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* 

. . The San Francisco Plan 




,AN FRANCISCO DISASTER COUNCIL AND CORPS. 
45 Hyde Street, San Francisco 2, California • HEmlock 1-2121, local 614 



INTIL A STABLE PEACE prevails in the 
world, we must stay strong and vigilant. Thus peace and preparedness 
are joined. Our Civil Defense program is essential to both. An effective 
Civil Defense is an important deterrent against attack on our country 
and thus helps preserve peace. In the event of an attack upon us, Civil 
Defense at once becomes one of our immediate reactions imperatively 
required for our nation's survival. 
Should an emergency occur, our nation's survival may be dependent upon 

the way each of ur ^^ "" "-'- "" ^ ^ " ' 3d, survival 

will initially rest n inity. 

From the collection of the Eisenhower 



erate — occur. San 
Defense organizati( 
any community em 
disaster strikes. K 
earnestly recommei 



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San Francisco, California 
2008 



al, or delib- 
i. Our Civil 

i^ action, in 
If aid when 
booklet. I 
t pages. 

er, Mayor, 
Francisco 
and Corps, 



'ENSE or- 
ganization will hel know how 

to help yourself. Y ^orps offers 

you this booklet of vital information so you will know how to save your- 
self if disaster occurs. 

A. G. Cook, R. Adm. U.S.N. (Ret.) 
Director, San Francisco Disaster 
Council and Corps, 




When any disaster comes, self help is essential. 
Organized aid from authorities civil or military cannot possibly assist 
each individual immediately. 

For you as an individual, self reliance is the quickest, surest means to 
survival. KNOW HOW to help yourself by knowing this official San 
Francisco Plan! 

The plan is a simple, common-sense means to survival. It is in complete 
agreement with, and is coordinated with, State and Federal policy. 

When a Civil Defense siren sounds, you either evacuate the City or you 
take cover, according to the siren signal. 

If you evacuate the city, start at once from where you happen to be 
at the time; follow the traffic pattern (see page 19) regardless of whether 
or not that pattern takes you directly or indirectly to your destination 
(or even away from it, temporarily). 

If you take cover do so at once, in the best cover available. Stay there 
until Civil Defense experts, after testing for radiation, advise it is safe 
to come out. 



'/rsyo£^i/F£ 



Your survival in disaster depends mainly on you. Now is the 
time you and your family must inform yourselves, make your 
decisions and determine individual action. This is the best way 
to insure survival. 



7>oA/0H^ 



f rr 



Learn siren signals and decide what to do for each. 

Memorize radio 640 - 1240. 

Prepare ready kit of water, food and supplies. 



NTIL A STABLE PEACE prevails in the 
world, we must stay strong and vigilant. Thus peace and preparedness 
are joined. Our Civil Defense program is essential to both. An effective 
Civil Defense is an important deterrent against attack on our country 
and thus helps preserve peace. In the event of an attack upon us, Civil 
Defense at once becomes one of our immediate reactions imperatively 
required for our nation's survival. 

Should an emergency occur, our nation's survival may be dependent upon 
the way each of us responds to his duty. In an area attacked, survival 
will initially rest mainly with the individual and the community. 

President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
July 17, 1956 



D] 



'ISASTERS — natural, accidental, or delib- 
erate — occur. San Francisco has had its heavy share of them. Our Civil 
Defense organization is here to help you, by planning and by action, in 
any community emergency. But Civil Defense is essentially self aid when 
disaster strikes. Know what to do. The facts are in this booklet. I 
earnestly recommend your careful reading of these important pages. 

George Christopher, Mayor, 
Commander, San Francisco 
Disaster Council and Corps. 



S 



AN FRANCISCO'S CIVIL DEFENSE or- 
ganization will help you in event of disaster. But you must know how 
to help yourself. Your San Francisco Disaster Council and Corps offers 
you this booklet of vital information so you will know how to save your- 
self if disaster occurs. 

A. G. Cook, R. Adm. U.S.N. (Ret.) 
Director, San Francisco Disaster 
Council and Corps, 



^ When any disaster comes, self help is essential. 

Organized aid from authorities civil or military cannot possibly assist 
each individual immediately. 

For you as an individual, self reliance is the quickest, surest means to 
survival. KNOW HOW to help yourself by knowing this official San 
Francisco Plan! 

The plan is a simple, common-sense means to survival. It is in complete 
agreement with, and is coordinated with, State and Federal policy. 

When a Civil Defense siren sounds, you either evacuate the City or you 
take cover, according to the siren signal. 

If you evacuate the city, start at once from where you happen to be 
at the time; follow the traffic pattern (see page 19) regardless of whether 
or not that pattern takes you directly or indirectly to your destination 
(or even away from it, temporarily). 

If you take cover do so at once, in the best cover available. Stay there 
until Civil Defense experts, after testing for radiation, advise it is safe 
to come out. 



Your survival in disaster depends mainly on you. Now is the 
time you and your family must inform yourselves, make your 
decisions and determine individual action. This is the best way 
to insure survival. 



7>o A/OH/ 



f wt 



Learn siren signals and decide what to do for each. 

Memorize radio 640 - 1240. 

Prepare ready kit of water, food and supplies. 




Arrange destination or learn assigned destination for evacuation. Take 
all the family on an outing to your destination (reception area), follow- 
ing the traffic pattern (traffic route), so all will be familiar with where 
you go and how you get there. 

Keep automobile ready at all times. 

Be sure you and each member of your family know this San Francisco 
Plan: ''It's Your Life." Discuss together your preparations and what 
your actions are to be in event of emergency. Especially make clear 
that any separation in leaving the City is temporary and that re-union 
will be at reception area (destination). 



jf ■■^■■^^B evacuate (leave) City at once. Meet family at pre- 
arranged destination or at assigned destination; don't delay departure. 

REGARDLESS OF DELAYS OR DETOURS, 
STAY IN TRAFFIC PATTERN. 

Turn radio to 640 or 1240. DO NOT USE TELEPHONE. 

If ^\r\r\/^^ take cover at once. Stay in cover until radio (640 or 

1240) or police or other official advises it is safe to come out. 

Turn radio to 640 or 1240. DO NOT USE TELEPHONE. 

^) How to do these things? 

Read this booklet for complete information. 

Here are the essentials of personal safety in time of emergency. All types 
of mass disaster are covered as briefly as so large and vital a subject can be. 

Read carefully . . . Re-read . . . Read again. 

^|) Be sure everyone in your family is familiar with these facts 
and the actions to take in emergency. 




