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JOURNAL 



OF THE 



JDFto gorfe djirfomologiral Hotirfg, 



Vol. VIII. JUNE, 1900. No. 2. 



REVIEW O.F THE AMERICAN CORYLOPHIDiE, 

CRYPTOPHAGID^E, TRITOMIDiE AND DER- 

MESTID^E, WITH OTHER STUDIES. 

By Thos. L. Casey. 

The following pages record the results of a number of studies made 
at various times during the year just coming to an end, and may pos- 
sibly be of some service to collectors in arranging their cabinets. The 
descriptions give only the salient characters of each species, and, in a 
genus such as the corylophid Gronevus for example, wherein the spe- 
cies mutually resemble each other very closely, can be appropriately 
limited to the few apparent differential characters. Further elaboration 
in such cases would prove to be largely repetition, and serve no really 
useful purpose in the present preliminary outline sketches, which are 
only intended to partially and imperfectly point the way. 
Fort Monroe, Va., December 14, 1899. 

HYDROPHILID^. 
Limnebius Leach. 
The minute species composing this genus have the body elongate- 
oval and convex, the very small sparse punctures of the upper surface 
bearing each a fine decumbent hair. The labrum is transverse, with 
the apex sinuate at the middle. The inferior part of the eye is well 
developed and prominent, with the individual facets convex, but the 
superior part is not more convex than the frontal surface, with the 
facets larger and perfectly flat. The antennae are partially received in 
repose in a very narrow groove between the eyes and the buccal open- 
ing, and, curving around the lower contour of the eyes, the club is 



52 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Voi.vm. 

concealed within the deep depression for the eyes in the anterior part 
of the hypomera. The anterior coxae are separated by a narrow promi- 
nent lamina. Hind tarsi slender, the first two joints short. 

This genus was investigated by the writer some time since under 
the name Limnocharis Horn, (Bull. Cal. Acad. Sci.). The male has 
the sixth ventral more elongate, sometimes as long as the two preced- 
ing combined or even longer, the seventh transversely impressed at 
base and the elytral apices transversely rounded. In the female the 
sixth ventral is not longer than the preceding, the seventh smaller and 
simple, and the elytral apices are frequently obliquely pointed at tip. 
The eighth segment, heretofore noted, is the projecting part of the 
dorsal pygidium, and does not belong to the venter. In most of the 
species the male seems to be much less abundant than the female. 

The American species of the genus may be defined as follows from 
the female throughout : — 

Elytra oval in outline, the sides arcuate 2 

Elytra conical, truncate at tip, the sides straight 7 

2 — Elytral apices in the female obliquely subtruncate ; pubescence rather long 3 

Elytral apices in the female rounded ; last joint of the maxillary palpi fusiform 4 

3 — Piceous to black in color, the sutural angles distinctly founded ; last joint of the 
maxillary palpi narrowly fusiform, pointed at tip ; pronotum obsoletely but rather 
Coarsely micro-reticulate throughout. California \_politus Csy.]....plceil8 Horn 
Black, the sutural angles extremely narrowly rounded and more nearly right, the sub- 
truncate apices slightly less oblique ; last joint of the maxillary palpi cylindric, 
the lip truncate; pronotum not micro-recticulate, except very feebly toward the 
sides; body relatively narrower and more elongate. Texas... angustulus Csy. 

4 — Black or piceous-black, the seventh ventral obtusely angulate 5 

Castaneous in color, the seventh ventral longer, trapezoidal, its apex broadly arcuato- 

truncate 6 

5 — Pubescence of the upper surface long and well developed ; pronotum strongly 
micro-reticulate, the sides very feebly arcuate. California (coast regions). 

alutaceus Csy. 

Pubescence extremely short and inconspicuous ; pronotum very obsoletely and more 
coarsely micro-reticulate, the sides more arcuate ; body smaller and more slender. 
California (coast regions) congener Csy. 

6 — Narrowly oval, moderately shining, rather coarsely micro-reticulate, the pubes- 
cence well developed but very fine ; prothorax strongly transverse, the sides con- 
vergent and feebly arcuate ; elytra scarcely one-half longer than wide, the apex 
unusually broadly rounded ; under surface piceous-black, the legs pale. Length 
1.2 mm.; width 0.58 mm. Vermont (Bennington Co.) discolor, sp. nov. 

7 — Pale piceo testaceous, the head and pronotum smooth, the elytra micro-reticulate ; 
pubescence long but sparse ; last two joints of the maxillary palpi stouter, the 
scutellum smaller than usual ; under surface and legs normal. Texas. 

conlclventris Csy. 



June i;oo] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 53 

Alutaceus is the largest species, being fully 1.6 mm. in length, and 
coniciventris the smallest. The latter greatly resembles a species from 
South Africa, taken some years ago by the writer. Piceus is very 
abundant in the coast regions from Monterey northward, and the fe- 
male described by me zspolitus does not seem to differ ; it is the only 
species before me which is represented by both sexes. Individual ex- 
amples vary but little among themselves in point of size. 

STAPHYLINID^. 

The genus Homxusa of Kraatz, represents an isolated group of the 
subtribe Aliocharina, containing a number of genera for the most part 
monotypic as far as known. Those before me may be characterized 
as follows : — 

Antennae ll-jointed 2 

Antennae 10-jointed • 4 

2 Prothorax broadly and evenly rounded at the sides, the apical angles rounded. ...3 

Prothorax broadly angulate at the sides at the middle, the angle rounded, the apical 
angles obtuse but not rounded, the base arcuate, not sensibly sinuate toward the 
angles, which are obtuse but not rounded ; two basal tergites broadly, equally 
and deeply impressed in about basal half; fine elevated anterior bounding line of 
the metasternum strongly and narrowly arcuate anteriorly at the middle, the 
mesosternal process long and finely acuminate, extending to almost opposite the 
apices of the coxae ; infraorbi al elevated line of the head feeble and obtuse ; an- 
tennae very strongly incrassate ; basal joint of the hind tarsi distinctly shorter than 

the next two combined ; [type crassicomis Csy.] Myrmobiota Csy. 

3 Base of the prothorax transverse and broadly bisinuate, the basal angles nearly 

right and not at all rounded ; two basal tergites narrowly, deeply and rather 
abruptly impressed along the basal margin ; antennae moderately incrassate ; an- 
terior marginal line of the metasternum transverse and only just visibly and very 
broadly arcuate anteriorly at the middle, the mesosternal process as in Myrmo- 
biota ; head with the infraorbital ridge very fine, and, between it and the eye, 
having two additional broad feeble and parallel ridges ; basal joint of the hind 
tarsi fully as long as the next two combined ; [type acuminata Mark.]. 

Homceusa Krtz. 
Base of the prothorax arcuate, becoming feebly sinuate near each angle, the latter 
slightly obtuse and distinctly, though narrowly, rounded ; basal tergites not im- 
pressed at base ; antennae feebly incrassate, the last joint longer than the two pre- 
ceding combined and somewhat compressed apically ; mesosternal process angu- 
late, much shorter than in the two preceding, the metasternal line obscured in 
the type ; infraorbital ridge fine but distinct, the additional ridges of Homceusa 
wanting ; basal joint of the hind tarsi distinctly shorter than the next two com- 
bined ; pubescence longer and more conspicuous ; [type . rinitula Csy. infra. ]. 

Soliusa, gen. nov. 



54 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vin. 

4 — Prothorax as in Homceusa, the base transverse and bisinuate, the angles right, not 
rounded and somewhat prominent, the sides arcuate and apical angles very 
broadly rounded ; basal tergites as in Soliusa, not impressed at base ; eyes smaller 
than usual, the antennas rather strongly incrassate, the tenth joint probably formed 
by the fusion of two, but not relatively longer than in Homceusa ; infraocular 
ridge fine but abruptly and strongly elevated, the additional ridges wanting ; 
basal joint of the hind tarsi as long as the last and a little longer than the next 
two combined ; pubescence moderate in length as in Homceusa ; [type expansa 
Lee] DeCUSS, gen. nov. 

The type of Soliusa may be briefly described as follows : — 

Moderately stout and depressed, the head nearly three-fifths as wide as the prothorax, 
with (he eyes slightly prominent ; antennae but little longer than the width of the 
body ; prothorax three-fourths wider than long, equal in width to the elytra and 
distinctly shorter, the sides rotundato-convergent anteriorly ; abdomen at base 
nearly as wide as the elytra, acuminate, the sides straight ; fifth tergite at apex 
three-fifths as wide as the first ; color throughout pale brown, the abdomen a little 
darker, the surface rather shining and quite feeble punctulate ; pubescence con- 
spicuous but subdecumbent as usual. Length, 1.75 mm. ; width 0.63 mm. 
New York crinitula, sp. nov. 

Individuals seem to be rare in all of these genera and probably have 
throughout a more or less complete symbiosis with ants. Myrmobiota 
crassicomis and Decusa expansa have both been sent to me by Mr. 
Wickham as having been discovered in ant-nests. 

Mr. Wasmann (Tijd. v. Ent. XLI), states that Myrmobiota Csy. 
(Col. Not. V, p. 594) is identical with Homceusa Krtz., citing speci- 
mens collected by Mr. Wickham and forwarded to him through Mr. 
Schmitt. There is manifestly some mistake in identification, how- 
ever, and my friend's remarks must refer to the species here described 
under the name Soliusa crinitula or to one closely al- 
lied thereto ; but if the latter surmise prove to be cor- 
rect, I am forced to differ in opinion concerning the 
status of that species, for a study of the basal tergites 

Oof the abdomen, form of the mesosternum and thor- 
acic base, and other characters, show that crinitula, 
fig. i.— Prothorax also, is generically distinct. In regard to Myrmobiota, 

of Myrmobiota and there can bfi nQ ^^ q{ ^ w j de j solation from jj 

/{amosusa. 

mceusa, as an inspection of the small accompanying 
diagrams of the prothorax will abundantly demonstrate, the upper 
figure referring to Myrmobiota and the lower to Homceusa acuminata. 
That Mr. Wasmann has fallen into an error in identification, is further- 
more evident at once from his statement that crassicomis (Wasm. nee 



June i 9 oo,] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 55 

Csy. ) differs from acuminata, among other minor characters, in hav- 
ing finer and denser pronotal punctuation, while, as a fact, the pro- 
notum is much more coarsely punctured in crassicornis Csy. than in 
acuminata. 

Chitosa gen. nov. 
The type of this genus is Dinarda nigrita Rosh., which differs from 
Dinarda, as represented by markeli and dentata, very profoundly in 
antennal and tarsal structure, as well as in the entire form of the pro- 
thorax and nature of the sculpture. In Dinarda dentata the pro- 
thorax is broadly and evenly bisinuate at base, and the sides near the 
basal angles are parallel and nearly rectilinear, the antennae cylin- 
drical, becoming somewhat acuminate at tip, and the basal joint of 
the hind tarsi but little longer than the second, the first four joints in 
fact diminishing only just visibly and quite regularly in length. In 
nigrita, on the other hand, the base of the prothorax is arcuate, becom- 
ing emarginate at each side, and the side margin is emarginate near the 
basal angles ; the antennas are gradually and strongly incrassate, a 
form wholly foreign to Dinarda, and, finally, the hind tarsi are very 
remarkable in structure and wholly different from any I have seen 
elsewhere in the Aleocharini. The basal joint is thicker than the 
remainder, darker in color or more highly chitinized, cylindrical and 
longer than the next three joints combined, the latter short, gradu- 
ally diminishing in length and obliquely truncate at their apices, the 
fifth as long as the preceding three together and more slender. These 
characters prove that Chitosa is a genus quite isolated from any other ; 
it is however related to Dinarda. It occurs in Spain. 

SCAPHIDIID^. 

This family seems to be very much better represented in America 
than in Europe, and a number of new forms have been discovered 
since my revision (Col. Not., V.). 

Scaphidium Oliv. 
The species before me seem to be five in number, piceum being 
quite evidently distinct from the maculate forms ; they may be de- 
fined as follows: — 

Elytra black, each with two pale subextemal spots 2 

Elytra uniform in coloration throughout, with a few discal coarse punctures in short 
series 4 



56 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Voi.vm. 

2 — Elytra without large punctures in series at any part of the disk, black, the spots 
small and flavate, the anterior triangular, not extending inwardly to outer third, 
the posterior very small, transversely oval, at outer fourth, twice as far from the 
apex as from the side margin. Length 4.7 mm. ; width 2.6 mm. Southern 
New England to Indiana obliteratum Lee. 

Elytra with coarse punctures in short series toward base and inner two-thirds, black, 
the spots large and generally rufescent 3 

3 — Coarse punctures very few in number, the remainder of the disk with the punc- 
tures very sparse and subobsolete ; posterior spot transverse and only very feebly 
sinuate anteriorly. Length 3.8-4.0 mm. ; width 2.3 mm. Indiana, Iowa and 
Kansas quadrlguttatum Say 

Coarse punctures numerous and close-set in the series, the general punctuation usu- 
ally more evident ; posterior transverse spot strongly arcuate, its anterior margin 
deeply sinuate ; body slightly smaller and distinctly narrower. Length, 3.8 mm. ; 
width 2.1 mm. Colorado? (Cab. Levette) ornatum, sp. nov. 

4 — Body deep black throughout, rather narrowly oval ; impressed area of the me- 
tasternum in the male sparsely punctate, the fulvous hairs longer. Length 
4.0-4.2 mm. ; width 2.4-2.5 mm. Rhode Island to Indiana and Iowa. 

piceum Melsh. 

Body castaneous, more broadly oval, the metasternal area of the male larger, more 
closely punctured and clothed with shorter hairs ; sculpture similar to that of 
piceum and quadrigutiatum. Length 4.5 mm. ; width 2.7 mm. Indiana. 

amplum, sp. nov. 

In quadriguttatum the first two, of the five joints constituting the 
antennal club, are equal in size and smaller than the last three ; in 
ornatum, however, the seventh joint is distinctly larger than the eighth. 



Cyparium Erichs. 

The two species now known to me may be distinguished as fol- 
lows : — 

Broader and somewhat oblong-oval, castaneous in color, the legs paler ; antennae 
pale throughout. Length 3.2-3.3 mm. ; width 1.9-2.0 mm. North Carolina. 
[substriatum Reit] flavipes Lee. 

Narrower and evenly oval, the body black throughout, the head rufescent and the 
legs rufo-piceous ; antennas pale, the 5-jointed club blackish ; eyes rather less 
widely separated on the front ; punctures of the six abbreviated elytral series 
much smaller. Length 3.5 mm. ; width 2.0 mm. Texas (Brownsville). 

ater, sp. nov. 

The characters given by Reitter to distinguish substriatum (Ver- 
hand. Nat. Ver. Briinn, XVIII) are completely those of flavipes, and 
the name must therefore be relegated to synonymy. 



June 1900.] CaSEY : On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEOPTERA. 57 

Bteocera Erichs. 

The known species of this genus have materially increased in num- 
ber of late, and those in my cabinet may be arranged as follows : — 

Scutellum not visible behind the basal lobe of the pronotum when the latter is 

normally adjusted to the base of the hind body 2 

Scutellum visible though always very minute and transverse 9 

2 — Basal marginal stria of the elytra entire 3 

Basal stria either much abbreviated externally or interrupted about the middle of 

each elytron 7 

3 — Larger species, iyi mm. in length or more 4 

Very small species, scarcely exceeding 1 mm. in length 6 

4 — Third antennal joint distinctly shorter than the fourth ; punctures along the di- 
lated posterior margin of the intermediate acetabula small or moderate in size. ..5 
Third antennal joint fully as long as the fourth ; marginal punctures very coarse ; 
color black throughout, the elytra feebly rufescent at the apical margin and the 
abdomen paler toward tip ; legs dark rufous ; upper surface not distinctly punc- 
tate at any part. Length 1.6 mm.; width 0.9 mm. Iowa (Keokuk). 

speculifer Csy. 

5 — Body broadly oblong-oval, the third antennal joint as long as the second, black, 
the elytra picescent posteriorly, very obsoletely punctulate ; legs dark rufous. 
Length 2.0-2.6 mm.; width 1.3-1.75 mm. Pennsylvania, District of Columbia, 
Illinois, and Iowa concolor Fabr. 

Body narrowly oval, black throughout, the elytra rather abruptly rufous in apical 
sixth or seventh; legs dark rufous; elytra sparsely and very obsoletely punc- 
tulate; third antennal joint much shorter than the second. Length 1.9-2.2 
mm.; width 1.2-1.25 mm - New York (Long Island), North Carolina (Ashe- 
ville), and Indiana congener Csy. 

6 — More narrowly oblong-oval, black, the elytra more distinctly rutescent at apex ; 
antennae shorter, not as long as the width of the body. Lengthl.15-1.25 mm.; 
width 0.7-0.75 mm. Rhode Island (Boston Neck), and Michigan 

apicalig Lee. 

Broadly and evenly elliptical , the median line of the body very much more arcuate in 
profile, deep black, the elytral apices scarcely paler ; antennae relatively dis- 
tinctly longer, as long as the width of the body. Length 1.1-1.15 rnm.; width 
0.7-0.72 mm. Texas (Columbus) robustula Csy. 

7 — Marginal line of the prothorax evenly and moderately arcuate when viewed later- 
ally ; mesepimera narrower ; species very small in size 8 

Marginal line, when viewed laterally, nearly straight, becoming rather abruptly and 
strongly bent downward through basal third ; mesepimera broader and not ex- 
tending quite so far toward the coxae ; metepisternal suture coarse, straight as 
usual ; size large, the body black, the elytra feebly rufescent at tip, not distinctly 
punctulate; antennae long and slender. Length 2.3-2.5 mm.; width 1. 3-1. 35 
mm. Rhode Island(Boston Neck), Virginia and Arkansas deflexa Csy. 

8 — Body moderately convex longitudinally, the metasternum more elongate, the epis- 
ternal suture not very coarse ; color pale flavescent throughout, the pronotum gen- 



58 Journal New York Entomological Society. [vol. vm. 

erally shaded a little darker ; basal stria of the elytra fine, disappearing com- 
pletely somewhat before attaining the middle of the width. Length 1. 15 mm.; 
width 0.68 mm. Pennsylvania (near Philadelphia) pallida, sp. nov. 

Body strongly convex longitudinally, smaller in size, deep black, the elytra rufescent 
toward tip ; under surface blackish, the abdomen and legs fulvous ; metepi- 
sternal suture much shorter and very coarsely excavated ; basal stria of the elytra 
stronger and only interrupted for a short space just beyond the middle of the 
width. Length 0.88 mm.; width 0.62 mm. Massachusetts (Tyngsboro). 

abdominal!?, sp. nov. 

9 — Basal stria of the elytra entire ; body larger, blackish throughout, the elytra) 
apices very narrowly rufescent ; antennas moderately long and slender, bristling 
with rather long stiff setae ; basal lobe of the pronotum rather feeble and broadly 
rounded; scutellum distinct. Length 1.7 mm. ; width 0.95 mm. Texas (Co- 
lumbus) texana Csy. 

Basal stria of the elytra much abbreviated externally ; size minute 10 

10 — Basal angles of the prothorax normally acute II 

Basal angles obtusely truncate at tip ; metepisternal suture arcuate 14 

II — Scutellum very short and indistinct ; abdomen concolorous ; metepisternal suture 
straight 12 

Scutellum distinct and longer than usual ; body deep black throughout, the entire 
abdomen abruptly pale rufous ; size very minute 13 

12 — Metepisternal suture coarse ; scutellum extremely small, short and very transverse ; 
body very smooth and polished, rufous throughout, the pronotum piceous ; an- 
tennas moderate. Length 1.3 mm. ; width 0.72 mm. Michigan. 

discolor, sp. nov. 

Metepisternal suture finer ; scutellum less abbreviated, but little mdre than twice as wide 
as long ; body rufo-piceous to blackish in color, the abdomen pale at tip. Length 
1.15-1.25 mm. ; width 0.65-0/7 mm. Pennsylvania (near Philadelphia) and 
Michigan plcea Csy. 

13 — Rather narrowly oval, highly polished and impunctate ; metepisternal suture 
feebly arcuate, fine and rather distinctly punctured ; mesepimera rather small and 
narrow, scarcely extending more than half way to the coxse. Length 0.95 mm. ; 
width 0.55 mm. Rhode Island (Boston Neck) rubrlventrls, sp. nov. 

14 — Rather stout, polished, black throughout above and beneath, the legs feebly 
rufescent. Length 0.9-1.0 mm. ; width 0.58-0.68 mm. Rhode Island (Boston 
Neck), Massachusetts, Michigan and Texas (Austin) nana Csy. 

Nana is a very widely distributed species of minute size, and is 
quite aberrant in the form of the basal angles of the prothorax and in 
the strongly arcuate metepisternal suture, but it does not differ gener- 
ically. 

Scaphiomicrus, gen. nov. 

The species described by LeConte under the name Scaphisoma 
pusilla, must form the type of a distinct genus because of the shorter 
and thicker antennae, situated at a greater distance from the eyes, 



Juneigoo] CaSE-Y: On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEOPTERA. 59 

which are notably smaller, the shorter tarsi, and especially, because of 
the radically different form of the post-coxal plates of the abdomen. 
These plates in Scaphisoma are very short and only developed inter- 
nally, the bounding arc extending outward externally, very gradually 
approaching the base of the segment, while in Scaphiomicrus the plates 
are more nearly semi-elliptic, having the outer part of the bounding 
curve directed upon the base without change of direction toward the 
sides of the body, somewhat, in fact, as in the subgenus Pullus of the 
Coccinellids. The species are all very much more minute than in 
Scaphisoma, and those which are represented before me may be dis- 
tinguished by the following characters : — 

Abdominal plates almost evenly parabolic in form, the apex more broadly rounded 
and the outer side more arcuate and approaching the base scarcely less obliquely 
than the inner side ; sutural line of the elytra not flexed outward basally 2 

Abdominal plates more narrowly rounded at apex, the external branch of the bound- 
ing curve much less arcuate than the internal, and directed almost perpendicu- 
larly upon the base ; sutural line of the elytra flexed outward at base, parallel to 
the basal margin ; elytra blackish, gradually and broadly pale toward tip 5 

2 — Elytra bicolored, black in about basal half, the remainder rufous 3 

Elytra pale throughout 4 

3 — Abdominal plates extending much beyond the middle of the segment, the 
punctures and the reticulations of the segment almost effaced ; form rather short 
and stout. Length 0.8-0.95 mm.; width 0.55-0.65 mm. North Carolina (Ashe- 
ville) puMllus Lee. 

Abdominal plates not quite extending to the middle of the segment, the surface of 
which is distinctly reticulate and finely, sparsely punctulate ; metasternum strongly, 
though sparsely, punctate; body slightly larger, the elytra destinctly longer when 
compared with the prothorax. Length I.I mm.; width 0.7 mm. Rhode Is- 
tand (Boston Neck) dimidiatus, sp. nov. 

4 — Entire body and legs pale fulvo-testaceous throughout, the form more narrowly 
oval ; abdominal plates broadly rounded, not extending quite to the middle of 
the segment ; metasternal punctures minute and very feeble. Length o. 9 mm. ; 
width 0.6mm.; Michigan, — Mr. Schwarz flavescens, sp. nov, 

5 — Sutural line of the elytra extending outward along the base to inner third 6 

Sutural line extending nearly to the middle of the width ; body more minute and less 
oval 7 

6 — Abdominal plates relatively larger, extending to the middle of the segment ; body 
blackish, the legs, antennas and apical half of the abdomen pale; elytral punctures 
sparse but rather distinct, effaced as usual toward base. Length 0.85 mm.; 
width 0.57 mm. Lake Superior lacustris, sp. nov. 

Abdominal plates very small, extending but little beyond basal third of the length, 
narrowly rounded at apex ; body in coloration and sculpture nearly similar to 
lacustris, the outline a little more broadly oval. Length 0.9 mm.; width 
0.65 mm. Iowa (Keokuk) nugatOr, sp. nov. 



60 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

f — Minute in sire, blackish, the elytra gradually rufescent behind the middle, 
sparsely, finely and very obsoletely punctate, the punctures almost effaced ; legs 
yellow ; abdominal plates well developed, extending almost to the middle. 
Length o. 7 mm. ; width 0.47 mm. Oregon exiguus, sp. nov. 

CORYLOPHID^E. 

The Corylophidae constitute a small family, evidently allied to the 
Silphidae, as shown by antennal structure, and, like them, display 
great variety in external habitus ; they are, however, remarkably 
homogeneous among themselves in sternal and abdominal structure. 
In Orthoperus a relationship with Scaphidiidae can be observed, and 
there are some characters, such as the 4-jointed tarsi with the third 
joint small, the post-coxal plates of the Corylophini and the project- 
ing rounded pronotum of the Parmulini — homologous with Crano- 
phorini, — which proclaim an indubitable relationship with the Coc- 




Fig. 2. — Antenna of Corylophid^— 1 Bathona {Corylophodes is similar, except that the 
third joint is shorter than the second); 2 Gronevus (also nearly of Rypobius); 3 Sericoderus ; 4 
Orthoperus ; 5 Eutrilia ; 6 Molamba lunata : 7 Molamba obesa ; 8 Sacium montanum ; 9 Ar- 
throlips nimius : 10 (Enigmaticum californicum. 

cinellidse. The chief difference in tarsal structure between these two 
families resides, indeed, simply in the freedom of the third joint, 
this being generally anchylosed to the fourth in Coccinellidse. The 
anterior coxa? are narrowly separated, displaying variations which 
serve to define tribal groups, and the cavities are broadly closed be- 
hind ; the intermediate are more widely separated and the posterior 
mutually very remote. The scutellum is always distinct, though 
small, the abdomen hexamerous, the first segment being much the 
longest and the palpi short, stout and acuminate. The American 
species may be assigned to four tribes as follows : — 



junei S oo.] Casey: On North American Colkopte* a. 61 

Prothorax widest at base 2 

Prothorax narrowed at base ; body narrower and lathridiiform 3 

2 — Anterior coxae long and narrow, inclosed within deep oblique fossae and attached 
more externally, the intermediate and posterior generally with distinct post-coxal 
plates ; body rounded or oval and convex, generally glabrous ; antennae II- or 9- 

jointed Corylophini 

Anterior coxse short, oblong ; body pubescent, the pronotum covering the head, con- 
vex, the edges not explanate and the hind angles greatly produced posteriorly 
and acute ; antennae io-jointed ; abdomen more extensile, with the basal segment 

shorter than usual ; post-coxal plates wanting Sericoderini 

Anterior coxae larger, less deeply imbedded and globular ; body more depressed, ob- 
long or oval, pubescent, the pronotum completely concealing the head, explanate 
at the margin, the hind angles not produced posteriorly ; antennae II- to 10- or 

possibly 9-jointed Parmulini 

3 — Head completely exposed from above ; anterior coxae small, oval ; antennae 
9-jointed ; integuments sparsely and feebly pubescent /Enigmatic ini 

All of these tribes occur on both sides of the continent, but in the 
first tribe the genera with 9-jointed antennae are the only ones which 
have thus far appeared in the Pacific district. 

Corylophini. 

The species of this tribe may be readily known by their rounded or 
oval convex form and shining glabrous integuments. The genera 
may be separated as follows : — 

Antennae 11-jointed, inserted between and near the eyes, widely separated at base, 
the eyes larger and coarsely faceted ; epipleurae rather wide and inflexed 2 

Antennae 9-jointed, inserted more anteriorly and more distant from the eyes, which 
are smaller and less coarsely faceted ; basal joint shorter ; epipleurae extremely 
narrow or subobsolete, not at all inflexed ; labrum broadly rounded ; prothorax 
emarginate at apex, the head in great part exposed ; post-coxal plates very short > 
tarsi slender 5 

2 — Head very deeply inserted within the prothorax, the anterior margin of which is 
evenly rounded and strongly descending ; post-coxal plates large, with rounded 
outline, the subbasal discal line of the metepisterna very oblique ; labrum rounded 
or subquadrate 3 

Head partially protruded and less concealed by the overhanging margin of the pro- 
thorax ; post-coxal plates very short, the subbasal line of the metepisterna nearly 
transverse ; labrum small, triangular, with the apex acuminate; tarsi dilated 4 

3 — Post-coxal plates of the abdomen more strongly rounded, the external part of the 
bounding line directed upon the base well within the sides ; third antennal joint 
elongate, longer than the second Bathona 

Post-coxal plates of the abdomen less arcuate posteriorly, the bounding line extending 
to -the sides of the body ; third antennal joint elongate but shorter than the sec- 
ond Corylophodes 



62 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm 

4 — Head entirely concealed from above, the prothorax almost evenly rounded ante- 
riorly and more descending, the margins not distinctly thickened and the hind 
angles acute and somewhat more posterior than the median parts of the base ; 
maxillary palpi moderately stout, regularly acuminate Gronevus 

Head partially visible from above, the prothorax sensibly sinuate at apex, the margins 
with a distinct thickened bead and the hind angles right ; maxillary palpi very 
stout Rypobius 

S — Anterior tibia flattened, the external edge acute, the axial line feebly arcuate 
throughout ; body larger Eutrilla 

Anterior tibia; slender, inwardly bent distally ; body very minute Orthoperus 

I have restored the original spelling of Rypobius, although it may 
not be etymologically correct. The European Moronillus of Du Val 
is identical, having similar structure and habits. 

Bathona, gen. nov. 
In this genus the body is broadly oval, convex, polished and gla- 
brous, with the edges of the pronotum subexplanate and diaphanous, 
and the hind angles not posteriorly produced. The tarsi are long and 
are compressed toward base. The species may be defined as follows : — 

Body moderately convex, the sides and apex of the pronotum widely subexplanate ; 
antennal club large 2 

Body very strongly, globularly convex, the limb of the pronotum very narrowly sub- 
explanate; antennal club rather less developed 3 

2 — Elytral punctures small and sparse but very distinct, impressed, each bearing, as 
usual, an excessively minute fine decumbent hair, black, the pronotum piceous- 
black, the edges broadly transparent and hyaline ; under surface paler, the legs 
and antennae rufescent. Length 1.35 mm. ; width 0.9 mm. North Carolina 
(Asheville) Carolina, sp. nov. 

Elytral punctures smaller and almost effaced ; body smaller, black, the pronotal limb 
broadly transparent and hyaline ; under surface and legs paler. Length I . I mm. ; 
width 0.75 mm. Virginia (Norfolk) virginica, sp. nov. 

3 — Impunctuate, piceous in color, the edges of the pronotum narrowly transparent 
and hyaline, the disk gradually darker toward the middle and base. Length 1.0 
mm.; width 0.78 mm. North Carolina (Asheville) convexa, sp. nov. 

Smaller and with feeble but visible traces of punctuation, piceous or testaceous in color, 
the under surface and legs more flavate. Length 0.8 mm ; width 0.7 mm. 
Pennsylvania (near Philadelphia).... spha;ricula, sp. nov. 

Individuals are rare, but virginica is represented before me by a 
number of examples, which exhibit no noteworthy variability. 

Corylophodes Matth. 
As in the preceding, the antennae in this genus have five small com- 
pacted and gradually wider joints between the third and the first joint 



June 1900.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 63 

of the club, and there is no vestige of an enlargement of the second 
joint before the club as there is in Rypobius, Gronevus and . Ortho- 
perus. The structure of the shaft differs in fact very radically, and, 
in this way, these genera are widely isolated. Corylophodes resembles 
Bathona in general structure, but, besides the characters indicated in 
the table, it differs in the generally more narrowly oval form of the 
body, shorter and less developed prothorax, finely margined along the 
basal lobe, and more slender and less coarctate five antennal joints 
immediately succeeding the third. The tarsi are nearly similar, but 
the anterior are feebly dilated in the male. The three species before 
me may be thus distinguished among themselves : — 

Elytral punctures sparse but rather coarse, deeply impressed and very distinct, black- 
ish-piceous, the limb of the pronotum broadly transparent and hyaline ; legs and 
antennae paler. Length 0.9 mm. ; width 0.72 mm. Rhode Island, Pennsyl- 
vania and North Carolina ( Asheville ) marginicollis Lee. 

Elytral punctures extremely minute and subobsolete. 2 

2 — Form narrowly oval, rufo-piceous in color, the pronotum with broad hyaline 
margin as in the preceding and succeeding species. Length 0.85 mm. ; width 
0.65 mm. Florida impunctatUS, sp. nov. 

Form more broadly oval, black, the legs, trophi and antennae pale ; prothorax trans- 
verse, the basal angles obtusely blunt as usual. Length o. 8r-o. 9 mm. ; width 
0.7-0.75 mm. Texas (Brownsville) SUbtropicilS, sp. nov. 

As pointed out by Mr. Matthews, the distinguishing feature of Cory- 
lophodes is the slender third antennal joint shorter than the second, 
but the author makes no allusion at all to the remarkable post-coxal 
plates. The genus as extended by its author in the " Monograph" is 
very composite, and I am unable to place the C. schwarzi, described 
therein from California. 

Gronevus, gen. nov. 
This and the succeeding genus differ very greatly from the two pre- 
ceding, in the very short and almost obsolete post-coxal plates, the 
meso-coxal being even much less developed than in Orthoperus, but 
the subtransverse line at the base of the metepisterna is present as 
in that genus ; the comparatively wide and steeply indexed epipleurae 
distinguish them at once however from Orthoperus and Eutrilia. They 
also differ quite radically in antennal structure, and from all others of 
the tribe, in the shorter and slightly dilated tarsi. In Gronevus the 
limb of the pronotum is hyaline and moderately widely subexpla- 
nate, the base not margined, and the hind angles are acute and dis- 



64 Journal New York Entomological- Society. [Vol via. 

tinctly though not abruptly produced posteriorly. The European 
Peltimis and Corylophus differ in having very narrow horizontal 
epipleurse and more slender tibiae. 

The species are somewhat abundant but closely allied ; those in my 
cabinet may be recognized by the following characters : — 

Elytra finely and sparsely but more or less distinctly punctate 2 

Elytra impunctate 5 

2 — Elytral punctures very minute throughout ^. 3 

Elytral punctures strong, especially on the descending flanks ; body smaller, more 
rounded, very strongly subglobularly convex, blackish, the pronotum paler, with 
narrow hyaline limb. Length 0.8 mm. ; width 0.65 mm. Iowa. 

Sticticus, sp. nov. 

3 — Antennal club blackish ; body more strongly and globularly convex, black, the 

pronotum slightly piceous, with narrow colorless hyaline margins ; scutellum 

twice as wide as long, very broadly rounded. Length 0.9 mm. ; width 0.7 mm. 

Canada (Ottawa) fuscicornis, sp. nov. 

Antennal club very pale, not differing in color from the shaft, body rather less con- 
vex 4 

4 — Blackish, the pronotum rufo-piceous, sometimes entirely pale from immaturity ; 
elytra but little more than twice as long as the prothorax ; scutellum twice as wide as 
long. Length 0.8-0.9 mm. ; width 0.63-0.75 mm. Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 

New York and New Jersey truncatus Lee. 

Psder, piceo-testaceous, the prothorax still paler, form more elongate-oval, the elytra 
much more than twice as long as the prothorax ; scutellum less transverse and 
somewhat ogival ; elytral punctures still finer, almost completely effaced pos- 
teriorly ; size a little larger as a rule. Length o. 95 mm. ; width o. 8 mm. Iowa 

and Nebraska hesperus, sp. nov. 

5 — Blackish, the pronotum and elytral suture rufescent ; elytral margin at and near the 
humeri more widely subexplanate than in the preceding species. Length 0.78-0.85 
mm. ; width 0.65-0.75 mm. Virginia (Norfolk and Fort Monroe) 

laevis, sp. nov. 

Individuals of the various species are much more abundant than in 
the two preceding genera, as is also the case in Rypobius. 

Rypobius Lee. 
The body in this genus is evenly oval and rather strongly convex, the 
pronotum evenly declivous toward the limb, which is not reflexo-expla- 
nate and not transparent or hyaline at the edges ; the hind angles being 
right and the apex sensibly sinuate indicates a closer affinity with Or- 
tlwperus. The integuments are minutely reticulate, and each of the 
very minute sparse punctules bears a small and very fine decumbent 
hair. The scutellum is less than twice, as wide as long and is para- 
bolic in form. The tarsal claws are rather long, slender and arcuate, 
with a feeble internal dilatation at base. 



juneigoo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 65 

The genus Glxosoma, of Wollaston, occurring in the Island of 
Madeira, which has been considered to be identical with Rypobius, is 
altogether distinct, not only in its 10-jointed antennas and type of 
elytral sculpture, but in its habits and gait, the single species of 
Glceosoma taking refuge under stones and running with great velocity 
when disturbed — habits wholly foreign to Rypobius. It may however 
be placed near Rypobius in a tabular arrangement of the genera of the 
family. A Spanish specimen sent me by Mr. Reitter under the name 
Rypobius velox, ' differs from the true Rypobius also in the elytral 
epipleuras, which are inclined upward and not at all inflexed, and also 
in the hind angles of the prothorax, which are acute and sensibly pro- 
duced posteriorly. I am unable to count the joints of the antennas 
with certainty in this example. 

The two species of Rypobius before me may be distinguished very 
readily as follows : — 

Base of the prothorax almost rectilinear, piceous, the prothorax and under surface 
paler ; micro-reticulation of the upper surface very deep, the lustre somewhat 
alutaceous. Length 1. 0-1.2 mm.; width 0.7-0.85 mm. Rhode Island, New 
Jersey and Virginia (near the ocean beaches) mannus Lee. 

Base of the prothorax distinctly bisinuate, blackish, thepronotum rufescent ; legs, an- 
tennas and trophi flavate, polished, the micro-reticulation of the upper surface 
almost completely effaced ; size very much smaller. Length 0.68 mm. ; width 
o 5 mm. Texas (Columbus) minutus, sp. nov. 

In both these species the first abdominal segment is as long as the 
next three combined. Minutus must bear some resemblance to the 
Central American guatemalensis Matth. , but differs in sculpture. 

Eutrilia, gen. nov. 
The single representative of this genus resembles a very large, 
broadly oval Orthoperus, and is evidently very closely related, being 
identical in the form of the prothorax and in the structure of the head, 
coxae and under surface. It however differs in the form of the an- 
terior tibiae, as indicated in the table, and in the virtual absence of 
any trace of epipleuras, these being indicated only by a slight thicken- 
ing of the elytral margins due to the very minute marginal bead. The 
meso-coxal plate is rather well developed, but the metacoxal plate is 
extremely short as in Orthoperus. The intermediate tibiae are slightly 
thickened externally just beyond the middle with arcuate outline, the 
posterior straight and the tarsi slender, the claws small, arcuate and 
very slender. The first ventral segment is as long as the next four 



66 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

combined. The integuments are micro-reticulate and very finely 
punctate, each puncture bearing a small decumbent hair, these how- 
ever being a little longer and more conspicuous, than in Rypobius. 
The scutellum is well developed, with broadly parabolic outline, and 
the elytral suture is not at all margined. The wings are well de- 
veloped, the fringing hairs very short. As in some species of Ortho- 
perus, especially scutellaris, there is a feeble impressed longitudinal 
line on each elytron near outer fifth or sixth, extending from the base 
for a short distance : — 

Oval, convex, moderately shining, brownish-testaceous in color throughout, the pro- 
thorax moderately developed, the base broadly parabolic, the sides strongly con- 
vergent, moderately arcuate and continuous in curvature with those of the elytra; 
punctures not distinctly visible under a hand lens of moderate power. Length 
0.95 mm.; width 0.8 mm. California brunnea, sp. nov. 

Orthoperus Steph. 
The species of this genus are among the most minute of the Coleop- 
tera, and may be readily recognized by their oval, moderately convex 
form, exposed head and 9 -jointed antennas, the fifth joint being gen- 
erally notably longer and sometimes thicker than the sixth. The 
epipleurse are represented by a narrow side margin of the descending 
flank, delimited by a fine line. The integuments of the body are 
more or less shining, micro-reticulate and virtually glabrous. The 
pronotum is very finely and feebly margined at base, the flanks not 
greatly descending, becoming very narrowly and feebly reflexo-expla- 
nate toward the basal angles, which are nearly right, not at all pro- 
duced posteriorly and narrowly rounded. The scutellum is dis- 
tinct though small and generally parabolic in shape. The species 
are rather numerous but closely allied among themselves as a rule ; 
thdse before me may be recognized as follows : — 

Elytral suture not margined except posteriorly 2 

Elytral suture finely margined to the scutellum , 8 

2 — Elytra without trace of punctuation of any kind, the minute reticulation distinct ; 
body much larger than usual, evenly elliptical, glabrous, pale brown in color 
throughout, the metasternum impunctate and with very sparse and microscopic 
hairs. Length 0.82 mm.; width 0.62 mm. Colorado... .... .princeps, sp. nov. 

Elytral punctures wanting but replaced by very small, sparse and V-shaped scratches ; 

size rather large 3 

Elytral punctures normal, being well-defined points but always very minute and sparse ; 

size small or very minute 4 

3— Form somewhat oblong and narrowly oval, black throughout, the legs and antennae 
rufescent ; micro-reticulation distinct ; metasternal punctures sparse but distinct. 



juneigoo.] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 67 

Length 0.7 mm.; width 0.45 mm. Lake Superior, Northern Illinois and Cali- 
fornia (Siskiyou Co.) scutellaris Lee. 

Var. A — Piceous and more broadly oval with more arcuate sides, the micro- 
reticulation less distinct and the scratch-like punctulation more visible. New 

York and Ohio.... piceus, v. nov. 

Var. B — Similar to piceus but with the punctules sparse and the elytra more 

rapidly narrowed toward tip. Washington State (Spokane). .lucidus, v. nov. 

4 — The punctures strong deep and very distinct, more especially so toward the suture 

and base of each elytron and toward the base of the pronotum, piceous in color, 

the legs luteo-flavate ; form rather narrowly oval. Length 0.65 mm. ; width 0.4 

mm. California (Sta. Cruz Co.) cribratus Matth. 

The punctures extremely fine throughout and only visible under strong amplification ; 

size small 5 

5 — Form oblong-oval 6 

Form evenly oval with more arcuate sides 7 

6 — Piceousblack, the micro-reticulations finer and stronger, giving a feebly subalu- 
taceous lustre. Length 0.6 mm.; width 0.4 mm. New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 

Delaware, North Carolina and Florida glaber Lee. 

Paler, piceous, smaller and more polished, the reticulation coarser and less visible ; 
suture more strongly margined posteriorly. Length. 0.5 mm.; width 0.35 mm. 

Florida (Enterprise) SUtu rails Lee. 

7 — Reticulations feeble, the surface more highly polished, piceous in color, the eyes 
separated on the front by nearly three times their own width. Length 0.6 mm. ; 

width 0.4 mm. Texas (Austin) texanus, sp. nov. 

Reticulations strong ; body smaller and paler in color, the eyes distinctly larger, sepa- 
rated on the front by but little more than twice their own width ; metasternum 
more coarsely reticulate. Length 0.5 mm.; width 0.35 mm. Illinois. 

micros, sp. nov. 

