexure A. 

Tlfilia Kalpa edited by Pandit Kedar .Natli oi‘ dliypnr 
together with an introduction by I'h'of. 8 unit, i, 
Kumar Chatterji. The complete iiianu .scrip!) scvut 
by Pandit Kedarnath has printed and 

the whole work will be issued a.s soon a.s the 
English Introduction, to be written by Prof. Sniiiti 
Kumar Chatterji, is submitted. 

Haft-Iqlim . — The materials for Vol. II of the work arc 
under preparation by Prof. M. Miihfuziil Haq. 
Vajjalagga/rn . — materials have been received from, the 
editor, Mr. Johan van Maneii. 

Annexure B. 

Kuttammakmi . — Edited with notes by^ Pandit Mad [lusudaii 
Kaul of Kashmir. Pandit Kaiil who obta-im^d 
permission from the Kashmir State to edit 
this work has completed the text which has now 
been printed. The book will be issued as soon 
as the Notes have been received from him and 
printed. 

Works in the Bibliotheca Indica series in ivhich further 
progress was wade during ike year, are : — 

(1) The Doctrine of Nimbarha, Vol. Ill, by Dr. Rnma 

Chaudhuri. 

(2) Amal4-8alih or Shah Jahan Nama. — ^An Index, to the 

three volumes already printed and issued, i.H still 
in preparation by Mr. G. Yazdani of Hyderabad. 

(3) Bhagawad QUa (in Persian verse) in preparation 

by Dr. Baini Prashad. 

(4) Madthir-^ul-Umard. — Vol. II, E.nglisli translation 

edited by Dr. Baini Prashad. 

New work in the Bibliotheca Dulica Series accepted for 
publication : — 

. The English translation of Padmmati of Malik Muhammad 
Jaisi prepared by Mr. A. G. Shirreff, I.C.8., from the Hindi 
texts published by the late Sir George Grierson in the Biblio- 
theca Mca Series inJOll and the Benares Edition published 
by the Nagri Pracharini Sabha. The complete m.anuscript 
IS now in the press. 

-p ^ Descriptim Catalogue of Manuscripts. — ^The materials 
tor the Descriptive Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts prepared 
■by the late MM. Haraprasad Shastri that still remain to bo 



1942] 


Annual Report, 


53 


published coiicera the subjects of (1) Philosophy, (2) Jyoti^a, 
(3) Jaina, and (4) Vaidyaka, besides those dealing with 
misceilaiieoiis subjects and Addenda and Supplements which 
will form the six concluding volumes of the series. It was 
decided that instead of entrusting the whole work to one scholar 
for revision, specialists in the different subjects should be invited 
to revise the work with a view to expediting the publication 
and more thorough checking of the materials. Accordingly, the 
work was divided among the following scholars : — 

Volume X dealing with Philosophy to Prof. Narendra 
Oliaiidra Bhattacharyya, M.A., Vedantatirtha, etc.; Volume XI, 
dealing with Jyotisa to Prof. P. C. Sen Gupta and Mr. X. C. 
Lahiii; and VoL XIII Vaidyaka to Kaviraj Bimalaiianda 
Tarkatirtha. 

VoL XIV~XV. — Miscellaneous and Addenda and Supple- 
ment to Prof. Chintaharan Chakravarti. 

Of these the materials for Vols. X and XI dealing with 
Philosophy and Ast^nomy have been revised and edited by 
Profs. Bhattachary 3 m and Sen Gupta and are now in the press. 

II. Catalogue of Arabic Manuscripts. Vol. II, pp. 1-80 of 
the volume have been printed and pp. 81-118 are in proof. Un- 
fortunately, the sudden death of Shams-ul-Ulama Dr. Hidayat 
Hosaiii in, November 1941 has made further printing of the work 
impossible for the present. A new editor will, have to be engaged 
to complete the work. 

In view of the shortage and enormous increase in the price 
of paper and other printing materials as a result of the War, it 
has been decided for the present to limit the volume of the J ournal 
to three issues, namely, one Letters, one Science, and one Year- 
Book consisting altogether of 600 pages and 12 plates. 

Philology. 

Five papers were read and published during the year. 
Two papers were read during the year and will be published 

later. 

History. 

Three papers were read and published during the year. 
'One paper was read during the year and will be published later, 

Anthropology. 

Five papers were read and published during the year. 

Archaeology. 

Two papers read in the previous year were published. 
Four papers were read and published during the year. 

4 



54 


[VOL= VTiij. 


T ear ‘Booh R,A.8.B, for 194L 

latural HistoiT * Zoology. 

Fiv© papers were read and published during tlie year. 

laturai History : Botany. 

One paper was read and published during t'he 


Mathematics. 

One paper read in the previous year was lyiibiished during 
the year. 

Psychology. 

One paper was read and published during the yeiu:’. 

Papers published in the Journal by well-known writers in 1941. 

(1) Dr. Franklin P. Mbtcalf. _ 

(2) Mr. D. H. Gordon. ^ 

(3) Dr. Siddhesliwar Varma. 

(4) Mrs. E. W. E. Macfarlane. 

(5) Dr. J. B. Grant. 

(6) Mr. E. F. 0. Murray. 

(7) Dr. R. C. Majumdar. 

(8) Dr. Christopli von Fiirer-Haimendorf. 


Air Raid Precaution Measures. 

As a result of the close approach of the War to India, 
measures had to be taken to protect the possessions a^tid the 
and valuable collections of the Society. At a cost of Rs.blH) a 
full set of A.R.P. equipment has been purchased, and sand hags, 
buckets and water tanks placed in various parts of tlio !)uilding. 
Glass in doors, windows and sky-lights has been rcMnovcnl and 
glass panes in the steel almirahs reinfoixMvl witli gbu‘d niuslin 
and kraft paper. One of the cku’ks, N. Gupta., was sent to tin* 
A.R.P. training school for training and h(^ is now instriictiiig 
the menial staff of the Society in the use of all ineasur(‘s 

against possible air-raids 

As, however, no method of protection exists against cliro(4, 
hits from explosive bombs, it was decided not to take tniy ri.sk: 
with the rare manuscripts and historical and art collections of the 
Society but to send them away for safe custody outside Calcutta/. 
Through the kind offices of Sir S. Radhakrislinan, Vice-Chancellor 
of the Benares Hindu University and sometime Vico-President of 
this Society, it was arranged to send, as a first instalment about 
2,500 of the most valuable and rare manuscripts to the Benares 
Hindu University Library. The General Secretary, accompanied 
by Mr. J. C. De, went to Benares and, .supervised the removal 

4B 



11M2] 


Anmicil Report, 


55 


of sixty cases containing the collections to a specially allotted 
room on the first floor of the Sayajit Rao Gaekwad Library, 
The Asokaii Edict from Jeypore and 21 bronze and marble 
busts have been removed to a place of safety in Calcutta, 

Lady Mary Herbert graciously visited the rooms of the 
Society, on the 26th December 1941, at the invitation of 
Mr. Justice Edgle}^ and having inspected the paintings very 
kindly agreed to keep ten of the most valuable of them at the 
Government House, JDarjeeling. These were delivered by Mr. 
P. 0. Matthai to the S.D.O. at Government House. 

The cost of removal and insurance of these valuable 
possession has been very heavy and a serious drain on the 
slender resources of the Society. The premium alone for the 
insurance against Fire and Burglary of the sixty cases of 
manuscripts, etc., sent to Benares was over four thousand rux^ees. 
The evacuation of the rest of the paintings and about 7,000 
more of important and valuable manuscripts and rare and 
unobtainable sets of Journals and books will further dissi|3ate 
our funds. But, as the preservation of these national treasures 
is of supreme importance, the situation will have to be faced 
and the expenditure met. 

General Lectures. 

The following General Lectures were delivered before fairly 
large audience of members and visitors : — 

February 26tli Mr. Percy Brown : The Arts of jSTepal. 

March 7th . . Dr. J. B. Grant : Rural Reconstruction — China. 

„ 10th . . Dr. F. Vreede : The living Culture of Java. 

„ 14th . . Sir S. Radhakrishnan : Is Religion a Spent Force ? 

,, 25th . , Dr. S, L. Hora : Life-history and Wanderings of 
Hilsa in Bengal Water. 

April 2nd . . Lt.-CoL S. D. Greval *. Blood Groups and Types. 

,, 9th . . Dr. Immanuel Olsvanger : The Resurrection of a 
Ijanguage. 

Jiiljr 4th . , Mrs. Savitri Mukherji : The Amarna Art. 

„ 22nd . . Mrs. Savitri Mukherji ; King Akhnaton and. his 
Philosophy. 

Cultural Activities. 

In addition to general lectures, facilities were provided for 
scholars who visited the Society for study and research, and 
information was given to Institutions and individual scholars 
on matters of antiquarian and historical interest. Mention may 
be made of the following. 

(1) Maharajkumar Raghubir Sinh with a note on the lives 
of John Collins and Josiah Webb. 

(2) Lt. Commander Geoffrey Rawson of Sydney, Australia, 
with a note on 'Sydney Gave which sailed from Calcutta to 
Australia in 1798 k 



56 


Yem-^Book E.A.8.B, for 1941. 


[VOL. VIII, 


(3) Tlie ITiiiversity of Dacca some of the Sooiety'‘’s 

blocks for reproduction in its fortlicoming publication on tlW'^ 
History of Bengal 

(4) The Survey of India 'with a map of Aiicicait l\ns.l'niiir 
for reproduction, published in Sir Aiirel Steirls article*- in oiir 
JournaL 

(5) Mr. Saroj Bhusan Barna, Govt, of Bengali Be\sea;r(Ii 
Scholar, continued for the greater part of the yea,r liis r(-.\sear(,?h 
on Later Buddhism in the Society’s Library. 

(6) Miss Sonia K. Joshi, a post-graduate student, cai*ried on 
her studies in ancient Indian History in the Library. 

Others who made use of the Library were : — 

(1) Miss Post Wheeler of the United States of Amc^rica. 

(2) Miss S. Benjamin (Bethune College), Calcutta.. 

(3) Mr. K. Banerji of the Meteorological Department, 

Alipore. 

(4) Dr. J. P, Chaudliuri (Presidency Coll(-‘.ge), Calcutta. 

(5) Mr. Isvarabhai Patel of Bombay, 

(6) Prof. Dinesh Bhattacharya of the Haigli College. 

(7) Swami Sadananda of the Gauriya Math. 


General. 

Boutine work in respect of the local distribution of tlic^ 
Society’s publications, circulars, forms, etc., and the kc.^eping 
up to date of the addresses of Members was carried out as usual, 
but the posting of Journals, etc,, to belligerent and many 
neutral countries affected by the War was eitlier sto’pped 
altogether, or was seriously handicapped by delays in sliipment. 


Printers. 

Under the capable superintendence of Messrs. P. Knight 
and G. E, Bingham, the Baptist Mission Press continucHl to act 
as our chief printers and gave, as usual, tlieir invaluable assist.- 
ance. Mention may also be made of the help rendered by the 
Directors of the Inland Printing Works in doing minor printing 
works for the Society. 


Agencies. 

Our European, American and Indian Agents remain the 
same. An extension of the list for Asiatic countries could not 
be made owing to the unsettled conditions in most of the 
countries. 



1942] Annual Report, 57 

Exchange of Publications. 

The following applications for exchange with the Society’s 
publications were considered by the Council, and its decisions 
are noted below: — 

Publications of : To be exchanged with : 

Sri Venkateswara Oriental Institute, 

Tinipati 

Afghan. Riyasat, Kabul 
Board of Research, Osmania University, 

Hyderabad . . 

Meetings. 

The Ordinary Monthty Meetings of the Society were held 
regularly with the exception of the recess month, October. The 
average attendance was 15 members and 2 visitors. The, maxi- 
mum attendance was in December vith 17 members and 4 
visitors. 

There were no meetings of the Medical Section. 

Exhibits. 

At the Ordinary Monthly Meetings exhibits were shown and 
commented upon by the exhibitors. The following may be 
mentioned : — 

S. K. Chatterji: A Bengali Reader published in Petrograd in 1922. 
J. 0. Be: Letter to Lord Olive, dated the 4th July, 1766. 

M. H. Hosain: Tafsir Nishapuri. 

Baini Prashad ; A note on Fatawa-i-Alarngiri. 


J ournaL 
Journal. 

Journal. 


Communications. 

Apart from papers, communications on matters of consi- 
derable scholarly and scientilic interests were made from time 
to time at the Ordinary Monthly Meetings. Among suck 
communications, the following may be mentioned: — 

Chintaharan Chakravarti: Sanskrit MSS. in the Royal Asiatic 
Society of Bengal. 

Baini Prashad : Birth of Nur J ahan. 

S. L. Hora: A hump-backed Catla; Races and Varieties of Mahseer. 

B. R. Chatterjee: Our trip to Tholing Monastery in Western Tibet. 

B. K. C/hatterjee: Some peculiar implements made of Tridacna 
Shell from the Nicobar Islands, 

M. H. Hosain; The Persian Histories of the Carnatic. 

Solicitors. 

The Society is under obligation to its Solicitors, Messrs. 
B. N. Basu & Co., for prompt and valuable service rendered 
during the year. To the head of the firmj.Mr. J. N. Basu, it is 



•68 


Year^Book B.ABM, for 1941 . 


[VOL. 'VIll 


specially indebted for his eoiniesy a;nd iuigriidgiiig h(:‘lp on all 
occasions when there was any need to eoj)sn!t liiriu 


Coiiclnsion. 

Tlie dovelopiiient of tlie ihiternational sitiia.tioii ajid tlie 
approach of War to its very sliores could :nol'» far re.achiiig 

effect on India, and the lloya.iI Asiatic Society of Bengal, like:'* 
other institutions in this eonntiy, has not escapc'd from the (’onsiL 
queiices. One of these has been tlie resignation of a, la-rgca* rm, nilMa." 
of its members and the admission of fewer new meini)ers than is 
usual in normal time. Another consequence has l:)e(3ii tliC' (mforcc^d 
curtailment of its ■ publications as a I'csiilt of tlie high cost of 
printing materials . The necessity for ta,king e i n cagiai (;*.y t n c\asu ri\s 
against possible air raids and the evacuation of tlu* rart* mid 
valuable collections of the Society have, made a, stnaoiis drain 
on its resources which, have never been very lai’ge. For aiiy^ large 
undertakings therefore we shall have no means in the near fiitiire, 
unless our funds can be augmented by increa.S(3d grani.s from thcj 
Government or benefactions from some of our mori^ richly' en- 
dowed members. In Europe and Anuiwica, hau'iied H<am‘tif‘s like 
ours depend primarily for funds upon rich pliihuilhroi-astH. 
Unfortunately, our wealthy men have not yet shown much 
inclination to help us or other learned Societies in this way but 
it is to be hoped that this appeal will find a responsive diord in 
the hearts of some of them to enable this Society to contiiiuo its 
work of more than a century and a half in the cause of oriental 
fioholarship and antiquarian research. 



1942] 


Annual Eeport. 


59 


[APPENDIX I.] 

Membership Statistics* 

(As calcnlated for December 31st, for 30 years.) 


YEAR. 

ORDINARY. 

- 

EXTRA- 

ORDI- 

NARY. 


Grand Total Membership. 

FEL- 

LOWS. 



Paying, 


Non- 

paying. 

Total Ordinary Members. 

Resident. 

Non-Resident. 

Foreign. 

Total. 

Ab.sent. 

4-1 

S 

Total. 

Centenary Honorary. 

Associate. 

Institutional. 

Anniversary Honorary. 

Total, 

Honorary. 

Ordinary. j 

1912 .. 

203 

229 

19 

451 

43 

23 

66 

517 

3 

13 



16 

533 

27 

24 

1913 .. 

200 

211 

19 

430 

46 

23 

69 

499 

3 

14 



17 

516 

27 

28 

1914 .. 

191 

187 

19 

397 

50 

26 

76 

473 

3 

14 



17 

490 

24 

27 

1915 . . 

171 

188 

21 

380 

40 

25 

65 

445 

3 

15 



18 

463 

29 

31 

1916,. 

145 

159 

IS 

322 

60 

25 

85 

407 

3 

15 



18 

425 

26 

33 

1917 . . 

150 

144 

15 

309 

45 

24 

69 

378 

2 

12 



14 

392 

22 

36 

1918 .. 

153 

145 

17 

315 

43 

24 

67 

382 

2 

10 



12 

394 

22 

39 

1919 .. 

141 

128 

15 

284 

64 

25 

89 

373 

2 

11 



13 

386 

18 

36 

1920 . . 

161 

134 

15 

310 

32 

26 

58 

368 

2 

11 



13 

381 

28 

38 

1921 .. 

160 

132 

16 

308 

26 

26 

51 

359 

2 

12 



14 

373 

28 

40 

1922 . . 

160 

141 

16 

317 

26 

26 

62 

369 

2 

13 



15 

384 

30 

39 

1923 . . 

147 

120 

13 

280 

30 

27 

57 

337 

2 

11 



13 

350 

28 

37 

1924 . . 

209 

134 

12 

356 

29 

28 

57 

412 

2 

12 



14 

426 

27 

37 

1926 . . 

263 

137 

12 

412 

23 

27 

50 

462 

2 

12 



14 

476 

26 

34 

1926 . , 

319 

162 

20 

501 

23 

28 

61 

552 

2 

12 



14 

566 

25 

34 

J927 .. 

328 

107 

18 

513 

28 

33 

61 

574 

2 

13 



15 

589 

28 

38 

1928 . . 

344 

167 

23 

534 

42 

46 

88 

622 

1 

12 



13 

635 

28 

40 

1929 . . 

331 

181 

21 

533 

36 

49 

85 

618 

1 

10 

2 


13 

631 

27 

43 

1930 . . 

291 

194 

37 

522 

22 

52 

74 

596 

1 

8 

2 


11 

607 

29 

47 

1031 .. 

228 

184 

29 

441 

26 

52 

78 

619 

1 

8 

5 


14 

533 

29 

46 

1932 . . 

222 

126 

23 

371 

27 

54 

81 

452 

1 

7 

5 


13 

466 

28 

46 

1933 . . 

194 

126 

27 

347 

33 

56 

89 

436 


7 

6 


13 

449 

26 

49 

1934 . . 

217 

112 

30 

359 

26 

57 

83 

442 


6 

7 

12 

25 

467 

26 

47 

1936 . . 

206 

107 

28 

341 

28 

56 

84 

425 


5 

7 

ll 

23 

448 

24 

44 

1936 . . 

214 

106 

24 

344 

16 

55 

71 

415 


6 

10 

11 

26 

441 

21 

46 

1937 . . 

205 

99 

29 

333 

20 

56 

75 

408 


5 

12 

10 

27 

435 

19 

49 

1938 . . 

193 

98 

21 

312 

24 

54 

78 

390 


4 

12 

10 

'26 

416 

19 

45 

1939 . . 

187 

103 

21 

311 

21 

54 

75 

386 


6 

12 

10 

28 

414 

22 

46 

1940 . . 

190 

108 

18 

316 

14 

57 

71 

387 


7 

12 

10 

29 

416 

21 

49 

1941 . . 

173 

113 

16 

302 

22 

58 

80 

382 


6 

12 

9 

27 

409 

18 

48 




60 


YeMr-B(Mk for \Ml. 

[APPENDIX IT.] 


VOL. vm, 


List of Publications issued by the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 
between 1939-41. 


Bibliotheca Indica : 

(1) Stmiidaj:*aiia,iida 

(2) Atmatattvavivoka, Fase, <> fViHtntdtv). 

(3) Maiiu-Smrti, Volvinio IL 

(4) Marm»Smi'fci, V oliime III, 

(5) Tarik’h-i-Shahl, 

(6) Tabaqat-i-Akbarl, 'English Trans. VoL Hi, i.'i. 1. 

(7) Ta'baqat-i-AkbarT, ,, „ ,, III, 1 i. 

(8) Akbar ISTama, Eng'lish Trans,^ VoL ITT, bispiclo li (enriDiiKling 

fasciclo). 

(9) Ain-i-Akbari, Eng. Translation ( llo|;>riut), Volin no I. 

(10) Rnba’iyat of ‘Umar-i-Khayyaiu. 

(11) Hafb-IqUm, VoUimo I, fa, sc. 3, (concindiiig laHC,). 

(12) ‘Ainabi-Salib, Volume HI, fasc. 5 (conehniing fase.). 

(13) Doctrine of Nimbarka, English Trans,, Vohnnn I. 

(14) Lusluii-Engliah Dictionary. 

(15) Varna-rafcimkara. 

(16) Dharmabiudn, Volume I. fa.sci<;lo 2 (concluding fascide), 

(17) Avadana-kalpalatfi, Voliinie 1, Faacich^ 2 {R.(qirint), 

(18) Qanii 1 1 - i - Hu may u ni , Text , 

(19) Qanun-i-Humayriiii, English transIaHon. 

(20) Tabaqat-i-AkbarJ, English translation, I'i.L Pt, I, i'l* 

Index. 

(21) Kesar Saga, fase, 5 (concluding fasciclo). 

(22) Maathir-ul-tlmam, Eng, trans., Vol, I, ‘Fascielo VII (corielnd- 

ing fascicle), 

(23) Tadhkira-i-Humayhn wa Akbar, Text. 

(24) Doctrine of Himbarka, English Trans., Volume IJ. 

(26) Vaikhanaaa ^rauta Sutra, Text. 


Journal and Proceedings : 


( 1 ) 

( 2 ) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

( 6 ) 

(7) 

(8) 
(9) 

(10) 

( 11 ) 

( 12 ) 

(13) 

(14) 

(15) 

( 16 ) 

(17) 

(18) 

(19) 

( 20 ) 


Volume III, Year-Book for 1936, 

,, IV „ „ „ 1937. 

V „ 1.938, 

Letters, Volume IV, No. 1. 

„ „ No. 2. 

,, ,, 3. 

ft »» ». 4 . 

Science, Volume IV, No. !. 

,, 2. 

Title-pages and Indexes to Volumes IT and 11 1 
Volume VI, Yea<r-Book for 1939. 

Letters, Volume V, No. L 

, >f ff >f 99 2 , 

» ,, „ „ 3, 

VI „ 1. 

Science, Volume V, No. L 

tf 99 99 99 2 * 

.. „ VI „ L 

Title-pages and Indexes to Volumes IV and V« 
Volume VII, Year-Book for 1940. 



1942] 


Annual Report, 


61 


(21) Letters, Volume VI, Ko. 2. 

(22) „ „ VII, „ 1. 

(23) „ „ „ „ 2. 

(24) Science, Volume VI, JSTo. 2. 

(25) ,, „ VII, ,, 1. 

(26) Title-page and Index to Volume VI. 

Memoirs : 

(1) Volume X, Xo. 3, 

(2) „ XII, „ 2. 

Miscellaneous : 

(1) Descriptive Catalogue of Arabic Manuscripts, Volume I. 

(2) Descriptive Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts, VoL VIII, 

Part I. 

(3) Proceedings of the 3rd Indian Science Congress (Reprint). 

(4) Descriptive Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts, VoL VIII, 

Part II. 

(5) Descriptive Catalogue of Vernacular Manuscripts, VoL IX, 




[APPENDIX III] 


Abstract Statement 

of 

Receipts and Disbursements 

of the 

Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 


for 


the Year 1941 


( 63 ) 



Year-Book for 1941. 


[TOL. VIII, 


STATEMENT No. I, 

194L 


General 

Income and Expenditure Account 
Rs. As. P. Rs, As. P, 


To Establishment : 

Salaries and Allowances . , 
Commission , . 

Geneeal Expenbituee : 
Stationery 
Fans and Light . . 

Telephone 

Taxes 

Postage 

Contingencies . . 

Printing Circulars, etc. 
Audit Fee 
Petty Repairs . . 

Insurance 
Menials’ Clothing 
Furniture and Repairs 
Interest on Security Deposit 


Gratuities , . 

LiBHAltY AN-D COLLECTIONS : 

Books , . . , 

Binding 

Steel Shelving . . 

Provident Fund Contribution for 1941 , 


Transfer to Building Repair Fund 
Account .. .. ,, 

SuNBKy Adjustments: 

Bad Debts written-off 
Depreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-41 .. 

Balance as per Balance- Sheet 


21,877 2 3 
243 4 9 


22,120 7 


0,288 0 t) 

690 0 0 


999 11 6 
1,776 6 0 


2,776 1 6 

5,296 0 0 
667 10 6 

40,828 3 0 

2,000 0 0 


744 0 0 
4,114 7 0 


~ 4,858 7 C) 

2,82,067 n 4 


3,29,754 0 4 



1942] 


Receipts and Disbursements. 


66 


STATEMENT No. 1. 

Fund. 1941 . 

for the year to 31st December, 1941. 


By Balance from last Account 


Rs, As. P. Rs® As. P, 
2,83,041 8 10 


Cash Receipts *. 

Interest on Investments 
Interest on Fixed Deposits . 
Advertising 
Rent 

Miscellaneous 


Personal Account : 

Members* Subscriptions 
Admission Fees 
Compounding Fees 


9,802 8 0 
600 0 0 
10,200 0 0 
10,630 0 0 
399 16 6 

31,632 7 6 


9,764 0 0 
736 0 0 
690 0 0 

— 11,080 0 0 


Contribution to General Expen- 
diture from — 

Oriental Publication Fund (1) .. 2,000 0 0 
Sanskrit MSS. Fund .. 2,000 0 0 

4,000 0 0 


3,29,764 0 4 



Year-Book B.A.S,B. for 1941. 


[VOL. vm, 


STATEMENT No. 2* 

!94L Oriental Publication 

From a monthly grant made by the Government of Bengal for the^piibii^ 
(Rs. 6OO5, Less 20% from the 1st April, 1932), and I'or the 
(Rs. 250, Less 20% from the of 


Rs. As. P, 


To printing . « . . . . • . 2,243 6 0 

Editing . - . . . . • • 47 1 4 0 

Binding .. .. .. ... 171 13 0 

Proportionate Share in General Expenditure . . 2,000 0 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . . . 14,861 12 8 


19,748 3 8 


STATEMENT No. 3. 

1 941 Oriental Publication 

From an annual grant made by the Government of Bengal of 

Historical 
{Less 20% from the 


Es. As. E 

To Balance from last Account .. 11,084 15 10 

Printing . . • • . • • • • 1,393 14 9 

Editing . . . . * . , . . 474 0 0 

12,952 14 7 


STATEMENT No, 4. 

1941. Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund 

From an annual grant of Rs. 3,200 made by the Govemniont of Bengal 

by the Society ; and Rs. 3,600 
from the same Government 


Hs. Aa. P. 


To Cataloguing 

775 

0 

0 

Binding . , 

85 

0 

0 

Printing 

1,646 

1 

0 

Purchase of MSS. 

60 

0 

0 

Repairs to MSS. . . 

1,287 

8 

0 

Preservation (A.R.P, Measures) 

660 

0 

0 

Proportionate Share in General Expen- 




diture . . . . . . ' 

2,000 

0 

0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet 

17,846 

6 

0 


24,269 16 0 



67 


1942 ] Eemipts and Disbursements. 

STATEMENT No. 2. 

Fund No. 1, in Account with R. A. 8, B. 1941^ 

cation of Oriental Works and Works of Instruction in Eastern Languages 
publication of Sanskrit Works hitherto unpublished 
Aprils 19??2 ^0 2^th February^ 1941). 

Rs. As. P* 

By Balance from last Account , . . , 12,148 3 8 

Annual Grant . . . « . , , , 7,600 0 0 


19,748 3 8 


STATEMENT No. 3. 

Fund No. 2 , in Account with R,A,8.B, 194h 

Rs. 3,000 for the publication of Arabic and Persian Works of 
• Interest. 

Isii of Aprils 1932.) 


Rs. As. P« 

By Annual Grant for 1940 and 1941 . . . . 4,800 0 0 

By Balance as per Balance Sheet «, 8,152 14 7 


12,952 14 7 


STATEMENT No. 4, 

Account^ in Account with E.A.S.B. 194F 

for the publication of the Catalogue of vSanskrit Manuscripts acquired 
(Less 20% from the Ist of April, 1932) 
for Research Work. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . . . . 18,179 16 0 

Annual Grant . . . . . . . . 6,080 0 0 


24,269 16 0 



68 


Ymr-Bmh E.A*8.B. for 1941. 


[VOL, VIII, 


STATEMENT Mo. 5. 

194/ Arabic and Persian Manmcripis 

From an anmial grant of Rs. OjOOO made by the Government of India lor 
by the Society ; for the piarchase of further Mahiiscripts, 

Manuscripts found in. 
{Less 50%/rom- IM Aprils 


Rs. As, P. Rs, As. P. 

S,141 3 3 

1,100 0 0 

2 8 0 


To Balance from last Account. . 
Gatalogoing 
Binding 


4,243 11 3 


STATEMENT No. 6. 

1941. Barclay Memorial 

From a smii of Rs. 500 odd given in 1896 by the Siirgoon 

encouragement of Medical 


To Depreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-41 . . 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs. 700, ^% G.P. Notes, 1854-65 
Surplus at date 


Rs. As. F. Rs. As. P. 


10 16 0 

647 8 0 

101 10 8 

749 2 8 


760 1. 8 


STATEMENT No. 7* 

1941, Servants’ Pension Fund 

Founded in 1876 as tho Piddiiigton Pensi<iu Kund 


Rs. As. P« 

To Depreciation on Investments revalued 
• on 31-12-41.. 

Pension 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs. 3,000, 3|% G.P. Notes, 1854-55 2,775 0 0 

Surplus at date . . . . gjO }4 g 


Rs. As. P. 

46 14 0 
132 0 0 


3,685 14 8 



1942] Eeceipts and Disbursements, 69 

STATEMENT No. 5« 

Fund Account^ in Account with R,A,S,B. I94F 

the cataloguing and binding of Arabic and Persian Manuscripts^ acquired 
and for the preparation of notices of Arabic and Persian 
various Libraries in India. 

1939 .) 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As, P. 
By Balance as per Balance Sheet . . . , . . 4,243 11 3 


4,243 11 3 


STATEMENT No, 6. 

Fund Account^ in Account with R.A,8,B. 194L 

■General, for the foundation of a medal for the 

and Biological Science. 


By Balance from last Account 

Interest realized during the year 


Rs. As. P. 


Rs. As. P. 

736 13 8 
24 4 0 


760 1 8 


STATEMENT No, 7. 

Account^ in Account with B, A, 8. B. 1941» 

with Rs. 500 odd from the Piddington Fund. 


By Balance from last Account 

Interest realized during the year 


Rs. As, P. Rs. As. P. 

3,660 0 8 
104 12 0 


3,764 12 B 


5 



70 


Year-Book B.A.S.B. for 1941. 


[voL. vni; 


STATEMENT No. 8. 

1941. Annandale Memorial Fund 

From donations by subscription^ 

Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

62 8 0 

3,700 0 0 

762 12 9 

4,462 12 9 

4,525 4 9 

STATEMENT No. 9. 

1941. Permanent Library Endowment 

From gifts received, 

Rs. As. P. Rs. As, P. 

. 218 12 0’ 

12,960 0 0 
3,226 7 8 

16,176 7 8 

16,396 3 S 

STATEMENT No. 10. 

1941. Sir William Jones Memorial 

From a sum gifted for the purpose in 
Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Depreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-41 . . 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs. 3,000, 3|% G.P. Notes, 1864-66 
Surplus at date 

3,180 9 O' 

5B 


46 14 O' 

2,776 0 0 
368 11 0 

3,133 11 0 ' 


To Depreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-41 . . 

Balance as per Balance Sheet-— 

Rs. 14,000, 3i% G.P. Notes, 1854-65 
Surplus at date 


To Depreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-41 . . 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Bs. 4,000, ^% G.P. Notes, 1864-56 
Surplus at date 



71 


1942] Receipts and Disbursements, 

STATEMENT No. 8. 

Account^ in Account with R.A.S,B, 1941 ^ 

started in 1926. 


Rs. As. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account .... 

Interest realized during the year .... 

4,386 12 9 
.138 8 ' 0 


4,525 4 9 

STATEMENT No. 9, 


Fund Account^ in Account with E.A.8.B. 

194L 

started in 1926. 


Rs. As. P. 

Rs, As. P. 

By Balance from last Account , . . . .... 

Interest realized during the year ^ . . .... 

15,906 3 8 
489 0 0 


16,395 3 8 

STATEMENT No. 10. 


Fund Accotmtf in Account with B.A.8.B, 

1941. 

1926, by Dr. XJ. R. Brahmachari. 


Rs. As. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . , - • 

Interest realized during the year * . .... 

3,075 13 0 
104 12 0 


3,180 9 0 



72 


Year-Book B.A.8.B. for 1941. 


[YOIi. VIII, 


STATEMENT No. 11. 

1941. Pramathanath Bose Memorial 

From a sum gifted for 


Es. As. P. Rs, As. P« 

To Depreciation, on Investments revalued 

0113142.41 .. .. .. .... 28 2 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs. 800, ^% G.P. Notes, 1842-43 ") , ^ . 

„ 1,000, „ 1865 j ^ ^ 

Surplus at date . . . . 362 12 0 

, ■ 2,027 12 0 


2,055 14 0 


STATEMENT No. 12* 

1 • Joy Gohind Law Memorial 

From a donation for the purpose 


To Depreciation on Investments revalued 
on 3142-41 . . 

Balance 'as per Balance Sheet— 

Rs. 3,000, 3|% G.P. Notes, 1854-55 
Surplus at date 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 


46 14 0 

2,776 0 0 
313 12 0 

3,088 12 0 


3,136 10 0 


STATEMENT No. 13. 

1941. 


Calcutta Science Congress Prize 


" Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P, 

To Depreciation on Investments revalued 

on 31-12-41 , . . . ^ ^ , 4 ^ 14 , a 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Re. 3,000, 31% G.P. Notes, 1854-66 2,775 0 0 
Surplus at date , , . , 1,292 6 7 

' 4,067 6 7 


4,114 4 7 



1942] Receipts and Disbursements. 7S' 

STATEMENT No. 11. 

Fund Account p in Account with R,A.8.B. 194h 

the purpose in 1,935. 

Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . , . . .... 2,006 7 0 

Interest realized during the year . . .... , , 49 7 0 



2,055 14 0 

STATEMENT No. 12. 


Fund Account, in Account with R,A.S.B. 

1941. 

in 1929, by Dr. Satya Churn Law. 


Bs. As. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account , • ' , , .... 

Interest realized during the year , , .... 

3,030 14 0 
104 12 0 

‘ 

3,135 10 0 

STATEMENT No. 13. 


Fund Account, in Account with R.A JS.B. 

1941. 

Bs. As. P. 

Rs., As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . . .... 

Interest realized during the year . . .... 

4,009 8 7 
104 12 0 


4,114 4 7 



74 


Year-Book M. A, S.B, for 194L 


[VOL. VIII, 


STATEMENT No» 14. 

1911 ^ Dn Bmhl Memorial 

From a sum gifted for the purpostu in 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Depreoiation on Investments revalued' 

on 31-12^41 . . . . - . • • 15 10 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Es. 1,000, ^% G.P. Notes, 1854-55 925 0 0 

Surplus at date . . . • 186 3 0 


1,126 13 0 


STATEMENT No. 15. 

1941. Building Repair 


To Repairs during the year . . 
Balance as per Balance Sheet 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

2,930 9 6 
3,386 9 6 


6,317 3 0 


STATEMENT No. 16, 

1941. Provident Fund 

From eontributioBB by the 


To Depreciation on Investments revalued 
on 31-12-41 
Cost of a stamp 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs. 5,200, 3% G.P Notes, 1963-66 
Rs. 6,000, Zl% G.P. Notes, 1900-01 
Savings Bank and Advances 


Rs. As. P. 


4,819 12 0 
5,660 0 0 
6,909 4 4 


Rb. As« P. 

339 10 0 
0 1 0 

17,279 0 4 


17,618 11 4 



75 


1942] Receipts and Disbursements. 


STATEMENT No. 14* 

Fund Account^ in Account with B,A,8>B^ 194F 

1929, by tho Briihl Farewell Committee. 



Rs. As. P. 

Bs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account 

Interest realized during the year 


1,092 1 0 

34 12 0 



1,126 13 0 

STATEMENT No. 15. 



Fund Account^ in Account with 

1941. 


Rs. As. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account 

Transfer from R.A.S.B. General Fund 


4,317 3 0 

2,000 0 0 



6,317 3 0 

STATEMENT No. 16. 

Account 9 in Account with E,A.S.B. 
Society and its Staff, 


1941. 


Rs, As. P. 

Rs. As, P, 


By Balance Irom last Accoimt 

Interest realized dtariog the year 
Staff Contribution for the year 
Society’s Contribution for the year 

Interest realized from Savings Bank 


65 13 0 
657 10 6 
667 10 6 


15,840 6 0 


1,381 2 0 
397 4 4 


17,618 11 4 



76 


Year-Book R.AB.B, for 1941. 


[voL. vm, 


STATEMENT No. 17. 

1941. Admmes Account^ 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Balance from last Acoount . . , , . , 25,473 0 0 

Payments during the year . . .... 2,383 0 0 

4,858 0 0 


STATEMENT No, 18, 

1941. 


To Balance from last Account 
Advances 

B.A,S.B.*s Subscriptions, etc. 
Book sales, etc. 


Personal 


Bs. As. P. 

11 , 080 * 0 0 
6,894 13 6 


Bs. As. P. 
4,267 7 3 

2,697 8 6 

17,974 13 6 


24,839 13 3 


STATEMENT No, 19. 

1941. 


To Books returned 

Journal and Proceedings 
Balance as per Balance Sheet 


Publication Fund Accomt, 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

1 8 0 
6,471 13 6 
6,931 9 6 


13,404 16 0 



77 


1942 ] Receipts and Dishursements, 

STATEMENT No, 17, 
in Account with B.A.8.B, 1941 , 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P- 

By RefiindR during the year . . .... 1,430 0 0' 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 3,428 0 ' 0 

4,858 0 0 


STATEMENT No. 18. 

Accomt. / 941 . 


By Cash Receipts during the year 
Books returned 

Bad Debts written off, R.A.S.B. 
Balance as per Balance Sheet 


Rs. As. F. Rs. As. P. 

17,858 6 3 

1 8 0 

744 0 0 

6,235 15 0^ 


Outstandings. 

Amount due 

Amount due 

to the Society. 

by the Society. 


Rs, 

As. 

P. 

Rs. 

As. 

p. 

Members 

3,487 

8 

0 

430 

13 

0 

Subscribers, etc. 
Bill Collector’s 

576 

0 

0 

24 

0 

0 

Deposit 



6 

_ 

100 

0 

0 

Miscellaneous ... 


7 

78 

14 

6 


\ 6369 

10 


633 

TT 

6 


24 839 13 3 


STATEMENT No. 19. 

in Account with R,A.S,B, 1941. 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

.... 4,403 15 0 

1,600 0 0 

.. 6,894 13 6 
. . 506 2 6 

7,401 0 0 


13,404 15 0' 


By Balance from last Account . . 
Government Grant 
Book'Sales, etc. . , 

Cash Sale of Publications . . 


78 Year-Booh R.A.8.B. for IMl. [tol. viii, 

STATEMENT No. 20. 

1941. (/) Deposit Account (Savings Bmik 

Rs. As. P. Ka. A8. P. 
2,655 15 0 

49 7 0 

1,315 5 0 
1,169 6 0 

2,534 2 

Interest for the year . . .... 397 4 

5,687 5 4 


To Balance from last Account 

Deposit of Interest realized from 
loans during the year 
Deposit of Contributions during the 
year 

Deposit of Advances returned 


STATEMENT No. 21. 
1941. 


(2) Deposit Account (Fixed Deposit 


Rs. As. P. 

40.000 0 0 

10.000 0 0 

60,000 ri) 


To Balance from last Account 
Deposit during the year 


Bs. As. P. 





1942] Receipts and Disbursements, 

STATEMENT No« 20. 

Deposit with Imperial Bank of India), 


R'S. As. P. 

By Withdrawal for Staff Advances, etc. .... 

Cost of a stamp . . . . .... 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 


STATEMENT No. 21. 

■with Imperial Bank of India). 


Bs. As. P. 

By Balance as per Balance Sheet , . .... 


79 


1941, 


Bs. As. P, 
2,106 0 0 
0 10 
3,481 4 4 


5,587 5 4 


1941. 


Rs. As, P. 
50,000 0 0 


50,000 0 0 



80 


Year-Book E.A.8.B. for 1941, 


[voL, vm, 


STATEMENT No. 22 « 

1941. 0) Investments 

Ea. Ab. P. 

To Balance from last Account .. 3,05,373 Pi 0 


3,05,373 12 0 


Face 

Value 

Es. 

FUNDS. 

Bate @ 
Bs. % 

31st 

December, 
1941, Valua- 
tion. 

.‘list 

Decorabor, 
1940, Valua- 
tion or cost. 

Boprocia- 

tion 

or 

*'Approoia- 

tion. 


BOYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF 
BENUAL. 


Rs. 

A. 

p. 

lis . 

A. 

p. 

lls. 

A. 

p. 

16,700 
J ,53,700 
44,300 
6,000 
33,000 

Permanent Reserve. 

31% Gr. P. Notes, 184243 \ 

G-. P. Notes, 1854-35 1 

3J% G-. P. Notes, 1865 > 

3|% U. P. Notes, 1879 | 

3|% a. P. Notes, 1900-01 / 











2,53,700 

500 

3% G.P Notes* 1896-97 

92/8/- 

79/12/- 

2,34,672 

398 

8 

12 

0 

0 

2,38,636 

404 

9 

6 

0 

0 

5 

1 

10 

0 

O' 

12,000 

11,400 

Temporary Reserve. 

3^% a. P. Notes, 1900-01 

41% Loan, l955«-e0 

.92/8/- 

112/14/- 

11,100 

12,867 

0 

12 

0 

0 

11,287 

12,825 

8 

0 

0 

0 

187 

'I’ll* 

8 

12 

0 

0 

700 

Barclay Memoria L Fund. 

31% G. P. Notes, 1&54.55 

92/8/. 

647 

8 

0 

658 

7 

0 

10 

IS 

O' 

3,000 

Servants’ Pension Fund, 

S|% G. P, Notes, 1854-55 

92'8/- 

2,775 

0 

0 

2,821 

14 

0 


14 

0 

4,000 

Annandale Memorial Fund, 

31% G. P. Notes, 1854-55 

92/8/- 

3,700 

0 

0 

8,762 

8 

0 

(52 

8 

0' 

14,000 

Permanent Library Endowment 
Fund. 

3|% G. P. Note.s, ia54-55 

92/8/. 

12,950 

0 

0 

18,168 

12 

0 

218 

12 

0 

3,000 ^ 

Sir William Jones Memorial 
Fund, 

3|% G. P. Notes, 1854-55 

92/8/- 

2,775 

0 

0 

2,821 

.14 

0 

4(5 

14 

0 

800 

1,000 

Pramathanath Bosk Memorial 
Fund. 

3J% G. P. Notes, 1842-43 > 

3i%G.P, Notes, 1865 } 

92/8/- 

1,665 

0 

0 

1,693 

2 

o' 

28 

2' 

0 

3,000 

Joy Gobind Law Memorial Fund. 
3|% G. P. Notes, 1854-55 

92/8/- 

2,775 

0 

0 

2,821 

14 

0 

4(5 

14 

0 

3,000 

Calcutta Science Congress Prize 
Fund. 

31-% G. P. Notes, 1854-55 

92/8/- 

2,775 

0 

0 

2,821 

14 

0 

46 

14 

O' 

1,000 

Dr. Bruhl Memorial Fund. 

3|% G. P. Notes, 1854-55 

92/8/. 

925 

0 

0 

940 

10 

0 

15 

10 

0 

5,200 

6,000 

Provident Fund. 

3% Loan (1963-65) 

31% G. P. Notes, 1900-01 ... 

92/11/- 

92/8/- 

! 4319 

5,550 

12 

0 

0 

0 

5,065 

5,643 

10 

12 

0 

0 

245 

93 

14 

12 

0 

0 

3,22,300 







8,00,396 


"o 

8,05J73 

12 

0 

4,977 

'i 

*0 




1942] 


Eeceipts and Dishurmnents. 


81 


STATEMENT No. 22. 
Account. 


To Depreciation on Investments revalued 
on3M2-41 

Balance as per Balance Sheet 


1941. 

Rs. As. R. 

4,977 8 0 
3,00,396 4 0 

3,05,373 12 0 



82 Year-Book R.A.S.B. for 1941 . 

[VOL 

. V. 

[tL 

STATEMENT No, 23. 

1941. 

Cash 

For the year ondod 31st 

To 

RSo As. 

P. Es. 

As, 

P, 

Balance from last Account 


' 6,836 

7 

6 

General Fund Account 


33,232 

7 

6 

Oriental Publication Fund No. 1 Account . . 


7,600 

0 

0 

Oriental Publication Fund No, 2 Account 


4,800 

0 

0 

Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund Account 


6,080 

0 

0 

Barclay Memorial Fund Account 


24 

4 

0 

Servants’ Pension Fund Account 


104 

12 

0 

Annandale Memorial Fund Account 


138 

8 

0 

Permanent Library Endowment Fund 
Account 


489 

0 

di 

Sir William Jones Memorial Fund Account 


104 

12 

1) 

Joy Gobind Law Memorial Fund Account 


104 

12 

0 

Calcutta Science Congress Prize Fund 
Account 


104 

12 

0 

Dr. Briihi Memorial Fund Account 


34 

12 

0 

Pramatbanath Bose Memorial Fund 
Account 


4!) 

7 

0 

Provident Fund Account 


1,381 

2 

0 

Advances Account . . 


1,430 

0 

0 

Personal Account . . 


17,868 

6 

3 

Publication Fund Account 


606 

2 

6 

Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 
Bank of India, Calcutta 


2,106 

0 

0 



82,983 

8 

0 



85 


1942] Receipts and Disbursements. 

STATEMENT No» 23. 

Account* 

December^ 1941. 


By Rs. As. F. 

General B"’iind Account . . . . .... 

Oriental Publication Fund No. 1 Account . . .... 

Oriental Publication Fund No. 2 Account . . .... 

Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund Account . . .... 

Arabic and Persian Manuscripts Fund 
Account . . . . . . .... 

Servants’ Pension Fund Account . . .... 

Building Repair Fund , . . . . . . 

Advances Account . . . . . . .... 

Personal Account . . . , . . .... 

Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 
Bank of India . . . . . . .... 

Fixed Deposit Account, Imperial Bank of 

India . . . . , . . . .... 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

In hand . . . . . .... 

With the Imperial Bank of India, on 
Current Account . . . . .... 


1941. 


Rs. As. P. 
47,300 0 6. 
2,886 7 0 
1,867 14 9 
4,413 9 O' 

1,102 8 0 
132 0 0 
2,930 9 e 
2,383 0 0 
2,597 8 0 

2,534 2 0 

10,000 0 0 

33 12 0 

4,804 1 6 


82,985 8 9 



84 


Year-Book M.A.S.B. foy 1941. 


[VOL. Vni: 


STATEMENT No. 24. 

JP 41 , Balance 

As at .11 at 


LIABILITIES. 



Bs 

. As. P. Rs, 

As. 

P. 

General Fund Account 


.... 2,82,067 

6 

4 

Oriental Publication Fund No. 1 Account 

.... 14,861 

12 

8 

Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund Account 

, , 

17,846 

6 

0 

Barclay Memorial Fund Account 

. . 

749 

2 

8 

Servants’ Pension Fund Account 

. . 

. . . . 1,585 

14 

8 

Annandale Memorial Fund Account 

, . 

4,462 

12 

9 

Permanent Library Endowment 

Fund 




Account 

. . 

16,176 

7 

8 

Sir William Jones Memorial Fund Account 

1,133 

11 

0 

Pramathanath Bose Memorial 

Fund 




Account 


2,027 

12 

0 

Joy Gobind Law Memorial Fund Account 

1,088 

12 

0 

Cfidcutta Science Congress Prize 

Fund 




Account 

• • 

4,067 

6 

7 

Dr. Bruhl Memorial Fund Account 


1,111 

3 

0 

Building Repair Fund Account 


3,186 

0 

6 

Provident Fund Account 


17,279 

0 

4 

Publication Fund Account 

« « 

6,931 

9 

6 

Personal Aecoun-fe — Sundry Liabilities 


613 

11 

6 


3,81,409 10 2 


We have examined the above Balance Sheet 
and the awended detailed accounts ■with the 
Books and vonchers presented to us and certify 
that they are in accordance therewith, and, in 
otir opinion, set forth correctly the position of 
the Society as at Slst December, 1941. 

Pkice, Watkrhoijsi!, Peat & Co., 


Calcutta^ 

29th January^ 1942. 


^ AudiiorSj 
Chartered Accountants, 
Registered Accountants, 



85 


1942] Receipts and Disbursements. 

STATEMENT No, 24, 

Sheet. 1941. 

December, 1941. 


ASSETS. 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 


Oriental Publication Fund No. 2 Account 8,152 14 7 
Arabic ' and Persian Manuscripts Fund 
Account . . . . . . 4,243 11 3 

12,396 9 10 

Advances Account . . . . . . 3,428 0 0 

Personal Account — Sundry Outstandings . . 6,869 10 6 

10,297 10 6 

Deposits ; — 

Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 
Bank of India . , . . . . 3,481 4 4 

Fixed Deposit Account, Imperial Bank 
of India . . . . . . 50,000 0 0 

53,481 4 4 

Investments Account . . , , .... 3,00,396 4 0 

Casli Account : — 

In hand .. .. .. 33 12 0 

With the Imperial Bank of India, on 
Current Account . , . . 4,804 1 6 

4,837 13 6 


3,81,409 10 2 


Baiot Pbashad, 
Honorary Treasurer. 


6 



[APPENDIX IV.] 

Abstract Proceedings Council, 1941. 

(Rule 48 f.) 

Annual Meeting — 

Annual Meetinu. Adopt usual procedure. 

No. 2. ^ 

Suggestion regarding request to H.E. tbo Governor and I'^atron of tlu:^ 
Society to preside over the Annual Meeting in February I1M2. Tin' 
General Secretary to invite His Excellency tlie Governor tif j'hnigal to 
preside at the Society’s Annual Meeting on Monday, thc^ Ihicl Fi^hnisirv'; 
1942. 

No. 26. 2()-vl F4L 

Letter dated 9-12-41 from the Private Secretary to H.E, tlu^ Govcunor 
of Bengal, informing that owing to the present intornational sit.nation. 
it is not possible for His .Excellency to commit himself to an t.nigagmraad. 
so far ahead to preside over the Annual Meeting of the Society cm, 2-2™42. 
Record. 

No. 3. 18-12-41. 

Annual Report — 

Annual Report for 1940. Adopt after revision by tlie .ProHident, 

No. 1. 29-L4L 


A,B.P. Measures — 

Letter No. Home Dept. Political 47(6)-P of 7-1-41 re : tbo Halbgtiari.ling 
of valuable documents of the Society against possible air rahlK. (I) 
Find out from the Government of Bengal if there is any profiosa,! fcir 
safely housing valuable documents from air luidH outside Galcutta ; 
(2) if so wdiether it will be possible for the Govern, m out to store 
Society’s valuable MSS. and records there.u 

No. 4. 29 -I -1,1. 

The Council considered further the question of the Safe ihmttxly of 
the ' manuscripts and other valuable d<)cui.nents iu its p<)SMCssi«;m 'rmrl 
resolved that Mr. L. R. Fawcus, Mornl:)('.u*, Ih>ard of Hevonuc, lie n|>- 
proached by the Ge,no,ral Secretary witli a view to vvhotht,u‘ it 

will be possible for him to arrange for the Sa,fb Cust(,)dy of the jnosfc 
valuable MSS. and documents belonging to the Socnety* in f’MiIiico 
of the Nawab Bahadur of Murshidaba'd against possible air raids. 

lb. 28-2-4L 

Letter No. 2694 of 10-3-41 from the Secretary to the Board of'Revenno, 
Bengal r© : the utilization of a portion of the Palace 'of the Nawab <.)f 
Murshidabad for safe custody of the Society’s Manuscripts, Find out 
total weight and area required for the safe custody of the moat valiiab,!© 
Manuscripts, Paintings, etc,, of the Society. 

lb. 3L34L 


6b 


( 86 ) 



YOh, VIII, 1942] Abstract Proceedings Council, 1941. 


87 


Further consideration of measures to be taken for protection of the 
Society’s valuable Manuscripts and other possessions against air raid. 
Adopt measures suggested by the Government in the circular issued 
regarding fire from air raids. 

‘ Mo. 13. 28-4-41. 


Letter from the Secretary to the Govermnent of Bengal, No, 112T, 
Edn. of 5-5-41, regarding the evacuation of irreplaceable MSS. in the 
possession of the Society. Enquire from Sir Sarvapalli Radimkrishnan, 
Kt., Vice-Chancellor, Benares Hindu University, whether it would be 
possible to house some of the valuable Manuscripts and records of the 
Society in the Library of the University under proper safeguards. 

No. 1. ' ■ ^ 30-5-41. 


Report by the General Secretary of steps taken by the Society 
against possible air raids. Cleiieral Secretary’s action be approved. 
Ask the advice of Sir S. Bhatnagar, Director of Scientific and Industrial 
Research Board, for additional protective measures against incendiary 
bombs. 

No. 12. 30-5-41. 


Letter No. 563(6), Misc. of 21-5-41. from the Government of Bengal, 
enclosing copy of a memorandum on protection of glass doors and 
windows at the time of air raids. Postpone consideration. 

No. 16. 30-5-41. 


Letter No. 6593 of 9-6-41 from the Board of Revenue, Bengal, en- 
closing an extract from a letter No. 3 (Con.) of 2-6-41 from the Manager 
of the Murshidabad Estate, re : storage of our Manuscripts. Postpone 
consideration. 

No. 1. 30-6-41. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(a) of 23-6-41. Allocation 
of Fund for the expenditure incurred due to A.R.P. measiires. The 
expenditure be met from the General Fund of the Society as a special 
ease. Accepted by Council. 

No. 5. 30-6-41. 


Letter dated 2-8-41 from the Benares Hindu University regarding 
the storage of Society’s MSS. in the Library of the Hindu University. 
Resolved that («) the Benares Hindu University be thanked for agreeing 
to store our Manuscripts, etc., in their Library; (6) a complete set of the 
Bibliotheca Indica as well as of the Journals and Memoirs of the Society 
be stored at Benares along with the manuscripts; (c) the General 
Secretary be requested to find out the total amount of money that will 
be required for transporting the MSS., etc., and insuring them against 
railway risks, burglary and fire, 

No.2. 29-8-41. 


Letter dated 4-9-41 from the Vice-Chancellor, Muslim University, 
Aligarh, suggesting the transfer of Persian, Urdu and Arabic MSS. of 
the Society to the Lytton Library of the Muslim University, Inform 
the Vice-Chancellor that it is not proposed to send these MSS. on 
permanent loan to any institution. 

No. 2. 


18-9-41. 



88 


Year^Book R.A.S.B. for 1941 . 


[VOL. VIII, 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 7 of 15-12-41. Resolved 
that the General Secretary be authorised to take all necessary measures 
for additional, protection against possible aii“ raids. Accepted by 
CoiniciL 


No. 8. 


15 - 12 - 41 . 


Oiir letter No. 1849 of 22-9-41 to Sir Zia-ud-diii Ahmed and his reply 
of 24-9-41 re ; the transfer of our Persian, Arabic and Urdu MSS. 
to the Lytton Library of the Aligarh University. Record. 

No. 3. 26-11-41, 


Letter No. 14467 of 24-9-41 from the Benares Hindu University 
re ; storage of our valuable MSS. in its library and a plan of the 
first floor of the library building wanted for purpose of insurance. 
Postpone consideration and prepare statement of costs to cover insur- 
ance, packing and transportation. 

No. 4, 26-11-4L 


The question of the removal of the Society’s valuable Manuscripts, 
books, etc., which was postponed from the last Council Meeting. The 
General Secretary, in consultation with the President, to take all 
necessary steps for the immediate removal of the Manuscripts to Benares 
according to the proposals already submitted, and the expenditure 
incurred in this connection is to be met out of 0. P. Fund No. 1 and the 
Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund. Steps for the protection of other valuable 
historical possession, such as, the Asokan Edict, are also to be taken 
by the General Seeretaiy in consultation with the President. 

No. 22. 18-12-41. 


Letter dated 16-12-41 from Mr. C. W. Gurner enquiring whether 
the Council could raise the question of requesting His Excellency’s 
kind permission to have some of the valuable pictures to be removed 
to the Government House, Darjeeling. The General Secretary be 
authorised to take the necessary steps in consultation with the President, 
the Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley and Mr. C. W. Gumer, for the 
removal of the most valuable paintings in the possession of the Society. 

No. 24. 18-12-41.’' 


Report of A.R.P. measures taken by the Society and the quostioji 
of formation of watch and war squads. Approved; the General Sec- 
retary in consultation with the President arrange the necessary details 
with regard to further A.R.P. measures to be taken. 

No, 26. 18-12-41, 


Autistic Possessiohs — 

Letter from Sir Upendra Nath Brahmaohari dated the 25th August 
presenting a photograph of Sir John Lort-Williams to the Society. 
Accept with thanks. 

No. 23. 29-8-4L 


Assessment — 

Notice of enhanced assessment from the Calcutta Corporation and 
action taken thereon by the General Secretary. Action approved, 

IS* 18-12-41. 



1942 ] 


Abstract Proceedings Council, 1941 . 


Associate Membbb — 

Letter to the President of the R.A.S.B. from Mr. L. S. Dugin resigning 
the Associate Membership of the Society. Accept his resignation. 
Ko.L 28-4-41. 


At Home — 

On the proposal of the General Secretary it was resolved that an 
“■At Home’ be given in honour of the Hon’ble Mr. Justice John 
Lort-Williams, Kt., on the eve of his retirement. 

Ho. 13. 28-7-41. 


Accounts of the ‘At Home’ given by the Ooimeil to Sir John Lort» 
Williams on the eve of his retirement. Record. 

No. 24. 29-8-41. 


Bibliotheca Indiga — 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2{g) of 29-1-41. Prof. 
Chintaharan Chakravarti, for revising and editing charges of Bib, 

Indica ‘Dharmabindu’, pp. 1-165, bill dated 22-1-41 Rs.l3I-4-0. 

Pay. Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. 29-1-41. 


Recommendation Publication Committee No. 2 of 29-1-41. Letter 
from Vish\"esvaranand Vedic Research Institute, Lahore, requesting 
for a set of printed sheets and proofs of ‘Vaikhanasa Srauta Sutrarn’ 
to be supplied in advance for preparing Vedic concordance. Grant. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 12. 29-1-41. 


Consideration of the list of incomplete works in Sanskrit, Hindi, 
Arabic and Persian and Tibetan published by Society in the 
Bibliotheca Indica series together with a letter dated 14th May, 1941, 
from Dr. B, C. Law containing suggestions on two works, Lalitavistara 
and Bodhicaryavatarapanjika (Nos. 90 and 150). Resolved that 
( 1 ) the publication of the following works be not proceeded with : 


Sanskrit, Hindi, etc,-- 


Brahiiaa Sutra 

Work No. 68 

P rthviraj a -rasau 

„ 77 

Yaska’s Nirukta 

» 89 

Lalitavistara . . 

„ 90 

Susruta-samhita (trans. by Huernle) . . 

„ 95 

Sri-bhashya 

„ 117 

Padmavati . . 

„ 135 

Mahabhashya Pradipodyata 

„ 142 

Bhattadipika . . 

„ 143 

Bliashavrtti 

„ 209 

Smx'tiprakasa . . 

„ 216 

Saduktikamamrta 

„ 217 

Arabic and Persian , — 

Tuzak-i- Jahangiri 

Work No. 126 

Ahsanu’t Taqasim fi Ma’-rifati’il Aqalim 

137 



90 Year-Book R.A.8.B. for 1941. [voL. vm, 

(2) The piiblicatioii of the following works be decided after fiirt'lier 
consideration : 


Sanskrit, Hindi, etc.-— 


Satapathabrahmana 

. . Work 

1,45 

Bodliica/ryavatarapaiijika . . 


150 

Nityacara-paddliati 


152 

Satasah asrikapraj naparamita 


153 

Satadiisliani 


158 

Nityacarapradipa, 


100 

Sarnaraicca-kaha 


100 

Yogasastra 


172 

Tatt vacintaman ididh itiprakasa 


194 

Tattvacintamanididhitivivrti 


196 

Aniimanadidhitiprasarini . . 


