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VISVA-BHARATl 

LIBRAfeY 


SbTHSuJB 





Presented By 










UNIVERSITY OF MADRAS 


THE CALENDAR 

1959-60 


VOLUME II 


Statutes, Ordinances, Regulations, Syllabuses 
and Text-books for the Examination in the 
Faculties of Arts, Science, Oriental Learning, 
Fine Arts and Commerce. 



PUBLISHED BY; 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MADRAS 


THE ROYAL PRINTING WORKS, 
MADRAS-1 



VOLUME II 


CONTENTS 

STATUTES, ORDINANCES, REGULATIONS, 
SYLLABUSES AND TEXT-BOOKS 

ChapteRvS: .PageKos, 

XXXIIL Register of Matriculates 1 

XXXIV. Admission of Holders of S.S.L.C. and A.T.S.L.C. 

and O.H.S.L.C. to University Courses of Study... 3 

XXXV. Admission to Courses of Study . . 8 

XXXVI. Conduct of Examinations ... i8 

XXXVII. Fees 23 

XXXVIIL Dates for Payment of Examination Fees, Etc. . 47 

XXXIX. Transfer and Term or Annual Certificates 63 

XL. Admission to Examinations and Exemption from 

Annual or Term Certificates 70 

XLI. Matriculation Examination ... gi 

XLII. Pre-University Examination ... 113 

XLlIl. Degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 

Science ... 177 

XLIV. Degree of Bachelor of Science — B.Sc. 

(Home Science) 585 

XLV. Degree of Bachelor of Commerce 638 

XL VI. Degree of Master of Arts . . 675 

XLVII. Degree of Master of Science .. 899 

XLVIII. Degree of Master of Science (Home Science) .. 997 

XLIX. Degree of Master of Commerce 1027 



ii VOLUME n, CONTENTS— (ctmtd.) 

Chapters. 


Page Nos* 

L. 

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

... 1067 

LI. 

Degree of Doctor of Letters 

... 1111 

HI. 

Degree of Doctor of Science 

.. 1114 

LIII. 

Oriental Title Examinations 

... 1117 

LIV. 

Titles in Music in the Faculty of Fine Arts 

. , 1207 


Note:— Vat Regulations for MXitt,, M.Sc. (by examination) will be 
found in Volume II, University Calendar 1953*54. Exami* 
nations will be conducted under these Regulations for 
a transitory period. The other Old Regulations may also be 
found in Volume 11, University Calendar, 1953-54. 



♦chapter XXXIII 


Register of Matriculates 

Ordinances under Sections 19 (p) and 31 (a) of the Act- 

Maintenance i. The Syndicate shall maintain 

of Register of a Register of Matriculates in which 
Matriculates^ — the names of the following classes of 
Enrolment. persons shall be registered: — 

(a) Candidates who pass the Matriculation 
Examination of the University. 

(h) Holders of completed Secondary School- 
Leaving or Anglo-Indian School -Leaving 
Certificates declared eligible, and holders of 
other Certificates accepted by the Syndicate 
as qualifying for admission to this University 
and candidates who have passed an examin- 
ation accepted by the Syndicate as equivalent 
to the Matriculation Examination of this 
University, when admitted to a University 
Course of Study. 

(c) Holders of any degree, title, diploma or 

certificate, other than those specified in 
(a) or {h), on first admission to a University 
Course of study. 

(d) Persons, other than those specified in [a), (b) 

or (c), who with or without exemption from 
attendance certificates are permitted to 
appear for the first time for any examination 
of this University other than the Mati icula- 
tion Examination. 

(e) Persons other than those specified in (a), (b), 

(c) or (d)y who are candidates for admission 
to a Research Degree of this University. 


For Chapters I to XXXII vide Volume I, Univer uty Calendar. 



2 


LAWS OF the university 


a. The Register of Matriculates maintained under 
the preceding Ordinance shall set forth, in respect of each 
Matriculate, the name in full, the name of father or 
guardian, age, religion, language, school where educated, 
numberanddate of School*- Leaving Certificate or Anglo- 
Indian School-Leaving Certificate, Government issuing 
certificate, accepted examination, date of passing and 
number of certificate, authority issuing certificate, 
institution entered, date of admission, and University 
examination for which he has been permitted to appear, or 
Research Degree for which he is a candidate. 



CHAPTER XXXIV. 


Admission of Holders of S.S.L.C., A.I.S.L.C. 
and O.H.S.L.C. to University Courses 
of Study 

Ordinances framed under Section 19 (p) of the Act, 

Secondary School -Leaving Certificates 

I. (a) Holders of completed Secondary School*. 
Leaving Certificates may be admitted to University 
Courses of Study if they (a) shall have completed the age 
of fourteen years and six months on the fifteenth day of 
July of the year in which they seek admission to Courses of 
study, and (b) shall have secured at the Public Exami- 
nation the marks prescribed below, and been declared 
eligible for admission to University Courses of Study 
by the Syndicate, 

7. Por candidates v>ho have selected the Academic 
Course. 

Not less than 80 marks out of a total of 200 marks 
in the Language or Languages chosen under Parts I and II 
together, 40 marks in English and 100 marks in the 
following three subjects taken together, (i) Mathematics, 
(ii) Social Studies and (iii) General Science, provided the 
candidate secures not less than 35 per cent in two of the 
subjects and not less than 25 per cent in the third subject; 
provided further that a certificated-holder who secures in 
the aggregate not less than 225 marks in the five subjects, 
but fails in not more than two subjects by a deficiency of 
not more than one mark in each subject, shall be declared 
eligible for admission to University Courses of Study. 

Candidates who have been declared eligible under 
the above rules may be admitted to any University Course^ 
of Study at the Prc*-University stage. 



4 


LAWS OF the university 


[C«AP. 


IL Par candidates who have selected teaching practice 
under the Diversified Course. 

Not less than 40 marks in the Regional Language, 
40 marks in English and 130 marks in the following 
subjects taken together; (1) Mathematics, (2) Social 
Studies, (3) General Science and (4) Teaching Practice; 
the marks being not less than 35 per cent in each of any 
two of these four subjects and not less than 25 per cent in 
(each of) the other two; provided that a Certificate-holder 
who secures in the aggregate not less than 215 marks in 
the six subjects but fails in not more than two subjects 
by a deficiency of not more than one mark in each subject, 
shall be declared eligible for admission to University 
Courses of Study. 

Such candidates as have been declared eligible under 
the above may be admitted to any Course of study at the 
Pre- University stage. 

II L For candidates who have selected the 
Secretarial Course. 

Not less than 40 marks in the Regional Language, 
40 marks in English, and 130 marks in the following 
subjects taken together: (i) Social Studies, (ii) Com- 
mercial Arithmetic, (iii) Drafting and Precis-writing and 
Typewriting and (iv) two subjects chosen from among 
Book-keeping, Commercial Practice and Shorthand; the 
marks being not less than 35 per cent in each ofany two of 
these four subjects and not less than 25 per cent in each 
of the other two; provided that a Certificate-holder who 
secures in the aggregate not less than 215 marks in the six 
subjects but fails in not more than two subjects by a 
deficiency of not more than one mark in each subject, 
shall be declared eligible for admission to University 
Gquiscs of Study. 

Such candidates shall be eligible for all Courses of 
study at the Pre-University stage. 



XXXA^] ADMISSION OF HOLDERS OF S.S.L.C., A.I.S.L.C. 5 
AN D O.H,S.L.C. TO UNIVERSITY COURSES OF S TUDY 

For candidates who have selected the 
Pre^Technological Course, _ 

Not less than 40 marks in the Regional Language, 
40 marks in English and 130 marks in the following 
subjects taken together: (i) Mathematics, (ii) Social 
Studies and for Engineering Course, (iii) General Science 
and Drawing and (iv) Applied Science and Practical 
Examination or, for Agriculture Course, (iii) and (iv) 
Agriculture, including Elementary Science being grouped 
under two subject headings; or, for Textile Technology 
Course, (iii) Handloom Weaving, Theory and Practical 
and (iv) Dyeing and Printing — theory and practical; the 
marks being not less than 35 per cent in each of any two of 
the subjects, and not less than 25 per cent in each of the 
other two subjects; provided that a Certificate-holder 
who secures in the aggregate not less than 2 1 5 marks in 
the six subjects, but fails in not more than two subjects 
by a deficiency of not more than one mark in each 
subject shall be declared eligible for admission to 
University Courses of Study. 

Such candidates as have been declared eligible under 
the above rules may be admitted to any University Course 
of study at the Pre-University stage. 

V, For candidates who have selected the Aesthetic and 
Domestic Course, 

Not less than 40 marks in the Regional Language 
under Parti, 40 marks in English under Part II and 130 
marks in the other two subjects under Part II and the two 
sub-divisions of the subject under Part III taken together; 
the marks being not less than 35 per cent in each of any 
two of these and not less than 25 per cent in each of the 
other two; provided that a Certificate -holder who secures 
in the aggregate not less than 2 1 5 marks in the six minima, 
but fails in not more than two subjects by a deficiency of 
not more than one mark in each subject, shall be 



6 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


declared eligible for admission to University Courses of 
Study. 

There shall be a Moderation Board appointed by the 
Syndicate to consider hard cases. 

(i) A candidate for admission to University 
Courses of Study who in any year fails to qualify by 
reason of deficiency in any subject or subjects in which he 
has undergone examination shall be required to appear 
again at the Public Examination in all the six (or five) 
subjects, and his eligibility shall be determined by the 
marks obtained by him at his last appearance. 

(c) No holder of a Certificate declared ineligible 
on a scrutiny shall be declared eligible on a re-scrutiny 
according to Ordinances prescribed after the first scrutiny 
provided, however, it shall be competent for the Syndic- 
ate to re-scrutinize the Certificates of candidates who 
appeared for the S.S.L.C. Examination of 1925 or earlier, 
in accordance with the Rules in force at the time (1926), 
and the Certificates of candidates who would have been 
eligible had the subjects of Shorthand and Typewriting 
been included in the list of subjects in the year in which 
they appeared for the examination under the S.S.L.C. 
Scheme of 1929 (t.e, from the S.S.L.C. Examination of 
1932), on payment of the prescribed fee. 

(d) A complete list of Certificated-holders declared 
eligible for admission to University Courses of Study 
shall be published in the Fort St. George Gazette, and a 
copy of the list shall be furnished to each Principal of a 
Constituent or an Affiliated College. 

Anglo-Indian School -Leaving Certificates 

2. [a) Candidates who have appeared for the 

Madras Anglo*-Indian High School Examination shall be 
declared eligible for admission to University Courses of 
Study if they have secured a “ pass ” at the Anglo-Indian 
High School Examination, Madras. 



xxxiv] ADMISSION OF HOLDERS OF S.S.L.C., A.I.S.L.C. 

AN D Q.H.S.L.C. TO UNIVERSITY COURSES OF STUDY 

Such persons shall have completed the age of 
fourteen years and six months on the fifteenth day of 
July •f the year in which they seek admission to 
University Courses of Study. 

(i) A candidate for admission to University 
Courses of Study, who in any year fails to qualify for 
admission by reason of deficiency in any subject or 
subjects in which he has undergone examination, shall be 
required to appear again at the Public Examination in all 
subjects and secure a pass. 

(c) A complete list of Certificate-holders declared 
eligible for admission to University Courses of Study shall 
be published in the Fort St. George Gazette and a copy 
of the list shall be furnished to each Principal of a Gon-^ 
stituent or an Afiiliated College. 

Oriental High School-Leaving Certificates 

3 . A candidate for the purpose of eligibility for 
admission to the Pre-University course of study should 
have completed the Oriental High School Examination 
securing the following percentage of marks in the subjects 
comprising the course : 

(iz) Classical Language or Non-Classical Language: 
Not less than 40 per cent. 

{b) English : Not less than 40 per cent. 

(r) Social Studies and Regional Language or 
Social Studies and Modern Knowledge : 
70 marks in the aggregate securing not less 
than 30 per cent in each. 



CHAPTER XXXV. 


Admission to Courses of Study 

Ordinances under Sections 19 (/>) and 31 {a) of the Act. 

1. No person shall be permitted to enter upon a 

University Course of Study for the 
Registration as first time unless he gets his name 
Matriculates. registered in the Register of Matric^- 
ulatcs maintained by the Syndicate. 
Every applicant for registration shall pay to the University 
such registration fee as may be prescribed. 

Such persons shall have completed the age of 
fourteen years and six months on the fifteenth day of July 
of the year in which they seek admission to University 
Courses of Study: 

Provided that it shall be competent for the Syndic- 
ate to waive a strict compliance with the above age limit 
in the case of a student who has been declared eligible in a 
year prior to the date of admission. 

2 . Admission to the Course of Study for the Pre- 

University Examination shall be 
Couditioiis of granted only to the following classes 
admission to of students: — 

the Pre-Univer- 
sity Course. 

(i) Persons who have passed the Matriculation 

Examination of this University. 

(ii) Holders of completed Secondary School- 

Leaving Certificates and of completed 
Anglo-Indian School-Leaving Certificates 
or Oriental High School Leaving Certifi- 
cates issued under the authority of the 


* On payment of Rs. lo. 



ADMISSION TO COURSES OF STUDY 


9 


Government of Madras, declared eligible 
for admission to a University Course of 
Study according to the rules and directions 
which the Syndicate may prescribe from 
time to time. 


(iii) (a) Persons who have passed the Matriculation 
Examination or Entrance Examination of 
other Indian Universities and holders of 
completed Secondary SchooKLeaving 
Certificates issued undei' the authority of 
States in India who have been declared 
eligible for admission to a University 
Course of Study by the University in the 
State concerned, provided that recogni^ 
tion shall be granted in such cases on a 
reciprocal basis: 

Provided, however, that a pass in the First 
or Second Division only of the Higher 
Secondary Certificate Examination of 
Hyderabad shall be accepted. 


(b) Persons who have passed the Secondary 
School*- Leaving Certificate Examination, 
and Anglo-Indian School-Leaving Certi- 
ficate Examinations, in respect of which 
no eligible List is issued by a University, 
and persons who have passed other Pub- 
lic Examinations, subject to such condi- 
tions as may be prescribed by the Syndi- 
cate from time to time: 

(iv) Holders of Oxford and Cambridge School 
Certificates, whose Certificates satisfy the 
conditions laid down by the Syndicate. 



10 


LAWS OF the university 


[chap. 


Note : — List of examinations recognised as equi- 
valent to the Matriculation Examination for purposes 
of admission to the Pre-University Course:^ — 

(i) Secondary School-Leaving Certificate Examin- 

ation of Andhra University provided the 
candidates have been declared eligible by the 
Andhra or Sri Venkateswara University. 

(ii) The Anglo-Indian High School Certificate 

Examination of the Andhra University. 
Candidates should have qualified themselves 
for the certificate and been declared eligible 
for admission to a course of study in the 
Andhra University. 

(iii) S.S.L.C. Examination of Mysore provided the 

candidates have been declared eligible for 
admission to a course of study in the Mysore 
University. 

(iv) S.S.L.C. Examination of Kerala provided the 

candidates have been declared eligible for 
admission to the Junior Intermediate or Pre- 
University class of the University of Kerala. 
Note : — Certificate should be scrutinised with 
reference to the marks (entered in page 11) 
obtained by the candidates even if the 
certificates contain the eligibility stamp in 
page 15 so as to avoid ineligible candidates 
being admitted in this University. 

(V) Secondary School Certificate Examination of 
the Government of Bombay provided such 
certificate-holders produce a certificate from 
the Registrar, Bombay University that they 
are eligible for enrolment as students of that 
University. 

(vi) The Higher Secondary Certificate Examination 
of Hyderabad provided the candidates have 
passed the Examination in the first or second 
division and have qualified for the certificate 



XXXV] 


ADMISSION TO COURSES OF STUDY 


11 


(vii) The Final passing out Examination of the 
Training Ship ‘‘Dufferin.” 

(viii) The Indian Air Force Matriculation Test, 

(ix) The Indian Army Special Certificate of 

Education. 

(x) Higher Education Test in the Royal Indian 

Navy. 

(xi) High School Examination of Burma provided 

the candidates have been declared eligible 
for Matriculation in the University of 
Rangoon. 

(xii) A full pass at the first sitting in the General 
Certificate of Education (Ceylon Senior 
School Certificate Examination) Examination 
in the Ordinary or Lower Level provided 
the holder has passed the Examination in six 
subjects (which should include English and 
another language) or pass in six subjects 
(which should include English and another 
language) with four credits secured at one or 
more sittings, 

(xiii) Higher School Certificate Examination of 
Ceylon. 

(xiv) School Final Examination of the Board of 

Secondary Education, West Bengal, Calcutta. 

(xv) High School Examination of the Board of 

Secondary Education, Madhya Pradesh. 

(xvi) Matriculation or Entrance Examination of 

Statutory Universities of the British 
Commonwealth. 

(xvii) Holders of the Oxford or Cambridge Senior 
School Certificates, provided the candi- 
dates have passed the Examination in 
English language and five other subjects, 
(xviii) Secondary School Examination of the Bihar 
School Examination Board, Patna. 



12 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[CHAP, 


(xix) Bangalore European High School Examination. 

(xx) Admission Examination of the Banaras Hindu 

University, 

(xxi) High School Examination of the Board of 

Secondary Education, Orissa. 

(xxii) High School Examination of the Board of 

Secondary Education, Rajasthan. 

3. The conditions under which students may be 
admitted to the Courses of Study for Oriental Titles shall 
be as follows: — 

Exitrance No candidate shall be admitted 

Tests to O.T* to the Courses of Study for any of the 
Courses* Oriental Titles unless he has passed: 

A 

The Matriculation Examination of this University or 
an examination accepted by the Syndicate as equivalent 
thereto, or 

B 

the Entrance Test prescribed below: — 

(i) SiROMANI AND ViDVAN (a) 

No person shall be admitted to the Courses of Study 
for the Siromani and Vidvan (a) Examinations unless he 
has passed the Entrance Test conducted by the Educa- 
tional Department of the Government of Madras. 

(ii) Vidvan (b) and (J), Adib-i-Fazil, Malpan 

AND SoPPAR. 

In the case of candidates for the Vidvan (A) and (d), 
Adib'-i^-Fazil, Malpan and Soppar Titles, the Entrance 
Test shall be in the selected language or main language 
(if there are two languages) and shall consist of the two 
papers set for the Intermediate Examination in Arts and 



xxxv] 


ADMISSION TO COURSES OF STUDY 


13 


Science in the corresponding language under Part II with 
the following modifications: — 

(fl) A few questions on Grammar shall be added in 
that part of the Intermediate (Part II) first 
paper intended for the candidates for the 
above Titles, and 

(b) the question on Translation in the second 
paper for the Intermediate Examination 
shall be replaced by questions on Para^- 
phrase or Composition. 

Candidates obtaining not less than 40 per cent of the 
total marks in the two papers taken together shall be 
certified to be eligible for admission to the respective 
Courses. 

(iii) Ahzal-ul-Ulama, Munshi-i-Fazil, Tabib-i-Kamiu 

AND AfZAL*-UL-At1BBA. 

There shall be two Written papers of 3 hours’ 
duration each. Each paper shall carry 100 marks. 

(1) Prose and Poetry Text^books. 

(2) Dijiiyyat. 

Candidales for Afzal-ul-Ulama and Afzal-ul-Atibba 
shall pass the Test in Arabic and candidates for Munshi'-i- 
Fazil and Tabib-i-Kamil shall pass the Test in Persian. 

In regard to the test in Arabic, the papers shall be set 
in' the Arabic Language, and th(‘ candidates shall have the 
option to write their answers either in Arabic or in their 
own mother-tongue, viz*, Urdu, Tamil, Malayalam. 

In regard to the test in Persian, the paper shall be set 
in Urdu, and the candidates are required to answer in 
Urdu only. 

Candidates obtaining not less than 40 per cent of the 
total marks in the two papers taken together shall be 



14 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


certified to be eligible for admission to the respective 
courses. 

It shall be competent for the Syndicate to recognize 
the Admission Tests of other Universities or examinations 
conducted by Indian States as qualifying for admission 
to the Vidvan and SIromani Courses of this University. 

Conditions of 4. Admission to the Sangita 

admission to Siromani Course shall be open to^ — 

Sangita Siro* 
mani Course. 

(1) Holders of completed Secondary SchooK 

Leaving Certificates with Indian Music as 
an optional subject, issued under the autho- 
rity of the Government of Madras, dec- 
lared eligible for admission to a course of 
study in this University. 

(2) Holders of completed Secondary School- 

Leaving Certificates without Indian Music 
as an optional subject, issued under tlie 
authority of the Government of Madras, 
declared eligible for admission to a Course 
of Study in this University or an examin- 
ation of some other University or Body 
recognized by the Syndicate as equivalent 
thereto, and who have also passed the 
Technical Examination in Indian Music 
(Lower Grade) of the Government of 
Madras, or the Teacher’s Certificate Exa- 
mination in Indian Music of the Govern- 
ment of Madras. 

(3) Candidates who have passed the Technical 

Examination in Indian Music (Lower 
Grade) of the Government of Madras or the 
Teacher’s Certificate Examination in Indian 
Music of the Government of Madras and in 




XXXV] ADMISSION TO COURSES OF STUDY 


15 


English of the Matriculation Examination 
of the University of Madras. 

Provided, however, it shall be competent for the 
Syndicate to permit a candidate who has passed the 
Matriculation Examination of this University or has been 
declared eligible for admission to a course of study in this 
University, but has not passed the Technical Examination 
in Indian Music (Lower Grade) of the Government of 
Madras to join the Sangita Siromani Course on the 
recommendation of the Head of the Institution, provided 
that the candidate qualifies in the Technical Examination 
in Indian Music (Lower Grade) of the Government of 
Madras before the end of the first academic year. 

Provided further, it shall be competent for the 
Syndicate to permit candidates who have passed the 
Technical Examination in Indian Music (Lower Grade) 
of the Government of Madras, to join the Sangita 
Siromani course on the recommendation of the Head of 
the Institution provided that the candidates pass the 
Matriculation or take the S-S.L. Certificate Examination 
and are declared eligible for a University course of 
study l)efore sitting for the Sangita Siromani Preliminary 
Examination. This proviso shall be in force for a 
period of five years from the academic year 1958-59. 

5. For the purpose of admission to courses of study 
in this University, the Syndicate shall 
have the power to recognize the Pre- 
University Examinations of other 
Indian Universities and of duly con- 
stituted Boards of Secondary and 
Intermediate Education, and Degree 
Examinations of other Indian Univer- 
sities, as equivalent to the corresponding examinations of 
this University, subject to the following conditions : — 

(1) that the normal length of the course prescribed 
leading to the examination sought to be 


Recognition of 
Examinations 
of other 
Universities 
and Bodies. 



16 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


recognized shall not be less than that for the 
corresponding examination of this Univer*- 
sity; 

( 2 ) that the Course of Study for the examination 

sought to be recognized shall have been 
pursued in a University or in a College 
recognized by a University, provided that 
it shall be competent for the Syndicate in 
special cases to waive the above conditions 
and 

(3) that, in the case of admission to a professional 

course, the restriction of subjects, if any, 
imposed on candidates of this University 
shall be applicable to candidates who have 
passed examinations of other Universities 
or Bodies. 

6 . For the purpose of admission to courses of study 
in this University, examinations conducted by Bodies 
other than those mentioned in the above Ordinance may, 
in individual cases and on their merits, be recognized by 
the Syndicate, as equivalent to the corresponding examin- 
ations of the University. 

7. Unless specific provision has been made in the 
respective Regulations, candidates other than those who 
have qualified from this University shall not be eligible 
for exemption from any part or parts of the Course of 
Study and/or examination for any Degree, Diploma or 
title, as the case may be. 

8 . Notwithstanding anything that may be contain- 

ed to the contrary in the Laws of the 
Concessions re: University, it shall be competent for 
Refugees from the Syndicate, with regard to students 
otber Provinces, whose Courses of Studies arc shown 
to the satisfaction of the Syndicate to 
have been interrupted owing to disturbed conditions in 



XXXV] ADMISSION TO COURSES OF STUDY 


17 


certain Provinces in the year 1947, to dispense with a 
strict compliance with the Laws, as may be decided in 
each and every case, in regard to admission to courses of 
studies or attendance at courses of this University or such 
other conditions as may be laid down in the Laws, 

9. Notwithstanding anything contained in the 
Laws of the University, it shall be competent for the 
Syndicate in the case of foreign nationals, admitted 
to courses of study in this University for the Pre‘-Uni- 
versity or B.A. Degree or B. Sc. Degree (Three- year) 
or B. Sc. Degree in Home Science, whose mother tongue 
is not any of the Indian languages or who have not 
taken a language recognised by this University of the 
required standard for the preceding qualifying examina*- 
tion to exempt them from the course and examination 
in Part II of the Pre‘-Univcrsity or B.A. Degree or B.Sc. 
Degree or B.Sc. Degree in Home Science, as the case 
may be. 


3 




CHAPTER XXXVI. 

Conduct of ExamiBatious 

Ordinances under Section 31 (A) of the Act. 

I. (a) All examinations shall be held in Madras and 
in such other places as may be fixed 
Place of by the Syndicate. A list of the 

ExaminatioBS* centres at which examinations will be 
held shall ordinarily be published 
annually in the Gazette in the preceding April. 

(A) When there are more centres than one for a 
written examination question papers shall be given out 
to candidates on the same day and at the same hour in 
every centre. 

2- Gazetted holidays shall be considered dies non for 
purposes of the University Examin- 
Gazetted ations, but the Syndicate may, for 

holidays special reasons, decide to hold 

dies non. examinations on such holidays. 

3 . The following examinations shall be held twice 
i n the academic year : — 

* Intermediate. 

ExaminatioBS Pre-University. 

held twice in * B.A. (Old Regulations), 
a year. B.A. (New Regulations). 

* B.Sc. (Old Regulations). 

B.Sc. (New^ Regulations). 

B.Sc. (Home Science). 

* B.Com. (Old Regulations). 
B.Com- (New Regulations). 

Pre-Professional. 

B.T. 

Law — F.L. and B.L. 

M.B.&B.S. 

B.S.Sc. — Part I and Part IL 

Diploma in Gynaecology and 
Obstetrics. 

Diploma in Venereology. 

♦ The examinations wilJ be conducted under Transitory Regulations. 



CONDUCT OF Examinations 


19 


Diploma in Dermatology. 

Diploma in Ophthalmology. 
Diploma in Oto -Rhino*- Laryngo- 
logy. 

Diploma in Radiology. 

Diploma in Orthopaedics. 

Diploma in Tuberculosis. 

Diploma in Child Health. 

Diploma in Clinical Pathology. 
Diploma in Anaesthesia. 

Diploma in Dietetics. 

M.D. or M.S. Part I. 

B. Pharm. 

b.d.s. 

B. Sc. (Nursing). 

B.E. 

B.Sc. (Ag.) 

B.V.Sc. 

B.Com. 

The other examinations shall be held once a year. 

4. The papers set in any subject shall be such as a 

candidate of decided ability well 
Standard of prepared in the subject can reasonably 

Question be expected to answer within the 

Papers. time allotted. 

5. No question shall be put at any University 

examination calling for a declaration 
Nature of of religious belief, or profession or 

Questions. political views on the part of the 
candidate, and no answer given by 
any candidate shall be objected to on the ground of its 
giving expression to any particular form of religious, 
belief, profession or political views. 



20 


LAWS OF THE university 


[chap. 


6 . All examinations, except practical and viva voce 

examinations, shall be conducted by 
Conduct of means of printed, typed or written 

Examinations, papers to be set and answered, 
except in the case of Indian langu*- 
ages and languages for the Oriental Titles Examinations, 
in English unless otherwise stated therein. 

It shall also be competent for the Syndicate to permit 
candidates to appear for and answer the papers in a Group 
under Part III of the B.A. Degree Examination in an 
Indian Language, provided one year’s notice is given by 
the college concerned. 

It shall be competent for the Syndicate to permit 
candidates to appear for and answer the papers in 
Section D of the Course of study for the B.T. Degree 
Examination (‘Methods of Teaching and learning- — 
Special’) in an Indian language provided one year’s 
notice has been given by the college concerned. 

It shall be competent for the Syndicate to permit 
candidates of the college to appear for and answer th e 
paper or papers in a subject or subjects of the B.T. 
Degree examination in the Indian Languages provided 
one year’s notice is given by the College concerned. 
This shall not apply to “ (D) HI — Methods of Teaching 
and learning— English.” 

7. Examination Boards shall, whenever there are 

candidates, be appointed annually by 
Examination the Syndicate for the following 
Boards. subjects or groups of subjects — 




viii. 

Oriya. 

i. 

English. 

ix. 

Bengali. 

ii. 

Greek and Latin 

X. 

Gujerati. 

iii. 

French 

xi. 

Burmese. 

iv. 

German. 

xii. 

Sinhalese. 

V. 

Sanskrit. 

xiii. 

Hebrew and Syriac. 

vi. 

Marathi. 

xiv. 

Arabic, Persian and 

vii. 

Hindi. 


Urdu. 



xxxvi] 


CONDUCT OF EXAMINATIONS 


21 


XV, 

Tamil 

xxxiii 

Law. 

xvi. 

Tclugu. 

xxxiv. 

Medicine. 

xvii. 

Kannada. 

XXXV. 

Sanitary Science. 

xviii. 

Malayalam. 

xxxvi. 

Pharmacy. 

xix. 

Mathematics. 

XXXvii. 

Dental Surgery. 

XX. 

Statistics. 

xxxviii. 

Nursing. 

xxi. 

Physics. 

xxxix. 

Engineering. 

xxii. 

Chemistry. 

XI. 

Agriculture. 

xxiii. 

Botany. 

Xli. 

Horticulture. 

xxiv. 

Zoology including 

xlii. 

Veterinary Science, 


Physiology. 

xliii. 

Technology. 

XXV. 

Geoolgy. 

Xliv. 

Commerce. 

xxvi. 

Home Science. 

xlv. 

Indian Music. 

xxvii. 

Anthropology. 

xlvi. 

Western Music. 

xxviii. 

Philosophy. 

Xlvii. 

Drawing & Painting. 

xxix. 

History and Politics. 

Xlviii. 

Journalism. 

XXX. 

Economics. 

xlix. 

Social Service. 

xxxi. 

xxxii. 

Geography. 

Teaching. 

1. 

Physical Education. 


The Syndicate may appoint separate Boards of Question 
Paper**Setters and Boards to conduct examinations, as it 
deems fit. Joint or separate Boards may be appointed to 
conduct different examinations. 


8* The Syndicate shall appoint a Chairman for each 
Board, who shall, at the conclusion of 
Chairman of every examination, forward to the 
Boards and Syndicate a report on the manner in 

their duties. which the examination has been 

conducted. 


9* The Syndicate may appoint Special Boards of 

o 1 1 j Examiners to supervise the Matricula- 

Special Boards. • 

tion Examination* 


10. The Examination Boards 
Boards’s report shall report to the Syndicate the 
to the results of all examinations conducted 

Syndicate. or supervised by them. 



22 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


Approval and li. The Syndicate shall have 

publication of power to approve and publish the 
results. results. 

12. In the examinations for Degrees in Law, 

Medicine, Engineering, Agriculture 
Manner of and Commerce and for the final Part 

publication of of the Degrees of the B.A. (Honours) 
results of and B.Sc. (Honours), the names of all 

successful successful candidates shall be pub- 
candidates. lished in the order of proficiency. In 
the case of the other examinations 
the names of candidates who are placed in the First Glass 
shall be published in the order of proficiency ; in the 
case of the B.A. and B.Sc. Degree Examinations, the 
names of candidates who are placed in the Second Class 
shall also be published in the order of proficiency. The 
names of other successful candidates shall be published 
in the order in which they were registered for the 
examination. 

13. A certificate signed by the Registrar shall be 

given to each successful candidate at 
Pass Ccrtifi- an examination other than an examin- 
cates. ation for a Degree, Title or Diploma. 

The certificate shall set forth the date 
of the examination, the subject in which the candidate was 
examined, the class in which he was placed, and the 
subjects, if any, in which he gained distinction in accord- 
ance with the Regulations. 

14. A Diploma under the seal of the University and 

signed by the Vice-Chancellor shall 
Diplomas. be presented at a Convocation to each 

successful candidate at an examina- 
tion fora degree, Title or Diploma. The Diploma shall set 
forth the date of the examination, the subjects in which 
the candidate was examined, the class in which he was 
placed, and the subjects, if any, in which he gained dis- 
tinction in accordance with the Regulations. 



CHAPTER XXXVII. 
Fees. 


I. Candidates for Examinations, Diploma and 

Degrees shall pay the following fees : — 

RS. 

(a) Examination fees : 

Matriculation Examination .. 15 

Statute English Part Only . . 5 

Examination Pre-University Examination — 

Fees. Whole Examination . . 25 

Part I — English . . 10 

Part II — Second language . . 10 

Part III — Optional subjects 18 

Each additional subject . . 8 

Intermediate Examination — 

(Under Transitory Regulations) 

Whole Examination , . 30 

Part I only . . 12 

Part II only . . 10 

Part III only . . 20 

For one subject under Part III . . 8 

For each Science subject under Part III 
in which a practical test has been 
prescribed, an additional fee of . . 3 

Three-year B.A. and B.Sc. Degree Examina- 
tions — 

Part I. — English’ — 

(a) Three papers at the end of the second 
year 

(J) One paper at the end of the third 
year 


6 



24 


LAWS OF the university 


[chap. 


Part II — Languages — 

(a) Two papers at the end of the second 

year . . 15 

{b) One paper at the end of the third 

year . . 6 

Three*-year B.A. Degree Examination — 

Part III — 

Group A .. 25 

Group B ..15 

[Note * — In the case of Branch XII — Languages, 
where there are no Groups, the first two papers consti- 
tute Group B and the remaining four papers (Nos. 3 
to 6) constitute Group A for purposes of Examination 
fees.] 

Three-year B.Sc. Degree Examination — 

Part III — 

Group A . . 35 

Group B . . 20 

Three-year B.A. and B. Sc. Degree Examina*. 
tions — 

Part IV — Minor . . 6 


Three-year B.Sc. (Home Science) Examina- 
tion — 


Part I — English 

.. 15 

Part II — Second Language 

.. 15 

Part III— 

Group A 

.. 15 

Group B 

.. 50 




XXXVIl] 


FEES 


25 


RS. 

B.A. Degree Examination — (Two-year) 

(Under Transitory Regulations) 

First appearance — 

Whole Examination or any Part or 

Parts . . 50 

Subsequent appearance — 

Whole Examination . . 50 

Part I . . 22 

Part II . . 12 

Partin .. 28 

B.A. ( Honours) Degree Examination — 
Preliminary .. 15 

Final . . 70 

M.A. Degree Examination (Old Regu- . . 70 

lations) 

B.Sc. Degree Examination — (Two year) 

(Under Transitory Regulations) 

Parti .. 15 

Part II .. 45 

B.Sc. (Honours) Degree Examination — 

Parti .. 15 

Part II — Any Branch . . 75 

(For all candidates, including Post^-graduate 

course students) 

Science Subjects (Physics, Chemistry or 
any Natural Science Subject) — 

Subsidiary Subject or Subjects . . 30 

Main Subject . . 45 

M.Sc. (by Examination) .. 150 




26 


LAWS OF the university 


[chap. 


RS, 

M.A. Degree (New Regulations) (Whole 

Examination) . . 15C 

Part I only . . 7C 

Part II only . . 8C 

For subsequent appearence in any subject. 25 

M.Sc. Degree (New Regulations) ; Whole 
Examination) . . 20C 

Part I only . . IOC 

Part II only . . IOC 

Subsequent appearance in any subject . . 25 

M.Sc. (Home Science) Examination . . 150 

Three-year B.Com. Degree Examination — 

Part I — English . . 20 

Part II — Second Language . . 8 

Part III- — 

Group A .. 15 

Groups B and C . . 50 

B.Com. Degree Examination — (two-year) 

{Transitory Regulations) 

Part I ..15 

Part II . . 7 

Part III . . 38 

B.Com. (Honours) Degree Examination- — 

Part I ..15 

Part II . . 70 

M. Com. Degree (Whole Examination) .. 150 
Part I . . 70 

Part II . . 80 

Subsequent appearance in any subject . . 25 

Pre-Professional Examination — 

Part I — English . . 8 

Part ir — Whole Examination . . 30 

For each subject . . 10 



XXXVII] 


FEES 


27 


RS. 

B.Sc. (Ag.) Degree Examination — - 

First Examination . , 30 

Second Examination . . 40 

Final Examination . . 50 

Subsequent appearance : 

For each subject for any Examination 15 

B.Sc. (Ag.) Degree Examination (Revised 
Regulations — 1952‘*53)' — 

First Examination (Whole Examination) . . 40 

Subsequent appearance (in subjects) — 

Each subject .. 15 

Second Examination( Whole Examination) 50 

Subsequent appearance (in subjects) — 

Each subject .. 15 

Final Examination — 

Whole Examination • . 60 

Subsequent appearance (in subjects)^ — 

Each subject . . 20 

Examination for the Diploma in Horti*- 
culture . . 75 

M.Sc. (Ag.) Degree (Whole Examination). 250 
Subsequent appearance for any subject 
or Dissertation . . 25 

B.V.Sc. Degree Examination (Old Regulations) 
Preliminary Examination . . 25 

Intermediate Examination — Part I . . 30 

Intermediate Examination — Part II . . 30 

Final Examination . . 50 

Subsequent appearance (in subjects) — 

For each subject in the Preliminary 
or Intermediate Examination . . 15 

For each subject in the Final Examin*- 
ation • • 20 



28 


LAWS OF THE UNIVEIUITY 


[CHAP- 


RS. 

B.V.Sc. Examination (New Regulations.) 


First Examination ... ... ... 50 

Second Examination ... ... 50 

Third Examination ... ... 60 

Final Examination, Part 1 ... ... 40 

Part II ... ... 40 


For each subject at a subsequent appearance in 
any of the above examinations Rs. 20. 

M. V. Sc. Degree (Whole Examination) . . 250 


Subsequent appearance for any subject 
or Dissertation . . 25 


B.Sc. (Tech.) Degree Examination' — 

(Old Regulations) 

Whole Examination . . 125 

Part I only . . 50 

Part II only .. 75 


Subsequent appearance (in subjects): 

For each subject under any Part . . 10 

B. Sc. ( Tech. ) Degree Examination — 
(Four-Year Degree course) 

(New Regulations) 


First Examination . . 125 

Second Examination . . 125 

Third Examination .. 125 

Final Examination . . 125 

For each subject for any examination . . 30 


B. Arch. Degree Examination — 

Intermediate Examination . . 150 

Subsequent appearance in any subject. 25 
Final Examination 1 SO 

Subsequent appearance in any subject. 25 


B.T. Degree Examination — 

Whole Examination . . 35 




XXXVll] 


FEES 


29 


RS. 

Subsequent appearance— 

Written Examination only . . 25 

Practical Examination only . . 15 

Additional Subject (Written and 
Practical) .. 15 

M.Ed. Degree Examination . . 50 

Subsequent appearance : 

Written papers only . . 35 

Thesis only . . 20 

B.L. Degree Examination:- — 

F.L. Examination . . 50 

For each Division . . 20 

B.L. Degree Examination . . 70 

For each Division . . 25 

M.L. Degree Examination . . 150 

LL.D. Degree . . 250 

M.B. & B.S. Degree Examination (Old 
Regulations) : 

First M.B, & B.S. Examination — 

Whole Examination . . 55 

Part I only . . 20 

Part II only . . 40 

Separate subjects after first appearance : 

parti — Organic Chemistry .. 20 

Part II -Anatomy or Physiology . . 25 

Second M.B. & B.S. Examination — 

Whole Examination • • 60 

Part I only • • 25 

Part II only • • 45 

Separate subjects after first appearance : 

Part I— Pharmacology • • 25 

Part II — Hygiene and Preventive 
Medicine or General Pathology with 
Bacteriology •• 25 



30 


LAWS OF the university 


[chap. 


RS. 

Final M.B & B.S. Degree Examination — 

F ir St appearance : 

Whole Examination . . 85 

Part I only — Forensic Medicine 
and Ophthalmology . . 35 

Part II only . . 60 

Separate subjects after first appearance : 
Part I — One subject (Forensic 

Medicine or Ophthalmology) . . 20 

Part II — One subject (Medicine, 
Surgery or Obstetrics and Gynae- 


cology) .. 25 

M.B. & B.S. Degree Examination 
(Revised Regulations) 

First M.B. & B.S. Examination. 

Whole Examination ... ... 60 

Subsequent appearance — 

Anatomy ... ... ... 30 

Physiology ... ... ... 30 

Chemsitry ... ... ... 10 

Second M.B. & B.S. Examination — 

Whole Examination , . 60 

Separate subjects after first appearance 

—Each ., 25 

Final M.B. & B.S. Examination — 

First appearance : 

Whole Examination . . 85 

Part I only . . 25 

Part II only . . 70 

Separate subjects after first appearance: 

Part I — One subject . . 25 

Part II — One subject (Medicine, 

Surgery or Obstetrics and Gynae*- 

cology) — Each . . 30 

Preventive and Social Medicine . . 25 



xxxvir] 


FEES 


31 


RS. 

M.D. or M.S. Degree Examination (Old 
Regulations) . . 200 

M.D, or M.S. Degree (New Regulations) 

Parts I and II ... 250 

Part I only ... 100 

Part II only ... 150 

Diploma in Gynaecology and Obstetrics .. 75 

Diploma in Venereology . . 75 

Diploma in Dermatology . . 75 

Diploma in Ophthalmology . . 75 

Diploma in Oto-Rhino-- Laryngology — 

Whole Examination . . 75 

do. Part I . . 30 

do. Part II .. 45 

Diploma in Radiology — 

Whole Examination . . 75 

do. Part I . . 30 

do. Part II .. 45 

Diploma in Orthopaedics . . 75 

Diploma in Tuberculosis .. 75 

Diploma in Child Health ... 75 

Diploma in Clinical Pathology ... 75 

Diploma in Anaesthesia ... 75 

B.S.Sc. Degree Examination — 

Pan I ..60 

Part II ., 100 

B.Pharm. Degree Examination — 

Preliminary Examination : 

First appearance or Whole Examination . . 35 

Subsequent appearance (by subjects) — 

Each subject .. 15 

Final Examination : 

Part I— 

First appearance or Whole Examination 30 



32 


LAWS OF the university 


[chap. 


RS. 

Subsequent appearance (by subjects) — 

Each subject .. 15 

Part II— 

First appearance or Whole Examination 50 
Subsequent appearance (by subjects)- — 


Each subject . , 20 

B.D.S. Examination : 

First B.D.S. Examination^ — 

Whole Examination . . 50 

Separate subjects after first appearance- — 
(Anatomy or Physiology) — each . . 25 

General Medicine or Metallurgy- — each . . 15 

Second B.D.S. Examination — 

Whole Examination . . 50 

Separate subjects after first appearance — 

each . . 25 

Third B.D.S. Examination- — 

Whole Examination . . 60 

Separate subjects after first appearance — 
each . . 25 

Final B.D.S. Examination — 

Whole Examination . . 75 

Separate subjects after first appearance — 
each . . 25 

B.Sc. (Nursing) Examinations — 

Intermediate Examination in Science In 
Nursing . . 35 

Subsequent appearance — 

Part I only . . 12 

Part II only .. 15 

Part III only .. 20 

B.Sc. (Nursing) Degree Examination — 

Whole Examination * . 75 




XXXV n] 


FEES 


33 


RS. 

Subsequent appearance ^ — • 

Part 1 only . . 10 

Part II only ‘ . . 30 

Part III only . . 40 

B.E. Degree Examination — (Old Regulations) 

First B.E. Examination .. 30 

Second B.E. Examination .. 40 

Third B.E. Examination . . 45 

Final B.E. Degree Examination . . 60 

Subsequent appearance in any subject in 
any examination .. 10 

B.E. Examination (New Regulations.) 

First B.E. ... ... . . . . 50 

^Second B.E. ... ... .. .. 

Third B.E. .. .. ..50 

Fourth B.E. .. ... ... 60 

Final B.E. .. .. ..60 


Subsequent appearance in any subject in any 
examination Rs. It). 

Oriental Titles Examination — 

Entrance Test to the following Oriental 
Titles — 

Vidvan, Adib-i-F'azil, Malpan and Sop- 
par and Titles in Arabic and Persian . . 10 


Oriental Titles — 

Preliminary Examination , . 25 

Final Examination . . 30 

B.O.L. (Pass) Degree Examination — 

Part I . . 15 

Part II .. 35 

B.O.L. (Pass) Degree Examination ( 

Regulatiom) — 

Parti .. 15 

Part 1 1*- A, General Indian History . . 5 

♦Will be prescribed later. 

5 



34 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY [CKAP. 


RS. 

Part I and Part II-A, General Indian 


History . . 20 

B.O.L. (Honours) Degree Examination — 

Preliminary . . 15 

Final , . 70 

Sangita Siromani Title — 

Preliminary : 

Whole Examination . . 25 

Parts I and III for candidates under 
Regulation 9 of Chapter LVII . . 25 

Part II only , . 10 

Final — Whole Examination . . 35 


Bachelor of Music (B^Mus.) Degree Examin*- 
ation — 

Whole Examination 
Part I only 
Part II only 
Part III only 

Examination for the Diploma in Economics. 
Examination for the Diploma in Politics and 
Public Administration 

Examination for the Diploma in Statistics . . 
Subsequent appearance in a Special Subject 
Examination for the Diploma in Modern 
European Languages (French or German) 

Examination for the Diploma in Librarianship 
First appearance — 

Whole Examination or any Division or 
Divisions . . 30 

Subsequent appearance : 

Whole Examination . . 30 

Any Division 10 

Examination for the Diploma in Geography. 50 

Subsequent appearance — Dissertation only .. 20 

Examination for the Diploma in Indian Music. 30 


50 

15 

25 

30 

50 

50 

50 

15 

20 



Xxxvil] 


fees 


35 


RS. 

Subsequent appearance — Practical Test in a 
subject or subjects (each subject) . . 15 

Examination for the Diploma in Anthropology 50 
Examination for the Diploma in Journalism . . 50 

Subsequent appearance— 

Shorthand or Typewriting . . 6 

Examination for the Diploma in Social 
Service . . 40 

Examination for the Diploma in Archaeology. 75 
Examination for the Diploma in Dietetics ... 75 

Examination for the Certificate in Librarian- 
ship . . 5 

Examination for the Certificate in 
Anthropology .. 15 

Examination for tlie Certificate in Modern 
European Languages {French or German). 15 
Examination for the Diploma in Physical 
Education . . 50 


Examination for the Diploma in Business 


Management — 


Part I 

.. 25 

Part II 

.. 35 

Part III 

.. 35 

Subsequent appearance in any subject 

.. 15 

Certificate Course in Sciences and Humanities 

Examination. 


(a) Physics and Chemistry . . 

.. 30 

(b) Botany and Zoology 

... 30 

(c) Mathematics and Physics 

... 30 



36 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


RS. 

(d) Mathematics and English or a 

Language ... ... ... 20 

(6») History and English or a Language. 20 

(/) Geography and English or a 

Language ... ... . . 2C 

{g) Geography and History ... .. 2C 

Research Degrees - — 

Degree of Master of Letters (M.Litt.) . . 150 

Subsequent appearance for — ^Parl I 

(Thesis) or Part II (Examination) . . 100 

Degree of Master of Science M.Sc. . . 150 

Subsequent appearance for — Part I 

('fhesis) or Part II (Examination) . , 100 

Degree of Doctor of Philosoi)hy (Pli.D.) . . 200 

Subsequent appearance for — Part 1 
(Thesis) or Part II (Examination) . . 100 

Degree of Doctor ol Letters (D.Litt.) , . 250 

Degree of Doctor of Science (D.Sc.) . . 250 

{b) Degree or Diploma Fee — 

Diploma Fee (for taking Degree at a CJonvo*- 
cation in person) . . 5 

Degree in absentia Fee (including Diploma 
Fee) ' ..15 

M.A. Degree Fee . . 25 

Diploma Fee (for Certificates and Diplomas 
given at a Special Meeting of the Senate) 
other than for Degrees taken at a Convo- 
cation . . 3 



30CXVII] 


FEES 


37 


RS. 

Diploma in absentia Fee (for Certificates and 
Diplomas given at a Special Meeting of the 
Senate) other than for Degrees taken at a 
Convocation . . 5 

Provided that the above fees shall not be 
levied in the case of Honorary Degrees. 

Statute — 

Fees from 
Research 
Students and 
Fellows 
permitted to 
work in the 
Depts. of the 
University. 

Persons working in Arts Departments — either 
Rs. 3u per annum or Rs. 10 per term (thrice 
in a year). 

Persons working in Science Departments — eithre 
Rs. 45 per annum or Rs. 15 per term (thrice 
in a year). 

3 . A College applying for recognition or affiliation 
shall pay a fee at the rate of Rs. 150 
Statute. for each member of the Inspection 

Recognition or Commission appointed ; and a 

Affiliation Fee. College applying for approval in 

courses in Oriental Titles shall pay a 
fee at the rate of Rs. 50/- for each 
member of the Commission appointed. 

Statute — 

Registration of 4. Graduates applying for 

Graduates Fee. Registration in the List of Registered 
Graduates shall pay a fee of Rs. 5. 


2 . Research Students and 
Pcliows (stipendiary and non- 
siipcndiai y ) permitted to study in the 
Departments of the University or 
under any Teacher of the University 
shall pay the following fees : — 



38 


[CKAP. 


LAWS OF the CNIVERSITV 


5 . Ocher Fees — 


RS. 


The following are the other fees prescribed : — 

I. ( 1 ) For registration as a Matriculate. •. 5 

Ordinance. 

Fees for Matri- (2) (a) For registration as a 
culation, candidate for the M.Litt., M.Sc. 

Diploma or Ph.D. Degree .. 50 

Courses, etc. 


(b) For undergoing the course for the M.Sc. 

Degree by Examination . . 200 

per year* 

(3)(a) For registration for the Degrees of M. D. 
and M.S. under Regulations 1 (ii)and 2 
of the Laws governing those Degrees, 
and for registration as a student for any 
of the Diploma Courses in Medicine or 
Surgery [inclusive of attending lectures 
under (i) and (c) in/ra] 100 

(b) Prescribed fee payable to the University 
in connection with the Course of 
Post-graduate Lectures in Medicine 
or Surgery arranged by the Council 
of Post-graduate Medical Education ; 

and/or 

{c) prescribed fee payable to the University 
in connection with the Refresher 
Courses arranged by the Council of 
Post-graduate Medical Education . . 100 


(4) For attending a part course specified in 
clause ( 3 ) above comprising one specific 
subject or branch in Medicine . . 50 



xxxvn] 


fees 


39 


RS. 

(5) For registration of application for admis- 

sion to the Pre- Technological course . . 5 

(6) For applying for admission to the B.Sc. 

(Tech.) Degree Course ... 5 

(7) For undergoing the Pre- Technological 

course .. 150 

for the year 
or 
60 

per term 
(the year consisting of 
three terms) 
if paid in 
instalments. 

(8) For undergoing the B.Sc. (Tech.) Degree 

course (four years) {New Regulations) 200 

per year 
or 
75 

per term, if paid 
in instalments. 

(9) For undergoing the B.Sc. (Tech.) Degree 

Course (two years) . . 200 

per year or Rs. 75 per term. 

(10) For registration of application for admis- 

sion to the B. Arch. Degree course . . 5 

(11) For undergoing the B. Arch. Degree 

course . . 250 

per year 
of three 
terms, 
or 

Rs. 85 
per term. 



40 


LAWwS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[GHAP. 


RS. 

(12) For undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Economics (two years course — Rs. 100) .. 50 

|)er year. 

(13) For undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Economics (one-year course) .. 100 

(14) For undergoing the course of lectures in one 

or more subjects for the Diploma Course 
in Economics (for each subject) . . 25 

(15) For undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Politics and Public Adminisliation (two 
years’ course — Rs. 100) . . 50 

per year. 

(16) For undergoing the course of lectures in one 

or more subjects for the Diploma Course 
in Politics and Public Administration (for 
each subject) .. 25 

(17) ror undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Statistics (two years’ course — Rs. 100) . . 50 

per year. 

(18) For undergoing the course of lectures in one 

or more subjects for the Diploma Course 
in Statistics (for each subject) . . 25 

(19) For undergoing the Certificate Course in 

French or German (one-year course) . . 60 

Provided, however, it shall be competent 
for the Syndicate to admit certain classes 
of applicants under the conditions 
enumerated in the proviso to Regulation 
45 of Chapter LXXI, at a concession 
rate of Rs. 45/- per candidate. 



XXXVII] 


fees 


41 


RS* 

(20) For undergoing the Diploma Course in 

French or German . . 60 

per year. 

Provided, however, it shall bn competent 
Ibr the Syndicate to admit certain classes 
of applicants under the conditions 
enumerated in the proviso to Regula*- 
tion 45 of Chapter LXXXl» at a con- 
cession rate of Rs. 45/*- per candidate. 

(21) For undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Librarianship (one-year course) . . 60 

(22) For undergoing the Diploma course in 

Geography (one-year course) . . 100 

(23) F’or Field-work by students of the Diploma 

Course in Geography . . 25 

(24) For undergoing the lectures in one or more 

subjects for the Diploma Course in Geo- 
graphy (for each subject) . . 25 

(25) F'or undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Indian Music (two years’ course^ — Rs. 75) 37| 

per year. 

(26) For undergoing the lectures in one or more 

subjects for the Diploma Course in 
Indian Music (for each subject) . . 25 

(27) For undergoing the Certificate Course in 

Librarianship . . 20 

(28) For undergoing the Certificate Course in 

Anthropology (one-year course) . . 50 

(29) For undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Anthropology (two-years* course — Rs. 100) 50 

per year 

Field-work . . 25 


6 



42 


I-AWS OF THB UNIVERSITY 


[CHAP. 


RS. 

(30) For undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Journalism (onc’-year course) . . 100 

(31) For undergoing the lectures in Constitutional 

and International Law, for Branch II of 
the M.L. Degree course (for each year). 100 

(32) For undergoing the Diploma Course in 

Business Management (three-years’ 

course — Rs. 300) .. 100 

per year. 

(33) For undergoing the Diploma course 

in Archaeology (two years’ course) . . 150 

per year. 

(34J For undergoing the Certificate Course 100 
in the Sciences and Humanities Payable 
(for the benefit of Graduate teachers on 
in High Schools). admission 

IL (1) (a) (i) For considering application for 
exemption from the production 
Ordinance, of attendance certificates (Appli- 

Other Fees for cations from students studying 
getting Marks, in Constituent or Affiliated or 
Certificates, etc. Oriental Colleges or University 

Departments) , . 10 

Provided, however, it shall be competent for the 
Syndicate to waive the payment of the above 
fee for exemption in cases where the candidates 
could not produce the prescribed certificates 
of attendance owing to the reduction of the 
College to a lower grade (voluntary or other- 
wise) or the closing down of the College, or 
the College not having been granted the 
necessary recognition or affiliation in time. 



XXXVn] 


FfiES 


43 


(n) Application for exemption from candi- 
dates after private study (non-coHe- 
giate) for Oriental Titles Examination 
Preliminary/Final, for Entrance Test 
to Oriental Titles [vide Ordinances 3 
and 4 of Chapter XXXV, Regulation 
9 (d) and (e) (iv) of Chapter XL.) . . 15 

(iii) Application for exemption from candi- 
dates after private study (rion- 
collcgiate) for all examinations other 
than Oriental Titles and Entrance 
Test to Oriental Titles viz., Matri- 
culation, Pre-University, B.A., M.A. 
or other Examinations . . 25 

(b) For scrutiny of application under Ordi- 
nance I {b) and (c) of Chapter XLI, 
Matriculation Examination .. 10 

(2) For considering application for recognition 

of an exaininalion of another University 
or examination conducted by other Bodies 
outside the jurisdiction of the University. 5 

(3) For considering application for combination 

of attendances earned by a candidate in 
two colleges . . 5 

(4) For scrutiny of Secondary School -Leaving 

Certificates of candidates who sat for the 
examination prior to 1926, and of those 
who sat for the examination within the 
Madras Presidency and outside the 
University area .. 5* 

* Also for scrutiny of Certificates with Shorthand or Typewriting 
as optional, from the examination of 1932 



44 


LAWS OP the UKIvERSITY 


tCHAP. 


RS. 

(5) For scrutiny of Madras European High 

SchooULeaving Certificates of candidates 
who sat for the examination prior to 1927, 
and of those who sat for the examination 
outside the University area after 1927 . . 5 

(6) For scrutiny of Bangalore European High 

School Certificates of candidates w^ho sat 
for the examination prior to 1933 and in 
1951 et seg. . . 5 

(7) For considering application for recognition 

of change of name .. 10 

(8) For endorsing in the University records in 

regard to the change in the date of birth; 
whether due to clerical error or otherwise 10 

(9) For obtaining a duplicate Diploma or 

Certificate . . 10 

(10) For obtaining a Provisional Certificate .. 5 

*‘•‘(11) For application for Intermediate Certificate 
received by the Registrar after the pres- 
cribed date . . 3 

(12) For application for Certificates and Diplomas 

(other than Intermediate) received by the 
Registrar one year alter the examination . . 3 

(13) For application for Certificates and 

Diplomas received by the Registrar five 
years after the examination .. 10 

(14) For obtaining a Migration Certificate . . 5 

Dates will be notified in the Fort St. George Gazette when 
i ublishing the results. 



XXXVII 1 


FEES 


45 


RS. 

(15) (a) For issue of a certified extract from 

Convocation Reports . . 5 

(b) For issue of a certified extract from the 
Eligible List (S.S.L.C. or E.S.L.C. 

or E.H. S. Examination) . . 5 

(16) For issue of a certified extract from the 

Registers or Records of the University 
(other than from the Convocation Reports 
and eligible Lists) . . 2 

( 17) (a) For furnishing to a candidate a statement 

of marks o1)tained b\' him at the Matri- 
culation Examination on each occasion. 
(March 1952 et ^cq). . , 1 

[Note :-~-Th is fee of Re 1/ ‘•should be paid by all 
candidates appearing for the Matriculation 
Examination, along with their examination 
fees.) 

{h) For furnishing to a candidate a statement 
of marks obtained by him at the Intern- 
mediate Examination on each occasion. 
(Maich 1945 cr. seq). . . 1 

{Note : — -This fee of Re. !/•- should be paid by all 
candidates appearing for the Intermediate 
Examination along with their examination 
fees.) 

(c) For furnishing to a candidate appearing 

for the whole examination (other than 
Matriculation and Intermediate ex*- 
aminations) a statement of marks 
obtained by him at the examination , . 2 



46 


LAWS OF THtE DNlVERSlfY 


For each recognised part or parts of the 
examination . . 1 

{Note : — -The fee shall be paid by all candidates 
appearing for the whole examination or in 
Part or Parts thereof.) 


(d) For furnishing to a candidate a statement 
of marks obtained by him at the Inter- 
mediate Examination for each appear- 
ance (whether for a Part or Parts or for 
the Whole Examination) at examin- 
ations prior to March 1945 or for 
furnishing duplicate statement of marks 
for each appearance . . 2 

(18) For checking the addition of the marks in 

each paper of a candidate for any Univer- 
sity Examination (for each paper) . . 10 

(19) (a) For supplying to Principals of Colleges 

marks of all the successful candidates 
at the Matriculation and Intermediate 
Examination (for each examination of 
the year) . . 20 


(b) For supplying to Principals 
of Colleges marks of all 
the candidates (passed 
and failed) from a parti- 
cular College for the B.A. 
(Old Regulations), B.Sc. 
(Old Regulations), B.A. 
(Hons.), B.Sc. (Hons.), 
F.L.,B.L., M.B. & B.S., 
B.T., F.E., B.E., B.Sc. 
(Ag.) or any other examin- 
ation far fifty candidates^ 
or less. 


Annas 8 per can- 
didate subject 
to a maximum 
fee of Rs. 10 
for an examin- 
ation, for fifty 
candidates or 
less. 



CHAPTER XXXVIII. 


Dates for payment of Examination Fees and 
Submission of Certificates, Dates of Com- 
mencement of Examinations, and Dates of 
Publication of Results of Examinations. 


Ordinance. 

Dates of 
Examinations, 
dates of 
submission of 
applications 
and attendance 
certificates, 
and dates of 
publication of 
results. 


The latest dates on which fees for 
examinations shall be payable, and 
application for admission thereto and 
certificates to be produced by candi- 
dates arc to be submitted to the 
Registrar in the Forms prescribed, 
the dates on which examinations 
shall begin, and the dates on which 
results of the examination shall be 
published at the University Buildings 
shall be : — 



48 


LAWS OF THE UEIVEESITY 


[chap. 


Examinations. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications, 
together with 
the receipt 
ofpajmmt 
offeesjinthe 
Registrar’s 
Office, 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

co^nL : 

mentof 

Exam i nat ion >. ! 

i 

1 

Arts and Science — 



1 

Matriculation ... 

Decembei 15 

March 9 

March 20 3rd Monday 

; in May 

Pre-University ... 

February 15 
Or 

July 15 

March 31 

Or 

August 25 

7th April (Or the ist June 
next working Or 

day ) Or Sep. 15. 4th Monday 
in October 

• Intermediate ... 

January 7 
or 

July 15 

March 9 

Or 

August 25 

March 20 3rd Monday 

Or in May or 

Scptembei 15 4th Monday 

i in October 

♦B.A. Part I ... 

January 7 
! Or 

July 15 

March 9 

Or 

AugU:,t25 

1 March 20 4th Monday 

1 Or in May Or 

Scpicmbcr 15 4th Monday 
in October 

Part II ... 

Do, 

Do. 

Immediately after Do. 

the Examination : 
in Pan I 

Part III ... 

DO, 

Do. 

Immediately after Do. 

the Examination 
in Part II 

* B.A. (Honours) 
Preliminary. 

December 20 
Or 

July 15 

March 9 

Or 

August 25 

March 20 ' 4th Monday 

Or in May Or 

September 1 5 , 4th Monday 

' in October 

♦ B.A. (Honours) 
Final. 

December 15 

1 

March 9 

March 20 j 2nd Monday 

1 in May 

* M.A. (Old 

Regulations). 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. Do. 


• Examinations conducted under Transitory Regulations. Particulars 
regarding the dates of commencement of examinations in Parts II and III 
of the B.A. Degree and Part 11 of the B.Sc. Degree will be notified in the 
Fort St. George Gazette when the time-tables are published. 




xxxviii] dates oe payment op pees., ex a mn. 


49 


Examinations. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications, 
together with 
the receipt 
of payment 
offeesjinihc 
Registrar's 
Office. 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

Date of 
commer.ee- 
ment of 
Examinations. 

Last date of 
publication 
of results. 

1 

♦B. Sc. Parti ... 

January 7 
Or 

Jtily 15 

March 9 | 

Or '1 

August 25 

! 

March 20 
or 

Septembci 15 

4th Monday 
in May Or 
4 thMoniay 
in October 

Part II ... 

Do. 

Do. 

Immediately after 
the Examinat ion 
in Part I 

Do. 

•B Sc. (Honours); 
Parti. 

December 20 
Or 

July 15 

March 9 ; 

Or 

August 25 

March 20 

Or 

September 15 

4th Monday 
in May Or 
4ih Monday 
in October. 

Part II (Main) 

December 15 

March 9 

! 

March 20 

3rd Monday 
in May 

♦B.Sc. (Honours) 
t Part II (Sub- 
sidiary). 

December 20 
Or 

July 15 

March 9 
or 

Augu^t25 

The same as for 

B A. and B Sc 
Subsidiary 

4th Monday 
in May or 
4th Monday 
in October 

i B A. & B.Sc, 
(Three year) — 
(New Regulations) 


1 

( 


Part I-(A)— 
English. 

i 

! 

January 10 
or 

July 15 

March 15 
or 

August 25 

i April I 

! Or 

September 1 5 

4th Monday 
in May or 
4th Monday 
in October 


♦Examinations conducted i nder Tiansito.y Regulations. 

Particulars regarding the dates of commencement of examinations in 
Parts II and III of the B. A, Degree and 1 ait II of the B. Sc Degree will he 
notified in Fort St George Gazette when the time-tables are published. 

t Particulars regarding the cate of commencement of the examination in 
Part II— Subsidiary Subjects (only) of the B Sc. rHoiis.) Degree will be 
notified in the Fort St. George Gazette when the time-tables arc published. 

t Note The examination will commence in respect of Part I-A on 
April I and September i 5 . 

For the other Parts the dates of commencement of examinations will be 
in the Order mentioned above- Where Groups have not been specified in 
Part IIIj the examinations wilj jn the respective papers as in th^ rcgylatipn. 




50 


I.AWS Of the ontvebsity 


[chap. 


'1 

Examinations. 

Last date j 
for receipt of 
applications, 
together with 
the receipt 

Of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar's i 
omcc. i 
i 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examination- 

1 

t 

1 Last date of 

1 publication 
! of results- 

1 

! 

i 

B.A. & B.Sc., 
(Three year) — ; 

(New Regulations)! 
— (contd.) 

1 



; 

Part II-(A)— 
Language. i 

January lO 
! or 

.Ldyi5 

! March 15 
or 

: August 25 

i 


4th Monday 
in May or 
4ih Monday 
in October 

Part in-(Gr. B) — i 
Ancillary Sub-' 
ject. 

Do. 

Do. 

i 

, Do. 

Part IV- 

Minor. 

Do. 

i Do. 

I 


Do 

Part I-B- 
English. 

Do. 

‘ Do 


Do. 

Part II-B— 
Language. 

Do. 

Do 

i 


Do. 

Part III— Gr. A. 
Subject. 1 

Do. 

: Do. 


Do. 

f 

1 

♦B.Sc. (Home 
Science) (Three i 
year)— i 





Parti 

i 

January lo 
Or 

July 15 

March 15 
or 

August 25 

April I 

Or 

September 15 

; 4 th Monday 
j in May or 
,4th Monday 
j in October 

Part n 

Do. 

Do. 


1 Do. 

Part III— Gr. A. | 

Do 

i Do. 


i Do 

„ Gr. B. j 

Do, 

i Do. 


1 Do. 

1 


* Note The examination in respect of Part I will commence on April t 
and September 15. For the other Parts, date of commencement of examina- 
tions will be in the Order mentioned above. 



XXKVIU] 


DATBS O*’ payment OP PBKS...H!XamN* 


51 


Examinations. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications, 
together with 
the receipt 

Of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar’s 
Office. 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

Certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations 

Last date Of 
publication 
of results. 

t B Com (Three 
Year) (New Regu- 
lations)— 





Part I 

January 10 
Or 

July 15 

March 15 
Or 

August 25 

April I 

Or 

September 15 

4th Monday 
in May or 
4ih Monday 
in October 

Part II 

Do. 

Do 

. . 

DO. 

Part HI 

Groups B & C. 

Do. 

Do. 


Do. 

Partin 

Group A. 

Do. 

Do 


Do. 

1 

M.Sc,(By Exam.) 

i Januaiy20 

i 

April 20 

May I 

ind Monday 
j in June 

M A. (New Regu- 
lations)— 




1 

Part I 

January 20 

April I 

April 15 

2nd Mon- 
1 day in 

1 June 

• Part II .. 1 

Do. 

Do. 

Do 

’ Do. 

M.Sc. (New Regu-j 
lations)— 


1 



Part I 

Do. 

Do. 

i 

Do. 

Do. 

* Part II 

Do. 

I 

Do. 

i 

Do. 

Do. 

t NoT£ :~-*The examination in Part i will be held on April i 
temher 15. 

and Septem- 

The dates of commencement of examinations in other Parts will be in the 
order mentioned above. 

Kt* , Parts have not been specified, the examination will 

oe new at the end of the Second year on the above dates specified for Part II. 


52 LAWS OF TPHB tTNIVUIlSITY 


Ex minatiops. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications, 
together with 
the receipt 
of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar’s 
Office. 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

Certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations 

M.Sc. (Home 
Science)— 
Branch I Or 




Branch II 

M Com. (New 
Regulations"— 

January 20 

April 20 

May I 

Part I 

DO 

April I 

April 15 

•Pan II 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

M.Litt.Or M Sc. 

January 31 

Or 

August 31 

** 


Ph.D. 

January 31 

Or 

August 31 



D.Litt.OrD.Sc. 

January 31 

Or 

1 August 31 



Pre-PiOf ssional. 

! February 15 

March 31 

! 7ih April (Or the 


1 

Or 

, next working 

Law— 

July 15 

i 

August 25 

' day) Or i st Sep- 
i lembcr (Or the 

1 next working 
day). 

F.L.andB.L. ... 

January 20 

April I 

April 15 


Or 

Or 

Or 


July 15 1 

September 10 

September 25 

M.L. 

December 20 


July 15 

LLD. 

January 31 
or 

August 31 




[CfiAl’. 


Last date of 
publication 
of results. 


2nd Mon- 
day in June 


Do. 

Do. 


I5lh May 
Or 

15th Sept. 


2nd Monday 
in June Or 
2nd Monday, 
in Nov. 

I St Monday 
in Sept. 


Note Wherever i arts iiuve not been spec i lied , the examination will 
be held at the end of the second year on the above dates specified for Part II 


XXXVIIl] DATK8 OF FATJtBUt OF FEES. .BXAMX. 


51 


Examinations. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications, 
together with 
the receipt 
of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar's 
Office. 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

i 

i 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations. 

La^t date of 
publication 
of results. 

Medicine— 


i 



First M.B&B.S. 

October 8 

Or 

January 20 

November 20 
Or 

March 20 

December i 

Or 

April I 

December 20 

Or 

April 20 

Second M.B. & B.S. 

August 8 
or 

January 20 

Sep. 20 

Or 

March 20 

October i 

Or 

April I 

Oct. 20 
or 

April 2o 

FinalM.B.&B.S. 

October 8 
or 

January 20 

November 20 
or 

March 20 

Tecember i 

Or 

April I 

December 20 
Or 

May I 

M.D.OrMS. 
(Old Regulitioas). 

January 20 

January 20 

March 15 

May I 

M.D.or M S, 
(New Regulations). 





Pan I 

January 20 
or 

October 8 

Maich I 

Or 

November 20 

March 15 

Or 

Decemocr i 

April 20 
or 

December 20 

Part II 

January 20 

January 20 

March 16 

May I 

Diploma in Gy- 
naecology and 
Obstetrics. 

January 20 
Or 

J^dy 15 

January 20 

Or 

Julyis 

April I 

Or 

October 15 

May I 

Or 

Nov. 15 

Diploma in 
Venereology. 

Do. 

DO. 

Do. 

Do. 

Diploma in ■ 
Dermatology. 

Do. 

DO, 

DO. 

Do. 

Kiai 

IM 

Diploma in Oph^ 
thalmology. 

DO. 

DO. 

DO. 

( 

Do. 

Diploma in Oto- 
Rhino-Laryn- 
goiogy. 

Do. 

DO. 

Do. 

Do. 




54 


LAWS OF THE UITIVBBSITY 


[chap. 


Examinations. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications, 
together with 
the receipt 
of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar’s 
Offia'. 

Last date 
for 

submitt iirg 
Certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations. 

Last date of 
publication 
of results. 

Diploma in 
Radiology. 

January 20 
or 

July 15 

January 20 
or 

July 15 

April I 

Or 

October x5 

May I 
or 

Nov. 15 

Diploma in 
Orthopaedics. 

Do. 

DO. 

Do. 

Do. 

Diploma in 
Tuberculosis. 

Do. 

DO. 

Do. 

Do. 

Diploma in 

Child Health. 

DO. 

Do 

Do. 

Do. 

Diploma in 

Clinical Patho- 
logy. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do 

Diploma in 
Anaesthesia. 

Do. ! 

i 

Do. 

Do 

Do. 

B.S.Sc.— Part I ... 

November i 
Or 

February i 

January 10 
Or 

April 5 

January 20 
' Or 

April 15 

2nd Monday 
in February 

Or May i 

Part II ... 

Mays 

Or 

Sepiembei i 

July 5 
or 

November 10 

July 15 

Or 

* November 20 

2nd Monday 
in August 

Or Dec. 20 

B.Pharm.— ' 





Preliminary 

January 20 
Or 

August 8 

1 March 20 

1 

jSeptember 2r 

April I 
or 

) October i 

April 20 
i Or 

i October 20 

F^'inal— 





Parti 

January 20 
Or 

October 8i 

: March 20 | April i 

I Or ' Or 

November 20, December i 

1 

April 20 
! Or 

; December 20 

Pan II 

Do. 

Do. 

j Immediately aftei 
! Part I 

ri Do. 


XXXVin] DATES Of payment of FEES...EXAMK. 


55 


Examinations. 


Last date 




for receipt of 
applications, 
together with { 
the receipt 
of payment 
of foes, ir the 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations. 

Last date of 
publication 
of results. 

R gislrar’s 




Office. 





BDS.- 

i 

i 

j 

! 

1 

1 


Fir^t 

January 20 | 

March 20 1 

April I ! 

April 20 

Rx iminaiion. 

Or t Or 

August 8 jSectember 20 

Or 1 

October i j 

Or 

October 20 

Second 1 

January 20 , 

March 20 

April I 

May I 

Examination. ; 

Or 

Or 

Or i 

or 


October S ; 

December i 

December lo , 

January 5 

Third 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Kxaminauon. 


i 

1 



Final 

Do. 

Do. 

1 

Do. j 

Do. 

Hximination. 





H.Sc. 1 Nursing) 

January 20 

March 20 

April I 1 

May I 

Tniormediate 

or 

Or 

or 1 

Or 

and Final 

Rngineering— 

July 15 

October 1 

October 15 | 

i 

Nov. 15 

(Old Regulations) 





FirstB.R. 

December 20 
Or 

July 15 

Match 9 

Or 

August 31 

March 20 ^ 

Or j 

September 25 j 

1st Monday 
in May or 
2nd Monda, 
in Nov. 

Second B.E. ... 

Do. 

i 

Do. 

Immediately after 
First B.E. Ex- 
amination. 1 

i 

Do. 

Third B.K. 

Do. 

DO. 

March 20 1 

Or 

September 25 ! 

Do. 

Final B.E. 
Degree. 

Do, 

Do. 

Immediately after 
Third B E. Ex- 
amination. 

DO. 

Teaching— 





B.T, 

January 20 
Or 

July 15 

Marcli 1 9 
Or 

September ic 

April I 
or 

) September 20 

4th Monda 
in May 
i Or 

kth Monday 

1 in Nov. 



56 


LAWS OF THE UNIYBBSITY 


fCHAP. 


Examinations. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications 
together with 
the receipt 
of payment 
of foesj in the 
Registrar's 
Office. 

^ Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations. 

j 

' Last date of 
publication 

I of results. 


j 

t 



^Practical Test 
(for deferred 
candidates). 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

First week of 
March 


M.Ed. 

i December 2o! March 19 

! i 

April I 

4 th Monday 
in May 

Agriculture— 

1 


j 


B.Sc (Ag ) First 
Examination. 

i January 7 

1 Or 

July 15 

j March 9 

1 Or 

Sept. 15 

1 

April T 

Or 

October i 
(Forenoon) 

3 rd Monday 
in May or 
3rd Monday 
in November- 

Second 

Examination. 

Do. 

Do. 

April 1 
or 

October i 
(Afternoon) 

i Do. 

Final 

Examination. 

Do. 

Do. 

April I 

Or 

October 8 

Do. 

Diploma in 
Horticulture. 

January 20 

July I 

July 20 

4th Monday 
in August 

/etcrinary Science 
(Old Regulations) 

1 

! 




3.V.SC. 

Preliminary 

January 20 
Or 

July 15 

March 15 

Or 

September 15 

April I 

Or 

October I 

2nd Monday 
in May Or 

I St Monday 
in November. 


^ Note.— T he first test for the students will be conducted by the Collies 
’n February vide Regulation 4(^) of Chapter I-XXV. 



XXXVril] DATES OV PAYMENT OF FEB8...EX/1MN. 


57 


Examinations. 

Last dale 
for receipt of 
applicitions, 
together with 
the rec-ipt 
of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar’s 
Office. 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations. 

Last date of 
publication 
of results. 

By.Sc.—^ccmtd.) 

Intermediate- 
Part I 

January 20 

Maich 1 5 

April I 

2nd Monday 


or 

Or 

or 

in May or 


July 15 

September 15 

October i 

1st Monday 

Part ri 

DO. 

DO. 

i 

DO. 

in November. 

Do. 

Final 

April 15 

June I 

June 15 

4ih Monday 


Of 

or 

Cl 

in July or 


October 15 

December i 

December 15 

4th Monday 

M.V.Sc. 

January 20 

March 15 

April I 

in January 

2nd Monday 

M.Sc. (Ag.) 

March i 

May 10 

May 20 

in May 

3rd Monday 

B.Sc. (Technology). 
(two year) 

Parti 

January 20 

March 19 

April 1 

in June 

! 

i3rd Monday 

Part II 

DO. 

Do. 

Immediately after 

1 in May. 

DO. 

B. Arch.: — 

Intermediate 

January 20 

April I 

Part I 

April 15 

2nd Monday 

Examination. 

Final Examn. 

do 

do. 

do 

in Juaa 

do 

B Com, — 

(Old Regulations) 
Part I 

i 

December 20 

March 9 

March 20 

tth Monday 


Or 

Or 

Or 

in May cr 


July 15 

August 25 

September 15 

4ih Monday 

Part II 

DO. 

DO. 

Immediately after 

' in October 

I 

Do 

Partin 

I Do. 

DO, 

Part I 

Immediate iv after 

Do 


Pan II 



8 



58 


I#AWS OF THK UNIYEBSITY 


[CHAF 


Examinitions. 


: Last date 
jfor rec.‘ipt of 
applications, 
1 ogether with 
I the receipt 
j of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar’s 
Office . 


Last d?tc i 
for i 
submitting i 
certificates. I 


Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations. 


i 

i 

i 


Last c'atc ol 
publication 
of results 








B, Com. (Honours) 

i 




Parti 

' December 20 

March 9 

March 20 

4ih Monday 


Or 

Or 

Or 

in May or 


July 15 

August 25 ; 

Scptembci 15 

4th Monday 



in October 

Part II 

; Dccembci 15 

March 9 

March 20 

3rd Monday 

Oriental Title — 


in May 

Entrance Test to 
Vidvan Course. 

Oriental Titles — 

1 November 15 

i 


Same day as Tan 
II— Second 
Language— 
Intermediate 
Examination 
in March 

4th Monday 
in May 

Preliminary 

November i< 

March 9 

March 27 

4th Monday 




in May 


1 Do. 

DO. 

Do. 

DO. 

Parti 

November 15 

March 9 

March 20 

4th Monday 

Or 

or 

or 

in May or 


Jtnyis 

August 25 

September 15 

4thMonday 
in October 

Pan 11 

Do. 

DO, 

{March 27 

Or 

September 22 

DO. 

4th Monday 
in May Or 

B O L i Honour 

Parti '• i 

December 20 
Or 

March 9 
or 

March 20 

Or 

i 

July 15 

August 25 

September 15 

4th Monday 
in October 

Part 11 •• pccember 15 

i 

1 

{March 9 

March 20 

4th Monday 
in May 


tThe paper on General Indian History should be taken along with B.A. 
Group (iv-a) candidates on the same day. 

t The paper on The History of India should be taken along with B.A. (Honours; 
Branch III candidates on ?5ame day. 


XXXVIII] DATES or fAVMBin; or rKK8...EXAMK. 


5 ^ 


Examinations. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications, 
together with 
the receipt 
of payment 
of fees , in the 
Registrar’s 
Office. 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

( 

Date of 
commence- 
mert of 
Examinations. 

1 

1 

Last date of 
publication 
of results. 

English Papers 
(Matriculation 
Examination) for 
Entrance Test to 
Sangita Siiomani 
candidates. 

November 15 

1 

i 

... 

March 20 

i 

l 

4th Monday 
in May 

Sangita Siromani — 
Preliminar) : 





Pan I 

November 15 

March 9 

March 20 

4th Monday 
in May 

P«rt II 

Do. 

Do. 

Same day as for 
Intermediate 
Part IT 

Do. 

Part III 

Sangita SirOmani — 
Final: 

Do. 

Do. 

Immediately after 
the Examination 
1 in Part II. 

Do, 

Pan I 

November 15 

! March 9 

i 

Maich20 

4th Monday 
in May 

Part II 

B Mus, — 

Do. 

Do. 

jimmediately after 

1 the Examination 
1 in Part I. 

DO. 

Part I 

December 20 
Or 

July 15 

March 9 
Or 

August 25 

March 20 

Or 

September 15 

4th Monday 
in May Or 

4th Monday 
in October. 

Part II 

Do. 

Do. 

Immediately after 
Parti 

DO. 

Part III 

Do. 

Do. 

Immediately after 
Part II 

Do. 



60 


LAWS Oir THS tmVERSITY 


[OSAY. 


Bxanii nations. 

Last date 
for receipt of 
applications^ 
together with 
the receipt 
of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar’s 
Office. 

l^st date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations. 

Last date Of 
publication 
of results. 

Diplomas— 





•Economics 

Jaunary 20 

April lo 

July 10 

3rd Monday 
in August 

Politics aiJ Public 
A iministntion. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Statistics 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

French 

Do. 

Do. 

April 25 

2nd Monday 
in June 

Geiman 

Do. 

Do. 

April 26 

Do. 

Librarian ship ... 

Do. 

Do. 

April 20 

DO. 

t Gcographj' 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

DO. 

In iian Music ... 

Do. 

Do. 

j Do. 

Do. 

Anthropology ... 

January 20 

April 10 

1 April 25 

I St Monday 
in June 

Joirnalism 

November i 

January 10 

January 20 

February 20 

Diploma in 

Social Service. 

January 20 

April 10 

July 10 

i3rd Monday 
in August 

Physical Educa- 
tion. 

January 20 

April 10 

April 25 

2nd Monday 
in June 

Business 

Management- 





Part I 

January 20 

April 10 

April 25 

2nd Monday 
in June 

Part II 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

P 

Part III 

Do. j 

1 1 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 


• Last dite for submission of Thesis — ^July i, 
t Last date for submission of Dissertation— May 15. 



MUCVIII] DATBs OF PAYMBNT oF FEES„.ExaMN. 


61 


Examinations. 

Last date 
for receipt Of 
applicaiionsj 
together with 
the receipt 
of payment 
of fees, in the 
Registrar’s 
Office. 

Last date 
for 

submitting 

certificates. 

Date of 
commence- 
ment of 
Examinations. 

Last date of 
publication 
of results. 

Diploma in 
Archaeology. 

January 20 

April 10 

July 10 

3rd Monday 
in August 

Diploma in 
Dietetics. 

January 20 
or July 15 

January 20 
or July 15 

April I 

or October i 5 . 

May I 

Or Nov. 15 

Certilicates— 



1 


French 

January 20 

j 

April 10 

j April 25 

2nd Monday 
in June 

German 

Do. ' 

Do. 

April 26 

Do. 

Librarianship ... 

June i 

June 20 

June 28 

4 th Monday 
in July 

Anthropology ... 

January 20 

April 10 

April 25 

1st Monday 
in June 

Certificate course 
in the Sciences 
and Humani- 
ties. 

December 15 

March 9 

March 20 

3rd Monday 
in May 




62 


OF the university 


Provided that applications for admission to examin- 
ations received within a period of five days after the dates 
specified above will be accepted on payment of a fee of 
Rupee one per candidate ; 

Provided further that if any of the dates under 
columns 2 to 5 supra happen to be holidays, the next 
working day shall be considered as the due date for the 
purpose enumerated under each of the columns ; 

Provided also that it shall be competent for the 
Registrar to publish the results on any day succeeding the 
dates mentioned only when it has been found necessary 
to postpone publication beyond the dates prescribed, after 
giving notice in the newspapers ; 

Provided also that— 

(1) the Syndicate shall so fix the dates of the 
several examinations as to avoid, as far as 
may be practicable, the setting of duplicate 
sets of question papers in the same subject ; 
and 

(2) the date of commencement of all examinations 
and time-tables in detail shall be published in 
the Port St- George Gazette by the Syndicate 
in the preceding February or August. 



CHAPTER XXXIX. 

Transfer and Term or Annual Certificates 

{Regulations) 

I. No student who has previously studied in any 
recognised school or college shall be 
Transfer admitted to a college unless he 

Certificates. presents a transfer certificate 

showing : — 

(a) the name of the student in full, 

(b) the date of birth as entered in the admission 

register, 

(c) the dates on which he was admitted to and on 

which he left the institution, 

(d) the class in which he studied at the time of 

leaving it, 

(e) the subjects or portions thereof studied by him 

while enrolled. 

{/) if it be tile time when annual promotions take 
place, whether he is qualified for promotion 
to a higher class, 

(g) that he has paid all fees or other moneys due to 
that institution in respect of the last term in 
which he was enrolled, and a certificate of 
Medical Inspection, if any, from the school 
in which he last studied, and 

(/i) reasons for leaving college. 

[H.iB. — Clause (h) must be filled in when the Trans- 
fer Certificate is sent to the Syndicate of the University 
under Regulation 4 of this Chapter.] 

No student shall be enrolled pending the production 
of such certificate. Every such certificate shall be 



64 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


endorsed with the admission number under which the 
student is enrolled and shall be filled for reference and 
inspection. 

2. A student admitted to a college shall be required 
to undergo a medical inspection 
Certificates of within the first term of the Pre- 

Medical University course and a re‘-inspec- 

Inspection. tion during the first term of the first 
year of the three*-year B.A. or B. Sc. 
or B.Sc. (Home Science) or B.Com. courses or the first 
term of the Pre-Professional courses. A student pro- 
ceeding from one college to another shall be required 
to produce along with his Transfer Certificate, the 
Medical Certificate given in the previous college. 

Such Medical Inspection shall be conducted by a 
doctor possessing the University qualification of L.M.&S. 
or M.B. & B.S. or a registrable British qualification. 

In a case where a college has difficulty in arranging 
for Medical Inspection, a report should be made to the 
Syndicate by the college in question. 

3. A student applying for a transfer certificate during 
a college term on any day of which 
Issue of Transfer he has been enrolled or applying not 
Certificates. later than the fifth working day of the 
college term immediately following 
shall forthwith be given such certificate upon payment of 
all fees or other moneys due or of such portion thereof, 
as the Principal may sec fit to demand, for the College 
term in which he was enrolled. 

A student applying for such cerificate after the fifth 
working day of the college term immediately following 
that during which he has been last enrolled shall forthwith 
be given it on payment of ( 1 ) all fees or other moneys due, 
or of such portion thereof as the Principal may sec fit to 
demand, in respect pf the college term ip ^vhieh he wa§ 



XXXIX] TRANSFER AND TERM OR ANNUAL 65 

CERTIFICATES 

last enrolled, and (2) an additional fee of Rs. 3 at the 
option of the Principal ; 

Provided that, when a student has been enrolled at 
favourable fee rates, he shall be liable for such rates only. 

No student shall be considered to have been enrolled 
in any college term unless he has attended the college and 
received instruction for at least one day of that college 
term or has paid the fees or portions thereof prescribed. 

In the case of a student who has been a candidate for 
a University Examination, the results of which have not 
been published before the beginning of the college term, 
the eleventh day after the results of that examination have 
been announced at the Senate House"*" shall be counted 
for him the first working day of the college term so far 
as the grant of a transfer certificate is concerned. 

In the event of the Principal refusing or delaying to 
give a transfer certificate to which a student may be 
entitled the student shall have right of appeal to the 
Syndicate. 

4. If any student is expelled from a Constituent 
or an Affiliated College, intimation of 
Expulsion of the fact ofexpulsion, with a statement 
student from of the reasons therefor, shall be given 
College. forthwith by the Principal (a) to the 

parent or guardian of the student, and 
6) to the Syndicate ; intimation to the Syndicate shall be 
accompanied by the transfer certificate of the student. 
The Syndicate, on the application of the student or his 
parent or guardian may, after making such enquiry as it 
deems proper, deliver the certificate to the student with 
any necessary endorsement or withhold it temporarily or 
permanently, 

• Or in the BulUlng in which the Office of the Regisuar, Univeriiry 
of Midrivi iu looited» 

9 



66 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


5. The academic year for Colleges affiliated or 

recognised in Arts, Science, Teaching 
Academic year, and Law shall consist of three terms 
which shall ordinarily begin and end 
as follows : — 

First term — June to September, closing with the 
Michaelmas holidays. 

Second term — October to December, closing with 
the Christmas holidays. 

Third term — January to April, closing with the 
Summer holidays. 

6. A student shall ordinarily qualify for the annual 

certificate in one and the same college, 
Combination of but in special cases the Syndicate may 
attendances. allow attendance in different colleges 
to be combined for purposes of the 
annual certificate. 

7. A student in the Arts or Science courses desirous 
of transfer from one college to another shall apply to the 
Syndicate for permission to combine attendance at the 
two colleges, for purposes ofthc annual certificate. Such 
applications shall be submitted in every case prior to 
making the desired transfer and shall furnish valid 
reasons for the change proposed. This rule applies to a 
transfer during a term as well as a transfer at the end of an 
academic year when an additional term is proposed to be 
kept in a different college. An application to combine 
attendances shall invariably be accompanied by (i) the 
written consent to the proposed transfer of the Principal 
of the College in which the student is studying and 
(ii) 4 ;hc written promise of admission from the Principal of 
the College which he proposes to join, together with an 
assurance countersigned by the latter Principal that the 
student* if permitted by the Syndicate to combine 



67 


KXXIK] transfer and term oit annual 
certificates 

attendances, will, in the main, be able to continue in his 
college the course of study already commenced by the 
student under each part of the examination. 

In the case of a student in Arts or Science who has 
been permitted to combine attendances in two colleges, 
the annual certificates will be accepted as statisfying the 
Regulations, provided the student has kept cither — 

(a) three quarters of the possible attendances in 

each college before and after his transfer 
respectively, 

or 

(b) three quarters of the combined total of possible 

attendances in the two colleges taken 
together. 

8 . In colleges affiliated or recognized in Arts, 

Science, Teaching and Law, the 
Coaditions of grant of the annual certificates shall 
grant of annual be in respect of three terms ordinarily 
certificate. consecutive comprising one year; 

but it shall be competent for the 
authorities of a college to grant such certificate in respect 
of three terms which are not consecutive, provided that 
the student has, during those terms, completed the neces- 
sary courses of study for the year, 

9. The grant of the annual certificate shall be 
subject, in addition, to the following conditions : — 

(1) In colleges affiliated or recognised in Arts, 
Science, Teaching and Law, the certificate 
shall not be granted, unless a student has 
kept three-fourths of the attendances pres- 
cribed by the college in the course of 
instruction followed by him during each 
year. 



[CHAl?. 


64 LAWS OF the university 

(2) In colleges affiliated to or recognized in 

Engineering, Agriculture, Veterinary Science 
and Commerce, the certificate shall not be 
granted unless a student has kept three- 
fau'ths of the attendances prescribed by the 
college in the course of instruction followed 
by him during each year and in colleges of 
Medicine and Technology, the certificates 
shall not be issued unless he has attended 
four-fifths of the lectures in each course, 

(3) In colleges or institutions recognised, affiliated 

or approved under the Faculties of Oriental 
Learning and Fine Arts and in University 
Departments conducting the several Diploma 
classes, the certificate shall not be granted 
unless a student has kept three^- fourths of the 
attendances prescribed by the college? 
institution or University Department in the 
course of instruction followed by him during 
each year: 

(4) The certificate shall not be granted unless the 

student has completed the course of ins- 
truction to the satisfaction of the authorities 
of his college and his progress and conduct 
have been satisfactory. 

Students for lo. In the Pre-University or the 

want of progress B.A. (Pass) Degree Course a student 
certificate to who has failed to earn the progress 
undergo certificate at the end of the first year’s 

additional course shall be required to rejoin the 

Instruction. first year class for another full year. 

A student who has not been selected for the March- 
April University Examination but who at the close of 
the academic year is certified by the Principal to have 




69 


Itxxix] TRANSFER AND TERM OR ANNUAL 
CERTIFICATES 

made such satisfactory progress that he may be admitted 
to the examination, may appear for a subsequent examin- 
ation without further attendance at a college, provided 
that he has earned the necessary attendance certificate. 

A student who has failed to earn the progress certifi^ 
cate for the second academic year must attend college, to 
receive such additional instruction as the Principal may, 
in his discretion, prescribe so as to enable him to earn 
the required progress certificate. 

II. The Regulations governing attendance and 
progress and combination of attendance shall apply 
mutatis mutandis to students in the Faculty of Law. 

Forms of iz. The certificates shall be 

certificates. drawn up in the prescribed forms. 




CHAPTER XL. 


Admission to Examinations and Exemption 
from Annual or Term Certificates 

{Regulations and Ordinances.) 

Regulation. i* Only persons whose names 

Admission to are contained in the Register of 

Examination Matriculates shall be admitted to 

only after any examination other than the 
Matriculation* Matriculation Examination. 


2* Before being admitted to an examination a 
candidate must have been registered 
Regulation. therefor. A candidate shall be 

Registration of registered afresh on each occasion 
application. on which he wishes to present 
himself for an examination and a 
candidate shall be registered only after he has submitted 
an application in the prescribed form and paid the fee 
prescribed. 


Regulation. 

Conditions for 
admission — 
preliminary 
qualification 


3. Every candidate for an 
examination shall produce evidence 
of having previously passed the 
qualifying examination prescribed by 
the Laws, if any. 


4. He shall also, unless exempted by a special order 
of the Syndicate made cither on the 
recommendation of the Academic 
Council or as otherwise provided 
under the Laws, produce in the 
prescribed form the certificate or 
certificates required by the Laws of 
the University. 


Regulation. 

Production of 
attendance 
certificates. 



ADMISSION TO examinations AND 71 

EXEMPT I ON from ANNUAL OR TERM CERTIFICATES 

Regulation. 5 . No candidate shall be per- 

Admission to milted to sit for an examination 
Examination unless his annual (term) certificates 
only on of attendance, conduct and progress 

production of or the order of exemption granted to 
certificates. him have been received by the 
Registrar f /re commencement of 
the examination. 

Ordinance. 

Exemption from 6. In the case of the Matricula*- 
attendance tion Examination, the Syndicate may 
certificate — grant exemption from the production 

Matriculation of the prescribed certificate of 
Examination, attendance to — 

(1) A candidate who has attained the age of 

twenty years on the first day of March in the 
year in which he appears for the examination. 

(2) A bona fide teacher, provided {a) he has 

completed a course of study in the Third 
Form (or the equivalent thereto in the case 
of courses of study other than the S.S.L.C. 
course) and has qualified for promotion to the 
higher class and (b) satisfies the condition 
laid down in Regulation 9 (c) of this Chapter. 

(3) A candidate who produces evidence of having 

qualified for promotion to the Fourth or 
Higher form (or the equivalent thereto in the 
case of courses of study other than the 
S.S.L.C. course) shall be considered for 
exemption. Such a candidate should receive 
approved instruction, during the whole 
period prior to his proposed appearance at 
the Matriculation Examination, which 
shall be not less than three years in the case 
of those promoted to IV Form, two years in 
the case of those promoted to V Form, and 
one year in the case of those promoted to 



72 LAWS OF the university [chap. 

VI Form. Satisfactory evidence should be 
produced that the applicant is of good 
character and has received suitable ins*- 
truction for the period required. 

7 . A candidate who has completed the age of 

14 years on the 15th day of January 
Ordinance, of the year of appearing for the 

Conditions of examination may be permitted by 
admission to the Syndicate to sit for the Oriental 
O.T. Title Entrance Test or the English 

Entrance Test. Part of the Matriculation Examina*- 
tion for entrance to Sangita Siromani 
Course of the University of Madras, without the 
production of any certificate of attendance. 

8 , In the case of other examinations, the Academic 

Council may recommend the grant of 
Regulation, special exemption by the Syndicate 

Exemption — subject to the condition that no such 

general application shall be granted in the 

conditions. case of a student studying in a Col*- 
lege or a Department of the Univer- 
sity, without a recommendation 
from the Head of the College, or 
the Head of the University Department in which he is 
a student. 

9 * The Syndicate may grant exemption : — 

(a) To a student studying in a College or in a 
Department of the University, who 
Regulation, has failed to keep three-fourths of 

Grant of the attendances prescribed by the 

exemption by Institution or the University Depart- 
tha Syndicate. ment of which he is a student, and is 
unable to produce his annual certifi- 
cate of attendance, conduct and progress, provided that 
(i) the shortage of attendance docs not exceed 
five days; and 



XL] ADMISSION TO EXAMINATIONS AND 73 

EXEMPTION FROM ANNUAL OR TERM CERTIFICATES 

(ii) ihe Synciicale considers that the reasons 
given for failure* to keep the |.)i escribed 
attendance are satisfactory. 

If Ihe shortage of aticndanct' (*xceeds five days, 
the exemption sliall be graiio d (nd\' on the recominendaw 
tion of the Academic Chjuncii or its Standing Cjomrnittee. 

Exemption to 

students in a (b) To a student studying in a 

language College in which t!ie language in 

(other than respect of which exemption is sought 

English) — is not taught, provided that the 

when and how Syndicate is satisfied — 
granted. 

(i) as to the reasons assigned by the student for 

not studying in a College where the 
language in question is taught, and 

(ii) as to the arrangements made for instruction 

being received by the student in that 
language in the following examination: — 

Pan or Group for 

Name of Exatnination, which exemption may be 

granted, 

B. A. Degree .. Part II — Second Language. 

' (c) To a candidate for the Final M.B. & B.S. 

Degree Examination who having 
Exemption — failed in the examination is unable 
Final M.B.& to produce an additional certificate 
B.S. Examina- of attendance for six months in one 
tion — Additional or more subjects of the examination 
course. in accordance with the Regulations 

provided that he is recommended 
for exemption by the Principal of a Constituent or an 
Affiliated Medical College^ in which he is studying^ 

10 



74 


laws of the university 


[chap. 


(J) To a candidate from the production of either 
or both of the annual certificates of 
Exemption — attendance, required for the Oriental 

Oriental Title Title Examination, provided that 
Examinations. he is at the time of the examination 
at least thirty years of age. 

Provided, however, that a candidate who has 
already qualified for an Oriental Title shall be permitted 
to appear for the examination for a different Title or for 
•a different subject in the same Title; . such a candidate 
shall be exempted from the necessity of passing in the 
Entrance Test in the new language and/or conforming 
to the age rule. 

Notwithstanding anything contained in the above 
Regulation, it shall be competent for the Syndicate to 
allow candidates who have already been granted exemp*- 
tion from the production of attendance certificates with 
a view to appearing for any of the Oriental Title Examin- 
ations under Regulation 8 (It) (i) of Chapter XXXIX, 
Volume I, Part II, Calendar, 1942-43. to sit for any 
division or whole of the Oriental Title Examinations; 

Provided, however, that exemption once granted 
prior to the introduction of new restriction (like the age 
limit and passing of Entrance Test for Oriental Title 
private candidates) shall be valid only for Examinations 
under the Old Regulations. 

Note . — As and from the academic: year 1947‘-48 the 
examinations for the Titles will be confined only to such 
subjects as are offered by colleges. 

Exemption— 

bona fide (^) To a bona fide teacher 

teachers. under the following conditions : — 

A bona fide Teacher employed in a College or 
School recognised by the Madras University, 




xlJ admission to examinations and 1S 

EXEMPTION FROM ANNUAL OR TERM CERTIFICATES 

or in Schools recognised by the Director of 
Public Instruction, Madras, or the Inspector 
of Schools, Coorg and situated within the 
jurisdiction of the Madras and Annamalai 
Universities or any alumnus of this Uni- 
versity serving in the Indian Army Edu- 
cational Corps irrespective of the place of 
employment, shall be emitlcd to apply for 
exemption. 

Applications for exemption should be made by 
thos(’ teachers with the permission of their 
managements and managements should cer- 
tify that the applicants are bona fide teachers 
in their respective Institutions. 

In the case of teachers serving in the Indian 
Army Educational Corps, the application^ 
for exemption should be made by the 
teachers concerned with tfjc permission of 
army autliorities and the army aiuhorilies 
should certify that the applicants arc bona 
fide teachers in the Army Edticational Corps. 

Bona fide teachers applying for exemption 
should have been in service as whole-lime 
teachers for not less than three years on the 
date of such application, 

(0 Pre- University Examination 

An applicant for exemption to appear for the 
Pre-Uiiivcrsity examination should eithei 
have passed the Matriculation examination 
of this University or an examination recog« 
nized as equivalent thereto or have been 
placed on the list of candidates declared 



76 


LAWS OF THE university 


[CHAF. 


eligible for admission to courses of study in 
this Univ^ei i>ity on the results of the S.S.L-C. 
Examination provided further that he shall 
not be allowed to appear for the examination 
until one year has elapsed between the passing 
of Matriculation examination or other 
qualifying examination and that of appearing 
for the Pre-University examination. He 
shall produce a certificate of having done 
the prescribed laboratory work from a Pro- 
fessor or a Lecturer of a college recognized 
by or affiliated to the University in the sub- 
jects concerned countersigned by the Princi- 
pal of that college. 

{it) B.A* Degree Examination (Old Regulations) 

Every teacher applying for exemption to appear 
for tl^e B.A. Degree Examination under the 
Old Regulations shall be permitted to do so, 
till the examination of March-April 1964. 
He should have passed the Intermediate 
Examination of Madras University or an 
examination recognized as equivalent 
thereto; provided that he shall not be 
allowed to appear for the examination until 
two years have elapsed between the passing 
of the Intermediate or other qualifying 
examination and appearing for the B.A. 
Degree Examination under the Old Regula- 
tions; and provided further that should he 
fail to qualify for the B.A. Degree under 
the Old Regulations by the March-April 
1964, he should appear for the Three-year 
Degree examination under the New 
Regulations in all Parts to obtain the B.A. 
Degree. 



77 


xl ] admission to examinations and 

EXEMPTION FROM ANNUAL O R TERM CERTIFICA TES 

(ii-a) Three-year B.A. Degree Examination 

Every teaclier applying for exemption to 
appear for the three -year B.A. Degree 
examination, should have passed the Pre- 
UniversMy examination of the Madras 
University or an examination recognised 
as equivalent thereto ; provided that 
he shall not be allowed to appear for the 
examination until three years have elapsed 
between the passing of the Pre-University 
or other qualitying examination and appear- 
ing for the B.A. Degre<‘ Examination. 

A bona fide teacher who has passed the 
Intermediate examination can also apply for 
exemption to appear for the three-year B. A. 
Degree Examination under the New Regula- 
tions; provided that 1 e shall not be allowed 
to appear for the examination until two 
years have elapsed between the passing of the 
Intermediate examination and appearing for 
the three -year B.A* Degree Examination. 


) M.A. Degree Examination 

Every teacher applying for exemption from 
the production of the prescribed attendance 
certificates for the M.A. Degree Examin- 
ation shall have passed the B.A. Degree 
Examination of the Madras University or 
an examination recognised as equivalent 
thereto; provided that he shall not be 
permitted to appear for the examination 
until two years have elai:>sed between the 
passing of the B.A. Degree Examination 



laws op the university 


[chap. 




or other qualifying examination and appear- 
ing for the M.A. Degree Examination : 

Provided, further, that a teacher, who is a 
B.Sc, or B. O. L. Degree holder of this 
University and has later qualified for the 
B*A. Degree may be permitted lo take the 
M. A. Degree Examination in any of the 
Humanities (Philosophy, History, Econo- 
mics, Politics or English Language and 
Literature) two yeai s after passing the 
B.A. Degree Examination. 

Provided further that a teacher who holds 
the B.O.L. Degree of this University shall 
be permitted to take the M.A. Degree 
Examination in one or other of the 
language offered by him for the B.O.L. 
Degree Examination, two years after 
passing the B.O.L. Degree Examination. 
This proviso shall be in force for a 
period of five years i.e. upto and including 
the examination of March 1962. 


<io) Oriental Title Examination 

Every teacher applying for exemption from 
the production of the prescribed attendance 
certificate for any Oriental Title Examin- 
ation shall have passed the Entrance Test 
before he is permitted to sit for the Preli- 
minary Examination. He may be per- 
mitted to sit for the Final Examination 
one year after passing the Preliminary 
Examination. 




XL] ADMISSION TO EXAMINATIONS AND 79 

EXEMPTION FROM ANNUAL OR TERM CERTIFICATES 

(/) The conditions for exemption prescribed in the 
case of bona fide teachers shall apply to full-time Libra- 
rians in schools approved by the Director 
Exemption of Public Instruction, Madras, and 
bona fide situated within the Madras University 

Librarians area, and in colleges recognized by or 
affiliated to the University, and who have 
put in a service of not less than three years as Lib- 
rarians, provided that in the case of candidates for 
the Pre-University and B.A. Degree Examinations 
they shall have passed the examination for the 
Certificate or Diploma in Librarianship of the Madras 
University, and in the case of candidates for the M.A, 
Degree Examination, they shall have passed the Examin- 
ation for the Diploma in Librarianship of the Madras 
University. 

10. Ill cases other than those specially provided for 

in the above Laws or in other 
Act and Statutes, Regulations or Ordinances, 

Regulation. the Syndicate may, by special order, 

Other grant exemption on the recommen- 

exemption — dation of the Academic Council, 

general Any such exemption may be made 

conditions. subject to such conditions as the 

Syndicate may think fit. 

11. Applications for exemption from students not 

studying in a College shall in every 
Ordinance- case be forwarded so as to reach 

Exemption the Registrar before the first Octo- 

opplications — berand the first March preceding 

when to be the March-April and September 

made. Examinations, provided, however, 

that applications for exemption 
from the production of attendance certificates for the 



80 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


examinations under Laws* 6, 7, 9 (^) and 9 (e) (iv) of 
this Chapter shall be forwarded so as to be received 
before the first August preceding the examinations. 

Ordinance, 

Exemption I2. Orders of exemption 

order granted under tlie preceding Laws 

permanent. shall be permanent. 

13. Notwithstanding anything that may be con- 
tained to the contrary in the Laws of the University, it 
shall be competent for the Syndicate, with regard to 
students whose courses of studies are shown to the 
satisfaction of the Syndicate to have been interrupted 
owing to disturbed conditions in certain Provinces in the 
year 1947, to dispense with a strict compliance with the 
Laws, as may be decided in each and every case, in 
regard to admission to courses of studies or attendance 
at courses of this University, or such other conditions 
as may be laid down in the Laws. 

14, Notwithstanding anything contained in the 
Laws of the University, it shall be competent for the 
Syndicate in the case of foreign nationals, admitted 
to courses of study in this University for the Pre- 
University or B.A. Degree or B.Sc. Degree (Three- 
year) or B.Sc, Degree in Home Science, whose mother 
tongue is not any of the Indian languages or who have 
not taken a language recognised by this University of 
the required standard for the preceding qualifying 
examination to exempt them from the course and 
examination in Part II of the Pre-University or B.A. 
Degree or B.Sc. Degree or B.Sc. Degree in Home 
Science, as the case may be. 


♦The same date will apply in the cas ' of scrutiny of ripplicaticns 
lor permission to appear for the Matr culaiion Ex mination uncer 
Ordinance 1 {d) of Chapter XLI infra. 



CHAPTER XLI. 

MATRICULATION EXAMINATION 

{Ordinances.) 

1. The Matriculation Examination shall be open 
to the following : — 

(a) Candidates from schools recognized by the 
University, as teaching to the Matriculation 
standard, but not recognized by the Direc- 
tor of Public Instruction, Madras, for pre- 
paring for the Secondary School- Leaving 
Certificate Examination. 

{h) Candidates from schools in the French Terri- 
tories in South India, certified by the 
Recognition Director of Public Instruction, 

of School. French India, to be organised and 

conducted so as to ensure efficient 
training to the standard of the Matri- 
culation Examination. 

(c) Candidates who hold completed School- 
Leaving Certificates issued under the autho- 
rity of the Government of Madras or such 
other authority as may be accepted by the 
Syndicate, in accordance with the provisions 
contained in Ordinance 2 infra and 
subject to the restriction therein. 

Note : — For the scrutiny fee to be paid by candidates 
for the examination under this Ordinance Vide Ordinance 
5 II (1) (b) of Chapter XXXVIIf- 

2. No candidate shall be admitted to the Matri- 
culation Examination unless he has 
Condition of completed the age of fourteen years on 
admission. the fifteenth day of January of the 
year of appearing for the examination 
and has undergone a course of study in one of the High 

t R*. iq 


U 



82 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap 


Schools specified in Ordinance 1 of this Chapter for 
a period of not less than three academic years sub- 
sequent to his admission to the Fourth Form ; 

Provided that it shall be permissible to admit a 
student to the Fifth or Sixth Form at the beginning of 
a school year on production of a valid transfer certificate 
from a school recognized by the Director of Public 
Instruction, Madras or equivalent authority; and 

PrONTc'ed, however, that no candidate who holds a 
completed School- Leaving Certificate shall be permitted 
to appear for the Matriculation Examination until the 
expiry of one academic year after having completed the 
course of study prescribed for the School -Leaving 
Certificate Examination, 


3. The course of study shall consist of five parts. 

(1) English Language. — Text -books shall 
Course of be prescribed of which a detailed 

Study — knowledge may be required. 

English. 

(2) A Second Language . — One of the following 
languages at the option of the 
candidate: — 


(a) Classical 


(b) Mo:iem 


Second 

Language. 


f(i) 


I 

I 



L 


f Sanskrit 
; Greek. 

■a Latin. 
(^Arabic. 

Foreign French 


Persian. 

Hebrew. 

Syriac. 

German. 


r Tamil Oria. 

1 Telugu. Hindi 

j Kannada. Bengali. 

Indian j Malayalam Burmese. 

I Urdu. Sinhalese. 

Marathi. 


In each language, there shall be 
prescribed text-books. In the Indian 
languages, the texts prescribed shall 
be nminly in modcro prose. 



XU] MATRICULATION EXAMINATION *3 


(3) Mathematics — The subject included 
Mathematics; shall be (a) Arithmetic, (h) Algebra 
and (c) Geometry. 

(a) Arithmetic . — The principles and processes 
of Arithmetic applied to whole numbers and 
vulgar and decimal fractions. The metric 
system. Approximations to a specified 
degree. Contracted methods of multipli- 
cation and division of decimals. Practice 
ratio and proportion. Square and cubic 
measure. Direct applications of the term 
per cent, including interest, present-worth 
and discount, stocks and shares, profit and 
loss, exchange, square root. 

(b) Algebra . — Symbolical expression of general 
results in Arithmetic. Algebraical laws and 
principles and their applications. Factoriza- 
tion of simple functions. Equations, 
conditional and identical. Equations of the 
first degree in one, two and three variables 
and the principles involved in their solution. 
Solution of problems by means of such equ- 
ations. Equations of the second degree in 
one variable and the principles involved in 
their solution. Theory of positive integral 
indices. Square root. Graphs of simple 
algebraic functions. 


(c) Geometry. — Experimental — Construction of 

lines, angles, circles, perpendicular, parallels, 
tangents, chords, triangles and regular 
polygons from given data. Division of lines 
in given ratios. Bisection of angles. 
Graphical extraction of arithmetical square 
roots. 



84 


LAWS OF tHE UNIVEkSITV 


tcHAF. 


Theoretical. — Angles at a point. Parallel straight 
lines. Triangles and recti-linear figures. 
Areas, simple loci. Elementary proposi- 
tions on circle. Proofs of the constructions 
in Experimental Geometry. Easy deductions. 

A detailed syllabus in Geometry shall be 
prescribed. 

(4) Elementary Science, — The subjects included 

Elementary shall be Elemeniary Physics and 

Science. Elementary Chemistry as defined in 

a syllabus. 

(5) History and Geography . — 

(1) Movements in History — a topic to be 

History and prescribed in each year, as defined 

Geography. in a syllabus. 

(2) History of India — & special period to 

be prescribed each year. Books will 
be recommended from year to year 
when the special periods are pres- 
cribed. 

Geography — 

(1) Geography of India, Great Britain and 

Ireland, as defined in a syllabus. 

(2) Geography of Europe, Asia, Africa, 

America and Australia, as defined in a 
syllabus. 

4. The Examination shall comprise five divisions : 

(I) English. — There shall be two papers, each of 
three hours’ duration and carrying 
Scheme of 100 marks each. The first paper 
Examination. shall be mainly upon the prescribed 
texts and shall be designed to test 
the candidate’s proficiency in composition and his 



XLl] MATRICULATION EXAMINji.TION 85 


knowledge of grammar and idiom. The second paper 
shall contain questions on (a) the non-detailed texts pres- 
cribed, (6) paraphrase not based on the prescribed texts, 
and (c) the conversion, expansion, and condensation of 
sentences. Paraphrase shall be treated as a test of the 
candidate’s power to understand and give the general 
meaning of passages of prose or poetry. 


(2) Second Language. — In each language, there 
shall be one paper of three hour;’ duration 
and carrying a maximum of 100 marks. 
The paper shall consist of two parts and 
not less than half the total marks shall be 
assigned to the second pa^t. In a clas ical 
or foreign language the first part shall 
contain passages for translation from the 
text-books and questions on grammar and 
idiom, and the second shall contiin unseen 
passage; for translation from the selected 
language into English and from English 
into the selected language. In an Indian 
language, the first part shall contain 
questions on the detailed text-books and 
on grammar and idiom, and the second 
part shall consist of questions on the non- 
detailed text-books and translation from 
English into the selected language. 


(3) Mathematics . — There shall be two papers — 

(1) Arithmetic and 

Algebra ... 3 Hours — lOO Marks. 

(2) Geometry ... 3 Hours — 100 Marks. 


(4) Elementary Science : — There shall be one paper 
of three hours’ duration carrying 100 marks. 



86 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY [CHAP. aCUj 


(5) History and Geography — There shall be two 
papers— 

(h) History ... 3 Hours — 100 Marks. 
(2) Geography... 3 Hours — 100 Marks. 

5. A candidate shall be declared to have passed the 
examination, if he obtains not less 
Marks than thirty-five per cent of the marks 

qualifying in each of the divisions, provided 

for a pass. that a candidate who fails to obtain 

the required minimum in one division 
only but who passes in English and gains fifty per cent 
of the total marks in the whole examination shall be 
declared to have passed. All the other candidates shall 
be deemed to have failed in the examination. 

Successful candidates who obtain not less than sixty 
per cent of the total marks shall be 
Classification placed in the first class. Successful 
of successful candidates who obtain less than sixty 
candidates. per cent but not less than forty-five 
per cent, of the total marks shall be 
placed in the second class. Other successful candidates 
shall be placed in the third class. 




MATRICULATION EXAMINATION 

Syllabuses and Text-Books 
MATHEMATICS 

(o) Arithmtic.’-^Tht principles and processes of Arithmetic 
applied to whole numbers and vulgar and decimal fractions. The 
metric system. Approximations to a specified degree. Contracted 
methods of multiplication and division of decimals. Practice, ratio 
and proportion. Square and cubic measure. Direct applications 
of the term per cent including interest, present-worth and discount, 
stocks and shares, profit and loss, exchange, square root. 

(b) Algebra . — Symbolical expression of general results in 
Arithmetic. Algebraical laws and principles and their applications. 
Factorization of simple functions. Equations, conditional and identical. 
Equations of the first degree in one, two and three variable and the 
principles involved in their solution. Solution of problems by means 
of such equations. Equations of the second degree in one variable and 
the principles involved in their solution. Theory of positive integral 
indices. Square root. Graphs of simple algebraic functions. 

W Geometry-Experimental , — Construction of lines, angles, 
circles, perpendiculars, parallels, tangents, chords, triangles and regular 
polygons from given data. Division of lines in given ratios. Bisection 
of angles. Graphical extraction of arithmetical square roots. 

Angles at a point. Parallel straight lines. Tri- 
angles and rectilinear figures. Areas, simple loci. Elementary pro- 
positions on circles. Proofs of the constructions in Experimental 
Geometry. Easy deduaions. 


Detailed Syllabus in Theoretical Geometry. 

Angles at a paint . — If a straight line stands on another straight 
line, the sum of the two angles so formed is equal to two right angles 
and the converse. 

If two straight lines intersect, the vertically opposite angles are 
equal. 

Parallel straight /iw«.— When a straight line cuts two other straight 
lines, if, 

(0 a pair of alternate angles are equal, or 
(tO a pair of corresponding angles are equal; or 


7 



88 SYLL. IN mathematics FOR MATRlC, EXAMN, [apP. 


(itV) a pair of interior angles on the same side of the cutting 
line are together equal to two right angles, then the two strSLight lines 
are parallel, and the converse. 

Straight lines which are parallel to the same straight line are 
parallel to one another. 

Triangles and rectilinear figures . — The sum of the angles of a 
triangle is equal to two right angles. 

If the sides of a convex pob^gon arc produced in order, the sum 
of the angles so formed is equal to four right angles. 

If two triangles have two sides of the one equal to two sides of 
the other, each to each, and also the angles contained by those sides 
equal, the triangles are congruent. 

If two triangles have two angles of the one equal to two angles 
of the other, each to each, and also one side of the one equal to the 
corresponding side of th : other, the triangles are congruent. 

If two sides of a triangle arc equal, the angles opposite to these 
sides are equal; and the converse. 

If two triangles have three sides of the one equal to the three 
sides of the other, each to each, the triangles arc congruent. 

If two right-angled triangles have their hypotenuses equal, and 
one side of the one equal to one side of the other, the triangles are 
congruent. 

If two sides of a triangles arc unequal, the greater side has the 
greater angles opposite to it; and the converse. 

Of all the straight lines that can be drawn to a given straight line 
from a given point outside it, the perpendicular is the shortest. 

The opposite sides and angles of a parallelogram are equal; each 
diagonal bisects the f arallelogram, and the diagonals bisect one another. 

If there are three or more parallel straight lines, and the intercepts 
made by them on any straight line that cuts them are equal, then the 
intercepts made by them on any other straight line that cuts them are 
also equal. 

Parallelograms of the same altitude on the same or equal 
bases are equal in area. 

Triangles of the same altitude on the same or equal bases are 

equal io area. 


9 



l) SYLL. IN MATHEMATICS FOR MATRIC. EXAMN. 89 


Equal triangles on the same or equal bases are of the same altitude. 

Illustrations and explanations of the geometrical theorems corres- 
ponding to the following algebraical identities:— 

k(a -j-d~h ^-f . . .) 

^a^^zab + 

<**— ft) — ft)j 
(O -f* ft)*— — ft)* MB^^tft^ 

(a-h ft)*-f (^— ^>)*«*2^**+ 2ft*. 

The square on a side of a triangle is greater than, equal to or less 
than the sum of the squares on the the other two sides, according as the 
angle contained by those sides is obtuse, right or acute. The difference 
in the cases of inequality is twice the reaangle contained by one of the 
two sides and the projection on it of the other. 

Loci . — ^The locus of a point which is equidistant from two fixed 
points is the perpendicular bisector of the straight line joining the 
two fixed points. 

The locus of a point which is equidistant from two intersecting 
straight lines consists of the pair of straight lines which bisect the angles 
between the two given lines 

The locus of the vertices of all triangles which have the same 
base and the sum of the squares of their sides equal to a given square 
is a circle having its centre at the middle point of the base. 

The locus of the vertices of all the triangles which have the same 
base and the difference of the squares of their sides equal to a given 
square is a straight line perpendicular to the base. 

The locus of the vertices of all the triangles which have the same 
base and their vertical angles equal to a given angle is the arc of a seg- 
ment of a circle. 

The Circle. — \ straight line drawn from the centre of a circle 
to bisect a chord which is not a diameter, is at right angles to the chord ; 
conversely, the perpendicular to a chord from the centre bisects the 
chord. 

There is one circle and one only, which passes through three 
given points nOt in a straight line. 


12 




90 SYLL. IN ELE. SCIENCE FOR MATRIC. EXAMN. [app. 


In equal circles (or, in the same circles) (i) if two arcs subtend 
equal angles at the centres, they are equal ; (ii) conversely, if two arcs 
are equal, they subtend equal angles at the centres. 

In equal circles (or, in the same circle) (i) if two chords are equal, 
they cut off equal arcs; (ii) conversely, if two arcs are equal, the chords 
of the arcs are equal. 

Equal chords of a circle are equidistant from the centre; and the 
converse. 

The tangent at any point of a circle and the radius through the 
point are perpendicular to one another. 

If two circles touch, the point of contact lies on the straight line 
through the centres. 

The angle which an arc of a circle subtends at the centre is double 
that which it subtends at any point on the remaining part of the cir- 
cumference. 

Angles in the same segment of a circle arc equal; and if the line 
ioining two points subtends equal angles at two other points on the 
same side of it, the four points lie on a circle. 

The angle in a semi-circle, is a right angle ; the angle in a segment 
greater than a semi-circle is less than a right angle ; and the angle in 
a segment less than a semi-circle is greater than a right angle. 

The opposite angles of any quadrilateral inscribed in a circle arc 
supplementary; and the converse. 

If a straight line touches a circle, and from the point of contact a 
chord be drawn, the angles which the chord marks with the tangent 
are equal to the angles in the alternate segments. 

If two chords of a circle intersect cither inside or outside the circle, 
the rectangle contained by the parts of the one is equal to the rectangle 
contained by the parts of the other ; and the converse. 


ELEMENTARY SCIENCE: (i) PHYSICS, (2) CHEMISTRY 

The examination shall test tokether the subjects included in the following 
Syllabus have been taught by the aid of experimental demonstrations’^ 
wherever this is possible. The application of physical and chemical facts 
cmd principles to experience in ordinary life should receive particular 
attention. 


10 



l] SYLL. IN ELE. SCIENCE FOR MATRIC. EXAMN. 


91 


It is desirable that, as far as the accommodation and equipment of 
the school mil allotOy pupils receive practical instruction in the physical 
and chemical processes included in the syllabus. 

I. Physics . — Measurement of length. Meaning of a unit and 
the measurement of a Physical quantity. British and metric uniu; 
their multiples and sub-multiples. Derived units of area and volume. 
Measurement of area and volume. 

Measurement of time: Unit of time> Rotation of the earth. 
Measurement by simple pendulum. 

Speed: its measurement involving length and time; calculation 
of speed in given cases; Elementary ideas regarding acceleration. 
Illustration of First Law of Motion ; definition of force. 

Matter: Definition. Measurement of mass. British and metric 
units. Determination of mass by the spring balance, and by the ordi- 
nary balance. Density and specific gravity. 

Gravitation: All matter attracted by the earth; illustration of 
Second Law of xMotion; attraction is mutual, illustration of Third 
Law of Motion. Universality of gravitation. Weight of a body. 
Distinction between mass and weight. 

Properties of matter: Extension, inertia, gravitation, divisibility, 
porosity, hardness elasticity, transparency and opacity, ductility, mal- 
leability, brittleness, plasticity, viscosity. The three states of matter. 
Changes of states produced by heating and cooling. Permanent and 
temporary elfects of heating different substances; effects on organic 
substances; tempering of metals. 

Simple machines : The lever, its general principle and appli- 
cation to the conrunon balance. The wheel and axle. The pulley. 
The inclined plane. Application of the screw. 

Centre of gravity: Definition. Experimental determination of 
Centre of gravity in simple cases. Condition of equilibrium of a body 
resting in a given position ; stable, unstable and neutral equilibria. 

The common balance ; how mass is measured by weighing. 

Solids: permanence of shape and volume which are only altered 
by application of forces. 

Liquids: no permanent shape. Surface of liquid at rest hori- 
zontal. Definition of pressure and its evaluation, it acts in all direction 
equally, and is greater at greater depths. Transmission of pressure. 
The Brahmah Press. The principle of Archimedes; its experimental 
proof and applications. 


ir 



92 SYLL. IN ELE. SClfiNdE FOR MaTRIC. EJ^AtlN. [apF. 


Oases: How distinguished from liquids. Gases have weight. 
Balloons. Pressure of the atmosphere: the mercury barometer; vari- 
ation of atmospheric pressure with height proved by mercury barometer; 
the Water barometer. Evaluation of pressure of atmosphere by means 
of barometer. Applications. Air-pump, Water-pump. Pressure of 
gas. Boyle’s Law. 

Temperature; Liquids expand by heat; the special case of water. 
Thermometer used for measuring temperature by observing change 
of volume of liquid. The mercury thermometer ; method of graduating; 
determination of fixed points; fundamental interval; the Centigrade 
and Fahrenheit scales. Thermal expansion of solids. Liquids and 
gases. 

Distinction between heat and temperature. Heat as a quantity 
and how it may be measured; the thermal unit. Specific heat. Change 
of physical state due to heat. Fusion and the latent heat of fusion; 
evaporation and ebullition and the latent heat of vaporization. Water 
vapour present in the atmosphere and determination of its amount. 
Cooling produced by solution and evaporation; freezing mixtures. 
The conduction and convection of heat; convection currents in the 
atmosphere and ocean; the trade winds; land and sea breezes; the 
gulf stream. The circulation of water vapour in the atmosphere: 
cloudsj rain. 

Light: Rectilinear transmission. Rays and pencils of light; 
shadows produced by different sources and images of sources produc- 
ed by pin-holes. The laws of reflection of rays of light; reflection of 
pencils by plane mirrors and images formed by plane mirrors. Direct 
reflection of pencils from concave spherical mirrors; experimental 
proof of law of distances. The laws of refraction of rays of light; 
refraction of rays through a plane and a prism. Refraction through a 
convex lens; experimental proof of law of distances; the principal 
focus of a lens. Image formed by a convex lens ; the simple microscope ; 
the photographic camera; the telescope. Analysis of white light by a 
pri$m> the method of producing, and order of colours in the spectrum. 
The spectra of sun-light, and of candle light. Recombination of the 
colours of the spectrum into white light. 

Electrification by friction; positive and negative electrification. 
Laws of attraction and repulsion. Conductors and non-conductors. 
Simple voltalic cell; Grove’s cell. Electric current. Magnetic effects 
of currents in straight and coiled wires. Simple galvanometer. Heating 
effects of currents. Simple facts of electrolysis. 

Magnatic substances; JLaws of magnetic attraction and repulsion, 
Magnetic induction. Methods of magnetization. 


XI 




l] SYLL. IN ELE. SCIENCE EOE MAtiUC. BXAIIN. ^ 


Graphic representation on squared paper of the relation between 
two of the physical quantities referred to in the syllabus. 

2. CAmwity.— Examples of mixtures and solution: (i) sand 
and sugar, (2) sulphur and iron fillings, (3) sand and salammoniac, 
(4) copper sulphate and water. Explanation of the processes of separa- 
ting the ingredients of these mixtures ; filtration, decantation, mechani- 
cal or magnetic separation, evaporation, distillation, sublimation. 

Chemical compounds. Characteristic differences between com- 
pounds and mixtures; illustrations. Chemical combination illustrated 
by (i) candle burning in air, (2) sulphur burning in air, (3) magnesium 
wire burning in air, (4) quicklime combining with water. 

Chemical decomposition illustrated by (i) heating mercuric oxide, 
(2) action of sodium on water, (3) heating potassium chloride (4) heat- 
ing lead nitrate. 

Iron in contact with air and water is converted into rust. Rusting 
is oxidation. Copper, lead, mercury, magnesium, sulphur and phos- 
phorus also oxidize, but their oxidation takes place at different tempe- 
ratures. Rapid oxidation. Combustion of candle: the products of 
combustion are heavier than the candle itself. One of these products 
is a gas which turns lime water milky and it is the same product which 
is obtained when charcoal burns in air. Water is another product 
of the combustion. Similar observations may be made and similar 
conclusions deduced when oil burns in air. Structure of a candle fiame. 

The rust or oxide is always heavier than the substances from 
which it is formed. When a substance (jf.g., iron or phosphorus) 
oxidizes in a confined volume of air, about one-fifth of the air ultim- 
ately disappears; remaining air is inactive (e.g. candle will not burn 
in it). Composition of air has two components; active (oxygen) 
and inactive (nitrogen). 

Oxygen; its discovery; its mode of preparation and properties 
Oxides: products formed when a candle, charcoal, sulphur, phosphorus, 
sodium Or iron burns in oxygen. Burning in oxygen and air compared. 
Illustration of acid and alkaline properties. 

Hydrogen produced by the action of sodium on water. Products 
of the decomposition. Same gas is produced when dilute sulphuric or 
hydrochloric acid acts on zinc; or on iron. Properties of hydrogen; 
its density and its combustion with air or oxygen. Water the sole 
produce of their combustions. 

Elements and compound: Two ways of determining the com* 
position of compounds: (i) by synthesis, (ii) by analysis; illustrated 
by the case of water. Synthesis of water (i) by burning hydrogen in air 

1 $ 



94 SYLL. IN ELE. SCIENCE FOR MATRIC. EXAMN. [apP. 


Or oxygen, (ii) by passing hydrogen overheated copper oxide. Analysis 
or decomposition (i) by action of sodium on water, (ii) by passing steam 
over red-hot iron filings, and (iii) by electric current. Composition 
of water by weight and by volume. Constancy of composition of 
chemical compounds illustrated by the case of water. Solvent action 
of water: crystallization, forms of crystals, water of crystallization. 
Solubility of gases in water; carbonic acid gas, air and oxygen. Soda- 
water, Spring, river, well and sea- water. Suspended and dissolved 
impurities. Purification by distillation. Extraction of salt from sea 
water by evaporation ; salt pans. 

Carbon : the different forms in which it occurs, their properties 
and uses. Carbon burnt in air or ox^^gen produces carbon-dioxide. 
This gas is always formed when candle, oil, etc., burnt; its preparation 
and properties. Action in lime water. Exhaled by living animals; 
action of plants on carbon-dioxide. Solution of carbon-dioxide in water 
and properties of the solution. Hard and soft water; permanent and 
temporary hardness. Methods of softening hard water. 

Nitrogen, the inactive constituent of air ; preparation and pro- 
perties, Two of its important compounds, viz.s nitric acid and ammo- 
nia. 

(a) Nitric acid: its preparation from nitre and sulphuric acid. 
Its properties ; power of dissolving copper and mercury and many 
other metals. Relations between acids, bases and salts illustrated 
by (i) nitric acid and caustic soda (2) magnesium oxide and sulphuric 
acid, (3) lime and hydrochloric acid. 

(d) Ammonia ; its preparation and properties. Solubility in 
water; power of neutralizing acids and forming salts, such as 
ammonium chloride and nitrate; behaviour of these salts on heating. 

Hydrochloric acid and chlorine. Treatment of common salts 
with Sulphuric acid and production of hydrochloric acid gas. Pro- 
perties of this gas ; solubility in water. Production of chlorine from 
hydrochloric acid and manganese dioxide. Its properties; its power of 
combining with hydrogen and with metals, such as, antimony to form 
chlorides. Bleaching action of chlorine. 