8 — Scutellum more transverse, ogival or rounded ; body more oblong-oval ...9 

Scutellum scarcely wider than long, triangular, the sides straight 10 

9 — Reticulations feeble and finer, the surface polished ; elytral punctures excessively 
fine and scarcely visible ; color testaceo-piceous ; head well developed. Length 
0.65 mm.; width 0.48 mm. Arizona (Tucson) and southern California. 

arizonicus, sp. nov. 

Reticulations strong, the lustre somewhat alutaceous ; punctures extremely fine and 
sparse but more visible ; head smaller, the coloration darker, piceous-black. 
Length 0.6 mm.; width 0.4 mm. Texas (Columbus) alutaceus, sp. nov. 

10 — Body oval, pale testaceous in color, polished, the reticulation very feeble, the 
punctures almost completely obsolete but simple ; sutural margin strongly defined, 
extending unbroken by the scutellum and along the base to beyond the middle of 
the width ; head well developed, meso-coxal plates shorter, with the bounding 
line more rectilinear and transverse. Length 0.55 mm.; width 0.35 mm. 
Bahamas (Harbor Island) bahamicus, sp. nov. 

Elongatus of LeConte, belongs to the yEnigmaticini. The crotchi 
of Matthews I, have not seen. 



68 Journal New York Entomological Society, [vm. vm. 

Sericoderini. 
This tribe is well differentiated from the preceding in the oval pu- 
bescent body, with more extensible abdomen and absence of distinct 
post-coxal plates, and from the following in the non-explanate limb of 
the pronotum ; from both it may be distinguished by the 10-jointed 
antennae and shorter basal segment of the abdomen, this, in the ex- 
tended condition, scarcely equaling in length the next two together. 
There is but a single genus. 

Sericoderus Steph. 
The species of this genus are so closely allied among themselves 
that it is scarcely possible to detect structural differences of any kind, 
and the names given below might be considered to represent subspecies 
of a single type form. The head is completely concealed from above 
and moderately deeply inserted, the pronotum broadly rounded at 
apex and with the hind angles acute and considerably produced pos- 
teriorly. The antennae are slender, with the basal joint narrowly 
oval and inserted in shallow frontal foveas at a slight distance from 
antero-internal margin of the eyes, the latter usually well developed 
and coarsely faceted. The frontal margin is feebly sinuato-truncate 
and the labrum short and broadly rounded. The tibiae and tarsi are 
slender, and the elytral epipleurae narrow, becoming strongly inflexed 
toward base. The following forms seem to be worthy of distinctive 
names : — 

Species of the Atlantic and Gulf regions 2 

Species of the Pacific slope 5 

2 — Elytra more strongly narrowed from base to apex 3 

Elytra feebly narrowed, the form more quadrate... 4 

3 — Larger, pale luteo-flavate in color, the usual nubilate subapical spot of the pro- 
notum piceous. Length 0.9 mm.; width 0.65 mm. New York to Lake 

Superior flavidus Lee. 

Smaller, the elytra generally piceous, the pronotum flavate with the subapical spot 
darker. Length 0.75-0.85 mm.; width 0.6-0.65 mm - Massachusetts, Penn- 
sylvania, and North Carolina ObscurtlS Lee. 

4 — Color pale flavate throughout, the elytra never darker, smaller in size than 
flavidus and more southern in distribution. Length 0.75 mm.; width 0.6 mm. 

Texas (Brownsville and Austin), Florida and Illinois subtilis Lee. 

5 — Larger, very broadly oblong, coarsely pubescent, dark rufo-testaceous, the usual 
subapical spot of the pronotum darker ; elytra but feebly narrowed from base to 
apex ; metasternum coarsely imbricato-reticulate but not distinctly punctured. 
Length o. 85 mm. ; width 0.68 mm. California (Monterey). 

quadratus, sp. nov. 



JUM1900.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOITERA. 69 

Very small, the elytra more rapidly narrowed from the base, piceous-brown in color, 
the pubescence rather less coarse ; metastemum distinctly punctured, especially 
toward the sides. Length o. 7 mm. ; width 0.55 mm. California ( Sonoma Co. ) . 

debilis, sp. nov. 

When discovered, individuals are rather abundant. Sericoderus is 
said in the "Biologia" to have the antennas n -jointed, but these 
organs are quite evidently io-jointed in our species, and the details 
given by Mr. Matthews for the antennse of .S. latus show that it should 
properly form a genus distinct from Sericoderus. 

Parmulini. 

The numerous species of this tribe can be recognized at once by the 
oblong or oval and less convex pubescent body, more or less widely 
subexplanate at the lateral and apical limb of the pronotum, and the 
rectangular thoracic angles. The genus Sacium of LeConte, is said 
by Heyden, Reitter and Weise to be the same as Parmulus of Gund- 
lach, but, as the LeContean Sacium is composite, I am in doubt as to 
which if any is the true Parmulus and have therefore not adopted the 
name for any one of our genera ; it is, however, retained for the tribal 
designation. The three genera before me may be identified by the 
following characters : — 

Antenna; 1 1 -jointed ; prosternum well developed in front of the coxae, the posterior 
margin of the buccal opening deflexed at the middle, forming a broad inferiorly 
vertical liguliform process 2 

Antennas io-jointed ; prosternum extremely short in front of the coxa;, the buccal 
margin not at all deflexed 3 

2 — Body elongate and subparallel ; antennse more elongate, the club relatively longer, 
looser and more serriform, the fifth and seventh joints both enlarged ; basal joint 
of the hind tarsi shorter, scarcely as long as the next two combined, the basal 
joints thicker ., Sacium 

Body oval, with more arcuate sides ; antenna; shorter, with a more slender shaft and 
stouter and more compact club, the seventh joint enlarged, the fifth normal ; hind 
tarsi with the basal joint elongate and more slender, always much longer than the 
next two combined Molamba 

3 — Body oval or oblong-oval, rather more convex but nearly as in Molamba ; an- 
tennae moderately elongate, the club loose and well developed, the elongate third 
joint followed by four small subequal joints ; posterior tarsi slender, with the 
basal joint elongate, the anterior more or less dilated at base ; species generally 
minute Arthrolips 

The epipleurse are horizontal, moderately wide, narrowing gradually 
and disappearing behind the middle, the first ventral segment very 
long, equaling the next three or four combined. 



70 Journal New York Entomological Society. \v<>\. viii. 

These genera are all widely distributed over the continent, but Sa- 
cium has not yet been found near the Pacific coast line, although 
occurring in Utah ; it is more northern in habitat than the other two. 
Molamba may perhaps prove to be the same as Parmulns, but at pres- 
ent I have no means of determining this. 

Previous authors appear to have entirely overlooked the very con- 
spicuous vertical ligula at the hind margin of the buccal opening in 
Sacium and Molamba, a character wholly wanting in Arthrolips. 

Sacium Lee. 

In this genus, and the next, the limb of the pronotum is broadly 
reflexo-explanate antero-laterally, and is scarcely at all so at the mid- 
dle of the apical margin, while in Arthrolips the edge seems to be 
more narrowly and evenly reflexed throughout the external circumfer- 
ence. Sacium, as understood by Mr. Matthews in the " Monograph," 
is composite, and lugubre should have been assumed as the type. The 
genus includes some of the largest species of the family known to 
me, and the four represented in my cabinet may be thus defined in 
brief: — 
Prothorax as long as wide or very nearly ; elytral punctures and pubescence rather 

sparse 2 

Prothorax shorter and more transverse, much wider than long in both sexes ; elytral 

punctures and pubescence dense 4 

2 — Elongate, twice as long as wide or very nearly, the elytral punctures smaller and 
rather sparser, piceous to blackish in color, with the usual two pale patches at 
the apex of the pronotum. Length 1.75-2.1 mm.; width 0.9-1.0 mm. Colo- 
rado montamim, sp. nov. 

Less elongate, always distinctly less than twice as long as wide, the elytral punctures 

stronger and less sparse 3 

3 — Piceous in color to blackish, the elytral suture sometimes slightly paler. Length 

.1.6-1.8 mm.; width 0.85-0.9 mm. Lake Superior lugubre Lee. 

Deep black, the suture not paler ; body a little larger and relatively broader. Length 

1.7-2.0 mm.; width 1.0-1.1 mm. Utah (southwestern) ..nigrum, sp. nov. 

4 — Body rather smaller, piceous-brown in color, the under surface and legs still paler. 
Length 1.65 mm.; width 0.85 mm. Lake Superior obscurum Lee. 

The elytra are uniform in color throughout and there is an entire 
absence of the paler maculation so characteristic of the two following 
genera. 

The genus represented by Clypeaster maderce Kr. (pusillus Woll., 
necGyll.) is radically distinct from Sacium in the structure of the an- 
tennae as figured by Wollaston, and I would propose the generic name 
Clypeastodes for that species . 



Junei9°o.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 71 

Molamba, gen nov. 
The species are much more numerous than those of Sacium and are 
generally of smaller size, though obesum is as large as any representa- 
tive of that genus discovered thus far. Those before me may be con- 
veniently arranged as follows : — 

Elytra uniform in coloration or devoid of distinctly defined pale maculation 2 

Elytra dark in color, with rufous or flavous maculation 3 

2 — Pubescence long, distinct and rather abundant ; body large, pieeous, the pronotum 
pale anteriorly, but darker at the middle as usual ; punctures fine, rather close-set ; 
elytra distinctly longer than wide, sometimes very feebly rufescent behind the 
middle in a small area but not obviously so. Length 1. 9 mm.; width 1. 2 mm. 
California obesa, sp. nov. 

Pubescence virtually wanting, each of the very minute sparse punctures having an ex- 
ceedingly minute hair, only visible under high power, the surface polished ; body 
much smaller, black, the pronotum piceous-brown, with two apical albescent 
areas ; elytra perfectly uniform black, scarcely longer than wide, the abdomen 
much extended behind them in the single type. Length (to extremity of elytra), 
I. o mm.; width 0.7 mm. Texas (Columbus) specularis, sp. nov. 

3— Elytra each with a small pale spot on the median line well behind the middle 4 

Elytra with a transverse pale band, sometimes failing to attain the sides or interrupted 
at the suture 6 

4 — The pale spot nubilate ; elytra black or paler from immaturity ; punctures fine and 
moderately close, the vestiture distinct. Length 1. 3-1.6 mm.; width 0.8-0.9 
mm. Colorado and Utah, one specimen not specifically distinguishable labeled 
"New York." biguttata Lee. 

The pale spot clearly defined ; size smaller 5 

5 — Antennae moderately long, nearly as in amabilis ; punctures fine, rather sparse, tht 
pubescence distinct ; metasternum finely but distinctly punctured and with short 
and stiffer hairs. Length 1.1-1.3 mm.; width 0.7-0.8 mm. Massachusetts 
and Maryland to Iowa and Missouri lunata Lee. 

Antennae very short, the club moderate but as long as the entire preceding part omit- 
ting the basal joint ; body almost exactly as in lunata but much smaller, the meta- 
sternum more minutely punctured but with longer and finer hairs. Length 
0.88 mm.; width 0.6 mm. Florida (Lake Monroe) parvula, sp. nov. 

6 —The pale band at the middle of the length consisting of a transverse discal spot on 
each, the elytra each with two large subconfluent basal spots also ; pubescence 
dense and conspicuous, the color pieeous ; pronotum darker along the median 
line. Length 1.5 mm.; width 0.8 mm. Texas lepida Lee. 

The pale band just visibly behind the middle and formed as in lepida, the body 
throughout as in that species but wholly devoid of pale spots at the elytral base ; 
punctures minute but rather close-set. Length 1.4-1.6 mm.; width 0.8- 
0.85 mm. Iowa ornata, sp. nov. 

The pale band much behind the middle, more conspicuous and attaining the sides of 
the elytra 7 

7 — The pale band nubilously interrupted at the suture ; body nearly as in the two pre- 



72 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. \ in. 

ceding species, the elytra indistinctly paler at. or near the base subexternally ; 
pubescence distinct and rather dense, the punctures minute. Length 1.3 mm.; 
width 0.8 mm. California amabilis Lee. 

The pale band very conspicuous, not at all interrupted at the suture ; pubescence 
coarser and not so dense 8 

8 — Piceous-black, the pronotum pale, clouded with blackish at the middle anteriorly; 
elytra each with a pale spot at the humeral callus, the punctures distinct, together 
much longer than wide. Length 1. 4-1. 7 mm.; width 0.85-1.0 mm. District 
of Columbia fascist a Say 

Black, the pronotum as vafasciata, the elytra but little longer than wide, the trans- 
verse pale band still wider and more conspicuous, wholly devoid of a subbasal 
pale spot, the punctures more minute and rather sparser ; body shorter and stouter. 
Length 1.5 mm.; width 1.0 mm. Texas (Columbus) decora, sp. nov. 

The Sacium balteatum, of Matthews, described from North Carolina, 
I have not seen ; it has on the elytra a straight transverse fascia behind 
the middle not extending to the sides, and also the apices, yellow. 
Lepida was placed in Arthrolips by Mr. Matthews but incorrectly. 

Arthrolips Erichs. 

This genus resembles the last in the outward habitus of the species, 
but these are in general much more minute and more narrowly oval or 
oblong-oval and perhaps a little more convex. In the structure of the 
anterior parts of the presternum and of the antennae it is radically dif- 
ferent. The species are nearly as numerous as those of Molamba, and 
are equally widely disseminated over the more southern parts of the 
United States ; as far as known to me they may be distinguished by 
the following characters : — 

Elytra dark in color, with paler maculation behind the middle 2 

Elytra unicolorous 6 

2 — Elytra each with an isolated spot which does not attain the suture ; larger 

species 3 

Elytra with a broad band crossing the suture ; size very minute 5 

3 — The spot behind the middle large, oblique and more or less rounded ; body piceous, 
the pronotum paler, becoming broadly diaphanous at apex as usual, the median 
line remaining dusky ; elytra finely, very closely punctate, distinctly pubescent, 
without basal or subbasal pale marking; legs pale. Length 1.2-1.35 mm.; 

width 0.78-0.82 mm. Southern California nimius, sp. nov. 

Var. A — Similar but stouter and more rounded at the sides, the spot less 
rounded and obliquely elliptical ; elytra more rapidly rotundato-convergent 
behind and narrower at tip. Length 1.4 mm.; width 0.9 mm. California 

(Owens Valley) robustulus, v. nov. 

The spot transverse and crescentiform, being broadly sinuate anteriorly 4 

4 — Elytra black, minutely and not so closely punctate, the limb not paler and without 
a humeral pale area ; pronotum not paler, except at the apical limb and very 



June i 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 73 

narrowly at the sides to the base ; integuments polished ; under surface blackish, 
the legs pale. Length 1 . 2 mm. ; width 0.75 mm. Virginia ( Fort Monroe ). 

cinctus, sp. nov. 

Elytra pale piceous-brown, the entire external limb flavescent, broadening over the 
humeral regions ; body narrowly oblong-oval ; under surface pale, the legs flavate. 
Length 1.0 mm.; width 0.65 mm. Florida (Tampa) mollinus S,iz. 

5 — Pubescence of the elytra moderately abundant and quite distinct, the hairs coarse ; 
elytra blackish, the pale band broad, sinuate anteriorly at the suture ; pionotum and 
legs pale. Length 0162-0.7 mm.; width 0.42-0.48 mm. California. 

scitulus Lee. 

Pubescence almost wholly wanting, each of the very minute sparse punctures bearing 
an extremely minute hair only visible under high power ; surface polished, the 
elytra piceous, the band transverse ; pronotum pale, clouded with piceous at the 
middle of the disk. Length 0.8 mm.; width 0.45 mm. Florida (Tampa). 

splendens Schz. 

6 — Elytra highly polished, without trace of reticulation 7 

Elytra minutely reticulate, the punctures minute and less visible ; pubescence short 
but rather abundant and quite distinct ; body pale luteo-flavate in color throughout, 
the elytra sometimes slightly darker. Length 0.7-0. 8 mm.; width 0.4-0.53 mm. 
California and Iowa. [ Sacium californicum Matth . ] decolor Lee. 

7 — Punctures small but strong and distinct throughout above, quite close-set, the 
pubescence moderately long and abundant, coarse and very distinct ; color black- 
ish, the pronotum paler. Length 0.95 mm.; width 0.65 mm. Massachusetts 
and Pennsylvania misellus Lee. 

Punctures minute and sparse, scarcely visible except under high power, each bearing 
an exceedingly minute hair as in splendens, blackish, the pronotum paler, the 
apical whitish spots small and rather widely separated. Length o. 8 mm. ; width 
0.55 mm. Texas (Columbus) sparsus, sp. nov. 

There may be some closely allied species included in the material 
before me which is referred to decolor, but in any event they would be 
so doubtfully distinct that there could be no advantage gained in 
separating them ; there can be little or no doubt of its identity with the 
Sacium californicum, of Matthews. 

The antennas in Arthrolips occasionally appear to have only nine 
joints, the slightly elongate third joint followed by three instead of 
four minute joints, but this appearance may be due simply to the diffi- 
culty in observing these organs in their natural position. 

^Enigmaticini. 

The general habitus of the few species comprising this tribe is 
wholly different from that of the preceding tribes, the body being 
narrow and somewhat as in Corticaria. There has been but one 
genus characterized thus far : 



74 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

/Enigtnatieum Matth. 
The body is parallel, moderately convex, the head entirely exposed 
and but slightly inclined, the eyes moderate in size, convex, with 
rather coarse convex facets as usual, the antennae inserted at some dis- 
tance from their antero-internal margin in angulate emarginations of 
the front. The prothorax is narrowed at base and truncate at base and 
apex, the apical angles very obtusely rounded, the basal more distinct 
but obtuse, the elytral suture strongly and widely margined, the line 
extending along the well-developed and transversely triangular scutel- 
lum nearly to outer third of each elytron. The anterior coxae are 
small and distinctly, though not broadly, separated, and the pro- 
sternum is largely developed in front of them ; the middle coxae are 
rather narrowly, the posterior very widely, separated, the legs slender, 
with the tibiae somewhat clavate and the tarsi rather slender, with the 
basal joints small. The basal segment of the abdomen is about as 
long as the next three combined. The two species known to me are 
minutely reticulate and subglabrous, each puncture bearing a very 
small but distinct cinereous hair ; they may be denned as follows : — 
Prothorax broadly subangulate and widest at the middle, the sides straight or very 
feebly sinuate thence to the basal angles ; body dark castaneous, finely and 
sparsely but very distinctly punctate. Length 0.75-0.9 mm.; width 0.42- 

0.5 mm. California (San Francisco) californicum Csy. 

Prothorax almost evenly rounded at the sides, becoming much more convergent toward 
apex, the latter scarcely more than half as wide as the base, the disk widest be- 
hind the middle and narrowed but slightly at base ; punctures sparse and very 
minute, those of the pronotum more visible and having the form of minute trans- 
verse arcs, enclosing each a very minute hair ; color dark brown ; size smaller 
and rather more slender inform than .alifornicum. Length 0.6 mm.; width 
0.25 mm. Florida elongatum Lee. 

Elongatum was described as an Orthoperus by LeConte, and the type 
is not before me at present, but a drawing from this type made by me 
some years ago seems to show that the prothorax differs so greatly in 
outline from that of californicum as to indicate some divergence of a 
generic nature. 

In the recent posthumous " Monograph of the Corylophidae and 
Sphaeriidae," page 35, Mr. Matthews has fallen into a singular misap- 
prehension, as my letter to him will undoubtedly show. My language 
was not by any means intended to imply that his sEnigmaticum 
ptilioides was identical with Orthoperus clongatus, but simply stated my 
conviction that the elongatus of LeConte is an sEnigmaticuni. There 



June i 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 75 

are many minor errors throughout this important monograph, which 
would doubtless have been avoided had the author lived to conduct it 
through the press. Sphcerius politus, for example, on page 214, is at- 
tributed to the author as a new species, whereas it was in reality de- 
scribed by Dr. Horn many years ago. 

CRYPTOPHAGID^E. 

Under this name have been grouped two closely allied types of so- 
called Clavicornia, comprising numerous genera and species. The 
body is small to minute in size, oblong or oval, more or less convex 
and generally clothed with coarse subdecumbent pubescence, with 
additional longer and more erect hairs arranged serially on the 
elytra in many genera, similar to those of the Tritomidae. The 
tarsi are pentamerous, becoming heteromerous in the males of certain 
genera as in certain Cucujidae, and the anterior coxae are oval, mod- 
erate in size, smaller and more deep-set than in Tritomidae, becoming 
decidedly transverse in the Ephistemini, and having an external 
trochantin. It is this form of the coxae which principally distinguishes 
the family from the Cucujidae, where the anterior coxae are still smaller, 
equally or still more deeply inserted and subglobular. The family is 
also unmistakably allied in many characters, especially evident in the 
Atomariinae, to the Scydmaenidae. Among these resemblances may be 
mentioned the basal impressions of the pronotum, so characteristic of 
the Cryptophaginae, the side margins of the latter in Ccenoscelis, and 
the recurved ventral sutures of that and some other genera, the elon- 
gate form of the trochanters, alternating long and short joints of the 
antennal shaft and slender pentamerous tarsi. The only serricorn 
character which is especially evident is the asymmetric antennal club 
of Ephistemus. 

Probably the most essentially peculiar structural feature of the Cryp- 
tophagidse, although a distinguishing character of the Silvaninae as 
well, is the modification of the lateral edges of the prothorax by serra- 
tures or nodular thickenings, and the various forms assumed afford ex- 
cellent subsidiary criteria for the definition of genera. Another pecu- 
liarity is the narrow and feeble dehiscence of the elytra at or very 
near the apex, there being but few genera, such as Diplocoelus and 
Loberus, in which this character virtually disappears. The eyes are 
rounded and convex, usually rather well developed and coarsely 
faceted, but somewhat variably so. The antennae are always n- 



"6 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. via. 

jointed, with a loose club which is generally 3-jointed, but sometimes 
purely 2 -jointed, and, in one case — Anchorius — 4 -jointed, a character 
remindful of Tritomidse. The anterior coxal cavities are generally 
widely open behind, but are completely and rather broadly closed in 
Diploccelus, completely but less broadly in Cryptophilus, narrowly but 
almost completely in Haplolophus, and about half closed in Setaria, 
proving that no useful generalization in the definition of the family 
can be drawn from the form of the cavities. The Biphyllini, as stated 
by Reitter, are evidently a perfectly natural part of the present family, 
this being proved by general organization, tarsal structure and espe- 
cially by the radiating straight lines of the first ventral segment, also 
occurring in Cryptophilus, and, in an arcuate form, in Tomarus.* 
The tribe is quite out of place in the Tritomidse, to which it was 
assigned by LeConte and Horn. 

The Cryptophagidae comprise two distinct subfamilies as shown by 
the following characters : — f 

Antennae inserted under the acutely margined sides of the front and remotely sepa- 
rated at base, the palpi mutually dissimilar, the maxillary elongate and slender, 
with the fourth joint elongate and more or less acuminate toward the tip, the 
labial short, with the last joint enlarged, oval to securiform ; pronotum generally 
bifoveolate at base Cryptophagin^; 

Antennae inserted on the front and more or less approximate at base, the palpi mutu- 
ally similar, short, stout and acuminate, the last joint of both small, narrow and 
subuliform ; trochanters always narrow and elongate, bearing the femora dis- 
tally ; pronotum never bifoveolate at base, though generally impressed ; anterior 
coxal cavities always widely open behind, the tarsi invariably simple and fili- 
form ; eyes always basal, the first abdominal segment never having radiating 
lines Atomariin/E 

In tarsal structure these two subfamilies are linked together by way 
of the Cryptophagini and Caenoscelini. The insertion of the antennje 
in Antherophagus %<zx.vas to suggest also a slight drift toward the Atoma- 
riinse, but this is very feeble and more apparent than real. In the 
mode of antennal insertion, and especially in palpal structure, the two 
subfamilies are radically distinct ; perhaps species may be discovered 
showing intermediate characters, but it is more probable that these 
bonds have long ago become extinct. 



* These lines also occur in the subfamily Silvaninse of the Cucujidas. 
f Names to which an asterisk is affixed apply to tribes or genera which do not occur 
within the limits of the American fauna as far as discovered. 



Juneigoo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 71 

CRYPTOPHAGINjE. 

The body in this subfamily is generally larger, more oblong, less 
convex and more pubescent than in the Atomariinae, possessing at the 
same time much more variety in tarsal structure and in the form of the 
anterior coxal cavities. These variations are important, being always 
accompanied by a peculiarity of general structure and habitus, and 
necessitate the erection of a considerable number of distinct tribes as 
follows : — 

Trochanters moderate in size, very obliquely attached at the side of the femoral base, 
the latter attaining the coxae ; anterior coxal cavities completely and broadly 
closed behind ; first ventral segment very much shorter than the.next two com- 
bined, and having two fine straight cariniform lines diverging from the inner 
margin of the coxal cavities ; antennal grooves before the eyes narrow and deep, 
the buccal processes narrow ; front short and without trace of clypeal sutures ; 
eyes basal and coarsely faceted ; body subdepressed, the pronotum generally with 
fine longitudinal raised lines at least visible toward the sides ; abdominal sutures 
fine, broadly arcuate; tarsi pentamerous in both sexes, the fourth joint small, the 
third strongly and the second mote feebly, lobed beneath BiphyllIni. 

Trochanters very short but less obliquely joined to the femoral base throughout the 
width of the latter ; anterior coxal cavities narrowly and partially closed behind 
by an inward projection of the side pieces of the prosternum ; tarsi stout, pentam- 
erous in both sexes, densely clothed beneath with coarse hairs, the fourth joint 
small ; eyes basal or subbasal and coarsely faceted ; front prolonged, more or less 
prominently convex above the antennae and with a short oblique clypeal suture at 
each side ; middle coxae narrowly separated ; pronotum never lineate, the basal 
foveae minute or subobsolete ; elytra with confused punctuation but becoming regu- 
larly seriato-punctate in Leucohimatitim ; basal segment of the abdomen short or 
moderate, never lineate, the sutures nearly straight ; antennal grooves before the 
eyes narrow and deep in Sttaria, obsolete in Haplolopkus and Leucohimatium ; 
antennal club 2-jointed in Setaria *SeTariini. 

Trochanters elongate, bearing the femora obliquely attached distally ; middle coxae 
smaller and less narrowly separated ; front short before the antennae, without 
trace of clypeal sutures ; antennal grooves obsolete ; antennal club always loosely 
3-jointed 2 

2 — Anterior coxal cavities completely, though not very broadly, closed behind ; first 
ventral segment but little longer than the second and with two straight diverging 
cariniform lines as in Biphyllini, the tarsi pentamerous in both sexes, with the 
fourth joint small, the joints toward base having simple brushes of hair beneath ; 
first joint of the posterior as long as the next two combined in Cryptophilus ; eyes 
basal and coarsely faceted ; pronotal foveae very minute .*CRYFr0PHlLiNl. 

Anterior coxal cavities broadly and completely open behind ; basal segment of the 
abdomen variable in length 3 

3 — Tarsi pentamerous in both sexes, with the fourth joint small, the third joint 
strongly, and the second less strongly or obsoletely, lobed beneath, the lobes 



78 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Voi.vm. 

narrow and pubescent ; eyes always basal ; first antennal joint relatively small ; 
last joint of the labial palpi usually flattened, obtusely truncate or securiform ; 
mesosternum flat or feebly concave between the coxeb ; elytra with serial punctures 

in Loberus Telmatophilini. 

Tarsi always filiform, simple and never lobed beneath, pentamerous in the females and 
heteromerous in the males, the penultimate joint similar in form to the preceding ; 
last joint of the labial palpi oval, convex, narrowly truncate at tip ; abdominal 
sutures straight throughout the width ; prosternal process acute, freely passing 
over the mesosternum, which is generally concave ; eyes variable ; elytra never 
margined at base and never having distinctly serial punctuation. .GRYPTOPHAGINI. 

The tribe Setariini is erected for three isolated European genera 
Setaria, Haplolophus and Leucohimatium, and there is no American rep- 
resentative known thus far. The European genus Cryptophilus also 
necessitates the creation of a distinct tribe. All the other tribes are 
common to the two hemispheres. 

Biphyllini. 

This is a small tribe, comprising a relatively large number of generic 
types. The body is oblong-oval or elongate-oval and generally no- 
tably depressed, pubescent and with the abdominal sutures very fine. 
The tarsi are pentamerous in both sexes, with the fourth joint small 
and simple, the fifth generally much elongated and the subbasal 
thicker and lobed beneath. The pronotum generally has some ele- 
vated longitudinal lines at least toward the sides ; the scutellum is 
short and transverse and the antennae rather short, with well developed 
club, very widely separated at base and inserted under the sides of the 
front, the basal joint moderate or small in size. The last joint of the 
maxillary palpi is slender, that of the labial large and securiform. The 
truncate posterior edge of the presternum passes freely over the surface 
of the mesosternum, and the first ventral segment has two straight 
carinse diverging from the middle of the base and extending to the 
apical margin or very nearly. The posterior sutures are flexed back- 
ward at the sides to a greater or less degree. The genera before me 
may be defined as follows : — 

Last joint of the labial palpi broadly oboval, thick and convex, with the apex broadly 
truncate and excavated ; antennal club broad, oval, rather compact and 4-jointed, 
the eighth joint, however, very small, transverse and obtrapezoidal ; pronotum 
longitudinally lineate throughout its width Anchorius 

Last joint of the labial palpi broadly securiform and flattened, with the apical edge 
fine ; pronotum only lineate toward the sides 2 



junei 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 79 

2 — Antennal club 3- jointed, narrower and more loosely connected, the ninth joint sen- 
sibly smaller than the tenth, the eighth small and similar to the seventh, the last 
subtr-ansversely oval and generally somewhat narrower than the tenth. [Marginus 
Lee] Diploccelus 

Antennal club 2-jointed, the eighth and ninth joints small and perfectly similar to the 
seventh, the tenth abruptly large, rectilinearly obconic in form and somewhat 
wider and longer than the eleventh, which is transversely suboval and obtusely 
pointed *BiphyIlus 

In this tribe the joints of the antennal shaft are equal among them- 
selves, showing little if any of the alternating inequality so prevalent 
elsewhere in the family.* 

Anchorius, gen. nov. 

In this genus the body is oblong-oval, rather depressed, the upper 
surface feebly and evenly convex. The legs are very much stouter 
than in Diploccelus, the femora broadly oval and the antenna? still 
shorter. The minute dense punctulation of the under surface is devoid 
of larger punctures, which is not the case in either Diploccelus or Bi- 
phyllus. There is but one species before me at present, which may be 
described as follows : — 

Uniform dark brown throughout the upper surface, densely dull and devoid of lustre, 
extremely minutely and densely punctulate and minutely, densely pubescent ; an- 
tennae as long as the width of the head, the eyes large, convex and very coarsely 
faceted ; prothorax twice as wide as long, with the sides moderately convergent 
from base to apex, evenly and distinctly arcuate, the apex broadly sinuate, with 
the angles bluntly rounded ; basal angles obtuse but not obviously rounded ; sur- 
face with ten fine and entire subelevated longitudinal lines, those toward the sides 
rather more widely spaced and somewhat more strongly elevated, the intervals 
feebly concave and with scattered coarser punctures ; elytra one-half longer than 
wide, three times as long as the prothorax but not at all wider, the sides feebly 
arcuate, not continuous in curvature with those ot the pronotum, evenly, rather 
strongly rounded behind ; strite composed of unimpressed series of fine punctures, 
the intervals feebly elevated along the middle, the crest having a single series of 
short coarse and somewhat paler hairs, similar to those along the crests of the 

* I follow DuVal in writing and adopting Biphyllus Stephens, instead of the emen- 
dation Diphyllus edt. Lacordaire writes Diphyllus, with the statement that 
Biphyllus is inconsistent with the laws of etymology. This would be perfectly 
correct if generic words were subject to the laws of etymology — but they are not. 
They are simply pronounceable, and, first of all, constant, combinations of letters 
having latiniform endings. They cannot, when once established, be changed under 
any circumstances. They are not supposed to have a meaning — that is as an essential 
quality. Specific names, on the contrary, always have a meaning, and are therefore 
subject to the rules of etymology. 



80 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

pronotal lines ; under surface minutely, densely and evenly punctulate through- 
out, the surface somewhat shining. Length 3.3 mm.; width 1. 4 mm. Arizona. 

lineatus, sp. nov. 
In the type, the fourth ventral segment has a small and very shal- 
low, transversely oval erosion at the middle and near the hind margin, 
the fifth much longer than the fourth, unmodified on the disk, and 
and very evenly rounded behind. This species is allied to the Cuban 
Diploccelus costulatus but differs in its larger size and in having ten, 
and not eight, longitudinal pronotal lines ; it also seems to differ from 
the mus of Reitter, in the latter character. 

Diplocoelus Guer. 
The species are few in number and are widely isolated structurally 
among themselves, in fact constituting several subgenera ; they may 
be outlined as follows : — 

Prothorax parallel or feebly narrowing from base to apex, broadly, evenly convex, the 
basal angles not prominent but not at all rounded, the surface with three longitu- 
dinal elevated lines at each side, of which the inner is feeble and incomplete ; 
eyes moderately coarsely faceted ; elytra with very feebly impressed series of 
close set punctures, the intervals each with a series of suberect hairs, which are 
short and inconspicuous, — becoming subobsolete in the European humerosus — 
brown or blackish in color, elongate-oval, feebly convex, feebly shining, minutely, 
closely punctured and densely pubescent, with coarse punctures interspersed on 
the p onotum, sterna and near the sides of the abdomen. Length 3. 1 mm. ; width 
1. 18 mm. Indiana. [Diplocoelus, in sp.] brunneus Lee. 

Prothorax subparallel and arcuate at the sides, finely serrulate as usual, the basal angles 
minutely prominent and acute, the surface convex and devoid of sublateral ele- 
vated lines except feeble traces, an arcuate excavated line at the apex and lateral 
fourth quite distinct ; eyes very coarsely faceted ; elytra pointed behind, having 
feebly impressed series of very coarse punctures, the intervals polished and with 
single series of very long erect setse ; general vestiture short and sparser, the sur- 
face strongly shining ; sterna coarsely punctate, the abdomen finely, closely and 
evenly. Length 2.0-2.3 mm.; width 0.8-0.92 mm. Florida, Mississippi and 
Texas (Houston). [Marginus Lee.] rudis Lee. 

Prothorax narrowed in front, the sides nearly straight, the hind angles prominent ex- 
ternally, covering the base of the elytra ; surface coarsely punctured, with three 
elevated lines at each side, becoming subobliterated in front ; elytra with series of 
coarse punctures, the single interstitial pubescent lines composed of short and 
coarser hairs. Length [3.25 mm.] Michigan. [Subgenus nov. ?] 

angusticollis Horn 

The last of these species is unknown to me, but the prominent 
basal angles of the prothorax seem to be foretold in rudis. Brunneus 
is a close derivative of the European fagi, but is more slender in form. 



Junei9oo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 81 

Telmatophilini. 

In this tribe the body is elongate-oval and convex, with slender an- 
tennae, moderate in length and having a narrow loose 3 -jointed club, 
with the ninth joint notably smaller than the tenth in Telmatophilus 
and Loberus, and subequal to the latter in Tomarus. The basal seg- 
ment of the abdomen is only moderately elongate, and the elytral 
suture is margined. The pronotum has two small deep and widely 
separated isolated fovese at the basal margin. The abdominal segments 
are perfectly mobile as in Cryptophagini, and the fourth tarsal joint 
is very small. The three genera differ considerably ar*ong themselves 
in general habitus and may be defined as follows : — 

Elytra not margined at base, feebly margined along the suture, the surface pubescent 
and closely and irregularly punctured ; prosternal process acute at tip ; eyes well 
developed and coarsely faceted ; tarsi thick and strongly lobed and pubescent 
beneath, the basal joint of the posterior not much longer than the second, the 
claws thick and strongly arcuate but not obviously dentate ; abdominal sutures 
flexed abruptly backward at the extreme sides, the first segment as long as the 
next two combined or longer ; pronotum having a very fine excavated line along 
the marginal basal bead throughout the width Telmatophilus 

Elytra with a thickened basal marginal bead, along which there are several small 
deep foveae in Tomarus, the suture finely and more or less strongly margined 
throughout ; prosternal process truncate at tip ; abdominal sutures straight 
throughout, the basal segment shorter ; body sparsely and feebly pubescent to 
glabrous 2 

2 — Pronotum broadly but feebly impressed at base between the foveae, the elytra 
evenly striato-punctate ; eyes large, convex and very coarsely faceted ; tarsi 
thicker, strongly lobed, the basal joint of the posterior but little longer than the 
second, the claws dentate within at base ; first abdominal segment without diverg- 
ing lines ; segments one to four decreasing gradually and but slightly in length. 

Loberus 

Pronotum not impressed at base, the elytral punctures sparse and irregular in dis- 
tribution ; eyes rather small and not very coarsely faceted ; tarsi very slender, 
feebly lobed and only on the third joint, the first joint of the posterior nearly as 
long as the next three combined, the claws very slender, arcuate and perfectly 
simple ; first abdominal segment with two very widely diverging arcuate lines, 
homologous with the straight and less diverging lines of Biphyllini and Cryp- 
tophilini Tomarus 

No representative has as yet been discovered in the Pacific coast 
fauna, but the tribe is much better developed in America than in 
Europe. Cryptophilus, which is placed near Telmatophilus by Reitter, 
is entirely out of place, the completely closed anterior coxal cavities 
betraying a greater affinity with Diploccelus. 



82 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Voi.vm. 

Telmatophilus Heer. 

This genus is widely extended in range through all the palaearctic 
and nearctic proyinces, but has not yet occurred on the Pacific coast 
of America. We have but one species, as follows : — 

Piceous-black, rather shining, densely and deeply but finely punctured throughout 
above and beneath, the pubescence short, ashy, the elytra in addition with im- 
perfect single series of slightly longer hairs ; antennae and legs rufous, the former 
scarcely as long as the head and prothorax ; eyes convex and prominent ; pro- 
thorax barely two-fifths wider than long, the sides parallel, evenly arcuate, the 
edges finely serrulate and single ; apex broadly arcuate and as wide as the base, 
which is broadly bisinuate ; basal angles acute, the apical obtusely rounded ; 
disk feebly convex, finely and very densely punctate ; elytra but little wider 
than the prothorax in the male, and less than three limes as long, relatively 
larger in the female, obtusely rounded at tip, the humeri not exposed at 
base ; punctures not coarser and much less dense than those of the pronotum ; 
legs stout. Length 2.4-2.7 mm. ; width 0.9-1.0 mm. Canada, Massachusetts, 
New York, Iowa and Colorado (Greeley) americanus Lee. 

The male is a little shorter and stouter than the female and has a 
deep oval pit at the apex of the fifth ventral segment, and the hind 
tibiae strongly dentate externally near the base ; the mesosternum is 
very feebly concave between the coxae. The European caricis, which 
resembles americanus very closely, has a very feeble impression at the 
middle of the fifth ventral of the male, and the hind tibiae of that sex 
are much more feebly and obtusely swollen externally near the base. 

Loberus Lee. 

This genus appears to be exclusively American and will prove to be 
tolerably rich in species. The resemblance to certain crepidoderid 
Chrysomelidae has been alluded to by LeConte and Horn, and is suf- 
ficiently striking, the body is however narrower than in the great ma- 
jority of Crepidoderae. The broad and shallow transverse depression 
extends between the pronotal foveae but is semi -independent of them. 
The species before me may be defined as follows : — 

Basal depression of the pronotum broadly impressed and transverse, almost adjacent to 
the basal margin; elytral margins very narrow and equal 2 

Basal depression more deeply and acutely impressed and somewhat anteriorly arcu- 
ate, being more distant from the basal margin on the median line ; elytral margins 
more broadly reflexo-explanate at basal third 4 

2 — Punctures of the elytral series rather coarse, each bearing a moderately long and 
very distinct recurved silvery hair, the intervals glabrous and impunctate. 
Body elongate-oval, convex, polished, dark rufo-testaceous to blackish in color, 
the head and pronotum sparsely pubescent ; antennae testaceous, with the club 



Juneigoo.] CaSEY : On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEOPTERA. 83 

darker, extending slightly beyond the base of the prothorax, the latter very 
slightly narrower than the elytra in the male, more distinctly so in the female, 
nearly twice as wide as long, the sides parallel and feebly arcuate, abruptly 
sinuato-convergent near the base, the basal angles right and not blunt, the apical 
obtusely rounded, the base broadly bisinuate ; punctures sparse and rather 
coarse ; elytra fully three and one-half times as long as the prothorax, parallel 
and broadly arcuate at the sides, the apex rather narrowly rounded ; humeri 
somewhat exposed at base ; disk more or less impressed at the suture on the pos- 
terior declivity before the apex. Length 1. 8-1. 9 mm.; width 0.75-6.8 mm. 
Middle States and Rhode Island (Boston Neck) impressus Zee. 

Punctures of the elytral series each bearing an infinitesimal hair only visible under 
great amplification, the surface throughout polished and apparently perfectly 
glabrous ; antenna; and prothorax similar to those of impressus, the elytra simil- 
larly between three and four times as long as the prothorax, narrowly rounded at 
apex and with somewhat basally exposed humeri 3 

3 — Body dark rufous or rufo-piceous in color, the punctures of the head and prothorax 
fine and very sparse, the superciliary ridges fine and scarcely at all flexed inward 
anteriorly ; elytral series scarcely at all impressed, the punctures more or less 
small in size. Length 1. 9-2. 1 mm.; width 0.78-0.8 mm. New Jersey. 

subglaber, sp. nov. 

Body black or blackish in color, the punctures of the head and prothorax coarse but 
sparse, the superciliary ridges coarse and strongly bent inward anteriorly ; elytral 
series sensibly impressed, the punctures coarse and deep. Length 1.8 mm.; 
width 0.75 mm. Florida... imbellis, sp. nov. 

Body rufo-testaceous in color, smaller and more slender in form ; superciliary ridges 
very fine, feeble and not flexed inward at their anterior end ; punctures of the 
head and pronotum fine but deep and very sparse ; elytral series not or scarcely 
at all impressed, the punctures fine but distinct. Length 1. 6-1. 75 mm.; 
width 0.65-0.7 mm. Bahamas (Egg Island) and Cuba (Bahia Honda). 

insularis, sp. nov. 
4 — Body elongate-elliptical, rather less convex, the elytra more strongly narrowed be- 
hind from about the middle, polished, blackish-piceous in color, the elytral 
humeri and apical fourth testaceous ; antennae, head and prothorax nearly as in 
impressus, the latter sparsely clothed with longer pubescence, finely and rather 
less sparsely punctate and much less declivous toward the sides ; elytra quite dis- 
tinctly wider at or just before the middle than at base ; slightly wider than the 
prothorax and nearly four times as long, subacute at apex, the humeri but slightly 
exposed at base, the series unimpressed, composed of rather small but distinct 
punctures, the intervals also with uneven series of smaller, still more widely 
spaced punctures, all the punctures bearing distinct subdecumbent hairs, the 
entire surface being sparsely pubescent. Length 2.0 mm.; width 0.9 mm. 
Mexico (Frontera in Tabasco). Prof. C. H. T. Townsend. 

puberulus, sp. nov. 