199 

Miigdliavodhat Yakarana S. 


201 

Nyayavarttikatatparyaparisuddh i 


205 

Surisarvasva . . 


218 

Prajnapradipa 


226 

Vajjalaggara 


227 

Prthvirajavijaya 


228 

Surajprakasa . . 


239 


(3) That steps be taken to complete the publication of the following 
works : 


Sanskrit, Hindi, etc . — 

Vidhanaparijata 

.. Work No. 156 

Balambhatti . . 

162 

Santinathacaritam 

178 

Karmapradipa 

179 

Kiranavali 

200 

Kavikalpalata 

„ 221 

Arabic and Persian . — 

MarhamuT-’Ilal 

190 

Shah ’Alam Nama 

211 

Bhagavat Gita in Persian 

Haft Iqlim 

215 

’Amal-i-Salih . . 

214 

Ma’athirii’l-Umara 

202 


No. 1. Bib. lad. Com. 14-5-41. 

Letter from Prof. V. Vedantatirthii dated 4-5-41 re ; Karaiapi’adipa 
in the Bibliotheca Iiidiea Series, Recommendation: Accc^pt his 
suggestions. 

No. 2. Bib. Ind. Com, 1,4-5-41. 

Letter from Mr. P, C. Sen-Gupta offering to translate the Gargasamhita 
by Vrddhagarga. Recommendation: Enquire about size of work and 
then re-consider his offer. It was further resolved that in future only 
complete Manuscripts should be accepted. 

No. 3. Bib. Ind. Com. 14-5-41. 

Statements regarding the present position of O.P. Fund No. 1 and 2 
were considered. Recommendation: That the sale proceeds of the. 
Bibliotheca Indica works be credited to the Publication Bund of the 
Society for financing the publication of works in that series. 

No. 4. Bib. Ind. Com. 


14-5-41. 



1942] 


Ahstmct Proceedings Council, 1941. 


91 


Recommendations of the Bibliotheca Indica Committee of 14-6-41. 
Accept. Prof. M. Z. Sicldiqi to be supplied with a list of Arabic and 
Persian works in the Bibliotheca Indica Series. 

No. 5. 30-6-41. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2(c) of 26-5-41. Dr. M. 
Hidayat Hosain for editing charges ‘Humayim Nama’, pp. 101-376 

bill dated 12-5-41 Rs. 414-0-0. Pay. Accepted, by 

Council. 

No. 30-6-41. 


Recommendation Publication Committee No. 3 of 23-7-41. Question 
of writing an introduction for ‘ Tirtha Kalpa a work in the Bibliotheca 
Indica Sanskrit Series, now being completed by Pandit Kedarnath of 
Jaipur City. Request Dr. S. K. Chatterji to write the introduction. 
Accepted hv Council. 

No. 9. 28-7-41. 


Recommendation Publication Committee No. 4 of 23-7-41. Question 
of dedicating the work ‘Tirtha Kalpa’ by Pandit Kedarnath to Rao 
Bahadur K. N. Dikshit on a slip attached to the final proof of this work. 
Express inabiUtv to accede to request. Accepted by Council. 

No. 9. 28-7-41. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2(c) of 26-8-41. Pandit 
Kedarnath Tarkatirtha, for editing Bib. Ind. ‘Tirtha Kalpa’, pp. 97-361 
bill dated 21-8-41. Rs.265. Pay. Accepted by Council. 

No. 11. 29-8-41. 


Letter dated 4-9-41 from Sh. Abdur Rashid requesting permission to 
translate Khwand Mir’s Qanun-i-Humayuni into Urdu. Permit 
translation on usual conditions but intimate inability to publish transla- 
tion in Journal. 

No. 19. 18-9-41. 


Recommendation Publication Committee No. 6 of 20-11-41. English 
translation of Malik Muhammad Jaisi’s ‘Padmavati’ prepared by 
Mr. A. G. Shirreff, I.C.S., for Bibliotheca Indica. Resolved that the 
work be published in the Bibliotheca Indica Series according to the 
recommendations of Dr. S. K. Chatterji in so far as those are in agree- 
ment witli the Rules and Regulations of the Society. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 22. 26-11-41. 


Letter dated the 20th November, 1941, from Dr. R. C. Majumdar 
addressesd to Dr. Baini Prashad giving his opinion on Maatbir-i-Umara 
published by the Society. Record. 

No. 33, 26-11-41. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(a) of 15-12-41. Honora- 
rium for cataloguing Arabic Manuscripts for the month of November, 
1941, due to the late Dr. M. Hidayat Hosain. Pay to the wife of the 
late Dr. M. H. Hosain. 

No. 8. 18-12-41. 



92 


Jear-^Boolc R.A.8.B. for 194L 


[VOL» VIII, 


Bubget-— - 

Consideration of Budget Estimate for 1942. After disctission, tlie 
Budget Estimate for 1942 was unanimously adopted. 

Dr, J. N, Mukherjee raised the point about the niotliod of main- 
taining Manuscripts out of the O.P. Fund No. 1 and the Sanskrit 
Manuscripts Fund which was ruled out of order in discussion of tlie 
Budget by the President on objection made by Mr. G, W, Gumer. 
The question of the extraordinary expenditure in connection with thtf 
removal of the Society’s Manuscripts to Benares was then discussed 
but Dr, J. K. Mulcherjee objected as ho considered this out of order 
also and left the meeting. The matter was then discussed informally 
and it wras decided to place it before the next meeting of the Ooimcil. 
In the meantime the General Secretary was a-uthorised to take tlie 
necessary stops to get the MSS. duly packed and made ready for 
despatch to Benares as soon as the Council’s sanction was obtained. 

Sp. Fill. Com. 10-12-41. 


Budget estimates for 1942. Minutes of the Special Finance Com- 
mittee of 10-12-41, and a letter dated 12-12-41 from Dr. J. N. Mukherjee 
containing a motion arising therefrom. (1) Accept the estimates as 
recommended by the Special Finance Committee; (2) Besolved: That 
in future all matters concerning the tinancial affairs of the Society 
especially th© statements concerning the different fimds and genera.! 
financial position of the Society, presented at the Aimual Meeting, 
shall be considered by the Finance Committee before they are submitted 
to the Council, unless the Council or the President in case of emergency 
may have directed otherwise in specifiic instances. 

No. 21. 18-12-41. , 


Buildino — 

Becommendation Finance Committee No. 4(a) of 29-1-41. Estimates 
received from firms for providing doors and nets of expanded metal 
in the Stock Boom and Library. (1) The General Secretary to call for 
samples of the expanded metal and to decide who should be given th© 
order. (2) The lowest estimate be accepted otlier things being equal. 
Accepted by Council. 

No, 10. 29-1 -4L 


Becommendation Finance Committee No. 2(c) of 23-4-41. Tropical 
Engineering Co., by cost of supplying materials and labour for expanded 
metal fixing at doors and windows, bill dated 22-3-41. BB.217*12-(.b 
Pay. Accepted by Coimcil, 

No. 5. * 28-4-41. 


Becommendation Finance Committee No. 2(/) of 26-5-41. A. 
Hamid & Co., by repairs done to the Society’s premises, bill dated 

19-12-40 .Rs. 770 - 8 - 6 . Pay. Accepted by Council. 

^ 30-5-4L 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(c) of 16-12-41. Society’s 
contribution to the Building Repair Fund, Rs.2,000. Transfer. 
Accepted by Council. 

. No. 8. 


18-12-41. 



Abstract Proceedings Council, 194L 


m 


1M2] 


C'ATALOaUES — • 

Letter No. J/4514, dated the 9th April, 1941, from the Solicitors, 
Messrs. B. N. Basu & Co., in connection with Mr. Ivanow’s complaints 
regarding publication of Arabic Catalogue. The General Secretary to 
draft a suitable letter to Mr. Ivanow explaining the position of the 
Society with regard to his complaints in consultation with the President 
and the Solicitors of the Society. 

Ivanow Sub -Committee. 23'4-41. 


Report of the Sub-Committee appointed by the Council to consider 
the letter addressed to the President by Mr. W. Ivanow. (1) Issue a 
new title page without names, simply stating that the work is published 
imder the authority of the R.A.S.B.; (2) Withdraw the preface and, 
request the General Secretary to write a fresh preface stating the res- 
pective contributions of Mr. W. Ivanow and Dr. Hosain and including 
the list of MSS., books, etc,, used in the preparation of the Cata- 
logue; (3) Communicate decision of the Council to Mr. W. Ivanow. 

No. 8. 28-4-41. 


Letter dated 20-6-41 from Mr. W. Ivanow in reply to the Council’s 
offer contained in letter of 16-5-41. Resolved that Mr. W. Ivanow 
be supplied with a draft of the preface to be published by the Society. 

No. 2. 30-6-41. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 2 of 23-4-41. Mate- 
rial for a Catalogue of Vernacxilar (Bengali) MSS. in the Collection 
of the Society prepared by the la.te MM. H. P. Sastri and revised 
edited by Jogendranath Gupta. Accept for publication. Mr. J. N, 
Gupta to write an Introduction and to see the catalogue through the 
press as suggested by Dr. S. K. Chatterji. The usual rate of remunera- 
tion of Rs.1/8/- per printed page to be paid to him. Accepted by 
Council, 

No. 7. 28-4-41. 


Recommendation Publication Committee No. 3 of 26-5-41, Letters 
from Sir S. Radhakrishnan and Prof. V. Vedantatirtha together with 
the General Secretary’s note regarding the publication of the remaining 
volumes of the Sanskrit MSS, Catalogue. Give Vol. IX dealing 
with Philosophy to Mr. Narendra Chandra Bhattacharyya Samkha- 
tirtha, Vedantatirtha, Mimamsatirtha, M.A.; Vol. X dealing with 
Tyotisha or Astronomy to Prof. P, C. Sen-Gupta and Mr. N. C. Lahiri; 
A^ol. XIII dealing with Vaidyaka or medicine to Kaviraj Bimalananda 
Tarkatirtha who should consult Dr. K. P. Biswas with regard to the 
bota-nical terms and Vol. XIV (Miscellaneous) and Vol. XV (Addenda 
and Supplements) to be given to Mr. Chintaharan Chakravarti for 
checking and verification on usual rate of remuneration. 

' No. S'; 30-5-41. 


Recommendation Library Committee No. 1 of 15-9-41. Letter from 
Prof. P. C. Sen-Gupta recommending the purchase of a number of books 
on xlstronomy and Astrology in connection with the preparation of the 
Catalogue of Sanskrit MSS. Purchase the books recommended by 
Prof. Sen-Gxipta, and debit the Sanskrit MSS. Fund for the cost. 
Accepted by the Council. 

No. 12. ■' 18-9-41. 

Letter from Mr. Chintaharan Chakravarti intimating his transfer to 
Krishnagar College and suggesting that he may be allowed either to 



94 


Year-Book E.A.B.B, for 194L 


[VOL. VIII, 


take. MSS. from here to Krishiiagar or to work on off days and holifiays 
in the Society in connection with his work on the Catalogue of Saiiskrit 
MSS. Allow Mr. Chakravarti to work here on off days a.nd holidays 
on a pro-rata basis. 

No. 4. 29-8-41. 

Letter dated. 27-10-41 from Mr. T. Vimalananda, Assistiuit Secretary, 
Maha Bodlii Society, Calcutta^, requesting permission of tho Society to 
catalogue the Sinhalese, Burmese and Siamese MSS. of the Sf'>i4.ety. 
Permit him to take notes of these MSS. 

No. 17. 20-11-41. 

Committees — 

Constitution of Standing Committees, viz., Finance, Library, Publica- 
tion and the Bibliotheca Indica. That the following shall constitute 
the Standing Committees of the Society for 1941-42. 


(а) Finance Commutes : 

President. 

Treasurer. 

Gene ral See re tary. 

Dr. C. S. Fox. 

Dr. S. C. Law. 

Dr. S. P. Mookerjee. 

Dr. J. N. Mukherjee. 

Major C. L. Pasricha. 

Mr.' C. W. Gurner, 

(б) Library Committee : 

President, 

Treasurer. 

General Secretary. 

Philological Secretary. 

Jt, Philological Secretary. 

Biological Secretary. 

Physical Science Secretary. 
Anthropological Secretary. 

Medical Secretary. 

Library Secretary. 

Philosophical Secretary. 

Historical and Archaeological Soerefcary, 
Khan Bahadur K. M. Asadullah. 

Prof. M. Z: Siddiqi. 

(c) Publication Committee : 

President. 

Treasurer. 

General Secretary. 

Philological Secretary. 

Jt. Philological Secretary. 

Biological Secretary. 

Physical Science Secretary. 
Anthropological Secretary, 

Medical Secretary. 

Library Secretary. 

Philosophical Secretary. 

Historical and Archaeological Secretary. 



1942] 


Abstract Proceedings Council, 194L 


95 


{(1) BihUotheca Indica Gommittee : 

President. 

Treasurer. 

General Secretary. 

Dr. S. K. Cliatterji. 

Prof. M. M. Haq. 

Dr. B. C. Law. 

Sir S. Radhakrishnan. 

Sir Jadunatli Sarkar. 

Dr. M. Z, Siddiqi. 

Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley. 

Mr. T. N. Ramachandran. 

Prof. V. Vedantatirtha. 

No. 5. 28-2-41. 


Gongratxtlations — 

Recommendations of the Sub-Committee for making necessary- 
arrangements re: Society’s felicitations on the 80th birthday of 
Sir P. C. Ray and of Sir Nilratan Sarkar. Send congratulatory addresses 
to both. 

No. 13. 29-1-41. 

List of Fellows and members of the Society who received the New”^ 
Year Honours, and letters in acknowledgment of the Society’s felicita- 
tions for the same. Record. 

No. 15. 29-1-41. 

Recipients of King Emperor’s Birthday Honours. Congratulate. 

No. 11. ‘ 30-6-41. 

Letter dated 21-7-41 from Dr. J. N. Mukherjee requesting the Society 
to participate in the celebration of the 80th birthday of Sir P. C. Ray on 
2-8-41 and to send him a letter of congratulations. Present a suitable 
address to Sir P. 0. Ray signed by the President. The General Secretary 
is to represent the Society and read the address on behalf of the Society. 

No. 2. 28-7-41.*' 

Letter dated 22-7-41 from MM. Sir Ganganatli Jba, Kt., expressing 
his thanks for the Society’s congratulations on his obtaining a Kniglvt- 
hood. Record. 

No. 12. 28-7-41. 

Council — 

Vote of thanks to the outgoing Council. Pass a vote of thanks. 

No. 17. ' '■ 29-1-41. 


Acceptance of seats on Council by the Council Members. Record. 
The Chairman extended a hearty welcome to the new members. 

No. 1. 28-2-4L 

The General Secretary reported that he would be absent from 
Calcutta from the 1st to the 25th of October and that during his absence 
Dr. Kali das Nag, Historical and Archaeological Secretary, will carry 
on the duties of the General Secretary. Approve the arrangement 
mad© by the General Secretary. 

No. 21. 


18-9-41, 



96 


Tear-Booh M.A.S.B, for 1941. 


[vor.. vni, 


Informal consideration regarding composition of Council for 1942-43. 

On Dr. Baini Prasha, d’s expressing a desire to retire from the Comieil 
during the coming year, the following list of candidates for nomination 
to next year’s Council was placed after discussion before the meeting 
for consideration: 


President 

Pice-President 


CTeueral Secretarj^ . . 

Treasurer 

Philological Secretary 
Joint Philological Secretary 
Natural Hist. Secretary (Biology) 
Natural Hist. Secretary (Phys. 
Science) 

Anthropological Secretary 
Philosophical Secretay 
Historica,! and Archaeological 
Secretary 

Medical Secretary . . 

Library Secretary . . 

Member of Council 


Dr. C. S. Fox. 

Sir John Lort- Williams, Kt. 
Dr. S. P. Mookerjee. 

Dr. S. K. Chatterji. 

Dr. M. N. Saha. 

Dr. B. S. Guha. 

C. W. Gurner, Esq. 

Dr. Nalinaksha Dutt. 

Prof. M. Mahfuz-ul Haq. 

Dr. K. P. Biswas. 

Dr. K. N. Bagchi. 

H. G. Chakladar, Esq. 

Prof. Vanamali Vedantatirtha 

Vacant. 

Dr. John B. Grant. 

Dr. Kalidas Nag. 

Dr. S. C. Law. 


. . Dr. M. Z. Siddiqi. 

. . Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. 
Edgley. 

. . Mr. L. R. Fawcus. 

. . Dr. S. L. Hora. 


^ Unanimously resolved that the General Secretary do print and 
eiroiilate to the members of Council the list of Council as at present 
constituted^ together with the new list placed before the meeting, and 
provided with a blank column for additional names, and that these lists 
be returned to the General Secretary within a week of the date of issue, 
and that a list be compiled of the candidates finally proposed and be 
placed before the next Council meeting to be voted upon. 

No. 19. ■ 26-11-41. 


On the motion of Dr. Syamaprasad Mookerjee it was resolved unani- 
mously to record Society’s great appreciation of the services of (1) 
Dr. Baini Prashad as Member of Council, as Natural History Secretary 
(Biology), as Treasurer and as Secretary of the Re-orgunisation Com- 
mittee between 1924-1941 and of (2) Dr. J. N. Miikherjeo as Natural 
History Secretary (Physical Science) and as Library Secretary between 


No. 34. 


26-11-41. 


Council Nomination, 1942-43. The General Secretary reported that 
13 Council Members had returned the list of candidates circulated, duly 
signed and with a few alternative suggestions. 

After discussion, resolved that the following names bo declared as 
Council candidates for election to next year’s Council, and that the list 
be ordered to be issued to the Resident Members as prescribed in Rule 
44. 

President . . . . Dr. C. S. Fox. 

Vice-President . . . . Sir John Lort-Williams, Kt. 

99 ' Hon’ble Dr. S. P. Mookerjee# 



1942] 


Abstract Froceedings Council, 1941, 


97 


Vice-President 

General Secretary . . 
Treasurer 

Pliilological Secretary 
Joint Philological Secretary 
Nat. Hist. Secretary (Biology) 
Nat. Hist. Secretary (Physical 
Science) 

Anthropological Secretary 
Philosophical Secretary • 

Hist, and Arch. Secretary 
Medical Secretary . . 

Library Secretary . . 

Member of Council 


No. 23. 


Dr. S. K. Chatterji, 

Dr. Meghnad Saha, 

Dr. B. S. Guha, 

C. W. Gurner, Esq, 

Dr. Nalinaksha Dutt. 

Prof. M. Mahfiiz-nl Haq. 

Dr. K. P. Biswas, 

Dn K. N. BagcM. 

H. 0. Chakladar, Esq. 

Prof. V. Vedantatirtha. 

Dr. Kalidas Nag. 

Dr. J. B. Grant. 

Dr. S, L. Hora. 

Dr. S. C. Law. 

Prof. M. Z. Siddiqi. 

Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. 
Edgley. 

L. R. Pawcus, Esq. 

18-12-41. 


Exchange — 

Recommendation Library Committee, No. 1 of 29-1-41. Application 
for an exchange of publication from the Director, Sri Venkateswara 
Oriental Institute, Tirupati. Exchange their publications of equal 
value with the Society’s Journal. Accepted by Council, 

No. 11. 29-1-41. 


Letter from the Afghan Riyaaat requesting our help in writing out 
the history of their country and desiring exchange of ‘ Kabul Magazines * 
with our Journals. (1) Profs. M. M. Haq and M. Z, Siddiqi to examine 
their request for assistance in writing out the history; (2) exchange their 
magazines with our Journal of equal value. 

No. 14. 28-2-41. 


Recommendation Library Conamittee No. 1 of 23-7-41. Applica- 
tion for exchange of publications from the Secretary, Board of Research, 
Osmania University. Agree to exchange, Journal. Accepted by 
Council, 

No. 8. 28-7-41. 


Finance — 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3 of 29-1-41. Report 
re : investment by the Honorary Treasurer of a Fixed Deposit 
(receipt No. 18437) of Rs. 10,000 for a further period of one year. 
Approve action taken. Accepted by Council. 

No, 10. 29-1-4L 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 5 of 29-1-41 . The Auditors’ 
(Messrs. Price, Waterhouse, Peat & Co.) report dated 27-1-41 on the 
Statement of Accounts for the year ended 31st December, 1940. Cir- 
culate. Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. 29-1-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2(a) of 27-12-41, Bill 
No. 525 of 3-2-41 from Messrs. Price, Waterhouse, Peat &■ Go., for 
Auditing fee for 1940, Pay. Accepted by Council. 

No. 6. 


28-2-41.' 



98 


Year^Booh R.A.8.B. for 1941 „ 


[VOIj. VIII, 


Recomaieiidation Finance Ooinmittee No. 6 of 27-2-41. It was 
further resolved that all matters relating to finance should be submitted 
to the Treasurer before any action regarding them is taken, so far as 
practicable. Accepted bv Council. 

No: 6, *' 28-2-41. 

^Recommendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 24-3-41. Renewal of 
Fixed -Deposit (Receipt No. 18521, dated 1-4-40) for Rs. 10,000 witli tlie 
Imperial Bank of India, Park Street, which will mature on tsb April, 
1941. Renew. 

No. 10. ' 31-3-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2(a) of 23-4-41. Bharat 
(Sales) Ld., by cost of supplying materials for Stock-Register, bill dated 
1-4-41. Rs.276-S-0. Pay. Accepted by Council, 

No. 5. 28-4-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(a) of 25-8-41. Renewal 
of a Fixed Deposit (Receipt No. 18673, dated 2-9-41) for Rs. 10,000 with 
the Imperial Bank of India, Park Street, whieb will mature on 2-9-41. » 
Renew as usual. Accepted by Council. 

No. 11. 29-8-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(6) of 25-8-41. Excess 
expenditure under the following heads over the Budget Estimate, 1941, 
and extra sanction required till the end of the year. 

Stationery, Rs.300; Contingencies, Rs.482; Furniture, Bs.400. 

Sanction excess expenditure to be met out of the surplus in other heads. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 11. 29-8-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No,. 4 of 25-8-41. Report 
conversion of Rs. 5, 000/3% Loan, 1941, belonging to the Provident 
Fimd of the Society, to 3% loan 1963/65 in pursuance of the recent 
Government Notification. Action approved. Accepted by Council. 

No. n. ' ‘ 29-8-41. 

Recommendation .Finance Committee No. 3(a) of 20-11-41. Renewal 
of a Fixed Deposit (Receipt No. 34406, dated 29-10-40) for Rs. 10,000 
for a furtlier period of one year, whieli matured on 20-10-41. Renew. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 20. 26-11-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(c) of 20-11-41. Payment 
of Office Establishment Bills for October, 1941, as a special oas (3 'w'dihoiit 
being put up before tlie Finance Committee for their fonnal a})proval. 
Resolved tliat the payment be approved. Accepted by Coumril. 

20. •' 26-11-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 9 of 20-11-41. Bad debts 
to be written off owing to deaths, resignations, operation of Rule 38, 
Rule 40, etc. Write off the amounts except in the cases of Messrs 
Mukul Dey, Rai Bahadur S. M. Bhuyan and Dr. C. C. Gaidar for final 
appeal by the General Secretary. Accepted by Council. 

No. 20. 


26-11-41. 



1942] 


Ahstract Proceedings Goiincil, 1941. 


99 


Investment of Rs. 10,000 to a Fixed Deposit with the Imperial Bank 
of India, Park Street, for one year beginning from 1st December 1941, 
Invest. 

No. 31. 2641-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2(6) of 15-12-41. Report 
Investment made of Rs. 10,000 to a fixed deposit with the Imperial 
Bank of India, for a period of one year from 1st December, 1941, as per 
Council order dated 28-11-41, Record. Accepted by CoimciL 

No, 8. ‘ , 18-12-41. 

Recommendation Fmance Committee No. 4 of 15-12-41. iiuthority 
for payment of bills by the General Secretary and Treasurer till the next 
Finance Committee meeting. Authorise. Accepted by Council. 

No. 8. 1S-I2-4I. 

Ftonitu:ee — 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2(d) of 26-5-41. Indian 
Electric Works Ld., for supplying four ‘India 69’ fans with regulators, 
etc., complete, bill dated 7-4-41, Rs.565-2-0. Pay. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 6. 30-5-41. 

Gbants — 

Letter No. 788 Misc. of 17-6-41 from the Government of Bengal 
informing the Society of the restoration of 20% cut in a monthly grant 
of Rs.250 towards publication of Sanskrit works in response to General 
Secretary’s letter No. 1736 of 25-8-39. Convey the thanks of the Coiineil 
to the Government and request it to restore the other cut. 

No. li. 28-7.4L 

Letter dated November 24 from Dr. Baini Prashad regarding his 
conversation with Mr. Sargent, Educational Commissioner, about 
grants to the Society from the Governent of India. Record. 

No. 27. 26-11-41. 

Indian Historical Records Commission — 

Letter No. 5965-R.R. of 12-12-40 from the Government of Bengal 
together with enoiosures asking the Society’s suggestion in connection 
with tijo re-organisation of the Indian Historical Records Commission. 
Recommendation: Resolved that the papers be re-circulated to the 
members of the Sub-Committee and another meeting held next week. 

Special Committee. 4-6-41. 


Letter No. 596(5) R-R of 12-12-40 from the Government of Bengal 
together with enclosures asking the Society’s suggestion in connection 
with the re-organisation of the Indian Historical Records Commission. 
Tlxe followdng resolution wms passed: 

(1) We suggest that before the various proposals for the preparation 
of a list of all documents, and the publication of some of the more im- 
portant ones, are taken in hand — a classification of the various docu- 
ments in Government Collections — a sort of classified hand-list — may 
first be undertaken, viz., under different heads, like political, economic, 
administrative, intellectual and cultural, etc.; the different documents 
might be arranged serially, with a brief indication of their scope, the 
date, etc. This will be of immediate practical utility for researcher 



100 Year-Booh R.A,8,B, for 194L [vox.. ¥iii, 

who will then foe in a better position to judge the value of particiihir 
documents for his use. 

(2) We also propose that the composition of the Indian Historical 
Records Commission and of its publication and Research Committee 
should be extended and certain principles followed in nominating or 
selecting its x^eraonnel. There are to be of course some Governrnont 
officials as Ex-officio members, but we consider that the Uiii’t^u'sities iMid 
Academic Institutions like ours should be given adequate .re|)ros 0 iita- 
tion, both on the Commission as well as on the Committees. I'lie 
number and the manner of selection of such representatives and, the 
panel of Universities to be selected may foe foxed by the C-oveniment. 
We do not agree to the proposal of reducing the number of corresponding 
members from the existing figure to 40. Considering that historical study 
and research is making good progress in different parts of India, and 
the number of really competent scholars in Indian History is growling 
apace, we think it would serve to encourage historical research in India, 
if the number of the corresponding members could be increased, so that 
all the Provinces and the Federated States might be fully associated 
with the work of the Commission. 

(3) W© w^ould also draw the attention of the Commission to the fact 
that some arrangements might be made by wliich the largest number 
of research workers may avail of the documents in tlie Government 
collection at Delhi without much hardship or inconvenience. As things 
stand, by far the largest number of such workers come from the different 
University centres which are outside the city of DeUii. The Commissioii 
should in this connection utilise the co-operation of Universities and 
Institutions like ours, so that documents might be sent on loan on 
similar terms and conditions as MSS. (some of which are unique) ai’e 
sent out to various parts of India by this Society and sometimes even 
from England to India by the India Office Library and vice versa, 

(4) Lastly, we suggest that arrangements may also be mad© for 
microfolmmg documents whenever such mierofihns are required by 
scholars. 

11-6-41. 


Report of the Indian Historical Records Commission Special Com- 
mittee. Circulate the minutes of the Committee (dated 30th June, 
1941) and re-consider the matter in the next meeting of the Council. 

No. 4. 30-6-41. 

Minutes of the meeting of the Indian Historical Records Commission 
Special Committee hold on 11-6-41. Resolved that of the 

minutes he made and re-circulated to members of Council, 

No. 1. 28-7-41. 

Minutes of the Indian Historical Records Commission S|,'»ecial Com 
inittee. Accept as modified by Dr. Prashad. 

No. 1. ‘ 29-8-41, 

Insubanoe — 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3 of 24-3-41. Renewal 
of Fire Policy No. 15467332 with the Commercial Union Assurance 
Co., Ld., for Rs.2, 50,000 at an annual premium of Rb.312-8-0 which 
falls due on 19th April, 1941. Renew. Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. :iD3„41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(6) of 23-6-4L Renewal 
of armiial premium of Rs.31-4-0 on Fire Policy No. 2014923 for Re.25,000 



I M2] 


Ahstmct Proceedings Council, 1941. 


101 


with Messrs. Royal Insurance Co., Ld., covering MSS. and Docu,ixi 6 nts 5 
etc., which will fall due on 6 th July, 1941. Renew. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 5. 30-6-41. 

Recoinmendation Finance Committee No. 3(6) of 23-7-41. Renewal 
of Fire Policy No. 15467733, with the Commercial XJnion Assurance 
Go., Ld., for Rs. 1,25,000 covering hooks and pictures at an annual 
premium of Rs. 156-4 which will fall due on 10th August, 1941, Renew. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 7. ' 28-7-41. 

Lease— 

Letter dated 8-1-41 from Messrs. B. N. Basu & Co. re; points 
raised by the President in connection with permission sought by the 
Standard Vacuum Oil Company. Ask the solicitors to make enquiries 
from the Corporation of Calcutta and other sources. 

No, 5. 29-1-41. 

Letter from Messrs. B. N. Basu & Co. dated 11-3-41 re ; the 
proposed structure to be erected by Messrs. Standard Vacuum Oil 
Company. Allow them to build. 

No. 1. 31-3-41. 

Leotijbes — 

Letter dated 23-12-40 from Dr. S. L. Hora re ; his proposed 
General Lecture. Accept Dr. Hora’s suggestion to deliver a lecture on 
‘The Life -History and Wanderings of Hilsa in Bengal’. 

No. 3. 29-1-41. 

On the motion of the Hon’ble Mr, Justice Edgley it was resolved that 
the time of General Lectures in the Society be feed at 6 p.m. instead of 
5 p.m. as at present. 

No. 14. 28-7-41. 

Libkauy — 

Recommendation Library Committee of 27-2-41, It was further 
resolved that matters concerning the working of the Library should in 
all cases be submitted to the Library Secretary before any action 
regarding them is taken so far as practicable. Accepted by Council. 

No. 7. ‘ 28-2-4L 

Recommendation Library Committee of 24-3-41. It was resolved 
that a copy of the list of purchase recommendations is to be sent to 
each member of the Library Committee before the meeting. Accepted 
by CouneiL 

No. 9. 31-8-41. 


Recommendations of the Library Committee Nos. 2, 3, 4 and 5 of 
24-3-41. 

Note on the reinforcement and preservation of old records and 
Manuscripts received from the Library Secretary, 

D.O. Letter No. 123/G.P./41 of 28-2-41 from Dr. J. N. Muldxerjee in 
continuation of his previous note regarding the preservations of MSS, 
D.O. letter No. 196/G.P./41 of 20-3-41 from Dr. J. N. Mukherjee 
enclosing a letter from Dr. S, N. Sen in connectioii with the preservation 
ofMSS«'~ 

7 



102 


Tear^Book RA.S.B. for 1941. 


[VOL* Ylll, 


Letter of 21-3-41 from Mr, A. B. Foster of Messrs.^ Tlio ^Iioperial 
C^iiemicai Iiidiistries (India), Ld., rejt^arcUng th© prcssorva-tioii of ALSh. 

(1) Refer these to the Gouncii; (2) Continue repairing the inanuscn'i.id.s 
bv the present process. Accepted by Conncil. 

■'No. 9. H 1-3-4 L 

Report of the Committee for the disposal of ine<ynipiot(» Ijoeks, etc., 
together with suggestions from Sectional Secretaries. Resolved, iha.t 
all such books, etc., be placed on the table for ins]:)ection by of 

til© Council and final decision. 

No. 3. 28-4-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No, 2(6) of 23-4-41. ^ ,Bliarat 
(Sales) Ld., by cost of supplying materials for Library .Register, liili datot! 
25-3-41. Rs'.232-12-0. Pay. Accepted by Counoii. 

No. 5. 28-4-41. 


Application dated 17th April, 1941, from Prof. JDinesh Cliamlra, 
Bhattaeharya of Hooghly Mohsin College requesting permission to take 
notes, etc., from several Sanskrit manuscripts belonging to tlie Hoeiety. 
Apply rules. 

No. 14. 28-4-41. 


Application dated the 26th of June from Prof. Dinosh Bluittaelsarya 
of Hooghly Mohsin College praying for permission to take <iown notOH 
and extracts from several manuscripts. Permit. 


No. 13. 


30-6-41. 


Recommendation Library Committee No. 2 of 26-5-41. Letter from 
Dr. Raghu Vira, International Academy of Indian Culture, Lahore, 
suggesting the purchase of ‘Ali-Kali-Bija-Haram’ (The first book of 
Sanskrit with Tibetan and Mongolian transliteration) for the Society’s 
Library — Rs.6, Purchase. Accepted by Council. 

No. 7. 30-5-4L 

Request for permission by Prof. I. Hikmet, Advisor at tlio Mirnatry 
of Education at Kabul, for photostat copies of first and the ]a,st |)nge, etc., 
of MSS. Jan-i-Fiiduli and Diwan-i-Kamran. Permit, 

No. 15. 30-5-41. 

Recommendation Library Committee No. 3 of 26-4-41. l.’lio t|U(wth>n 
of the purchase of part III of ‘ Paippalada’ Sainbita (prita^ ltH.3fr I 4-0) 
of which the Society possesses parts I and II. Ihjrchaso. AccepttH j by 
Council. 

30-5-41. 

Chang© of Office and Library hours duo to recent Govornmewt coin- 
munique about light restrictions. Existing office liours to continue, 
but the Library to close at 6 p.m. from the 2nd June, 1941. 

30-5-41. 


Informal sanction for extra expenditure of 148.760 incurred for the 
purpose of up-to-date registers and other ©quipmeiits for the Library 
and the Stock rooms not provided for in the Annual Budget for 1941. 
Sanction. o ■ - 

No. 13. 

7B 


30-5-41. 



1942] 


Ahstract Proceedings Council, 1941. 


103 


Kecommendation Finance Committee No. 2(a) of 23-6-41. Bharat 
(Sales) Ld., by cost of Library and Stock room equipments, bill dated 
28-5-41. Rs. 109-5-0. Pay. Accepted by Council. 

No. 5. ’ ‘ 30-6-4L 

Letter dated 3-6-41 from Dr. N. N. Law regarding presentation of the 
1 940 issues of tiio Indian Historical Quarterly to the Society. Convey 
Society’s thanks to Dr. N. N. Law. 

No. 10. 30-6-4L 

Letter No. RB/G-14 of 2-6-41 from Dept, of Commerce, Board of 
Scientific and Industrial Research, conveying their tlianks to the Council 
for the privilege of borrowing bo(^s from the Library. Record. 

No. 12. 30-6-41. 

Purchase recommendations. Write to Mr. Percy Brown to present 
a copy of his work ‘Indian Architect me ’ Vols. I and II, to the Library. 

No, 2. 23-7-41. 

Letter dated 13-8-41 from Mr. Siiresh Chandra Banerjee asking 
permission to utilise some Sanskrit MSS. belonging to the Society. 
Resolved that Mr. Banerjee be permitted to utilise th© following MvSS. 
with suitable acknowledgment to the Society: 

(а) Durgotsavaviveka (Cat. No. 113). 

(б) Durgotsavaviveka (Cat. No. 5336). 

(c) Durgotsavaviveka (Cat. No. 800). 

(d) Vratakalaviveka (Cat. No. 3437). 

(e) Vratakalaviveka (Cat. No. 114). 

No. 8. ■ 29-8-41, 

Letter from Mr. C. W. Gurner suggesting that Library Regulation 
No. 12 should be more strictly enforced. Resolved that the Library 
Regulation No. 12 be strictly enforced. 

No. 10. 26-11-41. 


Loan of Manitsceipts — 

Application from the Calcutta University Library for loan of two MSS. 
of Samadhirajasutra. Lend on usual conditions. 

No. 2. 28.2-4L 

Letter No. 2632 dated 4-12-40 from th© Pimjab University Library, 
requesting the loan of 3 MSS. (1) Tandalaksana Sutra, (2) Kalpanjpada 
Sutram, and (3) Anupada Sutfam. Issue under usual conditions. 

No. 18. ■ 31-3-41. 

Letter No. 2000/39 of 20-2-41 from the Registrar, University of Alla- 
habad, requesting th© loan of th© MS. Mayalaka Darpana. (1) Decline 
request as it is a rare work. (2) Ask the Registrar if they want a photo- 
stat copy to h© made. 

No. 19. 31-3-41. 


Letter dated 18-4-41 from Dr. Hem Chandra Ray returning the MS. 
Surjanaoaritam. Record and agree to Ms request not to issue the 
manuscript without first consulting Mm. 


No. 15. 


28-4-41. 



104 


Year-Book M.ABM. for 1941. 


[yoL. VIII, 


Application by the Calcutta University Library for the loan of M8, 
Siibhasliita-Sara-Samiiccaya, pt. 1. Lend on usual conditions. 

No. 14. 30-5-41, 


Application from the Punjab University Library for tlie loan of fclie 
MS. Krtyakalpataru. Lend on usual conditions. 

No. 9 ; 304L4L 

Applications from the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Inst,, Poona, 
for loan of the MS. Malatimadliava, and the Sharh-i-Nuzahatul-Arwah. 

(1) Extend the period of the loan of the MS. Malatimadhava to 1st 
January, 1942, but call it back for inspection before lending it for a 
further period. (2) Decline request to borrow the Sharli-i-Nuzatiil- 
Arwah, as it is in a damaged condition. 

No. 4, 28-7-41. 


Application from Visva Bharati for loan of the M‘S. Sirr-i-Akbai'. 
Lend only No. 1708 of the Society’s collection. 

No. 5. 28-7-41. 

Application dated 28-7-41 from the University of Madras for the 
loan of M'S. Vedantakaumudibhashya. Postpone consideration till next 
meeting. 

No. 7. 29-8-41. 


Request from the Punjab University Library to lend them 5 MSS. 

(1) Sirajul-Lughat. 

(2) Majmua. ' 

(3) Majmua-e-dar-Aruz. 

(4) Diwan-i-Arzu, 

(5) Safinat-ush-Shuara, 

Postpone consideration till next meeting. 

No. 18. 29-8-41. 


Request from Pandit Kedarnath for the loan of MSS. Sanatkumarii- 
samhita and Suvarnatantra, Lend on usual conditions. 

No. 19. 29-8-41. 


Application dated 28-7-41 from, the University of ]VIa.dra.s for tlio loan 
of MSS. Veda-ntakauimidibhashya. Lend on, usual coiiditionR. 

No, 7(a). 18-9-41. 


Application dated 15th Septem.ber, 1941, from the University of 
Madras for the loan of: 

(a) Raghuvamsa (with commentary of Srinatha). 

(b) Raghuvamsa (with commentary of Hemadri and Udayakara). 

(c) Raghuvamsatika by Avasathi. 

(d) Raghuvamsatika by Brhaspati Misra. 

(e) Raghuvamsatika by Sumativijaya. 

(/) Raghuvamsatika by Bharatasena. 

Lend the first two for the present. The others are to be lent out in lots 
of not more than three at a time after the former are returned, 

* 18-9-4L 



1942] 


Ahstract Proceedings Council, 1941 . 


105 


Request from the Punjab University Library for the loan of 5 MSS. 
Lend only the Diwau-i-Arzu and enquire if they want photostat 
copies of the others which are rare and cannot be lent out. 

No. 8. 18^9-41. 

Letter No. L/1668 of 10-11-41 from the Librarian, Calcutta Univer- 
sity, requesting an extension of the period of loan of two MSS. of 
Samadhiraja Sutra and one of Subhasitasarasamuccaya for a further 
period of six months. Extend loan and renew bond. 

No. 14. ■ 26-11-41, 

Letter No. MS. 3307 of 1941 of 18-9-41 from the Curator, Bhandarkar 
Oriental Research Inst., requesting an extension of the period of loan 
of the MS. Malatimadhava up to 1-3-42. Request them to return MS. 
for inspection and re-issue it under a fresh bond. 

No. 15. 26-11-41. 

Letter No. S/11955 of 21-11-41 from the Society’s Solicitors, Messrs. 
B. N. Basu & Co., regarding validity of the original bond when the loan 
periods are subsequently extended. Adopt Solicitors’ suggestions and 
apply it to all such cases from now on. 

No. 16. 26-11-41.. 

Application for loan of two Sanskrit MSS. by Mr. Chhote Lai Jain 
Request him to consult the MSS. in the Society’s premises. 

No. 29. 26-11-41. 

Application for loan of 1 Persian MS. by Khan Bahadur M. Zafar 
Hasan. Lend MS. No. 698 on usual conditions. 

No. 30. 26-11-41. 

Letter dated the 30th September, 1941, from the Registrar, University 
of Madras, regarding the substitution of formal voucher for Bond 
when borrowing MSS. from the Society. Apply rules. 

No. 32. ■ 26-11-41, 

Application dated 28-11-41 from the Registrar, Deccan College Post- 
Graduate and Research Inst., for the loan of the MS. ‘Mahmud Gawan 
Riyadu’l-Insha’. Lend the MS. No. 128 of the Curzon Collection against 
indemnity bond to the value of R8.200. 

No, 15. 18-12-41. 


Application for the extension of the period of loan of Manuscripts 
from ; 

(a) Prof. S. K. Rahman (letter of 8-12-41) till 31-12-42 (two MSS. 
of Curzon Collection Nos. 61 & 53). Request him to return the MSS. for 
inspection, and re-issue against fresh bonds for the period ending with 

(b) Pt. Kedar Nath (letter of 2-12-41) for three months two MSS. 
Sanatkumarasamhita and Suvarnatantra. Extend for three months. 

No. 16. 18-12-41. 


M.i3inJscBrPTS — 

Report of a theft of two copies of the Sanskrit MSS. Catalogue (VoL 
VIII. part 1) on 20-2-41 and of action taken by the Acting General 



106 Year-Booh Tt.A.S.B. for 1941. [vol. vni, 

Secretary regardiiip; the same. Approv^'O action taken by tlio .Acting 

General Secretary. 

No. 3. " •2S-2-.|.|. 


Note on the reinforcement and pieservatinn of olil roeorilM and MHS. 

received from the .Library Secretary. 

D.O. Letter No. 123/G.P./41 of 28-2-41 from Dr _ ,T. N. Muk!u3i‘ji,H,^ 
in continuation of his previous note re : the pre.se.rvatio,n of M,8S. 

D.O. Letter No. 195/G.P./41 of 20-3-41 from Dr. J. N. Mnklierjoe 
enclosing a letter from Dr. S. N. Sen in connection witli tlie preservation 
of MSS. ' 

Letter of 12-3-41 from Mr. A. R. Foster of Messrs. Imperial Cinvmical 
Industries (India) Ld., re: preservation of MSS. (Oireiilar No. 45).^^ 

It was resolved that a Sub -Committee consisting of the Ex-Oflicio 
members, the Library Secretary and Mr. A. .R. Foster of M/S. .Lm]')orial 
Chemical Industries (India) Ld., be formed to diseuvss methods of pre- 
servation, and that the General Seeretai'y bo requested to obtain an 
estimate for air-conditioning a room or |)ai*t of a room rofjuii'ed for 
preserving valuable MSS. 

Nos. 2-5. 31-3-41. 


Recommendation from the Philological Secreta.ry for tlie irurchase r>f 
a palm-leaf mamiseript, entitled ‘Purushapariksha’ in Maithili script. 
Purchase the manuscript for Rs.60. 

No. 25. 18-12-11. 


Meetings— 

The question of holding monthly and Council meetings during tln3 
recess month of September. Hold a Council and a Monthly Mooting in 
September. 

No. 14. 2{')-8-4L 


Fixing of dates for Special Finance Committee meeting for (ionsidorn.- 
tion of Budget for 1942; and of Committee and Council meotings in. 
December, 1941. Hold Special Finance Committee mooting on tlu’i lOtIr, 
Committee meeting on the ir)th an<l the Council on the 18th of Discern - 
her. 

No. 28. 25-1 1-41. 


Membeesi-iip — 

Report revival of Ordinary memhonship by Prof. Snkumar Roy whoso 
election lapsed on 6-1-41. Agree to revival. 

No. 10. 28-2-4L 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6(i) of 23-7-41, Ijist of 
members in arrears with subscriptions. Apply Rules. Also gend 
personal letters. Accepted by Council. 

N’o. 7. ' 28-7-41. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6(h) of 23-7-41. List of 
members who are in arrears with their subscriptions for eight or more 
quarters and to whom Circular Letter No. 3 will have to be sent. Apply 
rules. Accepted by Council. 

No. 7. 


28-7-4L 



1942] 


Abstract Proceedings Goimcil, 1941, 


107 


Letter dated 5-5-41 from Mr. Edward M. Groth, American Consul, 
submitting his resignation as a member of the Society on the eve of his 
departure from Calcutta. Record. 

No. 11. , 30-5-41. 

Letter from Mr. Vartan Melkonian dated 10th July, 1941, requesting 
th© Society to exempt him from payment of admission and membership 
fees till facilities for remitting money from Basrah are restored. Exempt 
till facilities are restored. 

No. 21. 29-8-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 5 of 20- 11 -41. List of 
members who are in arrears with their subscription for four or more 
quarters to whom circular No. 1 will have to be sent. Apply rules. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 20. 26-11-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6 of 20-11-41. List of 
members who are in arrears with subscription for four or more quarters 
to whom circular No. 2 will have to be sent. Apply rules. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 20. 26-11-41. 


Recommendation Finance Committee 

No. 7 of 20-11-41. List of 

Mtoibers for removal under Rule 38 to whom Circular No. 3 was sent 

more than, six months ago: — 


1. 

M. Jamal -iid-din Ahmed . . 

. . Rs. 96 

2. 

A, F. M. Abdul Kadir 

. . „ 78 

3. 

P. R. Awati 

„ 61/8 

4. 

N. C. Bhattaeharya 

. . „ 66 

5. 

B. C. Ghose 

. . „ 90 

6. 

N. K. Jain . . . . 

„ 66 

7. 

R. R. Khan 

„ 108 

8, 

B. Tarkatirtha 

. . „ 99 

9. 

C. W. Tressler . . 

. . „ 72 

Apply Rules. Accepted by Council. 


No. 20. 

26-11-41. 


Recommendation Finance Committee No, 8 of 20-11-41. List of 
Members for removal under Rule 40. 

1. M. C. Ghose (absent since 1938). 

2. A. J. Hopkins ,, 

3. G. T, Labey ,, 

4. Sarabjit Singh „ 

5. H. B. Short 

6. A. Sommerfeld ,, 

7. H. F. F. Williams 

Resolved that attempts may be made by the General Secretary to find 
the present addresses of as many of them as possible with a view to 
making a final appeal. Accepted by Council. 

No. 20. 26-11-41. 

Removal of names under Rule 38 (arrears of subscription) in terms 
of the Finance Committee recommendation of 20-11-41 in the Ordinary 
Monthly Meeting in January 1942. Apply Rules. 

. No. 14. ' 18-12-41. 



108 


Year-BooJc E,A.S.B, for 1941. 


[VOL. Till, 


Further application dated 11-10-41 from Mr. B. V. Raman requesting 
to b© elected as a member of the Society. Reject; no alteration of the 
decision of th© Council of January, 1940, 

KFo. 19. 1,8-13-41. 


Miscellaneous — 

Letter dated 23-12-40 from Dr. TJ. N, G-hosal forwarding his report 
on a number of High Court Records. Record with thanks. 

Ho. 6. 29-1-41, 


Letter from the Private Secretary to the Maharajadhiraja of Bar® 
bhanga conveying thanks for the presentation of a copy of Varnaratna® 
kara. Record. 

Ho. 12. 28-2-41. 


Letter of 22-3-41 from Mahara.jkumar Raghubir Sinli intimating his 
appreciation for the help rendered to him by the Society in comiection 
with the details of the life of John Collins and Joshiah Webb, Record. 
Ho. 17. 31-3-41. 


Letter dated 6-6-40 from the Director, Rockfeller Foundation, Hew 
York, regretting that owing to the present conditions it will not foe 
possible for them to render any financial help to the Society . ( 1 ) R ecord . 

(2) Send an appropriate reply. 

Ho. 10. 28-4-41. 


Letter from Mr. M. B. Ahmad of 9-7-41 regarding insertions of an 
advertisement in the Journal of the Society. The General Secretary 
be requested to draw up a scheme for advertisements and ascertain 
rates from different parties. 

Ho. 3. 28-7-41. 


Letter dated 23-8-41 from Atul Bose regarding the execution oi‘ a. 
portrait of the late Poet Rabindra Hath. Refer the matter to the next 
Finance Committee. 

Ho. 5. 29-8-41. 


Recommendation Finance Committee Ho. 2 of 15-9-41. (hTtisidora- 
tion of proposals for a portrait of Rabindra Hat:h Tagore. On the 
suggestion of the Chairman it was resolved to invite meiril)er.s to con- 
tribute to a fund for defraying the expenses of a portrait of Poet Tagore 
for the Society. Accepted by Council. 

Ho. 11. 18-9-41. 

Letter dated 8-9-41 from B. M. Press suggesting registration of the 
Society as a dealer under the Bengal Finance (Sales Tax) Act, 1941, 
for the purpose of selling its publications. Postpone consideration. 

Ho, 6. 18-9-41. 


Letter dated 22-9-41 from Mr, C. W. Gumer regarding th© registration 
of the Society as a dealer under the Bengal Finance , (Sales Tax) Act, 
1941,. for tbe purpose of selling its publications. Record, 

Ho. 7. 


26-11-41. 



1942] 


Abstract Proceedings Council, 1941. 


109 


Medals-™ 

Recommendations of the Sir William Jones Memorial Advisory 
Board. Accept. 

No. 9. 29-1-41. 


Appointment of Advisory Boards for the award of: 

(а) The Barclay Memorial Medal. 

(б) The Joy Gobind Law Memorial Medal. 

(c) The Paul Johannes Briihl Memorial Medal. 

Resolved that ; 

(а) The Barclay Memorial Medal Board be constituted of: — 

The President. 

Dr. K. P. Biswas. 

Dr. G. S. Bose. 

Dr. Baini Prashad. 

Dr. B. S. Guha. 

(б) The J oy Gobind Law Memorial Medal Board be constituted of; — 

The President. 

Dr. S. G. Law. 

Dr. Baini Prashad. 

Dr. K. P. Biswas. 

Dr. B. S. Guha. 

(c) The Paul Johannes Briihl Memorial Medal Board be constituted 
of : — 

The President. 

Dr. K. P. Biswas. 

Dr. S. P. Agharkar. 

Dr. Baini Prashad. 

Dr. B. S. Guha. 

No. 3. 18-9-41. 

Recommendation of the Barclay Memorial Medal Advisory Board 
of 16-12-41. Accept recommendation, Sir David Prain, 

No. 10. 18-12-41. 

Recommendation of the J oy Gobind Law Memorial Medal Advisory 
Board of 16-12-41. Accept recommendation. Dr. K. N. Bahl. 

No. IX. 18-12-41. 

Recommendation of the Paul Briihl Memorial Medal Advisory Board 
of 16-12-41. Ask for a detailed statement regarding Rao Bahadur 
G. N. Rangaswami Ayyangar, and circulate it with the statement 
submitted by Dr. K. P. Biswas to the members of the Board, after which 
the President, in consultation with the General Secretary, to decide, in 
consonance with the opinion expressed by the members, to whom the 
medal is to be awarded. 

No. 12. 18-12-41. 


Obituary — 

Death: Dr. Sushil Kumar Mukherjee (Ordinary Member, 1927), 
Send letter of condolence to Mrs, S. K. Mukherjee. ' 

^ No.' 9(c). 28-2.4L 



no Year-Book R.A.S.B. for H»4] . [vol. viii, 


Deaths: (I) Prof. C. R. Lanman (Honoi'ary Fellow, IStKi); (2) >Sir 

James EVazer (Honorary Fellow, 1920). 

xiinionnee. Request Dr, Kalidas Nag to write an Obi tiiar\’ Notice of 
tlie late Prof. C. R. Lantnan, and Dr. B. iS. G-iiba of the late Sir Janies 
Frazer. 

. No. 9(c). 20-5-41. 

Deaths: (1) G. S. Dutt; (2) Eugene Dubois, recipient of Aniiandalo 
Memorial Medal for 1933. 

Request Dr. M. N. Saha to write an Obituary Notice of tiie late 
Mr. G. S. Dutt, and Dr. B. S. Giiha of the late Dr. Eugene Dubois. 

No. S(c). 30-b-4l. 

Report by the Geiieral Secretary of the death of Maliarajadlii!‘a.ja Sir 
Bijay ChandMahtab of Burdwan, Vice-President of the Society, on 28th 
August, 1941. A condolence motion was paa.sed, the members remaining 
standing. Send a copy of the resolution to the present Maluirajadliira ja, 

(Prelf.) '! 8-9-41. 

Letter dated 9-11-41 from Maharajadhiraja XT. C. Mahtal) of Burdwan 
thanking the Society for sending him a letter of condolence on the 
deatli of his father. Record. 

No. 25. 20-11-41. 

Letter dated 26-8-41 from Mr. Rathindra Nath Tagon.^ {*xpressing 
appreciation for tlie message of sympathy sent to liim by the 
President on behalf of the Society. Record. 

No. 15. ’■ 18-0-41. 

Report of the death of Ganga Nath Jha, the Editor of the Manu- 
snirti, Tantravartika and Slokavartika in the Bibliotheca Indica. A 
condolence motion was passed, the members remaining standing. Send 
a copy of the resolution to his son, Dr. Aniar Nath Jha, Vice-Chancellor, 
Allahabad University. 

(Preli.) ‘ 26-11-41. 

Letter dated 8-12-41 from Dr. Amar Nath Jha thanking tlic Society 
for the letter of condolence on the death of his father, MM. Dr. Sir 
Ganganath Jha, Kt. Rec^ord. 

No. 1. . 18-12-14. 

Report of tlie rleath of Dr. M. Hidayat IXosaiu. Reijoi'd, 

No. 4. * 1H-I2-4L 

Ordinaby Fellows — 

Resolution of a meeting of Resident Fellows of the Society hold under 
the terms of Regulation No. 2 on the 27th June, 1941, regarding the 
election of Fellows. Confirm and send voting papers by air mail to 
foreign Fellows. 

No. 14. 30-6-41. 


Requests — 

Letter from Rev. G. C. Dutt requesting the Society for contribution 
to help the work of reclamation of young girls rescued from brothels. 
Record. Write to Rev. G. C. Dutt regretting that the Society is not in a 
position to help the scheme with money. 

No. 7. 


29-1-41. 



1942] 


Ahstm-ct Proceedings Council, 194L 


111 


Letter dated 23-1-41 from the Lady Mary Herbert’s Bengal Women’s 
War Fund (31sfc January and 1st and 2ud. February 1941) reciiiestiiig 
the support and co-operation of the Society and enquiring if seats are 
to be reserved for members in reserved enclosures. No seats be reserved 
for members of the Society. 

No. 18. ’ 29-1-41. 

Letter dated 15-2-41 from the Sri Venlcateswara Oriental Institute, 
Tirupati, requesting for a complete set of the past issues of our Journal 
at half price. Sell at half price. 

No. 15. 28-2-41. 

Letter dated 26-2-41 requesting the loan of microfilm apparatus. 
Resolved that as the microfilm camera is on permanent loan to this 
Society from the American Council of Learned Societies it cannot be lent 
out without their sanction, but tlbe enquirer be given all facilities to use 
it here by his own men if so desired. 

No. 13. 28-2-41. 

Letter dated 10-3-41 thanking the Council for permission granted to 
use the microfilm camera. Record. 

No. 14. 31-3-41. 

Letter of March, 1941, from Moorfields Eye Hospital requesting grant 
of donations. Record. 

No. 2. 30-5-41. 

Application from Dr. J. B. Chaudhury dated 21-8-41 asking for 
permission to publish a small portion of MS. Tantrarajatantratika 
and some select verses from the Subhasitasara-Samuccaya with due 
acknowledgment. Permit With due acknowledgment to the Society. 

No, 16. “ 29-8-41. 

Letter No. 6306/1189 dated the 19th August, 1941, from the Director, 
Geological Survey of India, requesting the use of the Society’s rooms 
by the Department of Supply of the Government of India on the 28th 
August. Approve action taken by the General Secretary. 

No. 17. ' 29-8-41. 

Request from the National Institute of Sciences of India dated 6th 
August for the use of the Society’s rooms on the 29th of August. Ap- 
yirove action taken by the General Secretary. 

No. 22. ' 29-8-4L 

Letter dated 12-9-41 from the Mining, Geological and Metallurgical 
Institute of India, requesting the use of the Society’s Hall and Council 
Room on Friday, the 9th January, 1942, for holding the Annual General 
Meeting of the Institute, Agree to the use of the hall and room on 
usual conditions. 

No. 5. 18-9-41. 


Letter dated 9th September, 1941, from the Vice-Chancellor, Uni- 
versity of Dacca, requesting the Society to lend seven blocks for illus- 
trating the History of Bengal edited by him now' in the press. Lend 
on usual terms. 

No. 18. 


18-9-41. 



112 


Year-Booh BAB.B. for 194L 


[VOL. vin, 


Letter dated 11-9-41 from Brahmo G-irls’- School requesting permission 
to use the Society’s hall, eha-irs, on Friday, in the second week of Feb- 
riia.ry, Grrant on usual conditions. 

No, 20. 18-9-4L 

Letter No. 2343 of 17-0-41 from the Principal (lurnknil ITiiiversity, 
Briiidaban, asking for the presentation of both parts of tlio Oornmentary 
of Medhatithi (in Sanskrit) on Mamismrti. Present. 

No. 2. 26-11-41. 

Letter dated 27-10-41 from the Corresponding Secretary, Royal 
Empire Society, Calcutta (with enclosures from the Royal Empire 
Society, London) requesting the Society to present it wdtli a set of our 
Journal and Proceedings and a complete set of all our publications due 
to the destruction of their eolleetioiis by enemy action. Present a set 
of Journal from 1915 and other available publications after the War is 
over. 

No. 6. 26-11-41. 


Letter dated 11-12-41 from the Corresponding Secretary, Royal 
Empire Society, thanking the Council for the decision to present to the 
Society a set of Journals, etc., after the War is over. Record. 

No.' 2. 18-12-41. 

Letter dated 20-6-41 from the Royal Irish Academy requesting the 
Society to supply it with several numbers of the Memoirs. Supply the 
available numbers after the War is over. 

ISTo. 5. 26-11-41. 

Letter No. 381 /48 of 19-9-41 from Bangiya Sahitya Parishad requesting 
the Society to place them in the Free Distribution List of the Society’s 
Publications. Enquire if they want copies of the works relating to 
Islamic Culture of the Bibliotheca Indica also. 

^0. 1. 26-11-41. 

PRINSEP COMMBMMORATION — 

To consider tlie best means of celebrating tlie Centenary of James 
Prinsep by the Society. Recommendation: (1) Kosolvod tliat a. medal 
called the James Prinsep Medal for Indian Epigra['>hy l>e awarded by 
the Society l)iennia.lly for the best original work iii Ancjient Indian 
Epigraphy and Niimismatics, the dotailH of am to he worked 

out by tlse Council and the cost of the medal is to be met out of the 
Funds of the Society, Tlie first medal is to be awa.rdod, if |:>ossil>le, in 
1942,^ (2) Resolved further that Prof. S. K. Aiyangar’s suggestion as 
contained in his letter be accepted when publishing the S-pocdal Com- 
memoration^ Number may bo truly international the ]>ub1ication bf^ 
postponed till the^nd of the War, though necessary steps to appraoch 
different scholars may meanwhile be taken. 

Sub-Committee. 20-11-41. 


