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March, 1913.] DAVIS : DRAGONFLIES OF NEW YORK ClTY. 11 

fliers and often range very widely from their breeding places. Es- 
pecially is this true of the females, which may often be found far 
away coursing through the woods, along the roads, or over fields in 
search of food. The male will often patrol a selected reach of stream 
or area of a pond, viciously attacking any other male of his own 
or another species which happens to wander into his chosen territory. 

Libellula pulchella and Plathemys trimaculata are much given 
to perching on sticks, cat-tails and in other exposed situations in the 
bright sunlight. Gomphines are most frequently seen when at rest, 
perched upon stones or upon the dry banks of streams or ponds. 
Some strong flying species, such as Anax Junius and the iEshnas 
are seldom seen at rest in the daytime, and often continue their search 
for prey during the twilight hour, though a crepuscular habit is not 
common to the group. 

Boyeria vinosa is usually found in shaded situations along streams, 
and the Somatochloras frequently wander far into the forests. The 
small Libellulines, Perithemis domitia and Nannothemis bella seldom 
are found very far from the lily-pads and the open water at the edge 
of pools and lakes. On the other hand the species of Sympetrum, 
a related genus, range far afield. 

The small, thin-bodied demoiselles usually do not wander far and 
generally fly low among the grasses and weeds, or hover close over 
or rest upon the lily-pads and floating vegetation of the marshes. 
The species of Agrion (Calopteryx) are fond of shady places along 
the creeks and springs. 

Notes on the habits and occurrence of our local species are given 
by Mr. Wm. T. Davis in the paper which follows this. 



DRAGONFLIES OF THE VICINITY OF NEW YORK 
CITY WITH A DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SPECIES. 

By Wm. T. Davis, 
New Brighton, Staten Island. 

In this Journal for March, 1895, Dr. Philip P. Calvert published a 
list of "The Odonata of New York State," and in the June, 1897, 
number, appeared his " Additions to the Odonata of New York State." 



12 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. xxi. 

Also in this Journal for September, 1898, appeared a " Preliminary 
List of the Dragonflies of Staten Island, with notes and Dates of 
Capture," by the present author. The information contained in these 
publications, together with the last edition of the New Jersey list, and 
much unrecorded material gathered in recent years has formed the 
basis of the present list, which numbers one hundred and seventeen 
species. The author has personally taken all but seven of the species 
at localities here recorded. He has been presented with four of the 
others by their captors ; has examined two in collections, leaving but 
one species to be added from the literature alone. Only four records 
have been taken from Dr. Calvert's New York lists, as most of his 
material came from localities further up the state. Following these 
and other copied records, the collector's name is given in parenthesis. 

The New Jersey list enumerates one hundred and nine species and 
the present list will add nine, including a new species, to the number 
known to occur in that state, all but three belonging to the Agrionidae.' 
Several species are also added to the New York list. Ischnura 
kellicotti has, according to the New Jersey list, been found in Ocean 
and Atlantic counties, but it will certainly be collected nearer to New 
York City than at present recorded. 

To Prof. Raymond C. Osburn I am indebted for the suggestion 
that I prepare the present list to include the species taken at localities 
within about fifty miles of New York City, and also for much help in 
connection with the new species. Mr. Lewis B. Woodruff has kindly 
given me a list of his captures, many of which were made in West- 
chester Co., N. Y. ; Mr. George P. Engelhardt, of the Children's 
Museum of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, has let me go 
over his material, and Mr. Frank E. Watson has added to my col- 
lestion from time to time such species as attracted his attention while 
in quest of butterflies. This information, together with one or two 
other records from friends, is in each case followed by the name of 
the contributor. When no name is given the records have been 
taken from material in the author's collection. 

In the matter of classification the recent " Catalogue of the 
Odonata of North America," by Richard A. Muttkowski, has been 
followed. 



March, 1913.] Davis: Dragonflies of New York City. 13 

Family AGRIONID^. 

Genus A6RI0N Fabricius. 
A. maculatum Beauvois. 

Common along brooks in June, July and August, and generally 
distributed. This dragonfly will fly from a twig or low plant by the 
brook side, catch a tiny insect and return to the same station again. 
They often come back to the same resting place many times in suc- 
cession where they remain until some small insect attracts their atten- 
tion and they sally forth to catch it. In this respect they resemble 
the insect-catching phcebe bird and its relatives. Though usually a 
slow flyer this species often indulges, when two males happen to meet,; 
in a very rapid aerial dance and at such times their bright colors 
show to the best avantage. They will advance against each other, 
dodge or recede, with remarkable rapidity and grace, but neither of 
the combatants ever appears to be injured. It seems to be more 
of an endurance test. 

A. sequabile Say. 

Bronx Park, N. Y. City, VI, 3; Newfoundland, N. J., V, 6, and 
Great Notch, N. J., V, 30 (Davis) ; Long Island, VIII, 12 (Engel- 
hardt). This is an addition to the New Jersey list. 