The lateral edges of the prothorax in all the species are distinctly 
thickened and bear a few very minute widely spaced sermles, one be- 
hind the apex being especially constant; the thickened margin is 



84 Journal New York. Entomological Society. [Volvhi. 

flexed inward for a short distance at the apical angles, and, along the 
base, forms a margin which becomes very feeble or obsolete along the 
broad median lobe. The only species in which sexual characters are 
noticeable is impressus, and here the male has a very minute shallow 
fovea, accompanied by a tuft of loose longer hairs, at each side of the 
median line and near the middle of the length of abdominal segments 
two, three and four. 

Tomarus Lee. 

The body in this genus is smaller and relatively shorter than in 
Loberus, and has a markedly different general habitus. The lateral 
edges of the prothorax are very finely double, the outer edge more or 
less distinctly and unevenly undulated, the border flexed inward for a 
short distance at apex, and, at base, as far as the fovese, where the 
margin becomes very fine along the basal lobe. There is a fine super- 
ciliary ridge as in Loberus, but the antennae differ in having the basal 
joint of the club about as large as the second. I have not noticed 
any distinctive sexual characters in the male. The three following 
are the only species known to me at present : — 

Body subglabrous, the head and pronotum clothed sparsely with very short subdecum- 
bent hairs, the elytra glabrous, each with three discal and one marginal series of 
very widely spaced erect sefce ; sides of the prothorax very obsoletely undu- 
lated 2 

Body clothed throughout with coarse, sparse, subdecumbent hairs in addition to the 
series of elytral setae ; sides of the prothorax more strongly and quite distinctly 
undulated 3 

2 — Body rather narrowly oval, convex, polished, the anterior part feebly alutaceous, 
flavo- testaceous to blackish throughout, the elytra broadly, suffusedly paler toward 
the humeri and in a transverse band interrupted at the suture, near apical third ; 
antennae but little longer than the head and prothorax, the club well developed ; 
head and pronotum finely but strongly, rather closely punctured, the punctures 
finer toward the sides of the latter, which is three-fifths to two-thirds wider than 
long and much narrower than the elytra, with the sides parallel and arcuate and 
the apex very nearly as wide as the base ; elytra two and two-thirds to three 
times as long as the prothorax, subinfiated and widest at two-fifths, gradually 
narrowed to the acute apex, the humeri feebly denticulate externally and ob- 
liquely exposed at base ; erect setae, moderately long and distinct, the punctures 
fine and sparse, with series of rounded areolae shining through the translucent 
chitin from the under surface. Length 1.25-1.6 mm.; width 0.65-0.72 mm. 
New York and Rhode Island to Iowa and Mississippi pulchellus Lee. 

Body and antennae nearly similar to the preceding, the former rather shorter and less 
acute behind, pale fiavo-testaceous in color, the head and pronotum more aluta- 
ceous, the elytra polished and almost similarly maculate, with the erect setae very 



June 1900.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 85 

short, those of the discal series extremely short and almost obsolete ; head and 
pronotum finely and feebly punctate, the latter shorter and more transverse, al- 
most twice as wide as long, the sides similarly parallel' and arcuate, the feeble 
punctures becoming almost completely obsolete toward the sides; elytra nearly simi- 
lar to those of pidchellus but shorter and more obtuse, three times as long as the 
prothorax and distinctly wider, the punctures sparse and very fine. Length 

1.2 mm.; width 0.59 mm. Arizona (Tucson) obsoletus, sp. nov. 

3 — Body smaller, shorter and more broadly oval than in the preceding, convex, 
polished, dark rufous, the elytra black, pale in the basal regions and broadly at 
apex, except transversely at apical fourth ; antennae longer than the head and 
prothorax, the latter short and strongly transverse, finely and sparsely but 
strongly punctate, the sides parallel and arcuate ; elytra short, but little longer 
than wide, ogival at apex, coarsely, rather closely and conspicuously punctured. 
Length 1.0-1. 1 mm. ; width 0.5-0.55 mm. Florida (Tampa). .. hirtellus Schz. 

A small specimen from North Carolina may possibly represent a 
distinct species or subspecies of pulchellus ; it is smaller, more obtuse 
behind and somewhat differently colored. The strong basal margin 
of the elytra enclosing a series of fovea along its posterior edge, is a 
marked feature of this genus and it is this which causes the minute 
denticulation of the elytral humeri mentioned above. 

Cryptophagini. 

This tribe differs from all those which precede primarily and very 
radically in the structure of the tarsi, which, instead of being shorter 
and stout, frequently lobed beneath, with the fourth joint very small 
and pentamerous in both sexes, are here more or less slender and fili- 
form, never lobed beneath, with the fourth joint similar to the preced- 
ing and pentamerous in the females and heteromerous in the males, 
as in the Csenoscelini of the next subfamily. From the Telmatophilini 
they differ besides, as a rule, in a coarser and denser sculpture and 
vestiture, stouter antennae, with less loosely connected club and less 
coarsely faceted eyes than in Telmatophilus and Loberus. The first 
segment of the abdomen is usually more elongate, being subequal to 
the next two combined, and never has diverging lines ; the sutures are 
straight throughout the width, differing in this respect from Cmioscelis. 
The genera are rather numerous, those before me being readily recog- 
nizable by the following characters : — 

Eyes ante-basal, small, rather finely faceted and not prominent ; frontal margin deeply 
emarginate and impressed at the middle, especially in the male, the front not at 
all prolonged beyond the antennae, the basal joint of the latter large and glob- 
ular, the second similar to the third and following, the club rather feebly de- 



86 Journal New York Entomological Society, [vol. vm. 

fined in the male but parallel and loosely 3-jointed as usual ; pronotum not 
impressed but finely, strongly margined at base, the foveae minute and almost 
completely obsolete, the sides even, with a rather thick margin, which becomes 
gradually very thick at the apical angles but continuously so, the apical callus 
not posteriorly delimited or truncated — as it is in Cryptophagus ; elytral suture 
margined except toward base ; mesosternum rather more concave between the 
coxae than usual, the tibiae compressed and somewhat triangular, the tarsi and 
claws slender as usual. [Subtribe Antherophagi] , Antherophagus 

Eyes basal, convex, prominent and more or less coarsely faceted ; tibia; slender. 2 

2 — Front declivous and concave between the antennae, the edge not beaded over the 
insertion of the latter 3 

Front declivous but evenly, longitudinally convex anteriorly, the edge sharply angu- 
late but not beaded over the antennae, the frontal margin with a broadly, pos- 
teriorly angulate smooth space, probably homologous with the emargination of 
Antherophagus ; antennae moderate, the club loosely 3-jointed, with the last joint 
obliquely and obtusely narrowed from near the base, the first joint small and 
globular ; prothorax with a broad flat marginal bead at base, before which the 
surface throughout is feebly impressed, the foveae wholly obsolete ; sides with a 
thickened nodal point at the apical angles but otherwise perfectly even, the nodal 
points projecting anteriorly, the apex broadly emarginate between them as in 
Emphylus ; punctures fine and irregular, the pubescence short, coarse and closely 
decumbent ; subsutural lines of the elytra not extending to the base ; mesoster- 
num not at all impressed between the coxae. [Subtribe Spanioph^eni.] 

'Spaniophtenus 

Front flat and not more declivous anteriorly ; antennal club normal and 3-jointed, its first 
joint not differing in form from the second though frequently smaller in size; body 
strongly punctured and rather coarsely pubescent. [Subtribe Cryptophagi]...4 

3 — Antennae stout, almost similar to those of Antherophagus but with the second joint 
wider than the third, the 3-jointed club narrow and feebly delimited, and with its 
basal joint smaller than the second though similar in form ; prothorax not impressed 
at base, the sides even, with a fine acute edge, the apical angles broadly, obliquely 
truncate and prominent but only slightly thickened, the apex broadly sinuate be- 
them, the basal foveae and transverse impression obsolete ; elytral suture mar- 
gined toward tip ; body subglabrous and strongly alutaceous, very finely, feebly 
and moderately closely punctured. [Subtribe Emphyli] Emphylus 

Antennae slender, the basal joint elongate-oval, not very thick, the second still nar- 
rower, elongate, broader than three to eight, which are very slender and. elongate, 
the club narrow, loosely 3-jointed, gradually formed, the ninth joint being slender 
elongate and obconical, altogether dissimilar in form to the tenth and unique in 
the family ; prothorax very feebly impressed transversely at base between the 
large but feeble foveiform depressions, the sides broadly and feebly triundulate, 
the edge thickened but not very prominent at the undulations, which >are at the 
apex and near apical and basal third, the apical angles not modified, the apex 
broadly arcuate from side to side ; elytral suture margined, very obsoletely so to- 
ward base ; body coarsely sculptured and pubescent, nearly as in Cryptophagi. 
[Subtribe Paramecosom^e] *Paramecosoma 



June I9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 87 

4 — Prothorax triundulate at the sides — at the apex and near apical and basal third, — 
the undulations similar among themselves, the apical angles not more thickened ; 
elytral suture feebly margined toward tip. 

Body short, broadly oval and convex, with long herissate vestiture, the pro- 
thorax finely bifoveate at base, the fovese connected by a fine deep trans- 
verse impression, the disk also having a fine cariniform line at each side at 
some distance from the side margin and parallel thereto ; lateral undulations 
moderate in development, rounded and finely serrate ; eyes very small and 

extremely prominent CrOSimtlS 

Body elongate and less convex, clothed with denser, shorter and more de- 
cumbent pubescence as in Cryptophagus, the prothorax without a sublateral 
line, having two small basal foveas connected by a very feeble and broadly 
impressed line, the lateral undulations simple but very prominent and denti- 
form ; eyes as in Cryptophagus Salebius 

Prothorax with thickened and obliquely truncate apical angles, the edge even, ex- 
cepting a minute acute tooth at about the middle and sometimes minute serrula- 
tions thence to the basal angles, the basal fovese very small and feeble, connected 
by a fine feeble impression along the basal margin, the apex truncate or feebly bi- 
sinuate ; elytral suture only margined posteriorly. [Subgen. Mnionomus Woll.] 

Cryptophagus 
Prothorax with thickened and obliquely truncate apical angles, the edges thence 
evenly, feebly arcuate, slightly converging and evenly, finely serrulate to the 
base, the basal foveae distinct and mutually connected by a larger deep basal im- 
pression; elytral and other characters nearly as in Cryptophagus *Micrambe 

Prothorax not thickened at the apical angles or undulated at the lateral edges, the 
latter perfectly even from apex to base and serrulate ; elytral suture margined 
very nearly to the scutellum 

Body oval, convex, coarsely sculptured and pubescent, the prothorax with two 
small but deep basal fovese connected by a very deep and conspicuous 
groove ; serrulation of the lateral edges more or less coarse and distinct. 

Henoticus 

Body oblong, parallel and strongly depressed, finely, more closely sculptured 

and pubescent, the prothorax with two very small but distinct basal foveas, 

the connecting impression or groove wholly obsolete ; lateral edges very 

minutely serrulate Pteryngium 

The definition of Emphylus is taken from the Europern glaber, and, 
as I have not seen the American representative — americanus Lee. , of 
the catalogue, — the genus will not be further dwelt upon ; its affinity 
with AntheropJiagus is much more pronounced than with Cryptophagus, 
and the sinuation of the thoracic apex — due to the prominence of the 
apical angles— which has been hitherto advanced as a differential 
character, is one of the least important. 

Antherophagus Latr. 
This is one of the most isolated genera of the family and contains 



8S Journal New York Entomological Society. [vol. vm. 

by far the largest species, Haplolophus being the only other which ap- 
proaches it in this respect. The emargination of the clypeus, very 
deep in the male but feeble in the female, is apparently a unique char- 
acter in the family, and the antennae are peculiarly thick and compact 
in the male, though bearing some resemblance to those of Emphylus ; 
the female antennae are much shorter, more slender and with relatively 
larger club. The eyes are almost without parallel in the family in 
their position upon the side of the head and in their relatively slight 
convexity, the convexity and prominence of these organs being one of 
the most characteristic features of the family. The body is oblong, 
rather convex, very finely, densely punctate and clothed, often densely, 
with very short subappressed pubescence. The elytra in some of the 
paler forms clearly show the regular series of areolse on their under 
surface, shining through the diaphanous chitin and perhaps of signifi- 
cance in indicating that the family may be derived from seriately 
punctate archetypes ; at present these series of areolae are not con- 
nected in any way with the punctuation of the surface, which is alto- 
gether irregular, but there are frequently very feebly impressed super- 
ficial lines which appear on the exposed surface above them. The 
species are few in number and those in my cabinet may be thus char- 
acterized : — 

Body large, more broadly oblong, densely clothed with pubescence which nearly con- 
ceals the surface, the eyes smaller, the mandibles more prominent ; tibiae rapidly 
enlarged from base to apex ; basal angles of the prothorax more or less obtuse... 2 

Body smaller, the sides of the prothorax parallel and straight, the basal angles right 
and not at all blunt; body smaller, the eyes moderately large, rather more convex 
and less finely faceted, the mandibles smaller and less prominent, the pubescence 
quite sparse, not at all concealing the surface ; tibia? but feebly enlarged from 
base to apex 3 

2 — Body broadly oblong, testaceous throughout, the antennae of the male except at 
base and apex, and the tibiae toward base, blackish ; antennae of the male thick, 
almost as long as the head and prothorax, the second joint much shorter than the 
third though equal in width ; prothorax distinctly less than twice as wide as lon^-, 
parallel and almost straight at the sides, but slightly rounding and convergent at 
apex and base, the punctures fine and dense ; elytra not wider than the prothorax, 
a third longer than wide, obtuse at apex, very densely and finely punctate. 
Length 4.1-4-5 mm.; width 1. 7-1.9 mm. New York to Minnesota. 

ochraceus Md-h, 

Body less broadly oblong and slightly smaller, equally densely but still more minutely 
punctate and densely clothed with short cinereous pubescence, pale flavo-testa- 
ceous, the tibiae and antennae colored as in ochraceus, the latter thick in the male 
and much shorter than the head and prothorax, the second joint equal in length 



June 1900.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 89 

and width to the third ; prothorax shorter, scarcely visibly less than twice as wide 
as long, the sides parallel and evenly, distinctly arcuate ; elytra two-fifths longer 
than wide, not wider than the prothorax and less obtusely rounded at apex. 
Length 3. 2-4. 25 mm. ; width 1.2-1.7 mm. Utah (southwestern) — Mr. Weidt. 

pallidivest is, sp. nov. 
3 — Body narrowly oblong-oval, pale rufo-testaceous throughout, the antennae and legs 
concolorous, polished, the elytra slightly alutaceous ; antennae moderate in the 
female ; prothorax less than twice as wide as long, parallel and straight at the 
sides, finely but deeply, not very densely punctate ; elytra subangularly dilated at 
two-fifths and wider than the prothorax, the base equal to that of* the latter, the 
apex obtusely rounded ; punctures very fine, feeble and rather sparse. Length 
3.3 mm.; width 1. 35 mm. Wisconsin (Bayfield) —Mr. Wickham 

convexulus Lee. 

The stout mandibles are bifid at tip, and the antennae are inserted 
within very small foveas on the vertical sides at a great distance from 
the eyes ; they differ very obviously in the sexes, as indicated above. 
Suturalis of Maklin, I have not seen. 

Crosimus, gen. nov. 
In the general structure of the body this genus is allied to Salebius, 
and especially in possessing three lateral projections at each side of 
the prothorax, and in the same positions, but here the nodes are not 
thickened and take the form of broadly rounded and rather feeble un- 
dulations of the edge, the salients being spiculato-serrulate. It differs 
greatly from Salebius or Cryptophagus in the short stout, very convex 
and oval form of the body, long hirsute sparse vestiture, in having the 
elytral punctures arranged in uneven unimpressed double series, in 
having a fine raised line near each side of the pronotum extending 
from base to apex, and in the more longitudinally convex prosternum, 
the process being elevated far above the coxae from an under view, the 
process more strongly margined at the sides ; the antennae, oral organs 
and legs are throughout as in Cryptophagus. The basal foveas of the 
pronotum are connected by a very deep channel along the basal mar- 
gin, which is never interrupted at the middle by a carina, and the 
callous discal spots of Cryptophagus appear to be obsolete. The tarsi 
are very slender and as long as in Salebius. The eyes are unusually 
small, absolutely basal and extremely convex, not very coarsely 
faceted. The two species before me may be described as follows : — 

Body more narrowly oval, polished, black, the legs and antennae testaceous, the elytra 
bright rufous, black at the apex, at the middle of the flanks and transversely be- 
hind the base near the suture ; pubescence moderately long and sparse ; prothorax 



90 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol vhi. 

about two-thirds wider than long, the sides in general form nearly straight and 
strongly convergent from base to apex, continuing the sides of the elytra ; punc- 
tures fine but deep and not very close-set, the surface shining ; submarginal line 
rather feeble ; elytra oval, before the middle much wider than the prothorax, 
scarcely three times as long as the latter, the punctures fine and sparse, the double 
series ill-defined. Length 1.6 mm.; width 0.78 mm. New York. 

ObeSUlUS, sp. nov. 
Body throughout in form and coloration as in obesulus, but a little stouter, the pro- 
thorax nearly four-fifths wider than long, with the sides feebly convergent, nearly 
straight in general form but not continuing the sides of the elytra, the surface less 
finely, very deeply and very closely punctate, the submarginal line parallel to the 
edge fine but strong ; elytra nearly as in obesulus but more broadly oval and with 
more prominent humeral callus, the punctures larger and less sparse, the pubes- 
cence longer, more abundant and with very long erect subserial hairs in addi- 
tion. Length 1. 7 mm.; width 0.85 mm. Iowa (Iowa City) — Mr. Wickham. 

hirtUS, sp. nov. 

These species are mutually very closely allied but appear to be dis- 
tinct. The genus is probably confined to the Atlantic regions of the 

continent. 

Salebius, gen. nov. 

This genus, with Crosimus, is distinguished from Cryptophagus by 
having three subequal obtusely dentiform nodal points along each side 
of the prothorax —at the apex and near apical and basal fourth of the 
length, instead of a single nodal point, with a submedian spicule as 
in that genus. The node at the apical angles in Salebius is merely 
thickened, convex and more or less pubescent, but the two posterior 
often have a deep puncture at the middle of the summit analogous to 
the central puncture of the flattened apical node so prevalent in Cryp- 
tophagus. The tarsi are long and slender and nearly all the other 
anatomical structures are similar to those of Cryptophagus, except that 
only the anterior two of the pronotal callous spots are visible, and the 
impression along the basal margin is feebler, with the median carina 
always distinct. The five species in my cabinet may be recognized 
as follows : — 

Punctures very fine but deep as usual, those of the pronotum very dense ; body dark 
piceous, blackish beneath, the antennas and legs castanequs ; pubescence short, 
even, decumbent and rather abundant, more distinct on the pronotum along the 
sides and median line ; prothorax parallel and slightly rounded at the sides, not 
more than one-half wider than long ; elytra two-thirds longer than wide, only 
slightly wider than the prothorax and fully three times as long, the punctures fine 
and rather close-set; hind tarsi nearly as long as the tibiae ( $> ). Length 2.4 
mm.; width 0.9 mm. Queen Charlotte Islands (Massett) — Mr. Keen. 

6 dentatus, sp. nov. 



junei 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 91 

Punctures strong and moderately coarse more or less close-set on the pronotum .2 

2 — Tarsi moderately elongate, the posterior distinctly shorter than the tibiae in both 

sexes — 3 

Tarsi more elongate, the posterior as long as the tibiae 5 

3 —Eyes rather large and well developed, more than half as long as the head ; body 

much stouter, dark rufo-testaceous throughout, the vestiture much longer though 
sparse ; prothorax relatively small, three-fifths wider than long, parallel and 
nearly straight at the sides, the teeth very large, subacute and conspicuous ; elytra 
large, parallel, evenly rounded behind, three-fifths longer than wide, fully a 
fourth wider than the prothorax and much more than three times as long, the 
punctures coarse and not very close-set ( ). Length 2.6 mm.; width I.I mm. 
California niillax, sp. nov. 

Eyes smaller but not more prominent, scarcely half as long as the head ; body darkee 
in coloration, the pubescence much shorter 4 

4 — Body oblong-oval, moderately slender, shining, blackish-piceous in color, the legs 
paler ; pubescence moderately short, coarse, somewhat abundant and distinct ; 
prothorax rather strongly transverse, about two-thirds wider than long, strongly, 
densely punctate, parallel and broadly arcuate at the sides, the teeth well devel- 
oped but less so than in minax ; elytra elongate, two-thirds longer than wide, 
only slightly wider than the prothorax and more than three times as long,' quite 
coarsely, but not very densely, punctate ( $ ). The female is larger but virtually 
similar in every way, the prothorax not relatively much smaller. Length 1.9- 
2.5 mm.; width 0.75-0.9 mm. California (Siskiyou and Sta. Cruz Cos.). 

lictor, sp. nov. 

Body nearly similar in form and coloration but less elongate, the prothorax large, 
much less transverse, barely one-half wider than long, the vestiture much shorter 
and inconspicuous, the sides parallel and evenly arcuate, the teeth pronounced ; 
elytra shorter, three-fifths longer than wide, slightly wider than the prothorat and 
two and three-fourths times as long, the punctures decidedly less coarse and 
rather more close-set, the pubescence much shorter, even, decumbent and not 
very close ( $ ) . Length 2.0 mm.; width 0.8 mm. California (Lake Tahoe). 

montanus, sp. nov. 
5 — Body narrowly oval, rather depressed, shining, pale rufo-ferruginous throughout, 
almost similar in the sexes, the female larger ; eyes rather small, not quite half as 
long as the head, the antennae moderate as usual ; prothorax parallel and broadly 
arcuate at the sides, but little more than one-half wider than long, the teeth 
strongly developed and serriform ; elytra three-fifths to two-thirds longer than 
wide, relatively a little broader in the female, rather coarsely, but not very 
densely, punctate, rather arcuate at the sides and narrowly rounded behind, 
slightly ( $ ) or distinctly ( O ) wider than the prothorax and three times as 
long, — or slightly more in the female, the pubescence short, even, rather sparse 
and suberect. Length 1.75-2.3 mm.; width o. 7-0. 85 mm. California (south- 
ern) — Mr. Fall tarsalis, sp. nov. 

The species are sufficiently numerous and individually abundant on 
the Pacific coast, to which region the genus appears to be confined. 
I place here provisionally the Sitkan Cryptophagus 8-dentatus of 



92 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vui. 

Maklin, who states that the prothorax is quadridentate at each side ; 
this would not apply to the 6-dentatus, described above, unless the 
author included the basal angles and these are in no respect dentiform 
in the latter species. 

Cryptophagus Hbst. 
This is a large genus, including some of the larger and more con- 
spicuous species of the family ; they are easily separable among them- 
selves but rather difficult to classify in a satisfactory manner. The 
body is oblong-oval, convex, strongly punctured and always coarsely, 
distinctly, though not densely, pubescent, the elytra having in addition 
some longer hairs, which are frequently very conspicuous and always 
subserial in arrangement, although the punctuation may, and usually 
does, exhibit no trace of series. The antennae are moderate in length, 
thick, with the club abrupt, parallel and loosely 3 -jointed. The 
prothorax is wider than long, subparallel anteriorly and narrowed 
toward base from about the middle, where there is a more or less dis- 
tinct acute and reflexed marginal tooth, and the apical angles are 
thickened and obliquely truncate, the oval truncature sublateral, pol- 
ished, generally flat or rarely concave and foveate at the middle ; the 
lateral edges between the submedian denticle and the well-defined and 
sometimes subprominent basal angles is generally obsoletely serrulate ; 
the disk is deeply, though finely, bifoveate at the base, the fovese 
connected by a fine groove following the basal margin and often sub- 
interrupted at the middle by a fine longitudinal carina. There are 
also quite generally visible two small impunctate and feebly callus-like 
spots at each side near lateral third. The maxillary palpi are well 
developed, the last joint elongate and gradually, somewhat obliquely 
and obtusely acuminate, the last joint of the labial moderately stout, 
oval and truncate at tip, the mentum large, transverse, the basal parts 
concave and punctured and separated from the deflexed apical parts 
by a strong, transversely arcuate carina, which is prolonged anteriorly 
on the median line to the extreme apex. The anterior cox» are 
obliquely oval, rather large and deep-set, and the intercoxal process 
is prolonged posteriorly, with its free tip ogivally acuminate and dor- 
sally margined. The mesosternum is broadly and feebly concave. The 
tarsi are slender, and the abdominal segments two to four decrease 
gradually in length, the first longer, generally exceeding the next two 
combined, the fifth about as long as the second and rounded in both 



June 1900.] Casey : On North American Coleoptsra. 93 

sexes, the sutures transverse, perfectly free and virtually straight 
throughout. The elytra have sometimes — as in J>lenus — a smooth 
callous discal spot near the apex of each, which may be homologous 
with the smooth polished mirror-like sexual spots of the melyrid genus 
Eurelymis. Sexual differences in the form of the body are occasion- 
ally very pronounced, the male being shorter and stouter than the 
female, with relatively broader prothorax and shorter elytra. 

The species before me may be tentatively characterized in the fol- 
lowing manner : — 

Lateral spicule of the prothorax situated at or near the middle of the length ; front 
not constricted between the antennae ; species general in distribution 2 

Lateral spicule situated far behind the middle, the sides just posterior to them fre- 
quently arcuately prominent ; front narrowed by the very large antennal fovea?. 
Pacific coast 32 

2 — Sides of the prothorax broadly and conspicuously angulate at about the middle, 
the spicule at the apex thereby rendered more prominent and separated from the 
truncature of the anterior angles by a pronounced sinus 3 

Sides of the prothorax in the form of a continuous and generally evenly arcuate curve, 
from the truncature' of the apical angles to the base, the submedian spicule ab- 
ruptly projecting from the limb and frequently extremely small 15 

3 — Eyes large, generally one-half as long as the head or more ; elytra finely and rather 
closely punctured 4 

Eyes smaller but more strongly convex, always much less than one-half as long as the 
head 6 

4 — Nodes of the thoracic angles very prominent and posteriorly unciform, the pro- 
thorax much wider anteriorly than at the middle, rather finely but deeply, 
densely punctate, the discal callous spots obsolete ; elytra elongate, between three 
and four times as long as the prothorax. Length 1.9-2.5 mm. ; width, 0.75-0.9 
mm. Europe, Siberia and Northern America acutangulus Gyll. 

Nodes moderate in development, acute but not unciform posteriorly, the prothorax 
equally wide anteriorly and at the middle 5 

5 — Pubescence long, coarse and very conspicuous, the serial hairs of the elytra dis- 
tinct ; elytra distinctly more than three times as long as the prothorax. Length 
2.2-2 5 mm. ; width 0.9-1.0 mm. Europe and Northern America. 

cellaris Scot. 

Pubescence short and more decumbent, less coarse and very much less conspicuous, 
the serial hairs subobsolete ; pronotum finely but deeply, only moderately densely 
punctate, the callous spots feeble ; elytra more oval and less elongate, about three 
times as long as the prothorax. Length 1.9-2. 1 mm. ; width 0.8-0.85 mm - 
California debilis Lee. 

6— Elytral punctures fine, the pubescence very short, inconspicuous and decumbent, 
the subserial hairs subobsolete or very short, the pronotal callous spots obsolete 
or scarcely traceable ; nodes of the thoracic angles sharply truncated, the pro- 
thorax as wide at the middle as at the apex 7 



94 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

Elytral punctures more or less coarse and much less close-set, frequently quite sparse, 
the surface strongly shining throughout ; pronotal callous spots generally con- 
spicuous 8 

7 — Elytral punctures moderately close-set, the surface strongly shinirig ; prothorax 
evenly convex, rather strongly and closely punctate, the nodes of the apical 
angles moderately prominent, much shorter than the sinus separating them from 
the median denticles ; antennal club moderately broad ; elytra two-thirds longer 
than wide Length 2.1 mm. ; width 0.8 mm. Alaska bidentatus Mai/. 

Elytral punctures extremely dense, the entire surface rather dull in lustre ; prothorax 
less convex and more uneven, two-thirds wider than long, the truncated nodes 
large and more prominent, though not unciform behind, and but little shorter 
than the sinus between them and the denticles ; elytra more than three times as 
long as the prothorax and a little wider, three-fourths longer than wide ; antennal 
club well developed and rather broad. Length 2.3 mm. ; width 0.88 mm. 

Colorado confertus, sp. nov. 

8 — Truncate node of the thoracic angles very large, though only moderately promi- 
nent, distinctly longer than the sinus separating it from the median spicules, the 
truncature elliptical, flat and sharply defined, the prothorax equally wide at apex 
— that is between the posterior angles of the truncatures — and at the middle, the 
median tooth short and broad, unciform posteriorly, the punctures rather coarse> 
deep as usual and only moderately close-set, the callous spots rather distinct, es- 
pecially in the male ; elytra much larger in the female than in the male, not wider 
than the prothorax in the latter ; pubescence rather long but sparse, the subserial 
hairs long, suberect and conspicuous. Length 2.3-2.7 mm.; widih 0.9-1. 15 
mm. New Jersey nodifer, sp. nov. 

Truncate node of the thoracic angles rather small, always much shorter than the sinus 
separating it from the denticles, the truncature narrow, convex and very acute 
posteriorly 9 

9 — Elytra rather oblong-oval, more elongate and less strongly rounded at the sides, 
never more than slightly wider than the prothorax 10 

Elytra ova], relatively more convex, more narrowly rounded behind and always very 
much wider than the prothorax 14 

10— Node of the thoracic angles very small and not acute or angulate posteriorly from 
. a vertical viewpoint ; body pale ferruginous throughout ; prothorax rather finely 
but deeply, only moderately closely punctate, a little narrower at apex than at 
the middle, the callous spots large and conspicuous, though not much elevated ; 
elytra only moderately coarsely and rather sparsely punctate ; pubescence long, 
coarse and conspicuous throughout, pale ochreo-cinereous in color ( $? ). Length 
2.3 mm.; width 1.0 mm. Indiana? parvinoda, sp. nov. 

Node of the thoracic angles better developed, with the posterior extremity very 
acutely prominent and unciform from a vertical point of view, the prothorax sub- 
equally wide at the middle and apex II 

1 1— Pubescence moderately long and suberect, sparse 12 

Pubescence short and more closely decumbent, even, the longer hairs subobsolete....l3 

12 — Body blackish-piceous in color, the pronotum rather paler and the elytra dark 
testaceous ; pronotum evenly convex, rather coarsely and closely punctured, the 
callous spots very distinct, rather small and scarcely elevated ; elytra about two- 



June igoo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 95 

thirds longer than wide, broadly rounded behind, coarsely and unusually sparsely 
punctate ($> ). Length 2.45 ram.; width I. oo. Pennsylvania (Westmoreland 
Co.) infuscatus, sp. nov. 

Body nearly as in infuscatus but smaller and rather less elongate, pale rufo-ferruginous 
in color throughout, the elytra rather more strongly narrowed and less broadly 
rounded behind, similarly sculptured but with the antennal club shorter and rela- 
tively broader and more compact ( $? ). Length 2.25 mm.; width 0.9 mm. 
District of Columbia .». plectrum, sp. nov. 

13 — Body parallel, rufo-ferruginous throughout, the prothorax large, three-fifths wider 
than long, fully as wide as the elytra, strongly, moderately densely punctured, the 
callous spots small but very conspicuous and distinctly elevated ; elytra three fifths 
longer than wide, rather abruptly and very obtusely rounded behind, the punc- 
tures coarse and rather sparse, but much closer and rather more perforate than in 
the two preceding species ( $ ). Length 2.4 mm.; width 0.95 mm.- New 
York— Mr. H. H. Smith cicatricosus, sp. nov. 

14 — Prothorax as wide at the apex as at the middle ; body pale flavo- testaceous in color 
throughout, the pubescence long, erect and hispid, very conspicuous though unusu- 
ally sparse ; prothorax small, transverse, strongly, but not very coarsely or closely, 
punctured, the callous spots all very distinct ; elytra oval, just before the middle 
nearly two-fifths wider than the prothorax, the punctures very coarse, deep and 
sparse, but, as usual, small or obsolete toward apex, each with an elongate cal- 
lous median space near the tip ( 9 ). Length 1.9 mm.; width 0.8 mm. North 
Carolina politllS, sp. nov. 

Prothorax much narrower at the apex than at the middle ; body broadly oval, strongly 
convex, highly polished, dark piceo-rufous in color throughout, the pubescence 
moderately long, sparse, coarse and ashy ; pronotum evenly convex, not very 
densely punctate, the callous spots small and subobsolete ; elytra inflated, 
scarcely one-half longer than wide, quite pointed at apex, the punctures very 
coarse, sparse and conspicuous toward the base and sides ( J ). Length 1.85 mm.; 
width 0.8 mm. Lake Superior difficilis, sp. nov. {tec. MS) 

15 — Truncature of the anterior thoracic angles forming a broadly oval, sharply defined, 
flat or feebly concave disk, having a large subcentral foveiform puncture, and 
from a vertical viewpoint, oblique and perfectly rectilinear 16 

Truncature irregular, narrow, sometimes nearly flat but generally more or less con- 
vex 25 

16 — Elytral pubescence semi-erect, the longer subserial hairs distinct and more or less 
bristling 17 

Elytral pubescence short, decumbent and even, the longer subserial hairs almost or com- 
pletely obsolete 22 

17 — Species of the Atlantic coast ; eyes small and strongly convex 18 

Species of the Pacific coast, the eyes still smaller, extremely convex and subparabolic 
in outline from above 21 

18— Body very short and stout, not more than twice as long as wide, oblong, convex, 
blackish-piceous in color, the head, pronotum, antennae and legs dark testaceous; 
prothorax large, very nearly as wide as the elytra, three-fifths wider than long, 
strongly and densely punctate, uneven, the callous elevations distinct ; angular 
truncatures sensibly shorter than the distance thence to the spicules ; elytra very 



96 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

short and obtusely rounded, less than one-half longer than wide, about two and 
one-half times as long as the prothorax, coarsely and rather closely punctate ; 
pubescence" rather long, suberect, coarse and bristling but not dense ; antennal 
club moderate in development ; each elytron has a large embosed rounded im- 
punctate spot near the apex at inner two-fifths ( $ ). Length 2.0 mm.; width 
1.0 mm. Florida plenus, sp. nov 

Body more elongate, more than twice as long as wide, more or less pale ferruginous 
in color throughout : 19 

19— Subserial setae of the elytra very long and conspicuous; body large, coarsely 
punctured, the elytra not very closely and sometimes subserially ; sexual differences 
very marked, the male stout, with the antennae very thick, the elytra one- 
half longer than wide, but little wider than the prothorax and barely three 
times as long, the female much narrower and more elongate, with thinner an- 
tennae and smaller prothorax, having rather more prominent but otherwise similar 
angular nodes, the elytra three-fourths longer than wide, much more than three 
times as long as the prothorax and distinctly wider, the punctures somewhat more 
sparse and more inclined to serial arrangement ; callous spots of the pronotum small 
but obvious ; angular truncatures large but barely as long as the distance thence 
to the spicules. Length 2.6-2.7 mm.; width 1.1-1.2 mm. North Carolina. 
(Asheville) amputatus, sp. nov. 

Subserial setae only moderately distinct ; body much smaller ; angular nodes of the 
prothorax well developed but not prominent, the callous spots small but distinct; 
antennal club broad and well developed '. 20 

20 — Body parallel, dark rufo-ferruginous in color, the pubescence rather abundant 
and conspicuous though only moderately long ; prothorax scarcely narrower 
than the elytra in the male, distinctly narrower in the female, strongly and closely 
punctured, . the angular nodes large and conspicuous, as long as the distance 
thence to the spicules, or even longer in the male ; elytra, in the latter sex, one- 
half longer than wide, less than three times as long as the prothorax, coarsely 
and closely punctured, in the female decidedly more elongate, more than three 
times as long as the prothorax and less closely though equally coarsely, punctured ; 
a feebly eroded adventitious second, line parallel to the posterior subsutural stria, 
is sometimes evident. Length 2.0-2.2 mm. ; width 0.85 mm. South Carolina 
to Illinois ; \crinitus Zimm.] croceus Zimm. 

Body more oval and rather more convex, pale flavo-ferruginous throughout ; prothorax 
smaller and more rounded at the sides than in croceus, the angular lobes much 
smaller, distinctly shorter than the distance thence to the spicules, the punctures 
strong and rather close-set, the posterior callous spots more obvious than the an- 
terior ; elytra three-fifths longer than wide, rather strongly rounded at tip, about 
three times as long as the prothorax, the punctures only moderately coarse, deep, 
decidedly close-set and inclined to subserial arrangement, the pubescence shorter 
and less conspicuous than in croceus {$ ). Length 1.9 mm. ; width 0.75 mm. 
Pennsylvania (Westmoreland Co.) laticlavus, sp. nov. 

21— Antennal club broader, with its basal joint scarcely smaller than the second as 
usual ; body rather small, oblong, dark testaceous in color, the pubescence 
moderately long and sparse ; prothorax very nearly as wide as the elytra, strongly 
transverse, three-fourths wider than long, strongly and closely punctured, the 



junei 9 °o.] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 97 

callous spots feeble, the angular nodes well developed and as long as the interval 
thence to the spicules, which are very minute ; elytra two-thirds longer than wide, 
more than three times as long as the prothorax, rather finely but deeply, not 
very closely punctate ( J )• Length 2.0 mm. ; width 0.88 mm. California 
(near San Francisco) inscitus, sp. nov. 

Antennal club narrow, with its basal joint distinctly smaller than the second ; body 
small, oblong, compact and convex, shining, dark rufo-testaceous in color, the 
vestiture rather long and abundant, suberect and distinct ; prothorax large, about 
as wide as the elytra, strongly, very closely and deeply punctato cribrate, nearly 
even, the posterior of the callous spots alone distinct ; sides parallel, very feebly 
narrowed at base, the angular nodes well developed and as long as the adjacent 
sinus, the spicules strong and distinct ; elytra about three-fifths longer than wide 
and two and three-fourths times as long as the prothorax, not very coarsely, but 
deeply and quite closely, punctate ( $ ). Length 1.8 mm.; width 0.78 mm. 
California (Mokelumne Hill, Calaveras Co.) — Dr. Blaisdell. 

cribricoilis, sp. nov. 

22 — Body normally convex, pale ferruginous in color throughout, the nodes of the 
thoracic angles well developed but not prominent and not unguiculate behind. .23 

Body sensibly depressed, blackish in color, the legs piceous, the head and pronotum 
rufo-piceous ; thoracic nodes smaller but much more prominent, strongly acute 
and unciform behind 24 

23 — Body oblong-oval, rather stout, the antennal club moderately wide, with the 
middle joint just visibly the widest, the pubescence very short and even, somewhat 
sparse ; eyes rather large and not very convex ; prothorax well developed, the 
angular nodes moderate in size, not more than a fifth of the total length and very 
much shorter than the distance thence to the spicules, which are small but dis- 
tinct, the sides between them and the nodes broadly sinuate ; punctures close-set, 
the anterior callous spots small but abruptly elevated and very distinct, the pos- 
terior almost obsolete ; elytra large, distinctly wider than the prothorax and more 
than three times as long, the punctures moderately coarse and somewhat close- 
set ( J ) . The male is shorter, with more finely and densely punctate prothorax 
and elytra. Length 2.0-2.4 mm. ; width 0.88-1.0 mm. California (Sta. Cruz 
Co.) brevipilis, sp. nov. 

Body nearly similar in form and color but with the eyes rather smaller and more convex, 
the thoracic lobes larger, about a fourth of the total length and but little shorter 
than the sides thence to the spicules, which portion is straight, the callous spots 
less distinct; elytra unusually finely and quite closely punctured;, pubescence rather 
longer than in brevipilis but nearly even and decumbent ( 9 ) . Length 2.25 
mm.; width 0.9 mm. California (exact locality not recorded). 

lepidus, sp. nov. 

24 — Broadly oblong-oval, feebly shining, the antennal club moderate and the eyes 
quite small and strongly convex ; prothorax relatively rather small but not very 
transverse, about three-fifths wider than long, unusually finely and very densely 
punctate, the callous spots very small and inconspicuous, the sides parallel, arcu- 
ately narrowing toward base, the spicules broad and truncate, unciform behind, 
the angular lobes rather small but very prominent, obliquely, rectilinearly truncate 
from above ; elytra large, black, evenly rounded behind, nearly a fourth wider 



98 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. via. 

than the prothorax and three and one-half times as long, rather finely but 
strongly, only moderately closely punctate, the pubescence very short, decum- 
bent, even and sparse, with scarcely a trace of longer subserial hairs ( 9 ). 
Length 2.6 mm.; width i.o mm. Lake Superior. — A male specimen from 
Siskiyou Co., California, is attached for the present and may belong to this 
species, as the differences presented are all in directions shown by other series to 

be sexual in origin depressulus, sp. nov. 

25 — Nodes of the thoracic angles small but very prominent, forming a narrow uneven 
convex surface sharply pointed behind ; body rather narrow, elongate, moderately 
convex, black, the head and pronotum slightly piceous, the antennae and legs 
rufo-piceous ; pubescence rather sparse, coarse, suberect, the subserial bristles 
long and distinct ; eyes small, the antennal club moderate ; prothorax not very 
transverse, one-half to three-fifths wider than long, not very coarsely but deeply 
and densely punctate, the callous spots subobsolete ; median denticle short but 
rather broad, acute posteriorly, the sides thence moderately convergent and 
broadly arcuate to the base, the width across the denticles slightly greater than at 
the apical nodes ; elytra elongate-oval, slightly wider than the prothorax and more 
than three times as long, the punctures moderately coarse, deep and not very 
close-set (J). Length 2.3 mm.; width 0.83 mm. Utah (southwestern) and 

Colorado porrectus, sp. nov. 

Nodes of the thoracic angles not notably prominent 26 

26 — Antennae long, rather stout and unusually developed, about half as long as the 
body, the club moderate ; eyes moderate ; body quite short and stout, oblong- 
oval, pale rufo-ferrugmous in color throughout, the pubescence conspicuously 
long, coarse, suberect and bristling, rather abundant and subeven ; prothorax 
large, as wide as the elytra, three-fourths wider than long, evenly convex, 
coarsely, but not very closely, punctured, the callous spots subobsolete ; nodes 
large, almost as long as the distance thence to the acute denticles, narrow and 
shining sublaterally ; elytra one-half longer than wide, between two and three 
times as long as the prothorax, coarsely but not very closely and in part subseri- 
ally, punctate, very minutely so toward apex ( $ ), Length 1.8 mm.; width 0.8 

mm. Michigan , antennatus, sp. nov. 