M The 5/REf\/ SOON r>^ 




There are two Civil Defense Siren Signals. Each has a different meaning. 
Both are urgent warnings to you. They require action — your action. 



(11 



SIREN 
SIGNAL 

"ALERT" 

Steady blast: 4 minutes 

"TAKE COVER" 
Warbling blast: 3 minutes 



MEANS 



Attack probable 



Attack coming 
any minute 



L^ 



YOUR 
ACTION 

Evacuate City; 
leave at once. 



Take cover at 
once in best 
available shelter. 



When sirens are used for practice only, or for testing to determine if in 
good working order, this is always publicized in advance in the news- 
papers and on the air. 

IF there has been no pubHc notice of practice or test 

WHEN YOU HEAR THE SIREN IT WILL BE THE 
REAL THING. 

^TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION TO SAVE YOURSELF, 

//oH/ ^v/// / /:/7otr IVhefs Go/h^ O? 7 

^) Use your radio. Confirm the siren signal by tuning regular radio channels; 
if they are off the air, try emergency channels 640 or 1240. 

^i^Even after the disaster hits, whether remaining in shelter or leaving 
the City, do not use the telephone. Lines are urgently needed for Civil 
Defense, police and military calls. 

Keep your radios tuned. Channels 640 and 1240 will carry news, instruc- 
tions for your safety, information of vital importance to you. 



Wh&f-hcb- Attack- No WAm/NG ^ 

Your first indication of a nuclear attack, if no warning siren sounds, will 
be a very brilliant flash — the brightest you've ever seen. This will be 
followed by a heavy shock wave; the time interval between flash and 
shock will depend on your distance from the center of the explosion. In 
that interval (probably a few seconds) dive under the nearest heavy piece 
of furniture or counter — if none available lie flat on the floor, face down, 
alongside wall out of line with window to avoid flying glass, if you^re 
indoors. 

If outdoors, lie flat on the ground face down — cover head and neck 
with arms. 

Immediately after shock wave has passed get into best available cover. 

How-fo Take Cbver i 




When the *'Take Cover" siren^^V\ sounds, take the best cover possi- 
ble. (See charts, page 18, for relative protection of various shelters.) 
The better the cover, the greater your protection. 

There are many ways of taking cover (shelter) including: 

Air raid shelter: Many air raid shelters are scattered throughout San 
Francisco. They are marked 




^) At Home: 

If no better shelter is nearby, select the safest part of your home as a 
shelter area. This should be away from the outside of the building, out 
of direct line with doors and windows and with minimum danger of 
flying glass, falling beams and debris. If possible have two outside exits; 
or take every precaution against possibility of debris blocking the single 
exit. Equip shelter area with first-aid kit, flashlight with extra batteries, 
a whistle, canned food, bottles of water, self -powered radio and other 
emergency necessities. 



WHEN ''TAKE COVER'' SIGNAL — a warbling blast of three minutes' 
duration, sounds, meaning attack imminent — close windows and doors. 
Draw blinds and draperies. Leave electrical and gas appliances as if you 
were leaving your home for the day and going downtown. Turn radio 
to 640 or 1240. DO NOT USE TELEPHONE. 

ON ACTUAL ATTACK — which may come without warning (very 
brilliant flash followed by a heavy shock wave) : Drop to floor, get under 
bed or heavy table. If these are not available, stay on floor against wall, 
out of line of glass, shielding face and head. 

AFTER ATTACK — don't rush outside right after a bombing and 
unnecessarily expose yourself to radiation. Remain in shelter. Keep the 
house closed as tightly as possible. If windows or doors have been broken 
nail blankets or other heavy material over them. Put a handkerchief over 
your nose and mouth to help prevent entry of dust. If you have been 
exposed in the open after the explosion it is advisable to change clothing 
and wash thoroughly all over including the hair. Listen on radio for 
instructions. Do not leave shelter until you are sure your area is safe. 
Contamination by fallout is possible even without visible evidence of 
moisture or dust. 

A building you're in: 
If there is no designated shelter area, get under the strongest desk, table, 
counter or other heavy furniture away from windows or where things 
may fall on you. A car in a garage may be the best available. If nothing 
else is available lie face down alongside an interior wall away from 
windows. Remain until authorities advise it is safe to come out. 





Automobile you're in: 

Park at the nearest curb; close windows, crouch face down on floor of 
car. Protect face, head and neck with your arms. Don't block street 
intersections when you park. 






%ln the open or a street: J> tM WMMl MtflVl HJI V J 

If you can't get to an air raid shelter or building, and are on the street 



(or elsewhere in the open): lie flat on the ground, face down, protecting 
head and neck with your arms. A ditch, gutter, side of a wall, even a 
curb will give partial shielding. By lying down flat you double your 
chance of survival! 



WiJl^hCl^^ be 5/? ^^ No siren signal will an- 

il // /»/>oOM ^7x7 #^^/^ nounce the end of an 

/4// CI^QI^ Z>l(Jn&/% emergency. Radio and 

official cars equipped 
with loud speakers will announce when it is safe to come out of shelter 
in the City or to return to the City from outside shelter areas. 

Before you are advised that it is safe to come out of shelter or to return 
to the City, radiological tests will be made. 

Ahbouf E]/ac^^fm 3efbteAHBcl<^ 

Evacuation before attack is simply leaving the City ahead of time 
in order to save lives. The more people who leave the City, the 
more lives will be saved. The evacuation signal will be sounded 
only if there is prior warning of attack. 



DO I HAVE TO GO? 

No. 

Evacuation is voluntary. You may stay in the City, at your own risk. 
If you stay, be sure to take cover in best available shelter. 

WIF I DECIDE TO GO? 




€ 



If you are going to leave the City, leave at once. Leave by the nearest 
route (see maps at back of booklet). Do not change routes. When you 
drive your automobile, take others along to the full capacity of your car. 

WHEN DO I GO? 

When the steady 4-minute "Alert" siren *"""*''* sounds. 
Leave at once, don't delay. 



o 




€) 



WHAT TRANSPORTATION DO I USE? 

Go by train, bus, cab, commercial truck, postal truck, automobile, or, 
if necessary, start out on foot. 

Southern Pacific trains at 3rd and Townsend Street depot will load to 
capacity, depart as soon as filled. Everything on wheels, passenger or 
freight, will be used. 

(Key Route trains will not run because the Bay Bridge will be 
closed to all traffic. The East Bay communities, too, will evacuate 
citizens and commuters; to pour people from San Francisco into 
those communities would only increase their problem and delay 
^2» everyone.) 

Municipal, Greyhound, Gray Line, Continental, Barrett and other busses 
will load to capacity wherever they happen to be, and depart as soon 
as filled. 