A. dimidiatum apicale Burmeister. 

Jamesburg, N. J., VII; Lakehurst, N. J., VI, VII. At the last 
mentioned locality it is often quite common flying up and down the 
larger ditches in the cranberry bogs. 

Genus HETiERINA Hagen. 
H. americana Fabricius. 

Collected at Paterson, N. J., in September by John A. Grossbeck. 
It has also been taken in Morris Co., N. J., by Dr. Calvert (N. J. 
list). When found at all, it is usually present in considerable numbers 
and flies up and down ditches and along the banks of slow flowing 
rivers. 

Genus LESTES Leach. 
L. eurinus Say. 

It has been taken on two occasions, June 18 and July 4 about a 
small tree shaded pond on Staten Island. Riverdale, N. Y., VII 
(Woodruff). 



14 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. xxi. 

L. congener Hagen. 

Bronxville, N. Y., VII, VIII (Woodruff) ; Flushing, N. Y., VIII: 
Staten Island, IX, X, XI; Lakehurst, N. J., X. This and the other 
species of Lestes are to be found about ponds and ditches. 

L. unguiculatus Hagen. 

Newfoundland, N. J., VII; Bronxville N. Y., VI, VII (Wood- 
ruff); Yaphank, N. Y., IX; Wading River, N. Y., Long Pond, 
VIII; Staten Island, VI, VII. Females have been observed oviposit- 
ing in the stems of grasses growing on the edge of a small pond on 
Staten Island, July 15. 

L. uncatus Kirby. 

Newfoundland, N. J., VII, 4 (Davis); Bronxville, N. Y., VII 
(Woodruff). This is an addition to the New Jersey list. 

L. vigilax Hagen. 

Yaphank, N. Y., VII; Wading River, N. Y., VIII; Wyandanch, 
N. Y., VII ; Lakehurst, N. J., VI, VIII, IX. 

L. rectangularis Say. 

Commonly distributed in the vicinity of N. Y. City from VI-IX. 
L. forcipatus Rambur. 

Bronxville, N. Y., VI, VII, VIII; Yaphank, IX; Wading River, 
N. Y., Deep Pond, VIII; Staten Island, IV-VIII. 

L. disjunctus Selys. 

Wading River, N. Y., Long Pond, VIII. It has also been taken 
at Calverton, Long Island, N. Y., in Sept. which, however, is some- 
what beyond our limits. 

L. inaequalis Walsh. 

Morris Co., N. J. (C. W. Johnson, N. J. list) ; Staten Island, 
VI, VII. 

Genus ARGIA Rambur. 
A. moesta putrida Hagen. 

Chatham, N. J., VIII (Dr. Calvert, N. J. list) ; Greenwood Lake, 
N. J., VI, 30 (Watson) ; Little Falls, N. J., VII. 

A. translata Hagen. 

Hank's Pond near Newfoundland, N. J., IX. Hooatcong, N. J., 
VII (S. N. Rhoads, N. J. list). 



March, 1913.] Davis : Dragonflies of New York City. 15 

A. tibialis Ramtrar. 

Singac, N. J., VI, 15. In the low meadows bordering the Passaic 
River. 

A. apicalis Say. 
Staten Island. 

A. bipunctulata Hagen. 

Newfoundland, N. J., VI, 4; Lakehurst, N. J., VI, VII. 

A. violacea Hagen. 

Bronxville, N. Y., VII (Woodruff); Newfoundland, N. J., VII; 
Staten Island, VII, VIII; Yaphank, N. Y., VII, IX; Smithtown, 
N. Y, VIII ; Wyandanch, N. Y, VII, Flushing, N. Y, VIII ; Lake- 
hurst, N. J., V, 30, VII. To be found about most ponds and the com- 
monest species of the genus. 

Genus ENALLAGMA Charpentier. 
£. durum Hagen. 

In the New Jersey list it is reported from Toms River and other 
localities in the southern part of the state. 

E. cyathigerum Charpentier (annexum Hagen). 

West Point, N. Y., VI, 4; Ramsey, N. J., V, 20. This is an addi- 
tion to the New Jersey list. 

E. geminatum Kellicott. 

Lake Hopatcong, N. J., IX (Dr. Calvert, N. J. list) ; Jamesburg, 
N. J., VII (P. Laurent, N. J. list) ; Staten Island, VIII, 8, 1909, 
many in Clove Valley; Yaphank, N. Y., VII, IX; Wyandanch, N. Y., 
VII; Flushing, N. Y, VIII. 

Enallagma recurvatum new species. 

Male. — Head black, beneath pale, the following blue; band on front be- 
tween eyes and postocular spots. Prothorax black above, pale beneath ; thorax 
pinkish or yellowish, a middorsal, a humeral stripe and a spot on the first and 
second sutures just under the wing bases, black; in alcohol metallic greenish 
black. Abdominal segments pale beneath, blue above and black as follows : a 
basal spot on dorsum and a minute apical spot each side on 1, a short apical 
spot connected with a narrow apical ring on 2, apical third of 3, apical half of 
4, apical two thirds of 5, apical three quarters of 6, all of 7 except basal ring, 
a narrow black linear spot each side on 8, dorsum of 10. Legs pale; femora 
above and tibia anteriorly, black ; tarsi pale, black at sutures arid tips of claws. 
Superior abdominal appendages black, tipped with pale, inferiors pale, tipped 



1(5 



Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. xxi. 



with black. In shape like those of hageni Walsh, but with the superiors 
shorter and the extremities more upturned, as shown in the accompanying 
figures. 