Antennae much shorter, always much less than half as long as the body 27 

27 — Eyes very small and strongly convex, scarcely a third as long as the head ; body 
large, rather stout, elongate-oval, pale flavo-testaceous in color throughout, the 
pubescence only moderately long but suberect, very abundant and conspicuous, 
the subserial hairs but little longer and not very distinct ; antennal club moderate ; 
prothorax well developed, two-thirds to three-fourths wider than long, evenly 
convex, finely, deeply and closely punctured, the callous spots subobsolete, the 
sides parallel and evenly rounded from base to apex, the spicules very minute, 
the nodes well developed but narrow, polished, with a small central puncture ; 
elytra elongate-oval, rather narrowly rounded behind, two-thirds longer than 
wide, obviously wider than the prothorax, the punctures fine and unusually close- 
set ; male and female almost completely similar in form throughout, the former 
very slightly less stout. Length 2.6-2.9 mm.; width 1. 05-1. 2 mm. Pennsyl- 
vania (Westmoreland Co.) — Mr. Schmitt valens, sp. nov. 



June 1900.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 99 

Eyes moderate in size and relatively less prominent, nearly half as long as the head. .28 
28 — Nodes of the apical angles well developed and longitudinally convex, but little 
shorter than the distance thence to the spicules ; antenna! club unusually long 
and narrow, the last joint longer than wide ; body rather large, narrowly elongate- 
oval, rather dark rufo-testaceous throughout, the pubescence somewhat short and 
moderately abundant but with the subserial setae quite long and obvious ; pro- 
thorax moderately transverse, densely and deeply punctured, the callous spots 
small but rather distinct, the lateral spicules small ; elytra unusually elongate, 
rather acutely ogival at apex, distinctly less elongate in the male, quite coarsely 
and deeply but not very closely punctured. Length 2.6-2.8 mm. ; width 1.05 

mm. Utah (southwestern) — Mr. Weidt histricus, sp. nov. 

Nodes of the apical angles small, very much shorter than the distance separating 

them from the spicules 29 

29 — Pubescence moderate in length and subdecumbent, the punctuation rather fine ; 
body oblong, shining, dark testaceous throughout ; prothorax well developed, 
moderately transverse, but little narrower than the elytra, the apical nodes ex- 
tremely small, feeble, very oblique, narrow and convex sublaterally, with a 
minute posterior spicule ; submedian spicule very minute, slightly behind the 
middle and separated from the nodes by between two and three times the length 
of the latter, punctures small but deep, moderately close-set, the callous spots 
small and rather feeble but distinct ; elytra oval, rather obtusely rounded at tip, 
three-fifths longer than wide, the punctures rather fine but deep and not very close- 
set ( J ). Length 2.2 mm. ; width 0.9 mm. Indiana; [Carolina — Zimm.] 

fungicola Zimm. 

Pubescence long and bristling, the body coarsely punctured. Sonoran regions 30 

30 — Lateral spicules of the prothorax distinct and moderately large, the sides behind 
them thickened and laterally subprominent half the distance to the base, then 
sinuate to the angles ; body rather stout, oval, convex, polished, piceous in color, 
the elytra blackish, nubilously paler at apex ; prothorax moderately transverse, 
very coarsely, closely punctate, uneven, the callous spots large, conspicuous and 
unusually approximate longitudinally ; apical nodes very oblique, spiculate be- 
hind ; elytra oval, distinctly arcuate at the sides, moderately obtuse at apex, 
scarcely more than one-half longer than wide, and, at the middle, slightly wider 
than the prothorax, the punctures very coarse, deep and somewhat sparse, as 
usual very small toward tip ( $> ). Length 2.1 mm. ; width 0.9 mm. Arizona 

(Tucson) discedens, sp. nov. 

Lateral spicules extremely minute and sometimes apparently obsolete, the sides be. 
hind them arcuately converging, sometimes sinuate very near the angles, in 
which case the latter are acutely prominent 31 

31 — Narrowly oblong-oval, testaceous, the elytra frequently infuscate ; prothorax 
rather short and transverse and slightly narrower than the elytra in both sexes, 
the punctures moderately coarse, deep and somewhat close-set, the callous spots 
large and normally placed, the lateral edges rather widely reflexed ; sides 
strongly convergent behind the middle ; elytra more than three times as long as 
the prothorax in the female, much shorter in the male, rather narrowly obtuse 
behind, very coarsely, but only moderately closely, punctate. Length 1. 9-2.0 
mm. ; width 0.78 mm. Utah (southwestern) — Mr. Weidt. 

fumidlllus, sp. nov. 



100 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Voi.vm. 

Rather broadly oblong-oval, flavo-testaceous throughout, otherwise similar to the pre- 
ceding, except that the punctures are less coarse and more close-set, the sides of 
the pronotum more narrowly reflexed and the lateral spicules still more minute 
and frequently almost invisible ; elytra broader and more broadly rounded be- 
hind ( f ). Length 2.0 mm.; width 0.88 mm. California (southern); [pilosus, 
hirtulusLec.~\ lecontei Harold 

32 — Tarsi moderate in length, the posterior distinctly shorter than the tibiae in both 
sexes 33 

Tarsi more elongate, the posterior fully as long as the tibiae in the male and but little 
shorter in the female ; body oblong-oval, convex, shining, dark rufo-testaceous in 
color throughout ; pubescence short, even, decumbent, yellowish, and not very 
dense ; antennae slender, the club moderate, the second and third joints both 
elongate and longer than the first, which is subglobular ; eyes moderate ; pro- 
thorax well developed, one-half ( $ ) to three-fifths( £ ) wider than long, nearly as 
wide as the elytra in both sexes, the nodes elongate-oval, flat and centrally punc- 
tate, the spicules small, the sides behind them prominently rounded and con- 
vergent ; punctures moderately coarse, deep and dense, the callous spots visible ; 
elytra nearly similar in the sexes, about three-fifths longer than wide, the punctures 
moderately coarse and not very close-set. Length 1.9-2.3 mm. ; width 0.75- 
0.85 mm. Queen Charlotte Islands (Massett) — Mr. Keen hebes, sp. nov. 

33 — Body similar to that of hebes in form, sculpture and vestiture but smaller, with the 
prothorax more transverse and the antennae less elongate and relatively stouter, 
the third joint obviously shorter and more slender than the second ; elytra three- 
fifths ( $ ) to two-thirds ( 9 ) longer than wide, three times as long as the pro- 
thorax in the latter sex but much shorter relatively in the male, but little wider 
than the prothorax in either sex. Length 1. 7-2. 2 mm. ; width 0.72-0.82 mm. 
• California (Coast regions from Humboldt to San Diego). .lyraticollis, sp. nov. 

Body nearly similar to the two preceding in general form, but differing in the finer and 
closer punctures of the elytra, and, from lyraticollis, in the more slender and 
somewhat more elongate antennae, the club rather narrow, loose and parallel as 
usual ; prothorax only moderately transverse, less so than in lyraticollis but 
otherwise nearly similar, the callous spots large and very distinct ; elytra large, 
much wider than the prothorax and distinctly less than three times as long, one- 
half longer than wide ( J>). Length 2.25 mm. ; width 0.95 mm. California 
(Mendocino Co.) , OtiostlS, sp. nov. 

I have been unable to identify the 4-dentatus of Mannerheim, from 
the Island of Sitka, or the Alaskan tuberculosus, punctatissimus and 
4-hamatus of Maklin. The last named must be very closely allied to 
depressulus, of the table, but differs somewhat in coloration, and 
especially in its much smaller size. I fail to identify the European lap- 
■bonicus among our species, and the nodulangulus of Zimmerman, is also 
unrepresented in my cabinet. The 8-dentatus of Maklin, is a Salebius 
without much doubt, and the californicus of Mannerheim, belongs to 
the genus Henoticus. Humeralis of Kirby, was placed in Triphyllus 



jane i 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 101 

by LeConte, but in reality forms the type of a new Melandryid genus, 
which will be described further on in the present paper, and the con- 
color of the same author, I have been unable to trace. 

Henoticus Thorns. 

The general structure of the body, presternum, legs and tarsi, trophi 
and antennae are here almost precisely as in Cryptophagus , but the con- 
verging sides of the front above the antennse are finely reflexo-margi- 
nate, and the structure of the sides of the prothorax wholly different, 
there being no trace of thickened nodal point, apical or otherwise ; 
the edge is regularly spiculato-serrulate throughout, except for a short 
distance near the basal angles ; it also differs in having the fine sub- 
sutural line entire or subentire. The deep groove near the basal mar- 
gin of the pronotum connecting the conspicuous basal fovea, is similar 
to that of Crosimus and without trace of medial interrupting carina. 
The elytral punctures are arranged wholly without order, the pubes- 
cence short and the pronotum without trace of callous spots. The 
species known thus far are two in number, and are both very abun- 
dant in individuals ; they may be outlined as follows : — 

Black or blackish in color throughout when mature, the legs and antennse paler, pol- 
ished, oblong, convex and moderately stout in form, the pubescence short, very 
sparse, even and reclined ; eyes well developed though scarcely half as long as 
the head ; prothorax moderately transverse, the sides very.nearly parallel, broadly 
and evenly arcuate, the serratures even and moderately developed, some eight to 
ten in number ; punctures not coarse but deep, moderately close-set, the sur- 
face rather convex ; elytra oblong, distinctly wider than the prothorax and three 
times as long or a little less, obtusely rounded behind, the punctures coarse and 
decidedly sparse. Length 1.7-2. 1 mm.; width 0.65-0.85 mm. Entire northern 
America, Siberia and northern Europe. \_Paramecosoma denticulata Lee. ] 

serratus Gyll. 

Pale testaceous in color throughout, shining, the pubescence not quite so short, rather 
abundant and suberect, bristling with slightly longer hairs toward the sides ; eyes 
small and extremely convex ; prothorax strongly transverse, distinctly widest 
slightly before the base, the sides thence rather strongly convergent and straight 
and provided with some eight very strong, .acute and equal serratures to the apex ; 
surface feebly convex, more finely, rather closely punctate, evidently impressed 
near the lateral margins toward apex ; elytra but little wider than the base of the 
prothorax and three times as long or more, very finely, though not very coarsely, 
punctate. Length 1. 75-2.1 mm.; width 0.78-0.9 mm. California (San Fran- 
cisco to Monterey) californicus Mann. 

The latter of these was assigned to Cryptophagus by its author. 
The Paramecosoma inconspicua Lee, i. litt., is unknown to me, but 
is probably founded upon a very small example of serratus. 



102 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

Pteryngium Reitt. 
Among the close allies of Cryptophagus ; the two species of this 
genus may be instantly recognized by the rather narrow, strongly de- 
pressed and planulate body, with parallel sides, finely, densely punc- 
tured surface, short pubescence and entire subsutural lines. In this 
last feature, as well as the evenly arcuate and minutely, evenly serru- 
late sides of the prothorax, they resemble Henoticus, but differ in the 
depressed body and in the very minute basal fovese of the pronotum, 
connected by a very fine and feeble basal groove, which is finely inter- 
rupted at the middle. In the structure of the legs, prosternum, 
trophi and antennae they perfectly resemble Cryptophagus, but differ 
from that genus, as well as Henoticus, in the somewhat shorter and 
thicker tarsi, and especially in the much more elongate basal segment 
of the abdomen, this being as long as the next three combined ; the 
sutures are free and perfectly straight throughout, as usual in the tribe. 
The frontal margin above the antennas is very obsoletely and indis- 
tinctly margined. The species may be thus characterized : — 

Body parallel, depressed, rather feebly shining, pale rufo-ferruginous throughout, the 
pubescence short, even, subdecumbent and rather abundant ; eyes moderate in 
size and prominence, not very coarsely faceted, the antennae scarcely as long as 
the head and prothorax, notably stout, the club parallel and broad, its first two 
joints equal and very strongly transverse, joints one to three rapidly decreasing 
in size ; prothorax»about one-half wider than long, the sides parallel, evenly, 
distinctly arcuate from base to apex and minutely, evenly serrulate, the apex 
broadly arcuate, the punctures fine but deep and very close-set ; elytra but little 
more than one-half longer than wide, about equal in width to the prothorax and 
two and one-half times as long, parallel, obtusely rounded behind, finely but 
deeply, very closely punctate. Length 1.8 mm.; width 0.72 mm. Lake Superior 
and Europe crenatum Gyll. 

Body similar in general form and coloration but smaller, narrower and more shining, 
the antennce distinctly less stout, with the club less robust ; prothorax similar in 
form but a little more transverse, finely, strongly punctured but only moderately 
closely, the surface more shining ; elytra similar in general form but more elon- 
gate, scarcely wider than the prothorax but almost three times as long, the punc- 
tures fine, strong and rather close-set but much less dense than in crenatum, and, 
as in that species, having the surface broadly, transversely impressed at some 
distance behind the base, but here the impression bears traces of longitudinal 
striiform lines, which are wanting in crenatum ; the pubescence, also, is still 
shorter, sparser and less evident throughout. Length 1.65 mm.; width 0.6 mm. 
Queen Charlotte Islands (Massett) — Mr. Keen malacum, sp. nov. 

These two species are each represented before me by a single ex- 
ample, in which the hind tarsi are 4-jointed. It is presumable, of 



June 1900.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 103 

course, that the female has these tarsi 5 jointed. In each case the three 
basal joints are short, stout and equal and together scarcely longer 
than the last. 

ATOMARIINiE. 

The genera of this subfamily may be readily recognized by the palpal 
structure and position of the antennae, these organs being inserted 
upon the front and more or less approximate at base, the foveas being 
either small and exposed or deep cavities, separated above by a short 
angular extension of the upper surface, and particularly developed in 
Canoscelis and Sterrwdea. The tarsi are always slender and filiform, 
as in the Cryptophagini, of the preceding subfamily, and, as in that 
case, there is frequently a feeble thickening of the anterior in the 
males. The body is much smaller as a rule than in the Cryptopha- 
ginre, and may be either narrow and parallel, as in Agathengis, or oval 
and more convex, as in the great majority of genera. The subfamily 
may be resolved into the four following rather widely differentiated 
tribes : — 

Prosternal process free, the tip passing over the flat or feebly concave surface of the 
mesosternum ; antennse free, the grooves before the eyes wholly ■ obsolete, the 
club loosely 3-jointed ; basal segment of the abdomen not modified behind the 
coxre except in Tisactia 2 

Prosternal process broader and flatter, generally prominent, forming a continuous sur- 
face with the mesosternum, its tip broadly arcuate and received closely within a 
corresponding depression at the apex of the mesosternum ; body more compact, 
the prothorax more closely fitted to the elytra ; buccal processes obsolete ; elytra 
never margined at base ; tarsi pentamerous , 3 

2 — Prosternal process prolonged and acute at tip, the mesosternum concave ; prothorax 
with a double lateral margin ; tarsi pentamerous in the female and heteromerous 
in the male ; first abdominal segment well developed, longer than the next two 
combined, the sutures bent strongly backward for a short distance at the sides ; 
antennal cavities large, narrowly separated ; buccal processes long and promi- 
nent, the eyes very coarsely faceted ; body elongate, only moderately convex, 
generally coarsely sculptured and sparsely pubescent Oenoscelini 

Prosternal process shorter and truncate, the mesosternal surface generally flat ; pro- 
thorax with a fine single lateral edge ; tarsi pentamerous in both sexes ; abdominal 
sutures straight throughout the width ; antennal cavities small and superficial, the 
buccal processes extremely short and inconspicuous, the eyes much less coarsely 
faceted; body variable in form, sculpture and vestiture Atomariini 

3 — Antennce free, the club 2-jointed in Stemodea, the cavities very large and deep, 
contiguous ; first ventral segment as long as the next three combined, without 
post-coxal plates, the sutures broadly, feebly reflexed toward the sides ; prester- 
num extremely prominent along the middle, with acute lateral margins extend 
ing to the anterior margin ; tibiae feebly claviform ; scutellum well developed and 
transverse; anterior coxse almost rounded *STERNODEINl 



104 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

Antennae variable, the club loosely 3-jointed, the fovea; small, more widely separated 
on the front and superficial ; eyes somewhat less coarsely faceted ; basal seg- 
ments of the abdomen relatively rather shorter and generally with a short and 
broadly arcuate post-coxal plate, the sutures straight throughout; prosternum 
broader and less prominent, the acute lateral margins not extending to the an- 
terior margin ; tibise slender, the sculellum very small ; anterior coxae transverse, 
the intermediate very widely separated ; body broadly oval, convex and generally 
glabrous Ephistemini 

The Sternodeini are peculiar to the palasarctic provinces, but the 
other tribes are well represented in America, the Ephistemini, however, 
by no means so extensively as in Europe. 

Oenoscelinj. 
This tribe is composed at present of the single genus Canoscelis, 
which is very well developed in the northern parts of America, and, 
to a less degree, apparently, in the palasarctic region ; its species are 
the largest and most conspicuous of the subfamily, and compare very 
closely in this respect with Cryptophagus , but the body is narrower and 
more elongate as a rule. 

Casnoscelis Thorns. 
This is one of the best defined and more isolated genera of the family, 
distinguished by the elongate, strongly punctured and pubescent body, 
with double lateral margin and broadly impressed basal parts of the 
pronotum, convex, coarsely faceted and sparsely setulose eyes and well 
developed stout antennas, with the basal joint unusually large and ob- 
conical, the second and third diminishing in size and four to eight 
still narrower and alternately shorter and longer, as usual in the Ato- 
mariinse; the basal joint of the club is small, the last two well devel- 
oped. The tarsi are very slender and the posterior are 5 -jointed in 
the female and 4-jointed in the male, there being otherwise but lit- 
tle sexual disparity; the male is usually rather narrower, with relatively 
larger, and occasionally somewhat less transverse, prothorax. The pros- 
ternal process is narrower, the tip prolonged, free, concave toward tip 
and acuminate, the mesosternum being appreciably concave. The 
abdominal sutures differ greatly from the usual type and are strongly 
reflexed for a short distance at the sides, especially posteriorly. The 
American species appear to be far more numerous than the European 
as described thus far, and those before me may be outlined as fol- 
lows : — 



Juneigoo.] CaSEY : On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEOPTERA. 105 

Body ferruginous in color throughout 2 

Body piceous-brown to black in color ; pronotum broadly impressed at base, parallel 

and evenly distinctly arcuate at the sides 9 

2 — Prothorax less transverse, never so much as one-half wider than long ; body narrow 

and much elongated s 3 

Prothorax one-half or more wider than long, the body stouter and more oval in form.,8 
3 — Prothorax strongly arcuate at the sides, the pronotal punctures fine and close-set, 

the subbasal impression medial only 4 

Prothorax feebly arcuate at the sides, the punctures coarse though generally close-set, 
the subbasal impression arcuate, deep and extending almost from side to side. ..5 
4 — Antennae stout ; the club robust and densely clothed with fine gray down-like 
pubescence, the joints increasing in size from the base and forming a gradual 
transition to the shaft ; prothorax one-third wider than long, convex, the basal 
impression median and feeble, the sides evenly rounded, more convergent an- 
teriorly, so that the apex is notably narrower than the base, the double margin 
narrow and feeble, not much more distinct toward base ; elytra oval, two-thirds 
longer than wide, nearly two-fifths wider than the prothorax ; body elongate-oval 
in form, the pubescence distinct, fine and sparse on the elytra, with the irregular 
series of longer hairs characterizing the genus. Length 1.8 mm.; width 0.7 mm. 

Alaska (Kenai) ferrtlginea Sahib. 

Antennae much less stout, the club similar in structure but narrower ; body narrower, 
more parallel and more depressed, the pubescence finer and rather denser, the 
prothorax one-third wider than long, less rounded at the sides, the apex not nar- 
rower than the base, the lateral margin and basal impression similar, the latter a 
little stronger ; elytra a third or fourth wider than the prothorax, three-fourths 
longer than wide, closely and finely punctate. Length 1. 7-1.75 mm.; width 

0.55-0.65 mm. Colorado — Mr. Schmitt ochreosa, sp. nov. 

5 — Elytra finely and ratter sparsely punctured 6 

Elytra strongly and more closely punctured ; body smaller, elongate-oval 7 

6 — Body narrow and parallel, the elytra very feebly arcuate at the sides, fully four- 
fifths longer than wide and only slightly wider than the prothorax, the latter 
quadrate, but very slightly wider than long, the sides parallel, and evenly, feebly 
arcuate throughout, the apex scarcely narrower than the base, with prominent 
angles, the double edge slightly indexed and notably wider toward base ; an- 
tennae moderate in length, the three basal joints well developed, the first as wide 
as the club, which is unusually narrow, sixth and eighth joints very small and 
subglobular, notably narrower than 'the fifth, seventh and ninth, the latter scarcely 
larger than the seventh, the club virtually 2-jointed {$)■ Length 2.0 mm.; 

width 0.75 mm. Colorado paralella, sp. nov. 

Body similar in size, sculpture and color, but less parallel, the elytra not quite so 
elongate and more rounded at the sides, fully two-fifths wider than the prothorax, 
which is otherwise similar to that of parallela, but more distinctly wider than 
long, with the parallel sides a little more arcuate ; antennoe similar but not so 
thick toward base, the first joint not so thick as the virtually 2-jointed club ( $ ). 
Length 2.1 mm. ; width 0.8 mm. Locality not recorded. 

angusticollis, sp. nov. 



106 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Voi.vm. 

7 — Antennae stout, the three decreasing basal joints moderate in development, four 
to eight globular and moniliform, ninth distinctly larger, obviously transverse, 
the club rather stout and notably wider than the first joint ; prothorax one-third 
wider than long, the sides very slightly converging from base to apex, evenly and 
feebly arcuate, the apex quite distinctly narrower than the base ; elytra fully three- 
fourths longer than wide, only slightly wider than the prothorax, the pubescence 
fine and short ( 2 ). Length 1.8 mm.; width 0.63 mm. California (Siskiyou 

Co.) shastanica, sp. nov. 

Antennae more slender and rather longer, more than two-fifths as long as the body, 
relatively a little more thickened toward base, the first joint but little narrower 
than the last two, the ninth joint not wider than long, the club very small ; pro- 
thorax more transverse, two-fifths wider than long, the sides parallel and very 
feebly arcuate, the apex scarcely narrower than the base, the double side margin 
more inflexed and wider toward base than in the preceding ; elytra relatively 
much wider and more oval, two-thirds longer than wide, nearly two-fifths wider 
than the prothorax, the pubescence rather coarser and sparser ($?). Length 
1. 7-1. 8 mm.; width 0.65-07 mm. New York and Pennsylvania. 

macilenta, sp. nov. 

8 — Basal joint of the antennee unusually developed, one-half as long as the width of 
the head and subequal in width to the last two joints, eight to ten, increasing 
gradually in width, the ninth larger than usual when compared with the tenth, 
the latter only moderately transverse ; prothorax one-half wider than long, the 
sides subparallel, evenly and rather strongly arcuate, the disk broadly impressed 
at base, as usual, and coarsely, deeply and closely punctured ; elytra oval, nar- 
rowed and strongly rounded behind, strongly, but somewhat sparsely, subseriately 
punctate, much wider than the prothorax, the pubescence sparse and rather 
coarse, but subeven and not long. Length 2.2-2.25 nim.; width 0.8-0.83 mm. 
New York basalis, sp. nov. 

Basal joint of the antennae normally developed, much less than one-half as long as 
the width of the head, the club moderate; body smaller in size, the pronotum 
quite coarsely, deeply and closely punctate, as usual, three-fifths to two-thirds 
wider than long, parallel and strongly, evenly rounded at the sides ; elytra about 
two-thirds longer than wide, oval, slightly narrowed behind, quite distinctly 
wider than the prothorax, rather coarsely, deeply but unusually sparsely, irregularly 
punctured, the pubescence rather long and coarse but sparse. Length 1.5-I.8 
mm.; width 0.65-0.78 mm. South Carolina and Kentucky....testacea, Zimm. 

9 — Body larger, the antennae more elongate, with joints four, six and eight longer 
than wide 10 

Body small or moderate and relatively stouter, the antennas shorter, with the fourth, 
sixth and eighth joints not longer than wide ; pronotum coarsely, deeply and 
more or less closely punctured, the elytra also strongly and more or less sparsely 
so 12 

10 — Elytra inflated at the middle, fully two-fifths wider than the prothorax ; body 
elongate-oval, rather convex, rufo-piceous, the elytra blackish ; pubescence 
coarse, moderately long, sparse as usual ; antennae moderately slender, distinctly 
less than one-half as long as the body, the club moderate, scarcely wider than the 
first joint, the ninth joint intermediate in width between the eighth and tenth , 



Juneigoo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 107 

the latter two-fifths wider than long ; prothorax two-fifths wider than long, rather 
strongly and closely punctured ; elytra three-fifths longer than wide, evenly ovai, 
a little more than three times as long as the prothorax, rather finely but deeply, 
moderately closely and irregularly punctate ($ ). Length 2.0 mm.; width 0.85 
mm. North Carolina Ovipennis, sp. nov. 

Elytra not inflated and but little wider than the prothorax in either sex II 

II — Antenna slender, about half as long as the body, the basal joint moderately de- 
veloped and not as long as the next two combined, the third unusually elongate, 
the club rather narrow though wider than the basal joint, the ninth not at all 
wider than long but intermediate in width between the eighth and tenth, the 
latter only slightly transverse ; prothorax scarcely two-fifths wider than long, 
closely and moderately coarsely punctured ; elytra about three times as long as 
the prothorax, rather finely but strongly, moderately closely, subseriately punc- 
tured, the vestiture as usual ( $ ). Length 2.25 mm.; width 0.85 mm. Ken- 
tucky macra, sp. nov. 

Antennae stout, not quite half as long as the body, the basal joint unusually developed, 
stout, fully as long as the next two combined, the third joint not unusually elon- 
gate and shorter than the second, the club rather stouter, the ninth joint slightly 
wider than long and the tenth more transverse ; prothorax shorter, more than 
one-half wider than long, strongly, but rather less densely, punctured ; elytra 
more than three times as long as the prothorax, rather finely but strongly, quite 
sparsely and irregularly punctured, the pubescence rather shorter and less coarse, 
a fifth wider than the prothorax in the male and a fourth in the female ( $ ). 
Length 1. 8-2.1 mm.; width 0.75-0. 82 mm. Pennsylvania (Westmoreland Co.) 
—Mr. Schmitt elongata, sp. nov. 

12 — Antennae stout, the first joint rather well developed and subequal in length to the 
next two combined, the club moderate ; prothorax rather short and transverse, 
strongly rounded at the sides, three-fifths wider than long ; elytra slightly wider 
than the prothorax, elongate-oval in form, fully three-fourths longer than wide, 
the punctures rather sparse and moderately coarse ; body blackish-piceous in 
color ( J ). Length 1. 65-1. 9 mm.; width 0.65-0.78 mm. ($<?)■ Pennsyl- 
vania (Westmoreland Co.) — Mr. Schmitt obscura, sp. nov. 

Antennae and prothorax throughout nearly as in obscura, the body stouter in the female, 
the male slender, rufo-piceous in color, the elytra scarcely two-thirds longer than 
wide, more rapidly narrowed behind and relatively more narrowly rounded at tip, 
the punctures coarser and more conspicuous though equally sparse and likewise 
irregularly disposed ( $? )• Length 1.8-2.0 mm. ; width 0.75-0. 88 mm. ( $ $> ). 
Kentucky .„ subfuscata, sp. nov. 

Obscura is represented by a large series displaying but little vari- 
ability, and four others of those described above are also present be- 
fore me in numbers sufficient to demonstrate the constancy of most of 
the differential characters stated in the table ; the number of apparently 
valid species is however unexpected, and, as a rule, they are remark- 
able similar to each other in general habitus, which causes the taxonomic 
study of them to be unusually difficult and beset with doubt. Testacea 



108 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

of Zimmermann, is omitted from the Henshaw list. The cryptophaga 
of Rietter, I have been unable to identify. 

Atomariini. 
The Atomariini constitute by far the larger part of the subfamily, and 
comprise several genera in America. The body is much smaller 
throughout than in the preceding tribe and seldom or never surpasses 
2 mm. in length. The genera before me may be briefly defined as 
follows : — 

Elytra not margined at base ; body always pubescent, the antennae separated at base 
by a third of the width of the head or less 2 

Elytra margined at base ; antennae separated at base by nearly half the entire width of 
the head, though purely frontal as usual ; body minute in size and virtually glab- 
rous 3 

2 — Body elongate and parallel in form, less convex, the prothorax angulate and foveate 
at the lateral edges far behind the middle ; antennas very approximate at base, with 
the basal joint obconical and feebly arcuate ; first ventral segment behind the 
coxae not as long as the next two combined ; prosternal process narrow. 

Agathengis 

Body oval, more convex, the prothorax rounded or angulate at or before the middle, 
and generally having the minute fovea, in the edge at the point of angulation, less 
developed than in Agathengis ; antennae less approximate at base, the basal joint 
shorter and oblong ; first ventral segment behind the coxae as long as the next 
two, the posterior segments shorter ; prosternal process generally narrow and not 
prominent but becoming broader and more prominent in certain aberrent European 
forms, such as cephennioides Atomaria 

3 — Body oblong-oval, strongly convex, the prothorax rounded at the sides from above 
and not angulate, the edge minutely beaded and not foveate ; first ventral as long 
as the next three combined, with a short feeble plate behind the inner part of the 
coxae, becoming obsolete externally and gradually confounded with the coxal 
margin, the posterior segments short ; prosternal process very wide, with acute 
lateral edges not attaining the apical margin, nearly as in Ephistemus. ..Tisactia 

The last of these genera is evidently a transition toward the Ephiste- 
mini in some respects, but the scutellum is broadly oval as in the 
others, the body more loosely connected and the prosternal process 
evidently free and broadly, arcuately obtuse at tip. The basal margin 
of the elytra will isolate it at once from any other member of the sub- 
family known to me, causing it to bear somewhat the same relation- 
ship to the others, in that respect, as Tomarus, does in the Cryp- 
tophaginje. 

Agathengis Gozis. 

This aggregate of species, usually treated as a subgenus of Atomaria, 
satisfies the ordinary definition of a genus in having several constant 



Juneigoo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 109 

and purely characteristic structural characters, and is therefore valid. 
It differs from Atomaria in the characters stated in the table, and the 
habital differences are such that it is seldom a matter of doubt as to 
the proper genus at the first glance. The body is elongate, generally 
quite slender and subparallel, convex and subuniformly, sparsely 
clothed with short and subdecumbent hairs, which become gradually 
still shorter in a sutural region near the elytral apex. The antennae 
and eyes are moderately developed, the former generally rather stout, 
with more pronounced club than in Atomaria, and the joints of the 
shaft also very conspicuously alternating in length ; the eyes are never 
very prominent and are not very coarsely faceted. The species are 
numerous in North America, relatively more so, apparently, than in 
Europe, where they are greatly outnumbered by Atomaria. Although 
easily separable by sight as a rule, they are even more homogeneous 
in adherence to' a fixed type form than in Atomaria, and consequently 
form a difficult study for the taxonomist, as the differences are nearly 
all comparative. They seem to be quite local in distribution, judging 
from the material at hand excepting crassula which is common to the 
Atlantic and Rocky Mountain regions, and therefore fall very satis- 
factorily into primary geographic subdivisions as follows : — 

Species of the Appalachian regions and Great Lakes 2 

Species of the Rocky Mountain system 6 

Species of the Pacific Coast regions 15 

2 — Pronotum impressed at basal only in median half, the basal bead bordered by 
coarse punctures, especially pronounced within the impression, the latter with 
clearly defined lateral limits ; body small, elongate-oval, convex, polished, pice- 
ous, the elytra somewhat paler, the legs and antennae flavo-testaceous ; pubes- 
cence short and very sparse ; prothorax slightly transverse, the sides broadly 
arcuate and feebly converging from basal fourth, narrowed at base, the punctures 
notably sparse and rather coarse ; elytra about three-fifths longer than wide, 
somewhat prominently rounded and subinflated at the middle, then rapidly nar- 
rowed, the punctures sparse, strong and moderately coarse. Length 1. 25-1. 35 

mm.; width 0.5-0.55 mm. Michigan subnitens, sp. nov. 

Pronotum more or less distinctly impressed along the basal margin throughout the 

width 3 

3 — Elytra variegated in color, red, a small post-scutellar transverse Spot on the suture, 
a large entire fascia behind the middle, fainter toward the suture, and the apex, 
black, remainder deep black, the legs and antennae testaceous ; body small, elon- 
gate-oval, strongly convex, highly polished ; antennae well developed, half as long 
as the body ; prothorax feebly transverse, nearly as in subnitens, finely but deeply, 
very sparsely punctate, the basal impression stronger toward the middle ; elytra 
feebly though subprominently inflated at the middle, then rapidly narrowed to 



110 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol viii. 

the apex, which is narrowly rounded, one-half longer than wide, coarsely,' very 
sparsely punctate, the pubescence short and sparse, but coarse and distinct ; pro- 
sternum distinctly carinate along the middle of the intercoxal portion. Length 
1.4 mm.; width 0.55 mm. Pennsylvania carinula, sp. nov. 

Elytra virtually uniform in coloration ; prosternum not, or only very feebly, carinu- 
late along the middle ; elytral punctures fine and more or less close-set 4 

4 — Antennae more elongate, fully half as long as the body in the male, the basal joint 
relatively longer and subequal to the next three combined ; body small, narrow, 
parallel and less convex, the sides very feebly arcuate, piceous in color, the elytra 
paler and brownish-testaceous, generally still paler near, but not at, the apex, the 
pubescence very short but abundant ; prothorax moderately transverse, sub- 
parallel, the sides distinctly and evenly arcuate from base to apex, the punctures 
fine and close-set ; elytra about two-thirds longer than wide, but little wider than 
the prothorax, not inflated at the middle, somewhat narrowly and parabolically 
rounded behind, finely and closely punctate. Length 1.25-1.5 mm. ! width 
o.5-o.6mm. Massachusetts to Lake Superior and Iowa pumilio, sp. nov. 

Antennas less developed, much less than half as long as the body, the basal joint sub- 
equal in length to the next two combined ; body more convex 5 

5 — Body parallel and feebly arcuate at the sides, the prothorax well developed, black 
in color, the elytra piceous, the legs and antennae piceo-testaceous ; pubescence 
short, moderately abundant but inconspicuous ; prothorax a third to two-fifths 
wider than long, the sides just visibly convergent and broadly, evenly arcuate 
from the broadly rounded and margined basal angles to the apex, the punctures 
fine but deep and only moderately close-set ; elytra elongate, three-fourths longer 
than wide, the sides rather more arcuate near the middle, moderately narrowed 
behind, at the middle a fourth to nearly a third wider than the prothorax, thepunc- 
ures fine and moderately sparse ; hypomera scarcely at all punctured. Length 1.78- 
2.0mm. ; width o.72-o.76mm. Michigan and Pennsylvania ..patens, sp. nov. 

Body decidedly obese, with relatively much smaller prothorax, similar in coloration, 
the pubescence still shorter and quite close ; prothorax nearly one-half wider 
than long, the sides feebly converging from the rounded basal angles to the apex 
and very slightly sinuate just behind the middle, the punctures fine and close ; 
elytra shorter, three-fifths longer than wide, nearly one-half wider than the pro- 
thorax, widest at or somewhat behind the middle but without trace of inflation, 
rather narrowly rounded behind, the punctures fine, only moderately close-set 
but rather less sparse than in patens; - hypomera thickly punctured except at base. 
Length I.65 mm. ; width 0.75 ;mm. Pennsylvania (Westmoreland Co.) and 
North Carolina (Asheville) — the single specimen from the latter locality being 
wholly pale flavo-testaceous, probably from immaturity — and Colorado. 

crassula, sp. nov. 

6 — Body dark in color, or with the head and prothorax darker than the elytra 7 

Body rufo-testaceous in color throughout II 

7 — Pronotum impressed along the basal margin in about median half only, the hind 
angles slightly more than right but exceedingly well marked and not blunt 8 

Pronotum impressed from side to side along the basal margin, the hind angles blunt, 
rounded or very obtuse 9 



junei 9 oo.] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. Ill 

8 — Body regularly elongate-oval and strongly convex, black, the legs and elytra rufo- 
piceous ; antennae dark testaceous, the club unusually stout and deep black ; 
pubescence short and not dense ; basal joint of the antennae unusually large and 
stout but of the usual form ; prothorax barely two-fifths wider than long, the sides 
distinctly converging, broadly and almost evenly arcuate from base to apex and 
almost continuous with those of the elytra, the punctures fine and moderately 
close ; elytra oval, two-thirds longer than wide, sensibly widest and feebly 
inflated before the middle, arcuately narrowed thence to the apex, which is 
rather narrowly rounded, the punctures very fine and quite sparse. Length 1.7 
mm. ; width 0.7 mm. Colorado capitata, sp. nov. 

Body oblong, parallel and subdepressed, much larger, moderately shining, dark rufo- 
piceous throughout, the legs and antennae but little paler ; pubescence short but 
coarse and sparse, even as usual ; antennae moderate, the first two joints of the 
club transverse ; prothorax unusually developed, parallel, but little wider than 
long, the sides feebly, almost evenly arcuate from base to apex ; punctures fine 
but strong, moderately close, the basal impression very fine and shallow along the 
middle of the basal margin, elsewhere obsolete ; elytra three-fourths longer than 
wide, but little wider than the prothorax, the sides broadly, feebly arcuate, grad- 
ually arcuato-convergent from about the middle, the apex somewhat broadly 
rounded ; punctures very fine and relatively sparse, somewhat disposed to linear 
arrangement. Length 1.9 mm.; width 0.72 mm. Colorado — Mr. Schmitt. 

quadricollis, sp. nov. 

9 — Sides of the prothorax distinctly sinuate behind the middle and prominent at basal 
third or fourth, the body, legs and antennae pale piceo-testaceous in color, the 
head and pronotum darker piceous ; pubescence very short and somewhat abun- 
dant ; antennae rather slender, the club moderate, sometimes dusky, its first two 
joints but slightly transverse ; prothorax two-fifths or more wider than long, the 
sides arcuate and strongly converging at apex and base, the former slightly 
narrower, the punctures fine but strong and rather close-set ; elytra oblong, two- 
thirds longer than wide, distinctly wider than the prothorax, narrowing gradu- 
ally behind the middle ( $ ) , or in apical two-fifths ( f ) , rather obtusely rounded 
at apex, the punctures fine but rather close. Length 1. 7-1. 85 mm ; width 0.7- 
0.8 mm. Colorado constricta, sp. nov. 

Sides of the prothorax not or very obsoletely sinuate behind the middle ; the body 
smaller and black throughout 10 

10 — Antennal club shorter and broader, its first two joints strongly transverse ; legs 
and antennae rufo-piceous, the club of the latter blackish ; pubescence moderately 
abundant and short but coarse and distinct ; prothorax less than one-half wider 
than long, narrowing slightly only very near the base, the sides obviously con- 
verging, broadly and evenly arcuate thence to the apex ; disk unusually tumid at 
the middle near the base and just before the impressed margin, the punctures 
rather fine but deep, close-set and conspicuous ; elytra rather elongate, distinctly 
wider than the prothorax, parallel anteriorly, gradually narrowed behind the mid- 
dle, moderately obtuse at tip, the punctures only' moderately fine, deep, close-set 
and distinct. Length 1.65 mm.; width 0.65 mm. Colorado. 

tenebrosa, sp. nov. 



112 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

Antennal club larger, narrow, not darker in color, its first two joints not transverse ; 
body shorter, the legs and antennae testaceous ; prothorax strongly transverse, 
more than one-half wider than long, strongly narrowed in basal third or fourth, 
where the sides are very slightly prominent, thence feebly converging and 
broadly arcuate to the apex ; disk not tumid in the middle subbasally, the basal 
impression very feeble throughout, the punctures fine and moderately close ; ely- 
tra short, parallel, gradually rounding behind, about three-fifths longer than wide, 
rather distinctly wider than the prothorax, the punctures very fine and rather 
close, the pubescence very short but somewhat abundant. Length 1. 45-1. 55 
mm.; width 0.65 mm. Colorado coloradensis, sp. nov. 

II — Pronotum broadly, or deeply and very obviously, impressed at base 12 

Pronotum not impressed at base, or only with an extremely fine line extending 
along the basal bead ; pubescence extremely short and moderately dense, the 
punctures fine ; sides of the prothorax without trace of sinus behind the middle.. 14 

12 — Sides of the prothorax distinctly sinuate for a short distance behind the middle 
and prominently rounded at basal third or fourth ; body elongate-oval, moder- 
ately convex, pale rufo-testaceous throughout, the elytra more fiavate, polished, 
the pubescence very short, sparse and inconspicuous ; antennae moderate, about 
two-fifths as long as the body, with the club moderate, the first two joints mod- 
erately transverse ( $ ) , or very short, stouter, with the club joints more trans- 
verse ( $? ); prothorax moderately transverse, strongly narrowed behind the lateral 
prominences, the apex not distinctly narrower than the base ; disk finely, strongly 
somewhat closely punctate, the basal impression confined to median half of the 
width ; elytra two-thirds longer than wide, gradually parabolically rounded to- 
ward apex, but little wider than the prothorax in either sex, the punctures fine 
but strong and rather sparse, sometimes inclined to serial arrangement. Length 
1. 6-1. 9 mm.; width 0.65-0.75 mm. Idaho (Coeur d'Alene). 

stricticollis, sp. nov. 

Sides of the prothorax without an obvious post-median sinus, rather strongly converg- 
ing and broadly, almost evenly and strongly arcuate from base to apex ; antennae 
moderate in length, rather slender, the club not stout ; integuments shining.... 13 

13 — Body narrowly oval, dark rufo-testaceous in color throughout ; prothorax but 
slightly transverse, strongly, evenly convex, finely but strongly, sparsely punctate, 
the basal impression wide and strong, coarsely punctate and confined to the me- 
dian regions ; elytra three-fifths longer than wide, the sides parallel and evenly 
arcuate, slightly, though obviously, wider than the prothorax, rather narrowly 
rounded behind, finely and sparsely punctate, the pubescences sparse, moder- 
ately long and coarse and distinct. Length 1.3-I.6 mm.; width 0.55-0.65 mm. 
Colorado lucida, sp. nov. 