Sulphur : the different forms ; their properties. The changes 
induced by heat when burnt in air or oxygen, produces sulphur 
dioxide. Sulphuric acid gas— its properties and uses. 

Phosphorus : the different forms, their properties and uses. 

Silicon : occurrence in nature, chief compoimd, silica. Occur- 
rence of silica in nature, free and combined as silicates. Chief form 
of silica, quartz, sandstone, flint. 


14 




I] SYLL. IN HISTORY FOR MATRIC. EXAMN. 95 


Metals and non-metals, their general properties. 

Sodium and potassium : their occurrence and properties. Dis- 
tinguishing properties of the alkali metals ; their more important 
compounds ; common salt, Glauber’s salt, washing soda, sodium 
bicarbonate, caustic soda, potassium carbonate, potassium chlorate, 
caustic potash, saltpetre potassium permanganate. Gun-powder. 

Calcium : chief compounds, calcium carbonate. Its occurrence 
in various forms. Limestone burnt into lime in limekilns. Slaked 
lime. The use of lime in making mortar and plaster. Calcium 
sulphate ; gypsum and Plaster of Paris. 

The occurrence, general method of preparation, properties and 
uses of the following metals 

Zinc, iron, copper, mercury, lead and silver. Their chief oxides 
and their salts which have been used or produced in experiment and 
illustrations included in the above syllabus, 

MOVEMENTS IN fflSTORY AND HISTORY OF INDIA 

One of the topics in “ Movements in History ” and one period 
in “ History of India ” will be prescribed each year. 

MOVEMENTS IN HISTORY 

Topics, 

(1) The Growl h of British Empire and Common wealth. 

(2) The Rise and Growth of the United States of America. 

(3) The Labour Movements in Modern Times. 

(4) International Co-operaiion. 

HISTORY OF INDIA 

Special Period, 

(1) Early Indian History from the rise of Buddhism to 1206 A.D. 

(2) The Moghul Empire, 1526 — 1707. 

(3) The British in India, 1600 — 1805. 

(4) The Modern Period, 1805—1935. 

Note. — eBooks will be recommended from year to year when the 
special periods arc prescribed. 


75 



f6 SYLt. IN GEOaHAPHY POR MATRIC. EXAMN. [aPP. 


GEOGRAPjHY 

/. — Southern Continents, 

Australia. 

1 . Relief and Rivers of Australia. 

2. Climate of Australia. The seasonal distribution of temper- 
ature and rainfall. 

3. Vegetation and animals ; relation between rainfall and natural 
vegetation regions of Australia ; peculiarity of its animal life. 

4. Life and work of the people with special reference to (a) East 
Coast Region, (b) Murray-Darling Basin, (c) Mediterranean regions of 
West Australia and Victoria. 

5. Favourable position for trading with lands around the Pacific 
and Indian Oceans. 


Africa. 

6. Structure — efiect upon the coastline, rivers and lakes of Africa 
relief and drainage. 

7. Climate and Vegetation of Africa ; apparent seasonal mig- 
ration of the sun and the duplication of climatic and vegetation belts 
North and South of the Equator. 

8 . Chief Natural Regions of Africa. 

9. Peoples of Africa. 

10. Trade routes of the Indian Ocean. 

South America. 

11. Structure and relief ; rivers. 

12. Climate and Vegetation of South America ; the effect of a 
mountain barrier, of a cold current and of altitude upon rainfall and 
temperature; Andean Zones. 

13. Peoples and States of South America ; the importance of 
minerals in the past and present development of the continent. 

14. Temperate countries of South America — ^Argentina, Uruguay 
and Chile. 

15. Tropical countries of South America — ^Brazil — ^thc world’s 
chief storehouse of tropical products. 

Id. Rc^sion of the three southern continents . 




ij SYLL. IN GEOGRAPHY FOR MATRIC. EXAMN. 97 


II. — North America. 

1. Structure and relief ; the work of rivers as illustrated on large 
scale by the Colorado and the Mississippi and as seen by actual observa- 
tion of local streams. 

2. Climate and vegetation ; factors that modify climate as 
evidenced in North America ; natural regions of North America. 

3. Population and political divisions ; Immigration. 

4. United States-- 

(u) North-eastern industrial and commercial region. 

(b) South-eastern plantation region. 

(e) Central farming region. 

(d) The basins and mining regions of the Rockies. 

(e) Pacific shorelands — fruit, grain, timber and minerals. 

5. Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland — 

(a) Eastern Canada — agriculture, dairying, timber, fisheries, 
mining and manufacture. 

(h) Prairie Provinces. 

(t) British Columbia. 

6. Mexico, Central America and West Indies. 

7. Transport and communication of North America and impor- 
tant links in round-the-world routes. 

Ill, — Eurasia and India. 

1. Surface, relief and rivers of Eurasia. 

2. Climate of Eurasia : the major climatic regions, comparison 
of temperature conditions on east and west margins ; effect of latitude 
and distance from the sea on range of temperature, causes of monsoons 
and their effect on climate of South-east Eurasia, 

3 British Isles : relief ; influence of the sea and the climate upon 
the life and activities of the people ; fisheries and farming ; the chief 
industrial regions and their outlets. 

4. Western Mainland of Europe : France — agriculture and 
industry; position of Paris and Marseilles, Belgium — plain of Flanders 
and the Sambre-Mcuse Valley. Holland — a delta land reclaimed from 
the sea ; its colonies and sea trade. Denmark — co-operative dairy 
farming. Germany — plain and plateau, forestry and development 
of special industries ^ industries of the Ruht and Saxon coalfields. 


13 



98 


syll. in geography for matric. examn. [app. 


5. Baltic Region — the new border state. Scandinavian peninsula 
— forestry and woodwork of Sweden. 

6. Central Highlands of Europe : Czechoslovakia — its minerals 
and industries ; agriculture of the Mid-Danubian plain. Alpine 
region— development of hydro-electric power and effect on industrial 
development. 

7. Mediterranean region — influence of climate on paint adaptation 
and fruit culture. Spain — its mineral wealth but lack of coal. Italy — 
alluvial plain of Lambady and its industrial development — peninsular 
Italy. 

8. South-western lands of Asia — regions of plateau and deserts 
with one important alluvial plain : its historical importance as a 
highway. 

9. Central and Northern Eurasia — rich meat and pasture lands 
of Romanian and Russian plains — desert conditions of the Aral Sea 
Basin, tundra, taiga and stcppi of Siberian plain, contrast development 
of this region with similar region in North America. 

10. China — her dependencies. Effect of climate and relief upon 
occupations and industries. 

11. Japan — ^A mountainous country, yet productive; agricul- 
tural, mineral and industrial development— importance of Korea. 

12. South-East Asia and the East Indies. 

13. Position, relief soils and minerals of India ar d Burma. 

14. Climate of India — her chief climatic regions, mean' of 
irrigation. 

15. Vegetation and animal life of India. 

16. Peoples of the Indian Empire. 

17. Survey of the Provinces and States — 

(a) Motmtain States. 

(b) Great Plain. 

(c) Plateau states and provinces 

{d) Madras. 

(«) Bombay. 

18. Occupations and Industries oi Ind ia 

19. Trade, transport and' seaports. 

2c. Ceylon. 





l] SYLL. IN GEOGRAPHY FOR MATRIC. BXAMN. 99 


JV.-^The World, 

I. Studies in climate — size and shape of the earth — ^movements 
ot the earth, day and night, the seasons annual and sessional distribu- 
tion of temperature, pressure, winds and rainfall, ocean currents natural 
vegetation, 

2. Regions of the World — 

(1) Tundra and Ice-cap. 

(2) The Cold Forests. 

(3) Broad-leaved Forests. 

(4) Temperate Grasslands. 

CS) Mediterranean Lands. 

(6) Desert Lands. 

(7) Equatorial Forests and Tropical Grasslands. 

(8) Monsoon Lands. 

(9) Islands of the Pacific, 

(10) High Mountain and Plateau, 
i) Industrial Regions of Europe. 

(12) Industrial Regions of North America. 

(13) Regions of the Empire. 


Books recommended. 


Text'Books-- 

Ci) The New Regional Geographies— Book IV, the World, Leonard 
Brooks ; London University Press. 

^2) Any one of the following : — 

(a) India, World and Empire, Herbert Pickles ; Oxford 

University Press. 

(b) Our World, Morrison ; Macmillan. 

(c) Sltfioj Bunnsmb; Morrison and Subrali- 

manyam; Macmillan. 

(d) A Secondary School Geography by Dudley Stamp 

(Longmans Green & Go.) 

(3) The following Atlases are recommended 

Longmans Senior Atlas or the Taj Mahal Atlas (Longmans 
Green & Co.) 


J9 



loo TE^Ct-BOakS FOR TtlE l^ATRtC. BXAMM., 195$ 


Reference Books , — 

(1) Physiography, Herbertson ; Oxford University Press. 

(2) Every one’s Book of the Weather, Franco Williams ; Sheldon 

Press. 

(3) Outdoor Geography, Hatch ; Blackie. 

(4) Surface of the Earth, Pickles ; Cambridge University Press. 

(5) Human Geography for Secondary Schools, Fairgrieve and 

Young ; G. Phillip & Son. 

(6) A Graded Course of Geography, E. S. Price ; G. Phillip & 

Son. 

(7) The Rambler Travel Books; Blackie. 

(8) The World, Howarth & Bridewell ; Oxford University Press. 


Text-Books for the Matriculation Examination* I959» 

ENGLISH 

Detaulbo. 

Poetry . — The following poems from “ Poetical selections for 
College classes ** (Macmillan) : — 

Tennyson — Ulysses. 

M. Arnold — The Forsaken Merman. 

Wordsworth — ^The Solitary Reaper, 

Wordsworth — To the Cuckoo, 

Wordsworth — ^The World is too much with u* 

Byron — The Ocean. 

Goldsmith — The Deserted Village. 

Prose. — Gulliver’s Travels (in Lilliput and Brobdingnag) (Blackic’s 
Easy English Classics). 


Non-dbtailed. 

1. Stories from Shakespeare— Wyatt (O.U.P.) 

2. My India — Jim Corbett (O.U.P.) 




ij TEXT-BOOKS FOR THE MAtRlC. BXAMN., 1959 


SANSKRIT 

The same as the selections for the Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of 1959 — Published by the Madras Uni- 
▼ersity. 


MARATHI 

Detailed. 

prose, — ^Marathi Gadya — ^Published by Vidhaiba Sahitya Sangha, 
Nagpur. 

Poetry , — Sahitya Swarna — Edited by Professor R. K. Lagu (pages 
I- 13 and 68-120). 


Non-dbtailed. 

Gad Ala Pan Singh Gcla by H. N. Aptc. 

Book recommended for Grammar — Marathi Vyakaranchi Mul 
Tatva by G. H. Kelkar. 

Note,— Books can be had at Venus Book Stall, Poona-2, or 
Modem Book Depot, Poona-2, or Bapat & Go., Booksellers, 
Bombay-2. 


HINDI 

Detailed. 

Prose and Pijairy.— The same as for Secondary School- Leaving 
Certificate Examination of 1959 — ^Firsi Language (Parts I and II) 

Non-dbtailed. 

1. Bharat Ke Mahapurush by Sri Sant Ram (Sadhu) Asram, 
Hoshiarpur, Punjab, excluding lessons 2, 6, 7, 8 and 9. 

2. Nav Pallav (Dakshana Bharat Hindi Prachar Sabha, Madras), 
excluding lessons 3, 5, 6 and 7. 


FRENCH 

A new book of French Verse by N. Cooper (O.U.P.), Pappiola 
(O.U.P.). 


LATIN 

Cornelius Nepos— Live s of Lysandcr, Alcibiades and Thrasybulus, 
Phacdurs— Fables, Book I, Macmillan's Elementary Classics. 



102 text-books for the matric. examn., 1959 [apt. 


HEBREW 

Prose , — ^Genesis Chapters 6-ii (both included). 

Poetry. — ^Psalms — i«i2 (both included). 

Grammar, — Students’ Hebrew Grammar by Rev. Michael Adler 
(David Nutt, London). 


SYRIAC 

Text-Book . — Gospel of St. Mathew — Chapters I to V. 

Grammar — 

1. Syriac Grammar by ReV. Fr. Gabriel, St. Joseph’s Press, 
Mannanam, Kerala State. 

2. Second Book of Aramac by Mar Ivanios^ St. Joscph*s Press, 
Tiruvalla, Kerala State. 


ARABIC 

Detailed. 

The same as for Secondary School-Leaving Ceniheate Examina- 
tion of 1959. 


Non-detailed 

The same as for Secondary School- Leaving Certificate Examina- 
tion of 1959. 


PERSIAN 

Detailed and Non-detailed. 

The same as for Secondary School-Leaving Certificate Examina- 
tion of 1959. 


URDU 

Detailed and Non-detailed. 

The same as for Secondary School-Leaving Certificate Examina- 
tion of 1959. 


TAMIL 

Detailed. 

The same as the selections for the Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of 1959 (Parts I and II), Published by the 
University of Madras. 




l] TEXT -BOOKS FOR THE MATRIC. EXAMN., 1959 103 


Non-dbtailed. 

Indiyapperumakkal by N. Nanjappa (published by E. M. Gopala- 
krishna Kone). 

Arachelvi by N. Baluswamy, Lecturer in Tamil, Thiagarajar 
College, Madurai. 


TELUGU 

Detailed. 

The same as the selections for the Secondary School- Leaving 
Certificate Examination of 1959 (Parts I and II), published by the 
Andhra University. 


Non-detailed 

Pachaiyappa by Kanchanapalli Kanakamba, published by Kavi- 
tilaka Granthamala, Vijayawada-2 (1952) 

KANNADA 

Detailed 

The same as the seleciion^ for the Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of 1959 (Parts I and II), published by the 
Madras University, 


Non-detailed. 

1. Chitra Vimarsbe Mattu Itara Kathegalu, by C. K. Venkata- 
ramayya (Satya Shodhana Book Depot, Fort, Bangalore.) 

2. Kodagina Kathegalu by G. T. Narayana Rao (Vasantha 
Malikc, Mangalore). 


MALAYALAM 

Detailed. 

The same as the selections for the Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of 1959 (Parts I and II), published by the 
Aladras University. 


Non-dbtailed. 

1. Saruda, Part II by T, S, Anantha Subramaniyam, published 
by Janatha Book House, 66, Bells Road, Madras. 

2. Madame Curie (abridged editon) by K. A. Paul, published 
by Sahityanilayam, Kaloor, Ernakulam. 

Referenc$for Papers I and II: Bhashasahyam by Habel G. Varghes^ 
published by Orient Longman’s, Aiadras. 




104 TBXT-BOOKS FOR THE MATRiC. EXAMN., 1959 [apP- 


mSTORY OF INDIA AND MOVE2VIENTS 
IN HISTORY 

Modern Period (1805-1935) 

Text-Bovks recommended : 

An Advanced History of India, Part II (i 8 o 5 *i 935 ) by 
C. S. Sreenivasachari (P. Varadachari & Co., No. 8, Linghi 
Chetti Street, George Town, Madras). 

Movements in History (topic prescribed) — The Rise and Growth 
of the United States of America. 


Detailed Syllabus 


I. Introductory : 


Lessons. 


Colonization and Conquest of America by Europe — 
Ascendency of Spain — ^Rise of New France — 
Virginia and New England Colonies — British 
Conquest of Canada ... ... ... ... 10 


2. The War of American Independence : 

The Old Colonial System — Grievances of the 

Colonists — ^Early attempts at Union — Declara- 
tion of Independence — George Washington and 
his achievements ... ... ... ... 10 


3. The Birth of the United States of America and its early 
difficulties : 

The convention of 1787 — ^Thc New Republic — 

The Makers of the Constitution Jefferson and 
Hamilton — Lousiana Purchase — The War of 

1812 ... ... ... ... 8 


4. Westward Expansion : 

Across the Alleghenies — The Mississippi Basin — 

The opening of the Middle West — The Prairie 
Land — The Rocky West — California and the 
Pacific Coast — ^The Trans-Continental Railway 
— Alaska Purchase — Influence of the Westward 
Expansion ... ... ... ... ... 10 

5. The Civil War of 1861-65 ; 

The Growth of Slavery — ^The Two Sides, Union 
and Confederacy — Abraham Lincoln the Saviour 
of the Union and the Liberator of the Negro — 

U. S. Grant and Robert Lce-~Reconstruction 
after the Civil War ... ... ... 10 


2d 




I] 


TEXT -BOOKS FOR THE MATRIC. EXAMN., 1959 105 


6. Rccoastruction Conquest of the Wild West ; 

Agricultural Expansion — ^The Miner and 

Rancher 


Lessons. 


the 


6 


7. American Imperialism : 

The Monroe Doctrincj its Genesis and its effect — 

Thi Spanish-American War of 1898 — Annexa- 
tion of Hawaii — Acquisition of Cuba — The 

Phillippines — Theodore Roosevelt and the 

Panama Canal ... ... ... ... 10 

8. The First World War : 

American Intervention — Woodrow Wilson and his 

Fourteen Points — The League of Nations ... ... 10 


9. Between two Wars ; 

Prosperity and depression after the War — Pussyfoot 
Johnson and Prohibition — The 1929 Crisis — 
Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal — ^Promise 
of Independence to the Phillippines ... ... 10 

10. The Second World War : 

Franklin D. Roosevelt — His Foreign Policy — 

Lease and Lend — War with Japan and Interven- 
tion in Europe — The Atlantic Charter — Closer 
understanding with Britain — ^The San Francisco 
Conference and the United Nations Organi- 
zation ... ... ... ... 10 

11. The American Nation : 

Its composite character — the persistence of the 
colour problem — Labour and invention — Education 
and Religion — The Government in America, its 
features — Position of America in World Politics ... 6 

Total number of Lessons ... 100 


Books : 

For the pupils — 

Text-book for study : America Yesterday and To-day by 
C. F. Strong — University of London Press (Local Agents : 
Messrs. Orient Longmans, Ltd., Mount Road, Madras). 


14 


25 



106 TEXT -BOOKS FOR THE MATRIC. EXAMN., I960 [apP 


Faff th4 Teacher — 

1 . A History of the United States by C. P. Hill — Edward Arnold 
& Co. (Agents : Orient Longmans, Ltd., Mount Road, 
Madras). 

3. A Brief History of the United States by Allan Nevins — Oxford 
University Press, Mount Road, Madras. 

3. The Growth of Modern America by Eric Ecclestone— G. Bell 

and Sons (Agents : Orient Longmans, Ltd., Mount Road, 
Madras). 

4 . The United States of America by H. P. Raskitt, Oxford Univer- 

sity Press, Mount Road, Madras. 


Text^books tot the Matriculation Examination, i960, 

ENGLISH 

Poetry , — The following poems frOm “ Poetical selections for 
College classes (Macmillan) : — 

Tennyson — Ulysses. 

M. Arnold — The Forsaken Merman. 

Wordsworth — The Solitary Reaper. 

Wordsworth — To the Cuckoo. 

Wordsworth — The World is too much with us. 

Byron — ^The Ocean. 

Goldsmith — ^The Deserted Village. 

Prosei {Detailed)* Modern Prose Selections — O.U.P. 

Norf^tailed: i. The Jungle book (Rudyard Krpling) — Mac 
millon. 

2 . More Tales from Shakespeare — Longmans 
(Simplified English Storks). 





ij TEXT-BOOKS FOR THE MATRIC. EXaMN., I960 107 


SANSKRIT 

The same as the selections for the Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of 1959 — Published by the Madras Univer- 
sity. 


MARATHI 

JPraJ#: 

Marathi Gadya — Published by Vidharba Shitya Sangha, Nagpur. 
Poetry: 

Sahitya Swarna — Edited by Professor R. K. Lagu (Pages 1-13 
and 68-120) 

Non^detailed : 

Gad Ala Pan Singh Gala by H. N Apte — Book recommended for 
Grammar — Marathi Vyakaranebi Mul Tatva by G. H. Kelkar. 

Note — Books can be had at Venus Book Stall, Poona-2, or 
Modern Book Depot, Poona-2, or Bapat and Co , Booksellers, 
Bombay-2. 


Detailed: 


HINDI 


Prose and Poetry: 

The same as for Secondary School-Leaving Certificate Exa- 
mination of i960— First Language (Parts I and II) 


Non-detailed: 

1. Bharat Ke Mahapurush by Sri Sant Ram (Sadhu) Asram, 

Hoshiarpur, Punjab. 

2. Prakash Ki Oor First six Stories only — D. B. Hindi Pra- 

char, Madras. 


FRENCH 

Les Astronautes by Ledesert — Harrap. 

L’Homme qui docmit cen ans — Edited by O. Bond, Heath. 
A new book of French verse by N. Cooper, O.U.P. 




108 TEXT-BOOKS FOR THE MATRIC. EXAMN., I960 [aPP. 


LATIN 

Cornelius Nepos: Lives of Lysander, Alcibiadcs and Thrasy- 
bulus. 

Ovid; Metamorphoses Book inclines 407 to 510, 


Detailed : 


ARABIC 


The same as fOr Secondary School- Leaving Certificate Examina- 
tion of i960. 


Non-detailid : 

The same as for Secondary School-Leaving Certificate Examina- 
tion of i960. 


PERSIAN 

Detailed and Ncn-detailed : 

The same as for Secondary School-Leaving Certificate Examin- 
ation of i960. 


URDU 

Detailed and Non^de tailed: 

The same as for Secondary School-Leaving Certificate Examina- 
tion of i960. 


Detailed: 


TAMIL 


The same as the selections for Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of i960 (Parts I and II) — Published 
by the University of Madras. 


Non-detailed: 

1. Tamizhaka Vendar by N. Baluswamy, M.A. (A. T. N. Naga- 

lingam and Co., Pudumandapam, Madurai) 

2. PuyalbyR. Ekambaranathan (Tamilakam, Tirukalambakam, 

Tanjore, Rs. 3-12-0) 

TELUGU 

Detailed : 

The same as the selections for the Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of i960 (Parts I and II)— Published by 
the Madras University. 


ZB 



l] TEXT-BOOKS FOR THE MATRIC. EXAMN., I960 109 


Non-detailedi 

Pachaiyappa by Kanchanapalli Kaiiakamba, published b3^ K*vi- 
tilaka Granihamala, Vijayawada-2 (1952) 

KANNADA 

Detailed: 

The same as the selections for the Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of i960 (Parts I and II), published by 
the University of Madras. 

Non-detailed: 

Subbana by Venkatesiengar. 

Kodagina Kathegalu by G T. Narayana Rao (Government Arts 
College, Mercara) 


Detailed: 


malayalam 


The same as the selections for the Secondary School-Leaving 
Certificate Examination of i960 (Parts I and II), published by 
the Madras University. 


Non^detaiUd : 

1. Otayil Ninnii by P. Kesava Dev — National Book Stall, 

Kottayam. 

2. Kastur Bayi Gandhi by Kamalamma — Published by G. Rada- 

krishnan, Giri Bhavan, Bhakii Vilasam Road, Trivandrum- 1. 


HISTORY OF INDIA AND MOVEMENTS 
IN HISTORY 

Modern Period (1805-1935) 

Text-books recommended : 

An Advanced History of India, Part II (1805-1935) t>y 
C. S. Srccnivasachari (P. Varadachari & Co., No. 8, Linght 
Chetty Street, Ocorge Town, Madras). 



110 TEXT -BOOKS FOR THE MATRIC. EXAMN., 1960 [apP. 


Movements in History (topic prescribed)— "JThe Rise and Growth 
of the United States of America. 

Detailed Syllabits 


i. Introductory : 


Lessons. 


Colonization and Conquest of America by Europe — 
Ascendency of Spain— Rise of New France — 
Virginia and New England Colonies — British 
Conquest of Canada ... ... ... ... lo 


2. The War of American Independence : 

The Old Colonial System — Grievances of the 
Colonists — Early attempts at Union — Declara- 

tion of Independence — George Washington and 
his achievements ... ... ... ... lo 


3. The Birth of the United States of America and its early 
difficulties : 

The convention of 1787 — The New Republic — 

The Makers of the Constitution Jefferson and 
Hamilton — Lousiana Purchase — The War of 

1812 ... ... ... ... 8 


4. Westward Expansion : 

Across the Allcgiienjcs — The Mississippi Basin — 

The opening of the Aiiddlc West — The Prairie 
Land — The Rocky West — California and the 
Pacific Coast — The Trans-Continenial Railway 
—Alaska Purchase — Influence of the Westward 

Expansion ... ... ... ... ... 10 

5. The Civil War of 1861-65 : 

The Growth of Slavery — The Two Sides, Union 
and Confederacy — Abraham Lincoln the Saviour 
of the Union and the Liberator of the Negro — 

U. S. Grant and Robert Lee — Reconstruction 
after the Civil War ... ... ... ... 10 

6 . RcOoyistructioD Conquest of the Wild West : 

Agricultural Expansion — ^Thc Miner and the 

Rancher ... ... ... ... 6 


30 




I] TBXT*BOOKS FOR THB MATRIC. EXAMN., I960 111 


Lessons. 

7. American Imperialism : 

The Munroe Doctrine, its Genesis and its effect— 

The Spanish-American War of 1898 — Annexa- 
tion of Hawaii — Acquisition of Cuba — ^The 

Phillippines — Theodore Roosevelt and the 

Panama Canal ... ... 10 

The First World War : 

American Intervention — Woodrow Wilson and his 

Fourteen Points— The League of Nations ... ... 10 

9, Between two Wars : 

Prosperity and depression after the War — Pussyfoot 
Johnson and Prohibition — ^The 1929 Crisis — 

Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal — Promise 
of Independence to the Phillippines ... ... 10 

TO The Second World War : 

Franklin D. Roosevelt — His Foreign Policy- 

Lease and Lend — War with Japan and Interven- 
tion in Europe — ^The Atlantic Charter — Closer 
understanding with Britain — The San Francisco 
Conference and the United Nations Organi- 
zation ... ... ... ... 10 

II. The American Nation : 

Its composite character — the persistence of the 
colour problem — Labour and invention — Education 
and Religion— The Government in America, its 
features— Position of America in World Politics ... 6 


Total number of Lessons ... 100 


Books: 

For the pupils^ 

Text-book for study : America Yesterday and To-day by 
C. F. Strong— University of London Press (Local Agents : 
Messrs. Orient Longmans, Ltd., Mount Road, Madras'). 


31 


112 TEXT-BOOKS FOR THE MATO IC. EXAMN., 1960 [app. J] 


P&r the Teacher — 

1. A History of the United States by C. P. Hill — Edward Arnold 

dtCo. (Agents: Orient Longmans, Ltd., Mount Road, 
Madras). 

2. A Brief History of the United States by Allan Kevins — Oxford 

University Press, Mount Road, Madras. 

3. The Growth of Modern America by Eric Ecclestone— »G. Bell 

and Sons (Agents : Orient Longmans, Ltd., Mount Road, 
Aladras). 

4. The United States of America by H. P. Raskitt, Oxford Univer- 

sity Press.. Mount Road, Madras. 




CHAPTER ZUt 


Pre-University Examination 
(Ordinances) 


I. The Pre -University course will be conducted in 
constituent or affiliated colleges of the University of 
Madras. 

Qualification for 2. Admission to the Pre- 

admission to the University course shall be open to 
course. candidates who — 

(i) have passed the Matriculation Examination of 
this University or of any other Indian University, 
accepted by the Syndicate; or 

(ii) have passed a qualifying examination of a 
University or of any duly constituted authority outside 
India accepted by the Syndicate as equivalent to the 
Matriculation Examination of this University; or 

(iii) have completed the Secondary School- 
Leaving Certificate, or the Oriental High School-Leav- 
ing Certificate, issued by the Government of Madras 
or the E.S. L,C. (Anglo-Indian High School- Leaving 
Certificate) issued under the orders of the Government 
of Madras; and have been declared eligible for admission 
to the Pre-University course of study by this University; 

(iv) have passed an examination conducted by any 
University, Board of Secondary Education or other duly 
constituted authority of any State in India accepted by the 
Syndicate as equivalent to the Matriculation Examination 
of this University: 

Provided, however, that persons who have appear- 
ed for the Entrance Test to Group- D Examination, prior 
to the introduction of these Ordinances and qualified in 
such examination shall be admitted to the Pre-University 



114 


LAWS OF the university 


{chap. 


course of study for a period of five years, i.e., till the 
academic year 1960-61. 

3 . The course of study shall 
extend over a period of one aca- 
demic year, the minimum number 
of working days being 180. 

4. The course shall consist of 
three parts — 

Part I 

English. 

Part II 

Any one of the following languages : — 

(a) Regional language — Tamil. 

(b) An Indian language — Telugu, Kannada, Mala- 
yalam, Urdu, Marathi, Oriya, Hindi, Bengali and Guja- 
rati. 

(c) Classical language -Sanskrit, Arabic, Pcrisan, 
Greek, Latin, Hebrew and Syriac. 

(d) Foreign language — French, German, Burmese 
and Sinhalese. 

Part III 

Optional subjects. 

These shall be divided into two groups — 

Group A — 

(1) Mathematics. 

(2) Physical Sciences with Basic Mathematics. 

(3) Natural Science. 

Group B — 

(1) World History. 

(2) Geography. 

(3) Elements of Commerce or Elements of 

Economics. 


Duratioa of the 
coarse. 

Course of study. 



PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


115 


XLIl] 


(4) Any one of the following subjects in Fine 

Arts : — 

(a) Drawing and Painting. 

(b) Music. 

(5) Household Arts. 

(6) Logic or Psychology. 

(7) An Advanced Course in a Language or a 

third language. 

Every candidate shall take at least two subjects from 
Group A and two subjects from Group B: 

(i) Provided that candidates who have offered bifur- 
cated course of study for the S.S.L.C. Examination of 
the Madras State and have not taken Mathematics as one 
of the subjects and been declared eligible and candidates 

who have passed the Entrance Test 
Transitory to Intermediate Group-D Examina- 

Provision tion of this University be permitted 

lo choose any one subject under 
Group A, and any three subjects under Group B of 
Part III of ihc Pre-University course and that this 
transitory provishm be in force for a period of four years 
from the commencement of the Pre -University course, 
that is, till the end of the year 1960. 

(ii) Provided further that candidates, who have 
completed the Oriental High School Examination of the 
Madras Stale and been declared eligible for admission to a 
course of study in this University, be permitted to choose 
aiiy one subject under Group A, and any three subjects 
under Group B of Part III of the Pre -University course, 
and that this shall be in force till the academic year 
1960-61. 



116 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


“(iii) Provided further that bona fide teachers 
applying for exemption from the production of atten- 
dance certificates to appear for Pre- University examina- 
tion be permitted to choose under Part III tv/o subjects 
from Group-A and two subjtcts from Group-B or 
one subject from Group-A and any three subjects from 
Group-B or any four subjects from G;oup-B.” 

“(iv) provided further, that it shall be compe- 
tent for the Syndicate to exempt candidates who are 
blind and who wish to pursue their studies for the 
Pre-University, from a portion of Part III of the exami- 
nation, and they be permitted to take only three subjects 
in Humanities which do not require any practical 
work. ” 

5. The object of the study of English shall be 
to enable the student to express his thoughts in simple 
English and to create in him a taste for literature. Like- 
wise, the object of the study of the regional or other 
Indian languages shall be to enable the candidate to 
express himself fluently and write in grammatical langu- 
age and to create in him a taste for standard literature 
in the language without assistance. 

Portions to be prescribed in English shall be as 
follows ; — 

Paper I — About 600 lines of Poetry and 125 pages 
of Prose. 

Paper II — Two books for non-detailed study, one 
of which may be a novel (abridged or retold) and the 
other a book of short stories, or adventure, or biography, 
(wa collection of one -act plays. 

In Paper II, the candidates shall be expected to 
write two essays, the topics being selected from each one 
of the non-detailed texts prescribed. There shall also 
be (1) a precis and (ii) a question on the correct use of 
idioms. 





PRB-UNIVBRSITV EXAMINATION 


117 


XLll] 

Portions prescribed in the languages will consist of 
Poetry, Drama, Prose and Non-detailed texts in accord- 
ance with the syllabus and text-books which may be pre- 
scribed from time to time. 

The subjects under Part III shall be taught accord- 
ing to the syllabus prescribed. Where practical exer- 
cises arc prescribed, a certificate to the effect that the can- 
didate has performed the practical work or experiments 
• prescribed and has satisfactorily undergone a test 
conducted by the college in the prescribed practical work 
will be required. 

6. No candidate shall be admitted to the 
examination unless he has attended a course of instruc- 
tion in the subjects prescribed for a 
Certificate of period of one year in a constituent 
attendance and or affiliated college of this University 
scheme of and produces the necessary certifi- 

examination. — cates of attendance and progress. 

The scheme of examination shall be as follows: — 
Part I 

English. — There shall be two papers — 

Hours 

Paper I — Poetry and Prose (pres- 
cribed books) ... 3 

Paper 1 1 — Non -detailed texts 

and General Composition ... 3 

Part II 

Other languages '. — There shall be two papers — 

Hours Marks 

Paper 1 — Prescribed Texts and 
Grammar, etc. ... 3 100 

Paper II — Translation, Com- 
position, etc. ... 3 IQO 


Marks 

100 

100 





118 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


Part III 
Optional Subjects 

There shall be one paper of three hours’ duration in 
each of the subjects under Part 111— Groups A and B, 
with the maximum of 100 marks for each paper. 

7. A candidate appearing for the examination * 
on the first occasion shall apply for 
Bxamination all the three parts of the examination, 

appearances. At subsequent appearances, the 

candidate shall appear for any part 
of the examination in which he has not already secured 
pass marks. 

8. A candidate shall be dec- 
Passing lared to have passed the Pre- 

minimum. University Examination, if he 

obtains — 


(i) not less tiuin 40 per cent in Part 1- -English; 

(ii) not less than 40 percent in Part II — Selected 
Second Language ; and 

(iii) not less than 35 per cent in each of the four 
subjects selected from Groups A and B of 
Part III. 

A candidate may pass the whole examination by 
passing in the three parts at the same time at the . same 
examination or at different examinations. A candidate 
shall be declared to have passed in any part on obtaining 
in that part the minimum marks prescribed for each of 
the subjects. 


e 



XLll] 


PRE-UNIVERSITV EXAMINATION 


119 


9. Candidates who pass in three parts of the 
examination at the same time and who obtain not less 

than 60 per cent of the total marks 
Classlficatjon of shall be placed in the first class; 
successful those who obtain less than 60 per 

candidates. cent but not less than SO per cent 

shall be placed in the second class 
and all the other successful candidates shall be placed in 
the third class. 

Candidates who pass the whole examination at the 
first appearance and obtain 75 per cent or above in any of 
the subjects shall be deemed to have passed with distinc- 
tion in the particular subject. 

Candidates who pass the examination in more than 
one sitting but obtain 75 per cent or above in any of the 
subject will have the symbol ‘D ’ denoting distinction 
recorded against the subject with a note that they have 
completed the examination at more than one sitting. 

10. No details of the marks will be made available, 

but the class obtained and the 
Symbolic symbolic representation of the grade 

representation will be indicated against each sub- 
of marks. ject in the certificate granted to the 

candidate — 

Symbol A plus will denote 65 per cent and above 
of the marks but below 75 per cent of the marks. 

Symbol A will denote 60 per cent and above of 
the marks but below 65 per cent. 

Symbol B plus will denote 55 per cent and above 
of the marks but below 60 per cent. 

Symbol B will denote 50 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 55 per cent. 

Symbol C plus will denote 45 per cent and above 
of the marks, but below 50 per cent. 

Symbol C will denote the minimum percentage 
required for a pass or above but below 45 
percent. 



120 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY [cHAP. XLIlj 


Symbol D will denote distinction as having 
obtained 75 per cent and above in any of the 
subjects provided the candidate passes the 
whole examination at the first appearance. 

If the candidate passes the whole examination at 
more than on" sitting and obtains 75 per cent 
and above in any one of the subjects, the 
symbol ‘D’ will be shown against the subject or 
subjects, together with a note that he passed 
at more than one sitting. 

Symbol F will denote failure. 

There shall be no Moderation Board. 

11. A candidate v/ho has passed the Pre -university 

Examination shall be permitted to 
Appearance for appear again for the examination 
additional in a new subject or subjects under 

subjects. Part III provided he has undergone 

the course of study prescribed in 
the subject or subjects selected after joining a college 
for one acade mic year. He shall be declared to have 
passed the examination, if he obtains not le.ss than 35 per 
cent of the marks in each new subject. 

12. A candidate who has failed in the Pre -Univer- 
sity Examination shall be permitted to change his lang- 
uage under Part II or optional 

Change of Langu- subject or subjects under Part 111 
age under Part II and present himself for the examin- 
Optional subject ation provided he has put in a 
under Part HI further course in the language or 
optional subjects concerned in a 
cdHege for one academic year. He shall be declared 
to have passed the examination in Part II or Part III if 
he obtains the passing minimum number of marks 
prescribed in Ordinance 8 supra. 



APPENDIX II. 

PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 

Syllabuses and Text -Books 
PART I 
English 

Two papers of 3 hours each : — 

Paper I — Poetry and Prose (^Detailed Texts) about 600 lines of 
Poetry and 125 pages of Prose shall be prescribed. 

Paper JI — Non-detailed Texts and General Composition. 

Two books shall be prescribed for non-detailed study; one of 
them shall be a novel (abridged or retold) and the other may be a book 
of short stories, or of adventure, or a biography or a collection of onc- 
act plays. 

In Paper II, candidates will be expected to write two non-detailed 
essays (one on each book). There shall also be (i) a precis and (b) a 
question on the correct use of idioms. 

PART II 
Languages 
Tamil 

Two papers of 3 hours each 
Paper I — Poetry and Detailed Prose (Detailed) 

Paper II — Composition and Translation. 

Poetry 

About 700 lines of Standard Poetry. 
l^ose : For Detailed Study. 

One prose work written in modern style dealing with Tamil 
Literature and Culture, serving as an introduction to the 
study of Tamil Classical Literature in the Degree Course. 

Composition and Translation : 

Composition on non-detailed text and general subjects and 
Translation from English into the language. 

Telugu 

Two papers of 3 hours each 

Paper /— -Poerty, Prose and Elements of Telugu Grammar, Prosody 
and Poetics. 


9 



122 


SYLL. in KANNADA FOR 
PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


[apf. 


Paper 11 — Composition and Translation. 

Poetry : 

Poetry 800 lines. 

Prose : 

Detailed : about 80 pages. 

Non-detailed : 2 short novels 
EUments of Telugu Grammar^ Prosody and Poetics : 

No text-book is prescribed but a Syllabus is given to indicate 
the scope of stody. 

A, Grammar : 

1. Telugu Alphabet: Vowels and Consonants and the Organs 

of Speech and the part they play in pronouncing them. 

2. Parts of Speech: Nouns, Pronouns, Adjectives, Verbs and 

Indeclinables and their characteristics. 

3. The fundamental features of Ka^a and Drutaprakrika, 

4. The main principles of Sandhi in 

(a) Sanskrit — Savarna Dirgha, Guna, Vriddhi and Yana- 
desa. 

{h) Telugu — ^The several vowel — Sandhis Drutaprakrika 
Sandhi and the letters that fill up the hiatus. 


B. Prosody : 

1. The main features of Guru and Laghu, Matra Ganas, Akshara 

Ganas, Surya and Indra Ganas and of Yati and Prasa. 

2. The features of Kanda, Tetagiti, Ataveladi Sisa, Dvipada, 

Utpalamala, Champakamala, Sardula and Mattebha . 

C. Poetics : 

The main features of Upama, Rupaka, Svabhavokti, Atisayokti, 
Anuprasa and Yamaka : 

Kannada 

Scheme of Studies ; 

Poetry 2 hrs. ; Prose i hr. ; Composition and Translation i hr. 
Two papers of 3 hours each : — 

paper /—Poetry and Prose. 

Paper /7— Non-detailed text. General Composition and Translation. 


10 



II] SYLL. IN MALAYALAM FOR 111 

PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


Poetry : 

(I) 800 lines of Old Poetry from three different Poets ; one classical, 
and two mediaeval and (2) 400 lines of Modern Poetry, 

Prose : 

One Prose of work written in modern style which may be a 
prose drama, a novel or essays on subjects relating to Arts 
and Sciences, Travels or Biographies. 

Non-de tailed Study : 

One book written in modern style. 

Composition and Translation : 

Composition on general subjects and Translation from English 
into Kannada. 


Malayalam 

Two papers of 3 hours each : — 

Paper / — Questions on Text-books prescribed for detailed study, 
grammar and idiom. 

Paper II — Questions on books prescribed for non-detailed study. 
Original Composition and Translation from English to 
Malayalam. 


paper I : 

(a) Poetry : 

About 1,000 hu:s of Classical Poetry preferably from the work, 
of Cherusscry, Ezhuthachan or Kunchan Nambiar. 

About t,5Chd lines of modern poerty from any two works 
preferably from those of Kumaran Asan, Ulloor, 
Vallathol, G. Sankara Kurup, Vcnnikulam, Kuttamath or 
P. Kunhi Raman Nayar. 

ib) Prose : 

There shall be two books each of which may contain 150 to 200 
pages. One shall be a selection of essays on topical interest 
and the other a narrative type, viz.. Biography, Travel, books 
on Science, History, Politics, Economics or Sociology. 

(c) Grammar and Idiom : 

The Pure Grammar as it is may be excluded from the scope of 
the course. Only the important and popular figures of speech 
(Alankara) and metres (Vritta) pertaining to the detailed texts 
need be pointed out. 


11 



124 SYLLS. IN MARATHI AND HINDI FOR [ app . 

PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIO N 

Paper jj: 

(a) Non-detailed Text : 

One Text 'book of abo'it 200 to 250 pages of light reading is to be 
prescribed. 

(h) Original Composition : 

The subicct slD.iId be on modern thought or on current affairs 
or on any a«;pect of Malayalam literature. 

(e) Tramlation from English to Malayalam, 

Marathi 


Scheme of studies : 

(i) {a) For detailed study — 

Selection from — 

(1) Ancient and Modern Poetry. 

(2) Modern Prose, 

(b) For Nor -detailed study — 

Collection of short stories. 

(ii) Knowledge of elementary grammar is essential but extensive 

and minute details are not expected. Onestionon applied 
grammar alone shall be asked. 

viii) Translation from English into Marathi. 

(iv) General Composition. 

Scheme of Examination : Two papers of three hours each:— 

Paper I — Questions on the text-books prescribed for detailed 
study and applied grammar. 

Paper II — A question on the book prescribed for non-dctailcd 
study, a general composition and a passage for trans- 
lation from English into Marathi. 

Hindi 

Two papers of three hours each: — 

Paper /—Questions on the Text-books prescribed for detailed study 
and Applied Grammar. 

Paper //—Questions on the book prescribed for Non-de tailed Study 
a General Ccwiiposition and a passage for Translation 
from English to Hindi. 


11 



irj SYLLS. IN SANSKrW, LATIN, FRENCH AND ARABIC 125 
FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAM INATION 

(0 Selection from 

(a) Aacijent and Modern Poetry for Detailed Study. 

{b) Modern Prose for Detailed Study and 

(c) A collection of short stories for Non-detailed Study. 

(ii) Knowledge of Elementary Grammar is essential but extensive 
and minute details arc not expected. Questions on 
Applied Grammar alone shall be asked. 

dii) Translation from English to Hindi. 

Uv) General Composition. 


Sanskrit 


Two papers of 3 hours each — 

Paper / — Prose and Poetry including one question on Grammar 
based on the prescribed Text-books. 

Paper //—Translation from Sanskrit and into Sanskrit including seen 
and unseen passages. 

Text-books — ^Poetry selection about 200 verses. 

Prose about 20 pages. 

Latin 

Paper / — Prescribed Text and Grammar. 

Paper // — Composition and unseen Translation, 

Prescribed Text: 

One book of Caesar’s Gallic War. 

French 

Paper /—Prescribed 7 'ext and Grammar. 
paper // — Composition and unseen Translation. 

Prescribed Text: 

One Prose book of not moie than 100 pages. 

Amble 

Two papers of 3 hours each — 

Paper I — Questions on the Text-books prescribed for Detailed 
Study and Grammar. ^ 

Paper //—Translation from English into Arabic and Vice Versa, 

^3 


n 



126 SYLLS. IN PERSIAN, URDU AND SYRIAC FOR [app> 
PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


Persian 

Two papers of 3 hours each — 

paper I — Questions on the Text-books prescribed for Detailed 
Study and Grammar. 

Paper H — Translation from English into Persian and Vice Versa 

Urdu 

Two papers of 3 hours each — 

Pap^r T — Questions on the Text -books prescribed for Detailed 
Study and Grammar. 

Paper IT — Composition and Translation. One Question on 
Composition from Study of Non-Detailed Text^ 
one Q rest ion on General Composition and Passa- 
ges for Translation from English into Urdu and 
Vice Versa. 


Syriac 

Scheme of studies'. 

Paper I — ^Prose, Poetry and Grammar based on the prescribed 
text-books. 

Prose selection about 10 pages. 

Poetry selection about 80 lines. 

Paper II— Translation from Syriac into English including seen 
and unseen passages, and from English into Syriac 
Cseen passages only). 


14 




Uj SYLL. IN OROUP-A — MATHEMATICS FOR 127 

PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 

PART m 
Optional Snbjects. 

Group A — i. Mathematics. 

The Course shall comprise the following. — 

(a) Laws of addition and multiplication. Remainder 
Theorem and its applications. Index laws. Logarithms and appl ications. 
Theory of the quadratic equation. Graphs. Easy types of simul- 
taneous equations, linear and quadratic in two variables. l*he 
three progressions and series whose summation depends on A.P. and 
G.P. Sum of squares and cubes of natural numbers. Definition of 
nCr. and its value. Binomial Theorem a positive integral index. 
Simple problems on the above. 

(b) Plane Trigonometry. — Measurement of angles in degrees and 
radians. Trigonometrical functions and their relations to one another. 

Sine, Cosine and Tangent + 0, 'rr ± Bp Graphs of 

Sinx G^s X aii Tan X. Ai iition and duplication formulae. Product 
form-ilae. The following theorems in the properties of triangles : 

a b c 

Sin A Sin B Sin C ^ 

(ii) a* = b*-f c* — 2 be Cos A 

A A A A 

(in) r-- , rx= — , r, = r* - 

(iv) A— i be sin A 
(v) a=b cos c-f c Cos B. 

Simple identities connected with angles of a triangle. 

(r) Pjtre Gromstry.— Proofs of the following theorems and easy 
dcduaions: 

(1) A given straight line can be divided internally or externally 

in a given ratio at one and only one point. 

(2) A straight line drawn parallel to one side of a triangle 

cuts the other two sides, or those sides produced, 
proportionally; and the converse. 

(3) If the vertical angle of a triangle is bisected internally 

or externally the bisector divides the base internally 
or externally into segments which have the same ratio 
as the other sides of the triangle; and the converse. 

(4) Triangles and parallelograms of equal altitude are to one 

another as their bases. 


15 



1^8 SVLt. IN GROUP- A— PHYSICAL SCIENCES WITH [aPP. 

BASIC MATHEMATICS FOR PRE-UNIVERSlT Y EX AMINATION 

Similar triangles , — 

(^5) If z triangles are equiangular, their corresponding sides 
arc proportional; and the converse, 

(6) If 2 triangles, have one angle of the one equal to one angle 

of the other and the sides about these equal angle, 
proportional, the triangles are similar. 

(7) If from the right angle A of a right angled triangle ABC 

AD is drawn perpendicular to BC then (i) AD is the 
mean proportional between BD and DC; (ii) BA is the 
mean proportional between BD and BG and (iii) GA 
is the mean proportional between CB and CD. 

(8) Similar triangles are to one another as the squares on their 

corresponding sides. 

(d) Analytical Cartesian rectangular co-ordinates 

of a point; Distance between two given points; Co-ordinates of a 
point dividing the line joining two given points in a given ratio inter- 
nally or eifternally. 

Area of a triangle given the three vertices. 

Equation of a straight line (i) in terms of the slope and intercept 
of the Y-axis; (2) passing through a given point and having a given 
slops; (3) passing through 2 points. Co-ordinates of the point of 
intcrsec ion of 2 straight lines. Conditions for parallelism and per- 
pendicularity. 

Equation of a circle given centre and radius. Easy problems 
on the above. 

There shall be one paper of 3 hours’ duration having 100 marks 
as maximum. There shall be 9 questions on the whole : 3 in Algebra, 
2 in Geometry, 2 in Analytical Geometry and 2 in Trigonometiy. Out 
of these 9 questions candidates must answer three-fourths to secure 
maximum marks, 

3, physical Sciences with Basic Mathematics 
(a) Basic Mathematict 

(N,B. — Application to problems in Physics and Chemistry only.) 

Solutions of Equations of 1st Degree with one or two unknowns. 
Knowledge of formula giving root of quadratic equation. X-aw of 
indices. Knowledge of (1 -f x)n 1 + nx, where x is very small. 
Use of logarithmic tables in calculations. Relationship of angles formed 
by transversal across parallel lines. Simple properties of triangles 


16 



Iljl SYLL. tN GROUI^'A — JPHVSlCAt SCIENCES WITH BASIC 129 
MATHEMATICS FOR PRE -UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


including the theorem of pythogoras. Tangent; circumference and 
area of a circle. Intersecting chords. Area and volumes of 
spheres and cylinders. Trigonometrical ratios and their mutual 
relationships. Circular measure of angles. 

(b) Physics 

(N,B, — ^Lectures shall be accompanied by demonstrations.) 

Mensuration . — Fundamental and derived quantities and their 
units. Forward reading vernier. Slide callipers and screw gauge. 
Weighing (Correct to a centigram) by vibration method. 

Dynamics — Displacement, speed, velocity and acceleration. Deri- 
vation and simple appliauions of equations of motion of an object 
moving in a straight line with uniform acceleration. V'^ertical motion 
under gravity. Measuring by means of the simple pendulum. 
Newton’s laws of motion: Definition of force, t'erivaiion ofF=«ma. 
Distinction between mass and weight. Law of conservation of momentum 
(no proof). Work, Energy Power and their units. Law of conserva- 
tion of Energy. 

Statics — Statement of the law of parallelogram of forces 
Conditions of equilibrium of a body acted on by (i) three force (Triangle 
of forces), (2) any number of coplanar parallel forces (no proof or verifi- 
cation is required). Centre of gravity in simple cases Lamina — 
circle, triangle and parallelogram; solids — spheres and cylinders (no 
proof). Experimental determination of centre of gravity of a lamina. 
States of Equilibrium. 

Hydrostatics . — Pressure and thrust in a liquid at rest. Use of 
Expression P — hdg. Archimedes* principle and determination of 
specific gravity. Law of floatation. Use of common Hydrometer, 
(Balancing columns. Atmospheric pressure. Fortin’s Barometer* Boyles 
Law, manometers. 

Heat, — Temperature and its measurement with a mercury-in-glass 
thermometer. Centigrade and Fahrenheit scales. Six’s maximum 
and minimum thermometer. Clinical thermometer. 

Determination of co-cfficicnt of linear expansion of solids and 
co-efficient of apparent expansion of liquids. Volume Co-efficient 
and pressure co-efficient of a gas. Charles’ law. Absolute tempera- 
ture. Use of the Expression PV/T — Constant. 

Unit quantity of heat; Thermal capacity. Specific heat and its 
determination. Latent heats and their determination. Qualitative 
study of convection, conduction and radiation. Concept of mechanical 
equivalent of heat. 


17 



130 SYLt^ IN OROUP-A-r-l»HYSlCAL SCIENCES WITH [aPF. 
BASIC MATHEMATICS FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


Rectilinear propagation of light. Laws of reflection. 
Image due to a plane mirror. Laws of refraction. Image due to 
normal refraction at a plane surface (proof not required), course 
of a ray through a rectangular slab and a prism. Critical angle and 
total internal reflection. Spherical mirrors and thin lenses. Principal 

focus. Use of formula ^ adopting real is positive 

convention (No proof required). Magnification. Dispersion, Pure 
spectrum. 

-Properties of magnets. Poles. Law of inverse 
squares. Pole strength. Field strength. Lines of force. Moment. 
Field due to a short magnet at a point along its axis (no derivation, 
statement only). Elements of the Earth’s magnetic field. 

Electricity . — ^Nature of magnetic field around a straight wire 
carrying current. Cork screw rule. Magnetic field at the centre of a 
circular coil carrying current. The ampere and coulomb. P.D. and 
E.M.F. The volt. Ohm’s law, the ohm, resistance in series and in 
parallel. Specific resistance. Use of ammeters and voltmeters. Joule’s 
laws of heating, determination of J. The Kilo-Watt Hour. Laws of 
Electrolysis. Concept of alternating current. 

Sound . — ^Production and propagation of sound. Characteristics 
of a musical note. 


List of Experiments in Physics. 

(To be done individually) 

r. Callipers and screw gauge. 

2. Simple pendulum — ^finding g. 

3. Balance— Specific gravity of a solid by Archimedes’ principle 

4. (a) Hare’s appa acus and (J?) Test-tube float hydrometer. 

5. Specific heat of a solid by the method of mixtures. 

6. Co-efiicient of linear expansion. 

7. Go-efficient of apparent expansion of a liquid using a density 

bottle. 

8. Reflection at a plane surface. 

9. Refraction through a rectangular glass slab. 

10. Finding focal length of (a) concave mirror and (b) Convex lens 

11. Mapping resultant magnetics field when a short magnet is 

placed (a) North pole pointing north and ib) North pole 
pointing south, and calculating polcstrcngth from the 
second map. 

12. Measuring resistance by using an ammeter and a voltmeter. 


18 


11] SYLL. IN GROUP-A — PHYSICAL SCIENCES WITH 131 
BASIC MATHEMATICS FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 

Books for reference — 

1. General Physics by Whiteley, University Tutorial Press, Ltd. 

2. A Manual of Physics by J A. Growther, Oxford Medical Publi- 

Ciitions. 

3. Intermediate Physics by Houston (Longmans) 

4. Elementary Physics by Littlcr (Longmans) 

5. Elementary Physics by Nightingale (Bell) 

6. Physics for General Science by Kearsey (Longmans) 

7. School Physics by Joshi (O.U.P.) 

8. Principles of Physics by Nelkon (Christophers) 


(c; Chemistry 


1 . Theory — 

{N,B . — Lectures shall be based on illustrative lecture- 
demonstrations) 


I. Mixtures aiul simple substances. 

Physical and Chemical changes. Decantation, filtration, 
fnsion. sublimation, distillation. 


2. Elements and compounds. 

3. Hydrogen and oxygen; their preparation, properties and uses. 

4 W'atcr audits purification. Solutions, crystallisation. 

5. Atoms and molecules. Elements of atomic theory, Valency 

of elements. Symbols, formulae and equations. 

6, Preparation and properties of chlorine, hydrogen chloride, 

sulphur, hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide and sulphuric 
acid . 

7. Air and nitrogen. Preparation and properties of ammonia, 

nitric acid and carbon dioxide. 

8, Phosphorus. * 

9 Diflferences between metals and non-metals. Methods of 
obtaining metals, properties of metals. Sodium, potassium, 
copper, magnesium, calcium, zinc, mercury, aluminium, tin, 
lead and iron. 

10. Preparation and uses of the following. — 

(<3t) Hydroxide^ carbonate, bi-carbonaic, chloride and hypo- 
chlorite of sodium. 


19 



132 S¥LL. IN OROUP-A — PHVSlCAt SCIENCES WITH [aPP. 
BASIC MATHEMATICS FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


(&) Nitrate, chlorate, permanganate and dichromatc of potassium 

(c) Chloride, carbonate and sulphate of ammonium. 

(d) Sulphates of copper, zinc, magnesium and calcium. 

(tf) Calcium oxide, calcium carbonate, ferrous sulphate, ferric 
chloride, ferrous ammonium sulphate, silver nitrate 
and alums. 

II. Equivalents of an acid, a basi, an ox idising agent and a reducing 
agent. 


II. Experiments (14 practical classes). — 

1. Bunsen burner, fiame. 

2. Separation of the ingredients of a mixture of two components. 

3. Action of heat on substances like. — (a) p9tassium chlorate, 

lead nitrate, and anunonium dichromate ; (b) a mixture^ 
of iron and sulphur. 

4. Precipitation and properties of Silver chloride, copper sul- 

phide, zinc sulphide, lead iodide, mercuric iodide, ferric 
hydroxide, manganese hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, 
calcium carbonate, barium chromate and sulphate, and 
magnesium phosphate. 

5. Action of zinc on copper sulphate solution and copper on silver 

nitrate solution. 

6. Preparation of the following salts: Copper sulphate from copper 

carbonate and ferrous sulphate from iron. 

7. Determination of the strength of (a) a solution of sodium 

hydroxide with a mineral acid and (b) a solution of a ferrous 
salt with potassium permanganate. 

8. Equivalent weight of : (a) a metal like magnesium by the 

displacement of hydrogen and (b) a metal like copper by 

conversion to oxide. 

• 

9. Determination of the solubility of a salt in water at the room 

temperature. 

10. Collection and study of any one of the following: hydrogen# 
oxygen, chlorine or ammonia. 

Books Recommended: 

1, Holmyar, E. J. : A Junior Chemistry. 

2. Partington,}. R.: Everyday Chemistry. 



Il] SYLL. IN OROUP'A — natural SCIENCE FOR 133 
PRE-UNlVERSlTY EXAMINATION 

3. Mellor, J. W. : Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry. 

4 . Foster and Alyea : Introduction to General Chemistry. 

5. Dobbin and Walker: Chemical Theory for beginners. 


3« Natural Science 

BIOLOGY 

(a) rhe Syllabus pre-supposes the teaching of the Botany and 
Zoology parts separately by qualified teachers. 

{b) A single written theory paper should be set, answered and 
valued separately by qualified teachers; marks should be 
equally divided between the two parts and an equal number 
of questions from the two parts should be attempted. 


(0 Botany 

(1) Characteristics of living organisms: animals and plants — 

their distinction. 

(2) The nature of protoplasm; the structure and physiology 

of the Cell; cell-division, cell-differenriation and tissue 
formation including an elementary knowledge of 
histology and functions of epidermis, parenchyms, 
sclerenchyma, collcnchyma, zylem and phloem. 

The fundamental form and structure of root, stem and 
leaves in the sunflower plant. 

(3) bcxual and non-sexual reproduction. 

Flower and its parts, pollination, fertilization, fruits and 
seed. 

(4) Nutrition of plants; Photosynthesis. 

(5) Th^ parasitic and saprophytic modes of nutrition, as exempli- 

fied in Mucor, yeast plant. Bacteria and Cuscuta. 

(6) Alternation of generations in Riccia and a Fern. 

(7) Gradation of plants ; plant phyla. 

Practicals demonstrating the following: — 

(1) The Structure of Oscillatoria^ Spirogyra^ Mucor and Agaricus, 

(2) Structure of a monocot flower. 

(3) Structure of a dicot flower. 

(4) Castor seed ; its parts and germination. 

(5) Comparative examination of the structure of a dicot stem 

and root. 



134 SYJLL. IN QROUP-A — NATURAL SCIENCE FOR [aPP. 
PRE- UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


Note — ^Demonstration experiments on respiration and photo- 
synthesis of plants are expected. 


Books Recommended : 

Sinnot and Wilson 
McLean and Cook 
Pool 

Ramsbottam 
Holman and Robbins 
Villee, G.A. and Saunders, 

W.B. 

WeisZjP.D. 

Marvin, J., Taylor and Raynor. 
Guilclier, J. M. Translated by 
Naollies, R.H. 

Emerson, F.W. 

Das,K.S. andMookerji,P.B. ... 
Knowles, F.G W. 

Kenoyer, L.A. and H.N. 
Goddard 

Winchester, A. M. 

Palmer, R. 

Felton, C. L. 


Botany — Principles and problems. 
Text-book of theoretical Botany. 
Basic Botany. 

Popular book of Botany. 

Text-booK of General Botany. 

Biology. 

Biology. 

Introducrioa to Botany. 

The hidden life of flower. 

Basic Botany. 

Outlines of Biolog>\ 

The living organism. 

General Biolog>'. 

Biolog>\ 

Living Things. 

Our Living World. 


(ti) ZcK>logy and Physiology 

1. An elementary knowledge of the histology and functions of 

Epithelia, blood, connective, skeletal, muscular and 
nervous tissues and germ cells of animals. The structure 
and functions of the more important organs of cockroach 
and man. 

2. An elementary knowledge of the metabolism of protein. 

Carbo-hydrates and fats. 

3. Digestion, absorption and assimilation in animals. An ele- 

mentary knowledge of Vitamins. The role of enzymes, 
the transport of Food material in animals. 

4. Respiration; Excretion; an elementary knowledge of the 

nervous mechanism in a vertebrate (Man); an elementary 
knowledge of the endocrine organs in man. 

5. An outline knowledge of the classification of animals to 

illustrate the gradation of animals. 


$2 



il] SYLL. IN OROUP-B — WORLD HISTORY FOR 135 

PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


6. Modes of nutrition as exemplified by malarial parasite; 

round worms. 

7 . An outline knowledge of the evidence of evolution. 

8. The life-history of frog and butterfly as illustrating 

metamorphoses. An outline of the life history of 
malarial and filarial parasites as involving an intermediate 
host. 

Practicals demanstrctting the following : 

I. The organs in cockroach. 
z. The organs of alimentation in frog. 

3. The organs of reproduction in frog. 

4. The organs of excretion in frog. 

5. The organs of respiration in frog. 

(The dissection of the frog is to form the basis of study 
of the vertebrate organism.) 

blote — Demonstration of human anatomy from models, charts etc. 
Group B — (i) World History 

1. Pre-historic man , — ^Archaeological evidence about early man. 
The invention of stone and metal tools and weapons. 

2 . The civilizations of the ancient world; Egyptian Sumerian 
Tndus Valley, Cretan, Babylonian, Assyrian and Persian. 

3. Ancient India, — The Vedas and the epics. Early Hindu 
king ^oms of the North. 

4. The rise of Buddhism and Jainism — Mahavira, Gautama the 
Buddha. Asoka — the spread of Buddhism to South-East Asia and the 
Far-East. 

5. Greece . — ^The City-States and their Government. Relations 
between Persia and Greece till the 4tb Century B.C —Alexander. 
The Legacy of Greece. 

6. Rome . — The rise of the Roman Republic. The expansion of 
Rome, and the transition to the empire. Julius Caesar and Augustus. 
The contribution of Rome to Government and law. 

7. The rise and spread of Christianity— Jesus — Gonstamine. 
The Barbarian invasions and the Fall of Rome. 

8. The growth of empires in India. Mauryas, Kushans, Guptas, 
Harsha. The Tamil Kingdoms. The Vijayanagar empire. The 
spread of Indian culture overseas. 

9. The rise of Islam-Mohamcd. The Caliphate. The Moors 
in Spain. The Delhi Sultanate. 

10. The Middle Ages in Europe Feudalism. The Holy Roman 
empire. The church and the monastic orders. The Crusades, 


Z3 




ii6 SYLL. In OtlOtJP-B — QfiOGRAt^HY FOk (APiP. 

PRB- UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


11. The Renaissance and the growth of European States— 
Revival of learning. The reformation Geographical discoveries and the 
beginning of colonialism in America and Asia. The growth of nation- 
Statcs. Spain, France, Great Britain, 

12. Asia in the i6th and 17th centuries. — ^The Moghuls in India. 
China under the Mings and Manchus. Unification of Japan. 

13. The age of despots in Europe. — ^Louis XIV — ^Peter the Great— 
Frederick the Great. 

14. The revolutionary era in Europe — 1789-1848. — ^The French 
Revolution — ^Napoleon. The Congress of Vienna — The Revolutions 
of 1830 and 184S. 

15. The emergence of America. — ^War of American Independence 
and the foundation of the U.S.A. The liberation of Latin America. 
The Civil War in the U.S.A, 

16. Nationalism in 19th century Europe. — Germany, Italy, South- 
Eastern Europe. 

17. The opening of the new continents. — ^Africa and Australia. 

18. The Industrial Revolution in Europe and its effects. 

19. Modem Asia. — ^The rise of Japan. The Russo-Japanese 
War. The founding of the Chinese Republic, The British in India. 
Indian nationalism Holland and the Netherlands — East Indies. France 
and Indo-China. The U.S.A. and the Phillippines. 

20. The 20th century world. — EWorld War I. Causes and effects. 
The Russian Revolution. The League of Nations. Fascism and Naz- 
ism. The Sino- Japanese War. World War II. Indian Independence. 
The free States of Asia — The U.S.A. and the U.S.S.R. as world. 
Powers. The U.N.O. 

Note. — ^T he course in World History is expected to be covered in 
outline only. 

Books for study-— 

(i) Davies — An Outline History of the World. 

Q2) Panikkar — Survey of Indian History. 

(3) Pearce — ^Outline History of World Civilization. 

(4) Rawlinson — ^A Concise History of India. 

(2) Geography 

One Paper — 3 hours^ — 100 marks. 

Physical: 

Section (1) (a) Elementary study of temperature, pressure and 
winds and precipitation. 

(d) Land — Study of major relief features correlated 
with weathering and denudation. 


^4 




If] iYLL. IN OROOP-B — ^BLBMENTS OF COMMERCE FDR 137 

pre-university examination 


35 — 40 hours. 

(c) Sea— Temperature, Salinity and surface currents. 

Section (11) Study of man in relation to his environment. Typical 
examples to be selected from the following; — 

(а) Hot-Wet Lands. 

(б) Monsoon lands of Asia. 

45—50 hours. 

(c) Mediterranean Lands. 

{d) Deserts — Hot and Gold. 

(e) Temperate Grass Lands. 

(/) Western Europe and the U.S.A. 

Practical: 

Section (tit) Elements of Map work. 

No University Test (a) Scales and Contours. 

(b) Elements of map setting, measuring and 

reading. 

(c) Diagrammatic representations. 

Booki for Referettce and Study : 

1. Preece and Wood, Part I: Foundations of Modern Geography. 

2. G. S. Fox; Physical Geography for Indian student. 

3. Stembridge: World. 

4. Brooks; Natural Regions. 

5. Geography for To Jay — Book V — World — Ed. by Stamp and 

Su^eate. 

6. Pickles: Intermediate Map reading. 

7. Bygott; Map work and Practical Geography. 

8. Oxford Junior School Atlas. 

(3) (t) Elements of Commerce 

I 

Part A : Fundamentals of Double Entry — Subsidiary Books — Ledger 
—Adjusting Entries — Tiading, Profit and Loss Account — 
Balance Sheet. 

Part B: Economic Goods — Wants — The Law of Demand — Law of 
Production — ^The Law of supply — ^Pricing in a Market — 
Types of Business Organisation— Money— Qualities of 
good money — ^Kinds of money — Functions and kinds of 
Banks — Wholesale and Retail Trading — Elementary ideas 
regarding the documents of Trade — Advantageous of 
Foreign Trade — Chief Methods of Transport and Com- 
munication. 

Nou —The Paper shall be of three hours’ duration and shall be 

divided into two Parts— A & B — 'A* comprising questions in Book- 
keeping and questions on General Principles of Commerce. 



138 SYLL. IN GROUP-B — elements OF ECONOMICS [aPP. 
FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 

Books for Reference 

Batliboi: Double Entry Book-keeping. 

Vaidyanathaiyer; Book-keeping. 

Jathar and Beri: Elements of Economics. 

Silverman : Substance of Economics. 

(3) (iV) Elements of Economics 

1. Introductory: — Subject matter of economics and its rela- 
tions to other social services — main sub-divisions — important stages 
of economic development. 

2. General notions: — of wealth, goods, income, value and 
price-market. 

3. Wants and their satisfaction— utility— standard of 
life — Family expenditure — Demand and its elasticity. 

4. Production of wealth — factors of production — Land, 
Labour, capital and organisation — Types of economic organisation — 
small-scale and large-scale production — Laws of rcu:rns. 

5. Value and exchange: — Markets — Price — competition — 
monopoly. 

6 . Mechanism of exchange:— Money — forms and functions 
— ^monetary standards — changes in prices — Credit and Banking — 
Commercial and Central Banks. 

7. International Trade: — Theory — Trade Policy — exports? 
imports— balance of trade — balance of payments. 

S. National income and distribution— Rent, wages, interest. 
Profits — general theory of distribution. 

9. State and economic activity — Revenues and expenditure 
of governments — Free enterprise — Socialism, communism — Welfare 
State— economic planning. 

N. B. : (i) The treatment of the subject is to be elementary 
and general, wherever possible, illustrations from 
Indian conditions should be used in the course 
of teaching and explanations. 

(ii) The scope of the subject is indicated by the 
following text-books:— 

(i) Jather Sc Beri : Elementary Economics (Oxford 
University Press) (5th Edition) 

(3) Arthur Bimic: Outline of Economics (Long- 
mans). 





Il] SYLL. IN GROUP-B— flNE ARTS FOR 139 

PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


(4) FINE ARTS 

(a) Drawing and Painting 
Practical 
1 Term: 23 hra. 

Introduction : 

Easy terminology, study of lines 2 hrs. 

Nature drawing : 

(a) Simple leaves, branches, fruits etc., in pencil only 2 hrs. 

(b) Trees in pencil only 2 hrs. 

Object drawing : 

Introduction to perspective through observation ... 2 hrs. 

Using ; 

Straight-line objects 2 hrs. 

Curved-line objects ... ... 2 hrs. 

Illustration by clear and simple diagrams for (out-door) 
space-perspective 4 hrs. 

Nature drawing: 

Out-door sketches, practical application of the 

previous lessons 7 hrs. 


n Term: 16 hrs. 

Nature drawing : {in water colour) 

(a) Simple leaves, branches, blossoms, single flowers 

or fruits 8 hrs. 

[b) Very simple “ landscapes with a big space for 

sky studies. ... ... 8 hrs 

111 Term: 16 hrs. 

Decorative Art: (Usurer or Tempera colour) 

(a) Border: 

Repetition of motifs in a simple border 8 hrs. 

and 

(^) All-over pattern: 

For a book cover or cloth etc. 8 hrs. 

History of Fine Arts (32 hours). 

Introduction (i hour) 

History of Indian Art (16 hours): 

Proto-History Period: Indus Valley Civilization (i hour): 
Historic Periods: 

Architecture (7 hours) Stambha, Stupa, Chaitya Hall, Brahma- 
nical Ternplc (Northern, Southern, Hoysala style), Indian 
Aiosqiie ; Islamic Tomb. 


Z7 



140 SYLL. IN group -B — FINE ARTS FOR [apP. 

PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


Sculpture (6 hours) Sunga and Early Andhra (Bharhut, Bodh 
Gaya, Sanchi); Later Andhra (Amaravathi); Gandharai 
Mathura, Gupta; South Indian Bronzes. 

Painting (3 hours) Ajanta; Moghul; Rajput. 

History of World An (15 hours) 

I hr. Egyptain Art. Architecture. The Pyramid. Sculputure. 

Some examples from the Old Kingdom. 

I hr. Greek Art Architecture. The Orders; The Parthenon. 

Scalpture. Some examples especially from 5th Century B.C. 
I hr. Roman Art. Architecture. Various types of Buildings. Sculp- 
ture. Portraits. 

I hr. Early Christian Art. Architecture. The Bascilia. 

I hr. Byzantine Art. Architecture. The Hagia ; Sophia. 

Minor Arts. The Mosaic. 

I hr. Romanesque Arc. Architecture. S. Ambrogio, Milan. 

1 hr. Gothic Art. Architecture; Sculpture; 

Minor Arts, Stained Glass 
(Illustrated on the Cathedral of Charters). 

6 hrs. Renaissance Art in Italy. General Character and outlines 
of the Early Renaissance ; Leonardo da Vinci ; Michelangelo ; 
Raffael. 

2 hrs. Renaissance Art in the Netherlands. Flemish Art. Van 

Eyck Brothers; Dutch Art. Embrandt. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 
INDIAN ART 

The Art and Architecture of India: Benjamin Rowland (The Pelican 
History of Art). 

Indian Art : A.G.Rawlinson;K. de B. Cordington; J. V.S. Wilkinson 
Sc J. Irwin; Faber & Gaber, London. 

Indian Architecture: Buddhist and Hindu Periods; Percy Brown ; 

Islamic Period ; Percy Browm. Tarapore wala, Bombay. 

Indian Painting: Percy Brown, Y.M.G.A., Calcutta. 

Classical Indian Sculptwre: Chimamoni Kar, 1950; Alex Tirani 
Ltd., London. 

Indian Metal Sculpture: Chintamoni Kar, 1952; Alex Tiram 
Ltd.» London. 

Rtf/pnrPapnifig: Basil Gray; The Faber Gallery of Oriental Art. 

Mughal Painting: J. V. S. Wilkinson; The Faver Gallery of Oriental 
Aft. 

htdiem Tmpksi O, U, P. O. — Monod-Bruhl. 



II] 


SYLL. IN OROUP-B — FINE ARTS FOR 
PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


141 


Marg. Vol. 2, Ma. 4 : Special Dipavali No. (contains good illustrations 
of Ajanta Wall-Paintings.) 

Early Indian Sculpture', Volumes I, II ; L. Bacchofer. 

1. An advanced History of India by Majumdar Raychau- 

dhuri of Kalikinkar Datta (pp. 224-254; 378; 410- 

421; 584-601). 

2. History and culture of the Indian People (General Editor, 

R. G. MajumJar) Chapters on Arts in the different 
Volumes. 

WORLD ART 

Art throughout the ages: Helen Gardener. 3rd Edition; G. Bell & 
Son., La tJon; Harcourt, Brace & Go., New York. 

Unierstaniing the Arts: Helen Garden; Harcourt, Brace and 
Go., New York, 

An Illustrated Handbook of Art History : Frank Ross, Macmillan, 
New York. 

A History of Architecture on the Comparative method i Banisterg 
Fletcher. 

Encyclopaedia of Arts: Louis Hourticq, Vols. I & II; George 
Harrap & Co , London & Bombay. 

PERSPECTIVE. 

The Principles of Model : Common object Drawing: B.A. Branch, 
London ; Ralph Holland & Go , Temple Chambers, E.G. 


ib) MUSIC 
(i) Indian Music 

The Syllabus for Indian Music — One year duration. Based on the 
availability of 4 hours pjr week, 2 hours for Theory and 2 hours for 
Practical. 

THEORY. 

iMusic as one of tlic Fine Arts. 

The place of Music in Life. 

The cultural, intellectual, emotional and spiritual value of Music. 

Inlian Misic an! its place amongst the musical systems of the 
world. Distinctive features of Indian Music. 

Notation used in Indian Aiusic. 

R151, the pivotal concept of Indian Music. Raga classification in 
general. Janaka raga and janya raga; varja raga and vakra rftga; upanga 
raga and bhashanga raga. 


An outline knowledge of the lakshana of the following tco.ragas: — 


Mayamalavagaula . 
Bhairavi. 
Madhyamavati. 
Mohana. 

Kambhoji. 

The Sapta talas and their 


Sankarabharana. 

Hamsadhvani. 

Biiahari. 

Pantuvarali. 

Kaiyani. 

constituent angas. 


2 9 


19 



142 


SYLL. IN GR0UP-B~FINB arts FOR 
PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


[app. 


Ghapu tala and its varieties. Talas figuring in concert forms 
viz: Adi, Rupaka and Jampa, Triputa and Ghapu talas. 

Musical forms and their classifications. Lakshana of the forms 
Gita, Swarajati, Varna and Kriti. 

Folk music and its characteristics. 

Musical instruments and their classifications into stringed, wind 
and percussion groups. Polyphonous and Monophonous instruments. 
Varieties of drones. 

Varieties of concerts. The different types of concerts and the types 
of performers figuring in them. Music concert, dance concert, Kalak- 
shepam and Bhajana. Accompaniments used in concerts. 

An outline knowledge of the life and contributions of the following 
composers — Purandaradasa, Tyagaraja, Muthusami Dikshiiar, Syama 
Sastri and Gopalakrishna Bharati. 

Ability to reproduce in notation compositions learnt. 

Practical, 

The preliminary Swara exercises. The Sapta tala alankaras. Six 
Gitas, one Swarajati, 4 tana varnas. Ten simple kritis, one in each of 
the 10 ragas prescribed under theory. One each of Tevaram, Tirup- 
pugazh and Divyanamakirtana. 

Ability to sing from sight, any passage given in the above ten ragas. 
BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 

In English: 

Oriental Music in European Notation by A. M. Chinnaswami 
Mudaliar. 

Music of India by H. A. Popley. 1 
South Indian Music— Books 1-3 j 
Great Composers — Books i and 2 ^ P. Sambamurti. 

Dictionary of South Indian Music | 
and Musicians. J 

Mahabharata Ghoodamani, Chap. IV — Madras Government 
Oriental Series. 

Thyagaraja’s Kirtis set to notation by C.S. Iyer. 

In Tamil: 

Practical Course in Karnatic Music, Books 1-3 : P. Sambamurti 

Kirtana Sagarm, Books x and 2 : P. Sambamurti. 

In Tthigu* 

Ta^tnr Singaradharlu’s : Books 1-3. 


30 




n] SYLL. IN OROUP-B — FINE ARTS FOR 143 

PRB-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 

(ii) Western Music 

Theory I One paper. 

Practical: 

(1) Notation-^ 

Positions of Notes on the Staffs Leger Liness Treble and Bass 
Cietss Accidentals Major and Minor (both forms) Chromatic 
Sales Key-signatures transposition of a Melody from Treble 
to Bass Clef, or vice versa, and from one key to another, 
naming the key of a given passage and supplying its Key- 
signature. 

(2) Time- 

Relative duration of soundsi Notes; Rest; Dots; Ties; Staccato- 
marks; the Pause; Regular and irregalar grouping of Notes; 
Syncopation; adding Time-signature and Bar-lines of a 
given Melody; re-writing a passage with altered note — values 
after a different Time-signature; completing a Bar by the 
addition of Rests or Notes. 

(3) Intervals-^ 

Diatonic and Chromatic Intervals, Simple and Compound, 
Direct and Inverted. 

(4) Tetfin and Signs in General Use — 

Words (English and Italian only) and marks indicating Tonal 
variety and Contrast, Speed and general directions as to per- 
formance; abbreviations; Embellishments, the Appoggiaturc, 
Pralltriller, Mordent, Turn, Shake, After-note and Slide. 

(5) Transposition and Term — 

{a) Transposition of a simple example from Clef to Clef from 
Key to Key, and from Short to Open Score, or vice 
versa. 

(6) Knowledge of terms used for the writing of chords, and 
for Part-Writing; naming the Key of a given passage 
and supplying the Key-signature. 

(6) Figuring of Basses^ 

Figuring the Bass of a simple example of Vocal Harmony up 
to and including Chords of the Seventh and their inversions. 

( 7 ) 

(d) Simple Exercises on Triads and their Inversions; the domi- 
nant Seventh and its inversions and Resolutions. 

(b) The construction and designation of Cadences. > 


SI 




144 


SYLL. IN oAOUP-B — jPlNE ARTS FOR [APF- 

PRB-UNIVERS^Y EXAMINATION 

(8) Melodic Analysis and Modulation — 

(a) The analysis of a simple eight-bar melody into “fore** 
and ** after phrases and sections. 

(h) The indication of Key-changes in a given example. 
practical : 

I. Studies — 

One complete group chosen by the candidate from either Album 
alternatively a complete group from one of the three Official 
Books of Studies Pianoforte Senior Album. 


2. Pieces — 


Group I. Shield-Moffat : Minuet. 

Sibelius : Arabesque Pp. 76^ No. 9 Augener. 

Group 2. Mozart : Courante from K. 399. 

Rowley : Scherzo. Hammond. 

Group 3. Arne : Movement from Sonata No. (Gundcll). 
Chopin : Valse in G Sharp minor Op, 64, No. 2. 

Williams. 


Group 

Group 


4. Mendelsson : Songs without Words (No. 45 in G). 

Love lock : Arabesque. Hammond. 

6. Beethoven : Minuetto and Trio, from Sonata in 
B flat. Op. 22. 

Grovlez ; Less Mar ionnettes. Augener. 


Group 9. Hummel : Scherzo. 

Moy : Procession. Hammond. 

Group II. Dandrieu : Les Tourbillons. 

Kierulf : Romance. Novcllo. 


Group 12. Nares : Gavotte. 

Bridge ; Rosemary. Winthrop Rogers. 

Group 14. Geeh : Pracludium. 

Paradies : Giga. Ashdown. 


Group 15. Chopin : Nocturne in G minor Op. 15 No. 3. 

Lovelock: Waltz. Hammond. 

Group 16. Scarlatti : Sonnata in B minor No. ii. 

Rosenthal : Impromptu (Four Interludes, No. 4) 
Group 18. Sibelius : Staccato, Op. 76, No. 2. 

List : Consolation in E. No. 2. Augener. 

Group 20. Rameau ; L*es Tourbillons, Rondo. 

Bridge : Valse Gapricieuse (Three Sketches, No. 3.) 

Winthrop Rogers. 


32 



SYLL. IN OROUP-B — FXNIE ARTS FOR 

prb-university examination 


145 


111 


Group 21. Butron : Scherzo. 

Rowley : Air (from Gcorgiaa Suite). Winthrop 

Rogers. 

Group 24, Alendclson : Andante in E minor (Characteristic 
PieceSj Op. 7, No. i). 

Lovelock : Toccatina. Hammond. 

Group 25. Mozrat : Fantasia in D Minor, K 397. 

Hurlstone : Rustic Song. Pp. 8, N0.4. 

Williams. 

3. SccUis and Arpeggios — 

Melodic Minor Scales in all keys, in the octave position, one 
note to each liand, to the extent of four octaves in similar 
motion, ascending and descending, beginning at the lower 
part of the keyboard. 

MLajor scales in all keys in contrary motion, beginning with 
the key-note in each hand, from the centre of the keyboard 
to the extent of two octaves, outwards and inwards. 

The Chromatic Scale beginning from any note, in the octave 
position, to the extent of four octaves in similar motion. 

Arpeggios — 

Arpeggios of Major Common Chords in all keys and their 
inversions to the extent of four octaves. 

The scales and Arpeggios may be required with the hands 
separately or together. They are to be played once only, 
without break. The notes arc to be grouped in fours. 

4. Sight Reading — 

A test of a moderately easy character, in a major or minor key 
not exceeding four sharps or four fiats, in simple or compound 
time. 

5. Viva Voce — 

A general knowledge of the Form of the Pieces selected will be 
required. Question will be asked on the work prepared : 
Intervals, Expression Marks, Modulation. 

6. Ear Test — 

(l) To recognise and name any diatonic interval and the aug- 
mented 4th or diminished 5 th, within the compass of an 
octave, played after and above any note within the treble 
stave. 



14^ SVlX. IN OROUP-B— fine ARTS FOR [aPP. 

P RB’UNIVERSITY 

(2) (a) To dap or tap the note-values of a melody not exceeding 

four bars of 2/4 or 3/4 time, after it has been played 
twice by the examiner. 

{b) To beat time (either down-up j or down-right-up) 
while the same melody is played again and to continue 
beating after the music ha:, ceased, 

(c) To state whether the melody is in duple or triple in time. 

(3) To hum or sing the upper or lower of two notes played 
together a major or minor 6th apart. 

Reference books : — 

Text-Book of Musical knowledge for the Trinity College Local 
Examinations in Theory of Music — ^Advanced Junior ana Inter- 
mediate. 

Rudiments of Music — By Stewart Maepherson. 

Form in Brief — By William Lovelock. 

Novello’s Biographies of famous composers. 

(c) Household Arts 


/. Home Making. 

The house and its surroundings : 

A, Allocation of the space in the house for essential purposes — 
for cooking, dining, sleeping, study, childicn, storages 
toilet, reception of guests — How to make the best use of a 
one-room apartment. Floor iixg, walls and ceiling of the 
different rooms; furniture. 

(o) Living and reception rooms — ^furniture, decorations. 

(ft) Bed-rooms — ^furniture, mattresses and pillows, linen etc. 

(e) Dining room — equipment necessary when dining in Indian 
or Western Style. 

\d) Kitchen-^ protection against flies; arrangement for wash- 
ing up ; cooking vessels and their arrangements. 

Types of stoves and ovens ; types of fuel. 

(e) Store-room- 

Arrangement for storing things like provisions, vessels that 
are not in daily use, etc. 

(/) The bath room— proper kind of flooring and walls ; lavatory 
and its sanitation. (8 hours.) 


34 



Ilj 


SYLL. IN GROUP- B — FINE ARTS FOR 
PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


147 


B, Interior decorations — Importance of good taste. Study of the 

colour chart and colour combinations— use of colour in 
the home. Choice of suitable pictures for the walls of the 
different rooms, curtains, cushions and any other articles 
used for decorating the home. Use of plants and flowers 
in decorations (5 hrs.) 

C. Cleanliness and care of the home — cleanliness of the surround- 

ings. Daily and weekly cleaning of the house — floor, walls, 
windows, furniture, beds and beddings. 

Care of Linen. 

Common house-hold pests — ^mosquitoes, cloth moths, bed 
bugs, cockroaches, silver fish, white ants, flies, grain and 
furniture weevils. Cleaning of kitchen utensils, cutlery, 
crockery and other metal articles like vases, trays, tea pots, 
etc. (5 hrs.) 


/ 1 . Income a ltd Expenditure , — 

Importance of planned house-hold budget. 

Chief budget items. Housing, food, clothing, house-keeping 
expenses, and personal expenses of the different members 
of the family. Thrift and methods of saving — Banks, 
Post Office, Co-operative Societies, Chit-funds and Nidhis, 
Insurance, investments, (6 hrs,) 

TIL Personal Hygiene . — 

Importance of p .Tsonal cleanliness ; care of skin, teeth, nails, 
hair, etc , Clothing in relation to personal appearance — 
Changing of clothing — Jay-time and night-wear. Proper 
foot-wear. (2 hrs.) 

IV, First Aid and Home- Nursing . — 

Treatment of simple cuts, bleeding from the nose and ear, 
shocks, artificial respiration, sun-stroke. Poisons — different 
kinds and treatment ; fractures and how to render first 
aid in case of fractures and sprains, burns and scalds. 

Care of sick — Preparation to be made for a patient in the house. 
How to disinfect a room in the house. Use of disinfectant 
a room in the home. (10 hrs.) 

K. Child Car 

Up to the age of three and from the ages of four to nine. 

Busic needs of a child — Food, dress, baths, fresh air, playing 
(games and toys). 


35 



148 


SYLt. IN GROUP-B — FINE ARTS FOR 
PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


[afp. 


Hab it — format ion . 

Minor ailments. 

VI. Food and Cookery. — 

Food requirements — Carbohydrates, Fats, proteins, minerals, 
vitamins, water — their common sources. 

The basic seven. 

Study Or common food materials. 

Demonstrations of balanced means by the use of the basic 
seven in terms of servings. (15 hrs.) 

Cooking — Methods of Cooking advantages and disadvan- 
tages in cooking food. 

Choice of essential equipment and utensils ; their cost. 

Cleaning of equipment and utensils ; cleaning materials. 
Flush Sterilization. 

Purchasing ni J storing of food in a home, weights and measures 
— Cost of common food stuffs. (8 hrs.) 

Practicah : (Each practical to be of two hours* duration). 

Daily cleaning of a house (one room). 

Weekly cleaning of a house — flooring, walls and ceiling, 
mirrors, glass, pictures, furniture, making of furniture 
polish at home. Gleaning of kitchen utensils — aliuninium, 
of cutlery and crockery. 

(2 practicals). 

Laundry — ^Washing of cotton and silk ; pressing and ironing 

(i practical). 

First aid and Home nursing. 

Preparing the surrounding of a patient. 

Bed-making and changing sheets for a patient in bed ; giving 
sponge baths. 

Use of clinical thermometer. (One practical). 

(The practical w^ork in connection with first-aid may be done 
along with the lectures). 

Study of a few plants of houses ; arrangement of furniture in 
room. 

Study of colour — Combinations in pictures. 

Colour Schemes in dress. 

Arranging flower-vascs. (i practical). 

Cooking— Invalid Cookery — Kanjees (broken rice, arrowroot. 
Sago, Barley water. Whey, Soups and atstards.) 



SYLL- IN GROUP -B — LOGIC FOR 

pre-university examination 


149 


nj 


Beverages — Coffee, tea, fruit*|uiccs. 

Tiffin. Uppuma and Chutney. 

(I Practical). 

Puri and potatoes. 

Coconut toffee, groundnut toffee 

Or 

(i Practical). 

Any other sweet. 

(i Practical). 

Cooking of a simple balanced meal. 

(I Practical). 

Preparing the dining-room for meals 
Indian style 


Western style. 

(I Practical) 

(.5) (i) Logic 



The following Syllabus indicates the scope of the subject to be 
covered in aboiu 75 hours. An elementary and outline treatment alone 
is intended. 

r. Definition of Logic and its relation to Psychology'. 

2. The Syllogism and its parts. 

3. The proposition and its Parts, Kinds of Propositions : 
Affirmative and Negative ; Universal and Particvlar ; Categorical, 
Hypothetical and Disjunctive. 

4. Square of Opposition ; distribution of terms in a proposition 
obversion and conversion of proposition. 

5. Categorical, hypothetical and disjunctive syllogisms; siruc- 
lure and general rules only. 

6. Problem of Induction. 

7. Postulates of Induction. 

8. Stages in the Inductive process. 

9. Observation, Exi^crimcnt and Analogy 

10. Enumeration and Scientific Analysis. 

1 1 . Hypothesis and Explanation. 

12. Identification and testing of arguments, deductive and induc- 
tive relating only to the topics listed above. 

Books of reference : Relevant portions in — 

Creighton and Smart : An Introductory Text-book of Logic. 

Latta and Macbeath : The Elements of Logic. 

T M. P. Mahadevan : Fundamentals of Logic, 

R. Ramanujachari : Handbook of I,ogic. 


20 


37 



150 SYLL. IN group -B — PSYCHOLOGY FOR [aPP. 

PRE-UNIVroSITY EXAMINATION 

(it) Psychologry 

Elements of General Psychology. 

1. What Psychology is I 

Aims, Methods, Relation to other Sciences. 

2. Brain and Nervous System : 

Stimulus-Response, Reflex action. Brain as a conditioning agent. 

3. Station ^ Attention and Perception : 

Nature and characteristics of Sense Organs (Visual, Auditory, 
Gustatory, Olfactory, Tactual, Kinesthetic, Static and Organic) 
Factors govrerning Attention and Perception and Illusions. 

4. Intelligence : 

What is Intelligence. Methods of measuring Intelligence. Use 
of Intelligence Tests. 

5. Learning and Memory : 

Animal and Human Learning : Kinds of Learning — Trial and 
Error, Observation, Insight, Conditioned Learning; Nature 
of Memory — Learning, Retention, Recall and Recognition : 
Nature of Forgetting ; Improvement of Memory. 

6. Imagination and Thinlwig : 

What is Imagination? Day-dreams, Dreams, Hallucinations, 
Nature of the Unconscious, Concept formation, Kinds of Images 
(memory image, after image, eidetic image). 

7. Feeling and Emotion : 

Difference between feeling and emotion ; Physical aspects of 
emotion — endocrine glands, autonomic nervous system. Gene- 
ral characteristics of Fear and Rage. 

B. Personality : 

Nature of Personality ; Multiple Personality. 

Books of reference 

1. S. P. Adinarayan, “ The Human Mind ”, Hutchinson Univer- 
sity Library, Hutchinsons, London. 

2. Rex and Margaret Knight, A Modern Introduction to 

Psychology ”, University 'Ditor ial Press, London. 


38 



II] SYLL. IN OROUP-B — AN ADVANCED COURSE IN A 151 
LANOtlAGE FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


The following visual aids and demonstration are to be given in 
conjunction with the above Syllabus : — 

1. Brain and Nervous System : Charts, Models and Specimens 

of the brain and nervous systems, demonstration or charac- 
teristics Or nerve fibre with Littie’s Steel nerve. 

2. Charts and Models of Sense Organs — ^Ear, Eye, Nose, Skin, 

Tongue and Larynx, 

3. Tachistoscope for illustrating span of apprehension, 

4. Charts for demonstrating Muller- Lyer illusion, Vertical- 

Horizontal illusion. Ambiguous Staircase, Cube; Fluctua- 
tion of attention — Figure-ground ; Reversible Configu- 
ration. 

5. Stereoscope for demonstrating depth perception. 

6. Photographs of morons, idiots and Cretins. 

7. Tests of Intelligence Group Verbal Test ; Performance 

Tests ; Alexander’s Pass-along Test, Cube Construction 
Test, Koh’s Block Design Tests, Goddard Form-board 
Test. 

E. Demonstration of simple T-mazes, finger and slot mazes, 
wire puzzles. Dem^nstiation of reflex-pupillary, winking 
and patellar. Demonstration of immediate memory with 
digits and non-sense syllabus. Demonstration of recog- 
nition, 

9. Demonstration of V^hipplc’s Ink Blots ; After images of 
aslours. 

(6) Ao advanced coiurse in a language 
(t) English 

One play of Shakespeare 
One non-detailed text 

There will be one paper of three hours* duration. 

(tf ) Tamil 

Schmti of studmfor those who study Tamil ufuUr Part II 
(Adxfanced Lctnguage). 

Poetry : 

300 lines of Classical Poetry and 300 lines of Modern Poetry. 

There will be two Text-books for Detailed Study of which one 
may deal with Literary Criticism or History of Tamil Litera- 
ture. There will be no Composition and Translation. 


S9 




#52 Syll. in oroup-b — an advanced course in (afp. 
A tANOUAOB FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


Scheme of studies for those alto study another language under Part If 
(Third Language') 

Poetry i 

500 lines of Modern Poetry. 

Prose : 

Two Prose Works for Detailed Study. 

(m) Telugu 

Scheme of studies for those who study Telugu under Part II 
(^Advanced Language). 

1. Old (a Classical) Poetry about 500 to 550 lines. 

2. Modem Poetry about 300 lines. 

3. Drama— A Short Play. 

4. Prose: — Detailed; A short look on a literary or scientific subject. 

5. Grammar^ Prosody and Poetics — the same as for Part II with 

the addition of the m?in features of the most important 
Consonantal and Visarga Sandhis in Sanskrit and the 
fundamental principles of Syntax in Telugu ; Ten main 
varieties of Yati ; Utpreksha and Arthantaranyasa, 

Scheme of studies for those who study another language under Part II 
( TJtird Language ) . 

The same as for Advanced Language deleting the more difficult 
part of Old Poetry and item 5 relating to Grammar, etc. 

(iv) Kannada 

Scheme of studies for those who study Kannada under Pari II 
(Advanced Language). 

Poetry : 

Soo lines of Old Poetry from two different Poets. 

Drama : 

One Drama of about five acts (not modem). 

Grammar : 

Applied Grammar, Prosody and Poetics with reference to detailed 
Texts. 

Scheme of studies for those who study another language under Part II 
(Third Language). 

Poetry : 

About 400 lines of Mediaeval poetry and 400 lines of Modern 
poetry. 


40 



nj SYLL. IN OROUP-B — AN ADVANCED COURSE IN A 153 
LANGUAGE FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


Prose : 

Two Prose Works for detailed study. 

(v) Malayalam 

Scheme of studies for those who study Mdhyalam under Part II 
(Advanced Language)^ 

Drama : 

One classical and one modern drama to be prescabed. 

Poetry , 

About too lines of ancient poetry, 400 lines of mediaeval and one 
modern Khandakavya to be prescribed. 

Scheme of studies for those who study Malay alum wider part II 
( Third Lon guage ) . 

The same as foi Part I omitting poetical selections from Ancient 
and Mediaeval Literature. 


\vi) Marathi 

Scheme of studies for those who study Marathi under Part II 
(Advanced Language). 

(i) (a) A modern * Khanda Kavya ’ and 100 lines of ancient 
poetry, 

(b) Study of the following Alankaras and Vrittas ; — 

Alankaras : Anuprasa^ Yamak, Upama, Utpreksha, Roo- 
pak, Apanhuti, Vyatircklia, Dcishianta, Atishyokii, 
Arthaniaranyas. 

Vrittas : Indravajna, Bhujangaprayar, Drutavilambita, 
Vasantatilaka, Prithwi, Shikharini, Malini, Shardulvi- 
kridita, Aiya, Dindi. 

Cii; Drama 

Scheme of sttsdies for those who study another language under Part II 
(Third Language,) 

(i) Selection from Poetry and Modern Prose. 

(ii) A oollection of short stories or Biographiers. 

(vii) Hindi 

Scheme of studies for those who study Hindi under Part II 
(Advanced Language). 

U) (d) A modem ‘Khanda Kavya* and 100 lines of Ancient 

Poetry. 


41 



154 SYLL. IH OROUl»-B— AN ADVANCED COURSE IN [aPF. 

A lanquagb for pre^university exa mination 

it) Study of the following Alankaras and Chandas 

Alankaras : Anuptas ; Shlesh ; Yamak • Upama ; 

Utpreksha ; Roopak ; Aiishayokti and Ananvay. 

Chand : Doha; Choupayee ; Soratha ; Harigeetika ; 
Rola ; Indravajra ; Upendravajra ; Vanshasth : Man- 
dakranta ; Malini. 

(ii) A Drama. 

Scheme of studies for those toho study another language under Pan 11 
iTkird Language). 

(i) Selections from Poetry and Modern Prose. 

(ii) A collection of short stories or Biographies. 

iviit) Sanskrit 

Scheme of studies for those who study Sanskrit under Part I I 
{Advanced Language). 

One Paper ; 

(i) One Drama. 

(a) About 100 Subhashita Verses like the Nitisataka of Bhart- 
ruhari. 

This paper may contain questions on Grammar but not 
Translation. 

Scheme of studies for those who study another language under Part II 
iThird Language). 

A prescribed text-book being the same as under Part II 
with the Poetical Selections under Part II reduced to half, 
i .e., about lOO verses. This paper shall include questions 
on Translation and Grammar based on the Texts. 

{ix) Latin 

Scheme (^studies far those who study Latin under Part II 
i Advanced Language). 

500 lines of Ovid. 

Scheme of studies for those who study another language under Pan II 
iThird Language). 

40 Chapters of Caesar. 

Otamxnat is to be studied throughout but no Text-bov^h 
prescribed. 


42 



Il] SYLL. IN OROUP-B — AN ADVANCED COURSE IN A 155 
LANGUAGE FOR PRE- UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION 


The folhmng are recommended for Reference : — 

The Tutorial Latin Grammar (University Tutorial Press, 
London). 

Matriculation Latin Course (Tutorial Course). 

(x) French 

Scheme of studies for those who study French under Part II 
{Advanced language). 

One Prose book of about 8 o pages. 

200 lines of Poetry. 

Scheme of studies for those who study another lartguage under Part I! 
(Third language). 

One book of easy French or about So pages. 

Grammar is to be studied throughout. 

No Text is prescribed but the following are recommended for 
reference : — 

Bertenshaw’s French Grammar (Longmans). 

Tutorial French Grammar (University Tutorial Press, 
London) 

The Matriculation French Course (University Tutorial 
Press). 


(xt) Arabic 

(Advanced language). 

One Paper : — Questions on the Text-books prescribed including 
Grammar. 


( Third Language). 

One Paper : — Questions on the Text-books prescribed and one 
Passage for Translation. (Seen Passage). 

(xii) Persian 
{Advanced Language). 

One Paper : — Questions on the Text-books prescribed including 
Grammar. 

{Third Language). 

One Paper Q>icstions on the Text-books prescribed and one 
Passage for Translation. (Seen Passage), 


43 



156 


TEXT-BOOKS IN ENGLISH [aPP. 

FOR PR E«UN 1 VERS 1 TY EXAMI N ATION , 1959_ 

{xiii) Urdu 
(Adv<^nced Language). 

One Paper : — Questions on the Text-books prescribed including 
questions on Grammar. 

(I'nird Language). 

One Paper : — Questions on the Text-books prescribed including 
Grammar. 

^xivi Syriac 

Scheme of studies for those zcho study Syriac under Part IJ 
{Advanced Language). 

One Paper : — Questions on the Text-books prescribed, inclviding 
grammar and translation (seen and unseen passages) 
from Syriac into English and vice versa. 

Prose : about 20 pages. 

Poetry : about 160 lines. 

Scheme of studies for thos*-' v)ho study another lattguagc under Part II 
( T bird Language) . 

The prescribed text-books be the same as those under Part II 
Syriac. 

This paper shall include questions on grammar based on text- 
books and questions for translation (seen and unseen passages.) 

Text-Books for Pre-University Examination^ 1959* 

ENGLISH 
Part I 

Prose: 

Choice Reading — ^Edited by S. Narasimhan (National Publishing 
House) (omitting Nos. 14, 17, 18, 21, 22 and 23). 

Poetry — The following from ‘^'The Heroic Theme in Verse’* by 
P. K. Venkata Rao:— 

(1) IpbigcDcia and Agamemnon (Landor). 

(2) John Burns of Gettysburg (Bret-Harte). 

( 3 ) Ulysses (Tennyson). 

(4) Rugby Chapel (Arnold). 

( 5 ) The Haystack in the Floods (Morris). 

(6) Thou Hast given us to Live (Tagore). 


44 



II] 


TEXT -BOOKS IN TAMIL 
FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION, 1959 


157 


Non-detailed text : 

(1) The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, simplified by E. G. Hoggett 

(Longmans), Longman’s Simplified English Series. 

(2) Dr. Sechweitzer by Nina Langley (Harrap) 

Part III 

{Advanced Language^, 

Shakespeare — The Merchant of Venice. 

Nonrdetailed Temt : 

King John’s Treasure — R. C. Sheriff — P.T.I. Book Depoi. 

TAMIL 
Part II, 1959. 

Poetical selectiofis ; 

(1) Purananuru (Stanzas 191 and 192). 

(2) Tirukkural (Chapters 8, 9 and 22). 

(3) Silappadhikaram (Five Venbas — Three Venbas at the end 

of Kathai XX, one at the end of Kathai XXI and one 
at the end of Kathai XXIII). 

(4) Kalingathupparani (40 lines). 

(5) Periyapuranam (Illayan Kudimaran Nayanar Puranam). 

(6) Kambaramayanam (Vali Vathaip Patalam — Stanzas 119 

to 153). 

(7) Nala Venba (Kali Neengu Kandam— 60 lines). 

(8) Kurralak Kuravanji (Thala Mahimai Kural — ^Stanzas 57 

to 60). 

(9) Bharathiyar — Porumaiyin Perumai (stanzas ii to 18) and 

Kadaviil En gc Irukkirar (Government Publication). 

(lo) Manonmaniyam (Sivakami Sarithai — 140 lines). 

Prase detailed-- 

(1) Sangakala Chanrorkal by N. Sanjeevi, Lecturer in Tamil, 

Pachaiyappa’s College, Conjeevaram. 

(2) Sangakala Tamilar Vazhvu by L, R. Kr. Ramanathan 

Chettiyar (published by Vellayan Pathippuk Kalagani, 
Kandanoor). 

Prose Non-detaikd : 

Sir Tirutham or Ilamai Virunthu by Thiru Vi, Ka. (published 
by Sadhu Press, Royapettah, Madras* 14). 



]58 TEXT-BOOKS IN TBLUGU [aPP 

FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION, 1959 

Part III 

^Advanced Language). 

Poetical Selections : 

(1) Kambaramayanam (Kumbakarnan Vathippatalani — 8o 

stanzas), 

(2) Thirukkura) (Chapters 70 to 73). 

( 3 ) Silappadhikaram (Adaikkalak Kathai — 100 lines). 

(4) Mukkudal Pallu (stanzas 19 to 26 and 34 to 3 j). 

Prose detailed : 

Thiru Arutpa, Book II, Vacanappakuthi by A* Balakrishiian 
Pillai, ^ Arutpavalakam No. 4, Tyagarajapuram, Mylapore, 
Madras. 

Manumiirai Kanda Vachakam. 

Jivakarunya Olukkam, pages i to 88. 

{Third Language 

1959. 

Poetry: 

1. Kannan Pattu by Bharathiar (60 lines), 

2. Kombi Virutham by V. P. Subramania Mudaliar (60 Stanzas^ 
Prose: 

1. Tamil Kathai by S. K. Ganapiuhi Iyer (Brahmajoti Noolakam, 

Mylaporcj Madras). 

2. Manonminiyam — A Drama by M. Shanmugasundaram, 

No. 21, Pacha iyapps’s Hostel Road^ Chetput, Madras. 

lELUGU 
Part II, 1959. 

Poetry : 

(1) Nannaya : Dharmarajasuya Yagemi. 

(2) Pillamarri Pinavirabhadra Kavi ; Jaimini Bhaiatamu (Canto 

VIII) ; Ghandrahasa Caritamu (from selections published 
by the University of Madras — Prc-University Examina- 
tion, 1957). 

Prote {detailed) : 

Vedam Venkataraya Sastry : Hie story of Akkannaand Madanna — 
Vedam Venkataraya Sastry and Brothers, 1949, No. 4, Mallikes- 
warar Koil South Lane, Linghi Chetti Street, George Town, 
Madraa-i, 


46 




u] 


TEXT-BOOKS IN KANNADA 
FOR PRB-UNIVBRSITY EXAMINATION, 1959 


159 


prose (non^etailed) : 

Vauama Veakataramaaa Gupta Rana Pratapudu, publishers — 
Rayaluand Gompaay — Branch: 32> Narayana Mudali Street, 
Madras-i. (i953 reprinted 1956). 

Part III 

(Adwnced Language). 

1959. 

Prose : 

1. Vanguri Narasundarai : Mahabhaktulu — ^Ramadasu and 

Tyagaraju (1955) — Kamalakutir, Narasapuram, West Goda- 
vari. 

Drama : 

2. Veturi Prabhakara Sastry : Naganandamu. 

Third Languagb, 1959 
(Not prescribed). 

KANNADA 
Part II, 1959. 

Old Poetry : 

The following selections edited by the University— 

Yasodhara Charities ; 

(а) 42 stanzas from Avatara i and 51 stanza^ from Avatara II. 

In all 93 stanzas — 372 lines. 

(б) Virata Parva — 62 to io8 stanzas — 47 stanzas— 282 lines. 

(c) Nitimanjari — ^Part I — 30 stanzas — 120 lines. 

Modem Poetry : 

Kshatra Darsana by Kinnigoli, A. G. (Yugapurusha Prabatana- 
laya, Kinnigolic), Chapters 3, 4> 5 — 400 lines (pages 14-36). 

Prose : 

MahabharaiaJa Sutradhara by C. R. Srinivasa Ayyar (T. S. 
Venkannaya Smaraka Series, Mysore). 

Non*detailed study : 

Aradhana by B. Deva Rao, Vasantha Malike, Mangalore-3. 

Part III 

(Advanced Language). 

1959. 

Poetry : 

(a) Maha Sweta Vrittanta (University of Mysore)— 125 stanzas 
with the intervening prose. 


47 




TEXT'BOOKS iN MALAYALAM 
FOR PRB-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION, 1959 




[apF. 


(6) Adi Parva Sangraha, Chapters 9 and 10 — 52 stanzas— <T. S. 
Venkannaya Smaraka Series, Mysore). 

Drama : 

Malavikagaimitra by Motaganaballi Subrahmanya Shastry(Kar- 
nata Sangha, Central College, Bangalore). 


{Third Language.) 


Poetry : 

(^) 

(h) 


1959. 

Virata Parva (University Kannada Selections). Stanzas 
62-108 (in all 282 lines). 

Kshatra darshana by A. G. Kinnigoli (Chapters 3, 4 and 5 — 
in all 400 lines). 


Prose : 

(a) xMahabharatada Sutradhara by C. R. Srinivasa Ayyangar. 
{b) Aradhana by B. Deva Rao (Vasantha Malike, Mangalore-3). 


malayalam 
Part II, 1959 
Paper 1. 

Text^booksy Grammar:, etc. 

Poetry : 

(1) Selections from Classical and Mediaeval Poeuy 

(edited by the University). 

(2) Veenapoovu by Kumaran Assan, published by Sarada 

Book Depot, Alwaye. 

(3) Idappallikritikal (Thiranieduthava) by Edappl Raghavan 

Pillai, published by the Mangalodayam Limited, Trichur. 

Prose : 

Valmikiyute Lokathil by I. C. Chacko, published by Jayabhara- 
tam, The vara, Emakulam. 

Paper II. 

NofpdctaiJed : 

Nammutc Sahityakaranmar— Part III by Pallippat Kunhi- 

krishnan. Published by National Book Stall, Kottayam. 

For reference : 

Bhashasahyam by Habel G. Varghese, published by Orient 
Longman’s, Madras-'2. 


48 



TEXT-ftOOKS In MARAThl 
FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION, l 959 


161 


li] 


Part III 

(^Advanced Language). 

1959. 

Brama : 

1. Karoabharam by Cheruliyil Kunjunni Nambeesan, P.O. 

Thiruvcgappuram (via) Pattambi. 

2. Dheeravratham by Attoor Krishna Pisharoty, Srithilakam, 

Puthole, Trichur P.O. 

Poury : 

1. Kaonassa Ramayanam — Sundara Kandani, first 100 lines 

(Any Press). 

2. Mayura Sandhcshara — Poorva Bhagom by Kerala Varma 

Valiya Koil Thampuran (Any edition). 

3. Chandala Bhikshuki by Kumaran Assan, Sarada Book Depot, 

Alwaye. 


{Third JMnguage). 

(All books prescribed under Part IT for the year omitting No. I 
under Poetry.) 


MARATHI 
Part II, 1959 
Paper / 

Par detailed study : 

Poetry : 

Kavya Vilasa Part I—edited by V. R. Nerurkar and 
D. P. Karkhanis (Pp, 1-80.) 

Prose 

Nibandha Parimal — edited by Shri H. N. Nene, published 
by Vidarbha Sahitya Sangha, Nagpur (All except essays 
Nos. 4 > 5 » 6 , 7, 12, 14 & 15). 

Groiffwor 

Navin Balbhodha Marathi Vyakarana by R. B. Joshi, Book IV, 
revised by R. S. Dikshit, B. A. (for reference only). 

Paper JI. 

Panch Kathakar«-ed 2 ted by Shri V. S. Khandekar (AUkathas 
except Nos. I, 4, 8 , 9 & 13.) 


49 




162 TEXT-BOOKS IN HINDI FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY [APF. 
EXAMINATION, 1959 


Part III — Group B. 

{Advanced Language) 

^ 959 . 

Far detailed study : 

Poetry : (i) (<*) Vanavasi Phool by N. V. Thilak. 

(b) Sloka Kekavali (1-25 stanzas only) by Moropani . 
(ii) Drama — Kichaka Vadha by Khadilkar. 

Books recommended for reference — 

1. Alankara Ghandrika by G. M. Gore. 

2. Vrittadarpan by P. B. Godbole. 


{Third Language) 

1959. 


For detailed study : 

(а) Kavyavilas Part I, edited by V. R. Nerurkar & D. P. Khar> 

kanis— Publisher: K. B. Dhawale, Bombay (Pp. 23-80 
only.) 

(б) Nibandha Parimal— edited by N. N. Nene, published by 

Vidarbha Sahitya Sangha, Nagpur (Essays except 4, 5, 6, 
7, 12, 14 & 15.) 


HINDI 
Part II, 1959. 

Poetry I — Detailed Study : 

jPoetry— Poetry Selections in Hindi for Pre-Univcrsity— Put>- 
lished by the University. 

Prose: 

Gadya Sourabh— Part I (D. B, Hindi Prachar Sabha, Adadras), 
excludinglessons 6 , 9 ^ ii> I 3 and ‘Parisistha*. 

Grammar : (For reference only), 

Hindi Grammar by Apte and Sastri, D. B, H P. Sabha, Madras. 

/J—Nav Kthaniyan (D. B. Hindi Prachar Sabha, Madras) 
excluding lessons 4 and 6, 


50 




llj TEXT-BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY 163 
EXAMIN ATION, 1959 

Part III — Group B 
{Advanced Language) 

1959. 


Detailed Stwfy : 

Poetry : 

1. Rang Me Bhang by M. S. Gupta (Sahitya Sadan Chirganj, 

Jhansi). 

2. Padya Pravesika (D. B. Hindi Prachar Sabha), first lo Dohas, 

each of the first five poets in Part III, 

Drama — “ Swapna Bhang ** by Hari Krishna Premi. 

For reference only : 

‘Kavya Pradeep’ by Ram Bahori Sukla (Hindi Bhavan, Allaha- 
bad). 

{Third Language) 

1959. 


Detailed Study : 

Poetry : 

Hindi Padyavali by A. Ghandrahasan (The Bharat Stores, 
Broadway, Ernakulam), excluding lessons i, 2, 3, 4, 13 and 14. 

Prose : 

Hindi Gadya Ratna by P. R. S, Shastri (Hindi Sahitya Seva 
Mandir, Chickamavalli, Bangalore), lessons 1 to 8 only. 

SANSKRIT 
Part II, 1959. 

Poetry : 

Raghuvamsa — Cantos 12 and 13. 
prose : 

Bharatasangraha of Mahamahopadhyaya. 

Lakshmana Suri. 

Vana and Virata Parvas only. 

Copies can be had of : Sri T. V. Balakrishnan, Advocate . 

“Sri Vidya Vilas Alwaipet, 
Madras-iS. 



164 


TEXT-BOOKS IN ARABIC AND PERSIAN [aPP. 

FOR PR E -UN IVERSITY EXAMIN ATION. 1959 

Part III. 

(Advaticed Language) 

1959. 

1 . Drama — ^Bhasa’s PratimanataRa . 

2. Bhartrhari’s Nitisataka (Nirnaya Sagar Press, Bombay). 

{Third Language) 

1959. 

Same as under Part II, omitting Raghuvamsa — Canto 13. 

ARABIC 
Part II, 1959. 

Prose and Poetry. — Al-Qir’ at-ur-Rasheeda, Vol. IV (^First 
half only). 

Grammar. — An-NahwuJ Wadeh (Ibtadi), Vols. I and II (topics 
covered by and all the exercises contained therein). 

Part III 

{Advanced Language), 

1959. 

Prose and Poetry. — Majamul Adab, Volume I (first 60 pages). 

Grammar — An-Nahwul Wadeh (Ibtadi), Volume III (copies covered 
by and all the exercises contained therein). 

{Third Language). 

Prose and Poetry. — Al-Quiratul-Faridah, Part I (First 20 lessons). 

Grammar. — ^An-Nahwul Wadeh, Volume I (Topics covered by 
and all the exercises contained therein.; 

PERSIAN 
Part II, 1959. 

Prose.— Gan jecna-i-Adab (Selections from Gulestan only). 

Poe^rjy.— Ganjcena-i-Adab (Scleaions from Boostan, first chapter 
only). 

Orammar^-^Hhh^hnl Qawaid— by Jafari. 



nj 


text-books in URDU AND SYRIAC 
FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION, 1959 


165 


Part III 

{Advanced language) 

1959 

Prose , — Ganjcena-i-AcIab (Sclcciions from Alf-o-Lailah only) 
Poetry , — Ganjeena-i-Adab (Selections from Ghaziyat-i-SaMt only) 
Grammar, — Misbahul Qawaid — ^by Jafari. 

Part III 

(Third Language) 

^959 

prose and Poetry, — Khazinai Adah— by Abdul Alleem Zaina-bi 
(.lessons 90 to 124), 

Grammar. — Ad*madan-Namah Seh Lafzi. 

URDU 

Part II, 1959. 

Prose, — Dhikr-o-Fikr, VoK I, Part II. 

Poetry. — Rang-o-Ahang, Vol. I, Part lU 
Grammar , — Asas-I~Urdu by Jafari. 

Non-Dctailed . — Farida by Khan Mahboob Tarzi, 

Part III 

(Advanced Language) 

1959. 

Pr< 75 e.— Dhikr-o-Fikr, Vol, I> Part III. 

Poetry , — Rang-o-Aghanh, VoL 1 , Part III. 

Grammar , — ^Asas-i-Urdii by Jafari. 

(Third Language). 

Prose , — Dhikr-o-Fikr, Vol. I, Part I. 

Poetry . — Rang-o-Ahang, Vol. I, Part I. 

Grammar . — ^Asas-I-Urdvi by Jafari. 

SYRIAC 
Part II, 1959. 

Prose^ 

(1) Readings in Syriac Prose for Intermediate classes 

(St. Joseph’s Press, Mannanam) : Lessons VII to XIII (both 
included). 

(2) Arayathinal, Aramai Grammar, exercises i to to (both 

included). 


22 


53 



166 TEXT-BOOKS IN HEBKBW [aPP. 

FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION, 1959 


Poetry . — ^Readings in Syriac Poetry, for the Intermediate 
Qasses (St, Joseph’s Press, Mannanam) : Lessons IX to XIV 
(both included) 

Grammar . — General Principles of grammar. 

Appropriate topics from — 

(1) Syriac Grammar by Fr. Gabriel, T.O.C.D. — revised and 
abridged by Fr. Thomas William, t.o.c.d. (St. Joseph’s Press, Man- 
nanam) 

( 2 ) Aramaic Grammar — ^by Rev. Thomas Arayathiiial (St. 
Joseph’s Press, Mannanam) 


Part III 

{Advanced Language) 

1959 

Prose — 

(1) Readings in Syriac Prose for the Intermediate Glasses (St. 
Joseph’s Press, Mannanam), the whole. 

(2) Arayathinal, Aramaic Grammar : Exercises i to 20 (both 
included) 

Poetry. — ^Readings in Syriac Poetry for the Inteimcdiaic classes 
(St. Joseph’s Press, Mannanam), the whole. 

Grammar. — The same as those under Part II. 

(Third Language) 

The same as those undci Part II. 

HEBREW 
Part II, 1959. 

Genesis : Chapter XII to XVIII (both included) 

Poetry. — ^Psalms XIII to XXII (both included) 

Grammar. — General Principles of Grammar. Appropriate topics 
from Students* Hebrew Grammar — by Rev. Michael Adler (David 
Nutt, London). 

Part III 

{Advanced Language) 

1959. 

Frw.— Genesis: Chapters XII to XXIV (both included) 

Poetry. —Psalms XIII to XXXI (both included) 

The same as those under Part 11. 


H 



nl TBXT-BOOKS IN L^TIN, FRENCH AND GERMAN 167 
FOR PRE-UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION, 1959 

(^Third Language) 

The same as those under Part II. 

LATIN 
Part II, 1959 . 

Caesar : De hello Gallico, Book IV. 

Part III (^Advanced Language )y 1959 . 

Ovid : Metamorphoses^ Book I, lines 500 to the end. 

{Third Language) 

Caesar : De hollo Gallico, Book I, Chapter 41 to the end. 

FRENCH 
Part II, 1959. 

Mouveaux Contes et rece its— Edited by Dyke and Cure Harrap 

Part III {Advanced Language)^ 1959- 
Le Tresor de M Toupie — Edited by Milne, O.U.P. 

A New Book of French Verse — Cooper, Numbers 20 to 36. 

{Third Language) 

Les belles histories — ^by G. Roc Longmans. 

GERMAN 
Part II, 1959. 

{a) Sprechem Sic Deutsch by Oscar Burhkaid George G. Harrap, 
O.U.P. 

{h) Hie Und Da by N. R. Ewing, Orient Longmans. 

(c) German Poetry for Students by A. Watson Bain — Macmillan 
(Nos. 30, 33, 43, 46, 53, 59, 67, 75, 88 and 107) 

Part III {Advanced Language)^ 1959 . 

(а) Die Juwclen Und Andere Geschichten by W. W. Dutton- 
Harrap, O.U.P. 

(б) Die Abenteuer Von Paula Und Peter by Else Johannsen 
and A.M. Wagner, University of London Press, O.U.P. (Kos. 17,22, 
34, 41 and 62). 

(6) German Poetry for Students by A. Watson Bain, Alacmillan. 
{Third Language) 

Allcrler Fabcln by Pin Hagboldt, Books i and 2 (Heath) 


55 



168 


tBxT-BQOKS IN ENGLISH ANp TAMIfc [ApB. 

TOR PRB«UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION, 1960 

TMct-Books for Pre-University Examination, i9<o. 

ENGLISH. 

Part I. 

prose: 

Choice Reading — Edited by S. Narasimhan (National publishing 
House) (Omitting Nos. 14, 17, i8,2i>22 & 23.) 

poetry: 

The following from An Anthology of Longer Poems— Moles and 
Moon (Longmans). 

Resolution and Independence ( Words wonh) 

Prisoner of Chillon (Byron) 

Sohrab and Rustum (Mathew Arnold) 

(from 1,689 to 1,794). 

Non*detailed Reading: 

{l) Kenilworth— Margery Green — Stories to remember— Stiuoi 
Series (Macmillan). 

(2) The story of Tagore — Marjorie Sykes- — Longmans. 

Part HI. 

Shakespeare — ^The Merchant of Venice. 

Non-Detailed Reading: 

Beau Geste — P. C. Wren, O. U. P. 

TAMIL. 

Part H, i960. 

Poetical Selection : 

1. Purananuru( Stanzas 72, 74, 77 and lOi). 

2. Tirukkural (Ulavu, Sanranmai, Alvinaiyutammai and 

Sirrinamceramai). 

3. Silappadhikaram(Katukan Kathai), 

4. Per iyapuranam (Apputhi Atikal Puranam) . 

5. Kambaramayanam (Vali Vathaip Patahm—Stanzas no-153) 

6. Nala Venba (Kali Neenku Kandam — 60 lines). 

7. Kurralak Kuravanchi (Tale Mahimai Kural — Stanzas 57-60). 

8. Bharathiyar— Porumaiyin Perumai (Stanzas ii to 18), Govt 

publication. 

9. Manonmaniyam (Sivakami Saritai — 140 lines). 



169 


Ilj TEXT-BOOKS IN TELUGU 

EOf^PRE-UNlVERSlTY examination, 1960 

Prose Detailed: 

1, Karantaik Katturaikkovai emitting Tiruviruttam (Karantai-t- 

Tamizh Sangham, Tanjore). 

2. llvazkkai (pp. 1-136 only) by Dr. M. Raiimanikkam 

(36, Mmjanakara Street, Madurai). 

Han^detailed: 

Katikalvalavan by V. Niri'^imhin, M.A, (Falaniappa Bros., 
Madras). 

PAitT HI (Advanced Language) ^ i960. 

Poetical SeUaionsi 

1. Kambaramayanaru— K liyataippatalam. 

2. Tirukkural (Chapters 64, 65, 66 & 67). 

3. Silappadhikaram — Natukan Kathai. 

Prose detailed: 

Pulithurai Mutriya Puyaiyar by Siva Parvathi Amm iiyar (C/o. 
N. M. Govindaswamy Nad ir, Nattarak.im, Tcrukuppcructhi i, 
TanjOre). 

Pakt H! 

(Third Language) 

(Will be prescribed later). 

TELUGU 
Part IL i960 

Poetry: 

1. Dharmarajuniraiasuyayaganiu byNannaya. 

2. Chandrahasa Charitra from PiUalamarri Pina Veerabhadra- 

kavi Jaimini Bharatainu Tom Selections No. i and No. 9 
published by the University of Ma^^ras. 

Detailed Prou : 

Chitraratnakaramu by Sri G. Kamamurti, V, Ramaswamy Sastrulu 
and Sons, Madras. 

Non-detailed ; 

Paschattapamu by Dr. N. Venknurammayya, Vidyasagar Corpora- 
tion, Madras. 

Part HI (Advanced Language)^ i960. 

Prose: 

Mahabhaktulu by Vanguri Narasimha Rao, Kamalakutir, Naiasa- 
puram. West Godavari Dt. 

Drama: 

Neganandamu by V. Prabhakara Sastry. 


57 



170 


TEXT-BOOKS IK KANNA0A 
FOR FRE-ONfVBilSrrY EXAMINATION, i960 


[APB. 


{Third Language). 

(Not Prescribed) 

KANNADA 
Part II> i960. 

Old Poetry : 

The fallowing selections edited by the University; — 

(a) Yasodhara Charite — 42 Stanzas fiom avatara I and 51 

stanzas from avatara II. In all 93 stanzas — 372 lines. 

(b) Nitimanjari — 30 stanzas — 120 lines. 

(c) Virata Parva — 47 stanzas — 282 lines. 

Modem Poetry : 

Kshetra Darshana by Kinnigoli A.G.— Chapters 3.^ 4 & 5 (400 
lines): Yugapurusha Prakatanalaya, Kinnigoli. 

Detailed Prose ; 

Bharatada Aivaru Mahaniyaru by V. Si (K. V. Govinda Shetty & 
Sons), Kunnigalu, Mysore State. 

Non^detaUed Study • 

Aradhana by B. Deva Rao (Vasantha MalikCj Mangalore), 

Part HI {Advanced Language), i960 

Poetry : 

{a) Maha Sweta Vrittanta (University of Mysore) — 125 stanzas 
with the intervening prose. 

{b) Adi Parva Sangraha, Chapters 9 and 10 — Stanzas — (T. S 
Venkannaya — Smaraka Series, Mysore). 

Ihama : 

Malavikagnimitra by Motaganahalli Subrahamanya Shastry 
(Karnata Sangha, Central College, Bangalore). 

Part HI 
{Third Language) 

Pmry: 

(а) Virata ParVa (University Kannada Selections). Stanzas 

62-108 (in all 282 lines). 

{b) Kshetra darshana by A. G. Kinnigoli (Chapters 3> 4 and 5— 
in all 400 lines). 

Prose: 

{a) Mahabharatada Sutradhara by C. R. Srinivasa Ayyangar. 

(б) Aradhana by B. Deva Rao (Vasantha Malike, Mangalore-3). 


58 




171 


Ij] TEXT-BOOKS IN MALAYALAM AND HINDI 

FOR PRE-UnIVERSITY EXAMINATI ON, I9 60 

MALAYALAM 
Part II? i 960 . 

Paper i. Text-Books^ Grammar, etc. Poetry. — (i) Selections from 
classical and Mediaeval PoetrY. Published by the Univer- 
sity of Madras. 

2. Acchanum Makalum by Vallathol Narayana Menon. 

Pub : Vallathol Granthalaya, Chcruthuruthi, Kerala. 

3. Edappillikritikal (Teranjeduthava — Selections i to 12) by 

IvJappillj Ragavan Pillay. Pub : Mangalodayam Ltd., 
Trichiir. 

Prose : 

Jeevitachintakal by K. P. Kesava Menon. Pub : National Book 
Stall, Kottayam. 

Non-detailed text : 

Londonil by Dr. K. Kunjunni Raja. Pub: National Book Stall, 
Kottayam. 

For Reference : 

Bhashasahyam : Habcl G. Verghesc, 

Part HI {Advanced Language)^ i960. 

Drama : 

r. Karnabhaiam by Cheruliyil Kunjunni Nambeesan, P.O. 

Thiruvcngappiiram (Via) Pattambi. 

2. Dhecravratham by Attoor Krishna PisharOty, Srithilakam, 
Put hole, Trichur. 

Poetry : 

1 . Kaunassa Ramayanam — ^Sundara Kandam, first 100 lines 

(Any Prc'is). 

2. Mayura Sandesham — FoOrva Bhagom by Kerala Varma Valiya 

Koil Thampiiran. 

3. GhandaU Bhikshuki by Kumaran Assan, Sarada Book Depot, 

.\I wave . 

HINDI 
Part II, 1960. 

Poetry : 

University Poetry Selection — Sections A and B. 

Prose : 

‘Hindi Madhuri’ — Part I — ^Excluding lessons 6,9 and ii (D. B. 
Hindi Prachar Sabha). 

Non-Detailed : 

‘ Chuni Hu! Kahaniyan > (Only Nos. i, 2, 3, 7 , 8, ? and I2. 

^59 



1 72 TEXT-BOOKS IN SANSKRIT AND ARABIC [aPP. 

]^R PRE-UNrVE^SlTY EXAMI NATION, I9 60 

Part HI {Advanced Ldni^tiagc)^ i960. 

Poetry : 

(i) Section C of University Poetry Selections. 

(ii) ^Panchayati’ — M. S. Gupta, 

Drama : 

‘ NivPrabhat ’—Vishnu Prabhakar. 

For reference only : 

‘^Kavya pradeep ’ — Ram Bahori Sukla. 

Part, III 
{Third Language) 

(Will be prescribed later.) 

SANSKRIT 
Part II, i960 

Poetry : 

Raghuvamsa — Cantos 12 and 13. 

: 

Bhiratasangraha of Mahamahopadyaya Lakshmana Suri Adi- 
parvan. 

Copies can he had of : 

Sri T. V. Bal krishnan, AJvocate, “ Sri Vidya Vilas ”, Alwarpet, 
Madras-18. 

Part HI {Advanced Language)y i960. 

1. Drama — Bhasa’s Pratimanataka. 

2. Batriihari’s Nitisataka (Nimaya Sagar Press, Bombay), 

{Third Language), 

Same as under Part II, omitting Raghuvamsa, Canto 13. 

ARABIC 
Part II, i960 

Prose oMd Poetry : 

Ai-Qir’at-ur-Rasheeda, Vol. IV (First half only). 

Grammar : 

An-Nahwul Wadeh (Ibtadi), Vols. I and II (topics covered by 
and all the exercises contained therein). 

Part HI {Advanced Language) ^ i960 
Prose and Poetry : 

Majamul Adab, Volume I (Fir^t 60 pages). 

Grammar : 

An-Nahwul Wadeh (Ibtadi), Volume III (Copies covered by and 
ah the exercises contained therein). 


60 



n] 


text-books in Persian and Urdu 
FOR pre-university EXAMINATION, I960 


173 


(Third Language^ 

Prose and Poetry : 

Al-Qjiratul-Faridah, Part I (First 20 lessons) 

Grammar 

An-Nahwul Wadeh, Volume I (Topics covered by and all the 
exercises contained therein). 

PERSIAN 
H, i960. 

Prose 

G-^nj ^e ia-i-Adab (S Sections from Gulcstan only) 

Poetry : 

Ganj^cna-i-Adao Selections from Boostan, first chapter only) 
Grammar : 

Misbahul Qawai I by Jafari. 

Part HI {Advanced Language)^ i960. 

Prose : 

Gan;eena-i-Adab (Selections from Alf-o-Lailah only). 

Poetry : 

Ganieena-i-Adab (Selections from Ghazliyat-i-Sadi only). 
Grammar : 

Misbabul Qawaid by Jafaii. 

Third Language) 

Prose and Poetry : 

Khazina-i Adah by Abdul Alcem Z^ainabi (lessons 90 to 124). 
Grammar : 

Ad’madan-Nainah Seh Lafzi. 

URDU 
Part n» i960. 

Prose : 

Dbikr-o-Fikr, Vol. I, Part II. 

Poetry : 

Rang-o-Ahang, Vol. I, Pari II. 

Grammar : 

Asas-i-Urdu by Jafari. 

Non-detailed : 

Farida by Khan Mahboob Xarzi. 

