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Annexure A 


EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN 
MUNICIPALITY 


Draft Reviewed Integrated Development Plan 

(IDP) 2014/15 



20 


2014/15 


CONTENTS 

1. INTRODUCTION 3 

1.1 INTRODUCTION, CONTEXT AND OVERVIEW 3 

1.2 THE PLANNING FRAMEWORK 14 

2. STATUSQUO 15 

2.1 SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 15 

2.2 VISION, MISSION ANDVALUES 27 

3. EKURHULENI GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 2055 28 

4. INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS 40 

5. REVIEW OF THE INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 44 

5.1 GUIDING PRINCIPLES 44 

5.2 IDP/SDBIP 45 

5.3 FLAGSHIPS 95 

6. EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 2035 - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 142 

7. DISASTER MANAGEMENTPLAN 157 

7.1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 157 

8. DRAFT MULTI YEAR FINANCIAL PLAN 158 

9. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 159 

10. PROVINCIAL PROGRAMMES AND BUDGETS 163 


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1. INTRODUCTION 


1.1 INTRODUCTION, CONTEXT AND OVERVIEW 


Integrated Development Planning is a process through which municipalities prepare a strategic 
development plan which extends over a five-year period. The Integrated Development Plan (IDP) is a 
product of the IDP process. The EMM IDP is the principal strategic planning instrument which guides 
and informs all planning, budgeting, management and decision making processes in the municipality. 

Through Integrated Development Planning which necessitates the involvement of all relevant 
stakeholders, a municipality:- 

• Identify its key development priorities; 

• Formulate a clear vision, mission and values; 

• Formulate appropriate strategies; 

• Develop the appropriate organizational structure and systems to realize the vision and 
mission; and 

• Align resources with the developmental priorities. 


In terms of the Systems Act, all municipalities have to undertake an IDP process to produce IDPs. As 
the IDP is a legislative requirement it has a legal status and it supersedes all other plans that guide 
development at local government level. 

Since the establishment of municipality, EMM has made excellent progress in enabling the people of 
this region to enjoy the fruits of liberation and democracy. We have seen substantial improvements 
made in the provision of healthcare, building houses and providing water, electricity and sanitation. 
The bucket system has been eradicated. We have laid a solid foundation and are on course to 
improving the lives of our communities. As we celebrate the change in our communities, we are also 
aware of the many challenges we still face. Our fight against poverty and underdevelopment will be 
further intensified to work towards halving unemployment. Our responsibility as a sphere of 
government is to ensure that the quality of life of all that live and work in Ekurhuleni is improved. We 
will continue to engage in both progressive and meaningful discussions with our communities to 
shape a clear path from which governance and development will draw guidance and direction. 

Since the establishment of EMM, it implemented projects and programmes through its IDP and the 
achievement of inter alia the following: 

• All communities have access to clean drinking water (which have been declared the best 
quality in the country) and decent sanitation; 

• There is universal provision of free basic services; 

• Constructed hundreds of new roads to improve access for our communities; 

• Improve the way government provide housing to ensure better quality houses closer to 
economic opportunities and combat corruption in the administration of waiting lists; 

• Creation of safety and security for communities, including plans to deal with disasters and 
emergencies; 


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• Utilization of sports, recreation, arts and culture for social and physical renewal and building 
towards a single identity of Ekurhuleni community; 

• Environmental management, including dealing with conditions of dolomite prevalent in the city; 

• Improvement of the general health in our communities. 

The IDP for 14/15 is first and foremost a product of extensive community consultation including all the 
101 wards in the boundaries of Ekurhuleni. Many meetings were held in communities and in these 
meetings; EMM requested each ward to identify its key priorities and needs. Municipal departments 
were then requested to ensure inclusion of these into Departmental plans and projects. 

But this IDP is also not only a product of community consultation. The IDP 14/15 is also informed by 
plans and strategic frameworks developed by other spheres of government and the various EMM 
Departments. Some of the key strategic frameworks from which this IDP draws include the National 
Development Plan, 14 National Outcomes, Gauteng 2055 and the EMM GDS 2055. 


NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

After an extensive process of research and canvassing of the views of South Africans on the 
challenges the country faced and the goals the country should strive to achieve, National Government 
released a diagnostic report in 201 1 . Some of the challenges highlighted in this report include: 

• Too few people work; 

• Corruption levels are high; 

• Spatial divides hobble inclusive development; 

• Public services are uneven and often of poor quality ; 

• The public health system cannot meet the demand or sustain quality; and 

• Infrastructure is poorly located, inadequate and under-maintained. 


The Diagnostic report formed the basis for the National Development Plan that was approved by 
Cabinet in November 2012. The National Development Plan is a plan for the country to eliminate 
poverty and reduce inequality by 2030 through uniting South Africans, unleashing the energies of its 
citizens, growing an inclusive economy, building capabilities, enhancing the capability of the state and 
leaders working together to solve complex problems. 

The programmes and projects identified in this IDP are aimed at addressing the challenges identified 
in this national roadmap. The key interventions that are already in the pipeline are being continued 
and some instances accelerated in order to progressively and sustainably improve the lives of our 
residents. EMM is for the view that the IDP needs to be used more strategically to focus attention on 
critical priorities in the NDP that relate to the mandate of local government such as spatial planning, 
infrastructure and basic services. Key interventions aimed at fostering economic development have 
been identified as we believe that local governments are not merely instruments of service delivery, 
but are expected to act as key agents for economic development. 


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NATIONAL OUTCOMES 


In 2010 Cabinet adopted the following 12 Outcomes which are the politically determined priorities of 
government as derived from the election manifesto of the ruling party and the Medium Term Strategic 
Framework (MTSF). Five priority areas were identified: decent work and sustainable livelihoods, 
education, health, rural development, food security and land reform and the fight against crime and 
corruption. These translated into 12 outcomes to create a better life for all: 


■ an improved quality of basic education; 

■ a long and healthy life for all South Africans; 

■ all South Africans should be safe and feel safe; 

■ decent employment through inclusive growth; 

■ a skilled and capable workforce to support an inclusive growth path; 

■ an efficient, competitive and responsive economic infrastructure network; 

■ vibrant, equitable, sustainable rural communities with food security for all; 

■ sustainable human settlements and an improved quality of household life; 

■ a responsive, accountable, effective and efficient local government system; 

■ environmental assets and natural resources that are well protected and enhanced; 

■ a better Africa and a better world as a result of South Africa’s contributions to global relations; 

■ an efficient and development-oriented public service; and 

■ an empowered, fair and inclusive citizenship. 

These outcomes have recently been revised and 2 additional outcomes were included. The 
programmes and projects identified in this IDP are directly linked with these outcomes and this link is 
demonstrated very clearly. For example, the Growth and Development Strategy 2055 (GDS) 
programmes (e.g. Capabilities Development) under the thematic area of social empowerment is 
directly linked with the outcome of a skilled and capable workforce to support and inclusive growth. 
This said GDS programmes can also be indirectly linked with the outcomes of decent employment 
through inclusive growth and an improved quality of basic education. See chapter 5 of this document 
for more discussion of EMM programmes and national outcomes. 

The EMM Growth and Development Strategy which this IDP draws significantly upon is discussed in 
a separate chapter. 


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COMMENTS RECEIVED FROM GAUTENG PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT ON THE 
REVIEWED IDP 2013/2014: 


COMMENTS ON THE 2013/2014 REVIEWED INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

The Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) wishes to congratulate 
the municipality for the timeous preparation, review and adoption of the final 2013/2014 financial year 
Integrated Development Plan (IDP) in compliance with provisions of the Municipal Finance 
Management Act as well as the Municipal Systems Act. In line with the Provisions of Section 32 (2) of 
the Municipal Systems Act, kindly receive these as the official comments on the 2013/2014 financial 
year IDP as submitted by the Municipality to the Department. 

The comments seek to highlight critical areas that the Municipality will need to focus on in the drive to 
improve the credibility of the IDP as well as to enhance intergovernmental coordination and alignment 
between the IDP and the sector plans and priorities of other spheres of government. To this effect, 
the comments will reflect on some of the critical issues highlighted during the draft IDP analysis in 
April. 

Most critically, the comments seek to shape and influence the 2014/2015 financial year IDP Review 
process, which coincides with the end of term for the current Provincial and National executive. To 
this effect, the comments are structured in order to reflect on the key areas that the Municipality must 
focus on in the 2014/2015 financial year as a contribution towards ensuring successful achievement 
of the priorities of the 2009-2014 mandate term. In the spirit of cooperative governance, the 
comments will also applaud the Municipality where the IDP demonstrated areas of excellence across 
the Key Performance Areas. As has been the case previously, the first section of the comments 
reflects on key generic issues that cut across the municipalities. The second section deals with issues 
specific to your Municipality, some of which are linked to the generic issues reflected upon in the first 
section and structure according to the Key Performance Areas: 

KEY-CROSS-CUTTING ISSUES 

• Planning for Migration: Since the release of the recent Census results, it is documented that 
Gauteng is the biggest province with regards to population size in the country. This points to 
upward trends regarding in-migration at both international and local levels. Whilst migration 
presents a number of opportunities for the province, it also comes with pressing challenges, 
key among which is the ability of municipalities to keep up with demands for basic services. A 
number of Gauteng municipalities are undertaking various initiatives to respond to this 
challenge which is commendable. However, a Provincial Migration Strategy is essential in 
enabling the province to respond effectively to the challenges posed by migration. To this 
effect, Gauteng COGTA will lobby all relevant stakeholders towards ensuring the development 
ofa Province-wide Migration Strategy. 

• Inter-Municipal Planning: Section 31 (c) (i) of the Municipal Systems Act imposes a 
requirement on COGTA to facilitate the alignment of IDPs of neighbouring Municipalities. 
Furthermore, inter-municipal planning is a critical component towards the achievement of the 
Gauteng Global City Region. Much of the efforts contained in the IDPs in this regard are 
around information sharing, which points to a glaring gap regarding inter-municipal planning. 
Municipalities are urged to start investigating collaborative initiatives in areas such as 


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investment in strategic economic infrastructure; transportation pianning (in iine with the 
provinciai iong term transport pian; as weii as corridor and cross-boundary nodai 
deveiopment. The Department wiii be convening a GCR Indaba aimed at faciiitating a process 
of diaiogue among various stake-hoiders in the bid to build a Globally Competitive Gauteng 
City Region. 

• Re-configuring the apartheid space: Linked to the above, Gauteng still bears evidence of 
apartheid spatial configuration, characterised by, among others, inequality and service 
disparities among various communities within municipalities. As a result of this, historically 
disadvantaged communities remained predominantly poorly-serviced as opposed to the 
wealthier areas. Foremost to the agenda of municipalities should be to reverse this trend 
through acceleration of service delivery to the poor communities. One of the most effective 
mechanisms of achieving this is area-based planning, through which municipalities are again 
urged to prioritise certain areas and make development impact in them as opposed to 
spreading the limited budgetary resources across a myriad of services with little impact. The 
success achieved by the City of Johannesburg in Soweto is the most glaring example of the 
kind of impact that this community-based planning model of service delivery can attain. 

• Operation Clean Audit: The year 2014 marks the deadline for Gauteng municipalities to 
achieve the Clean Audits. Whereas some municipalities have made significant strides in this 
regard, some are still lagging behind. Municipalities are called upon to utilise the 2014/2015 
financial year IDP review process to address the matters raised by the Auditor General (AG) 
in the bid to deliver Operation Clean Audit (OPCA). 

• Planning for Outcomes: Since the introduction of national outcomes, Gauteng Municipalities 
have made commendable progress in ensuring that IDPs are aligned to them. Municipalities 
are urged to continue striving for the attainment of all government outcomes through the IDP 
and not just to focus on outcome 9. The Department is currently coordinating the development 
of an intergovernmental engagement roadmap whose main aim is to facilitate structured 
engagements between Municipalities and sector departments in the bid to entrench 
coordination and alignment. 

• Gender, Youth and People with Disabilities (GEYODi). Although municipalities in Gauteng 
have made strides in their attempt to integrate GEYODI issues in their planning, serious 
challenges remain. The general picture with regard to the mainstreaming of GEYODI issues in 
IDPs still shows gaps especially in relation to employment equity, accommodating special 
groups of people in public participation processes. At the moment it is not clear how 
Municipalities facilitate participation of the above-mentioned group ofpeople during IDP public 
participation processes. In order to accommodate special groups, sign language skills should 
be developed as well as targeted sessions where women, youth or people with disabilities are 
prioritised to ensure meaningful participation. Efforts should also be intensified to prioritise 
GEYODI in areas of Service Delivery, Employment Equity as well as Economic 
Empowerment. 

In addition to the above, in specific reference to your municipality, the following issues are particularly 

pertinent: 


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GOOD GOVERNANCE AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 


• The decision of the Demarcation Board contained in the ‘Announcement on the MDB’s final 
determination of municipai boundary re-determinations’ points to the integration of Lesedi 
Locai Municipaiity into Ekurhuieni Metro with effect from 2016. Since this is a finai decision, the 
City is urged to therefore put mechanisms in piace to iay the foundation of this from an 
institutionai and governance perspective. Key to this wiii be streamiining the IDP processes so 
that the IDPs share the same strategic focus as a build up to implementing the said integration. 
Other initiatives should include cross border nodal development between the two municipalities. 

• The City is urged to capacitate Inter-Governmental Relations (Unit) for better coordination to 
facilitate alignment in the bid to ensure that the IDP is a shared process amongst the three 
spheres of government. This will go a long way in facilitating programmatic alignment between 
the City’s priorities and the plans and programmes of other spheres of government as 
envisaged in both the White paper on Local Government as well as the Municipal Systems Act. 

• The city is urged to consider conducting regular service delivery satisfactory surveys in its 
broader area of jurisdiction similar to those of the Cities of Tshwane and Johannesburg. The 
above-mentioned initiatives can provide important feedback from communities on the kind of 
impact that the City’s programmes is having on its communities. As part ofthis, the City is urged 
to partner with various research institutions to build internal research capacity so as to 
undertake these kinds ofresearch in a sustainable manner. 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

• The City’s 2013/2014 IDP demonstrates a clear understanding ofthe economy and its strategic 
location in the Global City Region triangle. The municipality is known as the manufacturing hub 
of the province and a significant contributor to provincial and national growth figures. The 
launch of the Aerotropolis has contributed positively towards rebranding of the city. However, 
the continued global economic uncertainty more so in the Eurozone and depressed demand for 
manufactured goods had affected the industry negatively. It is important that the municipality in 
collaboration with local industry begins to seek alternative markets for goods and commodities. 

• Gauteng Provincial Government (GPG) and South African Local Government Association 
(SALGA) have acknowledged the existence and the significance of the informal economy in 
employment provision and generation as well as its function as buffer between employment and 
unemployment. Moreover the informal economy has particular relevance for the creation of 
livelihood opportunities and alleviating poverty as part of individual survival strategies of the 
poor. However, it is not clearly observable in the 2013/2014 IDP how the municipality intends to 
support and provide any form of assistance to businesses in the informal economy. The City is 
therefore urged to refer to SALGA policy guidelines on informal economy and the 
recommendations made therein. 

• The 2013/2014 final IDP identifies the building of local economies to create employment, 
decent work and sustainable livelihoods as one of their key strategic objective. The municipality 
clearly outlines plans and programmes aimed at supporting and developing Small, Medium and 


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Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs) and cooperatives aiigned to the municipai strategic 
preferentiai procurement poiicy as weii as Broad Based Biack Economic Empowerment 
(BBBEE) frameworks. However, the paradox of the City’s economy is captured by the mismatch 
between unempioyment rates and iiteracy rates. The City has recorded 84% iiteracy rate which 
is the highest in Gauteng but continues to battie to attract technicai skiiis required by the formai 
empioyment sector. It is therefore important that the City iink skiiis deveiopment initiatives to 
market skiils demands through strategic cooperation with local training and tertiary institutions. 

FINANCIALVIABILITY 

• The IDP is silent on the management of creditors’ payments. This includes payment of creditors 
within 30 days as well as other contract management issues. The City is urged to reflect on this 
as part of the IDP so as to ascertain compliance with Municipal Finance Management Act 
(MFMA) requirements in this regard. 

• The City has undertaken major financial commitments which include provision of services to 
informal settlements. However the IDP does not identify any alternative revenue streams that 
the City will pursue in order to adequately finance its Capital and Operational commitments. 
The IDP only points out that the City intends undertaking a range of initiatives to cut operational 
costs, without clearly articulating what these would entail. The City is urged to investigate 
alternative streams of revenue so as to enable it to meet its service delivery objectives in a 
sustainable manner. 


SERVICE DELIVERY 

• Initiatives to provide service to people in informal settlements which include installation of PV 
lights in informal settlements are highly commended. This will go a long way towards ensuring 
human dignity to those living informal settlements. The City is still urged to consider a model 
similar to that adopted by the City of Johannesburg towards Soweto in the 2006-201 1 term of 
office as a means to achieve great impact from its investment. 

• Free Basic Services are still being provided universally. This is not cost-effective as it includes 
households that can afford to pay for services. The City is again urged to review this policy with 
the view to providing basic services only to indigents. This must be accompanied investigating 
initiatives aimed at supporting these indigents out of indigent support dependence though 
initiatives such as Community Works Programme as well as linking them to available economic 
opportunities. 

• IDP points out that Migration into EMM contributes to informality. This imposes an additional 
responsibility on the City to enhance provision of access to basic services (specifically water, 
sanitation and waste removal) to these communities. Whereas the City will most likely generate 
no revenue from providing the said services to these communities, this will be a critical 
programme to ensure protection of human dignity as enshrined in the country’s Constitution. 
The Department will coordinate a process towards the development of a province-wide 
migration strategy as a means to enable Provincial and Local Government as a whole to better 
respond to migration. The City’s support in this initiative will be of vital importance. 


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SPATIAL PLANNING 

• The City’s Spatial Development Framework (SDF) does not contextualise itself in relation to the 
provinciai space and adjoining Municipalities. /\s one of the anchor Cities of the Gauteng City 
Region, the City is urged to reference the provincial, regional and adjoining space in the spatial 
planning component of the Integrated Development Plan and demonstrate linkages in this 
regard. This will contribute significantly towards the spatial construction of the Gauteng City 
Region. 

• The City is commended for aligning the Capital Investment Framework (CIF) to the Spatial 
Development Framework. The Capital Investment Framework is also spatially referenced in the 
Integrated Development Plan. This is significant in that it ensures that the imperatives of the 
municipal Spatial Development Framework form the basis for prioritization of capital investment. 

• The City is again applauded for advancing transit oriented development through the 
establishment of Transit Orientated Development on mining land in close proximity to the 
Ekurhuleni railway system. This could lead to large scale infill development in the remainder of 
Ekurhuleni and the promotion of public transport, specifically rail transport as the backbone to 
the public transport system of Ekurhuleni. The City is urged to integrate these initiatives within 
the relevant Strategic Integrated Projects, specifically freight and logistics hubs. 

• The recent Aerotropolis conference hosted by the City is another indication of the City’s 
commitment to the pursuit of this notion. The latter is a critical component towards the 
development of a Metropolitan identity for the City so as to address the current Spatial 
Fragmentation along regional lines, which has characterised the City since its establishment. 


CONCLUSION 

The IDP continues to form a very critical aspect of our evolving system of inter-governmental 
development planning. The IDP has come to occupy a dual role both as a strategic planning tool of 
the municipality whilst also serving as an instrument of inter-governmental alignment among the 
various spheres of government. As envisaged in the White paper for Local Government, 
municipalities have a critical contribution to make in integrating and coordinating the programmes of 
various spheres of government being implemented within their spaces. As a Department, we re-affirm 
our commitment to partner with your municipality in an on-going effort to strengthen vertical alignment 
among the various spheres towards making the IDP a plan ofall government. 

In a bid to ensure that these comments contribute meaningfully to the Municipality’s planning 
processes, the Department will explore intergovernmental initiatives to assist the Municipality in 
addressing these. This will be anchored on implementing the provincial intergovernmental roadmap 
aimed at strengthening coordination and alignment. 

The Department remains grateful and reliant on your commitment to inter-governmental planning 
towards building a globally competitive Gauteng City Region. 


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EMM RESPONSE TO MEC COMMENTS 


Ekurhuleni Metropolitan acknowledges comments by the MEC on the IDP 13/14 and to thereto wish 
to provide the following response/s: 

■ Planning for migration: EMM has reviewed its Growth and Development Strategy and 
proposals made in this approved strategy (GDS 2055) are aimed, amongst others, at 
addressing the challenges of migration (including in-migration), skills and educational levels 
etc. These challenges are also highlighted in the Gauteng 2055 Strategy, which EMM has 
taken into account in the review of its own GDS. The GDS acknowledges migration as an 
issue placing a considerable burden on services, infrastructure and resources of the city, but 
views the phenomenon as also bringing opportunities which the EMM must strategically 
exploit. Although the phenomenon of migration affects all metros, EMM has sought to highlight 
that amongst the Gauteng Metros, it receives largest percentage of these migrants. The 
overall profile of migrants into Ekurhuleni is that they are much poorer, educational levels are 
lower and therefore possess few if any skills at all. This reality is acknowledged in the GDS 
which resolves to proactively absorb these migrants and to plan for the people it has, rather 
than plan for those that it wishes it had. To this end, the GDS places emphasise on “on-going 
support for urbanisation of the poorest-of-the-poor from rurai areas in South Africai’. 


■ Reconfiguring the apartheid space: Indeed one of the biggest challenges confronting Cities in 
the post-apartheid South Africa is the urgent need to speedily address the legacy of apartheid 
spatial planning. The reindustrialization agenda in the GDS emphasises the need to develop 
a much tighter spatial and functional relationship in regard to the location of working spaces 
and living spaces in order to reduce the demand for transport, improve the energy efficiency 
and productivity of the City, and to stimulate economies of agglomeration. To this end, EMM 
has placed on top of its agenda (as reflected in the MSDF and capital expenditure and 
investment in priority areas), the need to transform the fragmented and exclusionary spatial 
fabric reflected in the 9 fragmented towns that have been amalgamated. The welfare of the 
marginalized in the previously disadvantaged areas (PDAs) and informal settlements is a key 
priority in this process. 


■ Operation Clean Audit: EMM has obtained an unqualified audit opinion for five consecutive 
years. For 12/13 the metro has decreased the overall number of audit findings. EMM is 
determined to obtain a clean audit in 2014 and has put in place the following mechanisms, 
amongst others, to achieve this: 

EMM has an operation clean audit committee constituted by all Heads of Department and 
chaired by the COO. 

The OPCA will meet on a monthly basis and manages progress on implementation of 
Auditor’s recommendations; 

Matters reported which impact on the ability of the Metro to achieve a clean audit are 
followed up and ensured they are resolved before year end; 


30 



Compliance division (in the Finance Department) has been created and filled. This 
division is critical and will assist the municipality with compliance with the applicable laws 
and regulations. 


■ Planning for outcomes: EMM notes the MEC’s comments with regard to the need for 
municipalities to plan for national outcomes. In the IDP 13/14, EMM demonstrated a clear link 
between EMM’s GDS programmes and the National Outcomes. In the SDBIP departments 
are required to demonstrate their contribution (direct or indirect) to national outcomes. EMM is 
therefore contributing to a substantial number (except where EMM as a municipality does 
have a competency) of the national outcomes, but the MEC’s challenge that we must 
continuously strive to attain more of the Outcomes is accepted. EMM is also aware that the 
national outcomes were recently reviewed and increased and every effort will be made to 
bring these on board in our planning processes. 


■ Gender, Youth and People with Disabilities (GEYODI): EMM notes the MEC concerns with 
regard to the important matter of GEYODI. This matter is receiving high-level attention (co- 
ordinated politically by the Office of the Executive Mayor) in the municipality. A Youth Policy 
has already been approved by Council and draft on Gender and Disability Mainstreaming is 
currently been prepared. Administratively, the municipality is currently considering how we 
can meaningfully ensure the inclusion of GEYODI issues in the IDP and departmental plans. 
Departments are currently required to report quarterly on this issue. 


■ Municipal Boundary Redeterminations: The Council has noted the finalization of the 
incorporation of Lesedi Local Municipality into the municipal area of Ekurhuleni by the 
Municipal Demarcation Board (MDB). Further, the Council also noted the draft notice for 
publication by the MEC for local government and COGTA in terms of Section 14(5) of the 
Local Government Municipal Structures Act of 1998 as well as the proposed Implementation 
Plan for the incorporation of Lesedi Local Municipality into the municipal area of Ekurhuleni. 
Ekurhuleni is aligning itself with the proposed Implementation plan as put forward by the 
MEC. The Section 14(5) draft notice is still to be published. 


Administratively, the City Manager has appointed a committee of senior personnel to drive the 
process to implement the incorporation of Lesedi into EMM. There is also a task team of 
operational personnel who are undertaking due diligence exercises in line with the 
implementation plan provided by COGTA. Ekurhuleni is ready to engage with Lesedi Local 
Municipality once the Section 14(5) Notice is published. 


■ Capacitation of IGR Units: MEC’s comments with regards to the IGR units are noted. This unit 
currently exist in the Office of the City Manager but it is not at all capacitated. Plans are 
however underway to capacitate this office starting in 14/15 with a view of having it fully 
capacitated in few years. 


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■ Service Delivery Satisfaction Surveys: EMM has over the years conducted a small survey on 
service delivery satisfaction but a recent review determined it to be inadequate (sample, 
research instrument, methodology, issues covered, data analysis methods, etc.) in its 
usefulness to municipal decision making. The Strategy and Corporate Planning Department is 
currently working on substantially improving the satisfaction survey and ensuring that it 
becomes a worthwhile planning and monitoring tool for municipal departments and decision 
makers. 


32 



1.2 THE PLANNING FRAMEWORK 


The following is a graphic illustration of the strategic planning framework followed in the planning 
process of reviewing the EMM IDP: 


PLANNING PROCESSES 

National and Provincial Plans and Guidelines (SON Address, NDP, National Outcomes, PGDS, 

GSDP) 

Ekurhuleni GDS 2055 
Ward Priorities 


5 Year IDP 


3 Year Budget 

. ' 

lYearSDBIP 

V 

' T 



Implementation 

1 Performance 

1 Assessment 


Annual Report 


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2. STATUS QUO 
2.1 SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 

INTRODUCTION 

Section 26 of the Municipal Systems Act 2000 requires that as part of developing an IDP, existing 
levels of development within a municipality be assessed. This chapter does exactly that. It discusses 
factors such as population growth that influence various services as well as the challenges 
encountered in delivering these services. In addition the chapter also describes interventions made 
by Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (EMM) in an attempt to address these challenges including 
interventions planned for the future. Key information pertaining to demographics, the economy and 
the provision of basic services are discussed with the aim of extracting their implications for growth 
and development in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. 


HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

Ekurhuleni is a Tsonga word meaning “place of peace”. In light of the violence that engulfed certain 
parts of the municipality prior to the onset of 1994 elections, the name is pertinent and reflects the 
aspirations of Ekurhuleni communities to lead a peaceful and prosperous life. Ekurhuleni Metropolitan 
Municipality was established in the year 2000 from the amalgamation of the then two existing regional 
entities, namely Kyalami Metropolitan and the Eastern Gauteng Services (EGS). These two shared 
nine towns and eleven administrations among themselves. Today Ekurhuleni is comprised of the nine 
towns of Alberton, Benoni, Boksburg, Brakpan, Edenvale, Germiston, Kempton Park, Nigel and 
Springs. Included in these towns are well known townships such as Daveyton, KwaThema and 
Katlehong. Among them these townships have 119 informal settlements which serve as residential 
areas for some members of the community. Already, this attests to the magnitude of service delivery 
challenges that Ekurhuleni is confronted with. 


Geographically, Ekurhuleni is uniquely situated bordering the eastern part of Johannesburg and the 
northern part of Tshwane. The city spreads over 15.6% of Gauteng’s land mass. It is the fourth 
largest municipality out of the eight metropolitan areas that currently exist in South Africa. Ekurhuleni 
is exceptionally dense with a population of 1 609.4 people per square km when compared to Gauteng 
(680.6 people per square km) and the national population (42.8 people per square km). The city has 
three big towns and they are: Kempton Park, Benoni and Springs. Kempton Park covers 
approximately 41 600 hectares of land which is four times an average of 1 077 hectares for the 
smallest town (Edenvale). The greater part of the land which lies on the eastern side of R21 highway 
is mainly used for agricultural purposes. The climatic conditions and irrigation systems in the area 
makes the land conducive for commercial farming. 


34 



DEMOGRAPHICS 


Ekurhuleni houses 6% of the country’s population and 26% of Gauteng’s population. It has a resident 
population of approximately 3 178 470 million people and 1 015 645 million householdsV The 
municipality has an average annual population growth rate of 2.47%. The number of households in 
Ekurhuleni has increased by 36.1%, a figure which is above the average national growth of 35.7%. 
Figure 1 below shows the composition and size of the different population groups in Ekurhuleni. The 
municipality is home to 79% Africans, 16% Whites, 3% of Coloureds and 2% Indians. 

Figure 1 



StatSA, SuperCross 201 1 


The gender distribution of Ekurhuleni is shown in figure 2 below. Evidently, the majority of residents in 
the Metro are males at 51%. Females make up 49% of the population. This gender spread is however 
in line with the whole of South Africa. 


^ StatsSA 2011 Census 


35 


Figure 2 


Population by gender 



■ Male 

■ Female 


StatSA, SuperCross 201 1 


According to figure 3 below, Ekurhuleni is home to 72% of people aged 15-64 years. Those aged 
between 0 to 14 years constitute another significant group. The elderly make up 4% of the population. 


Figure 3 


Population by age group 



■ 0-14 

■ 15-64 

■ 64 + 


StatSA, SuperCross 201 1 


36 


According to StatSA 2011 Census, only 15% of Ekurhuleni residents have higher education in the 
form of an undergraduate, honours or master’s degree. As shown in figure 4, 36% have 
grade12/matric qualification followed by 35% who underwent secondary schooling but did not 
complete grade 12. 3% of the population of Ekurhuleni has managed to complete their primary school 
and 4% of residents have not attended school at all. With these low levels of education the 
municipality faces a major challenge when it comes to the full utilization of its human capital 
especially the deployment of individuals with the much needed skills to drive the economy of 
Ekurhuleni. 


Figure 4 


Educational Levels 


50% 

40% 

30% 

20 % 

10% 

0% 



No Schooling Completed 
Primary 
School 



Secondary Grade Higher 

School 12/Matric Education 

Attempt 


StatSA, SuperCross 201 1 


ECONOMIC DEVELPMENT 


Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is located in a province with a fast growing population. In similar 
fashion to Gauteng province therefore it is not immune to the socio-economic challenges that 
emanate from an ever growing populace. The economy of the metro has evolved since its heydays as 
an economy founded on mining. It is now a commercial and manufacturing hub of South Africa. The 
economy of Ekurhuleni contributes about 6% to the country’s GDP (Gross Domestic Product) and 
approximately 35% to the economy Gauteng. 

In South African high unemployment (25.6% in quarter two of 2013) coincides with low economic 
growth (0.9% in quarter one of 2013). Ekurhuleni suffers the same fate. It has the highest 
unemployment rate in Gauteng compared to other metros. According to StatsSA unemployment in 
Ekurhuleni stands at 28.8%. This is 3.2% higher than the national rate of 25.6% (Quarterly Labour 
Force Survey 2013). There are about 1.6 million economically active individuals (i.e. those who are 
employed or unemployed but looking for work) residing within the municipality. 36.9% of the 
unemployed is youth. The high unemployment in the country is likely to persist for the foreseeable 


37 


future as domestic growth forecasts continue to be revised downward. This unemployment coupled 
with a relatively low skilled population is a serious threat to the city’s sustainable growth and 
development. It therefore makes it incumbent on Ekurhuleni to innovatively to find solutions and 
strategies aimed at combating unemployment. 

In an effort to reverse this situation government has adopted the National Development Plan (NDP 
2030). Among others, the NDP aims to increase economic growth and create jobs through the 
following: 

■ Increased exports; 

■ A more efficient and competitive infrastructure; 

■ Expanded skills base; and 

■ Support for small business. 

These proposals are consistent with the analysis made in Ekurhuleni’s Growth and Development 
Strategy (GDS 2055) which includes long term economic investment in job creation instead of short 
term jobs, industry-based skills development, addressing infrastructure backlogs and mainstreaming 
SMMEs into major value chains.^ 

Figure 5 shows that the economy of Ekurhuleni is driven primarily by five economic sectors and these 
are: finance and business services, community services, manufacturing, trade and transport. These 
five economic sectors collectively account for 80% of economic activity within the City. These sectors 
also account for the highest levels of formal and informal employment. 

Figure 5 



Global Inslght 

As a manufacturing hub and with the opportunities presented by the location of OR Tambo 
International Airport within its borders, supporting the export industry represents a viable strategy for 
Ekurhuleni. In his budget speech, the Minister of Finance cited manufacturing as among sectors that 
need to play its part in expanding trade, investment and job creation. The metro has prioritised both 


^ EMM 2013 Budget Speech 


38 


the revitalisation of the manufacturing sector and the Aerotropolis (a city that maximizes economic 
benefits arising from the location of an airport within its jurisdiction) - a move that should give hope to 
the future of Ekurhuleni’s economy and its people. As the municipality rolls out its multi-year budget 
and through the job creation strategy, it is envisaged that allocated funding will respond to the 
economic realities of unemployment, skills development and provide support to small businesses. 
Through both financial and non-financial investments, Ekurhuleni will continue to contribute to job 
creation and income earning opportunities in the region. 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Consumers in Ekurhuleni currently enjoy access to best quality drinking water. This has been 
confirmed by the Blue drop Status which has consistently found the quality of water in Ekurhuleni to 
be the best for the past four consecutive years. In terms of access to water, approximately 57% of 
households have access to piped water inside their dwelling, followed by 30% of households with 
access to a tap inside the yard. 7% have access to water on a community stand whilst 1% has no 
access to water. People residing in informal settlements, that is, 19% of Ekurhuleni’s population 
receive water from a communal stand pipe within a walking distance of 200m in compliance with the 
minimum national standard. Having said so, this still constitutes a service backlog in terms of the 
target set by the metro for full water service to all. 

Overall, the figures on access to water indicated that it is still a challenge that the metro will have to 
address. The metro currently supports its residents through the provision of basic services for all 
those that cannot afford. These services include free basic water and sewer of 6kl per household. For 
the indigent it is 9kl. In order to receive this benefit, individuals have to first register with the 
municipality as indigents. 


Figure 6 


1 % 


Piped water by type of access 



H Piped (tap) water inside 
dwelling/institution 


■ Piped (tap) water inside yard 


H Piped (tap) water on community 
stand: distance less than 200m from 
dwelling/institution 


StatSA, SuperCross 201 1 


39 


Inadequate sanitation is a major cause of diseases world-wide and sanitation improvement will have 
a significant beneficial impact on health both in households and across communities. When it comes 
to sanitation, 85% of households utilize a flush toilet. 7% of Ekurhuleni residents still use pit toilets 
that do not have ventilation. 2% and 1% of households are still using the bucket and chemical toilets 
respectively. The battle to eradicate the use of the bucket system is still far from over. It is the 
intention of Ekurhuleni to prevent diseases, prolong life and promote the health and well-being of its 
citizens. The municipality will continue to work hard to ensure that the dignity of residents without a 
flush toilet is restored. 

In conclusion, when it comes to water and sanitation the current replacement value for the water and 
sewer infrastructure amounts to approximately R11 billion. The current budget allocation for the 
capital and maintenance levy projects remains inadequate. At this current rate of funding allocation, 
the backlog on water and sewer infrastructure can anticipate complete replacement in the next 50 
years. In order to expedite the replacement it is required that the current levels of funding allocation 
are increased^. 

ENERGY 

According to Census 201 1 , the proportion of households in Ekurhuleni using electricity as the main 
source of energy for heating is 66%, for cooking is 79.4% and for lighting is 82.2% (see figure 7 
below). There has been a significant increase of about 7.4% for electricity used for lighting from 2001 
to 2011. 


Figure 7 


Electricity Use 



Lighting Cooking Heating 


StatSA, SuperCross 201 1 


^ EMM 2013 Budget Speech 


40 


Even though access has increased, there are still challenges experienced in relation to the delivery of 
electricity. The theft of underground cable and equipment leads to unplanned load shedding costing 
the metro unnecessary exorbitant repairs. Broken and vandalized meter boxes also affect the budget 
allocation for maintenance and shifts funding away from new infrastructure. In some instances the 
network becomes faulty due to aging cables and transformers fail because of lightning. There is a 
backlog of 120 000 formal houses that must be electrified. According to legislation, electricity 
connections can only be provided to proclaimed stands. However, there is concern that the backlogs 
are not being addressed fast enough as this depends on the provision of houses by the Human 
Settlements Department. As a result of this dependency, electricity backlogs are not being addressed 
quick enough. 


In the informal settlements there is a backlog of 164 000 informal units. In response to these 
challenges and in the effort to promote energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy, 
Ekurhuleni provided 12 solar high mast lights as well as 8 000 PV solar lighting units to residents in 
informal settlements. Among others work has already been completed at the following settlements: 
Zama-zama, Emlotheni, Umgababa, Homeseekers (Emlotheni 1). For those households that are 
unable to pay for municipal services, through the social package policy it has adopted, the metro 
provides the first 50 units of electricity free of charge to all registered indigent consumers. To sum up, 
while the backlog in electricity connections could be reduced at a faster pace, it is compounded by 
the fact that, among others, the target for electricity connections has also been reduced from 10 000 
a year to 5 000 as a result of funding constraints. 


REFUSE REMOVAL 

Legislation such as environmental laws and regulations has a direct impact on waste services, and 
operations have to ensure compliance to prevent environmental damage, adverse publicity, and even 
closure of sites. Figure 8 below displays the compliance of the metro in the provision of refuse 
removal services. 88% of residents’ refuse is removed by the local authority at least once a week 
whilst 6% remove their own refuse. Approximately 2% of households use communal refuse dump 
whilst the other 2% have no rubbish disposal. As far as solid waste removal is concerned there are 
very minimal backlogs in terms of service. The municipality currently provides a full appropriate 
service to the different customer groupings as per municipal standard (different levels of service apply 
to various customer groups) as a result the backlog is not quantified. 


41 



Figure 8 



HRemoved by local authority/private 
company at least once a week 
■ Removed by local authority/private 
company less often 
HCommunal refuse dump 

HOwn refuse dump 

H No rubblsh dlsposal 

HOther 


StatSA, SuperCross 201 1 

Among the major challenges that Ekurhuleni municipality faces when it comes to refuse removal is 
illegal dumping which contravenes the city’s by-laws. Removals of illegal dumping happen on a 
continuous basis. Although mini dumping sites have been built to accommodate the waste 
management needs of communities, some areas have limited space. The municipality has 
implemented strategies to outsource the management and operation of all landfill sites as well as mini 
disposal and transfer sites. 


TRANSPORT 

According to the Quality of Life II Survey of 2011 by the Global City Region Observatory, public 
transport access in Gauteng is reasonably good. Overall, almost three-quarters of households live 
within 10 minutes’ walk of a public transport service and 95% live within a 30-minute walk (about 2 
kilometres). When public transport users were asked on the main problems they experience, people 
in the metros were more concerned with the high cost of transport, rude drivers/passengers and 
unreliable service as opposed to crime and security.'^ This makes the provision of an efficient and 
reliable public transport system by the metro imperative. 


Non-motorised transport - also plays a major role in all travel trips. Walking is the most predominant 
form of non-motorise transport in Ekurhuleni. Although, there is no data on the location and length of 
non-motorised transport facilities in Ekurhuleni, non-motorised transport facilities exist in some 
locations e.g. at the bus terminal and taxi ranks, near schools and hospitals. Several other studies 
have been conducted and recommend the provision of non-motorised facilities along different streets 
in Ekurhuleni metro particularly along public transport routes. An aspect of road services that needs 
to be given higher priority is provision for non-motorised and pedestrian modes of transport. Although 
investment in the construction of sidewalks has increased over recent years, the volume of pedestrian 
traffic especially in densely populated areas where vehicle ownership is still low is high. The lack of 


Quality of Life II, 2011, Gauteng City Region Observatory (GCRO) 


42 


adequate facilities for pedestrians including their safety needs to be considered in the planning and 
provision of more and better facilities in future.® 


In terms of interventions by Ekurhuleni metro to better the situation for public transport users, funding 
has been allocated for the upgrading of six taxi ranks covering Germiston Station Taxi Rank (a joint 
venture between Ekurhuleni, Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) and Gauteng 
Department of Roads and Transport); Bluegumview Taxi Rank; New Vosloorus Hospital Taxi Rank 
(Vosloorus); Palm Ridge Taxi Rank; Phuthaditjaba Taxi Rank and Ramaphosa Taxi Rank.^The 
Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network (IRPTN) is intended to transform the public transport 
sector through the provision of a high quality and affordable transport system whilst reducing the 
overall commuting times of public transport users. Its full implementation will have a major spin-off 
socially, economically and in terms of infrastructure. Jobs will be created, travelling times will be 
seamless and critically the cost of travelling will be affordable in the future. 


HUIVIAN SETTLEMENTS 

As a metro, Ekurhuleni is not immune to cross cutting challenges such as housing backlogs, land 
invasion and in-migration. In the 119 informal settlements, there are 152 families on the waiting list for 
proper housing structures whilst the backlog for top structure is 217 000. These figures confirm the 
general struggle to cater for an affordable housing market.^ Population growth and in-migration has 
led to densification and growth in settlements. Urban sprawling has resulted in inequality where due 
to the high cost of services provision, migrants have opted to stay in land that is not suitable for 
housing development such as dolomitic area and wetlands. There is continuous influx of people 
moving into the municipal area, particularly the unemployed in search of job opportunities. The 
perceived available economic opportunities that individuals see in Ekurhuleni has resulted in the 
continuous demand for affordable accommodation, which often becomes a back yard shack, informal 
settlement or hostel as these still remain the most affordable entry level housing options. 


In Ekurhuleni’s Backlog Study of 2011, the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Housing Development Plan 
(MHDP) highlights backyard shacks as an important dwelling type. However, it is not included as part 
of the housing backlogs when the counting is done. This means that the backlogs in EMM are higher 
as a result of this exclusion. However there is steady progress being made in strides to address the 
backlog®. Efforts to eradicate housing backlogs has led Ekurhuleni Municipality together with the 
Gauteng Department of Local Government and Housing to deliver an average of 5 000 housing units 
per annum for the past 16 years. This collaboration has led to a delivery of approximately 87 000 
units to date.® Out of the 119 informal settlements, 114 informal settlements have been identified for 
the implementation of interim services. 


^ EMM Comprehensive Integrated Transport Plans 2013-2017 
® EMM 2013 Budget Speech 
EMM CCA Imbizo Consolidation Report 
^EMM Backlog Study 2011 
^ Human Settlement Development Plan 2011 


43 



In addition, Ekurhuleni metro is one of the metropolitan municipalities that have been identified for 
level 3 accreditation (assignment) in 2014. Through this accreditation, it will take full responsibility in 
implementing housing programmes within the metro, including accessing the housing subsidies 
directly from national government. Consequently, the metro is now busy compiling a Long Term 
Funding Strategy to ensure that the balance between internal and external funding is optimal, whilst 
also aiming at increasing the capital budget to ensure both the stimulation of the local economy as 
well as the eradication of backlogs and as such; creating sustainable human settlements. The Human 
Settlements Strategy will promote a proactive approach that seeks to ensure that the citizens of 
Ekurhuleni are adequately housed in a sustainable and integrated manner. The strategy will also take 
into consideration the social and economic needs as well other environment related impacts to 
ensure that Ekurhuleni meets the constitutional obligation of ensuring that residents have proper 
access to sustainable human settlements solutions. 