Report of the Sub-Committee of the Society to consider the best 
means of celebrating the Centenary of J ames Prinsep by the Society. 
Accept recommendations of the Sub-Committee as modified below. 
{L) lhat fmds be raised for instituting a Medal to be called the James 
Prinsep Medal to be awarded biennially by the Society for the best 
original work m ^^cient Indian History. The first medal is to be 
awarded, if possible, in 1942. (2) Tliat a special Commomoration 



1942] 


Abstract Proceedings Council, 1941, 


113 


meeting be called to consider the details of the project* (3) That 
Prof, S. K. Aiyangar’s suggestion as contained in his letter be accepted 
when publishing the Special Commemoration Number of the Journal 
and, in order that the number may be truly International the publica- 
tion be postponed till the end of the War, though necessary steps to 
approach different scholars may meanwhile be taken. 

"No. 1,8. 26-il-4L 

Peovidbnt Pimn — 

Becommendation Finance Committee No. 4(6) of 29-i-41. Applica- 
tion dated 27-1-41 from N. Gupta, Despatcher, for a loan of Bs. 1,100 
from Provident Fund Account. Lend maximum amount entitled under 
the Billie at 3% interest per annumy repayable at monthly instalments 
of Bs.15. Accepted by Council. 

No. 10. 29-1-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 5 of 27-2-41. Application 

from N. Gupta, dated 27-2-41 for a loan of Bs.200 from the Provident 
Fund. Postpone consideration. Accepted by Council. 

No, 6. 28-2-41. 

Application from the Sino-Tibetan Clerk, Trin Chen, for permission 
to join the Provident Fund from the current month. Admit. 

No. 11. 28-2-41. 

Becommendation Finance Committee No. 3 of 27-2-41. Application 

dated 10-2-41 from Mr. P. O. Matthai, Librarian, for a loan of Rs.1,260 
from the Provident Fmid Account. Pay Rs. 1,000 only as per rules. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 6. 28-2-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 4 of 23-4-41. Application 
dated 19-4-41 of a loan of Rs.l90 from Provident Fund by B. B. Mukher- 
jee for consideration. Grant loan at 3% interest per annum, repayable 
at monthly instalments of Rs.lO. Accepted by Council. 

No. 5. 28-4-41. 

Recommendations of the Finance Committee of 23-4-41. (1) 

Accept. (2) Resolved that the Finance Committee be requested to 
suggest and pxit up before the Council additional regulations regarding 
grants of loans to members of* the stall from the Provident Fund. 

No. 5. 28-5-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. S(d) of 23-6-41. Addi- 
tional regulations regarding grants of loans to members of the staff 
from the Provident Fimd (vide Coimeil resolution of 28-4-41). The 
following be substituted in place of Regulation No. 17 of the Provident 
Fund Regulations of the Society, The Council may, at their discretion, 
authorise a temporary advance being granted from the Fund to any 
member subject to the following conditions: — 

(a) No advance shall be granted unless the Council is satisfied with 
the applicant’s pecuniary circumstances justify it, and that it will be 
expended on the following object or objects: — 

(i) to pay expenses incurred in connection with the prolonged 
illness of the applicant or any person actually dependent on 
him; . • 



114 


Year-Book E,A.S,B, for 1941 


[VOL. 'VIII 5 


(ii) to pay obligatory expenses on a scale appropriate to the appli- 
cant’s status in connection with .marriages, funerals or 
ceremonies which by his religio,n it is incumbent on him to 
perform. 

(6) All advance shall not exceed except for special reasons:”— 

(i) six months’ pay, or half the amount subscribed by the ineraber 
to the Fund, whichever is less; . 

(ii) unless the amount already advanced does not exceed two-fclords 
of the amount admissible under the siib-rule (b) (i) and siudl 
not be granted until at least after tire final repa,ymont of all 
previous advances together with interest tiiereon. No 
advance will be granted within a year of the proposed retire- 
ment of the member. The rate of interest to be charged 
will be decided by the Council, Init in any case will not be 
less than the corresponding rate of interest paid by the 
Bank. Accepted by CoimciL 

No. 5. 30-6-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(6) of 23-7-41. Applioa** 
tion dated 15-7-41 from Library Diiftry, Sheik Nawab Jan, lor a loan 
of Rs,24 from the Provident Fund. Pay amount allowable under rules. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 7. 28-7-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(c) of 23-7-4 L Applica- 
tion dated 17-7-41 from Office Duftry, Sheik Chunna, requesting per- 
mission to join the Provident Fund of the Society. Permit. Accepted 
by Council. 

No, 7. ,28-7-41.' 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(6) of 20-11-41. Grant 
of a loan of Ra.350 out of tbe Provident Fund Account to Press Clerk, 
as per Ms application dated 25-10-41. Postpone consideration till the 
next meeting with a proper office note on the subject. Accepted by 
Council. 

No. 20. • 26-11-4L 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 2(a) of 15-12-41. Grant 
of loan of Rs.350 out of the Provident* Fund Accoiafi; to Fr(\sw Ciork, 
as per his application dated 25-10-41. iVppiwod. Cou>so!idat<^ tlio 
previous and present loan, and recover at Ra.25 per month from llic^ dat<^! 
of loan, bearing the usual ra,te of interest at 3%. Accoptod by (kumcib 

No. 8. i 8-12-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(6) of 15-12-41. boeioty’s 
contribution to the Provident Fimd for the year, 1941, Rs.()57-l0-(b 
Pay. Accepted by Council. 

No. 8. ^ 18-12-41. 


Publications— 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. l{i) of 29- 1-41 . Revised 
estimates (500 and 1000 copies editions) for setting the Tibetan text 
of the paper on ‘Thousand Tibetan Proverbs’ by Rev. Y. Gergan and 
Rev. W. Asboe in small type. Accept estimate for 1000 copies. Publish 
as a separate number of the Journal. Accepted by Council, 

No. 12. 


29-I-4L 



1942] 


Abstract Proceedings Cotmcil, 194L 


115 


Letter dated 22-11-40 from Dr, E. W. Gudger, Honorary Associate, 
American Museum of Natural History, expressing satisfaction with the 
publication of his paper on the ‘Alleged Pugnacity of the Swordfish 
and the Spearfishes as shown by their attacks on Vessels Record. 

No. 17. ^ 29-1-41. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 1 of 27-2-41. Paper 
by Adris Banerji on ‘Some Mediaeval Temples of Malwah Refer to 
Dr, Kalidas Nag and enquire if subject has been already treated else- 
where and published. Accepted by Council. 

No. S. 28-2-41, 

Paper by Mr. N. C. Chatterjee on ‘A Psychological Study of 
Arithmetical ability with reference to the students of Secondary 
Schools h Accept. 

No. 6. . 31-3-41. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 4 of 24-3-41. Paper 
by Mr. N. C. Chatterjee on ‘A Psychological Study of Arithmetical ability 
with reference to the students of Secondary Schools’. Refer it to 
Council for further consideration. Accepted by Council. 

No. 8. 31-3-41. 

A notice dated 18-3-41 from the Superintendent, Lushai Hills, giving 
publicity to the publication of the Lushai Dictionary and generosity of 
the Society in reducing the price of the Dictionary from Rs.lS to Rs.lO. 
Record. It was further resohmd that similar action be taken regarding 
the Kashmiri Dictionary and other Kashmiri publications. 

No. 16. 31-3-41. 

Correspondence relating to Dr. Grant’s paper ‘Philosophy of R,m'al 
Reconstruction in China’ undertaken to be published by the Society 
together with a copy of ‘Science and Culture’ for April 1941 in which it 
was published. Record. It was resolved that the whole question of 
the ownership and publication of lectures delivered, papers read, and 
material submitted for publication by the Society be discussed by the 
Publication Committee who will report to the Council with recommenda- 
tions. The Council was further of opinion that it was not desirable to 
negotiate important matters regarding publication, etc., over the tele- 
phone. 

No. 2. 28-4-41. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 1 of 26-5-41. Paper 
by Dr. N. K. Bhattasali on‘Tlie Rajavadi (Bliawal) Plat© of Lakshmana 
Sena Deva’. Refer back to the author for modification in accordance 
with the suggestions of the referee. Accepted by Council. 

No. 8. 30-5-41. 

Correspondence to and from Dr. N. K. Bhattasali re : his 
paper on ‘The Rajavadi (Bhawal) Plate of Lakshmana Sena Deva’ 
together with the referee’s opinion and the 'General Secretary’s note. 
Publish as modified by the author according to the referee’s recommen- 
dations. 

No. 3. 29-8-41. 

Recommendation Publication Committee No. 3 of 20-11-41. Request 
from Dr. D. N. Majumdar of the Lucknow University for permission 
to reprint his paper on ‘ Some Aspects of the Cultural Life of the Khasas 
of the cis-Himalayan Region’ in a revised form in a book entitled 
‘Culture Contacts and Acculturation’. Resolved that permission be 



116 


Year^BookRA.S.B. for 1941. 


[YOh. VIII,, 


granted with due acknowledgment to the Society^ 
Council. 

No. 22. 


Accepted by 
26-11-41. 


Pveconimeiidation Publico, tion Committee No. 5 of lb- 12-41. Ke- 
solved that owing to tlio high cost of paper, only throe issues of tiw) 
Journal should be printed during the year, e.g. (i) Letters, (ii) vScicinco, and 
(iii) Year-Book, consisting of COO pages altogether and 12 ;|:)lates, but the 
number of pages for each issue is to be determined according to necessity. 
Author’s reprints of articles are henceforth to be printed without any 
cover. Accepted by Council. 

Ko. 7. 18-12-41. 


Repbesentation— 

Letter No. 306 of 24-3-41 from the Registrar, Calcutta University, 
requesting the Society to nominate a member on. tlie Selection Com- 
mittee for the award of the Sarojini Basu Medal for 1941. Nominate 
Prof. V. Vedantatirtha. 

No. 12. 31-3-41. 


Letter No. Met. 302 of 24-3-41 from the Registrar, Calcutta I'Jnivor- 
aity, requesting tlie Society to nominate a member on tlie Special 
Committee for tli© Kamala Lectui’er for 1941, Request J’)r, Baini 
Prashad to continue to act as CounciPs nominee. 

No. 13. 31-3-41. 

* 

Letter dated 20-6-41 from the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain 
and Ireland requesting the Society to nominate a candidate for election 
as a Corresponding Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great 
Britain. Send Br. S. K. Chatter ji’s name as Society’s nominee for 
election as a Corresponding Fellow of the Society. 

No. 6. 29-8-41. 

Letter from the Fifth Indian History Congress, Hyderabad, inviting 
the Society to send delegates to the Conference. Dr. S. K. Chatterji, 
Dr. A, M. Heron, Dr. U. N. Ghosal, Mr. G. Yazdani and Sir Jadimath 
Sarkar be nominated as Society’s delegates to the Conference. 

No. 20. 29-8-41. 


Letter dated 23-8*41 from the Benares Hindu University h.iviting the 
Society to send delegates on the occasion of its Silver Jul)ilee ceiobrations 
on 21-1-42. Postpone consideration. 

No. 1. „ 18-9-41. 


Letter dated 11-9-41 from Sir Jadu Natli Sarkar w^gardiug Ills uomlrm- 
tion as a delegate to the next Indian History Congress. Rt>c’*or(,h 
No. 4. i8-Sh4L 

^Letter dated 14th September 1941 from Dr. A. M. Heron intiuiating 
his inability to represent the Society at the Fifth Indian History Con- 
gress. Record, 

No* 1^). 18-9-4L 

^Letter dated 14th September 1941 from Mi\ G. Yazdani intimating 
his willingness to represent the Society at the Fifth Indian History 
Congress. Record- 
No. 17, 


18-9-41. 



1942] 


Abstract Proceedings Council, 1941 . 


117 


Letter No. 479(5)R-R. of 21-10-41 from the Additional Deputy 
Secretary to the Government of Bengal, together with Resolution, etc., 
regarding the selection of the Society’s nominee on the Research and 
Publication Committee of the Indian Historical Records Commission. 
Resolved that Mr. G. W. Gurner be requested to act as the nominee of 
the Society on the Committee. 

No. 8. ' 26-11-41. 

Letter No. 206/T of 7-11-41 from the Honorory Secretary to the 
Trustees of the Indian Museum in connection with the nomination of a 
Trustee of the Indian Museum by the Society. Resolved that Dr. J. N, 
Mukherjee be requested to act as the nominee of the Society on the 
Board of Trustees of the Indian Museum. 

No. 9. , 26-11-41. 

Letter dated 23-8-41 from the Benares Hindu University inviting the 
Society to send delegates on the occasion of its Silver Jubilee on 21-1-42. 
Resolved that Dr. S. P. Mookerjee be requested to act as the Society’s 
delegate. 

No. 13. 26-11-41. 

Letter from Dr. U. N. Ghosal intimating his willingness to represent 
the Society at the forthcoming Indian History Congress at Hyderabad. 
Record. 

No. 24. 26-11-41. 

Letter dated 1-12-41 from the Honorary Secretary, Golden Jubilee 
Committee, Maha Bodhi Society, requesting the Society to nominate a 
representative to attend the Jubilee Celebration of the Maha Bodhi 
Society at the end of December 1941 . Record. 

No. 20. 18-12-41. 

Letter dated 17-12-41 from the Honorary Secretary, National Institute 
of Sciences of India, requesting to nominate two representatives of the 
Society to serve as additional Vice-President and an additional Member 
of Council of the Institute for 1942. Mr. W. D. West and Dr. D. M. 
Bose be the Society’s nominees as Vice-President and Member of Coxmcil 
respectively. 

No. ^7. ‘ 18-12-41. 


Staff — 

Petition from the 1st Pandit, Aghor Nath Bhattacharya addressed 
to the President, R.A.S.B., dated 24-4-41 praying for: (1) Permission 
to retire from service owing to ill health and age. (2) Grant of a pension 
and gratuity, and (3) Appointment of his son, Babu Girija Nath Bhatta- 
charya, by the Society, (1) Grant permission to retire, (2) Refer 
question of pension and gratuity to Finance Committee, and (3) Appoint 
his son, Babu Girija Nath Bhattacharya, now working as an apprentice 
in the Library, as Pandit, Sanskrit Section, on probation for six months 
in the Junior grade on an initial salary of Rs.60. 

No. 11. 28-4-41. 

Petition from the Library Duftry, Sheik Nawab Jan, dated 25-4-41 
praying for full pay leave from 28th March to 24th April 1941 on grounds 
of serious illness. (1) Grant leave available under the rules, (2) Pay 
gratuity covering balance of salary. 

No. 12. 

8 


28-4-41. 



118 


Year-Book R.AB.B, for IfML 


[VOL* 


Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(c) of 23-6”41. Applica- 
tion from Pandit A. N. Bhattacharya, Society’s Pandit, praying i'ov n, 
gratuity or pension on his retirement. Pay Pandit A. N. Biiat/tacharya. 
six months’ salary as gratuity. Accepted by Council. 

No. 5. , 30-15-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6 of 23-7-41. Report 
regarding Postage Account, The Honorary Treasurer reported tni the 
detection of certain irregularities when he checked the Postage Account 
for June 1941. Resolved that the Assistant Secretary and tlio Dos- 
patcher be warned against such recurrences. Accepted by OnniciL 

No. 7. 28-7-41. 

Statement by the General Secretary about the three senioi* ])eons of 
the Society. Circulate the statement. 

No, 12.‘ 20- 11-41. 

Confirmation of Mr. J. C. De, as Assistant Secretary. Resolved that 
(1) Mr. J. G. De be not confumed but offered six months’ extension on 
his present salary of Rs.200 per month. (2) A Committee consisting of 
Dr. Kalidas Nag, Dr. M. N. Saha, Dr. J. N. Mukherjee and the Bx- 
Officio members be appointed to define the duties of the AsHistaiit 
Secretary. 

No. 3. 30-5-41. 

Recommendation Special Committee to duties of the Assistant 

Secretary. The matter was considered and it was resolved to meet 
again on Friday the 29th after the Council meeting. 

25-8-41. 

Minutes of the Special Committee to define the duties of the Assistant 
Secretary, Postpone consideration. 

No. 10. 29-8-41. 

Recommendation Special Committee to define the duties of tlie 
Assistant Secretary. Resolved that the proposals made by Prof. M. N. 
Saha were contrary to the statutes of the Society. The duties of the 
Assistant Secretary recommended by the Special Enquiry Committee are 
comprehensive and there is no need for any fresli dcparture/wlth the 
exception of No, 5 which is now performed by another memhor of th<» 
staff. 

9-9-41. 

Minutes of the Special Committee to define the duties of tlio Assistant 
Secretary. Resolved that the minutes be referred back to t.ht^ Special 
Committee. 

No. 10. 18-9-41. 

Consideration of the services of the present Assistant Seci'otary whose 
period of extension expires at the end of this month. After careful 
consideration it was resolved that from 1st of December 1941 (1) Mr. J. C. 
De, Assistant Secretary be placed in charge of the library of the 
Society on his present terms and designation ; (2) Mr. P. 0, Matthai, 
Librarian, be appointed as Superintendent of the Ofiie© on his own 
salary and that he shall perform all duties now performed by Mr. De ; 
(3) this arrangement be on an experimental basis for six montlis for the 

8b 



1942] Abstract Proceedings Council, 1941. 119 

present, and does not involve any additional charge on the Society's 
funds. 

No. 11. 26-0-41. 

Special Committee to define the duties of the Assistant Secretary. 
In view of the decision of the Council to assign the duties of the Library 
to tl'ie Assistant Secretary, Mr, J, C. De, and the appointment of Mr. P. O. 
Matthai as Superintendent of Office for a period of six months^ as an 
experimental basis, resolved: that the question of defining the duties 
of the Assistant Secretary be postponed for six months. 

Special Committee. 15-12-41. 

Recommendation of the Special Committee of the Council to define 
the duties of the Assistant Secretary dated 15- 1 2-41 . On Dr. Saha with- 
drawing the remarks made at the end of his note on the minutes of the 
Special Committee, resolved that the recommendations be accepted. 

No. 9. 18-12-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 10 of 20-11-41. Provisions 
for menials’ Winter Clothing. ( 1 ) Accept the lowest tender of Messrs. 
Wachel Mollah & Sons, to supply 19 coats at Rs. 13-9 each. (2) Resolved 
that an extra amoimt of Rs. 101-3-0 be sanctioned for that purpose. 
Accepted by Council. 

No. 20. ‘ 26-11-41. ^ 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(c) of 15-12-41. Payment 
of salary to staff for December 1941, one day earlier. Pay. Accepted 
by Council. 

‘No. 8. 15-12-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 6 of 15-12-41. Messrs. 
Wachel Mollah & Co. for supplying 19 warm coats for menials, bill 
dated 13-12-41, Rs. 257-1 1-0. Pay. Accepted by Council. 

No. 8. 15-12-41. 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3(d) of 15-12-41. Annual 
increment of salaries to staff. Grant increment to those members of 
sta:ff whose increments are due. Accepted by Council. 

No. 8. 18-12-41. 

The question of confirmation of appointment of Pandit G. N. Bhatta- 
charya, who was taken on probation for six months as Pandit of the 
Society with effect from 1-5-41. The matter to be referred to the 
Philological Secretary for opinion and to be put tip in the January 
Council Meeting. 

No. 17. 18-12-41. 

Applications from Members of staff, R.A.S.B., for advance of salary. 
The General Secretary, in consultation with the President and the 
Honorary Treasurer, to decide on the necessary action to be taken. 

No. 28. 18-12-41. 

Steel Shelving — 

Recommendation Finance Committee No. 3 of 23-4-41. Messrs. 
Bungo Steel Furniture Ld., for installation of Steel shelving bill dated 
21-4-41. Rs.5,79L General Secretary and Treasurer be empowered to 
make payment after the 'whole installation has been properly checked. 
Accepted by Coimcii. 

No. 5. 


284-41. 




List of 


Patrons, 

Officers, Council Members, Members, 
Fellows, and Medallists 
of the 

Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 

On the 31st December, 1941 



PATRONS 

1936 


1939 . . 

1910-1916 

1917-1922 

1922-1927 

1926 - 1931 

1927 - 1932 

1931 - 1936 

1932 - 1938 


OF THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF 

BENGAL 

, , H.E. the Most Hoii’ble Lord Victor 
Alexander John Hope, K.T., P.C., 
G.M.S.I., G.M.LE., G.C J*E., DX., 
T.D,, the Marquess of Linlithgow, 
Viceroy and Governor-Genera! of 
India. 

. . H.E. Sir John Arthur Herbert, 
G.C.LE., Governor of Bengal. 


. . Lord Hardinge of Penshurst, K.G., 
P.C., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., G.C.S.I., 

G.C.I.E., G.C.V.O., I.S.O. 

. . The Most Hon’ble the Marquess of 
Zetland, P.G., G.C.S.L, 6.CI.E. 

. . The Right Hon’ble the Earl of Lytton, 
P.C., G.GSI., G.CI.E. 

. . The Right Hon’ble the Viscount Halifax, 
K.G., P.C., G.C.SJ, G.CI.E. 

. . Colonel Sir Francis Stanley Jackson, 
P C G C I E 

. . The Right Hon’ble t he Earl of Willingdon, 
G.M.8.I., G.G.M.G., G.M.I.B., G.B.E. 

. . The Right Hoii’ble Sir John AnderBon, 
P.C., 6.C.B., G.C.I.E. 


( 122 ) 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF COUNCIL OF THE 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 
DURING THE YEAR 1941 


Elections Annual Meeting 


President 

The Hon’ble Mr. Justice John Lort-Williams, Kt,, K.C. 


F ice-Presidents 

Bt.-CoL R. N. Chopra, C.I.E., M.A., Sc.D., M.D., F.R.A.S.B*, 

F.N.I. 

C. S. Fox, Esq., D.Sc., M.I.Min.E., F.G.S., F.R.A.S.B., F.N.I. 
Syamaprasad Mookerjee, Esq., M.A., B.L., D.Lit., Barrister-at-Law. 

Sir S. Radhakrishnan, Kt., M.A., D.Lit., F.B.A. 


Secretaries and Treasurer 

General Secretary : — B. S. Guha, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., F.B.A.S.B., F.K.I. 

Treasurer: — Baini Prashad, Esq., D.Sc., F.Z.S., F.R.S.E., F.B.A.S.B., 
F.N.I. 

Philological Secretary : — S. K. Chatterji, Esq., M.A., D.Lit., F.B.A.S.B. 

Joint Philological Secretary : — Mahfuz-ul Haq, Esq., M.A. 

T^T X 1 TT* X r Biology: — Kalipada Biswas, Esq., M.A., D.Sc. 

Natural His ory 3 physical Science: — Meghnad Saha, Esq., D.Sc., 
beeretanes ^ p.R.S., F.B.A.S.B,, F.N.I. 

Anthropological Secretary : — H. C. Chakladar, Esq., M.A. 

Philosophical Secretary : — Vanamali Vedantatirtha, Esq., M.A. 

Historical and Archseological Secretary: — ^Kalidas Nag, Esq., M.A., 
D.Lit. 

Medical Secretary: — Major C. L. Pasricha, M.A., M.B., B.Ch., M.R.C.S., 
I.M.S., F.N.I. 

Library Secretary : — J. N. Mukherjee, Esq., D.Sc., F.C.S., F.B.A.S.B., 
F.N.I. 


Other Members of Council 

8. a Law, Esq., M.A,, B.L., Ph.D,, F.Z.S., M.B.O.U,, F.N.I. 

M. Z. Siddiqi, Esq., M.A., Ph.D. 

0. W. Burner, Esq., C.S.I., LC.S. 

The Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley, M.A., Barrister-at-Law, J.P. 


appointments, TBANSFEItS, AND OTHEB CHANGES DURING THE YEAR. 

Sir S. Radhakrishnan, absent from 1st July and resigned on 4-8-41. 

Major Pasricha, absent from 15th March to end of the year. 

Sir John Lort-Williams, absent from August to October and Col. Sir 
B. N. Chopra officiated for him. 

Dr. Prashad, absent for 10 days in February and Major Pasricha 
officiated for him ; again for 10 days in May and 2 weeks in November 
and Dr. Guha officiated for him. 

Dr. Guha, absent during October and Dr, Nag officiated for him. 

Col. Sir B. N. Chopra, absent from November to end of the year. 


( 123 ) 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF COUNCIL OF THE 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 
ELECTED FOR THE YEAR 1942 


President 

C. S. Fox, Esq., D.So., M.I.Min.E., P.G.S., P.R.A.S.B., F.N.L 
Vice-Presidents 

Sir John Lort- Williams, Kt., K.C. 

The Hon^ble Dr, Syamaprasad Mookerjee, M.A., B.L., D.Lit., 
Barrister - at-La w . 

S. K. Chatterji, Esq., M.A., D.Lit., F.R.A.S.B. 

Meghnad Saha, Esq., D.Sc., F.R.S., F.R.A.S.B., F.N.T. 


Secretaries and Treasurer 

General Secretary :~-B. S. Guha, Esq., M.A., Ph.D. F.R-.A.S.B,, 
F.N.I, 

Treasurer : — C. W. Guriier, Esq,, C.S.I., I.C.S. 

Philological Secretary: — Nalinaksha Dutt, Esq., M.A., Ph.D,, 
D.Litt. 

Joint Philological Secretary: — M. Mahfuz-ul Haq, Esq., M,A. 

S Biology : — ^Kalipada Biswas, Esq., M.A., 
D.So., F.B.S.E. 

Physical Science:— K. N. Bagchi, Esq., 
B.Sc., M.B., F.I.C,, D.T.M., F.N.I. 
Anthropological Secretary: — H. C. Chakladar, Esq., M.A. 
Philosophical Secretary : — ^Vanamali Vedantatirtha, Esq., M.A. 
Historical and Arohseological Secretary: — Kalidas Nag, Esq., 
M.A. 5 D.Lit. 

Medical Secretary: — J. B. Grant, Esq., M.D., 
F.A.P.H.A. 

Library Secretary: — Sunder Lai Hora, Esq., D.Sc., F.Z.S,, 
F.R.S.E., F.N.I., F.R.A.S.B. 

Other Members of Council 

S. C. Law, Esq., M.A., B.L., Ph.D., F.Z.S., M.B.OXT., F.N.I 
M. Z. Siddiqi, Esq., M.A., Ph.D. 

The Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley, M.A., Barrister-at- 
Law, J.P. 

L. R. Fawcus, Esq., C.I.E., I.C.S. 


( 124 ) 



ORDINARY MEMBERS 


R = Resident. ]Sr= Non -Resident. F= Foreign. A = Absent. L=Life. 
An Asterisk is prefixed to names of Ordinary Fellows of the Society. 


Date^of 

Election. 

5-4-22 

R 

Abdul All, AbijlFaiz Muhammad, m.a., m.r.a.s., f.r.s.l.. 

7-3-27 

N 

F.R.a.s., F.R.H.s. 3, Nawab Abdur Rahman Street, 
Calcutta. 

Abdul Kadir, A. F. M., m.a. (Aulahabad), maulvie eazil 

2-11-25 

N 

(Pun-jab), madrassah final (Calcutta), Professor, 

\ RajshaM College. Rajshahi. 

Acbarya, Paramantanda, b.sc.. State Archaeologist . 

2-3-21 

R 

Mayurbhanj State, P.O. Baripada. 

Agbarkar, Shankar Purushott^m. m.a., ph.d., f.l.s., 

3-2-36 

N 

i F.N.i,, Sir Rash Behari Ghose Professor of Botany, Calcutta 
! University, 35, Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta. 

Ahmad, Alfazuddin, K:han Bahadur, Offg. Assistant 

1-1-34 

N 

Director of Public Instruction for M uhammedan Education, 
Bengal {retd.). Dhalhora, Tamluk, Midnapur. 

Ahmad, Mian Jamal-ud-Din,b.a.,b.t., Member Bureau of 

6-6-17 

N 

Education, Afghanistan. 2, Andrabi, Kabul, Afghanistan. 
Aiyangar, K. V. Rangaswami, Rao Bahadur, m.a,, 

6-12-26 

N 

Director of Public Instruction, Travancore {retd. ) , V asumati 
Vilas, Rangachari Road, Mylapore, Madras. 

*Aiyan^ar, S. KIrishnaswami, m.a., ph.d., m.b.a.s., 

1-12-20 

N 

F.R.HiST.s., P.R.A.S.B., Rajosevasalcia, Professor, University 
of Madras. ‘Sripadam’, 143, Brodies Road, Mylapore, 
Madras, S. 

Akbar Khan, Thk Hon’ble Major Nawab Sir 

5-6-39 

R 

Mohammed, k.b.e., c.i.b., Khan ofHoti. Hoti, N.-W.F.P, 
All, S. Shamser, Insurance Underwriter. 3, Bright Street, 

4-4.38 

R 

Ballygunge, Calcutta'. 

Anderson, J. 15, Park Street, Calcutta. 

3-7-12 

F 

Andrews, Egbert Arthur, b.a. c/o The Royal Empire 

6-5-40 

R 

Society, Northumberland Avenue, London, W.C. 
Asaduiiah, Khalifa Mohammad, Khan Bahadur, 

3-3-30 

L 

General Qentral Service Class J, Librarian, Imperial 
Library, 34, Chittaranjan Avenue, Calcutta. 

Ashton, Hubert Shorrook, Merchant. Trueloves, 

3-9-34 

R 

Ingatestone, Essex, England. 

Auden, John Bigknell, m.a. (Cantab.), f.g.s., f.n.i.. 

3-11-30 

R 

Assistant Superintendent, Geological Survey of India. 
27, Chowringhee, Calcutta. 

Austin, George John, Sanitary Engineer, Messrs. J. B. 

4-4-17 

N 

Norton d; Sons, Ltd. Norton Building, Lalbazar, Calcutta. 
Awati, P, R., B.A. (Cantab.), d.i.c,, F.N.i, i.e.s., Professor 

1-5-39 

A 

of Zoology, Royal Institute of Science. Mayo Road, 
Fort, Bombay. 

Ayrton, Shavux Munchershaw, Assistant, Messrs. Shaw 



Wallace do Co., Madon Mansions, 275-0, Bow Bazar 
Street, Calcutta. 

( 125 ) 




126 


Year-Book R.A.8.B, for 1941. 


[VOL. VIII, 


Date of 
Election. 

L 

7-9-36 

R 

1-11-26 

R 

1-3-26 

R 

2-4-24 

N 

7-4-41 

R 

1-8-38 

R 

6-2-18 

N 

7-12-36 

R 

1-9-41 

N 

3-12-23 

R 

210-39 

N 

7-12-36 

R 

6-2-39 

R 

3-12-24 

R 

5-2-40 

N 

1-3-26 

R 

2-10-39 

1 N 

7-7-09 

N 

4-3-40 

N 

7-5-34 

R 

4-3-25 

N 

7-4-09 

L 

8-1-36 

N 


^Bacot, J., F.B.A.s.B. Boulevard Saiut -Antoine, 61, 
Versailles Seine -et- Oise, France. 

BagcM, K. N., Rai Bahadur, b.sc., m.b. (Cal.), f.i.c. 
(Lond.), d.t.m. (Cal. &; L’pool), Chemical Examiner 
to the Government of Bengal, Medical College, Calcutta. 
BagcMjPROBODH Chandra, m.a., dr.-es-lettbes (Paris), 
Member of the A,S, of Paris ; Lecturer, Calcutta University. 
9, Rustomjee Street, Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

Bagnali, John Frederick, b.sc., a.m.i.mbch.b., 
A.M.I.E.E., A.M.iNST.c.E., Consulting Engineer^ Messrs. 
Macneill <h Co, 2, Fairlie Place, Calcutta. 

*Bahl, K. N., D.sc., d.fhil., f.n.i., f.r.a.s.b., Professor of 
Zoology, Lucknow University. Badshabagh, Lucknow. 
Baker, Ernest Brain Hindley, i.o.s., Addl. Secretary to 
H.E. the Governor of Bengal. 6, Wellesley .Place, Calcutta. 
Banerjee, J. N., m.a., Lecturer, Calcutta University. 28, 
Manoharpukur Road, Calcutta. 

Banerjee, Narendra Nath, o.e., a.m.i.e., Chief 

Engineer, Posts dh Telegy'aphs, Simla. (38/1, Gariahat 
Road, Ballygunge, Calcutta). 

Banerjee, S., i.c.s. Magistrate’s House. Myniensingh. 
Banerji, Subes Chandra, m.a., Zemindar. 45, Laksmi 
Bazar, Dacca. 

Barwell, N. F,, m.c., m.a., lt. -col. (retd.), Barrister -at- 
Law. 6. Middleton Street, Calcutta {and) Aylmerton 
House, Avlmerton, Norfolk, England. 

Bastin, Reginald Walter, i.o.s., Settlement Officer, 
M 3 unensingh, B.B.Rly. 

Basu, Indubhusan, m.d. (Cal.), Medical Practitiomr, 
Associate Professor of Medicine and Visitiyig Physician, 
Carmichael Medical College. 19, Vivekanaixda Road, 
Calcutta, 

Basil, Jnanendra Nath, Vidyalankab, Member, 
Benares Hindti University Court, Fellow, TheosopMcal 
Society, Landholder, Director, Messrs, Thacker Spink 
da Co, 9, Park Lane, Calcutta. 

Basil, Jatindra Nath, m.a., m.l.c., Solicitor, 14, Baloram 
Ghose Street, Calcutta. 

Basil, Mriganka Mauli, Member of the Indian Civil 
Service, S.D.O., Gontai, Midnapur. 

Basil, Narendra Kumar, m.l.c.. Advocate, High Court, 
12, Ashu Biswas Road, Bhawanipore, Calcutta. 

Basil -Mazoomder, Wooshacur, b.l., m.r.a.s., e.r.s.a. 
(Lond.), Bengal Civil Service {Judicial), Munsif, 
Barisal, Dist. Bakharganj, 

Bazaz, Rangnath Khemraj, Proprietor, Shri Venkatesh- 
war Press. 7th Khetwadi, Bombay No. 4. 

Bell, Frank: Owen, Indian Civil Service, S.O,, Dinajpur. 
Bent, WjLLiAM Antony, Assistant, Messrs. George 
Henderson S Co., Ld, 101/1, Clive Street, Calcutta. 
Benthall, The Hon’ble Sir Edward C., kt. New 
Delhi. 

^Bentley, Charles A., c.x.e., m.b., d.p.h., d.t.m. & m, 
F.R.A.S.B., Professor of Hygiene. University of Egypt, 
Cairo 

Berkeley-Hili, Owen, a.r., m.a., m.d., b.oh. (Oxon), 
M.R.C.S. (England), d.t.m. (Lond,), lt.-ool., i.m.s. 
(retd.). Station View, Ranchi. 



1942] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary 3Ie7nbers. 


127 


Dace ox 
Election. 

4 T 28 

N 

1-8-17 

R 

6-5-40 

N 

7-7-24 

L 

6-9-.87 

N 

4-6-28 

N 

5-3-28 

R 

1-8-23 

L 

3-1-27 

A 

4-11-35 

N 

6-7-25 

R 

7-12-36 

N 

4-12-39 

R 

7-8-39 

R 

2-3-31 

N 

2-1-39 

R 

2-11-36 

N 

4-5-31 

R 

5-12-32 

A 

3-12-34 

R 

1-1-08 

L 

7-11-27 

N 


Bhadra, Satyein-dra Nath, Rat Bahadur, m.a., 
Principal, JagannatJi Intermediate College. Nayabazar, 
Dacca. 

*Bhaiidarkar, Deyadatta Ramkrtshna, m.a., ph.d., 
F.R.A.s.B. 2/1, Lovelock Street, Ballygunge, Calcutta. 
Bharucha, Fabbokh E., Merchant, Canada Building, 
Hornby Road, Bombay. 

Bhattacharyya, Binoytosh, m.a., ph.d., Rajaratna, 
General Editor, Gaekwad\^ Oriental Series, and Librarian, 
Oriental Collections, Baroda State. Baroda. 
Bhattacharya, N. C., Vice-Chairman, Birnagar Muni- 
cipality. Bimagar, Nadia. 

Bhattasali, Nalini Kanta, m.a., ph.d.. Curator, Dacca 
Museum. Ramna, Dacca. 

Biswas, The Hoh’ble Mb. Justice Chai^u Chandra, 
O.I.E., M.A., B.L., Judge, High Court. 58, Puddopukur 
Road, P.O. Elgin Road, Calcutta. 

Biswas, Kauipada, m.a., d.sc. (Bdin.), p.r.s.e., Superin- 
tendent. Royal Botanic Garden. Botanic Garden P.O., 
Howrah. 

Bivar, Hugh Godebey Stuart, i.c.s., District and 
Sessions Judge. Faridpiir. 

Bor, N. L., M.A., D.sc.. i.p.s. c/o Conservator of Forests, 
Shillong, Assam. 

Bose, Makmatha Mohan, m.a.. Professor Emeritus, 
Scottish Church College. 1 9, Gokul Mitra Lane, Hatkhola, 
Calcutta. 

Bose, Ambuj Nath, m.b.b,, m.d. (Lausanne), e.b.c.p. 

(Edin. & Lond.), lt.-col., i.m.s. Medical College, Patna. 
Bose, Debendba Mohan, m.a., ph.d., f.n.i., Director, Bose 
Research Institute, 93, Upper Circular Road, Calcutta. 
Bose, Gibindbashekhab, m.b., d.sc., p.n.i., Professor 
of Psychology and Head of Department of Psychology, 
Calcutta University. 14, Parsi Bagan Lane, P.O. Amherst 
Street, Calcutta, 

Bose, SuDHANSu Kumar, b.sc, (Cad.), a.b.s.m., b.sc. 
(mining) (London), Professor of Mining and Surveying. 
Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad. 

Bose, SuDHANSU Mohan, m.a., ll.b. (Cantab.), Barrister- 
at-Law, Member, Public Service Commission, Bengal. 
3, Federation Street, P.O. Amherst Street, Calcutta. 
Bothra, Subhkaban Singh, Landholder and Student. 

Kundigar Bhairon, Jaipur City. 

Bottomley, JohnMeldor, b.a, (Oxon), i.e.s., Director of 
Public Instruction, Bengal, 1, Sunny Park, Ballygunge, 
Calcutta. 

Boyle, Cecid Albxandeb, majob, d.s.o., Adviser in 
Languages and Secretary to the Board of Examiners, 
Army Headquarters, Sinda. 

Brahmachari, Phanindba Nath, m.so., m.b.^ 19, 
Loudon Street, Calcutta. 

*BrahLmacliari, Sib Upendra Nath, kt., Rai Bahadur 
M.A., PH.D., M.D., F.S.M.P., F.N.I., F.R.A.S.B. 19, Loudon 
Street, Calcutta. 

Brahmachary, Sarat Chandra, Rai Bahadur, m.a., 
B.T. Kasha Road, Ballygunge, P.O. Dhakuria, 
24-Pergs. 




128 


Year-Book E.A.8.B, for 1941. 


[VOL. VIII 


Date of 
Election. 


6-1-36 

3- 7-07 

6-10-09 

4- 3-40 


S-1-96 


3-12-34 


A 

L 


R 

R 

F 

E 


Brocke, A. G., r>.sc. (Doctor Philosomi-® NxItuealis) 
(Jena), Branch Manager^ PharniacGuiical Department, 
^ Baye7'\ 52/4/1, Ballygunge Circulai* Road, Calcutta.. 
*Brown, John Cogoin, o.b.e., d.so., e.g.s., m.i.m.e., 
M.iNST.M.M., M.i.E., F.R.A.s.B. c/o Mossrs. Griiicllay & 
Co., 54, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, 
S.W.L 

^Brown, Percy, m.b.e., a.r.c.a., b*’.e.a.s.b., Secretary and 
Curator, Victoria Memorial, Calcutta. 

Bruce, Aebxander Edwin Robert, b.a., a.c.p., 

M.R.S.T., F.R.G.S., A.B.I.P.H.H., M.R.A.S., CaPT. 12, RllSSOll 
Street, Calcutta. 

*Burii, Sir Richard, kt.. c.s.i., f.k.a.s.b. 9, vStaverton 
Road, Oxford, England. 

Burt, Sir Bryce "Chudleigh, kt., c.i.pn, m.b.e., e.sc., 
i.A.s., E.N.i. Bryn Dene, Allanson Road, Rhos-on-Sea, 
Golwyn Bay, N. Wales. 


4-12-39 

4-7-38 

3-2-36 


1-9-20 

7-3-32 

4-7-27 

3-2-30 

3-1-27 

7-2-38 

6-2-39 


1-9-20 


3-1-06 


7-5-28 


7-2-27 


1-7-40 


27-10-15 


R 

A 

P 

R 

R 

L 

N 

N 

R 

N 

R 

L 

R 

N 

R 

F 


Cameron, Rev. Allan, m.a., b.d., Principal, Scottish 
Church College, 3 and 4, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

Garstairs, Andrew McLaren, m.a,, Bengal Ohmnher of 
Commerce, Royal Exchange Buildings, 2, Clive Street, 
Calcutta. 

Catto OF Cairncatto, The Right Hon’ble Lord, 
Bart. ‘Woodlands’, Clamp Hill, Stanmore, Middlesex, 
England. 

Ghakladar, Haran Chandra, m.a. 28/4/2, Sriniohan 
Lane, Kalighat, Calcutta. 

Ghuckerbutty, Khirodb Bbhari, Engineer and Manufac- 
turer, 7, Hindusthan Park, P.O. Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

Ghakravarti, Chintaharan, m.a., KIvyatIrtha, 
Professor. Krisbnagar College, Krishnagar. 

Gbakravarti, M. N., m.sc., A.T.8, ‘ Gitaojali 37, 
Mayo Garden, Lahore. 

Ghakravarti, Niranjanrrasad, m.a., :i?h,d. (Cantab,), 
Government EpigraphisL Office of the Government Epi- 
graphist, Ootacamund, Nilgiris, S. India. 

Ghakravarti, P. K., m.a., b.l„ Advocate, High Court, 
6, Basanta Bose Road, Bhawanipora, Calcutta. 

Ghakravarti, Rash Mohan, ph.b., Feranratna, 
ViDYAviNODPJ, Superintendent, Emmnala. (Jlihairavm, 
Comilla, Bengal. 

*Ghanda, Ramaprasad, Rai Bahadur, b.a., i%b.a.s.b. 
37/1, Manoharpukur Road, Kalighat, Calcutta. 

Chapman, John Alexander. 32, Laviiigton Road, 
West Ealing, London, W.3. 

Ghatterjea, Sir Kalini Ranjan, kt., m:.a., b.l., IleUred 
Judge and sometime acting Chief Justice, Bengal, 91 A, 
Harish Mukherjee Road. Bhawanipore, Calcutta, 

Chatterjee, Ashoke, b.a. (Cal.), b.a. (Cantab,). Labour 
Welfare Office. Burnpur, Via Asansol. 

Chatterjee, A. B., m.a.. General Manager, Metropolitan 
Printing S Publishing House Ltd., 4-B, Council House 
Street, Calcutta. 

Chatterjee, Sir Atul Chandra, x.c.i.e., K,G.&,i,,LateEigh 
Commissioner for India, Withdean, Cavendish Road, 
Weybridge, Surrey, England. 


I 



1942] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members. 


129 


Date of 
Election. 



2-3-36 

R 

Ghatterjeej Manomohait, b.sc. (Gal.), ra.D. (Lond.), 
A.B.c.s,, D.I.C., Professor of Geology, Presidency College, 
170/2, Lower Cironlar Road, Calcutta. 

MO-20 

R 

Gliatterjee, Nibimal Ckandba, Barrister-at-Law. 6, 
Theatre Road, Calcutta. 

4-7-27 

R 

Gliatterjee, Patitpabon, m.a., b.l., VaUl^ High Court. 
84, Harrison Road, Calcutta. 

3-12-34 

N 

Gliatterjee, Sism Ohai^diia, m.d. (Edin'.),m.b.c,p. (Ebin.), 
D.p.H. (Edijst.), Chief Medical <Ss Health Officer. Head- 
quarters Offices, N.W. Ry., Lahore. 

2-9-40 

N 

Ghatterji, Baiteim Chandba, m.sc., (Oold Medallist), 
Member of the Calcutta Mathematical Society^ Research 
Scholar, Calcutta Unimrsity. P.O. Raghdi, Faridpur. 

4-6-34 

N 

Ghatterji, Bijatst Raj, ph.d. (London), d.litt. (Puistjab), 
Professor of History, Meerut College. Meerut. 

5-1-31 

N 

Ghatterji, Ddbgaohabait, m.a., Lecturer in Sanshrit. 
Krishnagar College, Krishnagar. 

7-6-11 

1 R 

i 

Ghatterji, KAjamrA Kumab, lt.-col., i.t.p., m.c., v.h.a.s. 
15, Camae Street, Calcutta. 

7-6-28 

R 

Ghatterji, Kedab Nath, b.sc. (LourDoisr), a.b.c.s. 
(London), c/o ^Probasi" office, 120/2, Upper Circular 
Road, Calcutta. 

6-8-24 

R 

^Ghatterji, Suniti Kumab, m.a. (Cal.), d,litt. (London), 
p.b.a.s.b. Khaira Professor of Linguistics, Calcutta 
University, ‘Sudharma’, 16, Hindusthan JPark, (off 
Rashbihari Avenue East End), Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

2-3-36 

N 

Ghatterji, Mbs. Tuhinika, m.a., Kavyatibtha, Research 
Scholar, Examiner, Calcutta University. 5, Wood Street, 
Calcutta. 

5-11-24 

R 

Ghattopadhyay, K.. P., m.sc., Professor and Head of the 
Department of Anthropology, Calcutta University. 2, Palm 
Place, Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

2-11-25 

N 

Ghattopadhyaya, Kshetresa Chandba, m.a., Lecturer 
in Sanskrit. Allahabad University, Allahabad. 

4-4-38 j 

R 

Ghaudhuri, Mbs. Roma, m.a., d.phil. (Oxon). 3, Fede- 
ration Street, Calcutta. 

4-11-36 

R 

Ghaudhuri, S. N. 52, Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta. 

5-12-23 

L 

Chopra, B. N., d.sc., p.n.i., e.l.s., Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Zoological Survey of India. Kaiser Castle, 
Benares. 

1-2-22 

R 

1 

’*'Ghopra, Sib R. N„kt., o.i.b., m.a., so.d., m.d. (Cantab.), 

P.B.O.P,, F.N.I., I'.B.A.S.B-, BBBVBT-OOL., I.M.S., DirectOf- 

General of Medical Services, Jammu and Kashmir State. 
Srinagar, Kashmir. 

5-12-27 

L 

Ghowdhury, Sib Ohhajdbam, kt., g.i.b., m.l.c. 21, 
Belvedere Road, Calcutta. 

2-4-28 

R 

Ghowdhury, Rai Jatindbanath, Zemindar. 36, Russa 
Road, Tollygunge, Calcutta. 

3-7-07 

L 

=^Ghristie, William Alexandeb, Ktnooh, b.sc., ph.d., 
M.iNST.M.M., P.B.A.S.B. Secretariat, Principal Supply 
Officers’ Committee (India), Defence Department, Simla. 

2-2-31 

R 

Giotigh, John, Barrister -at-Law. 17, Store Road, Bally- 
gunge, Calcutta. 

5-6-30 

F 

Cooper, G. A. P. 29, Eccleston Street, Eaton Square, 
London, S.W. 1. 

4-11-29 

L 

*Gotter, Gebald de Pijbcell, b.a., so.d. (Dublin), 
M.iNST,M.M., p.G.s,, F.B.A.S.B. ‘ Fallowfield Manot 
Road, Penn., Bucks., England. 



130 


Year-Book li.A .S,B. for 1941 , 


[VOL. VIII, 


bate of 
Election. 



4 V 40 

A 

Crawford, C. El. J., b.a., b.sc., Imperial Ghe/mical Indus- 
tries (Inclia) Ltd,., 18, Strand Road, OaUnitta. 


N 

Ciilsfiaw, Rbv. Wesl'KY James, Methodist Minister, 
R.O. Sa-ronga, Dist. Bankura. 

7-3-32 

K 

Darbarl, M. D., Incorporated Accountant, iS, B. Billitnoria 
<b Co., Ld, 100, Clivo Street, Calcutta. 

4-3-25 

R 

Das, Ajit Nath, Rax Bahaduh, m;.k.a..s., f.z.s., Zemindar. 
24. South Road, Entally, Calcutta. 

5-12-39 

R 

Das-Gupta, 0. C., m.a., 3, Alipore Park Avenue, Aiiporo, 
Calcutta. 

i-3-2G 

R 

Datta, Hirendra Nath, m.a., b.l., Solicitor, High Court, 
139, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

6-8-24 

L 

Davies, L. M., lt.-col,, m.a., f.h.s.e., f.r.a.i., f.g.s. 
8, Garscubo Terrace, Murray field, Edinburgh, 12, 
Scotland. 

4-3-29 

R 

De, J. 0., M.B., LT.-cjoii., i.M.s. 5, Loudon Street, 
Upper Flat, Calcutta. 

3-6-40 

R 

De, Jatis Chandra, m.a., b.l. (Gal.), m.a. (Lond.), 
11, Ray Street, Elgin Road, Calcutta. 

19-9-95 

L 

De, Kiran Chandra, c.i.e., b.a.,i.c.s. (retd.), 2, Gokhale 
Road, Calcutta. 

5-12-27 

L 

Dechhen, H.H. Maharani Kunzang, Maharard of SikJmn, 
Gangtok, Sikkim. 

6 - 5-30 

N 

i Deo, Sir Pratap Chandra Bhanj, k.o.i.e., Maharajah, 
Ruler of May urbhanj State. P.O. Baripada, Mayurbhanj, 
B.N.R. 

4-5-10 

1 ^ 

Dhavle, Hon’ble Mr. Justice Shankar Balaji, b.a*, 
i.o.s., Jtidge, Patna High Court, Patna. 

4-8-20 

,N 

*Dikshit, Kashinath Narayan, m.a., f.r.a.s.b. Director- 
General of Archaeology, New Delhi. 

5-1-98 

R 

Dods, William Kane, Agent Hongkong and Shanghai 
Banking Corporation, 6, Mxnto Park, Alipur, Calcutta, 

2-7-02 

L 

Doxey, Frederick. ‘Ballygunge’, Gooden Drive, 
Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex, England. 

7-11-32 

R 

Driver, Darab Cursetji, m.a. (Cantab.), Barrister -^at- 
Law, Constituted Attorney to Messrs. Tata cfc Sons, Ld., 
Managing Agents for The Tata Iron cO Steel Co., Ld. 


.V 

Flat No, 1, 2A, Lord Sinha Road, Calcutta. 

6-0-38 

N 

Dudhorla, Nab a Kumar Sing, Zemindar and Banker. 
Azimganj, Dt, Mui’shidabad. 

6-9-37 

A 

Durniz-Podewils, Count, OomuLOeneral for Germany, 
34, Park Street, Calcutta. 

2-1-33 

N 

Dutch, Robert Austen, b.a. (Cantab.), i.c.s., District 
Judge. Alipore, Calcutta. 

30-9-35 

R 

Dntt, Mohendra Nath, l.e., Consulting Hngineer, 12, 
Kailas Bose Lane, Howrah. 

5-12-32 

R 

Diitt, Nalinaksha, m.a., b.l., PH.I),, d.litt. (Lond.). 
Lecturer, Post-graduate Department of Pali wnd Ancient 
Indian History and Culture, Calcutta University , 39, 

Badur Bagan Row, P.O, Amherst Street, Calcutta. 

1-7-40 

R 

Dutt, SuDHiR Chundeb, Cart., m.b., a.i.r.o., Ophthalmic 
Surgeon, Mayo Hospital. 214, Lowe^r Circular Road, 
Calcutta. 

2-12-40 

R 

Edgley, The Hon’ble Mr. Justice Norman Gborge 
Armstrong, m.a. (Oxon.), Barrister -at-Law, i.c.s., Judge, 
Calcutta High Court. 9/1, Middleton Street, Calcutta. 



121 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members* 


13 : 


Date of 
Election. 

1 "11-38 N 3 mi.* 'B. 3*, Vice-Consul for Netherlands, Clarke’s 

Hotel, Simla. 

5- 1-31 .L Evans, Percy, b.a. (Cantab.), f.g.s., Geologist, c/o The 

Bui'ma Oil Co., Digboi, Assam. 

1-12-41 IST Ewart, Doitgeas J., Missionary of Presbyterian Church of 
Scotland. Westminster Hostel, Rajshahi, Bengal. 

6- 2-28 L Ezra, Sir David, kt., f.z.s., m.b.o.u. 3, Kyd Street, 

Calcutta. 


2- 5-38 R Haroqni, Nawab Sir K. G. M., kt., of Ratanpur. 20/1, 

Store Road,' Calcutta. 

2-12-29 R Fawcus, Louis Reginald, c.i.e., b.a.- (Cantab.), Indian 
Civil Service. United Service Club, Calcutta. 

3- 8-04 L *Fermor, Sir Lewis Leigh, kt., o.b.e., m.inst.m.m., 

D.sc., A.R.S.M., F.G.S. , P.B.S., P.N.I., F.R.A.S.B., Director^ 
Geological Stirvey of India (retd.), c/o Messrs, Lloyds 
Bank, Ld., 6, Pall Mall, London. 

4- 1-26 :F Fleming, Andrew. Rand Chib, Joheam.eshuig. 

4-3-40 R Foster, Albert Ridgeley, b.so., a.i.c., Agricultural 
Chemist and Agricultural Expert ^ ojo Imperial Chemical 
Industries (India) Ltd., 18, Strand Road, Calcutta. 

5-11-13 .L *Fox, Cyril S.. d.sc. (Birm.), m.i.m.e., f.g.s., f.n.i., 
F.R.A.s.B. Director, Geological Survey of India, 27, 
Chowriiighee, Calcutta. 


5- 11-28 R Galstaun, John Carapibt, o.b.e.. Merchant and Land* 

holder. 234/4, Lower Circular Road, Calcutta. 

1-11-26 R Galstaun, Shanazan, G., m.a., d.m.r.e., m.r.c.s., l.r.c.p., 
Medical Practitioner. Radiologist. Medical College Hospital. 
34, Chowringbee Road, Calcutta. 

6- 10-09 R * Gangoly, Ordhendra Coomar, b.a., f.b.a.s.b. 2, 

Asutosh Mukherjee Road, Calcutta. 

5-11-34 K Gee, Edward B,owija:nb, m.a. (Cantab.), f.n.l, f.g.s., 
Assistant Superintendent, Geological Survey of India. 27, 
Chowringbee, Calcutta. 

2-1-33 N George, James, b.a. (Cantab.), i.o.s., J oint Magistrate and 
Dy. Collector. Dacca. 

5- 2-40 N Ghatak, Indu Bhushan, b.a. (Cal.), o.t.e. (Dac.), med. 

(Amb.), Drp. Lbr. (B.L.A.), Examiner, Patna University, 
Lecturer, St. John Ambulance Association, Ex^member, 
Subordinate Educational Service, O.P., Associate, Red 
Cross Society, Headmaster, Raj High School. Garb Banaiii ’ 
P.O., Purnea. 

6- 2-33 L Ghatak, Jyotish Chandra, m.a. (Trifle), Sahitya 

Saraswati, Jyotish-Sagara, Professor, Calcutta Univer- 
sity. 4, Boloram Bose Ghat Road, Bhawanipore, Calcutta. 

7- 5-28 R ’^'Ghosal, Ufendra Nath, M,A.,FH.D., F.R.A.S3., Pro/e«w 

of History, Presidency College. 35, Badur Bagan Row, 
Calcutta. 

5-4-26 R Ghose, Bimal Chandra, 27/1, Harisb 

Mukherjee Road, Calcutta. 

7-1-29 A Ghose, Mohim Chandra, b.a, (Cal.), m.a. (Cantab.), 
I.o.s., Barrister -at-Law (Inner Temple), Retd. Judge, 
Calcutta High Court. 4A, Little Russell Street, Calcutta, 
3-12-24 B Ghose, Sushil Chandra, b.a., Deputy Magistrate. 1, 
Sikdarbagan Street, Calcutta, 



132 


Year-Book E.AB.B, for 194L 


[VOL. vni, 


bate of 
.Election. 

7-9-36 

R 

4-9-39 

N 

2-4-24 

B 

7-3-27 

B 

2-9-40 

R 

1-7-40 

R 

1-2-26 

B 

6-8-28 

B 

7-12-36 

B 

6-3-28 , 

R 

1-12-41 

R 

7-9-10 

N 

6-5-40 

R 

4-2-26 i 

L 

5-3-19 

N 

5-8-15 

R 

0-2-34 

R 

6-1-30 

N 

6-9-37 

N 

2-4-24 

R 

1-2-26 

F 

4-3-40 

N 

4-3-40 

N 

7-8-39 

A 


Ghosh, J*. M.A. (Cal.), fh.d. (Bbin.), f.n'.t., Proftmor of 
Mathmiatics^ PreskUncy OoUerfe, 9, Satyori Duttft Boad, 
Calcutta. 

Ghosh, J. 0., I). sc., F.W.I., Direclor, Indian hwlitulG 
of Science. Hobbal, Bangalore. 

Ghosh, K., D.p.n. (Cantab.), jl.m.s., Medical 

Practitioner. 45, Crock Kow, Calcutta. 

Ghosh, Phanindba Nath, m,a„ ph.d., sc.d. (Padua), 
F.iNST.p., Sir Rashbehary Qhosh Professor of Applied 
Physics^ University of Calcutta. 92, Upper Circular Road, 
Calcutta. 

Ghosh , PBrASHANTA KuMAB, Visit ing Physician^ Carmichael 
Medical College Hospital, BdgacMa, Calcutta, P.7/1, 
Chittaranjaa Avenue, P.O. Beadon Street, Calcutta. 
Ghosh, Ratneswab, Merchant and Manufacturer. 12/2, 
Circular Garden Beach Road, Kidderpore, Calcutta. 
Ghutznavi, Sib Abdul Halim, k:t., m.l.a., Zemindar^ 
18, Canal Street, Entally, Calcutta. 

Ghnznavi, Iskander S. K., Zemindar, 21, Syed Arnoor 
All Avenue, Circus P.O., Calcutta {and) Diiduar, 
Mymeusingh. 

Gillespie, Andrew Dollar, Chemist and Senior Partner, 
Messrs. Bathgate <& Co. 17, Old Court House Street, 
Calcutta. ■ 

Gooptu, Dwijbndra Nath, Medical Practitioner and 
Landholder. 6, Middleton Street, Calcutta. 

Grant, John B., m.d., m.p.h., f.a.p.h.a., Director, 
All-India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, 
110, Chittaranjan Avenue, Calcutta. 

’•‘Gravely, Frederic Henry, d,so„ e.n.i., e.r.a.s.b. 
Museum House, Egmore, Madras. 

Griffiths, Walter Gbraldson, b.so. (Calif.), b.d. 
(Brew), m.a. (New York), ph.d. (Brew), Missionary, 
13, Wellington Square, Calcutta. 

*Giiha, B, S., M.A., PH.D. (Harvard), f.n.i., f.r.a.s.b. 
Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Gupta, SiVAPBASAD. Seva Upavana, Benares City. 
Gurner, Cyril Walter, b.a. (Oxon), o.s.i., i.c.s., Chair- 
man, Improvement Trust. 5, Clive Street, Calcxitta. 

Haidar, BharatiViilas, m.a., b.l., Advocate, High Court, 
47, Haldarpara Road, Kaligliat, Calcutta. 

Haidar, Sudhindra Kumar, m.a., i.c.s., Commissioner, 
Burdwan Division. Ohinsurah. 

Halim, Abdul, Br., m.a.. Lecturer in History, Muslim 
University. M. U. Fida Manzil, Aligarh. 

Haq, M. Mahfuz-ul, m.a.. Professor, Presidency College, 
87, Park Street, Park Circus, Calcutta. 

Harris, H. G. Gunnespory Avenue, Ealing, London. 
Harshe, Ramkrishna Ganesh, b.a. (Tilak), d.lit, 
(Paris), Registrar, Deccan College Post-Qradua&e and 
Research Institute, Poona. 

Haryana, Ram Adhar, b.a,, Dy. Jailor (U.P. Jails), 
District Jail, Etdh, (U.P.). 

Holland, Bernhard Alvin, m.a. (Minnesota), b.d, 
(Augsburg Seivcenaby, U.S.A.), Missionary, Principal, 
Kaerabani Boys' MiMe English and Guru Training 
School, Kaerabani, via Bumka, Santal Parganas. 



1942] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members. 


133 


Date of 
Election. 