SI 


23 



174 


TEXT-BOOKS IN FRENCH AND MARATHI [APP. 
PR E-UN IVERSI TY EXAMIN ATION, J[ 9^0 

Part HI (Advanced Language) 
i960. 

Prose : 

Dhikr-o-Fikr, Vol. I, Part HI. 

Poetry ; 

Rang-o-Ahaug, Vol. I, Part HI. 

Grammar : 

Asas-i-Urdu by Jafari. 

( Third Language) 

Prose : 

Dhikr-o-Fikr, Vol. I, Part I. 

Poetry : 

Rang-o-Ahang, Vol. T, Pan I. 

Grammar : 

Asas-i-Urdu by Jafari. 


FRENCH 
Part IT (1960^ 

Nouveaus Contes et recits. Edited by Dyke and Cure Harrap 
Part HI (Advanced Language) ^ i960 
Maraouna du Barabassou. By Rene Guillet. O.U.P. 

A New Book of French VVr by Cooper, Nos. i to 36. 

( Third Language , 

Les belles histoires by C. Roc. Loni^meiiis. 

Part III 

(Third Language) — 1960. 

All books prescribed under Part II, omitting Mo. i under P.vctry. 

MARATHI 
Part H, i960 

Paper J^For detailed study ; 

Poetry : 

Kavya Viiasa Pan I, edited by V. R. Nerurkar and D.P, Karklmnis 
(pp. r-80). 



175 


I*] TXET-BOOKS IN LATIN 

FOR P^-UNI^RSIT 1 960 

Prose *. 

Nibandha Parimal, edited by Shri H. N. Nene. Published by 
Vidarba Sahitya Sangha, Nagpur (all except essays nos. 4, 5, 6, 
7, 12, 14 and 15). 

Orammar: 

Navin Balbhodha Marathi Vyakarana by T. B. Joshi, Book IV, 
revised by R. S. Dosjoi, b.a. (for reference only). 

Paper II: Panch Kaihakar edited by Shri V. S. Khandekar (All 
except Nos. i, 4, 8, 9 and 13. 

Part HI (Advanced Ijmgudgc), 1960 
For detailed study : 

Pmry : 

(a) Vanavasi Phool by N. V. Tiiak. 

(h) Sloki Kekavali (1-25 stanzas only) by Moropant. 

Drafna ; 

(a) Alankara Chandrika by F. M. Gore. 

(b) Vrittadarpan by P. B. Godbole. 

{Third Language) 

Detailed Study : 

(a) Kavyavilas Part I, edited by V. R. Nerurkar and 
D. P. Kharkanis — Publishers : K. B. Dhawale, Bombay 
(pp. 23-80 only). 

\b) Nibandha Parimal, edited by N. N. Nene. Published by 
Vidarbha Sahiiya Sangha, Nagpur (essays except 4, 5, 6, 7, 
12, 14, 15.) 

LATIN 
Part IL i960 

Caesar : 

De Bello Gallico Book. IV. 

Part HI — (Advanced Language) i960 

Ovid : 

Metamorphoses, Hook I, lines 500 to the end, 

(Third Language) 

Caesar: De Bello Gallico — Chapters 41 to the end. 


63 



176 


ffiJCT-BOOkS In OERiiAN [APP. li] 

for PRK-UNIVERSITY EXAMlNAT 1 0N> 1 9 60 

german 

Part II, i 960 . 

ia) Sprcchem Sie Deutschi — by Oscar Burkhard George 
Q. Harrap, O.U.P. 

(fc) Hie Und Da— -by N. R. Ewing, Orient Longmans. 

(c) German Poetry for Students by A. Watson Bain — Macmillan 
(Nos. 30, 33> 43> 46, 53> S 9 > 67, 75^ 88 and 107 ). 

Part HI {Advanced Language)^ i 960 . 

{a) Die Juwelen Und Andere Geschichten by W. W. Dutton — 
HarraPi O.U.P. 

(6) Die Abenteuer Von Paula Und Peter — ^by Else Johannsen and 
A. M. Wagner, University of London Press, O. U P 
(Nos. 17, 22, 34 j 41 62). 

(c) German Poetry for Students by A. Watson Bain, Macmillan 
(Third Language) 

• Ailweler Fabeln by Pin Hagboldt, Books I and 2 (Heath) 
WORLD HISTORY 

Reference Books : 

An Outline History of the World — Davies. 

Survey of Indian History — Panikkar. 

Outline History of World Civilization — Pearce. 

A Concise History of India— Rawlinson. 

World History by Sri M. V. Subrahmanyam (Scshachalam & Co , 
Madras). 

Man and His World by T. Dhanakoty and N. Subramanian (The 
National Publishing House, Madras-i). 

World History by Dr. M. S. Vairana Pillai (Madura Book House, 
Madurai). 


64 



CHAPTER XLIII 


DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

(B.A. and B.Sc.) 


(Three-year Degree Examinations) 
(Regulations) 


1. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 
or Bachelor of Science Examination shall be required to 
have passed the Pre- University Examination of this 
University or an examination accepted by the Syndicate 
as equivalent thereto and to have subsequently undergone 
a prescribed course of study in a constituent or affiliated 
college of this University for a period of not less than 
three academic years or nine terms. 

2. The course of study shall comprise the 

following subjects according to a 
Course of Study, syllabus to be prescribed from time 
to time. 

The course shall be common for the Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science Degrees in Parts I and II. 

Part I — English 

The course shall comprise — 

(a) The study in detail of certain prescribed books. 

The books prescribed for detailed study shall 
consist of the following ; — 

(i) Shakespeare : 2 plays. 

(ii) Modem Poetry : 2,000 lines. 

(iii) Modern Prose: 2 Texts 


I 



178 


Laws of the university 


[chap. 


(6) Composition: — The study of two non-detailed 
texts and general composition including 
essays on general themes, precis-writing 
and paraphrase. 

Note: — The paper set in English, Part I, shall test the 
candidate’s command of correct English, 
greater emphasis being placed in valuation 
upon this aspect of the answers than upon 
the knowledge of the texts. 

The study of the detailed texts prescribed 
shall extend over a period of two years 
and candidates shall be examined at the 
end of the second year on the detailed 
texts. The study of non-detailed text and 
General Composition shall be extended to 
the third year, and candidates shall be 
examined at the end of the third year on 
Composition. 

Part II — A Second Language. 

The course shall comprise the study of any one of 
the following Classical or Modern (Indian or Foreign) 
languages at the option of the candidate according to the 
syllabus and text-books prescribed from time to time: — 

Classical : 

Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Persian, Hebrew 
and Syriac. 

Modern : 

(1) Indian: Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Mala- 

yalam, Urdu, Marathi, Oriya, 

Hindi, Gujerati and Bengali. 

(2) Foreign: French, German, Burmese and 

Sinhalese. 





XLIII] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 


179 


Part III— Optional Subjects. 

The optional subjects shall consist of two Groups — 
Group-A and Gorup-B. Group-A shall consist of the 
main subject, or group of subjects, while Group-B shall 
comprise the study of an ancillary subject or subjects 
appropriate to the main subject of study. 

The following shall be the 
Optional Subjects optional subjects for those taking 
B.A. Degree. the Bachelor of Arts Degree: 


Group A — Main. 


Branch 1 : 

History. 

Branch 11 : 

Politics. 

Branch III : 

Social Sciences. 

Branch IV : 

Economics. 

Branch V : 

Geography, 

Branch VI : 

Philosophy. 

Branch VII : 

Psychology. 

Branch V 1 1 1 : 

Indian Music. 

Branch IX : 

Western Music. 

Branch X : 

Drawing and Painting. 

Branch XI : 

liistory of Fine Arts. 

Branch X 11 ; 

Language. 


Group B — Ancillary. 

Any two of the subjects appropriate to the main 
subject of study prescribed from the following shall be 
offered by the candidates. This will not apply to 
Branch III and to certain of the languages under 
Branch XII: — 

(1) Politics. 

(2) Economics, 

(3) Philosophy. 

(4) Geography, 


S 



180 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


(5) History of Fine Arts. 

(6) Indian Music. 

(7) Western Music. 

(8) Psychology. 

(9) Commerce. 

(10) Statistics. 

(11) History. 

(12) Anthropology. 

(13) Sociology. 

(14) Languages. 

Optional The following shall be the optional 

Subjects — subjects for those taking the Bachelor 
B.Sc. Degree of Science Degree: — 

Group A — Main. 


Branch I : 

Mathematics. 

Branch II : 

Statistics. 

Branch III : 

Physics. 

Branch IV : 

Chemistry. 

Branch V : 

Botany. 

Branch VI : 

Zoology. 

Branch VII : 

Geology. 

Branch VIII : 

Geography. 

Branch IX : 

Physiology. 


Group B — Ancillary. 

Any one of the following subjects shall be taken, the 
subject depending upon the main subject choscfn: — 

(1) Statistics. 

(2) Physics. 

(3) Numerical Mathematics. 

(4) Mathematical Economics. 

(5) Biology. 


4 



XLIIl] 


decree of bachelor of arts 


. 181 


(6) Educational Psychology. 

(7) IViathematics. 

(8) Composite Course in Mathematics and 
Chemistry. 

(9) Chemistry. 

(10) Geology. 

(11) Composite Course in Mathematics and 

Physics. 

(12) Botany. 

(13) Zoology. 

(14) Physiology. 

(15) Composite Ancillary Course for Zoology. 

(16) Anthropology. 

(17) Archaeology. 

(18) Geography. 

(19) Astronomy. 


Part IV— Minor. 

A candidate for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 
B.A- — Minor shall offer any two subjects accord- 

Subjects. ing to a syllabus prescribed from 

out of the following subjects: — 

(1) Physics. 

(2) Chemistry. 

(3) Biology. 

(4) Astronomy. 

(5) Statistics. 

(6) Geology. 

(7) Physical Geography. 

(8) Physical Anthropology. 

(9) Physiology. 


24 


5 



182 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


A candidate for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 
B.Sc. — Minor shall be required to offer any two 

Subjects. subjects according to a syllabus 

prescribed out of the following: — 

(1) History. 

(2) Politics. 

(3) Economics. 

(4) Commerce. 

(5) Geography. 

( 6 ) Psychology. 

(7) Philosophy. 

( 8 ) History of Fine Ans. 

(9) History of Music — Indian. 
flO) History of Music — Western. 

3 . The course of study in each of the 
branches for candidates appear- 
Course of Study, ing for the B.A Degree shall be as 
B.A. Degree follows: — 

Branch I- -History 

GroKp A. 

(a) Two compulsory Papers in Indian History: 

History of India: Paper 1 (i) 

History of India: Paper II ( 2 ) 

(b) Two other Papers to be chosen, taking not 

more than one from out of the follow- 
ing: — 

Section 1 

(i) History of Greece and Rome upto 395 A.D. 

(3) 

(ii) History of Europe from 395 to 1500 A.D. ( 4 ) 

(iii) History of Islam upto 1258 A.D. ( 5 ) 



XLIXI] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 


183 


Section II 

(i) History of America since 1776 A.D. ( 6 ) 

(ii) Modern Asian History from 1850 A.D. 

to the present day ( 7 ) 

(iii) History of Europe from 1500 A.D. to the 

present day ( 8 ) 

Section III 

(i) History of Islam after 1258 A.D. ( 9 ) 

(ii) The Political and Constitutional History 
of England upto 1603 A.D. ( 10 ) 


(iii) The Political and Constitutional History of 
England from 1603 A.D. to the present 
day 

Group B 

Any two from the following ; 

(i) Politics: (a) Political Theory or 

{b) Modern Governments 

(ii) Economics; General Economics 

(iii) Philosophy: (a) Outlines of General 

Philosophy 

or 

(b) Philosophy of Religion. ( 19 ) 

(iv) Geography: Principles of Human 

Geography ( 31 ) 

or 

Regional Geography of 

World and India ( 33 & 34 ) 

(v) * History of Fine Arts — History of 

Indian Art ( 54 ) 

(vi) * History of Fine Arts— History of 

World Art ( 55 ) 


(ii) 


(w) 

(14) 

(a3) 

(56) 


7 



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LAWS OF THfe UNlVBRSttV 


(dHAP. 


(vii) History of Indian Music (46) 

or 

(Viii) Musicology and History of 

Western Music (47) 

*Note: — Candidates choosing one of the History 
of Fine Arts branches must also choose 
the other. 

Branch II — Politics 

Group A. 

{a) (i) Political Theory, including one of the 
following texts: — (la) 

(1) Selections from Arthasastra. 

(2) Burke’s Reflections on the French Revolu- 
tion. 

(3) Locke : Second Treatise on Civil Govern- 

ment. 

(4j Macchiavelli: The Prince (World’s Classics). 

(5) J. S. Mill: Representative Government. 

(6) Selections from the Kural. 

(7) Selections from Aquinas. 

fii) The Evolution of Government ( 13 ) 

{b) Two papers to be chosen from the following: 

(1) Modern Governments (Great Britain, 

France, U.S.A., U.S.S.R., Switzerland, 
India, Japan, Canada, Australia and Eire.) 

(*4) 

(2) Elements of Public Administration (13) 

(3) State and Government in Ancient India. 

(i«) 

(4) International Relations and Diplomacy. 

(17) 


8 




TOUlttl DSOR^B OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

(5) The Constitutional and Administrative 
History of Modern India from 1600 A.D. 


(with documents) (i 8 ) 

Group B 

Any two from the following ; 

(i) History (a) History of Greece and 

Rome upto 395 A.D. or ( 3 ) 

(^>) History of Europe from 395 to 
1500 A.D. or ( 4 ) 

(c) History of Europe from 1500 A.D. 

to the present day or ( 8 ) 

(d) History of America since 1776 

A.D. or ( 6 ) 

(e) Political and Constitutional 

History of England upio 

1603 A.D. or ( 10 ) 

(/) Political and Constitutional 
History of England from 
1603 A.D. to the present 
day ( 11 ) 

(ii) Philosophy : Outlines of General 

Philosophy ( 56 ) 

(iii) Psychology ; General Psychology ( 41 ) 

(iv) Economics ; General Economics ( 23 ) 


Branch III — Social Sciences 

The candidates opting for this Branch shall take 
one subject from each of the following three sections; 
and there shall be two papers in each of the three 
subjects : — 

Section I 

(i) History (a) History of India — Paper II ( 2 ) 
( 6 ) History of Greece and Rome 

upto 395 A.D. ( 3 ) 


9 



Laws of the university 


tOMAP. 


iS6 

(ii) Philosophy : (a) Ethics (38) 

(b) Philosophy of Religion (19) 

(iii) Law : (a) Jurisprudence and Indian 

Constitutional Law (60) 

(b) General Principles of 

Contracts and Torts (61) 

Section II 

(i) Politics ; (a) Political Theory including 


a text (la) 

{b) Modern Governments (14) 

(ii) Psychology : (a) General Psychology (41) 

(b) Social Psychology (ao) 


(iii) Anthropology; (a) Social Anthropology (ai) 
(6) Cultural Anthropology (aa) 


Section III 

(i) Economics: (a) General Economics (as) 

(6) Indian Economic Problems {a9) 

(ii) Geography: (a) Principles of Human 

Geography (31) 

(i) Social Geography of 

India (*4) 

(iii) Sodology; (a) Paper I (a 5) 

(i) Paper II (a6) 


(The subjects will cover both Main and Ancillary.) 

Branch IV — Economics 

Group A 

(i) Principles of Economics (ay) 

(ii) Currency, Banking, International Trade and 

PuUic Finance (ag) 

in 




XLlIl] DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 187 

(iii) Indian Economic Problems (29) 

(iv) Modern Economic Development of 

the United Kingdom, U.S.A. and 
U.S.S.R. (30) 

Group B 

Any two from the following: 

(i) History: History of India — Paper II (2) 

(ii) Politics : Modern Governments (14) 

(iii) Commerce : Principles of Commerce (58) 

(iv) Statistics : Elements of Statistics (57) 

Branch V — Geography 

Group A 

(0 Principles of Human Geography (31) 

(ii) Physical Basis of Geography (32) 

(iii) (a) Regional Geography of the World (33) 

{b) Regional Geography of India (34) 

(iv) Practical Geography and Practical Test (35) 

Group B 

Any two from the following ; 

(i) History ; History of India — Paper 1 (i) 

(ii) Politics: Political Theory (12) 

(iii) Philosophy: (a) European Logic and 

Theory of Know- 
ledge or (36) 

{b) Indian Logic or (37) 

(c) Ethics or (38) 

(d) Outlines of Indian 

Philosophy or (39) 



188 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


(e) Outlines of European 
Philosophy from 
Descartes to Kant or (40) 

(/) Outlines of General 

Philosophy or (56) 

{g) Philosophy of Reli- 
gion (19) 

(iv) Psychology: General Psychology (41) 

(v) Anthropology ; (a) Social Anthropology (*i) 

or 

(ft) Cultural Anthropology (az) 

(vi) Statistics ; Elements of Statistics (57) 

(vii) Commerce : Principles of Commerce (58) 

(viii) Economics : Principles of Economics (zj) 

Branch VI — Philosophy 

Group A 

(i) (a) European Logic and Theory of 

Knowledge or (36) 

(b) Indian Logic (37^ 

(ii) Ethics (38) 

(iii) Outlines of Indian Philosophy (39) 

(iv) Outlines of European Philosophy from 

Descartes to Kant (40) 

Group B 

Any two from the following : 

(i) Psychology ; General Psychology (41) 

12 



XLIII] DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 189 

(ii) History: Any one of the subjects mentioned 

under sub- section (b) of Group A 
Branch I — History (3 to ii) 

(iii) Politics: Any one of the papers mentioned 

under Group A (a) of Branch II — 
Politics (12 & 13) 

(iv) Social Sciences: Sociology — Paper I (25) 


(v) Economics: General Economics (23) 

Branch VII — Psychology 

Group A 

(i) General Psychology (41) 

(ii) Experimental Psychology and 

Elementary Statistics (42) 

(iii) Child and Adolescent Psychology (43) 

(iv) Social and Abnormal Psychology (44) 


Group B 

Any two from the following: 

(i) Anthropology: (a) Social Anthropology (21) 

or 

(b) Cultural Anthropology 

(22) 

(ii) Sociology — Paper 1 (25) 

(iii) Philosophy: (a) Outlines of European 

Philosophy from Des- 
cartes to Kant (40) 

or 

(b) European Logic and 

Theory of Knowledge 

( 3 «) 

or 

ic) Indian Logic (37) 


25 


13 



190 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[CHAP» 


(iv) History of Fine Arts: History of World Art 

(55) 

(v) Statistics: Elements of Statistics (57) 

Branch VIU — Indian Music 

Group A 

(i) Theory of Music— Paper I (45) 

(ii) History of Music-Paper 1 1 (46) 

(iii) Practical Test: Compositions 

(iv) Practical Test: Manodharma Sangita 


Group B 

Any two from the following: 


(i) One Language: Tamil or Telugu or Sanskrit, 
provided that the language chosen is 
different from the one offered under 
Part II (gj) 

(li) History; Indian History— Paper 1 (i) 

(iii) Psychology; Gencial Psychology (41) 


(iv) *History of Fine Arts— History of Indian 

Art (54) 

(v) * History of Fine Arts— History of World 

Art (55) 


(vi) Musicology and History of Western 

Music 

(vii) Philosophy of Religion 


(47) 

(*9) 


(viii) Outlines of General Philosophy 


(56) 


*Note : — Candidates choosing one of the History 
of Fine Arts Branches must also choose 
the other. 


14 



XLiri] 


degree of bachelor of arts 


191 


Branch IX— Western Music 

Group A 

(i) Musicology and History of Western Music — 

(Theory, Form and Instrumsntatioa — 

History of Music) (47) 

(ii) Harmony. (48) 

(iii) Practical Test I. 

(iv) Practical Test II. 

Group B 

Any two from the following; — 

(i) General Musicology and History of Indian 


Music (59) 

(ii) History of World Art (55) 

(iii) History; Indian History — Paper I or (i) 

Indian Hbtory — Paper II (2) 


(iv) Politics: Any one of the papers mentioned 

under Group A of Branch II — Politics 

(12 to 18) 

(v) Economics: General Economics (23) 

(vi) Philosophy : (u) Any one of the four papers 

mentioned under Group A of Branch VI 
— Philosophy (36 to 40) 

or {b) Outlines of General Philo- 
sophy (56) 

or (c) Philosophy of Religion (19) 

Branch X — Drawing and Painting 

Group A 

(i) Nature Drawing in Oils (49) 

(ii) (a) Perspective and object drawing in water 

colour (56) 

(ft) Decorative Art (51) 


.» 5 



ii!>2 Laws bJ tIje UNJvEksiTY (chap. 

(iii) Lettering (5a) 

(iv) Principles and appreciation of Arts and 

Crafts Processes (53) 

Group B 

The following papers shall be taken: 

History of Fine Arts: 

(i) History of Indian Art (54) 

(ii) History of World Art (55) 

Branch XI — History of Fine Arts 
Group A 

(i) History of Fine Arts — Indian Art (54) 

(ii) History of Fine Arts — World Art (55) 

, (iii) Lettering (52) 

(iv) Principles and appreciation of Arts and 
Crafts Processes (53) 

Group B 

Any two from the following; — 

(i) History: Indian History — Paper I (i) 

(ii) History of Greece and Rome upto 395 

A.D. (3) 

(iii) History of Europe from 395 to 1500 

A.D. (4) 

(iv) General Musicology and History of 

Indian Music (59) 

(v) Musicology and History of Western 

Music (47) 


J6 




Xblll] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OP ARTS 


193 


Branch XII — Languages 


Candidates shall select any one of the following 
langtiages 


ENGLISH 


ing: 


The course shall comprise the study of the follow* 
Group A 


1. Shakespeare — 2 plays for detailed study and 

one play for non-detailed study. 

2. Drama of the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th 

Centuries. 

3. Prose of the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th 

Centuries. 

4. Poetry of the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th 

Centmies. 


Group B 

5. History of Literature. 

6. Social History of England 

or 

A Modern European Language. 


SANSKRIT 


The course shall comprise the study of the 
following : 


Section A 


1. Books of the Later Period I (Classical Lite- 

rature, Prose, Poetry and Drama) 

2. Ancient Indian History and Culture upto 1000 

A.D. 

3. Books of the Early Period (Prescribed books 

representative of the Literature of the Vedic 
Period). 


17 



194 


Laws of the university 


[chap. 


4. Books of the Later Period II (Prescribed books 

representative of the Epic Period) 

5. Comparative Philology and History of Sanskrit 

Literature — Vedic Period only. 

6. Elements of Poetics, Grammar and Indian 

Logic 

or 

Section B 

(a) General Part : 

1. Prescribed Text-Books — General I — Nyaya and 

Smriti Texts (Muktavali, Smriti and Dharma- 
sutras) 

2. Prescribed Text-Books — General II — Grammar 

and Vedic Texts (Siddhanta Kaumudhi, 
Rig- Veda and Upanishad) 

3. Prescribed Text-Books — General III — Mimamsa 

Texts (Mimamsa — Nyaya prakasa and Jaiminiya 
Nyayamala) 

{b) Special Part : Consisting of three papers { Nos. 4 
to 6) relating to one of the following six branches : 
(i) Mimamsa (ii) Vedanta (iii) Nyaya (iv) Vyakarana 
(v) Sahitya (vi) Jyotisha. 

Note ; — Of the six papers in Section A or Section B, 
the examination in Papers 1 and 2 may be taken at the 
end of the second year and the examination in the 
remaining four papers 3 to 6 at the end of the third year. 

HEBREW 

The course shall comprise the study of the following:— 

Group A. 

\. Prose — About 100 pages. 

2. Poetry— About 200 lines. 

3. Study of a prescribed Author’s life and works 

4. Grammar. 

5. History of Hebrew literature. 


18 



XLIIl] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 


195 


Group B, 

1. Ancient History of Palestine. 

2, Dispersion of the Jews (Assyrian), Babylonian, 
Persian and Roman Empires. 

SYRIAC 

The course shall comprise the study of the following: — 

Group A. 

1. Prose selections — About 300 pages. 

2. Poetry selections — About 1,000 lines. 

3. Study of a prescribed Author’s life and works. 

4. Grammar. 

5. History of Syriac Literature. 

Group B. 

1. History of Syria and Palestine upto XIV 

Century, 

2. History of Syrian Church in India. 

LATIN 

The course shall comprise the study of the following: 

Group A 

1. Two classical Dramas, from (i) Plautus and 

(ii) Terence or Seneca. 

2. Prose : A Speech of Cicero and a book of 

Tacitus. 

3. Poetry : A book of Virgil, a book of Horace’s 

Odes, and a Satire of Juvenal. 

4. History of Literature. 

5. Study of a prescribed author’s life and works. 

6. Translation from English into the language and 

from the language into English (unseen) 


19 



196 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


Group 3 

7. (a) History of Rome during the Republic; and 

(b) History of Rome from Augustus to the 
death of Nero. 

FRENCH 

The course shall comprise the study of the following; 

Group A 

1. Three Classical Dramas from Racine, Cor- 

neille, Molierc. 

2. Two thousand lines of Poetry from the Oxford 

Book of French Verse. 

3. Three books by writers of the 19th and 20th 
centuries, of which two shall be novels. 

4. History of French Literature from the Renais- 

sance to modem times. 

5. Study of a prescribed author’s life and works. 

6. Translation from English into the language and 

from the language into English (unseen) 

Group B 

7. (a) History of Europe from 395 to 1,500 A.D. (4) 
(6) History of Europe from 1.500 A.D, (8) 

ARABIC 

The course shall comprise the study of the following: 

Group A. 

1. Three longer Surahs of the Quran. Quramic 

Exegesis, Ahadis. Tassawurif, Tarikh and 
light Literature and Poetry of the Early 
Omayyid and the Abbasid periods. 

2. Grammar and Rhetorics. 

3. History of Literature. 

4 . Literary Criticism. 

5. Study of a Prescribed Author’s life and works. 


20 



XLIIl] 


DEGREE OF bXcHELOR OF ARTS 


197 


Group B. 

History of the Arabs — Period of Jahalliyyah and 
of the Post-Islainic Period from 495 A D. to 
850 A.D. 


PERSIAN 

The course shall comprise the study of the following: 

Group A. 

1. Maqalat, Ruqaat, Waqaih, Ornate Prose and 

light Literature. Epic, Didachi and Lyrical 
Poetry. 

2. Grammar and Rhetorics. 

3. History of Literature & Criticism. 

4. Study of a Prescribed Author’s life and works. 

Groifp jB. 

5. Cultural History of the Minor Persian Dynasties 

from Samanidcs to the end of Saljuqs 

or 

Cultural History of the Post-Man golian 
Period iipto the end of Safawides 

or 

Arabic Language (Prescribed Text-Rooks). 
URDU 

The course shall comprise the study of the following: 

Group A 

1. Urdu Prose and Poetry of the 19th and 20th 

centuries. 

2. Grammar, Prosody and Rhetorics. 

3. History of Literature. 

4. Literary Criticism. 

5. Prescribed Author’s Life and Works, 

2J 

26 



198 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


Group B 

6. Cultural History of Moghul Rulers from 
1526 to 1857 A.D. 

or 

Persian Language 


or 

Arabic Language 

nr 

Hindi Language 

HINDI 

The course shall comprise the study of the follow- 
ing: 

1. History of Hindi Literature. 

2. Indian History and Culture. 

3. Prescribed Text-Books I. 

4. Prescribed Text-Bo :»ks fl. 

5. Prosody and Poetics. 

6. History of Language and Grammar. 

Note : — The Examination for first two papers 
may be taken at the end of the second year and the 
examination in the remaining four papers (Nos. 3 to 6) 
at the end of third year. 

M.\RATH1 

The course shall comprise the study of the following: — 

1. History of Marathi Literature. 

2. History of Culture of Maharashtra. 

3. Prescribed Text -Books I— Poetry. 

4. Prescribed Text-Books II — Prose and Drama. 


^2 



XiAU\ 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 


199 


5. Prosody and Poetics and Criticism. 

6. History of Language and Orammar. 

Note — The Examination for the first two papers 
may be taken at the end of the second year and the 
examination in the remaining papers (Nos. 3 to 6) at the 
end of the third year. 


TAMIL 

The course shall comprise the study of the follow- 
ing; 

1. History of Tamil Literature. 

2. History of Tamil Nad and Culture. 

3. Prescribed Text-Books I. 

4. Prescribed Text-Books 11 

5. Grammar, Prosody and Poetics. 

6. History of the Tamil Language and Elements 

of the Comparative Grammar of the Dra- 
vidian languages. 

Note: — The Examination for the first two papers 
may be taken at the end of the second year and the 
examination in the remaining four papers (Nos. 3 to 6) 
at the end of the third year. 

TELUGU 

The course shall comprise the study of the 
following: 

1 . History of Telugu Literature. 

2. History of Andhra Desa and Andhra Culture. 

3. Prescribed Text -Books I — comprising 

(i) Old Poetry and 

(ii) Modern Poetry 

4. Prescribed Text-Books II — comprising 

(i) Drama and 

(ii) Prose texts 



^0 


law of the University 




5. Grammar, Prosody and Poetics. 

<6. History of Telugu Language and Elements of 
the Comparative Grammar of the Dra* 
vidian languages. 

i^ote : — The examination for the first two papers 
may be taken at the end of the second year and the 
examination in the remaining four papers (Nos. 3 to 6) 
at the end of the third year. 

KANNADA 

The course shall comprise the study of the follow- 
ing: 

[(a) The study of poetical selections representa- 
tive of the several periods of Kannada 
Literature. There will be of about 4000 
lines, of which about 1500 lines will be 
from classical poetry. 

(ft) The History of Kannada Literature. 

(c) Gram mar, Prosody and Poetics and the History 
of Kannada language. 

(d) Elements of the Comparative Grammar of 
the Dravidian languages.] 

1. History of Literature. 

2. History of Karnataka and Culture. 

3. Prescribed Text -Books 1. 

4. Prescribed Text -Books II. 

5. Grammar, Prosody and Poetics. 

6. History of Language and Elements of the 
Comparative Grammar of the Dravidian 
languages. 

Note ". — The examination for the first two papers 
may be taken at the end of the second year and the 
examination in the remaining four papers (Nos. 3 to 6) 
at the end of the third year. 




OEORXE or BACHELOR OF SCiENCE 


201 


MALAYALAM 

The course shall comprise the study of the 
following : — 

1 . History of Malayalam Literature, 

2. History of Kerala and Culture. 

3. Prescribed Text- Books I. 

4. Prescribed Text- Books II. 

5. Grammar, Prosody and Poetics. 

History of Language and Elements of the 
Comparative Grammar of the Dravidian 
languages. 

Note : — The examination for the first two papers 
may be taken at the end of the second year and the 
examination in the remaining four papers (Nos. 3 to 6 ) 
at the end of the third year. 

4. The course of study in each of the main 
subjects for candidates appearing 
Conrte of Study for Part III of the B.Sc. Degree 


B.Sc. Degree. shall be as follows : 

Branch I — Mathematics 

Group A 

(i) Pure Geometry and Trigonometry (i) 

(ii) Analytical Geometry (a) 

(iii) Algebra and Calculus — Paper I ( 3 ) 

(iv) Algebra and Calculus — Paper II (4) 

(v) Mechanics ( 5 ) 

(vi) Astronomy ( 6 ) 





202 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


Group B 

Any one of the following according to the syllabus 
prescribed : 

(i) Statistics (e8) 

(ii) Physics (a9) 

(iii) Numerical Mathematics (30) 

Branch II — Statistics 

Group A 

(i) Paper I (7) 

(ii) Paper II (8) 

(iii) Paper III (9) 

(iv) Paper IV (le) 

Two Practical tests. 

Group B 

Any one of the following according to the syllabus 
prescribed : 

(i) Physics (29) 

(ii) Mathematical Economics (31) 

(iii) Biology (32) 

(iv) Numerical Mathematics (30) 

(v) Educational Psychology (33) 

Branch III — Physics 

Group A 

(i) Mechanics and Sound (n) 

(ii) General Physics and Heat (la) 

(iu) Light (13) 

(iv) Electricity and Magnetism (14) 

(v) Modem Physics (15) 

Two Practical tests. 




XLIII] 


degree of bachelor of science 


203 


Group B 

Any one of the following according to the syllabus 
prescribed: — 


(i) Mathematics 

(34) 

(ii) Composite course in Mathematics and 

Chemistry 

( 35 - A & 35- B) 

(iii) Chemistry 

( 36 ) 

(iv) Geology 

( 37 ) 

(v) Statistics 

( 28 ) 

Branch IV — Chemistry 


Group A. 


(i) Theoretical Chemistry 

( 16 ) 

(ii) Physical Chemistry 

( 17 ) 

(iii) Inorganic Chemistry 

( 18 ) 

(iv) Organic Chemistry 

(*9) 


Two Practical tests. 


Group B 


Any one of the following according to the syllabus 
prescribed: — 


1 . Composite course in Mathematics and 


Physics 

2. Mathematics 

3. Physics 

4. Botany 

5. Zoology 

6. Geology 

7. Physiology 


(3 5- A & 35- C) 
(34) 
( 29 ) 

(38) 

(39) 
(37) 

(40) 


27 



204 


tAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


toHAP. 


Branch V — Botany 

Group A [ao (i to ix)] 

(i) Thallophyta, Bryophyta and Plant 

Pathology. 

(ii) Pteridophytes, Gymnosperms and 

Anatomy. 

(iii) External Morphology and Taxonomy 

of Angiosperms and Embryology. 

(iv) Physiology, Ecology, Heredity and 

Evolution. 

Two Practical tests. 

Group B 

Any one of the following according to the syllabus 
prescribed: — 

(i) Chemistry (36) 

(u) Zoology (39) 

(iii) Geology (37) 

Branch VI — Zoology 

Group A [at (i to *)] 

(i) Invertebrata 

(ii) Chordata 

(iii) Cytology and General Embryology 

(iv) Physiology, Ecology and Evolution 
Two Practical tests. 

' Group B 

Any one of the following according to the syllabus 


prescribed: — 

(i) Composite ancillary course (4l) 

(ii) Chemistry (36) 

(iii) Botany (3S) 

(iv) Geology (37) 




XLIIl] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 


205 


Branch VII — Geology 

Group A [22 (i to v)] 

(i) General and Structural Geology. 

(ii) Stratigraphy, Indian Geology and 

Palaeontology. 

(iii) Mineralogy and Economic Geology. 

(iv) Petrology. 

Two Practical tests. 


Group B 

Any one of the following according to the syllabus 
prescribed: — 

(i) Composite course in Mathematics and 

Physics (35-A& 35 -C) 

(ii) Mathematics (42) 

(iii) Physics (29) 

(iv) Chemistry (36) 

(V) Botany (38) 

(vi) Zoology (39) 

(vii) Anthropology: Any one of the following: 

(a) Social Anthropology (common 

with B.A.) (2 1 — B.A.) 

ib) Cultural Anthropology (common 

with B.A.) (22 — B.A.) 

(c) Sociology Paper 1 (common 

with B.A.) (25— B.A.) 

(viii) Archaeology (43) 

(ix) Geography : (a) Physical Basis of Geography. 

( 44 ) 

(b) Regional Geography of India 
(Syllabus common with B.A. 
Paper (iii) (b)] (34 — B.A.) 

Practical Test. 


27 



206 


LAWS Of THE UNIVERSITY 


(chap. 


Braacli VIII — Geograpliy 

Group A 

(i) Principles of Human Geography 

(ii) Physical Basis of Geography 

(iii) (a) Regional Geography of the 

World 

(b) Regional Geography of India 

(iv) Any one of the following optional subjects: 

(a) Geomorphology (23) 

(b) Climatology and Oceanography (24) 

(c) Bio-geography {25) 

(d) Cartography (26) 

Two Practical tests (Same syllabus as for Paper IV — 

B.A., Br. V) (35— B. A.) 


Common 
with 
1 B.A., 

> Br.V. 

(3* to 34 
-B.A.) 


Group jB 


Any one of the following according to 
prescribed : — 

the syllabus 

(i> Mathematics 

(4*) 

(ii) Physics 

(*9) 

(iii) Geology 

(37) 

(iv) Chemistry 

(36) 

(v) Botany 

(38) 

(vi) Zoology 

(39) 

(vii) Statistics 

(28) 

(viii) Astronomy 

(6) 


Branch IX — Physiology 

Group A 

The Scheme of the course shall be as prescribed in 
the syllabus. 


SO 



jCLlll] DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 207 

Group B {*7) 

Any one of the following according to the syllabus 
prescribed: — 

(i) Physics (29) 

(ii) Chemistry (36) 

(iii) Botany (38) 

(iv) Zoology (39) 

Scheme of 4. (a) The scheme of examination 

Examination — shall be as follows : 

Common for 
B.A. and B.Sc. 

Parts I and II. 

Part I — English 


Part I — English 


There shall be four papers, 

each of three 

hours’ 

duration, 

carrying a maximum of 100 marks each. 

Hours Marks 

I. 

Shakespeare 

3 

100 

11. 

Modern Poetry 

3 

100 

111. 

Modern Prose 

3 

100 

IV. 

Composition 

3 

100 


Candidates shall take the first three papers under 
this Part at the end of the second year and the fourth 
paper at the end of the third year. 


Part II — Second Language 

4. (ft) There shall be three papers, each of three 
hours’ duration, carrying a maximum of 100 marks each. 

Hours Marks 

Paper 1 ... 3 100 

Paper 11 ... 3 lOO 

Paper 111 ... 3 100 

The first and second papers shall be taken at the 
end of the second year and the third paper at the end of 
the third year. 


31 



Laws Of thk UNtvEfestTV 


[OKAP. 


^0^ 


Part III — Optional Subfect 

4. (c) There shall be four papers 
iBacbelor of of three hours’ duration in the main 
Arts. subjects under Group A, each carrying 

a maximum of 100 marks and two 
papers in the subjects under Group B. 

In the case of Branch III — Social Sciences, there 
shall be six papers of three hours’ duration carrying 
a maximum of 100 marks each, two papers in each of the 
subjects chosen from the three different sections. 

In the case of the languages under Branch XII, the 
number of papers and scheme of marks shall be as 
detailed under the Branch, 

The examination in Group B of Part III may be 
taken at the end of the second year and the examination 
in Group A at the end of the third year. 


Branch 1 — History 




Hours 

Marks 

1. 

History of India — Paper I .. 

3 

100 

2. 

History of India — Paper 11.. 

3 

100 

3. 

Optional subject 1 

3 

100 

4. 

Optional subject 2 

3 

100 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Group B subject 2 

3 

100 



Total ... 

600 


3Z 



Xtllt) 


DBOk£& OF BAOIIBLOR OF AitTS 


209 


1. 

Branch 11 — Politics 

Political Theory including 

Hours 


the text prescribed 

3 

2. 

The Evolution of Government 

3 

3. 

Optional subject 1 

3 

4. 

Optional subjea 2 

3 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

6. 

Group B subject 2 

3 


Total 

Branch HI — Social Sciences 

1. 

Section 1 — Optional subject 

Hours 


Paper 1 

3 


Paper 11 

3 

2. 

Section 2 — Optional subject 



Paper I 

3 


Paper H 

3 

3. 

Section 3 — Optional subject 



Paper I 

3 


Paper IT 

3 


Total 


Branch IV — Economics 

Hours 

1. Principles of Economics ... 3 

2. Currency, Banking, Inter- 

national Trade and Public 
Finance ... 3 

3. Indian Economic Problems ... 3 

4. Modern Economic Develop- 

ment of the U.K., U.S.A. 
and U.S.S.R. ... 3 

5. Group B subject 1 ... 3 

6. Group B subject 2 ... 3 

Total ., 


Marks 

100 

100 

100 

100 

loo 

100 

600 


Marks 

loo 

loo 


loo 

100 


100 

100 

600 


Marks 

loo 

100 

100 


100 
100 
100 

. 600 


33 


210 Laws ot the f/NivERstrv (chap. 


Braacb V^Geography 


1. 

Principles of Human 
Geography 

Hours 

3 

Marks 

100 

2. 

Physical Basis of Geography. 

3 

100 

3. 

Regional Geography of the 
World andRegional 
Geography of India 

3 

loo 

4. 

Practical Geography and 

Practical test 

3 

100 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Group B subject 2 

3 

100 


Total ... 

600 


Branch VI — Philosophy 




Hours 

Marks 

1. 

European Logic and Theory of 
Knowledge or Indian Logic 

3 

100 

2. 

Ethics 

3 

100 

3. 

Outlines of Indian Philosophy 

3 

100 

4. 

Outlines of European Philosophy 
from Descartes to Kant ... 

3 

100 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Group B subject 2 

3 

100 


Total ... 

600 


84 



XLIU] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 


211 


Branch VII — Psychology 


1. 

General Psychology ^ 

Hours 

3 

Marks 

100 

2. 

Experimental Psychology and 
Elements of Statistics 

3 

100 

3. 

Elements of Social and 
Abnormal Psychology ... 

3 

100 

4. 

Elements of Child and 
Adolescent Psychology ... 

3 

100 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Group B subject 2 

3 

100 



Total ... 

600 


Branch VIII — Indian Music 




Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Theory of Music — 

3 

100 

2. 

History of Music — 

3 

100 

3. 

Praaical Test I — Compositions. 3 

100 

4. 

Practical Test II — Manodharma 



Sangita 

3 

100 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Group B subject 2 

3 

100 



Total 

600 


Branch IX — Western 

Music 




Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Theory, Form and Instrumentation — 



History of Music 

3 

100 

2. 

Harmony 

3 

100 

3. 

Practical I 

3 

100 

4. 

Practical II 

3 

100 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Group B subject 2 

3 

100 


Total 600 


212 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap 


Branch X — Drawing & PaintinS 

Hours Marks 


1. 

Nature Drawing in Oils — ... 

12 

100 


Practical 

(3 hours 
per day) 


2. 

(a) Perspective and Object ... 

^ 1 
(3 hoiurs 1 



Drawing in water 
colour — Practical 

100 

per day) | 
12 [ 


(fc) Decorative Art — 



Practical 

(3 hours 1 
per day) j 


3. 

(a) Lettering — Practical 

6 

30 



(3 hours 
per day) 

70 


(£>) Sketch Books 

— 

4. 

Principles and appreciation of 




Art and Craft processes ... 

3 

100 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Group B subject 2 

3 

100 



Total 

600 


Branch XI — History of Fine Arts 




Hoiirs 

Marks 

1. 

History of Indian An 

3 

100 

2. 

History of World Art 

3 

100 

3. 

Principles and appreciation of 



Art and Craft processes ... 

3 

100 

4. 

(a) Lettering 

6 

30 


(3 hours 
per day) 




(ft) Note-books and Architec- 




tural Albums, charts, 
models, etc. 


70 

5. 

Group B subject 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Group B subjea 2 

3 

100 


Total ... 600 


36 



xini] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 


213 


Branch XII — Languages 
ENGLISH 
Group A 

Hours Marks 


1. 

Shakespeare 

3 

100 

2. 

Drama 

3 

100 

3. 

Prose 

3 

100 

4. 

Poetry 

3 

100 


Group B 



5. 

History of Literature 

3 

100 

6. 

Social History of England ^ 

i 



or \ 

► 3 

100 


A Modern European Langu- 




age. 




Total 

600 


SANSKRIT 




flection A. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Books of the Later Period I. 

3 

100 


Ancient Indian History and 




Culture upto 1,000 A.D. ... 

3 

100 

3. 

Books of the Early period ... 

3 

100 

4. 

Books of the Later Period II. 

3 

100 

5. 

Comparative Philology and 




History of Sanskrit Litera- 
ture — Vedic period only ... 

3 

100 

6. 

Elements of Poetics, Grammar 




and Indian Logic 

3 

100 


Total .. 

. 600 



214 


UiWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 




or 





Section B. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

' Prescribed Text -books General I 

3 

UK) 

2. 

Do. 

General II 

3 

100 

3. 

Do. 

General 111 

3 

100 

4. 

Do. 

Special I 

3 

100 

5. 

Do. 

Special II 

3 

100 

6. 

Do. 

Special HI 

3 

100 



Total 

600 



HEBREW 





Oroup A. 

Hours 

Mark 

1. 

Prescribed Text oks in Prt>se. 

3 

100 

2. 

Prescribed Text- books in Poetry 

3 

100 

3. 

Grammar 


3 

100 

4. 

History of Hebrew Literature 
and the study of a prescribed 
Author’s Life and works 

3 

100 



Group B. 



5. 

Ancient History of Palestine ... 

3 

100 

6. 

Dispersion of the Jews 

3 

100 



T(0tal ... 


600 


38 



xLin] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 


215 


SYRIAC 



Group A. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Prescribed Text-books in Prose. 

3 

100 

2. 

Prescribed Text-books in Poetry, 

3 

100 

3. 

Orammar 

3 

100 

4. 

History of Syriac Literature and 
the study of a prescribed 
Author’s life and works 

3 

100 


Gronip B. 



5- 

History of Syria and Palestine 
upto XIV Century 

3 

100 

6. 

History of the Syrian Church in 
India 

3 

100 


Total ... 


600 


LATIN 




Group A. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Prescribed Text-books in Poetry 
and Drama 

3 

100 

2. 

Prescribed Text-books in Prose 

3 

100 

3. 

Translation 

3 

100 

4. 

History of Latin Literature and 
the study of a prescribed 
Author’s life and works 

3 

100 


Group B. 



5. 

History of Rome during the 
Republic 

3 

100 

6- 

History of Rome from Augustus 
to the death of Nero 

3 

100 


Total ... 

600 


39 



116 


iLAW& Of tOB uMiVBitsity 





FRENCH 




Group A. 


Hours 

Marks 

1 . 

Flescribed Text-Books 
Poetry and Drama 

in 

3 

100 

2. 

Prescribed Text-Books 
Prose 

in 

3 

100 

3. 

Translation 


3 

100 

4. 

History of French Literature 
from Renaissance to 

Modern Times and the 
study of a prescribed 
Author’s Life and Works. 

3 

100 


Group B. 




5. 

History of Europe 

395 to 1500 A.D. 

from 

3 

100 

6. 

History of Europe from 
A.D. 

1500 

3 

100 




Total 

600 


ARABIC 





Group A. 


Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Prose and Poetry 


3 

100 

2. 

Grammar and Rhetorics 

... 

3 

100 

3. 

History of Literature 
Literary Criticism 

and 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed Author 

... 

3 

100 

5. 

Group B. 

Paper I 


3 

100 

6. 

Paper 11 

... 

3 

100 




Total 

. 600 


40 




)u.ill] bsORSE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 217 


PERSIAN 



Group A. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Prose and Poetry 

3 

100 

2. 

Grammar and Rhetorics 

3 

100 

3. 

History of Literature and 




Literary Criticis m 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed Author 

3 

100 


Group B. 



5. 

Paper 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Paper II 

3 

100 



Total 

600 


URDU 




Group A. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Prose and Poetry 

3 

100 

2. 

Grammar, Prosody and 




Rhetorics 

3 

loo 

3. 

History of Literature and 




Literary Criticism 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed Author 

3 

100 


Group B. 



5. 

Paper 1 

3 

100 

6. 

Paper 11 

3 

100 



Total 

. 600 


HINDI 





Hours 

Marks 

1. 

History of Hindi Literature 

3 

loo 

2. 

Indian History and Culture. 

3 

100 

3. 

Prescribed Text-Books I 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed Text-Books II ... 

3 

100 

5. 

Prosody and Poetics 

3 

100 

6. 

History of Language and 




Grammar 

3 

100 



Total .. 

. 600 


41 



218 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITV 


(OHAP. 



MARATHI 




History of Marathi Literature. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

3 

100 

2. 

History of Culture and Maha- 




rashtra 

3 

100 

3. 

Prescribed Text-Books I 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed Text-Books II 

3 

100 

5- 

Prosody & Poetics and Criticism. 

3 

100 

6. 

History of Language and 




Orammar 

3 

100 


Total 




TAMIL 





Hours 

Marks 

1. 

History of Literature 

3 

loo 

2. 

History of Tamil Nad and 




Culture 

3 

100 

3. 

Prescribed Text-Books I 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed Text-Books II 

3 

100 

5. 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics 

3 

100 

6. 

History of Language and Ele- 




ments of the Comparative 
Orammar of the Dravidian 
languages 

3 

100 


Total . . . 

600 


TELUGU 





Hours 

Marks 

1 

History of Telugu Literature ... 

3 

100 

2. 

History of Andhra Desa and 




Culture 

3 

100 

3. 

Prescribed Text-books I 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed Text -books II 

3 

100 

5. 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics. 

3 

100 

6. 

History of Telugu Lauguage and 




Elements of the Comparative 
Grammar of the Dravidian 
languages 

3 

100 


Total ... 

600 


42 



xun] 

degree of bachelor of arts 


219 


KANNADA 




Hours 

Marks 

1. 

History of Literature 

3 

loo 

2. 

History of Karnataka and Culture 

3 

100 

3. 

Prescribed Text-books I 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed 7'ext -books II 

3 

loo 

5. 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics... 

3 

100 

6. 

History of Language and 
Elements of the Comparative 
Grammar of the Dra vidian 
languages 

3 

100 


Total 


600 


MALAYALAM 




Hours 

Marks 

1. 

History of Malayalam Litera- 
ture 

3 

100 

2. 

History of Kerala and Culture ... 

3 

100 

3. 

Prescribed Text -books I 

3 

100 

4. 

Prescribed Text-books II 

3 

100 

5. 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics... 

3 

100 

6. 

History of Language and 
Elements of the Comparative 
Grammar of the Dra vidian 
languages 

3 

100 


Total .. 

. 600 


4$ 





220 


tAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


4. {d) The Scheme of Examination in each of the 
Bachelor of main subjects for candidates appearing 
Science for B. Sc. Degree shall be as follows: — 

The examination in Group B may be taken at the 
end of the second year and the examination in Group A 
at the end of the third year. 

Branch I — Mathematics 

Group A. 

Hours Marks 


1. Pure Geometry and Tri- 



gonometry 

... 

3 

100 

2. 

Analytical Geometry 

3 

100 

3. 

Algebra and 

Calculus — 




Part I 


3 

100 

4. 

Algebra and 

Calculus — 




Part II 


3 

100 

5. 

Mechanics 

... 

3 

100 

6. 

Astronomy 

... 

3 

100 




Total ... 

600 


Group B. 

(a) Statistics 

Hours Marks 

1. Paper I ... 3 75 

2. Paper il ... 3 75 


44 


Total 


150 


XLIIl] 


DBQREE or BACHELOR or SCIENCE 


22i 


or 

(6) Physics 

Hours Marks 

1. Paper I — Mechanics, Gene- 

ral Physics and Heat ... 3 50 

2. Paper II — Sound, Light, 

Magnetism and Electri- 
city ... 3 50 

3. Practical ... 3 50 

Total ... 150 

or 

(c) Numerical Mathematics 




Hours 

Marks 


Paper I 

3 

IS 


Paper U 

3 

75 



Total .. 

150 


Branch II — Statistics 



Group A. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Statistics — Paper I 

3 

100 

2. 

Statistics — Paper II 

3 

100 

3. 

Statistics — Paper III 

3 

100 

4. 

Statistics — Paper IV 

3 

100 

5. 

Practical I 

3 

80 

6. 

Practical II 

3 

80 

7. 

Record Note-book 

3 

40 



Total . 

.. 600 


4 §‘ 


29 



222 LAWS OF TUB UNIVERSlTy [CHAP. 

Group B. 

(a) Pf^sics 

llic same as for Group-B — Physics under Branch I 

or 

(b) Mathematical Economics 

Hours Marks 

Paper I ... 3 75 

Paper II ... 3 75 

Total ... 150 

or 

(c) Biology 

Theory : — Hours Marks 

Biology Paper I ... 2 50 

Biology Paper II ... 2 5o 

Practical '. — 

Parts A & B together 
(20 for Part A and 

20 for Part B) ... 3 40 

Record Note-books : — 

Biology I ... 5 

Biology II ... 5 

Total ... 150 

or 

{d) Numerical Mathematics 

Htrurs Marks 

Paper I ... 3 75 

Paper II ... 3 75 

Total ... 150 


49 




XLIll] 


DBOREE OP BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 


223 


or 

(*) Educational Psychology 




Hours 

Marks 


Paper I 

3 

50 


Paper 11 

3 

50 


Practical 

3 

40 


Laboratory Note -books 

— 

10 



Total ... 

ISO 


Branch OI — Physics 



Group A. 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Mechanics and Sound 

3 

80 

2. 

General Physics and Heat 

3 

80 

3. 

Light 

3 

80 

4. 

Electricity and Magnetism . 

3 

80 

5. 

Modern Physics 

3 

80 

6. 

Practical Examination I — 
Mechanics, General Physics, 

Heat and Sound 3 

80 

7. 

Practical Examination II — 
light, Magnetism and 
Electricity ... 3 

80 


Laboratory Note-books 

— 

40 



Total 

. 600 


Group B. 

Hours 

Marks 


(a) Mathematics — Paper I 

3 

75 


Mathematics — Paper II 

3 

75 



Total .. 

. 150 


47 


224 ' LAWS 6f TkE university 


or 


Honirs 


{b) (i) Composite Mathematics — 

one paper ... 3 

(ii) Chemistry (Composite) 

Written paper ... 3 

Practical Test ... 3 


Total 


or 

(c) Chemistry — Physical and 

Inorganic Chemistry ... 3 

Organic Chemistry ... 2 

Practical Examination ... 3 

Laboratory Note-books ... — 

Total 

or 

{d) Geology — (1) Written Exami- 
nation Paper I — all divisions 
other than Mineralogy and 
Petrology ... 2 

(2) Written Examination 
Paper 1 1 — Mineralogy 
& Petrology ... 2 

Practical Examination — 
Crystal Models, Fosils, 
Minerals, Rocks & 

Map 3 

Laboratory Note -books — 


Total ... 


fcHAP 

Marks 

75 

45 

30 

150 

60 

40 

40 

10 

150 


50 

50 

40 

10 

150 


48 




XLtll] 


DBOREB OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 


225 


or 

(e) Statistics — 

The same as for Group B — Statistics under 
Branch I. 

Branch IV — Chemistry 


Group A. 

Hours 

Marks 

Written : Paper I - 

-Theoretical 

Chemistry 

3 

100 

Paper II - 

-Inorganic 

Chemistry 

3 

100 

Paper Ill- 

-Organic 

Chemistry 

3 

100 

Paper IV - 

-Physical 

Chemistry 

3 

loo 


Practical : 


Two days of six bourse each — 

let day: Inorganic — Qualitative 

and Volumetric : 

Qualitative ... 45 

Volumetric ... 45 

2nd day. Inorganic — Gravimetric 

and Organic: 

Gravimetric ... 45 

Organic ... 45 

Laboratory record book which 
must contain evidence of 
systematic class work in In- 
organic, Organic and Physical 
Chemistry 20 

Total ... 600 


49 



2^6 


Laws of tHE university 


[chap. 


Group B. Hours Marks 

(a) (i) Composite Mathematics (com- 

mon with Group B— Compo- 
site Mathematics under 
Branch III) one paper ... 3 75 

(ii) Physics (Composite) 

Written Paper ... 3 45 

Practical Test ... 3 30 

(including 5 marks for Labora- 
tory Note-books) 

Total ... 150 

or 

(b) Mathematics — The same as for 

Group B — (a) Mathematics 
under Branch III 

or 

(c) Physics— The same as for Group B — 

Physics under Branch I 

or 

(d) Botany — 

(i) Paper I — Thallophytes, Bryo- 

phytes, Pteridophytcs, Gym- 
nosperms and Histology ... 

(ii) Paper II — Morphology and 

Taxonomy of Angios perms. 

Plant Physiology and General 
Principles 

Practical Examination 
Laboratory Note-books 

Total ... 150 



00 




XLlll] 


DEORBE OP BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 


227 


(«) Zoology — 

Hours 

Marks 

(i) Written Examination — Paper I 



(Invertebrata) 

2 

50 

(ii) Written Examination — Paper II 



(Chordata) 

2 

50 

Practical Examination 

3 

40 

Laboratory Note -books 


10 


Total .. 

. 150 


or 

(/) Geology — The same as for 
Group B — Geology 
under Branch III 


or 

(g) Physiology- 

Written Examination — 
Paper 1 

Paper II 

Practical Examination 
Laboratory Note-books 


Hours Marks 

2 50 

2 50 

3 40 

— 10 

Total ... 150 


91 



228 


tAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[char. 


Branch V — Botany 

Group A. 

1. Thallophyta, Bryophyta and 

Plant Pathology 

2. Pteridophytes, Gymnosperms 

and Anatomy 

3. External Morphology and 

Taxonomy of Angiosperms 
and Embryology 

4. Physiology. Eulogy, Heredity 

and Evolution 

Practical I — Morphology and 
Taxonomy of Angiosperms 
and Physiology 

Practical II — Thallophyta, 
Bryophytes, Pteridophyta, 
Gymnosperms and Anatomy 

Laboratory Note-books 
Plant Collection 
Slides 


Hours Marks 


Total ... 600 

Group B. 

(a) Chemistry, 

The same as for Group B— Chemistry under 
Branch III 

or 

(b) Zoology 

The same as for Group B — Zoology under 
Branch IV 


(c) Geology 

The same as for Group B <r- Geology under 
Branch III. 



XHIlJ 

DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

229 


Branch VI — Zoology 




Group A, 

Hours 

Marks 

]. 

Paper 1 — Invertebrata 

3 

100 

2. 

Paper II — Chordata 

3 

100 

3. 

Paper HI — C ytology and 
General Embryology 

3 

100 

4. 

Paper IV — Physiology 
Ecology and Evolution 


100 


Practical Examination I 

3 

80 


Practical Examination II 

3 

80 


Laboratory Note-books 

— 

40 


Total ... 

600 


Group B. 




(a) Composite Ancillary Con 

rst\ 




Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Written Paper I 


50 

2. 

Written Paper II 

2 

50 


Practical Examination 

3 

40 


Laboratory Note-books 

— 

10 


Total ... 

150 


or 

(b) Chemistry 

The same as for Group B— Chemistry under 
Branch III 

or 

(c) Botany 

The same as for Group B — Botany under Branch IV 
or 

(d) Geology 

The same as for Group B — Geology under 
Branch III. 


30 


55 



230 LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY [CHAP. 



Branch VII — Geology 




Group A, 

Hours 

Marks 

1. 

Paper I — General and Struc- 




tural Geology 

3 

100 

2. 

Paperll — Stratigraphy, Indian 




Geology and Palaeontology. 

3 

100 

3. 

Paper III — Mineralogy and 




Economic Geology 

3 

100 

4. 

Paper lY— Petrology 

Practical I — Mineralogy and 

3 

100 


Petrology 

Practical II — Palaeontology, 

3 

80 


Structural Geology and 
Blow Pipe 

3 

80 


Laboratory Note -books 

— 

20 


Specimens 

— 

20 


Total 

. 600 


Group B. 

(a) Compffsite Paper in Mathematics 
and Physics 

The same as for Group B — Composite Mathematics 
and Physics under Branch IV 

or 

(b) Mathematics 

Hours Marks 

]. Mathematics— Paper I ... 3 75 

2. Mathematics— Paper II ... 3 75 

Total ... 150 


54 



XLIII] 


DEOREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 


231 


or 

(c) Physics 

The same as for Group B — Physics under Branch I 

or 

(d) Chemistry 

The same as for Group B — Chemistry under 
Branch III 

or 

(e) Botany 

The same as for Group B — Botany under Branch IV 

or 

(f) Zoology 

The same as for Group B — Zoology under Branch IV 

or 

(g) Anthropology 

[Common with B.A., Branch III— Social Sciences, 
Section II — (iii) (a) and (6)] 

or 

(h) Archaeology 
(Will be prescribed later) 

or 

(i) Geography 

Hours Marks 

1, Paper I — Physical Basis of 

Geography ... 2 50 

2. Paper II— Regional Geography 

of India (Syllabus Common 
with B.A. under Branch V 
No. 34) ... 2 50 

Practical Examination ... 40 

Laboratory Note-books ... 10 

Total ... 150 


59 


2i2 tAWS OF THE ONtVEESltV [CfiAt*. 

Braach Vlll — Geography 

Grdup A. 

Hours Marks 

1. J^aper I — Principles of Human 

Geography (Common with 

B.A., Branch V) ... 3 100 

2. Paper II — Physical Basis of 

Geography (Common with 

B.A., Branch V) ... 3 100 

3. Paper III — Regional Geogra- 

phy of the World and Regio- 
nal Geography of India 
(Common with B.A., 

Branch V) ... 3 100 

4. Paper IV— Optional subject ... 3 lOO 

Praaical Geography I ... 3 90 

Practical Geography II ... 3 70 

Laboratory Note-books and 

Records ... 40 

Total ... 600 

Group B. 

(a) Mathematics'. The same as for Group-B — 
Mathematics under Branch VII 

or 

(i) Physics The same a,s for Group-B — 
Physics under Branch I 

or 

(c) Geology 

The same as for Group B — Geology under Branch III 

or 

(d) Chemistry 

The same as for Group B — Chemistry under Branch III 

or 

(e) Botany 

The same as for Group B—Botany under Branch IV 


56 




XLlll] 


233 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 


or 

(/) Zoology 

The same as for Group B — Zoology under Branch IV 


or 

ig) Statistics 

The same as for Group B — Statistics under Branch I 


or 

Hours Marks 

(A) Astronomy — One paper 3 15o 

(Syllabus Common with 
Astronomy under 
Branch I Group A.) 



Branch IX — Physiology 



Group A. 

Hours 

1. 

Paper I 

3 

2. 

Paper II 

3 

3. 

Paper III 

3 

4. 

Paper IV 

3 


Practical Examination I — 
Histology and Experi- 
mental Physiology. 

3 


Practical Examination 11 — 
Chemical Physiology. 

3 


Laboratory Note-books 



Marks 

100 

100 

100 

100 

80 

80 

40 


Total ... 600 

Group B. 

(a) Physics 

The same as for Group B — Physics under Branch I 


or 

{b) Chemistry 

The same as for Group B — Chemistry under 
Branch III 


67 



234 


LAWS OF THE l/NIVERSITV 


fcHAP. 


or 

(c) Botany 

The same as for Group B — Botany under 
Branch IV 

or 

{d) Zoology 

The same as for Group B — Zoology under 
Branch IV. 


Part IV — Minor 

4. {e) There shall be one paper of three hours’ 
duration carrying a maximum of lOO marks which may 
be taken at the end of the second year. 

5 . No candidate shall be declared eligible for the 

Degree of Bachelor of Arts or 
Conditions of Bachelor of Science unless he has 
eligibility of completed the course of study pres- 
a candidate cribed and passed the examinations 

for the in the several subjects contained in 

Degree. the course of study as detailed in the 

Regulations aforesaid. 

6 . A candidate shall not be declared eligible for the 
Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science unless 
he has passed the examination in English under Part I, 
in the selected language under Part II, in the selected 
Optional group under Part III and the examination in 
Minor under Part IV. 

7 . A candidate for the Degree of 
Marks for a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
Pass. shall be declared to have passed. 

(1) in Part I of the examination, if he obtains 
not less than 35 per cent of the marks in 
each of the first and second Parts of the 
examination constituting Part I. 



235 


XLlIl] DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 


(2) in Part II of the examination, if he obtains 

not less than 35 per cent of the marks in 
each of the first and second Pans of the 
examination constituting Part II. 

(3) in Part III of the examination, if he obtains 

not less than 35 per cent of the marks in 
each of the subjects or in each sub-division 
of Group A, where specified, and 35 per 
cent of the marks in Group B. 

(4) in Part IV of the examination, if he obtains 

not less than 35 per cent of the marks. 

Candidates who obtain 60 per cent or above of the 
total marks in any one of the Parts I, 
Classification 11 and HI shall be placed in the first 

of successful class in that Part. Successful candi- 

candidates. dates who obtain less than 60 percent 

but not less than 50 per cent of the 
marks in any of the Parts I, II and III shall be placed in 
the Second Class. All other successful candidates in 
Parts I, II and III shall be placed in the third class. 
A candidate securing not less than 75 per cent of the 
marks in any of the T, 11 or HI Part of the examination 
shall be declared to have passed with distinction. There 
will be no classification for Part IV — Minor. 

Symbolic representation shall be adopted in declaring 
the results and a statement of detailed marks shall not 
be furnished. 

Symbol A plus will denote 65 per cent and above of 
the marks but below 75 per cent of the marks. 

Symbol A will denote 60 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 65 per cent. 

Symbol B plus will denote 55 per cent and above 
of the marks but below 60 per cent. 


59 



236 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY [CHAP, XLiU] 


Symbol B will denote 50 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 55 per cent. 

Symbol C plus will denote 45 per cent and above of 
the marks but below 50 per cent. 

Symbol C will denote 35 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 45 per cent. 

Symbol D will denote Distinctionas having obtained 
75 per cent and above of the marks in any ono of 
the subjects; provided the candidate passes the 
whole examination at one sitting. 

Symbol F will denote Failure. 

8. It will be open for a candidate during his course 
of study in the B.Sc. Degree course to offer an additional 
ancillary provided he undergoes instruction in this 
subject in the college. Such a candidate can appear for 
the ancillary any time after the second year of the three 
year Degree course. 

Transitory Provision 

9. Candidates who pass the Intermediate Examina- 
tion shall be eligible to be admitted to the second year of 
the three-year Degree course. 

This Transitory Regulation shall be in foice for a 
period of five years after the introduction of the Three- 
year Degree course, 

10 . Candidates who have undergone the course of 
study and appeared for the examination or been exemp. 
ted to appear for the examination under the Regulations 
in force prior to the academic year 1958, shall be 
permitted to complete the examinations under those 
Regulations. This Transitory Regulation shall be in 
force till the Examinations of March -April 1964. 


60 



SYLLABUSES AND TEXT-BOOKS 

Part I — English 
{Vide Regulations) 

Part II — Second Language 

Sanskrit 

The course shall comprise the study of Text-books, Grammar, 
Translation and History of Literature. Text-books shall be 
as follows: 

(1) Poetry — ^About 200 Verses. 

(2) Prose — About 60 pages. 

(3) Drama — About one only. 

(4) Poetics — ^About an easy selection. 


Paper J: 

Prose, Poetry and Drama. 

Paper 11 : 

Translation from Sanskrit into English and English to Sanskrit. 
Paper III : 

Poetics and History of Sanskrit Literature — ^Epic and Classical 
Literature only, i.e., omitting Vedic Literature — The two 
subjects to carry 50 marks each. 

Latin 


A book of Vergil. 

A Speech of Cicero. 

Horace: One book of Odes. 

French 

One Classical Drama. 

Poetry ; 

1,000 lines. 

Prose: 

Two books, of which one should be a novel. 

One of the Prose books may be reserved for examination at the 
end of the third year. 


31 


61 



238 SYLLS. IN PART II — SECOND LANGUAGE FOR [aPP. 
B.A. and B.SC. degree EXAMINATIONS 


Hindi 

The Course shall comprise the study of: 

(i) Representative Seleaions from Ancient and Modern Poetry 

from Kabir to the Present day. 

(ii) Selections from Modern Prose from Bharatendu to the 

Present day. 

(iii) A Drama or a Collections of one- Act plays. 

(iv) A Novel and a representative selection of Short Stories. 

(V) History of Literature from Adikal to the Present day. 

Knowledge of the Chief Characteristics of the four 
periods together with their Sub-divisicms> and the 
important Poets alone is expected. 

(Vi) The following Alankaras and Chandas : 

Alankaras: Anupras; Shlesh; Yamak; Vakrokti; Upama; 

Utpreksha ; Roopak ; Atishayokti ; 
Ananvaya; Arthantaranyas; Virodhabhasj 
Srishtant and Udaharan. 

Chandas*, Doha; Choupayee; Soratha; Baravai; Hari- 
geethika; Rola; Indravajra; Upendrflva}ra ; 
Vanshast ; Mandakranta ; Mai ini ; Savaiya ; 
Kaviti and Chappay; and Nava Rasa. 

(vii) Grammar which shall be limited to the matter contained 
in Vyakarana Pradeep by Ram Dev. 

(viii) Translation from English to Hindi. 

(ix) General Composition. 

(x) A Text-book in Hindi bearing on the Ancillary subject 
where there i s one. 

Marathi. 

PART II. 

of Studies (fietaih ) — 

(i) Representative selections from ancient and modern poetry. 

(ii) Selection from modern prose. 

(iii) A Drama. 

(iv) A novel and a representative selection of short stories (for 
non-detailed study). 

(V) History of Literature (knowledge ^ the chief characteristics 
of the important authors above is expected). 

(vi) Alankaras and Chandas (those which occur in the books 
prescribed for poetry). 



{lij SYLL. IN P4jlt ii-s-secOnd tANaiiAdJi; foe e a. and 23^ 

B.SQ. I>EQREE ex amination s 

(vii) Granmar. 

(viii) Translation from English into Marathi. 

(ix) General Composition. 

Scheme of Examination . — There shall be three papers of three 
hours* duration each carrying the maximum of lOo marks. 

The first paper shall contain questions on text-books prescribed for 
detailed study in poetry, history of literature and prosody and poetics. 

The second paper shall confain questions on text-books prescribed 
for detailed study in prose, drama and grammar. 

Examination in tlicse two papers will be held at the end of the 
second year of the three-year degree course. 

The third paper shall contain (i) a question or questions on the 
noa-detailed text, (ii) a passage or passages in English for translation 
into Marathi and (iii) a general composition having reference to modern 
thought. 

The examination in this paper will be held at the end of the third 
year of the degree course. 


Tanail 

Hours of Instruction'. 6 hrs. a week: — 

Two hours will be devoted to Poetry; two hours for Prose; 
one hour for Grammar, etc., and one hour for Composition 
and Translation. 

Thrid year: 2 hrs, a week: — 

One hour will be devoted to Composition and Translation and 
one hour to A General History of Tamil Literature for which 
books will be recommended. 

Tttlitgu 

Paper /— ^of three hours* duration, carrying 100 marks) Com- 
prising. 

1. Old Poetry. 

2. Modern Poetry. 

Paper II — (of three hours* duration carrying 100 marks). 

3. Dram?. 

4. Detailed Prose. 

Note: Paper I only to contain questions on textual grammar etc., 
the maximum marks to be set apart fQr this part viz., gram- 
mar etc., being 10 out of 100). 


99 



‘240 SYLLS* IN FART II — SECOND LANGUAGE FOR B.A. [aPF. 
AND B,Sp. DEGREE EXAMINATIONS 


Paper III — Composition and Translation (of three hours’ dura- 
tion and carrying loo marks.) 

This Paper shall contain: 

1. One essay question on a Prescribed non-dctailed text. 

2. One essay question on a general subject i and 

3. One question on Translation from English into Telugu. 

Syllabus. 

Gramfnary Prosody Poetics : 

Grammar i 

1. Telugu Alphabet: Vowels and consonants, Ubhayamulu 

short, long hard consonants, soft consonants and sthiras. 

2. Words — Five kinds: Nouns, Pronouns, Adjectives, verbs. 

Indeclinable s. Their characteristics. 

3. Changes in pure Telugu words: G — Ayi — ^Ai; Avu — 

Au; lyi— e — . 

4. Kala and Drutaprakritika. 

5. Sandhi — ^Telugu— (i) Akara sandhi; Ikara sandhi; Ukara 

sandhi; Amredita sandhi — ^Yadaganta, (ii) Drutaprakri- 
tika sandhi, (iii) A. Gasadadavadesa sandhi, B. Tugagama 
sandhi, C. Dwiruktatakara sandhi, D. Nugagama sandhi, 
E. Pugagama sandhi, F. Vakyanta sandhi. 

6. Sandhi — Sanskrit — (i) Savama dirgha sandiii, (2) Guna 

sandhi, (3)Vriddhi sandhi and (4) Yanadcsa sandhi. 

7. Classification of Telugu words — ^Tatsama, Tadbhava, Desya 

(Andhra Desya and Anya Desya), Gramya, Anindya 
gramya. Their characteristic features. 

8. Sandhi — Sanskrit — The chapter on Halsandhi in Tatsama 

Chandrika (by Sannidhanam Suryanarayana Sastri). 

9. Compounds — Glassification: (i) Sidda, (2) Sadhya, (3) Yat 

purusha, (4) Dwanda, (5) Bahuvrihi. 

Prosoify: 

(I) Characteristics of Guru and Laghu, (2) (i) Matra ganas, 
(ii) Akshara ganas, (iii) Surya ganas, (iv) Indra ganas, 
(3) Yati and Prasa — Their characteristics, (4) Kanda, 
Thctagccti, Ataveladi, Sisa, Dwipada, Utpalamala, Cham- 
pakamala, Sardula, Mattcbha — ^Their characteristic fea- 
tures. 


64 




Ill] SVLLS. in PAtCr II — SECdNti LANGUAGE FOR E A. 24 l 
and b.sc. degree examinations 


The characteristic features of the metres ocairing in TeKt- 
books prescribed. 

Poetics: 

Upama, Rupaka, Utpreksha, Atisayokii, Swabhavokti> Ardhanta- 
ranyasya, Parikara, Virodhabhasa, Yadhasankhya . 

(i) (a) Sabdalank'ira — Anuprasa — Yamaka — Muktapadagrasta 
(i) (6) Arthalamkara — Ullekha, Lokokti Slesha- 

Vyajasturij Samasokti, Kavyalinga, Visama and 
Arthapatti, (ii) Kavyalakshana — Classification j 

Drisya, Sraya, Khanda Alahakavya and Kshudra- 
kavyj, (iii) Rasa — its characteristic features, 

(iv) Hero and Heroine — Their classification, 

(v) Kavyadoshas and Gunas. 


Kannada 

First two years : 

Hours oj Instruction : 

poetry and Applied Grammar — 2 hours a week. 

Prose 2 hours. Drama i hour; Composition and Translation 
I hour. 

Scheme of Studies: 

Poetry : 1200 lines of classical Poetry, 600 lines of mediaeval 
poetry and 600 lines of modern poetry. 

Drama: One Drama written in classical style. 

Old Prose: 60 pages of Old Prose. 

Modern Prose: 2 teXt-books written in modern style for detailed 
study. 

Grammar: Sandhi, Samasa, Tatsama, Tadbhava, Kridanta and 
Taddhitanta. 

paper / — Poetry and Grammar. 

Paper II — Drama and PrOsc. 

Third year: 2 hours a week: — 

One hour will be devoted to Composition and Translation 
and one hour to Non-detailed Study (Non-detailed Text 
prescribed will be one bearing on Scientific subjects). 

Scheme of Examination : 

One paper on Non-detailed text. Translation and Composition. 


65 




242 5 YLLS. IN PART 11 — SECOND LANOUAOR FOR (apF- WI] 

B.A. AND B.SG. DBOREE EXAMINATIONS 


Malayalam 

Paper /. 

Poetry: Classical: 

(1) About 150 to 200 lines from the works of Niranam poets. 

(2) About 400 lines from the works of Ezhuthachan or 

Cherusseri or one part of a Sandesa Kavya or about 
100 stanzas from any of the Manipravaia Kavyas or 
not more than 2 sargas from a Mahakavya. 

(3) An Attakkatha, 

(4) A classical drama. 

(5) One Khanda Kavya. 

(6) Poetical selections from the work of a modern poet Or 

poets not exceeding 300 lines. 


Detailed Prose : 

(7) Prose text. 

(8) Prose text. 

Mon-detailed Study: 

(1) Two books— one of which may be a fiction. 

(2) Original Composition. 

(3) Translation from English to Malayalam. 

Scheme of Examination for the Third Year Course : 

A study of the outline of the History of Malayalam language and 
literature. 

Arabic 

The course shall comprise the study of the poetry of the period of 
Jahiliyyah and of the Early Islamic and Abbaside periods: the Quraan 
the Ahadith and short stories relating to the Arab life and culture ^ 
Grammar, translation and principal movements in the History of 
Arabic literature. 

Persian 

The course shall comprise the study of Mediaeval and Modern 
Persian Prose and Poetry, Grammar prosody translation and principal 
movements in the history of Persian life and literature. 

Urdu 

The course shall comprise the detailed and non-detailed study of 
Urcu literature both prose and poetry as developed during the period 
1800-1950; Grammar, prosody, translation and principal movements 
in the History of the Urdu language and literature. 


66 



PART ni— OPTIONAL SUBJECTS 
B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Group- A Subjects 

BRANCH I— raSTORY MAIN 

(I) 

History op Iotia— Paper I. 

The geographical background of Indian History— Sources of 
Indian History — The races of India. 

The pre-historic period — The Palaeolithic, Neolithic and the 
Chalcolithic Agesi The Indus Civilization; Its nature, extent, date 
and general relation to (a) Sumerian (b) Tamil and (c) Vedic cultures. 
Dravidian India. The Aryans. The Vedic period and the Early 
Aryan settlements — ^Polity and Religion. The later Vedic period—? 
Aryanisation of India— Its nature and extent. 

(i) The Early period: 600 B,C,to 650 

(a) 600 B.G. to 350 B.C. Polity — Economic and Social life — 
Literature— Religious unrest— Rise of Jainism and Buddhism — Begin- 
nings of Magadhan ascendancy and Tribal Republic Foreign incur- 
sions, Persian invasion and Alexanders’ raid. 

(0 350 B.C. to 300 A.D. The Mauryan Empire— Chandra- 
gupta, Bindusara and Asc^a — Administration and Social life under 
the Mauryas — Decline of the Alauryas and the rise of the Sungas and 
theKanvas — Literature and inscriptions — Art and Architecture. 

(ti) Foreign Contacts : Indo-Greek Kingdoms— The Sakas and 
Pahlavas — The Kushans — Kaiiishka and the Saka Era— The Kshatrapas 
— Coins— Effects of foreign invasion on Religion and Saka Ciiture— 
Gandhara Art— Mahayana Buddhism. Other Religions — Vaislmavism 
and Saivism. 

(m) South India: The Satavahanas— Kharavela of Kalinga. 
Sangam literature. The Early Cholas, Pandyas and Cheras — l^olity — 
Social life and Religion — Classical writers— Roman trade and com- 
merce— Colonial and cultural expansion into South-East Asia. 

(c) 300 A. t). to 650 A.D.— (t) North India: The Gupta empire. 
The Golden Age of the Guptas— The decline of the Guptas and the 


67 



244 SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH I — HISTORY [aPP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


coming of the Huns— Toramana and Mihiragula — the rise of the Var- 
dhanas — Harshavardhana — ^Political, religious, economic and social 
conditions— Chinese pilgrim travellers— Literature and Art. 

(it) South India ; Political condition of the Deccan and S outh 
India — Early Pallavas, their origin^ history and contribution to South 
Indian culture. 

(a) The Mediaeval periodSsQ A.D. to 1525 A.D, 

(a) 65oA.D.toi20oA.D. 

(1) North India: The Rajputs— Their origin— The main 
Rajput dynasties. Rajput polity and social life. Nepal;, Kashmir 
and Assam during the period. 

(it) Deccan — The Ghalukyas of Badami — The Rashtrakutas— 
The Ghalukyas of Kalyani and Vengi — The contributions of these 
dynasties to South Indian literature, art and culture — Social life and 
religion during the period. 

(tit) South India: The Great Pallavas— Their political 
expansion — Their administration and contribution to South Indian 
culture — South Indian colonial and commercial enterprise under 
them — The imperial Cholas — Their political history — Relations with 
outside powers — Chola conquests beyond the seas — The decline of 
the Cholas — Chola administration — ^Religion^ art and literature. Tamil 
expansion — The early and the later Pandyas and their exploits— The 
history of contemporary Gheras. 

(b) 1200 A.D. to 1525 A.D. 

(1) Northern India: The Muslim period. Rise and Spread of 
Islam — ThejArab conquest of Sindh and its effects — Ghazni and 
Ghori — Stages in the Muslim conquest of Northern India. Causes of 
Muslim success. The Sultanate of Delhi — The Slave Sultans — The 
Khilji Rulers — Achievements of Alauddin Khilji — The Tughlaks 
— Muhammad Bin Tughlak’s character and achievements — Firuz 
Tughlak — The Sayyids and the Lodis — Fall of the Delhi Sultanate 
— ^Administration under the Delhi Sultans — Economic and social 
conditions — Effects of the impact of Indian and Islamic cultures 
on Literature, Religion, Art and Architecture — Religious move- 
ments of the 13th and 14th centuries. 

(it) The Deccan and South India — (i) 1200 A.D. to 1335 
A.D. The Yadhavas of Devagiri — The Kakatiyas of Warrangal-^ 
Thc Hoysalas of Dwarasamudra — ^Their contributions to art and 
literatjire— ^The later Cholas and Pandyas — Muslim conquest. 





Ill] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH I — HISTORY MAIN 245 
FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(2) 1335 A.D. to 1600 A.D. (a) TheBahmini Kingdom — 
Sources — Government and Society — ^The break-up Of the Bahmini 
Kingdom and the five Sultanates of the Deccan, (b) Vijayanagar — 
Source 8 --Origin of the Kingdom. Rise, Growth and Decline. Relations 
with contemporary states, Muslim and Hindu— The battle of Talikota 
and after — The splendour of Vijayanagar — Administration, Econo- 
mic and Social life. Art and Architecture — Religion and Literature. 

( 2 ) 

History of India — ^I^aper II. 

(a) The Mughals — Northern India on the eve of the Mughal 
conquest — Social, economic and political conditions — Babar — Hvima- 
yun — Shershah Sur — His career — His political and administrative 
achievements. Akbar — Sources — His reconquest of the Mughal 
Kingdom — His military achievements — Territorial expansion of the 
Mughal Empire — His Rajpvt policy — Social and religious reforms 
— ^I’he Din Ilahi — Akbar ’s Dcccan policy — Estimate of Akbar — 
Jehangirand Nurjehan — Shah Jehan — Foreign Travellers and their 
impressions — Fratricidal wars and the accession of Aurangazeb — 
Sources — His conquest — Religious policy and its consequences — 
Reaction against it — The opposition of the Marathas, Jats, Sat- 
namis and the Sikhs — The Rajput Wars — Aurangazeb and the 
Dcccan — Last days of Aurangazeb. 

Tne Administrative system under the Mughals — Military 
organisation — Social, economic and religious conditions — Foreign 
notices — Growth of Hindi and Persian — Literature, Music, Painting 
and Architecture. 

(h) (i) rhe Rise of the Sikhs — Sikhism as a religious and 
political institution. (iV) The rise of the Marathas — Sivaji — 
Flis career and achievements — Administration — Revenue and 
military system -“-the growth of the Maratha Empire from 1680- 
1761 — Rule of the Peshwas — The third battle of Panipat and after. 
{in} Later Mughals— Disintegration and decline of the Mughal 
Empire — Causes — Rise of Hyderabad and Oudh — Invasion of 
Nadir Shah and Ahmed Shah Abdali culminating in the third 
battle of Panipet. (itf) The brcck-up of Vijayanagar and the Naik 
fCingdoms of Madura, Tanjorc and Ginji. 

(c) The coming of the Europeans — The rise and fall of the 
Portuguese — The Dutch enterprise — The English East India Com- 
pany — The French — The Anglo-French Tangle in India. The 
establishment of the English supremacy jn South India. The 
Pritish conquest of Bengal— Robert Gliv? and his settlement— 



246 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH I HISTORY [APP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Warren Hastings — His reforms. Impeachment of Warren Hastings 
— Charges examined. The Regulating Act of 1773 and Pitt’s India 
Act of 1784 — Their effects on British rule in India. Cornwallis 
— Revenue and judicial reforms. The Charter Act of 1793 — Lord 
Wellesley and his subsidiary alliances — His forward polity — Lord 
Hastings — His policy of subordinate isolation — ^Reforms — ^Lord 
William Bentinck — ^His social and administrative legislation. The 
Charter Act of 1833 and its importance. Charles Metcalfe and his 
Press reforms — Lords Dalhousie — His character and administration 
— His doctrine of lapse and theory of Paramountcy — Mutiny of 
1857 — The Act of 1858 — ^The end of Company’s rule. 

The Company’s relations with Mysore, the Marathas, the Sikhs, 
Burma, Sind and Afghanistan. 

(d) India under the Crown from 1858 A D. to 1947 A.D. 

(i) Influence of European politics on British Indian Adminis- 
tration — North-West Frontier policy — British commercial expan- 
sion— Conquest of Burma. 

(ii) The administrative policy of the Crown — Its growth 
— Impact of Western education and thought on Indian life and 
Culture — Social upsurge and economic conditions in the 19th and 20th 
Centuries — Birth of the Indian Nation. The Congress and the 
story of the struggle for freedom — The relations between the Indian 
States and the Crown. 

(iii) Growth of representative institutions — The Minto- 
Morley Reforms — ^The effects of World War I and the Act of 1919 — 
Provincial autonomy — The Government of India Act, 1935. The 
Second World War. The attainment of Indian Independence. 
The establishment of the Indian Republic. 

Boohs for Study : 

1. Majumdar and Others: An Advanced History of India. 

2. Sathianathaier, R. : A College Text-Book of Indian History — 

3 Volumes. 

3. Nilakanta Sastri, K. A. : A History of India, 3 Parts. 
Boohs for Consiultatumi 

X . Gertrude Sen : The Pageant of Indian History. 

2. Basham: The Wonder that was India. 

3, Ishwari Prasad : A Short History of Muslim Rule in India. 

4. Roberts: British India. 

5, H. G. : India — A Cultural History. 

ra 




ni] SYLL. IN GROUP'A OF BRANCH I — HISTORY 247 

MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


SECTION I. 


(3) 


(i) The History of Greece and Rome up to 395 A.D. 


Greece. 


1. The Geography of Greece: Its rclatioa to the Mediterranean 
and Asia Minor. 

2. Pre^kistoric Civilzation: The Aegean civilization— The 

Myceanaean civilization. 

3. The Hotneric Age: The Trojan War. Political and social 
conditions. 

4. The City States: Origin and development. Constitutional 
changes from monarchy to tyranny. 

5. Greek Colonization: Causes — Relations between the founding 
city and the colony. The areas of colonization — Results. 

6. Early Greek Ufiity: Race and language — The Homeric 

peoms — The Amphictionies— »The Oracles— The Olympic games, 

7. The Early History of Argos and Sparta: Pheidon and the 
Argive confederacy— The Institutions of Lycurgus— The social and 
economic classes— The Spartan constitution— The Peloponnesian 
Confederacy. 

8. The History of Athens : Village communities of Attica— The 
four Ionic tribes and the social and economic classes— From monarchy 
to timocracy—Dracon— The reforms of Solon— The rise of Pisisratus 
—The fall of tyranny— The reforms of Clcssthenes. 

9 . The Persian Wars: The capture of Lydia by Cyrus— Darius I 
—The Ionic Revolt— The battle of Marathon— Xerxes and the Second 
Persian War— Thcrmophylac — Salamis— Plataea— Mycale — Causes of 
the failure of the Persians. 

10 . The Western Greeks: Tyranny in the city states of Sicily, 
Gelon of Syracuse. 

11. Growth of the Athenian Empire: Themi stocks— The confe- 
deracy of Delos— Aristides — Cimon— Athens under Pericles. 

12 . The Peloponnesian War: The Athenian League and the 
Twenty Years’ Peace. Corinth— Alcibiades and the battle of Mantinca. 
The Syracusan Expedition — The failure of Athens— The triumph of 
oligarchy— The restoration of democracy. 


71 



Us SYLL. In okotrp-A bF Ibranch t — JatsTORV [aPP 
main for the b.a. degree examination 


13. The March of the Ten Thousand: Xenophen, Significance 
of the Expedition. 

14. The Supremacy of Sparta: Lysander and Agesilaus— ‘The 
{^eaCe of Antalcidas— Battle of Haliartus. 

15. The Second Athenian Confederacy: Pelopidas and Thebes— 
Membership and constitution of the confederacy— ‘Relations with 
Persia— Failure of the confederacy. Athens in the 4th Century B.C.— 
Socrates, Plato, Aristotle. 

16. Syracuse before and ajter Dionysius 1 : Relations with Carthage. 
The work of Dionysius — -His successors— The battle of Crimisus. 

17. The Supremacy of Thebes: Jason of Pherae — Epantinondas— 
Peace of Callias— The battle of Leuctra — The four Peloponnesian 
expeditions. 

18. The Supremacy of Macedonia: Philip II— The peace of 
Philocrates— The battle of Chaeronea— The Congress of Corinth. 
Athens under Macedonia — 'Demosthenes. 

19. Alexander and the spread of Hellenism: The conquest of 
Asia Minor— The conquest of Syria, Egypt, Babylonia, Persia, Media, 
Bactria and Sogdiana. The invasion of India. His policy of consoli- 
dation. 

20. The Greece after the death of Alexander: The Hellenistic 
monarchies. The Achaean and Aetolian Leagues. The conquest of 
Greece by Rome. 

21. The Legacy of Greece: ArtandArchitecture-Political thought 
—Early Greek Science. Philosophy. Drama and Poetry. 


Rome. 

1 . The land of Italy— The peoples of Italy— The founding of Rome 
—The kings of Rome and the institutions of the legrd period. 

2. The political evoluion of Rome— From monarchy to aristocracy 
—The Institutions of the Republic— Patrician Government— The 
struggle between the Patricians and the Plebians— The new nobility — 
Roman citizenship. 

3. The conquest of Italy— The Latin League— The Samnitc 
wars— Settlement of Latium— The war with Pyrrhus— Consolidation of 
Roman rule in Italy. The Roman State— Colonies— Municipia— The 
Military system. 


7Z 



Ul] SYLL. In GR0UI>-A OF BltANGltl I — HISTORY 249 

MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


4. Roman expansion in the Mediterranean— Rome and Carthage— 
The Punic wars— The invasion of Italy by Hannibal— Battles of 
Trasimenc and Cannae and Zama— The West under Roman rule— 
Sicily, Spain— The third Punic war. 

5. Rome in the East— The Achaean and Actolian Leagues— The 
first and second Macedonian wars— The war with Antiochus and the 
settlement of Western Asia— The third Macedonian war— The settle- 
ment of Greece— Roman protectorate in Asia. 

6. Rome during the Great Wars- The ascendancy of the Senate— 
The Roman people — Effects of territorial expansion and material 
prosperity. The social evolution— The reforms of the Cracchi— The 
Jugurthine war— Marius— The social war— Cinna. 

7. The aims of Sulla— His reforms— The revival of the Senate — 
The rising of Spartaais— The first Consulship of Pompey — Caesar, 
Cicero and Catiline— Coalition of Pompey, Caesar and Crassus— 
Caesar’s command in Gaul— Pompey’s consulship — The Civil War. 
Caesar in Gaul— Germany and Britain — 'Roman advance towards the 
Danube— The Mithradatic wars — ^The annex.uion of Syria. 

8 . The transition to Empire.— Caesar and the Senate— The Civil 
War— Caesar in Spain— The Alexandrian war— The Dictatorship of 
Caesar— Caesar’s rule— His reforms. Struggle for power after Caesar’s 
death. The Scond Triumvirate — Octavius in the West— Battle of 
Actium. 

9. The Principate— Its elements— Dyarchy— The empire under 
Augustus— Provincial Government, 

Pax Romana— The reign of TrOjan— The organization of Roman 
government under Hadrian— The Age of the Antonines — Diocletian— 
Emperor worship — 'Theodosius— Constantine — 'The battle of Hadriano- 
ple 378. Division of the Empire. 

Books recommended : — 

1. J. B. Bury: History of Greece. 

2. Cary: History of Rome. 

3. Grant: A History of Europe, Part I 

4. Hayes and Moon: Ancient and Mediaeval History. 


7 ^ 



250 SYLL. IN GROUP -A OF BRANCH I — HISTORY [aPP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EKAMINATION 


( 4 ) 

(ii) The History of Europe— 395 A.D.— 1500 A.D. 

Europe in 395 A.D. The Roman Empire in the West, ^95-476 
A.D. The Invasion of Europe by the Germans— The Goths, Ostrogoths 
and the Visigoths — 'The Vandals —The Franks —Italy in the sixth 
century— The Eastern Empire— Justinian— Constructive forces of the 
Middle Ages— The Papacy; Islam; the Franks. 

Charlemagne and the revival of the Empire, The break-up of the 
Carolingian Empire. 

Europe in the ninth and tenth centuries— England and the 
Normans; the rise of the French Monarchy; Germany and Italy; 
Feudalism. 

The growth in power of the Papacy. 

The struggle between the Empire and the Papacy— The fall of the 
Hohen-Staufens and the great Interregnum— Monastic! sm— Benedict 
of Nursia; the Cluniac Reformation— The coming of the Friars; 
the Mediaeval Universities— The Crusades. 

England— The grow'th of National Unity. The growth of 
Parliament. 

France and the beginnings of the greatness of the Capetian 
Monarchy — ^Philip Augustus— St. Louis. 

The Hxmdred Years War. 

The Papacy and Philip IV of France, The Babylonish Captivity. 

The growth of Mediaeval cities . 

Germany and Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries. 

The Rise of the Swiss Republic. 

The Rise of Nation States— England ; Franco; Spain. 

The Byzantine Empire and the Ottoman Turks. 

The Renaissance and the end of the Middle ages. 

Books recommended: 

Grant: A History of Europe. 

Carl Stephenson; Mediaeval History. 

Hayes and Moon: Ancient and Mediaeval History. 

(5) 

(iii) History of Islam— Paper I. 

(For Ancient Times to 1258 A.D.) 

Geographical features of Arabia. Its physical divisions. Its 
climate. Its deserts. Its oases. Valleys that serve as trade route. 


74 




Ill] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH I — HISTORY 251 
main for the B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


liihabitants. Their racial affiliation and classification. The Ancient 
Afabs — The’ Ad and Thamud. 

Ancient Arabian Kingdoms. The Mincans, Sabacans and 
Himyarite"^. Thiir civilization. Architecture. Sources of Information. 
Inscriptions — The Dam of Marib. The Abyssinians. 

The Religion of Ancient Aiabia: The Cult of the Moon. Planetary 
worship. Advent of Ghristianiiv — spread of Judaism — Rivalries. 

Petty N. Arabian states. 

The Nabataeans. The Kingdom of Balmyrena. The Kingdom 
of Ghassan. The influence of Rome. Buffer State. Kingdom of 
Hira. Persian political influence. Numan bin Mundhir’s Court. 
Its spl ndoLir and greatness. 

A1 Hijaz. Significance of the Jahiliyah. The supremacy of the 
Quaraysh. Growth of the City State of Makkah. The constitution. 
Hconomic life. 

The religion of the Arabs of the Jahilii^a period. Their beliefs 
aiiJ practices. Their virtues — al Muru\wah. Their vices. Absence 
of national unity. The rivalries between North Arabians and South 
Arabians. Condition of Persian and Byzantine Empires. 

Advent of Islam. 

Teachings of the Prophet. His life and his reforms. Establish- 
ment of human brotherhood. Attitude towards other faiths. The 
Quran. The Traditions. An estimate of his achievements. 

iiarly Caliphate. 

The elective principle. Functions of the Caliph; Inaugural 
address. Abu Baker and Umar. Contacts with the Romans and the 
Persians. Speedy victories of the Arabs. Their causes. The Dhimmis. 
Expansion of I slam in Egypt, Syria and Persia. Political and adminis- 
trative machinery set up by Umar I, Separation of judiciary and execu- 
tive. System of taxation. The Agrarian reforms of Caliph Umar, 
Uthman and Ali. Schisms in Islam. Shias and the Kharijites. 
Settlements of Kufah and Basrah. Centres of learning. 

The Unxayya(»s. 

The change over from the elective to hereditary system of succes- 
sion. Transformation of the Caliphate into Kingship. Its conse- 
quences. Karbala, Its political and religious effects. Dominance 
of the Arab race. Administration. Departments of State. Reforms 
of Amir Muawiya and Abdul Malik. The Umayyad court life. DiVr 


75 



252 


SYLL. in OROUP-A of branch I — HISTORY 
main for the b.a. degree examination 

sion of Society. Adoption of foreign customs. The Harem systeM- 
Position of women in Society. Syedah Sukaina. Walid I . Conquf^s 
of Spain and Sindh, His interest in Architecture and Social amenities. 
Reforms of Umar II. Growth of learning. The Science of Tradition. 
The later Umayyads. The causes of the downfall of the Umayyads. 
The rise of Muhammad al Imam. The resurgence of the Persians 
— *Abu Muslim al-Khurasani , 

The change over to the Abbasides. Umayyads in Spain. Mansur, 
the great Abbasid. Bagdad. The influence of the Persians. The 
Barmakid dynasty of Wazirs. Sacrcmemal character of the Caliphate. 
The departments of the State. The Shu*ubiyah Movement— ^Emer- 
gence of Persian nationalism. Age of translations. The Baitul Hikmat. 
Harun al Rashid and Mamum. Intellectual awakening. Arabs as 
leaders of thought. Medicine. Travelling clinics. Medical libraries. 
Astronomy and Mathematics. Arab Numerals, Geography, His- 
toriography. General level of culture. 

The later Abbasides. 

The Abbasid Empire not co-extensive with Islam. Rise of 
independent states in the East and the West, The Buwyhids and the 
Saljuq Sultans. The Crusades. The Fatimids of Egypt. Their 
cultural activities. Al Azhar University of Cairo. Al Hakim the 
great Fatimid. His observatory at al Muqattam in Egypt. The rise 
of the Assassins. Hassan bin Sabbah, Nizamul Mulk, the Saljuq 
Wazir. His academy at Bagdad. Political upheavcls. The causes of 
the downfall of the Abbas ids. The factions at Bagdad. Luxury and 
laxity of morals. Hulaku Khan. Fall of Bagdad. 1258 (656 A. H.). 

Bocks recoptfnended: 

(1) Amir Ali: Short History of the Saracens. 

(2) Hitti: History of the Arabs. 

(3) Salik: Early Heroes of Islam. 

(4) Muir — Caliphate. 

(5) Lane-Pcole; Moors in Spain. 

(6) Hell:— Arab Civilization. 

SECTION II 

( 6 ) 

(i) History of America since 1776. 

(i) Latin America. Struggle for Independence-— The Wars of 
Revolution, 1810-1824— -Battle of Ayacuchae— The great Liberators— 
Course of jf}f-<49vernmenf in Latin America in tlie 10 republics and 



79 



SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH I — HISTORY 253 

main for the b.a. degree examination 

(the ^ colonies— The relations of Latin American States (,cl) among 
themselves, (6) with the United States and (c) with other countries, 
down to the en i of World War II — The period after World 
War II. 

(2) North America— United States, {a) History between 1763 
and 1788— 'American Revolution— Declaration of Independence— The 
Constitutional Convention. 

ib) History between 1778 and 1914: (i) The United States 

(1789 to 1861)— First Congress at New York — Economic Develop- 
ments— Political Parties- The Louisiana purchase— War of 1812 and 
the Treaty of Ghent— The Munroe Doctrine— Territorial expansion — • 
The Origin Trail— The annexation of Texas— War with Alaxico — 
The acquisition of California — 'Slavery— The Compromise of 1850 — « 
Abraham Lincoln as the i6th President. 

(ii) The Civil War (1861 to 1865)— Political and Social Aspects 
of the War Period. 

(iii) The United States (1865 to 1914) Assassination of Lin- 
coln— 14th Amendmmt— Tne B.? sic Reconstruction Act— The Sherman 
Anti-Trust Law— The Spanish American War— Treaty of Peace signed 
at Paris — The Federal Reserve Bank Act— Woodrow Wilson and the 
Foreign Policy of the United States— U.S. Declaration of War on 
Germany. 

(c) British North America; (i) Passage of the Canada Act- 
Exploration of the West— War between Great Britain and United 
States— Rebellion in Upper and Lower Canada— Durham’s Report— 
The Union Act— British North America Aa— Purchase of North-West 
Territories from the Old Hudson Bay Company— Red River Rebellion. 

(ii) Newfoundland— Grant of Responsible Government- 
Bait Act-— Bank failure and insolvency— Financial— depression— Sir 
Robert Bond and Sir Edward P. Morris. 

(d) Alaska— Early Explorations— Vitus Baring— .Thomas Cook— 
The Russian-American Fur Company— The United States Purchase 
of Alaska— Settlement of the Boundary Dispute— Alaska given territorial 
status. 

History after 1914: (i) The United States— War declared on 
Germany— Treaty of Versailles— Washington Conference- Stock Mar- 
ket Crash— Clark Memorandum on the Munroe Doctrine— Franklin 
D. Roosevelt and the New Deal — Agriculture, Banking Home financing, 
belief. Securities. Laboiir Legislation — Foreign policies of the New 
I)cal — The United Stares and the Second World War. 


33 


t7 



254 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH I— HISTORY 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

(ii) The Dominion of Canada — Canada between the two , 
World Wars — Canada during World War II. 

(iii) New Foundland — Loses its status as a dominion — The 
Royal Commission and its recojnmcndatioas — Union with Canada. 

Books recommended : 

1. Robertson: History of Latin American Nations. 

2. Kevins and Commager: A Short History of the United States. 

3. Andre Maurois: A New History of the United States. 

4 . Graham: Canada. 

( 7 ) 

(ii) Modfjrn Asian History ntoM 1850 To thl 
Present Day. 

(1) History of the Near East and Middle East. 

(a ) The Ottoman Empire and Turkey in Asia^ 1 876-1914 : Abdul 
Hamid II— Const itution of 1 876-— Armenian Revolutionary movement — 
The rise and growth of the Young Turk movement— Revolt of the 
First Army Corps— ‘Mohammed V’s Constitutional Revision, 1909 — 
Proclamation of the Republic — Kemmal Ata Turk. 

(Jb) Persia: Russian conquest of Merv. Sixty year oil conces- 
sion to W. K. D’Arcy— ‘The Anglo-Russian entente, 1907 — Persia 
since Raza Shah Pahalavi. 

W Afghanistan^ 1850-76 : Second Afghan War; Abdul 
Rahman; The Penjdeh Incident; The Durant Agreement; Habi- 
bullah Khan, 1907. Anglo-Russian entente and Afghanistan— Ami' 
nullah — Afghanistan since 1929, 

(d) Middle East and World War I : The Mesopotamian Cam- 
paign, 1914-1916. The Sykes-Picot Agreement— Arab Revolt in the 
Hejas— Proclamation of Hejas— The collapse of Turkey — The Treaty 
of Severes— ‘The rise of Hejas as an independent powci — French Man- 
date over Syria— British Mandate over Mesopotamia and Palestine. 
Syria since 1918— Palestine and Trans-Jordania since 1916— Saudi 
Arabia, Yemen and Iraq and the Hashmite Dynasty since 1919. 

(2) History of the Par East. 

(a) Japan 1868-1912— The Meiji period— The constitution of 
1898— The Sino-Japanese War, 1902— *Anglo- Japanese alliance, 1904- 
1905. The Russo-Japanes^ War— The Thjsoperiod, 1912-1926— Japan 


78 



Ill] i SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH I — ^HISTORY 255 

■ MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


during World War I. The Shona period —Japan and World War II— 
Japan since allied occupation. 

(Jb) Since 1850. The growth of diplomatic intercourse with 
the West. The Sino- Japanese War over Korea. The Far-Eastern 
Triplis, 1896— Treaty of Alliance between Russia and China— The 
threatened partition of China— The Boxer outbreak 1900— China under 
Yuan Shiki, 1912 — The beginning of the Republic of China- China 
during World War I — The unification of China under Kuommintang — 
New China since Alao-Tsc-Tung. 

(c) The lesser lands of Asia since 1850— Tibet— Sinkiang— 
Mongolia — Korea — Eastern — Siberia— Indo-China— Siam — Buima— 
Ceylon- The Malay Peninsula— The Hast Indies and Philippines. 

Books Recommended: 

Kroger: Kemalist I'urkcy and the Middle East. 

Foster : The Making of Modern Iraq . 

B r ock lem arm : H i s tor y o f I sla m i c People s . 

Heath: The World in the Twentieth Century, Part Vl, Chapters 

24, 45 and 46. 

Vinacke: A HitsOry of the Far-East in Modern times. 

Van xMook: The States of Democracy in South-East Asia. 

Owen and Eleanor Lattimoore: The Making of modern China. 

Porter: The Rise of Japan, the Rise of a Modern Power. 

( 8 ) 

(iii) History of Europe. 

(From 1500 to the present cay.) 

Introduction— Europe at the cioscof the middle ages. 

Renaissance — ^Voyages of Discovery — -Rise of national monarchies 
—France, England, Spain and Portugal. 

France under Louis XI— Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain — 
Charles VlIPs invasion of Italy— Franco-Spanish Rivalry— The Italian 
Wars— Emperor Charles V. 

The Reformation— Charles V and Germany— Luther and Calvin— 
The Counter-Reformation— Philip II of Spain— His work in Spain— 
The Battle of Lepanto— The Dutch war of Independence— French 
Religious wars— Philip II and England— The Armada— Decline of 
Spain. 


79 



^-56 SYtt. iN OROUt>-A OF BRANCH i — HtStORY ttAPP. 

main for the b.a. degree examination 


France under Henry IV— Richelieu — Mazarin— The Thirty 
Yeats’ war— Treaties of Westphalia and the Pyrenees— Louis— XIV 
—His policy and Government— His foreign policy— War of the 
Spanish Succession— -Peace of Utrecht. 

Rise and decline of Sweden— Gustavus Adolphus— Charles XII 
— -Rise of Russia— peter the Great— Plis character and policy — Baltic 
wars— Treaty of Nystadt — Turkey Siege of — Vienna Sobieski of 
Poland— Catherine the Great— Partition of Poland— Russia’s Wars 
with Turkey— Treatise of Kiitchuk-Kainardji and Carlowitz— Decline 
of Turkey. 

Rise of Prussia— The ‘Great Elector’ — Frederick the Great- 
Maria Theresa— War of the Austrian Succession— The Diplomatic 
Revolution— The Seven Years’ War— Anglo-French Colonial Rivalry. 

Age of the* Enlightened Despots ’—Joseph II. 

France under Louis XV— Louis XVI— The French Rcvolu- 
tiOn— Its course and results— French Revolutionary Wars— ‘Napoleon 
—His workin France— Napoleonic War— Fall of Napoleon— Congress 
of Vienna— The Holy Alliance— Metternicb. 

Liberalism and Nationalism— War of Greek Independence- 
Liberation of South America— MunrOe Doctrine — ^Revolution of 
1830— Revolution of 1848 — Second Empire in France— Unification 
of Italy— Unification of Germany— Policy of Bismark— Austro- 
Prussian War— Franco-Prussian War— The German Empire — ‘Third 
Republic in France. 

The Eastern Question— The Crimean W’ar— The Russo-Turkisb 
War— Congress of Berlin— The Balkan States — Young Turks— Balkan 
Wars, 19x2-1913. 

Germany between 1870 and 1914— The Triple Alliance— Britain 
and Germany— Russo-Japanese War— The Triple Entente Pan- 
Slavism— German Influence in Tureky- Armed Peace— Austria- 
Hungary under Francis Joseph— Sarejevo — First Woild War— Course 
and "results— Peace Treaties of Versailles and Lauss::nne— League of 
Nations— Its work and failure— Locarno Pact. 

Fascism in Italy— Nazism in Germany— Other Dictators— Kemal 
Pasha— Japanese aggression on China— Rise of the Axis— Municli— 
Second World War— Its course and results— U.N.O. 

Books fcfr Study: Grant: History of Europe— Pans 3 & 4 (Latest 
Edition), 

Hayes: Political and Social Histoiy of Europe, 1936 


80 




Ill) . syLL. in oroup-a of branch I— history 257 

MAIN for the B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Books for consultation: 

Seignobos — The Rise of European Civilization, 1944. 

Grant Sc Tempcrlcy: Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries, 
Sixth edition, 1952, 


SECTION III 

{9) 

(i) History or Islam. 

Paper IL 

Minor Dynasties after 1258. Kingdom of Granada. Almohavids 
of North Africa. Arabs in Sicily. Norman-Arab kings. Mamlukes 
of Egypt— ‘Hamdanids of Syria. Persia under the SafaVids. 

The Ottoman Empire — Sulaiman the Magnificient Turks in 
Europe. Causes and results of European Renaissance — Al olition of 
the Caliphate in 1924. Its causes and effects. The Turk sh Republic 
and the rise of Modern National Musl m States’ Morocco, Egypt, 
Syria, Arabia, Iraq, Mandatory powers. The resurgence of Israil. 
The Arab League. 

Books Recotnmended : 

1. Brocklemann: History of Islamic Peoples. 

2. P. K. Hitti: History of Syria. 

3. Everleigh: Ottoman Empire (abridged). 

4. Sykes: History of Persia. 

5. Lane-Poole: Muhammadan Dynasties. 

Books for Consultation (for both Papers): 

1. Amir AH: Spirit of Islam. 

2. Lane- Poole: Salad in. 

3. Lavy: Sociology of Islam— 2 volumes. 

4 J. Zaidan; Urmnayyads and Abbasids. 

5. T, W. Arnold: The Legacy of Islam. 

6. Gibb: Islam and the West. 


B1 



258 SYLt. is OROtP-A OF BRANCH I — HISTORV [aPP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(lO) 

(it) Political and Constitutional History of 
Engi.and— UpTO 1603. 

Political: 

Pre-Norman PerioJ — Roman-Britain — Anglo-Saxon Conquest — 
Heptarchy— Conversion of the English — West Saxon Supreniac}' — 
Danish Conquest. 

Norman Conquest— Norman Kings upto Stephen — Relations 
with the Barons— Relations with the Church. 

Comtitutumal : 

Features of the British Constitution — Anglo-Saxon Polity — Con- 
stitutional importance of the Norman Conquest — Growth of Feuda- 
lism— Norman Monarchy and its strength— Reforms of Henry I. 

Political : 

The Plantagenet Period— Henry IPs Empire— His quarrel with 
Becket— John— His quarrel with the Pope and the Barons— Henry III 
—Barons’ wars— Simon de Montfort. 

Constitutional', 

Reforms of Henry II— Magna Carta and its importance — Baro- 
nial opposition under Henry III— Provisions of Oxford. 

Political : 

Edward I— Conquest of Wales — Wars with Scotland — Edward II 
—Bannockburn — Mediaeval Culture— -The Church — The Monasteries 
—The Friars— Universities— The Mediaeval City and Guild — The 
Mediaeval manor. 

Constitutional : 

Laws of Edward I — Origin and Development of Parilament- 
“Model” Parliament— Confir mat io Cartarum — Edward II — The 
Lords Ordainers Revolution of 1327. 

Political : 

Edward III— The Hun derd Years’ War — Richard II— Peasant’s 
Revolt— Economic and Social clianges— Wycliffo ani the Lollard 
Movement. Deposition of Richard II — The Lancastrians— Renewal 
of the Hundred Years* war — End of the war and its results— Wars 
Of the Roses. The Yorkists. 

Constitutional: 

Development of Parliament under Edward III— The “ Good “ 
Parliament— Impeachment— Richard IPs attempt to set up despotism 


82 



in] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH I — HISTORY 259 

main for the b.a. degree examination 


—Lords Appellants— Revolution of 1399— The Lancastrian monar- 
chy— Parliament under the Lancastrians — Breakdown of Government 
and its causes— Strong monarchy of the Yorkists. 

Political : 

The Renaissance-Voyages of Discovery— Henry VII— His com- 
mci cial and foreign policy— Henry Vlll—Wolsey— Thomas Cromwell 
—The Reformation — Edward VI — Catholic reaction under Mary — 
Eliz:ibethan Church Settlement — Importance of the reign of Elizabeth 
—Her foreigia policy — Alaiy, Queen of Scots— Elizabethan seamen— 
The Armada— Conquest of Ireland — Social and Economic conditions — 
'Fuiding Compan'cs— Poor Law — Literature. 

Coiisiituiioual 

Tudor dictatorship— The Co’mcil — Star Chamber and other 
courts— Tudors and Parliament — ^Privileges of Parliament— Consti- 
tutional results of the Reformation — Local Government — The Justices 
of the Peace. 


Books for Study — 

Keith Foiling: History of England. 

Adams: Constitutional History of England (Rev. Ed., 1935). 

Books for Consultation-^ 

Trevelyan: History of England (2nd lid.., 1938). 
Tasswcll-Langmead : English Constitutional ElistOry (loth Ed.> 
1947 ). 

(II) 


{ Hi ) Political anh Ctinstitltionai. Histoky of England 
FROM 1603 TO thf Present Day. 


Political Introduction England at the end of the Tudor Period. 

The Stuart Period — James I— His cliaractcr — His religious and 
foreign policy— Cliarles I— His character— His Government— The 
Civil War— Its results. 

Constitutional : 

Relations bctw'een James T and Parliament— Revival of Impeach- 
ment-Clash between Charles I and Parliament — The petition of 
Right— The Eleven Years’ Tyranny— The Long Parliament and its 
work — Revolution of 1649— The Commonwealth— Its constitutional 
experiments. 

Political: 

Oliver Cromwell’s character and internal policy— His foreign 
policy— End of the Commonwealth— The Restoration— The Clarendon 



260 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH I — HISTORY [aPP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Code— Wars with Holland— James II— His character and religious 
policy— Monmouth’s rebellion— Revolution of 1688— Colonial and 
Commercial expansion under the Stuarts. 

Constitutional: 

Character of the Restoration— Charles IPs Declaration of Indul- 
gence-Test Act Habeas Corpus Act— Exclusion Bill— Whig^s and 
Tories— James II’s declaration of Indulgence— His use of the Dis- 
pensing power— The seven Bishops’ case — Nature and results of the 
Revolution of 1688— Bill of Rights— *Act of Settlement. 

Political: 

William Ill’s foreign policy — War of the English Succession- 
National Debt and the Bank of England— Anne— Union with 
Scotland— War of the Spanish Succession — Literature— Accession of 
George I— The Fifteen— Walpole’s domestic and foreign policy — 
George II — The war of the Austrian Succession— The Forty-five— 
The Seven Years’ War — Policy of Pitt, the Elder. 

Constitutional: 

Growth of party system and Cabinet Government — Importance 
of Walpole’s Ministry— The Whig Oliarchy- George III— His charac- 
ter and policy— Fall of the Whigs— Lord North— Wilkes. 

Political : 

War of the American Independence— Policy of Pitt the Yo’onger— 
Act of Union with Ireland— Industrial and Agrarian Revolutions— 
Humanitarian Movement— Wesley and the Methodists— The French 
Revolution and its influence on Britain— Nelson — Trafalgar— Welling- 
ton— Peninsular War— Waterloo— Congress of Vienna— Howard and 
Jail Reform— Wilber force and abolition of Slavery. 

Constitutional: 

George IV and William IV— Substitution of influence for power 
— Victoria and the Cabinet-Movement for Parliamentary Reform- 
Reform Acts of 1832, 1867 and 1884-1885— Representation of the 
People’s Acts of 1918 and 1928— Relations between the House of Com- 
mons and House of Lords— Parliament Act of 1911— Subsequent 
changes— Reorganisation of the Judiciary— Reform of Local Govern- 
ment. 

Political : 

Victorian Age— Problems of Industry— Factory Acts— Trade 
Developments— Protection versus Free Trade— Religion— Literature 
—Science— Growth of Canada and Australia— Transfer of India to 


S4 




ni] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH II — POLITICS 261 

MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


thcCrown— iBoer War— ‘Imperialism— Relations withRussia — Crimean 
War — 'Gladstone and Disraeli— Chamberlain and Tariff Reform— 
Eiward VII— Anglo-French entente— The Triple Alliance and the 
Triple Entente — 'The Irish Question— Home Rule Bill 1911-1914— 
The First World War — Britain’s part in the War — Lloyd George— 
Russian Revolution— .Wilson and American Intervention — Collapse of 
Germany— Peace Treaties — Effects of the War— League of Nations— 
Dictatorships in Europe— Events leading to the Second World War— 
The Second World War and Britain’s part in it— Churchill— Roosevelt 
and American intervention — Defeat of Italy and Germany— .Effects 
ofthc War— U N.O. 

Cmxstitutional'. 

Constitutional results of the two World Wars— War Cabinet- 
Relations between the Dominions and Britain— The Irish Free State. 
Statute of Westminster — Irish Republic-Abdication of Edward VIII 
—Beveridge Report and Social Security— The Civil Service— Develop- 
ment of Public Rights — 'Religious freedom— Rule of Lawand its limita- 
tions. 

Books for Study: 

Keth h'ciling: History of England. 

Adams: Constitution History of England (Rev. Ed., 1935). 

Books for Consultation: 

Trevelyan: History of England (2nd Ed., 193 ^). 
Tasswell-Lmgmead: English Constitutional History (loth Ed., 
1947 )- 


BRANCH II— POLITICS MAIN 
(12) 

((?) (i) Political Theory (Including a Text). 

Political Theory: 

Political Science— Its scope and methods— Relations between 
Politics and other Social Sciences. 

Chief elements and characteristics of the State — Its relation to 
Nation, Society, Government. 

Theories of the Origin ofthc State, speculative and historical. 
Sovereignty de jure and de facto and its location in the State con- 
. sidered in relation to various types of existing cpnsti tut ions. The 
pluralistic view of sovereignty. 


B6 

•/ ' 


34 



262 SYIL. IN 0ROUP-A OF BRANCH II — POLITICS [aPP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


The end of the State. Individualist collectivist and liberal demo- 
cratic views of the purpose of the State. 

its nature^ sources and sanctions— Law and Morality. 

Liberty. Civil liberty. Rights and drtics of citizenship. Safe- 
guards of liberty. Law and Liberty. 

Equality. Legal, political, economic and social equality in the 
modern State. 

Forms of Government. Democracy as a form of Government, 
as an order of Society, as an Industrial condition and as a moral and 
spiritual principle. The nature of public opinion. Dictatorship, 
personal and party. 

Unitary and Federal States. Federation and Confederation. 
Conditions of Federalism. 

The Constitution, its essential ingredients. Classification of 
Constitutions. Constitutional amendment. Political conventions, their 
Use and value. 

The theory of the Separation of Powers and the extent of its appli- 
cation to modern constitutions. 

Prescribed Text : One of the following : 

1. Machiavelli: The Prince Tr. by Ricci (World’s Classics). 

2. Locke; Second Treatise on Civil Government. 

3. Burke: Reflections on the French Revolution. 

4. Mill,]. S. : Representative Government. 

5 . Selections from Aquinas — 'to be presci ibce . 

6 . Selections from the Arthasastra— *to be prescribed. 

7 . Selections from the Kural— to be prescribed. 

Books Recommended'. 

Soltau : Introduction to Politic?. 

Lord: Principles of Politics. 

Strong: Modern Political Constitutions. 


( 13 ) 


(ii) The Evolution of Government. 


Earliest human governments. The empires of Egypt, Mcsq-, 
pot^mia and CEina, The organization of ancient bureaucracies. 


B9 



IllJ SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH II — POLITICS 263 

d egree E XAMINATION 

Tribal Polity. Indo-European tribal organization in the West 
and the East. 

The City-States of Greece and P*.ome. The evolution of govern- 
ment in Greece and nations of cyclical change. Colonial and imperial 
government. 

Barbarian monarchies in Europe. The influence of the organi- 
zation of the Church. Development of administrative organization 
in Carol ingian and Anglo-Norman Governments. 

Indian polity, ancient and mediaeval — Kingship— Tlie concept 
of Dharma— The administration — Mauryan and Gupta Governments 
—•Government in South India— The Chola Administrative system. 

The pluralist society of the Middle Ages in Europe. Feudalism 
and the supicmacy of law. The Estates— Mediaeval constitutiona- 
lism and representative assemblies in Span, France, England and Scot- 
land, Mediaeval cities— Italy, France and the Hansa towns. 

Rise of the modern nation state in sixteenth century— Europe 
—Consolidation of nations — ‘AbjOlute monarchies. 

The French Revolution and the spread of the principles of nationa- 
lity and regal itarian democracy. Church and State after the Reform- 
ation. 

The Liberal Democratic State of the nineteenth century. Collec- 
tivist and totalitarian state s in FlurOpe between World War land World 
War II. 

Federalism— Ancient federal unions— the Netherlands— Switzer- 
land — the U.S. A— Federalism in the Commonwealth. Latin American 
Federations. 

International organisation — The Pax Romana, the Mediaeval 
unity of Europe, Indian conception of Suzeranity and mandalas— 
Post Reformation cflorts at European Unity— The League of Nation s— 
—The United Nations, 

The Contemporary State— Democratic Centralism- Pepple’s 
Democracy— The Welfare State. 

Books recommended: 

Sidgwick: Development of European Polity. 

Altekar: State and Government in Ancient India. 

Schuman: World Politics. 


87 



2^4 SYLt. tN QROOP-A OF BRANCH II — POLITICS [aPP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(i4) 

(i) (I) Modern Governments. 

Constitutions^ written and unwritten— conventions and usages— 
federal and unitary constitutions— separation of powcis — rule of law 
and administrative law— constitutional amendment. 

The constitutions of India, the United Kingdom, Hire, the 
U.S.AoCanada, France, Switzerland, the U.S S.R., Japan and Austia- 
lia will be studied in detail withrefcrence to: 

1 . The mode of amendment. 

2 . The guaranteed r ights of the citizen . 

3. The expressed and /Or implicit socialideasof the constitution. 

4. The distribution of power between the Centre and the Units. 

5. The composition and functions of the formal and real execu- 
tives. 

6. The Organization and powers of the Legislatures, Central and 

LiOCal. 

' 7. The procedures and methods of business of the legislatures. 

8. The franchise and the electoral system. 

9, Political parties. 

10. The Administration and the Public Services including 
methods of recruitment and control. 

11. The structure and duties of the Judiciary. 

12. The rOle of minorities, interest and pressure groups. 

Books recotnfnended : 

Carter; Ranney & Herz: Major Foreign Pow'ers. 

Ghosh: The Government of the Swiss Republic. 

Marx (Ed.): Modem Foreign Governments. 

Gledhill : The Constitution of the Republic of India. 

OggandRay; Introduction to American Government. 

‘ Brogan: The U.S.A. 


(*5) 

' (2) Public Administration 

1. The scope and nature of Public Administration— Relation 

of the administration to the legislature, the executive and 
the judiciary— -Municipal administration in town and city. 

2 . Organisation of departments— Powers and liabilities of 

administrative officials— Organization for different Govern- 
mental functions— Line, staff and auxiliary services— 


88 



Ill] SYLL, IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH II — POLITICS 265 

. MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Relations within a departnient and between departments— 
Ofiice procedure— Administration of finances and records 
—Accounts and audit 

3. Public personnel administration — History of the civil service— 

Personnel Agencies and Civil Service Commissions— 
Recruitment examination and promotion— Service rating— 
Discipline and employed organization— Compensation 
and retirement. 

4. Government planning and research— Develompcnt of plans 

and programmes in war and peace— Publicity and Public 
relations— The Administrative organisation in India. 

Books recommended: 

1. White: Introduction to the Study of Public Administration. 

2. Morstein Marx(Ed.): Elements of Public Administration. 

3 . Gladden: Public Administration. 

4. Ruthnaswamy: Public Adminii^t ration. 

5. Joshi: Indian Administration. 

(16) 

(3) State and Government in Ancient India 

1. The works on Dliarma Sasira and polity as sources of our 

knowledge. 

2. Literary and epigraphical sources of our knowledge of Govern- 

ment in ancient India. 

3. Indian theories of the origin and function of the State. 

4. Legal and social status, rights and duties of individuals and 

classes. 

5. Indian social Organization as a pattern of pluralism. 

6. Limits of royal authority, 

7. Kingship in theory and practice. 

8. The role of the administration: The Organization of the 

executive. 

9. Deliberative Assemblies, Central, Local and Professional. 

10. Guilds and Corporate authorities. 

11. Civil Administrative Organisation. Evolution from age to 

age. 

12. Military Organization. 

13. Financial Organizations. 

14. Regional and District Government : The role of local bodies. 

15. The Administration of Justice. 

16. Centralism and Bureaucracy. 


89 



266 SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH II — POLITIC^ [APP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION f 

Books recofnfncnded: 

1. Bsni Prasad: The State in Ancient India. 

2. Altekar: State and Government in Ancient India. 

3. Dikshitar: Hindu Administrative Institutions. 

4. Mahalingam: South Indian Polity. 

5. Iyengar, S. K. *. Evolution of Administrative Institutions in 

South India. 


(«7) 

( 4 ) International Relations and Diplomacy. 

1. The State and the State System. Evolution of sovereign 

States imEurope and Asia— Balance of power. 

2. Nationalism and Sovereignty. Growth of nationalism in 

Europe in the 19th and in Asia in the 20th centuries. Poli- 
tical autonomy and national self-sufficiency. 

3. Foreign affairs and the concept of National security. The 

mechanism of management of foreign affairs. Diplomacy 
as instrument of national policy. 

4. War as instrument of national policy. Economic organisa- 

tion as part of national policy. 

5. Management of inter-state relations— Diplomatic negoti- 

ations— 'Collective Security— Conferences — Permanent orga- 
nisations of consultation— Open and Secret Diplomacy. 

6. History of international relations 1900-1945 — World War 1. 

The— Versailles settlement — Economic and political 
re-adjustments of the inter- war period. The expansion of 
international relations to cover the entire world— European 
and Asian politics leading to World War II— Regionalism, 
Internationalism and National! Fin after World War II. 

7. From the League of Nations to the U.N. Forces making for 

international government and forces operating against it. 

8* The foreign policies during and after World War II of the 
United Kingdom^ the U.S.S.R., the U.S.A , France, Ger- 
many, Japan and China. 


90 



Ill] ’ |YLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH II — POLITICS 267 

MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

9. Regionalism in Asia and Africa— Indian foreign policy since 

1947. 

lO. Tile problems of world community— Political, economic and 
social. The U.N. and its Agencies. 

Books recommended: 

Schuman: World Politics. 

Gathorne Hardy: Piistory of International Relations. 

Palmer & Perkins : International Relations. 

Nicolson: The Evolution of Diplomatic Method. 

(18) 

(5) Constitutional and Administrative History of Modern India 

(From 1600) 

The system of government and administration prevailing in India 
when the East India Company obtained the Diwani of Bengal. Deve- 
lopment of English government in the Presidencies. The govern- 
ment of the East India Company — 'The Regulating Act. The Charter 
Acts. Transfer of power to the Crov^'U. 

India under the British Crown — Development of the adminis- 
tration and the beginning ot decentralisation. Local Self-Government, 
rhe evolution of legislature till 1909. The Minto-MorleV consti- 
tution. 'Fhc Moriiagu-Chclmsford Report and Dyarchy. Provincial 
autonomy and the Government of India Act, 1935. The Government 
of Indian States: the administrative and political implications ofPara- 
mountcy. Political agitation fiom 1857 to 1947, The Indian Inde- 
pendence Act, 1947. The New Constitution. The structure of 
government at the centre and in the States. The Departments of 
government at Delhi and Madras. Their Organization and functions. 
The composition and working of the legislatures. Political parties 
and their organization. Cabinet government in India. Planning 
and the problems of administration. Constitutional change, formal 
amendment and development of conventions. 

iV.B. Illustrative documents to be prescribed. 

Books recofnfnetided : 

Ilbcrt: Government of India. 

Muir: The Making of British India. 

Keith; Constitutional History of India. 

Palande: The Indian Constitution. 


92 



268 SYLL. IN GliOUP-A OF fiRANGH HI SOCIAL 1 fAPP. 

SCIENCE ^OR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATIO^ 

BRANCH III— SOCIAL SCIENCE 

(19) 

Syllabus in Philosophy of Religion 

1. Philosophy of Religion: Nature, scope and method. Relation 
of religion to Science, Theology and Philosophy. Value of a philoso- 
phical study of religion. 

2. Origin and Development of Religion: The Urge fOr religion 
in m^n. Primitive forms of religion; tribal, national and universal 
religion. Characteristics of developed religion. Religion and Culture. 

3. The Psychology of Religion: The facts of religious experience. 
IiltelleCtual, moral and emotional attitudes in religion. Mystic experi- 
pnce:. 

4. Religious knowledge and its validity: Revelation, Reason and 
Intuition. Proof for the exi stence of God . Examination of the proofs. 
Best proof is soul-sight of God. 

5. Metaphysical problem: The nature of reality. God and His 
attributes. God and the Absolute. Immanence and Transcendence. 
God as the home of the values of Truth. Goodness and Beauty. Pro- 
blem of Evil. Relation of GoJ and the individual. Immortality 
and future life. 

6. Art^ Morality and Religion: The place of myths and rites. 
Personal and institutional religion. 

7. Thegoalof religion and the means’ Cod— realisation. Moksha. 
Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Jnana Yoga. Prayer, devotion and Grace. 

Bibliography: Relevant portions in: 

1. George Galloway: Philosophy of Religion. 

2. Harold Hoffding: The Philosophy of Religion and Western 

Thought. 

3. S. Radhakrishnaii: Eastcin Religions and Western Thought. 

4. P. N. Srinivasachari: Mysticism. 

5. W. K. Wright: Philosophy of Religion. 

6. Narada Bhakti Sutras (Ramakrishna Math, Madras). 

7. Joseph Gacr: How the Great Religions Began (A Signet Book). 

(60) 

Jurisprudence and Indian Constitutional Law 
Syllabus will be prescribed later. 


f 


92 



, SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH III — SOCIAL 269 

SCIENCE FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION' 


lljjf 


i 

(61) 

General Principles of Contracts and Torts- 
Syllabus will be prescribed later, 

(20) 

II. (ii) (6) Syllabus for Social Psychology 
Siaytd point and scope: Social Psychology and its relation to other 
sciences. 

Personality in Social and Cultural Settings: Social life at pre- 
human levels. Inter-play of culture and personality. Modes of 
social interaction. Emergence of self-social types of personality. 
Cultural influences on thought process and content. 

Function of stero types in myths and ideologies. 

Dominance and leadership inhuman and sub-humuti groups. 

Qualities ofa leader and leader selection. Mass behaviour. Psycho- 
logical factors and m-chanisms of crowd formation. Types and be- 
haviour of crowvis. Public opinion— Its nature. Rumour. News. 
Propaganda. 

Primary and sccottdary groups. 

Sociometry. 

Social Conflicts: Prejudices. Revolution. War. 

Reference's: Kiinbal Young: Handbook of Social Psychology 
W.J.W. Sprottt Social Psychology. 

(21) 

II. Ciii) (^) Social Anthropology 
A nthropology in relation to other social sciences. 

Analysis of Institutions — Marriage, Family and Kinship. 

House and clean- kinship structure and Organisation. 

Social structure — Primary civilizations — Food gatherers—* 
Bilateral — Social structure — Secondary Civilizations — Food 
producers— -plant cultivation— Matrilineal organisations^ Nomadic 
Herdsman — Patriarchal Organisations— Higher Hunters— Mixed 
type — clan totemism Distribution of each type— the world over 
structural differences of societies and their comparison. Custom 
and Morality 5 Social Control — ^folk lore. Mythology and religion. 
Religion and Social Organisation in their interdependance. 

{**) 

II. (iii) (b) Cultural Anthropology 

Anthropological definition of culture. 