Trucks, Taxicabs, Postal Trucks will load to capacity, wherever they 
happen to be, then roll. 

Automobiles — Load to full seating capacity, then GO. Don't drive alone; 
take a car full of people. 

Make a habit of filling up your gas tank, so you're ready to go. Keep 
motor tuned, tires in good condition, always. 

TRAFFIC FLOW IS HOW YOU GO. 

To evacuate the most people safely in the shortest time is the purpose 
of planned traffic flow patterns. There are six main highways out of the 
City (one northward, five southward). Use the one nearest to you when 
the siren sounds. Do not try to get to a different traffic pattern, even 
if the nearby pattern takes you away from where you want to go, or 
even if it temporarily separates you from your family. 

The traffic patterns assure that the greatest number of automobiles, 
trucks, busses and cabs, each loaded to capacity with people, can move 
along the highways with the least possible delay. Follow the traffic 
pattern — it is the most important single feature of evacuation, because 
it enables you and the greatest number of other people to get out quickly. 
In emergency: All highway lanes become one way exit lanes. Pick a lane, 
stay with it. 



Drive with extra care — avoid accidents — they delay you and the 
thousands of others following you. Should your car break down or acci- 
dent occur, push the car off the road, so traffic can flow. Then ''hop a 
ride" in another vehicle. 

Stay in the traffic pattern unless temporarily re-directed by traffic con- 
trol officials: California Highway Patrol, local police. Civil Defense auxili- 
aries or military. These will help direct traffic, keep it moving so the 
greatest number of people can move to safety. 

Regardless of your destination, remember — traffic flow is how you go. 



WHERE DO I GO? 

San Francisco Residents: 

You have a choice of where to go. Make the choice NOW and be sure 

each member of your family knows what that choice is. 

I. You may go to the home of a friend or relative living at least 20 miles 
away from San Francisco, and whose home you can reach by follow- 
ing the traffic pattern prescribed for you. If this is your choice, clear 
it with your friend or relative NOW. 

n. You may go to the reception area assigned to your neighborhood 
(that is, assigned to your evacuation area). If this is your choice, 
find on the maps and lists at the back of this booklet (a) the evacua- 
tion area in which you live, (b) the reception area to which you go, 
and (c) the route (traffic pattern) you take to get there. Use that 
route if you start from home. 

For Civil Defense planning, San Francisco is divided into 74 neighbor- 
hoods called evacuation areas (shown on maps, pages 19 to 31). For 
each of the City's evacuation areas there is a reception area located far 
enough away to be considered safe, and a route to get there (see map, 
page 32). 

Remember that if you start from some other part of San Francisco you 
may have to take a different route than you planned. Getting out of 
the City is the most important thing; getting to your destination (recep- 
tion area or home of friend or relative, according to your choice) is 
secondary to your immediate safety. 



(B 



San Francisco Visitors: 

Go with traffic pattern to temporary shelter southward at Stanford 
Stadium, Stanford University, Palo Alto, or northward to Fairgrounds, 
Santa Rosa. 

East Bay Commuters: 
Do not use Bay Bridge. Go with nearest traffic pattern to temporary 
shelter southward at Stanford Stadium, Stanford University, Palo Alto, 
or northward to Fairgrounds, Santa Rosa. Proceed later to your home 
or regular shelter area when traffic permits. 

Peninsula Commuters 

Leave City by nearest traffic pattern. If this takes you northward, go 
to temporary shelter at Fairgrounds, Santa Rosa. If the traffic pattern 
goes southward go to your family rendezvous or to your home, according 
to your local Civil Defense Plan. 

Marin and North Bay Commuters 

Leave City by nearest traffic pattern. If this takes you southward, go to 
temporary shelter at Stanford Stadium, Stanford University, Palo Alto. 
If the traffic pattern goes northward, go to your family rendezvous or to 
your home, according to your local Civil Defense plan. 




W WILL I BE EXPECTED AT THE RECEPTION AREA? 

Yes. 

Civil Defense preparations are completed and ready for you and all the 
others who will temporarily leave the City. Housing, food, water, clothing, 
bedding, medical services and supplies will be on hand or swiftly available. 
Neighboring communities know how many people to expect. You and 
your family will be sheltered at a group shelter (such as a school, church, 
or other large building) or in a private home. 



(B 



HOW LONG DO I STAY? 

Depends on damage to the City, radioactive fallout, traffic. Civil Defense 
will advise you promptly when it is safe to return to San Francisco. That 
may be 24 hours, or several days, or weeks. 

WHAT DO I TAKE ALONG? 

If supplies are already in the trunk of your car, or ready-packed at home 
(and you are at home) take them. Otherwise, go "as you are". If you go 
by car, be sure it is filled to absolute capacity with passengers. Don't 
delay — load up and GO. For supply list, see page 16. 

WHAT ABOUT PETS? 

Take 'em along, if this doesn't delay you or your family. 



TO MOTHERS — AND OTHER PARENTS 

If the siren ( ■^■^^■^ ) to evacuate is sounded when children are 
in school, several plans will go into effect. The plan to be followed by 
the individual child is for the parent to decide. The decision must be 
made in advance and school authorities notified now, if not already 
advised. 

Plan #1. Children will be evacuated at once by first available transporta- 
tion. These children will be called for by their families later at 
reception area. 

Plan #2. Children will await parents or neighbors to evacuate them. 
After a reasonable wait, children not called for will he evacuated 
by school authorities. 

Plan #3. Children whose parents wish them to remain in the City, will 
be taken to shelter in the school or nearby. There, they may 
remain if joined by a parent or designated adult. After a reason- 
able wait, unaccompanied children will be evacuated by school 
authorities. 



WHAT ABOUT MY FAMILY? 

If everyone is together when the evacuation siren sounds, go together. 
Otherwise go from where you are. If this temporarily separates the 
family, know that you will be re-united at your destination (reception 
area). Be sure each member of the family, especially youngsters, knows 
the destination, understands the possibility of delay in re-union, and 



10 




m 



knows that the re-union will take place at the reception area. Be patient, 
calm. San Francisco citizens have faced disaster again and again, always 
with courage, hope and determination to win over any emergency. 



Absolutely! 

Each work day between 4:30 and 6 P.M., many thousands of commuters 
leave San Francisco. 

There are several ways to greatly increase this number. The most im- 
portant single thing is to load every vehicle, train, bus, and truck to full 
capacity. Automobiles now travelling our highways carry an average load 
of 11/2 persons. If this is increased to six persons we have quadrupled 
the capacity of the road without adding any more vehicles. If you drive 
be sure your auto is carrying all the people it will hold. 