£ HAGENI 



£ /?£CU/?VATUM 



Female. — Head and prothorax colored as in the male, abdomen pale be- 
neath with dorsum black with indications of basal rings, the black on the 
eighth segment becoming more or less of an apical spot. No constant differ- 
ences have been discovered between the females of this species and hagtni. 
Abdomen, male, 22 mm.; female, 21 mm. Hind wing, male, 15 mm.; female, 
16 mm. 

The type male is from Wyandanch, Long Island, N. Y., July 1, 
1910, and the female from Lakehurst, N. J., June, 1898, when a pair 
were taken in copulation. Nine male paratypes and one female are 
from Wyandanch, and three males from Lakehurst collected in May 
and June. 

The species is most nearly related to Enallagma hageni, being col- 
ored about as in that insect, but may be readily told from it by the 
shorter superior appendages of the male. Some of the male para- 
types are without the linear spot on each side of segment eight. 
The species has been named recurvatum on account of the character 
of the male superior appendages. Mr. E. B. Williamson, Dr. Philip 
P. Calvert and Prof. Albert P. Morse have each examined a single 
male of this Enallagma from Wyandanch, and Prof. Raymond C. 
Osburn has seen the entire series. To them, and to Mr. John A. 
Grossbeck, who made the outline sketches of the male abdominal 
appendages, I am under obligations. 

E. piscinarium Williamson. 

Lakehurst, N. J., V, 29, 1910 (Woodruff). This is an addition to 
the New Jersey list. 

£. divagans Selys. 

Long Island (N. Banks, N. Y. list) ; Lakehurst, N. J., V, 30. 



March, 1913.] Davis: Dragonflies of New York City. 17 

E. exsulans Hagen. 

Pine Island, N. Y., VI; Bronxville, N. Y., VII (Woodruff) ; West 
Farms, N. Y. City (J. Angus). 

E. ebrium Hagen. 

Newfoundland, N. J., VII ; Lake Hopatcong, N. J., VII. This is 
an addition to the New Jersey list. 

E. carunculatum Morse. 

Stony Point, N. Y, VI; Bronxville, N. Y, VI, VIII (Woodruff) ; 
Yaphank, N. Y, VII, IX; Newfoundland, N. J, VII. 

E. doubledayi Selys. 

Wading River, N. Y., Deep Pond, VIII. 

E. civile Hagen. 

A common species about ponds, etc., from June to September, and 
generally distributed. Some of the localities are Yaphank, Fire 
Island, Flushing, Bronxville and Staten Island, New York, and New- 
foundland, Seabright and Lakehurst in New Jersey. 

E. aspersum Hagen. 

Dobb's Ferry, N. Y., VII (G. D. W. Williamson, N. Y. list); 
Yaphank, N. Y., VII, Staten Island, VI, VII, VIII. In the Canadian 
Entomologist, Vol. XXVI, p. 77, Mr. Banks records E. triviatum 
from Long Island, which he informs me by letter was a wrong 
identification. 

E. pictum Morse. 

Wyandanch, N. Y., VII; Lakehurst, N. J., IX. Found about 
ponds and ditches. 

E. signatum Hagen. 

Yaphank, N. Y, IX; Flushing, N. Y, VIII; Cold Spring Harbor, 
N. Y., VII (H. G. Barber) ; Staten Island, VI, VIII. 

E. pollutum Hagen. 

Yaphank, N. Y., IX; Lake Hopatcong, N. J., IX (Dr. Calvert, 
N. J. list). 

Genus NEHALENNIA Selys. 
N. irene Hagen. 

Nyack, N. Y, VI, Bronxville, N. Y., VII (Woodruff) ; Wyan- 
danch, N. Y., VII; Yaphank, N. Y., VII; Forest Park, Brooklyn, 
N. Y, VI; Staten Island, VI; Ft. Lee, N. J., VI (Daecke, N. J. list) ; 
Lakewood, N. J., VI. 



18 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. xxi. 

N. gracilis Morse. 

Yaphank, N. Y., VII ; Lakehurst, N. J., VI. 

Genus AMPHIAGRION Selys. 
A. saucium Burmeister. 

Yaphank, N. Y, VI ; Half Way Hollow Hills, Long Island, N. Y, 
VII; Staten Island, V, VI, VIII; Hewitt, N. J., VI; Newfoundland, 
N. J., VII. Often found in moist meadows. 

Genus CHROMAGRION Needham. 
C. conditum Hagen. 

Hewitt, N. J., VI; Lakehurst, N. J., V. 