Group and Personality in relation to culture. 

Co-operation, Competition and Conflict. 

9i 


35 



270 SYLL. IN OROUP‘A OF BRANCH III — SOCIAL [APP. 
SCIENCE FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Economics and Anthropology. 

Environment as the field in which culture Operates. 

Diffusion^ convergence and independent inventions. 

Culture areas. Culture Centres, Culture Traits and Culture. 
Complexes. TTieir distribution throughout the world. 

Social contacts and culture change. 

Land Tenure— The sociological background to land ownership. 
GrO^^h of money sense. 

Trade and barter. 

An outline of linguistic, religious and culture historic groups the 
world over, with special reference to India. 

A detailed study of txoo prescribed monographs on one Indian and 
one non-‘ Indian tribe or community . 

Books : 

R. Linston: The Study of Man (1946,0. Appleton — Century Co., 
N.Y.) 

C. K, M. Kluckhohn — Mirror of Man (1949, Megraw Hill Book 
Co.,Inc.,N.Y.,U.Sj^.) 

Ruth Benedict: Patterns of Culture (1936, George Routledgc & 
Sons, Ltd., London). 

M* J. Herskovits; Economic Anthropology. 

OgburnandNimkoff; Sociology. 

J. E. Lips: The Origin of Things. 

Evans-Pritchard : Social Anthropology. 

Ehrcnfels, U. R. : Mother-right in India (1941, Osmania Univer- 
sity Scries, Hyderabad (Dn.), Oxford University Press, Madras, 
Bombay.) 

Piddington: Introduction to Social AnthrOpolog\’, Vol. I. 
BealSjR.andHoijcr, H. : Anthropology. 

Hcfebel, A.E : Man in the Primitive World. 

J/)wie, R. H. : An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (1934, 
I^arrar & Rinehart, Inc., N.Y.) 

Radcliift A. The Andaman Islanders (Cambridge, 

193W). 


$4 




Ill] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH III — SOCIAL 2T1 

SCIENCE FOE THE B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(*3) 

General Econotnics 

(1) Scope anJ Method of Economics— Nature of Economic Laws 
—Fundamental concepts. 

( 2 ) Consumption— Wants and their nature— The Law of Dimi- 
nishing Marginal Utility— Demand — Elasticity of Demand— Consu- 
mer’s Surplus. 

(3) Production— Factors of Production and their combination— 
Laws of Returns— The organization of production — Division of labour 
—Location of Industry— Large scale production. 

(4) Economic Organization— Capitalism and Socialism— Mixed 
Economy— Types of production organization— partnership, joint stodc 
companies, co-operative organisation. State enterprise— Industrial 
combinations. 

(5) Value— The analysis of Supply and Demand— Value under 
perfect competition— Market value and Normal value— Joint demand 
and joint supply— Monopoly value— Monopolistic competition. 

(6) Distribution— General theory of distribution— Theories of 
wages, interest, rent and profit— The national income of India. 

(7) Money and Banking- Functions of money— Kinds of money 
—The Quantity Theory of Money — The gold standard— Paper money 
— Credit- Instruments of credit— Banks, commercial, industrial and 
land mortgage— The Central Bank and its functions with special 
reference to India— Components of the Indian money market. 

(8) International Trade— The theory of comparative costs— 
Balance of Trade and balance of payments— Indian Balance of Trade 
and payments— Free Trade and Protection— Foreign exchanges- 
The Purchasing Power Parity Theory. 

(9) Public Finance— Public expenditure and sources of public 
revenue— General principles of taxation— Revenue and Expenditure 
in India — Public Debt and its redemption. 

(10) Planning Economic development— India’s Five-Year Plans. 

Books E^cofnfnended: 

1. Benham: Economics. 

2 . Caimeross: Text-Book of Economics. 

3 . Banerjee, p.: AStudyof Indian Economics (Rev. Edo 1954)* 



11 % SYLL. In OftOUP-A OF BRANCH 111 — SOCIAL [aPP. 

SCIENCE FOR THE B. A. DE GREE EXAMINATION 

(* 4 ) 

III. (ii) (b) Social Geography of India 
Social Geography .Definition and Scope. 

Physical and Biological background: 

(a) The land, structure, relief and soil. 

(b) Climate, the dominant role of the monsOons, the regional 

and seasonal incidence of rainfall. 

(c) Plant cover— ‘Forests— exploitation— Forest as a source of 

wealth. 

Resources and their Uses : 

Land: Classification of land — forests and their utilisation— arable 
land— land use, problems connected with types of farming, practices, 
tenures and soil erosion. 

Crop^Distribution : 

(a) effect of relief, soil and climate. 

Traditional Practices. 

(b) exotic plants. 

(c) Cereals: Distribution, production and consumption studied 

in relation to regional dietetic practices. 

(d) Supplementary food crops, beverages. 

(e) Industrial Crops— Sugar, Jute, Tobacco and Cotton. 

(Special attention to be paid to self-sufficiency). 

Live Stock: Distribution — bovine population standard in relation 
to fodder supply; social beliefs and food habits— meat, milk and milk 
products — Self-sufficiency of India. 

Other Animals. 

Potoer and Mineral Resources: Power resources and Economic 
morals— distribution, exploitation and uses. 

Industry: (a) Major industries. 

{b) Minor industries. 

(c) Cottage industries. 

(d) Locatioaind Labour supply. 

(e) Social effects of Industrialisation. 





Ill] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH III — SOCIAL 273 

SCIENCE FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Trade and Transport: 

//. People of India : 

(a) Class ificationj races^tribes etc. 

Indian culture as the basis of homogenity of Indian 
people. 

(h) Population Numbers— Distribution, rural and urban 
population, growth of cities, population, growth and 
trends. 

(c) Social Problems of India as related to basic economic 
factors — Living standards. Literacy:, Health and 
Hygiene Distribution of diseases. 

Reference Books : 

Spate: India and Pakistan. 

Sharma: Location of Industries. 

R. K. Mukherjee : Food for four hundred millions. 

Howard : Agricultural testament. 

Indian Census Reports: 1931 and 1951 . 

Thomas: India’s Basic Industries. 

Gadgil: Industrial development. 

Anstey: Economic Development of India. 

Government of India: Planning Commission — First Five-year 
Plan, Progress Report for 1953-54. 

(25) 

III. (iii) Sociology — Paper I. 

Scope of Sociology— relation to other social science such as 
Anthropology, Psychology and History. Elements of structure. 
Meaning of ‘'Social Structure”. Social Order and social change. 
Analysis and classification of social groups. Social controls — Law, 
custom, morals and religion. Private property— its development from 
the earliest times. Class and status. Etlmocentrism. 

Books : 

Labierrc: Sociology. 

Forde: Habitat, Economy and Society. 

Kroeber: Anthropology. 

1-ewie: Social Organisation. 

Firth: Human types. 

R. Brown : Structure and Functions in Prim ' v : S ociety. 


97 . 



274 SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH IV — ECONOMICS [APP. 
MAIN FOB THE B.A, DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Murdock: Social Structure. 

Nadel: Foundations of Social Anthropology. 

Lowie: Cultural Anthropology. 

(26) 

Sociology— Paper II 

The Indian Castes and Tribes— *Their economy, sociology and 
religious beliefs, understood against the background of general culture 
-•history— Distribution^ geography— environment, linguistic affinities. 

Tribal Structure ; 

Contacts with civilization and their effects. 

Ethnocentrism in the contact between Highlanders and plains people. 
Village communities in India. 

Tribal rehabilitation. 

Economic life of tribes in South India. 

Books : 

Aiyappan — Iravas and Culture Change. 

Altekar— Village Communities in Western India. 

Hutton— Caste in India. 

Ehrenfels — Kadar of Cochin. 

Ghurye— Caste and Class in India. 

Majumdar— Fortunes of Primitive Tribes. 


BRANCH rV— ECONOMICS MAIN 

(* 7 ) 

(i) Principles of Economics. 

1. Nature, scope and methods of Economics— Economic Laws — 
Fundamental concepts. 

Consumption : 

2 . Law of Diminishing Marginal Utility (Laws of Substitution 
Indifference curves)— Consumer’s surplus — Demand — Law of Demand 
—Elasticity of Demand — The Demand Curve. 

3. Supply— Factors of Production. Theories of Population— 
i»aws of Returns— The Supply Curve. Forma of economic organiz- 
ation — Functions of the entrepreneur— Division of Labour, Large scale 
production— Localisation of in^^^try- The optimum firm, Capitalism> 
Socialism and Co-operation, 


98 



ni] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH IV — ECONOMICS 275 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


4. Price Mechanism — Market. Perfect and Imperfect competi- 
tion— Monopoly— speculation, value— -Theories of Value— Equilibrium 
of Demand and S apply— Market value and normal value. 

5. Value under imperfect competition and monopoly — Product 
Differentiation and selling costs — Value under joint supply and joint 
demand, composite supply and composite demand. 

6. Pricing of Factors of Production, the national income — Mea- 
surement of national income — Inequalities of incom.c. 

Wages — Labour as a factor Of production — Theories of Wages — 
Differences in Wages — Trade Unions and Wages — Minimum Wages. 

Interest— Nature and necessity of interest — Theories of interest— 
Long term and short term rates of interest — Interest and employment. 

Rent — The Ricardian Theory of Rent — Customary and competitive 
rent— Quasi-rent— Rent as a surplus— Transfer earnings. 

Profits — Gross profits and net profits — Theories of profit. 

8. Main Trends in the Development of Economic Thought — 
Mercantilists — Physiocrats — Adam — Smith— Alfred Alarshall — 
J. M. Keynes. 

Books Recommended: 

1. Meyers: Elements of Modern Economics. 

2. Benham: Economics (Latest Edition). 

3. J. R. Hicks: The Social Frame work (Second Edition). 

4. Alexander Gray : Development of Economic Doctrines. 

(28) 

(ii) Currency, Banking, International Trade and 
Public Finance. 

{a) The functions and Kinds of money. Monetary standard, 
Monometalism, Bimatalism— Different types of gold standard— Paper 
standard— Principles and Systems of Note issue — Value of money and 
its measurements— Index numbers— The Quantity Theory of Money- 
Inflation and Deflation— Methods of stabilising the value of money— 
The trade cycle, 

Foreign cxchanges*-^The gold points— Purchasing power parity 
theory— Exchange controls— The International Monetary Fund, 


99 



276 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH IV — ECONOMICS [aPP. 
main for the B .A. degree E XAMINATI ON 

{b) Evolution of modern banking — The general structure and 
methods of commercial banking — Assets and Liabilities of commercial 
banks — Bank balance sheets— The creation of credit— ‘The cheque 
system and the clearing house — Investment banking — Mixed banking— 
State regulation of banking— 'The World Bank. 

The Central Bank, nature and functions— ‘Types of Central 
Banks — Methods of credit control. 

The Money Market, main constituents— Bills of Exchange and 
discount houses. 

(c) Domestic trade and International trade — The theory of 
comparative costs — The terms of trade — ‘Balance of trade and balance 
of pay ments— Free trade verstu Protection— Regulation of international 
trade, tariffs, quotes, exchange control, etc. 

(d) The scope of public finance— Growth of public expenditure, 
its importance— Items of public revenue — Distribution of the burden 
of taxation — Principles of taxation — Direct and Indirect taxes, their 
main varieties— Public Debt — Distribution of revenues between the 
Centre and the States in a Federation. 

Books Recommended: 

1. G. Crowther: An Outline of Money (Rev. Ed.) 

2. Sayers: Modern Banking, 

3. Whale: International Trade. 

4. Dalton: Public Finance. 

(^ 9 ) 

{Hi) Indian Economic Problems. 

(1) Survey ofindia’s physical environment and natural resources. 

(2) The economic transition in India. 

(3) Population— Growth and distribution. 

(4) National Income of India— Its size and variations. 

(5) Agriculture, main features— Land tenures, history and current 
trends— Size of holdings, subdivision and fragmentation — Land reform 
•^Types of farming, subsistance, mixed, co-operative and Collective- 
Agricultural methods and technique— Irrigation— Animal Husbandry 
—Problems of marketing— Financing of agriculture— Co-operation, 
growth and structure of the movement, current trends— * Agricultural 
Planning. 


IQO 



Ill] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH IV — ECONOMICS 277 

MAIN FOR THE B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(6) Problems of Indian industry-^Industrial evolution in India— 
Location of i id'Jstries — Oxgmization of Large-scale industries, cotton 
textiles, iion and steel, jnte, cement, etc.— Small-scale industries— 
Cottage industries — Financing of industries, the Managing Agency 
system — External finance— Industrial policy— Planning for industrial 
development. 


(7) Labour problems— Trade unions, industrial disputes— History 
of labour legislation in In Ha— Minimum wages— Labour welfare— 
Social security. 


(8) Transport — History of railway development— Road— Rail co- 
ordination — Other forms of transport. 


t.9) 'I'ra le and Tariffs— Main trends in India’s foreign trade— 
Commercial policy— Discriminating protection — Tariff policy in recent 
yen s— 'Import and export controls— Features of internal trade. 

DO) (uirrcney and B inking— History of Indian currency— 
Mon.i.'.ry stun. lards in India— IncHa’s foreign exchange— India and 
the International Monetary Fund. 

Indigenous banking— Development of joint stock banking— The 
Reserve Bank of India- The Indian money market. 


(11) Public Finance — Main heads of revenue and expenditure of 
the Union and State Govjrnm.;nt3— Historical evolution— The Indian 
Public Debt. 

(12) State .n-l Economic Policy— Nationalisation— Mixed Eco- 
nomv— Community Projects— The Five-Year Plans. 

Boohs Jiecofnmcndcd'- 

I. P. Banerji: A Study of Indian Economics (Rev. El., 1954) 

Z. Jather and Beri: Indian Economics, Volumes I and II. 

3 . Wad ia and Merchant: Our Economic Problems. 

4. Malhotta, D. K: History and Problems Of Indian Currency. 

5. R. Balakrishna: Studies in Indian Economic Problems. 


36 


IQl 



278 SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH V — GEOGRAPHY [aPP. 
"THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

(30) 

(tv) Modern Economic Development of U.K.^ U.S.A. 

AND U.S.S.R. 

1. t/.iC,— Economic conditions in England on the eve of the 18th 
century— The Industrial Revolution —The Agrarian Revolution- 
Developments in Transport— ‘The Working Class Movement— Growth 
of Social Security— Industrial and Commercial Policy jn the 19th and 
20th Centuries— Development of Banking and Finance. 

2. l/.-S./I.— Struggle for commercial and economic independence— 
The effects of the Civil War— The advent of the Industrial Revolution- 
Transformation from an agricultural into a powerful industrial country 
—Growth of combinations— Development of transport— Revolution 
in agricultural methods and technique — Immigration and tariff policies 
—The New Deal— Effects of the Second World War on the economic 
position of U.S.A. 

3. U .5.5.R.— The history of the economic transformation of Russia 
from a mediaeval to a modern State— Effects of the Great War on 
Russian economy— The Revolution— The Soviet system— Planned 
economy and industrial development— Lessons of the Russians 
experiment. 

Boohs Recommended: 

1. L. C, A, Knowles: Industrial and Commercial Revolutions 

in Great Briuin during the 19th Century. 

2. Southgate: Economic History of England. 

3. Faulkener: American Economic History. 

4* Dobb! Russian Econom'c Development since the Revolution. 

BRANCH V— GEOGRAPHY MAIN. 

Paper /.—Principles of Human Geography. 

Paper //.—Physical Basis of Geography. 

paper Regional Geography of the World; and 

* (W Regional Geography of India. 

paper /K— Practical Geography and Practical Test. 

(100 marks each). 

* India denotes the Union of India only. 

(3*) 

Paper /.—Principles of Human Geography. 

I. Scope of Human Gwgraphy. Dsterminism Vs. Posgibilism 

ir. P<^utet|on Ri^ Settlements (Detailed Study), 



in] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH V — GEOGRAPHY 279 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

(a) Distribution of Man. 

(i) On the ba s is ofcultural elements— -Race, language 

and religion— iGrOup cxmtacts and conse- 
quences. 

(ii) On the basis of total numbers— Theories. 

Cb) patterns of distribution (Grouping). 

Settlement Patterns. 

Population Trends— Growth of Population— The diflfej > 
ent theories. 

(c) Population Movements, past and present. 

III. Mode of life (Systematic Treatment). 

Culture and Civilisation— Levels of Culture— The 
concept of sequent occupance. 

Mote: Mode oflife to be studied in relation to the levels of culture 
discussing in detail the different elements; House 
types, dress, food habits; arts and crafts, manners 
and customs, and rhythm of life. 

Ri ference Books : 

Brunhes: Human Geography. 

Vidal de la Blache: Principles of Hi man Geography. 

DaryllFOrde: Habitat, Economy and Society. 

Huntington: Human Habitat and Main springs of Civilisation. 
Huntington: Principles of Human Geography. 

Semple: Influences of Geographic environment. 

Benn : Foundations of Human Geography. 

Markham : Climate and Energy of Nations. 

Moodie: Principles of Human Geography. 

Carr Saunders; Population Problems, 

Chandrasekhar : Population and Food Supply. 

Boas: Race, language and culture (Macmillan). 

Thompson : Population Problems (McGraw Hill). 

(3») 

Paper /L— Physical Basis of Geography. 

I* Lithosphere: 

The earth— Origin— Distribution of land and sea— Perma- 
nency of Ocean basins. 


103 



SYLL. GltOliP-A OF B&ANCH V — GEOGRAPHY [aPP. 
MAIN FOR THE B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


General classification of the materials of the earth’s crust. 

Major rOck types, formation and scenic features associated 
with them-^Volcanism and crustal movements — ‘Process of 
denudation and deposition— Work of rivers, underground 
virater. Glaciers, Wind and Waves. Evolution of Land 
Forms— Cycle Concept. 

2. Atmosphere: 

Distribution of Land and Sea— The elements and factors 
of climate and weather— •Pressure— Distribution — 'Changes 
—Causes. Planetary, Seasonal and Local winds. Tempera- 
ture, insolation. Horizontal and Vertical distribution of 
temperature. Precipitation and Humidity. 

Weather types. Cyclones and Anti-cyclones. 

Climate— Classifications— Major climatic regions of the world. 
Climatic cycles. 

3. Hydrosphere: 

Submarine topography, temperature— Salinity— Cirailation 
of Ocean waters— Causes and effects— Waves and tides— 
Economic Resources of the Ocean- Marine Deposits. 

Reference Books: 

Woodridge and Morgan: Physical Basis of Geography, Geo- 
mOrphoIogy. 

Steers: The Unstable Earth 
Holmes: Physical Geology, Part I 
Salisbury: Physiography. 

Longwell, Knopf and Flint: Physical Geology, Parti. 

Hobbs; Earth features and their meaning. 

Kendrew: Climatology, Climates of the Continents. 

Miller: Climatology. 

Murreay: Oceans. 

Oommaney: Ocean. 

Jclikins: Oceanography. 

Johnstone: Oceanography. 

Lobeck: Gcomorphology. 

Lake: Physical Geography— 2 nd edition. 

Trewartha: An Introduction to Weather and Climate. 

Kimble: Weather. 

Pettersi*n; Introduction to Meteorology. 


I 04 




In} sylL. tN oroup-a of branch V— geography 281 

MAIN FOR THE B.A . D EGREE EXAMINATION 

Paper III. — '{a) Regional Geography of the Worljd. 

Part /.—General Smdy of Asia, Europe and North America. 
Discoveries. Expeditions, Explorations. 

Structure and Relief— Climate — Soils and Vegetal ion— -Agri- 
culture and Industries- Trade and Transport. 

Population— Natural Regions. 

Part //.—A Comparative Study of the Southern Continents. 

( 34 ) 

(6) Regional Geography of India. 

(India denotes Union of India only) 

/. Physical Setting and Resources : 

Space Relations. 

Structure, Relief and Drainage. 

Climate, Rainfall in relation to famine an J irrigation. 
Natural vegetation and soil. 

Mineral Resources and Production. 

//. Cultural pcaturcs : 

Population. 

Agriculture. 

Animal Husbandry and Fishing. 

Manufacturing. 

Communications and Trade. 

HI. Regional Study : 

Study of the Natural Regions of In Jia. 

Books for Reference . 

Lyde: Continent of Asia. 

Lyde : Cont inent o f Europe , 

Rodwell Jones: North America. 

G. B. Gressey : Foundations of Chi la. 

G. B. Gressey: Asia, Lands and Peoples. 

Fitzgerald: Africa. 

Stamp: Africa. 

Gregory and Shave; U.S.S.R. 


105 



282 SY3LL. IN GROUP -A OF BRANCH V — GEOGRAPHY [aPP, 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Stamp: Asia. 

Spate: India and Pakistan. 

Huntington and Valkenburg: Europe. 

Unstead ; World Survey. 

Shackleton: Europe. 

Shanahan; S. America. 

Griffith Taylor : Australia. 

Suggate : Australia. 

Stamp and Beaver: British Isles. 

Trewartha: Japan. 

Government of India: First Five-Year Plan. 

Government of Inda : Progress Report of First Five-Year Plan. 

( 35 ) 

Paper /l/.—*PRACticAL Geography and Practical Test. 

(0 Latitude, Longitude and Time— Elementary observations 
and problems. 

(it) Simple Surveying and Contouring with chain, prismatis 
compass, plane-table, clinometer. Dumpy Level Theo- 
dolite. 

(m) Graphic Method of Construction, properties and uses of 
the following projections : 

Zenithal (Polar cases only). Simple conical with one 
and two standard parallels. Polyconic, Bonne’s, 
Cylindrical equal area, equi-distant, Mercator, 
Sinusoidal, Mollweidc, Interrupted Mollweide and 
Recentcred Sinusoidal and International. 

(tv) Preliminary Cartographic exercises on area, enlargement, 
reduction and combination of maps. 

(i) Representation of relief and of typical land forms. 

(ii) Study and interpretation of (a) Survey of India, 

topographic sheets, (6) British O.S. Maps and 
(c) U.S. A'laps. 

(v) (i) Use of weather instruments. 

(ii) Study and Interpretation of Indian Daily Weather 
Report. 

(vt) Cartographical diagrams and distribution maps, land use 
maps. 

(vtO Instructional Tours lasting for about ten days for a geographic 
study of the home region and the surrounding region. 


106 



Ill] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH VI — PHILOSOPHY 282 
MAIN FOR THE B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Reference Books : 

Jameson and Ormsby: Mathematical Geography, Volume I. 

Raisz: Cartography. 

Hinks: Maps and Survey. 

Singh and Dutt: Practical Geography. 

Steers: Map Projections, 

Kellaway: Map Projections. 

Mcrrimann: Map Projections. 

R.N, Singh: Map Work and Practical Geography. 

D. Sylvcsrer: Maps and Landscape. 

Monkhouse: Aiapsand Diagrams. 

Birch: Maps. 

Carter*. Land forms and Life. 

Alice Garnett: Geographical Interpretation of Topographical 
maps with Atlas. 

A. L. Higgins: Elementary Surveying. 

H. M. S. O. : Manual of Map Reading. 

*20 marks to be apart for Note-books. 

50 marks for Practical Geography (Sections T, IV, V and VT) 
and 30 m xrksfor Practical Test (Sections II and III) 


BRANCH VI— philosophy MAIN 

( 3 «) 

1. (A) Eijropi an Logic and Theory ov Knowledge. 


A. Logic: — 


(a) Deduction: 

Deftnition and scope of Logic; Relation of Logic to other 
sciences with special reference to Psychology. Is Logic a science or 
an art or both ? Material of Logic. Logic and language. 

Unit of thought. Judgment and its parts. Word, name and 
term. Extension and intension of terms. 

Logical definition, division and classification; Logical defini- 
tion— Purpose — ^Ruli s— Testing. Logical division — Purpose— Rules— 
Testing. Dichotomy. Relation between definition and division. 
Nature of propositions — Categorical, hypothetical and disjunctive. 
Quality and quantity. Reduction of sentences to logicalforms. Distri- 
bution of terms. 


107 



283 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH VI — PHILOSOPHY [apP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Inference: Mediate and mxmeiiatc— Logical opposition; 
conversion, obversion, contraposition, inversion and obvcrt'jd converse. 

Nature of syllogism—Rules, figure and mood. Special 
rules of the figures. Determination of valid moods. Testing of 
Syllogisms. 

Hypothetical propositions and arguments. Disjunctive argu- 
ments and propositions. Relation between categorical, hypothetical and 
disjunctive propositions and arguments. A fortiori arguments. 

Fallacies. 

(b) Iftduction: 

The problem of Induction. Types of Induction— Enumerativc 
and scientific. Assumptions of Induction. Stages in the Inductive 
process. Observation and Explanation. 

Simple Enumeration*— Statistics and Calculation of Chances. 

Determination of casual relations ; Cause : Popular and 
Scientific views. Plurality of causes and Imermixtirc of effects. MilPs 
experimental methods. Method of Agreement . Method of Difference. 
Joint Method, Method of Concomittant Variations and the Method of 
Residues. Relation between the Methods ; their value. Place of 
^ elimination in Induction. 

Analogy : Nature, value and limitations. 

Hypothesis : Reasoning from a hypothesis. Formation of 
hypothesis. Requirement of a good hypothesis. Verification and 
proof of hypothesis. Deductive and hypothetical methods. 

Relation between deduction and induction. 

Fallacies of induction : Non-observation, mal-observation. 
False Cause, post hoc ergo popter. Unsound Analogy, Barren Hypothe- 
sis and Hasty generalisation. 

B, Theory of Kjioxoledge: 

General intrO-*uction. The problem of Epistemology. Rela- 
tion of theory of knowledge to theory of reality. 

» An outline treatment of theories of reality. Realism, Idealism 

and Pragmatism— Their basic ideas and their relation to the problem 
of knowledge. Examination of these theor ie s . 

Theories of trtiih based on them: Copy theory, Corregpon* 
dence theory. Coherence theory ; critical estimate of these theories. 


loa 



Ill] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH VI — PHILOSOPHY 285 

_ MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

bibliography : 

1. Creighton an1 Smart : An Introductory Text Book of Logic. 

2. Welton and Monahan : Intermediate Logic (Revised by 

Mellone). 

3 . T. M. P. Mahadevan : Fundamentals of Logic. 

4. R. Ramanujachari : Handbook of Logic. 

5. Lattaand Macbeath : Elements of Logic. 

6. Bosanquei : Essentials of Logic— Lectures I to IV. 

7. James : Pragmatism. 

8. Pratt: Pragmatism. 

9. Joad : Inrrojaction to Modern Philosophy. 

10. W, Carr : Problem of Truth (People’s Book Series). 

IT. Patrick : Introduction to Philosophy (Relevant Chapters) 

( 37 ) 

I. (B) Syllabus in Indian Logic. 

1. Nyaya : Tarka Sxstra or Pramana Sastra— Distinction of 
pratn i and hhram.i. Factors in knowledge : Prafnatr^ Pramacya, 
Pramiii and Pramana. Tha meaning of Pramana and its function in 
knowing process. 

2 . Definition : Freedom from the faults of ativyapti^ avyapti dJid 
asatnbhava, 

3. Distinction of yatharrha jTiana and ayathartha jnana. Means 
of yatkarthaj^t.ina : Preuyahshay Anumanay Upamana and Sabda. 

Praiyaksha : Definition of pratyaksha. Relation of self, mind, 
sense Organ and object— Different kinds of sense — • object contact : 
sarnyogUy samyukra^ samavaya and saniyukta-satnaveta-safnavaya , 
sam ivaya and viseshanata, 

4. Kinds of perception : Intermediate and determinate ^ laukika, 
manasa and yougika perceptions. 

5 . Annmma : Definition. Kinds : Purvavat, Seshavat and 

Satmnyatodrshta, 

Pararttha and Svarttka anumanas . 

Pararttha anumana Or Syllogism : its 5 members. Pratijm 
HetUy Udaharanay Upamaya and Abridgcjiicnt sometimes 

into 3 members. 


37 


109 



286 SYLL, IN GROUP -A OF BRANCH VI— PHILOSOPHY [AfJ*- 
MAIN FOR THE B. A, DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Meaning of Sadya^ Paksha, Hem and Vyapii ; of Sapakslia and 
Vipaksha ; of anvaya and vyaiireka. Inference distinguished into 
Anvyafjyatireki^ kevatamayi and kevalavyattrcki, 

6. Inductive process in Scivartthanipnanci. Importance of bhuyo- 
darshana and avyahhicketrita sakacarya. Importance of negative 
instance— sapaksha and vipaksha. 

7. Upamana : Two factors involved in it. Relation of Samjna 
and Samjni, Sadrssya jnana. Comparison and contrast with analogy. 

8. Sabda : Explanation of apta vakya — abhida and lakshana. 
Dependence of meaning of sentence on akanksha, yogyiita^ sajmidhi and 
tatparyajnona. Distinction of mdhi^ nisheda and arttha vada. 

9 . Fallacies •' savy^bMchari, viruddha^ satpratipaksha^ asiddka 
and bckihita. Their explanation and examples. Identification of 
arguments and detection of fallacies. 

10 . My^yei theory of Truth and Error : Pragmatic test of truth. 
Realism in Nyaya, that reality is external to thought. Repudiation of 
subjectivism . Anyatthakhyati theory of error. 

Bibliography : 

1. Annambhatta : Tarka Sangraha (Tr. by Athalye). 

2. S. Kuppuswami Sastri : Tarka Sangraha : A Primer of Indian 

Logic. 

3. S. Parthasarathi : Tarka Sangraha. 

4 . S, Radhakrishnan : Indian Philosophy, Vol. II — iGhapter on 

Nyaya. 

5 . Keith: Indian Logic and Atomism. 

6. S. C. Chatter jee : The Nyaya Theory of Knowledge. 

(3«) 

2. Syllabus in ethics. 

X , Scope and methods of Ethics. Relation to other sciences. 

2 . The beginning and growth of morality. Customary morality. 
Conscience. Systematic reflection. 

3 . Analysis of moral judgment. Motive and intention. Character 
and conduct. The Moral Self. 

4. Types of Ethical Theory. 

(a) Hedonism : Ancient and Modern. 

{b) Rationalism : Kant. 


; 10 



Ill] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH VI — PHILOSOPHY 287 
MAIN for the B.A. DEG REE EXAMI N ATION 

(c) Evolutionism : Huxley, Spencer, Darwin. 

(d) Idealism : Green and Bradley. 

(e) Pragmatism. 

(/) Marxism. 

5. The Right and the Good— Casuistry. The concept of moral 
values. 

6. Evil and Sin. Punishment. Theories of pimishmem. 

7. Moral Institutions : The Family. The State. 

8. Rights and Duties— Dharma as a moral concept, Svadharma. 

9. Freedom and necessity. The doctrine of Karma. The Ethics 
of nishkama karma. 

10. Morality and religion. 

Bibliography : 

j. J. S. Mackenzie : Manual of Ethics : (Books I and II and 
Chapters 2, 6 and 7 of Book III). 

2 A Seth : Ethical Principles. 

3. J. Muirhead : Elements of Ethics. 

4. Dewy and Tufts : Ethics. 

5. William Lilly : Ethics (Methuen). 

6. Ewing : E)thics (Teach Yourself Series). 

7. Thomas English Hill : Contemporary Ethical Theories (Chaps. 

VIII, IXandX) (Macmillan & Co., N.Y , 1950). 

8. P. N. Srinivi.sachari : The Ethical Philosophy of the Gita. 

9. T. M. p. Mahadevan : Outlines of Hinduism (Chapters V 
and VI). 


( 39 ) 

3 . Syllabus in Outlines of Indian Philosophy. 

1. The Vedas— Rcligous ideas. Ritual — ^Philosophical concepts. 

2. The Upanishads. Central teaching. Concept of Brahman- 
Atman. Nature of the World : 2 views ; Cosmic and Acosmic. 
Soul, its nature and destiny. 

3. The Bhagvad Gita. Idea of God. Spiritual disciplines. 
Ethics and religion . Concept of the perfect man . 

4. Riseof the systems : Non-Vcdicand Vedic. 



288 sVll. iH Oroup*-a of branch vi — BhIlosoBhy [aBF. 
main for the b,a. degree examination 


5. Indian Materialism : Charvaka. 

6. Jainism : Syadvada, Categories. Soul, its nature and destiny. 

*7. Buddhism : Philosophical implications. Kshanika vada and 
anatma vada. The Four Noble Truths. Ehics. Conception of 
Nirvana and Mahayana and Hinayana. 

8. Nyaya-Vaiseshika : Pramanas, Categories. ' Theory of causa- 
tion, Atomism, God. Soul audits destiny. 

9. Sankhya-Yoga. Prakriti and Purusha, Satkaryavada. Theory 
of Evolution. Eight limbs of Yoga. Idea of Go J . 

10. Purva Mimamsa. Authority of the Veda and the concept of 
Dharma, 

11. Schools of Vedanta : 

(a) Advaiia : Absolute and God. Doctrine of AFiya-Avidya- 
Vivaita Vada. Jiva. The doctrine of non-differcnce. Means of 
Moksha, Jivanmukti. 

(b) Visishtadvaita : Distinction from Advaita. Nature of 
Brahman, Jiva and Prapancha. Ethics, religion and moksha. 

(c) Dvaita : Nature of God, Soul and matter. Ethics and 
religion. 

(d) Saiva Sidhanta : God, Soul and Matter ; the theory of 
malas. Stages in spiritual growth. 

Bibliography: 

1. Max. Muller : SixSystemsOf Indian Philosophy. 

2. M. Hiriyanna : Essentials of Indian Philosophy, 

3. Datta and Chaterjee ; Introduction to Indian Philosophy. 

4. S. Radhakrishnan (Editor): History of Philosophy, Eastern and 

Western, Vol. I, Relevant Chapters. 

5. P. N. Srinivasachari : The Ethical Philosophy of die Gita. 

(40) 

4. Syllabus in Outlines of European Philosophy 
from Descartes to Kant. 

1 . Beginnings of Modern European Philosophy. 

2. Continental Rationalism : 

Descartes: The Method of Doubt. Dualism of Mind and Matter, 
Proofs for the ex i stence of God> Occasionalism j Spinoza. Sub stance. 
Attribute a Mode. The principle that all determination is negation. 
Nature, God, Substance. Necessity, Freedom and Teleology. Intel- 



Ill] SYLL. in OROUP-A of branch VII — psychology 289 
main for the b>a. degree Examination 


lectual love of God; Leibnitz: Theory of Monads, Pre-established 
harmony. Non-contradiction and Sufficient Reason. Best of all 
possible worlds. 

3. British Efnpiricisfn: Locke: The way of Ideas. Substance. 
Primary and Secondary qualities. 

Berkeley: Refutation of matter. World of Spirit. God. 

Hume: Creicism of ideas of Substance, Self, Causality, etc. 
Phenomenalism and Scepticism. 

4. Kant: The problem of c. iiical philosophy. Is metaphysical 
knowledge possible ? The Teaching of the dialectic. Principle of 
morality. God, Freedom and Immortality. 

Bibliography ; Relevant por tion sin: 

1. Thilly : History of Philosophy. 

2. Rogers: History of Philosophy. 

3. Will Durant; Story of Philosophy. 

4. Bertrand Russell : History of Western PliilOsOphy. 

5. Weber and Perry : History of EurOpjan PhilOsOpliy. 


BRANCH VU— PSYCHOLOGY MAIN 

( 41 ) 

I. General Psychology. 

1 . Scope, Methods and Branches . 

2. The Nervous System ; 

Structure of the nerves. Nerve comections. The Stimulus — 
Response mechanism. Reflex action. The Brain, Localisa- 
tion of cortical function. Co-oruination. Inhibition and facili- 
tation . Interac: ion of ind i vidual and cn V ironment . 

3. Sensations: 

General nature and characteristics. The mechanism of sensa- 
tions. Cutaneous, Olfoctory, Gustatory, Kinesthetic, Organic 
and Static senses. Structure of the eye and the ear. Theories 
of Hearing and Vision. Webcr-Ftchncr Law. 

4. Attention: 

The span of attention. Factors determining attention Physical 
adjustment during attention. Fluctuation. Varieties. Distrac- 
tion. 


lia 



290 SYLt. IN GROUP-A OF^BRANCH VII— PSYCHOLOGY [aPP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.A>ibEGREE EXAMINATION 


Perception; 

Rehtion to sensation. Characteristics. Perception of Space and 
Time. Inflacnce of past experience and set. Illusion. Social 
perception. 

6. The process of thinking ; 

Concept, Reasoning, Autistic thinking, Creative thinking. 

7 . Intelligence: 

Theories of intelligence. Intelligence tests. Measurement of 
Intelligence. Mental Age and I. Q. Use of intelligence tests. 

8. Emotion: 

Difference between feeling and emotion. The influence of incli- 
nation and learning on emotional behaviour. Facial and postural 
reactions Organic States and emotion. Central and pere- 
pheral theories. How emotions are defined and distinguished 
from oneanoth.:r. 

9. Learning: 

What is learning? Animal learning. The curve of learning. 
Kinds of learniag— Trial and error, Imitations, Observation, 
conditioned reflex. Negative adaptation; Insight; transfer of 
training. Habit, 

10. Memory: 

Learning. Distributed Vs. massed learning. Part Vs. whole 
learning. Relearning. Retention. Recall. Recognition. For- 
getting, Retroactive inhibition. Memory training. Recent ex- 
periments in memory. 

11 . Motivation and Behaviour : 

Physiological and psychological needs (instincts and motives) 
Conflict of motives. 

12. Heredity and Environment : 

Carriers of heredity. Chromosomes and genes. Relative im- 
portance of heredity and environment. Maturation. Experi- 
mental approach . Study of twins . 

13. Imagination: 

Play. Daydreams. Fantasy. Dreams-Freud’s theory of dream. 
Inv^tion and criticism. Appreciation of imaginative art. 
Types of imagery. 


114 




in] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH VII — PSYCHOLOGY 291 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


14. Personality: 

Methods of investigating personality. Biological influence on 
personality. Influence of environment. Types of persona- 
lity. Normal and Abnormal Personality. Dissociation. 

Reference : Psychology: N. L. Munn. Houghton, Mifflin Co., 
Boston, U.S.A. 

Psychology : Woodworth and Marquis — Latest edition. 
Methuen, London, 


( 42 >) 

2. Experimental Psvcholo^jy and Elementary Statistics 
Experimental Psychology. 

1. Description and Report: 

(a) Observ.aion and Description. 

{b) Aussage Experiment. 

Acatracy and Reliability of Report. 

2. Reflex Action: 

(a) Knee-jerk reflex and reinforcemen 
{b) Control of winking reflex. 

3. Sensory and Motor Processes: 

(u) Laws of colour mixture. 

{b) Cutaneous sensations. 

(c) Some phenomena of audition. 

(d) Galton’s Questionnaire. 

(c) Motor tests. 

(/) Fatigi’c. 

4. Attention: 

(a) Concentration of attention. 

(Jb) Negative control of attention 

5. Suggestion and rumour: 

(а) Progressive weights, 

(б) Illusion of warmth. 

(c) Suggestive questions. 

(d) Social transmission oi a story 


115 



292 SYLL. IN GRO'JP-A OF BRANCH VII — PSYCHOLOGY [APP* 
MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


6. Perception: 

(a) Individual differences in perception. 

Ih) Muller-Lyer Illusion. 

(c) Horizontal Vertical Illusion. 

(d) Size-Weight Illusion. 

(e) Illusion of movement. 

(/) Reversible perspective. 

(g) Selection and grouping. 

7. Reaction Time: 

(u) Simple reaction. 

(b) Choice reaction. 

(c) Associative reaction. 

8. Learning: 

{d) Learning of a motor pattern. 

(b) Effect of punishment on learning. 

(c) Insight learning. 

(d) Conditioned responses. 

9. Association: 

(a) Free Association— Word list method. 

(b) Free Association — Continuous method. 

(c) Controlled Association. 

(d) Association and strength of motives. 

(e) Association and Crime detection. 

10. Feeling and Emotion : 

(а) Affective Value of colours. 

(б) Judging Emotional expressions. 

(c) Bodily changes 

(d) Analysis of effective aspects of experience (materials— 

various bottles containing substances for smell and taste, 
stimuli j salt, sugar, quinine, vinegar, etc.) 

11. Memory and Intelligence: 

(a) Memory span. 

(fi) Memory for name sand faces. 

Ic) Rote, meaningful and logical material. 

(jd) T^sts pf retention. 


lie 




ril] SYLL. IN GROUP A OF BR. VII^PSYCHOUJOY 293 
MAIN FOR THE B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(e) Performance tests. 

(/) Binet Scale. 

(g) Group Verbal tests. 

(A) Group Non-verbal tests. 

(i) Tests for mental projections 

12. Imagination: 

(a) Inkblot tests. 

(b) Word building tests. 

(c) Sentence construction test. 

(d) Vividness of imagery. 

1 3 . Thinking and reasoning : 

(a) Development of concepts. 

(b) Controlled association. 

(r) Wire puzzles. 

(d) Syllogistic reasoning. 

14. Judging Human Nature from external signs: — 

(a) Distinguishing criminals and non-criminals from photo- 
graphs, 

(W Estimating intelligence from photographs. 

15. Personality: 

(a) Introve rs ion and extrove rsion , 

(b) Ascendence— Submission. 

(c) PresscyX-o tests. 

(d) Laughter Reaction tests. 

(c) Psycho- neurotic questionnaire. 

16. Personal Applications : 

(a) vocational guidance— Interest blanks. 

(b) Vocational guidance — ^tcsts. 

Reference : Collins and Drewer : Laboratory Guide in Experimental 
Psychology. 

Collins and Drewer: Experimental Psychology. 

Munn: A Laboratory Guide in General Experimental 
Psychology. 

Valentine: Introduction to Experimental Psychology. 
Kuppuswamy: Elementary Experimental Psychology. 
Kadir and Yoganarasimiah: A Guide to experiments 
in Psychology, 


38 


117 



294 SYLL. IN OJROUP A OF BR. VII — ^PSYCHOLOGY [APP. 
MAIN FOR THE B-A- DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Elementary Statistics. 

1 . Frequency distribution : 

Class interval, its frequencies and limits. Graphic represen- 
tation of frequency distribution. 

2. Measures of Central Tendency; 

Arithmetic mean, of grouped and ungrouped data; sbort method 
of calculating mean; the median of grouped and ingrOuped 
data ; the mode i when to employ mean ; medivW and mode ; the 
geometric mean^ the harmonic mean. 

3. Measures of Variability: 

Range; the semi-quartile range; average deviation of grouped 
and ungrouped data; the standard deviation of grouped and 
ungrouped data. Uses of different measures of distribution. 
Skewness and its relationship to measures of central tendency. 
Co-efficient of skewness. 

4. Cumulative Distribution: 

Types of cumulative frequencies and plotting cumulative distri- 
bution curves ; use of ogive, centile norms. 

5. The Normal Distribution Curve: 

Nature of the normal curve; practical applications of the normal 
curve, areas under a normal curve. 

6. Correlation: 

Measuring of correlation. How to compute a co-dficiem of correl- 
ation— Product moment and Rank difference. Scattergram. 
Size and reliability of correlation co-efficients. 

7. Reliability and Significance of Statistics: 

Population and samples; sampling distribution; confidence limits 
of estimates; reliability of an estimated mean; reliability of 
an estimated standard deviation; significance of difference 
between two means. 

Referemes: Statistics for the Social Sciences by T. G. Connolly and 
W. Sluckin. 

Tippet L. H, C.— Statistics. 


11 $ 




in] SYLL. IN GROUP A OP BR. VII — PSYCHOLOGY 2^5 
MAIN FOB THE B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


( 43 ) 

3. Child and adolescent Psychology 
Child Psychology’ 

1 . The MethcxJs of Child Psychology: 

Biographical, Observational, Experimental and Psycho-analyiical. 

2. The Child at Birth: 

The physique of new horn infants. SensOry and motor responses 
of the new born. Babinski Reflex. Sleeping. Emotional 
behaviour. Crying. 

3 . Motor Development: 

Holding the head; sitting; prehension and grasping; crawling; 
Creeping and walking. Maturation and learning and their 
relation to the development of walking. Relationship of age of 
walking to other variables. Race and sex. 

4. Development of Speech: 

Patterns of speech development; co nprehension ; building voca- 
bulary; forming sentences and pronunciation. 

5 . Emotional Development : 

Characteristics of childhood emotions. Common emotional 
patterns of childhood— Fear, Anger, Jealousy, Joy, Pleasure, 
Affection and Curiosity. 

6. Social Development : 

The problem of social development; Origin of social behaviour. 
Choice of companions. 

7. Play: 

Theories of Children’s Play, Kinds of play— Free and spontane- 
ous play; Make-believe; Constructive play; Collecting; Games, 
sports and amusements. 

8. Problems of Childhood: 

Thumbsucking, Nail biting. Enuresis. Physical handicaps 
Shyness. Left-handedness. Temper Tantrums. Speech dis- 
orders. Stuttering and stammering. Fceble-mindedne»s. 


119 




SYLL. IN GkOUP A OP BR. VII— PSYCHOLOGY [aPP. 
MAIN POR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


9. Mental Hygiene of Chidren : 

Attitude of parents towards children developing a feeling of secu- 
rity. 

References: J. W. Naggie: Psychology of the Child. The Ronald 
CooN. Y.,U.S.A. 

A. T. Jersild; Child Psychology, Prentice Hall, N.Y., 

U.S.A. 

Adolescent Psychology. 

1. Adolescence : 

The meaning of the term adolescence. The importance of adoles- 
cence. Methods of studying adolescence. Observational, 
Experimental, Diary, Case-history, Rating, Questionnaire and 
Projective methods. 

2. Physical and Motor Development during Adolescence: 

Increase in height and weight. Physiological changes. Endo- 
crine factors. Blood pressure, heart, pulse-rate and the diges- 
tive system. Special problems related to physiological growth. 

3 . Emci ional Growth : 

The nature and development of emotional behaviour. Emotions 
and their relation to over behaviour. Biological and socio- 
logical responses. Description of the major emotion s^Love, 
Anger and Fear, 

4. Intellectual Development: 

Age of cessation of intellectual growth. Constancy of I.Q. Distri- 
bution of ability. Sex difference in intelligence. 

5. Adolescent Interests: 

Nature and grow'th of interests in adolescence. Special charac- 
teristics of interests in social, personal and recreational activi- 
ties. 

6. Social Development: 

The nature of social development in adolescence. Selecting 
companions. The desire for conformity. Leadership. 

7. Adjustments of Adolescence: 

Adjustments at home, school and community. 

8. Mental Hygiene and Guidance; 

Tfuancy and delinquency. Healthful living. Developing a sense 

of worth. Understanding and accepting one’s self. Achieving 
a consistent attitude towards life. 


IZO 



II.] SYLL. TN GROUP A OP BR. Vll — PSYCHOLOGY 2^7 
MAIN FOR THE B«A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Refergnces: Karl C, Garrison; Psychology of Adolescence, Prentice 
Hall,N. Y.,U.S.A. 

J. W, Horrocks: The Psychology of Adolescence, 
Houghton Mifflin&Co., Boston, U.S.A. 

( 44 ) 

4. Social amd Abnormal Psychology. 

Social Psychology: 

1. The province of Social Psychology. Relation to Socialogy. 

The role of behaviour and consciousness. 

2. Social behaviour in animals, 

3. The influence of language and gesture on social consciousness. 

4. Elementary forms of social stimulation. Sympathy, imitation, 

suggestion and laughter. 

5. Nature and characteristics of coacting, face to face and Organic 

groups. The crowd. Is there a group mind ? 

6. Leaders — Type sand characteristics. Followers. 

7. Public Opinion. Radio, News. Rumour. Assessing public 

opinion, 

8. Culture and the development of personality. 

9. Cultural analysis and national character. 

References : AHpOrt: Social Psychology^ 

W. G, W. Sprott; Social Psychology, Methuen, 
London. 

Abnorfnal psychology ; 

General: The history of mental disorders. Psychological concep- 
tion of disorders. 

The Phenomenon of Unconscious: Main theories of Freud, 
Jung and Alder. Defence mechanisms. Conflia. Complex. 

Infancy and Childhood: Problems affecting infancy and early 
childhood. Avoidance of behaviour problems and childhood. The 
phenomenon of withdrawal. Depression. Schizophrenia. Organic 
brain disease and mongolism in childhood. 

Adolescence: Problems of mental health. Conflicts and adjust- 

ments in adolescence. 

Adulthood: Phenomenon of Anxiety. Insecurity and psycho- 
neurosis. Physical complaints arising from neurosis. Obesity as a 


121 



2^8 SYjLt, IN GROU^ A Ot RR. VlII — ^INblAN [aPR. 

MUSIC aiAlN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMN. 


disturbance in homeostasis initiated by psychological factors. The 
drink addict. The psychological factors involved in epilepsy. Hys- 
teria and mass hysteria. Schizopherenic disorders. Psychological 
characteristics of Schizophneria. Paranoid and paranoid disorders. 

Mental Hygiene: Hospitalisation. Building up mental health 
and imder standing. Prevention of abnormal behaviour. 

Reference: Gardner Murphy and Arthur J. Bacharach: An 

Outline of Abnormal Psychology. 

Bernard Hart : The Psychology of Insanity. 

BRANCH Vm— INDIAN MUSIC MAIN 
(45) A (4^) 

2 Papers.— T heory and HisYory of Music I & II. 

Two Practical tests: One on Compositions and the other on 
Manodharma Sangita. 

Paper I (45) 

Theory of Indian Music. 

In addition to the portion prescribed for tbe Pie-Universii> 
Course the following: 

Sangita: Nada, Ahata and Anahata. 

Nadotpatti: Marga sangita and Desi sangita. 

South Indian Musicography. 

Technical terms and their meanings. Swara nomenclature. 

Raga classification in detail. 

The scheme of 72 melakartas. The names of the 12 charkas 

The Katapayadi formula and its application. 

22 Srutisandtheragas wherein they figure. Scales of just inton- 
ation and eq: al temperament. Raga lakshana in detail. Lakshana of 
the following 51 ragas: 


I. 

Todi. 

7. 

Saver i. 

2 . 

Dhanyasi. 

8 . 

Chakra vaka. 

3. 

Asaveii. 

9. 

Vasanta. 

4. 

Punnagavarali. 

10. 

Saurashtra, 

5. 

Mayamalavagaula. 

II. 

Bhairavi. 

6 . 

Bauli. 

12. 

Anandabhairavi. 


IZZ 




Ill] SYLt. IN GKOUP A OP BR. VIII—INDIAN 299 

MUSIC MAIN FOR THE B A. DEGREE EXAMN 


13. 

Kharaharapriya. 

33 . 

Hamsadhvani . 

14. 

Sriraga, 

34 . 

Suddha Saveri. 

15. 

Madhyamavati . 

35 . 

Kedaram. 

16. 

Sriranjani. 

36 . 

Arabhi. 

17. 

Darbar. 

37 . 

Begada. 

18. 

Mukhari. 

38. 

Bilahari. 

19. 

Kanada. 

39 . 

Nilambari. 

20 . 

Ritigaula. 

AO. 

Devagandhari. 

21 . 

Huseni. 

41. 

Athana. 

22 . 

Harikambhoji. 

42. 

Nata. 

23. 

Mohana. 

43. 

Varali. 

24. 

Kedaragaula. 

44. 

Subhapantuvarali. 

25. 

Natakuranji. 

45 . 

Pantuvarali (srst Mela) 

26. 

Surat i. 

46. 

Purvakalyaani. 

27. 

Sama. 

47. 

S hanmukhapr i ya . 

28. 

Sahana. 

4 ^. 

Simhendramadhyama. 

29. 

Khamas. 

49 . 

Kalyani. 

30. 

Kambhoji. 

50. 

Saranga. 

31. 

Yadukulakambhoji. 

51. 

Hamirkalyani. 

32. 

Sankarabharana. 




The tala system of South Indian Music. 35 talas and 175 talas. 
Desadi tala and Madhyadi tala. Tala dasa pranas. Shadanga and 
Shodasanga. 

Lakshana of the musical forms figuring in art music, sacred music, 
vlancc music, dance drama, opera and Kalakshepam. Manodhaima 
sangita and its forms. Paddhati in Raga alapana kalpana swara and 
niraval. Pallavi exposition and the principles underlying it. De- 
corative angas figuring kritis, in Diadasa mudras figuring in musical 
compositions. 

Gamakas and their varieties. 

Musical Prosody. 

Musical appreciation. Styles of the great composers. Ability 
to write appreciation essays on classical compositions. 

Detailed knowledge of the construction, technique of play and use 
of the following concert instruments:— Tambura,Veena, Getuvadyam, 
Violin, Flute, Nagaswaram, Mridangam^ Thavil. 


123 



300 


SYLL, IN GROUP A OP BR. VIII — INDIAN [APP. 

MUSIC MAIN POR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMN. 


Drones used in Indian music— their Varieties and evolution. 

Materials used in the manufacture of Indian Musical Instruments. 

Gayaka Gunas and Gayaka Doshas. 

Physiological Acoustics. 

Acoustics of concert halls. 

Radio and Gramophone. 

Acoustics: Production and transmission of sound. Musical 
sounds and intervals. Consonance and dissonance. Vadi, Samvadi, 
Anuvadi and Vivadi. 

Pitch, intensity and timbre. The international Philharmonic 
pitch. Resonance; sympathetic vibration ; echoes, beats, harmonics. 
Laws of vibration of stretched strings and air columns. Absolute 
pitch and relative pitch. 

Modal Shift of tonic. Its possibilities and imitations. 

Moorchanakaraka melas, Moorchanakaraka ragas. 

Paper 7/(46) 

History of Indiaji Music, 

Raga classification in ancient music. The Grama-murchana-jati 
system. Suddha-chayalaga-sankirna system. The Tray odaslakshanas 
mentioned for ragas in ancient works. 

Musical forms and their evolution. Evolution of the concept of 
mela and the evolution of mcla paddhati and mela nomenclature. 

Evolution of the Veena. Dronesused in Indian Music, their varie- 
ties and evolution. 

Principal seats of music during the lyth, i 8 th and 19 th centuries 
in South India. 

Influence of exotic music on the development of South Indian 
Music. 

An outline knowledge of the contents of the following lakshana 
granthasand the historical value of those granthas : 

Swaramela Kalanidhi. Sangita Parijata. 

Raga Vibodha, Sangita Saramrita. 

Chaturdandi Prakasika. Sangraha Chudamani. 


1Z4 




301 


III) SYjLL. IN GROUP A OF BR. VIII — INDIAN 

MUSIC MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMN. 


History and development of South Indian Muse with special 
reference to the contributions of the following composers and lakshana- 
karas; also short biographies of these composers and lakshanakaras; 


Jayadeva. 

Talappakkam Annamacharya. 

Arunagirinathar. 

Purandaradasa. 

Ramamatya . 

Somanatha, 

Venkaiamakhi. 

Narayana Tirtha. 

Kshetrayya . 

Ahobala. 

Bhadrachala Ramadoss. 
Sadasiva Brahmcndra. 
Pachimiriyaiu Adiyappayya. 
PaidaJa Gurmnnrti Sastri. 
Ramaswami Dikshitar. 
Tulajaji. 

Thyagaraja. 

Muthtiswamy Dikshitar. 
Syama Sasti i. 

Govindacharya. 

Pallavi Gopalayycr. 
Arunachala Kaviraycr. 


Muthu Thandavar. 
Gopalakrishna Bharati. 
Subbaraya Sastri. 

Veena Kuppayyar. 

Swathi Thirunal. 

Subbarama Dikshitar 
Ghanam Krishnayyer. 
Anayya. 

Mysore Sadasiva Rao. 
Ramaswami Si van. 

Muthia Bhagavatltar. 

Maha Vaidyanatha Aiycr. 
Pallavi Scshayycr. 

Karttr Dakshinamtirthi Sastri. 
Miivvalur Sabliapati Iyer 
Patnam Subrahmanya Aiyar, 
Chengalvaraya Sastri. 

Tachur Singaracharlu. 
Tiruvottiyur Thyagayyar, 
Ramnad Srinivasa Ayyangar. 
Dharmapuri Subbarayar. 


Sources for the Musical History of India 
Contemporary Music 
Practical. 

One Rag.tnga raga lakshana gita and one janya raga lakshana gita. 

Two swarajatis including one of Scyama Sasti. Six tana Varnas 
of an advanced nature, representative of the Adi, Ata and Jampa talas . 
One Padavariia. Two of Thyagaraja’s Pancharatnam; four pada f . 
tvvo ragamalikas, two tillanas, two javalis and two darus. Fifty-one 
kritis, one in each of the 51 prescribed ragas. One each of the 
Ashtapadi, Tarangam and Devarnama, 

NoI'E : The compositions studied shall as far as possible be repre 
sentative of the composers mentioned under History: 

135 


39 



SYJuL. IN GROUP A OP BR. VUl — JNJJIAN [APP. 

MUSIC MAIN FOR THE B-A. DEGREE EXAMN. 


Alapana of the following 30 ragas: 


♦Todi. 

Natakuranji. 

Dhanyasi. 

Sahana. 

♦Mayamalavagaula . 

♦Khamas 

*Saveri. 

♦Kambhoji. 

Vasanta. 

Yadukulakambhoji . 

♦Bhairavi 

♦ Sankarab har ana . 

♦ Anand ab ha ira vi 

*Hamsadhvani. 

♦Kharaharapriya 

♦Begada. 

Sriraga. 

♦Bilahari. 

*Madhyamavati. 

Nilambari. 

♦Sriranjani 

Athana. 

♦Mukhari. 

♦Pantuvarali (51st mela) 

Surati 

Purvakalyani. 

♦Mohana. 

♦S ha nmukha p r i ya . 

♦Kcdaragaula. 

♦Kalyani. 


Ability to c eve lop Kalpana j waras to given themes in Adi, Rupaka, 
Triputa, Jampa and Chapii talas in the 20 starred ragas mentioned 
for alapana. 

Ability to sing or perform 6 simple Pallavis. 

In the pactical examination, candidates may offer vocal music or 
one of the following instruments : Vina, V iolin Gotuvadyam, Flute. 

Scheme of Examination. 

Paper I— Theory of Indian Music, 

Paper II— 'History of Indian Music. 

practical. 

Test I— Compositions, 

Test II— Manodharma Sangita. 

Bocks for Reference : 

1. Gayal^dlochanam by Tachur Singaracharlu. 

2. Ganendn Sekharam by Tachur Singaracharlu. 

3. Pallavi Swarakalpavalli by Tiiuvottijojr Thyagayyar. 

4. Sangita Sampradaya Pradarsini by Subbarama Dikshitar 

(2 VOUJ) » 

5. $10^^ Swara Praatara Sagaiam by Nadamuni Pandithar. 

1126 



mj SYLt. IN GROUP A OP BR. VIM— INDlIAN 

MUSiCMAIN POR THE B.A. DEGREE EXA&IN- 


6. Karimamirtha Sagaram by Abraham Pandithar. 

7. Principles of Layam by K. Ramachatidran (The Indian Music 

Publishng House, Madras). 

8. Music of Hindustan by A. H. Fox Strangways, 

y. Music and Musical Instruments of Southern India and Deccan 
by Capt. Day. 

10. Madras Museum Bulletin on South Indian Mucical Instru- 

ments by P. Samba murti. Government Museum, Egmore, 
Madras. 

11. Musical Instruments in the Indian Museum, Calcutta by 

Dr. Meerwarth. 

12. Richardson: Sound. 

13. Acoustics of the Auditoria by Davis and Kaye. 

14. Svaramelakalanidhi— edited by M. S. Ramaswamy Ayyar 

(Annamalai University Publication). 

15. Varna Malika by K. Ramachandran (Messrs. V. Ramaswami 

Sastrulu & Sons., Esplanade, Madras). 

16. Ghaturdandiprakasika — published by the Music Academy, 

Madras, 

17. Gana Bhaskara by K. V. Srinivasa Ayyangar. 

18. Syama Sastri and other composers by P. Sambamurti. 

19. Guruguha Gnanamrta Varshini by Vedanta Bhagavatar. 

20. Kirtanasagaram, BookslI,IIIand IV by P. Sambamurti. 

21. Songs by T. LakslimanaPillai. 

22. Acoustics in Tamil by R. K. Vis wana than. 

23. Dikshitar*s Compositions by Nataiaja Sundaram Pillai. 

24. South Indian Music, Books i to 5 by P. Sambamurti, 

25. Nowka Gharitra of Thyagaraya, edited by P. Sambamurti, 

26. The 72 Mclaragamalika of Maha Vaidyanatha Ayyar. Edited 

by Sabhesa Ayyar, 

27. Tanjai Peruvudayan Perisai by K. Ponniah Pillai, 

28. Sangita Sudha, Tamil translation of Chathurdandiprakasika 

and Sangita Saramrita-— published by the Music Academy, 
Madras. 

29. Grammar of South Indian Music by C. S. Ayyar. 

30. Sangita Lakshana Sangraha by A. S, Murti. 

31 . Tala Dipika by K, Ramachandran. 

32. Purandaramanimala by X^litangi. 

33. “ Flute *’ by P. Sambamurti (Second Edition). 



304 


SYLL. IN <3R0UP a OB' BlR. IX — ^WEStERN [APR. 

MUSIC MAIN BOR THE B A. DEGREE EXAMN- 


34. Introduction to the Study of Musical Scales by AlainDanielou . 

3 5 . Sangita Alartanda. 

36. The Kritis of Syama Sastriand others— 3 volumes by Vidya. 

37. Kxitimanimalai— *4 volumes by R. Ramanujam . 

38. Thyagaraja Kirtanalu with Commentary by Vcerabliadra Sastri. 

39. The Teaching of Music by P. Sambamurti. 

40. Great Composers— Books I and II by P Sambamurti . 

41. Dictionary of South Indian Music and Musicians by 

P. Sambamurti. 

42. Musical Compositions of Chengalvaraya Sastri by P. Samba- 

murti. 

43. North Indian Alusic by Alain Danielou. 

44. Life of Thyagara}aby SriP. Sambamurti. 

45. Alahabharata Choodamani, Chap. IV— Aladras Government 

Oriental Series. 

46. Thyagaraja’s Kritis set to notation by Sri C. S. Iyer, 

47. Pallakisevaprabandham of Sahaji by P. Sambamurti. 

48. Dakshinaraga Ratnakaram by K. Ramachandran. 

49. Dikshitar’s Compositions by A. Sundaram Iyer. 

50. 108 kritis of Tyagaraja by C. S. Iyer. 

51. Musical Compositions of Kalidasa by Kamala Krishna- 

murthi. 

52. Sangita Sabdartha Chandrika, by A. Satyanarayanamurtlii. 

53. AbhayambalNavavarnakritisby A. AnaniakrisliUa Iyer. 


branch IX— western music main 


Pour Papers— 2 Written and 2 Privctical. 


( 47 ) 


First paper ^Theory --*Forfii and InsirutnefUation^ History 
of Music. 


(1) Transposition and Tifuei Transposition from Clef to Qef, 

from Key to Key and from Short to Open Score, vice versa. 

The addition of Key and Time signature. Bar-lines, Rests to a 
melody, completing given bars by the addition of proper 
notes and rests. 

(2) Intervals and terms* Intervals of all kinds— Diatonic and 

Chromatic, Simple and Compound Direct, and inverted, 
naming the Keys Aiajor and Minor in which these may be 
found. 





Ill] SYLL. lU GROUP A OP BK. IX — WESTERN 30$ 

MUSIC MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMN. 


(3) Ornafnmts and phrasing'. To write out in full as essential 

notes of the bar given ornaments or abbreviations and to 
add suitable phrasing, bowing, marks of expression and 
indications of tempo. 

(4) Form: Knowledge of the Vocal and instrumental forms. 

(5) Orchestration: A general knowledge of all instruments of the 

Orchestra is required. 

(6) History oj Music: A general knowledge of the history of music 

from earliest times to modern times. 


(48) 

Second Paper -^Harmojiy, 

1 . Harmonic Analysis and Figuring of Basses: 

(a) AniiiysisofPianoforie Muisc by giving Chord Indications 
and by indicating the presence of unessential notes, 
notes of anticipation, pas sing notes and Pedal points. 

(b) Figuring the Bass of a simple example of Vocal Harmony 
lip to and including Chords of the Seventh and their 
inversions. 

2 . Harmony : 

(a) Simple exercises on Triads and their inversions; the 
Dominant Seventh, its Inversions and Resolutions. 

The construction and naming of Cadences. 

3. Figured Bess: Adding (in Open Score), Alto and Tenor parts 

with C clefs to a given Melody and Figured Bass,emplifying 
Triads, Chords of the seventh and their inversions, siispen- 
sion, passing notes, etc. 

Adding two or three parts above a figured Bas sin Open Score 
with G clefs for the inner parts. The bass may include 
unessential notes and Chromatically altered Harmony 
notes. 

4. Melody: Harmonizing a short Treble melody in three or four 

parts in Short Score. 

5. XJnfigured Bass: Harmonization of a simple unfigured bass in 

Short Score. 


129 



30<S SYstL. IH GROO? A m- li — IWESTKRN [APR. 

WSJC M^W RQR THE »>A- PBQRBE EXAMN. 

6 . Tm part Comterpoim : 

(a) Adding Cpuntcr point in the first species, above or below 
a given Canto Fermo. 

(ft) Adding a Counterpoint above or below a given Canto 
FermO in any other Species as may be inquired. 

Third and Fourth Paper ^Practical . 

Third Paper : Practical I « 

Pieces: One piece chosen by the candidate from each of the 
following lists: 


Bach : 


List I. 


Any Prelude and Fugue from the 48 PreLides and Fugues. 


List IL 

Beethovan : 

Sonata in G.Op. 14, No. 2. 
Sonata in B. Plat, Op. 22. 
Sonata in G. Op. 79. 

Sonata in F. Op 54. 

Haydn: 


Sonata in D. No. 7. Williams. 

Sonata in D. No. 9. Williams. 

Sonata in E. Flat No, i. Williams. 

Mozart : 

Sonata in F. (K. 280). Williams. 

Sonata in G (K. 283). Williams. 

Soiata in F (K. 332), Williams. 

Sonata in B. Flat (K. 570). Williams. 

List III. 

Bantock: Glory of the Son. Paxton. 

Bax: CoimtryTune. Chappell. 

Berkeley: Number 5 from “ Six Preludes’^ Chester. 


Bridge: “Fragrance** from ‘ Chaiacteri Stic Pieces’*. 

W, Rogerss. 


ISO 



nil SYJLL. IN GROUP A OF BR. IX — ^WESTERN 

MUSIC MAIN FOR THE B-A. DEGREE EXAMN* 


307 


Bowen: Prelude from * Suite Mignonne” Op. 39 Williams. 
Brahms: Intermezzo, Op. 76, No. 6. 

Chopin: Polaniaisc in Cminor, Op. 40, No. 2. 

Debussy: Seranade for the Doll. U.M. Publishers. 

Dohnanyl: March on a Ground Bass, Op. 17, No. i. 

Lengnick. 


Edmunds: September Williams, 

Farjeon: A pipe Tune from “ Moorish Idylls.*’ Ashdown 

Greig: Puck, Op. 7i3No.3,Peter8-Hinrichescn,Ed.2985. 
Harrison: Burlesque from “ Five by Ten ” (Book 5). 

Lengnick . 

Ireland: Soliloquy. Augener. 

Macdowcll; Schcrzinc, Op. 39, No. 1 1 . Elkin. 

Moeran: Bank Holiday. Oxford Univ, Press. 

Parry: A Caprice from “ Five Romantic pieces.” Ashdown. 

Poulence : Novelette in C. Chester 

Ravel: Minuet on the name Haydn. United Music Publishers. 
Rowley: Idyll. Ashdown. 

Schumann: Novellette in E, Op. 21, No. 7. 

Scott: Number 2 from “Etudes,’* Op. 64. Elkin. 


pour ih paper : Practical II. 

(1) Sight Reading: 

(2) Ear Tests : 

(a) To name major, minor and diminished triads played in 
close root position or first inversion, also to name 
the augmented triad. 

(hj To name the modulation of an harmonic passage as 
being from a major key to its relative minor, its 
median minor, its supertonic minor; or from a 
minor key to its relative major, flattened leading 
note major or submediant major, after the passage 
has been played by the examiner. 

(c) To name cadences— Perfect, plagal, imperfect or inter- 

rupted, as they occur in a simple diatonic passage, 
in a minor or major key, played by the examiner 

«' 

(d) To sing or play from memory the upper or lower part 

of a two-part passage in a major or minor key which 
will be in some form of simple time, played twice 
by the examiner. The key will be stated and the 
tonic chord sounded first. 


308 


SYLL. IN GROUP A OP BR. IX — ^WESTERN [aPP. 

MUSIC MAIN FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMN. 


(e) Arythmic phrase not exceeding four bars in simple time 
will be played twice by the examiner. The candidate 
will be required: 

(a) To clap or tap the note-values fi<>m memory. 

(b) To beat time while the same phrase is played 

again and to continue after the music has 
ceased. 

(c) To state the time signature of the phrase. 

(3) Scales arid Arpeggios: To be played from memory. 

Scales (i) Tne Mijor, Harmonic and Melodic Minor and 
Chromatic Scales, in thirds and sixths, one note to each 
hand, in similar motion, beginning frOm above or below 
to the extent of four octaves. For the Chromatic Scales 
minor thirds and major sixths arc required. 

(2) The Major Scales in double octaves, to the extent of 
three octaves in similar motion. 

(4) Arpeggios: 

Arpeggios founded on Dominant and Diminished Sevenths 
and their inversions^ one note to each hand, beginning 
from above or below, to the extent of four octaves. 

All scales and arpeggios are to be prepared legato and 
staccato, and fortCy piano, cres and dim, 

(5) Viva Voce: 

Questions will be asked on technique, repertioire and form. 
Also on harmonic progressions occurring in the selected 
pieces up to and including chords of the Dominant and 
Diminished sevenths and their inversions, suspensions 
and passing and other unessential notes. 

Reference Books : 

Trinity College Texi-books Musical Knowledge for Local Examina- 
tion in theory Adv. Intermediate Division— Senior Division 
and Higher Local. 

Melody and Harmony by Stewart Maepherson. 

Harmony i8t,2nd and 3rd Year by William Lovelock. 

Form in Brief by William Lovelock. 

Form by Steward Maepherson. 

The Insmimcnta of the Orchestra by Borland. 

Brass Wood Wind and Strings by Detmond McMahon. 

The Listener’s History of Music by Percy A. Scoles. 


13 ^ 



Ill] SYLL. IN GROUP A OF BR. X — ^DRAWING AND 3^9 
_J>MNTING MAIM FOR TH K B .A> DEGREE BXAMN. 

TIic Growth of Music- 
Part I— Up to J. S. Bach. 

Part II— The Age of the Sonata. 

Part III—* The Ideals of the i 8 th Century. 

Each part published separately by Oxford University Press. 

Studies of Great Composers by Hubert Parry. 

branch X— darwing a painting main 

4 hours per week for 2 years. 

20 hours per week for i year. 

Syllabus. 

Practical. 

( 49 ) 

I. Mature Drawing . 

Plants: Flowers, fruits and branches, a single tree, a group of 
trees, from nature. 

Medium: Pencil, coloured pencil, watercolour. 

Still-life: In pastel, water-colour, oils. 

Animals: Study of construction and proportions. Some domestic 
animals: cows, goats, dogs, etc. Some birds, fowls. Quick 
sketches in pencil. 

Composition: Village scenes with animals. 

Medium: Water-colour, tempera, oils. 

Landscapes: Medium: Pencil, coloured pencil, water-colour, 
pastels, Indian ink, oils. 

Human figure: 

(a) In repose from real life and in action from real life. Quick 

sketches in pencil only. 

(b) Study of parts, construction and proportions of the human 

body. Medixim: Pencil, charcoal or colouied pencils. 

’ Portrait: In oils or any other medium. 

Figure Composition: Scenes depicting action. Milium- Tem- 
pera, watcr-colour> pastels, oils. '• 


40 


133 



^10 SYLL. IN group a of BR. X — DRAWING AND [aPP 
painting MA^K FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMN. 

(50) 

2. (a) Perspective and Object Drawing* 

Laws ofperspective by observation of a straight-line objects. 

Laws of perspective by observation of curved-Une object. 
Space-perspective by obrsevation in out-door sketches. 

Law of perspective of oblique lines in 
(a) Object drawing. 

Space perspective. 

Practical application of perspective in 

1. Object drawing: 

Single objects^ group of objects in straight-line. curVed-linc 
and oblique line. 

2. Landscape: 

(a) Illustration by clear diagrams of out-door space-pcrs- 
pective. 

(Jb) Free-hand drawing of landscapes from nature, or com- 
posed by the students. 

Medium: Pencil, coloured pencils, pastels, Indian ink 
or water-colour. 


(51) 

2. (b) Decorative An. 

(a) Flat design Compositions for Handicrafts: borders, all-over 
patterns, etc. , for silk, satin, woo J, leather, pottery, etc. 

{Jb) Occasional execution of Compositions of borders, all-over 
patterns, etc., on silk, satin, wood, leather, pottery, etc. 

(5*) 

3. Lettering, 

(ei) Decorative handwriting. 

(h) Letter-composition, for signs, etc. 

(For Alfnmsp Charts 9 ModsUt Crafts; Museum, 

Exemskmi earn as for Hilary of Pine Arts Mam). 


1S4 


Ul] SYLL. IN GROUP A 0» BR. XI— HISTORY Of 311 
FINE ARTS MAIN TOR THE B.A- DEGREE EKAMN- 

( 53 ) 

4. Principles and Appreciation of Arts ay.d Craft Processes. 

Same syllabus as for History of Fine Arts Main. 

Bibllooraphy. 

Por Drawing and Painting Degree Course, 

E, A. Branch: The Principles of Model and Common Object 
Drawing (Paper-Setters should limit themselves in their ques^ 
tions to the amount of perspective given in this book). 

W. Abbott: The Theory and Practice of Perspective. 

H. W. HarricOnand W. I. Wyllie: The Theory of Pictorial Art. 

F. J. Glass : Drawing Design and Craft work. 

B. Sleegh: A Handlx>ok of Elementary Design. 

Herbert A. Rankin: The Teaching of Colour (Art Manuals). 

E. G. Larz: Practical water-colour sketching. 

L. Richmond and J. Littlejohn: The Technique of water-colour 
Painting. 

Hilair Hilcr : Notes on the Technique of Painting. 
AdirianStockes: Landscape Painting. 

Rex Vicat Cole: The Artistic Anatomy of Trees. 

Harold Speed: Practice and Science of Drawing. 

Th. Kautzky: Pencil Pictures, 

Th. Kautzky: Ways with Water-colour. 

Th. Kautzky : Painting Tree and Landscapes in Water-colour. 

H. Gasser; Oil Painting, methods and demonstrations. 

vS. J. Solomon: The Practice of Oil Painting and Drawing. 

Russell Laker ; Anatomy of Lettering. 

A . Cecil Wade : Modern Lettering, 

James M, Dunlop: Anatomical Diagrams, 

PedrodeLemos,F.R, S. A,: The Art Teacher. 

BRANCH XI—mSTORY OF FINE ARTS MAIN 

4 papers, 

4 hours per week for 2 years. 

20 hours per week for i year. 





3i2 SYl.1.. IK GROUP A Oi' BR. K1 — HISTORY OF [aFP. 

fine ARTS MAIN FOR THE R.A. DEGREE BXAMN. 


Stllabvs. 

(S4) 

/. History af Indian Art : 
PrOto-Historic Period, 

Indus Valley Civilisation, 

Historic Periods, 


Arghitbcturb. 

Mauryan Architecture (c. Fourth cent. B.C.^c. 185 B.C,) 

Sunga and Early Andhra Architecture: Barhut, Bodh Gaya, 
Sanchi(c. 185B.C.— ‘C. 150 A.D.) 

Rock-cut Architecture of the Hiuayana Period. 

W. India: Bhaja, Kondane, Kasik Pandulena Cave, Bedsa, Karlc, 
Kanheri ; Ajanta Caves 8, 9, 10, 12, 13 (22nd Cent. B.C, -—2nd 
Gent. A.D.) 

Rock-cut Architecture in Orissa (c. 2nd Cent. B.C.) 

Gandhara— Mahayana Buddhist Viharas(c. 250B.C.— 450 A.D.) 
Buddhist Architecture in South India: Later Andhra: Amaravati, 
Nagarjunakonda (c. 25 B.C. —•320 A.D.) 

Gupta Architecture (c. 320— c. 650 A.D.) 

Early Chalukyan Architecture; Ailiole, Badami, Pattadakkal 
(c. 450— c. 650 A.D.) 

Rock-cut Architecture of the Mahayana Period: 

W. India: Ajanta, Ellora Buddhist Caves, Aurangabad, Bagh 
^420—642 A.D.) 

Rock-cut Architecture Final phase. Ellora: Brahmanical and 
Jain Caves (600—900 A.D.) 

Dravidian Architecture: 

Origin under the Pallavas (600—900 A.D.) 

Chola (900— 1150 A.D.) 

Pandya (1100— 1350 A.D.) 

Vijayanagar (c. 1350—1565 A.D.) 

Madura (from c. 1600 A.D.) 

Northern or Indo-Aryan Architecture : 

Orissa (800—1250 A.D.) 

Khajaraho Group C. India (950—1050 A.D.) 

Gujarat and the West (941— 1311 A.DJ 


1S6 


Ill] SYJUt. IN GROUP A OPjfPR. XI — ^HISTORY OF 313 
F INE a rte main for THE B.A. DEGR EE EXAMN. _ 

Later Ghalukyan Style (a) Hoy sala, (^) N. Mysore up the Thunga- 
badra river (c. 1050—1300 A.D.) 

Kashmir: The Buddhist and Brahmanical remains (200— 
1300 A.D.) 

The Building Art of Nepal. 

Islamic Architecture: 

(a) Delhi or Imperial Style under the Slave Dynasty (c. 1200— 
1246 A.D.) 

Under the Khilji Dynasty (1290—1320 A.D., 

Under the Tughlak Dynasty (1320—1413 A.D.) 

Under the Sayyid Dynasty (1414— 1451 A.D.) 

Under the Lodi Dynasty (1451—1526 A.D.) 

(i) Provincial Styles (Summary only). 

Buildings of Sher Shah Shur (c. 1530—1545 A.D.) 

Mughal Architecture: 

BabUr (1526— *1531 A.D.) 

Humayun (1531 — 1556 A.D. ; 

Akbar (1556—1605 A.D.; 

Jahangir (1605—1627 A.D.) 

Shah Jahan (1627—1658 A.D.) 

Aurangazeb (1658 — 1 707 A.D.) 
and after. 

The Mediaeval Palaces and Civic Buildings. 

Sculpture. 

Mauryan. 

Sunga and Early Andhra: Barhut, Bodh Gaya; W, Ghats: 

Kondane, Bhaja, Bedsa, Karle, Sanchi. 

Later Andhra: Amaravati, Nagarjunakonda, 

Kushan: Gandhara (Greco-Roman form and Indian Iconography), 
Mathura (Indian Phase), 

Gupta : In the Gupta Empire ; in the Deccan : Ajanta, Auranga- 
bad, Bagh and Kanheri. 

Post-Gupta : Ellora, Elephanta, Pala, Sena and Orissa (with absolute 
restriction of erotic motifs, so here, as elsewhere). 

South Indian : Pallava, Chola, Vijayanagar and Modern. 

Hoysala. 

Indian Bronze Sculpture. 


1S7 



31.4 SYLL, IN G^ROUP A OF BR. XI — HISTORY OF tAPP. 
FINE ARTS MAIN FOR THE B-A. DEGREE EXAMN» 


Painting. 

A|anta: especially Caves 9 > i6, 17, 2. 

Paintings at Bagh, Sittannavasal, Badami, Ellora, Tanjor » 
Lepakshi, Travancore-Cochin, Conjeevaram. 

Mughal : Perio J of Humayun. 

Perio 1 of Akbar. 

Perioi of Jahanghir. 

Period of Shah Jahan. 

Dekkani Paintings, 

Rajput Painting: Rajastani School. 

Pahari School— (a) Early Period: Basholi. 

(6) Liter Period: Kangra, Cjahrwala. 
Sukhat, Mandi. 

Modern Indian Painting: 

Indian Art in South-East Asia : 

Ceylon, Cambodia, Siam, Brnma, Java 
Indian Art in China : 

Buddhist Art in China. 


( 55 ) 

//. History of World Art. 

Ancient Art : 

Egyptian Art : 

Early Egypt and Old Kingdom (about 4500 — 2475 B.C.) 

The Middle Kingdom and the Empire (2160—1090 B.C.) 

Art in the Tigris-Euphrates Valley and Persia : 

Sumer ian Art (about 4000—1925 B.C.), Assyrian Art (about 
1000—612 B.C.), Chaldean or Neo-Babylonian Art (612—539 
B.C.), Achemenian Persian Art (539—331 B.C.). 

Aegean Art (abo it 3000-1100 B.C.). 

Greek Art : 

Geometric, Archaic and Fifth Century Art (about noo— 400B.C. ) 
Fourth Century and Hellenistic Art (400 B.C. to the 1st cent. 
B.CJ. 

Etruscan and Roman Art (about no B.C.— ‘A.D. 500). 


isa 



Ill] SYLL. IN GROUP A OF RR. XI— HISTGRY OF 

fine ARTS KU I ^ ®!PIL t>E<3R EE EXAMN. 

Chinese Art (about 3 ooo— B.C.— -A.D. 907), 

Japanese Art (A.D. 552—900). 

Mediaeval Art, 

Early Cliristian and Byzantine Ait: 

Russian Ait (tenth to eighteenth century A.D.). 
Muhammadan Art (A.D. 622 to date). 

Persian Art: Sassanian Persian Art (A.D. 226—641). 

Muhammadan Persian Art (A.D. 641—1736). 
Romanesque Art (About A.D. 500—1150). 

Gothic Art (About A.D. 1150— 1550). 

Chinese Art (A.D. 960 to date). 

Japanese Art (A.D, 900 to date). 

Renaissoftce Art, 

A. Renaissance Art in It ay: 

Architecture and Sclupture (about 1300—1600). 

P.unting: Sienese and Florentine Painting, 

Non hern Ii alian Painting. 

B<JrOque Art : (Seventeenth Century). 

B. Rcnaissoftcc Art hi ^ortherjiy Western and Eastern Europe : 

Flemish Art (Fourteenth to Seventeenth Century). 

German An (Fourteenth to Sixteenth Century). 

Spardsh Art (Fifteenth to Nineteenth Century). 

Dutch An (Sixteenth to Seventeenth Century). 

English Art (Sixteenth to Nineteenth Century). 

French Art (Fifteenth to Nineteenth Century). 

Russian Art (Sixteenth to Nineteenth Century). 

Tendemies in Modem Art, 

Nineteenth Century: 

Architecture. 

Painting: English and French. 

Twentieth Century : 

Architecture. 

European Painting. 


315 


J30 



316 SYLL. IN GROUP A OP BR. XI— MSTORY OF fXPP. 
FINE ARTS MAIN FOR THE B A. DE GREE EXAMN. 

( 5 «) 

Principles and Apprhciation of Art & Craft 
Processes. 

Fundamental Principles of Art : 

BUtnents of Form: Line. 

Colour (Hue Value— •Inttfnsiiy). 

Texture. 

Area. 

Volume. 

Organisatio/n of Form : Structural and Decorative. 

Re^remejits : “ Form follows function,** 

“ Variety in Unity 

principles of Design : Harmony— Proportion— Rhythm— 'Emphtsis. 
Architectural Form : 

Determinants : Purpose— Material— Site. 

Creation: 

Plan: 

Mechanical activity : 

Four kinds of construction: 

Lintel, Arch, Concrete, Steel. 

Elementary Forms of Construction : 

Foundation. 

Walls. 

Columnar construction. 

Arch construction. 

Roofs. 

Floors. 

Openings. 

Aesthetical activity : 

Proportion and relationship. 

Line Direction, light and dark. 

Colour and texutre of materials. 

Architectural Design ^ Decoration : 

Elevation, Section : Facades. 


140 



in] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OP BR. XI — ^HISTORY OF 317 

fine arts main POR the B.A. DEGREE EXAIilN. 


Horizontal Section : Plans. 

Elementary Forms (design). 

Decoration: 

exterior. 

interior. 

Sculptural Form: 

Three classes : Sculpture in the round. 

Relief. 

Intaglio. 

Materials: Hard and Plastic. 

Process: Carving and Modelling. 

Function: Dependent or Independent on architecture. 

Site: Outside or indoors. 

Pictorial Form : 

Painting: Fresco. 

Tempera. 

Oil. 

Water Colour. 

DraoHng: Pencil. 

Crayon. 

Pen and ink. 

Charcoal. 

Graphic Hand Processes: 

Wood-cut and Linoleum Gut. 

Engraving. 

Etching. 

Dry Point. 

Lihography. 

Silk Screen Process. 

Forms in Minor Arts: (With special emphasis on Indian crafts). 
Ceramics and Glasswsre: 

Porcelain Stoneware. 

Pottery Chinaware, 

Enamels. 

Mosaics, 


41 


141 




318 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. XI —HISTORY OF [ARP. 
FI|i^ ARTS MAIN FOR THE B-A. DEGREE BXAMN. 

Baked clay Terra Cotta. 

Glassware. 

Stained Glass. 

Metal Work: 

Work in precious metal. 

Iron work. 

Other metals. 

Oiyptics and Carving: 

Gems. 

Seals. 

Wood carving. 

IvOrYj horn, bone etc. 

Textile: The Processes: — 

Weaving. 

Knitting. 

Felting. 

Lace making. 

Design. 

Strucmral. 

Woven Patterns. 

Printed. 

Batik. 

Applique. 

Embroidery. 

Art of the Book: Development— 

Manuscript : Formal writing. 

Cursive writing. 

Miniature painting. 

Printing: Pictorial woodblocks. 

Woodblocks with a few words on them. 

Individual letters. 

Platen press. 

Cylinder press. 

Rotary type. 


142 




hi] SYLL. in OROTiP-A OF BR. XI -—HISTORY OF 310 
fine arts main for the B.A. PBCTIEB BKAMN. 

Setting : Handsetting. 

Linotype. 

Monotype. 

Different types. 

Mechanical Graphic Process: 

Line cut. 

3- colour process. 

Half-tone process. 

4- colour pocess. 

Photogravure and Rotogravure. 

Collotype. 

Short Historical Survey of Art Theories: 

In India (Silpa Sastras etc.) 

In Europe. 


( 57 ) 

Lettering. 

Same Syllabus as for Drawing and Painting Main. 

Hote^Booksy AlbumSy Charts, Models, etc. : 

Architeaural albums, containing copies of buildings (Plans, 
elevations and sections), photo collections, charts, enlargements of 
monuments, note-books on excursions and visits to museums,Craft 
samples, architectural models have to be prepared by the students, 
during the course. 

Students who privately acquaint themselves with a craft like : 
photographic, book-binding, leathercraft, lino-cut, weaving, embroi- 
dery, fretwork, etc. , etc. can submit their work together with their albums 
for the examination. The examiner will give them marks according 
to the merit of the work. The College could provide students with 
facilities for such work. 

A Fine Arts Museum should be provided in the College, contain- 
ing Art reproductions (Monochrome and polychrome) maps, charts, 
architectural models, copies of sculptures, samples of different crafts 
(especially Indian), drawings and pianiings of the students and objects 
of decorative art. 

Excursions and trips to archaeological places as well as visits to 
museums exhibitions and crafts-^ctorics are part of the Syllabus. 


143 



320 SYLt. IN OROOP-A OS' BR. XI— filSTORY OF [aPP- 
FINE ARTS MAIN POR THE B A. DBGOIEE EKAMN. 


Bibliography for History of Fine Arts Degree 
Course. 


Indian Art : 


Benjamin Rowland : 
Rawlinson, Wilkinson, 
Irwin, Cordington 
Percy BrOwn : 

J. Ph. Vogel : 

A. H. Longhurst : 


The Art and Architecture of India. 
Indian Art. 

Indian Architecture, 2 Vols. 

Buddhist Art in India, Ceylon and Java. 
Story of the Stupa. 

Pallava Architecture, 3 Volb. 
Nagarjunakonda. 


Cordington, Irwin & 
B. Gray 

Ludwig Bachhofer : 
Chintamoni Kar : 

G. Yazdani : 


Stella Kramrish: 


Basil Gray: 

J.V.S. Wilkinson: 


^ The Art of India and Pakistan. 

Early Indian Sculpture, 2 Vols. 

Classical Indian Sculpture. 

Indian Metal Sculpture. 

Ajanta, 4 Vols. (Text & Plate). 

Fine Arts: Architecture Sculpture and 
Painting History of the Deocan, Vol. I, 
Part VIII. 

The Act of India through the Ages. 
Indian Sculpture, 

A Survey of Painting in the Deccan. 
Rajput Painting. 

Mughal Painting, 


Percy Brown : Indian Painting, 

Indian Painting under the Mughal s. 


Majumdar: 


The History and Culture of the Indian. 
People; Chapters on Art. 


Art Publications of the Government of India. 


A Handbook for Travellers in India and Pakistan, Burma and 
Ceylon. 


World Art: 

' Helen Gardner : Art through the Ages. 

Note : The History of Pine Arts being so vast, paper^setters should 
limit themselves to the cheaters in this booh, bearing the same name of the 
topics as regards the choice of artists and their work. 


144 



ui] sylL. In group*a oi br. xi — ^history of 321 

FINE ARTS MAIN BOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMN. 


Frank Ross : 

Louis Hour t icq: 

Sir Banister Fletcher : 

D. Ware & Beauty : 
Jose Pijoan : 

Upjohn, Evcrard & 

Wingcrt : 

J. I. Sowall : 

E. H. Gombrich : 
Adolfo Venturi ; 
Jackson : 

Emile Male : 

Marcel Aubert : 
Barnes, Maude, FierO : 
Gregory Padrick : 
Giorgio Vasari : 

Otto Bene sell : 

Roger Fry : 

Raymond S. Stites : 


An Illustrated Handbook of Art History. 
Encyclopaedia of Art, 2 Vols. 

History of Architecture on the Compara- 
tive Method. 

A Short Dictionary of Architecture. 
History of Art, 3 Vols. 

History of World Art. 

A History of Western Art. 

The Story of Art. 

A Short History of Italian Art. 

Gothic Architecture in France, England 
and Italy, 2 Vols. 

Religious Ai t. 

French Cathedral Windows. 

Renaissance Vistas, 

When Painting was inglor}'. 

The Lives of the Painters, Sculptors 
Architects. 

Art of the Renaissance in Northern 
Europe. 

Flemish Art. 

The Arts and Man. 


Principles and Appreciation of Art and Craft Processes : 


Faulkner, Ziegfeld 
Hill. 

Harriet Goldstein: 

1 lelcn Gardner : 

A. Philip Me Mahon : 
Overton : 

L. Kainz & O. Riley : 
Heinrich Wolfflin : 

H. Ruhemannand 
E. M. Kemp. 
Lionello Venturi : 
Arthur Stratton : 
Mitchell : 


Art to-day : An Introduction to the Fine 
and Functional Art. 

Art in Every Day Life. 

Understanding the Arts. 

The Art of Enjoying Art. 

Appreciation of Art. 

Exploring Art. 

Principles of Art History. 

The Artist at Work. 

Painting and Painters. 

The Orders of Architecture. 

Building Construction and Drawing. 



322 SYLL. IN OROUP'A O! BR- *11— tANOUAOBS [aRP. 

tOR THE RA. DECmBB B^M]^ 

Glass : Modelling and Sculpture. 

R ich : Materials and Methods of Sculpture . 

H. Hiler : Notes on the Technique of Painting. 

Carol Janeway : Ceramics and Pottery making for every 

one. 

Shirley: Handcraft in Metal. 

Baxton : Jewellery, Gem-cutting and Metalcraft. 

Brinkley : Designsfor Print— a Handbook of Design 

and Reproduction Processes. 

Sean Fannett : The making of books. 

P. Orman : Handloom Weaving. 

Ch. H. Groneman : Leather Tooling and Carving. 

John Halliday : Book craft and Book bind ing. 

Journal of Indian Art : Articles on Indian Crafts. 

Kamala S. Dongerkery : The Romance of Indian Embroidery. 
Designs in Indian The Indian Institute of Art in Industry. 

Textiles : 

Indian Handicrafts : Government of India. 

Kashmir Handicrafts : Government of India. 

Kanu Desai & Bhadra Indian Decorative Art. 

Desai. 

Some of Mac Millan’s : Craftsmen’s Library Pamohlcts. 

Dryad Handicraft Instruction Leaflets. 

Maitland Graves : The Art of Color and Design. 


BRANCH Xn— LANGUAGES 
Sanskrit 

Ancient Indian History and Culture upto looo A.D. 

(One Paper) 

[For Branch XII— Sanskrit Main— (One Paper)]. 

Influence of G 'Ography— Racial elements in India’s population— 
Sources of Indian History. 

The pre-historic period— Indus civilisation : Its authorship, 
date and extent. 


I4f 



in] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. XI I ^LANGUAGES 323 

FOR THE B.A. DECREE EXAMN. 


Origin of the Aryans— Vedic literature— Religion, society and 
polity in the Rigvedic and later vedic periods. 

The sixth century B.G.— Religious unrest : Jainism and Buddhism 
—•Rise of Magadha — Persian and Macedonian invasions and their 
influence on Indian culture. 

TheMauryan Empire — Asoka — the Mauryan polity-literature and 
inscriptions — Art and architecture. 

Foreign invasions — Indo-greeks, Sakas, Kushans — effects on 
culture and religion — Mahayana Buddhism> Gandhara Arts. 

The South : Satavahanas— Kalinga — Sangam literature — early 
Cholas., Pandyas and Cheras — Religion and polity— Indian colonisation 
and cultural expansion in South-east Asia. 

The Gupta Empire— The gupta period as a golden age ; Literary 
revival, sculpture and painting. 

Hun invasions — Marsha’s Empire— Administration, religion and 
society — Chinese pilgrims and their accounts. 

The Deccan : Chalukyas and Rashtrakutas— Contribution to art 
and architecture- Religion and social life. 

South India : The great Pallavas— Administration, architecture, 
religion— Rise of the imperial cholas. 

North India on the eve of Muslim invasions— The Rajput dynasties 
—Arab conquest of Sindh. 

Books recommended : Sathianathier— College Text-book of Indian 

History— Vol. I 

Nilakania Sastri— History of India— Part I. 

Basham — The Wonder that was India. 

Latin 

Two Classical Dramas, from (i) Plauturs and (ii) Terence or 
Seneca. 

prose : 

A Speech of CicserO and a book of Tacitus. 

Poetry: 

A book of Virgil, a book of Horaces Odes and a Satire of Juvenal. 

History of Latin Literature. 

Study of prescribed author’s life and works. 


147 




324 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OP BR. XII — ^LANGUAGES [APP. 
FOR THE B.A. DEGRE E E XAMINATION 

Group B. 

1 . History of Rome during the Republic. 

2. History of Rome from Augustus to the death of Ncro. 

Frencli 

Three Classical Dramas from Racirnc, Corneille, Molierc. 

2,000 lines of Poetry from the Oxford Book of Frenhc Verse. 

Three books by writers of the 19th and 20th centuries of which 
two shall be Novels. 

History of French Literature from the Renaissance to Modern 
Times, 

Study of a prescribed author’s life and works. 

Grammar : 

No Text-book is prescribed but the following is recommended ; 
French Grammar based on Modem French Course by 
M. Dondo (Heath). 

Group b. 

1. History of Europe from 395 A.D. to 1,500 A.D. in the first year. 

2. History of Europe from 1,500 A.D. in the second year. 

Hindi 

Syllabus for the History of the Hindi Language and 
Literature. 

A, Language.— 

I. General , Its purpose, origin, definition and development. 

(ii) The Aryan family of languages. The 
language of the Early Aryan settlers in India. 
Stages of development of that language— 
Prakrits— Apabhramsas— ‘Old Hindi.* 

II. The different The Antrang and Bahirang groups of 

languages and their geographical distribution. Eastern Hindi and 
Western Hindi and their important literary dialects. 

III. The Language employed far literature: 

(i) The Language of Ancient Hindi literature with special 
reference to the works of Chandbardai, Kabir and 
Amir Khusro. 


148 



I III SYtL. IN OROUP-A OP HR. XII — ^LANGUAGES 325 

POR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(ii) Avadhi and its development with special reference to the 
works of Jayasi and Tulsidas, 

(iii) Vraja-Bhasa and its development. 

(iv) Khadi-Boliand its development. The origin of the term 

Hindi and its relation to Urdu and Hindustani. 

IV. Language and DiQliect.—'Th& standard of literary language 
and the spoken language. Their iclaicn and mutual influence. The 
dialect spoken by the Mussalmans of South India and its peculiarities 
regarding vocabulary, grammar and construction. The extent of 
Persian and Othci influence on the Hindi Language. 

B. Literature.— 

I. Qeneral . — The dawn of Hindi as a distinct language. Its 
early development. The different literary dialects represented by the 
term Hindi. A general survey of Hindi Literature. Division into 
periods. Main characteristics and tendencies of each period. 

II. The Early Period.— Specimens of Hindi found in the works 
of the SIDDAS and the JAINS. Pccularities regarding matter and 
language. 

III. The Caron pariW.— •Historical background. General 
characteristics regarding matter, language and poet. cal forms. 

(i) Dingal Literature-^Kuhman Raso \ Bisaldev Raso ; 
Prithviraj Raso s Prithviraj Vijaya ; Alha Khand ; 
Hammir Raso. 

(ii) Miscellaneous Literature— The works of Amir Khusro 
Mulla Daud and Gorakhnath. 

IV. The Bhakti Pariod.— The rcligous awakening, Nirgun 
School andSargun School and their sub-divisions. Historical back- 
ground. The influence of political and social condtions on literature. 
The main currents. Their characteristics regarding language and the 
religious philosophy expounded. 

(i) Gyan Xdcyai.— The important poets— Jayadev, Nam- 

dev, Sadna, Ramanand, Pipa, Raidas, Kabir, 
Dharmdas, Guru Nanak, Farid, Malukdas, Dadu- 
dayal, Sundordas, Daria Saheb, Carandas, Garib- 
das, Sahjobai^ Tulsi Saheb, Faltooc'as. 

(ii) The important works and their authors : 
Mrigavati (Kutuban)^ Madhumalati (Manjhan), 
Padmavati (ioyasi)^ Citravali (Usman), Indravati 
(Nur Muhafiimad}» Kanak Manjari (Kasiram). 


42 


1411 



326 SYtJL. IN tJROUP-A OR BR. XU — ^LANGUAGES [APP. 
ypR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(iii) Ram Kavya. Vaishnovism. The Rama School. Tulsi 
and his works, Kcsavdas-^-'his importance as a 
poet artist. Nabhadas (Bhaktamal). Hridayram 
Maharaj Visvanathsinh. Ramcarandas Harbaksh 
Sinh. Girdhardas. 

(i^) Krishna Kaf>ya,—>Vaishnavistn, The Krishna School. 
Vidyapati, Surdas and other Astachhap poets, 
Mirabai, Kriparam, NarOttamdas, Swami Haridas 
Hitaharivams, Balabhadir Misr, Senapati, Sunderdas, 
Rasakhan^ Alam. 

(v) Akhur and the Hindi poets of his cot/rr.— Manohar Kavi; 
Rahim ; Virbal ; Todarmal; Narahari Bandijan ; 
Gang. 

(Vi) Prose writers of the period. ; Vitthalnath and 
Gang. 

V. Riti Period. •-•The development of Literary forms in Hindi 
Poetry. Poetical works on Rhetoric and Prosody. Erotic Poetry. 
Kesav Das ; Tripathi brOthers-^Bhushan— his Virkavya ; Matiram ; 
Biharilal Dev ; Bhikhari Das ; Padmakar ; Pratapsahi ; Gnananand ; 
Raja Jas want Sinh. 

VI. The Transition Temporary dearth in the produc- 

tion of literature, Dawn of prose literature. Impetus given to the same 
by Christian Missionaries and the Arya Samajists. The poets and 
prOse writers of the period. 

VII. The Modern Period — -Outstanding features of the period. 
The development of Khadi-Boli prOse and poetry. Influence of Bengali 
and Marathi literature and that of the Western culture and literature 
Renaissance in Hindi literature. Makers and masters of Modern 
Hindi Prose. 

(i) Important Vraj-Bhasa poets of the age. 

(ii) Important Khadi-boli poets of the age. 

(iii) Development of prOse— -Important writers. 

(iv) Development of the Drama^Jayashankar and other 

important. dramatists. , . 

(v) Development of the Novel— Premchand and other 
novelists. 

(Vi) Development of Galp-sahitya— Important writers. 



SYLt. IN GROlJP-A OF BR. XII — ^LANGUAdES 32“? 

FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(vii) Literary criticism in Hindi— The important critics, 

(viii) Important writers on subjects like History, Biography, 
Scic ice. Politics, Philosophy, etc. 

(ix) The part played by Journals in the development of 

Hindi literature. 

(x) The service rendered by institutions like the Nagari 

Pracharini Sabha for the development and preser- 
vation of Hindi literature. 

(xi) Modern tendencies of Hindi Literature. 


Syllabus for Grammar (Historical and Comparative). 

Rhetoric and Prosody : 

I. Introductory, ^i) The Origin of language. Classification. 
Dialectical separation and growth of literary standard languages, 
Dialects and cognate languages. 

(ii) The Aryan family of languages. The language of the 
Early Aryans who settled in India. The development of the Prakrits. 
Eastern and Western Hindi. 

II. The Literary Dialecfs , — The literary dialects of Eastern 
and Western Hindi. Comparison between Vraj-Bhasa, Avadhi and 
Khadi-Boli. 

III. The Hindi Alphabet.-^^i) The script. History of the letters. 
Special symbols used for foreign sounds, (ii) The Sound values. How 
far the alphabet is phonetic. Pronunciation. Written symbols and 
sound c. 

IV. PhofWlogy.-^ii) The vowel system. Comparison with the 
Sanskrit vowels. Diphthongs — Comparison with Vraj-Bhasa and 
Avadhi vowels, (ii) Consonants and their classification. Conjunct 
consonants. Sandhi— 'Nasalisation. Anusvara and Ardhanusvara. 
Final aspiration. Accent. Interchange of consonants in Old Poetry, 

V. Word-building. Classification of words. Parts of Speech. 
Substitute for the Article. 

VI. Nouns. Classification, Gender : According to meaning 
and according to ending. Exception^, Gender indicated by different 
words. Gender of Compound Nouns and Urdu Nouns. 

Number : Formation of plurals. Special uses of Singular and 
Plural. 




328 SYLL. IN OROOP-A OP BR. XH — LANOUAOES [APP. 

POR THE B.A. DEOROI EXAMINATION 


Case : The different cases and declension of nouns. The case- 
ending. Their history. Coxnparison with Vraj-Bhasa and Avadhi 
case-endings . Other parts of speech used as nouns. 

VII. iVowoww. --^Glassification. History of the pronouns. 
Comparison with those of Vrai-Bhasa and Avadhi. Compound 
pronouns. 

VIII. ---Classification, Cemparison of adjectives. 
Uses of SsLy Sarikiiaj Namak^ Rupi^ etc. The a^ and o endings of 
Avadhi, Khadi-boli and Vraj-Bhasa adjectives. 

IX. Roots, single and combined. Intransitive, Tran- 
sitive and Causative. Their formation. Roots formed out of nouns. 
Tenses, Their formation. Roots formed out of nouns. History and 
use of Nc. The present, past and future tenses of the Vraj-Bhasa and 
Avadhi verbs. Moods: How formed. Voices; Active, passive and 
impersonal. Kridants and their uses. Compound (close, loose, 
synonymous. Alliterative) verbs. Noun GOmpounds. Onomato- 
poetic verbs. 

X. Classification. Adverbial phrases. 

XI. Post-positions ; Conjunction ; Interjections. 

XII. Prefixes and s uffixes (Hind i, Ur du and Sanskrit) . 

XIII . Tatsama, Tatbhava, Dcs i, Vikr i and foreign 
words. 

XIV. Sefnantics, Chatigesin the meanings and usage of words. 
Elevation, degradation and specialisation of native and foreign words. 

XV. Order of words in a sentence. Components of sentences. 
Punctuation. Phrases and proverbs. 

Note. The study of Rhetoric and Prosody shall be limited to the 
matter contained in the bock « KAVYAPRADEP*' by Pandit 
Rambihari Sukl, Published by Hindi Bhavan, Lahore. 

TamiL 

{Vide Regulations) 

Teliigii* 

Syllabus for the History of Andhra Db»a and 
Culture. 

I, Andhrasj^Esixlitst references. Satavahana Empire. (B.C, 
22$ — A.D. aas). Origin of Satavahanas and their identity with 


I CM 




1H3 SVLL. IN OROUP-A OF BR. 3£ll — ^LANdUAOES 
for the B.A- DEOREE EXAMINATION 


Andhras. Important rulers^ Satakarni, Gautamiputra Satakami, 
Yajna Sri, Pulamayi IV. Arts and crafts; Commercial enterprise 
and colonisation; Religion; Important places: Nasik, Srikakulam, 
Dhanyakatakam, Amaravati, Jaggayapeta, Ghanta Seia;Hala*s Sapta 
Sati, Nagarjuna. 

2. Early KaUngaJQngdom,’-^I>la^^i<^i2iXi land; Asoka’s Conquest. 
Kharavela and Hati Gumpha inscription. 

3. Ikshvakus, (A.D. 210 — 260) in the Krishna and Guntur 
areas. 

4. Early PoI/uckw.— ‘(A.D, 265— *400): Sivaskanda Varma — 
his grants from Kanchi in Hirahada Galli (near Harpana Halli), 
Maidavolu and Kandukuru. Vishnu Gopa, Contemporary of 
Samudragupta (A.D. 340 )- 

5. Brhat Po/ayawos, —(About A.D. 275): Jayavarma Maharaja 

and Salarikayanas (A.D. 275 — 450 )* The sun Temple at Peda, 
Vengi, Hastivarman (A.D. 340) — ^Revival of Brahmanism and 

Sanskrit. 

6. Shnukundins^'^ih.'D. 350—610): Madhava Varma, ruler on 
Vengi—Dendalur ; Inscriptions found at Epur and Ramathirthalu. 
Caves at Undavalli, Mogalrajapuram and Sithanagaram. 

7. Later pallavas. 400 — 735): Conflict with Chalukyas 
of Badami; Mahendra Varnia, defeatei by the Chalukyas. 

8. TeUitgana.^^i^hjy, 500—1200): Under Early Chalukyas of 
Badami, Rashtrakutas and Later Chalukyas of Kalyani. 

9. The Eastern Chalukyas, — (A.D. 624 — 1232): at Vengi, at 

Rajahmundry. Rajaraja Narendra (1022 — 1063). Nannaya Bhat> 
la; Kulothunga Chola Dcava*s usurpation of Ghola Kingdom. 

10. Later History ofKalitiga De^a.— (^A.D. 340 — 1530); Reference 
in Samudra Gupta’s Inscription 10 Mahendra of Pishtapuram, 
Svami Datta of Grikotturu; to Devarashtra with Erandapalli. 
Minor Dynasties— Sakti Varma (Rajolu plates); Chandra Varma 
and Uma Varma at Simhapuram. Nanda Prabhanjana Varma at 
Sariyapalli. 

The Oaf^ios.— (A.D. 498—1434): Grants of the rulers found 
at several places in Srikakulam District. Antiquities of Mukha- 
lingam and the nature of the inscriptions. Ananta Varma Ghoda 
Ganga’s exploits and conquest of Orissa, Fall of the Gangas and the 
rise of the Qajapati dynasty (Orissa) and their conquest of the Tclugu 
country and their withdrawal. ^ 






330 SVI,L. In OttOOP-A OF BR. Xu — lANOUAOES [apb* 
FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

11. Minor Dynasties of the Telugu Cotmtry, iicx>— *1206): 
Velanati Cholas — ^Battle of the Goiavari. Haihayas (A.D. 1112— 
1206) in the Kona Sima (Godavari) 

12. Kakatiyas and Telingana,--* Jijy, 1089—1323): Important- 
rulers, Ganapati, Rudramamba, Prataparudra, Mussalman Inva- 
sions, Fall of Warrangal (1323); Cultural Progress— Religion, 
literature, music^ dance, architecture and sciilpture. Chola Tikka 
and Manama Jiddhi at Nellore. 

13. Re^cstahlishment of Hindu Supremacy Telingana and the 
Cioastal districts (A.D. 1329 — 47) Prolaya and Kapaya at Warran- 
gal; Reddi Kingdom at Addanki and Kondavidu; Rachakonda 
Kingdom under Anapota and his successors. 

14. Bhoanani iCtFigiot/i.— ‘(A.D. i347 — 1556)- its conflict with 

Vijayanagar Kingdom; its break us; Golkonda— Ibrahim Kuth 
Shah (1543—80). Telugu literature; annexed to the Moghul Empire 
(1687). 

15. Vijayanagnr Empire. — (A.D. 1336—1565): Origin and 
growth, as a freedom movement to save Southern India and Hindu- 
ism from Mussalman invasion. The effects of Vidyaranya. 

Sangama (1336— 1486)— Praudha Devaraya (1442—46) 

Saluva Dynasty— J $05): SaUiva Narasim/ia (i486— 
1491): Immadi Narasimha (1491—1505): Tuluva Dynasty-^ 

(1505— *76) — Vira Narasimha (1505 — 09) Krishna Devaraya (1509 — 
29), Achyuta D^va Raya (1530—42) and Sadasiva (1542—76). 
Ramaraya, the virtual ruler (1542—1565); Fall of Yijayanagar 
Empire and destruction of the City, Telugu literature and art. 

Aravidu Dynasty of Yijayanagar Kings 05^5“^Jt675); Tiru- 
malaraya (1570— 71)— Penugonda and Chandragiri and Raya Vellore 
^the Principal seats cf the rulers. Telugu literature and revival of 
Vaishnava religion. 

16. Hayaks of Tanjore. Raghunath Nayak (,1600— 34)— Literary 
and cultunl activities; Vijayaraghava Nayak (1634—73) Madura-^ 
Tirumala Nayak c 1623— 59); Invasion of Tanjore by Chokkanatha 
Nayak of Madura (.1673). 

17. Nizam, (A.D. 17^4 — i95o)* Asafjah, Viceroy of Deccan, 
independent of the Mohgul Empire. Hyderabad merged with Inde- 
pendent India. Progress of L iterature and Culture. 


164 



Ill] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BR. XII — ^LANGUAGES 331 

FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


i8. Telugu Country under Urttish ‘(A.D. I766--*1947): 

English Vs. French, Northern Circars ceded to the English East 
India Company (1766)^ Ceded Districts (1801); Indepcndfnt India 
(1947); Andhra Province (1953); Andhra Pradesh (1936). Literary 
and cultural progress. 

Syllabus for“-*A. The History of thi- TelUgu Language; and 
B. Elements of the Comparative Grammar of the 
Dravidian Languages. 

A. The History of the T dug u language. 

1. Oeneral. The place of Telugu in the Dravidian family of 
languages. The relationship between Andhra and Telugj. The 
antiquity and the geographical distribution of the Telugu Language 
and the people. 

2. Origin and Growth of the Telugu Poetic (Kavya) 'Accord- 

ing to the S tages in the History of Telugu literature : 

(a) Pre-Nannaya Period ; (b) Nannaya Period ; (c) Saiva Period ; 
(d) Tikkana Period; (/) Srinada and Prabhandha Period; (/) Southern 
Period ; and (g) Modern Period. 

The extent to which the Growth of the poetic dialect has been 
noticed in the Telugu Grammars and Poetics. 

3. Development of Telugu Prosc.—Its early stages during the 
early periods, PrOre works at Madura and other places in the South. 
Later stages up to the time of Chinnaya Suri. Contributions to Telugu 
prOsc by the Pandits of the age of C. P. Brown. Chinnaya Suri*s Prose, 
an innovation. Followers of Chinnaya Suri. Virctal ingam's Prose. 
The Modern Telugu Movement, a revival of the old Modern Telugu 
Prose in various patterns. 

4. Language and Dialects, how they were formed 

with reference to different localities and to different classes of people 
in the same locality. The presence of dialectal forms in the poetic 
(kavya) literature and their recognition by grammarians and lexico- 
graphers. Modern Telugu dialects and their significance. 

5. Vocabulary . — The native element, the so called achclia Telugu 
words borrowed from Sanskrit (Samskrta-sama and Samskrta- 
bhava) and from Prakn (Prakrta-sama and Prakrta-bhava) ; from 
other Dravidian Languages rfrom other Indian Languages like Maharash- 
tras, Oriya, etc., and from foreign languages like English and French. 

Words Compounds and words with suffixes. 

7 . -“•Changes in meaning and usage in Telugu words— 

elevation and degradation— Samskrit works used in Telugu with 


155 



332 SYlLi IN ^ROUP-A OP BR. XU —LANGUAGES [aPP. 
FOR THE B«A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


varying shades Qf meaning and slightly or widely difierent meaning; 
Obsolete and obsolescent words. 

8. Sp€c0l features of the Telugu Arthanusvara Sakat- 

arepha; Accent in Telugu speech and metre; Sandhi— -its nature and 
history; gasadadaradess and Saraladcsa; formation of plurals and their 
history; case and aupavibhaktika features; Telugu Compounds 
as distinct from Samskrit Compounds ; Verbal forms and derivative 
words; Karaka and Syntax, 

B. Bkfnents of Camparatwe Orammar of the Dravidian Languages 
zoith special reference to Telugu. 

1 . Dravidian Languages. ’-^Oivgm of the word Dravidian. Enu- 
meration of the Dravidian Languages— Cultivated and un-cultivatcd 
The regions where the principal Dravidian languages (Tamil, 
Malayalam, Kannada and Telugu) are spoken. Their varying 
relationship with Samskrit. Dravidian element in the North Indian 
Vernaculars. 

2. Drvidian Alphabets.^Tht origin and growth of script. The 
Telugu— ‘Kannada form and its relation to Brahmi, Vengi and Chalukya 
scripts. A comparision of the Dravidian Scripts— their adequacy and 
inadeqxiacy. The sotmd values and the phonetic nature of the alphabet. 

3. Dravidian Phonology {Fundamentals of)-^ 

A. Vowel system— Harmonic sequence of vowels. 

B. System of Gonsemants— Telugu pronunciation of Palatals 
and how it differs that of Tamil; Origin of Cerebrals; Dialecta inter- 
change Of Cbnsonant 8 . 

C. Euphonic nunnatiem or nasalisation. 

D. Prevention of Hiatus. 

E. Dravidian Syllabation. 

F. Euphonic displacenients of Conaonants and of Vowels. 

Kamuida 

(Vide Regulations.) 

Malayalam 

(1) The study of Classical Limawre^Poetryard Prose. 

iPtmry: 

(i) Selections from Ramacharitham not exceeding xo petalams. 

(ii) Selections from the works of Nlr^nam poets not exceeding 

100 stanzas (Vorses). 


1S€ 



[in SYLL. IN GROUP-A OP BR. XII— LANGUAGES 333 

pbore e examination 

(iii) Selections from Cherusseri about 400 lines ^ 

(iv) Selections from Ezhuthachan about 400 lines. 

(v) A suitable portion of a Manipravala Kavya of this period. 

Prose : 

(vi) and (vii) Suitable prose-wOrks pertaining to this period. 

(2) Study of Modem Literature^ Poetry and Prose ^ 

(i) Two sargas from Mahakavya. 

(ii) One Attakkatha. 

(iii) One drama (translation of a Classical Sanskrit Drama may 

also be considered). 

(iv) One Khanda Kavya. 

(v) Poetical selections frOm the works of modern poet or poets. 
Prose: 

(vi) A book on literary criticism, 

(vii) Selection of essays on modern thonght. 

( 3 ) Study of History of Language and Literature, 

A general study of the origin^ growth and development of the 
Language and Literature. 

(4) Oranmar, Prosody and Poetics, 

(a) Grafnfftar : 

Study of Kerala Paniniyam omitting the detailed discussion on 
the various Grammatical Theories. Only the study of the 
principles be emphasised. 

(jh) Prostkfy ; 

Only the important metres discussed in Vrittamanjari be studied . 
(c) Poetics : 

A detailed study of Bhasha Bhushanam. 

(5) Comparative Grammar ami Philology of the Drtwidian 
Language. 

Reference Bodk : 

‘A Comparative Grammar of the Dravidian Languages* by 
Dr. Caldwell. « ^ 


43 


157 



B.A. 

Part III 

GROUP-B— ancillary SUBJECTS. 

BRANCH I-HISTORY 

(Ancillaries) 

Syllabuses. 

(i) Pdlitics. ^SyWahMs sameasfor Branch 1 1 — Politics. 

(vide Syllabus Nos. 12 and 14) 

(i j) Genera/ Syllabus same as for Branch III— Social 

Sciences— -riJe Syllabus No. 23. 


( 58 ) 

(iii) (a) Syllabus in Outlines of OejieraJ philosophy: 

I. What is Philosophy of Philosophy : Cosmology, 
Epistemology Ontology, Axiology and Aesthetics, 

Relation to other studies : Science, History, Sociology (including 
Politicsand Economics), Religion. 

The need for Philosophy: As the synthesis and consummaiion ol 
Other studies— ‘the philosophic outloohand temper. 

II. Divisions of the subject: Study of Nature, of Man, of God, 
and of values. 

Study of Nature: The concepts of Matter, Alotion and Energy, 
of Space, Time and Gasualiiy. Mechanism vs. Teleology. Creation 
Vs, evolutionism. Materialistic Pluralism and MaterialiMic Monj^ni 
Theories of Evolution as formulated by Darwin, Lloyd— Morgan, 
Alexander, Smuts and Whitehead. 

III. Study of tnan: Socrates’s dictum: thyself : Huma- 

nism of Protagoras, Comte, Schiller and Dewy. Theories of Mind: 
Materialistic, Dualistic or Animistic, Idealistic and Double Aspect 
theories. Newer Theories: Freudian, Pragmatic, Behaviourist and 
Gestalt. The appioch of Religion to the study of Man. Man as 
spirit Do<|trinc of Immortality. 

IV. Study of God: Proofs for the existence of God and dis- 
cussion of their Validity. Theories of the nature of God. Dcism^ 


1§8 



in) SYLI,. IN GROUP-B— ANCILLARY SUBJECTS 33S 

FOR THE B.A^ DEGRE E EXA MINATION 

Pantheism, Theism. Immanence and Transcendence of God. God as 
Creator and moral governor of the universe. God as Law and Love. 
God as ground and goal. Man*s seeking God and God’s revelation 
to man. The best proof of God is to experience him. Mysticism and 
the Mystics. 

V. Study of Values: Intellectual, Moral, Aesthetic anJ Spiri- 
tual values. Arc values subjective or objective or both ? The concept 
of eternal values. The triad of Truth. Goodness and Beauty ; Inter- 
relation between them. Tran svalitat ion of values. 

Bibliography : 

1. Patrick : An Introduction to Philosophy. 

2. Cunningham : Problems of Philosophy. 

3. Mary Wilton Calkins: The Persistent Problems of Philosophy 

4. R.B. Perry : The Approach to Philosophy. 

5. J. H. Muirhead : The Use of Philosophy (Harward University 

Press). 

6. Bertrand Russell : Problems of Philosophy. 

7. M. lliriyanna ; The Quest After Perfection— Chapters II, 

III, V and VIII (Kavyaliya Publishers, Mysore). 

8. P. N. Srinivasachari : Mysticism. 

9. S. Radhakrighnan : An Idealist View of Life, 1951 EJition, 

pp. 326 to 331 

or 

(iii) (6) Philosophy of Religion : Syllabus same as for 
Branch III— Social Science vide Syllabus No. ^9. 
Civ) Geography— 

(1) Principles of Human Geography— 

(Paper I of Group A) vide Syllabus No. 31, 

(2) Regional Geography- 

World and India (Paper III of Group A) vide 
Syllabuses Nos. 33 and 34. 

(v) History of Indian Art vide Syllabus No. 54. 

(vi) History of World Art vide Syllabus No. 55. 

(vii) History of Indian Music vide Syllabus No. 46. 

viii) Musicology and History of Western Music vide Syllabus 
NO. 47. 


Ii9 



336 SVLL. IN GHOUP-B — ancillary subjects 
BOR THE B A. DEOREB EXAMINATION 

branch u— politics main 

(^Ancillaries) 

Syllabus : 

(1) History — Syllabus same as for Branch I— History Main 

vide Nos. 3 > 4 ^ 6, 8, lo and ii . 

(2) Philosophy.— Syllabus No. 56. 

(3) General Psychology.— Syllabus same as for Branch I Psy- 

chology Main vide No. 41 . 

(4) General Economics — Syllabus vide No. 23 . 

BRANCH m-SOCIAL SCIENCES MAIN 

(No Ancillary) 


Syllabus : 


BRANCH IV— ECONOMICS MAIN 

{Ancillaries') 


I. History of India— Paper II— Syllabus same as for Branch I 
History Main, vide No. 2. 


2. Politics: Modern Governments — Syllabus same as for 

Branch II— Politics Main, videl^o, 14. 


( 59 ) 

(4) Statistics. 

(^Derivation of formulae is not exacted in this course), 

paper J: 

Scope of Statistical Methods, nature of statistical data. 

Collection of statistical data— Census and sample methods, use 
of Questionnaire, agency of collection. 

Tabulation of data— •Methods of classification and tabulation in 
respect of one or more characters, formation of frequency 
distributions. 

Diagrammatic and graphical representation — ^Bar diagram, pie dia* 
gram, scatter diagram, histogram, frequency polygon, frequency 
curve, ogive, interpretation of charts and graphs. 

Measures of location— Mean, median and mode. 


160 



in3 SYLL. IN GROUP-.B — ANCILLARY SUBJECTS 

FOR THE B-A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Measures of dispersion— .Stan^fard deviation, quartile deviation, . 
deciles, co-efficient of variation. 

Association of attributes. Correlation, Co-efficient of correlation 
and its interpretation— .Regression lines and their applications. 

Elementary ideas of probability ; descriptive account of binomial 
and normal distributions; importance of these distributions. 

General ideas of statistical populations ; random samples and 
sampling distributions; basic concepts of statistical reasoning; 
Standard errors of proportion and mean tests of significance in large 
samples. 

Index numbers— properties of a good index number, method of 
construction and uses; cost of living index number as an illustration. 

Time Series-trend. 

Planning of experiments : Sample surveys, elementary ideas. 

Books far reference: 

Garret, H. E. : Statistics in Psj’chology and Education. 

Edwards, Allen L. : Statistical Analysis for students in Psycho- 
logy and Education. 

Connolly, T. G. and Sluckin, W. : Statistics for the Social 
Sciences. 

Yates, F. : Sampling Methods for Censuses and Surveys. 

Allen, R.G.D. : Statistics for Economists. 

Tippet, L. H. C. : Statistics (Home University Library Series), 

(60) 

(3) pRiNCipLBs op Commerce. 

Economic basis of Commerce— Types of Business Organisation- 
Sole Trader— Partnership— -Partnership Act— Duties, Rights and 
Liabilities of Partners— Admission, Retirement and Death— Insol- 
vency, Dissolution and winding up— Joint Stock Company— Indian 
Companies Act— Formation, Memorandum and Articles of Asso- 
ciation— Prospectus — Capital and its classes— Shares and Debentures 
—Statutory Books— Divisible Profits and Dividends— Meetings of 
Directors and Shareholders— Procedure Amalgamation, Absorption 
and Reconstruction— Winding up— Holding and Subsidiary 
Companies— Rights and Duties of Directors, Auditors and Liquidators. 



338 


SVLL. in GROUP-B — ^ANCILLARY SUBJECTS [aPP. 

FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Instiuments of Credit and their uses— Sale of Goods— Implied 
conditions and Warranties— Pas sing of PiOperiy in the goods— Remedies 
of Buyer and Seller— Hire and Instalment Purchase. 

Funccionsof Banks— Commercial and Central Banks. 

Means of Payment— Agency— Rights, Duties and Liabilities — 
Termination. 

Financing of Industries — Large and Small scale Industries— 
Managing Agency System — Industrial Finance Corporation— State 
Aid to Industries— Issue of Debentures. 

Chamber of Commerce and allied Institutions for promotion of 
trade. 

Advenising and Salesmanship. 

Books for Reference : 

Evelyn Thomas: Theory and Practice of Commero;. 

Stephenson: Theory and Practice of Commerce. 

J. G. Mitra: Business Organisation. 

Haney: Business Organisation. 

O. R. Krishnaswami : Essentials of Commerce. 

Dr. B. V. Naidu and Datta: Business Organisation. 

A, Palmer: Company’s Secretarial Praaice. 


BRANCH V— geography MAIN 


Syllabus : 


{Ancillaries) 


I. History of India— Paper I. Syllabus same as for Branch I— 
History Main, ride No. i. 


2. Political Theory — Syllabus same for Ihanch II — Politics ^lain 
vide No. 12 . 


3. Philosophy,— 

(i) (a) European Logic and Theory of Knowledge or 
{b) Indian Logic or 

(ii) Ethics or 

(iii) Outlines of Indian Philosophy or 

(iv) Outlines of European Philosophy from Descartes to Kant 


or 

(v) Outlines of General Philosophy or 

(vi) Philosophy of Religion or 




in] SYLL. IN OROUP-B — ^ANCILLARY SUBJECTS 339 
FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Syllabuses for (i) to (iv)— Same as for Branch I— Philosophy 
Main, vide Nos. 36 to 40. 

Syllabuses for (v) (&) (vi ) — vide Nos. 56 and 1 9. 

4. Psychology -^General Psychology — Syllabus same as for 

Branch I— Psychology Main, vide No. 41. 

5 . Anthropology . ~-^vide Syllabuses Nos. 21 and 22. 

6. Elements of Statistics— Syllabus vide No, 57. 

7. Principles of Conuncrcc — vide Syllabus No, 58. 

8. Economics— Principles of Economics Syllabus 27. 

BRANCH VI-PHILOSOPHY MAIN 

(AnctUaries) 

Any two from Group- A of the following Humanities Courses for 
B.A. provided that both subjects are not from the same course. 

Psychology, History, Politics, Social Sciences and Economics, 
vide Syllabuses Nos. 41, 3 to ii, 12, 13. 25 and 23. 


BRANCH VII— PSYCHOLOGY MAIN 

{Ancillaries) 

1. Social Anthropology or C.uliural Anthropology— Syllabus, 

Nos. 21 and 22. 

2. Sociology' Part I vide Syllabus No, 25. 

3 . Outlines of European Philosophy —Descartes to Kant — Syllabus 

same as for Philosophy Main, vide No, 40. 

4 European Logic and Theory of Knowledge or Indian Logic 
Syllabus. Same as for Philosophy Main, vide Nos. 36 and 

37. 

5, History of World Ar I — Same as for History of Fine Arts Main, 

vide No. 55. 

6. Statistics — Syllabus iiWt No. 57. 


Syllabus: 


branch Vfll— INDIAN MUSIC 

(Ancillaries) 


1. History of India— Paper I Syllabus same as for Branch I- 
History Main, vide No. i. 


16S 



340 SYLL. IN GROUP-B — ^ANCILLARY SUBJECTS [aPP. 
FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


2. History of Fine Arts. History of Indian Art and History of 

World Art, Syllabus game as for Branch XI— History of 

Fine Arts, vide Nos. 54 and 55. 

3 . General Psychology, vide Syllabus No. 41 . 

4. Musicology and History of Western Music— Syllabus 

No. 47. 

5 . Philosophy of religion, vide Syllabus No. 19. 

6. Outlines of General Philosophy, vide Syllabus No. 56. 

7. Language— (i) Tamil or 

(ii) Telugu or 

(iii) Sanskrit. 

(61) 

(i) SYLLABUS FOR TAMIL (ancilu^rY) FOR INDIAN 
MUSIC— 2 ^IN. 

1. The EMvision of Tamil into lyal, Isai and Natakam— Its 
significance and antiquity— References to Isait tamil in Silappathi- 
karam. 

2. Ancient Tamil Musical Instruments— The Yal— Its variety, 
construction and technique of play— References to Yal in Sangam 
literature— Kudumiyamalai musical inscription. 

3. The Pans of Tevaram and Diviyaprabandam— Fifteen Pans 
Viz. 1. Pandiamam, 2. Sikamaram, 3. Puranirmai, 4. Viyazhakkurinji, 
5. Kausikam, 6. Senturuthi, 7. Gandara Panchamam, S. Andalik> 
kurinji, 9. Takkesi, 10. Sewazhi, ii. Pazhampanjuram, 12. Kolli, 
13. Megaragakkurinji, 14. Nattapadai, 15. Sadari— Their lakshnas 
and their modern equivalents— One song illustrative of each of the 
above Pans. 

4. The metrical patterns of Thirupukal— A study of ten of them 
with illustrative songs— The melody types known as Talisai, Vannam, 
Kanni and Sindu — Illustrations from Kalingathupparani, Paraparak 
Kanni (Thayumanavar) and Kannikal in Thiru Arutpa (Raxnalinga 
Swamigal)— Kavadi Sindu (Annamalai Reddiar). 

BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR STUDY. 

1. Isai, lyal by Sangectha Kalanithi K. Ponnaiah PiUai, 

2 . Pannan Kyvali or Yal Nul by A . Varakuna Pandian. 

(ii) Telugu will be prescribed later* 


164 



m] 


SYLL. IN GROUP-B — ^ANCILLARY SUBJECTS 341 
FOR THE B-A- DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Ciii) SYLLABUS FOR SANSKRIT AS ANCILLARY TO 
INDIAN MUSIC— PART III. 

1. Poetry— loo verses. 

2. Prose— 15 Pages, 

3 . Elements of Prosody and Grammar. 

4. 30 musical compositions in Sanskrit selected from standard 
composers like Jayadeva, Muthuswami Dikshitar, Narayana 
Tirtha, Swati Tirunal, Sadasivabrahmendra and Thyagaraja. 

BRANCH IX— WESTERN MUSIC 

(Ancillaries) 

Any iwo from the following: 

(1) General Musicology and History of Indian Music. 

(2) History of World Art, 

(3) History of India. 

(4) Politics. 

(5) Economics. 

(6) Philosophy. 

(1) General Musicology and History of Indian Music vide Syllabus 
No. 59 below. 

(2) History of World Art. — Syllabus same as for Branch XI— 
History of Fine Arts, vide No. 55. 

Syllabus same as for Main Subjects 
vide Nos. I, 2, 12 to 18, 23, 

^ 36 to 40, 56 & 19. 

( 62 ) 

Syllabus for General Musicology and History of Indian Music. 

The two systems of Music: Harmonic and Melodic and their 
features. 

The important scales figuring in the music of the different countries 
of the Orient and Occident. 