In emergency all lanes of all roads will be one way outbound. Regardless 
of the closing of the Bay Bridge lanes, this further greatly increases the 
number of persons per hour that can leave. 

By using busses and trucks fully loaded the per person capacity of each 
lane is further increased. 

Trains too can greatly increase their load capacity. Standing room and 
additional passenger and freight cars promptly available will nearly 
double the normal load. 

74 % of the time prevailing winds from the ocean keep evacuation routes 
free of dangerous radiation. So the exit routes usually would be safe 
from fallout. (See page 16 on Radioactive Fallout). 

Neighbors are prepared and ready to receive, house, feed, clothe and 
medically attend San Franciscans at the reception areas. 

With you and all of us doing our part — and that includes extra careful 
driving — those who wish to leave can safely evacuate San Francisco. 



11 




^CMerP/sas/eJ'S 



• 



The San Francisco Disaster Council and Corps plans for your safety not 
only in event of enemy attack but under other, more common, forms 
of disaster. All of these other types have been experienced in San Fran- 
cisco or its neighboring areas. Know what to do, for your safety. 

SEVERE EARTHQUAKE 

When a severe earthquake occurs, take these precautions: 

IF YOU'RE INDOORS remain indoors. Protect yourself by crouching 
under a well built table or by standing in a doorway. Collapsing walls, 
falling plaster, fixtures, ornaments, pictures or even a brick fireplace 
that breaks away from its wall, then is less likely to harm you. 

IF YOU'RE OUTDOORS avoid standing by ornamented, faced or brick 
buildings which might fall or drop. If possible get into a doorway. Or 
stand in the middle of the street. 

EXPLOSION 

"Take Cover" instructions prevail. Don't be a ''sightseer." Inquisitive 
onlookers often gather by hundreds, even thousands. This obstructs fire, 
police and medical aid. 

FIRE 

AT HOME: 

1. Notify the Fire Department immediately. Send alarm from nearest 
Fire Alarm Box. Dial the Fire Department number (UN 1-8020) and 
give address and exact location of fire (If you do not know where nearest 
Fire Alarm Box is, find it NOW before need arises). 

2. Evacuate all persons in the building. 

3. Close all openings, doors, windows, etc., to prevent spread of fire. 

4. Before you open a door, feel it with the palm of your hand. If the 
door feels hot, the hallway or room is already filled with deadly heated 
gases. If you are caught in dense smoke, remember that the best air for 
breathing is nearest the floor. 

5. Do not burden yourself with personal belongings. Many serious casual- 
ties result from attempting to save possessions. 



12 



(B 



6. Do not re-enter the building for any reason until permitted by the Fire 
Department. 

AT WORK: 

1. Notify the Fire Department: 

(a) By sending two runners to the nearest street fire alarm box to 
transmit the alarm. (One runner to remain at box until arrival of fire 
department apparatus, then direct apparatus to location of fire: the 
other to return and report to the plant official concerned that the 
alarm has been transmitted). 

(b) By sending in an alarm from the nearest auxiliary fire alarm box, 
if one is installed in the building. 

(c) The telephone switch-board operator, in addition to the above, 
when notified, transmits the alarm by dialing the Fire Department 
number, UN 1-8020, giving address and exact location of the fire. 

2. Sound Fire Drill: 

(a) People other than those required to fight the fire evacuate the 
building or area where the fire is located, depending on the decision 
of the plant official in charge. The exit and stairway guards should 
take assigned stations at all doors to stairs and exits leading to fire 
escapes immediately. Monitors should search floors for people not 
alerted. 

3. Elevators should be used only for the evacuation of incapacitated 
persons. When this has been accomplished, elevators should be brought 
to the ground floor and remain there for use of the Fire Department. 

SABOTAGE 

If sabotage is in the form of explosion or fire, follow safety instructions 
already listed under those headings. For other types, follow Civil Defense 
instructions or medical instructions which will be issued at the time. 
Listen to your radio, or read the newspapers for information. 

FLOOD 

Unlikely within the City, it is a danger in surrounding areas. Obey 
police. Civil Defense or other official authorities as to evacuation, traffic, 
assistance. Keep car radio or other radio tuned for news and instructions 
in threatened areas. 



13 




& %^,f!^/nf cfflTv/z^^rr 



xy 



[any ''experts" both professional and non-professional, mili- 
tary and civil, make public comment (or comment which be- 
comes public) on new, bigger, more devastating dangers. Others criticize 
Civil Defense plans without offering better solutions. Such remarks, 
however well meant, create harmful confusion. FOR YOUR OWN SAFE- 
TY, FOR THE SAFETY OF YOUR FAMILY, do not let such things 
confuse you, or sway you from following the plans outlined here. WHEN 
BETTER MEANS OF PROTECTING YOU AND YOURS ARE 
POSSIBLE, San Francisco will present them to you. Meanwhile KNOW 
AND FOLLOW THE SAN FRANCISCO PLAN here given. IT'S YOUR 
LIFE THAT CAN BE SAVED BY IT. 

%% CmlMe/p? 

Yes. ^^-^ ^ 

WHEN disaster strikes, keep calm. Fear is a normal reaction, but hysteria 
has no place in your safety. A scared person does not act wisely. 

Offer your services through Civil Defense to distribute supplies, carry 
messages, etc. If you are trained in cooking, first aid, medical science, 
social welfare, you are especially needed. Speak up. 

BEFORE disaster strikes, learn the facts in this booklet. Be sure each 
member of your family knows them, too. 

Take an active part in Civil Defense. There are scores of interesting and 
important tasks open. Telephone a Warden Office for information. 

THESE ARE THE CIVIL DEFENSE WARDEN OFFICES 



45 Hyde Street 


HE 1-2121, Local 614 


1420 Clement St. 


SK 2-2329 


437 Eddy Street 


TU 5-2911 


1541 Taraval St. 


OV 1-8434 


1900 Union Street 


FT 6-2516 


2301 San Jose Ave. 


JU 7-1525 


305 Divisadero St. 


UN 1-5907 


1001 Valencia St. 


MI 8-4422 



Have you a question about Civil Defense? 

Write to San Francisco Disaster Council and Corps., 45 Hyde St., San 

Francisco 2, or telephone HE 1-2121, local 614. 