HEALTH 

Ekurhuleni has made efforts to ensure that it accelerates access to health care and continue to 
improve facilities in order to provide a comprehensive package of primary health care services to 
residents of the metro. Amongst key projects under these efforts is addressing the HIV pandemic. 
The metro aims to increase access to 80% HlV-positive clients by providing ARV services (or FDC). 
HIV incidence has declined from 27% reported in March 2011 to 15% as at end September 2013, 
registering a decline of 12%. Figure 9 shows the absolute number of people tested. As reflected in 
the graph the decrease in the HIV Infection Rate can be noted. This can be attributed to the focus on 
this high priority programme as well as the dedication of the personnel in the Primary Health Care 
Division to make a difference. 


Figure 9 



44 


HIV PREVALENCE RATE IN THE EMM 


In 2011 HIV Prevalence Rate was reported to be 30.1%; while in 2010 it was 33.8% and in 2009 it 
was 34.5%. 2012 results are still being awaited. These entire figures indicate a decrease or reduction 
in HIV Positivity Rate. Statistics show that an increase in TB incidence since 1990 corresponds with 
increasing HIV prevalence. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global TB Control 
report 2011, the prevalence of TB in South Africa has increased from 800/100000 in 1990, to 
>1200/100000 in 2010. In 2012, TB incidence in Ekurhuleni was estimated to be at 316, per 100 000 
population, slightly lower than 376 per 100 000 reported by City of Johannesburg. Given South 
African TB Incidence rate however, there has been a suspicion of underreporting of TB Incidences in 
Ekurhuleni. This suspicion is further perpetuated by the increase in Multiple Drug Resistant TB cases. 
Research initiatives have therefore been initiated in this particular area in order to investigate the 
matter and reach new conclusions and/or propose new solutions. 

Figure 10 


HIV Prevalence in EMM 


50 . 0 % 


40 . 0 % 


30 . 0 % 


20 . 0 % 


10 . 0 % 

0 . 0 % 

2009 2010 2011 



Ekurhuleni Metro, HIV Unit 2013 


CONCLUSION 

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has come a long way since its establishment in the year 2000. 
As discussed in the preceding paragraphs, the municipality faces its own unique set of challenges 
when compared to other metros. It is particularly confronted with an increasing inflow of migrants that 
place a strain on its infrastructure and ability to provide services. The number of households in 
Ekurhuleni has also grown at a rate that outpaces that of the national one implying even greater 
challenges for service delivery by the metro. It has a considerable proportion of young people and is 
also confronted with the challenge of low levels of skills. As if this was not enough, Ekurhuleni also 
suffers from high levels of unemployment with more than a third of the unemployed being youth - a 
situation that calls for targeted solutions. 


45 


Ekurhuleni has made serious strides in its effort to provide services. The provision of water and 
sanitation are the highest they have ever been. Even so, challenges still remain such as the use of 
the bucket system and declining quality of infrastructure. Even though electricity usage has increased 
in Ekurhuleni, the municipality is making efforts to mix the energy use of its communities such as the 
use of solar power. Cable theft and the vandalizing of electricity meter boxes will continue to be 
clamped down on as they come with unnecessary resource implications. The levels of refuse removal 
are also high in Ekurhuleni but illegal dumping still poses a challenge. On the transport front, the 
provision of an efficient public transport system remains a goal that the municipality intends to 
achieve including the provision of facilities for non-motorized transport. The backlogs on housing will 
also continue to receive the metro’s attention and its accreditation will hopefully see Ekurhuleni have 
a better handle on this through direct involvement in the housing delivery process. Ekurhuleni 
remains committed to fighting the spread of HIV and ensuring that those who are infected continue to 
live a wholesome life through the provision of ARVs. Even with all its challenges therefore, Ekurhuleni 
has its hands on deck and aims to ensure that service delivery continues unabated including their 
extension to those not benefitting 


2.2 VISION, MISSION AND VALUES 

VISION 

Smart, Creative and Developmental City 

MISSION 

Ekurhuleni’s mission is: 

To provide sustainable and people centred development services that are affordable, appropriate and 
of high quality by focusing on social, environmental and economic regeneration of our city and 
communities, as guided by the principles of Batho Pele and through the commitment of a motivated 
and dedicated team 

VALUES 

In pursuing the above-mentioned vision and mission Ekurhuleni is committed to upholding the 
following core values: 

• Performance Excellence; 

• Integrity; 

• Community Centeredness; 

• Transparency; and 

• Cooperative Governance 


46 



3. EKURHULENI GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 
2055 


The following is an extract from the executive summary of National Development Plan: 

“South Africa’s principal challenge is to roll back poverty and inequality. Raising living standards to 
the minimum level proposed in the plan will involve a combination of increasing employment, higher 
incomes through productivity growth, a social wage and good-quality public services. All of these 
challenges are interlinked. Improved education, for example, will lead to higher employment and 
earnings, while more rapid economic growth will broaden opportunities for all and generate the 
resources required to improve education. The graphic below demonstrates the close link between 
capabilities, opportunities and employment on social and living conditions. It shows how leadership, 
an active citizenry and effective government can help drive development in a socially cohesive 
environment. The plan focuses on the critical capabilities needed to transform the economy and 
society. Achieving these capabilities is not automatic, nor will they emerge if the country continues on 
its present trajectory. Rising levels of frustration and impatience suggest that time is of the essence: 
failure to act will threaten democratic gains. In particular, South Africa must find ways to urgently 
reduce alarming levels of youth unemployment and to provide young people with broader 
opportunities. Progress over the next two decades means doing things differently. Given the 
complexity ofnational development, the plan sets out six interlinked priorities: 


• Uniting all South Africans around a common programme to achieve prosperity and equity. 

• Promoting active citizenry to strengthen development, democracy and accountability. 

• Bringing about faster economic growth, higher investment and greater labour absorption. 

• Focusing on key capabilities ofpeople and the state. 

• Building a capable and developmental state. 

• Encouraging strong leadership throughout society to work together to solve problems. ” 


47 



The EMM GDS 2025 were reviewed to evaluate progress made in the implementation of long term 
strategic goals. Part of this process was to take guidance from the NDP and to respond thereto by 
drafting programmes that would respond to the results planned in the NDP but also to the unique 
challenges Ekurhuleni is facing in relation to its development trajectory. 



48 



GDS 2055 URBAN 
DEVELOPMENT 
PERSPECTIVE 

Urban Development Structural 
Analysls 

The City of Ekurhuleni’s urban 
development tensions are situated 
in the broader structural context of 
the first and second phases of 
development. In the first phase, 

Ekurhuleni enjoyed a well organized 
and rail-based urban form, informed 
by the West-East corridor (mining 
belt) connected via the Main Reef Road as the main connecting spine and the North-South corridor 
connected via the Old Pretoria and Vereeniging roads. It is in these corridors that the Central 
Business Districts (CBDs), hostels and black townships developed over time. In the second phase, 
the urban form and logic was fractured by the overlay of national road networks and moved from rail 
based to road based. These national road networks directed investment and development away from 
the original connecting spines and CBDs to the freeway system and hence regional malls and super 
rich suburbs and other forms of developments started to attach themselves to this road network. 

Urban Development Strategic Tensions towards 2055 

There are five strategic tensions that the Growth and Development Strategy (GDS) has identified to 
be critical for the City of Ekurhuleni. These relate to; human settlements planning, infrastructure, 
inefficient natural resource use, skewed urban form and inefficient densities as well as urban 
informality. 




1. Human Settlements Planning- The current housing backlog (144 000) and the housing solution 
(one house per stand) 
targeting poor families is 
constrained by land 
availability because the City 
has about 7000 hectares of 
developable land. This is 
caused by the fact that most 
of the City’s Land is on 
dolomite, some undermined 
and others with serious 
natural and environmental 
constraints. 


49 






2. Infrastructure - The current on-grid- 

infrastructure solutions are decaying fast to an 
extent that continued dependence on these 
types of infrastructures will require extensive 
investment into renewals, maintenance and 
decommissioning. While it is projected that a 
R62 billion investment into on grid 
infrastructures will have to be made by 2025, 
off-grid solutions will have to be integrated. 


3. Skewed urban form and Inefficient densities - The City is suffering from the same features of 
skewed urban form which is inherent in South African urban development processes; where the 
majority of the poor’s settlements are far away from the places of economic opportunities. This 
type of urban form promotes the use of motorized and private transportation than a sustainable 
integrated public transport solution. Furthermore; the current land use management approaches 
are prone to reproduce and strengthen the existing densities. 


4. Regulation and formalization of informal settlements - The City has within its urban fabric 122 
informal settlements of which 20% of these are upgradable for various reasons. This then leaves 
the City with the burden of 80% of these informal settlements which accommodates more than 
400 000 of its residents not being targeted for redevelopment given that there is inadequate 
resource availability. 


5. Inefficient resource use - The on-grid and linear infrastructure development programmes adopted 
historically in urban development in Ekurhuleni promote inefficient resource use. This programme 
has trapped the city into a vicious cycle of continuing to make investments to maintain linear 
infrastructures without guaranteed sustainable resource use of any kind. 


50 


GDS 2055 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE 

Economic Development Structural Analysis 

The City of Ekurhuleni’s economic development tensions are also situated in the broader structural 
context of the first and second phases of development. The City emerges from a single mining 
complex and to be a dual complex of industry and mining and thus recognised as a manufacturing 
hub of Southern Africa. This was made possible by the industrialisation programme of the first phase 
of development which ensured that Ekurhuleni was a productive city which received impetus during 
the Second World War II when production had ceased in Europe. The de-industrialization 
programmes that define the second and third phase of development trapped Ekurhuleni into a down- 
ward spiral of poverty, unemployment and inequality. 


Economic Development Strategic Tensions towards 2055 


There are four strategic tensions that the 
Growth and Development Strategy (GDS) have 
identified to be critical for the City of Ekurhuleni 
from the economic development perspective. 
These relates to unemployment, slow 
economic growth, skills development, market 
constraints, development incentives and 
development of SMMEs. 


1. Inadequate skills development - The skills 
development in line with what industry 
needs continues to confront the City in 
addressing the challenge of employment 
creation as indicated above. In making the necessary strides in skills development the national 
government established Skills, Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) to undertake this 
project. But the lack of effectiveness during the implementation of this initiative has raised the 
need for industry led skills development approaches. 

2. Market constraints and Development incentives- the City’s development status as a 
manufacturing hub has its connections to steel/metal and plastic as key sectors and these have 
maintained their resilience. However with the shift that is being undertaken globally and nationally 
towards a green economy, the City will have to balance making more investments and structuring 
incentives that promote its traditional manufacturing base and making investment and structuring 
incentives in line with the changing demands from emerging markets and the requirements of the 
green economy. 



51 



3. SMME development - There have been major strides that the City has undertaken in this regard, 
these include establishment of tender advice centers, cooperatives and other SMME support 
mechanism. Underpinning these mechanisms has been massive reliance on Preferential 
Procurement framework and BEE frameworks as development systems. These systems have 
made some gains; however it is also noticeable that SMMEs continue to be dislocated from the 
main economic value chains defining the structure of the South African economy. 


GDS2055 ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE 

Environmental Development Structural Analysis 

The City of Ekurhuleni’s environmental development tensions are also situated in the broader 
structural context of all phases of development. These phases maintained an extractive approach to 
environmental resources; these include also minerals. The discovery of gold and coal in the first 
phase of development and the twinning of the mining and manufacturing industries translated into 
natural resource use that was not sustainable for the environment and the residents of the city. The 
third phase of development which ensured 
access of the majority of the City’s residents 
which were excluded in the past to land 
resources which was at most was also 
extractive in character in line with the two 
phases of development. 


Environmental Development Strategic 
Tensions towards 2055 

There are five strategic tensions that the 
Growth and Development Strategy (GDS) has identified to be critical for the City of Ekurhuleni. These 
relate to mining legacy, extreme pollution, climate change, unsustainable natural resource use and 
degradation of eco systems. 



1. Legacy of mining - The 100 year history of mining has left the City of Ekurhuleni with massive 
environmental deficits. Key among these is the acid mine water which continues to threaten 
human, plant and animal life. Secondly, are undermined and waste lands, coupled with mine 
dumps that have radio-active materials. While these appear to be problems, creative solutions will 
have to be considered so as to turn some of these challenges into solutions given the fact the City 
has limited water resources and developable land to support its future growth. 

2. Extreme pollution - As the industrial hub of Southern Africa, the City of Ekurhuleni has high levels 
of pollution and these have negatively affected land, water and air resources. While these 
industries continue to generate employment for many of the City’s poor and revenue for the 
administration, alternatives approaches that are environmental friendly to industrial development 
will have to be considered. 


52 



3. Climate change - The City of Ekurhuleni like all other cities in South Africa is exposed to impacts 
of climate change given its weather patterns and topographical realities. This will require that it 
finds appropriate mitigation and adaptation strategies thus demanding that the city balances its 
investments in relation to socio-economic development and investment in environmental 
development. 


4. Degradation of biodiversity and ecosystems - the type of industrial and urban development that 
has shaped Ekurhuleni has resulted into degradation of biodiversity and ecosystem. This simply 
means that if Ekurhuleni desires to be sustainable in the long run attention will have to be given 
on the approach and models it uses to undertake urban and industrial development so that there 
is a need to replenish, recover and regenerate its biodiversity and ecosystems. 


5. 


Natural resource scarcity - 
Ekurhuleni is confronted with 
natural resource scarcity in 
terms of water, soil, energy 
and waste. This scarcity will 
determine and to a great 
degree constrain the choice 
of developmental path. What 
is clear from the start 
however is that a revenue 
based approach of using 
prices and regulation to 
constrain demands of these 
resources will not prove 
sustainable in the long run. 


EMM NATURAL ENVIRONMENT 
19% Critical Biodiversity Areas 

18% Ecological Areas 

1% Protected Areas 

16 Threatened Plant Species 

14 Threatened Animal Species 
10% Threatened Ecosystems 


Source: SANBI 2008 


53 



The City of Ekurhuleni’s social 
development tensions are also 
situated in the broader structural 
context of the first and second 
phases of its development. 
During the first phases urbanism 
was on the basis of race, which 
planted extreme racial intolerances among the City residents. On the second phase of the City’s 
development racial urbanism was diversified with tribal urbanism where specific areas were 
designated on the basis of ethnicity. The third phase of development marked a serious departure 
from the previous, as it has become clear that urbanism is on the basis of class. These realities need 
to be confronted so that Ekurhuleni is able to build itself as a cosmopolitan, multi-cultural and multi- 
racial city of the 21®’ century. 


GDS 2055 SOCIAL 

DEVELOPMENT 

PERSPECTIVE 

Social Development Structural 
Analysis 


Social Development Strategic Tensions towards 2055 

There are six strategic tensions that the Growth and Development Strategy (GDS) have identified to 
be critical for the City of Ekurhuleni. These relates to systemic poverty and inequality, food scarcity, 
inadequate human capabilities, youth development and family development, as well HIV/Aids 
pandemic. 

1 . Systemic poverty and inequality - Urban poverty and inequality have become the phenomena 
that define South Africa cities and Ekurhuleni is no exception to this. 

Various interventions have been 
implemented to try and undermine these 
in the long run but these interventions 
(indigent support and social grants) while 
important, their effectiveness is hampered 
by the lack of integration with other 
development interventions. 


For an example there is no direct 
relationship between social grants and 
SMME development and as a result these 
grants are still supporting the main retails 
stores than small businesses. This 
realization necessitates that in thinking 
about social development Ekurhuleni 


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54 



would need to consider how 
to use such for economic 
and environmental 

development purposes. 


2. Food scarcity - The 
existence of poverty in 
the City reflects also a 
lack of food for many 
households and this lack 
of food has to do with the 
fact food is mostly a cash commodity. This is going to require that the City considers serious 
investment in food networks that will be able to support those in the City that are cash strapped. 
Therefore when the City considers urban development that is targeted towards poor households, 
such development should create urban spaces that are not only meant for houses but also food 
production networks. 

3. Inadequate human capabilities development - Capabilities development in most cities has been 
left on the hands of formal education and Further Education and Training (FET) programmes. 
This means that capabilities development programmes that are not covered by the curricula of 
these institutions regardless of their importance to the City are being engaged on ad hoc basis. 

4. Lack of integration in child and family development - The City currently implements early 
childhood development programmes but these are not integrated with family development. This is 
a result of among other challenges inadequate resources both human and non-human. Moving 
forward into the future, the City will have to extend its investment to early childhood development 
to include family development programmes particularly for those children who come from poor 
backgrounds. 

5. Inadequate youth development - The youth development programmes that have been adopted 
focused more on homogenous understanding of the youth challenge to that of youth 
unemployment. While this policy orientation remains important it will need to be balanced with 
youth engagement. This balancing will require investment in economic development and social 
development strategies and institutions facilities that seek to support different youth categories. 

6. HIV/AIDS - Ekurhuleni is one of the Metros in Gauteng that has high level of HIV/AIDS infection 
rates, even though the latest figures indicate a decline on new infections. The solutions 
implemented by the City to deal with this pandemic have focused mainly on treatment with no 
reference made to the socio-economic status and realities of those that are being treated. What 
will be required in the near future is a programme that is more health comprehensive that also 
deals with dietary requirements as well particularly for those who socio-economic status is less 
desirable. 


□ Approximately 14% of the EMM is regarded as high potential land suitable 
for agricultural production, while 12% is regarded as moderate to high. 

□ Furthermore, the Gauteng Agricultural Potential Atlas identified and mapped 
41% of the EMM as being of importance for protection for agriculture. 22% of 
this is of high importance, while 19% is of moderate to high importance. 

□ These areas need to be reserved and protected from development (State of 
the Environment Report, 2004). 


GDS 2055 GOVERNANCE PERSPECTIVE 

Governance Structural Analysis 


55 


The City of Ekurhuleni’s governance 
tensions are also situated in the 
broader structural context of the third 
phase of its development. Whilst the 
first and second phases of the City’s 
development enjoyed different 
governance frameworks that required 
national policy for industrial and urban 
development to be implemented, in the 
third phase only the urban development 
policy was delegated to local 
government. This separation of 
development instruments meant that 
Ekurhuleni is forced to negotiate its 
development within the framework of 
three spheres of governance and the 
extent through which it influences the other two spheres of government has become crucial for the 
realization of its future. 

Governance Strategic Tensions towards 2055 

There are five strategic tensions that Growth and Development Strategy (GDS) has identified to be 
critical for the City of Ekurhuleni. These relate to inadequate supply for services, poor municipal 
performance, limitations of government solutions, inadequate resources and ineffective 
intergovernmental relations. 

1 . Inadequate supply of services - Currently, the demand for services outstrips that of supply. This 
has to do with the historical backlogs of access and maintenance that continue to bedevil the City 
in its growth. These backlogs have trapped service delivery to be more historical in nature without 
being sensitive to the natural growth of the City. What is needed though going into the future is a 
balance between service delivery approaches on backlog basis and on need basis. 

2. Intergovernmental Weaknesses - The municipality is the only sphere of government that 
implements mandates of all the two spheres of government and this comes with its own 
challenges particularly when the priorities of the other spheres are not the same as the priorities 
of the local sphere. This will require that the City manages its interaction with other spheres and 
also exerts its constitutional role in the Intergovernmental Framework arrangements in a manner 
that benefits the City in the long run. 

3. Poor municipal performance - The performance problems of the City have had its roots on the 
amalgamation process of the former administrations and this was attributed to the failure to 
undertake and implement effectively the institutional programme. More than 10 years later there 
are areas where the performance of Ekurhuleni is not up to standard and therefore what is 
needed is to identification of performance barriers that can be unlocked via the institutional review 
approach and those that needs other forms of interventions to be unlocked. 


EMM ECONOMY 

R 26 Billion Annual Budget 
769 000 Residential Customers 
18 000 Emplovees 
769 000 Residential Customers 
R 43 Billion Immovable Assets 
74 000 Non Residential Customers 
24 Departments 


56 



4. Limitations of iocai government soiutions - the local government has been mandated to drive 
integrated development which aims at addressing the socio-economic challenges faced by its 
communities, but some of these solutions are very limited in fulfilling their purpose. Communities 
observing these limitations then establish community based solutions (street vending, informal 
settlements etc.) to close the gap and the local government tends to react towards these with 
force and further regulate these community interventions. This is the area where the City will have 
to balance its act, so that its attempts to ensure stability are counterbalanced with the need for 
communities to take responsibility of its development. 

5. Inadequate funding - currently the City generates annually in average R2 billion CAPEX funding 
to support its infrastructure development programme for growth, renewals and access. But this is 
not adequate as the recent studies have indicated that for the City to be sustainable, R4 Billion 
CAPEX will be needed annually. 

This in the short to medium term will require that the City relooks it priorities given the lack of 
resources in line with what is affordable within the budget. 


MACRO STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK 

The review suggests that the City has entered a time of profound strategic choice with powerful long 
term consequences. As the industrial and logistical core of the Gauteng City Region, Ekurhuleni is 
pivotal to South Africa’s growth trajectory to 2020, 2030 and beyond. Historical structural analysis 
from 1896 to 2012 indicates that Ekurhuleni has played a crucial role in national manufacturing value 
chains that have been shaped strongly by national industrialization policies in the context of powerful 
evolving global dynamics. This has been complimented and often contradicted by local and national 
urban strategies. The ultimate effect of these strategies was to produce an unsustainable, 
obsolescent and most inequitable urban industrial formation that is currently being managed by a 
weak institution. This system is currently in a downward spiral. The following transitions indicate how 
EMM should position itself if we are to realize the above developmental imperatives. 

Delivering City (2012 -2020) which would lay the foundation for a Capable City (2020 -2030) and 
ultimately enable a Sustainable City (2030 -2055). The three stages in the trajectory are proposed as 
follows: 

2012- 2020: Deiivering City. 

A coherent, tightly managed, 
enabled and resourced EMM 
institution which will rise to the 
challenge of delivering services that 
are nationally competitive, 
consistent, financially sustainable, 
efficient and modern. 

2020 - 2030: Capabie City: 

Ekurhuleni will adapt to the needs of 
the energy transition and facilitate a 
thriving and inclusive industrial 
economy and meaningful reduction 


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57 



of unemployment and poverty through excellent inter-governmental cooperation, providing a globally 
competitive package of services and investment options, an integrated, efficient and regionally well 
connected spatial structure and logistics infrastructure and a well-oiled network of collaborative 
partnerships with civil society and communities in the City. 

2030 - 2055:Sustainable City 

Ekurhuleni will be at the leading edge of urban sustainability innovations and will support a clean, 
green and sustainable African manufacturing complex and a city development network that together 
have reduced poverty and unemployment to below 10%. It will be a place where the poor, the old, the 
young and disabled are able to access the opportunities of a global society and to move freely about 
the City in order to make their contribution to the City and enjoy its amenities. 


EKURHULENI’S INTEGRATED 

For EMM to navigate itself 
in line with the above 
transitions the following five 
long term imperatives/goals 
will guide this 2055 journey 
namely: sustainabie urban 
integration, job creating 
economic growth, sociai 
empowerment, 
environmentai weiibeing 
and effective cooperative 
governance. Five lead 
strategies will be deployed 
to pursue these goals 
namely: 

• Re-urbanise to achieve sustainable urban integration 

• Re-industrialise to achieve to job creating economic growth 

• Re-generate to achieve environmental wellbeing 

• Re-mobilise to achieve social empowerment 

• Re-govern to achieve effective cooperative governance 


STRATEGY 



58 



GDS 2055 LONG TERM IMPERATIVE: SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 


The intent of the Re-urbanise theme is to enable a process of re-urbanisation of well-connected and 
networked spaces to ensure a compact and sustainable city. This will include rejuvenating blighted 
and neglected areas, managing and channelling growth, facilitating upward mobility in the formal and 
informal housing markets, catering for the needs of households requiring affordable accommodation 
in well located areas and providing efficient and affordable accessibility to places of work, shopping 
nodes and facilities within the City and the Gauteng City Region. 


4. INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS 


The municipality comprises 202 councillors, of both elected (101 ward representatives) and 
proportional (101 Councillors) representation. Each of the 101 ward councillors chairs a ward 
committee as part of the Ward Participatory System that brings participation down to community level. 
An election of new ward committees in EMM after the local government elections has been 
completed. 

Ward councillors play a central role in the communication process between the communities they 
represent and the Council, reporting back regularly through ward meetings and assisting the 
community in identifying needs and priority areas of development which feed into the municipality's 
planning processes. 

The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (EMM) has implemented in the current financial year the 
separation of powers model. The purpose this new governance framework for EMM was to create 
independent oversight of the effective achievement of the municipal mandate. The mandate for Local 
Government (section 152 of the Constitution) is to: 

• Promote democratic and accountable government for local communities; 

• Ensure the provision of sustainable services to communities; 

• Promote a safe and healthy environment; 

• Encourage community participation in local government. 

Inadequacies in accountability and poor governance at Local Government level were highlighted 
amongst other challenges in the State of Local Government Overview Report (COGTA 2009). 

Separation of powers between the legislative and executive arms of government is congruent with 
internationally accepted principles of good governance. It creates independent oversight of the 
effective achievement of the municipal mandate. It further establishes an appropriate level of 
accountability, representation and participation through: 

• Clear delineation of powers and functions among the spheres of government; 

• Executive accountability for service delivery and development; 

• Independent and representative oversight by the Legislative arm. 

The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality accordingly in April 201 1 (Item A-RC {15-2011}) approved in 
principle the separation of legislative and executive powers and the implementation thereof and 
further resolved that the matter be referred to the newly elected Council for re-affirmation. 


59 



On 28 August 2011 under item A-Corp (145-2011) the separation of powers model was approved. 
The following is a reflection of the Governance structure for EMM: 

The key role of Council in the current structure is to focus on legislative, participatory and oversight 
roles. Its principal and most substantive role is therefore that of a lawmaker. The other key role is to 
facilitate political debate and discussion. The executive function is delegated to the Executive Mayor 
and the Mayoral Committee and is responsible for day-today decision-making and operational 
oversight. 


LEGISLATIVE PLOITICAL LEADERSHIP 
SPEAKEROFCOUNCIL 

Councillor Patricia Kumalo is the Chairperson of Council, known as the Speaker and presides over 
Council meetings. Other responsibilities of the Council Speaker include, amongst other delegated 
functions, ensuring that Council meets monthly and that the meetings are held in an orderly manner 
in accordance with the law and the Standing Orders of Council, to ensure functionality and resourcing 
of Ward Committees, functionality of section 79 Committees, leadership and governance of the 
institution and effective participatory democracy in the work of Council and its structures. 

CHIEFWHIPOFCOUNCIL 

Councillor Robert Mashego is the Chief Whip of Council and responsible, amongst other delegated 
functions, powers and responsibilities, for maintaining cohesiveness within the governing party and 
building relationships across political parties represented in Council. 

CHAIRPERSON OF CHAIRPERSONS 

Councillor Nozipho Mabuza is the Chair of Chairs, and responsible for the coordinating the work of all 
Section 79 Committees and works closely with individual chairpersons of Committees. 

CHAIRPERSONS OF SECTION 79 COMMITTEES 

Chairpersons have been appointed to lead section 79 committees, whose responsibility is to oversee 
the work of related departments in respect of the Oversight stream of the committees. These 
committees monitor the delivery of the executive and in return report directly to Council. In respect of 
the Standing Committees stream, the committees are internally focused with regards the work of the 
Legislative arm. 


60 



SECTION 79 COMMITTEES 

To advance and strengthen Council’s oversight and accountability role, Section 79 committees were 
established to hold the Executive Mayor, Members of the Mayoral Committee (MMCs) and officials 
accountable for service delivery undertakings against the financial resources allocated to them. Most 
of these committees are chaired by full-time councillors who are not part of the executive arm of 
Council. 

These are separated into Standing and Oversight Committees. 


OVERSIGHT COMMITTEES 

Oversight Committees perform an oversight role by monitoring the delivery and outputs of the 
Executive. They are entitled to request departments and MMCs to account for their functions. In line 
with this responsibility, these committees may summon departments to appear before the committee, 
produce required documentation, or provide necessary information. The Oversight Committees are 
however not delegated any decision-making powers. 

The specific functions of Oversight Committees include: 

• Reviewing, monitoring and evaluating departmental policies; 

• Reviewing plans and budgets; 

• Considering departmental quarterly Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plans 
(SDBIP’s) and annual reports; 

• Examining the link between programmes and budget expenditure; 

• Monitoring the implementation of plans; 

• Exploring options to increase value for money; and 

• Holding the political executive accountable for performance against policies and municipal 
priorities. 


SECTION 79 OVERSIGHT COMMITTEES AND CHAIRPERSONS 


Committee 

Chairperson 

Finance 

Councillor Neil Diamond 

City Planning & Economic 
Development 

Council Mahlomola Mabote 

Community Safety 

Councillor Vivienne Chauke 

Corporate Services 

Councillor Fuzile Booi 

Human Settlements 

Councillor Ndosi Shongwe 

Sports, Heritage, Recreation, Arts 
& Culture 

Councillor Sphiwe Ditshego 

Environmental Development 

Councillor Sonya Kraai 

Health & Social Development 

Councillor Nocawe Mafu 

Roads & Transport 

Councillor Pinky Mkonza 

Water & Energy 

Councillor Victor Chiloane 


POLITICAL PARTY WHIPS 


61 




Party Whips are representatives of all the recognized political parties represented in Council and 
collectively are called the Multi-party Whippery. The whips are the political managers of their 
individual parties but also have the responsibility to ensure cross-party co-ordination of the political 
work of Council. 

MULTI PARTY WHIPPERY 


Party 

Whips 

African National Congress 

Chief Whip: Councillor Robert Mashego 

• Deputy Chief Whip: Councillor Ibrahim Motara 

• Councillor Dora Mlambo 

• Councillor Peter Ngubeni 

• Councillor Connie Mashigo 

• Councillor Sibongile Msibi 

Democratic Alliance 

Chief Whip: Councillor Andre du Plessis 

Deputy Chief Whip: Councillor Michelle Clark 

National Freedom Party 

Councillor Nhlanhla Nyandeni 

Congress of the People 

Councillor Lesego Sentsho 

Pan Africanist Congress 

Councillor Patric Kumalo 

African Christian Democratic Party 

Councillor Masande Papu 

African People’s Convention 

Councillor Ramahlalerwa Mathume 

Displacees Rate-payers Association 

Councillor Puni Mkhize 

Freedom Front Plus 

Councillor Hennie van der Walt 

Inkatha Freedom Party 

Councillor J A Esterhuizen 

Independent Ratepayers Association of 
South Africa 

Councillor Izak Berg 

United Democratic Movement 

Councillor Mluleki France 


ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE 

Ekurhuleni’s executive leadership manages the metropolitan municipality along best practice 
principles, implementing the strategies and plans needed to meet the organisation’s long-term goals 
which are set out in the Growth and Development Strategy 2055. Day-to-day management and 
administration of the municipality is carried out by the City Manager and his staff of more than 17 000 
employees led by Heads of Departments, Divisional Heads, Customer Care Area Managers and 
operational levels of management. 

The City Manager, in discharging his duties and in line with the principles of good governance and 
legislative requirements, has established administrative committees which are as follows: 

• The Strategic Management Committee (SMT/EXCO) is constituted as executive 
management committees of EMM. The duties and responsibilities of the members are in 
addition to those as HODs. The deliberations of the SMT do not reduce individual and 
collective responsibilities of the City Manager and HODs with regard to their fiduciary or 
administrative duties and responsibilities, and they must continue to exercise due diligence 
and good judgment in accordance with their statutory and contractual obligations. 

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality took a resolution on the 24th of November 2010 to structurally 
rearrange the municipality, in order to increase the potential for improved service delivery. This 


62 




process is what is commonly known in the Metro as the Institutional Review (IR) project. Because of 
the importance of service delivery, this project has been earmarked as one of the most strategic 
projects in the Metro like in similar standing with the IRPTN, Aerotropolis and others. 

The first phase started in November 201 1 and was completed on the 27th of September 2012 when 
Council approved the Metro’s top structure. Planning for the second phase started at the beginning of 
October 2012 and consultation with departments about the roll-out of phase two roll-out is in 
progress. 

5. REVIEW OF THE INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 
5.1 GUIDING PRINCIPLES 


The EMM IDP is its principal strategic planning instrument, which directly guides and informs its 
planning, budget, management and development actions. This framework is rolled out into planning 
statements covering the 5 year objectives, key performance indicators and targets for implementation 
which directly inform the Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan. The whole process was 
structured around supporting and working toward contributing to the achievement of the programmes 
set in the GDS 2055. 

In terms of section 34 of the Municipal Systems Act, 32 of 2000, the Council must annually review its 
Integrated Development Plan in terms of a predetermined process. This process was adopted by the 
Council on 30 August 2012. 

The review of the Integrated Development Plan (IDP) in terms of the Municipal Systems Act is guided 
and informed by the following: 

■ It must support and work towards achieving the Vision and Mission of EMM. 

■ Working towards the achievement of the EMM GDS 2055 programmes 

■ Addressing the National Outcomes set by Cabinet 

■ Focus on basic service delivery in terms of the eradication of backlogs and the maintenance of 
existing infrastructure and community needs. 

■ Provincial plans and programmes applicable to the specific. Budget allocations by the respective 
provincial sector departments to these projects should also be reflected as far as possible. 

All departments were part of the process of reviewing the IDP and SDBIP. The IDP/SDBIP for 14/15 
is slightly different to the previous financial year in that the key results to be achieved are presented 
not so much in terms of the various departments but more in terms of the GDS programmes and sub- 
programmes. With this approach the linkage between the national outcomes and the GDS is clearly 
demonstrated. The linkage between the key results and the GDS is also demonstrated. The number 
of indicators has also been reduced in order to focus the organisation on the most important results 
that the municipality seeks to achieve. The overall planning philosophy of EMM is results based and it 
is for this reason that focus must be on the key results and not activities and outputs in the IDP. 
However as this is the first attempt to focus the municipality on the most important results, it is 
expected that it will take a number of planning and implementation years before the system can be 
perfected. 


63 



The outcomes of the engagements with various municipal departments are contained below in the 
Metro-wide IDP and SDBIP. 


5.2 IDP/SDBIP 


5.2.1 NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 

The inefficiencies and inequities in South Africa’s settlement patterns are deeply entrenched as 
apartheid left a terrible spatial legacy (NDP: 2012). As described in the NDP, where people live and 
work matters. Apartheid planning consigned the majority of South Africans to places far away from 
work, where services could not be sustained and where it was difficult to access the benefits of 
society and participate fully in the economy. Towns and cities are highly fragmented imposing high 
costs on households and the economy. 

Informal settlements and backyard shacks present a particular challenge related to the pursuit of 
economic livelihood opportunities linked to a fundamental shift in the structure of households and 
survivalist strategies. Most migrants utilise informal settlements, which constitute the most affordable 
housing as landing points in towns and cities. With a declining delivery rate of supply of public and 
private housing and the inability of migrants and other unskilled people to break into the labour 
market and improve incomes, they find it difficult to move out of shacks into more formal 
accommodation. 

At the core is the need to transform the functioning of human settlements and the workings of the 
space economy so as to observe meaningful and measurable progress in creating more functionally 
integrated, balanced and vibrant urban settlements by 2030. This requires institutional capabilities for 
effective coordination and spatial. 


(I) GDS PROGRAMME: EMM GAUTENG CITY REGIONAL INTEGRATION 

In support of the national outcome on sustainable human settlements, Ekurhuleni Metro has 
embarked on a number of programmes and sub-programmes. The strategic intent is to enable a 
process of re-urbanisation of well-connected and networked spaces to ensure a compact and 
sustainable city, rejuvenate blighted and neglected areas, manage and channel growth, facilitate 
upward mobility in the formal and informal housing markets, cater for the needs of households 
requiring affordable accommodation in well located areas and provide efficient and affordable 
accessibility to places of work, shopping nodes and facilities within the City and the City Region. At 
the heart of Ekurhuleni’s urbanisation challenge is an inability to meet needs and demands with 
current policies and supply modalities. 

To address these challenges these challenges and deal with the elements of transformation towards 
sustainability with regard to matters such as public transport, linear metabolism and air-road-rail 
logistics, concerted action and integration at an inter metropolitan level will be required, as will the 


64 


need to position the urban industrial complex from an economic development perspective, the 
following programmes will be implemented during the 2014/2015 financial year: 

(1) GDS SUB-PORGRAMME: REGIONAL AGGESSIBLE PUBLIG TRANSPORT NETWORK DEVELOPMENT 

There are a number of good reasons for improving the accessibility of public transport services. 
Improving accessibility is good for business. It improves the perceived quality of services and leads to 
satisfied customers. It also enables transport services for a wider group of customers at all times of 
the day and week. Improving accessibility means increasing access for people meeting physical and 
informational barriers. Accessible cities will enhance their reputation among their citizens, tourists and 
visitors by being known as inclusive cities or locations. Improving accessibility will attract passengers 
who would not previously have considered using public transport. This will improve both the 
sustainability and the effectiveness of the urban transport system. The most imperative reason is that 
all citizens have the right to participate in society on equal terms, and transport, in many ways, is the 
gateway to participation; that is, daily life, social and leisure activities, employment etc. The services 
are then available for more citizens and fewer other arrangements are needed. Legislative and 
regulatory frameworks also require accessible public transport systems. 

The regional accessible public transport network development will be implemented through providing 
access to public transport by extending existing routes and building new routes thereby facilitating 
easier transit from one point to another. In addition, to ease traffic congestion the city has will 
continue with the installation of LED lights in order to increase operational capacity and reduce any 
outages. For the 2014/2015 financial years the following results are envisaged: 


65 


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o 

o 

of an integrated 

Vosloorus, Palm 







Palm Ridge, Bluegum View 

consulting engineers 

Q 

LO 

c 

transport system 

Ridge, Bluegum 












and Phuthaditshaba. 

Physical inspection Taxi 



that includes all 

View and 













register 



modes of 

Phuthaditshaba 
















transport and 

No. of kms of BRT 













Copy of completion 



non-motorized 

routes constructed 












The total kms of dedicated 

certificate 



transport 

for phase 1 of the 

18 

0 

0 

0 

0 

2.5 

2.5 

lOkms 

3 kms 

0 

0 

BRT lanes completed 

Copy of progress report 



infrastructure. 

IRPTN from 

kms 

kms 

between Tembisa and 

from the consulting 




Tembisa to 












Vosloorus. 

engineers Physical 




Vosloorus* 













inspection 


66 



Level of 

Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 Year Target 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

2014/ 

2015 

Annual 

Target 

2014/2015 

2015/2016 

YEAR2 

2016/2017 

YEAR3 

2017/2018 

YEAR4 

2018/2019 

YEAR5 

Definition of Indicator 

Data 5ources 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

5ept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

Direct Outcome 

BBC 

Improve 
operating 
efficiencies of the 

buses 

Efficient utilisation 

of the buses to 
operate the public 
transport network. 

175 

176 

30 568 

32 096 

8 024 

8 425 

8 024 

7 

623 

33 

701 

35 

386 

36 

094 

37 

899 

Operational efficiency will be 
measuring the reliability of 
the service by, calculating 
number of buses operated 
against bus drivers utilised, 
kilometres operated and fuel 
consumed, including the 
cancelled and or delayed trips 
as opposed to scheduled 
trips. 

Payment certificates 

from DoRT. Copies of 
operations' logs or 
registers (waybill). Shift 
schedule and Inspectors 
reports. 


(2) GDS SUB-PORGRAMME: REGIONAL BROADBAND INERASTRUGTURE NETWORKS DEVELOPMENT 

Broadband is increasingly regarded as a strategic infrastructure essential to meeting the needs of knowledge economies and 
information societies, enabling economic and social inclusion and as a key determinant of global competitiveness. This is premised 
on the development not only of interlinked physical networks, but an entire connected ecosystem of services, applications and 
content that open up and create efficiency in information flows that improve productivity, stimulate innovation, resulting in diversity of 
services and increased demand, resulting in job creation and all this in ways that enable greater participation, transparency and 
accountability. 

Regional integration: This policy seeks to address some of the gaps between status of regional integration currently and the vision 
to achieve a 'Digital SADC' by 2027 which acknowledges that the key benefits from becoming a knowledge-based society are based 
on the provision of always-on affordable broadband connectivity delivering relevant content and useful applications by means of easy 
to use access devices. Making sure this happens by 2027 will require rapid and concerted efforts by all. The plan is to consolidate 
regional telecommunications networks to ensure that the region is fully interconnected nationally, regionally, inter-regionally and 
globally, through reliable and affordable fibre optic links. Every capital city in the Region is to be linked to all of its neighbours via at 
least two routes, and to at least two different cross-continental submarine networks. Affordable satellite based connectivity solution is 
available for remote areas outside the near-term reach of fibre infrastructure. 


67 


Level of Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual Performance 

Previous Year 


2014/2015 

2015/ 

2016 

YEAR 

2 

2016/ 

2017 

YEAR 

3 

2017/ 

2018 

YEAR 

4 

2018/ 

2019 

YEAR 

5 

Definltion of Indicator 

Data Sources 

0) 

go 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

ZU14/ 

2015 

Annual Ta 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 1.1.2 Regional broadband infrastructure networks development 

Direct Outcome 

1— 

u 

Increased 
availability of 
customer 
facing 

applications 

Percentage 
availability of 

enabled customer 
facing 

applications 

99% 


96% 

96% 

96% 

96% 

96% 

97% 

98% 

99% 

99% 

Amount of time that service is available 
(number of days the application is 
available per quarter divided by 
90days Absolute indicator (Library 
System, Prepaid System, Call Centre 
Systems, Cash drawer System, 
Esiyakhokha) 

Applications that are used by the 
Ekurhuleni Citizens. 

Systemic source - CA 
Unicentre, System 
centre, Nagios and 
OpsManager 
currently. 

1— 

y 

Increased 

(fibre) 

broadband 

coverage 

within the 

metro 

Number of Wi-Fi 
Flotspots 

deployed is 

operational and 
usable with 80% 

coverage 

300 


75 

15 

20 

20 

20 

75 

75 

75 


A hotspot is a site that offers Internet 
access over a wireless local area 
network through the use of a router 
connected to a link to an Internet 
service provider. Hotspots typically use 
Wi-Fi technology. 

WiFi hot spot deployed 

Hotspot that providing access when 
required 

Systemic Source : 
Commissioning 
Certificate, Ops 

Manager 

1— 

u 

Increased 
responsiveness 
to the 

prioritised ICT 
solutions 

Number of 

solutions/functio 
ns provided and 
signed off by line 
managers 

500 

0 

100 




100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

Number of solutions required by 
Departments. Solutions are as per 
prioritised profile approved by the ICT 
Steering Committee based on the 
Departmental Requirements 

Management Portfolio. 

Prioritised RMP 

profile approved by 
the ICT Steering 
Committee 

% deviation from 
agreed timeline / 
project plan 

(Average based 
on all solution 
projects) 

0% 

0 

0% 




0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

0% 

Timeline / Responsiveness 

measurement % Deviation from 

agreed project timelines. (e.g. Project 
must be done in 100 days - A 0% 
deviation implies that project is done 
and signed off within 100 days - early 
delivery would produce a positive delta 
- 10 days early would produce a 
positive delta of 10%. Late delivery of 
10 days would produce a negative 
delta of -10%). 