Body more broadly oval, equally convex, pale flavo-testaceous throughout ; prothorax 
nearly one-half wider than long, evenly convex, finely and very sparsely punctate, 
the basal impression broader and more feeble than in lucida- and stronger in me- 
dian half or more, subobliterated toward the sides ; elytra short, not more than 
one-half longer than wide, but little wider than the prothorax, narrowed behind 
from about the middle, the apex moderately obtuse ; punctures very fine and 
sparse, the pubescence short, very sparse and inconspicuous. Length 1.5 mm.; 
width 0.68 mm. Arizona? lUCIllenta, sp. nov. 



June 1900.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 113 

14 — Antennae thick, moderate in length, the club unusually broad, with its first two 
joints distinctly transverse ; body very elongate and moderately convex ; prothorax 
moderately transverse, less than one-half wider than long, the sides distinctly 
converging and almost evenly, moderately arcuate from base to apex, the latter 
distinctly narrower than the base ; disk feebly but almost evenly convex, finely 
but strongly, rather closely punctured, with a more or less distinct impunctate 
median line ; elytra oblong, parallel, elongate, fully three-fourths longer than wide, 
only slightly wider than the prothorax, rather obtusely rounded in apical third, 
finely but distinctly, rather closely punctured. Length 1.7-1.8 mm.; width 0.62- 
0.65 mm. New Mexico (Coolidge) and Colorado forticornis, sp. nov. 

Antennae slender, the club narrow, with its first two joints but little wider than long, 
moderate in length ; body smaller and less elongate but similar in coloration and 
general characters to forticornis ; prothorax rather strongly transverse, fully one- 
half wider than long, otherwise similar to forticornis but still more closely and 
more finely punctured ; elytra three-fifths to two-thirds longer than wide, scarcely 
wider than the prothorax ( $ ) or distinctly so ( £ ) , the punctures fine but strong 
and very close-set, the pubescence very short but coarse. Length 1. 5 mm. ; width 
0.55 mm. Arizona (Williams) — Mr. Wickham macer, sp. nov. 

15 — Pronotum distinctly impressed at base, the impression abruptly limited to about 
median half of the width, the surface before the impression never tumid at the 
middle 16 

Pronotum distinctly impressed but more broadly and indefinitely, the impression ex- 
tending from side to side 17 

Pronotum not impressed at base, other than the fine line rendered apparent by the fine 
basal bead 24 

16 — Body very elongate-oval, narrow, rather convex, polished, pale flavo-testaceous 
throughout, the pubescence very short, sparse and inconspicuous ; antennae rather 
short and thick, the club broader than usual, short, with its first two joints strongly 
transverse ; prothorax not quite one half wider than long, the sides prominent 
near basal third, strongly convergent thence to the base, and, feebly, nearly to 
the apex, where they are rounded ; punctures fine, but strong and rather sparse ; 
elytra parallel, elongate, moderately obtuse at apex, slightly wider than the pro- 
thorax, very finely and quite sparsely punctate, the punctures strongly tending to 
serial arrangement. Length 1.75 mm.; width 0.7 mm. California (Sonoma 
Co.) ochronitens, sp. nov. 

Body much smaller, elongate-oval and narrow, less shining and rather less convex, 
dark rufo-testaceous throughout ; antennae moderately developed, more slender, 
the club narrow, with its two basal joints but feebly transverse ; pubescence very 
short, moderately sparse ; prothorax moderately transverse, the sides distinctly 
sinuate just behind the middle, but not very prominent behind the sinus, thence 
converging^strongly to the base, converging and rounded at apex, the latter but 
little narrower than the base ; disk rather depressed, quite strongly and closely 
punctate, the basal impression strong ; elytra rather less elongate, about two- 
thirds longer than wide, slightly wider than the prothorax, gradually rather ob- 
tusely rounded behind, the punctures strong and moderately close-set, not tend- 
ing to linear arrangement. Length 1. 5 mm.; width 0.65 mm. California 
(Siskiyou Co.) „ undulata, sp. nov. 



114 Journal New York Entomological Society. [v i. vm. 

17 — Pronotum evenly convex, not at all tumid at the middle before the basal impres- 
sion, the surface sloping steeply to the impression, which is very fine; body 
narrowly oblong-oval, rather strongly convex, shining, black, the elytra feebly 
picescent, the legs and antennae dark rufo-testaceous ; pubescence short but coarse 
and rather abundant ; antennae slender and rather more than half as long as the 
body, the basal joint well developed and nearly as long as the next three com- 
bined, the club rather small and narrow, with its two basal joints but slightly 
transverse ; prothorax slightly transverse, evenly and strongly convex, fully as 
wide as the elytra, the sides subparallel, broadly, feebly arcuate, more convergent 
at base and apex, the latter but little the narrower ; punctures only moderately 
coarse but strong and somewhat close-set; elytra barely three-fifths longer than 
wide, obtusely rounded behind, parallel, convex, the punctures strong, close-set 
and distinctly sublinear in arrangement. Length 1. 4 mm.; width 0.6 mm. 
California (Lake Co.) melas, sp. nov. 

Pronotum more or less feebly, though perceptibly, tumid at the middle before the 
basal impression ; body never entirely black 18 

18 — Elytral punctures conspicuously coarse and well separated 19 

Elytral punctures not very coarse, though always strong, and very distinct, generally 
less sparse 21 

19 — Sides of the prothorax with a broadly rounded feeble sinus just behind the mid- 
dle, a little more rounded but scarcely prominent near basal fourth, becoming . 
apparently even and broadly arcuate throughout mpuella 20 

Sides of the prothorax strongly converging and broadly arcuate from basal fourth to 
apex with a very short feeble rounded sinus just before the slight prominence at 
basal fourth, from which point to the base they are strongly convergent ; body 
oblong-oval, moderately stout and convex, shining, black, the elytra, legs and 
antennae piceo-rufous ; pubescence very short and moderately abundant ; antennae 
well developed, the club rather stout, with its two basal joints strongly transverse, 
prothorax fully one-half wider than long, the apex very much narrower than 
the base, the punctures not very coarse but deep and only moderately close ; 
elytra scarcely more than one-half longer than wide, fully a fourth wider than the 
prothorax, parallel, obtusely rounded in apical two-fifths, the punctures quite 
coarse and moderately close-set. Length 1.3 mm. ; width 0.55 mm. California 
(Siskiyou Co.) SOror, sp. nov. 

20 — Body moderately stout, elongate-oval and convex, shining, blackish, the elytra, 
legs and antenna; testaceous ; pubescence short and sparse ; antennae rather long 
and slender, nearly half as long as the body, the club moderately wide, rather 
long and loose, its two basal joints transversely obtrapezoidal, the eighth joint 
subquadrate and but slightly narrower than the seventh ; prothorax well developed 
and transverse, fully two-fifths wider than long, narrowed only slightly in basal 
fourth, the apex but little narrower than the base ; surface almost evenly convex, 
finely but strongly, somewhat closely punctate ; elytra parallel and broadly 
arcuate at the sides, obtusely rounded at apex, three-fifths longer than wide and 
but little wider than the prothorax, the punctures coarse and moderately sparse. 
Length 1.65 mm. ; width 0.7 mm. California (Humboldt Co.). 

cribripennis, sp. nov. 



June i9oo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 115 

Body smaller and narrower, the elytra parallel and only very slightly arcuate at the 
sides, similar in coloration and vestiture to cribripennis , the antennae shorter, dis- 
tinctly less than half as long as the body, the club shorter, more compact and 
unusually broad, its two basal joints strongly transverse, the eighth joint very 
small and much narrower than the seventh ; prothorax narrower and less trans- 
verse, a third wider than long, otherwise similar, except that the sides are per- 
ceptibly convergent and the apex distinctly, although not greatly, narrower than 
the base ; elytra two-thirds longer than wide, obtusely rounded behind, distinctly 
wider than the prothorax, the punctures coarse and sparse, becoming gradually 
fine and rather close posteriorly. Length 1.28-1.55 mm. ; width 0.45-0.6 mm. 
California (Monterey) dispersa, sp. nov. 

Body still smaller and narrower, piceous, the elytra pale testaceous, with a large 
piceous cloud on the suture behind the middle ; antennae slender, fully half as 
long as the body, the club rather small and narrow, its two basal joints moderately 
transverse, the eighth joint but little narrower than the seventh ; prothorax moder- 
ately transverse, nearly as in cribripennus but more arcuate at the sides and with 
the punctures very sparse ; elytra three-fifths longer than wide, parallel and broadly, 
distinctly arcuate at the sides, obtuse at apex, only very slight wider than the 
prothorax, the punctures coarse and quite sparse, notably less close- set than in 
either of the preceding. Length 1.1 mm. ; width 0.48 mm. California. 

puella, sp. nov. 

21 — Antennae moderately developed, rather stout, dark testaceous, the club rather 
broad and shorter, its two basal joints moderately, though very distinctly, trans- 
verse ; body narrowly oblong-oval, rather strongly convex, polished, blackish- 
castaneous, the elytra slightly paler and more rufescent toward base ; pubescence ■ 
short, sparse and inconspicuous ; prothorax moderately developed, a little less 
than one-half wider than long, the sides feebly convergent and broadly, almost 
evenly, arcuate from base to apex, with a short and scarcely visible sinus just 
behind the middle ; surface strongly, almost evenly, convex, rather strongly, 
conspicuously and somewhat closely punctate, the basal impression quite finely 
and feebly impressed ; elytra nearly three-fourths longer than wide, parallel and 
very feebly arcuate at the sides, broadly and obtusely rounded at apex, distinctly 
wider than the prothorax and about three times as long, the punctures rather fine 
but very deep, perforate and distinct, not very close-set and clearly inclined to 
serial arrangement. Length 1.45 mm. ; width 0.58 mm. California (Sonoma 
Co.) casta nea, sp. nov. 

Antennae rather slender, the club longer and narrow, with its first two joints not, or 
but very slightly, transverse 22 

22 — Antennae only moderate in length, distinctly less than half as long as the body, 
the latter rather stout, oblong-oval, moderately convex, the pronotum rather less 
shining than the elytra, black, the legs piceous, the elytra and antennae paler and 
piceo-testaceous ; pubescence very short and sparse ; prothorax one-half wider 
than long, almost fully as wide as the elytra, very slightly narrowed at apex and 
abruptly and distinctly so near the base, the median tumidity before the basal 
impression very obvious ; punctures not coarse but deep, perforate and close-set ; 
elytra three-fifths longer than wide, parallel and nearly straight at the sides, 
parabolically obtuse in apical two-fifths, the punctures rather fine but deep, im- 



116 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

pressed, moderately close and not very distinctly inclined to serial arrangement. 
Length 1.7 mm. ; width 0.7 mm. Alaska (Kenai) vespertina Makl. 

Antennae more slender and almost half as long as the body ; pubescence short and 
inconspicuous though rather abundant 23 

23 — Body piceous, the elytra paler and piceo -testaceous, the antennae testaceous, 
with the club slightly dusky ; prothorax small, but little more than a third wider 
than long, the sides distinctly, but obtusely, prominent at basal third, thence 
strongly arcuate and convergent to the base, very feebly and indefinitely sinuate 
before the prominence, and thence feebly convergent and broadly arcuate to the 
apex, which is subequal in width to the base ; surface broadly convex, finely but 
strongly, densely punctate ; elytra rather short and broad, parallel, somewhat 
narrowly parabolic behind from slightly behind the middle, three-fifths longer 
than wide and nearly a third wider than the prothorax, the punctures rather fine 
but strong, subimpressed, only moderately close and arranged wholly without 
trace of order. Length 1.5 mm. ; width 0.63 mm. California (Siskiyou Co.). 

parvicollis, sp. nov. 

Body similar in coloration to the preceding but somewhat more narrowly oblong-oval ; 
prothorax more transverse, two-fifths wider than long, the sides nearly similar 
but scarcely at all prominent at basal third, the punctures less distinct and much 
less close-set, the basal impression finer and feebler ; elytra rather shorter, but 
little more than one-half longer than wide, very obtusely rounded behind, parallel 
at the sides and less arcuate and only about a fourth wider than the prothorax, 
the punctures similar but very close-set and arranged in conspicuously even, very 
close-set rows almost throughout. Length 1.4 mm. ; width 0.6 mm. California 
(Siskiyou Co.) parvicollis( $ )? 

24 — Antennae rather short, scarcely two-fifths as long as the body, the club somewhat 
robust, with its two basal joints distinctly, though not strongly, transverse ; body 
oblong-elongate and parallel, piceous, the elytra and antennae slightly paler and 
testaceous ; pubescence very short and rather abundant ; prothorax two-fifths 
wider than long, parallel, feebly sinuate at the middle point of the sides, obtusely 
prominent behind the sinus and thence narrowed to the base, the punctures 
strong and close-set ; elytra oblong, obtusely parabolic behind, three-fourths 
longer than wide, distinctly, though not greatly, wider than the prothorax, the 
punctures rather fine but strong and close-set, irregular in arrangement. Length 
1.8 mm.; width 0.75 mm. California (Siskiyou Co.) subrecta, sp. nov. 

Antennae slender, the club narrow, with the two basal joints not notably transverse.. 25 

25 — Elytra much more than one-half longer than wide and but very slightly wider 
than the prothorax, the body narrow and elongate-oval 26 

Elytra short and broad, about one-half longer than wide and fully two-fifths wider 
than the prothorax, the latter relatively very small 27 

26 — Body black, the elytra and antennae pale rufo-testaceous, the pubescence short 
and sparse ; prothorax shorter, two-fifths wider than long, distinctly and rather 
acutely prominent at the sides near basal third, narrowed gradually thence to the 
apex, which is slightly narrower than the base, with a small and almost imper- 
ceptible sinus just before the prominence, the punctures fine but strong and only 
moderately close-set; elytra two-thirds longer than wide, evenly rounded in 
apical two-fifths, parallel toward base, the punctures moderately fine, strongly 



Juneigoo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEOPTERA. 117 

impressed and somewhat close-set. Length 1. 3-1. 65 mm.; width 0.55-0.6 mm. 
California (Siskiyou Co.) nigricollis, sp. nov. 

Body piceous, the elytra and antennse slightly paler and rufous, the pubescence short 
but rather abundant ; profhorax well developed, scarcely more than a third wider 
than long, parallel and broadly, feebly sinuate at the middle of the sides, arcu- 
ately and equally narrowed at apex and base, the surface rather strongly convex, 
only moderately finely, deeply and very closely perforato-puncta e ; elytra well 
developed, fully three-fourths longer than wide, parabolically rounding in apical 
two-fifths, parallel and almost straight thence to the base, the punctures rather 
fine but deep, close-set and arranged without order. Length 1. 6-1. 9 mm.; 
width 0.6-0.72 mm. California longipennis, sp. nov. 

27 — Body evenly dark rufo-testaceous throughout, moderately convex and shining, the 
pubescenee very short but somewhat abundant ; antennas moderate ; prothorax 
nearly one-half wider than long, the sides conspicuously and rather narrowly 
prominent at basal third, thence strongly converging to the base and more grad- 
ually so and nearly straight to the'apex, which is not distinctly narrower than the 
base ; disk more convexo-declivous near the basal margin than in the three pre- 
ceding species but not properly impressed, the punctures fine and rather enevenly 
close-set, becoming 1 very minute and sparse broadly along the middle ; elytra 
short and broad, the punctures very fine but distinct and moderately close-set, al- 
together irregular in arrangement. Length 1.4 mm.; width 0.68 mm. Cali- 
fornia subdentata, sp. nov. 

Ochronitens quite strongly resembles stricticollis , but differs in the 
more slender form of the body and in the very much more minute 
and sparse punctuation. The species described under the name par- 
vicollis is represented by a unique, as is also the form with seriately 
punctured elytra which I have surmised to be- its male ; more material 
is necessary to decide this rather puzzling point, as the difference in 
elytral sculpture is certainly very marked. I have, however, noticed 
at times a slight sexual difference in density and arrangement of punc- 
tures elsewhere in the family. Fuscicollis of Mannerheim, and planulata 
of Maklin, I have not seen, the latter is described as oblong, de- 
pressed, fusco-testaceous, finely and densely punctate with the legs 
and elytra rufo-testaceous. 

Atomaria Steph. 
The species of this genus are less numerous in America than Aga- 
thengis, and for the most part present a rather monotonous appearance. 
The body is generally oblong-oval and convex, shining and sparsely 
clothed with short ' subdecumbent hairs. The antennae are usually 
slender, moderate in length, with the basal joint short and oblong 
or more developed internally toward base than externally ; the joints 



118 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vin. 

of the funicle are alternately shorter and longer as usual in the tribe, 
but they are somewhat more widely separated at base than in Agathen- 
gis ; the first two joints of the club are generally about as long as 
wide or longer, and seldom at all transverse. The eyes are larger and 
more coarsely faceted as a rule than in Agathengis. The prothorax is 
narrowed anteriorly and generally more or less distinctly angulate at 
the middle — not nearer the base as in Agathengis — and the marginal 
fovea at the point of angulation is not so marked a character as it is 
in that genus ; the edge is finely beaded and frequently feebly crenu- 
late from the angulation to the base ; the disk is evenly convex, be- 
coming broadly concave along the very finely margined or simple 
transverse base. The prosternal process is narrow, but in certain 
species, such as the European turgida and cephennioides, becomes 
wider, more prominent and more strongly margined along the sides — 
a divergence in the direction of the remarkable genus Sternodea. 
There seem to be, in fact, several quite well defined subgenera among 
the species of the European fauna having for types such forms as 
turgida, with medially lobed thoracic base, stout antennae and 
broader and more prominent prosternal process, cephennioides, with 
large and broadly truncate prothorax, broad prosternal process, stout 
antenna? and very small eyes, and unifasciata, which is perfectly con- 
generic with our species and might be regarded as Atomaria proper. 

The elytra are finely, irregularly punctured, frequently subinflated 
before the middle, truncate at base and slightly impressed within the 
humeral callus. The abdominal sutures are straight, the first seg- 
ment as long as the next two combined and the fourth shorter than 
the second or third. The legs and tarsi are slender. 

The species before me may be identified as follows : — 

Elytra conspicuously ornamented or bicolored, the lines of demarcation more or less 

well defined 2 

Elytra unicolorous or nubilously darker toward base 7 

2 — Elytra pale, a dark fascia just before the middle extending from side to side 3 

Elytra black or blackish, the apical third or fourth abruptly, and the basal regions nu- 
bilously pale 4 

Elytra black, abruptly pale in apical two-fifths to half, the base not paler, excepting, 

rarely, the humeral callus 5 

3 — Suboval, strongly convex, piceous, the antennse, legs and elytra pale luteo-flavate, 
the latter each with a large, broadly oval oblique blackish spot from basal third 
at the sides, the two mutually tangent on the suture at the middle ; antenna? 
slender, half as long as the body ; prothorax strongly, longitudinally convex in 
profile, moderately transverse, strongly rounded at the sides and narrowed per- 



juaei 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 119 

ceptibly more at apex than at base, the basal impression deep and rather nar- 
row, the punctures minute and sparse ; elytra widest before the middle, narrowly 
rounded at apex, distinctly wider than the prothorax and but two and one-half 
times as long, the punctures very fine but subperforate and sparse. Length 
1. 4-1. 5 mm.; width 0.65-0.7 mm. Vermont and Rhode Island to Iowa and 

Colorado ephippiata Zimm. 

Var. A — Similar to ephippiata in form and size but more narrowly elongate- 
oval and with the antennae shorter, the elytral spots broadly uniting on the 
suture, and with the elytral punctures quite coarse, deeply impressed and ap- 
parently denser. Washington State (Spokane Falls )...hesperica, v. nov. 

Suboblong oval, convex, much smaller in size, pale and rufo-testaceous throughout, 
the head blackish, each elytron with a narrower oblique black band from basal 
third externally to the suture at the middle, and spreading longitudinally on the 
flanks ; antennae moderate, less than half as long as the body, the prothorax 
moderately transverse, but little narrower at apex than at base, broadly rounded 
at the sides and more closely punctulate than in ephippiata, the basal impression 
confined to median two thirds of the width ; elytra nearly similar to the preced- 
ing in form but only very slightly wider than the prothorax and much more 
closely, though equally finely, punctate. Length I.I-I.22 mm.; width 0.52- 
0.58 mm. California to Washington State (Spokane Falls) la-tula Lee. 

4 — Elongate-oval, convex, shining, rufo-testaceous throughout, the under surface gen- 
erally piceous, the elytra shaded with blackish from near the base to apical third 
or fourth ; antennae slender, half as long as the body, a little shorter in the 
female ; prothorax moderately transverse, rather strongly narrowed from base to 
apex, the sides broadly and feebly subangulate at the middle, the base broaflly, 
feebly arcuate ; basal impressions strong, extending almost to the sides, gradu- 
ally evanescent laterally ; disk only moderately convex longitudinally, the punc- 
tures strong, moderately coarse and well separated ; elytra at least three times as 
long as the prothorax and distinctly wider, very much so in the female, more de- 
clivous toward apex in profile, the sides parallel and almost evenly arcuate ; apex 
rather obtusely rounded ; punctures fine but distinct, moderately sparse. Length 
1.4-1.6 mm.; width 0.65-0.72 mm. California (Los Angeles to Monterey) 

nubipennis, sp. nov. 

5 — Species of the Pacific coast regions. Body somewhat broadly oval, strongly con- 
vex, polished, black throughout, the antennae and legs testaceous ; elytra pale in 
apical two-fifths to half, the margin of the pale area broadly and posteriorly angu- 
late ; pubescence ashy and distinct ; antennae slender, nearly half as long as the 
body, shorter in the female ; prothorax moderately transverse, both this and the 
elytra strongly arcuate in profile as in ephippiata, the apex distinctly narrower 
than the base, the sides broadly subangulate at the middle, the basal impression 
strong, not extending beyond lateral fourth or fifth, the punctures fine but deep 
and quite close-set ; elytra much wider than the prothorax and not quite three 
times as long, the sides almost evenly arcuate from the humeri to the sutural 
angles, but little wider before the middle than at base, the apex ogival ; punc- 
tures very fine but strong and perforate, quite close-set. Length 1.3-1.4 mm., 
width 0.68-0.72 mm. California (Monterey to Humboldt Bay) and Nevada 
(Reno) postpallens, sp. nov. 



120 Journal New York Entomological Society. [vo1.viii. 

Species of the Atlantic slope 6 

6 — Rather narrowly oval, strongly convex, polished, dark rufo-testaceous through- 
out, the sterna of the hind body and basal half of the elytra black, the 
pale apex more advanced on the suture ; pubescence very sparse ; antennae slen - 
der, not quite half as long as the body ; prothorax not more than three-fifths 
wider than long, subangularly inflated at the middle, the apex but little narrower 
than the base, the basal impression rather feeble and medial ; disk strongly, 
longitudinally convex in profile, the punctures small and very sparse ; elytra two 
and one-half times as long as the prothorax and distinctly wider, the sides evenly, 
strongly arcuate, the apex rather acute, punctures fine and very sparse. Length 
1.35 mm.; width 0.63 mm. District of Columbia. distincta, sp. nov. 

More broadly oval, strongly convex, nearly similar in coloration to the preceding but 
paler testaceous, the elytra black in basal half, less on the suture ; antennae 
slender and half as long as the body ; prothorax shorter and more transverse, 
three-fourths wider than long, the sides strongly arcuate, the apex but little nar- 
rower than the base, similarly feebly impressed at base, the punctures fine and 
distinctly less sparse ; elytra distinctly wider than the prothorax and about three 
times as long, subangularly inflated and widest at basal two-fifths, the apet 
acutely rounded ; punctures fine and rather sparse but much less so than in 
distincta, the pubescence similarly very short. Length 1.4 mm.; width 0.7 mm. 
Iowa (Independence) divisa, sp. nov. 

7 — Second antennal joint subequal in length to the third, both elongate ; base of the 
prothorax transverse and rectilinear or very feebly arcuate 8 

Second antennal joint much longer and generally thicker than the third, frequently 
as long as the third and fourth combined ; base of the prothorax variable, some- 
times distinctly lobed in the middle 16 

8 — Base of the prothorax, at the middle, finely beaded and frequently abruptly though 
feebly elevated 9 

Base of the prothorax reflexed but not beaded at the middle of the base. Body pice- 
ous, the elytra paler, sometimes wholly pale, rather stout, oval, strongly convex, 
highly polished and very sparsely clothed with short recurved pubescence ; head 
subimpunctate, the eyes rather small ; antennae slender, a little less than half as 
long as the body ; prothorax scarcely two-thirds wider than long, widest and 
broadly angulate at the sides just before the middle, the apex very much nar- 
rower than the base ; surface strongly convex, minutely and very sparsely 
punctate, the basal impression broadly concave and gradually evanescent later- 
ally ; elytra at base slightly wider than the base of the prothorax, widest, but 
not inflated, before the middle, where they are a third wider than the prothorax, 
not quite three times as long as the latter, oval, rather pointed behind, strongly 
but very sparsely impresso-punctate. Length 1. 6-1. 75 mm.; width 0.72-0.88 
mm. New Jersey gilvipennis, sp. nov- 

9 — Body oval in form and strongly convex 10 

Body oblong or oblong-oval in form and subparallel at the sides 15 

10 — Juxtahumeral impressions at the base of the elytra very large and conspicuous, 
though shallow. Body short and very stout, dark rufo-piceous in color through- 
out ; legs and antennae pale, the latter moderately slender and nearly half as 
long as the body ; prothorax well developed, strongly convex, fully three-fourths 



junei 9 oo] Casey : On North American Culeoptera. 121 

wider than long, widest and broadly angulate at the sides at the middle, the 
apex much narrower than the base ; punctures fine but deep and perforate, 
separated by two or three times their diameters, with a narrow impunctate median 
line not attaining the base, the basal impression well developed, the basal bead 
very feeble and flat ; elytra subinflated and widest at two-fifths, where they are a 
fourth wider than the prothorax, about three times as long as the latter, the 
humeri narrowly exposed at base, the apex narrowly rounded ; punctures very 
small but perforate and moderately close-set. Length 1.45 mm.; width 0.75 

mm. Canada (Ottawa) saginata, sp. nov. 

Juxtahumeral impressions very small and feeble 11 

II — Prothorax rather rounded than angulate at the sides at or before the middle 12 

Prothorax conspicuously, though broadly, angulate at the sides at or slightly before 
the middle, where it is much wider than at base, the sides rapidly convergent 
from the angle to the apex and straight or broadly sinuate ; elytral humeri dis- 
tinctly exposed at base 13 

1 2 — Prothorax relatively long and narrow, scarcely three-fourths as wide as the elytra 
and but little wider at the submedian dilatation than at base, very strongly nar- 
rowed at apex, the latter much narrower than the base ; body elongate- oval, 
shining, testaceous throughout, the antennae distinctly less than half as long as 
the body in the female ; prothorax strongly convex, finely but deeply and closely 
perforato-punctate, the basal impression deep and narrowly impressed ; elytra dis- 
tinctly wider at two-fifths than at base, where they are scarcely wider than the base 
of the prothorax, two and two-thirds times as long as the latter, acutely rounded 
at tip, the punctures fine but distinct, rather impressed and moderately close-set, 
at least three times as sparse as those of the prothorax. Length 1.6 mm.; width 

0.78 mm. District of Columbia ochracea Zimm. 

Var. A— Similar in color but with the head and prothorax slightly piceous, the 
latter equally distinctly and very closely punctate, the punctures separated by 
only their own diameters, and, as usual, coarser toward the sides and basal 
angles ; basal impression much feebler and less acutely impressed ; elytra 
strongly and rather sparsely impresso-punctate ; body more narrowly oval. 

Length 1.65 mm.; width 0.75 mm. Lake Superior lacustris, v. nov. 

Var. B — Body nearly similar in form but slightly smaller and more rapidly at- 
tenuate at the extremities, blackish-piceous to dark testaceous in color, pol- 
ished, the pronotum finely and rather sparsely punctate, the basal impression 
much feebler and more broadly impressed than in ochracea ; elytra minutely 
and rather feebly, moderately sparsely punctate, the punctures but little more 
widely separated than those of the pronotum. Length 1. 2-1.5 mm.; width 
0.58-0.75 mm. Mountains of Pennsylvania (Westmoreland Co. ). 

pennsylvanica, v. nov. 
Prothorax shorter and decidedly more transverse, two-thirds to three-fourths wider 
than long, much narrower at base than at the med'an inflation, at least four-fifths 
as wide as the elytra, distincdy, though less markedly, narrower at apex than at 
base, strongly convex, finely and rather sparsely punctate, the basal impression 
rather deep and acutely impressed ; elytra shorter and less obviously narrower at 
base than at the feeble inflation two-fifths from the base, the humeri more widely 
exposed at base, less than three limes as long as the prothorax and narrowly 



122 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Voi.vm. 

rounded at tip, the punctures fine but rather strongly impressed, moderately sparse 
and slightly more widely separated than those of the pronotum ; antennae slender, 
half as long as the body in the male, a little shorter in the female ; body piceo- 
testaceous in color, shining. Length 1. 25-1.45 mm.; width 0.63-0.75 mm. 

Canada (Ottawa) CUrtllla, sp. nov. 

Var. A — Similar but less stout and much smaller, piceous in color, the legs and 
antennae pale luteo-flavate, the latter slender, fully half as long as the body ; 
eyes slightly larger, convex and well developed ; pubescence finer and a lit- 
tle closer ; prothorax similar in form, deeply and rather acutely impressed at 
base, very finely and moderately closely punctate ; elytra very finely, feebly, 
rather inconspicuously and moderately closely punctate, otherwise nearly 

similar. Length 1. 2 mm.; width 0.6 mm. Iowa pumilio, v. nov. 

13 — Prothorax small, at its widest part not quite as wide as the base of the elytra, the lat- 
ter less than three times as long as the prothorax. Body rather broadly oval, mod- 
erately convex, polished, pale ferruginous in color throughout, the antennae slen- 
der, not quite half as long as the body in the male, shorter and a little stouter in 
the female ; prothorax nearly two-thirds wider than long, angulate at the middle, 
the sides thence to the base distinctly convergent, feebly arcuate and minutely 
serrulate, more strongly convergent and feebly sinuate to the apical angles, which 
are somewhat prominent, the apex distinctly narrower than the base ; disk finely 
but deeply, moderately closely punctate, the impression along the base rather 
deep ; elytra about one-half longer than wide, subinflated at two-fifths and nearly 
a third wider than the prothorax, acute at tip, finely but strongly and somewhat 
sparsely impresso-punctate, the punctures at least twice as sparse as those of the 
pronotum. Length 1. 4-1. 6 mm.; width 0.7-0.75 mm. New York — Mr. H. 

H. Smith gonodera, sp. nov. 

Prothorax small, nearly as in the preceding but with the converging sides anteriorly 
not sinuate and the apical angles not so acute. Body similar but shorter and 
more convex, black or blackish in co'or, the legs and antennas dark testaceous ; 
surface polished ; antennae slender, moderate in length ; pronotum similarly 
punctured and impressed ; elytra a little shorter and relatively broader, strongly 
rounded at the sides, acute at apex, more finely and sparsely punctate. Length 
1.5 mm.; width 0.73 mm. Delaware to Florida riparia, sp. nov. 

Prothorax more developed, at its widest part fully as wide as the base of the elytra, 
the latter fully three times as long as the prothorax 14 

14 — Oval, moderately convex, subalutaceous in lustre, piceous, the elytra slightly 
paler ; legs and antennae pale ; eyes rather well developed, convex ; antenniE 
moderately slender, with the club rather stout, distinctly less than half as long 
as the body in the female ; prothorax nearly four-fifths wider than long, the sides 
prominently inflated before the middle, thence converging and arcuate to the base 
and strongly convergent and feebly sinuate to the apex, the latter not more than 
three-fourths as wide as the base ; punctures small but deep and distinct, notably 
dense, the basal impression strong ; elytra fully three times as long as the pro- 
thorax, widest, inflated and a fourth wider than the prothorax at two-fifths, rap- 
idly narrowed thence to the acutely rounded apex ; punctures fine, moderately 
close-set, twice as sparse as those of the prothorax. Length 1.6 mm.; width 
0.72 mm. ( 9 ) Rhode Island (Boston Neck) SUbalutacea, sp. nov. 



Juneigoo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEOPTERA. 123 

Oval, rather more convex, shining, black, the antennae and legs dark testaceous ; 
antennae slender, less than half as long as the body in the female ; prothorax 
more than three-fourths wider than long, somewhat obtusely angulate and inflated 
at the middle, the sides thence straight and moderately convergent to the base 
and strongly so and straight to the apex ; punctures fine and somewhat sparse, 
the impression deep ; elytra nearly as in the preceding but more than a fourth 
wider than the prothorax, the punctures very fine and quite sparse — though but 
slightly sparser than those of the pronotum. Length 1 . 5 mm. ; width o. 7 mm. 
( 9). Colorado incerta, sp. nov. 

15 — Body oblong, parallel, only moderately convex, polished, piceous, the entire ely- 
tra and legs pale flavo-testaceous , antennae pale with the club infuscate, some- 
what slender and slightly less than half as long as the body ; prothorax small, 
much narrower at any part than the base of the elytra, angularly inflated slightly 
before the middle, the sides nearly straight and converging to base and apex, the 
latter quite distinctly narrower than the base ; disk convex, two-thirds wider than 
long, finely, rather sparsely punctate, the basal impression strong, extending evan- 
escently to the very obtuse basal angles ; elytra oblong, parallel and almost 
straight at the sides, broadly rounded at apex, more than three times as long as 
the prothorax and about a third wider, the humeri widely exposed at base, rather 
coarsely but not densely impresso-punctate and somewhat rugose by oblique il- 
lumination. Length I.55 mm.; width 0.72mm. Colorado. 

brevicollis,sp. nov. 

Body oblong, the elytra feebly inflated, polished, black or blackish, the elytra very 
dark piceo-testaceous throughout ; antennae and legs dark testaceous, the former 
slender and nearly half as long as the body ; prothorax large, three-fifths wider 
than long, fully as wide at base as the closely fitting base of the elytra and nearly 
as wide as at the very feeble subangular dilatation slightly behind apical third, 
the apex slightly narrower than the base ; disk convex, finely and quite sparsely 
punctate, the basal impression moderate ; elytra parallel and broadly arcuate at 
the sides, widest and distinctly wider than the prothorax at the middle, not more 
than two and one-half times as long as the latter, rapidly narrowed behind the 
middle and acutely rounded at tip, the punctures rather coarsely impressed, 
moderately close-set, not materially sparser than those of the pronotum. Length 
1.4mm. ; width 0.65 mm. Alaska aleutica, sp. nov. 

16 — Prothorax subangularly dilated at, or a little before, the middle, narrowed to- 
ward base and still more strongly toward apex, the elytral humeri exposed at 
base 17 

Prothorax, viewed vertically, rounded at the sides from the base, more strongly nar- 
rowed toward apex and widest perceptibly behind the middle 18 

Prothorax, viewed vertically, parallel at the sides from the base to or beyond the 
middle, then strongly narrowed to the apex 19 

17 — Body, legs and antennae uniform pale ochreo-testaceous throughout, the latter 
rather short and stout, but little longer than the head and prothorax, the eyes 
moderate ; surface shining, the pubescence short, fine, ashy and rather abun- 
dant ; prothorax four-fifths wider than long, not quite as wide as the base of the 
elytra,the sides broadly angulate at apical two-fifths, the apex distinctly nar- 
rower than the base, the basal impression rather feeble ; punctures very fine and 



124 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

quite close-set ; elytra oblong, feebly arcuate at the sides, obtusely rounded at 
apex, barely three times as long as the prothorax and about a fourth wider, the 
punctures very fine and moderately close-set. Length 1.5 mm. ; width 0.75 mm. 
Colorado oblongula, sp. nov. 

Body deep black throughout, the legs and antennae piceo-testaceous ; surface polished, 
the pubescence short and inconspicuous ; antennae moderately slender, distinctly 
longer than the head and prothorax, the latter convex, two-thirds wider than 
long and fully as wide as the base of the elytra, dilated and strongly rounded 
laterally just before the middle, the converging sides thence nearly straight to 
the base and apex, the latter but little narrower than the base, the basal impres- 
sion moderate, extending throughout the width but feeble at the sides, the punc- 
tures fine but deep and strong and not very close-set ; elytra short, oblong, two 
and one-half times as long as the prothorax and barely a fifth wider, parallel and 
broadly arcuate at the sides and obtusely rounded at apex, rather strongly and 
moderately closely impresso-punctate. Length 1.3 mm.; width 0.6 mm. Iowa. 

crypta, sp. nov. 

Body very small, parallel, pale testaceous, the elytra gradually shaded blackish to- 
ward base ; integuments shining ; antenna; slender, nearly half as long as the body ; 
prothorax short and strongly transverse, about as wide as the elytra, angulato- 
dilated at the middle, the apex distinctly narrower than the base ; punctures 
minute and moderately dense, the basal impression rather acutely impressed ; 
elytra parallel, feebly arcuate at the sides, obtusely rounded at tip, three times as 
long as the prothorax in the female but obviously shorter in the male, the punc- 
tures very fine and moderately close-set. Length o. 88-1. 05 mm. ; width 0.35- 
0.48 mm. Europe and Northeastern America pusilla Schonh. 

18 — Body oblong-suboval, parallel, convex, polished, blackish in color, the elytra grad- 
ually pale posteriorly and the humeral callus also slightly paler ; legs and antennae 
testaceous ; the latter moderately slender, nearly half as long as the body, the 
club rather thick ; prothorax moderately transverse, rounded on the sides, more 
strongly toward base, from above, but broadly subangulate at the middle when 
viewed sublaterally, the punctures fine and moderately close-set, the ape< but 
little narrower than the base, the basal impression distinct ; elytra parallel, 
broadly arcuate at the sides, but little wider at the middle than at base and only 
slightly wider than the prothorax, nearly three times as long as the latter, moder- 
ately obtuse at tip, the humeri evidently exposed at base ; punctures fine but 
strong and distinct, scarcely sparser than those of the prothorax. Length 1.2 
mm.; width 0.5 mm. California fallax, sp. nov. 

19 — Species of the Atlantic regions. Body oval, rapidily attenuate at the extremities 
and very convex, shining, black or piceous-black, the legs and antennae testace- 
ous, the latter notably stout, nearly half as long as the body in the male ; pro- 
thorax small, less transverse than usual, three-fifths wider than long, the sides 
strongly converging anteriorly, the apex only two-thirds as wide as the base, the 
latter with a feeble but distinct arcuate lobe in median third ; punctures rather 
strong and close-set, the impression somewhat feeble ; elytra oval, subinflated, 
and, at two-fifths, very much wider than at base and a third wider than the pro- 
thorax, the base of the latter scarcely at all narrower than the base of the elytra, 
the humeri not exposed at base ; apex narrowly rounded, the punctures fine but 



juneigoo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 125 

distinct, rather sparse, two or three times sparser than those of the pronotum. 
Length 1. 22-1. 4 mm.; width 0.6-0.73 mm. Canada, New York, Pennsylvania, 

and Iowa ovalis, sp. nov. 

Species of the Pacific coast and Alaska 20 

20 — Larger species, oblong-oval in form, rather stout, convex, polished, black, the en- 
tire elytra bright testaceous ; legs piceous; the antennae pale, with the club rather 
stout; prothorax but little more than one- -half wider than long, subangularly 
rounded at the sides slightly before the middle, then strongly narrowed to the 
apex, finely, rather sparsely punctate, as wide at base as the base of the elytra, the 
latter parallel and broadly arcuate at the sides, rather narrowly rounded at apex, 
finely but strongly, rather sparsely impresso-punctate. Length 1.6 mm.; width 

0.78 mm. Alaska (Kodiak Island) fulvipennis Mann. 

Small species, shining, rather narrow and elongate-oval in form 21 

21 — Black, the elytra picescent, the legs paler ; antennae testaceous, moderately stout, 
two-fifth as long as the body ; prothorax short, three-fourths wider than long, 
very slightly narrower than the base of the elytra, the sides parallel almost to 
apical third, then strongly convergent to the apex, the punctures strong, deep 
and close-set, dense toward the sides, the basal impression moderate, not attaining 
the sides ; elytra parallel and broadly arcuate at the sides, ra her obtuse at apex, 
fully three times as long as the prothorax, finely and rather sparsely punctate, the 
punctures much less close than those of the pronotum. Length 1. 25 mm.; width 

0.6 mm. California ( Mendocino Co. ) irtepta, sp. nov. 

Black, the elytra suffusedly paler toward tip, frequently pale ferruginous throughout, 
the antennae pale, rather stout, two-fifths as long as the body ; prothorax rather 
small, three-fifths wider than long, sligfitly narrower than the base of the elytra, 
the sides parallel for three-fifths the length, then moderately converging to the 
apex, the punctures very fine and rather close set, not materially denser laterally, 
the impression rather fine and moderately deep ; elytra parallel, broadly arcuate 
at the sides, somewhat obtuse, at apex, widest at the middle, not quite three times 
as long as the prothorax and fully a fourth wider, the punctures fine but strong 
and moderately close-set. Length 1.2 mm.; width 0.55 mm. California (Hoopa 
Valley, Humboldt Co.) nanula, sp. nov. 

The species in the neighborhood of ochracea form a very difficult 
study, and my treatment of them above must be regarded as pro- 
visional. Fallax bears some resemblance to nanula, but the antennae 
are more approximate in insertion upon the front, being separated by 
a third of the total width in the latter. Kamtschatica Mots., is 
quoted by Mannerheim as occurring in Alaska, but I hav not seen it ; 
it is ovate, black, with the elytral humeri and apex testaceous and 
the prothorax arcuately dilated at the middle. The species lepidula of 
Maklin, from Sitka, is also unknown to me ; it is described as oval, 
slightly convex, shining, testaceous, with the prothorax slightly 
rounded at the sides and deeply, the elytra finely, punctate, and the 
antennas not approximate at base; it must be an unusually large 



126 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

species, as its length is given " i line," and it is said to be extremely 
rare. 

Tisactia, gen. nov. 

Although bearing a certain general resemblance to Atomaria, this 
genus is really profoundly different in several structural characters, 
and it may be readily recognized by the marginal bead at the base of 
the elytra ; it also differs in having the pronotum perfectly even and 
unimpressed at base, in its widely separated frontal antennas and in 
its broad prosternal process, margined at each side by an acute carini- 
form edge. The head is rather deeply inserted, the eyes well de- 
veloped and rather coarsely faceted but not very convex, and the cly- 
peus, which is slightly prolonged and expanded before the antennae, . 
is separated from the front by an impressed straight suture extending 
between theantennal foveas. The antennas are nearly as in Atomaria, 
the first joint relatively still smaller but subsimilar in form, and the 
club parallel, loosely 3-jointed and well developed. The legs and 
tarsi are slender, the latter filiform, moderately short and pentamerous, 
the mesosternum moderately wide and unimpressed between the coxae, 
and the deep -set anterior coxas are oblique and much more transverse 
than in Atomaria approaching Ephistemus in this respect, the cavities 
sharply angulate externally. The scutellum is moderate in size and 
transversely oval. The single species is the following : — 

Body oblong-oval, very conve», black or blackish, the legs and antennae paler, testa- 
ceous, the club of the latter blackish, apparently glabrous, each puncture, how- 
ever, with an excessively minute hair ; punctures throughout very fine and sparse, 
not denser on the prothorax, which is moderately transverse, very convex and 
deep on the flanks, the base distinctly wider than the apex, transverse, finely 
beaded and feebly lobed at the scutellum ; sides broadly arcuate from above, the 
lateral edges finely but acutely reflexo-beaded and nearly straight from a sublat- 
eral viewpoint ; elytra slightly longer than wide, ogival at tip, widest and dis- 
tinctly wider than the prothorax slightly before the middle, the base equal to the 
base of the latter, the humeri not at all exposed at base, the sides arcuate, the 
suture not margined, minutely dehiscent at apex as usual. Length 0.9 mm. ; 
width 0.55 mm. Indiana Sllbglabra, sp. nov. 