14 







% 



This will supply 6 people for 3 days. It is not a complete diet, but can 
be eaten without cooking, provides ample liquids and satisfies hunger. 
Special diets and infant's food should be provided as required. Provides 
two meals per day with chocolate bars for snacks. Select foods for your 
family, or if you wish, use this suggested list. Whichever supplies you 
select, keep ready in cartons for taking into a shelter when Take Cover 
siren 4%/%^^^ sounds, or for placing in trunk of your auto if Alert 
(Evacuation Siren) wmmmmmmmmm sounds. 

Water: 
3 gallons bottled water 

Foods: 

3 large cans unsweetened fruit juice 

3 large cans #21/2 sweet peas 

6 large cans pork and beans 

6 large cans (13 oz.) evaporated milk 

3 large cans #2% canned fruits 

1 pound tin honey or syrup 

1 box of 24 chocolate bars (should be used and replaced periodically) 

Instant drinks (coffee, chocolate, tea, or other of your choice). 

3 loaves of bread, if available, or crackers. 

First aid and medical supplies: 

Antiseptic solution — 3 to 6 oz. bottle (for cuts, scratches, wounds; 
not burns) 

Adhesive bandages ready to use: large tin (for covering small cuts, 

wounds) 
Aromatic spirits of ammonia — 3 oz. bottle (inhale for faintness) 
Sodium bicarbonate tablets: 5 gr., 50 tablets in bottle (for shock, 

nausea; make solution for burns) 
Twelve gauze pads in sterilized package, 3 inch square 
Three roller bandages 1 inch wide by 10 yards long 



15 



Triangular bandage, folded, 37 by 37 by 52 in., with 2 safety pins: 
4 bandages, (for sling or holding wounds or burn dressings in place) 
Eye drops: Castor oil — 2-oz. bottle with dropper (for irritated eyes) 
Water purification tablets — bottle of 100 
Aspirin — small bottle (for headache or pain) 
Safety pins: 2 dozen 
Special medicines you or your family require 

Other Items: 
Blankets 
Bed sheets: 2 
Large bath towels: 3 
Small bath towels: 3 
Soap 

2 dozen paper plates; 2 dozen paper cups 
Eating utensils 
Can opener 

Flashlight and extra batteries 
Scissors 
Tweezers 

Measuring spoon, set of metal or plastic 
Toilet tissue 
For small children: toy or book 




rWhen a nuclear weapon is exploded on or near the ground 
hundreds of tons of solid material is pulverized and en- 
trapped in the fireball. This material and other debris 
sucked up by the uprushing column of gases created by 
the explosion become radioactive. Should this explosion 
occur at or near the surface of a large body of water, 
water vapor droplets are similarly entrapped. 

These particles gradually fall back to earth and thus contaminate or 
subject to radiation anything they fall on. When this happens a serious 
hazard is created. This descending radioactive material is called fallout. 
No eye, ear, nose, or tongue can determine whether or not a radiation 

16 



hazard exists. It descends in a path whose width and length depends 
on the winds existing at the time at all levels up to as high as 100,000 
feet. It can reach out over a hundred miles. 

Civil Defense will warn of radiation, and through radio broadcasts 
(channel 640 and 1240) will keep you informed of wind borne fallout 
path. 




TYPICAL FALLOUT PATTERN: Winds from the Ocean cause this pattern to 
fall to the eastward of our evacuation routes 74 % of the time. 

The San Francisco evacuation plan takes you away from radiation, by 
routes generally safe, to radiation free areas. Return to the City will 
be advised only when safety permits. 

Much has been spoken and written about increasing radiation risk. 
Realize this: radiation damage calculations as published usually are 
based on exposure for 24 to 36 hours upon an individual doing nothing 
to protect himself. The San Francisco plan of taking cover in event of 
immediate danger, and staying in shelter until safe to come out, will 
minimize or eliminate such danger for you. 

There is plenty that can be done to protect people from radioactive 
fallout. Getting in a car or frame house cuts the dosage in half. A base- 
ment below ground can cut the dosage to one-tenth. A simple fox hole 
with the excavated non-active earth around the edge would cut dosage 
in half! Multistoried buildings, such as office and apartment structures 
and tunnels and underground garages and basements are good shelters 
against radioactive fallout. 

Get as much shielding as possible between you and any area where 
radioactive fallout may settle. 



17 



COMPARATIVE VALUE OF SHELTERS 



if 

^ * 



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si U 

Si is 



























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BLAST EFFECT 



Comparative danger from 
blast effects 



G MATERIAI 



Thicknesses required to reduce 
radiation by one half 

Value of shielding will vary 
depending on amount of material 
and degree of closure on all 
four sides top and bottom. 



- Basement also interior 
of multistoried building. 

- Basement completely 
underground and well 
shielded on top. 

B 




RADIOLOGiCAl EFFECT 



Proper shelter reduces the effect of radioactive fallout 



The Risk of Becoming a Casualty 

decreases according to the cover you take. When the "Take Cover" siren 
sounds, take the best cover available. 



18 



i 




19 



cT 


2 


R 


4 


5 





N DEX MAP 



GOLDEN \GATE 



PRESIDIO 



LINCOLN PARf<\ 



ALAMO 



lEARY BLVD. 



SUfRO GEORGL 
V ly|p.EAB0D>5 



FRANK -; 



t.F.YETTE ,C«BBILlO,,|«"<i?'"f|,><'C?"""; 



ro FULTON ST 

GOLDEN GATE PARK 



SCOTT KEY LA TolUMBUI 

I^NORlEGAy ^ " ^1 V ^ 



NORIEGA ST. 



PACHECO I ST. 




20 



If you live in this 

SAN FRANCISCO 

EVACUATION AREA 



Go to this 
RECEPTION AREA 



By this 
ROUTE 



ALAMO 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



ARGONNE 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



CABRILLO 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



COLUMBUS 



FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 



19th Avenue — Junipero Serra 
Skyline (State #5) — Slate #9 



FRANCIS SCOTT KEY 



FRANK McCOPPIN 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 

Great Highway — Coast Highway 

(State #1) 



GEORGE PEABODY 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



JEFFERSON 
LAFAYETTE 



FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



19th Avenue — Junipero Serra — 
Skyline (State #5) — State #9 

Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



LAWTON 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



Sunset Blvd. — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



NORIEGA 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



SUTRO 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



• IF you are out of your regular evacuation area, leave City at once by 
nearest traffic route. Do not "buck traffic." You will reach your destina- 
tion later on, when traffic and other conditions permit. 