Summation of Signed 
project plans (which 
defines end date 

when solution is 
required) 


68 


(II) GDS PORGRAMME: SUSTAINABLE SETTLEMENTS AND INFRASTRUCTURE 


The NDP envisions that by 2030 South Africa will have a state that is capable of playing a developmental and transformative role. In 
broad terms such a state intervenes to support and guide planning, development and provision of infrastructure and basic services in 
such a way that benefits accrue across all of society with a specific emphasis on poor, marginalised and working households.. 

By 2030 we will have a developmental local state that is accountable, focused on citizen’s priorities and capable of delivering high- 
quality services consistently and sustainably through cooperative governance and participatory democracy. In this scenario, local 
government is at the forefront of participatory democracy involving citizens in meaningful deliberations regarding governance and 
development; is responsive to citizens’ priorities and enjoys high levels of trust and credibility amongst the public; whose employees 
are skilled, competent and committed to delivering quality services; is able to cost-effectively increase the quantity and quality of 
services and operates within a supportive and empowering intergovernmental system. Linked to sustainability is the need for local 
government to invest in integrated and a comprehensive basket of basic services infrastructure provision and maintenance. 

This programme seeks to target the infrastructure, services and adequate shelter needs of the 1 .5 million additional residents who 
will live in Ekurhuleni by 2055, as well to accommodate the on-going urbanisation and re-urbanisation needs of the people already 
living in Ekurhuleni. The programme will involve a demand-driven approach which seeks to meet the needs and capabilities of formal 
and informal household modalities within an evolutionary framework that enables adaptation and flexibility into the future. It will 
encompass provision of services and catering to the needs of households within the cycle of individual and household development 
and evolution. Simultaneously the City needs to grow, adapt and redefine its infrastructures in accordance with the emerging 
imperatives of resource availability, scarcity and sustainability. Government will commit to ensuring the supply of energy and water is 
reliable and sufficient for a growing economy, and that City’s maintenance of distribution systems are appropriately allocated and 
funded. Already bold steps have been taken by the City in placing infrastructure at the forefront of its agenda to transform the 
economy and stimulate economic growth and job creation. 

Although household access to tenure and basic services has improved, much remains to be done to further improve the livelihoods 
of poor people who continue to receive no or poor levels of service, especially in the more rural provinces. Throughout the post-1994 
period, government has set very ambitious targets with regard to access to services, but universal access to functional infrastructure 
has been elusive primarily due to constraints in the availability, operation and maintenance of infrastructure and the application of 
appropriate delivery technologies in remote rural areas. Households having sustainable access to the five key services (water, 
sanitation, electricity, refuse removal and roads) remain a major policy and implementation emphasis. The key enabling activity is 
that each sector should organise itself into a service delivery management structure to plan and implement the delivery of basic 


69 


services. The central task in this regard is for service delivery backlogs for each sector to be mapped and projects and funding 
coordinated per municipality to improve access to basic services. To this end the following GDS programmes will be implemented: 

(I) GDS SUB-PORGRAMME: INVEST IN ON -GRID LONG TERM INERASTRUGTURE 


n 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

U) 

201S 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

■> 

0) 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

& 

Target 





E 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 
5 E 


ec 
< 
in uj 

^ > 

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o 

cg 


PO 

ec 

— < 

o uj 

° ^ 

O 

fM 


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00 2 

O 

IN 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME; SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA: 1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 

Direct Outcome 

SRAC 

Reduced backlog 
in SRAC facilities 
in line with 

approved 
minimum norms 

and standards. 

Number of new 
Sport and 

Recreation facilities 
developed and 

operationalized 

5 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1 

1 

3 

0 

Measuring the practical 
completion of new SRAC 
facilities, namely Library, 
Swimming pools, Sport 
facility, Museums and 
Theatres. 

1. Monthly and Quarterly 
progress report and final 
completion report signed 
by the internal project 
manager and approved by 
the HOD 2.0ccupation 

certificate signed off by the 
External Project manager 
Registered with the 

relevant professional 

body.2 new Libraries 

((Tsakane and 

Brakpanjfunded as per 
approved Multi-year Capex 
Budget. Kingsway and 
Leondale libraries funded 
and implemented by the 
Province through library 
recapitalisation 
programme. Funding 

commitment from the 
province. Completion of 
the Chris Hani memorial, 
Duduza reconciliation park 
Indaba tree. Construction 
of the Germiston theatre{ 
multi year project) 

Number of new 
library facilities 

developed and 

operationalized 

10 

3 

4 




4 

2 

1 

2 

1 

Number of new 
Arts, Culture and 
Heritage facilities 
developed and 

operationalized 

6 

1 

3 

0 

0 

0 

3 

1 

2 

0 

0 


70 



oj J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 

2 I 


m 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

's 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

£ 

Target 





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C«J 


oc 

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5 

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r«j 


oc 

> < 

r«« LLI 

S >- 
° S 

o 

C«J 


in 
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N 3 

O 

C«J 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA 

1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 














ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 

INTERMEDIATE 0UTC0ME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 
















Goe Technical hazards 

are sinkholes and 

shallow undermining 

that are natural. 


01 

£ 

City Planning 

Increased 

rehabilitation of 
land affected by 
geotechnical 
hazards 

% of land affected 
by geotechnical 

hazards 

rehabilitated 

90% 

77% 

80% 

80% 

80% 

80% 

80% 

82.5% 

85% 

87.5% 

90% 

Total number of 

hectares of dolomitic 
land (52% of EMM) 

Dolomite development 

applications Register 















Total number of 

dolomitic land 

rehabilitated (restore to 
natural state) 


o 

u 

Z5 

O 

u 

£ 

Q 


Increased 
compliance and 
provision of basic 
interim services 
meeting 

standards for 

households living 
informal 
settlements 













The unit of measure is 

The source of data is 


Human Settlements 

Number of 

informal 

settlements 
provided with 

interim services 

119 

119 

119 

60 

80 

100 

119 

119 

119 

119 

119 

required compliance by 
the relevant service 
departments on the 
service standards in the 
provision of minimum 
basic services in terms of 
the informal settlements 
management Plan and 
council's standards. 

monthly compliance 

reports from sector 

departments and quarterly 
departmental monitoring 
reports of the human 
settlements department on 
compliance by 

departments 


71 



oj J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 

2 I 


m 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

's 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

£ 

Target 





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C«J 


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r«j 


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> < 

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in 
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O 

C«J 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA: 1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 


ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 


INTERMEDIATE 0UTC0ME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 


City Planning 

Increased 

investment of the 
municipal capital 
budget in 

geographic 
priority areas 

Percentage of 

municipal capital 
budget invested in 
geographic priority 

areas 

65% 


Increased roll out 




LO 

of housing units 




01 

£ 

in support of 




_gj 

integrated 

Number 

of 



human 

subsidised 

housing 

19100 

c 

settlement and 

units built. 



E 

transport 




X 

orientated 





development 





60% 

- 

- 

- 

60% 

61% 

62% 

63% 

65% 

Denominator - total 

Ekurhuleni wide annual 
capital budget 

expenditure 

Numerator - annual 
capital budget 

expenditure in the 

geographic priority 

areas. ( Invested refers 
to the Rand-value of the 
capital budget of 

Ekurhuleni spent in the 
Geographic Priority 

Areas expressed as a 
percentage of the total 
Ekurhuleni capital 

budget.) 

Annual Capital Expenditure 
Report (as prepared by 
Finance Department) 

1100 

1100 

200 

400 

500 

2000 

4000 

5500 

6500 

The unit of measure and 
a unit of analysis is a 
subsidised housing unit 
built. 

The indicator is 

calculated through a 
physical count and is an 
absolute target for the 
quarter. 

The source of data is the 
completion certificates for 
houses built/ signed happy 
letter and or the Housing 
Subsidy System report on 
houses completed. 

Tools used to collect the 
data is the project progress 
report and the Housing 
Subsidy System. 

Evidence of the data 
collected is the copies of 
occupation / happy letters 
issued to beneficiaries. 


72 



oj J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 

2 I 


m 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

's 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

£ 

Target 





oc 
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r«j 


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> < 

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O 

C«J 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA: 1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 
ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 


INTERMEDIATE 0UTC0ME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 


Direct Outcome 

Human Settlements 

Increased 
procurement of 
well-located land 
in support of 
integrated 
human 

settlements and 
transport 
orientated 
development, 

Hectares of land 
procured 

408 

0 

95 

0 

0 

0 

95 

18 

75 

100 

120 

The unit of measure and 
analysis is hectares and 
or number or erven per 
SG plan 

The indicator is 

calculated based on the 
Surveyor General and 
the Title deed of the 
acquired land. The target 
is absolute for the 
quarter 

The source of data is the 
title deed of the acquired 
land. There data is 
collected through simple 
counting. 

The evidence of the data 
collected is the tittle deed 
of the acquired land 
portion 

Increase in the 
number of 

households living 
in informal 

settlements, who 
are provided with 
secure tenure. 

Number of 

households in 

formal townships 
with secure tenure 

and basic services 

6 

New 

Target 

3 

0 

1 

0 

2 

3 

0 

0 

0 

The unit of measure and 
analysis is done by 
determining the number 
of approved layout plans 
and or proclaimed 

township. 

The indicator is 

calculated based on the 
township approval by the 
relevant authority, or 
delegated official, 

Surveyor General for the 
respective erven 

absolute for the quarter 

The source of data is the 
township layout approval 
on the subject land. There 
data is collected through 
simple counting. 

The evidence of the data 
collected is the 

letter/memorandum on 

township layout approval. 

Real Estate 

Improved 
utilization of 

burial space 

Lifespan of 

cemeteries in years 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

Physical measuring of 
available burlal space 
and additional burial 
space (198 000 graves) 
divided by average 
number of burials per 
annum (18 000) which 
represent a 11 year 
lifespan - Target absolute 
per quarter 

Physical quarterly 

calculation of number of 
graves used for burials 


73 



oj J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 

2 I 


m 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

's 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

£ 

Target 





oc 
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r«j 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA: 1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 

INTERMEDIATE 0UTC0ME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 


Real Estate 

Increased 
development of 
leisure facilities 

Number of leisure 
facilities developed 

25 

5 

5 

0 

0 

0 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 X Facilities identified 
for development as per 
Capex budget - Absolute 
annual target 

Completion reports 

Photos 

DEMS 

Increased access 

to Disaster and 
Emergency 
Management 
Services 

Number of Disaster 
& Emergency 

Management 

Services facilities 

established 

7 

2 

2 

0 

0 

0 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

Number of Disaster & 
Emergency Management 
Services facilities 

established 

Practical completion 

certificate issued 

ERWAT 

Improve the 

effluent quality 
compliance 

Percentage of 

wastewater 

treatment works 

complying 90% 

against the 

applicable 
standards 

80% 

87% 

78% 

78% 

77% 

76% 

79% 

78% 

79% 

80% 

85% 

It is calculated by 
dividing the number of 
determinants complying 
to the Water Use 

Authorization with the 
total number of 

determinants analyse for 
the specific period. 

Water Quality Data of each 
Wastewater Treatment 

Works (From the Lab) 
Spreadsheet used to 

calculate overall 

compliance 

Applicable Water use 
authorization of each 

Waste Water Treatment 

Works 

Roads and Stormwater 

Increased 
provision of tar 
roads 

constructed 

KM of tar roads 

constructed 

220 

63.8 

50 

20 

15 

10 

5 

94 

136 

178 

220 

kms of new Tertiary 
Roads, constructed from 
existing gravel roads to 
tar roads, as per 
Contractor's Completion 
Reports. 

Completion Certificates 

signed by the Contractor, 
Engineer and Client. 

Increased 
provision of 

stormwater 

infrastructure 

KM of Stormwater 

infrastructure 

provided 

125 

23 

25 

10 

5 

5 

5 

50 

75 

100 

125 

kms of additional 

pipelines and channels 
added to the existing 
stormwater network. 

Completion Certificates 

signed by the Contractor, 
Engineer and Client. 


74 



oj J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 

2 I 


m 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

's 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

£ 

Target 





oc 
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Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA: 1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 

INTERMEDIATE 0UTC0ME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 


Roads and Stormwater 

Increased 
maintenance of 

roads across 

informal 

settlements 

KM of roads 

maintained across 

informal 

settlements 

50 

87.3 

10 

3 

2 

3 

2 

20 

30 

40 

50 

kms of existing gravel 
roads in informal 

settlements maintained 
through grading and 
gravelling 

Completion Certificates 

signed by the Contractor, 
Engineer and Client as well 
as Job cards of 

Departmental Maintenance 
signed by Depot Managers. 

Improved 
strategic Road 

network 

Km of newly 

constructed 
strategic roads 

5 


1 




1 

1 

1 

1,25 

1,25 

Km, cumulative 

Asset Register 

Improved 
strategic Road 

network 

Number of 

intersections 
upgraded on 

strategic roads 

30 


6 


1 

3 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

Number of intersections 
with upgrades to the 
surface e.g. widening, 
traffic-circles, road 

marking 

Completion Certificates 

signed by the Contractor, 
Engineer and Client. 

Waste Management Services 

Increased 
operational 
compliance of 

landfill sites 

Number of landfill 
sites compliant 

with permit 

conditions 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

Landfill site means any 
site or premise used for 
the accumulation of 
waste with the purpose 
of disposing in sanitary 
manner. This facilities 
are operated in line with 
the permit or licence 
conditions granted by 
the Provincial and 

National Environmental 
Authority, therefore 

increased compliance 

with permit conditions 
refers to adherence to 
the stipulated the level 
of compliance per site. 

List of landfill sites with 
addresses, Independent 

quarterly reports as well as 
Provincial Landfill Audit 
Reports per site 

Water and 

Sanitation 

Services 

Increased access 

to sanitation in 

EMM 

Number of 

additional 

households 
provided with 

sewer connections 


7827 

2378 

100 

440 

700 

1138 

2378 




Additional number of 
households connected 

with sewer connections 

in the whole metro 

Venus System plus 

pending connection 

application forms to be 
input in the 

system{Revenue, & 

Projects divisions) 


75 



oj J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 

2 I 


m 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

's 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

£ 

Target 





Q£ 
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C«J 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA: 1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 

INTERMEDIATE 0UTC0ME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 


Water and 

sanitation 

Increased access 

to water in EMM 

Number of 

addltlonal 

households 
provided with 

water connections 


7827 

2378 

100 

440 

700 

1138 

2378 




Additional numberof 

households connected 

with water connections 
in the whole metro 

Venus System plus 

pending connection 

application forms to be 
input in the 

system(Revenue, & 

Projects divisions) 

Transport and 
Licensing 

Decentralization 
of Licensing 

Services to 

Townships 

Number of 

Licensing Hubs 

constructed in 

previously 
disadvantaged 
areas (Katlehong, 
Tembisa and 

KwaTsaduza). 

3 

0 

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

(Katl 

ehon 

g) 

1 

0 

0 

1 

100% completion of the 
Katlehong Licensing Hub. 

Copy of Completion 

Certificate or Progress 
report from consulting 
engineers (if issuance of 
completion certificate is 
still pending) 

Health and 

Social 

Development 

Increased access 
to primary health 
care services 

Number of 

functional newly 
constructed 

facilities 

18 


3 

0 

0 

0 

3 

1 

6 

4 

4 

Newly constructed 

facilities functional and 
providing Primary Health 
Care services to clients. 

Practical completion 

certificate. PHC service 
delivery reports. Evidence 
of reporting in DHIS 

Energy 

Increased 
implementation 
of energy 

efficient 

measures 

Number of solar 
high mast lights 
installed 

60 

2 

12 

0 

2 

4 

6 

12 

12 

12 

12 

High mast lighting is a 
tall pole, generally 

approximately 30 metres 
in height, with lighting 
attached to the top 
pointing towards the 
ground. 

The installations are 

recorded in the SDBIP 
register, maintained by the 
Divisional Head: Planning, 
with their GPS coordinates, 
locations and date of 

installation. 

Increased 
provision of 

public lighting 

(street lights and 
high mast lights) 

No of PV Solar 
Lighting Units 

installed in Informal 

Settlements 

35000 

12181 

7000 

1750 

1750 

1750 

1750 

7000 

7000 

7000 

7000 

These are portable solar 
units that provide energy 
for four (4) globes and a 
cell phone charger. 

Details are collected by the 
service provider of each 
shack. The information 
collected is ID number, 
shack number, owner 
/occupier. This is linked to 
a bar code on the solar 
unit. The number of solar 
units is matched by the 
number of dwellings in the 
settlement 


76 



oj J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 

2 I 


m 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

's 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

£ 

Target 





oc 
< 
in uj 

S >- 

° s 

o 

C«J 


oc 

^ £ 
5 

o 

r«j 


oc 

> < 

r«« LLI 

S >- 
° S 

o 

C«J 


in 
oc 
< 
00 UJ 

° » 
N 3 

O 

C«J 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA: 1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 
ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 


INTERMEDIATE 0UTC0ME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 


Direct Outcome 

Energy 


Number of high 
mast lights installed 

360 

98 

72 

0 

18 

18 

36 

72 

72 

72 

72 

High mast lighting is a 
tall pole, generally 

approximately 30 metres 
in height, with lighting 
attached to the top 
pointing towards the 
ground. 

The installations are 

recorded in the SDBIP 
register, maintained by the 
Divisional Head: Planning, 
indicating the areas of 
installation. 

Number of street 
lights installed 

2850 

2103 

570 

0 

95 

95 

380 

570 

570 

570 

570 

A street light is a raised 
source of light on the 
edge of a road, which is 
turned on/off at a pre- 
determined time. 

Modern lamps may also 
have light sensitive 
photocells to turn them 
on at dusk and off at 
dawn or automatically 
activate in dark weather. 

The installations are 

recorded in the SDBIP 
register, maintained by the 
Divisional Head: Planning, 
indicating the areas of 
installation. 

Increased 

electrification of 

subsidized 

developments 

Number of 

subsidized 

households 

electrified 

25000 

10048 

5000 

0 

500 

1500 

3000 

5000 

5000 

5000 

5000 

This indicator is in 
respect of low income 
earners housing which 
are electrified in 

conjunction with Human 
Settlements department. 

The data is obtained from a 
register maintained by 
Energy department. The 
evidence of such data is 
obtained from the Suprima 
and Venus software. 

Physical verifications are 
also done. 


77 



oj J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


m 2 

2 I 


m 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


> 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 

O 

's 

Annua 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

£ 

Target 





oc 
< 
in uj 

S >- 

° s 

o 

C«J 


oc 

^ £ 
5 

o 

r«j 


oc 

> < 

r«« LLI 

S >- 
° S 

o 

C«J 


in 
oc 
< 
00 UJ 

° » 
N 3 

O 

C«J 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA 

1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 














ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 

INTERMEDIATE 0UTC0ME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 

Direct Outcome 

Energy 

Increased 
provision of 

reliable and 

sustainable 
electricity supply 
to all customers 

Percentage 
downtime of 

network availability 

0,7% 

0,8% 

0,8% 

0,8% 

0,8% 

0,8% 

0,8% 

0,8% 

0,8% 

0,7% 

0,7% 

This part of NRS 048-6 
addresses the impact on 
medium voltage (MV) 
customers' supply 

interruptions, caused by 
events on the medium 
voltage (MV), high 

voltage (HV) 

and extra high voltage 
(EHV) systems. 

This is the industry 
norm. A percentage 
below the norm indicates 
improvement. 

Outages are recorded at 
Benoni Control Centre in 
the MV Outages Log Book. 
This is then uploaded onto 
a spreadsheet and 

calculated in accordance 

with the formula in the 
directive. 



















78 



2014/2015 


OJ J2 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


_ E ^ 

B I i 


2014/ 

2015 

Annua 

I 

Target 


Q1 


Sept 


Q2 


Dec 


Q3 


Mar 


Q4 


June 


IN 

— < 
in u 

° S 

O 

C«J 


ec 

^ £ 

o 

r«j 


ec 

> < 
r«« LLI 

S >- 
° S 

o 

C«J 


in 
ec 
< 
00 uj 

° » 
N 3 

O 

C«J 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND IMPROVED QUALITY OF HOUSEHOLD LIFE 


THEMATIC AREA 

1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN INTEGRATION 














ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 1.2. Sustainable Settlements and Infrastructure 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:1.2.1 Invest in on-grid long term infrastructure 
















Approval of Town 

Planning applications in 
accordance with 

departmental business 
process flow chart as 


0) 

£ 



% of town planning 












guided in Townships 


CtO 

Increased 

applications 












Ordinance no. 15 of 


u 

Z5 

O 

u 

'E 

c 

<T3 

CL 

>• 

efficiency with 
respect to the 
application 

approved in 

accordance with 
the departmental 

95% 

91% 

92% 

91.25 

% 

91.50 

% 

91.75 

% 

92.0 

0% 

93% 

94% 

95% 

95% 

1986. Denominator- 

total number of 

applications received 

Development applications 
register 

b 

u 

process 

business process 
flow chart 












Numerator - total 
numberoftown planning 
applications approved in 
accordance with 

departmental business 
process flow chart 



NATIONAL OUTCOME: AN EFFICIENT, COMPETITIVE AND RESPONSIVE ECONOMIC 
INFRASTRUCTURE NETWORK 

South Africa needs to invest in a strong network of economic infrastructure designed to support the country’s medium- and long-term 
economic and social objectives. This economic infrastructure is a precondition for providing basic services such as electricity, water, 
sanitation, telecommunications and public transport, and it needs to be robust and extensive enough to meet industrial, commercial 
and household needs 

The importance of investment in infrastructure to the socio-economic advancement of a nation cannot be overemphasized. 
Insufficient or poor infrastructure limits citizens’ access to markets, as well as livelihood opportunities and services such as clean 
water, education, health, transport and communication. The importance of investment in infrastructure to the socio-economic 
advancement of a nation cannot be overemphasized. Insufficient or poor infrastructure limits citizens’ access to markets, as well as 
livelihood opportunities and services such as clean water, education, health, transport and communication. The public infrastructure 


79 



such as streets and highways, mass transit, water and sewer systems, and the like should be considered as a factor of production, 
along with labour and private capital, in the private sector production process. Therefore, to raise productivity growth countries must 
boost the rate of capital accumulation on the tangible capital such as plant and equipment, or intangible capital such as that 
generated by research and development expenditures. 

Economic theory identifies five channels through which infrastructure can positively impact on economic growth: (i) Infrastructure 
may simply be regarded as a direct input into the production process and hence serve as a factor of production; (ii) infrastructure 
may be regarded as a complement to other inputs into the production process, in the sense that its improvements may lower the cost 
of production or its deficiency may create a number of costs for firms, (iii) infrastructure may stimulate factor accumulation through, 
for example, providing facilities for human capital development; (iv) infrastructure investment can also boost aggregate demand 
through increased expenditure during construction, and possibly during maintenance operations; and finally, (v) infrastructure 
investment can also serve as a tool to guide industrial policy^°; The City has activated this by investing in specific infrastructure 
projects with the intention of guiding private-sector investment decisions. 


From the South African legislative perspective, notably the National Small Business Act 102 of 1996, SMMEs are categorised into 
five stages of development: (1) survivalist, (2) micro, (3) very small, (4) small and (5) medium-sized enterprises. Survivalist 
enterprises operate form part of the informal economy, are undertaken by unemployed persons whose primary objective is to survive 
economically (Turner, Varghese & Walker 2008:8). Little capital is invested in survivalist enterprises and therefore they do not 
generate as much as necessary income and assets, the owners possess inappropriate business skills and training to run the 
business, and the opportunities for growing the business are limited. 


Fedderke and Garlick, 2008 


80 



[1] GDS PROGRAMME: NEW VALUE CHAINS DEVELOPMENT 

1. GDS SUB-PROGRAMME: INTEGRATED SMME DEVELOPMENT AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 


evel of 

Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning Statements 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual Performance 

Previous Year 

2014 

/ 

2015 

Annu 

al 

Targ 

et 

2014/2015 

2015 

/ 

2016 

YEAR 

2 

2016 

/ 

2017 

YEAR 

3 

2017 

/ 

2018 

YEAR 

4 

2018 

/201 

g 

YEAR 

5 

Definition of 
Indicator 

Data Sources 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

1. NATIONAL OUTCOME: DECENT EMPLOYMENT THROUGH INCLUSIVE GROWTH 

THEMATIC AREA: 2. JOB CREATING ECONOMIC GROWTH 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 2.3. New Value Chains Development 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 2.3.2 Integrated SMME development and urban development 

Direct 

Outcome 

Economic 

Development 

Increased 

Development of 

Economic Clusters 
across sectors and 

Metro-wide. 

Number of sustainable 
enterprises developed 

615 

0 

100 

25 

25 

25 

25 

110 

120 

135 

150 

Development 
and support of 
self-sustainable, 
operational 
enterprises with 
bankable 
business plans. 

Quarterly reports 

from 3rd party 

service providers and 
partners as approved 
bythe HOD 


2. GDS SUB-PROGRAMME: INVESTMENT IN SKILLS AND JOB GREA TION 

The NDP 2030 asserts that employment is the best form of social protection. However, given the structural and historical factors in 
South Africa, and the effects of economic downturn that limit the immediate growth of formal employment based on an industrial 
model of development, it is proposed that the country’s approach to social protection should be a two-pronged strategy that protects 
the vulnerable and those at risk, while simultaneously ensuring economic inclusion through a range of active strategies. Government 
should ensure that social protection is affordable and sustainable to avoid withdrawal of what is currently provided, and to promote 
solidarity and social cohesion. 

South Africa is working towards improving the quality and skills levels of their labour forces. The increasing recognition that higher 
technical and vocational skills are crucial in enhancing competitiveness and contributing to social inclusion, decent employment, and 
poverty reduction has been a strong incentive for reform. Competencies can be acquired either through structured training in public 
or private TVET schools and centres, or through practical experience on the job in enterprises (work-place training in the formal 


81 



sector and informal apprenticeship), or both (the so-called “dual” training, involving a combination of work-place and institution based 
training). 

It is generally recognised that the development of relevant skills is an important instrument for improving productivity and working 
conditions, and the promotion of decent work in the economy, which represents the major employer in South Africa. Education and 
skills can open doors to economically and socially rewarding jobs and can help the development of small informal-sector businesses, 
allow the re-insertion of displaced workers and migrants, and support the transition from school to work for school drop-outs and 
graduates. Ultimately, developing job-related competencies among the poor, the youth and the vulnerable is recognised as crucial to 
progress in reducing poverty. The development of job-related skills is, therefore, not only part of the countries’ human resource 
strategies but also of their economic-growth and poverty-reduction strategies. 

The inclusion of a skills-development component and job creation opportunities is critically important towards breaking the cycle of 
poverty and reducing unemployment in Ekurhuleni. The programmes that embarked upon in the 2014/2015 financial year include: 

• Building the capacity of you through accredited programmes 

• Facilitation of EPWP programmes and community worker programmes 

• Creating jobs through marketing Ekurhuleni as a visitations destination of choice 


2014/2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

e 


Level of 
Plannin 


Responsible 

Department 


Planning 

Statement 

s 


Indicators 


re 

OJ 

> 


Q) 

U 

c 

ro JS 

1 

5 


tn ^ 

° i 
^ < 


f'-., 

aD 


o 

fM 


^ 2 
O < 
fM U- 


O o < 

° f'l ^ 


O 

fM CC 

2^ l2 

o > 

fM 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: AN INCLUSIVE AND RESPONSIVE SOCIAL PROTECTION SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA;4. SOCIAL EMPOWERMENT 


ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 4.2 Capabilities Development 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:4.2.1 Increase investment in economic and social skills 


Direct 

Outcom 

SRAC 

Increased 
capacitation 
of youth 
and adults 

Number of 
youth and 
adults 
receiving 
accredited 

400 

0 

150 

64 

64 

100 

150 

100 

100 

200 

250 

e 


across the 
developmen 
t continuum 

capacity 

building 

programme 

s 













Measuring numberof 
youth and adults 
receiving accredited 
capacity building 
programmes offered 
and implemented in 
respect of technical 
skills. Indicatornot 
cumulative due to the 
continuous nature of the 
training which is over a 
lengthy period ranging 
from 10 to 12 month 
period 


The 5 year target changed due 
to the amendment of the 
outcome and indicator 
statement. ABET Level 1-4. 
Coaching clinics Level and 
Accredited Sport 
Administration Course. 
Cinematography, Indigenous 
Music instruments and Art 
Development Bridging Course. 
Attendance registers, signed 
completion report by the 
project manager, Divisional 
Head and approved by HOD. 


82 



Level of 

Plannin 

g 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statement 

s 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

AcTUal 

Performance 

Prpv/inii^ Ypar 

2015 

Annual 

2014/2015 

ZUI57 

2016 

YEAR 2 

S 5 a 

5^2 

2017/ 

2018 

YEAR4 

2018/2019 

YEAR5 

Definition of Indicator 

Data Sources 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

e 

















Ready to Read capacity 
building for ECD teachers and 
Braille literacy. 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 4.2.2 Promote multiple livelihood approaches 

Direct 

Outcom 

e 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Increased 
number of 

Job 

opportuniti 
es created 

Number of 

EPWP & CW 
job 

opportuniti 

es 

facilitated 

and created 

150000 

6000 

2000 

0 

2500 

5000 

5000 

7500 

2500 

0 

3000 

0 

35000 

40000 

Ajob opportunity refers 
to any paid work created 
for an individual for any 
period of time. 

Official Report from NDPW and 
Work attendance registers, 
appointment letters and 
payment schedules per 
project. 

Direct 

Outcom 

e 

Economic 

Developme 

nt 

Increased 
visitation by 
tourists to 

Ekurhuleni 

% 

of business 

tourists 

visiting 

Ekurhuleni 

50% 

10% 

10 % 

2% 

2% 

2% 

4% 

10% 

10% 

10% 

10% 

As per recently 
developed Ekurhuleni 
Tourism Strategy, the 
indicator refers to 

visitors who come to 
Ekurhuleni for business 
travel, both domestic 
and international. 

Gauteng Tourism Agency Stats 
and South African Tourism 
Agency Stats 


83 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: PROTECT AND ENHANCE OUR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS 
AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

The NDP 2030 vision is that by 2030, South Africa’s transition to an environmentally sustainable, climate-change resilient, low- 
carbon economy and just society will be well under way. The NDP 2030 envisages a phased trajectory over the three successive 
MTSF periods. In order to realise the NDP 2030 Vision for Environmental Sustainability and Resilience there are a number of 
immediate constraints that must be addressed. South Africa faces the challenge of deteriorating environmental quality due to 
pollution and natural resource degradation, destruction and/or depletion. If the current challenges are not effectively addressed they 
will exacerbate the rate of environmental degradation and have the potential to undo or undermine many of the positive advances 
made in meeting South Africa’s own development goals and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as well as the 2030 vision. 

Looking to the future the demand for sustainable natural resource usage will be driven both by scarcities and by legislative and 
commercial compulsion to produce more value with fewer resources and materials. Obvious examples of this include the reduction of 
carbon emissions and the conservation of scarce water resources. Inasmuch as the protection of ecosystems and safeguarding of 
biodiversity will be important for the future, it will also be necessary to protect the poor from future price rises in key resources such 
as energy and water. Integrated and sustainable agriculture will need to work within a framework of water conservation and soil 
conservation and rehabilitation. 

[1] GDS SUB-PROGRAIVIME: CLIMATE CHANGE 

South Africa is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions and the country is also vulnerable to the impacts of climate 
change with adverse effects on inter alia socio-economic conditions, water, food security, health, natural resources and ecosystem 
services. In order to address increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, market-based instruments such as a carbon tax, carbon 
budgets and policy support for low-carbon technologies will be employed to ensure that greenhouse gas emissions peak, plateau 
and decline. There is also a need to enhance the resilience of people and the economy to adapt to the effects of climate change. 

If climate variability is to increase, it is necessary to understand how climate impacts on the different sectors and their resultant 
vulnerabilities. This will focus attention on where priority intervention might reduce the impacts of climate change, and help cities to 
adapt rather than react when the damage has already been done. It is, therefore, necessary to develop a framework for adaptation to 
climate change at the municipal level in order to prioritize the most urgent local adaptation activities and identify the required local 
human and financial resources. In the 2014/2015 financial year the City will invest in the development of climate change response 
plans across the metro. 


84 



Level of 

Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 Year 

Target 

Actual 

Performanc 

e Previous 

Year 

2014/ 

2014/2015 

2015/ 

2016/ 

2017/ 

2018/201 

9 

Definition of 

indicator 

Data Sources 

2015 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

2016 

2017 

2018 

Annual 

Target 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

YEAR2 

YEAR3 

YEAR4 

YEAR5 

NATIONAL OUTCOME: PROTECT AND ENHANCE OUR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

THEMATIC AREA: 3. ENVIRONMENTAL WELLBEING 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 3.1 Sustainable Natural Resources Use 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 3.1.2 Deployment of renewable energy regimes 

Direct Outcome 

ERM 

Decreased 
vulnerability 
in EMM to 

the effects 

of climate 
change 

Number of 

departments in 
EMM with a 
Climate Change 
response plan 
developed and 
implemented. 

30 

0 

6 

1 

1 

2 

2 

6 

6 

6 

6 

Department based 
Climate Change 

response plans 

aimed at decreasing 
EMM vulnerability 
including climate 

proofing initiatives 
to reduce risks 

associated with 

climate change. 

Departmental 
Climate Change 
Response plans 
Departmental 
Climate 

Proofing project 
Implementation 
plans 


1) GDS SUB-PROGRAMME: DEPLOYMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY REGIMES 

At present, the commercial exploitation of South Africa’s renewable energy sources is limited, but it is clear that the cost of renewable 
energy will continue to decline as the technologies mature. Increased use of renewables will require the introduction of new policies. 
The White Paper on Renewable Energy (2003) set a target of 4% of projected electricity demand for 2013 (DME 2003b). A strategy 
for implementing this target needs to be formulated, focussing on specific projects and their financing. The government has often 
stated its intention to improve the local content of renewable energy technologies used in South Africa. Hence a policy should be set 
up for progressively increasing local content in the local manufacture of renewable technologies. Such a policy should be 
accompanied by government-sponsored enabling conditions for local technology development. EMM in its bid to deploy renewable 
energy regimes will increase the accessing energy from renewable sources. 


85 



Level of 
Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 Year Target 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

2014/ 

201S 

Annu 

al 

Targe 

t 

2014/2015 

2015/ 

2016/ 

2017/ 

2018 

2018/2 

019 

Definition of Indicator 

Data Sources 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

2016 

2017 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

YEAR 

2 

YEAR 

3 

YEAR 

4 

YEAR5 

NATIONAL OUTCOME: PROTECT AND ENHANCE OUR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS AND NATURAL RESOURCES 

THEMATIC AREA: 3. ENVIRONMENTAL WELLBEING 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 3.1 Sustainable Natural Resources Use 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 3.1.2 Deployment of renewable energy regimes 

Direct Outcome 

Energy 

Increased generation of 
renewable energy, from 
alternative /renewable 

sources 

Number of 

Megawatts of 
energy 

generated from 
renewable 

sources 

7MW 

0 

500 

kW 

0 

0 

0 

500k 

W 

IMW 

IMW 

2MW 

2MW 

Electricity generated from 
renewable energy 

sources. A Power Meter 

shall be used to measure 
the power generated by 
the system. The energy 
generated by the system 
in kWh will be measured 
by an Energy meter. 

Data stored on 

meter. Or on 

metering on line. 
Monthly reports to 
be downloaded 

from meter or 

Metering on line. 

Direct Outcome 

Roads and Stormwater 

Increased provision of 
traffic signals with LED 
lights 

% of 

intersections 
with LED lights 
installed 

90% 

65% 

70% 




70% 

75% 

80% 

85% 

90% 

% number achieved. 

Numerator = number of 
intersections fully fitted 
with LED lights & 
Denominator = number 

of intersections that 
EMM is responsible for 

Payment Certificates 
and asset register 


86 



2) GDS SUB-PROGRAMME: Promoting the re-use of waste 


The GDS indicates the need to reduce the negative impact on the environment that is caused by waste throughout its life-span, from 
production to disposal, via recycling. This approach means that every item of waste is seen not only as a source of pollution to be 
reduced, but also as a potential resource to be exploited. The programmes that will be implemented during 2014/2015 will move 
towards limiting waste production. Certain techniques will be used to reduce the volume of waste are actually more polluting than 
others, even if using them means greater reductions in volume. The main focus of the strategy for preventing waste production is on 
reducing the environmental impact of waste and products that will become waste. In order to be effective, this impact must be 
reduced at every stage of a resource's life-span. 

The strategy aims to promote the recycling sector in order to reintroduce waste into the economic cycle in the form of quality 
products, while at the same time minimising the negative environmental impact of doing so. Recycling targets could in the long run 
be set at appropriate levels, taking accounttJ of the characteristics of each material and the range of options for recycling it. 



01 

t/i 



0) 

2014/ 

2014/2015 







M- 00 

o c 

^ 0) 
c ^ 

00 c 

.E 0) 

o 

5 Year 
Target 

Actual 

Performani 

Previous 

Year 

2015 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

2015/ 

2016/ 

2017/ 

2018/2 

Definition of 

Data 5ources 

> 1 

01 ro 

CL 

Q. ra 

t/i Q. 

0) 0) 
a: Q 

<T3 .Jli 

to 

c 

Annual 

Target 

5ept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

2016 

YEAR2 

2017 

YEAR3 

2018 

YEAR4 

019 

YEAR5 

Indicator 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 3.1.4 Promote re-use of waste 
















Any activity to 

prevent or reduce the 
volume and/or 



t/i 

0) 














environmental impact 



■> 














of waste that is 


Dlrect Outcome 

01 

LO 

c 

01 

£ 

01 

00 

<T3 

c 

ra 

Increased 

waste 

minimizatlon 

% of recyclable 
waste (reclaimed) 
or diverted from 

landfill 

10% 

10% as 

at Q2 
2013/1 

4 

3% 

0.75% 

0.75% 

0.75% 

0.75% 

3% 

7% 

9% 

10% 

generated, treated, 
stored or disposed of 
through mechanisms 
such as re-using, 
recycling and 

processing waste for 

Waste Reclamation 
reports from private 
sector and monthly 
waste disposal 

tonnages per landfill 


t/i 














re-use calculated as 

















follows: (Total Waste 
Reclaimed/Total 

Waste Disposed) x 
100 



87 


3) GDS SUB-PROGRAMME: Conserving existing Ecosystem and Biodiversity 


Ecosystems will also be sustained through an increase in the conservation estate, the protection of biomes and endangered species, 
restoration of degraded land and sustainable exploitation of natural resources. The desired impact is to restore the ecological 
integrity of water resources through improvement in water quality. There will be reduction of water losses in line with international 
best practice. 


Level of 
Planning 

Responsibl 

e 

Departme 

nt 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

2014/ 

2015 

Annua 

1 

Target 

2014/2015 

2015/ 

2016 

YEAR 

2 

2016/ 

2017 

YEAR 

3 

2017/ 

2018 

YEAR 

4 

2018/ 

2019 

YEAR 

5 

Definition of 

indicator 

Data Sources 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

5ept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:3.2.1 Conserving existing ecosystem and biodiversity 

Direct 

Outcome 

Real Estate 

Increased 
development of 
Conservation 

Areas 

Number of 

conservation areas 

developed 

5 

New 

1 

0 

0 

0 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 X Conservation area 

identified for 

development as per 
Capex budget 
Absolute annual 

target 

Completion Reports - 
Photos 


4) GDS SUB-PROGRAMME: Environmental Governance 


Managing the transition towards achievement of the vision will require strong institutional and governance mechanisms that create an 
enabling environment for stakeholders to contribute to the transition. The desired outcome includes the establishment of monitoring 
and evaluation mechanisms. Compliance mechanisms will also be improved to build a culture of compliance. 

South Africa faces the triple challenge of poverty, inequality and unemployment which are aggravated by the increasingly negative 
environmental footprint of developments. To minimise this, economic development polices and infrastructure investments will need to 
consider the impact on the environment. Hence the main programme to be implemented during 2014/2015 will be the enforcement 
of by-laws of carbon reduction. 


88 


M- 00 

o c 

§ 'i 




4-* 

Q) 

bA 

S " 

c 5 

2014/ 


2014/2015 


2015/ 

2016/ 

2017/ 

2018/ 



° ^ 

Planning 

Indicators 

ra 

1- 

re ro 

1 ^ § 

2015 

Annual 

Target 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

2016 

2017 

2018 

2019 

Definition of Indicator 

Data Sources 

oj ra 
— ' CL 

co Q. 

0) OJ 

QC Q 

Statements 


ra 

Q) 

> 

tn 

y o .2 
< > 

a. ^ 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

YEAR 

2 

YEAR 

3 

YEAR 

4 

YEAR 

5 




NATIONAL OUTCOME: PROTECT AND ENHANCE OUR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS AND NATURAL RESOURCES 


THEMATIC AREA: 3. ENVIRONMENTAL WELLBEING 
ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 3.3 Improved Environmental Governance 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 3.3.2 Develop, implement and enforce by-laws of carbon reduction 


Direct 

Outco 

me 

Environme 

ntal 

Resources 

Managem 

ent 

Increased 

compliance 

with 

environment 
al leglslation 

Number of EMM 

departments 

with an 

improved 

Environmental 

Compllance 

Index score 

(Internal) 

30 

0 

6 

1 

1 

2 

2 

6 

6 

6 

6 

Internal: A number of 
departments are audited 
against defined criteria 
The number of criteria 
that each department 
complies with is recorded 
to give a score per 
department. As a 

department complies 

with more criteria over 
time, the score of that 
department increases. 
The quarterly target 
indlcates the number of 
departments that are 
identified for an 

increased score. 

Audit Reports 
Index 

evaluation 

sheets 

Number of 

industries with 
an improved 

Environmental 
Compliance 
index score 

(External) 

30 

0 

6 

1 

1 

2 

2 

6 

6 

6 

6 

External: A number of 

llcensed industries are 
audited against defined 
criteria. The number of 

criteria that each 

industry complies with is 
recorded to give a score 
per industry. As an 

industry complies with 
more criteria over time, 
the score of that industry 
increases. The quarterly 
target indicates the 
number of industries that 

are identified for an 
increased score. 

Inspection 

Reports 

Index 

evaluation 

sheets 


89 



Level of 
Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

2014/ 

2015 

Annual 

Target 

2014/2015 

2015/ 

2016/ 

2017/ 

2018 

2018/ 

2019 

Definition of Indicator 

Data Sources 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

2016 

2017 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

YEAR 

2 

YEAR 

3 

YEAR 

4 

YEAR 

5 

Direct 

Outco 

me 

Waste 

Managem 

ent 

Services 

Increased 
operational 
compliance 
of landfill 

sites 

Number of 

landfill sites 

compliant with 
permit 
conditions 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

Landfill site means any 
site or premise used for 
the accumulation of 
waste with the purpose 
of disposing in sanitary 
manner. This facilities are 
operated in line with the 
permit or licence 

conditions granted by the 
Provincial and National 
Environmental Authority, 
therefore increased 

compliance with permit 
conditions refers to 

adherence to the 

stipulated the level of 
compliance per site. 

