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THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN SECTION OP THE ASSOCIATION. 281 

It is with more than passing pleasure that I recall the fine courtesy, the 
generosity, the extreme modesty and the enthusiasm exhibited by Frere Gabriel 
Marie in occasional correspondence during the past decade. 

R. C. Archibald. 
Bbown University, 
March 23, 1917. 



FIRST REGULAR MEETING OF THE IOWA SECTION. 

The first regular meeting of the Iowa Section of The Mathematical Association 
of America was held at Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa, on April 28, 1917, and 
the following program given: 

(1) "A unified course for Freshman mathematics:" by Professor R. B. 
McClenon, Grinnell College. Leader of the discussion: Professor Julia 
Colpitis, Iowa State College. 

(2) "The foundation of Freshman mathematics in technical schools:" 
by Dean E. W. Stanton, Iowa State College. In his absence, the paper was read 
by Professor. Maria Roberts, Iowa State College. Leaders of the discussion: 
Professors J. F. Reillt, Iowa State University, and C. W. Emmons, Simpson 
College. 

(3) "Putting life into dry bones:" by Professor F. M. McGaw, Cornell 
College. Leaders of the discussion: Professors W. J. Rusk, Grinnell College, and 
W. E. Beck, Iowa State University. 

The following also took part in the discussions: Professors Weston, Trow- 
bridge, Stewart and Neff. All the papers were good and the discussions were to 
the point showing a keen interest in the sort of a program offered. The action 
at the business session in planning two meetings each year also indicates some- 
thing of the interest taken in the Iowa Section. The attendance included some 
twenty members of the Association and others who will become members in due 
course. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: I. F. Neff, Drake 
University, Chairman; R. B. McClenon, Grinnell College, Vice-Chairman; 
W. E. Beck, Iowa State University, Secretary. 

G. A. Chaney, I. F. Neff, 

Chairman, Secretary-Treasurer. 



THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN SECTION OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

In September, 1916, it was suggested to Dr. G. H. Light, of the University 
of Colorado, that a section of The Mathematical Association of America be formed 
to include the states of Wyoming and Colorado. The suggestion was acted upon 
and as a result a meeting was called at the University of Colorado on April 7, 
1917. 



282 THE KENTUCKY SECTION OP THE ASSOCIATION. 

The meeting was a great success and the Rocky Mountain Section of the 
Association was formed with the following officers: C. B. Ridgaway, Professor of 
Mathematics, University of Wyoming, Chairman. C. C. VanNuys, Professor of 
Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Vice-Chairman. G. H. Light, Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics, University of Colorado, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Papers were presented by O. C. Lester, Professor of Physics, University of 
Colorado, on "The Solid Angle," and Florian Cajori, Professor of Mathematics, 
Colorado College, on "Fluxions." Discussion of these papers was general. 

There were twenty-one present at the meeting, fifteen of whom are already 
members of the Association and the others will join at once: C. B. Ridgaway, 
Professor of Mathematics, C. E. Stromquist, Professor of Mathematics, J. C. 
Fitterek, Professor of Civil Engineering, University of Wyoming; C. R. Burger, 
Professor of Mathematics, G. E. F. Sherwood, Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics, C. C. VanNuys, Professor of Physics, H. M. Showman, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Civil Engineering, F. W. Lucht, Assistant Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering, W. J. Hazard, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
Colorado School of Mines; S. L. Macdonald, Professor of Mathematics, Colorado 
A. & M. College; G. W. Finley, Professor of Mathematics, Colorado State 
Teacher's College; Florian Cajori, Professor of Mathematics, Colorado College; 
W. H. Hill, Greeley High School; E. L. Brown, East Denver High School; 
I. M. DeLong, Professor of Mathematics, G. H. Light, Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics, Claribel Kendall, Instructor in Mathematics, 0. C. Lester, 
Professor of Physics, J. W. Woodrow, Assistant Professor of Physics, Dr. O. A. 
Randolph, Instructor in Physics, C. E. Sperry, Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics, University of Colorado. 

G. H. Light, 
Secretary- Treasurer. 

THE KENTUCKY SECTION OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

The Mathematics Section of the Association of Kentucky Colleges and 
Universities (now the Kentucky Section of the Mathematical Association of 
America) was organized in April, 1909, and since then has met regularly twice a 
year. 

This organization has directed most of its attention to a consideration of 
problems peculiar to collegiate work, one result of which has been a tendency 
toward a standardization of the mathematical courses in the colleges of the 
state. 

Another feature of the work of this organization has been the consistent 
efforts put forth to strengthen and improve the teaching of mathematics in the 
high schools of the state. It was at first planned to work out a correlated course 
in mathematics for the high schools but this was later abandoned. In 1910 it was 
decided to test the degree of preparation of all students entering the colleges of 
the state by setting examinations covering algebra and plane and solid geometry.