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS TO "GET OUT. " 



21 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY 



^^^fc'oTT 



BAlST^ 



PRES I Dl 






lllllii U 



Ull 



GE/^^^ 






FRANK d 
McCOPPlN^ 



(D\ (AI 



^^^£?£A/ ^^^^ P^^^ 










If youlive in this 

SAN FRANCISCO 

EVACUATION AREA 

ANZA 

ALVARADO 
DOUGLAS 
DUDLEY STONE 

EDISON 
EMERSON 

FRANK McCOPPIN 
GEARY 

GEORGE PEABODY 
GOLDEN GATE 



GOUGH 
GRANT 

GRATTAN 
JACKSON 

JOHN MUIR 

JOHN SWETT 

LAGUNA HONDA 

LOMBARD 

MADISON 

Mckinley 
pacific heights 
raphael weill 

SANCHEZ 
SHERMAN 

TWIN PEAKS 
WINFiELD SCOTT 

YERBA BUENA 



Go to this 
RECEPTION AREA 

SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 

See Page 29 
See Page 29 

FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 

See Page 29 

REDWOOD CITY 

Washington School 

See Page 21 

SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 

See Page 21 

REDWOOD CITY 

Washington School 



By this 
ROUTE 



REDWOOD CITY 

McKinley School 



CUNNINGHAM, SONOMA COUNTY 

Mt. Vernon School 



See Page 29 

FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 

EAST PALO ALTO 

Belle Haven School 

MENLO PARK 

Encinal School 

FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 

LOS GATOS 

Los Gatos Union High School 

SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 

LOS GATOS 

Los Gatos Union High School 

REDWOOD CITY 

McKinley School 

REDWOOD CITY 

Herbert Hoover School 



See Page 29 

SANTA ROSA 

Herman Slater Junior High School, 3500 Sonoma Avenue 



See Page 29 

NAPA 

Ridgeview High School 



HEALDSBURG 

Healdsburg Union Elementary School, North and First Sts. 



Great Highway 
(State #1) 



Junipero Serra 
#5) - State #9 



Coast Highway 



Skyline (State 



Divisadero — Market — Portola — 
Junipero Serra — El Camino Real 
(US 101) 



Great Highway 
(State #1) 



Coast Highway 



Divisadero — Market — Portola — 
Junipero Serra — El Camino Real 
(US 101) 

Divisadero — Market — Portola — 
Junipero Serra — El Camino Real 
(US 101) 

Golden Gate Bridge — US 101 to 
Gravenstein Hwy. (} o fnile north of 
Cotati). Then northwest to Cun- 
ningham 



Junipero Serra — Skyline (State 
#5) - State #9 

Market — Portola — Junipero 
Serra — El Camino Real (US 101) 

Van Ness — Guerrero — El Ca- 
mino Real (US 101) 

19th Avenue — Junipero Serra — 
Skyline (State #5) — State #9 

Junipero Serra — Skyline (State 
#5) — State #9 — Saratoga — 
Los Gatos 



Coast Highway 



Great Highway 
(State #1) 

Junipero Serra — Skyline (State 
#5) — State #9 — Saratoga — 
Los Gatos 

Divisadero — Market — Portola — 
Junipero Serra — El Camino Real 
(US 101) 

Divisadero — Market — Portola — 
Junipero Serra — El Camino Real 
(US 101) 



Golden Gate Bridge- US 101 



Golden Gate Bridge - US 101 - 
thence State #37 and State #12 to 
Welch's corner, then north on Old 
Sonoma Road to junction with 
Sonoma Highway 

Golden Gate Bridge — US 101 



23 




24 



If you live In this 

SAN FRANCISCO 

EVACUATION AREA 



Go to this 
RECEPTION AREA 



By this 
ROUTE 



BRYANT 
CARMICHAEL 

COOPER 

D. WEBSTER 
GARFIELD 

HANCOCK 
HAWTHORNE 

IRVING 
IRVING SCOTT 

LINCOLN 

MARSHALL 

PARKER 

P. HENRY 
REDDING 

North-South line: 
Leavenworth St. 
East-West line: Geary St. 
NWand NE sectors 
SE sector 
SW sector 

SPRING VALLEY 
STARR KING 
STOCKTON 



SAN JOSE 

College Park Elementary School, 470 McKendrie Street. 
Before reporting to above, park at holding area 2 or 3, off 
Brokaw Road 

SAN JOSE 

Herbert Hoover Jr. High School, Park and Naglee Ave. Be- 
fore reporting to above, park at holding area 4 or 5, off Davis 
Street 



PETALUMA 

Kenilworth Park, East Washington and Payran Streets, East 
Petaluma 

ALUM ROCK, SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

James Lick Union High School 



NAPA 

Westwood Grammar School 



PETALUMA 

Kenilworth Park, East Washington and Payran Streets, East 
Petaluma 

SAN JOSE 

Selma Olinder School, 24th and San Fernando Streets. Be- 
fore reporting to above, park at holding area 9, off Santa 
Clara Street or 10 off San Antonio Street 

CLOVERDALE 

Cloverdale Citrus Fair Pavilion, Railroad Avenue and West Street 

SAN JOSE 

College Park Elementary School, 470 McKendrie Street. Be- 
fore reporting to above, park at holding area 2 or 3, off Bro- 
kaw Road 

SAN JOSE 

Herbert Hoover Jr. High School, Park and Naglee Ave. Be- 
fore reporting to above, park at holding area 4 or 5, off Davis 
Street 



SAN JOSE 

Willow Glen Senior High School, 2001 Cottle Ave. Before re- 
porting to above, park at holding area 15 or 16, off Almaden 
Road 

SONOMA 

Sonoma Valley Union High School, Broadway and McArthur 
Streets 

ALUM ROCK, SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

James Lick Union High School 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 



Central School, San Carlos 

Herbert Hoover School, Redwood City 

Fremont School, Menio Park 

SAN JOSE 

Willow Glenn Senior High School, 2001 Cottle Avenue. Be- 
fore reporting to above, park at holding area 17 or 18, off 
Hamilton Avenue 

SAN JOSE 

College Park Elementary School, 470 McKendrie Street. Be- 
fore reporting to above, park at holding area 2 or 3, off Bro- 
kaw Road 

SAN JOSE 

Woodrow Wilson Junior High School, Vine and Grant Streets. 
Before reporting to above, park at holding area 13 or 14, off 
Montgomery Street. 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypassi to San 
Jose. Turn right on Brokaw Road 



BayshorefUS 101 Bypass) to Santa 
Clara - Alviso Road. Turn right to 
El Camino, turn left on El Camino 
to San Jose, turn right on Davis 
Street 

Golden Gate Bridge US 101 



Bayshore lUS 101 Bypass; to San 
Jose, turn left on Alum Rock Ave. 