List of landfill 

sites with 

addresses, 
Independent 
quarterly 
reports as well 
as Provincial 

Landfill Audit 
Reports per site 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: AN INCLUSIVE AND RESPONSIVE SOCIAL PROTECTION 
SYSTEM 

Social determinants of health are defined as the economic and social conditions that influence the health of people and communities, and 
include employment, education, housing, water and sanitation, and the environment. South Africa’s 2010 MDG Country Report to the United 
Nations indicated that the country made progress towards the goals of eradicating extreme poverty achieving universal primary education, 
through social protection and provision of free basic services to the indigent. However, inequality has increased, as reflected by the huge Gini 
coefficient. Persistent reports of poor quality education and poor health care services, especially in rural areas and socio-economic 
communities also exist. 


[1] GDS PROGRAMME: SOCIAL CARE SUPPLYCHAINS MANAGEMENT 

The GDS states that the current policy response to poverty is that of “one size fits aH’’ social grants from national government, and 
indigent support and free basic services from local government, at least in formal areas. This creates a culture and reality of 
dependency and lack of ambition and entrepreneurship. Poor communities are disconnected and disassociated from value chains in 


90 


food production and community services that could easily provide for security, productivity and income generation. The education 
and development ladder is fragmented between a wide range of authorities from ECD to basic education to secondary, tertiary and 
vocational skills development, which is failing to provide an effective or needs based solution to Ekurhuleni’s developmental 
challenge. Supply-driven initiatives such as the Extended Public Works Programme, Community Works Programme and antiretroviral 
(ARV) roll-out programmes are indisputably valuable and important but fail to address the root causes of systemic social problems. 
The current trajectory of “one size fits aH’’ interventions where citizens are beneficiaries and not participants in the social development 
process is likely to widen rather than narrow the painful gaps which currently exist in Ekurhuleni society. As these approaches fail to 
recognise the inherent capability of individuals, families and communities to manage their own up-liftment and capacitate themselves 
in the process, the current interventions have very limited coverage and very limited impact. 

Going forward the City there will be support to multiple livelihood strategies and the upgrading of human capability in the broadest 
sense. Looking to the future it will also be essential to intensify and focus EMM’s role in early childhood development and youth 
development in general. The young people of Ekurhuleni are the future and there can be no prospect of a competitive future unless 
concerted effort is made to bridge the gaps which previous approaches have created. This will require cooperation and alignment of 
goals and resources between different departments within EMM as well as between EMM, provincial and national spheres of 
government. The question of food security also has multiple implications and impacts, given the inevitability of future scarcities of 
food, water and soil at a global, national and local level. Accessible nutritional and affordable sources of food supply in the future will 
be ever more important. This GDS report proposes the following programmes going forward: 

• Social care supply chains management; 

• Capabilities development; 

• Responsive and active citizenry. 

1) GDS SUB-PROGRAMME: INTEGRATE SOGIAL GARE POLIGYAND PAMILY DEVELOPMENT 

South Africa has some of the most progressive ECD policies but there are no effective frameworks in place to promote 
ECD. Although there may be some rapid growth in ECD provision, the type of ECD service is often of poor quality with no 
professional benchmarks, few training opportunities and lack of recognition for ECD professionals. The poorest and most vulnerable 
groups are still receiving poor quality service. An added challenge is the lack of capacity which is critically disadvantaging the 
delivery of high quality ECD programmes. The majority of the practitioners, have limited or no previous exposure to preschool 
education. It is envisaged that the long term impact of the training is lasting and sustainable as it directly builds and develops human 
capital and resources. To achieve the long term impact, it is imperative that integrated approach to ECD service is adopted and is 
inclusive of all stakeholders from the government, non-governmental and private sectors 


91 



Level of 
Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

2015 

Annual 

2014/2015 

n rv 

H 2 

2016/ 

2017 

YEAR3 

2017/ 

2018 

YEAR4 

2018/2019 

YEAR5 

Definition of Indicator 

Data Sources 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

5 fM u 

NATIONAL OUTCOME: AN INCLUSIVE AND RESPONSIVE SOCIAL PROTECTION SYSTEM 

THEMATIC AREA;4. SOCIAL EMPOWERMENT 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 4.1 Social care supply chains management 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:4.1.1 Integrate social care policy and family development 

Direct 

Outcome 

HSD 

Increased 
capacity in Early 
Childhood 
Development 
service delivery. 

Number of ECD 
practitioners 
trained in 
accredited ECD 
training 
programme 

980 

310 

150 

150 

(April 

2013 

cohort) 

0 

0 

0 

100 

120 

140 

160 

ECD practitioners 
graduating from an ECD 
training programme 
conducted by relevant 
accredited external service 
provider. 

Copies of certificates 
issued by relevant 
accredited training 
provider. Attendance 
registers and Training 
reports 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 4.2.4 Integrated family and early childhood development | 

Direct Outcome 

SRAC 

Increased 
participation of 
children aged 3- 
6 in accredited 
early childhood 
development 
programmes. 

Number of 

accredited ECD 

programmes 

implemented. 

24 

7 

8 

6 

7 

8 

8 

9 

9 

9 

9 

Measuring number of ECD 
programmes supporting 
physical and cognitive 
development of children 
aged 3-6: Indigenous 
music instrument 
program, art development 
program, Art as Healing, 
museum exhibition and 
educational tours, spelling 
bee, toy library, kiddies 
Olympics as well as learn 
to swim program. 

Children aged 3-6 
participating in 
accredited early 
childhood development 
programmes. 

Attendance registers, 
photos and completion 
report generated by 
project managers 
approved by HOD. 


2) INCREASE SUPPORT TO PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Academics are an important part of each student's school years, especially since high school grades play an integral role in college 
acceptance. Parents spend a lot of time encouraging their teens to study more - and play less -- in the pursuit of this goal. However, 
there are other components of a well-rounded education - outside the regular academic program - that may positively impact 
students' success. Activities, such as basketball, baseball, tennis, debating, chess clubs, student government, yearbook, drama, 
choir and computer clubs can round out students' academic careers to great effect. Besides being fun and a great way to socialize 
with peers, extracurricular activities can enhance students' time management and stress management skills, improving overall 
productivity. 


92 



The GDS promotes the implementation of sports, arts, recreation and culture programmes in primary and secondary schools. This IDP will 
implement SRAC programmes (Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture) as well as the implementation of awareness programmes that helps children 
to become fully involved with their environment. 


Level of 
Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statemen 

ts 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

2015 

Annual 

2014/2015 

in oc 

S o < 

2016/ 

2017 

YEAR3 

2017/ 

2018 

YEAR4 

2018/2019 

YEAR5 

Definition of Indicator 

Data Sources 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

5ept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

N ^ 

NATIONAL OUTCOME: AN INCLUSIVE AND RESPONSIVE SOCIAL PROTECTION SYSTEM 

THEMATIC AREA:4. SOCIAL EMPOWERMENT 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 4.2 Capabilities Development 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:4.2.3 Increase support to primary and secondary education 

Direct Outcome 

SRAC 

Increased 
participati 
on of 
learners in 

SRAC 

School 

programm 

es 

Number of 

SRAC school 

programs 

implemente 

d 

5 

4 

5 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

6 

7 

7 

Measuring the number of children 
focused programmes done in 
collaboration with the department of 
education. The programmes include sport 
and recreation, libraries and information 
services as well as arts and culture. The 
programmes include teaching children 
basic music instruments through 

Elementary Classic Music programmes. 
Strongest Link reading promotion, 

Debates (Chris Hani and OR Tambo 
months) 3. Football and Netball as well as 
the 7 other priority sporting as 
determined by the province. 

SLA with the 
department of 
Education. 

Attendance 
registers and 
Completion report 
approved by the 
HOD, 

Photographic 
evidence School 

fixtures and 

events 

programmes. 

ERM 

Increased 

environme 

ntal 

awareness 

In 

communit 
yof EMM 

Number of 

beneficiarie 

s with 
improved 

awareness 

levels after 
participatin 
g in a 
campaign. 

1100 

00 

0 

10000 

2500 

2500 

2500 

2500 

2500 

0 

25000 

25000 

2500 

0 

A number of awareness campaigns will be 
conducted and before and after 
awareness level surveys will be 
completed by all attendees. An improved 
score on the post campaign survey is 
indicative of a raised awareness level. The 
number of surveys with and improved 
score (raised awareness levels of 
beneficiaries) will be added up and 
compared with targets set. 

Before and after 

awareness surveys 

Minutes 

Attendance 

registers 


93 



NATIONAL OUTCOME: A LONG AND HEALTHY LIFE FOR ALL SOUTH AFRICANS 


The national Development Plan (NDP) 2030 envisions a health system that works for everyone and produces positive health 
outcomes and is accessible to all. To realise the vision of the NDP 2030, the country has introduced the national health Insurance 
(NHI) in order to redress the structural differences in access to health care amongst and ensure universal health coverage. The 
Primary Health care (PHC) service delivery services as a platform that provides an important foundation for the implementation of the 
NHI. The NDP 2030 further recognizes the health challenges faced by the country ad identifies quadruple burden of disease which 
are HIV and AIDS and related diseases such as tuberculosis (TB), and sexually transmitted infections (STIs); maternal and child 
morbidity and mortality; Non-communicable diseases (mainly related to life-style) and violence, injuries and trauma. Of these health 
challenges, HIV and AIDS has been a leading cause of death and contribute significantly to high maternal and child mortality rates. 

To address this burden of disease, government committed itself to ensuring “A long and health llfe for all South Afrlcans” thereby 
focusing on increasing life expectancy, improving maternal and child health, combating HIV and AIDS and TB, and strengthening 
health system effectiveness. 

1) GDS SUB-PROGRAMME: IMPLEMENT LIEE GYGLE MANAGEMENT 

Key NDP 2030 proposals for preventing and reducing diseases and promote health include: preventing and controlling epidemic burdens 
through preventing and treating HIV/AIDS, deterring new epidemics and alcohol abuse; improving the allocation of resources and the 
availability of health personnel in the public sector; improving health systems management by improving the calibre of care, operational 
efficiency, health worker morale and leadership and innovation. Strategic Objective (SO) 3 of the NSP 2012-2016 outlines pertinent 
interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality from AIDS related causes and Tuberculosis. SO 3 focuses on sustaining health and wellness, 
and achieving a significant reduction in deaths and disability as a result of HIV and TB infection through universal access to accessible, 
affordable and good quality diagnosis, treatment and care. The programmes implemented in the 2014/2015 financial year include strategic 
focus on combating HIV and AIDS and TB. 


94 



ra 

2014/ 

2014/2015 

Q) 

> 

(/) 

2015 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

O 

Annua 





Q) 

1 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


Target 






2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

/ 

/ 

/ 

/201 

2016 

2017 

2018 

9 

YEAR 

YEAR 

YEAR 

YEAR 

2 

3 

4 

5 


Planning 

Statement 

s 


Indicators 


ra 

OJ 

> 


Q) 

U 

_ c 

ro JS 

II 


Definition of Indicator 


Data 

Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: LONG AND HEALTHY LIFE FOR ALL 


THEMATIC AREA:4. SOCIAL EMPOWERMENT 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 4.1 Social care supply chains management 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 4.1.2 Implement life cycle management 


Direct Outcome 

Health and Social Development 

Reduced 

vertical 

transmissio 

n of HIV 

from 

Motherto 

Child 

Percentage 
of babies 

tested HIV- 
positive 
(PCR) at six 
(6) weeks 

<2% 

2.20% 

<2.15% 

<2.15% 

<2.15 

% 

<2.15 

% 

<2.15 

% 

<2.12 

% 

<2.11 

% 

<2.10 

% 

<2.00 

% 

Numerator: Total number 
of babies tested PCR HIV- 
positive at six (6) weeks 
after birth during the 
reporting period 
Denominator: Total 

numberof babies born to 
HlV-positive mothers PCR 
tested for HIV at 6 weeks 
after birth during the 
reporting period 

District 

Health 

Information 
System - 
statistical 
data reports 

Improved 

Tuberculosi 

s Treatment 

Outcomes 

Percentage 
of New 

Smear 

Positive (+) 
Tuberculosi 

s Patients 

Cured 

>85% 

National 

target 

>85% 

National 

target 

>85% 

>85% 

>85% 

>85% 

>85% 

>85% 

>85% 

>85% 

>85% 

Numerator: Total Number 
of New Sputum Smear 
Positive Pulmonary 
Tuberculosis patients 
started treatment in a 
given period that was 
cured. 

Denominator: Total 

Number of New Sputum 
Smear Positive Pulmonary 
Tuberculosis patients 
started on treatment in 
the stated reporting 
period. 

District 

Health 
Information 
System - 
statistical 
data reports 

Increased 

access to 

Antiretrovir 
al Therapy 
initiations 

Number of 
eligible 
patients 
initiated on 

Antiretrovir 
al Therapy 

155 000 

36 785 

33 000 

8 300 

8 300 

8 100 

8 300 

32 000 

31 000 

30 

000 

29 000 

Number of eligible HIV- 
positive patients initiated 
on Antiretroviral Therapy 
during the reporting 
period 



95 



RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL 
LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


The consolidated legal framework for local government consists of chapter 7 of the Constitution, the Municipal Finance Management 
Act, together with the Municipal Structures Act, Municipal Systems Act, Municipal Property Rates Act, various sector and other 
legislation applicable to local government. The South African intergovernmental fiscal relations system is based on section 41(1) of 
the Constitution, the Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations Act and Division of Revenue Act. Underlying policy development in the arena 
of municipal finances is the issue of providing acceptable levels of municipal services to poor households at affordable rates which in 
turn, requires some redistribution. That source of redistribution can be local, through cross-subsidisation within the municipality or 
from grants financed from national taxes, or a combination of the two. The conventional view internationally is that redistribution is 
best effected from the national level. In this regard, an increasing reliance of municipalities on transfers (equitable share and others) 
from national government to fund their activities is evident. This partially reflects the national priority accorded to combating poverty 
through providing universal access to basic services 


[1] GDS PROGRAMME: RESPONSIVE AND ACTIVE CITIZENRY 

The National Development Plan (NDP) views active citizenship as one of three ‘cogs’ that need to work effectively to keep the wheels 
of development going in a desirable direction. The concept of “active citizenship”, in particular as applied to the sphere of community 
development, has gained much currency in community discourse and practice ... The National Development Plan (2012) highlights 
the need to improve state-citizen relations at the point of service delivery and positions this in terms of routine accountability, arguing 
for the delegation of authority to frontline managers to enable this. “Delegation presents an opportunity to strengthen mechanisms of 
routine accountability, enabling the state to be more responsive to public concerns. Service delivery protests stem from citizens’ 
frustration that the state is not responsive to their grievances. This is unfortunate, as citizens are often best placed to advise on the 
standard of public services in their communities and to suggest possible interventions.” (2012:427) 

This is perhaps not surprising. Enveloped in wholesomely positive values such as cooperation, cohesion, caring and neighbourliness, 
and evoking heart-warming ideals of belonging and solidarity, the idea appears all at once virtuous, worthy and highly seductive. 
However, what actions constitute active citizenship? Is it about community members taking initiative, raising popular support and 
challenging government? Does it matter how active citizenship takes place, and if so, how? Is it always helpful in addressing the 
needs of the majority of residents in an area? The South African government has attempted, through for example the Municipal 
Systems Act (No. 32 of 2000), to legislate opportunities for active citizenship to play a role in defining development at a local level. 
The Municipal Systems Act (2000) (Section 16(1) obliges municipalities to “develop a culture of municipal governance that 
complements formal representative governance with a system of participatory governance and must for this purpose a) encourage, 
and create conditions for, the local community to participate in the affairs of the municipality, including in (ii) the performance 


96 



management system”. Thus, there seems to be greater potential for local residents to have control over development processes that 
affect them. 

The experiences of citizens - the intended beneficiaries of government services - are a critical component in measuring the 
performance of government and for the delivery of appropriate and quality services. Currently the emphasis of government’s 
monitoring is on internal government processes and the voice of the citizen is largely absent. This presents a risk, as the picture is 
not complete. It is therefore necessary to support the uptake of systematic ways to bring the experiences of citizens into the 
monitoring of services. This will provide a measure of the gap between the perceived and the actual experiences of service delivery, 
for both user and provider. Citizens cannot be passive recipients if government is to deliver services that address real needs. The 
process of citizens working jointly with government to produce information on service delivery fosters active citizenry and contributes 
to building a capable and developmental state. 

The programme described in the GDS seeks to embrace ordinary people within the rubric of civic life and governance. Communities 
are taking responsibility for their destiny and delivering services which no government could effectively provide. The GDS has looked 
at the response to active citizenry through a number of programmes 

1) INTEGRATE SERVICE DELIVERYAND CITIZEN RESPONSIBILITY 


The supply of basic social services, or lack thereof, directly impacts on the quality of life for all. To this end the Constitution of the 
Republic of South Africa, various policy instruments and strategy documents emphasise the provision of such services to all citizens 
of the country. The responsibility and accountability for the provisioning of social services is divided among the national, provincial 
and local authorities. Public engagement in the planning and prioritising of these services is crucial and a prerequisite for efficient 
and effective functioning of government. According to Shah (2006) government should be citizen-centred in its planning and in the 
implementation of policies and programmes. The Municipal Systems Act, the Batho Pele (People First) principle, and the Turn- 
around Strategy of 2009 compel municipalities to engage communities in their planning. This is reflected in, for example, the 
Integrated Development Plans (IDPs), Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plans (SDBIPs) and other matters that impact on 
the service recipients or users. Do all municipalities adhere to and apply these in their planning and budgeting for services? 

This IDP focuses on integrating service delivers and citizen responsibility through action in terms of: 

• EMM providing access to disaster and emergency services 

• Through providing basic services e.g. removal of waste 

• Ensuring the communities are rodent free 


97 



Level of 
Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning Statements 

Indicators 

5 Year Target 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

a 1 
s ^ 

2014/2015 

ec 
m < 
^ >■ 

2016/ 

2017YEAR 3 

ec 

s 1 

o 

fS 

2018/2019 

YEAR 5 

Definition of indicator 

Data Sources 

3 1 

o C 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

° s 

o 

^ < 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 

THEMATICAREA:5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 4.3 Responsive and Active Citizenry 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:4.3.1 Integrate service delivery and citizen responsibility 

Direct Outcome 

DEMS 

Increased 
implementation of 
Ambulance Service 

Norms and Standards. 

Number of Operational 
Ambulances on 24/7 

60 

50 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

The number of Ambulances that 
are scheduled to operate 
throughout each shift, 365 days 
of theyear. 

The daily operational 
vehicles status 
report 

% Reduction in number 
of Emergency Medical 
calls where not 

serviced. 

5% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

1% 

The indicator seeks to reduce the 
number of emergency medical 
calls where ambulances did not 
respond and reach the incident, 
treat and/or transported the 
patient/s. 

Patient Report 

Forms. 

Increased efficiency of 
response to Fire 

Incidents. 

% compliance with the 
prescribed South 

African National 

Standard 10090 (speed 
of response) 

82 

% 

82% 

82% 

82% 

82% 

82% 

82% 

82% 

82% 

82% 

82% 

% compliance with the prescribed 
South African National Standard 
10090 (speed of response) 

Fire incident report 
forms 

Reduced fire incidents 

in informal settlements 
against baseline 

Number of Fire 
incidents reported in 
informal settlements 

213 

52 

43 

0 

0 

0 

45 

42 

42 

42 

42 

The number of fires reported in 
informal settlements for the year 
in review should be 45 less than 
that of the preceding year. 

Number of Fire 

Incident Reports 
submitted on 

informal settlement 
fires 

Waste Management Services 

Increased provision of 
waste management 
services in line with the 

National and Provincial 
Waste management 
norms and standards 

Number of households 
with weekly kerb-side 
waste removal services 
in formal areas 

959 

190 

9591 

90 

959, 

190 

959, 

190 

959, 

190 

959, 

190 

959, 

190 

959, 

190 

959, 

190 

959, 

190 

959, 

190 

Formal households refers to a 
developed residential property 
where individual erven were 
approved in terms of Town 
planning legislation with weekly 
kerbside waste collection. Kerb 
side waste collection refers to 
municipal refuse collection from a 
2406 bin or plastic bags on a 
designated day of the week. 

Departmental Waste 
collection trip sheets 

Number of additional 
households (RDP) with 
access to refuse 

removal 

55 

575 

5557 

5 

55 

575 

55 

575 

55 

575 

55 

575 

55 

575 

55 

575 

55 

575 

55 

575 

55 

575 

Low cost housing built in line with 
the Reconstruction and 
Development Policy, 1994 with 
weekly kerb side waste collection 
viewed mostly as indigent 
households for equitable share 

Department Waste 
collection trip sheets 


98 




Level of 
Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning Statements 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

a 1 

o m 

2014/2015 

ec 
in 2 

2016/ 

2017YEAR 3 

Q£ 

s S 

o 

fM 

2018/2019 

YEAR5 

Definitlon of Indicator 

Data Sources 

rH 3 

o c 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

s s 

o 

^ < 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 

THEMATICAREA:5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 4.3 Responsive and Active Citizenry 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:4.3.1 Integrate service delivery and citizen responsibility 
















allocation by National Treasury. 


Direc 

t 

Outc 

ome 

Waste 

Manag 

ement 

Service 

s 

Increased provision of 
waste management 
services to informal 

settlements 

Number of informal 
settlements with 

access to refuse 

removal 

119 

119 

119 

119 

119 

119 

119 

119 

119 

119 

119 

An area where no sub division of 
individual erven has taken place 
in terms of Town planning 
legislation with weekly waste 
collection from a communal area 
or comprehensive waste 
collection through the plastic 
waste collection system. 

List of Informal 

Settlements 
indictating the type 
of service delivered 

in the area. 

Direc 

t 

Outc 

ome 

HSD 

Increased rate of 

rodent infestation-free 
settlements 

Percentage of 
inspected premises 
with no signs of rodent 
infestation after 

intervention. 

98 

% 

96% 

96.5 

0% 

96.5 

0% 

96.5 

0% 

96.5 

0% 

96.5 

0% 

97% 

97.50 

% 

98% 

98% 

Numerator: Total number of 
inspected premises without the 
presence of active signs of 
rodents after intervention during 
the reporting period. 

Denominator: Total number of 
premises inspected for rodent 
infestation after intervention 
during the reporting period 

Inspection reports 
and Regional 
Environmental 

Health Information 
System Database 

Direc 

t 

Outc 

ome 

HSD 

Increased registration 
of new indigents. 

Number of new 
indigent households 
registered 

85 

000 


15 

000 

3 750 

3 750 

3 750 

3 750 

16 

000 

17 

000 

18 

000 

19 

000 

Number of newly registered 
indigent households during the 
reporting period 

Indigent Register 

Direc 

t 

Outc 

ome 

CRM 

Uniform Customer 

Service throughout the 
City 

Numberof contact 
points using eMIS 

25 

15 

25 

2 

2 

3 

3 

25 

25 

25 

25 

Count of physical contact points 
that log in all customer queries, 
enquiries and requests into the 
Customer Relations Management 
System (currently the eMIS is the 
approved system) 

The eMIS report will 
serve as evidence for 
this indicator. 


99 



2) MODERNIZEAND CAPACITATE LOCAL GOVERNMENT 


Municipal capacity to deliver is severely constrained by high vacancy rates and a lack of suitably qualified individuals at all levels. 
The objective is to ensure municipalities have the right skills, important technical and management positions are filled and the 
country has a coherent human resource development strategy for local government. To achieve this, it is important that there is a 
long term strategy to develop the skills required by municipalities including appropriate mechanisms for recruiting young people and 
ensuring the organizational ethos is conducive for them to grow and develop their skills on the job. 

The MFMA marked the start of a major reform process in local government and various mechanisms and tools are created to monitor 
results and outcomes of this legislation. The MFMA contains provisions that require a number of frameworks, guides and training 
material to be developed, to enable and empower municipal officials to comply with the Act in its totality. The key objective of the 
Municipal Finance Management Act (2003) (MFMA) is to ‘modernise’ and capacitate local government, especially with regards to 
financial management. The reforms introduced by the MFMA are the cornerstone of the broader reform package for local 
government and it has four interrelated components: planning and budgeting; revenue and expenditure management; reporting; and 
oversight. 

The current programme of local government renewal aims to significantly improve management and decision making structures and 
financial and human resource management. It aims to develop the role of local government in community leadership. Essentially, the 
same objective drives the reform process at central and local levels - to put in place a first class service, efficient and responsive to 
its customer base. 

To give effect to this, the GDS programmes implemented through the IDP for 2014/2015 includes programmes such as more 
rigorous planning and organisational performance reporting; recruiting appropriate capacity and putting in place mechanisms to 
manage the capacity; strengthening governance structures and systems to ensure efficient and effective service delivery. 


1 « 

2014/2015 

in c 2 

C (tl 
< •- 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


E 

OJ ra 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


ra ™ ^ 

3 E S 
a o .2 
^ *t > 

Q- Q. 


- 

JO 5 02 

Q O < 

S N m 


_ ^ 

^ rH 5 
O < 


in 

00 2 QS 

O O < 

° ''i S! 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 


ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 5.1 Building a Capable Local City State 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:5.1.2 Modernize and capacitate the institution 


100 



JLevel of 
Planning 

Responsibl 

e 

Departme 

nt 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual 

Performance 

Previous Year 

3 3 

t c 

3 < 

^ 2014/2015 

l 

^ ft 

2016/ 

2017 

YEAR3 

^ ^ 

3 o < 

3 fM ^ 

2018/ 

2019 

YEAR5 

Definition of Indicator 

Data Sources 

! Qi 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

3 o <1 
3 iN i; 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 

THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 5.1 Building a Capable Local City State 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:5.1.2 Modernize and capacitate the institution 

UlttJLL UULLUriie 

Strategy and corporate Planning 

Increased 
implementation of 
an integrated and 
coordinated 
approach to 
planning and 
performance 
monitoring in order 
to achieve the 
prioritised GDS 
interventions 

Numberof GDS 
programmes linked to 
the SDBIP evaluated 

22 

New 

4 


2 

1 

1 

4 

4 

4 

4 

Programmes and sub programmes as per 
the approved GDS and detailed in the 
SDBIPfor 2014/2015 

Programme 

evaluation 

reports 

Improved business 
intelligence to 
inform service 
delivery decision 
making 

Metro-wide service 
delivery satisfaction rate 


65% 

65% 




65% 

67% 




Survey to asses customer perceptions on 
EMM service delivery 

Service Delivery 
satisfaction 
survey report 

Strategy and 
Corporate Planning 

Improved audit status 
for non-financial 
performance 

AG opinion 

Clean Audit 

New Indicator 

Unqualified Audit 
Opinion 



Unqualified Audit 

Opinion 

Unqualified Audit 

Opinion 

Unqualified Audit 

Opinion 

Unqualified Audit 

Opinion 

Unqualified Audit 

Opinion 

Section 14 (1) of the Municipal Planning 
and Performance Management 

Regulations 2001 (Regulation 796) 
stipulates that (a) a Municipality must 
develop and implement mechanisms, 
systems and processes for auditing the 
results of performance measurements as 
part of its internal and external auditing 
processes. 

AG report 

Fleet 

Increased efficient 
utilisation of the 

vehicle fleet 

Number of Vehicles 
utilised, tracked and 
reported on 

4100 

2850 

280 

70 

70 

70 

70 

280 

280 

280 

280 

Numerator is 3500 vehicles targeted for 
location and recovery, kilometre usage 
per month, driver identification, driver 
behaviours (speeding, harsh braking and 
acceleration), fines routing. 

Fleet Reports 

Increased 
monitoring of fuel 
consumption to 
reduce fuel 
operating costs 

Number ofVehicles 
monitored through the 
Fuel management 
system 

3200 

0 

244 

61 

61 

61 

61 

900 

900 

900 

900 

Number of vehicles (3500) fitted with 
Electronic fuel management system to 
monitor daily fuel consumption per 
vehicle and provide a secondary source 
of kilometre travelled to calculate the 
cost per kilometre (cpk) for all vehicles 
fitted with the technology. 

Fleet Reports 


101 



E 

OJ fg 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


fo 2 

5 i „ 

y o .9 


= 2 ^ 


2014/2015 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


o < 

N m 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 5.1 Building a Capable Local City State 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:5.1.2 Modernize and capacitate the institution 


Risk 

Improved level of 
corporate 
governance and 
compliance through 
efficient and 
effective standards, 
practices and 
systems. 

Number of 
departmental risk 
profiles completed and 
business continuity 
plans developed 

27 

20 

27 

7 

7 

7 

6 

27 

27 

27 

27 

1. The number of risk profiles developed. 

2. This is an absolute number and not 

cumulative 

3. The number of OHS audits that will be 

carried out. 

4. The number of departments that will 
require business continuity plans. (A firm 
number will be confirmed by a Business 
Impact Analysis which will be completed 
in Q4of 2013/14 

5. This is an absolute number and not 

cumulative 

6. The target remains static in the outer 
years as the same business continuity 
plans will be maintained 

1. Approved 
departmental risk 
profile reports 

2. Approved OHS 
Audit reports 

3. Approved 
business 
continuity plans 

Risk 


Institutional Level of 

EMM compliance 
maturity 

4 

N/A 

N/A 

2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

4 

4 

Organizations now view compliance 
within the context of the overall risk 
profile. Compliance with industry 
regulations and standards, achieve best 
practices and meet internal audit 
requirements. 

1. Maturity 
assessment 
report for EMM 

2. Maturity 
assessment 
report for Entities 

HRDM 

Reduced vacancies 

in line with the 
identified critical 
posts on the new 
organisational 
structure 

Percentage ofcritical 
prioritised posts filled 

100 

% 

0 

40% 





60% 

80% 

90% 

100 

% 

Positions that are filled that will assist 
departments in meeting the mandate of 
EMM 

Numerator - number of positions filled 
Denominator - number of critical 
prioritised posts signed off by CM 

Signed schedule 
by City Manager 
of critical posts 

Signed letters 

HRMD 

Increased 

institutionalisation 
of the Performance 
Management 

System 

Percentage of executive 
managers performance 
management 

100 

% 

0 

100% 



100 

% 


100 

% 

100% 

100 

% 

100 

% 

Denominator - total number of executive 
managers with, signed performance 
agreements 

Numerator - number of executive 
managers with completed bi-annual 
assessment. 

Performance 
Management 
System. Evidence 
- Performance 
Reports 


102 



E 

OJ fg 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


fo 2 

5 i „ 

y o .9 


= 2 ^ 


2014/2015 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


o < 

N m 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 
ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 5.1 Building a Capable Local City State 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:5.1.2 Modernize and capacitate the institution 


Direct Outcome 

Legislature 

A functional 
Legislature 

Percentage effectiveness 
of Council decision 
making processes 

100 

% 

100 

% 

100% 

100% 

100 

% 

100 

% 

100% 

100 

% 

100% 

100 

% 

100 

% 

The target relates to the seamless flow of 
matters referred to Council by the 
Programming Committee. This to be 
achieved by measuring the percentage of 
decisions taken by Council against the 
number of matters referred and/or 
before it. The target is absolute through- 
out the quarters and outer years. 

Programming 
Committee and 

Council Minutes 

Number of functional 

Section 79 Committees 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

The indicator is based on the total 

number of Section 79 Committees of 
Council. The target is absolute 
throughout the Quarters and outer years. 
Functionality in this case means that all 
the eighteen committees convene as per 
the Council-approved Calendar, 
deliberate on matters referred to them 
and report to Council. 

Minutes of 

committee 
meetings Council- 
approved 
calendar 

Number of functional 

ward committees 

101 

101 

101 

101 

101 

101 

101 

101 

101 

101 

101 

The target is absolute over the quarters 
and outer years and is based on the 
number of ward committees in EMM 
that are functioning optimally. 

Functionality in this instance means that 
all Ward Committees meet as scheduled, 
deliberate and report to Council on 
relevant community issues in their 
respective areas. 

Ward Committee 
reports prepared 
for Council on 
community issues 
considered. 

EMPD 

Improved 
competency of 
police officers 
(academy) 

Number of police 
officers successfully 
completing 
advanced/specialized 
training programs 

1000 

397 

200 

- 

- 

- 

200 

200 

200 

200 


Advanced or specialised training 
members of the EMPD acquiring detailed 
and specific knowledge or training. 

Copies of 
attendance 
registers and 

D/CoP 

Declaration 

DirectOut 

come 

Corporate 
and Legal 
Services 

Reduced legal 
threats against 

EMM 

% functionality of the 
Office of the Municipal 
Ombudsman 

100 

% 

New 

KPI 

60% 

15% 

30% 

45 

% 

60% 

70% 

75% 

85% 

100 

% 

Receiving (40%); recording (15%); 
investigating (20%) and reporting (25%) 
on complaints lodged with the Office of 
the Ombudsman 

Approved: 


103 



E 

OJ fg 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


fo 2 

5 i „ 

y o .9 


= 2 ^ 


2014/2015 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


o < 

N m 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 
ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 5.1 Building a Capable Local City State 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:5.1.2 Modernize and capacitate the institution 




Resolved resident 
Complaints/dispute 

s 

% disputes/ complaints 
resolved 

100 

% 

New 

KPI 

100% 

20% 

50% 

70 

% 

100% 

100 

% 

100% 

100 

% 

100 

% 

• Education and compliance in respect of 
by-laws and, revenue generation 
through: 

• Enforcement of by-laws (40%); 

• Service of infringement notices (20%), 
and 

• Prosecutions pertaining to By-laws to 
judgment & execution (40%) 

Registers on: 

• Contraventions 

• Attachment 

notices issued 

(Forfeiture) 

• Report on (10: 

4 X Magisterial 

Districts & 6 X 

Branch Courts) 

Improved 

regulatory 

compliance 

% of by-law 
contravention cases 

finalised 

100 

% 

New 

KPI 

100% 

20% 

50% 

70 

% 

100% 

100 

% 

100% 

100 

% 

100 

% 

Finalisation of the cases of bi-law 

contravention refers to cases resolved 
through issuing of court orders with 
instructions to the transgressor 

Dated and signed 
Court register 

T3 

Z5 

03 

"ra 

c 

0) 

c 

Enhanced internal 
audit processes and 
systems 

% of planned internal 
audit reviews completed 

95% 

90% 

90% 

90% 

90% 

90 

% 

90% 

90% 

90% 

95% 

95% 

Numerator: Number of completed 

Internal Audit reports. 

Denominator: Number of planned audit 
reviews according to the approved 

Internal Audit plan. 

Internal Audit 
reports. 

Approved Internal 
Audit Plan 
indicating audits 
planned. 

Improved forensic 
audit processes 

% of cases finalised with 
clear recommendations 

75% 

60% 

60% 

60% 

60% 

60 

% 

60% 

65% 

70% 

75% 

75% 

Numerator: Number of forensic reports 
for the year to date. 

Denominator: Number of cases carried 
over plus new cases reported for the year 
to date. 

Forensic 

investigation 

reports. 

Register of 

forensic 

investigations. 


104 



[II] GDS PROGRAMME: ESTABLISH LONG TERM FISCAL STRENGTH 


The fiscal performance of South African municipalities is under increasingly intense scrutiny, as more municipalities are failing to create and 
deliver public value to their communities, despite sustained national government efforts to build the capacity in local sphere and to support 
improvements in the quality of municipal services and the eradication of service backlogs. Many municipalities are in fiscal distress, which is a 
key public issue that affects the economic, social and political wellbeing of both individuals and communities (Carmeli, 2008). As noted in 
Chapter 6, fiscal distress may mean different things to different people. In this chapter, fiscal distressl is defined as the sustained inability of a 
municipality to fund the delivery of basic public goods and other requirements as per its constitutional mandate and also meet its financial 
obligations. Municipalities in fiscal distress not only fail to satisfy their service obligations to citizens but also drain the fi cus by requiring 
ameliorative measures, which implies forgone economic growth and development. Therefore, fiscal distress modelling is needed to provide early 
warnings of fiscal distress incidents in municipalities to promote proactive responses for their resolution. 

A key programme proposed by the GDS to establish long term fiscal strength is the need to develop a long-term financial framework which 
clearly articulates how the EMM will meet its constitutional obligations in regard to service delivery and finance new growth within an overall 
growth management framework. The framework would cover the following aspects such as galvanise private and state investment and 
strengthen the tax-base and income streams. Both these programmes will be addressed in the 2014/2015 IDP. 


1) GAL VANISE STA TE AND PRIVA TE SECTOR INVESTMENT 



2014/2015 


Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


O t 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


ra 


= E S 
y o .9 
< *«- > 
U 0) 

O- CL 


I 

I 




tt 90 


S 2 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 


ULTIMATE OUTCOME: : 5.3 Establish Long Term Fiscal Strength 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 5.3.1 Galvanise state and private sector investment 


105 



E 

e 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


fo 2 

5 E 



2014/2015 


Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


oe -o 




g 

o < 

(N ^ 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 


ULTIMATE OUTCOME: : 5.3 Establish Long Term Fiscal Strength 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: 5.3.1 Galvanise state and private sector investment 


Increased public 
investment and 
large scale 
private 
investments 
through the 
proposals 
submitted 


R-value of 
investments 
facilitated and 
committed 


R47. 

5bn 


R6.5bn 


R6.5 

bn 


R8. 

Obn 


R9.5 

bn 


RIO 

.5b 

n 


R12 

.5b 

n 


Rand value of investment refers to a 
total of all projects' investment 
values given by investors / 
developers for all projects facilitated 
within the reporting period" . The 
indicator only refers to new 
Investment that may be in the form 
of green field, brown field or an 
expansion facilitated by among other 
activities: assisting new and existing 
investors with Council and other 
regulatory processes needed before 
an investment can be undertaken, 
site identification, applications for 
council bulk services, applications for 
incentives and or finance, etc. 


Letters of confirmation 
or commitment, Council 
approved items, and 
other EMM related 
approvals like bulk 
services, etc.) 


Improved 
management of 
property 
portfolio - 
Strategic Land 
Parcels 


No of land 

parcels 

released 


50 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


The unit of measure and analysis of 
performance is the absolute number 
of properties released through lease 
or sale. The target is only realisable 
in Q3 and Q4. 


Minutes of council 


2) GDS SUB=PROGRAMME: STRENGTHEN TAX BASE AND INGOME STREAMS 


The mandate for local government is succinctly contained in the preamble to the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, 1 998 
(Act 1 1 7 of 1 998) as: A vision of democratic and developmental local government in which municipalities fulfil their constitutional 
obligations to ensure sustainable, effective and efficient municipal services, promote social and economic development, encourage a 
safe and healthy environment by working with communities in creating environments and human settlements in which all ourpeople 
can lead uplifted and dignified lives. The White Paper on Local Government asserts that “basic services enhance the quality of life of 
citizens and increase their social and economic opportunities by promoting health and safety, facilitating access to work, to 
education, to recreation and stimulating new productive activities” (RSA, 1998:92). 


106 



Sound financial management is one of the key pre-requisites for an efficient and effective local government. Although a lot has been 
achieved by local government in delivery of services, there is still a lot of evidence which shows that local government does not have 
adequate capacity to manage its affairs, as well as perform its functions - particularly with respect to delivery of good quality services 
and achieve compliance with the MFMA. Through the implementation of the GDS programme “strengthening its tax base and 
revenue streams” the 2014/2015 IDP proposes the following: 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


re V 
0 ) 00 


t > 

^ Sl 


< I- 



2014/2015 

bi 

|f5 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


KO I 




a » 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 
ULTIMATE OUTCOME: : 5.3 Establish Long Term Fiscal Strength 
INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: :5.3.2 Strengthen tax base and income streams 


Water and Sanitation Services 

Decrease Non 

Revenue 

Water 

Percentage of Non- 
Revenue Water (NRW) 


40.3 

% 

Yl.%% 

39% 

38.5 

% 

38% 

37.6 

% 

35.4 

% 




Total system input volume minus 
billed authorised consumption 
minus consumption in Informal 
settlements (bulk metered and 
extrapolated) and RDP houses 
(bulk metered and extrapolated) 
divided by the total system input 
volume. 

IWA Water Balance calculated on a 
monthly basis by the Planning 

Division 

Increased 
Metering of 
unmetered 
stands 

Number of unmetered 
stands provided with 
meters 


0 

10000 

500 

4000 

3000 

2500 

150 

00 




Number of metered stands 

Venus plus outstanding installation 
applications for metered stands 
awaiting input into the 
system(from Revenue and Projects) 

Finance 

Optimization 
of Collections 

% of Billed Amounts 
Collected 

95% 

93% 

93% 

89.0 

0% 

92.8 

0% 

93.5 

0% 

97.6 

0% 

94% 

94% 

95% 

95% 

The actual cash payments received 
per month compared to the total 
amount billed to customers. It also 
takes into consideration 
adjustments of billing. Formula 
used is the rand amount of cash 
collected divided by the rand 
amount billed by the income 
section. 

The monthly collection levels 
report that is extracted from Venus 
Financial System. 

Economic 

Development 

Increases 

Revenue 
generated by 
SFPM 

% increase in SFPM 
Revenue generated 

60% 

9.40 

% 

10% 

2.00 

% 

2.00 

% 

2.00 

% 

4.00 

% 

10% 

15% 

15% 

20% 

Sales T urnover of Fresh Produce at 
Springs Fresh Produce Market 

SFPM Financial Statements 
(Month-end Reports) 


107 



Level of 
Planning 

ble 

Departm 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 Year 

Target 

Performanc 

e Prevlous 


2014/2015 

2015/ 

2016 

YEAR2 

^ rs. " 

5 O < 
3 N ^ 

2DT77 

2018 

YEAR4 

)o 2 tt 

S o <i 

5 IN U 

Definltion of Indlcator 

Data Sources 

? g i S 
s 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 

THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: : 5.3 Establish Long Term Fiscal Strength 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: :5.3.2 Strengthen tax base and income streams 


u 

co 

CD 

Improve 
sustainability 
of the bus 

service 

Revenue Generated 

R 

170, 

162, 

554 

R23, 

395, 

103 

R25,95 

5,067 

R6,7 

48,3 

17 

R5,7 

10,1 

15 

R6,7 

48,3 

17 

R6,7 

48,3 

17 

R28 

,881 

,872 

R37, 

546, 

434 

R38 

,297 

,363 

R39 

,481 

,818 

The total amount of revenue 
generated from cash paying 
commuters, sales of bus coupons 
and smart cards, and also the 
Government subsidy calculated as 
a proportion of the budgeted 

revenue. 

Copy offinancial statement, actual 
revenue generated compared with 
budgeted 

Direct Outcome 

Real Estate 

Revenue 

enhancement 
through the 
property 
portfolio 

Revenue generated 
through management 
of property 
transactions 

25% 

TBD 

5% 

1.25 

% 

1.25 

% 

1.25 

% 

1.25 

% 

5% 

5% 

5% 

5% 

5% is an annual increase target. 

The Quarterly target is 5% divided 
by 4. The numerator for Quarter is 
the increase for the Quarter and 
the denominator is 25% of the 
previous year's revenue. 

Numerator for year is the increase 
for that year and the denominator 
is the previous year's total revenue 

Sources of data is the property 
management division which is 
responsible for generating revenue 
and enforcing the collecting of due 
rental income on all Council 
properties. Revenue is determined 
by aggregating amounts collected 
from each lease agreement. 

Banking accounts provide evidence 
of revenues generated. 

u 

a 

LU 

Increased 

access to 
social housing 
units 

Number of new units 

constructed to 

accommodate social 
housing target 
market. 

3 50 

0 

units 


250 

units 

0 

0 

0 

250 

units 

800 

unit 

s 

900 

unit 

s 

750 

unit 

s 

800 

unit 

s 

Absolute number of newly 
constructed housing units to 
provide additional rental housing 
opportunities for the social 
housing target market. 