Genus ISCHNURA Charpentier. 
I. verticalis Say. 

From May to September and generally distributed, being found 
even in the city parks. 

I. ramburii Selys. 

Fire Island, N. Y., IX; Staten Island, IX, X. 

I. posita Hagen. 

From May to September and generally distributed. 

Genus ANOMALAGRION Selys. 
A. hastatum Say. 

Bronxville, N. Y., VII (Woodruff); Staten Island, VII, VIII, 
IX, X, and XI, 2, 1902. Sandy Hook, N. J., VIII. Found on salt 
meadows as well as about freshwater ponds, etc. 

Family JESCHNIDiE. 

Genus TACHOPTERYX Selys. 
T. thoreyi Hagen. 

West Point, N. Y., VI, 18; Ramapo, N. Y., VI, 7 (Watson). 
This dragonfly is often found resting on the trunks of trees where, 
owing to its gray color, it can hardly be detected. 

Genus CORDULEGASTER Leach. 
C. diastatops Selys. 

Hewitt, N. J., V, VI; Lake Hopatcong, N. J., VI; Lakehurst, 
N. J., V. Sometimes not uncommon in low-lying moist meadows. 



March, 1913.] d AV ts ; Dragonflies of New York City. 19 

C. maculatus Selys. 

Yaphank, N. Y., V (Engelhardt) ; Nyack, N. Y., VI; Ramapo, 
N. Y., V, 31 ; Bronxville, N. Y, VI (Woodruff) ; Staten Island, V, 
VI; Greenwood Lake, N. J., VII; Newfoundland, N. J., VII; Lake- 
hurst, N. J., V, 22 (Engelhardt), Often found flying up and down 
brooks. 

C. erroneus Hagen. 

Bear Swamp, Ramapo Mountains, N. J., VII, 18, 1910, o* (Chas. 
E. Sleight). This is an addition to the New Jersey list. 

C. obliquus Say. 

Pine Island, N. Y., VI; Palisades, N. J., VI (Engelhardt); Van 
Cortlandt Park, N. Y. City, VI (Watson) ; Lake Hopatcong, N. ]., 
VI (Watson). On June 19, 1898, two were captured in Bronx Park, 
N. Y. City, near to where the bear dens have since been located. 

Genus GOMPHOIDES Selys. 
G. obscura Rambur. 

Found on several occasions in May and June flying up and down 

a shaded ditch by the side of the railroad track at Lakehurst, N. J. 

Wading River, N. Y., Deep'Pond, Aug. 7, 1912. 

Genus HAGENIUS Selys. 
H. brevistylus Selys. 

Long Island (Engelhardt) ; Newfoundland, N. J., V, VII. On 
the 4th of July, 1897, two of these dragonflies were observed on 
Jefferson Mt, near Newfoundland, N. J., engaged in chasing butter- 
flies. One of them was particularly active, and every Papilio or 
Limenitis that came near- was pursued, but it was not successful in 
catching any of them. 

Genus OPHIOGOMPHUS Selys. 
0. johannus Needham. 

Hewitt, N. J., VI, 19, 1904. 

0. rupinsulensis Walsh. 

Dover, N. J., (C. W. Johnson, N. J. list). Ramapo Mts., near 
Halifax, N. J., several found near a stream. 



20 Journal New York Entomological Society. C Vo1 - xxi 

Genus LANTHUS Needham. 
L. albistyius Hagen. 

Bear Swamp, Ramapo Mountains, N. J., VI, VII (Chas. E. 

Sleight). This is an addition to the New Jersey list. 

L. parvulus Selys. 

Ramapo, N. Y., V; Hewitt, N. J., V (Watson) ; Schooley's Mt., 
N. ]., V; along South Branch of Raritan River, N. J., V. 

Genus GOMPHUS Leach. 
G. lividus Selys (sordidus Hagen). 

Pine Island, N. Y., VI; Bronxville, N. Y, VI (Woodruff) ; New- 
foundland, N. J., VII ; South Branch of Raritan River, N. J., VI. 

G. exilis Selys. 

Generally distributed about New York City and found in May and 
June. 

G. ventricosus Walsh. 

Pine Island, N. Y., VI, 19, 1912. This appears to be an addition 
to the list of New York State dragonflies. 

G. plagiatus Selys. 

Long Island (C. Olsen) ; Runyon, N..J., IX, 4 (Watson). 

G. spicatus Hagen. 

Newfoundland, N. J., V, VI. 

G. villosipes Selys. 

Ramsey, N. J., VI; Staten Island, VI. 

G. f ucif er Hagen. 

Hewitt, N. J., VI, 19. 

Genus DROMOGOMPHUS Selys. 
D. spinosus Selys. 

Pine Island, N. Y., VI; Van Cortlandt Park, N. Y. City, VII 
(Watson); Sparta, N. J., VII; Newfoundland, N. J., VII; Lake 
Hopatcong, N. J., VII. 

Genus BOYERIA MacLachlan. 
B. vinosa Say. 