Golden Gate Bridge - US 101, 
then State #37 and *12 to Welch's 
corner. Then north on Old Sonoma 
Road to Buhman Ave. to Brown's 
Valley Road, east bright) to school 

Golden Gate Bridge -US 101 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn left on Santa Clara 
Street or right on San Antonio 
Street 

Golden Gate Bridge — US 101 



Bayshore fUS 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on Brokaw Road 



BayshorefUSlOl Bypass) to Santa 
Clara - Alviso Road. Turn right to 
El Camino, turn left on El Camino 
to San Jose, turn right on Davis 
Street 

Mission — El Camino Real lUS 
101). Thru San Jose business dis- 
trict, turn right on Alma Ave., then 
Almaden Road 

Golden Gate Bridge — US 101 — 
State .37- State il2 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose, turn left on Alum Rock Ave. 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) or 
El Camino Real 'US 101) 



Van Ness and El Camino Real (US 
101) to Santa Clara, turn right on 
Washington Street, thru San Jose, 
turn left on Hamilton Avenue 

Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on Brokaw Road 



Market — Mission — El Camino 
Real (US 101) into San Jose busi- 
ness district, turn right on Mont- 
gomery Street oe 




26 



If you live in this 

SAN FRANCISCO 

EVACUATION AREA 



Go to this 
RECEPTION AREA 



By this 
ROUTE 



COLUMBUS 

CRESPI 

FARRAGUT 

FRANCIS SCOTT KEY 
HEARST 
JEFFERSON 
JOSE ORTEGA 

LAKESHORE & 
LAKE MERCED 

LAWTON 
MARK TWAIN 
NORIEGA 
PARKSIDE 
SHERIDAN 



FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



CUPERTINO 

Collins School 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 

SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 

FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 

GILROY 

Gilroy Union High School 



CAMPBELL 

Campbell Union High School 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 

SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 

GILROY 

Gilroy Union High School 



19th Avenue Junipero Serra 
Skyline fState #5) - State iC9 



Sunset Blvd. — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



Junipero Serra — Skyline fState 
#5) — State ^9 - Saratoga - 
Cupertino 



Great Highway - Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



19th Avenue — Junipero Serra 
Skyline (State #5) — State #9 



Junipero Serra — Skyline (State 
#5) — State #9 — Saratoga — Los 
Gatos — Gilroy 



Lake Merced Blvd. — Skyline 
(State #5) — State #9 — Saratoga 
— Campbell 



Sunset Blvd. — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



Sunset Blvd. — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



Junipero Serra — Skyline (State 
#5) — State i9 — Saratoga — Los 
Gatos — Gilroy 



SLOAT 



SUNNYVALE 

Fremont Union High School 



Junipero Serra — Skyline (State 
#5) — State #9 — Saratoga ~ 
Cupertino — Sunnyvale 



STEVENSON 

ULLOA 

WEST PORTAL 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



SANTA CRUZ 

Bayview School, Mission and Bay Streets 



FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 



Sunset Blvd. — Coast Highway 
estate #1) 



Great Highway — Coast Highway 
(State #1) 



19th Avenue — Junipero Serra 
Skyline (State #5) — State #9 



27 



rY] 


2 


M 


4 
\ 


5 


ny 


INDEX MAP 1 




28 



If you live in this 
SAN FRANCISCO 
EVACUATION AREA 
ALVARADO 

CLEVELAND 
DOUGLAS 

EDISON 

EL DORADO 
E. R. TAYLOR 
EXCELSIOR 

FAIRMOUNT 

GLEN PARK 

GRATTAN 

GUADALUPE 

HAWTHORNE 
HILLCREST 

JUNIPERO SERRA 
KATE KENNEDY 
LE CONTE 

longfellow 
McLaren 

miraloma 

MONROE 

PAUL REVERE 
SANCHEZ 

SAN MIGUEL 

SUNNYSIDE 



SUNSHINE 
TWIN PEAKS 

VISITACION 



Go to this 
RECEPTION AREA 

SUNNYVALE 

Fremont Union High School 

PALO ALTO 

Ray Lyman Wilbur Jr. High School, 480 East Meadow Drive 

SUNNYVALE 

Fremont Union High School 

SAN JOSE 

Willow Glenn Senior High School, 2001 Cottle Ave. Before 
reporting to above, park at holding area 19. off Union Ave- 
nue 

See Page 31 
See Page 31 

PALO ALTO 

Ray Lyman Wilbur Jr. High School, 480 East Meadow Drive 

MOUNTAIN VIEW 

Escuela School, 505 Escuela Avenue 

PALO ALTO 

Mayfield School, 2650 El Camino Real 

FELTON, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Henry Cowell State Park 

SAN JOSE 

College Park Elementary School, 470 McKendrie Street. Be- 
fore reporting to above, park at holding area 2 or 3, off Bro- 
kaw Road 

See Page 25 

SAN JOSE 

Peter Burnett Junior High School, Second and Mission 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 8, off 
Rosa Street 

LOS ALTOS 

Covington School, Covington Road near El Monte, Los Altos 

MOUNTAIN VIEW 

Benjamin Bubb School, Hans Street 

See Page 31 

MORGAN HILL 

Live Oak Union High School 

SAN JOSE 

College Park Elementary School, 470 McKendrie Street. Be- 
fore reporting to above, park at holding area 2 or 3, off Bro- 
kaw Road 

CAMPBELL 

Campbell Union High School 



East Meadow Drive 



PALO ATLO 

Ray Lyman Wilbur Jr. High School, 

See Page 31 

PALO ALTO 

David Starr Jordan Junior High School, Middlefield Road 
and California Avenue 

LOS ALTOS 

Los Altos High School, 201 Raymond Avenue, Los Altos 

SAN JOSE 

Herbert Hoover Junior High School, Park and Naglee Ave. 
Before reporting to above, park at holding area 6, off Heath- 
erdale Drive or at holding area 7, off Stevens Creek Road 



See Page 31 

SANTA CLARA 

Santa Clara Union High School, 551 Jackson Street 



By this 
ROUTE 

Junipero Serra - Skyline (State 
*5) - State .*9 — Saratoga 
Cupertino - Sunnyvale 

Mission - El Camino Real 
(US 101) 

Junipero Serra Skyline (State 
i'5) - State #9 - Saratoga - 
Cupertino — Sunnyvale 

Guerrero — El Camino Real ^US 
101) to Santa Clara, turn right on 
Washington St., thru San Jose, 
turn left on Union Avenue 



Mission -- El Camino Real 
(US 101) 

San Jose Avenue — El Camino 
Real (US 101) 

San Jose Avenue — El Camino 
Real (US 101) 