Practical completion certificate. 
Project progress reports. 

u 

a 

LU 

Ensure 

financial 

sustainability 

Revenue collected as 

a % of amount billed 
(R30,2m)fortheyear 
excluding arrears 

95% 

95% 

95% 

95% 

90% 

97.5 

0% 

97.5 

0% 

95% 

95% 

95% 

95% 

Cash collected (numerator) over 
amounts invoiced (denominator) 
which excludes amounts that have 
been written-off; and amounts 
owed by tenants that no longer in 
the EDC units. The target is an 
average of results achieved for the 

FY (all four quarters) 

Management Accounts/ Financial 
Statements/ Audit Reports 


108 



E 

0, e 

— ra 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


ra V 
ra 00 
>■ S; 


I I „ 

O SJ 3 


< I- 



2014/2015 


2015/ 

2016 

YEAR2 

^ rs. 

3 o < 
3 is ^ 

2DT77 

2018 

YEAR4 

5 5 « 

5 o < 

3 N U 



Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Definltion of Indlcator 

Data Sources 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 




NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 
ULTIMATE OUTCOME: : 5.3 Establish Long Term Fiscal Strength 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: :5.3.2 Strengthen tax base and income streams 


Direct Outcome 

Energy 

Improved 
energy 
balance by 
reduction of 

non-technical 

losses 

Unaccounted for 
electricity 

10.5 

0% 

11% 

11.50 

% 

11.50 

% 

11. 

50 

% 

11. 

50 

% 

11.50 

% 

11.5 

0% 

11.3 

0% 

11.1 

0% 

10.5 

0% 

It is the reconciliation of energy in 
kilowatt-hour units bought from 
Eskom and City Power (and 
possible future power producers), 
with kilowatt-hour units sold to 
Ekurhuleni Metropolitan 

Municipality customers averaged 
over a rolling 12 months. The 
indicator is dependent on meter 
read data for credit meters which 
is two months old. However, the 
year - end report is based on end 
June figures. 

Information is sourced from Venus 
system, Suprima, IMS, MOL 
metering. 

Information is captured in a 
spreadsheet. The spreadsheet 
requires the monthly capturing of 
every "sales" component. These 
values are then subtracted from 
the Eskom and City Power (and 
possible future power producers) 
purchase values for that month, to 
provide a monthly figure. Thefinal 
figure, which is the losses averaged 
over 12 months, is then obtained 
by applying the second formula 
below. 

NON-TECHNICAL LOSSES = TOTAL 
ESKOM plus CITY POWER 
PURCHASES-TOTALEMM UNITS 

ACCOUNTED 

NON-TECHNICAL LOSSES (AVE) = 

LAST 12 MONTHS NON-TECHNICAL 
LOSSES/12. Total losses will be 
determined by adding the technical 
loss component, to the non- 
technical loss component. 

Finance 

Improved 

Cost 

Effectiveness 

% Savings of 

Operating Costs 
(Expenditure 

Efficiency) 

10% 

6% 

10% 

2.50% 

2.5 

0% 

2.5 

0% 

2.50% 

10% 

10% 

10% 

10% 

The indicator measures how much 
savings have been achieved on the 
Operational Budget, this will be 
determined by comparing actual 
budget against actual expenditure, 
this will however exclude repairs 
and maintenance. 

Monthly management accounts 
and Opex Report 


109 



E 

0, e 

— ra 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


re V 
0) 00 
>■ S; 


I 1 

o 2! 
‘t a 

P flj 


< I- 



2014/2015 


2015/ 

2016 

YEAR2 

^ rs. " 

3 o < 
3 is ^ 

2DT77 

2018 

YEAR4 

5 5 « 

5 o < 

3 N U 



Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Definition of Indicator 

Data Sources 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 




NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA :5. EFFECTIVE COOPERATIVE GOVERANCE 


ULTIMATE OUTCOME: : 5.3 Establish Long Term Fiscal Strength 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME: :5.3.2 Strengthen tax base and income streams 



Clean and 



Unq 

ualifi 

ed 












Fina 

Effective 

Audit Opinion from 

Clea 

Clean 

Clean 

Cle 

Cle 

Clean 

Clea 

Clea 

Clea 

Clea 

Audit Opinion from the Auditor 

Audit Report 

nce 

Administratio 

n 

the Auditor General 

n 

an 

an 

n 

n 

n 

n 

General 


Dir 

ect 

Ou 

tco 

me 


3) STRATEGIC ACQUISITION AND MANAGEMENT OEASSETSAND OPERATIONS 

A strategic asset management framework brings together the inter-relationships between key corporate planning activities and asset 
management, allowing the entity’s strategic goals to be integrated with the asset portfolio to meet the organisation’s program delivery 
requirements. The primary objective of strategic asset management is to create and maintain an asset portfolio that contains an 
optimal mix of assets to efficiently meet program delivery requirements. The program delivery requirements of an entity are outlined 
in its strategic and business plans, which will reflect the organisation’s strategic goals. Strategic asset management involves 
consideration of the City’s plan in light of the programme delivery requirements, to identify an optimal asset mix and compare it to the 
existing asset portfolio. This identification and review then culminates in an asset divergence analysis. The results are then 
incorporated into an asset management strategy, which sets out how the asset portfolio will assist the entity to meet its strategic 
outcomes. A key function of the municipality is to maintain their assets in terms of the regulatory requirements. 


110 



Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


"S ™ 

3 E S 
a o .2 


2014/ 

2014/2015 

2015 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Annual 

Target 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 


ec 

< 


Definition of Indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA:4. CORPORATIVE GOVERNANCE 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 5.4 Strategic Acquisition and Management of Assets and Operations 


INTERMEDIATE OUTCOMES: 5.4.2 Strategic acquisition and management of key assets 


Direct Outcome 

Roads and Stormwater 

Improved 

management of key 
assets 

KM of strategic 
road network 

maintained 

100 

14.6 

20 

5 

5 

5 

5 

40 

60 

80 

100 

kms of existing 
major{class 2 & 3, 
primary/secondary) 
tarred roads maintained 
through 

rehabilitation(crack 
sealing, slurry seals, base 
preparation, repairs, 
comprehensive fixing of 
potholes), rebuilding and 
overlay of the existing 
network 

Completion Certificates 
signed by the Contractor, 
Engineer and Client as well 
as Job cards of 

Departmental maintenance 
signed by Depot Manager. 

KM of tar road 
maintained 

900 

81.6 

180 

20 

60 

70 

30 

360 

540 

720 

900 

kms of existing 
minor{tertiary) tarred 
roads maintained 
through 

rehabilitation(crack 
sealing, slurry seals, base 
preparation, repairs, 
comprehensive fixing of 
potholes), rebuilding and 
overlay of the existing 
network 

Completion Certificates 
signed by the Contractor, 
Engineer and Client as well 
as Job cards of 

Departmental maintenance 
signed by Depot Manager. 

KM of Stormwater 

infrastructure 

maintained 

750 

92.1 

150 

50 

50 

25 

25 

300 

450 

600 

750 

Kms of existing pipelines 
cleaned and channels 
desilted on stormwater 

network. 

Completion Certificates 
signed by the Contractor, 
Engineer and Client as well 
as Job cards of 

Departmental maintenance 
signed by Depot Manager. 

Direct 

Outco 

me 

Water 

and 

Sanita 

tion 

Servic 

es 

Maintain Blue drop 
status on drinking 
water quality 
management 

Blue Drop score 
(min 95%) 


98.95 

% 

>95% 

>95% 

>95 

% 

>95 

% 

>95% 

>95 

% 




Blue Drop certification 
and quaterly chemical, 
biological water quality 
results which should be 
greater >95% 

Blue Certificate and 
quarterly water quality 
results obtainable from the 

Revenue Division 


111 



OUTCOME 3: ALL PEOPLE IN SOUTH AFRICA ARE AND FEEL SAFE 


Crime in South Africa has occupied centre stage on the public agenda. Unacceptably high levels of crime, especially serious and 
violent crime, result in people in South Africa, especially vulnerable groups such as women, children, older persons and people with 
disabilities, living in fear and feeling unsafe. It also impacts negatively on the country’s economic development and undermines the 
wellbeing of people in the country and hinders their ability to achieve their potential. 

Some progress has been made over the past five years in reducing the levels of serious crime such as murders, aggravated 
robberies, crimes against women, children and other vulnerable groups, but they remain unacceptably high. Communities and all 
people feel unsafe due to unacceptably high levels of serious and violent crime such as murder, rape and aggravated robberies. To 
make certain that all people are and feel safe the following actions will be undertaken: 

Political and/or domestic instability is a serious challenge that if left unabated will undermine our democracy, rule of law and 
development trajectory. Issues that contribute to this instability are violent industrial and service delivery-related protest actions, as 
well as disrespect for authority and for one another. It is therefore imperative to prevent and combat the violent crime that 
accompanies what is otherwise legitimate industrial and protest action. 

To combat and eliminate crime and contraventions of the laws the GDS has called upon the citizens of Ekurhuleni to be responsive 
and active citizen is upholding the laws and legislation of the country so all people in South Africa are and feel safe. Through the 
GDS the following will be considered in 2014/2015: 

• Reduce fatal accidents 

• Drive down high levels of violent and serious crime 

• Enforcement of by-laws 


E 

e 


Planning 

Statements 


Indicators 


3 E s 
a o .2 


2014/ 

2014/2015 

201S 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Annual 

Target 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 




in 2 02 
o o < 

S " 


O 2 K 

g p < 


' 00 


ec 

< 


Definition of indicator 


Data Sources 


NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 


THEMATIC AREA:4. SOCIAL EMPOWERMENT 


ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 4.3 Responsive and Active Citizenry 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:4.3.1 Integrate service delivery and citizen responsibility 


112 



Level of 
Planning 

Responsible 

Department 

Planning 

Statements 

Indicators 

5 YearTarget 

Actual 

Performance 

Prevlous Year 

2014/ 

201S 

Annual 

Target 

2014/2015 

2015/ 

2016 

YEAR2 

2016/ 

2017 

YEAR3 

^ “ s 

o o < 

S ^ Si 

2018/2019 

YEAR 5 

Deflnltion of Indlcator 

Data Sources 

Ql 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

June 

NATIONAL OUTCOME: RESPONSIVE, ACCOUNTABLE, EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT SYSTEM 

THEMATIC AREA:4. SOCIAL EMPOWERMENT 

ULTIMATE OUTCOME: 4.3 Responsive and Active Citizenry 

INTERMEDIATE OUTCOME:4.3.1 Integrate service delivery and citizen responsibility 

Direct Outcome 

EMPD 

Reduction 
fatal road 

accidents 

Incidence rate 

of fatalities 

5% 

redu 

ction 

from 

200 

127 

Not 

more 

than 127 

Not 

more 

than 

127 

Not 

more 

than 

127 

Not 

mor 

e 

than 

127 

Not 

mor 

e 

than 

127 

Not 

more 

than 

127 

Not 

more 

than 127 

Not 

more 

than 127 

Not 

more 

than 

127 

A death resulting from injuries 
sustained in a road traffic 
accident including those of a 
pedestrian, pedal cyclist, 
motorcycle rider, occupants of 
three-wheeled motor vehicle, 
occupant of pick-up truck or van, 
occupant of heavy transport 
vehicles, and bus occupant. 

Copies of the 

OAR's; D/CoP 
Declaration; and 
SAPS case data 
register. 

Increased 

EMPD By-Law 
enforcement 

Number of 

violations 
recorded with 
respect EMPD 
By-Laws 

5000 

2794 

1000 

- 

- 

- 

1000 

1000 

1000 

1000 


by-law exists to ensure that 
certain kinds of anti-social 
behaviour are prohibited and 
punished 

G.R.A.P Reports 
and D/CoP 
Declaration 

Increased 
arrest of 

criminals 

Number of 
criminals 

arrested 

6000 

1709 

1200 

300 

300 

300 

300 

1200 

1200 

1200 


A criminal is defined as a person 
who has committed a crime. 

SAPS - CAS no.'s 
and D/CoP 
Declaration 


113 



5.3 FLAGSHIPS 


Due to the multi nodal set up of Ekurhuleni we have struggled over the last number of years to focus 
our investment in such a way that we start creating an identity for EMM but also ensure that we 
sustain our infrastructure investment that were made over time. Specific Flagship programmes are 
being rolled out to support growth and development of the City over the coming period. These are: 

• The development of the Ekurhuleni Aerotropolis with the nucleus the OR Tambo International 
Airport; 

• The development of Township Economies 

• Urban Regeneration; 

• Strategic Land Parcels 

• Revitalization of the Manufacturing Sector; 

• The concept of a Digital City; 

• Beautification of Dams, Lakes and Pans; 

• Revenue Enhancement; and 

• Institutional Review. 


Progress made in these projects and 14/15 deliverables are as follows: 


114 



FLAGSHIP NAME 

EKURHULENI AEROTROPOLIS 

DESCRIPTION OF 
THE FLAGSHIP 

The Ekurhuleni Aerotropolis Project seeks to explore interventions that 
leverage the economic benefits of having the busiest airport on the African 
continent, the OR Tambo International Airport (ORTIA), located within its 
boundaries. Given that the OR Tambo International Airport resides within their 
municipal jurisdiction, the City of Ekurhuleni and the Gauteng Provincial 
Government needs to plan accordingly for any development related to this 
asset, to unlock its value proposition and position the Region as a globally 
competitive one. 

PROGRESS TO 
DATE 

The Aerotropolis Project is at design conceptual stage. A Strategic Roadmap 
has been developed to guide the development of a detailed Master Plan for 
the Ekurhuleni Aerotropolis. The Roadmap outlines the Case and Global 
Context for the Ekurhuleni Aerotropolis, provided for business rationale and 
competitive logic for an air logistics hub and greater Aerotropolis at and 
around OR Tambo International Airport and illustrated how this is working 
currently throughout the world. The Strategic Roadmap and Conceptual 
framework for the Aerotropolis has been approved by the Ekurhuleni 
Metropolitan Municipality. 

AEROTROPOLIS PLANNING PROCESS 

The Strategic Road Map formed the backbone of the Aerotropolis planning 
process. The Aerotropolis Planning Committee has been established. The 
Committee comprises of Departmental representatives within EMM and the 
Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA), and consists of work-streams. The 
Committee will oversee input from Specialist Working Committees dealing 
with the following factors: 

• Strategic, spatial and land use planning; 

• Transportation planning (road, rail, public transport); 

• Telecommunication; 

• Municipal services 

• Freight and Logistics; 

• Business and Industry; 

• On-airport and Airline strategies; 

• Research and Development; 

• Education, training and Labour; Community upliftment (the pro- 
poor agenda); 

• Sustainability and Environment; 

• Aesthetics; 

• Marketing and Communication; and 

• Institutional and Financial processes. 

Work of Strategic, Spatial and Land Use Planning, Transportation planning 
(road, rail, and public transport), Sustainability and Environment, Economic 
Planning (research and industrial planning) and Marketing and 
Communications has commenced. 


115 





The Terms of Reference (ToR) for the establishment of the Planning 
Committee between ACSA and EMM has been finalized and signed by EMM 
and ACSA. The Planning Committee will report to the Inter-departmental 
coordinating team with the Department of Economic Development serving as 
a Secretariat and convener of both the coordinating team and the steering 
committee. 

MASTER PLANNING 

The Aerotropolis Master Plan is currently under development to provide clear 
proposals to improve the City of Ekurhuleni's economic competitiveness, 
diversify its economy, and drive positive development throughout the 
province. The anchor points of the Master Plan is to be used as a tool that can 
be used as a government intervention to proactively improve the status quo 
(pro-active), underpin the Global City Region concept, and lead to significant 
further economic development and job creation. The plan will take into 
account existing initiatives and studies conducted, give priority to the 
consideration of logistic hubs, key freight and logistics nodes and corridors, 
and consider a financial model to finance the various stages of development 
of the Aerotropolis. 

CO-ORDINATION OF THE AEROTROPOLIS 

An Operational Task Team has been set up to coordinate planning between 
the EMM and the Gauteng Provincial Government(GPG). The Task Team has 
representation from the following Departments from the EMM and GPG: 

• Economic Development 

• Roads and Transport 

• Infrastructure Development 

• T reasury and Finance and 

• City Planning 

• Human Settlements 

EXPECTED OR 

PLANNED 

DELIVERABLES 

FOR 14/15 

The following activities will form deliverables for the next financial year: 

• Roll out of the Five Year Implementation Plan and 
implementation of approved recommendations; 

• Stakeholder Engagement throughout the development of the 
Master Plan; 

• Finalization of the Master Plan and submission for approval. 


116 




FLAGSHIP 

NAME 

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality IRPTN 

DESCRIPTIO 
N OF THE 
FLAGSHIP 

The Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network (IRPTN) refers to the Ekurhuleni 
Metropolitan Municipality’s (EMM’s) transformation of the public transport system^^ 
that aims to provide “a high-quality and affordable public transport system in line with 
national policy”. The main objective of the IRPTN is to provide a new and attractive 
integrated public transport network that includes road and rail public transport 
services that serve the people of Ekurhuleni as a whole. The first phase, Phase 1, 
will be the implementation of a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system. 

From a public transport point of view, the IRPTN is the most significant intervention to 
improve and promote the use of public transport in Ekurhuleni and responds to 
EMM’s transport vision of providing accessible, affordable and integrated transport 
services that are competitively-priced while adhering to global standards. 

The IRPTN has three main strategic objectives: 

• the provision of an affordable and accessible public transport system; 

• the integration of both motorised public transport and Non-Motorised 
Transport (NMT), including rail, bus, and taxi; 

• the transformation/enabling of existing bus and taxi operators in Ekurhuleni to 
participate in the development of and operation of the new vehicle operating 
company/ies (VOCs). 

EMM’s IRPTN is comprised of trunk routes along the major mobility spines in line with 
its Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework (MSDF), with branch and feeder 
routes, ensuring significant area-wide coverage. These routes link the existing (and 
proposed) major residential and economic nodes of Ekurhuleni, providing equitable 
access to opportunities for all of EMM’s citizens. 

The IRPTN will be implemented incrementally along priority corridors, according to 
strategic priorities, available budget and operational viability of the system. The first 
phase is to implement the BRT along the corridor from Tembisa to Vosloorus. This 
has been broken down into three sub-phases, viz. Phase 1A, Phase 1B and Phase 
1C. 

It is intended that the 18 km trunk route along Phase 1A is to be operationalized in 
2016, together with express (limited stop) complementary routes that run from the 
airport through Boksburg to Vosloorus. After the commencement of sub-phase 1A. 
the further development of sub-phases 1B and 1C will proceed in line with the 
development of EMM’s Aerotropolis precinct, the extent of densification along the 
identified routes and EMM’s Capital Investment Framework. 

PROGRESS 
TO DATE 

The Ekurhuleni IRPTN project is primarily still in the Planning and Design 
phase but Implementation (construction) has commenced on a minor scale 
but is scheduled to increase substantially in the near future. 


The use of the term 'public transport system' usually refers to transport provided by government. For purposes of the 
IRPTN, because the minibus taxi industry is involved in the transformation of public transport, and in any event transport 
members of the public, the term 'public transport' includes minibus taxi operations as well. 


117 




More detailed description of the activities and status of the various 
workstreams is given below. 

1. DESIGN 

a. IRPTN Transport Management Centre (TMC): 

The existing Disaster Management Call Centre in Kempton Park 
(Spartan) is to be converted into a TMC. Once the Ekurhuleni 
Unified Command Centre (UCC) is established, the TMC will be 
accommodated in the UCC. The Kempton Park TMC will then act 
as a Failover facility for the TMC. 

The Real Estate Department’s consultants have completed the As 
Built plans for the complex. The Prelim & Detail design team is 
busy with the preliminary design for the building. 

b. Depots: 

Real Estate Department is dealing with the processes on behalf of 
the Transport Department. The process of acquiring suitable 
properties has been delayed due to the owners of previously 
identified sites deciding not to sell their land to EMM. The 
following sites are currently being considered for the 
establishment of depots: 

• Erf 123, Ehlanzeni: Tembisa Depot: Property belongs to 
JR Choeu Bus Service. 

• Erf 161, Klopper Park: Holding area: Ekurhuleni owned. 

• Erf 5, Vosloorus: Holding Area (could become a depot 
later): council owned and currently being leased by 
PUTCO. 

c. Roadways: 

Designs for various sections are underway. Design for widening 
of first two km of Tembisa Complementary is completed. The 
design of the upgrade of Rondebult Road as part of the Vosloorus 
Complementary route is also nearing completion. 

d. Stations: 

The Concept Design for the stations has been completed and the 
architects are currently busy with Stage 3 designs. 

e. Non-Motorized Transport (NMT): 


118 




The design of NMT facilities in Kempton Park and Tembisa have 
been completed. These sections are not alongside the trunk route 
as the NMT along these routes will be implemented at the same 
time as the trunk route bus lanes. 

2. CONSTRUCTION 

a. NMT: 

Construction of NMT facilities in Kempton Park has commenced. 
Work in Tembisa is scheduled to commence at the beginning of 
March. 

b. Complementary routes: 

Construction of Tembisa North complementary route is scheduled 
to commence in the beginning of March 2014 the upgrade of 
Rondebult Road is scheduled to commence at the end of March. 

c. Trunk Route Roadways: 

A tender for the construction of the trunk (BRT) roadway sections 
has closed and is anticipated to be awarded in April. Construction 
of the first sections is scheduled to commence at the beginning of 
May 2014. 

d. Architectural work: 

Construction of the architectural work related to the BRT stations, 
TMC and depot/holding areas are scheduled to commence only in 
2014/15. 

3. BUDGET 


The multi-year budget currently available is reflected in the table below: 



2013/14 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

PTIG 

R239 

R250 

R350 

R370 

USDG 

Nil 

R211 

R259 

R280 

Total: 

R239 

R461 

R609 

R650 


Table 1: Available funding for the Ekurhuleni IRPTN project (Rm) 

The above financial scenario indicates that it will not be feasible to implement 
the entire Phase 1 along either the original alignment or the proposed revised 
alignment by the target date of 2016 as the total cost of the first phase 
(excluding the purchase of buses) amounts to approximately R2,5bn. 
Consideration is therefore being given to constructing and operationalising a 
core trunk phase of approximately lOkm in 2016 together with complementary 
routes while the balance of the trunk routes are completed in future financial 
years. 


119 






EXPECTED 

OR 

PLANNED 
DELIVERAB 
LES FOR 

14/15 

Proposed project milestones: 

1 

■ 

Operations Plan 

Industry Transition 

Bus Fleet 

14-Feb 

Final refined Ops Plan 

Facilitator appointed. 

Secretariat established. 

Finalise communication and 
document protocol guideline. 

Bus specs 
Transactio 
Arrangers , 

14-May 


Negotiation plan approved 
by EMM 

Negotiating structure agreed 

Bus procur 
funding stn 

14-Aug 

CITP approved 


Bus tender 

14-Nov 



Bus tender 


120 


FLAGSHIP NAME 

Township regeneration and township economies 

DESCRIPTION OF THE 
FLAGSHIP 

• The Township regeneration programme entails 
transformation of 5 EMM township complexes 
into a prosperous, compact, and sustainable 
and better managed urban centres with vibrant 
economies, better transport linkages, well 
managed public spaces and infrastructure. The 
goal is to redevelop EMM townships into great 
places to live, works and play. 

• Economic, transport and housing have been 
identified as catalytic sectors to drive the 
regeneration of townships. 

• Targeted investment in public spaces, public 
infrastructure and public buildings is prioritised 
to boost private investor confidence 

• The primary focus of the transport sector is on 
provision of new and improvement of existing 
public transport network and promotion of non- 
motorised transport, including pedestrianization 
of selected high activity nodes and corridors. 

• The focus of the economic sector is to develop 
and grow a diversified economy that go beyond 
the prominent retail developments, but seek to 
attract investment in other sectors such as light 
industrial, manufacturing, agriculture and 
tourism. A combination of attracting external 
investment and supporting local entrepreneurs 
particularly in the SMME and cooperatives 
sector is at the centre of the economic strategy. 

PROGRESS TO DATE 

• Framework Planning and Business Plans for 
Tembisa, Katorus, Kwatsaduza, Wattviile- 
Actonville and Daveyton-Etwatwa were 
completed in 2012/13. 

• Non-Motorized transport strategy for T embisa 
has been completed and phase one NMT 
projects are being implemented by EMM 
transport department 

• Public realm upgrade projects that are being 
implemented in the current financial year 
include; 

o Civic square, 
o Winnie Mandela Square and 
o Link roads that link the proposed George 
Nyanga square and the civic square (A 
portion of George Nyanga, Andrew 
Mapheto and Hadebe streets) 


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• The following studies are being undertaken in 
the current financial year ; 

o Bulk infrastructure assessment to verify 
whether the existing infrastructure is 
sufficient to support proposed 
development and to identify additional 
infrastructure upgrade required. 
o Geotechnical investigations to determine 
the development parameters for Katorus 
projects due to the prevalence of 
dolomite soil conditions in the area. 
o Detailed economic study to identify 
interventions required to unlock township 
economies. The study will also provide 
detailed business plans and project 
plans for catalytic economic projects. 

EXPECTED OR PLANNED 
DELIVERABLES FOR 14/15 

PLANNED ACTIONS FOR 14/15 

• Finalisation of economic study and packaging of 
projects aimed at attracting private investment 

• Implementation of Basket of Catalytic Projects 
as per interdepartmental project plans 
including; 

o Implementation of phase 2 public realm 
upgrade projects along Sam Molele, 
George Nyanga and Andrew Mapheto in 
Tembisa 

o Implementation of high density rental 
units in Esselenpark 
o Finalisation of Detailed design and 
procurement processes for the 
implementation of public realm upgrades 
and Non-motorised Transport for the 
following townships; 

• Katorus, Wattville-Actonville and 
Daveyton-Etwatwa 


FLAGSHIP NAME 

Inner City Renewal 

DESCRIPTION OF THE 
FLAGSHIP 

• The inner city renewal programme entails, in the 
first instance, transformation of two out of the 9 
existing EMM towns into a prosperous, compact, 
and sustainable and better managed urban 
centres with better transport links and as great 
places to live, works and play. 

• EMM made a choice to focus its interventions in 
the short to medium-term on Kempton Park and 
Germiston Central Activity/Living Areas. These 
primary urban renewal areas give EMM its 
identity and urban structure as a city with dual 


122 






city centres that complement each other, where 
Kempton park’s role is seen as a cultural and 
economic hub of the Metro anchored by the 
Aerotropolis and Germiston as an Administrative 
headquarters of EMM 

• The long term vision of the programme is to 
redevelop all EMM towns into Central Living 
Districts (CLD’s), where there is an 
intensification of residential land uses to 
complement the economic uses that prevail 
currently and to ensure that all the towns are 
green, clean and safe. 

PROGRESS TO DATE 

• An Urban Renewal Plan for Kempton Park is not 
yet finalised. Various studies that have been 
completed in the Kempton Park Area such as 
Region A RSDF, Rhodes field Urban 

Development Framework and the Aerotropolis 
Plan will be used as points of departure in 
Developing the Kempton Park Urban Renewal 
Framework 

• A comprehensive Urban Development 

Framework Plan (Gear 2030 Phase 2) for 
Germiston was completed in 2012/13. The Plan 
includes development guidelines for selected 
zones, business plans and project plans for 
priority projects. 

• In Germiston there are 6 projects prioritized for 
implementation, these are, 

(1) Germiston Theatre - SRAC, 

(2) Germiston Civic Precinct - Real Estate, 

(3) Germiston Brownfield Acquisitions - Real 
Estate, 

(4) Germiston Station - intermodal facility 
including taxi rank - Transport Department, 

(5) Detailed planning and design for Dukathole, 
Goodhope and Fire station and Delville Housing 
projects - Human Settlement Department, 

(6) Detailed planning and design for Germiston 
fire station - DEMS 

EXPECTED OR PLANNED 
DELIVERABLES FOR 14/15 

• PLANNEDACTIONSFOR 14/15 

• SRAC to proceed with the implementation of the 
Germiston Theatre project (14/15 budget 
estimate - R20m) 

• DEMS to proceed with the construction of the 
Central Germiston Fire Station (14/15 budget 
estimate - R20m) 


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• Real estate to proceed with the Municipal 
Buildings Upgrade Programme in Germiston 
Civic Precinct (14/15 budget estimate - R50m) 

• T ransport Department to continue with the 
implementation of Germiston station intermodal 
facility (14/15 budget estimate - R23m) 

• Construction of 150 phase 1 social housing units 
in erf 808 (fire station site) and Construction of 
100 social housing units in Delville to commence 
(14/15 budget estimate - R57.3m) 

• Finalization of Goodhope and Dukathole 
detailed planning and implementation plans 

• Public realm upgrade interventions in priority 
nodes to commence, this is meant to augment 
investment by line function departments 
implementing projects in the following nodes; 

o Cultural precinct, fire station precinct, 
Germiston station precinct and civic 
node(14/15 budget estimate - R52m) 


FLAGSHIP NAME 

Development of identified Strategic Land Parcels 

DESCRIPTION OF THE 
FLAGSHIP 

The aim is to mobilise private sector investors to partner 
with the metro to maximise the potential land asset 
value and attract more investment in order for 
Ekurhuleni to achieve its developmental objectives that 
would result in economic growth, poverty alleviation 

It is the intention of Ekurhuleni metropolitan municipality 
to package land for development to alter the metro’s 
spatial landscape and optimize urban development by 
maximising the potential of strategic developable land 
and property through partnership with private sector, 
lease or outright disposal of the land and property 
assets. 

PROGRESS TO DATE 

Framework for the development of Strategic Land 
Parcels and Development Areas owned by council has 
been approved by Council in February 2014 

Currently busy with the Bid Initiation process for the 
appointment of the service provider for the provision of 
professional specialized consulting services for 
conducting feasibility studies and execution of business 
plans for the development of strategic land parcels 

EXPECTED OR PLANNED 
DELIVERABLES FOR 14/15 

Feasibility Studies completed with a minimum of 10 
identified land parcels packaged, profiled and business 
plans prepared. 


FLAGSHIP NAME 


Revitalisation of the Manufacturing Sector 


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DESCRIPTION OF THE 
FLAGSHIP 

Revitalisation of the manufacturing sector is a 
programme aimed at leveraging on the existing 
industrial capabilities to stimulate industrial activities, 
efficiencies and competitiveness. 

13 Pillar Programmes have been identified to 
implement this flagship: 

Pillar 1: Industrial Situational Analysis and 
Competitiveness Index 

Pillar 2: Industrial Planning and Strategy 

Pillar 3: Industrial Sector Clustering and Development 
Pillar 4: Investment and Development Facilitation 

Pillar 5: Productivity Improvements and Industrial 
Upgrade 

PillarG; Green Economy Sector Development through 
Cleaner Production, Resource Efficiency & Waste 
Beneficiation 

Pillar 7: Technical Skills Development and Industrial 
Incubation 

Pillar 8: Economic Infrastructure Development & 
Logistics Networks 

Pillar 9: Leverage Strategic Procurement for Industrial 
Development and Inward Investment 

Pillar 10: Research and Development to encourage 
Innovation 

Pillar 11: Database Development and Stakeholder 
Mobilization 

Pillar 12: Strategic Industrial Financing 

Pillar 13: Support for Local Companies 

PROGRESS TO DATE 

• Investment and Development Facilitation 

Strategic Policy Framework has been developed 
and adopted. 

• Investment Centre being operationalised to 
implement the investment and development 
facilitation framework. 

• proposed Investment & Development Incentives 
Policy Guidelines drafted - part of the bulk 
contribution task team initiatives 

• PRASA new rolling stock investment facilitated - 
investment is a result of the designated 
industries, sectors and sub-sectors for local 
production at a specific level of local content 
bringing about opportunities for local suppliers. 

• Strategic Land parcels identified for industrial 
and manufacturing sector - Dunnotar for 

PRASA project and Tambo Springs for the 
inland port 

• Initiated engagements with industrialists for 
possible partnership in skills development for 


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industrial development - companies approached 
include Nampak, Phillip Morris International and 
GRW. 

• Initiated engagements with key stakeholders 
(manufacturing Circle) for initiatives aimed at 
flagship advocacy 

• Initiated discussions with Denel Aerostructures 
in collaboration with Aerotropolis project office to 
workshop their project pipeline including 

Research & Development initiatives 

• Partnered with National Cleaner Production 
Centre (NCPC) to implement pillar 6. Since 
2012/13 to date, 17 companies have signed up 
for the NCPC programme. 

• Initiated collaboration with Productivity SA to 
promote productivity improvements and 
industrial upgrade - Immediate interventions 
with Productivity SA are to host Awareness 
Workshop for SMME and Cooperatives and 
Workplace Challenge 

• Appointment of service provider for the Industrial 
Development Policy, Strategy & Programme - 
this will give effect to implementation of pillars 1 , 

2, 3 & 1 1 in the main 

EXPECTED OR PLANNED 
DELIVERABLES FOR 14/15 

• Implementation of Pillar 1 , 2, 3 & 1 1 through the 
Industrial Development Policy, Strategy and 
Programme 

• Continued implementation of the NCPC 
programme 

• Development and implementation of Productivity 
Improvement & Industrial Upgrade programme 
in partnership with Productivity SA 

• Increased number of manufacturing companies 
and expansions investing in Ekurhuleni. 


FLAGSHIP NAME 

DIGITAL CITY 


Alignment with the GDS 2055: 

Goal: Increased broadband coverage 

This strategy is supported by: 

• Creating a fibre and wireless network throughout 
Ekurhuleni to create a connected city 

• Create internet zones to the public to encourage 
economic development, especially in historically 
disadvantaged areas 

• Connect all the EMM buildings and as such increase 


126 





efficiency 

Install video conferencing in boardrooms and meeting 
rooms to increase efficiency and reduce travelling time 
Install application functionality to have an increased 
engagement with the citizens by means of easy-to-use 
and advanced technology. These include sms, smart 
phone, web site and other electronic communication 


DESCRIPTION OF THE 
FLAGSHIP 


Project Components 


Streaml: Broadband 
(Fibre connectivity) 


Stream2: Broadband 

Wireless 

Connectivity 


StreamS: Unified 
Command Centre 


Streamd: EMM E- 
Citizen Services 


’Rbiro’ut 6fFibrebFdadband’tlTrbu6>ibut EkutburenC AriMu’nrdps 
buildingstobe connected {estimatedSASbuildings). 
Existingconnectivity : 21, Remainder : 524 
645 km implemented-statusquestionable(only IBOkmvalidate 


Provisionof Broadband Wirelessoverlay (WiFi based). 
Estimated22sitesdoneat present Required : 523sitES 


UCC Steering Committee Drtving 

Interim UCCestablished-capacitizationin ptogtess 


In assessment 

City Operations: Functionof BPM andcommon architecture prq 
External : Function of potential datasetswhichcan bemadeava 
outside workJ, as well as potential in-city BPO components whid 
appetiteto ptovide 


PROGRESS TO DATE 


Infrastructure: 

Fibre audit and verification completed 
Built 5 network links 
Fibre repair programme commenced 
Specifications and standards defined 
Master plans and business cases developed 
Tender process in progress for 9 of the 1 0 tenders to 
execute the programme. 

• 54 Wi-fi units rolled out for internal use 
Business Process Mapping: 

Business processes mapping for the 20 key departments 
targeted for the UCC is underway and due for completion at the 
end of March 2014 

Applications: 

• City Process model, BPM Framework, APM and RMP 
have been created. 

• Master Systems Plan in progress. 

Unified Command Center: 

» Interim UCC at Bedfordview capacitated - people , 


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systems, communications and IT systems) 

• Long-term UCC: 

• Site identified, soil sampling done 

• Sizing of headcount done 

• Key functions to be included identified 

• Tender in progress to appoint a consultant for the 
development of the strategy, high level 
processes, operating procedures and 
requirements analysis 

EXPECTED OR 
PLANNED 

DELIVERABLES FOR 
14/15 

Infrastructure: 

• Develop Fibre based Broadband Propositions with 
commercial business case 

• Install 350km of fibre; Build 80 sites; Install 75 wi-fi units 

• Install 10 fixed video conferencing units and 30 screens 
for internal video streaming 

• Upgrade the data centres by installing 2 generators, 20 
air conditioners and access control systems 

• Connect 4 Siyafunda centres 

• Upgrade security 

Business Process Automation: 

Complete the business process mapping for the 20 key 
departments targeted for the Unified Command Centre. 
Applications: 

• Initiate ERP Programme for ( HR, EPMO, O&M, 

Planning and Finance) 

• Acquire and Implement Workforce management system. 

• Provide the relevant applications and solutions for the 
Unified Command Centre 

• Automation of customer facing UCC Processes. 

Unified Command Center: 

• Perform conceptual design 


FLAGSHIP NAME 

Beautification of Lakes and Dams 

DESCRIPTION OF THE 
FLAGSHIP 

A project initiated to improve the image of the City and 
make it more aesthetically pleasing. This has the 
potential to increase investor interest in the City, while 
the beautification of the lakes and dams will contribute 
to the increase in Tourism 

PROGRESS TO DATE 

The planned activities for 2013/14 were related to the 
following: 

• Compile Master plan 

• Germiston Lake upgrade 

• Murray Park upgrade 

• Develop RFPs and RFIs to identification 
of Wetlands 

• Implement the EMM and South African 
Maritime Safety Authority Mou 


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The progress to date is summarised as follows: 

• The concept document for the Master 

Plan on the Beautification of Lakes and 
Dams has been drafted. 

• Germiston Lake was upgraded 

• Slipway finalised 

• Lapa upgraded construction on site 

• New ablution facility plans are been 
reviewed by consultants 

• Murray Park - Phase 1 development 

• Develop site specific RFP’s and RFI’s to 
identification of Wetlands - Concept 
document completed 

• Implement the EMM and South African 

Maritime Safety Authority Mou - planned 
for implementation in the 2014/15 
financial year 

EXPECTED OR PLANNED 
DELIVERABLES FOR 14/15 

The way forward will include the following areas: 

• ToR for the rehabilitation, restoration and 
enhancement of water bodies for eco- 
recreational and aquatic biodiversity 
functionality. 

• Baseline concept document on lakes and 
dams 

• RFI’s and RFP’s development 

• Issuing a tender for the maintenance of 
water bodies on an as and when basis 
to augment current capacity 

• Mapping of the entire catchment and 
sub-catchment surface water monitoring 
points for EMM and the baseline water 
quality status quo 


FLAGSHIP NAME 

Revenue Management and Enhancement Program 

DESCRIPTION OF THE 

FLAGSHIP 

The programme has identified the following key 
business themes which serve as strategic objectives 
that should drive and support revenue management 
and enhancement programme. 


• Reduction of consumer debt through appropriate 
credit control and debt collection to improve 
revenue 


• Improved, Consistent and Accurate /Integrative 


129 





property value chain 

• Improved Customer Services 

• Monitoring and Evaluation of consumption 
processes and efficiencies 

• Revenue Collection 


The flagship has several projects under it and these 
are: 

1 . Key Accounts - 

2. E-siyakhokha - 

3. Indigent management programme - 

4. Restructuring of the debtors book - 

5. Siyakhokha Siyathuthuka - 


PROGRESS TO DATE 


Progress of Individual Projects within RMEP Flagship is 
summarised as follows: 


1. KeyAccounts 

Concept document, customer survey, customer 
segmentation, systems developments completed. 
Operating model and structure to be implemented by 30 
June 2014. 


2. E-Siyakhokha 

Number of Accounts Registered: 114 522 

Summary Statements send by SMS: Over 200 000 
SMS’s sent per month. 

Payments per month: Average R25m 

Planned Activities for remainder of 2013/14: 


• Increase number of registered accounts to 140 000 


130 




accounts by 30 June 2014, through Siyakhokha 
Siyathuthuka Campaign 

• Complete the implementation of the Transaction 
Consolidator which integrates e-Siyakhokha with 
Venus 

• Roll-out MMS statements and emailing of PDF 
statements. 

3. Indigent management programme 

The indigent Support policy is reviewed yearly taking 
into account the changes in the environment both 
internally and externally. There is currently a review 
being considered to deem all properties with the value 
of R 150,000 and less. The Finance department has 
done the necessary analysis to determine the viability 
thereof. 

Streamlining of process deals eliminating bottlenecks 
on the system and thus improving turnaround times. 
Bottlenecks were identified as being with the verification 
and approval process. 

• Verification Process: 

Field workers still continue with the work of verifying 
and will be given hand held devices to do the work. This 
is anticipated to begin next financial year. 

• Approval of applications. 

This was previously done by the committee and that 
presented challenges because the seating of the 
committee was never consistent. The committee was 
replaced by an approval by Indigent Co-ordinators. 

The Business Process Management (BPM) was 
implemented to deal with the process from the point of 
application to the point where subsidy is issued for an 
approved indigent. This has help to improve turnaround 
times and provide audit trail. An application can easily 
be tracked in the system. 

4. Restructuring of the debtors book 

Revenue department has accessed the collection 


131 





capability within EMM and the resources we have so 
far. Alberton & Springs are utilising a system that 
maybe be outdated in terms of collection and we have 
engaged ICT to look into a compatible system that may 
be utilised. 

Revenue division is planning to enhance the current 
collection system or procure a more appropriate system 
based on the advice from ICT. 

Revenue division is setting up a debt collection unit. 
Internal staff at credit control together with the 20 
students from Economic Development will form part of 
the team. The will all be focusing on debt collection. 

5. Siyakhokha Siyathuthuka 

For the year 2013/1 4 the drive was on a door to door 
campaign focussing on the Eskom supplied areas. The 
project engaged over 470 field workers that visited 
about 50,000 households. 

While on the field the field workers noted issues ranging 
from indigents, water leaks, illegal connections and any 
other queries raised by residents. 

A report is still to be compiled for the project done and 
an application has been sent to CPO office to get a 
service provider that can analyse the 50,000 forms we 
got back from the field workers. 

EXPECTED OR PLANNED 

DELIVERABLES FOR 14/15 

1. Keyaccounts 

Key accounts to operate as a fully-fledged unit going 
forward 

2. e-siyakhokha 

Increase the number of EMM services offered through 
e-Siyakhokha: 

Increase number of registered accounts to 200 000 
accounts by 30 June 2015, through Siyakhokha 
Siyathuthuka Campaign 


132 




3. Indigent management programme 

The Social & Health Department needs to acquire an 
electronic register or somewhat of a database of all 
indigents in the system. 


Handheld devices will need to be acquired for 
verification purposes. 

The automation process will link both internal & external 
systems as part of the verification and approval 
process. Internal systems include Venus, GIS and 
Valuation -VA3. External systems include Home 
Affairs, SARS, SASSA, to name the critical ones. Our 
internal controls must be such that we are able to 
interface with all systems identified. 

4. Restructuring of the debtors book 

Continue and intensify efforts to reduce debtors book 
and improve cash-flow. 

5. Siyakhokha Siyathuthuka 

The Siyakhokha Siyathuthuka campaigns to continue 
and there will be increased focus on the services that 
the department needs to drive awareness for. 


PLANNiNG PROCESS 

Section 29 (1) (b) of Chapter 5 of the Municipal Systems Act of 2000 states that Municipalities 
through appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures established in terms of public 
participation; allow for communities to be consulted on their development needs and priorities; the 
local community to participate in drafting of the IDP. 

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality used the ward committees as a mechanism for the purpose of 
engaging and consulting communities on their needs and priorities. The IDP review meetings were 
held in all 20 Customer Care Centres with the ward committees from 101 wards. Several wards 
(between 2 and 9) were combined into a single CCA with the effect that only 17 meetings were held 
across the metro. These meetings took place between 6 August 2013 and 17 September 2013. 