Indian Music and its distinctive features. Ragas, Talas, Musical 
forms and Musical instruments used in Indian Music. 

Forms figuring in Art Music, Sacred Music, Dance Music and 

Operas. 


(3) History of India. 

(4) Politics. 

(5) Economics. 

(6) Philosophy 


44 


165 


342 SYIX. IN OROOT-B — ^ANCILLARY SUBJECTS [APP. 
BOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Folk Music and folk instruments. 

Notation used in Indian Music. 

Types of concerts and instruments used as accompaniments therein. 
History of Raga concept and Raga classification. 

History and evolution of Musical forms. 

Origin and development of the five braich^s of MmoJharma 
sangita. 

Evolution of the Vina. Causes for the exit of the Indian harp 
(Yazh). 

Materials used in the manufacture of musical instruments of 
ancient^ mediaeval and modern times. 

Obsolete ragas, talas, musical forms, musical instruments and 
musical terms. 

Evolution of concert programme. Origin and development of 
brindagana. 

The diflEerent seats of music in the past. 

Evolution of the opera and dance drama (Kura van ji nataka and 
Bhagavata mela nataka). 

Circumstances that occasioned famous musical compositions. 

Lives and contributions of the following composers : 

Puiandaradasa. 

Narayana Tirtha. 

Thyagaraja, 

Muthuswami Dikshitar. 

S3^ma Sastri. 

Amnachala Kavirayar. 

Gopalakfishna Bharat i. 

Swathi Tirunal. 

BRANCH X— drawing & PAINTING 

iAncillariei) 

History of Fine Arts. 

Paper I— Indian Art.— Syllabus No. 54. 

Paper II— World Art.— Syllabus viiie No. 55. 


166 




in] SYLL. IN GROUP-B—ANCILI.AIIY SUBJECTS 343 
BOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

branch X1--H1STORY Qp FINE ARTS 

{AnciUaries) 

Indian History Paper I.— Syllabus same as for GrOup-A — 
History Main. — w^'eNo. i. 

(ii) History of Greecse and 

Rome up to 395 A.D. Syllabus vide No. 3. 

(iii) History of Europe 

from 395 to 1500 A.D. Syllabus vide No. 4. 

(iv) General Musicology and History of Indian Music Syllabus 

NO. 59, 

(V) Musicology and History of Western Music vide Syllabus 
No. 47, 


BRANCH XII—LANGUAGES 

(Ancillaries) 

(Group B— Ancillary for English Main) 

Social History of England (One Paper) 

England after the Anglo-Saxon Conquest— An Agricultural 
society freeman and serbs — Influence of the Church. 

Feudal society after the Norman conquest— The Manor and its 
life— Architecture — Growth of monasteries and Universities. 

England in the 14th century— Rise of the country gentlemen— 
Decline of serfdom — Growth of towns and trade— Effects of the 
Black Death— 'The Peasants revolt— ‘Chaucer and literary revival- 
Wycliflfe and the revolt against the church. 

Tudor England— ‘The Renaissance and Reformation — Dissolution 
of monasteries— Social unrest and Elizabeth’s social policy— Literary 
revival in the Elizabethan Age : Spenser, Ben Johnson. Shakespeare 
and Bacon. 

England under the Stuarts— Puritanism— Colonial expansion — 
social life in Restoration England— -the Plague and the great fire — 
Christopher Wren. 

Transition to the i8th century— the landowning oligarchy— an 
era of contentment— the age of Prose : Addison, Steele, Swift— pro- 
gress of Science. 


ter 




344 SYtL. IN OROUP-B— ANCILI-AilY SUBJECTS [aPP. 
FOR THE B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


The Industrial Revolution—- social consequences— the Wesleys 
and religious revival— Humanitarian and anti -slavery movements— 
literature : Johnson, Burke, Gibbon. 

The French Revolution — social unrest— Red icalism—Cobbett— 
movement for reform— literature : the Romantic Revival— Byron, 
Shelly, Keats — Religion : the Oxford Movement. 

Victorian England — Railways— Penny Postage Factory Legisla- 
tion— Co-operative Movement— decline of agricultu re— Puritanism- 
Universal Primary education. 

The 20th century— effects of the World wars— Industrial unrest — 
Social security and the welfare state. 

Books recommended : Trevelyan— English Social History. 

Wilmot— Buxton— A Social History of England. 

Tickner— Social and Industrial History of England. 

Group A— Ancillary foy Latin— Main (One Paper) 

History of Rome during the Republic (One Paper) 

The Early republic 508-451 B.G.— Constitution— Judicial system 
—Struggle of the orders- Valerio— Horatian laws. 

The latin league- Etruscan wars— Samrite and gallic wars- the 
struggle with pyrrhers- Rome, mistress of Italy. 

The Punic Wars— Hannibal— Taccdonian w'ars— Wars in Spain— 
‘The Scipios and Cato.’ 

Domestic strife— Tiberians Graeckus^— Italian demands for the 
franchise — Gains Graeckus and his measures. 

Jugurthine war— Marines— Social war- Mithradatic wars— 
Sulla’s dictatorship. 

First and Second Triumvirates— War with Serf onius— Consul- 
ship of Pompeius and Grassus- The Gakinian and Manilian Laws— 
The Conspiracies of Catiline— The first Triumvirate— The Luca 
confermee— -Caesar’s campaigns in Gaul— Caesar and the Senate.— 
Dictatorship and murder of Caesar— Battle of Aaium. 


168 



hi] SYLL. in GROUP-B — ANCILLARY SUBJECTS 345 
FOR THE B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Group B— 'Ancillary for Latin Main— (One pa perr— alternative). 

History of Rome from Agustus to the death of Nero 

Agustus— position and powers— reforms : administrative military 
legal, religious— Public works — -birth of Jesus— German Campaigns. 

Tiberius — Constitutional changes — German campaigns and revolt 
in Gaul— plots of sejanusr— Crucifixion of Jesus. 

Caligula, ihe megaloma iiac— campaigns in Germany and Britain— 
assassination. 

Claudius— domination by Freedmen— Administrative reforms- 
conquest of Britain. 

Ncro influence of Seneca— Acts of cruelty-^ com pa igns in Armenia 
— limitation on the powers of the Tribunes— Trial of St. Paul — Revolt 
of Boiidica in Britain — Great Fire in Rome— persecution of Christians 
—revolt in Judea- death of Nero. 

Books recommended: Allcrofi and Masom— The Tutorial HislOrV 
of Rome 

Cary— History of Rome. 

Stuart Jones— The Roman Fmpirc. 


Gioup B— Ancillary for Arabic Main— 2 Papers (Paper I). 

Hiatory of the Arabs from 495 A.D. to 750 A.D. (Paper i) 

Pre-Islamic Arabian— Poliiical, social, leligious and economic 
condition of Arabia in the 5th century of Christian era— City state 
of Mecca under Quassy — Abyssinian invasion of Mecca— Birth of 
Muhammad— Early life— Harb-uI-Sijar— Rebuilding of Kaba — • 
Marriage with Khadija — First revelation. 

Ministry of Muhammad— Persecution of the Quraish— Immigra- 
tions to Abyssinia— pledges of Aqba— Hijrai to Medina — Prophet as 
the head of the Commonwealth of Medina — Banks of Badi , Uhad and 
Trench— Treaty of Pludabiah — Conquest of Mecca— Farewell pil- 
grimage — Last days of Prophets, life and his death. 

Hlection of Abu B a kr— Suppression of internal disorders — Muslim 
conquests in his reign— selection of Umar— Muslim conquests— 
Umar’s administration — Usmani election— disturbance during his 


169 



346 SYLL* IN GHOUJP-B — ANCILLARY SUBIBCTS [APP, III] 
FOR THE B-A. degree EXAMINATION 


reign— ^issasination of Usinan--«lectic«i of Ali— Battle of Jamal and 
Siffin— Khanjites^Hasanibn-Ali— £nd of the orthodox Caliphate. 

Mdyiyah— Establishment of the first Dynasty in Islam— ‘Yavid 
and the tragedy of Karbala— Mar war— Abdul Malik— Ha jjaj bin 
Yusuf and his reforms— -Walid— conquest of Spain and Sindh— 
Sulaiman— ‘Omar iln Abdul Aziz— Revival of the orthodox glOry— 
his reforms— Hishavn— department of archives — Decline of the Omay- 
yad power— *its causes— ‘Abbasid propaganda-downfall of the Omay- 
yads— 750 A.D. 

History of the Arabs from 750 A.D. to 850 AJ>. 

A 1 Saffab— A 1 Monsur— Building of Baghdad— Institution of 
Wizarat— Religion— political aspect of Abbasid Caliphate— Mahidi — 
Heressies in his period— Shu ’liyah movement— Hadi — Harun— Tran- 
slation bureau— fall of Barmak — War with the Romans— cultural 
activities under Harun— Baghdad under Harun— The Arabian Nights— 
His character and achievements — his death — Amin and Mamun— The 
civil war — Amin’s death — Mamun — Mutavilite school — progress of 
learning— Mamun’s death— Mutasim — The rise of theTurk^ — ^Decline 
of the Abbasids— the petty states. 

Books recommended for study :— 

1. History of Arabs— P. K, Hilt. 

2. History of Saracens— Syed Amir Ali. 

3. Life of Muhammad — GhuJam Sarwar. 

4. Early Heroes of Islam — Salaik. 

5. General History of Islam— Professor S. A. W. Bukhari 

Saheb. 




B.Sc. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

PART III 

Otoup A-^Main SubJecU. 

1. Mathematics. 

2. Statistics. 

3. Physics. 

4. Chemistry. 

5. Botany. 

6. Zoology. 

7. Geology. 

8. Geography. 

9. Physiology. 

Branch 1— MATHEMATICS. 

(1) 

I Paper •^Purc Oeofnetry and Trigonofnetry. 

Concurrence and Collineariiy. Properties of triangles. Loci. 
Harmonic ranges and pencils. Complete quadrangle and quadrilateral. 
Properties of circles. Inversion. Solid Geometry of line, plane, 
sphere, right cylinder and right cones, orthogonal projection. 

Trigonometry: Full treatment of the properties of triangles. 
Quadrilaterals inscribed in and circumscribed about circles. Regular 
polygons . Limits of S in x/x and Tan x/x as x tend s to zero. 

Complex numbers. Argand’s diagram. De Moivre’g theorem 
and its immediate applications. Summation of elementary trigono- 
metrical series. Hyperbolic functions. 

Detailed Syllabus in Pure Geometry 
Concurrency ColHnearity : 

The Use of signs as applied to lines, angles and areas. If two 
parallel lines are cut by three or more concurrent transversals, the 
corresponding segments arc proportional and the converse. 


171 



348 SYJLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. I — MATHEMATICS [APP* 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


If X, Y, Z are points in the sides BC, CA, AB of a triangle ABC, 
such that the perpendicular to those sides at these points are concurrent 
then (BX2-XGa)+(CY2-YA2)+(AZ2— ZB2) = 0 

or BX^ + C + AZ* = CX* + BZ* + A Y^ 

and the converse. 

If any transversal meets the sides BC, CA^ AB of a iriangle in D,E, 
Fj then AF. BD. CE. = AE. CD. BF ; and the converse. 

If the lines joining any point to the vertices A,B,C of a triangle 
meet the opposite sices in D., E, F then AF. BD. CE. = FB. DC. EA. 
and the converse. 

If two unequal similar figures are similarly placed the lines joining 
the vertices of one to the corresponding vertices of the other are con- 
current . 

Properties of Triangles : 

The three medians of a triangle meet in a point and this point is a 
point of trisection of each median and also of the line joining the cir- 
cumcentre to the orthocentre. 

The perpendiculars from the vertices of a iriangle on the opposite 
sides meet in a point, and the distance of each vertex from the Ortho- 
centre is twice the perpendicular distance of the circumcentrc from the 
side opposite to the vertex. 

Detailed syllabus in Pure Geometry. 

The circle through the middle points of the sides of a triangle 
passes through the feet of the perpendiculars of the triangle and through 
the middle points of the three lines joining the orthocentre to the 
vertices of the triangle. 

If a perpendiculai drawn from the vertex to the opposite side of a 
triangle is produced to meet the circumclrCle then the distance of this 
point of intersection from the base is equal to the distance of the ortho- 
centre of the triangle from the base. 

If D is a point in the side BD of a triangle ABC such that 
^BD =3 wDC then. 

mAB* +«AG* 4-wDC2+(w +n)AD*. 

The feet of the perpendiculars drawn on the sides of a triangle 
from any point P on the circumcirclc of that triangle are collincar. 

The pedal line of P bisects the line jointing P to the orthocentre 
of the triangle. 


172 



iv] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OP BR. I — ^MATHEMATICS 349 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


If the vertical angje of a triangle is bisected by a straightlihe whi(^ 
cuts the base, the rectangle contained by the sides of the triangle is 
equal to the rectangle contained by the segments of the base together 
with the square on the straight line which bisects the angle. 

If from the vertical angle of a triangle a straight line is drawn 
perpendicular to the base the rectangle contained by the sides of the 
triangle is equal to the rectangle contained by the perpendicular and the 
diameter of the circumcircle. 

Loci: 

(1) If P and Q are two points on a line passing through a fixed 
point O, s uch that OP : OQ is a constant then the locus of Q is a straight 
line Or circle according as the locus of Pis a straight line or circle. 

( 2 ) If A and B are two fixed points and P moves such that PA: PB 
is a constant then the locus of Pis a circle Or a straight line. 

(3) Given the base and the vertical angle to find the locus of (i) the 
centroid, (ii) incentre or excentre and (iii) orthooentre. 

Harmonic ranges and Pencils : 

Definitions of Harmonic Range and harmonic pencils . 

If C, D divide AB harmonically, then A, B divide CD harmoni- 
cally: If O is the mid-i>oint of AB thenOB*=OC. CD. 

A harmonic pencil cuts any transversal in a harmonic range. 

If O (ACBD) is harmonic and AO and BO are at right angles, 
^hen they arc the two bisectors of the angle GOD. 

If (ACBD) and (AG'B'D') are harmonic ranges on two lines, 
AD, AD', then CC', BB', DD' are concurrent; its dual theorem for 
harmonic pencils. 

The definition of a complete quadrangle and a complete quadri- 
lateral and the proof of their harmonic property. 

Properties of the Circles : 

Definition of orthogonal circles and of a pair of inverse points 
with reference to a circle. 

It two circles are orthogonal, the diameter of one is cut harmoni- 
cally by the other; and the converse. 


45 


17 $ 



350 srix. IN OROUP-A OF BR. I— MATHEMATICS [APP 

MAIN FOR THE B SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Ihiemidfylari 

Tic locus of the harmonic conjugate of a given point P with 
reference to ends of chords of a circle through it is a straight line per- 
pendicular to the diameter throu gh the point passing through its inverse . 

If the Polar of A passes through then the Polar of B passes 
through A. Definition of conjugate points and lines. 

If P and Q be any two points and O the centre of a circle, then 
OP bears to OQ the same ratio as the perpendicular from P on the 
polar of Q bears to the perpendicular from Q on the polar of P. 

If four points form a harmonic range then their Polar s with refer* 
cnee to any circle form a harmonic pencil . 

The harmonic triangle of the quadrangle inscribed in a circle is a 
self-conjugate with reference to the circle ; and its dual theorem. 

Coaxal Circles, 

Power of a point with reference to a circle. The locus of a point 
the powers of which with reference to two circles are equal is a line 
perpendicular to the line of centres. 

The radical axes of the three circles taken two by two are con- 
current. 

The difference of powers of a point with reference to two circles 
varies as its distancse from their radical axis. 

Coaxal systems, intersecting, and non-intersecting. Limiting 
points— Orthogonal system— Limiting points of a coaxal system are 
inverse points with reference to any circle of the system; and its 
converse. 

The Polars of a given point P with reference to each circle of a 
coaxal system pass through a fixed point R, and PR is bisected by 
the radical axis. 

In a complete quadrilateral, the circles on three diagonals as dia* 
meters are coaxal. 

If a point P moves so that the tangents from it to two circles are 
in constant ratio the locus of P is a circle coaxal with the given circles. 

Centres of Sitnilimde, 

In two circles, if any two parallel radii are drawn (one in each 
circle}, the line joining their extremities cut the line of centres in 
one ex other of two fixed points called centres of similitude. 






IV] SYLL. m OEOUP^A OF BR. T— MATREMATiCS JSl 

MAIN FOB THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


If through a centre of similitude of two circles, a line is drawn 
cutting the circles the radii, to a pair of corresponding points, are 
parallel. 

If through the centre of similitude S of two circles a line is drawn 
cutting the circles, the rectangle contained by the distances from S 
of a pair of non- corresponding points is a constant. 

Two circles and their circle of similitude are coaxal. 

Inversion : 

The inverse of a line with reference to a point, (i) on it; (ti) not 
on it. 

The inverse of a circle with reference to a point, (i) on it, («) not 
on it. 

The angle at which two curves cut is equal to the angle at which 
their inverses cut. 

If P' and Q' are the inverse points of P, Q with reference to O, 
p and p' arc the lengths of the perpendiculars from O to PQ, P'Q' 
then. 

P'Q' p K* OP'OQ' where K is the radius 

PQ p' OP.OQ K* of inversion. 

In any quadrilateral, the sum of the rectangle contained by two 
pairs of opposite sides is not less than the rectangle contained by the 
diagonals. 

A pair of points inverse with reference to a circle inverts into a 
pair of points inverse with reference to the inverse of a circle. 

Solid Oeofnetry : One and only one plane can be drawn through 
any two intersecting lines. 

Two planes (generally) intersect in a straight line. If a straight 
line is perpendicular to each of two intersecting straight lines, at their 
point of intersection, it is perpendicular to the plane containing them. 

perpendicular and Parallel Planes: 

To draw a straight line perpendicular to each of two lines and to 
prove that it is the shortest distance between them. 

The section of a sphere by a plane is a circle. 

The common section of two spheres in a circle. 

Plane sections of a right cylinder and a right cone. 


175 



352 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. I — ^MATHEMATICS [APP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Orthogonal projection Its definition and the following theorems. 

Segments of the same straight line project into segments of 
proportional length while a straight line parallel to the base line 
is unaltered in its length. Parallel straight lines project into 
parallel straight lines: If A be the area of a closed curve in Q 
plane then its orthogonal projection of another plane will be of area 
A cos B where 0 is dihedral angle between the two planes. 

How to project orthogonally a circle into an ellipse and vice versa. 
Books for Reference: 

1. Russell: Sequel to Elementary Geometry. 

2. C. V. Durell: Modern Geometry. 

3. Askwith: Piire Geometry. 

4. C. V. Durell & Rolson: Trigonometry. 

5. T. M. McRobert: Trigonometry, Vols. I, II & III. 

6. Siddons and Hughes*. Trigonometry. 

( 3 ) 

II paper--* Analytical Oeometry 

Tfoo dmensiotis: The Cartesian equations of the straight line 
and the circle referred to rectangular axes: the parabola, ellipse and 
hyperbola referred to their principal axes and the rectangular hyper- 
bola referred to its asymptotes. The general equation of the second 
degree. The polar equation of the straight line, circle and the conic. 
Simple problems on the above. 

Three dimensions: The straight line, the plane and the sphere. 
Tangent plane to the sphere. The condition that the general equation 
ofthe second degree may represent a pair of planes or a sphere. 

Books for reference: 

1. Askwith: Analytical Geometry of the Conic Sections. 

2. Shackleton Bailey: Analytical Conics. 

3. Mccrea: Analytical Geometry of Three Dimensions. 

( 3 ) 

III paper— "Algebra and Calculus: Paper I 

Fuller treatment of algebraic operations. 

Elementary theory of numbers. Format's and Wilson’s theorem 
and their generalisations. 


176 




IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. I — MATHEMATICS 353 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC- DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Permutations and combinations. Inequalities. Partial fractions. 
Elementary methods of summation of finite series. 

Limits. Convergence and divergence of series. Simple tests. 
Binomial theorem for a rational index, homogeneous product, exponen- 
tial theorem for a rational index. Binomial, exponential, logarithmic 
series. Summation of series based on the above. Fundamental 
processes of differentiation. Successive differentiation. Leibnitiz’ 
theorem. Simple applications to plane geometry, including curvature, 
and to Mechanics. Maxima and Minima. Mean value theorem. 
Graphical interpretation. Partial differentiation. Approxmations, 

(4) 

IV paper^^Algebra and Calculus' Paper JI. 

General properties of the equation of the nth degree: its roots 
and cxy-efficicnts. Simple transformations of equations. Reciprocal 
equations. Typical Graphs: y = ay = y— y— 'log 

Graphical solutions oc cubic and biquadriatic equations. 

Elementary properties of determinants. 

Integration as inverse of differentiation. Standard forms. Stan- 
dard methods of integration Easy reduction formulae. Integra- 
tion as the limit of a sum. Applications to length of cars, plane areas, 
areas of surfaces of revolution and volume of solids of revolution, 
in Cartesian and in polar co-ordinates. 

Differential equations of the first and second order of the 
following types: 

I. (I) dy /t (x) 
dx CX) 

(2) dy ^ /x (x,y) 
dx /2 


Where /| and arc expressions homogeneous and of the same 
degree in x and y 

(3) ^ _ ax + -1- g 

dx ax + \>y + c 


(4) dy 
dx 


+ Py 


Q orQy^ 


n. 






where P andQ are functions of x or cos tnx or sinwx. 
a, 6, c being constants. 


277 



354 SYIX. IN GROMP-A OF BR. I — MATHEMATICS [AW. 
MAIN FCHt THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Books for reference : 

1. Barnard and Child— Higher Algebra, 

2. F^errar— ‘Higher Algebra. 

3. C. V. Durell— Advanced Algebra, Vols. I and 11, 

4. W. P. Milne — Higher Algebra. 

5‘ Gibson— Elementary Treatise on Calculus. 

6. Gaunt— Advanced Calculus. 

7. Osgood — First course in Differential and Integral Calculus. 

8. Middlemiss — 'Differential and Integral Calculus. 

9. Murray— Differential Equations. 

10. Ince— Differential Equations. 

11. S. L. Green— Differential Equations. 

(5) 

V paper --^Mechanics, 

Resolution and composition of displacements and forces, velo- 
cities and accelerations, curves of speed and velocity diagram. 

Motion of a particle in one plane under constant acceleration. 
Simple harmonic motion. Composition of simple harmonic motions. 
Angular velocity and angular acceleration. 

Angular momentum . Moment s of inert ia in s imple cases. Motion 
about a fixed axis. The pendulum, simple and compound. Deter- 
mination of g. Work, energy and conservation of energy. Laws of 
impact. Conditions of equilibrium of a body acted upon by forces 
in one plane. Moments. Couples. Centres of mass. Simple machines: 
Lever, Pulleys, Wheels and Axes, Screws, Laws of friction. 

( 45 ) 

VI Paper -^Astronoiny. 

Formulae of spherical trigonometry without proofs may be 
assumed. The stars. Rotation of the earth. The celestial sphere. 
The principal instruments. Determination of latitude and longi- 
tude! Distance and magnitude of heavenly bodies. Refraction. 
Simple problems connected with diurnal motion. Apparent annual 
motion of the Sun. Aberration. The equation of time. The motion 
of the moon. Eclipse. The Stellar system. 


178 




IVJ SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BR. 1 — ^MATHEMATICS 355 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Detailed Syllabus. 

The most conspicuous stars. The principal constellations. The 
signs of tl>c 2oadic. Double and multiple stars. Variable stars 
Nebulae, comets and meteors. 

The apparent motion of the heavens and its explanations by the 
rotation of the earth. Arguments and proofs for the earth’s rotation, 
Foucault’s gyroscope and pendulum experiments. 

The celestial sphere and the different systems of co-ordinates. 

The telcscospes. Reflectors and refractors. Advantages and 
disadvantages of the two. The transit theodolite. The transit 
instrument, meridian circle, the clock. The chronometer. The 
chronograph. The equatorial. Sextant. Zenith telescope. 

Clock error and rate: The right ascension and declination of a 
heavenly body, latitude and longitude of a place on land or sea. Sum- 
ner’s mehod. 

Form and size of the earth. Phenomena depending on a change 
of the observer’s place on the earth. Parallax (diumial and annual). 
Distance, and magnitude of the sun, moon and the planets and 
stars. 

The atmosphere and its effect on astronomical observations. The 
tangent formula for refraction. Cassini’s formula. Twilight. 

Simple problems connected with the diurnal motion. The 
apparent annual motion of the sun and its consequences. The 
ecliptic and its obliquity. The position of the ecliptic at any given 
instant. The equinoxes and sclstices. Determination of the first 
point of Aries and the obliquity of the ecliptic. Effects of 
precession and nutation. 

The earth’s motion round the sun. Aberration and its effects. 
Kepler’s laws and Newton’s deductions therefrom. True anomaly 
mean anomaly and lengths of the seasons. Siderial time. Apparent 
solar time. Mean solar time. Equations of time. The ciendar. 
Indian Standard time. 

The motion of the moon and her phases. The nodes and their 
motion. The moon’s siderial and synodic periods. Eclipses and 
their causes. Ecliptic limits. Number of eclipses in a year. The 
Saros. 

The Solar system and the direct and retrograde motions of 
planets (coplanar circular orbits). The stationary positions, duration 
of direct and retrograde motions. Phases of planets. 

A general descriptive idea of the stellar system. 


179 



356 


SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF jSR. II — ^STATISTICS [APP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Books recoftifttcnded for study : 

1. Barlow and Bryan: Astronomy. 

2. Russell, Dungan and Stewart: Astronomy, Vol. T. 

3. Spencer Jones: General Astronomy, Chapters XU to XIV, 

outlines only. 

4. Text-book of Astronomy by G. V. Ramachandran. 

5. Parker: Astronomy. 

6. Astronomy by Dr. H. Subrahmanya Ayyar. 

7. Foundations of Astronomy by W. M. Smirt. 

Books for reference : 

1. Russell, Dungan and Stewart: Astronomy, Vol. 11. 

2. Hutchinson: Splendour of the Heavens, Vol. II. 

f 

3. Godfrey: Astronomy. 

4. Spherical Astronomy by W. M. Smart. 

5. Ball: Spherical Astronomy. 

There shall be six papers of 3 hours’ duration each. The maxi- 
mum marks for each shall be lOo. 

Branch II-STATlSTICS 

The topics allotted to the different papers are as follows : 

(7) 

Paper L 

Rules of probability— Addition and multiplication, conditional 
probability and independence. Random variables, probability dis- 
tributions, mathematical expectation,| moments. Bernoulli’s theorem 
without proof. Binomial and its limiting forms, Poisson and 
normal distribution. Bivariate normal distribution. 

Interpolation, Gregory- Newton formula, central difference for 
mulae, forward and backward differences, inverse interpolation. 

General nature and scope of sutistical methods, colleaion of 
data— census and sample methods. Classification by categories and 
by measurements. Discrete and continues variation. Tabulation. 
Graphical and diagrammatic representation. Logarithmic graphs. 

Measures of location and dispersion, co-efficient of variation, 
skewness, 


180 



IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. 11 — STATISTICS 357 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


( 8 ) 

Paper II. 

Association of attributes, contingency tables, correlation— co-effi- 
cient of correlation, concept of regression lines and their determin- 
ation. 

Method of least squares normal equations, fitting Polynomials. 

Fitting of Binomial, Poisson and Normal distributions. 

Statistical population and random samples. Concept of a sampling 
distribution. Standard errors; large sample tests. 

Tests of significance with observed correlation co-efficients using 
Fisher’s z-transformation. 

Distributions of s, t, X* and F in normal samples (without 
derivations). 

Tests based on X*,t and F distributions. 


( 9 ) 

Paper III. 

Analysis of variance, one and two-way classification in general. 
Application to the analysis of randomised blocks and Latin squares in 
Design of Experiments. 

Sample surveys— choice of a sample, random, stratified and syste- 
matic ; errors of estimates in simple cases, use of questionnaire. Organi- 
sation of a large scale sample survey. 

Economic statistics— construction and use of index numbers of 
prices, cost of living and business activity indices. £lem«itary analysis 
of time series, determination of trend, seasonal indices. 

Vital Statistics— Birth and death rates, corrected and standardised 
rates, mortality tables, application to life insurance. Census of popu- 
lation in India, a critical study. 


(lo) 

Paper JV. 

In addition to the Pre-University course in Mathematics the 
following should be covered : 


46 


281 



S58 SYLt. IN OROUP-A OF BR. II — STATISTICS [APP. 

MAIN FOR THE B-SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Algebra: Permutations and combinations. Binomial theorem 
for positive integraj and rational indices. Elementary properties of 
determinants and matrices. Simple transformations. 

OMnetryi Equation of parabola, ellipse, hyperbola reft i red lo 
principal axes. Asymototes of a rectangular hyperbola. General 
equation of the second degree. 

Theory of E9U€itions(: Graphical representation of simple func- 
tions. Roots of Mth degree equation and then connection with the 
co-efficients of the equation. 

Calculus: Concept of a function. Idea of a limit, limits of 
sin OlO, tan 6}0 as Q tends to zero. Definition of differential co- 
efficient, derivatives of sums and products. Successive differentia- 
tion. Leibnitz theorem. Geometrical interpretation of the deriva- 
tive, equation of the tangent and normal— ‘Maxima and minima of a 
function of one variable. Mean value theorem. Continuity and 
differentiablity of functions of two variables. Partial differentiation. 

Exponential and logarithmic series. Taylor’s scries. Elementary 
methods of summation of series. 

Integration as a reverse process of differentiation. Indefinite 
integrals. Integration by substiution, by parts. Integration of stan- 
dard forms. Reimann integration. Definition of arcs, areas and sur- 
faces. Multiple integrals, infinite integrals. Gamma and Beta ftme- 
tions. Simple differential equations of the first and second orders. 

papers K, VHPracticaf): 

Practical instruction must provide for the use of desk calculators 
and statistical tables. Desk calculators will not however be necessary for 
answering the practical papers. The practical record which must be 
submitted for examination, should contain the analysis of typical 
illustrations based on the practical problems mentioned below. 

List of Practical Exercx&es in Statistics. 

I. Formation of a frequency table with about i,ooo observations. 

a. Bivariate frequency tables. 

S, Simple graphical representations: bar diagram; pie diagram; 
scatter diagram. 

4, Preparing histograms, frequency polygons^ frequency curve. 

5. Cumulative frequency tables, ogive, Lorenz curve. 


182 




IV) SYLt. IN QkOVf-A OF BR. 11— STATISTS 359 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. PEOREB BXAMlNAyiON 

6. Logarithmic graphs, y =cx* y =e* 

7. Calculation of averages from a frequenc;^ table. 

8 .. Measures of dispersion. Co-Efficient of variatioa. 

9. Skewness. Moments. jSj and jSg. 

10. Using a bivariate table for calculating a correlation coefficient 

and regression lines. 

11. Fitting a parabola (of the second degree) by the method of 

least squares. 

12. Formation of a binomial distribution by model sampling by, 

experiments with coins, with dies and with beads in an um. 

13. Model sampling. Use of random numbers. Method of draw- 

ing random samples from given data, 

14. Sampling distribution of the proportion, by experimental 

sampling. 

15. Sampling distribution of the mean, by experimental sampling. 

16. Fitting of Binomial, Poisson and Normal curves. (Graduation 

is not expected for the Normal curve). 

17. Interpolation with equal intervals. 

18. Inverse interpolation. 

19. I’cst of independence in a contingency table. 

20. Large sample tests : proportions. 

21. Large sample tests: means. 

22. Tests of goodness of fit: X*. 

23. Small sample tests for moans, and the difference between 

means. 

24. Testing a correlation co-efficient, using the z-transformation. 

The difference between observed correlations. 

25. Analysis of variance. Use of the F-iesc. One-way classifica- 

tion, with equal and unequal numbers. 

26. Randomised blocks. 

27. Latin square. 

28. Construction of index numbers. 

29. Estimatioa of trend by moving averages. 

30. Computation of seasonal indices. 

3 1 . Corrected and standardised birth and death rates. 

32. Calculation of expectation of life from a Afortality Table. 





360 


SYLL. IN OROUP-A OP BR. Ill— PHYSiqs 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


APP. 


Books for Stu^: 

1. Hoel, S, P. ; Introduction to Statistics. 

2. Cramer, H.: Elements of Probability and Applications. 

Books for Reference : 

1, Cochran, W. G.: Sample Surveys, 

2* Freeman, H, : Mathematics for Actuarial Students. 

3. Uspensky, J. V. : Introduction to Mathematical Probability. 

4. Johnson, M. L. and Tetley, H. : Statistics. 

5. Pearl, R. : Medical Biometry and Statistics. 

6. Yule, G. U. and Kendall, M. G,; Introduction to Statistics. 

7. Croxton and Gowden: Applied General Statistics. 

Branch Ul— PHYSICS 

Syllabus. 

(II) to (15) 

Mechanics. 

Preliminary: Fundamental and derived units— ‘Standards of length 
mass and time ; Measurement of length— 'Vernier— ‘Backward and 
forward vernier ; calipers— ‘Screw gauge— ‘Spherometer ; mass—* 
Spring balance— ‘Comman balance— Chemical balance ; measurement 
of time— Simple Pendulum; Qock*s working. 

Dynamics: Kinematics : Displacement speed ; Velocity; accele- 
ration of a particle moving in a straight line— uniform and variable; 
composition and resolution of displacements, velocities and accelera- 
tions. Equation of a particle moving in a straight line with uniform 
acceleration ; angular velocity and angular acceleration. Relative 
velocity and relative angular velocity; vectors in general. 

Kinetics: Newton’s Laws of motion ; principle of inertia; Defi- 
nition of force, momentum, impulse, impulsive force. Measurement 
of force; Atwood’s machine, conservation of momentum; Recoil of a 
gun; Jet propulsion and turbines; work, power, energy; Conservation of 
Energy; Gravitational and absolute units; Dimension of units; vertical 
motion of body under gravity— Curvilinear motion ; Hodograph ; 
parabolic motion of projectiles; Range on a horizontal and 
inclined plane ; Constrained motion under Gravity ; motion on a 


i84 



IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. Ill — ^PHYSICS 361 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


smooth inclined plane ; motion in a Circle under uniform velocity; 
Normal acceleration ; Centrifugal and centripetal forces ; Banking of 
curves. Conical pendulum. Centrifuge and its application. 

Impact and Collision : Impact ofa particle on a plane ; Co-efficient 
of restitution ; Direct impact between two spheres ; Oblique impact 
between two spheres, I^ss of Kinetic energy ; Impact of inelastic 
bodies. 

Sifnple Harmcmic Motion: Characteristics. Analytical expression 
—Composition of two simple harmonic motions in the same aixd per- 
pendicular directions having the same period. Equation of a simple 
harmonic wave. 

Dyn<imics of rigid bodies: Rotation of a rigid body about a fixed 
axis; moment of momentum ; moment of inertia ; law of parallel 
and perpendicular axes ; Calculation of moment of inertia of bodies 
of regular shape in simple cases ; kinetic energy of a rotating body; 
relation between applied couple and angular acceleration ; Acceleration 
of a rigid body down an inclined plane ; Ball rolling on a concave 
surface; Fly Wheel. 

Acceleration due to gra\jiiy: Simple pcnduliim ; Compound 
Pendulum^ equivalent simple pendulum; Borda’s pendulum. Reveisi- 
ble pendulum, Kaier’s pendulum ; BessePs Correction ; Bifilar 
pendulum— •Non-parallel threads ; Comparison of moments of inertia; 
Torsional pendulum; Determination of moment of inertia ; ‘g’ by 
Spiral Spring. 

Dimensions: Theory and use of dimensional equations. 

Statics: 

Force: Vectors ; Resultant ; Eqiiilibram ; Parallelogram law; 
Composition ;ind resolution of forces. Forces at a point and parallel 
forces; Conditions of equilibrium of a particle acted on by several 
coplanar forces (i) Two forces, ( 2 ) Three forces at a point ; moments 
and theorems of moments. Couples and moment of a couple. 

Friction: Laws of Friction ; Definition of fi and X Angle of 
friction; cone of friction ; verification of tan 0=/*; and 0 equal to X'- 
Inclined plane ; Friction Clutch. 

Simple Machines: Effect of friction ; Mechanical advantage ; 
Velocity ratio ; and Efficiency ; Levers— -Balance— Requisites and 





362 


SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BR. Ill— PHYSICS [aPP. 

MAIN FOR THE B-SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Characteristics ; Sensitivity ; Pulleys ; Wheel and axle Screw ; 
Wedge ; Inclined plane. 

Centre of Gravity— plane figures ; Pyramid, Cone, Tetrahedron, 
Sector, Solid and hollow hemisphere. Virtual work and its application. 

Hydrostatics i Liquid state; Pressure and thrust ; pressure at a 
point ; Pressure and thrust on the base, and vertical sides ; Lateral 
pressures ; Total thrust ; Centre of pressure. Calculation in simple 
cases. Variation in the position of Centre of pressure, when the lamina 
is lowered. Pascal’s Law. 

Principle of Archifnedes: Thrust on Curved surfaces ; Laws of 
floating bodies— Common hydrometer calibration; Nicholson’s hydro- 
meter— ‘Conditions of equilibrium of floating body. Different methods 
of determining relative density. Stability of equilibrium of floating 
bodies, Metacentre, Metacentric height determination. 

Atmospheric Pressure: Barometers. Corrections, Boyle’s Law; 
Fortin’s Barometer, Aneroid Barometer, Manometers, Pressure gauges. 
Variation of pressure with altitudes— ‘Derivation of expression— Deter- 
mination of heights by barometer. Compression pumps, Exhaust 
pumps. Cenco hyvac pump ; Diffusion pump ; Waran’s pump. 
Measurement of low pressures— Mcleod gauge— 'High Vacuum 
Technique— Centrifugal and force pumps. 


General physics. 

Gravitation and Gravity: Newton’s Laws of Gravitation, Kepler’s 
Laws— Gravitation constant, mass and density of Earth— Experiments 
of Cavendish, Boys and Poynting. Methods of finding ‘g’. Methods of 
comparison of ‘g’ at various places. Effects of latitude and rotation 
of the earth on ‘g’. Variation in *g’ due to altitude— Variation in 
‘g’ below the surface of the earth. Potential at a point due to a 
particle, spherical shell and solid sphere. 

Elasticity: Stress, strain, modulus of elasticity ; Hooke’s law ; 
strains due to a simple longitudinal pull; elastic limit ; elastic fatigue. 
Poisson’s ratio, compressibility and rigidity of solids; Young’s Modulus 
and its expression in terms of (On and (2) wander. Simple twisting of 
wires of circular crOss-section by couple at right angles to its length. 

Torsional rigidity: Torsional balance. Searlc’s method of finding 
H, q and a. Bending in one plane of bars of simple Cross sectional area 
(Rectangular and circular). Relation between the bendmg moment at a 
point and curvature of neutral axis; 5 by uniform and non-uniform 
bending. I form of girders. Oscillations of a cantilever— Compressi- 
bility— *and elasticity of gases . Regnault’s experiments. 


196 



iv] SYLL. IN OROUP^A OF RR* IH— PHYSICS 363 

main for the b»sc> degree examination 


Diffusion: Graham’s experiments ; Pick’s law. Analogy between 
diffusion and heat conduction— ‘Determinations of the co-efficient of 
diffusion. 

OmoJs : Semipermeable membranes— ‘Laws of Osmotic pres- 
sure-— Measurement of osinatic pres sure— Vapour pressure of solutions, 
elevation of boiling point of solutions— Depression of freezing point— 
Determination of molecular weights. Abnormal value of osmotic 
pressure of electrolytes. 

Viscosity: Streamline, turbulent and vortex motion of fluids. 
Critical Velocity ; Poisoiulle’s flow and experimental determination 
of the co-efficient of viscosity. Comparison of viscosities ; Stoke’s 
formula, applications. Lubricants. 

Surface Tension: Capillary phenomena and their explanation by 
surface tension; Molecular theory of surface tension ; Surface energy; 
the angle of contact — Neumann’s triangle. Measurement of surface 
tension by (i) Capillary rise and (2) torsion balance; Force between 
two plates due to a thin film of liquid between them. Difference of 
pressure on the two sides of a curved liquid surface due to surface 
tension. 

Expression for the excess of pressure p in spherical and cylindrical 
drops and bubbles- Energy consideration. Measurement of surface 
tension based on the above— Drop weignt method; Quincke’s methods 
Jaeger’s metliod ; variation of surface tension with temperature ; 
Interfacial tension between liquids ; spreading of one liquid on the 
surface of another s surface films— Mono-moleciilar layer, experimental 
methods of determining interfacial tension— Relation between pressure 
surface tension and curvature ; conditions for drop forming. 

Heat, 

Thermotnetery Heat and temperature. Thermometers, fixed points 
—Mercury thermometers. Defects of mercury thermometer. Gas 
thermometers— Resistance thermometers— Thermoelectric thermo- 
meters. Their relative merits and uses. Measurement of high and 
low temperatures. Pyrometers ; Special thermometers— Maximum 
and minimum thermometej s— Beckmann’s thermometers. 

Expansion : Solids, liquids and gases— Go-efficient of linear 
expansion of a solid (Alpha) Superficial expansion (fi) and cubical 
expansion (•i) experimental methods of determining Alpha, fi and K. 
Variation of density with rise of temperature. Apparent and absolute 
expaxision of liquids— their relation. Deteimination of co-efficients 
of apparent and absolute expansion. 


187 




364 SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BR. Ill — ^PHYSICS [APP. 

MAIN FOR THE B-SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Anomalous expansion of water and its coisequences— ‘Volume 
co-eiScient and pressure co-efficient of a gas and their equality. Charles* 
Law. Absolute Zero and Absolute Scale of temperature. Gas equa- 
tion (isothermal)— Gas constants. Compensated pendulum. Balance 
wheel of a watch correction for barometer scales. 

Calorifmtry : Units of heat ; specific heat of solids^ liquids and 
gases— Changes of state^ solid to liquid and liquid to gas— Laws of 
fusion, evaporation and boiling, latent heats. Radiation correction 
total heat of steam, experimental determination of specific heat and 
latent heats ice and steam calorimeters. Vapour pressure and tem- 
perature. Determination of vapour pressure. Effect of curvature on 
vapour pressure. 

Kinetic Theory: Postulates ; Pressure of an ideal gas, Boyle’s 
law ; Charles’ law and Avagadro’s Lw— ‘Mean free path. Boltzman’s 
Law, Degrees of freedom —•Deviations from Boyle’s Law— 'Amagat’s 
experiments — Andrew’s experiments. Van der Waal’s equation of state 
and critical constants. Law of corresponding states . 

Lov) temperatures: ?TOdMCt[ori of low temperatures— Liquefaction 
of gases Joule-Thompson effect— Regenerative cooling— Linde’s 
and Claude’s methods. Measurement and uses of low temperatures. 

first lato of Thermodynamics: Experimental determination of 
(I) Searle’s method. (2) Rowland’s method, (3) Joule’s method 
and (4) Callendar and Barnes* method . 

Isothermal and Adiabatic changes : Two specific heats of a gas. 
Detemination of Cp and C©. Adiabatic equation of a gas. Difference 
between the two specific hears of a gas. Mayers method of finding J. 
Determination of Kundt’s Tube method, Clement and Desorme’s 
method— Significance of K for gases from Boltzman’s cquipartilion 
law — 'Work done in isothermal and adiabatic expansions. 

Heat engines and their general principle of working: Carnot’s 
engine— Indicator diagram; efficiency — Carnot’s theorem. Otto cycle, 
Rankine Cycle and Diesel Cycle. 

Second Laxo of Thermodynamics: Thermodynamical scale of tem- 
peratures (Kelvin’s scale) Ideal gas scale; Refrigeration. First and 
second latent heat equations. Change of boiling point and melting 
point— Entropy and change in entropy for a reversible cycle; Entropy 
temperature diagram ; Entropy and available energy. 

Conductions Convection and Radiation: Thermal conductivity and 
thermometric conduct ivity,Searle’s method, Forbe’s method,Lee’s disc 


X88 




IVj 


SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BR. Ill — PHYSICS 36$ 

MAIN FOR THE B-SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


method. Convection currents, Prevost’s theory of exchanges. Emissive 
and absorptive powers— Radiation laws, Stefean’s Law, Newton’s 
Law, Kirchoff’s law. Pyrometers— Total Radiation type, disappearing 
filament ; Solar constant. Effective temperatures of the sun and 
stars. Pyrheliometers. 


Sound. 


Dynamical bass: Gliaracteristics of musical note, equation of a 
wave, progressive waves and stationary waves, their characteristics ; 
Lissajous figures. Beats— analytical expression and uses. Forced 
vibrations and resonance. Velocity of sound in a solid, liquid, 
and a gas— Transverse and longitudinal waves ; Derivation of 


expressions V = ^EjP 




Laws of transverse vibrations of stretched strings : Sonometer, 
Determination of frequency and mass per unit length Meldes*s experi- 
ment— Velocity of sound in a rod, Kundt’s Tube— Determination of 
for gases— Vibration in air columns, organ pipes. Vibrating plate— 
Chaldni’s plate— Synthesis and analysis of sound ; Resonators— 
Manoinetric Flames— Cathode ray oscillograph- Acoustics of build- 
ings. 

Musical scales— Equal temperament— Musical instruments, 
general principles— Acoustic measurements— Frequency, Wave length 
and Velocity in air— Electrically maintained tuning forks — Ultrasonics. 

Light, 

Geometrical Optics: Rectilinear propagation of light : formation 
of shadows— Solar and liuiar eclipses. Intensity of illumination- 
illuminating power, units— Cosine law— Photometers— Rumford’s, 
Bunsen’s Joly’s, Lummer brodhun. Flicker and photoelectric photo- 
meters— Illuminating sources, various kinds. 

Laws of reflection of light at plane surfaces: Multiple reflection in 
parallel and inclined mirrors— Images— Definition and characteristics— 
Sextant ; single and double optical levers. 

Reflection at spherical surfaces: Convex and concave mirrors— 
Principal focus and focal length— Relarionbctwcen the focal length and 
radius of curvature — Images formed by concave and convex mirrors 
and the relation between «, v and /. Experimental determination 
of focal length and radios of curvature of spherical mirrors— ^Chaxap*> 
tcri sties of images. 


47 


189 




366 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. IH— PHYSICS [APP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Refraction at plane surfaces : Laws— Experimental Verifications* 
Refraction through a parallel glass slab, expressions for refractive index 
and lateral displacement— -Relative positions of objects and images 
due to refraction through a slab (i) when the object is close to the slab 
(2) when the object is at a distance from it. Expression for the shift- 
total internal reflection and critical angle— 'Total reflecting prism— 
Comparison with plane mirrors— Measurement of critical angle and 
refractive index — Refractometers (Pulfrich and Wollaston) Conse- 
quences of refraction— Refraction through a prism— Oonditions for 
minimum deviation— Deviation through a right angled prism and 
(narrow angled prism when light is incident normally— Derivation of 
ft= Sin (A+D)/2/Sin A/2— Derivation of (/x— i) A = D for narrow 
angled prism— Spectrometer^ and determination of refractive index— 
Dispersion— Combination of prisms— Achromatic combinations— 
Direct vision spectroscope— constant deviation prism. 

Refraction at spherical surfaces: Lenses— convex and concave— 
Focal length ; optic centre; relation connecting m, v and /. Charac- 
teristics of the images formed. Relation between focal length of the 
lenses, refractive index of the material of the lenses and the radii of the 
curvature of the surfaces— liquid lenses— Determination of tlie refractive 
index of the liquid— Combination of two thin lenses (i) in contact, 
( 2 ) separated by a distance— Determination of the focal length of the 
lenses— Focal powers— Chromatic and spherical aberration— Achro- 
matic combination of lenses— Optical instruments, telescopes— 
Terrestrial, Galelean, Refracting and reflecting telescopes— Magnify- 
ing powers— Microscopes, simple and compound, oil immersion— 
Aplanatic surface— eye— Photographic Camera epidiascope- Projection 
lantern— Cine projectors— Binoculars — -Eyepieces— Defects of the eye. 
Correction— Constant deviation spectrometer- Pure spectrum- radia- 
tion and absorption spectra— Solar spectrum, Fraunhofer lines — 
Rainbow. 

physical Optics: Velocity of light ; Romer, Bradley, Fizeau, 
Foucault and Michelson’s rotating mirror experiments— Significance of 
Foucault’s experiments— Support to wave theory— Wave theory and 
Corpuscular theory— ‘Huygen's theory of wave propagation— Expla- 
nation for reflection and refraction at plane and spherical surfaces ; for- 
mula for lens ; total internal reflection. 

Interference: conditions. Young’s Fresnel’s Bimirror and Biptism 
experiments for the determination of wave lengths. Shift in the 
ceptfal band when a thin plate of transparent material is 
introduced. Lloyd^s mirror— Colours of thin films reflected and 
transmitted— Newton^j* rings, reflected and transmitted systems— 


19Q 




IVl SYLL. IN GROUF-A OF B&. Ill —PHYSICS 367 
MAIN FOR THB B-SC. DBOREB EXAMINATION 


Angle of wedge, testing the planeness of surface— Simple interferome- 
ters, Jamin and Rayleigh. 

Diffraction : Rectilinear propagation— Diffraction at a straight 
edge— Rectangular aperture— narrow wire— Circular disc--Diffraaion 
grating (transmission). Minimum deviation ; Zoncplatc, comparison 
with lens— Resolving and dispersive powers of grating and prism 
spectrometers— Resolving power of a telescope. 

Polarisation: Transverse nature of light waves— Plane polarised 
light by reflection, refraction and double refraction— Brewster’s law— 
Pile of plates— Reflecting polariscope- Huygen’s theory of double 
refraction— Construction of wavefronts— Elliptically and circularly 
polarised light, production and analysis— Half-wave plates and quarter 
wave plates— Nicol—Polaroids— Double image prisms— Verification of 
Huygen’s theory— Rotation of plane of polarisation— Fresnel’s explana- 
tion— Saccharimetry-Polarimeter, half shade and biquartz. 

Magnetism. 

Magnetic phenomena: Poles: Inverse square law; force between 
poles— Unit poles— Magnetic field— Couple on a magnet in a magnetic 
field, magnetic moment— Intensity of field (i) at a point along the axis 
‘End-on* position, (2) at a point along the equatorial line ‘Broad side 
on* position (3) Field at any point for a short magnet. Neutral point 
and mapping of field ; force and couple between two magnets (i) placed 
axially and (2) placed at right angles— Earth’s magnetic field— Magne- 
tic elements and their measurements— Variation of these elements— 
Magnetic compass— Gyrostatic compass on ships. 

Magnetic potential: Magnetic shell— Strength— Potential at a 
point in the field of a shell— Potential energy of a small magnet in a 
magnetic field— Magnetic potential (i) along the axis (2) along the 
equator and (3) at any point for a short magnet— Intensity of magnetis- 
ation— Tangent law— Deflection magnetometer— Tan A and Tan B 
positions. Comparison of M and H and verification of inverse square 
law— Vibration, magnetometer, determination, m, M and H.— Gaus’s 
theorem, Coulomb’s modification— Total normal magnetic induaion. 

Magnetic properties: Magnetic induction — ^Permeability — Suscep- 
tibility and relation between H, I, ft, B and k — ^Determination of per- 
meability (Ferromagnetic substances only) B-H and I-H curves— 
Magnetic hysterisis— Cycle of magnetisation and energy dissipated 
in a cycle of magnetisation. Dia,Para and ferro magnetic substances 
-Molecular theory of magnetism. Electron theory of magnetism and 
qualitative explanation of dia, para and ferro magnetism . 


191 



368 SYLL, IN OROUP-A OF BR. Ill — ^PHYSICS [aPP. 

^IN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Electricity. 

Electrostatics: Fundamental phenomena : Charging by induction 
—Gold leaf electroscope— ‘Faraday’s ice pail experiments— Insulators 
and conductors— ‘Coulomb’s law, verification— Action of points, 
lightning conductors— Force between charged bodies— Inverse square 
law— Dielectric constant— Gauss theorem; field intensity duc to (i) a 
uniform surface distribution of electricity on a sphere, (2) an infinitely 
long conductor and (3) an infinite plane— Intensity due to a uniform 
volume ; distribution of electricity in a sphere. 

Electrostatic potential: Potential at a point— Equipotential surfaces 
—Potential gradient and field intensity— Charge resides on the surface 
of the conductor — ^Electrostatic shielding; Cavendish experiments— 
Verification of the inverse square law; Coulomb’s law— Mechanical 
stress on the surface of charged conductors— Relation between 
potential and energy of an insulated charged conductor— Electrostatic 
field— Lines and tubes of force— Faraday tubes— Interpretation of force 
between charged bodies. Electrostatic* machines : Electrophorus ; 
Wijnshurst’s machine— Van dc Graaf ’s high voltage generator. 

Capacity: Capacity of an isolated sphere— Influence of neighbour- 
ing charge on the capacity of a condenser— Condenser in series and in 
parallel— Spherical— Cylindrical and parallel plate condensers— Force 
between parallel plate condenser with different dielectrics — Guard ring 
—Kelvin absolute electrometer- Measurement of potential difference— 
Energy of a charged condenser— Sharing charges— Loss of energy in 
sharing the charge. The quadrant electrometer— Hctrostatic and 
ideostatic uses— Measurement of p. d., comparison of capacities and 
ionisation current. 

Capacity of a condenser: Effect of capacity when the space between 
the plates is filled with a dielectric— Faraday tubes in dielectrics— 
polarisation in dielectrics— Lines and tubes of induction. Gauss theorem 
for a field with dielectric— Polarisation and elecuic dipole— ^Capacity 
Of a parallel plate condenser when a slab of dielectric is inserted between 
the plates— Force between the plates when they are insulated and when 
the dielectric is introduced— Measurement of dielectric constant with 
absolute and quadrant electrometer. 

The method of electrical images : For a small body placed near an 
infinitely conducting plane maintained at zero potential— Calcula- 
tion Of the force and charge. 

EUctrodynatmcs^^Magnetic fields of currents’^urrentmeasurement : 
Ampere’s theorem* equivalent magnetic shell — ^Magnetic field of a 
linear current element-^^Field on the axis of a circular current— 


192 



iv) SVLL. IN OROOP-A OP BR. Ill — ^PHYSICS 369 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Tangent galvanometer— Helmholtz Galvanometer— sensitive mirror 
galvanometer — Moving needle type and coil type— Sensitivity- 
magnetic field of infinitely long straight conductor carrying 
current— Magnetic field in a solenoid— Magnetic field and induction 
in a solenoid with an ironcore— Forces on a straight conductor in a 
magnetic field— Force between two straight parallel wires carrying 
current— Force between two circular coaxial coils of nearly the same 
diameter placed close together— Electrodynamometer— Kelvin’s 
ampere balance— Determination of international ampere in absolute 
electromagnetic units. 

Metallic conduction and resistance : Ohm’s law— Definition of 
resistance— Unit— Verification of law— Combination of resistances 
in series and in parallel; specific resistance conductivity— Shunts— 
Universal shunt — Distribution of a steady current in a net work— 
KirchofF*s laws, application to Wheatstones net work— P.O. box^ metre- 
bridge and Gareyfoster’s bridge— Variation of resistance with tempera- 
ture— Callendar and Griffith’s bridge— Ammeter and voltmeter. 

Electrolytic conduction : Faraday’s Laws of electrolysis* electro- 
chemical equivalent— Ions— Conduction through solutions of electro- 
lytes— Faraday— The verification of Faraday’s laws— Equivalent con- 
ductivity— Arrhenius theory— Strong and weak electrolytes- Hictorfs’ 
diagram— Transport numbers— Absolute velocities of ions. 

Electromotive /orce:— Contact potential— Electrode potential— Sim- 
ple Voltaic Cell and its defects. E.M.F. of a cell— Internal resistance- 
Daniell’s Cell, Leclanche’s Cell, Dry cell, accumulators, acid and 
alkali type, standard cell— thermodynamics of reversible Cell — Gibb’s 
Helmholtz equation— Calculation of e.m.f. of a Daniell cell from 
chemical data. 

Electrical Measurments Measurement of emf, current and 
resistance by potentiometer— Internal resistance by potentiometer— 
The ballistic galvanometer, suspended needle and coil type- 
logarithmic decrement— Constant of a ballistic galvanometer— Mea- 
surement of absolute capacity of a condenser; comparison of electro- 
magnetic and electrostatic units of capacity— Heating effects of current, 
fuses; determination of J. 

Thermoelectricity :— Seebeck’s effect and Peltier effect — difference 
between Peltier and Joule heating effect— Law of intermediate metals 
and law of intermediate temperatures— Experimental demonstration 
and determination of Peltier co-efficients— Thomson effea— Experi- 
mental demonstration— Thermodynamics of thermoelectric circuits— 
Peltier and Thomson co-efficients as functions of temperature— thermo 


199 



370 


SYLL. iN GKOUF-A OF BR. Ill— PHYSICS [APP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


emf as function of temperature— thermoelectric power and thermo- 
electric diagram^ measurement of emf of thermocouple— thermo- 
electric pyrometer and thermopile. 

Electromagnetic tVzducttim:— -Faraday’s experiments— Lenz’s law— 
Expression for the induced emfs. Faucault’s currents— Flux linked with 
a circuit due to current— co-efficient of self induction— co-efficient 
of mutual induction, work done— co-efficient of coupling =Af/\/Z,iL2 
Calculation of co-efficient of induction in simple cases— Standard sole- 
noid— Instantaneous value of emf. induced in a circuit rotating in a 
magnetic field— Growth of current in a circuit containing inductance 
capacity and resistance when a steady emf is applied ; the decay of 
current when emf is removed i time constant of the circuit. Induction 
coil— work done in establishing a steady current in a circuit— the 
energy in the electromagnetic field due to a current in the circuit. 

Calibration of a ballistic Galvanometer using a standard solenoid 
— Hibbert’s standard and Earth inductor —determination of dip— 
Experimental determination of co-efficient of self and mutual induction 
—experimental determination of international Ohm in absolute electro- 
magnetic unit":!charging and discharging with resistance— Measure- 
ment of high resistance. 

AUemating :— Rotating coil and motor effect of Faraday, 

current through a circuit containing inductance and resistance, emf in 
a circuit with resistance inductance and capacitance— impedance, 
reactance— R.M.S. Values of the emf and current— power in A.G. cir- 
cuits; Choke, power factor of a choke— Wattless current- Oscillating 
charge and discharge. Amplitude, phase and frequency— High fre- 
quency oscillatory currents— Tesla coil; skin effect — Transformers, 
energy loss, iron loss and copper loss— Transmission of power-measure- 
ment in A.G. circuit— Determination of frequency by sonometer— 
H.F. measurements— Hot wire ammeter— Transformer for extending 
the range of amnteters and voltmeters. 

»A.C. and D.C. Generator— Distribution system, shunt, series 
and compound wound generators and their characteristics— series and 
shunt wound D.C, motors and their characteristics, uses— -Induction 
motors— efficiency of a motor. 

Simple applications of electricity— Telegraphy— Telephony— 
Mierc^hones and loudspeakers— Electric lighting— Heating, efficiency 
of electric lamp— Sodium vapour lamp— Mercury vapour lamp— 
FlucMsoent lamp'-^rc lamp. 


194 




IV] 


SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. Ill— PHYSICS 

main for the b.sc. degree examination 


371 


Modern Physics. 

Spectroscopy .•—Line and band spectra— series spectra — infra red 
and ultraviolet spectra— transformation of radiations (fluorescence and 
phospherescence) — Doppler’s effect — Its application in lights. 

Electronics .'—Series circuit, parallel circuit, series parallel circuit 
—Resonance — Sharpness of tuning — resistance in resonance circuit 
—Electromagnetic waves. The tuned circuit — crystal rectifiers — 
valves— diode and triode, their characteristics — Triodc as rectifier and 
amplifier — Rectification of alternating currents — Half wave and full 
wave rectifiers— Mercury arc rectifier — Simple receiver using radio 
frequency and audiofrequency; amplification and resistance capacity 
coupling— triode valve as generators of oscillations — Simple ideas of 
modulation — Elements of broadcasting and reception— Aerials — loni- 
sation layers— Atmospherics — Principles of television — Elementary 
ideas of Radar. 

Discharge of electricity through gases .‘—Cathode rays; Specific 
charge e/m by Thomson’s method and Millikan’s experiment on elec- 
tronic charge — Cathode ray oscillograph — Thermionic emission — 
Valves — Photoelectric phenomena and their applications. Positive 
rays; E/M, Thomson’s positive ray method — Aston’s mass 
spectrograph, isotopes. 

X-rays Production and properties — Gas and Coolidge Tubes 
—X-ray plant installation — X-ray diffraction — Bragg’s law — X-ray 
spectrometer, characteristic X-rays, Moseley’s law — Compton effect, 
Change of wave length (no theory). 

Structure of the Atom : — Thomson, Rutherford, Bohr Models of 
the atom— Hydrogen Spectrum — Balmer, Lymann, and Paschen 
series. 

Radioactivity : — General properties, half period — Alpha, Beta and 
Gamma rays— Geiger counter — ionisation chamber; Wilson’s Cloud 
Chamber — Artificial transmutation — High Voltage generator— Cyclotron 
Induced radioactivity — Positron and Neutron. Cosmic Rays — 
Mesons. 

Wave nature of matter De broglie’s theory — G P. Thomson’s 
experiment— Electron diffraction — Electron microscope (qualitative 
study only). 

Molecular scattering of Ught : — Rayleigh scattering — ^Raman effect. 

Mass and Energy Their equivalence — Einstein’s equation— 
Nuclear fission — Chain reaaion — Atomic energy — Uses. 


195 




372 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BR. Ill— PHYSICS [APP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


A practical examination toill be held to test the candidate's acquaint- 
tance with phenomena and his ability to show them^ as well as his ability 
to make physical measurements. At the practical examination candidates 
must submit to the Examiner or Examiners their laboratory note-books 
duly certified by their Professors or lecturers as a bona-fide record of 
work done by the candidates. 

List of Experiments forming the Course in Practical Physics for 
THE Three- Year Degree Course (Physics IVIajor). 

A. ^General Physics, 

1. Sphcromcter and Single Optical lever. 

2. Balance — Sensibility and correction for buoyancy. 

3. Specific gravities of liquids and solids (heavier and lighter 

than water — soluble and insoluble in water) using hydro- 
static balance. 

4. Specific gravity bottle — Specific gravities of liquids and solids 

(soluble and insoluble in water). 

5. Nicholson’s Hydrometer, Test-tube float, and common hydro- 

meter. 

6. Boyle’s law — Fortin’s barometer. 

7. Parallelogram law of forces — Triangular law of forces Lami’s 

Theorem and Tangent law— Verification and determina- 
tion of mass. 

8. Law of parallel forces — Verification and conditions of equi- 

librium. Weight on non-uniform bar, centre of gravity 
of irregular lamina. 

9. Inclined plane — Mechanical advantage (i) when power acts 

parallel to the plane, (2) when power acts parallel to the 
base. 

10. Compoimd pendulum — Bar pendulum — K and ‘ g ’ deter- 

mination. 

11. Katcr’s Pendulum — ‘ g ’ by Bessel’s formula and method 

of coincidence. 

12. Young’s modulus by stretching. 

13. Young’s modulus by uniform bending. 

14. Young’s modulus by non-uniform bending. 

15. Rigidity by static torsion. 

x6. Rigidity by torsional oscillations. 

17. n and <r by Searle*8 apparatus. 

18, Mqinent of inertia— Torsional pendulum. 


196 



IV] SYLL. IN GROUP'A OF BRANCH III— PHYSICS 373 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

19. Moment of inertia— Comparison— Bifilar pendtilum. 

20. Surface tension — Capillary rise. 

21. Surface tension by pull on a plate. 

22. Surface tension by weight of drops— S.T. at water oil inter- 

face. 

23. Surface tension of mercury, Quincke*s drop. 

24. Viscosity by flow of liquid in capillary tube and comparison of 

viscosities. 

B. — Htau 

25. Co-efficient of linear expansion — Optic lever. 

26. Co-eflicient of expansion of liquid specific gravity bottle. 

27. Co-efficient of increase of pressure of air at constant volume. 

28. Co-efficient of expansion of air at constant pressure. 

29. Specific heat of a liquid using a solid— Barton’s correction. 

30. Latent heat of fusion of ioc. 

31. Latent heat of steam. 

32. Melting point, cooling curve. Boiling point of a liquid, J-tube. 

33. Newton’s Law of cooling — Verification— Specific heat of 

liquid by cooling. 

34. Thermal conduaivity — Scarle’s apparatus. 

35. Thermal conductivity — Bad conductor — Lee’s apparatus. 

36. Mechanical equivalent of heat— Friction cone apparatus. 

C. ~Light. 

37. Photometers— Bunsen’s and Joly’s. 

38. Direct refraction — Determination of refractive indices of 

solids and liquids by parallax method and by microscope. 

39. Refraaive index by critical angle (i) Glass prism, (2) Air cell, 

40. Focal length of concave and convex mirrors. 

41. Focal length of convex and concave lenses — Auto collimation. 

42. Refractive index of material of convex lens and concave lens. 

43. Refractive index of a liquid — Liquid lens. 

44. Magnif3nng powers of microscope and telescope. 

45. Resolving power of a telescope. 

46. Spearometcr — Refiractive index i critical angle. 

’ 47. Spcarome^ef^P^cftactivc index of material — Minimum devia* 
tion. 


48 


197 



374 SYLL. IN GROOP-A OF BRANCH HI— PHYSICS [aPP. 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

48. Spectrometer— Refractive index of liquid— Hollow prism. 

49. Spectrometer — Refractive index of a material of narrow angled 

prism. 

50. Spectrometer — ^i-D> i~i * Curve — Stokc*s method. 

51. Spectrometer — Dispersive power of the material of a prism. 

52. Spectrometer— Grating — Wave length of light — Normal ind* 

denoe — Dispersive power. 

53. Spectrometer — ^Wavc length of light — Minimum deviation 

method. 

54. Newton’s rings by reflected light — Radius of curvature. 

55. Wave length of light — Biprism— Optic bench. 

56. Polarimcter — Rotation of plane of polarisation. 

57. Solar spectrum — Fraunhofer lines. 

D. — Sound. 

58. Frequency by resonance column; end correction. 

59. Volume resonator. 

60. Frequency by falling plate. 

61. Kundt’s dust tube — determination of q of rod and Velocity 

of soimd in a rod. 

62. Sonometer — ^Verification of laws of transverse vibration. 

63. Sonometer — Frequency of Fork. 

64. Mclde’s experiment. 

U. — Magnetism. 

^5. Deflection magnetometer — Comparison of magnetic moments. 

66. Deflection magnetometer — ^Verification of inverse square law. 

Gauss method and pole strength — long magnet. 

67. Vibration magnetometer— Polestrcngth — Inverse square law. 

68. Determination of M and H. 

69. Mirror magnetometer ; inverse square law verification. 

70. Hysteresis by magnetometer method. 

'F.*^Electricity. 

71. Resistance by post office box — Spedfic resistance. 

72. Resistance by Metre Bridge— Specific resistance. 

Absolute Measurement of current by tangent galvaaometer*- 

calibration of ammeter. 


I9a 



IV] SYLL- IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH III— PHYSICS 375 
Main for the b,sc> degree examination 

74. Electro-chemical equivalent of copper — Copper Voltameter. 

75. Field along the axis of a coil— deflection magnetometer. 

76. Field along the axis of a coil— Vibration magnetometer. 

77. Conductivity of an electrolyte. 

78. E.M.F. by potentiometer. 

79. Current by potentiometer— Ammeter Calibration. 

80. Resistance by potentiometer. 

81. Internal resistance of a cell by potentiometer. 

82. Standardisation of potentiometer ^-Low range voltmeter calib- 

ration. 

83. Potentiometer— Calibration of high range voltmeter. 

84. Potentiometer— Rayleigh’s form. 

85. Carey Foster’s method of comparing nearly equal resistances. 

86. Temperature co-efficient of resistance. 

87. Comparison of low resistances by direct deflection. 

88. High resistance — Comparison and determination. 

89. Resistance of a galvanometer by half deflection method. 

90. Figure of merit of a galvanometer — Current and voltage 

sensitivity. 

91. Mechanical equivalent of heat — ^Joule’s law. 

92. E.M.F. of Thermocouple by potentiometer. 

93. E.M.F. of Thermocouple by direa deflection method. 

94. Constant of a ballistic galvanometer — Hibbert’s standard 

— condenser method — Quantity sensitivity. 

95. Search coil ; pole strength of a magnet. 

96. Comparison of Emfs. by condenser and ballistic galvanometer. 

97. Internal resistance of a cell by ballistic galvanometer. 

98. Absolute measurement of capacity. 

99. Comparison of mutual inductances by ballistic galvanometer. 

100. Absolute measurement of mutual inductance. 

101. Earth inductor (1) Constant of a balUstic galvanometer. 

(2) Dip. (3) H. 

102. Self inductance — Anderson’s method. 

103. Characteristics of a triode valve. 

Books for Stwfy , — 

X. Nightingale : Higher Physics. 

2. Loncy : Elements of Dynamics, Statics and Hydrostatics. 


TOO 


376 SYLL. IN oitOUY-A OF BRANCH III— FHYSICS [APP- 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE E3CAMINATION 


3. P. R. Subramanian : Mechanics (Industrial School Press 

Trichi), 

4. T. V. Venkatachary : Hydrostatics. 

5. P. E. Subramania Iyer : Properties of matter (S. Visvanathan). 

6. Mathur : Properties of matter (S. Chand & Co., Delhi). 

7 . N. Anantakrishnan, S. R. Govindarajan & S. Rajagopalan : 

A Text-book of Heat (S, Visvanathan). 

8. Tyler F.: Intermediate Heat (Edward Arnold Co.). 

9. Noakes : Heat (Macmillan Sc Co.), 

10. Noakes : Light (Macmillan Sc Co.). 

11. Sethi and Raizada : A Text-book of Optics (S. Chand Sc Co., 

Delhi). 

12. K S. Mandalam Iyer and Narayanamoorthy : 'Fexi-book of 

Light (S. Visvanathan). 

13. Winstanley : Sound (Longmans). 

14. S. R. Govindarajan and T. Murugaiyan : Sound (Rochouse Sc 

Sons). 

15. H. G. Mitchell : Elearidty and Magnetism (Methuen). 

16. Nelkon; Electricity and Magnetism (Arnold Sc Co.). 

17. D. N. Vasudeva : Magnetism and Electricity (Chand Sc Co., 

Delhi). 

18. Syed Yakub and J. P. Manidtam : Atomic Physics (S. Visva- 

nathan). 

19. Fr. J. B. Rajam : Practical Physics (St. Joseph’s College, 

Trichinopoly). 

20. Sri K. S. Venkatesan : Practical Physics (Madura CQllege» 

Madurai). 

Bimks for Refertnct : 

1. Analytical and Experimental Physics by Lemon and Ference 

University of Chicago Press. 

2. Elementary Statics and Dynamics by Barnard. 

3. Dynamics, Statics and Hydrostatics by Humphry. 

4. A Second Course in General Physics: Me. Kenzie (C.U,P.). 

5. General Physics: Kronig. 

6. , Mechanics and Properties of matter : Nelkon (Arnold). 

7. Mechanical Properties of matter : S.G. Starling (Maonillan). 

8. Statics : Sastry. 

9. Dynamies : S. Narayanan (Rodiouse dr Sons). 



ivj SYLL. IN G&OUP-A OP BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY 377 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEOREE EXAMIN ATION 

10. Heat for Junior students : Saha and Srivastava. 

11. A Text-book of Heat : Allen and Maxwell (Macmillan), 

12. A Text-book of Light : Barton (Longmans). 

13. A Text-book of Sound : F. G. Mce (Heinlan & Co.). 

14* A Text-book of Sound : Capstick (S. Chanda Co.). 

15. Electricity and Magnetism : Noakes (Macmillan). 

16. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism : Hutchinson. 

17 A Second Course of Electricity: Me. Kenzie (C.U.P.). 

18. Advanced Text-book of Practical Physics : Wornosop and 

Flint (Methuen). 

19. A Text-book of Practical Physics : Watson (Longmans). 


Brmach IV— CHEMISTRY. 

(16) 

I. Theoretical Chemistry. 

1. Atomic weights. Chemical formulae and stoichiometric equa- 
tions. Determination of atomic weights. The classification of ele- 
ments into metals, non-metals and metalloids. The contributions of 
Dobercincr, Ncwlands, Mendclceif and Lothar Meyer in classifying 
elements. Radio activity and the laws of radioactive decay. The 
structure of the atom. Periodicity of the properties of the elements 
Moseley’s work on atomic numbers. Transmutation of elements. 
Isotopes. Tracer elements. 

2. Properties of molecules in relation to structure : Dipole moments; 
refraction ; molecular spectra ; magnetic properties. 

3. Attraction between molecules : van der Waais-London forces. 
Boiling points^ latent heat of vaporisation, surface tension and parachor 
association, molecular compounds. 

4. Acids and bases : Definition: — Lowry-Bronsted, G. N. Lewis ; 
very weak adds and bases ; strength of adds and bases ; strong adds 
and bases ; indicators. 

5. Formation and stability of free radicals. Photochemical fission 
of a bond, thermal decomposition of metal alkyls, thermal fission of 
carbon-carbon bonds, other thermal fissions, chain reactions. Chlori- 
nation of hydrocarbons. 


201 



378 SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY [apF. 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


6. Tautomerism: The idea of tautomerism, keto-enol tautomeriam, 
nitro-isonitroso tautomerism, amido-imino tautomerism, lactam-laaim 
tautomerism and quinone oximes. 

7. Molecular rearrangements: Pinacol rearrangement (Whitmore 
mechanism), Hofmann and Curtius transformations, benzilic acid re- 
arrangement, Fries rearrangement, Ckisen rearrangement, the diazonium 
transformation and benzidine rearrangement. 

8. Aromatic substitution: Inductive effect, mesomeric effect, 
electromeric effect and tautomeric effect. Orientation of substituents 
in benzene. Theory of substitution in benzene: nucleophilic and 
electrophilic. 

9. Stereochemistry : Elements of symmetry. Resolution of 
racemic forms. Raoemisation. Walden Inversion. Asymmetric syn- 
thesis. Geometrical isomerism. Stereochemistry of aldoximes and 
ketoximes. Bayer’s strain theory and its modifications. Mechanism 
of addition to double and triple bonds. Allcnes and spirans. An 
elementary knowledge of the optical isomerism of other quadrivalent 
elements whose valences are directed tetrahedrally. 

10. The Chemical bond: Historical. The covalent bond, ionic 
bond, transition from covalent to ionic bond, metallic bond, dative 
bond, hydrogen bond, ‘ Onium compounds,’ double and triple bonds ; 
conjugated systems i the application of resonance concept to systems 
like benzenci naphthalene, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitro 
and carboxyl groups, quin ones, triphenyl methane dyes. 

11. The solid state. Elements of crystal struaure. X-ray study 
of a cubic crystal. 

Idst of books in Ckemsitty for reading and reference : 

General Chemistry 

Ehrct— Smith’s General Chemistry for Colleges (Longmans). 

Pauling — College Chemistry (W. H. Freeman & Co.). 

Pauling — Nature of the Chemical Bond (Ornell University). 

Latimer Sc Hilderbrand — Principles of Chemistry and Reference 
Book of Inorganic Chemistry (Macmillan). 

Sidgwick— Electronic Theory of Valency (Oxford). 

Speakman— Modern Atomic Theory (Arnold). 


Z 02 




iv] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY 379 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(17) 

11. Physical Chemistry. 

N,B . — Experimental demonstrations arc obligatory 

1. Ideal gas laws: The laws of Boyle, Charles, Gay Lussac 
Dalton, Gaham Vapour densities : Experimental determinations 
by the methods of Regnault, Dumas, Hoffman and Victor Meyer. 
Avogadro’s hypothesis. Molecular weights of gases and vapours. 
Limiting densities. 

2. Kinetic theory of gases. The behaviour of ideal gases. The 
equation of state of ideal gases from kinetic theory. Mean molecular 
velocity and mean free path. Collisions between molecules of the same 
kind. Real gases. The equation of state of van der Waals. 

3. The solution of gases in liquids and of solids in liquids. Henryks 
law. Determination of these solubilities. Solubility curves and their 
significance. Supersaturation. 

4. Vapour pressures of solutions, Raoult*s law. Measurements 
of vapour pressure differences. Determination of the molecular 
weights of a non-volatile solute by cryoscopic and cbullioscopic methods. 
Osmotic pressure and its relation to tlie vapour pressure of dilute solu- 
tions. Measurement of osmotic pressure. Isotonic solutions. ^ 

5. Electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions. Faraday’s laws 
of electrolysis and their significance; use in determining equivalents. 
Ionic theory. Elearolytic dissociation and the Arrhenius concept. 
Equivalent and molecular conductivities. Mobility of ions. Kohlrausch’s 
law. Transport numbers. Strong and weak electrolytes. Ostwald’s 
dilution law. Interionic attraction. Electrode potentials and their 
applications. Hydrogen ion concentration ; its measurement by using 
indicators, conductivity, hydrogen electrode, glass electrode. Ion 
activity. Solubility products and its analytical applications. Hydro- 
lysis. Buffer solutions. Dissolution of metals. Corrosion and passi- 
vity. Redox reactions. Redox potentials and redox indicators. 

6. The First law of Thermodynamics. Internal energy and heat 
content, Hess’s law. Heat of formation, solution, dilution, neutrali- 
sation and combustion, 

7 . Isothermal and adiabatic changes. Carnot’s cycle. The 
Second law of Thermodynamics. Free energy. Clapeyron equation. 
Joule Thomson effect. Liquefaction of gases. Critical phenomena. 
van*t Hoflf isotherm and isochorc. 


203 



380 SYLL. IN GROUP -A OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY [aPP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


8. The phase rule of Willard Gibbs. Applications to one com- 
ponent and two component systems like the following : Water, sul- 
phur, steam distillation, mixture of benzene and toluene, constant boiling 
hydrochloric acid, ethyl alcohol-water system, dissociation of calcium 
carbonate* Partition co-efficient and its applications. Miscibility 
of liquid systems. Distillation of mixtures of two liquids. A study 
of binary alloy systems involving the formation of an eutectic, solid 
solution and compound. Salt hydrates. 

9. Exothermic and endothermic reactions. Reversible reactions. 
The influence of temperature on reactions. The le Chatelier-Braun 
principle. Association and dissociation. The law of mass aaion: 
enunciation and application to systems like dinitrogen tetroxide, hydro- 
gen iodide, ammonium chloride, phosphorus pcntachloride and 
calcium carbonate. 

10. Velocity of chemical change. Order and molecularity of 
reactions. The Arrhenius rate equation and the parameters. A study 
of the following reactions : the combination of hydrogen and iodine : 
the reaction between nitrogen monoxide and oxygen, the decomposition 
of dinitrogen pentoxide ; the hydrogen-chlorine reaction (thermal and 
photochemical) ; the hydrolysis of carboxylic esters. Neutral salt 
effects. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. 2 ^ro order 
reactions. Absorption at surfaces. 

11. The colloidal state and its characteristics. General methods 
of preparing lyophobic and lyophillic colloids. Oil-in-water and water- 
in-oil emulsions. Sols and gels. Peptisation and protective action. 

Gold number. Electrophoresis. Brownian movement and Avogadro 
number. Adsorption indicators. Permeability of synthetic mem- 
branes. A qualitative picture of the Donnan membrane equilibrium. 

Physical Chemistry 

Prutton & Maron— Fundamental Principles of Physical Chemistry 
(Macmillan). 

Macdougall— -Physical Chemistry (Macmillan). 

Glasstone— Elementary Physical Chemistry (Van Nonstrand). 

Daniels and Albery— Physical Chemistry (Wiley). 

Eastman and RollefsOn— Physical Chemistry (McGraw Hill). 

W, J. Moore— Text-book of Physical Chemistry (Longmans). 

Goman and Daniels— Physical Chemistry (Wiley). 

a. J. Mcc— Text-book of Physical Chemistry (Heincmann). ' 


SQ4 



Iv] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH IV — CHEMISTRY 381 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(18) 

III. Inorganic Chemistry. 

N,B. — Experimental demonstrations are obligatory. 

1. Hydrogen, — Preparation, properties, manufaaure and uses, 
Heavy hydrogen. 

2. Oxygen, — Preparation, manufacture, properties and uses. Oxides 
of metals and their thermal stability. Acidic, basic and amphoteric 
oxides. Higher oxides. 

3. Water. — Hard and soft waters. Methods of purification and 
softening. Composition of water by weight and by volume. Efflores- 
cence and deliquescence. Aaion of water (liquid and vapour) on metals 
and non-metals. Heav> water. 

4. Ozone and Hydrogen peroxide. — Preparation, manufacture, 
properties and uses. Composition and relationships with oxygen 
and water respectively. Structural formulae of ozone and hydrogen 
peroxide. Oxidation and i eduction. 

5. The halogens and their compoimds. 

6. The composition of the atmosphere. Nitrogen, its hydrides, 
halides, oxy halides, oxides and oxyacids and their salts. Hydroxy- 
lamine. Fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. 

7. Sulphur. Allotropic forms. Hydrides, halides, oxyhalides. 
Oxides, oxyacids and their salts. Manufacture and uses of sulphuric 
acid. Selenium. Selcnious acid. 

8. Phosphorus. Allotropic forms. Hydrides, halides, oxyhalides, 
oxides, oxyacids and their salts. Superphosphates. 

9. Arsenic, antimony and bismuth. The elements, their hydrides, 
oxides, chlorides and sulphides. Arsenites and arsenates. Anti- 
monates of the alkali metals. Sodium bismuthate. 

10. Carbon. Carbon suboxide, carbon monoxide and carbon 
dioxide. Carbonates and bicarbonates and percarbonates. Carbonyl 
chloride, carbon disulphide, cyanogen, hydrogen cyanide, cyanides and 
c>’anidc complexes. Metal carbonyls. 

11. Silicon, silicon dioxide, silicic acid, mono and di silanes. 
Alkali silicates. Carborundum. Silicon tetrachloride and silicon 
tetrafluoride. Boron, diborane, boron trifiuoride, borontrioxide and 
boric acids. Borates of sodium. Boron nitride. 



382 SYIX. m OROUP-A of branch iv — chemistry [app. 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


12. The general occurrenoe of metals and principles of obtaining 
the metals from their oxide and sulphide ores. A comparative study 
of the following methods : — 

Lithium^ sodium> potassium > 

Copper, silver, gold ; 

Magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, radium ; 

Zinc, cadimium, mercury ; 

Aluminium, lanthanum, actinium ; 

Titanium, thorium ; 

Tin, lead ; 

Vanadium ; 

Chromium, molybdenum, tungsten (wolfram), uranium ; 
Manganese ; 

Iron, cobalt, nickel ; 

Platinum. 

Inorganic Chemistry : — 

Moeler— Inorganic Chemistry (Wiley). 

Barnett and Wilson— Inorganic Chemistry (Longmans). 

Palmer— Experimental Inorganic Chemistry (Cambridge). 
Ephraim— Inorganic Chemistry (Gurney and Jackson). 

Emelcus and Anderson— Inorganic Chemistry (Routledge). 

Philbrick and Hohnayard— A Text-book of Theoretical and 
InOrg. Chemistry (Dent). 

Mellor revised by Parkes— Modern Inorganic Chemistry 
(Longmans). 

Partington— A College course of Chemistry (Macmillan). 
Sidgwick— The chemical elements and their compounds (Oxford) 

(*9) 

IV. Organic Chemistry. 

N.B. — Experimental demonstrations arc obligatory. 

1. The aliphatic hydrocarbons. — ^Primary, secondary, tertiary and 
quaternary carbon atoms. Nomenclature. Preparation of alkanes. 
Substitution and oxidation reactions. 

2 . OUfines and acetylems.’^Vtepai^<m.y oxidation, reduction, 
addition (i^rkovnikov’s rule), isomerisation and polymerisation. 


Z06 




IV] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY 383 

, MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEOREE EXAMINATION 

t 

^3. —Preparation, addition products with anunonia, amines, 

metals; condensation, hydrolysis, reduction and double decomposition ; 
vinyl chloride, allyl chloride and allyl bromide, chloroprene. 

4. Polyhalo alkanes, — Preparation of chloroform, carbon tetra- 
chloride and iodoform. Specific rcaaion. 

5. Alcohols. — Preparation of mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy alcoholy 
Replacement, dehydration and oxidation. Allyl alcohol. Production 
of methyl and ethyl alcohols. 

6. Ethers, — Preparation, single and double cleavages at the oxygen, 
linkage, substitution. 

7. Halohydrins and oxides. — Preparation. Polyfunctional nature 
of the halohydrins. Additive reaction of oxides. 

8. Aldehydes and ketones, — Preparation, oxidation, reduction, 
addition, substitution of oxygen and of hydrogen, condensation, poly- 
merisation. Preparation and properties of acrolein, crotonaldchyde, 
mesityl oxide and phorone. 

9. Saturated monocarboxylic acids, — Preparation, reactions of the 
carboxyl funaion, dehydrogenation and decarboxylation. 

10. Unsaturated monocarboxylic acids. — Preparation from alcohols, 
aldehydes, halogen substituted acids, hydroxy and amino acids. Re- 
actions of the carboxyl function, oxidation, reduction, addition and 
oxirane ring formation . Shift of the double bond. 

11. Halogen and hydroxy substituted acids, — Halogenation at the 
alpha carbon atom, substitution, dehalogenation. Preparation of alpha 
hydroxyl acids by cyanhydrin reaction. The influence of the position 
of the hydroxyl group on the behaviour of hydroxy acids. Lactic and 
tartaric acids. Malic and citric acids. 

12. Oxo substituted acids. — Glyoxylic, formyl acetic, pyruvic 
aoetoaoetic and laevulinic acids. General methods of synthesising 
aldehydic and ketonic acids and special synthesis of aoetoaoetic ester 
by Claisen reaction. Special reactions of acetoacetic ester. 

13. Malonic and other dicarboxylic acids, — Preparation and special 
reactions. Comparison with acetoacetic ester, alpha formyl and 
cyanacetic ester and acetone dicarboxylic ester. Oxalic, succinic, 
glutaric and adipic acids. Synthetic uses of malonic ester. Pumaric 
and maleic acids. 

14. Acid d^rtvotfoer.— Anhydrides, acid chlorides, esters and 
amides. 


Z07 




384 SYLL. in OkOtJ^-A of BRAMCH IV— chemistry tXpP.{ 
Maw for the b.sc. degree examinatiw ‘ 

15. Aliphatic sulphur compofind!;. •--•Preparation of thio 
ReactioiQ of thio-alcohols with metals, metallic oxides, aldehydes, 
ketones, organic acids and acyl halides. Oxidation. Mustard ga^ 

16. Aliphatic nitrogen dmoattcies.— Preparation and properties of 
nitroalkanes. Preparation and properties of urea. Preparation and 
properties of alkylamines. Ethanolamine. Preparation and properties 
of alkyl cyanides and isocyanides. 

17. Grignard reagents. 

iS. Unsaturated hydrocarbons, — Isolated double bonds, cumulated 
double bonds, conjugated double bonds. Thiele’s theory of partial 
valency. 

19. Dicddekydes and diketones. — Preparation and properties of 
glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, diacetyl, succindialdehyde, acetylacetone and 
aoetonylacetone. 

20. Hydroxyaldehydes and hydroxy ketones. — Preparation and pro- 
perties of glycolaldehyde, aldol and diacetone alcohol. 

21. Diazo componnds.-— Preparation and reactions of diazomethane 
and diazoacetic ester. 

22. Carbohydrates. — Nomenclature, Aldotriose, aldotctrose, aldo- 
pentose. Glucose and fruaose. Reactions of glucose and fructose 
with phenyl hydrazine. Method of ascending and descending the 
sugar series. Interconversion of aldose and ketose. Constitution of 
glucose and fruaose. 

23. Ali^clic compounds. — General methods of preparation and 
general properties of cycloparaffins. 

24. Simple Aromatic compounds. — Structure of benzene. Prepara- 
tion of homologues. Properties. Synthesis of aromatic compounds 
from aliphatic compounds. 

25. Aromatic halogen compatmir.— Preparation and properties of 
nuclear and side chain substitution produas. Polyvalent iodine 
compounds. 

26. Aromatic nitro compounds. — Mahods of nitration. Properties 
of aromatic nitro compounds and nitroso compounds. Reduction pro- 
ducts of nitro compounds. Phenyl hydroxylamine. 

27. Aromatic amino compounds. — General methods of preparation 
of primary amines. Aniline, acetanilide, chloro-, brorao-, and nitro 
anilines. N-^alkyl anilines. Hofmann rearrangement and toluidinei. 
Diphenylamine, benzylamine and phenylene diamines. 



ZOB 



IV] hfLL. IN GROUP-A OP BRANCH IV — CHEMISTRY 385 

r MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

^ Diazonium salts. — Diazotisation. Replacement reactions. Re- 
actions in which nitrogen is retained. Structure of diazonium salts. 
Phenylhydrazine. Diazoamino and aminozo compounds. Azoxy, 
azo, and hydrazo benzenes. Benzidine. Hydroxy azo compounds. 
Simple azo dyes. 

29. Sulphomc acids. — Methods of sulphonation. Benzene sul- 
phonic acid. Sulphanilic acid. Sulphanilamide. Saccharin. 

30. Phenols. — Phenol, Cresols, halogenated phenols, nitrophenols, 
aminophenols, nitrosophcnol, phenolsulphonic acids, catechol, resor- 
cinol, quinol, pyrogallol, hydroxyquinol and phloro-glucinol. Anisolc, 
Guiacol. 

31. Alcohols^ aldehydes, ketones and quinones. — Benzyl alcohol, 
Betaphenyl ethyl alcohol. General methods of preparing aromatic 
aldehydes. Benzaldehyde and its condensation reactions. Nitration 
and halogenation of benzaldehyde. General methods of preparing 
phenolic aldehydes. Salicylaldehyde. Acetophenone. Phcnacyl chlo- 
ride. Houben-Hoesch synthesis. Benzo-phenone. Benzoquinones. 

32. Aromatic aa'c/^.— General methods of preparation. Benzoic 
acid, benzoyl chloride, benzamide, nitrobenzoic acids, anthranilic acid, 
salicylic acid, phenylacetic acid, mandelic acid, cinnamic acid, phthalic 
acid, phthalic anhydride, phthalimide, phthaloyl chloride, iso-and 
icrephthalic acids. Esters. 

33. Polynuclear hydrocarbons and their derivatives. — Diphenyl, 
diphenylmethane, triphenylmcthane. Triphenylmethyl chloride. 
Stilbene. Benzoin, hydrobenzoin and benzil. Phthaleins. 

Structure of naphthalene. Oxidation and reduction of naph- 
thalene. Nitronaphthalenes. Aminonaphthalenes and their reduction. 
Naphthalene sulphonic acids. Naphthols and their reduction. Naph- 
thaquinones. 

Structure of anthracene, anthraquinone, alizarin. 

Structure of phenanthrene. Phenanthraquinonc. 

34. Amino acids and polypeptidcs.-^GlycinQ, alanine, nor-lcudnek, 
leucine, isoleucinc, tryptophane. Polypeptides. 

35. Heterocyclic compomds. — ^Pyrrol, pyridine, quinoline, isoqui- 
noline. 

36. Coniine, piper ine, nicotine. 

37. T^p^nes, — Geraniol, citral, dipentene, mcthol. 


209 



386 SYLL. IN GROUP -A OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY' (aPP. 
MAIN FOR THB B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION > ' 

— — i— ^ 

Organic Chemistry :~-^Books recommended for reference); 

Dyson— Manual of Organic Chemistry (Longmans). 

Fieser and Fieser— ‘Organic Chemistry (Asia Publishing House), 
Branch and Calvin— Theory of Organic Chemistry (Prentic Hall). 
Hermans— Theoretical Organic Chemistry (Elsevier). 

Kipping and Kipping— Organic Chemistry (Chambers). 
Schmidt— Organic Chemistry (Gurney), 

Hickinbottom— Reactions of Organic Compounds (Longmans). 
Noeller — Chemistry of Organic Compounds (Saunders). 

Paul Karrer— Organic Chemistry TElsevier). 

Sidgwick — Organic Chemistry of Nitrogen (Oxford). 

Finar— Organic Chemistry, Vols. I and II (Longmans). 

Tume and Harris— Organic Chemistry (Longmans). 

Practical:-^ 

Kolthoff and San dell— Text-book of Quantitative of Analysis 
(Macmillan). 

Deihl and Smith— Quantitative Analysis (Wiley). 

Arthur and Smith— Semimicro Qualitative Analysis (McGraw Hill) 
Vogel— Qualitative Analysis (Longmans). 

Vogel— Quantitative Analysis (Longmans). 

VogeL- Organic Preparation (Longmans). 

Middleton- Organic Analysis (Cambridge). 

Wild— Estimation of Organic Compounds (Cambridge). 

Wild— Characterisation of Organic Compounds (Cambridge). 
Daniels Mathews and Wilson— Practical Physical Chemistry 

(McGraw Hill). 

palmer— Practical Physical Chemistry (Cambridge). 

Cavea— Qualitative Analysis (Blackie). 

Qatk— Qualitative Organic Analysis (Arnold). 

Findlay— Practical Physical Chemistry (Longmans). 


210 



iv] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY 387 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC, DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Syllabus In Chemistry — Practical 

1. Verification of the law of multiple proportions. 

2. Verification of the law of definite proportions. 

3. Equivalent weight by the conversion of a metal to its chloride. 

4. Equivalent weight by displacement of one metal by another. 

5. Equivalent weight by conversion of one compound to another. 

6 . Solubility of a solid at different temperatures. Solubility 

curve. 

7. Solubility of a gas in water. Estimation of the major compo- 

nents of air. 

8 . Separation of liquids by fractional distillation. 

9. Purification of a solid by fractional crystallisation. 

10. Acidimetry and alkalimetry : 

(a) Strong acid and strong base system. 

(jb) Strong base weak acid system. 

(c) Strong acid weak base system, 

(d) Solubility of acidic and basic substances. 

(e) Determination of sodium carbonate in washing soda. 

(/) Determination of the strength of glacial acetic acid. 

(y) Analysis of sodium hydroxide flakes. 

(Jh) Hardness of water. 

(0 The Kjeldahl method of nitrogen estimation. 

11. Oxidations involving potassium permanganate : 

(a) Estimation of ferrous iron. 

(b) Estimation of oxalic acid and oxalates. 

(c) Estimation of hydrogen peroxide. 

Cd) Determination of ferrous and ferric iron in a mixture . 

(tf) Determination of calcium. 

(/) Determination of nitrite. 

(y) Determination of manganese dioxide in pyrolusite. 

(A) Estimation of nitrite and chlorate using Bunsen valve. 

X2. Oxidations with potassium dichromate ; 

(a) Determination of ferric iron. 

(b) Determination of chromium in a chromium salt. 



3 S 8 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH IV — CHEMISTRY [apP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION ^ 

13. lodimetry : 

(а) Estimation of copper, arsenious oxide and hypochlorite. 

(б) Estimation of tin. 

14. Precipitation and complex formation : 

Determination of chlorides in neutral and acid solutions. 

15. Gravimetric estimations : 

(a) Iron as ferric oxide using cupferron or pyridiiie. 

(b) Magnesium as pyrophosphate or oxinate. 

(c) Nickel as dimethylglyoxine complex. 

(d) Lead as chromate. 

(e) Copper as cuprous thiocyanate. 

(/) Complete analysis of hydrated barium chloride. 

(^) Estimation of calcium as oxalate and as carbonate. 

(h) Estimation of lead as sulphate. 

16. Qualitative analysis : 

(a) Reactions of the following radicals : — 

Silver, mercury, lead, copper, bismuth, cadmium, 
antimony, tin, iron, aluminium, chromium, zinc, 
manganese, cobalt, nickel, calcium, strontium, barium, 
magnesium, potassium, sodium, ammonium, sul- 
phide, sulphite, carbonate, nitrite, thiosulphate, 
sulphate, nitrate, fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, 
acetate, oxalate, tartrate, arsenite, arsenate, phos- 
phate, chromate, silicate, borate. 

(b) Analysis of a mixture of four radicals including mixtures 

which involve the elimination of interfering radicals. 

17. Organic Chemistry ; 

(a) Distillation under atmospheric pressure and under reduced 

pressure. Steam distillation. 

(b) Preparations involving : Oxidation, reduction, esterifica- 

tion, hydrolysis, nitration, sulphonation, halogcnation, 
diazotisation. 

(c) Charaaerisation of organic compounds by their funaional 

groups and confirmation by preparation of derivatives. 

18. Physical Chemistry : 

(a) Determination of molecular weights by cryotcopic, 

cbullioscopic and steam distillation meth^s. 

(b) Transition temperature by thermometrsc method. 


SIS 



iv] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH V — BOTANY 389 

main for the b.sc. degree examination 


(c) Partition co-efficient involving: — 

(0 Simple systems, (ii) systems involving the formation 
of complex and (iii) systems involving association or 
dissociation. 

(d) Determination of heats of solution and heats of neutrali- 

sation. 

{e) Determination of hydrogen ion concentration by use of 
indicators. 

(/) Study of the kinetics of simple reaaions: 

Pottassium iodide and potassium persulphate, of 
Po.tassium iodide and potassium bromate. 

Branch V— BOTANY. 

[ao (i to ix)] 

I . A general account of the nature of plant viruses. 

A general account of the various groups of Bacteria; a brief 
study of their morphology and physiology'. 

2 The main points of structure development, life history and 
taxonomic relations of the following groups in general and 
the genera in particular: — 

Thallophyta: 

Algae: Chlorophyceae: 

Chlamydomonas, Pandorina, Eudorina, Plcodorina, Volvox, 
Ulothrix, Enteromorpha, Cladophora, Coleochaete, 
Oedogo lium, Spirogyra, Desmids, Caulerpa> Vaucheria. 
Diatoms. 

Botrydium. 

Chara and Nitclla. 

Cy<^f*aphyceae : 

Gleocapsa, Oscillatoria, Nostoc, Rivulana, 

Phaeophyceae ; 

Ectocarpus, Sargassum, Dicyoia, 

Rhodophyceae : 

Bicrachospermum, Polysiphonia, Gracilaria. 

Ftifigi: 

Myxomycetes : 

Plasmodiophora. 


50 


21 J 




3^0 SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH V — BOTANY [aPP, 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Phycamycetes : 

Synchytrium, Saproleognia, Pythium, Peronospora, Albugo. 

Ascomycttes : 

Saccharomycesi Penicillium, Pyronema, Peziza^ Claviceps, 

Xylaria. 

Basidiomyceus : 

Exobasidium, Ustilago, Puccinia, Agaticus, Lycopcrdon^ 
Polyporus. 

pungi Imperfecti: 

Fusarium, Piricularia, Colletotrichimi. 

Lichnes : 

Usnea. 

Bryophyta: 

Riccia, Marchantia, Anthocerosj Porella, Funaria. 

Pteridophyta: 

P^ilotum, Lycopodium, Selagindla, Isocics> Equisteum, 

Ophioglossum> Lastrea, Marsika. 

Gytnnospermae : 

Cycas, Piiius> Gnetum. 

3. The external Morphology of Flowering Plants. 

Principles of classification with reference to the systems of 
Bentham and Hooker and of Engle r and prantl. 

The morphology and systematics of the following families 
of Angiosperms. 

Ranunculaceac;, Magnoliaceae, Nymphacaceae, Crucifcrac, 
Malvaceae, Sterculiaceae, Tiliaceae, Geraniaccac, Bal- 
saminaceae, Oxalidaceae, Tropaeolaceae, Rutaceae, 
Meliaceae, Anacardiaceae, Papilionaceae, Caesalpini- 
aceae, Mimosae, Rosaceae, Myrtaccac, Cucurbitaceae, 
Umbelliferae, Rubiaceae, Compositae, Apocynaceae, 
Asclepiadaceae, Convolvulaceae, Solanaccac, Scrophu^ 
lariaceae, Acanthaceac, Labiatae, Vcrbcnaceae, Euphor- 
biaceae, Amarantaceae, Uimaceac, Unicaceac, 
iVloraccae, Cannabinaceae, Orchidaccac, LiUaccac, 
Palamae, Araceae, Musaccae, Zingiberaceae, Cannaceae, 
Marantaccae, Cyperaceae, Gramineac. 


214 


iv] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH V — BOTANY 39 1 

MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION ^ 


4. Embryology of Angiosperms. 

Anther— Lilium. 

Ovule and Embryosac— Polygonum. 

Embryo — Amman nia. 

5 . Anatomy: 

The structure and modes of division of the cell! Mitosis, 
Amitosis^ Meiosis. 

The nature and mode of origin of plastids* cell sap and 
other cell contents. 

The physical and chemical properties of protoplasm* The 
cell walU its composition. Modification of the cell- wall. 
Meristcms: Location — Kinds of Properties. Primary 
and secondary tissues and their distribution in the plant 
body. Root stem transition and different types of 
anomalous secondary growth. 

6. Physiology: 

{a) The chemical composition of the plant. 

Material of plant food and their sources. 

Absorption of water i Root-pressure; Absorption of ions. 
Sand-culture experiments with special reference to the 
use of inorganic nutrient salts in plant growth. 

(6) Soil microflora with reference to nitrogen fixaticai. 

Maintenance of soil fertility in cultivated soil-rotation 
of Crops. 

(c) Transpiration: Laws of diffusion ; Movements of sto- 

mata-wilting and its significance; Movement of water 
solutes and gases; Cohesion theory. 

(d) Assimilation of Carbon: External and internal factors. 

Law of limiting factors; Liebig’s law of minimum. 
Simple theories connected with the mechanism of 
photosynthesis. 

(e) Assimilation of Nitrogen: Carbon-nitrogen ratio and 

its significance. Special methods of obtaining nitrogen. 
Translocation of Assimilated Products. 

Enzymes and their action. 

(J) Respiration: Energy relations of the plant. Factors 
afifecting respiration. Aerobic and anaerobic respira- 
tion and their relationships. Respiratory quotient. 

(g) Growth: Movement and irritability in plants. 


216 



3W SYLL* In OilOUt»-A OF BRANCH V — BOTANY [aPF. 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


7. Ecology i 

(а) Factors of plant habitat — soil water^ — soil air. 

(б) Units of vegetation. Plant succession. 

Migration and Eceais^ Types of vegetation: — 
Mangrove, coastal, scrub and evergreen. 

(c) Characteristic features of Hydrophytes (submerged, 

floating and immersed types). Mcsophytcs with refer- 
ence to stomatal frequency. Xerophytcs (types of 
xeric environment.) 

Physical and physiological drought. 

8 . Heredity and Evolution: 

(a) A general introdution to plant life iluough the ages. 

(^) Mendelism with special reference to mono-and di- hybrid 
ratios. 

Chromosome theory of heredity. 

{c) Mutations and the factors that induce them Origin of 
species and theories of evolution. 

(d) Modern methods of plant-breeding. 

Improvements of crops. 

Plant Pathology. 

9. Tobacco mosaic — Citrus canker — Potato blight and Tomato 

manganese deficiency. 

Practical work. 

A. An introduction to culture technique of micro-organisms and 

to micro- technique as a demonstration. 

B. Each student is expected to have done the following; — 

(а) Preparations illustrating the form and structure of any 

plant of the groups or families mentioned in the 
syllabus and their description with sketches sufficient 
for their identification. 

(б) Preparations of permanent slides with double staining. 

(c) Dissections under the simple microscope of the floral parts 
of Phanerogams; making sketches of the parts dis- 
sected; drawing the floral diagram and giving reasons 
for reforing them to their families. 


tie 




iv] SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH — BOTANY 393 
main for the B.SG. degree EXAMINATION 

(i) Descriptions in technical terms of plants belonging to the 
families of Phanerogams specified in the syllabus. 

(e) Field work under tuition for at least five days each year. 

(/) The following experiments in plant physiology to be made 
by the students: — 

Osmosis — Permeability. 

Root Pressure — Respiration (Anaerobic and aerobic). 
Photosynthesis (2 experiments). 

Transpiration (2 experiments). 

Nutrition (water culture experiments). 

Tropisms (3 experiments). 

Growth (2 experiments). 

Demonstration of the use of synthetic hormones in the 
growth of plants. 

At the practical examination candidates are required to 
submit their laboratory note -books, a dozen microscopic 
preparations in permaiicnt mounts, a collection of about 
one hundred plants with relevant field nctes. 

Note: Candidates are expected to comment on the experiments 
set up by the examiners. 

Books for Study : — 

1. Text-book of Botany for India, Pakistan and Ceylon by 

Lowson, Howarth and Warner, 

2. plant Physiology by O. Rabcr 

3. Introduction to Systematic Botany by A. W. Haupt. 

4. Cryptogamic Botany by G. M. Smith (Vols. I and II) 

5. Economic Botany by A. F. Hill, 

6. Plant Physiology by Maximov, 

7. Introduction to Plant Anatomy by Eames. 

8. Plant Ecology by Weaver and Clements. 

9. Genetics by Walter. 

10. Structural Botany by Scott (Vols. I and II) 

11. Elements of Plant Pathology by I. E. Melhus and G. C. Kent. 


217 



394 SYJLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH VI— ZOOLOOV [aPP« 
MAIN FOR the B.SG. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


12. Flora of Madras by Gamble. 

13 . Fungi and Plants Diseases by B. B. Mundkur, 

14. Classification of Flowering plants by Rcndle. 

15. College Botany by Fuller and Tippo. 

16. Taxonomy of Vascular Plants by Lawrence. 

17. Theoretical Botany by McLean and Cook. 


Branch VI— ZOOLOGY 

(21) 

Paper Inver tebrata : 

A general survey of the invertebrate phyla (except the groups 
Mesozoa,Entoprecta, Bryozoa (Ectoprocta), Priapuloidea Chaetognatha, 
Roiifora, Gastrotricha, Kinorhynacha> NematomOrpha); characters of 
the phyla and their diagnestic features; classes and the main or Jers^ 
their salient features and common examples (South Indian examples as 
far as possible development in Invertebrate (eggs, fertilization, cleavage 
gastrulation, larvae and their metamorphosis) ; evolutionary interrelation- 
ships of the Invertebrate phyla in broad outlines. The human parasites, 
their life histories and the diseases they cause shall be included in the 
treatment. 

Paper Il^Chordata : 

A survey of the Prochordata and the classes and orders of the 
Vertibrata;a comparative study of the vertebrate systems from the 
evolutionary point of view; a survey of the vertebrate fauna of South 
India. 

Paper IlI—*Cytologyy Genetics and General, Embryology • 

Elements of Cytology : 

Cell structure and functions of parts of the cell; cell division with 
emphasis on chromosomes and their behaviour (mitosis and mciosis). 

Principles of Genetics : 

The general principles derived from experimentation with plant 
and animals (chromosomes, genes, Mendel’s laws, linkage, chromosome 
maps, non-disjtmction, sex-determination, sex-linkgatlon; and 
introduction animal breeding. 


21B 



IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-^A OF BRANCH VI— ZOOLOGY 395 

main for the B.SC. PEGRBE EXAMINATION 


Embryology : 

A survey of th principles of animal embryology based on verti- 
brate and invcrtcberate forms and an outline study of the origin as 
development of the Organ systems with special reference to Amphiox 
rog> chick and pig. The fundamentals of experimental embryology. 

paper IV — Physiology, Ecology and Evolution : 

Principles of Physiology : 

A comparative study of the vital functions of animals indicated 

below c 

1. Feeding and nutrition (a general knowledge of enzymes 

and their role will be expected). 

2. Respiration: respiratory media, exchange and transport of 

grases, role of respiratory pigments, anaerobiosis. 

3. Circulation: properties of heart muscles, composition and 

the functions of blood, blood groups, mechanics of cir- 
culation, 

4 . Excretion: elements of the physiology of excretion. 

5. Neurometer system; nervours control of muscles, elements 

of the chemistry of muscular contraction ; nerve centres 
and pathways; nerve impulses; re- flexes ; nerve endings 
(sensory and motor) ; functions of the autonomic 
system ; chemical co-ordination. 

6 . Animal behaviour: an outline comparative physiology of 

the sensory and the nervous systems in relation to 
animal behaviour. 

7. Practical demonstration of : — 

(a) muscle nerve preparation to show the muscle twitch. 
(Jb) heart-beat; recording of the heart-beat. 

(c) demonstration of reflexes. 

Principles of Ecology : 

The relation of animals to the facts of their environments; 
animal populations and animal corrununitics, their formation and their 
interrelationships. A study of invertebrate life in a local pond, tank 
or river. 

Evolution: 

A study of the evidence and the theories relation to evolutions; 
modes of spcciation. 


R19 




396 SYLL. IN GROUP*A OF BRANCH VII — OBOLOOY [APP. 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Practical, 

The following animal forms are to be studied in regard to the 
Structure, functions and habits. Evolutionary aspects are to be 
stressed. 

Amoeba, Paramecium, Vorticilla, Euglena, Hydra, Obelia* 
Physalia, Porpita, Aurelia, Sea-anemone, Corals, Ctenophorcs, like 
pleurobrachia. Parasitic worms. Nereis, Earthworm, Leech, Strepto- 
cephalus. Prawn, Crab, Hippa, Centipede, Millepede, Scorpion, 
Spider, Cockroach, Honey Bee, Mosquito, Termite, Fresh water 
Mussel, Pila, Sepia, Star-fish, Sea-urchin, Sea-cucumber, Amphioxus, 
Shark, Mullet, Frog, Calotes, Pigeon and Rat. 

Dissections and preparations will be required for the following: 

Earthworm, Leech, Cockroach, Prawn, Fresh water mussel, Pila, 
Shark, Frog, Calotes, Pigeon and Rat. (Dissection of nerves will not 
be required in the case of Fresh water mussel, Calotes and Pigeon.) 

Embryology of amphioxus frog, chick and pig will 
be studied as far as possible from living materials and microscopic 
preparations. 

Physiology , practical study of Vertenate physiology will be 
made from a few simple physiological experiments on frog. 

Field collection of animal forms and their identification will be 
expected. 


Branch VB— GEOLOGY 

[22 (i to V)] 

(i) Physiography: 

A course of lectures on the following;— 

The earth as a planet, its general relations to other members 
of the solar system, hypotheses as to the Origin of the earth; 
form, size and density of the earth; its movements and their 
effects. 

The atmosphere — Its composition, height, density, pressure, 
temperature, moisture and movements; weather, refraction, 
twilight and aurora-borealis. 

The Hydrosphere — Its composition, extent and distribution, 
depth, temperature and movements. 

The Lithosphere — The Chief constituents of the earth’s crust, 
the general characters and mode of occurrence of gencous and 
sedimentary rocks. Condition of the interior of the eartb« 




JV] SYLL. IN GROUP^A OF BRANCH VII— GEOLOGY 397 
main fob the b.sc. degree examination 


Agents of Geological Change — The hypogene and epigene 
agents of geological change, manner and results of their 
action, especially as influencing earth-sculpture; the destruc- 
tion, construaion and gradual evolution of the crust of the 
earth and of its surface features. 

Fossils, the main conditions favourable for their formation and 
preservation and their value as interpreters of the past history 
of the earth. 

Climates — Their causes and distribution; glacial epochs. 

Simple facts about the geographical and geological distiibut'on 
of the chief types of plant and animal life. Antiquity of man. 
Views as to the age of the earth’s crust. 

Candidates arc required to examine and draw skeiche of speci- 
mens and preparations relating to the development of amphioxus, Frog, 
Chick and Pig. 

( 2 ) Mineralogy. 

Crystallograpy: 

Elements of Plane Trigonometry: — 

Measurement of angles; Trigonometrical function and their 
relations to one another. Trigonometrical ratios of the 
angles o, 30, 45, 60 and 90 degrees. 

Use of Logarithms: 

Symmetry ; lines, planes and axes of symmetry, laws of Crystallo- 
graphy; the common holohedral, hemihedral and hemi- 
morphic crystal forms and combinations under each of the six 
crystal systems; twenty-two types of crystal symmetry as 
follows. 

Cubic system: 

Normal Pyriiohcdral, Tetrahedral and Plagiohedral Classes. 

Tetrogonal system, — Normal, Tri-pyramid al. Pyramidal Hcmi- 
morphic. Sphenoidal and Trapezohedral Classes. 

Hexagonal system, — Normal, Hemimorphic, Tri— Pyramidal, Pyra- 
midal, Hemimorphic, Trapezohedral, Rhombohcdral, 
Rhombohedral Hemimorphic, Tri-Rhomb ohcdral and 

Trapezohedral Classes. 

Orthohombic HcmimQrphic and Sphenoidal 

Classes. 


Ill 


SI 



98 SYLL. IN GROUP -A OF BRANCH VH — GEOLOGY [app. 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Monoclinic. — Normal Class. 

Triclinic. — Normal Class. 

The more important types of twins and twinning; grouping 
and irregularities of crystals, parting planes, percussion figures, 
etched figures ; zonal characters ; drawing of the more 
important crystal forms ; systems of crystal notation, use of 
the contact and the reflecting Goniometer. 

Physical Mineralogy : 

Colour, Streak, Lustre, cleavage, parting, fracture, hardness 
and specific gravity of Minerals. 

Megascopic and Microscopic characters of : 

Quartz, Orthoclase, Microcline, Plagioclases, Hypersthene, 
Augite, Aegerite, Hornblende, Glaucophane, Actinolite, 
Muscovite, Biotite, Olivine, Leucite, Nepheline, Nosean, 
Magnetite, Zircon, Garnet, Topaz, Apatite, Tourmaline, 
Sphene, Chlorite, Epidote, Calcite, Andalusitc, Sillimanitc 
and Cordierite. 

Chemical Mineralogy : 

General Principles of chemistry as applied to Minerals : Atom, 
molecule, atomic weight, symbol, formula, combining weight, 
molecular weight, valency, chemical reaction, radicals, chemical 
compound, acids, bases, salts, normal acid and basic salts. 

Empirical and molecular formula. 

Isomorphism, dimorphism, isodimorphism, pseudomor- 
phism and paramorphism. 

Optical Mineralogy : 

General Principles of Optics. — Light as wave motion ; Laws of 
reflection and refraction, R.I. under the microscope and Beeke 
Test, 

Double refraction in calcitc, polarisation by reflection. Refraction 
and absorption. Construction of Nicol Prism. Isotropic, 
anisotropic, uniaxial and biaxial crystals and their properties, 
Interference. 

Application of the colour chart to the study of minerals. 
Construction and use of quartz wedge, sensitive tint and mica 
plate and a simple petrological microscope. Description aq^ 
pgstifleation of the important rocK^fortninp minerals. 


Ill 




ivj. SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH VII— GEOLOGY 399 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Economic Mineralogy : 

Procss of mineral formation, Lindgrcn’s classification of mineral 
deposits ; oxidation and supergene enrichment. Occurrence 
and distribution in India, and utilization of the ores of gold, 
copper, tin, aluminium, iron, manganese, chromium, mag- 
nesium, lead, silver, zinc and sirconium, Non-Metallic 
Minerals — Coal, petroleum, clay, feldspars, gypsum, asbestos, 
mica, talc, corundum, emery, garnet, phosphates, precious and 
semiprecious stones. 

( 3 ) Petrology : 

The classification and distribution of rocks : Their composition, 
structure, texture, origin and mode of occurrence of the more 
important types and their metamorphic and altered forms. 

Crystallisation of binary magmas with (i) simple eutectic, 
(2) with incongruent melting point and (3) in solid solutions. 

Contact and regional meamorphism. 

The Macroscopic and microscopic examination of rocks (for list 
see under practical). 

Principles of Mechanical separation of rock and mineral consti- 
tuents. 

(4) Structural and Field Geology : 

Order of superposition ; Conformable and unconformable 
beds, overlap, lithology and fossil correlation ; facies ; divi- 
sion of rocks into groups systems, etc., and geological time into 
era epochs, etc. 

Dip, strike and outcrop ; variation in outcrops with reference to 
dip of bed and slope of valleys ; types of— Unconformity, 
folds and faults ; inlier and outlier. 

Compass — Clinometer and its uses. 

( 5 ) Stratigraphy and Palaeontology : 

The chief petrological and palaeontological characters of the 
main geological divisions and the probable physical conditions 
under which they were formed. Geology of India. 

The distribution of land and sea in India through ages : — 
Fossils, their nature and preservation. The main groups of 
vegetable and animal life and their distribution in time. 

The characters, classification and distribution of the more 
important types of fossils especially Indian ; identification 
and sketching of fossils ; causes for the imperfections of the 
geological record; the general succession of life as revealed 


2ZB 



400 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH vil — GEOLOGY 
MAIN FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


f 


thereby and the general evidence furnished in support of 
evolution ; principles of correlation ; homo-taxis. 

1. Zoological characters and chief divisions of Protozoa— 

Fossils— -Textulaira^ fusulina and nummulites. 

2. Zoological characters of the Porifera. Canal system of 

the sponges — Ventriculites. 

3. General characters of the Graptolites — Monograptus, 

diplograptus. 

4. General characters and divisions of the Coelenterata- 

corals— Cyathophyllum, zaphrentis, calceola, thecos- 
milia, favosites, halysites, lithostrotion. 

5. General characters of Echinodermata-echinoderms-cidaris, 

micraster, holasrer, encrinus and pentremites. 

6. General characters of Brachiopoda and brachiopod shell, 

Fossiis-lingula, productus, pentamerus, spirifer, 
rhynchonclla and terebratula. 

7. General characters of the Lamellibranchiata and lamelli 

branchshell — Fossils — Area, inoce ramus, peciens, ostrea, 
gryphaea, alectryonia, pectunculus, Irippurites, 
spondylus, unio, cardita and trigonia. 

8. General characters of the Gasteropods and gastcropod 

shell Fossils — Bellerophon, natica, turritella, ccritliium, 
murex, fusus, conus, voluta and physa. 

9. General characters of the Cephalopods, Nautiloidca and 

ammonoidca— Fossils— Bclemnites, nautilus, goniatites, 
orthoccras, ceratite*s, scholoenbachia. 

10. General characters of the Trilobita — Fossils — Calymenc, 

paradoxides, phacops, trinucleus. 

11. Plant fossils : 

Prmdorpmm.— Glossopteris, Gangamopteris, Vcrtc- 

braria and Thinn feldia. 

Cordaites, — Noeggerthiopsis and Dadoxylon. 
i2ga«ifa/er.— Schizoncura, Phyliotheca and Equisites. 
HltcoZer.— Alethopteris and Ciadophlebis. 

Sphenophyllaks. — Sphenophyllum. 

Cycadophyta. — ^Taenioptcris, Ptilophyllum, Otozomhes 
and Dictyozomites. 


£24 



IVJI |YLL. IN UKUUF-A Ot BRANCH VH — UtOJUUUY HUl 

f T MAIN FOB THE B, SC. D EGRE E EX A MINAT ION 

C(7wi/era/c5.— Buriadia (Voltzia) and Elatocladus. 

Dissocladella and Acicularia. 

Angiosperms. — Azolla, Nipadites and Palmoxylon. 
Lycopodiales. — Lepidodendron, Sigiilaria and Stigmaria. 


Fossils : 


Practical. 


Those in the list already given. 


Minerals . 

(1) Those in the syllabus under various headings and ores 

under ( 2 ). 

( 2 ) Wet and dry tests of the following : — 

Anglesite, Anhydrite, Apatite, Arscnopyrite, Barite, 
Bauxite, Calcite, Cassiteriie, Celestite, Cerussite, Chal- 
copyritc, Chromite, Dolomite, Gypsum, Haematite, 
Ilmenite, limonite, Magnesite, Magnetite, Malachite, 
Orpiment, Psilomelane, Pyrite> Rhodoclirosite, Rutile, 
Sideriie, Simithsonite, Sphalerite, Strontianite, Witherite 
and Wolframite. 


Rocks : 

Megascopic and microscopic study of the following rocktypes: — 

Micagranite, hornblend-granite, tournmaline- granite. Pegmatite, 
amphibolc- syenite, pyroxene- syenite, nephelinc- syenite, 

theralite, mica-diorite, hypersthene-diorite, quanz- 
diorite, olivine gabbro, norite, eclogite, peridotite, dunite, 
pyroxenite, anorthosite, syenite porphyry, diorite por- 
phyry, dolerite, lamprophyre, obsidian, quartz porphyry, 
rhyolite, trachyte, phonolite, andesite, basalt, pyroxene 
granulitc, amphibolite, Chiastolite slate, biotite gneiss, 
garnetiferous gneiss, cordierite sillimanite gneiss, mica, 
schist, hornblende schist, quartzite, crystalline limestones, 
chamockite, khondalite, gonditc. 

Sedimentary Rocks : 

The more important types : 

Structural Geology.^Exerdsts in plotting of outcrops in 
contour maps, reading of maps relating to thickness, uncon- 
formity, simple folds and faults ; constimetion of sections ; 
simple dip and strike problems. 



402 SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH VIU— GEOGRAPHy|[a^P. 
MAIN FOB THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION f \ 

Branch Vm-^GEQGRAPIIY 

Paper 1 — Same as for B.A. Group-A, Paper I. 1 g ^ 
Paper //—Same as for B.A. Group-A, Paper 11. V syllabuses 
Paper HI — Same as for B.A. Group- A, Paper III. J 3^ 34*) 

Paper /F— Optional Subjects : Any one of the following ; 

Geomorphology, Climatology and Oceanography, 
Biogeography and Cartography, 

Practical Geography I — Map Work. 

Practical Geography II — Surveying and Map Projec- 
tions. 

Same as for B.A. Group-A, Paper IV. 

Syllabuses and Text-books for Optional Subjects: 


(* 3 ) 

Geomorphology. 

An elementary treatment of the following : — 

I. (a) Earth as a member of the Solar system , — The fundamental 
principles of the main theories regarding the origin of the 
earth. 

(6) Earth as a wmt.— Structure — Physical and chemical, and the 
evidence relating thereto. 

(r) Surface of the earr A.— Distribution of land and sea and the 
theories regarding their present distribution ; Isostasy 
and its bearing on surface configuration. 

(Section I should be dealt with in greater detail than in the 
Physical Basis paper for the Pass.) 

2 . Materials of the earth^s crust . — Minerals and rocks — two-fold 
classification — division into igneous, sedimentary and 
metamorphic groups and their sub-divisions based on 
their mode of formation and chemical characters. 

An elementary knowledge of the more important rock forming 
minerals like quartz, felspars, amphiboles ; pyroxines^ 
mica-chlorites, carbonates, iron oxides, in so far as 
they lead to a better imderstanding of the rocks— -exami- 
nation of Common rocks and minerals and their identi- 
fication in the hand specimens. 


226 



ivl SVLt,. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH VIII— GEOGRAPHY 403 
main for the B.SC. degree EXAMINATION 


Mode of formation and structures associated with rocks — 
scenic features of important rock types. 

Simple geological structures. — Dip and strike, deforma- 
tion of the earth’s crust — joints, folds and faults — tcn- 
sional and compressional, and their topograhic effects — 
construction of block diagrams to illustrate the common 
effects of faults. 

Interpretation of geological maps to illustrate common struc- 
tures and drawing of sections. 

3. Geological time scale. — Basis of division — standard time scale 
and the Indian equivalents thereof — an elementary know- 
ledge of the Indian Stratigraphy — the main divisioni, 
their geological characters, geographical distribution and 
economic importance. 

4 Land forms. — Classification into the first, second and third 
orders — constructional and destructional. 

Greomorphic processes — weathering, rivers, ground water, air, 
glacier, waves and currents and organisms. 

5. Geomorphic Units. — Simple structures : (i) Plains, Plateaus 

and Karsts. 

Complex Structures : Domes, Fold mountains. Faulted Block 

mountains. 

Shields and their structures. 

6. Cycle concept in Geomorphology. — Development of the Fluvial 

cycle in (a) young lands, (6) old lands and (c) in domes 
and folded structures. 

Interruptions of the Fluvial cycle and their consequences. 
Davisian and Walther Penck Systems. 

7. Geomorphic cycles in deserts, lime-stone areas, glaciated coun- 

tries (Knowledge of a type area is expected). 

8. Volcamc landscapes. — Volcanic plains and plateaus, domes and 

mountains. 

Evolution of relief in volcanic areas. 

9. Coastal forms. — Erosional and constructional — progradation 

and retrogradation— ^astlines of submergent, emergent 
and composite characters. 

(O. Mountotw.— Origin, development, dissection and destruction 
of mountains. 

(Students will be expected to have some knowledge of 
geomorphological features of India*) 


297 



404 SYLL. IN OROUP-A OF BRANCH VIII— GEOGRAPHY [aPP. 
MAIN f6r the b'.SC. degree EXAMINATION 


(* 4 ) 

Climatology and Oceanography. 

An elementary treatment of the following 
Clitnatol(^y : — 

1. The earth as a planet. Its movement and relations to the sun, 

the consequent distribution and seasonal variation of inso- 
lation over the earth’s surface. 

2. The atmosphere. Distribution and periodic variation of — 

(а) The pressure and temperature of the air — ^adiabatic tempera- 

ture changes. 

(б) Air movements and wind systems — ^the nature, origin and 

distribution of planetary, seasonal and local winds. 

(c) Humidity and Precipitation. 

(J) The structure of the atmosphere— stratosphere and tropo- 
sphere — air masses — cyclones and anti-cycloncs, temperate 
and tropical. 

(e) Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Clouds, Fog, Mist, Dcw> 
Snow, Hail, Hoar Frost, Lightning and Thunder, Aurora, 
Halo, Twilight, Rainbow, Coronas, etc. 

3. The factors and elements of climate. 

4. Classification of climates. Climatic control of soil types and of 

the regime of rivers. 

5. Chief climatic types and their regional variations, the effect 

of such climates on life. 

6. The construction and use of the chief meteorological instru- 

ments, weather maps and their interpretation — Seasonal 
and daily weather forecasts. 

7. Climatic changes. Periodic and secular variations, the principal 

theories. 

Books recommended for study : — 

1. Austin Miller : Climatology. 

2. Kendrew : Climate. 

3. Kendrew : The Climates of the Continents. 

4. Trewartha : Weather and Climate. 

5. Brooks : Evolution of Climate. 

Shaw I Forecasting Weather. 



ivj SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH Vlll — GEOGRAPHY 40i 
main f o b the B,SC. degree EKA MI NATION 

7. Bruiit : Meteorology. 

8. Lcmpfert : Meteorology. 

9. Huntingtoa : Climatic Changes. 

10. Coleman : Ice Age— ancient and recent. 

11. Thomas Blair : Climatology. 

12. Pettersen : Meteorology (McGraw Hill). 

13. Conrad : Methods in Climatology. 

14. Zeuner : Dating the Past. 

15. Meteorological Glossary. 

Oceanography : 

1 . Form of sea and ocean beds— origin of the oceans and seas. 

2. Floor of the oceans — characteristic features of the ocean basin*. 

3. Properties of ocean waters : (a) Temperature of oceans and 

seas, (b) Composition of rivers, lake and ocean waters. 

(c) Salinity of oceans and seas — causes and effects. 

(d) Waves and tidal movements — their causation and effects. 

(e) Ocean circulation, its origin and effects. 

4. Methods of oceanographical survey and their development. 

5. Plant and animal life in the oceans and seas— economic exploi- 

tation. 

6. Marine deposits— Shallow water and pelagic deposits. 

Books recommended for study: — 

1, Murray : Ocean, 

2, Jenkins : Text-book of Oceanography. 

3, Jolinstone : Introduction to Oceanography. 

4, Johnson : Shore Processes and Shore line development. 

5, Daly : Changing World of the Ice Age. 

(» 5 ) 

Bio- Geography. 

1. Introduaion : 

Characteristics of plants and animals and their classification 
(the main classes and phyla). 

2. General : 

Biology and Bio-geography — ^reproduction of plants and 
animals — their dispersal— struggle for existence— -surviva 
of the fittest— !cyol^tiQn— different theories. 



406 SYLL. m GROUP-A OF BRANCH VlII-KJEOGRA PHY [app. 

MAIN F OR T HE B.SC. DEQREE EXA MINATION 

' •*' 

3, Environment : 

A, Plants. — (n) Habitat factors ; (i) Origin and classification 

of soils, major soil groups of the world. (2) Water salts 
and organic matter, (fi) Climatic factor — effect on plant 
life — world climatic belts and vegetation belts, (c) Plant 
adaptation to environment, xerophytes, hydrophytes, 
epiphytes, (d) Plant communities — forests — grass lands, 
marine and aquatic — plankton and submerged plants. 

B. Animals.^a) Environment — its effects on development and 

habits. {}>) Habitat — ^terrestrial, aquatic, arboreal ; verti- 
cal distribution of animals in the sea-corals and coral reefs, 
(c) The Zoo-Geographical regions of the world — Neogaea 
Notagaea (Australia — Malayan and Polynesian and Haw- 
aiian Regions), Actogaea (Holarctic and Ethiopian), Ethio- 
pians — ^Africa, Oriental with reference to India. 

4. Palaeo-Geographic Distribution ; 

Geological eras and their sub-divisions with special reference 
to the dominant plant and animal forms — present and past 
distribution and land connections. 

(a6) 

Cartography. 

An elementary treatment of the following ; 

1. Shape and size of the earth. Geodetic surveys, Gravity surveys, 

the theodolite and its errors. 

2. Methods of Trigonometrical surveying including Triangulation, 

Resection and Traversing. Sextant and its uses. Traverse 
co-ordinates. Triangulation co-ordinates. Convergence of 
meridians. Solution of right-angled spherical triangles, Times 
of sunrise and sunset in any place (including the relationship 
between hour angle and declination). Determination of 
distances and directions on the earth. 

3. Determination of latitude by simple observations on the sun 

the moon and the stars (candidates should be able to use the 
nautical almanac for this purpose). Atmospheric refraction. 

4. Time, sidereal, mean and apparent. Time and longitude. 

Longitude by wireless signals and by the moon, 

' 5; Iiiternaddxial Date Line. 

6. Simile methods of determining azimuth. 

7. Photo^aphi? surveying — ^Photo theodolite. 



IV j SYLL. IN OROUP-A OP BRANCH IX — PHYSIOLOGY 407 

MAIN for the B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

8. Advanced M^P Projections : 

(a) Conical — Simple conical with 2 standard parallels) 

rectangular) polyconic, conical equal area with one and two 
standard parallels, the conical orthomorphic. 

{h) Cylindrical — Mercator’s, Cassinis, Gauss’s. 

(c) Transverse and oblique zenithal projections. 

(ti) Others like the Mollweidc (candidates arc expected to make 
the necessary derivations). Combination of the Moll- 
weide and the Sinusoidal, etc. 

(e) Cubic projection. (Gnomonic)— Pcrspcaive projections. 
Oblique, Orthographic, Aitoff’s, Clark’s, etc. 

(Candidates are expected to derive the formulae and to draw 
the nets). 