Junipero Serra — Skyline (State 
#5) — State #9 

Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on Brokaw Road 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on 13th Street or 
on Rosa Street 

Mission — El Camino Real 
(US 101) 



San Jose Ave. 
(US 101) 



El Camino Real 



See Page 31 



Mission — El Camino Real (US 
101) San Jose— Morgan Hill 

Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on Brokaw Road 



junipero Serra — Skyline (State 
#5) — State 49 — Saratoga — 
Campbell 

Mission — El Camino Real 
(US 101) 



Guerrero — El Camino (US 101) 



San Jose Ave. — Alemany Blvd., 
or Mission — El Camino Real 
(US 101) 

El Camino Real (US 101) to Santa 
Clara, turn right on Washington 
Street to San Jose, turn right on 
Heatherdale Drive or left on Ste- 
vens Creek Road 



Junipero Serra — San Bruno — 
El Camino Real (US 101) to Santa 
Clara, turn right on Jackson Street 

29 




16 S-T 



HENRY ^ 5 



°l / P 

^ll D.WEBSTER 1| d 




N DEX MAP 



22 ST. 



BRYANT 



2 5 ISL 

SUNSHINE 

ARMY ST. 

LE CONTE 

ESMERALOi. 



PAUL 

REVERE 



RVING 
clSCOTT 

uJ xl 



23 ST. 

STARR KING 



NAPOLEONj 



FREMONT 



/ 



RIDGEPOINTI 



BAYVIEW 



BURNETT 



SMITH 



cXE.R. TAYLOR!^ 



EL DORADO 
VISITACION 



COUNTY LINE 




30 



If you live in this 

SAN FRANCISCO 

EVACUATION AREA 

BAYVIEW 



BRET HARTE 

BRYANT 
BURNETT 

CANDLESTICK COVE 



D. WEBSTER 
EL DORADO 



E. R. TAYLOR 

FREMONT 

HUNTERS POINT 

IRVING SCOTT 
LE CONTE 

PAUL REVERE 

P. HENRY 
RIDGEPOINT 

SMITH 

STARR KING 
SUNSHINE 

VISITACION 



Go to this 
RECEPTION AREA 

SAN JOSE 

Selma Olinder Elementary School, 24th and San Fernando 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 11 
off Story Road 

SAN JOSE 

Peter Burnett Junior High School, Second and Mission 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 8 off 
Rosa Street 

See Page 25 

SAN JOSE 

Peter Burnett Junior High School, Second and Mission 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 8 off 
Rosa Street 

SAN JOSE 

Peter Burnett Junior High School, Second and Mission 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 8 off 
Rosa Street 

See Page 25 

SAN JOSE 

Herbert Hoover Junior High School, Park and Naglee Ave- 
nues. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 4 or 5, 
off Davis Street 



SAN JOSE 

Peter Burnett Junior High School, Second and Mission 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 1 off 
Gish Road 

SAN JOSE 

Selma Olinder Elementary School, 24th and San Fernando 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 11 
off Story Road 

SAN JOSE 

Peter Burnett Junior High School, Second and Mission 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 8 off 
Rosa Street 

See Page 25 

SANTA CLARA 

Santa Clara Union High School, 551 Jackson Street 

SANTA CLARA 

Santa Clara Union High School, 551 Jackson Street 



See Page 25 

SAN JOSE 

Peter Burnett Junior High School, Second and Mission 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 8, off 
Rosa Street 

SAN JOSE 

Peter Burnett Junior High School, Second and Mission 
Streets. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 8 off 
Rosa Street 

See Page 25 

SANTA CLARA 

Santa Clara Union High School, 551 Jackson Street 

SAN JOSE 

Herbert Hoover Junior High School, Park and Naglee Ave- 
nues. Before reporting to above, park at holding area 4 or 5, 
off Davis Street 



By this 
ROUTE 

Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on Story Road 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on 13th St., or on 
Rosa Street 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on 13th St., or on 
Rosa St. 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on 13th St., or on 
Rosa St. 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to Santa 
Clara - Alviso Road, turn right to 
El Camino Real (US 101). Turn left 
on El Camino Real to San Jose. 
Turn right on Davis Street 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose, turn right on Gish Road 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on Story Road 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on 13th St. or on 
Rosa St. 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to Santa 
Clara 

Alemany — El Camino Real (US 
101) to Santa Clara — turn right 
on Jackson Street 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on 13th St. or on 
on Rosa Street 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to San 
Jose. Turn right on 13th St. or on 
Rosa Street 



Bayshore (US 101 Bypass) to Santa 
Clara 

Bayshore(US 101 Bypassj to Santa 
Clara - Alviso Road, turn right on 
El Camino ReaKUS 101). Turn left 
on El Camino Real to San Jose. 
Turn right on Davis Street. 



31 



CLOVERDALE 




Ready Reference of Map 
Numbers, Corresponding to 
"Route" in Lists. 

is "El Camino Real" 

BYA US 101 Bypass 
^21/ is "Bayshore Highway' 

State Highway #1, is 
"Coast Highway' 

5 . State Highway #5, is 
"Skyline" 

All other numbers refer to 
State Highways. 



32 




Air Raid Shelter: 



Civil Defense: 



Cover: 

Dispersal: 
Evacuation: 



Holding Area: 

Reception Area: 

Shelter: 
Shielding: 

Traffic Pattern: 



Cc^^0fr*uu.T£JRAfJ 



A heavily constructed refuge which protects people, 
records, or equipment, from heat and radiation in 
attack. 

All activities (1) to minimize the effects upon the 
civilian population caused or which would be caused 
by an attack upon the United States or by a natural 
disaster; (2) to deal with the immediate emergency 
conditions which would be created by any such attack 
or disaster, and (3) to effectuate emergency repairs 
to, or the emergency restoration of, vital utilities and 
facilities destroyed or damaged by any such^ttack or 
disaster. The San Francisco Civil Defense organization 
is called "San Francisco Disaster Council and Corps". 

Any comparatively safe area to occupy during an 
enemy attack or other disaster. 

See Evacuation. 

Organized, timed, and supervised moving of civilians 
from dangerous and potentially dangerous areas, their 
reception and care in safer areas, and their return to 
their own home communities. 

A parking area where traffic is taken off highways or 
streets and held prior to continuing to destination. 

A designated location where emergency aid will be 
provided for evacuees from a disaster area. 

See Air Raid Shelter. Also, see Cover. 

Any substances which will act as a barrier to the 
passage of radioactive energy. 

The planned methods and routes prearranged to 
assure maximum safe evacuation from the City of 
the greatest number of people. 



33