The process entailed a work session per CCA which focused around the following: 

■ Basic feedback on the past IDP / Budget Process - comments and process 

■ Discussion of 5 ward Priorities 

■ Departmental Plans in relation to ward priorities 


133 




■ Report on Capital Budget to be implemented in CCA per Ward 

■ Reflection of Department ‘s operational budget in CCA and Wards 

■ Alignment of the above with each other 


In terms of the IDP review meeting itself, there was a plenary session which was chaired by the 
Chairperson of oversight committees or CCA Manager, thereafter there was a break away session 
which was chaired by the Ward Councilor. During the break away session, the wards were afforded 
an opportunity to go through their previous years IDP needs and also to peruse the current financial 
year’s budget which was divided into a CCA based budget and the Metro wide budget. 

Most Departments attended all these meetings to answer to Ward Committees’ questions based on 
the IDP needs identified last year and previous years. 

After all this was discussed, Ward Councillors signed-off the IDP needs of their ward and this was to 
be sent to departments in order for them to incorporate them into their operational plans for 14/15 
financial year. 

For the 201 4/1 5 IDP the meetings were held as follows: 

The following community needs were identified during these meetings: 

Ward 1 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of road link Ndlovu and Algeria 

Roads 

Bridge over storm-water channel in Duduza 

Roads 

Construction of sport facility in Clayville ext. 29 cnr Porcelain & 
Aluminum Drive 

SHRAC 

Construction of Clinic in Tswelopele Ext 8 ERF 4764 

Health 

Tarring of Kubu Road Ext 1 to Langaville Road Ext 8 

Roads 


Ward 2 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Pedestrian Bridge between Makhulong section and Winnie Mandela 
Zone 01 

Roads 

Construction of up flats/RDP Houses and Kopanong sinking houses 

Human Settlement 

Construction of pay point at Tshepho Arts Centre 

Finance 

Road construction and storm water and humps in consultation with 
Councillor 

Roads 

Installation of High Mast lights at: Moriting section, Makhulong Section 
next to Bokamoso Sec School, Kopanong section* 

Energy 


134 





Ward 3 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Alternative land for relocation (two families staying in one stand) 

Human Settlement 

Road construction and storm-water in consultation with Councillor 

Roads 

Building of Multipurpose center at Winnie Mandela Park 

SHRAC 

Installation of Street lights at Maokeng Extension 

Energy 

Installation of high mast lights to identified areas Extension 6 at: 

Maokeng next to pay less and Entshonalanga School ;Erin Clinic next 
to the shops; Zone 04 Winnie Mandela Park; Zone 8 Winnie Mandela 
park 

Energy 


Ward 4 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Palisade fencing around Sethokga hostel for access control 

Human Settlement 

New storm-water drain Nyari Street and Isibongi Street and at Oakmor 
Taxi Rank. 

Roads 

Covering of open storm-water tunnel (in Extension 7 Oakmore). 

Roads 

New paving from Mala Street to Ndlovu crescent West and from 

Ndlovu Crescent East to Mala Street East. 

Roads 

New paving at Ext 7 Nare, Tsukudu and Bongo 

Roads 


Ward 5 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Pedestrian bridge at Extension 07 and Speed humps from Corner 
Kanyama to Kangaroo street 

Roads 

Library to be constructed at erf no.1 Ecaleni, Emalahleni Coal Yard 

SRAC 

Storm-water drainage - Nyoni Circle and pedestrian side walk from 
Corner Nyoni and Mvu street to Mbongolo Cresent 

Roads 

Skills development for youth and co-operatives 

Economic Development 

Covering of open storm water tunnel in ext 7 Oakmoor 

Roads 


Ward 6 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Widen of storm-water at Mampuru Street at Extension 26 

Roads 

Widen of Street at Indulweni Section. 

Roads 

Upgrading of sewer system at Indulweni, Isithame, Extension 26, 
Mashimong Section and Kopanong section 

Roads 

Widen Caprocon street and placement of storm water drain 

Roads 

Fencing of entire Ibazelo Park 

Parks 


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Ward 7 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Rev. Namane Rd: from Temong -Tlamatlama Sec Storm-water & 
roads throughout Ward 7 

Roads 

Walk ways / pavements and speed humps throughout Ward 7 

Roads 

Construction of level two clinic within ward of waiting for land 

Health 

Community hall development in ward 7 (waiting for land) 

SRAC 

Sports centre (Tsenelong ext 5) and Tlamatlama Park 

SRAC 


Ward 8 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Installation and Upgrade storm water pipe in llliba, Emoyeni and 
Emmangweni section 

Roads 

Multi sports grounds at Essellen parks (Recreational centre) 

SRAC 

Multipurpose park at llliba and community hall at Essellen park 

Parks 

Remove rubble in open space between Emmangweni and Essellen 
park and fencing of Dam at Essellen park 

Waste Management 

New paypoint at Essellen park 

Parks 


Ward 9 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Walkways Priotised - Mmaphake Kerstel, Spoonbill, Shoebill and 
roads etc at Lifateng 

Roads 

Formalization of soccer field next to Seotloane school 

SRAC 

Maintenance and repairs of the tennis courts next to Mehlareng 
stadium 

SRAC 

High mast light next to Mehlareng park at Legodi street, Seotlore 
section 

Energy 

Secretary bird & Kgano street (speed humps) 

Roads 


Ward 10 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Sidewalk paving - Lekaneng street to Seagul street/ road 

Roads 

Andrew Mapheto road next to Lekaneng Pay Point - the bridge must 
be upgraded 

Roads 


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Ward 11 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Overhead bridge between Mufyaneni section Street name Andrew 
Mapheto Dr. 

Roads 

Putting subsoil drain for KL’s at Lawrence Phokanoka Tembisa. 

Roads 

Storm water pie/drain at Esiqongweni section Archie Gumed street 

Roads 

Extension of clinic proposal, to extend to Endayeni shopping centre 
(Council Premises) 

Health 

Multipurpose centre at Endayeni Taxi Rank. Proposal - Remove 
Endayeni Taxi Rank as the rank is not being 

SRAC 


Ward 12 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Sidewalks paving in Friendship town all streets 

Roads 

Building of community hall in Phomolong Extension of existing one 

SRAC 

Development of the sport ground including lighting and grand stands 

SRAC 

Palisade fencing in Chloorkop on the side of Allendale Road. 

Roads 

Installation of three way stop at Modderfontein Road next to 
Phomolong 

Roads 


Ward 13 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Project started at Harry Gwala Sec. and also note to include Sisulu 
Section 

Human Settlement 

Building of Multipurpose Community Hall Centre 

SRAC 

High mast lighting between Phomolong Secondary school and 

Madiba section, Birch Acres Ext 3, Ext 17 Ext 6 and Ext 12 

Energy 

Building of community Clinic at Birch Acres 

Health 

Extension of Phomolong Park in Joe Slovo with sports facility e.g. 

Parks 

Netball court etc. 

SRAC 


Ward 14 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Pedestrian Bridge between Brianard Vusimuzi 

Roads 

Library at Enxiweni Section. 

SRAC 

Renovations of Sport grounds - Thafeni section 

SRAC 

Two way road from Brain Mazibuko. 

Roads 

Renaming of Streets: Ibaxa, Isivana, Thafeni and Jiyane 

City Development 


137 







Ward 15 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Installation of main sewer line in Sim Street, Glen Marais 

Water 

Storm-water management - Glen Marais are 

Roads 

Upgrading of Pretoria Road (Kios) No3 

Roads 

Pedestrian bridge in Pretoria Road at the Bircleigh Station 

Roads 

Street lights in Pretoria street from Beukes robots, until intersection of 
Vlei street 

Energy 


Ward 16 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Upgrade of the EMPD office in Edleen 

EMPD 

Upgrade of the Media Centre at the Civic Centre 

CRM 

Communications and 
Branding 

Building of New Clinic in Kempton Park next to cnr Swart Road 

Health 

New fire station for Albertina sisulu 

DEMS 

Upgrade of the swimming pool cnr Highveld and Pienaar 

SRAC 


Ward 17 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Building of Community hall in Kempton Park West 

SRAC 

Upgrading of Spartan Clinic- including Dorothy road, signage and 
access 

Health 

Repairs, maintenance and upgrading of In -door sports facility 
including repairs to the roof and air-conditioning of Dries Niemand 

SRAC 

Fencing of both sides Zuurfontein Road Road, Kempton Park 

Roads 

Upgrading of roads and pavement in the Kempton Park CBD. 

Roads 


Ward 18 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Traffic lights at 4th avenue and 2nd street 

Roads 

Rehabilitation of llliondale wetlands 

Environment 

Management 

IRPTN station near Edenvale CBD 

Transport 

Rehabilitation of Harnods farm dam 

Environment 

Management 

Paving of Laurie road from Terrace to R25 both sides 

Roads 


138 







Ward 19 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Double the capacity of the storm-water drain in Plantation road, 
Eastleigh. 

Roads 

Three way traffic lights in Terrace road, Eastleigh 

Roads 

Paving around Dunvegan primary school 

Roads 

Upgrade taxi rank at 8th avenue & 8th street 

Transport 

Refurbishment of Edenvale library 

SRAC 


Ward 20 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Intersection accessibility into the freeway at Van Buuren road and N3 
through to the intersection of Van Buuren & Van der Linde N3 on 
ramp (wireless grid) cameras to be installed, also R24 and Bradford 
on ramp 

Roads 

North Reef Road & AG de Wit intersection - upgrade Riley rd, 

Boering Harper road swing bridge 

Roads 

Upgrade Van Buuren rd in front of the Police station - traffic to be 
diverted down Park road into Hawley - from Park into - intersection 
Van Buuren/ Nicole/ Hawley to establish a boulevard between Park / 
Nicole/ Hawley/ Van Buuren intersection 

Roads 

Upgrade of Goollolys farm 

Parks 

Upgrade of the electrical I substation in Stuart park Wychwood 

Energy 


Ward 21 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Makause informal settlement & toilet roll out 

Human settlement 

Multipurpose centre consisting of community hall one stop centre for 
the paying accounts , open ground Petunia & Poppy and Library 

SRAC 

Upgrade of all sidewalks in all schools in Primrose 

Roads 

Urban Renewal and upgrading of Primrose CBD. 

Urban Renewal 

Develop taxi rank in Pretoria road 

Transport 


Ward 22 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Electrical ring-feet in Comet to prevent long outages due to cable 
theft 

Energy 

Pedestrian bridge at the EG Jansen over Rietfontein 

Roads 

Taxi offloading bays in the following roads, Paul Smith, Casen road, 
North road and Trichard Centenary hall 

Transport 

Albution facilities at the netball and soccer facilities in Boksburg 
north 

SRAC 

Traffic impact study for Northrand road to alleviate traffic congestion 

ROADS 


139 






Ward 23 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Upgrade of Bonaero Park Clinic 

Health 

Improvement of Stormwater system north boundary of Bonaerodrive 
and improvement of Stormwater system De Hatland st Impala park 

Roads 

Traffic lights to be installed on the corner of Celia Nestlad and Stokroos 
Street in Benoni 

Roads 

Additional parking bays and offloading bays to be created in front of 
Rebel fruit and veg at Star street in Atlasville 

Transport 

Upgrade of Bonaero Park Clinic 

City Development 


Ward 24 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Rebuild storm water drains at Western, Evans, Hodson, Mollison and 
Renny Roads 

Roads 

Electrification of chief Albert Luthuli park Ext 6 

Energy 

Community Development Centre. 

SRAC 

Soccer fields for Albert Luthuli Ext 4 and Crystal park 

SRAC 

Enlargement of the Crystal park clinic 

Health 


Ward 25 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Construction of Tsaro road ,ext 37 

Roads 

Staffing of new clinic at Etwatwa, ext 37 

Health 

Early child development centre needed at ext 37 

Community Development 

Multipurpose Sports Centre at Umgababa 

SRAC 

Multipurpose Park in Yende. 

Parks 


Ward 26 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of Tsavo road at Extension 34. 

Roads 

Development of a Multipurpose Centre at Erf 36435 

SRAC 

Storm-water next to Vezikhono Secondary 

Roads 

Clinic to be developed at 34095 

Health 

Extend the high mast lights as per plan in 17 units at Etwatwa Ext 34 

Energy 


Ward 27 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Priority is the basic infrastructure, namely the provision of electricity, 
water and sewerage. 

Roads, Water, Energy 

The increase in densification through townhouse development and sub- 
division, water pressure must be improved or increased and the 
electricity supply should be secured. 

Water 

Energy 


140 








Further, road maintenance remains essential to ensure that the cost of 
repair in the long term is kept as low as possible. 

Roads 

Rynfield, Airfield and Morehill parks must be cleaned 5 times per year 
(grass cutting emphasis is on second and final cutting, edges need to 
be trimmed also). 

Parks 

Replace water pipes in the old suburbs of Benoni 

Water 


Ward 28 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Grass cutting emphasis is on 2nd and final cutting, edges need to be 
trimmed. Homestead Dam Park Thulane Dene Street- Farramere 
Gardens 

Parks 

Investigate and repair of the whole water network in Farramere - 
specially Gillwell street, Southy and Kei roads 

Water 

Resurfacing of Homestead 

Roads 

Water pressure investigation and resolve for Lakefield, The Stewards 
and Westdene 

Water 

Water pressure at western extension to be increased or upgraded. 

Water 


Ward 29 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Replacement of water pipes, sidewalks, roads 

Water 

Roads 

Housing for backyard and sub tenants in Wattville and Actonville and 
home seekers, Hostel 

Human Settlement 

Upgrading of all parks in Actonville and Wattville 

Parks 

High mast lights at Mabuya Park, Ephes Mamkele Sec School and 
Hostel 

Energy 


Ward 30 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Storm-water drainage to be installed at Spoornet, Lakeview and at 

Dube Street next to the Cemetery. 

Water 

Multipurpose Centre 

SRAC 

Housing at Wattville. 

Human Settlement 

Recreation facilities - Sesedi Park tennis court & the tennis court next 
to Etwatwa Secondary school to be revamped. 

SRAC 

Replacement or upgrade of all ward water pipes in Ward 30, Wattville. 

Water 


141 







Ward 31 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Mogane Mlangeni,Abby Nyalunga, WCRC ,Dabula, Jangu, Malele, 

Mamkele, Xaba, Maseko, Moni, Mathibela, Matlaisane Streets(in 
consultation with the ward Councilor) 

Roads 

Multipurpose Centre : Dalpark Extension 6, Minnebron (in consultation with 
the ward Councilor) 

SRAC 

Re-evaluation & rectification of the water pipeline system & valves in 
Tamboville,installation of new pipeline in Sebotsane street which are 
connected to a stronger water supply system(in consultation with the ward 
Councilor) 

Water 

Tarring of roads- Withok- Floors Street Tamboville-Mike, Louis Street and 
the rest of Sebotsane are Gravel & re-tar & expansion of Van Dyk road(in 
consultation with the ward Councilor) 

Roads 

High mast lights & construction of walkway between Tamboville down to 
Tiger wood street across Dikbas street all the way to Carnival Mall( in 
consultation with the ward Councilor) 

Energy 


Ward 32 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Further funding and rehabilitation of Boksburg Lake. (Budget allocated not 
enough) 

Parks 

Extension of the Boksburg Civic Centre Clinic to accommodate the 
number of people attending (in consultation with the ward Councilor) 

Health 

Boksburg CBD Library - security cameras and alarms & IT Equipment 
(more computers) more computers for children training centre in library 

SRAC 

Boksburg City Stadium - track maintenance, ablution maintenance & 
concrete palisade fence maintenance 

SRAC 

Storm-water problems, a seasonal occurrence at Trichard Street (Cason), 
Hospital & Railway Street (Plantation) at Railway Subway (CBD) & Albu, 
Konig Koenage Street between Boksburg High School & CBC School and 
storm-water problem in Albu Street between Boksburg High School and 
CBC School 

Roads 


Ward 33 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Clinic in Ward 33 

Health 

Water for informal settlements 4 taps Kanang, 5 taps Jerusalem and 
firehydrain Jerusalem 

Water 

Paving along with deep roads 

Roads 

Sports ground (development of soccer field and netball field (Smene & 

Bird street) 

SRAC 

Housing for informal settlements in Ward 33 

Human Settlement 


142 






Ward 34 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Housing for Reiger Park, back yard informai settiements. 

Human Settiement 

High mast iight needed at Joe Siovo informai settiement 

Energy 

Refurbishment of the grand stand at C.J. Ciements Stadium at Reiger 

Park 

SRAC 

More community taps in Joe Siovo for in case of fire emergency and in 

DEMS 

centrai hostei (Five extra taps) 

Water 

Housing for Reiger Park, back yard informai settiements. 

Human Settiement 


Ward 35 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Ext 9 New community recreationai haii 

SRAC 

Ext 8 & 9 roads construction 

Roads 

New Dukathoie Ciinic 

Heaith 

New Secondary Schooi next to Extension 9 

GDE 

Dukathoie Housing deveiopment (Ext 8) 

Human Settiement 


Ward 36 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Upgrading of buiidings in Germiston iake grounds c/o Kingfisher, 

Nandos and Caretaker house 

Parks 

Rehabiiitation of the Aiberton dam iapa and compieting the fencing 

Environment Management 

Resurfacing of Refinery between power street and Raiiway Bridge in 
consuitation with the counciior 

Roads 

Upgrading of Barrang park (Driehoek) 

Parks 

Paving of Victoia Lake ciub (Germiston iake) 

Parks 


Ward 37 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Expand & improve the taxi rank in Dupiessis street 

Transport 

Address serious storm water capacity probiems of Ring road east, 
Swartkoppies & Heideiiberg road 

Roads 

Totai rehabiiitation of Aiberton Bouievard paving, storm water road, 
pruning of trees and covering manhoie 

Roads 

Pavement upgrade in the foiiowing streets; Hendrik Potgieter, 2nd 
Avenue, Louis Trichard , Pieter Uys and Van Riebeck road 

Roads 

Upgrade of aii storm water system aiong Padstow & Austei street 

Roads 


143 






Ward 38 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Fixing of Pedestrian bridge over Swartkoppies between Vermooten & 
Hennie Albeas road 

Roads 

Jackson dam; implementation of a storm water system 

Roads 

Brackenhurst Library needs a complete new air conditioner 

SRAC 

Fencing of a park; south western corner of Palala &Gardenia street 

Parks 

Fencing of a park on the cnr of Strydpoort and Eekhorning street. 

Parks 


Ward 39 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads in Buhle Park (in Consultation with Councillor) 

Roads 

Tarring of roads in Rondebult x2 Nectarine Angel road and Melon road 
& Boikhotsong 

Roads 

Complete construction of community hall Rondebult ext2 

SRAC 

Fencing of Community Hall in Rondebult Ext 2 

SRAC 

Rehabilitation and fencing of Weideman in Elsburg 

Parks 


Ward 40 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Clinic in Buhle Park. 

Health 

Roads construction in Buhle park 

Roads 

Indoor sports centre / swimming pool in Spruitview 

SRAC 

Refurbishment of Old Beerhall 

Human Settlement 

Upgrading of street lighting network in Roodekop ext 31 

Energy 


Ward 41 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Construction of Inkongolo Thupello and Ekuphumleni streets at 
Roodekop ext 22 

Roads 

Construction of Storm water drains at Kusasa, Lithemba and Luvuyo 
streets at Roodekop ext 21 

Roads 

Construction of storm water drains at Sekete and Ndobe Crescent at 
Spruitview 

Roads 

Construction of Luvuyo street from corner Ndiphe & Luvuyo to Luvuyo 
street at ward 95 

Roads 

Construction of Phelindaba street at road Roodekop ext 23 Mfundo 
and Funda streets at Roodekop ext 2 

Roads 


144 







Ward 42 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads in Reiger Park Extension 5 

Roads 

Electricity upgrade in Reiger Park Ext 5 (Ramaposa) and Egoli 

Village 

Energy 

Community Hall 

SRAC 

Re-surfacing of Roads in Freeway Park 

Roads 

Taxi rank in Egoli & Graceland 

Transport 


Ward 43 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Library & community hall in Dawn Park 

SRAC 

Construction of the link Road from Windmill Park to North Boundry 
Road (The extension at Hewitt Drive) 

Roads 

Curbing and paving of West central Road Dawn Park 

Roads 

Protective structures for the Electricity boxes in Windmill Park 

Energy 

Protective structures for the electricity boxes in Dawn Park 

Energy 


Ward 44 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Primary school Ext 16 and 31 

GDE 

RDP Houses for Ward 44 

Human Settlement 

Upgrading of Moagi & Briedfield 

Roads 

Multipurpose Park 

SRAC 

Rental stocks for ward 44 

Human Settlement 


Ward 45 


IDP Needs 

Department 

To replace electrification proclaimed with Zenzakwenzeke & 

Greenfield ext 2 

Energy 

Extension of Extension 9 Clinic 

Health 

Multipurpose Cultural Centre for Vosloorus 

SRAC 

New Community Hall for Villa Siza 

SRAC 

Streetlights - Masianoke - ext 9 Vosloorus 

Energy 


Ward 46 


IDP Needs 

Department 

High mast lights at Levakako Extension 9 

Energy 

High mast lights at phase 3 Extension 28 

Energy 

Storm water drainage at Rest in peace street Extension 2 (Douglas 
Montsheng) moved to 2014/2015 sidewalks 

Roads 

Road kerbs at Rest in Peace Street Ext 2 

Roads 

Developing of sport grounds at Nkidi & Nyashego street at Extension 8 

SRAC 


145 








Ward 47 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads in Extension 28 (Tsau,Jwaneng, Sehitwa, Lobatse, 
Moremi, Mauno, Shakane, Sefophe, Gaborone, Botswana and 
Tshabong. 

Roads 

Multipurpose Centre consisting of Hall, Clinic and accommodating 
other ward activities. 

SRAC 

Health 

High mast lights-2 needed in Nyoni and Isikhebhe Streets in 
consultation with the ward Councillor 

Energy 

Housing-Vumbuka Informal settlement needs to be developed as well 
as Sotho hostel converted into family units. 

Human Settlement 

Development of Parks and Sport facilities- for Ward 47 in consultation 
with the Ward Councillor 

Parks 

SRAC 


Ward 48 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Upgrade of Mofokeng pump station 

Water 

Construction of Mofokeng sport field to be fenced with the following 
facilities : Netball court; Soccer ground; Tennis court 

SRAC 

Renovation and cleaning of Bhekekazi recycling centre for agricultural & 
recycling purposes 

Waste Management 

Construction of storm water drainage at Mokgampanyane & Poole 
streets 

Roads 

Tarring of roads - Magibiyane at Mofokeng;Tshoafu at 

Mofokeng;Nkoebe Annalanzi 

Roads 


Ward 49 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Storm-water - Makula Section from stand no. 194-198 properties 
not accessible when raining and houses are always flooded. 

Moumetsi Street in Phooko Section is 1 00% no storm-water and 
houses are always flooded throughout the rain season, cnr Tladi and 
the newly constructed Bakoena Street. 

Roads 

Installation of street lights from Thutong Sibisi street and Moseu street 
from Mopeli to Tsolo Section 

Energy 

High mast lights near Akanyang Primary School and two High light 
masts at Poole street and Phooko Section 

Energy 

Developing of sports facilities in Phake Section between Bakwena 
and Mphuthi Streets. 

SRAC 

Upgrade of old dilapidated sewer system (whole ward). 

Water 


146 






Ward 50 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Development of a Regional Park at 69 Twala (planting of grass and 
trees) 

Parks 

Storm-water drainage - Ville Street. 

Roads 

Paving median at Khotso and Masakhane Street 

Roads 

Storm water system at Mabizela & Masakhane street 

Roads 

Storm water system cnr Tshabalala & Twai across Railway line 
between Moshoeshoe & Motsamai 

Roads 


Ward 51 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Youth Centre Next to Monde Primary School 

SRAC 

Erection of Trading Stalls at Lamola Street next to Natalspruit station 

Economic Development 

Paving of sidewalks in consultation with Clr 

Roads 

Upgrade of sewer network in Ward 51 

Water 

Tarring of Big Street 

Roads 


Ward 52 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Develop a multipurpose park (Tennis court, netball, volleyball and 
basketball court) at stand no 2097 opposite DH William Hall Katlehong. 

Parks 

Develop an intermodal taxi rank at stand no 50/151 - IR near 

Natalspruit Hospital, Katlehong. 

Transport 

Develop a new Library near Katlehong CCC 1 Offices. 

SRAC 

Street lights at Letsoho Street Mandela Section, Katlehong and 

Serema Street, Mpilisweni Section, Thokoza. 

Energy 

Paving (sidewalk) at Nhlapo, Basothong, Maphanga and 

Phumulamqashi Section 

Roads 


Ward 53 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring and construction of one or more of the following streets 

Verbena Ugagane, Ntloboshlyane Umqwaloth Kotloano, Street 

Roads 

Development of Parks at are of the following areas: Thinasonke; 
Edenpark Ext 5 and Greenfield 

Parks 

Construct taxi rank at: Greenfields 

Transport 

Constructionof stadium at greenfield at Renovation of Eden Park 

Stadium 

SRAC 

Installation of speed-humps at: 

Roads 


147 







Ward 54 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Speedhumps at Mtambo Street next to Thembalethu Primary in 
Consultation with Councilor 

Roads 

High mast light at Erf 231 Letlatsa Street at Thintwa village 

Energy 

Relocation of Mavimbela families from the 2 rooms housing into 
houses 

Human Settlement 

Storm water / Curbs - Wayithi Street from Thuto to Mbooi Street and 
Vlle and Ndlovu stormwater 

Roads 

Development of early child learning centre 

Social Development 


Ward 55 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Construction of storm-water drainage at Masakhane, Moya, 

Masango, Mandlevo, Tselopele, Matla, Phokojoe and Myezane 

Street at Everest Thokoza 

Roads 

Extension of Goba clinic, erf 328 

Health 

Contruction of Roads in consultation with Clr at Mnagadi, Salie, 
Hlongwane and Zuma 

Roads 

Building of Skills Centre at Radebe Section Erf 326 

Roads 

Construction of Child development Centre at Thokoza, Nkaki Street 
at Everest 

Economic Development 


Ward 56 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tobatse -Tshele & Maphale Streets - Construction of storm-water 
drainage. 

Roads 

Nkaki & Mokoena Street storm-water drainage to be upgrading 

Roads 

Tarring of 4 Circles at Mkwayi street, 5 Circles at Pitso, Mabuya, 
Mapatone, Mokoena, Xaba street, Moepshe Street 

Roads 

Storm water between Mpye and Maronyane to be contructed 

Roads 

Storm water between Mahano and Moepshe to be upgraded 

Roads 


148 






Ward 57 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads Phuta Park Ext 1 & 2 

Roads 

Paving of all passages in Phola Park Extension 1 & 2 

Roads 

Sports ground Thinasonke 

SRAC 

High mast lights in Extension 2 (in consultation with the Councillor) 

Energy 

Cosovo informal settlement 

Human Settlement 


Ward 58 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Extension of existing library (Palmridge) 

SRAC 

Construction of road in consultation with the councillor in Palmridge 
Ext 1 to 4 

Roads 

Multiple Purpose Centre - Erf no. 5414 or 2747 

SRAC 

Early Childhood Centre a - Erf no. 5960 

SRAC 

Swimming Pool at Eden Park - corner Lancia Street and Ferari 

Health and Social 

Street 

Development 


Ward 59 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Multipurpose skill centre 903 Likole Section 

Economic Development 

Roads of Kwanele proper Kwanele South & Kwanele Extension 2 in 
consultation with the councilor 

Roads 

Roads at Likole Section & Likole Extension 2 

Roads 

High mast lights at Kwanele 

Energy 

Development of formal sports complex 81 1 with toilets change 
rooms, grand stands, lights & fenced around. 

SRAC 


Ward 60 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of Ramokonupi Roads in consultation with the Councillor 

Roads 

Tarring of Siluma roads in the consultation with the Councillor 

Roads 

Upgrading of Khumalo Park and fencing around it. (Fencing and 
park furniture) 

Parks 

Construction of multipurpose sports Centre in Moleki proper 

SRAC 

Calvert coverage of storm-water stream between Khumalo valley 
and Siluma View 

Water 


149 







Ward 61 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads Zonkezizwe in consultation with the Councillor 

Roads 

Tarring of roads Magagula heights in consultation with the 

Councillor 

Roads 

Alternative housing - build flats (2500 units), there is congestion in 
residential stands and this requires alternative human settlements 
due to the lack of land. 

Human Settlement 

Palmridge Extension 9 clinic - building of a new clinic at Palmridge 
Extension 9. 

Health 

Palmridge Extension 9 - install solar Street lights. 

Energy 


Ward 62 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Roads and stormwater pipes 

Roads 

High mast lights 

Social Development 

Sport and recreation multipurpose centre 

SRAC 

Skills development Centre erf No. 5781 Zonkizizwe Ext 1 Zone 6 

Economic Development 

Early childhood development centre 

Social Development 


Ward 63 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Building of a new Auditorium Hall in Ward 63 at Erf 6221 . The land is 
owned by the Municipality 

SRAC 

Construction of streets: Nobakhethwa, Tsie, Malefetsane, Lerumo, 
School street, Pherekgong, Banzana, Tau, Shona, Hlakula, Masoko, 
Mmesa, Lwetse, Phato, Street next to 8090, Thobisi, Vikin, Sonyboy, 
Lamoen, Seretse, Gambia, Zambia, Comoros, Zanzibar, Seychelles, 
Malawi, Sudan, Egypt, Togo, Phundungwane, Hlakubele, Tsholofelo, 
Tshitwe, Mphelane, Ntaka, Thahameso, Kgatleng, Langa, Seho, 
Pudumo, Silumko, Matsitela, Chingwedzi, Somalia and Cameroon 
streets 

Roads 

Building of second Clinic with waiting rooms in Ext 20 at ERF 21 567. 
The land is owned by EMM 

Health 

Development fo Thusong Squatter Camp (Stands allocation, roads 
and sanitation) at Stand number 7049 & 7050 Zonkizizwe Ext 2. Land 
is owned by EMM 

Human Settlement 

Building of new Public Taxi rank, The land is owned by EMM 

Transport 


150 






Ward 64 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Completing of Moagi Street up to Tambokies cemetery. 

Roads 

Taxi Rank in Extension 28, 25 and 14 (Erf 11531) 

Transport 

Roads at Extension 28, 1 8, 25, 47, 53 and Phase 2 - These roads 
are short roads connecting each other 

Roads 

Park Extension 14 Ukusuka and Uhamba Streets 

Parks 

Multipurpose Centre at Ext 28 

SRAC 


Ward 65 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Complete houses at Etwatwa Ext 10 construct new houses with 
toilets at Etwatwa Ext 18 and 19 

Human Settlement 

Electrification Etwatwa of Extension 18 and 19 

Energy 

Storm water: Chris Hani Drive Ext 10 

Roads 

Tarring of streets:- Mqamelo street at Etwatwa Extension 36, 

Mqamelo street linking to Shabalala, Mahlokoana & Cumbe Street. 

Roads 

Construction of Multipurpose Centre at Portion 7/8/3624 Etwatwa 

Ext 10 

SRAC 


Ward 66 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Construction of centre at Et 24 

SRAC 

Housing Development Phase 3, Extension 9 

Human Settlement 

Paving of passages & Sidewalks 

Roads 

Construction of roads: 24th, 29th and 32nd Street 

Roads 

Street lights and high mast lights to all areas and Chris Hani Street 

Energy 


Ward 67 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads; 12th Street (Etwatwa West and 8th Ext 4) 

Roads 

Multipurpose hall (in consultation with the councilor) 

SRAC 

Converting an old clinic to a multipurpose Centre of Etwatwa West 

SRAC 

Development of housing project at Etwatwa West 

Human Settlement 

Street lights - Kopie Motebang and Lesoalo 

Energy 


151 







Ward 68 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Park at Chris Hani Ext 2 developed and fenced 

Parks 

Multi-purpose Centre construction at Erf 869 

SRAC 

Upgrade of informal sports ground at Chris Hani Ext 2 

SRAC 

Tarring of all roads at Chris Hani Ext 1 & 2 

Roads 

Upgrade of storm water drainage at Chris Hani at Ext 1 & 2 

Roads 


Ward 69 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Storm water drainage and channel at Bhengu Street 

Roads 

Rehabilitation of Old Houses for eldery / indigent 

Social Development 

Build a proper Taxi Rank in Turton 

Transport 

Tarring of all passages and incoming streets adjoining Chris Hani 

Roads 

Indoor Sport Facility at Sinaba Stadium 

SRAC 


Ward 70 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Paving of passages. 

Roads 

Paving of passage Dungeni to Shongwe, Shongwe to Thembu, 

Sindane to Swazi. Barwa and Ledwaba, Hlakwane next to the station, 
Hostel passage. 

Roads 

Paving of sidewalks - Kwena & Kolobe. Resource centre at Shezi 

Street. 

SRAC 

Upgrading of Art Centre (Rhu Hlatswayo) 

SRAC 

Upgrading of Daveyton Hostel. 

Human Settlement 


Ward 71 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Paving of sidewalks and passages: Dotwana, Bomba, Duvula, Dumer, 
Tonga Street 

Roads 

Installation of two high mast lights in Lindelani. Nomathamsanqa Park, 
Saints Ground, Mabuya ground, Passage lights. 

Energy 

Four water tanks in Lindelani. 

Water 

Establishment of Industrial Hive 

Economic Development 

Lindelani Housing Project 

Human Settlement 


152 







Ward 72 


IDP Needs 

Department 

High mast lights in Bakerton sport ground, Bakerton community centre 
and Bakerton cemetery, Gugulethu & Madiba Park at Payneville Ext 1 

Energy 

Formalise housing for Gugulethu, Skomplaas and Everest informal 
settlement. 

Human Settlement 

Install robots at cnr Paul Kruger and Main Reef roads in Dersley near 
Jameson school. 

Roads 

Upgrading of Murray Park 

Park 

Upgrading of a park in Dersely Park (corner Lovefield and Episode 
street behind the shops) and Erection of New Park opposite Payneville 
school 

Parks 


Ward 73 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Multipurpose Centre Kingsway plus or include Library & Community 

Hall 

SRAC 

Upgrading of water Pipes in Rynsoord & New Modder 

Water 

Parks at New Modder and Kingsway along main Reef and New 

Modder in existing one 

Parks 

Upgrading of sewerage system in Kingsway township 

Water 

Construction of bridge at Pikoko street, Kingsway 

Roads 


Ward 74 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Drain stormwater at Mohlala street 

Roads 

Tarring of Bathurist Lane 

Roads 

Street caps at Tornando and Phomolo 

Roads 

Electricity cables to be put underground 

Energy 

Drain stormwater at Mashila/Rietvlei Ottaw Street 

Roads 


Ward 75 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Electricity cables at Development areas 

Energy 

Paving of street 9,11,12 

Roads 

Dam at Resin Berriger to Dr Revamps 

Waste Management 

Pam Brink Stadium 

SRAC 

Never-Never Informal Settlements Housing Development 

Human Settlement 


153 


Ward 76 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Mobile Clinic for all the areas in the ward 

Health 

Houses in the N17 and Hollywood 4 Kwasa Village, Daggafontein 

Human Settlement 

Surfacing of Loerie Street, Leoni Street, Mossie & Fulmar street to be 
upgraded 

Roads 

Electricity in the Infomal Settlement. 

Energy 

Sports and recreation indoor centre at R BA OR Erf 125 A or B 
selection Park 

SRAC 


Ward 77 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads: Masango, Mphahlela, Mbhele, Holomisa and Malume 

Roads 

Construction of primary school 

GDE 

Multipurpose centre with a library at Kgaswane and Thabahadi street 

SRAC 

Police Station 

SAPS 

Speed humps at September Street Extension 2 and Thokalo and 
Molopyane street 

Roads 


Ward 78 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Roofing of old houses at Overline. 

Human Settlement 

Develop Indaba tree to a proper heritage village. 

SRAC 

Rehabilitation of CBD 

City Development 

Upgrading of Kwa-Thema main clinics 

Health 

Hostel to be converted to family units. 

Human Settlement 


Ward 79 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads: 

Roads 

Dungwana at Ext 6, Nquthu Str at Langavillle Ext 8, Conwell/Sobukwe 
Street in Ext 7A, Freedom Avenue behind Pick n’ Pay, Nongoma Str, 
Ndabana in Ext 8 

GDE 

New building of Primary School at Langaville Ext 8 and Police Station 

SRAC 

Sport complex at Extension 7 Langaville 

Human Settlement 

Clinic and Pay Point Office at Extension 8 Langaville 

Roads 


Ward 80 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Re-construction of roads at Mthethwa, Masike, Phuthagae, Mashiane, 
Ntshengu and Zwane Streets. 

Roads 


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Library at Verganoeg area or Kofane Street 

SRAC 

Building of a new Community Hall at Kofane Street 

SRAC 

Demolishing old structure between Nafcoc and old Cemetary. 

Economic Development 

Construction of calvets in water streams 

Roads 


Ward 81 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Construction of new roads: Kwa-makhosi, T. Mbheki in Langaville, 

Hearth Str, Oliver Str, Mbele Str, Gabuza Str 

Roads 

Development of informal settlement in Langaville Ext 1 and Ext 6 

Human Settlement 

Development of Sports field 

SRAC 

Street lights in Vlakfontein 

Energy 

Police station 

SAPS 


Ward 82 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Roads & storm-water 

Roads 

Speed humps in all main roads 

Roads 

Vehicle testing station 

Licensing 

Multi-purpose Cultural Centre with Auditorium with complete Sports & 
Recreational Facilities with swimming pool 

SRAC 

Mechanical workshop - Car City 

Gauteng Transport 


Ward 83 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Completion of Ngweni Street 

Roads 

Drainage system in Nhlabathi and Marambane 

Roads 

Intallation of Plaveltsin Nmo & Madonsela 

Human Settlement 

Install concrete barriers and speed humps 

Health 

Converting of so shacks into RDP Houses. Repair water logged and 
cracked houses 

SRAC 


Ward 84 


IDP Needs 

Department 

New Clinic for Ext 16, 17, 19 and 1 2B 

Health 

Primary school to serve 16, 17, 19 and 1 2B 

GDE 

Early childhood development in Ext 16 

Social Development 

Construction of Roads in 12B (Gogo, Zimele streets and others, (Ext 
17and 19) 

Roads 

Technical training college is needed at Ext 16, 17, 12b, Duduza 

GDE 


155 








Ward 85 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Tarring of roads: Mthunzi avenues, Njelele, Mothibe, Malaza, 
Kotavushika & Vulindlela 

Roads 

Day Care Centre Ext 8 

EMPD 

Metro Police prescent 944/40520 Ext 8 

Roads 

New Storm-water: Thubelisha Extension 8 Rockville Thakado, and 
Modjadji Street 

GDE 

High school Extension 8. 

Social Development 


Ward 86 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Houses need to be built in ward 86 

Social Development 

Roads to be tarred in Masechaba Ext 1 Mayekiso street, JB Max str, 
Tswete Str, bluegum Ext 2 zabalaza Freedom 

Roads 

Bluegum Ext 35 Mahlangu, Namibia Ext 17 roads 

SRAC 

Ext 9 Ekuthuleni Ext 15 Di wetse, Francis Brown, Maharaj, Thubelisha 
Ext 4 

Roads 

Library to be built in ward 84 Duduza in a vacant land 

Water, Energy, Roads 


Ward 87 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Upgrading of formal soccer ground at Masechaba view at Corner 
Ramaphosa and Lekope 

SRAC 

Primary School in Wards 87 

GDE 

Tarring of roads: Winnie Mandela, ZK Mathews, Robinson 

Roads 

Construction of houses in Bluegum View, Spaarwater PTN 1714 Cool 
breeze Ext 1 

Human Settlement 

Swimming pool at Multipurpose Centre 

SRAC 


Ward 88 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Concrete fencing upgrading and maintenance Alra Park 

Parks 

Paving of sidewalk Tuna Road Alra Park 

Roads 

Enclosure of Nigel Gold Club 

SRAC 

Additional high mast lights and water points Snake Park 

Energy 

Rehabilitation of wetland Alra Park 

Environment 

Management 


156 







Ward 89 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Alternative land for Winnie Mandela and L&J informal settlement, to 
settle the communities 

Human Settlement 

Registration of Beneficiaries in L&J Informal Settlement 

Human Settlement 

EMPD Precinct: Erf 2739 

EMPD 

Multipurpose Park within Ward 89 

Parks 

Community hall: Erf 5877 

SRAC 


Ward 90 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Upgrade informal settlement (proper stands with sustainable sanitation) 
Emhlangeni stands No. 316, 317, 318, 319, 320. Vusimuzi, Two line 
and Mangosuthu 1 and 2 

Human Settlement 

Relocation of congested and under electric pylons informal settlement 
for construction of roads and storm 

Human Settlement 

Building of early childhood development (ECD) centre at ERF 

124/stand and a Hall at No. 210/124 

Social Development 

Proclamation of the following stands: 124/618, 619, 620, 621, 622, 

623, 624, 159, 463, 462, 795 and 208 

Human Settlement 

City Development 

Transform Castel Hostel: Amour Foundation - stand no 303. Private 
school into a public primary school 

GDE 


Ward 91 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Community Hall with Clinic and Library in Birch Acres Ext 23-44 

SRAC 

Health 

Pedestrian Bridge and paved walkways across stream/ spruit from 
Malvina Road/ Pongola Drive linking with Frikkie Street, Birchleigh 

SRAC 

North 

Health 

Community Hall with Clinic and Library in Esselen Park Ext 3 

Roads 

Pedestrian Bridge across Andrew Drive (between the Birch Acres Mall 
and Sophia Town) 

Roads 

Fence next to Strydom Street from Pongola Drive closing off the open 
field between Birchleigh North and Esselen Park 

Roads 


Ward 92 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Housing for backyard dwellers in Elandsfontein is needed as they are 
being evicted. Low cost housing needs to be built 

Human Settlement 

Storm water Management in consultation with the Councillor 
throughout the ward prioritizing Eastleigh in wards 18 and 19 which 
impacts on ward 92. 

Roads 

Clinic to be moved to Erf 603A, Klopper Park 

Health 


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Development of ERF 40/60 IR between Olifant, Serenade, Amber, 

Reef, Elandsfontein 

City Development 

Ridge Road becoming yaldwin crossing R21 to be widened. 

Roads 


Ward 93 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Sidewalks from Corner Withfield and Boksburg Road Delmore Park 

Roads 

High mast lighting - Delfort Informal settlements 

Energy 

Sidewalks - corner Boksburg and Du Preez Road Delmore Gardens 

Roads 

Housing - good hope informal settlement 

Human Settlement 

Housing in Marathon and Delport informal settlement 

Human Settlement 


Ward 94 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Mobile Clinic in Mayberry Park 

Health 

Paving from Blue crane Drive in Meyersdal 

Roads 

Traffic calming measures at J.G. Strydom 

Roads 

Upgrading of pavements at J.G. Strydom and Potgieter in Mayberry 

Park 

Roads 

Pedestrian walkaway, stand 261 Bosworth Street South in Alrode 

Roads 


Ward 95 


IDP Needs 

Department 

High Mast lights in Mapleton Ext 10 & 12 

Energy 

Storm water drainages at Mapleton Ext 1 2 and Vosloorus Mabaso and 
Kgosana Street, and Lefokotsane 

Roads 

Tarring of outstanding roads Mapleton Ext 10 and 12 

Roads 

Development of Parks (Mapleton Ext 10 & 12) 

Parks 

Mobile Clinic Mapleton Ext 10 

Health 


Ward 96 


IDP Needs 

Department 

New Clinic at Mayfield Extension 8 

Health 

Multipurpose Centre Ext 6 Mayfield 

SRAC 

Construction of access road Mayfield Ext. 6,7 (Ntokozo Street) 

Roads 

Informal sports grounds and park in Mayfield 

SRAC 

Construction of house in Mayfield Extension 1 

Human Settlement 


Ward 97 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Convert the over line cables to underground lines in Leachville Ext 3 

Energy 

Demolish and refurbish Brakpan tennis club. 