Yaphank, N. Y., VII, IX; Smithtown, N. Y., VIII; Staten Island, 
VII, VIII; Sparta, N. J., VII; Newfoundland, N. J., VII, IX; Lake- 



March, 1913.] Davis : Dragonflies of New York City. 21 

hurst, N. J., VII. This insect is quite crepuscular in habit, and some- 
times flies when it is so dark that it can be distinguished with difficulty. 
Sometimes each vinosa appears to have a certain " beat " on the ditch 
or brook up and down which it flies, while a little further on will be 
another vinosa, also confined to a limited range. 

Genus BASLSSCHNA Selys. 
B. Janata Say. 

Pine Island, N. Y., VI ; Bronxville, N. Y., VI (Woodruff) ; Yap- 
hank, N. Y, V, VI; Staten Island, V; Newfoundland, N. J., V; Pater- 
son, N. J., V; Ramsey, N. J., V; Lakehurst, N. J., V. 

Genus GOMPHJESCHNA Selys. 
G. furcillata Say. 

Yaphank, N. Y., V, VI; Ramapo, N. Y., VI; Hewitt, N. J., VI; 
Newfoundland, N. J., V, VI; Beaver Lake, N. J., VI; Lakehurst, 

N. J., V, VI. 

G. furcillata antilope Hagen. 

Newfoundland, N. J., VI. 

Genus ANAX Leach. 
A. Junius Drury. 

Generally distributed and common. Flies from March to October. 

On one occasion eight of these insects were observed flying about on 

the lea side of a barn looking for the flies that had taken refuge there 

from the strong wind that was then blowing. 

A. longipes Hagen. 

Yaphank, N. Y., VII; Staten Island, VI, VIII; Orange, N. J.; 
Lakehurst, N. J., VII. 

Genus iESHNA Fabricius. 
A. clepsydra Say. 

Wading River (Deep Pond), N. Y., VIII; Greenwood Lake, VII; 
Terrace Pond, Passaic Co., N. J., VIII; Newfoundland, N. J., IX; 
Lakehurst, N. J., IX. 

A. canadensis Walker. 

Newfoundland, N. J., VII ; Staten Island, VI. 



22 Journal New York Entomological Society. t Vo! - XXI - 

A. verticals Eagen. 

Normanock, N. J., VII ; Point Pleasant, N. J., IX ; Lakehurst, N. J., 
IX; Brooklyn, N. Y, VII, IX (Engelhardt) ; Cold Spring Harbor, 
N. Y, VIII (H. G. Barber) ; Staten Island, VI, IX. On October 
21, about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, a female was seen to crawl down 
a stick, lying in a slow flowing spring, until it was entirely beneath 
the surface of the water. 

A. umbrosa Walker. 

Bronxville, N. Y., IX, X (Woodruff) ; Yaphank, N. Y., X; Pine- 
lawn, N. Y, IX; Staten Island, VIII, IX, X; Newfoundland, N. J., 
IX; Bear Swamp, Ramapo Mrs., N. J., IX; Ft. Lee, N. J., VIII; 
Cranford, N. J, VIII; Morgan, N. J., X; Mattawan, N. J., IX. 
Found flying up and down brooks. 

A. constricta Say. 

Bronxville, N. Y., VII (Woodruff) ; Flatbush, N. Y, IX. While 
the species of Mshna are most often found about their breeding places 
they are great flyers, and may be seen most anywhere in the vicinity 
of New York City as well as in the city itself. 

Genus EPIiESCHNA Hagen. 
E. heros Fabricius. 

Generally distributed and found from May to September. It often 
enters buildings and may be seen flying up and down the streets in the 
heart of the city. A female was observed on Staten Island, on the 
28th of July, laying eggs in dead, water-soaked branches lying in 
swampy pools in the woods. 

Family LIBELLULIOffi. 

Genus DIDYMOPS Rambur. 
D. transversa Say. 

Ramapo, N. Y., VI; Hewitt, N. J., VI; Bear Lake, N. J., VI 
(Engelhardt) ; Newfoundland, N. J., V, VI, VII; Mt. Arlington, N. J., 
VII (Watson) ; Great Notch, N. J., V. 

Genus MACROMIA Rambur. 
M. illinoiensis Walsh. 

Ft. Montgomery, N. Y., V; Ramapo, N. Y., VI; Newfoundland, 
N. J., VII; Lakewood, N. J., VII. 



March, 1913.] Davis : Dragonflies of New York City. 23 

Genus EPICORDULIA Selys. 
E. princeps Hagen. 

Greenwood Lake, VI, VII (Watson) ; Newfoundland, N. J., VI, 
VII; Hopatcong, N. J., IX, 14 (Dr. Calvert, N. J. list) ; Singac, N. J., 
VI; New Brunswick, N. J., VII (Coll. N. J. Agri. Exp. Sta.) ; N. Y. 
City, VI (Woodruff). 

Genus NEUROCORDULIA Selys. 
N. obsoleta Say. 