Two specimens are before me, one much damaged. 

Ephistemini. 

This is one of the more highly specialized tribes of the family, 
composed of very minute, broadly oval and convex glabrous species, 
feebly represented in the nearctic, but moderately abundant in the 



junei 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 127 

palaearctic provinces. It is distinguished from the other tribes of the 
Atomariinae, excepting the Sternodeini, by the structure of the pro- 
and mesosterna, and in the close juncture of the prothorax with the 
hind body, and, in the extremely specialized Ephistemus, also by a 
form of anterior coxa, antennal club, antennal clefts of the prester- 
num and form of scutellum which are wholly foreign to the rest of 
the family. The post-coxal plates of the first ventral segment, 
though feebly developed, should also be alluded to as an important 
distinguishing character. In the general structure of the body, legs, 
palpi and tarsi it is however a perfectly normal member of the sub- 
family Atomariinae. The elytra are never margined at base, the pro- 
notum is always unimpressed, and the deeply seated anterior coxse are 
transverse and subcylindrical and attached near the sides of the body, 
the cavities acutely angulate externally. The species before me may 
be assigned to the two following widely differentiated genera: — 

Antennae free, the club more slender and bilaterally symmetric, the grooves before the 
eyes and prosternal clefts wholly obsolete ; scutellum transversely oval as in 
Atomariini ; prothorax more transversely truncate at base, feebly arcuate at the 
middle *Curelius 

Antennae partially received in repose within narrow deep grooves before the eyes and 
in a broad shallow cleft and excavation between the presternum and hypomera, 
the club«_rafher more developed, parallel, loose and asymmetric, the joints being 
more developed on the inner side ; scutellum still more minute, cordate, pointed 
behind and as long as wide or longer ; prothorax broadly angulate at base. 

Ephistemus 

These genera are related to the Atomariini through the singularly 
synthetic genus Tisactia described above, which has the unimpressed 
pronotum, broad, flat and laterally margined prosternal process, an- 
tennal insertion and sensible, though somewhat differently formed, 
post-coxal plates of the Ephistemini, the loosely connected body and 
prothorax and free prosternal process of the Atomariini, and a strongly 
margined elytral base, which very exceptional character is foreign to 
both but existent to a well-developed degree in Tomarus of the Cryp- 

tophaginae. 

Curelius, gen. nov. 

This genus is founded upon the Ephistemus dilutes of Reitter, and 
exiguus of Erichson, and, as far as known to me, is exclusively 
European. Although abundantly distinct from Ephistemus, it does 
not seem te have been recognized thus far by Reitter and other 
European authors. 



128 Journal. New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vin. 

Ephistemus Steph. 
In this genus, as in the preceding, the body is evenly oval and 
rather pointed behind, the sides of the elytra and prothorax being 
perfectly continuous and without a reentrant angle at the contiguous 
bases. The surface is virtually glabrous, having only a few extremely 
minute hairs visible under high amplification, and is feebly and 
sparsely sculptured. Our single representative is the following : — 

Oval, convex, polished, black or piceous-black the elytra gradually rufo-testaceous 
posteriorly almost in apical half, the legs and antennae paler ; surface impunctate ; 
prothorax moderately transverse, the sides convergent and rather strongly, almost 
evenly arcuate ; elytra rather less than three times as long as the prothorax and 
about a third to nearly half wider, widest at two-fifths, the sides strongly, almost 
evenly arcuate, converging behind, the tip narrowly rounded. Length 1. 1 mm. ; 
width 0.72 mm. New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Indiana. 

apicalis Lee. 

Almost perfectly resembles the European dimidiatus , but rather 
stouter and much larger ; the latter species seems to be distinct from 
globulus, with which it is united as a variety in the European catalogue 
of Heyden, Reitter and Weise.* 

TRITOMID,E. 

MYCETOPHAGIDiE Auct. 

It matters but little what name is used to designate a genus, and 
consequently perhaps, a family, provided it be the oldest properly 
published name, and that there be unanimity of opinion in regard to 
the points at issue. The Geoffroyian name Tritoma has been adopted 
in the most complete European catalogue, presumably after proper 
investigation, for the familiar Mycetophagus, and, as arbitrary dissent 
from this decision would only tend to perpetuate ambiguity in the 
fundaments of nomenclature, I am ready to take any course which 

* The following is a new species from the European fauna, recently received from 

Mr. Reitter : 

Narrowly ova], polished, blackish throughout, the elytra obscurely rufescent,blackish toward base, the 
legs and antennae pale, extremely minutely, feebly and sparsely punctate; prothorax rather short and 
strongly transverse, the sides converging and arcuate as usual ; elytra relatively long, rather mote 
than three times as long as the,prothorax but only about a fourth to a third wider, subinnated be- 
tween a third and two-fifths from the base and narrowly rounded at tip. Length 0.95 mm. ; 
width o.6 mm. Russia (Caucasus) reitteri, sp. nov. 

Distinguishable at once from globulus or dimidiatus by its narrower and less ovate 
form, the elytra in the species referred to being from two-fifths to a half wider than 
the prothorax. 



juneigoo.] Casey: On North American Colkopte ja. 129 

may tend to bring about permanent agreement, assuming that it is 
never too late to correct a mistake, however repugnant it may be to 
our spirit of conservatism. The name Triplax is therefore to be re- 
established in the Erotylidse. 

The present family is taken up for investigation at this time, 
primarily to draw attention to the inharmonious and composite scope 
which has been given to it hitherto by our systematists. Of the genera 
which have been included within its limits by LeConte and Horn, 
Diplocxlus and Biphyllus are assigned by Heyden, Rejtter and Wise 
to the Cryptophagidse, which disposition of them is eminently ap- 
propriate. Hypocoprus forms a subfamily of Cucujidae near the Mono- 
tominae, and is also to be removed. 

Again, as an important fact because affecting both the European 
and American scope of the family, it should be stated that Berginus 
is in no wise allied to the Tritomidae, but belongs near Lyctus, in fact 
only distinguishable from that genus by the obliquely truncate maxil- 
lary palpi.* 

Finally, but by no means least, it is to be remarked that the Euro- 
pean Triphyllus does not occur in America, the species assigned by 
LeConte and Horn to that genus forming in reality two purely hetero- 
merous genera in the vicinity of the malandryid Tetratoma. The 
Tetratomini are distinguished from other Malandryidae by the 3- or 4- 
jointed antennal club, and will be alluded to in more detail near the 
close of the present paper. 

The present family is evidently closely related to the Trixagidse 

* The following is an interesting new species of Berginus : — 

Very slender, convex, blackish, the under surface, legs and antennae paler ; head and pronotum 
coarsely and closely punctured, the elytra with approximate series of similar coarse and close-set 
but well-defined punctures, each puncture throughout bearing a very small recurved squamiform 
hair ; prothorax as long as wide, slightly narrower than the elytra and a little wider than the head, 
the sides arcuate and parallel ; eyes small and prominent ; antennae slender, the two basal joints 
larger and the club 2-jointed ; under surface coarsely, sparsely punctured, except the last four 
segments of the abdomen which are finely and longitudinally strigato-punctate, the first segment 
as long as the next three combined ; legs short, the femora stout, the tibiae and tarsi slender. 
Length 0.9-1.2 mm. ; width 0.32-0.42 mm. Bahama Island (Eleuthera) — Mr. Wickham. 

bahamicus, sp. nov. 
Differs from pumilus in its smaller size, more slender form, evenly seriato-punctate 
elytra, even pronotum and general habitus. I have taken pumilus in abundance at 
San Diego, California ; it has an almost entire longitudinal impression at each side of 
the pronotum, which exists in the European tamarisci only as a minute basal impression, 
and in bahamicus is wholly wanting ; it was described from Pennsylvania, but per- 
haps this may be an error. 



1 30 Journal New York Entomological Society. [vol. vm. 

(Byturidae) and Dermestidae, and is quite out of position in the 
catalogue of Hey den, Reitter and Weise. Its general characters have 
been sufficiently presented by LeConte and Horn and need not be re- 
peated at the present time. The tarsi are filiform and 4-jointed and 
the anterior in at least the first subfamily, are 3-jointed, more or less 
dilated and pubescent beneath in the males ;* the basal joint is 
generally elongated. The anterior coxae are large, obliquely ovoidal 
and prominently convex in the first subfamily but smaller in the 
second, narrowly separated, with the cavities widely open or closed. 
The ornamentation of the elytra in many species is remindful of the 
Attagenini, but the eyes are coarsely faceted — in marked contrast to 
the Dermestidae. The Trixagidae are intermediate between the two 
families in this respect. 

The Tritomidas of America consist of two subfamilies which differ 
greatly from each other in general habitus, and are sufficiently defined 
by the following characters : — 

Anterior coxse large and convexo-prominent, the cavities widely open behind ; bases 
of the prothorax and elytra equal in width, the scutellum well developed ; sides 
of the prothorax defined by a thin acute edge ; hind coxse narrowly separated. 

TRITOMINyE. 

Anterior coxae small and more deep-set, oblong-oval, the cavities broadly closed 
behind ; , base of the prothorax much narrower than that of the elytra, its lateral 
edges obtuse and not acutely defined ; scutellum small ; hind coxa: rather widely 
separated Myrmechixenin^e. 

The latter of these is represented by a single isolated genus com- 
mon to Europe and America. 

Tritomin^e. 
The body is oblong-oval, convex or moderately depressed and 
always clothed with coarse and sparse pubescence. The four American 
genera before me may be separated by the following primary 
characters : — 

Basal angles of the prothorax well defined 2 

Basal angles broadly rounded; body very minute , 5 

2 — Epipleurse horizontal and flat 3 

Epipleuree concave and rapidly descending externally 4 

3 — Eyes transverse, sinuate anteriorly Tritoma 

Eyes more rounded, not sinuate Typhaea 

* The anterior tarsi are said to be 4-jointed in both sexes in the Myrmechixenina;, 
but my four examples seem to be females and I cannot, therefore, confirm this. 



juneigoo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 131 

4 — Eyes nearly as in Tritoma ; body much smaller and more oval Litargus 

5 — Epipleurae flat and horizontal, not extending much behind the middle. 

Thrimolus 

All of these genera are common to the Atlantic and Pacific dis- 
tricts, except the last, which has been taken thus far only in Texas. 

Tritoma Groff. 
Mycetophagus Hellw. 

The species are oblong-oval in form, moderately convex and clothed 
rather sparsely with short stiff reclined pubescence, the elytra generally 
ornamented with a pale design upon a darker ground ; they are 
moderately numerous and the American forms may be defined as 
follows: — 

Antennae gradually incrassate toward tip, the outer joints sometimes feebly subserriform, 
the prothorax widest at base, with the sides more or less strongly convergent and 
broadly arcuate thence to the apex, the two subbasal foveae deep and distinct ; 
body broadly oblong-oval. [Tritoma, in sp.] 2 

Antennae with a very feebly differentiated subparallel 5-jointed club ; prothorax but 
little wider at base than at apex, more or less serrulate at the sides, much wider 
near the middle, the sides strongly arcuate, the subbasal pits deep and distinct ; 
body narrowly elongate -oval, the elytral intervals each with a series of semi-erect 
hairs. [Ilendus, sg. nov.] 8 

Antennae with a feeble parallel 4-jointed club ; body shorter and moderately broadly 
oblong-oval, the prothorax with the sides but feebly converging from the base and 
broadly arcuate, the subbasal pits distinct. [Parilendus, sg. nov.] n 

Antennce with a 3-jointed club ; body rather broadly oblong-elongate, the prothorax 
widest before the base, with the subbasal pits feeble or obsolete. [Gratusus 
sg. nov.] 12 

2 — Last joint of the antennae elongate, distinctly longer than the two preceding com- 
bined ; punctures rather coarse, not dense ; elytra blackish, with a large reddish- 
yellow design involving the suture from fifth to three-fourths, extending obliquely 
to the humeri, and, transversely at its posterior limit, nearly to the side margin, 
the apices also yellow. Length 4.5-5.7 mm. ; width 2.2-2.6 mm. New York, 
Indiana and North Carolina punctata Say 

Last joint of the antennae -shorter, never longer than the two preceding combined ; 
body smaller in size 3 

3 — Elytral striae impressed, strongly punctured and distinct almost throughout. At- 
lantic regions 4 

Elytral striae scarcely at all impressed, very finely punctured and almost completely 
obliterated behind the middle. Pacific coast 7 

4 — Pale design of the elytra somewhat as in punctata, involving the suture from 
basal fifth or sixth to slightly behind the middle, extending obliquely to the 
humeri, near which there is a projection from each side of the ramus, extending 
obliquely outward also at its posterior limit to the middle of the width and with 



132 Journal New York Entomological Socieiy. [Vol. vm. 

a subdisconnectei transverse lateral spot more posterior, the apex also maculate. 
Length 2.8-4.0 mm. ; width 1.4-1.8 mm. New York, North Carolina, Indiana, 
Lake Superior and Montana ; \bimaculata Melsh.] flexuosa Say 

Pale design of the elytra never involving any part of the suture 5 

5 — Side edges of the prothorax finely serrulate, the punctures not very dense, unequal 
as usual, moderately coarse toward the sides, which are narrowly explanate ; 
elytra blackish-piceous, each with seven pale spots, one, quadrate, at the humeri, 
one smaller, rounded, at inner third and basal fifth, one small rounded, at inner 
fourth just behind the middle, one elongate, near the median line at four- sevenths, 
one very small, subattached to the last at outer and basal third, one transverse, 
near the margin at three-fifths and one rather large, involving the apex. Length 
3.6 mm. ; width 1.7 mm. Virginia serrulata, sp. nov. 

Side edges of the prothorax even, not at all serrulate, the sides more or less narrowly 
explanate ; abdomen finely and closely punctate 6 

6 — Body more elongate-oval, larger and more convex ; elytra each with a large sub- 
quadrate humeral pale spot not involving the callus, another, large and slightly 
elongate-oval, very near the suture at basal sixth and narrowly connected with 
the humeral, a narrow irregular spot near the center, extending along and scarcely 
broader than the sixth interval from three- sevenths to slightly behind the middle 
and then obliquely extending internally nearly to the suture at four-sevenths, 
two submarginal spots, the anterior minute at two-fifths, the posterior larger and 
transverse at three-fifths and a moderate subapical spot. Length 4.2-4.3 mm. ; 
width 1.9 mm. New York picta, sp. nov. 

Body oblong-oval, rather depressed, black, the profhora* scarcely paler and more 
transverse than in picta ; elytra of the male each with two large coalescent sub- 
basal pale spots in oblique line and one, smaller, sublateral at one-fourth from 
the base and frequently obsolete, also an oblique irregular fascia at or near apical 
third, sometimes obsolete or existing as two minute pale spots, and, finally, a 
large subapical spot ; in the female the inner of the two subbasal spots is wholly 
obsolete, only the humeral and subapical remaining, or, sometimes, with the two 
minute pale spots in oblique line near apical third in addition. Length 3.7-4.2 
mm. ; width 1. 75-1. 9 mm. Indiana and North Carolina. 

subdepressa, sp. nov. 

7 — Body oblong- elongate, rather depressed and shining, the punctures finer than 
usual ; elytra blackish, each with a large oblique subbasal spot, from the humeri 
nearly to the suture at basal fourth, and a smaller transverse spot at apical fourth, 
not attaining the suture or margin ; subapical pale spot wholly obsolete. Length 
3.4-4.2 mm. ; width 1. 65-1. 8 mm. Washington State to California. 

californicar Horn 

8— Elytra more than twice as long as wide ; abdomen sparsely punctured ; pronotum 
coarsely, sparsely and equally punctate ". o 

Elytra not moie than twice as long ds wide, the abdomen more closely punctured . 
pronotum less coarsely, more densely and somewhat unequally punctate 10 

9— Body black or piceous-black throughout above, the under surface, legs and an- 
tenna; testaceous, the latter becoming blackish in outer half; elytra maculate with 
pale spots, of which two on each, elongate-oval, disposed in oblique line near the 
base and one transverse, discal and anteriorly angulate at apical third or fourth, 



June i 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 133 

are most conspicuous, a small elongate spot, just before the middle and near the 
side margin, is also generally evident ; striae strongly punctured, feebly impressed 
and distinct very nearly to the tip. Length 4.3 mm.; width 1.45 mm. Texas. 

melsheimeri Lee. 

Body nearly similar in form and sculpture but rather less slender, the under surface 
and legs more dusky-testaceous, the antenna; blackish throughout, except near 
the base, distinctly longer than in melsheimeri and almost two-fifths as long as 
the body in the male, the elytra black throughout, without trace of paler spots ; 
intromittent organ of the male very slender and nearly straight. Length 4.6 mm. ; 
width 1. 6mm. Indiana; [Georgia — LeConte] obscura Lee. 

10 — Body very narrow, piceous or blackish, the elytra with numerous small flavo-tes- 
taceous spots, the striae rather distinctly impressed but somewhat finely punctured 
and obliterated well before the tip ; under surface, legs and antennae pale, the 
latter dusky distally as usual. Length 3.4 mm.; width 1.3 mm. Indiana. 

pluripunctata Lee. 

Body distinctly broader but almost similarly sculptured, the prothorax less transverse, 
relatively narrower at apex and somewhat more coarsely punctured ; elytra evenly 
piceous-black throughout, without trace of paler maculation ; under surface, legs 
and antennae pale testaceous. Length 3.75 mm.; width 1.6 mm. North Caro- 
lina (Asheville) ; pini Zieg. 

II — Body oblong-oval, rather strongly convex, the sides very feebly arcuate ; antennae 
testaceous throughout, short and rather thick, not as long as the head and pro- 
thorax, the latter dark piceous-brown, three-fourths wider than long, the sides 
very feebly convergent from base to apex and very slightly arcuate ; disk convex, 
coarsely, densely and unequally punctured throughout, the edges minutely serru- 
late ; elytra dark, finely, densely punctulate, the striae feebly impressed, finely 
punctate and obliterated toward tip, each with a suffused humeral pale spot and 
another, transverse and discal, near three-fifths ; each interval with a single series 
of suberect hairs; abdomen finely and densely punctate. Length 2.9-3.5 nun.; 
width 1. 3-1.5 mm. Massachusetts, New York, Indiana, Iowa and Nebraska. 

bipustulata MelsA. 

Body oval, piceous, sparsely pubescent ; elytra densely punctulate, with a feebly striate 
arrangement at the middle near the base, maculate with large yellow spots some, 
what as vaflexuosa. Length [4.5 mm.]. Colorado COnfusa Horn 

12 — Subbasal impressions of the pronotum distinct but in the form of short narrow 
canaliculations, the punctures moderately coarse, deep, not very dense, equal and 
evenly distributed throughout, the sides broadly, evenly arcuate, very feebly con- 
vergent, the apical angles broadly rounded ; disk widest behind the middle ; 
elytra piceous, with pale humeral, post-humeral and post-median maculation, the 
striae scarcely at all impressed, rather finely and not conspicuously punctured and 
obliterated toward tip, the pubescence short and even ; abdomen finely, densely 
punctate. Length 4.3-4.8 mm.; width 1. 7-1. 9 mm.. California (Truckee and 
Lake Tahoe) plurigtlttata Lee. 

Subbasal impressions small and feeble but rounded and foveiform 13 

Subbasal impressions wholly obsolete 14 

13 — Elytra immaculate, except some very minute widely scattered pale spots which 
are clothed with paler pubescence, of which there is on each one at base at each 



134 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol vm. 

side of the scutellum, one at outer fourth and one-sixth from the base, two at 
inner fourth in line with the basal spot at two-sevenths and one-half from the 
base, and one, transverse, near the margin at three-fifths ; body oblong-oval, 
piceous-black throughout, the prothorax a little less than twice as wide as long, 
with the sides feebly convergent and feebly arcuate, only slightly wider behind 
the middle than at base, the punctures rather fine, close-set and unequal, with 
coarse punctures intermingled toward the sides ; elytral striae feebly impressed 
but strongly punctured, distinct nearly to the extreme apex ; abdomen finely but 
not densely punctate ; legs blackish, the tarsi paler. Length 5-° mm.; width 
2.1 mm. British Columbia notatula, sp. nov. 

Elytra with very narrow sinuous bands of grayish pubescence at basal third and be- 
hind the middle, and also an apical spot, the posterior band bifurcating near the 
middle of each elytron, sending one branch forward the other backward to the 
side margin ; body otherwise nearly similar to notatula. Length [5.0 mm.]. 
New Hampshire (White Mts. ) tenuifasciata Horn 

14 — Body moderately stout, oval, strongly convex, piceous-black, the legs and an- 
tennae paler ; prothorax distinctly less than twice as wide as long, the sides 
strongly convergent throughout, but very feebly arcuate, obsoletely serrulate, ob- 
liquely convergent near the base to the basal angles, which are very obtuse ; disk 
convex, very coarsely, almost equally punctate, not densely toward the middle but 
closely laterally ; elytra sparsely pubescent, with impressed entire striae of coarse 
deep punctures, each with an irregular pale oblique subbasal fascia from the hu- 
meri nearly to the suture, another, oblique in contrary sense, at three-fifths and 
not attaining the suture and an oval, margino-median and a subapical spot. 
Length 4. 5 mm. ; width 2.0mm. Virginia obsoleta Melsh. 

Confusa and tennifasciala I have not seen, and the characters are 
drawn from the descriptions. Pluriguttata is a very aberrant species, 
with the 3 -jointed club very much feebler than in the others of that 
section and with a very complex male intromittent organ, consisting 
of a gradually narrowed thin basal piece, arcuate in plane, with an 
apical appendage curved sharply in contrary sense, and having two 
posteriorly diverging, rapidly and finely acuminate basal alas and a 
terminal asymmetric button. 

Typhaea Curtis. 

Closely related to Tritoma and distinguished by the much smaller 
size of the body and the form of the eyes. The single species seems 
to be cosmopolitan : — 

Narrowly oblong-oval, moderately convex, pale flavo-testaceous throughout, the elytra 
rarely piceous ; antennae with a 3-jointed club, distinctly shorter than the head and . 
prothorax, the latter about twice as wide as long, with the apex but little nar- 
rower than the base and the sides arcuate, the punctures fine, subequal and 
rather close-set ; elytra finely punctate, with unimpressed series of fine punctures 



juneigoo.] Carey : On North Amertcav Coleoptera. 135 

becoming obliterated toward tip, the pubescence short, moderately dense ; each 
strial interval with a single series of suberect hairs. Length 2. 25-2. 7 mm. ; width 
0.85-1. 15 mm. Vermont to Washington State, Florida and Texas 

fumata Linn. 

The single specimen with dark elytra is from Palm Beach, Florida, 
and seems to have the prothorax slightly less transverse and the an- 
tennal club a little thicker ; additional material may ultimately prove 
it to represent a variety or closely related species. 

Litargus Erichs. 

This genus differs profoundly from the two preceding in the form 
of the epipleurse, but the eyes are nearly as in Tritoma and the anten- 
nae have a loose 3-jointed club as in Typhtza. The ornamentation of 
the elytra is similar to that of Tritoma, and the body is very small in 
size. The species are rather less numerous than in Tritoma and may, 
as far as discovered, be separated by the following characters : — 

Elytra with the pubescence short and sparse but stiff, pale in color and arranged 
throughout in even approximate series, piceous to blackish in color, each with a 
large transversely oval discal spot near basal and apical fourth, the posterior ap- 
proaching more closely to the suture ; punctures sparse throughout, the body 
rather broadly oval, convex and shining, the pronotum not impressed at base but 
with the basal sinuation at each side of the middle distinct ; last antennal joint 
short, rounded, the labrum small ; epistomal suture wholly obsolete. Length 
1.7-2.0 mm.; width 0.85-1.2 mm. Rhode Island to Texas and Lake Superior. 

[Tilargus, sg nov.] 4-spilotus Lee. 

Elytra with the pubescence in general confusedly arranged 2 

2 — Elytra with fine dark pubescence, closely punctulate and with widely separated 
single series of longer semi-erect and paler hairs, each with a small subbasal spot 
at three-fifths from the suture, a larger triangular subsutural spot at two-sevenths 
and an obliquely oval subsutural spot at five-sevenths, the pale spots clothed also 
with pale hairs ; pronotum finely, not very densely punctate, the punctures simple 
and not asperate, feebly biimpressed at base ; body elongate-oval and depressed ; 
last antennal joint short, narrowly rounded at tip ; labrum large and very trans- 
verse. [Litargus in sp. ; type conne xus\ . Length 2.2 mm.; width I.I mm. 

Illinois and Kansas 6 punctatus Say 

Var A — Similar but with the rows of erect paler hairs only evident toward the 
sides of the elytra, the basal spot more oblique, the anterior subsutural 
smaller, rounded and more distant from the suture, the elytra relatively less 
elongate, the spots subobsolete occasionally. Length 1.8-2.2 mm.; width 

0.9-1.2 mm. New Jersey and Indiana obsolescens, v. nov. 

Elytra without widely separated series of pale hairs - 3 

3 — Epipleurse strongly concave and deeply descending, the epistoma trapezoidal 
as usual 4 



136 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

Epipleurje much narrower, almost flat and but slightly descending externally ; epis- 
toma rounded, the suture fine but rather more distinct ; punctures granulato- 
asperate ; last antennal joint short and transverse, somewhat obliquely but broadly 
rounded at tip ; pronotum not at all impressed at base and with the sinuations 
very feeble. [Paralitargus, sg. nov.] 7 

4 — Last antennal joint elongate, the tip obliquely and rectilinearly truncate ; pronotal 
pun ctures simple. [Alitargus, sg. nov. ] 5 

Last antennal joint short and very broadly, subobliquely arcuato-truncate at apex ; 
pronotal punctures minute, slightly elevated and subannulate. [Litargellus, sg. 
nov.] 6 

5 — Rather narrowly oval, moderately convex, shining, piceous or darker, finely, rather 
closely punctate, the pronotum with two feeble subbasal impressions, the basal 
sinuations small but evident; elytra with humeral, post-scutellar, subsutural and 
transverse post-median paler maculation and also with a very feeble paler spot at 
the side margin at two-sevenths, the paler spots clothed with paler pubescence. 
Length 1.75-1.9 mm ; width 0.9-1.0 mm. Texas to California (Los Angeles), 

balteatus Lee. 

Var A — Similar but larger, more elongate-oval and more depressed, the body 
generally darker, the subbasal impressions of the pronotum feebler and less 
linear, the elytra similarly maculate. Length 2.2-2.4 mm., width 1.0-1.15 

mm. California (San Francisco) transversus Lee. 

6 — Body oval and strongly convex, shining, the punctures sparse, the pubescence fine 
and rather sparse, closely decumbent and even ; prothorax about two and one- 
half times as wide as long, the sides strongly converging from base to apex and 
moderately arcuate, flavo- testaceous, sometimes transversely clouded with piceous 
in the central part ; elytra flavo- testaceous, each with three incomplete narrow 
piceous fascice, the two posterior anteriorly arcuate, the subbasal less obvious. 
Length I.5-I-7S mm - > width 0.73-0.83 mm. New York and Pennsylvania to 

New Mexico (Las Cruces) nebulosus Lee. 

7 — Elytra with the post-median pale fascia transverse, or, to a slight degree, 
posteriorly oblique toward the suture. Body narrowly oblong-oval, rather 
convex, not coarsely but strongly, somewhat closely and asperately punctate, 
blackish throughout above, the elytra each with an oblique pale spot from the 
humeri nearly to the suture at two-sevenths and a more or less narrow fascia at 
four-sevenths, which is virtually entire. Length 1.6-1.9 mm.; width 0.7-1.0 

mm. Rhode Island and Illinois to Florida (Palm Beach) didesmus Say 

Elytra with the posterior pale area median and anteriorly oblique toward the suture. 
Body narrowly oval and convex, not densely but strongly, evenly and asperately 
punctate, the pubescence shorter and sparser but coarse and rather pale in color ; 
integuments piceous above, the elytra each with an oblique subbasal pale spot 
nearly as in didesmus and also having an equally broad and conspicuous pale spot 
extending from the, sides, just behind the middle, almost to the suture well before 
the middle and near the apex of the subbasal spot. Length 1.6 mm. ; width 
0.78 mm. Dakota — Mr. Wickham aspenilus, sp. nov. 

In 6-punctatus and its varieties the epistoma of the male is clothed 
densely with an extremely fine short pale pubescence, which is want- 



Juneigoo.] CaSEY : On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEuPTERA. 137 

ing in the female, and the labrum is larger than in any other species, ex- 
tending to the extreme limits of the epistomal truncature. lnfulatus 
of LeConte, I have not seen ; it is said by Horn to be a synonym 
of balteatas. 

Thrimolus, gen. nov. 

This genus is composed of a single exceedingly minute species, 
differing radically from those which precede in the broadly rounded 
basal angles of the prothorax. The body is oblong-oval, moderately 
convex, clothed rather sparsely with coarse and moderately long re- 
clined hairs, with other longer erect setae serially bristling from the 
elytral flanks. The head is large, transverse and well developed, the 
eyes moderately large, basal, not very prominent, somewhat trans- 
versely oval, entire and much less coarsely faceted than usual ; the 
clypeus is rather short and broad, with the suture transversely rec- 
tilinear, not impressed and very feeble. Antenna; moderate in length, 
1 1 -jointed, with a compactly cylindric stout and 3-jointed club, the 
joints six to eight gradually increasing in width and decreasing in 
length, the latter as wide as the base of the club. Prothorax broadly 
arcuate and very finely beaded at base. Scutellum well developed, 
broadly subtriangular or parabolic. Anterior coxae large, obliquely 
suboval, very convex and narrowly separated. Basal segment of the 
abdomen as long as the next two combined ; two to four relatively 
shorter than usual and gradually diminishing somewhat in length, the 
hind coxae very narrowly separated. Legs slender, coarsely, sparsely 
herissate with moderately long hairs, the tarsi extremely slender, fili- 
form, much shorter than the tibiae, with the basal joint but little longer 
than the second, normally 4-jointed throughout, the claws small and 
very slender ; tibial spurs small and much less developed than usual. 

The antennae are bilaterally symmetric, shorter and more compact 
than in Typhaa and the elytral punctures are altogether irregular in 
distribution. The type may be briefly defined as follows : — 

Body dark luteo-testaceous in color throughout, the legs and antennae still paler, the 
club of the latter very feebly infuscate, shining ; head and pronotum subimpunc- 
tate, the latter short and strongly transverse, more than twice as wide as long, the 
sides converging, broadly arcuate and subcontinuous with those of the elytra, the 
disk wholly devoid of basal foveae or impression ; elytra oblong-oval, rather con- 
vex, slightly longer than wide, broadly and obtusely rounded conjointly at tip, 
much wider than the prothorax and more than three times as long, the sides 
broadly arcuate ; punctures very fine, sparse and subasperate ; under surface 
shining, sparsely clothed with coarse inclined hairs. Length 0.78 mm. ; width 
0.45 mm. Texas minutus, sp. nov. 



138 Journal New York Entomological Society. [voi.vni. 

The single example before me is so frail that I am unable to dis- 
mount it to better observe the structure of the mouth, the trophi 
however appear to be in perfect homology with the rest of the family. 

Myrmechixenin^e. 

This subfamily is evidently assigned properly to the Tritomidse by 
LeConte and Horn, although the fades departs conspicuously by 
reason of the small prothorax and wide elytra, the latter rather 
sparsely clothed with an even decumbent vestiture, finer and less con- 
spicuous than in Tritominae. The single genus is as follows : — 

Myrmechixenus Chev. 

Our single species occurs throughout the more southern parts of the 
United States, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and may possibly be 
identical with some European form ; it may be briefly defined as 
follows : — 

Body narrowly oblong, convex, rather shining though finely, deeply and very closely 
punctured throughout, reddish-brown in color, the legs and antennae paler ; 
head subtriangular, the eyes well-developed, moderately convex, coarsely faceted 
as usual ; antennoe moderate, the club loosely 5-jointed, joints six to eight in- 
creasing gradually in width ; prothorax distinctly wider than the head, slightly 
transverse, widest near apical third, the sides parallel, rounded, the base and 
apex equal and feebly arcuate ; elytra between two and three times as long as 
the prothorax and about two-fifths wider, the humeri evposed at base ; sides 
parallel and broadly arcuate, the apex obtusely rounded ; abdominal segments 
convex, gradually and but slightly decreasing in length, as usual in the Tritom- 
ida), the last partly exposed dorsally. Length 1. 7-1. 8 mm.; width 0.75-0. 78 
mm latridioides Crotch 

This species does not appear to be very common ; the specimens 
in my cabinet are from South Carolina, El Paso, Texas, and River- 
side, California, the latter sent to me by Mr. H. C. Fall. The basal 
joint of the hind tarsi is much elongated, as in normal members of 
the family, which is an additional reason for believing that it is cor- 
rectly placed in the Tritomids. 

DERMESTID^:. 

The Dermestidse are a small family of clavicorn beetles, which, in 
their notably varied structural characters, seem to constitute one of 
the old synthetic types of Coleoptera, having some philogenetic 
relationship with both the Geodephaga and Serricornia. They have 
the anterior coxal cavities open behind, the tarsi simple and 5-jointed, 



juneigoo.] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 139 

the claws unmodified, the sternal side pieces very wide and the hind 
coxae lamellate and transversely excavated. The antennas are ex- 
tremely varied in structure and may or may not be received within 
protecting pits or excavations, and the legs may be free or strongly 
retractile. In considering the depression for the protection of the 
antennae, a distinction should be drawn between a large and vaguely 
limited concavity of the hypomera — or inflexed side of the prothorax — 
as in Dermestes, and a closely circumscribed and sharply defined pit ; 
the former characterizes most of the genera in some form, and be- 
comes a true protective fossa in a few genera, but the latter only oc- 
curs in Anthrenus. 

The genus Trixagus {Byturus Lat. ), is evidently allied to the 
Dermestidae, but differs in so many radical characters, such as the 
closed anterior acetabula, lobed tarsi, dentate claws, narrow sternal 
side pieces and structure of the mesosternum, that the position as- 
signed it by Reitter as a distinct family is probably as satisfactory. as 
any, and I have therefore not considered it in the following revision. 
As thus restricted, the American Dermestidae may be assigned to five 
distinct tribes characterized as follows : — 

Head without ocellus ; anterior coxae large, contiguous, the presternum not visible 
between them, the mesosternum between the coxae moderately wide, ogival and 
not sulcate ; antennae n-jointed, with a 3-jointed club, similar in the sexes and 
not received within sharply circumscribed pits ; hypomera concave anteriorly ; 
epipleura? strongly defined, wide and inflexed toward base ; body clothed with 
short hairs Dermestini 

Head with a single ocellus , 2 

2 — Presternum visible between the coxae ; metacoxal lamina not extending to the sides 
cf the body 3 

Presternum not visible between the coxae ; metacoxal lamina extending to the sides of 
the body 5 

3— Metacoxal plate extending laterally half way across the parapleurae ; prosternal 
process impinging upon the exposed surface of the mesosternum between the 
coxae ; epipleurse well developed toward base ; legs in great part free ; body 
clothed with short hairs Attagenini 

Metacoxal plate only extending laterally to and abutting against — squarely in Trino- 
dini, obliquely in Anthrenini— the inner boundary of the parapleurae 4 

4 — Epipleurae subobsolete ; lateral margin of the prothorax entire as usual ; antennal 
club received within deep fossae at the apical thoracic angles ; body compact, 
clothed with decumbent scales, the legs all very closely retractile ; coxae large ; 
scutellum very minute ANTHRENINI 

Epipleurae narrow but strongly delimited and inflexed toward base ; lateral thoracic 
margins obliterated at apex ; legs and antennae perfectly free, excepting, as usual, 



140 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vin. 

the hind femora ; coxae small ; body clothed with long sparse erect coarse and 

bristling hairs ; scutellum large Trinodini 

5 — Anterior coxae contiguous at apex over the prosternum, which has the form of a 
transverse pointed plate; antennas n-jointed, the club 3-jointed, not received 
within abruptly excavated pits, the hypomera biconcave ; legs very closely retrac- 
tile ; body glabrous, the epipleurae distinct toward base ; scutellum well developed. 

Orphilini 

Except the small and isolated tribe Trinodini, which is confined to 
the Atlantic and Sonoran regions, all of these groups are very general 
in distribution. 

Dermestini. 

The genus Dermestes differs so greatly from the other types of the 
family in the absence of the very characteristic vertexal ocellus and 
contiguous anterior coxa?, that it is necessary to regard it as a distinct 
tribe. The metacoxal lamina is narrow, extending only to the para- 
pleura?, and is notably elongate internally, the tibiae seriate with short 
stout spinules and the tarsi rather stout, with the basal joint shorter 
than the second, generally very markedly so, but sometimes only 
slightly as in lardarius. 

Dermestes Linn. 
The species of Dermestes are rather numerous and are the largest 
of the family. They can be readily classified by the form of the 
inner marginal suture of the abdomen toward base, and by the form 
and vestiture of the prothorax, as follows : — 

Inner lateral suture of the first abdominal segment inflexed at base to the outer limit 
of the hind coxae, becoming deeply excavated at the basal margin 2 

Inner lateral suture straight, not inflexed basally and distant at base from the outer 
limit of the cowe ; pronotum not deeply declivous laterally, the margin visible 
throughout from above 10 

2 — Pronotum clothed densely throughout with variegated black and fulvous pubes- 
cence, except in mcdialis, the flanks deeply declivous ; male with the third and 
fourth segments foveolate at the middle 3 

Pronotum clothed with dense cinerous pubescence laterally, leaving. a large triangular 
or parabolic discal area sparsely clothed with almost uniform pubescence, the 
flanks rather deeply declivous 7 

Pronotum somewhat sparsely or inconspicuously and quite uniformly pubescent 
throughout, the flanks less declivous, the lateral margin visible from above 
throughout the length ; third and fourth ventrals foveolate in the male 9 

3 — Pronotum having, as a marked feature of the vestiture, three widely separated 
points of pale pubescence arranged transversely at about the middle of the 
length 4 

Pronotum without the three points of paler pubescence 6 



junei,oo.] Casey: On North American Coleopte ;a. 141 

4 — Large species, 10 mm. or more in length ; vestiture cinereous to ochreous, the pale 
points of the pronotum cinereous, sometimes ochreous and less distinct ; elytra 
with a large oblong area of dense pubescence at each side, extending two-fifths, 
and elsewhere marmorate with black and cinereous or ochreous hairs ; ventral 
segments each with the usual lateral dark spot, that of the basal segment very 
large; median fovese of the male very small. Length 10.0-12.5 mm.; width 

3.9-5.3 mm. Texas to California marmoratus Say 

Smaller species, always distinctly less than 10 mm. in length..'. 5 

5 — Pronotal punctures fine and more distinctly separated ; body moderately large, 
the elytra marmorate with cinereous and black, usually subtransversely, and with 
certain parts of the surface uniformly clothed with the pale hairs, the abdomen 
densely clothed with whitish pubescence, with black lateral spots ; ventral foveolas 
of the male much larger than in marmoratus. Area of uniform pale pubescence 
subquadrate, extending from near the base to basal third and from the side mar- 
gin nearly to the middle. Length 7.5-8.4 mm.; width 3.5-3.75 mm. Atlantic 
Coast from Canada to Florida (Palm Beach); \11ubilus Say, dissector Kby., and 

murinus Lee. nee Linn.] caninus Gemi. 

Var. A — Area of pale pubescence extending from near the base scarcely to 
basal third, but prolonged transversely to or near the suture. Length 7-0-8.3 

mm.; width 3.0-3.75 mm. Pacific Coast mannerheimi Lee. 

Var. B — Area of pale pubescence extending entirely across the elytra and pro- 
longed to about apical third. Length 6.5-8.0 mm.; width 3.2-3.7 mm. 
Iowa fKeokuk) to Florida; [nubilus Lee. nee Say]...nubipennis, v. nov. 
Var. C — Area of pale pubescence extending at the lateral margin from the 
base for two-fifths and dilated internally subbasally nearly to the middle, 
the entire sutural region also clothed with a very large preponderance of 
pale hairs. Length 8.3 mm.; width 3.65 mm. Texas (Galveston). 

compactus, v. nov. 

Pronotal punctures quite coarse and more close-set ; body very small in size, the elytra 

clothed to the tip with dense cinerous pubescence, with a few small black spots, 

especially at base ; ventral pubescence much less dense, especially toward tip. 

Length 5.0 mm.; width 2.2 mm. Oregon rattus Lee. 

Pronotal punctures coarse, deep and narrowly separated ; body small in size, elon- 
gate-oval and strongly convex, deep black throughout, the pronotum clothed 
rather sparsely and almost uniformly with dusky pubescence, with three small 
widely separated spots of pale pubescence arranged transversely ; scutellum trans- 
verse, densely clothed with coarse pale yellowish hairs ; elytra rather coarsely 
and quite closely punctured and clothed uniformly throughout with short blackish 
inconspicuous hairs ; abdomen densely clothed with white pubescence only in 
the middle third of the two basal segments, elsewhere more sparsely clothed 
with a mixture of white and fuscous hairs ; femora annulated. Length 5.6 mm. ; 

width 2.4 mm. California medialis, sp. nov. 

6 — Elytra transversely marmorate with black and cinereous pubescence, the pale hairs 
generally forming a condensed transverse fascia behind the base, the portion 
thence to (he basal margin having some fulvous hairs intermingled ; body larger 
and more broadly oval. Length 6.8-7.5 mm.; width 3.0-3.5 mm. Wyoming 
to New Mexico (Fort Wingate) fasciatus Lee, 



142 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

Elytra finely and more uniformly variegated with black, cinereous and fulvous hairs 
throughout ; body narrowly and evenly ellipsoidal, rather small in size. Length 
5.0-6.7 mm.; width 2.35-3.0 mm. Idaho (Cceur d'Alene), Nevada (Reno) and 
California (San Francisco and Monterey) talpinus Mann. 