SRAC 

Multipurpose centre (Recreation Centre centre with Sports and Hall) 

SRAC 


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Relocation of Weltevrede informal settlements 

Human Sttlement 

Upgrading a Roads and Stormwater in Leachville Ext 3, Salie Street 

Roads 


Ward 98 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Canal/Bridge at Corner Leopeng and Mabuya Street 

Roads 

Electrification of John Dube 

Energy 

Sports facilities; Dunnottair / Duduza 

SRAC 

Street lights: Ndudula, Letsapa & Lekope Streets 

Energy 

Sidewalks: Lekope, Letsapa, Jacobs, Ndudula streets 

Roads 


Ward 99 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Clinic for Windmill Park Extension 8 & 9 including Lindelani and D 
Section. 

Health 

Community Hall (Windmill Park). 

SRAC 

Police Station (Windmill Park). 

SAPS 

High Mast Lights in Villa Lisa Extension 3, and Extension 8, 9 Windmill 
Park. 

Energy 

Storm-water reticulation in all of ward 99. Storm-water drainage 
(James Strachan Street between house no. 1260 and 1266. 

Roads 


Ward 100 


IDP Needs 

Department 

Develop stand no 1 88 Hospital view for a soccer field - Change rooms 
and caretakers cottage, complete with toilets as well as spectators 
plastic stands and paved walkways 

SRAC 

Tarring of gravel roads (8th road, 6th ave and Ist ave Bredell) 8th Road 
between Third avenue and Fernandes Road 

Roads 

6th Avenue between Seventh road and Ninth road Ist Avenue between 
Fourth road and Sixth Road. 

Water 

Water - Improve the low water pressure system in Bredell and Pomona 
as well as relocating water meters in Hospital view(midblock). 

Energy 

Street lights in Marister, Zesfontein and Benoni Agricultural holding and 
Hospital view Streets, plus in the rest of the ward. 

Roads 


Ward 101 


IDP Needs 

Department 

New Tsietsi Clinic- South/Palm-Ridge Ext 8 

Health 

Tarring of Moduwane, Emphefumulo, Odeke, Empangeni roads 

Roads 

New Library with auditorium in cricity of Katlehong CCC 2. 

SRAC 

Complete tarring Mqandana street and connect to Zonkizizwe 

Roads 

New multipurpose Sports Facility in Ext 7 

SRAC 


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TOP 5 IDP IDENTIFIED 

The following are key matters identified by the Ward Councillors and ward Committee members 
during the IDP reviews held during the months of August and September 201 3: 

• Construction of new roads 

• Erection of high mast lights and street lights 

• Construction of new RDP houses 

• Development of new parks and maintenance of existing parks 

• Development of sports facilities and Multipurpose Centres 


6. EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FRAMEWORK 2035 - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

SECTION A: INTRODUCTION 

This is an Executive Summary of the Ekurhuleni MSDF Review 2010/1 1 (MSDF). The MSDF consist 
of 4 reports: 

Report 1 : MSDF Status Quo Report 
Report 2: The Ekurhuleni MSDF 
Report 3: MSDF Participation Report 

Report 4: Executive Summary (which is this report and it also includes the summary of capital 
investment framework which has been approved by the Council). 

Report 1 and 2 contains the content of the MSDF starting with Section A, being an Introduction to the 
MSDF. 

Section A (Chapter 1 ) describes the purpose of the MSDF, the contextual framework, legal and policy 
imperatives and the Ekurhuleni GDS. The purpose of the Spatial Development Framework (MSDF) is 
to indicate to members of the public and interested stakeholders in the city, the desired long term 
proposals which will affect the Spatial form for the entire Ekurhuleni area. It indicates issues which 
have been formed and considered and provides everyone with the opportunity to participate in the 
plan making process. 

This conceptual and legislative framework forms the basis for the development of the Ekurhuleni 
MSDF. Based on the National Spatial Development Perspective of 2006, the MSDF is informed by its 
comparative advantages as well as its competitive advantages. The comparative advantage is the 
provision of efficient production and service delivery. In this instance it entails an inward focus within 
Ekurhuleni, that is, its self-assessment. It also looks at the competitive advantage wherein 
Ekurhuleni as a developmental metropolitan municipality will compare itself with other metropolitan 
municipalities and regions. The comparative advantage of Ekurhuleni is its industrial and 
manufacturing base (called the industrial heartland of Africa). In Africa and in South Africa in 
particular the O.R. Tambo International Airport gives the metro tremendous comparative advantage. 
The transport network such as the Maputo-Johannesburg Corridor that passes through Ekurhuleni 


160 



including retail and commercial services give Ekurhuleni a competitive advantage that the MSDF will 
work to enhance. 

Section B contains the Status Quo analysis while Section C contains the SDF Proposals. Section D 
details the SDF Implementation Plan. These three Sections are summarised in this report. Report 3 
documents the MSDF Participation process. For further detail on the matters addressed in this 
Executive Summary, please refer to Reports 1 , 2 and 3 

SECTION B: STATUS QUO ANALYSIS 

The MSDF Status Quo Analysis addressed all status quo information available during the review 
process. In order to align with the Ekurhuleni Growth and Development Strategy, the following four 
categories were used to reflect on status quo information: 

• Physical Landscape; 

• Social Landscape; 

• Economic Landscape; and 

• Institutional landscape. 

Ekurhuleni is a metropolitan municipality found in the province of Gauteng, South Africa; located east 
of the Johannesburg; and south of Tshwane along the east-west Johannesburg-Maputo Corridor as 
well as the east-west gold (and coal) mining corridor; and the north-south iron and steel corridor. 
Ekurhuleni has a population of 2.7 million, and its geographic area measures just under ^OOOkm^ in 
extent. The metropolitan area was previously referred to as the East Rand, the industrial heartland of 
South Africa and the home of the biggest international airport in Africa. Chapter 2 describes the status 
quo analysis of Ekurhuleni’s physical aspects in terms of land use, municipal infrastructure, the 
natural environment and development corridors. 

Chapter 3 describes the status quo analysis of Ekurhuleni’s social aspects including Demographics, 
Socio-Economic Inequality, and Social Development. Family Health Care and related matters are 
also addressed, namely Education, HIV and Aids, and Mortality & Nativity. Also included are Sport, 
Recreation, Art & Culture, Public Safety, Disaster Management, and Housing. 

Chapter 4 describes the status quo analysis of Ekurhuleni’s economic aspects including Local 
Economic Development, Informal Businesses, Gross Geographic Product, Economic Growth, 
Employment, Local Economic Trends, Retail, Tourism and Industrial Development. 

Chapter 5 describes the status quo analysis of Ekurhuleni’s institutional aspects including Customer 
Care Areas, Wards, The IDP and Budget, Urban Renewal, and City Vision & City Identity. 

Section A concludes with a synthesis of all status quo information in Chapter 6. It is obvious that to 
some extent the development within the core economic triangle, the corridors and at the East Rand 
Mall and Q R Tambo International Airport (for which there is a master plan enjoying Council support), 
are in line with the MSDF as well as within the context of the NSDP which recognises the airport as of 
both comparative and competitive advantage, as well as the Gauteng’s SDF. Being part of the global 
village has resulted in the growth of the airport and foreign direct investment (FDI). It is however also 
important to steep the development discourse in a social agenda. There should be mutual 
coexistence rather than exclusivity. The challenge however is the fact that there is lack of reliable 
socio-economic data to proceed confidently on a comprehensive review of the MSDF. However, in 
the absence of data the reviews merely incorporate sectorial strategies that are available. Upon 


161 



completion of this Status Quo Report, a copy of the ‘Infrastructure and Community Services Backlog 
Study, 2009-2025 became available. The second challenge is the fact that there are 101 wards since 
the last local government elections of 2011. The strategies and policies stemming from this review 
are dynamic and robust, and remain flexible. 


SECTION C: THE SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 
PLANNINGAPPROACH 

The SDF Approach is described in Chapter 7 by means of a summary of the main principles which, in 
combination represents an approach towards the spatial restructuring of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan 
area. The approach was informed by work done for the previous MSDF as well as by further studies 
and planning work undertaken since, (including the aerotropolis concept). Of importance in 
formulating this approach is the ‘Academic Critique of the Local Spatial Development Framework 
Modules’ as compiled by the University of Witwatersrand in 2009. The said report provides a critique 
of the concept of LSDFs and the way the Scope of Work is constructed, as well as of specific 
modules. A set of recommendations arising from the critique is also developed ans is more fully 
detailed in the MDSF document. 

The SDF Approach is described in terms of the following: 

• Specialised Activity Nodes within & beyond the Core Development Triangle 

• Optimise linkages within the Core Development Triangle 

• Link Disadvantaged Communities to the within the Core Development Triangle 

• Mixed use, high density development along corridors and at nodes 

• Structure the IRPTN to support corridors 

• Extend economic activities into PDAs 

• Promote infill residential development 

• Upgrading of Engineering and Social Infrastructure in PDAs 

• Maintain and upgrade residential quality in suburbs 

• Formalise and protect the Municipal Open Space System 

• Promote access to services through CCCs 

• Implement a statutory Urban Edge 

• Land reform 

• Informality 


SPATIAL OBJECTIVES AND CONCEPTS 


162 



In Chapter 8, the Objectives and Concept of the MSDF is described. The development concept is 
spatially indicated on MSDF Map 11. This concept is used to guide the drafting of the Metropolitan 
Spatial Development Framework and Implementation Plan in the following chapters. This section 
should be read with Map 1 1 and describes the following components: 


(a) Core Development Triangle 

The Core Development Triangle area, presents an opportunity for Ekurhuleni to achieve a variety of 
development and restructuring objectives at once within one functional area. This includes: 

• To stimulate economic development in the broad sense by promoting: 
o Corridor development, especially the development of the R21 corridor which could eventually 

extend up to Tembisa in the north; 

o a variety of economic activities associated with OR Tambo International Airport; 

• Promoting sustainable development (development which does not impact negatively on the 
receiving environment); 

• The gradual upgrading and renewal of the CBDs of Ekurhuleni; 

• to introduce modern industrial concepts like high tech industries, industrial parks, export 
processing zones etc. in Ekurhuleni to enhance the tradition of Ekurhuleni being the industrial 
heartland of South Africa; 

• The development of corporate office parks near OR Tambo International Airport which could 
establish Ekurhuleni as an office destination (something it severely lacks at present); 

• To promote residential infill development and densification within the urban fabric, whilst 
preserving open space needed for social, recreational and ecological purposes; 

• The establishment of Transit Orientated Development on mining land in close proximity to the 
Ekurhuleni railway system that could lead to large scale infill development in the remainder of 
Ekurhuleni; 

• The promotion of public transport, and specifically rail transport as the backbone to the public 
transport system of Ekurhuleni; 

• To unlock development potential of certain areas by way of the provision of strategic transport 
linkages; 

• To optimise the potential benefits to be derived from national and provincial initiatives in the 
area surrounding OR Tambo International Airport; 

• To enhance the tourism potential of Ekurhuleni; 

• The development of a core identity for Ekurhuleni - not an extension of the identity of one of 
the former nine towns of Ekurhuleni, but the creation of a brand new identity which reflects the 
diversity of what and who Ekurhuleni represents 


163 




SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK CONCEPT 


Legend 

Setvice UpgradingAreas 
Devecpment Comdore 
im l-bgh_Potentai_A^ 
CoreTnange 
I I Dams 4 Pans 

Munictpa Open Space 
1^3 EMMBojn<Janes2011 
ractus 
25Km raduis 
Lan^ii Stle 

* Qaucran StatiorB 

Gautrain_A>ignment 

Q| ^ Taf*ibo Incemational 

+ Arports 

MOi EklM UrbanEd9e_2008 
National 
K Rcutes 
Fieeway 
Strategic Links 

• Secondaiv_Nodes 


' Prmary NotJes 


Proposed Nodes 

Tertary EducatJon 
Hosprtas 

- R/ver 

- Proposed PubiicTrartsport Corridors 
RailW3y_StaUorB 

Rail 


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aenaoraj'MViHunu^'t 


MAP 11 


164 




The idea is not that development of this area should be promoted at the cost of the remainder of the 
EMM. It is, however, clear that this area has the best combination of existing infrastructure, strategic 
land uses and resources in the form of vacant land/land developed at low intensity in the entire 
metropolitan area to serve as pilot area around which to commence with the restructuring and 
consolidation of the Ekurhuleni urban structure. Geographically it also represents the most central 
part (point of gravity) of Ekurhuleni. Market interest is very high in the area which is a major benefit, 
and in addition to the above there is also large public sector spending (Blue IQ initiatives) in the area 
to which value can be added. 

The EMM should thus utilise the high development potential of this area to set certain development 
trends in motion which could benefit the entire metropolitan community in the following ways: 

• increased revenue to the municipality resulting from development in the area which could 
be used to support and enhance the economic potential of other parts of Ekurhuleni that 
are not as well located, or as accessible; 

• more job opportunities which will serve the entire metropolitan community; 

• the spill-over effect where the successful implementation of a concept leads to the concept 
being extended into adjoining areas. A good example in this regard is the Centurion area 
which is now benefiting from the Midrand-strip concept which was initiated some 15 years 
ago. 


The Core Economic triangle should thus be seen as the first phase (the starting area) of a broader 
initiative towards developing the EMM Area in line with the principles as contained in the 
Development Facilitation Act. All other initiatives aimed at enhancing specific parts of the metro 
outside the Core Development Triangle area will continue parallel to the Core Development Triangle 
initiative as described in the Capital Investment Framework. 

(b) Activity Nodes 

Map 1 1 indicates all Primary and Secondary Activity Nodes for Ekurhuleni. In this regard, the 
‘Burgess’ planning theory as applied in the Gauteng 2055 SDF is also being applied in the Ekurhuleni 
Spatial Concept. Map 1 1 indicates application of the theory around the Ekurhuleni Core Node and 
throughout the rest of Ekurhuleni. 

The theory as applied indicates the role of other (primary and secondary) nodes relative the Core 
Node. On Map 11 the lOkm radius around the Core Node indicates the position of the Edenvale, 
Germiston, Boksburg and Benoni Primary Activity Nodes. The lOkm radius also shows the need for 
future Primary Nodes in Tembisa, along the Albertina Sisulu Corridor (R21) and in the area linking 
OR Tambo International (the centre of the aerotropolis) to Daveyton -Etwatwa, Alberton CBD and 
Nigel SBD relative to the 20km to 25km radius for the Core Node. The need for stimulate the 
development of strong nodes in Etwatwa, Tsakane, Vosloorus, and Kathlehong/Tokoza is also 
indicated. 


165 



A strong nodal network is promoted within the Ekurhuleni Metro. The types of nodes are to be 
delineated and defined in greater detail in the section dealing with the RSDFs to be drafted. As far as 
retail is concerned, the 9 Primary Activity Nodes (Central Business Districts) which currently exist in 
the Ekurhuleni Metro are being maintained and strengthened. These areas are highly accessible by 
car and (in most cases) by rail and therefore caters for the entire EMM community. Billions of rand of 
transportation infrastructure, engineering services and buildings have been created in these areas, 
and the Metro cannot afford to neglect these areas or to allow these to decay. As and where there is 
a need/opportunity for the development of larger regional shopping malls, these should be located 
within the functional area of one of the CBDs in order to prevent these Malls from becoming 
competing entities for the CBDs. If correctly developed, a shopping mall can actually contribute 
towards the improvement of a CBD. As a principle, however, a decentralised regional shopping mall 
should not be supported by the EMM. Local and neighbourhood centres can, however, be, allowed at 
decentralised locations as and where the need arises. 


The implementation of City Improvement Districts (CIDs) is proposed as a strategy to improve safety, 
security and overall environmental improvement in the CBDs. This could serve to counteract 
deterioration and urban decay, which are the result of land uses moving from central business 
districts to suburbs and regional malls. The implementation of the CIDs could protect existing public 
and private investment in the central business districts and counteract further decentralisation. 


(c) Development Corridors (Redevelopment Areas) 

There are two metropolitan level corridors identified in the Ekurhuleni Study for the Development of 
Corridors, 2004. These are depicted on Map 1 1 and described below. 

The Tembisa - Kathorus Corridor: “The future role of the corridor is largely seen as being an 
development corridor that will create a vital north-south development link in the Ekurhuleni 
Metropolitan area, where higher density development and concentration of economic activity will 
contribute to a more favourable and market-driven investment environment for businesses and local 
communities. This corridor will create opportunity for economic development on land currently 
underutilised (without damaging the environmental sensitive areas) and the more efficient use of 
available infrastructure. Envisaged land uses include mixed development, residential, industrial, 
aviation and transport orientated development and tourism.”1 

The Germiston - Daveyton Corridor extends from Germiston traversing the Boksburg and Benoni 
areas as far east as Daveyton and Etwatwa. “The main mobility spine of this Corridor is the N12 
highway and the railway line that runs parallel to it. The length of the Corridor is approximately 35 
kilometers from Germiston to Etwatwa. Despite being located at long distances from the Corridor, it 
constitutes an important link between the major residential areas of the city. This fact is due to the 
important linkage of this Corridor to the main labour and economic pools of the city and to the 
Johannesburg CBD. Residents in areas such as Katlehong, Vosloorus and Tsakane are functionally 
linked to the Daveyton/Germiston Corridor, as this is where an important amount of the job 
opportunities are located. The N17 runs from Alberton in the west to Springs in the east. Although it 
falls outside the primary corridor, it is an important mobility spine serving the corridor and the main 
link between Springs, Boksburg, Germiston and the southern areas of Johannesburg. Traffic on this 


166 



freeway is much lower than the traffic volume on the N12 and is to a large degree underutilised. The 
fact that this is a toll road may contribute to this under-utilisation.” 

More detailed corridors are indicated on the Spatial Concept map (Map 11). These corridors were 
identified based on the proposed Ekurhuleni Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network (IRPTN). The 
proposed IRPTN network was then aligned to the theory of the ‘Burgess’ model so as to link and 
support the proposed activity nodes. 


(d) Municipal Open Space 

The hydrological system in Ekurhuleni provides a strong and distinct natural backbone to open 
spaces. The hydrologic systems is vital when it comes to the biological and hydrological functioning of 
the area, therefore it must remain intact and disallow any further development. The hydrological 
systems and the remaining high quality vegetation areas provide important spatial nodes which 
contain high potential for the conservation of biodiversity. Topographical feature such as ridges are 
scares in Ekurhuleni and when they occur in natural state, they match up with the occurrence of 
primary vegetation. Thus, it was agreed that topographical features should be used an integrated 
element in the classification of open spaces. 


The remaining natural open spaces were reassessed in terms of quality and were classified into the 
following categories: 

• Hydrology, which indicates areas that are clearly discernible such as rivers, streams, pans, 
dams and wetlands. 

• High, which means areas are not in a good natural state and normally consists of primary 
vegetation and in a few instances of high quality secondary vegetation where such vegetation, 
despite previous disturbance, is recognised as a typical condition of the particular vegetation 
type especially where it occurs in combination with significant areas of primary vegetation. 

• Medium, which consists almost entirely secondary vegetation, where the present of state of 
such vegetation is still good enough to support open space connectors and links, despite 
reduced and species diversity 

• Low, which consists of secondary vegetation that has been heavily degraded and/or 
fragmented that are not in itself, without rehabilitation, suitable to serve as a natural open 
space, connector or link between natural open spaces. 

Classification of open space: 

• Metropolitan open space node: open spaces areas that have a distinct character that area 
meant for the use or enjoyment of all persons in the metropolitan area and even beyond. 


167 



• Local open space nodes: “open space areas that have a distinct character that are meant 
primarily for the use or enjoyment of specific communities.” 

• Corridors: “open spaces that form part of the hydrological system, are natural areas that are 
shallowly undermined or areas with high quality natural vegetation that links different nodes 
with each other.” More detailed information and mapping is available in the Ekurhuleni 
Biodiversity and Open Space Strategy documents. 

(e) Urban Edge 

The Ekurhuleni Urban Edge as depicted on Map 13 and Map 14 reflects the official urban core 
beyond which no extensive development shall be supported and in the process discourage urban 
sprawl in favour of densification and compacting the city. 


(f) Land reform and informality 

EMM would make available its land resources for the benefit of land reform in two ways. The first is 
includes the identification of strategic land parcels to achieve land reform objective as espoused at 
national government level. The second and very significant way is the formalisation and regularisation 
of informal settlements in line with the new land use scheme approved by the Council. This 
decriminalisation of informality will pave the way for informal business to grow and flourish into 
SMMEs and other entrepreneurial activities. 


168 



THE CAPITAL INVESTMENT FRAMEWORK 


The MSDF of 201 1 was approved with a capital investment model. The prioritisation model has since 
been approved by the Council and a summary of the capital investment framework for 2014/15 is 
provided. This capital investment framework is the executive summary and is the update of Chapter 
15 of the Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework (MSDF), 201 1 Report 3 and is structured as 
follows: 

INTRODUCTION 

The Capital Investment Framework (CIF) forms part of the Metropolitan Spatial Development 
Framework, and should therefore be noted as a review of Chapter 15 of the MSDF. 

The drafting of the Capital Investment Framework is a requirement in terms of Section 4(e) of the 
Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations, 2001 as promulgated in terms of the 
Municipal Systems Act. The CIF also fulfils the function of a Capital Expenditure Framework (CEF) 
as required in terms of Section 21 (n) of the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act, 2013. In 
addition, the CIF also informs the Capital Expenditure Programme (CEP) as referred to by National 
Treasury. The CIF also strives to meet Section 153(a) of the Constitution, in which the developmental 
duties of a municipality is stipulated to “structure and manage its administration and budgeting and 
planning processes to give priority to the basic needs of the community, and to promote the social 
and economic development of the community”. The purpose of the CIF is therefore to strategically 
and spatially guide, align and co-ordinate municipal capital expenditure across all sectors that will 
make provision for balanced spending of the municipal budget so as to promote economic growth and 
meet the infrastructure and services needs of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (EMM) 
residents. 


The content of a CIF is not specifically defined, but the above mentioned legislation refers to the 
following as functions of a CIF: 

• spatially influence and guide municipal capital prioritisation and allocation; 

• strategically influence and guide municipal capital prioritisation and allocation; 

• spatially and strategically coordinate and integrate capital expenditure across all sectors; 

• show where the municipality must and will be spending its capital budget; and 

• map capital projects included in the budget. 

The Capital Investment Framework therefore holds the function of meeting legislative requirements, 
and bridging the gap between the GDS, IDP that is a 5 year strategic investment tool and the MSDF 
that provides strategic spatial guidance. Therefore, providing financial management to achieve 
economic growth and meeting basic needs as linked to achieving a desired strategic spatial directive 
for the Metro. In summary the function of the CIF is to spatially and strategically influence, guide and 
prioritize the allocation of the municipal budget in a co-ordinated manner across all sectors that will 
provide for focused investment and achieve positive spatial transformation for the Ekurhuleni Metro. 


169 



The CIF report comprises of the following Chapters that detail information utilized to inform the CIF, 
and the geographic priority areas and Capital Prioritisation Model that are implementation tools of the 
CIF: 


Chapter 1 - Services Backlogs 

Chapter 1 reflects the utilization of statistics from the CMIP on services backlogs, economic spending, 
household figures and a projected population growth scenario in determining future infrastructure 
needs for the Metro. This information guided the CIF in identifying geographic areas with capacity 
backlogs in relation to capital expenditure and investment required throughout Ekurhuleni to address 
areas of upgrading, renewal and maintenance of services. 


Chapter 2 - Geography of Ekurhuleni Income 

This section spatially presents net revenue as per the various spatial structuring elements identified 
within the MSDF and as further detailed in Chapter 4 for trading services (water, sewer, electricity, 
refuse) as well as for income from property rates. This therefore includes findings revenue generated 
per trading service and Ekurhuleni’s top 500 customers. 


ChapterS- Modelling of the CIF 

This section highlights the results form modelling work conducted on the MSDF density proposal as 
modelled over a 25 year period by IMQS (and i@consulting). Modelling work underway has also 
been outlined in Chapter 3 to provide necessary future projections and information into guiding the 
direction of the CIF. 


Chapter 4 - Geographic Priority Areas 

The Capital Investment Framework utilizes the geographic priority areas as a tool to strategically 
guide, focus and align capital spending into the Ekurhuleni Metro in order to yield greater results in 
achieving spatial transformation as outlined within the MSDF. The 201 1 MSDF outlines key spatial 
structuring elements that give form and direction to the spatial formation of the EMM. The spatial 
structuring elements (SSEs) that were used to inform and define the development of the geographic 
priority areas are as follows: 

• Previous MSDF priority areas (service upgrading, infill, expansion); 

• Densification areas (Aerotropolis, nodes, corridors); 

• Geography of CoE income; 

• IRPTN; 

• Rail Stations; 

• Major Housing Projects; 

• Industrial Areas; 

• Major investments and Strategic Projects; 


170 



• Primary and Secondary Nodes; and 

• Poverty Eradication Areas 


This section also outlines the review of the CIF geographic priority areas with the aim to reduce the 
extent of the five priority areas, provide for a realistic implementation timeframe as aligned to the 
GDS, and to review the status of the spatial structuring elements and bring into consideration new 
strategic projects and major investments. The review resulted in the refinement of the priority areas 
into three geographic priority areas as tied to the timeline framework of the GDS as aligned to 
achieve a “Delivering City”, a “Capable City” and a “Sustainable City”. The map reflects the spatial 
layout and influence of the geographic priority areas as based on the MSDF SSEs. 


Geographic Priority Areas aiignment to the GDS 



DELIVERING 

CITY 

( 2012 - 2020 ) 


CAPABLE 

CITY 

(2020- 2030) 


SUSTAINABLE 

CITY 

(2030- 2055) 


171 


Reviewed Geographic Priority Areas 



172 



Chapter 5 - Flagship Projects and Other Major Investments 

The CIF has taken into consideration a number of major investment and strategic projects identified 
within the MSDF, in addition to newly identified strategic projects and other major investments. These 
include the Ekurhuleni Flagship projects and development applications of a large scale, as well as 
large development initiatives for which no applications have been submitted yet. The flagship 
projects and other major investments were taken into account in the review and refinement of the 
geographic priority areas were sufficient information was made available. The CIF report provides a 
summary of the Flagship projects and supporting priority strategic projects and major investments. 

Chapter 6 - List of Infrastructure Requirements 

This section of the CIF report highlights areas with identified backlogs with regard to social services 
as per the Ekurhuleni Backlog Study, and infrastructure requirements as per the Region A RSDF and 
the Rhodesfield Urban Development Framework. The infrastructure requirements are aimed at 
guiding departments and encouraging departments to align projects with the CIF. 


Chapter 7 - Poverty Eradication 

In a recent Provincial study, all the poorest wards in Gauteng were identified and were listed for 
provincial intervention. A number of wards in Ekurhuleni were included on the provincial list. 


Chapter 8 - Implementation of the CIF with the 2014/15 Budget 

The implementation of the CIF with the 2014/15, 2015/16, and 2016/17 multi-year capital budget 
process outlines the engagement process as per the steps 1 - 5 of the capital prioritisation model. 
This section therefore outlines the CIF implementation process in terms of the participation process 
followed, the mapping of the multi-year capital projects, assessment of the CIF evaluation into the 
budget process with regard to alignment of departmental projects with the geographic priority areas, 
and alignment with the budget percentage split allocation between Urban Restructuring, Upgrading 
and Renewal, and Economic Development. The assessment outlines the impact of the CIF in 
achieving more focused budgeting and expenditure, as an interactive and transparent process. 

Chapter 9 - Long Term Financial Plan, 

Chapter 9 looks at the inclusion of the Ekurhuleni Long Term Financial Plan that has informed the 
MSDF by determining a projected expenditure forecast for the metro, which has helped in formulating 
a comprehensive CIF for the MSDF. This includes looking into the utilization of “Special Rating Areas” 
as per the Rates Policy, and performance based budgeting as a measurement of meeting desired 
outcomes. The Long Term Financial Plan is also utilized to inform the Capital Prioritisation Model of 
the CIF. 


ChapterlO- Risk Reduction 


This section acknowledges the Risk Analysis conducted on assets and liabilities, and has identified 
the need to include risk assessment criteria into the evaluation criteria of step 6 of the Capital 
Prioritisation Model as part of the criteria on informing the prioritisation of capital projects. 


173 



Chapter 11 - Capital Prioritisation Model 

This capital prioritisation model was drafted utilizing all available information described in this CIF. 
The 2013 approval of the CIF included the approval of steps 1 to 5 of the capital prioritisation model, 
which was applied to the 2014/15 multi-year budget process. The Ekurhuleni Capital Prioritisation 
Model as implemented during the 2013 budget process is described in more detail within the CIF 
report. The model was developed based on Ekurhuleni specific conditions and based on work done to 
date by the City of Johannesburg in this regard. The Capital Prioritisation Model must be understood 
as part of a phasing in process in the alignment of departmental projects with the CIF, based on a 
process of test, guide and align, as being phased in over the financial year period from 2013/14, 
2014/15 and 2015/16. 


The below diagram reflects steps 1 to 5 of the CPM, with step 6 of the model undergoing necessary 
modelling work for the implementation of a workable weighting system in the prioritization of capital 
projects. The full MSDF proposals and the CIF are annexures to the IDP document. 


CAPITAL PRIORITISATION MODEL FOR THE DEUVERING CITY 

(«iiiM ■'iof Vodri lO^ MW •ndCtf i. idpiiTrv •rri v)»o‘ 




Allocjt* Capital Budgd into four Proiact Cato|ori*i 


Urbjirt 

lltftDEninne 

Up«r»dlng 

and 


Economtc 

Local 

lnt«rv«nt>oni 

30 » 

40 % 


29 % ^ 

1 % 





w- 


Allocation wthe CIF Proiect Categories Per Geographic Prioritv 

PROJECTCATEGORY 

GEOGRAPHIC PRIORITY 

% OF 2014/15 


AREAS 

BUDGET 

Urban Restructuring 

GPAl 

37% 


GPA2 

23% 


GPA3 

7% 


Outside GPA 

24% 


Unmapped 

11% 

Upgrading and Renewal 

GPAl 

42% 


GPA2 

9% 


GPA3 

11% 


Outside GPA 

6% 


Unmapped 

32% 

Econonm Developnient 

GPAl 

21% 


GPA2 

47% 


GPA3 

12% 


Outside GPA 

M% 


Unma®ed 

7 % 

Note Percentaees are orooortlonal to total budeet rand value oer Ci^ Proiect Cateeocv 

J .STEP 4: Screen all subinirted projects for IDP, SDBEP, aud 

1 PMO compliauce 


STEP 5: .\llocate all inditidual capiral projects as submirfed 
by departmenrs into CIF categoiies and geograpbic Piioiits' 


174 



7. DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN 


7.1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 


The Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002 directs in section 53(2)(a) that a disaster management 
plan mustform an integral part of the municipality’s integrated development plan. This is also directed 
as such by the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, Act 32 of 2000 in section 26(g). 

In giving effect to the above, a municipal disaster risk and vulnerability assessment was completed in 
2008. This assessment identified the following main disaster threats: 

• Floods 

• Storms (damaging winds, hail, etc.) 

• Fires: Industrial (including mining) fires/explosions/spillage/accidents 

• Mayor Events 

• Transport: air 

• Civil unrest (including terrorism) 

• Epidemics (Human & Animal) 

• Infrastructure failure: Power, sanitation, water & other key services 

• Geological (Earthquake, Landslides, Subsidence, Erosion, Land Degradation) 

• Environmental degradation 

• Air pollution: industrial 

• Drought / water shortage 

• Surface water/land pollution (including Acid Mine Drainage) 


The main strategy of all disaster management activities, in line with the provisions of the Disaster 
Management Act, is disaster risk reduction. The Disaster Management Plan of Ekurhuleni 
predetermines, to the extent possible, actions to be taken by all departments, stakeholders and 
cooperating private organisations, to prevent disasters and to reduce the vulnerability of EMM 
residents to any disasters that may occur. The plan further aims to establish capabilities for protecting 
citizens from the effects of disasters and for mechanisms to respond effectively to the actual 
occurrence of disasters, and then to provide for recovery in the aftermath of any disaster involving 
extensive damage or other debilitating influence on the normal pattern of life within the community of 
the municipality. 

The Disaster Management Plan provides the basis for the development of risk specific plans as well 
as Departmental Disaster Management Plans, which takes into account the peculiarities of different 
risks. A flood, for instance, has a different risk profile to drought and an earthquake has a different 
risk profile to a toxic chemical release. 

Disaster Management is the business of all stakeholders in Ekurhuleni and so the integration of 
disaster response plans, the integration of sustainable development and the integration of disaster 
risk reduction measures must be a coordinated focus of all stakeholders. It is only through 
sustainable development which considers the impact of development on future generations that we 
as a municipality are able to leave a legacy of a healthy and safe world for all to be enjoyed. 


175 



The Ekurhuleni Corporate Disaster Management Plan provides the results of consultation of disaster 
risk reduction and response role-players. Each Department of Council has identified its disaster 
responsibilities to ensure that any response to a disaster means that responders do not work against 
each other but rather complement each other to ensure a speedy recover from the disaster. The plan 
further aims to ensure that sustainable development remains just that, by the application of disaster 
management principals related to disaster risk reduction, mitigation of disaster risks and prevention 
into developmental projects. This is accomplished by the participation of the function in the 
Development Facilitation Committee as well as other committees whose primary functions are related 
to the identified disaster risks, i.e. Environmental Management Department, Health Department and 
Disaster and Emergency Management Services Department. 

A typical disaster response scenario provides for immediate response actions by the Emergency 
Services and Metropolitan Police in the form of emergency medical services (ambulance), fire and 
rescue and police services. Other departmental role-players like engineers, electricians, building 
inspectors, health workers, housing officials, to name a few and a host of non-municipal role-players 
first aid organisations, the SPCA, Amateur Radio HAMS and the like, all have a joint and or 
supporting responsibility during the response to a disaster. The Disaster Management Centre will be 
activated and senior departmental officials are required to participate in the decision making 
processes at the Centre while the disaster declaration is being done by the Executive Mayor in terms 
of delegated authority. 

The longer term disaster effects would continue to be coordinated from the Disaster Management 
Centre using relevant departments to supply the necessary skills and direction. These actions would 
ensure that rehabilitation, and if necessary, reconstruction occurs in order to normalise a disaster 
stricken community. 

Funding of post disaster response will take place by utilisation of municipal funds and then secondly 
by approaching the Provincial and National Government for additional disaster response and or 
disaster grant funding and by application of Municipal Finance legislation related to emergency 
purchases. 

In conclusion, the Municipal Disaster Management Plan aims at gearing Ekurhuleni to identify and 
then reduce disaster risk through proper and timely disaster risk reduction actions as well as the 
execution of disaster responses. 

Not all disasters can be prevented and so the disaster management plan provides all role-players 
with pre-determined guidelines on the processes to be followed to save lives and protect property and 
the environment. 


8. DRAFT MULTI YEAR FINANCIAL PLAN 


The Draft 2013-2016 Multiyear Financial Plan is contained under separate cover. 


176 



9. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 


The Municipal Systems Act (MSA), 2000 requires municipalities to establish a performance 
management system. Further, the MSA and the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) 
requires the Integrated Development Plan (IDP) to be aligned to the municipal budget and to be 
monitored in terms of the performance of the budget against the IDP via the Service Delivery 
and the Budget Implementation Plans (SDBIP). 

In addition, Regulation 7 (1) of the Local Government: Municipal Planning and Performance 
Management Regulations, 2001 states that “A Municipality’s Performance Management System 
necessitates a framework that describes and represents how the municipality’s cycle and processes 
of performance planning, monitoring, measurement, review, reporting and improvement will be 
conducted, organised and managed, including determining the roles of the different role players.” 

The OPMPF’s purpose is to give effect to the performance management system as prescribed 
by legislation. It provides an overarching framework for the management of organisational 
performance in the EMM. Performance management is aimed at ensuring that municipalities monitor 
their IDP/SDBIP and continuously improve their operations and in terms of Section 19 of the Local 
Government Municipal Structures Act (MSA), that they annually review their overall performance in 
achieving their constitutional objectives. The Performance Management System must: 

a) Put appropriate performance indicators, including outcomes and impact, with regard to the 
municipality's development priorities and objectives set out in the IDP/SDBIP and the National 
KPAs. 

b) Develop measurable targets set against a baseline. 

c) Monitor performance and put measures in place to improve performance where targets have not 
been achieved. 

d) Measure and review performance at least once a year. 

e) Institutionalise the process of regular reporting. 

f) Develop an early warning system to identify areas of poor performance. 

The implementation of a performance management system allows the Municipality to collect, process, 
organise, analyse, audit, reflect and report on performance information. It also allows the Municipality 
to take practical steps to improve its performance. This system constitutes the performance system of 
the Municipality, together with the KPIs and performance targets in the service delivery and budget 
implementation plan. To undertake the full organisational performance management cycle the 
following elements have been instituted: 

(a) Development of the IDP and SDBIP 

The performance of the Municipality is managed in terms of its IDP and the process of compiling an 
IDP and the annual review thereof constitutes the process of planning for performance. It should be 
noted that the last component of the cycle is that of performance review and the outcome of such a 
review process must inform the next cycle of IDP compilation/review by focusing the planning 
processes on those areas in which the Municipality has underperformed. 


177 


(b) Performance measurement 


Performance measurement refers to the formal process of collecting and capturing performance data 
to enable reporting to take place for each key performance indicator and against the target set for 
such indicator. The setting of measures and targets happens during the IDP process and is linked to 
the strategic objectives of the IDP. To ensure the integrity of the targets set, baseline information 
based on backlog and current performance should be used as the basis for setting sound measures 
and targets. Performance measurement allows the Municipality to compare their actual performance 
in relation to backlog and current performance. 

(c) Organisational Performance monitoring 

Organisational Performance monitoring is an ongoing process by which a Manager accountable for a 
specific indicator as set out in the SDBIP continuously monitors current performance against targets 
set. The aim of the monitoring process is to take appropriate and immediate interim (or preliminary) 
action where the indication is that a target is not going to be met by the time that the formal process 
of performance measurement, analysis, reporting and review is due. In addition, the Strategy and 
Corporate Planning drafts the metro-wide report, conducts periodic verification of information 
submitted by the line departments and frontline service delivery monitoring. 

(d) Performance analysis 

Performance analysis involves the process of making sense of measurements. It requires 
interpretation of the measurements as conducted in terms of the previous step to determine whether 
targets have been met and exceeded and to project whether future targets will be met or not. Where 
targets have not been met or have been exceeded, departments are required to provide reasons for 
the deviation. Where targets have not been met the reasons for the deviation must be accompanied 
by remedial action or the plan of action which is followed up in the subsequent quarter. Where 
targets have been met or exceeded, the key factors that resulted in such success should be 
documented and shared so as to ensure organisational learning. 

The frontline service delivery monitoring which is part of the organisational performance monitoring 
goes beyond the numbers and information provided by a department on the organisation 
performance reporting template. The focus of this is what changes are beginning to emanate from the 
delivery of services. It is during this process the municipality begins analyse and get answers to: 

• Whether the services planned for in the IDP was rendered? 

• Was the services directed to the affected community? 

• Was it delivered on time? 

• Were the service standard met? 

• Is there evidence to suggest that the services delivered are making a difference? 


178 



The annual SDBIP populated with Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), measures and targets, is an 
integral part of the PMS and must be annually approved and adopted by council. The contents of the 
SDBIP are taken up into the Performance Agreements of all Section 57 employees, contract workers 
as well as in performance appraisals of other municipal employees. A 100% alignment is thus 
ensured. 

The SDBIP forms the basis for the development of the performance agreements for the Section 57 
Managers. The indicators detailed in the SDBIP together with the management responsibilities of the 
Section 57 managers are included in the performance agreement that is signed by the Section 57 
manager and the City Manager. The metro-wide SDBIP is used as the basis to draft the performance 
agreement between the City Manager and the Executive Mayor. 

Both the organizational and individual performance management provides a mechanism for learning 
and improvement. The PMS provides both the executive and political leadership with information 
signaling under or not performance - signaling a risk. These identified risks when addressed 
expeditiously and correctly enables the municipality to effect the necessary changes to improve 
service delivery. 

(e) Performance Reporting 

The submission of the performance reports to the Mayoral Committee for consideration and review of 
the performance of the Municipality as a whole is the next step in the process. The first such report is 
a major milestone in the implementation of any PMS and it marks the beginning of what is a regular 
event namely using the performance report as a tool to review the Municipality’s performance and to 
make important political and management decisions on how to improve. 

The organisational performance report is submitted to the Mayoral Committee for consideration and 
review on a quarterly basis. The organisational performance report serves at the Oversight 
Committees and Council. Prior to the submission of the organisational performance report to the 
Oversight Committee and Council, the Senior Management Team reviews the report for quality and 
inaccuracies. 

Section 72 of the MFMA requires the accounting officer to prepare and submit a report on the 
performance of the municipality during the first half of the financial year. The report must be submitted 
to the mayor, National Treasury as well as the relevant Provincial Treasury. As with all other reports 
this is a crucial report for the Council to consider mid-year performance and what adjustments should 
be made, if necessary 

Section 46 of the Municipal Systems Act states that a municipality must prepare for each financial 
year, a performance report that reflects the following: 

• The performance of the municipality and of each external service provided during that financial 
year; 


179 



• A comparison of the performances referred to in the above paragraph with targets set for and 
performances in the previous financial year; and 

• Measures to be taken to improve on the performance 

The performance report must be submitted at the end of the financial year and will be made public as 
part of the annual report in terms of chapter 12 of the MFMA. The publication thereof will also afford 
the public the opportunity to judge the performance of the municipality against the targets set in the 
various planning instruments. 

Every municipality is required by Section 121 to prepare an annual report for each financial year, 
which must include: 

• the annual financial statements of the municipality or municipal entity as submitted to the Auditor- 
General for audit (and, if applicable, consolidated annual financial statements); 

• the Auditor-General’s audit report on the financial statements; 

• an assessment by the accounting officer of any arrears on municipal taxes and service charges; 

• particulars of any corrective action taken or to be taken in response to issues raised in the audit 
reports; 

• any explanations that may be necessary to clarify issues in connection with the financial 
statements; 

• any information as determined by the municipality, 

• any recommendations of the municipality’s performance audit committee, 

• an assessment by the accounting officer of the municipality’s performance against the 
measurable performance objectives for revenue collection and for each vote in the municipality’s 
approved budget for the relevant financial year; 

• the annual performance report prepared by a municipality; and 

• any other information as may be prescribed. 

The elements detailed above provide the process organisational performance management process. 