6-8-28 

N 

4-11-35 

R 

1-4-25 

R 

2-12-40 

R 

7-3-27 

A 

2-11-21 

L 

6-6-23 

L 

5-2-40 

R 

7-3-32 

R 

•6-8-34 

N 

6-6-23 

A 

1-12-41 

R 

1-2-11 

L 

,2-12-40 

R 

2-5-38 

R 

1-7-40 

R 

6-6-27 

L 

2-2-21 

R 

6-1-30 

N 

,2-12-40 

R 

7-4-41 

N 

1-11-26 

H 

1-11-38 

R 


^Heron, A. M., d.sc. (Ei>ik.), p.g.s., p.n.i., 

p.R.s.K., Lato, Director, Geological Survey of India. Mines 
and Geology Office, Hyderabad, Deccan. 

Hirtzel, Michael Abthtjb 'Fbbdbbioe:, b.a. (TamiTY 
College, Oxford), Mercantile Assistant, Macneill cfc (7o« 
2, Fairli© Place, Calcutta. 

Hobbs, Henry, major, v.d. 9, Old Court House 
Street, Calcutta. 

Hodgson, Lionel Leonard, Secretary and Treasurer, 
British and Foreign Bible Society {Calcutta Aux.). Bible 
House, 23, Chowringhee Road, Calcutta. 

Hopkinson, Arthur John, i.o.s., Secretary to the 
Qovernment, N.AV.F. Province. Peshawar, IST.-W.F.P. 
^Hora, Sunder Lal, Rai Bahadur, d.sc., f.z.s., p.r.s.e., 
F.N.I.. F.R.A.s.E. Director of Fisheries, Bengal. 1, 
Deodar Street, Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

^Howard, Sm Albert, xt., c.i.e., m.a., f.b.a.s.b.. Late 
Director, Institute of Plant Industry, Indore, and Late 
Agricultural Adviser to States in Central India. 14, 
Liskeard Gardens, Blackheath, London, S.E, 3. 

Huda, Sybd Shamsul, Besearch Scholar {Anjuman 
Taraqqee Urdu, Delhi), 3B, TaHolla, Entaliy, Calcutta. 
Hughes, Arthur, b.a. (Manchester), Indian Civil 
Service, Labour Commissioner, Bengal. 5, Council House 
Street, Calcutta. 

Husain, Syed Ata, m.a. (Cal.), c.e. (Roorkee), Eetired 
Superintending Engineer, Hyderabad State, Mohalla 
Lingumpally, Hyderabad, Deccan. 

^Hutton, J. H., C.I.E., I.C.S., m.a., d.sc., f.r.a.s.b. 
University Museum of Archseology and Ethnology, 
Downing Street, Cambridge, England. 

Ingalls, Daniel Henry Holmes, m.a. (Harvard), 
Junior Fellow of Society of Fellows, Harvard University, 
217, Lansdowne Road, Calcutta. 

Insch, James. 1 8, Beechwood Avenue, Boscombe, Hants, 
England. 

Isch-Wall, Claude, licencib-es -science (matbgbmI- 
TiQUES ET PHYSIQUES) Lieutenant British Army, Grand 
Hotel, Calcutta, 

«lacob, J. R., Director, Messrs. B. N. Elias cSs Co., Merchant 
and Landholder. Isforton Buildings, Old Court House 
Corner, Calcutta. 

Jagannath, Sri, m.sc., i.s.r., Superintendent, Commercial, 
E.l, By. Hotise, Fairlie Place, Calcutta. 

Jain, Baldbodas, Merchant and Banker. 21, Armenian 
Street, Calcutta. 

Jain, Ghhote Lal, m,r.a.s, 174, Central Avenue, 
Calcutta. 

Jain, Nirmal Kumar. Devashrama, Arrah. 

Jalan, Mohanlal, Landlord, c/o Seth Soorajmall Jalan, 
Smriti Bhawan, 186, Chittaranjan Avenue, Calcutta. 
Jama! -ud- Din, Lieut. -Col., Civil Surgeon, Rawalpindi. 
Jameson, Thomas Blandford, major, m.c., m,a. (Can- 
tab.), I.C.S., Magistrate and Collector, Chittagong. 

Jatia, Kanai Lall. 21, Roopchand Roy Street, 
Calcutta. 


9 



134 Ymr-Booh R,A,8.B. for 194L [voL. viii. 


Date of 
Election. 



4~29 

R 

JenkiE®, Walteb Allen, d.sc. (Sheffield), i.e.s., 
United Service Club, Calcutta. 

i«n4i 

; L 

Kanialiiddin, Ahmad, §hamb’ul-'Ulama, m,a., 

3, Nawab Abdur Rahman Street, Calcutta. 

4-5-10 

L 

*ICejmp 5 Stanley W., b.a., d.sc., f.b.s., f.a.s.b. Marhm 
Biological Association of U.K^ Tlie Laboratory, Citadel 
Hill, Plymouth, England. 

6-3-01 

N 

The Hon’ble Nawab Sadb Yah J hng, Mohd.. 
Habib - tnci-RiUiMAN, e.b.a.s.b., Rais^ Bhikanpur. 
Habibganj , District Aligarh. 

3-12-24 

R 

Khan, Rezaub. Rahman, m.a., b.l., Deputy President 
Bengal Legislative GounciL 46, Old Ballygiiiige 1st Lane, 
Calcutta. 

2-8-26 

R 

Khettry, Benimadho, Proprietor^ Messrs, Gouri Bkanker 
Kheitry, Landholders, Bankers and Merchants, 16, 
Paggiyapatti, Barabazar, Calcutta. 

2-11-25 

F 

Kinanra, R. (Ko-Shi), Principal, College Department of 
Rissho University. Osaki Maehi, Tokyo, Japan. 

6-6-41 

A 

Kirby, Edwabd Stuart, Captain, ph.d., b.so. (ecok.), 
P.B.BCON.S., Indian Army^ 12, Russell Street, Calcutta. 

5-2-34 

N 

Kirby, Walter, b.sc., Inspector of Mines in India. 
Dhatibad, E.I.R. 

4-11-36 

A 

i Klebe, Anina, ii6e Brandt, ph.d. (Gbeifswald, 
Germany), Psychologist. 26, Royal Court, 6/1, Russell 
Street, Calcutta. 

1-3-26 

R 

Kramrisch, Stella (Mrs.), ph.d., Lecturer in Ancmit 
Indian History (Fine Arts), Calcutta University. 14, 
Y,w.o.A., 1, Middleton Row, Calcutta. 

7-3-23 

A 

L-,abey, George Thomas, m.c., Bengal Pilot Service. 
United Service Club, Calcutta. 

4-2-35 

R 

Lai, Ram Bihari, m.b.b.s., d.p.h., d.t.m. & h., d.b., e.n.x., 
Professor' of Vital Statistics and Epidemiology, AU-India 
Institute of Hygiene and Public Health. 21, Chittaranjan 
Avenue, Calcutta. 

5-2-40 

R 

Law, Ananta Churn, Amrney-^at Law, 23, Badnr Bavan 
Road, Calcutta. 

6-2-34 

R 

Law, Bhabani Churn, Merchant, Zemindar and Artist. 
223, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

6-8-14 

L 

*Law, Bimala Charan, m.a., b.l., x>h.d., f,r.h:i.st,s.„ 
E.R.A.8,B. 43. Kailas Bose Street, Calcutta. 

1-2-11 

R 

*Law, Narendra Nath, m.a., b.l., ph.d., 

96, Amherst Street, Calcutta. 

4-2-35 

B 

Law, Parbutty Churn. 223, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

1-7-14 

B 

Law, Satya Churn, m.a., b.l., ph.d., f.n.i., f.z.s., m.b.o.u, 
50, Kailas Bose Street, Calcutta. 

7-6-26 

R 

Lemnnon, Richard Dennis, Merchant, c/o Messrs. 
Martin & Harris, Ld., 17, Prinsep Street, Calcutta. 

1 -6-31 

L 

Lort- Williams, Sib John, kt., k.o,, BarTisler-at-Law. 
2/1, Lansdowne Road, Calcutta. 

2-8-06 

L 

*McGay, David, lt.-col., i.m.s,, m.d., b.ch., b.a.o., 
M.R.C.P., F.B.A.S.B. c/o Thc Standard Bank of S. Africa, 
Hanover, Cape Province, S. Africa. 

11-1-93 

L 

*Maclagaii, Sir Edward Douglas, k.o.s.i., k.o.i.e.? 
39, Egerton Terrace, London, S.W. 3. 


9B 


1942] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members. 


135 


Dato of 
Election. 



3-3-20 

R 

MahalanoMSj P. C., o.b.e., m.a., b.sc., f.n.l, i.e.s., Pro- 
fessor, Presidency College. 210, Cornwallis Streefcj 
Calcutta. 

2-5-38 

R 

Mahtab, Maharaj Kumar A. G., Bijay Manzil, 2, 
Judge's Court Road. Alipur, Calcutta. 

3-2-30 

N 

Mahtab, Bo ay Chand, b.a., Maharajadhiraja Bahadur of 
Burdwan. The Palace, Burdwan. 

6-2-24 

A 

Mahindra, K. C., b.a. (Cajntab.). Messrs. 'Martin & Co., 
12, Mission Row, Calcutta. 

3-7-39 

R 

Majumdar, Jatinuba Mohan, m.a., Deputy Dock 
Superintendent, Calcutta Port Commissioners. 29, School 
Row, Bliawaniporo, Calcutta. 

2-2-16 

R 

Majumdar, Narendba Kumar, m.a., Professor, Calcutta 
University. 3, Government Place, West, Calcutta. 

4-0-13 

R 

*MaJiimdar, Rambsh Chandra, m.a., ph.d., f.r.a.s.b., 
Vice-Chancellor, Dacca University {retd.), 4, Bepin Pai 
Road, Kalighat Calcutta. 

7-4-41 

R 

Malik, A. R., Khan Bahadur, Senior Marketing Officer, 
Bengal. 49, Jhowtala Road, P.O. Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

4-n-20 

N 

Mallya, Bantwal Ganapathy, lt.-col., p.r.c.s., m.d., 
M,R.o,s., Officer Commanding, War Hospital, 

Bikaner. 

6-2-18 

L 

*Maiien, Johan van, c.i.e.. Officer de Vlnstruction 
Puhlique, e.r.a.s.b, 6, Temple Chambers, 6, Old Post 
Office Street,’ Calcutta. 

5-6-01 

F 

Mann, Harold Hart, d.sc., m.sc., f.i.c., f.l.s. Woburn 
Experimental Station, Aspley Guise, Bedfordshire, 
England. 

4-3-40 

R 

Mazumdar, Dwijendra Lad, Indian Civil Service, 
11 A, Mayfair, Ballygunge, Calcutta. 

2-1-28 

N 

Mello, Froilano de, Colonel, Director-General of Medical 
Services in Portuguese India, Professor of Parasitology. 
Nova G6a. 

6-3-39 

R 

Meyer, Miss Sally, m.a.. Professor of Botany, Victoria 
Institution. 11, Sudder Street, Calcutta. 

5-11-84 i 

L 

'•^'Middlemiss, C harles Stewart, o.i.e., f.r.s., b.a., f.g.s., 
F.R.A.S.B. Aviemore, Crowborough, Sussex, England. 

1-2-26 

N 

*MiUs, James Philip, o.i.e., i.o.s., m.a. (Oxon), j.p., 
F.N.I., F.R.A.S.B. Secretariat, Shillong, Assam. 

3-3-41 

R 

Mitra, Miss Pbiti, m.a., Research Student. 14, 
Chowr inghee Terrace, Calcutta. 

6-3-24 

N 

Mitter, Sir B. L., k.o.s.i., m.a,, b l., Barrister -at -Law, 
Advocate-General, Federal Court. New Delhi. 

5-4-26 

R 

Mitter, Khaoendra Nath, Rai Bahadur, m.a., Professor, 
Presidency College {Retired). 6, Ballygunge Place, Calcutta. 

30-9-35 

R 

Mitter, Sudhir Ohunder, Barrister -at- Law. 19, Camac 
Street, Calcutta. 

7-12-36 

R 

Mittra, S. C. 34, Shampukur Street, Calcutta. 

I-11-2G 

R 

Modi, Jal R. K., B.A. 4, Camac Street, Calcutta. 

5-3-34 

R 

Modi, Jehangir Jbbvanji Jamshedji, Merchant. 5, 
Dhurrumtollah Street, Calcutta. 

6-11-24 

R 

Mookerjee, B. N., b.a. (Cantab.), Engineer. 12, Mission 
Row, Calcutta. 

2-7-24 

R 

Mookerjee, The Hon’blb Dr* Syamaprasad, m.a., b,l., 
D.LiTT., Barrister-at-Law, Minister, Govt, of Bengal. 77, 
Asutosh Mookerjee Road, Calcutta. 

6-4-37 

N 

Mooney, H. F., i.f.s., Forest Adviser. Sambalpur, 
B.N. Ry., Orissa. 





YM 


Year^Book E.AB.B. for 194L 


[voL, vin, 


Date^of 

Election. 

5~37 

A 

4-12-39 

R 

6-3-39 

R 

2-2-21 

N 

6-2-28 

R 

5-7-37 

R 

7-11-27 

N 

2-8-26 

R ^ 

5-7-26 

R 

2-2-21 

R 

2-4-28 

R 

■6-8-34 

R 

4-3-29 

R 

7-5-28 

N 

5-6-39 

R 

5-12-27 

L 

6-6-27 

N 

4-2-29 

N 

5-2-34 

N 

5-3-28 

R 

'3-11-30 

N 

3-12-24 

A 

7-4-15 

L 


Mozumdar, Sufrabhat, 3IaMer, Hajhtmmr College. 
Staff Gliib, Raipur. CfP. 

Mukerjea, Jyotish Ghaitdra* Late Chief Exemdive 
Officer, Calcutta Corporation, 28, Oamac Street, Calcutta, 
Mukerjee, S- G.. Retired Member of the Indian Civil 
Service. 25/1, Rowland Road, Calcutta. 

Mukerjees Subodh CnANDBA, Shastbi, m.a., docteur- 
ES-LETTEBS (Paeis), Head of the Dept, of Samkrit, 
Hindu University/, Benares. 

Mufcerjl, Sib Manmatha Nath, kt., m.a., b.l., Judge, 
Calcutta High Court {retd.). .8/1, Harsi Street, Calcutta. 
Mukerji, Pahnalal, Rai Bahadue, Zemindar and 
Honoranj Magistrate. 7, Rajmohan Road, Uttarpara, 
Hooghly. 

Miikfierjee, Dbvafeosahna, m.a., b.l., Zemindar, 

Burdwan. 

*Miikherjee, Jnanendba Nath, d.sc. (London*), f.c.s. 
(London), f.b.a.s.b., Chose Professor of Chemistry , 

University of Calcutta. 92, Upper Circular Road, 
Calcutta. 

Mnkhopadhyaya,' Pbabhat Kumae, m.a., Research 
Assistant, Calcutta University, 6, Hindustan Park, 
Ballyguuge, Calcutta, 

Mukhopadhyaya, Ramapbasad, m.a., b.l. 77, 
Ashutosh Mookerjee Road, Bhawanipore, Calcutta. 
Muliick, Kabtiok Chtjbn, Kxtmab, Director, Raja D. N. 
Mullick Sons, Ltd. Colootola Rajbati, Chittaranjan 
Avenue, Calcutta. 

Mullick, Manick Lall, Landholder ; Honorary Magistrate, 
Sealdah. 123, Grey Street, Calcutta. 

Mullick, Pbamatha Nath, Rai Bafadue, Zemindar and 
Landholder, 129, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

Murray, Eugene Flobian Olifhant, a.i.m.m., e.o.s., 
Mining Geologist and Engineer. Tatanagar, B.N, By, 

INfag, Kalidas, m.a. (Cal.), d.litt. (Pabis), Lecturer, 
Calcutta University, P.26, Lansdown© Road Extension, 
Calcutta. 

Namgyal, H.H. Mahaeaja Sib Tashi, k.o.i.e., Maharaja 
of Sikkim, Gangtok, Sikkim. 

Nandi, Mahabaja Sbis Chandba, m.a., m.l.o., Zemindar. 

Kasimbazar Bajbari, Kasimbazar, Mursbidabad, 

Narain, Hibde, m.a., b.t,, Professor of History, Morris 
College. Nagpur, C.P. 

Nariman, Rustom, IC., m.i.o.e., a.o.h., e.b.g.s, (Retired 
Superintending Engineer, Punjab Irrigation), Professor of 
Engineering, Osmania University, o/o The Union Bank 
of India. Fort, Bombay. 

Neo^i, Panohanan, m.a., fh,d., e.n.i., i.e.s.. Professor 
of Chemistry, Presidency College. 44A, New SUamf)azar 
Street, Calcutta. 

Newman, Gael Damien, m.b., b.s., d.t.m. & h., b.p.h., 
Chief Medical Officer. 6, Mayo Gardena, Lahore. 
Newman, Chas. F., r.B.a.s., m.e.s.t., m.o.f. Ramnagar, 
Benares. 


Ohtani, Count Kozui, San-ya-so, EdomacM, Fushlmi, 
Kyoto, Japan. 



1942] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members. 


137 


Date of 
Election. 

1-5-39 

A 

6-2-34 

N 

6-2-40 

R 

2-6-41 

R 

6-6-88 

L 

6-2-34 

N 

1-4-25 

R 

3-6-40 

F 

3-4-18 

L 

3-8-25 

N 

3-12-24 

R 

3-11-30 ! 

R 

7-9-36 

N 

2-1-39 

R 

2-10-39 

N 

6-8-34 

R 

1-2-26 

N 

1-9-41 

R 

7-9-21 

R 

5-1-21 

N 

5-3-90 

R 

7-7-41 

1 N 


Parker, B., Capt., i.a. (retd.), c/o Renaington Rand 
Inc., 3, Council House Street, Calcutta. 

Pasriclha, Chiranjt Lal, m.a., m.b., b-ohir. (Cantab.), 
M.R.c.s. (Eng.), l.r.c.p. (Lond.), ma.tor, i.m.s., Medical 
Directorate, General Headquarters, Delhi. 

Pask, John David, b.so., ph.d. (Leeds), Ghief Chemistf 
Howrah Mills Oo,, Ltd., Ramkristopur, Howrah. 
Paterson, Edward Alford, Assistant, Jardine, Skinner 
Go., Ltd., 4, Olive Row, Calcutta. 

Pennell, Aubrey Peroival, m.a«, Barrister -at-Law. 

St. Canon’s Tower, Loch Awe, Argyll, Scotland. 
Percival, Frederick George, ph.d. (Lond.), p.g.s., 
General Superintendent, Ore Mines and Quarries, Tata 
Iron and Steel Co., Ld. Jamshedpur. 

Perier, Ferdinand, s.j.. Most Reverend the Archbishop of 
Calcutta. 32, Park Street, Calcutta. 

Poleman, Horace Irvin, b.a., m.a., ph.d., Director of 
Indie Studies, Library of Congress. Washington, D.C., 
XJ.S.A. 

*Prashad, Baini, d.sc., f.z.s., f.r.s.b., f.n.i., f.r.a.s.b., 
Director, Zoological Survey of India. Kaiser Castle, 
Benares. 

*Pruthi, Hem Singh, m.sc. (Punjab), ph.d. (London), 
F.N.I., F.R.A.s,B., Imperial Entomologist, Imperial Institute 
of AgricidPitral Research, New Delhi. 

Pnshong, E. S., m.d., l.s.a., Medical Practitioner. 1, 
Chapel Road, Hastings, Calcutta. 


Rahman, Shah Kalimur, m.a., Lecturer in Arabic and 
Persiari, Calcutta University. Carmichael Hostel, 51, 
Baitakkhana Road, Calcutta. 

Ram, Doulat, Accountant, Military Secretary's Office^ 
c/o Messrs, Biru Mai Chiranji Lai, Chhatla Magni Ram, 
Patiala. 

Ramachandran, T. N., m.a., Offg. Superintendent, 
ArchcBologieal Section, Indian Museum. 27 , Chowringhee, 
Calcutta. 

Rangarajam, Krishnaswami, Employee, I.GJ. [India) 
Ltd,, Madras. Rukmani Building, Mambalam West, 
Madras. 

Rao, U. Shanker, Bengal Pilot ServAoe. 83. Ghowringhee, 
Calcutta. 

Rao, Y. Ramaohandra, Rao Bahadur, m.a., f.b.s.. 
Retired Government Entomologist, Madras. 199, Market 
Road, Visveswarapuram, Bangalore. 

Ratcliif, George Massey, i.o.s. 5, Wellesley Place, 
Government House, Calcutta. 

Ray, Hem Chandra, m.a., ph.d. (London), d.lit* 
(London). 136B, Vivekananda Road, Calcutta. 

Ray, Jagadisnath, Maharaja, Maharaja of Dinajpore. 
Dinajpore. 

*Ray, Sir Profulla Chandra, kt., o.i.e., d.sc., f.n.i., 
F.R.A.S.B. University College of Science, 92, Upper 
Circular Road, Calcutta, 

Ray, Satis Chandra, m.a., D.P.I. Shillong, Assam. 



138 


Year-Book for 1941 . 


VOL. VIII, 


Date of 
Election. 

1~40 

N 

Ray, SuKTTMAB, M.A., Lccturcr in History/, RqjshaM 

4vl2-39 

R 

College. P.O. Ghoramara, Ra,jsiia,hi. 

Ray-Ghowdhury, H. C., m.a.,ph.b., OarmiehnelProJesmr 

3-2-41 

N 

of Ancient Indian History and Culhire, CalctUta 
University. 6, Mysore Road, Tvalighat, CaFnitta. 

Reddy, B. Ranga, Joint Revenue Secretary^ H.EJI. fM 

6.11.28 

L 

Nizamfs Government, Bholakpur, Secundorabad, Deccan. 
Reinhart, Wbrister. c/o Messrs. Volkart Bros., Ld., 

S.il.41 

N 

Rychenberg, Winterthur, Switzerland. 

Reynolds, Hbbmak M., m.a., b.d., Missionary, Pendra 

2-4.24 

F 

Road, C.P. 

Richards, F. J., i.o.s. Treeps, Hurstpier Point, Sussex, 

3-12-24 

L 

England. 

Roerich, George Nicholas, m.a,, m.b.a.s., Orientalist, 

2-7-28 

h 

310, Riverside Drive, New York, U.S.A. {‘XJrusvati’ 
Naggar, Kulu, Punjab). 

Roerich, Nicholas, Professor. Honorary President, Master 

6-6-33 

A 

Institute of United Arts, New York, U.S.A., Artist- 
Painter. 310, Riverside Drive, New York, U.S.A. 
Rossetti, Felix Francis Leo, b.so., b.h., Secretary, 

7-4-41 

R 

Y.M.C.A, 42, Corporation Street, Calcutta. 

Roxburgh, The Hon’blb Mr. Justice T. J. Y., o.i.b., 
I.o.s. , Additional Judge, High Court, Calcutta. 6, Lee 
Road, Calcutta. 

Roy, Sir A. K„ kt.. Barrister -at-Law, Advocate-General, 

6-12-26 

R 

6-2-40 

R 

Bengal. 3, Upper Wood Street, P.O. Theatre Road, 
Calcutta. 

Roy, B. 0., B.A., M.D„ F.R.c.s, (Eng.), m.r.o.b. (Loni).)j» 

0-4-37 

N 

E.S.M.E. (Bengal). 36, Wellington Street, Calcutta. 

Roy, David, m.b.b., Assam Civil Service. Shillong, Assam. 

i-12-30 

N 

Roy, Kumar ELamalaranjan, b.a., Zemindar, Kasim- 

3-2-41 

N 

bazar Post, Dt. Murshidabad. 

Roy, Nirod Bhushan, Professor of History, A. M. 

6-8-24 

N 

College. Suburban Road, Mymensingh. 
Roy-Ghowdhnry, Brajendra Kishore, Zemindar. (63, 

7-5-28 

R 

Siikea Street, Calcutta.) Gauripur, Myinensingh. 

^’‘Saha, Meghnad, d.sc., f.r.s., e.n.i., p.r.a.s.b., Palit 
Professor of Physics, Calcictta University. 02, Upper 
Circular Road, Calcutta. 

Sahni, M. R., m.a. (Cantab.), d.sc. (Bond.), d.i.o., 
Geologist, Geological Survey of India. 27, Chowringhoe, 
Calcutta, 

Sale, Harold Montague, m.a., e.g.s., Mancotter Cottage, 

5-4-37 

N 

5-2-34 

L 

3-12-24 

R 

Atherstone, Warwickahiro, England. 

Sarkar, 0, K., o.e., Engineer and Architect. 10, Hastings 

4-2-35 

N 

Street, Calcutta, 

Sarkar, The Hon’ble Mr. Nalini Ran, tan, Member, 

5-4-37 

R 

Viceroy^s Council. New Delhi. 

Sattar, The Hon’ble Mr, A. R. H. A., Member, Council 

3-6-40 

A 

of State. 32, Ezra Street, Calcutta. 

Seal, John Robert, m.b,e., c/o. Grand Hotel, Simla, H.O. 

6-3-33 

R 

Seal, Satis Chandra, m.a., b.l., Honorary Secretary, 
Indian Research Institute. 1 70, Maniktola Street, Calcutta. 
Sen, Benoy Chandra, m.a., ph.d. P.341, Jatin Das 
Road, P.O. Rashbehari Avenue, Calcutta. 

Sen, D. N, 7, Rawdon Street, Calcutta. 

1-4-25 

R 

9-12-36 

R 


1942] 


Alphabetical List of Ordinary Members, 


139 


Date of 
Election. 

1-6-36 

N 

5-12-23 

L 

5-4-37 

N 

5-2-40 

N 

1-4-29 

R 

5-7-11 

L 

5-4-37 

N 

2-11-25 

N 

6-5-29 

N 

3-2-41 

L 

5-8-35 

N 

2-5-23 

1 F 

1 

6-1-09 

N 

4-1-26 

N 

6-2-28 

I. 

4-11-29 

R 

6-2-39 

N 

5-3-13 

L 

6-3-39 

F 

6-2-18 

N 

5-3-34 

I. 

2-1-33 

N 

4-2-35 

A 

5-9-12 

R 

7-8-33 

N 


Sen, J, M., M.EB. (Leeds), b.sc» (Cal.), t.d. (Lond.), 
DIP .ED. (Oxford), f,b.g,s., f.n.i. Principal, Krishnagar 
College. Krishnagar, Nadia. 

Sen, Laxshman, H.H. Baja of Suket. Sukei State, 
Pimjab. 

Sen, Kshitish Mohan. Principal, Visvabharati, Santi- 
niketan, List. Birbhum. 

Sen, S. 0., B.sc. (Gal.), b.a. (Cantab.), a.m.i.chbm.e. 
(London.), Superintendent, Cinchona Cultivation in 
Bengal. Mungpoo, Biyand, I).B[.By. 

Sen-Giipta, Nares Chandra, m.a., d.l.. Advocate, High 
Court. 23 A, Manoharpukur Boad, Calcutta. 

*Sewell, Bobert Beresford Seymour, c.i.e., m.a., sc.d. 
(Cantab.), m.r.c.s., l.r.c.p., f.z.s., f.l.s., f.r.s., f.n.i., 
F.R.A.s.B., LT.-COL., Director, Zoological Survey of 

India {retd.). 18, Barrow Road, Cambridge, England. 
Sharaf-nd-Din, S., m.a., b.l., Professor, Chittagong 
College. Chittagong. 

Sliarif, Mohammad, d.sc., f.r.m.s., f.l.s., Lecturer in 
Zoology. Muslim University, Aligarh. 

Sharma, Sri Ram, m.a., m.r.a.s., m.a.o.s., Professor of 
History. B.A.V. College, Lahore. 

Shastri, Gtangeyanarottam, Kavyatirtha, Kavicahra- 
cudamani. Landholder. Gangeya Bhawan, 280, Chitta- 
ranjan Avenue, Calcutta. 

Sbattock, John Swithin Harvey, b.a. (Oxon), m.b.e., 
T.c.s. The Residency, Baroda. 

Shebfoeare, E. O., Chief Game Warden . Post Box No, 376, 
Kuala Lumpur, F.M.S. 

SMrreff, Alexander Grierson, b.a., i.c.s., Board of 
Revenue, Lucknow. 

Shortt, H. E., C.I.E. , m.d., ch.b., d.sc., f.n.i., lt.-col., 
I.M.S., Inspector-General of Civil Hospitals. Shillong, 
Assam. 

Shumser, Jung Bahadur Rana, Sib KIaisee, x.b.e., 

SURPRADIPTA MANYAVARA, LIEUT. -GENERAL, JSfepalcse 
Army. Kaiser Mahal, Kathmandu, Nepal. ' 

Siddiqi, Mohammad Zubayr, m.a., fh.d.. Sir Asutoah 
Professor of Islamic Culture, Calcutta University. 6, 
Suhrawardy Avenue, Calcutta. 

Simeons, Albert Theodore William, m.d. (Heidel- 
berg), Physician, Khatau Mansion, Cooperage, Bombay. 
’'‘Simonsen, John Lionel, d.so., f.i.o., f.r.s., f.r.a,s.b. 
University College of North Wales, Bangor, North Wales. 
Sinclair, Gregg M., Director, Oriental Institute, Univer- 
sity of Hawaii. Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A. 

Singh, Many ABABA Badakaji Mariohi Man, Panditji, 
c.i.e. 38, Khichapoklmri, Kathmandu, Nepal. 

Singh, His 'Highness The Hon’bi-e Maharajadhiraja 
Sir ICameswar, k.c.i.e. Darbhanga. 

Singh, Rudba Pertab, Rao Bahadur, Proprietor, 
Sonbarsa Bag. Sonbarsa P.O., District Bhagalpore. 
Singh, Sarabiit, m.a., b.l. P.O. Imphal, Manipur State, 
Singh!, Bahadur Singh. (Azimganj, Murshidabad). 
48, Gariahat Road, Calcutta. 

Sinh, Raghubir, Rajkumab, m.a., ll.b., Heir-Apparent of 
\ Sitanmu State. Raghubir Niwas, Sitamau, C.I. 



140 


Year-Book R.AB.B.for 1941. 


[VOL. viij;,. 


Date of 
Election. 

L8.38 

R 

6-6-27 

N 

4-1-26 

N 

5-7-16 

L 

5-3-24 

R 

5-8-29 

R 

3-9-34 

R 

7-3-23 

F 

28-9-04 

L 

4-8-41 

N 

2-6-20 

A 

3-3-20 

N 

7-11-32 

L 

6-4-98 

R 

7-11-27 

R 

31-8-93 

L 

1-6-04 

L 

6-6-38 

N 

3-2-41 

R 

5-7-26 

N 

4-1-37 

R 

7-8-33 

R 

7-4-41 

N 


Siniia, J3. N. 4, Hastings Pa-rk Street, Calcutta. 

Sinliaj Shbonandan Prasad, m.d., Asmtmit Surgeon. 

Goi^ernmeiit Hospital, J amshedpiir, 

Staton, J. A., o.B.E.,LT.-coL., y.c!., Officer -in-Vharge, 
Malaria Bureau. Central Besearcli Institute, Kasauli. 
Sircar, Ganapati, Vidyabatna. 69, Beliaghatta Main 
Road, Calcutta. 

Sircar, Sm Nil Ratan, kt., m.a., m.d., Physician. 7, 
Short Street, Calcutta. 

Snmmerfield, Alfred, Merchant, c/o Mousell & Co., 
Mercantile Buildings, Lall Bazar, Calcutta. 

Sondhi, Ved Pall, m.b.e., m.sc., f.g.s., Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Geological Survey of India. 27, Chowringhoo, 
Calcutta. 

Stamp, L. Dudley, b.a., d.sc. University of London, 
London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London, 
W.C. 2. 

*Stapletoii, Henry Ernest, m.a., b.sg.,d.lxtt.,f.r,a.s.b., 
Late Director of Public Instruction, Bengal. St. Breiado, 
Jersey, C.I., England. 

Subramanyam, R. A., General Manager, Bharat Sugar 
Works, Paohrukhi. 

Suhrawardy, Sir Hassan, o.b.e., lt.-col., kt., 
F.R.c.s.i., D.P.H., La^e Vice-Chancellor, Calcutta University . 
3, Suhrawardy Avenue, Park Circus, Calcutta. 
Simdararaj, Bunguru, Dewan Bahadur, m.a., f.n.i., 
PH.D., Eetd. Director of Fisheries, Madras. ‘The An- 
chorage’, P.O. Adyar, Madras. 

Spvarna, Shumser Jung Bahadur Rana, Major-General 
in the Nepalese Army. Singha-Darbar, Kathmandu, Nepal. 

T agore, Sib Pradyot Coomar, kt., Maharaja Bahadur. 
‘Tagore Castle’, 12, Prasanna Coomar Tagore Street, 
Calcutta. 

Tarkatirtba, Bimalananda, Kaviraj, Pundithhusan^ 
Byakaranatirtha. 90/3, Grey Street, Calcutta. 

Tate, George Passman. 56, Cantonment, Bareilly, U.P, 
♦Tipper, George Howlett, m.a., f.o.s., m.inst.m.m,, 
f.e.a.s.b. ‘The Laurels’, Glebe Road, Cambridge, 
England. 

Tressler, G. W., m.a., Senior Professor of History and 
Political Science, Murray College, Sialkot, Punjab. 
Tribedi, B. P., m.b. (Cal,), d.b. (Loni>,), Professor of 
Pathology, Medical College, and Bacteriologist to the 
Government of Bengal, Medical College, Calcutta. 

Tyson, John Dawson, o.b.e., m.a. (Oxon), i.c.s., j.f. 
Secretary to the Government of India, Department of Edm- 
caHon, Health and Lands. New Delhi. 


Vedantatirtha, Narendra Chandra, m.a., BagchIj» 
Bhattaoharja, Sankhyatirtha, Mimeamsatirtha. 
Tattvaratna, Sastri, Author and Editor of Books. 
49, Cornwallis Street, Calcutta. 

VedantaHitlia, Vanamali, m.a., Formerly Professor, 
Cotton College, Gauhati. 8/4-E, Nepal Bhattacharya 
Lane, Kahghat, Calcutta. 

Vicary, Thomas C., m.a. (Lond.), a.k.o,. Missionary, 
Principal, Union OhrisHan Training College, Berham- 
pore, Bengal. 



1942] 


Alphahetiml List of Ordinary Members, 


141 


Bate of 
Election. 



6-3-01 

L 

♦Vogel, Jean Philippe, litt.d., f.r.a.s.b. Noordeind- 
splein 4a, Lieden, Holland. 

27-9-94 

L 

Vost, William, lt.-col., i.m.s. ‘Woodhurst’, Manor 
Way, South Croydon, Surrey, England. 

6^5-26 

N 

♦ Wadia, D. N., m.a., b.sc., f.r.g.s., e.n.i., f.k.a.s.b., 
Government Mineralogist. Torrington Square, Colombo, 
Ceylon. 

5-3-28 

N 

Waiglit, Harry George, m.a. (Oxon), i.c.s.. District 
and Sessions Judge. Mymensmgh. 

6-2-33 

N 

Wellsted, Thomas Arthur, a.r.s.m., b.sc., assoc, inst. 
M.M., Mining Engineer. Mansar, P.O. Kandri, Bambei.:, 
C.P. 

6-2-33 

B 

West, William Dixon, m.a. (Cantab.), f.n.i., Geologist, 
Geological Survey of India, 27, Chowringhee, Calcutta. 

i-11-26 

R 

Westcott, Foss, Most Reverend, d.d. (Cantab.), 
honorary d.d. (Oxon), Lord Bishop of Calcutta and 
Metropolitan of India, Burma and Ceylo7i. Bishop’s 
House, 51, Chowringhee, Calcutta. 

19-9-06 

L 

♦WMtehead, Richard Bertram, f.r.a.s.b., i.o.s. (retd.). 
30, Millington Hoad, Cambridge, England. 

6-6-29 

A 

Williams, Henry French Fulford, m.a., Clare Col- 
lege (Camb.), Chaplain of Barrackpore. Barrackporo. 

7-9-36 

R 

Williams, N. T., Messrs. Orr Dignam & Co. 32, Dalhousie 
Sqr., Calcutta. 

1-4-08 

B 

Wordsworth, William Christopher, c.i.b., m.a., i.e.s. 
(retd.), c/o The Statesman, Chowringhee Square, 
Calcutta. 

6-2-19 

N 

♦Vazdanij Ghulam, o.b.e., m.a., f.r.a.s.b., Director, 
Archaeological Department, B. EM. the Nizam's Dominions. 
Hyderabad, Deccan. 

2-10-39 

N 

2^afar Hasan, Maulvi, Khan Bahadur, o.b.e. 
Curator, Central Museum, Lahore. 


ORDINARY MEMBERS 

{Chronolo(jical) 


1884. 



1907. 


Nov. 

6. 

Middlemiss, C. S. 

July 

3. Brown, J. C. 




„ Christie, W. A. K. 

1888. 





June 

1890. 

6. 

Pemiell, A. P. 

1908. 

Jan. 

1. Brahmachari, Sir U. 



N. 

Mar. 

5. 

Bay, Sir Prafulla C. 

April 

L Wordsworth, W. C. 




1909. 


1892. 



Jan. 

6. ShiiToff, A. G» 25 

Jan. 

11. 

Maclagan Sir Ed- 

April 

7. Bentley, C, A, 



ward D, 

July 

7. Bazaz, R. K. 




Oct. 

6. Brown, P. 

1893. 



ff 

,, GangoM, 0. C, 

6 Aug. 

31. 

Tate, G. Passman 

1910. 


1894. 



May 

Sept. 

4. Dhavle, S. B. 30 

Sept. 

27, 

Vest, W. 

„ Kemp, S. W. 

1896. 



7. Gravely, F. H. 

Sept. 

1896. 

19. 

Be, K. C. 

1 4911. 
Feb. 

1. Insch, J. 

Jan. 

8. 

Bum, Sir Richard 

„ Law, N. N. 

1898. 



June 

7. Cbatterjee, K. K. 36 

Jan. 

5. 

Dods, W. K. 

July 

Nov. 

6. Sewell, E.B.S. 

1. Ahmed, TC. 

10 April 

6. 

Tagore, Sir Pradyot 
n 




1912. 


1901. 



July 

3, Andrews, E. A. 



Sept. 

4. Siiighi, B. 8. 

Mar. 

6. 

Shirwani, H, 



'S7 

June 

5. 

Vogel, J, P. 

Mann. H. H. 

1913, 





Mar. 

6. Simonsen, J. L» 40 

!902. 



June 

4. Majumdar, R, 0. 

July 

2, 

Doxe3r, p. 

Nov. 

5. Fox, as. 

1904. 





15 June 

I. 

Tipper, G. H, 

1914. 


Aug. 

3. 

Fermor, Sir L. L. 

Mar. 

4, Bacot,J. 

9 » 


Stapleton, H. E. 

July 

L Law,S.a 

1905. 



Aug. 

6. Law, B. C. 46 

Aug. 

2. 

McCay, D. 

1915. 


1906, 



April 

7. Ohtani, Count K. 

Jan. 

3. 

Chapman, J. A. 

Aug. 

4. Giirner, C. W. 

20 Sept. 

19, 

Whitehead, B. B, 

1 Oct. 

27, Ohatterjee, Sir A. 0* 


{ 142 ) 



Chronological List of Ordinary Members. 


143 


1916. 


Feb. 

50 July 

2. 

5. 

Majurndar, N. K. 
Sarkar, G. 

1917. 

April 

4. 

Aiyangar, Iv. V. B. 

Aug. 

1. 

Bhandarkar, D. R. 

1918. 

Feb. 

6. 

Banerji, N. N. 



Manen, Joban van 

55 „ 


Singh, B. M, 

' April 

3. 

Prashad, B. 

1919. 

Feb. 

5. 

Yazdani, G. 

Mar. 

5. 

Gupta, S. P. 

1920. 

Mar. 

3. 

Mahalanobis, P. C. 

60 


Sundara Raj, B. 

June 

2. 

Suhrawardy, Sir H. 

Aug. 

4. 

Bikshit, K. N. 

Sepfc. 

1. 

Chakladar, H. 0. 


Chanda, R. P. 

65 

»! 

Chatterjeo, N. G. 

Dec. 


Akbar Khan, Sir M. 

1921. 

Jan. 

5. 

Ray, J. N. 

Feb, 

2. 

Jain, Chhote Lall 

jt 


Mxikherjee, R. P. 

70 


Mookherjee, S. 0. 

Mar, 

2. 

Agharkar, S. P. 

Sept. 

7. 

Ray, H. 0. 

Nov. 

2. 

Flora, S, L. 

1922. 

Feb. 

1. 

Chopra, R. N. 

75 April 

6 . 

Abdul Ali, A. F. M. 


1923. 


Mar. 

7. 

Labey, G. T. 


,, 

Stamp, L, D. 

May 

2. 

Shebbeare, E, 0. 

June 

6. 

Howard, Sir A, 

80 

>? 

Hutton, J, H. 

Aug. 

1. 

Biswas, K. P. 

Dec. 

5. 

Chopra, B. N. 


» > 

Harwell, N. F. 


,, Sen, H. H. Lakshman 


1924. 




Feb. 

6. 

Mahindra, K. C, 

85 

Mar. 

5. 

Mitter, Sir B. L. 



9 9 

Sircar, Sir N. R. 


April 

2. 

Bahl, K. N. 


,, 


Ghose. K. 


,, 

u 

Richards, F. J. 

90 

„ 

)» 

Haq, M. M. 


Hay 

7. 

Bhattacharya, B. 


July 

2. 

Mookerjee, S. P. 


Aug. 

6. 

Cliatterji, S. K. 


,, 


Roy Chowdhury, B.K. 95 

,, 


Davies, L. M. 


Nov. 

5. 

Chattopadhyay, 




K. P. 


Dec. 

,, 

Mookerji, B. N. 


3. 

Newman, Chas. F. 


,, 


Pushong, E. S. 

100- 



Basu, J. N. 




Ghose, S. 0. 


99 


Roerich, G. N. 


»» 


Khan, R. R. 




Sarkar, C. K. 

105 

1925. 




Feb. 

4. 

Guha, B. S. 


Mar. 

4. 

Benthall, Sir E. 0. 




Das, A. N. 


April 

1. 

Perier, F. 



99 

Hobbs, H. 

110 


99 

Sen, B. C. 


May 

6. 

Wadia, D. N. 


July 

6. 

Bose, M. M. 


Aug. 

3. 

Priithi, H. S. 


Nov. 

2. 

Acharya. P. 

116 

i> 


Chattopadhyay a, 




K. C. 


' ft 


Kimura, R. 




Sharif, M. 


1926. 




Jan. 

4. 

Shortt, H. E. 




Sinton, J. A. 

120 

»> 

}> 

Fleming, A. 


Feb. 

L 

Rao, Y. R. 



99 

Ghuznavi, Sir A. H. 


99 

Harris, H. G. 


Mar. 

1. 

Datta, H. N. 

125 


J, 

Basu, N. K. 


99 

»» 

Kramrisch, Stella 


99 

April 

19 

Bagnall, J. F. 


6. 

Ghose, B. 0. 



j> 

Mitter, Iv. N. 

130 

June 

6. 

Lemmon, R. D. 


July 

5. 

Mtikhopadhyaya, 




P. K, 




144 


Jeaf’^Booh for 1941. 


[VOL. Vllly 


July 5. Tyson, J.D. 

Aug. 2. Mukherjee, J. N, 

135 ,, ,, Khettry, B. 

Nov. 1. Jameson, T. B. 

„ „ Modi, J. B. K. 

„ ,5 Wesfccott. F. 

„ ,, Mills, J. P- 

140 ,, s, Galstaiin, S* 

„ „ Bagchi, P. G. 

Dec, 6. Aiyaiigar, S. K. 

5j ss Boy, A« lit. 

1927, 

Jan. 3. Oliakravarfcy, N, 

145 ,, ,, Bivar, H. G, S. 

Feb. 7. Obatterjee, A, 

Mar. 7, Hopkinson, A. J. 

,, „ Ghosh, P. N. 

„ „ Abdul Kadir^ 

A. M. F. 

150 June 6. Nandi, Maharaja 

S,C. 

„ ,, Jain, B, 

„ „ Sinha, S. P. 

July 4. Chatterjee, P. P. 

„ ,, Chakravarti, 0. 

155 Nov. 7. Tarkatirbha, B. 

,, ,, Mukherji, D. 

,, „ Brahmachary, S. 0. 

Deo. 5. Namgyal, H.H. Sir 

Tashi 

j, „ Dechhen, 

Kunzaiig 

160 „ „ Chowdhurv, Sir 

C. 


1928. 


Jan. 

2. 

Melio, F. do 

Feb. 

6 , 

Ezra, Sir D. 


ff 

9* 

Mukerji, Sir M. N. 
Shumsher, Sir Kaiser 

165 Mar. 

6 . 

Waighb, H. G. 
Gooptu, D. N. 

ff 

»» 

99 

9 9 

Neogi, P. 

Biswas, 0. C. 

April 

2. 

Mullick, K. G. 

170 „ 

99 

Chowdhury,Bai J. N. 

May 

7. 

Chatterji, K. N. 
Chatterjea, Sir N. R. 


„ „ Murray, E, F. 0. 

n „ Ghosal, U. N. 

175 „ „ Saha, M.N. 

June 4. Bhadra, S. N. 

„ ,, Bhattasali, N. K. 

July 2. Boerich, N. 

Aug. 6. Ghuznavi, I. S, K. 
180 „ „ Heron, A. M. 


Nov. 

99 

5. 

99 

Boililiart, W. 

Galstaiin, J. C. 

1929. 



Jan. 

7. 

GliOKo, M'. C, 

Feb. 

4. 

Narain, 'Hirdo 



Jhnkias, W’. A. 185 

Mar, 

4. 

Do, J. C. 

99 

M 

Mullick, P, N. 

April 

!, 

Sen-Gupta, N. C, 

May 

6. 

Sharma, S. R. 



Williams, H. F. F. 190 

Aug. 

5. 

Souimerfeld, A. 

Nov, 

4. 

Cotter, G. de P. 

SJ 

,, 

Siddiqi, M. Z. 

S9 

9* 

Mallya, B. G. 

Dec, 

2. 

Fawcus, L. R. 195 

1930, 

Jan. 

6, 

Jain, N. K. 



Plaldar, S. K. 

Feb. 

3. 

Mahtab, IJ. C. 

99 

Mar. 


Chakravarti, M. N. 

3. 

Ashton, H. S. 200 

May 

5. 

Deo, Sir P. C. Bhanj 

„ 

,, 

Cooper, G. A. P. 

Nov. 

3. 

Austin, G. J. 

99 


Rahman, S, K. 

99 

99 

Newman, C. D. 205 

Dee. 

i. 

Roy, K. K. 

1931. 

Jan. 

5. 

Chatterji, D. 

Feb. 

*9 

Evans, P, 

2. 

Clough, J. 

Mar. 

2. 

Bose, S. K. 210 

May 

4, 

Bottomley, J, M, 

June 

1. 

Lort«WilliamB, J. 

1032. 

Mar. 

7, 

Hughes, A, 

99 

9) 

Ohakraborty, K. B, 

H 


Darbari, M, I). 215 

Nov. 

99 

Suvarna Shumser 

ff 

*9 

Driver, D, C, 

Dec. 

5. 

Dutt, N. 

99 

- 

Boyle, C. A. 

1933. 

Jan, 

2. 

George, J. 220^ 

9 > 

99 

Dutch, B. A. 

99 

99 

Singh, R. P. 

Feb, 

6. 

Wellsted, T. A. 

»> 

99 

Ghatak, J. C. 


„ West, W. D. ' 225 



1942] 


Chronological List of Ordinary Members. 


145 


, Mar. 

6. Seal, S. G. i 

Jutt© 

5. Rossetti, F. F. L. ! 

Aug. 

7. Singh, Raghubir 

9f 

„ Vedantatirtha, V. 

1934. 


230 Jau. 

1. Ahmad, M. J. 

Feb. 

6. Haidar, B. V. 

9* 

,, Kirby, W. 

»> 

,, Law, B. C, 


„ Nariman, R. K. 

235 „ 

,, Pasricha, C, L. 

>5 

„ Percival, F. G. 


„ Sale, H. M. 

Mar. 

5. Modi, J. J, J. 

' > j 

„ Singh, H.H. Sir K. 

240 May 

7. Bent, W. A. 

June 

4. Chatterji, B. R. 

Aug. 

6. Husain, S. A. 

»» 

„ Mullick, M. L. 

245 Sept. 

„ Rao, U. S. 

S. Auden, J, B. 

!»9 

Nov. 

Sondhi, V. P. 

5. Gee, E. R. 

Dec. 

3. Burt, B. 0. 

*» 

,, BrahmacharijP.N. 

250 „ 

,, Chatterjee, S. C. 

1935. 


Feb. 

4. Singh, S. 


,, Sarkar, N. E. 


„ Law, P. 0. 


„ Lai, R. B. 

265 Aug. 

6. Shattock, J. S, H. 

Sept. 

30. Dutt,M.N, 


„ Mitter, S. K. 

Nov. 

4. Bor,N.L, 


„ Chaudhuri, S. N. 

260 „ 

,, Anina Kdebe. 


,, Hirtzel, M. A. F. 

1936. 


Jan. 

6. Brooke, A. G. 

Feb. 

„ Berkely-Hill, 0. 

3. Catto, Lord 

266 „ 

,, Ahmad, A. 

Mar. 

2. Chatterji, Mrs. T. 

June 

„ Chatterjee, M. 

1. Sen, J.M. 

Sept, 

7. Williams, N. T. 

270 „ 

„ Ghosh, J. 


„ Ram, D. 

TJ 

„ Bagehi, K. N. 

Nov, 

2. Bothra, S. 

Dec. 

9. Sen, D.N. 

270 ,, 

„ Mittra, S. C. 


„ Gillespie, A. D. 


Dec. 

>» 

9. Bose, A. N. 

„ ■ Basil, I. B. 

„ Banerjee, S. M. 

1937. 

Jan. 

4. Vedantatirtha, N. C. 280 

April 

0. Sharaf-ud-Din, S. 

>» 

„ Sattar, A. H, 

9* 

„ Sahni. M. R. 

,, 

„ Roy, D. 

99 

„ Mooney, H. F. 285 

9> 

„ Sen, K. M. 

July 

5. Mozumdar, S. 

„ Mukherjee, P. 

Sept. 

6. Halim, A. 

„ Durniz-Podewils, 

Count 290 


,, Bhattacharya, N. 0. 

1938, 

Feb. 

7. Chakravarti, P. K. 

April 

4, Chaudhuri, Mrs. R. 

99 

„ Anderson, J. 

May 

2. Faroqui, K. G. M. 290 


,, Mahtab, Maharaj 

Kumar A. C. 

ft 

,, Jacob, J. R. 

Jim© 

6. Tressler, G. W. 

99 

„ Dudhoria, N, K. S. 

July 

4. Carstairs, A. M. 300 

Aug. 

1. Sinha, B, 

,, Banerjee, J. N. 

Nov. 

i, Jatia, K. L. 


„ Eelchout, Jhr., P. J. 

Dec. 

6. Das Gupta, C. C. 305 

1939. 

Jan. 

2. Bose, S. M. 

)> 

„ Ramachandran, 

T. N. 

Feb, 

6. Basil, J. N. 


,, Simeons, A. T. W. 

Mar 

„ Chakravarti, R. M. 310 

6. Culshaw, W. J, 


„ Sinclair, G. M. 


,, Mukerjee, S, C. 

99 

„ Meyer, Miss S. 

May 

1. Parker, E. 310 

„ Ayrton, S. M. 

June 

6. All, S. S, 

99 

„ Nag, K. 

July 

3. Majumdar, J, M. 

Aug. 

7. Bose, G. 320 

„ Helland, B. A. 

j Sept. 

4. Ghosh, J. 0. 



146 


Ymr^Book E,A.S.B. for 194i. [roh. vni, I942j 


Oct. 


325 „ 

JiK 

Dec. 


SS0 


«(? 


2. Hasan, Z. 

„ BasuMazoomder,W. 
,, Eangarajam, K. 

„ Bastin, R. W. 

4, Ray Chowdhury, 

H. C. 

„ Cameron, A. 

„ Mukerjea, J. 0. 

„ Bose, D. M, 


July L Butt. S. 0. 

„ * „ Oliatterjee, A. B, 

„ ,, Gliosh, R. 

„ „ Ray, B. 355 

Sept, 2. Gkosli, P, K. 

„ „ Chatter] i, B. G\ 

Dec. 2. Bdglcy, N. G. A. 

„ „ IsctWall, C. 

„ „ Jalan, M. ,160 

„ „ Hodgson, L. L. 


1940. 

Feb. 

»? 

JS 

335 „ 

ft 

Mar. 
340 ” 

t> 

ft 

"»> 

345 May 

June 

350 II 
July 


2. Sen, S. G. 

„ Roy, B. C. 

„ Bask, J. D. 

„ Law, A. 0. 

,, Huda, S. S. 

,, Ghatak, I. B. 

„ Basu, M. M. 

4. Mazumdar. D. L. 

„ Harshe, R. G. 

„ Haryana, R. A. 

„ Crawford, C. E. J. 
„ Bruce, A. E. R. 

„ Bell, F. 0. 

„ Foster, A. R. 

6. Griffiths, W. G. 

„ Bharucha, F. E. 

„ Asadullali, K. M, 
3« Seal, J . R. 

„ Poieman, H. I. 

,, De, J . 0. 

1, Jagannath, 


1941. 


Feb. 

3. 

Ray, N, B. 


>9 

Reddy, B. R. 

?? 

99 

Shastri, Cl. 

99 

99 

Tribedi, B. P. 365 

Mar. 

3. 

Mitra, Miss P. 

April 

7. 

Baker, E. B. PL 

99 

99 

Janial-ixd-Dia. 

99 

99 

Malik, A. R. 

99 

99 

Roxburgh, T. J. Y. 370 

,5 

99 

Vieary, T. C. 

May 

6 . 

Kirby, E. S. 

June 

2. 

Patei’Bon, E. A. 

July 

7. 

Ray, S. C. 

Aug. 

4. 

Subrfunanyam, 

R.A. *' 375 

Sept, 

1. 

Bailor] i, S. 0. 

>) 

99 

Ratcliff, G. M. 

No\^ 

3. 

Reynolds, H. M. 

Dee. 

1. 

EwWfe, D. J. 

Grant, J. B. 380’ 

>) 

99 


99 

Ingalls, D. H. H. 



LIFE MEMBERS 

{Ghronological) 


5-11-84 G. S. Middlemiss 
(30 N.). 

6-6-88 A. P. Pennell (88 F.)- 
11-1-93 Sir Edward D. 

Maolagan (94 B.). 
31-7-93 G. P. Ta1:e (23 N.). 

5 27-9-94 W. Vest (94 F.). 

19-9-95 K. 0. De (26 B.). 

6- 2-01 J.Ph. Vogel (25 F.). 

2-7-03 F. Doxey (28 B.). 

1- 6-04 G. H. Tipper (27 NO- 

10 3-8-04 Sir Lewis L. Fermor 

(36 N.). 

28-9-04 H. E. Stapleton 

(26 B.). 

2- 8-05 D. McOay (29 F.). 

3- 1-06 J. A. Chapman 

(28 N.). 

19-7-06 R. B. Whitehead 

(26 N.)* 

15 3-7-07 J. Coggin Brown 

(28 N.). 

3- 7-07 W. A. K. Christie 

(29 N.). 

1-1-08 Sir U. N. Brahma- 
chari (27 R.). 

7- 4-09 C. A. Bentley (SON. )- 

4- 5-10 S.B.Dhavle(10N.). ' 

20 4-5-10 S. W. Kemp (29 F.)- 

1-2-11 James Insch (28 R.)* 

5- 7-11 R. B. S, Sewell 

(28 N.)* 

1-11-11 Kamaluddin Ahmad 
(24 NO- 

5- 3-13 J. L. Simonsen 

(19 N.). 

25 5-11-13 0. S. Fox (40N.). 

4- 3-14 J. Bacot (14 F.)- 

6- 8-14 B. C. Law (33 R.)* 

7- 4-15 Count K. Ohtani 

(39 F.). 

5- 7-16 G- Sircar (29 N.). 

6 - 2-18 Johan van Manen 

30 (25 R.). 


3- 4-18 B- Prashad (29 R.)* 

2- 11-21 S. L. Hora (30 NJ. 

6- 6-23 Sir A. Howard 

(30N.)< 

1-8-23 Kalipada Biswas 
(36 R.). 

5-12-23 B. H. Chopra (40 H.), 36 

5- 12-23 H. H. Lakshman Sen 

(24 N,). 

7- 5-24 B. Bhattaciiarya 

(24 N,). 

6-8-24 L. M. Davies (24 N.). 

3- 12-24 G. Roerich (28 F.). 

4- 2-25 B. S. Guha (40 N.), 40 

6-6-27 B. D. Jain (28 R,). 

4- 7-27 C. Chakravarti (41 N.)* 

6- 12-27 SirGhhajuramCiiow- 

dhury (27 R.)- 

5- 12-27 H.H. Sir Tashi 

Namgyai (27 N.). 

6- 12-27 H.H. Kunzang 

Dechhen (27 IST.). 45 
6-2-28 Sir D. Ezra (28 R.). 

6- 2-28 Sir Kaiser Shumsher 

Jung Bahadur 
Rana (28 N.). 

2- 7-28 N. Roerich (28 F.). 

5- 11-28 W. Reinhart (28 F.). 
4-11-29 G. de P. Cotter 

(32 N.). 50 

3- 3-30 H. S. Ashton (30 N.). 

6-1-31 P. Evans (31 N-)- 
1-6-31 Sir John Lort-Williams 

(40 K). 

7- 11-32 Suvarna Shuniser 

Jung Bahadur 
Kana (32 N.). 

6-2-33 J. C. Ghatak (33 R.). 55 
6-2-34 H. M. Sale (34 N.). 

6-3-34 H.H. Sir K. Singh 
(34 N.). 

3-2-41 G. Shastri (41 R.). 


( 147 ) 



SPECIAL ANNIVERSARY HONORARY MEMBERS 


Bate of 

Election. (Science.) 

15- 1-34 Pbof. Albert Einstein, c/o Princeton University, New 

Jersey, U.S.A. 

16- 1-34 M. A. Lacroix, Secretaire Perpetual, Academie des Scieiiees, 

Paris. 

16-1-34 Sir Sydney Bubrard, k.c.s.i., f.b.s., Foxhill, Salisbury Eoaci, 
Farnborough, Hants, England. 

16-1-34 Dr. Sib Sven Hedin, Stockholm, Sweden. 

(Letters.) 

16-1-34 Sib John Marshall, kt., c/o Messrs. Grindlay & Co., Ltd,, 
64, Parliament Street, London. 

16-1-34 Prof. Taha Hosain, Cairo. 

16-1-34 Prof. Arthur Christensen, 62, Raadhusvej, Oharlottenlund, 
Denmark. 

16-1-34 Dr, J. Van Kan, President, Royal Society of Arts and Letters, 
Batavia, J ava. 

16-1-34 H.R.H. Prince Damrong Rajanubhab of Siam, Siam. 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Date of 
Election. 


*PmRRE Johanns, Rev., s.j., b.utt. (Oxon), Professor of 
Philosophy. St. Xavier’s College, 30, Park Street, Calcutta. 

Anantakrishna Sastri, Mahamahofabhtaya, Vkdanta- 
VISABADA, Lecturer in Sanskrit, Calcutta Vnivcrmty.' 32. 
College Square, Calcutta. 

f S^AT C^DBA Roy, Bai Bahador, m.a., b.i,.. Editor, 

Man %n India*. Church Road, Ranchi. 

Pbthorew, 64, Grinadyko Road, Hatch End, 
Middlesex, England. 

Itos Matob Lina West Cleghobn, f.l.s., f.e.s. The 
Retreat, Behala, 24-Pergs. 

*^d^' °/° Burma Shell, Budge 


’»Re. 

Rule 2c. 

tRo- 
Rule 2c. 


•elected for a further period of five years on 6-4-1937 under 
•elected for a further period of five years on 6-3-1939 under 


( 148 ) 



Ordinary Fellows, 

INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS 


149 


Date of 
Election, 


2840-29 

2 - 12-29 

4 - 5-31 

1 - 6-31 

7 - 12-31 

30 - 10-33 

30 - 4-34 

6 - 1-36 
4 - 5-36 

7 - 12-36 

4 - 1-37 

7 - 6-37 


Legatum Warnerianum (Oriental Department), University of 
Leyden, Leyden, Holland. 