Books Recommended , — 

1. Steers : Map Projections. 

2. Jameson and Ormsby : Surveying and Map Projections, VoL 11 . 

3. Erwin Raisz : Cartography. 

4. Hinks : Maps and Survey. 

BRANCH IX-PHYSIOLOGY. 

(a?) 

Syllabuses. 

Application of physico-chemical laws to physiological processes. 
Surface tension and surface phenomena. Diffusion, Osntosis. Proper- 
ties and functions of cell membrane. Cell permeability. The proper, 
ties of colloidal solutions. The Donnan equilibrium. 

Chemical constitution and properties of proteins, lipides and 
carbohydrates. Composition of tissues and body fluids. 

Catalysis in biological processes. Enzymes : Classification) com- 
position and characteristic features. 

Sources and transformation of energy in living organisms. Rela- 
tion between chemical, mechanical and thermal changes. Work and 
efficiency. 

Blood ; structure, composition, formation and destruaion ; 
respiratory functions and buffer mechanisms. Immunity. Blood 
grouping. Lymph, tissue-f uid and cerebro-spinal fluid. 


2S1 


408 SyLl. in OftOUl^-A OF BkANCH IX— PHYSIOLOGY [APP 
MAIN FOK THE B.SC. DEOKBE EXAMINATION 


Anatomy of the heart and general arrangement of the circulatory 
system. The properties of cardiac mu&cle. Origin^ transmission 
* and control of the heart beat. Pressure changes and time relations 
in the cardiac cycle. Blood pressure and blood flow throughout the 
vascular system^ and their nervous and chemical control. 

Mechanics of respiration. Gaseous interchange. Control of 
pulmonary ventilation. Effects of depth and altitude. Circulatory 
and respiratory changes in exercise. 

Mechanism and control of the secretion of digestive juices. 
Composition of juices Digestion and absorption of foodstufts. 
Movements of the alimentary tract. 

Metabolism. Exchanges of matter and energy. Nitrogenous 
equilibrium. Intermediate metabolism of protein, fat and carbohy- 
drate. 

Regulation of body temperature. Functions of the skin. 

Nutrition. Dietary requirements at different ages and under 
different conditions. Mineral metabolism. Vitamins: Origin, pro- 
perties and functions. Tissue oxidation. 

Endocrine organs : functions and inter-relationships. Cliemical 
constitution of hormones, 

Excretary organs. Functions of the kidney. Composition and 
formation of urine. Micturition. 

Reproduction. Development and functions of sex organs. 

Ovulation and spermatogenesis. Fertilization. Formation and 
functions of the placenta. Development of mammary glands. Partu- 
rition and lactation. 

The physiology of striated muscles, smooth muscle and nerve 
Excitation. The nerve impulse and its transmission centrally and 
peripherally. 

General anatomy and functions of the nervous system in man : 
Origins^ destinations and functions of the fibre tracts of the cerebro- 
spinal axis. Reflex-action. Maintenance of tone and posture. Special 
functions of the brain stem, cerebellum and basal ganglia. Cerebral 
cortex, including functional localization and conditioned reflexes. 

Sense organs : structure and function. 

The autonomic nervous system. 


232 



IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-A OF BRANCH IX — PHYSIOLOGY 409 
MAIN for. the B.SC, DEGREE ^XAHO^TION 

PRACTICAL WORK. 

Histology, including the staining and mounting of paraffin sections 
of the different organs of the body to show general structure and the 
various tissues of which they are composed. The preparation from 
fresh material of suitably stained perntanent specimens of the elemen- 
tary tissues including blood, lymph and marrow, nerve cells and nerve 
fibres. The staining of specimens of the spinal cord and medulla 
to show nerve fibres and nerve cells. 

Animal experiments. Experiments on the frog muscle-nerve 
preparation which illustrate the physiological properties of muscle 
and nerve. The properties of cardiac muscle, and the initiation and 
control of cardiac rhythm in the frog. Study of the mammalian heart 
by perfusion of the coronary circulation. The properties of smooth 
mtisclc as shown by the intestine and uterus. Suitable experiments 
to illustrate the action of hormones. 

Experiments on the human subject. Blood counts and colour 
index. Blood grouping. The adaptability of the circulatory and 
respiratory systems to changed conditions, including experiments 
on circulation in the skin. Metabolism, metabolic rate, work. Factors 
influencing the flow and composition of urine. Reflex time. Experi- 
ments on eye ; visual acuity, accommodation, measurement of 
blind spot, field of vision, binocular vision, colour vision, etc. Experi- 
ments on hearing and equilibration. 

Chemical physiology. Qualitative tests which illustrate the pro- 
perties of carbohydrates, lipides and proteins in food and animal tissues. 
Separation and estimation of fats, carbohydrates and proteins in foods 
and tissues. Experiments to illustrate the action and properties of 
enzymes. Quantitative work on enzymes. Digestion : test meals 
qualitative and quantitative experiments on digestive juices. Urine 
chemistry : qualitative tests for and estimation of the main constituents. 
Experiments on tissue oxidation. 

Blood : coagulation, spectroscopic analysis, preparation of deri- 
vatives of haemoglobin. Estimation of haemoglobin, oxygen capacity, 
percentage oxygen saturation and carbon dioxide content. Esti- 
mation of (blood constituents such as) sugar, urea. 


BS3 



B^Sc. 

GROUP-B SUBJECTS 
BRANCH I— MATHEMATICS 
( 38 ) 

Statistics as Ancillary Subject. 

The distribution of topics allotted to the two papers are as follows 
Paper I. 

Scope of statistical methods. Collection of data — Classification 
by categories and measurements. Discrete and continuous variation. 
Tabulation in respect of one or two charaaers. 

Graphical and diagrammatic representation — Bar diagrams, pie 
diagrams^ scatter diagram ; histogram ; frequency polygon, frequency 
curve, ogive ; logarithmic graphs. 

Measures of location — mean, median and mode. Measures of 
dispersion— mean deviation — standard deviation, quartile deviation, 
co-ef&dent of variation. First four moments ; measures of skewness 
ft and fii. 

Association of attributes, contingency table. Correlation — co- 
efficient of correlation and its interpretation. Regression equation. 

Fitting first and second order polynominals by method of least 
squares. 

Linear interpolation ; Newton’s and Lagrange’s formulae ; 
simple problems. 

Paper II. 

Rules of probability, addition and multiplication; simple 
problems. 

Theoretical distributions — binomial and its limiting forms, Poisson 
and Normal, properties of these distributions, the importance of these 
distributions in statistical studies. 

i Statistical populations and sampling distributions ; basic concepts 
of st^stical reasoning. 

Standard errors of proportion, mean. Standard deviation and 
correlation co-cfl&cicnt. Large sample tests. 


234 



SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BR. I — MATHEMATICS 411 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Uses of t and F tesst. Tests for independence in a contin- 
gency table. 

Sample surveys— choice of sample^ random sample, stratified 
and systematic. Use of questionnaire, practical problems in organising 
and conducting sample studies. 

Planning of Scientific experiments; principles of experimentation. 

Practical work. 

(Examples to be set in both the papers). 

The practical work should include exercises bearing on the above 
topics. The problems chosen should provide scope for an intelligent 
understanding of the theory and acquaint the students with computa- 
tional procedures. Use of slide rules, mathematical tables and graph 
paper should be included. 

Books for Study and Reference : — 

Yule and Kendall : Introduction to Statistics. 

Hoel, P, ; Introduction to Statistics. 

Wcatherburn : Statistics. 

Dixon, W. J. & Massey: Intrv>duction to Statistical analysis. 


(29) 

Physics (Ancillary). 

Two theory papers of 3 hours* duration each and one practical paper 
of 3 hours* duration. 

Preliminary. — Units of measurement — accurate measurement of 
length — verniers, vernier callipers — Screw gauge — Spherometer — 
Measurement of mass — spring balance — common balance — ^measure- 
ment of time — Simple Pendulum. 

Dynamics. — Displacement, speed, velocity — Uniform Velocity- 
Uniform acceleration — velocity time curve — Equations of motion — 
parallelogram law of velocities and acceleration — Simple harmonic 
motion — measurement of ‘ g ’ by simple pendulum. Momentum- 
impulse — Newton’s laws of motion — Definition of Force — measurement 
of force— Weight and mass — gravitational units — law of conservation 
of momentum — work, power, energy — Potential and kinetic cilergy — 
Law of conservation of energy — motion down and inclined plane- 
water power. 



412 SYLL, IN GROUP-B OF BR. I — MATHEMATICS [aPP. 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Resultant and equilibrant— parallelogram law of forces 
verification of law— ^Resolution of force— equilibrium of three forces at a 
point— Triangular law of force — verification — application of triangular 
law of force— conditions of equilibrium. 

Moment of force — equilibrium under parallel forces — the lever 
principle and its application — common balance, its requisites — centre 
of gravity and its position in bodies — centre of gravity of regular objects 
and combined objects— stability and centre of gravity— Machines— 
three classes of levers — ^three systems of pulleys — relation between 
mechanical advantage, velocity ratio and efficiency — Weston differen- 
tial pulley — ^Wheel and axle — Principle of screw driver — inclined plane 
—parallel and horizontal effort — Friction — Laws of friction, Elasti- 
city— Hooke’s law — Elastic modulii — Determination of Y by stretching. 

Hydrostatics. — ^Pressure at a point. Thrust, Lateral Thrust- 
Pascal’s law. Transmissibility of fluid pressure — Brahma press- 
Density and specific gravity Archimedes principle — upthrust of a liquid 
—determination of specific gravity using Archimedes principle — den- 
sity of a solid, liquid, light solid and soluble solid, etc. — law of flotation 
—floating of ships — Plimsoll line — hydrometers — Archimedes principle 
applied to gases — Hare’s apparatus — Atmospheric pressure — pressure 
and thrust of fluids — differences between liquids and gases — Liquids 
pressure — Hydraulic press — Torricelli’s vacuum — magnitude of atmos. 
pheric pressure — Magdeburg hemispheres — Fortin’s Barometer and 
aneroid barometer — manometers — Boyle’s law. Diving bell — compres- 
sion pump — air pumps— Rotary pumps — diffusion pump — Mcleod’s 
gauge— Force pumps and centrifugal pumps. 

Surface Tension. — Definition— experiments to illustrate effects 
Of surface tension — Capillary rise — ^Drops and bubbles — surface energy 
—Determination of surface tension by drop weight method and Tor- 
sional balance method— spreading of liquids — surface films — molecular 
lay^. 

Osmosis and Diffusion. — Laws of Osmotic pressure — vapour pres- 
sure of solutions — Boiling and freezing point of solutions — Graham’s 
law — flick’s law— experiments to find ‘ K ’ — analogy with heat con- 
duction. 

Kiko5*/y.---Co-efficicnt of viscosity— experimental determinatlo]:i 
of viscosity by flow of liquid through a narrow horizontal tube ; coni- 
parison of viscosities — Ostwald’s viscometer. 



iv] SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BR. I — MATHEMATICS 413 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Heat. 

Measurement of Tempcraturc^-^Typcsoi thermometers and scales 
of temperature-— centigrade, Fahrenheit and Reaumer systems— 
M^ercury thermometer— *s team point and ice point — Alcohol thermo- 
meter “^clinical thermometer— Maximum and minimum thermo- 
meters— Pyromocouple thermometers. 

Expansion of Solids and Li quids. --^lixpam ion of sOJids— co- 
efiicient of liner expansion (ot) experimental determination co- 
efficient of superficial expansion and co-efficient of cubical 
expansion (^) of a solid— experimental determination— Relation 
between a, p and ^—consequences of expansion of solids— ba!ancc 
wheel of a watch, and compensated pendulum — co-efficient of cubical 
expansion of a liquid*— apparent and real expansion and the relation 
between them — Determination of apparent and absolute c'O-efficient 
cf expansion of a liquid. 

Expansion of (rases. — •Voiumc co-ctficient and pressure co-efficient 
— r.liarks’ law, equality between volume co-efficient and pressi.ire 
CO- efficient — absolute scale of tcinpcrature— gas equation — correction 
for HaiomeiC!'. 

(jalorimetry , — 'Units of heat— specific ht. at ol solids, 1. quids and 
gases — Newton’s law and radiation correction fappioximate)— changes 
of state— laws of fusion— evaporation and boiling— total heat of steam 
^experimental methods of determining latent heat of steam and ice. 

Kinetic 7Yit'c»rv. —Postulates and expression for pressuu — Dcd\ c- 
lion of Hoyle’s Uw— Charles% Avagadro’s and Graham's laws — 
Deviations from Boyle's law— Amagat's and Andrew's experiments — 
Vandcr Waals' equation— Liquefaction,— critical constant— refrigerat- 
ing machines— vapour pressure and hydromctr>. 

First kw^ of thermodynamics— Determination 
of J ; Isothermal and adiabatic changes— Two specific heats of a gas 
::nd their relation— Dctei minai ion of ^ by Clement and Dcsormcs 
method— work done in Isotheimal and adiabatic exps'insionJ — Heat 
engines and their general principles of tvor king— Carnot’s engine- 
indicator diagram efficiency— Carnot’s theorem — Second law ol 
thermodynamics and thc^^modynamical scale of temperature. 

Conduction and Thermal conductivity— S carle's 

method— Lee’s method -^convection of heat, land and sea breezes— 
Radiation— Stefan’s Jaw— Newton’s law as apprp 5 «ifnation of Stcfan’% 

law—Solar constant, PyrohcHopwtcr. 


S3 


SS7 



414 SYLL. IN OROUP-B OF BR- I — MATHEMATICS [APP. 
FOR THE B.SC. degree EXAMINATION 


Sound Vibrations and Waves — Simple treatment of vibrations— 
harmonic vibrations and waves — forced harmonic vibrations — Reson- 
ance-— velocity of sound waves — velocity of sound in air, and its depen- 
dence on Pressure and temperature — Relation between v, n, and X 
Reflection of sound — accoustics of rooms — refraction of sound — 
stationary waves — wave length and its relation to nodes and antinodes — 
vibration in strings — Laws of Transverse vibration of strings — sono- 
meter— Beats. 

Vibrations of Air in Pipes, — Open and closed pipes — overstones — 
Resonance, measurement of velocity of sound in air — sound recording. 

Light. 

Rectilinear propagation — shadows — Eclipses — Photonict r y — Rum- 
ford’s, Joly’s and Bunsen’s photometers. 

Reflection of Light at plane surfaces. — Laws of reflection — formation 
of image and its characteristics — Periscope — Parallel mirrors and 
inclined mirrors — Deviation of a ray by a rotating mirror — Sextant — 
single optic lever. 

Reflection of Light at Spherical surfaces. — Convex and concave 
mirrors— principal focus and focal length — relation between focal length 
and radii of curvature — images formed by concave and convex mirrors 
and the relation between their positions with respect to the positions 
ofthe object and focal length of the mirror— experimental determination 
of focal length, characteristics of images. 

Refraction of Light at plane surfaces, — Laws of refraction — refrac- 
uon through a parallel slab— expression for and lateral displacement- 
relative positions of object and its image due to refraction through a slab. 
When the object is closest or at a distance from the farther face — 
expression for the shift — ^total internal reflection and critical angle- 
total reflecting prism— measurement of critical angle and refractive 
index — refraction through a prism — conditions for minimum deviation 
AMD 

— derivation of = Sin — / Sin Ajz Spectrometer and determi- 

nation of A, D and 

Refraction at Spherical surfaces. — ^Thin lenses, convex and concave, 
optic centre— focal length — Relation between u, v and f Characteris- 
tics of images formed— Relation between focal length, refractive index 
of the material of the lens and the radii of curvature of their surfaces— 
liquid lens— ^letermination of the refractive index of a liquid— combina- 
tion qf ttyq jenses— focal power Optical /wtriiwaww— Tekscopc— 


t9i 



iv] SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH I — MATHEMATICS 415 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


refracting and reflecting types — simple and compound microscopes. 
Magnifying power of Telescopes and microscopes. Eye— camera — 
projection lantern— Epidiascope — BinocularS'--defect8 of the eye, 
correction, dispersion— absorption and radiation spectra— Fraunhofer’s 
lines and explanation. 

Physical Optics, — Velocity of light — Romer Fizeau Foucault, and 
Michelson’s methods— significance of Foucault’s experiment— support 
to wave theory — Huygen’s theory of wave propagation — Explanation 
for reflection and total internal reflection— Interference — Young’s 
experiment— Frcnnel’s biprism experiment — Newton’s rings — experi- 
ment-colours of thin films — testing of planeness surfaces — 
Diffraction — rectilinear propagation— diffraction at straight edge — and 
rcaangular aperture — transmission grating— grating spearometer— 
Polarisation by refleaion and refraction — Brewster’s law— double 
refraction — Nicol — Polaroid — rotation of plane of polarisation — 
Sacharimetry. 


Magnetism. 

Poles— inverse square law— force between poles— unit pole — 
natural and artificial magnets — magnetic field — intensity and lines of 
force— couple acting on a magnet — magnetic moment— intensity of 
field (i) at a point along the axis — (2) at a point along the equator and 
(3) at any point — Neutral point and mapping of field— Earth’s nugnetic 
field— dip declination and H— their measurements; compass— deflection 
magnetometer- Tan A and Tan B positions— comparison of magnetic 
moments — vibration magnetometer — measurement of M and H— 
verification of inverse square law— magnetic properties of materials — 
intensity of magnetisation— susceptibility and permeability— deter- 
mination of i>ermeability by magnetometer method I-H and B-H 
curves— magnetic hysteresis — cycle of magnetisation — Ferro, dia and 
Paramagnetic substances. 

Etornrfarics.— Positive and negative electricity — Frictional 
electricity— conductors and insulators— Gold leaf electroscope — Induced 
charges— charging by induction— Faraday’s ice-pail experiment 
distribution of charge on a conductor— aaion of points— the lightning 
conductor— electrostatic machines— the clectrophorus— Wimshurts 
machine— Van de graff’s generator— Coulomb law— electrostatic unit 
of charge— elearic and intensity— electric potential— earths 
potential— positive field and negative potential— condensers— charging 
capacity— aaion of a condenser— Leyden jar— electrolytic and paper 
condensers. 



4 16 SYLL. IN OllOUP-B OF BR. I— MATHEMATICS [aPP. 

FOR THB B.SC. DEOREE EXAMINATION 


Electrodynamics , — Magnetic field due to a current passing through 
a straight conductor, a circular coil and a solenoid — Corkscrew rule- 
electro magnet— the buzzer — telephones — carbon microphone — ^moving 
iron ammeter — ^tangent galvanometer— moving coil galvanometer— 
Telegraphy — Ohm’s law and its applications — electrical measurement — 
Metre-bridge-P.O, Box— Potentiometer — Faraday’s laws of Electrolysis 
—Arrhenius theory — cells — primary and secondary — accumulators 
acid and alkai type — Standard cell — ^Joule’s law — heating effects of 
current — force exerted on a current carrying conductor in a magnetic 
field— Fleming’s left hand rule for direction of force — moving coil 
instrument — Mirror galvanometer — electric motor — moving coil loud 
speaker — laws of electric and magnetic induction — Leinz’s law — Primary 
and self inductance and mutual inductance — induction coil — Eddy 
current — induction furnace — ^rotating coil — A C. and D C. generator — 
transformer — Power transmission — Rectifiers. 

E/ec/ro/n'es — Discharges of electricity through gases — deiermina- 
tipa of e/m; evaluation of e — thermionic valve — Radio receiver — simple 
valve circuit — cathode ray oscillograph — photo electric cell — X-rays — 
Production and properties — Goolidge tube — application of X-rays — 
radio activity — and a» 7 panicles — induced ratio activity — 
cosmic rays — Elementary study of the structure of an atom. 

List of Experiments in Physics for the Ancillary 
Course of Two Years 

1. Measurement with Spheromeier. 

2. Young’s Modulus by stretching. 

3. Surface tension by capillary rise. 

4. Surface tension by pull on a plate. 

5. Surface tension by drop weight method, interfacial tension. 

6. Viscosity of flow of liquid in a capillary tube. 

7. Comparison of viscosities. 

8. Co-efficient of linear expansion of a solid — optic lever. 

9. Co-efficient of expansion of air at constant pressure. 

10. Co-efficient of expansion of air at constant volume. 

11. Specific heat of a liquid method of mixture. 

12. Specific heat of a liquid — ^using a known solid. 

13. Latent heat of ice. 

14* Latent heat of steam. 

15. Newton’s Law of cooling, verification and sp. heat of a liquid. 

16. Thermal conductivity— Searle’s apparatus. 






iv] SYLL. IN OROUP-B OF BRANCH I— MATHEMATICS 41^ 
FOR THE B.SC. DEG REE EXAMINATION 

17. Refractive index by critical angle (a) glass prism and (6) air 

cell in liquid. 

1 8. Refractive index by microscope. 

19. Concave and convex mirrors — determination of focal length. 

20. Concave and convex lenses — determination of focal length. 

21. Refractive index — liquid lens. 

22. Spectrometer — refractive index of a solid. 

23. Spectrometer — Wave length of light — Transmission grating — 

normal incidence. 

24. Newton’s rings — ^Reflected light — radius of curvature. 

25. Polari meter — rotation of plane of polarisation. 

26. Comparison of magnetic moments — Deflection magnetometer. 

27. Inverse square law — pole strength — deflection magnetometer. 

28. M. and H. determination. 

29. Current by tangent galvanometer. 

30. Resistance by Metre Bridge. 

31. Resistance by Post Office Box — Temperature co-efficieni of 

resistance. 

32. Electrolysis— Copper voltmeter — e.c. e. of copper. 

33. Resistance of a galvanometer — half deflection method. 

34. Figure of merit of a galvanometer. 

35. E.M.F. — Sum and difference method, substitution method. 

36. Conductivity of an electrolyte. 

37. E.M.F. Potentiometer method. 

3 Current by potentiometer, calibration of ammeter. 
u>. Resistance by potentiometer. 

40. Internal resistance of a cell by potentiometer. 

41. Joule’s law — Determination of J. 

42. Sonometer — Laws of Transverse vibration of strings. 

43. Resonance — Velocity of sound in air. 

Books Recommended for Reference : — 

1. Intermediate Physics — C. J. Smith (Arnold). 

2. A Course of Physics — H. A. Perkins (Blackie). 

3. Analytical Experimental Physics (Lemon and French), University 

of Chicago Press. 

4. A Laboratory Manual of Physics for Intermediate students— 

Tyler (Arnold). 


211 



411 SYIiL. IN «»tOUP^B OF BRANCH I~ MATHEMATICS [AFP. 

FOR The b.sc. degree examination 


5. Practical Physics — ^K. S. Venkatesan, 

6. Text-bookof Physics— J. Duncan and S. G. Starling (Macmillan) 

7. QoMcnts of Physics— A. W. Smith (McGraw HUl). 

(30) 

Numerical Mathematics. 

Constructian and use of nomograms. 

Nomograms for the solution of linear^ quadratic and trigonometrical 
equations. 

The use of a slide rule. 

Graphical solution of problems : logarithmic, semi-logarithmic, 
trilinear rulings. 

Reference books : — 

S. Brodetsky ; A First Course in Nomography. 

John Maclean : Descriptive Mathematics especially Chapters I 
and IV. 

John Maclean : Graphs and Statistics especially Chapter IX, 
Whittaker and Robinson : Calculus of Observations, Chapter VI. 
Whittaker and Robinson : Interpolation. 

(Detailed Syllabus) 

Numerical Mathematics. 

Syllabus. 

Paper I. 

Finite differences— operators E and A i interpolation with equal 
intervals ; divided differences, horizontal and diagonal difference 
tables ; interpolation with unequal intervals ; central differences— 
Gauss> Stirling, Everett and Bessers formulae. Inverse interpolation. 
Differences of Zero ; symbolic operators. 

N<Mnography : construction and use of nomograms ; nomograms 
•for the sdution of linear, quadratic and trigonometrical equations 

Graphical solution of problems ; logarithms, semi-logarithmic, 
trilinear rulings. 

The use of a slide rule. 


t42 




IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BR. 1 1 — STATISTICS 419 

FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Paper n. 

Numerical differentiation. Numerical integration, Simpson’s 
three-eighths and Weddle’s rules. Eulor Maclaurin formula, application 
to summation of scries; Newton — Cote’s formula. Stirling’s approxi- 
mation for factorial 

Numerical solution of equations in one unknown. Newton’s 
approximation for determining roots; use of calculus of diflfercnces— 
Horner’s method. 

Books for Study and Ref erence : 

(Only relevant sections of the books need be used). 

Freeman, H : Mathematics for Actuarial Students, Vol. II. 

Whittaker, E, T. & Robinson, G. : The Calculus of Observations. 

Steffensen, J. F. : Interpolation. 

Beodetsky, S, : A First Course in Nomography. 

John Maclean : Descriptive mathematics (especiaUy Chapters 

I and IV), 

John Maclean : Graphs and Statistics. 

Milne Thompson, L. M. : The Calculus of Finite Differences. 

BRANCH II— STATISTICS. 

Ancillary Subjects : 

Physics ; Mathematical Economics; Biology : Numerical 
Mathematics ; Educational Psychology. 

Syllabus : 

(29) Physics — Same as for Group-B — Physics under Branch I. 

( 3 *) 

Mathematical Economics, 

Syllabus. 

(The treatment of the subject should be mathematical.) 

Paper I. 

Scope of Economics, Nature of Economic Iaws> fundamental 
concepts. Scope of mathematical methods in Economics. 

Consumption — wants and their nature, rnarginal concept, derive* 
hV®8 ; iht l«w of diminishing marginal utility. 



420 


SYLL. IN GROUP*B OF BR. U — STATISTICS [aPP* 

FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Demand — d*;mand functions and curves j elasticity of demand, 
logarithmic derivatives, scales of preferences— economic plan of a 
household, indifference airves and surfaces. 

Supply — Supply functions ; mathematical treatment of interaction 
of supply and demand. 

Cost — Average and marginal cost ; cost elasticity and normal cost 
conditions, Market Value and normal value — simple equilibrium ; 
analysis under perfect and imperfect competition ; conditions of joint 
and composite supply and demand — problems of monopoly duopoly. 

Production — factors of production and their combinations ; Law 
of returns ; production functions and surfaces. Constaiii output 
curves. Competitive and complementary goods, elasticity of 
substitution. 

Paper II. 

Theories of population growth — logistic curve; population trends. 

Individual income ; distribution of incomes. Pareto's Law — 
unequality of incomes ; income elasticity. 

Levels of living ; family budgets, price statistics, cost of living 
indices. 

Social capital and social product; methods of calculating national 
income — applications to India. 

Theory of rent. Law of differential returns. 

Theory of wages, marginal productivity ; interest, ekmcinary 
treatment of liquidity and preference theory. 

Money and banking ; functions of money, quantity theory. 

Books for Study and Reference : 

Allen, R.D.G. ; Mathematical Analysis for Economics; 
Joan Robinson : The Economics of Imperfect Competition; 
Benham, F. : Economics— a general text-book for students; 
Stonier, A. W. & Hague, D. C. : A Text-book of Economic Theory; 
Wold, H. and Jureen, L. : Demand Analysis (Relevant sections). 

( 3 ») 

BIOLOGY. 

Tliis Syllabus in Biology for the Statistics Major students has been 
4esi|pied in two parts, Parts A and B. Part A largely deals with 


144 



iv] SYLL. IN GROUP‘B OF BR. H “STATISTICS 421 

FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Botanical aspects and Part B with Zoologic^il aspects. Ncvcnhclcss, 
ovcilap in the Genetics portion is obvious and this can be covered 
as an integrated subject by either the Botanist or the Zoologist. 
Notwithsiancing this, the Botany portion and the Zoology portions 
are best taught by qualified teachers. 

Of the theory papeis for the examination, one can contain the 
Botany portion and the other the Zoology portion; but problems in 
Genetic Can appear in both the papers, whether it be botanical or 
Zcx>logical in approach. However, the correction of the two theory 
papers has tobe done by Botanist and Zoologist separately. Likewise, 
the Practical examination can be conducted jointly by a Zoologist and a 
Botanist. 


Theory : 


PART A. 


r. The cell as a living unit; Phy.sical and Chemical properties 
of protoplasm; Cell division— Mitosis and Alciosis; 
Uiii-cellulir and multi^-cellular organisms. 


2. The following plant : 

G *neral external features and modifications of the root, stem 
and leaf; The biology of the flower; The fruit; An ele- 
mentary knowledge of embryology. 

Tissus and their functions; The distribution of tissues 
in the root, stem and leaf. 


3. Soil conditions and plant growth : 

soil and its nature; Absorption, conduction and uaaspirit- 
lion; Photos>'nthesis and nitrogen meiabolism; Respira- 
liot; GiOwih and movements— geotrop ism, phototropism, 
hydrotropism; The role of enzymes and auxions ; Effects of 
radiation on plant life; A general idea of antib.otics and 
miciobial mcuibolism. 


4. The plant kingdom : 

Bacteria; An elementary idea of plant viruses. 

Algae— •Chlamydomonas^ Ulothrlx, Spirogyra. 

Fungi— Rhizopus, PeuiciiHum, Yeast, Neurpspora, Agaricus, 


54 



422 SYLZ.. IN OROUP-B OP BR. JI— STATISTICS [APP. 

POR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Bryophyta— Marchantia . 

Pteridophyta— .pern. 

Gymnosperms— ^ycas. 

Angiospcnns.— Chief distinguishing characters oi Dicots 
and Monocots. A knowledge of the following families:— 

Malvaceae, Tutaceac, Leguminosac, Solanaceac, Conipo- 
sitae, Labiateac, Euphorbiaceac, Palmae, Musaccae, 
Gramincae. 

5. Plant geography; 

A general idea of the occurrence and distribution of plants 
with special reference to climatic conditions 

6. Heredity and plant breeding: 

Mendel’s laws of inheritance; Chromosomes; genes; 
Crossing over, Chiasma formation, genetic and cytological 
proof of crossing over; Linkage; variation in chromosome 
number; Mutations; Hybridization. 

Practical Work : 

1. Examination under the microscope of stages in mitosis from 

onion root tip, meiosis frOjn Liliumanthcr, Embryo 
development. 

2. To prepare glycerine mounts of plant material, and prepare 

and identify the sections of parts of plants. 

3. To demonstrate the fundamental aspects of plant phy.siology 

such as transpiration, photosynthesis, respiration and 
growth. 

4. To identify and describe the microscopic and macroscopic 

types included in the syllabus. 

5. To identify the families specified in the syllabus 

d* Application of elementary sUtistical knowledge like analysis 
of variance Or standard error etc. on populations of miiced 
seeds, leaves etc. 


240 




IVj SYLL. IN OROUP-B OF BR. II~STATISTICS 423 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

B9ok$ for study : 

1. College Botany by Fuller & Tippo. 

2. Plant Physiology by Raber. 

3. Elements Of Plant Pathology by Melhus k Kent. 

4. Genetics by Coulter. 

5. Genetics for Medical Students by E. B. Ford. 


PART B. 

Theory : 

Organisms and their charaaers ; Protein; Protoplasm; Cell 
and parts of a Cell; Cell division (Mitosis); Tissues; Organs. 

Structure and physiology of the following animals treated in an 
elementary manner 

Ambeba, Paramo.:cium, Hydia^, Earthworm, Cockroach, 
Shark, Frog, Calotes, Pigeon and Rat, 

The main animal phyla and their basic features. 

Elements of cmbrvX)logy (eggs, fertilization, cleavage, gastnilation, 
formation of the definitive adult form). 

Heredity : Experiments and laws of Mendel, mechanism of 
heredity, chromosomes, genes, meiosis, linkage, crossing over. 

Evolution : Evidence for evolution ; Theories of the mechanism 
of evolution ; variation ; Mutations in relation to evolution. Funda- 
mentals of population genetics ; Hardy-Weinberg law. 

(30) Numerical Mathematics — The same as for Group B — 
Numerical Mathematics under Branch 1. 


( 33 > 

Educmtioiuil Psycholofy. 

1 . Definition, scope, methods, relation to other sdenoes. 

2. Physiological basis of learning, nervous system# saase 

organs. Reflexes. Conditioned reflexes. 


24 7 



424 SYLL. IN GROUf»-B OF BRANCH HI— PHYSICS [aPP. 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

3. Developmental processes— Motor, Social, Intellectual and 

emotional developments— Role of heredity and environ- 
ment. 

4. Thought Processes: Perception. Thinking. Heasouitig. 

Imagination. 

5. Motivation : Learned and unlearned. Emotions. Interests. 

Attention. 

6. The Learning Processes: Kinds of learning. Theories and 

laws of learning. Trial and error versus insightful 
learning. Transfer of training. 

7. Remembering and forgetting. 

8. Intelligence: Its nature and measurement. 

9. Personality: Its nature. Traits and types of Personality. 
Diagnostic tests. Word Association, T.A.T., Research 

Test. 

10, Construction and use of Educational and Psychological 

Tests. 

Intelligence Tests. Achievement Tests. Aptitude Tests 
Diagnostic Tests. Attitude Tests. Questionnaire, Rating 
scales. Inventories. Profile. 

11. Mental Hygiene and Behaviour Problems. 

BRANCH HI— PHYSICS 
I. Mathematics. 

Z. Composite Course in Mathematics and Clicmistry. 

3. Chemistry. 

4. Geology. 

5. Statistics. 

(34) 

Mathematics— Ancillary to Physics and Chemistry- 
Main. 

There shall be 2 papers of 3 hours’ duration each at the end of the 
second year, each carrying 75 marks. 

The subjects are to be taught with greater emphasis on application 
to Physics or Chemistry. 


248 



IV) SYLL. IN OROUP-B OF BRANCH III — PHYSICS 425 
FOR TH E B.S C. DEG REE EXAMINATION _ 

Paper /. 

Algebra. — Remainder Theorem and factor izat ion. Index Laws. 
Surds. Logarithms and use of the slide rule. Quadratic equations. 
The 3 progressions. nPr, Nl, nCr. Binomial Theorem for a positive 
integer. Applications of Binomial theorem. Exponential and Loga>- 
rithmic series. Solutions of Linear Equations in 2 and 3 variables. 
Determinants. Elementary Probability. Newton’s and Horner’s 
method of approximation to roots of an equation. 

Calculus — Differentiation of x", Sin x, Cos x, ex, log x. Inverse 
function. Differentiation of sum, pr. quotient and simple function of 
a function. Differential co-efiicient as a rate measurer. Successive 
differentiation. Simple examples on maxima and minima. Tangents 
and normals and curvature of plane curves. Partial differentiation — 
Notion of Differentials errors and approximation. 

Integration. — Standard integrals; Integration by simple substi- 
tution and by parts. Application to find length of arcs, areas> volume*. 
Centroid, M.I. 

Differential equations, — First order including the following type: 
I. Variables separable; 2, Homogeneous Equations; 3. Linear 
Equations; 4. BernouilUs’ Equations. 

Second order. — Linear with constant co-efficient. Applications to 
damped oscillations and Forced vibrations. Application for Fourier 
scries. 

Paper //. 

Geometry. — Elementary properties of triangles. Parallelograms, 
trapeziums, and regular polygons of n sides. Simple solid figures, 
solid angles Tetrahedron, cylinder, cone, sphere, pyramid. 

Analytical Geometry. — Standard equations in rectangular coordi- 
nates straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola. Plotting of 
graphs. 

y =r= log* y == e*. 

Y = c— X*. 

Trigonofnetry. — Sin (A ± B) Cos (A ± B), tan ( A ± B) 

Sin A ± Sin B, Cos A ± Cos B. 

Simple identities, — Relation between sides and angles of a triangle. 
Solution of triangles. Solution of simple Trigonometrical equations 
of the type of a Cos 0 -f b Sin 0 = 0. Complex numbers. Argand 
diagram. De. Moivre’s Theorem and immediate applications. Scries 
for Sin ©, Cos 0 in powers of 0. Hyperbolic functions: Solution of the 
equation X**ssaa. 



426 SYLL. IN GROUP-B^OF BRANCH HI — PHYSICS [ApP, 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Vector Analysis. — Vectors, Scalar and Vector products. Scalar 
Triple product. Vector Triple products. Illustrations. Equations 
to a line, plane and simple curves in vector notation, 

(35-A&B) 

Composite Course in Mathematics and Chemistry. 

(35-A) 

Composite Course in Mathematics {Ancillary.) 

One paper of 3 hours* duration — 75 marks. 

To be taught in two years — 2 hours per week. 

In addition to the syllabus under basic mathematics in the Pre- 
University Course the following : — 

Algebra. — Binomial theorem for a positive integer. Application 
of the Binomial theorem. Exponential and logarithmic series. Solutions 
of linear equations in 2 and 3 variables. Solutions of algebraic 
equations by graphical methods and by Newton’s and Horner's 
methods. Probability, determinants. 

Calculus. — Differentiation of x”, Sin x, Cos X, e*, log X, inverse 
functions. Differentiation of sum, product, quotient and simple 
function of a function. Differential co-efficient as a rate measurer. 
Successive differentiation. Simple examples of raaidma, minima, tan- 
gents and normals. Curvature (without proof) of plane curves. Partial 
differentiation. Differentials, errors and approximations. Integra- 
tion; standard integrals, Integration by simple substitution and by parts. 
Application of integration to find areas and volumes in simple cases. 
Differential equations of the first order ; variables separable ; homo- 
genous type ; Linear type. 

Geometry. ‘^Elementary properties of triangles ; concurrence and 
collinearity. Simple solid figures. Solid angles. Tetrahedron. 

Analytical Geometry. — Standard equation in rectangular coil 
ordinates; straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola, plotting of 
the following graphs. 

yxslogx; y:=ex, y=e~x; y = c-x2 

Trigonometry. ^Addition and product formulae. Power tefies 
or sia X, coi X, tan*rx. 


250 



IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH 111 — PHYSICS 427 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(35-B) 


Composile Course in Chemistry {Ancillary.) 


I norganic Chemistry . 

Laws of Chemical combination, atomic and molecular theories; 
equivalent, atomic and molecular weights and their determination; 
valency; simple ideas of atomic structure and their relation to different 
types of valency and the peiiodicity of their properties. 


Properties of carbo lates, nitrates, sulphates, halides, silicates and 
different varieties of glass and steel. 


Chemistry involved in inorganic qualitative and volumetric analysis. 


Physical Chemistry. 

Determination of molecular weights of gases and vapours ; Proper- 
ties of solutions ; determination of molecular weight in solutions. 
Differences between colloidal and true solutions. Hydrogen ion concen- 
tration and its determination. 


Chemical equilibrium and applications of the law of mass action. 
Solubility product. Simple treatment of the strengths of acids and 
bases. Effect of concentration, temperature and catalysts on rate of 
reaction. Exothermic and endothermic reactions. Heat of solution; 
heat of neutralisation. 


Organic Chemistry. 

Empirical and molecular formulae ; Homologous series. AEphatlc 
hydrocarbons and their derivatives — ^alcohols, aldehydes ketones, alkyl 
halides, nitro-alkanes and ethers. 

Saturated and unsaturated fatty acids; esters; dibasic acids — 
oxalic, malonic and succinic acids; simple aliphatic amino acids. 
Glucose, fructose; Benzene, toluene, xylene, and their simple deriva- 
tives. Geometrical and optical isomerism. 

Practicais. 

1. Qualitative analysis of a simple salt (2 radicals). 

2. Volumetric analysis involving solutions of acids and alkalis, 
potassium permanganate, sodium thiosulphate, iodine, arsenious 
oxide, silvemitrate, potassium thiocyanate (about 20 experiments). 



428 SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH 111 - PHYSICS [APP. 
JPjL the b.sc. degree examination 

(3«) 

Chemistry (Ancillary'; 

General and Physical 

Laws of chemical combination. Dalton’s atomic theory. Avo- 
gadro’s hypothesis. Atoms and molecules Combining weight, atomic 
weight and molecular weight. 

Gas laws : Boyle’s, Charles’s. Dalton’s, Graham’s. General gas 
equation. Kinetic theory. Imperfections in gas behaviour. Van der 
Waals equation of state (derivation not expected) Liquifaction of 
gas:$. Critical constants. Liquids, vapour pressure, boiling point. 
Solutions of solids, liquids and gases in liquids. Determination of 
solubility and solubility curve. Significance of solubility curves. 
Henry’s law. Supersaturation. 

Determination of molecular, equivalent and atomic weights : 

(а) Molecular weights — (i) From densities of gases and vapours. 

iMethod of limiting density. Regnault, Dumas, Victor 
Meyer and Hoffman methods. Abnormal vapour den- 
sities. Dissociation, (ii) From Graham’s law of diffu- 
sion. (iii) From osmotic pressure, cryoscopic and ebul- 
lioscopic methods (Raoults* law). Abnormal molecular 
weights. 

(б) Equivalent weights. Determination of equivalent weights. 

(c) Atomic weights — Methods of Cannizzaro, Dulong and Petit 

Mitscherlich. 

The structure of the atom. Valency : Classical and electronic 
theories 

Classification of elements. Metals, non-metals and metalloids. 
Classification by Doberciner, Newlands, Mendclcff and Lotliar Meyer. 
Modifications. 

Exothermic and endothermic reactions. Heats of solution and 
neutralisation. Reversible reaaions and the Law of mass aaion. 
Verifidation of the law in simple systems: application to hydriodic 
add, phosphorus pentachloride and dinitrogen tetroxidc. 

Catalysis. Haber and contact processes. Electrolysis and its 
applications. Faraday’s laws and applications. Theory of electrolytic 
dissociation. Equivalent and molecular conductivities. Degree of 
difsodadon. Adds, bases and salts. Hydrogen ion concentration. 

Colloid8--*preparation and properties. 






IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH III — PHYSICS 429 
_ FOR THE B.SC . D E GREE EXA MINAT ION 

Inorganic Chemistry, 

Oxygen. — Preparation, manufacture, properties and uses. Oxides 
and their classification. 

Hydrogen. — Preparation, manufacture, properties and uses. Heavy 
hydrogen. 

Water. — Hard and soft waters, methods of softening. Composition 
by weight and by volume. Hydrates, efflourcscence and deliquescence. 

Ozone and Hydrogen-peroxide. — Preparation, properties and uses. 
Oxidation and reduaion. Formulae. 

Halogens. — Comparative study of fluorine, chlorine, bromine, 
iodine and their hydrides. Oxides and oxy-acids of the halogens and 
their salts. Bleaching powder. Chlorate, bromate and iodate of potas- 
sium. Potassium perchlorate. 

Sulphur. — Extraction, allotropic modifications. Hydrogen sulphide. 
Metallic sulphides, their solubilities and application in qualitative 
analysis. 

Sulphurous, sulphuric, ihiosulphuric acid and their salts. 

Sitvogen. — The composition of the atmosphere. Preparation and 
properties of nitrogen, oxides of nitrogen, nitrous acid and nitric acid. 
Action of nitric acid on metals and non-metals. 

Phosphorus. — Extraction, allotropic modifications, uses. Phos- 
phine. Chlorides, oxides; phosphorous and phosphoric acids. 

Arsenic^ antimony and bismuth. — Comparison; oxides, hydrides, 
chlorides and sulphides, Arsenites and arsenates. 

Carbon. — ^Allotropic forms, cirbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, 
carbon disulphide, phosgene. Carbonates and bicarbonates. 

Boron and Silicon. — Boric acid, sodium borate, boron triftuoridc. 
Silicon dioxide, silicic acid and silicon tetrafiuoride. Alkali silicates. 

A study of the following metals from the standpoint of the periodic 
tabic I SJa, JVlgj Cu, Ba, Sr, Zn, Cd, H8, Al, Sn, Pb, Cu, Ag, Ci. 
Mti, Fcj Co, Ni. A general outline of the preparation of the metals 
from their oxides, hydroxides and sulphides. Oxides, hydroxides, 
carbonates, chlorides, nitrates, sulphides and sulphates of metals. 

Organic Chemistry. 

Purification of organic compounds. Detection and estimation 
of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine and sulphur. Empirical 
and molecular formulae. Paraffin hydrocarbons upto pentane. 
Homologous series, Polyhalogen derivatives of methane, ethane, 

i59 

55 



430 SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH III— PHYSICS [APP. 
FO R THE B.SC . DE GREE EXAMINATION 

Alcohols upto butyl alcohols. Ethers. Aldehydes and ketpnes. 
A comparative study of acids upto butyric acids. Chlor-acetic acids. 
Acid chlorides, anhydrides, amides and esters. Nitro-methane, ethyl 
nitrite and dimethyl sulphate. Primary, secondary, tertiary amines. 
Quaternary salts. Dibasic acids upto succinic acid. Lactic and 
tartaric acids. Optical isomerism. Fumaric and maleic acids. 
Geometrical isomerism. Glycol and glycerol. Glucose, fructose, 
cane-sugar-properties, reactions and methods of differentiation. 

Benzene, toluene and naphthalene. Chlorination, nitration and 
sulphonation of benzene and toluene. Benzaldehyde, benzoic acid and 
derivatives of benzoic acid. Aniline, diazotisation and reactions of 
diazonium salts. Acetophenone, benzophenone. Benzyl alcohol, phe- 
nol, anisol, picric acid and salicylic acid. Phthalic acid, phthalimide 
and phenolphthaen. 

Practical. 

Qualitative analysis of a simple salt. The following exercises in 
volumetric analysis : — (The students should do their own w'eighings). 

1. Standardisation of an acid against sodium carbonate. 

2. Standardisation of alkali against oxalic acid. 

3. Standardisation of potassium permanganate. 

4. Standardisation of thiosulphate against dichromate. 

5. Estimation of ferric and ferrous iron (external indicator). 

6. Estimation of copper or a solution of a copper salt, 

7. Estimation of silver nitrate against sodium chloride. 

Books recomfnetided for reference : 

Prescott— Intermediate Chemistry (U.T.P.) 

Lowry and Cavell Intermediate Chemistry (Macmillan). 
Holmyard-^'Inorganic Chemistry (Arnold). 

Holmyard— Organic Chemistry (Arnold). 

Philbrick— Inorganic Chemistry (Bell). 

Durrant — General & Inorganic Chemistry (Longmans). 

Durr ant— ‘Organic Chemistry (Longmans). 

(37) 

Geology. 

{Ancillary,) 

Imrpduction The scope and sub-divisions of Geology. 

Ommal Geology 

Hie earth as a planet and its relation to the other members of 
the solar femily. 


2S4 



IVj SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH lU— PHYSICS 431 

FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


The hypothesis of the origin of the earth. 

The size and form of the earth, the interior of the earth; the physical 
zones of the earth. The atmosphere, the hydrosphere and litho- 
sphere. 

Land and Sea : Distribution by surface extent; heights and depths; 
the continental shelf. 

Planetary circulation : Rotational deflection; sea breezes; nton- 
soons and rainfall. 

Oceanic circulation : Causes and effects; waves and tides. Geo- 
logical Agents. 

(а) Epigcne agents; atmosphere, oceans, rivers, glaciers and 
their work, 

(б) Hypogenc agents: Volcanoes, earthquakes, their causes and 

effects. 


Age of the earth. Marine transgression and regressions. Raised 
beaches. River terraces and Origin of coral reefs. 

Palaeontology Introduction : Fossils, their mode of formation ; 
their value in Geological and Biological Sciences, tables of the 
divisions of Geological time. 

(1) Zoological characters and chief divisions of Protozoa— 
Fossils — textularia, fusulina and nummulites. 

(2) Zoological characters of the Porifera. Canal system of the 
sponges — Ventriculites. 

(3) General characters of the Graptolitcs— monograptus, diplo- 
graptus. 

(4) General characters and divisions of the Coelenterata — corals 
— cyathophyllum, zaphrentis, calceola, thecosmilia, favosites, halysitcs, 
lithostrotion, 

(5) General characters of Echinodermata— cchinoderms — ddaris 
micraster, holaster, encrinus and pentremites. 

(6) General characters of Brachiopoda and brachiopod shell. 
Fossils — lingula, productus, pentamerus, spirifer, rhynconella and tcrc- 
bratula. 

(7) General characters of the Lamcllibranchiata and lemelli- 
branch shell — Fossils — area, inoceramus, peaen, ostrea, gryphea, 
alectryonia, pcctunucleus, hippurites, spondylus, unio, cardita and 
trigonia. 


955 



432 SYLL. IN GROUP -B OP BRANCH III— PHYSICS [aPP. 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(8) General characters of the Gasteropoda and gasteropod shell 
— Fossils — Belierophon, natica, turritella, cerithium, murex, fusus> 
conus» voluta and physa. 

(9) General characters of the Gephalopods, Mautiloidea and 
ammonoidea— Fossils— belemnites, nautilus, goniaitites, orthoocras, 
ccratites, scholenbachia. 

(10) General characters of the Trilobita — Fossils — Calymene, 
paradoxides, phacops, trinucleus. 

(11) Plant fossils — glossopteris, gangamopteris, piilophylluni . 
calamites and lepidodendron. 

Structural and Field Geology and Stratigraphy : — Order of super- 
position, conformable and uncomformable beds, overlaps, lithology 
and fossils correlation ; facies ; division of rocks into groups, system, 
etc., and geological time into era, epoch, etc. 

Dip, strike and outcrop ; variations in outcrops with reference to 
dip of bed and slope of valleys ; types of unconformity ; folds, synclines, 
anticlines, overfolds and fanstructure. Faults, normal and reverse 
faults, inliers and outliers. 

A course of lectures to giv'e a comprehensive general outline of 
Indian Stratigraphy. 

Crystallography: Dehnition of a crystal, crystalline and amorphous 
external form, variation of form and surface, law of constancy of inter- 
facial angles, symmetry — planes, axes and centre, axial ratio, parameters, 
indices, symbol, Weiss and Miller, law of rationality of indices, hcini- 
hedrism and hemimorphism. 

The six normal classes, the pyritohedral class, the tetrahedral 
class, the tetragonal sphenoidal class, the rhoinbohcdral class, the 
rhorabohcdral hemimorphic, the trigonal trapezohedral class and their 
forms. 

Mineralogy : Physical— crystalline aggregates, columnar and 
fibrous structure, lamellar struaure, granular structure, imitative 
shapes and pseudomorphs. 

Cleavage, parting, percussion figures, fraaure, hardness, tenacity, 
sp. gr. and its determination. 

Isomorphous mixture, isomorphous replacement, dimorphism, 
sodimorphism and pseudomorphs. 

Minerals : Quartz, and the more important varieties, feldspars, 
orthodase, microcline, plagioclases, hypersthene, enstatite and augite, 
hornbkhde, actinoUtc and termoUtc— micas, tourmaline, topaz, fluritc, 
natrolite, stilbite. 


256 



iv] SYLL. IN GROUP -B OF BRANCH HI — PHYSICS 433 

FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Olivine, garnet, nephelin^ eieucite,sodalite,beryl>epidote, stauroUta, 
kyanite, apatite, talc^ chlorite, serpentine (asbestos), kaolin^ bauxite, 
calcite, dolomite, siderite, magnesite, selenite, gypsum, baryte, celestite^ 
anhydrite, corundum, diamond and graphite. 

Ores : Magnetite, haematite, Umonite, ochre, Ilmenitc, chromite, 
pyritc, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, pyrolusite, psilomelane, mala- 
chite, azurite, graphite, gold, silver, halite and zircon. 

Petrology : — Igneous rocks ; their distinguishing characters, intru- 
sive modes of occurrence — dike, sheet, laccolith, neck, stock, batholich, 
and lava flows. Textures and structures for megascopic study ; jointing 
in rocks. 

Principles of classification, megascopic classification. 

Description of rock types ; Granite, syenite, diorite, gabbro, norite, 
Peridoiite, pyroxenite, amphibolite, porphyry, dolerite, rhyolite, 
trachyte, andesite and basalt. 

Metamorphic Roch : Metamorphic agencies and kinds of meta- 
morphism. Texture in metamorphic rocks. 

Rock types : gneiss, slate, schist, phyllite, marble and serpentine. 

Sedimentary Rocks : Classification into mechanically formed, 
chemically formed and organically formed rocks. 

Mechanically formed : — Soil, blown sand, grit, sand-stone, clays, 
boulder clay. 

Chemically formed : — Tufa, dolomite, rock salt, gypsum, flint and 
ironstones. 

Organically formed : — Limestones, carbonaceous rocks and copro- 

lites. 


Practical work will comprise of the following : — 

A study of the more important crystal models : The fossil type 
mentioned— megascopic study of the minerals and rocks. 

Exercises in plotting of outcrops on contour maps. Reading for 
maps relating to beds with thickness, unconformities, simple folds and 
an acquaintance with strike and dip faults. 

Sketch maps of the following : Physiographical features of India, 
Dharwar rocks of South India, Cuddapah and Vindhyan systemsi 
Gondwana system, Cretaceous of Peninsular India and Deccan trap. 


ZQ7 



434 SYLL. IN GROUP -B OF BRANCH IV — CHEMISTRY [APP. 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE E XAMINATION 

Baah recommended for Study 

Text-book of Geology : Longwell, Knopf and Flint, John Wiley, 
Geology : Principles and processes — Emmons and others. 
Introduction to Geology: Bailey, Weir and others, Macmillan & Co, 
Woods : Palaeontology. 

Dr. M. S. Krishnan : Introduction to the Geology of India, The 
Madras Law Journal Office, Madras. 

Reference : — 

Physical Geography of India for Indian students : C. S. Fox, 
Macmillan & Co, 


Statistics 

{Ancillary to Physics) 

Syllabus — Same as for Group-B under Branch I, vide No. 28. 

FOR BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY. 

(35-A & 35-0 

1. Composite Course in Mathematics and physics. 

For Syllabus in Composite Mathematics — Same as for Group-B — 
under Branch III, vide No. 35-A. 


(35- C) 

Syllabus in Composite Physics. 

One paper of 3 hours’ duration and one practical test of 3 hours’ 
duration. 


Mechanics. 

Measurements . — Units and dimensions. Vernier, screw gauge. 
Common balance. 

Linear motion . — Definitions of velocity, acceleration, force, momen- 
tum impulse. 

Equations of Newton’s laws of motion. Conservation of 

momentum. Work. Power and energy. Conservation of energy 
(Statements and simple illustrative problems only) 

Relative Composition of veaors. Simple problems on 

relative velocity. 


9^58 



iv] SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH IV — CHEMISTRY 435 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Circular motion — Normal acceleration, angular momentum, kinetic 
energy of rotation, moment of inertia (explanation of simple cases only) 

Simple harmonic motion. — Definition and calculation of energy of 
simple harmonic motion. Simple pendulum. 

Pressure and thrust. — Definition and principles of Archimedes. 
Laws of flotation from pressure idea. 

Determination of specific gravity by different methods. 

Properties of Matter. 

Gravitation : Laws of gravitation. Newtonian constant. Varia- 
tion of acceleration due to gravity. 

Viscosity : Definition. Smooth and turbulent motion. Rate of 
flow of liquid in capillary tube. Viscometers. Stoke’s method. Sur- 
face tension: Definition. Surface energy. Capillary rise. Forma- 
tion of drops. Quincke’s method. Vapour pressure over curved 
surfaces and condensation conditions. 

Heat 

Thermometry : General methods. One thermometer of each type. 
Specific heats: Solids and liquids ; mixtures. Bunsen’s method. 
Difference of Cp and Gy. Determination of these. Conduaion and 
Radiation. Thermal conductivity. Properties of thermal radia- 
tions. Prevost’s theory. Kirchoff’s law. Stefan’s Law. Newton’s 
law. Solar radiation. Temperature of sun. 

Optics. 

Geometrical optics: Laws of reflection and reffaaion. Refractive 
index. Refraction through prisms. Direct vision spectroscope. Lenses, 
Expression for the focal length in terms of refractive index. Thin 
prisms. Achromatism in lenses. Spectrometer. Constant deviation 
prism. 

Interfereiue of light : Physical concept. Biprism. Colours of 
thin films. Newton’s rings. Interferometers. Expansion of crystals. 

Diffraction : Inierfcrcnce of diffracted rays. The grating. Dis- 
persion and resolution in grating. 

Polarisation : Explanation of plane polarisation. Double rcfirac- 
lion, Nicol. Rotation of plane of polarisation. Elliptically and 
circularly polarised light. Polaroid. Spectroscopy ; Modes of 
excitation. Types of spectra and Explanation. Doppler effect and 
optical applications. 



436 SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY [APF. 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Magnetism 

Fundamental phenomena. Ewing’s theory. Dipole. Pole 
strength. Moments. Intensity. Potential from poles and dipoles. 
Shell. Cycles of magnetisation. Permeability and susceptibility. 
Para and Diamagnetism. Explanation of these. Curie point. Curie and 
Gouy methods. Hysteresis. 


Electricity. 

Electrostatics : Electrification ; Definitions. Gauss theorem. 
Condensers of various types. Electrometers. 

Magnetic effects : Rules. Em. and E. S. units. Relation between 
these. Deat beat and ballistic galvanometers. Electromagnetic induc- 
tion ; Laws of Faraday and Lenz Mutual and self induaion. 
Dynamo^ motor, induction coil, transformer rectifier. 

Alternating Current : Cuirent in L-R circuits. Choke. Oscillat- 
ing L-C-R. Circuits. Electromagnetic waves ; production and recep- 
tion by crystal and valve circuits. 

Electrical Measurements : Potentiometer, meter bridge, Carey 
Foster, P.O. Box. Ammeters and voltmeters for D. C. Ammeter 
for A.C. 

Thermoelectricity : Peltier and Thomson Effects. Practical appli- 
cations. 

X-rays : Production, properties and uses — Elucidation of crystal 
structure by X-rays. 

Photo electric cell and its applications. 

Radioactivity, Nuclear disintegration, protons, neutrons, positions, 
electrons, nuclear fission. 

Syllabus in Physics Pracfical (One Examination of 3 hours). 

1. Balance. Sensibility. True weight of body using rider. 

2. Density of powders and of liquids using density bottle. 

3. Surface tension by capillary rise. 

4. Viscosity by capillary flow. 

5. Latent heat of ice. 

6. Conduaivity— Scarlc’s method. 

7. Focal length of concave and convex mirrors, 

8. Focal length of concave and convex lease 1. 


t90 



IV] SYLL. IN OROUP-B OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY 437 
FOR T HE B. SC. DEGREE EXAMINATI ON 

9. Refraaive index ofliquid by total internal reUcction. 

10. Spectrometer — Rcfraaive index of a solid. 

11. Spectrometer— Refractive index of a liquid. 

12. Spccffometcr— Dispersive power of a prism. 

13. Spectrometer — Wave length by transmission grating (normal 

incidence). 

14. Magnifying power — Telescope and Microscope. 

15. Newton’s rings by reflected light. 

16. Polarimeter. 

17. Resistance by meter bridge and P.O. Box, 

18. Potentiometer — E.M.F. and internal resistance 

19 Potentiometer — Calibration of an ammeter. 

20 Potentiometer — Measurement of resistance. 

2 r . Current by copper voltameter. 

22. J with Joules calorimeter. 

Baoks Recommended for Reference : — 

1. Intermediate Physics — C. J. Smith (Arnold) 

2. A Course of Physics — H. A. Perkins (Blackie). 

3. Analytical and Experimental Physics — I.^mon and France 

(University of Chicago Press). 

4 A Laboratory Manual of Physics for Intermediate : Taylor 
(Arnold). 

5. Practical Physics — K. S. Venkatesan. 

6. Text-books of Physics — J. Duncan and S. G. Starling (Mac- 

millan), 

7. Elements of Physics — A. W. Smith (McGraw Hill). 

Mathematics {Ancillary) 

Vide Syllabus No. 34. 

Physics (Ancillary) 
l^ide Syllabus No. 29 

(38) 

Botany 

(Ancillary Grmtp^B) 

1. The structure and life-history of the following : — 

Bacteria.^ Osciilatoria, Nostoc, Chlamydomonas, Pandorina , 
Eudorin*lj VolvoXi Ulothrix, Oedogoniqm, Spi^ 



438 SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH IV — CHEMISTRY (APP. 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


rogyra, Ectocarpus, Polysiphonia, Nitclla, Rhizopus, Yeast, 
PenicilUum, Puccinia, Agaricus, Usnea, Riccia, Funaria, 
Selagmel]a> Lycopodium, Lastrea, Cycas. 

2. External morphology of flowering plants in general and a syste- 
matic study of the following natural orders together with the 

economic importance of those marked in asterisks : — 

Anonaceae, Nymphaeaceae, ♦Leguminosae, ♦Malvaceae, 
♦Rutaceac, Mjrrtaceae, *Cucurbitaceae, ♦Rubiaceae, Com- 
positae, Apocynaccae, Asclepiadaceae, Convolvulaceac, 
♦Solanaceae, Acanihaceae, Labiatac^ Amarantaceae, ♦Eu- 
phorbiaceae, Urticaceae, Liliaceae, *Scitamineac, Orchi- 
daceae, ♦Palmae, ♦Gramineae, 

3. Plant Physiology : — 

Chemical composition of the plant. Soil and its nature, absorp- 
tion of water and inorganic nutrients, osmosis, plasmolysis. 
Transpiration and factors affecting transpiration. Photo- 
synthesis. Special methods of nutrition (hetcrotrophism — 
parasitism, saprophytism, bacterial symbiosis, camivory). 
Respiration. Growth and movement — Geotropism, Photo- 
tropism and Hydrotropism. 

4. Histology : — 

Cell and its parts. Mitosis and mciosis. Merisiem, primary 
and secondary tissues and their distribution in the angiosper- 
raous plant body (excluding anomalous types). Structure and 
development of the anther, development of male gametophyte. 
Structure and development of the ovule and the female 
gametophyte. Fertilization. Parts of the typical dicotyle- 
donous and monocotyledonous embryo. 

5. Ecology : — 

Chief external and internal and physiological features of Xero- 
phytes, Mesophytes and Hydrophytes with examples from 
local flora. 

6. General principles : — 

Evolution and Heredity. 

A short account of the work of Lamarck, Darwin and dc Vries 
Heredity — Mendel’s Laws of Inheritance, Monohybrid ratio. 

7. Practical work : — 

Candidates are expected to be able to make preparations illus- 
trating the form and structure of any plant of the orders or 


262 



IV] SYLL. IN OROUP-B OF BRANCH IV— CHEMISTRY 439 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE E}UMINAT^ION 

groups mentioned in the syllabus and to describe them with 
sketches sufiicient for their identification ; to make dissection 
with the simple microscope of the floral parts of Phanerogams 
included in their syllabus and to make drawings^ construct floral 
diagrams and refer them to their natural orders ; to describe in 
technical language plants belonging to any of the orders of 
groups specified in the syllabus and to describe simple setups 
of physiological experiments. To make, stain, mount and 
examine through the compound microscope and identify pre- 
parations of plant material belonging to paragraphs 1, 4 and 
a. At the practical examination each candidate must submit 
his laboratory note-book The practical examination will be 
of tluee hours’ duration. 

Books recommended : 

For study : 

(1) Text-book of Botany by Lowson, Howarth and Warne — 

Oxford University Pres^. 

(2) Plant Kingdom oy Brown — Ginn & Co., New York. 

(.1) Structural Botany by Scott & Brooks, Volumes I and II — 

Macmillan & Co, 

(4) A Text-book of General Botany by Smith etc. — Macmillan 

&Co. 

(5) Introduction to Botany fay Haupt — McGraw Hill, 

(6) Hand-book of Botany by Rangachary, Sekhar & Sarathy; 

P. Varadachari & Co. 

Reference : 

(1) Cryptogamic Botany by G. M. Smith — Vols, I and II— 

McGraw Hill. 

(2) Text-book of Botany — Vols. I to III by Coulter, Barnes 

and Cowles. 

(8) Plant Anatomy by Barnes and McDaniels — McGraw Hill. 

(39) 

Zoology 

{Ancillary Group^B.) 

I. Inver tebrata: A study of the following animal forms as 
illustratiYe of the main characteristics of the groups to which they 
belong. 


263 



440 SYLL, IN OkOUP-to OF IkEANCH IV — CHBMISTEY [aFF- 
FOR THE B.SC. OEOREE EXAMINATION 


Amoeba, Euglena, Paramecium, Plasmodium, Hydra, Obclia, 
Aurelia, Parasitic worms (Liverfluke, Tape worms and Round worms). 
Earthworm, Leech, Prawn, Crab, Centipede, Millepede, Cockroach, 
Scorpion, Freshwater mussel, Pila, Sepia and Star-fish. 

2. Chordata : A general survey of the chordata and the evolution 
of Vertebrate organs and organ systems with the anatomy of Frog as 
the basis of comparison. 

3. Embryology: A broad outline knowledge of the development 
of the Frog, the Chick and the Rabbit. 

4. General Principles ; A basic knowledge of Evolution and 
Heredity. 

PRACTICAL 

Candidates will be required to identify and describe specimens 
and preparations relating to the types mentioned above, lliey will 
be required to dissect and make simple microscopic preparations of 
Earthworm, Cockroach, Fresh-water mussel, Frog, Calotes, Pigeon 
and Rat. 

Dissections of the nerves will be expeaed only in the case of 
Earthworm, Cockroach and Frog. External characreis alone to be 
studied in the case of Prawn, Pila and scorpion. Practical record 
note-books must be submitted for valuation at the University 
Examination. 

Geology 

{Ancillary) 

Vide Syllabus No. 37. 

(40) 

PHYSIOLOGY— ANCILLARY 

Protoplasm — Cells and tissues of the body — cell division — 
Properties and functions of cell membrane ; cell permeability — diffu- 
sion, osmosis. 

Atomic weights — ^Molecules — Equivalent weights — oxidation and 
reduction — Adds, bases and salts — crystalloids and colloids. 

Blood— Compositions and functions — Red Blood corpuscles— 
Haemoglobin — factors responsible for anaemias — 

Blood groups ; blood transfusion — 

Leucocytes— origin, functions, fate — 

Blood platelets— clotting of blood— Blood forming organs— 
factors in blood formation. 


Z$4 



JV] SYLt. IN GROUP-B OP BRANCH IV — CHfiMIStRY 441 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Circulation of blood — Structure and working of the heart — Proper- 
ties of cardiac muscle — Regulation of heart beat — Pulse — Velocity 
of blood — Blood pressure — Arteries, capillaries, veins. 

Tissue fluid — formation, circulation, functions — lymphatic vessels 
and glands. 

Urinary system — structure and functions of the kidney — acid-base 
balance in the body. 

Skin — structure and functions — Regulation of body temperature — 

Respiration — Respiratory mechanism — gaseous exchange in the 
lungs and tissues — Regulations of respiration — Transport of respira- 
tory gases in the body. 

Digestion — Hssential food factors — structure of the different 
regions of ihe alimentary canal and the different digesiic glands. 
Action of different enzymes on food taken in — Movements of the 
alimentary canal — Absorption and assimilation. 

Nutrition — Food icquirements of the b(Hly — Balanced diet — 
Composition of common foods of South India. 

Endocrincs — 'Fhe functions of endocrine secretions with special 
reference to thyroid, pituitary and adrenals. 

Nervous system — Parts of the nervous system and their functions 
treated in an elementary manner — Atomic Nervous system and 
its working — Reflex action. 

Structure and functions of the sense organs — the eye, the car, 
organs of smell, taste and cutaneous sensations. 

Neuro-muscular system — Physical and chemical changes during 
muscular contractions ; fatigue ; work done by muscles. 

Reproduction-— The ovary — development of the graafian foUoclc 

Development of the sperm — Fertilization, segmentation, Development 
of the embryo ; the foetus ; panurition. 

Practical 

Tissues — Examination of prepared slides of the different tissues 
of the body — Fresh mounts of a few tissues — 

Preparation of a blood smear and how to stain it. 

Blood count — use of hacmocytomctcr to make a count of R.B.C. 
and W.B.C. 

Estimation of haemoglobin with the hacmometcr. 


265 



442 SYLL. IN OROUP-B OF BRANCH V— BOTANY [aPP. 

® • .degree examihimion 

Blood pressure determination. 

Effect of stannuis ligature. 

Recording the effect of temperature on lieart beat ; stimulation 
of the vago sympathetic Histological study of the various organs studied 
in theory — 

Salivary digestion — 

Study of spinal frog — reflex action — 

Human reflexes. 

Recording pulse and temperature — Exercises demonstrating tlic 
effect of exercise on temperature and pulse. 

Experiments with the muscle — nerve. Preparations from a frog — 
Recording. 

1 . A simple muscle twitch. 

2. The effect of fatigue. 

a. The effect of temperature. 

4 . The effea of “ loading and “ after loading 

BRANCH V— BOTANY 

(Artcillaries') 

1. Chemistry — vide Syllabus No 36. 

2. 2 ^ 1 ogy — vide Syllabus No. 39. 

3. Geology — vide Syllabus No. 37. 

(39) 

Zoology 

{Ancillary to Botany) 

Common with Branch IV — Chemistry. 

(37) 

Geology 

{Ancillary to Botany) 

Syllabus same as for Group-B. Geology under Branch HI. 


266 



IV] SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH VI — ZOOLOGY 443 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


BRANCH VI^ZOOLOGY 

(Ancillaries) 

(i) Chcmistiy — vide Syllabus No 36. 

(ii) Botany — zide Syllabus No. 38. 

(iii) Geology — vide Syllabus No. 37. 

(41) 

(iv) Composite Ancillary Syllabus for Zoology. 

A. Quantitative methods in Biology . — Measurement of variation — 
Probability — Standard error — Standard deviation — Chi — Square — co- 
efficient of variation — Correlation — relative growth (allomctric). 

B. Physico-Chemical approach to Biological processes: — 

(a) Elementary composition of protoplasm. 2. pl l — Indicators 
Buffers and determination of pH — Ionic concentration — 
Osmoregulation — 3. Elementary knowledge of surface 
tension — viscosity — adsorption and properties of colloids. 

(Jb) Properties — Classification — simple qualitative tests of carbo- 
hydrates — lipids and proteins. 

(c) Utilisation of carbohydrates — lipids and proteins in the 
animal body — urea formation. 

id) Elements of bio-chemistry of muscle. 

(tf) Calcium and phosphorus metabolism in the animal body. 

(/) Digestive enzymes — Respiratory pigments — hormones — 

demonstration of principal digestive enzymes. 

C. Geological approach. (Historical) — Earth’s crust — Fossilization, 
Fossil- bearing rocks — Geological eras — their climatic and other 
physical features and biological characteristics. 

D. Some applications of physical principles in instruments of 
biological studies. 

The compound microscope and its essential optical principles — 
The principle of illumination — Kohler’s principle — uses of filters — 
dark ground illumination — polarising filters and polarising micros- 
cope — phase contrast microscope — principles of ultra-violet and electron 
microscope. 

E. Physiology of respiration of plants and photosynthesis and 
nutrition— -Trace elements in plants and animals. Plant pigments. 
Plant hormone. Yeast and fermentation. Organisational levels in the 
plant kingdoms. (Grades of plant orgamsation). 


^67 



444 SYLL. IN GROUP-B OF BRANCH VII— GEOLOGY [aPP. 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


BRANCH Vn— GEOLOGY. 

{Ancillaries) 

1. Composite Course in Mathematics and Physics. 

2. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 

4. Chemistry. 

5. Botany. 

6. Zoology. 

7. Anthropology, 

8. Archaeology. 

9. Geography. 


Syllabus 

t. Composite Course in Mathematics and Physics — Syllabus same 
as for Group-B— Composite Mathematics and Physics 
under Branch IV — vide Syllabus Nos. 34-A & 35-C. 


(4*) 


Mathematics Ancillary to Geology. 

Total lectures 60 {for two years — One hour per week) 

In continuation of the syllabus under the basic mathematics adopted 
for the Pre-University Course, the following syllabus is recommended: 

Plane Trigonometry : — Measurement of angles ; trigonometrical 
functions and their relations to one another. Trigonometrical ratios 
of angles 0°, 30®, 45°, 600, 900 (standard formulae for Sm (a ± ff) ; 
Cos (a ± 3 ), tan (a ± 0 ) ; cos a ± Cos 0 ; Sin (a ± Sin 0 ); 
Solutions of triangles; application of logarithms to such solutions. 

Spherical triangles .-—Properties of spherical triangles; Congruency 
of spherical triangles. Right-angled triangles. Napier’s formula. 
Solutions of spherical triangles using logarithms. 

Calculus : — Graphical idea of a function. Idea of a limit (intui- 
tive and not rigourous). Differential coefficient of a constant Xn (In 
positive integer), cos x, sin x. Derivative of the product of two func- 
tiohs^ derivative of a simple function, Derivatives of second order. 

Geometrical interpretation of the derivative. Gradient of a wrve, 
equation of a tangent and normal. 



iv] SYLL. IN GROUP -B OF BRANCH VII — GEOLOGY 445 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Standard integrals. Simple definite integrals. Easy applications 
to areas and volumes of simple solids of revolutions, the generating 
curve not cutting the axis of revolution. (Candidates are not expected 
to do any complicated differentiation nor will they be expected to do 
any integration of functions other than simple Polynomials; a cos bx, 
a sin bx (a, b constants). 

Analytical Geometry of two and three dimensions : — Cartesian rect- 
angular co-ordinates of a point. Distance between two given points. 
Equation of a straight line (i) in terms of its slope and its intercept 
made on the y-axis, (2) passing through a given point and having a 
given slope, and (3) passing through two given points. Co-ordinates 
of the points of intersection of two straight lines. Conditions for paral- 
lelism and perpendicularity. Equation of a circle given centre and 
radius. 

Standard forms of equations of parabola, ellipse, hyperbola and 
rectangular hyperbola. 

Analytical geometry of three dimensions with Cartesian co-ordi- 

— Straight line and plane; standard forms of the equations of the 
sphere, cone and the ellipsoid. 

3. Physics Ancillary 

Syllabus same as for Group-B under Branch l^vide Syllabus 
No. 29. 


5. Botany Aptcillary. 

Common with Branch IV — Chemistry Syllabus No. 38 

6 . Zoology Ancillary, 

Common with Branch IV — Chemistry vide Syllabus No. 39. 

7 Anthropology Ancillary — (Common with B.A. Syllabus.) Nos. 21 
22 Si 25 — B A. 


(43) 

Arciuieology 

(Ancillary for Geology Main;' 

Paper 1. 

Early man and his cultures. Early man in Europe. Pithecanthc- 
ropus group ; nanderlhaj group ; HomO Sapiercs group ; Upper 


57 


$69 




446 SYLL. m GKOUP-B OF BRANCH VII— GEOLOGY [AFF. 
FOR THE B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Plustocere Homo sapiens in Europe ; Jombc capede. Grimalde 
nugroids; Cro-magron ; Magdaliriam and later man. Association of 
Human remains with industries in Europe. Their chronology. 

Early man in Africa^ Asia, Australia and America. 

Dating the old stone age. The relative and absolute chrono- 
logy of the Puistocerc. The astronomical theory ; duiclo chronology ; 
various analysis. 

Books recommended 
Turner : Dating the Past. 

A. V. M. Pradenne : Prehistory. 


Paper II. 

Early man and stone age cultures of North-western India: Rhin- 
tocene sequence in the Punjab and the Narmada Valley. 

Stone age man in South India: Paliolithic sites in the vicinity 
of Madras and Chingleput, North Arcot and Nellore districts. Imple- 
ments in lauiie deposits. 

The metal age in India : Sequence of metal age cultures. 
iSevelopment of Pottery’s types of the prc-historic pottery. Mcgalithic 
monuments in India ; their type— distribution. 


Books recommended * 

Stuart Piggot — Prc-historic India. 


N. Vc Terra and J. J. Paterson— Studies in the Ice Age in 
India and Associated Human Cultures. 

V. V. Krishnaswami — 

Stone Age in India (Ancient India, No. 3, 1947). 

9. AncHlary Geography to Geology, 

Poftr /—Physical Basis of Geography, 
fopir //--General Geography of India. 


i70 



lY] SYLL. IN GROOP-B OF BRANCH VII— GEOLOGY 447 
FOR T H E B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

( 44 ) 

Syllabus for Physical Basis of Geography 

Geography Ancillary, 

/. The Physical Basis of Geography — 

{o') The Atmosphere , — Movements of air and water and the resulting 
types of weather and climate — insolation — distribution of 
land and water — horizontal and vertical distribution of 
temperature — atmospheric pressure and world winds — 
conditions of humidity and precipitation — storms. Local 
winds : their causes and effects on climate. 

{b) The Oceans . — Area and depth — Continental shelf and slopes — 
deeps — distribution of salinity and temperature — movement 
of the ocean waves and tides— currents and their effects on 
climate — deposits — coral formations. 

(c) The Land . — Materials of the earth’s crust— earth sculpture — 
agencies of disintegration and reconstruction — work of 
moving water — development of river systems — under- 

ground water — snow and ice — work of wind as an agent 
of erosion, transport and deposition. Earth movements : 
volcanoes — lakes — shorelines — deltas and estuaries — factors 
affecting soil formation and distribution of soil types. 

Syllabus for Regional Geography of India 

The same as for Paper Ill(b) of B.A. Group A — vide Syllabus 
No. 34 (B-A.) 

Practical Test : — 

A. Shape of the Earth : 

Determination of Position — Latitude and Longitude — Local time 
— Greenwich time and Indian Standard time. 

Typical exercises: 

(i) Determination of Latitude by Solar observation. 

(ii) Determination of Longitude with reference to time. 

B. Field Mapping : 

(Elementary treatment only to be excepted). Use of t^ain. 

Prismatic CompasS) Plane Table and Clinometer. 

Candidates must be able to handle these instruments. 

C. Map^tvork: 

(i) Scales— Section drawing— Intervisibility — Enlargement and 
reduction. 


271 



448 SYtL. IN OROUP-B OF BBANCH VII— OBOLOOY [aPP. 
FOR THB B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(it) Methods of representiiig relief and other physical features— 
Typical landforms» conventional signs and symbols. 

(tii) Elementary study and interpretation of Survey of India 
Topographic Maps with special reference to the one-inch 
map. 

D. Cart(^raphk Seaion: 

Diagrammatic and Cartographic methods of expression of 
Climatic^ Economic and other Geographic data. 

E. Weather Recording Instruments:-^ 

Use of Thermometers including the Maximum and Minimum, 
Wet and Dry bulb — Rain gauge — Barometer — ordinary and 
Aneroid — Anemometer. 

Rules for conducting the Practical Examination: 

The candidates must submit their practical note- books at the 
Praaical Examination. 

The students to be required to answer three questions only. 

The following text-booha are recommended to indicate the 
standard of work required : — 

Intermediate Geography. — L. Dudley Stamp (Longmans, Green 
&Co.) 

The Indian Empire — L. Dudley Stamp (Longmans, Green & Co.) 
Physical Geography — P. Lake (Cambridge University Press). 

A Shorter Physical Geography — Emde Martonne (Christophers) 
Physical Geography for Indian Students — Cyril S. Fox (Mac- 
millan). 

Map work and Practical Geography— J. Bygott (University 
Tutorial Press). 

Systematic Geography, Part I — Willis (Philip). 

A Systematic Regional Geography— Unstead (University of 
Lohdon Press). 

Land Forms and Life— C. C. Carter (Christophers). 

Foundations of Modem Geography, Books i to 3 : Preaoe and 
Wood (Oxford University Press). 

Cartography i Erwin Raisz (McGraw Hill Book Co.) 
Intermediate Commercial Geography— Dudley Stamp, Fart I. 


871 



ivj SYLJl. IN OROUP-B OF BRANCH VIH— OEOCmAPHY 449 
FOR THE B»SC> DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Far Reference:^ 

Oicford Advanced Atlas — Oxfc^'d Univergity Press. 

Phillip's University Atlas — Longmans. 

Mathematical Geography- Vol. I— Jameson & Ormsby (Pittman) 

The Continent of Asia — L. W. Lyde (Macmillan &Co.). 

Earth Lore — Shand (Methuen). 

A Key to Maps: Winterbotham (Blackie) 

Exercises in Cartography: — Debenham (Blackie). 

The following books in the Home University Library Series 
(Butterworth) arc recommended for general reading: — 

Modern Geography — Newbigin. 

Commercial Geography — Newbigin. 

Climate and Weather — Dickson. 

Origin of the Earth — Gregory. 

BRANCH Vm— GEOGRAPHY. 

{Ancillaries) 

1. Mathematics — wide Syllabus No. 42. 

2. Physics — vide Syllabus No. 29 

3. Geology— vidf Syllabus No. 37. 

4. Chemistry — vide Syllabus No. 36 

5. Botany— vide Syllabus No. 3S. 

6. Zoology — vide Syllabus No. 39. 

7. Statistics — vide Syllabus No. 28. 

8. Astronomy — vide Syllabus No. 6. 




PART IV 
MINOR SUBJECTS 
(For B.A.) 

X. Phystoi. 

2. Cheimstry. 

3. Biology. 

4. Astronomy. 

5. Statistics. 

6. Geology. 

7. Physical Geography. 

8. Physical Anthropology. 

9. Physiology. 

(I) Physics—Minor. 

Measurements of Time : 

Reaaive forces— recoil of a gun, working of jet pianes. 

Rodcct propulsion. 

Molecular structure of matter — Kinetic Theory. 

Steam Engines and Outline of Internal Combustion Engines. 
Microscopes and Telescopes. 

Photography. 

Spectra — Infra-red, visible and ultra-violet — Elearomagnetic 

spectrum. 

Ammeters, Voltmeters, Electromagnets. 

Simple idea about A.C. and D.C. — Motors and Generators. 

Illumination — Modem methods (including Fluorescent lamps, arcii 
etc.). 

Radio Television and Radar (fundamentals). 

Sound Recording and Reproduction — Cinematography. 

Atomic Stmcturc, Radio-activity. 

X-Rays— Properties and uses. 

Nuclear energy and its application (only elementary ideas). 

Standard of treatment to be as given in the Reference bo^ given 
behw : — 

1. Oxford Junior Encyclopaedia, Vols. Ill, VIII and DC 

2. Book of Popular Science (Grolier Society, New York), 

10 Volumes. 


2 74 



SYLL. IN PART IV — MINOR SUBJECTS 451 

FOR B.A^MGl^E EXAMINATION 

3. A. M Low : Science and Industry 

4. Prof. Peicrics ; Laws of Nature. 

5. Odhams Press : Modern Science (Illustrated). 

u) Citumistry—Minor. 

('30 Lectures). 

Natural waters. Hard and soft water. Treatment of water for 
domestic and industrial uses. 

Solid fuels : wood, coals. Liquid fuels : petroleum, power 
alcohol. Gaseous fuels : coal gas, producer gas, water gas. 

Carbohydrates : Sugar, starch, cellulose, cotton, wood pulp, 
paper, rayon, mercerised cotton, celluloid. 

Milk and milk products: bread, confectionery, beverages, food 
preservation, food colouring and flavouring materials. 

Vitamins: anti-biotics, anti-septics, disinfectants, synthetic drugs. 

Oils and fats: soaps and detergents. 

Coal-tar and its important products : Dyes, Perfumes, Explosives, 
Plastics, Synthetic fibres. 

Fertilisers : Glass, ceramics, cement. 

Protective coatings for metals : Electro-plating, paints. 

Wood Preservation. 

(3) Biology — Minor (Botany and Zoology). 

1. Outline study of the landmarks in the progress of biological 
knowledge, c.g., theinvenrion of microscopes; Biogenesis and Pasteur’s 
contribution ; Development of Evolutionary concept ; Mendel’s woork 
and development of science of heredity. 

2. Organisms as causative agents of human diseases, such as 
worms, Entamoeba, malarial parasite, baacria causing tuberculosis, 
cholera and dysentery and virus diseases causing small-pox, influenza, 
etc., immunity. 

3. Role of micro-organisms in human welfare; nitrogen fixation; 
fermentation ; anti-biotics; bacteriophage. 

4. Insect vectors and their relationships to man and plants. 

5. X-ray and other radiations and their application to htunan 
welfare and progress. (The theoretical aspea of radiation may be done 
in the Physics section.) 



452 


SYLL. m PAKT IV — MINOR SUBJECTS 
FOR B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


6. Some aspects of human physiology^ viz., the chemioo-physio* 
logical properties of blood, muscle and their responses ; nervous control 
of human actions ; Respiratory and excretory processes. 

M. B , — The above may be covered in an elementary way in 
about 20 lectures. 

(4) Astronomy — Minor. 

One hour each week for one year-^Roughly 30 lectures. 

The Earth ; the Moon ; the Sun ; the Ecliptic. Measurement 
of time ; 2 k>daic i the seasons and the Calendar ; Solar and Lunar 
eclipses ; the Sun and his family of Planets ; Kepler’s laws ; Bode’s 
law j Planetary discoveries ; Neptune and Pluto ; the Stars ; visual 
magnitudes ; absolute magnitudes ; the 27 asterisms of Indian Astro- 
nomy. The important first magnitude stars among them. 

(5) Statistics— Minor 
{No derivation of formula w contemplated) 

Method of reasoning in scientific studies— Inductive and deductive 
processes. Observational data — Statistical method. Population and 
sample. 

Diagrammatic rcprescatation. Computation of average mean, 
mediam and mode Measures of dispersion— Quart ilc deviation and 
Standard deviation. 

Association of attributes and variables. Correlation and regression 
with the help of scauer diagram. 

Sample Surveys 

Books for Study and Reference : — 

Tippet, L.H.C.: Statistics (Home University Library Series) 

Morncy : Farts from Figures. 


(6) Geology— Minor. 

The solar system, the origin of the earth 

Pkyskai Geology : 

Amoevkme 
Siir&ce features 
Dittriliiitioo of land and sea 
Imorfer of the earth 


Lectures, 


4 



453 


SYLL. IN PART IV — MINOR SUBJECTS 
FOR B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Dynamical Geology : Lectures 

Geologicil action of wind> water and Ice 3 

Mountain Building . 

Earthquakes, volcauisnij the growtli of cominents and 
oceans 

Historical Geology : 

GeoIogioU Time-scale 
Plants and animals of the past 

Petrology : 

Classification into igneous met.imorpi ie an \ sedimentary 
rocks 

Economic Geology : 

Search for miacral deposits and Etiginecring projects 
An outline of the Mineral wealrh of India 
Coal and Petroleum 

Leciures to be illiutratcJ wherever possibL- witli visual 
(7) Geography. 

Syllabus same as fv>r Group-B — Ancillary Geography — for B.Sc. 
— i cj Physical Basis of Geography, vide Syllabus No. 44 

(8) Physical .Anthropology. 

PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY— minor. 

1. Physical Anthropology — -Scope and definition 

2. Man's place among mammals as related to the geological 

history of the World and Evolution. 

3. The order of Primates. 

4. Idcmentary study of the comp native anatomy of man-like 

apes and man. 

5. Ontogcnic and Phylogenic Sequences 

6. Fossil Primates and fossil men 

7 . T!ie Quaitcrnary Ice Age and emergence of man 

8. Theories regarding the Cradle of man. 

9. Race— Definition, classification — factors— bipod groups — 
' major racial groups and their distribution. 

10. Studies of human heredity and Finvironment. 


3 


2 

8 

aids. 


58 


277 



454 SYLL. IN PART IV — MINOR SUBJECTS 

FOR B.A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Books for study : — 

1. Ashley Montague 

2. E. P. Stibbe 

Books for Reference : — 

1. E. A. Hooton : 

2. A. C. Haddon 

3. G. Elliot Smith 

4. A. Keith : 

5. R. R. Gates : 

6. M. R. Sahni : 

7. W. E. Le Gros Clark: 

8 . Julian Huxley : 


Introduction to Physical Anthro- 
pology, Illinois, 1945 

An Introduction to Physical Anth- 
ropology, London, 1938. 


Up from the Ape, New York, 1947. 
The Races of Man, New York, 

1924. 

Human History— London, 1934 
(Revised Edition) Essay's on the 
Evolution of Man. 

Antiquity of Alan. 

Human Ancestry — Alassachii- 
setts, 1948. 

Man in Evolution. 

History of the Primates. 
Evolution. 


(9) Physiology. 

Syllabus ifi Physiology. 

The subject will be taught with special emphasis on applied 
aspects. Protoplasm, the Cell, the Tissues- 

Composition of the Blood. The Red Blood Cells or Erythro- 
cytes. The volume of the Blood. Haemoglobin. The White Cells 
or Leucocytes. Blood groups. The spleen. The Lymph, and the 
Lymphatic system. The Coagulation of Blood and Lymph. 

General Desciiption of the Circulation System. The Arterial 
Blood Pressure. The arterial pulse. The structure and Physiolo- 
gical properties of COrdiac muscle. The Cardiac cycle. 

Respiration : An outline of the structure of the Respiratory 
Organs. The Mechanics of Respirations. Asphyxia, Anoxia. 
Artificial Respiration. The sub-divisjons of the Lung Air. The 
Chemistry of Respiration. The control of Respiration. 

The Physiology of the Kidney ; Micturition. 


278 



SYLJL. IN PART IV—MINOR SUB ECTS 455 

FOR B A. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Skin. Struaure and functions. Regulation of temperature of 
the body. Digestion. Enzymes and their actions. Digestion in 
the Mouth. Digestion in the Stomach. Digestion in the Intes- 
tine. The production of Bile by the Liver. The Composition of 
the Bile and its functions. Absorption from the Intestinal Tract. 

Principles of Dietetics and Elementary knowledge of Vitamins, 
The Endocrine Glands : An elementary knowledge of the thyroid 
gland. The parathyroid glands. The Adrenal glands. The 
Pituitary gland. The Sex glands. 

The Central Nervous System ; Pvcflex action. The spinal cord. 
The Brain. The Autonomic Nervous System. 

The Physiology of Vision. The Ear, 

The following experiments will be demonstrated to the 
students : — 

Enumeration of White Blood Cells. 

Enumeration of Red Blood Cells. 

Haemoglobin Estimation. 

Physiological Anatomy of the Mammalian Heart (Sheeps' 
heart) and Actions of Valves. 

Inspection ol the frog’s in silu-graphic record of the heart- 
beat. 

Effect of stimulation of the Bagiis on the frog’s heart. 

Determination of vital capacity in man (Spirometry). 

Recording of a simple muscle twitch (gastrenemics- sciatic 
preparation of frog). 

Demonstration of reflex action in a spinal frog. 

Demonstration of deep reflexes in man. 

Text^book recommended : 

‘The Living Body’ by C. H. Best and N.B. Taylor— Pub- 
lishers — Henry Holt and Co., New York. 


279 




PART IV 

MINOR SUBJECTS 

(For B.Sc.) 

1. History. 

2. Politics. , 

3. Economics. 

4. Commerce. 

5. Geography. 

6. Psychology. 

7. Philosophy. 

8. History of Fine Arts. 

9. History of Music — Indian. 

10. History of Music — Western. 

(i) History— Minor. 

History of Indian Culture (30 lectures)*, 

1. Discovery of Ancient India. 

2. The Culture of Vedic Aryans. 

3. Social Life in Ancient India: Class-Family — Individual 

caste— system — The four stages of life. 

4. Religion: Philosophy of the Upanisbads-Buddhism-Jainism- 

Later Religious Teachers — Sankara, Ramanuja, Ghiuianya— 
Bhakti Cult — Christianity in India. 

5. Arts: Early Architecture — Stupa — Cave temples — Sculptural 

temples — Sculpture it* stone and metal — The Dancing 
Siva— Paintings at Ajama, Bagh, Sittannavasal, Sigiriya 
and Tanjore — India’s dance and music. 

6. Islam’s Impact on India — Cultural influences — Muslim 

Architecture. 

7. The Impact of the West on Modern India 

8. India’s contribution to World culture. 

Books recommended : 

1, The Legacy of India: Edited by Garrett (O.U.P.) 

2. The Wonder that was India — Basham(Sidgwick and Jackson.) 


^^0 



SYLL. IN PAKt IV— MINOR SUBJECTS 457 

FOR B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(2) Politics— Minor. 

Elements of Politics (30 lectures): 

1. Beginnings of Government in Greece and Rome. 

2. Kmergcnce of the Modern State in Europe— Absolute 

monarchies. 

3. Growth of Parliamentary Government. 

4. French Revolution and Democracy in Europe, 

5. Nationalism and Liberalism in 19th Century Europe. 

6. Federalism in the United States of America. 

7. National Self-Determination after World War L 

8. Idle Russian Revolution. 

9. Fascism; Nazism; Cornmunisin. 

10. United Nations Oiganization and International Government.- 

11. The Working Constitution of India. 

Books Recotn mended : 

Geitcl: Political Science. 

Palande: The Indian Constitution. 

(3) Economics — Minor. 

(1) Economics as a Social Science — Fundamental concepts — 
Economic goods — Utility — Value — Competition — Monopoly. 

(2) Economic Organization — Capitalism, Socialism — Mixed Eco- 
nomy — Planning. 

(3) The general laws of Supply and Demand — ^Determination of 
value under competition and monopoly. 

(4) Money and its funciions — Monetary standards — Inflation and 
Deflation — Effects of changes in prices. 

(5) Banks and their functions — Credit instruments, cheques, bills 
of exchange, promissory notes. 

(6) Exports and Imports — Balance of payments — Sources of Public 
revenue and items of expenditure. 

Books Recommended : — 

1. Dearie : Economics, 

2. Lehfeldt : Descriptive Economics. 


281 



458 SYLL. IN PART IV— MINOR SUBJECTS 

, FOR B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATIO N 

(4) Fttiidameiitftls of Coiiiiiierca--*Mliior. 

I. Commerce and its Economic Basis. 

а. Kinds of Business Organisation— Sole Trader — Partnership 
and Joint Stock Companies— Formation, Management and Dissolu- 
tion— Co-operative Organisation. 

3. Instruments of Credit — Cheques, Promissory Notes and Bills 
of Exchange — Documents of Trade — Functions of Banks in relation 
to Commerce. 

4. Customs and Excise Duties — Imports and Exports. 

5. Formation of Contraa — Offer, Acceptance, Revocation — Valid, 
void and voidable contracts— Conditions and Warranties — Performance 
and Breach— Sale of Goods — Agency. 

б. Elements of Fire and Marine Insurance — Conditions and 
Warranties— Insurable Interest — Perils and Risks — Brokers and Under- 
writers — Subrogation — General and Particular Averages — Lloyd’s In- 
surance. 

Books Recommended : 

Haney ; Business Organisation. 

Stephenson : Theory and Practice of Commerce. 

Evelyn Thomas : Theory and Practice of Commerce. 

B. V. Naidu and Datta : Business Organisation* 

J. C. Mitra : Business Organisation. 

A. Palmer : Company’s Secretarial Practice. 

O. R. Krishnaswami : Essentials of Commerce. 

(5) Geography — Minor. 

PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. 

A. Mode of Life : 

Effect of environment on Man, Culture and Civilisation. Cultural 
levels and contacts (12 hours). 

B. Distribution of Man : 

On the basis of race, culture, religion and actual numbers (8 hours). 

C. World Population Trends : 

Growth rates, movements, problems (10 hours). 


282 



SYLL. IN PART IV — MINOR SUBJECTS 459 

FOR B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Reference Books : — 

Daryll Forde : Habitat, Economy and Society. 

Huntington and Cushing : Principles of Human Geography. 
Moodie : Human Geography. 

(6) Psychology-Minor. 

Fundamentals of Psychology: 

1. Aim, Scope and Method of Psychology. 

2. Importance of heredity and environment. 

3. Intelligence: Its nature and measurement. 

4. Learning: Remembering. Attentions. 

5. Personality: Traits, types, measurement. The unconscious. 

6. Animal Psychology: Trial and error learning. Condition 

ing insight. Motivation. 

7. Child Psychology: Motor developments. Speech and play. 

8. Adolescent Psychology: Adolescent interests and emotional 

instability. 

9. Social Psychology; Crowd formation and leadership. 

10. Abnormal Psychology: Types of mental disorders. 

Dreams, Psycho-analysis. 

11. Industrial Psychology: Vocational Guidance. Fatigue 

and boredom. .Occidents. 

Reference Books : — 

M. Collins and J. Drevers — Psychology and Practical Life. U.L.P. 
Woodworth and Marquis — Psychology— A Study of Mental 
Life — Methuen, London. 

(7) Philosophy — Minor. 

1. Comparative Religion 

or 

2. Philosophical Foundations of Modern Science, 

SYLLABUS IN COMPARATIVE RELIGION. 

Under Humanities Minor for B.Sc. course (To be covered in 
30 lectures) 

1. Religion: Its nature and necessity. Religion and religions. 

2, Founded (Historical religions) and religion not traced to a 
founder. Place of scripture in religion. The scriptures of the great 
religions. 


283 



460 SYLL. IN PART IV — MINOR SUBJECTS 

FOR B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


3. Faith, Reason and Intuition: Their nature and function in 
religion, 

4. Essential concepts of religion: God, iVlan and Nature. 
Inter-relation between them. 

5. Man: His origin, nature and destiny. View of immortality 
and salvation. 

6. God: Personal and impersonal, 'rranscondcnco and imman- 
ence. The Incarnation and the In-dwcller. 

7. The Problem of Evil: Punishment and redemption. Karma 
and Grace. 

8. The Religious Predicament: Attitudes and practices. The 
place of ritual in religion. The devotee and devotion. Renunciation, 
prayer, fasting, pilgrimage, service, idea of surrender. Thirst for God, 

9. Religion as Yoga (union with God): The perfected soul 
Mystic experience. 

10. Religion and Society: Religious basis of social service. 

11. Features common to the several religions: Religioit as instru- 
ment for peace. 

Mote: Stress to be laid o!i tlie points of agreement op these 
topics in the main religions of the world, namely Hinduism, Islam, 
Christianity, Jainism and Buddhism. Where difFercnces have to be 
brought out, there is to be no attempt to assess any religion as superior 
or inferior. 

Bibliography: 

1. A. C Bouquet: Comparative Religion (Pelican Books). 

2. S. Radhakrishnan : East and West in Religion. 

3. S. Radhakrishnan: The Hindu View of Life. 

4. Kenneth W. Morgan: (Ed.) Tlie Basic Beliefs of Hinduism 

(Y.M.C.A. Publishing House, Calcutta). 

5. T. M. P. Mahadevan: Outlines of Hinduism 

6. Floyd H. Ross and Tynettc Hills: Questions that Matter Mo t 

Asked by the World’s Great Religions (Beacon Press, Boston, 

U.S.A.) 

or 

syllabus in philosophical foundations of modern science 

Under Humanities Minor for B.Sc. Courses (to ^ covered in 
30 Icaurcs). 


284 



SYLL. IN PART IV — MINOR SUBJECTS 
FOR B.SC. DEGREE EXAMINATION 


461 


I. What is Philosophy ? What is Science ? That the postulates 
of the sciences are the problems of Philosophy, 

II. Physical Sciences : Their main concepts, methods and limi- 
tations. 

III. Biological Sciences: Life and its evolution. Mechanism 
vs. Teleology, 

IV. Social Sciences: Concept of mind. Individual and group 
behaviour. Place of values in social life. Values : Instrumental and 
intrinsic. Need for an integral study of man. 

V. Philosophy of Evolution: A critical study — Emergence 
Transition from matter to spirit through life and mind. 

V I . Relevance of Philosophy : 

1. Difference between observation and explanation. 

2. Need for critical examination of the assumptions and metho- 

dology of the sciences. 

3. Fact and value: Values: moral, aesthetics and religious. 

4. Extension of the frontiers of modern science into the 

realm of philosophy. 

5. Philosophy as an attempt to unify and synthesise the find- 

ings of the sciences. 

Bibliography: 

1. E. P. Burtt; Philosophical Foundations of Modern Science. 

2. Alexis Carrell: Man the Unknown. 

3. Kenneth: Meaning and Purpose. 

4. Cunningham: Problems of Philosophy. 

5. Patrick: Introduction to Philosophy. 

6. Joad: Philosophical Aspects of Modern Science. 

( 8) History of Fine Arts — Minor. 

Introduction (2 hours). 

History of Indian Art (20 hours) : Proto-Historic Period : Indus 
Valley Civilization (i hour) Historic Periods. 

Arehitecture (7 hours) : Stamba, Stupa, Chaitya Hall, Brahmanical 
Temple (Northern, Southern, Hoysala style), Indian Mosque 
and Islamic Tomb, 


Z85 


59 



462 


SYLL. IN FART IV — MINOR SUBJECTS 
FOR B.SC. DEOREE EXAMINATION 


Sculpture (7 hours) : Sunga and Early Andhra (Barhut, Bodh 
Gaya, Sanchi) ; Later Andhra (Araaravati) ; Gandhara ; 
Mathura ; Gupta ; South Indian Bronzes. 

Painting (5 hours) : Ajanta ; Moghul ; Rajput. 

History of World Art (18 hours) : 

1 hour, Egyptian Art : Architecture ; The Pyramid. Sculp- 

ture : Some examples from the Old Kingdom. 

2 hours. Greek Art : Architecture : The Orders. The Par- 

thenon. Sculpture : Some examples especially from the 
5th Century B.C. 

I hour. Roman Art : Arcliiiecturc : Various types of Build- 
ings. Sculpture : Portraits. 

I hour. Early Christian Art : Architecture : The Basilica. 

I hour. Byzantine Art : Architecture : The Hagia Sophia? 
Istambul. Minor Arts : The Mosaic. 

1 hour. Romanesque Art : Architecture : S. Ambrogia, Milan. 

2 hours. Gothic Art : Architecture. Sculpture : Minor Arts: 

Stained Glass. (Illustrated on tlxe Cathedral of Chartres) 

6 hours. Renaissance Art in Italy : General charaaer and 
outlines of the Early Renaissance ; Leonardo da Vinci, 
Michelangelo and Raffael. 

2 hours. Renaissance Art in the Netherlands : Flemish Art : 
Van Eyck Brothers. Dutch Art : Rcnbrandt. 

Bibliography. 

Indian An : 

B, Rowland : The Art and Architecture of India. 

A. G. Rawlinson : K. dc B. Cordington ; J, V. S. Wilkinson ; 
Indian Art. 

P. Brown : Indian Architecture : Buddhist and Hindu Period, 
Islamic Period. 

F, Brown : Indian Painting. 

Chintamoni Kar : Classical Indian Sculpture. 


Z86 



SYLL. IN PART IV— MINOR SUBJECTS 

for b.sc. degree examination 


463 


Chlntamoni Kar : Indian Metal Sculpture. 

B. Gray : Rajput Painting. 

J. V. S. Wilkinson ; Mughal Painting. 

O. Monod — Bruhl : Indian Temples. 

“ Mark ’* Vol. 2, No. 4 : Special Dtpavali No. (contains good 
illustrations of Ajanta Wall-Paintings). 

L. Bacchofer : Early Indian Sculpture, Vols. I and II. 

Majumdar, Raychaudhuri, Kalikinkar Datta : Advanced His- 
tory of India. (pp. 224-254 ; 378 ; 410-421 ; 584-601). 

R. G Majumdar : History and Culture of the Indian People : 
Chapters on Art in the dilferent volumes. 

World Art : 

H. Gardner : Art Through the Ages (3rd Edition). 

H. Gardner : Understanding the Arts. 

F, Ross : An Illustrated Handbook of Art History. 

Banister Fletcher : A History of Architecture on the Comparative 
Method. 

L. Hourtick : Encyclopaedia of Art, Vols. I and II. 

(9) Syllabus for History of Indian Music (Minor) 

History of Indian Music, ancient, mediaeval and modern 
Sources tor the musical history of India. 

History of Raga concept and Raga classification. 

History and evolution of musical forms. 

Origin and development of the five branches of manodharma 
sangita. 

Evolution of the Veena. Causes for the disappearance of the Yazh . 
Materials used in the construction of musical instruments of 
ancient, mediaeval and modem times. 

Obsolete ragas, talas, musical forms, terms and instruments. 
Evolution of concert programmes. Development of biindagana. 

Seats of music in the past. Circumstances that occasioned famous 
musical compositions. 

Evolution of the Opera and Dancc-Klrama (Kuravanji and 
Bhagavatamela) 


287 



464 SYLL. IN PART IV — MINOR SUBjfiOTS 

FOR B.SC. DBOREE EXAMINATION 

Lives and contributions of the following composers : 

Purandaradasa; NarayanaTirtha; Thyagaraja ; Syoma Sastri; 
Muthuswami Dikshitar; Amnachala Kavirayar; Swathi 
Tininal; Gopalakiishna Bharathi. 

Contemporary Music: 

(Reference books to be the same as for B.A Music Group; 
Diploma in Music and Sangita Siromani courses.) 


(lo) Musicology and History of 
Western Music — Minor— 'One Paper. 

Syllabus. 

1. Staff Notations : The Staff with treble and Bass Clefs, names 
and positions of notes, leger lines, the sharp, fiat and natural. Accidentals » 
Notes and rests values, Time-Signatures, Dots and ties. 

2. Keys and Scales : Key-Signature — Diatonic and Chromatic 
Scales, Major and Minor Scales, Harmonic and Melodic Scales. 

3. Intervals : Simple Intervals — Perfect, major, minor intervals. 
Triads. Major and Minor Triads. 

4. Pour-part Harmony : The Four parts, Soprano, Alto, Tenor, 
Bass. Their compass. 

5. Melody— Harmony — Polyphony — ^and Counterpoint — Their 

differences. Definitions only. 

6. Form and Style: Difference between tlic two — Sonata as a whole. 
Chamber Music— Orchestra Music — Symphony — Conceno— Overture 
— Opera — Aria, Ballad Oratorio. 

7. Instrumentation : An outline knowledge of the suucturc and the 
construction of the following instruments : Piano, Instruments of the 
Violin Family. Flute, Clarinet^ Saitophone, Harmonium and Organ, 
Constitution of the Western Orchestra. 

8. History: The beginnings of Western European Music. The 
early development of Counterpoint. Early Secular Music. The New 
Art and its Development — Vocal Music in the sixteenth and seventeenth 
centuries. The rise of instrumental Music. The age of Bach and 
Handeir— The rise of Classicism. Developments in Opera— Beethoven 
—The Romantios and their music— Romantic Opera — Late Romantics 
and Nationalists— Impressionism and the Contemporary Scene. 


f88 



SYLL* in part IV — ^MINOR SURJECTS 465 

FOR THE B.SC. degree EXAMINATION 


9 . Biographm: Bach — Beethoven — ^Mozrat — Handel— Haydn— 

Schumann. 

Referene* Books 

Trinity College Text-Books Junior and Rudiments by Maepher- 
son. Trinity College Text-Book, Intermediate, Chapters 
I and 3 only ; Senior, Chapter n only. The instruments 
of the Orchestra by E. Borland “ Little Biographies ” by 
F. H. Martens. 

A Concise History of Music by William Lovelock. 

Summary of the History and Development of the Mediaeval and 
Modern European Music by C. H. Parry. 


289 




466 TEXT-BOOKS IN ENOLISH FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(three- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

Text-books and Syllabuses for B.A. and B. So. 
(Three-Year) Degree Examinations, 
1959-60. 

English. 

B.A. and B.Sc. 

Part I (a) — English* i959 
{papers I to III) 

Shakespeare^ 

Twelfth Night. 

King Lear. 

Poeffy— The following selections from “ Leaves from English 
Poetry** (Orient Longmans) : — 

Milton ; Debate at Pandemonium. 

Drydcn : Song for St. Cecilia’s day. 

Wordsworth : French Revolution— 

Wordsworth : Selections from the Prelude. 

Coleridge : KublaKhan. 

Shelley : Ode to the West Wind. 

Shelley : Ode toa Sky Lark. 

Keats : Ode on a Grecian Urn. 

Keats : Ode on Melancholy. 

Keats : Ode on Indolence. 

Keats: Ode toa Nightingale. 

Fitzgerald : from Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. 

Tennyson : The Lotus-Eaters. 

Browning ; A Grammarian’s Funeral. 

Arnold : The Scholar Gipsy. 

T. S. Eliot : The Hollow Meft. 





TEXT-BOOKS IN ENGLISH FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 467 
(three- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 


Detailed Prose 

(1) Living Voices (Ed. Sharma)— Black ie. 

(2) An of Life — ^Macmillan. 

Part I { h ) — English, i960. 

{Paper JV), 

Nan-Detailed Reading — 

(1) Hardy — Far from the Madding Crowd. 

(2) Modern Stories (Ed. by Saxena) (Oxford University Press). 

Note. — ^Thc examination in Shakespeare, Poetry and Prose 
(detailed) will lx: held in 1959 and in Composition (Non-detailcd 
Prose) in i960. 

B.A. 

PARt lit— B ranch XII— English. 

Group A^Main, 
i960. 

(a) Shakespeare^^ 

Richard III. The Tempest. (A general knowledge of tb« 
other plays of Shakespeare will be required.) 

(]b) Dratm — 

For Detailed Study 
Dr, Fau 8 tus (Marlowe). 

St. Joan (Bernard Shaw). 

For Nan-detailed Readings 
Goldsmith : She stoops to Conquer. 

Galsworthy ; The First and the Last. 

(c) JRrosfi— 

For Detailed Siudy^ 

Essays of Elia (First scries). 

Essays by Modern writers : Jepson (Longmans). 

For Nan-detailed Readings 
Even Harrington : Meredith. 

Barchester Towers : Trollope. 


291 




468 TEXT^BOOKS IN ENGLISH FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(three>year) degree examinations, 1959-60 


(d) Poetry — 

Wordsworth’s * Prelude ’—Book I 
and 

The following selections from Standard English Poems (Ed. 
Young and K. R. Srinivasa Iyengar (O.U.P.) 

Milton : L’Allegro and IL Penseroso. 

Pope : Epistle to Arbuthnot. 

Collins : Ode to Evening. 

Browning ; Child e Roland to the Dark Tower came. 

The Last Ride Together. 

Arnold : Dover Beach. 

Yeats : The Tower. 

Brooke : Menelaus and Helen ; Peace: Safety: The Deavl: 
The Soldier. 

Hodgson : The Song of Honour. 

Lawrence : Snake. 

Note. — A general knowledge of the other poems of Wordsworth 
will be required. 

all the four papers, credit will be given for a good 
general knowledge of English Literature. 

Group Ancillary , 

1959. 

1. History of EngUsh Literature^ 

Books recommended^ 

(1) Legouis — A Short History of English Literature. 

(2) Compton— Rickett— A Short History of English Litera- 

ture. 

(3) Sampson, G. — ^A Concise History of English Litciaturc. 

(4) Hudson— An Introduction to the Study of Literature. 

(5) Hudson— Outline History of English Literature. 

2 . Social History of England*^ 

Book recommended : 

Trevelyan— English Social History. 



TEXT -BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR^'B.A. AND B.SC. 469 
(three-year) degree EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 


Sanskrit 

B*A. and B.Sc. 

Part It (a)— Sanskrit, 1959 
(Papers I and II) 

1. Kalidasa's Sakuntala. 

2. Kalidasa’s Meghadhuta Whole). 

3. Bharavi’s Kiraiarjuniya — Canto I only. 

4. Dandin’s Dasakumaracharita— Ucchvasas 2, 3 and 4 only. 

5. Bhamaha’s Kavyalankara— Chapters I 103. 

The allocation of text-books for the three papers shall be as 
follows 

Paper I — 

Sakuntala, Meghadhuta and Kirtarjnnia 
Paper 11 ^ 

Dasakmnaracharita and Translation from Sanskrit into English 
and English into Sanskrit. 

40 Marks to be allotted for prose-text and 60 marks for transla- 
tion. 

Part II (6)— Sanskrit, i960 

(Paper II At the end of the bird year course) 

Bhamahalankarai— Poetics and History of Sanskrit literature i 
50 marks to be allotted for each subject. 

Text-books — 

Macdonell; History of Sanskrit Literature, Chapters X toXIV. 
Keith : Classical Sanskrit Literature— Heritage of India Series. 


B.A* 

Part III.— Branch XII — Sanskrit— Section A. 
Examination for Papers I and 1 1 to be held in 1959- 
Paper i— 

Books of the later period /— 

1. Bhavabhutis Uttaramacharita. 

2. Bhoja's Campuramayana— Ayodhya Kanda only. 

3. Harsha Cfearita.flptlJfcchvasa 3. 


60 


29 S 



470 TEXT-BOOKS Il4 SANSKRIT FOR B.A. AND B.8C. 

.(three- year) degree examinations, 1959-60 

Paper Ancient Indian History and Culture up to looo A,D. 
Books recofftsnended for study^ 

1 . K. A. Neclakania Sastri : History of India, Volume I. 

2. BAshHjn : The wonder that was India. 

Copies can be had of Orient Longmans & Co., Madras^z. 

Books recommended for consultation^ 

History and Culture of the Indian People, Bharathiya Vidhya 
Bhavan, Bombay. (Volumes i to 6.) 

Examination foi' Papers HI to VI to be held in i 960 . 
paper I 1 1^ 

Books of the Early Period — 

1. Macdonell : Vedic Reader : The following seleCi ions; — 

Agni I. I. 

Savitril. 35. 

Maruts I.— 85. 

Visnu I. 153. 

Funeral Hymn X. 14. 

PitarasX. 15. 

Gambler X. 34- 
YamaX. 135- 

2. Aiiareya-brahmana VII— 3 and 4. 

3. Kathopanishad— First Adhyaya— Text only. 

4. Gautama Dharma Sutrar— Text onlyf— Chapters i to 9, 

Government Press, Mysore or Anandasrama Press, Poona. 

jpaperlV*^ 

* Books of the Later Period //— 

1. Mahabharata — Vidu^anit wPrajagaraparva in Udyoga- 
Chapters 33 1040. 

2. Patanjali’sMahabashya I-I-I. 

3. Bhagavadgita*— Chapters 1 to 6. 




TBXT-BOOKS IN SANSICRIT FOR R.A. AND B.SC. 471 
(THREE- YEAR) PEOREB EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

Paper 

Comparative Philology with special reference to Sanskrit, accord- 
ing to the existing syllabus for Grammar (historical) under Part III 
Sanskrit and History of Sanskrit Literature*— Vedic Period only. 

Macdonell : History of Sanskrit Literature. 

Winternitz : History of Indian Literature (Volume I). 

Paper Vh^ 

Elements of Poetics^ Grammar and Indian Logic. 

1. Dandin's Kavyadarsa^— Pariccheda I, 

2. Grammar— VaradarajaN Madhya Sidahantakaumudi— the 
Chapters on Samjna, Pancasandhi and Karaka only (Chowkhamba 
Book Depot, Benares). 

3. Annambhacta’s Tarkasangraha with Nyayabodhini. 

Section B — Sanskrit. 

Papers / and 11, 1959. 

1. Prescribed text-books — General— Paper 1— 

(i) Visvanatha Pancanana — Muktavali with Dinakari of Sab- 
dakhanda. 

(ii) Gauthama dharma Sutras — First nine Paricchedas. 

(iii) Manusmriti — Chapter 9. Text only. 

2. Prescribed text-books— General— Paper II— 

(i) Siddhanthakaumudi— Purvardha only omitting Tadhita. 

(ii) Rig Veda, Macdonell’s Vedic Reader, I to X hymns (both 
inclusive) — Text only. 

(iii) Kathopanishad — Text only. 

Papers III to Vf 1960. 

3. Prescribed text-books — General — Paper III — 

(i) Jaiminiya Nyayamalavistara from the beginning to the 
end of Pada 3 in Chapter III. 

(ii) Mimamsa Nyayaprakasa of Apodeva* 


295 



4?2 TEXT-BOOKS IN SXNSKUlt FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(three- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 


1. Mim0nsa^ 


Special Part. 
Paper L 


Taittiriya Samhita with Sayana's Bhasya, Khanda Prapathaka. 

2. Apasthamba Srautha — Sutra with Rudradatta's Vritti— 

Prasnas I to V (both inclusive). 


Paper II, 

Bhatta Dipika from beginning to end of the third Pada of the 
third. 

Adhyaya (Chapters I to III). 

Aitreya Brahmana with Sayana Bhasya, fourth Panchika. 

Paper HI, 

Bhatta Dipika from the fourth Pada of Chapter III. 

3. Nyaya — 

Paper /. 

Gauthama’s Nyaya sutras with Vatsyayanas Bhasya, Chapters 
1 and II. 

Kanada*s Vaiseshika sutras. Text only. 

Paper II, 

Jagadisa’s Panchalaksani and Simhavyaghri. 

Gadadhara’s Caturdasalaksani. 

(n) From beginning up to the end of the Dvitiyasvalaksana. 

(6) Kutaghatitalaksana. 

(c) Kutaghatitalaksana. 

(d) Vyadhikarana — Dharmavacchinanabhava — Khandanagrantha 

Paper III, 

Gadadhara*s Paksata; SARVABHIMANTA. 

Gadadhara’s Siddhantalaksana (whole). 


Vyakaram — 


Paper L 


Paribhasandusekhara (whole). 


296 




TEXT -BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 473 
(three- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 


Paper IL 

Praudamanorama, Text from beginning to end of Avyayibhava, 
Siddhantakaumudhi Krt and Taddhita Sections. 

Paper III. 

Sabdaratna from beginning to end of Stripraayaya. 

5. Sahitya— 

Paper 1. 

Bana’s Kadambari from Mahasveta Vrttanta to the end of Pur- 
vardha. 

Sri Harsha’s Naisadha, cantos 10 and 11. 

Kumarasambhava, cantos 1 to 5 (inclusive). 

Nilakanthavijaya of Nilakantha Dikshitha, Uchvasa III only. 


Paper II, 

Sakuntala. 

Malatimadhava. 

Mrcchakatika. 

Mudraraksasa. 

Paper III. 

Dandin*s Kavyadarsa — Pariccheda 1 only. 
Kuvalayananda (whole). 

Siddhanthakaumudhi — Taddhitha—Apatyadhikara only. 
Dhananjaya— Dasarupaka with Avaloka. 


6. Jyotisha — 


Paper L 

Bhaskara’s Rijaganita. 

Bhaskaracarya’s LUavati— whole, omitting Parkarmastaka, Kuttaka 
and Pasa. 


Paper II, 

Kshetramiti by Durgaprasada, Books III and IV only. 
Trikonamiti. 

Paper III. 

Goplaprakasa. Capiyatrikonamiti and Golarekhaganita only. 


297 



474 TBXT'BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A. AND B SC. 
(threb-year) deoree examinations, 1959-60 


7. Ayurveda — 


Paper L 

Astangahrdaya, Sarira, Nidana and Cikitsa sthanas. 


Paper IL 

Carakasaniita, Sutra and Sarira Sthanas. 

Pratyaksa Sarira by Mahamahopadhyaya Gananath Sen. 


Paper III. 

Rasaratnasamuccaya, first eleven chapters. 


Sanskrit* 


B.A. 


Part III. 

Branch Vlll — Indian Music (Main). 

Ancillary Syllabus in Sanskrit, 1959. 

(i) Kalidasa's Rahuvamsa, Canto Xll. 

(ii) Vikramarkacarita — Stories 1 to 4. Pages from about 25 to 40, 

(iii) Prosody — 

Elements of Sanskrit prosody — distinction into Matra, Vrtta 
and Gana Vrtta — The characteristics of the Vrtlas — ^Anustubh Upajati, 
Vamsastha, Vasantatilaka, Malini, Sikharini, Mandakranta Sardula- 
vikrldita, Sragdhara, Dandaka, Arya — Examples of the more musical 
metres: Campakamala, Dodhaka and Totaka, Bhujangaprayata, 
Mattamayura, Tunaka and Citra, Panca -Camara, Mattakrida, Tanvi, 
Kraunchapada. Consult: Vrttaratriakara, Sratabodha, Candomanjari. 

(iv) 30 Sanskrit Musical Compositions— 

I. Jayadeva*— 

(i) Pralayapayodhi jale — Introductory Dasavatra Astapadi. 

(ii) Lalitalavanga— First Astapadi. 

IL Narayanatirtha’s Tarangas— 

(iii) Govinda Ghayta— Bhairavi. 

(iv) Puraya mama kamarn-— Bhilahari. 


298 




TEXT-BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 475 
(three-yea r) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

III. Sadasiva Brahmcndra — 

(v) Manasa Sancararc (Saraa). 

(vi) Bruhin Mukundcti. 

(vii) Tunga tarangc. 

IV. Svati Tirunal — 

(viii) Saras tjanab ha myrare — Todi. 

(ix) Sarasksa pai ipalaya — Pantuvarali. 

(x) Kripaya palaya Saurc — Carukesi. 

(xi) Vande Sada Padmanabham — Navarasa Kannada. 

V. Syama Sastri — 

(xii) Kanaka Saila Viharini— Punnagavarali. 

(xiii) Sankari Sam Kuril — Savcri. 

VI. Snanasami Sastri — 

(xiv) Sri Lalite — Bhairavi. 

VII. Tyagaraja— 

(xv) Girirajasutatanaya — Suddhabangala — Ganesa. 

(xvi) Varasikhivahana — Supradipa — Subrahmanya. 

(xvii) Nadatanumanisam— Cittaranjani — Siva. 

(x vi i i ) Samajavara ga mana— H i ndol a —K ri shna . 

(xix) Sri Narada — Kanada — Narada. 

(xx) Janakiramana — Sudhasimantini — Rama. 

(xxi) Jayamangalam — Ghauta — Mangalam. 

VII. Muttuswami Dikasitar — 

(xxii) Siddhivinayakam — Cannara or Sanmukhapriya—Gancsa. 
(xxiii) Vinapustakshidharini — Vegavahini — Saraswati. 

(xxiv) Mahalakshmi karunarasalahari— Madhava Manohari (raga) 
Lakshmi. 

(xxv) Sri Subramanya-Nyanamastc-Kambhoji-Subrahmanya. 
(xxvi) Sri Parvatiparamcswaran— Barali — Parveti and Para- 
meswaran. 

(xxvii) Sri Daksinamurtc — Sankara bharana — Daksinamurthi. 
(xxviii) Kamalabam bhajarc — Kalyana — Devi, 

(xxix) Suryamurte— Saurashtra — Sun, 

(xxx) Mamava Pattabhiram — Maniranga — Rama. 


^99 


476 TEXT-BOOKS IN HINDI FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(THREE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959>60 


Hindi 


B.A. and B.Sc. 

Part II (a)— Hindi, 1959. 

{Examination for Papers I & II) 

Paper I>^ Prescribed Text-Books I — Poetry — 

Detailed Study : 

T. B.A. Poetry Selection— 1958 — Published by the University of 
Madras. 

2. Milan — Ram Naresh Tripathi. 

3. SudamaCharit— Narottam Das. 

Paper I Prescribed Text- Books 11-^ Prose and Drami^ 

Detailed Study*— 

1. Hindi Gadya Sanchaya— Mahairu Prasad (Publishers— Ram 
Narayan Lai, Allahabad.) 

2 . Raksha Bandhan— Hari Krishna Premi. 

3. Chaturyuga (One Act Plays)— Prabhai Shasiri (Kaushambi 
Prakasham Darakanj, Allahabad.) 

por reference only— , 

1 . Hindi Bhasha Aur Sahitya by Udai Narayan Tiwari, 

2. Kavya Pradeep— Ram Bahori Shukla. (Only those Alankaras 
and Chandas as per Syllabus). 

3. Vyakaran Pradeep— Ram Deo. 

Part II {b) — Hindi, i960 
(Examination for Paper III) 

paper III— 

Nan-detailed Texts— 

1. Nirmala— PremChand. 

2. Katha Kaumudi*— Dakshina .Bharat Hindi Prachar Sabha, 
Madras, 


3QQ 



TEXT-BOOKS IN HINDI FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 477 
(three-year) degree examinations, 1959-60 


For reference only*-- 

1. Vigyan Ke Chamatkar^by Bhagwatiprasad Jrivastava (Pub- 
lished by Gyan Mandal, Ltd., Kashi). 

2. Nibandh PraboJh by Dr. Ram Rjtna Bhatnagar (Published 
by Kiiab Mahal, Allahabad). 


B.A. 

Part III— Branch XII— Hindi. 

{Examination for Papers I and IT to be held in 1959) 

Paper - 

History of Hindi Literaiure — 

1. Hindi Sahitya Ka Itikas— by Dr. Ram Kumar Vefma. 
(R. N. Lai). 

2. Hindi Kavya Vimarsli — by Sri Gulab Rai. 

3. Hindi Bhasha aur Sahitya — by Shyam Suudar Das. 

4. Hindi Sahitya Ka Itihas— by Pt. Ram Chandra Shukla. 

5. Kavya Charcha— by Prof. Lalita Prasad Sukil. 

Paper //— 

Indian History and Culture^ 

1. Itihas Pravesh— Jaichandia Vidyalankar. 

2. Bharateeya Sanskrici— Dr. Baidev Prasad Mishra. 

For reference only^ 

1. History of India, — K.A. Nilakanta Shastri. 

2. The Legacy of India — Edited by Garret. 

3 . Bharateeya Sanskrit— Sri Ram Dhari Singh “ Dinkar 

4 . Bharatvarsh Ka Sankshipta Itihas — University of Madras 

Examination for Papers HI to VI to he held in i960. 

Paper Iljm^ 

Prescribed Text Books’ll {Poetry)*^ 

1. Kavya Kalanidhi—Baugeeya Hindi Pari shad, Calcutta 

2. Kavitavali (Omitting Uttar Kanda)— Tulasidas. 

3. Gunjao— SumitraNandan. Pant. 

SOI 


61 



478 TEXT-BOOKS IN MARATHI FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(THREE- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMNS., 1959-60 

Paper /K—- 

Prescribed Text^books*^!! {Prose and Drama) 

1. Gadya Kusum Mala.— Ram Narayan Lai & Co., Allahabad 

2. Ajatshatru— Jai Shankar Prasad. 

3. Gaban— Premchand. 

4. Hindi Ki Amar Kahaniyan— Edited by Jagannath PrasaJ 
Sfearma. 

5. Reshmi Tie^Ram Kumar Verma. 

Paper K— 

Prosody and Poetics^ 

1 . Kavya Pradeep— Ram Ba hori Shukla. 

2. Alankar manjoosha — Lala Bhagwan Been. 

3. Kavya Parichayr— by Chandra Shekar Shastri and Ram 
Chandra Snkla “ Saras 

Paper K/— 

History of Language and Grammar-^ 

1. Hindi Bhasha Aur Sahitya— Shyam Sundar Das. 

2. Vyakaran Pradeep— Ram Deo (Hindi Bhavan, Allahabad). 

3. Sankshipta Hindi Vyakaran— Kamta Prasad Gvru. 

(Hote.-^ All the papers shall be set and answered in Hindi.) 

Marathi. 

B.A. and B.Sc. 

Part II («)— Marathi? 1959, 

(Papers I ottd JI ) 

Poetry, History of Literature, Prosody and Poetics. 

For Detailed Study. 

Poetry^ 

1. Moropant— Virataparva. 

2, Pacha Kavi— 'Edited by Rajadhyaksha. 

History of Marathi Literature-^Books recommended: 

I. Maharashtra Saratwat (Chapters on Dyaneshwar, Woman 
hy Bhavc Pandit, Tukaram and Moropant), 

Mara|h} gubityachjl Rwparesha by Or, U. P. DandokVi 


90t 



TEXT -BOOKS IN MARATHI FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 479 

(three-year) degree examinations, 1959-60 

prosody and poeiks'^Books recommended: 

1. Alankara Chandrika by Gore, G. U. 

2. Vrittadarapan by P, B. Codbolc. 

Paper //— (PrOse, Drama and Grammar) 

For Detailed Study. 

Prosc^ 

Marathi Nibandha by R. S. Walimbc. 

Dtamct^ 

Punya Prabhava by Gadkari. 

Grammarm^ 

Book recommended— Praudhabodha Vyakaran, by R. B. Joshi. 

Part II ( b ) — Marathi^ i960 

{.Paper III) 

Paper ///—^Non -detailed text, passage or passages in English ot 
translation into Marathi, General Composition having reference to 
modern thought)— 

Non^deiaiUd Text : 

1. Daulatby N. S, Phadakc. 

2, Parijat — edited by V. S. Khandekar. 


B.A. 

Part III— Branch XII— Marathi. 
(Examination for Papers I and II to be held in 1959.) 

Paper I^ History of Marathi Liter ature-^B oaks recommended: 

1. Maharashtra Sarasvvat by Bhavc. 

2. Pradakshina— Edited by A. A. Kulkarni. 

3. Arvachina Marathi Sahitye*— Nene. 

4. Marathi Sahityachi Ruparesha by Dr. U. P. Dandekar. 


303 




4^0 fBXT-BOOKS IN MARAtUI TOR B.A. ANd B.SC. 

(three- year) p eqree examinations, 1959-60 

paper History and Culture of Maharashtra: 

Books recofnmmded^ 

r. Maharashtracha Samskritic Iiihasa by Dr. S. D. Pcndrc. 

2. Marathi Riyasai by Sardesai. 

$4 Tirtharupa Aiaharashtra, Parts I and II by Mahadeshanri 
Joshi. 

Examination for Papers 11 J to VI to be held in i960. 

Paper 11 1 ^ Poetry (ancient and modern)^ Prescribed Text-book I 

1. Dyaneshwar, 12th Adhyaya. 

2 . Mukteshwai— Sabhaparva. 

3. Keshavasuta— Kcshana Sutanchi Kavita. 

4. Tilakp— Tilakanchi Kavita. 

5. Beo— Phulanchi Orjala. 

paper I Prose and Dr Prescribed Text •books 12 . 

1. Adnyapatra»— by Ramachandra Pant Amatya. 

2. Amachya Deshachi Sthiti by Chiplonkar. 

3. Nibaniha Sangraha— . Part I by Agarkar. 

4. Vidyaharani by Uhadilkar. 

5. Ekach Pyala»— Gadkari. 

Paper Prosody and Poetics^Books recotmnended: 

1. Ghandraihana by Patmardhan. 

2. Abhinana Kavyaprahash by Jog. 

3. Kavyalochana by Kelkar. 

Paper Vl^ History of Language and Oranmar^ Books Reootn- 
mended: 

1, Marathi Bhasha»— Udgama Ani Vikasa by Kulkami) K. P. 

2. Sabni^Adhunik Marathiche Ucehatar Vyakaran. 


S04 



TEXT-BOOKS IN FRENCH FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(THREE -YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINAITONS, 1959-60 


481 


French 

B.A* <Sc B.Sc* 

Part II. 

papers I ^nd 11 lo he taken in 1959 and Papjr 111 in i960. 

Dramas 

Corneille’s Horace. 

Poetry^ 

Oxford Book of French Vcrscj 13th to che 2och cent ury— numbers 
146 to 202. 

Prose — 

Le iivie tie monami— -by Anatole France— O.U.P. 

French Tales of Our Time^By W. Lough Harrap. 

Contes Humoristiques*— A. L. Garre. (University of London 
Press.) 

French I’alcs of Our Time by W. Lough Harrap to be reserved 
for the third year. 


B*A. 

Part TII— Branch XII. 
i960* 

Drama"^ 

Molicre’s L’Avare. 

Racine’s Athalic. 

V. Hugo’s Hernani. 

Poetry^ 

Oxford Book of French Verse, i3ih to the 20th century — Num- 
bers 198 10231. 

Prose ^ 

Colonel Ghabert, Gobseck— Honore dc Balzac. 