7 — Elytra black, rufo-piceous toward the humeri, where there is a small post-humeral 
area of fulvous pubescence, elsewhere marmorate subtransversely with black and 
cinereous pubescence ; body rather small and stout, the abdomen very densely 
clothed with white hairs, the black marginal spots very small ; male with the 
third and fourth segments foveolate. Length 6.5-6.9 mm.; width 2.9-3.25 mm. 
Arizona ; [mueoreus Lee] carnivorus Fabr. 

Elytra uniform in color and uniformly clothed with a mixture of black and paler 
hairs ; fourth ventral alone foveolate in the male, at least in vuh inw 8 

8 — Elytra piceous, uniformly and rather sparsely clothed with a mixture of black and 
fulvo-cinereous hairs in almost equal proportions, dense whitish pubescence to- 
ward the sides of the pronotum not maculate at base ; body elongate. Length 
5.8-8.9 mm.; width 2.4-3 6 mm. Indiana, Florida, California and Guadalupe 
Island VUlpinus Fabr. 

Elytra black, sparsely clothed with black hairs, among which longer yellowish-ciner- 
eous hairs are uniformly but sparsely intermingled ; densely pubescent lateral area 
of the pronotum with a small rounded dark spot at base ; body stouter and more 
oval. Length 7.5-8.5 mm.; width 3.5-3.75 mm. New Jersey, Virginia (Fort 
Monroe) and Iowa (Keokuk) frischi Kug. 

9 — Pubescence throughout above and on the abdomen uniform and yellowish-cinere- 
ous, somewhat sparse, not concealing the sculpture, the abdomen without trace 
of quasi -denuded dark spots at any part ; body very elongate, subparallel, the pro- 
notum with two pronounced basal impressions and the elytra with feebly im- 
pressed longitudinal lines extending almost to the base. Length 8.9 mm.; width 
width 3.6 mm. Indiana elongatus Lee. 

Pubescence, thoracic impressions and elytral lines as in elongatus, the vestiture of the 
abdomen even less conspicuous and dark fulvous in color, with two marginal and 
two discal series of rounded subdenuded spots, the two male foveolae small ; legs 
not annulated ; body shorter and less parallelo-subcylindric than in elougatus. 
Length 7.5 mm.; width 3.3 mm. Florida (Key West) cadaverinus Fabr. 

10— Elytra densely cinereo-pubescent in basal two-fifths or more, each with three 
small nigro-pubescent points in transverse posteriorly arcuate series at or near 
basal fourth ; male with two ventral foveola? II 

Elytra black, pale and fulvo-pubescent at base for a short distance, not maculate ; 
male with two ventral foveote 12 

Elytra piceous, uniform in color and vestiture throughout ; male with a single ventral 
foveolaon the fourth segment as in vulpinus 13 

II — Pronotum closely punctured throughout and uniformly clothed with blackish 
hairs, with small clusters of yellowish-cinereous hairs interspersed ; basal pubes- 
cent area of the elytra not extending to the middle and sharply delimited, the 
hairs of the remainder being entirely black. Length 6.8-7.7 mm.; width 2.75- 
3.4 mm. United States and Europe lardarius Linn. 

Pronotum finely and sparsely punctured toward the middle, clothed uniformly through- 
out with longer fulvo-cinereous pubescence, the elytra rufo-piceous throughout, 



junei 9 oo] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 143 

the densely pubescent basal area extending well beyond the middle and not 
sharply defined, the pubescence of the remaining parts being in large part similar 
in color but sparser. Length 5-7~7-4 mm.; width 2.5-3.2 mm. Vancouver Is- 
land and New Mexico ( Fort Wingate ) sigtiatus lee. 

12 — Body oblong-oval, more depressed than usual, pale rufo-ferruginous throughout 
above and beneath and clothed with rather sparse fulvous pubescence, the elytra 
black, except at the basal margin and along the sides to basal fourth or more, 
the black parts clothed uniformly with inconspicuous blackish pubescence ; ab- 
domen without quasi-denuded spots. Length 6.3 mm.; width 3.0 mm. Illinois. 

pulcher Lee. 

13 — Narrow and convex ; body and legs throughout uniform dark piceous-brown in 
color, thepronotum rather finely, not very densely punctate, deeply and narrowly 
bisinuate at base, broadly biimpressed at the basal margin, with rounded hind 
angles, the vestiture uniform throughout and consisting largely of fulvo-cinereous 
hairs ; elytra clothed rather sparsely with dark pubescence, with fulvo-cinereous 
hairs sparsely and uniformly interspersed throughout ; pubescence of the under 
surface denser and uniformly flavo-cinereous, the abdomen without quasi-denuded 
spots. Length 6.7 mm.; width 2.7 mm. Texas (El Paso). 

angustus, sp. nov. 
Sobrinus of LeConte, I have been unable to identify amidst the 
material accessible to me. Rattus and signatus are by no means 
varietal forms, but perfectly valid and very interesting species ; 
mannerheimi seems, however, to be a variety of the very widely dis- 
tributed caninns ; it is wholly different from marmoratus, as I have 
previously pointed out (Bull. Bk. Ent. Soc. ). The identity of 
mucoreus and carnivorus rests upon the authority of the Hanshaw 
List. Say described his nubilus from Florida and Pennsylvania, and 
the characters given coincide entirely with those of caninus and 
not with the more pubescent form named nubipennis above. 

Attagenini. 

This is the largest tribe of the family, and contains a considerable 
number of genera having the legs more or less free throughout. The 
laminate portion of the hind coxae extends about half way across the 
end of the parapleural ; the epipleurae are distinct and generally 
strongly defined toward base, and the prostemal process is visible, 
though generally narrow, between the coxa;, its free tip resting in an 
apical pit of the mesosternum which is frequently prolonged to the 
apex of the latter as a well-defined sulcus or fossa. The antennae are 
of varied structure, and the antennal fossa may be traced in successive 
stages of development through the genera in an instructive and inter- 
esting manner. In the first four or possibly five genera of the tribe, 



144 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

the hypomera are merely flat or concave, without trace of an enclosed 
antennal fossa, but in Trogoderma the fossa appears in one of its prim- 
itive stages, and may be conceived to be the result of retractility of 
the anterior femora. The crural fossae are deep and denned anteriorly 
by a strongly elevated acute cariniform line, extending obliquely to the 
hind angles of the prothorax, and forming the posterior boundary of 
the hypomeral concavity. To suggest that this latter concavity has 
not been evolved primarily as a shelter for the antennae as in An- 
threnus, for example, it may be observed that it is equally large and 
well formed in both sexes, although the antennae differ sexually to a 
great degree, and it is only in the male that it is in any way com- 
pletely utilized or compactly filled by that organ ; in the female, 
where the antennas are comparatively very feebly developed, these 
organs lie in repose along the bottom of the concavity, which is much 
too large to form a secure shelter. In Trogoderma the fossa occupies 
the entire length of the prothorax, but in Cryptorhopalum while hav- 
ing a general form which undoubtedly betrays a development from 
that of Trogoderma, it has become smaller and forms a secure shelter 
for the antennae, these having become similar in the sexes and assum- 
ing a form so radically different from those of Trogoderma that it is 
difficult to trace any philogenetic relationship, and in Thaumatoglossa, 
the modification is carried still further, the two closely connected 
club-joints of Cryptorhopalum becoming a single very large joint. 
Acolpus appears to be a very satisfactory intermediate between the 
non-fossate genera and Trogoderma, and it is possible that more care- 
ful observation may there show the antennal fossa in a still more in- 
cipient stage of formation. The American genera may be defined as 
follows : — 

Basal joint of the hind tarsi very short, much shorter than the second ; antennal fossa 
not defined ; legs free, the hind femora retractile as usual 2 

Basal joint elongate, generally but little shorter than the next two combined ; antennae 
1 1 -jointed in both sexes 3 

2 — Antennae 11-jointed in both sexes, the two basal joints of the male club short 
and transverse, the last greatly elongated ; mesosternum between the coxae longer 
than wide, not sulcate, the anterior coxae narrowly separated ; metacoxal lamina 
greatly elongated internally Attagenus 

Antennae 10-jointed in the male, II-jointed in the female, the two basal joints of the 
male club much elongated and the last joint relatively much less so ; meso- 
sternum between the coxae very narrow and elongate, not sulcate, the prosternal 
process extremely narrow ; metacoxal lamina as in Attagenus, the epipleurae less 
inflexed and less strongly defined ; body with denser and more variegated pubes- 
cence Novelsis 



Juneigoo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEOPTERA. 145 

Antennae 9-jointed in both sexes, the club oval, compact and dilated in the male, 
with its two basal joints very short and transverse ; mesosternum between the 
coxae rather narrow, divided longitudinally throughout by a narrow shallow sulcus ; 
anterior coxae narrowly separated ; hypomera feebly concave anteriorly ; metacoxal 
lamina short, gradually and very slightly longer internally ; epipleurae narrow but 
distinct Dearthrus 

3 — Hypomera indefinitely concave as usual, without antennal fossa 4 

Hypomera with a deep concavity which is' well defined internally by acute edges. ..5 

4— Antennal club 3-jointed in both sexes, formed nearly as in Attagenus but with the 
last joint less elongate in the males ; mesosternum between the coxae moderately 
narrow, divided throughout by a very shallow longitudinal impression and deeply 
emarginated behind by the tip of the metasternal process ; anterior coxae rather 
narrowly separated ; epipleurae strongly defined ; metacoxal lamina scarcely at all 
longer internally Perimegatoma 

Antennal club of the male 6- jointed and serriform, nearly as in Trogoderma; 
hypomera concave ; metacoxal plates only attaining the parapleurae ; mesosternum 
as in Trogoderma [Jayne] Acolpus 

5 — Antennae stout, claviform and usually serrate in the male, with the subbasal joint 
small, generally very small and with a narrow 4-jointed club in the female ; 
mesosternum very short and wide between the coxae and completely divided 
longitudinally by a deep broad sulcus ; anterior coxae rather narrowly separated ; 
metacoxal lamina short, gradually, feebly and rectilinearly longer internally, as in 
Dearthrus ; epipleurae rather feebly inflexed and not coarsely delimited ; anterior 
femora retractile, the crural cavities separated from the antennal fossae by a thin 
cariniform interval Trogoderma 

Antennae with a large oval and compactly 2-jointed club, securely and closely fitting 
in repose within deep fossae, which are separated by a flat interval from the crural 
cavities in both sexes ; mesosternum as in Trogoderma, the anterior coxae more 
widely separated ; epipleurae feebly inflexed, rather well defined ; metacoxal 
lamina short, with its hind margin transverse Cryptorhopalum 

Antennae with a male club consisting of a single very large subsecuriform joint, closely 
fitting in repose within hypomeral fossae ; remaining characters nearly as in Cryp- 
torhopalum ; [Axinocerus Jayne] Thaumatoglossa 

If the metacoxal plates only attain the parapleurae in Acolpus, as 
stated by Jayne, this genus forms a remarkable exception to the entire 
tribe, and I strongly suspect that the author is mistaken. Neither 
this genus nor Thaumatoglossa is represented before me at present, 
and I am therefore unable to consider them below. The species are 
all pubescent, generally with nubilous variation in density, usually 
elongate or oblong-oval in form and of less compact build than in the 
Anthrenini or Orphilini, but similar in this respect to the Dermestini 
and Trinodini. 



146 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

Attagenus Latr. 
The prosternal process is wider between the coxae than in Novelsis, 
though still very narrow, and the species are larger, stouter, more ob- 
long and almost uniformly clothed with rather sparse dark and incon- 
spicuous pubescence. The species are somewhat numerous but closely 
allied among themselves, those forms which are apparently worthy of 
distinctive names may be defined as follows : — 

Elytra deep black throughout, the head and pronotum concolorous 2 

Elytra rufous to piceous-black in color, the anterior parts frequently darker than the 

elytra 4 

2 — Elytra each with a small spot of white pubescence at the middle of the length and 
at inner fourth of the width ; pronotum with three small and widely separated 
areas of pale pubescence at base ; third joint of the male antennal club black, 
as long as the entire remainder of the antenna and rather more than four times 
as long as the two basal joints of the club combined. Length 4.0 mm.; width 
2.0 mm. Rhode Island pell id Linn. 

Elytra without paler pubescence at any part ; pronotum without pale hairs at the 
base 3 

3— Pronotum coarsely and closely punctate, without subbasal impressions ; antennte 
of the male nearly as vapellio ; pubescence fulvo-piceous in color. Length 3.3 
-4.0 mm.; width 1.6-1.9 mm. Indiana and California ; [megatoma Fabr.J. 

piceus Oliv. 

Pronotum very finely and less closely punctured, with three widely separated subbasal 
impressions ; body more broadly oblong-oval, shining ; legs piceous, the tarsi 
ferruginous, pubescence blackish ; last joint of the female club more than one- 
half longer than the two preceding combined ; male not observed. Length 3.8 
mm.; width 2.0 mm. Idaho (Coeur d'Alene) schaefferi Herbst 

4 — Pronotum not impressed, or clothed with paler pubescence along the basal sinua- 
tions 5 

Pronotum feebly impressed along the broadly rounded basal sinuations, the impressed 
margin clothed with finer and pale pubescence 9 

5 — Entire upper surface dark piceous-brown to piceous-black in color ; pronotum 
with a feeble subbasal impression before the scutellum 6 

Elytra bright red, sometimes narrowly infuscate along the suture, the head and pro- 
notum black and much more closely punctured, the ante-scutellar impression 
not visible 8 

6 — Last joint of the male antennal club black, about as long as the entire preceding 
part of the antenna, which is testaceous, and slightly more than three times as 
long as the two preceding joints combined ; body moderately stout, oblong-oval, 
legs ferruginous- throughout. Length $ 3.2, 93.7 mm.; width $ 1.7, 91.85 
mm. Pennsylvania extricatus, sp. nov. 

Last joint of the male antenna much shorter than the entire preceding part 7 

7 — Male club stout, the last joint two and one-half times as long as the two preceding 
combined ; prothorax of the male fully twice as wide as long. Length $ 3.25, 
9 3-4-3-7 mm -; width $ 1.6, 9 1.65-1.85 mm. New York, District of Co- 
lumbia and Virginia (Norfolk) deficiens, sp. nov. 



June 1900.] 



Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 



147 



Male club relatively still shorter, the last joint but slightly more than twice as long 
as the two preceding combined ; prothorax less transverse and less strongly and 
densely punctured, not quite twice as wide as long, the male narrower and the 
female larger than in deficient. Length $ 2.8-3. 1, 9 3-^-4-5 mm.; width $ 
1. 4-1. 65, 9 2.0-2.4 mm. Iowa (Keokuk) and Nebraska; \spurcus hec.,fior- 
icola and obscurus Mels., i. litt.] cylindricornis '•'ay 

8 — Body narrowly oval or oblong-oval, the head and pronotum strongly and moder- 
ately closely punctured, the elytra unusually sparsely and much less coarsely so ; 
hypomera but feebly concave ; last joint of the male antennse black, longer than 
the entire preceding part and four times as long as the two preceding joints com- 
bined ; female club black ; under surface piceous, the legs ferruginous through- 
out. Length $ 2.9, 9 3.6-4.1 mm.; width 0*1.35, 9 1 -7~ 2 - 1 mm. Cali- 
fornia to Utah rufipennis Lee 

9 — Head and pronotum generally blackish-piceous, the elytra rufous, the entire body 
sometimes testaceous ; hypomera deeply concave ; punctures moderately dense , 
those of the pronotum finer than the elytral ; male club very elongate and 
slender, the last joint contorted distally, longer than the entire preceding parts. 
Length $ 3.2, 9 4.9 mm.; width $ 1.65, 9 2.4 mm. Towa (Keokuk); 
' \_dichrous Lee] , bicolor G. &= H. 

Head and pronotum blackish, the elytra somewhat, but not very noticeably, paler 
piceo-rufous ; in body and antenn«e nearly similar to bicolor, the former obviously 
narrower and relatively more elongate-oval. Length $ 2.9-3.4, 9 4.4 mm.; 
width $ 1.4-1.7, 9 2.1 mm. Nebraska to Utah elongatulus, sp. nov. 

As may be inferred from the detailed measurements given in the 
table, the female is generally very much larger than the male, but in 
extricatus and deficient there is greater equality in this respect, judging 
from the material accessible to me. The discriminative work hitherto 
bestowed upon this comparatively monotonous, and consequently less 
interesting, genus, has been very superficial, and detailed study of the 
male antennae reveals a variety of 
structure too great apparently to be 
the result of fortuitous variation ; 
some of the names proposed by 
LeConte must therefore be restored 
to specific weight ; rufipennis is, in 
fact, quite isolated as a species — more 
so than pellio when compared with 
piceus for example. The diagrams 
given in the accompanying cut will 
serve to show some of the variations in the club of the male antennae, 
and, although some variability in an organ so over-developed is to 
be expected, it will be probably granted that such extreme variations, 



Fig. 3. 




1 2 

i, Antennal club of Attagenus extri- 
catus cV ! 2, same of A. cylindricornis; 3 
same of A. deficient ; 4, same of A, elonga- 
tulus ; 5, antenna of Dearthrus longulus. 



148 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vin. 

especially when accompanied by differences in the form, color and 
sculpture of the body, must, until further evidence, be held to have 
specific weight. 

Novelsis, gen. nov. 

This genus is comparatively local, occurring only in the Sonoran 
provinces, and is distinguishable at once from Attagenus by the 
structure of the antennal club and hypomera and the io-jointed male 
antenna as well as by the complex vestiture. The few species before 
me may be identified as follows : — 

Hypomera nearly horizontal, not concave and with the outer edge rather obtuse and 
not at all descending ; mesosternura very narrow between the coxse. [Novelsis, in 

sp] 2 

Hypomera concave and strongly descending, the outer edge very acute ; mesosternum 

wider between the coxte. [Paranovelsis, sg. nov.] 6 

2 — Elytra without distinct paler pubescent maculation behind the middle 3 

Elytra with transverse paler pubescent spots or bands in apical half 5 

3 — Elytra with the suture, external margin in basal two-fifths, and an oblique line 
connecting the latter with the pale sutural line at basal third or less, pale tes- 
taceous and clothed with coarser fulvo-cinereous hairs, the remainder blackish and 
clothed with shorter blackish pubescence ; head and pronotum blackish, the basal 
margin of the latter testaceous ; last joint of the male antennal club much longer 
than the preceding. Length 3.2 mm. ; width 1.5 mm. Arizona... XlOtfft Jayne 
Elytra piceous to testaceous in color and almost uniform throughout, the pubescence 
dense and less variegated, a condensed oblique spot near basal third generally 

more or less distinct 4 

4 — Subbasal spot of condensed cinereous pubescence posteriorly angulate at inner third 
or fourth of the width ; body stouter ; sides of the prothorax strongly convergent 
and distinctly arcuate. Length 2.7-3.4 mm. ; width 1. 55-1. 75 mm. Arizona. 

byturoides, sp. n. (Cr. MS) 
Subbasal spot straight and oblique, frequently suffused and indistinct; body narrower and 
much smaller in size, the prothorax less narrowed at apex, the sides very broadly 
and feebly arcuate from base to apex ; last joint of the male antenna three times 
as long as wide and distinctly shorter than the two preceding combined. Length 
2.4-2.65 mm. ; width 1.15-1.35 mm. Utah (southwestern) — Mr. Weidt. 

uteana, sp. nov. 

5 — Body narrow and elongate-oval, convex, piceous-black above and beneath, the 
legs testaceous ; pubescence very dense, rather short, subdecumbent, the longer 
semi-erect hairs not conspicuous, uniform, brownish-cinereous on the pronotum 
and pale areas of the elytra, of which there is, on each, a large transverse basal 
spot, an oblique fascia between basal third and fourth, separated from the spot 
by a short transverse darker interval, a narrow and irregularly sinuous transverse 
band near apical third, and a straight transverse fascia very near the apex pro- 
longed to the apical angles along the suture ; male antennal club extremely long, 
the last joint neaily as long as the two preceding combined and as long as the 



Juneigoo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 149 

width of the head. Length 3.25 mm. ; width 1.65 mm. Arizona (Riverside) — 

Mr. Wickham picta, sp. nov. 

6 — Body much broader, oblong-oval, more sparsely pubescent, the sub-erect hairs 
longer, abundant and conspicuous ; elytra piceous, variegated with paler and 
with three transverse fasciae of pale hairs, the second usually divided into two 
spots on each elytron, and the third broadly interrupted at the suture, also with a 
spot of paler pubescence at each side of the scutellum. Length 3.4 mm. ; width 1.8 
mm. Arizona varicolor Jayne 

Perplexa of Jayne, I have not seen, but it is evidently allied to 
byturoides, differing in the relatively shorter last joint of the antennal 
club. Byturoides was considered by Dr. Jayne as the female of horni, 
but this is not the case, as I have both male and female of that species 
as well as the allied uteana, 

Novelsis differs from Lanorus in antennal and hypomeral structure, 
and from Telopes in the structure and armature of the legs in addition. 

Dearthrus Lee. 

This genus is allied to Attagenus but diners in having the meso- 
sternum completely divided by a narrow shallow sulcus, in the 
9-jointed antennae and in the shorter, less inwardly postero-extended 
metacoxal lamina. The single species may be defined as follows from 
the male : — 

Narrowly oblong-oval, moderately convex, piceous-black in color ; prothorax twice 
as wide as long, strongly narrowed from base to apex, with the sides evenly and 
feebly arcuate, the base broadly and feebly lobed, feebly oblique and sinuate 
laterally, the surface rather strongly but not densely punctate, with a fine exca- 
vated median line not attaining base or apex ; elytra three-fourths longer than 
wide, rather strongly but not very closely punctured ; under surface black, the 
legs rufopiceous ; pubescence throughout dark in color, uniform, short and not 
conspicuous; antennae as figured under Attagenus. Length 2.4 mm. ; width 1. 15 
mm. Indiana longulus Lee. 

Apparently rare ; I have before me only a single specimen in rather 
poor state of preservation. 

Perimegatorna Horn. 

In this exclusively western genus, which belongs to an important 
section of the Attagenini differing from those above considered in the 
elongate basal joint of the tarsi, the antennal club is 3-jointed, with 
its two basal joints transverse and the last elongate, though to a less 
degree than in Attagenus. The prosternum is strongly deflexed at 
tip to form a protection to the mouth in repose, as in most of the other 



150 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vin. 

genera of the family, the process between the coxae moderately nar- 
row, the mesosternum narrow and divided throughout by a relatively 
wide parallel sulcus. The hypomera are moderately and indefinitely 
concave, and the metacoxal lamina short. Belfragei, which is assigned 
to the genus by Jayne, undoubtedly forms the type of a distinct genus 
because of the 5-jointed antennal club ; it is therefore not considered 
in the following table, which comprises all the species known to me : — 

Last joint of.the male antennal club short, scarcely one-half longer than the two pre- 
ceding combined 2 

Last joint much longer, nearly twice as long as the two preceding ; body narrower.. .9 

2 — Last joint conical, pointed at apex v 3 

Last joint ovo-conoidal, rounded at apex 8 

3 — Body in great part black or piceous-black in color 4 

Body wholly rufo-ferrugiuous, stout. 7 

4 — Pubescence rather persistent ; zig-zag testaceous bands at basal third and apical 

fourth very narrow and frequently indistinct 5 

Pubescence readily denuded, the rufous bands very wide, the anterior broadly inter- 
rupted at the suture 6 

5 — Vestiture rather fine, largely black, the suberect bristle-like hairs rather incon- 
spicuous ; elytral punctures close-set; body moderately stout. Length 3.5-4.6 
mm.; width 1.65-2. 1 mm. California (San Francisco to Calaveras). 

jaynei, sp. nov. 
Vestiture much coarser, the sub-erect bristles conspicuous, the hairs sparser, largely 
fulvous and whitish, the darker much less numerous ; body less stout and more 
elongate, the elytral punctures sparse. Length 4.0 mm.; width 1. 9 mm. Guad- 
alupe Island guadalupensis. sp. nov. 

6 — Black areas of the elytra clothed with nearly uniform short blackish pubescence, 
the rufous bands with sparse uniform fulvous hairs ; body broad, feebly convex, 
oblong, the elytral punctures rather fine and sparse. Length $ 3.9, O 6.0 mm.; 

width $ 1.7, O 2.8 mm. California ampla sp. nov. 

7 — Oblong-oval, convex, the vestiture short but abundant, much variegated, in great 
part fulvous and white, the suberect black bristles distinct, the white hairs gen- 
erally forming a distinct cluster at basal and inner third and three detached spots 
at apical fourth in the zig-zag paler band. Length 4.7 mm.; width 2.2 mm. 

California variegata Horn 

8 — Body rather narrowly oblong-oval, moderately convex, black, the elytra rufous 
along the lateral edges and rufo-piceous in two narrow obscurely evident 
bands at the usual positions, the vestiture persistent, nearly as in jaynei, but with 
the whitish hairs more abundantly interspersed. Length 3.4 mm.; width 1.5 

mm. Nevada (Reno) nevadica, sp. nov. 

9 — Body black, the elytra with the usual two rufous bands clothed with paler, denser 
and more persistent pubescence, the latter elsewhere readily denuded, the an- 
terior pale areas more impressed than usual ; punctures of the elytra fine but 
deep, perforate as usual and somewhat sparse ; prothorax about twice as wide as 
long in the male. Length 3.6mm.; width 1.5 mm. Utah (southwestern) — Mr. 
Weidt , impressa, sp. nov. 



June koc.] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 151 

Body black, more depressed, the elytra more strongly and closely punctured, without 
distinct rufous areas, almost evenly clothed with subdecumbent fulvous pubes- 
cence, with very narrow and scarcely noticeable zig-zag bands of more cinereous 
hairs in the usual positions ; prothorax of the male more transverse, more than 
twice as wide as long ; under surface black, the legs and antennae piceous -black. 
Length 3.65 mm.; width 1.5 mm. Wyoming (Laramie). ..monticola, sp. nov. 

Cylindrica of Kirby (Saskatchewan), and angularis Mann., 
(Alaska), are not known to me at present, the former is said to be 
distinguished by its uniform elytral vestiture and was assigned by Kirby 
to Attagenus ; it was considered to be the same as piceus by Gem- 
minger and Harold, but is probably different, as it is said by the 
author to rese.nble a Cryptopkagus. The Attagenus angularis of Man- 
nerheim, seems by the description to be uniformly pubescent, except 
toward the hind angles of the prothorax, where the hairs become 
whitish and condensed ; it cannot be the same zsjaynei, of the above 
list, which latter was considered to be cylindrica, var. C, by Horn. 
The falsa of Horn, is evidently a rare and local species, entirely un- 
known to me, having the male antennal club slightly longer than the 
funicle, with its first joint " extremely short " — language which will 
not apply to any other species known to me — and the last joint more 
than twice as long as the two preceding together and pointed at tip ; 
it occurs at and near Sta. Barbara, California. 

The pronotum throughout the genus is coarsely and very closely 
punctured, and there are generally two small and very shallow sub- 
basal fovea at outer fourth, in which the punctures become still more 
crowded and coalescent. The species are difficult to identify, as there 
is a strong mutual resemblance throughout. Ampla, however, is a 
very striking species, differing enormously in the relative size of the 
sexes ; the females are the largest by far of the entire genus. Generally 
the divergence of the sexes in this respect is not quite so noticeable as 
in Attagenus, although the paucity of material before me will not 
allow of definite statement in this regard. 

Trogoderma Latr. 

In this genus the body is oblong-oval, less elongate than in Perime- 
gatoma but almost similarly clothed with variegated pubescence. The 
species described by Dr. Jayne under the name Trogoderma simplex, 
seems to have a somewhat unusual construction of the side pieces of 
the prosternum, and it should therefore form the type of a distinct 
genus ; it is unknown to me. 



152 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

The antennae are of a different type of structure from that pre- 
vailing elsewhere in the tribe, the club being 6- to 8-jointed and 
generally loose and serriform in the males, and 4-jointed and regular 
in the females. The presternum is not so strongly deflexed at apex 
as in Perimegatoma, and the process between the coxa? is wider, the 
mesosternum between the coxae very much wider, transverse and 
divided throughout by a broad deep sulcus. 

Dr. Jayne was mistaken in his diagnosis of the species of the 
sternalis group in two important particulars. The mesosternum is as 
completely and widely divided by the median sulcus as in the others, 
but the metasternal process is rather more arcuate, and the broad flat 
marginal bead usually extends along the apex throughout the width ; 
this misled the author in determining the true anterior limit of the 
metasternum. The author also failed to observe the true structure of 
the male antennae, the very minute third joint giving rise to the ap- 
pearance of a 10-jointed condition, which is alluded to as a general 
fusion of the tenth and eleventh joints in the male (Proc. Am. Phil. 
Soc, XX, p. 363). 

The species are quite numerous and those before me may be thus 
briefly characterized : — 

Eyes entire, the inner frontal margin not sinuate; antennae serrate in the male 2 

Eyes sinuato-emarginate at about the middle of their inner frontal edge ; male antennas 
compact, not serrate, the third and fourth joints subequal and transverse ; prono- 
tum minutely, sparsely punctate, becoming strongly and more densely so toward 

the sides 14 

2 — Male antenna? with the third and fourth joints equal in size 3 

Male antennae having the third joint minute and very much smaller than the fourth.. 10 

3 — Body more elongate in form, the elytra nearly one-half longer than wide 4 

Body stout and broadly oblong-oval, the elytra one-fourth longer than wide or even 

less 9 

4 — Submedian testaceous band of the elytra crossing the suture at the middle of the 

length; species small and inhabiting the Eastern and Gulf States 5 

Submedian testaceous band crossing well behind the middle of the length ; species 

much larger and inhabiting the Pacific States 8 

5 — Pronotum strongly and rather closely punctate, especially toward the sides ; pubes- 
cence persistent 6 

Pronotum very minutely and sparsely punctate throughout, the pubescence readily de- 
nuded 7 

6 — Elytra black, with the usual pattern of fine irregular rufescent bands clothed with 
paler hairs ; vestiture of the pronotum much variegated. Length 3.0 mm. ; width 

I.65 mm. Iowa (Keokuk) ; \piisilla Lee] ornata Say 

Elytra and pronotum almost similarly colored, and with the variegated pubescence 



junei 9 oo.] Casey: Ox North American Coleoptera. 153 

nearly similar but finer, the subapical irregular band emitting a fine spur anteri- 
orly at inner two-fifths ; body narrower ; club of the male antennae beginning with 
the fourth joint. Length 2.9 mm.; width 1.45 mm. Texas.. serriger, sp. nov. 

7 — Body nearly similar in ornamentation and color to the preceding, the basal lobe 
of the pronotum not so distinctly marked with white pubescence ; serrate antennal 
club of the male beginning with the sixth joint. Length 1.6-2.7 mm.; width 
0.8-1.3 mm. Massachusetts, New York (Long Island) and Virginia ( Norfolk ) . 

tarsalis Mels. 

8 — Body large, elongate-oval, black, the elytra with irregular anastomosing bands of 
testaceous nearly as in the preceding, the pale vestiture of the rufous areas rather 
long and fulvous, that of the black areas short, dark and inconspicuous ; pron- 
otal punctures fine and sparse, those of the elytra coarser but sparse ; legs fer- 
ruginous throughout. Length 4.0 mm.; width 2.0 mm. California. 

pollens, sp. nov. 

9 — Epipleurae of the elytra flat ; body stout, black, the elytra variegated with paler 
areas which are clothed with paler pubescence, nearly as in the preceding species ; 
pronotum in the female not quite twice as wide as long, rather strongly but 
sparsely and evenly punctured throughout, the sides moderately convergent. 
Length 2.7 mm.; width 1.6 mm. Texas complex, sp. nov. 

Epipleune deeply concave ; body in coloration and sculpture nearly as in complex, 
the pale areas of the elytra larger and more suffused and the variegated vestiture 
shorter ; pronotum in the female much more transverse, more than twice as wide 
as long, the sides very strongly converging from base to apex ; If gs pale, the 
femora black. Length 3.2 mm. ; width 1.78 mm. California ( Shasta Co. ) 

variipes, sp. nov. 

IO — Pronotum minutely punctate, the punctures simple and perforate. Pacific 
Coast u 

Pronotum strongly and closely punctate, the punctures simple and perforate. Atlantic 
and Sonoran 12 

Pronotum strongly but sparsely punctate, the punctures rugose. Sonoran 13 

II — -Body black, the elytra with broken transverse pa'er bands clothed with the 
usual paler pubescence, the sutural portions of the submedian band far in advance 
of, and detached from, the lateral portion ; prothorax of the male with the 
median lobe of the base rather broadly rounded, the sides evenly convergent and 
broadly, almost evenly arcuate from base to apex. Length 2.4 mm.; width 1.2 
mm. California sternalis Jayne 

Body as in the preceding, the submedian band of the elytra finer, almost continuous, 
the sutural crossing but little more advanced than the lateral part ; basal lobe of 
the prothorax smaller, more narrowly rounded and more abruptly formed, the 
sides strongly rounded basally, becoming thence much more strongly convergent 
and almost straight to the apex in the male, the base somewhat wider than the 
base of the elytra ; size very small. Length 1.8 mm.; width I. o mm. Cali- 
fornia (Los Angeles.) simutans, sp. nov. 

12 — Body black, with variegated white and fulvous bands nearly as in sternalis, the 
sutural part of the submedian band far in advance of the lateral angulation and de- 
tached from it; prothorax at base equal in width to the elytra, very strongly trans- 
verse, in the male distinctly more than twice as wide as long, the sides very 



154 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

strongly convergent toward apex, more rounded toward base. Length 2.65 
mm.; width 1.4 mm. Virginia [Fort Monroe] virginica, sp. nov. 

Body black and with variegated pubescence nearly as in the preceding species, the sub- 
median band of the elytra almost continuous, transverse, the sutural part not 
much in advance of the lateral, forming a broad even arc in more than inner half 
of each elytron ; prothorax of the male much less transverse, scarcely twice as 
wide as long, the sides less convergent and more even in curvature ; size much 
smaller. Length 2.2 mm.; width 1. 18 mm. Texas [El Paso]. 

oblongula, sp. nov. 

13 — Body black, with variegated white and fulvous elytral bands nearly as in virginica, 
except a distinct sutural rhombus included within the subapical band, which is 
wanting in that species, the submedian band much broken ; prothorax at base not 
quite as wide as the elytra in the female, the punctures deep, well separated and 
strongly annulo-rugose, much less than twice as wide as long ; elytral punctures 
rather strong but twice as sparse as in vi'ginica, the pubescence very much sparser 
than in that species or oblongula. Length 2.5 mm.; width 1.3 mm. Arizona. 

aspericollis, sp. nov. 

14 — Form very short and broad, oblong, the elytra in both sexes scarcely a fourth 
longer than wide 15 

Form narrower and more elongate in both sexes, the pattern of elytral ornamentation 
obsolete or partially so 16 

15 — Elytra black, with narrow anastomosing paler bands nearly as in omata, which 
are clothed sparsely with whitish hairs, the subapical transverse band enclosing 
a transverse rhombus on the suture ; elytral punctures sparse and rather fine ; pro- 
thorax of the female twice as wide as long, the sides evenly and moderately 
arcuate. Length 2.9 mm.; width 1.7 mm. Pennsylvania; \_pallipes Zieg.]. 

inclusa Lee. 

Elytra as in the preceding, with the pale anastomosing markings broader and clothed 
in great part with fulvous pubescence, the punctures somewhat stronger and 
slightly less sparse, the subapical band not forming a distinct sutural rhombus ; 
hairs of the pronotum sparse, suberect and black, becoming paler laterally to- 
ward base ; prothorax of the male more than twice as wide as long. Length 2.3 
mm.; width 1.35 mm. California (San Francisco) brevis, sp. nov. 

16 — Elytra parallel and feebly arcuate at the sides, rounded and narrowed only at 
the apex, black, with a narrow testaceous bisinuate band clothed with paler pu- 
bescence near the base, aDd a few small spots of pale pubescence posteriorly, 
notably one on each at the suture at the middle, and at the side slightly behind 
the middle of the length, and one at the middle of the width at apical fourth. 
Length 2.4 mm.; width 1.28 mm. Indiana? — Cab. Levette. 

obsolescens, sp. nov. 

Elytra narrowed slightly from the rather pronounced humeral swelling to the rounded 
apex ; body pale testaceous throughout, the head and pronotum slightly piceous ; 
pubescence sparse and not at all varied, pale in color ; surface of the elytra 
rugose, sparsely punctate. Length 1.9 mm.; width 0.9 mm. Arizona. 

advena, sp. nov. 
Unlike nearly all the other genera of Dermestidse, the present seems 




junei 9 oo.] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 155 

to be very rare in individuals, and.it is seldom that more than a single 
one it taken at any one time ; most of the species, which appear how- 
ever to be abundantly distinct among themselves, are therefore repre- 
sented at present by unique types. Peri- 
megatoma resembles it in this respect to ^ t^ 10 ' 4 ' 
some extent. The pale coloration of advena 
may be due to immaturity, at least partially. 
In the adjoining diagram the antenna of 
advena, which is representative of that en- 
tire section of the genus, is drawn in a con- l "" 2 """ a i 

. , ii. ii * Antenna of Trogoderma tar- 

tracted state, but the insect has the power mlis $< , same r serriger> 3 
to separate the joints slightly, when they are same of r. obionguia, 4 same of 
seen to be deeply concave at their apices ; r ' advem - 
they are mutually attached by short stipes or pedicels as in the others, 
but differ in being virtually symmetrical and not eccentric. These 
antennal differences, although marked, are not indicative of subgen- 
eric groups, as the general structure of the under surface, and partic- 
ularly of the hypomera, is indentical throughout. 

Cryptorhopalum Guer. 

The body in this genus, which is the most extensive of the Ameri- 
can Dermestidas, becomes more oval and compact than in any other 
of the present tribe, but in anatomical structure it is evidently homol- 
ogous with Trogoderma. The species are small to quite minute in 
size, of sober color and generally uniformly clothed with short dark 
pubescence, which, in some forms, becomes slightly variegated as in 
most of the other genera. The species before me are the following : — 

Pubescence of the elytra variegated 2 

Pubescence uniform throughout 9 

2 — Elytra with irregular or interrupted transverse bands of dense paler pubescence... 3 
Elytra without transversely fasciate pubescence, but with a spot of dense pale and 

coarser hairs near the apex of each ; last ventral of the female unmodified 8 

3— Last ventral segment of the female with two small, widely separated and rounded 

discal erosions ; elytra not paler posteriorly 4 

Last ventral of female with two small, rounded, fiat and entirely unexcavated scar- 
like spots ; elytra paler in apical third 7 

4 — Pubescence of the pronotum dusky, sparse and inconspicuous but becoming pale 

and conspicuous toward the sides and on the basal lobe 5 

Pubescence of the pronotum uniform or nearly so, coarse, denser, pale and conspicu- 
ous throughout 6 



156 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

5 — Pale pubescent bands of the elytra at basal and apical third entire, the anterior 
irregular, the posterior narrowly interrupted at the middle ; body narrowly oval, 
more or less palepiceo-testaceousin color, finely punctate, the pronotum minutely 
and sparselj ; tarsi very slender, the posterior as long as the tibiae in the female 
and distinctly longer in the male ; autennal club of the latter stout, not twice as 
long as wide, the second joint slightly shorter than the first. Length 1. 9-2. 25 
mm.; width 1.1-1.3 mm. California (Sta. Barbara) filitarse, sp. nov. 

Pale pubescent bands subentire but composed of short, sparse hairs and mutually 
separated by a distance equal to that of the anterior band from the base ; body 
castaneous, sparsely punctured ; legs testaceous, the femora picescent ; posterior 
tarsi slightly shorter than the tibia? ; antennal club of the female rather small, 
stout, one-half longer than wide, with the second joint distinctly longer than 
the first — a reversal of the general rule. Length 2.15 mm.; width 1.3 mm. 
New Mexico (Fort Wingate — Dr. Shufeldt) reversum, sp. nov. 

Pale pubescent bands broken up into small sparse spots, a spot also behind the humeri 
and another near the apical angle of each elytron ; body much larger, elongate- 
oval, darker in color, castaneous, the punctures a little coarser and rather more 
close-set than in filitarse ; hind tarsi nearly similar. Length 2.5-2.65 mm.; 
width 1. 4-1. 55 mm. Arizona (Canon of the Colorado River) — Dr. T. Mitchell 
Prudden pruddeni, sp. nov. 

6 — Elytra feebly narrowed posteriorly from the humeral callus, the pale pubescent 
bands cinereous and almost entire, separated mutually by a distance which is equal 
to that of the anterior band from the basal margin ; apical spot of pale pubes- 
cence concolorous or nearly so, the spots and bands rather poorly defined, and 
with the pubescence largely cinereous toward base throughout the width, joining 
the first band at the suture ; hind tarsi quite distinctly shorter than the tibiae in 
the female. Length 2.65 mm.; width 1.6 mm. Arizona balteatum Lee. 

Elytra rapidly narrowed behind from the humeral callus, the apex more narrowly 
rounded, body smaller, convex, and relatively stouter, cas'aneous in color, the 
bands of coarser pale yellowish-cinereous pubescence narrower, subentire and 
better defined, the two mutually much more distant than the first from the 
base, the apical spot fulvous in color ; basal regions with a large proportion of 
pa'e hairs ; hind tarsi very slightly in the male, distinctly in the female, shorter 
than the tibiae ; male antennal club stout, not twice as long as wide, the second 
joint a little shorter than the first, the cavities extending to basal third. Length 
1.9-2.25 mm.; width 1. 2-1. 4 mm. Texas (Brownsville) — Mr. Wickham. 

festivum, sp. nov. 

7 — Body oval, blackish, the elytra rufous in apical third or more, with subhumeral an- 
nulus and two transverse bands of short, rather sparse pale hairs ; pronotum with 
pale hairs toward the sides and basal lobe ; joints of male antennal club sub- 
equal, the second but slightly shorter than the first, nearly similar, but a little 
smaller, in the female ; tarsi slender and elongate. Length 1.8-2.5 mm. ; width 
1.2-1.5 mm - Missouri, Kansas and Texas hemorrhoidale Lee. 

8 — Rather broadly suboblong-oval, black, the elytra gradually and suffusedly rufescent 
toward tip, the pubescence short, dark, sparse and inconspicuous, becoming pale 
and distinct, though sparse, toward the sides and basal lobe of the pronotum and 
toward the sides, and more densely, near the apices, of the elytra ; pronotal lobe 



Juneigoo.] CaSEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 157 

rather broadly, rectilinearly truncate ; legs testaceous, the femora blackish, except 
toward tip, the hind tarsi shorter than the tibiae ; male antennal club extending 
three-fifths of the thoracic length, with the second joint three-fifths as long as the 
first, in the female smaller, with the second joint slightly shorter than the first 
Length 2.0-2.8 mm.; width 1. 23-1. 8 mm. Oregon, California (Humboldt to 

San Diego) and Nevada (Reno) apicale Mann. 