Adyar Library, Adyar, Madras S. 

Benares Hindu University Library, Benares. 

Obtani University Library, Kyoto, Japan. 

Annamalai University Library, Annamalainagar, Obidam- 
baram, S. India. 

Allahabad University Library, Allahabad. 

Bombay University Library, Bombay. 

Islamia College, Peshawar. 

Patna College, Patna. 

Forest Research Institute, Dehra Dun. 

Dacca University, Dacca. 

Agra University, Agra. 


6 


10 


ORDINARY FELLOWS 


Date of 
Election. 

2X10 

7 - 2-12 

5 - 2-13 

5 - 2-13 

3 - 2-15 
2 - 2-16 
2 - 2-16 

7 - 2-17 

6 - 2-18 
6 - 2-18 
5 - 2-19 
5 - 2-19 
5 - 2-19 

5 - 2-19 

2 - 2-21 

1 - 2-22 

7 - 2-27 

6 - 2-28 
■ 6 - 2-28 
6 - 2-28 

4 - 2-29 
4 - 2-29 
4 - 2-29 
' 3 - 2-30 
3 - 2-30 
3 - 2-30 
3 - 2-30 
• 2 - 2-31 
. 2 - 2-31 


Sir Frafulla Chandra Ray, kt., o.i.b,, m.a., d.so., e.h.i. 

C. S. Middlemiss, b.a., f.b.s. 

J. Ph. Vogel, PH.D., LITT.D. 

S. W. Kemp, b.a., d.so., f.b.s. 

G. H. Tipper, m.a., f.o.s., M.iisrsT.M.M, 

Sir Richard Burn, kt., o.s.i., i.o.s. (retired). 

Sir L. L. Fermor, kt., o.b.e., a.e.s.m., d.so., f.g.s., m.inst.m.m., 

F.E.S., F.IT.I. 

F, H. Gravely, D.so., f.n.i. 

J. L. Simonsen, d.so., f.i.o., f.e.s. 

D. McCay, m.d., m.r.o.p., i.m.s. 

J. Coggin Brown, o.b.e,, f.g.s. 

W. A. K. Christie, b.so., ph.d., M.iN 8 r.M.M. 

D. R. Bhandarkar, m.a., ph.d. 

R. B. Seymour Sewell, 0.1.B,, m.a., so.d., m.b.o.s., l.b.o.p., 

F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.R.S., I.M.S. 

Sir U. N. Brahtnachari, kt., m.a., ph.d., m.d., f.s-m.f., f.n.i. 
Bamaprasad Chanda, b.a. 

Johan van Manen, o.i.b. 

H, E. Stapleton, m.a., d.litt., b.so., i.e.s. (retired). 

B. Prashad, d.so., f.z.s., f.b.s.®., F.2sr.i. 

C, A. Bentley, o.i.E., m.b., d.p,h,, d.t.m, & h. 

Sir Albert Howard, kt., o.i.e., m.a. 

J. H. Hutton, O.I.B., M.A., D.SO., i.o.s. 

Sir Edward D. Maclagan, k,o,s.i., k.o,i.e. 

G. de P. Cotter, b.a., so.d,, m.inst.m.m., f.g.s, 

S. L. Hora, d.so., f.z.s., 

J. P. Mills, I.o.s., M.A., J.P., p.ir.i- 
Meghnad Saha, d.so., f.r.s., 

S. Krishnaswami Aiyangar, M.A., PH.D., p.e.hist.S- 

Sir R. H. Chopra, K.T., M.A., M.D., SO.D., f.k.i,, -1.21.8. . 


5 


10 


16 


20 


26 


10 



150 


Year-Book B.A.S.B. for 1941. 


VOL. VIII, 


30 

Date of 
Bleotlon. 

'2X31 

R. B. Whitehead, i.e.s. {retired). 


1-2-32 

J. Bacot. 


6-2-33 

Percy Brown, m.b.b., a.b.c.a. 

Ordhendra Coomar Gangoly, b.a. 


.6-2-33 


6-2-33 

Ghulam Yazdani, m,a. 

36 

5-2-34 

D. N. Wadia, M.A., B.sc., f.e.g.s., p.n.i. 


3-2-36 

Suniti Kumar Ghatterji, m.a,, d.litt. 


3-2-36 

A. M. Heron, d.sc., p.g.s., p.r.g.s., p.b.s. b., f.n.i, 


3-2-36 

Habib -ur-Rahman Shirwani. 


15-2-37 

K. N. Bahl, D.so., d.phil., p.n.i. 

40 

15-2-37 ' 

K. N. Dikshit, m.a. 


15-2-37 

N. N. Law, M.A., B.L., ph.d. 


15-2-37 i 

J. N. Mukherjee, d.so., p.o.s., p.n.i. 


6-2-39 

C. S. Fox, D.sc. M.I.M.E., P.G.S. , P.N.I. 


6-2-39 

B. S. Cuba, M.A., PH.D., P,N.I. 

45 

5-2-40 

U. H. Ghoshal, m.a,, ph.d. 


6-2.40 

B, 0. Law, M.A., B.L., PH.D., P.B.HIST.S. 


6-2-40 

R, C. Majumdar, m.a., ph.d. 


6.2-40 

H. S. Pruthi, m:.so., ph.d., p.n.i. 


HONORARY FELLOWS 


10 


15 


Date of 
Election. 

4X20 

4-2-20 

4-2.20 

4-2-20 

4-2-20 


4-2-20 

4-2-20 

2-3-21 


7-6-22 

7-6-22 

7-1-26 

7-3-27 

5-5-30 

7-2-38 

4-9.39 


lOB 


Sib Aubel Stein, e.cj.b,, ph.e., d.litt., d.sc., d.o.l., f.b.a., 
c/o Indian Institute, Oxford, England. 

A. Fouoheb, D.LITT. Boulevard Raspail 286, Paris, XVF. 

Sib Arthur Keith, m.d., f.b.c.s., ul.d., p.r.s.a. Royal College 
of Surgeons of England. Lincoln’s Inn P'ields, London, W.C. 2. 

R. D. Oldham, p.b.s., p.q.s., f,r,g.s. I, Brooinfiokl Road, 
Kew, Surrey, England. 

Snt David Peain, et., c.m.g,, c.i.e., m.a., m.b,, f.r.s.e,, 

F,B,s., r.L.s., P.Z.S., m.r,i.a., lt.-ool., Late K^uperlnkm'- 

dent. Royal Botanic Garden, Calmtta, and Director, Botmuml 
Survey of India, and late Director, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Surrey, England. 

Sib Joseph Labmob, kt., m.a., d.so., ll.d., d.c.l., e.r.s., 
P.B.A.S., St. John’s College, Cambridge, England, 

Imperial University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. 
o,i.E., M.A., PH.D,, Bodm ProfeMor of Sanskrit, 
University of Oxford. .161, Woodstock Road’ Oxford, 
England. 

Sm Thomas Holland, k.c,s.i., e.c.i.e., d.so., p.b.s. FrimipaL 
University of Edinburgh, Blackford Brno, Edinburgh. 

Sm Leonaed Rogers, kt., c.i.e., m.d., b.s,, bmlo.p., p.r.s., 
I.M.S. 24, Cavendish Square, London, 4, 

Sten Konow. Ethnographisk Museum, Oslo, Norway, 

Bt, Hon’blb The Earl op Lytton, p.c., o.c.s.i., a.o,i.E, 
Knebworth, Herts, England. 

E. Robotson, D.ac., r.E.s. Dyson Perrins Laboratory, South 
Parks Road, Oxford, England. ^ 

Sm John Andebson, p.c., s.o.b., o.o i e 
Lord Prwy Seal. 11. Oheapstow Vilas, London, S.W. 

M.A., d.htt.. Vice-Ghancellor. 

Benares Hindu XJnnv&rsity. Benares. 



1942] 


Honorary Fellows. 


151 


Election. 


4 «. 9.39 

4-9-39 

4-9-39 


Pros'. Dr. Heinrich Luedbbs, Germany. 

The Most Hon’ble the Marquess, of Zetland, p.c., o.o.s.i.^ 
G.o.x.B. Aske, Bichmond, Yorkshire, England. 

Sir Jadunath Sarkab, kt., o.i.e., m.l.c., m.a., d.litt, 169, 
Southern Avenue, Kalighat, Calcutta. 




CHANGES IN MEMBERSHIP 


Loss OF Membbbs bueing 1941. 
By Retirement. 


Ordinary Members, 

1. Sir George Campbell. (1929.) 

2. Sir S. Badbakrisbnan. (1939.) 

3. E. M, Groth. (1936.) 

4. S. K. Cbakravarti. (1933.) 

6. J, C. Bhose. (1931.) 


Associate Member. 

L L. S. Dugin. (1934.) 


By Death. 


Ordinary Members, 

L G. S. Dutt. (1933.) 

2. Tarapada Ghose. (1912.) 

3. Mabarajadhiraj Sir B. C. Mahteb. (19in 

4. M. E. Sufi. (1937.) ' 

6. M. Hidayat Hosain. (1911.) 

6. S. K, Mukberjee. (1927.) 


Honorary Fellows, 

1. Charles Rockwell Lanman. (1896.) 

2. Sir George A. Grierson. (1904.) 

3. Sir J ames Frazer. (1920.) 


1 . 

2 . 

3. 

4. 

5 . 
0 . 


UNDER KXTLE 38. 

M. L. Bhatia. (1926.) 

P. L. Jaitly. (1928.) 

H. C. Mandhata. (1936.) 

Abinash Ch. Ray. (1924.) 

Rai Mahasai K. Deb. (1926.) 
MukulDey. (1934.) 

( 152 ) 



Undee Rule 40 . 


1 . P. N. Banorjee. (1924.) 

2, H, CrooksliswQk. (1925.) 

3, A. H. Harley. (1912.) 

4 . L. E. Harris. (1928.) 

6. Major M. P. 0. Martin. (1930.) 

6. H. Richter. (1934.) 

7. Jaipal Singh. (1929.) 

8. a. Tncci. (1928.) 

9 . T. Wmiarns. (1928.) 

10 . Rai Bahadur S. K. Bhuyan. (1934.) 

11 . C. 0. Calder. (1913.) 



MEDALLISTS 


ELLIOTT GOLD MEDAL AND CASH 


Reoipients. 

1893 Chandra Kanta Basu, 

1B95 Yati Bhusana Bhaduri. 

1896 Jiian Saran Chakravarti. 

1897 Sarasi Lai Sarkar. 

1901 Sarasi Lai Sarkar. 

I QA-i f Sarasi Lai Sarkar. 

( Surendra Nath Maitra. 

1907 Akshoy Kumar Mazumdar 
IQ, 1 C Jitendra Nath Rakshit. 

I Jatindra Mohan Datta. 

I^Rasik Lai Datta. 

1 Qi o 3 Saradakanta Ganguly. 

1 Nagendra Chandra Nag. 

LNiirataxi Dhar. 

1918 Bibhutibhusharx Dutta. 

1919 Jnanendra Chandra Ghosh. 

1922 Abani Bhusan Datta. 

1923 Bhailal M. Amin. 

1926 Bidhu Bhusan Ray. 

1927 Kalipada Biswas. 

1931 T. 0. N. Singh. 

1932 P. N. DaS'Gupta. 

1933 Nirmal Kumar Sen. 

1934 D. P. Roy Chowdhury. 

1936 Kalipada Biswas. 

1937 Pulin Behari Sarkar. 

1939 P. K. Ohatterjee. 


BARCLAY MEMORIAL MEDAL 
RBorpiBiras. 

B. Ernest Green, 

Sir Ronald Ross, kt., ic.o.b., M.i 

D.P.H., LL.D., n.SO., M.n., f.b.s. 

D. D, Cuimingham, o.i.b., f.k.s. 

A. W. Alcock, O.I.B, , M.B., liL.B., B.B.S. 

Sir David Prain, bt., o.i.bj;, om , q „ m.a,, m.b,, j 

ff.L.S., S'.Z.S., M.E,I.A., B’.B.S, 

Carl Diener. 

WBliam Glen Liston, o.i.b,, m.d,, d.b,h. 

«r. S. Gamble, o,i.b., m.a., f.b.s. 

H, H. Godwin-Austen, i'.b.s., b.z*s,, b,b.o,s. 

N. Amandale, O.I.E., d.so., o.m.z.s., p.^s., f.b.s., 
bir Leonard Rogers, kt., o.i.b., m.b., b.s„ b.b 

I’.B.S. 

Sir Samuel Christophers, kt,, o.i.b., o.B.k f e s 
LT.-COL., I.M.S, 

( 154 ) 



Medallists. 


155 


1925 J, Stephenson, o.i.e., b.sc., m.b., ch.b., f.r.s., f.b.c.s., f.r.s.e.j 

liT.-COL., I.M.S. 

1927 S. W. Kemp, b.a., d.sc., e.b.s., f.a.s.b. 

1929 Sir Albert Howard, kt., c.i.k-, m.a., p.a,s.b. 

1931 R. B. Seymour Sewell, c.i.e., m,a., sc.d, (Gantab*), m.e.c.s., 

L.R.C.P., F.Z.S., P.L.S., P.R.A.S.B., P.E.S., LT.-COL., I.M.S. 

1933 R. Row, O.B.E., D.sc, 

1935 B. Sahni, m.a., sc.d. (Cantab.), d.sc., f.g.s,, p.r.s., p.e.a.s.b. 

1937 R. N. Chopra, g.i.e,, m.a., m.d. (Cantab.), p.e.a.s.b., bt.-col., 

I.M.S. 

1939 Major-General R. MoCarrisou, kt., c.i.b., m.d., d.sc., p.b.c.p,, 

LL.D., K.H.P., I.M.S, (Retd.). 

SIR WILLIAM JONES MEMORIAL MEDAL 

Recipients. 

1927 Sir Malcolm. Watson, kt., ll.d. (hon.), m.d., c.m., d.p.h. 

1928 Sir George A. Grierson, k.c.i.e., o.m., ph.d., d.litt., ll.d., p.b.a. 

(hon.), p.r.a.s.b., i.c.s. { retired ). 

1930 Br. Felix H. D’Herelle. 

1932 Br. C. Snouck Hurgronje. 

1931 Rai Sir Upendra Nath Brahmachari, Bahadur, kt., m.a., m.d., 

PH.D,, F.S.M.P., P.R.A.S.B. 

1937 Prof. Br. A. J. Weiisinck. 

1940 Sir Prafulia Chandra Bay, kt., c.i.b., d.sc., p.r.a.s.b., p.n.i. 


ANNANDALE MEMORIAL MEDAL 

Recipients. 

1927 Fritz Sarasin. 

1930 Br. Charles Gabriel Seligman, m.d., p.r.o.p.. p.e.s. 

1933 Br. Bugdne Dubois. 

1936 Br. John Henry Hutton, c.i.e., r.o.s. {retired), m.a.‘, d.sc., p.e.a.s.b. 
1939 Prof. Frank Weidenreich. 


JOY GOBIND LAW MEMORIAL MEDAL 

Recipibnts. 

1929 Max Weber. 

1932 Br. Ernst J. 0. Hartert, ph.d. 

1935 Prof. Leo Semenowitch Berg. 

1938 Dr. Baini Prashad, D.sc,, p.z.s., p.k.s.e., p.e.a.s.b. 

PAUL JOHANNES BRtIHL MEMORIAL MEDAL 

Recipients. 

1931 Rev. Ethelbert Blatter, s.j. 

1934 Isaac Henry Burkill, m.a. 

1938 Sir David Prain, kt., f.e.s. 


INDIAN SCIENCE CONGRESS MEDAL, CALCUTTA 

Recipients. 

1935 Meghnad Saha, d.sc., f.b.s., f.r.a.s.b. 

1938 Sir James H. Jeans, d.sc., sc.d., dd.d., p.i.o., p.e.s. 




PROCEEDINGS OF THE ORDINARY MONTHLY 

MEETINGS, 1941 


JANUARY 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 6th January, 1941, at 5-30 p.m. 


Present 

Percy Brown, Esq., A.R.C.A., M.B.E., E.R.A.S.B., 
Member of Cmincil, in the Chair. 


M embers : 

Anderson, Mr. J. 
Biswas, Dr. Kalipada 
Bruce, Lt. A, E. R. 
Chakravarti, Prof. C. 
Chatterjee, Mr. B. C. 
Chatterji, Dr. S. K. 


Visitors : 

Hosain, Syed Mohd. 


De, Mr. J. C. 
Ghoshal, Dr. U. NT. 
Guha, Dr. B. S. 
Gurner, Mr. C. W. 
Haq, Prof. M, M. 
Isch-Wall, Lt. C. 
Majumdar, Mr. J. 


Mukherjee, Mr. S. K. 


The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The General Secretary reported receipt of the following 
fiye presentations of books, etc. which had been kept on the 
table for inspection : — 

(1-2) Prom the Japanese Consulate-General — HirsMge, 2 vols.*. 

(3-4) From the Govt, of Bengal — ^‘Press List of Ancient Documents, 
Vol, 13, pt. 2 and Catalogue of Indian Insects’. 

(5) From the Government of India — Index,. Land Revenue Records’. 

The General Secretary reported that no application for 
Ordinary Membership had been received since the previous 
meeting. 

The General Secretary announced the following loss of 
membership since the previous meeting by death : — 

1. J. W. L. Grieve (Life member, 1900). 

2. Dr. C. G. Seligman (Recipient of the Annandale Memorial Medal, 

1930 ). ■ 


( 157 ) 



158 


Year-Book B.AB.B. for 1941. 


[VOL. VJII, 


The Chairman called upon Dr. B. S. Giiha to read an obituary 
notice of the late Sir J. J. Thomson, prepared by Dr. M, N. Saha 
(see page 195). 

The General Secretary reported that there had becui no loss 
of iiieiiibership since the previous meeting by resigiiatioii. 

The General Secretary announced the following lapses of 
election, since the previous meeting, under Biiile 7 : — 

1. Rai Baliadar Diwan Khilaiida Ram. 

. 2. Dr. A jit Mohan Bose, 

3. Prof. Gaiida Singh. 

4. O. P. Bhatnagar. 

5. K. B. Srinivasan. 

6. K. R. Venkataraman- 

7. Bisveswar Chakravarti. 

8. Mohd. Ghoiam Akbar. 

9. Mohd. Osman. 

10. Siikiimar Ray. 

11. Dr. Mahdi Husain. 

12. K. C. Chatterji-Shastri. 

13. Nityananda Kanimgo. 

The General Secretary reported that thei’e had been no 
withdrawals of application since the previous meeting. 

In accordance with Buie 38, the General Secretary announced 
that the names of the following six members whose names had, 
since the last Ordinary Meeting, been suspended as defaulters 
within the Society’s building, had now been removed as 
defaulters from the Society’s registers for non-payment of dues:— 

1. M. L. Bhatia. 

2. P. L. Jaitly. 

.3. H. C. Mandhata. 

4. Ab inash Ch. Ray. 

5. Raja Kshitindra Dev, 

6. Miikiii Dey. 

The Chairman called upon the following to rejid tlieir 
papers: — 

1. Umes Cha]:^bba CHAiTUHtTRy.— OhservaMom on 
Two Copper -plate Grants from BJiatera^ Sylhet District, Assam, 

The boundaries of the district of Sylhet. The claim of the 
copper-plates being the oldest historical records of the district. 
The copper plates begin by giving eulogistic description of a 
royal family. They record gifts of land to the extent of about. 
1,500 acres, of houses, kitchens, slaves, etc., to the deities 
Vateswara Siva and Kamala Kanto Madhukaitabhari Narayana. 
Plots of land in the gift are spread over the different parts of the 
district over 51 villages and these are in the sub-divisions of 
Habiganj, South Sylhet, North Sylhet and Karimganj and 
some even in the plains of the district of Cachar. ' 



1942] Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 159 

2., Chintahaean Chakeavabti. — Panegyric of Malai- 
mmtna. 

Unique character of the paneg 3 rric consisting of eighty-four 
verses, which form a part of a Tantric work, commentary on the 
Yantra section of the Sivatandavatantra by Premanidhi Pantha. 
The description of each Yantra in the commentary is followed by 
a reference to the author’s patron, Malaivamma (18th century) 
or one of his ancestors, children or relatives represented as 
having obtained success through the worship of the Yantra 
under description. The paneg 3 n*ic gives a detailed genealogical 
account of Malaivamma, a ruler of territories included in the 
Chaiibisi states of the Sapta Gandaki Pradesh of the modern 
kingdom of Nepal, going as far back ' as his eleventh ancestor 
and as far down as his grandsons. The paper concludes with an 
account of the author and the many works composed by him. 

The Chairman called upon the following to show and 
comment upon his exhibit: — 

1. S. K. Chattebji. — A Bengali Reader published in 
Petrograd in 1922. 

This is a Reader in modern Bengali published from Petrograd 
in 1922 by Prof. Michael Tubianski, Lecturer in Bengali in the 
Oriental Academy of Petrograd. There is an introduction in 
Russian and some transcriptions in the Roman script and the 
comparison between Bengali and Sanskrit in parallel columns 
giving a selection from the Hitopadesa in Bengali and some 
pieces from Bengali literature including modern writers. The 
whole thing has been reproduced in lithogi'aph, evidently in 
compiler’s handwriting. This interesting document of the 
language and literature of Bengal in Soviet Russia is noteworthy. 

The Chairman called upon the following to read their 
communications : — - ^ ^ 

1. Chintaharan Chakeavarti. — Sanskrit Manuscripts in 
the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal. 

The Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal is the custodian of one 
of the biggest collections of Sanskrit Manuscripts. History of 
the different collections — Society’s own collections, Government 
collections, Indian Museum collections. Catalogues and notices 
of the Manuscripts. Manuscripts of a general interest: old 
Manuscripts of the 7th-12th conturies; illustrated Manuscripts of 
artistic interest, Manuscripts' of works on the game of chess, on 
warfare, on the Persian language, on stealing, on pornography, on 
veterinary science and on hawking. Sanskrit texts published 
from rare or unique manuscripts belonging to the Society. 
Works published with the help of manuscripts in the possession 
of the Society, ^ ' . ■ ' . , • 



160 


Year-Book E,A,S.B.for 1941. 


[VO'L. 'TUI, 


2. K. 3iqw AS. —Introduction and Acclimatisation and Pros- 
pects of Cultivation on a Commercial Scale of the Twi§ 0%l yielding 
Trees in India. 

Tung oil yielding trees belong to the genus Aleurites of tlio 
family of Enpliorbicese. There are 5 species known to sciences 
Of these — 3 species -were introduced to the Botanic Oaiticui 
about I a century ago. Prolonged experiments and acclimatisa- 
tion of these species in India indicate that Aleurites Fordii and 
Aleurites Montana can be grown in the plains, and also two 
other species, A. moluccana and trisperma, are found to grow 
up to a full-size tree. 

About half a ton of seeds was received in 1931 froiti the 
Eoyal Botanic Garden, Kew. These were distributed to the 
different provinces of India for experimental cultivation in order 
to ascertain which part of the country proves more favoural)le 
for their cultivation. Most of the recipients were different Tc^a 
Estates in Assam. Records of successful cultivation are available 
from the Indian Lac Research Institute, Ranchi, and. Sabya 
Division, Ranchi. The Bhooteachang Tea Company Ld. have 
also been very successful in the cultivation of both A. Fordii and 
A. Montana. The Mysore State in South India also cultivated 
the Tung oil yielding tree with success. 

The analysis of the oil establishes that the standard of Indian 
oil extracted from the seeds of A. Fordii, A. Montana and 
A. Moluccana are fairly of a high standard — almost as high as 
that of Chinese oil. 

Different methods of cultivation have been adopted in the 
different areas and in some cases manuring has been taken, 
recourse to. It must, however, be remembered that ultimately 
the cultivation of the tung oil tree will have to be left in the 
hands of villagers, who can ill-afford to spend money in manuring 
and taking other expensive steps in cultivating the tre<\ 
Cultivation of resisting species whicli can be grown without 
much attention and care should therefore be encouraged. 

The results of cultivation in the different parts of the country 
during the last decade indicate that A. Montana is more vigorous 
and disease resistant species. It can he grown easily in well- 
drained soil along the hill-side from an elevation of 1,500 to 
4,000 ft. with considerable success. The yield of the fruits is 
also much higher than that of A. Fordii. A. Moluccana, as 
experiments for the last so many years in the Botanic Garden 
show, is another hardier species which is expected to grow easily 
under the soil and climatic conditions of the plains of Bengal, 
Behar, Assam and South India. 

The yield of fruits depends on several factors. 

From the data gathered hitherto from many sources I am 
now in a position to declare that there is sufficient prospect of 
successful cultivation on a commercial scale, of tung oil trees 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly MeeU7igs. 


161 


particularly J., Montana and A. Moluccana. They can be 
grown in the village shrubberies, in the different Tea estates for 
plantation purpose or as shade trees and along the portions of 
the hill-sides which are not productive enough for other profit- 
able plantations. Viable resistant seeds yielding larger 
quantity of oil may be obtained from experimental cifitivation 
which may conveniently be undertaken by the Forest Department 
in suitable areas. Tung oil or as it is commonly known the 
Chinese Wood Oil is of considerable commercial value. There is 
scarcity of this oil nowadays due to the war in China — ^the 
chief source of supply. The United States of America imported 
tung oil of the value of Rs. 53,514,342 about four years ago. 
Some time about 10 years ago 50,000 tons of tung oil was exported 
from China to the United States and about 4,000 tons to the 
United Kingdom. The various uses of the tung oil, such as in 
connection with the electrical industry, in the manufacture of oil 
cloth, water proof, Chinese ink, etc., are well known. It is 
invaluable in the manufacture of paints and varnishes. 

There is not much difficulty in the disposal of any possible 
surplus production as the Advisory Committee on oils and oilseeds 
(Sub-Committee on Tung Oil) of the Imperial Institute, London, 
offers sufficient facilities for the marketing of the tung nuts. 

The Chairman announced that the Annual Meeting of the 
Society would be held on Monday, the 3rd February 1941, and 
invited the members present to communicate with the General 
Secretary the names and addresses of non-members to whom they 
would wish invitation to he issued. 

— O — 

FEBRUARY 

An Ordinary Monthly meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 3rd, immediately after the 
termination of the Annual Meeting, for the election of Ordinary 
Members and transaction of business. 

Present 

The Hok’ble Mb. Justice John Lobt- Williams, Kt., K.C. 
President, in the Chair. 

Members : 

Biswas, Dr. K. P. Haq, Prof. M. M. 

Brown, Mr. Percy Mukherjee, Dr. J . N. 

Chakladar, Prof. H. C. Nag, Dr. K. 

Chatterji, Dr. S. K. Pasricha, Major C. L. 

Chopra, Bt.-Col. Sir R. N. . Prashad, Dr. B. 

Edgley, Hon. Mr. Justice N. G. A. Saha, Dr. M. N. 

Guha, Dr. B. S. Vedantatirtha, Mr. V. 

West, Mr. W. D. 



162 


Year-Book B.A,S.B. for 1941. 


[VO'L. VIIIj 


The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The General Secretary announced that the |)rese!itatioiis of 
books, etc., received since the last meeting wonkl be exliibited in 
the next monthly meeting. 

The General Secretary announced that tlie ibllowing fiv"e 
candidates would be balloted for as Ordinary Members:— 


(1) Bizvi, Moulvi Syed Kasim Hasan, M.A., Miuishi Fazifi B.T,^ 
Author, Journalist and Teacher, Najafgarh, Delhi. 

Proposer: B. S. Giiha. 

Seconder: J. C. De. 

(2) Tfihedi, B. F., M.B. (CaL), D.B. (Load.), Professor of Pathology, 
Medical College, Calcutta and Bacteriologist to the Govoriimeut of Bengal 
Medical College, Calcutta. 

Proposer; C* L. Pasricha. 

Seconder: B, S. Guha. 

(3) Eeddy, B. Banga, Joint Revenue Secretary, H.E.H, the NizmiFs 
Government, Bholakpur, Secmiderahad, Deccan. 

Proposer: J. C. De. 

Seconder; B. S. Guha. 

(4) Ba>y, Nirod Bhushan, Professor of History, A.M. College, Subura 
Road, Mymensingh. 

Proposer; B. S. Guha. 

Seconder; J. C. De. 

(5) Shastri, Gangeyanarottam, Kavyatirtlm, Kavicakracuihunani, 
Landholder, Gangeya Bhawan, 280, Chittaranjan Avenue, Calcutta.. 

Proposer ; Hirendranath Datta. 

Seconder: Chintaharan Chakravarti. 

The General Secretary announced tliat since tlic? prtndouH 
meeting: (a) there had been no loss of inomhcrB eitlier l')y death 
or by resignation; (6) there had been no lapses of clectioii tiiwh^r 
Rule 9; and (c) there had been no withdrawals of afiplicatioii. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for the 
election of the Ordinary Members and declared that ail tlie 
candidates had been duly elected. 



1942 ] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


163 - 


march 

All Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 3rd, at 5 p.m. 


Peesent 


Baiki Peashad, . Esq., D.Sc., F.Z.S., P.R.S.E., F.N.I.,, 
F.R«A,S.B., Honorary Treasurer, in the Chair. 


Members : 

Bose, Mr. S. M. 
Bruce, Lt. A. E. R. 
Chaltravarti, Prof. C. 
Chatter] ee, Mr. B. C. 
Be, Mr. J. C. 

Guha, Dr. B. S. 
Hobbs, Major H. 


Hora, Dr. S. L. 
Majumdar, Mr. J. M. 
Mukherjee, Dr. J. N. 
Pasricha, Major C. L. 
Saha, Dr. M. N. 
Sastri, Mr. G. N. 
Tgibedi, Mr. B. P. 
West, Mr. W. D. 


Visitors : 


Sen-Gupta, Mr. P. C. Szclechaw, Mr. M. 


The minutes of the last meeting were read and confiimed. 

The General Secretary announced receipt of the following 
ten presentations of books, etc. which had been placed on the 
table for inspection : — 

(1) From Government of India — ‘Manual of Rules regulating access 
to Archives in India and Europe’. 

(2) From Mr. P. B. Chakravarti — ‘Doctrine of Sakti in Indian 
Literature ’. 

(3) From Mr. D. J. P. Andrade — ‘The Portuguese and P. John of 
Abyssinia’. 

(4) From Mr. V. Melkonian — ‘The Grass-folk or Motes on Bhaktiaries’, 

(5) From Government of Madras — ‘Annual Report on South Indian 
EiDigraphy 

(6) From Trustees Bashford Dean Memorial— ‘Archaic fishes’. 

(7) From Koninlisch Bataviaasch Genootschap, Java — ‘Beschrijving 
der Handschiften’. 

(8) From Trustees Gibb Memorial Series — ‘Mathnawi of Jalalludin 
Rume, IV, 8’. 

(9) From Dr. M. Z. Siddiqi — ^‘As-Saiyarul Hathith. 

(10) From Trustees Gibb Memorial Series — ^‘Kitab-Ar-Riaya’. 

The General Secretary announced that the following two 
candidates would be balloted for as Ordinary Members : — 

(6) Mitra, Miss Priti, M.A., Research Student, 14, Chowringhe© 
Terrace, Calcutta. 

y 

Proposer: J. C. De. 

Seconder; Ohintaharan Chakravarti. 


(7) Hasan, Manzoor, M.A., M.O.L., Munshi Fazil (Punjab University),, 
Lieut., A.I.R.O., 136, Jhowtola Road, Calcutta. 

Proposer: A. E. R. Bruce. 

Seconder; Claude Isoh-WalL 



164 


Year^Book R.A.S.B.for 1941. 


[VOL, VIII, 


The General Secretary reported that there had been no 
loss of membership since the previous meeting by rasigiiatioin 

The General Secretary announced tlio following loss of 
membership, since the previous meeting, by doatli:— 

Dr. Suahii Kumar Mukherjee (Oidinary Member, 1927), 

The General Secretary reported that since the previous 
meeting there had been no lapses of election, under Rule 9 
and that there had been no withdrawals of application. 

The General Secretary announced the composition of 
various Standing Committees of the Society for 1941-42 to be as 
follows : — 


Finance Committee : 

President 
General Secretary 
Treasurer 

Dr. C. 8. Fox. 

Dr. S. C. Law. 

Dr. 8. P. Mookerjee. 
Dr. J. JST. Mukherjee. 
Major C. L. Pasricha. 
Mr. C. W. Garner. 


^ Ex-officio. 


Library Committee : 

President 

General Secretary > Ex-officio, 

Treasurer ) 

Philological \ 

Jt. Philological / 

Biological I 

Physical Science 1 

Anthropological ) 

Medical | Secretaries. 

Library I 

Philosophical ] 

Historical and Archaeological • 

Khan Bahadur K. M. Asadullab 
Prof. M, Z. Siddiqi. 


Publication Committee : 

President 1 

Gleneral Secretary > Ex-officio, 

Treasurer J 

Philological 
Jt. Philological 
Biological 
Physical Science 

Anthropological iSecretaries. 

Medical ■ | 

Library . | 

Philosophical I 

Historical and Archaeological / 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


165 


Bibliotheca Indica Committee : 

President 1 

General Secretary V Ex-officio. 

Treasurer J 

Dr. S. K. Chatter ji. 

Prof. M. Mahfuz-nl Haq. 

Dr. B. C. Law. 

Sir S, Eadhakrishnan, 

Sir J adunath Sarkar. 

Dr. M. Z. Siddiqi. 

Hon, Mr. Justice G. A. Edgley. 

Mr. T. N. Eamchandran. 

Prof. V. Vedantatirtha. 

The Chairman caRed upon the foRowing to read their 
papers : — 

1. C. L. Pasbicha. — A Note on the History of Bacteriology 
and some of the Early Worlcers in India. 

After briefly indicating the growth of the science of 
bacteriology during the nineteenth century, short biographical 
records are given of seventeen of the earlier workers in bacterio- 
logy who came to India. These workers contributed in no smaR 
measure to the development of the science of bacteriology more 
particularly in applied medical bacteriology. India has played an 
important role in two ways, firstly the presence of epidemic 
diseases and secondly the facRities for large scale trials under 
controRed conditions and with reasonable faciHties for coRecting 
data. The fact that of the 330 early workers who have found 
place in Bulloch’s history of bacteriology seventeen workers 
came to India is suflQ.cient justification for India to feel proud of 
the facilities that she had been able to offer these workers and 
thus to the development of the science of bacteriology. 

2. P. C. Sbe-Gxjpta. — The Solar Eclipse in the Rg- Yeda and 
the Date of Atri. 

This paper presents a solution of an unsolved problem in 
Indian Chronology. The first attempt was made by the late 
Prof. Ludwig of Prague in May of the year 1855 A.D. in his 
paper "On the mention of solar eclipses in the Rg-veda’, written 
with the assistance of the Viennese astronomer Oppolzer. In 
the JAOS of the same year for October, Whitney severely cri- 
ticised the paper and concluded by saying "that no result 
possessing even a presumptive value as bearing on ancient 
Hindu chronology has been reached by his investigation’. 
Lanman wrote a paper in the Pestscrift-Roth in the year 1893 
pointing out a paraRel to the Rg-veda solar eclipse in the Buddhist 
work Samyuhta Nilcdya, II, 1, 10. Mr. Sen-Gupta is not aware of 
the work of other researchers who may have made an attempt 
to solve this problem. 

II 



166 


Year-Book EAB.B.for 1.94L 


[voL. viri, 


The present author has evolved from the Rg-veda and the 
Rgveda Brahmaiias that the solar eclipse described in the 
Rg-veda V, 40, (a) must have happened either on tlic correctly 
determined summer solstice day or on the day following, (b) tiiat 
it was a central solar eclipse, (c) it ended in the fourth, part of the 
day of the meridian of Kurnksetra, (d) it was observcKl by Atri 
from the foot of a snow capped peak either of the Himalayas 
or of the Karakoram range, (e) that at the place of Atri the 
eclipse did not reach the totality and (/) that the eclipse must 
have happened between 4000 B.C, and 2400 B.C., when the word 
Visuvant had its oldest meaning, viz,, the summer solstice day. 
Mj'. Sen-Gupta has done, according to his estimate, a complete 
survey of all the central solar eclipses happening on the sumnier 
solstice day within the above range and has found that the 
eclipse in question admits of a unique solution — that it happened 
on the 26th July, 3928 B.C., and no other central solar eclipse 
occurring within the range established meets all the conditions set 
forth above. 

The author comes to the conclusion that this 3928 B.C,, 
was about the time of the first Aiyan colonisation of the Punjab. 
The date does not admit of being raised or lowered, if the most 
up to date astronomical constants are correct for all times past, 
present or future. 

The circumstances of this eclipse have been calculated for 
the meridian of Kuruksetra and for the latitudes of 33°! N and 
N. 

The paper has three appendices, in the last of which 
Mr. Sen-Gupta has shown a method of finding a central solar 
eclipse near a past date. 

3. MiinnisrDAMTOABi CHA.KRAVAETY.~066*en;tt^fon.s‘ on Pwa 
Myxosporidians Zschokkella lissomysi n, from the gall-bladder 
of the tortoise Lissemys punctata amd Zschok kella auerba-cibi ( W eMl) 
from the gall-bladder of Bufo melanostictiis with a note on the ge..nns 
Zschokkella anorbach. 

A discussion on the genera Oystodise/m and Zschokkella is 
dealt with in detail. 

An amended definition of the genus Zschokkella, especiiilly in 
reference to the characteristics of the spores, is proposed. 

A new myxosporidian, Zschokkella lissem/ysi n. sp. is describexi 
in detail. The main observations are; 

(a) amoeboid uninucleate trophozoites are described; 

(5) the spores are ovoidal and are characterised by the 
presence of a lid, striations on the shell, equal and 
spherical polar capsules, each of which is provided 
with a fine duet. 


XIB 



1942] _ Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 167 

Zschokkella prasadi reported by Ray is synonymous with 
Zschokkella auerbachi (Weill) as the spores of these two myxo- 
sporidians resemble one another. 

Zschokkella auerbachi (Weill) is reported and described from 
a new host Rana Umnocharis. 

4. N. B. Roy. — Futuhat-i-Firuz-shahi. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for election 
of the Ordinary Members and declared that all the candidates 
had been duly elected. 

APRIL 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 7th, at 5-30 p.m. 


Present 

SuNiTi Kumar Chatterji, Esq., M.A., D.Litt., F.R.A.S.B.,, 
Philological Secretary, in the Chair. 

Members : 

Bruce, Lt. A. E. R. 

Chakravarti, Prof. C. 

Chatterjee, Mr. B. C. 

Cleghorn, Miss M. L. 

Do, Mr, J. C. 

Visitor : 

Cleghorn, Miss 0. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The General Secretary announced receipt of the following 
fourteen presentations of books, etc. which had been placed on 
the table for inspection: — 

(1) From Trustees of Prince of Wales Museum, Bombay — ‘Annual 
Report, 1939-40’. 

(2) From D. J. P. Andrade, Esq. — ‘ Historical study of the Rosary’. 

(3) From Government of India — ^‘Calendar of Persian Correspondence, 
VoLVII’, 

(4--1I) From President, Advaita Ashrama, Almora — ^‘Complete 
works of Swami Vivekananda, 7 vols. and index’. 

(12) From Madras University-— ‘Origin and early history of Saivaism 
in South India’. 

(13) From local American Consul — ^‘Tepe Hissan Excavations of 
1931’. 

(14) From Calcutta University — ^‘Buddhi and Bodhi’. 


Guha, Dr. B. S. 

Hobbs, Major H. 

Hosain, Dr. M. H. 

Macfarlane, (Mrs.) Dr. E. W. E. 
Majumdar, Mr. J. M. 



168 


Year-Book B.A.S.B. for 1941. 


[VOL. vra, 


The General Secretary announced that the following six 
candidates would be balloted for as Ordinary Members: — 

(8) Jamal-nd-Din, Liewt.-Gol., I.M.S., Civil Surgoon, Rawalpindi. 

Proposer: M. Hidayat Hosain, 

Seconder: B, S. Guha. 

(9) Melkoniany Vartan, €. 173, Margil, Basra, Iraq. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder: M. Hidayafc Hosain. 

(10) Roxburgh, The Hon^hle Mr, Justice T> J. P., C.I.E!., I.C.S., 
Additional Judge, Higli Court, Calcutta, 6, Lee Road, Calcutta. 

Proposer: The Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. Q-, A, Edgley. 

Seconder: .L, R. Fawcus. 

(11) Baker, Ernest Brain Mindley, Addl. Secretary to H.E. the 

Governor, 6, Wellesley Place, Calcutta. 

Proposer: The Hon’fole Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley. 

Seconder: L. R. Fawcus. 


(12) Malik, A, R,, Senior Marketing Officer, Bengal, 11, Circus Row, 
P.O. Circus, Calcutta. 

Proposer; S. L. Hora. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 


(13) Vicary, Thomas Q,, M.A. (Lond.), A.K.C., Missionary, Principal, 
Hnion Christian Training College, Berhampore, Bengal. 

Proposer; W. J. Culshaw. 

Seconder; B. S. Guha. 

The General Secretary announced the following loss of 
membership since the previous meeting by death: 

Sir Georg© A. Grierson, O.M. (Hon. Follow, 1904). 

The General Secretary reported that since tbe previous 
meeting: (a) there had been no loss of memlx'^rship l;)y rc^isigna^ 
tion; (6) there had been no lapses of election under Rule 9; and 
(c) there had been no withdrawals of application. 

The Chairman called upon the following to read theii* 
papers: — 

1. Christoph woh FnRER-HAiMEHnoRP.--~Sca^ofial 

Nomadism and Economics of the Chenchus of Hyderabad. 

Of all the aboriginal tribes of the Deccan the Chenchus 
■are racially and culturally the most primitive, and though at 
present they form but a small group, they may be considered as 
representative of those larger populations of hunters and collectors 



1942] 


OfdiTMry Monthly Meetings. 


169 


that roamed the jungles of the tableland when the first invaders 
of higher culture penetrated the country south of the Godavari* 
While other tribes lost their social and economic independence 
and were gradually absorbed within the cultural system of the 
new-comers, the Chenchus of Hyderabad remained comparatively 
isolated until recent times. During the last few generations, 
however, with the exploitation of the forest and the intrusion of 
outsiders this isolation had greatly disappeared. These ‘Jungle 
Chenchus ^ as they may be conveniently called, as distinct from 
the Chenchus dwelling in or near the villages of Telugu cultivators 
or in the settlements created by the Dorest Authorities of Madras, 
number at present 426 men, women and children. They inhabit 
the upper part of the Amrahbad Plateau in the Malibubiiagar 
District of Hyderabad, an area of about 320 sq. miles on the 
northern baiik of the Kristna River, 

The Chenchus still speak of a time when their ancestors 
owned no houses, but lived under trees and in rock shelters. 
That this does not lie very far is borne out by a passage in 
Ferishta’s ‘History of the Deccan’, who describes them as 
‘living in caverns and under the shady branches of trees’. 

The economic system of the Chenchus is essentially that of a 
tribe of hunters and food collectors. For the Chenchus depend 
for nine-tenths of their food-supply on that which nature provides 
and it is only a limited number of families, who by owning a 
few domestic animals are now in the process of emerging from 
this lowest and primeval stage of human development. 

Before the Chenchus came in contact with races of higher 
developed culture, trade and barter was probably non:existent. 
But this condition must have prevailed in very early times, for 
during the immediate past the Chenchus must have depended on 
barter to obtain the knives, axe-heads and iron for arrow-tips,, 
which have formed indispensable parts of their equipment. The 
commodities he tendered in exchange for these goods were 
undoubtedly forest produce, such as honey, wax and fruits, and 
sometimes perhaps even venison. Growing contact with their 
neighbours has induced many of them to leave the jungle and 
settle in the villages of the plains. But those, who to-day 
still live in the hiUs, cling tenaciously to their old forest life and 
scorn the idea that they too might exchange it for a more settled 
existence. Their old social organisation has remained intact and 
their economics are still what they have been since time imme» 
morial — ^th© economics of a tribe of primitive food-gatherers. 

2. W. J. CiTLSHAW. — Some Beliefs and Customs relating ^to 
Birth among the Santals. 

In this paper an account is given of preparations for the 
birth of a child in a Santal home, including the taboos observed 
by the parents during the mother’s pregnancy, and various 



170 Year^Booh for 1941 . [vol. viii, 

beliefs relating to it. An account is given of the mode of birtlij 
and also of the ceremonies which follow it. This is accompanied 
by a translation of an account givcn-by a Santal seventy years ago, 
and a coinparison of it with present conditions. Tlie rites ai*e 
viewed from the points of view of the infant, tiis parents and tiie 
community. 

Some account is also given of Santal customs relative to 
naming, and a reference is made to the problem of illegitimate 
children. 

3. S. L. Hoba and J. C. Gupta. — On a Collection of Fish 
from Kalimpong Duars and Siliguri Terai, North Bengal, 

Attention is directed to the great importance of tlio study of 
the fish“fauna of the Eastern Himalayas and notes are given on 
the physical conditions of the parts of the Kalimpong Duars and 
of the Siliguri Terai in which collections wca*e made. Tlie fish- 
fauna is roughly divided into ecological associiitions and a 
reference is also made to the methods of collecting fish. 

A list of 58 species is given and additions and alterations 
made in a list of 131 species of fish of Northern Bengal published 
by Messrs. Shaw and Shebbeare in 1938 are explained. Taxono- 
mic notes are given on Lepidocephalus guntea (Hamilton), 
Semiplotus semiplotus (McClelland) and Barbus (Puntius) titius 
Hamilton. 


The Chairman called upon the following to show and com- 
ment upon his exhibit: — 

1. J. C. De. — Letter to Lord Clive dated the Mh July, 1766. 

A letter was addressed to Lord Clive and Council of Fort 
William on the 4th July, 1766, by Walter Wilkins, apparently a 
salt-agent stationed at ‘ Luckipore A ship called the Falmouth 
IndiamaiC had become hstranded’ somewhere near tlie mouths 
of the * Raymungal and Mutwalla Rivers b and the Presidcint and 
Council were anxious to save the passengers and crew of thf’^ 
vessel. They had written to Wilkins on the 30th June, and 
'conformable to (their) orders’ Wilkins had sent 'two boats with 
an European’ to the river-mouths with 'instructions to bo 
extremely vigilant in making constant signals by day and night 
as a guide to the sloops ’ entrusted with the rescue- work. Circular 
letters were also forwarded by Wilkins to various 'Zemindars 
bordering on the Sea Coast’ to help the distressed. 

The letter now exhibited was found among the old files of 
the Society. It is an old and very nicely made copy of the 
original letter written under the direction of 'H. R. R.’ The 
paper has turned yeUow through age and was extremely brittle 
when first .seen. It has now ■ been repaired. It bears the 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


171 


Government of India arms and there are two short notes wiitteii 
by ‘H. R. R. ’ on the third page. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for election 
of the Ordinary Members and declared that ail the candidates 
had been duly elected. 


MAY 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 5th, at 5-30 p.m’ 

Present 

Baini Prashad, Esq., D.Sc., E.Z.S., P.R.S.E., F.N.I., 
F.R.A.S.B., Honorary Treasurer, in the Chair. 

Members : 

Ghakravarti, Prof. 0. Haq, Prof. M. M. 

Chatterji, Dr. S. K. Hobbs, Major H. 

Chopra, Dr. B. IST. Hora, Dr. S. L. 

Edgley, Hon’ble Mr. Justice G. A. Hosain, Dr. M. H. 

Guha, Dr, B. S. Macfarlane, (Mrs.) Dr. E. W. E. 

Gurner, Mr. C. W. Rahman, Prof. S. K. 

Skldiqi, Dr. M. Z. 

Visitor : 

Prashad, Mrs. B.. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and .confirmed. 

The General Secretary announced receipt of the following 
six presentations of books, etc. which had been placed on the 
table for inspection: — 

(1-2) Indian Science Congress Association — ‘Proceedings 27th Indian 
Science Congress 2 copies. 

(3-4) American Consul, Calcutta — ‘Exposition de Fart populaire 
Ukrauiien^ and ‘Studien over Palmyreach Skulpturh 

(5) Dept, of Education, Health and Lands, Government of India — 
‘The Voyages of Sir James Lankaster’. 

(6) Swami Harisarananda Vaidya — ‘Kupi-pakkya-Rasa-ninnan- 
vigyan’. 

The General Secretary announced that the following candi- 
date would be balloted for as an Ordinary Member: — 

(13) Kirby, Edward Stuart, Capt., Ph.D., B.Sc. (Econ.), F.R.Econ.S., 
Indian Army, 12, Russell Street, Calcutta. 

Proposer: J. C. De. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 

The Chairman called upon Hr. S. K. Chatterji to read an 
obituary notice of the late Sir George A. Grierson, O.M. (See 
page 196.) 



172 


Tear-Booh B.AB.B. for 1941. 


[VOL. VIII, 


The General Secretary reported that since the previous 
meeting: (a) there had been no loss of membership either by 
death or by resignation ; (6) there had boon no lapses of olectrioii 
under Rule 9 ; and (c) there had boon no ■\vlthdrawals of applica- 
tion. 

The Chairman announced the retirement of Pandit 
Agliornath Bhattacharya, Head Pandit, Society’s Sanskrit 
Department, due to ill-health and old-age; and the appointment 
of Babu Girijanath Bhattacharya as Pandit in the Sanskrit 
Section on probation for six months in the junior grade on an 
initial salary of Rs.50. 

The Chairman called upon the follovring to read tlieir 
papers : — 

1. M. I. Borah.— Life and Work of Awir Hasan 
Dihlavi. 

Amir Hasan Dihlavi, son of a Persian emigrant to India, 
named 'Ala-u’d-Din Sijzi, was one of the greatest Indo»P(irsian 
poets who flourished during the late seventh and early ciglith 
centuries of the Hijra. He was born at Delhi in A.H. 615 (A.D, 
1253), during the reign of Nasir-u’d-Din Miihmnd. Hu began to 
compose verses when he was a boy of thirteen, and dcwoted 
himself to the art of poesy for a period of fifty yeai'S. In the 
prime of his youth he attached himself to the court of Ghias-u’d- 
Din Balban and his son, Prince Muhammad, in whose service he 
spent five years at Multan, together with his contemporary 
Amir Khusraw. After the fall of the House of Balban he 
lived under the patronage of the Khilji Kings, and at the age of 
fifty-six he became a disciple of Nizam-u’d-Din A wliya. He dicxl 
in A.H. 729 (A.D. 1328) at Dawlatabad when Sultfin M'uhammad 
Tughlaq transferred the capital from Delhi and forced its 
population to migrate there. 

His extant poetical works are contained in a Dwfm whicjli 
comprises about ten thousand couplets, cont^iining Qa§%dm, 
Ghazals, Ruhd%s, and a romantic Math navi, called 

HikdyaUi^ Asliiq4’Ndguf%. His prose works that have survived 
are a short piece of Marfhiya written on the occasion of the 
death of Prince Muhammad, and the Fawa'id-uLFu'di, a 
collection of discourses made by his spiritual guide at a number 
of successive meetings held during the years A.H. 707-722 (A.D. 
1307-22). 

2. K. G. ^ ^ Chatterjbe.— A Psychological Study of 
Arithmetical Ability with Reference to the Students of Secondary 
Schools. 

The work extended over a period of two years 1939 and 
1940, and samples of students in Bihar and Bengal wore tested 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


173 


ill Aritlmietic under certain specific conditions uniformly 
observed. It contains three parts, namely: (1) a standardised 
objective test in 'reasoning^ arithmetic on grade-norm basis, 
(2) a Psychological analysis of students'" responses, and (3) a 
comparative study of Arithmetical abilities of students in Bihar 
and BeiigaL 73 graduates and 2,404 school students, 1,520 of 
Patna and 884 of Calcutta, were tested and 29,371 correct 
responses were carefully scrutinised in connection with the work. 

The test has been standardised for the four top classes of 
the High Schools of Bihar and Bengal, the process of standardisa- 
tion going through elaborate statistical analysis. Parameters, 
e.g., mean, median, quartile, sigma, etc., were computed and 
tabulated for each group and grade-norms determined therefrom. 
The test has been proved to satisfy the statistical criteria of 
validity, reliability, representativeness of samples, objectivity and 
ease of administration and scoring, — ^the proof being supported 
by tables and graphs. 

About 30 thousand correct responses to the questions were 
scrutinised and their p.c.’s calculated class b}^ class and question 
by question, to study psychologically the rate of growth, of the 
students’ abilities in arithmetic, the difficulty values of the 
questions and their educational implications. 

A comparative study of the arithmetical abilities of the 
Bihar and Bengal students clearly shows that in both cases 
about a year’s progress is lost to them during the first two years 
of their career in the four top classes of the High Schools. Among 
other things it has come to light that the Bihar students are a 
bit more serious and laborious than their brothers in Bengal, and 
that although the innate, general ability of the latter, on the 
average, is quite high, they are prevented from bringing this 
into full play due to various extraneous factors. 

The Chairman called upon the following to make his com* 
munication: — 

1. Baini Pbashab. — Birth of Bur Jahdn. 

The published accounts in regard to the birth of the Empress 
Nur Jahan, based on some of the contemporary records, are 
unfortunately very conflicting. An important reference in 
ghafi Mian’s famous history has apparently escaped the attention 
of previous workers ; this clears up the romance in regard to the 
birth of this great personality, and in view of the information 
having been supplied to the author by an eye-witness should be 
accepted as authentic. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for election 
of the Ordinary Member and declared that the candidate had 
been duly elected. 



174 


Year-Book B.A.S.Bjor 1941. 


[VOL. VIII 


JUNE 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Eoyal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 2nd, at 5 p.m,. 

Present 

Baini Pbashad, Esq., D.Sc., E.Z.S., P.R.S.E., F.N.I., 
E.R.A.S.B., Hon. Treasurer, in the Chair. 

Members : 

Agharkar, Dr. S. P. 

Bruce, Lt. A. E. R. 

Chakra varti, Prof. C, 

Chatterji, Prof. B. R 
Chatterjee, Mr. P. P. 

De, Mr. J. C. 

Visitors : 

Datta, Mr. J. M. Reudall, Mr. J. H. 

Greval, Lt.-Col. S. D. S. Roonwal, Dr. M. L. 

Greval, Mrs, Kirby, Capt. D. E. S. 

The minntes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 
The General Secretary announced receipt of the following 
thirteen presentations of books, etc. which had been placed on 
the table for inspection: — 

(1) From George Alleu and Unwin, Ltd. — Islam and Christianity*. 

(2) From Mr. Tokiizo Saito — ‘A primer of modern J apanose language k 

(3) From University of Pennsylvania Press — ^‘The Wragfiyat of 
Ahmed Pasha*. 

(4) From Director of Public Instruction, C.P.— ‘Korku -Hindi -Eng. - 
Dictionary’. 

(5) From Dr. E. W. Macfarlane—Love in the Western World*. 

(6) From Konink. Bataviaasch Genootsohaf, etc.— Oatalogtisder 
Bibliotheek*. 

(7-8) From R,A.S,B.-~-*Tndex to Vol. 3 of Tabaqat-i-Akbari, Eng.*. 
(9-13) From R.A.S.B.-— ‘Des. Gat. of Sans. MSS., Vol. 8, pt. 2*, 
Dharmabindu, Vol. I, fasc, 2 ‘ Avadanakalpalata, Vol. I, fasc. 2*/Atma- 
tatvaviveka, fasc. 6’, and ‘Varnaratnakara*. 

The General Secretary announced that the following tliree 
candidates would be balloted for as Ordinary Members:— 

(15) Laxmmh, Mannay Verikat, Military Contractor, c/o Lieut, 
M. G. Raja, A.I.R.O., Assistant Garrison Engineer, Ahmednagar. 

proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder: J. C, De. 


(16) Paterson, Pdward Alford, Assistant, Jardine, Skinner & Co., 
4, Clive Row, Calcutta. 

Proposer; Sir John Lort-Williams. 

Seconder: The Hon’ble Mr. Justice H. G. A. Edgley* 


Guha, Dr. B. S. 

Hora, Dr. S. L. 

Hosain, Dr. M. H. 

Macfarlano, (Mrs.) Dr. E. W. E. 
Rahman, Prof. S. K. 
and others. 



1942] Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 175 

(17) Husen, J.., M.R.A.S., Medical Practitioner, 24, Zakaria 

street, Calcutta. 

Proposer: M. Hidayat Hosain. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 

The General Secretary announced the following loss of 
membership since the previous meeting by death : — 

1. Prof. 0. R. Lanman (An Hony. Fellow, 1896). 

2. Sir James Frazer (An Hony. Fellow, 1920). 

The General Secretary reported the following loss of member- 
ship since the previous meeting by resignation : — 

1. L. S. Dugin (An Associate Member, 1934). 

The General Secretary reported that since the previous 
meeting there had been no lapses of election under E-ule 9 and 
there had been no withdrawals of application. 

In accordance with Rule 48((Z) the General Secretary reported 
for confirmation b}?^ the meeting the following resolutions passed 
by the Council in its last meeting : — 

(1) ^ Mr. J. C. De be not confirmed but ofiered six months’ extension 
on Ms present salary of Rs.200 per month.’ 

(2) ‘Due to light restrictions the library of the Society will remain 
open up to 6 p.m. instead of 7 p.m. from 2nd June, 1941.’ 

Order: Confirm. 

The Chairman called upon the following to read his paper : — 

1. P. Sen. — Observations' on the method of Carp Culture in 
the so-called Salt Lakes near Calcutta, with a note on the Fish 
Fauna of the Lakes. 

The author refers to the physical changes undergone by 
the so-called Salt Lakes near Calcutta since the silting up of 
the tidal river Bidyadhari, of which the Salt Lakes formed the 
spill area. As a result, the salinity of the Lakes has decreased 
considerably and in consequence the fish-fauna has also changed. 
Instead of estuarine forms, such as Lates calcarifer, Mugil parsia, 
Hilsa ilisha, etc. which used to occur in the Lakes, the fauna 
now consists mainly of freshwater species. A list of 37 species 
of fish and 6 species of prawns is given. 

The present practice of the culture of carps in the Salt 
Lakes is described, and attention is particularly directed to the 
f^<id to the fingerlings and the methods adopted in 
protecting the fry from their natural enemies. 

The Chairman called upon the following to show and explain 
the exhibit : — 

1. M. Hidayat Hosain , — Tafslr Mshupurl. 

Among the many Arabic and Persian MSS. in the collection 
of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal there is a Persian 



176 


Year-Book R.AB.B. for 194L 


[voL» vin. 


commentary of tlie Qur'an, named, Tafsir Ninhapuri. Uiifor- 
tunately this is a fragment of the work' — ^tho beginning anrl tlie- 
eiid are wanting. It appears from foL 360, that thf^ aiitlior of 
the work is Muhaimnad bin Mahmud Nisapuri {:in(l fi’orri foL 293, 
he was a pupil of Sadar al-Islain Qadi al-Qodat Mfis^ild. 

I thiiil?: most probably the full name of tiie latter is Mas^fid 
bin 'All bill Ahmad al-Baihaqi, died in A.H. 544 (A.l). 1149.) 
He is also the author of a commentary on the Qur'an whicli. our 
author quotes. (See Yaqut, Irshdd al-Ar^b, voL vii, p. 150.) 
If this assumption is correct then our author floiirislied at the 
latter half of the 6th century Hijra. 

The copy belonging to the Society is ve,ry valuable on 
account of the following reasons : — 

(1) The commentary of the Qur’an mitten in the Persian 
language in the Sixth Century of Hijra is hardly to be found in 
any library. 

(2) It is very elegantly written in beautiful Naskb and the 
verses of the Qur’an are written in bold character, between two 
beautiful drawings, a bigger one on fho margin, and a smaller 
one at the end of the text. 

(3) The fine caligraphy and decoration of the MS. indicate 
that it was written in Bul^ara and was in the library of some 
prince. 

(4) The colophon says that the most competent caligrapher 
with the title of Sayyid al-^affat (Lord of caligrapliers), whose 
name is 'Ali bin Muhammad bin Ahmad al-Adib al-Bukbari, 
has wiitten this copy in A.H. 685 (A.l). 1286), Our copy is 
consequently 655 years old. 

This MS. was in a very dilapidated condition and it was not 
possible to use it. It has now been repaired properly. 