Harrap. 

Le Barrage— .Bordeaux. 

Cheque disent Ics livres. By Emile Faguet, O.U.P. 


305 



482 TEXT-BOOKS IN LATIN AND HEBREW & SYRIAC FOR 
B>A, AND B.SC. (THREE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMNS., 1959-60 


History of French Literature from the Renaissance to Modern tlmes^ 
The following books are recommended 

Cazamin’s History of French Literature, O.U.P. 

History de la langua francaisc. By Gh. des. Granges, 
Saintsbnry’s History of French Literature. 

Author’s Life and works to be studied : Victor Hugo. 

Horace : Odes. Bk, II (To be reserved for the 3rd year). 

Cicero : ProRoscio. 


Latin 


B.A. 

Part III*— Branch XII 


1960. 

Dramas 

Miles Gloriosus of Plautus. 

Adelphi of Terence. 

Prose^ 

Cicero’s Pro Legs Manillia. 

Tacitus ; Annals Bk, I. 

Poetry^ 

Vergil : Aeneid, Book VIII , 

Horace ; Odes, Book III, 

Juvenal ; Satire X. 

History of Latin Literature. 

Study of a prescribed author’s life and works : Cicero, 


Hebrew and Syriac 
(i) Syriac 
& B.Sg« 


Part II. 


jFVoie— 

Selections in Syriac Prose for the B.A. Glass— ‘Lessons I to XX 
(St. Joseph’s Press^ Mannanam). 


306 




TEXT-BOOKS IN HEBREW & SYRIAC FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 483 
(THREE- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 


Poetry^ 

Selections in Syriac poetry for the B.A. Class^ Lessons I to XIV 
(St. Joseph’s Pressj Mannanam). 

Prosody and Grammar-^ 

Syriac Grammar by Fr, Gabriel (St. Joseph’s Press^ Mannanam). 

History of Syriac literatures^ 

Dr. Wright (A. C. Blackie, London). 

Early History of Syria and Palestine and History of the Syrian Church 
in Jndta^ 

1. Early History of Syria and Palestine> by Lewis Beyles Petton, 
D.P.H. (John C, Kimjnu, 14 , King William Street, Strand, London.) 

2 . St. Thomas the Apostle (Centenary Souvenir) by Dr. P. J. 
Thomas, Dr. Placid, Dr. Ettumanookaran and Mr. K. E. Job (Mar 
Louise Memorial Press, Ernakulam). 

3 . The Two Apostles of India by A. G. Perumali, s.j. (Catholic 
Mission Press, Ranchi, Bihar). 

4 . The Syrian Church of Malabar ard its Cultural Contributions, 
by J. Placid, T.o.c.n., phd.> d. d., d.c.l , and K. E. Job, m a.,l.T. 

(Si. Joseph’s Press, Mannanam), 

5 . History of the St. Thomas Christians, Vols. I and II, by Fr» 
Bernard, t.o.c.d. (St, Joseph’s Press, Mannanam). 

6 . The Indian Church of St. Thomas by E. M. Philip (C. M. S. 
Press, Kottayam). 


(H) Hebrew. 
B.A. & B.Sc. 

Part II. 

Prose^ 

The First Book of Samuel, 

Poetry^ 

1. Psalm 7^. 

2 . Proverbs, Chapter XV. 

3 . The Prophecy of Nahum . 


ao7 



484 TEXT-BOOKS IN HEBREW &SYRIAC FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(three- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

Orawwar— 

1. Student’s Hebrew Grammar by Mich:al AJicr, b-A. (David 
Nutt, London). 

2. Hebrew Grammar by Davi("son. 

History-^ 

1. History of Hebrew literature by Aiichacl Ac ler. 

2. The Hebrew Sj their history and Government, by Professor 
McCardy (John C. Nimmu, 14, King William Street, Strand, London). 

3. Early History of Syria and Palestine by Lewis Boyless Petton, 
PH.D. (John G, Nimmu, 14, King William Street, Strand, London). 

B.A. 

PARt in— B ranch XII— Syriac. 

GrotiP A. 
i960. 

1. Prose-^ 

1. Exodus (whole). 

2. Acts of the Apostles (whole). 

3. Epistle of St. Paul to Thimothy (whole). 

4. Life of St. Ephrem (St. Joseph’s Press, Mannanam). 

2. Poetry^ 

1. St. Ephrem Morcaux Choisis, Pages 34-73 (Dominican Fathers, 
Mosul). 

2. Isaac of Antixoch Morceui Choisis, Pages 150-176 (Dominica 

Fathers, Mosul). 

3. Prescribed Author^ s life and works-^ 

St. Aphraatis : His complete works , Patrologia Syriaca Series, 
First part. First volume (whole, comprising 22 homilies), and Second 
volume, 23rd Homily, pages 1-150— edited by R. Graffin, published 
by Firmin— Didot-ct Socii, via lacob, 56, Paris, 

4. 

1. Syriac grammar by Fr. Gabriel. 

2, Syriac Cj-rammar by Rev. Fr. Thomas Arayathinal, m.o.l. 
(St, Joseph’s Press, Mannanam). 


308 



TEXT-BOOKS IN HEBREW & SYRIAC FOR B.A. AND B. SC. . 
(three- YEAR) DBOREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 


5. History cf Syrinc language and literature, by Cardinal. Tappauni 
(Beirut), 


Group B. 

1959. 

1. Early History of Syria and Palestine by L.B. Pctton, ph.d. 
(John C. NijnmUa London). 

2. St. Thomas the Apostle, Centenary Souvenir by Dr. P.J. Thomas, 
Dr. Placid, Dr. Ettumanookaran and Mr. K, E. Job. 

3. The two Apostles of India, by J. C. Perumalil. 

4. History of the St. Thomas Christians, by Fr. Bernard. 

5. The Indian Church of St. Thomas, by E. M. Philip. 

6. The Syrian Church of Malabar and its cultural contributions, 
by Placid and Job. 


B.A. 


Part III— Branch XII— Hebrew. 
Group A. 

1960. 

1. Prose^ 

1 , The Book of Exodus. 

2. The Book of Micaa. 

2 . Poetry^ 

The prophecy of Sophonias. 

3 . Prescribed Author-^ 

Jcrcmias the Prophet, Life and work. 

4. Grammar’^ 

1 . Student’s Hebrew Grammar, by Michael Adler. 

2. Hebrew Grammar, by Davidson. 

3. Hebrew Twes, by pfiyi^son. 

909 


62 




4 ff tIXT-BOOKS m URDU rOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(THMl-YEAlt) PECatBB EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

S> Histtiry tS thtnm Literature, by Michael Adler. 

OroupB, 

1959. 

I. Etrly History of Syria and Palestine, by L. B. Petton, ph.d. 

X. ilK Hebrews, their history and Goyernment, by Professor 
MeCaidy (John C. Nimmu, London). 

Urda. 

B.A. end B.Sc. 

Part II («)— Urdu, 1959 
(Examination for Papers I and II) 

Paper h—Pme, Poetry and Orammar: 

JVbjs— 

j. Zikr-O-Fikcr, Vol. II. 

2. Nazir Abamad Ki Kabani by Farahatullah Baig. 

Peatty— 

i, Rang-O-Abang, Vol. II. 

4. Di«an-e-Zouq>Radif Ya only. 

Oremmam- 

5. PM8«e*Urdu, Anwer Abmadi Press, AUababad. 

fihp^ tif Idterature and Trantlationx 

HiMfy rf Littrature— 

6 . Urdu Adab-Ki>Taiikb by Nasijn Quniiahi«Aiad Kiub 
ObV.Ddbi. 

Tmsbttioa-No bocdc is itreacribad. 


SIO 



TWXT-Wnns W KE8IAN WQK |8.A. AMD B.W. 
(TiniBB-YEAlt) PBOKJBE BXAMINAT|0N8p 19 $P^ 

Part II (^>— Urdu* 19^ 

(JSxmnmaiiaH fcr Papir III) 

Paper Ill^Cimpositiaf^ General and Textual: 

Non-detaikd^ 

7 . Oulistan Amjat by Ahamad Hussain Amjad. 

8. Maidaii->e-anal by Premchaad. 

9. DcedwO-Shuneed by Rayis Ahmad Ja*fari. 

10, Susral by Showkat Thanavi. 

Perslmii* 

B.A. mnd B.Sc. 

Part II (a)— P ersian, 1959 
{Examnatim for Papers I and //) 

Paper l^Prose^ Poetry and Grammar: 

Proses 

1. Siyahat Namah Ibrahim Baig^Vol. !•— First half. 

2. Ruq*aat-e-Aalamgiri, Vol. I^ Edited by N. A. Nadvi. 

Poetry^ 

3. Bustan-c-Sa*di*— First two chapters. 

4. Diwan-e-Haf^i— Radif Alif only. 

Grammar^ 

5. Misbahul Qawaid by Ja*fari— First three chapters. 

pt^er 1 History of Uterature: 

Histtrry of Literature ; 

6* History of Persian Literature by Levy. 

Part II (6)— Persian, i96e 
{Examimtion for Paper III) 

Paper lll^mmTranslation' 

Translation^ 

No text«book is prescribed. 


4t7 


311 



4ti m Arabic for b.a. and B.iC. 

(THEM- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-^60 

Amble. 

B«A.«iidB. 8 c. 

Part II (e)— A rabic, i959 
(JBxanttnation for papers I ^nd JI) 
paper J^Prose, Poetry and Orammar: 

Pr os^" > 

1. All Quran : Surah Al. Nur. 

2. Bulugh al-Maran>— First half. 

3. Nafhatul Zameib— First Forty Stories. 

Poetry^ 

4. Mullaqat Antara. 

5. Qasida Banat Su’ai. 

6. Diwan Ibal-Rumi Radif Jim only. 

Qratnmar’^ 

7. Teach yourself Arabic by Tritton. 
paper Ij 

History of Literature^ 

8. History of Arabic Literature by H. A. R. Gibb, 

Part II (ft)— ^abic, i960 
(Examnation for Paper //). 

Paper IJ I 
Translatiork^ 

No book is prescribed. 

B.A. Def ree. 

Part III*— Branch XII^Urou, 

Oroup A (Main). 

(Examination in i960.) 
paper J-^Prose arui Poetrym^ Text-books 
Pfos^^ 

1. Yadjfar-e-Ghalib by Hali. 

2. AlFaruqbyShibli. 


Sit 




TBXT-BOOKS IN ARABIC FDR B.A. ANI> B.SC. 489 
(three-year) degree examinations, 1959-60 


3. Ghubar-i-Khatir by Moulana Abul Kalam Azad. 

4 . Waqait-i-Azfariby Md. Husain Mahvi. 

5 . Ganjha*e-Giran maya by Rashid Ahmad Siddiqui. 

6. AnjambyProf. Ml. Mujib. 

poetry--^ 

7. Qasaid-i-Momiiv— edited by Zia Ahmad Zia. 

8. Diwan Ghalib. 

9. Rooh-i-Akbar (Central Publishing House, Bangalore-2.) 

10. Bal-i-Jibril by Iqbal. 

11. Fikr-O-Nishat by Josh. 

12. Meyar Ghazal (Kitab Khana Anjuman Tarraqqi-e Urdu, 
Abid Roadf Hyderabad.) 

Non-detailed-^ 

13. AakhriTohfaby Premchand. 

14. Shikast by KishenchanJer. 

Paper Il^Qrammar , Prosody and Rhetoric 
Orantfnar and Prosody^ 

15. Qaqaidc-Urdu by Moulvi Abdul Haq, Rhetoric. 

16. Tashil al Balaghat by SajjaJ Mirza Baig. 

paper History of Literature attd Literary Criticism 
History of Urdu Literature'^ 

17. Mukhtasar Tarrikh Adab-i-Urdu by Dr. Ejaz Husain. 

Literary Criticisin'^ 

18. Muqaddima Sher Shairiby Hali. 

19. Harmari Shairi by Massod Hasan Razvi. 

20. Aabe Hayat by Azad. 

21. Akbar Naniah by Abdul Majid Daryabadi. 

22 . Tanqidi Jaize by Ehtesham Husain. 

paper IV^Prescrihed Author 

Prescribed Author 
Shibili. 




499 in aiuiiic iroii M.k. km mmj. 

(THWB-^YBAR) DEOafiB g3CA.MIWATI0W&t 1959^0 

Books ncrnmnended^ 

23. ShibiUKamahbyMohd.Ikrftm 

24. Hayat-e-Shibiliby Syed Sulaimtn Nadvi. 

Qroup B (Ancillary), 

(Examination in 1959.) 

One of the follpwing^ 

I. Cultural History of the Moghul Rulers* 1526 to 1857. 

Books recommended for consultation-^ 

Tarikh-e-Hindustan by Moulvi ZakauUah. Vols. Ill to X. 

(Paper I will deal with period from Babar to AurangaaDob and 
Paper II from Shah Aalam to Bahadur Shah.) 

2. Arabic. 

Prose and Poetry 

MiQaniulAdab, Vol. 11 — Firat half— 'Paper I— Text*b(xrttt. 

Paper II^Translation and Grammar-^ 

Qrammar^ 

Kitabus Sarf and Kitab-al Nahv or Teach yomrsclf Arabic by 
Tritton, 

Tranglation— from Arabic into Urdu and Vice-Versa. 

3. Persian. 

paper [•-^prescribed Text-books— 

Prose— 

3 tyahat Namah-c- Ibrahim Baig. Vol, I (First half only). 

Poetry-^ 

Diwan-e^Hafiz (Radif Alif only). 

Paper lI--*Translation and Oranmar— 

Oranmar— 

Qewaide Farsi by JaTari. 

Translation from Persian into Urdu and Vice*Verii*-*No book 
if prescribed. 



491 


TBXT'BOOKS IN ARABIC FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(thrbb-year) deorbb examinations, 1950-60 

4. Hindi. 

P^PiT J^^Ttxt-hooks in Prose and Poetry 
pros^'^ 

1. Rasili Kahaniyan. 

2, Adhunik Hindi Gadya by Sushila Ayer. 

Poetry^ 

Chainika— Published by Dakshina Bharat Hindi Prachara Sabba, 
Madras. 

Paper JJ-^>KkmpoHtion^Qmeral and Textual 
Ncn^detailed’^ 

Madhu Manjari— Published by D. B. H, Prachara Sabha^ Madras. 

Part m— Branch XU— Persian. 

Group A (Math), 

(Examination in i960.) 

Paper I-^Prose and Poetry Text-d>ooks 
Proses 

1 . Chahar Maqala by N izam i Aruzi . 

2. Ruqa’ai-c-Abdul Fazl — First Daftar (First halO. 

3. Vaqai Ncmat Khan-c-Aali (First half only). 

Poetry^ 

4 . Rustain-O-Soharab edited by Jalaluddin Ahmad Jahuri. 

5 . Zabur-e-Ajajn by Iqbal. 

6. Kuttiy«t<e«C^lib(Radifmimonly). 

7. Quasaid Urfi (First Qasideh only). 

(Anwar Ahmadl Presst Allahabad). 

Nen^d^aiUd^^ 

8« Seb Quiae Khun by Sadiq Hidayat. 

9. DilDadaganbyShajuddinShifa. 


315 


492 


text-books in ARABIC FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(three- year) degree examination, 1959-60 


Paper IJ^Orammar and Rhetoric: 

Oronmar^ 

10. Persian Graxnmar, Prosody and Rhetoric, by Platts 

11 , Kanzul Balaghat by Jalauddin Ahmad Jafari. 

paper IIJ--^Htstory of Literature and Literary Criticism: 

History of Literature--* 

12. A History of Persian Literature by E. G. Biownc, Vol. 11 . 
Literary Criticism’-^ 

13. Navisandagan-e-Buzarg by Nasrullah Fulsafi. 

14. Darya-c-Gauhar by Dr. Meddi, Vol. I only. 

paper JV^-^Pr escribed Author: 

Ibus Sina. 

Books recommended*^ 

15. Zindagani-o-Andisha-o-Kar-c-Pur-i-Sina by Sayced Nafisi. 

Oroup B (Ancillary). 

(Examination in 1959.) 

Any one of the following subjects : — 

I. Cultural History of minor Persian Dynasties from 
Samanids to the end of Seljuqs. 

Paper I— 

The Samanids and their successors. 

Books recommended for study—* 

Khulasat al Akhbar by Khound Mir. (Maqala Hashtum- First 
half). 

paper Jl—* 

The Seljuqs. 

Books recommended for study— 

Khulasat-al Akhbar by Khound Mir (Maqala Hastuin— Second 




TEXT-BOOKS IN ARABIC FOR B A. AND B SC. 493 
(THREE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS^ 1959-60 

2. Cultural History of the Post-Mongol Period. 

Paper /— • 

Shah Ismail to Shah Abbas. 

Paper //-— 

Shah Safi to Sultan Hussain. 

Books recommended for study — 

Tarikh-c-Iranby Malcum Khan. 

3. Arabic. 

Paper / : 

Prose and Poetry*^ 

Majaniul Adab. Vol. II (First half only). 
paper Il'-^Oratnmar 

Saif-i-Alir and Navh Mir Or 
Teach yourself Arabic by Tritton. 

Translation from Arabic into English and Vicc-Vcrsa. 

No book is prescribed. 


Ara bic. 

Part III-— Branch XII— Arabic. 

Oroup A {Main) , 

(Examination in i960) 

paper [•^Prescribed Texts in Prose and Poetry: 
prose 

1. Al-Quran-Surat al-Kisaj Surat al-Ma*ida and Surat al- 

An*ain, 

2. Al-Itqanby Suyuti, Vol. I only (Egyptian Edition). 

3. Sahih al-Bukhari (Kitab al-Iman and Kitab al-Ilm only). 

4. Ghunyaral-Talibin by al-Jili. (First fifty pages only of the 

Egyptian Edition.) 

poetry’^ 

5 . Diwan Omar Ibn Abi Rabi’a (Radif AHf and Ba only.) 

6. piwanAbaiaPAthiyah— Radif :tnim<^ly. 



494 


TEXT-BOOKS IN ARABIC FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(three-year) deoree examinations, 19S9-60 

Non^detailed-^ 

7. Tarikh al Khulafa by Suyuti. 

Paper II-^Grammar and Rhetoric: 

Grammar^ 

8. Al-Navh al Wadeh-Thanavi. 

(Volumes I to III Ma*arif Press, Cairo publications.) 

Rhetoric — 

9. Al-Balaghat al Wadeha (Ma’arif Press, Cairo, publications.) 

Paper II History of Arabic Literature ajid Literary Criticism: 

10. History of Arabic Literature by Nicholson. 

Literary Criticism’-* 

11. Fi al-Adab al-Jahili by Dr. Taha Husain. 

12. A. Shihab al-Rashid by Lutfi Juma. 

Paper IV^ Prescribed Author: 

Ibn Bajiah al-Andhalusi. 

Book recommended-^ 

Ibn Bajjah al-Andaluis by * Umar Fsr'Uiih * 

Group B {Ancillary Subject), 

(Examination in 1959) 

Paper /— 

History of the Arabs. 

Pre-Islamic Period. 

Books recomfnended’-’^ 

Sannajat al- arab fi Taqaddumat al-Arab by Naufal BfTenJi. 
Paper 

Post Irfamic Period up to 850 A.D. 

Books recommended-^ 

1. AI-Mawahib al-Ladunniah by al-Qastalani. (Al-Maqtad al- 
Awwal). 

2 . Mnhadar^tal Taril* al-Umam*ai-lslaihiA^ by IChidri Bek. 




TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B SC. 495 

(three-year) peqrbe examinations, 1959-60 

TamU. 

B.A* & B.Sc. 

PART II (a) — Tamil, 1959 
(Papers I and //) 

Paper J-^Poetry and Orammcir : 

Poetry^ Selections published by the University of Madras — 

1. Girupanarrupadai ... 268 lines. 

2. IHirananuru ... 200 lines from Kapilar’s verses 

3 Knruntokai ... 50 lines 

4. Tirukkural ... 100 lines (Kmiceyalvakai, Ulavu, 

NalkuravUj Iravn and Ira vac- 
cam). 

5. Ghilappadhikaram ... 216 lines (Kadnkan kathai). 

6. Ghintamani ... 312 lines from Kemaccariyar 

Illajmpakam. 

7. Periyapuranam ... 400 lines from Taduttatkonda- 

puranam. 

8. Kambaramayanam ... 400 lines from Valivadaip pata- 

1am. 

9. Desikavinayakam 

P ilia i’s Umarkay yam. 160 lines. 

10. Thanippadalkal .. 80 lines from Tanippadal Tilirauu 

Granwwar— The following syllabus is prescribed— 

Sctndki: Valleluttu mikumidam, mikavidam. 

Na-Na, La-La tiribukal. 

Udanpattu mey, 

Kurriyalukarasn kedal. 


319 



49t> TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL TOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(THREE- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 19S9-6Q 

Vikaram Tondral, tir idal, keduthal. 

Ceyyul vikaram ani: 

Mudarkurai, Idaikkurai, Kadaikkurai. 

ChorrodJLfiyal: Vinari, Peya Vina, payanilayatal. 
Veriumaitrokai. Alvalittokaikal. 

Tamil Marabum pira marabnm. 

AnkilaccorrOtarai otti amaintha tavaraiia valakkukal. 

Valti vamaithikal ; Kalavaluvama itb i . 

Idavaluvamjiith i . 

Palvaluvamaithi — Matippuppanniai . 
iVlarab u valu vama i t h i . 

Iraitaikkilavi. 

Adukkuttodar. 

V 

Ennummai, Eccavummai, Murrommai, Izhivuchirappu, UyaV- 

vuchirappu. 

Chorrodarkkurikal: Mcrkol kurikal, Piraikkotu valankal, Veyyu- 
kiirikal. 

Arnki valankal. 

ChoHiyal : Peyar : Tinai pal unarttum murai— Vikutikal. 

Vinai— Kalam unarttum murai— Itainilaikal. 

Peyarecham— ‘V inaiyeccain— Murreccam. 

Eval Viyankol— ‘Vikutiakal. 

Tolirpeyar— ‘Vinaiyalanaivoim peyar. 

Palpaka akrinai. 

Cheyappattuvinai valaukum murai. 

Pakupata uruppukkal. 

Idaichol— Urichol— Tisaichol— Vadachol. 

Akupcyar (Vakaikalainthu), 

Tan, Tam— Idappeyarkal, Itaichorkal, 

Porul: Akan>— Elu tinai. Mutual Kara Uri, 

Puran>— Panniru tinai. 

Tinai Mayakkam. 

Yappu: Vennba— Rural vennba—Asiriyappa. 

Vtruttam, 

Ethukai, Monai, Muran Tokaikal. 

Fadathil varupa pira pa vakaikalum pira yappu tiayangahim. 
Meyppatukal: Encuvaimattum. 


3Z0 



TEXT-BOOICS IN'^TAMIL FOR B A. AND B.SC, 497 
(THRfeE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

Ani: (Vakaika venta). 

Tanmai. 

Uvfiunai. 

Uruvakam. 

Veruuiiai. 

Vc n ii ppor u 1 va i p pu . 

Tarkurippcrram. 

Piritumolital (Otiu). 

Pinvarunilai. 

Iraicci-Ullurai. 

Pilai tiruitam p^iyircikal. 
liakkiyat tamilum ccytittal tamilum. 

Qru-Or : Valankum idankal. 

Aiu-Aktu: Valankum idankal. 

Tan^Tatn : Valankum idankal. 

Anru, Alla, Allan mutaliyavai Valankal. 

Venta— Vcntam. 

Ra, Ra— . VerupaJu— Aticcx>rkalal ariyujninurai. 

La, La— Verupadiw- 
Ksa, tea. 

Na,Na. 

Acarku, Atarkku. 

Avarkku, Avarku, Parpala, Palppala, Katkuti Katkkuti. 

Note — The hundred marks allotted for this Paper I, shall be distri- 
buted between Poetry and Grammar in the proportion of So :20. The 
questions on Grammar shall be based on ihc syllabus correlated with 
the Poetical Selections prescribed. 

Paper II 

Drama and Proses 

Drama: Manonmaniyam by Sundaram Pillai (S.S.W.P. House, 
Madras). 

Pr0s&>^ 

I. Anpumuti by T. P. Meenakshisundaram (T.P.M. Jubilee 
Commemoration Committee, Ghintadripet). 


3 91 



498 TEXT-»OOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(three- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS^ 1959^60 

2. Ccntamiikatturaikal by Venkatachalam Pillai (Palaniappa 

Bros.). 

Note »-.The marks shall be distributed in tbe proportion of 8o : 20 
between the Essay type questions and the questions on annotations. 

Part II (^)— Tamil, i960. 

{Paper III) 

Paper IJI^ 

Translation^ Composition and u G-u^ril History ot Tamil 
Literature. 

Books recomtnended for ‘ A General History of Tamil Linraiure,^ 

1. Murkalappirkalattamil pulavar by Maraimalai Adikal 
(S.S.W.p. HousCj Madras). 

2. Sankakalattamilum ,Pirkalattamilum by Dr. Swaminatha 
Aiyar (Theagaraja Vilas, Tiruvatteeswaranpet, Madras). 

3. Ilakkiya Varalaru by K. Subrahmanya Pillai (S.S.W.P- 
House, Madras). 

Notfi I.*— Questions should not be based on these texts* but should 
be of general nature on the History of Tamil Literature. Questions 
should not be asked tofix the dates of Poets, etc. 

Note 2..— There shall be three Parts in the Question Paper, the 
first Part on Translation from English to Tamil, the second Part on 
General Composition and the third Part generally on ‘A History of 
Tamil Literature.’ The marks shall be distributed in the proportion 
of 40 : 30 : 30. 


B.A. 

Part III— Branch XII— Tamii.. 

Papers I and 11. 

Paper /— 

History of Tamil History and Developments of 

various trends and their changes in the subject-matter idiom, rhythm 
and versification and other modes of expression generally, all through 
the ages and in particular from age to age or century to century: — 

I. The condition of literature as may be gleaned from Tol- 
kappiyam. 


32 ^ 



TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 499 

(THREE- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

2. Gankam period: Characteristics of Gankam Literature— 
the conception of Tokai and the absence of Epic before Cilappati- 
karam. 

3. The eighteen ctiiical works— their general trends and 
characteristic features — inter-relations ^influence of Kural and its 
place in Tamil Litcrunre— The relationship beiween Kilkkanakku 
snd Melkanakku — the later Ethical Literature and their relation- 
ship with Kilkanakku. 

4. Growth of Epics— Gilapaiikkaram— its relationship with 
Gankam Ag“— its influence on later day literature— its relationship 
with Manirnekalai. 

5. The so-called major and minor five epics— i criticism of 
this conception from the historical and literary point of view. 

6. Kamba Ramayanam— its age— characteristic features— 

importance and influence. 

7. Periyapuranam— its age— characteristic features— impor- 

tance and influence. 

8. The later Sihalapuranas. 

9. The various kinds of prabandams— their rise and develop- 
ment in general with an explanation of the influences shaping them. 

10. The folk song influencing literature from time to time. 

11. The history of drama— Kuravimchi, Pallu, Nondi Natakam, 
Kirthanai natakam— Foreign dramas and their influence— Modern 
Dramas and Radio Dramas and Cinemas. 

12. Prose— Development from the earliest Age to the modern 

times. 

13. Modern trends and modern kinds of literature. 

14. Religion and Philosophy in Tamil literamre— the 
development and varieties. 

15. The general trends of the Cankam age, of the Pallava 
age^ of the later Colas of the later Pandyas* of the Vijayanagar period 
and of the period of the Western influence. 

16. The contributions of the various religions and their 
institutions (Mutts), etc., to Tamil literature. 

Books recommended. 

1. K. S. Srinivasa Pillai— Tamil Varalaru, Parts I and II. 

2. K. Subramania Pillai— Ilakkia Varalaru. 


399 



500 TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B A. AND B.SC. 

(three*year) degree examinations, 1959-60 

3 . Somasundara D-sikar— i6th Century Tamil Poets > iTth 
Century Tamil Poets . 

4, Pandai Tamil IJakkiya Varalaru by SaJasiva Pandarat- 
tar — (a) 300-600 A.D.; (h) 13th, 14th and 15th Centuries. 

Paper II — History of Tamil Nad and Culture — 

I. History^ 

1. Sources of O-ir study. 

2. Influence of geography oi\ h‘ story— Historical divisions 
of the country in the various periods. 

3. The culture of the earliest inhabitants ►—Old Stone Age- 
New Stone Age— Race types— Linguistic and Cultural affinities— 
Megalithic monument 1— Rock paint ingt— Painted pottery. 

4. Pre-Gankam history and Culture— Cankam Age— ^Foreign 
contacts. 

5. Post-Gankam period— Kalabhra 5 Foreign influence— 
Pallavas conflict with the North and the South— the Pandyas, 
Mutharaiyas, Irikkuvel; the Religious condition— Village cammu- 
nity and Local-Self Government Polity. 

6. The Later Colas— 'their growth — Conflict with other 
powers— their influence in and outside India— The Rise of the 
Later Pandya Power— the conflict of the Cholas, Pandyas, Hoysalas 
and Yadavas. 

7. The fall of the Tamil Political Power— influence of Vijaya- 
nagar Rulers, Nayaks, Marattas— 'the development of Western and 
Muslim influence— the Palayagars. 

8. The struggle for Freedom— Gandhian Era. 

IL Culture-^ 

The Social and Economic conditions— Literature— Religion 
and Philosophy— Painting— Sculpture— Iconography— A rchiiccturc 
—Music and other Fine Arts— Handicrafts — Polity, Custom and 
Law, all forming a distinctive Culture, developing from Age to Age, 
influenced by and influencing others. 

Books recommended-^ 

1 . Ten Indiyac-cirpankal by Kaiiakarathnam. 

2 . Alaku Kala ikal by Seen Venkata s wamy. 

3. South Indian History by K.Nilakanta Sastry. 





TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 501 
(three- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

4. Tamils i,8oo years ago by Kaaakasabai Pillai. 

5. Contributions of South India to Indian Culture by S. K. 
Aiyangar. 

Note.— ‘T he Questions on Political History shall bear 40 marks 
and the questions on culture shall bear 60 marks. 

{papers III to 1//— 1960.) 
paper III 

Prescribed Texts /— 

1 . PerumbanatuppaJi— 248 lines. 

2. Tirukkural-Araciyai— 500 lines. 

3. Purananuru, Vol. 51-100—635 lines, 

4. Cilappatikaram— (a) Urkan Katai, (6) Ataikkalakkaihai 
and (c) Kolaikkalakkathaj— 658 lines. 

Paper IV 

Prescribed Texts II — 

1. Kambaramayanam— 'Katchi Niiuhai and LJrukkattu* 

paialams— 1,104 lines. 

2. Villipuiiurar Baraiham — • Kan Javadhahanaccarukkam— 

304 lines. 

3. Tiruvilaiyadalpuranam— Parancothiyar — Virakuvirapatalam 
— lotal 280 lines, 

4. Tiruvembavai and Tiruppayai— 200 lines, 

5. Cckkilar Pillaittamil— *isi five in each of the 10 paruvams 
—200 lines. 

paper V 

Grammar^ Prosody and Poetics^^ 

I . Natmul Kandikai urai— Arumukha Navalar. 

2 Yapparunkalakkarikai— Old Commentary. 

3. Dandiyalankaram— Porulani lyal— General study without 
details of classifications. 

Note.— T he questions on Grammar shall bear 40 marks: Ques- 
tions on Prosody 30 marks and Questions on Poetics 30 marks . 

$25 

64 



502 


TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

( three- YEAR ) DEGREE E XAM I NATIONS, 1959-60 

Paper . VI 

History of the Tfml Language and Elemnts of the Dravtdiati Coftf 
pcrative (dammar ^ 

I. Syllabttsjor the History of the Tamil Language 

G€nt:rJ/— ‘The place of Tamil in the Dravidian family of 
Languageb-— ‘Its high antiquity— I ls geographical area in ancient 
times— ihe Centamil and Kotmtamil Couniies— Very early cultiva- 
tion of Tamil— The three Cankams. 

The Periods of Tamil Languoite — ‘’Ihc Old Or Cankam 
ramil— The Mediaeval Tamil and the Alodcrn Tamil— 111 istrativc 
Literature of each Feriod— Grammars of the different Periods— The 
extent of Foreign influence on Tamil Grammars. 

VovvcL— I'hcir relationship to the primitive 
Dravidian. Vowel system— History of Vowels— Accent and 
Emphasis— Kisiiig, Falling and Vanishing Accents— Influence of 
accent on Word change and in Prosody Alapedai— Mutation of 
Vowels— Vowel Ho-rmony— Vov;el Sandhi— Glides. 

Consonatits^Theiv relation to the Primitive Consotiants— 
History of Consonants— Mi lations of Consonants, Palatalization, 
Dentalization, Voicing, Unvoicing, Consonant length. Assimilation, 
Alapedai — Consonantal Sandhi, 

Laws of Tamil Diflcicnce between Tolkap- 

piam and Nannul — Light on the Nature of Loan words. 

MorphoJogy\—-¥lis\OTic^\ treatment in the Old and Modern 
Tamil of the following— Nouns— Fronouns— Case, the Verbs, The 
Passive Voice, The Moods— Imperative, Infinitive, Subjunctive. 
The Tenses—- The tense-formation— The principles of their use— 
Negative partich. The Relative and Verbal Participles. 

Word Building. — By Composition— Compound words 
(Tokai, Ummai, Uvamai, cicj— By Derivation— By Root creation— 
Back formation— Double bases, etc. 

Vocabulary--^i:hc general character of Tamil Vocabulary at 
different Periods— Borrowings— Their causes— Doublets— Tclugu 
and Kannada Elements in Tamil— Loss of Old words— Nature 
and extent— Sanskrit words— Tatsamas—Tadbhavas (Rules regard- 
ing these)— Prakrit borrowings- Manipravala style— Other borrow- 
ings (Hindi, Portuguese, English, etc.)— Hybrids— Tests distin- 
guishing words. 



503 


TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(three-year) degree examinations, 1959-60 

<;hanges irt the meantiig of words— ‘Elevation, 
Degradation^ Specialization and Generalization from age tjh age. 

Historical. Study of the order Of words in a Sen- 
tence— Deviation from the Normal— Causes— Difference between 
the Syntax Poetry and Prose— Foreign influence in Tamil Syntax. 

2. Syllabus for the EhfnetUs of the Dravidian Comparative 
Grammar: Dravidian Language Dravidian Group of Langu- 
ages and their chief characteristics— Enumeration of the Dravidian 
Languages. 

Dravidian Ehonology-^TYvi. Primitive Dravidian Parent 
Language— Vowel System— Changes— Accent— Harmonic sequence 
of Vowels— System of Consonants— Origin of Cerebrals (Retroflex 
♦—Dialectic interchange of Consonants — Euphonic permutation of 
Consonants— Sandhi— Nasalization Prevention of Hiatus— Dravidian 
Syllabation. 

Cemamil and Kotumamil. 

Morphology--~-’^hc Noiui. 

Gender— Dravidian Nouns divided into two Classes 
denoting Rationals and Irrationals. 

Number— Singular and pi iral— No Dual— Singular- 

Masculine, Feminine and Neuter— Plural— Pi inciples of plural ization. 

Case— Principles of Gase-foriniiioa— Dravidian Cases— 
Comparison with Sanskrit Cases. 

The pronoun — Pronouns of the First and Second Person- 
Comparison of Dialects — The Reflexive Pronoun— Pluralizuion 
of the Personal and Reflexive Pronouns— Demons rrative and 
Interrogative Pronouns— Their bases— Demonsiraiivc and Interro- 
gative Adjectives and Adverbs— Honorific Demonstrative Pronouns. 

The Structure of the Dravidian Verbs— Roots used 

cither as Verb or Nouns— Formative Particles often added to Roots— 
Qassification of Verbs. 

Casual Verb— their formation. 

Frequentative Verbs. 

Gonjugational System— Formation of the Tenses— Their 
signiflcance and force— The Present Tense— The Preterite Tense— 
The Future Tense— The Verbal and Relative Participles. 

Formation of Meads— Methods of forming the Condi- 
tional, the Imperative and the Infinitive . 


3^,7 



504 TEXT-BOOKS IN TELDOU FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(three- YMR) PEOREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 

. The Voice— ^ive and Passive— The Negative Voice— 
CombinttiOQ of Negative Panicles with Verbal themes— The Dravi- 
dian Negative Particles. 

Formation of Verbal Nouns, Derivative Nouns and Abstract 

Nouns. 

Comparative The S\’ntax of the several Languages 

compared— The extent of Foreign influence over the Syntax of the 
several Languages. 

Note.— The Questions on the History of the Tamil Language shall 
carry 50 marks and the Questions on the Elements of the Dravidian 
Comparative Grammar shall carry 50 marks. 


Telugu. 

B«A. and B.Sc. 

Part II (d)— T elugu, 1959. 

(Papers I and ID 
Paper J. 

A. Old Poetry---* 

1. Tikkana—Udyogaparvam— Krishna Rayabaram— Cantos 3 

and 4. 

2. Srinatha— Haravilasam— Ghirutondanambi Katha— Canto 2. 

3 . Dhurjati— Sri Kalahasti Mahaimyam— Nalkiruni Katha. 

B. Modem Poetry^ 

J«ndhyala Papaya Sastry-Vij«ya Sri (Telugu Pandit, A.G College, 
Guntur). • * ev-j 


Paper JI, 

C. Drama--* 

l. Vedam Venkataraya Sastry— Vikramorvasiyam (V Venkata- 

^^t^y Bros., 4, Mallikcswara Gudi Lane, Lingi Chetty Street, 

« I.' Venkata Krishna Sarma-Urubhangam Telugu 

Pandit, S.K.P.D. High School. Madras-r. "“Bam lemgu 





TEXT -BOOKS IN TELUOU FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 505 
(three -year) degree examinations, 1959 60 


D. Prose-^ 

Duwuri Ramireddi— Straswatft Vyastmulu (Kavikokila Publi- 
cations, Nellore). 

B. Ofomf/iur, Prosody and Poetics'^ 

According to the Syllabus prescribed (Vide pp. 450 - 1 , University 

Calendar, Vol, II. 1953-54 Granunar: Scope Kavya... 

doshas and gtuias). 


Pakt II {b ) — Telugu, i960. 
{paper 111) 


F. Noft^detailed Prose^ 

Ghiramananda Svanoir-Sri Rama Krishnuni Jecvita Ghattria 
(Sri Ramakrishna Seva Samaiam, Morrispeta, Tenali). 


B.A. Degree. 

Part III— Branch XII— Telugu, 1959. 

^Papers I and II) 

Paper /. 

I . History of Telngu Literature--^ 

The following books arc prescribed for consultation only; 

1 . Khandavilli Lakshmiianjanam— Andhra Vangmaya Charitra 
sangiaham (author. Head of the Department of Telugu, Osmania 
University, H>^derabad). 

2 . Vangiiri Subbarao— Andhra Vangmaya Charitra. (V.Nara- 
simha Rao, Kamala Kutecr, Narasapur, West Godavari district). 


Paper 11, 

2 . History of Andhra Desa and Andhra CtUture-^ 

According to the Syllabus prescribed. 

Inscriptions— (I to 10 ) published by Jayanti Ramayya Pantulu 
(Telugu Academy, Kakinada.) 


3^9 


506 TfiXT-BOOKS IN TEJ-UGU FOR B,A. AN0 B SC. 

(three-year) degree examinat ions^ 1959-60 

(papers III to 

Paper III, 

3 . Prescribed Text books /— 

1. Old Poetry-^ 

1. Nannichoda--Kiiinara Sambhavam, Parvatiparinayam 
Cantos 7 and 8. 

2. Palkuriki Somantha— Dvipada Panditaradhya Gharltra— 
Sura Sananuna Katha. 

3. Pingaii Suranna — ^Kalapurnodayamu— *Gant08 i and 2— 
(Without the avatarika or the introiuctory verses.) 

4 . Kankanti Paparajii— Uttara Ramayanamu— Sita Vana- 
vasagamanamu. 

2 . Modem Poetry’-^ 

1. T. Sivasankara Sastri—‘Dikshita Duhita (Saras vat i Nlketa- 
namu, Vetapalern, Guntur District). 

2. C. Narayana Reddi—Nagarjuna Sagar (6i, M, L. A. 
Quarters, Hyderabad.) 


Paper IV, 

4 . Prescribed Text-books //— 

1 . Dramas 

1. V. Subbarayadu—Venisamharamu. (V. Hswaravara 
Prasada Rao, near Government Training College, Innespeta, Rajah- 
mundry. East Godavari District.) 

2 . Chilakamarti Lakshminarasimliam“-<Jayopakhyanam 
(Kondapalli Viravenkayya, Book Sellers, Rajahmundry, East Godavari 
district). 

2 . Prose^ 

Veturi Prabhakara Sastri— Meegada tarakalu (Veturi Sankara 
Sastri, Arsha Rasayana Sala, Muktyala, Krishna District). 

Paper K 

5 . Qratnfnar^ Prosody and Poetics — 

1. Chinnayasuri Balavyakarnamu— Tatsaxna, Acchika and 
Kriya Paiicchedamulu. 

2 . Bahujanapalli ^itararaacharyula— •Proudha Vyakaranam, 
Sandhi, Sobda, Karaka and Kriya Paricchedamulu. 


330 


TEXT-BOOKS IN KANNADA FOR B.A. AND B.SC- 507 

(three-year) degree examinations, 1959-60 


3 . Narasabhupaliyam— Cantos 3 and 5. 

4. Appakaviyam— Canto 3. 

5. K. Anantacharyulu— Dasarupakamu. 

Paper VJ, 

6. History of T^lugu Language and Elements of the 
Comparative! Oraynfnar of the Dravidian Languages according to the 
Syllabus prescribed. 


Kannada. . 

B.A. and B.Sc. 

Part II (a>— K annada, 1959 

/. Old Poetry 

(a) Pampa Bharata 12th Aswasa (221 Stanzas) (Published by 
th6 University). 

(b) Gada Yuddha by Rann'»— 7th and 8th Aswasas (68 + 67== 
135 stanzas) (Published by the University). 

//. Mediaeval Poetry 

(a) Jaimini Bharata — Sandhis i, 2 and 3 ^ omitting stanzas 7 , 9, 
lO and 29 in Sandhi 3 . (Published bv the University). 

(b) Mcgha Sandesha by Kiikkc Subrahmanya Shastry (Kavya- 
laya, Mysore). 

HI, Drama 

Shakuntala by Basappa Shastry. 

IV. Old Prose 

Ramaswamedha (Muddana)*— Chapters i3> 14, 15 and 16. 

K Modem Prose 

(a) Samskrit by D. V. Gun Jappa. 

(b) Pracliina Sahitya by T. S. Venkannaya. 

Oramnar 

Portions relating to Grammar in Kannada Kaipidi (Mysore Univer- 
sity Publica* jon). 




508 TEXT-BOOKS IN KANNADA FOR B.A. AND B.SC, 
(THREE -YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 


VII, History of Literature 

An accoiint of the life and words of the following authors together 
with those of the prescribed works:— 

1. Nagachandra. 

2. Rudra Bhatta. 

3 . Akka Maha Devi. 

Harihara. 

5. Chatu Vithalanatha. 

6. Ratnakara Varni. * 

Part II (b ) — Kannada, i960. 

(Paper ///) 

VIII, Kon-detailed study 

(a) Avyakta Manava by K. S. Haridasa Bhat (M. G. M. College, 
Udipi). 

(b) Odahuttidavaru by K. S. Karantha (Puttur). 

Part III— Branch XII— Kannada, 1959 

(Papers / and //) 
paper I 

History of Literature'-^ 

Kannada Sahitya Gharitre by Dr. R. S. Mugali (For consul- 
tation: Kavi Charite, Volumes i and 2 by Narasimhachar). 

Paper // 

History of K<imataka and Culture-^ 

1, Kannada Nadina Gharitre, parts 1 to 3 (Kannada Sahitya 
Parithat, Bangalore). 

2. Popular Gulture of Karnataka by Masti Venkatcsiengar. 

For Consulttttion--^ 

1. Heritage of Karnataka by R. S. Mugali. 

2 . Karnataka Darshana (Gommcmoration Volume in honour 
of It. R. Diwakar). 



TEXT-BOOKS IN KANNADA FOR B-A. AND B SC. 509 
(THREE-YEAR) DEOREE EXAMINATIONS, 19 S 9--60 


Paperg III to F/— 1960. 
paper HI. 

Prescribed Text-book^ /— 

1. Adipurana (Pajnpa)— 14th Aswasa (149 stanzas). 

2. Kabbigara Kava (Andayya). 

3. Sri Rama Partabhisheka by Mahalakshmi. 

4. Chitrangada by K. V. Puttappa. 

Paper /F. 

Prescribed Text-books // — 

1. Ramaswajnedha, Chapters i to 7. 

2. Veni Samhara Nataka Prati Kirti. 

3. Bhasa Bharata Chakra by L. Gundappa. 

4. jeevana Soundarya mattxi Sahiiya by D. V. Gundappa. 

5. Rayachur Vijaya Krishnappa (Vasaniiia Aialike Publication, 
Mangalorc-3). 

paper V. 

Orammar^ Prosody aftd Poetics — 

1 . Sabdasmriti by Nagavarma. 

2, Portions relating to PrOsoJy and Poetics fiom Kannada 
Kaipidi (Mysore University Publications). 

Paper VL 

History of Language cmd Fletnents of the Dravidian Comparative 
Orammar : 

1 . History of Kannada Language by Narasimhachar. 

2. Kannada Bhasha Shastra by R. Y. Dharwadkar. 

B. Kannada Vamagalu by Sediyapu Krishnan Bhat (Kannada 
Research Institute, Dhar^r), 

sss 


65 



510 TBXT-BOOKS IN MAtAYALAM FOR B.A. AND B,SC. 
(THRBE-YEAR) degree EXAMINATIONS, 1959*60 


Malayalam* 
and B.Sc. 

Part II (a) — ^Malayalam, i9,>9 
(Papers 1 & //). 


Paper f. 


I & 2 . Niianam works and ... Published by the University. 
Cherusseri. 


3 . Unnayi Variyar 

4 . Vallathol ... 


5. Asan 


6. Balamani Amma ... 


Nala char itrain— Nalamdi vasam 
(Mathrubhumi Edition). 

Abhigjana Sakimta lam— Published 

by Vallathol Granthaiayam, 
Cheruthurithi. 

Chintavishtayaya Seetha— Pub- 
lished by Sarada Book Depot, 
Alwaye. 

Levant bar angal il — Publi shed by 
Mathrubhumi Printing and 
Publishing Co., I^d., Kozhi- 
kode. 


7- C. H, Kunhappa ... ... Vicharakorakam— Published by 

Gannanore Printing Works, 
Caxmanore. 

8. Kuttikrishna Marar ... Sahitya Vidya— Published by 

P. K. Brothers, Kozhikode. 


Paper //. 

Nm^detailed^ 

X, P. K. Parameswaran Nayar. Mahatma Gandhi— Published by 

The National Book Stall, Kotta- 
yam. 

3|. AttUf Krishna PisharOti ... Kerala Katha, Part II— Published 

by R. T. Bhattarak Brothers, 
" ^ Sri ThiJaktm, Trichur, 




TEXT-BOOKS IN MALAYALAM FOR B.A. AND B.SC. $11 
(THREE- YEAR) PEOREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959-60 


Part U (()— Malayalam. i 960 . 

Paper ///— 1960. 

An outline of the History of Malayalam Literature. 

No text-books prescribed. 

ConstUtation by Teachers^ 

I* Pradakshinani By Dr. C. A. Menon. 

2. Adhunika Malayala By P. K. Parameswaran Nayar. 

Sahiryam. 

Part III— Branch XII— Malayalam. 

Papers I and f/— * 1959 . 

Paper /. 

History of Literature-^ 

(A study of only the outlines of the History of Malayalam Literature 
is cxpectco). 

The following books arc prescribed : 

1. Dr. C. A. Menon ... Prsdakshinam, Published by The 

Lokavani Publication— Tam- 

baram. 

2. P. K. Parameswaran Adhunika Malayala Sahityam— 

Nayar. Published by Sri Rama Vilasam 

Press, Trivandrum. 

Books recommended for consultation 

1. Ullur S. Paramea- Kerala Sahitya Charimm— 

wara Iyer. (A pans) Published by the 

University of Travancore* 

2. T. M. Chummar ... Bhasha Gadya Sahitya Ghariuam— 

Published by National Book 
Stall, Kottayam. 


Paper // 

History of Kerala and Culturc^^ 

No Text-books prescribed 

Books recommended for conmUaiion^ 

I. The Chew Kings of the Sangam age by K. G. Sesha Iyer, 
a. Chronology ofthe early Tamils by K. N. Sivar8}a Filial. 



mi TBXT-BOOKS IN MALAYAtAM FOR B*A. AND B.SC. 
(THRBE^YEAR) PEOREE EXAMINATIONS, 1959*60 

3. Kerla Charithathile Iruladanja Edukal by flankulam Kimjan 
Pillai. 

4. Chila Kerala Charitra Parinamangal by Elankulam Kunian 
PiUaL (All Parts) 

5. History of Cochin, Volumes I & H by K. P. Padmanabha 
Menon. 

6. TranvancOi^ State Manual, Volum: II by T. K. Volu Pillai. 

7. Malabar Manual by Logan. 

8 . Malabar and the Portughese by K. M. panikkar, 

9. Malabar and the Dutch by K. M. Panikkar. 

10. The Portughese Pirates by O. K. Nambiyar. 

11. Koothum Kootiyattamum by Animaman Thampuran. 

12. Kootiyattam by Sri Nurayana Pisharoti. 

13. Keralathile Nadodi Natakangal, University Publication. 

14. Land of Perumals by Francis Day. 

Papers III to VI’^1960. 

Paper IJJ, 

Pfescribed ttxtdjooks I ( Upto including Ezhuthachchcat'y- 

1. Kamacharitram : First Edited by P. V, Krishnan Nayai . 

10 Pataiams. 

2. Kannassa Ramayanam Any Press. 

Balakandam: First 

100 Verses. 

3. Kuchela Qathi By Ghcrusscri— 400 Lines. 

4. Mahabharatani*-**Santhi By Thunchathu Ezhuthachchan. 

Parvanu 

5. Unnimeeli Sandesam, Any Editions, 

PoorVa Bhagam. 

6. Pracheena Malayala Edition by Dr. P. K. N. Pillai. 

Gadya Matrukakal. 

7. Uttara Ramayana By Cochin Bhasha Parishkarana 

C 3 Ed 7 iin> Part 1 . Committee. 

». . 

« ^999 



TEXT -BOOKS IN MALAYALAM FOR B.A. ANB B-SC. 513 
(THREE-YEAR) PEQREB EXAMNS» 1959-^0 


Paper IV, 


Prescribed text-brooks 11 {Post-Ezhuthachchan Period)--' 


1. Malayalam Kollam: By Kochuani Thampuran. 

First two Sargas. 

2. Kirmeera Vadham ... By Kottayathu Thampuran. 

3. UttaraRama Gliaritam... By Ghattukurti Mannadiar. 

4 Kamabhooshanam ... By Ullur S. Parameswara Iyer, 

Uilur Publication, Jagati, 
Trivandrum. 


5. Niramala 

6. Sahitya Vicharam 

7. Kalayum Kaiavum 


By Venni Vasu Pillai, National 
Book Stall, Koctayam. 

By M. P. Paul^ National Book 
Stall, Kottayam, 

By Dr. Bhaskaran Nayar. 


Paper V. 

Orammar^ Prosody avd Poetics-^ 

1. Grammar Kerala Paniniyam. 

Omitting Peciika and the detailed discussion of the various gram* 
maiical theories. Only the study of the principles to be 
emphasised. 

2. ProsOviy—Vritha Manjari. 

3. Poetics— Bhasha Bhooshanam. 


Paper VL 

History of Language and Elements of the Dravidkn Comparative 
Granunar. 

Prescribed-^ 

1. Kerala Bhashayutc By Blank ul am Kunj an Pillai. 

Vikasa-Parinamangai. 

2. Evolution of Malayalam. By Dr. A. G. Sekhar, 

Far cmmltation-^ 

Comparative Grammar of Dravidian Languages, by Dr. .Caldwell. 


3S7 




514 TBXr*BOOO IN ENOUSa FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(thrbb«year) degree examinations, 1960^61 

T#Bt*book8 for Parts If II an4 

Three -Year Degree Sxaiiifoi|tion8 

(1960-ii). 

B.A. & B.Sc. 

1960-61 

Part I (a) —English— 1960. 

(Papers / to III) 

Shakespeare — 

Much Ado About Nothing. 

King Lear. 

Poetry — 

The same as for 1959. 

Prose — 

The Art of Life— Macmillan. 

Essays of To-day— O.U.P. 

Part I (b)— English— 1961. 

{Paper IV) 

Non-Detailed Readings 
Silas Mamer. 

Modem Portrait Essays— Macmillan (Ed. M. Alderton Pink). 


B.A. 

PART III. 

Group A, 1961. 

(o) Shakespeare-- 

Richard III. The Tempest. (A general knowledge of the other 
ol Siiakespeare will be required.) 

if 

Drama: 

Krr Nan-Detailed Study- 
Tit. Faustus— Marlow. 

St Imiii (Bernard Shaw). 



TEXT -BOOKS IN ENGLISH FOR BA. AND B.SC. 515 

(three- year) degree examinations, 1960«-6I 


For Non-Detaikd^Feading — 

She Stoops to Conquer-^Goldsmith. 

The First and the Last — Galsworthy. 

The Admirable Crichton— J. M. Barrie (Longmans). 

Prose* 

For Detailed Study — 

Essays of Elia (First series). 

Essays by Modern writers: Jepson (Longmans). 

For Non-Detailed Reading — 

Evan Harrington: Meredith. 

Barchestcr Towers: Trollope. 

Poetry— 

Wordsworth’s ’Prelude’ — Book I 
and 

The following selections from Standard English Poems (Ed* 
Young and K. R. Srinivasa Iyengar) (O.U.P.) : — 

Milton: L’ Allegro and IL Pcnscroso. 

Pope: Epistle to Arbuthnot. 

Collins: Ode to Evening. 

Browning: Childe Roland to the Dark Tower came. 

The Last Ride Together. 

Arnold: Dover Beach. 

Yeats: The Tower. 

Brooke: Mcnclaus and Helen; Peace; Safety; The Dead; The 
Soldier. 

Hodgson: The Song of Honour. 

Lawrence: Snake. 

Note.— A general knowledge of the other poems of Wordsworth 
will be required. 

MB.— In all the four papers, credit will be given for a good genera) 
knowledge of English Literature. 


i S98 




516 TEXT -BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(THREE- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1960-61 

Group B — Ancillary, 

1960. 

1 . History of English Literature — 

Books recommended — 

(1) Lcgouis— A Short History of English Literature. 

(2) Compton — Rickett — Short History of English Literature. 

(3) Sampson, G. — ^A Concise History of English Literature, 

(4) Hudson — An Introduction to the Study of Literature. 

(5) Hudson — Outline History of English Literature. 

2. Social History of England-- 
Books recommended — 

Trevelyan — English Social History. 

B.A, Sc B.Sc. 

Part II (a) — Sanskrit— 1960. 

L Kalidasa's Sakuntala. 

2. Kalidasa's Megadhuta (Whole). 

3. Bharavi’s Kiratarjuniya — Canto 1 only. 

4. Dandin's Dasakumaracharita — Ucchvasas 2, 3 and 4 only. 

5. Bhamaha’s Kavyalankara— Chapters 1 to 3. 

The allocation of text-books for the three papers shall be as follows:— 

Paper I— 

Sakuntala, Megbadhuta and Kiratarjuniya, 

Paper li— 

Dasakumaracharita and Translation from Sanskrit Into English 
and English into Sanskrit. 

40 marks to be allotted (or prose-text and 60 marks for trani* 

ladon. 


8i0 



TEXT-BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A- AND B*SC. 517 
(THREE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1960-61 


Part II (b) — Sanskrit — 1961. 

Bhamahalankara — Poetics and History of Sanskrit literature; 
50 marks to be allotted for each subject. 

Text'books-^ 

Macdonell; History of Sanskrit Literature, Chapters X to XIV. 
Keith: Classical Sanskrit Literature — Heritage of India Series. 


B.A. 

Part III — Branch XII— Sanskrit—Section A. 

Examination for Papers / and U to be held in 1960. 

Paper / — 

Books of the later period / — 

1. Bhavabhuti's Uttararamacharita. 

2. Bhoja’a Campuramayana — Ayodhya Kanda only. 

3. Harsha Carita— Uocbvasa 3. 

Paper 1 Ancient Indian History and Culture upto 1000 A,D. 

Books reeommendkd for study — 

1. K. A. Neelakanta Sastri ; History of India, Volume I. 

2. Basham: The wonder that was India. 

Copies can be had of Orknt Longmans Sl Co., Madras -2. 

Books recommended for comultation — 

History and Culture of the Indian People, Bharathlya Vidhy| 
Bhavan, Bombay. (Volumes 1 to 6.) 

Examination for Papers III to Vi to he held in 1961. 

PtBter in--- 

Boides of the Early Period-^ 

1. Macdonell; VedicRead^: The following selections; — 

Agni 1. 1. 

Savitrl. 35, 




94i 




5t8 IN SAN$KaiX FOE BJk. ANO 

(tHRBB«*yBAR) OBQEEE EXAMINATIONS, 1960-^^1 

Maruts I. 85* 

Vism h 153. 

Funeral Hymn. X, 14. 

Pitaras X. 15. 

Gambler X. 34. 

YamaX, 135. 

2. Aitarcya-brahmana VII— 3 and 4. 

3. Kathopanishad — First Adhyaya — Text only. 

4. Gauthama Dharma Sutra— Text only—Chaptara 1 to 9. 
Government Press, Mysore or Anandasrama Press, Pooaa. 

Paper /F— 

Books of the Later Period //— 

1 . Mahabarata— Viduraniti— Pr^'agaraparva in Udyogaparvi--^ 
Q»pters 33 to 40. 

2. Patapjali’s Mababashya 1-M-. 

3. Bhagayadgita-~Cbapters I to 6. 

Paper F— 

Comparative Philology with special reference to Sanskrit, accord* 
tag to the existing syllabus for Grammar (historical) under Part II! 
Sanskrit and History of Sanskrit Literature— Vedic Pcnod only. 

Macdonell: History of Sanskrit Literature. 

^ WintemiU; History of Indian yterature (Volume I). 

Pern Vl^ 

Bkmeniidf Poetke, Of&mmar md Ituhm Lopk, 

L ]>8ndin*s Kavyadarsa— Pariccheda I. 

2» Giaiiiiiiar— Varadaraja's Madhya Sidhantalmumuillii^the 

<»i> Saiitiiia» paneasandhi and Karaka only (Cbovidcim 
look Benares). 

3, Aiiniiilbhatta*s Tarkasangraha with Nyayabodhloi 


Six 



TBXT^BOOKs IN SANSKRIT W)R B-A. AND B SC. 519 
(TBiBEE-YEAK) PEO RB E E XA MINATIO N S, 1960-61 

Part III — Branch xii — Section B — Sanskrit. 

Papers I and 11—1960. 

1. Prescribed text-books— General— Paper I — 

(i) VisvRoatha Pancanana — Muktavali with Dioakari of 

Sabdakhanda. 

(ii) Gauthama dharma Sutras — First nine Paricchedas. 

(iii) Manusmriti — Chapter 9. Text only. 

2. Prescribed text-books— General — Paper II — 

(i) Siddhanthakaumudhi— Purvardha only omitting Tadhita. 

(ii) Rig Veda. Macdoneirs Vcdic Reader, I to X hymns (both 
inclusive) — Text only. 

(iii) ICathopanishad— Text only. 

Papers in to Vi— 1961. 

3. Prescribed text-books — General Paper III — 

(i) Jaiminiya Nyayamalavistara from the beginning to the cad 
of Pada 3 in Chapter III. 

(ii) Miraamsa Nyayaprakasa of Apodeva. 

Special Part. 

1. Mimmnsa — 

Paper I. 

Taittiriya Samhita with Sayana's Bha&ya, Khanda 1, Praptlhaki. 

2. Apisthambd Srautha — Sutra with Rudradatta*s Vritti — Prasaas 
I to V (both inclusive). 


Paper IL 

Bhatta Dipika from beginning to end of the third Pada of the 
third. 

Adhyaya (Chapters I to 111). 

Aitreya Brahmana with Sayana Bhasya, fourth Panchika. 

Paper III. 

Bhatta Dipilui from the fourth Pada of Chapter IIL 


SA9 



520 TEXT*»OOKS IN SANSKKIT FOR B*A. AND B.SC. 
(tHRBE->YB AR) degree jm^INATIONS, I 96 0 >61 

3. Nyiiya-^ 

Paper I. 

GauUiama*s Nyaya sutras with Vatsyayanas Bhasya, Chaptcis 
1 and II. 

Kanada*s Vaiseshika sutras. Text only. 

Paper II. 

Jagadisa’s Panchalaksani and Simhavyaghri. 

Gadadhara’s Caturdasalaksani. 

(a) From beginning up to the end of the Dvitiyasyalaksara. 
(h) Kutaghatitalaksana. 

(c) Kutaghatitalaksana. 

(i/) Vyadhikarana-Dharmavacchinanabhava-Khandr na grantha. 
Paper III. 

Gadadhara’s Paksata; SARVABHIMANTA. 

Gadadhara*s Siddhantalaksana (whole). 


4. Vyakaram’^ 

Paper I. 

Paribhasandusekhara (whole). 

Paper li. 

Praudamanorama, Text from beginning to end of Avyayibhava. 
Siddhantakaumudhi Krt and Taddhita Sections. 

Paper III. 

Sabdaratna from beginning to end of Stripraayaya. 


5. Sttkitya — 

Paper I. 

Batia*8 Kadambari from Mahasveta Vrttanta to the end of Pur« 
vardha. 

Sri Harsha*8 Naisadha^ cantos 10 and 11. 

Ktitnaiasambhava, cantos 1 to 5 (inclusive). 

HUalcanthavlaya of Nilakantha Dikshitha, Uchvasa III only, 


fi4 



TEXT-BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A. ANd B.SC. 521 
(three-year) degree examinations, 1960-61 


Sakuntala. 

Malatimadhava. 

Mrcchakatika. 

Mudraraksasa. 


Paper II. 


Paper III. 

Dandin’s Kavyadarsa — Paricchcda I onl> . 

Kuvalayananda (whole). 

Siddhanthakaumudhi — Taddhitha — Apat>adhikara c nly . 
Dhananjaya — Dasarupaka with Avaloka. 

6. Jyotisha — 

Paper I. 

Bhaskara*s Rijaganita. 

Bhaskaracarya*s Lilavati — whole» omitting Parkarmastaka, 
Kuttaka and Pasa. 


Paper 11. 

fCshetramiti by Durgaprasada> Books 111 and IV only. 
Trikonamiti. 


Paper III. 

Goiaprakasa. Capiyatrikonamiti and Ooiarekhaganita only. 
7. Ayurveda*- 

Paper I, 

Astangahrdaya, Sarira, Nidana and Okitst sthanas. 

Paper 11. 

Carakesamita, Sutra and Sarira Sthanas. 

Pratyaksa Sarira by Mahamahopadhyaya Gananath Sen. 

Paper III. 

Raaarainasamuccaya, tirst eleven chapters. 




* ill ftXT^toots iM' SA^4Sl^n‘ Fok b.a. an» ».sc. 

(THkte-YBAlt) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1^60-6 1 


B.A. 

SANSKRIT. 

Part III. 

Branch Vlll — Indian Music (ikfo/ii). 

Ancillary Syllabus in Sanskrit— 1960. 

(i) Kalidasa's Raghuvamsa, Canto XI 1. 

(ii) Vikramarkacarita — Stories 1 to 4. Pages from about 25 to 40 

(iii) Frasody^ 

Elements of Sanskrit prosody — distinction into Matra, Vrtta 
and Qana Vrtta — The characteristics of the Vrttas — Anustubh 
UpiUati» Vamsastha, Vasantatilaka, Malini, Sikharint, Mandakranta, 
Sardulavikridita, Sragdhara, Dandaka. Arya— Examples of the more 
musical metres: Campakamala» Dodhaka and Totaka, Bhujaogapra* 
yata, Mattamayura, Tunaka and Citra, Panca-Camara, Mattakrida, 
Tanvi, Kraunchapada. Consult: Vrttaratriakara, Sraufabodha, 

Candbmaidari. 

(iv) 30 Sanskrit Musical Compositions — 

I. layadeva — 

(i) Pralayapayodhi jale — Introductory Dasavatra Astapadi. 

(ii) Lalitalavanga — ^First Astapadi. 

II. Narayanatirtha's Tarangas— 

(iii) Govinda Ghatya— Bhairavi. 

(iv) Puraya mama kamam — Bhilahari. 

III. Sadasiva Brahmendra — 

(v) Matiasa Sancarare (Sama). 

(vi) Bruhin Mukundeti. 

(vit) Tonga tarange. 

IV* Svati Tirunal— 

(viii) Sarasijanabha myrarc—Todi. 

(ix) Sarasaksa Paripalaya— Pantuvarali. 

(g) Kripaya palay^ Saurc-^arukesi, 

(li) Vande Sada Pj8tdmanablidm--Navarasa Kannada. 

h46 



TEXT-BOOKS IN HINDI POK B A. ANJ> B»EC. 523 

(tHUBB-YEAII) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 196<i-(^l 

V. Syama Sastri — 

(xii) iCanaka Saila Viharini — Punnagavarali. 

(xiii) Sankari Sam Kuru—Saveri. 

VI. Snanasami Sastri — 

(xiv) Sri Laiile— Bhairavi. 

VII. Tyagaraja — 

(xv) Girirajasutatanaya— Suddhabangala— Gancsa. 

(xvi) Varasikhivahana — Supradipa — Subrahmanya. 

(xvii) Nadatanumanisam—Cittaranjani— Siva. 

(xviii) Samajavaragamana — Hitidbla — Krishna. 

(xix) Sri Narada — Kanada — Narada. 

(xx) lanakiramana — Sudbasimantini — ^Rama. 

(xxi) Jayamangalam— Ghauta— Mangalani. 

VIII. Muttuswami Dikshitar — 

(xxii) Siddhivinayakam — Cannara or Shanmukhapriya — 

Ganesa. 

(xxiii) Vinapustakshidharini—Vcgavahini—Saraswati. 

(xxiv) Mahalakshmi kamnarasalahari — Madhava Manobari 

(raga) — Lakshmi. 

(xxv) Sri Subramanya Nyanamastc — Kambhoji — Subrah- 

manya. 

(xxvi) Sri Parvatipararoesvaran — Barali— Parvati and Para- 

meswara. 

(xxvii) Sri Daksbinamurte— Sankarabbarana — Dakshioamurthi. 
(xxviii) Kamalamba bhajare-^^Kalyani — Devi. 

(xxtx) Suryamurtc—Saurasbtra — Sun. 

(xxx) Mamava Pattabhiram—Maniranga— Rama. 

B.A. aoi BSt* 
im^6i 

Paet II (a)-rHiNoi-^1960, 
i-^FmcrBed Text^Books i^Foetry-^ 

Deiaikd Simfy* 

I. 8, A. Poatrir $al«atloii^i958*-^Publlaliad by the Unlvertity 
of Madras* 


94 f 



S24 text-books in HINDI FOR B.A. AND B SC. 

(THREE- year) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1960»61 

2. Mikn—IUiii Naresh Tripathi. 

3, Sudama Charit^-Narottam Das. 

Paper IJ — Prescribed Text-books II — Prose and Drama — 

Detailed Study--- 

1. Hindi Gadya Sanchaya — Mahairu Prasad (Publishers — 
Ram Narayan Lai, Allahabad). 

2. Raksha Bandhan— Had Krishna Premi. 

3. Chaturyuga (One Act Plays) — Prabhat Shastri. (Kau« 
sltfimbi Prakasham Darakapj, Allahabad^ 

fbr reference only — 

L Hindi Bhasha Aur Sahitya by Udai Narayan Tiwari. 

2. Kavya Pradeep — ^Ram Bahori Shukla. (Only those Alankaras 
and Chandas as pa* Syllabus). 

3. Vyakaran Pradeep— Ram Deo. 


Part II (b)— Hindi— 1961. 

Paper III — 

Non-detailed Texts — 

1. Nirmala— Prem Chand. 

2. Katha Kaumudi— Dakshioa Bharat Hindi Prachar Sabha, 
Madras. 

For reference otdy — 

1. Vigyan Ke Chamatkar— by Bhagwatiprasad Srimtava 
(Published by Gyan Mandal, Ltd., lOtshi). 

2. Hibandh Prabodh by Dr. Ram Ratna Bbatnagar (Published 
by Kitab Mahal* Allahabad). 


B.A. 

Pakt III— Branch XII— Hindi. 

Examinadon for Papers I and II to be hM in 1960. 

Paper I— 

Bl^my of Hindi Uteraiure-^ 

iJHIiids Sahitya Ka Itikas— by Dr. Ram Kumar Vertna. 

(It. W .1#- m ^ 


H9 




TBXT'BOOKS IN HINDI TOR B.A. AND 525 

B.sc. (threE’Year) dborbb examinations, 1960 - 61 

2. Hindi Kavya Vimarsh — by Sri Oulab Rai. 

3. Hindi Bhasha aur Sahitya — by Shyam Sundar Das. 

4. Hindi Sahitya Ka Itihas — by Pt. Ram Chandra Shi^la. 

5. Kavya Charcha— by Prof. Lalita Prasad SukaL 


Paper II — 

Indian History and Culture — 

1 . Itihas Pravcsh — Jaichandra Vidyalankar. 

2. Bharateeya Sankriti — Dr. Baldev Prasad Misiirm. 

Far reference only — 

1. History of India — K. A. Nilakanta Shastri. 

2. The Legacy of India — Edited by Garret. 

3. Bharateeya Sanskrit — Sri Ram Dhari Singh “ Dinkar.*’ 

4. Bharatvarsh Ka Sankshipta Itihas — University of Madras. 

Examination for Papers III to VI to be held in 1961 . 

Paper III-- 

Prescribed Text-books— I (Poetry ) — 
t. Kavya Kalanidhi^ — Baugeeya Hindi Parishad» Calcutta. 

2. Kavitavali (Omitting Uttar Kanda) — Tulasidas. 

3. Ounjan — Sumitra Nandan. Pant. 

Paper IV— 

Prescribed Text-bo<dcs — I! (Prose and Drama ) — 

L Oadya Kusum Mala— Ram Narayan La! A Co.. Allahabad. 

2. Ajatshatnj— Jai Shankar Prasad. 

3. Oaban^ — ^Prcmchand. 

4* Hindi ki Amar Kahanfyan— Edited by lagannath Prant) 
SlMunnt. 

5. Reshmi Tie—Ram Verma. 



5i6 nXT-BOOKS IN MABATHI FOR B«A. AND B.SC. 
(THitBB-YBAR) DEORBE EXAMINATIONS, 1960-61 


K— 

Fra9o4y and Potties — 

L Kavya PiBd€ep<— Ram Bahori Shukla. 

2. Alaiikar]mnjoosha-~l^aBhagwai) Oeen. 

3. Kavya Parichaya — by Chandra Shekar Shastri and Ram 
Chandra Sukla Saras/* 

Paper 

# 

History of Language and Grammar — 

1 . Hindi Bhasha Aur Sahitya — Shyam Sundar Das. 

2. Vyakaran Pradeep->Ram Deo (Hindi Bhavan, Aiiahabad). 

3. Sankshipta Hindi Vyakaran — Kamta Prasad Guru. 

(N(Pf#.—AU the papers shall be set and answered in Hindi.) 


B.A.& B.Sc. 

MARATHI. 

Part II (n)— 1960. 

{Papers I and If). 

Paper /—(Poetry, History of Literature, Prosody and Poetics). 

For Detailed Study. 

Poetri-— 

1. Moropant — Virathparva. 

2. Pacha Kavi— Edited by Rajadhyaksha. 

History of Marathi Literature — Books recommended— 

1. Maharashtra Saraswat (Chapters on Dyaneshwar, Wamaa 
by Bhave Pandit, Tukaram and Moropant). 

2. Marathi Sahityachi Ruparesha by Dr. U. P. Dandekar. 

Prssody and Poetia—*Books recommended— 

1. Alankara Chandrika by Gore, G. U. 

2. Vrittadarpanby P. B. Oodholc. 

paper //— <Prose, Drama and Grammar) — 

For Detailed Study. 

Marathi Nibandha by R. S. WAlimbe. 






TBXT'AOQKS iH MARATHI FOR B.A. AND ^7 

(thbbb-year) dboreb examinations. 19$0«61 


Drama — 

PunyaPrabhava by Qadkari. 

Orammar — 

Books recommended --Praudhabodha Vyakaraa by R. B. Joslii. 

Part 11(6)— 1961. 

{Paper III)- 

Paper ///— (Non-dctailcd text, passage or passages in English for 
translation into Marathi, General Composition having reference 
to modern thoughts) — 

Non-Delailed Text. 

I: Daulat by N. S. Phadkc. 

2. Parijat — edited by V. S. Khandekar. 


B.A. 

Part III— Branch XII— Marathi. 

Examination for Papers / and 11 to be held in 1960. 

Paper Marathi Literature — Books recommended— 

1. Maharashtra Saraswat by Bhave. 

2. Pradakshina — Edited by A. A. Kulkami. 

3. Arvachina Marathi Sahitya— Nenc. 

4. Marathi Sahityachi Rupareshaby Dr. U. P.Dandokar. 

Paper U— History and Culture of Maharashtra — 

Books recommended — 

1. Maharashtracha Samskritic Itihasa by Dr. S. D. Pendre. 

2. Marathi Riyasat by Sardesai. 

3. Tirtharupa Maharashtra Parts I and II by Mahadcshartri 
Joshl 

Examination for Papers HI to Vltobeheldin 1961 
Paper III — Poetry {ancient and modern) — Prescribed Text •books L 

1. Dyaneshwari 12th Adhyaya. 

2. Mukteshwar-^Sabhaparva. 

3. ICeshavasuta*-Keshana Sutanchi Kavita. 

4. Tilak— Tilakanchi Kavita. 

5. Bee-^Phulanchi Orjala. 


351 



#1 m wknUcA Fok b.a. and 

. (TiailiB-YEAR) PEORBB EXAMINATIONS, 1960*61 

^aper I V-^Prose and Drama — Prescribed Texts II. 

L Adnyapatra by Ramachandra Pant Amatya. 

2. Atnachya Deshachi Sthiti by Chipplaunkar. 

Nibhandha Sangraha — Part I by Agarkar. 

4. Vidyaharam by Uhadilkar. 

5. Ekach Pyala — Gadkari. 

Paper V. — Prosody and Poetics — Books recommended^ 

1 . Chandraihana by Patmardhan. 

2. Ablnana Kavyaprahash by Jog. 

3. Kavyalochana by Kelkar. 

Paper Vl-^History of Language and Grammar — Books Recom- 
mended — ^ 

1. Marathi Bhasha — UdgamaAni Vikasa by Kulkarni, K. P. 

2. Sabnis — ^Adhunik Marathichc Ucehatar Vyakaran. 

B.A. & B.SC. 

Part II— French. 

Papers I and li to be taken in and Paper /// in 1961 . 

Drama — 

Corneille’s Horace* 

Poetry — 

Oxford Book of French Verse, 13th to the 20th century— Numbers 
146 to 202. 

Prose — 

Le Uvre de mon ami— by Anatole France (O.U.P.) 

French Tales of Our Time — By W. Lough Harrap. 

CoiHes Humoristiciues— A. L. Carre. (University of London 
Press,) 

French Tales of Our Time by W. Lough Harrap (to be reserved 
for the third year). 

' i^dre.^Tb6 Papers I and II taken at the end of the second year 
of the three-year degree course wOl follow the model of the same papers 
in the two-year degree course. The examination in the third year 
should contain passages for trandation from the text (50 marks)* one 
essay in English (20) and one essay in French on the subject-matter 
or the texts (30)* a choice being given of three essays in English and 
three essays in French, 






lixt-ftoow IN FRBNCK Anh LAtlN FOR B.A. AND B. SC. 52 $ 
(THRBB-YEAR) DEQREE EXAMINATIONS, 1960 -> 6 l 


B.A. 


Part III— Branch XII— French— 1961. 

hrama-- 

Molicre’s L’ Avarc. 

Racine's Athalie. 

V. Hugo's Hcrnani. 

Poetry — 

Oxford Book of French Verse. 13th to the 20th century — Num* 
bers 198 to 231. 

Projsr — 

Colonel Chabert, Gobseck — Honore de Balzac. 

Harrap. 

Le Barrage — Bordeaux. 

Cheque disent Ics iivres. By Emile Faguct, O.U.P. 

History of French Literature from the Renaissance to Modern times^-^ 
The following books are recommended: — 

Cazamin's History of French Literature. (O.U.P.) 

History de la langua francaise. By Ch. dea. Granges. 

Saintsbury's History of French Literature. 

Author’s Life and works to be studied: Victor Hugo. 

Horace: Odes, Bk. II (To be reserved for the 3rd year), 

Cicero: Pro Roscio. 


B.A* Ac B.Sc. 

Part II (a) — Latin — 1960. 

{Papers I and //), 

Cicero: Pro Roscio Amcrino. 

Vergil: Aeneid, Bk. 1. 

Part II (b) — Latin— 1961. 

{Paper ///) 

Horace: Odes» Bk. IV. 

Note. — Papers I and II in Part II will follow the model of papers 
in Part II of the two-year degree course. Paper III will be a paper 
of three hours, containing passages for translation from the pres- 
cribed text (50 marks), one unseen passage for translation from Lathi 
into Bnglbh (25) and one essay on the subject-matter of the texts-^ 
a choke of three being given. ^ 


SS9 




S30 TBXT-SOOICS IN LATIN. OSRMAN ANP SYIUAC TOR B.A. 
AND B.SO. (THREE- year) PEOREB EXAMINATIONS, 1960-61 


Part III— Branch XII— La™— 1961. 

Drama — 

Miles Gloriosus of Fiantus Addphi of Terence. 

Qccro’s Pro Legs ManilUa. 

Tacitus; Annals, Bk. I. 

Poetry-^ 

VergU: Aencid, Book VllL 
Horace: Odes, Book III. 

Juvenal: Satire X. 

History of Latin Literature. 

Study of a prescribed author's life and works: Cicero. 

B.A. A BaSc. 

Part II (a) — German— 1960. 

Papers / and //. 

1. Grammar — Wrenn — Krips. (Harrap) An intermediate German 

course (40 poems). 

2. Modern German Short Stories. Second Series by H. F. Bggling 
(0*U.P.) 

3. Wilhelm Tell by Schiller. 

Part XI (b)— G erman. 

. Pc^ ///— 1961. 

Egmont by Gecthe. 


Part II— Syruc. 

I Paper: Prose. 

II Paper: Poetry. 

The Papers I and II are to be given at the end of the second year 
of the course. 

Hi Paper: Translation and History. 

The III Paper ts to contain translation (3 questipni)* Histoiy 
^ |4tmture (1 question), and the History of Syria and 
tipe apd of liie Syrian Church of Kerala (1 question). The 111 Ptyper 
it Ip be glv^ at the end of the third year of the course. 




text-books in sykiac for b.a. and b.sc. 531 
(THRBB^YEAR) degree EXA MI NATIONS, 1960>6 1 


TexhBookc . — 

(a) Text-Books for the I Paper and the II Paper: 1960 — 

1. Prose: (1) Selections from Syriac Prose for the B.A. classes 
(St. Joseph’s Press, Mannanam): the whole. 

(2) Arayathinal (Aramaic Grammar) Exercises 11 to 37 
(both included). 

2. Poetry: Readings in Syriac Poetry for the B.A. classes (St* 
Joseph’s Press, Mannanam): the whole. 

Grammar — 

1. Syriac Grammar by Fr. Gabriel, T. O. C. D. (St. Joseph’s 
Press, Mannanam). 

2. Aramaic Grammar by Rev. Thomas Arayathinal, M.O.L. 
(St. Joseph’s Press, Mannanam). 

(b) Text-Books for the III Paper, 1961 — 

1. Prose, Poetry and Grammar; the same as those fot the 
I paper and the II paper (1960). 

2. History of the Syriac Literature: Wright (A & C. Bladd& 
London.) 

3. History of the Syrians and of the Syrian Church in Kerala: 

(1) Early History of Syria and Palestine by Lewis Boyles, 
Pctton, D.p.H. (John C. Nimmu, 14, King William Street, Strand, 
London). 


(2) St. Thomas the Apostle, 19th Centenary Souvenir of the 
Landing of St. Thomas in Cranganore by Dr. P. J. Thomas, Dr. 
Joseph Placid, Dr. J. Eltumanookaran and Mr. K. E. Job, MJt.,L.T. 
(Mar Lousic Mcnwrial Press, Ernakulam). 

(3) The Two Apostles of India by A, C. Perumalil, sx 
(Catholic Mission Press, Ranchi). 

(4) The Syrian Church of Malabar and its Cultural Contci* 
buttons by J. Placid, pho., d.d., d.c.l. and H.E. Job, MJt., l.t. 

(5) History of the St. Thomas Christians, Vols. I and II 
by Pr. Bernard, T.O.CJ). (St. Joseph’s Press, Mannanam.) 

(6) The Indian Church of St. Thomas by E. M. Phillip 
(C*M.S. Pre^, Kottayam). 


365 



532 tmx-Boom m syriac for b.a. and b.sc. 

(^HRBB" YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS,^ 1 960* 6 1 

Part III— -Branch XII— Syriac. 

Grouf A— 1961. 

Grouf B — 1960. 

Details of the Papers , — There are six papers in all, each of 3 hours’ 
duration and each carrying 100 marks. Four of these papers 
for the main subjects under Group A and the remaining two papers 
are for the subsidiary subjects under Group B. 

Group A— 

I Paper: Prose. 

II Paper: Poetry. 

III Paper: Prescribed author. 

IV Paper: Grammar, Prosody and History of Syriac Literature. 

Group B— 

V Paper: History of Syria and Palestine up to the 14th Century 
included. 

VI Papor: History of the Syrian Church in India. 

The papers for Group A will be for the examination at the end 
of the 3rd year, and those for Group B will be for the examination at 
the end of the 2nd year. 

(a) Text-books for the four papm under Group A, 1961— 

1, Prose^ 

(1) Exodus (whole). 

(2) Acts of the Apostles (whole). 

(3) Epistle of St. Paul to Thimothy (whole). 

(4) life of St. Ephoome (St. Joseph’s Press, Mannanam). 

2 . Poetry^ 

(1) St. Ephrem: Morceaux Choisis: Pages 34 to 73. (Domi- 
nieaii Fathers’ Mosul). 

(2) Isaac of Antioch: Morceaux Choisis: Pages 150-172 (Domi* 

idean Mosul). 

(3) Prescribed author’s life and works. 

SL Aphrailis: His complete works: Patrologia Syriac a Series, 
fiifi pirt» irk volume, whole comprising 22 homilies, and second 
YOlemR 2lfd homily, pages 1 to 150— Edited by R. Griffin, published 
bf fttffiiii--^l)idot et Sot^i, via Jacob, 56 Paris. 


m 


TEXT-BOOKS IN HEBREW FOR B.A. AN0 B.SC. 533 
(THREE-YEi^) DEGREE EXAMI NATIONS, 1960> 6l 

(4) Grammar — 

(1) Syriac Grammar by Fr, Gabriel, t.o.c.d. (St. Joseph’s 
Press, Mannanam). 

(2) Aramaic Grammar by Rev. Thomas Arayathinal, M.ox. 
(St. Joseph's Press, Mannanam). 

(5) History of Syriac Language and Literature— 

(1) Wright (A& C.Blackic, London). 

(2) Tappenni (Beirut). 

(h) Text -books for the 2 papers under group B for 1960 — The same 
as those for B.A., Part II. 

Part II— Hebrew. 


1 Paper— Prose. 

II Paper — Poetry. 

Ill Paper — Translation and History — 

The III Paper is to be given at the end of the Third year of the 
course. It will cover translation (three questions), History of Hebrew 
Literature (one question) and History of the Hebrew people (one 
question). 

Text •book A — 

(o) Text-Books for the I and 11 Papers, I960— 

Prose — The First Book of Samuel. 

Poetry — 

(1) Psalm 78, 

(2) Proverbs: Chapter XV. 

(3) The Prophecy of Nahum. 

Grammar — 

(1) Student’s Hebrew Grammar by Michael Adler, B.A. 
(David Nutt, London). 

(2) Hebrew Grammar by Davidson. 

(b) Text-Books for the III Paper, 1961— 

L Poetry, Prose and Growwor— The same as those r the 
1 and II papers (1960), 

2. History — 

(1) History of Helnrew Literature by Michael Adler. 


67 


357 



534 TEXT-BOOKS IN HEBREW FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(three-year) deoreb examinations, 1960-61 


(2) The Hebrews^ their history and government by ^Professor 
McCardy (John C. Nimmu, 14, King WQIiam Street, Strand, London). 

(3) Early History of Syria and Palestine by Lewis Boyles 
Petton, D.P.H. (John C. Nimmu, 14, King William Street, Strand, 
London). 


B.A. 


Part III— Branch XII~-Hi>br£W. 

Group A— 1961. 

Group B— 1960. 

Details of the Papers— Thete arc six papers in all, each of 3 hours’ 
duration and each carrying 100 marks. Four of these papers are 
for the main subjects under Group A, and the remaining two papers 
are for the subsidiary subjects under Group B. 

Group A— .1 Paper: Prose; II Paper: Poetry; III Paper: Pres- 
cribed author; IV Paper: Grammar, Prosody and History of Hebrew 
Litmture. 

Group B— V Paper: Anc: History of Palestine; VI Paper: 

Dispersion of the Jews (Assyrian, Babylonian, Persian and Roman 
Empires). 

(a) Text-books for Group A, 1961 — 

1. Prose— 

(1) The Book of Exodus. 

(3) First Book of Kings, Chapters I to X (both included). 

2, Poetry— 

(1) Book of Sphonias. 

(2) Book of Mica. 

3. Preserved autfm: Jeremeias, the Prophet, Life and Work. 

4, Grammar— 

(1) Student's Herbrew Grammar by Michael AcUer. 

(2) Hebrew Grammar by Davidson. 

(3) Hebrew Tenses by Davidson. 

(ft) History Of Hebrew Literature by Michael Adler. 

Group B— 

1. Bady History of Syria and Palestine by L. B. Patton. 

2* The Hebrews, their history and Boveinsnent by Prof 
MeCar# ldliii King Willitm Street, Strand, London)/ 



TBXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL POR B.A. AND 8.»C. 535 

(threb-year) degree examinations, 1960-61 

B.A. and B.Sc. 


11 Part (a)-«TAMiL-^l960. 


Paper 1. 

Poetry and Grammar. 


Poitkal SiUcthns-- 

1 . Tinippanarruppadai 

2. Purananuru 

3. Kuruntogai 

4 . Tinikkura! 

5. Silappadhikaram . . 

6. Cmtamani 

7. Periapuranam 

8. Kambaramayanam 

9. Bharathiar—Kuii Paitu « . 

10. Tanippadalgal 


26 lines. 

200 lines from Kapiiar’s Verses. 
50 lines. 

100 Unes (Kudiccyalvagai, uzhavu, 
Iravu, Nathanaru and Iravac- 
cam). 

216 lines (Kadukann Kathai). 

312 lines (Pathumaiyar Ilamba* 
kam). 

42 stanzas (Anaya Narayanar 
Puranam). 

4(K) lines (Kaikcyi Soolvinaip Pada- 
lam). 

160 lines, 

80 lines. 


Paper II. 

Prose detailed-- 

1, Madurai Tamil Sanga Malar (Published by Madurai Tamil 
Sangam). 

2. Katturai Pozil by A. M. Saravana Mudaliar (Published by 
Manivachaga Nilayam, Tiruchirappalli). 

Drmm — 

Sakuntalam by Maraimalai Adigai (Publishers: SJ.S.S.W.P. 
Society^ Madras). 


Part 11(6) Tamil— 1961. 

Paper HI-- 

Tramlation» Composition and a General History of Tamil 
Literature. 

Botdes rectmmmnded far * A General History of Tamil Literature ^ — 
I. Murkalap-Pirkalat Tamil Pulavar by Maraimalai Adigai 
House, Madras). 




536 


TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(THREE- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS. lWO-61 _ 

2. Sangakalattamilum Pirkalattaniiluin by Dr. Swami* 
nathaAyyar (Theagaraja Vilas, Tiruvatecswaranpct, Madras). 

3. llakkiya Varalaru by K. Subrahmanya Pillai (S.I.S.S.W.P. 
House, Madras). 

Note 1. — Questions should not be based on these texts, but 
should be of general nature on the History of Tamil Literature. 
Questions should not be asked to fix the dates of Poets, etc. 

Note 2. — There shall be three Parts in the Question Paper: the 
first Part on Translation from English to Tamil, the Second Part on 
General Composition and the third Part generally on ‘A History of 
Tamil Literature’. The marks shall be distributed in the proportion 
of 40 : 30 : 30. 


B.A. 

Part III — Branch XI! — Tamil. 

{Papers I and //— 1960.) 

Paper 1. 

History of Tamil Literature.— HhXoxy and Developments of 
various trends and their changes in the subject-matter, idiom, 
rhythm and versification and other modes of expression generally, 
all through the ages and in particular from age to age or century to 
century: — 

1. The condition of literature as may be gleaned from Tol- 
kappiyam. 

2. Sangam period: Characteristics of Sangam Literature — 
the conception of Tokai and the absence of Epic before Silappadhi- 
karam. 

3. The eighteen ethical works— their general trends and 
characteristic features— inter relations— Influence of Kural and its 
place in Tamil Literature— The relationship between Kilkkanakku 
and Melkanakku— the later Ethical Literature and their relation- 
ship with Kilkanakku. 

4 . Growth of Epics— Silappadhikaram-*-its relationship with 
Sangam Age— its influence on later day literature — ^its relatiofiship 
with Manimekalai. 

5. |1ie so*called major and minor five epics— a criticism of 
Ihii conseption from the historical and literary point of ykw. 


390 



TEXT-BOOKS fN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND 537 

B.SC. (three- Y EAR ) DEOREE EXAMINATIONS, 1960-61 

€. Kamba Ramayanam — its age — characteristic features — 

importance and influence. 

7. Periyapuranam — its age — characteristic features — impor- 

tance and influence. 

8. The later Sthalapuranas. 

9. The various kinds of prabandams — their rise and develop- 
ment in general with an explanation of the influence shaping them, 

10. The folk song influencing literature from time to time. 

11. The history of drama — Kuravanchi, Pallu, Nondi 
Natakam, Kirthanai natakani — Foreign dramas and their influence 
— Modern Dramas and Radio Dramas and Cinemas. 

12. Prose— Development from the earliest Age to the 
modern time. 

13. Modern trends and modern kinds of literature. 

14. Religion and Philosophy in Tamil literature — their 
development and varieties. 

15. The general trends of the Sangam age, of the Pallava 
age, of the later Cholas, of the later Pandyas, of the Vijayanagar 
period and of the period of the Western influence. 

16. The contributions of the various religions and their 
institutions (Mutts), etc., to Tamil literature. 

Books recommended — 

1. K. S. Srinivasa Pillai — Tamil Varalaru, Parts I and 11. 

2. K. Subramania Pillai — Ilakkiya Varalaru. 

3. Somasundara Desikar — 16th Century Tamil Poets; 17th 
Century Tamil Poets. 

4. Pandai Tamil Ilakkiya Varalaru by Sadasiva Pandaral- 
tar (a) 300— 6(X) A.D.; (/>) I3th, I4thand 15th Centuries. 


Paper !l. 

History of Tcmdl Nad and Culture, 

1. History^ 

1, Sources of our study. 

2, Influence of geography on history — Historical divisions 
of the country in the various periods. 


961 



538 TBXT'BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR R.A. AND B.SC. 

(thrsb-toar) peoreb examinations, 1960-61 

3. The culture of the earliest inhabitants— Old Stone Age- 
New Stone Age— Race types— Linguistic and Cultural afi^ities— 
hiqBEfdithic monuments— Rock paintings— painted pottery^ etcJ 

4. Pre*Sangam history and Culture — Sangam Age^l^orelgn 
contacts. 

5. Post-Sangam period— Kalabhras— Foreign influence— 
Pallavas conflict with the North and the South — the Pandyas. 
Mutharaiyas, Irikkuvel ; the Religious condition— Village commu- 
nity and Local Self-Government Polity. 

6. The Later Cholas — their growth — Conflict with other 
powim — ^thelr influence in and outside India — The Rise of the 
Later Pandya Power— the conflict of the Cholas, Pandyas, Hoysalas 
and Yadhavas. 

7. The fall of the Tamil Political Power — influence of Vdayt- 
nagar Rulers, Nayaks, Marattas — the development of Western and 
Mu^im influence — ^the Palayagars. 

8. The struggle for Freedom — Gandhian Era. 

//. Culfiinp— 

The Social and Economic conditions — Literature — Religion 
and Philosophy — Painting — Sculpture— Iconography— Architecture 

— Music and other Fine Aris^ — Handicrafts— Polity, Custom and 
Law, all forming a distinctive Culture, developing from Age to Age, 
influenced by and influencing others. 

Books recommended-^ 

1. Ten Indiyach-chirppankal by Kanakarathnam. 

2. Alagu Kalaikai by Seem Venkataswamy. 

3. South Indian History by K. Nilakanta Sastry. 

4. Tamils 1,800 years ago by Kanakasabal Pillai. 

5. Contributions of South India to Indian Culture by 
S. K. Aiyangar. 

Note. — The Questions on Politicai History shall bear 40 marks 
and the questions on culture shali bear 60 marks. 

{Papers /// to P/— 1961.) 

Paper ill. 

hmeedmd Texts I— 

U Perpmbaniuiui^Mfli l^tnes. 


S9» 




TEXT -BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B A. AND B.SC. 

(threI-year) degree examinations, 1960-61 


539 


Tirukkural'Araciyal — 500 lines. 

* 1 Purananuru, Vol. 51 — 100 — 635 lines. 

4. Chilappadhikaram— (fl) Urkann Katbai, (6) Adaikkalak- 
kathai and(c) Kolaikkalakkathai— 658 lines. 

Paper IV 

Prescribed Texts IJ — 

1. Kambaramayanam-— Katchl, Nintbai and Urukkattu- 

patalams — 1,104 lines. 

2 . Villiputturar Baratham— Kandavatbabanaccanikkair— 304 

tines. 

3, Tiruvilaiyadalpuaranam — Paranchotbiyar— Viraguvitra pa tala m, 
total 280 lines. 

4. Tiruvembavai and Tinippavai — 200 lines. 

5. Sckkilar Pillaittamil — 1st five in each of the 10 panivams 
— 200 lines. 


Paper V 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics — 

1 . Nannul Kandigai urai — Arumuga Navalar. 

2. Yapparunkalakkarikai— Old Commentary. 

3. Dandiyalankaram— Porulani lyaJ— General study without 
details of classibcations. 

Note. — The questions on Grammar shall bear 40 marks: Ques- 
tions on Prosody 30 marks and Questions on Poetics 30 marks. 

Paper VI 

History of the Tamil Language and Elements of the Dra vidian Cem* 
parathm Grammar — 

1. Syllabus for the History of the Tamil Language — 

General — The place of Tamil in the Dravidian family of 
Languages— Its high antiquity— Its geographical area in ancient 
times— the Sentamil and Koduntamil Countries— Very early cultiva- 
tion of Tamil— The Three Sangatns. 

The Periods of Tamil Language*^Tbe Old or Sang am Tamil—- 
The Mediaeval Tamil and the Modem Tamil— Illustrative Literature 


540 TiXT'BOOK3 IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(threb^year) degree examinations, 1960-61 


of each Period — Orimmars of the different Periods — The extent of 
Foreign influence on Tamil Grammars. ^ 

Phonology, — Vowels — Their realtionship to the primitive 
Dravidians. Vowel system — History of Vowels— Accent and , 
Emphasis— Rising* Falling and Vanishing Accents— Influence of 
accent on Word change and in Prosody Alapedai — Mutation of 
Vowds — Vowel Harmony — Vowel Sandhi — Glides, 

Consonants , — Their relation to the Primitive Consonants — 
History of Consonants — Mutations of Consonants, Palatalization, 
Dentalization, Voicing* Unvoicing, Consonant length, Assimilation, 
Alapedai— Consonantal Sandhi. 

Laws of Tamil Syllabation. — Difference between Tolkap- 
piam and Nannul— Light on the Nature of Loan words. 

Morphology, — Historical treatment in the Old and Modern 
Tamil of the following — Nouns— Pronouns— Case, the Verbs, The 
Passive Voice, The Moods — Imperative, Infinitive, Subjunctive. 
The Tenses — The tense-formation — The principles of their use — 
Negative particle. The Relative and Verbal Participles. 

Word Building.^By Composition— Compound words (Tokat, 
Ummai, Uvamai, etc.) — By Derivation — By Root creation— Back 
formation— Double bases, etc. 

Vocabulary-^Thc general character of Tamil Vocabufary at 
different Periods— Borrowings — Their causes— Doublets — Tciugu and 
Kannada Elements in Tamil— Loss of Old words— Nature and extent— 
Sanskrit words — Tatsamas — Tadbhavas (Rules regarding these) — 
Prakrit borrowings — Manipravala style— Other borrowings (Hindi 
Portuguese, English, etc.)— Hybrids— Tests for distinguishing Loan 
words. 


Semantics— Chan$^s in the meaning of words— Elevation 
Degradation, Specialization and Generalization from age to age. 

Syntax, — Historical. Study of the order of words in a Sen- 
tence-Deviation from the Normal— Causes— Diflfercncc between 
the Syntax of Poetry and Prose — Foreign influence in Tamil Syntax. 

2 . Sydlahus for the Elements of the Dravidlm Comparatlye 
Grammar: Bravidian Langaag^s.-^The Dravidian Group of Langu- 
agea and their chief eharaeteristics Enumeration of the Dravidian 
Lgnguagest 


$W4 



541 


TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 

(THREE- YE AR) DEGREE EXAMIN ATIONS, 1960-61 

Dravidian Phonology, — The Primitive Dravidian Parent 
Language — Vowel System — Changes — ^Accent — Harmonic sequence of 
Vowels — System of Consonants— Origin of Cerebrals (Retroflex) 
— ^Dialectic interchange of Consonants — Euphonic permutation of 
Consonants — Sandhi — Nasalization Prevention of Hiatus— Dravi^ 
dian Syllabation. ^ 

Dialect, — Sen tarn il and Koduntamil. 

Morphology, — The Noun. 

Gender — Dravidian Nouns divided into two Classes deno- 
ting Rationals and Irrationals. 

Number — Singular and plural — No Dual — Singular — 
Masculine, Feminine and Neuter — Plural — Principles of pluraliza* 
tion. 


Case — Principles of Casc-formation—Dravidian C^ses — 
Comparison with Sanskrit Cases. 

The Pronoun, — Pronouns of the First and Second Person 
— Comparison of Dialects — The Reflective Pronoun— Pluraliza tion 
of the Personal and Reflective Pronouns— Demonstrative and Intcrrro- 
gative Pronouns — Their bases — Demonstrative and Interrogative 
Adjectives and Adverbs — Honorific Demonstrative Pronouns. 

The Verbs, — Structure of the Dravidian Verbs— Roots used 
either as Verbs or Nouns — Formative Particles often added to Roots 
— Classification of Verbs. 

Casual Verb — their formation. 

Frequentative Verbs. 

Conjugational System — Formation of the Tenses— Their 
significance and force— The Pr<^ent Tense— The Preterite Tense— 
The Future Tense— The Verbal and Relative Participles. 

Formation of Moods — Methods of forming the Condi- 
tional, the Imperative and the Infinitive. 

The Voice — Active and Passive — The Negative Voice — 
Combination of Negative Particles with Verbal themes — The Dravi- 
dian Negative Particles. 

Formation of Verbal Nouns, Derivative Nbuiii ap^ 
Abstract Nouns. 



542 TEXT-BOOKS IN TELUOU FOk B.A. AND B.SC. 

(threb-ybar) oegree examinations, 1960-61 

Con^aratiye Syntax. — The Syntax of the scvcra 1 Language 
coiiii>ared— The extent of Foreign influence over the Syntax of the 
sev^ Languages. 

Notb.— T he Questions on the History of the Tamil Language shall 
eanry 50 marks and the Questions on the Elements of the Dravidian 
Comparative Grammar shall carry 50 marks. 

B.A. and B.Sc. 

Part II (a)p- Teluou— I960. 

{Papers / and II — 1960V 

Paper I. 

A. Old Poetry— 

1. Tlkkana — Udyogaparvam— Krishna Rayabaram—Cantos 3 

and 4. 

X Srinatha — Haraviiasam — Chirutondanambi Katha— Canto 2. 
3. Dhuijati — Sri Kalahasti Mahatmyam — Nalkirunl Katha. 

B. Modern Poetry— 

D. V. Krishnamurthy: Sri Sukanasopadesamu (1952), (author, 
V. R. College, Nellore). 

Prefer IL 


C, Drama — 

L Vedam Venkataraya Sastry— Vikramorvasiyam (V. Venkata- 
raya Sastry Bix>s., 4, Mallikcswara Gudi Lane, Linghi Chctiy St., 
Madras-1.) 

X M. Upendra Sarma: Tikkana (Lecturer in Telugu, Hindu 
CoU^, Guntur). 

D, Prose— 

Duwuri Ramireddi— Saraswata Vyasamulu (Kavikokila Pubii- 
catioiia» Nellore.) (Portions prescribed: From the beginning, i.c,, 
Seetkm h KEvito 13— Natakamu Charitra both inclusive). 

K GrammoTf Prosody and Poetics— 

According to the Syllabus prescribed. 

Part II (^) — Teluou — 1961. 

Paper ///— 1961. 

K NmHl$taikd Prose— 

> $vami--^ri Rama Krishitunl Jeevita Chufitrr 

Tenali.) 


SBB 



TEXT-BOOKS IN pLUOU FOR B.A. AND B.SC. S43 
(thrbb-ybar) dborbe examinations, 1960-61 

B.A. 

Part III— Branch XII— Tilwou, 

t 

{Papers / and //— 1960). 

Paper /. 

L History of Telugu Literature — 

The following books are prescribed for consultation only : — 

1. Khandavilli Lakshmiranjanam — ^Andhra Vangmaya Charitra 
langiuham (author, Head of the Department of Telugu, Osmania 
University, Hyderabad.) 

2. Vanguri Subbarao— Andhra Vangmaya Charitra. 

(V. Narasimha Rao, Kamala Kuteer, Narasapur, West 
Godavari district.) 


Pnofer II. 

2. History of Andhra Desa and Andhra Culture — 

According to the Syllabus prescribed. 

Inscriptions— (1 to 10) published by Jayanti Ramayya Pantulu 
(Telugu Academy, Kakinada.) 

{Papers II! to K/— 1961). 

Pi^r HI. 

3. Prescribed Text books II . — 

1. Old Poetry — 

L Naonichoda— Kumara Sambhavam, Parvatipaniiayam, 

Cantos 7 and 8. 

2. Palkurlki Somanatha— Dvipada Panditaradhya Charitra— 
Sura Sanamma Katha. 

X Pingali Suranna — Kalapumodayamu — Cantos 1 and 2 
(Without the avataiika or the introductory verses.) ^ 

4 Kankanti Papanuu— Uttara Ramayanamu— SIta Vaao- 
vasagamanamu. 


ser 



i44 tBXT'dOOKS IN TS 1 .U 0 U FOR AMD B.SC. 
(thrbb-ybar) deoreb examinations. 1960»61 

2* Modem Poetry — 

1. T. Sivasankara Sastri — Dikshita Duhita (Sarasvati Nikett* 
oamu, Vctapalem, Guntur Dt*) 

2. Viramanidu by Mudivarti Kondamacharyulu (1948), 
Publishers: Vadiamudi Ramiah, Nellore. 

Paper JV. 

4. Prescribed TextdHfoks // — 

1* Drama — 

1, V. Subbarayudu — Venisamharamu. (V. Eswara Vara Prasada 
Rao, near Government Training College, Innespeta, Rajahmundry, 
E. Godavari Dt.) 

2. Chilakamarti Lakshminarasimham— Gayopakhyanam 

(Kondapalii Viravcnkayya, Book Sellers, Rajahniundry, East 
Oocifvari district). 

2. Prose — 

Veturi Prabhakara Sastri — Meegada tarakalu (Veturi Sankara 
Sastra, Arsha Rasayana Sala, Muktyala, Krishna Dt.) 

Paper V. 

5, Grammar, Prosody and Poetics — 

1. Chinnayasuri Balavyakaranamu — Tatsama, Acchika and 

Kriya Paricchedamulu. 

2. Bahuianapalli Sitaramacharyulu—Proudha Vyakaranam— > 

Sandhi, Sabda, Karaka and Kriya Paricchedamulu. 

3. Narasabhupaliyam — Cantos 3 and 5. 

4. Appakavyamu — Canto 3, 

5. K. Ananatacharyulu — I>asarupakamu. 

■ii 

Paper VI, 

^ Wsmry of Telugu Language and Elements of tfm Comparative 
Grammar of the Dra vidian Languages according to Syllabm prsscribid. 

^ B.A. 

f. Part IIL 

Branch VUI-^Ormp B-^Telugu-^l9S9 and 1960, 

. i« PaUiki Seva Piabhandam: Copies can be had of Sri E Samba* 
muirtby* Music Elepartment, University of Madras- 


S09 



tBXr -IBOOKS IN KANNAOa t'OR iB.A. ANt> jB.SC- 545 

(THREE -YEAR) DBORBE EXAMINAITONS, 1960-61 

2. Telugu introductioiis to Kshetraya Padams.— 

(a) Edited by Sri Vissa Appa Rao. 

(b) Edited by Dr. G. V. Sitapathi and published by the Mahtt« 
nuah of Pithapuram : Copies can be had of Dr. O. V. Sitapathi, 17, 
Devaraya Mudali Street, Madras-5. 

B.A. and B.Sc. 

Part Ilffl) — K annada — 1960. 

Paper /. 

1. Old Poetry^ 

(а) Pampa Bharata — 12th Aswasa (221 stanzas). 

(б) GadaYuddha by Ranna : 7th and 8th Aswasas (68 + 67== 135 
stanzas). 

2. Mediaeval Poetry — 

(ft) Jaimini Bharata : Sandhis 1, 2 and 3 (omitting stanzas 7, 9, 
10 and 29 in Sandhi 3), 

if}) Mcgha Sandesha by Kukke Subramaniya Sastry (Kavyalaya, 
Mysore). 

3. Grammar — 

Portions relating to Grammar in Kannada Kaipidi (Mysore 
University Publication). 


Paper JJ. 

1. Drama: Shakuntala by Basappa Shastry. 

2. Old Prose: Ramaswamedha (Muddana)—- Chapters 13, 14. 

15 and 16. 

3. Modern Prose— 

(а) Sanskrit by D. V. Gundappa. 

(б) Prachina Sahitya by T. S. Venkannaya« 

4. History of Literature ; An account of the life and woi|c$ of the 
following authors together with those of the prescribed works: — 

(I) I4agachandra. 

(i) Rlidra Bhatta. 


36 § 



S46 TB3Cr-»b0tS IN KANNAbA fOR B.A. AND R.SC. 
(tHRBB-YEAR) DBQRBB EXAMINATIONS, 1960»(SI 

(iii) Akka Maha Devi. 

(iv) Harihara. 

(v) Chatu Vithalanatha. 

(vi) Ratnakara Vami. 

Part II (6)— Kannada-~196I. 

Pi^er III, 

1. Avyakta Manana by K. S. Haridass Bhat (M.G.M. CkiUete, 
Udipi). 

2. Odahutti davaru by K, S. Karantha (Puttur). 

Part III — ^Branch XII — Kannada. 

(Piters / and //— 1960.) 

Paper /. 

History of Literature — 

Kannada Sahitya Charitra by Dr. R. S. Mugali (For cxmaal- 
tatibn: Kavi Charite, Volumes 1 and 2 by Narasimhachar). 

Paper II, 

History of Karnataka and Culture — 

1. Kannada Nadina Cbaritre, Parts 1 to 3 (Kannada Sahitya 
Parishat, Bangalore). 

2. Popular Culture of Karnataka by Masti Venkatesieogar. 

For Constdtation-- 

1. Heritage of Karnataka by R. S. Mugali. 

2. Karnataka Darshana (Commemoration Volume in bonotir 
cf R. R. Diwakar.) 

(Papers III to Pi— 1961. )| 

Paper III, 

Fmseribid Textdtooks /— 

1. AiBpurana (Pampa)^14th Aswasa (149 stanzas). 

2. KabWgara iCava (Andayya). 

3. Sii Rama PattabhislHdca by Mahalakihini. 

4 Clritmngadi by K. V. Puttappa. 


Sf0 




TEXT-BOOKS IN KANNADA AND MALAYALAM FOR 547 
B.A.ANPB.SC. (three-year) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1960-61 

Paper IV. 

Prescribed Texi-books IJ— 

1. Ramaswamedha, Chapters 1 to 7. 

2. Vcni Samhara Nataka, Prali Krti- 

3. Bhasa Bharata Chakra by L. Gundappa. 

4. Jeevana Soundarya mattu Sahitya by D. V. Gundappa. 

5. Rayachur Vijaya by Krishnappa (Vasantha Malike Publi- 
cation» Mangalorc-3). 


Paper V. 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics — 

1. Sabdasmriti by Naga Varma. 

2. Portions relating to Prosody and Poetics from Kannada 
Kaiptdi (Mysore University Publications). 


Paper VI. 

History of Language and Elements of the Dravidian Comparative 
Grammar — 

h History of Kannada Language by Narasimhachar. 

2. Kannada Bhasha Shastra by R. Y. Dharwadkar. 

3. Kannada Vamagaiu by Sediyapu Kxishnan Bhat (Kannada 
Research Institute, Dharwar). 

B.A. and B.Sc. 

Part II (n)~-MALAYALAM— 1960. 

Paper /. 

(1) and (2) Selections from Niranam Works and Cherusseri. 
PubUshed by the University. 

(3) Unnayi Variar * . Nakcbaritam Onnam Divasanx 

Pub. : Mathnibhumi PubllcatiooSi 
Kozhikode. 

(4) Kaladi Raman Nam- Kell Sakuntalam, Pub.: Kaladi Bipa.. 

biar* MdluTs €halakkudi« 


37J 




548 mXT-BOOSS IN MAIAYALAM FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(THREE- YEAR) PEOREE EXAMINATIONS, 1960-61 


(5) ICumaran Asan .. Chiiitavishtayya Seetha. Pub.: Saradi 

Book Depot, Alwayc. 

(O P. Kunhiraman Nayar. Kaliyacban. Pub. : Sri Guruvayurappan 

Book Depot, Guruvayur. 

(7> N. V. Krishna Variar. Kalotsavam. Pub. : Kerala Book Depot, 

Kozhikode. 


(8) Id P. Paul .. Sahityavicharam. Pub. : National Book 

Stall, Kotta>am. 

Paptr IL 

(1) Kappaim Krishna Chcraman Pcrumal Pub.: Mathru* 

Mcnon. bhumi Publications, Kozhikode. 

(2) P. K. Parameswaran Mahatma Gandhi. Pub.: NarionaJ 

Nayar. Book Stall, Kottayam. 


Part n(6)~~l%l. 


Paper ///. 

An outline of the History of Malayalam Literature. 

No text-books prescribed. 

Comndtation by Teachers— 

h Pradakshinam .. By Dr. C A. Mcnon. 

X Adhunika Malayala By P. K. Parameswaran Nayar. 
Sahityam. 

Part III — BraNch XII — Malayalam— 1961. 

{Papers / and //) 

Paper /. 


Sbtary ef Literaiure — 


(A atndy of only 
Uliimtiirie If expected.) 


the outline of the Hiitory of Malayaitfi) 


file ftitlowinf bodca are prescribed— 

I. Br# C A. MenoQ . . Pradakshiiiam, Published by The 

^vaol PuWlctdoii--11i«i- 
baitm. 




TEXT-BOOKS IN MALAYALAM POK B.A. ANO B,SC. 549 
(THREB^YEAR) DEOKRE EXAMlNATlOyS. 19(0-61 


2. P. K. Paramcswaran Adhunika Malayala Sahityam — 

Nayar. Published by Sri Rama Vilasam 

Press, Trivandrum, 

Books recommended for consultation — 

1. Ullur S. Parameswara Kerala Sahitya Charitram— (A) 

Iyer. parts) Published by the Uni- 

versity of Travancorc. 

2. T. M. Chufiunar . . Bhasha Gadya Sahitya Charitram. 

Published by National Book 
Stall, Kottayam. 

Paper //, 

History of Kerala and Culture — 

Ho Teat -books prescribed. 

Books recommended for consultation — 
t The Chera Kings of the Sangam age by K. O. Sesht Iyer. 

2. Chronology of the Early Tamils by K. N, Sivaraja Pillai. 

3. Kerala Charitrathilc Iruiadainia Edukal by Elankulam 
Kunjan Pillat. 

4. Chila Kerala Charitra Prasnangal by Elankulam Kupiao 
Pillai (All parts). 

5. History of Cbchm, Volumes ! and U by K. P, Padmanabha 
Menofi. 

6. Travancorc State Manual, Volume 1! by T. K* Velu Pillai. 

7. Malabar Manual by Login. 

S. Malabar and the Portuguese by K. M. Pamkkar. 
f. Malabar and the Outch by K, M. Panikkar. 

10. The Portuguese Pirates by O. K. Nambiyar. 

IL Koothum Kudiyattamum by Ammaman Thampuran, 

12. fCudlyatlain by Sri Narayana Pisharoti. 

13. KendBthOe Nadodi Nattkanipd. Unlvei^qr Publkalion. 

14. l*nd of FMacis Day. 

1 


08 



550 ^t>books in malayalam for b.a. and b.sc. 
(TaBRB-YBAR) PBORRE EXAMINATIONS, 1960»61 

(Papers til to K/— 1961.) 

Paper III, 

Preeer&fed iexi*books /. (Upto and including Ezhuthachan ) — 

L Ramacharitam: First Edited by P. V. Krishnan Nayar. 

10 Patalams. 

2. Kantiassa Ramayanam Any Press. 

Balakandam: First 

100 Verses. 

3. Kuchela Gathi . , By Cherusseri 400 Lines. 

4 . Mahabharatam — Santhl By Thunchathu Ezhuthachan* 

Parvam. 

5. Unnuneeli Sandesbam— «Any Edition. 

Poorva Bhagam. 

6. Prachecna Malayala Edition by Dr. P. K. N. Pillai. 

Gadya Matnikakal. 

7. Uttara Ramayana By Cochin Bhasha Parishkarana 

Gadyam, Part I. Committee. 

PflSper IV, 

Preserihed textdxwks II (Post -Ezhuthachan Period ) — 

1. Malayalam KoUam: By Kochunni Thampuran. 

First two Sargas. 

2. Kirmccra Vadham . . By Kottayathu Thampuran. 

3. Uttara Rama Charitam. By Chathukuiti Mannadiar. 

4. Kamabhooshanam . . By Ullur S. Paramcswira Iyer, 

Ullur Publication, lagati. Tri- 
vandrum. 

5* Ninnala .* ..By Venni Vasu Pillai, Natioiuii 

Books Stall, fCottayaoi. 

6. Saliitya Vicharam *. By M. p. Paul. National Book 

* Stall, Kottayam, 

7. ICalaiyani KaJavuin . . By Dr. Bhaskaran Nayar, 


$ 7 € 



TBXT-BOOICS IN MKhhYkUM FOR B.A. AND B.SC. SSI 

(thrbb*ybar) degree examinations, 1960*61 


K 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics — 

1. Orammar .. Kerala Paniniyana. 

Omitting Peetika and the detaOed discussion of the various gram* 
maticai theories. Only the study of the principles to be emphasised 

2- Prosody — Vritha Manjari. 

3. Poetics — Bhasha Bhooshanam. 

Paper VL 

History of Language and Elements of the Dravidian Comparative 
Grammar. 

Prescribed — 

1. Kerala Bhashayute By Elankulam Kupjan Pillai. Vikasa*Parina- 

mangal. 

2. Evolution of Malayalam by Dr. A. C. Sekhar. 

For consultation — 

Comparative Grammar of Dravtdiai) Languages by Dr. Caldwell. 




TBtT>lK>dKS Iti fiNdLlSlt POlt b.A. AMt> JS.S<$- 

(thrbb»ybar) pecweh examinations, 1961-62 

Text^Eooks for Parts 1, II and lH of the 
[Three-jear Degree Examination, 196i-d9 

B.A./B.SC. 

Part I (a) — E nglish— 1961. 

(First three papers to be taken In 1961,) 

Shakespeare — 

1 , Much Ado about Nothing. 

2. Macbeth. 


Poe fry : 

Paradise Lost— Book I! (After dissolution of the Stygian Council 
350—11 (506-1055). 

and 

The following from * An Anthology of Longer Poems ' (Moles and 
Moi^n) — Longmans : — 

1 . Goldsmith : The Deserted Village (from line 25 1 to 430). 

2. Coleridge: Christable— Part I. 

3. Keats: The Eve of St. Agnes. 

4. Browning: Abt Vogler. 

5. Thompson: The Hound of Heaven. 

6. Flecker: Gates of Damascus. 

7. Wilfred Bigson: The Lodestar 


Pime: 


L 



English Essays of today — O.U.P. (The following eeiayt in 
the book arc (OMITTED)— 


Beerbobm 

Blunden 

Walter Dc La Marea . . 

Prater 

Gould 

Graham 

Hadow 

Scott 

The Times . . 

Tomlinson 

Widddl 


The Golden Drugget. 
The Somme Still Flows. 
The Vats. 

A Dream of Cambridge. 
Refuge from Nightmare. 
Snow in Monteith. 

The Meaning of Music. 
Joys of Critktiin* 

The Street. 

Beauty and the Beast 
The Hyacinth Fields. 


tff 



IM BMOLtSH BOR ».a. AiND R.SC. SSI 
(THRBg^YBAR) PEQRBB EXAMINATIONS, 1961 >62 

Woolf . . Lord Chesterfield*ft Lettm to his 

SOIL 

Yeats . . Emotion of Multitude.) 

2. The Art of English Prose — ^K. P. K. Menon — Longmans, 

Part I (b)— English— 1960. 

(Fourth paper to he taken in 1962) 

Mon-l>eti^ied Reading : 

1 . The Trumpet (Hardy) — Macmillan. 

2. The Roll Call of Honour (Quillcr-Couch), Thomas Nelson. 


B.A. 


Part HI— Branch XII — English* 

Group A — Main. 

1962. 

(a) Shakespeare — 

Richard 111. The Tempest. (A general knowledge of the other 
plays of Shakespeare will be required.) 

(b) Drama — 

Far Detailed Study— 

Or. Faustus (Marlowe). 

St. loan (Bernard Shaw). 

Fdr Nan*det€dkd Readii ^ — 

Goldsmith: She stoops to Conquer. 

GalswcMthy. The First and the Last 

J. M. Bassie: The Admirable Crichton (Longmans), 

(c) From— 

Fbr Detailed Study— 

Essays of Elia (First aeries). 

Essays by Modem Writers: lai»oii (Lonimans). 

Far NatMkttdkd RemRm^ 

Evan Harrington: Meredith. 

Baiohester Towers: TtoUope. 



554 tbxt'Books m enolisk for b.a- and b.sc. 
(three-year) deoreb examinations, 1961-62 

id) Poetry — 

Wordsworth’s ‘Prelude’ — Book I. 

and 

The following selections from Standard English Poems (Bd* 
Young and K. R. Srinivasa Iyengar) (O.U.P.) 

Milton: L’ Allegro and IL Penscrosc. 

Pope: Epistle to Arbuthnot. 

Collins: Ode to Evening. 

Browning: Child Roland to the Dark Tower came. 

The Last Ride Together. 

Arnold: Dover Beach. 

Yeats: The Tower. 

Brooke: Menclaus and Helen; Peace: Safely: The Dead; 
The Soldier. 

Hodgson: The Song of Honour. 

Lawrence: Snake. 

Nonra. — ^A general knowledge of the other poems of Wordsworth 
will be required. 

N.B . — In all the four papers, credit will be given for a good 
general knowledge of English Literature. 

Group B — AnciHary, 

1961. 

1. History of English Literature — 

Bboks recommended — 

(1) Legouis — ^A Short History of English Literature. 

(2) Compton—Rjckctl— A Short History of English Uteri* 

tore. 

(3) Sampson, G. — A Concise History of English Utemtuie. 

(4) Hudson — An Introduction to the Study of Ltieraiun. 

(5) Hudson— Outline History of English Literatitre. 

1. Sodal Mkiory of EogitMd--- 
Book mwmmended: 

Tievalyaii— English Social History. 


3fB 



TEXT-BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 555 

(three-year) degree examinations, 1961-62 


B.A. and B.Sc. 

Part II (a) — Sanskrit — 1961. 

1. Kalidasa's Sakuntala. 

2. Kalidasa*s Meghadhuta (Whole). 

3. Bharavi's Kiratarjuniya — Canto I only. 

4. Dandin's Oasakumara charita — Purvapithika only. 

The allocation of text>books for the three papers shall beas followi:>« 
Paper ! — 

Sakuntala. Meghadhuta and Kiratarjuniya. 

Paper /A 

Dasakumara charita and Translation from Sanskrit into English 
and English into Sanskrit. 

40 marks to be allotted for prosc-text and 60 marks for iran&s 

lation. 


Part II (b)— SANsKRit — 1962. 

Paper ///. 

Dandtn's Kavyadarsa, Chapters I and II, Verses 1-96, ending 
with the hgure Rupaba. 

Hiuary of Saff$krii Utermurt '. 

T€Xt4*ooks — 

Macdoncll; History of Sanskrit Literature, Chapters X to XIV. 
Keith: Classical Sanskrit Literature— Heritage of India Seriet. 


B.A, 

Part HI— Branch XH— Sakskrjt—Section A. 
{Bxamimiian far Papers ! and It fa be held in !%1.) 

Paper /, 

BoidfS af the later perhd /-*- 
t. iliavabhutrs Uttararanta charita. 

2. Bhoia's Campuramayana— Ayodhya Kanda oidy. 

I. Hiursha Clmrita— Ucehvaia 




556 text-hooks IN SANSKRIT FOR B,A. AND B.SC. 
(t^rbe-yeaRs) deorBe examinations, 1961-62 

P€^er // 

Ancient indlan Histcry and Culture t^ta tOOO AM* 

Books recommended for study — 

K K. A. Neelakanta Sastri: History of India, Volume I. 

2. Basham: The wonder that was India. 

Copies can be had of Orient Longmans Sl Co., Madras-2. 

Books recommended for consultation — 

History and Culture of the Indian People, Bharathtya Vtdhya 
Bhavan, Bombay. (Volumes 1 to 6.) 

(Kxamination/or Papers III to VI to be held in 1 962. \ 

Paper Ilf 

Books of the Early Period — 

1. Macdonell: Vcdic Reader: The following selections - 
Agni L 1 . 

Savitr I. 35. 

Maruts I. 85. 

Visnu I. 153. 

Funeral Hymn X. 14. 

Pitaras X. 1 5. 

Gambler X. 34. 

YamaX. 135. 

2. Aitareya-brahmana VII — 3 and 4. 

3. Kathopanishad-~First Adhyaya-— Text only. 

4. Gautama Dharma Sutra-— Text only— Chaptcn I to 9. 
Oovemmcmt Press, Mysore cr Anandatrama Frees, Baona. 

Pt^ IV. 

moksofilrn Later Period 11--^ 

I. Matttbl]arata--^VIduianiU— Preiagant^ in U%t>i|pafiai*^ 

Chapiire 33 to 40. 

1L FataojalTs Miliabasliym I*!*!. 

3, Ppi^vadgiti**--^^ 1 to C 



TEXT-BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A AND B.SC* 557 

(three year) degree examinations, t 06 i -62 


Paper V. 

Comparative Philology with special reference to Sanskrit, accor- 
ding to the existing syllabus for Grammar (historical) under Part III 
Sanskrit and History of Sanskrit Literature — Vedic Period only. 

Macdoncll : History of Sanskrit Literature. 

Winternitz: History of Indian Literature (Volume 1). 

Paper VI. 

Eiemtnis of Poetics^ Grammar and Indian Lo^ic, 

1. Dandin’s Kavyadarsa — Pariccheda 1. 

2. Grammar — Varadaraja’s Madhya Siddhantakaumudi — 

the Chapters on Samjna^ Pancasandhi and Karaka only (Chowkhamba 
Book Ekpot, Benares). 

3. Annambhatta's Tarkasangraha with Nyayabodhini. 

Si^:ti{>n B. 

<Papns / Oftd //— 1961 .) 

1. Prescribed text-books — General —Paper I-- 

(i) Vifvamitha Pancanana — Muktavali with Dtnakari of Sabdft 
khanda, 

(li) Gauthama dlutrma Sutras — First nine Paricchcdai. 

(til) Manusmriti — Chapter 9. Text only, 

2. Prescribed text-books — Gciicnil— Paper II— 

(i) Stddhanthakaumudt— Purvardha only (omitting Tadhtta). 

(ii) Rig. Veda. Macdocieirs Vedic Reader, I to X hymni (both 
inclusive)— Text only. 

(ill) Kaihopanithad— Text only. 

(Papers IJI te P/— 1%2.) 

3- Prescribed text«books — General— Paper III— - 

(i) Jaiminiyii Nyayamalavistara from the beginning to the end of 
Pada 3 in Chapter IIL 

(ii) hfimamsa Nyiympnilcasa of^^podeva. 

SBl 


€8a 




558 text-books JN SANSKRIT FOR N.A. AND B.SC. 
(THREE* YEAR) PEO RBE EXAMINATIONS, 19 1-62 

Special Part. 


1 . Mimamm- 


Paper J. 

Taittiriya Sanihita with Sayana’s Bhasya, Khunda I, Prapa- 

Ihaka. 

2. Apasthamba Srauta — Sutra with RudraJatla’^ Vritti — Prasaoi 
r to V (both inclusive). 


Paper If. 

Bhatta Dipika from beginning to end ot the third Pada of thi 

third. 

Adhyaya (Chapters I to 1 1 1), 

Aitreya Erahmana with Sayana Bhasya, fourth Panchika. 

Paper III. 

Bhatta Dipika from the fourth Pada of C hapter III. 

3, Afyaya — 

Paper I. 

Gauthama*s Nyaya sutras with X'atsyavanas Bhasya, Chapteri 
1 and 11. 

Kanada's Vatseshika sutras, Text only. 

Pap,r //. 

jagadm^s Paochataksani and SimhavyaghtL 
Gadadhara*s Cauturdasalakshana. 

(a) From beginning up to the end of the DvuiyasvaJakshana* 

(b) Kutagbatitaiakshana. 

(e) Kutagbatitaiakshana. 

(d) Vytdhikarsipa — Dharma vacc hi na na bha vii — K ha nda na 
grantlia. 


Paper ilL 

* 

‘ Uadadhara’s SambhimRnu. 

Oa<adliata’$ SiddhaBtalakdMpa (whole). 



TEXT-BOOKS IN SANSKRIT FOR B.A. AND B-SC. 5 Sf 
(threb-year) degree examinations, 19 61*62 


4. Vyakarana 


Pap^r /. 

Paribhasandusckhara (whole). 


Papjr //. 

Praudamanorama, Text from beginning lo end of Avyayibhe% * 
Siddhaniakaumudi Kril and Taddhita Sections. 

Paper III. 

Sabdanitna frotn beginning to end of Siripraayaya. 


5. Sahitya - 


Paper 1. 

Bana\ Kadunbari from Mahasveta Vrittanta lo the end of Pur- 

viifdha. 

Sri Harsha's Naishada, cantos 10 and 1 1. 

Kutnara'vambhava. cantos I to 5 (inclusive). 

Ni}akiintha\ij;tva f>f Nilakantha Dikshita, Uchva^a 111 only. 


Papir //. 

Sakiiruaki. 

Malaiimadhava. 

Mnchiikttttka. 

Mtidrarakshasa, 


Paper lit 

Dandin\ Kav>adars;i~- Pancchcda J only. 

K u V a I a > a na nd a ( vv h ole). 

Si ddha m tiaka u m u d i - -- 1'"addb it ha — A patyadhikarm only. 
Dhawinjaya — Oasarupaka wnh Avaloka. 


6. Jivikka — 

P*tprr I 

BhMkiim’s Rijiiganita, 

Bhaskaiacharvirs Lilavati— whole (omitting PriltaftlMStlka. 

Kutukii and Pa!wi>. 

Poper il 

ICftlielmmiti by Durgaprasatla, Books III md IV oitly. 

Trlkonamiti. t 



560 tlXT-^»OOKS IN SAHSIUEllT FOR ».A. ANP B-SC. 
(THREB-YgAR) BEORBB EXAMlNATIONS> 1961 ">62 

Pap§r ///. 

Ooiapmkasii. Capiyatrikonamlti and Oolarekhaganiu only. 


7. Aymyeda — 


Papers /. 

Aitaagahrdaya, Sarira, Nidana and Cikiisa stbana^. 

Paper //• 

Carakasamita, Sutra and Sarira Sthanas. 

Pratyaksha Sarira by Mahamahopadhyaya Gananaih Sen* 

paper ///. 

Rasaratnaftamuccaya, first eleven chapters. 


B*A. 


Part Hi — S anscrit. 

Branch VI! I — Indian Music (Main), 

Ancillary Syllabus in Sanskrit — 1961. 

(i) Kalidasa*! Raghuvamsa, Canto XU. 

(ii) Vikranmrka chariti— Stories I to 4. Pages fromalxiut 25 to 40 

(iii) Prosody^ 

Elements of Sanskrit prosody — distinctioo into Matm, Vdtta 
and Oana Vritta— The characteristics of the Vrittas—Anustubh Upsyatt* 
Vamsastha^ Vasantatilaka, Malini, Sikhanni. Mandakranta, Sarduk- 
vfleridita, Sraghara, Ekndaka, Arya— Examples of the mofc musical 
metres: Charnpakamala, I>odhakaand Tbtaka, Bhujangaprayata, Mat* 
tamayiira, Tunaka and Citra, Panca-Camara, Mattakrida* Tanvi. 
Kmunchapada. Consult: Vrittaratriakara, Sratabodha, Canikmapjan* 

(iv) 30 Sanskrit Musical Compmitions— • 

L layadeva— 

(i) PrakyapayodliJ jale— Introduaory Dasavatra Ashtapadl. 