Lake Hopatcong, N. J., VI, VII, IX (N. J. list). 

Genus HELOCORDULIA Needham. 
H. uhleri Selys. 

Newfoundland, N. J., V, 28; Lakehurst, N. J., V, 24. 

Genus TETRAGONEURIA Hagen. 
T. spinosa Hagen. 

Great Notch, N. J., V, 5 (Dr. Love, N. J. list) ; Old Bridge, N. J., 

IV, 23. 

T. spinigera Selys. 

Greenwood Lake, N. J., VI, 30 (Watson) ; Newfoundland, N. J., 

V, 28 (Davis). This is an addition to the New Jersey list. 

T. semiaquea Burmeister. 

Yaphank, N. Y., V, 29; Ramapo, N. Y., V, VI; Ramsey, N. J., VI ; 
Newfoundland, N. J., V; Lakehurst, N. J., V, VI. 

T. cynosura Say. 

Pocantico Hills, N. Y., VI (Woodruff) ; West Point, N. Y., VI; 
Ramapo, N. Y., V; N. Y. City, Wall St., VI (Woodruff); Staten 
Island, V, VI, VII; Hewitt, N. J., VI. On May 28, 1910, there was a 
remarkable gathering of this species, together with an occasional 
spinigera and semiaquea, along the road leading from Newfoundland, 
N. J., to Cedar Pond. The air was full of these dragonflies, and on 
one small dead bush we counted twenty-two individuals, and there 
were other bushes and stems of plants that also had a great many rest- 
ing upon them. 

Genus DOROCORDULIA Needham. 
D. lepida Hagen. 

Jamesburg, N. J., VII (Daecke, N. J. list) ; Lakehurst, N. J., V, 
VI. 



24 Journal New York Entomological Society. t Vo1 - XX1 - 

D. libera Selys. 

Bronxville, N. Y., V; N. Y. City, V (Woodruff); Normanock, 

N. J., VII; Beaver Lake, N. J., VI (Engelhardt) ; Newfoundland, 

N. J., V, 28 (C. Schaeffer) ; Paterson, N. J., V, 24 (Coll. N. J. Agri. 

Exp. Sta.). 

Genus SOMATOCHLORA Selys. 
S. filosa Hagen. 

Lakehurst, N. J., VII. 

S. tenebrosa Say. 

Ramapo Mts., N. J., VIII (Watson) ; Jamesburg, N. J., VII; Lake- 
hurst, N. J., IX; Hauppaug, N. Y, VIII. 

Genus LADONA Needham. 
L. exusta Say. 

Croton, N. Y, VII; Ramapo, N. Y, VI; Ramsey, N. J., V; New- 
foundland, N. J., V, VI, VII; Lake Hopatcong, N. J., VII. 

L. exusta deplanata Rambur. 

Amityville, N. Y, VI (W. T. Bather) ; Wyandanch, N. Y, IV; 
Newfoundland, N. J., V; Lakewood, N. J., VI; Lakehurst, IV, V, VI. 

Genus LIBEIXULA Linne. 
L. luctuosa Burmeister (basalis Say). 

Bronxville, N. Y, VII (Woodruff) ; Van Cortlandt Park, N. Y. 
City, VII; Flushing, N. Y., VIII; Staten Island, VI, VII, VIII; 
Sparta, N. J., VII; New Brunswick, N. J., VI (Coll. N. J. Agri. Exp. 
Sta.). 

L. auripennis Burmeister. 

Wading River, N. Y, Long Pond, VIII; Coney Island, N. Y; 
Staten Island, V, VI, VII. We have captured a male of this species 
on Staten Island, July 4, 1900, flying over a small pond grasping a 
female L. semifasciata. 

L. flavida Rambur. 

Westchester Co., N. Y. (W. Beutenmuller, N. Y. list) ; Ramsey, 
N. J., VII ; Lakehurst, N. J., VI, VII, VIII. It is quite common at the 
last mentioned locality. 



March, 1913.] Davis : Dragonflies of New York City. 25 

L. cyanea Fabricius. 

Bronxville, N. Y., VI, VII ; Riverdale, N. Y., VII (Woodruff) ; 
Yaphank, N. Y., VII; Half Way Hollow Hills, N. Y., VII; Flushing, 
N. Y., VIII; Staten Island, VI-VIII; Newfoundland, N. J., VII; 
Fort Lee, N. J., V, VI (Woodruff) ; Jamesburg, N. J., VI, VII. 

L. vibrans Fabricius. 

Staten Island, VI, VII, VIII; Lakehurst, N. J., VI (Woodruff). 
This species was common on Staten Island in the summers of 1894, 
1899 and 1908. It was also collected in 1895 and 1912. 

L. axillena West-wood. 

Staten Island, Buck's Hollow, V, 31, 1908, two males. 

L. incesta Hagen. 

Croton, N. Y., VI; Yaphank, N. Y, VII; Wading River, N. Y., 
Long Pond, VIII; Ramapo, N. Y., VI; Normanock, N. J., VII; Lake 
Hopatcong, N. J., VII; Staten Island, VII, VIII. 