The Chairman called upon the following to make his com- 
mnnicatioii : — 

1. S. L. HOea. — A Hump-’hwcked Catla. 

Malformations or abnormalities in iislies a:re not uniiBual 
and even a casual observer of the supplies reacliing a fish-marked# 
cannot fail to notice them. Some of the abnormalities are due 
to accidental injuries or certain environmental factors and, in 
consequence, can be easily accounted for, while some others are 
more deep-seated or congenital and, therefore, it is sometimes 
dificult to trace their origin. As an instance of the latter kind, 
it may be mentioned that in September, 1939, Mr. R. M. Chatterji 
of the Geological Survey of India presented to the Zoological 
Survey the head of a blind Rohu fish. A detailed study of this 
specimen (K, K. Nair, Rec. Ind, Mus,, XLII, pp. 25-33, text- 
figs. 5, 1940) showed that the brain was defective and asymmetri- 
cal in several respects.' Prom this it was presumed 'that the 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


177 


brain had probably become defective at a very early stage of 
development and, in consequence, the normal growth of the 
eyes was inhibited. The lack of sight, however, had not affected 
the normal mode of life of the fish, as it had grown to a con- 
siderable size; the length of its head being 80*7 mm. 

More recently, Mr. Pulin Krishna Das of the Geological 
Survey presented to the Zoological Survey of India a hump- 
backed Gatla^ which in outward appearance looked almost like a 
large Chanda (one of the Perches), "The size of the specimen, 
418 mm. in total length and 202 mm. in height, indicates that 
the fish was none the worse for the deformity, but had instead, 
size for size, put on much greater weight. Enquiries have shown 
that such a Gatla has never been heard of or seen. The present 
communication is intended to elicit further information from or 
through the members of the Society regarding the frequency of 
occurrence of such abnormalities in our common food fishes. 
After a perusal of the literature, the hump-backed condition of 
Gatla could readily be ascribed to an abnormality of the vertebral 
column, but until a skiagraph of the fish was taken the extent 
of this deformity did not become clear. The X-ray photograph 
taken by Dr. 'M. Miikherji, Radiologist, Campbell Hospital, 
Calcutta, has shown that in the abnormal specimen the vertebral 
column, instead of consisting of a series of individual vertebrae 
(with the exception of the normal compound vertebra comprising 
vertebrae 1 to 4) is composed of a series of compound bones 
without any clear demarkation of the extent of each vertebra. 
The number of vertebrae represented by each compound bone 
can, however, be made out by the number of neural spines and 
ribs or haemal spines attached to each. Such a condition is 
known as coalescence or synostosis of the vertebral centra (vide 
J. P. GemmiU, The Teratology of Fishes, p. 52, Glasgow: 1912). 
It is remarkable that in the whole of the vertebral column there 
is not a single normal vertebra ; each compound bone representing 
from 2 to 5 vertebrae. In Gatla the number of vertebrae is 
about 37 (Nos. 1-4 form the compound vertebra), of theselS are 
trunk vertebrae with ribs and 19 caudal vertebrae with haemal 
spines. The arrangement of these in the hump-backed Gatla 
from front backwards is somewhat as follows : — 

5d"2 -b4Hh3 4"2 4*^ d“4:Hh5’4“fi^ d"! and urostyle. 

Thus there are in all eleven compound bones in the vertebral 
column of the abnormal Gatla. Owing to the compression of the 
vertebral elements the dorsal and anal fins are shifted somewhat 
forwards. The arrangement of the bones connected with the 
caudal fin is also greatly disturbed. 

The preparation of the skeleton of the fish will reveal the 
precise nature of the malformation of the vertebral column 
noted above, and a detailed study of the musculature and nerve 
supply of the vertebrae will show how far the metamerio arrange- 



Year-Book EA,S,B:for 194]. 


178 


[VOL. VIII, 


iiieiit of the other structures has been disturbed l)y tiiis abiioi’- 
iiiality. These studios are now being undertaken. 

The Cliainnaii announced the I'esult of tlie balloti for eiocitioii 
of Ordinary Members and declared that all candidates duly 
elected. 


JULY 


An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the R.oyal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 7th, at 5 P.M. 


Present 

Baini Prashad, Esq., "D.Sc., P.Z.S., E.R.S..E., F.N.L, 

F.R.A.S.B., Honorary Treasurer, in the Cliair. 

Members : 

Agharkar, I)i\ S. P- Macfarlane, (Mrs,) Br, E. W. E* 

Chatterjee, Mr. B. C. Majiimdar, Mr. N. K. 

Ohatterji, Prof. B. R. Malik, Mr. A. R. 

Be, Mr. J. 0. Mitra, Miss Priti 

Edgley, Hon’ble Mr. Justice N. G . A. Mukherjoe, Dr. J. N. 

Ghosh, Mr. P. IST. Nag, Br. Kalidas 

Hobbs, Major H. Saha, Dr. M. N. 

Hosain, Dr, M. H. Sen, Mr. S. C. 

Vedantatirtha, Mr. N. C. 

Visitors : 

Ahmed, Mr. S. Cbaudhuri, Br. J. B. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and (X)iifirrnod. 

The Chairman announced receipt of the following twelve 
presentations of books, etc. which had been i)laoed on the table 
for inspection : — 

(1) Prom Govermnent of India— ‘Annual Report, Arch. Survov, 
1936-37’. 

(2) From Br. F. d© Mello— Von der seele der Indischou FrauL 
(3-5) From Mr. 0. Isch -Wall— ‘Aeschylus’, ‘La Religion, Tom 1-2’ 

and ‘Relativity Thermodynamics and Cosmology’. 

(6) From Arch. Survey, Mysore — ^‘Report for 1938 and 39’. 

(7-8) From Government Press, Madras — ^‘Records of Fort St. George, 
Letters, Vol. 40, and Biary and Consultation, 1753, VoL 81’. 

(9-10) From Government of Assam — ‘Report on Khasi and Jaintia 
Hills’, and Administration of Cossyah and Jynteah’. 

(11)‘ From Imperial Library— Chin Lushai Land 
. (12) From Arch. Bept, Jodhpur — ^‘Marwar ka Itihasa, Vol. 12’. 

The Chairman announced that the following two candidates 
would be balloted for as Ordinary Members 



1942 ] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


179 ” 


(18) Clark j Thomas Welbournet Major, Army Officer, Plassey Mess, 
Fort-William, Calcutta. 

Proposer; J. C. De. 

Seconder: M. H. Hosain. 

(19) Boy, Satis Chandra, M.A. (Lond.), D.P.I., Assam, FaHs 

View, Shillong. 

Proposer': Kalidas Nag. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 

The Chairman announced the following loss of membership 
since the previous meeting by death : — 

1. G. S. Dutt (An Ordinary Member, 1933). 

2. Dr. Eugene Dubois (Recipient of Annandale Memorial Medal 
for 1933.) 

The Chairman called upon Dr. Kalidas Nag to read an 
obituary of the late Prof. 0. R. Lanman — an Hony. Fellow, 1896 
(see page 206). 

The Chairman reported that since the previous meeting 
there had been no loss of membership by resignation, there had 
been no lapses of election under Rule 9, and there had been no 
withdrawals of application. 

The Chairman called upon the following to read their 
papers : — 

1. P. C. Sengupta . — The Gu^ta Era. 

In this paper the author has made a thorough astronomical 
examination of no less than 11 instances of dates as found in the 
Gupta- Valabhi inscriptions and he has shown that the zero year 
of this era was originally almost the same as the Christian year 
319. In times later than that of Aryabhata, viz., 499 A.D. 
the year beginning was, in some cases, changed from the light 
half of Pausct to the light half of Caitra or that the year of this 
era used originally to be reckoned from the winter solstice day,, 
and in times later than 499 A.D. the year came to be begun 
from the vernal equinox day. The zero year of the Gupta era 
is found pn these instances, taken as the same as the Caitra- 
Suhlddi Saka year 241 or 319-20 A.D. One year of the Gupta 
era, which was different in different localities and the Saka 
year 420 A.D., was thus taken equal to 15 or 16 lunations, and 
there happened also in India what is called '^the year of con- 
fusion’ in calendar reform. The paper thus shows that the so- 
called Caitra- Suklddi reckoning of the Hindu year was introduced 
by Aryabhata I ; before his time all the Indian eras reckoned the 
year from the winter solstice day and the Gupta era was 
necessarily of Pausa Suklddi reckoning. 

Mr. Sengupta’s finding corroborates the tradition about 
this era as recorded by Aiberuni, that its zero year was the 



180 


Year-Book B.A.8.B. for 1941. [voL. viii, 

same as 241 of the Saka era of Gaitra &ukla reckoning, of Ms 

time. 

The author claims that his findings are more definite and 
conclusive than those of Dr. Fleet and Diksit, who found this, 
zero year to have varied between 319-”321 A.D. and could not 
prove that the Gupta and the Valabhi eras were but one and 
the same era. Mr, Sengupta trusts that his investigation has 
clearly established this fact as well. 

2. P. G. Senoxipta . — Time Indications in the Baudhayarm 
Srauta Sutra. 

The present paper modifies the author’s interpretation of a 
time reference recorded in this work which he published in ills 
paper on 'Solstice Days in Vedic Literature’ in the JPASBL, 
Vol. IV, 1938, page 429. Mr. Sengupta has in this paper shown 
from 3 distinct references relating to the proper seasons for 
beginning the Rdjasuya, NaJcsatresti and the Pancaiaradlya 
sacrifices as contained in the Baudhdyana Srauta Sutra, that they 
all converge to the mean date, viz., 887-886 E.C. The actual 
days for starting these sacrifices in this year have been 
ascertained by back calculation as ; — 

(1) 886 A.D., Nov. 1 — ^N. Moon day : the Ist day of the 

Indian season of the .Dews — 
Pahcaidradlya sacrifices to start. 

(2) 885 A.D., Feb. 27 — ^N, Moon day : the Indian spring 

begins: Rdjasuya sacrifices to 
start. 

(3) 885 A.D„ March 29 — ^N. Moon day near vernal equinox 

at the end of the first quarter 
of Bharani division: Nah§atresti 
sacrifices to start. 

This year was about the time when the summer solstice 
was at the first point of the AMe^d division and the winter solstice, 
at the middle point of the ^ravai^a division. 

3. Eileen W. E. Maofablane. — Tibetan and Bhotia 
Blood Group Distributions, 

One hundred and twelve mixed Bhutias were grouped at 
Darjeeling, North Bengal. They showed less of Group B than 
of Group A and over 10% of Group AB. 

When those born in Tibet were separated from those born in 
Sikkim or Bengal the former were found to be genetically In 
equiiibriuin and the latter to be racially mixed. 

The Bhotias of Sikkim are known to have interbred with 
the Lepchas. They show three times as much of Group AB as 
the Tibetans, and this increase is at the expense of Group A. 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


181 


The blood group distribution in mixed Bhotias is of the 
same order as that found in the Khasis of Assam. 

A small sample of bloods was typed and indicates that Type 
N is scarce among the Bhotias and that the types are distributed 
a.s among the Bengalis. 

4. S. X. Chakeavabti. — The Sohgaura Copper -plate In- 
scription . 

The Sohgaina eopper-piate inscription, wliieh is written in 
Brahmi character of the Mauryan period, is a circular notice 
relating to famine relief measures, issued by the Council of 
Mahamatras (great officials) of ^ravasti. The upper face of the 
plate contains symbolic devices in three fields. On the lower 
face is the inscription in four lines. The order of the Council of 
Mahamatras is that in times of scarcity food and seeds in the 
royal storehouse are to be distributed, while in times of plenty 
the distribution of the same is to be withheld. The symbolic 
devices in the first field, comprising a leafsome tree and a smaller 
storehouse with a ladle, signify a stage of plenty and, therefore, 
a restricted distribution of food and seeds, while those in the 
third field, consisting of a leafless tree and a larger storehouse 
without a ladle, indicate a drought stage and, therefore, an 
unrestricted distribution of the same. Evidently, it is su- 
atiyayika of the Mauryan Brahmi inscription of Mahasthan 
which is to he understood at the end of the Sohgaura plate. 

The Chairman called upon the following to make their 
communications : — 

1. B. R, Chattebji. — Our Trip to Tholing Monastery in 
Western Tibet [where Atisa converted Ye ses 'od, the King of 
Gu-ge, to Mahdydna Buddhism^). 

Nine hundred years ago Tholing was a rival of Lhassa as 
a centre of culture and learning. But we had no idea of its 
historical importance when we reached this famous monastery 
on 15th August,. 1922. Professor Shiv Ram Kashyap, I.E.S., 
had led our part}- across the Lipu Lekh Pass to Manas Sarovar 
and Kailas. Prom Kailas, instead of going back the way we 
came, we travelled in a south-westerly direction starting from 
the source of the Sutlej near Raksas Tal. After a fortnight’s 
journey from Kailas we reached Tholing (Totling of Sven Hedin). 
The approach to the great monastery, situated in the deep gorge 
of the Sutlej, was through an intricate labrynth of deep canyons. 
Both Sven Hedin and Tucci have described it as a nightmare 
landscape. . ' 

■ The next day we obtained permission to enter what Tucci 
calls the White Temple at Tholing. The lofty roof was supported 
by columns of deodar trunks which must have been brought from a 
great distance .(as no large 'tree can grow in the cold deseirt of; 

12 



182 Year^Book for 1941, , S vol . vui. 

Western Tibet). In the centre there was a groat image of the 
Buddha with a wonderfully spiritual face seated on a On 

the walls were beautiful frescoes which strongly remind, ed us of tln^ 
Ajaiita school of painting. In the library it was all disorch'vr and 
confusion. On account of an unpleasant incddi'iit wc <iO‘ii!.d :i,iot 
see other parts of this great shrine. But wc had been impressed 
very much by one feature. Nowhere else in the Westfvni Tibet 
had we seen Indian art so free from any foreign influcun.-e as fit 
Thoiiiig. ■ ^ 

Whence came this strong Indian influence The Naga 
Sanyasi who was with us, who had visited this place several times, 
told us that Tholing Gumpha'was the Adi Badri (the (>rig,inal 
Badrinatli) and that it was Shankaracharya who ordered the 
removal of the seat of Badri to the Indian side of tlie Himalayas. 

This is not the correct explanation. In 1925 I (u:ime ac.ross 
a passage in the Journal of the Buddhist Text Society of India,, 
Vol. I, Part I. There I read that Atisa, tlie gx'eatost Buddhist 
scholar, Bengal has produced, went from tlie uoiversity of 
Vikramasila to Suvarnadwipa (probably Srivijayti in Sumatra) 
to put the finishing touches to his Buddhistic studies. On his 
return from Suvarnadwipa he received several earnest invitations 
from Ye ses ’od, King of Gu-ge in Western Tibet. At lavst, 
in spite of the protests of the Pala King of Bengal, Atisa left 
Vikramasila (c. 1040 A.D.), passed through Nepal, and was 
escorted by Tibetan generals from Mtoasa Sarovara to Tholing 
where the Tibetan king was waiting for him. There (at Tholing) 
lie preached the Mahayana doctrine to the people of Nah-ri 
(Western Tibet) who had become mere Tantriks. 

Tholing became in the 11th century in the words of '’Ihicci 
a place celebrated in the culture of Tibet because many works 
were here translated into Tibetan by a cliose,n. band of pandits 
who, when Buddhism declined in India, were transplanted into 
this land of the snows b Tradition says that E-in, c'on l,)zaii po, 
the feinoiis saint and scholar of Western Tibet, livi^d and W' 0 !‘I\chI 
in one of the chapels of Tholing. According to my ,fri(H'id 
T)r. Prabodh. Chandra Bagelii, Sri Aiuipama Niral')hoga Vihara 
was the name of this centre of learning in i,l}s pal,TO,y' dxiys. 

From Tholing we made a shortcut to Ind,i,a by the Miliia 
Pass— a difficult pass as Father Andrade found to his cost early 
in _the seventeenth century. We passed t.h,rough wonderful 
Himalayan scenery, glaciers and mountain tarns overlooked l)y 
giant peaks, and came to Badrinath. 

2. Baini Peashad. — Some examples of Moghul Justice, 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for election 
of two, ordinary members and declared that both the caBd,idates^ 
were duly elected. 

— ❖ 

I2B 



1942 ' 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings, 


18 ^ 


AUGUST 

An Ordinary Montlily Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 4th, at 5 r.M. 

Present 

Baini Prashad, Esq., D.Sc., F.Z.S., F.R.S.E., P.NJ., 
E.R.A.S.B., Honorary Treasurer, in the Chair. 

Mmnhers : 

(Jhatterji, Mr. B, C 
De, Mr. J. G. 

Griffiths, Dr. W. C4 
Guha, Dr. B. S. 

Haq, Prof. M. M. 

Visitors : 

Ohatterjee, Mr. B. K. Mitra, Mr. A. K. 

The iniiiiites of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

Tlie General Secretary amiounced receipt of the following 
eleven presentations of hooks, etc., which had been placed on 
the table for inspection : — 

(1) From Govermnent of Jodhpur — ^‘Marwar ka Itihas, Vol. 2’. 

(2) From Mr. N. Shastri — ‘Karuna Tarangini’. 

(3) From Mahabodhi Society — ^‘Suttha Nipadah 

(4) From Government MSS. Oriental Library, Madras — ‘Library 
Gatalogue 

(5) From Dr. Fitz Sarasin — ^‘Ano einen Glucklichen leben: Bio- 
graphische Notizeii’. 

(6) From British Consulate General Pondicherry — ‘Dupleix’. 

(7) From Prof. V. Vedantatirtha — ‘Vedanta Philosophy of Brahma 
sutra*. 

(8) From Government of India — ‘Proc. 18th Session, Indian Historical 
Records Commission’. 

(9) From Den Directeur Van’slands Plantentain, Java — ‘Nature 
Protection in Netherlands Indies’. 

(10-11) From Government of India — ‘List of inscriptions copied by 
the office Supt. of Epigraphy, Madras’, and ‘Subject-Index to the Annual 
Reports, S.I. Epigraphy. • 

The General Secretary announced that the following two 
candidates would be balloted for as Ordinary Members : — 

(20) Buhramanyam, E. A., Ganeral Manager, Bharat Sugar Works, 
Pachnikhi. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha. 

Seconder: J. C. De. 

(21) Bhadani, W. H. A., M.A., M.O.L., M.F., Ph.D. (Lond.), Lecturer 
izi Persian and Urdu, Dacca University, 74, Begum Bazar Road, Dacca. 

Proposer: M. Z. Siddiqi. 

Seconder: B. S, Guha, 


Hora, Dr. S. L, 

Hosain, Dr. M. H. 
Macfarlane, Mrs. E. W. E. 
Mitra, Miss Priti. 
Vedantatirtha, Mr. N. C. 



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I V<Jj.. VllL 


Tlie Chairman called upon Di*. Meghnad Salia to l■<.‘.ad aii 
obituary notice of the late Mr. Guru Saday Butt — a.:!i Ofdinar\' 
Member of tlie> Society (see page 203). 

The General Secretary reportcnl that sin(‘(,‘ the |)i‘e\’iou.s 
meeting there had been no loss of rnembership either l)y dea.t.h, oi* 
resignation; there had been no lapses of oltHdion under K-ule lb 
and there had been no withdrawals of any application. 

Ill accordance with Rule 48(a) the General Seiiretary I'eportiMi 
for confirmation by the meeting the following changes made iii 
the Regulations of the Provident Pund of the Society’s staff 
w^hicli were passed by the Council in its meeting of 30th tfune, 
1941;— ' 

'Regulation No. 17 to be amended as follows: — 


'The Couiicii may, at their discretion, authorise a teniporary advance 
being granted from tlie Fund to any member subjoot to tlu^ to Ilf) wing 
conditions ; — 

(а) No advance shall be granted unless the Council is satislied that 
the applicants’ pecuniary circumstances justify it, and that it will be 
expended on the following object or objects; — 

(i) to pay expenses incurred in comieetion with the prolonged 

illness of the applicant or any person actually dependent 
on him; 

(ii) to pay obligatory expenses on a scale ax^propriate to the 

applicants’ status in connection with marriages, funerals or 
ceremonies which by his religion it is incumbent on him to 
perform. 

(б) An advance shall not exceed except for sx^e^iial reasons: — 

(i) six months’ pay, or half the amount subscribed by the member 

to the Fund, whichever is less ; 

(ii) unless the amount already advanced does not exceed two -thirds 

of the amount admissible under the sub-nde (6) (i), and shall 
not be granted until at least after the final repayment of ail 
previous advances together with interest thereon. 

No advance will be granted within a year of the proxjosed retirement 
of the member. 

The rate of interest to be charged will be decided by the Council 
but in any case will not be less than the oorrcBponding rate of interest 
paid by the Bank.’ 

• Order: Confirm. 

The Chairman called upon the following to read their 
papers': — 

1 . R. C. Majttmdab. — Some Dates in the Pdla and Sena 
Mecords. 

In the paper entitled 'Some Dates in the Pala and Sena 
Records ’ an attempt has been made to correct the dates as read 
by previous scholars. The following changes in the reading of 
dates have been proposed: 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings, 


185 


T Date as Date 

Name oe Ikscbiptiok. originally read. proposed. 

Nalaiida C. .P. DevapMa . . 39 35 

Jayiiagar Ins. Madaimpala .. 19 14 

Reasons have also been shown for doubting the reading 
of the dates of the following Inscriptions : 

(1) Barrackpui* C.P. of Bijayasena Year 62, 

(2) Imadpur Inscriptions of Mahipala Year 48, 

(3) Rajibpur Inscription of Gopala 3rd Year 14. 

2. D. N. Majitmdab.— RacmZ Affiliation of the Gonds. 

In an earlier paper the author had discussed the tribal 
cultures of Bastar, Eastern States^ Agency and suggested the 
intra-group racial distances in the area from a study of indefinite 
somatic traits. Since then anthropometric measurements of 
about 600 people were taken by the author and the statistical 
data were analysed with the help of the Statistical Laboratory, 
Calcutta. In the present paper, the author presents the results 
of the anthropometric survey of Bastar in a systematic way. 

The native population of Bastar belong to the Gond group 
of tribes and the immigrants and foreigners who have settled 
down in the state appear to have freely mixed with the indigenes. 
A large section of the Gonds vstill living in the wild state have 
remained more or less isolated, as for example the Hill Marias, 
w^ho have recently figured in an instructive monograph by W. V. 
Grigson (Oxford University Press). The social precedence in 
the State as is popularly understood there, is as follows : — (1) The 
HiU Marias, (2) The Marias of the Plateau otherwise known as 
Dandami Marias or Bison Head Marias, (3) Murias, (4) Par j as 
or Dhruvas, (5) Bhatras, (6) Gadabas, (7) Panora or Panra, 
(8) Sundris, (9) Kalhars, (10) Kewats, Kurukhs or Dhimars, 
(11) Halbas and (12) Dhakars. At the bottom of the social 
ladder are the Hill Marias while the Dhakars, form the top dress- 
ing on a solid aboriginal base. 

Analysis of anthropometric data reveals a close corres- 
pondence between social units and racial status. The following 
conclusions have been drawn from the anthropometric survey 
of Bastar State. (1) The Gonds represent a blended racial t3rpe. 
(2) The higher castes, Dhakars and Halbas of Bastar have freely 
mixed with the Gond tribes in the neighbourhood, (3) The 
HiU. Marias who are the most primitive cultural group in Bastar 
differ from the higher caste groups. (4) The Dandami Marias 
who were originally Hill Marias have come in closer contacts 
with the higher castes. (5) From a comparison of the head 
measurements, it appears that there is a progressive lengthening 
of the head towards the mountain regions. 



186 


Year- Boole R.A.S.B. for 1941. 


[VoL. VIH, 


3. (Mbs.) E. W. E. Macfablane. — Blood Groiip^s among 
BalaMs (weavers), Bhils, KorJeus, and Mundas, anth a fiots on 
Pfirdhis and Aboriginal Blood Types. 

The Balahis, lower caste weavers of the Niiiiar District, 
CiP., show more relationship, serologically with the Mabrattas, 
Rajputs, Jats, and Pathans west and north of them tlian with, 
the Depressed Classes. They have the three main blood groups 
in equal proportions with a little more of Grfoup A tlian of 
Group B. 

The Bhils have high xjercentages of group B and AB and 
the highest frequency for gene B yet found in India. The 
Korkus and Bhils are veiy shnilai* in blood group distribution 
and seem to belong to an undifferentiated ])opulation. 

There is some resemblance between the Korku and the 
Toda blood group distributions. It is suggested that the Korkus 
and Bhils, even if descended from Mundari-spoaking ancestry 
may have ancient affinities with the southern al)origines 
(Chenchiis and Paniyans) from whom tliey differ serologically 
chiefly in possessing more B. 

The Mundas of the Singbhum District, Beliar, show the 
three main blood groups equally distributed, but they do not 
differ significantly serologically from tlie Santals who have more 
ofB. ' 

As the Mundari- speaking tribes migrated w^estward in 
India, the}^ accumulated more of Group B, perhaps from an 
aboriginal people with southern alffinities whose descendants now 
are represented in the Depressed Classes. 

A few of the nomadic aboriginal Pardhis showed all three 
blood groups present and a marked variation in racial types. 

Mnndas and Bhils, in small samples, ( 3 ac}i. show less of 
type M and more of type N than the general popnlatiou of 
Bengal. 

The Chairman called upon tlie following to • make tliciir 
communications : — 

1. B, K. Ohattee-ji. — Boms Peculiar Implements made of 
Tridacna Shell from the Nicobar Islands. 

( 1 ) A Combined Celt a.nd Shovel. 

(2) An ordinary Celt. 

These two implements w'ere found by Mr. 8eott in the 
Nicobar Islands and sent for examination by the Geological 
Survey of India. They were found along with certain fish- 
teeth. The general appearance of the tw^o implements is like 
that of the Neolithic Celt but in ' their . case they were made out 
of Tridacna shell, instead of stone. The implements No. 1 
|P . R. 8263 ; 22341 (9)), is of special interest showing the ingenious 



1942] 


Ordinary Mcmflily Meetings. 


187 


skill of the people in utilising the natural groove present on the 
ventral side of the shell for fashioning it as a shovel and using 
it for the combined uses of a Shovel and a Celt. Both the 
implements have got definite sharp ends, shafts, polished surface 
and elongated shape, 

A similar Celt made of Tridacna shell along with mace-heads 
or shell bangles were found by Col. R. B. S. Sewell, in a grave in 
the Nicobar Islands together with some human skuUs and are 
in the collections of the Anthropological Section of the Zoological 
Survey of India. The use of Tridacna shell for such purposes is 
not confined to the Nicobar Islands but is also found in other 
parts of Oceania (Micronesia). 

2. B, Pbashad- — A Note o7i Fatawa-i-Alamgiri. 

The six volumes of the famous works on the Shariat law 
prepared under the orders of the Emperor Aurangzib were 
exhibited, and a short account of its preparation was given. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for election 
of Ordinary members and declared that both the candidates 
were duly elected. 


SEPTEMBER 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 1st, at 6 p.m. 


Present 

Baini Prashab. Esq., D.Sc., E.Z.S,, F.R.S.E., F.N.I., 
F.R.A.8.B.. Honorary Treasurer, in the Chair. 

M. embers : 

AIL Mr. 8. 8. 

Bose, Mr. J. N. 

Chatter] i, Mr. P. 

Be, Mr.' J. C. 

Ghosh, Mr. P. K. 

Guha, Dr. B. 8. 

Haq, Prof, M. M. 

Visitor : 

Halim, Mr. M. 

The minutes of the last meetings were read and confirmed.. 

The G-eneral Secretary announced receipt of the following six 
presentations of books, etc. which had been placed on the table 
for inspection:^ — 


Hora, Dr. 8. L. 

Hosain, Dr. M. H. 
Majumdar, Mr. D. L. 
Rahman, Prof. 8. K. 

Ray Chaudhiiri, Prof. H. C. 
Shastri, Pt. G. 
Vedantatirtha, Mr. N. 



188 


Year-Book R,A,S.B,for 1 . 941 . 


fVOL. VI H 


(1—4;) From Gov'emmenfc of India — ■ MomoirSy Areh. 8iirvoy oi Iri-clMy 
No. 64% ‘Index to the Annual Keporhs of the Direeter-GeMf3ml of 
Archaeology, 1919-29’, ‘Birunis Picture of the m^orld’ and ‘M'omoim, 
A.SJ., No. 6S’. 

(5) From, the China Information Committee — 'China alh‘r 4: yejs.ri't o| 
War’. 

(6) From iSwanii Sadananda — ‘Thailand*. 

The General Secretary aiitiounced that the followiiig touF.' 
candidates would be balloted for as Ordinary Merabei's: — 

(22) Spendlove, F. St. G. de. c/o The Royal. «)ntario Museum of 
Archaeology, Toronto, S. Canada. 

Proposer; B. 8. Guha. 

Seconder ; J. C. De, 

(23) Jhunjhunwala. BajrmmgalaL Wheat and 'fjinseed Bi’oker, 244, 
Central Avenue, Calcutta. 

Proposer: B. S. Guha, 

Seconder: J. C. De. 

(24) Ratcliff, George Maffseg, I.C.B., Legislative Secrotar> , (.iiovcriiincfkt 
of Bengal, c/o A. C. Hartley, Esq.. I.C.S., District M'ogistmtc. Howrah. 

Proposer: L. R. Fa wens. 

Seconder: B. S. Guha. 

(25) Bamrjee, Suren Chandra, M.A,, Resean.di Stiulcnt. 
University, Zemindar, Mu rapara, Dacca. 

Proposer; J, C. De. 

Seconder: M. Hidayat Hosaiii. 

The General Secretary annoiin(*cd th.e following loss of 

membership since the previous meeting by death: — 

1 . Poet Rabindranath Tagoo' (Spi^cial Anniversary M<vrjd)*u‘. 1 934), 

2. T. P. Ghose (An Ordinary Member, 191 2j. 

3. Mabarajadhiraja Sir Bija-v Chaiid Mnhta.h {An Orrliukify 
Member, 1911). 

The General Secretary announced tlie ibi lowing' h'»ss t>f 

membership since the |)revious meeting by fd^signetiotK 

1. Sir George Campbell (Ati Ordinary Membor, 1929). 

2. Sir S. Radhakrishuan (An Ordinary Meml»cr. 1939). 

The General Secretary announced tliat sinc*e tiie |>rcwq*oii,8 
meeting there had been no lapses of election n,ndi‘r 9 and 
no withdrawals of any applica,tion. 

The Chairman called upon the following to read Ills pitpcT:— 

1. L, S. Dxjgik.— TA c KashfuA^Makm of Ahud^Hamn 
\mb. ^Umianal-JnUdbi. 

Up to about some thirty or forty year’s ago tlie Kashfu-l 
Ma^j'ub and its autlior (more commonly known in India under 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly Meetings. 


189 


his povsthiimous title of Data Oanj-hahhsh) were not very widely 
known and attracted comparatively little attention : the known 
MSS. of the work were few and were reputed to be rare, of 
editions there existed only one Indian lithograph not very easily 
obtainable, but no ti'anslation or critical edition whatsoever. 
The almost simultaneous coming to light of more MSS. (the 
RASE possesses five of them), the appearance of several Eastern 
lithographs of the work, and, last but not least, of the English 
translation by Nicholson and of the critical edition by ZMiJcovshy 
broke the spell and reawakened the interest foi* that oldest 
manual on Sufyism in Persian and for its author. 

Several questioiis as to the more exact tim e of its composition, 
the exact date of its aiithorts death, the peculiarities of the langu- 
age in which the work is written, etc. arose in that connexion. 

In the article a general survey of the materials published is 
made, together with an attempt at solving some of the above 
questions or proving the impossibility of ansv^ering them on the 
strength of data so far available. 

The Chairman called upon the following to make their 
communications : — 

1. S. L. Hora. — Races and Varieties of Himalayan Mahseer, 

Mahseer or the Large-scaled Barbel of India is the most 
famous Game Fish of the country and several books have been 
written on its sporting qualities. Though anglers have long 
been familiar with the fact that several races and varieties of 
this fish exist in Indian waters, the scientists, following the lead 
of Day, have hitherto grouped them into a single species, Barhus 
tor (Hamilton). Attempt has recently been made to study 
very critically the material of this species in the collection of the 
Zoological Survey of India with the result that at least four kinds 
can now be recognised from the Himalayan waters on definite 
morphological characters. The distinguishing features of the 
four species will be discussed and attention will be directed to 
the great variation in colouration observed in each species. 
Refc’srence will also be made to the occurrence of Black Mahseer 
and the probable causes that are believed to be responsible for 
melanism in fishes, 

2, M. Hidayat Hosain. — The Persian Histories of the 
Carnatic. 

The sources in Persian for the History of the Carnatic during 
the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are not many. Atten- 
tion may however be drawn to fourteen of these, of which the 
following may he mentioned: — 

(1) Satd Nama by Jaswant Bai dealing with the history 
of Sa^adat Allah Khan. 



190 


Yenr-BoohR.A.S,B.for 1941. 


I VOL. VIIC, 


(2) Anwar Naina celebratiirig the cxplisit^; of Nawa-h 
Anwar Kliaii by Mir Tsinall 'Ali poetically 

known as Ahjadi, and 

(:i) 'Azim at-Tawarikh h\ Miilniininad Sibglia-t Alhili 
Mufti. 

Bain I Prashad. — On a rare PerAau M.B. in the l/ilmify 
^of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bemgal. 

'The Chairnian announced the result of tlie ballot for Mectioii 
of Ordinary Mcmhors and declared that a.11 candidati^s had been 
■duly elected. 

” 

NOVEMBER 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of tin^ Roya.1 Asiatic Sodety 
of Bengal was held on Monday, th(‘ ilrd, at 5 P.M. 

Present 

C. S. Fox, Esq., D.Sc., M.I.Min.E., P.dS., F.N.I., 
P.R.A.S.B., Vice-President, in the Chair. 


Metnber.^* : 

Agharkar, Dr. S. P. 

Asadullah, Khan Ba,ha<iur K. M. 
Bagchi, Dr. K. N. 

Brown, Mr, Percy 
Chatterji, Mr. B.' C. 

Chatterji, Mr. P. P. 

Gliosh, Mr. P. K. 


Gnlui, Dr. B. S. 

Haq, Prof. M:. M. 
Hosain, Dr. M. H. 
TSTag, Dr. K. 

Prashad, Dr. B. 
Siddiqi, Dr. M. Z. 
Vedantatii'tha, Mr, N. 


Visitors : 

Brown, Mrs. P. Datt-a, Mr. 4. M. 

The minutes of the last meeting wei*e read and couiirimd. 

Th(‘ General Heeretary reported rinuapt. of tlie following 
fiffcy-niiio presentations of hooks, fd.c. whi(4i had Ixa^n f>!a.(^ed on 
the table for inspection 

(1-2) Prom Government Oriental MSS. Library, Madras Descriptive 
Catai. of Telega’, and ‘Descriptive Datal. of Malayalam MBS. \ 

(3) Prom Bhandarkar Oriental Res. Institute -‘Mahabhai’atti fasc.. 

XI’. 

(4-34) From the Government of Travancore — ‘Trivi;ajdnim Sanskrit 
Series Nos. 114 to 144’. 

(35) Prom Dr. B. Bhattacharya — ‘Sakti-Sangama-Tantra, Vol. 2\ 
(35) Prom Ft. N. C. Vedantatirtha — ‘Nyaya-Darsana-ltiliasab 
(37) Prom Baron O. R. Ehrenfels — ^‘Mother-B,ight in India’. 

(38-39) From Government of Madras— ‘ Manilha Consnlations, 
Vols. lands’. 

,(40-42) Prom Trustees of Parsi Panchayet, Bombay — -‘Barshold’s 
Iran’, ‘Collection of Colophons, etc. Zoroastrianism’, ‘Parsia-EngeTiies 



1942] 


Ordinary Monthly Meeling,^. 


191 


(43) From Government of Madras — ‘Letters froni Fort St. George, 

tol. • ' 

(44) From F, C. Dharnaa., Esq.— -‘The Ramayana Polity'. 

(46) From Messrs. Mohd. Ismail- Mania Bux — ‘Religion of Islam’. 
(46-47) Ifrom Government of India — Hymenoptera , Vol. Ill, pt. I 
^Maliusea-, Vol. 111’. 

(48-49) From Bhandarkar Oriental Res. Institute — ‘History of 
Dharmasastra \ Vol. 2, parts 1-2. 

(50-65) From Dr. E. S- Kirby — 'Business Forecasting', ‘The 1,000 
Indias’, ' Yoga\ ‘Prospects of Indian Trade with the U-S.A. of America’, 
^ Studies of Indian Economic issued by the office of the Economic Adviser. 
1st Series, Aspects of the Indian Tariff ISTo. I ‘Kuo Huo, Kos. 6-8 

(56-57) From Pt. N. 0. Vedantatirtha — ^‘Introduction to the Vaisesika 
System’, 'Introduction to the Ad vaita Vedanta System’. 

(58-59) From the Calcutta University — ‘Public Administration in 
India’, ‘International Law and Custom in Ancient India’. 

The General Secretary announced that the following 
candidate would be balloted for as an Ordinary Aleinber : — 

(.26) Reynokh, Herman M.. M.A., B.D., Missionary, Pendra Road, 

C.P. 


Proposer: Walter G. Griffiths. 
Seconder: B. 8. Guha. 


The General Secretary announoecl that riince the previous 
meeting there had been no loss of membership either by death 
or resignation. 

The General Secretary announced the following lapses of 
election under Eiile 9 : — 


1. 

The Revd. H. P. Judd 

elected on 4-11-1940. 

2. 

T. T. S. May ley 

4-11-1940. 

:l 

Dr. A. B, M. Habibullah 

4-11-1940. 

4. 

Dr. FT. P. Mukherjee 

4-11-1940. 

5. 

Pt. Kodamath Sabityabhuaaiia 

2-12-1940: 

6. 

G. R. Genge 

2-12-1940. 

7. 

Dr. A. F. M. Khaiilur Rahman 

2-12-1940. 

8. 

Maulbi Syed Kasim Hasan Rizvi 

:L 2-1941. 

9. 

Manzoor Hasan 

„ :L 3-1941. 

10. 

Maimay Veiikat Laxmiah 

2- 6-1941. 

11 . 

Dr. A. Husen 

2- 6-1941. 

12. 

Major Thomas Welbourne 

„ 7- 7-1941. 


"The General Secretary announced that since the prtwious 
meeting there had been no ndthdrawals of any application. 

The Chairman called upon the following to read his paper: — 

1, P. L. Misra. — Obsermtions on an Intestinal Flagellate^ 
Tetratrichomastix hegneri. sp. nov,,f7'om the' Shipping Frog' 
Rana limwooharis Meig. 

Introduction. Material and methods. Observations on 
Tetratrichoniastix hegneri, sp. nov. .'Previous work. System- 
atic position. Summary. Acknowledgments. References. ^ 



im 


Yeri-r-Book E.A.S,B.for liUl. 


I VOL. vra, 


The Cliairmaii caiied upon tiie following t;o coiiiiiieiit upon 
his exhibit 

L Kalidas N’ag . — ^Interesting exhibits from the Bocieiifs 
Archives'. 

The Chairman called upon the following to make his eoii!- 
muiiication : — 

1. Baini Prashad . — \iccount of Delhi in the Miiaihir-uh 
Umara\ 

The Chairniaii announced the result of the ballot for tiio 
election of an Ordinary Member and declared that the (’andidato 
had been duly elected. 

DECEMBER 

An Ordinary Monthly Meeting of tlie Royal Asiatic* 8o(3ioty 
of Bengal was held on Monday, the 1st, at 5 p.m. 

Present 

C. S. Fox, Esq., D.Sc., M.I.Mm.E., F.C4.S., F.N.I., 
F.R.A.S.B., Vice-President, in the Chair, 

Members : 

Asadnllah, Khan Bahadur K. M 
Biswas, Dr. K. 

Ohatterjee, Mr. B. C. 

Chatterjee, Mr. P. P. 

Ghopra, Dr. B. N. 

Das-Gupta, Mr. G. G. 

De, Mr. J. C. 

Griffiths, Dr. W. G. 

Visitors : 

Hafizs, Mr. H. A. Mukherjec, Mr. vS. K. 

Hosain, Mr. S. W. Rezvi, Mr. T. 

The Chairman announced the death, of Shams-ul-'Ulama 
Dr. M. Hidayat Hosain, a Life Member, since 1911, Ordiiia.ry 
Fellow, and past Joint Philological Secretary from 1925-1939, 
on 27th November 1941, after which an obituary iiotioe was 
read by Dr. Baini Prashad (see page 204). 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed. 

The General Secretary reported receipt of the following six 
presentations of books, etc. which had been placed on the table 
for inspection : — ' 


Guha, Dr. B. S. 
Gumer, Mr. 0. W. 
Haq, Prof. M. M. 
Hora, Dr. S. L. 
Prashad, Dr. B. 
Rahmau, Mr. S. K. 
Ratcli^, Mr. G. M. 
Siddiqj, Dr. M:. Z, 



■ 1942 ] 


Ordhmry Monthly Meetings. 


193 


( 1) From the Adyar Library — ^^Rajadharma’. 

(2) From the Government of Madras — ‘Records of Fort St. George, 
1752-53, Vol. 33’. 

(3) From the Government of Madras — Records of Fort St. George, 
Yol. 37’. 

(4) From 8. D. Atkins, Esq. — ‘Rusan in the Rig Veda’. 

(5) From C. L. Jain, Esq. — ‘Srimat Rajacandrah 

(6) From Oriental Library, Mysore — ‘Tattvamnktakalapa’. 

The General Secretary announced that the following four 
ca ndidates would be balloted as Ordinary Members ; — 

(27) Ewart, Douglas J„ Missionary, Westminster Hostel, Rajshahi, 
Bengal. 

Proposer: B. 8. Guha. 

Seconder: C. W. Gnmer. 

(28) Ingalls, Daniel Henry Holmes, M.A. (Harvard), Junior Fellow 
of Society of IFellows, Harvard Hnjversity, ^jl, Lansdowne Road, 
Calcutta. 

Proposer: G. W. Gnrner. 

Seconder: B. 8. Guha. 

(29) Majumdar, Dhirendra Nath, M.A., Lecrurer in Anthropology, 
Luoloiow University, Lucknow. 

Proposer: B. 8. Guha. 

Seconder: J. C. De. 

(30) Grant, John B., (Doctor), M.D., M.P.H., F.A.P.H.A., Director, 
AH -India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, 110, Ohittaranja-n 
Avenue, Calcutta, 

Proposer: B. 8. Guha. 

Seconder: J. C. De. 

The General Secretary announced the following loss of 
membership since the previous meeting by death : — 

1, Dr. M. E. Sufi (An Ordinary Member, 1937). 

2, Dr. M. Hidayat Hosain (An Ordinary Fellow 1926, and Life 
Member, 1911). 


The General Secretary announced that since the last meeting 
there had been no loss of membership by resignation, and no 
lapses of election under Rule 9, nor withdrawals of any applica- 
tion. 


In accordance with Rule 40, the General Secretary reported 
that the names of the following eleven Ordinary Members would 
be removed from the next membership list of the Society : — 


1. P. 3Sr. Banerjee. 

2. H. Crookshank. 

3. A. H. Harley. 

4. L. E. Harris. 

6. ■ Major M. F. C. Martin. 
6, Dr. H. Richter. 


7. Jaipal Singh. 

8. Prof. G. Tucci. 

9. T. Williams. 

10. Rai Bahadur S. K. Bhuyan. 

11. C. 0. Calder. 



194 


Ymr^Eook E.AE.B.for 1941. fvOL. viii, 1942] 


The General Secretary r^orted that in accordance with 
Rules 37 and 38, the names of the following ^ nine Ordinary 
Members would be suspended as defaulters within tht) Socioty^s 
building for the period of one month, to bo removed from the 
Society "*8 register’s for non-payment unless tlio amount <i;iio bi) 
paid before the next Ordinary Monthly Meeting : — 


1. 

Jamaluddin Ahmed 


. . Rfl. 06 

2. 

A. F. M. Abdul Kadir 


. . „ 78 

3. 

Prof. P. R. Awati . . 


. . „ 61-8 

4. 

N. C. Bhattacharya 


. . „ 66 

5. 

Bimal Ch. Ghosh 


. . „ 00 

6. 

Mrrnal K. Jain 


. . „ 60 

7. 

Rezanr Rahman Khan 


. . „ 108 

8. 

Kaviraj Bimalananda Tarkatirtha 

. . ,, 99 

9. 

Prof. 0. W. Tressler 

. . 

. . „ 72 


In accordance with Rule 48(d) the General Secretary roported 
tor confirmation by the meeting the following resolution passed 
by the Council in its last meeting : — 

'From the 1st December, 1941, Mr. J. 0. Do, the Assistant 
Secretary, be placed in charge of the Library of the Society on his 
present terms and designation; and Mr. P. 0. Matthai, the 
Librarian, be appointed as Superintendent of the office on liis 
own salary and that he shall perform all duties now perfoimied 
by Mr. De. This arrangement will be on an experimental basis 
for six months for the present and does not involve any additional 
charge on the Society’s funds.’ 


Order: Confirm. 

The Chairman announced the result of the ballot for tiie 
election of Ordinary Members and declared that all the candidates 
had been duly elected. 

After the transaction of formal business tlio meeting was 
adjourned as a token of respect to the ra.emory of tlie late Klian 
Baliadiir Dr. Hosain. 



OBITUARY NOTICES 


8ib J. J. Thomson 
(1856-1940) 

With, the death of Sir J. J. Thomson is removed from the 
world of Science, the last of the line of British Physicists like 
Kelvin, Stoker and Maxwell, all of whom took experimental 
research after receiving their early training in mathematical 
Physics. 

Joseph John Thomson was born on December 18, 1856, in 
Gheetham, a suburb of Manchester. His father intended to 
make an Engineer of him and with that end in view^ he was 
admitted at the age of 14 to the Owen’s College which siib- 
seqnentl^T- became the University of Manchester. There, young 
Thomson had the unique opportunity of studying under eminent 
scientists like Osborne Reynolds in Engineering, Balfour Stewart 
in Ph 3 rsics, William Roscoe in Chemistry. While a student, he 
lost his father and at this on account of the family circumstances 
the idea of his ever joining an engineering firm was entirelj’^ 
abandoned, and he continued his studies in ]3iire Science at the 
same college. 

From there, Thomson joined the Trinity College in 1876. 
He sat for the Mathematical Tripos in 1880 and came out as 
second Wrangler, Sir Joseph Larmor being the senior for that 
year. 

Even while «at Manchester, young Thomson undertook a 
certain amount of research work and took to experimental and 
theoretical investigations wdth whole-hearted devotion after 
getting his B .A. degree in 1 880. At this time he began his famous 
work on the motion of charged particles and the theory of 
electromagnetic origin of mass. This fundamental research was 
the starting point of a number of important investigations by 
Abraham, Heaviside and others on the variation cf effective 
mass of the electron with velocity and of the experimental 
testing of these theories by Kaufmami, Bucherer and others. 
The consequence of these investigations was the formulation of 
the electromagnetic theory of matter — a theory proved untenable 
by later investigations. 

In 1884, at the age of 27, Thomson was elected a Fellow of 
the Royal Society and the same year he succeeded Lord Rayleigh 
as Cavendish Professor of Experimental Physics in the University 
of Cambridge. This post he held till 1918 when he was' made;' 

(. 195 ) 



196 YcMtr-BooJc R.A.S.B. for 194L [vol, vii!, 

Master of Trinity College. His early age was tli(3 subject ot soiii<3 
caustic comineiits by. older inoinbers of the ITiiivc^rsity, 0:110 of 
whom remarked that times had comi^ when niorci boys were? lioirig 
appointed to University Chairs. 

As Cavendish. Professor, Tliomson startec,} iMvostigJvti(.n:is o,n 
til© plie:!ioiiioria of discharge of electricity throiigii gases ■from 
which ho passed, on, at about 1895, to his works on the ca,thod(3 
rays, the phenomena of gaseous ionization and. cond-uetio:n, a! id 
the properties of positive rays. T,hese researches are embodied 
ill Ms famous book, ‘Gonductio:n of Electrieity through Gases’ 
and it is for those investigations that he got tlie Nobel Prize in 
1906. 

From the study of positive rays ho devised tlie famous 
parabolic method of focussing charged paiivieles having the 
same value for the ratio e/m. The method has since^ fxMui 
considerably improved by Aston for* determining atomic masses. 

In 1918, he resigned his Cavendish profossorship wluni 
Rutherford was elected to succeed him but he still continuod to 
work in the laboratory. 

In 1936, his last and the interesting work VRocoilections 
and Reflexions’ was published. Those who are familiar with tin*! 
pre-war dajKS of Cambridge will find considerabk^ interest in 
these reminiscences. 

Such was the man whose loss to the scientifle world we 
are mourning. AU his life, he worked devotedly to the caiis<3 of 
Science and it is juvstly said that his works wore of the pioncm* 
type. He was interested more in the discovery of now plie nomei la 
rather than in the complete and accurate survoy of a limited 
region. 

Sir J. J. Thomson is survived by a daughter and a. son Prof. 
G. P. Thomson, also a Nobel Laureate and the wortliy son of tlie 
worthy father. 

M. N. Saha. 

{Mead in the Ordinary Monthly Meeting of %th January, 1941 .) 


Sir Grobor Abkaham Gbibbso]^ 

(1851-1941) 

A unique personality in the domain of Indologicai Studies, 
with special reference to the linguistic science, has boon joined 
to the majority last March by the death of Sir George Abraham 
Grierson at the ripe old age of ninety. For more than a genera- 
tion, Sir George Grierson, living in his studious retirement at 
Camberley in Surrey, has been universally respected as the 
great Director of the Linguistic Survey of India, the doyen of 



194 : 2 ] 


Obituary Notices, 


197 - 


Ijidiaii Linguistics. If not the founder of and the first worker 
in tlie Linguistics of the Modern Languages of India, Sir George 
■was one of the fi.rst investigators in the subject, and his has 
l)een so far the greatest name in this branch of the Science; and 
it will ce]*tainly continue to be so, at least among the first 
generation of workers who distinguished themselves in it. For 
over seventy years, from 1868 when he first began to read 
Sanskrit and Hindustani in Dublin, he was connected with the 
study of Indian languages; and these seventy years and more 
liave -been most fruitful in the results achieved by this silent 
explorer in tlie uncharted lands wliich were the modern Indian 
languages and dialects. 

Sir George Grierson was born near Dublin in 1851 and was 
educated at Shrewsbury and in the Universities of Dublin and 
Cambridge and Halle in Germany where he had a brilliant career. 
He entered the Indian Civil Service and came out to India in 
1873, and from the beginning ho took up Indian languages — the 
IndO” Aryan ones at first — as the chosen subject of his studies. 
From 1873 to 1888, during which years he worked as a civilian, 
as district magistrate, school inspector and opium agent in 'the 
Lower Provinces of BengaL (which included in those days 
Bengal Proper, Bihar and Orissa), he devoted ail his spare time 
outside of his usually strenuous official duties in making an 
intensive study of the ancient and medieval forms of the Aryan 
speech in India — Sanskrit and the Prakrits and the earlier Hindi, 
Bihari and Bengali literatures — ^l^esides a host of the modern 
languages and dialects, making special efforts to get at the 
genuine dialects of the country folk and their popular literature 
in the districts in which he was posted. All this was in pre- 
paration for his great life work, the Linguistic Survey of India ; 
but it was during these years that he brought out some of the 
most significant things on Modern Indian languages and litera- 
tures. Long before the Bangiya Sahitya Parishad — the Academy 
of Bengali Literature — was conceived, Sir George anticipated its 
work Ity collecting from North Bengal a number of folk songs 
and poems, with a sketch of the Rangpur dialect of Bengali 
(published in the Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1877, 
VoL I, No. 3, pp, 186-226) and the story of Raja Gopicandra 
(published in the same Journal, 1878, Vol. I, No. 3, pp. 135-238), 
with the Bengali texts in Devanagari characters aUd with English 
translations. The Bangiya Sahitya Parishad was founded more 
than twenty years after, and this body has since distinguished 
itself as a National Academy of Bengali Letters and Philology by 
publishing early Bengali texts and popular literature, and the 
pioneer work of Sir George in this line was gratefully recognised 
by the Parishad when it made him one of its honorary members 
some years ago. From 1883 onwards he began to investigate 
the dialects of Bihar, and during 1883-1887 he published his 
important Seven Grammars of the Dialects and Svd}-dmte^ 



198 


Year-Book R.A.S.B. for 1941. 


[VOL. 'Vllly 


Bi'hari Language in which he demonstrated clearly the position 
of the three 'speeches of Bihar, viz,, M^aitliili, Magalii_ ^ind! 
Bhojpnri, with regard to thoh* sisters and cousins of tlio liido- 
Aryaii Speech-group. His Bihar Peasami Life, hemg o PisTvrmve 
Catalogue of the Siirroundmgs of the PeoplM of that Frotmiee 
(1888) is a big volume giving a iiiiiqxie collection of rural words, 
ill the setting of an interesting descriptive framework, invalnahle 
for liiigiiistician and ethnoiogist alike. Before tills, lie liad 
brought out his 3£aithiU Grammar with a Chrestoioatliy and 
Vocabulary as an extra number of the Journal of the Adatic 
Society of Bengal, in the year 1880; and in this book lie piiblisbed 
the first collection of the poems of Vidyapati, the greatest jioet 
of Mithila or North Bihar (c. 1400 A.B.), obtained fr*oni plac<\s 
where tiie}/- were still current. 

The International Congi‘ess of Orientalists lield, ati Vienna* in 
1886 represented to the G-overnment of India tlu^ neiuissity of 
liaviiig a Linguistic Survey of India, and on tliis rcvjirosentatioi'i 
the Survey wars instituted in 1888, with Grica-son as i,ts Dlrocton 
From 1888 to 1903 Grierson gathered and prepaii^d Ids materials 
for the Survey in India, and during the ninetic^s of tlie last, 
century while still in India he published sonn^ of his most nottn 
worthy articles and papers, on the Bihar diakHl-s, on Ea.steru 
Hindi and Western Hindi, and on Kashmiri. Tie also piibllslied 
his important monograph on the Phonology of the Ifodern Indo- 
Aryan Vernaculars in the Journal of the German Oriemlal Society 
(1895-96), which alone would have placed liiin on a. level with 
Beames, Bhandarkar and Hoernle as the founders of tlu^ liistorical. 
grammar of New Indo- Aryan. 

Sir George Grierson left India in 1903, and from tluit yea,!* 
onwards began to be published the volumes of tlie JjmguisUc 
Survey of India. The twenty-one volumes of th,is griiiit work 
form not only a mine of information a.bout most of tli(3 language's 
and dialects of tlu^ sub-continent of India (which havo^ num- 
bered and scheduled with very great envo in the Survey, running 
up to 179 languages and 544 di.akM.ds, taking all mlnutia..(^ of 
detail) — about the spoeelies of omvfifth of tlio humati ra,(.»e— but 
also embody tlie fi,nd.ings of historical and com])arative gu'eanmar 
regarding the correct placing of tliese spoecjlies witli regarcl to ojidi 
other. The Survey is a unique thing of its kind, and nothihig 
like this has been attempted or accom,plished in any other 
polyglot country. What looked like a vast jungle growth of 
uneducated dialects and local forms of patois, which. acknowledgCMi 
either vague or a clear allegiance to some standard form" of 
literary speech, has been surveyed, and paths have been dis- 
covered and made in the trackless wastes: “what was previously 
unintenigible has .been grasped in its true significance. ’ 

Thanks to the comprehensive vision and attention to eveiy 
detail .which its Director possessed, the Survey has drawn the 
linguistic map of India as surely and certainly as any such ina|> 
’13B 



1942] 


Obituary Notices, 


199 


can be drawn. In this way it has given an inestimable indication 
of the social, ethnological and cultural past of the country, 
whicli no historian and anthropologist, sociologist and adminis- 
trator, and social worker and politician can afford to neglect. 

In India itself, although the Science of Phonetics and 
Grammar developed very early, there has never been much study 
of the actual spoken forms of the language. The literary tradition 
has always been very strong in India, and consequently a strong 
spirit of conservatism which preferred the older or archaic form 
of a speech to its actual living form has always interfered with 
proper justice being done to the spoken language, whether in 
literature or in linguistic studies. The spoken forms, as in most 
other communities outside India possessing a. strong literary 
tradition, have generally been neglected as " vulgar b Buddha 
gave his great charter to the spoken dialects of man by com- 
manding that his discourses were to be studied by men in their 
own longues. But the Sanskrit tradition w^as too powerful. 
It is only in the inscriptions of Asoka (3rd century B.C.) that 
anything like a faithful representation of the local dialects (of 
the South-West, of the North-West, of the North Centre and of 
the East) are found; and even here the official language which 
w'-as of the East is found to have influenced the other local 
dialects. Prom the 3rd century B.C. to the 20th century A.B. 
is indeed a long period of time. Yet it is only in the Linguistic 
Survey of India of George Abraham Grierson that we find modern 
science and scientific curiosity achieving what Asoka’ s secretariat 
(the direction doubtless was from the emperor, inspired no 
doubt by what Buddha himself had enjoined) did as a matter 
of convenience and policy in giving out the injunctions and the 
admonitions of the King to his people in their ovni dialects. 
The completion of the Linguistic Survey marks an epoch in the 
cultural history of India; and it forms one of the best fruits of 
the British connexion with India. Science here has become the 
great golden link joining the rulers and the ruled. On the ter- 
mination, so far as Sir George Grierson’s labours were concerned, 
of the Linguistic Survey, he was given the Order of Merit by the 
Government in recognition of his valuable scientific labours, 
■He was already knighted in 19l2. A final volume remains to be 
done— a Comparative Dictionary of the Indo- Aryan languages, 
and that has been taken up by another great British scholar of 
Indo- Aryan linguistics, and one of the greatest in the fi.eld, 
Dr. R. L. Turner. 

The number of Sh George’s monographs on different aspects 
of Aryan linguistics in India is legion, and it. is not necessary to 
catalogue and appraise them here. But mention must be made of 
his work in connexion with Kashmiri. Kashmiri, a language 
belonging to the Bardic group of Aryan — a group which Grierson 
Mmself has placed as an intermediate one between the Iranian 
and the Indo-Aryan (although other scholars incline to^ look . up ■ 



200 


Year-Book E.A.S.B, for 11)4.L 


[VOL. VIII, 


it as a Iiiemboi* of tlie Indo- Aryan group and not as an indepen- 
dent sroiip);— has a fairly old literature, a,.nd it is the most 
cultivated of the Bardic speeclies, Griersoids seiies of pa|;)ers on, 
Kashmiri i^ra-mniar were culminated by liis ^ijreat I\.a,shni/hri 
DicMonary. of over' 1,31)0 quarto pa.ges whicli \va>s co'm|)lel:ie«i 
some ten years ago as a ]:)iibiicat,iou ol the Asiatic 8o(aety of, 
Beiiga,!. Ho had'h^lso written a handy Kashniiri Manual in 
two '"parts which is one of the best hand-books of a .language.^ 
known. Further, he edited som,e Kas'hmiri texts iindtir the 
auspices of botli our Society and tlie Royal Asiatic Society of 
Breat Britain and Ireland. 

Sir George Grierson was no ' di‘y-as-dust linguist or 
liiigiiisticiaii ; he was a lover of lit{U'atnro, and had tire soul of a 
literary connoisseur. His appreciation of Ttilasidasa is a weli- 
knowii nionograpli in eonne.vion with the greatest of tlu^ ini^di^wal 
North Indian poets. He also brouglit out in collaborat:.i()n witli 
Mahamahopadiiyaya Siidhakai'a Dvivedi an edition (ivliich ciould 
not be completed) of the Early Awadhi narratives and mystic 
poem the Padumawati of Malik Miihannnad Jayasi, with, a 
Hindi commentary from his collaborator. Mention may also 
be made of his fine edition of anotiier gi'eat classic of Earl}' 
Hindi — the Satasaiyd of Bihari Lai, a highly ornate and poetic^ 
composition in the Braj-bhakha dialect; and his 'Vernacukir 
Literature of Hindustan, which first appeart^d in the Journal of 
the Asiatic Society of Bengal (1889), is an indispensable com- 
pendium of the literature of North India in the various dialects 
which have accepted the standard High Hindi Speech as their* 
literary form. 