(Ii) ljtlikkvaiiiar**First Ashtapadl 


$9i 



TEXT 'BOOKS IN SANSKRIT TOR B A. AND B.SC. 56 1 

(THRBB-YEAR) DEOREE EXAMI NAT IO NS, 1961-62 


II. Narayaimtirtha*s Tarangas*— 

(iii) Govinda Ghatya— Bhairavi. 

(iv) Puraya mama kamam--*Bhi!ahart. 

III. Sadasiva Brahmendra — 

(v) Manasa Sancarare (Sama). 

(vi) Bruhin Mukunckti. 

(vii) Tunga tarangic. 

IV. Swati Tirunai — 

(viit) Sarasijaoiibha myrarc — lod4. 

(ix) Sarasakiiha paripalaya— Paniuvarali. 

(x) Kripaya palaya Saarc— Charukcsi. 

(xi) Vandc Sada Padmanabhain Navarasa Kannada. 

V. Syaina Sastri - 

Kanaka Saiia Vihanni -Punnagavarali. 

(xiii) Sankan Sam Kuru — Savcri. 

VI. Chinnasami Sastn — 

(xtv) Sri Lalite — Bhairavi. 

VII. Tyagaiaya — 

fxv) GirinM^utacanaya" Suddhaiiangala — Ganesa. 
ixvi) Varasikhivahana — Supradipa— Subrahnmoya. 

(xvit) Nadaianumaitisam Chittaranjani — Siva. 

(xviii) Sarriaiavaragamarui--Htfidola~- Krishna. 

(xix) Sri Narada--Kanada - Narada. 

(xx) lanak iramana — Sudhai^t manthi ni —Rama. 

Cxxi) liytmangalain — Ghaula— Matigalam. 

VllJ. Multiiiimmi Dikshitar-- 

(xxii) Siddhivuiayiikam — Catinara or Shanmukhapriya — 

Ganesa. 

(xxtii) VtnipmtaludiidharlQi---Vegavahtni--Sm$m 

(ijuv) Mahalakihffii karitnaiasakhari— Madhava Matiohari 
(raia)*^Lakshini 



562 TB 3 CT-fiOdlCS IN FOR B.A. AND B,SC* 

CrHREE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1961* 62 


(kxv) Sri Subratnanya Nyaitamastc— -Kambhoji— Subrah- 

manya* 

(xxvi) Sri Parvatiparameswaran— Barali— Farvati and Para- 
mtawara. 

(xxvii) Sri Dakshinamurte — Sankarabharana — Dak&binamurthi. 
(xxviii) ICamalamba bhajare — Kalyani -Devi, 

(xxtx) Suryamuric — Saurashtra— Sun, 

(xxx) Mamava Pattabhiranm — Maniranga — Rama. 


B.A, and B.Sc. 

Part U (a)~--HiNDl— I%1. 
(PaiKrs I and li) 


Poeiry: 

(i) University Poetry Selections. 

(ii) Milan— -Ram Naresh Tripaii. 


Prose and Drama: 

(1) Hindi Gadya Garimar (excluding lessons 7, 11, 14, 16 and 
18) — Edited by Ramdhir Upadhyaya, Macmillan h Co . Lid. 

(2) Kirti Stammbha— Hari Krishna 'PremiL 

(3) Chaya (One- Act plays)— D. B. Hindi Pracliar Sabhi, 
Madras. 


Part II ( 6 )— Hindi— 1962. 
Paper HI. 

Nan^tailed texts — 

1. Nirmala — ^Prem Chand. 

2. Katha Kaumudi— D.B.H.P. Sabha. Madras. 


B.A* 

» Part III— Br.anch XU— Hindi. 

(Examimtion for Papers / and if to he held in 


Paper /. 

Mktory of MimB Eiltmmnf— 

L Hindi Sahitya iCa ltika»--by 0r. Ram Kumar Venna 
(R- N. Lal)*^ 





TEXT-BOOKS IN HIN0t FOR B*A. AND B SC. 563 

(three-year) degree examinations, 1961-^^ 

2. Hindi Kavya Vimarsh — Sri Gulab Rai. 

3. Hindi flhasha aur Sahitya— Shyam Sundar Das. 

4. Hindi Sahitya Ka Itihas — Pt. Ram Chandra Shukla. 

5. Kavya Charcha— Prof. Lalita Prasad Sukai. 

Paper //. 

Indian History and Culture — 

1. Itihas Pravcsh— Jaichandra Vidyalankar, 

2. Bharat 45 cya Sanskrit! — Dr. Baldcv Prasad Mishrc. 

For reference only — 

1. History of India— K. A. Niiakanta Shastri. 

2. The Legacy of India — Edited by Garret. 

3. Bharateeya Samkrit— Sri Ram Dhari Singh “Dinkar”. 

4. Bharatvarsh Ka Sankshipta Itihas— University of Madras. 
(Examination for Papers If! to VI to be hetd on 1962 .) 

Paper Hi. 

Prescribeel Text -books — / (Poetry}— 

!. Kavya Kalanidht— Baugccya Hindi Panshad, Calcutta. 

2. Kavitavali (Omitting Uttar Kanda)— Tulasidas. 

3. Gunian—Sumitra Nandan. Pant. 

Paper /K 

Pmcribed Text-hocks—U (Prose and Drama)— 

L Gadya Kusum Mala— Ram Naraytn Lai dk Co., Alithabad. 
2, J** Shankar Prasad- 

I, Gtban—Frtmchand. 

4. Hindi Ki Aittar Kafianiyan- Edited by Jagannath Prasad 
Sharma. 

5- Reihmi Tie— Ram Kumar Verma, 


S$7 



564 text-books in MAJRATHl FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(THREE- YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, *961-62 


Paper K 

Prosody md Poetics— 

1. Kavya Pradecp — Ram Bthari Sukla. 

2. Aiafikar Manjoosha — Lala Bhagwan Dcen, 

3. Kavya Parichaya— Chandra Shckar Shastri and Ram 
Chandra Sukla '"Saras*’. 


Paper VI 

History of Language and Grammar — 

L Hindi Bhasha Aur Sahitya — Shyam Sundar Das. 

2. Vyakaran Pradecp — Ram Deo (Hindi Bhavan, Allahabad) 

3. Sankshipta Hindi Vyakaran — Kamta Prasad Guru. 

{Note . — All the papers shall be set and answered to Hindi.) 

B.A. and B-Sc. 

Part II (n)--MAitATHi~l96l. 

(Papers / and H ) 

Paper /. 

(Poetry^, History of Literature, Prosody and Poclicf). 

For Detailed Study. 

Poetry— 

1. Moropant— Virat parva. 

2. Pacha Kavi —Edited by R^adhyaksha. 

History of Marathi Uterature^ Books reamimended— 

L Maharashtra Saraswat (Chapters on Dyaneshwar, Waman 
by Bhava Pandit, Titkaram and Moropant). 

2, Marathi Sahityachi Ruparesha by Dr. U. P. Datiddear. 

Pwmdy md Poetics— Books recommended— 

L Alankaia Chandrtka by Gore, G. U. 

2, Vnthidarpaii by P. B. Gadbc^. 




TEXT-BOOKS IN MARATHI FOR B.A. AMD B.SC. 565 
(THREE- YEAR) DEOREB EXAMINATIONS, 1961-62 


Papm- ft. 

(Prcm. DnimA and Otafomar). 


Frote — 


For Detailed Study. 


Mamtht Nihandha by R. S. Walimba. 


Drama— 

Piinya Prabhava by Gadkari. 


Grammar — 

Books recommended —Praudhabodha Vyakaran by R. B. Joshi. 


Pajit 11(6)— MaratMj~.!962. 

Paper ///. 

Paper I II — ^Non>dctailed text, (mssage or passa«ea in Eolith for 
triinslation into Marathi, General Compositton having reference to 
modem thought)- 

Non- Detailed Text 

1. Dauiat by N. S. Fhadake- 

2. Parijat"' Edited by V. S. Khandekar. 


B.A. 

P4ltT in— BaANCH XII— Mamatmi. 
{Examimtion for Papers / and t ! to be heid im 1961.) 

Paper L 

Histar^f a/ Maraiki UieratureSaaka reermvmmkd^ 

1. Maharashtra Saraawat by Bhava, 

2. Pradakihlna — Edited by A. A, Kulkami. 

3. Arvachina Marathi Sahitya — Hene. 

4. Marathi Sahityachi Ruf>aresha by Dr. U. P, Dandekar. 


PDstofy md Cultme af Medmrmkim-^Booki meammmded^ 

L Matiaraahtradia Samskritic Itihasa by Dr. S, D, fmdm. 



566 TBXt-iiO€m3 IN Marathi for b.a, and b.sc, 
(threb^year) degree examinations^ 196 1 *>62 

X Marattii Riyasat by Sardesai. 

X Tirthanipa Maharashtra, Parts 1 and I! by Ma hadesliartri 
Josbi 

(Examination for Papers ill to VI to he held in 1962.) 

Pc^r in. 

Poetry (ancient ami modern) — Prescribed Text -hooks I—* 

1. Dyaoeshwari )2th Adhyaya. 

X Muktcshwar— Sabha parva. 

3. Keshavasuta-Keshana Sutaochi Kavita. 

4. Tilak—Tilaknachi Kavita. 

5. Bee — Phulanchi Orjala- 


Paper IV. 

Prose and Drama — Prescribed Texts //— 

1. Adnyapatra by Ramachandra Pant Amatya. 

2. Amachya Desliachi Sthiti by Chipplonkar. 

3. Nibandha Sangraha Part I by Agarkar. 

4. Vidyaharam by Uhadilkar. 

5. Ekach Pyala — Ciadkari. 


Paper V. 

Prosody and Poetics — Books recommended 
1. Chandraihana by Patvardhan. 

X Abhtiiarm Kav^aprahash by Jog. 

3. Kavyalochana by Kclkar. 

Paper VI. 

0Dtary of iMngw^emai Grammar-- Books Mewmmemkd^ 

L Marathi Bhafiia*-Udgaiiia Ani Vtkasa by Kulkami. K.P. 
X Sabfiis^Adhyiiik Martthiche Ucehatar Vyakarait. 


S90 


TBXT-BOOltS IN PRENCH AND LATIN PO% B.A. AND 567 
B.SC. (THREE-YEAR) DEORBB EXAMINATIONS, 1961-62 


B.A. and B.Sc. 


Fapnch. 

Part II— Fiusnch, 1961. 

Talcs of Adventure from Modem Authors by F. Roc Longmam 
Lc Petti Choc Pan I By Dandet. Harap. Oxford Book of 
French Verse. 13iK to the 20tb Century. Racine Esther; Numbers 
146 to 202. Lc Colonel Chabert Gobsceb. By Balzac. Harap (to be 
taken in 1962). 


B.A. 


Part lU—1962. 

Drama : 

L'Avarc by Moliere. 

Allialic by Racine. 

Hernani by Victor Hugo, 

Porfrv: 

Oxford Book of f rcnch Verse, 1 3th to the 20tb Century. Numberii 
19H to 231. 

Prne 

Colonel Chabert Gobsceb. By Balzac. Harap Le Barrage. By 
Bordeaux. 

Cc Que dilscentes livres. By F, Faguet. O.IJ.P. 

Author's life and Work to be studied: Victor Hugo. 

History of French Lticraturc from the Renatssance to Modem 

Times. 

i Recommended for Reference: Cazaiiiaii*s Htstoty of Freocli 
Literature Saintsbury’s History of French Literaliire. HiHoria 
de k language Francies. By Ch* das Granges). 

B.A. and B.Sc. 

Latin. 

Part II- 196L 
Cicero: Pro Archia Pocta. 

Venil: Acoeid Book I. 

Horace: Odes Book IV (to be taken in 1962). 






566 tnxt »aoiu in obemah and Tamil fob b*a* and 
M.WC. (tHREB-YEAB) DBQREfe EXAMINATIONS, 1961*62 


Part in*-^]961, 1962, 

Pmma: 

litbcr Milas. Glonosus of Glaums, or Adalphi of Ttranoa* 

Cicero: Pro Lege Manilla Tacitus Annalas Book I. 

Psi^fry: 

Vergil; Acneid Book Vlll. 

Horace: Odes Book III. 

Juvenal: Satire X. 

Study of author's life and work: Cicero. 

History of Latin Literature. 


B,A* and B,Sc« 

Part II (o)— G fRMAN—l96L 

(Paper# I an4 if.) 

1. Grammar— Wrenn—Krips. (Harrap). An I Met mediate Ger- 
man course (40 poems). 

2. Modem German Short Stories, Second Scries by H. F Pfftiri| 
(O.U.P.), 

X Wilhelm Tell by Schiller. 

Paet 1962. 

(Paper /// ) 

Efcnont by Geethe. 


B.A. and B.Sc. 

Paet U (a) — T amil— 1961. 

Paper !. 

Paefiry mui Grmtmar : 

1. Faitinappalai. 

1 Pufinfmttnt: 200 lines from Auvvaiyar*s Verm. 

X Kunintiiokai: 50 Hoes other than those ftftfttfd in I960. 




TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIt FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 569 

(THREB-YBAR) DEQREB EXA MINATIONS, 1961-62 

4 . Tirukkitral: iOO lines (Five Chapters beguining with Iral- 
imtchi). 

5. Silappadhikaram— Vanchikkandam^-Katchikkathai. 

6. Chintatnani : 312 lines (Fathumaiyar Jlambakam). 

7. Pertyapuranam ; 42 stanzas (Anaya Nava lar Puranam). 

8. Kambaramayanam: 400 lines (Kaikc>t Siizhvinaippatalam) 

9. Bharathtyar Kuyil Pattu: 160 lines. 

10. Tanippadalkai : 80 tines. 

Note.— I n Grammar the syllabus has to l>e followed. The 100 
marks allotted for this Paper J shall be distributed between Poetry 
and Grammar in the proportion of 80; 20. I hc questions on Grammar 
shall be based on the syllabus correlated vsith the Poetical Selecttons 
prescribed. 


Paper //. 


Drama ami Prau* : 

Frost: 

1. liakkiyak katturaigal by Dr. M. A Dorai Rangasamy 
(Navanertham Ammaiyar, c o Star Prasuram. Triplicane, Madras). 

2. Mannavar Nithiyum Mangaivar Mannbuin by K. Balasuoda- 
ram Miidaliar, S. Vasan A Co.. Mylapore, Madras-4. 

Drama 

MmoonmaEiiyam. 


Paar 11(6)*^ Tamii- 1962 
Paper Ifi 

Trmmlattofi* Cdinpmttion and A Ctcneral History of 
Tamii Literature. 

Baokt mmnmtftdrni far-- A Gmtml History of Tmtii IJfrraturr 

I . Tliarlcalap*ptrlcatat Tamfl Pulavar by Maraimalat AdigthS S. W.P. 
House, Madras). 

2« Satifikalai Tamirhum Pirkalal Tamirhum by Dr. Swuminatha 

Ayyar. 


3 $$ 




Ho TEXr-BOOKs IN TAMIL FOR * A. AND B.SC. 

(THRE E-YEA R) DEGREE EXAMINA TION S, 1961-62 

3. Ilakktya Vanilaru by K, Subramanya PiUai (S.S.W.P. House, 
Madras). 

Not£.— Q uesiions should not be based on these texts but should 
be of general nature on the History of Tamil Literature. Questions 
should not be asked to fix the dates of Poets, etc. 


B.A. 

Part III— Branch XII- Tamu. 

(Papers / and A/-.1961 ) 

Paper /. 

History of Tamil Literature — History and DevclopnierUs of various 
trends and their changes in the subject-matter, idiom, rhythm and 
verification and other modes of expression geaeraliy all through 
the ages and in particular from age to age or century to century : 

1. The condition of literature as may be gleaned from Tol- 
kappiyam. 

2. Sangam period: Characteristics of Sangam Literature-- 
the conception of Tokai and the absence of Epic before Silappadht- 
karam. 

3. The eighteen ethical works—thcir general trends and 
characteristic features — inter relations — influence of Rural and Us 
I^ce in Tamil Literature— The relationship between Kiikkanakku 
and Melkanakku — the later Ethical Literature and their relation- 
ship with Kiikaoakku. 

4. Growth of Epics — ^Silappadhtkaram — its rclationslup wnh 
Sangam Age — its influence on later day literature — us rcfaiiomhip 
with Manimegalai. 

5. The so-called major and minor five epics - a criticism of 
this conception from the historical and literary point of view. 

6. Kamba Ramayanam— its age— characteristic festurcs — 

importance and influence. 

7. Periyapuranam — its age--characterittic features— impor- 

tance and influence. 

8. The later Sthakpuranas. 

9. The variotii Mndsof prabandhiim— their rise and develop* 
mmt in gmetil with an explanation of the influence thaping thetti. 


$94 



TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 571 
(THREE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1961-62 


10. The folk song influencing literature from time to time. 

11. The history of drama— Kura vanchi, Pallu, Nondi Nata- 
kam, Kirlhanai natakam— Foreign dramas and their inhuence — Modern 
Dramas and Radio Dramas and Cinemas. 

12. Prose — ^Development from the earliest Age to the modern 

times. 


13. Modem trends and modern kinds of literature. 

14. Religion and Philosophy in Tamil literature— their 
developfnent and vaHelks. 

15. The general trends of the Sangam age, of the Pallava age, 
of the later Cholas, of the later Pandyas, of the Vijayanagar period and 
of the period of the Wettern influence. 

16. The contributions of the various religions and their 
InttJtutiom (Mutts), etc., to Tamil literature. 

Books rtctmmmnded-^ 

1. K. S. Srinivasa Pillai — Tamil Varalaru, Parts 1 and 11. 

2. K. Subramania Pillai — Dakkiya Varalaru. 

3. SomasiUKkim Detikar— 16th Century Tamil Poets; 17th 
Century Tamil poets. 

4. Pandai Tamil Ilakkiya Varalaru by Sadasiva Pandarat- 

tar (a) 300-600 A.D.; (6) 13th, 1 5th Centuries. 


Pflgwr //. 

ffismyof Tatfdi Nad ami Cultum^ 

L Mtsiory — 

I, Sources of our study, 

X Influence of geography on hisioD— Historical divisions 
of the country in the various periodi, 

3, The culture of the earliest inhabitants — Old Stone A^— 
New Stone Age— Race types — Linguistic and Cultural affinities— 
Megalithlc monuments— paintings— Painted pottery, etc. 

4. Pre-Sangam History and Culture— Sangam Age--^Boretgii 
contacts, 


B96 



572 TEXT -BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B.A. AND B-SC. 

(threb*>year) degree examinations, 1961-62 


5. Post«Sangam period — Kaiabhras — Foreign inBuence — 

Palkvas conflict with the North and the South — the Pandyas, 
Mutharaiyas, IrikKuvei; the Religious condition— Village commu- 
nity and Local Self-Government Polity. 

6. The Later Cholas — their growth— Conflict wiln other 
powers— their influence in and outside India— The Rise of Utc 
Later Pandya Power— the conflict of the Cholas* Pandyas, Hoysalas 
and Yadhavas. 

7. The fall of the Tamil Political Power— influence of Vijaya- 
nagar Rulers, Nayaks, Marattas — the development of Western and 
Muslim influence — the Palayakars. 

8. The struggle for Freedom —Gandhian Era, 

//. Culture — 

The Social and Economic conditions — Literature — Religiofi 
and Philosophy— Painting — Sculpture— Iconography— Archiiecluft 

— Music and other Fine Arts — Handicrafts— Polity, Custom and 
Law, all forming a distinctive Culture, developing from Age to Age 
influenced by and influencing others. 

Books recommended— 

L Ten Indiyac-chirppangal by Kanakarathciatn. 

2. Alagu Kaiaigal by Seen! Venkataswamy 

3. South Indian History by K. Nilakanta Sastry. 

4. Tamils 1,800 years ago by Kanakasabai Pillat. 

5. Contributions of South India to Indian Culture b> 
S. K. Aiyangar. 

Note. — The Questions on Political History shall bear 40 marki 
and the questions on Culture shall bear 60 marks, 

{Papers HI to F/— 1962|, 

Paper HI 

Presmdited Tex ts / — 

1, Perumbanarruppadai— 248 lines. 

2. TinikkuiiiJ-Aradyal— 500 lines. 

3, Purananuru, Voi 51-100 — 635 lines. 

4. Sikppailhikaraiii— Urkann Kathai, (h) Adaikkilak kathaf 
and (e) Kolatkkaiak kithai— 858 lin^. 






573 


TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOR B A. AND B.SC. 

(three>year) degree examinations, 1^61-62 

Paper IV. 

Prescribed Texts II — 

1. Kambaramayanam — Kaatchi, Ninthai and Urukkattup- 
patalams—1.104 lines. 

2. Villiputturar Baralham -Kandavadhahanaccharukkam — 304 
lines. 

3. Ttruviiaiyadalpuranam— Paranjothiyar — Viraguvirra patalam 

—total 280 lines. 

4 . Tiruvembavai and Tiruppavai — 200 lines. 

5. Sekktzhar Pillaiitamizh — Isi five in each of the 10 parvams 
—200 lines. 

Paper V 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics — 

1. Nannul Kandigai urai — Arumuga Navalar. 

2. Yapparungalakkarigai — Old Commentary, 

3 Dandtyalankaram - Porulani lyal- General study without 
details of classifications. 

Non-. —The questions on Grammar shall bear 40 marks: Quet* 
tions on Prosody 30 marks and Questions on Poetics 30 marks. 


Paper VI 

History of the Tamil Language and Elements oj the Dra vidian Com^ 
pararive Grammar — 

1 . Syltahus for the Hbtory of the Tamil Language--^ 

General — The place of Tamil in the Dravidian family of 
Languages— Its high antiquity— Its geographical area in ancient timet 
— the Sentami/h and Koduntamtzb Counties —Very early cultivation 
of Tamil — The three Sangams. 

The Periods of Tamil Language— Ihc Old or Sangam Tamil— 
The Mediaeval Tamil and the Modern Tamil— Illustrative Literature 
of each Period— Grammars of the different Periods— The extent of 
Foreign influence on Tamil Grammars. 

Phonohrg}\^~Voytch — Their relationship to the primitive 
Dravidian. Vowel system— History of Vowels — Accent and Emphasis 
—Rising, Falling and Vanishing Accents— Influence of accent on Word 
change and in Prosody Alapedai— Mutation pf Vpwclg — Vowel Har- 
mony— Vowel Sandhi— ^idoi. 


69a 





574 TEXT-BOOKS IN TAMIL FOK B.A. AND B.SC. 

(three- YEAR) OEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1961-62 

Consonants — Their relation to the Primitive Consonants — 
History cf Consonants — Mutations of Consonants, Palatali/alion, Den- 
talizatton. Voicing, Unvoicing, Consonant length. Assimilation, Alapedai 
—Consonantal Sandhi. 

Laws of Tamil Syllabathn Difference between Tolkap- 
piam and Nannu!- - Light on the Nature of Loan words. 

Morphology Historical treatment in the Old and Modern 

Tamil of the following: — Nouns — Pronouns — Case, the Verbs, The 
Passive Voice, The Moods — Imperative, Infmitive, Subjunctive. 
The Tenses — The tense-formation — The principles of their use 
Negative particle. The Relative and Verbal Participles. 

iVord Building — By Composition— Compound words (Tokai, 
Umnrni, Uvamai. etc.) — By Derivation— By Root ci caiton— Back 
formation — Double bases, etc. 

Vocabulary — The genera! character of Tamil Vocabulary at 
different Periods — Borrowings- Their causes — iX>ublets~~ Tc I ugu 
and Kannada Elements in Tamil — Loss of Old words Nature and 
extent — Sanskrit words— Tatsamas — Tadbhavas (Rules regarding these) 
— Prakrit borrowings— Manipravala Other borrowings (Hindi, 

Portuguese, English, etc.) — Hybrids— Tests for distinguishing Loan 
words. 

Semantics— Chsingts in the meaning of words - E'lcvation, 
Degradation, Specialization and Generalization from age to age. 

Syif/ojr— Historical. Study of the order of words in a Sen- 
tence — Deviation from the Normal- Causes- DifTcrcnce between 
the Syntax of Poetry and Prose — Foreign inHuence in Tamil Syntax 

2. Syilabtis for the Elements of the Dra vidian Comparative 
Grammar: Dravidian Languages — The Dravidian Group of Langu- 
ages and their chief characteristics — Enumeration of the Dravidian 

Languages. 

Dravidian Phonology— Iht Primitive Dravidian Parent 
Language— Vowel System — Changes— Accent-Harmonic sequence 
of Vowels — System of Consonants— Origin of Cerebrals (Retroflex) 
— ^Dialectic interchange of Consonants— Euphonic permutation of 
Consonants— Sandhi— Nasalization Prevention of Hiatus-- Dravidian 
Sytlabation. 

Dialect — Sentamizh and Koduntami/h. 

Morpphology— The Noun. 

Gender— Dravidian Nouns divided into two Oassei denolllig 
Rationals and Irrattonals* 



TEXTBOOKS IN TAMIL AND TELUGU FOR BA. AND 575 
B«SC. (THREE>YfcAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS. 1961-62 


Number— Singular and plural— No Dual— Singular- 

Masculine, Feminine and Neuter —Plural— Principles of pluralizatiofl. 

Case— Principles of Case-formation— Dravidian Cases— 
Comparison with Sanskrit Cases. 

The Pronoun — Pronouns of the First and Second Person 
—Comparison of Dialects— The Reflexive Pronoun— Pluralization 
of the Personal and Reflexive Pronouns — Demonstrative and Interro- 
gative Pronouns— Their bases— Demonstrative and Interrogative 
Adjectives and Adverbs — Honorific Demonstrative Pronouns. 

The I — Structure of the Dravidian Verbs — Roots used 
either as Verbs or Nouns— Formative Particles often added to Roots 
— Classification of Verbs. 

Casual Verb -their formation. 

Frcc|uentativc Verbs. 

Conjugational System Formation of the Tenses — Their 
significance and force— The Present Tense The Preterite Tense — 
The Future Tense — The Verbal and Rclaiisc Participles. 

Formation of Moods Methods of forming the Conditional, 
the Imperative and the Infinitive. 

The Voice- Active and Passive— The Negative Voice — 
Combination of Negative Particles with Verbal themes — The Dravi* 
dian Negative Particles. 

Formation of Verbal Nouns, Derivative Nouns and Abstract 

Nouns. 

€otfipmm\e .Vvrinxv— The Syntax of the several Languages 
compared * * The extent of Foreign influence over the Sv ntax of the 
several languages. 

Notk. The Questions on the History of the Tamil Language shall 
carry' 50 marks and the Questions on the EknKnis of the Dravidian 
Comparative Grammar shall carry 50 marks. 


B.A. A B.Sc. 

Part IMa)- T elvou— 1%L 
Papers i and ///. 

A. OldPmry : 

I. Krishnaiayabaramu--*C^nt^^ 3 and 4 from Udbyoga Parvaaiii 
by Tikkana. 


S99 



576 . tEXT-toOOM IN TBLUOU FOB B.A. AND B SC. 
(THREE -YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1961-62 


2* Chinithondanambi katha—Canto 2 from Haravilasamu by Sri- 

aatha. 

Natkiruni katha~~Canto 3 from Srikalahasti mabatmiyamu by 
Dhurjati. 

(Selections Nos. 3, 5 and 6 published by the University of Madras.) 

B* Modern Poetry : 

Panchamrutamu by Srimathi M. Audilakshmi, m.a., m.i itt. Copies 
available from: N. Sar\'eswara Rao, 15, MuzafTaijang Bahadur Street, 
TripUcane, Madras-5. 

C. Drama : 

1. Malavikagnimitramu by Sri M. Sarabheswara Sarma, Pandit, 
Government Oriental Manuscript Library, Madras. 

2. Dhruvavijayamu by Sri Vangipuram Krishnamacharya, Assistant 
Professor, Pachaiyappa’s College, Madras. 

D. Prose : 

Vyasamaia — Edited by Sri P, V. Somayajuiu, m.a. Copies available 
At M. S. R. Murty A Co., Book- Sellers and Publishers, Main Road, 
Viiakhapatnam. 


Part I! (b)- T eluou - 1962. 

{Paper III). 

IE. Non*detailed Prose : 

Kokoro—By Sosaki|Naisumc (Japanese Fiction) Translated mto 
Tdugu by Srinivasa Chakravarthi Adarsagrandha Mandali, Vijayawada. 

B.A. 

Part HI -Branch XII ~ 'fEi UGU— i%i 
papers / Ofid // 

No books arc prescribed ; syllabus to be followed. 

Papers III to F/— 1961. 

Text^Books I: 

1. Old Poetry: 

1. PuYBthi iwrinayain— Cantos 7and8 from Kumarasarobhavaaiu 
of Nonnicboda. 


400 



lEJtT -BOOKS IN TElUOU FOR BA. AND B-SC. 577 
_ (THREE-YEA^ DEGREE E XAM I NATIONS, 196 1 -62 

2. Surasananima kaiha from Dvipada Panditaradhyacharitra by 

Pulkuriki Somanalha Kalabhashi. 

3. Kalapurnodayamu— Cantos 1 and 2 (without the avatarika 
or introductory verses) by Pingali Suranna, 

4. Sitavanavasa Ganianamu—From Uttara Ramayanamu by 
Kaukanti Paparaju Sasiry. 

B.A. Selections Nos 1.2, 8 and 9— published by the University 
of Madras. 

2. Modern Poetry : 

I. Dikshita Duhiia by T. Sivasankara (Saraswati Niketanamu^ 
Vetapalem, Guntur district). 

2. Viramanedu by Mudivarti Kondamacharyulu, Published by 
M/s. Vadlamudi Ramayyu, Nellore. 


Text" Books IT. 

Drama : 

1. Veni Samharamu by Subbarayudu. V. (Publishers: Y. 
Eswaravaraprasada Rao, near Training College, Rajahmundry, East 
Godavari district.) 

2, Gatopakhyanamu by Chilakamarti Lakshmi Narasimham 
(Publisher. Kondapalli Vecravenkaiah, Rajahmundry, East Godavari 
district). 

Prose : 

Meegada Tarakalu by Veturi Prabhakara Sastry (Veturi Sankara 
Sastry, ArshaRasayana Sala, Muktyala, Krishna district). 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics: 

1. Balavvakaranamu— Tatsama, Acchika Kriya Pahchchedamulu. 

2. Boudhavyikaranamu — Sandhi Sabda Karaka* Kriya Parich- 
ehedamulu. 

3. Narasabhupaliyamu — Cantos 3 and 5. 

4 . Appa Kaviyamu— Canto 3. 

5. Dasarupakamu— K. Ananta Charyulu. (All books availabl# 
from Vavilla Raraaswamy SastruIuA Sons, Esplanade, Madras). 


401 



S7t TBXT-HOOltS IN Tittjail AND KANNA0A FOA B.A. AND 
».SC> (TmUSB-YBAR) DBORBE BXAMlNATIONS» 1961-62 

B.A. 

Part III— Branch VIU. 

Group B — Tclugu—1961. 

1. PaUakiscvaprabandhamu— Edited by Sri P. Sambamurti, Music 
Department, University of Madras, Madras. 

2. Kshetrayapadamulu — Introductions to the Editions published 

(1) Sri V. Appa Rao, M.a.. L.t., Paitabhipuram, Guntur, 

(2) Dr. G. V. Sitapati, a. a., l.t. 

B.A. A B.Sc. 

Part 11 (a) — Kannada — 1961. 

(Papers / and J/.) 

Paper /. 

(1) Old Poetry : 

(а) Pampa Bharata — i2th Aswasa (221 stanras). 

(б) Gada Yuddha by Ranna: 7th and 8ih Aswasas (68 '4"67=: 
135 stanatas). 

(2) Mediaeval Poetry : 

(а) Jaimifii Bharata: Sandhis !, 2 and 3 (omitting stanias 7, 9, 10 
and 29 in Sandhi 3). 

(б) Megha Sandesha by Kukkc Subramanya Sastry (Kavyataya, 
Mysore). 

(3) Grammar: 

Portions relating to Grammar in Kannada Katppidi (Mysore 
University Publication). 


Paper II, 

1. Brama: Shakuntala by Basappa Chowdhury, 

2. Old Prose: Ramaswamedha (Muddana)--Chapters t to 6. 

3* Modern Prose : 

(a> Saanskriti by D. V. Gundappa. 

(i^ Pradbina SahMya by T. S. Vmikaiiiiaya, 





TEXT -BOOKS JN RAN'NADA FOR BA. AN0 B.8C. 579 

(THREE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1961-62 


4. History of Literature : 

An account of the life and works of the following authors together 
with those of the prescribed works:— 

(i) Nagachandra. 

(ii) Rudra Bhatta 

(iii) Akka Maha Devi. 

(iv) Harihara. 

(V) Chaiu Vrihalanatha. 

(vi) Ratnakara Varni. 

Pari U (b)™-KANNADA— 1962, 

Paper ///: 

1. Ramakrjshna Paramahamsa by Masii. 

2. Shanula by K V. Ayyar. 

i'AKr in —Branch XII— Kannada 
Papers / and II — 1961 . 

Paper / 

History of Literature— 

Kannada Sahitya Chariirc by Dr. R. S. Mugali (For conaul- 
tat ion: Kavi Chanic, Volumes 1 and 2 by Narasimbachar). 

Paper II. 

History of Karnataka ami Culture— 

I. Kannada Nadina Chariirc, Parts I to 3 (Kannada Sahitya 

Partshat, Bangalore)* 

2* Popular Culture of Karnataka by Masii Venkatesiengar. 

For Consultation— 

1. Heritage of Karnataka by R. S. Mugali. 

2. Karnataka Darshana (CofnmenK>ratton Volume in honour of 
R* R. Diwakar). 


Papers Hi to P/— 1962* 

Paper Hi. 

PmeHkmi Text^imokM I— 

1. Adlpurtiii (Fampi)— I4tb Aswaaa (149 staimii). 


4Q9 




580 TEXT-BOOKS IN KaNNaDA^ANO MALAYALAM FOR B A. 
AND B.SC. (THREE^YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1961-62 


2. Kabbikara Kava (Andayya). 

3. Sri Rama Pattabhisheka by Mahalakshmi, 

4. ChitraBgada by K. V. Puttappa. 

Paper IV. 

prescribed Text -books III — 

1. Ramaswamedha — Chapters 1 to 7. 

2. Veni Samhara Nataka Prati Krti. 

3. Bhasa Bharala Chakra by L. Gundappa. 

4. Jeevana Soundarya mattu Sahitya by D. V. Gundappa. 

5- Rayachur Vijaya by Krishnappa (Vasantha Malikc Publication, 
Mangalore'3). 


Paper V. 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics-— 

1. Sabdasmriti by Naga Varma. 

2. Portions relating to Prosody and Poetics from Kannada Kaippidi 
(Mysore University Publications). 

Paper VI. 

History of Language and Elements of the Dravidian Comparative 
Grammar — 

1. History of Kannada Language by Narasimhachar, 

2* Kannada Bhasha Shastra by R. Y. Dharwadkar. 

3. Kannada Vamagalu by Sediyapu Krishna Bbai (Kanoida 
Rfsearch Institute, Dharwar). 

B.A. St B.Sc. 

Part II (a) — Malayalam— 1961. 

Paper /. 

1 and 2. Sclectioiif from Nirtnain Warks and Chcrusseri: Publitli^ 
by tli4 University. 

% linnayt Variyir .. - Nalacharitam Rantttmdivmsam: 

PubUibers; Mathnibbtimi* 
Koabikode. 


404 



TEXT-BOOKS IN MAIAYALAM FOR B.A. AND B.SC, 581 
(THREE >YEAR) DEGREE EXAMINATIONS, 1961-62 


4. Chcrutiyil Kunjunni Nambisan. Vikramorvasiyam— Publishers : 

Sahitya Parishat Book Stall, 
Ernakulam. 


5. Valia thol Narayana Menon 

6. Vailoppillil Sridhara Menon 

7. N. V. Krishna Vadyar 

8 . M, P. Paul . . 


. . Sahityamanjari Part 111 — 
Publishers: Valiathol Gran- 
dhaiayam, Chcruihuruthi, 
Kerala. 

. . Kannikkoythu (Following 
titles only: 1. Mampazham, 
2. Vasantham, 3. Assam 
Panikkar, 4. Kaakka, 
5. Sahyantc Makan, 6. Pas- 
chima Samudram — Pub- 

lishers : National Book Stall, 
Kottayam. 

. . Kalotsavam — Publishers: Book 
Depot, Kozhikode. 

.. Sahitya Vicharam — Publishers: 
National Book Stall, Kot- 
tayam. 


Paper //— 1961, 


1. V, C Raman Pillay .. 

2, P. K. Narayana Pillay . , 


Martanda Varma — B. 

Book Depot, Trivandrum. 

Smarana Mandaiam-^Pub* 
lishers: P. K. Memorial 
Press, Trivandrum. 


Part II (b) — MAtAYALAM--l96l. 


for Comuliation^ 


Papers III. 


1. N. Kfishtia PUlay 


2. P. K. Paranmwmrait Ntyar 


iCftiraUyute Katita--«Publi* 

then: SaUtyt Pariibat 
Mudranaalayam, Bim- 
kulam. 

Malayala Sahitya Charitam-- 
Publishers: Mathrul^umi^ 
Kozhikode, 


70 


dOi 




582 TEXT-^BOOKS IN MALAYALAM FOR B.A. AND B,SC. 
(three^ybar) degree examinations. 1961-62 

Part III~Branch XII— Mala yalam, I96K 

(Papers t and 11.) 

Paper /. 

Histary of Literature — 

(A study of only the outlines of the History of Malayalam Literature 
IS expected). 

The following books are prescribed-™ 

1. Dr. C. A. Menon Pradakshinani — Published by 

The Lokavani Publication 
- - Tambaram. 

X P. K. Parameswaran Nayar, Adhunika Mala>i»hi Sahiiyt^ir.- 

Published by Sri Rama 
Vilasam Press, Trivandrum- 

Books recommended for consultation— 

1. Ullur S. Parameswara Iyer. Kerala Sahitya Charitram 

(A parts)--Publishcd by the 
University of Travancorc. 

2. T. M. Chummar Bhasha Gadya Sahitya Chari- 

iram — Published by National 
Book Stall, Kottayam. 


Paper 11. 

History of Kerala and Culture- 
No Text-books prescribed. 

Books recommended for consultation — 

1. The Chera Kings of the Sangam age by K. G. Sesba Iyer. 

2. Chronology of the Curly Tamils by K. N. Sivaraja Pillai. 

3. Kerala Oiaiitrathile Iruladalnja Edugal by Eknkulaiti Kurban 
Pillai- 

4- Chila Kerala Charitra Prasnangal by Elankulam Kunjan Pillau 

(AUparta) 

5* lifatory of Cochin* Volumes I A If by K, F- Padmanabha 
Mffion* 


4$9 



TEXT^&OOKS IN MALAYALAM FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 583 
(thre e- YEAR) PBOREB EX AMlNATiOm , 19 61-62 

6. Travancorc State Manual, Volume II by T. K. Vclu PtUai. 

7. Malabar Manual by Logan. 

8. Malabar and the Portuguese by K. M. Panikkar. 

9. Malabar and the Dutch by K. M. Panikkar. 

16, The Portuguese Pirates by O. K, Nambiyar. 

11. Koothum Kudiyattamum by Ammaman Thampuran. 

12. Kudiyattam by Sri Narayana Pisharotl. 

13. Keralathile Nadodi^Natagangal, University Publication, 

14. Land of Perumals by Francis Day. 

{Papers III to F/~I962,> 

Paper III. 

PreKtibed Text^books I ( Up to and ind tiding Btuthachan ) — 

1. Ramacharitam, First Edited by P. V. Krishnan Nayar. 

10 Pa ta lams. 

2. Kannassa Ramayanam Any Press. 

Balakandam: First 

100 Verses. 

3. Kuchela Galhi By Cherusseri 400 Lines. 

4. Mahabharatam, Santhi By Thunchathu Eahuthachan. 

Parvani. 

5. Unnunecii Sandesham, Any Edition. 

Poorva Bhagam. 

6. Pracbecna Malayala Edition by Dr. P. K. N. Pillai. 

Gadya Matrukakal. 

7. Uttara Ramayana By Cochin Bhasha ParishktnuMi 

Gadyam, Part 1. Committee. 

Paper IV, 

Pmerdmd Text-iH>oks ii (PiasuBiluithackm Period ) — 

L Malayalam KoUam, By Kochutini Thampuria. 

First two Sargis, 


407 



584 TBXT-kOOlCS IN NAl^YAUt^M FOR B.A. AND B.SC. 
(thrbe-year) dboree examinations, 1961-62 


Kirmeera Vadbam .. 

3. Uttara Ratna Chari - 

tarn. 

4. Karnabhooshanam .. 

5. Nirmala 

6. Sahitya Vicharam 

7. Kalaiyum Kalavum .. 


By Kottayathu Thampuran. 

By Chathukutti Mannadiar. 

By UUur S. Parameswara Iyer, UHur 
Publication, Jagati, Trivandrum. 

By Venn! Vasu Pillai, National Book 
Stall, Kottayam. 

By M. P. Paul, National Book Stall, 
Kottayam. 

By Dr. Bhaskaran Naymr. 


Paper V. 

Grammar, Prosody and Poetics — 

L Grammar Kerala Paniniyam. 

Omitting Pectika and the detailed discussion of the various gran - 
maticai theories. Only the study of the principles to be 
emphasized. 

2. Prosody — Vritta Manjari. 

3. Poetics — Bhasha Bhooshanam. 


Paper Vt. 

History of Language and Elements of the Dravidian Comparative 
Grammar: — 

Prescribed — 

1. Kerala Bhashayute. By Elankulam Kunjan Pillai. Vikaia- 

Parinamangal. 

2. Evolution of Malaya- By Dr. A. C. Sekhar. 

lam. 

For consultation — 

Comparative Grammar of Dravidian Languages by Dr. Caldwell. 





CHAPTER XLIV 


Degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Science 
(B.Sc. Home Science) 

1. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Science (Ho me Science), shall be required to have 
passed the Pre-University Examination of this Univer- 
sity or an examination accepted by the Syrdicite as 
equivalent thereto and to have subsequently undergone 
a prescribed course of study in a Constituent or 
Affiliated College of this University for a period of not 
less than three academic years or nine term';. 

2. The course of study shall contprise the 

following subjects according to 
Course of study, syllabuses to be prescribed from 
time to time. 

PART I 

English 

The course of study shall extend over a period of 
three years, the third year being dovoted to the training 
of students in communications including radio talks, 
public speaking etc., f(‘r which no examin.ttion will be 
held. The e.xamination will cov.'r the text-books pres- 
cribed and will be held at the end of the second 
academic year. 

PART II 

A Second Language 

The course shall comprise the study of any one of 
the foUowing languages. The course of study shall 
•xtend over a period of three years, the third year 



586 


LAWS OP THE UNIVERSITY 


tCHAP. 


being devoted to the training of students in communica- 
tions including r^dio talks, public speaking etc., for 
which no examination will be held. The examination 
will cover the text-books prescribed and will be held at 
the end of the second academic year. 

Classical: Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Arabic, 
Persian, Hebrew and Syriac. 

Foreign : French, German, Burmese and 

Sinhalese. 

Indian: Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Alalayalam, 
Urdu, Marathi, Oriya, Hindi, Bengali and 
Oujerati. 


PART III 

The course of study shall be as follows; 

Group A 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics). 
Physiology and Bacteriology 

Group B 
Foods and Nutrition. 

Home Management. 

Clothing and Textiles. 

Child Development and Psychology. 
Sociology. 

3. The scheme of examination shall be as follows: 

Scheme of 
Examination. 

PART I 
English 

There shall be two papers, each of three hours* 
duration carrying a maximum of 100 marks each 


z 



XLIV] 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN HOME SCIENCE 


587 


Hours Marks 

Paper I (Piose and Poetry) ... 3 100 

Paper II (Compo ition) ... 3 100 

Candidates shall take the two papers at the end of 
the second year. 


PART II 

A Second Language. 

There shall be two papers, each of three hours’ 
duration, carrying a maximum of 100 marks each. 

Hours Marks 

Paper I (Prose and Pi)eiry) . . 3 100 

Paper II (Composition) ... 3 100 

PART III 

The scheme of examination shall be as follows . 


1. 

Group A. 

Physical Sciences (Che- 

Hours 

3 

Marks 

100 

2. 

mistry and Physics). 
Physiology & Bacterio- 

3 

100 

3. 

logy. 

Group B. 

Food & Nutrition 

3 

100 

4. 

( Written). 

Home Management 

3 

100 

5. 

(Written). 

Clothing & Textiles 

3 

100 

6. 

(W'rittcn). 

Child Development and 

3 

100 

7. 

Psychology. 

Sociology 

3 

100 


9 


588 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[chap. 


Practical Examination. 



Hours 

Marks 

Foods and Nutrition 

3 

40 

Ho me Ma na gc me nt 

3 

40 

Clothing and Textiles 

3 

40 

Practical Record i;Ooks — 

Foods and Nutrition 


10 

Home Management 


10 

Clothing and Textiles 


10 


Total .. 

. 850 


Each candidate shall sbumit her practical record 
books containing the record of all her practical work 
performed during the period of her study. The records 
shall be countersigned by ihc Profcs<;or under whom 
the candidate worked to certify them to be bona fide 
records of work pcrfiTined by the candidate. The 
record books shall be submitted by the 31st January of 
the year of appearance to th * Exit miners conducting 
the examination, and the allotment of marks on the 
practical record books shall rest with the examiners. 

Candidates shall take Group A ai the end of the 
second year and Group B at the end of the third year. 

4. No candidate shall be declared eligible for the 

Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Conditions of Home Science unless She has corn- 
eligibility of a pitted the course of study prescribed 
candidate for and/passed the examinations in the 
tlic Degree. several subjects of the course of 
study as detailed in the Regulations 
aforesaid. 

5. A candidate shall not be declared eligible for 
the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Hume Science 


4 



LIV] DBOREB OF BACHELOR OF 589 

SCIENCE IN home SCIENCE 

unless She has passed the examination in English under 
Part I, in the selected language under Part II, and in 
the subjects under Part III. 

6. A candidate for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Scienc; in Horae Science shall be declared to have 
passed — 

(i) in Part 1 of the examination, if She obtains 
not le?s than 35 per cent of the marks. 

A candidate who obtains not less than 60 per 
cent of the marks in Part I shall be dec- 
lared to have passed Part I of the examin- 
ation with distinction. 

(ii) in Part II of the examination, if She obtains 

not less than 35 per cent of the marks. 

A candidate who obtains not less than 60 per 
cent of the marks in Part II shall be dec- 
lared to have passed Part II of th; exami- 
nation with distinction. 

(iii) in Part III of the examination, if She obuint 

not less than 35 per cent of the marks in 
each of the subjects. 

Candidates who obtain 60 per cent or above of the 
total marks in Part III shall be placed in the first class. 
Successful c.indidates who obtain less than 60 per cont 
but not less than 50 per cent of the marks in Part III 
shall be placed in the second class. All other successful 
candid itcs in Part III shall be placed in the third class. 
There will be n > classification for Parts I and II. A 
c.indidate securing not less than 75 per cent of the 
marks in Part III of the examination shall be declared 
to have passed in that Part with distinction. 

Symbolic representation shall be adopted in declar- 
ing the results in Part III and a statement of detailed 
marks shall not be furnished. 

i 


70a 


590 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


Symbol A plus will denote 65 per cent and above 
of the marks but below 75 per cent of the marks. 

Symbol A will denote 60 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 65 per cent. 

Symbol B plus will denote 55 percent and above of 
the marks but below 60 per cent. 

Symbol B will denote 50 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 55 per cent. 

Symbol C’ plus will denote 45 per cent and above of 
the marks but below 50 per cent. 

Symbol ( will denote 35 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 45 per cent. 

Symbol D will denote distinction as having 
obtained 75 per cent and above of the marks in Part III; 
provided the candidate passes the whole examinational 
one sitting. 

Symbol F will denote Failure. 

7. Candidates who pass the Intermediate Exami- 
nation shall be eligible to be admitted to the second 
year of the Three-year Degree course. 

This Transitory Regulation shall be in force for a 
period of five years after the introduction of the Three- 
year Degree course 

8. Candidates who have undergone the course of 
study and appeared for the examination or been 
exempted to appear for the examination under the 
Regulations in force prior to the academic year 1958, 
shall be permitted to complete the examinations under 
those Regulations. This Transitory Regulation shall be 
in force till the Examination of March, April 1964. 



SYLLABUSES. 


SYLLABUS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE. 

A. Chemistry 
(I St year: 4 hours a wc-*k.) 

(2nd year: z hours a week.) 

General and Inorganic. — ^Avagadro’s hypothesis, Relation Of 
gaseous and vtpour densities to Molecular Weight, Gram Molecular 
Volume. Influence of concentration, temperature, pressure and 
catalytic agents on chemical reactions in general. Liiws of osmotic 
pressure, depression of freezing point and elevation of boiling point 
— Gaseous dissociation— Electrolysis -Electrolytes — Ncn-elcctrolytes. 
Elementary treatment of ionic theory. Catalysis -characteristics 
of catalytic reactions - Poisons - promotvTS — autcaitalysis — Elements 
of Photo Ctiemistry — absorption spectra and chemical considerations. 
Elementary treatment of colloids- pH and its significance — Modern 
views on the structure of the Atom — Radioactivity — Occurrence 
preparation, properties and important uses of the following : 

Ozone, Hydrogen Peroxide, Halogens including halogens hydracids 
and their salts, Sulphur dioxide, sulphur trioxidc, sulphuric acii and 
sulphates. Oxides of Nitrogen, Nitrous aCid, Nitric acid and their 
salts. Phosphoric acid -Phosphates, carbon fuels, Extraction of 
metals (general) Cnaractcristics, properties and uses of the alloys 
of Copper Migncsium, Zinc, Aluminium, Tir., Antimony, Ixad, Iron 
and Chromium. 

Organic. Mi tho Js of pur iftcat ion cf Organic comt)Oun J«. Quali- 

tative detection of the elements Carbon, Hydrogen, Nicrogen, Chlo- 
rine and 8u;phur. Empirical formula, Mokailar formula and 
Isomerism. Petroleum Industry— -Aict bane, Ethane, Ethylene and 
Acetylene. Methyl and lithyl halides. Chloroform, lovioform, Methyl 
and Ethyl Alcohols, Ether. Formaldehyde, Acetaldehyde, Acetone, 
Acetic Acid and Ethyl Acetate, Acetamide, Amines, Glycerol, Oils. 
Fats, Soaps and ( andks, Ixictic, Citric, I'anaric and Pyruvic acids, 
Coal tar distillation — Preparation, projx'rues and uses of Benzene, 
Nitro-4>cnzcnc, Amilinc, Diazo compounds. Phenols, Cresoh, Toluene, 
Benzyl Alcohol, Benzaldehyde, Benzoic acid, Ind go and Napthalenc, 
Sulphanilamidc, Aspirin and Saccharin. 

Elementary ideas of alkaloids. 

Chemistry and m tabolism of Carbohydrates, Fats and Proteins, 


7 



592 StLL. IN CHEMISTRY OR THE B SC. [aPP. 

(HOME SCIENCE) DEOREB EXAMINATION 

PRACTICAL 

I. Reactions of acid and basic radicals limited to Halide, 
Sulphite, Sulphate, Nitrite, Nitrate, Carbonate and Phosphate. 

Silv^er, Mercury, Copper, Tin, Iron, Chromium, Aluminium, 
Zinc, Nickel, Magnesium, Sodium and Ammonium. 

II. Volumetric. — Simple ex.rciscs in Volumetric Analysis. 

Acidemetry and Alkalimetry : — 

Determination of the strength ot Hcl or HoSOi 

Determination of the strength of KOH or NaOH 

Determination ol a Carbonate and a Bicarbonate in a mixtuie - 
Indicator method. 

Pirmanganimetry . — Determination of the strength of Permanga- 
nate solution with (a) Oxalic acid. (^) Ferrous Ammoninm Sulphate 

hJim^iry . — Determination of the strength of a solution of 
Copper Sulphate. 

III. Action of heat and air on. — Copper, Silver, Aluminium, 
Tin, Iron and Common alloys — Brass, Bronze and Chrome Ste-.h. 

IV. Effect of acids, alkalies and commost salts on. — Aluminium, 
Copper, Iron, Lead, Nickel, Silver, Tin and Zinc. 

V. Orgarnc. — Dctcimination of Melting and Boiling Poinis. 

Detection of Elements. — Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Sulphur 
tnd Halogens. 

Simple icacticns cf the Hydroxyl, Aldehyde, Caiboxyl, Ketone. 
Amino, NitiO, Phenolic and Amido groups taking as examples liihyl 
alcohol. Acetaldehyde, Acetic acid, Acetone, Aniline, Nitiobcnzcnc, 
Phenol and Urea. 

Preparation of Simple orgatic substances, — Iodoform* Ethyl 
Acetate, Methyl Orange. 

VI. General, — Determination of the Hydrogen ion concentra- 
tion using indicators. Preparation of {a) Soaps, Detergents and 
Geanicidcs. it) Metal, leather, wood and floor polishes, (c^ Per- 
fumei and C^otmaiici. 


$ 



vl SYLL. IN PHYSICS OF THl B.SC. 393 

(HQMB SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMINATION 

B. PHYSICS 

(isiycar: 2 hours a week) 

(2nd year; 2 hours a week) 

Introductory.— quantities, their units and measure- 
ments. Displaa^mem, Velocity, Acceleration « g ’ Momentum — 
Newton’s Laws of Motion — Force wv^ik, Power and Energy. 

Properties of Mutter. — Uniform Circular motion — Centrifugal 
and Centripetal forces —applications to Centrifuges — Cream separaters 
— Drying clothes in LaunJry machines — Sugar crystallisation etc. 

Engine Governors. 

Laundry Alach incs . 

Simple Alachincs — balance, weighing machines, levers etc. Frio- 
tion — Sliding and rolling fjiction — their advantages and d i sad van i ages. 

Viscosity of fluids— Its applications — Effect of temperature — 
City Water Supply— Hydrants. 

Pumps — ^Watci pumps and air pumps— Gauges and meters 
(water m' icrs, Gas meters, an;.. Eken ic meters). 

Turbines. 

Faucets. 

Heuts, — Thermometry — High and Low Temperature measure 
ments. 


Expansion — Practical applications. 

Specific Heats and Latent Heats. 

Liquefaction of air (Oxygen, Nitrogen and Ammonia). 

Dry Ice 'preparation and uses. 

Kefrigerating madiincs and cold storage. 

Humidity and Air conditioning — heating devices. 

Alodcs of Transmission of Heat — ^Their applications. 

Pressure cook.rs, Firelcss Cockers, Solar Cookers. 

Incubators — ^Thermos Flask. 

i — Im:n.Jiy of illuminatton — Illumination of rooms. 

Optical Instruments — Microscope, Telescope, Epidiascope, 
Binoculars and Stereoscopes. 

The Eye —Its defects and correction. 

Photography. 


9 




£94 SYLL. tN PHYSICS Of THB B.SC. [aPP. 

(HOME -SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Motion pictures — ^Movie Camera, 

Special Character of light — its relation to physiological and 
active properties. 

Sotmd . — ^Transverse and Longitudinal waves. 

Laws of Transverse Vibrations of strings. 

Resonance. 

Musical Instruments — ^Veena, Violin^ Harmonium, Piano, Flute, 
Mridangam, Organ pipes. 

Gramophone, its principles— Disc recording. 

Electricity, — Friction Electricity — Lightning and Thunder. 
Lightning arresters — ^Principles of condensers. 

Simple Instruments for measuring current resistances and 

E.M.Fs. 

Heating Effect of Electric Current — Its applications — Filament 
lamps, Neon lightning. Arcs, Electric cooking appliances. 
Electric Wiring of houses and fuses. 

Chemical Effect of Electric current — Its applications. 
Electroplating (Copper, Silver, Gold, Nickel, Chromium). 
Magnetic Effect of Electric Currents. 

Recording and Reproduction of Sounds. 

Principles of Generators and Motors— AC and DC— Appli- 
cation to fans, Vacuum cleaners, motor cars, tra n cars, electric 

trains, etc. 

Induction Coils, Transformers, Microphones, Telephones, 
Telegraphy. 

Discharge of Electricity through Gases. 

X-rays and their applications. 

Nuclear Energy and its applications (elementary). 

Elements of Radio-Activity — Radio and Television. 

Practical Experiments. 

1. Balance — Weighing. 

2 . Specific Heats of liquids and solids. 

3. Latent Heats of Steam and Ice. 

4. Photometry. 

5. Sonometer. 

6. Ohm’s Law— Measurement of Resistance. 

7. Measurement of Current— Tangent Galvanometer. 


10 




v] SYLL. IN PHYSIOLOGY OP THE B.SC. 595 

(home science) degree examination 

8. Potentiometer — Comparison of E.M.Fs. 

9. Joule’s Law. 

10. Copper Voltameter. 

Group Experiments (Demonstration) : — 

1. Photography. 

2. Electroplating. 

3. Tinning. 

4. Soldering. 

5 . Testing of Fuses, etc. 

6. Changing of Washers. 


SYLLABUS IN PHYSIOLOGY 
(2nd year: 4 hrs. a week). 

Theory. 

Introduction and Cell Physiology , — Structure and organization 
of cells and properties of protoplasm. 

Tissues . — Histology of the tissues and their distribution in the 
body. Blood and Lymph, heart and circulation. 

Blood and lymph . — Composition cf blood : red blood cells, and 
haemoglobin, white blood cells and platelets i clotting. 

Blood grouping and transfusion. 

Blood formation and destruction. 

Composition of lymph . 

Heart and Circulation . — "Structure of heart and blood Vessels 
working of the heart ; blood flow ; cardiac and circulatory reflexes ; 
pulse and arterial pressure. 

Respiration . — Structure of respiratory organs, mechanism of 
respiration; gaseous exchange in lungs and tissues; acid base balance; 
nervous and chemical control cf respiration anoxia, asphyxia; artificial 
respiration. 

Digestion . — General anatomy of the digestive system ; more ' 
detailed study of structure of stomach, small intestine, pancreas and 
liver. 


Movements of alimentary canal. 

n 



596 SYLL. IN PHYSIOLOGY Or THE B.SC. [APP. 

(home science) degree examination 

Mechanism of secretion, action of enzymesj absorption Kidneys 
and Excretion. 

Structure of Kidney and tubules. 

Urine formation and composition ; micturition. 

Renal mechanism in acid base balance. 

Skin and body temperature. 

Elements of muscle physiology. — ^Mechanical and chemical change, 
during muscular contraction. 

Work and efficiency. 

Nervous system. — General anatomy of the nervous system (Cen- 
tral and autonomic). 

Fundamental principles of nervous control : reflex actions 
regulation by higher centres, relation to muscle action, review of relation 
to circulatory, respiratory and digestive functions. 

General mechanisms of sensation and perception, with special 
emphasis on Vision and hearing. 

Endocrinology. — General principles of hormonal scCrction and 
control with special reference to growth, metabolism and reproduction. 

Reproduction. — General anatomy of male and female reproductory 
Organs, Puberty : hormenal activity in male and female. Develop- 
ment of gralian follicle; ovulation ; Ovarian and Uterine cycles 
and their regulation fertilization, implantation, pregnancy, foetal mem- 
branes parturition; lactation and its regulation. 

Body defenses against disease. — ^Localization of infection : inflamma- 
tion; phagocytosis Immunization ; antigens, antibodies. 


Practical. 

Cells and tissues, general anatomy. — Cells — demonstration of cell 

lypes. 

Tissues — Detailed study of epithelium of stomach, intestine, 
pancreas and liver. 

Kidney, striated muscle, nerve cell and fibres ovary. 

Demonstration of connective tissue, bones, blood vessels, 
traehei imd }un|, 



597 


V] SYLL. IN BACTERIOLOGY OF THE B.SC. 

(home science) degree examination 


Skin, testis, uterus. 

Demonstration dissection of mammalian Viscera. 

Blood . — ^Blood cells — fresh mount and stained smear ; demonstra- 
tions of Haemoglobin estimation and coagulation. 

Heart . — ^Anatomy of sheep’s heart ; experiments with frog’s 
heart — normal beat, effects of temperature. 

Demonstrations of refractory period, stannuis ligature, effect 
of vagus stimulation. 

Respiratiorii Circulation and body temperature . — ^Respiratory 
volumes; respiratory and pulse rates and temperature changes in 
exercise. 

Oral and rectal temperatures. 

Demonstrations of graphic record of respiration and arteria 
blood pressure. 

Digestion . — Salivary digestion. 

Demonstration of rhythmic movements of small intestine 
(rabbit). 

Excretion . — Qualitative tests of urinary. 

Constituents on 3-hour sample. 

Nerve . — ^Muscle physiology. 

Demonstration of brain and spinal cord. 

Demonstration of gastrocnemius nerve — muscle preparation, 
simple muscle twitch. 

Experiments on muscle contraction : load and work ; tetanus; 
fatigue. 

Reflex action — spinal reflexes in frog ; human reflexes. 

Sensation : Experiments to demonstrate tactile sensations 5 
tastCa smell, demonstrations of sochlea and retinea. 

Reproduction . — Demonstrations of mammalian reproductory Organs 
pregnant mammal and foetus. 

SYLLABUS FOR BACTERIOLOGY. 

(2 hours a week in II year). 

Theory. 

1. General characteristics of bacteria, yeasts and moulds. 

2. Distribution of microorganisms — air, water, soil, sewage, milk 
and milk products, fruits and vegetables, meat, fish and eggs. 


71 


13 



598 SYLL. IN FOODS AND NUTRITION OF THE [AFR. 
(HO ME S CIENCE) DEGREE EXAMINA’^ION 

3. Microorganisms in fermentation and decay. Common anti- 
biotics. ’ 

4. Pasteurization, sterilization and disinfection. 

5. Microorganisms and food preservation — ^Need of food preser- 
vation — Methods of food preservation — Heat — Cold — ^Drying — ^Preser- 
vative substances. 

6. Food poisoning and food infection. 

7. Microorganisms and health — ^Disease transmission — Immunity 
— Types of immunity — ^Acquired immunity — ^The nature of acquired 
immunity (active and passive). 

8. Hyper sen bitiveness — ^Allergy. 

9. An elementary knowledge of the common infectious diseases 
caused by bacteria, virus and protozoa. 

practical. 

1. Microscopic examination of bacteria, yeasts and moulds (Mucor> 
Aspergillus, Penicillium). 

2. Use of simple stains in the study of bacteria. 

3. The nutrition of bacteria — ^Preparation of nutrient broth and 
nutrient agar. 

4. The technique of pure cultures — Isolation and cultivation 
of bacteria. 

5 . Bacteriological examination of air, water, milk. 

6. Pathogenic bacteria. 

7. Excursions to milk factories, sewage farm, and water works 
and research institutes. 

Syllabus in Foods and Nutrition. 

First Year. — (3 hrs. per week.) 

General Plan. — ^A study of food selection, preparation and service 
with the purpose of improving the nutrition and health of the indivi- 
dual. 

A study of the nutrition needs of the family. 

Selection of food for the family within different income levels 
and observation of the probleths involved in the improvement of nutri- 
tional praaices in a community. 

* I fej^erience in the preparation of foods with attention to the 
reservation of nutritive values, using cooking methods generally 


14 



Vj SYtU IN FOODS AND NUTRITION OF THE 599 

B.SC> (HOME science) DEGREE EXAMINATION 


eir ployed in Indian homes. Practice in the j^eparation of food for the 

family. 

Theory (r hr. per week). 

1. The relation of good nutrition of normal physical development 
and sound health . 

2 . Food groups which will provide the nutritive requirements 
for normal health ; body building foods ; energy foods ; protective 
foods. 

3. A study of cooking methods and how they may be used properly 
to preserve the nutritive elements in foods — ^Advantages and disadvan- 
tages of different cooking methods — boiling, steaming, stewing, frying, 
broiling, parching, baning and cooking under pressure. 

4. The source, manufacture, food composition and nutritive 
value of common foods. 

(a) Beverages. 

(&) Cereals — structure of cereal grains — results of over-milling 
and over-washing; parboiled rice; comparison of the food values of 
ragi, wheat and rice. 

(c) Pulses — dhals, grams, soya beans, field beans and peas — 
their limitations as only source of protein in the diet — values of germi- 
nation. 

(d) Fruits — cleanliness in preparation and serving seasonal 
fruits — plantains, mangoes, citrUs fruits, papaya, melon, guava, amla 
and other common fruits. 

{e) Vegetables — cleanliness in preparation, leafy vegetables, 
roots and tube] s, salad vegetables and other vegetables. 

(/) Flesh foods — quality of meat, poultry and fish ; food value 
of liver. 

{g) Eggs. 

(A) Milk and milk-products — ^bacteria in milk — ^pasteurisation 
of milk — sanitary milk production and testing. 

(0 Nuts — coconuts, groundnuts, cashews, almonds, walnuts 
and others. 

(j) Spices and condiments — their uses and abuses. 

5. Sanitation requirements in the procurement and Use Of water 
and foodstuffs in the home. 

(a) Rules in personal hygiene for working with food and water — 
food and water borne diseases. 


15 



600 SYLL. IN FOODS AND NUTRITION OF THE [APP. 
P.SC. (HOME SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(fi) Cleanliness in the kitchen and food storage areas — recent 
developments in storage practices. 

(c) The control of insects and rodents in the food supply, pre- 
paration, storage and serving areas — diseases carried by insects and 
rodents. 

(d) The particular care needed in the provision of hygienic 
water supply and food supply for babies, 

6. The basic food requirements of children and other members 
of The family including all ages. 

7. the energy requirements of the body and foods high in energy 
values. 

8. Body building foods, the protein requirements of family mem- 
bers of all ages. 

9. The body’s requirements for minerals. Foods which will 

provide sufficient minerals. ^ 

10. Vitamin requirements — ^functions in relation to health. 

(а) Fat-soluble— A group, D group, others. 

(б) Water-soluble — B Group, C Group. 

(c) Foods rich in vitamins — ^how to avoid losses in storage, 
preparation, cooking and serving 

11. The effect of food preparation and service on healthy food 
habits and the factors involved in building a good appetite. 

12. A study of the nutritive values of foods in relation to cost ; 

(a) Energy rich foods. 

(b) Protein rich foods. 

(c) Foods providing minerals and vitamins with special atten- 
tion to those most apt to be deficient in the diet. 

13. Planning meals for the family at different income levels; 
calculation of food values and planning the storage, preparation, cooking 
and serving of the food for the greatest retention of food values at the 

(a) Minimum income level for subsistence. 

(b) Low income level. 

(c) Medium income level. 

14. A study of the problems involved in the improvement of 
nutritional practices in a community. 


Id 



vl SYLJL. IN FOODS AND NUTRITION OF THE 601 

B>SC. (HOME science) DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Practical (one 2~hour period per week). 

1. A study by each student of her own status of health and evalua- 
tion in relation to the “Signs of good nutrition** (See reference 
list. 

2. An introduction to the use of kitchen and dining equipment — ■ 
sanitation requirements for washing dishes, vessels and utensils and 
the care and cleaning of equipment. Preparation of coffee, tea and 
cocoa. 

3. Examination of rice — the composition and structure of grains. 
Preparation of rice — boiled and steamed (Rukjnani Cooker) — prepara- 
tion ofrasam (pepper water). 

4. Preparation of other cereals and cereal products commonly 
used in India — ragiand wheat. 

5. Tests for carbohydrates, proteins and minerals in common 
foods. Tests for calcium, iion and total ash. 

6. A study of the composition and food value of dhals, grams, 
soya beans and nuts. Preparation of pulses — sambar, sprouted green 
gram> sundal and thick dhal preparations. 

7. A study of safe sources of milk— safety in handling milk ; 
preparation of milk dishes such as custards, payasams, curds and kesari 
milk, 

8. A study of the contributions of fruits to the diet — cleaning, 
preparing and serving fruit and retaining the food values through 
proper handling. Preparation and i>ervice of raw fruits and salads. 

9. A study Of the nutritive contributions of vegetables in the diet — 
cleaning, cooking and serving vegetables. Preparation of avial, curry, 
pachadi and kurma. 

10. A three-day dietary study by each student to determine if 
foods from each basic group are included in her daily meals. 

11. Preparation of energy rich foods such as iddli, dhosai and 
fried foods — methods of testing fat temperatures for frying. 

12. Preparation of protein rich foods — temperature controls in 
cooking the following : — 

(a) Milk products such as cheese and tomato, cauliflower cheese 
and cheese in dhal curries. 

{b) Eggs — scrambled eggs, Omelette and egg curry. 


17 



602 SYLL. IN FOODS AND NUTRITION OF THE [aPP. 
B.SC. (HOME science) DEGREE EXAMINATION 


(c) Meat (including liver) fish and fowl or protein rich vege- 
tarian dishes — cereal and protein combinations as pilav and briyani. 

13. Food preparation and the study of comparative costs in relation 
to food values. 

(a) Energy values in relation to cost — 

Simple rice, ragi and wheat compared with pilav, briyani 
and meals with sweets as payasams, mysore pak and somas. 

(b) Protein values in relation to cost. 

Comparison of meat, fish, poultry. 

Dhals, kootus, masseels and chutneys. 

(c) Mineral values in relation to cost — 

Greens preparations, dhals and liver, ridgegourd, cluster- 
beans and drumsticks. 

(d) Vitamin values in relation to cost — 

Greens and other vegetables, fruits, milk, liver, dhals or 

grams. 

14. Preparation of foods available as supplementary to the predomi- 
nently cereal diet,i.e. powdered milk, cheese, dried beans and peas. 

15. Preparation and service of meals for the family : — 

(a) A meal planned to emphasize the provision of adequate 
protective foods. 

(b) A meal for the family including foods suitable for pre-school 
children and old age. 

(c) A meal for the family on the minimum income level — low 
income level — medium income level. 

16. Field trip to observe nutrition work being done in a com- 
munity ; conference with workers concerning problems faced in this 
programme. 


3 rd Year — (6 hours per week). 

Oemral Plan . — thorough study of the food needs of the individual 
in regard to age, build, sex and activities. The relationship of food 
to physical, mental and general health. 

Planning and preparation of meals for the fa nily tc meet special 
dietary needs. 

A study of cooking methods illustrating their eftcct On the nutri- 
tive value of foods. Determination of nutritive values by chemical 
tests. 


IB 




V] SYLL. IN FOODS AND NUTRITION OS THE 603 

B.SC. (home SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Calculation of the food values of the dietaries planned, prepared 
and served. 

Emphasis on organization, management of time, marketing 
and cost of food in relation to food value. 

Improved sanitation practices in the handling and storing of 
food and equipment. Scientific methods of storing and preserving 
foods. 


Observation of small animals used for demonstration of the 
effects of adequate and inadequate diets. 

Observation of activities both rural and urban which are designed 
for the improvement of nutrition practices. 

Theory (Two hours per week). 

1 . Energy needs of the body — effect of age, build, sex and acti- 
vities. 

2. Calculation of energy requirements in terms of calories and 
foods to supply them. 

3. Basal metabolism — factors affecting metabolism, Demonstra- 
tion of the measurement of the basal metabolic rate. 

4. Body building foods — the protein requirement. The biological 
value of foods and how they may be used to supply adequate protein. 

5. The specific dynamic action of foodstuffs. 

6. Mineral metabolism and the functions of minerals in the body. 
Foods which may be used to supply the mineral needs of the body. 

7. The vitamin requirements of the body, sources, functions 
and effects of deficiencies of vitamins. 

8. Nutritive losses of foods in different methods of preparation, 
cooking and serving. 

9. The relation of hormones to the body’s use of different types 
of food. 

10. The effects of food on digestion, absorption, elimination and 
the health of the digestive tract. 

11. The differences in food requirements to meet special needs ; 
(o) During pregnancy and lactation. 

{b) For the child from infancy through the second year ; breast 
deeding vs, artificial feeding ; types of milk and how they should be 


19 



604 5YLL. IN FOODS AND NUTRITION OF THE [APR. 
B.SC. (home science) degree examination 

altered to meet the child’s needs (cow, buffalo and goat milk). Wean- 
ing, Addition of other foods in the first and second year. 

(c) For the pre-school child. 

(d) For the child from 6 to 12 years and during adolescence. 

12. A study of the factors involved in developing good food habits 
for young children — a review of ne^ discoveries relating to the building 
of good food habits. 

13. Modification of the normal diet to help in the prevention of 
dietary deficiency diseases. Special diets required in the treatment 
of these and other diseases with emphasis on diseases most common 
in India. 

A study of dietaries for the following : — 

(a) Deficiency diseases — ^vitamin^ mineral and protein defi- 
ciencies. (b) Diabetes mellitus. (c) Disorders of the stomach and 
digestive tract, (d) Diseases of the liver ana biliary tract, (e) Diseases 
of the heart and circulatory system. (/) Diseases cf the urinary tract. 
C^) The importance of diet in the prevention and treatment of tuber- 
culosis. 

14. Menu planning, marketing and organization of work for food 
service for different occasions. 

(a) Feasts— -how these effect the daily dietary of the family — 
cost of these meals in relation to the total food budget. 

(b) A study of food service and good manners — Indian style, 
other Asian styles and Western style. 

15. Food preservation by scientific methods : — (i) storing, refri- 
geration, freezing; (2) open-kettle, water-bath and pressure canning; 
( 3 ) preserving with sweets and spices ; (4) dehydration; (5) salting 
and pickling. 

16. The Use of kitchen gardens in helping to provide an optimum 
food supply for the family, 

17. The use of so-called supplementary foods such as powdered 
milk and all-purpose food in the improvement of diets . 

18. Food adulteration practices and methods of control — sl review 
Of pure food laws. 

V, 

19. A study of schemes being executed in India for the improve- 
ment of nutrition practices— Five-year plans ; National Extension 


20 



v] SYLL. IN FOODS AND NUTRITION OF THE 605 

B.sc. (home science) degree examination 


Service; Village level worker’s prOgrammesj etc.' — Field trips for 
observation. 

20. A review cf international schemes for the improvement of 
nutrition practices. 

Practical, — ^Two— 2 hour periods per week. 

I. Estimation of nutritive values of foods and nutritional losses 
in different methods of food preparation. 

A. Chemical tests — (i) quantitative estimation of sugar 
(2) quantitative estimation of total protein in foods (3) esti- 
mation of total ash and calcium (4) quantitative estimation 
if Vitamin C. 

B. Demonstration experiments on the quantitative estimation 
of ijron and carotene. 

C. Experimental study of the eftects of different methods of 
s/orage^ preparation and cooking on the preservation of 
nutritive values, the appearance and palatability of foods : 
(i) rice and other cereals (2) pulses (3) milk and milk 

' products (4) other protein foods (5) fried foods (6) vege- 
tables, raw and cooked (7) fruits. 

Demonstrations of the use of foods from a practical kitchen 
gardfii and their importance in improving the family food supply. 

Demonstrations of the use of so-called supplementary foods 
such ^s powdered milk and all-purpose food, in the improvement of 
family dietaries. 

i 

f. Review of sanitation practices to be observed in the labo- 
ratojjiy^ and kitchen and in the use and care of food and of utensils for 
cooking and serving. 

5. Practice in the use of scientific methods of preserving foods. 

(a) Preservation of fruits and vegetables by canning (i) open- 
kef le (2) water-bath and (3) pressure methods. 

(р) Preservation by adding sweets and spices. 

(с) Salting and pickling. 

(d) Dehydration. 

/ 6, Planning, preparation and service of food and meals for 

family groups to gain experience in learning to cope with varying 


Zl 



606 


SYLli. IN BOMB MANAGEMENT; OF THE [aPP- 

B.sc. (bomb science) degree examination 


dietary problems — calculation of food values provided by the meals 
prepared. 

(a) Preparation of a low cost meal planned to emphasize proper 
cooking methods and attractive service. 

(]b) Preparation of meals planned to meet extra needs for preg- 
nant and lactating mothers (i) low cost (2) medium cost. 

(c) Preparation of foods for the infant and child through the 
second year — experience or demonstration in feeding an 
infant. 

(<i) Preparation of a meal for a family including foods suit- 
able for a pre-school child and for old age. 

{e) Preparation of a family meal including provision or in- 
creased requirements for the adolescent. 

(/) Preparation of a low-cost meal planned with special atten- 
tion to the inclusion of foods which will help prevent dietary 
deficiency diseases. 

{g) Preparation of foods for diseases requiring special diets 

(1) Diabetes mellitus — ^use of exchange lists. 

(2) Disorders or diseases of the stomach and h testines, 

the heart and circulatory system, and the urinary 
tract. 

(3) Fluid, soft and convalescent diets. 

7. Planning, preparation and service of a meal for a speciaj 
occasion — ^market list, organization of work — determination of cost and 
how it will affect the adequacy of daily meals of the family at different 
income levels. 

8. Demonstration of food service and good manners for 
(i) Indian style (2) other Asian countries ( 3 ) Western style. 

9. Field trips to rural and urban centres for the purpose of 
learning methods for furthering the improvement of nutrition praqices. 

SYLLABUS IN HOME MANAGEMENT. 

FIB ST YEAK 
I. Applied art. 

(2 hours per week; 2 hour period if possible) 

Objectives, 

I, To help students understand the principles of design ani 
colour. 





V] SYLL. IN HOME MANAGEMENT OW THE 607 

B.SC. (HOME SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMINATION 

2. To provide experience in the application of the principles 
of design and colour to planning pleasing surrounding for the home. 


Theory, 

A. Characteristics of good structural design; characteristics of 

good decorative design. 

B. Principle of design: — 

1. Harmony — Characteristics that may help to build a pleasing 

and unifying relationship: lime or shape^ size, texture, 
ideas, colour. 

2. Emphasis — Devices used to effect emphasis: repetition, 

contradiction, transition. 

Confusion Or monotony resulting from over-emphasis. 

3. Proportion — Importance of scale in design of furnishings 

and in successful combination of objects. Ihe import- 
ance of proportion in providing for margins and placing 
illustration and slogans on pesters. 

4. Balance — Formal and informal Or assymetrical balance. 

Ways to make an arrangement balance. Formal and 
informal schemes for garden plannings. 

5. Rhythm — The use of repetition, progression in size and 

easily connected or continuous lines to achieve rhythmic 
effects. 

G. Colour: — 

I. Colour systems. 

2. Qualities of colour; hue, value, intensity. The effect of 
texture on colour. 

3. Schemes for using the colour systems for creating harmev- 

nious colour combination: mono-chromatic, analogous, 
complementary, split-complementary, triads. 

4. Use of colour to create an illusion of space, warmth, coOlness , 

size of an object. 

5. The principle of emphasis and proportion applied to the 

use of colour. 


MS 



608 SYLL. IN HOME MANAGEMENT OF THE [aPP. 

B.SC. (home science) pbgreb examination 


D. Interior Decoration:— 

1. The influences- that affect the architecture of houses in 

India. Hindu, Persian, Chinese, European, Climatic: 
interior decoration in Indian houses during the las 
hundred years. 

2. The selection of furnishings with regard to suitability of 

their design to their function (Indian and Western). 

3. The selection of furnishings with regard to their relation 

to the architecture of the dwelling and to each other. 

4. Using colour, texture and line to create an atmosphere, 

such as quietness, dignity, cheerfulness, informality. 

5. Problems of combining the old and the new. 

6. Window treatments and their effect on proportions and 

functions of the window. 

E. Exterior Decoration: — 

1. Laying out the garden. 

(a) Kitchen garden. 

(b) Flower garden. 

2. Selecting seeds and plants. 

(a) Heights and shapes. 

(b) Colours. 

(c) Methods of propagation. 

3. Caring for the garden. 

(a) Manuring; Preparation of compost. 

(&) Cultivation. 

4. Caring for the lawn, hedges and trees. 

Practical, 

A. Classifying a number of objects as good or bad design explain- 

ing the reasons for the designation. 

B. Finding illustrations of each in a painting, a rug, a printed 

fabric, a piece of furniture, a building, or a flower arrange- 
ment. 

Examining posters, pictures, gardens. Show how the 
eye is drawn to some particular point. Prepare an arrange- 
ment of objects to illustrate emphasis. 



v] SYLL. IN HOME MANAGEMENT OF THE 609 

B.sc. (home science) degree examination 

Illustrating effect of proportion by showing proper size 
shade for a lamp; effect of small bouquet on large table, 
short-stemmed flowers in a tall Vase, mounting a piaure 
with proper margins and framing. 

Making arrangement on a shelf in formal and informal 
balance. Arranging bouquets in formal and informal 
balance. 

Finding illustrations of the various means of producing 
rhythmic effects. 

G. Illustrating harmonious colour combinations in flower arrange- 
ments; costume, cushions, couch covers and rugs, walls, 
curtains and ru^s; menus. 

Plan for decorations suitable for some of the festivals. 
Making posters suitable for demonstrating some Home 
Science information. 


D. Creating a centre of interest in a room such as, worship niche 
a beautiful hanging or vase. 

Displaying pictures and other Objects of art. 

Arranging furnishings to promote ease Of conversation. 
Arranging furnishings to direct trafl&c through the home. 

Making simple furnishings from the materials available 
in the home. 

Repainting old furniture. 

Making harmonious arrangements either with life-size , 
objects Or scale models. 

Practical in gardening to be extracurricular. 


SECOND YEAR. 

II. Housing the family and family health. 

(3 hours per week; i lecture 2 hours practical). 

Ohjectives, 

1. To help students understand the elementary principles oi 
planning and constructing houses. 


25 



610 


SYhh. IN HOME management OF THE [aPP. 

B>sc. (home science) degree examination 


2. To help students understand principles of maintenance that 
promote the health and comfort of the family. 

3. To help the students learn techniques for care of illness and 
accidental injury in the home. 


Theovy. 

A. Functions of the house and its site: — 

Kinds of activities carried on by families within the home plot 
in relation to family objectives such as, raising vegetables 
and preparing food, providing for sanitary surroundings, 
promoting personal cleanliness, getting sufiBlcient rest, effective 
studying, satisfuing worship. 

Conditions that are favourable to carrying on the .activities 
satisfactorily. 

Changes in the activities and corresponding demands as the 
family grows up. 

Types of possessions used to carry on family activities, problems 
associated with storing the possessions when not in use. 

The minimum housing needs. Values to be considered in 
deciding the relative importance of other desirable housing 
features. 

B. Possibilities and restrictions presented by the house site — 

Effect of the dimensions of the site on the use of the lot and 
the design of the house. 

Problems of levelling or terracing a site to promote case of 
maintenance of prevention of stagnant water or erosion after rains. 

Utilization of full advantage of the orientation of the size to 
sun, breeze and access to the community. 

Provision for privacy without sacrificing hospitable atmosphere. 

C. Features of a dwelling contributing to comfort, safety, sanita- 
tion, convenience and beauty — 

The rooms: their size, their orientation to sun and breeze, 
their orientation to the another for ease of circulation without cutting 
across activities in progress. 

The location of doors, and windows to improve ventilation, 
to provide advantageous use of space in the room^ to provide light 
with as little glare as possible. 






v] SYLL. IN HOME MANAGEMENT OF THE 611 

B.SC. (home SCIEKCE) DEGREE EXAMINATION 


The location of sources of artificial light with respect to the 
amount of light needed on the task and to the prevention of glare and 
shadow. 

Provision for preventing the entrance of insects and rodents. 

Provision for the prevention of theivery. 

Various methods of providing for water and disposal of refuse 
in the parts of the house involving activities requiring such provision. 
Means of conserving water by preventing spillage and leakage from 
taps and vessels. 

Storage space adapted to preserving the condition of articles 
and supplies stored : water, fuel, food supplies, dishes, utensils, clean- 
ing supplies and equipment, clothing and household linens. 

Arrangement within the area or room that permits an efficient 
manner of working. 

Learning to read a house plan. Study of some plans for houses 
of different sizes j desirable features provided; location of artificial 
lights, storage units. 

Study of directions from health units for building different 
common types of private latrine. 

D. Building Materials and Practices — 

Methods of creating illusions of space, schemes for expanding 
houses or adding features to the existing structure at a later date. 

Pelative costs of different types of roof construction, floor mate- 
rials, windows and doors, electrical fittings, finishing hardware. 

Construction features that aid housekeeping. 

E. Maintenance of cleanliness, sanitation and order in the home — 

Daily housekeeping practices that promote sanitation and Order 
in the home. 

Systematic provision for the less frequently occurring mainte- 
nance problems. 

Simple household cleaners and polishes. 

Gleaning and/or polishing the different metals used in homes 
wood surfaces and glass. 

Purifying water for drinking purposes. 


27 



612 


SVIX. IN HOME MANAGEMENT OF THE [APP- 

B.sc. (home science) degree examination 


Methods of dealing with household pests such as flies, mosqui- 
toes, bed-bugs, ants, weevils, cockroaches, moths. 

Safe storage of insecticides. 

F, Group action for securing and maintaining sanitary conditions 
in a community — 

Means employed to obtain an adequate and pure water supply: 
locations of wells and reservoirs, provision for testing water, kinds 
of wells characteristics of good well construction. 

Safe-guarding the water supply: sources of contamination, 
programmes of positive action to eliminate practices of groups and 
individuals which contributes to contamination. 

Safe disposal of sewage and other waste; problems involved in 
maintaining public latrines. 

Community measures for control of mosquitoes and flies. 

G. Problems arising in making a decision between owning and 
renting a house — 

Schemes for purchase of houses in the area. 


Responsibilities of a property owner; advantages of owner- 
ship. 

Advantages and disadvantages of renting. 

Cost of owning and renting with respect to various levels of 
accommodation service included in the rent payment. 


H. Town and Community Housing Development in India— 

Government aids to slum clearance. 

Structure, operation, and responsibilities of housing organi- 
sations. 

Plans for provision for water and water disposal, markets, 
schools, playgrounds, community centres, etc., in each residential 
unit. 


PRACTICAL. 

Reading house plans. 

Set up an exhibit showing how to store water carried into the 
house. 

Arrange an efficient grouping of equipment and supplies for 
some household jobs such as laundry, sewing. Try them 
and suggest ways to improve them. 

Visits to houses under construction. Study of the floor plan 
and the house. 



v] SYLL. IN HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS OF THE 6l3 

B,SC> (HOME SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMINATION 


Experience in daily housekeeping practices that promotes sani- 
tation and order in the home sinks, drains, latrines, floors. 

Study of systematic provision for the less frequently occurring 
maintenance problems — ^Experience in replacing fuses. 

Experience in preparing simple household cleaners and poli- 
shes. 

Experience in cleaning and/or polishing the different metals 
used in homes, wood surfaces and glass. 

Experience in changing washers in taps. 

Experience in purifying water for drinking purposes. 

Experience in preparing kerosine oil emulsions. 

Experience in use of spray guns, spray and other insecticides. 

Observation of practices followed in combating household 
pests in the food laboratories, the hostels and homes. 

Visit to some new housing developments. Note the provision 
for access to the lot, provision for water supply, and other 
features of the community lay-out. What features are added 
to the homes as rental rise ? 

Experience on living in a cottage for one week at least carrying 
full responsibility for the cottage. 

Every candidate is expected to present a certificate from a recog- 
nised course in First Aid and in Home Nursing. 

THIRD YEAR. 

III. HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS. 

(5 hours per week). 

Objective, 

To help students understand the principle of planned house- 
keeping and home-making. 

Theory, 

I. Scope Of the subiect — 

The aspects of House-keeping and Home-making. 

The two Science and Art of planned family living. 

Problem, — i. Illustrate planning — in terms of your week’s acti- 
vities month’s and year’s. 


29 


72 



614 SYLL. IN HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS OF THE [APP. 
B-SC. (home science) DEOREE EXAMINATION 


2. Human wants and their nature — 

The concept of Marginal utility. 

Law of Diminishing Utility and the Law of Substitution and 
their application — ^Principle of equi-marginal utility. 

Wealth and its meaning — ^Types of wealth. 

Problem . — ^Make as complete as list as possible of the wants of 
an individual. Classify them. How many are, in part at 
least, due to family existence > 

Make as complete as possible, a list of general values which the 
family-household contributes to members* such as education 
and security. 

List items of household wealth (a) material items (/>) personal 
items, such as personal satisfaction, personality increments, 
personal relationships. 

3 . Standard of Living — 

Constituents of the Standard of Living — ^Different Standards. 

Urban and Rural Standards. 

Wages and Standards of Living, 

State and Standards. 

Indian Standard of Living. 

How to raise the standard. 

— ^Plan a survey of living stanaards at your institution. 

Illustrate urban levels of living in the wity fcr the different 
standards; and rural levels for the farm owner, labourer 
and tenant. 

Find out the local rates of wages for unskilled day labourer, 
semi-skilled and skilled trades. 

How f ir the legal minimum wage rates now imposed is help- 
ful in raising the standard of living ? 

The effect of sales tax on standard and which standard. 

4. Family Income — 

Real Income and Money Income. 

Sources of Income. 

How to supplement the family income — subsidiary occupations; 
children as contributors. 

The wage earner in the family. 


BO 



V] SYLL- IN HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS OF THE 61 S 

B.SC. (home science) DEGREE EXAMINATION 

Problem. — Analyse the items of real income of a family. 

Beasons for mothers in ivorkiog class families to work outside 
the home. 

The chief occupations they follow locally, and their wages. 

The possibilities of part-time gainful employment for the rural 
and urban housewife. 

Wage earning children’s contribution to the family purse. 

“ The wife contributes as much to the family real income 
as does the husband.” State qualifying conditions, if any. 

The relation between the money income of the family, and the 
choice of vocations by the minor members of the family. 

Analyse the phrase “Economic Independence” applying it 
to the unmarried man or woman; the married man or woman. 

5. Family Expenditure — 

Family Income Management. 

The family budget — its main items. 

Engle’s Laws of Consumption. 

Budget studies. Money versus Commodity budget. 

Financial records of the household. Their purpose and nature. 

Waste in the household. 

Family debts. 

Problem . — Bases for the expenditure of the income. 

List kinds of household consumption. 

Social standards for expenditure; social co-operation in setting 
more rational standards^ e.g., in your college community. 

Compare the budget of an unmarried man with that of a married 
man in a City. 

Drawing up a personal budget. 

Family financial report. 

The use of the expenditure — record in the planning of a budget. 

The larger sources of waste and inefficiency in the family 
household. 

Comment on “ Parents should not overspend upon their children 
and incur debts they cannot themselves carry; children 
should not undertake to pay off an over-large burden of debt 
for education.” 

The advisability of borrowing for family capital equipments. 


31 



616 SYLL. IN HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS OF THE [aPP. 

p.sc. (home science) degree examination 


6. Household Production- 

Household Production and national economy. Population. 

The old self-sufficing home and the modern home. 

Growing dependence of home Or Organised industry. 

Significance of production and consumption for the home 
maker. 

Problem , — “ The household is strictly a business enterprise,” 
Criticize or modify. 

The household controls population in quantity and quality. 

Malthus’ principles of the growth of population. 

“ Household production will go, simply because it is not large 
scale production:” its application to India. 

The money value of products produced by a housewife in a 
year of home-keeping. 

Tne administrative and managing responsibilities of husband 
and wife in a typical household. 

The psychological and economic hindrances to more rapid 
industrialisation of house, work in India. 

7. Labour in the Home — 

The housewife— ‘The chief labourer. 

Advisability of outside career for woman. 

The share of the husband and children in the house-work. 

Labour saving appliances. 

Leisure in the family. 

Problem , — ^The worth of the housewife’s services versus. 

(a) outside employment. 

(ft) cost of hired services. 

List items of work contributed by the individual student to 
the total upkeep of the family home. 

Appraisal of small child’s contribution to house work. 

List the household tasks which a child usually undertakes — ^at 
2, 3} 5 and 10 years. 

A siirvey of the contributions to house work made by the man 
of the familiy in 20 or more households. 

E. Saving in the Family: — 

The family capital. 

Need for saving. 

32 



V] 


SYLL. IN HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS OF THE 617 

B.sc. (home science) degree examination 


Temporary and Permanent institutions for small and big 
saving— Savings’ Bank, Post OflBce, Chit funds, Midhis, 
Banks. 

Banks — different kinds of accounts. How to open an account? 

Cheques and their uses. 

Insurance — its chief principles — Types of policies. 

The best type of investment for the common family. 

Inheritance and Bequest. 

How to make a Will ? 

Problem , — ^List and classify all kinds of capital goods used by 
the household and find out fields in which household capital 
is increasing rapidly. 

The amount of capital needed to start house-keeping. 

Secure individual estimates as to household capital in homes 
you know best — as to its value, history of accumulation and 
annual replacement and repairs. 

Period in the family cycle when best opportunities to save occur. 

Methods of saving for a College student. 

Criteria for judging a family investment. 

A survey of different types of thrift and saving institutions 
in the community. Promissory note, mortgage, bonds, 
stocks and shares. 

The influence of inheritance laws upon family. 

The advantages of system of freedom of bequest, compulsory 
equal division and primogeniture. 

9. Household Purchase — 

When, Where and How to purchase ? 

Functions of money — General price levels — ^how to read cost 
of living Index numbers. 

Consumer’s surplus. 

Markets; Fairs; Consumers’ Co-operative Store with special 
reference to Triplicane Urban Co-operative Stores. 

Gash purchase and credit purchase; Wholesale and piecemeal 
purchase; adulteration of food and other materials. 

Consumer action in abolishing adulteration practices. 

Influence of the taxes on articles of household consumption. 

The main Indian Taxes. 

Problem , — Study of food and clothing prices. Collection of 
family food bills for the week and studying accurately the 
food costs. 


3S 




618 SYJLL. IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILES OF THE fAEF. 

BiSc. (home science) degree examination 

Comparison or local retail price and wholesale price for certain 
foods such as rice, dhal, ghee and oil for a period of three 
months. 

Packaging economy in various sized containers of the same 
quality food. 

Cost of packaging. 

An estimation of the entire cost involved in the food service 
as related to food materials alone. 

The problem of reducing food! costs in a family with no hired 
workers with one employee. 

List foods which could be purchased annually monthly and 
weekly. 

Use of cooked food service in India. 

Comparison of the cost and utility of ready-made and home- 
made goods in clothing. 

Evaluating a “ bargain ” in clothing. 

A careful study of advertising methods. 

10. Family Health, Sickness and Death Costs — 

** Malnutrition reduces industrial efficiency;*’ Illustrate. 

Aladras Public Health Act. 

Present Employee’s Health Insurance Scheme. 

Importance of vital statistics. 

Prablem , — Group ways of buying medical, nursing and hospital 
care. 

Public Health services in the urban and rural communities of 
India. 

The desirable equipments for a family medical chest. 

Problem of aged persons without adequate incomes with 
special reference to India, 

The principles that should guide families and society in the 
matter of funeral management and cost. 

The cost of different types of burials. 

N,B , — Students have to maintain a Record Book where they 
enter their observation. 

CLOTHING & TEXTILES. 

Objectives, 

Thes^ courses in Clothing and Textiles aim to help students to 
study clothing from the standpoint of health, comfort and economy 


34 



V] SYLL. IN CtOTHINO AND TEXTILES OF THE 619 

B>sc (home science) degree examinatio n 

and to understand the contribution of clothing to personality; to 
enjoy clothes as an expression of beauty and to use them for creative 
self expression. 

The field of textiles and clothing divides into scientific and art 
Ph ises. It opens many posaibilitie„ to those students who wish to 
use clothing in a general and aesthetic sense for their personal and 
family development. 


First year. 

(2 hours per week.) 

This course will consist of discussions and practice in selection 
of textile fabrics and their identification through simple laboratory 
tests; technical information and laboratory practice to develop good 
buying habits and to encourage proper use and care of fabrics and 
clothing. It will also include visits to shops, factories, mills^ museumsj 
showing of appropriate films on textiles. Specific outline of material 
and processes to be included. 

I. Selection of fabrics for garments— 

A. Based on personal characteristics and needs related to colour, 
design, texture of fabric. 

B. Based on knowledge of textile fabrics through study of: — 

1. The nature of cotton, silk, rayon, linen, synthetics, fibre 

combination and wool; 

2. Special finishes of fabrics, e.g., mercerizing, sanforizing, 

glazing, etc. 

3. Kinds of weaves — plain, twill, Satin basket. 

G. Based on size of budget and wise buying. 

D. Based on knowledge of textiles available through — 

1. Visits to cloth shops, mills, clothing factories, museums. 

2. A review of all the stitches in Government Constructions. 

3. Care of garments — 

I. General storage and care. 

II. Laundering and finishing. 

Second year. 

(3 hours per week). 

This course includes elementary drafting of patterns, construction 
of clothing. 


S5 



620 SYLL. IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILES OF THE [aPP. 

B.sc. (home science) degree examination 

Specific laboratory processes to be included: 

I. Drafting patterns and constructing garments — 

(i) Studying body measurements. 

(ii) Preparing material— Straightening and shrinking. 

(iii) Finishing neck — ^facing, bias binding. 

(iv) Finishing sleeves — ^hem, bias binding, cuff, facing, 

gathers. 

(v) Drafting a sari petticoat — ^four Or six gores. 

(vi) Constructing a sari petticoat from pattern drafted, 

(vii) Drafting bodice and sleeve blocks. 

(viii) Adapting bo lice and sleeve blocks to blouse pattern 
and constructing same. 

(ix) Adapting bodice block to brassiere pattern and construc- 
ting same. 

(X) Making one of the following household articles: door 
and window curtains, table cloth, cushion covers. 

II. Chemistry of textiles — 

(i) Simple chemical analysis of various fabrics. 

(ii) Stain removal. 

(iii) Laundering reagents and processes. 

Third year. 

(3 hours per week.) 

A course to help students gain experience in dealing with clothing 
problems of families with special emphasis on the changing needs of 
growing children and the wise use of the clothing Rupee; construction 
of garments for various age levels. 

I, Living within the clothing budget. 

(i) How to select and buy clothing for a growing family at 

different economic levels. 

(ii) Selecting ’colours, fabrics, designs and patterns suitable 

for different family members. 

II, Constructing garments, and comparing cost of home con- 

structed and tailor or ready-made garments. 

(i) Infant and pre-school child. 

I. Layette, including abdominal band, diaper, night- 
gown. 


36 



V j SYJLL. IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT & PSYCHOLOGY 62 1 

OF THE B.SC. (home SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMN. 

2 . Garment using Carter neck, either on romper, frock 
or boy’s shirt. 

(ii) Grade school child— 

1. Boy’s shirt. 

2. Girl’s frock. 

(iii) Adult man — 

1. Paijama. 

2. Shirt. 

III. Care of clothing — 

A. Simple mending— calico, flannel and print patches, darn. 

IV. Designing original pattern for embroidery. 

Application to one of above garments. 

Second year. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOLOGY. 

(Three hours per week; Lectures — 2 hours. Observation, 
Tutorial, Film and Film discussion — i hour.) 

Objectives, 

To help students— 

1, develop an understanding of the psychological, biological 

and social development of the individual from infancy to 
adulthood. 

2 . develop a scientific attitude towards behaviour patterns in 

individual, family and community life. 

Psychological Principles. 

1. The meaning and Importance of childhood. 

2. Methods of child study — 

(very briefly— mainly to help the student in her practical 
work). 

Observation, Experiment, Tests and Measures. 

Rating scales. Questionnaire, Case History. 

Long Period Biography. 

3. Motivation and Learning — 

Unlearned motives. 


57 




622 StLE,. IN C1IIS.D DEVEEOPBfENT & S8YCHOLOOY 
OF TBPB B.8e» (HOME SCIENCE) PEORBE EXAMH. 

Organic needs. 

Efiects of Learning. 

Sensory and perceptual learning. 

IJeas and meanings. 

Maturation and Learning. 

4. Psychological needs— 

Aifeciion, recognition, success, adventure, 
freedom and independence and security. 

5. Play life ; Imagination — 

Theories of play. 

Characteristics of play. 

The significance of the play spirit and the diiferent types of 
play. 

Difference between the imagination of adults and children. 
Value of imagination, 

6. Habit and Habit Formation. 

Psychological basis of habit formation. 

Importance of habit. 

Conditions of habit formation. 

Maturity and habit formation. 

7. Development of character — 

Levels of Development, 

The functions of the will. 

The self-regarding sentiment. 

Discipline — ^Rewards and Punishments. 

C^ld neye''t>jpitteiit, 

8. The Right Beginnings— 

(a) Care of the expectant mother. 

(5) Laying good foundations — sound tissues, healthy sor- 
roundings, sound habits. 

9. The Infant — 

Abilities, needs, learning, development, in the first year of 
life. 

Feeding, bathing, clothing, sleep. 

SB 




V} SYIX. m CIttt!>0BVBI,OPMaNT & FAMILY RBiA- 623* 
TI^NSBIBSOFTHEmSC. (HOME SCIBNCB) DEGREE EBAMN. 


Play and toys^ 

Psychological relationships in the family. 

10. The Pre-School child years i to 6. 

Motor and physical development. 

Language and intellectual development. 

Social development. 

Eating habits^ toilet training^ clothing . 

Play and toys. 

Behaviour problems. 

Nursery school experience. 

The Home and the Nursery School. 

11. The child from 6-12 years — 

Physical growth and skills. 

Intellectual growth and activities — Interests. 

Social Progress. 

Sex interests and sex education. 

Learning in school. 

Health, food ana sleep requirements. 

Psychological needs in the family and in the outer wjrl I 

12. Health care and safety — 

Accidents and Prevention. 

First Aid, 

Children’s illnesses, prevention, treatment, care. 
General care of the baby and sick child. 


Third year. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS 

(Five hours per week; Lectures 3 hours, obscivatiou, 

Tutorial, Film and Film discussion — ^2 hours ) 

Objectives. 

(a) To develop greater understanding and appreciation of the 
home and family as basic to a satisfactory community life. 

(b) To develop increased skills in achieving positive human 
relationships. 


^9 



624 SYtL. IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT & FAMILY RELA- [ APP* 
TIOWHIPS OJ TH E B.SC. (HOME SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMN. 

(c) To strengthen family living and develop greater appreciation 
of the problems of individual members of the family. 

1. The family — the basic Social Institution — 

The place of the individual — man, woman and child in th^ 
family and their roles in society. 

The Family of the past. 

The Joint Family system. 

The Family today. 

2. Preparation for Parenthood — • 

Some principles of inheritance. 

Interaction of heredity and environment. 

Evidence from Orphanages, tvins, foster homes. 

The child’s relationship with the mother. 

The influence of the father. 

The foundations of personality development laid in the 
attitude of parents to children. 

Alaladjustment — The unconscious mental life. 
Introversion, rationalisation, repression, defence reaction. 

3. The influence of relatives — 

Sibling relationships. 

Other adults in the family. 

4. Authority and Discipline in the Home. 

Patterns of authority and discipline in modern families. 

The need for discipline in the home at all stages of develop- 
ment. 

Children’s common difficulties — obstinacy, luing, stealing, 
truancy, bullying, cruelty. 

Delinquency: Correlated factors, readjustment. 

5. The problems of Adolescence — 

Physical growth and changes. 

Health needs. 

New responsibilities and interests. 

Emotional and Social development. 

Psychological needs. 

6. Sex Education — 

Prevailing attitudes to sex. 



V] SYLL. IN cniw DEVELOPMENT & FAMILY RELA- 625 
TIONSHIPS OF THE B>SC. (HOME SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMN> 


Sex problems of the adolescent and young adult. 

The support of the family in the adjustment to these 
problems. 

7. Marriage — 

Motives for marriage. 

Functions of marriage. 

8. Personal development in relation to marriage — 

Physical and mental health. 

Emotional maturity. 

Personality development. 

9. Adjustments in Marriage — 

The early period. 

The arrival of children. 

Physiological domestic and social adjustments. 

In-law relationships. 

10. Factors affecting marriage relationships — 

Religion. 

Socio-economic influence. 

Career and money. 

11. Critical family situations — 

Infidelity, 

Desertion or divorce. 

Alcoholism. 

sponsioility towards exceptional children: physical 
and mental. 

Early diagnosis, provision for their special needs. 

12. Old Age— 

The psychology of old age. 

Family attitudes towards the aged. 

Place of the aged in Indian Society. 

13. The significance of the family in a democracy— 

Community organisation and family life. 

PRACTICAL WORK (TWO YEARS) 

(a) A record of one child for two years — 

Age. 

Height and weight (every quarter). 


41 



626 SYJDL. IN OHILD DEVBIjOPMENT & FAMILY RELA- 
TtONSHIPS OF THE p.SC. (home SCI.i) PBGMEE EXAMN. 

Parents’ Socio-Economic status. 

Number in the family. 

Position in the family. 

Class. 

Progress in school. 

Special abilities and disabilities. 

Interests. 

Play. 

Temperament. 

Social traits. 

Conduct and discipline . 

Leadership. 

Any other information. 

(&) A study of — 

1. The routine in the home in physical matters and training 
in such matters. 

2. The play activities of children of different age groups. 

3. Companionship and Friendship. 

4. Occasions which cause anger or temper tantrums and duration 
of these moods. 

5. Occasion which cause amusement and laughter. 

6. Common breaches of discipline and form and correaion 
and punishment. 

7. Children’s fears. 

8. Phantasy and imagination. 

9. Concepts of God, right and wrong. 

10. Children’s drawings. 

11. Children’s collections. 

12. Children’s first reactions to school. 

1 3 . S chool health programmes . 

Visits to Health Centres, Nursery Schools, Primary Schools 
Playgrounds. 

Entertaining children with story telling, games and other types 
of recreation. 

Making toys for children. 

(Items 2 to 13 may be undertaken as group work, and the different 
age levels compared. Each groijip will cover a few aspects only). 


42 



627 


V] SYLL. IN SOCIOLOGY OF THE B.SC. 

(home science) degree examination 

SOCIOLOGY. 

First 3^ar 

(2 hours per week.) 

Objectives — 

(a) To make the students aware of the society in which they 
live and their contact with it in its various aspects. 

(b) To develop appreciation of and pride in their society. 

(c) To help them to make their contribution to its welfare and 
progress. 

1. The origin and evolution cf society — primitive society, the 
clan and the tribe, Patriarchial and Matriarchial societies. Kinship, 
adoption and marriage. Exogamy and endogamy. Caste and race. 

2. Society and the Individual. The value of individual peisona- 
lity. The democratic basis of society. Importance of the individual 
in Hindu, Muslim and Christian literature. The individual as iso- 
lated unit, versus a socialised individual. The individual in the midst 
of social relationships^ together with social rights and responsibilities 
as the unit of our thought and discussions. Social harmony and social 
disruption. 

3. Social groups and social institutions. Uses and abuses of 
social groups. The family, caste and communal groups. Economic 
groups such as trade unions. Racial groups. The ideal of World 
Society. Science has made the world and neighbourhood; How 
can Sociology make it into a Brotherhood ? Explanation of the Culture 
lag theory. 

4. The nature of Social change and the meaning of social progress. 
Social change in Hinduism and Islam. Social changes in daily life. 
Social change in the city and village. Factors of social change. 
Social logs. Culture contacts and fusion. Culture contacts and 
friction. 

5. Enquiry into Indian social conditions and examination of 
their effects — such as malnutriticn, marriage of the immature, igno- 
rance disease and squalor. A^k each siudenr to make a case study. 

6. Social survey — Importance of case study. Studies of investi- 
gations into social conditions conduced in England and America. 
Social survey in India, regarding poverty and Other economic condi- 
tions. Budget studies and the standard of life. Comparative study 
of the standards of their countries. Famine condition^ in India, 


4 S 



628 SYht. IN SOCIOLOGY OF THE B.SC. [APP. 

(HOME SCIENCE) DEGREE EXAMINATION 


7. Poverty — Causes — ^Population and poverty, over-population 
and under-population. Birth and death rates in India, Length 
of life. Comparison with other countries. Malnutrition and change 
in national diet. Removal of poverty; social, economic and political 
remedies. 

8. Harmful social customs and their removal. Caste exclusive- 
ness and uniouchability. Modification of the rigors of caste by State 
and social action. Marriage of the immature and marriage practices. 
The purdah — Eugenic and hygienic practices. Legal disabilities 
of women in Hindu and Islamic society. The new Hindu Code. 
Polygamy and polyandry and attempts at their abolition. Limitations 
Of the joint family system. The dowry and inheritance. Hindu- 
Muslim and Christian laws of inheritance. 

Third Year 

(2 hours per week.) 

1. Indian village — ^main characteristics — ^main village problems 
diseases and epidemics — ^maternal and infant mortality — illiteracy — 
general ignorance and apathy — lack of leadership. 

2. Principles of rural reconstruction — 

Economics Aspect supplementing agricultural incomes by rural 
industries. Dairying — ^poultry breeding, bee keeping and 
sericulture. Other handicrafts. Agricultural demonstration 
and propaganda ; cattle breeding centres ; better seeds 
and manures; more grazing facilities, agricultural co-opera- 
tion of all types. 

Social aspcct-“Improvement of rural health and physique and 
hygiene — rural welfare centres. Better rural doctors, nurses 
and midwives. 

Rural education and recreation — ^broadcasting and cinemas — 
village panchayats. Place of voluntary organisations in 
rural welfare work. Implementation of the five-year plans. 
Community Development programme and the National 
Extension schemes. 

3. Indian Industrial worker — His main problems — ^Housing 
scarcity ; illiteracy ; lack of akill; diseases, unemployment. Exist- 
ing welfare scheme — Statutory and voluntary — Social Insurance 
in India. The Employee State Insurance Act. 

4. Indian Political Society. Evolution of our present day Govern- 
ment structure and functions of our national, State and Local Govern- 
ment. Contributions cf the individual and the family to the State. 


44 




v] SYLL. IN SOCIOLOGY OF THE B.SC. 629 

(home science) degree examination 


5 . What is meant by the terms Welfare State and “ The 
socialistic pattern of society India and the world outside. India’s 
contribution to World peace. Her leadership in South-East Asia. 

6. Social attitudes and their development. Social deviants— 
their causes and remedial measures. Civic conscience — How to create 
it among the public — ^Regard for public property. 

7 . Education in India. Ancient and Modern — ^Education for 
the community. Functional education and education for leisure — 
Basic education and its implication. 

8. Women in industry. Women’s work and wages. Equal pay for 
equal work. Causes for the low rates of women’s wages — Cottage 
Industries and women. 

9. Women and civic responsibilities. Women as social workers 
and teachers. The ideal of Indian womanhood. 


4 « 


73 



630 TEXT-BOOKS IN ENGLISH FOR B.SC. (HOME SCI.) 

(THR EE -YEAR ) DEGREE £XAMN^» ; 1959-61. 

Text-Books for B.Sc. Degree iia Home Science 
(Three-year course), 1959 , 1960 & 1961 . 

Part I — English — 1959 & 1960. 

Paper I — Poetry and Prose. 

Poetry — The following poems from “Sixteen fifty — Nineteen 
fifty” Anthology by L. G. Salinger (Blackie). 

Milton — Lycidas. 

Johnson — The Scholar (from Vanity of Human Wishes). 
Wordsworth — Tin tern Abey. 

Wordsworth — Resolution and Independence. 

Shelley — Ode to the West Wind. 

Keats — Ode to a Nightingale. 

Keats — Ode on a Greecian Urn. 

Keats — Ode to Autumn. 

Arnold — The Scholar Gipsy. 

D. H. Lawrence — The Snake. 

W. Owen — Strange Meeting. 

Prose — Detailed — 

1. Gulliver's Travels — the First two Voyages only — The 
Scholars’ Library (Macniillon) 

2. D. C. Sharma— Reperesentative, English Essays (Blackic). 

NuB . — The question paper will consist of five questions, two ques- 
tions on Poetry, two questions on Prose, the fifth question being 
an annotation question on the prescrited text in Pi esc and Poetry. 

Paper // — Composition. 

Prose —( Non-detailed reading ) — 

1 . Hardy — The Woodlanders. 

2. Shaw, B. — Arms and the Man. 

3. Hudson, H. N. — Far Away and Long Ago. 

Part I—English — 1961. 

Poetry: 

The same as for 1960 examinations. 


4 $ 



TEXT-BOOKS IN SANS. AND HINDI FOR B.SC. (HOME SCI.) 631 

(three-year) degree EXAMN.^ 1959-61. 

Prose : ' 

1. Prose with a purpose — Swaminathan and Ramaswami (O.U.P.) 

2. Pride and Prejudice — Jane Austin. 

Non-Detailed Study: 

1. Vanity Fair — Thackersay. 

2. Strife — Galsworthy — Duckworth. 

3. The Kon-Tiki Expedition by Thor Heyerdahl — edited by. 

G. C. Thornby — Longmans. 

Part II — Sanskrit. 

1959, 1960& 1961. 

1. Kalidasa’s Sakuntala. 

2, Vagbhata’s Ashtangahrdaya — Sutrasthana, Chapters 2 and 4. 
Paper I shall be on these two text-books ; and 

Paper II — Translation from Sanskrit into English and from 
English into Sanskrit. 

Both the papers to be taken at the end of the second year course. 

Third year course — Sundarapandiya’s Nitidvisastika is recom- 
mended for study, but there will be no examination in it. 

Part II — Hindi. 

1 959 & 1960. 

Paper I. 

Poetry and Prose — 

1. University Poetry Selections for B.A. — Modern Period only. 

2. Hindi Gadya Sanchaya — Mahavir Prasad (Published by 
Ram Narayan Lal& Sons, Allahabad). 

Paper II, 

Composition-^ 

1. Nirmala by Prem Chand. 

2. Katha Kaumudi — Dakshina Bharat Hindi Prachar Sabha, 
Madras. 

For reference only — 

1. Arogya Sadhan — Mahatma Gandhi (Sasta Sahitya Mandal). 


47 



632 text-books in HINDI, FRENCH, URDU AND PERSIAN 
FOR B.SC* (home SCI,) (THREE^YEAR) DEGREE 
EXAMN., 19S9-6I. 

Part II— Hindi. 

1961. 

Hindi Gadya Garmia (excluding lessons 7, 11, 14, 16 and 18) — 
Edited by Randhir (Upadhyaya, Macmillan & Co., Ltd.) 

Part II— French. 

1959. 

En marge des temps modernes — ^Edited by A. E. Forster (O.U.P.) 
Mon oncle et mon cure by J. de la Brete. 

Harrap — ^Racine’s Esther. 

Part II — French. 

1960& 1961. 

Contes et recito. by J. Mansion. Harrap. Mon oncle et 
mon cure by J. de la Brete. Harrap — En marge des temps modernes 
by A.E. Forster, O.U.P. (There is no examination in the third year.) 

Part II — Urdu. 

1959. 

Paper I — Prose and Poetry Text -books. 

Prose— 

1. Mirat al Arus by Nazir Ahmad. 

2. Chand Ham’aiar by Moulvi Abdul Haq. 

Poetry — 

3. Rang-O-Aahang, Vol. II. 

Paper 11— Composition — General and Textual, 
Non-detailed — 

4. Gulistan-e*Andad by Hussain. 

Part II — Persian. 

1959. 

Paper I— Prose and Poetry Text-books, 

Prose-^ 

I. Baharistan by Jami. 



' TBXT-BOpKS IN ARABIC, GERMAN AND TAMIL FOR 633 
B.SC. (HOME SCI.)(THkEE-YEAR) DEGREE EX AMN.. 1 959 - 61 . 

Poetry^ 

2. Diwan Hafiz (First Twenty Ghazals). 

3, Bustane Sa’d (First Chapter only). 

Paper II — Translation from Persian into English and vice versa. 

(No book is prescribed). 

Part II—Arabic. 

1959. 

Paper I — Prose and Poetry. 

1. Majaniul Adab, Vol. II (First sixty pages only). 

2. Azhar al-Arab. 

Paper IJ — Translation from Arabic into English and vice versa. 
(No book is prescribed.) 

Part II — German. 

1959 and 1960. 

1. Grammar —Wrenn — ^Krips (Harrap.) 

2. Allerlei Menschen by Curts and Reinsch, William Heine- 

manna Ltd. 

3. Wilhelm— Tell by Schiller. 

Part II — Tamil. 

1959, 1960 & 1961. 

Paper L 

Poetry and Prose — 

Poetry — 

1. Tirukkural: Payiram (4 chapters), Maruntu (1 chapter), 
Ilvazhkai (I chapter). 

Vazhkairrunai (I chapter), Pudalvaraipperudal (I chapter). 

Virunthombal (I chapter), Anbudaimai (I chapter), Ozhukka- 
mudaimai (I chapter), Iniyavai kural (I chapter), Cheynnanriyaridal 
(I chapter), Kalvi (I chapter), Kurrantalall (I chapter) — Total 
300 lines. 

2. Manimekalai — Malarvanam pukku katai — 171 lines. 


49 



634 TEXT-BOOKS IN TELUGU FOR B.SC. (hOME. SCI.) 
(THREE- Y EAR) Degree E XAMN., 1959 -61. 

3. Kambaramayanam — Kaikesi Sulvinaippatalam — 440 lines. 

4. Minakshi Pillaittamizh— Varugaippanivam and Oosal— 80 
lines. 

Prose {Detailed)— 

Valluvarum Magalirum by T. P. Meenakshisundaram (T.P.M. 
Commemoration Committee, Chintadripet, Madras). 

Note. — The questions shall be divided into those on Poetry and 
Prose and marks shall be distributed in the proportion of 70 : 30. 

Paper 11. 

Composition — Prescribed Texts for Composition — 

1. Kulantai by Dr. M. Varadarajan (Pari Nilayam, Broadway 
Madras). 

2. Pennmathimalai by Vedanayakam Pillai (Catholic Diocesanj 
Tuticorin). 

Note. — There shall be a question paper each on the two Texts 
prescribed and a third on a general subject and the marks shall be 
distributed in the proportion of 30: 30: 40. 

Books recommended for Study in the Third Year — 

1. Nalavimapaka Sastiram (Ratna Nayagar& Co., Madras). 

2. Padarthaguna chintamani (Indigenous School of Medicine). 

Note. — No question shall be set on these texts. 

Part II — Telugu. 

1959 & 1960. 

Poetry — 

Tikkana Bharatam, Udhyoga Parvam, Cantos 3 and 4. 

Prose — 

Duvvuri Rami Reddi : Sarasvata Ramya Harmyam — N. M. Venn- 
gopala Naidu’s Sri Saraswati Granthamala, 84, Giddangi Street, 
Madras- 1. 


Part II — Telugu. 


1961. 


Krishnarayabaramu— Cantos 3 and 4— Udhyoga parvam (Tikkana, 
B.A., University Selections — ^No. 3). 


50 



TEXT-BOOKS IN KANNADA AND MALAYALAM FOR B.SC. 
(HOME SCI.) (THREE- YEAR ) DEGREE EXAISW., 1959 - 61 . 


635 


Prose — 

Saraswata Vyasamulu by Duvyuri Rami Reddi. 

Non^detailed — 

Translation by Srinivasa Chakravarti, Adarsa Grandha Mandali, 
Vijayawada. 


Part II — Kannada. 

1959, 1960 & 1961. 

Paper 1 

Poetry and Prose — 

1. Jaimini Bharatam — Sandhis 1, 2 and 3 (omitting Stanzas 7,9^ 
10, 29 in Sandhi 3.) 

2. Megha Sandesha by Kukkc Subrahmanya Shastry. 

3. Samskriti by D. V. Gundappa. 

4. Prachina Sahitya by T. S. Venkannaya. 

Paper II. 


Composition — 

1. Avyakta Manava by K. S. Haridasa Bhat. 

2. Odahuttidavaru by K. S. Karantha. 


Part II — Malayalam. 

1959. 

Paper I. 

Detailed Study — 

1. Vallathol Abhijana Sakunthalam — Published 

by Vallathol Granthalayam. 

2. Asan .. Chinthavishtayaya Seetha — Pub- 

lished by Sarada Book Depot, 
Alwaye. 


51 



636 TEXT-BOOKS IN MALAYALAM FOR B.SC. (HOME SCI.) 

(three-year) degree examnw 1959-61. 


3. Balamani Amma •• Lokantharangalil — Published by 

Mathrubhumi Printing and Publi- 
shing Co., Ltd., Kozhikode. 

4. C. H. Kunhappa .. Vicharakorakam— -Published by Canna- 

nore Printing Works, Cannanore. 

5. Kuttikrishna Marar .. Sahitya Vidya — Published by P. K. 

Bros., Kozhikode. 


Paper 11. 

Non-detailed Study — 

1. P. K. Parameswaran Mahatma Gandhi— Published by 

Nayar, National Book Stall, Kottayam. 

2. Attur Krishna Pisharoti. Kerala Kathakali Part II — Published 

by Bhattarak Brothers, Sri Thila- 
kam, Trichur. 


Part II— M^layalam. 
iq6o. 

1. Kaladi Raman Nambiar Kalidasa’s Sakuntalam (Pub. by Kaladi 

Bros., Chalakkudi). 

2. KumaranAsan Chinthavisthayaya Seetha (Published 

by Sarada Book Depot, Alwaye). 

3. P. Kunhiraman Nayar. Kaliyachan (Pub: Sri Guruvayur- 

appan Book Depot, Guruvayur). 

4. N. V. Krishna Variar Kalotsavam (Pub: Kerala book Depot, 

Kozhikode). 

5. M. P. Paul .. .. Sahityavicharam (Pub: National Book 

Stall, Kottayam). 

6. Kappana Krishna Cheraman Perumal (Pub: Mathru- 

Menon. bhumi Publications, Kozhikode). 

7. P, K. Parameswaran Mahatma Gandhi (Pub: National 

Nayar. Book Stall , Kottayam) . 


5 ^ 



TEXT-BOOKS IN MALAYALAM FOR B.SC. (KOME SCI.) 637 
(THREE-YEAR) DEGREE EXAMN., 1959 - 61 . 

Part II— Malayalam. 

Paper /, 

1961. 

Same as for B. A. Part 1 1, Papers 1 and 2 (omitting items 1, 2&3 
under Paper 1 viz.)** 

1. Cheruriyil Kunjunni Vikramovrasiyam : Published by Sahitya 

Nambisan. Parishat Book Stall, Ernakulam. 

2. Vallathol Narayana Sahityamanjari Part III— Published 

Menon. by Vallathol Granthalaya, Cheni- 

thuruthi, Kerala. 

3. Vailoppillil Sridhara Kannikkoythu (Following titles only): 

Menon. 1. Mampazham, 2. Vasantham, 

3. Assan Panikkar, 4. Kaakka, 
5. Sahyante Makan, 6. Paschima 
Samudram — Pub : National Book 
Stall, Kottayam. 

4. N. V. Krishna Variar .. Kalotsavam— Publishers: Kerala Book 

Depot, Kozhikode. 

5. M. P. Paul .. .. Sahitya Vicharam (Publishers: National 

Book Stall, Kottayam.) 


Paper II. 

1961, 

1. V. C. Raman Pillai .. Martanda Varma— Published by 

B.V. Book Depot, Trivandrum. 

2. P. K. Narayana Pillay. Smarana Mandalant — Publishers: 

P. K. Memorial Press, Trivandrum. 


5S 



CHAPTER XLV 


DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE 
{B.COM.) 


Regulations. 

1. Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of 
Commerce shall be required. 

(а) to have passed the Pre- University examina- 

tion of this University or an examina- 
tion accepted by the Syndicate as equiva- 
lent thereto, and 

(б) to have subsequently undergone the pres- 

cribed course of study in a constituent or 
affiliated college of this University for a 
period of not less than three academic 
years or nine terms. 

2. The course of study shall comprise instruction 

in the following subjects according 
Course of Study to syllabuses and text-books to be 
prescribed from time to time: — 

PART I 
English 

The course shall extend over a period of two 
academic years. The course shall cover: — 

1. the study in detail of certain prescribed 

books in Modern Prose; 

2. composition on matter supplied by books set 

for perusal; 

3. precise writing and business correspondence . 

PART II 

A Second Language 

The course shall extend over a period of two 
academic years and shall comprise the study of any- 



639 


XLV] DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE 


one of the following languages at the option of the 
candidate: — 


1. Foreign — 
French. 
German 


Foreign— 

Sinhalese. 

Burmese. 


Indian — 

Kannada. 
Malayalam. 

Marathi. 

Oriya. 

Hindi. 

Bengali. 

Urdu. 

Gujarati. 

{Note : — The language taken shall not to be 
the same as that taken for the Pre- 
University examination.) 

The course shall cover Translation from the selected 
language and vice versa and Composition which shall 
be in the nature of short letters dealing with Commer- 
cial correspondence. 

{Note : — There will be only one paper and no 
text-books will be prescribed.) 


2. Indian — 
Tamil. 
Telugu. 


PART III 

The course shall extend over a period of three acade- 
mic years and shall comprise the study of the following: — 

Group A 

1. General Economics. 

2. Modern Econonaic Developments and Econo- 

mic Problems of India. 


2 



640 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[CHAP. 


Group B 

1. Banking Law and Practice. 

2. Business Organisation and Secretarial 

Practice. 

3. Mercantile Law. 

4. Advanced Accountancy. 

5. Statistical Methods and their application to 

commerce. 

Group C 

Any one of the following: — 

1. Trade and Transport. 

2. Insurance. 

3. Rural Economics and Co-operation. 

4. Industrial Organisation and Cost Accounts. 

5. Income-tax Law and Practice. 

6. Actuarial Science. 

7. Advanced Currency and Banking. 

8. Special Accounts and Audit. 

3. The examination shall be in three Parts— Part I, 
Part II and Part III. Candidates 
Examination. may take Part L Part II and 
Group A of Part III at the end of 
the second year of the course and Group B and C of 
Part III at the end of the third year. 


3 



XLV] 

DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE 

641 

4. 

The scheme of examination shall be 

as 


Scheme of follows: — 


Examinatioa. 

PART I 

Hours Marks 

1. English— Prose ... 3 100 

2. Composition ... 3 100 

3. Precis writing and Busi- 3 100 

ness correspondence. 

Total ... 300 

PART II 

A Second Language 

Translation, Composition 3 100 

and Correspondence. 

PART III 

Group A 

1. General Economics ... 3 100 

2. Modern Economic Deve- 3 100 

lopments and Econo- 
mic Problems of 
India. 


Group B 


1. Banking Law and Prac- 
tice. 

3 

100 

2. Business Organisation 

and Secretarial Prac- 
tice. 

3 

100 

3. Mercantile Law 

3 

100 

4. Advanced Accountancy. 

3 

100 

5. Auditing 

3 

100 

6. Statistical Methods and 
their application to 
Commerce. 

Group C 

3 

100 

1. Paper I in the selected 
subject. 

3 

loo 

2. Paper II in the selected 
subject. 

3 

100 


Total .. 1,100 


4 



642 


LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY 


[CHAP. 


5. A candidate shall be declared to have passed 

Part I or Part II of the examination 
Marks required if he obtains not less than 35 per 
for a Pass in cent of the total marks in each Part, 
the several A candidate shall be declared to 
Parts to qua- have passed Part HI if he obtains 
lify for the not less than 35 per cent of the 
Degree. marks in each group separately and 

40 per cent in the aggregate in 
Groups B and C together. 

6. No candidate shall be eligible for the Degree of 

Bachelor of Commerce until he has 
Conditions of completed the course of study pres- 
eligibility for cribed and passed the examination 
the Degree. in alt the Parts specified. 

There shall be separate lists of successful candidates 
in each Part. Candidates obtaining not less than 
60 per cent of the total marks in Part I or Part II shall 
be declared to have passed that Part with distinction. 

Successful candidates who pass the examinations at 
the first appearance and obtain 60 per cent or above of 
the total marks in Part III (Groups B and C only) shall 
be placed in the first class in that Part. Successful can- 
didates who obtain less than 60 per cent but not less 
than 50 per cent of the marks in Part III (Groups B 
and C only) shall be placed in the second class. AH 
other successful candidates in Part III (Groups B and 
C only) shall be placed in the third class. A candidate 
securing not less than 75 per cent of the marks in any 
group under Part HI of the examination shall be 
declared to have passed that group with distinction. 
There will be no classification for Group A of Part HI. 

Symbolic representation shall be adopted in 
declaring the results and a statement of detailed marks 
shall not he furnished. 


5 



XLV] 


degree of bachelor of commerce 


643 


Symbol A plus will denote 65 per cent and above of 
the marks but below 75 per cent of the marks. 

Symbol A will denote 60 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 65 per cent. 

Symbol B plus will denote 55 per cent and above 
of the marks but below 60 per cent. 

Symbol B will denote 50 per cent and above of the 
marks but below 55 per cent. 

Symbol C plus will denote 45 per cent and above 
of the marks but below 50 per cent. 

Symbol C will denote the passing minimum above 
but below 45 per cent. 

Symbol D will denote Distinction as having obtained 
75 per cent and above of the marks in any one 
of the subjects or groups provided the candidate 
passes the whole examination at the first 
appearance. 

Symbol F will denote failure. 

8. Candidates who fail in any Part or Parts of the 
examination shall be permitted to appear in such Part or 
Parts at any subsequent examination on payment of the 
prescribed fees without producing any additional cer- 
tificate of attendance and progrevss. 

Successful candidates under the above Regulation 
shall be placed in a separate list. Ti^ey shall not be 
eligible for prizes or medals awarded by the University. 

9. Candidates who pass the Intermediate exami- 
nation taking ‘Elements of Commerce and Accountancy’, 
shall be admitted to the second year of the three-year 
degree course. 

This Transitory Regulation shall be in force for a 
period of five years after the introduction of the three- 
year degree course 

10. Candidates who have undergone the course of 
study and appeared for the examination or been 
exempted to appear for the examination under the 
Regulations in force prior to the academic year 1958, 
shall be permitted to complete the examinations under 
those Regulation. This Transitory Regulation shall be 
in force till the Examination of March-April 1964. 



644 SYtU IN PART I OF THE B.aOM. DEGREE [CHAP. 

examination 


B.Com* 

Syllabuses 
Part I 

Precis Writing and Business Correspondence 

A. PRECIS WRITING.— 

Precis of commercial matter— Precis of Commercial and Official 
Correspondence — ^Precis in the Forms of Narration or Story of 
Document relating to a particular subject — ^Precis of Public speeches 
ani commercial essays. 

B. BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE — 

(a) Introduction — Organisation of Correspondence department — 
business letters — Orders and Execution — Complaints and settlements of 
accounts circulars and official letters — Correspondence on imports and 
cxports> bills of exchange> agency, carriage by land and sea — banking 
and insurance. 

(b) Drafting the report — ^Reports by individual — Reports of 
Committees — Drafting of reports for the press — Writing reports from 
statistical data — Drafting replies to questionaires — Drafting short 
speeches — Writing of essays — Descriptive Economic and commercial 
essays relating to Agriculture, Industries, Population and Labour 
Finance and Currency, Planning, Transport, Broadcasting and 
Miscellaneous. 

Books Recommeiided* — 

Pink and Thomas : English Grammar, Composition and 
Commercial Correspondence. 

Lydall : Precis Writing. 

G. M. Moitrs ; English Composition. 

Carrad : Commercial Correspondence. 

Pocock : Precis Wr