180 



10. PROVINCIAL PROGRAMMES AND BUDGETS 


The table below reflects the projects and programmes which will be implemented by the Gauteng Provincial Government in 
Ekurhuleni: 


AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT 


No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates ROOO 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

1 

New Infrastructure 

Assets 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

New Adventure 
Centre 

Identification 

- 

- 

3,000 

5 

New Infrastructure 

Assets 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Booster pump for 
Northern water 
line 

Construction 


6,000 

- 

6 

New Infrastructure 

Assets 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Southern water 
line 

Identification 

5,639 

10,354 

- 

8 

Upgrading and Additions 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Renovation of 

house 1 to 7 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

10 

Upgrading and Additions 

Suikerbosrand 
Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Maintenance and 
Repairs at 

Ouhoutkamp 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

11 

Upgrading and Additions 

Kareekloof 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Reconstruct 
stables into 

accommodation 

Identification 

- 

- 

“ 

12 

Upgrading and Additions 

Suikerbosrand 
Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

General 

Renovations of 
Yellow house 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 


181 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates ROOO 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

15 

Upgrading and Additions 

Kareekioof 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Refurbishments 

identification 

107 

- 

- 

16 

U[grading and Additions 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Cupboards, 
bathroom of 

Schoengesight 
house 

identification 

_ 

100 

100 

17 

Upgrading and Additions 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Kitchen cupboards 
at Yeiiow house 

identification 

- 

- 

50 

19 

Rehabiiitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Generai 

Renovations of 

Schoengesight 

house, 

outbuiidings and 
paiisade fence 

Construction 




21 

Rehabiiitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Repiacement of 
carpets in 

breakaway rooms 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

26 

Rehabiiitation and 

Refurbishment 

Roodepiaat 

Training Centre 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Refurbishment 
and restoration of 
existing amenities 

identification 

1,075 



27 

Rehabiiitation and 

Refurbishment 

Kareekioof 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Renovation of 

Oxidation tank 

identification 

2,285 

- 

- 

28 

Rehabiiitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Refurbishment at 
Schoongesight 

identification 

152 

- 

- 


182 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates ROOO 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

29 

Rehabilitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Refurbishment at 
vehicle garages 

Identification 

173 



32 

Rehabilitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Oxidation tank 

Identification 

- 

1,500 

- 

33 

Rehabilitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Repair crack in 
Auditorium 

Identification 

- 

2,000 

- 

34 

Rehabilitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Refurbishment of 
Managers house 
at Kareekloof 

Identification 


1,500 

1,000 

35 

Rehabilitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 
Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Refurbishment of 
shalleys 

Identification 

- 

272 

- 

38 

Rehabilitation and 

Refurbishment 

Suikerbosrand 
Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Maintenance of 
old boom gates at 
Diepkloof and 

Schoongesight 

Hand over 

. 

. 

. 

44 

Maintenance and Repair 

Suikerbosrand 

Nature Reserve 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Maintenance at 
Admin block 

Identification 

- 

- 

- 


183 




HEALTH 


No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipaiity 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

4 

New or Replaced 
Infrastructure 

Asset 

Bertha Gxawa 
Hospltal - new 

300 bed 

Ekurhulenl 

Health Faclllty 

Revltallsatlon 

Grant 

Bullt new 300 bed 
Dlstrlct Hospltal 

Retentlon 

15,000 



9 

New or Replaced 
Infrastructure 

Asset 

Natalsprult 

Hospltal 

Ekurhulenl 

Health Faclllty 

Bullt new 760 Bed 
Reglonal Hospltal 

Constructlon 
76% - 99% 

42,324 



10 

New or Replaced 
Infrastructure 

Asset 

Natalsprult 

Hospltal - 
Equlpment 

Ekurhulenl 

Health Faclllty 

Revltallsatlon 

Grant 

Equlpmentforthe 

Revltallsatlon 

Project 

Procuremen 

t 

93,769 



429 

New or Replaced 
Infrastructure 

Asset 

Natalsprult 

Hospltal - Staff 
resldences 

Ekurhulenl 

Health Faclllty 

Revltallsatlon 

Grant 

New staff 

resldences to serve 
new Natalsprult 
hospltal 

Deslgn 

2,000 

56,640 


739 

New or Replaced 
Infrastructure 

Asset 

Natalsprult 

Hospltal - OD 
and QA 

Ekurhulenl 

Health Faclllty 

Revltallsatlon 

Grant 

Organlsatlonal 
Development and 
Quallty Assurance 
actlvltles assoclated 
wlth Hospltal 
Revltallsatlon 
projects 

Procuremen 

t 

(quotatlons) 

2,260 

2,088 


433 

New or Replaced 
Infrastructure 

Asset 

Daveyton FPS 
Mortuary - new 
bulld 

Ekurhulenl 

Equltable 

Share 

Elther upgrade of 
exlstlng mortuary 
(Sprlngs) a new 
mortuary 

Deslgn 

3,658 

35,100 

53,263 

20 

Upgrade and 
Addltlons 

Edenvale Hospltal 
- Addltlonal 
oxygen and 
vacuum pump 
polnts 

Ekurhulenl 

Health Faclllty 

Revltallsatlon 

Grant 

Addltlonal oxygen 
and vacuum pump 
polnts In Neo-natal 
and maternlty wards 

Retemlon 

597 




184 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

30 

Upgrade and 
Additions 

Phoiosong 

Hospitai - 
Additionai oxygen 
and vacuum 
pump points 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Additionai oxygen 
and vacuum pump 
points in Neo-natai 
wards 

Construction 
51% -75% 

154 



34 

Upgrade and 
Additions 

Tambo Memoriai 
Hospitai - 
Additionai oxygen 
and vacuum 
points 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Additionai oxygen 
and vacuum pump 
points in Neo-natai 
wards 

Construction 

100% 

250 



38 

Upgrade and 
Additions 

Tembisa Hospitai 
- Biood Bank 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

New 24hr Biood 

Bank 

Construction 
7% - 25% 

1,399 



458 

Upgrade and 
Additions 

Khayaiami 

Hospitai - 
Compiete 
Refurbishment (in 
Kempton Park) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

S1P12: 

Revitalisation of 
public hospitals; and 
other health facilities 

Identified 

1,000 



451 

Upgrade and 
Additions 

Far East Rand 
Hospitai - 
Upgrade Wards 4 
&8 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

MEC Special Project 
to upgrade ward 4 
and 8 to Falateng 
level. 

Construction 
26% - 50% 

21,682 

3,163 


721 

Upgrade and 
Additions 

Bertha Gxawa 
Hospitai - 
Additionai 

Ekurhuieni 

Wards 

Equitabie 

Share 

Additional changes 
to new hospital 

Identified 


500 

1,000 

729 

Upgrade and 
Additions 

Speciai Projects 
Directorate - 
Capitai 

Various 

Equitabie 

Share 

Various capital 
projects, typically of 
minor value, 
managed by the 

GDoH Special 

Projects Directorate 

Construction 

75% 

-99% 

2,700 

1,079 


735 

Upgrade and 

HCW Phase 2- 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Phase 2 of 

Tender 

4,500 




185 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 


Additions 

Ekurhuieni District 


Share 

upgrades to faciiities 
in the Ekurhuieni 
District to enabie 
compiiance with 

Heaith Care, Waste 
protocoi 





737 

Upgrade and 
Additions 

Magaguia Heights 
Ciinci Park- 
homes 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Procurement and 
instaiiation of + - 
600 square meters 
Park-home adjacent 
to the existing 
Magaguia Heights 
Ciinic to provide 
additionai space 

identified 

1,000 



749 

Upgrades and 
Additions 

Tembisa Hospitai 
Revitaiization 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

SIP12: 

Reviitaiization of 
pubiic hospitais and 
other heaith faciiities 

Compieted 

5,571 



240 

Renovation, 

Rehabiiitation, 

Refurbishment 

Phoiosong 

Hospitai - 
Renovations to 
accommodate TB 
beds 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Renovations and 
refurbishments of 
wards to 

accommodate TB 
beds 

Construction 

51% 

-75% 

15,000 

3,000 


241 

Renovation, 

Rehabiiitation, 

Refurbishment 

Germiston 

Hospitai - 
Renovations to 
oid hospitai 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Demoiition of oid 
hospitai 

identified 

261 



251 

Renovation, 

Rehabiiitation, 

Refurbishment 

Tembisa Hospitai 
- Renovations to 
Psychiaticwards 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Renovations and 
refurbishments to 
Psychiatric wards 

Tender 

5,154 



252 

Renovation, 

Rehabiiitation, 

Refurbishment 

Tambo Memoriai 
Hospitai - 
Renovations to 
Psychiatric wards 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Renovations and 
refurbishments to 
Psychiatric wards 

Construction 

76% 

-99% 

2,272 



487 

Renovation, 

Rehabiiitation, 

Refurbishment 

Oid Nataispruit 
Hospitai - 
Refurbishment 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Refurbish oid 
hospitai 

identified 


1,000 

1,000 


186 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

4190 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Oid Nataispruit 
Hospitai 
Maintenance 
(GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

4,771 

1,434 


4203 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Phoiosong 

Hospitai 

Maintenance 

(GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

4,206 

1,064 


4257 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Tambo Memoriai 
Hospitai (GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

4,837 

1,479 


4262 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Tembisa Hospitai 

Maintenance 

(GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

6,304 

987 


4630 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Edenvaie Hospitai 

Maintenance 

(GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

20,272 

3,951 


4631 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Far East Rand 
Hospitai (GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

12,480 

3,809 


4645 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Oid Nataispruit 
Hospitai 
Maintenance 
(GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

9,911 

4,301 


4646 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Phoiosong 

Hospitai 

Maintenance 

(GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Heaith Faciiity 

Revitaiisation 

Grant 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

7,519 

3,192 


4001 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

EMS 

Maintenance 
Ekurhuieni District 
2013/14 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

167 

176 

500 

4019 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Bonai Lesedi 
Coiiege 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

886 

934 

934 

4062 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

East Rand 

Regionai Office 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

891 

940 

1,000 


187 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

4188 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Oid Germiston 
Hospitai 
Maintenance 
(GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

1,185 

1,843 

2,076 

4509 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Ekurhuieni District 
Pharmacies 
Maintenance 
(GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

102 

108 

108 

4603 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Ekurhuieni District 
Ciinics 

Maintenance 
2013/14 (GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

11,680 

4,368 

6,120 

4608 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Ekurhuieni 

District Ciinics 
Maintenance 
2013/14 (GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

11,161 

7,603 

9,855 

4612 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Ekurhuieni District 
CHCs 

Maintenance 
2013/14 (GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

2,380 

1,062 

2,814 

4613 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Ekurhuieni District 
CHs Maintenance 
2013/14 (GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

10,547 

3,185 

4,937 

4622 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Bertha Gxawa 
Hospitai 
Maintenance 
(GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii Maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

5,000 

3,202 

1,954 


188 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

4643 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Oid Germiston 
Hospitai 
Maintenance 
(GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

2,435 

5,530 

6,500 

4640 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

New Nataispruit 
Hospitai 
Maintenance 
(GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

3,190 

2,420 

4,172 

4669 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Ekurhuieni District 
Pharmacies 
Maintenance 
(GDiD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

306 

1,325 

2,075 

450 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Edenvaie Hospitai 

Maintenance 

(GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

63,411 

7,200 

10,752 

448 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Far East Rand 
Hospitai 
Maintenance 
(GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

9,897 

6,200 

11,552 

4697 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

Bertha Gxawa 

Maintenance 

(GDOH) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Aii maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

2,681 

5,000 

5,000 

4698 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

EPWP 

Various 

EPWP 

incentive grant 

Aii maintenance 
Activities 

Construction 

1% 

-25% 

2,000 




189 




HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 


No. 

Nature of 
Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Housing 

programme 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

1 

Maintenance and 
Repairs 

State Asset 
Maintenance 

Ekurhuieni 

Financiai 

intervention 

Land audit, devoiution 
of assets and titie 
deeds 

Various 

5,000 

5,000 

6,990 

2 

New infrastructure 

individuai waik 
in South 

Ekurhuieni 

Financiai 

intervention 

individuai subsidy 
appiication 

Various 

4,450 

8,900 

8,900 

3 

New infrastructure 

Ekurhuieni 

Extended 

Discount 

Benefit 

Scheme 

(EEDBS) 

Ekurhuieni 

Financiai 

intervention 

Pianning 

Various 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

4 

Rehabiiitation and 
Refurbishment 

Minor 

Rectification 

Ekurhuieni 

Financiai 

intervention 

Rectification of houses 

Various 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5 

New infrastructure 

Germiston 

URP 

Ekurhuieni 

Financiai 

intervention 

Pianning / Construction 
of houses 

Various 

15,000 

10,000 

10,000 

6 

New infrastructure 

Tembisa 

Master Pian 

Ekurhuieni 

Financiai 

intervention 

Pianning 

identification 

20,000 

10,000 

10,000 

7 

New infrastructure 

NHBRC 

Ekurhuieni 

Financiai 

intervention 

Housing enroiment 

Various 

10,000 

10,000 

8,000 

8 

New infrastructure 

Ekurhuieni 

Land parceis 

procured 

(iHAHSD) 

Ekurhuieni 

Financiai 

intervention 

Pianning for iand 
acquisition 

identification 

15,000 

10,000 

15,000 


190 




No. 

Nature of 
Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Housing 

programme 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

9 

New Infrastructure 

Essellen Park 
x3 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Feaslblllty 

1,963 

10,000 

5,000 

10 

New Infrastructure 

Etwatwa ext35 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

9,221 

15,986 

- 

11 

New Infrastructure 

Etwatwa ext19 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

13,500 

- 

- 

12 

New Infrastructure 

Rletfonteln 

Kwa Thema 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Pre- 

feaslblllty 




13 

New Infrastructure 

Zwaartkooples 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Feaslblllty 

1,000 

18,650 

51,637 

14 

New Infrastructure 

Rondebelt 2, 9, 
35 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Pre- 

feaslblllty 

1,000 

25,313 

93,129 

15 

New Infrastructure 

Zonklzlzwe ext 

6 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Pre- 

feaslblllty 

9,825 

- 

- 

16 

New Infrastructure 

Dukathole 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Constructlon 

1,000 

5,000 

41,800 


191 




No. 

Nature of 
Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Housing 

programme 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

17 

New Infrastructure 

Goodhope 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Feaslblllty 

1,000 

41,000 

41,800 

18 

New Infrastructure 

Relger Park 

Ext9 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Servlces/Plannlng/Con 

structlon 

Feaslblllty 

68,739 

45,879 

45,979 

19 

New Infrastructure 

Rletsprult 152 

IR Rletfonteln 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Feaslblllty 

1,000 

17,450 

61,487 

20 

New Infrastructure 

Mayfleld Extl 
(Project 56) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Feaslblllty 

1,000 

17,450 

13,351 

21 

New Infrastructure 

Etwatwa 8,21 
&24 (TBA) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Feaslblllty 

21,082 

24,120 

19,526 

22 

New Infrastructure 

Tswelopele 

ext5 

&Temblsa 23& 

24 (TBA) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

22,591 

24,120 

25,201 

23 

New Infrastructure 

Tswelopele 6 & 
Tswelopele 
Proper (TBA) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

11,295 

11,810 

12,351 

24 

New Infrastructure 

Etwatwa32 

(Urban 

Dynamlcs) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

42,174 

31,658 

- 


192 




No. 

Nature of 
Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Housing 

programme 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

25 

New Infrastructure 

Mayfleld ext6 
(Gamont) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

15,384 

8,556 

- 

26 

New Infrastructure 

Etwatwa ext37 
(Karlbu) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

39,436 

- 

- 

27 

New Infrastructure 

Etwatwa ext34 
(AM sharp) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

31,648 

33,386 

34,430 

28 

New Infrastructure 

Umthambeka 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

13,149 

- 

- 

29 

New Infrastructure 

Khayelltsha 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

8,123 



30 

New Infrastructure 

Ollfantsfonteln 

410JR 

(Clayvllle X45) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

38,886 

19,333 

35,430 

31 

New Infrastructure 

Chlef Albert 
Luthull ext6 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

67,973 

92,888 

83,315 

32 

New Infrastructure 

Bluegumvlew 
ext2 & 3, 
Masechaba 
proper & extl 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

63,795 

53,587 

56,266 


193 




No. 

Nature of 
Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Housing 

programme 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

33 

New Infrastructure 

Kwa Thema 
ext3, 7a, 
Ekuthulenl 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Servlces /Plannlng/ 
Constructlon 

Constructlon 

1,529 

- 

- 

34 

New Infrastructure 

Tsakane ext19 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Constructlon 

1,729 

- 

- 

35 

New Infrastructure 

Etwatwa ext9 
&10 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of houses 

Constructlon 

20,138 

68,984 

52,233 

36 

New Infrastructure 

Langavllle ext6 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Feaslblllty 

364 



37 

New Infrastructure 

Chrls Hanl 

Proper extl 
(Thabong) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

49,346 

42,190 

45,200 

38 

New Infrastructure 

John Dube 
Vlllage 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Feaslblllty 

500 

1,000 

- 

39 

New Infrastructure 

Kwa Thema 
ext2 (Scheme 
621) (PMPZ) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Feaslblllty 

11,899 

79,491 

65,439 

40 

New Infrastructure 

Tsakane 22 
(PMA) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

87,850 

83,797 

88,847 

41 

New Infrastructure 

Phola Park 
Greenflelds 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

1,895 

- 

- 


194 




No. 

Nature of 
Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Housing 

programme 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

42 

New Infrastructure 

Eden Park 5 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

3,500 

17,600 

22,750 

43 

New Infrastructure 

Zonklzlzwe 1 & 

2 proper 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

7,287 

16,000 

15,200 

44 

New Infrastructure 

Thlntwa Vlllage 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

3,536 

- 

- 

45 

New Infrastructure 

Zonklzlzwe 

ext3 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

12,011 

12,383 

- 

46 

New Infrastructure 

Katlehong 

south, 

Vosloorus 

ext20 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

5,144 

3,328 

3,328 

47 

New Infrastructure 

Wlndmlll Park 
ext9 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

2,186 

- 

- 

48 

New Infrastructure 

Palm Rldge 
Project 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

40,436 

39,391 

34,200 

49 

New Infrastructure 

Vosloorus ext 

28 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

26,579 

32,457 

75,339 

50 

New Infrastructure 

Vllla Llza ext2 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

11,893 

10,931 

17,100 


195 




No. 

Nature of 
Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Housing 

programme 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

51 

New Infrastructure 

Tlnasonke ext3 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

350 

- 

- 

52 

New Infrastructure 

Molelekl Ext2 
(Erven9177& 
9178) 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Deslgn 

1,200 

3,500 

15,569 

53 

New Infrastructure 

Vllla Llza ext3 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

28,817 

27,737 

- 

54 

New Infrastructure 

Tlnasonke ext4 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

40,656 

24,574 

- 

55 

New Infrastructure 

Eden Park 
West&XI 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

14,963 

- 

- 

56 

New Infrastructure 

Chlef Luthull 

2,3 & 5 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Plannlng of sltes 

Feaslblllty 

500 

40,700 

49,485 

57 

New Infrastructure 

AlraPark 

Ekurhulenl 

Incremental 

Houslng 

Programmes 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

11,500 

- 

- 

58 

Upgradlng and 
addltlons 

Thokoza 

Hostel 

Ekurhulenl 

Soclal & 

Rental 

Houslng 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

65,700 

42,500 

76,500 

59 

Upgradlng and 
addltlons 

Kwa Mazlbuko 

Ekurhulenl 

Soclal & 

Rental 

Houslng 

Constructlon of Houses 

Constructlon 

44,000 

62,500 

69,000 


196 




No. 

Nature of 
Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Housing 

programme 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

60 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Sotho Hostei 

Ekurhuieni 

Sociai & 

Rentai 

Housing 

Pianning of houses 

Feasibiiity 

3,000 

10,000 

23,500 

61 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Nguni Hostei 

Ekurhuieni 

Sociai & 

Rentai 

Housing 

Pianning of houses 

Feasibiiity 

20,000 

38,000 

63,000 

62 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Sethokga 

Hostei 

Ekurhuieni 

Sociai & 

Rentai 

Housing 

Construction of Houses 

Construction 

57,400 

75,885 

67,209 

63 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Wattviiie 

Hostei 

Ekurhuieni 

Sociai & 

Rentai 

Housing 

Construction of Houses 

Construction 

29,950 

31,775 

35,114 

64 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Kwa Thema 
Hostei 

Ekurhuieni 

Sociai & 

Rentai 

Housing 

Construction of Houses 

Construction 

27.000 

31,775 

33,114 


INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 



Project 

Classification 



Funding 

Source 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

No. 

Project name 

Municipality 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

7 

New 

infrastructure 

asset 

Thembisa Muiti-purpose centre 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

share 

Construction of new 
faciiity - repairs due to 
vandaiism 

Construction 

500 

- 



197 





SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 


No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

20 

New Construction 

Tembisa 

Rehab Centre 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Inpatient Substance 
Rehab Facility 

Feasibility 

- 

- 

500 

41 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishments 

Zanele Mbeki 
Home 

Renovations 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Residential Home 

Tender 

1,000 

500 

500 

45 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishments 

Don Materra 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Child & Youth Care 
Residential Home 

Tender 

6,058 

500 

500 

52 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishments 

Mary Moodley 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Child & Youth Care 
Residential Home 

Tender 

4,153 

500 

500 

75 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishments 

Mary Moodley 
CYCC Office 
Facility 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

New Administration 
Offices 

Tender 

7,000 

- 

- 

81 

OHSA Upgrading 

Igugulethu 

OHSA 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Child & Youth Care 
Residential Home 

Tender 

100 

500 

500 

83 

OHSA Upgrading 

Mary Moodley 
OHSA 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Child & Youth Care 
Residential Home 

Tender 

100 

700 

700 

85 

OHSA Upgrading 

Zanele Mbeki 
Home OHSA 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Residential Home 

Tender 

200 

500 

500 

89 

OHSA Upgrading 

Ekurhuleni 
Region OHSA 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Regional Offices 

Tender 

200 

500 

500 


198 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

93 

Maintenance and repair 

Ekurhuieni 

Region 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Regionai Offices 

Construction 

1,800 

2,000 

2,000 

99 

Maintenance and repair 

iguguiethu 

CYCC 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Chiid & Youth Care 
Residentiai Home 

Construction 

3,000 

3,000 

2,400 

100 

Maintenance and repair 

iguguiethu 

CYCC 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Chiid & Youth Care 
Residentiai Home 

Construction 

3,000 

2,000 

3,300 

101 

Maintenance and repair 

Don Matterra 
CYCC 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Chiid & Youth Care 
Residentiai Home 

Construction 

2,000 

2,139 

3,000 

107 

Maintenance and repair 

Zaneie Mbeki 
Home 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Residentiai Home 

Construction 

3,000 

3,000 

2,000 

109 

Maintenance and repair 

David Bopape 
ECD and 

Aged Day 

Care 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Eariy Chiidhood & 
Aged Care Centres, 
Regionai offices, 
Guardhouse, Mini- 
substation, Waii & 
Landscaping 

Construction 

300 

300 

300 

112 

Maintenance and repair 

Tembisa ECD 
and Aged 

Day Care 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Eariy Chiidhood & 
Aged Care Centres, 
Regionai offices, 
Guardhouse, Mini- 
substation, Waii & 
Landscaping 

Construction 

300 

300 

300 

113 

Maintenance and repair 

Tembisa Oid 
Age 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Eariy Chiidhood & 
Aged Care Centres, 
Regionai offices, 
Guardhouse, Mini- 
substation, Waii & 
Landscaping 

Construction 

300 

300 

300 


199 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 

description/ type 
of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 

Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

114 

Maintenance and repair 

Etwatwa ECD 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Construction 

Chiidren and 
Famiiies 

300 

300 

300 

115 

Maintenance and repair 

Daveyton 

ECD and 

Aged Day 

Care 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Construction 

Chiidren and 
Famiiies 

300 

300 

300 

116 

Maintenance and repair 

Katiehong 

ECD 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Construction 

Chiidren and 
Famiiies 

300 

300 

300 

117 

Maintenance and repair 

Kwathema 

ECD 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Construction 

Chiidren and 
Famiiies 

300 

300 

300 

129 

Maintenance and repair 

Duduza ECD 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Construction 

Chiidren and 
Famiiies 

300 

400 

400 


200 




ROADS AND TRANSPORT 


No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

21 

New Infrastructure 

Germlston Statlon 
Intermodal Publlc 
Transport Faclllty 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

PublicTransport 

Facility 

Feasibility 

. 

15,000 

5,250 

25 

New Infrastructure 

Kempton Park 
Station 

Intermodal Public 
Transport Facility 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

PublicTransport 

Facility 

Design 

1,000 

10,000 

7,231 

26 

New Infrastructure 

Limindlela Station 
Intermodal Public 
Transport Facility 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

PublicTransport 

Facility 

Feasibility 

_ 

2,500 

31,500 

59 

Upgradlng and 

Addltlons 

P4-1 Nederveen 
rd (R103) from 
Leondale, 

Fordsdick rd 
(R554 to Barry 
Marais Rd). 

Access 

amendments and 
Land 

Proclamation 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Survey and Land 
acquisition 

Design 

1,100 



68 

Upgradlng and 

Addltlons 

K60 between 

Ivory Park K71 
(55) Tembisa 
Renewal 

City of 

Johannesburg 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Transport 

Branch 
conduction 
feasibility study 

Design 



6,000 


201 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

78 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

D1511 and D51 
rehab of access 
roadsto Tembisa 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Heavy 

rehabiiitation 

Design 

- 

- 

- 

85 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

K101 Doubiingof 
existing road P1- 
2 from N1 to road 
D795 (Midrand) 
(Preiiminary 
design) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Design 

3,000 

5,200 


89 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

K11:K47toK77 

Preiiminary 

Design 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Design 

- 

- 

- 

95 

U[grading and 

Additions 

K60 Construction 
of one 

carriageway from 
Gautrain yard to 
K101 (Oid JHB 
road) and river 
bridge 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Design 



7,500 

97 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

K88: new road 
from Midfieid 
(K90)toAtias 
road K157 to iink 
via K85 to PWV 

15 Preiiminary 
Design 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Design 


2,500 



202 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

103 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

K105: Upgrading 
to duai from K60 
(Tembisa access) 
to Kempton Park 
Civic 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Design 




109 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

K101 from 
Randjiesfontein 
interchange to 

New Road 

Ekurhuieni / City 
of Johannesburg 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Design 

2,000 

_ 

_ 

117 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

P4-1 Nederveen 

Rd(R103)from 

Leondaie 

Forsdick Rd 
(R554) to Barry 
Marais Rd (21) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Construction 

90,000 

108,000 

59,275 

133 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

K11 between 
Goiden Highway 
to P1-1 (R82): 

EiA, detaii 
design, tend doc 
& Land 
Prociamation 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Construction 



100 

163 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

Construction of 

5km waikways 
Katiehong in 
Ekurhuieni 
Metropoiitan 
Municipaiity 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Non Motorised 
Transport 

Hand over 





203 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

168 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

Construction of 
waikways / cycie 
ianes at 

Vosioorus in 
Ekurhuieni 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Non Motorised 
Transport 

Feasibiiity 

9,000 

1,000 


175 

Upgrading and 

Additions 

Refurbishment of 
Transport 

Operating 

Licensing 

Administrative 

Bodies 

(Ekurhuieni) 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Refurbishment 
of new buiiding 

Construction 

2,000 



186 

Rehabiiitation and 
Refurbishment 

P41/1 (R42 Nigei 
to Springs 

20.97km) 

Ekurhuieni 

Provinciai 

Roads 

Maintenance 

Grant 

Diiuted Emuision 

Design 

1,500.0 

_ 

_ 

187 

Rehabiiitation and 
Refurbishment 

P91/1 (R25): 
Doubiing of R25 
Wikus rd. to P58- 
1 Modderfontein 
rd. Birchieigh 

Ekurhuieni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Design 



8,000.0 

192 

Rehabiiitation and 
Refurbishment 

D1884 reseai of 
road Heideiberg 
west between 

D478 and P243-1 

Lesedi 

/Ekurhuieni 

Provinciai 

Roads 

Maintenance 

Grant 

Roads 

Design 

2,000.0 



195 

Rehabiiitation and 
Refurbishment 

K1 1 1 reseai of 
road (Tembisa) 

Ekurhuieni 

Provinciai 

Roads 

Maintenance 

Grant 

Roads 

Design 

3,000.0 

_ 

_ 


204 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

198 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

P122/1 Phase2 
(Tembisa) (K105 

Ekurhuleni / City 
of Tshwane 

Provincial 

Roads 

Maintenance 

Grant 

Roads 

Design 

2,000.0 

_ 

_ 

202 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

P41/1 (R42 Nigel 
to Springs 

20.97km) 

Benoni/ 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Design 

8,000.0 

- 

- 

228 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

Reseal of D2666 
(Klipportjie Road) 
(1.34km) 

Benoni/ 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Design 

750.0 

- 

4,700 

229 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

Reseal of D1511 

(Chloorkop/ 

Tembisa) 

(4.1 6km) 

Benoni/ 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Design 

750.0 

14,240 


230 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

Reseal of road 

K111 (8.20km) 

Benoni/ 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Design 

750.0 

10,500 

10,000 

236 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

P6/ 2 (R23 
Heidelburg) 

Benoni/ 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Design 

750.0 

5,000 

- 

264 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

P140/1 Nigel to 

Eikenhof 

(28.56km) 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

265 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

K109 

(9.22km)road to 
Bapsfontein 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

266 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

K175(R568) 

10.52kmfrom 

18.48-7.96km 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 


205 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

267 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

R548 (P36/3) 

P36/1 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

268 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

R548(P36/3) 

D1059 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

277 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

K175(R568) 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Design 

- 

- 

- 

278 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

R42(P101)from 
Delmas to N17 

Ekurhuleni 

Provincial 

Roads 

Maintenance 

Grant 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 




294 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

P67-1 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

295 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

P40-1 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

297 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

R42(Phase1) 

Ekurhuleni 

Provincial 

Roads 

Maintenance 

Grant 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 




300 

Rehabilitation and 
Refurbishment 

P68-1 Benoni 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Road Tarred 

Hand over 

- 

- 

- 

301 

Maintenance and 

Repair 

TrafficSignals 

Maintenance 

Ekurhuleni, City 
of Tshwane, 
Mogale city, 
Emfuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

Roads 

Construction 

9,830 

13,424 

16,170 


206 




No. 

Nature of Investment 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

302 

Maintenance and 

Repair 

Speciaiized 

Traffic Surveying 
Services 

City of 

Johannesburg, 
Ekurhuieni, City 
of Tshwane, 
Sedibeng 

Equitabie 

Share 

Counting 
systems and 
HSWM devices 

Construction 

3,160 

3,160 

4,776 

303 

Maintenance and 

Repair 

Maintenance of 
provinciai weigh 
bridges 

City of 

Johannesburg, 
Ekurhuieni, City 
of Tshwane, 
Sedibeng 

Equitabie 

Share 

Weighing 

faciiities 

Construction 

2,850 

1,420 

1,700 

304 

Maintenance and 

Repair 

Project: identify & 
prioritize 
intersection with 
capacity 
probiems 

City of 

Johannesburg, 
Ekurhuieni, City 
of Tshwane, 
Sedibeng 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Construction 

1,000 

867 

1,890 

305 

Maintenance and 

Repair 

Project: 

identification of 
hazardous 
iocations road 
safety 

investigations 

City of 

Johannesburg, 
Ekurhuieni, City 
of Tshwane, 
Sedibeng 

Equitabie 

Share 

Roads 

Construction 

1,750 

3,000 

3,300 

313 

Maintenance and 

Repair 

Benoni Region 
Regraveiiing of 
gravei roads 

Ekurhuieni/ 

Benoni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Road-Gravei 

Tender 

11,000 

6,000 

6,000 

332 

Maintenance and 

Repair 

Road D1511 
between 
intersection with 
Daie and Aiien 
roads D51 
(8.96km) 

Ekurhuieni/ 

Benoni 

Equitabie 

Share 

Road-Tarred 

Tender 

25,000 

13,600 



207 




SPORT, ARTS, CULTURE AND RECREATION 



Project 

Classification 



Funding 

Source 

Project description/ 
type of structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

No. 

Project name 

Municipality 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

4 

New 

Infrastructure 

Asset 

Roodekop Erf 1665 Community 
Library 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Community Library 

Design 

10, 000 

- 

- 

9 

Infrastructure 

Asset 

Kingsway Erf 8 Community 
Library 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Community Library 

Design 

10, 000 

- 

- 


EDUCATION 


No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

1 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Albertsdal 

Primary 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 




5 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Buhle Park 

Primary 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grant 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 


17,000 

33,400 

6 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Chief A Luthuli 
Primary 

No2 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grant 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 


17,000 

33,400 

7 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Chief A Luthuli 
Primary 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grant 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




8 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Clayville Tembisa 
Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 





208 





No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipaiity 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

15 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

DRW.K. Du 

Plessis LSEN 

Ekurhuieni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grant 

Schooi - 
Speciaiised 

Design 

12,000 

60,000 


16 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

DRW.K. Du 

Plessis LSEN 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Speciaiised 

Design 



40,000 

17 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Duduza 

Bluegumview 

Ext3 

Primary 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Primary 

Tender 




18 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Duduza 

Mosechobo Ext 
Secondary 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Secondary 

Tender 




21 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Esselpark 

Primary 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Secondary 

Tender 




22 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Etwatwa Ext 30 
Secondary 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Secondary 

Tender 




23 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Etatwa Primary 
Ext9 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Primary 

Tender 




34 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Katlehong 

Primary School 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Primary 

Hand over 




36 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Koponong 

Secondary 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Secondary 

Tender 




37 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Langaville Ext 4 
Primary 

Ekurhuieni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grant 

Schooi - 
Primary 

Tender 

17,000 

33,400 


38 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Langaville Ext 5 
Secondary 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Secondary 

Tender 




39 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Langaville 

Secondary 

School 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Secondary 

Tender 




45 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Mayberry Park 
Primary 

Ekurhuieni 

Eguitable 

Share 

Schooi - 
Primary 

Tender 





209 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

53 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

New Birch Acres 
Ext 5 Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 




63 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Oosrand 

Secondary 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grant 

School - 
Primary 

Construction 

50,000 



65 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Palmridge / Eden 
Park Secondary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grant 

School - 
Secondary 

Hand over 

5,000 


1,000 

68 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Phomolong 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grant 

School - 
Primary 

Construction 




69 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Phumulo Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 




70 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Pholokong 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Handover 




74 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Provision of land 
cost 

All 

Equitable 

share 

Program 

Support 

Construction 

12,000 

20,000 

50,000 

75 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Rethabiseng 
Primary No 2 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 

17,000 

33,400 


77 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Rondebult 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 

17,000 

33,400 


91 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Spruiitview 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 




93 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Thulosizwe 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Handover 




94 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Tinosonke 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 

17,000 

33.400 


95 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Tsakane Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




97 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Umnyezone 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 





210 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

98 

New Infrastructure 

Villa Liza 
Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 




99 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Winnie Mandela 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




100 

New Infrastructure 
assets 

Zankizizwe 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 




103 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Abraham Hope 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School 

Secondary 

Fencing 

Identification 


1,100 


104 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Actonville 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


108 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Alston 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


109 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Alston Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Identification 


1,500 


140 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Brakpan High 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School 

Secondary 

Fencing 

Identification 


1,500 


150 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Civinkani Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


151 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Con Amore 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Tender 

2,100 



154 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Dan Pharosi 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


155 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Dan Radebe 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


158 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Dawn Park 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 



211 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

171 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Duduza Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Fencing 

Identification 

1,563 



180 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Eden Park Ext 5 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


181 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Edleen Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Hand over 




182 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Ekurhuleni 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Hand over 




183 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Ekurhuleni 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


196 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Encochoyni 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


197 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Endicott 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


203 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Esibonelweshle 

Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 

Secondary 

Fencing 

Hand over 




216 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Fortune Kunene 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


220 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Geluksdal 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


226 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Greenfields 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


235 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Hoerskool 

Primrose 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School- 

Primary 

fencing 

Identification 


1,500 



212 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

255 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Isekelo 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


262 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Izibuko 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 

Primary 

fencing 

Identification 


1,100 


263 

Upgrading and 
additions 

James Nkosi 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 

Primary 

fencing 

Identification 


1,100 


269 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Kabelo Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


271 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Keketso 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


273 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Kgolema 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


276 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Kgotholong PS 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


279 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Khumbindlela 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


287 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Kommando 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


290 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Kwanele 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


297 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Laerskool 

Elandia 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,500 


309 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Laerskool 

Morewag 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 

Primary 

fencing 

Tender 


1,500 



213 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

319 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Laerskool 

Westwaal 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 

Primary 

fencing 

Identified 


1,500 


332 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Leondale 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


333 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Leratadima 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


334 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Lerutle 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


339 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Letsho Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 


1,100 


349 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Lungisani 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


355 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Mogogulla 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


356 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Magolelogose 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


371 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Mampudi 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


372 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Manzini Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


384 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Matshediso 

LSEN (GE) 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School 

Specialised 

Ablution 

Hand over 


1,100 


401 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Mahlodi Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Tender 


2,100 


402 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Mahlodi Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 

Primary 

fencing 

Identification 


1,500 


408 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Mon Sebone 
Secondary 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Septic tank 

Hand over 




410 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Montic Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 



214 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

414 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Morojoneng 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 



1,100 

423 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Muriel 

Brandskool 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 

Specialised 

fencing 

Hand over 


1,500 


429 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Ndlelenhle 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


432 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Nonmekane 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1.100 


434 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Norkem Park 
Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


435 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Nqubela 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


437 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Ntsoko 

Secondary 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 

Secondary 

fencing 

Identification 

1,500 



438 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Ntuthoko Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary Full 
Service 

Construction 

2,000 



462 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Pleasant Folly 
Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Hand over 




463 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Pleasant Folly 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Septic Tank 

Construction 

600 



490 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Reaagile Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,500 


495 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Redumeletse 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Identification 


1,500 


503 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Rollhlohlo 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 



215 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

504 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Rondebult 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


547 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Solomon Motlana 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


551 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Stoneridge 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


552 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Strubenvale 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


559 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Thabotona 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


566 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Thuliso Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,500 


568 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Thukhutkanisizw 

e 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


580 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Tlamatloma 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


584 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Tshobololo 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


589 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Tsjwangano 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


595 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Ukuthulo Farm 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 



216 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

596 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Umtholo 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


600 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Villa Liza Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


2,914 


601 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Vosloorus Ext 28 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


602 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Vukucinge 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


603 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Vunbeni Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


606 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Welamlamba 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


607 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Welgedag 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Identification 


1,100 


611 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Windmill park 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Hand over 




613 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Wychwood 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Education 

Infrastructure 

grant 

Grade R 

Hand over 




616 

Upgrading and 
additions 

Zanukhanya 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

Grade R 

Hand over 





217 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

620 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Abraham Hllope 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




624 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Akanyang 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




625 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Alafang 

Secondary 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand Over 




626 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Alberton High 
School Urgent 
Repairs 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Construction 

17,528 



631 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Asser Malaka 
Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Construction 

2,000 



639 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Benoni Junior 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Construction 

2,800 



650 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Buhlebuzile 

Secondary 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Hand over 




662 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Crystal Park 
Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 



8,000 

665 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Dalpark Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




667 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

De Bruyn Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




669 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Dinoto Tech 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 



8,000 

671 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Drommedaris 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




672 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Dukathole 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




673 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

East Leigh 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 





218 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

675 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Eden Park 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 



8,000 

676 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Eden Park 
Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 



8,000 

677 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Eden Park 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




691 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Endicoti Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Design 

3,000 

6,000 


692 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Enkangolo 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 

8,000 

10,000 


694 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Eureka High 

School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Design 

10,000 

5,000 


696 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Ezibeleni LSEN 
(geotech) / 

Zineleni 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Special 

Design 

6,000 

10,000 


700 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Gahlanso 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




701 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Geluksdal 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 



8,000 

702 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

George Mbilase 
Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 



8,000 

705 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Hoerskool 

Alberton 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Design 

9,000 

10,000 


706 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Hoerskool 

Birchleigh 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Design 

3,500 

1,500 


707 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Hoerskool 

Kempton Park 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Construction 

11,000 

10,000 


710 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

HTS Springs 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Design 

1,000 

5,000 


712 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Hulwazi 

Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 



8,000 


219 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

715 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Inxiweni Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Construction 

2,500 

10,000 


716 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Ithenbahle 

School LSEN 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Special 

Design 

5,000 



729 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Kingsway 

Intermediate 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 



8,000 

731 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Klopper Park 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




732 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Kuzinisela 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




738 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Laerskool Wenda 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Design 

3,500 

500 


739 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Lakeside Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Design 

1,000 

3,000 


742 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Leondale Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 



8,000 

745 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Letsie Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




752 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Mabuya 

Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 



8,000 

756 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Mamellong 

Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 

7,000 

4,000 


758 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Manhulana 

Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 



7,324 

759 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Masiiqhakaze 

Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 



7,324 

760 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Masibenze 

Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Tender 



8,000 

765 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Mehlareng 
Combined School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 





220 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

802 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Phumla Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 



10,000 

803 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Phumla 

Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Identification 



10,000 

804 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Pioneer Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Tender 



10,000 

819 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Rondebult 

Secondary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Hand over 




820 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Rondebult 

Secondary 

School (Phase 2) 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Secondary 

Hand over 

2,500 



829 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Shadrack 

Mbombo Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Hand over 




830 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Shadrack 

Mbombo Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Identification 



10,000 

834 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Siphiwe Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Desiqn 

1,600 

6,000 


841 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Solomon Motlana 
Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Identification 



10,000 

848 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Thuthukani 

Tswelapele 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Identification 



10,000 

855 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Tsakane Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Identification 



10,000 

858 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Tshepisa Primary 
School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Design 

2,000 

6,000 


861 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Umsabomvu 
Primary School 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

Share 

School - 
Primary 

Identification 



10,000 

862 

Rehabilitation and 
refurbishment 

Umthabeka 

Primary 

Ekurhuleni 

Equitable 

share 

School - 
Primary 

Identification 



10,000 


221 




No. 

Project 

Classification 

Project name 

Municipality 

Funding 

Source 

Project 
description/ 
type of 
structure 

Project 

status 

2014 Medium Term Estimates R 000 

2014/15 Budget 

2015/16 

Budget 

2016/17 

Budget 

876 

Maintenance and 
repair 

Dolomite 

Contingency 

Unplanned 

Maintenance 

All 

Equitable 

share 

All Schools 

Construction 




877 

Maintenance and 
repair 

General services 
(Vacant Site, 

Maint, Water 
supply, 

Sanitation) 

All 

Equitable 

share 

All Schools 

Construction 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

878 

Maintenance and 
repair 

Maintenance 

AET 

All 

Equitable 

share 

All Schools 

Construction 




879 

Maintenance and 
repair 

Unplanned 
Maintenance 
Offices (Roster) 

All 

Equitable 

share 

All Schools 

Construction 

6,736 

14,945 

15,972 

880 

Maintenance and 
repair 

Unplanned 
Maintenance 
Offices (Roster) 

All 

Equitable 

share 

All Schools 

Construction 

233,560 

200,500 

335,100 

881 

Maintenance and 
repair 

Unplanned 
Maintenance 
Schools - 
Special (Roster) 

All 

Equitable 

shares 

All Schools 

Construction 

4,000 

5,000 

6,000 

882 

Maintenance and 
repair 

Expanded Public 
Works 

All 

Expanded 

Public Works 
Incentive 

Grant 

All Schools 

Construction 

2,450 




222 




ANNEXURE B 


223