Sir George Abraham Grierson was one of the giants, so to 
say, in his special subject: and he has accumulated, sorted, and 
arranged, and in this way left for posterity, a mass of materic.1 
the value of which will never be diminished. His forte was 
Indo- Aryan, and Bardic : and for the non- Aryan languages of 
India he was fortunate in having some very competent col leaguers 
and collaborators, pre-eminent among whom lias ‘been 13r. Sten 
Konow, the Norwegian Orientalist and Indologist, wlio was 
responsible for the volume on the Kol (Munda) and Briwidiaii 
languages in the Linguistic Surmy, But it was Grierson's 
spirit and execution that co-ordinated everything. A mass of 
scattered materials on the various insignificant and recondite 
dialects of the Sino-Tibetan or Tibeto-Chinese family as found 
in the North-eastern part of India — ^in the Valleys of Nepal and 
the inaccessible hills of Assam and the Indo-Burman border- 
country — was brought in order, and something like a clear 
pathway was traced in the intricate tropical jungle of languages 
and dialects that is presented by the Tibeto-Burman and Sino- 
Ghinese groups of speeches in India and Burma: and this was 
the work not of a specialist in Sino-Tibetan, but of one who had 
'established Indo-A,ryan linguistics in its present position. The 



1942 ] 


Obituary Notices. 


201 


Mon-Khmer speeches were similarly studied by Griersoiij although 
here the complications did not present the same hopeless tangle 
as in the case of Sino-Tibetan. 

Grierson the Scholar will live for ever in the pages of Science ^ 
particularly in Indian Linguistics and Indian Literature. Grierson 
the Man, however, was no less worthy of esteem and affection. 
His pareer as that of an I.C.S. officer and then of a scholar 
working in his retirement has on the whole been unexciting and 
comparatively uneventful — ^barring, of coui*se, the thrills that 
science and scientific discovery bring to every scholar. In his 
personality, with which the present VTiter had some opportunity 
of coming into close contact, he was singularly affable, — courteous 
and dignified, sympathetic and helpful, and free from the slightest 
trace of artificiality or hauteur: a personality which evoked 
respect and love at the same time, and a spirit of devoted 
collaboration. For some thirty years, Sir George Avas helped 
with a rare devotion to his work by his principal assistant, Mi*. 
E. H. Hall, who was trained by Grierson himself, — a remarkably 
unostentatious and unassuming scholar (whose acquaintance also I 
was privileged to make in Grierson’s residence) who was practically 
Grierson’s right-hand man in bringing out the Linguistic Survey 
and to Avhose qualities and services Grierson bears ample 
testimony in the peroration to the concluding volume — which ivS 
now the Introductory one — of the Linguistic Survey. I made 
Grierson’s acquaintance in 1919 as a student of Indian Linguistics 
in England, and our first meeting was in connexion with the 
readings in a MS. of a Prakrit grammar; and some little sugges- 
tions of mine were appreciated and warmly praised by Grierson, 
and this was the beginning of the very rare privilege I had of 
becoming, if not his pupil officially, at least something of a 
chela to one whom I regarded as one of my gurus in the science. 
I recall with a melancholy pleasure the several visits I paid to 
Cambeiiey, and the great hospitality I received from both Sir 
George and Lady Grierson (Lady Grierson, so full of kindness 
and dignity and motheiiiness, would be with us during lunch 
and tea, and would talk about things Indian and European, and 
she would show me the beautiful prospect of hill and down 
from her garden Avhich she called her ‘Himalaya View’, recalling 
Simla and Darjeeling). I had the run of his vast library, and 
the benefit of his immense scholarship. He was, while I stayed 
in England, and subsequently also, my friend, philosopher, 
and guide — and my great patron as well. During one Christmas 
week in London, he wi'ote to me from Camberley to see some 
English pantomimes and Christmas plays, and reminded me 
that ‘all work and no play made Jack a dull boy’. He helped 
me, after an examination of my claims for that privilege, to 
obtain permission of the University authorities of London to 
proceed straight to D.Lit. examination without my being 
required to pass the M.A. or the Ph.D. as a preliminary qualifica- 



202 


Year^Booh E.A.S.B.for 1941. 


[VOI.* VIII, 


tion. After I was awarded my degree, Sir George very carefully 
read througii my thesis, making corrections and adding sugges- 
tions before, it was rewritten for the press (ji kindiic^ss which 
Prof. Jules Bloch of Paris, who was another gum of mine in 
tlie subject, also extended to my thesis lat(,yr); and wlien it was 
finally published under the auspices of the Uni vc^rsity of Calcutta 
as the Origin and Development of the Bengali langua..ge, Sir George,) 
contributed the Preface. Since my return to India in 1922, I 
was ill correspondence with him off and on, and it was always an. 
honour to be favoured by him with a r 0 pri,rit, and with an 
occasional query in a matter in which he thought I might be 
helpful He made a bakhshish to m,e of all the volum,es of the 
Linguistic Survey, which remains for me a precious possession 
for ever. It is a thousand pities for me that during iny two 
subsequent visits to England in 1935 and 1938 it was not possible 
for me to come up to Camberley and pay my personal respects 
to Mm, as his doctors advised him complete rest after two 
severe fits of illness on both occasions; he was in very fading 
health, and the doctors’ injunctions were dutifully obeyexl by :me. 

Sir George Grierson’s connexion with the (Royal) Asiatic; 
Society of Bengal which began after his arrival in Calcutta on 
15th November 1876, was long and intimate. The Society’s 
Journal was the main venue for the publication of his articles 
up to the time he left India, and besides the Society published 
some substantial works by him, including flio Kashmiri 
Dictionary, He was in the Council of the Society for the first 
time in 1893, as one of the Secretaries, and was made an Honorary 
Bellow in 1904. A terra-cotta bust of Sir George Grierson by 
the Italian Sculptor, A. Marzollo, is in the collection of the 
Society. The Council of the Society had it made in 1932 to 
commemorate the completion of his Kashmm Dictionary. 

With his genuine love for the Indian people and his sincere 
appreciation of the deeper elements in Indian culture, Sir George 
Grierson has helped the Indian people to know itself in that most 
important expression of its culture, namely, its language. That 
is why his memory deserves to be respected and cherished 'by all 
Indians. 

This opportunity I now take to present to the memory of 
George Abraham Grierson, as father of Linguistic Studies in 
India during the present age, our respectful and affectionate 
homage, on behalf ^ of students of Indian Linguistics, Indians 
and others, both living and yet to come; and as a great humanist 
who loved man and loved the people of India, and wlio by his 
scientific work was a bond of union between two continents. May 
Ms name grow greater and greater, an insp.iration for all time. ' 

Sttniti Kumab Chattbbji. 

{Mead in the Ordinary Monthly Meeting of Uh May, 194L) 



1942] Obituary Notices, 203 

Ctitbu Saday Butt 
(1882-1941) 

The unexpected death of Mr, G. S. Butt, just after Ms 
recent retirement from the Indian Civil Service and when he 
was free to devote his full energy to nation building activities, 
creates a gap in the ranks of India’s foremost sons, wMch is 
hard to fill up. Mr. Butt wiU be remembered with gratitude 
by posterity as the founder of the Saroj Nalini Association and 
of the Bratachari Movement. The former is a women’s social 
service and education centre founded in memory of his wife, 
who died some 16 years ago, and has now 400 branches in Bengal 
and other provinces. The Bratachari Movement is an expression 
of his intense love for country. 

WMle in charge of districts, in com-se of his tours in rural 
areas, he was struck by the simple decorative art practised in 
the village homestead of Bengal. Gradually after a painstaking 
search and enquiry a large amount of material embodying rural 
arts and crafts was collected by him and in 1931 he organised 
Bural Heritage Preservation Society of Bengal, which had for 
its principal object the revival and preservation of folk songs, 
folk dances and folk literature of Bengal as well as of its rural 
fine arts. The Bratachari Movement in its present form was 
started in 1932. This Movement has served as a very useful 
vehicle for imparting physical education and love for the country 
to the adolescent and the adult alike through social work, dance- 
drills and active contact with the life of the people, on which 
the scheme lays emphasis. Mr. Butt had dreams of extending 
Ms movement on wider lines, and he acquired for the Bratachari 
Society a very big plot near Calcutta for a permanent training 
centre but the cruel hands of death has snatched him away 
wMle he was in a position to devote the whole of his dynamic 
energy to this self-imposed task. 

1^. Guru Saday Butt was born in 1882 at Birasri, in the 
district of Sylhet in Assam. After passing the Intermediate 
Examination of Calcutta University in which he secured the 
first place, Mr. Butt proceeded to England where he qualified 
for the Indian Civil Service in 1904. He was at the Emmanuel 
College at Cambridge for a year and came out at the end of 
1905 to join his appointment. At the end of 1929 while posted 
at M3rmensingh as district magistrate and collector, he in- 
augurated a movement for village reconstruction. He did not 
rest with merely drawing up of the programme, but axe in 
hand, he led parties to cut down insanitary jungles and trees in 
villages and to re-excavate silted-up channels. He was a pioneer 
in tMs line and he identified Mmself completely with the ordinary 
people. His example made these humble works fasMonable 
for the ‘Bhadralog’ class who are now following them up ; with 
great zeal and earnestness. 



202 


Year-Book M.A.S.B, for 1941. 


[voL. vni, 


tion. After I was awarded my degree. Sir George very carefully 
read througii my thesis, making corrections and adding sugges- 
tions before, it was rewritten for the press (a kindness which 
Prof. Jules Bloch of Paris, who was another guru of mine in 
the subject, also extended to my thesis later); and when it was 
finally published under the auspices of the University of Calcutta 
as the Origin and Development of the Bengali la^iguage. Sir George 
contributed the Preface. Since my return to India in 1922, I 
was ill correspondence with him off and on, and it wa,s always an 
honour to be favoured by him with a reprint, and with -an 
occasional query in a matter in which he thought I might be 
helpful. He made a bakhshish to me of all the volumes of the 
Linguistic Survey, w^Mch remains for me a precious possession 
for ever. It is a thousand pities for me that during my two 
subsequent visits to England in 1935 and 1938 it was not possible 
for me to come up to Camberley and pay my personal respects 
to him, as his doctors advised him complete rest after two 
severe fits of illness on both occasions; he was in veiy fading 
health, and the doctors’ injunctions were dutifully obeyed by me. 

Sir George Grierson’s comiexion with the (Royal) Asiatic 
Society of Bengal which began after his arrival in Calcutta on 
15th Hovember 1876, was long and intimate. The Society’s 
Journal was the main venue for the publication of his articles 
up to the time he left India, and besides the Society published 
some substantial works by him, including fhe Kashmiri 
Dictimary. He was in the Council of the Society for the first 
time in 1893, as one of the Secretaries, and was made an Honorary 
Bellow in 1904. A terra-cotta bust of Sir George Grierson by 
the Italian Sculptor, A. MarzoUo, is in the collection of the 
Society. The Council of the Society had it made in 1932 to 
commemorate the completion of his Kashmiri Dictionary, 

With his genuine love for the Indian people and his sincere 
appreciation of the deeper elements in Indian culture, Sir George 
Grierson has helped the Indian people to know itself in that most 
important expression of its culture, namely, its language. That 
is why Ms memory deserves to be respected and cherished by all 
Indians. 

This opportunity I now take to present to the memory of 
George Abraham Grierson, as father of Linguistic Studies in 
India duriiig the present age, our respectful and affectionate 
homage, on behalf of students of Indian Linguistics, Indians 
and others, both living and yet to come ; and as a great humanist 
who loved man and loved the people of India, and who by his 
scientific work was a bond of union between two continents. May 
Ms name grow greater and greater, an inspiration for aU time. 

SuOTTi Kxtmab Chattebji. 

(Rmd in the Ordimry Monthly Meeting of Uh May, 1941.) 



1942 ] Obituary Notices, 203 

GuRtr Sabay Butt 
(1882-1941) 

The unexpected death of Mr. G. S. Butt, just after his 
■recent retirement from the Indian Civil Service and when he 
was free to devote his full energy to nation huilding activities^ 
creates a gap in the ranks of India’s foremost sons, which is 
hard to fill up. Mr. Butt will be remembered with gratitude 
by posterity as the founder of the Saroj Nalini Association and 
of the Bratachari Movement. The former is a women’s social 
service and education centre founded in memory of his wife, 
who died some 16 years ago, and has now 400 branches in Bengal 
and other provinces. The Bratachari Movement is an expression 
of his intense love for country. 

While in charge of districts, in course of his tours in rural 
areas, he was struck by the simple decorative art practised in 
the village homestead of Bengal. Gradually after a painstaking 
search and enquiry a large amount of material embodying rural 
arts and crafts was collected by him and in 1931 he organised 
Rural Heritage Preservation Society of Bengal, which had for 
its principal object the revival and preservation of folk songs, 
folk dances and folk literature of Bengal as -well as of its rural 
fine arts. The Bratachari Movement in its present form was 
started in 1932. This Movement has served as a very useful 
vehicle for imparting physical education and love for the country 
to the adolescent and the adult alike through social work, dance- 
drills and active contact with the life of the people, on which 
the scheme lays emphasis. Mr. Butt had dreams of extending 
his movement on wdder lines, and he acquired for the Bratachari 
Society a very big plot near Calcutta for a permanent training 
centre but the cruel hands of death has snatched him away 
while he was in a position to devote the whole of his dynamic 
energy to this self-imposed task. 

Mr. Guru Saday Butt was horn in 1882 at Birasri, in the 
district of Sylhet in Assam. After passing the Intermediate 
Examination of Calcutta University in winch he secured the 
first place, Mr. Butt proceeded to England where he qualified 
for the Indian Civil Service in 1904, He was at the Emmanuel 
College at Cambridge for a year and came out at the end of 
1905 to join his appointment. At the end of 1929 while posted 
at Mymensingh as district magistrate and collector, he in- 
augurated a movement for village reconstruction. He did not 
rest with merely drawing up of the programme, but axe in 
hand, he led parties to cut down insanitary jungles and trees in 
villages and to re-exoavate silted-up channels. . He was a pioneer 
in this line and he identified himself completely with the ordinary 
people. His example made these humble works fashionable 
for the 'Bhadralog’ class who are now following them up .with 
great zeal and earnestness. 



204 


Year-Booh E.A.S.B, for 1941. 


[VOL. VIII, 


Mr, DIItt^s vision did not fly off the realities of his surround- 
ings , and lie did not spare himself manual labour to execute 
his plans. He devised his schemes vdtli such humble beginnings 
that little jerk was put to the people whose help he souglit 
ill their execution. He has always progressed step step 
and there was no ostentation in his methods. His niuseuni 
of folk art and crafts and his Eratachari Movement bear testimony 
to his characteristic methods. The Saroj Nalini Association 
for Women is a monument of his po-werful organisational abilities. 
It is very rare to find high officials utilising their office and the 
attendant influence for the social and cultural uplift through 
their personal contact. ’ But people of the districts of which he 
held charge remember him more as one of them rather than as 
an upright civilian administering law and order, and living in 
dignified seclusion. 

In 1929 Mr. Dutt made an extensive tour in Europe and at 
tiie meeting of the General Assembly of the International 
Institute of Agriculture at Rome headed the Indian delegation 
representing the Government of India. He also attended the 
World Adult Education Conference at Cambridge in 1929 as an 
Indian delegate. 

He retired early this year as Secretary to the Government 
of Bengal in the department of Local Self-Government and Public 
Health. On account of his independence and initiative which 
are supposed to interfere with bureaucratic administrative 
methods, he never a persona grata with the Government 
and he was not appointed to higher posts, and was not a recipient 
of any official ‘honours’. 

M. N. Saha. 

(Read m the Ordinary Monthly Meeting ofifh August, 1941.) 


Shams’fl- TTlamI’ KhIx BahIbttb Muhammad 
HidIyat Hosaik 

( 1887 - 1941 ) 

Shams’iil-‘Ulama’ ^an Bahadur M. Hidayat Hosain was 
bom in June 1887. His father, Maiilvi Wilayat Hosain, was a 
well-known Arabic and Persian scholar and like his distinguished 
son was connected with the Asiatic Society of Bengal: he pre- 
pared for the BihUotheca Indica series of the Society the text of 
Shams-i-Siraj ‘AM’s TdrlJchd-FtruzsMM which was published 
during 1888-91. Hidayat Hosain was educated at home and 
in the Calcutta Madrassa and obtained a 1st Class in the Einal 
Madrassa Examination, topping the list of' the successful 



1942] 


Obituary Notices. 


205 


candidates. In 1903 he was appointed as the Travelling Manlvi 
on the staff of the Asiatic Society of Bengal for collecting 
manuscripts for the Arabic and Persian Section of the Library 
of the Society and continued in this post till October 1908 
when he was appointed Lecturer in Arabic and Persian in the 
Presidency College, Calcutta. In July 1914 he vras appointed 
Professor of Arabic and Persian in the ‘same institution and 
continued in this post till July 1928 when he was transferred 
as the Principal of his Alma Mater, the Calcutta Madrassa; this 
post ho held till his retirement from Government Service in 
1935. On his retirement from the Calcutta Madrassa he again 
made the Society’s rooms as his headquarters, and in view of his 
special experience and qualifications was entrusted with the 
very important work of preparing detailed descriptive catalogues 
of the extensive collections of Arabic and Persian manuscripts 
in the Society’s Library. He carried on this work with great- 
zeal and enthusiasm till his sudden death on November 27th. 
1941. 

He joined the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal in 1911 as an 
Ordinary Member, and later became a Life Member. He W’-as 
elected an Ordinal y Fellow of the Societt’ and a member of its 
Council in the Annual Meeting of 1925. The same year he was 
appointed as the Joint Philological Secretary of the Society 
and continued in this capacity till 1939. Throughout this long 
period of his close association with the Society he showed a 
keen interest in its welfare and activities, particularly in the 
Arabic and Persian Section. He contributed several learned 
papers which were published in the Jotcrnal and Memioirs of the 
Society and edited a number of important Persian and Arabic 
works relating to Islamic culture and Indian history for the 
Bibliotheca' Indica series. In addition he prepared a Catalogue 
of the Manuscripts of the Buhar Collection in the Imperial 
Library (Vol. II, in 1933) and was tbe author of several learned 
articles in the Encyclopaedia of I slain. 

Shams’ul-^Ulama’ Hidayat Hosain, though he was educated 
ill the Calcutta Madrassa, came into very close contact with 
Sir E. Denison Ross, who w'as the Joint Philological Secretary of 
the Society, on his appointment as the Travelling Manlvi in 
1903, and it was under the influence of this great scholar that he 
imbibed the true spirit of research along Western lines. He 
.often used to say that liis success in life was due to the inspiring 
influence of, and his close association with, Sir Denison Ross in 
the early years of his life. 

Shams’uL'Ulama’ Hidayat Hosain was a well-knowm 
in Calcutta and was connected with the work of a number of 
charitable institutions of tbe city, among w^hieh may he men- 
tioned the District Charitable Society and the Society for the 
Protection of Children in India. He w'as a well-known scholar 
of Mohammedan , Law, and intricate questions relating to the 



206 


Year-Book B.A.S.BJor 1941. 


[¥OL. ¥111, 


Hadtik were often referred to him by the Government. He was a 
man of culture and refinement, endowed with many qualities of 
head and heart, and above all a gentleman in the true sense of 
the word. He was aiw’-ays ready to help young workers in every 
possible ivay. His services to the cause of education were 
recognised by the Government by the grant of the titles of 
Klian Bahadur and i^amshil-'Ulama’. 

Shaius’ul-‘Ulama’ Hidayat Hosain’s sudden death has left 
void ill the circle of Arabic and Persian scholars of Calcutta, if 
not of the wiiole of India, and his loss to the Society is irreparable. 

‘ May his Soul rest in peace ! 

Eaini Pbashad, 

{Mmd in the Ordkumj Monthly Meeting of Ist December, 1941.) 


Profess'oe C. R. Lanma^i 
(1850-1941) 

On February 20, 1941, passed away Prof. Charles Rockwell 
Lanmaii at the ripe age of 90. Born on July 8, 1850, he gra- 
duated from Yale University in 1871 and won his Ph.B. in 187J 
for comparative studies on Sanskrit and Greek. We worked 
for four years (1873-1876) at Berlin and Tubingen, under 
Dr. Roth and Prof. Curtins. On return he was recruited by the 
Johns Hopkins University as a lecturer in Sanskrit (1876-80). 
There he got the Chair of Sanskrit in Harvard, holding it for 
56 years (1880-1936). 

Has first direct contact with India and Indian scholars began 
with Ms tour in India (1889) during wMch he collected valuable 
books and manuscripts. On return he began his lectures on 
Indian poetry, literature and early Mstory. He was elected 
President of the American Philological Association in 1890 
and published the same year, 'The Beginning of Hindu Pan- 
theism*. His book on ^ Hindu Drama’ (1900) showed Ms keen 
interest in Sanskrit literature. We find him there as the sponsor 
of the now famous Harvard Oriental Series wMch had published 
over forty stout and well-edited volumes on BuddMstio and 
Brahmanioai literature and thought. The Religion and Philo- 
sophy of the Vedas (Keith), Vedic Concordance (Bloomfield), 
.Translation of the Atharva Veda (WMtney and Lanman), 
Jatakamala (Kern), Samkhya Philosophy (Garbe), Karpura- 
manjari (Steii Kondw) among other volumes of the series have 
endeared the name of the General Editor Prof. Lanman among 
Indologists. He was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Asiatic 



1942] 


207 


Society of Bengal in 1896 and kept ns in tonek with, the study of 
Sanskrit in the U.S.A. by sending some of Ms brilliant pupils 
and colleagues as well as their publications to our library. 

He took keen interest in the group of Indian students in 
Harvard and was responsible for securing for them some 
fellowships of the University. Lanman’s Sanskrit Header was 
responsible, for more than an3d5hing else, for popularising the 
study of Sanskrit amongst the University students of America, 
and his edition of the Translation of the Atharva Veda will 
make us all cherish his memory for years to come. 

Kalibas Nag. 

{Mead in the Ordinary Monthly Meeting of lih July, 194L) 



INSTRUCTIONS TO AUTHORS FOR THE SUBMISSION 
OP PAPERS FOR PUBLICATION IN THE JOURNAL 
AND MEMOIRS OP THE SOCIETY. 


PAPERS 

1. All communications submitted to the Society for publication 
should be addressed to the General Secretary and not to any officer by 
name. They should be type- written on one side of the paper with sufficient 
margin on the sides, and in all respects must he absolutely in their final 
form for printin g. 

2. Papers must be accompanied by a brief abstract not exceeding 
1,000 words, which shall indicate the subject of the paper and the nature 
of the advance in the existing knowledge on the subject. 

S. Tables of contents (for long papers), references to the plates and 
literatures, etc., should be given in their proper places. 

4. Quotations in Oriental languages should be in the original script, 
and wherever they are transliterated the System of Transliteration 
adopted by the Society must be followed (see instruction 15). The 
names of genera and species in the case of biological communications 
should be underlined to indicate that they are to be printed in italics. 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

5. All drawings and photographic prints should be as clear as 
possible. They should be in a form immediately suitable for reproduction , 
preferably of a size to permit reduction to about two-thirds the linear 
dimensions of the original, and should be capable of reproduction by 
photographic processes. 

6. Drawings and diagrams to be reproduced as line blocks should 
be made with fixed Indian ink, preferably on fine white Bristol board, 
free from folds or creases; smooth clean lines or sharp dots, but no washes 
or colours should be employed for shading. The positions of the illustra- 
tions that are to appear in the text must be clearly indicated in the margin 
of the paper; and explanations of the figures should be typed at the end 
of the main paper with the indication: Explanation of text-figures, 

7. The maximum space allowable for illustrations in the Journal 
and the Memoirs are as follows: — 

Journal, text^ X 6^^; Plates^ X T, 

Memoirs, text, 6|-' X ; Plates, lY 

These spaces include the usual figure numbering. Explanations of 
the plates to be printed on separate pages, facing the plates, must be 
typed on separate sheets. 

PROOFS 

8. A proof of each paper will be sent to the author, on the address 
given on the MS, 

9. No alteration or addition necessitating any considerable change 
of type may be made in the proofs. Shoidd such alterations or additions 
be necessary, these must be added as footnotes duly dated and initialled. 
The cost of corrections made in the proofs should not exceed 20% of 
the printers’ charges for the setting of the paper; any excess will be 
charged to the authors. 

10. The proof must, if possible, be returned within one week of the 
date of receipt to the Society duly corrected, 

( 208 ) 



[voii* vin, 1942] Instructions to Authors 

mSCELLANBOUS 


209 


11. Authors of papers published in the Society’s Journal and 
Memoirs are entitled to receive gratis 30 copies of each paper, and as 
many more as they require on payment of the cost of printing, paper, 
and make up. Such requirements must be stated at the time of returning 
the proofs. 

12. Papers by non-Members of the Society must be communicated 
through a Member, who shall satisfy himself that the paper is suitable 
for presentation to the Society, and is ready for the press. 

13. No communications under consideration or accepted for the 
Society’s publications may be published elsewhere without the express 
sanction of the Council. 

14. To facilitate the compilation of indexes, each author is requested 
to return to the Society together with the proof, a brief index of the 
contents of the paper. These indexes will be edited and incorporated 
in the volume when completed. 

15. The following systems of transliteration are henceforth to be 
followed (as far as practicable) in the publications of the Society, in 
quoting non -European words as such. In giving names of places, authors 
or books, which would occur in the course of the English text, a ‘broM’ 
transcription, following English values of the consonants and avoiding 
diacritical marks, is recommended. 


SANSKBIT 

^==a ^T = a = i ^ n ' 

^ -s p ^ f =s i ^ = e (or e) $ = ai (or a|) 

5= o (or 6) =s an (or au) (Prakrit == a!, at) 

■^{Anusvdra) = m i (Visarga) = h x {Jihvdmullya) = x 
(Upadhmdmya) = <^ , 

Sandhi Vowels may he indicated as a i n e o. Avagralm^\ 
Accents in Vedic — Uddtta a a etc. Svarita — a. 


w 



w 


s= 

k- 

kh 

g 

gh 

n (or g) 


W 




= 

c 

ch 

j 


fi (or p) 


H 




= 


th 

d 

db 



1^ 



•r 

= 

t 

th 

d 

dh 

n 







P 

ph 

b 

bb 

ra 






=: 

y 

r 

1 

V 

{OIW) 


V 




= 

& 

§ 

s 

b 



oS^ 




== 

1 

Pi 





HINDI (and other North Indian Speeches) 

As for Sanskrit, only nasalised Vowels are to he indicated 
by a tilde mark ('^) above the Vowel (e.g. ’if ^ = a i S 



Year^Book M.A.S.B.for 1941. 


[VOL* vin, 


m 


etc*), and ^ ^ are to be denoted optionally by either d dh or by 
f fh. Care should be taken in distinguishing w and w (b and 
i?)— the latter preferably may be written as w rather than % 
specially in intervocal and &al positions. The final silent •a 
may be optionally omitted : but in quoting Early Hindis etc* the 
final a should be retained. oJ ^ as in Rajasthani, Panjabi, etc* 
are to be indicated as in Vedic. 


BENGALI 

The system for Sanskrit, with the provision for nasal 
Vowels and for ^ ^ f ) as in Hindi. Eor ^ ^ in all 

tatsama or pure Sanskrit words, y should be employed, in 
Prakritic and semi-tatsama words, j ; subscribed ^ ) 

should be indicated by y. The difference between ^ (= 6) 
and ^ ( = 1 ;, w) ne^ not be indicated for Bengali — b may be 
written for both: only subscribed is to be written 

as w (e.g. Skt. Visvdsa = Bengali Biiwds), Final -a may b© 
omitted optionally, but it should be retained for Early Bengali. 


ARABIC 

In transcribing Arabic, according to the context either 
(1) the native Arab pronunciation (as current in the Jazimtu4- 
‘Arab) or (il) the Perso-Indian pronunciation may be followed. 
(!) Arabic in native Arab Pronunciation — 

> ^ {dlf hamm) = ’ ; v = b, ^ = t, = th (or 0 ) ; £ = j 

(or g), c = C = feb Xs or X) ; ^ = d, ^ dh (or 8 ); j = r, 

j s= z ; a- = s, ■= sh (or S) ; <>*==§, == d; t (or t), 'h ^ 

(or z) ; t == ^ (or r); ^ = f, J = q ; k ; J « 1 ; 

= u; ^ = h; (i=:y, !. 

respectively = a, i, u (or S, 5 optionally in place 

of i, u), ^ = a, i, u ; a ; ^ t = i ; = ii ; cr = ay 

(or a!) ; jf = aw (or an) ; tanmn ^ above line ; ds - L 

(Woie: = *Abdu-l-Haqq, or "Abd al-Haqq, not ‘Abd-ul* 

Haqq.) 

4 =s t (or h, or th)* 



YEAR-BOOK 

OF THE 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL 

FOR 1942 


VOLUME IX 




Year-Book, Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1942 

CONTENTS 

Page 

1. Proceedings, Annual Meeting, 1943 .. ** .. 5 

Annual Address, 1942-43 . . , . . . . 10 

Officers and Members of Council, 1943 . . . . . . 17 

Annual Report, 1942 . , . . . . . , 18 

List of Publications, 1942 . . . . . . . . 32 

Abstract Statement of Receipts and Disbursements, 1942 . . 33 

Abstract Proceedings Council, 1942 . . . . . . 56 

2. Addenda to List of Patrons, Oflicers, Coimcil Members, etc., 1942 71 

New Members, 1942 . . . . . . . . 72 

New Associate Member . . . . . . . . 73 

Changes in Membership . . . . . , . . 73 

Loss of Members, 1942 . . . . , . . . 73 

Barclay Memorial Medal, recipient . . . . , . 74 

Joy Crobind Law Memorial Medal, recipient . . . . 74 

3. Proceedings, Ordinary Monthly Meetings, 1942 . . . . 75 

Obituary Notices . . . . , . . . 102 




PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, 1943 

FEBRUARY 

The Annnal Meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 
was held on Monday, the 1st February, 1943, at 5 p.m. 

Present 

Db. C. S. Fox, D.Sc., M.I.M.E., F.G.S., F.NI., F.R.A.S.B,, 
President (in the Chair). 


Members : 

Agharkar, Dr. S. P. 

Akbar, Mr. M. 

Alimuddin, Mr, M. S. 

Asadullah, Khan Bahadur K. M. 
Auden, Mr. J. B. 

Bagchi, Dr. K. N. 

Banerjee, Mr. S. 

Banerjee, Dr. J. N. 

Bastin, Mr. ,R. W. 

Bhandarkar, Dr. D. R. 

Biswas, Dr. K. P. 

Bose, Mr. M. M. 

Brown, Mr. Percy 
Chatter jee, Mr. B. C. 

Chatter] ee, Mr. K. N, 

Chatter] ee, Dr. M. M, 

Chatterjee, Mr. N. C. 

Chatter] ee, Mr. P. P. 

Chatterjee, Mrs. T. 

Chatter] i, Dr. S. K. 

Dhiman, Mr. M. C. 

Edgley, The Hon’ble Mr, Justice 
N. G. A. 

Fawciis, Mr. L. B, 

Gangoly, Mr. O. C. 

Ghatak, Mr. J. C. 

Ghose, Mr. R. C. 

Ghosh, Dr. P. K. 

Ghosh, Dr. P. N. 

Visitors : 

Ahmad, Mr. S. 

Bardhan, Major P. 

Biswas, Mr. J. K. 

Biswas, Mr. P. C, 

Chakravarti, Dr. A. 

Chatterjee, Mr. B. K. 

Chatterjee, Mr. S. R. 

Ohaudhuri, Dr. J. B. 

( 


Ghuznavi, Sir A. H. 
Griffiths, Dr. W. G. 

Guha, Dr. B. S. 

Gupta, Mr. P. C. 

Haq, Khan Sahib M. M. 
Hendrie, Major J. H, 

Hora, Dr. S. L. 

Ishaque, Dr. M, 

Law, Dr. B. C. 

Law, Dr. S. C. 

Lort- Williams, Sir Jolm 
Majumdar, Dr. R. C. 
Meyer, Miss S. 

Mitter, Rai Bahadur K. N. 
Mookerjee, Mr. R. P. 
Mookerjee, Dr. S. P. 
Mukherjee, Dr. J. N. 
Mukherjee, Mr. P. K. 

Nag, Dr. Kalidas 
Neogi, Dr. P. 

Rahman, Sh. K. 
Ray-Chaudhuri, Dr. H. C. 
Roy, Dr. B. C. 

Sarkar, Sir Jadunath 
Siddiqi, Dr, M. %. 

Sircar, Mr. Ganapati 
Waight, Mr. H. G. 

West, Mr. W. D. 
and others. 


Das-Gupta, Mr. S, 

Donmithoime, Miss A. G. 

Edgley, Mrs. 

Ghosh, Mr. P. K. 

Habibuilah, Dr. A. B. M. 
Heywood, Major-General T. J. S. 
Imam, Dr. A. 

Jugantar (Reporter) 

5 ) 



Ymr-^Boolc R.AB.B, for 1942, 


[VOL« 


Maifcra, Dr. D. IST. 
Hiikherjee, Mr, S. K. 

Nag, Mr, R. C. 

IXair, Mr. K. Kaishnan 
Narayanaswami, Mr. V, 
Xityaswarupananda, Swami 
Pal-Chaudliuri, Mrs. A. 
Ralunaii^ Mr. B. 

Ray, Dr. A. N, 

Ray, Mr. B, N". 

Ray, Mr, I. R. 

Ray, Dr. IST. 

Ray-Cliandlinri, Mr. G. C. 
Rudra, Mr. S. -N. 


Sadeque, Dr. R. 
Sadeque, Mrs. S. 
Samadar, Mr. M. N. 
Samadar, Mrs, S, 
Saraswati, Mr. S. K. 
Sarttar, Mr. S. S. 

Sen, Dr. A, C. 

Sen, Mr. K. B. 

Sen, Mr. N. 0. 

Sen, Mrs. P. 
Sen-Gupta, Mr. R. G. 
Spencer, Mr. E. S. 
Tyson, Mr. G. W, 
and others. 


In declaring the Annual Aleeting open, the President for 1942 
ordered the distribution of voting papers for the election of 
Officers and Members of Council for 1943, as weU as the voting 
papers for the election of Ordinary Fellows proposed by the 
Council to all the Ordinary Members present, and appointed 
Dr. E. S. Guha and Br. S. P. Agharkar to be the scrutineers. 
He then called upon the General Secretary to present the Annual 
Beport for 1942, 

The Annual Eeport was presented (vide page 18). 

The retiring President then addressed the meeting (vide 
page 10) after which he called upon the scrutineers to report 
and announced the result of the Council election (vide page 17). 


After this announcement the retiring President gave place 
to the President for 1943, who thanked the Society, as follows : — 

Members of tsm Sooiety, Ladies akd Gei^tlemek, 


I thank you sincerely for the honour you have done 
me by electing me as President of this great Society. For more 
reasons than one I value this honour deeply. Let me assure 
you, so long as I hold this offiice, it will be my endeavour to, 
maintain with your co-operation the highest traditions of the 
Chair. The Society occupies a unique place in the chequered 
history of development of Indian research and scholarship. 
While it has served to inspire many a worker to further studies 
in diverse fields of knowledge, it has helped to bring together 
the best elements of the East and the West and to promote 
goodwill and understanding between them. In course of the 
coming year we shall complete 160 years of our existence. While 
we shall take stock of our achievement, we shall also have to 
consider in the light of existing conditions how best we can 
increase the usefulness and vitality of the Society and foxther 
the aims of the great Founder who was actuated by no other 
desire than the service of humanity through the path of know- 
ledge. I confidently ask not oiffiy for the support of the 
members, of the Society hut of the enlightened' pubKo outside 
in the ta^k of reconstruction that lies ahead of us. 



1943 ] 


Proceedings Annual Meeting. 


7 


On behalf of yon all, let me thank the retiring President for 
his services to the Society/ 

The President for 1943, then made the following annonnce- 
nionts : — 

' I have now the great pleasure to announce that, having 
received the report of the scrutineers, I declare the following 
ordinary members, 

Mr, A, P. M. Abdul All, and 
Sir J. C, Ghosh, Kt. 

duly elected as Ordinary Fellows of the Royal Asiatic Society of 
Bengal. 

I have now to make the following announcements concerning 
the awards of the Elliott Prize for Scientific Research for 1941 
and 1942. 

The prize for 1941 was for Chemistry for which papers 
froni two candidates had been received in 1941 in competition 
for the prize, but announcement as to whom the award was 
given could not be made at the last Annual Meeting because the 
Trustees of the Prize had not received the report of the referee 
in due time. So announcement concerning it is being made 
this year. 

The Trustees of the Prize have judged the papers of one 
candidate deserving of the award and have accordingly been 
given to Dr. M. C. Nath, D.Sc., Lecturer in Physiological 
Chemistry of the Dacca University for meritorious contributions 
to the subject of Chemistry.’ 

The President then called upon Dr. Nath to receive the 
prize, in the following words: — 

^Dr. Nath, I have great pleasure in handing over this prize 
to you and I congratulate you most heartily on your success in 
winning it.’ 

The President continued to say — 

^ The Elliott Prize for 1942 was for Physics for which papers 
from one candidate only had been received in competition for 
the prize. The Trustees have reported that his papers were not 
of sufficient merit as to award the prize. 

The prize for 1943 will be for Geology and Biology (including 
Pathology and Physiology)” concerning which notifications will 
be published in the Calcutta, Bihar and Orissa Gazettes. 

My next announcement is regarding the Aroaandale 
Memorial Medal. This medal is awarded every three years for 
conspicuously important contributions to the study of 
Anthropology in Asia. 

This year the medal is awarded to Dr. Birajasanker Guha, 
M,A., Ph.D., F.N.I., Anthropologist of the Zoological Survey of 



Tear-Book E.A.S.B. for 1942. 


[VOL. IX, 


India, for Ms long sustained labours in the field of Anthropological 
Research, and one time General Secretary of the Society/ 

The President called upon Dr. Guha and addressed Mm. as 
follows : — 

® Dr. Guha, I have great pleasure in bestowing upon you, on 
behalf of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, the Annaiidale 
Memorial Medal for the year 1942. Kindly accept it with the 
Society’s and nay hearty congratulations. I thank you very 
much for coming over from Benares to receive the medal 
personally this evening/ 

next announcement is regarding the Paul Johannes 
Briihl Memorial Medal. This medal was instituted in 1931 to 
be bestowed on a person who, in the opinion of the Briihl Medal 
Board, has made most meritorious piece of original research in 
any branch of Botany with reference to the Indian Empire, 
It was due to be awarded last year. As announced at the last 
Annual Meeting, the Rules governing the award were amended in 
accordance with the terms of the Trust in 1942, and the award 
is now being made in accordance with the amended Rules this 
year. 

The Paul Johannes Briihl Memorial Medal for the year 1941 
has been awarded to Rao Bahadur G. N. Rangaswami Ayyangar, 
E.NJ., Geneticist and Millets specialist, and retired Principal, 
Agricultural College and Research Institute, Coimbatore, 
S. India, in recognition of the work done by him on the genetics 
of the millets of India.’ 

The President then called upon Dr. S. P. Agharkar, M.A., 
Ph.D., P.NJ., Ghose Professor of Botany, Calcutta University, 
to receive the medal on behalf of the recipient and addressed 
him as follows : — 

‘Dr. Agharkar, I have great pleasure in handing over to 
you, on behalf of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, the Paul 
Johannes BrOhl Memorial Medal for the year 1941, and request 
you to transmit it to Rao Bahadur G. K. Rangaswami Ayyangar 
with the Society’s and my hearty congratulations. I thank you 
very much for your courtesy in receiving the medal on his behkf/ 

In conclusion, the President for 1943 announced that the 
Annual Meeting had been dissolved and requested all to remain 
on their seats to witness a Cinematograph performance featuring 
Korthem Afghanistan, Darjeeling, etc., by Mr. W. D. West of 
the Geological Survey of India. He further announced that at 
its conclusion an Ordinary Monthly Meeting of the Society would 
be held for the election of Ordinary Members and the transaction 
of the routine business for which he invited the members to be 
present* 



1943] 


Proceedings Annml Meeting. 


The Cinematograph performance was then held and was 
appreciated by the au^ence. The General Secretary proposed a 
vote of thanks to Mr. West on behalf of the Society stating that 
Dr. H. H. Wilson who served the Society in several capacities 
from 1811-1833 was the first to unfold the archaeological 
treasures of Afghanistan in his/Ariana Antiqua’. 



AllUAL ADDRESS. 1942«43 


Ladies aistd Gentlemen, 

It lias been the custom for your President to address 
you, after liis year of office, at the Annual General Meeting. 

I have had the* honour of being your President during the year 
1942, and you will agree with me that 1942 has been a year of 
great events. We have watched the shadow of War spread 
over southern Asia and creep across Burma to stand at the border 
of India. Even this city of Calcutta has had some scratches, 
from the few bombs which have been unloaded on us during 
moonlight raids by Japanese bombers within the last few 
weeks. Compared with the affairs taking place in Soviet Russia, 
or North Africa, or the Western Pacific, or China, or even in 
India, our own activities must appear insignificant. However, 
I am confident that the part we play can be useful and may thus 
be of some value. 

2. We remember to-day that the Society was founded 
and named 'The Asiatick Society’ by Sir William Jones in 1784. 
He had landed in Calcutta in October 1783 after a voyage of 
six months. The objects of the Society were described by the 
founder in the following language: ‘The bounds of its investi- 
gations will be the geographical limits of Asia, and within 
these limits its enquiries wfll be extended to whatever is per- 
formed by Man, or produced by Nature.’ To many of us the 
original name seems finer and bigger than the one now used, 
and it seems a great pity that anyone could alter the name of the 
Society from that it first carried. When I hand over my proud 
place to my successor the Society will have entered on its 159th 
year, and I hope you will celebrate its 160th Anniversary in 
a victorious peace. 

3. My predecessor, Sir John Lort-Williams, in his earlier 
address to you in 1940-41, was distinctly pessimistic as to the 
Society’s constitution, and he believed he had found evidence 
of lukewarmness— the most dangerous of all human oomplamts^ — 
in our midst. He was of the opinion that this form of rot was 
due to the specialisation which has become evident in all kinds 
of scientific work. It is certainly true that the contributions by 
some specialists are not easily understood by those who have 
become specialists in some other branch of science. And while 
the papers submitted by these specialists may be of great value 
to their respective colleagues, they are often uninteligible and 
therefore of little interest to lawyers and merchants and other 
educated people. 

4. In his next address in 1941-42, last year, my predecessor 
was able, largely as a result of his own efforts, to report a little 

{ 10 ) 



[VOL. IX, 1943] 


Annual Address, 


11 


more favourably. I agree with him that re-organisation is not 
sufl3.cieiit to put life into anything lukewarm. However, during 
1942, whether we desired it or not, the Society was obliged to 
take measures for the safety of many ' valuable books and 
manuscripts and pictures.' Also, since I assumed office, we have 
had three successive General Secretaries, omitting the interim 
periods when I acted in this capacity. First Dr. B. S. Guha 
resigned, when his office was transferred with the Zoological 
Survey collections to Benares. JSText Dr. S. L. Hora was ohHged 
to relinquish these duties, because his charge of the Fisheries 
Department of Bengal required all his time. 

5. We have now been fortunate in securing Dr. KaKdas 
Nag for our General Secretary, and I hope he will be able to 
continue. I would also like to mention how much I have ap- 
preciated the assistance and guidance of my colleagues on the 
Council. Our monthly and other meetings, even during the 
hot weather in 1942, were well attended. Our clerical and 
subordinate staff have been most useful — ^from our able Super- 
intendent, Mr. P. 0. Matthai, to the very loyal office servants. I 
have to refer to the remarkable flight of some of the servants 
after the air raids at Christmas time (1942). It is difficult to 
understand why that class of servant deserted from almost 
every place where they had been employed, in many cases for 
several years, in Calcutta. 

6. There is no doubt that the high prices of food and 
clothing have put our clerical staff and servants to considerable 
inconvenience, but your Council has given careful thought to 
these matters and by a ‘dearness allowance b and in other ways, 
hope to solve these difficulties. Another problem has been the 
paper shortage. It has had to be faced and the greatest economy 
has been observed consistent with the necessity of maintaining 
contact with our Members and Fellows. We have been able to 
complete journals, which had been long in arrears, and thus 
bring the published journals up to date. In so doing we have 
reaped some financial benefit as well as released large quantities 
of tjrpe. The Bibliotheca Indica was issued, and it is hoped that 
the catalogues of Arabic and Sanskrit manuscripts will be 
published during the ensuing year. 

7. A feature of the Society's activities in 1942 has been the 
Discussion meetings, which are held fortnightly, and are intended 
to attract visitors — ^members of His Majesty's Forces, soldiers 
from the United States, Canada, China, and other foreign 
countries — ^who happen to be in Calcutta and are interested in 
questions of Indian geography, history, literature, customs, 
architecture, paintings, etc. Discussions at meetings were one 
of the chief reasons for the growth of the Society in its earlier 
days, and there is no doubt that most people enjoy popular 
discussions. It is necessary to keep the meetings popular even 
for highly educated people. However, a key to satisfactory 



12 Tear-BooJc BA.S.B, for 1942. [voL. ix, 

discussions is that there must be time and leisure to prepare 
attractive subjects and questions for discussion. 

8. At the present time when so few of us have any leisure 
and most of us are thronged with duties, there seems to be need 
for some opportunity to discuss matters relating to the realm of 
Nature or any inspiring work performed by Man. It has never 
been within the activities of the Society to take part in 
politics or in religious disputes. The chief purpose of our dis- 
cussions is in providing accurate information, and this can only 
be given in a manner which is intelligible to all our members. 
It is for this reason largely that contributions by specialists 
should relate to subjects of interest and be understood by most 
educated people. The Society should be a meeting place and a 
clearing house and not the particular home of any specialisation 
branch of science or art. 

9. The Discussion meetings which have been arranged by a 
Committee are thus an endeavour to go back to a custom which 
provided much intellectual pleasure to educated people who 
had the leisure to come here or contribute to our publications. 
We have been encouraged in our efforts, as a wartime measure, 
by our Patron, H.E. Sir John Herbert, Governor of Bengal. His 
Excehenoy sent me Rs.2,000 from his War Purposes Fund to 
meet capital expenses for additional furniture — ^tables, crockery 
and a loud-speaker apparatus. Teas are provided at these 
meetings at a charge of eight annas a head and this enables 
military officers and other visitors who are interested to bring 
friends and take part in the discussions in the capacity of 
members pro tem., and perhaps more permanently later. 

10. I would mention that this historic building has become 
a meeting place for special meetings of other institutions such 
as the Mining, Geological and Metallurgical Institute, and 
actually houses the National Institute of Sciences of India. The 
former Institute, as its title shows, is a specialists’ society who 
publish their technical papers in their own Transactions. The 
latter Institute, which was originally to be called the Academy 
of Sciences in India, has many sections, so that the various 
branches of science have their own lines of specialisation provided 
for and at the same time have a common meeting place to 
explain their discoveries, without too much scientific jargon, 
at our discussions if they wish. The Indian Science Congress 
Association developed in this way as a permanent organisation. 

11. You may feel that I have dwelt unduly on this aspect 
of the Society’s activities, but you must remember that it is our 
very life that is at stake. I have shown that there are specialist 
societies or institutions where specialists may discuss their most 
valuable discoveries in their own technical language. There is, 
however, a need for a central society where we may meet and, 
without any loss of dignity or diminution in the quality of 
our researches, still explain or describe the work of Nature or 



1943] 


Annual Address, 


13 


performances by Man, in words which are intelligible to educated 
people, and interest them. The value of a discovery may often 
be unknown, if it is not disclosed in a fashion that cannot only be 
understood but also appreciated, especially by those who possess 
the machinery for making it useful. 

12. The growth' or, shall I say, spread of lukewarmness may 
come from many sources and I am interested in it from the 
point of view of a geologist. The name ‘Geology’ was intro- 
duced into scientific literature in about 1779, a few years before 
‘ The Asiatick Society ’ was founded. I beKeve the word ‘ Geology ’ 
was coined in 1777, or 1778, after the date that workable coal 
was reported to occur in the Raniganj area of Bengal. Of 
course, minerals and ores and metals had been worked for or 
prepared in India and elsewhere for centuries. Gold mines were 
worked in India in the times of King Solomon and iron was 
prepared in this country in very remote times as far back as 
the dawn of civilisation, and this must go back almost to the 
Garden of Eden, when work became necessary. 

13. The use of maps is also a very early innovation, and 
the value of a map, having rock and mineral deposits marked on 
it, was appreciated as far hack as 1685. Thus the search for 
ores and minerals and the employment of mineral maps go back 
to a period long before the introduction of the word ‘Geology’. 
However, the oldest Geological Survey, that of Great Britain, 
claims its initiation from the date 1835, when Sir Henry de la 
Beche was made ‘Geological Colourer of Ordnance Maps’ in 
England. It has been from this source that some geologists 
have obtained the idea that the objective of a Geological Survey 
is to prepare a geological map of the country. Such a map 
would show by colours and symbols the distribution of rock 
formations and the occurrence of mineral deposits. 

14. It is true that the preparation of a geological map by 
field work is as important as the making of plans and sections 
by a civil or mechanical engineer, but there still remains the 
practical development or erection to be carried out if the surveys 
were made with any seriousness. The Geological Survey of 
India was definitely begun in 1846 to give assistance to the coal 
mining industry of that day, and had, as its immediate result, 
the recognition of the Raniganj coalfield as a Great Coalfield 
and planned its exploitation. For the next 40 years, until about 
1886, the Geological Survey of India had as its main objective 
the development of the mineral resources of this country. 
Already in 1868 this Department was provided with mining 
specialists for conducting boring operations and opening mines 
in the Wardha Valley. 

15. Further mining and metallurgical specialists were 
included in the Geological Survey of India up to 1902 when they 
were suddenly made the nucleus of what is now the Mines 
Department. This procedure would have been of far greater 



14 


Year-Book B.ABM.for 1942. 


[VOL. IX, 


value had this Mines Department been established to open up 
mineral deposits and generally show the way for the development 
of the mineral resources of India. Instead of this, it has been 
eTiiplo5"ed for administering the mining rules and regulations, 
largely for the purpose of ensuring safety in working coal mines. 
The Geological Survey was at the same time deprived of the 
very men who were needed for conducting prospecting and deve- 
lopment operations on mineral deposits. 

16. Ill spite of the fact that Sir Thomas Holland, in a 
Presidential Address to the Mining and Geological Institute of 
India in 1907, made it quite clear that mineral development 
was the chief objective of the official geologist in India, and 
indeed his duty, this Department was obliged to concentrate 
on the preparation of the geological map of India. Wliether 
this was due to lack of personnel or the belief that India was 
not well endowed with economic minerals is hard to say. The 
fact remains that mineral development was left largely to 
private enterprise and concentrated on rich occurrences of ores 
and minerals whose exploitation for export or other use required 
little risk and practicaUy no capital. There seemed to be some 
misunderstanding . 

17. With the re-organisation that followed the Great War 
of 1914-18, the Geological Survey was able to secure more 
technical staff, but it seems that by then the Government of 
India had also come to believe that it was a scientific department 
chiefly concerned with the preparation of geological maps. 
Consequently, when the necessity for retrenchment arose in 1932, 
this Department was included, but being small, was not as roughly 
handled as it might have been. India had therefore never 
possessed organisations like the Bureau of Mines in the United 
States or Canada, whose essential duties are mineral research to 
show the way for mineral development. It was, however, left 
to the Government of Soviet Eussia to demonstrate the use of 
its Geological Survey. 

18. Previous to the establishment of the Soviet Government, 
Russia had maintained a Geological Survey on the same lines 
as that in India, and like the Geological Survey of India, the 
Russian organisation had collected, by field observations b,y 
skiEed geologists, a vast amount of valuable information. All 
this data, together with museum specimens, and some trained 
personnel, were avaEable when the Soviet Government began 
its drive for mineral development for the industrialisation 
which it had planned. In spite of every 'kind of criticism by 
foreign experts and in the face of many difficulties in their way to 
development, the drive was maintained. There was in 1937, 
when I visited Russia, a boom in geological personnel, and the 
numbers employed then were said to be upwards of 10,000 
geologists, who, needless to say, had to prove their practical 
value in a thoroughly satisfactory way. 



1943] 


Annual Address. 


15 


19. It is my opinion that the names 'geology' and 'geoio« 
gicaF are liable to give an erroneous idea of the actual duties 
to be performed by those engaged in this sphere of investigation. 
To many^ including some geologists themselves, the idea seems 
to be that their work is entirely a distinct scientific' business 
which may or may not be of practical value to the country that 
provides for them. As I hinted, Soviet Russia was no place for 
uncertain workers or dreamers, although the Government did 
insist on rest days and parks and rooms for rest and culture in 
every city and in every works. We have seen the miracle of the 
Soviet Union performed before our very eyes in the grandest 
way possible and under conditions which are simply those of 
a struggle against something worse than death. 

20. Here in India the Government has recognised the 
possibilities of its Geological Survey and has provided for its 
utilisation, but I am not quite sure if the Government is fully 
convinced that any considerable outlay for mineral develop- 
ment win have a resounding benefit, either by direct return in 
revenue or from a general improvement of the country. It is 
quite correct to be prudent, especially in a case where risk 
must be admitted in so great a project as the type I have in- 
dicated, but Government have approved in principle and already 
sanctioned the establishment of an Utilisation Branch of the 
Geological Survey of India for mineral exploration. This is, 
however, a beginning and the creation of a research organisation 
on the lines of the Canadian Bureau of Mines has still to come. 

21. In the case of Russia the Soviet Government planned 
on an immense scale with the idea to provide work for all and 
utilise to the fullest the mineral and other resources in its Union 
of Socialistic Republics. It was claimed during my visit to 
the Urals region in 1937 that geologists were needed everywhere. 
Geologists were engaged in various operations — ^routine surveys, 
sx>ecial prospecting, detailed investigations in mines for coal, 
salt and other minerals and ores, problems of water-supply and 
engineering, questions of soil erosion and fertility, research 
laboratories and for training. In India we have a fewer number 
of geologists for these purposes than is the case in Great Britain 
where' the Geological Survey does not need any personnel for 
matters relating to mineral research, prospecting or the training 
of students and has little to do with the opening of mines. 

22. As a result of the 97 years' work carried out by officers of 
the Geological Survey in India it has been found that an average 
of 500 square miles can be accurately surveyed each year, and 
that the average service iii the field is about 10 years per 
geologist. Roughly 100 geologists in aU have been so employed 
since 1846 so that theoretically only about 500,000 square miles 
could have been examined in any detail in the time, and there 
remains over a million square miles still to scrutinise. We have. 



16 


Jear-Booh RA.S.B, for 1942, [vol. ix, 1943] 


of course^ covered the whole peninsula and much of the border- 
landSj but this work cannot be regarded as detailed except in 
places like the Jharia and Raniganj coalfields and certain other 
areas of economic or technical importance. There is a great 
deal to do and the personnel and equipment required must be 
on lines similar to those adopted in Soviet Russia. 

23 . That there is every hope for a profitable return for State 
expenditure, on mineral development, may be seen from the 
progress already made since the Mines Department was created 
to ensure safety in mines, which were developed largely by 
private enterprise. About 1902 the total value of the annual 
production of minerals, ores, etc. "in India was estimated at 
roughly Es*500 laklis, while in 1940 the figure is computed at 
nearly Rs.4,000 lakhs, or eight times more. Another factor 
for consideration is that the imports into India are such that 
approximately half the goods are made from minerals, ores 
and related substances, and, that a great proportion of such 
materials could be obtained in this country. What is lack- 
ing chiefly is the fabricating machinery, cheap electric power 
and, to some degree, skilled operators for manipulation and 
manufacture. 

24. It may seem that I have wandered somewhat from the 
Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, but I have really only sketched 
in, very roughly, a great background of industrialisation for 
the utilisation of those materials I have been an agent for to the 
Government of India. The Society stands as a peaceful meeting 
place for those who study the arts of man’s oivfiisation and who 
investigate the realm of nature by observation and scientific 
research . M[ost of us have come to realise how misunderstandings 
may grow, by neglect by lukewarmness, to problems of economic 
importance, and even become the affair of nations, and end in 
the senselessness of brutal war. We must know the value of 
commonsense and the need for some rest and Ipisure. What 
better way can there be than for us to meet here occasionally 
and regularly, and discuss the matters that interest us, and thus, 
by fair criticism, learn to keep that civilisation which we have 
been in peril of having taken away from us. 


Cyril S. Fox. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF COUNCIL » 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL^ 1943, 

Elected and announced in the Annual Meeting^ 

1,5^ February, 1943. 

President, 

Dr. Syamaprasad Mookerjee, M.A., B.L., D.Litt., Barrister-at» 
Law. 

Vice-Presidents, 

Dr. C. S. Fox, D.Sc., M.I.Min.E., F.G.S., F.N.L, F.R.A.S.B. 

Sir John Lort-Williams, Kt., K.O. 

Dr. Meghnad Saha, D.Sc., F.R.S., F.N.I., F.R.A.S.B. 

Dr. S. C. Law, M.A., B.L., Ph.D., F.Z.S., M.B.O.U., P.N.I. 

Secretaries and Treasurer, 

General Secretary : — Dr. Kalidas Nag, M.A., D.Litt. 

Treasurer: — C. W. Garner, Esq., C.S.I., I.C.S. 

Philological Secretary: — Dr. Nalinaksha Dutt, M.A., Ph.D., 
D.Litt. 

Joint Philological Secretary : — ^Dr. M. Z. Siddiqi, M.A., Ph.D. 

S Biology : — Dr. S. P. Agharkar, M.A., Ph.D., 
F.N.I. 

Physical Science: — Dr. K. N. Bagchi, B.Sc., 
M.B., F.LC., D.T.M., F.N.I. 

Anthropological Secretary: — ^Dr. W. G. Griffiths, M.A., B.D., 
B.Sc., Ph.D. 

Historical and Archaeological Secretary : — Dr. R. C. Majnindar, 
M.A., Ph.D., F.R.A.S.B. 

Medical Secretary :— Dr. J. B. Grant, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.P.H.A. 
Library Secretary : — Dr. Sunder Lai Hora, D.Sc., F.Z.S., 
F.R.S.E., F.N.I., F.R.A.S.B. 

Other Members of Council, 

The Hoffible Mr. Justice N. G. A. Edgley, M.A., I.C.S., J.P., 
Barrister- at-Law. 

L. R. Fawcus, Esq., C.I.E., I.C.S. 

Percy Brown, Esq., M.B.E., A.R.O.A., F.R.A.S.B, 

Dr. E. C. Law, M.A., B.L., Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S., F.R.A.S.B. 

Dr. M. Ishaque, M.A., B.Sc., Ph.D. 


( 17 ) 



AllUAL REPORT FOR 1942. 


Tlie Council of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal has the 
honour to submit the following report on the state of the Society’s 
affairs during the year ending the 31st December, 1942. 

Ordinary Members. 

Gains and Losses , — These were as follows : — 

Gahw. I Losses, 


Elections carried forward . . 5 Lapses of election . . 4 

New elections . . . . 27 Elections carried over . . 6 

Deaths . . . . 7 

Resignations . . . . 11 

Rule 38 .. ..9 

Withdrawals of applications 2 

Total . . 32 Total . . 39 


Initial total 382; net loss 7, final total 375. 

Life Members . — ^The number of our Life Members at the end 
of the year stands the same as that of last year, viz. 58. One 
was lost by death ; one member compounded during the year. 

Deaths . — ^Members lost to us: — 

G. P. Tate (1893). Hirendra Nath Datta (1926). 

Maharaja SirP. C. Tagore (1898). Sir Maninatha Nath Miikherjee (1928), 
D, N. Gooptu (1921). Sir Nalini Ranjau Chatterjee (1928). 

Rai Bahadur R. Ohanda (1922). 

Associate Members. 

The present number is 6, the statutory maximum is 15. 

Ordinary Fellows. 

^ On the date prescribed by the Regulation for the issue of 
voting papers for the election of Ordinary Fellows, there was 
one vacancy on the roll of Fellows, and two candidates were 
proposed for election; hut on scrutiny of the voting papers, it 
was found that neither of the two candidates had received the 
required number of votes hence no election of new Fellows was 
made. 

We lost through death — Rai Bahadur Ramaprasad Chanda. 

At the end of the year the number was 47 ; the statutory 
maximum is 50. 


f 18 ) 



[VOL, IX j 1943] 


Annual Report 


i9 


Honorary Fellows. 