9 — Body broadly oval, the thoracic lobe broadly truncate ; joints of the antennal club 

very unequal 10 

Body more or less narrowly oval, the thoracic lobe much narrower II 

10 — -Body deep black throughout, the elytral punctures sparse and coarse, the pubes- 
cence sparse, fine, blackish in color, uniformly distributed and very inconspicu- 
ous ; antennal club of the male slender, two and one-half times as long as wide, 
extending to basal third, its second joint relatively very short, much less than 
half as long as the first, the litter twice as long as wide, of the female much 
smaller, extending to the middle, the second joint much shorter than the first. 
Length 2.1-2.8 mm.; width 1.4-1.8 mm. Arizona... dorcatomoides, sp. now 
Body piceous-brown in color, the elytra coarsely and less sparsely punctured, the 
pubescence uniform, more abundant, short, coarse, fulvo-cinereous in color and 
distinct ; male club not extending quite to basal third, the second joint more than 
half as long as the first, the latter not twice as long as wide. Length 2.5-2.7 

mm.; width 1. 6-1. 7 mm. Texas (Austin) Obesultim, sp. nov. 

II — Thoracic punctures sparse, at least toward the middle 12 

Thoracic punctures rather close-set throughout 16 

12 — Elytra coarsely, though rather sparsely, punctate. Sonoran and Pacific re- 
gions 13 

Elytra very finely and rather less sparsely punctate. Atlantic regions.. 15 

13 — Pubescence of the elytra longer, coarse, yellowish-cinereous and distinct; body 
very small, somewhat narrowly oblong-oval, black or piceous-black ; male an 
tennal club extending beyond basal third, elongate-oval in form, relatively large, 
more than twice as long as wide, the second joint three -fifths as long as the first, 
the latter much longer than all the preceding portion together, the funicle very 
short, not as long as the two globular basal joints combined. Length 1.65 mm.; 

width 1.0 mm. Arizona , granum, sp. nov. 

Pubescence short, fine, dark in color and less conspicuous 14 

14 — Body deep black in color, the elytral pubescence blackish and not at all fulvous ; 
joints of the antennal club in the female less unequal, the second four-fifths as 
long as the first. Length 2.3 mm.; width 1.3 mm. Arizona...anthrax, sp. nov. 
Body piceous-black, polished, sparsely punctured and unusually sparsely pubescent, 
the hairs fulvo piceous in color and more distinct ; joints of the antennal club in 
the female very unequal, the second about two-thirds as long as the first, the latter 
longer than the entire funicle; legs ferruginous. Length 2.0-2.6 mm. ; width 

1. 25-1. 6 mm. California (Lake and Sonoma Cos.) affine, sp. nov. 

15 — Narrowly oblong-oval, black or piceous-black, shining, the pubescence very short, 
dark in color and inconspicuous ; antennal club pale as usual, large and evenly 
oval, in the male not twice as long as wide, the second joint very much shorter 
and narrower than the first. Length 1. 73 mm.; width I. o mm. Georgia. 

ruficorne Lee- 



158 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Voi.vm. 

j6 — Pubescence coarse, pale, ashy-cinereous and distinct, rather sparse but denser 
toward the sides of the prothorax ; elytra coarsely, rather sparsely punctured ; 
male antennal club more than twice as long as wide, the joints very unequal, the 
second scarcely more than one-half as long as the first but only a little narrower, 
the first as long as the entire preceding parts, the funicle fully as long as the two 
basal joints combined ; club of the female much smaller but with the joints un- 
equal. Length 1.65-2.2 mm.; width 0.9-1.28 mm. Arizona (Benson). 

fusculum Lee. 

Pubescence darkfulvo- or piceo-cinereous and less distinct 17 

17 — Pronotal punctures moderately close-set but very fine, not dense and very incon- 
spicuous. Sonoran regions 18 

Pronotal punctures small but strong, dense and very distinct. California coast re- 
gions 19 

18 — Pubescence fulvo-cinereous, coarser and distinct, moderately dense ; body oval, 
black or piceous-black, less elongate ; sides of the male pronotum strongly con- 
vergent and almost evenly arcuate throughout ; antennal club rather dark brown- 
ish-ferruginous in color, narrowly oval and two and one-half times as long as 
wide in the male, with the second joint three-fourths as long as the first ; hind 
tarsi distinctly shorter than the tibia;. Length I.9-2.25 mm.; width I.1-I.3 
mm. Texas (Brownsville) modestum, sp. nov. 

Pubescence finer, piceous and much less distinct ; body black, narrower, more paral- 
lel ; sides of the pronotum in the male strongly convergent anteriorly, subangu- 
larly rounded behind the middle and thence parallel and straight to the base, the 
edges more widely subexplanate ; antennal club black or blackish, nearly similar 
in form in the male but with the joints less unequal, the second four -fifths as long 
as the first. Length 1.7-1.8 mm.; width 1. 05-1. 15 mm. Texas and Utah 
(southwestern) fusciclave, sp. nov. 

Pubescence blackish, nearly as in the preceding but much denser ; body black, stouter, 
the elytra coarsely and unusually closely punctured ; legs ferruginous, the femora 
piceous ; antennal club pale rufo-testaceous the joints only slightly unequal in 
the female ; hind tarsi about as long as the tibite in the latter sex. Length 2.0 
mm.; width 1.25 mm. Arizona pumiluil), sp. nov. 

19 — Body narrowly oblong-oval, black, the elytra more closely punctured, the pubes- 
cence blackish, fine, rather dense but short and very inconspicuous ; antennal 
club black or blackish, extending to basal fourth or fifth in the male, elongate- 
oval, with the second joint nearly four-fifths as long as the first ; legs piceous, 
the hind tarsi slightly shorter than the tibial, notably so in the female. Length 
2.4 mm.; width 1.3 mm. California ( Humboldt to Sta. Barbara); [nigricorne 
Lee] triste Lee. 

There are a few other apparent species indicated by inadequate or 
poorly preserved material, and the genus is evidently a large one. In 
striking contrast to Trogoderma, individuals are abundant when dis- 
covered, and most of the species are represented by good series. The 
species fusculum of LeConte, which is entirely valid, is said by Dr. 
Jayne to inhabit the Atlantic regions ; it is however Sonoran, and was 



junei 9 oo.] Casey : On North American Coleoptera. 159 

not correctly identified, and triste is not an Atlantic, but a Pacific 
species. One female of apicale in my cabinet has the two joints of 
the antennal club equal in length ; as it is not in very good condition, 
I cannot state whether it differs specifically. The remarks made by 
Dr. Jayne in regard to the female of balteatum are erroneous, as the 
antennal cavity is normal inform. The same author gives "Cali- 
fornia" as the locality of ruficorne, whereas it is confined in reality to 
the southern Atlantic States. Picicome, described by LeConte from 
the southern Atlantic regions, is unknown to me, but is probably a 
valid species. 

Anthrenini. 

The distinguishing characters of this tribe are the compact body, 
very retractile legs and the deep and acutely defined fossag for the 
antennal club. The tarsi are short and rather slender, the basal joint 
of the posterior distinctly shorter than the second, the next three 
subequal or progressively decreasing slightly in length. The mouth 
parts are completely protected in repose by the deflexed presternum. 
The antennae vary in the number of joints, but these divergencies do 
not indicate more than subgenera, as the structure otherwise is quite 
homogeneous. There is but one genus : — 

Anthrenus Geoff. 
The eyes may be sinuato-emarginate within or entire as in Trogo- 
derma, and are finely faceted as usual. The prosternal process is 
rather narrow, impinging upon the transverse, deeply sulcate meso- 
sternum, also as in that genus. The species are moderately numerous, 
and number among them some of the most destructive enemies of 
dried insects preserved in cabinets ; those before me may be easily 
identified as follows : — 

Eyes emarginate; antennae n-jointed, the club broadly oboviform and composed of 
three closely connate joints of which the two basal are strongly transverse and 
much shorter than the last; body clothed with broad scales. [Anthrenus 
in sp.] 2 

Eyes entire ♦ 6 

2— Pronotum having a large well-defined lateral spot of pale scales, not inclosing a 
darker spot 3 

Pronotum with a large pale lateral spot, as above, but inclosing a small darker spot 
at nearly its central point. Pacific Coast 4 

Pronotum clothed throughout with a mixture of white and brown scales. Sonoran 
regions 5 



1 60 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

^ — Elytra having the suture clothed throughout with whitish or rufescent scales, the 
vitta dilated laterally near base and apex and at the middle, also with a trans- 
verse area of pale scales just behind the middle and seldom attaining the sutural 
area, a subbasal and subapical marginal pale area and a basal ring at each side 
of the scutellum. Length 2.7-3.6 mm.; width I.75-2.25 mm. New Jersey and 

Europe scrophularite Linn. 

Elytra similar but with a large uniform area of white scales extending from fourth to 
three-fifths from the base, and from the margin to inner third or fourth. Length 

2.3-3.4 mm.; width 1.5-2.25 mm. Texas thoracicus Melsh. 

4 — Elytra clothed with black scales, with clearly limited areas clothed with whitish 
scales nearly as in scrophularia, but with the sutural vitta generally interrupted 
at apical third and the transverse marginal spot behind the middle rarely extend- 
ing beyond the median line, the oblique marginal fascia at basal third or fourth 
sometimes enlarged internally and forming with the basal sutural white regions a 
large irregular white spot covering a third of the entire area ; pale scales of the 
elytra always white. Length 2.3-3.0 mm.; width 1. 5-2.0 mm. California 

(Sta. Cruz and Lake Cos.) Occidents, sp. nov. 

Var. A — Similar to occidens but more narrowly oblong-oval, the scales of the 
subbasal sutural area yellow and not white ; enclosed black spot within the 
lateral pale area of the pronotum very near the inner edge of the latter. 

Length 2.8 mm.; width 1. 85 mm. Nevado (Reno) nevadicus, v. nov. 

Var. B — Similar to occidens, except that the large subbasal area on the suture 
is clothed with dark fulvo-ferruginous scales, and the enclosed thoracic 
spots are composed of fulvous, and not black, scales, the formation nearly 
as in lepidus and its varieties. Length 2.5 mm.; width 1.7 mm. Cali- 
fornia pictus, v. nov. 

Elytra variegated nearly as in the preceding but with a sprinkling of brown scales ; 
enclosed dark spot within the lateral white areas of the pronotum never black as 
in occidens but clothed with fulvous-brown scales ; body smaller and less dilated. 
Length 2.25-2.5 mm.; width 1. 6-1. 7 mm. California (San Diego) 

lepidus Lee. 
Var. A — Body similar in form to the preceding, the pronotum less transverse, 
densely clothed throughout above with ochreo-fulvous scales, replac- 
ing the black scales of occidens; black scales wholly wanting at any part. 

Length 2.7 mm.; width 1.75mm. California obtectus, v. nov. 

Var. B — Similar to lepidus but with the scales of the paler areas more suffused 
and dispersed, the body more broadly oval, the prothorax larger, with the 
sides less convergent; antennae longer, the club broader. Length 2.4-2.7 

width 1. 6-1. 8 mm. California (Lake Co.) suffusus, v. nov. 

Var. C — Similar to lepidus but smaller and still narrower, the scales of the 
elytra black and fulvous, confusedly intermingled, with some feeble whitish 
sutural and external areas remindful of lepidus. Length 2.15 mm.; width 

1.4 mm. California ,( San Diego) — Mr. Dunn conspersus, v. nov. 

5 — Broadly and evenly elliptical, convex, blackish-piceous, the legs paler ; antennas 
moderate, ferruginous throughout ; upper surface clothed with relatively very 
large white and brown scales, confusedly mottled on the pronotum and elytra, 
but with the white scales forming two tolerably distinct suboblique fasciae on the 



Juneigoo.] CASEY : On NORTH AMERICAN COLEOPTERA. 161 

latter behind the middle ; on the under surface white throughout. Length I.8-, 
1.95 mm. ; width 1.15-I.25 mm. Texas (El Paso) parvus, sp. nov. 

6 — antennae Il-jointed, the club subparallel, consisting of three connate joints, the 
two basal slightly transverse; scales elongate. [Nathrenus, sg. nov.] 7 

Antennae 8-jointed, the club consisting of two closely connected joints. [Florilinus]..8 

Antennae 5-jointed, the club consisting of a single very elongate claviform joint. 
[Helocerus] 10 

7- — Oblong-oval, moderately convex, black, clothed with yellow, black and white 
scales, largely black on the median parts of the pronotum, the basal lobe always 
with whitish scales, the elytra with a transverse zig-zag pattern of pale scales, 
largely white bordered with yellow in two fasciae. Length 1.8-2.8 mm. ; width 
1. 25-1. 75 mm. Europe and Eastern United States ; \yarius Fabr.] 

verbasci Linn. 

Var A — Similar but more narrowly oblong-oval , the yellow scales still narrower, 
more elongate and more dispersed over the entire surface, the pattern of verbasci 
scarcely traceable and the scales more isolated among themselves. Length 

2.2 mm. ; width 1.3 mm. Virginia (Norfolk) pistor, v. nov. 

Var B — Nearly similar to verbasci but larger and more broadly oblong, the 
yellow scales entirely covering the pronotum, the elytral pattern nearly 
similar but with the yellow scales more dispersed, the white patches similar 
in position but larger. Length 2.8-3.0 mm. ; width 1.8-2. 15 mm. In- 
diana vorax, v. nov. 

Var C — Almost similar to vorax but very much smaller, the yellow scales 
densely clothing the entire surface, except where replaced by the equally 
dense white scales in patches similar in position to those of verbasci ; form 
more broadly rounded than in the European nebulosus ; scales broader than 
in verbasci. Length 1. 7-2. 2 mm. ; width I.I 5-1. 6 mm. Iowa (Keokuk). 

destructor Melsh. 
Var D — Similar to verbasci but larger and more broadly oblong-oval, the zigzag 
pattern of the elytra equally well marked but with the post-median fascia more 
sharply anteriorly angulate near the suture, the surface when denuded show- 
ing feebly impressed longitudinal lines. Length 3.0 mm. ; width 2.2 mm. 

Central America substriatus, v. nov. 

8 — Basal joint of the antennal club subquadrate, the second nearly twice as long as 
wide ; body piceous, rather sparsely clothed with scales which are less decum- 
bent, elongate and with oval cross-section and concave apices, the pale scales less 
numerous than the darker ones and irregularly disposed, the dark scales ap- 
parently flatter and more decumbent ; elytral punctures fine but rather deep, 
moderately sparse. Length 2.9 mm. ; width 1.75 mm. Europe. 

museorum Linn. 

Basal joint much smaller, transversely obtrapezoidal, the second relatively shorter and 

but little longer than wide apparently in both sexes ; scales less elongate, flatter, 

more decumbent and triangular, the punctures very shallow. America 9 

9 — Antennal funicle moderately stout, the third joint about one-half as thick as the 
second ; pale scales of the elytra strewn without order toward base but forming 
two somewhat evident transverse fasciae behind the middle, the scales all broadly 
triangular and coarsely strigose ; body castaneous in color, evenly and not very 



]62 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

broadly oval in form and strongly convex, much smaller than museorum. 
Length 2.2 mm.; width 1.3 mm. Pennsylvania and Indiana..castaneae Mclsh. 
Var A — Similar in color, form and size to castanece but with the scales more 
narrowly triangular, less coarsely strigose, the paler sparsely dispersed but 
forming a tolerably evident ring on each at base, very sparse behind the 
middle, though arranged in two more evident transverse areas nearly as in 
castanetz but more widely separated. Length 2.25 mm.; width 1. 35 mm. 

North Carolina (Asheville) Carolina:, v. nov. 

Var B — Similar in color to the preceding, the elytra a little paler ; form much 
more narrowly oblong-oval, the surface more rugulose and alutaceous ; pale 
scales as in Carolina: but much more abundant than in either of the preced- 
ing, scattered without order in basal half but with a large lateral condensation 
at basal third or fourth, the two transverse fasciae behind the middle more 

evident. Length 1.9 mm.; width 1.2mm. Texas angustulus, v. nov. 

Antenna? funicle very slender, the third and fourth joints scarcely a third as wide as the 
second ; pale scales of the elytra very few in number and sparsely interspersed 
among the darker ones, more noticeably abundant at basal third or fourth, just 
behind the middle and near the apex ; body shorter and more broadly rounded 
than in the preceding, castaneous in color, the tibiae and tarsi testaceous ; surface 
shining between the very minute sparse punctules. Length 2.0 mm.; width 1.4 

mm. New York rotutldulllS, sp. nov. 

10 — Body oval and convex, nearly as in Costarica in color, form and vestiture, the 
pale s.ales of the elytra forming on each a transverse fascia at basal fourth, curv- 
ing forward internally to the scu ellum, and forming two less evident transverse 
fasciae behind the middle. Length 1.9-2.5 mm.; width 1. 2-1.4 mm. Europe; 
\_clavigerY.x.~\ fuSCUS Latr. 

A form which I have not seen was described by LeConte, from 
New York, under the name flavipes ; this was supposed by Jayne to be 
the same as the European albidus of Brulle, and may have been 
founded upon an introduced individual of that species, which in my 
opinion is distinct from scrophularice, although inscribed as a variety 
in the catalogues ; signatus and proteus appear to be identical and to 
form a variety of albidus, but senex may be another distinct species. 
The two European species museorum and fuscus are introduced above 
into the table, although I have never seen any examples taken in this 
country. Those mentioned by Jayne may have been adventitious im- 
portations. From the illustrations given of the antennae, however, it 
is probable that Dr. Jayne did not have the true museorum before him 
at all, but mistook the much smaller castanece for it ; museorum might 
therefore be stricken from the American lists. Verbasci and its varie- 
ties constitute the chief destructive element of entomological collec- 
tions in temperate climates, but I have never known of any such habits 
in scrophularioz or allied species. 



Juneigoo.] CaSEY : On NORTH AMERICAN CoLEOPTERA. 163 

Trinodini. 
This tribe includes at present but two very anomalous minute 
species, differing radically in sternal structure but perfectly homo- 
logous otherwise, and inhabiting the pafearctic and nearctic regions 
respectively. They represent two distinct genera as follows : — 

Anterior cox e narrowly separated, the process feebly carinate, free and received at 
tip within a deep anterior excavation in the broad mesosternum ; tarsi shorter, 
the first joint of the posterior but little longer than the second. Europe 

*Trinodes 

Anterior coxa; more widely separated, the intercotal process flat, non-carinate and ex- 
tending beneath the anterior margin of the still broader mesosternum, which is 
free, arcuate and feebly deflexed ; prosternum more deflexed at apex, the tarsi 
longer with the basal joint more elongate. Eastern America Apsectus 

In both these genera the hypomera are flat, becoming broadly, 
feebly impressed posteriorly, the antennae long, with very slender 
shaft, received in repose within a narrow groove beneath the eyes, ex- 
tending posteriorly for a short distance along the suture separating 
the prosternum from its hypomera, the club 3-jointed, with the two 
basal joints small, the third large and oblong-oval. The legs are slender 
and free, the posterior retractile, the hind coxal plate very short, but 
little longer internally and extending only to the wide parapleurse, 
which are in a single piece. 

Apsectus^ Lee. 
The single species seems to be rare, though rather widely dis- 
tributed; its general characters are as follows : — 

Oval, convex, piceous-black, polished, sparsely clothed with long erect and bristling 
fulvo-piceous hairs, each of which completely fills at base a very minute punc- 
tule, which, consequently, only become distinctly visible on the removal of the 
bristles ; prothorax transverse, closely fitted to the elytra and lobed as usual at 
base, the lateral edges entirely devoid of acute margin anteriorly but with an 
acute and narrowly reflexed margin in basa) two-thirds, the surface with a fine 
deep groove in outer third, closely paralleling the basal margin ; scutellum 
large, flat, equilatero-triangular ; elytra wider than the prothorax and more than 
three times as long, evenly and conjointly rounded behind ; under surface 
sparsely and very minutely punctulate, the pubescence shorter ; legs and antenna? 
testaceous throughout, the large terminal joint of the latter blackish. Length 
1.5 mm.; width 0.9 mm. Texas (Austin) hispidUS Melsh. 

The ocellus is unusually small and feeble in Apsectus but is much 
more distinct in Trinodes. I have seen specimens, either of hispidus 
or a species closely allied, collected by Mr. Schwarz in Arizona, but 
probably in the higher regions. 



164 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

Orphilini. 
This tribe is quite as anomalous as the Trinodini, and differs from 
any other in having the metacoxal plate well developed, almost equal 
in length throughout the width and extending to the sides of the 
body. The head rests in repose upon the vertical pointed plate form- 
ing the prosternum between the coxae, and the body is glabrous. 
The legs and head are strongly retractile, the mesosternum transverse 
and even between the coxae and the epipleurae well defined. We 
have a single genus which is also palaearctic in range : — 

Orphilus Er. 

The body is compact, oblong-oval in form, moderately convex, the 
elytra impressed along the suture except at base and with rather 
prominent humeral callus, the prothorax at base as wide as the elytra, 
to which it is closely fitted, the base broadly lobed in the middle. 
The scutellum is well developed and ogival in form. The tarsi are 
slender,, glabrous, much shorter than the tibiae and the two basal 
joints of the posterior are subequal and each rather shorter than the 
third or fourth, which also are subequal, the fifth about as long as the 
first three together. The antennae are n -jointed, with a broadly oval 
compact club composed of three transverse free joints, and the eyes 
are emarginated by the short post-antennal sides of the front. The 
species are rather closely allied among themselves, and those repre- 
sented in my cabinet may be distinguished as follows : — 

Integuments deep black, without metallic lustre 2 

Integuments black, with bright steel-blue reflection 4 

2 — Elytra finely and sparsely punctured throughout, the punctures toward base separ- 
ated by at least twice their own diameters ; pronotum finely and sparsely punc- 
tured throughout; integument highly polished. Length 3.2 mm.; width 1.8 
mm. Arizona (Canon of the Colorado River) — Dr. Prudden..aequalis, sp. nov. 

Elytra coarsely punctate toward base, where the punctures are separated by their own 
diameters or less 3 

3 — Punctures of the elytra toward base smaller, always clearly separated, those of the 
pronotum fine but rather close-set. Length 2.8-3.5 mm.; width 1. 6-2.1 mm. 
California to Colorado SubflitidllS Lee. 

Punctures of the basal regions coarser and usually densely crowded so as to become 
more or less distorted in form ; pronotal punctures larger and stronger but rela- 
tively scarcely so close-set; body distinctly smaller in size. Length 2.3-2.8 
mm.; width 1. 28-1. 7 mm. Lake Superior to Georgia ater Erichs. 

4 — Nearly similar in form to ater, the elytral punctures not so coarse or deep toward 
base and widely isolated among themselves, the pronotal punctures very fine and 
not close-set. Length 2.8-2.9 mm.; width 1.7 mm. Idaho (Coaur d'Alene). 

chalybeus, sp. nov. 



juneigoo] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 165 

Individuals of the various species appear to be abundant, and the 
genus, both in number of species and relative abundance, is much 
better represented in America than in Europe. Niger of Rossi, 
(= glabratus Fabr. ), is the only European species, and its occurrence 
in this country has not been confirmed. 

CIOID,E. 

Maphoca, gen. nov. 

The genus based upon the following characters may be placed fbr 
the present near Plesiocis. The body is narrow, parallel and moder- 
ately convex. Head well developed, wider than long, only moder- 
ately inclined, the eyes slightly behind the middle, remote from the 
base, moderate or rather small, entire, convex, relatively rather coarsely 
faceted, the facets individually strongly convex ; front broadly and 
evenly arcuate from eye to eye, with a small transversely oval inclosed 
clypeus defined by a very feeble suture, the labrum small, rounded. 
Antennae inserted under the sides of the front immediately before the 
eyes, short, 9-jointed, with a moderately developed loose parallel 
2 -jointed club, the two basal joints enlarged ; three to six forming a 
slender shaft ; third as long as the next two combined ; four to six 
small, moniliform, the seventh transverse and wider. Maxillary palpi 
well developed, the last joint large, oval, slightly longer than wide, 
narrowly truncate at tip, the labial very minute ; buccal opening 
small, the mentum very minute, longer than wide. Antennal grooves 
before the eyes rather distinct, the buccal processes almost obsolete ; 
mandibles short and stout, bifid at tip. Prothorax widest toward 
apex, the disk even throughout and slightly convex ; presternum long 
before the coxae, broadly truncate, the intercoxal process narrow. 
Elytra completely enclosing the abdomen, striato-punctate. Scutel- 
lum small, transversely oval or broadly angulate behind. Abdomen 
with five perfectly mobile segments, the sutures straight throughout, 
the first segment unmodified, as long as the next two combined ; two 
to four decreasing scarcely visibly in length, the fifth scarcely longer 
than the fourth and rounded. Anterior- coxae small, very deep- set, 
transverse, the cavities narrowly open behind and angulate externally ; 
intermediate and posterior narrowly separated, the latter extending 
nearly to the sides of the body, the met-episterna extremely narrow. 
Mesosternum even, transversely convex, the metasternum large. Legs 



166 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

rather short, slender, the femora but slightly dilated, the tarsi much 
shorter than the tibiae, 4-jointed, the three basal joints small, the first 
with a brush of long hairs beneath, the fourth long and notably stout, 
the claws well developed, divaricate, slender, simple and arcuate. 
Epipleurae extending almost to the sutural angles but narrow throughout, 
scarcely at all dilated but horizontal toward base, indexed behind the 
middle. 

The extremely minute species having the assemblage of characters 
given above is one of those aberrent forms continually occurring 
among the serricorn Clavicornia. It may be described as follows : — 

Body narrow and parallel, testaceous, the elytra blackish and the under surface 
piceous, the legs and antennae pale ; surface rather shining ; head nearly three- 
fourths as wide as the prothorax, the antenna: as long as the width of the head ; 
prothorax about a fourth wider than long, the sides rather prominently rounded 
at apical fourth, thence feebly convergent and straight or broadly, feebly sinuate 
nearly to the basal angles, which are somewhat obtuse ; apex broadly arcuate, 
equal in width to the base, which is even and subtruncate ; disk feebly convex, 
declivous at the sides, very minutely and feebly margined at base, minutely and 
rather sparsely punctate, each puncture with an extremely minute hair ; elytra 
nearly twice as long as wide, scarcely visibly wider than the prothorax, rather 
obtusely rounded at tip, the sides parallel and almost straight, the humeral angles 
right and well defined ; disk with even feebly impressed series of small punctures, 
the intervals each with a series of extremely minute punctures, each of which bears 
a very short, stiff erect hair. Length 1.05 mm.; width 0.35 mm. California 
(Mokelumne Hill, Calveras Co.) — Dr. F. E. Blaisdell blaisdelli, sp. nov. 

No notes concerning the habits of this species have come to me, 
but probably they do not differ from those of other members of the 
family. 

MELANDRYID^E. 

Tetratominj. 

The definition of this tribe must be enlarged to include all those 

Melandryids, with simple claws, which have the outer three or four 

antennal joints abruptly dilated to form a strongly developed loose and 

parallel club. The genera may be defined as follows : — 

Last four joints of the antenna; dilated ; eyes well developed, emarginate anteriorly ; 
pronotal foveae distinct 2 

Last three joints abruptly and strongly dilated, forming a loose club ; eyes emarginate 
or sinuate anteriorly, generally less developed ; abdominal sutures moderately 
fine; edges of the prothorax subeven 4 

2 — Pronotal margins not reflexed at the sides ; basal segment of the abdomen about as 
long as the next two combined ; joints of the antennal club pedunculate, the 
seventh not much dilated Tetratoma 



juneigoo.] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 167 

Pronotal margins rather broadly concave and reflexed, the edge unevenly undulato- 
crenulate 3 

3 — Basal segment of the abdomen as long as the next two combined, the sutures very 
coarse Abstrulia 

Basal segment but little longer than the second, one to five decreasing gradually in 
length, the sutures rather fine Incolia 

4 — Eyes rather well-developed ; pronotum broadly reflexo-explanate at the sides, 
transversely truncate and scarcely perceptibly bisinuate at base, the foveae ob- 
solete ; abdominal segments decreasing uniformly and slowly in length, the first 
scarcely visibly longer than the second EupisetlUS 

Eyes smaller, very short and strongly transverse ; prothorax not at all explanate at the 
sides, the base broadly, arcuately lobed at the middle, the foveas distinct though 
not very well developed ; first abdominal segment as long as the next two com- 
bined ; body much shorter and more convex Pisenus 

The last two of these genera were mutually confounded by LeConte 
and Horn, and both considered identical with the European tritomid 
genus Triphyllus. Pisenus resembles the latter considerably in form, 
and the noting of the 4-jointed hind tarsi, antennse and pronotal foveas 
no doubt led the distinguished authors astray; an inspection of the an- 
terior and intermediate tarsi, which are 5 -jointed, would have enabled 
them to avoid the error. 

Tetratoma Fabr. 

This holarctic genus contains several species in the European fauna, 
and the two following American species seem to be perfectly con- 
generic, as far as can be judged by the descriptions : — 

Elongate -oval, strongly convex, rufo-testaceous, the head and antennae black, the 
elytra steel-blue ; body above polished, glabrous, except that each puncture en- 
closes an infinitesimal hair ; antennre well developed, nearly two-fifths as long as 
the body, the club as long as the entire preceding portion, the joints quadrate or 
oblong, the last a little longer and pointed and all pedunculate at base ; prothorax 
transverse, as wide at base as the base of the elytra, narrowed moderately from 
base to apex, the latter scarcely at all sinuate, with the angles broadly rounded, 
the base very broadly and feebly lobed at the middle and finely margined through- 
out like the sides, the latter broadly and very feebly irregular or subundulate ; 
basal angles obtuse but not in the least blunt or rounded ; punctures rather coarse 
and sparse, the basal fovea; distinct, deep and punctiform ; scutellum moderately 
transverse, cordiform, finely punctured ; elytra three -fifths longer than wide, a 
little more than three times as long as the prothorax, rather wider behind the 
middle than at base, thence rapidly, arcuately narrowed to the subogival apex ; 
humeral callus obtusely prominent ; punctures coarsely impressed and sparse ; 
under surface more finely but rather sparsely punctate and sensibly pubescent ; 
basal joint of the hind tarsi about as long as the last. Length 4.7-5.8 mm.; 
width 2.1-2.65 mm - Northern Atlantic regions truncorum Lee. 



168 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. viii. 

Elongate-oval, convex, finely and sparsely pubescent, shining, piceous with a red- 
dish tinge ; legs and base of the antennae yellowish-brown ; head more finely 
punctured ; prothorax and elytra equally punctured, the former transverse, 
narrower in front, rounded at the sides which are narrowly margined, the base 
margined like the sides and with a large puncture half way between the middle 
and the basal angle, the latter obtuse and rounded. Length 4.0 mm. Colorado 
(VetaPass)... concolor Lee. 

The latter of these species I have not seen, but, from the originally 
published characters reproduced above, it would seem to be provision- 
ally attachable to the true Tetratoma ; the principal differences appear 
to reside in the pubescence and in the rounded basal angles of the 
prothorax. 

Abstrulia, gen. nov. 

The species of this genus differ greatly from truncorum in general 
habitus and in the structure of the sides and base of the prothorax. 
The irregularly crenulate sides of the latter are prominent just before 
the middle and at basal third or fourth, and the disk is concave along 
the basal margin, with the foveas larger, deep and more impressed or 
less punctiform, the scutellum smaller and more nearly subquadrate, 
and the elytra are dark in color with a complex maculation of pale 
spots, the punctures coarse, impressed and sparse. The surface is 
sparsely but distinctly pubescent, and the basal joint of the hind tarsi 
is, as a rule, obviously shorter than the last. The species are mutu- 
ally closely allied, and the three before me may be thus defined from 
the male : — 

Basal joint of the hind tarsi very much shorter than the last 2 

Basal joint scarcely visibly shorter than the last 3 

2 — Oblong-oval, convex, polished, pale piceous-brown in color, the legs and antennae 
concolorous, the elytra blackish with pale flavous and sharply defined intricate 
markings, the pale areas together somewhat exceeding the dark, and having as 
a prominent feature a subsutural obverted C-shaped mark on each extending 
near the suture to apical two-fifths ; antennae scarcely as long as the head and 
prothorax, the dlub distinctly shorter than the stem, cylindric, rather compact, 
the joints wider than long, the last a little, longer than wide and conically 
pointed, the seventh joint transverse and forming a gradual passage to the club, 
third as long as the next two combined ; prothorax short, nearly twice as wide as 
long, the base and apex equal in width, the latter transverse, narrowly and 
feebly sinuate at each side, the middle broadly arcuate and as advanced as the 
very broadly rounded angles, the base broadly, feebly lobed at the middle, the 
angles very obtuse but not rounded ; punctures coarse and rather sparse, but 
not as coarse or sparse as those of the elytra,_ the pubescence distinct ; elytra three 
and a half times as long as the prothorax and equal in width, two-thirds longer 
than wide, parabolic behind, parallel at the sides ; basal angles obtuse, the cal- 



juneipoo.] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. 169 

lus feeble; under surface finely and more closely punctured. Length 3.5 mm.; 
width 1.7 mm. New York tessellata Mehh. 

Oblong-oval, more convex, polished, black, the antennae pieeous toward base, the legs 
dark testaceous, the elytral pale markings rufo-testaceous and together riot occu- 
pying as much area as the black ground, the subsutural pale spot not extend- 
ing behind the middle and not forming an obverted C-shaped macula ; antennae 
nearly as in tessellata but black and stouter, the third joint very much shorter 
than the next two combined ; prothorax much more convex, distinctly less than 
twice as wide as long, the sides broadly arcuate, converging anteriorly, the prom- 
inence before the middle almost obsolete ; apex much narrower than the base and 
broadly sinuate ; punctures moderately coarse and sparse ; elytra nearly similar 
in form and sculpture, as wide as the prothorax but only three times as long ; 
under surface finely, sparsely punctate. Length 3.0 mm.; width 1.45 mm. 
Pennsylvania variegata, sp. nov. 

3 — Body throughout nearly as in tessellata but black, the antennae concolorous, the 
periphery of the pronotum rather paler, the legs piceo-testaceous, the elytral pale 
maculation nearly similar but less extended, much less in area than the black 
ground, the subsutural C-shaped marks before the middle much shorter and not 
extending distinctly behind the middle ; antennae nearly similar in structure but 
stouter, and with the third joint very much shorter than the next two combined ; 
prothorax and elytra nearly similar in form, the former a little narrower at apex, 
with the apical angles somewhat more advanced and much less broadly rounded, 
the pubescence longer and more conspicuous ; lateral prominence before the 
middle equally conspicuous and much more so than in variegata. Length 2.9 
mm.; width 1.4 mm. Indiana. — -Cab. Levette maculata, sp. nov. 

In tessellata the male has a large and very abruptly limited deep 
oval excavation, slightly wider than long, occupying almost median 
third of the fifth ventral, and extending from the apex almost to the 
base, the bottom of the excavation polished, impunctate and glabrous, 
with a very few piliferous punctures posteriorly; in maculata it is 
equally deep and abrupt but smaller, occupying about median fourth 
and is more distinctly pubescent posteriorly; in variegata it is as large 
as in tessellata or larger, but very much more shallow. 

Incolia, gen. nov. 

In this genus the body is much more elongate and less convex than 
in either of the preceding, and differs greatly in abdominal structure 
and somewhat in its finer sculpture ; in the form and structure of the 
antenna? and prothorax it is nearly similar to Abstrulia. The single 
species may be described as follows from the unique type, which ap- 
pears to be a female : — 

Body elongate, parallel, feebly convex, polished, blackish, the antennae toward base, 
legs, limb of the pronotum and an indefinite oblique elytral streak, extending for 



170 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

a short distance from the elytral humeri, dark testaceous ; pubescence short, in- 
clined, very sparse and rather inconspicuous ; head rather small, not half as 
wide as the prothorax, the antenna; rather stout, nearly as long as the head 
and prothorax, the third joint as long as the next two combined, the seventh 
wider than the sixth, transverse, forming a broader support for the club, which 
is fully as long as the stem, cylindrical, the joints transverse and rather closely 
connected, the-last oval and pointed ; joints of the club much more than twice 
as thick as three to six ; prothorax short, about twice as wide as long, the sides 
broadly arcuate and coarsely, feebly and irregularly crenulate throughout, more 
convergent anteriorly, the apex slightly narrower than the base and transversely, 
rectilinearly truncate ; base feebly and arcuately lobed in rather more than me- 
dian half, the fovea? very large and impressed ; side margins broadly reflexo-ex- 
planate, less widely so anteriorly, the basal angles very obtuse but not rounded, 
the apical obtusely rounded and not at all advanced ; disk not concave along 
the base, but finely impressed within the basal bead, finely, sparsely punctate, 
the punctures gradually becoming closer and coarser toward the sides ; scutellum 
slightly transverse, broadly angulate behind, minutely punctate ; elytra much 
elongated, about twice as long as wide and four times as long as the prothorax, 
just visibly wider at three-fifths than at base and thence rapidly narrowed to the 
strongly rounded apex ; humeral callus decidedly pronounced and elongate, 
gradually disappearing at some distance from the base ; punctures impressed, 
rather sparse, moderately coarse, gradually becoming very fine posteriorly ; sterna 
strongly, rather closely but not very coarsely, punctured, the abdomen' minutely 
and rather densely so, especially toward the sides ; tarsi slender, the first joint 
of the posterior as long as the last two combined. Length 3.8 mm.; width 1.6 
mm. Indiana? longipennis, sp. nov. 

The locality is reasonably certain, but the type bore no label in the 
cabinet of the late Dr. Levette. I considered this to be the ooncolor 
of LeConte, for some time, but the description will not serve, espe- 
cially regarding the " narrowly margined " sides of the prothorax of 
concolor. 

Eupisenus, gen. nov. 
This is the only genus of the tribe Tetratomini which has been 
discovered thus far on the Pacific coast, the others all being inhabi- 
tants of the Atlantic districts. The body is elongate, parallel and 
moderately convex, with the prothorax relatively narrower than in the 
preceding genera, and the elytral humeri somewhat exposed at base. 
The following description of the only known species will bring out 
other characters which may prove to be generic : — 

Parallel, polished, sparsely clothed with short fine and subdecumbent pubescence, 
black, the legs, antenna;, trophi and elytra pale luteous, the latter indefinitely 
shaded with piceous at the middle of the flanks and on the suture toward tip ; 
antenna; rather stout, as long as the head and prothorax, the third joint about as 



juneigoo] Casey: On North American Coleoptera. Ill 

long as the next two together, eighth globular and perfectly similar to the seventh, 
the club very strong, parallel, the joints rather closely connected and strongly 
transverse, the last pointed and but little longer than wide ; prothorax three- 
fourths wider than long, not more than two-thirds wider than the head, widest 
near basal third, the sides broadly arcuate, gradually converging anteriorly and 
almost even, the apex sensibly narrower than the base and broadly arcuate ; basal 
angles slightly more than right and not at all rounded ; surface rather coarsely 
and closely punctate ; elytra parallel, obtusely and broadly rounded behind, four- 
fifths longer than wide, three and a half times as long as the prothorax and nearly 
a fourth wider, the punctures moderately fine but deeply impressed, somewhat 
close-set and nearly similar in size to those of the pronotum ; humeri obtusely 
rectangular, the callus distinct ; scutellum moderate, transverse ; under surface 
polished, finely, rather sparsely punctured ; legs slender, the four basal joints of 
the anterior and middle tarsi short, subequal and together but little longer than 
the last ; basal joint of the posterior much shorter than the last. Length 4. 5 
mm.; width 1.65 mm. Alaska and southward elongatus Lee. 

The head has a deep frontal impression at the middle of the line 
between the antennae apparently in both sexes. 

Pisenus, gen. nov. 
The species of this genus may be readily distinguished from the 
preceding by the shorter, more oval form, greater convexity and much 
smaller size, as well as by the characters of the table ; the prothorax, 
also, is as wide at base as the base of the elytra, so that the humeri 
are not exposed at base, and the sides of both form a virtually continu- 
ous arc. The antennae are nearly similar in structure. The two spe- 
cies are the following : — 

Body more elongate-oval, shining, clothed sparsely with rather short fine subdecum- 
bent pubescence, black, the legs and antennae dark testaceous, the basal regions 
of the elytra, especially at the humeri, suffusedly rufous ; head about as wide as 
the rectilinearly truncate apex of the prothorax, the antennas stout, fully as long 
as the head and prothorax, the eighth joint similar to the seventh and the club 
similar to that of Eupisenus elongatus but narrower ; prothorax three-fourths or 
more wider than long, the sides almost perfectly even and broadly arcuate from 
the distinct basal angles to the apex, the latter much narrower than the base ; 
surface rather finely but strongly, moderately closely punctate ; scutellum trans- 
verse, broadly angulate behind ; elytra suboval, rather ogivally pointed behind, 
scarcely at all wider than the prothorax and three times as long, two-thirds longer 
than wide, the punctures only moderately coarse, impressed, larger than those of 
the pronotum and somewhat sparse ; under surface finely, rather sparsely punc- 
tate ; legs moderately slender, rather short, the tarsi short, with the four basal 
joints of the anterior and intermediate equal among themselves and together 
about as long as the fifth, the last joint of the posterior very nearly as long as the 
first three combined. Length 2.8-3.1 mm.; width 1. 3- 1. 4 mm. Pennsylvania, 
Indiana and northern Illinois ; [Tribhyllus ruficornis Lee] humeralis Kirby 



172 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. vm. 

Body nearly similar to the preceding but shorter and more broadly oval, strongly con- 
vex, shining, rufo-testaceous throughout, the pubescence long, coarse, rather 
abundant and conspicuous, ashy in color ; head smaller, notably narrower than 
the apex of the prothorax, the antenna? similar to those of humeralis but still 
stouter, and with the third joint very much shorter than the next two combined ; 
prothorax similar but only a little more than one-half wider than long and with 
the punctures coarse, deep and densely crowded ; elytra sensibly wider than the 
prothorax and two and a half times as long, the sides slightly arcuate toward 
base, the apex gradually, rather narrowly rounded, one-half longer than wide, 
the punctures rather smaller than those of the pronotum and somewhat sparse, 
moderately coarse toward base, especially externally, gradually fine posteriorly ; 
under surface finely, very densely punctate ; legs rather stouter, the tarsi short 
but slender, the last joint of the posterior as long as the first three combined. 
Length 2.75 mm. ; width 1.4 mm. Virginia pubescens, sp. nov. 

In no individual of the Tetratomini that I have seen, is there the 
faintest trace of serial arrangement of the always conspicuous elytral 
punctures at any part of the surface ; the placing of Tetratoma near 
Triplax, by Redtenbacher, is an unaccountable error for this, as well as 
a multitude of other reasons, besides the radically different formation 
of the tarsi and palpi.