L. quadrimaculata Linne. 

Bronxville, N. Y, VI, VII (Woodruff); Staten Island, V, 11, 
1889, and VI, 19, 1893; Lake Hopatcong, N. J. (S. N. Rhoads, N. J. 
list). 

L. semifasciata Burmeister. 

Bronxville, N. Y., V, VI, VII (Woodruff) ; Yaphank, N. Y, VII; 
Aqueduct, Long Island, N. Y., VII; Staten Island, IV, V, VI, VII, 
VIII, IX; Fort Lee, N. J., V, VI (Woodruff) ; Lakehurst, N. J., VII. 

L. pulchella Drury. 

A generally distributed species and found principally about ponds 
from May to September. 

Genus PLATHEMIS Hagen. 
P. lydia Drury (trimaculata DeGeer). 

Bronxville, N. Y, VI; Van Cortlandt, N. Y., VI (Woodruff); 
Yaphank, N. Y., VII; Flushing, N. Y., VIII; Staten Island, V, VI, 
VII, VIII, IX; Ft. Lee, N. J., V, VI; Lakehurst, N. J., VI 
(Woodruff). 



26 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. xxi. 

Genus PERITHEMIS Hagen. 
P. domitia tesera Say. 

Tarrytown, N. Y., VII; Van Cortlandt, N. Y., VII; Bronxville, 
N. Y., VII, VIII (Woodruff) ; Wading River, N. Y., Long Pond, 
VIII ; Flushing, N. Y, VIII ; Prospect Park Lake, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
VIII ; Staten Island, VI, VII ; Westfield, N. J., VII. 

Genus NANNOTHEMIS Brauer. 
N. bella Uhler. 

Westchester Co., N. Y. (W. Beutenmuller, N. Y. list) ; Yaphank, 
N. Y., VII; Wyandanch, N. Y, VII; Staten Island, VI, VII; Beaver 
Lake, N. J., VI (Engelhardt) ; Lakehurst, N. J., V, VI, VII. 

Genus ERYTHRODIPLAX Brauer. 
E. berenice Drury. 

Riverdale, N. Y., VII (Woodruff) ; Rockaway Beach, N. Y, VII, 
VIII; Flushing, N. Y, VIII; Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y., VII (H. G. 
Barber); Staten Island, V, VI, VII, VIII; S. Amboy, N. J., VII; 
Seabright, N. J., VII (Woodruff). One was taken at Lakehurst, 
N. J., July 28, 1907, but this dragonfly is usually not found so far 
inland, and is often quite common on the salt meadows, where of a 
quiet evening they may be seen settled on the grass stems, in which 
position they spend the night. In many places where the meadows 
have been ditched to prevent the mosquitoes from developing, this 
dragonfly, which devours mosquitoes, has also become far less numerous. 

Genus ERYTHEMIS Hagen. 
E. simplicicollis Say. 

Wading River, N. Y, VIII; Yaphank, N. Y., VII; Flushing, N. Y, 
VIII; Staten Island, V, VII, VIII; Fort Lee, N. J., V (Woodruff) ; 
Westfield, N. J., VII ; Lakehurst, N. J., VI, VII. 

Genus SYSIPETRUM Newman. 
S. rubicundulum Say. 

Generally distributed and found from June until September. 
S. obtrusum Hagen. 

Staten Island, VI, VII ; Sandy Hook, N. J., VIII. 



March, 1913.] Davis : Dragonflies of New York City. 27 

S. sernicinctum Say. 

Croton, N. Y., VII; Riverdale, N. Y., VII; Bronxville, N. Y., 
VIII (Woodruff); Van Cortlandt Park, N. Y. City, VIII; Staten 
Island, VII, VIII, IX, 15; Sparta, N. J., VII. 

S. vicinum Hagen. 

West Point, N. Y, X; Yaphank, N. Y, X; Bowling Green, N. Y. 
City, X; Staten Island, IX, X, XI; Lake Hopatcong, N. J., VII 
(S. N. Rhoads, N. J. list); Jamesburg, N. J., IX; Lakehurst, N. J., 
VIII, X. This is one of the latest of our dragonflies and is to be 
found far into the fall. We have seen them in copulation on Staten 
Island on November 8. They are much attracted to anything light 
colored, like a newspaper lying on the ground, and several may often 
be seen sunning themselves in such a situation. They will light on 
your hat, if you keep quiet, and will show no inclination to fly away 
provided you walk about quietly. 

S. corruptum Hagen. 

Staten Island, shore at Eltingville, VI, 27, 1896, and New Dorp, 
VIII, 8, 1903; Barnegat, N. J., VIII, 25, 1900. This species is much 
more common in the west and only occasionally found within our 
limits. 

Genus PACHYDIPLAX Brauer. 
P. longipennis Burmeister. 

Riverdale, N. Y., VII (Woodruff); Flushing, N. Y., VIII; 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Forest Park, VI; Staten Island, VI, VII, VIII, IX; 
Lakehurst, N. J., VI. 