Bied — Sir Joseph Larmor, Kt., M.A., B.Se., LL,I)., DXhL., F.R.S,, 
F.R.A.S. (1920). 

The number at the end of the year was 17, the statutory 
maximum is 30. 

■Special Anniversary Honorary Members. 

There remain only 9 Special Anniversary Members on the 
roll who were elected on the occasion of the Society's 150th 
Anniversary. 

Council. 

The Council met 14 times. The attendance averaged 11. 

Office Bearers. 

Changes in the Council were as follows : — 

Br. B, S. Guha, absent from 14-2-42 to 9-3-42; from 1-4-42 to 
13-4-42; from 1-5-42 to 25-5-42 and from 22-6-42 to 3-8-42; and 
Dr. Hora officiated for him. 

Dr. K. P. Biswas, absent from 5-5-42 to 10-8-42 ; from 27-8-42 to 
12-12-42. 

Dr. Chatterji, absent from 15-3-42 to 1-5-42 and from 26-5-42 to 
25-6-42. 

Prof. Vedantatirtha, absent from 1-2-42 till the end of the year. 
Prof. Chakladar, absent from 1-2-42 till the end of the year. 

Prof. Haq, absent from 9-4-42 to 14-6-42. 

Dr. Nag, absent from 15-3-42 to 16-5-42. 

Hon. Mr. Justice Edgley, absent from 5-9-42 to 25-10-42. 

Sir John Lort-Williams, absent from 11-9-42 to 23-11-42. 

Dr. S. L. Hora was appointed General Secretary vice Dr. B. S. 
Guha resigned on 3-8-42. 

Dr. Kalidas Nag was appointed General Secretary vice Dr. S. L. 
Hora resigned on 7-12-42. 

Dr. B. C. Majumdar was appointed Library Secretary mce Dr. S. L. 
Hora resigned on 2-11-42. 

Dr. S. L. Hora was appointed Library Secretary vice Dr. R. C. 
Majumdar resigned on 7-12-42. 

Dr. B. C. Majumdar was appointed Historical and Archaeological 
Secretary vice Dr. Kalidas Nag resigned on 7-12-42. 


Committees of Council* 

The Standing Committees of Council, namely, the Einance,, 
Publication, and Library Committees, met monthly. A special 
meeting of the Finance Committee was held in December to 
consider the Budget for 1943. 

During the year a Standing Programme Sub-Committee, 
consisting of the ex-officio members, Sir John Lort- Wiliams, 
Dr. Bagchi, the Hon'ble Mr. Justice Edgley and Mr. Fawcus, was 
constituted with power to arrange the programme of meetings, 
lectures, etc. of the Society. This Committee met 9 times during 
the year. ^ 



Tear-Booh Il.AB,B.for 1942. 


[¥OL« IX, 


The following Sub- Committees were appointed;— 

(1) A Sub-Committee consisting of the ex-officio members, 

Sir John Lort-WilUams, Dr. S. P. Mookerjee, 
Dr. M. N. Saha and Dr. R. C, Majumdar, to enquire 
into and report upon the working of the system of 
administration of the Society, to which Dr. S. L. 
Hora was co-opted. 

(2) A Sub -Committee consisting of the ex-officio members, 

Sir John Lort-Williams and Dr. S. L. Hora, for 
further A.R.P. measures, 

(3) A Sub-Committee consisting of the ex-officio members, 

Sir John Lort-WiUiams and Dr. S. P. Agharkar, to 
amend the regulations regarding the award of the 
Briihl Memorial Medal, 

Office. 

During the year, the office of General Secretary was held 
successively by Dr. B. S. Guha, Dr. S. L. Hora and Dr. 
Kalidas Nag. Dr. Guha, who was General Secretary of the 
Society since August, 1939, had to resign his office in July 
owing to the transfer of the Zoological Survey of India to Benares 
Cantonment. In August, Dr. Hora was appointed in his place, 
but he had to give up the appointment as he was unable to 
devote enough time to the work of the Society. Since 7th 
December Dr. Nag has been General Secretary, He took up the 
onerous duties at the special request of the Council. He is 
devoting three hours every day in the afternoons to the work of 
the Society. 

As stated in the Annual Report of last year, Mr. P. 0. 
Matthai continued as Superintendent and the entire responsibility 
of running the office rested with him. The routine w'ork 
of the Society, along with its cultural activities, was continued 
without any break. 

The office has been following the new Indian Standard Time 
according to the rules from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on week days, and 
from 10 a.m, to 2 p.m. on Saturdays since September. Owing to 
the existing Black-out Regulations in Calcutta, the extension of 
the library hours had to be curtailed, which now are the same as 
the office, except Saturdays till 5 p.m. During the year strict 
measures had to be adopted to enforce discipline and regular 
attendance of office staff, and, as a consequence, there has been 
appreciable improvement in the office administration. 

Some changes have been effected during the year with 
regard to the seating accommodation of the office staff. The 
office has been shifted from the main hall, western end, to the 
two southern rooms with thembject of keeping the entire haU' 



1943] 


Annml Report. 


for tlie use of members and for meetings. Tke members' 
reading room is now at the south-eastern end of the main hal^ 
where members and research workers can carry on their studies 
without being disturbed by the noise of t\^3ewriters and other 
distractions. This has been a notable improvement and our 
thanks are specially due to Sir John Lort- Williams for his vision 
and his abiding interest in the work of the Society. 

There was a dislocation of work during the latter part 
of December owing to the sudden departure of members of the 
menial staff caused by the war scare in Calcutta, They had to 
be replaced by others, and it will take some time before these get 
accustomed to their work. Temporary dislocation therefore is 
inevitable. 

The following changes took place in the personnel of the 
office staff. Mr. J. C. De, whose probationary period was extended 
to 31st January, 1943, resigned his appointment in December, 
and the general and stock clerk, S. K. Raye, was transferred 
to the library. His work on stock and sales ' and stationery 
has been allotted to the press clerk, D. K. Das and the cashier, 
B. M. Chakravarti, respectively. The services of H. B. Banerjee, 
who was engaged temporarily in ISTovember 1940, to number, 
arrange and classify the old files, were dispensed with towards 
the end of the year and his work was allotted to the despatch 
clerk. 

With the introduction, during the year, of Discussion 
Meetings every fortnight, the work of the staff has increased 
considerably. 

Correspondence. 

Correspondence, as heretofore, occupied much of the time 
of the office staff. In spite of the war and curtailed activities 
of many offices in India and abroad the number of letters 
received during the year was 1,809 and issued 2,083. Of 
incoming letters, several were book orders, and a number of 
letters were issued in connection with the Discussion Meetings. 
Regular Monthly Meeting notices and Discussion Meeting notices 
were issued to members and visitors, in addition to invitations to 
the General Lectures. The total number of notices issued by 
post, under several heads, was 3,625 excluding the regular Council 
and Committee Meeting notices. Library reminders, Fellowship 
Meeting notices. Medal Meeting notices, quarterly subscription 
Mis, etc. 

In addition, 150 Council and Committee circulars were 
issued. 

Stock Booms. 

Re-arrangement of the stock rooms on the ground floor waa 
continued. On further examination of the shelves, it was found 



22 


Year^Book R.A.SM.for 1942. 


[VOL. IX^ 


that misceliaiieous loose parts of our Journals^ Memoirs^ and 
publications of the Bibliotheca Indica which were set aside for 
further, scrutiny, as they were damaged and worm-eaten, remain 

to be sorted. 

In accordance with the orders of the Council, ten complete 
sets ofthe Society’s publications, including the Bibliotheca Indica ^ 
were sent, as a precautionary measure, to places outside 
Calcutta. The thanks of the Society are specially due to 
the authorities of the Muslim University, Aligarh, Allahabad 
University and Nagpur University for their kind offices in keeping 
ill safe custody the publications sent to them, safely packed, 
ill wooden boxes. 


Rules and Regulations. 

No changes were made in the Rules, but certain amendments 
were made in the 'Regulations regarding the General Lectures’ 
and in the ' Regulations regarding the award of the Paul Johannes 
Briibl Memorial Medal’. A set of Regulations were adopted 
by the Council regarding 'Discussion Meetings 


Representations. 

Indian Museum. — The Society’s representative on the Board 
of Trustees of the Indian Museum, under the Indian Museum 
Act X of 1910, was Dr. J. N. Mukherjee. 

Kamala Lectureship — The Society’s nominee to serve on 
the Selection Committee of the Kamala Lectureship, adminis- 
tered by the Calcutta University, continued to be Dr. Bain! 
Prashad. 

lationai Institute of Sciences of India. — ^The Society’s 
representatives to serve on the Conncil of the National Institute 
of Sciences of India were Mr. W. D. West as' Vice-President and 
Dr. D. M. Bose as member of the Council for 1942. 

Sarojini Basu Gold Medal. — ^The Society’s nominee to serve 
on the Special Committee for the award of the Sarojini Basu 
Gold Medal, administered by the Calcutta University, was Prof. 
Y. Yedantatirtha. 

Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland.— The 
Society’s nominee for the corresponding fellowship of the Royal 
Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland was Dr. S. K. 
Chatter ji. 

Indian Historical Records Commission.— The Society’s re- 
presentative to serve on the Indian Historical Records Com- 
mission was Mr. C. W. Giirner. 

2B 



1943] 


23 


Annual Report, 

Deputations. 

Tlie Society received invitations to send representatives to 
tlie various functions of the under-mentioned bo^es 

Annual Conference of the National Academy of Sciences^ 
Allahabad, at Agra on 13th to 15th February. 

Silver Jubilee Celebration of the Bhandarkar Oriental 
Research Institute at Bombay in January 1943« ■ 

Awards. 

EUiott Prize for Scientific Research. — ^The annual prizes 
offered for the years 1941 and 1942 were Chemistry and Ph3"sics 
respectively. Announcements regarding the prizes will be made 
at the Annual Meeting in 1943. 

The prize for next year will be for Geology and Biolog}^ 
(including Pathology and Physiology). 

Barclay Memorial Medal. — ^The (biemiial) award of the 
Barclay Memorial Medal for conspicuous contributions to 
Medical and Biological Sciesice with reference to India, for 1941, 
was announced at the Annual Meeting in 1942. The medal was 
bestowed on Sir David Prain. 

The next award will be announced at the Annual Meeting 
in 1944. 

Sir William Jones Memorial Medal. — ^The next (triennial) 
award of the medal will ie made at the Annual Meeting in 1944. 

Annandale Memorial Medal. — ^The announcement of the 
(triennial) award of the medal for important contributions to the 
study of Anthropology in Asia will be made at the Annual 
Meeting in 1943. 

Joy Cjobind Law Memorial Medal. — ^The (triennial) award for 
conspicuously important work in Zoology in Asia was aimounced 
at the Annual Meeting in 1942. The medal was awarded to 
Prof. K. N. BahL 

Paul Johannes BruM Memorial Medal. — ^The announcement 
of the (triennial) award of the medal for important contributions 
to the stud}’' of Asiatic Botany with special reference to the 
Indian Empire, for 1941, will be made at the Annual Meeting in- 
1943. The next award wiU be made at the Annual Meeting in 
1945. 

Indian Science Congress, Calcutta, Prize. — ^The next award 
wiU be made in connection with the next session of the Congress 
to he held in Calcutta. 

Pramatha Nath Bose Memorial Medal. — ^The Council has not 
yet decided upon the year in which the initial award of this 
medal for conspicuously important contributions to practical or 
theoretical Geology with special reference to Asia wil be made. 



24 ' 


[VOL. IXj 


Tear^Book R.A.S.BJor 1942, 

Library. 

Tlie re-organization of the library, commenced in 19303 was 
continued in spite of many handicaps. 

Accessions. — There has been a drop in the number ' of 
periodicals received owing to the international situation. ’Due 
to the same cause, a limited number of books, totalling 150 in 
al, could be purchased. The total amount spent was onty 
Es.626-5-6 out of Rs. 1,000 budgeted for the purpose. 

Six new journals were added to the librar}^ either by 
exchange or purchase: (1) Journal of the Music Academy; 
(2) New Indian Antiquary ; (3) Modern Review ; (4) Proceedings 
of the Missouri Academy of Sciences, U.S.A.; (5) Transactions 
of the Indian Ceramic Society’ ; and (6) Journal of the University 
of Bombay. 

Binding and repair. — Binding and repair work was con- 
tinued vigorously. In the English Section 961 volumes were 
bound and repaired at a cost of Rs. 1^531-10-6. In addition, 
75 Islamic and 127 Sanskritic manuscripts have been pasted 
and repaired. Owing to the high price of materials for pasting 
and their unavailability, the repair of manuscripts will have 
to be suspended till conditions become normal. 

Booh reviews. — Books and journals are being received 
regularly for review in the Society’s Journal. Several books 
were added to the library as presentations under this head. • 

Permanent Library Endowment Fund. — ^No donation was 
received during the year. The total amount of the fund is 
Rs.l6, 665-7-8 in 3| % Government Securities. 

Cataloguing. — Some progress was made in the preparation of 
author and subject indexes of those books in the library whose 
names do not appear in the existing printed authors catalogue. 
In the Sanskrit, Tibetan, Persian and Arabic sections some 
progress was made with regard to the cataloguing of manuscripts 
and printed books. 

Removal of books from the first floor to the ground floor. — 'As 
many books as possible have been removed to the empty shelves 
on the ground floor as a precautionary measure against air raids. 
30,000 volumes of books and periodicals have been brought dowm, 
of which about 20,000 have been arranged according to the serial 
numbers. All available space on the ground floor will be made 
use of, and it is hoped that by the end of January this work 
will be completed. 


Finance. 

Appendix III contains the usual Statements showing our 
accounts for 1942. No change has been made in the form of 
their presentation. 



1943] 


Annual Report 


25 


The. following three new funds have been opened:— 

(1) Air Raid Precaution Fund (Statement No. 20). 

(2) Discussion Meeting Fund, Capital Account (Statement No. 21), 

(3) Discussion Meeting Fund, Running Account (Statement No, 22). 

Details are given elsewhere in the report. 

During the year Bs.608 were received as admission fees 
and Rs.420 as compounding fees. The total of E.s.1,028 
will be transferred to the Permanent Reserve by conversion of 
Government Paper (3|%) belonging to the Temporary Reserve. 

The Government of Bengal maintained the 20% out in some 
of the grants made. 

The Government of India maintained the 50% cut in the 
grant for Arabic and Persian MSS. (Statement No. 5). The 
fund closed with a debit balance of Es. 1,960-3-3. 

The Government Securities, shown in Statement No. 25, are 
held in safe custody by the Imperial Bank of India, Park Street 
Branch, During the year there was an appreciation of the 
securities, thus increasing the book assets of the Society. 


Budget Estimate for 1943. 

Ordinary Receipts. 



Budget 

Estimate 

Actuals for 
1942. 

Budget 

Estimate 


for 1942. 

for 1943. 


Rs. 

Rs, 

Rs, 

Interest on Investments and 

C 9,800 

9,860 

9,860 

Deposits 

1 750 

750 

450 

Advertising 

10,200 

10,200 

10,200 

Rent 

10,680 

10,680 

10,680 

Annual Grant 

1.600 

1,600 

1,600 

Miscellaneous 

300 

420 

350;, 

Members’ Subscription 
Publication, Sales and Subscrip- 

8,000 

7,706 

8,000 

tions . . . 

5,000 

3,913 

4,000 

Total . . 

46,330 

45,129 

45,140 


Extraordinary Receipts, 


By Fees 

by Admission Fees 
by Compounding Fees 


Es. 

Rs. 

Rs. 

700 

688 

700. 


420 


700 

1,108 

700 


Total . . 



26 


Ymr-Book EA.S.B, for 1942. [vol. ix, 


Ordinary E:spenditure, 




Budget 
Estimate 
for 1942. 

Actuals 
for 1942. 

Budget 
Estimate 
for 1943. 



Rs. 

Rs. 

"Rs. 

Scilaries and Allowaneo 


22,250 

21,816 

23,700 

280 

Ooinmissioii 


300 

253 

Stationery 


1,000 

350 

500 

Fan, Light and Telephone 


500 

436 

600 

Taxes . . 


2,400 

2,388 

2,400 

Postage 


1,400 

1,240 

1,000 

Contingencies 


1,000 

890 

1,000 

Petty Repairs 


150 

100 

150 

Insurance 


500 

500 

500 

Menials’ Clothing . . 


50 

42 

250 

Office Furniture 


1,000 

253 

200 

Building Repairs 


2,000 

2,000 

1,500 

Provident Fund Share 


700 

691 

700 

Audit Fee 


250 

250 

250 

Books, Library 


1,000 

790 

1,600 

Binding . . 


4,500 

1,626 

2,000 

Journal and Memoirs 


6,500 

6,250 

5,760 

Printing, Circulars, etc. 


700 

620 

800 

A.R.P. Measures 



2,270 

660 

War Allowance 



1,176 

1,600 

Total 


46,200 

43,941 

45,140 

Extraordinary Expenditure. 




Rs. 

Rs. 

Rs. 

To Permanent Reserve 





by Admission Fees 

• 

700 

688 

700 

by Compounding Fees 



420 


Total 

e « 

700 

1,108 

700 


Publications. 

The complete volume of the Journal for the year has been 
published and distributed to members. The volume is composed 
of four numbers (2 Letters, 1 Science and 1 Year-Book) and consists 
of 642 pages and 10 plates. The Title-pages and Indexes for 
the three parts of Volume VII, viz. Letters, Science and 
Ymr-Booh, have been published and issued separately. 

Memoifs ^, — Not much appreciable progress has been made 
in the printing of Mahdvyutpatti by Alexander Csome de Kdrds. 
The whole material in Sanskrit, English and Tibetan has been 
set up in type and it is estimated that the number will be 
published during the next year. 

The Council at its meeting held in November decided to 
reduce the number of printed copies of the following publications 



1943] 


Anmml Report, 


27 


of the Society in accordance with the desire of Government to 
economize in the use of paper: — 

Journal and Memoirs — 850 ' copies from 1,000 copies, 
Catalogue of Sanskrit Mamiscripts, Vols, X and XI — 
500 copies from 1,000 copies. 

It is with this end in view, as well as according to the 
observations of the Bibliotheca Indica Sub-Committee on the 
high rise of prices of printing paper and its scarcity in the 
market, that no new work could be sanctioned for the coming 
year. 

Bibliotheca Indica Series . — ^The following work was published 
during the year : — 

Tirthakalpa edited by Pandit Kedar Nath of Jeypur 
together with an introductory note by Dr. S. K. 
Chatterji- It consists of 1-360 pages of text and 
and pp. i-viii of preliminary matter. 

Works in the Bibliotheca Indica Series in which further 
progress was made during the year are ;• — 

(1) The Doctrine of Nimbdrka, Volume III, by Dr. Roma 

Chaudhuri. 

(2) Padmdvati of Malik Muhammed Jaisi, English 

Translation and Notes by Mr. A. G. Shirreff, I.C.S, 

(3) Kuttanimatam — Edited with notes by Pandit 

Madhusudan Kaul of Kashmir. 

Descriptive Catalogues of Manuscripts in -the possession of the 
Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal : — • 

I . (1 ) The Descriptive Catalogue of Sanskr it MSS., Volume X , 

Astronomy and Astrology, prepared by MM. H. P. 
Shastri," and revised and edited by Prof. P. C. 
Sen-Gupta, has progressed considerably, and if 
progress can be maintained uninterrupted by the 
scarcity of paper, the Volume will be published in 
the coming year (1943). 

(2) The Descriptive Catalogue of Sanskrit MSS.^ 
Volume XI, Philosophy, prepared by MM. H. P, 
Shastri, and revised and edited by Prof. N. C. 
Bhattacharyya, M.A., Vedantatirtha, has been 
prepared and sent to the Press, but on account of 
scarcity of metal and paper it could not progress 
simultaneously with Volume X. 

II. Catalogue of Arabic Manuscripts, Volume II. — Since the 
death of Khan Bahadur Shams-ul-Ulama Dr. M. 
Hidayat Hosain, the task of seeing this Volume 
through thePress was. entrusted to Prof.M.Mahfuz- 
ul Haq, M. A. So far the material prepared by the 



Jem^Booh B.A.S.BJor 1942. 


[VOL. IX^ 


2S 

late Shanis-iil-Ulama was concerned^ Prof. Haq 
lias agreed to see it throngh the Press. This will 
form Part I of the Volume and it may be issued 
next 3^ear. For the remaining incomplete material 
for the Volume forming Part II, Prof. Haq has 
recommended that Dr. S. A. Imam, be engaged 
to complete it. 

TM following works are still imder preparation and as soon as 
remimd will he passed on to the Printers : — 

{!) Haft-Iqlim, Volume II, by Prof. M. Mahfuz-ui Haq. 

(2) AmalA-Salih or Shah Johan Nama — ^Iiidex, by M. G. 

Yazdani, 

(3) Bhagavad Gita (in Persian verse) by Dr. Baini Prashad. 

(4) Madthir-uBUmard — Volume II, English translation, 

edited by Dr. Baini Prashad. 

Air Raid Precaution Measures Fund. 

At the last Annual Meeting of the Society, our Patron, 
His Excellency the Governor of Bengal, who presided, 
made a special appeal for donations to the Society to defray 
the heavy cost of packing, insurance, etc. of the hooks, manu- 
scripts and pictures, which were removed to places of safety 
outside Calcutta, as a precautionary measure against air raids. 
He started the fund himself with a donation of Rs.500. The 
Society sent letters of appeal to all members and to the Govern- 
ments of Bengal and India and the response was very satis- 
factory, Rs,8,500 were realized and the thanks of the Society 
are due to those who generously contributed to the fund. 


General Lectures. 


The following General Lectures were delivered before fairly 
large audiences of members and visitors: — 


March 26tli 
March 28th 
March 30th 


April 2nd 
April 7 th 
April 15th . . 

April 27th 
November 10th 

November 24th 

December 8th . . 


Dr. Girindrashekar Bose: Psycho-Analysis. 

Major H. Hobbs : Old-time Clubs in India. 

Dr. C. J. Pao: China To-day with special 
reference to Cultural Development and her 
Relations with India. 

Dr. Suniti Kumar Chatterji: Romanization of 
Indian Languages. 

Dr. H. K. Sen: Lac, its biological and other 
Aspects. 

Dr, K. P. Biswas: The Vegetation of the 
Borderland of Tennasserim and Thailand 
(Siam) in the Mergui District, S. Burma. 

Dr. P. K. Ghosh : Indian Mineral Waters. 

Dr. A. A. Bake: Affinity of Indian, and Western 
Music. 

Dr. A. A. Bake: Some Indian Religious and 
Secular Folk-dances. 

Dr. A. A, Bake: Ladakh and the Dances at 
the Hemis Monastery. 



1943] 


Annual Report, 


29 


Cultural Activities. 

In addition to general lectures, facilities were offered to 
scholars for study and research and help was rendered to 
institutions and scholars outside Calcutta on matters of anti- 
quarian and historical interest. 

Discussion meetings are now being held for the first time. 
The object of these meetings is to afford opportunities to the 
pubhc for informal discussion in. order to stimulate interest in 
the work of the Society and in Indian culture. Such discussions 
have taken place fortnightly since August with intervals during 
the Pujah and Christmas holidays. Invitations to these 
meetings were extended to members. of the Allied Forces (British, 
Indian, American and Chinese) who are stationed in or in the 
vicinity of Calcutta. The meetings were ver^^ well attended and 
the topics chosen evoked great interest among all those who 
were present. 


August 27 th . . 
September M)th 

September 24th 
November 19fch 
December 3rd , . 
December 17th 


Major H. Hobbs: Old Calcutta. 

Capt, F. Kingdon Ward: Burma- Frontier and 
Beyond. 

Lt.-Col. G. L. Hyde: Chittagong Hill Tracts. 
Dr. W. G. Griffiths; Peoples of India. 

Dr. Kalidas Nag: Indian P^eligions. 

Mr. 0. W. Gurner; Topography of Calcutta 
(with special reference to the fighting in 
1756 - 57 ). 


General. 

Routine work in respect of the local distribution of the 
Society’s publications, circulars, forms, etc. and the keeping 
up to date of the addresses of members was carried out as usual, 
but the posting of Journals, etc. to belligerent and many 
neutral countries affected by the war was either stopped 
altogether, or was seriously handicapped by delays in shipment. 


Printers. 

Under the capable superintendence of Mr. G. E. Bingham, 
the Baptist Mission Press continued to act as our chief printers 
and gave, as usual, their valuable assistance. Mention 'also 
may & made of the help rendered by the Directors of the Inland 
Printing Works in doing minor printing work for the Society. 

Agencies. 

Our European, American and Indian Agents remain the 
same. An extension of the list for Asiatic countries could not 
be made owing to unsettled conditions. 

Exchange oi Publications. 

The following applications for exchange with the Society’s 
publications were considered by the Council, and its decisions 
are noted below - 



30 


Year-Book BA.S.B.for 1942, 


[VOL. IX, 


Publications oj : To be exchanged with : 

Missouri Academy of Science, U.S.A. . . Science volume of Journal. 
Indian Ceramic Sooiet.y . . . . Science volume of Journal. 

Meetings. 

Tlie Ordinary Monthly Meetings of the Society were held 
reguiaii}^ with the exception of April, May and the recess months, 
September and October. The average attendance was 1 1 members 
and 1 visitor. The maximum attendance was in November 
with 13 members and 3 visitors. 

There were no meetings of the Medical Section. 

Exhibits. 

At the Ordinary Monthly Meetings several interesting ex* 
hibits were shown and commented upon. The following may be 
mentioned: — 

Nalmaksha Dutt: Saddharma-pundarika. 

K. N. Bagchi: Some Indigenous Poisons used in Crimes. 

R. 0. Majiimdar: Rajavijaya-natakam. 

M. Z. Siddiqi: An important mA of the Poems of four important 
Poets of Persia: Sa’di, Hafiz, Jal41-i-‘Adud and KamAl of 
Khujand. 

Solicitors. 

The Society is under obligation to its Solicitors, Messrs, 
B. N. Basu & Co., for prompt and valuable service rendered 
during the year. To the head of the firm, Mr. J, N. Basu, it is 
specially indebted for his courtesy and ungrudging help on all 
occasions when there was any need to consult him. 

Summary. 

The year 1942 was one in which the activity and general 
prosperity of the Society were maintained. Though membership 
decreased by 7 by reason of the application of rules, by resigna- 
tion and death, the reputation of the Society stands high as the 
premier learned Society in the East, as can be seen from new 
applications for membership, of which 34 were received. On 
the cultural side, regular Monthly General Meetings, General 
Lectures, and Discussion Meetings were held, which were well 
attended. The publications, though unavoidably curtailed for 
want of paper, consisted of four issues of the Journal^ which 
were distributed to all members. 

The publications under the head Bibliotheca Indica pro- 
gressed satisfactorily and one work, viz. Tirthakalpa, fasc. 2, has 
been issued during the year. The cataloguing of the Sanskrit 
and Arabic Sections has progressed satisfactorily. The Council, 
towards the end of the year, appointed an editor to make up the 



1943] 


Annual Eepori, 


arrears in the Arabic Catalogue and it is hoped that substantial 
progress will be made during the ensuing year. The Council and 
Committees have performed their duties, contributing much to 
the success of the Society’s activities. There still remains much 
to be done in the Library, including the rich Manuscript library, 
in order- to implement the recommendations of the Special 
Enquiry Committee of 1939. 

The year under review was generally successful in spite of 
the reduced activities of institutions in Calcutta and elsewhere 
on account of the international situation. The output of work 
in all directions has been fairly large in quantity and valuable in 
quality. All worked harmoniously in a spirit of good-will and 
enthusiasm, adding materially to the growth of the Society’s 
scholarly and social prestige. 

The Founder of the Society, Sir William Jones, landed in 
Calcutta in October 1783. In the perilous voyage of those days, 
taking over six months (April to October 1783), Jones, with the 
intuition of a real genius, was already dreaming of developing a 
centre of research wherein would be co-ordinated the multi- 
tudinous currents of oriental culture, language and literature, law 
and social institutions, religion and philosophy, civic and natural 
science of Man in India against the background of the history of 
Man in Asia, and this dream was realized by him although 
his premature death prevented its full achievement. The 
coming year of 1943 will be the 160th anniversary of his 
grand 'Passage to India’, and the Council requests all well-wishers 
of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal to offer their whole- 
hearted co-operation to enable it to prepare adequately for the 
160th anniversary of the foundation of the Society in January 
1784, before the next Annual Meeting. In that expectation 
and hope this Report may be concluded with these words of 
our illustrious Founder: 'When I was at sea last August, on 
my voyage to this country, which I had long desired to visit, I 
found one evening, on inspecting the observations of the day, 
that India lay before us, and Persia on our left, whilst a breeze 
from Arabia blew nearly on our stern. A situation so pleasing 
in itself, and to me so new, could not fail to awaken a train of 
reflections in a mind which had early been accustomed to con- 
template with delight the eventful histories and agreeable 
fictions of this eastern world. It gave me inexpressible pleasure 
to find myself in the midst of so noble an amphitheatre, almost 
encircled by the vast regions of Asia, which has ever been 
esteemed the nurse of sciences, the inventress of delightful and 
useful arts, the scene of glorious actions, fertile in the productions 
of human genius, abounding in natural wonders and infinitely 
diversified in the forms of religion and government, in the laws, 
manners, customs, and languages, as well as in the features and 
complexions, of men.’ 



Tmr-Booh B.A.8.B. for 1942. [voL. ix, 1943] 


32 

[APPENDIX I] 

List of Pabiieations issued by the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 

daring 194S. 

(a) Bibliotheca Indiea : 

Price 
Rs. As .P« 

Indian Work: 


Tirtliakalpa, Fascicle 2, conciuding the work " , « 3 0 0 

(b) Journal and Proceedings (Third Series) ; 

(1) Vol.VIII (Letters), No. 1 .. .. .. 7 U 0 

(2) „ „ „ „ 2 .. .. S 8 0 

(3) „ „ (Science) „ 1 . . . . . , ?? S 0 

(4) „ „ (Year-Book) . . . , . . 7,0 0 

(5) Title-pages and Indexes to Vok VII® 



[APPENDIX n] 


Abstract Statement 

of 

Receipts and Disbursements 

of the 

Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal 

for 

the Year 1942 


( 33 )- 



34 Year-Book HA. S.B. for \%43,. [vol. ix, 

STATEMENT No. 1. , General 

Income and Expenditure Account 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P* 

To Establishment : 

Salaries and Allowances . 

Commission . . 

War Allowances 

Gbicbral Expenbitubb : 

Stationery 
Pans and Light . . 

Telephone 
Taxes 
Postage 

Contingencies . . 

Printing Circulars, etc. 

Audit Pee 
Petty Repairs . , 

Insurance 
Menials" Clothing 
Pumitur© and Repairs 
Interest on Security Deposit 
A.R.P. Expenses 

Purchase op Investments 

Library and Collections: 

Books . . . . . . 626 5 6 

Binding .. .. .. 1,631 10 6 

2,168 0 0 

Provident Fund Contribution for 1942 . . .... 690 9 0 < 

40,495 11 5 

Transfer ^ to Building Repair Fund 
Account . . . . , . .... 2,000 0 0 

Sundry Adjustment : 

Bad Debts written-oS 1,183 8 0 

BaiiAnob as per Balance Sheet .... 2,89,182 13 11 


.. 21,877 0 3 

295 11 6 

.. 1,170 13 0 

23,343 8 9 


299 

0 

3 

182 

14 

9 

251 

6 

0 

2,387 

5 

0 

926 

4 

6 

885 

2 

6 

544 

4 

3 

250 

0 

0 

84 

15 

0 

500 

0 

0 

41 

8 

0 

243 

2 

9 

5 

0 

0 

2,654 

12 

0 


5,047 14 8 


32,862 1 4 



1943] 


Beeeipts and Disbrnsements. 


35 


Fmd. 1942. 

for the year ended 3ist December, 1942. 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As, P. 
By Balance fbom: last Acoount .... 2,S2,067 6 4 


Cash Receipts : 

Interest on Investments . . . . 9,859 10 6 

Interest on Fixed Deposits . , . . 760 0 0 

Advertising . . . . . , 10,200 0 0 

Rent .. .. .. 10,365 0 0 

Miscellaneous .. .. .. 418 10 6 

31,583 5 0 

Personal Account : 

Members’ Subscriptions . . . . 9,024 0 0 

Admission Fees . . . . 608 0 0 

Compounding Fees . . . . 420 0 0 

Unclaimed Credit Balances . . 54 0 0 

10,100 0 0 

Investments purchased during the year 
credited at face value . . . . .... 6,000 0 0 

Appreciation on Investments re-valued 
on 31st December, 1942 .. .... 4,105 6 0 


3,32,862 1 4 



36 


Tmr-Booh B.A.S.B, for 194:2, [voL. ix^ 

STATEMENT No, 2. Oriental Publication 

From a moethly grant made by the Government of Bengal for the ptibli- 
(Rs.SOOy Lm$ 20% from the Ist April, 1932)5, and for the 


To Purchase of Investments 

Depreciation on Investments re- valued on 31st 
December, 1 942 
Printing 
Binding 

A.R.P. Expenses 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — Rs. As. P. 
Rs.5,000 3% War Loan . . 4,993 12 0 

Surplus at date .. .. 11,356 11 9 


Bs» As. P, 
5,047 14 8 

6 4 0 
4,476 12 9 
125 0 0 
1,712 8 0 


16,350 7 9 


27,718 16 2 


STATEMENT No. 3. Oriental Publication 

From an annual grant made by the Government of Bengal of 

Historical 
{Leas 20% from the 


To Balance from last Account 
Printing 
Editing 
Binding 


Rs. As. P, 
8,152 14 7 
2,687 6 0 
127 8 0 
125 0 0 


11,092 12 7 


STATEMENT No. 4. Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund 

From an annual grant of Rs,3,200 made by the Government of Bengal 

by the Society ; and Rs.3,600 
from the same Government 


To Cataloguing ,• 

Binding 

Printing 

Repairs to MSS. . . 
Preservation (A.R.P, Measures) 
Balance aa per Balance Sheet 


Re. As. P, 

615 0 0 
125 0 0 
1,538 0 6 
549 6 0 
8,468 7 6 
9,440 8 0 



1943] 


Receipts aTid Disbursements. 


37 


Fund No. in Account with B.A.S.B, 1942. 


cation of Oriental Works and Works of Instraction In Eastern Languages 
•publication of Sanskrit Works hitherto tmpufohshed, Rs.250. 



Rs. 

As. 

P. 

By Balance from last Account 

14,861 

12 

8 

Annual Grant . . 

7,800 

0 

0 

Interest realized during the year 

57 

2 

6 

Investments purchased during the year credited 




at face value 

5,000 

0 

0 



27,718 15 2 

Fund No. 2 , in Account with R.A.S.B. 

1942, 

Rs. 3,000 for the publication of Arabic £uid Persian Works of 
Interest. 

o/ ApnZ, 1932.) 



Rs. As. P. 

By Balance as per Balance Sheet , . * , 

11,092 12 7 


11,092 12 7 

Account^ in Account with B,A.S,B. 

1942. 

for the publication of the Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts acquired 
{Less 20% from the 1st of April, 1932) 
for Research Work. 


Bs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account 

Annual Grant . . . • • • 

17,846 6 0 
2,880 0 0 


20,726 6 0 


3 



38 7mr-BoohB.A.8.B.fw lMi. [tol, ix, 

STATEMENT No. 5. ' Arabic and Persian Manuscripts 

FroiB an annual grasit of Jls.S.OOO mado by tb© Government of India for 
by the Society ; for the purchase of further Manuscripts, 

Manuscripts found in 
(Less 50% from 1st Aprils 


Rs. As, P. Rs. As, P, 

To Balance from last Accoimt. . . . .... 4-5243 1 .1 3 

Printing . . • • • • . . , . 216 8 0 

4,460 3 S 


STATEMENT No. 6. Barclay Memorial 

From a sum of Rs.500 odd given in 1896 by the Surgeon 

encouragement of Medical 


Rs. As. P, Rs. As. P. 

To Cost of a Medal . . . . .... 1690 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs.700, 3|% G.P. Notes, 1864-55 658 0 0 

Surplus at date . . • • 109 5 8 

767 5 8 

783 14 8 


STATEMENT No. 7. Servants’ Pension Fund 

Founded in 1876 as the Piddington Pension Fund 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 
To Pension . , , , . . .... 132 0 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — ' 

Rs.3,000, 3J% G.P. Notes, 1854-55 2,820 0 0 
Surplus at date .. .. 783 10 8 

a, 603 10 8 

3,736 10 8 


STATEMENT No. 8. Annatidale Memorial Fund 

From donations by subscription. 


Rs, As, P. Rs, As. P. 

To' Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Ra.4,000, 3i% G.P. Notes, 1864-66 3,760 0 0 

Surplus at date . . . . 901 4 9 

4,661 4 9 

4,661 4, 9 

3B 



Eemipts aifid Disbursements, 


1943] 


Fund Account j in Account with R.AM.B^ 

1942. 

the cataloguing and binding of Arabic and Persian Manuscripts® acquired 
and for the preparation of notices of Arabic and Persian 
various Libraries in India. 

,1939.) 

Rs. As. P. 

Rs. As, P. 

By Annuai Grant . . . . . . .... 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 

2,500 0 0 

1,960 3 3 


4,460 3 3 

Fund Account^ in Account with E,A.S.B, 

1942. 

General, for the foundation of a medal lor the 

and Biological Science. 


Rs. As. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . . ...» 

Interest realized during the year . . , , . , 

Appreciation on Investments re- valued 

on 31st December, 1942 . . . » . « 

749 2 8 
24 4 0 

10 ,8 D 


783 14 8 

Account 9 in Account with B.AB-B. 

with Rs.600 odd from the Piddington Fund. 

1942. 

Rs. As. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . . . . , , 

Interest realized during the year . . .... 

Appreciation on Investments re- valued 

on 31st December, 1942 . . - .... 

3,585 14 8 
104 12 0 

45 0 0 


3,735 10 8 

Account t, in Account with R,A,8,B. 

1942. 

started in 1926. 


Rs. As. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account , . .... 

Interest realized during the year 

Appreciation on Investments re-valued 

on 31st December, 1942 . , .... 

4,462 12 9 
138 8 0 

60 0 0^ 

4,661 4 9 



40 Year-BoohKA.S.B.form43,. [vol. ix, 


STATEMENT No. 9. Permanent Library Endowment 

From gilts received, 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs.14,000, 3|% G-P. Notes, 1854-55 13,160 0 0 
Surplus at date . . . . 3,715 7 8 

16,875 7 8 


16,875 7 8 


STATEMENT No. 10. Sir William Jones Memorial 

From a sum gifted for the purpose in 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs.3,000, 3|% G.P. Notes, 1854-56 2,820 0 0 

Surplus at date . . . . 463 7 0 

3^283 7 0 


3,283 7 0 


STATEMENT No. 11. Pramathanath Bose Memorial 

From a sum gifted for 


To Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Bs.800, 3J% G.P. Notes, 1842-43 
„ 1,000, „ „ 1866 
Surplus at date ' 


2,102 5 0 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

I 1.692 0 0 
410 5 0 

2,102 5 0 


STATEMENT No. 12. Joy Gohind Law Memorial 

From a donation for the purpose 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Cost of a Medal . . . . 359 14 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet— 

Rs.3,000, 3i% G.P, Notes, 1854-66 2,820 0 0 

Surplus at date . . . . 103 12 , 0 

2,923 12 0 


3,283 10 0 



1943] Receipts and Disbursements. 4i 

Fund Account, in Account with E.A.SD. 1942, 

started in 1926. 



Rs, As. P, 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from, last Accoimt , , 

Interest realised during the year 
Appreciation on Investments re- valued 
on 31st December, 1942 . . 

.... 

16,176 7 8 

489 0 6 

210 0 0 



16,875 7 8 

Fund Account, in Accourd with B.A.S,B. 

1942, 

1926, by Dr. XJ. N. Brahmachari. 




Rs. As. P, 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account 

Interest realized during the year 
Appreciation on Investments re-valued 
on 31st December, 1942 

.... 

3,133 11 0 

104 12 0 

45 0 (} 



3.283 7 0 

Fund Account, in Account with R,A,8.B. 

1942. 

the purpose in 1935, 




Rs. As. P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account 

Interest realized during the year 
Appreciation on Investments ro- valued 
on 31st December, 1942 

— 

2,027 12 0 
47 9 0 

27 0 0 



2,102 5 0 

Fund Account, in Account with R-A£>B» 

1942. 

in 1929, by Dr. Satya Chum Law. 




Rs. As. 'P. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . • 

Interest realized during the year 
Donation 

Appreciation on Investments re- valued 
on 31st December, 1942 



3,088 12 0 
104 12 0 
45 2 0 

45 0 0 


3 , 283 ' 10 0 



42 Yea,f-BoohR.A.8.B.forlM2. [voi. ix, 

STATEMENT No. 13. Calcutta Science Congress Prize 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As, P. 

To Cost of two Medals . , . , .... 890 8 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs.3,000, ^% G.P. Notes, 1854-55 2,820 0 0 

Surplus at date . . . . 506 10 7 

,%326 10 7 

4,217 2 7 


STATEMENT No. 14. Dr. BriiM Memorial 

From a sum gifted for the purpose in 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

To Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

Rs.l,000, 3J% G.P. Notes, 1854-55 940 0 0 

Surplus at date . . . . 220 15 0 

1,160 15 0 

1,160 16 0 


STATEMENT No, 15. BaiMing Repair 

Rs. As. P. Rs. As, P. 
To Repairs during the year . . . . . , . . 104 13 ■ 6 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 5,281 12 0 

6,S86 '9 9 




1943] Meceipta and Disbursements, 

43 

Fund Account^ in Account with 

1942 , 

Es. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account , , , . . » ' 

Interest realized during the year , . .... 

Appreciation on Investments re-valued 
on 31st December, 1942 . . . . .... 

Rs. As. P, 

4.067 6 7 

104 12 0 

45 0 0 


4.217 2 7 


Fund Account^ in Account with E»A.8.B> 

1929, by the Briilil Farewell Committee. 

1942. 

Es. As. P. 

Es. As. P, 

By Balance from last Account . . .... 

1,111 3 0 

Interest realized during the year . . .... 

Appreciation on Investments re-valued 

34 12 0 

on Slst December, 1942 . . .... 

15 0 0 

1,160 15 0 

Fund Account 9 in Account with R,A,8,B. 

1942. 


By Balance from last Accoimt 

Transfer from B.A.S,B. General Fund 


Ea. As. P. 

3.386 9 6 

2,000 0 0 

5.386 9 6 


Es. As. P. 



44 


Year-Booh B.A.8.B. for 1942. [vol. ix, 

STATEMENT No. 16. Provident Fund 

From contributioDS by the 


To A.B.P. Contiiigeneies 
Cost of a stamp 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 
Rs,6,000, U% G.P. Notes, 1900-01 
Rs.5,200, 3% G.P, Notes, 1963-65 
Savings Banfe and Advances 


Rs. As. P, 


Rs. As. P 

3 0 0 
0 1 0 


5,640 0 0 
4,969 4 0 
8,754 5 4 


19,363 9 4 


19,366 10 4 


STATEMENT No. 17. 


Advances Account, 



Rs, As. P. 

Rs. As. P, 

To Balance from last Account 

Payments during the year 


3,428 0 0 
1,930 0 0 



5,358 0 0 

STATEMENT No, 18. 


Personal 


Rs, As* P, 

Rs. As. P. 

To Balance from last Account 

Advances 

Unclaimed Credit Balances written 
back 

R«A.S.B.*s Subscriptions, etc. 

Book Sales, etc. 

54 0 0 
10,062 0 0 
2,667 14 6 

6,235 15 0 

432 8 6 


12,773 U «i 



1943 ] Receipts and Disbursements. 

Account, in Account loith R,A,8,B. 

Society and its Staff. 


Rs. As. P. 

By Balance from last Account . . .... 

Interest realized during the year . . 21 3 0 

' Staff Contribution for the year . . 690 9 0 

Society’s Contribution for the year 690 9 0 


Interest realized from Savings Bank 
xAppreeiation on Investments re -valued 
on 31st December., 1942 


in Account with R,A.8.B, 


Rs. As, P. 


By Refunds during the year 

Balance as per Balance Sheet 


Account. 


Rs, As. P. 


By Cash Receipts during the year 
Bad Debts written off, R.A.S.B. 
Balance as per Balance Sheet 


Outstandings. 

Amount due Amount due 
to tlie Society, by the Society 


Rs, 

As, 

P. ; 

Rs. 

As. 

P, 

Members 

3,161 

11 

0 

251 

13 

0 

Subscribers, etc. 
Bill Collector’s 

1,001 

13 

6 ; 

6 

10 

0 

Deposit 

222 



100 

0 

0 

Miscellaneous ... 

i 

0 1 

88 

6 

0 


4,388 

8 

~r 

i 

446 

13 

0 


4:0 

1942. 


Rs. As. P. 
17,279 0 4 


1,402 5 0 
445 13 0 

239 8 0 

19,366 10 4 


1942. 


Rs. As. P. 

1,S36 0 0 

3,522 0 0 

5,358 0 0 


1942. 


Rs. As. P. 
14,317 2 6 

1,183 8 0 

3.941 11 6 


19,442 6 0 



46 


Tmr-Book B.A.S.B. for 1Q42. [vol. is, 

STATEMENT No. 19. Publication Fund Account, 


Rs. As. P. Es. As, P 

To Journal and Proceedings . . .... 4,775 6 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 7,394 5 3 


12,169 11 3 


STATEMENT No. 20. A.RJP. Fund Account, 

From a sum donated by His Excellency the Governor of Bengal in 

Members of 

Rs. As. P. Bs. As. P. 
To Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 8,352 10 0 

8,352 10 0 


STATEMENT No. 21. Discussion Meeting Fund Capital 

From a sum given by His Excellency the Governor 


'To Purchase of Crockery 
Purchase of Furniture 
Contingencies . . 


Rs. As, P. Rs. As. P. 

692 4 9 
1,277 11 3 

.... 30 0 0 

2,000 0 0 



1943 ] 


Receipts mid Dishtirsements, 


47 


in Account with 


1942. 


Rs. As. P« 

Rs, As, P* 

By Balance from last Account , . 

* « tt « « . 

6,931 9 6 

Government Grant 

Book Sales, etc. . . 

’ ! 2,667 *14 6 

1,600 0 0 

Cash Sale of Publications . . 

970 3 3 

3,638 1 9 

12,169 11 3 


in Account with B.A.B.B, 

1942. 

1942 and contributions made by the Government of Bengal and 
the Society. 

Rs. As. P. 

By Contributions received during the year .... 

Bs, As. B. 
8,362 10 0 

8,352 10 0 

Account^ in Account tviih B.AB.B. 

of Bengal out of the Bengal War Purposes Fund. 

1942. 


Es. As. P. 

2,000 0 , 0 


2,000 0 0 


By Cs-miit 


Rs. As. P. 



48 Year-Book B. A. S.B. for 1^4:2. [tol. ix, 

STATEMENT No. 22. Discussion Meeting Fund Running 

From sale proceeds 


To Purchase of Stationery 

Contingent charges (tea, etc.) 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

4 10 0 

.... 201 12 0 

206 6 0 


STATEMENT No. 23. ( 7 ) Deposit Account {Savings Bank 


To Balance from last Account 

Deposit of Interest realized from 
loans during the year 
Deposit of Contributions during the 
year 

Deposit of Advances returned 
Interest for the year 


Rs. As. P. Rs. As. P. 

3,481 4 4 


21 3 0 

1.381 2 0 

1,836 0 0 


3,238 5 0 
445 - 13 0 


7,165 6 4 


STATEMENT No. 24. ( 2 ) Deposit Account {Fixed Deposit 


Rs. As, P« , Rs, As* P. 

50,000 0 0 


50,000 0 0 


To Balance from last Account 



1943] Eec&ipts and Disbursements. 49 

Account^ in Account with 1942. 

of Tickets. 

Bs. As. P. Bs. As. P. 

By Sale of Tickets . . . . .... 152 S 0 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 53 14 0 

206 6 0 


Deposit with Imperial Bank of India). 1 942^ 


Rs. As. P, Rs. As. P. 

By Withdrawal for Staff Advances, etc. 1,933 0 0 

Cost of a stamp .. •• •••• ^010 

Balance as per Balance Sheet . . .... 5,232 5 4 


7,165 6 4 


with Imperial Bank of India), 1 942, 


By Withdrawals during the year 
Balance as per Balance Sheet 


Ks. As. P. Bs. As. P. 

20,000 0 0 

30,000 0 0 



50 


Tmr-Book B.A.S.B. for 1942. 


[TOL. IX, 


STATEMENT No. 25, 


(3} Investments 


To Balaaee from last Account 

Porcliase of Invostiiients during the year . . 
Appreciation Investments re-valued on 31-12-1942 


Rs. As. P, 
3,00,396 4 0 
10,000 ‘0 0 
4,841 2 0 

3,15,237 6 0 


Face 
Value ' 
Es. 


FUNDS. 


16,700 

1,53,700 

44.300 

6,000 

33,000 


2,53,700 

500 


12,000 

11,400 

5,000 


5.000 
700 

3.000 

4.000 

14,000 

3.000 


800 

1,000 


3,000 

3.000 

1.000 


5,200 

6,000 


3,32,300 


'.ROYAL AST/VTIG SOCIETY OE 
BENOAL. 

PE^^^^ANENT Reserve. 

3|% a.P. Notes, 1842-43 N 

31% O.P. Notes, 1854-55 

3^% G-.P. Note.s, 1863 

3^% a.P. Notes, 1879 

3|% a.P. Notes, 1900-01 / 


3% a. P Notes, 1896-97 

Temporary Reserve. 

31% a.P. Notes, 1900-01 
4|% Loan, 1955-60 
3% War Loan, 1951-54 ... 

Oriental Publication Fund No. 1. 
3% AYar Loan, 1951-34 ... 

Barclay Memorul Fund. 

3|% a.P Notes, 18.54-55 

Servants’ Pension Fund. 

31% a.P. Notes, 1854-55 

Annandale Memorial Fund. 

3|% a.P. Notes, 1854-55 

•Permanent Library Endowment 
Fund. 

% a. P. No tes, 1854-55 

Sir William Jones ^Memorial 
Fund. 

3| % a.P. Notes, 1854-55 

Pramathanath Bose Memorial 
Fund. 

B|% a.P. Notes, 1842-43 1 

3|% a.P. Notes, 1865 f 

Joy Oobind Law Memorial Fund. 
3|% a.P. Notes, 1854-55 

Calcutta Science Conq-ress Prize 
Fund. 

3| %. a.P. Notes, 1854-55 

Dr. Bruhl Memorial Fund. 

3i% a.P. Notes, 1854"55 

Provident Fund. 

3% Loan (1963-65) 

3|% a,P. Notes, 1900-01 ... 


Rate @ 
Rs. % 


31st 

December, 
1942, Valua- 
tion. 


81st I 

'December, 1 Apprecia- 

1941, Valua-1 tion 

fcion incltid-i or 

ing ‘'’''piir- j ■•'Doprocia- 
, chases diir- i tion. 

jingtheyeaiM 


94/0/- 

80/12/- 


94/0/- 

113/15/- 

99/14/. 


99/14/- 

94/0/- 

940/- 

94/Oi- 

94/0/- 

94/0/- 

94/0/- 

94/0/- 

94/0/. 

94/Oi- 


95/9/- 

94/0/- 


Rs. U. 


2,38,478 

403 


11,280 
12,988 
4, <'93 


4,993 

658 

2,820 

3,760 

13,160 

2,820 

1,692 

2,820 

2,820 

940 

4,969 

5,640 


Rs .Ia.I 


2,S4,672i 8 
398 12 


11,100 

12,867 

«5,000 


=*=5,000 
647 ; 8 
2,775 ! 0 
3,700 I 0 


0! 12,950 ! 0 


2,775 


1,665 I 0 

I 

2,775 I 0 


2,775 

925 


4,819 

6,550 


8,15,237 6 0 3,00396 4 0 4,a53 10 0 

‘ ' ' no, 000 0 0 *12 1 8) 0 


.Rs. 


3,805 I 8 
5 0 


180 ' ()! 


121 

*6 


10 

45 

60 

210 

45 


27 I Oj 
45 


149 

90 


1943 ] Receipts and Disbursements, 

Account. 

By Balance as per Balance Sheet 


51 

1942. 

Rs. As. P. 
3 , 15,237 6 0 


3,15,237 6 0 



52 7mr-BoolcR.A.S.B. for 1242,. [vol. ix, 

STATEMENT No. 26. Cash 

For the year onclecl Slst 

To 

Rs. As. P. Rs. 

As. 

p. 

Balance from last* Account 

4,837 

13 

6 

'General Brunei Account 

31,583 

0 

0 

Orientai Piibiication Fund No. 1 Account . . 

7,857 

2 

6 

Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund Account « * 

2,880 

0 

0 

Ariibic and Persian Fmid Account 

2,500 

0 

0 

Barclay Memorial Fund Account 

24 

4 

0 

Servants’ Pension Fund Account 

104 

12 

0 

Annaiidale Memorial Fund Account 

138 

S 

0 

Permanent Library Endowment Fund 




Account 

489 

0 

0 

Sir William Jones Memorial Fund Account 

104 

12 

0 

Joy Grobind Law Memorial Fund Account 

149 

14 

0 

■Calcutta Science Congress Prize Fund 




Aeoouiat 

104 

12 

0 

Dr. Brtilil Memorial Fund Account 

34 

12 

0 

Pramathanath Bose Memorial Fund 




Account . . . . ■ 

47 

9 

0 

Provident Fund Account 

1,402 

5 

0 

Advances Account . . 

1,836 

0 

0 

Personal Account' .. 

14,317' 

2 

6 

Publication Fund Account 

2,670 

.3 

3 

A.E.P. Fund Account 

8,352 

10 

0 

Discussion Meetings Fund Capital Account 

2,000 

0 

0 

Discussion Meetings Fund Running Account 
Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 

152 

8 

0 

Bank of India, Calcutta . • , . 

1,933 

0 

0 

Fixed Deposit Account 

20,000 

0 

0 


1,03,420 4 9 



1943] Beceipts and Disbursements. 

Account. 

December j 1942, 


By Rs. As 

General Fund Account 
Oriental Publication Fund No. 1 Account . . 

Oriental Publication Fund No. 2 Account . . 

Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund Account 
Arabic and' Persian Manuscripts Fund 
Account 

Barclay Memorial Fund Account 
Servants’ Pension Fund Account 
Joy Gobind Law Memorial Fund Account 
Calcutta Science Congress Prize Fund 

Account . . . , . . ... 

Building Repair Fund Account 
Provident Fund Account 

Advances Account . . , , . . ... 

Personal Account . « 

Publication Fund Account . . . . ... 

Discussion Meetings Capital Account . . ... 

Discussion Meetings Running Account . . 

Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 
Bank of India 

Balance as per Balance Sheet — 

In hand 

With the Imperial Bank of India, on 
Current Account 


5S 


1942 .. 


Rs. As. P, 

40,495 11 5 
11,362 3 6 
2,939 14 0 
11,285 14 0 

216 8 0 
16 9 0 
132 0 0 
359 14 0 

890 8 0 
104 13 6 
3 0 0 
1,930 0 0 
432 S 6 
4,776 6 0 
2,000 0 0 
206 6 0 

3,238 6 0 

117 2 9 

22,913 9 2 


1,03,420 4 9 



64 


Tear-Book R.A.S.B. for 1942. 


STATEMENT No. 27. 


[VOL. IS, 

Balance 

As at 31st 


LIABILITIES. 



Rs 

. As. P. Rs* 

As. 

P. 

Oeaeral Fund Account 

» « 

2,89,182 

13 

11 

Oriental Publication Fund No. 1 Account 

.... 16,350 

7 

9 

Sanskrit Manuscripts Fund Account 

, , 

9,440 

8 

0 

Barclay Memorial Fund Account 


767 

5 

8 

Servants’ Pension Fund Account 

. . 

3,603 

10 

8 

Aimandaie Memorial Fund Account 

. . 

. . . . 4,661 

4 

9 

Permanent Library Endowment 

Fund 




Account 


16,875 

7 

8 

Sir William Jones Memorial Fund Account 

3,283 

7 

0 

Pramathanatli Bose Memorial 

Fund 




Account 


2,102 

5 

0 

Joy Gobind Law Memorial Fund Account 

2,923 

12 

0 

Calcutta Science Congress Prize 

Fund 




Account 


3,326 

10 

7 

Dr. Bruhl Memorial Fund Account 


1,160 

15 

0 

Building Repair Fund Account 


5,281 

12 

0 

Provident Fund Account 


19,363 

9 

4 

Publication Fund Account 


7,394 

5 

3 

A.R.P. Fund Account 


8,352 

10 

0 

Personal Account — Sundry Liabilities 

. . 

446 

13 

0 


3,94,517 13 7 


We have examined the above Balance Sheet 
and the awended detailed accounts with the 
Books and V onchers presented to us and certify 
that they are in accordance therewith, and, in 
our opinion, set forth correctly the position of 
the Society as at Slst December, 1942. 

Bkscib, Waterhous®, Peat & Co., 


Calcutta, 

29ih January, 1943, 


• Auditors, 
Ohariered Accountants^ 
Registered Accountants, 


4B 



1943] 

Sheet. 

Decembers, 1942. 


Receipts and Disbursements. 




1942. 


ASSETS. 


E'S, As. P. Rs. As. P. 

Oriental Publication Fund No. 2 Account 11,092 12 7 

Arabic and Persian Manuscripts Fund 
Account .. .. 1,960 3 3 

13,052 15 10 


Advances Account . • , , . . 3,522 0 0 

Personal Account — Sundry Outstandings . . 4,388 S 6 

7,910 8 6 

Discussion Meetings Fund Rumiing Account .... 53 14 0 

Deposits ; — 

Savings Bank Deposit Account, Imperial 
Bank of India . . . . . . 5,232 5 4 

Fixed Deposit Account, Imperial Bank 
of India . . . . . . 30,000 0 0 

35,232 5 4- 

Investments Account . . . . .... 3,15,237 6 0- 

Gash Account : — 

In hand . . . . . . 117 2 9 

With the Imperial Bank of India, on 
Current Account .. .. 22,913 9 2 

23,030 11 It 


3,94,517 13 T 


0. W. 

Honorary Tremurer 



[APPENDIX III,] 

Abstract Proceedings Cowncii, 1942» 

(Hul© 4S £.) 


A.'R.P. Mbasitres. — Expenditure incurred due to A.R.P. measures 
taken. Approve action taken by the General Secretary with regard 
to the evacuation of the rest of the Society’s valuable MSS. and rare 
books, and the expenditure incurred in this connection to be debited 
to the Sanskrit MSS. Fund Account and Oriental Publication Fund No. 1. 
No. 9.(d), Fin. Com. 23-1-42. 

Report on action taken by the General Secretary as A.E.P. measures: 
(a) Most valuable manuscripts, plates, etc., to Benares, (6) ten valuable 
paintings to the Government House at Darjeeling, (c) twenty-one busts, 
Asokan Stone, etc., to the Indian Museiun. Approve action taken by the 
General Secretary. No. 13(1), Coimcil, 29-1-42. 

Further emergency measures taken concerning the evacuation of 
the rest of the Society’s most valuable manuscripts, rare books, paintings, 
etc. : (a) Approve the measures taken by the General Secretary for the 
removal of the rest of the most valuable MSS., books, to Benares, (6) this 
consignment not be insured. No. 15(3), Council. 29-1-42, 

Circular letter from Imperial Bank of India, Park Street, concerning 
the custodianship of the securities held by the Bank for safe custody 
during the emergency period, and reply thereto by the General Secretary. 
Action approved. No. 3(d), Fin. Com. 18-2-42. 

Letter from Dr. S. L, Hora forwarding a scheme for ‘Fire Fighting 
for the Buildings of the Society’ prepared by himself and Dr. B. N. Chopra 
of the Zoological Survey of India. The thanks of the Council bo 
conveyed to Dr. S. L. Hora and Dr. B. N. Chopra for their suggestions. 
After discussion it was resolved to constitute a Special Sub -Committee 
consisting of the ex-officio members. Sir John Lort-Williams and Dr. S. L. 
Hora as members with power to do whatever is necessary for further 
A.R.P. measures in the Society. No. 13, Council. 23-2-42. 

The Acting General Secretary (Dr. S. L. Hora) placed before the 
mee