Genus LEUCORRHINIA Brittinger. 
L. intacta Hagen. 

Croton, N. Y, V; Bronxville, N. Y., VI (Woodruff) ; Manhattan 
Island, N. Y. City, VI; Staten Island, V, VI; Normanock, N. J., 
VII; Newfoundland, N. J., VII; Ramsey, N. J., VI; South Orange, 
N. J., IV, 18 (Collection N. J. Agri. Exp. Sta.). 

Genus CELITHEMIS Hagen. 
C. ornata Rambur. 

Yaphank, N. Y, VII, VIII; Wading River, N. Y., Long Pond, 
VIII ; Jamesburg, N. J., VII, VIII ; Lakehurst, N. J., VII, VIII, IX. 



28 Journal New York Entomological Society. [Vol. xxi. 

This species occurs along the coast from Maine to Florida, but does 
not appear to have been previously reported from New York State. 

C. elisa Hagen. 

West Point, N. Y., VI; Tarrytown, N. Y., VII; Pocantico Hills, 
N. Y., VI; Bronxville, N. Y., VI (Woodruff) ; Yaphank, N. Y, VII; 
Wading River, N Y, VIII; Flushing, N. Y, VIII; Staten Island, 
VI, VII, VIII; Hewitt, N. J., VII; Newfoundland, N. J., VII; 
Newark, N. J., VII ; Lakehurst, N. J., VI, VII. 

C. monomelasna Williamson. 

Wading River, N. Y., VIII, 8, 1912. Two males flying over the 
white sand at the southerly end of Long Pond. This species has been 
recorded from southern New Jersey, but appears not to have been 
listed from New York state. 

The specific name monomelana Williamson has been used, and 
based on maculation this is correct. In the four specimens in the 
author's collection, however, from Long Island, N. Y., New Jersey 
and Virginia, five fore wings have two cross veins in each triangle 
and three fore wings have but one cross vein in each triangle. See 
Ohio Naturalist, Vol. X, p. 153, 1910. 

C. eponina Drury. 

Tarrytown, N. Y. (Woodruff); Flushing, N. Y., VIII ; Cold Spring 
Harbor, N. Y., VIII (H. G. Barber); Staten Island, V, VII, VIII; 
Lake Hopatcong, N. J., VII ; Lakehurst, N. J., VII. 

Genus PANTALA Hagen. 
P. flavescens Fabricius. 

Staten Island, VII, VIII, IX. We have seen great numbers flying 
over a field of oats on Staten Jsland ; also a female laying eggs on 
August 14, in a ditch of brackish water by the side of the road at 
Watchogue, Staten Island. This is a widely distributed species. 

Genus TRAMEA Hagen. 
T. lacerata Hagen. 

West Point, N. Y., VI, 17; Staten Island, V, VI, VIII, IX. Some- 
times not uncommon over fields and the salt meadows on Staten 

Island. 



March, 1913-] Barber : Aquatic Hemiptera. 29 

T. Carolina Linne. 

Bronxville, N. Y., V (Woodruff) ; Yaphank, N. Y., VII ; Wading 
River, N. Y., VIII ; Staten Island, IV, V, VI, VII, IX, X ; Newfound- 
land, N. J., IX; Great Notch, N. J., V; Jamesburg, N. J, IX; Lake- 
hurst, N. J., IV, 25, 1908, many individuals and a pair in copulation; 
VI, VIII. Only two or three of our dragonflies have as long a season 
as this, namely from April to October. We quote the following from 
the " Preliminary List of the Dragonflies of Staten Island with notes 
and Dates of Capture " (this Journal, Sept., 1898) : " On July 15, 
1894, a male Tramea Carolina was flying over one of the Four Corners 
iron mine ponds. Soon a female came and commenced dipping her 
abdomen into the water. In a moment she was seized by the male and 
they flew away. In a half hour they were back and went flying about 
together, the male now and then suddenly letting go his hold and with 
equal rapidity catching the female again by the neck. Other male 
dragonflies flew after them and when the female stopped to lay eggs, 
they annoyed her considerably. The chief among the disturbers was 
a Libellula basalis. After a time the male Tramea left his mate and 
she was quickly seized by the aforesaid Libellula basalis, after which 
they flew about together for a considerable time. After letting go his 
hold once and flying down the pond, the L. basalis returned and seized 
the Tramea a second time." 



AQUATIC HEMIPTERA. 

By H. G. Barber, 
Roselle Park, N. J. 

The aquatic Hemiptera have excellent and frequently wonderful 
adaptations to their environment, exhibiting among them most mar- 
velous variability of construction for their life in or on the water. 
The local, strictly aquatic species, belong to ten families of the hete- 
ropterous Hemiptera. These for convenience of treatment of relation 
of adaptations to habit may be grouped into (1) those which spend 
their active existence on the surface of the water, (2) those which 
habitually walk about upon some substratum beneath the water and 
(3) those which are, for the most part, free swimmers.